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Kansas State College Bulletin 



Volume XXIII 



May 15, 1939 



Number 7 



Seventy-sixth Session, 1938-1939 



Announcements for the Session of 1939-1940 




KANSAS. STATE COLLEGE 
OF AGRICULTURE AND APPLIED SCIENCE 



MANHATTAN, KANSAS 

Published by the College 



PRINTED BY KANSAS STATE PRINTING PLANT 

W. c. AUSTIN, State printer 

TOPEKA 1939 

17-8766 



The Kansas State College Bulletin is published on the first 
and fifteenth of each month by Kansas State College of 
Agriculture and Applied Science, Manhattan, Kan., to which 
requests for copies of the publication should be addressed. 
Entered as second-class matter November 6, 1916, at the post 
office at Manhattan, Kan., under the Act of August 24, 1912. 



LU 



c '^Kansas State College Bulletin 



Volume XXIII 



February 15, 1939 



Number 4 



Catalogue Number 

Seventy-sixth Session, 1938-1939 
Announcements for the Session of 1939-1940 




KANSAS STATE COLLEGE 
OF AGRICULTURE AND APPLIED SCIENCE 



MANHATTAN, KANSAS 

Published by the College 



PRINTED BY KANSAS STATE PRINTING PLANT 

W. C. AUSTIN, STATE PRINTER 

TOPEKA 1939 

17-6529 



1«3 



The Kansas State College Bulletin is published on the first 
and fifteenth of each month by the Kansas State College of 
Agriculture and Applied Science, Manhattan, Kan., to which 
requests for copies of the publication should be addressed. 
Entered as second-class matter November 6, 1916, at the post 
office at Manhattan, Kan., under the Act of August 24, 1912. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



I'AUH 

The College Calendar 7 

Registration and Assignment Schedules 9 

Administrative C fficers 10 

Officers of Administration, Instruction and Research 11 

Agricultural Agents 47 

Home Demonstration Agents 56 

Standing Committees of the Faculty 60 

History and Location of the College 61 

Purposes of the College 61 

Buildings and Grounds 62 

Admission 64 

Requirements for Admission 64 

Methods of Admission 66 

Freshman Induction 67 

Junior Colleges 68 

Late Admission 68 

General Information 69 

Undergraduate Degrees 81 

Student Health 95 

The College Library 96 

The Division of Graduate Study 97 

The Division of Agriculture 103 

Curriculum in Agriculture 106 

Curriculum in Agricultural Administration ' 108 

Curriculum in Specialized Horticulture 109 

Curriculum in Milling Industry 110 

Agricultural Economics Section of Economics and Sociology 112 

Agronomy 114 

Animal Husbandry 116 

Dairy Husbandry 118 

General Agriculture 120 

Horticulture 121 

Milling Industry 124 

Poultry Husbandry 125 

Agricultural Experiment Station and Branch Stations 127 

The Division of Engineering and Architecture 129 

Curriculum in Agricultural Engineering 132 

Curriculum in Architectural Engineering 133 

Curriculum in Architecture 134 

Curriculum in Chemical Engineering 135 

Curriculum in Civil Engineering 136 

Curriculum in Electrical Engineering 137 

Curriculum in Industrial Arts 138 

Curriculum in Mechanical Engineering 139 

Agricultural Engineering 141 

Applied Mechanics 143 

(3) 



4 Kansas State College 



Architecture 145 

Civil Engineering 148 

Electrical Engineering 150 

General Engineering 153 

Machine Design 154 

Mechanical Engineering 156 

Shop Practice 159 

Engineering Experiment Station 162 

The Division of General Science 163 

Curriculum in General Science 165 

Preveterinary Adaptation of Curriculum in General Science 165 

Curriculum in Industrial Chemistry 166 

Curriculum in Industrial Journalism 167 

Curriculum in Music Education 168 

Curriculum in Applied Music 169 

Curriculum in Physical Education for Men 170 

Curriculum in Physical Education for Women 171 

Curriculum in Business Administration 172 

Curriculum in Business Administration with Special Training in 

Accounting 173 

Groups of Electives and Options 174 

Bacteriology 181 

Botany and Plant Pathology 183 

Chemistry 186 

Economics and Sociology 191 

Education 195 

English 202 

Entomology , 205 

Geology 207 

History and Government 208 

Industrial Journalism and Printing 211 

Library Economics 214 

Mathematics 215 

Military Science and Tactics 217 

Modern Languages 220 

Music 221 

Physical Education and Athletics 224 

Physics .228 

Public Speaking 231 

Student Health 232 

Zoology 233 

The Division of Home Economics 235 

Curriculum in" Home Economics 238 

Curriculum in Home Economics with Special Training in Art 239 

Curriculum in Home Economics with Special Training in Institutional 

Management and Dietetics 240 

Curriculum in Home Economics and Nursing 241 

Groups of Electives 242 

Art 244 

Child Welfare and Euthenics 246 



Contents 5 

PAGR 

Clothing and Textiles 247 

Food Economics and Nutrition 248 

General Home Economics 250 

Home Economics Education 250 

Household Economics 251 

Institutional Management 253 

Bureau of Research in Home Economics 254 

The Division of Veterinary Medicine 255 

Curriculum in Veterinary Medicine 255 

Anatomy and Physiology 257 

Pathology 258 

Surgery and Medicine 260 

The Division of College Extension 263 

Extension Schools 264 

County Agent Work 265 

Home Economics 266 

Boys' and Girls' 4-H Club Work 267 

Rural Engineering 267 

Home Study 268 

Degrees Conferred in 1938 274 

Honors 284 

Index 287 



CALENDAR. 



1939 



JANUARY 



S M T W T F S 



FEBRUARY 



MARCH 



APRIL 



MAY 



JUNE 











1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


S 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 





JULY 



S M T W T F S 



AUGUST 



If) 



21 22 

28 29 



SEPTEMBER 



OCTOBER 



NOVEMBER 



2 3 



DECEMBER 



1940 



JANUARY 



S M T W T F S 



FEBRUARY 



MARCH 



APRIL 



MAY 



JUNE 



JULY 



S M T W T F S 



AUGUST 



SEPTEMBER 



OCTOBER 



NOVEMBER 



DECEMBER 



2'.) 



(6) 



THE COLLEGE CALENDAR 

SUMMER SCHOOL, 1939 

May 31, Wednesday. — Registration of students for nine-week Summer School begins at 8 a. m. 
May 31, Wednesday. — Examinations for students deficient in entrance subjects, 8 a. m. to 

5 p. m. 
May 31 to July 29, Wednesday to Saturday. — Nine-week Summer School in session. 
June 5 to 9, Monday to Friday. — 4-H Club Round-up. 

June 29, Thursday. — Scholarship deficiency reports to students and dean are due. 
July 3 to 29, Monday to Saturday. — Four-week Summer School in session. 
July 4, Tuesday. — Independence Day, holiday. 
July 28, Friday. — Graduation exercises at 7 :30 p. m. for those receiving degrees at end of 

Summer school. 
July 29, Saturday. — Summer School closes at 5 p. m. 
August 5, Saturday. — Reports of all grades for Summer School are due in registrar's office. 

FIRST SEMESTER, 1939-1940 

Aug. 16, Wednesday. — All preparatory school credentials and college credentials should be 
filed with the vice-president of the college not later than this date. 

Sept. 7, Thursday. — Assigners meet with committee on schedule at 2 p. m. in W 101. and with 
deans at 3 p. m. 

Sept. 8, Fridav. — Examinations for students deficient in entrance subjects, 8 a. m. to 5 p. m. 

Sept. 8, Friday. — *Resistration and assignment of freshmen. 

Sept. 9, Saturday. — flnduction exercises for freshmen. 

Sept. 11 and 12, Monday and Tuesday. — flnduction exercises for freshmen. 

Sept. 11 and 12, Monday and Tuesday. — ^Registration and assignment of all other students. 

Sept. 13, Wednesday. — ^Classes meet according to schedule, beginning at 8 a. m. 

Sept. 13, Wednesday.- — Opening convocation at 11 a. m. 

Sept. 29, Friday. — Annual All-College Mixer at 8 p. m. 

Oct. 7, Saturday. — Examinations to remove conditions. 

Oct. 14, Saturday. — Scholarship deficiency reports to students and deans are due. 

Nov. 10, Friday. — Midsemester scholarship deficiency reports to students and deans are due. 

Nov. 11, Saturday. — Armistice Day, holiday. 

Nov. 29, Wednesday. — Thanksgiving vacation begins at 12 m. 

Dec. 2, Saturday.- — Thanksgiving vacation closes at 6 p. m. 

Dec. 20, Wednesday. — Christmas vacation begins at 6 p. m. 

Jan. 3, 1940, Wednesday. — Christmas vacation closes at 6 p. m. 

Jan. 23 to 27, Tuesday, 1 p. m. to Saturday, 12 m. — Examinations at close of semester. 

Jan. 27, Saturday. — First semester closes at 12 m. 

Jan. 27, Saturday.- — Semester scholarship deficiency reports to students and deans are due not 
later than 6 p. m. 

SECOND SEMESTER, 1939-1940 

Jan. 29, Monday. — Assigners meet with committee on schedule at 2 p. m. in W 101. 

Jan. 29, Monday. — Examinations for students deficient in entrance subjects, 8 a. m. to 5 p. m. 

Jan. 30 and 31, Tuesday and Wednesdav. — Registration and assignment of all students. 

Feb. 1, Thursday. — §Clas*es meet according to schedule, beginning at 8 a. m. 

Feb. 3, Saturday. — Reports of all grades for first semester are due in registrar's office. 

Feb. 6 to 9, Tuesday to Friday. — Farm and Home Week. 

Feb. 16, Friday. — Founders' Day. The College was located at Manhattan on February 16. 

1863. 
Feb. 22, Thursday. — Washington's Birthday, holiday. 
Feb. 24, Saturday. — Examinations to remove conditions. 

March 2. Saturday. — Scholarship deficiency reports to students and deans are due. 
March 21, Thursday. — Easter vacation begins at 6 p. m. 
March 25, Monday. — Easter vacation closes at 6 p. m. 

March 30, Saturdav. — Midsemester scholarship deficiency reports to students and deans are due. 
May 15 to 21, Wednesday to Tuesday. — Examinations for seniors graduating May 27. 
May 23 to 27, Thursday to Mondav. — Examinations at close of semester. 
May 25, Saturday. — Alumni Day. Business meeting at 2 p. m. ; banquet at 6 p. m. 
May 26, Sunday. — Baccalaureate services at 7:30 p.m. 
May 27, Monday. — Seventy -seventh annual Commencement at 7 :30 p. m. 
May 28, Tuesday. — Semester scholarship deficiency reports to students and deans are due not 

later than 6 p. m. 
June 1, Saturday. — Reports of all grades for second semester are due in registrar's office. 

* See "Registration and Assignment Schedule for Freshmen." 
f All freshmen students must attend the exercises on each of the three days. 
t See "Registration and Assignment Schedule for All Other Students." 

§ Students must be present at the first meeting of each class or render a reasonable 
excuse. Failure to take out an assignment is not accepted as an excuse for absence from 
classes. Except in summer school, a fee of $2.50 is charged those who are assigned after the 
time set for close of registration. 

(7) 



8 Kansas State College 

SUMMER SCHOOL, 1940 

May 29, Wednesday. — Registration of students for nine-week Summer School begins at 8 a. m. 

May 29, Wednesday. — Examination for students deficient in entrance subjects, 8 a. m. to 5 p. m. 

May 29 to July 27, Wednesday to Saturday. — Nine-week Summer School in session. 

May 30, Thursday. — Memorial Day, holiday. 

June 3 to 7, Monday to Friday. — 4-H Club Round-up. 

June 27, Thursday. — Scholarship deficiency reports to students and dean are due. 

July 1 to 27, Monday to Saturday. — Four-week Summer School in session. 

July 4, Thursday.- — Independence Day, holiday. 

July 26, Friday. — Graduation exercises at 7:30 p.m. for those receiving degrees at end of 

Summer School. 
July 27, Saturday. — Summer School closes at 5 p. m. 
Aug. 3, Saturday. ■ — Reports of all grades for Summer School are due in registrar's office. 

FIRST SEMESTER, 1940-1941 

Aug. 16, Friday. — All preparatory school credentials and college credentials should be filed 

with the vice-president of the College not later than this date. 
Sept. 5, Thursday. — Assigners meet with committee on schedule at 2 p. m. in W 101, and 

with deans at 3 p. m. 
Sept. 6, Friday. — Examinations for students deficient in entrance subjects, 8 a. m. to 5 p. m. 
Sept. 6, Friday. — Registration and assignment of freshmen. 
Sept. 7, Saturday. — Induction exercises for freshmen. 

Sept. 9 and 10, Monday and Tuesday.- — -Induction exercises for freshmen. 
Sept. 9 and 10, Monday and Tuesday. — Registration and assignment of all other students. 



REGISTRATION AND ASSIGNMENT SCHEDULES 

Nichols Gymnasium 

The following tabulation shows the schedule of hours for registration and 
assignment of students for the college year 1939-1940, arranged according to the 
initial letters of their last names : 

FIRST SEMESTER 

SCHEDULE FOR FRESHMEN STUDENTS 

Friday, September 8, 1939 

College Auditorium, 7:30 a.m. 

General Meeting: for All Freshmen 

Hours Initial letters 

8 :00 to 8 :50 a. m H R X Z 

8 :50 to 9 :40 a. m S D U 

10 :00 to 10 :50 a. m B L V 

10 :50 to 11 :40 a. m M I K Y 

12 :50 to 1 :40 p. m J N O W 

1 :40 to 2 :30 p. m C E G Q 

2 :30 to 4 ;00 p. m A F P T and any freshman 

students who failed to report 
during the period provided 
for their group. 

SCHEDULE FOR ALL OTHER STUDENTS 

Monday, September 11, 1939 
Hours Initial letters 

7 :45 to 8 :30 a. m Ha-Hol 

8 :30 to 9:15 a. m Hom-Hy R X Z 

9 :30 to 10 :15 a. m Sa-Sm 

10 :15 to 11 :00 a. m Sn-Sz D U 

12:00 to 12:45 p. m Ba-Bra 

12 :45 to 1 :30 p. m Bre-By L V 

1 :45 to 2 :30 p. m Ma-Mi 

2 :45 to 3 :30 p. m Mo-My IKY 

Tuesday, September 12, 1939 

7 :45 to 8 :30 a. m Wa-Wh 

8 :30 to 9:15 a. m Wi-Wy J N O 

9 :30 to 10:15 a. m Ca-Con 

10 :15 to 11 :00 a. m Coo-Cz E G Q 

1 :00 to 1 :45 p. m A F 

1 :45 to 2 :30 p. m P T 

2 :30 to 4 :00 p. m Special students and any stu- 

dents who failed to report 
during the period provided 
for their group. Late assign- 
ment fee of $2.50 in effect 
after this period. 

SECOND SEMESTER 

SCHEDULE FOR ALL STUDENTS 

Tuesday, January 30, 1940 
Hours Initial letters 

7 :45 to 8 :30 a. m A F 

8 :30 to 9:15 a. m P T 

9:30 to 10:15 a. m Ca-Con 

10:15 to 11 :00 a. m Coo-Cz E G Q 

• 12 :00 to 12 :45 p. m Ba-Bra 

12 :45 to 1 :30 p. m Bre-Bv L V 

1 :45 to 2 :30 p. m ' Ma-Mi 

2 :45 to 3 :30 p. m Mo-My IKY 

Wednesday, January 31, 1940 

7 :45 to 8 :30 p. m Wa-Wh 

8:30 to 9:15 a. m Wi-Wy J N O 

9 :30 to 10 :15 a. m Sa-Sm 

10:15 to 11:00 a. m Sn-Sv D U 

1 :00 to 1 :45 p. m Ha-Hol 

1 :45 to 2 :30 p. m Hon-Hy R X Z 

2 :30 to 4 :00 p. m Special students and anv stu- 

dents who failed to report 
during the period provided 
for their group. Late assign- 
ment fee of $2.50 in effect 
after this period. 

(9) 



The State Board of Regents 



Name and address Term expires 

Ralph T. O'Neil, Chairman, Topeka June 30, 1939 

E. F. Beckner, Colby June 30, 1941 

L. J. Beyer, Lyons June 30, 1942 

Maurice L. Breidenthal, Kansas City June 30, 1942 

Lester McCoy, Garden City June 30, 1939 

Clarence G. Nevins, Dodge City June 30, 1941 

Howard Payne, Olathe June 30, 1940 

H. L. Snyder, Winfield June 30, 1940 

Leslie Wallace, Lamed June 30, 1942 



J. A. Mermis, Business Manager 

Mark Krouch, Assistant Business Manager 



Administrative Officers* of the College 



President F. D. Farrell 

College Historian J. T. Willard 

Dean of the Division of Agriculture, and Director of 

the Agricultural Experiment Station L. E. Call 

Dean of the Division of Engineering, and Director of 

the Engineering Experiment Station R. A. Seaton 

Dean of the Division of General Science R. W. Babcock 

Dean of the Division of Home Economics, and Direc- 
tor of the Bureau of Research in Home Econom- 
ics Margaret M. Justin 

Dean of the Division of Veterinary Medicine R. R. Dykstra 

Dean of the Division of College Extension H. J. Umberger 

Dean of the Division of Graduate Study J. E. Ackert 

Dean of Women ". Mary P. Van Zile 

Dean of the Summer School E. L. Holton 

Vice-President S. A. Nock 

Registrar Jessie McD. Machir 

Librarian Arthur B. Smith 

Superintendent of Maintenance G. R. Pauling 

* Also included in the general alphabetical list. 

(10) 



Officers of Administration, Instruction 
and Research* 



Nellie Aberle, Assistant Professor of English (1921, 1935). J 

B. S., K. S. C, 1912; M. S-, ibid., 1914. f A 53. 

Erwin Abmeyer, Assistant Professor of Horticulture in Charge of North- 
eastern Kansas Experiment Fields (1934, 1936). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1933. Atchison, Kan. 

Fulton George Ackerman, Associate Soil Conservationist, Soil Conservation 
Service, U. S. D. A.; in charge of Soil and Water Conservation Investiga- 
tions, Fort Hays Branch Agricultural Experiment Station (1933, 1934). 
B. S., K. S. C, 1931. Hays, Kan. 

James Edward Ackert, Dean of Division of Graduate Study (1931) ; Professor 
of Zoology (1913, 1918) ; Parasitologist, Agricultural Experiment Station 
(1913). 

A. B., University of Illinois, 1909; A. M., ibid., 1911; Ph.D. ibid., 1918. F 26. 

Anna Tessie Agan, Assistant Professor of Household Economics (1930; Sept. 
1, 1938). 

B. S., University of Nebraska, 1927; M. S., K. S. C, 1930. T 53. 

Michael Francis Ahearn, Professor and Head of Department of Physical 
Education, and Director of Athletics (1904, 1920). 

B. S., Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1904; M. S., K. S. C, 1913. N 35. 

Louis C. Aicher, Superintendent, Fort Havs Branch Agricultural Experiment 
Station (1921). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1910. Hays, Kan. 

Harry Workman Aiman, Assistant Professor of Woodwork (1918, 1925). 

A. B., Oskaloosa College, 1921. S 27A. 

Harry Starkey Aldrich, Capt., C. A. C, U.S.A.,; Assistant Professor of Mili- 
tary Science and Tactics (1937). 

B. S., Michigan College of Mines, 1917; E. M., ibid., 1917. N 26. 

* The staff of a department is listed under the department hpading in the body of the 

Catalogue. See Table of Contents, page 3 ante, or Index at end of volume, 
t The College buildings are designated by letters, as follows: 
A — Anderson Hall (Administration) N — Nichols Gymnasium 

Ag — Waters Hall (Agr., Chem., Physics) (Phys. Ed., Mil. Sci., Music) 

Bks — Barracks P — Stock Judging Pavilion 

C — Calvin Hall (Home Ec.) PP — Power. Heat and Service Building 

CH— College Hospital R — Farm Machinery Hall 

D — Dickens Hall (Hort., Botany) S — Engineering Shops 

E — Engineering Hall T — Thompson Hall (Cafeteria) 

EA — Extension Annex V — Veterinary Hall (Vet. Med., Bact.) 

F — Fairchild Hall (Hist., Zool., Ent.) VH — Veterinary Hospital 

G — Education Hall (Educ, Publ. Spkg.) VRL — Veterinary Research Laboratory 

I — Illustrations Hall VZ — Van Zile Hall (Girls' Dormitory) 

K — Kedzie Hall (Printing) W — Physical Science Building 

L — Library X — Chemistry Annex No. 1 

M — Auditorium XX — Chemistry Annex No. 2 

X One date standing after the title shows when the office was assumed. In the case of 
two dates separated by a comma or semicolon, the first date indicates when services with the 
College began, the second when present office was assumed. Dates separated by a dash indi- 
cate time of assumption and termination, respectively, of the duties indicated in the title. 

(ID 



12 Kansas State College 

Gertrude Edna Allen, Assistant Professor of Foods and Nutrition, Division 
of College Extension (1929, 1936). 

B. S., University of Minnesota, 1923; M. S., K. S. C, 1936. EA 304. 

Oscar William Alm, Professor of Psychology (1929, 1933). 

A. B. University of Nebraska, 1917; A.M., Columbia University, 1918; Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Minnesota, 1929. G 30. 

Annette Alsop, Graduate Assistant in Zoology (Sept. 1, 1938). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1938. F 36. 

Inez Gertrude Alsop, Assistant Professor of History and Government (1923, 
1927). 

B. S., Kansas State Teachers College, Emporia, 1916; M.S., University of Kansas, 1920. 

F 63. 

Donald Jules Ameel, Instructor in Zoology (1937). 

A. B., Wayne Universitv, 1928; M. A., University of Michigan, 1930; Sc. D., ibid.. 1933. 

F 78. 

Edith Evelyn Ames, Graduate Assistant in Institutional Management (Sept. 
1, 1938); resigned Oct. 3, 1938. 

B. S., K. S. C, 1927. VZ. 

Edoar McCall Amos, Associate Professor of Industrial Journalism and Print- 
ing (1920, 1936). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1902. K 29. 

William Gerald Amstein, Assistant Professor of Horticulture, Division of 
College Extension (1935). 

B. S., Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1927 ; M. S., K. S. C, 1928. A 3. 

James Russell Anderson, (Temporary) Instructor in Applied Mechanics (Feb. 
1, 1939). 

B. S., University of California, 1937. E 113. 

John Edmond Anderson, Instructor in Milling Industry (1932, 1933). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1932; M. S., ibid, 1933. E. Ag 101B. 

Kling LeRoy Anderson, Assistant Professor of Pasture Improvement (1936; 
July 1, 1938). 

B. S., University of California, 1936; M. S., K. S. C, 1938. E. Ag 206A. 

Arthur Clinton Andrews, Assistant Professor of Chemistry (1926; Sept. 1, 
1938). 

B. S., University of Wisconsin, 1924; M.S., K. S. C, 1929; Ph.D., Universitv of Wis- 
consin, 1938. XX 28. 

Adelaide Aschmann, Graduate Assistant in Child Welfare and Euthenics 
(Sept. 10, 1938). 

B. S., Carnegie Institute of Technology, 1938. C 62. 

Floyd Warnick Atkeson, Professor and Head of Department of Dairy Hus- 
bandry (1935) ; Dairy Husbandman, Agricultural Experiment Station (1935). 
B. S., University of Missouri, 1918; M.S., K. S. C, 1929. W. Ag 128. 

Cliff Errett Aubel, Professor of Animal Husband^ (1919; July 1, 1938). 

B. S., Pennsylvania State College, 1915; M.S., K. S. C, 1917; Ph.D., University of 
Minnesota, 1935. E. Ag 24. 

Madalyn Avery, Assistant Professor Physics (1928). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1924; M.S., ibid., 1932. W. Ag 134. 

Thomas Burt Avery, Graduate Assistant in Poultry Husbandry (1937; July 1, 
1938). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1934. W. Ag 230. 



Officers of Instruction 13 

J. Dewey Axtell, 1 Research Assistant in Agronomy, Agricultural Experiment 
Station (October 25, 1938). E. Ag 207A. 

Rodney Whittemore Babcock, Dean of Division of General Science (1930). 

A. B., University of Missouri, 1912; A.M., University of Wisconsin, 1915; Ph.D., ibid., 
1924. A 47. 

Dorothy Alice Bacon, (Temporary) Instructor in Junior Extension ; Assistant 
State Club Leader, Division of College Extension (Sept. 20, 1938). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1936. A 35A. 

Harry Charles Baird, Assistant Professor of Agricultural Extension; District 
Supervisor, Division of College Extension (1920, 1934). 
B. S., K. S. C, 1914. A 60. 

Clarence Potter Baker, (Temporary) Instructor in English (1937). 

B. S., Haverford College, 1933; A. M., Harvard University, 1936. K 54. 

Gladys Baker, Head Cataloguer in Library (1935; July 1, 1938). 

B. L. S., University of Illinois, 1924. L 52. 

Robert Metcalfe Baker, Instructor in Electrical Engineering (1937). 

B. S. in E. E., University of Texas, 1926; M.S., University of Pittsburgh, 1931. 

E 120. 

Nora Elizabeth Bare, 4 Assistant in Education (1927, 1937). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1925. G 32B. 

Dorothy Barfcot, Professor and Head of Department of Art (1930, 1935). 

A. B., State University of Iowa, 1922; A.M., Columbia University, 1928. A 68A. 

Edgar Lee Barger, Associate Professor of Agricultural Engineering (1930; July 
1, 1938). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1929; M.S., ibid., 1934. E 216. 

Harold Nathan Barham, Associate Professor of Organic Chemistry (1929, 
1932). 

A. B., Bethany College, 1921; M.S., Ohio State University, 1922; Ph.D., University of 
Kansas, 1928. XX 28. 

Mark Alfred Barmore, 1 Agent, Bureau of Plant Industry, U. S. D. A.; Cereal 
Chemist, Agricultural Experiment Station (Feb. 1, 1938). 

A. B., Quaker College, 1927; M. A., Stanford University, 1929; Ph.D., ibid., 1931. 

E. Ag 102. 

Jane Wilson Barnes, Assistant to the Dean, Division of Home Economics 
(1928; July 1, 1938); Acting Assistant Dean, Division of Home Economics, 
Aug. 1, 1938, to June 30, 1939. 

B. S., K. S. C, 1912; M. S., ibid., 1932. C 38. 

Robert John Barnett, Professor of Horticulture (1907-1911; 1920); Head of 
Department of Horticulture, 1930-1938. 

B. S., K. S. C, 1895; M.S., ibid., 1911. D 29. 

Ellen Margaret Batchelor, Assistant Professor and District Home Demon- 
stration Agent Leader, Division of College Extension (1917; July 1, 1938). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1911. EA 306. 

James Charles Bates, Instructor in Botany (1935). 

A. B., University of Kansas, 1927; A.M., ibid., 1934; Ph.D., ibid., 1935. D 53. 

Laura Falkenrich Baxter, Assistant Professor of Home Economics Education 
(1927, 1934). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1915; M. S., ibid., 1930. G 28. 

1. In cooperation with the U. S. Department of Agriculture. 

4. In cooperation with the State Board for Vocational Education. 



14 Kansas State College 

Mabel Gertrude Baxter, Assistant in Charge of Continuations, College Li- 
brary (1916, 1918). L 96. 

Buell Wesley Beadle, Assistant Chemist, Agricultural Experiment Station 
(1935). 

B. S., K.S.G., 1935; M.S., ibid., 1938. E. Ag 204A. 

Edgar Sidney Beaumont, Graduate Assistant in Horticulture (Sept. 1, 1938). 

B. S., Massachusetts State College, 1938. D 35 A. 

Glenn Hanse Beck, Instructor in Dairy Husbandary (1936, 1937). 

B. S., University of Idaho, 1936; M. S., K. S. C, 1938. W. Ag 125. 

Russell James Beers, Instructor in Chemistry (1935). 

B. S., University of Nebraska, 1933; M. S., ibid., 1935. A 74. 

Floyd Wayne Bell, Professor of Animal Husbandry, in Charge of Advanced 
Judging (1918, 1921). 

B. S., Cornell University, 1911. E. Ag 12. 

John Gregory Bell, Assistant Professor of Farm Crops, Division of College 
Extension (1933, 1937). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1932. A 3. 

Ada Grace Billings, Associate Professor of History and Government, Depart- 
ment of Home Study, Division of College Extension (1921, 1927). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1916; M.S., ibid., 1927. A 5. 

Chester Bert Billings, Instructor in Agriculture, Department of Home Study, 
Division of College Extension (1936). 
B. S'., Fort Hays Kansas State College, 1930; M. S., K. S. C, 1936. A 5. 

Frank Otto Blecha, Assistant Professor of Agricultural Extension; District 
Agricultural Agent, Division of College Extension (1919, 1923). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1918; M. S., ibid., 1926. A 60. 

James A. Blodgett, Graduate Research Assistant in Agronomy (Sept. 1, 1938). 

B. S., University of Oregon, 1939. E. Ag 208. 

Robert Edmund Bock, Custodian (1936, 1937). pp 35. 

Clara Bogue, (Temporary) Instructor in English (1921-1929; Sept. 1, 1938). 

B. S., Kansas State Teachers College, Emporia, 1919; M. A., University of Chicago, 1921. 

A 52. 

Mary Elsie Border, Instructor in Junior Extension; Assistant State Club 
Leader, Division of College Extension (1929, 1936); on sabbatic leave Sept. 
20, 1938, to June 19, 1939. 

B. S., Ohio State University, 1926. A 35. 

Phyllis Boyle, Graduate Assistant in Bacteriology (Feb. 1, 1939). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1939. V 52. 

William Raymond Brackett, Associate Professor of Physics (1919, 1923). 

A. B., University of Colorado, 1905. W. Ag 31. 

Boyd Bertrand Brainard, Professor of Mechanical Engineering (1923; Sept. 1, 
1938). 

B. S. in M. E., University of Colorado, 1922; S. M., Massachusetts Institute of Tech- 
nology, 1931. E 109. 

George Francis Branigan, Assistant Professor of Engineering Drawing and 
Descriptive Geometry (1927, 1936). 
B. S. in C. E., University of Nebraska, 1927; M. S., K. S. C, 1933. E 209. 

Augustin Wilber Breeden, Associate Professor of English (1926). 

Ph. B., University of Chicago, 1924; A.M., ibid., 1925. K 52. 



Officers of Instruction 15 

Jesse Lamar Brenneman, Professor of Electrical Engineering (1920, 1928). 

B. S., University of Chicago, 1908; E. E., University of Wisconsin, 1913. E 120. 

Everett Ernest Brown, Maj., Inf., U. S. A.; Associate Professor of Military 
Science and Tactics (Sept. 1, 1938). 

Graduate, Infantry School, 1926; Graduate, Command and General Staff School, 1938. 

N 26. 

Hale H. Brown, 4 Instructor in Vocational Education (1937). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1928; M. S., ibid., 1937. G 28. 

Helen Martin Brown, 4 Assistant in Education (1937). 

A. B., Oberlin College, 1927. Capitol, Topeka, Kan. 

Mary Viola Brown, Laboratory Technician, Department of Student Health 
(1936). 

B. S., Baldwin-Wallace College, 1934. A 57. 

Nina Myrtle Browning, Assistant Professor of Food Economics and Nutri- 
tion (1930, 1937); on sabbatic leave 1938-1939. 

B. S., K. S. C, 1923; M. S., ibid., 1927. C 43. 

Howard W. Brubaker, Professor of Analytical Chemistry (1913, 1922). 

B. S., Carleton College, 1899; Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania, 1904. XX 3. 

Loren Aldro Bryan, Graduate Assistant in Chemistry (1937). 

B. S. in Ed., Kansas State Teachers College, Emporia, 1937 ; B. A., ibid., 1937. X 29A. 

Harry Ray Bryson, Assistant Professor of Entomology (1924, 1929). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1917; M.S., ibid., 1924. F 54. 

Harry Copley Buchholtz, (Temporary) Graduate Assistant in Electrical En- 
gineering (Feb. 1, 1939). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1939. E 24. 

James Henry Burt, Professor and Head of Department of Anatomy and 
Physiology (1909, 1919). 

V. S., Ontario Veterinary College, 1895; D. V. M., Ohio State University, 1905. V 31. 

Lucile Beatrice Burt, Graduate Assistant in Botany (1937). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1928; M. A., University of Kansas, 1938. D 52A. 

Marjorie Burton, Graduate Assistant in Child Welfare and Euthenics (Sept. 
1, 1938). 

B. S., Iowa State College, 1933. C 62. 

Leland David Bushnell, Professor and Head of Department of Bacteriology 
(1908, 1912); Bacteriologist, Agricultural Experiment Station (1908, 1912). 

B. S., Michigan Agricultural College, 1905; M.S., University of Kansas, 1915; Ph.D., 
Harvard University, 1921. V 56. 

Frank Byrne, Instructor in Geology (1930). 

B. S., University of Chicago, 1927. F 1A. 

Marion John Caldwell, Instructor in Chemistry (1932, 1934). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1931; M.S., ibid., 1933. X 29A. 

Leland Everett Call, Dean of Division of Agriculture (1907, 1925); Director 
of Agricultural "Experiment Station (1907, 1925). 

B. S. in Agr., Ohio State University, 1906; M.S., ibid., 1912. E. Ag 106. 

James Phillip Callahan, Associate Professor of English (1924, 1930). 

B. S., Kansas State Teachers College, Hays, 1919; A.M., University of Kansas, 1926. 

K 56. 

Mildred Camp, Head of Circulation Department, College Library (1927). 

A. B., Eureka College, 1912; B. L. S., University of Illinois, 1924. L. 

4. In cooperation with the State Board for Vocational Education. 



16 Kansas State College 

James Kirker Campbell, Maj., Inf., U. S. A.; Associate Professor of Military 
Science and Tactics (1937). 

Graduate, Culver Military Academy, 1905; Graduate, Infantry School, 1926. N 26. 

Alvin Boyd Cardwell, Professor and Head of Department of Physics (1936, 
1937). 

B. S., University of Chattanooga, 1925; M.S., University of Wisconsin, 1927; Ph.D., 
ibid., 1930. W. Ag 225. 

Walter William Carlson, Professor and Head of Department of Shop Prac- 
tice (1910, 1917); Superintendent of Shops (1910, 1912); Industrial Engineer, 
Engineering Experiment Station (1913); on sabbatic leave July 1 to August 
31, 1938. 

R. S., K. S. C, 1908; M. E., ibid., 1916. S 62. 

Arthur Adam Case, Graduate Research Assistant in Zoology, Agricultural Ex- 
periment Station (1937). 
B. S., K. S. C, 1937. F 36. 

Ralph Boyd Cathcart, Assistant Professor of Animal Husbandry (1935, 1937). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1933; M. S., University of Nebraska, 1934. E. Ag 6A. 

Wilbur John Caulfield, Assistant Professor of Dairy Husbandry (1927, 1930). 

B. S., University of Minnesota, 1924; M.S., Pennsylvania State College, 1926. 

W. Ag 147. 

George Edward Cauthen, Technician and Instructor in Zoology (1935); re- 
signed Nov. 15, 1938. 

B. A., Austin College, 1928; M.S., K. S. C, 1931. F 30. 

Harry Winfield Cave, Professor of Dairy Husbandry (1918, 1926). 

B. S. A., Iowa State College, 1914; M. S., K. S. C, 1916. W. Ag 128. 

Dena C. Cederquist, Technician in Food Economics and Nutrition (1937). 

B. S., Iowa State College, 1931; M.S., ibid., 1937. C 13. 

Ernest Knight Chapin, Associate Professor of Physics (1923, 1932). 

A. B., University of Michigan, 1918; M.S., ibid., 1923. W. Ag 134A. 

James Percy Chapman, Assistant Extension Editor (1936). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1932. EA 104. 

Joseph Rudolph Chelikowsky, Instructor in Geology (1937). 

B. A., Cornell University, 1931; M. A., ibid., 1932; Ph.D., ibid., 1935. F 1A. 

Robert Frederick Childs, 2 Road Materials, Engineering Experiment Station 
(1931). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1929. E 230. 

Alfred Lestetc Clapp, Associate Professor of Agronomy, in Charge of Cooper- 
ative Experiments (1920, 1934). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1914; M. S., ibid., 1934. E. Ag 201. 

Francis Eugene Clark, 1 Associate Bacteriologist, U. S. D. A.; Soil Microbi- 
ology Investigations, Agricultural Experiment Station (1937). 
B. A., University of Colorado, 1932; B. D. E., ibid., 1933; M. A., ibid., 1933; Ph.D., 

ibid., 1936. V28. 

Eugene Arthur Cleavinger, Assistant Professor of Farm Crops, Division of 
College Extension (1926, 1931). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1925. A 3. 

Owen Lovejoy Cochrane, Instructor in Physical Education (Jan. 1, 1939). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1931. N 33. 



2. In cooperation with the Kansas State Highway Department. 



Officers of Instruction 17 

Maynard Henry Coe, Professor and State Club Leader, Division of College 
Extension (1922, 1927). 

B. S., University of Minnesota, 1917. A 35B. 

Alice Cole, Nurse, Department of Student Health (1938). 

R. N., Bethany Methodist Hospital School of Nursing, 1937. CH. 

Embert Harvey Coles, 1 Associate Agronomist, Bureau of Plant Industry, U. S. 
D. A.; Superintendent, Colby Branch Agricultural Experiment Station (1922, 
1929). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1922. Colby, Kan. 

Tate Benton Collins, Jr., (Temporal) Graduate Assistant in Electrical En- 
gineering (Feb. 1, 1939). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1937. E 19. 

Charles William Colver, Professor of Organic Chemistry (1919, 1925). 

B. S., University of Idaho, 1909; M.S., ibid., 1911; Ph.D., University of Illinois, 1919. 

XX 28. 

Doris Compton, Instructor in Recreation, Division of College Extension (1937; 
July 1, 1938). 

B. S., Northwestern University, 1937. EA 304. 

Laurence Laur Compton, Assistant Professor of Soils, Division of College Ex- 
tension (1930, 1935). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1930. A 3. 

Robert Warren Conover, Professor of English (1915, 1920). 

A. B., Wesleyan University, 1911; A.M., ibid., 1914. K 53. 

William Joseph Conover, Assistant Professor of Agricultural Economics, Di- 
vision of College Extension (1934, 1937). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1932 Pratt, Kan. 

Lowell Edwin Conrad, Professor and Head of Department of Civil Engineer- 
ing (1908, 1909); Civil Engineer, Engineering Experiment Station (1913). 

B. S., Cornell College, 1904; C. E., ibid., 1906; M. S., Lehigh University, 1908. E 124. 

Ralph Martin Conrad, Assistant Professor of Poultry Chemistry (1936). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1933; M.S., State University of Iowa, 1934; Ph.D., ibid., 1936. 

W. Ag 234. 

John Herbert Coolidge, Assistant Professor of Agricultural Economics, Divi- 
sion of College Extension (1926, 1931). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1925; M.S., ibid., 1932. Farm Bureau, Kingman, Kan. 

Lloyd Marion Copenhafer, Instructor in Landscape Gardening, Division of 
College Extension (Oct. 1, 1938). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1933; M. S., ibid., 1936. A 3. 

Esther Margaret Cormany, Assistant Professor of Clothing and Textiles 
(1936). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1926; M.S., ibid., 1932. C 68. 

Charles Meclain Correll, Professor of History and Government (1922, 1934); 
Assistant Dean, Division of General Science (1927). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1900; Ph. B., University of Chicago, 1907; Ph. M., ibid., 1908. 

F 61 and A 47A. 

1. In cooperation with the U. S. Department of Agriculture. 



2—6529 



18 Kansas State College 

Richard Thomas Cotton, 3 Senior Entomologist, Bureau of Entomology and 
Plant Quarantine, U. S. D. A.; Investigator of Stored Grain and Flour-mill 
Insects; in charge of U. S. Entomological Laboratory (1934). 

B. S., Cornell University, 1914; M. S., ibid., 1918; Ph.D., George Washington University, 

1924. U. S. Lab., 1204 Fremont. 

Junieta Harbes Cowan, 4 (Temporary) Instructor in Home Economics Educa- 
tion (Sept. 1, 1938). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1930. 
Ina Foote Cowles, Associate Professor of Clothing and Textiles (1902, 1918). 

B. S., K. S. C., 1901; M.S., University of Wisconsin, 1931. C 68. 

Rufus Francis Cox, Associate Professor of Animal Husbandry (1930, 1G35). 

B. S., Oklahoma Agricultural and Mechanical College, 1923; M.S., Iowa State College, 

1925. E. Ag 8A. 

William Wesley Crawford, Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering (1923, 
1934). 

A. B., State University of Iowa, 1912; B. S. in C. E., Iowa State College, 1917; M. Di., 
Iowa State Teachers College, 1908. E 220. 

Don Baker Creager, Instructor in Botany (1937). 

B. S., Miami University, 1927; M.S., State University of Iowa, 1929; Ph.D., Harvard 
University, 1937. D 54. 

Leonard Roscoe Crews, Maj., C. A. C, U. S. A.; Assistant Professor of Mili- 
tary Science and Tactics (1934). 

Graduate, Battery Officers Course, Coast Artillery School, 1929. N 22. 

Cornelia Williams Crittenden, Associate Professor of Modern Languages 
(1926, 1929). 

A. B., University of Nebraska, 1918; A. M., ibid., 1926. A 71. 

Martha Rebecca Cullipher, Assistant Loan Librarian (1928); on sabbatic 
leave Sept. 1, 1938, to May 31, 1939. 

A. B., Indiana University, 1926; B. S. in L. S., University of Illinois, 1928. L 51. 

Ruth J. Dales, Instructor in Child Welfare and Euthenics (1937). 

B. S., Elmira College, 1933; Merrill Palmer School, 1934. C 32B. 

Rose Marie Darst, Assistant Professor of Art (1933; Sept. 1, 1938). 

B. S., Ohio University, 1926; A.M., Columbia University, 1927. A 68B. 

Robert Dodds Daugherty, Assistant Professor of Mathematics (1930, 1932). 

Ph. B., Iowa Wesleyan College, 1910; M. S., State University of Iowa, 1930. S 52. 

Allan Park Davidson, Professor of Vocational Education (1919, 1930). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1914; M. S., ibid., 1925. G 28. 

Floyd Ewing Davidson, Assistant in Agronomy, Southeastern Kansas Experi- 
ment Fields (1934). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1933. R. F. D. 3, Parsons, Kan. 

Charles DeForest Davis, Assistant Professor of Farm Crops (1921). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1921; M. S., ibid., 1926. E. Ag 305A. 

Elizabeth Hamilton Davis, Reference Librarian (1920). 

A. B., MacMurray College for Women, 1909; B. L. S., University of Illinois, 191 t. 

L 51. 

Hallam Walker Davis, Professor of English (1913, 1918); Head of Depart- 
ment of English (1913, 1921). 

A. B., Indiana University, 1909; A.M., Columbia University, 1913. K 54. 

3. In cooperation with the Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station. 

4. In cooperation with the State Board for Vocational Education. 



Officers of Instruction 19 

Wilmer Esla Davis, Professor of Plant Physiology (1909, 1927). 

Graduate, Ohio Normal University, 1894; A. B., University of Illinois, 1903. D 77B. 

Earle Reed Dawley, 2 Professor of Engineering Materials (1920, 1933) ; Acting 
Materials Testing Engineer, Engineering Experiment Station (1920; Feb. 1, 
1939) ; Acting Head of the Department of Applied Mechanics June 1 to 
August 31, 1939. 
B. S„ University of Illinois, 1919; M.S., K. S. C, 1927. E 135. 

George Adam Dean, Professor and Head of Department of Entomology (1902, 
1913); Entomologist, Agricultural Experiment Station (1902, 1913). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1895; M. S., ibid., 1905. F 51. 

Samuel Wesley Decker, Associate Professor of Horticulture (1937). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1924; M. S., University of Illinois, 1927. D 12. 

Maude Elizabeth Deely, Assistant Professor and District Home Demonstra- 
tion Agent Leader, Division of College Extension (1923, 1937). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1923; A.M., Columbia University, 1932. EA 306B. 

Hermann Charles Dempewolf, Maj., Inf., U. S. A.; Associate Professor of 
Military Science and Tactics (1935). 

Graduate, Infantry School, 1925; Graduate, Chemical Warfare School, 1930. N 26. 

Grace Emily Derby, Associate Librarian (1911, 1918). 

A. B., Western College for Women, 1905. L 55. 

Arthur Devor, Graduate Assistant in Chemistry (1936). 

B. S., McPherson College, 1935; M.S., K. S. C, 1937. X 29A. 

Rose Geraldine Diller, Class Reserves Assistant in Library (Sept. 1, 1938). 

L l. 

George Franklin Dillon, Graduate Assistant in Entomology (1937) ; resigned 
Jan. 31, 1939. 

A. B., Friends University, 1936. F 51. 

Paul Lawrence Dittemore, (Temporary) Editorial Assistant in the Agricul- 
tural Experiment Station (Feb. 1, 1939). 
B. S., K. S. C, 1932. E. Ag 105. 

Raymond Joseph Doll, Instructor in Agricultural Economics (1935, 1936). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1935; M. S., ibid., 1938. W. Ag 328. 

Charles Edward Dominy, Assistant Professor of Agricultural Economics, Di- 
vision of College Extension (1936.) 

B. S., K. S. C, 1926 ; Graduate, Institute of Meat Packing, 1927. W. Ag 327. 

Vernon Lloyd Doran, (Temporary) Assistant in Agricultural Economics (Oct. 

1, 1938). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1938. W. Ag 327. 

Carl Alfred Dorf, Instructor in Chemistry (1931, 1935). 

A. B., Bethany College, 1920; M.S., K. S. C, 1932. X 26. 

Lyle Wayne Downey, Associate Professor of Music and Director of the Col- 
lege Band and the College Orchestra (1928, 1935). 

A. B., James Millikin University, 1923; B. Mus., American Conservatory, 1928; M.S., 
K. S. C, 1932. M 30. 

Lester Henry Drayer, Chief Engineer, Heat and Power Department (1916, 
1927). E 3. 

2. In cooperation with the Kansas State Highway Department. 



20 Kansas State College 

Hugh Durham, Associate Professor of Agricultural Education (1927); Assist- 
ant in the Division of Agriculture and in the Agricultural Experiment Sta- 
tion (1915, 1937); deceased Oct. 15, 1938. 

Graduate, Kansas State Teachers College, Emporia, 1901 ; A. B., University of Kansas, 
1909; A.M., ibid., 1915. E. Ag 105. 

Merrill Augustus Durland, Professor of Machine Design (1919, 1928); As- 
sistant Dean, Division of Engineering (1926). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1918; M. E., ibid., 1922; M.S., ibid., 1923. E 116. 

Ralph R. Dykstra, Dean of Division of Veterinary Medicine (1919); Pro- 
fessor of Surgery (1911, 1913). 

D. V. M., Iowa State College, 1905. V 30. 

Samuel Allen Edgar, Technician and Instructor in Zoology (1937; Nov. 16, 
1938). 

A. B., Sterling College, 1937. F 30. 

Robert John Eggert, Assistant Professor of Agricultural Economics (Sept. 1, 
1938). 

B. S., University of Illinois, 1935; M.S., University of Illinois, 1936. W. Ag 330B. 

Hal Field Eier, Instructor in Rural Engineering, Division of College Extension 
(1934, 1935). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1936. E 131. 

Harold Russell Ekroth, (Temporary) Instructor in Architecture (Feb. 1, 
1939). 

B. S., University of Illinois, 1938. E 223. 

Helen Elizabeth Elcock, Associate Professor of English (1920, 1926). 

A. B., College of Emporia, 1907; A.M., University of Chicago, 1921. A 52. 

Carl G. Elling, Associate Professor of Animal Husbandry, Division of College 
Extension (1918, 1921). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1904. A 3. 

Vera May Ellithorpe, Graduate Assistant in Household Economics (Sept. 1, 
1938) . 

B. S., K. S. C, 1935. T 53. 

Otto Herman Elmer, Associate Professor of Botany and Plant Pathology 
(1927, 1937). 

B. S., Oregon Agricultural College, 1911; M.S., ibid., 1916; Ph.D., Iowa State College, 
192-1. D 56. 

Walter Titus Emery, 3 Assistant Entomologist, Bureau of Entomology and 
Plant Quarantine, U. S. D. A.; Investigator of Staple Crop Insects (1934). 

A. B., University of Kansas, 1911; A. M., ibid., 1913. U. S. Lab., 1204 Fremont. 

Donald Engle, (Temporary) Instructor in Music (Sept. 1, 1938). 

B. Music, K. S. C, 1938; B. S., K. S. C, 1938. M 54. 

Andrew Brian Erhart, Assistant in Agronomy in charge of the Southwest 
Kansas Experiment Fields (1934, 1936). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1933. Meade, Kan. 

Fred Page Eshbaugh, Forest Nurseryman, Fort Hays Branch Agricultural Ex- 
periment Station (1934). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1926 ; M. S., Purdue University, 1928. Hays, Kan. 

Louise Helen Everhardy, Associate Professor of Art (1919, 1920). 

Graduate New York School of Fine and Applied Art, 1916 ; B. S., Columbia University, 
1925; A.M., ibid., 1926. A 55A. 

3. In cooperation with the Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station. 



Officers of Instruction 21 

Vernetta Fairbairn, (Temporary) Instructor and District Home Demonstra- 
tion Agent Leader, Division of College Extension (1928; Oct. 19, 1938). 

A. B., University of Kansas, 1927. EA 306B. 

William Lawrence Faith, Professor of Chemical Engineering (1933, 1936). 

B. S.; University of Maryland, 1928; M.S., University of Illinois, 1929; Ph.D., ibid., 
1932. XX 28. 

Herman Farley, Associate Professor of Pathology (1929; July 1, 1938). 

D. V. M., K. S. C, 1926; M.S., ibid., 1934. V 61 and VRL. 

Francis David Farrell, President of the College (1918, 1925). 

B. S., Utah Agricultural College, 1907; Agr. D., University of Nebraska, 1925. A 30. 

Mae Farms, Instructor in Home Furnishings, Division of College Extension 
(Jan. 25, 1939). 

B. S., Oklahoma Agricultural and Mechanical College, 1933; M. S., ibid., 1936. A 62A. 

Jacob Olin Faulkner, Professor of English (1922, 1927). 

A. B., Washington and Lee University, 1907; A.M., Pennsylvania State College, 1920. 

K 62. 

Hurley Fellows, 1 Associate Pathologist, U. S. D. A.; Cereal Investigations, 
Agricultural Experiment Station (1925). 

B. S., Oregon State College, 1920; M.S., University of Wisconsin, 1921; Ph.D., ibid., 
1923. D 2. 

Lee Shriver Fent, Graduate Assistant in Zoology (Nov. 16, 1938) . 

B. S., K. S. C, 1938. F 36. 

Frederick Charles Fenton, Professor and Head of Department of Agricul- 
tural Engineering (1928). 

B. S., Iowa State College, 1914; M.S., ibid., 1930. E 214. 

John Moses Ferguson, Instructor in Farm Machinery, Division of College 
Extension (1937). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1934. E 131. 

Chris Henry Ficke, 1 Junior Pathologist, U. S. D. A.; Cereal Investigations, 
Agricultural Experiment Station (1930). 
B. S., Iowa State College, 1925; M. S., K. S. C, 1927. D 2. 

MiscAL Fierke, Instructor in Bacteriology (1937; Feb. 1, 1939). 

B. S., Southern Illinois State Normal University, 1926 ; M. S., University of Illionis, 1933. 

V 54. 

George Albert Filinger, Associate Professor of Pomology (1931, 1937); As- 
sistant Pomologist, Agricultural Experiment Station (1931). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1924; M. S., ibid., 1925; Ph. D., Ohio State University, 1931. D 35. 

John Charles Finerty, Graduate Research Assistant in Zoology, Agricultural 
Experiment Station (1937). 

A. B.j Kalamazoo College, 1937. F 5 - 

Alva L. Finkner, Graduate Research Assistant in Agronomy, Agricultural 
Experiment Station (July 1, 1938). 

B. S., Colorado Agricultural College, 1938. E. Ag 208A. 

Karl Frederick Finney, 1 Agent, Bureau of Plant Industry, U. S. D. A.; 
Baking Technologist, Agricultural Experiment Station (Jan. 3, 1938). 

A. B., Kansas Wesleyan, 1935; B. S., K. S. C, 1936; M. S., ibid., 1937. E. Ag 102. 

Emory D. Fisher, Instructor in Chemistry (1935). 

B. S., Dakota Wesleyan University, 1931; Ph. D., University of Wisconsin, 1935. A 74. 



1. In cooperation with the U. S, Department of Agriculture. 



22 Kansas State College 

Lyle Craig Fitch, (Temporary) Instructor in Economics (Sept. 1, 1938). 

B. S., State Teachers College, Chadron, Nebr., 1935; M. A., University of Nebraska, 
1938. W. Ag 327. 

Beatty Hope Fleenor, Professor of Education, Department of Home Study, 
Division of College Extension (1923, 1927). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1919; M.S., ibid, 1923; Ph.D., University of Missouri, 1931. A 5. 

Hazel Marie Fletcher, Assistant Professor of Clothing and Textiles (1937). 

A. B., Indiana University, 1922; A.M., ibid., 1927; Ph.D., ibid., 1929. C 53. 

Mary Genevieve Fletcher, Instructor in Foods and Nutrition, Division of 
College Extension (1936, 1937). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1928; M. S., ibid., 1934. EA 304. 

Arthur Oran Flinner, Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering (1929, 
1934). 

B. S. in M. E., K. S. C, 1929; M.S., ibid., 1933, S. M., Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology, 1937. E 109. 

Eustace Vivian Floyd, Professor of Physics (1911, 1921). 

B. S., Earlham College, 1903. W. Ag 228. 

Vernon Daniel Foltz, Assistant Professor of Bacteriology (1927, 1932) ; Food 
Bacteriologist, Agricultural Experiment Station (1937). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1927; M. S., ibid., 1929. V 52. 

Kknney Lee Ford, Alumni Secretary (1928). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1924; M.S., ibid., 1932. A 38A. 

Helen Gertrude Forney, Instructor in Food Economics and Nutrition (1937). 

A. B., Manchester College, 1927; A.M., Columbia University, 1936. C 64. 

Sina Faye Fowler, Instructor in Institutional Management (1935). 

B. S., Northeast Missouri State Teachers College, 1927; M. S., K. S. C, 1933. T 28. 

Donald B. Frane, Assistant College Physician (Sept. 1, 1938). 

B. S., University of Minnesota, 1935; M. B., ibid., 1937; M. D., ibid., 1938. A 63. 

Edward Raymond Frank, Professor of Surgery (1926, 1935). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1918; D. V. M., ibid., 1924; M.S., ibid., 1929. VH 53. 

Karl C. Frank, Capt., C. A. C, U. S. A.; Assistant Professor of Military 
Science and Tactics (1935). 

GraduaTe, Battery Officers Course, Coast Artillery School, 1930. N 27. 

Forrest Faye Frazier, Professor of Civil Engineering (1911, 1922). 

C. E., Ohio State University, 1910. E 123. 

John Carroll Frazier, Instructor in Plant Physiology (1936, 1937). 

A. B., DePauw University, 1925; A.M., University of Nebraska, 1926. D 28. 

Edwin Jacob Frick, Professor of Medicine (1919, 1926); Head of Department 
of Surgery and Medicine (1935). 

D. V. M., Cornell University, 1918. VH 54. 

Lyman Frick, Graduate Research Assistant in Zoology, Agricultural Experi- 
ment Station (Sept. 1, 1938). 

A. B., University of Kansas City, 1937. F 29. 

Robert Jerome Frick, Graduate Research Assistant in Shop Practice (Sept. 1, 
1938). 

B. S., Rockhurst College, 1936; B. S., K. S. C, 1937; B. S. in M. E., K. S. C, 1938. 

S 60. 

Roy Fred Fritz, Graduate Assistant in Entomology (Feb. 1, 1939). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1937. F 81. 



Officers of Instruction 23 

Wesley Leonard Fry, Professor of Physical Education (1934, 1935). 

LL. B., State University of Iowa, 1926. N 35. 

Manford W. Furr, Professor of Civil Engineering (1917, 1927). 

B. S., Purdue University, 1913; C. E., ibid., 1925; M.S., K. S. C, 1926. 

Percey Leigh Gainey, Professor of Bacteriology (1914, 1922) ; Soil Bacteri- 
ologist, Agricultural Experiment Station (1914). 

B. Agr., North Carolina Agricultural and Mechanical College, 1908; M.S., ibid., 1910; 
A. M., Washington University, 1911; Ph.D., ibid., 1927. V 26. 

Annabel Alexander Garvey, Assistant Professor of English (1920, 1927). 

A. B., Wellesley College, 1912; A.M., University of Kansas, 1914. A 51A. 

Frank Caleb Gates, Professor of Plant Taxonomy and Ecology (1919, 1928). 

A. B., University of Illinois, 1910; Ph.D., University of Michigan, 1912. D 76A. 

Stephen Arnold Geatjque, Assistant Custodian (1918, 1937). 

PP 35. 

George Albert Gemmell, Professor of Education, in charge of Department of 
Home Study, Division of College Extension (1918, 1922). 

B. S., Kansas State Teachers College, Pittsburg, 1917; B. S., K. S. C, 1920; M. S., ibid., 
1922; Ph.D., University of Missouri, 1930. A 5. 

Katherine Geyer, Assistant Professor of Physical Education for Women (1927, 
1935). 

Diploma, Sargent School of Boston University, 1925; B. S., Ohio State University, 1927; 
A. M., Columbia University, 1934. N 3. 

John H. Gibson, Graduate Assistant in Agronomy (Sept. 12, 1938) ; resigned 
Dec. 31, 1938. 

B. S., University of Missouri, 1938. E. Ag 305A. 

William Everett Gibson, 2 Engineer of Tests, Kansas State Highway Commis- 
sion; Road Materials, Engineering Experiment Station (1930). 
B. S., K. S. C, 1927; M. S., ibid., 1933; C. E., ibid., 1933. E 17. 

Henry Wilbur Gilbert, Instructor in Landscape Gardening, Division of Col- 
lege Extension (1935) ; resigned Sept. 30, 1938. 

B. S., K. S. C, 1931. A 3. 

Randolph Forney Gingrich, Associate Professor of Engineering Drawing and 
Descriptive Geometry (1923, 1931); Assistant Superintendent of Mainte- 
nance (1933). 

B. S. in C. E., University of Nebraska, 1923; M. S., K. S. C, 1929. E 207. 

Clarence Lee Gish, Superintendent of Poultry Farm (1934). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1934. Poultry Farm, R. F. D. 1. 

Kingsley Walton Given, Associate Professor of Public Speaking (1930). 

A. B., Park College, 1926; A.M., State University of Iowa, 1928. G 55. 

Kenneth Jack Gleason, Assistant College Physician (Sept. 1, 1938). 

M. D., University of Kansas, 1937. A 63. 

Otis Benton Glover, Assistant Professor of Agricultural Extension; District 
Supervisor, Division of College Extension (1929, 1934). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1915. A 62. 

Arthur Leonard Goodrich, Jr., Assistant Professor of Zoologv (1929; Sept. 1, 
1938). 

B. S., Coll ge of Idaho, 1928; M.S., University of Idaho, 1929; Ph.D., Corn-11 Uni- 
versity, 1938. F 78. 

2. In cooperation with the Kansas State Highway Department. 



24 Kansas State College 

Stanley Douglas Gralak, Jr., Instructor in Machine Design (1937). 

B. S., University of Illinois, 1936; M. S., ibid., 1937. S 51. 

Clarence Owen Grandfield,i Assistant Agronomist, U. S. D. A.; Forage 
Crops, Agricultural Experiment Station (1927, 1929). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1917; M. S., ibid., 1929. E. Ag 206A. 

Edward Grant, Instructor in Foundry (1913); Foreman of Foundry (1913); 
on sabbatic leave July 1 to August 31, 1938. s 45. 

John Willard Greene, Assistant Professor of Chemical Engineering (1937). 

B. S., University of Washington, 1926; M.S., Carnegie Institute of Technologv, 1927; 
Ph. D., University of Pittsburgh, 1930. XX 28. 

George A. Gries, Graduate Research Assistant in Botany, Agricultural Experi- 
ment Station (July 1, 1938). 

A. B., Miami University, 1938. D 28. 

Waldo Ernest Grimes, Professor and Head of Department of Economics and 
Sociology (1913, 1936). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1913; Ph.D., University of Wisconsin, 1923. W. Ag 330A. 

Hilda Rose Grossmann, Assistant Professor of Voice (1927, 1932). 

B. Mus., Chicago Musical College, 1925; B. S. in Music Ed., K. S. C, 1932; A.M., 
Stanford University, 1938. N 76B. 

LaMotte Grover, Assistant Professor of Applied Mechanics (1938; Sept. 1, 
1938). 

B. S. in C. E., K. S. C, 1924. E 135. 

Loren Dwight Grubb, Graduate Assistant in Chemistry (1937). 

B. S. in Ch. K, K. S. C, 1937; M. S., ibid., 1938. X 29A. 

Jessie Gulick, Acting Cataloguer in Library (1907, 1923); resigned Aug. 31, 
1938. 

L 52. 

Myrtle Annice Gunselman, Associate Professor of Household Economics 
(1926, 1937). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1919; A. M., University of Chicago, 1926. T 5. 

Ralph Leonard Gustafson, Graduate Assistant in Applied Mechanics (Sept. 
1, 1938). 

B. S. in M. E., University of North Dakota, 1937. E 112. 

Anna Hadden, Graduate Assistant in Institutional Management (Sept. 1, 1938). 
B. S., Iowa State College, 1932. T 51B. 

Charles W. Hadley, (Temporary) Instructor in Mathematics (Sept. 1, 1938). 

A. B., Southwestern College, 1938. S 52. 

Ruth Haines, Secretary of the Young Women's Christian Association (1934). 

A. B., University of Denver, 1931; A.M., ibid., 1933. A 36. 

Everett 1 Raymond Halbrook, Assistant Professor of Poultry Husbandry, Divi- 
sion of College Extension (1934). 

B. S. in Agr., University of Missouri, 1930; M.S., University of California, 1936. 

W. Ag 230. 

Joseph Lowe Hall, Assistant Professor of Chemistry (1922, 1923) ; Meat In- 
vestigations, Agricultural Experiment Station (1937). 

B. S., University of Illinois, 1919; M.S., ibid., 1921; Ph.D., ibid., 1922. XX 27A. 
1. In cooperation with the U. S. Department of Agriculture. 



Officers of Instruction 25 

Lawrence Fener Hall, 4 Assistant Professor of Vocational Education (1929, 
1931). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1923; M.S., ibid., 1927. G 28. 

Alanson Lola Hallsted, 1 Associate Agronomist, Division of Dry-land Agri- 
culture, U. S. D. A., in charge of Dry-land Agriculture Investigations, Fort 
Hays Branch Agricultural Experiment Station (1909). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1903. Hays, Kan. 

John Orr Hamilton, Professor of Physics (1901, 1908) ; Physicist, Engineering 
Experiment Station (1913); Head of Department of Physics, 1908-1937; 
deceased Aug. 9, 1938. 

B. S., University of Chicago, 1900. W. Ag 225. 

Floyd Joseph Hanna, College Photographer (1922, 1930). T 

Murville Jennings Harbaugh, Assistant Professor of Zoology (1929, 1930). 

A. B., University of Montana, 1926; A. M., ibid., 1930. F 37. 

Elizabeth Perry Harling, 5 Seed Analyst, Department of Agronomy (1912, 
1917) ; on indefinite leave April 1, 1938; deceased Nov. 30, 1938. 

A 77. 

Mary Theresa Harman, Professor of Zoology (1912, 1921). 

A. B., Indiana University, 1907; A.M., ibid., 1909; Ph.D., ibid., 1912. F 39. 

Charles Hal Harned, Graduate Assistant in Geology (Sept. 1, 1938). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1938. F 3. 

Vida Agnes Harris, Assistant Professor of Art (1927, 1931). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1914; A. M., University of Chicago, 1927. A 55A. 

Stella Maude Harriss, Assistant Professor of Chemistry (1917, 1927). 

Graduate, State Normal School, Peru, Neb., 1908; B. S., K. S. C, 1917; M.S., ibid., 
1919. X 26. 

Lawrence William Hartel, Assistant Professor of Physics vl920). 

A. B., Central Weslevan College, 1911; B. S., ibid., 1912; B. S. in Ed., University of 
Missouri, 1915; M.S., K. S. C, 1924. W. Ag 130. 

Ruth Hartman, Assistant Professor of Music (1924). 

Graduate in Public School Music, Iowa State Teachers College, 1912; Two-year Certificate, 
Northwestern University, 1923. M 56. 

Effie LoVisa Hastings, Second Assistant to the Registrar (1927, 1928). 

A 29. 

Ward Hillman Haylett, Assistant Professor of Physical Education for Men 
(1928, 1937). 

A. B., Doane College, 1926. N 33. 

Herbert Henley Haymaker, Professor of Plant Pathology (1917, 1927). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1915; M. S., University of Wisconsin, 1916; Ph. D., ibid., 1927. D 54. 

Henry Miles Heberer, Associate Professor of Public Speaking (1925, 1930). 

A. B., University of Illinois, 1922; A.M., Stanford University, 1938. G 51A. 

J. Eldred Hedrick, Instructor in Chemical Engineering (1936.) 

B. A., Illinois College, 1931; M. S., State University of Iowa, 1932; Ph.D., ibid., 1934. 

XX 29. 

1. In cooperation with the U. S. Department of Agriculture. 

4. In cooperation with the State Board for Vocational Education. 

5. In cooperation with the Kansas State Board of Agriculture. 



26 Kansas State College 

Linn Helander, Professor and Head of Department of Mechanical Engineer- 
ing (1935); Mechanical Engineer, Engineering Experiment Station (1935). 
B. S. in M. E., University of Illinois, 1915. E 109. 

John Frederick Helm, Jr., Professor of Free-Hand Drawing and Painting 
(1924; Sept. 1, 1938). 

B. D., Syracuse University, 1924. E 305. 

John Vern Hepler, 1 Assistant Professor of Agricultural Extension; District 
Agricultural Agent, Division of College Extension (1921, 1930). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1915. A 60. 

Earl Howard Herrick, Associate Professor of Zoology (1935); Mammalogist, 
Agricultural Experiment Station (1935). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1926; M. S., ibid., Ph. D., Harvard, 1929. F 5. 

Katherine Jane Hess, Associate Professor of Clothing and Textiles (1925, 
1931). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1900; M.S., ibid., 1926. C 53. 

Elmer George Heyne, 1 Junior Agronomist, U. S. D. A; Plant Breeder, Agri- 
cultural Experiment Station (1936; June 1, 1938). 

B. S., University of Nebraska, 1936; M.S.. K. S. C, 1938. E. Ag 303. 

John Clifford Hide, Assistant Professor of Soils (1935, 1937). 

B. Sc, University of Alberta, 1930; M.S., University of Minnesota, 1932; Ph.D., ibid., 
1935. E. Ag 207. 

Howard Templeton Hill, Professor and Head of Department of Public Speak- 
ing (1920, 1922). 

B. S., Iowa State College, 1910; J. D., University of Chicago, 1917. G 55. 

Randall Conrad Hill, Professor of Sociology (1929, 1935). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1924; M.S., ibid., 1927; Ph.D., University of Missouri. 1929. 

W. Ag 325B. 

Wilma Marguerite Hilt, (Temporary) Instructor in Physics (Sept. 1, 1938). 

B. S., University of Nebraska, 1932; M. S., K. S. C, 1937. W. Ag 134. 

Lora Valentine Hilyard, Instructor in Clothing and Textiles, Division of Col- 
lege Extension (1930, 1936). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1930. EA 304. 

Julian Adair Hodges, Professor of Agricultural Economics (1923, 1936). 

B. S. in Agr., University of Kentucky, 1917; M. S., ibid., 1923; Ph. D., Harvard Univer- 
sity, 1938. W. Ag 328. 

Leonard Casper Hoegemeyer, 1 Research Assistant in Agronomy, Agricultural 
Experiment Station (1937). 

B. S., University of Nebraska, 1937. E. Ag 301. 

Mary Elizabeth Hoff, Head of Documents Department, College Library 
(1928). 

A. B., Friends University, 1925; B. S. in L. S., University of Illinois, 1928. L 26. 

Mary Eck Holland, Instructor in Art (Sept. 1, 1938). 

B. F. A., Ohio State University, 1937; M. A., ibid., 1938. A 68B. 

Hilton Delos Hollembeak, Assistant in Agronomy, in charge of Cooperative 
Experiments (1936, 1937). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1937. E. Ag 201. 

Thomas R. Holmes, Maj., Inf., U. S. A.; Associate Professor of Military Science 
and Tactics (Sept. 1, 1938). 

B. S., St. John's College, Annapolis, Md., 1917. N 27. 



1. In cooperation with the U. S. Department of Agriculture. 



Officers of Instruction 



Zi 



Ina Emma Holroyd, Assistant Professor of "Mathematics (1900, 1929). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1915; B. S., Kansas State Teachers College, Emporia, 1916; A.M., Co- 
lumbia University, 1929. S 53. 

Edwin Lee Holton, Professor and Head of Department of Education (1910, 
1913); Dean of Summer School (1910, 1918). 

A. B., Indiana University, 1904; Ph.D., Columbia University, 1927. G '27. 

Adrian Augustus Holtz, Men's Adviser and Secretary of Young Men's Chris- 
tian Association (1919); Associate Professor of Sociology (1929, 1935). 

A. B., Colgate University, 1909; Ph. M., University of Chicago, 1910; B. D., ibid., 1911; 
Ph. D., ibid., 1914. A 43. 

Maurice Wilson Horrell, Instructor in Electrical Engineering (1936); re- 
signed Feb. 28, 1989. 

B. S., K. S. C, 1935; M. S., ibid., 1938. E 22. 

Abram Eld-red Hostetter, Instructor in Chemistry (1930, 1934). 

B. S., McPherson College, 1925; M. S., K. S. C, 1932; Ph. D., ibid., 1938. XX 28. 

Helen Pansy Hostetter, Associate Professor of Industrial Journalism and 
Printing (1932, 1937). 

A. B., University of Nebraska, 1917; M.S., Northwestern University, 1926. K 28. 

Harold Howe, Professor of Agricultural Economics (1925, 1934). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1922; M.S., University of Maryland, 1923; Ph.D., University of Wis- 
consin, 1937. W. Ag 325A. 

Hazel Dell Howe;, Instructor in Clothing and Textiles (1936). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1921; M.S., ibid., 1935. C 51. 

Leo Everett Hudiburg, Assistant Professor of Physics (1930). 

B. S., Kansas State Teachers College, Pittsburg, 1923; M.S., K. S. C, 1930. 

W. Ag 130. 

Josiah Simson Hughes, Professor of Biochemistry (1910, 1920); in charge of 
Animal Nutrition, Agricultural Experiment Station (1937). 

B. S., Ohio Wesleyan University, 1908; M.S., ibid., 1909; A.M., Ohio State University, 
1910; Ph.D., ibid., 1917. XX 28. 

Robert Leo Hummer, Instructor in Surgery and Medicine (1937) ; resigned 
Aug. 1, 1938. 

V. M. D., University of Pennsylvania, 1934. VH 53. 

Orville Don Hunt, Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering (1923, 1935). 

B. S. in E. E., Washington State College, 1923; M. S., K. S. C, 1930. E 127. 

Myron Williams Husband, College Physician and Head of Department of 
Student Health (1935). 

A. B., University of Kansas, 1921; B. S., University of Minnesota, 1925; M. D., ibid., 
1928. A 65. 

Emma Hyde, Associate Professor of Mathematics (1920, 1926). 

A. B., University of Kansas, 1912; A. M., University of Chicago, 1916. S 56. 

Heman Lauritz Ibsen, Professor of Genetics (1919, 1924). 

B. S., University of Wisconsin, 1912; M.S., ibid., 1913; Ph.D., ibid., 1916. 

E. Ag 58. 

Ivor Victor Iles, Professor of History and Government (1911, 1920). 

A. B., University of Kansas, 1905; A. M., ibid., 1905. F 57. 

Clarence Roy Jaccard, 1 Assistant Professor of Agricultural Economics, Divi- 
sion of College Extension (1922, 1936). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1926. A 4. 
1. In cooperation with the U. S. Department of Agriculture. 



28 Kansas State College 

Elden Valoetus James, Professor of History and Government (1912, 1924). 

A. B., Marietta College, 1901; A. B., University of Michigan, 1905; A.M., Marietta 
College, 1908. F 64. 

Florence Elizabeth James, Director of the Cafeteria; Instructor in Institu- 
tional Management (1934); Acting Head of Department, Sept. 1, 1938, to 
June 30, 1939. 

B. S., K. S. C, 1931; M. A., Mills College, 1932. T 52. 

William Charles Janes, Assistant Professor of Mathematics (1922, 1926); on 
sabbatic leave 1938-1939. 

B. S., Northwestern University, 1919; A.M., University of Nebraska, 1922. S 52.. 

Alice. Claypool Jefferson, Assistant Professor of Piano (1925, 1927); on leave 
1938-1939. 

Graduate, American Conservatory of Music, 1921 ; B. Mus., ibid., 1929. N 76D. 

Richard Roslyn Jesson, Assistant Professor of Music (1929, 1931); on sab- 
batic leave 1938-1939. 

B. Mus., Oberlin College, 1929. M 54. 

John Harold Johnson, Instructor in Junior Extension; Assistant State Club 
Leader, Division of College Extension (1927, 1935). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1927. A 35B. 

Charles Otis Johnston, 1 Associate Pathologist, U. S. D. A.; Cereal Investi- 
gations, Agricultural Experiment Station (1919). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1918; M.S., ibid., 1924. D 53. 

Edward C. Jones, Assistant Professor of Machine Tool Work (1916, 1920). 

B. M. E., Iowa State College, 1905; M. E., ibid., 1922; M.S., K. S. C, 1934. 

S 32. 

Elmer Thomas Jones, 3 Assistant Entomologist, Bureau of Entomology and 
Plant Quarantine, U. S. D. A.; Investigator of Staple Crop Insects (1934). 

B. S., University of Missouri, 1924; A.M., ibid., 1925. 

U. S. Lab., 1204 Fremont. 

Louis Mark Jorgenson, Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering (1925, 
1935). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1907; M.S., ibid., 1930. E 127. 

Robert William Jugenheimer, 1 Agent, U. S. D. A.; Corn Breeder, Agricul- 
tural Experiment Station (March 21, 1938). 

B. S., Iowa State College, 1934; M.S., ibid., 1936. E. Ag 301A. 

Margaret M. Justin, Dean of Division of Home Economics (1923). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1909; B. S. in Educ, Teachers College, Columbia University, 1915; 
Ph. D., Yale University, 1923. C 29. 

Eneas D. Kane, Graduate Assistant in Mechanical Engineering (Sept. 1, 
1938). 

B. S., University of California, 1938. E 109. 

Rosamond Kedzie, Instructor in Art (Sept. 1, 1938). 

B. S., Michigan State College, 1906; M. A., University of California, 1937. 

A 54. 

Virginia Voigt Keim, Graduate Assistant in Child Welfare and Euthenics 
(Sept. 1, 1937). 

B. S., University of Nebraska, 1937. C 33. 

Edgar Talbert Keith, Professor of Industrial Journalism and Printing (1912, 
1925). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1912. K 26A. 



1. In cooperation with the U. S. Department of Agriculture. 

3. In cooperation with the Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station. 



Officers of Instruction 29 

Ernest Baker Keith, Professor of Chemistry (1918; Sept. 1, 1938). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1913; Ph.D., University of Chicago, 1924. X 27. 

Leone Bower Kell, Associate Professor of Child Welfare and Euthenics 
(1927; Sept. 1, 1938). 

B. S., K. S. C., 1923; M.S., ibid., 1928. C 33A. 

Edward Guerrant Kelly, Professor of Entomology, Division of College Ex- 
tension (1918, 1922). 

B. S., University of Kentucky, 1903; M. S., ibid., 1904; Ph. D., Iowa State College, 1927. 

F 51. 

Alvin Lawrence Kenworthy, Assistant in Horticulture (1937; Feb. 1, 1939). 

B. S., Oklahoma Agricultural and Mechanical College, 1937. D 33. 

Russell Marion Kerchner, Professor of Electrical Engineering (1922, 1934). 

B. S., University of Illinois, 1922 ; M. S., K. S. C, 1927. E 121. 

Alice Day Kimball, Technician in Veterinary Pathology (1935). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1935. VH 59. 

Mary Kimball, First Assistant to the Registrar (1918). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1907. A 29. 

Herbert Hiram King, Professor and Head of Department of Chemistry (1906, 
1918); Chemist, Agricultural Experiment Station (1918); Chemist, En- 
gineering Experiment Station (1909, 1918). 

A. B., Ewing College, 1904; A. M., ibid., 1906; M. S., K. S. C, 1915; Ph.D., University 
of Chicago, 1918. XX 29. 

Ralph Willcox Kingman, Col., Inf., U. S. A.; Professor and Head of Depart- 
ment of Military Science and Tactics (1937). 

B. S. in C. E., University of Tennessee, 1902. N 26. 

Eunice Leola Kingsley, Instructor in Botany and Plant Pathology (1929, 
1935). 

B. S., North Dakota Agricultural College, 1926; M. S., K. S. C, 1931. D 52A. 

Charles Howard Kitselman, Professor of Pathology (1919, 1933). 

V. M. D., University of Pennsylvania, 1918; M. S., K. S. C, 1927. V 61 and VRL. 

Glenn Charles Klingman, Graduate Assistant in Agronomy (Feb. 1, 1939). 

B. S., University of Nebraska, 1939. E. Ag 305A. 

Royce Gerald Kloeffler, Professor and Head of Department of Electrical En- 
gineering (1916, 1927). 

B. S. in E. E., University of Michigan, 1913; S. M., Massachusetts Institute of Tech- 
nology, 1930. E 120. 

Kathleen Knittle, Assistant to the Dean of Women (1931). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1923; M. A., Columbia University, 1938. A 42. 

Lester Henry Koenitzer, Assistant Professor of Applied Mechanics (1929, 
1934). 

B. S., Iowa State College, 1926; M.S., ibid., 1929; C. E., ibid., 1930. E 14. 

James Michael Koepper, Graduate Assistant in Botany (Feb. 1, 1939). 

B. A., DePauw University, 1939. H 56. 

Martha Morrison Kramer, Professor of Food Economics and Nutrition (1922, 
1925) ; on leave July 1, 1938, to June 30, 1939. 

B. S., University of Chicago, 1916; A. M., Columbia University, 1920; Ph. D., ibid., 1922. 

C 28. 

Hillier Krieghbaum, Assistant Professor of Industrial Journalism (July 1, 
1938). 

B. A., University of Wisconsin, 1926. K 28B. 



30 Kansas State College 

Bernice Lydia Kunerth, Instructor in Food Economics and Nutrition (1932, 
1936) ; on sabbatic leave Oct. 15, 1938, to June 30, 1939. 

B. S., Iowa State College, 1932; M. S., K. S. C, 1933. C 7. 

Joseph Benjamin Kuska, 1 Associate Agronomist, Division of Dry-land Agri- 
culture, U. S. D. A.; in charge of Dry-land Agriculture Investigations, Colby 
Branch Agricultural Experiment Station (1914). 
B. S., University of Nebraska, 1913. Colby Branch Station, Colby, Kan. 

Raymond John Ladd, Instructor in Shop Practice (Sept. 1, 1938). 

B. S., Iowa State College, 1933. S 60. 

Russell Laman, Instructor in English (1935). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1931; M. A., State University of Iowa, 1932. K 56. 

Paul Griffith Lamerson, Assistant in Entomology, Agricultural Experiment 
Station (1932, 1936). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1927; M.S., ibid., 1931. Wathena, Kan. 

Roy Clinton Langford, Associate Professor of Psychology (1925, 1937). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1925; M.S., ibid., 1926; Ph.D., Stanford University, 1934. 

G 32C. 

Ralph Kenneth Larmour, Professor of Milling Industry (May 15, 1938). 

B. S., University of Saskatchewan, 1923; M. S., ibid., 1925; Ph. D., University of Minne- 
sota, 1927. E. Ag 111. 

Elmer Larson, Staff Sergt., D. E. M. L., U. S. A.; Instructor in Military 
Science and Tactics (1933). N 27. 

Mendel Elmer Lash, Assistant Professor of Chemistry (1929). 

A. B., Ohio State University, 1920; M. S., ibid., 1922; Ph. D., ibid., 1928. A 74. 

Ralph Richard Lashbrook, Associate Professor in Industrial Journalism and 
Printing (1934; July 1, 1938). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1929. K 28C. 

Alpha Corinne Latzke, Professor and Head of Department of Clothing and 
Textiles (1929, 1935). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1919; M.S., ibid., 1928. C 55. 

Hilmer Henry Laude, 1 Professor of Farm Crops (1920, 1931). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1911; M.S., Texas A. and M. College, 1918; Ph.D., Universitv of 
Chicago, 1936. E. Ag 208. 

Alvin George Law, 1 Research Assistant in Agronomy, Agricultural Experiment 
Station (June 1, 1938). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1938. E. Ag 206A. 

Elden Emanuel Leasure, Professor of Physiology (1926, 1935). 

D. V. M., K. S. C, 1923; M. S., ibid., 1930. V 34. 

Henry H. Lee, (Temporary) Assistant in Physics (Oct. 1, 1938). 

A. B., College of Emporia, 1936. W. Ag 134. 

Wilfred Chester Leland, Jr., (Temporary) Instructor in Economics (Sept. 1. 
1938) . 

B. A., University of Minnesota, 1937. W. Ag 327. 

Thomas Doyle Letbetter, Instructor in Accounting (Sept. 1, 1938). 

B. B. A., University of Texas, 1933. W. Ag 327. 

Clarence Flavius Lewis, Associate Professor of Mathematics (1920, 1926). 

A. B., University of Denver, 1913; M.S., K. S. C, 1925. E 105. 

1. In cooperation with the U. S. Department of Agriculture. 



Officers of Instruction 31 

Louis Henry Limper, Professor of Modern Languages (1914, 1926). 

A. B., Baldwin -Wallace College, 1907; A.M., University of Wisconsin, 1914; Ph.D., 
State University of Iowa, 1931. A 71. 

Ruth Lindquist, Professor and Head of Department of Household Economics 
(Sept. 1, 1938). 

B. S., University of Minnesota, 1916; M. A., University of Chicago, 1922; Ph.D., 
University of North Carolina, 1931. C 65. 

William Lindquist, Professor and Head of Department of Music (1925, 1927). 

B. Mus., Cosmopolitan School of Music and Dramatic Art, Chicago, 1925. M 33. 

Ellen Lindstrom, Instructor in Home Management, Division of College Ex- 
tension (1937). 

B. S., University of Nebraska, 1928; M. S., K. S. C, 1937. EA 304. 

Roger P. Link, Instructor in Veterinary Physiology (1935). 

D. V. M., Iowa State College, 1934; M. S., K. S. C, 1938. V 34. 

James Walton Linn, Associate Professor of Dairy Husbandry, Division of 
College Extension (1923, 1927). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1915. W. Ag 125. 

Beatrice M. Lins, Assistant Physician, Department of Student Health (1936) ; 
on leave 1938-1939. 

B. A., University of Wisconsin, 1924; M. D., ibid., 1927. A 58. 

Sarah Josephine Lister, Instructor in Child Welfare and Euthenics (1937; 
Sept. 1, 1938). 

A. B., University of Kansas, 1937. C 32B. 

Glenn Wesley Long, (Temporary) Instructor in Economics and Sociology 
(Sept. 1, 1938). 

A. B., Baker University, 1926. W. Ag 325B. 

Sam Long, Graduate Assistant in Chemistry (Sept. 1, 1938).. 

B. S. in Ch. E., K. S. C, 1937. X 29A. 

Lisle Leslie Longsdorf, Extension Editor and Radio Program Director, Di- 
vision of College Extension (1927). 

B. S., University of Wisconsin, 1925; M.S., ibid., 1926. A 4. 

Alvin Ernest Lowe, Assistant in Agronomy, Garden City Branch Agricul- 
tural Experiment Station (1937). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1933; M. S., ibid., 1935. Garden City, Kan. 

Morrison Lowenstein, Graduate Assistant in Dairv Husbandry (Sept. 1, 
1938). 

B. S., University of Nebraska, 1938. W. Ag 127. 

John Wallace Lumb, Professor of Veterinary Medicine, Division of College 
Extension (1924, 1937). 

D. V: M., K. S. C, 1910; M. S., ibid., 1930. V 32. 

Eva Lyman, (Temporary) Instructor in Physical Education for Women (Sept. 
1, 1938). 

B. S., Battle Creek College, 1925; M. A., State University of Iowa, 1930. N 3. 

Daniel Emmett Lynch, Assistant Professor of Forging (1914, 1920) ; Foreman 
of Blacksmith Shop (1914). S 41. 

Eric Ross Lyon, Associate Professor of Physics (1921, 1928). 

A. B., Phillips University, 1911; M. S., ibid., 1923. W. Ag 134. 

Waldo Hiram Lyons, Associate Professor of Mathematics (1924, 1926). 

A. B., University of Denver, 1912; A.M., ibid., 1916. S 52. 



32 Kansas State College 

Jessie McDowell Machir, Registrar (1913). A 29. 

Albert John Mack, Professor of Mechanical Engineering (1917, 1928). 

B. S., K. S. 0., 1912; M. E., ibid., 1921. E 109. 

Eugene Joseph Mackey, Instructor in Architecture (1937). 

B. Arch., Carnegie Institute of Technology, 1936. E 223. 

David Leslie Mackintosh, Associate Professor of Animal Husbandry (1921, 
1935). 

B. S., University of Minnesota, 1920; M. S., K. S. C, 1926. E. Ag 1. 

Dorothy Manchester, Instructor in Clothing and Textiles (Sept. 1, 1938). 

B. S., University of Washington, 1934; M. A., ibid., 1937. C 51A. 

Rachel Markwell, Instructor and District Home Demonstration Agent 
Leader (1929, 1937) ; on leave Oct. 19, 1938 to May 24, 1939. 

B. S., Oklahoma Agricultural and Mechanical College, 1926. EA 306B. 

Hubert Whatley Marlow, Assistant Professor of Chemistry (1925, 1932). 

B. S., North Texas Teachers College, 1925; M.S., University of Chicago, 1928; Ph.D., 
ibid., 1931. X 27. 

Rachel Martens, Instructor in Home Furnishings, Division of College Ex- 
tension (1936, 1937). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1936. EA 304. 

Max Rule Martin, Assistant Professor of Violin, Viola, and Reed Instruments 
(1929). 

Graduate in Violin, William A. Bunzen ; Graduate in Orchestra, Sander Harmati ; Grad- 
uate in Musical Composition, R. Cuscaden. N 76A. 

Willard Hungate Martin, Professor of Dairy Husbandry (1925, 1928). 

B. S., Purdue University, 1918; M.S., Pennsylvania State College, 1922. W. Ag 128C. 

Willmima Pearl Martin, Instructor in Home Health and Sanitation, Division 
of College Extension (1919). 

R. N., Christ's Hospital, Topeka. EA 304. 

James Warren Mather, Instructor in Agricultural Economics, Division of Col- 
lege Extension (1936). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1934; M. S., ibid., 1936. W. Ag 329. 

Charles Walton Matthews, Professor of English (1920, 1925); on sabbatic 
leave first semester, 1938-1939; on leave second semester, 1938-1939. 

B. S., Kansas State Teachers College, Pittsburg, 1918; A.M., University of Chicago, 
1923. K 55. 

Fred Walter Matting, (Temporary) Instructor in Mechanical Engineering 
(Oct. 19, 1938). 

B. S., University of California, 1937. E 109. 

George Willard Maxwell, Assistant Professor of Physics (1927, 1928). 

A. M., University of Michigan, 1920. W. Ag 134A. 

Nellie May, Postmistress (1911). A 44. 

Lorraine Maytum, Instructor in Physical Education for Women (1933) ; on 
sabbatic leave 1938-1939. 

B. S., University of Wisconsin, 1926. N 1. 

Thomas Mark McCalla, Instructor in Bacteriology (1937). 

B. S., Mississippi State College, 1934; M. A., University of Missouri, 1935; Ph.D., ibid., 
1937. V 28. 



Officers of Instruction 33 

Charles Wilbur McCampbell, Professor and Head of Department of Animal 
Husbandry (1910, 1918); Animal Husbandman, Agricultural Experiment 
Station (1910, 1918). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1906; D. V. M., ibid., 1910; B. S. in Agr., ibid., 1918. E. Ag 9A. 

George Reeves McCaulley, Assistant Professor of Structural Design (1937). 

B. S. in Arch. E., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1934; M.S., ibid., 1936. 

E 223. 

Max Elton McCluggage, 1 Agent, Bureau of Plant Industry, U. S. D. A.; Mill- 
ing Technologist, Agricultural Experiment Station (Dec. 1, 1937). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1935. E. Ag 102. 

Sterling McCollum, Instructor in Shop Practice (1930). g 34. 

Elizabeth McCracken, Assistant in Botany (Sept. 1, 1938). 

B. A., Welleslev College, 1929; M. A., ibid., 1932; Ph.D., University of California, 1937. 

D 52A. 

Clifford Dale McDonald, Sergt., D. E. M. L., U. S. A.; Instructor in Military 
Science and Tactics (1933). N 27. 

Maynard Lee McDowell, Instructor in Chemistry (1926). 

A. B., Central College, 1924; A.M., University of Missouri, 1926; Ph.D., State Uni- 
versity of Iowa, 1934. X 29A. 

Florence Elizabeth McKinney, Instructor in Household Economics (1937). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1934; M. S., Iowa State College, 1937. T 53. 

William Max MoLeod, Professor of Anatomy and Physiology (1919, 1933). 

D. V. M., Iowa State College, 1917. V 33. 

Eva Myrtle McMillan, Assistant Professor of Food Economics and Nutri- 
tion (1930, 1937); Assistant Dean of Division of Home Economics (1937); 
on leave Sept. 1, 1938, to June 30, 1939. 

Ph. B., University of Chicago, 1918; M.S., ibid., 1929. C 38. 

James Howard McMillen, Associate Professor of Physics (1937). 

A. B., Oberlin College, 1926; M.S., Washington University, 1928; Ph.D., ibid., 1930, 

W. Ag 237. 

Ella Jane Meiller, Instructor in Food Economics and Nutrition (1937). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1932; M.S., University of Wisconsin, 1937. C 28. 

Raymond Lamar Meisenheimer, Radio Operator, Division of College Exten- 
sion (1937). EA 104 and N 79. 

William Henry Meissinger, Instructor in Agricultural Economics, Division of 
College Extension (1934; March 15, 1938). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1931. Farm Bureau, Holton, Kan. 

Leo Edward Melchers, Professor and Head of Department of Botany and 
Plant- Pathology (1913, 1919); Plant Pathologist, Agricultural Experiment 
Station (1913). 

B. S., Ohio State University, 1912; M.S., ibid., 1913. D 57. 

Alice Maude Melton, Assistant to the Dean, Division of General Science 
(1900, 1919). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1898. A 47. 

Joseph Farrington Merrill, Assistant Chemist, Agricultural Experiment Sta- 
tion (1921). 

B. S., University of Maine, 1907. E. Ag 204A. 



1. In cooperation with the U. S. Department of Agriculture. 
3—6529 



34 Kansas State College 

William Harold Metzger, Associate Professor of Soils (1932, 1935); on sab- 
batic leave July 9 to Sept. 8, 1938. 

B. S., Purdue University, 1922; M. S., K. S. C, 1927; Ph.D., Ohio State University, 
1931. E. Ag 207A. 

Bernadine Helen Meyer, Instructor in Food Economics and Nutrition (1936). 

B. S. in Ed., University of Illinois, 1933; M.S., ibid., 1936. C 04. 

Edwin Cyrus Miller, Professor of Plant Physiology (1910, 1919). 

A. B., Lebanon College, 1906; A. B., Yale University, 1907; Ph. D., ibid., 1910. D 27. 

John Orville Miller, Instructor in Plant Pathology, Division of College Ex- 
tension (1935, 1936). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1934. A 3. 

Kenneth William Miller, 1 Research Assistant in Agricultural Economics, 
Agricultural Experiment Station (1936, 1937). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1936. W. Ag 327. 

Leonard Fred Miller, Instructor in Agricultural Economics (1936). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1936; M. S., ibid., 1938. W. Ag 328. 

Reba Clare Miller, Assistant to the Vice-President (1937). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1934. A 46. 

Catherine Beatrice Mitchell, Assistant in Animal Husbandry (1936). 

B. S., K. S. C., 1935. E Ag 9. 

Maurice Charles Moggie, Assistant Professor of Education (1933, 1937). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1929; M. S., ibid., 1931. G 27. 

Conrad Stephen Moll, Assistant Professor of Physical Education for Men 
(1929, 1937). 

Graduate, Concordia College, Fort Wayne, Ind., 1918; B. P. E., George Williams College, 
1925; M.S., K. S. C, 1933. N 31A. 

George Montgomery, Associate Professor of Agricultural Economics (1925; 
July 1, 1938). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1925; M.S., ibid., 1927. W. Ag 330B. 

Ruth Montgomery-Short, Assistant College Physician (Sept. 1, 1938). 

B. S., Washburn College, 1932 ; M. D., University of Kansas, 1937. A 59. 

Doris Leota Moon, Instructor in Piano (1937). 

B. Mus., Illinois Wesleyan University, 1937; M. Mus., ibid., 1938. N 76D. 

Fritz Moore, Professor and Head of Department of Modern Languages (1934). 

B. A., University of Akron, 1927; M. A., University of Illinois, 1930; Ph.D., ibid., 1932. 

A 75A. 

George Russell Moore, Instructor in Surgery and Medicine (Aug. 1, 1938). 

A. B., Central Michigan State Teachers College, 1928; D. V. M., Michigan State Col- 
lege, 1938. VH 53. 

Leo Albert Moore, Instructor in Shop Practice (1935, 1937). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1925. S 27. 

Charles Cleon Morrill, Associate Porfessor of Pathology (1935; July 1, 
1938). 

D. V. M., Michigan State College, 1933; M.S., ibid., 1935. V 57A. 

Maria Morris, Assistant Professor of Art (1925, 1932). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1911; Graduate, New York School of Fine and Applied Art, 1924; M. S., 
K. S. C, 1927. A 54. 

1. In cooperation with the U. S. Department of Agriculture. 



Officers of Instruction 35 

Marguerite Jane Morrison, (Temporary) Instructor in Institutional Manage- 
ment (Sept. 1, 1938). 

B. S., Ohio University, 1935; M. S., K. S. C, 1936. T 28. 

Reed Franklin Morse, Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering (1929, 1934). 

A. B., Cornell College, 1921; B. S., Iowa State College, 1923; M.S., K. S. C, 1933. 

E 220. 

Thirza Adaline Mossman, Assistant Professor of Mathematics (1922, 1926). 

A. B., University of Nebraska, 1916; A. M., University of Chicago, 1922. S 53. 

Jeptha Jerry Moxley, Assistant Professor of Animal Husbandry, Division of 
College Extension (1925, 1927). 

B.S., K. S. C, 1922. A 3. 

Clyde William Mullen, Associate Professor of Agronomy; Assistant to the 
Dean, Division of Agriculture; Assistant to the Director, Agricultural Ex- 
periment Station (1937). 

B. S., Oklahoma Agricultural and Mechanical College, 1915; M. S., K. S. C, 1917. 

E. Ag 105. 

Iva Manilla Mullen, Instructor in Food Economics and Nutrition (1936; 
Sept. 1, 1937). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1925 ; M. S., Iowa State College, 1928. C 64. 

Anna Neal Muller, Assistant Cataloguer in Library (1929; July 1, 1938). 
B. S., K. S. C, 1921; M. S. in L. S., University of Illionis, 1937. L 1. 

George Colin Munro, Assistant Professor of Mathematics (1937). 

B. S., Acadia University, 1927; Ph. D., University of Michigan, 1930. E 105. 

Frank Lewis Myers, Assistant to the Director of Physical Education (1926). 

B. Mus., K. S. C, 1925. N 35. 

Harold Edwin Myers, Associate Professor Soils (1929, 1937). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1928; M. S., University of Illinois, 1929; Ph. D., University of Missouri, 
1937. E. Ag 207. 

Robert Kirkland Nabours, Professor and Head of Department of Zoology 
(1910, 1913); Zoologist, Agricultural Experiment Station (1910, 1913); Cu- 
rator of Natural History Museum (1910). 

Ed. B., University of Chicago, 1905; Ph.D., ibid., 1911. F 29. 

Arthur Leslie Neal, Instructor in Chemistry (1937). 

B. S., Monmouth College, 1934; M. S., University of Illinois, 1935. A 74. 

Carl Leroy Nelson, Assistant Professor of Economics (1935); on leave Sept. 
1, 1938 to June 30, 1939. 

B. B. A., University of Minnesota, 1931. W. Ag 325B. 

Frank Eugene Nelson, Assistant Professor of Bacteriology (1937); Dairy 
Bacteriologist, Agricultural Experiment Station (1937). 

B. S., 'University of Minnesota, 1932; M.S., ibid., 1934; Ph.D., Iowa State College, 
1936. V 28. 

Margaret Alice Newcomb, Assistant Professor of Botany (1925, 1935). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1925; M. S., ibid., 1927. D 52A. 

Samuel Albert Nock, Vice-President of the College (1936). 

B. A., Haverford College, 1921; M. A., Carleton College, 1927; Ph.D., University of 
Tartu (Estonia), 1929. A 46B. 

Elva Lavina Norris, 5 Seed Analyst, Department of Agronomy (Dec. 1, 1938). 

A. B., Nebraska Wesleyan University, 1915; A. M., University of Wisconsin, 1924; Ph. D., 
University of Nebraska, 1938, E. Ag 307. 

5. In coopeiation with the Kansas State Board of Agriculture. 



36 Kansas State College 

Pauline Nutter, (Temporary) Assistant Professor of Food Economics and 
Nutrition (Sept. 1, 1938). 

B. S., State Teachers College, Kearney, Neb., 1932; M.S., University of Arizona, 1934; 
Ph. D., University of Rochester, 1938. C 43. 

Chester Winfield Ofelt, Research Fellow in Milling Industry (Sept. 1, 1938). 

B. S., University of Minnesota, 1932. E. Ag 111. 

Allen Leslie Olsen, Instructor in Chemistry (1935). 

B. A., St. Olaf College, 1929; M.S., University of Nebraska, 1931; Ph.D., ibid., 1934. 

XX 28. 

Maxine Josephine Osbourne, Graduate Assistant in Institutional Management 
(Jan. 1, 1939). 
B. S., K. S. C, 1935. VZ. 

Charles K. Otis, Instructor in Agricultural Engineering (1936). 

B. S. in Agr., University of Wisconsin, 1932; B. S. in M. E., University of Wisconsin, 
1933. E 217. 

Carol Lee Owsley, (Temporary) Assistant Loan Librarian (Sept. 1, 1938). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1932; Certificate in Library Science, Kansas State Teachers College, Em- 
poria, 1937. L 51. 

Clarice Marie Painter, Assistant Professor of Piano (1924). 

Diploma in Piano, Hardin College, 1919 ; Diploma, New England Conservatory of Music, 
1932. M 51. 

Reginald Henry Painter, Associate Professor of Entomology (1926, 1930). 

A. B., University of Texas, 1922; A.M., ibid., 1924; Ph.D., Ohio State University, 
1926. F 77. 

Jasper Earl Pallesen, 1 Junior Agricultural Statistician, U. S. D. A.; Agri- 
cultural Experiment Station (1937). 

B. S., University of Wyoming, 1932. W. Ag 208. 

Eunice Anderson Pardee, Assistant Professor of Home Management, Division 
of College Extension (1937; July 1, 1938). 

B. S., Michigan State College, 1929; M.S., ibid., 1936. EA 304. 

Harriet Shipley Parker, Assistant Professor of English (1924, 1927); on sab- 
batic leave 1938-1939. 

A. B., University of Kansas, 1909; A. M., Washington University, 1912. A 52. 

John Huntington Parker, 1 Professor of Crop Improvement (1917, 1921); 
Agronomist, U. S. D. A.; Plant Breeder, Agricultural Experiment Station 
(1917); on half-time leave Sept. 1, 1938, to Jan. 31, 1939; resigned Jan. 31, 
1939. 

B. S. in Agr., University of Minnesota, 1913; M.S., Cornell University, 1916; Ph.D., 
Cambridge University, 1928. E. Ag 304A. 

Ralph Langley Parker, Professor of Apiculture and Entomolog}' (1925, 1930) ; 
State Apiarist (1925); Associate Entomologist, Agricultural Experiment 
Station (1925, 1930). 

B. S., Rhode Island State College, 1915; Sc. M., Brown University, 1917; M.S., Iowa 
State College, 1922; Ph.D., Cornell University, 1925. F 82. 

Fred Louis Parrish, Professor of History and Government (1927, 1935). 

A. B., Northwestern University, 1917; B. D., Garrett Biblical Institute, 1920; A.M., 
Northwestern University, 1922 ; Ph. D., Yale University, 1938. F 61. 

Earl Foster Parsons, Research Fellow in Agricultural Economics (1937); re- 
signed August 31, 1938. 

B. S., K. S. C, 1938. W. Ag 329. 
1. In cooperation with the U. S. Department of Agriculture. 



Officers of Instruction 37 

Franklin Leonard Parsons, Assistant Professor of Agricultural Economics 
(1935). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1932; M. S., ibid., 1934. W. Ag 330B. 

Dan Partner, Assistant in Physical Education (Aug. 1, 1938). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1936. N 34. 

Buel Rorex Patterson, Instructor in Physical Education (1933, 1937). 

B. S., Oklahoma Agricultural and Mechanical College, 1934. N 32. 

Floyd Patttson, Professor of Mechanical Engineering, Department of Home 
Study, Division of College Extension (1919, 1927). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1912; M. S., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1929. A 5. 

George Richard Pauling, Superintendent of Maintenance, in Charge of Build- 
ings and Repairs, Custodian, and Heat and Power Departments (1913, 1925). 

PP 28. 

Loyal Frederick Payne, Professor and Head of Department of Poultry Hus- 
bandry (1921, 1922); Poultry Husbandman, Agricultural Experiment Sta- 
tion (1921, 1922). 

B. S., Oklahoma Agricultural and Mechanical College, 1912; M.S., K. S. C, 1925. 

W. Ag 227A. 

Clinton Ellicott Pearce, Professor and Head of Department of Machine De- 
sign (1917, 1922). 

S. B., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1913; M.S., Cornell University, 1937. 

E 210. 

Ruth Jeanette Peck, Instructor in Home Furnishings, Division of College 
Extension (1928, 1934); resigned Oct. 31, 1938. 

B. S., K. S. C, 1928. A 62A. 

Frederick Adams Peeiry, Instructor in English (1935). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1933; M. S., ibid., 1936. K 54. 

Theresa Peltier, Nurse, Department of Student Health (Sept. 1, 1938). 

R. N., Kansas City General Hospital, Kansas City, Missouri, 1937. CH. 

Marion Herfort Pelton, Assistant Professor of Piano (1928, 1931). 

B. Mus., University of Wisconsin, 1927; B. S., K. S. C, 1932; Graduate Study, Brussels 
Conservatory of Music. N 76E. 

Royce Owen Pence, Assistant Professor of Milling Industry (1927, 1935). 

B. S. in F. M. E., K. S. C, 1924; M. S., ibid., 1930; F. M. E., ibid., 1935. E. Ag 101. 

Alfred Thomas Perkins, Associate Professor of Chemistry (1925, 1933); Soil 
Chemist, Agricultural Experiment Station (1937). 

B. S., Pennsylvania State College, 1920; M. S., Rutgers College, 1922; Ph.D., ibid., 1923. 

E. Ag 204A. 

Milfred John Peters, Military Property Custodian, Department of Military 
Science and Tactics (1935). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1934. N 29. 

John Christian Peterson, Professor of Psychology (1917, 1926). 

A. B., University of Utah, 1913; Ph.D., University of Chicago, 1917. G 30. 

Maurice L. Peterson, 1 Research Assistant in Agronomy, Agricultural Experi- 
ment Station (July 1, 1938). 

B. S., University of Nebraska, 1938. E. Ag 206A. 

Walter John Peterson, Assistant Nutrition Chemist, Agricultural Experiment 
Station (1935, 1936). 

B. S., Michigan State College, 1930; M. S., ibid., 1933; Ph. D., State University of Iowa, 
1935. W. Ag 42. 



1. In cooperation with the U. S. Department of Agriculture. 



38 Kansas State College 

Dorothy Bradford Pettis, Associate Professor of Modern Languages (1927, 
1937) ; on sabbatic leave Sept. 1 to Dec. 31, 1938; on leave Jan. 1 to May 
31, 1939. 

A. B., University of Nebraska, 1919; A.M., ibid., 1924. A 70. 

Hazel Elizabeth Taylor Pfuetze, Secretary, Department of Education (1925). 

G 27. 

Lucile Phillips, Nurse, Department of Student Health (Sept. 1, 1938). 

R. N., Kansas City General Hospital, Kansas City, Mo., 1938. CH. 

Gerald Pickett, Associate Professor of Applied Mechanics (1929; Sept. 1, 
1938). 

B. S., Oklahoma Agricultural and Mechanical College, 1927; M. S., K. S. C, 1931; Ph. D., 
University of Michigan, 1938. E113. 

William Francis Pickett, Professor and Head of Department of Horticul- 
ture, (1917; July 1, 1938); Horticulturist, Agricultural Experiment Station 
(July 1, 1938). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1917; M.S., ibid., 1923; Ph.D., Michigan State College, 1935. 

D 33. 

Eugene H. Pietsch, Graduate Assistant in Machine Design (Sept. 1, 1938). 

B. S., University of Illinois, 1938. S 51. 

Frederick Van Loan Pindar, (Temporary) Editorial Assistant in Agricul- 
tural Experiment Station (July 1, 1938); resigned Dec. 31, 1938. 

B. A., Princeton University, 1933. E. Ag 105A. 

Wilfred Harold Pine, Assistant Professor of Agricultural Economics (1934; 
July 1, 1938) ; on leave Oct. 1, 1938, to June 30, 1939. 

B. S., K. S. C, 1934; M. S., ibid., 1938. W. Ag 328. 

Clarence Andrew Pippin, Instructor in Mechanical Engineering (1937). 

B. S., University of Illinois, 1936. E 232. 

Martha S. Pittman, Professor and Head of Department of Food Economics 
and Nutrition (1919, 1922). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1906; B. S., Columbia University, 1916; A. M., ibid., 1918; Ph. D. Uni- 
versity of Chicago, 1930. C 39. 

Glare Robert Porter, Assistant in Agronomy, South Central Kansas Experi- 
ment Fields (1937; Jan. 16, 1938). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1937. Goddard, Kan. 

Clarence Osborn Price, Assistant to the President (1920). a 30. 

Imogene Price, Assistant in Institutional Management (1937). 

A. B., Park College, 1932; B. S. in Ed., Central Missouri State Teachers College, 1934. 

T 51B. 

Ralph Ray Price, Professor and Head of Department of History and Govern- 
ment (1903). 

A. B., Baker University, 1896; A.M., University of Kansas, 1898. F 56. 

William Morrow Proudfit, Graduate Assistant in Chemistry (Sept. 1, 1938). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1938. X 29A. 

Robert Emmett Pyle, (Temporary) Instructor in Modern Languages (Sept. 
1, 1938). 

A. B., University of Kansas, 1938. A 70. 

Leon Reed Quinlan, Professor of Horticulture, in Charge of Landscape Gar- 
dening (1927, 1931). 

B. S., Colorado Agricultural College, 1920; M. L. A., Harvard University, 1925. 

D 8. 



Officers of Instruction 39 

George Ellsworth Raburn, Professor of Physics (1910, 1920); on leave 1938- 
1939. 

A. B., University of Michigan, 1907; M.S., ibid., 1913. W. Ag 225. 

Margaret Elizabeth Raffington, Assistant Professor of Child Welfare and 
Euthenics (July 1, 1938). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1924; M.S., ibid., 1928. C 37. 

Glen Bradshaw Railsback, Instructor in Agricultural Economics, Division of 
College Extension (1933, 1935). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1925. Farm Bureau, Clay Center, Kan. 

Robert Rawhouser, (Temporary) Instructor in Mathematics (Sept. 1, 1938). 

B. S., Lebanon Valley College, 1932. S 52. 

George Nathan Reed, Instructor in Chemistry (1929). 

B. S., Oklahoma Agricultural and Mechanical College, 1922; M.S., University of Okla- 
homa, 1924; Ph.D., K. S. C, 1938. XX 27A. 

Lawrence Reed, Assistant to the Superintendent, Fort Hays Branch Agricul- 
tural Experiment Station (1934). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1933. Hays, Kan. 

Roger Eli Regnier, Instructor in Junior Extension ; Assistant State Club 
Leader, Division of College Extension (1934, 1937). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1924; M.S., ibid., 1932. A 35A. 

Louis Powers Reitz, Associate Professor of Agronomy (Feb. 1, 1939). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1930; M. S., University of Nebraska, 1937. E. Ag 304A. 

Benjamin Luce Remick, Professor of Mathematics (1900); Head of Depart- 
ment of Mathematics, 1900-1937. 

Ph. B., Cornell College, 1889; Ph. M., ibid., 1892. S 54. 

Ada Rice, Professor of English (1899, 1927). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1895; M. S., ibid., 1912. - A 51A. 

Clarence Rice, Graduate Research Fellow in Animal Husbandry (August 22, 
1938). 

B. A., Kalamazoo College, 1938. E. Ag 58. 

M. Vesta Richmond, Assistant to the Dean, Division of Extension (1936). 

A 33. 

William Hugh Riddell, Associate Professor of Dairy Husbandry (1929, 1931). 

B. S. A., University of British Columbia, 1922; M.S., University of Minnesota, 1924; 
Ph. D., ibid., 1932. W. Ag 125. 

Jules Henry Robert, Professor of Applied Mechanics and Hydraulics (1916, 
1925) ; Acting Head of Department of Applied Mechanics second semester, 
1938-1939 and first semester, 1939-1940. 

B. S., University of Illinois, 1914. E 113. 

June Roberts, Instructor in Agricultural Engineering (1934, 1935). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1933; M.S., ibid., 1934. E 216. 

Mary Eilleen Roberts, Documents Cataloguer in Library (Sept. 1, 1938). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1930; B.S.inL.S, University of Illinois, 1938. L 26. 

Stephen J. Roberts, Instructor in Surgery and Medicine (July 1, 1938). 

D. V. M., Cornell University, 1938. VH 52. 

Mott Luther Robinson, Assistant Professor of Agricultural Extension, Dis- 
trict Supervisor (Wheat), Division of College Extension (1923, 1934). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1923; M.S., ibid., 1938. EA 201. 



40 Kansas State College 

Noble Warren Rockey, Professor of English (1921). 

AB., Ohio State University, 1905; A.M., ibid., 1916. K 52. 

Lee Miles Roderick, Professor and Head of Department of Pathology (1938). 

D. V. M., Ohio State University, 1915; M. S., North Dakota State College, 1922; Ph. D., 
University of Chicago, 1926. V 60 

Charles Elkins Rogers, Professor and Head of Department of Industrial 
Journalism and Printing (1919, 1926). 

A. B., University of Oklahoma, 1914; M.S., K. S. C, 1926; A.M., Stanford University, 
1932. K28. 

Frank Pletcher Root, Assistant Professor of Physical Education and Athletics 
(1924). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1914; M. S., ibid., 1924. N 34. 

Vance Mather Rucker, 6 Assistant Professor of Agricultural Economics, Divi- 
sion of College Extension (1928, 1930). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1928; M.S., ibid., 1937. A3. 

Lucile Osborn Rust, Professor of Home Economics Education (1924, 1929). 

B. S., Kansas State Teachers College, Pittsburg, 1921; M. S., K. S. C, 1925. G 28. 

Olga Barbara Saffry, (Temporary) Instructor in Food Economics and Nutri- 
tion (1937; Sept. 1, 1938.) 

B. S., K. S. C, 1928; M.S., ibid., 1937. C 7. 

Adelbert Bower Sageser, (Temporary) Professor of History and Government 
(Sept. 1, 1938). 

A. B„ State Teachers College, Wayne, Neb., 1925; M. A., University of Nebraska, 1930; 
Ph. D., ibid., 1934. F 59. 

Helen G. Saum, Professor of Physical Education for Women (1928, 1931). 

Diploma, Battle Creek School for Physical Education, 1919; B. S. in Ed., Ohio State Uni- 
versity, 1927 ; M. A., Columbia University, 1935. N 3. 

Edwin Donald Sayre, Associate Professor of Voice (1925, 1934). 

A. B., Depauw University, 1923; B. Mus., School of Music, ibid., 1925; A. M., Columbia 
University, 1931. N 76C. 

Jesse McKinley Schall, Associate Professor of English, Department of Home 
Study, Division of College Extension (1930; July 1, 1937). 

A. B., Southeast Missouri State Teachers College, 1927 ; A. M., University of Missouri, 
1930. A 5. 

Jean Willard Scheel, Assistant Extension Editor, Division of College Exten- 
sion (1934, 1935). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1934. A 4. 

Milton Otto Schmidt, Instructor in Civil Engineering (Sept. 1, 1938) ; resigned 
Feb. 15, 1939. 

B. S., University of Wisconsin, 1938. E 220. 

Charles Henry Scholer, 2 Professor and Head of Department of Applied Me- 
chanics (1920, 1922); Materials Testing Engineer, Engineering Experiment 
Station (1920); on leave Feb. 1, 1939, to Jan. 31, 1940. 

B. S., K. S. C, 1914. E 112. 

William George Schrenk, Instructor in Chemistry (Sept. 1, 1938). 

A. B., Western Union College, 1932; M.S., K. S. C, 1936. X 29A. 

Luke Michael Schruben, Instructor in Agricultural Economics, Division of 
College Extension (1933, 1935). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1933. EA 307. 

2. In cooperation with the Kansas State Highway Department. 
6. In cooperation with the Federal Crop Insurance Corporation. 



Officers of Instruction 41 

E. Robert Schwartz, Assistant Physician, Department of Student Health 
(1938; July 1, 1938). 

B. S., University of Minnesota, 1936; M. B., ibid., 1936; M. D., ibid., 1937. A 64. 

Louise Schwensen, Secretary to the Dean, Division of Engineering (1915, 
1918). E lis. 

Harold Martin Scott, Associate Professor of Poultry Husbandry (1928, 1931). 

B. S., Oregon Agricultural College, 1924; M. S., K. S. C, 1927; Ph. D., University of 
Illinois, 1938. W. Ag 230. 

Myra Edna Scott, Assistant Professor of English (1928, 1937). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1921; A. M., Stanford University, 1928. A 53. 

Dwight M. Seath, Assistant Professor of Dairy Husbandry, Division of Col- 
lege Extension (1930). 

B. S., Iowa State College, 1926; M. S., K. S. C, 1930. W. Ag 125. 

Martine A. Seaton, Assistant Professor of Poultry Husbandry, Division of 
College Extension (1928). 

B. S. in Agr., University of Missouri, 1924. A 3. 

Roy Andrew Seaton, Dean of Division of Engineering (1904, 1920); Director 
of the Engineering Experiment Station (1904, 1920). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1904; M. S., ibid., 1910; S. B., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 
1911. E 115. 

Gabe Alfred Sellers, Professor of Metallurgy and Metallography (1919, 1928). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1917; M. S., ibid., 1929. S 30. 

Harner Selvidge, Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering (1938). 

S. B., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1932; S. M., ibid., 1933; M. S., Harvard 
University, 1934; D. Sc, ibid., 1937. E 19. 

Fred Albert Shannon, Professor of History and Government (1926, 1934) ; on 
leave 1938-1939. 

A. B., Indiana State Teachers College, 1914; A. M., Indiana University, 1918; Ph. D., 
State University of Iowa, 1924. F 59. 

John Henry Shenk, Assistant Professor of Chemistry, (1929, 1936). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1929; M. S., ibid., 1931; Ph. D., University of Illinois, 1936. 

XX 3C. 

Christiana Marie Shields, 4 Assistant in Education (1931, 1937). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1929. Capitol, Topeka, Kan. 

Raymon Shobe, (Temporary) Instructor in Mathematics (Sept. 1, 1938). 

B. S., Kansas State Teachers College, Emporia, 1936. E 105. 

Clara Magdalene Siem, Financial Secretary, Division of College Extension 
(1920, 1924). A 34. 

Daniel T. Sigley, Assistant Professor of Mathematics (Sept. 1, 1938). 

A. B.; University of Kansas, 1927; A.M., ibid., 1928; Ph.D., University of Illinois, 
1932. S 52. 

Earl LeRoy Sitz, Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering (1927, 1935). 

B. S. in E. E., Iowa State College, 1927; M. S., K. S. C, 1932. E 24. 

Laurence Nelson Skold, 1 Research Assistant in Agronomy, Agricultural Ex- 
periment Station (July 1, 1938). 
B. S., Colorado Agricultural College, 1938. E - A S 301. 

1. In cooperation with the U. S. Department of Agriculture. 

4. In cooperation with the State Board for Vocational Education. 



42 Kansas State College 

Beirniece Sloan, Graduate Research Assistant in Household Economics (Sept. 
1, 1938). 

B. S., K. S. C., 1928. T 53. 

Leland Milton Sloan, Superintendent, Garden City Branch Agricultural Ex- 
periment Station (July 1, 1938). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1932. Garden City, Kan. 

Robert Fred Sloan, Assistant in Pasture Improvement (July 1, 1938). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1938. E. Ag 206A. 

Arthur Bourne Smith, College Librarian (1911). 

Ph. B., Wesleyan University, 1900; B. L. S., University of Illinois, 1902. L 31. 

Lloyd Francis Smith, Associate Professor of Forestry (1935) ; State Forester 
(1936). 

A. B., University of Kansas, 1930; M. F., Yale University, 1932; Ph.D., ibid., 1938. 

D 34. 

Mabel Rachel Smith, Instructor in Junior Extension; Assistant State Club 
Leader, Division of College Extension (1929, 1931). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1926. A 35A. 

Roger Cletus Smith, Professor of Entomology (1920, 1926); Associate Ento- 
mologist, Agricultural Experiment Station (1926). 

A. B., Miami University, 1911; A.M., Ohio State University, 1915; Ph.D., Cornell 
University, 1917. F 54. 

Benjamin Levi Smits, Assistant Professor of Chemistry and Associate Food 
Chemist (1926, 1932). 

B. S., Michigan State College, 1924; M. S., ibid., 1925; Ph. D., ibid., 1926. X 29. 

Georgiana Smurthwaite, Professor and State Home Demonstration Leader, 
Division of College Extension (1924, 1937). 

B. S., Utah Agricultural College, 1911; M. S., K. S. C, 1931. EA 306A. 

Floyd Alonzo Smutz, Professor of Engineering Drawing and Descriptive 
Geometry (1918, 1934). 

B. S. in Arch., K. S. C, 1914. E 210. 

Raymond Sollenberger, Graduate Research Assistant in Applied Mechanics 
(July 1, 1938). 

B. S., K. S. C, 19S8. E 112. 

Arthur Bradley Sperry, Professor of Geology (1921, 1927). 

B. S., University of Chicago, 1919 F 3A. 

Mary Ashman Stalder, Instructor in Art (1936). 

A. B., Ohio University, 1929; M. A., ibid., 1931. A 68B. 

Florence Margaret Stebbins, Research Assistant in Genetics, Department of 
Zoology (1931). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1923; M. S., ibid., 1928. Insectary. 

Elizabeth A. Stewart, (Temporary) Instructor in Food Economics and Nutri- 
tion (1937; Sept. 1, 1938). 

A. B., Southwestern College, 1922; M. A., Columbia University, 1924. C 7. 

Harry Martin Stewart, Associate Professor of Accounting (1926, 1934). 

A. B., University of Kansas, 1920; M. B. A., ibid., 1926. W. Ag 327. 

Thomas Bruce Stinson, Superintendent, Tribune Branch Agricultural Experi- 
ment Station (1924). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1924. Tribune, Kan. 
Eva Stotts, (Temporary) Instructor in Clothing and Textiles (Feb. 13, 1939). 

B. S., University of Nebraska, 1930; M. A., ibid., 1937. C 51A. 



Officers of Instruction 43 

Harold Earl Stover, Instructor in Rural Engineering, Division of College Ex- 
tension (1936). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1929. E 131. 

Marie Jeanette Stover, (Temporary) Assistant Reference Librarian (Sept. 1, 
1938). 

B. S., Kansas State Teachers College, Emporia, 1938. L 51. 

Charles William Stratton,- Assistant Professor of Piano (1927, 1930). 

B. Mus., K. S. C, 1926; M. S., ibid., 1933. M 55. 

William Timothy Stratton, Professor and Head of Department of Mathe- 
matics (1910, 1937). 

A. B., Indiana University, 1906; A. M., ibid., 1913; Ph. D., University of Washington, 
1931. S 54. 

Vivan Lewis Strickland, Professor of Education (1917, 1922). 

A. B., University of Nebraska, 1906; A. M., ibid., 1915; Ph. D., ibid, 1925. G 28. 

Lillian Laura Strnad, Head Hospital Nurse (1937; Sept. 1, 1938). 

R. N., Halstead (Kan.) Hospital, 1934. CH. 

Anna Marie Sturmer, Associate Professor of English (1920, 1926). 

A. B., University of Nebraska, 1917; A. M., ibid., 1920. A 69. 

Milo J. Stutzman, Assistant Professor of Metallurgy and Metallography (1934, 
1936) 

A. B., McPherson College, 1920; M. S., University of Nebraska, 1922; Ph. D., Iowa State 
College, 1927. S 30. /^ V 

Francis Joseph Sullivan, Instructor in Machine Design (1938). 

B. S. in M. E., Harvard University, 1936. S 5/.^ 

Harrison Boyd Summers, Professor of Public Speaking (1923, 1930). 

A. B., Fairmount College, Wichita University, 1917; A. M., University of Oklahoma, lv^| ; 
Ph. D., University of Missouri, 1931. . G 5 A 

Arthur Frithiof Swanson, 1 Associate Agronomist, Division of Cereal Cro 
and Diseases, U. S. D. A.; in charge of Cereal Investigations, Fort Hays 
Branch Agricultural Experiment Station (1919). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1919; M. S., University of Minnesota, 1923. Hays, Kan. 

Charles Oscar Swanson, Professor and Head of Department of Milling Indus- 
try (1906, 1923). 

A. B., Carleton College, 1899; M. Agr., University of Minnesota, 1905; Ph. D., Cornell 
University, 1922. E. Ag 110. 

Lillian Juliette Swenson, Assistant Reference Librarian (1927) ; on sabbatic 
leave Sept. 1, 1938, to June 30, 1939. 

A. B., Colorado College, 1924; B. S., Simmons College, 1927. L 51. 

Martha Elizabeth Swoyer, 4 Assistant in Education (1936, 1937). 

A. B.,. Southwestern College, 1929; M. S., K. S. C, 1937. T 51B. 

William Augustus Tanner, Graduate Assistant in Bacteriology (1937, 1938). 

B. S., University of Illinois, 1938. V 54. 

Delos Clifton Taylor, Instructor in Applied Mechanics (1931). 

B. S. in C. E., K. S. C, 1925; M. S., ibid., 1937. E 14. 

Earl Hicks Teagarden, Assistant Professor of Agricultural Extension, District 
Agent, Division of College Extension (1929, 1934). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1920. A 60. 

1. In cooperation with the U. S. Department of Agriculture. 

4. In cooperation with the State Board for Vocational Education. 




44 Kansas State College 

Charles Ray Thompson, Associate Professor of Economics (1929, 1937). 

A. B., University of Kansas, 1927; A.M., ibid., 1928. W. Ag 327. 

Frank James Thompson, Instructor in Physical Education (1937). 

B. Ed., Minnesota State Teachers College, Mankato, 1934; B. S., Springfield College, 1935; 
M. Ed., ibid., 1936. N 35. 

Hazel E. Thompson, 4 State Supervisor of Vocational Homemaking (1925). 

B. S., Kansas State Teachers College, Pittsburg, 1919; M. S., K. S. C, 1927. 

Capitol, Topeka, Kan. 

Walter W. Thompson, Assistant Professor of Pathology (1936, 1937). 

D. V. M., Michigan State College, 1929. VH 51B. 

William T. Thomson, Instructor in Applied Mechanics (1937). 

B. S., University of California, 1933; M. S., ibid., 1934; Ph. D., ibid., 1938. 

E 135. 

Ray Iams Throckmorton, Professor and Head of Department of Agronomy 
(1911, 1925); Agronomist, Agricultural Experiment Station (1911, 1925). 

B. S. in Agr., Pennsylvania State College, 1911; M. S.,'K. S. C, 1922. E. Ag 206B. 

Francis Leonard Timmons, 1 Agent, Bureau of Plant Industry, U. S. D. A.; in 
charge of Bindweed Control Investigations, Fort Hays Branch Agricultural 
Experiment Station (1928, 1935). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1928; M. S., ibid., 1932. Hays, Kan. 

Sue Townsend, Instructor in Modern Languages (1934). 

B. S., Kansas State Teachers College, Emporia, 1923; M. A., University of Colorado, 1927. 

A 70. 

Wilson Tripp, Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering (1936; Sept. 1, 
1938). 

B. S., University of California, 1930; M.S., ibid., 1933. E 232. 

William Chilton Troutman, Assistant Professor of Public Speaking (1937). 

A. B., University of Illinois, 1917; M. A., ibid., 1918. G 55. 

Alonzo Franklin Turner, 1 Associate Professor, Field Agent, Division of Col- 
lege Extension (1917, 1920). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1905. EA. 

Marvin John Twiehaus, Instructor in Bacteriology (1937). 

D. V. M., K. S. C, 1936. V 53. 

Grace Ellen Umberger, Head Nurse, Department of Student Health (1919). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1905; R. N., Illinois Training School for Nurses, 1909. A 64. 

Harry John Charles Umberger, Dean and Director, Division of College Ex- 
tension (1911, 1919). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1905. A 33. 

Gladys Ellen Vail, Associate Professor of Food Economics and Nutrition 
(1927; Sept. 1, 1938). 

A. B., Southwestern College, 1924; M.S., University of Chicago, 1927. C 43. 

William Alexander Van Winkle, Associate Professor of Chemistry (1922, 
1931). 

B. S., University of Michigan, 1911; M.S., University of Illinois, 1917; Ph.D., ibid., 
1920. XX 28. 

Mary Pierce Van Zile, Dean of Women (1908); Professor of Domestic Sci- 
ence, 1908-1918; Dean of the Division of Home Economics, 1912-1918. 

Diploma, Iowa State College, 1904; B. S., K. S. C, 1929. A 42. 

1. In cooperation with the U. S. Department of Agriculture. 

4. In cooperation with the State Board for Vocational Education. 



Officers of Instruction 45 

Richard George Vogel, (Temporal) Instructor in Economics (1937); re- 
signed August 31, 1938. 

B. S., K. S. C, 1931. W. Ag 327. 

Robert Phillip Wagers, Instructor in Anatomy and Physiology (Sept. 1, 1937). 

D. V. M., Ohio State University, 1936; M.S., ibid., 1937. V 33. 

George B. Wagner, 3 Assistant Entomologist, Bureau of Entomology and Plant 
Quarantine, U. S. D. A.; Investigator of Stored Grain and Flour Mill In- 
sects (1934). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1928; M.S., ibid., 1929. U. S. Lab., 1204 Fremont. 

Elizabeth Daniel Walbert, Graduate Assistant in Household Economics 
(Sept. 1, 1938). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1935. T 53. 

Herbert Halden Walkden, 3 Assistant Entomologist, Bureau of Entomology 
and Plant Quarantine, U. S. D. A.; Investigator of Staple Crop Insects 
(1934). 

B. S., Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1916. U. S. Lab., 1204 Fremont. 

Carroll Kramer Ward, Instructor in Economics and Sociology (1935) ; on 
leave Sept. 1, 1938 to May 31, 1939. 
B. S., University of Kansas, 1930; M. B. A., ibid., 1937. W. Ag 327. 

Walter Gilling Ward, Professor in Charge of Rural Engineering, Division of 
College Extension (1920, 1925). 

B. S. in Arch., K. S. C, 1912; Architect, ibid., 1922; M.S., Iowa State College, 1931. 

E 131 

Joseph Thomas Ware, Assistant Professor of Architecture (1929, 1935); on 
leave Feb. 1, 1939, to Jan. 31, 1940. 

B. S., Georgia School of Technology, 1929. E 223. 

Eugene D. Warner, Instructor in Rural Architecture, Division' of College Ex- 
tension (1935, 1937). 

B. S. in Arch., K. S. C, 1934. E 131. 

Don Cameron Warren, Professor of Poultry Husbandry (1923, 1929). 

A. B., Indiana University, 1914; A.M., ibid., 1917; Ph.D., Columbia University, 1923. 

W. Ag 229. 

Ellen Grace Warren, Assistant Extension Editor, Division of College Ex- 
tension (1936). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1933. EA 104. 

Louis Pierce Washburn, Professor of Physical Education for Men (1926, 
1931). 

B. S., Carleton College, 1907; B. P. E., Springfield Y. M. C. A. College, 1911; M. P. E., 
ibid., 1926. N 35. 

Arthur- D. Weber, Professor of Animal Husbandry (1931). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1922; M. S., ibid., 1926. E. Ag 13. 

Norman Coates Webster, Instructor in Public Speaking (1937). 

B. O., Geneva College, 1927; A. B., ibid., 1928. G 55. 

Paul Weigel, Professor and Head of Department of Architecture (1921, 1924). 

B. Arch., Cornell University, 1912; Architect, University of State of New York, 1920; 
Graduate, Buffalo Normal School, 1921. E 305. 

George H. Wellington, Graduate Research Assistant in Animal Husbandry 
(Sept. 1, 1938). 

B. S., Michigan State College, 1937. Meats Lab. 

3. In cooperation with the Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station. 



46 Kansas State College 

Leon Elbert Wenger, 1 Agent, Bureau of Plant Industry, U. S. D. A.; Forage 
Crops Specialist, Fort Hays Branch Agricultural Experiment Station (1936; 
March 1, 1937). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1936. Hays, Kan. 

Bessie Brooks West, Professor and Head of Department of Institutional 
Management (1928); Manager of Cafeteria (1928); on sabbatic leave Sept. 
1, 1938, to June 30, 1939. 

A. B., University of California, 1924; A.M., ibid., 1928. T 52. 

Alfred Everett White, Professor of Mathematics (1909, 1918). 

B. S., Purdue University, 1904; M.S., ibid., 1909. A 72. 

Hattie Helen White, Secretary and Treasurer, Business Office (1912, 1925). 

A 27. 

Hugh Erwin White, Graduate Research Assistant in Agricultural Engineer- 
ing (Sept. 1, 1938). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1929. E 217. 

Leon Vincent White, Associate Professor of Civil Engineering (1918, 1927). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1903; C. E., ibid., 1918; M. S., ibid., 1927. E 122. 

John Hendrick Whitlock, Assistant Professor of Pathology (1934; July 1, 
1938). 

D. V. M., Iowa State College, 1934; M. S., K. S. C, 1935. V 36. 

Carrell Henry Whitnah, Assistant Professor of Chemistry (1929); Dairy 
Chemist, Agricultural Experiment Station (1929, 1937). 

A. B., University of Nebraska, 1913; M.S., University of Chicago, 1917; Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Nebraska, 1925. W. Ag 42. 

Henry Evert Wichers, Associate Professor of Rural Architecture (1924, 1934). 

B. S. in Arch., K. S. C, 1924; M.S., ibid., 1925; Architect, ibid., 1930. E 224. 

Mary Christine Wiggins, Instructor in Clothing and Textiles, Division of 
College Extension (1931, 1934). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1929. A 62A. 

Donald Alden Wilbur, Assistant Professor of Entomology (1928). 

B. S., Oregon State College, 1925; A.M., Ohio State University, 1927. F 83. 

Julius Terrass Willard, College Historian (1883, 1936); Vice-president, 1918- 
Dec. 31, 1935; Dean, Division of General Science, 1909-1930; Professor of 
Chemistry, 1901-1918. 

B. S., K. S. C, 1883; M. S., ibid., 1886; Sc. D., ibid., 1908. A 32. 

Cyrus Vance Williams, Professor of Vocational Education (1920). 

B. Ed., State Teachers College, Peru, Nebr., 1909; A. M., University of Nebraska, 1910; 
B. S. in Agr. ibid., 1919; Ph. D., ibid., 1925. G 28. 

Dwight Williams, Associate Professor of History and Government (1926). 

A. B., University of Minnesota, 1916; LL. B., ibid., 1918; A. M., ibid., 1926. F 60. 

Harvey O. Williams, Staff Sergt., D. E. M. L., U. S. A.; Instructor in Military 
Science and Tactics (1932). N 27. 

Jennie Williams, Assistant Professor of Child Welfare and Euthenics (1932, 
1937). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1910; R. N., University of Michigan Hospital, 1924; M. S., K. S. C, 
1933. C 63. 

Louis Coleman Williams, Professor of Horticulture (1915, 1926) ; Assistant 
Dean and Assistant Director, Division of College Extension (1937). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1912; B. S., ibid., 1922. A 4. 

1. In cooperation with the U. S. Department of Agriculture. 



Officers of Instruction 47 

Stanley L. Williamson, Associate Professor of Physical Education (1935; Dec. 
1, 1938). 

B. S. in Ed., University of Southern California, 1932. N 35. 

Luther Earl Willoughby, 1 Associate Professor of Farm Crops, Division of 
College Extension (1917, 1926). 
B. S., K. S. C, 1912; B. S. in Agr., ibid., 1916. A 4. 

Charles Peairs Wilson, Instructor in Agricultural Economics (1938; March 
1, 1938). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1938. W. Ag 330. 

Mannie Ray Wilson, Associate Professor of Shop Practice (1936). 

B. S. in E. E., K. S. C, 1925. S 37. 

Roy Elmer Wilson, Staff Sergt., D. E. M. L., U. S. A.; Instructor in Military 
Science and Tactics (1921). N 27. 

Edward Joseph Wimmer, Associate Professor of Zoology (1928, 1937). 

A. B., University of Wisconsin, 1925; A. M., ibid., 1927; Ph. D., ibid., 1928. F 38. 

Temple Fay Winburn, 3 Junior Entomologist, Bureau of Entomology and 
Plant Quarantine, U S. D. A.; Investigator of Stored Grain and Flour-mill 
Insects (1938). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1929; M. S., ibid., 1931. U. S. Lab., 1204 Fremont. 

Joe Nate Wood, Instructor in Machine Design (1936). 

B. S. in E. E., State University of Iowa, 1936. E 209. 

LeVelle Wood, Assistant Professor of Institutional Management (1928). 

B. S., Oregon State College, 1921; M.S., Columbia University, 1928. VZ. 

Earl Booth Working, Associate Professor of Milling Industry (1923). 

A. B., University of Denver, 1917; A. M., ibid., 1919; Ph. D., University of Arizona, 
1922. - E. Ag 111. 

Bernie William Wright, Assistant Professor of Agricultural Economics, 
Division of College Extension (1929, 1934) ; resigned Oct, 16, 1938. 

B. S., K. S. C, 1924. A 3. 

Gladys Wyckoff, 4 Instructor in Education (1935). 

B. S., Central Missouri State Teachers College, 1920; M. A., University of Missouri, 1928. 

Capitol, Topeka, Kan. 

Florence E. Young, Instructor in Physical Education for Women (1937). 

B. S., University of Wisconsin, 1937. N 4. 

James Walter Zahnley 5 , Associate Professor of Farm Crops (1915, 1921). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1909; M. S., ibid., 1926. E. Ag 308. 

Myrtle Evelyn Zener, Secretary to the Vice-President (1918). a 46. 

COUNTY AGRICULTURAL AGENTS 1 

Walter Abmeyer, Franklin County Agricultural Agent, Division of College 
Extension (1938; Oct. 1, 1938); resigned Oct. 31, 1938. 

B. S., K. S. C, 1938. Ottawa, Kan. 

Henry Joseph Adams, Republic County Agricultural Agent, Division of Col- 
lege Extension (1934). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1917. Belleville, Kan. 

1. In cooperation with the U. S. Department of Agriculture. 

3. In cooperation with the Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station. 

4. In cooperation with the State Board for Vocational Education. 

5. In cooperation with the Kansas State Board of Agriculture. 



48 Kansas State College 

Dale Allen, Assistant County Agricultural Agent, Division of College Exten- 
sion (1935), 

B. S., K. S. C, 1922. Council Grove, Kan. 

William R. Allen, Assistant County Agricultural Agent, Division of College 
Extension (June 1, 1938) ; resigned Oct. 25, 1938. 

B. S., K. S. C, 1938. Manhattan, Kan. 

Samuel Edward Alsop, Haskell County Agricultural Agent, Division of College 
Extension (1937, 1938). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1935. Sublette, Kan. 

Milburne Clinton Axelton, Jackson County Agricultural Agent, Division of 
College Extension (1929, 1935). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1928. Holton, Kan. 

Kimball Lincoln Backus, Wyandotte County Agricultural Agent, Division of 
College Extension (1932). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1931. Kansas City, Kan. 

Clarence E. Bartlett, Jewell County Agricultural Agent, Division of College 
Extension (1937). 

B. S., University of Nebraska, 1929. Mankato, Kan. 

R. E. Bausman, Assistant County Agricultural Agent, Division of College Ex- 
tension (1935). Parsons, Kan. 

Deane Redmond Bell, Assistant County Agricultural Agent, Division of Col- 
lege Extension (Dec. 1, 1938). Leavenworth, Kan. 

Herman Albert Biskie, Franklin County Agricultural Agent, Division of Col- 
lege Extension (1928); on indefinite leave Oct. 1, 1938. 

B. S., University of Nebraska, 1917. Ottawa, Kan. 

Harold Andrew Borgelt, Edwards County Agricultural Agent, Division of 
College Extension (1937; 1937). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1937. Kinsley, Kan. 

John Robson Brainard, Jr., Assistant County Agricultural Agent, Division of 
College Extension (Jan. 1, 1939). Dodge City, Kan. 

Lee Justin Brewer, Greeley County Agricultural Agent, Division of College 
Extension (1935, 1936). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1935. Tribune, Kan. 

Frank L. Brooks, Jr., Assistant County Agricultural Agent, Division of Col- 
lege Extension (Aug. 1, 1938). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1938. Hoxie, Kan. 

Albert Brown, Bourbon County Agricultural Agent, Division of College Ex- 
tension (1934) ; resigned Jan. 7, 1939. 

B. S., K. S. C, 1929. Fort Scott, Kan. 

Gerald James Brown, Hamilton County Agricultural Agent, Division of Col- 
lege Extension (1936, 1937). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1936. Syracuse, Kan. 

Frank Sherman Burson, Chase County Agricultural Agent, Division of Col- 
lege Extension (1935, 1936). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1934. Cottonwood Falls, Kan. 

Jewell C. Campbell, Assistant County Agricultural Agent, Division of College 
Extension (Oct. 10, 1938). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1938. Seneca, Kan. 



Officers of Instruction 49 

Richard Henry Campbell, Assistant County Agricultural Agent, Division of 
College Extension (1935). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1935. Oskaloosa, Kan. 

Sylvester Ulric Case, Crawford County Agricultural Agent, Division of Col- 
lege Extension (1934). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1923. Girard, Kan. 

Francis Willard Castello, Ellsworth County Agricultural Agent, Division of 
College Extension (1935). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1933. Ellsworth, Kan. 

Herbert William Clutter, Finney County Agricultural Agent, Division of 
College Extension (1935). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1933. Garden City, Kan. 

Carl Clarence Conger, Pawnee County Agricultural Agent, Division of Col- 
lege Extension (1934; April 1, 1938). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1933. Larned, Kan. 

Ralph A. Cooley, Assistant County Agricultural Agent, Division of College 
Extension (1937). 

B. S., K. S. C., 1912. Abilene, Kan. 

Lawrence Edward Crawford, Pratt County Agricultural Agent, Division of 
College Extension (1937). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1928. Pratt, Kan. 

Vernon Simpson Crippen, Assistant County Agricultural Agent, Division of 
College Extension (1934; April 1, 1938); resigned Oct. 31, 1938. 

B. S., K. S. C., 1920. Belleville, Kan. 

Fred B. Cromer, Kingman County Agricultural Agent, Division of College 
Extension (1936). 

B. S., K. S. C., 1916. Kingman, Kan. 

Wilbur R. Crowley, Assistant County Agricultural Agent, Division of Col- 
lege Extension (June 6, 1938) ; resigned Jan. 5, 1939. 

B. S., K. S. C, 1938. Ottawa, Kan. 

Harold Amos Daily, Stafford County Agricultural Agent, Division of College 
Extension (1935, 1938). 

B. S., K. S. C., 1933. St. John, Kan. 

Walter Jones Daly, Cowley County Agricultural Agent, Division of College 
Extension (1925, 1937). 

B. S., K. S. G, 1925. Winfield, Kan. 

Laurence Robert Daniels, Rooks County Agricultural Agent, Division of Col- 
lege Extension (1934). 

B. S., K. S. G, 1933. Stockton, Kan. 

Ivor Harold Davies, Wyandotte County Club Agent, Division of College Ex- 
tension (1937, 1938). 

B. S., K. S. G, 1937. Kansas City, Kan. 

Elmer A. Dawdy, Saline County Agricultural Agent, Division of College Ex- 
tension (1938; Feb. 1, 1989). 

B. S., K. S. G, 1938. Salina, Kan. 

John William Decker, Wabaunsee County Agricultural Agent, Division of 
College Extension (1935, 1937). 
B. S., K. S. G, 1930. Alma, Kan. 

4-3529 



50 Kansas State College 

Marion Maxwell Dickerson, Stevens County Agricultural Agent, Division of 
College Extension (1937, 1938). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1937. Hugoton, Kan. 

Carl Emmert Elling, Scott County Agricultural Agent, Division of College 
Extension (1934). 

B. S., K. S. C. 1932. Scott City, Kan. 

Carl Mudge Elling, Hodgeman County Agricultural Agent, Division of Col- 
lege Extension (1938). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1937. Jetmore, Kan. 

Roland Baker Elling, Franklin County Agricultural Agent, Division of Col- 
lege Extension (1938; Nov. 14, 1938). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1938. Ottawa, Kan. 

Kermit Vernon Engle, Kearny County Agricultural Agent, Division of Col- 
lege Extension (1936). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1931. Lakin, Kan. 

Wayne Ewing, Sedgwick County Club Agent, Division of College Extension 
(1936, 1937). 

B. S., K. S. C., 1932. Wichita, Kan. 

Roy Henry Freeland, Assistant County Agricultural Agent, Division of Col- 
lege Extension (Dec. 8, 1938). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1937. Iola, Kan. 

Raleigh Bordner Flanders, Rawlins County Agricultural Agent, Division of 
College Extension (1936). 

B. S., Colorado Agricultural College, 1928. Atwood, Kan. 

Robert Whitsel Fort, Saline County Agricultural Agent, Division of College 
Extension (1935); resigned Jan. 10, 1939. 

B. S., K. S. C, 1926. Salina, Kan. 

George Willis Gerber, Osage County Agricultural Agent, Division of College 
Extension (1936, 1937). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1936. Lyndon, Kan. 

Ralph Friedly German n, Russell County Agricultural Agent, Division of Col- 
lege Extension (1935, 1937). 

B. S. ( K. S. C, 1931. Russell, Kan. 

Joe Myron Goodwin, Linn County Agricultural Agent, Division of College 

Extension (1919, 1937). Mound City, Kan. 

Elmer Oscar Graper, Thomas County Agricultural Agent, Division of College 
Extension (1929; Nov. 15, 1938). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1913. Colby, Kan. 

William Ellsworth Gregory, Harper County Agricultural Agent, Division of 
College Extension (1934, 1936). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1929. Anthony, Kan. 

Paul Wilson Griffith, Decatur County Agricultural Agent, Division of 
College Extension (1935, 1937). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1934. Oberlin, Kan. 

Paul Bernard Gwin, Geary County Agricultural Agent, Division of College 
Extension (1921, 1925). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1916. Junction City, Kan. 

Roy Elmer Gwin, Wichita County Agricultural Agent, Division of College 
Extension (1921, 1934). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1914. Leoti, Kan. 



Officers of Instruction 51 

Frank Alexander Hagans, Marion County Agricultural Agent, Division of 
College Extension (1930). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1925. Marion, Kan. 

Charles Adrian Hageman, Wilson County Agricultural Agent, Division of 
College Extension (1936; Feb. 1, 1939). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1936. Fredonia, Kan. 

Dale Evart Halbert, Assistant County Agricultural Agent, Division of College 
Extension (1936). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1933. Hutchinson, Kan. 

Preston Orin Hale, Shawnee County Agricultural Agent, Division of College 
Extension (1929, 1934). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1916. Topeka, Kan. 

Charles Tomas Hall, Jefferson County Agricultural Agent, Division of Col- 
lege Extension (1934). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1932. Oskaloosa, Kan. 

John Hamon, Wilson County Agricultural Agent, Division of College Exten- 
sion (1934) ; resigned Jan. 18, 1939. 

B. S., K. S. C, 1933. Fredonia, Kan. 

John Bonar Hanna, Butler County Club Agent, Division of College Extension 
(1935; Jan. 1, 1939). 
B. S., K. S. C, 1932. El Dorado, Kan. 

Leonard Beath Harden, Johnson County Agricultural Agent, Division of Col- 
lege Extension (1928, 1934). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1926. Olathe, Kan. 

Harold Byron Harper, Harvey County Agricultural Agent, Division of Col- 
lege Extension (1932, 1933). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1933. 'Newton, Kan. 

A. Eugene Harris, Seward County Agricultural Agent, Division of College 
Extension (1938; Oct. 10. 1938). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1938. Liberal, Kan. 

Edwin Hedstrom, Clay County Agricultural Agent, Division of College Ex- 
tension (1935). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1924. Clay Center, Kan. 

John Albert Hendriks, Anderson County Agricultural Agent, Division of 
College Extension (1920, 1924). 

B. S. A., Iowa State College, 1913. Garnett, Kan. 

Harvey J. Hensley, Cloud County Agricultural Agent, Division of College 
Extension (1936, 1937). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1936. Concordia, Kan. 

Sherman Stanley Hoar, Barton County Agricultural Agent, Division of Col- 
lege Extension (1929). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1928. Great Bend, Kan. 

Clarence Athel Hollingsworth, Bourbon County Agricultural Agent, Di- 
vision of College Extension (1937; Jan. 23, 1939). 
B.S., K. S. C, 1931. Fort Scott, Kan. 

Ray Mitchell Hoss, Woodson County Agricultural Agent, Division of Col- 
lege Extension (1935). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1930. Yates Center, Kan. 



52 Kansas State College 

Donald Walter Ingle, Reno County Agricultural Agent, Division of College 
Extension (1930, 1934). 

B. S., University of Missouri, 1929. Hutchinson, Kan. 

Zara W. Johnson, Morton County Agricultural Agent, Division of College 
Extension (1938; July 18, 1938). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1938. Elkhart, Kan. 

Charles C. Jones, Assistant County Agricultural Agent, Division of College 
Extension (Jan. 1, 1939). Hiawatha, Kan. 

Eugene F. Keas, Assistant County Agricultural Agent, Division of College Ex- 
tension (July 1, 1938). Lyons, Kan. 

Oliver Willard Kershaw, Smith County Agricultural Agent, Division of Col- 
lege Extension (1935; Jan. 1, 1939). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1935. Smith Center, Kan. 

Claude Lewis King, Shawnee County Club Agent, Division of College Ex- 
tension (1934, 1936). 
B. S., K. S. C, 1932. Topeka, Kan. 

Richard Franklin King, Jr., Crawford County Club Agent, Division of Col- 
lege Extension (1938; Feb. 1, 1939). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1938. Girard, Kan. 

Arthur William Knott, Montgomery County Agricultural Agent, Division 
of College Extension (1927). 

B. S., University of Wisconsin, 1917. Independence, Kan. 

Ben C. Kohrs, Gray County Agricultural Agent, Division of College Exten- 
sion (1935, 1937); resigned Sept. 18, 1938. 

B. S., K. S. C, 1935. Cimarron, Kan. 

Reuben Carl Lind, Lincoln County Agricultural Agent, Division of College 
Extension (1933). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1923. Lincoln, Kan. 

Philip Warner Ljungdahl, Gray County Agricultural Agent, Division of 
College Extension (1936; Oct. 19, 1938). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1936. Cimarron, Kan. 

Charles Enoch Lyness, Doniphan County Agricultural Agent, Division of 
College Extension (1923). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1912. Troy, Kan. 

Verl Ephriam McAdams, Barber County Agricultural Agent, Division of 
College Extension (1934). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1928. Medicine Lodge, Kan. 

Ralph Waldo McBurney, Mitchell County Agricultural Agent, Division of 
College Extension (1930). ; 

B. S., K. S. C, 1927. Beloit, Kan. 

Frances Dean McCammon, Ford County Agricultural Agent, Division of 
College Extension (1934, 1936). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1932. Dodge City, Kan. 

Everett Lynn McClelland, Sheridan County Agricultural Agent, Division of 
College Extension (1936, 1937). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1928. Hoxie, Kan. 

John Edwin McColm, Meade County Agricultural Agent, Division of College 
Extension (1936, 1938). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1936. Meade, Kan. 



Officers of Instruction 53 

Dewey Zollie McCormick, Morris County Agricultural Agent, Division of 
College Extension (1925). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1921. Council Grove, Kan. 

Ernest Lee McIntosh, Lyon County Agricultural Agent, Division of College 
Extension, (1920, 1937). 

B. S. ( K. S. C, 1920. Emporia, Kan. 

Robert Fred McNitt, Pottawatomie County Agricultural Agent, Division of 
College Extension (1934, 1935); resigned Jan. 31, 1939. 
B. S., K. S. C, 1933. Westmoreland, Kan. 

Earl Thomas Means, Allen County Agricultural Agent, Division of College 
Extension (1935, 1936). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1922. Iola, Kan. 

Wilmer Abele Meyle, Atchison County Agricultural Agent, Division of Col- 
lege Extension (1934). 
B. S., K. S. C, 1931. Effingham, Kan. 

John Delmont Montague, Sedgwick County Agricultural Agent, Division of 
College Extension (1926, 1930). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1920. Wichita, Kan. 

Law t rence Dale Morgan, Sherman County Agricultural Agent, Division of 
College Extension (1933). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1935. Goodland, Kan. 

Harold Lewis Murphey, Comanche County Agricultural Agent, Division of 
College Extension (1930, 1936). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1928. Coldwater, Kan. 

Howard Cecil Myers, Elk County Agricultural Agent, Division of College 
Extension (1938; Jan. 23, 1939). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1938. Howard, Kan. 

Leonard Neff, Washington County Agricultural Agent, Division of College 
Extension (1925, 1930). 

B. S. A., Purdue University, 1922. Washington, Kan. 

Paul Harold Nelson, Phillips County Agricultural Agent, Division of College 
Extension (1936, 1937). 

B. S., K. S. O., 1936. Phillipsburg, Kan. 

Russell C. Nelson, Assistant County Agricultural Agent, Division of College 

Extension (1936). Hiawatha, Kan. 

William O'Connell, Marshall County Agricultural Agent, Division of College 
Extension (1924). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1916. Marysville, Kan. 

Charles • Herman Olson, Assistant County Agricultural Agent, Division of 
College Extension (June 16, 1938) ; resigned Jan. 15, 1939. 

B. S., K. S. C, 1938. Girard, Kan. 

Merton Louis Otto, Leavenworth County Agricultural Agent, Division of 
College Extension (1934). 

B. S., K. S. C., 1921. Leavenworth, Kan. 

Robert Thomas Patterson, Cherokee County Agricultural Agent, Division of 
College Extension (1928). 

B. S., K. S. C., 1924. Columbus, Kan. 

Leonard William Patton, Graham County Agricultural Agent, Division of 
College Extension (1933, 1937). 
B. S., K. S. C., 1933. Hill City, Kan. 



54 Kansas State College 

Albert Arnold Pease, Rice County Club Agent, Division of College Extension 
(1935, 1937). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1932. Lyons, Kan. 

Allison Glen Pickett, Kiowa County Agricultural Agent, Division of Col- 
lege Extension (1935). 

B. S M K. S. C, 1935. Greensburg, Kan. 

Edward W. Pitman, Assistant County Agricultural Agent, Division of College 
Extension (April 7, 1938.) 

B. S., K. S. C, 1938. Kingman, Kan. 

William Harold Polhamus, Assistant County Agricultural Agent, Division of 
College Extension (1938; Feb. 2, 1939). , Kan. 

Robert Louis Rawlins, Nemaha County Agricultural Agent, Division of 
College Extension (1931). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1929. Seneca, Kan. 

Clyde Cadwell Reed, Assistant County Agricultural Agent, Division of College 
Extension (June 6, 1938) ; resigned Jan. 5, 1939. 

B. S., K. S. C, 1938. Independence, Kan. 

Leonard Abbott Rees, Riley County Agricultural Agent, Division of College 
Extension (1936, 1937). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1932. Manhattan, Kan. 

Oren J. Reusser, Assistant County Agricultural Agent, Division of College 
Extension (July 22, 1938). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1937. Lyons, Kan. 

Donald Rice, Assistant County Agricultural Agent, Division of College Exten- 
sion (Jan. 1, 1939). Iola, Kan. 

Cecil E. Richards, Assistant County Agricultural Agent, Division of College 
Extension (1935). iola, Kan. 

Arthur Eugene Schafer, Norton County Agricultural Agent, Division of Col- 
lege Extension (1937, 1937). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1937. Norton, Kan. 

Lester Shepard, Neosho County Agricultural Agent, Division of College Ex- 
tension (1928). 

A. B., University of Iowa, 1913; B. S., Iowa State College, 1916. Erie, Kan. 

Karl Gardner Shoemaker, Ellis County Agricultural Agent, Division of Col- 
lege Extension (1936, 1937). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1936. Hays, Kan. 

George W. Sidwell, Rice County Agricultural Agent, Division of College Ex- 
tension (1913, 1937). 

A. B., Fairmount College, 1915. Lyons, Kan. 

Deal D. Six, Douglas County Agricultural Agent, Division of College Exten- 
sion (1935). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1922. Lawrence, Kan. 

Joseph Daniel Smerchek, Sumner County Agricultural Agent, Division of 
College Extension (1933, 1937). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1932. Wellington, Kan. 

Orin Grover Steele, Assistant County Agricultural Agent, Division of College 
Extension (May 2, 1938). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1935. Manhattan, Kan. 



Officers of Instruction 55 

Alvin Howard Stephenson, Dickinson County Agricultural Agent, Division of 
College Extension (1935, 1936). 

B. S., K. S. C., 1932. Abilene, Kan. 

Harold Calvin Stevens, Assistant County Agricultural Agent, Division of 
College Extension (1936). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1930. Fredonia, Kan. 

Harvey J. Stewart, Cheyenne County Agricultural Agent, Division of College 
Extension (1929). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1928. St. Francis, Kan. 

Raymond Luther Stover, Brown County Agricultural Agent, Division of Col- 
lege Extension (1927, 1930). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1924; M.S., Oregon Agricultural College, 1927. Hiawatha, Kan. 

Frank B. Stuckey, Assistant County Agricultural Agent, Division of College 
Extension (1936); resigned Oct. 15, 1938. Leavenworth, Kan. 

Victor Fred Stuewe, Ottawa County Agricultural Agent, Division of College 
Extension (1934, 1937). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1915. Minneapolis, Kan. 

Byron J. Taylor, Logan County Agricultural Agent, Division of College Ex- 
tension (1937; April 5, 1938). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1916. Page City, Kan. 

John Edward Taylor, Grant County Agricultural Agent, Division of College 
Extension (1930). 
B. S., K. S. C, 1930. Ulysses, Kan. 

Lot Forman Taylor, Chautauqua County Agricultural Agent, Division of 
College Extension (1935). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1931. Sedan, Kan. 

Merrill Medsgar Taylor, Thomas County Agricultural Agent, Division of 
College Extension (1931, 1935); resigned Oct. 26, 1938. 

B. S., K. S. C, 1930. Colby, Kan. 

Chester Gordon Thompson, Assistant County Agricultural Agent, Division of 
College Extension (1936). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1932. Florence, Kan. 

Merle Barton Thomson, Assistant County Agricultural Agent, Division of 
College Extension (1937). Topeka, Kan. 

Abram B. Thut, Assistant County Agricultural Agent, Division of College 

Extension (1936). Anthony, Kan. 

Wayne Tjaden, Assistant County Agricultural Agent, Division of College Ex- 
tension (1938). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1938. Burlington, Kan. 

Obed Lee Toadvine, Jr., Ness County Agricultural Agent, Division of College 
Extension (1934). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1932. Ness City, Kan. 

James Frederick True, Jr., Coffey County Agricultural Agent, Division of 
College Extension (1935). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1929. Burlington, Kan. 

Francis John Turner, Assistant County Agricultural Agent, Division of Col- 
lege Extension (1936). Manhattan, Kan. 

Howard Victor Vernon, Osborne County Agricultural Agent, Division of Col- 
lege Extension (1934, 1937). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1928. Osborne, Kan. 



56 Kansas State College 

Harold Osmond Wales, Stanton County Agricultural Agent, Division of Col- 
lege Extension (1936, 1937). 

B. S., North Dakota Agricultural College, 1934; M. S., K. S. C, 1936. Johnson, Kan. 

Herman W. Westmeyer, Lane County Agricultural Agent, Division of College 
Extension (1936). 

B. S., University of Missouri, 1936. Dighton, Kan. 

Ray H. Whitenack, Assistant County Agricultural Agent, Division of College 
Extension (1937). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1916. Olathe, Kan. 

Earl LaVerne Wier, McPherson County Agricultural Agent, Division of 
College Extension (1934). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1931. McPherson, Kan. 

Carl Williams, Clark County Agricultural Agent, Division of College Ex- 
tension (1935). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1932. Ashland, Kan. 

Richard Gordon Wiltse, Miami County Agricultural Agent, Division of Col- 
lege Extension (1938; July 1, 1938). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1938. Paola, Kan. 

William Alexander Wishart, Greenwood County Agricultural Agent, Divi- 
sion of College Extension (1935; March 15, 1938). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1935. Eureka, Kan. 

Maurice Ivan Wyckoff, Labette County Agricultural Agent, Division of 
College Extension (1935). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1935. Altamont, Kan. 

Walter William Zeckser, Butler County Agricultural Agent, Division of Col- 
lege Extension (1935). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1933. El Dorado, Kan. 

Robert Zilliox, Assistant County Agricultural Agent, Division of College Ex- 
tension (Jan. 1, 1939). Smith Center, Kan. 

Frank Zitnik, Rush County Agricultural Agent, Division of College Ex- 
tension (1931, 1934). 
B. S., K. S. C, 1931. La Crosse, Kan. 

Joseph Zitnik, Wallace County Agricultural Agent, Division of College Ex- 
tension (1936, 1937). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1936. Sharon Springs, Kan. 

HOME DEMONSTRATION AGENTS 1 

Marie Antrim, Wyandotte County Home Demonstration Agent, Division of 
College Extension (1935). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1934. Kansas City, Kan. 

Mildred Beil, Cloud County Home Demonstration Agent, Division of College 
Extension (1936. 1937). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1932. Concordia, Kan. 

Ellen Blair, Lyon County Home Demonstration Agent, Division of College 
Extension (1935, 1937) ; resigned Dec. 31, 1938. 

B. S., K. S. C, 1934. Emporia, Kan. 

Grace Dorothy Brill, Bourbon County Home Demonstration Agent, Division 
of College Extension (1936, 1937). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1931; M. S., K. S. C, 1932. Fort Scott, Kan. 

1. In cooperation with the U. S. Department of Agriculture. 



Officers of Instruction 57 

Vira Brown, Assistant Home Demonstration Agent, Division of College Ex- 
tension (1935; Nov. 1, 1938); resigned Jan. 31, 1939. 

B. S., K. S. C, 1925. Leavenworth, Kan. 

Pauline Crawford, Stafford County Home Demonstration Agent, Division of 
College Extension (1938; Jan. 1, 1939). 
B. S., K. S. C, 1935. St. John, Kan. 

Ruth Esther Crawford, Harper County Home Demonstration Agent, Di- 
vision of College Extension (1934). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1932. Anthony, Kan. 

Eleanor Dales, Wabaunsee County Home Demonstration Agent, Division of 
College Extension (1938; Jan. 1, 1939). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1938. Alma, Kan. 

Pauline Drysdale, Smith County Home Demonstration Agent, Division of 
College Extension (1938; Feb. 1, 1939). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1938. Smith Center, Kan. 

Ermina J. Fisher, Barton County Home Demonstration Agent, Division of 
College Extension (1938; July 1, 1938). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1938. Great Bend, Kan. 

Marjorie Forbes, Barber County Home Demonstration Agent, Division of Col- 
lege Extension (1938; Jan. 1, 1939). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1938. Medicine Lodge, Kan. 

Emma Freehling, Osborne County Home Demonstration Agent, Division of 
College Extension (1937, 1937). 

B. S., University of Nebraska, 1933. Osborne, Kan. 

Isabel Gallemore, Franklin County Home Demonstration Agent, Division of 
College Extension (1937). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1928; M. S., ibid., 1932. - Ottawa, Kan. 

Mae Gordon, McPherson County Home Demonstration Agent, Division of 
College Extension (1935, 1936). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1934. McPherson, Kan. 

Gertrude Greenwood, Atchison County Home Demonstration Agent, Division 
of College Extension (1936, 1937). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1936. Effingham, Kan. 

Gersilda Guthrie, Assistant Home Demonstration Agent, Division of College 
Extension (1937; Jan. 1, 1939). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1936. Emporia, Kan. 

Avis Hall, Kiowa County Home Demonstration Agent, Division of College 
Extension (1938; Jan. 1, 1939). 
B. S., K. S. C, 1938. Greensburg, Kan. 

Mildred Hofmann, Marion County Home Demonstration Agent, Division of 
College Extension (1938; Feb, 1, 1939). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1936. Marion, Kan. 

Maxine Hofmann, Ellsworth County Home Demonstration Agent, Division 
of College Extension (1936, 1937). 

B. S., K. S .C., 1936. Ellsworth, Kan. 

Ruth Hofsess, Montgomery County Home Demonstration Agent, Division of 
College Extension (1938; Oct. 19, 1938). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1938. Independence, Kan. 



58 Kansas State College 

Iva Luella Holladay, Leavenworth County Home Demonstration Agent, Divi- 
sion of College Extension (1929). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1929. Leavenworth, Kan. 

Mary Alice Howard, Cherokee County Home Demonstration Agent, Division 
of College Extension (1937, 1938). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1937. Columbus, Kan. 

Ruth Kathrina Huff, Pratt County Home Demonstration Agent, Division of 
College Extension (1931). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1924. Pratt, Kan. 

Velma Good Huston, Harvey County Home Demonstration Agent, Division 
of College Extension (1935, 1937). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1931. Newton, Kan. 

Agnes Jenkins, Comanche County Home Demonstration Agent, Division of 
College Extension (1938). 
B. S., K. S. C, 1938 Coldwater, Kan. 

Alice Jennings, Greenwood Countv Home Demonstration Agent, Division 
of College Extension (1937). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1923; M. S., ibid. 1936. Eureka, Kan. 

Naomi Johnson, Neosho County Demonstration Agent, Division of College 
Extension (1938; May 7, 1938)'. 

B. S., K. S. C, 1932. Erie, Kan. 

Edith Kelley, Cheyenne County Home Demonstration Agent, Division of 
College Extension (1938; Jan. 1, 1939). 

B. S., Baker University, 1937. St. Francis, Kan. 

Mildred McBride, Labette County Home Demonstration Agent, Division of 
College Extension (1936, 1937).' 

B. S., K. S. C, 1933. Altamont, Kan. 

Mary McCroskey, Miami Countv Home Demonstration Agent, Division of 
College Extension (1937, 1938).' 

B. S., K. S. C, 1931. Paola, Kan. 

Ella Mabel Meyer. Rice Countv Home Demonstration Agent. Division of 
College Extension (1932). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1907. Lyons, Kan. 

Muriel Morgan, Pawnee County Home Demonstration Agent, Division of 
College Extension (1938; Sept. 1, 1938). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1934. Lamed, Kan. 

Irene Morris, Morris County Home Demonstration Agent, Division of Col- 
lege Extension (1937, 1938). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1934. Council Grove, Kan. 

Eula May Neal, Johnson County Home Demonstration Agent, Division of 
College Extension (1930, 1936). 

B. S., State Teachers College, Kirksville, Mo., 1927. Olathe, Kan. 

Edythe LaVerne Parrott, Crawford County Home Demonstration Agent, 
Division of College Extension (1936, 1937). 

B.S., K. S. C, 1929. Girard, Kan. 

Minnie Belle Peebler. Sumner County Home Demonstration Agent, Divi- 
sion of College Extension (1932, 1937). 

B. S., University of Oklahoma, 1924; M. S., University of Colorado, 1929. 

Wellington, Kan. 



Officers of Instruction 59 

Kathryn Peterman, Ford County Home Demonstration Agent, Division of 
College Extension (1937, 1937). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1936. Dodge City, Kan. 

Florence Phillips, Rawlins County Home Demonstration Agent, Division of 
College Extension (1936, 1937). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1936. Atwood, Kan. 

Juanita Louise Riley, Assistant Home Demonstration Agent, Division of Col- 
lege Extension (Jan. 26, 1939). Cottonwood Falls, Kan. 

Elizabeth Roniger, Allen County Home Demonstration Agent, Division of 
College Extension (1936). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1933. Iola, Kan. 

Anna Rueschhoff, Dickinson County Home Demonstration Agent, Division 
of College Extension (1936, 1937). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1936. Abilene, Kan. 

Berniece Ethel Sloan, Pawnee County Home Demonstration Agent, Divi- 
sion of College Extension (1935); resigned Aug. 31, 1938. 

B. S., K. S. C, 1928. Larned, Kan. 

Mary Ethel Stewart, Finney County Home Demonstration Agent, Division 
of College Extension (1938; Jan. 1. 1939). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1938. Garden City, Kan. 

Leona Zoe Tibbetts, Cowley County Home Demonstration Agent, Division of 
College Extension (1938; Feb. 1, 1939). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1938. Winfield, Kan. 

Marguerite Whitten, Reno County Home Demonstration Agent, Division of 
College Extension (1938; July l/l938). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1936. Hutchinson, Kan. 

Laura B. Willison, Butler County Home Demonstration Agent, Division of 
College Extension (1937; 1937). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1911. El Dorado, Kan. 

Anna Marian Wilson, Doniphan County Home Demonstration Agent, Divi- 
sion of College Extension (1936; 1938). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1931. Troy, Kan. 

Laura Winter, Sedgwick County Home Demonstration Agent, Division of 
College Extension (1925). 

Cornell University, 1916. Wichita, Kan. 

Mary Dunlap Ziegler, Shawnee County Home Demonstration Agent. Divi- 
sion of College Extension (1928, 1930). 

B. S., K. S. C, 1916. Topeka, Kan. 



60 Kansas State College 

Standing Committees of the Faculty 



Admission: Jessie McD. Machir, E. L. Barger, Ina Holroyd, A. B. Card- 
well, H. L. Ibsen, George A. Dean, W. T. Stratton, S. A. Nock. 

Advanced Credit: S. A. Nock, L. D. Bushnell, W. L. Faith, H. H. King, 
H. W. Davis, R. R. Dykstra, L. F. Payne, M. A. Durland, Myrtle Gunselman. 

Assembly: S. A. Nock, H. W. Davis, E. L. Holton, William Lindquist, V. 

D. Foltz, C. H. Scholer. 

Assignment: Jessie McD. Machir, A. E. White, C. H. Scholer, W. E. 
Grimes, J. H. Robert, C. V. Williams, S. A. Nock, Margaret Raffington. 

Athletic Council: H. H. King, F. D. Farrell, M. F. Ahearn, E. L. Holton, 
R. A. Seaton, R. I. Throckmorton, G. A. Dean, R. W. Babcock. 

Calendar: Mary P. Van Zile, J. C. Peterson, M. F. Ahearn, H. T. Hill, 
S. A. Nock, William Lindquist, R. R. Lashbrook. 
Catalogue: I. V. lies, J. O. Faulkner, S. A. Nock. 

Community Chest Executive: F. L. Parrish, H. T. Hill, Mary P. Van Zile, 
F. D. Farrell, A. A. Holtz, Jessie McD. Machir, Ruth Haines. 

Control: I. V. lies, Margaret M. Justin, R. A. Seaton, R. R. Dykstra, 
Mary P. Van Zile, R. J. Barnett. 

Examinations: A. E. White, C. W. Colver, B. B. Brainard. 

Faculty Council on Student Affairs: Mary P. Van Zile, A. A. Holtz, 
L. E. Conrad, R. I. Throckmorton, Grace E. Derby, Harold Howe, F. P. 
Root, Helen Saum. 

Faculty Loan Fund: R. R. Dykstra, Mary P. Van Zile, L. E. Call, R. A. 
Seaton, Jessie McD. Machir. 

Freshman Induction: S. A. Nock, C. H. Scholer, C. V. Williams, Harold 
Howe, W. M. McLeod, Margaret Raffington. 

Graduate Council: J. E. Ackert, L. E. Conrad, L. E. Call, H. H. King, 
L. D. Bushnell, J. H. Burt, Margaret M. Justin, R. C. Langford. 

Honorary Degrees: R. W. Babcock, Margaret M. Justin, L. E. Call. 

Major Musical and Dramatic Entertainments : S. A. Nock, William 
Lindquist, H. T. Hill, H. W. Bouck, R. H. Brown, W. E. Sheffer, Mrs. R. 
W. Conover. 

Reinstatement: R. I. Throckmorton, W. M. McLeod, J. H. Robert, E. C. 
Miller, Ella J. Meiller. 

Relations With Junior Colleges and Arts Colleges: George Gemmell, 
R. R. Dykstra, M. A. Durland, F. L. Parrish, G. A. Filinger, Eva McMillan. 

Residence Status: S. A. Nock, W. F. Pickett, R. M. Kerchner, Martha S. 
Pittman, R. R. Dykstra, A. B. Sperry. 

Schedule of Classes: A. E. White, W. T. Stratton, L. E. Conrad, W. E. 
Grimes, Martha S. Pittman, R. W. Babcock. 

Scholastic Eligibility: Mary P. Van Zile, W. H. Riddell, Emma Hyde, 
R. M. Kerchner, Gladys E. Vail, W. M. McLeod. 

Selection of Veterinary Students: R. R. Dykstra, S. A. Nock, J. H. Burt, 

E. J. Frick, L. M. Roderick. 

Student Health: L. E. Conrad, L. D. Bushnell, Mary P. Van Zile, M. F. 
Ahearn, M. W. Husband. 

Student Honors: M. W. Furr, R. W. Conover, B. L. Remick, R. F. Morse, 
A. B. Car dwell. 

Use of Rooms: R. A. Seaton, R. I. Throckmorton, Margaret M. Justin, 
A. E. White, S. A. Nock. 

Vocational Guidance: Mary P. Van Zile, R. A. Seaton, R. R. Dykstra, 
E. L. Holton, Margaret M. Justin, L. E. Call, R. W. Babcock. 



Kansas State College of Agriculture 
and Applied Science 



History and Location 

Kansas State Agricultural College was established under the authorization 
of an act of congress, approved by Abraham Lincoln, July 2, 1862, the pro- 
visions of which were accepted by the state February 3, 1863. By act of the 
legislature, effective March 9, 1931, the name was changed to Kansas State 
College of Agriculture and Applied Science. 

Under the enabling act the College received an endowment of 90,000 acres of 
land, and its leading object as stated by law is — 

"Without excluding other scientific and classical studies and including 
military tactics, to teach such branches of learning as are related to agri- 
culture and the mechanic arts, in such manner as the legislatures of the 
states may respectively prescribe, in order to promote the liberal and prac- 
tical education of the industrial classes in the several pursuits and profes- 
sions in life." 

The College was located at Manhattan February 16, 1863, partly in order to 
receive as a gift the land, building, library, and equipment of Bluemont Cen- 
tral College, an institution chartered by a group of pioneers on February 9, 
1858. The Bluemont College building was erected in 1859. 

The Agricultural College opened September 1, 1863, in the Bluemont College 
building. Most of the work of the College was moved to the present site in 
1875. 

Manhattan is on the Union Pacific and Rock Island railways, U. S. high- 
ways 40 and 24, and state highways 13 and 29. 

The residents of Manhattan give most cordial support to the College. 

PURPOSES 

Kansas State College has three purposes: To give to the young men and 
women of Kansas undergraduate and graduate training in agriculture, engi- 
neering, home economics, general science, and veterinary medicine; to investi- 
gate, through its experiment stations, the agricultural and industrial problems 
of Kansas; and by means of its extension division to carry the full benefits of 
the College to all parts of the state. The college encourages in all students 
sound thinking and good citizenship. 

The second purpose of Kansas State College is to investigate scientifically 
the state's problems in agriculture and the industries. This work is done 
through the agricultural and engineering experiment stations, and is directly 
connected with the educational work of the College, so that the students are 
benefited directly by scientific investigation. Many opportunities in the 
United States Department of Agriculture and in the various experiment sta- 
tions of the country are open to such students as show interest and skill in in- 
vestigational work. 

In addition to the regular instructional work conducted on the campus, the 
College serves also, through the Division of College Extension, a highly or- 
ganized system of agricultural education carried directly to the homes of the 
farmers. The work has been so well developed that the College has come to 
look upon the whole state as its campus. In addition to the regular staff of 
the Division of College Extension, many members of the College faculty and 
the staff of the experiment stations give several weeks of each year to this 
work. 

(61) 



62 Kansas State College 

Buildings and Grounds 



The College campus adjoins the western limits of the city of Manhattan. 
The grounds, laid out by a landscape architect, are planted with a variety of 
trees and shrubbery, interspersed with lawns and gardens. 

Including the campus of 155 acres, the College owns 1,428.7 acres of land at 
Manhattan, valued at $415,093. Outside the campus proper, all the land is 
devoted to educational and experimental work in agriculture. 

The College buildings are constructed of native limestone obtained in part 
from the College quarries. These buildings are listed below. 

Anderson Hall. Named in honor of John Alexander Anderson (1834-1891), 
second president of the College, 1873-1879. Erected, 1879, 1883, and 1885. Cost, 
$79,000. Administration, College post office, student health, alumni office, 4-H 
office, Division of General Science, and Division of College Extension. 

Animal Husbandry Barn. Erected, 1914. Cost, $25,000. 

Auditorium. Erected, 1904. Cost, $40,000. 

Calvin Hall. Named in honor of Frances Henrietta Willard Calvin (1865 — ), 
librarian of the College, 1901-1903; professor of domestic science, 1903-1908. 
Erected, 1908. Cost, $70,000. Division of Home Economics. 

Chemistry Annex No. 1. Erected, 1876. Cost, $8,000. 

Chemistry Annex No. 2. Erected, 1904. Cost, $15,000. 

Dairy Barn. Erected, 1933. Cost, $45,000. 

Dickens Hall. Named in honor of Albert Dickens (1867-1930), assistant in 
horticulture, 1899-1901; professor of horticulture, 1901-1930. Erected, 1907. 
Cost, $50,000. 

Education Hall. Erected, 1900. Cost, $25,000. 

Engineering Hall. Erected, 1909, 1921. Cost, $270,000. Division of En- 
gineering. 

Engineering Shops. Erected, 1875, 1890, 1900, and 1905. Cost, $35,000. 

Fairchild Hall. Named in honor of George Thompson Fairchild (1838-1901), 
third president of the College, 1879-1897. Erected, 1894, 1903, and 1927. Cost, 
$91,750. Division of Graduate Study. 

Farm Machinery Hall. Erected, 1873. Cost, $11,250. 

Heat, Power, and Service Building. Erected, 1928. Cost, with plant equip- 
ment, $375,000. 

Horticulture Barn. Erected, 1917. Cost, $1,500. 

Illustrations Hall. Erected, 1876. Cost, $4,000. 

Infirmary. Erected, 1866; enlarged, 1919. Cost, $6,500. 

Kedzie Hall. Named in honor of Nellie Sawyer Kedzie Jones (1858 — ), 
teacher of household economy and hygiene, superintendent of sewing, 1882- 
1884; teacher of household economy and hygiene, 1884-1885; instructor in 
household economy and hygiene, 1885-1887; professor of household economy 
and hygiene, 1887-1897. Erected, 1898. Cost, $16,000. 

Library. Erected, 1927. Cost, $250,000. 

Memorial Stadium. Erected, 1922, 1924. Cost, $260,000 



Seventy-sixth Annual Catalogue 63 

Nichols Gymnasium. Named in honor of Ernest Reuben Nichols (1858- 
1938), instructor in physics, 1890-1891; professor of physics, 1891-1900; acting 
president, 1899-1900; fifth president of the College, 1900-1909. Erected, 1911. 
Cost, $122,000. 

Nurses' Quarters. Erected, 1888. Cost, $5,000. 

Physical Science Building. To be named Willard Hall in honor of Julius 
Terrass Willard (1862 — ), assistant in chemistry, 1883-1887; assistant chemist, 
or chemist, agricultural experiment station, 1888-1918, director, 1900-1906; 
professorial rank in chemistry staff, 1891-1918; dean, Division of General 
Science, 1909-1930; vice-president, 1918-1935; college historian, 1936—. To 
be completed, 1939. Cost with equipment, $700,000. 

President's House. Erected, 1923. Cost, $31,000. 

Thompson Hall. Named in honor of Helen Bishop Thompson (1875 — ), 
assistant in preparatory department, 1903-1907; professor of nutritions and di- 
etetics, 1918-1922; professor of food economics and nutrition, 1922-1923; dean 
of the Division of Home Economics, 1918-1923. Erected, 1922. Cost, $125,000. 

Van Zile Hall. Named in honor of Mary Pierce Van Zile (1874 — ), profes- 
sor of domestic science, 1908-1918; dean of the Division of Home Economics, 
1912-1918; dean of women, 1908—. Erected, 1926. Cost $200,000. 

Veterinary Hall. Erected, 1908. Cost, $70,000. Division of Veterinary 
Medicine. 

Veterinary Hospital. Erected, 1923. Cost, $100,000. 

Waters Hall. Named in honor of Henry Jackson Waters (1865-1925), sixth 
president of the College, 1909-1917. Erected: East wing, 1913; West wing, 
1923. Cost, $500,000. Division of Agriculture. 

Experiment Station Building. Erected, 1918. 

General-Purpose Building. Erected, 1918. 

Greenhouses. Erected, 1910, 1927. Cost, $20,000. 

Plant Museum. Erected, 1907. Cost, $2,500. 

Pump House. 

Sheep Barn. Erected, 1927. Cost, $10,000. 

Shop Warehouse. Erected, 1918. 

Tractor Laboratories. Erected, 1918. 

Veterinary Research Laboratory Buildings. Erected, 1914. Cost, $10,000. 



64 Kansas State College 

Admission 



Correspondence about the admission of undergraduate students should be 
addressed to the vice-president of the College. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION 

The entrance requirements of the College are broad and flexible, only funda- 
mental subjects being required. These requirements are made upon the sup- 
position that high schools are local institutions in which the courses should be 
adapted to the needs of the individual localities. 

Any person who has completed a four-year course of study in any high 
school or academy accredited by the State Board of Education will be ad- 
mitted to the freshman class, except in the Division of Veterinary Medicine. 

As enrollment in the curriculum in Veterinary Medicine is limited, persons 
desiring admission to that curriculum should read the statement entitled, 
"Veterinary Enrollment Limited". 

In order to carry one of the several curriculums, a student must have com- 
pleted the following subjects: 

English,, 3 Units ; Algebra, 1 Unit ; Geometry, 1 Unit ; Science, Physical or 
Biological, 1 Unit 

Agriculture (4 years) 

Agricultural Administration (4 years) 

Applied Music (4 years) 

Home Economics (4 years) 

Home Economics with special training in Art (4 years) 

Home Economics with special training in Institutional Management and Dietetics 

(4 years) 
Home Economics and Nursing (5*4 years) 
Industrial Journalism (4 years) 
Music Education (4 years) 
Physical Education for Men (4 years) 
Physical Education for Women (4 years) 
Pre-veterinary (1 year) 

English, 3 Units; Algebra, iy 2 Units; Geometry, 1 Unit; Science, Physical or 
Biological, 1 Unit 

Business Administration (4 years) 

Business Administration with special training in Accounting (4 years) 

General Science (4 years) 

Milling Industry (4 years) 

Specialized Horticulture (4 years) 

English, 3 Units; Algebra, iy 2 Units; Geometry, iy> Units; Science, Physical or 
Biological, 1 Unit 

Agricultural Engineering (4 years) 
Architecture (4 years) 
Architectural Engineering (4 years) 
Chemical Engineering (4 years) 
Civil Engineering (4 years) 
Electrical Engineering (4 years) 
Industrial Arts (4 years) 
Industrial Chemistry (4 years) 
Mechanical Engineering (4 years) 

The above curriculums were formulated on the assumption that high-school 
subjects named will be offered for admission. A graduate of an accredited high 
school who in accordance with a state law is admitted as a freshman without 
all the high-school subjects that are prerequisite to carry the curriculum chosen, 
will be assigned, if necessary, to a five-hour course in college algebra instead of 
the regular three-hour course, and to a two-hour course in solid geometry, and 
may be allowed college credit toward graduation for the extra hours, except in 
the curriculums in the Division of Engineering and Architecture. A student 
lacking the required unit of high-school science is held for four hours of college 
physical or biological science in addition to any science required by his college 



Seventy -sixth Annual Catalogue 



65 



curriculum, but may be allowed elective credit toward graduation on such 
science, except in the Division of Engineering and Architecture. 

A student without high-school credit in one unit of algebra and one unit of 
geometry is not permitted to register for an engineering curriculum, the cur- 
riculum in industrial chemistry, or the curriculum in milling industry, until 
those fixed requirements are completed. Geometry, one unit, is offered each 
semester in classes provided by the Department of Home Study. A student 
without high-school credit in one unit of algebra must, during his first se- 
mester of attendance, enroll in algebra by correspondence study. A student 
with one unit of algebra, but without one unit of geometry, should enroll in 
the geometry class during his first semester of attendance; such a student 
must complete this requirement in geometry by the close of his third se- 
mester of attendance. A student will not be advanced in classification un- 
til these required units are completed. 

A person who is not a graduate of an accredited high school or academy will 
be admitted to the freshman class if he has completed fifteen acceptable units 
of high-school work, including the fixed requirements. (A unit is defined as 
the work in an accredited high school or academy in five recitation periods a 
week for one school year.) One who offers fourteen such units will be ad- 
mitted as a freshman, but will be conditioned in one unit. Such deficiency 
(whether fixed or optional requirement) must be made up during the first year 
that the student is in attendance. If the optional requirement is not made up 
within that time, College credits are taken in its place. 

Subjects acceptable for entrance, arranged in eight groups, together with the 
number of units that may be offered, are shown as follows: 

GROUP I English, three to four units 

English Journalism, one-half or one unit 

Public speaking, one-half or one unit 

GROUP II French, one to four units 

P'oreign German, one to four units 

Languages Greek, one to four units 

Latin, one to four units 

Spanish, one to four units 

GROUP III Elementary algebra, one or one and one-half units 

Mathematics Plane geometry, one unit 

Advanced algebra, one-half unit 
Solid geometry, one-half unit 
Plane trigonometry, one-half unit 

GROUP IV *Botany, one half or one unit 

Natural 'Chemistry, one unit 

Sciences *General biology, one-half or one unit 

*General science, one-half or one unit 

Physical geography, one-half or one unit 
*Physics, one unit 
*Physiology, one-half or one unit 
'Zoology, one-half or one unit 

GROUP V American history, one unit 

History and Civics, one-half or one unit 

Social Sciences Constitution, one-half unit 

Economics, one-half or one unit 

English history, one unit 

Greek and Roman history, one unit 

Medieval and modern history, one unit 

Sociology, one-half unit 

International relations, one-half unit 

GROUP VI Higher arithmetic, one-half unit 

Normal Training Methods and management, one-half unit 

Subjects *Music, one unit 

Psychology, one-half unit 
Reviews 

Grammar, geography, and reading 1 

twelve weeks each, or [ 1 unit 

two of these, eighteen weeks each J 

* In courses consisting of laboratory work, wholly or in part, two periods of laboratory 
work are to be considered the equivalent of one recitation period. 



5—6529 



66 Kansas State College 

GROUP VII *Agriculture, one -half to four units 

Industrial *Domestic art, one-half, one, or two units 

Subjects *Domestic science, one-half, one, or two units 

*Drawing, one-half or one unit 
*Forging, one-half or one unit 
*Printing, one-half, one, or two units 
*Woodwork, one-half, one, or two units 

GROUP VIII Bookkeeping, one-half or one unit 

Commercial Commercial geography, one-half unit 

Subjects Commercial law, one-half unit 

Salesmanship, one-half unit 
*Shorthand and typewriting, one-half or one unit each 

METHODS OF ADMISSION 

Admission by certificate. The applicant must apply to the vice-president 
of the College for a blank, "Vital Statistics," to be properly filled in and 
returned to the vice-president; on it he must indicate the curriculum in 
which he wishes to enroll. The vice-president will then send to the appli- 
cant's high-school principal for an official transcript of record. The registrar 
will send the student a permit to register shortly before the opening of the 
semester. The permit cannot be sent unless the prospective student 
chooses a curriculum. The students who present permits at the registration 
room in Nichols Gymnasium will not have to meet the Committee on Admis- 
sion, as must those not holding permits. High-school transcripts received later 
than one week before enrollment cannot be acted upon before the opening of 
College. An applicant from another state will be accepted on certificate, 
provided — ■ 

1. He is a graduate of a high school accredited by the recognized ac- 
crediting agency of that state; or 

2. He has completed the subjects required for graduation from an ac- 
credited Kansas high school; and 

3. He has been recommended by the principal of the preparatory school 
where the majority of his work was: taken as fully qualified to pursue the 
course for which he is applying. 

Admission by examination. Examinations for admission will be held at 
the College on the dates stated in the College calendar (see page 7 of this 
catalogue). These examinations are given for the benefit of students who need 
some additional high school credits to qualify them for admission to the fresh- 
man class. Applications for these examinations should be made in advance to 
the registrar. 

Admission as special students. In recognition of the fact that experience 
and maturity often compensate for lack of scholastic attainment, the College 
admits as special students persons over twenty-one years of age who cannot 
meet the regular entrance requirements. For admission as special students in 
Veterinary Medicine, applicants must have completed at least fifteen units of 
high-school work. The age limit does not apply to special students in music. 

Students who meet the regular entrance requirements may also register as 
special students for specific work not provided for in the regular curriculums. 
This classification does not, however, include students who merely fulfill cur- 
ricular requirements irregularly or who take approved courses in addition to 
those provided for in their curriculums. 

An applicant for admission as a special student must secure a permit from 
the dean of the division in which his major work is to be done, and the dean 
must approve each assignment. Such a permit is good for one semester only, 
but may be renewed in succeeding semesters. 

Special students must present certificates of their preliminary training, and 
must give evidence of satisfactory preparation for the courses they wish to 
pursue. They are subject to all the general regulations and requirements of 
regular students, such as assignment to physical education and military train- 
ing, payment of fees, regular attendance at classes, and maintenance of satis- 
factory scholastic standing. 



Seventy-sixth Annual Catalogue 67 

Admission with advanced credit. The applicant must apply to the vice- 
president of the College for a blank, "Vital Statistics of Students with Ad- 
vanced Credit," to be properly filled in and returned to the vice-president. 
On it he must indicate all other institutions in which he has been en- 
rolled and the curriculum in which he wishes to enroll in the College. The 
vice-president will then obtain the proper transcripts of record from the stu- 
dent's former institutions. Any fees charged for such transcripts must, of 
course, be paid by the student, who should at the time of application make 
necessary arrangements with his former institutions. College catalogues 
covering the period of attendance at the former institutions should be 
sent with the "Vital Statistics." Students whose transcripts show credits 
for college work done in other acceptable institutions are allowed hour-for- 
hour credit on courses in this College insofar as the credits may be directly 
applied or can be accepted as substitutes or electives. A student who cannot 
furnish an acceptable certificate of work for which he wishes advanced credit, 
may be examined in subjects studied under competent instructors. 

In order that credentials may be properly evaluated, all transcripts must 
be in the office of the vice-president at least three weeks before date of en- 
rollment. The Committee on Advanced Credit cannot act on transcripts re- 
ceived later than this date in time for the student to enroll without serious 
inconvenience and perhaps delay which will necessitate payment of the $2.50 
fee for late registration. 

In general, no student will be admitted to the College unless he is 
eligible to return to the college or university he last attended. 

SUMMARY 

The following credentials must be in the hands of the Committee on Ad- 
vanced Credit at least three weeks before enrollment : 

1. An official transcript of high-school work; 

2. An original complete transcript of the work done at each college or 
university attended; 

3. An official statement that the student is eligible to return to the college 
or university last attended; 

4. A properly filled blank of vital statistics on which the curriculum 
chosen must be indicated. 

Note: Transcripts of credits must come to the Committee on Advanced 
Credit directly from the institution concerned. Others will not be ac- 
cepted. 

Matriculated students may secure advanced credit in certain subjects of 
freshman rank by examination, on account of surplus high-school units over 
and above the fifteen acceptable units required for admission. On request, the 
registrar will furnish to the Committee on Advanced Credit a statement of 
such surplus units, and that committee will conduct the examination within 
the first thirty days of the semester or summer school. Examinations, how- 
ever, which affect the assignment of a semester or summer school will be given 
on the first Saturday of that semester or summer school. After the expiration 
of the thirty-day period such examinations may be authorized by the student's 
dean. 

If the work of the student shows that advanced credits have been wrongly 
allowed, such credits will be revoked. 

FRESHMAN INDUCTION 

Freshmen enrolling for the first time in Kansas State College must be on 
the campus at 7:30 a. m. on the Friday before the Monday on which upper- 
class registration begins. Because these freshmen are separately assigned be- 
fore the other classes, they receive the entire attention of the assigners, and 
have every opportunity to get desirable class schedules. Furthermore, their 
deans and faculty advisers meet them in small groups to discuss with them 



68 Kansas State College 

their work and their ambitions, to take them on tours of the campus, and to 
introduce them to other members of the faculty. During the week-end, the 
freshmen may meet the clergymen of Manhattan's churches and get acquainted 
with the officials of the Y. M. C. A. and the Y. W. C. A., the Student Govern- 
ing Association, and the Collegiate 4-H Club. Before the first classes meet on 
the following Wednesday, the freshmen will have had their aptitude tests and 
the benefit of other freshmen-induction activities, and will be ready to begin 
their classwork with some understanding of the College and its methods, and 
some acquaintance with faculty, students, and townspeople. 

JUNIOR COLLEGES 

Every junior college student who expects to continue his education at this 
College should arrange his course in junior college to meet the requirements 
of the curriculum which he expects to pursue here. Different curriculums have 
different prerequisites; but admission to advanced standing in the College is 
reasonably flexible, hour-for-hour credit being given for two years' work wher- 
ever the work done in an accredited junior college can be directly applied or 
can be accepted as substitutes or electives in the curriculum chosen. If his 
course in junior college has been arranged to meet the requirements of the 
curriculum to be pursued here, a junior college graduate carrying the maximum 
assignment can usually complete the requirements for the degree of Bachelor 
of Science in two years. 

Detailed statements as to the requirements for graduation in each of the 
several curriculums at the College are printed in other sections of this cata- 
logue. 

Kansas Junior Colleges in Fully Accredited Relations With 

the College 

public 

Municipal Junior College, Arkansas City 
Chanute Junior College, Chanute 
Coffeyville Junior College, Coffeyville 
Dodge City Junior College, Dodge City 
El Dorado Junior College, El Dorado 
Fort Scott Junior College, Fort Scott 
Garden City Junior College, Garden City 
Highland Junior College, Highland 
Hutchinson Junior College, Hutchinson 
Independence Junior College, Independence 
Iola Junior College, Iola 
Kansas City Junior College, Kansas City 
Parsons Junior College, Parsons 

private 

Central Academy and College, McPherson 

College of Paola, Paola 

Sacred Heart, Wichita 

Saint John's College, Winfield 

Saint Joseph's College, Hays 

Tabor Academy and College, Hillsboro 

Western University, Kansas City 

LATE ADMISSION 

A student is not admitted to the College later than ten days after the open- 
ing of a semester, except by special permission of his dean. Except in summer 
school, a fee of $2.50 is charged any one assigned after the time set for the 
close of registration (see the College calendar). There is no exception to 
this rule. 



Seventy-sixth Annual Catalogue 69 



General Information 



BUSINESS DIRECTIONS 

General information concerning the College may be obtained from the 
president or the vice-president. Financial matters are handled through the 
office of the business manager, State Board of Regents, Topeka, Kan. 

Prospective students who desire information or catalogues should communi- 
cate with the vice-president. 

Scientific and practical questions and requests for special advice in subjects 
in which the College and the experiment stations are prepared to give infor- 
mation, should be addressed to the heads of the departments concerned with 
the work regarding which information is sought. 

Applications for farmers' institutes should be made as early in the season 
as possible, to the Division of Extension. Requests for the publications of 
the Agricultural Experiment Station or of the Engineering Experiment Station 
should be made to the director of the station concerned. 

Donations to the Library should be addressed to the librarian, and dona- 
tions to the Museum to the curator of the Museum. 

DUTIES AND PRIVILEGES 

In the informal and democratic life of the College, every student is very 
largely his own preceptor. He is a part of the community life, and as such 
a responsible member of College society. 

College discipline is usually limited to dismissing from College those whose 
further attendance is unprofitable or inadvisable. 

A student must account to the instructor concerned for absences from class. 
Only the dean of the division in which the student is enrolled can give per- 
mission for an absence from College of one or more daj^s. Except by previous 
arrangement with his dean, a student must not leave College before the close 
of a semester. 

Various societies and clubs give opportunities, in addition to College courses, 
for literary, scientific, musical, and forensic activity. At various times during 
the year students present dramatic and musical entertainments under the 
direction of the Manhattan Theater and the Department of Music. 

FEES 

Fees Subject to Change. All fees are subject to change at any time by the 
State Board of Regents. 

Payment op Fees. The matriculation fee is paid upon admission to the 
College. The incidental fee, the student-health fee, the student-activity fee, 
and laboratory fees are payable at the beginning of each semester. 

Students must be prepared to pay these fees in full at the time of registra- 
tion; assignments cannot be completed without the payment. Checks on out- 
of-town banks or on local banks are accepted to the amount of the fees. 

Tuition. There is no charge for tuition. Class instruction in music is free, 
but fees are charged for individual instruction. (See Department of Music for 
statement of fees for music.) 

Matriculation Fee. A matriculation or entrance fee of $10 for residents of 
Kansas, or $20 for nonresidents, is charged all students in College curriculums, 
but it is not paid by students who enroll in the summer school only, unless 
they are candidates for a degree at the end of the session. Special students 
must pay this fee. 



70 Kansas State College 

Incidental Fee. An incidental fee of $25 a semester, or $20 for the nine- 
week summer school, is charged residents of Kansas; nonresidents pay $75 a 
semester, or $50 for the nine-week summer school. The incidental fee for the 
four-week summer school is $10 for residents of Kansas, or $20 for nonresidents. 

Student-health Fees. Undergraduate students pay a student-health fee of 
$5 a semester, or $2 for the nine-week summer school, for which they receive 
the services of the Department of Student Health. Graduate students do not 
pay this fee, or receive the services of the Department of Student Health. 

Student-activity Fee. In accordance with a vote by the student body, each 
undergraduate student pays a student-activity fee of $7.50 a semester, collected 
by the College with the fees levied by the state. Payment of the student- 
activity fee admits one to athletic contests and plays presented by the Man- 
hattan Theater. It gives one membership in the Student Governing Associa- 
tion, and entitles one to the student newspaper and the College yearbook. 
Members of the faculty, employees of the College, and graduate students 
have the privilege of paying the fee and receiving its benefits. In the nine- 
week summer school, every student pays a student-activity fee of one dollar. 

Recapitulation. To make clear the amount of fees due at the opening of 
each semester of the College year, exclusive of laboratory fees, the following 
tabular statement is given: 

FOR RESIDENTS OF KANSAS 

New Students Old Students 

Matriculation (paid only once) $10.00 None 

Incidental (one semester) 25.00 $25.00 

Student-health (one semester) 5.00 5.00 

Student -activity (one semester) 7 . 50 7 . 50 

Totals $47.50 $37.50 

FOR NONRESIDENTS OF KANSAS 

New Students Old Students 

Matriculation (paid only once) $20.00 None 

Incidental (one semester) 75 . 00 $75 . 00 

Student-health (one semester) 5.00 5 . 00 

Student -activity (one semester) 7 . 50 7 . 50 

Totals $107 . 50 $87 . 50 

Definition of Residence. The residence of students entering Kansas State 
College is determined by an act of the legislature (L. 1938, Special Session, ch. 
70, sec. 1), which reads as follows: 

Persons entering the state educational institutions who if adults have not been, or, if 
minors, whose parents have not been residents of the state of Kansas for six months prior 
to matriculation in the state educational institutions, are nonresidents for the purpose of the 
payment of matriculation and incidental fees : Provided further, That no person shall be 
deemed to have gained a residence in this state for the aforesaid purpose while or during 
the elapse of time attending such institution as a student, nor while a student of any semi- 
nary of learning, unless, in the case of a minor, his parents shall have become actual residents 
in good faith of the state of Kansas during such period, or unless, in the case of a minor, 
he has neither lived with nor been supported by his parents or either of them for three 
years or more prior to enrollment and during said years has been a resident in good faith of 
the state of Kansas. 

Laboratory Fees. In all laboratories students pay for supplies used and for 
apparatus broken or lost. Charges are noted under the descriptions of the 
several courses; changes in charges are effective June 1. The following tabu- 
lation shows the laboratory charges for each semester of the freshman year in 
the several curriculums. In a few instances these are approximate, since op- 
tions exist in some curriculums and charges are affected by the subjects 
chosen. 



Seventy-sixth Annual Catalogue 71 

First Second 

Curriculum semester semester 

Agricultural Administration $20 . 55 $10 . 75 

Agricultural Engineering 17 . 50 13 . 00 

Agriculture 20.55 10.75 

Applied Music (not incl. sheet music and private 

lesson) 14.25* 

Architectural Engineering 17 . 00 7.50 

Architecture . 18.00 3.50 

Business Administration 18 . 85* 4 . 75* 

Business Administration and Accounting 18.85* 4.75* 

Chemical Engineering 18 . 50 8 . 50 

Civil Engineering 22 . 00 10 . 00 

Electrical Engineering 13 . 50 13 . 50 

General Science 20.95 4.00 

General Science Pre -veterinary 18.70* 4 .00 

Home Economics 16.35 9.60 

Home Economics and Art 16.35 9.60 

Home Economics and Institutional Management and 

Dietetics 16.35 9.60 

Home Economics and Nursing 15 . 85 6 . 60 

Industrial Arts 17.00 14.00 

Industrial Chemistry 22 . 45 9.75 

Industrial Journalism 18 . 60* 9 . 25* 

Mechanical Engineering 19 . 00 13.50 

Milling Industry 16.65 7.55 

Music Education (not incl. sheet music and private 

lesson) 15.00 5.00* 

Physical Education for Men 13.85 7.10 

Phsical Education for Women 15 . 85 6 . 50 

Specialized Horticulture 18 . 80 5.75 

Veterinary Medicine 22.80 5 . 00 

Late Assignment Fees. Except in summer school, for assignment after 
the close of the regular registration period the fee is $2.50. There is no ex- 
ception to this rule. 

Audition Fee. To persons not enrolled in or employed by the College, the 
fee for auditing classes is one dollar per semester hour of the course audited. 

Commencement Fee. On graduation and on receiving an advanced degree, 
students pay a commencement fee of $7.50 to cover the cost of the diploma 
and other commencement expenses. 

Transcript Fee. Rules governing issuance of transcripts of record: 

1. Students may have one transcript and one carbon copy without charge. 

2. Each additional transcript with one carbon copy costs 25$ for each year's 
record. 

No student may receive his degree or obtain transcripts of record if 
he is financially indebted to the College or any of its departments or 
subsidiaries. 

Refund of Fees. No refund is made on the matriculation fee. Certain 
refunds are made on other fees, as shown below, and no exceptions are made 
to these rules. 

Refunds are given only on the presentation of the fee receipts for various 
fees paid. Refunds are authorized at the office of the registrar. The student 
must keep fee receipts. To be accepted, claims for fee refunds must be pre- 
sented at the office of the registrar not later than the end of the semester or 
summer school for which the fees were paid. 

A student permitted to withdraw before the end of the first week of the 
semester or summer school may receive a refund of all the fees paid for that 
semester or summer school. The first week ends at 5 p. m., Saturday, follow- 
ing the first day of enrollment. 

A student permitted to withdraw after remaining the first week and less 
than one third of a semester or summer school may receive a refund of one 
half of the fees paid for that semester or summer school. 

* Approximate figures. 



72 Kansas State College 

The unused portion of laboratory fees is refunded. All claims for refunds 
on laboratory deposits must be made within fifteen daya of the close of the 
semester or summer school. 

A student dropping music before the end of a semester or summer school 
may receive a refund of fees paid, proportional to the remainder of the first 
three fourths of the semester or summer school; that is, the fees for at least 
the last fourth of a semester or summer school are retained. 

OTHER EXPENSES 

Textbooks. The cost of textbooks varies considerably from semester to 
semester and according to to the curriculum pursued. The following tabulation 
shows the approximate cost of books required during the freshman year : 

First Second 

Curriculum semester semester 

Agricultural Administration $19.50* $11.00* 

Agricultural Engineering 9.00 12 . 50 

Agriculture 19.50* 11.00* 

Applied Music . 3.25* 3.25* 

Architectural Engineering 6.50 13.50 

Architecture 5.50 7.00 

Business Administration 8 . 50* 8 . 50* 

Business Administration and Accounting 8.50* 8.50* 

Chemical Engineering 14.50 14.50 

Civil Engineering 5 . 50 14 . 00 

Electrical Engineering 11.00 12.00 

General Science 17.00* 17.00* 

General Science Pre-veterinary 15.00* 16.50* 

Home Economics 19.25 14 . 00 

Home Economics and Art 21 . 00 15.25 

Home Economics and Institutional Management and 

Dietetics 19.25 14.00 

Home Economics and Nursing 19.75 14.00 

Industrial Arts 17.00 16 . 50 

Industrial Chemistry 13.50* 13.50* 

Industrial Journalism 15 . 00* 10 .00* 

Mechanical Engineering 9.00 14.50 

Milling Industry 16.50 6.50 

Music Education 3.25* 7.50* 

Physical Education for Men 14 .75 6 . 75 

Physical Education for Women 12.50 14.00 

Specialized Horticulture 18.00 9.50 

Veterinary Medicine 21 . 00 22 . 00 

Drawing Instruments. In several curriculums, especially in architecture 
and engineering, drawing instruments are necessary. These range in price 
from $7.50 to $25 a set. 

Gymnasium Suits. Each young woman taking physical training must have 
an approved gymnasium suit costing about $2.75. In the major course the 
cost of a suit is $6.75. 

The gymnasium suit for a young man costs about $3.50. In the major 
course for men the suit costs $9. 

Military Uniform. Each student who takes military training must have 
a uniform. For the basic courses the uniform, except shoes, is furnished by 
the War Department. To insure the return of this uniform, a $5 deposit is 
required of each basic course student, the deposit to be refunded to the stu- 
dent when the complete uniform is returned to the military department in 
good condition. The money value of any missing articles will be deducted 
before the refund is made. For advanced courses an allowance is made by 
the War Department toward the cost of the uniform used. 

Rooms. Van Zile Hall is a residence for 130 women; other rooms are not 
furnished by the College, but many rooms are available in the city. A room 
for two persons costs each occupant from $7 to $9 a month. 

Board. In clubs and private boarding houses the cost of board is $4 a week 
and upward, but students may board themselves for less. The College operates 

* Approximate figures. 



Seventy-sixth Annual Catalogue 73 

a cafeteria where all meals may be obtained, except on Saturday evenings and 
on Sundays, at moderate prices. Food is furnished at cost. The expense to 
the student depends upon his judgment. A limited number of students may 
exchange services for a portion of their board. 

Board and room may be obtained at a minimum cost of about $5.50 a week. 

Laundry. The expense for laundry may be estimated at 40 cents to 70 cents 
a week. 

APTITUDE TESTS FOR FRESHMEN 

Aptitude tests are designed to ascertain what features of the students' 
mental endowment and attainment are strongest. The results are helpful to 
deans and advisers in judging the intellectual progress of students, and in 
giving counsel concerning occupational aptitudes, as well as in placing students 
or graduates in positions. 

ASSIGNMENTS 

The student is responsible for seeing that he conforms to the requirements 
of the curriculum in which he is enrolled. His assigner and his dean will assist 
him in planning his work, but are not responsible for his errors. The catalogue 
is the authentic source of information. The student should read all catalogue 
statements concerning assignments and curriculum. 

No student may be enrolled in classes or for private lessons in music or 
other subjects before receiving an assignment, and no assignment is completed 
until after the incidental fee and any special fees or charges are paid. 

Assignments on the dates shown in the College calendar are made in 
Nichols Gymnasium, where detailed directions are announced by placards. 
Later assignments are made by the student's assigner during regular office 
hours, but are subject to checking by the registrar in respect to availability 
of classes. Classes are closed when the limits as to numbers are reached. A 
student is not admitted later than ten days after the opening of the semester 
except by special permission of his dean. An extra fee of $2.50 is charged for 
assignments secured after the last period provided for assignment of students 
at the opening of each semester as announced in the College calendar. 

A student desiring to take work at any other than the regular time must 
obtain the written consent of his dean, the head of the department in which 
the work is to be done, and the dean of the division to which the department 
belongs. 

Each student must take full work unless excused by his dean. No 
student may take more than regular work except by permission of his 
dean, and under no circumstances may a student do so who failed or was 
conditioned or deficient in any subject the preceding semester, or whose 
average grade was below B. 

A student must not carry work by correspondence while enrolled here, ex- 
cept by permission of his dean. 

Special requests concerning assignments, and permission to make up de- 
ficiencies by outside study under an approved tutor, are acted upon by the 
student's. dean in conference with the heads of the departments involved. 

CHANGES IN ASSIGNMENTS 

Deans do not alter assignments within two weeks of the end of a period 
covered by midsemester or final scholarship-deficiency reports. 

No student may drop a study or modify his assignment except by a re- 
assignment; any student desiring a change in his assignment must apply to his 
dean, who is the only person who can make such change. Instructors desiring 
changes of assignment send requests to the proper dean. Notices of changes 
are sent to the registrar, the student, and the student's assigner. The registrar, 
through the heads of departments, sends notices or enrollment cards to the 
instructors concerned. Changes are effective immediately. 

A student receiving a notice of reassignment must at once report to classes 
in accordance therewith. If not content with the revised assignment, he may 



74 Kansas State College 

confer with his dean about it. The instructor reports as unexcused absences 
all those caused by a student's dropping out of class without a proper re- 
assignment. 

WITHDRAWAL FROM COLLEGE 

A student who withdraws from college must secure an official withdrawal 
permit from his dean. Withdrawals become effective on the dates the permits 
are issued. In no case will they be antedated. To find rules concerning refund 
of fees, see Index. 

AUDITING CLASSES 

Auditing a class consists in attending it regularly without other participa- 
tion, and without credit. Only persons having written permits may audit 
classes. Permission to audit is issued to (a) any person who is enrolled for 
credit, by the dean in charge of his assignment; (b) any employee of the Col- 
lege not enrolled for credit, by the dean of the division in which the person 
is employed, with approval of the head of the department in which the course 
is offered; (c) any other person, on payment of a fee of one dollar a credit 
hour, by the dean of the division in which the courses are offered, with the ap- 
proval of the head of the department. Laboratory courses may not be audited. 

SCHOLARSHIP DEFICIENCES 

Probation 

Any freshman student who receives at the end of a semester deficiencies 
(grades of F or Con) in one third of the work to which he is assigned, or any 
other student who receives at the end of a semester deficiencies in one fourth 
of his work, is automatically placed on probation for one semester, and his 
parent or guardian is informed of the fact. A third such probation automati- 
cally involves dismissal from College. 

Dismissal 

Any freshman who receives at the end of a semester deficiencies in one-half 
of his work, or any other student who receives at the end of a semester defi- 
ciencies in two-fifths of his work is automatically dismissed from the College. 
The deans notify parents and guardians when students are dismissed or put on 
probation on account of scholarship deficiencies. 

Reinstatement 

Students dismissed at the end of the first semester are excluded until the 
beginning of the next summer session. Those dismissed at the end of the sec- 
ond semester are excluded until the end of the next fall semester. During this 
period of dismissal the student must not habitually appear upon the campus 
or enter any classes. Any student dismissed for scholarship deficiencies may 
petition in writing, on a form provided by the College, for immediate rein- 
statement. The Committee on Reinstatement considers such petitions, grant- 
ing reinstatement in exceptional cases only. 

ABSENCE AND TARDINESS 

Each student must appear at the first exercise of his classes after he is as- 
signed. Students must be present on the first day of each semester or render 
a reasonable excuse. All absences are reported from the first day of the semes- 
ter, even though the student enrolled late. Failure to take out an assignment 
is not accepted as an excuse for absence from classes. A student is not admit- 
ted later than ten days after the opening of the semester except by special 
permission of his dean. 

Each undergraduate, except seniors, must attend every exercise of a class to 
which he is assigned, unless exempted under the provision that a junior student 




Seventy-sixth Annual Catalogue 75 

has the privileges of optional attendance if, during the last two semesters he 
attended this College, he made not fewer than thirty points each semester, with 
an average record of not fewer than two points per credit hour each semester 
and no grades below passing. 

All absences and all cases of tardiness must be promptly reported on the 
"absence blanks." Permission for necessary absences from College for a day 
or more must, in all cases, be previously obtained from the dean. Any student 
desiring to be excused for the day from certain classes must apply in advance 
to the instructors in those subjects. 

At the beginning of each class period the instructor takes the attendance. 
A late-comer may have his record of absence changed to one of tardiness if at 
the end of the class he gives his instructor, on the absence blank, a written 
statement of his presence. 

Any class is excused if for any reason the instructor fails to report at the 
end of ten minutes after the beginning of the recitation period, unless the 
instructor sends word that he will be there later. 

Before 5 p. m., instructors send signed reports of absences for the day to the 
deans. Excuses submitted by students are transmitted with a recommendation 
concerning the absence, which only the dean can excuse. Excuse for an absence 
does not relieve the student of responsibility for lecture, recitation, or labora- 
tory work lost by absence. 

If, after due warning, a student is persistently inattentive to his work, _ 
dean will report him to the president for suspension. 

EXAMINATIONS 

Final examinations are held during the last four days of each semester, ac- 
cording to a definite schedule; students who are to be graduated at the close 
of the semester take their examinations earlier, usually at the regular hours 
for the respective courses. Vy, 

No regular examination may be given at a date earlier than the one sched- 
uled except that, at the discretion of the head of the department', a student 
may take his examination with another class in the same subject instead of 
with his own class; in cases of extreme importance the student's dean may 
authorize an earlier examination. 

Any student who receives a grade of A for the semester, in any subject, 
and whose absences for all causes from the class in that subject do not ex- 
ceed one tenth of the number of times the class is scheduled to meet during 
the semester, may be excused from the final examination in that subject, at 
the discretion of the instructor; provided, however, that instructors are to 
announce such exemption lists in their respective subjects not earlier than the 
last session of the class preceding the final examination. 

Examinations to remove conditions are held on the fourth Saturday of each 
semester. A student who has received the grade of Con may take such condi- 
tional examination, if he applies for permission to his instructor or department 
head not later than the Tuesday evening preceding the Saturday set for the 
examination. If a student does not at the first opportunity pass an examina- 
tion in a subject in which he is conditioned, his grade is changed from Con to 
F, except that in individual instances the student's dean may authorize such 
examination at a special date. 

Permission for examination in subjects not taken in class or to make up 
failures by special examination must be obtained, on recommendation of the 
professor in charge, from the dean of the division in which the student is as- 
signed. Permission to take such examination is not granted unless the prepa- 
ration for it is made under an approved tutor. All such examinations are under 
the immediate supervision of the professor in whose department the subject is. 

Examinations in high-school subjects for admission to the College are held 
at the beginning of each semester and of the summer school. Students desiring 
such examinations should consult the registrar in advance. 



76 Kansas State College 

GRADES 

Grades are A, B, C, D, Con, and F, having the following significance : 

A, distinguished achievement; only five to ten percent of the students in 
a course are apt to get A. 

B, superior achievement; about twenty-five percent of the students in a 
course are apt to get A or B. 

C, average achievement; about half the students in a course are apt to 
get C. 

D, passed; below average; about twenty-five percent of the students in a 
course are apt to get D, Con, or F. 

Con, conditioned, for unsatisfactory work. The result of examinations to 
remove conditions is reported simply as D (passed) or F (failed). If such 
examinations are not taken at the first opportunity, the grade Con automati- 
cally becomes F, unless in the meantime the student has reenrolled in the 
course; then Con shall not become F if the student completes the course sat- 
isfactorily. 

F, failed; the work must be repeated in class or under an approved tutor. 

Inc, meaning incomplete, is reported when, in the judgment of the instruc- 
tor, the student deserves further time to complete work which has been ex- 
cusably interfered with. This is only a temporary report and in no way 
prejudices the student's final grade in a course. Students in laboratory and 
industrial work must put in at least four-fifths of the required time in order 
to get a passing grade in the subject. Should the required time minimum not 
be reached, a mark of Inc is reported if the quality of the work done is satis- 
factory and F if it is unsatisfactory. Incomplete work for which a mark of 
Inc has been reported, if not made up within the first subsequent semester 
the student is in attendance, automatically becomes an F. The dean con- 
cerned may, however, extend the time in meritorious cases, if he sends the 
registrar notice of such extension within the "first semester" time limit. 

The distribution of grades indicated above applies to large numbers, and is 
not necessarily true of small numbers. It is not a foregone conclusion, for 
example, that one in a class of twenty must fail or even that one in a class 
must get an A. In a small group the chances are great of a departure from 
the normal. Such a departure should of course be recognized in the grades 
issued. In the long run the accumulated grades for a series of small classes 
should, however, approach the normal distribution. 

REPORT OF GRADES 

(1) On the fifth and the ninth Saturday of each semester; (2) not later 
than 6 p. m. on, the last day of the first semester; (3) and not later than 6 
p. m. on the day after the close of the second semester, reports of all grades 
below passing on those dates are sent to the students concerned and the deana. 
The dates appear in the College calendar; these reports are an imperative 
duty of all instructors. The first two reports are made in percentages on a 
scale of seventy for passing. The reports at the end of the semester are on 
the letter system. 

Students desiring reports of intrasemester grades must supply their instruc- 
tors with properly filled official cards after the fifth or the ninth Saturday of 
the semester. Instructors will make reports so requested to the students or 
send them to the student organizations. 

The instructor prepares for each student a semester grade based on the 
examination and classwork, and must report this to the registrar for record 
within one week after the close of the semester. 

If a student drops a subject before midsemester a mark of Wd (withdrawn) 
is reported. Subjects may not be dropped from assignments within the last 
two weeks of a period covered by midsemester or final scholarship-deficiency 
reports. 

If a student withdraws from College before midsemester a mark of Wd is 
reported for each subject, irrespective of the standing of the student in the 



Seventy-sixth Annual Catalogue 77 

subject. Regardless of the time of withdrawal, however, a final grade shall be 
reported, if all the required work of a course has been completed. If a stu- 
dent goes through the first half of the semester, but not the second half, a 
half-semester grade is reported for record, and designated as such; but a 
subject dropped at any time after midsemester on account of failure is given 
a semester grade of F. 

In case of absence from a final examination, no semester grade is reported 
until the reason for such absence has been learned; within the week after the 
end of the semester, however, the instructor reports to the registrar a mark of 
Inc. If the student's absence is inexcusable a semester grade is reported on 
the basis of zero for the final examination; but if the absence is excused or 
excusable, a reasonable time, usually not over one month, is allowed within 
which the examination may be taken. 

The result of an examination to remove a condition is reported in quad- 
ruplicate to the dean of the student, who transmits copies to the registrar, the 
student, and the student's assigner. The same procedure is followed in re- 
porting a grade to replace Inc and in reporting corrections of grades. 

Instructors are to leave all class books on file in the proper department or 
with the president of the College when severing their connection with the 
institution. 

THE POINT SYSTEM 

For each hour of work assigned, the student receives points, according to 
the grade attained, as follows: Grade A, 3 points; B, 2 points; C, 1 point; 
and D (or lower), no points. For graduation the total requirement in points 
is the same as in hours. Above the freshman year classification is based on 
the same requirement in points as in hours. 

Seniors meeting the graduation requirement in hours but failing to meet it 
in points must take further courses designated by the dean of the division in 
which their major work lies, until the requirement in points is met. 

HONORS 

In each of the divisions of the College, "sophomore honors" are awarded 
at commencement to not more than five percent of the sophomore class hav- 
ing the highest standing up to the close of the sophomore year. 

In a similar manner "senior honors" are awarded to not more than ten per- 
cent of the senior class having the highest standing during their junior and 
senior years. 

For honors, the grades for each semester hour have the following values: 
A, 3; B, 2; C, 1; D, 0; Con. minus 1; and F, minus 2. The honor grade is 
found by dividing the sum of the honor points by the number of semester 
hours of work taken. To receive honors, the student must have an average of 
B or higher. 

The diplomas of the highest three percent of the senior class are inscribed 
"with high honor" and of the remainder of the highest ten percent "with 
honor." 

CLASSIFICATION OF STUDENTS 

The .Committee on Admission classifies new students. To be classified as a 
freshman on entrance a student must be a graduate of an accredited high 
school, or offer fifteen units of acceptable high-school work. A student offering 
fourteen acceptable high-school units is classified as a conditioned freshman. A 
student is not advanced in classification until the required entrance units are 
completed. A student is classified as a sophomore, junior, or senior when he 
has credit in a number of hours and also of points nine less than the full num- 
ber of hours required in one, two, or three years, respective^, of the curriculum 
in which he is enrolled. The registrar reclassifies students each academic year 
before the opening of the first semester. 



78 Kansas State College 

CREDITS FOR EXTRACURRICULAR WORK 

Students may earn credit towards graduation by satisfactorily participating 
in certain extracurricular activities. These activities, and the maximum of 
semester hours of credit allowed, are as follows: 

Per 

Subject semester Total 

Orchestra , y 2 4 

Band " i/ 2 4 

Choral Ensemble y 2 4 

Debate 2 4 

Oratorical Contest 2 4 

Kansas State Collegian journalism 1 4 

Agricultural Student journalism 1 4 

Kansas State Engineer journalism 1 4 

To obtain credit on one of these subjects, the student must be regularly 
assigned to it in accordance with the general rules governing assignments, but 
may be assigned only upon the written recommendation of the instructor in 
charge of the work. This recommendation is filed in the office of the student's 
dean, and is effective until revoked. 

Credits obtained in the above-named subjects may be counted as electives 
in the student's curriculum, or may be formally substituted for required sub- 
jects if the curriculum does not offer sufficient elective opportunity. Approval 
as electives or substitutions is obtained only through the regular procedures. 
A total of not more than eight semester hours may be allowed a student for 
these subjects, and not more than two of these may be obtained in any one 
semester. 

BIBLE STUDY 

Bible study is an elective. Two semester hours are granted for each com- 
pleted one-year course. A student may get credit for not more than two 
courses. Instructors must have College approval as tutors; the Department of 
Education supervises the work and conducts the examination for credit. 

COURSE NUMBERS 

Each course offered bears a number indicating in a general way the classi- 
fication of students for whom it is given. Courses for undergraduates bear 
numbers 101 to 199, courses for undergraduates and graduates bear numbers 
201 to 299, and courses for graduates only bear numbers 301 to 399. Each de- 
partment numbers its courses independently. 

CLASSES 

The minimum numbers for which classes are organized are as follows: 

Freshmen 15 

Sophomores, juniors, or seniors 7 

This rule is varied only by special permission of the Board of Regents. 

COLLEGE ASSEMBLY 

The College Assembly is held one hour fortnightly. Students and' faculty 
gather in the College auditorium for the exercises, which consist of devotional 
services, usually conducted by a Manhattan minister; music by soloists, en- 
sembles, or the College orchestra; and an address by a prominent visitor or a 
member of the College faculty. 



Seventy-sixth Annual Catalogue 79 

COLLEGE PUBLICATIONS 

The official organ of the College is The Kansas Industrialist, published 
weekly and printed at the College by the Department of Industrial Journalism 
and Printing. It discusses the work of the College, investigations of the Ex- 
periment Stations, and local and alumni news. The Kansas Industrialist will 
be sent to any address for $3 a year. Alumni having active membership in 
the Alumni Association receive The Kansas Industrialist free of charge. 

The Kansas State Collegian, a semiweekly newspaper, and Royal Purple, the 
College year book, are published by the Board of Student Publications. 

The Kansas Agricultural Student is issued quarterly by the Agricultural 
Association of the Division of Agriculture, and The Kansas State Engineer is 
published by students in the Division of Engineering. 

COLLEGE POST OFFICE 

The College operates an office for the reception and delivery of mail. This 
is not a part of the United States postal service, but students and College of- 
fices may have their mail delivered there. Mail arrives from the Manhattan 
post office twice a day. The College post office sells stamps, but not money 
orders, and insures and registers mail. Its chief purpose, however, is to facili- 
tate intercommunication of College departments and communication of faculty 
with students. All students should call for their mail at least once every two 
days, and preferably every day. 

PARKING REGULATIONS 

Public Parks. There are two public automobile parks for general use by 
students, faculty members, employees, and visitors. One of these is northwest 
of Engineering Hall and the other is north of Waters Hall. No permits are 
required for the use of these parks. 

Restricted Parks. To accommodate crippled students and others having 
special need for parking spaces, a few small parks have been provided; permits 
for the exclusive use of these parks are issued when necessary. Each stall is 
assigned to a certain car and may be used by that car only. 

Parking on Driveways. No parking is permitted on driveways except dur- 
ing public exercises, and for a short time before and after them. 

BOARDING AND ROOMING HOUSES 

Students who are not residents of Manhattan live in rooming houses ap- 
proved by the College administration. The Department of Student Health in- 
spects the rooms and the Faculty Council on Student Affairs issues certificates 
of approval for those that are satisfactory. Young women should address cor- 
respondence about rooms and board to the dean of women, and upon arriving 
in Manhattan should visit her office or that of the secretary of the Y. W. C. A. 
Young men should address such correspondence to the adviser to men, and 
visit his office upon arriving in Manhattan. 

Van Zile Hall, a residence hall which accommodates 130 women students, is 
located on the campus. It is a beautifully furnished, well-equipped fireproof 
building of stone. Applications for rooms are considered in the order in which 
they are received. To validate an application for residence in the Hall a de- 
posit of $10 is required, which will be refunded in case of a change in plans, if 
request is made to the dean of women by August 25. The contract for room 
and board in Van Zile Hall is for a full semester (eighteen weeks) and the 
obligation is canceled only for reasons satisfactory to the dean of women. All 
correspondence about the residence hall should be addressed to the dean of 
women. 



80 Kansas State College 

SELF-SUPPORT 

Students of limited means are encouraged and aided in every possible way; 
but unless they are exceptionally strong, such students should take lighter work 
by extending their courses, if they are obliged to give any considerable time to 
self-support. As a rule, a student should have means for at least a semester, 
as some time is required to make acquaintances and to find suitable work. 

The College employs student labor to the extent of about $6,000 a month, 
at rates varying from 25 to 40 cents an hour, according to the nature of the 
employment and the experience of the employee. Most of this labor is on the 
College farm, in the orchards and gardens, in the shops and the printing office, 
and for the janitor. Students of exceptional ability are sometimes employed 
in special duties about the College. Many students secure employment in 
town; and there is some opportunity for obtaining board in exchange for work 
with families either in town or in the neighboring country. 

About a third of the students support themselves wholly, while another third 
support themselves in part. 



Seventy-sixth Annual Catalogue 81 



Undergraduate Degrees 



To be graduated, a student must complete a prescribed curriculum. Under 
special conditions such substitutions are allowed as the interests of the student 
demand. The total requirement, including military science or physical training, 
or both, is about 120 to 140 semester hours, according to the curriculum taken. 
(A semester hour is one hour of recitation or lecture work, or three hours of 
laboratory a week, for one semester of eighteen weeks. When no ambiguity is 
involved, the term "hour" is used for "semester hour" in this catalogue.) 

To be considered as a candidate for an undergraduate degree, a student 
must have completed in residence twenty of his last thirty undergraduate hours 
with not less than thirty hours of undergraduate work at this institution. 
Resident work is interpreted to include all regularly scheduled class or labora- 
tory instruction given by the regular College faculty, exclusive of Extension 
courses. In special cases candidates will be considered who have completed 
three full years of work in this institution and have taken their last year of 
work in an institution approved by the faculty. 

Seniors meeting the graduation requirement in hours but failing to meet it 
in points must take further courses designated by the dean of the division in 
which their major work lies, until the requirement in points is met. 

No student is considered a candidate for graduation in the spring who, at 
the beginning of the first semester, is deficient more than nine hours in ad- 
dition to his regular assignment for the 3 r ear. Candidates desiring to be 
graduated must make application to the registrar at least thirty days before 
the date of graduation. The candidate is responsible for complying with all 
requirements. 

A candidate for graduation must be present in person, unless he has ar- 
ranged in advance to receive his degree in absentia. The candidate must apply 
for this privilege to his dean. Degrees are conferred in the spring and in the 
summer. Candidates must be present at the Baccalaureate Exercises, unless 
excused by the Council of Deans. 

DEGREES 

The following degrees are conferred on completion of four-3 r ear curriculums: 

Bachelor of Science. 

Bachelor of Science in Agriculture (Agriculture; Agricultural Adminis- 
tration; Specialized Horticulture) 

Bachelor of Science in Agricultural Engineering 

Bachelor of Science in Architecture 

Bachelor of Science in Architectural Engineering 

Bachelor of Science in Business Administration (Business Administra- 
tion ; Business Administration and Accounting) 

Bachelor of Science in Chemical Engineering 

Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering 

Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering 

Bachelor of Science in Home Economics (Home Economics; Home Eco- 
nomics and Art; Home Economics and Institutional Management and 
Dietetics) 

Bachelor of Science in Industrial Arts 

Bachelor of Science in Industrial Chemistry 

Bachelor of Science in Industrial Journalism 

Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering 



6—6529 



82 Kansas State College 

Bachelor of Science in Milling Industry 
Bachelor of Music 

Bachelor of Science in Music Education 
Bachelor of Science in Physical Education 
Doctor of Veterinary Medicine 

The degree of Bachelor of Science in Home Economics and Nursing is con- 
ferred upon those who complete the five-and-one-half-year curriculum in Home 
Economics and Nursing. 

For a second bachelor's degree an additional year of not fewer than thirty 
semester hours is required. This work is in charge of the dean who admin- 
isters the curriculum chosen. 



Seventy-sixth Annual Catalogue 83 

College Organizations 



THE STUDENT GOVERNING ASSOCIATION 

The governing association of the student body was organized in the [spring, 
of 1919, as the Student Self-governing Association, and reorganized Wathie 
spring of 1926 as the Student Governing Association. V^> 

The executive council of the association consists of seven members, elec&d ^J* 
by the student body each spring for the following school year. The cou 
discharges all executive functions of the association, and sits as a court in dis 
ciplinary cases. Actions of the council are subject to approval by the faculty 
council. In cases of disagreement which are not compromised successfully, the 
decision of the president of the College is final. 

Officers of the association are president, vice-president, secretary, and treas- 
urer, elected by the council. Though the council sits as a committee of the 
whole in all its affairs, certain members are put in charge of certain activities, 
such as discipline, social affairs, etc. Membership in the student association is 
contingent upon payment of the student activity fee. 

THE CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATIONS 

THE YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 

All men students are welcome as members of the College Y. M. C. A. There 
is no fixed fee, but each member gives what he can afford. The work of the 
organization is carried on by a student cabinet, composed of the officers and 
the chairmen of the standing committees. Each year a freshman commission 
is organized for the benefit of the new men, especially those who have had 
Hi-Y experience. The Y. M. C. A. maintains an employment bureau for men 
students, and has a complete list of rooms and boarding places for men. The 
permanent, secretary is glad to correspond with prospective students and to 
receive them for interviews. 

THE YOUNG WOMEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 

The College Y. W. C. A. maintains an office and a reading room. The full- 
time secretary has the assistance of the student leaders of the association and 
of a group of local women. Through its college sister work the association en- 
deavors to reach every new woman student. Any young woman who expects 
to enter College may write to the secretary of the association for assignment 
to a college sister who will help her to make campus adjustments during the 
opening weeks of the College year. Cooperating with the dean of women, the 
association helps women students to find satisfactory rooms and boarding 
places, and maintains an employment bureau for them. 

THE NEWMAN CLUB 

On alternate Sundays, the Newman Club, an organization of Catholic stu- 
dents, holds meetings devoted to religious study supervised by the local pastor. 
The College authorities recognize this Bible study by allowing a two-hour 
credit for it when duly certified. There are social as well as religious meetings. 
Th^ club is affiliated with the national organization of Newman clubs of the 
state universities and colleges. Its aim is to foster sound morality, to develop 
character, and to promote the knowledge and practice of their faith among 
Catholic students. 

HONOR SOCIETIES 

A chapter of Phi Kappa Phi, membership in which is open to honor students 
in all departments of American universities and colleges, was installed at Kan- 
sas State College on November 15, 1915. Scholarship determines the eligibil- 
ity of undergraduates for membership. 

A chapter of Sigma Xi was installed at Kansas State College in March, 1928. 
Members of the faculty and graduate students who have shown noteworthy 




84 Kansas State College 

achievement in original investigation are eligible for election to active mem- 
bership; seniors who have shown marked excellence in two or more depart- 
ments of pure or applied science are eligible for election to associate member- 
ship. 

A chapter of Gamma Sigma Delta, national honor society of agriculture, was 
established at Kansas State College in May, 1914. Its object is the encourage- 
ment of scholarship in agricultural science and education, and of excellence in 
the practice of agricultural pursuits. Seniors in the upper one fourth of their 
class are eligible for election by the faculty members of the local chapter. 

A chapter of Omicron Nu was established at Kansas State College in 1915. 
Its object is the recognition and promotion of scholarship, leadership, and re- 
search in home economics. From the upper one-fourth of their class fifteen 
percent of the seniors, and from the upper one-fifth of their class five percent 
of the second semester juniors may be elected by the active faculty and stu- 
dent members of the local chapter. 

HONORARY AND PROFESSIONAL ORGANIZATIONS 

Tlrere are a number of honorary and professional fraternities, sororities, and 
societies in the College, membership in which is based on scholarship and 
achievement. They seek to promote the interests of the various divisions or 
departments which they serve or represent. The list of organizations follows: 

Organization Division or department- 
Alpha Kappa Psi Business 

Alpha Zeta Agriculture 

Blue Key Senior Men 

K Fraternity Athletics 

Kappa Eta Kappa Electrical Engineering 

Mortar and Ball Military 

Mortar Board Senior Women 

Mu Phi Epsilon Music 

Phi Delta Kappa Education 

Phi Epsilon Kappa Physical Education 

Phi Lambda Upsilon Chemistry 

Pi Kappa Delta Debating 

Pi Mu Epsilon Mathematics 

Quill Club College Writers 

Scabbard and Blade Military 

Sigma Delta Chi Industrial Journalism 

Sigma Tau Engineering 

Tau Epsilon Kappa Architecture 

Theta Sigma Phi Industrial Journalism 

AMERICAN CHEMICAL SOCIETY 

The Kansas State College section of the American Chemical Society arranges 
during the school year for monthly meetings which are usually addressed by 
eminent chemists from out of town. 

SCIENCE CLUB 

The Science Club, meeting monthly, is an organization of instructors, stu- 
dents, and others interested in science. Its programs include popular lectures 
by prominent men of science, papers giving the results of research work at the 
College, and discussions. 

AGRICULTURAL SOCIETIES 

The Agricultural Association meets during regular agricultural seminar pe- 
riods. Special meetings are held at the call of the president of the association. 
All resident students enrolled in the Division of Agriculture are members. The 
objectives of the association are to encourage and support divisional activities; 
to correlate the work of various clubs and other organizations of students 
within the division; and, in general, to have leaders elected and authorized to 
speak for the student body of the division at all times. 

The Agricultural Economics Club meets on the first and third Tuesdays of 
each month. Membership is open to students enrolled in the curriculum in 



Seventy-sixth Annual Catalogue 85 

agricultural administration, to majors in agricultural economics, to graduate 
students majoring or minoring in agricultural economics, and to members of 
the faculty whose work lies within the field of agricultural economics. The 
objectives of the club are to promote interest in agricultural economic topics 
and to further the acquaintanceship of faculty and students. Faculty members 
and outside speakers are usually secured for programs. Some social meetings 
are held each year. 

The Alpha Mu Club meets on the second Monday of each month during the 
college year. Its object is to promote interest in milling and its closely as- 
sociated fields. Membership is open to those taking the milling industry cur- 
riculum, the milling faculty, and others associated with the milling industry. 
Outside speakers are frequently secured for programs. 

The Block and Bridle Club meets on the first and third Tuesdays of each 
month. Membership is open to students majoring in animal husbandry and 
to students signifying their intention of majoring in animal husbandry. The 
object of the club is to promote the interests of animal husbandry in the Col- 
lege and in the state. Livestock problems of all kinds are discussed, and mem- 
bers of the faculty and outside speakers are secured for addresses on special 
topics. 

The Dairy Club meets on the first and third Tuesdays of each month. 
Membership is open to anyone who is taking any four-year curriculum in the 
Division of Agriculture and also to anyone actively engaged in dairy work at 
the College. The object of the organization is the furtherance of dairying in 
Kansas. Current topics and records of the dairy breeds are read and lectures 
on special subjects are given by faculty and outside speakers. 

The Horticultural Club meets the first and third Mondays of each month 
during the College year. Its object is to promote the horticultural interests of 
the state and to afford opportunity for students to improve their knowledge 
of horticulture. Faculty members and students of the college interested in 
horticulture are eligible for membership. Students present the majority of the 
programs. 

The Klod and Kernel Club meets on the second and fourth Tuesdays of 
each month. Membership is open to all students and members of the agro- 
nomic faculty. The object of the society is to arouse more interest in agro- 
nomic work and to help students and faculty members of the department of 
agronomy to become better acquainted. Faculty members and outside speak- 
ers appear on the programs. 

The Poultry Club meets each Tuesday during the fall semester and irreg- 
ularly during the spring semester. Membership is open to all students major- 
ing in poultry husbandry and to members of the faculty teaching or carrying 
on research in poultry husbandry. The object of the club is the promotion of 
interest in poultry husbandry in the college and state. Problems of current 
interest in the field of poultry husbandry are discussed by the students and 
faculty. Some social meetings are also held. 

ENGINEERING SOCIETIES 

All the students enrolled in the Division of Engineering and Architecture 
are members of the Engineering Association, which meets usually once each 
month. In addition, the students in agricultural, chemical, civil, electrical, and 
mechanical engineering are organized as student branches of the American 
Society of Agricultural Engineers, the American Institute of Chemical En- 
gineers, the American Society of Civil Engineers, the American Institute of 
Electrical Engineers, and the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, re- 
spectively. The Gargoyle Club conducts the meetings of the students in 
architecture. The Kansas State Glider Club is an organization open to all 
students interested in glider flying; meetings are held weekly, and flying oper- 
ations are supervised by experienced glider pilots. 

The purpose of these various societies is to acquaint the students with the 
latest developments in engineering and architecture, to give them more definite 
ideas as to the opportunities and the requirements for success in their profes- 



86 Kansas State College 

sions, to promote acquaintance and fellowship among the students, and to fur- 
ther the interests of the Division of Engineering and Architecture in the Col- 
lege and in the state. 

POPENOE CLUB 

The Popenoe Entomological Club meets twice a month. The object of the 
club is to promote interest in entomological work at the College. Membership 
is open to students and faculty members interested in insects. Entomological 
topics are discussed by members of the club and outside speakers. The club 
sponsors occasional field trips. 

HOME ECONOMICS CLUB 

The Margaret Justin Home Economics Club includes all students in the 
Division of Home Economics. Its purpose is to promote professional interest 
by means of social contacts and talks by leaders in home economics. It is 
affiliated with the American Home Economics Association and leads to con- 
tinued membership in that organization after graduation. 

VETERINARY MEDICAL ASSOCIATION 

The Junior Chapter of the American Veterinary Medical Association is a 
student organization in affiliation with the American Veterinary Medical As- 
sociation. The object of the chapter is to promote interest and knowledge in 
veterinary science. The organization meets on the second and fourth Thurs- 
days of each month; students present papers, and members of the faculty and 
outside speakers also appear on the program. 

COLLEGIATE 4-H CLUB 

The Collegiate 4-H Club is composed of former 4-H Club members among 
the College students. Its purpose is to maintain the interest of its members in 
extension and 4-H Club work, to develop more effective leadership in such 
work, to maintain and increase a loan fund for 4-H Club members in college, 
and in general to aid and promote the well-being of former 4-H Club members 
at Kansas State College. It participates actively in many campus activities 
and lends its aid to the various extension activities conducted on the campus 
or in connection with the College. The club publishes each year the yearbook 
of 4-H Club work in Kansas known as the "Who's Whoot." Outside speakers 
are frequently secured, and the organization sends representatives to various 
national or interstate student conventions or meetings. 

THE COLLEGE BANDS 

The three college bands, the Concert Band, the Varsity Band, and the 
Military Band, are student organizations, membership in which is voluntary. 
The Concert Band is limited in membership to men only, meets for rehearsal 
or drill three times a week, plays a number of concerts, and performs for var- 
ious functions on and off the campus. 

The Varsity Band is in part a training unit for the Concert Band. It is open 
to the entire student body, women being admitted after December 1, when 
the outdoor drill season closes. It meets three times a week for drill or re- 
hearsal, plays several concerts, and performs for various functions on the 
campus. 

From the opening of school in the fall until December 1 the two bands are 
drilled together to form a marching band, which plays for football games and 
other outdoor spectacles. 

The Military Band is a strictly military organization, made up of Basic 
Course R. O. T. C. members who are assigned to Military Band duties in lieu 
of drill and technical military instruction. It is limited in its membership, and 
attendance of the members upon its exercises is obligatory. 



Seventy-sixth Annual Catalogue 87 

Membership in all band units is determined by competitive tryouts. Regu- 
lar assignment to Concert Band or Varsity Band may carry one-half hour of 
credit a semester. 

Men pay a membership fee of 50<^ for the Concert and Varsity Bands and 
a deposit of $2. 

THE COLLEGE ORCHESTRA 

The Orchestra is a student organization connected with the Department of 
Music, membership in which is voluntary. Its daily training under competent 
leadership results in the acquisition of a considerable repertory. 

ATHLETIC ORGANIZATIONS 

Kansas State College gives complete physical training. In addition to gym- 
nasium classes and the physical training of the military corps of cadets, intra- 
mural sports as well as varsity games are popular. Every encouragement is 
given to a man who wishes to play football, basketball, baseball, or tennis, or 
to take part in track athletics. Only the most proficient enter intercollegiate 
contests, but others receive sound instruction and get considerable enjoyment 
from their athletics. All professionalism is strictly repressed and the athletic 
rules adopted by the faculty prevent students deficient in their studies from 
participating in intercollegiate games. Kansas State College is a member in 
good standing of the Big Six Conference. 

Young women as well as young men have opportunity to develop themselves 
physically. In the part of the gymnasium reserved for their use they not only 
carry out a program of physical education, but likewise enjoy many intramural 
sports, such as basketball, tennequoit, dancing, and swimming. Orchesis, a na- 
tional interpretive dancing organization, the swimmers' Frog Club, and other 
athletic groups are active at the College. All the work of the Women's Ath- 
letic Association, as well as in the required courses, is under the supervision of 
the professor of physical education for women. 

LITERARY SOCIETIES 

The literary societies of the College, four in number, are wholly student or- 
ganizations, holding weekly meetings in the College buildings. The Ionian and 
Browning societies admit only women to membership ; the Hamilton and the 
Athenian societies admit only men. These societies jointly maintain an ora- 
torical board which arranges for the intersociety oratorical contest. 

COSMOPOLITAN CLUB 

There is in the College a chapter of the Association of Cosmopolitan Clubs 
in Universities and Colleges of America. The active membership consists of 
foreign and American students, both men and women. The objective of the 
club is to promote international understanding through friendship among stu- 
dents of various nationalities. 



88 Kansas State College 



Loan Funds 

All student loan activities are coordinated in the office of the executive sec- 
retary of the Kansas State College Alumni Association, Anderson Hall. A 
student wishing to apply for a loan from any fund listed below should address 
his request to Kenney L. Ford, Secretary, K. S. C. Alumni Association. 

The State Board of Regents has established rules governing the administra- 
tion of student loan funds. These rules include the following: 

1. A student loan is made only when a note is signed by the borrower and 
one other responsible person, preferably the borrower's parents or guardian. 
This endorser must be recommended by his bank as of good financial standing 
and as otherwise satisfactory as an endorser. 

2. In general, loans will be made only to juniors, seniors, and graduate stu- 
dents who have attended Kansas State College for at least one semester, and 
preferably for one year, and who have a scholarship average of at least C. 

3. The maximum total amount loaned from all loan funds to one individual 
usually shall not exceed $250. 

ALUMNI LOAN FUNDS 

The Alumni Loan Fund. The Alumni Association of Kansas State Col- 
lege has created a loan fund, chiefly from payments for life memberships in 
the association. Members pay the association $3 a year, but on payment of 
$50 in one sum they are relieved from further dues. If husband and wife are 
both eligible for membership they may obtain joint membership by paying 
$75. The fund so created, about $70,412, is administered by a committee ap- 
pointed by the directors of the Alumni Association. The committee announces 
no specific rules governing the granting of loans, but in general gives preference 
to junior and senior students, and to loans of smaller amounts on short time 
over larger amounts which cannot be paid for several 3'ears. Interest is 
charged at the rate of six percent a year. Alumni are urged to take life mem- 
berships and thus add to the funds available to worthy students. 

Acknowledgment of additions to the life membership fund is made in this 
place from year to year. Since the last report, up to and including September 
20, 1938, the following alumni have completed payments for life membership : 
Lyman Abbott, A. W. Aicher, Theodore Appl, W. R. Ballard, W. L. and Alta 
(Handlin) Blizzard, James P. Bonfield, Andrew Boss, David G. Brandt, Vira 
Brown, Frank S. Campbell, L. L. Compton, Ralph Conrad, Ralph M. Crowell, 
William E. Forney, Sina Faye Fowler, Myrtle Gohlke, Lloyd O. Gugler, John 
Oscar Johnson, Aldene (Scantlin) Langford, C. F. Laude, Allen V. Lester, Dan 
McLachlan, Abby L. Marlatt, F. A. Marlatt, A. H. Montford, Louise S. Moyer, 
Elmer L. Munger, Karl B. and Madge (Rowley) Musser, Norris W. Nelson, 
John L. Noble, Mildred (Bobb) Paulsen, Marion E. Phillips, H. A. and Edna 
(Grizzell) Praeger, David A. Reid, Earl H. Regnier, Harold G. Rethmeyer, 
Henry W. and Maud (Sauble) Rogler, Carl H. Rupp, Mrs. Lucile O. Rust, 
Glen R. Sawyer, Herbert G. Schultz, Lois Scripter, Harry G. Sitler, Louis V. 
Skidmore, Oscar Steanson, Jean P. Sullivan, Raymond J. and Amy (Jones) 
Tillotson, Theodore R. Varney and O. O. Wolf. This list brings the total of 
paid-up life members to 890. 

GIFTS, MEMORIALS, AND BEQUESTS 

The Alumni Association of Kansas State College is incorporated under the 
laws of Kansas to administer gifts and bequests to the college. Any person 
wishing information about making such gifts or bequests may communicate 
with Kenney L. Ford, secretary of the Alumni Association. The following 
gifts and bequests are now administered by the Alumni Association as units 
in the Alumni Loan Fund: 

Albert Dickens, '93, Memorial. $1,912.70. contributed by friends, alumni, 
and facultv members. 



Seventy-sixth Annual Catalogue 89 

J. M. Westgate, '97, Memorial. $1,250. $1,000 a bequest of J. M. Westgate; 
$250 given in his memory by Mark W. and Philip J. Westgate. 

J. Chester Allen, '82, Memorial. $1,000, given by E. A. Allen, '87, in 
memory of his brother. 

Frances M. Allen Memorial. $1,000, given by E. A. Allen, '87, in memory 
of his wife. 

Vilona Cutler, '17, Endowment Membership. $1,000; a loan to relatives 
of the donor and, upon repayment, to other students. 

J. U. Higinbotham, '86, and Mrs. Higinbotham. $1,000. 

Nellie Sawyer Kedzie, '76, Unit. $801.60, contributed by friends and former 
students. 

Samuel and Eleanor Thackrey Memorial. $696.75, given by their de- 
scendants. 

Kary C. Davis, '91, Memorial. $500. given bv his widow, Fannv Waugh 
Davis, '91. 

Lydia Gardiner Willard Fund. . $500. given bv her husband, J. T. Wil- 
lard, '83. 

Venus Kimble Wilson, '08, Memorial. $400, given bv her husband, Bruce 
Wilson, '08. 

Albert Dietz, '85. $117.97. 

E. A. Allen, '87. $100, on the fiftieth anniversary of his graduation. 
Clara F. Castle, '94, Memorial. $100. 
Jacob Lund, '83, Memorial. $70. 

C. H. Stiles, f. s. '81, Memorial, $50, given bv his widow, Nellie Cottrell 

Stiles, '87. 

E. C. Trembly, '95, Memorial. $50. 

Ethel Arnold, '18, Memorial. $26, contributed by her students. 

OTHER UNITS IN THE ALUMNI LOAN FUND 

Manhattan Chamber of Commerce. $3,023.72. 

4-H Club. Approximately $1,500, loaned in units of $50 to former success- 
ful 4-H Club members. Created bv the Collegiate 4-H Club bv publishing 
'Who's Whoot," annual 4-H Club Book of Kansas. 

Ao Fair Unit. $850, a temporary loan from the Ag Fair Board for aid to 
students in the Division of Agriculture. 

Cosmopolitan Club. $700, for foreign members of the Cosmopolitan Club. 

Klod and Kernel Klub Unit. $200, for students in the Department of 
Agronomy. 

Future Farmers Unit. $180, from high-school vocational agriculture stu- 
dents and teachers. 

Phi Kappa Phi. $150, for members or pledges of Phi Kappa Phi. 

Sigma Delta Chi. $150, for students in Industrial Journalism. 
Classes : 

Class of 1916. $100. 

Class of 1919. $622.47. 

Class of 1922. $106.39. 

Class of 1923. $76.16. 

Class of 1926. $9.13. 

Class of 1927. $3.10. 



90 Kansas State College 

Contributions to the Chimes Fund, at present used in the Alumni Loan 
Fund : 

Class of 1929. $674.12. 
Class of 1930. $647.30. 
Class of 1931. $592.38. 
Class of 1932. $647.37. 
Class of 1935. $57.50. 
Class of 1936. $111.50. 
The Architectural Unit. 



LOAN FUNDS ADMINISTERED BY THE COLLEGE 

Lockhart Student Loan Scholarships. The Lockhart Loan Fund is de- 
rived from a bequest to the college by the late George N. Lockhart, and was 
devised as "a fund to assist male students through college by means of loans, 
at a reasonable rate of interest . . ." 

1. Seven loan scholarships are available each year to male graduates of 
Kansas high schools entering the freshman class in Kansas State College, one 
scholarship to be awarded each year in each of the seven congressional districts 
of the state if such distribution is practicable. 

2. Ten loan scholarships are available each year to male students trans- 
ferring with advanced credit from other Kansas colleges. 

3. The fund is administered by the Lockhart Student Loan Fund Commit- 
tee, W. E. Grimes, chairman, to whom correspondence may be addressed. 

Fannie J. Hamilton. $6,000 bequeathed by John O. Hamilton, in memory 
of his wife. 

Henry Jackson Waters. Royalties received from sales in Kansas during 
the first five years after publication of The Essentials of Agriculture , by former 
President Waters; augmented by gifts from Senator Arthur Capper and L. R. 
Eakin, and others. More than $5,000 available for emergency loans of $50 to 
$150. 

Social Club. $3,000, loaned by the Kansas State College Social Club. 

Belle Selby Curtice, '82. $1,000, available to women in the curriculum in 
Home Economics. 

D. A. R. $750, available to men and women students. 

Student Emergency. $540, available for short-term loans not in excess 
of $15. 

Franklin Literary Society. More than $300. 

Woman's Club of Manhattan. Available to both men and women. 

Housemothers' Club. Available to undergraduates. 

LOAN FUNDS NOT ADMINISTERED BY THE COLLEGE 

American Association of University Women. Maintained by the Man- 
hattan branch of the Association and available to a graduate woman student. 

State Federation of Women's Clubs. For women students. 

Women's Pan-Hellenic. For women students. 

P. E. O. For women students. 

Masonic. Established by the Knights Templar Commandery, available to 
junior and senior men and women. Applicants should seek recommendations 
from the commandery with whose members they may be acquainted. 

Order of the Eastern Star. For members and sons and daughters of mem- 
bers if juniors or seniors. Applications are passed on in August for the first 



Seventy-sixth Annual Catalogue 91 

semester and in January for the second, but should be filed considerably earlier. 
For information address the Grand Secretary, The Order of the Eastern Star, 
National Reserve Building, Topeka. 

Rebecca Dubbs, '28, Memorial. Established by members of her family to 
assist students in any college in Kansas who are graduates of any high school 
in Ness, Lane, Scott, Wichita, Greeley, or Gove counties. For information 
address Mr. G. G. Hays, Ransom, Kan. 



92 Kansas State College 

Scholarships and Assistantships 

SCHOLARSHIPS 

Capper. $300. The annual gift of Senator Arthur Capper, divided equally 
between the boy and the girl standing highest in the 4-H leadership project in 
Kansas. 

Sears, Roebuck. Fifteen scholarships of $150, the annual gift of Sears, Roe- 
buck and Company to leading high-school graduates who have distinguished 
themselves in 4-H Clubs or in vocational agriculture, and whose attendance 
at college is dependent on such an award. From the holders of these scholar- 
ships a student is selected at the end of the freshman year to receive an ad- 
ditional award of $200, to apply on the expenses of his sophomore year. 

Union Pacific. $100 scholarships, the gift of the Union Pacific Railroad 
Company, to winners in 4-H Club work and in the study of vocational agri- 
culture in thirty-six counties named ; to be used to enroll for a full-year course 
in agriculture or home economics. 

La Verne Notes. $1,000 annually from the trustees of the estate of La 
Verne Noyes, to deserving and necessitous students who served in the army 
or the navy of the United States between April 6, 1917, and September 11, 
1918; or are descended by blood from some one who so served. Enlistments 
must have been previous to May 11, 1918, unless active overseas, prearmistice 
service was rendered. The student's dean must have all applications for these 
scholarships by August 1 preceding the academic year in which the scholarship 
is desired. 

GRADUATE ASSISTANTSHIPS 

Graduate assistantships and graduate research assistantships have been 
established for some years by action of the Board of Regents, and are available 
in several departments of the College. See Division of Graduate Study. 



Seventy-sixth Annual Catalogue 93 

Prizes and Medals 

PRIZES 

Klod and Kernel Klub. Cash prizes, trophies, merchandise, and subscrip- 
tions to farm papers; for grain judging. 

Department of Poultry Husbandry. Prizes to the value of $100; for poul- 
try judging. 

Department of Architecture. Books to leading freshmen, sophomores, and 
juniors in architecture. 

American Institute of Chemical Engineers. A certificate of merit to the 
sophomore in chemical engineering ranking highest in his freshman year. 

American Society of Civil Engineers. To the civil engineer ranking high- 
est during his senior year, payment of the initiation fee into the American 
Society of Civil Engineers. 

Capper. The leading student in agricultural journalism each year has his 
name engraved upon one of several small shields surrounding a larger shield 
bearing the words: "Recognition for superior attainments in Agricultural 
Journalism. Presented by Arthur Capper to students in the Department of 
Industrial Journalism and Printing, Kansas State College." 

Chi Omega. By the Kappa Alpha Chapter; $25 to the woman ranking 
highest in sociology at the end of the first semester. 

Margaret Russel Scholarship Award. By Phi Alpha Mu; $50 to the jun- 
ior woman enrolled in the curriculum in general science ranking highest at the 
close of the second semester of her sophomore year. To be eligible a student 
must have done her sophomore work in the Division of General Science in 
Kansas State College. 

Phi Beta Kappa. $10; to the highest ranking eight-semester senior in the 
curriculum in general science. 

Quill Club. $10; for the best short story in the annual contest. 

Omicron Nu Scholarship Award. $10; to the highest ranking freshman in 
the Division of Home Economics. 

Prizes in Veterinary Medicine 

Dr. Benjamin F. Pfister, '21, and Dr. Earl F. Hoover, '24. $15 and $10; as 
alumni prizes in general efficiency; to seniors. 

Dr. C. W. Bower, '18. $10 and $5; for senior students leading in work in 
the small-animal clinic. 

Dr. O. M. Franklin, '12. $10 and $5; to seniors ranking highest in pathology. 

Dr. N. D. Harwood, '18. $10 and $5; for sophomores ranking highest in 
physiology. 

Dr. C. E. Salsbery, representing the alumni of the suspended Kansas City 
Veterinary College. $10 and $5; for juniors ranking highest in therapeutics. 

MEDALS 

Block and Bridle Club. For stock judging: gold, silver, and two bronze. 

Student Dairy Club. For dairy judging: gold, silver and bronze. 

Alpha Rho Chi. To the graduating senior in the Department of Archi- 
tecture selected for leadership and professional merit. 

American Institute of Architects. To the leading senior architect. 



94 Kansas State College 

Electrical Engineering. Gold and silver; to seniors who have made the 
best records in twenty semester hours of required subjects in electrical en- 
gineering. Gold and silver; to the highest ranking juniors who have com- 
pleted at least eighty semester hours of the required curriculum in electrical 
engineering. 

Sigma Tau Scholarship Award. To three sophomore engineering students 
ranking highest in their freshman year. 

Alpha Kappa Psi. By the Alpha Omega Chapter; a scholarship medallion 
to the highest ranking junior man enrolled in the curriculum in business ad- 
ministration. 

Oratory. By the literary societies through the Inter-Society Council; three 
cash and medal prizes in the Inter-Society Oratorical Contest. 

By the Missouri Valley Oratorical Association; cash and medal awards in 
its annual contest. 



Seventy-sixth Annual Catalogue 95 



Student Health 

Head Physician Husband Head Hospital Nurse Strnad 

Assistant Physician Frane Nurse Cole 

Assistant Physician Gleason Nurse Peltier 

Assistant Physician Montgomery-Short Nurse Phillips 

Assistant Physician Schwartz Technician Brown 

Head Dispensary Nurse Umrerger 

The Department of Student Health is supported by the student-health 
fee fund. There are five full-time physicians, five nurses, and a technician in 
the department. The College Hospital has a capacity of fifty beds. 

The offices of the department are in Anderson Hall and are open to stu- 
dents each school day from 7:45 a m. to 5 p. m. Students have the privilege 
of consulting any of the College physicians on any question of personal hy- 
giene. Students who need medical service and are able to walk should go to 
the department offices, unless there is a possibility that they have a con- 
tagious disease. Those who are unable to walk, or who suspect that they have 
some contagion, should go to the hospital at once. The College maintains no 
ambulance service. The health department observes the same holidays and 
vacations as other departments of the College. 

The College hospital is ready to receive students at any hour of the day 
or night, but patients are admitted only on the recommendation of staff physi- 
cians. Hospital service does not include major surgical cases, such as appen- 
dicitis, hernia, etc. If such a case develops while the student is in the hospital, 
he will be transferred, at his own expense, to a hospital of his choice. The 
College physicians are not required to treat chronic diseases, but, if practicable, 
may handle them as they do acute cases. They do not treat fractures and 
dislocations of a serious nature, but may handle minor cases at the option 
of the head physician. Students with fractures are admitted to the hospital. 

During a regular semester not to exceed three days, and during the nine- 
weeks summer school not to exceed two days of hospitalization may be pro- 
vided for each student without charge ; for additional hospitalization, a charge 
of $1 a day is made. Students admitted to the hospital or remaining in the 
hospital at a time for which the student-health fee has not been paid, or 
during Christmas holidays, will be charged $2 a day for hospitalization. 

The following charges are made for the indicated special services which are 
optional with students: (1) for X-rays, $1 for large-size films, 50 cents for 
medium-size films, and 25 cents for small-size films; (2) for each basal metab- 
olism test, 75 cents. All ordinary medicines and dressings are furnished free 
both at the hospital and at the dispensary. The services of the college physi- 
cians and standard hospital nursing service are free, but a student may employ, 
at his own expense, any physician or private nurse he may desire. 



96 Kansas State College 



The College Library 

Librarian Smith Assistant Loan Librarian Cui.lipher 

Associate Librarian Derby Assistant Loan Librarian Owsley 

Loan Librarian Camp Head Cataloguer Baker 

Reference Librarian Davis Assistant Cataloguer Mtjlleb 

Documents Librarian Hoff Documents Cataloguer Roberts 

Assistanl Reference Librarian Swenson Continuations As>istant Baxtkr 

Assistant Reference Librarian Stover Class Reserves Assistant Diller 

The general College Library consists of all books belonging to the College, 
including the library of the Agricultural Experiment Station, which is incor- 
porated with it. On June 30. 1938, the Library contained 118,909 bound vol- 
umes, besides much unbound material. It receives currently about 1,100 serial 
publications. As a depository the Library receives the documents and other 
publications of the United States government. The books are classified ac- 
cording to the Dewey system and are indexed in a dictionary card catalogue. 
The Library is primarily for free reference, but the privilege of drawing books 
is accorded to all of those connected with the College as registered students or 
as members of the faculty. Books not specially reserved may be drawn for 
home use for two weeks. All books are subject to recall at any time. 

General reference books, books reserved for classes, general periodicals, and 
certain other groups of books are to be consulted only in the reading rooms. 
They may not be loaned from the Library except when the reading rooms are 
closed. They must be returned to the Library by the time it next reopens. 
Any violation of the regulations of the Library subjects the offender to a fine 
or to a withdrawal of library privileges, or to both, according to the gravity of 
the offense. More serious offenses, such as mutilation or theft of books or 
periodicals, are considered just causes for suspension or expulsion of the of- 
fender, who is also required to make good the loss incurred. 

Reading Rooms. Three reading rooms are maintained in connection with 
the Library: the general reference room, containing encyclopedias, dictionaries, 
atlases, bibliographies, and general reference books; the special reference room, 
containing books reserved for classes; and the periodical room, containing cur- 
rent magazines and the important daily and weekly Kansas newspapers. These 
rooms are freely open to the student and to the public for purposes of reading 
and study. 

Divisional Libraries. Divisional and departmental collections are deposited 
in certain College buildings apart from the main Library. These collections 
are for the special convenience of the instructors and students of the depart- 
ments concerned. They are under the direction of the librarian and are acces- 
sible to all students at regular hours. 



The Division of Graduate Study 

James Edward Ackeht, Dean 



ADMISSION 

Correspondence regarding admission to graduate study should be addressed 

to the (loan of the Division of Graduate Study, who will on request supply the 
required application blanks. Each applicant who is not a graduate of this 
College must submit with his application an official transcript of his college 
record. 

Admission to graduate study is granted to graduates of institutions whose 
requirements for the bachelor's degree are substantially equivalent to those of 
Kansas State College. Admission to graduate study, however, may not be con- 
strued to imply admission to candidacy for an advanced degree. Such can- 
didacy is determined after the student has demonstrated by his work for a 
period of two months or longer (M.S.), or approximately two years (Ph.D.), 
that he has the ability to do graduate work of major rank. 

REGISTRATION 

Students who have been admitted to graduate study register, obtain their 
assignments from the dean of the division, and pay their fees during the reg- 
ular registration periods. 

FEES* 

Graduate students are subject to the same fees as other students except that 
(1) they are exempt from the student-health fee; (2) they pay the student- 
activity fee in summer school, only; and (3) the fee for problem or research 
work pursued in absentia is $2.50 a semester hour. 

ASSIGNMENTS 

Not more than sixteen hours, including research, may be assigned in a single 
semester, nor more than eight hours during the nine-week summer school, nor 
more than four hours during the four-week summer school. Students holding 
graduate assistantships may not be assigned to more than twelve hours, in- 
cluding thesis, in one semester. 

GRADESt 

A candidate for an advanced degree must make a grade of B or higher in 
three-fourths of the hours taken for the degree, including research. A failure 
or absence from examination in any course may prevent the conferring of 
the degree, and failure in any course in the major field precludes conferring 
the degree in the same year. 

DEGREES 

Of the advanced academic degrees, the College confers the degrees Master 
of Science and Doctor of Philosophy. Degrees are conferred at the end of the 
second semester and of the summer school. Candidates for advanced aca- 
demic degrees are required to be present at commencement exercises in the 
academic costume and hood appropriate for the degree, unless arrangements 
have been made in advance for the conferring of the degree in absentia. Ap- 

* Sir section headed Fees, under General Information. 
t See section headed Grades, under General Information. 

(97) 
7—6529 



98 



Kansas State College 



plication for this privilege should be made to the dean of the Division of 
Graduate Study. Candidates for degrees at the end of the second semester 
are required to be present at the exercises of Baccalaureate Sunday also, unless 
excused by the Council of Deans. 

GENERAL REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREES MASTER OF 
SCIENCE AND DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY 

Candidates for the degrees Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy 
are expected to assume the initiative and the responsibility. It is important 
to recognize that graduate work does not consist in the fulfillment of routine 
requirements alone. The various courses, as well as the assistance and advice 
of the instructors, are to be regarded simply as aids in acquiring the methods, 
discipline, and spirit of independent research. 

Each candidate for a degree is expected to have a wide knowledge of his 
subject and of related lines of work, which usually is obtained only by a 
wide range of private reading and study outside of the immediate field cov- 
ered by the formal courses to which he may be assigned. 

The branch of knowledge to which the student expects to devote the 
larger part of his time is termed his major subject. The other fields of study 
selected, which necessarily are more restricted in scope, are termed minor 
subjects. The latter should be so chosen as to make the candidate proficient 
in a second field. 

Approximately two-thirds of the student's time is devoted to his major 
subject and one-third to one or more minor subjects. The word subject is 
used to designate a recognized field of study, and is not defined by the limits 
of a department. The nature and distribution of the majors and minors 
(program of study) are approved by the Graduate Council, upon the recom- 
mendation of the major instructor and the head of the department (M.S.), 
or of the supervisory committee (Ph.D.). 

The approved program of study is the basis of the formal assignment to 
courses at the beginning of each semester and of the summer school. 

Courses numbered in the two hundreds are open to both graduate and 
undergraduate students. For graduate credit in such courses, the student must 
do extra work, the nature and amount of which is determined by the instructor. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE MASTER OF SCIENCE 

Major work leading to the degree Master of Science is offered in the follow- 
ing departments or major fields: 



Division op Agriculture : 

Agronomy 

Animal Husbandry 

Dairy Husbandry 

Economics and Sociology 

Horticulture 

Milling Industry 

Poultry Husbandry 
Division of Engineering: 

Agricultural Engineering 

Applied Mechanics 

Architecture 

Chemical Engineering 

Civil Engineering 

Electrical Engineering 

Machine Design 

Mechanical Engineering 

Shop Practice and Industrial Arts 
Division of General Science : 

Bacteriology 

Botany and Plant Pathology 

Chemistry 

Economics and Sociology 



Education* 

English 

Entomology 

Geology 

History and Government 

Industrial Journalism and Printing 

Mathematics 

Physics 

Psychology 

Public Speaking 

Zoology 
Division of Home Economics: 

Art 

Child Welfare and Euthenics 

Clothing and Textiles 

Food Economics and Nutrition 

General Home Economics 

Household Economics 

Institutional Management 
Division of Veterinary Medicine: 

Anatomy and Physiology 

Pathology 



* In graduate work in education, major emphasis is placed upon rural and vocational 
education. 



Division of Graduate Study 99 

Minor graduate work is offered in each of the above departments and in 
the departments of Modern Languages, Physical Education, and Surgery and 
Medicine. 

Residence Requirements. Candidates for the degree Master of Science 
(M.S.) are required to spend one collegiate year in residence, except under 
certain special conditions when the residence may be reduced to one and one- 
half semesters, or three nine-week summer schools. The equivalent of thirty 
semester hours, including a thesis, must be satisfactorily completed. 

Language Requirements. A reading knowledge of two modern foreign 
languages is desirable. 

Master's Thesis. Each candidate for a master's degree is required to pre- 
sent a thesis on some subject approved by the major instructor, the head of 
the department, and the Graduate Council. (See general requirements for 
the master's and doctor's degrees.) 

The thesis ordinarily demands one-fourth of the student's time and may 
not exceed one-third of it. The thesis and special reports upon it must be 
prepared in accordance with specifications to be obtained from the office of 
the dean of the Division of Graduate Study. 

A candidate for the master's degree is subject to an oral examination cov- 
ering the major and minor subjects and thesis by a committee consisting of in- 
structors with whom the major and minor work was taken, the head of the 
major department, and a member of the Graduate Council as chairman. The 
dean of the division in which the major work is offered is a member ex officio. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY 

Departments Offering Major Work. Major work leading to the degree 
Doctor of Philosophy is offered in the following fields: Bacteriology, Chem- 
istry, Entomology, Plant Genetics, Poultry Genetics, Genetics, and Milling 
Industry. Minor work for this degree may be chosen in the departments offer- 
ing major work for the degree and in supporting fields in other departments 
offering graduate work. 

Residence and Credit Requirements. At least three years (of nine months 
each) of graduate study beyond the bachelor's degree, equivalent to 90 se- 
mester hours, including a thesis, are required of candidates for the degree 
Doctor of Philosophy. At least one year of this time must be spent in resi- 
dence at this College. 

Language Requirements. Each candidate for the degree Doctor of Philos- 
ophy must demonstrate to the head of the Department of Modern Languages, 
or to members of his staff designated by him, ability to read the literature of 
the major field in two modern foreign languages, to be designated by the su- 
pervisory committee. The language requirements shall be fulfilled before the 
preliminary examinations are taken. 

Supervisory Committee. For each student who contemplates working for 
the degree Doctor of Philosophy, a supervisory committee is chosen by the 
dean of the Division of Graduate Study. This committee, consisting of not 
fewer than five members representing the major and minor fields, aids the stu- 
dent in the preparation of the program of study, which must be approved by 
the Graduate Council, and has charge of all examinations except the language 
examinations. The chairman of the preliminary and final examinations is a 
member of the Graduate Council. 

Majors and Minors. Approximately two-thirds of the graduate work (pro- 
gram of study) shall be in a major field and the remainder devoted to one or 
two minors. In exceptional cases, all the graduate work may be chosen in 
one field. The work in the major field may be taken wholly within a depart- 
ment or it may include closely related courses and problems in other de- 
partments or divisions of the College. The same principle applies to the minor 



100 Kansas State College 

or minors. (See general requirements for the degrees Master of Science and 
Doctor of Philosophy.) 

Program of Study and Examinations. Students enrolling in graduate study 
leading to the degree Doctor of Philosophy work on a tentative program of 
study until approximately two-thirds of the program, including a substantial 
portion of the thesis, has been completed. Ordinarily at the close of the 
second year of graduate study, and not later than the beginning of the year 
in which the student contemplates, receiving the degree, the candidate must 
pass written and oral preliminary examinations over the entire field of study. 
When the student has passed the language examinations and the preliminary 
ones, he is recommended by the supervisory committee to the Graduate Coun- 
cil for admission to candidacy for the degree Doctor of Philosophy. The 
program of study leading to the degree accompanies the recommendation. 

On completion of three years of graduate study as prescribed in the pro- 
gram of study and on submission of a thesis satisfactory to the supervisory 
committee, at least one month before commencement, the candidate is given 
the final examination. 

Doctor's Thesis. Early in the graduate work a thesis subject is chosen in 
the major field and approved by the supervisory committee. The finished 
thesis must constitute a contribution to knowledge, either presenting conclu- 
sions from new material, or reinterpreting previous knowledge. Two complete 
typewritten copies of the thesis approved by the supervisory committee shall 
be submitted to the dean of the Division of Graduate Study at least one month 
before commencement. On the completion of all requirements for the degree, 
one copy shall be placed in the College library and the other filed with the 
head of the department in which the major work is taken. 

Before the degree is conferred the candidate shall guarantee the printing of 
the doctor's thesis (wholly or in part as determined by the supervisory com- 
mittee) within three years after the date of the conferring of the degree. This 
guarantee shall be either a statement from the editor of an appropriate techni- 
cal serial or publishing company that the thesis has been accepted for publica- 
tion or shall be in the form of a cash deposit of $100 or a bond acceptable to 
the Graduate Council. If the thesis is not published in acceptable form within 
three years, the deposit or the bond shall be forfeited unless an extension of 
time is granted by the Graduate Council for delayed publication after accept- 
ance. When the thesis has been published, 125 copies shall be consigned to 
the College library. 

VACATION CREDIT 

Two semester hours of graduate credit in problem or research work may be 
earned between the close of the summer school and the beginning of the first 
semester provided that permission to do so is secured in advance from the 
major instructor and from the dean of the Division of Graduate Study. 

On completion the credit so earned will be included on the student's next 
regular assignment marked " vacation credit," and will be in addition to the 
regularly allowed number of hours assigned. Such credits will be forwarded to 
the registrar by the instructor as soon as the latter receives the class cards. 

GRADUATE WORK IN ABSENTIA 

Graduates may be enrolled for a limited amount of research or problem 
work in absentia on the recommendation of the head of the department and 
with the approval of the dean of the Division of Graduate Study. 

GRADUATE ASSISTANTS 

To facilitate research work, laboratory teaching and the acquisition of ad- 
vanced degrees, the College has established graduate assistantships in several 
departments. Part-time positions with the United States Department of Agri- 
culture and fellowships with commercial concerns are sometimes available. 



Division of Graduate Study 101 

These assistantships, which may be graduate assistantships, or graduate re- 
search assistantships, are part-time appointments which demand approximately 
one-half of the time of the student for laboratory or research assistance in the 
field of his major work during the regular collegiate year. The remainder of 
his time is given to advanced study. No graduate assistant or graduate re- 
search assistant may receive more than twelve hours of credit per semester nor 
satisfy the residence requirements for the master's degree in less than two 
semesters and one nine-week summer school. 

Graduate assistantships, paying a salary fixed each year by the State Board 
of Regents, have been established as follows: 

Subject Number 

Agronomy 1 

Applied Mechanics 1 

Bacteriology 1 

Botany 1 

Chemistry 5 

Child Welfare 3 

Dairy Husbandry 1 

Entomology 1 

Geology 1 

Horticulture 2 

Household Economics 2 

Institutional Management 2 

Machine Design 1 

Mechanical Engineering 1 

Poultry Husbandry 1 

Zoology 2 

Graduate research assistantships, as listed below, usually are maintained in 
the departments named. Holders of these positions assist in conducting the 
regular research work in the institution. 

Subject Number 

Agricultural Engineering 1 

Agronomy 6 

Animal Husbandry 2 

Applied Mechanics 1 

Botany 1 

Household Economics 1 

Shop Practice 1 

Zoology 4 

By completing six hours of graduate work in the nine-week summer school, 
graduate assistants and graduate research assistants may meet the require- 
ments for the master's degree within one year. 

Applications for all assistantships should be made annually by April 1 for 
the following academic year. Students desiring such appointments may obtain 
application blanks from the dean of the Division of Graduate Study. 

GRADUATE LOAN 

The Manhattan Branch of the American Association of University Women 
maintains a loan fund which is available to graduate women students enrolled 
in any department of the Kansas State College that offers graduate work. Ap- 
plication' for this loan shall be made to the chairman of the Graduate Loan 
Fund Committee of the Manhattan Branch of the American Association of 
University Women. 

SENIORS AND GRADUATE STUDY 

A senior who has completed so much of his work for the bachelor's degree 
that his program for the year is not full may, with the consent of his dean and 
of the dean of the Division of Graduate Study, be assigned to one or more 
courses for graduate credit. In no case shall such combination of courses ex- 
ceed seventeen hours. 



102 Kansas State College 

GRADUATE WORK IN THE SUMMER SCHOOL 

Graduate students desiring to do a part or all of the work for the master's 
degree in the summer may complete the requirements, in certain fields only, 
by pursuing graduate work for four nine-week summer schools. Persons in- 
terested should correspond in advance with the dean of the Division of Grad- 
uate Study. 

In special cases it may be possible to complete the residence requirements 
for the master's degree in three nine-week summer schools. 

Full information concerning the courses offered is contained in the Summer 
School number of the Kansas State College Bulletin, which may be obtained 
upon application to the vice-president of the College. 

THE GRADUATE CLUB 

The Graduate Club is an organization composed of graduate students and 
members of the graduate faculty. Its purpose is to promote sociability and 
wide acquaintance among its members. 

GRADUATE CALENDAR 

SUMMER SCHOOL, 1939 

May 31. Wednesday. Registration of students for nine-week Summer School begins at 8 

a. m.* 
June 10, Saturday. — Preliminary reports on masters' theses are due. 
July 7, Friday. — Abstracts of masters' theses are due. 
July 22, Saturday. — Masters' theses are due. 
July 28, Friday. — Graduation exercises at 7 :30 p. m. for those receiving degrees at end of 

Summer School. 

FIRST SEMESTER, 1939-1940 

Sept. 11 and 12, Monday and Tuesday. — Registration and assignment of graduate students.* 
Dec. 9, Saturday. — Programs of study are due from candidates for the masters' degree in 1939. 

SECOND SEMESTER, 1939-1940 

Jan. 30 and 31, Tuesday and Wednesday. — Registration and assignment of graduate students.* 

Mar. 15, Friday. — Preliminary reports on Masters' theses are due. 

April 27, Saturday. — Doctors' theses are due. 

May 20, Monday.- — Masters' theses are due. 

May 26, Sunday.- — Baccalaureate services at 7 :30 p. m. 

May 27, Monday. — Seventy -seventh annual Commencement at 7 :30 p. m. 

* See general calendar for vacation, holiday, and other special dates. 



The Division of Agriculture 

Leland Everett Call, Dean 



The successful farmer must have scientific and economic knowledge and 
training. They are quite as essential as practical knowledge of agriculture in 
the development of an agricultural state such as Kansas. Soil is most effec- 
tively utilized by those who have knowledge of how soils have been formed, 
how fertility has been stored in them, and how the resources of the soil can 
be maintained. 

The successful farmer also knows what kind of plants to grow and how to 
improve them. He understands the principles of selection, breeding, and feed- 
ing of livestock. He knows how to maintain orchards, gardens, and attractive 
surroundings. He has an appreciation for good and adequate farm buildings 
and a farm home equipped with modern conveniences. He is familiar with 
the best methods of marketing the products of the farm. 

Kansas State College gives systematic training in agriculture which fits 
young men for the farm. 

The College also prepares students for the scientific investigation of agri- 
cultural problems in state and national institutions, for agricultural extension 
work, for the teaching of agriculture, for service in industries closely related to 
agriculture, and for a variety of other public and private services of an agri- 
cultural nature. 

The College owns 1,428 acres of land, which are used for experimental work 
and instruction, and maintains large and well-equipped laboratories for soil and 
crop work. There is ample greenhouse space for problems and research work 
in crops and soils. 

The College herds and flocks contain high-class representatives of the im- 
portant breeds of dairy and beef cattle, poultry, hogs, horses, and sheep. The 
student becomes familiar with types and breeds by actual work with the stock. 

Three of the four-year curriculums offered in this Division lead to the de- 
gree of Bachelor of Science in Agriculture. The four-year curriculum in milling 
industry leads to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Milling Industry. 

The curriculums in agriculture and agricultural administration have a com- 
mon freshman year, toward the end of which students decide which curriculum 
they will pursue. 

CURRICULUM IN AGRICULTURE 

Students choosing the curriculum in agriculture need not name the depart- 
ment in which they will major before the second semester of the sophomore 
j^ear. They have their choice of numerous electives in soils, crops, agricultural 
economics, animal husbandry, dairy husbandry, horticulture, milling, and poul- 
try husbandry. 

All electives in any of the departments must be officially approved by the 
dean of the Division of Agriculture and the head Sf the department in which 
the student majors. 

A student may major not only in any department in the Division of Agricul- 
ture but also in the departments of Botany, Entomology, Zoology, Bacteriol- 
ogy, Chemistry, or Agricultural Engineering. Substitutions may be made to 
meet definite objectives. See "Substitutions to Meet Certain Objectives," fol- 
lowing the outline of "Curriculum in Agriculture." 

Any candidate for such a degree must have had at least six months' farm 
experience approved by the dean of the Division of Agriculture. Students in 
dairy manufacturing, milling industry, or specialized horticulture may substi- 
tute practical experience in their respective industries for farm experience. A 

(103) 



104 Kansas State College 

formal statement outlining farm experience or substitutions therefor must be 
filed in the dean's office during the last semester of the senior year. 

The student who completes the freshman and sophomore years will have 
had basic studies in soils, farm crops, livestock, dairying, poultry husbandry, 
horticulture, and agricultural economics, giving him a general knowledge of the 
whole range of agriculture. More than one-third of his time will have been 
devoted to strictly agricultural courses. 

During his junior and senior years, the student continues his studies of fun- 
damental science and begins to learn to apply science to agriculture. 

CURRICULUM IN AGRICULTURAL ADMINISTRATION 

The curriculum in agricultural administration is planned to meet the needs 
of students preparing for industries closely related to farming, which require 
training in both agriculture and business principles. Among such industries 
and occupations are : rural banking, development and sale of lands, processing 
and marketing of grains, agricultural journalism, and the teaching of agricul- 
ture in high schools and elsewhere. 

There is ample opportunity to elect business subjects such as accounting, 
business organization, credit and finance, business law, and marketing. 

CURRICULUM IN SPECIALIZED HORTICULTURE 

The curriculum in specialized horticulture is planned for students who wish 
to prepare for one of the highly specialized subdivisions of horticulture such as 
landscape gardening and floriculture. It gives such students opportunity to 
elect a larger number of courses in artistic and technical branches of horticul- 
ture. 

CURRICULUM IN MILLING INDUSTRY 

The curriculum in milling industry is planned for students in three major 
fields: (1) milling administration, (2) milling technology, (3) milling chemis- 
try. 

Major electives in each of the three fields are listed following the curriculum 
in milling industry. Minor electives which are not listed are selected to meet 
the needs of the individual student. 

Students choosing the field of milling chemistry must so indicate at the 
time of assignment in the first semester of their freshman year in order to be 
assigned to proper chemistry courses. 

MILLING ENROLLMENT LIMITED 

By authority of the State Board of Regents, the number of students en- 
rolled in the four-year curriculum in milling industry is limited to 65. Stu- 
dents having their residence in Kansas have first preference. Out-of-state 
students who have had practical milling experience are given second preference. 
Selections from either group are further based on scholarship and other evi- 
dence of fitness. 

Persons wishing to be selected for this curriculum must apply several weeks 
before the beginning of the academic year. Application should be made be- 
fore August 15. Application blanks may be obtained from the dean of the 
Division of Agriculture. 

STATE TEACHER'S CERTIFICATE 

By selection of proper electives in the Department of Education, the four- 
year curriculum in either agriculture or agricultural administration may lead 
to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Agriculture and also qualify the 
graduate for the three-year Kansas state teacher's certificate, valid in any high 
school or other public school in the state, and renewable for life. 

A student in the curriculum in agriculture desiring to qualify for teaching, 



Division of Agriculture 105 

should elect General Psychology in the first semester of his junior year. (This 
course is required in the second semester of the sophomore year in the cur- 
riculum in agricultural administration.) A total of 18 hours in the Department 
of Education is required for this certificate, as follows: General Psychology, 
Principles of Secondary Education, Educational Psychology, Methods of 
Teaching Agriculture, Teaching Participation in Agriculture, and Vocational 
Education. 

STATE CERTIFICATE FOR TEACHERS OF VOCATIONAL 

AGRICULTURE 

Electives in the field of agricultural education may be so chosen as to meet 
requirements for the state certificate for teaching vocational agriculture in 
Kansas high schools participating in federal Smith-Hughes funds. The group 
of minor electives in related nonagricultural subjects must complete the candi- 
date's professional preparation in education, and the group of general electives 
must include the mechanical training necessary for the handling of farm shop 
problems. Therefore these groups must include the following courses or their 
equivalents : 

Minor electives 15 

Principles of Secondary Education, Educ. 236 3 

Educational Psychology, Educ. 109 , 3 

Methods of Teaching Agriculture, Educ. 136 3 

Teaching Participation in Agriculture, Educ. 16] 3 

Vocational Education, Educ. 241 3 

General electives 17 

Gas Engines and Tractors, Agr. Engr. 130 3 

Farm Buildings, Agr. Engr. 101 3 

Farm Machinery, Agr. Engr. 108 3 

Farm Carpentry I, Shop 147 3 

Farm Blacksmithing I, Shop 157 1 

Farm Blacksmithing II, Shop 158 1 

Farm Shop Methods, Shop 175 3 

Total — — 32 

AGRICULTURE IN THE SUMMER SCHOOL 

All departments of this Division usually offer courses in the Summer School. 
Some of these are basic college courses, but graduate work particularly suited 
to high-school teachers of vocational agriculture is emphasized. The Summer 
School number of the Kansas State College Bulletin may be obtained upon 
application to the vice-president of the College. 

HOME STUDY IN AGRICULTURE 

The home study department of the Division of College Extension offers a 
number of college courses in agriculture which can be taken by correspondence. 
Such courses carry the same credit as resident college courses having the same 
description. These courses will be found especially advantageous to college 
students who desire to make up deficiencies or to gain certain credits during 
the summer vacation season. All courses given by correspondence are listed in 
the latter part of this catalogue under the title "Home Study" in the Division 
of College Extension. 



106 



Kansas State College 



Curriculum in Agriculture 

FRESHMEN 



First Semester 

College Rhetoric I, Engl. 101 

Gen. Botanv I, Bot. 101 

Chemistry I, Chem 101 

El. of An. Husb., An. Husb. 125.. 
El. of Dairying, Dairy Husb. 101. . 
Freshman Lect,, Gen. Agr. 102.... 

Infantry I, Mil. Sc. 101A 

Phys. Education M. Phys. Ed. 103, 
Agr. Seminar, 1 Gen. Agr. 103 



*3(3-0) 

3(1-6) 

5(3-6) 

3(2-4)or 

3(2-3) 

1(2-0) 

Kl-2) 

R(0-2) 

R 



Second Semester 

College Rhetoric II, Engl. 104 3(3-0) 

Gen. Geology, Geol. 103 3(3-0) 

Gen. Botanv II, Bot. 105 3(1-6) 

Chemistry II Rec, Chem. 103 3(3-0) 

El. of Dairying, Dairy Husb. 101.. 3(2-3) or 

El. of An. Husb., An. Husb. 125.. 3(2-4) 

Library Methods. Lib. Ec. 101 1(1-0) 

Infantry II, Mil Sc. 102A 1(1-2) 

Phys. Education M, Phys. Ed. 104, R(0-2) 

Agr. Seminar, 1 Gen. Agr. 103 .... R 



Total 



16 



Total 



17 



First Semester 



SOPHOMORE 



El. of Horticulture, Hort. 107 3(2-3) 

Organic Chemistry, Chem. 124.... 3(2-3) 

Anat, and Physiol, Anat. 131 3(2-3) or 

Plant Physiology I, 3 Bot. 208 3(3-0) 

Soils, Asrron. 130 4(3-3) or 

Farm Crops, Agron. 101 4(2-6) 

Farm Poult, Pro., Poult. Husb. 101, 2(1-2. 1) 

Infantry III. Mil. Sc. 103A 1(1-2) 

Phys. Education M, Phys. Ed. 105, R(0-2) 

Agr. Seminar, 1 Gen. Agr. 103 R 



Total 



16 



Second Semester 



Prin. of Feeding, An. Husb. 152 2 .. 3(3-0) 

Economics I, Econ. 101 3(3-0) 

Farm Crops, Agron. 101 : 4(2-6) or 

Soils, Agron. 130 4(3-3) 

General Zoology. Zool. 105 5(3-6) 

Infantry IV, Mil. Sc. 104A 1(1-2) 

Phys. Education M, Phys. Ed. 106, R(0-2) 

Agr. Seminar, 1 Gen. Agr. 103 R 



Total 



16 



First Semester 

Genetics, An. Husb. 221 

Plant Pathology I, Bot, 205 

"F^rm Organization, Agr. Ec. 106.. 
Elective 

Agr. Seminar, 1 Gen. Agr. 103 



Total 



JUNIOR 



3(3-0) 

3(2-3) 

3(2-3) 

7 

R 



Second Semester 

Gen. Econ. Entomology, Ent, 203. 
Gen. Microbiology, Bact. 101... 
Agr. Journalism, Ind. Jour. 160. 

Elective 

Agr. Seminar, 1 Gen. Agr. 103.... 



16 



Total 



3(2-3) 
3(1-6) 
3(2-3) 

7 
R 



16 



First Semester 

Elective 

Agr. Seminar, 1 Gen. Agr. 103.. 



Total 



SENIOR 

Second Semester 
16 .Asr. Relationships, Gen. Agr. 105, 



R 



Elective 

Agr. Seminar, 1 Gen. Agr. 103. 



16 Total 

Number of hours required for graduation, 129. § 



R(l-0) 
16 
R 



16 



* The number before the parentheses indicates the number of hours of credit; the first 
number within the parentheses indicates the number of hours of recitation each week: the 
second shows the number of hours to be spent in laboratory work each week; and the third, 
where there is one, indicates the number of hours of outside work in connection with the lab- 
oratory each week. 

1. Four meetings each semester. 

2. Some time during the second semester of the sophomore year each student is required 
to file a written statement in the office of the dean of the Division of Agriculture, designating 
the department of the division in which he will major. 

3. Students who do not expect to major in animal husbandry, dairy husbandry, or poultry 
husbandry may, with the approval of the head of the department in which they expect to 
major, take Plant Physiology I (Bot. 208) instead of Anatomy and Physiology (Anat. 131). 

§ Seniors must meet the graduation requirement in points as well as in hours. See section 
headed : The Point System. 



Division of Agriculture 107 

Electives 

The electives in the curriculum in agriculture are grouped as follows: 

Sem.ester hours 

MAJOR ELECTIVES 12 

These electives may be taken in any one of the departments of the Division of 
Agriculture. In certain cases also a science department outside of the division may 
be selected for a major department; e. g., Chemistry, Entomology, Bacteriology. 

MINOR AGRICULTURAL ELECTIVES 9 

These electives may be taken from one or more departments but must directly 
strengthen the student's preparation in agriculture. 

MINOR NONAGRICULTURAL ELECTIVES 6 

These electives must be chosen from one or more of the following departments : 
English, Education, Economics and Sociology, History and Government, Mathematics, 
Modern Languages. 

GENERAL ELECTIVES 19 

These electives should be chosen to meet individual needs and to round out the 
preparation provided by the rest of the student's curriculum. All students not 
offering one unit of high -school physics for entrance must include three hours of 
general physics in their electives. 

All electives must be officially approved before assignment, by both the 
dean of the Division of Agriculture and the head of the department in which 
the student majors. 

SUBSTITUTION TO MEET CERTAIN OBJECTIVES 

Students desiring to prepare themselves for scientific or special work in the 
field of agriculture may, with the approval of the dean of the Division of 
Agriculture and the head of the department in which they expect to major, 
substitute courses in the departments of Mathematics, Physics, Chemistry, 
Bacteriology, Entomology, Zoology, Botany and Plant Pathology, Education, 
Agricultural Engineering, Modern Languages, and other approved departments, 
for twenty-five hours in the curriculum in agriculture ; provided, that no 
student may receive a degree in agriculture who does not have at least twenty- 
five hours in technical agriculture in not fewer than three departments. 



108 



Kansas State College 



Curriculum in Agricultural Administration 



First Semester 
College Rhetoric I, Engl. 101., 



Gen. Botany I, Bot. 101. 

Chemistry I, Chem. 101 

El. of An. Husb., An. Husb. 125.. 
El. of Dairying, Dairy Husb. 101. . 
Freshman Lect., Gen. Agr. 102. . . . 

Infantry I, Mil. Sc. 101A 

Phys. Education M, Phys. Ed. 103, 
Agr. Seminar,* Gen. Agr. 103 



FRESHMAN 



3(3-0) 

3(1-6) 

5(3-6) 

3(2-4)or 

3(2-3) 

1(2-0) 

1(1-2) 

11(0-2) 

R 



Second Semester 



104 



College Rhetoric II, En£ 

Gen. Geology, Geol. 103 

Gen. Botanv II, Bot. 105 

Chemistry II Rec, Chem. 103.... 
El. of Dairying, Dairy Husb. 101 . . 
El. of An. Husb., An. Husb. 125. . 
Library Methods, Lib. Ec. 101.... 

Infantry II, Mil. Sci. 102A 

Phys. Education M, Phys. Ed. 104, 
Agr. Seminar ,* Gen. Agr. 103 



3(3-0) 

3(3-0) 

3(1-6) 

3(3-0) 

3(2-3)or 

3(2-4) 

1(1-0) 

1(1-2) 

R(0-2) 

R 



Total 



16 



Total 



17 



First Semester 
Organic Chemistry, Chem. 124.... 

Economics I, Econ. 101 

General Algebra, Math. 108 

Soils, Agron. 130 

Farm Crops, Agron. 101 

Infantry III, Mil. Sci. 103A 

Phys. Education M, Phys. Ed. 105, 
Agr. Seminar,* Gen. Agr. 103 



SOPHOMORE 



Total 



3(2-3) 
3(3-0) 
5(5-0) 
4(3-3)or 
4(2-6) 
1(1-2) 
R(0-2) 
R 



Second Semester 



El. of Hort., Hort. 107 3(2-3) 

Feeding L. S., An. Husb. 172 3(3-0) 

General Psychology, Educ. 184 3(3-0) 

Soils, Agron. 130 4(3-3) or 

Farm Crops, Agron. 101 4(2-6) 

Farm Poult. Pro., Poult. Husb. 101, 2(1-2, 1) 

Infantry IV, Mil. Sci. 104A 1(1-2) 

Phys. Education M, Phys. Ed. 106, R(0-2) 

Agr. Seminar,* Gen. Agr. 103 R 



16 



Total 



16 



First Semester 

Agr. Journalism, Ind. Jour. 160. 
Agr. Seminar,* Gen. Agr. 103. . . 
Elective 



Total 



JUNIOR 



Second Semester 



3(2-3) 
R 
13 



Agr. Seminar,* Gen. Agr. 103, 
Elective 



16 



Total 



R 

16 



16 



SENIOR 



First Semester 



Second Semester 



Agr. Seminar,* Gen. Agr. 103, 
Elective 



R Agr. Relationships, Gen. Agr. 105, R(l-0) 

16 Agr. Seminar,* Gen. Agr. 103 R 

Elective 16 



Total 



16 Total 

Number of hours required for graduation, 129. 



16 



Electives 

The electives in the curriculum in agricultural administration are grouped 
as indicated below in the following fields: (1) rural banking, (2) land eco- 
nomics, (3) grain industries, (4) agricultural journalism, (5) agricultural en- 
gineering, and (6) agricultural education. 

SEMESTER HOURS OF ELECTIVES REQUIRED FOR VARIOUS FIELDS 

Hours 

in fields Hours 

Group 1,2, 3, 4, 5 in field 6 

Major electives in agricultural economics 15 10 

Minor agricultural electives (not more than nine semester hours from one 

department) 15 17 

Minor electives in related nonagricultural subjects 15 15 

General electives 16 19 

Total - 61 61 

Note.- — All students not offering one unit of high -school physics for entrance must include 
three hours of general physics in their electives. 

All electives must be officially approved before assignment by both the 
dean of the Division of Agriculture and the head of the Department of Eco- 
nomics and Sociology. 

* Four meetings each semester. 



Division of Agriculture 



109 



Curriculum in Specialized Horticulture 



FRESHMAN 



First Semester 

College Rhetoric I, Engl. 101 

Gen. Botany I, Bot. 101 

Chemistry I, Chem. 101 

Library Methods, Lib. Ec. 101 

Freshman Lect., Gen. Agr. 102. . . . 
Infantry I, Mil. Sc. 101A (men). . . 
Phys. Education M, Phvs. Ed. 103, 
Phys. Education W, Phys. Ed. 151A, 

Elective 1 

Agr. Seminar, Gen. Agr. 103 2 



3(3-0) 

3(1-6) 

5(3-6) 

1(1-0) 

1(2-0) 

1(1-2) 

R(0-2)or 

R(0-3) 

2 

R 



Second Semester 



College Rhetoric II, Engl. 101 3(3-0) 

Gen. Botany II, Bot. 105 3(1-6) 

Chemistry II Rec, Chem. 103 3(3-0) 

Gen. Geology, Geol. 103 3(3-0) 

Infantry II, Mil, Sc. 102A (men).. 1(1-2) 
Phvs. Education M, Phys. Ed. 104, R(0-2) or 

Phys. Education W, Phys. Ed. 152A, R(0-3) 

Elective 4 

Agr. Seminar, Gen. Agr. 103 2 R 



Total 15 or 16 



Total 16 or 17 



SOPHOMORE 



First Semester 
Economics I, Econ. 101 



Soils, Agron. 130 
Tax. Bot. Flrg. Pints., Bot. 225... 
Infantry III, Mil. Sc. 103A (men). . 
Phys. Education M, Phys. Ed. 103, 
Phys. Education W, Phys. Ed. 153, 

Elective 

Agr. Seminar, Gen. Agr. 103 2 



3(3-0) 

4(3-3) 

3(1-6) 

1(1-2) 

R(0-2)or 

R(0-3) 

5 

R 



Total 15 or 16 



Second Semester 



Plane Trigonometry, Math. 101. . . . 3(3-0) 

El. of Horticulture, Hort. 107 3(2-3) 

Agr. Journalism, Ind. Jour. 160. . . . 3(2-3) 

Infantry IV, Mil. Sc. 104A (men), 1(1-2) 

Phvs. Education M, Phvs. Ed. 106, R(0-2)or 

Phys. Education W, Phys. Ed. 154, R(0-3) 

Elective 6 

Agr. Seminar, Gen. Agr. 103 2 R 



Total 



15 or 16 



First Semester 

Plant Materials I, Hort. 224.. 
Plant Physiology I, Bot. 208. . , 

Elective 

Agr. Seminar, Gen. Agr. 103 2 . . 

Total 



JUNIOR 

Second Semester 

3(2-3) Plant Materials II, Hort. 226 3(2-3) 

3(3-0) Gen. Entomology, Ent. 101 4(3-3) 

10 Elective 9 

R Agr. Seminar, Gen. Agr. 103 2 R 

16 Total 16 



SENIOR 



Fikst Semester 

Plant Pathology I, Bot. 205.. 

Elective 

Agr. Seminar, Gen. Agr. 103 2 . . 



3(1-6) 
13 
R 



Second Semester 

Agr. Relationships, Gen. Agr. 105 

Plant Ecology, Bot, 228 

Spraying, Hort. 207 

Elective 

Agr. Seminar, Gen. Agr. 103 2 .... 



Total 16 Total 

Number of hours required for graduation: Men, 129; women, 125. 

Electives in Landscape Gardening 



R(l-0) 

2(2-0) 

3(2-3) 

11 

R 



16 



Engr. Drawing, Mach. Des. 101... 2(0-6) 

Free-hand Draw. I, Arch. Ill 2(0-6) 

Silviculture, Hort. 119 3(2-3) 

Forest Nursery Prac, Hort. 120... 3(2-3) 

Landscape Gardening I, Hort. 125, 3(3-0) 

Pencil Rend, and Sketch., Arch. 116, 2(0-6) 

Surveving I, Civ. Engr. 102 2(0-6) 

Theory of Lands. Design. Hort. 243 3(3-0) 

El. of Floriculture, Hort. 127 3(3-0) 

Landscape Gardening II, Hort. 238, 3(1-6) 

Landscape Constr., Hort. 227 3(2-3) 

Civic Art, Hort. 223 3(1-6) 

From this group of courses, together with other courses, the student will elect 
fifty-eight credit hours to be approved in advance of assignment by the head 
of the Department of Horticulture and the dean of the Division of Agriculture. 



Domestic Arch., Arch. 124. 2(2-0) 

Free-hand Draw. II, Arch. 114 2(0-6) 

Ext. Speech I, Pub. Spk. 106 2(2-0) 

Phvsiographic Geol., Geol. 110 3(3-0) 

Water Color I, Arch. 118 2(0-6) 

Surveying III, Civ. Engr. 151, 155, 3(2-3) 

Appreciation of Arch., Arch. 244.. 3(3-0) 

Landscape Gardening III, Hort. 246, 3(2-3) 

Applied Floriculture, Hort. 212... 3(2-3) 

Plant Ecology, Bot. 228 2(2-0) 

Horticultural Probs., Hort. 244.... 2 to 8 



1. All students not offering one unit of high -school physics for entrance must include 
three hours of general physics in their electives. 

2. Four meetings each semester. 



110 



Kansas State College 



Electives in Floriculture 



El. of Floriculture, Hort. 127 3(3-0) 

Floral Arrangement, Hbrt. 129 2(1-3) 

Landscape Gardening I, Hort. 125, 3(3-0) 

Genetics, An. Husb. 221 3(3-0) 

Forest Nursery Prac, Hort. 120... 3(2-3) 

Plant Genetics, Agron. 208 3(3-0) 

Accounting I, Econ. 133 3(2-3) 

Engr. Draw., Mach. Des. 101 2(0-6) 

Modern Language 3(3-0) 

Meteorology, Phvs. 133 3(3-0) 

Botanical Microtechnic, Bot. 217.. 3(1-6) 



Gen. Org. Chemistry, Chem. 122, 5(3-6) 

Org. Chemistry, Chem. 124 3(2-3) 

Business Management, Econ. 126.. 2(2-0) 

Applied Floriculture, Hort. 212 3(2-3) 

Plant Physiology III, Bot. 211 3(3-0) 

Credits and Collections, Econ. 223, 2(2-0) 

Extern. Speech I, Pub. Spk. 106.. 2(2-0) 

Horticulture Seminar, Hort. 235... 1(1-0) 

El. of Vegetable Gard., Hort. 133, 3(2-3) 

Literature of Hort., Hort. 208 2(2-0) 

Modern Language 3(3-0) 

Horticultural Probs., Hort. 24-1 2 to 8 



From this group of courses, together with other courses, the student will elect 
fifty-eight credit hours to be approved in advance of assignment by the head of 
the Department of Horticulture and the dean of the Division of Agriculture. 

Curriculum in Milling Industry 



First Semester 

El. of Milling, Mill. Ind. 101 

College Rhetoric I, Engl. 101 

College Algebra, Math. 104 

Chemistry I, Chem. 101 

Freshman Lect., Gen. Agr. 102. . . . 
Library Methods, Lib. Ec. 101. . . . 

Infantrv I, Mil. Sc. 101A 

Phys. Education M, Phys. Ed. 103, 
Milling Seminar 1 

Total 



FRESHMAN 

Second Semester 

2(1-3) College Rhetoric II, Engl. 104 3(3-0) 

3(3-0) Plane Trigonometry, Math. 101... 3(3-0) 

3(3-0) Chemistry II Rec, Chem. 103 3(3-0) 

5(3-6) Milling Entomology, Ent. 117 2(2-0) 

1(2-0) Engr. Drawing, Mach. Des. 101... 2(0-6) 

1(1-0) Flow Sheets, Mill. Ind. 103 2(0-6) 

1(1-2) Infantry II, Mil. Sc. 102A 1(1-2) 

R(0-2) Phvs. Education M, Phvs. Ed. 104, R(0-2) 

R Milling Seminar 1 R 

Total 16 



First Semester 

Milling Practice I, Mill. Ind. 109. . 

Gen. Physics I, Phvs. 102 

Gen. Botany I, Bot. 101 

Infantry III, Mil. Sc. 103A 

Phys. Education M, Phys. Ed. 105, 

Milling Seminar 1 

Elective 2 

Total 



SOPHOMORE 

Second Semester 

3(1-6) Gen. Physics II, Phys. 103 4(3-3) 

4(3-3) Gen. Botany II, Bot. 105 3(1-6) 

3(1-6) Current History, Hist. 126 1(1-0) 

1(1-2) Infantrv IV, Mil. Sc. 104A 1(1-2) 

R(0-2) Phys. Education M, Phys. Ed. 106, R(0-2) 

R Milling Seminar 1 R 

5 Elective 2 7 

16 Total 16 



First Semester 

Mkt. Grading Cereals, Agron. 115, 

Economics I, Econ. 101 

Milling Seminar 1 

Elective 2 

Total 



JUNIOR 

Second Semester 

3(1-6) Mill. Qual. of Wheat, Mill. Ind. 212, 3(3-0) 

3(3-0) Milling Seminar 1 R 

R Elective 2 13 

10 

16 Total 16 



First Semester 

Milling Seminar 1 

Elective 2 



Total 



SENIOR 



R 
16 



Second Semester 

Milling Seminar 1 

Agr. Relationships, Gen. Agr. 105. 
Elective 2 



16 



Total 



Number of hours required for graduation: 128- — basic courses, 61 hours; 
elective courses, 67 hours. 



R 

R 
16 



16 



1. Two meetings each month. 

2. Major electives may be in milling administration, milling technology, 3 or milling chem- 
istry. These groups of electives are listed below. Minor electives are flexible to adapt the 
curriculum to individual needs. Minor electives must be officially approved before assignment 
by the dean of the Division of Agriculture and the head of the Department of Milling 
Industry. 

3. Students majoring in milling technology nm t include solid geometry in their minor 
electives unless this subject was included in their entrance requirements. 



Division of Agriculture 



111 



Electives for Students in Milling Administration 

MAJOR ELECTIVES 

5(3-6) Corp. Org. & Fin., Econ. 219.. 



Gen. Org. Chem., Chem. 122 

General Psychology, Educ. 184 3(3-0) 

Extern. Speech I, Pub. S'pk. 106... 2(2-0)or 

Public Speaking, Pub. Spk. 107*.. 2(2-0) 

Extern. Speech II, Pub. Spk. 108, 2(2-0) 

Coml. Correspondence, Eng. 122.. 3(3-0) 
Writ, and Oral Salesmanship, Engl. 

123 3(3-0) 

Accounting I, Econ. 133 3(2-3) 

Accounting II, Econ. 134 3(2-3) 

Mktg. of Farm Prod., Econ. 202, 3(3-0) 



Grain Marketing, Econ. 203 

Money and Banking, Econ. 116. .. . 

Business Law I, Hist. 163 

Business Law II, Hist. 164 

Prin. of Advertising, Ind. Jour. 178, 
Business Finance, Econ. 217 



Total 



2(2-0) 
3(3-0) 
3(3-0) 
3(3-0) 
3(3-0) 
4(4-0) 
3(3-0) 



48 



Minor Electives: 
curriculum. 



A total of 19 hours of minor electives completes the work of the 



Electives for Students in Milling Technology 



MAJOR ELECTIVES 



Gen. Org. Chem., Chem. 122 5(3-6) 

Plane Anal. Geometry, Math. 110, 4(4-0) 

Calculus I, Math. 114 4(4-0) 

Calculus II, Math. 115 4(4-0) 

Applied Mechanics, Ap. Mech. 202, 4(4-0) 

Des. Geom., Mach. Des. 106 2(0-6) 

Mechanism, Mach. Des. 121 3(3-0) 

Mach. Drawing I, Mach. Des. Ill, 2(0-6) 

Mill. Tech. I, Mill. Ind. 201 2(0-6) 

Mill. Tech. II, Mill. Ind. 202 2(0-6) 

Minor Electives: A total of 19 hours 
curriculum. 



Mill. Prac. II, Mill. Ind. Ill 3(1-6) 

Str. of Material E, Ap. Mech. 216, 3(3-0) 

Flour Mill. Constr., Mill. Ind. 203, 3(0-9) 
Steam and Gas Engineering C, 

Mech. Engr. 120, 125 3(2-3) 

Elec. Engr. C, Elec. Engr. 102, 106, 3(2-2,1) 

Engr. Woodwork, Shop 101 1(0-3) 

Total 48 

of minor electives completes the work of the 



Electives for Students in Milling Chemistry 

MAJOR ELECTIVES 



Gen. Org. Chem., Chem. 122 5(3-6) 

Chemistry II Lab., Chem. 104 2(0-6) 

Plane Anal. Geometry, Math. 110, 4(4-0) 

Calculus I, Math. 114 4(4-0) 

Physiological Chemistry, Chem. 231, 5(3-6) 

Quan. Analysis A, Chem. 250 3(1-6) 

Quan. Analysis B, Chem. 251 3(1-6) 

Gen. Microbiology, Bact. 101 3(1-6) 

Wheat, Flour Test, Mill. Ind. 205, 3(0-9) 

Physical Chemistry I, Chem. 206.. 5(3-6) 

Minor Electives: A total of 15 hours 
curriculum. 



Mill. Ind. Probs., Mill. Ind. 214.. 3(0-9) 

Chemistry of Proteins, Chem. 236A, 3(2-3) 
Experimental Baking, Mill. Ind. 

207 4(2-6) 

Colloidal Chemistry, Chem. 213... 2(2-0) 
Adv. Wheat and Flour Testing, Mill. 

Ind. 210 2(0-6) 

Chemical Microscopy, Chem. 245, 1(0-3) 

Total 52 

of minor electives completes the work of the 



Electives for Students of Agriculture Majoring in Industrial Journalism 

Students who wish to prepare for agricultural journalism may major in 
industrial journalism, thus combining training in agriculture or agricultural 
administration with the fundamentals of journalism. The electives provided 
for students selecting such a field for major work are as follows: 



Industrial Writing, Ind. Jour. 161, 2(2-0) 

Editorial Practice, Ind. Jour. 257.. 2(2-0) 

Ind. Feature Writing, Ind. Jour. 167, 2(2-0) 

The Rural Press, Ind. Jour. 181.. 2(2-0) 

Prin. of Advertising, Ind. Jour. 178, 4(4-0) 



Copy Reading, Ind. Jour. 254 2(0-6) 

History and Ethics of Journalism, 

Ind. Jour. 273 3(3-0) 

Journalism Surveys, Ind. Jour. 278, 2(0-6) 



* For juniors and seniors. 



112 



Kansas State College 



Agricultural Economics 

Section of 
ECONOMICS AND SOCIOLOGY 



Professor Grimes 

Professor Howe 

Professor Hill 

Associate Professor Hodges 

Associate Professor Montgomery 

Assistant Professor Parsons 

Assistant Professor Eggert 



Assistant Professor Pine 
Instructor Doll 
Instructor Miller 
Instructor Wilson 
Assistant Doran 
Assistant Reed 



Work in economics and sociology is offered in the divisions of Agriculture 
and General Science. The more general courses are listed in the general 
science section of the catalogue. Those courses listed here have a direct 
bearing on agriculture. 

The investigational work in agricultural economics and rural sociology brings 
together the latest information concerning the business problems of agriculture 
and the problems of rural life. These data are used in the instructional work 
of the department. The student has an opportunity to learn of the factors 
and economic forces involved in farm management, marketing, taxation, land 
utilization, agricultural finance, rural life, and other closely related subjects. 

COURSES IN AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS 

FOR UNDERGRADUATE CREDIT 

106. Farm Organization. 3(2-3)*; I and II. Prerequisite: Econ. 101, 
Agron. 130. and An. Husb. 152. Hodges and staff. 

Economic forces affecting the organization and operation of the farm busi- 
ness. Charge, $1. 

112. Farm Cost Accounting. 3(2-3); I and II. Prerequisite: Econ. 101. 
Staff. 

Systems of farm records and accounts. Analysis and utilization of cost of 
production data. Charge, $1. 

FOR GRADUATE AND UNDERGRADUATE CREDIT 

202. Marketing of Farm Products. 3(3-0); I and II. Prerequisite: Econ. 
101. Staff. 

Marketing services and functions and price-making forces. 

203. Grain Marketing. 3(3-0); I. Prerequisite: Econ. 202. Mont- 
gomery, Wilson. 

Price influences and relationships, buying and selling problems, domestic 
and export trade; grain trade organization and regulation. 

206A. Advanced Farm Organization. 3(2-3); II. Prerequisite: Econ. 
106. Hodges, Pine. 

Advanced studies of factors affecting the successful organization and oper- 
ation of farms. 

212. Conservation of Agricultural Resources. 2(2-0); II. Prerequisite: 
Econ. 101; junior standing. Howe, Miller. 



*The number before the parentheses indicates the number of hours of credit ; the first 
number within the parentheses indicates the number of hours of recitation each week; the 
second shows the number of hours to be spent in laboratory work each week ; and the third, 
where there is One, indicates the number of hours of outside work in connection with the lab- 
oratory each week. I, II, and SS indicate that the course is given the first semester, second 
semester, and summer school, respectively. 



Division of Agriculture 113 

218. Land Economics. 3(3-0) ; I. Prerequisite: Econ. 101. Howe, Miller. 
Relation of population to land supply; land tenure, ownership, and valua- 
tion. 

220. Taxation and Land Ownership. 3(3-0) ; II. Prerequisite: Econ. 101. 
Not open to students having credit in Econ. 214. Howe. 

Public expenditures and revenues, public credit, and fiscal administration. 

Land Law. See Hist. 276. 

225. Agricultural Finance. 3(3-0); II. Prerequisite: Econ. 101. Par- 
sons. 

Sources and use of credit for purchase of farm land and to finance farm 
operations. 

227. Farmer Movements. 3(3-0); I. Prerequisite: Econ. 101. Hodges. 
Principles underlying successful organization of farmers. 

231. Agricultural Economics Seminar. 1(1-0); II. Prerequisite: Econ. 
101. Staff. 

Current questions in agricultural economics. 

235. Livestock Marketing. 3(3-0); II. Prerequisite: Econ. 202. Eggert, 
Wilson. 

Livestock marketing services, functions, and prices. 

240. Principles of Cooperation. 3(3-0); II. Prerequisite: Econ. 101. 
Montgomery. 

Principles underlying successful cooperative activities. 

251. Marketing of Dairy Products. 3(3-0); I. Prerequisite: Econ. 202. 
Parsons. 

Factors affecting prices; dairy marketing organizations. 

270. Agricultural Economic Problems. Credit to be arranged; I, II, and 
SS. Prerequisite : Consult instructors. Staff. 

271. Economic Analysis and Interpretation. 3(3-0); I. Prerequisite: 
Econ. 101. Hodges. 

FOR GRADUATE CREDIT 

301. Research in Agricultural Economics. Credit to be arranged; I, II, 
and SS. Prerequisite: Consult instructors. Staff. 

Individual research problems which may be used for a master's thesis. 

COURSES IN RURAL SOCIOLOGY 

FOR UNDERGRADUATE CREDIT 

156. Rural Sociology. 3(3-0); I. Preferably preceded by a course in so- 
ciology. Hill. 

FOR GRADUATE AND UNDERGRADUATE CREDIT 

256. Advanced Rural Sociology. 3(3-0) ; II. Prerequisite: Econ. 156. Hill. 
A continuation of Econ. 156. 

FOR GRADUATE CREDIT 

350. Research in Rural Sociology. Credit to be arranged; I, II, and SS. 
Prerequisite: Econ. 156. 



8—6529 



114 



Kansas State College 



Agronomy 



Professor Throckmorton 
Professor Laude 
Associate Professor Zahnley 
Associate Professor Clapp 
Associate Professor Reitz 
Associate Professor Metzger 
Associate Professor Myers 
Associate Professor Mullen 



Assistant Professor Davis 

Assistant Professor Hide 

Assistant Professor Anderson 

Assistant Hollembeak 

Seed Analyst Norris 

Graduate Assistant Klingman 

Graduate Research Assistant Blodgett 



The farm used by the Department of Agronomy comprises 320 acres of 
medium rolling upland soil, suited to experimental and demonstration work. 
The general fields and experimental plots used for the breeding and testing of 
farm crops, and for conducting experiments in soil fertility and methods of 
culture, afford the student excellent opportunities for study and investigation. 

Laboratories for soil and crop work are maintained for the regular use of 
students. Material is provided for the study of the grain and forage crops best 
adapted to different purposes and most suitable for growing in the state. 
Greenhouse space is provided for problems and research work in crops and 
soils. 

COURSES IN FARM CROPS 

FOR UNDERGRADUATE CREDIT 

101. Farm Crops. 4(2-6) ; I and II. Prerequisite: Bot. 101. Davis. 
Economic significance of important grain and forage crops. Deposit, $4. 

105. Seed Identification and Weed Control. 2(1-3); I. Prerequisite: 
Agron. 101. Zahnley, Norris. 

Laboratory. — Identification; germination and purity testing; field trips, 
Charge, $1. 

108. Grain Grading and Judging. 2(0-6); II. Prerequisite: Agron. 101. 
Zahnley. 

Practice with cereals, grain sorghums, legumes, and other seed crops. 
Charge, $3. 

114. Advanced Grain Judging. 2(0-6); I. Prerequisite: Agron. 108. Zahn- 
ley. 

Commercial grading and judging. Charge, $3. 

115. Market Grading of Cereals. 3(1-6); I. Prerequisite: Mill. Ind. 101. 
Zahnley, Mullen. Charge, $3.50. 

FOR GRADUATE AND UNDERGRADUATE CREDIT 

202. Crop Improvement. 3(2-3); or 4(2-6) ; II. Prerequisite: Agron. 101 
and An. Husb. 221. Reitz. 

Principles of breeding field crops; selection, hybridization, and breeding for 
special qualities. 

Laboratory. — Laboratory, greenhouse, and field methods of plant breeding. 
Charge, $1. 

205. Principles of Agronomic Experimentation. 3(2-3); I. Prerequisite: 
Agron. 101 and 130. Laude. Charge, SI. 

207. Pasture Improvement I. 3(2-3); II. Prerequisite: Bot. 105 and 
Agron. 101. Anderson. 

Grazing management of tame and native pastures, poisonous plants and 
methods to eliminate losses. Charge, $1. 

208. Plant Genetics. 3(3-0) ; I. Prerequisite: An. Husb. 221. Reitz. 
An advanced course. Offered in 1938- '39 and alternate years thereafter. 

209. Genetics Seminar. 1(1-0); I and II. Prerequisite: Consult instruc- 
tors. Nabours, Reitz, Warren, Ibsen, Jugenheimer. 

Study and criticism of genetic experiments in plants and animals, and of the 
biological and mathematical methods employed. 



Division of Agriculture 115 

210. Crop Problems. Credit to be arranged; I, II, and SS. Prerequisite: 
Agron. 101 and 130. Staff. 

Special problems assigned; written reports thereon. Deposit, $4. 

211. Crop Ecology. 2(2-0); II. Prerequisite: Agron. 101 and 130. Laude. 
A study of the environmental conditions that influence growth of crops; 

natural and economic factors primarily responsible for the concentration of 
crop production in different regions and countries. 

214. Advanced Crops. 3(2-3); I. Prerequisite: Agron. 101. Offered in 
1939-'40 and alternate years thereafter. Zahnley. 

Recent investigations in production and handling of forage, fiber, sugar, 
root, and other crops not considered in previous courses. 

Laboratory. — Growth habits, classification, preparation for market, and grad- 
ing of crops studied. Charge, $1. 

215. Pasture Improvement II. 2(2-0); II. Prerequisite: Agron. 207 and 
208. Offered in 1938- '39 and alternate years thereafter. Anderson. 

Experimental methods; selection and breeding of pasture plants. 

216. Agronomic Literature. 2(2-0); I. Prerequisite: Senior standing. 
Staff. 

FOR GRADUATE CREDIT 

301. Research in Crops. Credit to be arranged; I, II, and SS. Pre- 
requisite depends on the problem selected. Staff. 

Special problems chosen or assigned, resulting data being available for 
master's thesis. Deposit, $4. 

COURSES IN SOILS 

FOR UNDERGRADUATE CREDIT 

130. Soils. 4(3-3); I and II. Prerequisite: Chem. 101 and Geol. 103. 
Throckmorton, Myers, Hide. 

Fundamental principles underlying the management of soils. Charge, $3. 

FOR GRADUATE AND UNDERGRADUATE CREDIT 

231. Dry-land Farming. 2(2-0); I. Prerequisite: Agron. 130. Myers. 
Principles of soil management under light rainfall conditions. 

235. Development and Classification of Soils. 3(2-3); II. Prerequisite: 
Agron. 130. Metzger. 

Influence of soil-forming agencies on soil characteristics. Charge, $1. 

236. Soil Problems. Credit to be arranged; I, II, and SS. Prerequisite 
depends on problem assigned. Staff. Deposit, $4. 

244. Soil Management. 3(2-3); I and II. Prerequisite: Agron. 101 and 
130. Myers. 

Tillage, erosion control, nitrogen maintenance, crop rotations; use of lime, 
manure, and commercial fertilizers. 

248. Soil Fertility. 3(3-0); I. Prerequisite: Agron. 130 and Bot. 208. 
Hide. 

Chemistry of soils and related physical and biological factors. Major 
emphasis on fundamental soil fertility problems. 

249. Soil Fertility Laboratory. 2(0-6); I. Prerequisite: Agron. 130 and 
Chem. 102. Metzger. 

Chemical and physical laboratory studies of soils. Charge, $4. 

FOR GRADUATE CREDIT 

331. Research in Soils. Credit to be arranged; I, II, and SS. Prereq- 
uisite : Consult instructor. Staff. 

Special problems, which may extend throughout the year and furnish data 
for a master's thesis. Deposit, $4. 



116 



Kansas State College 



Animal Husbandry 



Professor McCampbell 
Professor Weber 
Professor Bell 
Professor Ibsen 
Professor Aubel 



Associate Professor Mackintosh 
Associate Professor Cox 
Assistant Professor Cathcart 
Assistant Mitchell 



The courses in this department give the student special instruction in the 
selection, breeding, feeding, marketing, and management of all classes of live- 
stock. 

The department devotes 624 acres of land to the maintenance of herds and 
flocks of purebred horses, cattle, sheep, and hogs, and feeds experimentally 
from 750 to 1,000 animals each year, giving excellent opportunity to study 
problems in feeding. 

The laboratory of the animal husbandry student is the feed lot and the 
judging pavilion, where the animal can be studied from the standpoint of 
the breeder and the feeder. 

COURSES IN ANIMAL HUSBANDRY 

FOR UNDERGRADUATE CREDIT 

125. Elements of Animal Husbandry. 3(2-4) ; I and II. Staff. 

Survey of the field of animal husbandry, special emphasis on the importance 
of livestock as a major phase of agriculture. Type, conformation, quality, 
character, and breed characteristics are studied in the laboratory. Charge. 50 
cents. 



Prerequisite: An. Husb. 125. 
One field trip. 



140. Advanced Stock Judging I. 2(0-6); I. 
Bell. 

Judging market animals and different breeds of livestock. 
Charge, 50 cents. 

143. Advanced Stock Judging II. 2(0-6); II. Prerequisite: An. Husb. 140. 
Bell. 

Continuation of An. Husb. 140; occasional trips to livestock farms and 
shows. Charge, 50 cents. 

146. Form and Function in Livestock. 2(0-6); I. Prerequisite: An. 
Husb. 143. Bell. 

A detailed study of animal form and type; influence of type upon func- 
tion ; special training in presenting orally the relative merits of animals of all 
breeds. Charge, 50 cents. 

152. Principles of Feeding. 3(3-0); II. Prerequisite: Anat. 131 and 
Chem. 124. Open to students in the curriculum in agriculture. Cox. 

The digestive system and processes of nutrition; origin, chemical analysis, 
and feeding values of different feeds; nutritive requirements for maintenance, 
growth, and production of farm animals. 

156. Beef-cattle Production. 2(2-0); II. Prerequisite: An. Husb. 152 
or 172. Weber. One field trip. 

II. Prerequisite : 



159. 
Aubel. 



2(2-0) 



An. Husb. 152 or 172. 



I. Prerequisite: I. An. Husb. 152 or 172. 
2(2-0); I. Prerequisite: An. Husb. 152 or 172. 



Swine Prodltction 
One field trip. 

162. Sheep Production. 2(2-0) 
Cox. One field trip. 

165. Horse Production 
Cathcart. One field trip. 

168. Meats. 3(2-3) ; I and II. Prerequisite: An. Husb. 125. Mackintosh. 
Killing, dressing, cutting, curing, judging, selecting, and grading meats. 
Charge, $1. 

171. Livestock Production. 3(3-0); I. Prerequisite: An. Husb. 152 or 172. 
Open only to juniors and seniors not majoring in animal husbandry. Cox. 
Practical insight into the production of beef cattle, horses, swine, and sheep. 



Division of Agriculture 117 

172. Feeding Livestock. 3(3-0); II and SS. Prerequisite: Chem. 124 or 
its equivalent. Open only to students not enrolled in the curriculum in agri- 
culture. Bell. 

Processes of digestion and assimilation, feed requirements, feed values, cal- 
culating rations. 

176. Meats H. E. 1(0-3) ; I and II. Prerequisite: Food and Nutr. 106. For 
juniors and seniors in home economics. Mackintosh. 

Selecting, cutting, and curing meats; grading carcasses, uses of the various 
cuts. At least one field trip. Charge, $1. 

184. Breed Studies. 2(2-0); I. Prerequisite: An. Husb. 125. Mackintosh. 
Origin, development, adaptability, families, strains, noted sires, and noted 
breeders of the leading breeds of farm livestock other than dairy cattle. 

187. Animal Husbandry Practicums. 3(1-6); II. Staff. Manual phases 
of livestock management. Charge, 50 cents. 

189. Feeds and Feeding. 3(3-0) ; II. Prerequisite : Chem. 124 and Anat. 

222. Open only to students in the curriculum in veterinary medicine. Weber. 

A resume of digestion and nutrition dealing primarily with practical feeding. 

FOR GRADUATE AND UNDERGRADUATE CREDIT 

221. Genetics. 3(3-0); I, II, and SS. Prerequisite: Zool. 105 and Bot. 
105. Ibsen. 

Variation, Mendelian inheritance, and related subjects. 

224. Animal Breeding. 2(2-0); I. Prerequisite: An. Husb. 221. Aubel. 
Physiology of reproduction; heredity; variation; systems of mating; pedi- 
grees and herdbook standards; practices of leading breeders. 

225. Advanced Genetics. 4(3-3) ; II. Prerequisite: An. Husb. 221. Ibsen. 
Particular attention to the relation of chromosomes to heredity. 

227. Genetics Seminar. 1(1-0); I and II. Prerequisite: Consult instruc- 
tors. Nabours, Ibsen, Reitz, Warren. 

Genetic experiments in plants and animals, the biological and mathematical 
methods employed, and the validity of conclusions drawn. 

229. Research in Genetics. Credit to be arranged; I and II. Prerequi- 
site : An. Husb. 225. Ibsen. 

Problems in which small mammals are used as the experimental animals. 

231. Advanced Studies in Pedigrees, 3(1-6); II. Prerequisite: An. Husb. 
184. Mackintosh. 

Pedigrees and performances of outstanding individuals. Important strains 
and families of beef cattle, horses, sheep, and swine. 

233. Advanced Feeding. 2(2-0); I. Prerequisite: An. Husb. 152 or 172. 
Weber. 

Application of the principles of nutrition in the feeding of farm animals. 

244. A*nimal Husbandry Seminar. 1(1-0); II. Prerequisite: An. Husb. 
152. Open only to senior and graduate students majoring in animal husbandry. 
Weber. 

245. Animal Husbandry Problems. Credit to be arranged; I, II, and SS. 
Prerequisite: An. Husb. 152 and other courses; consult instructor. McCampbell. 

250. Purebred Livestock Production. 2(2-0) ; II. Prerequisite: An. Husb. 
184 and 224; senior or graduate standing. McCampbell. 
One field trip. 

260. Livestock and Meat Industry. 3(3-0); II. Prerequisite: An. Husb. 
125 and 152. McCampbell. 

The livestock and meat industry; its organization, operation, and develop- 
ment; relation to the public. Lectures, assigned readings, and reports. 



118 Kansas State College 

268. Principles of Animal Husbandry Experimentation. 2(2-0) ; II. Pre- 
requisite: An. Husb. 152 and 221. McCampbell, Ibsen, Weber. 

Conducting and interpreting experiments involving the use of animals. 

274. Advanced Meats. 1 to 4 hours; I. Prerequisite: An. Husb. 168. 
Mackintosh. 

Grading; nutritive values; factors influencing quality; dressing percentages; 
identification of meats from different animals. 

290. Problems in Training Agricultural Judging Teams. 2(10-0) ; four- 
week SS. Prerequisite: An. Husb. 125, Agron. 101, Poult. 101, Dairy Husb. 101, 
and one year's teaching experience. Cox, Zahnley, Scott, Cave, Davidson. 

A seminar course in training agricultural judging teams. 

FOR GRADUATE CREDIT 

301. Research in Animal Husbandry. Credit to be arranged; I and II. 
Prerequisite : Consult instructor. Staff. 

Special problems in genetics and in the production of all kinds of livestock 
except dairy cattle. 

305. Animal Nutrition Seminar. 1(1-0); I and II. Prerequisite: Senior 
or graduate standing. McCampbell. 

Study and criticism of experimental work in animal nutrition, of the meth- 
ods employed, and of the validit}' of conclusions drawn. 

311. The Wool Industry. 3(2-3) ; II. Prerequisite: An. Husb. 162. Cox. 
Supply and demand, production, marketing, manufacturing. 



Dairy Husbandry 



Professor Atkeson Assistant Professor Caulfield 

Professor Cave Instructor Beck 

Professor Martin Graduate Assistant Lowenstein 
Associate Professor Riddell 

The activities of the Department of Dairy Husbandry are divided into 
two groups: those that deal with the production of milk, and those that deal 
with the manufacturing of the several dairy products. The animals in the 
dairy herd are used by judging classes and in experiments in the feeding, care, 
and management of dairy animals. They are purebred cattle of the four dairy 
breeds: Jersey, Guernsey. Ayrshire, and Holstein. The department operates a 
farm of 150 acres. 

In the creamery up-to-date equipment is available for giving instruction in 
the handling of butter, cheese, milk, ice cream, and condensed milk. The 
dairy industry is expanding in Kansas, and demands more men with experience 
and knowledge of dairying. 

Instruction in the Department of Dairy Husbandry includes study of the 
selection and breeding of dairy animals ; and the production of milk, its manu- 
facture into butter, cheese, and other dairy products, and its sale on the market. 

COURSES IN DAIRY HUSBANDRY 

FOR UNDERGRADUATE CREDIT 

101. Elements of Dairying. 3(2-3); I and II. Staff. 

Problems of the milk producer and manufacturer; feeding, handling, breed- 
ing, and selecting of dairy cattle; composition and properties of milk; manu- 
facture of dairy products. 

Laboratory. — Selection of dairy cattle, production, manufacture, and com- 
mon tests of dairy products. Charge, $1.50. 

104. Dairy Cattle Judging for Veterinary Students. 1(0-3); I. Riddell, 
Cave. 



Division of Agriculture 119 

105. Dairy Cattle Judging. 2(0-6); II. Prerequisite: Dairy Husb. 101. 
Cave. 

106. Dairy Inspection. 2(1-3); I. Prerequisite: Dairy Husb. 101. Caul- 
field. 

Advanced work in testing dairy products and testing for adulterations; prac- 
tice in use of dairy and creamery score cards ; state and city ordinances ; duties 
of city, state, and government inspectors. Charge, $3. 

108. Milk Production. 3(3-0); II. Prerequisite: Dairy Husb. 101 and An. 
Husb. 152 or 172. Atkeson. 

Handling the dairy herd; construction of dairy barns and buildings; other 
subjects concerning the dairy farmer. 

110. Butter Making. 3(2-3) ; I. Prerequisite: Dairy Husb. 101 and Bact. 
101. To be taught concurrently with Bact. 235. Martin. 

The butter industry; cream production and care on the farm and in the 
plant; manufacturing, marketing, and food value of butter. 

Laboratory. — Sampling and grading cream, butter analysis and tests, prepara- 
tion of cream for churning, manufacture of butter. Charge, $3. 

116. Market Milk. 3(2-3); II. Prerequisite: Dairy Husb. 101 and Bact 
101. Martin. 

Classes of market milk; clean milk production; relation of clean milk to 
producer, dealer, and consumer; milk inspection, score cards, and milk and 
cream contests; milk plants. 

Laboratory. — Actual processing of market milk and cream. Charge, $3. 

119. Dairy Inspection for Veterinary Students. 2(1-3); II. Caulfield. 
Composition and properties of milk ; clean milk production ; study of state 

and city ordinances affecting milk and dairy products. 

Laboratory. — Testing of milk and dairy products; preparation and testing 
chemical disinfectants; scoring of dairy farms and milk plants. Charge, $3. 

120. Advanced Dairy Cattle Judging. 1(0-3); I. Cave. 
Continuation of Dairy Husb. 105; visits to some of the best farms in the 

state. 

128. Condensed and Powered Milk. 3(2-3) ; I. Prerequisite: Dairy Husb. 
101 and Bact. 101. Offered in 1939-'40 and alternate years thereafter. Martin, 
Caulfield. 

History, methods, condensing machinery, and powdered-milk industry. 

Laboratory. — Condensing milk in the College plant. Charge, $3. 

130. Ice Cream Making. 3(2-3); II. Prerequisite: Dairy Husb. 106 and 
Bact. 101. Offered in 1938-'39 and alternate years thereafter. Martin, Caul- 
field. 

Laboratory. — Manufacture of ice cream and ices. Charge, $3. y^ 

»• . 

135. Cheese Making. 3(2-3); II. Prerequisite: Dairy Husb. 106 and 
Bact. 101, Offered in 1939-'40 and alternate years thereafter. Caulfield. 
Laboratory. — Manufacture of various types of cheese. Charge, $3. 

140. Dairy Products Judging. 1(0-3); II. Prerequisite: Dairy Husb. 101. 
Martin. Charge. $2. 

141. Advanced Dairy Products Judging. 1(0-3); I. Martin. v Continua- 
tion of Dairy Husb. 140. Charge, $2. 

FOR GRADUATE AND UNDERGRADUATE CREDIT 

202. Dairy Seminar. 1(1-0); II. Prerequisite: Dairy Husb. 101, 106, and 
108. Atkeson. 

Study of dairy periodicals, bulletins, books, other dairy literature. 



120 Kansas State College 

207. Feeding and Management of Dairy Cattle. 3(2-3) ; II. Prerequi- 
site : Dairy Husb. 108 and An. Husb. 152. Offered in 1938-'39 and alternate 
years thereafter. Cave. 

Laboratory. — Includes fitting of animals for show and sale. Charge, $1. 

214. Dairy Cattle Breeding and Selection. 3(2-3); II. Prerequisite: 
Dairy Husb. 108. Offered in 1939-'40 and alternate years thereafter. Riddell. 

History of breeds and families; inheritance of milk secretion; bull indexes; 
selection of herd sire; systems of breeding. 

Laboratory. — Herdbook studies; pedigree writing and analysis. 

216. Dairy Production Problems. Credit to be arranged; I and II. Pre- 
requisite: Dairy Husb. 101, 105, and 108, and An. Husb. 152. Atkeson, Cave, 
Riddell. 

Dairy production problems that may be continued for more than one semes- 
ter. 

221. Dairy Manufacturing Problems. Credit to be arranged; I and II. 
Prerequisite: Dairy Husb. 101, 106, 108, and 110. Martin, Caulfield. 

Dairy manufacturing problems that may be continued for more than one 
semester. 

226. Creamery Management. 2(2-0); II. Prerequisite: Dairy Husb. 110. 
Offered in 1938- '39 and alternate years thereafter. Martin. 

An advanced course for students specializing in dairy manufacturing. 

FOR GRADUATE CREDIT 

301. Research in Dairy Husbandry. Credit to be arranged; I and II. 
Prerequisite: Dairy Husb. 108, 110, 116, and 226; consult instructors. Staff. 

Special investigation in dairy production or dairy manufactures which may 
form the basis of a master's thesis. 

305. Animal Nutrition Seminar. 1(1-0); I and II. Prerequisite: Con- 
sult instructors. Atkeson, Cave, Riddell. 

Study and criticism of experimental work in animal nutrition, of the 
methods employed, and of the validity of conclusions drawn. 

Dairy Refrigeration. See Mech. Engr. 170 and 175. 

Dairy Bacteriology. See Bact. 211. 

Bacteriology of Butter Cultures. See Bact. 235. 

Dairy Chemistry. See Chem. 254. 

Marketing of Dairy Products. See Econ. 251. 



General Agriculture 

Dean Call 

Associate Professor Mullen 

102. Freshman Lectures. 1(2-0); I. Call, Mullen, Peterson, various 
faculty members. 

Guidance in learning to study; information regarding opportunities for 
graduates in various fields. 

103. Agricultural Seminar. R; I and II. Four meetings each semester. 
Programs presented by students, members of faculty, invited speakers. 

Charge, 75 cents. 

105. Agricultural Relationships. R(l-0) ; II. Call. 

Responsibilities and opportunities for agricultural graduates as citizens and 
as specialists in various phases of agricultural activity. 



Division of Agriculture 



121 



Horticulture 



Professor Pickett 
Professor Barnett 
Professor Quinlan 
Associate Professor Smith 
Associate Professor Filinger 



Associate Professor Decker 
Assistant Professor Abmeyer 
Assistant Ken worthy 
Graduate Assistant Beaumont 



Instruction offered in the Department of Horticulture includes general horti- 
culture, forestry, landscape gardening, pomology, vegetable gardening, flori- 
culture, and greenhouse practices. 

The horticultural farm, the campus, and the college greenhouses provide 
adequate materials for instructional use. There are ornamental plantings of 
many species, and vegetable and flower gardens on the campus. Field work in 
pomology and forestry is provided for on the horticultural farm. 

In general, the basic curriculum in horticulture is the same as that followed 
by other departments in the Division of Agriculture. Students who desire to 
prepare for specialized work in horticulture, such as landscape gardening and 
floriculture, may arrange electives adapted to their objective throughout the 
four years of the curriculum. Each student should make provision for these 
electives with the head of the department before taking out his first freshman 
assignment. 

COURSES IN GENERAL HORTICULTURE 

FOR UNDERGRADUATE CREDIT 

107. Elements of Horticulture. 3(2-3) ; I and II. Prerequisite: Bot. 105. 
Barnett and staff. 

Principles and practices of successful orcharding and gardening. 

Laboratory. — Study of fruit-bearing habits, propagation, pruning, spraying, 
transplanting, cover crops, fruit varieties, etc. Charge, $2. • 



FOR GRADUATE AND UNDERGRADUATE CREDIT 

207. Spraying. 3(2-3); II. Prerequisite: Chem. 103 or equivalent, Pickett, 
Filinger. 

Spray machinery; chemical properties; insecticides; fungicides; spray 
dates; fumigation. 

Laboratory. — Spray materials, residue determinations, fumigants; spray 
machinery and accessories. Charge, $2. 

208. Literature of Horticulture. 2(2-0) ; II. Open only to junior, 
senior, and graduate students in horticulture. Offered in 1938- 39 and alter- 
nate years thereafter. Filinger. 

Books and publications are reviewed and bibliographies prepared. 

235. Horticulture Seminar. 1(1-0); I and II. Open only to junior, 
senior, and graduate students in horticulture. Barnett. 

Critical discussion of horticultural publications and of experimental and 
research projects under way at this and other experiment stations. 

244. Horticultural Problems. Credit to be arranged; I, II, and SS. 
Prerequisite : Consult instructor. Staff. 

Investigations and reports in pomology, olericulture, floriculture, forestry, or 
landscape gardening. 

FOR GRADUATE CREDIT 

301. Research in Horticulture. Credit to be arranged; I, II, and SS. 
Prerequisite : Consult instructor. Staff. 

Problems in pomology, olericulture, floriculture, or landscape gardening. 
Data collected may form basis for a master's thesis. 



122 Kansas State College 

COURSES IN FORESTRY 

FOR UNDERGRADUATE CREDIT 

114. Farm Forestry. 3(2-3); I. Prerequisite: Bot. 105. Smith. 
Management and utilization of woodlots and tree belts. Charge, $2. 

119. Silviculture. 3(2-3); I. Prerequisite: Bot. 105. Smith. 
Ecology of the forest; regions, types. Charge, $2. 

120. Forest Nursery Practice. 3(2-3); I. Prerequisite: Bot. 105. Smith. 
Tree seed; planting practice; regeneration. Charge, $2. 

COURSES IN LANDSCAPE GARDENING 

FOR UNDERGRADUATE CREDIT 

125. Landscape Gardening I. 3(3-0); I and SS. Quinlan. 

An introductory course in the fundamental principles of landscape gardening. 

FOR GRADUATE AND UNDERGRADUATE CREDIT 

223. Civic Art. 3(1-6); II. Prerequisite: Hort. 243. Offered in 1939-'40 
and alternate years thereafter. Quinlan. 

Growth and development of cities and towns; land subdivision. Charge, SI. 

224. Plant Materials I. 3(2-3); I. Prerequisite: Bot. 105. Quinlan. 
Perennials and annuals for general ornamental planting; planting plans. 

226. Plant Materials II. 3(2-3); II. Prerequisite: Hort. 224. Quinlan. 
Trees, shrubs, vines for ornamental planting; planting plans and reports. 

227. Landscape Construction. 3(2-3); I. Prerequisite: Civ. Engr. 151, 
155. Offered in 1938-'39 and alternate years thereafter. Quinlan. 

Topographic maps; grading plans; structures, sewage, water supply, light- 
ing, and drainage on the private estate. Charge, $1. 

238. Landscape Gardening II. 3(1-6); I. Prerequisite: Hort. 125 and 226. 
Quinlan. 

Elementary designing of the home grounds, country estates, special gardens; 
sketch problems. Charge, $1. 

243. Theory of Landscape Design. 2(2-0); I. Prerequisite: Hort. 125. 
Offered in 1939-'40 and alternate years thereafter. Quinlan. 

The economic and esthetic theory of design; taste, character, historic styles, 
and composition; natural elements in design; planting design. 

246. Landscape Gardening III. 3(1-6); II. Prerequisite: Hort. 226, 243, 
and 238. Quinlan. 

Advanced course in designing of large parks, cemeteries, golf courses, educa- 
tional groups, and high-class land subdivisions. Sketch problems. Charge, $1. 

COURSES IN POMOLOGY 

for undergraduate credit 

109. Small Fruits. 3(2-3); II. Prerequisite: Bot, 105. Filinger. 
Growing, harvesting, and marketing small fruits. Charge, $2. 

111. Systematic Pomology. 3(2-3); I. Prerequisite: Hort. 107. Filinger. 

Technical study of fruit varieties, varietal relationships, pomological nomen- 
clature, variety description, artificial and natural systems of variety classifica- 
tion. 

Laboratory. — Description, identification, judging, and preparation of dis- 
plays. Charge, $2. 



Division of Agriculture 123 

FOR GRADUATE AND UNDERGRADUATE CREDIT 

201. Practical Pomology. 3(2-3); II. Prerequisite: Hort. 111. Filinger. 
Applied orcharding; manufactured products; finances; marketing. 

Laboratory. — Grading and packing fruits; identification of fruit plant varie- 
ties; propagation and advanced pruning. Charge, $2. 

202. Subtropical Pomology. 2(2-0); II. Prerequisite: Hort. 111. Offered 
in 1939- '40' and alternate years thereafter. Barnett. 

Geography and culture of subtropical fruits. 

205. Advanced Pomology. 3(2-3); I. Prerequisite: Hort. 111. Pickett, 
Filinger. 

A course in the fundamentals of orcharding. 

Laboratory. — Advanced apple judging; production and marketing studies. 
Charge, $2. 

COURSES IN VEGETABLE GARDENING AND FLORICULTURE 

FOR UNDERGRADUATE CREDIT 

127. Greenhouse Construction and Management. 3(3-0) ; II. Decker. 
Greenhouse maintenance, heating, ventilation, soils, and water. 

130. School Gardening. 2(2-0) ; SS. Decker. 

Soils, pests, and machinery as related to vegetable culture. 

133. Vegetable Gardening. 3(2-3) ; II. Decker. 

Principles underlying vegetable production for the home or local market, 
special attention given to farm gardens. 

Laboratory. — Varieties, planting schedules, and crop rotations. Charge, $2. 

135. Floral Arrangement I. 2(1-3); I. Decker. Consult instructor for 
prerequisites. 

The commercial flower shop, source of supplies, sales. 

Laboratory. — Arrangement of flowers for various occasions. Charge, $2. 

136. Floral Arrangement II. 2(1-3) ; II. Decker. Consult instructor for 
prerequisites. Continuation of Hort. 135. 

Laboratory. — Care of cut flowers, packing, delivery, and arrangement. 
Charge, $2. 

140. Commercial Floriculture I. 3(2-3); I. Prerequisite: Hort. 127. 
Decker. 

Principles underlying the culture of greenhouse crops. Charge, $2. 

141. Commercial Floriculture II. 3(2-3); II. Prerequisite: Hort. 140 
Decker. 

Continuation of Hort. 140. Charge, $2. 

FOR GRADUATE AND UNDERGRADUATE CREDIT 

210. Market Gardening. 3(2-3); I. Prerequisite: Agron. 130 and Hort. 
133. Decker. 

Competitive areas, market requirements, harvesting, grading, and costs. 

Laboratory. — Grading and packing, sources of market supplies, and prices. 
Charge, $2. 

214. Horticultural Cash Crops. 2(2-0) ; I. Decker. 

Vegetable crops grown in Kansas principally as cash crops; potatoes, sweet 
potatoes, watermelons, and cantaloupes. 



124 Kansas State College 

Milling Industry 

Professor Swanson Assistant Professor Pence 

Professor Larmour Instructor Anderson 

Associate Professor Working 

The Department of Milling Industry offers courses to prepare students for 
work in flour-milling operation, products control, or administration. 

The department has a flour mill of 65 barrels daily capacity, equipped as a 
commercial plant and also with many features designed for research and in- 
struction. For the study of elementry principles in milling and special prob- 
lems in milling technology there are several units of nonautomatic mills. 

The baking laboratory has dough mixers, proofing cabinets, ovens and other 
apparatus needed for baking tests in elementary and advanced work. The 
chemical laboratory has the usual chemical apparatus for wheat and flour test- 
ing, and special equipment for work on advanced problems. 

COURSES IN MILLING INDUSTRY 

FOR UNDERGRADUATE CREDIT 

101. Elements of Milling. 2(1-3) ; I. Larmour, Anderson. 

A survey of the field; basic work on experimental mills. Charge, $2. 

103. Flowsheets. 2(0-6) ; II. Prerequisite: Mill. Ind. 101. Pence. 
The construction and assembling of a flow sheet. Charge, $2. 

105. Principles of Baking. 4(2-6) ; II. Larmour. 

Baking procedures and interpretation of qualities in baked products. Not 
open for credit to students who major in milling chemistry. Charge, $5. 

109. Milling Practice I. 3(1-6) ; I. Prerequisite: Mill. Ind. 103. Pence. 
A studv of milling machinery and methods of checking flour mill operations. 
Charge, $2. 

111. Milling Practice II. 3(1-6) ; II. Prerequisite: Mill. Ind. 109. Pence. 
A study of roll and bolting surfaces, power transmission, lubrication, mill- 
wright work, and controls for flour mill operation. Charge, $2. 

FOR GRADUATE AND UNDERGRADUATE CREDIT 

201. Milling Technology I. 2(0-6); I. Prerequisite: Mill. Ind. 111. 
Anderson. 

Technical study of special phases of wheat conditioning and flour milling. 
Charge, $2. 

202. Milling Technology II. 2(0-6); II. Prerequisite: Mill. Ind. 201.. 
Anderson. 

A study of the physical, chemical, and engineering principles used in the 
control of flour mill operations. Charge, $2. 

203. Flour Mill Construction. (0-8-1); I. Prerequisite: Mach. Des. 
Ill and 121; prerequisite or concurrent, Ap. Mech. 216. Pence. 

205. Wheat and Flour Testing. 3(0-9); I. Prerequisite: Mill. Ind. 212 
and Chem. 122 or 123, and 251. Working. 

Special quantitative tests of cereals and their products; methods of analysis 
and interpretation of results. Deposit $7.50. 

207. Experimental Baking. 4(2-6); II. Prerequisite: Chem. 122. Larmour. 
Practice in baking tests ; comparison of methods, formulas, and flours ; in- 
terpretation of results. Charge, $5. 

210. Advanced Wheat a^ t d Flour Testing. 1 to 5 semester hours; I and 
II. Prerequisite: Mill. Ind. 205 and other courses; consult instructor. Working. 

Physiochemical and other methods used in testing wheat and flour. De- 
posit, $2.50 per hour. 



Division of Agriculture 125 

212. Milling Qualities of Wheat. 3(3-0); II. Prerequisite: Chem. 122. 
Swanson. 

The qualities of wheat and flour as affected by growth, storage, physical, 
chemical and biological factors. 

214. Milling Industry Problems. Credit to be arranged; I, II, and SS. 
Prerequisite: Mill. Ind. 212, or such other courses as are necessary for the 
problem selected. Staff. Charge, $2.50 per hour. 

218. Milling Industry Seminar. R(M.»-0) ; I and II. 

Discussion of problems of general interest to all students in milling industry. 
Charge, 75 cents. 

FOR GRADUATE CREDIT 

301. Research in Milling Industry. Credit to be arranged; I, II, and SS. 
Prerequisite : Consult staff. 

Research may be used as basis for the master's thesis. 



Poultry Husbandry 

Professor Payne Graduate Assistant Avery 

Professor Warren Farm Superintendent Gish 

Associate Professor Scott 

The poultry plant, occupying twenty-four acres and situated just north of 
the northeast corner of the College campus, is devoted to the breeding and 
rearing of the stock used for class and experimental work. 

COURSES IN POULTRY HUSBANDRY 

FOR UNDERGRADUATE CREDIT 

101. Farm Poultry Production. 2(1-3); I and II. Payne, Scott. Avery. 

Charge, $2. 

109. Poultry Judging. 3(1-6); I. Prerequisite: Poult. Husb. 101. Scott. 
Production characteristics and evolution of present breed types. 

Laboratory. — Judging the standard breeds and varieties by comparison ; 
judging hens for egg production on the basis of their trap-nest records. 
Charge, $2. 

116. Market Poultry and Eggs. 4(2-6); I. Prerequisite: Poult. Husb. 
101. Offered in 1939-'40 and alternate years thereafter. Payne. 

Methods of handling market eggs and live and dressed poultry. 

Laboratory. — Candling and grading eggs; crate-feeding, killing, dressing, 
grading, and packing market poultry. Charge, $2. 

120. Artifical Incubation and Brouding. 3(1-6) ; (laboratory 3 times a 
day, 7 days a week, for not less than 8 weeks, at hours outside the regular 
schedule); II. Prerequisite: Poult. Husb. 101 and Zool. 105. Scott. 

Development of the chick; metabolism; survey of the literature on incuba- 
tion and brooding ; actual care of an incubator ; bringing off the hatch ; care 
of chicks in brooder for 3 weeks. Charge, $2. 

125. Advanced Incubation. 1(0-3); (laboratory 3 times a day, 7 days a 
week, for not less than 3 weeks, at hours outside the regular schedule) ; II. 
Prerequisite: Poult. Husb. 101 and 120. Offered 1939-'40 and alternate years 
thereafter. Scott. 

Study of the baby chick industry; operation of a Mammoth incubator; 
packing and shipping of baby chicks. Charge, $2. 



126 Kansas State College 

FOR GRADUATE AND UNDERGRADUATE CREDIT 

204. Poultry Genetics. 3(3-0) ; II. Prerequisite: An. Husb. 221. Warren. 
Special reference to bearing of genetics on practical breeding problems. 

Poultry Farm Organization. See Ag. Ec. 206A. 

Poultry Sanitation. See Bact. 218. 

Poultry Anatomy. See Anat. 202. 

206. Poultry Problems. Credit to be arranged; I, II, and SS. Prereq- 
uisite: Poult. Husb. 101 and 104; consult instructors. Payne, Warren, Scott. 
Investigations which may be continued into the next semester if necessary. 

210. Genetics Seminar. 1(1-0); I and II. Prerequisite: Consult Warren. 
Genetics experiments in plants and animals; the biological and mathemati- 
cal methods employed; and the validity of conclusions drawn. 

216. Poultry Management. 3(3-0); II. Prerequisite: Poult. Husb. 101; 
senior or graduate standing. Payne. 

A detailed study of all phases of farm and commercial flocks, including cost 
of production. 

220. Poultry Seminar. 1(1-0); I. Prerequisite: Poult. Husb. 101. Re- 
quired of all graduate students and of both juniors and seniors majoring in 
poultry husbandry. Warren. 

FOR GRADUATE CREDIT 

301. Research in Poultry Husbandry. Credit to be arranged; I, II, and 
SS. Prerequisite: Poult. Husb. 101, 104, 109, 116, and 120; consult instructors. 
Warren, Payne, Scott. 

Investigations which may form the basis of a master's thesis. 

305. Animal Nutrition Seminar. 1(1-0); I and II. Prerequisite: Con- 
sult Payne. 

Study and criticism of experimental work in animal nutrition. 



The Agricultural Experiment Station 



The Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station was organized under the pro- 
visions of an act of congress, approved March 2, 1887, which is commonly 
known as the Hatch act. 

Two days later, March 4, 1887, the legislature of Kansas adopted a resolu- 
tion accepting the conditions of the Hatch act, and vesting the responsibility 
of carrying out its provisions in the Board of Regents of Kansas State College. 

The Hatch act carried an annual congressional appropriation of $15,000. 
No further addition to this amount was made until the passage of the Adams 
act, approved March 16, 1906, which provided a sum beginning with $5,000, 
and increasing each year by $2,000 over the preceding years for five years. 
Since this time the annual appropriation has been $15,000. Under the Adams 
act, experiments entered upon must be approved by the Office of Experiment 
Stations of the United States Department of Agriculture. 

The Purnell act, approved February 24, 1925, authorized an appropriation 
of $20,000 for the fiscal year beginning July 1, 1925, with allotments increasing 
annually by $10,000 until a total of $60,000 was reached for the fiscal year be- 
ginning July 1, 1929. The Purnell act is broad in scope and provides specifi- 
cally for scientific research in agricultural economics, home economics, and 
rural sociology, in addition to providing more liberal support for the older 
established work of the Agricultural Experiment Station. 

A fourth act authorizing support for the agricultural experiment stations is 
the Bankhead- Jones act, approved June 29, 1935. This act authorizes ap- 
propriations to the land-grant colleges for research, based upon the rural 
population of the various states. The amount available to Kansas was ap- 
proximately $12,000 for the first fiscal year, and will amount to approximately 
$60,000 annually when the act is in full force. The Bankhead-Jones act states 
specifically that the research authorized shall be in addition to research pro- 
vided for under existing laws and that no allotment of funds shall be made to 
a state for any fiscal year in excess of the amount which the state makes 
available for such fiscal year out of its own funds for research. 

The Agricultural Experiment Station is, then, a research agency organized 
to ascertain facts of value to agriculture. It devotes its attention solely to 
the solution of problems of the farm and the farm home. 

Farms, livestock, laboratories, and general equipment of the college are all 
directly available for the use of the station. 

More than one hundred projects covering practically all phases of agricul- 
tural investigation are being studied by the members of the experiment station 
staff. Results of this work are published in the form of scientific papers and 
bulletins and circulars intended primarily for the general reader. 

All bulletins and other publications from the Agricultural Experiment Sta- 
tion are sent without charge to citizens of the state. Any person in the state 
may have his name placed on the permanent mailing list of the station. 

Letters of inquiry and general correspondence should be addressed to Agri- 
cultural Experiment Station, Manhattan, Kan. Special inquiries should be 
directed, as far as possible, to the head of the department having charge of 
the matter concerning which information is desired. 

(127) 



128 Kansas State College 

Branch Agricultural Experiment Stations 



FORT HAYS BRANCH STATION 

Land occupied by this station is a part of what was originally the Fort Hays 
military reservation. A bill was approved by congress March 28, 1900, setting 
aside this reservation for experimental and educational purposes. By act of 
the state legislature, approved February 7, 1901, the act of congress donating 
this land and imposing the support of these institutions was accepted. The 
same session of the legislature passed an act providing for the organization 
of a branch experiment station and appropriating a small fund for preliminary 
work. In the division of this land, the college received 3,560 acres. 

The work of this station may be divided into two divisions: (a) experi- 
mental projects; (b) general farm and livestock work. Investigations are 
confined primarily to the study of problems peculiar to the western half of 
the state where rainfall is limited. Facilities of the station are also being 
used for the growing of large quantities of pure seed of the strains and varieties 
which have proved in actual test to be most productive in the western part of 
the state. 

GARDEN CITY BRANCH STATION 

In 1906, the county commissioners of Finney county purchased for purposes 
of agricultural experimentation a tract of land amounting to 320 acres, situated 
four and one-half miles from Garden City in western Kansas. The land has 
been leased for a term of ninety-nine years to the Kansas Agricultural Experi- 
ment Station as an experimental and demonstration farm. Investigations in 
irrigation are conducted at this station. 

COLBY BRANCH STATION 

The legislature of 1913 provided for the establishment of a branch experi- 
ment station near Colby, in northwestern Kansas. It is located on a tract of 
314 acres. The land was purchased by the county and deeded to the state. 
Operations were begun in March, 1914. Cropping experiments are being con- 
ducted under dry-land conditions and under irrigation. The primary purpose 
of the Colby station is to determine the best methods of developing the agri- 
culture of northwestern Kansas. 

TRIBUNE BRANCH STATION 

At the Tribune station experimental and demonstration work is conducted 
for the benefit of the surrounding western territory. Special attention is paid 
to the problems of producing crops under conditions of limited rainfall. 



The Division of Engineering and Architecture 

Roy Andrew Seaton, Dean 



The Division of Engineering and Architecture offers curriculums in agri- 
cultural engineering, architectural engineering, architecture, chemical engineer- 
ing, civil engineering, electrical engineering, industrial arts, and mechanical 
engineering, each leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in the particular 
branch of the profession selected. 

The curriculums as tabulated give fundamental preparation for entering 
upon work in the several branches of the professions, with some opportunity 
for specialization through options and electives. To a limited extent substitu- 
tions may be made for certain of the courses listed as required when there ap- 
pears to be good reason for them, but each such substitution must have the 
approval of the head of the department in which the curriculum is adminis- 
tered, the head of department giving the course which is displaced, and the 
dean of the division. In no case will the substitution of an additional amount 
of technical work for any of the cultural work be permitted. 

CURRICULUM IN AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING 

The field of the agricultural engineer includes: research, sales, or advertis- 
ing in the farm-machinery and farm-motor industry; farm structure design, or 
promotional work with the building materials industry; soil erosion prevention 
with the federal and state agencies; rural electric service with electric power 
companies; management of farms where drainage, irrigation, or power-farming 
methods are of major importance; and engineering in agricultural develop- 
ment. 

The curriculum in agricultural engineering includes all of the basic courses 
which are common to the other engineering curriculums such as mathematics, 
physics, and mechanics. Courses in agriculture are also included in order to 
familiarize the student with the modern methods of agriculture. Training 
along engineering lines includes farm machinery, farm power, farm structures, 
highway engineering, drainage, irrigation, soil-erosion control, and modern 
farm and home equipment. 

CURRICULUM IN ARCHITECTURAL ENGINEERING 

The curriculum in architectural engineering emphasizes the structural and 
mechanical phases of architecture. The field of the architectural engineer com- 
prises the superintending of building construction, general contracting, struc- 
tural design, estimating construction costs, and specification writing. 

Students pursuing the curriculum in architectural engineering are urged to 
devote a fifth year to the work. By so doing a student can combine the cur- 
riculums in architecture and architectural engineering and receive the bachelor 
of science degree in both. Students intending to receive both degrees should 
consult with the head of the department at the beginning of the sophomore 
year. 

It is also recommended that students obtain practical experience during the 
summer vacations in the building industry, either on construction projects or 
in the office of an architect, construction engineer, or contractor. 

(129) 
9—6529 



130 Kansas State College 

CURRICULUM IN ARCHITECTURE 

The curriculum in architecture, while stressing architectural design, in- 
cludes also training in building construction, properties and uses of building 
materials, professional practice, and other phases important to the architec- 
tural profession. The aim is to train students for efficient service as drafts- 
men and designers in an architectural organization and provide them with the 
necessary foundation for future independent practice. 

It is recommended that students obtain practical experience during the 
summer vacations in the building industry, either on construction projects or 
in the office of an architect. 

CURRICULUM IN CHEMICAL ENGINEERING 

The aim of the curriculum in chemical engineering is to prepare the student 
for work in the design, construction, and operation of chemical plants. The 
scope of chemical engineering includes the strictly chemical industries, such 
as those manufacturing acids, alkalis, lacquer solvents, dyes, explosives, metal§ 
and like materials, and also the process industries, such as those processing 
petroleum, rubber, foods, leather, and those manufacturing cement, glass, soap, 
paints and varnishes, pulp and paper. 

CURRICULUM IN CIVIL ENGINEERING 

The aim of the curriculum in civil engineering is to give preparation for 
the active practice of the profession. The first and second years are devoted 
largely to general cultural studies and the sciences, including mathematics. 
An introduction to the technical work is given in these years through courses 
in drawing, surveying, and the elementary phases of engineering. 

The last two years are devoted largely to technical work. In recognition of 
the mechanical trend of the age, provision is made for class and laboratory 
work in mechanical and electrical engineering. In view of the growing im- 
portance of municipal problems, such as paving, sewerage, and water supply, 
the curriculum in civil engineering includes required courses in these subjects. 

Advanced elective courses in railway, highway, and irrigation and drainage 
engineering are offered in the second semester of the senior year. 

CURRICULUM IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 

The graduate from the curriculum in electrical engineering may enter either 
the power or the communication field of electrical engineering, and he may 
engage in such lines as research, design, application, business management, or 
plant operation. 

In order to qualify for the various divisions of the profession, the student 
should have a thorough grounding in mathematics and the sciences; practice 
and theoretical training in drawing, surveying, and shop practice; and a liberal 
training in the cultural subjects, English, history, and economics. Such a 
broad foundation serves as the basis for the more technical training in elec- 
trical engineering. This technical training begins with a course in the first 
year, is followed by another course in the second year, and is completed by 
several courses extending through the junior and senior years. The curricu- 
lum provides, in addition, elective work, giving the student opportunity for 
the selection of extra work along cultural, economic, or technical lines. 

CURRICULUM IN INDUSTRIAL ARTS 

The curriculum in industrial arts is designed to prepare students for posi- 
tions as supervisors and directors of training schools in industry, or as teachers 
in colleges, high schools, and trade schools; also to give some technical train- 
ing and experience in shop work and drafting, preparatory to entering indus- 
trial shops. 



Division of Engineering 131 

CURRICULUM IN MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 

The curriculum in mechanical engineering is a combination of theory and 
practice, to give the student the technical skill required for engineering opera- 
tions, and also an understanding of the scientific and economic principles neces- 
sary for the solution of engineering and industrial problems. 

Throughout the four years the theoretical studies in the classroom are sup- 
plemented by practical work in the laboratories. In the testing laboratories 
the work does not end when the test is completed, but the entire problem must 
be written up in such a manner as would be approved in commercial testing 
laboratories. The laboratory work in the shops gives the student practice in 
operating the machinery and performing the various mechanical operations, 
and includes a scientific study of the factors of production, so that loss of ma- 
terial and expenditure of human effort will be at a minimum. 

Optional and elective courses are available in the senior year and give the 
student an opportunity for instruction in the more specialized branches of 
mechanical engineering, including industrial engineering, power production, 
petroleum production, and aeronautical engineering. 

Students pursuing a mechanical engineering curriculum are urged to spend 
at least two summers in some shop or commercial plant. 

ENGINEERING AND ARCHITECTURE IN THE SUMMER SCHOOL 

The Division offers summer courses in free-hand and mechanical drawing, 
water-color and oil painting, manual training and shop practice for high-school 
and grade-school teachers, as well as various courses required in the several 
curriculums. Therefore, teachers who wish to take an engineering or archi- 
tectural curriculum can get a considerable start on the work during their sum- 
mer vacations, and College students who are irregular may make up courses. 

Full information concerning the courses offered is contained in the Summer 
School number of the Kansas State College Bulletin, which may be obtained 
upon application to the vice-president of the College. 



132 



Kansas State College 



Curriculum in Agricultural Engineering 



FRESHMAN 



First Semester 

Chemistry E-I, Chem. 107 

College Algebra,* Math. 104 

Plane Trigonometry, Math. 101... 

College Rhetoric I, Engl. 101 

Engr. Drawing, Mach. Des. 101.. 
Oxyacetylene Welding, Shop 171, 

Artillery I, Mil. Sc. 113A 

Engr. Lectures, Gen. Engr. 101... 
Phys. Educ. M, Phys. Ed. 103... 



4(3-3) 

3(3-0) 

3(3-0) 

3(3-0) 

2(0-6) 

1(0-2, 1) 

1(1-2) 

R 

R(0-2) 



Total 



First Semester 

Engr. Physics I, Phys. 105 

Calculus I, Math. 114 

Surveying I, Civ. Engr. 102 

Mach. Drawing I, Mach. Des. Ill 
El. of An. Husb., An. Husb. 125.. 

Artillery III, Mil. Sc. 115A 

Engr. Assembly, Gen. Engr. 105.. 
Phys. Educ. M, Phys. Ed. 105 



Total 



First Semester 
Applied Mechanics, Ap. Mech. 202, 
Field and Power Mach., Agr. Engr. 

Ill 

Engr. Thermo. A, Mech. Engr. 201A 
Public Speaking, Pub. Spk. 107... 

Metals and Alloys, Shop 165 

Machine Tool Work I, Shop 170.. 

Technical Reports, Engl. 215 

Engr. Assembly, Gen. Engr. 105.. 

Total 



First Semester 
Farm Structures, Agr. Engr. 203, 



Soils, Agron. 130. 
Hydraulics, Ap. Mech. 230, 235. 
Highway Engr. I, Civil Engr. 231. 
Amer. Ind. History, Hist. 105... 
Engr. Assembly, Gen. Engr. 105. 
Inspection Trip, Agr. Engr. 140. 



Total 



Second Semester 

Chemistry E-II, Chem. 108 

Plane Analytical Geom., Math. 110, 
Agr. Mach. and Con., Agr. 

Engr. 122 

College Rhetoric II, Engl. 104 

Desc. Geometry, Mach. Des. 106.. 
Foundry Production, Shop 161... 

Artillery II, Mil. Sc. 114A 

Engr. Lectures, Gen. Engr. 101... 
Phys. Educ. M, Phys. Ed. 104... 



17 



Total 



SOPHOMORE 



5(4-3) 
4(4-0) 
2(0-6) 
2(0-6) 
3(2-4) 
1(1-2) 
R 
R(0-2) 



Second Semester 

Engr. Physics II, Phys. 106 

Calculus II, Math. 115 

Surveying II, Civil Engr. 111... 
Mechanism, Mach. Des. 121.... 

General Geology, Geol. 103 

Artillery IV, Mil. Sc. 116A 

Engr. Assembly, Gen. Engr. 105. 
Phys. Educ. M, Phys. Ed. 106.. 



17 



Total 



Total 



4(3-3) 
4(4-0) 

2(1-3) 
3(3-0) 
2(0-6) 
1(0-3) 
1(1-2) 
R 
R(0-2) 

17 



5(4-3) 
4(4-0) 
2(0-6) 
3(3-0) 
3(3-0) 
1(1-2) 
R 
R(0-2) 



11 



JUNIOR 

Second Semester 
4(4-0) Str. of Mtls., Ap. Mech. 211, 220, 6(5-3) 

Farm Motors, Agr. Engr. 225 4(2-6) 

4(2-6) Farm Crops, Agron. 101 4(2-6) 

3(3-0) Economics I, Econ. 101 3(3-0) 

2(2-0) Graphic Statics, Ap. Mech. 225... 1(0-3) 

2(2-0) Engr. Assembly, Gen. Engr. 105.. R 

2(0-6) 
1(1-0) 
R 



SENIOR 

Second Semester 
4(2-6) Mod. Farm and Home Equipment, 

4(3-3) Agr. Engr. 210 3(2-3) 

4(3-3) Land Reclamation, Agr. Engr. 250, 3(2-3) 

2(2-0) Air Conditioning A, Mech Engr. 135 3(3-0) 
3(3-0) Elec. Engr. C, Elec. Engr. 

R 102, 106 3(2-2, 1) 

R Farm Organization, Agr. Econ. 106, 3(2-3) 

Electivef 2( - ) 

Engr. Assembly, Gen. Engr. 105.. R 

17 Total 17 



Number of hours required for graduation, 139. 



* Students who offer but one unit of algebra for admission take a five-hour course in col- 
lege algebra, Math. 107, the first semester, postponing two hours of other work. 

t Eleetives are to be chosen with the advice and approval of the head of the department 
and the dean. 



Division of Engineering 



133 



Curriculum in Architectural Engineering 



First Semester 

Chemistry E-I, Ch<?m. 107 

College Alegbra,* Math. 104 

Plane Trigonometry, Math. 101... 

College Rhetoric I, Engl. 101 

Desc. Geometry A, Mach. Des. 107, 

Artillery I, Mil. Sc. 113A 

Engr. Lectures, Gen. Engr. 101... 
Phys. Educ. M, Phys. Ed. 103... 



Total 

First Semester 

Engr. Physics I, Phys. 105 

Calculus I, Math. 114 

Freehand Drawing II, Arch. 113. 

El. of Arch. I, Arch. 106A 

Surveying I, Civil Engr. 102.... 

Artillery III, Mil. Sc. 115A 

Engr. Assembly, Gen. Engr. 105. 
Phys. Educ. M, Phys. Ed. 105. . . 

Total 



FRESHMAN 

Second Semester 

4(3-3) Chemistry E-II, Chem. 108 4(3-3) 

3(3-0) Plane Analytical Geom., Math. 110, 4(4-0) 

3(3-0) College Rhetoric II, Engl. 104 3(3-0) 

3(3-0) Shades and Shadows and Perspec- 

3(0-9) tive, Mach. Des. 108 3(0-9) 

1(1-2) Freehand Drawing I, Arch. 112... 2(0-6) 

R Artillery II, Mil. Sc. 114A 1(1-2) 

R(0-2) Engr. Lectures, Gen. Engr. 101... R 

Phys. Educ. M, Phys. Ed. 104 R(0-2) 

17 Total 17 

SOPHOMORE 

Second Semester 

5(4-3) Engr. Physics II, Phys. 106 5(4-3) 

4(4-0) Calculus II, Math. 115 4(4-0) 

2(0-6) Economics I, Econ. 101 3(3-0) 

3(0-9) El. of Arch. II, Arch. 107A 3(0-9) 

2(0-6) Pencil Rend, and Sketch., Arch. 116, 2(0-6) 

1(1-2) Artillery IV, Mil. Sc. 116A 1(1-2) 

R Engr. Assembly, Gen. Engr. 105.. R 

R(0-2) Phys. Educ. M, Phys. Ed. 106 R(0-2) 

17 Total 18 



JUNIOR 



First Semester 

Applied Mechanics, Ap. Mech. 202 4(4-0) 
Bldg. Materials and Construction, 

Arch. 187A 3(3-0) 

Architectural Design I, Arch. 142.. 3(0-9) 

Hist, of Arch. I, Arch 154A 2(2-0) 

Foundations, Civil Engr. 121 2(2-0) 

Law for Engineers, Hist. 167 2(2-0) 

Public Speaking, Pub. Spk. 107... 2(2-0) 

Engr. Assembly, Gen. Engr. 105. . . R 

Total 18 



Second Semester 



Str. of Mat., Ap. Mech. 211, 220, 
Working Draw, and Speci., Arch. 

191 

Architectural Design II, Arch. 144, 

Hist, of Arch. II, Arch. 157 A 

Water Color I, Arch. 118 

Illumination A, Elec. Engr. 116... 
Engr. Assembly, Gen. Engr. 105. . . 



6(5-3) 

3(0-9) 
3(0-9) 
2(2-0) 
2(0-6) 
2(2-0) 
R 



Total 



First Semester 
Stresses in Framed Struc, Civil 

Engr. 201 

Architectural Design III, Arch. 145, 
Hist, of Arch. Ill, Arch. 158A... 
Civ. Engr. Draw. II, Civ. Engr. 205, 
Soil Mechanics, Ap. Mech. 290... 

Electivef 

Engr. Assembly, Gen. Engr. 105.. 
Inspection Trip, Arch. 199 

Total 



SENIOR 

Second Semester 

Des. of Framed Struc, Civ. Engr. 

4(4-0) 246 3(0-9) 

5(0-15) Reinforced Concrete Design, Civ. 

2(2-0) Engr. 250, 255 3(2-3) 

2(0-6) Hist, of Arch. IV, Arch. 160A... 2(2-0) 

2(0-6) Building Equipment, Arch. 188... 2(2-0) 

2( - ) Air Cond. A, Mech. Engr. 135,... 3(3-0) 

R Electivef 4( - ) 

R Engr. Assembly, Gen. Engr. 105.. R 

17 Total 17 



Number of hours required for graduation, 139. 



* Students who offer but one unit of algebra for admission take a five-hour course in col- 
lege algebra, Math. 107, the first semester, postponing two hours of other work. 

f Electives are to be chosen with the advice and approval of the head of the department 
and the dean. 






134 



Kansas State College 



Curriculum in Architecture 



FRESHMAN 

First Semester Second Semester 

College Algebra,* Math. 104 3(3-0) Plane Trigonometry, Math. 101... 3(3-0) 

College Rhetoric I, Engl. 101 3(3-0) College Rhetoric II, Engl. 104 3(3-0) 

Desc. Geometry A, Mach. Des. 107, 3(0-9) Shades and Shadows and Perspec- 

El. of Arch. I, Arch. 106A 3(0-9) tive, Mach. Des. 108 3(0-9) 

History of Arch. I, Arch. 154A 2(2-0) El. of Arch. II, Arch. 107A 3(0-9) 

Freehand Drawing I, Arch. 112... 2(0-6) History of Arch. II, Arch. 157A. . 2(2-0) 

Artillery I, Mil. Sc. 113A (men)... 1(1-2) Freehand Drawing II, Arch. 113... 2(0-6) 

Engr. Lectures, Gen. Engr. 101... R Artillery II, Mil. Sc. 114A (men).. 1(1-2) 

Phys. Educ. M, Phys. Ed. 103 R(0-2) or Engr. Lectures, Gen. Engr. 101 R 

Phys. Educ. W, Phys. Ed. 151A. . R(0-3) Phys. Educ. M, Phys. Ed. 104 R(0-2)or 

Phys. Educ. W, Phys. Ed. 152 A. . R(0-3) 

Total, men 17 Total, men 17 

Total, women 16 Total, women 16 

SOPHOMORE 

First Semester Second Semester 

General Physics I, Phys. 102 4(3-3) General Physics II, Phys. 103 4(3-3) 

Economics I, Econ. 101 3(3-0) Applied Mech. A, Ap. Mech. 102.. 3(3-0) 

Architectural Design I, Arch. 142.. 3(0-9) Architectural Design II, Arch. 144, 3(0-9) 

Building Mat. and Con., Arch. Work. Drawing and Spec, Arch. 

187A 3(3-0) 191 3(0-9) 

History of Arch. Ill, Arch. 158A. . 2(2-0) History of Arch. IV, Arch. 160A.. 2(2-0) 

Pencil Rend, and Sketch., Arch. 116 2(0-6) Water Color I, Arch. 118 2(0-6) 

Artillery III, Mil. Sc. 115A (men), 1(1-2) Artillery IV, Mil. Sc. 116A (men).. 1(1-2) 

Engr. Assembly, Gen. Engr. 105... R Engr. Assembly, Gen. Engr. 105.. R 

Phys. Educ. M, Phys. Ed. 105 R(0-2) or Phys. Educ. M, Phys. Ed. 106 R(0-2) or 

Phys. Educ. W, Phys. Ed. 153 R(0-3) Phys. Educ. W, Phys. Ed. 154 R(0-3) 

Total, men 18 Total, men 18 

Total, women 17 Total, women 17 

JUNIOR 

First Semester Second Semester 

Str. of Mat. A, Ap. Mech. 116, 121 4(3-3) Theory of Structures I, Arch. 192, 4(2-6) 

French I, Mod. Lang. 151 3(3-0) French II, Mod. Lang. 152 3(3-0) 

Architectural Design III, Arch. 145, 5(0-15) Architectural Design IV, Arch. 147, 5(0-15) 

Life Drawing I, Arch. 121 2(0-6) Life Drawing II, Arch. 123 2(0-6) 

Hist, of Painting and Sculpture, Building Equipment, Arch. 188.... 2(2-0) 

Arch. 179 3(3-0) Public Speaking, Pub. Spk. 107.. 2(2-0) 

Engr. Assembly, Gen. Engr. 105.. R Engr. Assembly, Gen. Engr. 105... R 

Total 17 Total 18 

SENIOR 

First Semester Second Semester 

Architectural Design V, Arch. 254, 7(0-21) Architectural Design VI, Arch. 257, 7(0-21) 

Theory of Structures II, Arch. 194A, 5(3-6) Theory of Structures III, Arch. 196, 4(2-6) 

Law for Engineers, Hist. 167 2(2-0) Professional Practice, Arch. 195... 2(0-6) 

Electivef 3( - ) Electivef 4( - ) 

Engr. Assembly, Gen. Engr. 105... R Engr. Assembly, Gen. Engr. 105.. R 

Inspection Trip, Arch. 199 R 

Total 17 Total 17 

Number of hours required for graduation: Men, 139; women, 135. 



* Students who offer but one unit of algebra for admission take a five-hour course in col- 
lege algebra, Math. 107, the first semester, postponing two hours of other work. 

t Electives are to be chosen with the advice and approval of the head of the department 
and the dean. 



Division of Engineering 



135 



Curriculum in Chemical Engineering 



First Semester 
Chemistry I, Chem. 101, 



College Algebra,* Math. 104 

Plane Trigonometry, Math. 101 
College Rhetoric I, Engl. 101 . . 
Engr. Drawing, Mach. Des. 101 

Artillery I, Mil. Sc. 113A 

Engr. Lectures, Gen. Engr. 101 . 
Phys. Educ. M, Phys. Ed. 103. . 



FRESHMAN 



Total 



5(3-6) 
3(3-0) 
3(3-0) 
3(3-0) 
2(0-6) 
1(1-2) 
R 
R(0-2) 



17 



Second Semester 



Chemistry II Rec, Chem. 103.. 
Chemistry II Lab., Chem. 104. . . 
Plane Analytical Geom., Math. 110 
College Rhetoric II, Engl. 104... 
D'esc. Geometry, Mach. Des. 106. 
Mach. Drawing I, Mach. Des. Ill 

Artillery II, Mil. Sc. 114A 

Engr. Lectures, Gen. Engr. 101 . . . 
Phys. Educ. M, Phys. Ed. 104. 



3(3-0) 
2(0-6) 
4(4-0) 
3(3-0) 
2(0-6) 
2(0-6) 
1(1-2) 
R 
R(0-2) 



Total 



17 



First Semester 

Engr. Physics I, Phys. 105 

Calculus I, Math. 114 

German I, Mod. Lans. 101 

Chem. Engr. Materials, Chem. 280, 

Mechanism, Mach. Des. 121 

Artillery III. Mil. Sc. 115A 

Engr. Assembly, Gen. Engr. 105.. 
Phys. Educ. M, Phys. Ed. 105... 



Total 



SOPHOMORE 



5(4-3) 
4(4-0) 
3(3-0) 
2(2-0) 
3(3-0) 
1(1-2) 
R 
R(0-2) 



18 



Second Semester 



Engr. Phvsics II, Phys. 106 5(4-3) 

Calculus II, Math. 115 4(4-0) 

German II, Mod. Lang. 102 3(3-0) 

Quan. Analysis, Chem. 241 5(1-12) 

Artillery IV, Mil. Sc. 116A 1(1-2) 

Engr. Assembly, Gen. Engr. 105, R 

Phys. Educ M, Phys. Ed. 106... R(0-2) 



Total 



18 



JUNIOR 



First Semester 

Applied Mechanics, Ap. Mech. 202, 4(4-0) 

Phys. Chemistry I, Chem. 206... 5(3-6) 

Org. Chemistry I, Chem. 218 4(2-6) 

Industrial Stoichiometry, Chem. 244, 2(2-0) 

Electivef 2( - ) 

Engr. Assembly, Gen. Engr. 105.. R 

Total 17 



Second Semester 



Str. of Mat. E., Ap. Mech. 216, 220, 4(3-3) 

Phys. Chemistry II, Chem. 272.. 3(3-0) 

Org. Chemistry II, Chem. 219 4(2-6) 

El. of Chem. Engr. I, Chem. 278, 4(3-3) 

Economics I, Econ. 101 3(3-0) 

Engr. Assembly, Gen. Engr. 105.. R 



Total 



SENIOR 

First Semester Second Semfster 

Heat Power Engr. B, Mech. Engr. Elec. Engr. C, Elec. Engr. 102, 106, 3(2-2, 1) 

211 5(4-3) Chem. Engr. Plant Design, Chem. 

Chem. Engr. Calculations, Chem. 293 4(3-3) 

273 3(3-0) Org. Chem. Technology, Chem. 212, 3(3-0) 

El. of Chem. Engr. II, Chem. 279, 4(3-3) Elective 7( - ) 

Inorg. Chem. Tech. Rec, Chem. Engr. Assembly, Gen. Engr. 105.. R 

247 3(3-0) 

Inorg. Chem. Tech. Lab., Chem. 

248 2(0-6) 

Engr. Assembly, Gen. Engr. 105, R 

Inspection trip, Chem. 130 R 

Total 17 Total 17 

Number of hours required for graduation, 139. 



* Students who offer but one unit of algebra for admission take a five-hour course in col- 
lege alegbra, Math. 107, the first semester, postponing two hours of other work. 

t Electives are to be chosen with the advice and approval of the head of the department 
and the dean. 



136 



Kansas State College 



Curriculum in Civil Engineering 



First Semester 

Chemistry E-I, Chem. 107 

College Algebra,* Math. 104 , 

Plane Trigonometry, Math. 101 . . 

College Rhetoric I, Engl. 101 

Engr. Drawing, Mach. Des. 101. 

Surveying I, Civ. Engr. 102 

Artillery I, Mil. Sc. 113A 

Engr. Lectures, Gen. Engr. 101.., 
Phys. Educ. M, Phys. Ed. 103. . . 

Total 



First Semester 
Engr. Physics I, Phys. 105.... 



Calculus I, Math. 114. 

Surveying II, Civ. Engr. Ill 

Economics I, Econ. 101 

Mach. Drawing I, Mach. Des. Ill, 

Artillery III, Mil. Sc. 115A 

Engr. Assembly, Gen. Engr. 105.. 
Phys. Educ. M, Phys. Ed. 105 



Total 



First Semester 
Str. in Fmd. Struc, Civ. 

Engr. 201 

Astr. and Geod., Civ. Engr. 211, 216, 
Water Supply, Civ. Engr. 220.... 

Sewerage, Civ. Engr. 225 

C. E. Drawing II, Civ. Engr. 205, 
Soil Mechanics, Ap. Mech. 290... 
High Mat. Lab., Ap. Mech. 250.. 
Engr. Assembly, Gen. Engr. 105.. 
Inspection Trip, Civ. Engr. 180.. 



Total 



FRESHMAN 



Second Semester 



4(3-3) 
3(3-0) 
3(3-0) 
3(3-0) 
2(0-6) 
2(0-6) 
Kl-2) 
R 
R(0-2) 

18 



Chemistry E-II, Chem. 108 4(3-3) 

Plane Analytical Geom., Math. 110, 4(4-0) 

Araer. Ind. History, Hist. 105 3(3-0) 

College Rhetoric II, Engl. 104 3(3-0) 

Descriptive Geom., Mach. Des. 106, 2(0-6) 

Artillery II, Mil. Sc. 114A 1(1-2) 

Engr. Lectures, Gen. Engr. 101. ... R 

Phys. Educ. M, Phys. Ed. 104 R(0-2) 



Total 



SOPHOMORE 



Second Semester 



5(4-3) Engr. Physics II, Phys. 106 

4(4-0) Calculus II, Math. 115 

2(0-6) Surveying III, Civ. Engr. 151, 155, 

3(3-0) Metals and Alloys, Shop 165 

2(0-6) C. E. Drawing I, Civ. Engr. 125.. 

1(1-2) Artillery IV, Mil. Sc. 116A 

R Engr. Assembly, Gen. Engr. 105.. 

R(0-2) Phys. Educ. M, Phys. Ed. 106 



17 



Total 



JUNIOR 



First Semester 

Ap. Mechanics, Ap. Mech. 202 4(4-0) 

Engr. Geology, Geol. 102 4(3-3) 

Surveying IV, Civ. Engr. 156, 157, 3(2-3) 

Highway Engr. I, Civ. Engr. 231. . 2(2-0) 
Steam and Gas Engr. C, Mech. 

Engr. 120, 125 3(2-3) 

Water and Sewage Bact., Bact. 125, 2(0-6) 

Engr. Assembly, Gen. Engr. 105.. R 

Total 18 



Second Semester 



Str. of Mat., Ap. Mech. 211, 220, 
Hydraulics, Ap. Mech. 230, 235... 

Foundations, Civ. Engr. 121 

Drain and Irrig. I, Civ. Engr. 161, 
Railway Engr. I, Civ. Engr. 145.. 
Public Speaking, Pub. Spk. 107... 
Engr. Assembly, Gen. Engr. 105. . . 



Total 



17 



5(4-3) 
4(4-0) 
3(2-3) 
2(2-0) 
2(0-6) 
1(1-2) 
R 
R(0-2) 



17 



6(5-3) 
4(3-3) 
2(2-0) 
2(2-0) 
2(2-0) 
2(2-0) 
R 



SENIOR 

Second Semester 
Reinforced Concrete Design, Civ. 

4(4-0) Engr. 250, 255 3(2-3) 

4(2-6) Design of Framed Structure, Civ. 

2(2-0) Engr. 246 3(0-9) 

2(2-0) Elec. Engr. C, Elec. Engr. 102, 106, 3(2-2, 1) 

2(0-6) Law for Engineers, Hist. 167.... 2(2-0) 

2(0-6) Technical Reports, Engl. 215 1(1-0) 

1(0-3) Electivef 5( - ) 

R Engr. Assembly, Gen. Engr. 105.. R 

R 

17 Total 17 



Number of hours required for graduation, 139. 



* Students who offer but one unit of algebra for admission take a five-hour course in col- 
lege algebra, Math. 107, the first semester, postponing two hours of other work. 

t Electives are to be chosen with the advice and approval of the head of the department 
and the dean. 



Division of Engineering 



137 



Electrical Engineering 



First Semester 

Chemistry E-I, Chem. 107 

College Algebra,* Math. 104 

Plane Trigonometry, Math. 101... 

College Rhetoric I, Engl. 101 

Engr. Drawing, Mach. Des. 101... 
Forging and Heat Treating, Shop 

150 

Artillery I, Mil. Sc. 113A 

Engr. Lectures, Gen. Engr. 101.. 
Phys. Educ. M, Phys. Ed. 103... 

Total 



FRESHMAN 

Second Semester 

4(3-3) Chemistry E-II, Chem. 108 4(3-3) 

3(3-0) Plane Analytical Geom., Math. 110, 4(4-0) 
3(3-0) Elec. Mach. & Construction, Elec. 

3(3-0) Engr. 112 2(0-6) 

2(0-6) College Rhetoric II, Engl. 104 3(3-0) 

Desc. Geometry, Mach. Des. 106.. 2(0-6) 

1(0-2, 1) Arc Welding, Shop 172 1(0-2, 1) 

1(1-2) Artillery II, Mil. Sc. 114A 1(1-2) 

R Engr. Lectures, Gen. Engr. 101... R 

R(0-2) Phys. Educ. M, Phys. Ed. 104... R(0-2) 

17 Total 17 



First Semester 

Engr. Physics I, Phys. 105.... 

Calculus I, Math. li4 

Amer. Ind. History, Hist. 105.. 
Mechanism, Mach. Des. 121.... 
Surveying I, Civ. Engr. 102... 

Artillery III, Mil. Sc. 115A 

Engr. Assembly, Gen. Engr. 105. 
Phys. Educ. M, Phys. Ed. 105. 



Total 



SOPHOMORE 

Second Semester 

5(4-3) Engr. Physics II, Phvs. 106 5(4-3) 

4(4-0) Calculus II, Math. 115 4(4-0) 

3(3-0) Economics I, Econ. 101 3(3-0) 

3(3-0) Mach. Drawing I, Mach. Des. Ill, 2(0-6) 
2(0-6) Principles of Electronics, Elec. 

1(1-2) Engr. 120 2(2-0) 

R Artillery IV, Mil. Sc. 116A 1(1-2) 

R(0-2) Engr. Assembly, Gen. Engr. 105.. R 

Phys. Educ. M, Phys. Ed. 106 R(0-2) 

18 Total 17 



First Semester 

Applied Mechanics, Ap. Mech. 202, 

Bus. Engl. & Sales, Engl. 125 

Machine Tool I, Shop 170 

D. C. Machinery Rec, Elec. Engr. 

207 

Electrodynamics, Elec. Engr. 201, 
Differential Equations, Math. 121, 
Engr. Assembly, Gen. Engr. 105.. 



Total 



JUNIOR 

Second Semester 

4(4-0) Str. of Mat. E, Ap. Mech. 216, 220, 4(3-3) 

3(3-0) Public Speaking, Pub. Spk. 107... 2(2-0) 

2(0-6) Metals and Alloys, Shop 165 2(2-0) 

A. C. Circuits, Elec. Engr. 209... 4(4-0) 

4(4-0) Elec. Meas. Rec, Elec. Engr. 227, 2(2-0) 
2(2-0) Elec. Meas. and Electronics Lab., 

2(2-0) Elec. Engr. 229 2(0-4,2) 

R D. C. Machinery Lab., Elec. Engr. 

208 2(0-4, 2) 

Engr. Assembly, Gen. Engr. 105.. R 

17 Total 18 



First Semester 



SENIOR 



A. C. Mach. I, Elec. Engr. 210, 211, 5(3-4, 2) 
Engr. Thermo. A, Mech. Engr. 

201A, 202 4(3-3) 

Wire Commun. I, Elec. Engr. 244, 3(3-0) or 
Pub. Util. Managt., Elec. Engr. 

290 3(3-0) 

Elec. Mach. Des., Elec." Engr." 27o', 1(0-3) 

Technical Reports, Engl. 215 1(1-0) 

Electivef 3( - ) 

Engr. Assembly, Gen. Engr. 105.. R 

Inspection Trip, Elec. Engr. 190.. R 



Total 



17 



Second Semester 



A. C. Mach. II, Elec. Engr. 212, 213, 5(3-4, 2> 
Heat Power Engr. A, Mech. Engr. 

204 4(3-3) 

Hydraulics, Ap. Mech. 230 3(3-0) 

Electivef 6( - ) 

Engr. Assembly, Gen. Engr. 105.. R 



Total 



Number of hours required for graduation, 139. 



18 



* Students who offer but one unit of algebra for admission take a five-hour course in col- 
lege algebra, Math. 107, the first semester, postponing two hours of other work. 

f Electives are to be chosen with the advice and approval of the head of the department 
and the dean. 



138 



Kansas State College 



Curriculum in Industrial Arts 



FRESHMAN 



First Semester 

Chemistry E'-I, Chem. 107 

College Algebra,* Math. 104..... 

College Rhetoric I, Engl. 101 

Engr. Drawing, Mach. Des. 101... 

Sheet Metal Work, Shop 173 

Wood Turning, Shop 135 

Artillery I, Mil. Sc. 113A 

Engr. Lectures, Gen. Engr. 101... 
Phys. Education M, Phys. Ed. 103, 



Second Semester 



4(3-3) 
3(3-0) 
3(3-0) 
2(0-6) 
2(0-6) 
2(0-6) 
1(1-2) 
R 
R(0-2) 



Chemistry E-II, Chem. 108 

Plane Trigonometry, Math. 101. 
College Rhetoric II, Engl. 104. . . 
Desc. Geometry, Mach. Des. 106 
Surveying I, Civ. Engr. 102 .... 
Foundry Production, Shop 161.. 
Farm Blacksmithing I, Shop 157 

Artillery II, Mil. Sc. 114A 

Engr. Lectures, Gen. Engr. 101. 
Phys. Education M, Phys. Ed. 104 



Total 



First Semester 



17 



Total 



SOPHOMORE 



Second Semester 



General Physics I, Phys. 102 4(3-3) 

Gen. Psychology, Educ. 184 3(3-0) 

Mach. Drawing I, Mach. Des. Ill, 2(0-6) 

Mechanism, Mach. Des. 121 3(3-0) 

Woodwork I, Shop 120 2(0-6) 

Arc Welding, Shop 172 1(0-2,1) 

Elec. Mach. and Const., Elec. Engr. 

112 2(0-6) 

Artillery III, Mil. Sc. 115A 1(1-2) 

Engr. Assembly, Gen. Engr. 105.. R 

Phys. Education M, Phys. Ed. 105, R(0-2) 



General Physics II, Phys. 103 

Educ. Psychology, Educ. 109 

Mach. Drawing II, Mach. Des. 118, 

Metals and Alloys, Shop 165 

Farm Carpentry, Shop 147 

Wood and Metal Fin., Shop 121.. 

Artillery IV, Mil. Sc. 116A 

Engr. Assembly, Gen. Engr. 105.. 
Phys. Education M, Phys. Ed. 106, 



Total 



18 



Total 



First Semester 

Ap. Mechanics A, Ap. Mech. 102. . 

Economics I, Econ. 101 

Principles of Accounting, Econ. 136, 
Machine Tool Work I, Shop 170.. 
Farm Blacksmithing II, Shop 158, 
Amer. Ind. History, Hist. 105.... 
Public Speaking, Pub. Spk. 107.. 
Engr. Assembly, Gen. Engr. 105.. 



Total 



First Semester 

Business Law I, Hist. 163 

Extemp. Speech II, Pub. Spk. 108 
El. of Heat Power, Mech. Engr. 131, 

Woodwork II, Shop 126 

Machine Tool Work II, Shop 192, 
Oxyacetylene Welding, Shop 171.. 

Electivef 

Engr. Assembly, Gen. Engr. 105.. 
Inspection Trip, Shop 194 

Total 



4(3-3) 
3(3-0) 
3(3-0) 
2(0-6) 
2(0-6) 
1(0-3) 
1(0-3) 
1(1-2) 
R 
R(0-2) 



17 



4(3-3) 
3(3-0) 
2(0-6) 
2(2-0) 
3(1-6) 
2(0-6) 
Kl-2) 
R 
R(0-2) 



17 



JUNIOR 

Second Semester 

3(3-0) Str. of Mat. A, Ap. Mech. 116, 121 4(3-3) 

3(3-0) Labor Problems, Econ. 234 3(3-0) 

3(3-0) Bus. Engl, and Sales, Engl. 125.. 3(3-0) 
2(0-6) Gas Engines and Tractors, Agr. 

1(0-3) Engr. 130 3(2-3) 

3(3-0) Metallography I, Shop 262 1(0-3) 

2(2-0) Technical Reports, Engl. 215 1(1-0) 

R Electivef 3( - ) 

Engr. Assembly, Gen. Engr. 105.. R 

17 Total 18 

SENIOR 

Second Semester 

3(3-0) Business Law II, Hist. 164 3(3-0) 

2(2-0) Credits and Collections, Econ. 223, 2(2-0) 

2(2-0) Educ. Sociology, Educ. 239 3(3-0) 

2(0-6) Elec. Engr. C, Elec. Engr. 102, 106, 3(2-2, 1) 

2(0-6) Engr. Thermo. A Lab., Mech. 

1(0-2,1) Engr. 202 1(0-3) 

6( - ) Electivef 5( - ) 

R Engr. Assembly, Gen. Engr. 105.. R 

R 

18 Total 17 



Number of hours required for graduation, 139. 



* Students who offer but one unit of algebra for admission take a five-hour course in col- 
lege algebra, Math. 107, the first semester, postponing two hours of other work. 

f Electives are to be chosen with the advice and approval of the head of the department 
of shop practice and the dean. 



Division of Engineering 



139 



Curriculum in Mechanical Engineering 



FRESHMAN 



First Semester 

Chemistry E-I, Chem. 107 

College Algebra,* Math. 104 

Plane Trigonometry, Math. 101.. 
College Rhetoric I, Engl. 101... 
Engr. Drawing, Mach. Des. 101. 
Oxyacetylene Welding, Shop 171. 



Second Semester 



4(3-3) 
3(3-0) 

3(3-0) 

3(3-0) 

2(0-6) 

1(0-2, l)or 



Arc Welding, Shop 172 1(0-2,1) 

Artillery I, Mil. Sc. 113A 1(1-2) 

Engr. Lectures, Gen. Engr. 101... R 

Phys. Ed. M, Phys. Ed. 103 R(0-2) 



Total 



9 First Semester 

Engr. Physics I, Phys. 105 

Calculus I, Math. 114 

Amer. Ind. History, Hist. 105.... 
Mach. Drawing I, Mach. Des. Ill, 
Machine Tool Work I, Shop 170, 

Artillery III, Mil. Sc. 115A 

Engr. Assembly, Gen. Engr. 105 . . 
Phys. Ed. M, Phys. Ed. 105 

Total 



Chemistry E-II, Chem. 108 4(3-3) 

Plane Analytical Geom., Math. 110, 4(4-0) 

Desc. Geometry, Mach. Des. 106.. 2(0-6) 

College Rhetoric II, Engl. 104... 3(3-0) 

Metals and Alloys, Shop 165 2(2-0) 

Forging and Heat Treating, Shop 

150 1(0-2, 1) 

Artillery II, Mil. Sc. 114A 1(1-2) 

Engr. Lectures, Gen. Engr. 101.. R 

Phys. Ed. M, Phys. Ed. 104 R(0-2) 



17 



Total 



17 



SOPHOMORE 

Second Semester 

5(4-3) Engr. Physics II, Phys. 106 5(4-3) 

4(4-0) Calculus II, Math. 115 4(4-0) 

3(3-0) Mechanism, Mach. Des. 121 3(3-0) 

2(0-6) El. Heat Power, Mech. Engr. 131, 2(2-0) 

2(0-6) Surveying I, Civ. Engr. 102 2(0-6) 

1(1-2) Foundry Prod., Shop 161 1(0-3) 

R Artillery IV, Mil. Sc. 116A 1(1-2) 

R(0-2) Engr. Assembly, Gen. Engr. 105.. R 

Phys. Ed. M, Phys. Ed. 106 R(0-2) 

17 Total 18 



JUNIOR 



First Semester 

Applied Mechanics, Ap. Mech. 202, 4(4-0) 
Engr. Thermodynamics, Mech. 

Engr. 208 4(4-0) 

Economics I, Econ. 101 3(3-0) 

Mach. Drawing II, Mach. Des. 118, 2(0-6) 

Metallography I, Shop 262 1(0-3) 

Heat Power Lab. I, Mech. Engr. 209, 1(0-3) 

Option (see below) 3( - ) 

Engr. Assembly, Gen. Engr. 105.. R 

Total 18 



Second Semester 



Str. of Mat., Ap. Mech. 211, 220, 6(5-3) 

Hydraulics, Ap. Mech. 230 3(3-0) or 

Fluid Mechanics, Ap. Mech. 231.. 3(3-0) 

Option (see below) 9( - ) 

Engr. Assembly, Gen. Engr. 105.. R 



Total 



First Semester 

Elec. Engr. M-I, Elec. Engr. 237, 
238 

Mach. Design I, Mach. Des. 204, 
205 

Heat Power Lab. II, Mech. Engr. 
213 

Technical Reports, Engl. 215 

Option (see below) 

Engr. Assembly, Gen. Engr. 105 . . 

Inspection Trip, Mech. Engr. 180, 



Total 



SENIOR 



5(4-3) 

5(3-6) 

1(0-3) 

1(1-0) 

5( - ) 

R 

R 



17 



Second Semester 

Elec. Engr. M-II, Elec. Engr. 242, 

243 4(3-2, 1) 

Air Conditioning, Mech. Engr. 228, 3(2-3) 
Air Cond. Equipment Lab., Mech. 

Engr. 229 1(0-3) 

Graphic Statics, Ap. Mech. 225... 1(0-3) 

Hydr. Lab., Ap. Mech. 235 1(0-3) 

Option (see below) 7( - ) 

Engr. Assembly, Gen. Engr. 105.. R 



Total 



Number of hours required for graduation, 139. 



17 



* Students who offer but one unit of algebra for admission take a five-hour course in col- 
lege algebra, Math. 107, the first semester, postponing two hours of other work. 



140 



Kansas State College 



Elective! 



Total 



Options: Curriculum in Mechanical Engineering 

Power Option 

JUNIOR YEAR 
3( - ) 



First Semester 



Second Semester 
Heat Transfer and Fluid Flow, 

Mech. Engr. 251 4(3-8; 

Public Speaking, Pub. Spk. 107.. 2(2-0,1 
Elective! 3( - ) 



Total 



First Semester 

Pr. Plant Equipment, Mech. Engr. 

216 

Electivef 



SENIOR YEAR 

Second Semester 

Pr. 'Plant Design, Mech. Engr. 217, 
3(2-3) Ht. Pr. Lab. Ill, Mech. Engr. 219, 
2( - ) Electivef 



Total 



Elective! 



Total 



First Semester 



5 Total 

Industrial Option 

JUNIOR YEAR 

Second Semester 

3( - ) Heat Power Engr., Mech. Engr. 214 
Public Speaking, Pub. Spk. 107... 
Elective! 



First Semester 

Ind. Management, Shop 246.. 
Elective! 



3 Total 

SENIOR YEAR 



3(3-0) 
2( - ) 



Second Semester 

Factory Design, Shop 255 

Machine Tool Work II, Shop 192, 
Elective! 



Total 



5 Total 

Petroleum Production Option 

JUNIOR YEAR 



First Semester 
General Geology, Geol. 103.... 



Second Semester 
3(3-0) Heat Power Engr., Mech. Engr. 214 
Historical Geology, Geol. 203 .... 
Elective! 



Total 



First Semester 
Petroleum Production I, Mech. 

Engr. 270 

Public Speaking, Pub. Spk. 107 . . 



3 Total 

SENIOR YEAR 



3(3-0) 
2(2-0) 



Second Semester 

Petroleum Production II, Mech. 

Engr. 271 

Economic Geology, Geol. 207.. 



3(1-6) 
KO-3) 
3( - ) 

5 



4(3-3) 
2(2-0) 
3( - ) 



9 



2(0-6) 
2(0-6) 
3( - ) 



4(3-3) 
4(3-3) 

K - ) 



3(2-3) 
4(3-3) 



Total 



Total 



! Electives are to be chosen with the advice and approval of the head of the department 
and the dean. 



Division of Engineering 141 



Agricultural Engineering 

Professor Fenton Instructor Otis 

Associate Professor Barger Graduate Research As istant White 

Instructor Roberts 

This department gives instruction in farm power and machinery, farm 
structures, farm land drainage, irrigation, soil and water conservation, and the 
equipment of the home and farmstead. 

Laboratory equipment is ample. Especial attention is given to the solu- 
tion of farm problems and to research. 

COURSES IN AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING 

FOR UNDERGRADUATE CREDIT 

101. Farm Buildings. 3(2-3)*; II. Fenton, Otis. 

Requirements, details of arrangements, and materials of construction for 
farm buildings; preparation of plans, bills of material, and estimates of costs; 
water supply, sewage disposal, lighting, and other modern equipment for the 
farmstead. 

108. Farm Machinery. 3(2-3) ; I and II. Roberts, assistants. 
Construction, operation, adjustment, power requirements, use, service and 
repair of farm machinery. (For agricultural students.) Charge, $2. 

111. Field and Power Machinery. 4(2-6); I. Prerequisite: Mach. Des. 
121 and Phys. 106. Roberts, assistants. 

A comprehensive study of the development, design, construction, economics, 
power requirements, use and servicing of farm machinery. Charge, $2. 

122. Agricultural Machines and Construction. 2(1-3) ; I. Barger, as- 
sistants. 

Review of introductory principles of mechanics and physics as applied to 
the construction and operation of farm machinery; practice in identification 
of structural parts, construction methods, and servicing of farm machinery. 
(For freshman agricultural engineers.) Charge, $2. 

130. Gas Engines and Tractors. 3(2-3) ; I, II, and SS. Barger, assistants. 

Principles of the internal combustion engine ; carburetion, valve timing, igni- 
tion, cooling, lubrication, and fuels; the servicing and repair of farm engines 
and the selection of power for agriculture. (For agricultural students.) 
Charge, $2. 

140. Inspection Trip. R; I. Prerequisite: Senior classification. Fenton, 
assistants. 

A trip of three to five days for the purpose of studying farm machinery pro- 
duction and other projects of special interest to agricultural engineers. Cost 
of trip, $25 to $50. 

FOR GRADUATE AND UNDERGRADUATE CREDIT 

201. Power and Machinery in Agriculture. 2(2-0); I and II. Prerequi- 
site: Junior or senior classification. Fenton. 

History and development of machinery in agriculture; the application, 
selection, management, and cost of machines; future development; a survey 
course dealing with the mechanization of agriculture. Open to all students who 
have not taken Agr. Engr. 108 or 130. 

* The number before the parentheses indicates the number of semester hours of credit ; the 
first number within the parentheses indicates the number of hours of recitation each week ; 
the second shows the number of hours to be spent in laboratory work each week ; and the 
third, where there is one, indicates the number of hours of outside work in connection with 
the laboratory required each week. I, II, and SS indicate that the course is given the first 
semester, second semester, and summer school, respectively. 



142 Kansas State College 

203. Farm Structures. 4(2-6); I. Prerequisite: Ap. Mech. 211 and 225 
Fenton, assistants. 

Design of farm structures; details and materials of construction; specifica- 
tions and estimates. 

205. Agricultural Engineering Problems. Credit to be arranged; I, II, 
and SS. Prerequisite : Permission of instructors. Fenton, Barger. 

Problems in the design, construction or application of machinery or power 
in agriculture, structures, modern conveniences, rural electrification. 

210. Modern Farm and Home Equipment. 3(2-3); II. Prerequisite: Ap. 
Mech. 230 and 235. Roberts. 

Water supply, sewage disposal, lighting, heating, and ventilation of farm 
buildings; refrigeration; rural electrification. Charge, $2. 

215. Tractor Research. Credit to be arranged; I. Prerequisite: Agr. 
Engr. 225 or equivalent. Barger, Roberts. 

Research studies relating to tractor construction and operation. 

225. Farm Motors. 4(2-6); II. Prerequisite: Phys. 106, Math. 114, and 
Mech. Engr. 201A. Barger, assistants. 

Theory, design, operation, and adjustment of the internal combustion en- 
gine, and a comprehensive study of power and its application to agriculture. 
Charge, S3. 

240. Drainage, Erosion Control, and Irrigation. 3(2-3); I and II. Pre- 
requisite: Agron. 130. Otis. 

Principles and practices of land improvement by terracing and other meth- 
ods of erosion control; drainage, irrigation, and land clearing. (For agricul- 
tural students.) Charge, $1. 

250. Land Reclamation. 3(2-3); II. Prerequisite: Ap. Mech. 230 and 
Agron. 130. Fenton, Otis. 

Principles and methods of land drainage, soil and water conservation, and 
irrigation. Charge, $1. 

FOR GRADUATE CREDIT 

301. Research in Agricultural Engineering. Credit to be arranged; I, 
II, and SS. Prerequisite : Agron. 130 and Phys. 106 or equivalent. Fenton, 
Barger. 

The laboratories of the College are available for research in the design, use, 
and application of machinery and equipment in the development of agricul- 
ture. The results of such investigation, if suitable, may be incorporated in 
bulletins of the Engineering Experiment Station, or furnish material for the 
master's thesis. 



Division of Engineering 143 



Applied Mechanics 

Professor Scholer Assistant Professor Grover 

Professor Robert Instructor Taylor 

Professor Dawley Instructor Thomson 

Associate Professor Pickett Instructor Anderson 

Assistant Professor Koenitzer Graduate Research Assistant Sollenberger 

Assistant Professor McCaulley Graduate Assistant Gustafson 

COURSES IN APPLIED MECHANICS 

FOR UNDERGRADUATE CREDIT 

102. Applied Mechanics A. 3(3-0); I and II. Prerequisite: Math. 101 
and Phys. 102. McCaulley. 

A study of statics, with applications to stress in structures; center of gravity; 
moment of inertia. 

116. Strength of Materials A Recitation. 3(3-0); II. Prerequisite: Ap. 
Mech. 102. McCaulley. 

Behavior of materials subjected to tension, compression, shear, and bending; 
designs of beams of wood, steel, and reinforced concrete; design and investiga- 
tion of columns; practice in the use of a handbook. 

121. Strength of Materials A Laboratory. 1(0-3); II. Prerequisite: Ap. 
Mech. 102. McCaulley. 

A study of various testing machines; tension, compression, shear, and bend- 
ing tests on iron, steel, wood, and concrete; tests on cement and on the fine 
and coarse aggregates for concrete. Charge, $2. 

150. Thesis. Credit to be arranged; I and II. Scholer, Robert. 
Subject of investigation to be selected in consultation with the head of the 
department at the beginning of the senior year. 

FOR GRADUATE AND UNDERGRADUATE CREDIT 

202. Applied Mechanics. 4(4-0); I, II, and SS. Prerequisite: Math. 115 
and Phys. 105. Staff. 

Composition, resolution, and conditions of equilibrium of concurrent and 
nonconcurrent forces; center of gravity; friction; laws of rectilinear and curvi- 
linear motion of material points; moments of inertia; relations between forces 
acting on rigid bodies and the resulting motions; work, energy, and power. 

211. Strength of Materials Recitation. 5(5-0); I, II, and SS. Prerequi- 
site : Ap. Mech. 202. Staff. 

Behavior of materials subject to tension, compression, and shear; riveted 
joints; torsion; shafts, and the transmission of power; strength and stiffness 
of simple and continuous beams, bending moments and shear forces in beams ; 
design of beams; stresses in columns and hooks; design of columns; the me- 
chanics of reinforced concrete. About two-fifths of the time is devoted to the 
mechanics of reinforced concrete. 

216. Strength of Materials E Recitation. 3(3-0) ; I, II, and SS. Pre- 
requisite: Ap. Mech. 202. Staff. 

Similar to Ap. Mech. 211, but much less time given to study of continuous 
girders and of reinforced concrete. 

220. Strength of Materials Laboratory. 1(0-3); I, II, and SS. Must ac- 
company or follow Ap. Mech. 211 or 216. Staff. 

Tension, compression, shear, and bending tests on specimens of iron, steel, 
wood, and concrete; torsion tests on steel shafting; standard tests on fine and 
coarse aggregates for concrete. Charge, $2 

225. Graphic Statics. 1(0-3); I and II. Must accompany or follow Ap. 
Mech. 102 or 202. Robert. 

Graphical solutions of the stresses existing in a number of typical trusses 
under a variety of loadings. 



144 Kansas State College 

230. Hydraulics Recitation. 3(3-0); I, II, and SS. Prerequisite: Ap. 
Mech. 202. Staff. 

Fluid pressures, center of pressure, immersion and notation ; Bernoulli's 
theorem ; orifices, weirs, short and long pipes, flow of water in open channels, 
and its measurement ; elements of water power, impulse wheels, reaction tur- 
bines, and centrifugal pumps. 

231. Fluid Mechanics. 3(3-0); II. Prerequisite: Ap. Mech. 202 and 
Mech. Engr. 208. Robert, Pickett. 

An optional course to hydraulics, for mechanical engineering students, in 
which both gaseous and liquid fluids are treated. (Not open to students with 
credit in Ap. Mech. 230.) 

235. Hydraulics Laboratory. 1(0-3); I, II, and SS. Prerequisite: Ap. 
Mech. 202; must accompany or follow Ap. Mech. 230 or 231. Staff. 

Tests to determine the coefficients of weirs and orifices, loss and head in 
pipes, water wheels, water turbines, rams and pumps. Charge, $1. 

250. Highway Materials Laboratory. 1(0-3); I. Prerequisite: Ap. Mech. 
220. Koenitzer, Taylor. 

A comprehensive course in the examination and testing of road materials. 
Charge, $1.50. 

265. Advanced Mechanics of Materials. 2(2-0); I. Prerequisite: Ap. 
Mech. 211 or 216. Scholer. 

Theory of elasticity and its applications ; advanced problems in continuous 
girders involving general three-moment equations. 

268. Elastic Energy Theory. 3(3-0); I. Prerequisite: Ap. Mech. 211 or 
216. Scholer, Pickett. 

The elastic energy theory applied to trusses, frames, beams, and curved 
beams. 

269. Applied Elasticity. 3(3-0); I and II. Prerequisite: Ap. Mech. 211 or 
216; Math. 201. Pickett. 

Theory of elasticity with its application to stress analysis. 

270. Hydraulic Machinery. 2(2-0); I, Prerequisite: Ap. Mech. 230. 
Robert. 

Characteristics and applications of water wheels, turbines, pumps, and 
other hydraulic machinery. 

275. Advanced Highway Materials. 2(1-3); II. Prerequisite: Ap. Mech. 
250. Scholer. 

An advanced course in the properties and testing of the various materials 
used in road construction. 

276. Design of Concrete Mixtures. 3(1-6); I. Prerequisite: Ap. Mech. 
220. Dawley. 

Practical applications of the fundamental principles of concrete making, 
using various kinds of cement and placing special emphasis on the proper 
designing, mixing and placing of concrete mixtures to meet certain strength 
and durability requirements. Charge, $2.50. 

280. Mechanics of Reinforced Concrete. 2(2-0); I. No credit for stu- 
dents who have had Ap. Mech. 211. Prerequisite: Ap. Mech. 216. Scholer, 
Robert. 

The behavior of reinforced concrete structural elements, including slabs, 
rectangular beams, T-beams, columns, and special floor systems under load. 

290. Soil Mechanics. 2(0-6); I. Prerequisite: Ap. Mech. 250. Scholer, 
Koenitzer. 

The physical properties of soil which govern its behavior as a material for 
highway surfaces or foundations; the behavior of soil when used as a material 
of construction in fills and dams. Charge, $1.50. 



Division of Engineering 145 

FOR GRADUATE CREDIT 

301. Research in Materials of Construction. Credit to be arranged; I, 
II, and SS. Prerequisite : Consult instructors. Scholer, Robert, Dawley. 

Many problems related to materials used in engineering construction offer 
"attractive fields for research. A number of special pieces of apparatus in addi- 
tion to the usual equipment of strength-of-materials laboratory are available 
for this work. The results of such investigations, if suitable, may be incor- 
porated in bulletins of the Engineering Experiment Station, or furnish ma- 
terials for the master's thesis. 



Professor Weigel Assistant Prof' ssor Ware 

Professor Helm Assistant Professor McCaulley 

Associate Professor Wichers Instructor Mackey 

Instructor Ekroth 

Students are urged to consider the advantages of combining the work in 
architectural engineering and in architecture, receiving the degree of Bachelor 
of Science in Architectural Engineering at the end of the fourth year, and the 
degree of Bachelor of Science in Architecture at the end of the fifth year. 
Students wishing to combine both curriculums should enroll in the curriculum 
of architectural engineering for the first three years. 

All drawings or designs made by the student during the course becomes the 
property of the department, to be used or returned at the discretion of the 
faculty. 

COURSES IN ARCHITECTURE 

FOR UNDERGRADUATE CREDIT 

106A. Elements of Architecture I. 3(0-9) ; I and II. Mackey. 

A study of the fundamentals of architectural design by their application in 
the original solution and presentation of simple architectural problems. 
Charge, $1. 

107A. Elements of Architecture II. 3(0-9); I and II. Prerequisite: 
Arch. 106 A. Mackey. 

A continuation of Arch. 106 A. Charge, $1. 

112. Freehand Drawing I. 2(0-6); I. II. and SS. Helm, Wichers. 
A basic course in the fundamentals of freehand drawing. 

113. Freehand Drawing II. 2(0-6); I, II. and SS. Prerequisite: Arch. 
112. Helm. Wichers. 

A continuation of Arch. 112. 

116. Pencil Rendering and Sketching. 2(0-6) ; I, II, and SS. Prereq- 
uisite : Arch. 112. Mackey. 

117. Still-Life Drawing. 2(0-6); I and SS. Prerequisite: Arch. 112. 
Helm. 

Sketches in various media of still-life groups in the studio and out-of-doors. 

118. Water Color I. 2(0-6); I, II, and SS. Prerequisite: Arch. 116 or ap- 
proval of instructor. Helm. 

Rudiments of water color painting; translation and theory of color. Sketch- 
ing of simple objects and groups of objects; includes both studio and outdoor 
sketching. 

119. Water Color II. 2(0-6); I, II, and SS. Prerequisite: Arch. 118. 
Helm. 

Advanced study in the technique of the medium. Includes both studio 
work and outdoor sketching. 

10^6529 



146 Kansas State College 

120. Interior Design. 2(0-6); I and SS. Prerequisite: Arch. 118, 125, and 
145. Helm. 

A study of the principles of interior architecture. Deposit, SI. 

121. Life Drawing I. 2(0-6); I, II. and SS. Prerequisite: Arch. 118. 
Helm. Charge, $3. 

123. Life Drawing II. 2(0-6); I, II, and SS. Prerequisite: Arch. 121. 
Helm. 

A continuation of Arch. 121. Charge, $3. 

124. Domestic Architecture. 2(2-0) ; II. Wichers. 

An elective course intended for students not enrolled in the department of 
architecture. A study of the design and planning problems of the small home. 

125. Appreciation of Architecture. 3(3-0) ; II. Ware. 

A survey of the history of architecture. An elective, nontechnical course 
intended for students not enrolled in the department of architecture. 

133. Clay Modeling. 2(0-6); I and SS. Prerequisite: Arch. 117. Helm, 
Mackey. 

The making of clay models, plaster casts of simple decorative fragments 
and anatomical forms; and construction of relief maps. Charge, $1. 

134. Pen and Ink Drawing. 2(0-6); I, II, and SS. Prerequisite: Ap- 
proval of instructor. Mackey. 

137. Block Prints. 2(0-6); I and SS. Prerequisite: Arch. 113 or approval 
of instructor. Helm. 

The carving of original compositions in linoleum and wood blocks. Charge, 

SI. 

142, 144. Architectural Design I and II. 3(0-9) each; I and II each. 
Prerequisite: For I, Arch. 107A; for II, Arch. 142. Mackey. 
A continuation of Arch. 107A. Charge, Si for each course. 

145, 147. Architectural Design III and IV. 5(0-15) each; I and II each. 
Prerequisite: For III, Arch. 144; for IV, Arch. 145. Ware. 

Continuation of Arch. 144; time problems and rapid design sketches re- 
quired at frequent intervals. Charge, SI for each course. 

153. Rural Architecture. 2(0-6); I. Prerequisite: Arch. 144 and 191. 
Wichers. 

A study of the architectural needs of rural communities, with special em- 
phasis on the small home, using architectural models as a medium. 

154A, 157A. History of Architecture I and II. 2(2-0) each; I and II, re- 
spectively. Prerequisite: For II, Arch. 154A. Ware. 

I, preclassical and classical architecture; II, medieval architecture. 

158A, 160A. History of Architecture III and IV. 2(2-0) each; I and II, 
respectively. Prerequisite: For III, Arch. 157A; for IV, Arch. 158A. Ware. 

Ill, Italian and French Renaissance architecture; IV, continuation of Arch. 
158 A through modern architecture. 

165, 170. Commercial Illustration I and II. 2(0-6) each; I, II, and SS, 
each. Helm. 

The principles of advertising arrangements; making various types of ad- 
vertising design, such as newspaper advertisements, lettering, and posters; mak- 
ing cover designs for magazines, books, and trade catalogues; for headings, tail 
pieces, and decorative page arrangements; drawings carried out in black and 
white and in one or more colors. 

179. History of Painting and Sculpture. 3(3-0) ; I. Helm. 

The appreciation and development of painting and sculpture. A required 
course for students in architecture and a recommended elective for other stu- 
dents. 



Division of Engineering 147 

187A. Building Materials and Construction. 3(3-0); I. McCaulley. 
An introduction to the properties and uses of the materials of construction; 
construction methods; occasional visits to buildings under construction. 

188. Building Equipment. 2(2-0); II. Prerequisite: Arch. 187A. Mc- 
Caulley. 

A study of plumbing, sanitation systems, and mechanical equipment of 
buildings. 

191. Working Drawings and Specifications. 3(0-9); II. Prerequisite: 
Arch. 142 and 187 A. Wichers. 

Preparing working drawings and specifications for a residence. 

192. Theory of Structures I. 4(2-6); II. Prerequisite: Ap. Mech. 116 
and 121. McCaulley. 

Mathematical and graphical solutions of stresses in framed structures under 
static loading; practical problems in the design of wood construction; oc- 
casional inspection trips to buildings under construction. 

194A. Theory of Structures II. 5(3-6); I. Prerequisite: Arch. 192. Mc- 
Caulley. 

A continuation of Theory of Structures I applied to steel and masonry 
structures. 

195. Professional Practice. 2(0-6); II. Prerequisite: Arch. 147. Weigel. 
The preparation of building documents; interpretation of building codes 

and analysis of documents of American Institute of Architects; office or- 
ganization; client and contractor relationships. 

196. Theory of Structures III. 4(2-6); II. Prerequisite: Arch. 194A. 
McCaulley. 

A continuation of Theory of Structures II, including design of reinforced 
concrete building frames; footings, columns, and floor systems, attention being 
given to costs and economical design. 

199. Inspection Trip. R; I. Prerequisite: Senior classification. Weigel. 

An inspection trip is made to one of the larger cities of the Middle West, 
usually Chicago, by the senior students in Architectural Engineering and Archi- 
tecture. The inspection party is under the charge of one or more faculty 
members of the Department of Architecture. Time allotted to the trip is 
from three days to one week. Approximate cost of trip, $50. 

for graduate and undergraduate credit 

201. Advanced Freehand Drawing. Credit to be arranged. I, II, and SS. 
Prerequisite: Arch. 117 and 118. Helm. 

217. Etching. 2(0-6); I, II, and SS. Prerequisite: Arch. 117 and 134. 
Helm. 

Technical principles and practice of etching on copper and zinc plate. 
Charge, $1. 

221. Problems in Architectural Development. Credit to be arranged; I, 
II, and SS. Prerequisite : Approval of instructor. Weigel, McCaulley. 

Under direct supervision of some member of the departmental staff, study 
of specific architectural problems. Deposit, $1. 

230. Oil Painting. Credit to be arranged. I, II, and SS. Prerequisite: 
Arch. 118 or approval of instructor. Helm. 

249. City Planning. 3(0-9); II. Prerequisite: Arch. 144. Weigel. 

A detailed study of city planning, including transportation and street sys- 
tems, parks and recreation facilities, public buildings and civic centers, sub- 
divisions of land, restrictions and zoning. 



148 Kansas State College 

254, 257. Architectural Design V and VI. 7(0-21) each; I and II each. 
Prerequisite: For V, Arch. 147; for VI, Arch. 254. Weigel. 
Continuation of Arch. 147. Charge, SI for each course. 

FOR GRADUATE CREDIT 

301, 304. Advanced Architectural Design I and II. Prerequisite: Arch. 
257. Credit to be arranged. I, II, and SS, each. Weigel. 

A study of the planning of important buildings and groups of buildings. 
II, a continuation of I, may furnish material for the master's thesis. Deposit, 
$1 each. 



Civil Engineering: 



Professor Conrad A^s ; $tant Professor Crawford 

Professor Frazier Assistant Professor Morse 

Professor Furr Instructor 

Associate Professor White 

COURSES IN CIVIL ENGINEERING 

FOR UNDERGRADUATE CREDIT 

102. Surveying I. 2(0-6); I and II. Prerequisite or parallel: Math. 101. 
Staff. 

The use and care of engineer's surveying instruments, and plane surveying 
practice. Charge, $1. 

111. Surveying II. 2(0-6) ; I and II. Prerequisite: Civ. Engr. 102. White, 
Morse. 

Land surveying, the U. S. system of public land surveys, route surveying, 
the legal survey, the stadia survey, and calculations of areas and boundaries. 
Charge, SI. 

121. Foundations. 2(2-0); II. Prerequisite or parallel: Ap. Mech. 202. 
Frazier. 

Design and construction of foundations. 

125. Civil Engineering Drawing I. 2(0-6); II. Prerequisite: Mach. Des. 
111. White. 

Stereotomy, shades and shadows, isometric and perspective drawing; copy- 
ing working drawings of engineering structures. 

145. Railway Engineering I. 2(2-0); II. Prerequisite: Civ. Engr. 156 
and 157. Frazier. 

Railway engineering based on Wellington's economic theory ; study of track 
construction and maintenance; design of yards and terminals. 

151, 155* Surveying III. 3(2-3); I and II. Prerequisite: Civ. Engr. 111. 
White, Crawford, Schmidt. 

Topographic, municipal, and underground surveying; the celestial sphere; 
elements of horizontal and vertical curves and earthwork. 

Laboratory. — Topographic surveying and topographic mapping. Charge, $1. 

156, 157. Surveying IV. 3(2-3); I and II. Prerequisite: Civ. Engr. 151 
and 155. Furr. 

Field engineering; various problems in curve selection and location; includ- 
ing pertinent curve, spiral and earthwork computations; railway track and 
cross-over exercises. Charge, $1. 

161. Drainage and Irrigation I. 2(2-0); II. Prerequisite or parallel: Ap 
Mech. 230 and 235. Furr, White. 

Design and construction of drainage and irrigation works. 

* In the case of many of the engineering courses, one course number is used for the recita- 
tion and another for the laboratory part of the course. 



Division of Engineering 149 

170. Thesis. Credit to be arranged; I and II, Conrad. 

180. Inspection Trip. R; I. Prerequisite: Senior classification. Conrad. 
A trip of four to six days to one or more industrial centers for the purpose 
of making inspections of power plants, mills, structures, waterworks, sewage 
disposal plants, to illustrate the principles and applications of interest to civil 
engineers. Approximate cost of trip, 



FOR GRADUATE AND UNDERGRADUATE CREDIT 

201. Stresses in Framed Structures. 4(4-0); I, II, and SS. Prerequisite: 
Ap. Mech. 211. Conrad, Morse. 

Computation of stresses in bridges and buildings. 

205. Civil Engineering Drawing II. 2(0-6); I and SS. Prerequisite or 
parallel: Civ. Engr. 201. Conrad, Morse. 

Graphic statics and design of simple roof trusses in timber and steel. 

207. Advanced Bridge Stresses. 3(3-0); I. Prerequisite: Civ. Engr. 201. 
Conrad. 

A study of deflections; stresses in continuous, movable, cantilever, suspen- 
sion, and steel-arch bridges; and secondary stresses. 

211, 216. Astronomy and Geodesy. 4(2-6); I. Prerequisite: Civ. Engr. 
151 and 155 and Math. 115. Frazier. 

The elements of practical astronomy; precise methods of surveying and 
leveling. 

Laboratory. — Astronomical observations, principally for determining true 
meridian and latitude; base-line measurements and triangulation work. 

220. Water Supply. 2(2-0); I and SS. Prerequisite: Ap. Mech. 230 and 
235 and Bact. 125. Frazier. 

Water supply from the standpoint of consumption, collection, storage, dis- 
tribution, and purification. 

225. Sewerage. 2(2-0); I and SS. Prerequisite: Ap. Mech. 230 and Bact. 
125. Crawford. 

A study of sewer systems and sewage treatment. 

228. Sanitary Engineering Design. 2(0-6); II. Prerequisite: Civ. Engr. 
220 and 225. Frazier. 

Design of water purification plants, sewage treatment plants, water distri- 
bution systems, and sewage collecting systems. Estimates of cost and methods 
of financing. 

231. Highway Engineering I. 2(2-0); I, II, and SS. Prerequisite: Civ. 
Engr. 111. Furr. 

Fundamental principles, location, design, construction, and maintenance of 
roads and pavements. 

246. Design of Framed Structures. 3(0-9); II and SS. Prerequisite: 
Civ. Engr. 201. Conrad. 

The making of general drawings for a highway truss bridge, a railroad truss 
bridge, and a railroad deck-plate girder. 

248. Economics of Design and Construction. 3(3-0); II. Prerequisite: 
Civ. Engr. 201 and 231. Conrad. 

Primarily a study of methods, equipment, construction costs, and economy 
in design. 

250, 255. Reinforced Concrete Design. 3(2-3); II and SS. Prerequisite: 
Ap. Mech. 211. Frazier, Furr. 

Design of reinforced concrete retaining walls, dams, slab bridges, and girder 
bridges. 

Laboratory. — 'Drawing reinforced concrete retaining walls, dams, slab bridges, 
and girder bridges. 



150 



Kansas State College 



256. Reinforced Concrete Arches. 3(3-0); II. Prerequisite: Ap. Mech. 
211. Conrad. 

Various types of reinforced concrete arches adapted for use in bridges, 
buildings, and dams; computation of stresses; arrangement of details. 

266. Railroad Transportation. 3(3-0); II. Prerequisite: Civ. Engr. 145. 
Frazier. 

A study of the function of the railway system ; its relation to industrial 
development, and its correlation with other methods of transportation. 

270,275. Highway Engineering II. 4(2-6); II. Prerequisite: Civ. Engr. 
156, 157, and 231. Furr. 

Highway laws, highway administration, and highway economics. 

Laboratory. — A reconnoissance and survey for a highway a few miles long; 
making maps, profiles, and estimates from the survey. Charge, $2. 

276. Highway Economics. 3(3-0) ; I. Prerequisite: Civ. Engr. 231. Furr. 
Economic concepts, highway transport, design, and construction problems 
as affected by recent findings of research agencies. 

FOR GRADUATE CREDIT 

304. Research in Civil Engineering. Credit to be arranged; I, II, and 
SS. Prerequisite : Consult instructors. Conrad, Frazier, Furr. 

Original investigation or advanced study in some field related to the prac- 
tice of civil engineering. 



Electrical Engineering 



Professor Kloeffler 
Professor Brenneman 
Professor Kerchner 
Associate Professor Hunt 
Associate Professor Jorgenson 



Assistant Professor Sitz 
Assistant Professor Selvidge 

Instructor 

Graduate Assistant Collins 
Graduate Assistant Bucholtz 



Special laboratories are provided for the research conducted by the elec- 
trical engineering staff and for television and other investigations made by 
graduate students. One of the laboratories contains the television broadcasting 
station W9XAK of Kansas State College. 

COURSES IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 

FOR UNDERGRADUATE CREDIT 

102, 106. Electrical Engineering C. 3(2-2, 1); I, II, and SS. Prerequisite: 
Phys. 106. Jorgenson, Sitz. 

The fundamental principles of direct-current and alternating-current circuits. 
For nonelectrical students. 

Laboratory. — Experiments covering characteristics and applications of di- 
rect-current and alternating-current machinery. Charge, $1.50. 

112. Electrical Machinery and Construction. 2(0-6); I and II. Hunt, 
Jorgenson. 

An introductory course in applied electricity covering various methods of 
interior wiring, theory of simple electric circuits, and tests of dynamos. 
Charge, $3. 

116. Illumination A. 2(2-0); II. Prerequisite: Phys. 106 or 103. Hunt. 
Systems, calculations, and specifications of interior wiring; principles of 
illumination. 

120. Principles of Electronics. 2(2-0); I and II. Prerequisite: Chem. 
107 and 108, Math. 101, and Phys. 105. Kloeffler. 
The fundamental principles of electronics. 



Division of Engineering 151 

190. Inspection Trip. R; I. Prerequisite: Senior classification. Kloeffler. 

A trip of four to six days to St. Louis, Chicago, and other cities for the 
purpose of making inspections of power plants and various industries illus- 
trating the application of electrical engineering principles. Approximate cost 
of trip, $50. 

195. Thesis. Credit to be arranged; I and II. Staff. 

A subject for thesis work is selected in consultation with the department 
head at the beginning of the senior year; every opportunity is given to work 
out original ideas as to design and operation of electrical apparatus and 
machinery. 

FOR GRADUATE AND UNDERGRADUATE CREDIT 

201. Electrodynamics. 2(2-0); I, II, and SS. Prerequisite: Math. 114 and 
Phys. 106. Brenneman. 

Principles of magnetic, electric, and electrostatic circuits. 

207. Direct-current Machinery. 4(4-0) ; I, II, and SS. Prerequisite or 
concurrent: Elec. Engr. 201. Brenneman, Sitz. 

Principles of operation and the characteristics of direct-current generators 
and motors. 

208. Direct-current Machinery Laboratory. 2(0-4, 2) ; I, II, and SS. 
Prerequisite : Elec. Engr. 207. Sitz. 

Experiments illustrating operating characteristics, losses, and efficiencies of 
direct-current motors and generators. Charge, $3. 

209. Alternating-current Circuits. 4(4-0); I, II, and SS. Prerequisite: 
Math. 121 and Elec. Engr. 207. Kerchner, Hunt, Jorgenson. 

A mathematical treatment of alternating-current phenomena in single and 
polyphase circuits. 

210. 211. Alternating-current Machinery I. 5(3-4, 2); I, II, and SS. 
Prerequisite: Elec. Engr. 209. Kerchner, Hunt, Sitz. 

Principles of design, construction, and operation of transformers, alternat- 
ing-current generators, and polyphase induction motors. 

Laboratory. — Experiments illustrating the characteristics of alternating- 
current circuits and transformers. Charge, $3. 

212, 213. Alternating-current Machinery II. 5(3-4, 2) ; I, II, and SS. 
Prerequisite: Elec. Engr. 210 and 211. Kerchner, Hunt, Sitz. 

Continuation of Elec. Engr. 210, including synchronous motors, parallel 
operation of alternators, converters, induction and commutator alternating- 
current motors, rectifiers, and accessory apparatus. 

Laboratory. — Continuation of Elec. Engr. 211. Experiments on machines 
listed in Elec. Engr. 212. Charge, $3. 

227. Electrical Measurements Recitation. 2(2-0); I and II. Prerequi- 
site: Math. 114. Phys. 106, and Elec. Engr. 120. Selvidge. 

Methods for electric and magnetic measurements; resistance, quantity, cur- 
rent, electromotive force, capacity, inductance. 

229. Electrical Measurements and Electronics Laboratory. 2(0-4, 2) ; 
I and II. Prerequisite: Math. 114, Phys. 106, and Elec. Engr. 120. Selvidge. 

Characteristics of electron tubes ; measurement of potential, resistance, in- 
ductance, capacity, etc. Charge, $3. 

237, 238. Electrical Engineering M-I. 5(4-3); I and II. Prerequisite: 
Math. 114 and Phys. 106. Hunt, Sitz. 

Theory of direct-current circuits and machines, magnetic circuits, and alter- 
nating-current circuits. 

Laboratory. — Experiments on measurement of resistance and study of direct- 
current machine characteristics. Charge, $1.50. 



152 Kansas State College 

242, 243. Electrical Engineering M-II. 4(3-2); I and II. Prerequisite: 
Elec. Engr. 237 and 238. Hunt. 

Theory of alternating-current machinery. 

Laboratory. — Experiments on alternating-current circuits and alternating- 
current machinery characteristics. Charge, $1.50. 

244. Wire Communication I. 3(3-0); I. Prerequisite: Elec. Engr. 209. 
Kloeffler. 

Principles of wire communication; telephone and telegraph switching sys- 
tems, line loading, repeaters, and carrier currents. 

248, 249. Wire Communication II. 3(2-2, 1); II. Prerequisite: Elec. 
Engr. 209. Selvidge. 

Transmission problems, networks, wave niters. 

Laboratory. — Measurements as applied to wire communication networks. 
Charge, $1.50. 

251, 253. Radio Communication I. 3(2-2, 1); I. Prerequisite: Elec. Engr. 
120 and 209. Selvidge. 

An introduction to radio theory and practice including a study of tuned cir- 
cuits, electron tubes, and audio-frequency amplifiers. 

Laboratory. — The application and operation of electron tubes in radio cir- 
cuits; audio- and radio-frequency measurements. Charge $1.50. 

255. Radio Communication II. 3(3-0); II. Prerequisite: Elec. Engr. 251 
and 253. Selvidge. 

Radio-frequency amplifiers and oscillators, modulation; application to 
transmitter circuits; antennas and wave propagation. 

256. Industrial Electronics. 2(2-0); I. Prerequisite: Elec. Engr. 120 
and 209. 

Electronic devices as utilized in industry; control circuits employing ampli- 
fier, photo-electric, thyratron, glow, and other types of tubes. 

260, 261. Illuminating Engineering. 3(2-2, 1); I. Prerequisite: Math. 
114 and Phys. 106. Hunt. 

Photometry, light standards, principles of illumination, and illumination 
design. 

Laboratory. — Photometric measurements of light intensity, luminous flux, 
brightness, and illumination. Charge, $1.50. 

262. Advanced Illuminating Engineering. 3(3-0); II. Prerequisite: Phys. 
106 and Math. 116. Hunt. 

The various theories on the property of light, the theoretical distribution 
curves from light sources of various shapes, psychological and physiological 
phases of lighting, daytime illumination in buildings, and spectrophotometry. 

270. Electrical Machine Design. 1(0-3); I and II. Prerequisite: Elec. 
Engr. 207. Brenneman, Hunt. 

The principles of electrical design; each student makes calculation for elec- 
tromagnets and a direct-current motor. 

280. Transmission and Distribution of Electrical Energy. 3(3-0); II. 
Prerequisite: Elec. Engr. 210. Brenneman. 

Transmission line design, economic and technical features; and properties of 
cables and insulators. 

284. Transient Electrical Phenomena. 3(3-0); II. Prerequisite: Elec. 
Engr. 209, 210, and 211, and Math. 201. Brenneman. 

Two phases of electrical phenomena: (a) transients in time, and (b) tran- 
sients in space. 



Division of Engineering 153 

290. Public Utility Management. 3(3-0); I and II. Prerequisite: Econ. 
101. Kloeffler. 

The problem of depreciation, finance, rates, and public regulation in gas. 
electric, and telephone properties. 

FOR GRADUATE CREDIT 

301. Advanced Electric Circuits I. 3(3-0); I. Prerequisite: Elec. Engr. 
212. Kerchner. 

Short-circuit currents in networks; equivalent impedance of multicircuit 
transformers; analysis of unbalanced polyphase circuits and analysis of induc- 
tion motor performance on unbalanced voltages; short transmission lines in 
steady state. 

304. Advanced Electric Circuits II. 3(3-0); II. Prerequisite: Elec. Engr. 
301. Kerchner. 

Long transmission lines in steady state with various terminal conditions; 
transmission charts; harmonics in circuits; general circuit constants; transmis- 
sion problems involving synchronous machines. 

313. 314. High-Frequency Measurements. 3(2-2, 1); II. Prerequisite: 
Elec. Engr. 209 and 251. Selvidge. 

Theory of measurement at radio frequencies of current, voltage, frequency, 
modulation; antenna and transmission line characteristics. 

Laboratory. — Applications of high-frequency measurements. Charge, $1.50. 

316. Advanced Electrical Theory. Credit to be arranged; I and II. Pre- 
requisite: Elec. Engr. 212. Staff. 

336. Research in Electrical Engineering. Credit to be arranged: I, II, 
and SS. Prerequisite: Elec. Engr. 210. Staff. 

Special investigations adapted to the needs of individual students. The 
laboratory work is correlated with the work of the Engineering Experiment 
Station and may be used as the basis of a master's thesis. 



General Engineering 

Dean Seaton 

Assistant Dean Durland 

101. Engineering Lectures. R(l-0); entire freshman year. Dean Seaton, 
other members of the engineering faculty, and visiting practicing engineers. 

Designed to acquaint freshman engineers and architects with fundamental 
principles of their profession and to give a general survey of the field. Charge, 
75 cents. 

105. Engineering Assembly. R(l-0); sophomore, junior, and senior years. 
Members of the engineering faculty. 

Presentation by students of abstracts and reviews of articles appearing in 
the journals of their respective societies or in the technical press of their pro- 
fession, and reports of engineering projects, industrial experiences, and original 
investigations; as far as possible conducted by the student branches of the pro- 
fessional engineering societies. Occasionally two or more of these individual 
groups unite for lectures by practicing engineers and by members of the en- 
gineering and college faculties. Charge, 75 cents. 



154 



Kansas State College 



Machine Design 



Professor Pearce 
Professor Durland 
Professor Smutz 
Associate Professor Gingrich 
Assistant Professor Branigan 



Instructor Wood 
Instructor Gralak 
Instructor Sullivan 
Graduate Assistant Pietsch 



The courses in drawing deal principally with the training of the freshman 
and sophomore students in visualization, and the application of graphical 
language to engineering problems, with particular reference to commercial 
drafting-room methods. 

The courses in machine design deal with mechanical transmission of power, 
analysis of the action of machine parts, design of machine elements and of 
complete machines, aerodynamic forces, and airplane structures. 

COURSES IN DRAWING AND MACHINE DESIGN 

FOR UNDERGRADUATE CREDIT 

101. Engineering Drawing. 2(0-6) ; I, II, and SS. Staff. 

The selection and use of drawing instruments; construction of geometrical 
figures; lettering; orthographic projections and sections; pictorial methods of 
representation. 

106. Descriptive Geometry. 2(0-6); I, II, and SS. Prerequisite: Math. 
102 or equivalent and Mach. Des. 101. Staff. 

Problems involving the point, line, and plane; the intersection and develop- 
ment of the surfaces of geometric solids; practical applications of the principles 
involved; emphasis on developing the student's ability to visualize drawings in 
the third angle. 

107. Descriptive Geometry A. 3(0-9); I. Prerequisite: Math. 102 or 
equivalent. Smutz, Gingrich. 

This course is similar in content to Mach. Des. 106, but is primarily for 
architectural students, and its problems are related to their work. 

108. Shades and Shadows and Perspective, 3(0-9); II. Prerequisite: 
Mach. Des. 107 and Arch. 106A. Smutz, Gingrich. 

Conventional shades and shadows of common geometrical solids and solids 
of revolution; simple architectural problems; the theory of perspective as ap- 
plied to the same simple solids and to problems from architectural practice. 
Charge, $1.50. 

111. Machine Drawing I. 2(0-6); I. II, and SS. Prerequisite: Mach. 
Des. 101. Staff. 

Conventional representations; working drawings; dimensioning; the repro- 
duction of drawings; checking for errors; arrangement of titles and notes; 
sheet metal drafting; simple perspective. 

118. Machine Drawing II. 2(0-6); I, II, and SS. Prerequisite: Mach. 
Des. 111. Staff. 

Machine sketching from parts of actual machines; complete working and 
assembly drawings; tracing and blue printing. 

119. Machine Drawing III. 2(0-6); I, II, and SS. Prerequisite: Mach. 
Des. 121 and Mech. Engr. 131. Staff. 

Graphical solutions of problems in belting, cams, linkages, and gears; valve 
gears and valve diagrams; governors and governor diagrams. 

121. Mechanism. 3(3-0); I, II, and SS. Prerequisite: Math. 101 and 
Mach. Des. 106. Staff. 

A careful study of the fundamental elements of machinery with reference 
to the transmission of motion and force, and to their forms and arrangements 
in actual machines. 



Division of Engineering 155 

126. Thesis. Credit to be arranged; I and II. Pearce, Durland. 

Excellent material for thesis study is furnished by projects in machine de- 
sign or aerodynamics; the subject of the investigation is selected in consulta- 
tion with the head of the department at the beginning of the senior year. 

FOR GRADUATE AND UNDERGRADUATE CREDIT 

204, 205. Machine Design I. 5(3-6); I and II. Prerequisite: Ap. Mech. 
211, Mach. Des. Ill, and Mech Engr. 204 or 212. Pearce, Durland. 

The straining actions in machine elements; friction and lubrication; prob- 
lems arising in the transmission of power and in the design of high-speed ma- 
chinery ; fastenings. 

Laboratory. — Riveted joints designed in conformity to the A. S. M. E. 
Boiler Code ; calculations for a number of simple machines and machine parts, 
paralleling the recitation class assignments. 

210. Machine Design II. 2(0-6) ; I and II. Prerequisite: Mach. Des. 204 
and 205. Pearce, Sullivan. 

Complete design of a small power shear with a graphical analysis of the 
shaft; the rotative effect diagram and balancing of an engine. 

215. Machine Vibration. 3(3-0); II. Prerequisite: Ap. Mech. 202 and 
Math. 121. Pearce, Durland. 

A general consideration of free and forced vibration in machines for various 
degrees of freedom; critical speed; vibration isolation. 

220. Kinematics and Kinetics. 2(2-0); II. Prerequisite: Mach. Des. 121 
and Ap. Mech. 202. Pearce, Durland. 

A study of the velocities and accelerations in mechanisms and machines, and 
of the forces resulting therefrom. 

225. Graphics of Engineering Formulas. 2(2-0); II. Prerequisite: Math. 
110. Pearce. 

Simple empirical equations; diagramming of formulas; nomographic or 
alignment charts; special slide rules. 

230. Patents and Inventions. 2(2-0); I. Prerequisite: Junior or senior 
standing. Pearce. 

A brief consideration of the fundamental principles of United States patents 
and their relationship to the engineer; the inception and development of in- 
ventions. 

250,251. Aerodynamics. 4(3-3) ; I. Prerequisite: Ap. Mech. 202. Pearce, 
Durland. 

A general introduction into aerodynamics, particularly as regards action of 
air foils, parasite drag, prediction of performance, stability and control. 

Laboratory. — Determination of performance curves and the stability of an 
airplane; operation of demonstration wind tunnel. 

255. Airplane Design. 2(0-6); II. Prerequisite: Mach. Des. 250 and 251, 
and Ap. Mech. 211 and 220. Pearce, Durland. 

A general presentation of the problems involved in the design and stress 
analysis of an airplane structure, particularly as regards the requirements of 
the United States Department of Commerce. 

FOR GRADUATE CREDIT 

301. Advanced Machine Design. Credit to be arranged; I or II. Pre- 
requisite: Consult instructors. Pearce, Durland. 

At the option of the student this course may include a study of some ad- 
vanced subject related to courses in this department. 

310. Research in Design. Credit to be arranged; I, II, and SS. Pre- 
requisite : Consult instructors. Pearce, Durland. 

Original investigation in some advanced subject related to courses in this 
department. This work may furnish material for the master's thesis. 



156 Kansas State College 

Mechanical Engineering 

Professor Helander Assistant Professor Tripp 

Professor Mack Instructor Pippin 

Professor Brainard Instructor Matting 

Assistant Professor Flinner Graduate Assistant Kane 

The object of the instruction in this department is to give to the student 
the fundamental principles underlying the design, construction, selection, op- 
eration, and testing of steam boilers; steam engines and steam turbines; inter- 
nal combustion engines; air compressors; air conditioning equipment; refrig- 
erating machinery; condensers and evaporators. These subjects are developed 
by courses in engineering thermodynamics and heat power engineering, and are 
followed in the fourth year by courses in power-plant design, air conditioning, 
and in petroleum engineering. Courses in refrigeration and internal combus- 
tion engines are offered for electives. 

In addition to the equipment installed especially for experimental purposes, 
all the heating, power, ventilating and pumping equipment of the College sub- 
serves the further purposes of experimental work. 

COURSES IN MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 

FOR UNDERGRADUATE CREDIT 

120, 125. Steam and Gas Engineering C. 3(2-3); I and II. Prerequisite: 
Math. 114 and Phys. 105. Staff. 

Steam boilers, steam engines, steam turbines, internal combustion engines, 
and auxiliaries. 

Laboratory. — Power-plant instruments and testing of power-plant equip- 
ment. Charge, $1.50. 

131. Elements of Heat Power. 2(2-0) ; I and II. Prerequisite: Phys. 105. 
Mack. 

Principles and practices, underlying the conversion of fuel energy into me- 
chanical energy, and essential equipment in heat power plants. 

135. Air Conditioning A. 3(3-0); II. Prerequisite: Phys. 105 or 102. 
Primarily for students who have not had engineering thermodynamics. Mack. 

Principles of heating, cooling, and ventilating; heat transmission; equip- 
ment used for heating, cooling, and ventilating. 

170, 175. Dairy Refrigeration. 2(1-3) ; I. Mack, Brainard. 

Cold storage and the elementary theory and principles of operation of 
various refrigerating and ice-making machinery, with special reference to the 
dair^v industry. 

Laboratory. — Refrigeration systems and their operation; tests of refriger- 
ation machines. Charge, $1. 

180. Inspection Trip. R; I. Prerequisite: Senior classification. Helander. 
A trip of three to six days to industrial centers for the purpose of inspect- 
ing industrial plants of special interest to mechanical engineering students. 

195. Thesis. Credit to be arranged; I and II. Helander, Mack. 
Subject for investigation to be selected in consultation with the depart- 
ment head at the beginning of the senior year. 

FOR GRADUATE AND UNDERGRADUATE CREDIT 

201A, 202. Engineering Thermodynamics A. 4(3-3); I and II. Prerequi- 
site: Mach. Des. 121 and Math. 114. Staff. 

Similar to Mech. Engr. 208, but designed for non-mechanical engineering 
students. 

Laboratory. — Power-plant instruments and testing of power-plant equip- 
ment. Charge, $1.50. 



Division of Engineering 157 

204, 205. Heat Power Engineering A. 4(3-3); I and II. Prerequisite: 
Mech. Engr. 201A. Staff. 

Power-plant equipment, fuels and combustion. 

Laboratory.- — Similar to Heat Power Laboratory II. Charge, $1.50. 

208. Engineering Thermodynamics. 4(4-0); I and II. Prerequisite: 
Math. 115 and Mech. Engr. 131. Staff. 

Laws of the conversion of heat energy into mechanical energy; properties 
of fluids; gases, vapors, and gas vapor mixtures; flow and non-flow processes; 
power generating cycles; air compression and refrigeration. 

209. Heat Power Laboratory I. 1(0-3); I and II. Prerequisite: Mech. 
Engr. 131. Staff. 

Power-plant instruments and testing of power-plant equipment. Charge, 
$1.50. 

211. Heat Power Engineering B. 5(4-3); I. Prerequisite: Phvs. 106 and 
Math. 115. Staff. 

Same as Mech. Engr. 204, except that some material on Engineering 
Thermodynamics has been added. 

Laboratory. — Power plant instruments, tests of lubricating oils, testing of 
power plant equipment. Charge, $1.50. 

213. Heat Power Laboratory II. 1(0-3); I and II. Prerequisite: Mech. 
Engr. 208 and 209. Staff. 

Continuation of Heat Power Lab. I. Charge, $1.50. 

214. Heat Power Engineering. 4(3-3); I and II. Prerequisite: Mech. 
Engr. 208. Staff. 

Application of thermodynamic principles to power generation, flow of 
fluids, turbines, engines, compressors, and blowers; also a study of prime 
movers, steam generating equipment, auxiliaries, fuels and combustion, and 
evaporators. 

216. Power-plant Equipment. 3(2-3); I. Prerequisite: Mech. Engr. 251. 
Llelancler, Pippin. 

Similar to Mech. Engr. 214, except that more attention is paid to design 
factors. 

217. Power-plant Design. 3(1-6); II. Prerequisite: Mech. Engr. 214 or 
216. Helander, Pippin. 

Industrial and central station power generation practices, means for effect- 
ing economies in central station and industrial plants that use process steam ; 
preliminary design of a power plant, selection of pressures, temperatures, and 
equipment, including an evaluation of economic factors; and a complete de- 
termination of the station heat balance. 

219. Heat Power Laboratory III. 1(0-3); I and II. Prerequisite: Mech. 
Engr. 213 and 214 or 216. Helander, Pippin. 

Performance tests of power generating equipment, internal combustion en- 
gines, steam engines, turbines, and auxiliaries. Students are required to organ- 
ize and conduct tests and to submit complete reports. Charge, $1.50. 

221. Refrigeration. 2(2-0); I. Prerequisite: Mech. Engr. 201A or 208. 
Mack, Pippin. 

Thermodynamics of refrigeration; systems of refrigeration and their opera- 
tion; application of refrigeration to ice making, cold storage, and the cooling 
of gases, liquids, and solids. 

228. Air Conditioning. 3(2-3) ; I and II. Prerequisite: Mech. Engr. 201A 
or 208. Mack, Flinner. 

Psychrometry ; heat transmission; air-conditioning equipment and systems; 
design problems. 

229. Air-Conditioning Equipment Laboratory. 1(0-3); I and II. To be 
taken with or following Mech. Engr. 228. Flinner, Pippin. Charge, $1. 



158 Kansas State College 

230. Advanced Thermodynamics. 2(2-0); I. Prerequisite: Mech. Engr. 
208. Helander. 

235. Steam Turbines. 2(2-0); II. Prerequisite: Mech. Engr. 214 or 216. 
Flinner. 

240. Internal Combustion Engines. 2(2-0); II. Prerequisite: Mech. 
Engr. 201 A or 208. Brainard, Flinner. 

251. Heat Transfer and Fluid Flow. 4(3-3); II. Prerequisite: Mech. 
Engr. 208. Tripp. 

Particular reference to heat exchangers, air preheaters, economizers, boilers, 
condensers, evaporators, and similar equipment. 

Laboratory. — Tests to study transfer of heat by radiation, convection, and 
conduction, and the flow of fluids in pipes and heat exchangers. Charge, $1.50. 

260. Advanced Power-plant Engineering. Credit to be arranged. Pre- 
requisite: Mech. Engr. 217. Helander. 

An advanced course in the economic problems met with in the design of 
power plants and in the generation of power. Selection of equipment, choice 
of station heat balances, generation of by-product power in industries, and in- 
terconnections between utilities and industrial plants for the economical in- 
terchange of power. 

270. Petroleum Production I. 3(3-0) ; I. Prerequisite: Senior standing in 
Department of Mechanical Engineering or permission of head of department. 
Brainard. 

Properties of petroleum; exploration methods; field development; drilling; 
oil field hydrology; casing and well completion; and fishing tools and methods. 

271. Petroleum Production II. 3(2-3); II. Prerequisite: Mech. Engr. 
270. Brainard. 

Prime movers and fuels; production methods; methods for flowing and 
pumping wells; refining; storage; transportation. 

Laboratory. — Construction and study of oil field peg models; tests on oil 
bearing sands; field trips to study equipment and operations. Charge, $1.50. 

FOR GRADUATE CREDIT 

305. Research in Mechanical Engineering. Credit to be arranged; I, 
II, and SS. Prerequisite: Consult instructors. Helander, Mack. 

The laboratory work is correlated with the work of the Engineering Ex- 
periment Station. Research in any field pertinent to subjects taught in th? 
department of mechanical engineering. 



Division of Engineering 



159 



Shop Practice 



Professor Carlson 
Professor Sellers 

Associate Professor Wilson 

Assistant Professor Jones 

Assistant Professor Lynch 

Assistant Professor Aiman 



Assistant Professor Stutzman 

Instructor Grant 

Instructor McCollum 

Instructor Moore 

Instructor Ladd 

Graduate Research Assistant Frick 



The work in the department is planned to meet the needs of two classes 
of students: (1) those who are preparing for the teaching field and need a gen- 
eral knowledge of the principles of industrial arts work in metal and wood, of 
the materials and equipment used, including their control and arrangement, 
and of methods of handling work and students in the laboratory, together with 
sufficient skill in the performance of the various tool operations to be able to 
instruct others; and (2) those in the courses in engineering who need to secure 
a general knowledge of machine operations and methods used in job shops and 
mass-production factories, and of the economical selection and control of the 
materials, machinery, buildings, and personnel used in the manufacturing in- 
dustries. 

COURSES IN SHOP PRACTICE 

FOR UNDERGRADUATE CREDIT 

101. Engineering Woodwork. 1(0-3); I and II. Moore. 

Importance of the use of methods, machinery, and men in connection with 
an industrial woodworking plant; forest conditions, wastage, the structural 
growth of wood, and the kiln drying of lumber. Charge, $1.25. 

118. Elementary Crafts for Teachers. 2(0-6) ; I and SS. Moore. 
Exercises and projects suitable for pupils from the primary to eighth grade. 

Special instruction in methods of teaching, materials, and equipment. Charge, 
$2.50. 

119. Reed Furniture Construction. 2(0-6); I and SS. Moore. 
Exercises and instruction in methods of teaching this work. Charge, $2.50. 

121. Woodwork I. 2(0-6); I and SS. Moore. 

Elementary bench work course in tool operations. Charge, $2.50. 

122. Wood and Metal Finishing. 2(0-6); II and SS. Prerequisite: Shop 
121. Moore. 

A study of materials, processes, methods of applications of finishes for both 
wood and metal. Brush and spray equipment used. Charge, $2.50. 

126. Woodwork II. 2(0-6) ; II and SS. Prerequisite: Shop 121. 
Continuation of Woodwork I, including the use of the power 
Charge, $2.50. 

131. Woodwork III. 2(0-6) ; I and SS. Prerequisite: Shop 126. 
Advanced woodwork and cabinetmaking. Charge, $2.50. 

135. Wood Turning. 2(0-6); I and SS. Moore. 

Practice in handling the lathe and turning tools. Charge, $2.50. 

139. Woodwork IV. 2(0-6) ; II and SS. Prerequisite: Shop 131. 
An opportunity to specialize in wood finishing, carpentry work, cabinet 
work, or some other work of special interest to the student. Charge, $2.50. 

147. Farm Carpentry. 3(1-6); I, II, and SS. Wilson. 

Rafter cutting and erection, studding and siding work, making window and 
door frames, hanging doors, and similar operations on full-size construction 
work; making out bill of material; care and upkeep of tools; designed for 
training of teachers who must solve problems in connection with carpentry 
work on the farm. Charge, $2.50. 



Moore, 
machines. 

Moore. 



Moore. 



160 Kansas State College 

150. Forging and Heat Treating. 1(0-2, 1)); I and II. Lynch. 

(a) Forging of iron and steel; (£>) production equipment as used in the 
commercial forge shop; (c) operation of gas, oil. and electric furnaces, and the 
heat treatment of steel. Charge, $2.50. 

157, 158. Farm Blacksmithing I and II. 1(0-3) each; I and SS, and II and 
SS, respectively. Lynch. 

In I, exercises closely related to work on the farm; designed to train teach- 
ers for work in rural communities. Charge, $2:50. 

In II, more advanced instruction in the working of iron and steel, and in 
the annealing, hardening, and tempering of tools. Charge, $2.50. 

161. Foundry Production. 1(0-3); I and II. Grant. 

(a) Bench, floor, and pit molding, use of molding and core machines, oper- 
ating nonferrous furnaces and cupola; (b) study of commercial foundry equip- 
ment and the operation and control of the foundry. Charge, $1. 

165. Metals and Alloys. 2(2-0); I and II. Prerequisite: Chem. 107 and 
108, or may be taken with Chem. 108. Sellers, Stutzman. 

The manufacture and use of iron, steel, copper, aluminum, and their alloys. 

170. Machine Tool Work I. 2(0-6); I. II. and SS. Jones, McCollum. 
Practice in chipping, filing, shaper and planer work; drilling and turning on 

the lathe. Charge, $5. 

171. Oxyacetylene Welding. 1(0-2, 1); I and II. Ladd. 

The theory and practice of oxyacetylene welding, including a microscopic 
study of welds. Charge, $2.50. 

172. Arc Welding. 1(0-2, 1); I and II. Ladd. 

The theory and practice of arc welding, including a microscopic study of 
welds. Charge, $2.50. 

173. Sheet Metal Work. 2(0-6); I, II, and SS. Prerequisite: Mach. Des. 
101 or equivalent. Moore. 

Covers developments, the use of templets, practice in soldering, brazing, 
folding, wiring, flanging, seaming, rolling, and the more common operations on 
sheet metal. Charge, $2.50. 

175. Farm Shop Methods. 3(1-6); II and SS. Prerequisite: Shop 147 and 
157. Wilson. 

Babbitting, soldering, drilling and drill grinding, thread cutting with dies 
and taps, tool sharpening, belt lacing, repair of machinery, and other practical 
operations; designed to train teachers in farm-shop work. Charge, $2.50. 

192, 193. Machine Tool Work II and III. 2(0-6) and 1(0-3), respectively; 
I, II, and SS. Prerequisite: Shop 170. Jones.. McCollum. 

In II, progressive problems in turning, calipering, boring, reaming, taper 
turning, threading on the lathe, in chucking, use of forming tools, gear cutting; 
study of cutting edges and tool adjustments best suited to the different metals, 
cutting speeds and feeds. Charge, $5. 

In III, work on the turret lathe, boring mill, hand and automatic screw 
machines, and grinder; practical work with jigs and fixtures and a study of 
rapid production of duplicate parts. Charge, $2.50. 

194. Inspection Trip. R; I. Prerequisite: Senior classification. Staff. 

A trip of three to six days to industrial centers for inspection of establish- 
ments of special interest to industrial arts students. 

195. Thesis. Credit to be arranged; I and II. Carlson, Sellers. 

FOR GRADUATE AND UNDERGRADUATE CREDIT 

246. Industrial Management. 3(3-0); I. Prerequisite: Shop 170 and Ap. 
Mech. 116, 121. Carlson. 

Problems of the industrial executive, such as plant location, selection and 
arrangement of buildings and equipment, production planning and control, 



Division of Engineering 161 

simplification and standardization, time and motion study, job and methods 
standardization, control of inventory and costs. 

265. Factory Design. 2(0-6); II. Prerequisite: Shop 246. Carlson. 
Knowledge gained in shops and laboratories and in Shop 246 is used in the 
design of a factory. 

261. Advanced Shop Practice. Credit to be arranged; I, II, and SS. Pre- 
requisite: Consult instructor. Staff. 

Opportunity is offered to specialize to a limited degree along certain lines 
such as heal treatment of steel, oxyacetylene and arc welding, jig fixtures and 
die work, metallography, pattern making and any shop work that may be of 
special interest to the student. All assignments must be approved by the head 
of the Department of Shop Practice. Charge varies with subject matter. 

262. Metallography I. 1(0-3); I and II. Prerequisite: Shop 165, or may 
be taken with Shop 165. Sellers, Stutzman. 

The microscopic constituents of the different grades of iron and steel; 
changes in the structure and properties as produced by heat treatment, me- 
chanical working, and composition. Charge, $2.50. 

263. Physical Metallurgy. 2(2-0); II and SS. Prerequisite: Shop 262. 
Sellers, Stutzman. 

An advanced study of the structure, properties, and uses of the more com- 
mon metals and alloys involving heat and mechanical treatment and casting. 

265. Metallography II. 2(0-6) ; I and II. Prerequisite: Shop 262. Sellers, 
Stutzman. 

A continuation of Shop 262. nonferrous metals, with special attention to 
photomicrographic analysis. Charge, $5. 

274. General Shop Organization. 3(1-6); II and SS. Prerequisite: Shop 
147. 157, 161. 170, 171, 172, 173. and Elec. Engr. 112. Wilson. 

A course covering the organization, methods of teaching, and equipment 
for the general shop. Charge, $2.50. 

286. Shop Practice Teaching. Credit to be arranged; I, II, and SS. Pre- 
requisite: Consult instructor. Staff. 

Actual laboratory teaching experience under the supervision of an instructor. 
Work covers the outlining, preparation, and presentation of assignments and 
the supervision of the work; procurement of materials and equipment, shop 
layouts and upkeep, and general considerations. Insofar as possible the course 
is adapted to the particular needs of the student. All assignments must be ap- 
proved by the head of the Department of Shop Practice. 

FOR GRADUATE CREDIT 

301. Research in Shop Practice. Credit to be arranged; I, II, and SS. 
Prerequisite : Consult instructors. Staff. 

Investigations of interest to the individual student. May be used as the 
basis of the master's thesis, and is usually correlated with the work of the En- 
gineering Experiment Station. 



11—6529 



162 Kansas State College 

The Engineering Experiment Station 

Roy Andrew Seaton, Director 



The Engineering Experiment Station was established for the purpose of 
carrying on tests and research work of engineering and manufacturing value to 
the state of Kansas, and of collecting, preparing, and presenting technical infor- 
mation in a form readily available for the use of the industries and the people 
of the state. All the work of the Experiment Station is intended to be of 
direct importance to Kansas. 

All the equipment of the engineering and scientific laboratories, the shops, 
and the College power plant are available for the work, while the personnel of 
the station consists of members of the teaching staff from the departments of 
the Division of Engineering and Architecture and from other scientific depart- 
ments whose work is directly related to the work of this Division, and others 
employed especially for the work of the station. 

Among the investigations now being carried on are : Atmospheric resistance 
of automobiles ; pise de terre construction ; durability of concrete ; school shops 
for vocational agriculture and industrial arts instruction; deterioration of con- 
crete in silos; relation of potential gradient to meteorological elements; air 
conditioning for residences; cost and depreciation of farm machinery; wind 
pressures on farm buildings; cutting edges of tillage implements; tractor fuels; 
television apparatus; electrical grounds; wind-electric plants; low-cost resi- 
dential construction; residential construction units; ductility of welded joints; 
cutting tool performance; binders for foundry cores; carburizing properties of 
gases; rubber tires for tractors and implements; farm fencing; catalytic oxida- 
tion of petroleum derivatives; reactions of petroleum below cracking tem- 
peratures; planning farm homes; soil and water conservation; uses of ma- 
terials in farm shops; fluid flow friction factors; heat transfer in heat-exchange 
equipment ; nursery thresher ; Kansas coal ; and sorghum grains. 

The testing laboratories of this station have been made available by lawt 
for the use of the State Highway Commission and the state highway engineer, 
and the road materials for use in state road construction are tested in these 
laboratories. 

Some of the results of the investigations are published as bulletins of the 
Engineering Experiment Station, which are sent free to any citizen of the state 
upon request. Thirty-six such bulletins have been published. Besides issuing 
these bulletins, the station answers yearly many hundreds of requests for in- 
formation upon matters coming within its field. 

Requests for bulletins and general correspondence should be addressed to 
Engineering Experiment Station, Manhattan, Kan. Requests for information 
in specific matters should be addressed, as far as possible, to the heads of 
departments in whose fields the particular matters lie. 

t Chapter 281, Laws of 1931. 



The Division of General Science 

Rodney Whittemore Babcock, Dean 



In the land-grant colleges, of which this institution is one, the classical 
studies of the older type of college are replaced by work in the sciences and 
in professional and vocational subjects. Education should also include some 
preparation for the discharge of one's duties to the state and to the commu- 
nity. It is the province of the departments grouped in this Division of the Col- 
lege to give this basic, scientific, and cultural training. 

CURRICULUM IN GENERAL SCIENCE 

The curriculum in general science includes fundamental training in English, 
mathematics, science, history, economics, military science, and physical train- 
ing, which constitute the central educational basis of the institution. Groups 
of electives meet the needs of several types of students, among whom are: (1) 
those who have not yet chosen their vocation, but who wish a well-balanced 
education; (2) those who expect to teach in the high schools of the state; (3) 
those who are fitting themselves for research work in the sciences; (4) those 
for whom a general education is required or desirable before studying a pro- 
fession such as law or medicine. 

CURRICULUM IN INDUSTRIAL JOURNALISM 

The curriculum presents such subjects as will enable the writer to see his 
work in proper perspective, to obtain authoritative knowledge of some field of 
industrial activity, and to write acceptably. It offers fundamental studies of 
literary, social, and scientific character. The student must select subjects in 
agriculture, mechanic arts, applied science, or home economics, depending on 
the portion of the field of industrial journalism which he desires to enter. 
Theory and practice of journalism are presented in a series of courses extend- 
ing through the sophomore, junior, and senior years, and students may take 
additional electives in journalism. 

CURRICULUM IN INDUSTRIAL CHEMISTRY 

Demand of students for a curriculum planned especially to give chemical 
training is such that a formulation has been made to meet the needs of those 
desiring to specialize in industrial chemistry. The facilities of the Department 
of Chemistry, reinforced by opportunities for practical work in connection 
with the research of the experiment stations, provide for this specialized train- 
ing. A curriculum in chemical engineering is offered in the Division of En- 
gineering and Architecture. 

CURRICULUMS IN MUSIC 

A four-year curriculum is offered in applied music, preparing the student 
with a major in voice, piano, violin, organ, or other instrument, and with a 
minor in another of these subjects. Students completing this curriculum are 
awarded the degree Bachelor of Music, and are eligible to receive a three-year 
special state certificate in music renewable for three-year terms if they have 
elected the required subjects in education. 

A four-year curriculum in music education is also offered, with specialization 
in voice, instrument, or public-school band or orchestra. Students completing 
this curriculum are awarded the degree of Bachelor of Science in Music Educa- 

(163) 



164 Kansas State College 

tion, and are eligible to receive a special state certificate to teach music and 
permission to teach any nonmusic subject in which they have completed fifteen 
or more college hours; students completing this curriculum with sufficient extra 
hours so that not more than forty hours in music are submitted to the State 
Board of Education, are eligible to receive the state three-year renewable-for- 
life certificate. 

CURRICULUMS IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

The theoretical and practical instruction given in these curriculums pre- 
pares students for coaching athletic games. The curriculums are also planned 
to enable the student to elect work in some other subject which may be taught 
in connection with physical education. 

CURRICULUMS IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

The curriculums in business administration are designed to train men and 
women for citizenship and business. The curriculum in business administra- 
tion, with special training in accounting, furnishes a course of study for those 
who wish preparation in this important activity of business and government. 
The basic subjects of the four-year curriculum in business administration are 
included, and a sequence of courses in accounting extends through the entire 
four years. 



Division oj General Science 



165 



Curriculum in General Science 



FRESHMAN 



First Semester 
College Rhetoric I, Engl. 101. 



Chemistry I, Chem. 101, 
College Algebra, f Math. 104.... 

General Botany I, Bot. 101 

Library Methods, Lib. Ec. 101 .. . 
Infantry I, Mil. Sc. 101A (men). 
Phys. Educ, M or W 



*3(3-0) 
5(3-6) 
3(3-0) 
3(1-6) 
1(1-0) 
1(1-2) 
R 



Second Semester 

College Rhetoric II, Engl. 104.. 
Chemistry II Rec, Chem. 103.. 
Chemistry II Lab., Chem. 104.. 
Plane Trigonometry, Math. 101. 

General Botany II, Bot. 105 

Current History, Hist. 126 

Infantry II, Mil. Sc. 102A (men), 
Phys. Educ, M or W 



3(3-0) 
3(3-0) 
2(0-6) 
3(3-0) 
3(1-6) 
Kl-0) 
1(1-2) 
R 



Total 15 or 16 



Total 15 or 16 



SOPHOMORE 



First Semester 

English Literature, Engl. 172 

English History, Hist. 121 

General Physics I, Phys. 102 

General Zoology, Zool. 105 

Infantry III, Mil. Sc. 103A (men), 
Phys. Educ, M or W 



Second Semester 



3(3-0) American Literature, Engl. 175.... 

3(3-0) Modern Europe II, Hist. 223 

4(3-3) General Physics II, Phys. 103 

5(3-6) General Psychology, Educ. 184.... 

1(1-2) ElectiveJ 

R Infantry IV, Mil. Sc 104A (men), 

Phys. Educ, M or W 



3(3-0) 
3(3-0) 
4(3-3) 
3(3-0) 
2( - ) 
1(1-2) 
R 



Total 15 or 16 



Total 15 or 16 



JUNIOR 



First Semester 
Hist, of Engl. Literature, Engl. 181, 

Amer. Govt., Hist. 151 

Current History. Hist. 126 

Public Speaking, Pub. Spk. 107... 
Elective^ 



3(3-0) 
3(3-0) 
1(1-0) 
2(2-0) 
6( - ) 



Second Semester 
American History I, Hist. 201 . 

Economics I, Econ. 101 

Gen. Microbiology, Bact. 101.. 
Elective! 



3(3-0) 
3(3-0) 
3(1-6) 
6( - ) 



Total 



15 



Total 



SENIOR 

First Semester 
Elective^ 15( - ) 



Second Semester 



Elective^ 



15 



15( - ) 



Summary. — Men : Physical education, two years required ; military science, 4 hours ; other 
prescribed subjects, 76 hours; elective, 44 hours; total, 124 hours. Women: The same, ex- 
cept no military science; total, 120 hours. 



Pre-Veterinary Adaptation of Curriculum in General 

Science 

The following arrangement is prepared for students who wish to enter 
the Division of Veterinary Medicine. At least 32 hours must be completed, 
after which students are eligible for consideration by the Committee on Selec- 
tion of Veterinary Students for admission to the freshman year of the Cur- 
riculum in Veterinary Medicine. 



First Semester 

College Rhetoric I, Engl. 101 3(3-0) 

Chemistry I; Chem. 101 5(3-6) 

Extern. Speech I, Pub. Spk. 106... 2(2-0) 

Elective** 5( - ) 

Infantry I, Mil Sc. 101A (men)... 1(1-2) 

Phys. Educ, M or W R 



Second Semester 

College Rhetoric II, Engl. 104. . . 
Chemistry II Rec, Chem. 103 . . 
Chemistry II Lab., Chem. 104.. 

General Zoology, Zool. 105 

Elective** 

Infantry II, Mil. Sc. 102A (men), 
Phys. Educ, M or W 



3(3-0) 
3(3-0) 
2(0-6) 
5(3-6) 
2( - ) 
1(1-2) 
R 



Total 15 or 16 



Total 15 or 16 



* The number before the parentheses indicates the number of hours of credit ; the first 
number within the parentheses indicates the number of hours of recitation each week ; the 
second shows the number of hours to be spent in laboratory work each week. 

t Students who offer but one unit of algebra for admission take a five-hour course in 
College Algebra, Math. 107. The additional hours are applied as electives. 

t Electives are to be chosen, with the advice and approval of the dean, in groups of not 
fewer than eight hours, or in courses which extend fields already entered in the required work. 

** Electives should be chosen from Modern Languages, Descriptive Physics, Mathematics, 
or Economics I -II. 




166 



Kansas State College 



Curriculum in Industrial Chemistry 

FRESHMAN 

First Semester Second Semester 

College Rhetoric I, Engl. 101 3(3-0) College Rhetoric II, Engl. 104 3(3-0) 

Chemistry I, Chem. 101 5(3-6) Chemistry II Rec, Chem. 103 3(3-0) 

College Algebra, Math 104 3(3-0) Chemistry II Lab., Chem. 104 2(0-6) 

Plane Trigonometry, Math. 101... 3(3-0) Plane Anal. Geometry, Math. 110, 4(4-0) 

Engr. Drawing, Mach. Des. 101... 2(0-6) Library Methods, Lib. Ec. 101 1(1-0) 

Artillery I, Mil. Sc. 113A (men)... 1(1-2) Des. Geometry, Mach. Des. 106... 2(0-6) 

Phys. Educ, M or W R Artillery II, Mil. Sc. 114A (men).. 1(1-2) 

Phys. Educ, M or W R 

Total 16 or 17 Total 15 or 16 



First Semester 
Inorg. Preparations, Chem. 202. . . . 
Adv. Inorg. Chemistry, Chem. 207, 

Calculus I, Math. 114 

Engr. Physics I, Phys. 105 

Electivef 

Artillerv III, Mil. Sc. 115 A (men), 
Phys. Educ, M or W 



SOPHOMORE 



2(0-6) 
3(3-0) 
4(4-0) 
5(4-3) 
2( - ) 
1(1-2) 
R 



Total 16 or 17 



Second Semester 



Quant. Analysis, Chem. 241 5(1-12) 



Calculus II, Math. 115. 

Engr. Physics II, Phys. 106 

Electivef 

Artillerv IV, Mil. Sc. 116A (men) 
Phys. Educ, M or W 



4(4-0) 
5(4-3) 
2( - ) 
1(1-2) 
R 



Total 16 or 17 



First Semester 

German I, Mod. Lang. 101 

Organic Chemistry I, Chem. 218. 
Physical Chemistry I, Chem. 206, 
Electivef 

Total 



JUNIOR 

Second Semester 

3(3-0) German II, Mod. Lang. 102 3(3-0) 

4(2-6) Organic Chemistry II, Chem. 219, 4(2-6) 

5(3-6) Physical Chemistry II, Chem. 272, 3(3-0) 

4( - ) Economics I, Econ. 101 3(3-0) 

Elective! 4( - ) 

16 Total 17 



SENIOR 



First Semester 

Amer. Govt., Hist. 151 3(3-0) 

Inorg. Chem. Tech. Rec, Chem. 247, 3(3-0) 

Inorg. Chem. Tech. Lab., Chem. 248, 2(0-6) 

Scientific German, Mod. Lang. 137, 4(4-0) 

Inspection Trip, Chem. 130 R 

Elective! 5( - ) 

Total 17 



Second Semester 
Org. Chem. Tech., Chem. 212.. 
Prob. in Chemistry, Chem. 270. 
Hist, of Chemistry, Chem. 208.. 
Elective! 



Total 



3(3-0) 
3(0-9) 
1(1-0) 
9( - ) 



16 



Summary. — Men: Physical education, two years required; military science, 4 hours; chem- 
istry, 48 hours; engineering, 4 hours; other prescribed subjects, 51 hours; electives, 26 hours; 
total, 133 hours. Women: The same, except no military science; total, 129 hours. 



! Electives are to be chosen, with the advice and approval of the dean, in groups of not 
fewer than eight hours, or in courses which extend fields already entered in the required work. 



Division oj General Science 



167 



Curriculum in Industrial Journalism 



First Semester 
College Rhetoric I, Engl. 101... 
General Chemistry, Chem. 110.. 

Modern Language I* 

Library Methods, Lib. Ec. 101.. 
General Psychology, Educ 184 . . 
Industrial Journalism Lecture. . . 
Infantry I, Mil. Sc. 101A (men) 
Phys. Educ, M or W 

Total 



First Semester 
Elem. Journalism, Ind. Jour. 152.. 

Current History, Hist. 126 

Prin. of Typography, Ind. Jour. 101, 

Biological Science 

Modern Language III* 

Industrial Journalism Lecture 

Infantry III, Mil. Sc. 103A (men), 
Phys. Educ, M or W 



FRESHMAN 

Second Semester 

3(3-0) College Rhetoric II, Engl. 104 3(3-0) 

5(3-6) General Geology, Geol. 103 3(3-0) 

3(3-0) Modern Language II* 3(3-0) 

1(1-0) Journalistic Vocations, Ind. Jour. 

3(3-0) 140 2(2-0) 

R Option* 4( - ) 

1(1-2) Industrial Journalism Lecture R 

R Infantry II, Mil. Sc. 102A (men).. 1(1-2) 

Phys. Educ, M or W R 

15 or 16 Total 15 or 16 



SOPHOMORE 



Second Semester 



3(3-0) 
1(1-0) 
3(2-3) 

5( - ) 
3(3-0) 

R 
1(1-2) 

R 



Industrial Writing, Ind. Jour. 164, 

Economics I, Econ. 101 

Option* 

English Literature, Engl. 172 

Extern. Speech I, Pub. Spk. 106 . . 

Current History, Hist. 126 

Industrial Journalism Lecture 

Infantry IV, Mil. Sc. 104A (men), 
Phys. Educ, M or W 



3(3-0) 
3(3-0) 
3( - ) 
3(3-0) 
2(2-0) 
1(1-0) 

R 
1(1-2) 

R 



Total 15 or 16 



Total 15 or 16 



First Semester 
Ind. Feature Writing, Ind. Jour. 

167 

Prin. of Adv., Ind. Jour. 178 

American Literature, Engl. 175. . . . 

Option* 

Industrial Journalism Lecture 

Total 



First Semester 

Editorial Practice, Ind. Jour. 257 . . 
Contem. Thought, Ind. Jour. 255.. 

Elective and Option* 

Industrial Journalism Lecture 

Total 



JUNIOR 

Second Semester 

Jour, for Women, Ind. Jour. 172.. 2(2-0)or 

2(2-0) The Rural Press, Ind. Jour. 181.. 2(2-0)or 

4(4-0) Radio Writing, Ind. Jour. 162 2(2-0) 

3(3-0) Copy Reading, Ind. Jour. 254 2(0-6) 

6( - ) Hist, of English Lit.. Engl. 181... 3(3-0) 

R Elective and Option* 8( - ) 

Industrial Journalism Lecture R 

15 Total 15 

SENIOR 

Second Semester 

2(2-0) History and Ethics of Journalism, 

3(3-0) Ind. Jour. 273 3(3-0) 

10( - ) American Government, Hist. 151.. 3(3-0) 

R Elective and Option* 9( - ) 

Industrial Journalism Lecture R 

15 Total 15 



Summary. — Men: Physical education, two years required; military science, 4 hours; in- 
dustrial journalism, 29 hours; restricted options, 25 hours; modern language, 9 hours; other 
prescribed subjects, 42 hours; general electives, 15 hours; total, 124 hours. Women: The 
same, except no military science; total, 120 hours. 



* The options and electives are chosen with the advice and approval of the dean. The 
options are in two general groups: (1) fifteen hours in courses related to an industry or to 
applied science, and (2) ten hours in courses in political or social science, history, government, 
economics, or sociology. The options taken in the freshman year, and a large part of those 
in the sophomore year, must be those related to an industry or applied science. In the 
tabulated presentation of electives for students in the Division of General Science, groups may 
be found that will be accepted as the required options and electives. These are printed fol- 
lowing the tabulation of the curriculums. The fifteen-hour option related to an industry or to 
applied science must be selected from one of the following groups: Group 31 (applied science), 
group 32 (home economics), group 35 (agriculture), group 36 (drawing and art), group 37 
(manual and industrial arts), group 38 (printing), and group 39 (radio). The ten-hour 
option in social science may be selected by any combination formed from the following groups : 
Group 15 (history, government, and law), group 16 (economics and sciology), and group 30 
(social science). 

Proficiency equivalent to nine hours of study in a modern language is required. Each unit 
of German, French, or Spanish offered for entrance reduces this requirement in that language 
by three hours, an equal amount of additional electives being chosen. 

Electives are to be chosen in groups of usually not fewer than eight hours, unless they 
are selected in subjects which extend fields already entered through the required subjects or 
the options. 



168 



Kansas State College 



Curriculum in Music Education 



Students wishing special training in Band or Orchestra make the following 
substitution : 

Instrument, 16 hours, for Voice, 6 hours, Piano, 2 hours, and Voice or In- 
strument, 8 hours, and take Chorus R(l-O), throughout the senior year. 



FRESHMAN 



First Semester 

College Rhetoric I, Engl. 101 

Harmony I, Mus. 101 

Ear Tr. and St. Sing. I, Mus. 105, 

Piano, Mus. 161 

Voice, Mus. 156 

Orch. Instruments I, Mus. 151A... 

Choral Ensemble, Mus. 194 

General Psychology, Educ. 184.... 
Infantry I, Mil. Sc. 101A (men)... 
Phys. Educ. M or W 



Second Semester 



3(3-0) 
2(2-0) 
2(1-3) 
2(1-6) 
2(1-6) 

y 2 d- ) 

y 2 (o-2) 

3(3-0) 

1(1-2) 

R 



College Rhetoric II, Engl. 104 

Haimony II, Mus. 102 

Ear Tr. and St. Sing. II, Mus. 106, 

Piano, Mus. 161 

Voice, Mus. 156 

Orch. Instruments II, Mus. 151B.. 



3(3-0) 
2(2-0) 
2(1-3) 
2(1-6) 
2(1-6) 
%(1- ) 



Choral Ensemble, Mus. 194 V 2 (0-2) 

Phys. or Biol. Science 3( - ) 

Infantry II, Mil. Sc. 102A (men).. 1(1-2) 

Phys. Educ, M or W R 



Total 15 or 16 



Total 15 or 16 



First Semester 

Harmony III, Mus. 103 

Ear Tr. and St. Sing. Ill, Mus. 107, 

Piano, Mus. 161 

Voice, Mus. 156 

Orch. Instr. Ill, Mus. 151C 

Choral Ensemble, Mus. 194 

School Music I, Mus. 138 

Choral Conducting, Mus. 133 

Phys. or Biol. Science 

Infantry III, Mil. Sc. 103A (men), 
Phys. Educ, M or W 

Total 



First Semester 

Counterpoint, Mus. 108A 

Voice or Instrument 

Hist, and Ap. of Mus. I, Mus. 130, 
Rad. Mus. Ap. Programs, Mus. 115, 
Instrumental Conducting, Mus. 134, 

Orch. Instr. V, Mus. 151E 

Choral Ensemble, Mus. 194 

Educational Psychology, Educ. 109, 
Education elective 

Total 



SOPHOMORE 

Second Semester 

2(2-0) Harmony IV, Mus. 104 2(2-0) 

2(1-3) Ear Tr. and St. Sing. IV, Mus. 108, 2(1-3) 

KV2-3) Piano, Mus. 161 l(y 2 -3) 

KV 2 -3) Voice, Mus. 156 l(y 2 -3) 

y 2 (l- ) Orch. Instr. IV, Mus. 151D y»(l- ) 

y 2 (0-2) Choral Ensemble, Mus. 194 y 2 (0-2) 

2(2-0) School Music II, Mus. 139 2(2-0) 

1(1-0) English Literature, Engl. 172 3(3-0) 

5( - ) Nonmusic elective 3( - ) 

1(1-2) Infantry IV, Mil. Sc. 104A (men).. 1(1-2) 

R Phys Educ, M or W R 

15 or 16 Total 15 or 16 

JUNIOR 

Second Semester 

2(2-0) Musical Form and Analysis, Mus. 

2(1-6) 111 1(1-0) 

2(2-0) Voice or Instrument 2(1-6) 

1(1-0) Hist, and Ap. of Mus. II, Mus. 131, 2(2-0) 
1(1-0) Pub. Spk. for Teachers, Pub. Spk. 

y(l- ) 138 1(1-0) 

y.(0-2) School Music III, Mus. 143 2(2-0) 

3(3-0) Orch. Instr. VI, Mus. 151F y(l- ) 

3(3-0) Choral Ensemble, Mus. 194 y 2 (0-2) 

Educ Admin., Educ 210 3(3-0) 

American Literature, Engl. 175.... 3(3-0) 

15 Total 15 



SENIOR 



First Semester 



Second Semester 



Voice or Instrument 2(1-6) 

Orch. Instr. VII, Mus. 151G y 2 (l- ) 

Choral Ensemble, Mus. 194 y 2 (0-2) 

Teach. Part, in Grade School, Educ 

129 3(3-0) 

Instr. and Orches., Mus. 136 3(3-0) 

English elective 3(3-0) 

Nonmusic elective 3( - ) 



Voice or Instrument 2(1-6) 

Orch. Instr. VIII, Mus. 151H y 2 (l- ) 

Choral Ensemble, Mus. 194 y 2 (0-2) 

Education elective 3(3-0) 

Nonmusic elective 9( - ) 



Total 



15 



Total 



15 



Summary. — Men: Physical education, two years required; military science, 4 hours; 
theoretical music, 39 hours; applied music, 24 hours; other prescribed subjects, 36 hours; 
restricted electives, 6 hours; nonmusic electives, 15 hours; total, 124 hours. Women: The 
same, except no military science ; total, 120 hours. 



Division of General Science 



169 



Curriculum in Applied Music 

Students majoring in piano or pipe organ are required to take Piano En- 
semble, R (1-0), each semester. 



First Semester 

College Rhetoric I, Engl. 101 

Music Major 

Ear Tr. and St. Sing. I, Mus. 105, 

Harmony I, Mus. 101 

Modern Language 

Orch. Instr. I, Mus. 151 A 

Ensemble, Mus. 183 

Infantry I, Mil. Sc. 101A (men). . . 
Phys. Educ, M or W 

Total 



First Semester 

Music Major 

Music Minor 

Harmony III, Mus. 103 

Orch. Instr. Ill, Mus. 151C 

Ensemble, Mus. 183 

Recital I, Mus. 181A 

Hist, and Ap. of Mus. I, Mus. 130, 
Rad. Mus. Ap. Programs, Mus. 115, 

Modern Language 

Infantry III, Mil. Sc. 103A (men), 
Phys. Educ, M or W 



FRESHMAN 

Second Semester 

3(3-0) College Rhetoric II, Engl. 104 3(3-0) 

4(1-12) Music Major 4(1-12) 

2(1-3) Ear Tr. and St. Sing. II, Mus. 106, 2(1-3) 

2(2-0) Harmony II, Mus. 102 2(2-0) 

3(3-0) Modern Language 3(3-0) 

%(1- ) Orch. Instr. II, Mus. 151B M>(1- ) 

V 2 (0-2) Ensemble, Mus. 183 Vo(0-2) 

1(1-2) Infantry II, Mil. Sc. 102A (men).. 1(1-2) 

R Phys. Educ, M or W R 

15 or 16 Total 15 or 16 



SOPHOMORE 



Second Semester 



4(1-12) 
2(1-6) 
2(2-0) 

%(1- ) 

y 2 (o-2) 

R 

2(2-0) 
1(1-0) 
3(3-0) 
1(1-2) 
R 



Music Major 

Music Minor 

Harmony IV, Mus. 104 

Orch. Instr. IV, Mus. 151D 

Ensemble, Mus. 183 

Recital II, Mus. 181B 

Hist, and Ap. of Mus. II, Mus. 131, 
Pub. Spk. for Teachers, Pub. Spk. 

138 

Modern Language 

Infantry IV, Mil. Sc. 104A (men), 
Phys. Educ, M or W 



4(1-12) 
2(1-6) 
2(2-0) 

y 2 (i- ) 
y 2 (o-2) 

R 
2(2-0) 

1(1-0) 

3(3-0) 

1(1-2) 

R 



Total 15 or 16 



Total 15 or 16 



JUNIOR 



First Semester 



Music Major 4(1-12) 

Music Minor 2(1-6) 

Counterpoint, Mus. 108A 2(2-0) 

Orch. Instr. V, Mus. 151E y 2 (l- ) 

Ensemble, Mus. 183 y>(0-2) 

Recital III, Mus. 181C R 

Choral Conducting, Mus. 133 1(1-0) 

Physics for Musicians I, Phys. 121, 5(4-3) 



Second Semester 

Music Major 4(1-12) 

Music Minor 2(1-6) 

Musical Form and Analysis, Mus. 

Ill 1(1-0) 

Orch. Instr. VI, Mus. 151F y 2 (l- ) 

Ensemble, Mus. 183 y 2 (0-2) 

Recital IV, Mus. 181D R 

General Psychology, Educ. 184 3(3-0) 

Nonmusic elective 4( - ) 



Total 



First Semester 



15 



Total 



SENIOR 



Second Semester 



15 



Music Major 4(1-12) 

Ensemble, Mus. 183 V 2 (0-2) 

Orch. Instr. VII, Mus. 151G %(1- ) 



Recital V, Mus. 181E. 
Methods and Materials for the 

Studio, Mus. 149 

English Literature, Engl. 172.. 
Nonmusic elective 



R 

U2-0) 
3(3-0) 
6( - ) 



Music Major 4(1-12) 

Orch. Instr. VIII, Mus. 151H Y 2 (l- ) 

Ensemble, Mus. 183 V 2 (0-2) 

Recital VI, Mus. 181F R 

Instr. and Orches., Mus. 136 3(3-0) 

Practice Teach, of Music, Mus. 187, R(l- ) 

American Literature, Engl. 175.... 3(3-0) 

Nonmusic elective 4( - ) 



Total 



15 



Total 



15 



. Summary. — Men: Physical education, two years required; military science, 4 hours; 
theoretical music, 25 hours; applied music, 48 hours; other prescribed subjects, 33 hours; 
nonmusic electives, 14 hours; total, 124 hours. Women: The same, except no military 
science; total, 120 hours. 



170 



Kansas State College 



Curriculum in Physical Education for Men 



First Semester 

Intro, to Phys. Ed., Phys. Ed. 107, 
Phys. Ed. Act. I, Phys. Ed. 137.. 

Basketball, Phys. Ed. 130 A 

College Rhetoric I, Engl. 101 

Extern. Speech I, Pub. Spk. 106.. 

Chemistry I, Chem. 101 

Library Methods, Lib. Ec. 101.... 

Infantry I, Mil. Sc. 101 A 

Phys. Educ, M 

Total 

First Semester 

Human Anatomy, Zool. 123A 

General Psychology, Educ. 184... 
Personal Hygiene, Phys. Ed. 119.. 
Phys. Ed. Act. Ill, Phys. Ed. 139, 

Gen. Microbiology, Bact. 101 

Infantry III, Mil. Sc. 103A 

Phys. Educ, M 



Total 



First Semester 
Community Hygiene, Phys. Ed. 147, 
Org. and Admin, of Phys. Educ. M, 

Phys. Ed. 146 

Sociology, Econ. 151 

Phys. Ed. Act. IV, Phys. Ed. 140, 
Psych. Child, and Adol., Ed. 250, 
Practice Teaching in Phys. Educ. 

I, Phys. Ed. 135 

Elective* 

Total 



First Semester 

Phvs. Diagnosis and Prescrip., 
Phys. Ed. 124A 

Physiol, of Exercise, Phys. Ed. 123, 

Educ. Psychology, Educ. 109 

Practice Teaching in Phys. Educ. 
Ill, Phys. Ed. 136C 

Elective* 

Total 



FRESHMAN 

Second Semester 

1(1-0) Phys. Ed. Act. II, Phys. Ed. 138, 2(0-6) 

1(0-3) Football, Phys. Ed. 126 2(1-3) 

2(1-3) General Zoology, Zool. 105 5(3-6) 

3(3-0) College Rhetoric II, Engl. 104 3(3-0) 

2(2-0) Chemistry II Rec, Chem. 103 3(3-0) 

5(3-6) Infantry II, Mil. Sc. 102A 1(1-2) 

1(1-0) Phys. Educ, M R 

1(1-2) 
R 

16 Total 16 

SOPHOMORE 

Second Semester 

5(3-6) Baseball, Phys. Ed. 133 2(1-3) 

3(3-0) Swimming M, Phvs. Ed. 120 1(0-3) 

2(2-0) Nat. and Fen. of Play, Phys. Ed. 

2(0-6) 145 2(2-0) 

3(1-6) Kinesiology M, Phys. Ed. 141B... 3(3-0) 

1(1-2) Physiology, Zool. 130 4(3-3) 

R History and Principles of Phys. 

Education, Phys. Ed. 192 3(3-0) 

Infantry IV, Mil. Sc. 104A 1(1-2) 

Phys. Educ, M R 

16 Total 16 

JUNIOR 

Second Semester 

2(2-0) First Aid and Mas., Phys. Ed. 113A, 3(3-0) 

Track and Field Sports, Phys. Ed. 

3(3-0) 140A 2(1-3) 

3(3-0) Educ. Admin., Educ 210 3(3-0) 

1(0-3) Practice Teaching in Phys. Educ 

3(3-0) II, Phys. Ed. 136B 2(0-6) 

Current History, Hist. 126 1(1-0) 

1(0-3) Teaching Health, Phys. Ed. 149... 2(2-0) 

3( - ) Elective* 3( - ) 

16 Total 16 

SENIOR 

Second Semester 

Teach. Partic in H. S., Educ. 163, 3(3-0) 
3(3-0) Public-school Program in Phys. 

2(2-0) Educ, Phys. Ed. 142 2(2-0) 

3(3-0) Educ. Sociology, Educ. 239 3(3-0) 

Community Recreation, Phys. Ed. 

2(0-6) 203 2(2-0) 

5( - ) Elective* 5( - ) 

15 Total 15 



Summary. — Military science, 4 hours; physical education, 50 hours; professional educa- 
tion, 18 hours; other prescribed subjects, 38 hours; elective, 16 hours; total, 126 hours. 



* Electives are to be chosen with the advice and approval of the dean, in groups of not 
fewer than eight hours, and from departments other than physical education. 



Division of General Science 



171 



Curriculum in Physical Education for Women 



First Semester 

College Rhetoric I, Engl. 101 

General Chemistry, Chem. 110. . . . 
Music Fundamentals, Mus. 118. . . . 
Fund. Rhythms, Phys. Ed. 155... 
Personal Health, Child Welfare 101, 

Phys. Educ, W 

Gen. Technic I, Phys. Ed. 157A. . . 



FRESHMAN 



3(3-0) 
5(3-6) 
2(3-0) 
KO-3) 
2(2-0) 
R 
2(1-3) 



Total 



15 



Second Semester 

College Rhetoric II, Engl. 104 

General Psychology, Educ. 184.. 
Extern. Speech I, Pub. Spk. 106. 

General Zoology, Zool. 105 , 

Phys. Educ, W 

Gen. Technic II, Phys. Ed. 157B. 



Total 



3(3-0) 
3(3-0) 
2(2-0) 
5(3-6) 
R 
2(1-3) 



15 



First Semester 

Human Anatomy, Zool. 123A 

English Literature, Engl. 172 

Sociology, Econ. 151 

Playground Management and Games 

W, Phys. Ed. 182A 

Phys. Educ, W 

Gen. Technic III, Phys. Ed. 157C, 



Total 



SOPHOMORE 



5(3-6) 
3(3-0) 
3(3-0) 

2(1-3) 

R 

2(1-3) 



Second Semester 



Kinesiology W, Phys. Ed. 184 2(2-0) 

Physiology, Zool. 130 4(3-3) 

History and Prin. of Phys. Educ, 

Phys. Ed. 192 3(3-0) 

American Literature, Engl. 175.... 3(3-0) 

Phvs. Educ, W R 

Gen. Technic IV, Phys. Ed. 157D, 2(1-3) 

Electivef 1( - ) 



15 



Total 



15 



First Semester 
Prin. Health Educ, Phys. Ed. 163, 
Psych, of Child, and Adol., Educ. 

250 

Phys. Educ, W 

Gen. Technic V, Phys. Ed. 157E. . 
Health Exam. W, Phys. Ed. 171.. 
Electivef 



Total 



JUNIOR 



3(3-0) 

3(3-0) 
R 

2(0-6) 
2(0-6) 
5( - ) 



Second Semester 



Teach, and Adapt, of Phys. Educ, 

Phys. Ed. 188 

Phys. Educ, W 

Gen. Technic VI, Phys. Ed. 157F, 
Therap. and Mas., Phys. Ed. 172. 

Embryology, Zool. 219 

Electivef 



3(3-0) 
R 
2(1-3) 
2(0-6) 
4(3-3) 
4( - ) 



15 



Total 



15 



First Semester 
Amer. Hist. Survey, Hist. 104.... 

Educ. Psychology, Educ. 109 

Ap. Nutr., Food and Nutr. 121... 
Teach. Partic. in H. S., Educ. 163, 

Phys. Educ, W 

Gen. Technic VII, Phys. Ed. 157G, 
Electivef 



Total 



SENIOR 



Second Semester 



3(3-0) 
3(3-0) 
2(2-0) 
3(3-0) 
R 
2(1-3) 
2( - ) 



Educ Sociology, Educ. 239 3(3-0) 

Organization and Administration of 

Phys. Educ. W, Phys. Ed. 176, 2(2-0) 

Phys. Educ, W R 

Gen. Technic VIII, Phvs. Ed. 157H, 2(1-3) 

Educ. Admin., Educ 210 3(3-0) 

Adult Recreation, Phys. Ed. 183. . . 2(2-0) 

Electivef 3( - ) 



15 



Total 



15 



Summary. — Physical education, 40 home: professional education, 18 hours; other pre- 
soiibed subjects, 47 hours; general electives. 15 hours; total, 120 hours. 

f Electives are to be chosen with the advice and approval of the dean, in groups of not 
fewer than eight hours, and from departments other than physical education. 



172 Kansas State College 

Curriculum in Business Administration 

FRESHMAN 

First Semester Second Semester 

College Rhetoric I, Engl. 101 3(3-0) College Rhetoric II, Engl. 104 3(3-0) 

Phvs. or Biol. Science* 3( - ) Phys. or Biol. Science* 5( - ) 

Current History, Hist. 126 1(1-0) Current History, Hist. 126 1(1-0) 

General Algebra, Math. 108 5(5-0) American Ind. History, Hist. 105, 3(3-0) 

Accounting I, Econ. 133 3(2-3) Accounting II, Econ. 134 3(2-3) 

Infantry I, Mil. Sc. 101A (men).. 1(1-2) Infantry II, Mil. Sc. 102A (men).. 1(1-2) 

Phys. Educ, M or W R Phys. Educ, M or W R 



Total 15 or 16 Total 15 or 16 

SOPHOMORE 

First Semester Second Semester 

Coml. Correspondence, Engl. 122.. 3(3-0) General Psychology, Educ. 184 3(3-0) 

Economics I, Econ. 101 3(3-0) English Literature, Engl. 172 3(3-0) 

History, Elective 3( - ) Economics II, Econ. 104 3(3-0) 

Elements of Statistics, Math. 126, 3(3-0) Sociology, Econ. 151 3(3-0) 

Valuation Accounting, Econ. 280 . . 3(3-0) Option* 3( - ) 

Infantry III, Mil. Sc. 103A (men), 1(1-2) Infantry IV, Mil. Sc. 104A (men), 1(1-2) 

Phys. Educ, M or W R Phys. Educ, M or W R 



Total 15 or 16 Total 15 or 16 

JUNIOR 

First Semester Second Semester 

Public Speaking, Pub. Spk. 107. . . 2(2-0) Investments, Econ. 222 3(3-0) 

Option* 3( - ) Amer. Govt., Hist. 151 3(3-0) 

Money and Banking, Econ. 116 3(3-0) Bus. Org. and Fin., Econ. 215 3(3-0) 

Marketing, Econ. 246 3(3-0) Option* 3( - ) 

Electivef 4( - ) Electivef 3( - ) 



Total 15 Total 15 

SENIOR 

First Semester Second Semester 

Business Law I, Hist. 163 3(3-0) Business Law II, Hist. 164 3(3-0) 

Public Finance, Econ. 214 3(3-0) Bus. Adm. Seminar, Econ. 249.... 1(1-0) 

Electivef 9( - ) Electivef 11( - ) 



Total 15 Total 15 

Summary. — Men : Physical education, two years required ; military science, 4 hours ; 
business administration courses, 46 hours; other prescribed courses, 38 hours; option, 
special and general electives, 36 hours; total, 124 hours. Women: The same, except no mili- 
tary science; total, 120 hours. 

* Eight hours of physical or biological science are to be elected in this curriculum, if pos- 
sible in the freshman year. Subject to any prerequisites, chemistry, physics, botany, zoology, 
entomology, and geology are available. 

If Chemistry I. Chem. 101, is taken, Chemistry II Rec, Chem. 103, is required also. 
The nine-hour option is selected from a modern language, or a single department in a 
natural scienee. Students who present one and one-half units of high-school algebra may 
replace General Algebra, Math. 108, by College Algebra, Math. 104. 

f Ten hours of special electives must be chosen from the following group : Economics 
223, Credits and Collections; 230, Principles of Transportation; 234, Labor Economics; 242, 
Property Insurance; 244, Life Insurance; 248, Problems in Economics; 258, Social Pathology; 
280, Valuation Accounting; 281, Advanced Accounting; 286, Tax Accounting; 287, Cost 
Accounting; 288, Advanced Cost Accounting; 289, Government Accounting; 290, Auditing; 
Education 265, Psychology of Advertising and Selling; 273, Psychology and Personnel Man- 
agement; English 123, Written and Oral Salesmanship; 223, Advanced Problems in Com- 
mercial Correspondence; History and Government 260, Government Regulation of Business; 
Industrial Journalism 178, Principles of Advertising; and Mathematics 150, Mathematics 
of Finance. 



Division oj General Science 



173 



Curriculum in Business Administration with Special 
Training in Accounting 



FRESHMAN 



First Semester 

College Rhetoric I, Engl. 101 

Phys. or Biol. Science* 

Accounting I, Econ. 133 

Current History, Hist. 126 

General Algebra, Math. 108 

Infantry I, Mil. Sc. 101A (men) 
Phys. Educ, M or W 



Second Semester 



3(3-0) 
3( - ) 
3(2-3) 
1(1-0) 
5(5-0) 
1(1-2) 
R 



College Rhetoric II, Engl. 101... 

Phys. or Biol. Science* 

Accounting II, Econ. 134 

Current History, Hist. 126 

American Ind. History, Hist. 105. 
Infantry II, Mil. Sc. 102A (men). 
Phys. Educ, M or W 



3(3-0) 
5( - ) 
3(2-3) 
1(1-0) 
3(3-0) 
1(1-2) 
R 



Total 15 or 16 



Total 15 or 16 



SOPHOMORE 



First Semester 
Economics I, Econ. 101. 



Second Semester 



Coml. Correspondence, Engl. 122.. 
General Psychology, Educ. 184.... 

Cost Accounting, Econ. 287 

Options* 

Infantry III, Mil. Sc. 103A (men), 
Phys. Educ, M or W 



3(3-0) 
3(3-0) 
3(3-0) 
3(3-0) 
3( - ) 
1(1-2) 
R 



Economics II, Econ. 104 

English Literature, Engl. 172.... 
Valuation Accounting, Econ. 280. 
Math, of Finance, Math. 150.... 

Options* 

Infantry IV, Mil. Sc. 104A (men), 
Phys. Educ, M or W 



3(3-0) 
3(3-0) 
3(3-0) 
3(3-0) 
3( - ) 
1(1-2) 
R 



Total 



15 or 16 Total 

JUNIOR 



First Semester 

Elements of Statistics, Math. 126, 
Money and Banking, Econ. 116... 
Business Org. and Fin., Econ. 215, 

Adv. Accounting, Econ. 281 

Options* 



Second Semester 



15 or 16 



3(3-0) 
3(3-0) 
3(3-0) 
3(3-0) 
3( - ) 



Auditing, Econ. 290 

Am. Govt., Hist. 151 

Public Speaking, Pub. Spk. 10' 
Electivef 



2(2-0) 
3(3-0) 
2(2-0) 
8C - ) 



Total 



First Semester 



15 



Total 



SENIOR 



Second Semester 



Govt. Accounting, Econ. 289. 
Public Finance, Econ. 214... 
Business Law I, Hist. 163... 
Electivef 



2(2-0) 
3(3-0) 
3(3-0) 
7( - ) 



Business Law II, Hist. 164 

Bus. Admin. Seminar, Econ. 249, 
Adv. Cost Accounting, Econ. 288, 

Tax Accounting, Econ. 286 

Electivef 



15 



3(3-0) 
Kl-0) 
2(2-0) 
3(3-0) 
6( - ) 



Total 



15 



Total 



15 



Summary. — Men: Physical education, two years required; military science, 4 hours; 
business administration courses, 55 hours; other prescribed courses, 35 hours; option, 9 
hours; electives, 21 hours: total, 124 hours. Women: The same, except no military science; 
total, 120 hours. 

* Eight hours of physical or biological science are to be elected in this curriculum, if pos- 
sible in the freshman year. Subject to any prerequisites, chemistry, physics, botany, zoology, 
entomology, and geology are available. 

If Chemistry I, Chem. 101, is taken, Chemistry II Rec, Chem. 103, is required also. 
The nine-hour option is selected from a modern language, or a single department in a 
natural science. Students who present one and one-half units of high-school algebra may 
replace General Algebra, Math. 108, by College Algebra, Math. 104. 

t Attention is called to the list of special electives for the curriculum in business 
administration, ante. 



174 



Kansas State College 



Groups of Electives and Options for Students in the 
Division of General Science 

At least eight hours in any new field are usually required, but a smaller 
number will be accepted in a field already entered upon. In a modern lan- 
guage a student must reach a point equivalent to that obtained by college 
courses aggregating nine hours. Any student desiring to major in a certain 
field should confer in the sophomore year with the head of the department in 
which most of the work is given. 

1. English Language 

Students majoring in English should elect English 219 and 220, and twelve to twenty ad- 
ditional hours of English language and literature, under the guidance of the head of the 
department. Twelve hours of a modern foreign language is strongly recommended. 

Engineering English, Engl. 110 2(2-0) Adv. Composition II, Engl. 220... 3(3-0) 

Coml. Correspondence, Engl. 122.. 3(3-0) Adv. Prob. in Coml. Correspond- 

Writ. and Oral Salesmanship, Engl. ence, Engl. 223 3(3-0) 

123 3(3-0) Short Story I, Engl. 228. 3(3-0) 

Agricultural English, Engl. 137 3(3-0) Short Story II, Engl. 230 3(3-0) 

Technical Writing, Engl. 207 2(2-0) Oral English, Engl. 232 3(3-0) 

Adv. Composition I, Engl. 219 3(3-0) Advanced Grammar, Engl. 243 3(3-0) 



2. English Literature 



Chaucer, Engl. 260 3(3-0) 

English Bible, Engl. 271 3(3-0) 

Shakespearean Drama I, Engl. 273, 3(3-0) 
Wordsworth, Shelley, and Keats, 

Engl. 278 3(3-0) 

World Classics I, Engl. 280 3(3-0) 

Contemporarv Fiction, Engl. 283.. 3(3-0) 

Novel I, Engl. 286 3(3-0) 

English Survey I, Engl. 288 2(2-0) 

American Literature, Engl. 175.... 3(3-0) 
Literature of the Middle West, 

Engl. 268 3(3-0) 



Milton and the Puritan Revolt, 

Engl. 262 3(3-0) 

American Survey, Engl. 265 2(2-0) 

Shakespearean Drama II, Engl. 274, 3(3-0) 
English Essavists of the Eighteenth 

and Nineteenth Cent., Engl. 276, 3(3-0) 

World Classics II, Engl. 281 3(3-0) 

Contemporary Drama, Engl. 284.. 3(3-0) 

Novel II, Engl. 287 3(3-0) 

English Survey II, Engl. 290 2(2-0) 

Browning and Tennyson, Engl. 293, 3(3-0) 

Contemporary Poetry, Engl. 297. . . 3(3-0) 



German I, Mod. Lang. 101. . , 
German II, Mod. Lang. 102. , 
German III, Mod. Lang. 111. 
German IV, Mod. Lang. 112, 



3. German 

3(3-0) Scientific German, Mod. Lang. 137, 4(4-0) 

3(3-0) Schiller, Mod. Lang. 209 3(3-0) 

3(3-0) Goethe, Mod. Lang. 213 3(3-0) 

3(3-0) 19th Cent. German Drama, Mod. 

Lang. 215 3(3-0) 



4. French and Spanish 

Students who wish to major in Romance Languages should take such of the following 
courses as they have not already pursued: In French, courses 151, 152, 161, 162, and 261; 
in Spanish, courses 176, 177, 180, 181, 275, and 280. In each group the courses should be 
taken approximately in the order here shown and always in conformity with requirements as 
to prerequisites. 



French I, Mod. Lang. 151 

French II, Mod. Lang. 152 

French III, Mod. Lang. 161 

French IV, Mod. Lang. 162 

French Drama I, Mod. Lang. 257, 

French Drama II, Mod. Lang. 258, 

French Comp. and Conv., Mod. 

Lang. 261 



3(3-0) Spanish I, Mod. Lang. 176 

3(3-0) Spanish II, Mod. Lang. 177 

3(3-0) Spanish III, Mod. Lang. 180 

3(3-0) Spanish IV, Mod. Lang. 181 

3(3-0) Spanish Novel, Mod. Lang. 275... 

3(3-0) Spanish Drama, Mod. Lang. 280.. 

Spanish Comp. and Conv., Mod. 

3(3-0) Lang. 194 



3(3-0) 
3(3-0) 
3(3-0) 
3(3-0) 
3(3-0) 
3(3-0) 

3(3-0) 



5. Mathematics 



Students continuing work in mathematics beyond trigonometry are advised to take courses 
in the following order: Math. 110, 114, 115, 201, 210, 213, and 216, and in any event 
strictly in accordance with the stated prerequisites. 

Plane Anal. Geometry, Math. 110, 4(4-0) Theory of Statistics, Math. 203... 3(3-0) 

Calculus I, Math. 114 4(4-0) Advanced Calculus I, Math. 210.. 3(3-0) 

Calculus II, Math. 115 4(4-0) Theory of Equations, Math. 216.. 3(3-0) 

Differential Equations, Math. 201, 3(3-0) Modern Plane Geometry, Math. 225, 3(3-0) 

Advanced Calculus II, Math. 213.. 3(3-0) Vector Analysis, Math. 230 3(3-0) 

Higher Algebra, Math. 202 3(3-0) Fourier Series, Math. 223 3(3-0) 



Division of General Science 175 

6. Inorganic and Physical Chemistry 

Students desiring extensive training in chemistry are advised to take the curriculum in 
industrial chemistry, supplementing the required work by electives chosen with the advice of 
the head of the department. Those who wish to prepare for teaching chemistry in high 
schools, in addition to Chem. 101, 103, and 104, should elect Chem. 218 and 219, and Chem. 
207, 241, and 206. Math. 110, 114, and 115 are very desirable, and Phys. 102 and 103, 
or 105 and 106, are essential. 

Adv. Inorg. Chemistrv, Chem. 207, 3(3-0) Ind. Electrochem, Chem. 205 2(2-0) 

Inorg. Chem. Tech., Chem. 203... 5(3-6) Physical Chem. II, Chem. 272 3(3-0) 

Org. Chem. Tech., Chem. 212 3(3-0) Colloid Chem., Chem. 213 2(2-0) 

Physical Chemistrv I, Chem. 206.. 5(3-6) Chemical Thermodyn., Chem. 215, 3(3-0) 

Surf. Tension and Rel. Phenomena, Theoret. Electrochem., Chem. 216, 3(3-0) 

Chem. 209 2(2-0) Electrochemistry Lab., Chem. 217, 2(0-6) 

Selected Topics in Inorg. Chemis- 
try, Chem. 271 2(2-0) 

7. Organic and Physiological Chemistry 

Preparation for work in biological chemistry or nutrition should include courses Chem. 101, 
103, 104, 121, 241, 206, 231, 237, and 239; Phys. 102 and 103; Zool. 105 and 235; and 
Bact. 101. 

Organic Chemistry I, Chem. 218. . . 4(2-6) Organic Chemistry II, Chem. 219. . 4(2-6) 

Stereoisomeric and Tautomeric 

Compounds, Chem. 225 2(2-0) 

Organic Preparations, Chem. 223.. 5(0-15) Carbocyclic and Heterocyclic Com- 
pounds, Chem. 226 2(2-0) 

Physiological Chem., Chem. 231... 5(3-6) Qual. Org. Analysis, Chem. 221... 3(1-6) 
Pathological Chem., Chem. 235... 2(2-0) Laboratorv Technique in Animal 
Biochemical Analysis, Chem. 237.. 2(0-6) Nutrition, Chem. 239 2(0-6) 

8. Analytical Chemistry 

After completing Chem. 241 or 250 and 251, the student may take one or more courses in 
several different fields of analysis, such as soils, fertilizers, gases, feeds, foods, dairy prod- 
ucts, etc. 

Adv. Qual. Analysis, Chem. 240... 3(1-6) Quan. Analvsis, Chem. 241 5(1-12) 

Quan. Analysis A, Chem. 250 3(1-6) Quan. Analysis B, Chem. 251 3(1-6) 

9. Physics 

Students who expect to teach physics in high schools should complete a course in college 
physics and at least ten hours additional as advised by the head of the department. Students 
who wish to major in physics may, with the advice of the major instructor, choose from 
Phys. 227, 228, 238, 239, 240, 243, 244, 253, 254, and 270. Math. 110, 114, and 115 are 
desirable or necessary for the advanced courses. Phys. 136, 141, 146, and 151 are available 
for commerce or journalism students. 

Household Physics, Ph V s. 109 4(3-3) Heat, Phys. 238 3(3-0) 

Descriptive Physics, Phys. 136 3(3-0) Heat Laboratorv, Phys. 239 1(0-3) 

Descriptive Astronomy, Phys. 141, 3(3-0) Sound, Phys. 240 3(3-0) 

Meteorology, Phys. 146 3(3-0) Light, Phys. 243 3(3-0) 

Photography, Phys. 151 2(1-3) Light Laboratorv, Phvs. 244 1(0-3) 

Lab. Tech. and App., Phys. 201... 2(0-6) Elec. and Magnetism, Phys. 253... 2(2-0) 

Applied X-ravs. Phvs. 205 3(2-3) Elec. and Magnetism Lab., Phys. 

Astronomy, Phvs. 210 3(3-0) 254 1(0-3) 

Geophysics I, Ph V s. 217 3(3-0) Elec. Oscill. and Waves, Phys. 265, 3(3-0) 

Geophysics II, Phys. 218 3(1-6) Elec. Oscill. and Waves Lab., Phys. 

Applied Spectroscopy, Phys. 220. . 3(2-3) 266 2(0-6) 

Mechanics, Phys. 227 3(3-0) Electron Optics, Phys. 268 2(2-0) 

Mechanics Laboratory, Phys. 228. . 1(0-3) Atomic Physics, Phys. 270 3(3-0) 

Problems in Physics, Phys. 297. . . . Cr. Ar. 

10. Microbiology 

Bact. 101 may be followed in order by 202, 204, 206, 229, 222, and 225. 

Gen. Microbiology, Bact. 101 3(1-6) Dairy Bacteriology, Bact. 211 3(1-6) 

Path. Bacteriology I, Bact. Ill 4(2-6) Poultry Sanitation, Bact. 218 3(2-3) 

Path. Bacteriology II, Bact. 116... 4(2-6) Phvsiol. of Microorg., Bact. 222... 3(3-0) 

Soil Microbiol., Bact. 202 3(3-0) Bact. Technic, Bact. 225 3(0-9) 

Soil Microbiol. Lab., Bact. 204 2(0-6) Adv. Serology, Bact. 229 5(3-6) 

Hyg. Bacteriology, Bact. 206 4(2-6) 



176 



Kansas State College 



11. Botany 

Bot. 101 and 105 are prerequisites to all other courses, excepting 110. Students specializing 
in plant diseases should take, in order, Bot. 2)05, 202, and 232 ; those in plant physiology, 
Bot. 208, 210, and 232 ; those in taxonomy and ecology, Bot. 225, 228 or 234 and 232. For 
general training, all are available if the prerequisites have been taken. 

General Botany I, Bot. 101 3(1-6) Plant Histology, Bot. 216 3(1-6) 

General Botany II, Bot. 105 3(1-6) Tax. Bot. of Flowering Plants, Bot 

Nat. and Dev. of Plants, Bot. 110, 3(3-0) 225 

Fruit Crop Diseases, Bot. 202 2(1-3) Plant Ecology, Bot. 228 



Plant Pathology I, Bot. 205. 
Morph. of the Fungi, Bot. 206. 
Plant Phvsiologv I. Bot. 208. . , 
Plant Physiology II, Bot. 210.. 



3(1-6) Problems in Botany, Bot. 232 

3(1-6) Field Crop Diseases, Bot. 241., 

3(3-0) Literature of Botany, Bot. 266. 

3(1-6) Plant Cytology, Bot. 268 



3(1-6) 
2(2-0) 
Cr. Ar. 
3(1-6) 
2(2-0) 
3(1-6) 



12. Zoology 

A student who wishes to major in zoology should, in connection with the required work in 
this field or after completing it, elect from the courses listed below subjects varying with his 
special interest, such as parasitology, embryology, genetics, etc. Consult the head of the 
department. 

Human Phvsiologv, Zool. 235 4(3-3) 

Cvtology, Zool. 214 4(2-6) 

Parasitology, Zool. 208 3(2-3) 

Comp. and Human Neur., Zool. 250, 3(2-3) 

Taxonomy of Parasites, Zool. 240. . 2(1-3) 

Field Zoology, Zool. 205 3(1-6) 

Heredity and Eugenics, Zool. 216.. 2(2-0) 

Problems in Zoology, Zool. 203. . . . Cr. Ar. 



Comp. Anat. of Vertebs., Zool. 246, 4(2-6) 
Evol. and Heredity, Zodl. 

217 3(2-3) or 4(2-6) 

Embryology, Zool. 219 4(3-3) 

Adv. Embryology, Zool. 220 4(2-6) 

Human Parasitology, Zool. 218 3(3-0) 

Zoological Technic, Zool. 206 1 or 2( - ) 

Zool. and Ent. Seminar, Zool. 225, 1(1-0) 
Genetics Seminar, Zool. 207 1(1-0) 



13. Geology 

The basic courses are Geol. 103, 203, and 209. Students who expect to major in geology 
should take these three courses as early in their collegiate careers as possible. 



Engineering Geology, Geol. 102. . . . 4(3-3) 

Economic Geology, Geol. 207 4(3-3) 

Crystal, and Mineralogy, Geol. 209, 4(2-6") 

Invert. Paleontology, Geol. 220 4(3-3) 

Prin. of Geography, Geol. 240 3(3-0) 

Optical Mineralogy, Geol. 234 4(2-6) 



General Geology, Geol. 103... 
Historical Geology, Geol. 203. 
Physiographic Geol., Geol. 110 
Structural Geology, Geol. 215. 
Vert. Paleontology, Geol. 955. 
Field Meth. in Geology, Geol. 230, 



3(3-0) 
4(3-3) 
3(3-0) 
4(3-3) 
3(3-0) 
3(1-6) 



Students majoring in entomolog 
211, 212, 231. 216, 217, 218, 226, 

Gen. Entomology, Ent. 101 

Gen. Econ. Entomology, Ent. 203 
Extl. Insect Morphology, Ent. 211 
Intl. Insect Morphology, Ent. 212 
Ent. and Zool. Literature, Ent. 231 
Medical Entomology, Ent. 226... 
Advanced Apiculture I, Ent. 229., 
Advanced Apiculture II, Ent. 230 



14. Entomology 

y, with due regard for prerequisites, should take Ent. 203, 
206, 221, and 238, and preferably in this order. 

3(3-0) Prin. of Taxonomy, Ent. 216 1(1-0) 

3(2-3) Taxonomy of Insects I, Ent. 217. . . 2(0-6) 

3(1-6) Taxonomy of Insects II, Ent. 218.. 3(0-9) 

3(0-9) Adv. Gen. Entomology, Ent. 221.. 3(3-0) 

2(2-0) Staple Crop Entomology, Ent. 206, 3(2-3) 

3(2-3) Problems in Entomology, Ent. 238, Cr. Ar. 

3(2-3) General Apiculture, Ent. 208 3(2-3) 

3(2-3) Inset Physiology, Ent. 240 3(3-0) 



15. History, Government, and Law 

To prepare for teaching history in high school the student should have at least 
hours of college history following two years of history in high school or its equivalent 
lege. The advice of the head of the department should be followed in each case. 



Ancient Civilizations, Hist. 101 3(3-0) 

English History, Hist. 121 3(3-0) 

American History I, Hist. 201 3(3-0) 

American History II, Hist. 202 3(3-0) 

American Agr'l History, Hist. 204. . 3(3-0) 

Modern Europe I, Hist. 115 3(3-0) 

Far East, Hist. 236 3(3-0) 

Hist, of Com. and Ind., Hist. 110, 3(3-0) 

Am. Political Parties, Hist. 206 2(2-0) 

Immig. and Intern'l Rel., Hist. 228, 2(2-0) 

Am. Government, Hist. 151 3(3-0) 

Am. Nat'l Government, Hist. 152.. 3(3-0) 

Comp. Government, Hist. 252 2(2-0) 

Farm Law, Hist. 175 2(2-0) 

Business Law I, Hist. 163 3(3-0) 

Land Law, Hist. 276 2(2-0) 



Medieval Europe, Hist. 102 

Current History, Hist. 126 

Am. Indust. History, Hist. 105... 
American History III, Hist. 203. 

Latin America, Hist. 208 

Modern Europe II, Hist. 223 

20th Century Europe, Hist. 234. 

British Empire, Hist. 226 

History of the Home, Hist. 225. 

International Law, Hist. 256 

Gov't and Business, Hist. 260 
Am. State Government, Hist. 153. 
History of Religions, Hist. 231... 
Business Law II, Hist. 164.... 
International Law, Hist. 256.... 



fifteen 
in col- 

3(3-0) 
1(1-0) 
3(3-0) 
3(3-0) 
3(3-0) 
3(3-0) 
3(3-0) 
2(2-0) 
3(3-0) 
2(2-0) 
2(2-0) 
3(3-0) 
2(2-0) 
3(3-0) 
2(2-0) 



Division of General Science 



177 



16. Economics and Sociology 



Some of the subjects in this list are required 
and the others are available as electives if prereq 

Economics I, Econ. 101 3(3-0) 

Economics II, Econ. 104 3(3-0) 

Money and Banking, Econ. 116 3(3-0) 

Business Management, Econ. 126.. 2(2-0) 

Economic Systems, Econ. 210 2(2-0) 

Public Finance, Econ. 214 3(3-0) 

Bus. Org. and Finance, Econ. 215, 3(3-0) 

Investments, Econ. 222 3(3-0) 

Credits and Collections, Econ. 223, 2(2-0) 

International Trade, Econ. 224 2(2-0) 

Prin. of Transportation, Econ. 230, 3(3-0) 



in the several curriculums of the institution, 
uisites have been satisfied. 

Labor Economics, Econ. 234 3(3-0) 

Property Insurance, Econ. 242.... 2(2-0) 

Life Insurance, Econ. 244 2(2-0) 

Marketing, Econ. 246 3(3-0) 

Problems in Economics, Econ. 248, Cr. Ar. 

Sociology, Econ. 151 3(3-0) 

Social Pathology, Econ. 258 3(3-0) 

Com. Org. and Lead., Econ. 267.. 3(3-0) 

Adv. Sociology, Econ. 273 3(3-0) 

Hist. Soc. Thought. Econ. 277 3(3-0) 

Problems in Sociology, Econ. 279. . Cr. Ar. 



Accounting I, Econ. 133 

Accounting II, Econ. 134 

Valuation Accounting, Econ. 280. . . 
Advanced Accounting, Econ. 281.. 
Institutional Accounting, Econ. 284, 



17. Accounting 

3(2-3) Tax Accounting, Econ. 286 3(3-0) 

3(2-3) Cost Accounting, Econ. 287 3(3-0) 

3(3-0) Adv. Cost Accounting, Econ. 288.. 2(2-0) 

3(3-0) Government Accounting, Econ. 289, 2(2-0) 

2(2-0) Auditing, Econ. 290 2(2-0) 



18. Education and Psychology 

Students desiring to qualify for the state teacher's certificate based on graduation from 
a four-year curriculum should take Educ. 184 and Educ. 109, 163, and 210. Advice should 
be obtained from the head of the Department of Education in respect to additional courses 
necessary. See, also, "Education" in this catalogue for information concerning certificates. 



Gen. Psvchologv, Educ. 184 3(3-0) 

Educational Psvchology, Educ. 109, 3(3-0) 
Methods of Teaching, Educ. 111.. 3(3-0) 
Meth. of Teaching Home Econom- 
ics, Educ. 132 3(3-0) 

Meth. of Teach. Agric, Educ. 136, 3(3-0) 
Teach. Participation in High School, 

Educ. 163 1(1-0) to 4(4-0) 

Extracur. Activities, Educ. 202 3(3-0) 

Educ. Admin., Educ. 210 3(3-0) 

Educ. Measurements, Educ. 212... 3(3-0) 
Statis. Meth. Applied to Education, 

Educ. 223 3(3-0) 



Principles of Secondarv Education, 

Educ. 236 3(3-0) 

Educ. Sociology, Educ. 239 3(3-0) 

Psychology of Childhood and Ado- 
lescence, Educ. 250 3(3-0) 

Abnormal Psvchology, Educ. 254.. 3(3-0) 

Adv. Gen. Psychology, Educ. 257.. 3(3-0) 

Experimental Psvchologv, Educ. 259, 3(3-0) 

Mental Tests, Educ. 260 3(3-0) 

Psvc. of Excep. Children, Educ. 266, 3(3-0) 

Animal Psvchologv, Educ. 269 3(3-0) 

Social Psvchologv, Educ. 270 3(3-0) 

Psvchology of Art, Educ. 276 3(3-0) 



20. Industrial Journalism 



While those who wish to give much attention to journalism will choose the curriculum in 
industrial journalism, many in other curriculums desire some training in this field. Selection 
from the following list may be made insofar as the prerequisites permit. 



Jour. Vocations, Ind. Jour. 140 2(2-0) 

Elem. Journalism, Ind. Jour. 152.. 3(3-0) 

Radio Writing, Ind. Jour. 162 2(2-0) 

Industrial Writing, Ind. Jour. 164.. 3(3-0) 

Ind. Feat. Writing, Ind. Jour. 167. . 2(2-0) 

Jour, for Women, Ind. Jour. 172.. 2(2-0) 

Prin. of Advertising, Ind. Jour. 178, 4(4-0) 

Rural Press, Ind. Jour. 181 2(2-0) 



News Bureau Methods, Ind. Jour. 

183 2(2-0) 

Contem. Thought, Ind. Jour. 255.. 3(3-0) 

Materials of Jour., Ind. Jour. 265, 2(2-0) 

Magazine Features, Ind. Jour. 270, 2(2-0) 

Jour. Surveys, Ind. Jour. 278 2(0-6) 

Current Periodicals, Ind. Jour. 287, 3(3-0) 



23. Music 

Students in the various curriculums are permitted to study theoretical or applied music, but 
the acceptability for elective credit of work in voice or instrumental music is contingent upon 
the attainmjent of an effective degree of proficiency. 

APPLIED MUSIC 



Instrument, Mus. 153 0-4 hours 

Voice, Mus. 156 0-4 hours 

Violin, Mus. 158 0-4 hours 

Piano, Mus. 161 0-4 hours 

Violoncello, Mus. 163 0-4 hours 



Double Bass, Mus. 167 0-4 hours 

Organ, Mus. 172 0-4 hours 

Choral Ens^mb'e, Mus. 194 i/ o f0-2) 

Orchestra, Mus. 195 V 2 (0-2) 

Band, Mus. 198 y 2 (0-2) 



THEORETICAL MUSIC 



Harmony I, Mus. 101 2(2-0) 

Harmony HI, Mus. 103 2(2-0) 

Counterpoint, Mus. 108A 2(2-0) 

Hist, and Apprec. of Music I, Mus. 

130 2(2-0) 

School Music I, Mus. 138 2(2-0) 

Inst, and Orchest., Mus. 136 3(3-0) 

12—6529 



Harmony II, Mus. 102 2(2-0) 

Harmony IV, Mus. 104 2(2-0) 

Mus. Form and Analysis, Mus. Ill, 1(1-0) 
Hist, and Apprec. of Music II, Mus. 

131 2(2-0) 

School Music II. Mus. 139 2(2-0) 

School Music III, Mus. 143 2(2-0) 



178 



Kansas State College 



25. Military Science and Tactics 

Men who have completed the basic course in infantry may elect the advanced course if 
approved by the dean and the head of the Department of Military Science and Tactics. 

Infantry V, Mil. Sc. 109 3(2-3) Infantry VII, Mil. Sc. Ill 3(2-3) 

Infantry VI, Mil. Sc. 110 3(2-3) Infantry VIII, Mil. Sc. 112 3(2-3) 



26. Physical Education and Athletics 

In connection with the required work or after its completion, students may elect courses 
in physical education. The courses listed below, and others on the advice of the head of the 
department, are available. 

FOR MEN 



Intro, to Phys. Ed., Phys. Ed. 107, 
First Aid and Massage, Phys. Ed. 

113A 

Personal Hygiene, Phys. Ed. 119.. 

Swimming M, Phys. Ed. 120 

Physiol, of Exercise, Phys. Ed. 123, 
Phys. Diag. and Pres., Phys. Ed. 

124A 

Football, Phys. Ed. 126 

Baseball, Phys. Ed. 133 

Phys. Ed. Act. I, Phys. Ed. 137. . . 
Phys. Ed. Act. II, Phys. Ed. 138. . 
Phys. Ed. Act. Ill, Phys. Ed. 139, 
Phys. Ed. Act. IV, Phys. Ed. 140, 



1(1-0) 

3(3-0) 
2(2-0) 
1(0-3) 
2(2-0) 

3(3-0) 
2(1-3) 
2(1-3) 
KO-3) 
2(0-6) 
2(0-6) 
1(0-3) 



Track and Field Spts., Phys. Ed. 

140A 

Kinesiology, Phys. Ed. 141B 

Pub. Sch. Prog, in Phys. Ed., Phys. 

Ed. 142 

Nat. and Fen. of Play, Phys. Ed. 

145 

Community Hygiene, Phys. Ed. 147, 
Teaching Health, Phys. Ed. 149. . . 
Community Recreation, Phys. Ed. 

203 



2(1-3) 
3(3-0) 

2(2-0) 

2(2-0) 
2(2-0) 
2(2-0) 

2(2-0) 



FOR WOMEN 



The following courses are available after completing the two years of required work 



Fundamental Rhythms, Phys. Ed. 

155 1(0-3) 

Gen. Tech. I, Phys. Ed. 157A 2(1-3) 

Gen. Tech. II, Phys. Ed. 157B 2(1-3) 

Gen. Tech. Ill, Phys. Ed. 157C... 2(1-3) 

Gen. Tech. IV, Phys. Ed. 157D... 2(1-3) 

Gen. Tech. V, Phys. Ed. 157E 2(0-6) 

Gen. Tech. VI, Phys. Ed. 157F... 2(1-3) 



Gen. Tech. VII, Phys. Ed. 157G.. 
Gen. Tech. VIII, Phys. Ed. 157H, 
Prin. Health Educ, Phys. Ed. 163, 
Plavgr. Man. and Games, Phys. 

Ed. 182A 

Adult Recreation, Phys. Ed. 183.. 
Teach, and Adapt, of Phys. Ed., 

Phys. Ed. 188 

Hist, and Prin. of Phys. Ed., Phvs. 

Ed. 192 .' 



2(1-3) 
2(1-3) 
3(3-0) 

2(1-3) 
2(2-0) 

3(3-0) 

3(3-0) 



27. Public Speaking 



Courses covering various aspects of public 

sites. The head of the department should be 

Extern. Speech I, Pub. Spk. 106... 2(2-0) 

Oral Interpretation, Pub. Spk. 101, 2(2-0) 

Pari. Proced., Pub. Spk. 126 1(1-0) 

Dramatic Produc. I, Pub. Spk. 130, 2(2-0) 

Argum. and Debate, Pub. Spk. 121, 2(2-0) 



speech are open after completing any prerequi- 
consulted for advice as to the individual needs. 
Extern. Speech II, Pub. Spk. 108.. 2(2-0) 
Dramatic Reading, Pub. Spk. 102.. 2(2-0) 
Dramatic Produc. II, Pub. Spk. 135, 2(2-0) 
Advanced Debate, Pub. Spk. 222.. 2(2-0) 
Public Program, Pub. Spk. 225... 2(2-0) 



30. Social Science 

(Political and Social History, Government, Economics, and Sociology.) 

In the curriculum in industrial journalism students are required to •elect ten hours in a 
social science option. The following list includes some subjects, and many more are offered by 
the several departments. See groups 15 and 16. 



American History I, Hist. 201 3(3-0) 

Am. Pol. Parties, Hist. 206 2(2-0) 

Am. Natl. Government, Hist. 152.. 3(3-0) 

Latin America, Hist. 208 3(3-0) 

Money and Banking, Econ. 116... 3(3-0) 

Business Finance, Econ. 217 3(3-0) 

Markt. of Farm Prod., Econ. 202, 3(3-0) 

Agric. Land Probs., Econ. 218 3(3-0) 

Labor Economics, Econ. 234 3(3-0) 



American History II, Hist. 202... 
American History III, Hist. 203.. 
Am. State Government, Hist. 153. 

Modern Europe I, Hist. 115 

Modern Europe II. Hist. 223 

English History, Hist. 121 

Economics I, Econ. 101 

Public Finance, Econ. 214 

Sociology, Econ. 151 



3(3-0) 
3(3-0) 
3(3-0) 
3(3-0) 
3(3-0) 
3(3-0) 
3(3-0) 
3(3-0) 
3(3-0) 



Division of General Science 



179 



31. Applied Science 

Students in the curriculum of industrial journalism who do not wish to elect subjects 
directly related to a single industry are permitted to elect sciences that support industries 
and subjects that involve applications of the sciences, insofar as they have satisfied re- 
quirements as to prerequisites. 



Seed Iden. and Weed Cont., Agron. 

105 2(1-3) 

Soils, Agron. 130 4(3-3) 

General Microbiology, Bact. 101.. 3(1-6) 

Hygienic Bacteriology, Bact. 206.. 4(2-6) 

General Botany I, Bot. 101 3(1-6) 

General Botany II, Bot. 105 3(1-6) 

Nature and Dev. of Plants, Bot. 

110 3(3-0) 

Fruit Crop Diseases, Bot. 202 2(1-3) 

Plant Pathology I, Bot. 205 2(1-3) 

Plant Ecology, Bot. 228 2(2-0) 

Field Crop Diseases, Bot. 241 3(1-6) 

Gen. Org. Chemistry, Chem. 122. .. 5(3-6) 

Dairy Chemistry, Chem. 254 3(1-6) 

Gen. Entomology, Ent. 101 3(3-0) 

Hort. Entomology, Ent. 201 2(2-0) 

Gen. Economic Ent., Ent, 203 3(2-3) 

Staple Crop Ent., Ent. 206 3(2-3) 

General Apiculture, Ent. 208 3(2-3) 

Human Nutrition, Food and Nutr. 

112 3(3-0) 

Ap. Nutrition, Food and Nutr. 121, 2(2-0) 



General Geology, Geol. 103 3(3-0) 

Physiographic Geol., Geol. 110 3(3-0) 

Principles of Geography, Geol. 140, 3(3-0) 

Historical Geology, Geol. 203 4(3-3) 

Economic Geology, Geol. 207 4(3-3) 

Crystal, and Mineralogy, Geol. 209, 4(2-6) 

Sedimentary Petrology, Geol. 236.. 5(3-6) 

Vertebrate Paleontology, Geol. 255, 3(3-0) 

Micropaleontology, Geol. 256 3(1-6) 

El. of Horticulture, Hort. 107 3(2-3) 

Small Fruits, Hort. 110 2(2-0) 

Farm Forestry, Hort. 114 3(2-3) 

Landscape Gardening I, Hort. 125, 3(3-0) 

Household Physics, Phys. 109 4(3-3) 

Descriptive Physics, Phys. 136 3(3-0) 

Descriptive Astronomy, Phys. 141, 3(3-0) 

Meteorology, Phys. 146 3(3-0) 

Photography, Phys. 151 2(1-3) 

General Zoology, Zool. 105 5(3-6) 

Parasitology, Zool. 208 3(2-3) 

Embryology, Zool. 219 4(3-3) 

Endocrinology, Zool. 247 3(3-0) 



32. Home Economics 

This group is suggested for women in the curriculum in industrial journalism. It states 
the fundamental subjects in the three lines, food, clothing, and applied art. The required 
option related to an industry may be satisfied by fifteen hours in one or more of these lines. 
Additional subjects in each line are described in the department sections of the catalogue. 
Prerequisites count on the group requirement. 



Elementary Design I, Art 101A. . . 2(0-6) 

Principles of Art I, Art 124 3(3-0) 

Principles of Art II, Art 125 3(3-0) 

Costume Design I, Art 130 2(0-6) 

Child Guidance, Child Welf. 201.. 3(1-6) 

The Family, Child Welf. 216 2(2-0) 

Clothing for the Ind., Clo. and 

Text, 103 4(1-9) 

Foods I, Food and Nutr. 102 5(3-6) 



Applied Nutrition, Food and 

Nutr. 121 2(2-0) 

The House, Household Econ. 107, 3(2-3) 
Family Finance, Household Econ. 

263 2(2-0) 

Econ. of Household, Household 

Econ. 265 2(2-0) 

Consumer Buying, Household Econ. 

270 2(2-0) 



35. Agriculture 

This group, compiled for the use of young men who elect the agriculture option in con- 
nection with their work in industrial journalism, gives the basic subjects in some agricultural 
lines. Subjects for which these are prerequisite are also acceptable. See the expositions of the 
work of the several departments in the Division of Agriculture. 

Farm Crops, Agron. 101 4(2-6) Field Crop Diseases, Bot. 241 3(1-6) 

Soils, Agron. 130 4(3-3) Gen. Org. Chemistry, Chem. 122.. 5(3-6) 

El. of An. Husb., An. Husb. 125.. 3(2-4) El. of Dairying, Dairy Husb. 101, 3(2-3) 

Prin. of Feeding, An. Husb. 152... 3(3-0) Dairy Cattle Judging, Dairy Husb. 



Genetics, An. Husb. 221. 
General Botany I, Bot. 101., 
General Botany II, Bot. 105 . 
Plant Pathology I, Bot. 205. 



3(3-0) 
3(1-6) 
3(1-6) 
3(1-6) 



104 



El. of Horticulture, Hort. 107 

Farm Poultry Prod., Poult. Husb. 
101 



1(0-3) 
3(2-3) 

2(1-3) 



180 



Kansas State College 



36. Drawing and Art 



Students in industrial journalism, 
from this group in order to fulfill the 

Freehand Drawing I, Arch. 112... 
Freehand Drawing II, Arch. 113.. 
Pen. Rend, and Sketch., Arch. 116, 
Still-Life Drawing, Arch. 117.... 

Water Color I, Arch. 118 

Water Color II, Arch. 119 

Life Drawing I, Arch. 121 

Life Drawing II, Arch. 123 

Domestic Architecture, Arch. 124.. 

Apprec. of Arch., Arch. 125 

Clay Modeling, Arch. 133 

Pen and Ink Drawing, Arch. 134.. 

Block Prints, Arch. 137 

Commercial Illus. I, Arch. 165. . . . 
Commercial Illus. II, Arch. 170... 
Hist. Paint, and Sculp., Arch. 179, 
Adv. Freehand Drawing, Arch. 201, 

Etching, Arch. 217 

Oil Painting, Arch. 230 

Elementary Design I, Art 101 A. . . 
Elementary Design II, Art 101B... 



with due regard for prerequisites, may elect fifteen hours 
requirement in respect to subjects related to an industry. 



2(0-6) 
2(0-6) 
2(0-6) 
2(0-6) 
2(0-6) 
2(0-6) 
2(0-6) 
2(0-6) 
2(2-0) 
3(3-0) 
2(0-6) 
2(0-6) 
2(0-6) 
2(0-6) 
2(0-6) 
3(3-0) 

2-5 hrs. 
2(0-6) 

2-5 hrs. 
2(0-6) 
2(0-6) 



Design in Crafts, Art 102 2(0-6) 

Intermediate Design, Art 103 2(0-6) 

Advanced Design, Art 105 2(0-6) 

Art of Southwest Indians, Art 111. . 1(1-0) 

Interior Decoration I, Art. 113 2(0-6) 



Interior Decoration II, Art 115.. 
Interior Decoration III, Art 117. 

Drawing I, Art 120 

Principles of Art I, Art 124 

Principles of Art II, Art 126 

Lettering, Art 127 

Costume Design I, Art 130 

Costume Design II, Art 134, 



2(0-6) 
2(0-6) 
2(0-6) 
3(3-0) 
3(3-0) 
2(0-6) 
2(0-6) 
2(0-6) 

Costume Design III, Art 138 2(0-6) 

Costume Illustration, Art 139 2(0-6) 

Problems in Design, Art 220 2(0-6) 

Problems in Interior Decoration, 

Art 232 2(0-6) 

Historic Textiles Design, Art 233.. 2(0-6) 
Problems in Costume Design, Art 

235 2(0-6) 



37. Manual and Industrial Arts 



Students preparing to teach industrial arts will require credit in at least fifteen hours in 
that line. Fifteen hours may also be chosen from the group by students in industrial jour- 
nalism in satisfaction of the option related to an industry. Prerequisites must be observed. 



Farm Buildings, Agric. Engr. 101.. 3(2-3) 

Farm Machinery, Agric. Engr. 108, 3(2-3) 
Gas Eng. and Tract., Agric. Engr. 

130 3(2-3) 

Surveying I, Civ. Engr. 102 2(0-6) 

Engr. Drawing. Mach. Des. 101... 2(0-6) 

Des. Geom., Mach Des. 106 2(0-6) 

Mach. Drawing I, Mach. Des. Ill, 2(0-6) 

Engr. Woodwork, Shop 101 1(0-3) 

Ele. Crafts for Teachers, Shop 117, 2(0-6) 

Reed Furn. Const., Shop 119 2(0-6) 

Woodwork I, Shop 120 2(0-6) 

Woodwork II, Shop 125 2(0-6) 

Woodwork III, Shop 130 2(0-6) 

Woodturning, Shop 135 2(0-6) 



Woodwork IV, Shop 140 2(0-6) 

Farm Carpentry I, Shop 147 3(1-6) 

Forging, Shop 150 1(0-3) 

Farm Blacksmithing I, Shop 157.. 1(0-3) 

Farm Blacksmithing II, Shop 158, 1(0-3) 

Foundry Production, Shop 161 1(0-3) 

Metallurgy, Shop 165 2(2-0) 

Metallography I, Shop 167 1(0-3) 

Machine Tool Work I, Shop 170.. 2(0-6) 

Sheet Metal Work, Shop 173 2(0-6) 

Farm Shop Methods, Shop 175 3(1-6) 

Machine Tool Work II. Shop 192.. 2(0-6) 

Machine Tool Work III, Shop 193, 1(0-3) 

Adv. Shop Practice, Shop 261 Cr. Ar. 



38. Printing 

Students in industrial journalism may elect fifteen hours from this group in order to ful- 
fill the requirement in respect to subjects related to an industry, or they may elect courses 
in this group to satisfy elective requirements, choosing not fewer than eight hours. 

Ad Comp. I, Ind. Jour. 108 2(0-6) Job Comp. II, Ind. Jour. 118 2(0-6) 

Ad Comp. II, Ind. Jour. Ill 2(0-6) Job Comp. Ill, Ind. Jour. 120 2(0-6) 

Ad Comp. Ill, Ind. Jour. 112 2(0-6) Press Work I, Ind. Jour. 122 2(0-6) 

Job Comp. I, Ind. Jour. 114 2(0-6) Press Work II, Ind. Jour. 126 2(0-6) 



39. Radio Broadcasting 

Students considering an option in radio broadcasting must consult the head of the Depart- 
ment of Public Speaking and arrange for a microphone test, before enrolling in any of the 
broadcasting courses. 



Radio Writing, Ind. Jour. 162 2(2-0) 

Radio Advertising, Ind. Jour. 179. . 3(3-0) 
Broadcasting Station Practice, Ind. 

Jour. 180 1(0-3) 

Elements of Broadcasting, Pub. 

Spk. 161 . 3(2-3) 

Broadcast Musical Programs, Mus. 

119 2(3-0) 

Hist, and Apprec. of Mus. I, Mus. 

130 2(2-0) 



Hist, and Apprec. of Mus. II, Mus. 

131 2(2-0) 

Radio Program Partic, Pub. Spk. 

168 1(0-3) 

Phonetics, Pub. Spk. 201 4(3-3) 

Radio Continuity, Pub. Spk. 230.. 2(2-0) 
Radio Program Production, Pub. 

Spk. 231 2(1-3) 

Problems in Broadcasting, Pub. 

Spk. 232 Cr. Ar. 



Division of General Science 



181 



40. Milling Industry 



Students in general science or industrial c 
which they have taken the prerequisites. 

Milling Practice I, Mill. Ind. 109. . 3(1-6) 
Wheat and Flour Testing, Mill. Ind. 

205 3(0-9) 

Advanced Wheat and Flour Testing, 

Mill. Ind. 210 1 to 5 hrs. 

Farm Crops, Agron. 101 4(2-6) 

Grain Marketing, Econ. 203 3(3-0) 

Quantitative Analysis A, Chem. 250, 3(1-6) 

Elem. Org. Chemistry, Chem. 123.. 3(2-3) 
Milling Technology I, Mill. Ind. 

201 2(0-6) 

Probs. in Milling, Mill. Ind. 211.. Cr. Ar. 

El of Milling, Mill. Ind. 101 2(1-3) 



hemistry may elect work in milling industry for 



Flow Sheets, Mill. Ind. 103 2(0-6, 

Milling Practice II, Mill. Ind. Ill, 3(1-6) 
Mill. Qual. of W T heat, Mill. Ind. 

212 3(3-0) 

Exper. Baking, Mill. Ind. 206 3(1-6) 

Grain Grad. and Judging, Agron. 

108 2(0-6) 

Quant, Analysis B, Chem. 251 3(1-6) 

Chem. of Proteins, Chem. 236A... 3(2-3) 
Milling Technology II, Mill. Ind. 

202 2(0-6) 

Colloid Chemistry, Chem. 213 2(2-0) 



42. Personnel Management 



Students who desire specific training for 

273 and Econ. 126, 234, and 267, along wi 
as may seem desirable. 

Economics II, Econ. 104 3(3-0) 

Business Management, Econ. 126.. 2(2-0) 

Principles of Accounting, Econ. 136, 3(3-0) 
Business Organization and Finance, 

Econ. 215 3(3-0) 

Labor Economics, Econ. 234 3(3-0) 

Social Pathology, Econ. 258 3(3-0) 

Com. Org. and Lead., Econ. 267.. 3(3-0) 

Advanced Sociologv, Econ. 273.... 3(3-0) 

Vocational Guidance, Educ. 230A. . 3(3-0) 



personnel and excutive work should elect 
th such other courses from the following 

Stat. Meth. App. to Educ, Educ. 

233 

Vocational Education, Educ. 241.. 

Mental Tests, Educ. 260 

Technic of Mental Testing, Educ. 

261 

Psvch. of Adv. and Selling, Educ. 

265 

Social Psychology, Educ. 270 

Psvch. of Personnel Mgmt., Educ. 

273 



Educ. 
group 



3(3-0) 
3(3-0) 
3(3-0) 

3(1-6) 

3(3-0) 
3(3-0) 

3(3-0) 



44. Social Welfare Work 



Economics I, Econ. 101 3(3-0) 

Economics II, Econ. 104 3(3-0) 

Sociolosv, Econ. 151 3(3-0) 

Rural Sociologv, Econ. 156 3(3-0) 

Labor Economics, Econ. 234 3(3-0) 

Social Pathologv, Econ. 258 3(3-0) 

Com. Org. and Lead., Econ. 267.. 3(3-0) 

Advanced Sociologv, Econ. 273 3(3-0) 

General Psychology, Educ. 184 3(3-0) 

Psychology of Childhood and Ado- 
lescence, Educ. 250 3(3-0) 

Abnormal Psychology, Educ. 254.. 3(3-0) 

Social Psychology, Educ. 270 3(3-0) 



Psych, of Pers. Mgmt., Educ. 273, 3(3-0) 

Personal Health, Child Welf. 101.. 2(2-0) 

Child Guidance I, Child Welf. 201, 3(1-6) 

Child Guidance II, Child Welf. 206, 3(3-0) 

Family Health, Child Welf. 211... 3(3-0) 

The Family, Child Welf. 216 2(2-0) 

Clo. for the Ind., Clo. and Text. 103, 4(1-9) 

Clo. Selection, Clo. and Text. 110, 2(2-0) 

Foods I, Food and Nutr. 102 5(3-6) 

The Hou-e, Household Econ. 107.. 3(2-3) 

Home Mgmt., Household Econ. 116, 3(1-6) 

Heredity and Eugenics, Zool. 216.. 2(2-0) 



Bacteriology 



Professor Bushnell 
Professor Gainey 
Assistant Professor Foltz 
Assistant Professor Nelson 



Instructor Twikhaus 
Instructor McCalla 
Instructor Fierke 
Graduate Assistant Tanner 
Graduate Assistant Boyle 



Only the simplest forms of life, consisting almost invariably of one-celled 
organisms, are studied. It is now possible to study these microscopical forms 
with ease and accuracy, thus paving the way for a more complete study and 
better understanding of cells in the aggregate. Emphasis is given to applica- 
tions in agriculture, general science, home economics, and medicine. 



COURSES IN BACTERIOLOGY 

FOR UNDERGRADUATE CREDIT 

101. General Microbiology. 3(1-6)*; I, II, and S'S. Prerequisite: Chem. 
110, or 103 and 104. Staff. 

Morphological and biological characters, classification and distribution of 
bacteria, factors necessary for the development of bacteria, culture media, cul- 



182 Kansas State College 

tural features, staining values, and fundamental principles of applied bacteri- 
ology. 

Laboratory. — The student prepares culture media and becomes familiar with 
principles of sterilization and incubation, and with general laboratory technic. 
Deposit, $8. 

Ill, 116. Pathogenic Bacteriology I and II. 4(2-6) each; II and I, respec- 
tively. Designed for students in veterinary medicine. Prerequisite: Chem. 
122. Bushnell, Foltz, Twiehaus. 

Fundamental principles of bacteriology as applied to veterinary medicine. 
Deposit, $8 for each course. 

125. Water and Sewage Bacteriology. 2(0-6); I. Prerequisite: Chem 108. 
Gainey. 

Bacteriological aspects of water purification and sewage disposal; analyses 
of water supplies; microbial changes involved in the disposal of sewage. De- 
posit, $5. 

FOR GRADUATE AND UNDERGRADUATE CREDIT 

202. Soil Microbiology. 3(3-0); II. Prerequisite: Bact. 101. Gainey. 
Influences of soil upon the activities of soil microorganisms. 

204. Soil Microbiology Laboratory. 2(0-6); II. Prerequisite: Bact. 202 
or concurrent registration. Gainey. 

Plot experiments and field work illustrative of theories developed in course 
202. Deposit, $8. 

206. Hygienic Bacteriology. 4(2-6); I. Prerequisite: Bact. 101. Offered 
in 1939-'40 and in alternate years thereafter. Bushnell, Foltz. 

Pathogenic bacteria and their effect upon human health and diseases. De- 
posit, $8. 

211. Dairy Bacteriology. 3(1-6); II. Prerequisite: Bact. 101 or 111. 
Nelson. 

Bacterial flora and their effects in milk, butter, cheese, and other dairy 
products; laboratory practice to accompan}' the theory. Deposit, $8. 

217. Poultry Diseases. 2(2-0); II. Prerequisite: Bact. 116 and Surg, and 
Med. 163. Bushnell, Twiehaus. 

Anatomy of fowls; poultry sanitation and hygiene; infectious and nonin- 
fectious diseases of fowls; parasites; minor surgery. 

218. Poultry Sanitation. 3(2-3); II. Prerequisite: Bact. 101 or 111. 
Twiehaus. 

Methods of control of poultry diseases. Deposit, $3. 

222. Physiology of Microorganisms. 3(3-0); II. Prerequisite: Bact. 101 
or 111 and Chem. 122. Offered in 1940-'4l and in alternate years thereafter. 
Nelson. 

Chemistry and physics of microbial processes. 

225. Bacteriological Technic. 3(0-9); I. Prerequisite: Bact. 101 or 111. 
Offered in 1940-'41 and in alternate years thereafter. Gainey. 

Technic of laboratory manipulation; fundamental experiments and special 
experiments selected according to the interest of the student. Deposit, $5. 

229. Advanced Serology. 5(3-6); II. Prerequisite: Bact. 206. Offered in 
1939-'40 and in alternate years thereafter. Bushnell, Foltz. 

Theories of immunity and immunization; preparation, purification, and 
standardization of the various biological products used in human and veteri- 
nary medicine. Laboratory arranged according to the material available. De- 
posit, $8. 

* The number before the parentheses indicates the number of hours of credit ; the first 
number within the parentheses indicates the number of hours of recitation each week, and 
the second shows the number of hours to be spent in laboratory work each week. I, II, and 
SS indicate that the course is given the first semester, the second semester, and summer 
school, respectively. 



Division of General Science 



183 



235. Bacteriology of Butter Cultures. 1(0-3); I. Prerequisite: Bact. 
211. Nelson. 

Bacteriological and chemical aspects of butter cultures. 

270. Problems in Bacteriology. Credit to be arranged; I, II, and SS. Pre- 
requisite: Bact. 101, 111, or 116. Staff. 

Special problems assigned, credit depending upon the amount and quality 
of work done. Deposit, $3 per credit hour. 

275. Bacteriology Seminar, 1(1-0); I and II. Prerequisite: Consult pro- 
fessor in charge. Bushnell. 

Papers and discussions on various phases of current research work in bac- 
teriology, serology, and related subjects. Advanced students in this depart- 
ment may be assigned to this subject for credit; others interested may visit 
the meetings at any time by making proper arrangements. 

FOR GRADUATE CREDIT 

301. Research in Bacteriology. Credit to be arranged; I, II, and SS. 
Prerequisite: at least two courses in this department. Staff. 

Properly qualified students admitted to this course upon approval of the de- 
partment head; opportunity to do experiment station and research work during 
vacation periods; problems for students working toward an advanced degree; 
upon completion, results presented in form of a thesis which, when accepted, 
fulfills part of the requirements for the master's degree or doctor's degree. 
Deposit, $3 per credit hour. 



Botany and Plant Pathology 



Professor Melchers 

Professor Miller 

Professor Davis 

Professor Haymaker 

Professor Gates 

Associate Professor Elmer 

Assistant Professor Newcomb 



Instructor Kingsley 

Instructor Bates 

Instructor Frazier 

Instructor Creager 

Assistant McCracken 

Graduate Assistant Koepper 

Graduate Research Assistant Gries 



Instruction in this department has a three-fold purpose : Training in bot- 
any for the general broadening of the student's knowledge; training in the 
knowledge of plants that will serve as a foundation for the student's further 
college courses in agricultural subjects; instruction and direction for students 
who desire to investigate problems in plant life that affect agriculture. Inves- 
tigations may be undertaken in any of the major fields of botany. 

COURSES IN BOTANY 

FOR UNDERGRADUATE CREDIT 

101, 105. General Botany I and II. 3(1-6), each; I and SS, and II and 
SS, respectively. Staff. 

I: The 'principal life processes of plants, such as photosynthesis, digestion, 
respiration, transpiration, and growth; the responses of plants to environmen- 
tal conditions and physical stimuli ; and the anatomy of the plant. 

II: The significance of plant morphology to the allied branches of botany, 
plant physiology, taxonomy, and ecology; the economic importance of the 
fungi and other pathogenic plants; the evolution of plants, as developed by 
morphological criteria. 

Laboratory. — I: A series of typical experiments followed out in the labora- 
tory and in the greenhouse. Charge, $3.50. 

II: Study of the morphology of the typical representatives of the great 
groups of the plant kingdom, ecological factors which affect plants, and plant 
identification under both winter and summer conditions by use of an identi- 
fication key. Charge, $3.50. 



184 Kansas State College 

110. Nature and Development of Plants. 3(3-0); II and SS. Haymaker. 

A general survey of the plant kingdom emphasizing structure, life processes, 
identification, classification, evolutionary development, geographical distribu- 
tion, and economic importance. 

126. Medical Botany. 2(1-3); I. Prerequisite: high-school botany or its 
equivalent. Gates. 

The principal stock-poisoning plants of the range; habitat, poisonous prop- 
erties, and methods of control and elimination of native poisonous plants. 
Charge, $2. 

FOR GRADUATE AND UNDERGRADUATE CREDIT 

202. Fruit Crop Diseases. 2(1-3); I. Prerequisite: Bot. 205. Offered in 
1939-'40 and in alternate years thereafter. Haymaker. 

Diseases of major and minor fruit crops; cause, effect on host, control. 
Charge, $2. 

205. Plant Pathology I. 3(2-3); I and SS. Prerequisite: Bot. 101 and 
105. Melchers, Haymaker, Elmer. 

Characteristics of important diseases of crops and the organisms causing 
them. Charge, $2. 

206. Morphology of the Fungi. 3(1-6); I. Prerequisite: Bot. 105. Of- 
fered in 1938-'39 and in alternate years thereafter. Creager. 

Structure of slime molds, moldlike bacteria, and fungi studied to determine 
taxonomic relationships. 

208. Plant Physiology I. 3(3-0); I. Prerequisite: Bot. 101 and 105 and 
Chem. 103 and 104 or 110. Miller. 

A detailed study of the plant cell, solutions and membranes in relation to 
the cell, root systems, intake of water, intake of solutes, elements used, and 
loss of water. 

210. Plant Physiology II. 3(1-6) ; II. Prerequisite: Bot. 208. Offered in 
1940-'41 and in alternate years thereafter. Miller. 

Methods used in obtaining experimental data in regard to the more com- 
mon functions of plants. Charge, $5. 

211. Plant Physiology III. 3(3-0); II. Prerequisite: Bot. 208. Miller. 
A continuation of Bot. 208, including a detailed study of photosynthesis, 

nitrogen metabolism, fat metabolism, digestion, translocation, respiration, and 
growth. 

212. Problems in Botanical Instruction. 3(2-3); SS. Prerequisite: ten 
hours in botany or in courses of botanical nature. Haymaker. 

Advanced work in the morphology, anatomy, physiology, taxonomy, and 
diseases of plants ; technic in presenting botany to high-school and college stu- 
dents. Charge, $2. 

217. Botanical Microtechnic. 3(1-6); II. Prerequisite: Bot. 101 or 105. 
Offered in 1939-'40 and in alternate years thereafter. Bates. 

Principles and methods of preparing plant materials for histological or cyto- 
logical study. Charge, $3. 

218. Field Botany. 3(2-3); SS. Prerequisite: Bot. 101 and 105. Hay- 
maker. 

Identification and classification of seed plants. Charge, $2. 

220. Botany Seminar. 1(1-0); I and II. Prerequisite: consult head of 
department. 

Reports of investigational work or other matters of interest in the various 
branches of botany. 



Division of General Science 185 

225. Taxonomic Botany of the Flowering Plants. 3(1-6) ; I. Prerequi- 
site: Bot. 101 and 105. Gates. 

Development of the systems of classification; identification of plants in the 
field and in the laboratory; consideration of orders and families of plants. 
Charge, $2. 

228. Plant Ecology. 2(2-0); II. Prerequisite: Bot. 101 and 105. Gates. 
Structure and dynamics of vegetation. Field trips. 

232. Problems in Botany. Credit to be arranged; I, II, and SS. Prerequi- 
site : Bot. 101 and 105, and approval of the head of the department. Staff. 

Some special field of work not definitely represented by one of the under- 
graduate elective courses. Charge, $2. 

241. Field Crop Diseases. 3(1-6); II. Prerequisite: Bot. 205. Offered in 
1939-'40 and in alternate years thereafter. Melchers. 

Diseases of cereal and forage crops; cause, effect on host, control. Breed- 
ing for disease resistance. Charge, $2. 

251. Anatomy of Higher Plants. 3(1-6); II. Prerequisite: Bot. 101 and 
105. Offered in 1940-'41 and in alternate years thereafter. Newcomb. 

Structure and development of the various tissues and organs of seed plants. 
Charge, $3. 

266. Literature of Botany. 2(2-0); I. Prerequisite: Bot. 205. Offered in 
1940-'41 and in alternate years thereafter. Davis. 

Current botanical publications, together with the classics of botanical litera- 
ture; historical development of botany. 

268. Plant Cytology. 3(1-6); I. Prerequisite: Bot. 101 or Zool. 105. Of- 
fered in 1939-'40 and in alternate years thereafter. Newcomb. 

Structure, development, and functions of the plant cell, with special refer- 
ence to chromosome behavior and its bearing on genetic results. Charge, $3. 

270. Recent Advances in Cytogenetics. 3(2-3); II. Prerequisite: Agron. 
208 or Bot. 268 or Zool. 214. Offered in 1939- '40 and in alternate years there- 
after. McCracken. 

Chromosome structure, mechanics, and behavior; their significance for prob- 
lems of genetics, evolution, and the origin of species. Charge, $3. 

FOR GRADUATE CREDIT 

301. Plant Pathology III. 3(1-6) ; I. Prerequisite: Bot. 205. Offered in 
1940-'41 and in alternate years thereafter. Elmer. 
A course in phytopathological technic. Charge, $5. 

310. Research in Botany. Credit to be arranged; I, II, and SS. Prereq- 
uisite : consult instructor. Staff. 

Individual research problems are assigned in the fields of plant pathology, 
plant physiology, taxonomy, ecology, cytology, anatomy, and mycology. 



186 



Kansas State College 



Chemistry 



Professor King 
Professor Hughes 
Professor Brubaker 
Professor Colver 
Professor Faith 
Professor Keith 
Professor Perkins 
Associate Professor Van Winkle 
Associate Professor Barham 
Assistant Professor Hall 
Assistant Professor Harriss 
Assistant Professor Whitnah 
Assistant Professor Lash 
Assistant Professor Marlow 
Assistant Professor Smits 
Assistant Professor Shenk 
Assistant Professor Conrad 
Assistant Professor Greene 
Assistant Professor Andrews 



Instructor McDowell 
Instructor Reed 
Instructor Caldwell 
Instructor Hostetter 
Instructor Dorp 
Instructor Beers 
Instructor Olsen 
Instructor Fisher 
Instructor Hedrick 
Instructor Neal 
Instructor Shrenk 
Graduate Assistant Devor 
Graduate Assistant Grubb 
Graduate Assistant Bryan 
Graduate Assistant Proudfit 
Graduate Assistant Long 



COURSES IN CHEMISTRY 



FOR UNDERGRADUATE CREDIT 



101. Chemistry I. 5(3-6); I, II, and SS. Not open to students who have 
credit in Chem. 107, 108, or 110. 

Beginning of the study of general chemistry. Deposit, $10. 

103. Chemistry II Recitation. 3(3-0) ; I, II, and SS. Not open to stu- 
dents who have credit in Chem. 108 or 110. Prerequisite: Chem. 101. Staff. 

Completion of the study of general chemistry. 

104. Chemistry II Laboratory. 2(0-6) ; I, II, and SS. Not open to stu- 
dents who have credit in Chem. 108 or 110. Prerequisite: Chem. 103 or con- 
current registration. Staff. 

General principles of qualitative analysis. Deposit, $10. 

107, 108. Chemistry E-I and E-II. 4(3-3) each; I, II, and SS each. Not 
open to students who have credit in Chem. 101 or 103 and 104, respectively. 
Staff. 

Similar content to Chem. 101, 103, and 104; with special emphasis on appli- 
cations to engineering. Deposit, $7.50 for each course. 

110. General Chemistry. 5(3-6) ; I and II. Not open to students having 
credit in any college courses in inorganic chemistry. Staff. 

A general treatment of some of the principal laws and theories of chemistry; 
the important metallic and nonmetallic substances. Deposit, $10. 

122. General Organic Chemistry. 5(3-6); I, II, and SS. Prerequisite: 
Chem. 110. Staff. 

General study of some of the more important classes of organic compounds. 
Deposit, $10. 

124. Organic Chemistry (Agr.). 3(2-3); I, II, and SS. Prerequisite: 
Chem. 103. Staff. 

Fundamentals of organic chemistry, particularly fats, proteins, and carbo- 
hydrates. Deposit, $7.50. 

130. Inspection Trip. R. Greene. 

Such manufacturing centers as Kansas City, St. Louis, and Chicago are 
visited. The cost of the trip varies from about $30 to not more than 



FOR GRADUATE AND UNDERGRADUATE CREDIT 

202. Inorganic Preparations. Credit to be arranged; one credit for each 
three hours of laboratory; I, II, and SS. Prerequisite: Chem. 104. Brubaker. 

Preparation and purification of some typical inorganic compounds, of those 
of more complex composition, and compounds of the rarer elements. De- 
posit, $10. 



Division of General Science 187 

205. Industrial Electrochemistry. 2(2-0); II. Prerequisite: Chem. 104 
or 110 and Phys. 103 or 106. Faith. 

206. Physical Chemistry I. 5(3-6); I. Prerequisite: Chem. 220 and 241, 
and Math. 115. Students from other divisions may enroll without Math. 115. 
King, Hall, Shenk. 

Relations with matter in the gaseous, liquid, and solid states; elementary 
principles of thermodynamics, solution phenomena., colloids, surface chemistry, 
and thermochemistry. Deposit, $10. 

207. Advanced Inorganic Chemistry. 3(3-0); I. Prerequisite: Chem. 104. 
Keith. 

Facts of chemistry and their present theoretical interpretations; properties 
of the elements as a basis for methods of classification ; the rarer elements and 
compounds. Students electing this course are advised to take Chem. 202. 

208. History of Chemistry. 1(1-0); II. Prerequisite: Chem. 206. Olsen. 
Development of the principal laws and theories of chemistry; failures and 

triumphs of the founders of chemical science. 

209. Surface Tension and Related Phenomena. 2(2-0); I and II. Pre- 
requisite: Chem. 206. King. 

Methods of measuring surface tension; surface energetics, relation of surface 
tension to adsorption; and colloidal formation. 

211. Paint Oils and Pigments. 2(2-0); I. Prerequisite: Chem. 104 and 
122. King. 

Extraction, purification, and properties of the oils commonly used in paints; 
manufacture and properties of paint pigments; the products employed as pro- 
tective coverings for both wood and metal. 

212. Organic Chemical Technology. 3(3-0); II. Prerequisite: Chem. 206 
and 219. Faith. 

Organic process industries, including oil refining, synthetic organic chemicals, 
cellulose, fats, and oils. 

213. Colloid Chemistry. 2(2-0); II. Prerequisite: Chem. 206. Fisher. 
Suspensoids and emulsoids, optical and electrical properties of colloids, 

Brownian movement, action of electrolytes on colloids, adsorption and surface 
phenomena, and short review of the method for the preparation of colloids. 

214. Organic Chemical Technology Laboratory. 2(0-6) ; II. Prerequisite: 
Chem. 212 or concurrent registration. Faith. 

Investigation of the important unit processes. Deposit, $10. 

215. Chemical Thermodynamics. 3(3-0); II. Prerequisite: Chem. 206 
and Math. 115. Keith. 

Principles of thermodynamics particularly applicable to chemistry, such as 
the first and second laws of thermodynamics and their application. 

216. Theoretical Electrochemistry. 3(3-0); I. Prerequisite: Chem. 206 
and 272. Keith. 

The theory of electrolytic cells, the electrochemical series of metals, elec- 
trodes, potentials, polarization, overvoltage, and deposition of metals by elec- 
trolysis. 

217. Electrochemistry Laboratory. 2(0-6); II. Prerequisite: Chem. 216 
or concurrent registration. Hall. 

Experiments in electrometric titrations, storage battery efficiency, polariza- 
tion, overvoltage, electrode potentials, and related subjects. Deposit, $10. 

218. 219. Organic Chemistry I and II. 4(2-6) each; I and II, respectively. 
Prerequisite: Chem. 104. Colver, Neal. Deposit, $10 for each course. 

220. Organic Chemistry. 5(3-6); I, II, and SS. Prerequisite: Chem. 104. 
Colver. 

Topics selected from the content of Chem. 218 and 219. Deposit, 



188 Kansas State College 

221. Qualitative Organic Analysis. 3(1-6); I. Prerequisite: Chem. 219. 
Colver. Deposit, $10. 

223. Organic Preparations. 1(0-3) to 5(0-15) ; I. Prerequisite: Chem. 219. 
Colver. Deposit, 



225. Stereoisomers and Tautomeric Compounds. 2(2-0) ; II. Prerequi- 
site : Chem. 219. Colver. 

226. Carbocyclic and Heterocyclic Compounds. 2(2-0); II. Prerequisite: 
Chem. 219. Colver. 

228. Special Reactions of Organic Compounds. 2(2-0); I. Prerequisite: 
Chem. 219. Colver. 

230. Principles of Animal Nutrition. 3(3-0); II. Prerequisite: Chem. 
122. Hughes. 

231. Physiological Chemistry. 5(3-6); I, II, and SS. Prerequisite: 
Chem. 122. Hughes, Marlow, Devor. Deposit, $10. 

232. Vitamins. 2(2-0) ; I or II. Prerequisite: Chem. 231. Hughes. 
Chemistry and functions of vitamins and related compounds. 

233. Biochemical Preparations. 2(0-6) to 5(0-15); II. Prerequisite: Chem. 
219 and 231. Marlow. Deposit, $10. 

235. Pathological Chemistry. 2(2-0). Prerequisite: Chem. 231. Hughes. 

236A. Chemistry of Proteins. 3(2-3); I. Prerequisite: Chem. 122. Con- 
rad. Deposit, $7.50. 

237. Biochemical Analysis. 2(0-6); I and II. Prerequisite: Chem. 231 
and 241. Marlow. Deposit, 



238A. Catalysis in Organic Chemistry. 3(3-0); I. Prerequisite: Chem. 
206 and 219. Barham. 

239. Laboratory Technic in Animal Nutrition. 2(0-6) ; I and II. Pre- 
requisite: an acceptable course in nutrition or Chem. 231. Hughes. 

Preparation of diet and the care of experimental animals used in the study 
of various nutritional problems. Deposit, $10. 

240. Advanced Qualitative Analysis. 3(1-6); I and II. Prerequisite: 
Chem. 104. Van Winkle. Deposit, $10. 

241. Quantitative Analysis. 5(1-12); II and SS. Prerequisite: Chem. 
104. Brubaker. 

Practically the same as Chem. 250 and 251. Deposit, $10. 

242. Fire Assaying. 2(0-6); I. Prerequisite: Chem. 241. Faith. 

Assays of ores containing such metals as copper, zinc, lead, bismuth, tin, 
silver, and gold. Deposit, $10. 

243. Gas Analysis. 1(0-3); I. Prerequisite: Chem. 241. Hedrick. 
Analysis of air, flue and furnace gases, and illuminating gas. Deposit, $7.50. 

244. Industrial Stoichiometry. 2(2-0); I. Prerequisite: Chem. 241. 
Faith. 

Problems involving heat, material, and economic balances. 

245. Chemical Microscopy. 1(0-3); I, II, and SS. Prerequisite: Chem. 
122 and 250. Brubaker. 

Use of the microscope in chemical analysis, both qualitative and quantita- 
tive, applied both to inorganic substances and to vegetable and animal prod- 
ucts. Deposit, $7.50. 

246. Instrumental Methods in Chemical Analysis. 3(3-0). Prerequi- 
site: Chem. 206. Shenk. 

Application of the spectrograph, spectrophotometer, colorimeter, nephe- 
lometer, refractometer, X-ray equipment and other instruments in the chemical 
analysis of gases, liquids, and solids. 



Division oj General Science 189 

247. Inorganic Chemical Technology Recitation. 3(3-0) ; I. Prerequisite: 
Chem. 206. Faith, Greene. 

Applications of physical chemistry, unit operations, and economics to the 
inorganic chemical industry. 

248. Inorganic Chemical Technology Laboratory. 2(0-6) ; I. Prerequi- 
site: Chem. 241. Faith, Greene. 

Gas, oil, water, and fuel analysis; manufacturing problems. Deposit, $10. 

249. Intermediary Metabolism. 2(2-0); I. Prerequisite: Chem. 231. 
Marlow. 

Chemistry of the metabolism of various classes of nutrients. 

250. 251. Quantitative Analysis A and B. 3(1-6) each; I and II, respec- 
tively, and SS. Prerequisite: Chem. 104. Brubaker. 

A : General procedure of gravimetric analysis. Deposit, 
B: General procedure in volumetric analysis. Deposit, 

252A. Chemistry of Soils and Fertilizers. 2(0-6) ; I. Prerequisite: Chem. 
250. Perkins. Deposit, $10. 

253A. Chemistry of Crops. 2(0-6); II. Prerequisite: Chem. 122 and 250. 
Perkins. Deposit, $10. 

254. Dairy Chemistry. 3(1-6); I. Prerequisite: Chem. 122 and 250. 
Whitnah. Deposit, 



255. Advanced Soil Chemistry. 3(1-6); I and II. Prerequisite: Chem. 
206 and an acceptable course in soils. Perkins. 

Chemical phenomena of soils, ionic exchange, electrodialysis, solutions, and 
colloidal phenomena. Deposit, $ 



256. Insecticides and Fungicides. 2(2-0). Prerequisite: Chem. 122 and 
250. Smits. 

257. Food Analysis. 3(0-9); II and SS. Prerequisite: Chem. 220 and 241 
or 251. Brubaker. 

Quantitative methods employed in the analysis of foodstuffs, practice in 
testing for adulterants, preservatives, and coloring materials. Deposit, $10. 

260. Advanced Quantitative Analysis. 1 to 5 hours. Prerequisite: Chem. 
241 or 250 and 251. Brubaker. Deposit, 



265. Chemistry of Carbohydrates. 2(2-0); I or II. Prerequisite: Chem. 
122. Whitnah. 

268. Problems in Chemical Engineering. Credit to be arranged; I and 
II. Faith, Greene, Hedrick. 

An introduction to chemical engineering research. Deposit, 



270. Problems in Chemistry. Credit to be arranged; I, II, and SS. Staff. 

Individual problems to fulfill the thesis requirements of students in agricul- 
tural chemistry, chemistry, and curriculum in industrial chemistry. De- 
posit, $10. 

271. Selected Topics in Inorganic Chemistry. 2(2-0); II. Prerequisite: 
Chem. 206. Lash. 

Thermal analysis, temperature measurements, atomic hydrogen, hydrides, 
halogens, solutions, ammonia systems, and crystal chemistry. 

272. Physical Chemistry II. 3(3-0) ; II. Prerequisite: Chem. 206. King. 

Homogeneous and heterogeneous equilibria, chemical kinetics, electrical con- 
ductance, electromotive force, chemical thermodynamics, photochemistry, and 
atomic and molecular structure. 

273. Chemical Engineering Calculations. 3(3-0); I. Prerequisite: 
Chem. 272. Faith. 

Stoichiometry and thermodynamics applied to chemical engineering. . 



190 Kansas State College 

274. Chemical Engineering Analysis. 3(3-0); I or II. Prerequisite: 
Chem. 272. Greene. 

Graphical methods and dimensional analysis applied to chemical engineering 
problems. 

275. Chemistry Seminar. Twice a month the officers of the department, 
with the more advanced students and such others as wish to, meet for papers 
and discussions upon topics representing the progress of chemical science, 
chiefly as found in the current journals. The preparation of subjects for pres- 
entation at these meetings may be a part of the credit work of advanced 
students. 

276. Chemical Literature. 2(2-0); I or II. Prerequisite: Chem. 219. 
Reed. 

278. Elements of Chemical Engineering I. 4(3-3); II. Prerequisite: 
Chem. 206 and Math. 115. Hedrick. 

Fundamentals of chemical engineering operations, with emphasis on flow 
of fluids and flow of heat; application of these principles to equipment design. 
Deposit, $10. 

279. Elements of Chemical Engineering II. 4(3-3); I. Prerequisite: 
Chem. 278. Greene, Hedrick. 

A study of unit operations, including filtration, evaporation, humidification 
and drying, absorption, distillation, and crystallization. Deposit, $10. 

280. Chemical Engineering Materials. 2(2-0); II. Prerequisite: Chem. 
103 and 104. Faith. 

Manufacture, use, and properties of metallic and nonmetallic materials of 
construction. 

284. Organic Unit Processes. 2(2-0); I. Prerequisite: Chem. 212 and 
272. Faith. 

Unit processes in organic synthesis, especially nitration, sulfonation, oxida- 
tion, hydrogenation, esterification, and hydrolysis. 

285, 286. Petroleum Refining Engineering I and II. 3(3-0) each; I and 
II, respectively. Prerequisite: for I, Chem. 279 or concurrent registration; for 
II, Chem. 285. Hedrick. 

I: Properties of hydrocarbon mixtures, cracking, polymerization, hydroge- 
nation, separation by distillation. 

II : Design and operation of plants, refinery economics, natural gasoline 
plants. 

287. Corrosion. 3(3-0); I and II. Prerequisite: Chem. 122 and 206 or 
concurrent registration. Van Winkle. 

Theories and various factors involved in the corrosion of iron, steel, and 
nonferrous metals; methods of testing for and preventing corrosion. 

288, 289. Advanced Physical Chemistry I and II. 3(3-0) each; I and II, 
respectively. Prerequisite: Chem. 272, or permission of the instructor. 
Andrews. 

Extension of certain topics of physical chemistry such as thermodynamics, 
chemical kinetics, photochemistry, atomic and molecular structure. 

290. Biochemistry of Internal Secretions. 2(2-0) ; I or II. Prerequisite: 
Chem. 231. Marlow. 

Chemistry of the glands of internal secretions. 

291. Distillation. 3(3-0); I or II. Prerequisite: Chem. 279. Greene. 
Advanced study of distillation. 

292. Absorption and Extraction. 3(3-0); I or II. Prerequisite: Chem. 279. 
Hedrick. 

Advanced study of absorption and extraction. 



Division of General Science 



191 



293. Chemical Engineering Plant Design. 4(3-3); II. Prerequisite: 
Chem. 279. Greene. 

Unit operations, thermodynamics, reaction kinetics and economic balance, 
solution of the annual A.I.Ch.E. contest problem. Deposit, $7.50. 

299. Chemical Toxicology. 3(2-3) ; I, II, and SS. Prerequisite : Chem 
122, 219, or 220. Smits. 

Occurrence, chemical properties, and detection of the more common poisons. 
Deposit, $7.50. 

FOR GRADUATE CREDIT 

301. Research in Chemistry. Credit to be arranged. Research work in 
the laboratories in connection with the agricultural and engineering experi- 
ment stations, the State Food Laboratory, and the laboratories for analysis of 
feeds and fertilizers. Students working out theses in the Department of Chem- 
istry are assigned to this course. Work is offered in: 

Agricultural Chemistry. King, Perkins. 

Industrial Chemistry and Chemical Engineering. Faith, Van Winkle, 
Greene, Hedrick. 

Analytical Chemistry. Brubaker, Perkins. 

Organic Chemistry. Colver, Barham, Whitnah. 

Biochemistry . Hughes, Whitnah, Marlow. 

General and Physical Chemistry. King, Hall, Keith, Lash. 

305. Animal Nutrition Seminar. 1(1-0); I and II. Prerequisite: con- 
sult instructor. Hughes, McCampbell, Burt, Kramer, Payne. 

Experiments in nutrition, methods employed, and validity of conclusions 
drawn. 



Economics and Sociology 



Professor Grimes 
Professor Howe 
Professor Hill 
Associate Professor Stewart 
Associate Professor Holtz 
Associate Professor Hodges 
Associate Professor Thompson 
Associate Professor Montgomery 
Assistant Professor Nelson 
Assistant Professor Parsons 
Assistant Professor Eggert 



Assistant Professor Pine 
Instructor Ward 
Instructor Doll 
Instructor Miller 
Instructor Wilson 
Instructor Letbetter 
Instructor Fitch 
Instructor Leland 
Instructor Long 
Assistant Doran 
Assistant Reed 



The work in economics and sociology is offered in the divisions of General 
Science and Agriculture. The more general courses are listed here. Those 
having a direct bearing on agriculture are listed in the agricultural section of 
the catalogue. 

CERTIFICATE OF CERTIFIED PUBLIC ACCOUNTANT 

By act of the Kansas legislature passed March 24, 1915, provision is made 
for the examination for the certificate of Certified Public Accountant. Appli- 
cants must be citizens of the United States or must have declared their in- 
tention to become citizens. They must be at least twenty-one years of age; 
must have good moral character; must have a high-school education or the 
equivalent thereof; must have four years of experience and study in account- 
ancy, at least three of which must have been in the office of a public account- 
ant or on their own account; and must pass an examination in auditing, ac- 
counting, and business law given by the. State Board of Examiners. 

Examination questions are prepared and graded by the American Institute 
of Accountants and examinations are held in May and November of each year. 



192 Kansas State College 

COURSES IN ECONOMICS 

FOR UNDERGRADUATE CREDIT 

(For Econ. 106, see agricultural section.) 

101. Economics I. 3(3-0) ; I, II, and SS. Staff. 
Introductory study of the principles of economics. 

104. Economics II. 3(3-0) ; I, II, and SS. Prerequisite: Econ. 101. Nelson. 
Continuation of Econ. 101. 

116. Money and Banking. 3(3-0) ; I, II, and SS. Prerequisite: Econ. 101. 
Thompson. 

Nature, history, and functions of money; banking in its modern and historic 
forms. 

126. Business Management. 2(2-0) ; I. II, and SS. Not open to students 
in curriculums in business administration. Prerequisite: Econ. 101. Thomp- 
son. 

Analysis of management factors such as personnel, finance, accounting, pro- 
duction, and marketing. 

FOR GRADUATE AND UNDERGRADUATE CREDIT 

(For Econ. 202, 203, 206A, 212, 218, 220, 225, 227, 231, 235, 240, 251, 270, and 271, see 

agricultural section.) 

210. Economic Systems. 2(2-0); I and SS. Prerequisite: Econ. 101. 
Thompson. 

214. Public Finance. 3(3-0) ; I. Not open to students with credit in Econ. 
220. Prerequisite: Econ. 101. Howe. 

Public expenditures and revenues; the administration of public funds. 

215. Business Organization and Finance. 3(3-0) ; I and II. Prerequi- 
site: Econ. 104 and 134. Thompson. 

Organization and classification of business enterprises, their financial 
structure, and internal management. 

222. Investments. 3(3-0); II and SS. Prerequisite: Econ. 116 and 134 or 
136. Stewart. 

Types of investment securities; investment risks and values; investment 
banks; investment policies. 

223. Credits and Collections. 2(2-0); II. Prerequisite: Econ. 101. 
Thompson. 

224. International Trade. 2(2-0); II. Prerequisite: Econ. 101. Nelson. 

230. Principles of Transportation. 3(3-0); II. Prerequisite: Econ. 101. 
Ward. 

Development of transportation; principles involved; public regulation. 

234. Labor Economics. 3(3-0); I and II. Prerequisite: Econ. 101 or 151. 
Holtz. 

Status and trends in industrial relations. 

242. Property Insurance. 2(2-0); I and SS. Prerequisite: Econ. 101. 
Stewart. 

Fire, marine, automobile, title, and credit insurance and corporate bonding; 
also other forms of property insurance. 

244. Life Insurance. 2(2-0); II and SS. Prerequisite: Econ. 101. Stew- 
art. 

Nature and uses of life insurance, kinds of policies, determination of pre- 
miums, reserves, surrender values, dividends. 

246. Marketing. 3(3-0) ; I and SS. Prerequisite: Econ. 101. Ward. 
Marketing functions, services, and agencies. 



Division of General Science 193 

248. Problems in Economics. Credit to be arranged. Prerequisite: Econ. 
101. Staff. 

249. Business Administration Seminar. 1(1-0); I and II. Prerequisite: 
senior standing. Staff. 

Current questions in economics and business. 

FOR GRADUATE CREDIT 
(For Econ. 301, see agricultural section.) 

302. Research in Economics. Credit to be arranged; I, II, and SS. Pre- 
requisite : such courses as the problem undertaken may require. Staff. 

Graduate students may elect for original investigation any acceptable prob- 
lem in the general field of economics. 

305. Advanced Economics. 3(3-0); I. Prerequisite: Econ. 101. Nelson. 
Advanced study of economic theory. 

310. History of Economic Thought. 3(3-0); II. Prerequisite: Econ. 101. 
Grimes. 

Development of economics and relation of economic doctrines to conditions 
existing when they were formulated. 

COURSES IN SOCIOLOGY 

FOR UNDERGRADUATE CREDIT 

(For Econ. 156, see agricultural section.) 

151. Sociology. 3(3-0); I, II, and SS. Prerequisite: sophomore standing. 
Hill, Ward. 

Fundamental principles of social life as related to other scientific principles. 

FOR GRADUATE AND UNDERGRADUATE CREDIT 

(For Econ. 256, see agricultural section.) 

258. Social Pathology. 3(3-0); I, II, and SS. Prerequisite: Econ. 151. 
Hill, Ward. 

Problems of society such as poverty, crime, delinquency, immigration, fam- 
ily discord, group conflict, and population. 

259. Population and Human Ecology. 2(2-0); I. Prerequisite: six hours 
of sociology or economics or history. Hill. 

Early theories, policies, growth, composition, spatial aspects, movements, 
and population trends. 

260. Family and Society. 2(2-0); II. Prerequisite: Econ. 151. Hill. 
Origin and development of marriage customs and systems of family organ- 
izations, the family under present conditions. 

267. Community Organization and Leadership. 3(3-0) ; II and SS. Pre- 
requisite: Econ. 151. Hill. 

Organizations working in the urban and rural fields; the principles involved 
and the technic of organization. 

273. Advanced Sociology. 3(3-0) ; II. Prerequisite: Econ. 151. Hill. 
A continuation of Econ. 151. 

277. History of Social Thought. 3(3-0); I. Prerequisite: Econ. 151. 
Holtz. 

Development of social thought from ancient civilization to the present. 

279. Problems in Sociology. Credit to be arranged; I, II, and SS. Pre- 
requisite: Econ. 151. Hill. 

Selected literature and investigation of social problems. 

1&— 6529 



194 Kansas State College 

FOR GRADUATE CREDIT 
(For Econ. 350, see agricultural section.) 

351. Research in Sociology. Credit to be arranged; I, II, and SS. Pre- 
requisite: such courses as the problem undertaken may require. Hill. 

Graduate students may elect for original investigation any acceptable prob- 
lem in the field of sociology. 

COURSES IN ACCOUNTING 

FOR UNDERGRADUATE CREDIT 
(For Econ. 112, see agricultural section.) 

133, 134. Accounting I and II. 3(2-3) each; I, II, and SS. Prerequisite: 
For Econ. 134, Econ. 133. Stewart, Letbetter. 

I : Principles and structure of accounts designed to give power to analyze 
commercial accounts and statements; problems and practice sets used as an ap- 
plication of principles to practice. 

II: Partnership and corporation accounting and problems; valuation of 
balance-sheet items, with special reference to depreciation, inventories, and in- 
tangibles. 

136. Principles of Accounting. 3(3-0) ; I and II. Not open to students 
in curriculums in business administration. Stewart, Letbetter. 

Principles of accounting; use of accounting records and statements. 

FOR GRADUATE AND UNDERGRADUATE CREDIT 

280. Valuation Accounting. 3(3-0); I, II, and SS. Prerequisite: Econ. 
134. Stewart. 

Advanced course in accounting theory; content and analysis of accounting 
statements. 

281. Advanced Accounting. 3(3-0); I and SS. Prerequisite: Econ. 134. 
Stewart. 

Application of accounting principles to such types of business enterprise as 
partnerships, corporations with subsidiaries and branches, companies in finan- 
cial difficulties, and estates and trusts. 

284. Institutional Accounting. 2(2-0); II. Not open to students in 
curriculums in business administration. Stewart. 

Accounting principles and their application to cafeteria, lunch and tea 
rooms, restaurants, dormitories, clubs, and other institutions. 

286. Tax Accounting. 3(3-0); II. Prerequisite: Econ. 280 or concurrent 
registration. Stewart, Letbetter. 

Accounting problems arising in connection with income, sales, social security, 
and other taxes. 

287. Cost Accounting. 3(3-0) ; I and SS. Prerequisite : Econ. 134. Stewart, 
Letbetter. 

Allocating production and distribution costs for the purpose of determining 
financial results and guiding the management of the business enterprise. 

288. Advanced Cost Accounting. 2(2-0); II. Prerequisite: Econ. 287. 
Offered in 1939-'40 and in alternate years thereafter. Stewart, Letbetter. 

289. Governmental Accounting. 2(2-0); I. Prerequisite: Econ. 280 or 
287. Stewart. 

Federal, state and municipal accounts, and accounts for public institutions. 

290. Auditing. 2(2-0); II. Prerequisite: Econ. 280 and permission of in- 
structor. Offered in 1940-'41 and in alternate years thereafter. Letbetter. 

Auditing accounts of commercial enterprises; attention to balance sheet and 
detail audits. 



Division of General Science 



195 



Education 



Professor Holton ^ 
Professor Peterson 
Professor Williams - 
Professor Strickland " 
Professor Rust v 
Professor Davidson ' 
Professor Alm * 
Associate Professor Langford 
Associate Professor Hall 



Associate Professor Baxter 
Assistant Professor Moggie 
Instructor Wyckoff 
Instructor H. H. Brown l 
Instructor Cowan - 
Assistant Swoyer-^ 
Assistant Bare 
Assistant Shields 
Assistant H. M. Brown 



The courses in this department have been organized with the following ob- 
jectives: (1) to meet the requirements of the Kansas State Board of Educa- 
tion in education and psychology for state certificates for teachers; (2) to give 
general information in the fields of psychology and public education; (3) to 
meet the requirements of a major for the degree of Master of Science. In the 
graduate work the main emphasis is on rural and vocational education. 

The State Board of Education has set up the following standards or their 
equivalents for certification of high school teachers: 

1. Three-year Certificate Renewable for Life. 

a. Complete four years of college work with degree. 

b. At least eighteen hours must be taken in the Department of Edu- 

cation, as follows: 

(1) Three hours each in General Psychology, Educational Psy- 
chology, Educational Administration, and Teaching Participation 
in High School. 

(2) Six hours elected from the following courses in the Depart- 
ment of Education: Rural Life and Education, Extra-curricular 
Activities, Educational Measurements, Curriculum, Statistical 
Methods Applied to Education, Vocational Guidance, Educational 
Sociology, Vocational Education, History of Education, Psychol- 
ogy of Childhood and Adolescence, Abnormal Psychology, Mental 
Tests, Technic of Mental Tests, Social Psychology, Psychology of 
Art, and Psychology of Exceptional Children. 

c. Valid in any elementary or high school in Kansas. 

2. Certificate for Teachers of Vocational Agriculture. 

a. Complete four years of college work with degree, including the fol- 

lowing : 

(1) Not less than fifty hours in technical or practical agriculture. 

(2) Not less than twenty-one hours of science related to agri- 
culture. 

(3) Eighteen hours in the Department of Education; three 
each in General Psychology, Educational Psychology, Vocational 
Education, Methods of Teaching Agriculture, Teaching Partici- 
pation in Agriculture, and Educational Administration or Princi- 
ples of Secondary Education. 

(4) Seventeen hours in mechanical lines related to farm-shop 
problems. 

b. Valid for three years and may be renewed for life. 

c. The State Board for Vocational Education issues certificates of ap- 

proval for one year only, to teachers of Vocational Agriculture 
and reserves the right to require individual teachers to return to 
summer school for further preparation when the need becomes 
apparent. 

3. Certificate for Teachers of Vocational Home-making. 

a. Complete four years of college work with degree, including the fol- 
lowing : 

(1) Thirty-four hours in technical home economics, three in 
Child Welfare, and three in Practice Work in Household Man- 
agement. 



196 Kansas State College 

(2) Eighteen hours in the Department of Education; three 
each in General Psychology, Educational Psychology, Vocational 
Education, Methods of Teaching Home Economics, Teaching 
Participation in Home Economics, and Educational Administra- 
tion or Principles of Secondary Education. 

b. Valid for three years and may be renewed for life. 

4. To comply with the regulations of the State Board of Education regard- 
ing teachers' certificates based on four years of college work, the student must 
complete at least twenty-four of the last thirty semester hours or fifty of the 
last sixty semester hours, in residence at the college granting the degree. 

COURSES IN EDUCATION 

FOR UNDERGRADUATE CREDIT 

109. Educational Psychology. 3(3-0); I, II, and SS. Prerequisite: Educ. 
184 and junior or senior standing. Moggie. 

The native equipment of human beings, individual differences, the psy- 
chology of learning, motivation, and the psychology of the school subjects. 

111. Methods of Teaching. 3(3-0) ; I, II, and SS. Prerequisite: Educ. 184. 
Open to freshmen and sophomores only. Moggie. 

Problems of general method in classroom procedure in grades and junior 
high school. 

129. Teaching Participation in Grade School. 1 to 4 hours. I, II, and SS. 
Prerequisite: Educ. 184, 111, and 107; open only to students in ithe curricu- 
lums in music. Hartman. 

The work in this course is done in an elementary school of Manhattan. Ap- 
pointment must be made at the time of registration for the semester during 
which it is done. 

132. Methods of Teaching Home Economics. 3(3-0) ; I. II, and SS. Pre- 
requisite: Food and Nutr. 102 and 107, Clo. and Text. 103, and Educ. 184. 
Rust, Baxter. 

The principles of teaching applied to the selection and development of 
home-economics subject matter in lessons for all types of pupils, and to the 
conduct of laboratory and classroom exercises. 

136. Methods of Teaching Agriculture. 3(3-0); I, II, and SS. Prerequi- 
site: Educ. 184. Davidson. 

Planning lessons, organizing materials, and conducting class, laboratory, and 
field instructional work in vocational agriculture. Individual and class projects 
are studied, as well as coordinating farm mechanics work. 

160. Teaching Participation in Home Economics. 3 hours. I, II, and SS. 
Prerequisite: Food and Nutr. 102 and 107, Clo. and Text. 103, and Educ. 132 
or concurrent registration. Rust. Baxter. 

Supervised teaching carried on in the home economics classes of the Man- 
hattan high school. 

161. Teaching Participation in Agriculture. 3 hours. I and II. Pre- 
requisite: Educ. 109 and 136. Davidson. 

Three weeks of observation and practice teaching in vocational agriculture 
classes in Manhattan high school and other high schools by arrangement; 
group study of classroom problems; lesson plans and presentation criticized by 
the College instructor and the vocational teacher in the practice department. 

163. Teaching Participation in High School. 1 to 4 hours. I, II, and SS. 
Prerequisite: Educ. 109 and senior standing. Strickland, Washburn, Saum. 

Work is done in classes in the Manhattan high school, and special appoint- 
ment must be made at the time of registration for the semester in which it is 
done. The work may be elected in biology, English, mathematics, modern 
languages, physical science, social science, art, physical education, and indus- 
trial arts. 



Divisio?i of General Science 197 

FOR GRADUATE AND UNDERGRADUATE CREDIT 

202. Extracurricular Activities. 3(3-0); II and SS. Prerequisite: Educ. 
210. Moggie. 

Extracurricular activities of the junior and senior high schools; educational 
objectives of these activities; methods and means employed in their accom- 
plishment. 

206. Philosophy of Education. 3(3-0); SS. Prerequisite: Educ. 109. 
Holton. 

Controlling and unifying philosophy of the American public school system 
and its European background. 

210. Educational Administration. 3(3-0); I, II, and SS. Prerequisite: 
for undergraduate credit, senior standing; for graduate credit, Educ. 109 and 
184. Strickland. 

Organization of state, county, city, and rural school systems in Kansas; 
Kansas school laws. 

212. Educational Measurements. 3(3-0); I, II, and SS. Prerequisite: 
Educ. 109 and 184. Strickland. 

Scientific measurement of achievement as distinguished from intelligence 
testing. 

219. Curriculum. 3(3-0); SS. Prerequisite: six hours in education and 
junior standing. Holton. 

Requirements of modern life upon schools and their objectives; examination 
of the entire school curriculum. 

223. Statistical Methods Applied to Education. 3(3-0) ; I, II, and SS. 
Prerequisite: junior standing. Not open to students who have credit in Math. 
203. Moggie. 

Statistical interpretation of data from educational and biological experience 
and research; graphical representation and interpretation; experimental and 
research methods. 

230. Principles of Guidance. 3(3-0); I, II, and SS. Prerequisite: Educ. 
210 or 236. Williams. 

Methods and practices in pupil guidance for vocations and career planning; 
analysis of desirable trades, professions, and business callings; guidance prob- 
lems in the public schools. 

232. Teaching Subjects Related to Home Economics. 1 to 3 hours; I, 
II, and SS. Prerequisite: Educ. 132 and 184. Rust. 

Objectives and principles in teaching subjects related to home economics; 
planning of courses of study which are based upon the problem methods of 
teaching. (Designed for teachers of vocational homemaking in the Smith- 
Hughes high-school courses.) 

234. Methods in Adult Homemaking Classes. 1 to 3 hours; SS. Pre- 
requisite : Educ. 132 and 184 or equivalent. Wyckoff. 

The principles of teaching applied to adult classes and a demonstration 
class in one' or more phases of homemaking. 

236. Principles of Secondary Education. 3(3-0) ; I, II, and SS. Prerequi- 
site: Educ. 184 and junior or senior standing. Williams. 

Historical study of secondary education; objectives of junior and senior 
high-school organization, administration, and supervision; methods of organiz- 
ing and conducting secondary education; field problems in junior and senior 
high school. A limited amount of field work required. 

239. Educational Sociology. 3(3-0); I, II, and SS. Prerequisite; Educ. 
184 and junior or senior standing. Holton. 

The group activities of the school in relation to personality traits; psy- 
chology of personality; the school's responsibility in the development of social- 
ized personality traits. 



198 Kansas State College 

241. Vocational Education. 3(3-0); I, II, and SS. Prerequisite: Educ. 
210 and 236 and junior or senior standing. Williams. 

Provisions for vocational education in Kansas and other states and coun- 
tries; principles underlying such education; relation of vocational education to 
the community, county, state, and nation. 

244. History op Education. 3(3-0); I, II, and SS. Williams. 

The history of education in the United States, with a consideration of the 
more important present-day problems in the organization, administration, and 
adjustment of public education in the light of historical development. 

249. Problems in Extension Education. Credit to be arranged. Pre- 
requisite : Econ. 151 or CS 3, and Educ. 184 or CP 8, or EXT 5. Gemmell, 
Fleenor.* 

Problems in extension met by director, supervisor, county agricultural agent, 
county home demonstration agent, 4-H club leader, or specialist. 

FOR GRADUATE CREDIT 

306. Advanced Educational Administration. 3(3-0); SS. Prerequisite: 
Educ. 210 or equivalent. Strickland. 

Constitutional and legal basis of public-school administration. Intended 
primarily for school executives. 

309. Problems in Educational Psychology. Credit to be arranged; I, II, 
and SS. Prerequisite: Educ. 109 and 184. Moggie. 

A study of problems, recent experimentations, and applications of the prin- 
ciples of educational psychology. 

311. Problems in Educational Measurement. Credit to be arranged; I, 
II, and SS. Prerequisite: Educ. 109 and 212. Strickland. 

Problems in refining educational measurement and using its results. 

312. Problems in Teaching Methods. Credit to be arranged; I, II, and 
SS. Prerequisite : Educ. 109. Strickland. 

Individual problems in development and definition of effective teaching 
procedure. 

313. Research in Organization and Presentation of Home Economics. 
Credit to be arranged; I, II, and SS. Prerequisite: graduate standing. Justin, 
Rust. 

Individual research problems in phases of organization and administration 
for home economics. May be chosen as the basis for thesis for the master's 
degree. The nature of the problem will depend upon the student's major 
interest. 

314. Problems in Organization and Presentation of Home Economics. 
Credit to be arranged; I, II, and SS. Prerequisite: graduate standing. Justin, 
Rust. 

This course permits opportunity for study of problems of organization and 
administration in this field. 

315. Supervision in Home Economics. 2(2-0); II and SS. Prerequisite: 
Educ. 160 and experience in teaching home economics. Rust. 

Problems met by a supervisor or director of home economics in the public 
schools; standardization of work; relation of supervisor to teacher; modern- 
ization of plant and equipment; course of study. 

316. Seminar in Home Economics Education.! 3(3-0) ; II and SS. Pre- 
requisite : Educ. 160 and experience in teaching home economics. Rust and 
visiting instructors. 

Recent trends in home economics education. 

* From the staff of the Department of Home Study. 
f Effective May 31, 1939. 



Division oj General Science 199 

317. Problems in Educational Administration. Credit to be arranged; I, 
II, and SS. Prerequisite: Educ. 210 and one year of teaching experience. 
Strickland. 

Critical study of a financial or administrative school problem. Primarily 
for school executives. 

322. Problems in Statistical Methods Applied to Education. Credit to 
be arranged; I, II, and SS. Prerequisite: Educ. 223 or equivalent, eight hours 
of college mathematics, and full graduate standing. Moggie. 

Solution of some statistical problem in research or thesis preparation; theory 
of statistics from a more advanced point of view; regression curves and various 
methods of correlation; literature of statistics. 

325. Research in Education. Credit to be arranged; I and II. Staff. 
Individual research problems in the general field of education and in the 
fields of psychology, mental testing, administration, and vocational education. 

333. Problems in Educational Sociology. Credit to be arranged; I, II, and 
SS. Prerequisite: Educ. 109 and 184 and graduate standing. Holton. 

Research problems in the social organization of the school and the social 
inheritance of school population, with special reference to the development of 
desirable personality traits. 

337. Problems in Vocational Education. Credit to be arranged; I, II, and 
SS. Prerequisite: Educ. 241 and 210 or 236. Williams. 

Solution of some vocational educational problem in research or in thesis 
preparation. Problems in administration, supervision, or curriculum building in 
the varied vocational fields to meet community needs. 

338. Problems in Vocational Guidance. Credit to be arranged; I, II, and 
SS. Prerequisite: Educ. 230A. Williams. 

Research problems in phases of guidance which affect better coordination 
and supervision of the work of junior and senior high schools, and develop- 
ment of part-time and adult education progress. 

COURSES IN PSYCHOLOGY 

FOR UNDERGRADUATE CREDIT 

184. General Psychology. 3(3-0) ; I, II, and SS. Peterson, Aim, Langford. 
Charge, 25 cents. 

FOR GRADUATE AND UNDERGRADUATE CREDIT 

250. Psychology of Childhood and Adolescence. 3(3-0); I, II, and SS. 
Prerequisite: Educ. 184. Aim. 

A genetic study of the trends in the development of structures, capacities, 
interests, and personality traits, that facilitate understanding and control of 
the behavior of childhood and adolescence. 

254. Abnormal Psychology. 3(3-0); I and II. Prerequisite: Educ. 184. 
Aim. 

Maladjustment of personality, behavioral disorders, psychoneuroses, de- 
mentias, dreams, hypnotism, and multiple personality. 

257. Advanced General Psychology. 3(3-0); II. Prerequisite: Educ. 184. 
Langford. 

Fundamental problems, methods, and interpretations of general psychology. 

259. Experimental Psychology. 3(3-0); I or II. Prerequisite: Educ. 184. 
Peterson. 

Experiments in animal and sensorimotor learning; a survey of the experi- 
mental literature; objective studies of the thought processes. 

260. Mental Tests. 3(3-0) ; I and II. Prerequisite : Educ. 184. Peterson. 
Selection of the best tests for particular purposes at various age and school 

levels; methods of conducting and scoring tests and of utilizing test results. 



200 Kansas State College 

261. Technic of Mental Tests. 3(1-6); II. Prerequisite: Educ. 223 and 
260 or concurrent registration. Peterson. 

Methods of giving and scoring the principal standard group tests of intelli- 
gence and special abilities; choice of tests; tabulation and interpretation of 
scores. 

265. Psychology of Advertising and Selling. 3(3-0); II. Prerequisite: 
Educ. 184. Peterson. 

Experimental results of present advertising and selling practices. 

266. Psychology of Exceptional Children. 3(3-0) ; II and SS. Prereq- 
uisite: Educ. 184. Aim. 

Mental giftedness, mental subnormality, speech disorder, handedness, psy- 
choneurotic and psychopathic personality trends and delinquency in children, 
with emphasis on causes, diagnostic tests, and behavioral adjustments. 

269. Animal Psychology. 3(3-0); I. Prerequisite: Educ. 184 and Zool. 
105. Aim. 

Animal behavior from the standpoint of sensory capacities, perception, 
adaptive behavior, learning, insight, and other functions. A survey of psy- 
chological apparatus and contributions to animal psychology. 

270. Social Psychology. 3(3-0); II and SS. Prerequisite: Educ. 184. 
Langford. 

The individual as a member of the group, including results of experiments 
upon and observations of the individual in the group situation. 

273. Psychology and Personnel Management. 3(3-0); I. Prerequisite: 
Educ. 184. Peterson. 

Scientific principles and procedures involved in employment; promotion, 
motivation of work, measurement and reward of achievements. 

276. Psychology of Art. 3(3-0); I, II, and SS. Prerequisite: Educ. 184. 
Langford. 

Brief introduction to the philosophy of art; interpretation of psychological 
principles used in production and appreciation of art; review of experimental 
esthetics in pictorial art and music, with special emphasis on the former. 

FOR GRADUATE CREDIT 

370. Problems in Psychology. Credit to be arranged; I, II, and SS. Pre- 
requisite : consult instructor. Peterson, Aim, Langford. 

Individual problems and reports in the field of psychology. Enrollment by 
recommendation of the instructor not later than midsemester. 

373. Psychology of Teaching and Learning. 3(3-0) ; I and SS. Prereq- 
uisite: Educ. 184. Peterson. 

Analysis of the various forms of learning and of the conditions favorable 
to the rapid development and effective functioning of knowledge, skills, atti- 
tudes, and purposes. 

376. Research in Psychology. Credit to be arranged; I, II, and SS. Staff. 
Individual research problems in the field of psychology. 

COURSES FOR FOUR-WEEK SUMMER SCHOOL 

for graduate and undergraduate credit 

283. Administration and Supervision of Secondary Schools. 2(10-0); 
four-week SS. Prerequisite : Educ. 210. Williams. 

Problems of organization, administration, and supervision covering the com- 
plete program of an administrative head of a school system in a small city. 
(Designed for principals of rural high schools and superintendents of small 
city systems.) 



Division oj General Science 201 

285. The Project Method in Agricultural Education. 2(10-0); four-week 
SS. Prerequisite: Educ. 161. Davidson, Hall. 

Intensive treatment of values, analysis, accounting, supervision, types, re- 
sults, records, reports of projects; conducted on the problem basis. 

287. Organization and Conduct of Group Activities. 2(10-0); four-week 
SS. Prerequisite: Educ. 241. Davidson, Hall. 

Fundamentals and principles on which productive class projects should be 
organized. Research and field work in class project study. 

289. Administration and Supervision of Vocational Education. 2(10-0); 
four-week SS. Prerequisite: Educ. 210. Williams. 

Objectives, curriculum organization and content, administrative and super- 
visory problems from the viewpoint of the city superintendent — leadership 
needs which must be met in a school system offering vocational education. 
The problem basis of treatment is used. 

291. Community Problems in Vocational Agriculture. 2(10-0); four- 
week SS. Williams, Davidson. 

Methods, organization, and conduct of club work, junior project work, class 
projects, and community projects in general — a course conducted on the prob- 
lem basis and designed specifically for teachers, supervisors, and directors of 
agricultural work. 

293. Problems in Evening School Classes. 2(10-0); four-week SS. Open 
to college graduates who have taught one year of vocational agriculture. 
Davidson, Hall. 

Problems of organization, curriculum, and methods of teaching evening 
schools and classes sponsored by the national vocational education act. De- 
signed for teachers in service. 

295. Organization Problems in Teaching Farm Mechanics. 2(10-0); 
four-week SS. Prerequisite: Educ. 161. Davidson, Hall. 

Analysis of the farm mechanics course of study; needs and interests of boys, 
learning difficulties, skills, and technical knowledge required. Correlation with 
agriculture. Application of laws of learning to the teaching process. Deter- 
mination of objectives. 

FOR GRADUATE CREDIT 

339. Problems in Part-time Classes* 2(10-0) ; four-week SS. Prerequi- 
site: graduate standing and one year's experience teaching vocational agri- 
culture. Davidson, Brown. 

Organization, curriculum, and methods of teaching part-time classes, spon- 
sored by national vocational education act. Designed for teachers in service. 

340. Statistical Methods in Agricultural Education.* 2(10-0); four- 
week SS. Prerequisite : graduate standing. Moggie. 

Fundamental statistical technics and interpretation of results. Problems 
encountered in the organization, use, and expression of agricultural data. 

* Effective June 1, 1938. 



202 



Kansas State College 



English 



Professor Davis 
Professor Conover 
Professor Rockey 
Professor Matthews 
Professor Rice 
Professor Faulkner 
Associate Professor Sturmer 
Associate Professor El cock 
Associate Professor Breeden 



Associate Professor Callahan 
Assistant Professor Garvey 
Assistant Professor Parker 
Assistant Professor Aberle 
Assistant Professor Scott 
Instructor Laman 
Instructor Peery 
Instructor Baker 
Instructor Bogue 



COURSES IN ENGLISH LANGUAGE 

FOR "UNDERGRADUATE CREDIT 

101. College Rhetoric I. 3(3-0); I, II, and SS. Prerequisite: three units 
of high-school English. Staff. 

104. College Rhetoric II. 3(3-0); I, II, and SS. Prerequisite: Engl. 101. 
Staff. 

110. Engineering English. 2(2-0) ; I and II. Prerequisite: Engl. 104 and 
junior standing. Rockey, Matthews, Faulkner. 

Technical descriptions, expositions of ideas, mechanisms, and processes; 
preparation of engineering talks, business letters, technical manuscripts, and 
records; brief review of composition. 

122. Commercial Correspondence. 3(3-0); I, II, and SS. Prerequisite: 
Engl. 104. Faulkner, Callahan. 

Writing of adjustment, credit, collection, and sales letters; principles of 
effective commercial writing. 

123. Written and Oral Salesmanship. 3(3-0); I and II. Prerequisite: 
Engl. 104. Faulkner. 

Writing of follow-up systems of sales letters; composition and display of 
circular material and catalogues; principles of advertising and psychology of 
selling; sales talks; actual sales practice with commercial concerns. 

125. Business English and Salesmanship. 3(3-0); II. Prerequisite: 
Engl. 104. Callahan. 

Principles of business letter writing and salesmanship in the field of engi- 
neering; writing of business letters; preparation of oral and written sales 
material. 

137. Agricultural English. 3(3-0); I. Prerequisite: Engl. 104. Davis, 
Matthews, Faulkner. 

Review of the composition essentials; business correspondence; bulletin 
writing; organization of short business talks; principles of farm advertising; 
problems that confront the county agent, the high-school teacher of agricul- 
ture, and the farm manager. 

140. Literature from the Readers. 3(3-0); SS. Staff. 

Planned to meet the needs of teachers of rural and grade schools. 

for graduate and undergraduate credit 

207. Technical Writing. 2(2-0) ; II. Prerequisite: Engl. 113 or 122. Staff. 

215. Technical Reports. 1(1-0) ; I and II. Prerequisite: Engl. 104. Davis, 
Organization and writing of technical reports, to accompany certain courses 
in engineering specified by heads of engineering departments. 

219. Advanced Composition I. 3(3-0); I. Prerequisite: Engl. 104. Davis. 

Subjects selected from the student's particular field of work; exposition of 
mechanisms, processes, and general expository writing. For graduate students 
practice is given in thesis organization and style. 



Division oj General Science 203 

220. Advanced Composition II. 3(3-0) ; II. Prerequisite: Engl. 104. Davis. 

Narrative writing both in its relation to the other forms of composition and 
as an independent form. Direction and criticism of thesis work is offered to 
graduate students. 

223. Advanced Problems in Commercial Correspondence. 3(3-0) ; II. 
Prerequisite: Engl. 122. Faulkner. 

Writing adjustment, credit, and collection letters; specialized study and 
writing sales and business promotion letters; composition of form paragraphs 
and circular letters; correspondence supervision. 

228, 230. Short Story I and II. 3(3-0) each; I and II, respectively. Pre- 
requisite: for I, Engl. 172; for II, Engl. 228. Rice. 

I: The world's best short stories; practice in writing sketches and short 
stories. 

II: Preparation of the short story for publication; the short story in 
America; types, characteristics, and tendencies. 

232. Oral English. 3(3-0); I, II, and SS. Prerequisite: Engl. 104. Rockey, 
Matthews, Faulkner. 

Oral composition as applied to conversation and informal discussions; cor- 
rection of errors in grammar, pronunciation, and idiom in everyday speech; 
a brief histoiy of English sounds. Investigations in phonology for graduate 
students. 

243. Advanced Grammar. 3(3-0); I, II, and SS. Prerequisite: Engl. 104. 
Elcock, Aberle. 

English etymology, inflections, syntax, and modem English and American 
usage. For graduate credit, reports on problems in modern English grammar. 

245. History of the English Language. 1(1-0). Prerequisite: for under- 
graduates, permission of the instructor; for graduates, Engl. 181. Nock. 

Nature of language and its development; English language and its use in 
the United States. 

COURSES IN ENGLISH LITERATURE 

FOR UNDERGRADUATE CREDIT 

172. English Literature. 3(3-0); I, II, and SS. Prerequisite: Engl. 104. 
Staff. 

175. American Literature. 3(3-0); I, II, and SS. Prerequisite: Engl. 172. 
Staff. 

181. History of English Literature. 3(3-0); I, II, and SS. Prerequisite: 
Engl. 172. Staff. 

for graduate and undergraduate credit 

255. Cultural Reading. 3(3-0) ; I and II. Not open to students who have 
credit in Engl. 172, 175, or 181. Prerequisite: Engl. 104. Conover, Davis, 
Matthews. 

A reading course in English and American literature, designed for students 
in agriculture, engineering, and other technical curriculums. 

260. Chaucer. 3(3-0); I. Prerequisite: Engl. 172. Elcock. 

262. Milton and the Puritan Revolt. 3(3-0); II. Prerequisite: Engl. 
172. Elcock. 

265. American Survey. 2(2-0); II. Prerequisite: Engl. 172 and 175. 
Davis, Breeden. 



204 Kansas State College 

268. Literature of the Middle West. 3(3-0); I. Prerequisite: Engl. 172. 
Callahan. 

Literature of the Middle West, particularly Kansas and the surrounding 
territory; its background, authors, and literature since the close of the Civil 
War. 

271. English Bible. 3(3-0); I, II, and SS. Prerequisite: Engl. 172. 
Conover, Rockey. 

273, 274. Shakespearean Drama I and II. 3(3-0) each; I and II, respec- 
tively. Prerequisite for each: Engl. 172. Davis, Conover, Sturmer. 

I : The life and times of Shakespeare ; five of Shakespeare's tragedies : 
Macbeth or Othello, Hamlet, King Lear, Coriolanus, and Romeo and Juliet. 

II: Five of Shakespeare's comedies: The Winter's Tale, As You Like It, 
Twelfth Night, Cymbeline, and The Tempest; collateral reading of earlier, 
contemporary, and Shakespearean comedy; present-day criticism of Shake- 
speare. 

276. English Essayists. 3(3-0); II. Prerequisite: Engl. 172. Davis, 
Conover. 

Among the authors discussed are Swift, Addison, Steele, Johnson, Burke, 
Lamb, Hazlitt, DeQuincey, Wilson, Newman, Ruskin, Spencer, Huxley, Pater, 
and Wilde. 

278. Wordsworth, Shelley, and Keats. 3(3-0); I. Prerequisite: Engl. 
172. Rockey. 

280, 281. World Classics I and II. 3(3-0) each; I and II, respectively. 
Prerequisite for each: Engl. 172. Faulkner. 

I : The literary masterpieces (in translation) of early times, particularly 
Greek and Latin classics. 

II: The literary masterpieces (in translation) of Western Europe, partic- 
ularly Italian, Spanish, French, and German writings. 

283. Contemporary Fiction. 3(3-0); I and SS. Prerequisite: Engl. 172. 
Conover, Scott. 

The more important British and American fiction since Hardy. 

284. Contemporary Drama. 3(3-0) ; II. Prerequisite: Engl. 172. Conover. 
Development of the drama since Ibsen; types of modern drama; works of 

important English, Irish, and American dramatists. 

286, 287. Novel I and II. 3(3-0); I and II, respectively. Prerequisite: 
Engl. 172. Breeden. 

288, 290. English Survey I and II. 2(2-0) each; I and II, respectively. 
Prerequisite: Engl. 172. Davis, Conover, Matthews. 

I: History of English literature from Anglo-Saxon times down to the close 
of the ElizalDethan period. 

II: The rise of Puritanism and its influence on English literature; the 
classical movement; romanticism and its development. 

293. Browning and Tennyson. 3(3-0); II. Prerequisite: Engl. 172. 
Rockey. 

297. Contemporary Poetry. 3(3-0); II and SS. Prerequisite: Engl. 172. 
Davis, Conover. 

FOR GRADUATE CREDIT 

305. Research in English. Credit to be arranged; I, II, and SS. Prereq- 
uisite : consult head of department and instructors concerned. 

Students undertake original investigation in English literature or applied 
English. The final results may be used to fulfill the thesis requirements for 
the master's degree. 



Division oj General Science 205 

Entomology 

Professor Dean Assistant Professor Bryson 

Professor Smith Assistant Professor Wilbur 

Professor Parker Assistant Lamerson 

Associate Professor Painter Graduate Assistant Dillon 

COURSES IN ENTOMOLOGY 

FOR UNDERGRADUATE CREDIT 

101. General Entomology. 3(3-0) or 4(3-3); I and II. Smith. 

A popular, general course dealing with insects and related arthropods in 
their relations to plants and animals, including man. Students expecting to 
use this course as a preerquisite to other courses in entomology should register 
for the laboratory, which is the same as for Ent. 203. Charge, $1. 

117. Milling Entomology. 2(2-0) ; I. Dean. 

Insect pests of flour mills, elevators, granaries, warehouses, and bakeries, 
and standard methods of dealing with them; inspection trips to flour mills and 
warehouses. 

for graduate and undergraduate credit 

201. Horticultural Entomology. 2(2-0); I. Prerequisite: Ent. 101 (4 
hours) or 203, and Zool. 105. Parker. 

The most important injurious insects of the vegetable garden, shade trees, 
flowering and greenhouse plants, deciduous and citrus orchards; methods of 
control. 

203. General Economic Entomology. 3(2-3); I and II. Prerequisite: 
Zool. 105 or Bot. 101 and 105; when taken for graduate credit, Zool. 105. Staff. 

Elementary anatomy and physiology of insects and the general principles 
upon which the control of these economic forms is based. Charge, $1.50. 

206. Staple Crop Entomology. 3(2-3); II. Prerequisite: Ent. 101 (4 
hours) or 203, and Zool. 105. Dean, Wilbur. 

Important economic insects of field crops, and methods to be used in deal- 
ing with them. Charge, 50 cents. 

208. General Apiculture. 3(2-3); I and II. Prerequisite: Ent. 101 (4 
hours) or 203. Parker. 

Structure, life history, general behavior, activities, and products of the 
honeybee; practice bee keeping; bee diseases and their eradication and con- 
trol; relation of bees to agriculture and horticulture. Charge, $1. 

211. External Insect Morphology. 3(1-6); I. Prerequisite: Ent. 203. 
Wilbur. 

External anatomy of representative insects belonging to a number of orders; 
structure of the exoskeleton ; a basis for taxonomv and hexapod morphology. 
Charge, $1.50. 

212. Internal Insect Morphology. 3(0-9); II. Prerequisite: Ent. 211. 
Painter. 

Internal anatomy of representative insects; plan and structure of the 
internal systems. Charge, $1. 

216. Principles of Taxonomy. 1(1-0); II. Prerequisite: Ent. 203 and 211. 
Painter. 

217. Taxonomy of Insects I. 2(0-6) ; II. Prerequisite: Ent. 203, 211, and 
216 or concurrent registration. Painter. 

Determination of major orders of insects; taxonomic literature; use of 
catalogues. Charge, $1.50. 

218. Taxonomy of Insects II. 3(0-9); II. Prerequisite: Ent. 217. Painter. 
Intensive study of a selected group of insects. Charge, $1.50. 



206 Kansas State College 

221. Advanced General Entomology. 3(3-0); II. Prerequisite: Ent. 101 
(4 hours) or 203, and Zool. 105. Wilbur. 

Broad biological aspects of the subject; understanding of the relation of 
insects to the complex environmental factors; the various subdivisions of 
entomology. 

226. Medical Entomology. 3(2-3); I. Prerequisite: Ent. 101 (4 hours) or 
203, and Zool. 105. Smith. 

Insects and other arthropods as parasites and disseminators of disease; life 
cycles, biology, and control of insect parasites. Charge, $1.50. 

229. Advanced Apiculture I. 3(2-3); I and II. Prerequisite: Ent. 208. 
Parker. Charge, $1. 

230. Advanced Apiculture II. 3(2-3); I and II. Prerequisite: Ent. 229. 
Parker. Charge, $1. 

231. Entomological and Zoological Literature. 2(2-0); I. Prerequisite: 
Ent. 101 or 203, and Zool. 105. Smith. 

All advanced students of entomology and zoology are expected to take this 
course. 

233. Insect Ecology. 2(2-0); II. Prerequisite: Ent. 101 (4 hours) or 203, 
and Zool. 105. Bryson. 

Influence of light, temperature, pressure, moisture, evaporation, air move- 
ments, food relations, biotic and other conditions of soil and atmosphere. 

234. Insect Control by Host Plant Resistance. 2(2-0); I. Prerequisite: 
Ent. 101 (4 hours) or 203 (3 hours), and An. Husb. 221. Painter. 

Resistance of varieties of crop plants to insect attack and their utilization 
in insect control; insect habits and physiology in relation to the cause of 
resistance and methods of breeding resistant varieties of crops. 

236. Zoology and Entomology Seminar, 1(2-0); I and II. Prerequisite: 
consult seminar committee. 

Presentation of original investigations, reviews of papers appearing in cur- 
rent journals, summaries of recent advances in various fields and discussion of 
various aspects of the fundamental problems of modern biology. 

238. Problems in Entomology. Credit to be arranged; I, II, and SS. Pre- 
requisite : consult instructors. Staff. 

Students may pursue a special problem in one of the following subjects: 
insect life history, insect control, insect classification, apiculture, insects in- 
jurious to stored grain and milled products, and household insects. 

240. Insect Physiology. 3(3-0); II. Prerequisite: Ent. 211 and Chem. 
122, 218, or 219. Parker. 

for graduate credit 

316. Research in Entomology. Credit to be arranged; I, II, and SS. 
Prerequisite: (1) for research in taxonomy and morphology, Ent. 203, 211, 217, 
and Zool. 214; (2) for research in economic entomology, Ent. 203, 206, and 
217; (3) for research in apiculture, Ent. 208, 229, and 230. Staff. 

Advanced students may undertake original investigation in taxonomy, 
morphology, or economic entomology. The results may be used to fulfill the 
thesis requirement for the master's or doctor's degree. 



Division of General Science 207 

Geology 

Professor Sperry Instructor Chelikowsky 

Instructor Byrne Graduate Assistant Harned 

The courses offered in geology are designed to meet the needs of three 
groups of students: the technical student in agriculture, civil engineering, 
or chemistry, who must know something of the relationship of geology to his 
particular field; the general student who desires some knowledge of the world 
about him; and the student who wishes to major in geology. 

COURSES IN GEOLOGY 

FOR UNDERGRADUATE CREDIT 

102. Engineering Geology. 4(3-3); I and II. Prerequisite: Chem. 110 or 
equivalent. Sperry, Chelikowsky. 

General principles of geology and their application to engineering problems. 
Charge, $1.50. 

103. General Geology. 3(3-0) ; I, II, and SS. Staff. 

Structural and dynamic features of the earth; the rock-forming minerals; 
the rocks and their decay; a short history of the earth. Three or four field 
trips during the semester. Charge, $1.50. 

110. Physiographic Geology. 3(3-0); II and SS. Prerequisite: Geol. 102 
or 103. Sperry. 

Topography of the earth and forces that have produced it. Origin of the 
topographic features of North America. Charge, $1.50. 

140. Principles of Geography. 3(3-0) ; II and SS. Sperry, Byrne. 
An introductory course in college geography, emphasizing the relationships 
between human activities and environment. Charge, $1.50. 

FOR GRADUATE AND UNDERGRADUATE CREDIT 

203. Historical Geology. 4(3-3); I and II. Prerequisite: Geol. 102 or 
103. Sperry, Byrne. 

Physical and biological events through which the earth has gone. Charge, 
$1.50. 

207. Economic Geology. 4(3-3); II. Prerequisite: Geol. 203 and Chem. 
110. Sperry. 

Origin and mode of occurrence of nonmetallic minerals, including coal and 
petroleum, and of metallic mineral deposits. Charge, $1.50. 

209. Crystallography and Mineralogy. 4(2-6); I. Prerequisite: Chem. 
110. Sperry, Chelikowsky. Charge, $1.50. 

210. Field Geology. SS. Credit to depend upon the amount of work done. 
Opportunity is offered students to do field work in the Rocky Mountains. 
Students interested should consult Mr. Sperry. 

215. Structural Geology. 4(3-3); II. Prerequisite: Geol. 203 and 209. 
Sperry, Chelikowsky. 

Mechanics of the earth's crust. Interrelation of structures found in the 
earth. Charge, $1.50. 

220. Invertebrate Paleontology. 4(3-3) ; I. Prerequisite: Geol. 203. Byrne. 
Evolution and geologic history of the invertebrate animals. Charge, $1.50. 

230. Field Methods in Geology. 3(1-6); I. Prerequisite: Geol. 203. 
Byrne. 

Construction of geologic maps, including a complete map of the Manhattan 
area; application of field methods to the problems of geology. Charge, $1.50. 



208 Kansas State College 

235. Optical Mineralogy. 4(2-6); I. Prerequisite: Geol. 209. Sperry, 
Chelikowsky. 

Use of the polarizing microscope in identifying crystal fragments, powders, 
sediments, and thin sections; optical methods of microscopic research. Charge, 
$1.50. 

236. Sedimentary Petrology. 5(3-6); I. Prerequisite: Geol. 203 and 209. 
Sperry. 

Mineralogy and origin of soils and other sediments, their transportation, 
deposition, and transformation. Charge, $1.50. 

241. Geologic Literature. 3(3-0); I. Prerequisite: Geol. 203 and 209. 
Staff. 

Current geologic literature and history of geology. Charge, $1.50. 

255. Vertebrate Paleontology. 3(3-0); II. Prerequisite: Geol. 203 or ten 
hours of zoology. Byrne. 

Evolution, geologic history, and classification of the vertebrates. Charge, 
$1.50. 

256. Micropaleontology. 3(1-6); I. Prerequisite: Geol. 203 and junior 
standing. Byrne. 

Preparation, identification, and use of microscopic fossils. Charge, $1.50. 

275. Problems in Geology. Credit to be arranged; I, II, and SS. Staff. 
An individual problem in a particular phase of geology investigated under 
the guidance of an instructor. 

FOR GRADUATE CREDIT 

301. Research in Geology. Credit to be arranged; I, II, and SS. Staff. 
Students with adequate preparation may undertake original investigations in 
geology. 



History and Government 

Professor Price Professor Parrish 

Professor Iles Professor Sageser 

Professor James Associate Professor Williams 

Professor Correll Assistant Professor Alsop 
Professor Shannon 

COURSES IN HISTORY 

FOR UNDERGRADUATE CREDIT 

101. Ancient Civilizations. 3(3-0) ; I and SS. Parrish. 

Early western culture and civilization, from its beginning to the decline of 
the Roman empire. 

102. Medieval Europe. 3(3-0) ; II and SS. Parrish. 

General history of Europe from the decline of the Roman empire to the 
discovery of the new world. 

104. American History Survey. 3(3-0) ; I and SS. Not open to students 
who have credit in Hist, 105, 201, or 202. Price. 

American history and institutions, combining constitutional, political, diplo- 
matic, economic, and social phases of the growth of our republic, with back- 
ground and interpretation. Charge, $1. 

105. American Industrial History. 3(3-0); I, II, and SS. Not open to 
students who have credit in Hist. 104, 201, 202, or 203. Staff. 

History of American agriculture, manufactures, and commerce with related 
activities from their colonial beginnings to the present; European develop- 
ments, as a side light on American history; growth of our national industrial 
organization and its present-day aspects. 



Division of General Science 209 

110. History of Commerce and Industry. 3(3-0) ; I. Shannon. 

Evolution of industry and commerce from primitive beginnings to pres- 
ent-day organization. Economic survey of world history, with special stress 
on the modern period. 

115. Modern Europe I. 3(3-0) ; I. Alsop. 

Development of Europe from 1500 to 1815, with special study of the Com- 
mercial Revolution; the Reformation; political democracy; French Revolu- 
tion; and the Napoleonic era. 

121. English History. 3(3-0) ; I, II, and SS. James. 

Political history of England; constitutional growth, and development of the 
British Commonwealth. 

126. Current History. 1(1-0); I, II, and SS. May not be taken more 
than four semesters for credit. Staff. 

FOR GRADUATE AND UNDERGRADUATE CREDIT 

201. American History I. 3(3-0) ; I, II, and SS. Not open to students who 
have credit in Hist. 104. Prerequisite : when taken for graduate credit, six 
hours of college history. Price. 

Beginning of American nationality and democracy through the War of 1812, 
including our industrial, constitutional, and political development with the 
European background. Charge, SI. 

202. American History II. 3(3-0); I, II, and SS. Prerequisite: when 
taken for graduate credit, six hours of college history. Price. 

Western expansion and sectionalism ; industrial conditions, political and con- 
stitutional issues, and leaders from 1812 to 1876. Charge, $1. 

203. American History III. 3(3-0); I, II, and SS. Prerequisite: when 
taken for graduate credit, six hours of college history. Price, lies, Shannon. 

Industrial conditions in America as affected by the Civil War; political and 
governmental activities of the period since 1865 in the light of industrial" con- 
ditions and developments. 

204. American Agricultural History. 3(3-0) ; I. Prerequisite: when taken 
for graduate credit, six hours of college history. Shannon. 

European background and Indian beginnings; development during the co- 
lonial period; the westward movement into the prairie regions of the Missis- 
sippi valley with the distinctive American developments in methods, livestock, 
and farm machinery. 

206. American Political Parties. 2(2-0); I. Prerequisite: when taken 
for graduate credit, six hours of college history. lies. 

Origin, development, leaders, and functions of political parties in America; 
issues and results of presidential elections; growth of nationality and develop- 
ment of self-government with special reference to present tendencies. 

208. Latin America. 3(3-0); I, II, and SS. Prerequisite: when taken f^vt; 
graduate credit, six hours of college history. James. /*§• 

Spanish expansion movement into the New World; development oy^lv, 
panic institutions therein; movement for independence and problems /«Ftl 
republican period. 

223. Modern Europe II. 3(3-0); I, II, and SS. Prerequisite: wher^^aken, 
for graduate credit, Hist. 115 or 121. Parrish. y*» 

General history of Europe from 1815 to the present, with emphasis upon^he 
social and political developments, including international relations. 

225. History of the Home. 3(3-0); II. Prerequisite: when taken for 
graduate credit, six hours of college history. Alsop. 

History of marriage and the family from primitive times to the present; 
marriage customs, position of women, child training; the modern home and 
recent changes and tendencies. 

14—6529 




210 Kansas State College 

226. British Empire. 2(2-0); II and SS. Prerequisite: when taken 
for graduate credit, six hours of college history. James. 

British maritime expansion movement; founding of colonies overseas; 
growth of self-governing dominions and the British Commonwealth. 

228. Immigration and International Relations. 2(2-0); I and SS. Pre- 
requisite : when taken for graduate credit, six hours of college history. Price, 
James. 

Causes and effects of the coming of the foreigner; changes as to the char- 
acter of the immigrants; conditions in Europe and in America that affect the 
number and quality of immigrants; survey of our diplomatic history. 

231. History of Religions. 2(2-0); I and SS. Prerequisite: when taken 
for graduate credit, six hours of college history. Parrish. 

Historical survey of the world's living religions; relation of each religion to 
its natural and cultural environment; dominating religious conceptions, lead- 
ers, and historic developments which characterize each. 

234. Twentieth Century Europe. 3(3-0); I, II, and SS. Prerequisite: 
when taken for graduate credit, Hist. 223 or equivalent. Correll. 

236. Far East. 3(3-0); II and SS. Prerequisite: when taken for graduate 
credit, six hours of college history. Parrish. 

Chinese culture and civilization from the beginning to the present day; 
achievements in the classical period; contacts with outsiders since 1840; new 
role of China and Japan in world commerce, trade, and politics. 

250. Seminar in History and Government. 2 to 5 hours; I, II, and SS. 
Prerequisite: six hours of college history of a type that will serve as proper 
background for the subject to be studied. Staff. 

Special fields connected with the history of agriculture, industry, commerce, 
though other fields may be studied at the discretion of the department. 

290. Historical Method and Bibliography. 2(2-0) ; I and SS. Prerequisite: 
when taken for graduate credit, six hours of college history. Shannon, 
Sageser. 

Survey of historical works; methods in writing history, historical articles, or 
theses. Required of graduate majors in history, recommended to undergradu- 
ate majors. 

FOR GRADUATE CREDIT 

301. Research in History. Credit to be arranged; I, II, and SS. Prerequi- 
site: Hist. 290 or concurrent registration, and permission of instructor. Staff. 

Research problems in European or American history, including international 
relations. Conclusions will generally take the form of a thesis. 

COURSES IN GOVERNMENT 

FOR UNDERGRADUATE CREDIT 

151. American Government. 3(3-0); I, II, and SS. lies. 

State and national government with emphasis on constitutional principles 
and on functional activity. 

152. American National Government. 3(3-0) ; I. Not open to students 
who have credit in Hist. 151. lies. 

Mechanism, functions, and control of the government of the United States. 
With Hist. 153, this course affords a comprehensive study of American na- 
tional, state, and local government. 

153. American State Government. 3(3-0); II. Not open to students who 
have credit in Hist. 151. lies. 

State and local government, with special attention to functions and prob- 
lems. 



Division of General Science 211 

163, 164. Business Law I and II. 3(3-0) each; I and II. Williams. 

I : Contracts, agency, and sales. 

II: Negotiable instruments, partnership, and corporations. 

167. Law for Engineers. 2(2-0) ; I and II. Williams. 

Case study of such rules of law as will prove most useful to engineers and 
architects; law of contracts. 

175. Farm Law. 2(2-0) ; I. Offered in 1939- '40 and in alternate years there- 
after. Not open to students who have credit in Hist. 276. Williams. 

Law, particularly real property, deeds, mortgages, relation of landlord and 
tenant, developed through study of Kansas cases. 

FOR GRADUATE AND UNDERGRADUATE CREDIT 

252. Comparative Government. 2(2-0) ; I or II, and SS. Prerequisite: Hist. 
151 or equivalent. lies, Williams. 

Principal democracies, including comparisons with the government of the 
United States; principal dictatorships of Europe. 

256. International Law. 2(2-0) ; I. James. 

Nature and scope of international law; factors contributing to its growth; 
tendencies in the development of the law today. 

260. Government and Business. 2(2-0) ; II. Prerequisite: when taken for 
graduate credit, Hist. 151, 163, 167, 175, or 276. Williams. 

Constitutional limitations upon the powers of government; laws affecting 
economic interests such as trade regulations, taxation, labor legislation; legis- 
lation for the benefit of debtors, and emergency legislation. 

276. Land Law. 2(2-0) ; I. Planned to supplement Econ. 218. Offered in 
1940-'41 and in alternate years thereafter. Not open to students who have 
credit in Hist. 175. Williams. 

Interests and rights in land ; methods by which such interests and rights are 
acquired and protected; relation of landlord and tenant and that of mortgagor 
and mortgagee, developed by study of Kansas cases. 

FOR GRADUATE CREDIT 

351. Research in Government. Credit to be arranged; I, II, and SS. Pre- 
requisite: consult instructor. Staff. 

Research problems in national or local government, American or European; 
studies in comparative government or international law. The conclusions gen- 
erally take the form of a thesis. 



Industrial Journalism and Printing 

Professor Rogers Associate Professor Hostetter 

Professor Keith Associate Professor Lashbrook 

Associate Professor Amos Assistant Professor Krieghbaum 

Courses in industrial journalism train students to do occasional writing for 
newspapers and periodicals. The curriculum in industrial journalism prepares 
for positions on farm journals, newspapers, and publications where articles on 
agricultural and industrial subjects are in demand. 

The Kansas Industrialist and The Kansas State Collegian are published 
under the supervision of the department. 

Printing has been taught in the College continuously since 1873, the longest 
period of instruction in any American college. 

All students enrolled in the curriculum in industrial journalism and all 
other students who take courses designated "Journalism fee charged," pay a 
charge of $1.50 a semester. Only one journalism fee is charged a student in a 
given semester. 



212 Kansas State College 

COURSES IN PRINTING 

FOR UNDERGRADUATE CREDIT 

101. Principles of Typography. 3(2-3) ; I and II. Prerequisite: Ind. Jour. 
140 or sophomore classification. Amos. 

History and art of printing; practice in setting straight matter; typography 
of advertisements and head display; principles of effective makeup. Journal- 
ism fee charged. 

102. Printing Practice. 2(0-6) ; SS. Amos. 

108, 111, 112. Ad Composition I, II, and III. 2(0-6) each; I, and II each. 
Prerequisite: for I, Ind. Jour. 101; for II, Ind. Jour. 108; for III, Ind. Jour. 
111. Amos. 

I : Principles of display and design as applied to advertisements. Journalism 
fee charged. 

II and III: Ind. Jour. 108 continued; more complicated work studied. Jour- 
nalism fee charged. 

114, 118, 120. Job Composition I, II, and III. 2(0-6) each; I and II each. 
Prerequisite: for I, Ind. Jour. 101; for II, Ind. Jour. 114; for III, Ind. Jour. 
118. Amos. 

I: Differences in requirements for job composition and ad composition. 
Journalism fee charged. 

II and III: Color work, tabular forms, and other job work. Journalism fee 
charged. 

122, 126. Press Work I and II. 2(0-6) each; I and II each. Prerequisite: 
for I, Ind. Jour. 108 or 114; for II, Ind. Jour. 122. Amos. 

I : Practical platen presswork under ordinary printing-office conditions 
Journalism fee charged. 

II: I continued; mixing inks; color work. Journalism fee charged. 

COURSES IN INDUSTRIAL JOURNALISM 

FOR UNDERGRADUATE CREDIT 

140. Journalistic Vocations. 2(2-0); II. Rogers. 

Orientation of the student in the profession and business of journalism. 
Journalism fee charged. 

152. Elementary Journalism. 3(3-0); I, II, and SS. Prerequisite: Ind. 
Jour. 140 or sophomore classification. Hostetter, Lashbrook. 

Methods of obtaining news of various types, the writing of the lead, and the 
general styles of the news story. Journalism fee charged. 

153. Kansas State Collegian Journalism. 1(0-3); I, II, and SS. Pre- 
requisite: permission of instructor. Lashbrook. 

Gathering and writing of news, or advertising practice, on The Kansas 
State Collegian under the supervision of the instructor. 

160. Agricultural Journalism. 3(2-3) ; I and II. Lashbrook. 

Principles of news writing as applied to agriculture. Journalism fee charged. 

162. Radio Writing. 2(2-0); I, II, and SS. Prerequisite: Ind. Jour. 152. 
Rogers, Keith. 

Preparation and broadcasting of radio news. 

164. Industrial Writing. 3(3-0); I and II. Prerequisite: Ind. Jour. 152. 
Hostetter, Lashbrook. 

Principles of journalism in the treatment of industrial subjects. Journalism 
fee charged. 

167. Industrial Feature: Writing. 2(2-0); I, II, and SS. Prerequisite: 
Ind. Jour. 164. Krieghbaum. 

Feature articles; underlying principles applied to writing on agricultural 
and other industrial subjects. Journalism fee charged. 



Division of General Science 213 

172. Journalism for Women. 2(2-0); II. Prerequisite: Ind. Jour. 167. 
Hostetter. 

A course for women students in news and feature writing for women's pages 
and women's magazines and consideration of specialized fields for the woman 
writer. Journalism fee charged. 

178. Principles of Advertising. 4(4-0); I and II. Prerequisite: for stu- 
dents in curriculum in industrial journalism, Ind. Jour. 164; for business ad- 
ministration students, Engl. 123. Keith. 

Study of goods to be advertised, analysis of the market, psychology of ad- 
vertising, preparation of advertising copy, and other important matters. Jour- 
nalism fee charged. 

179. Radio Advertising. 3(3-0); I, II, and SS. Prerequisite: for students 
in curriculum in industrial journalism, Ind. Jour. 178; for other students, Pub. 
Spk. 161. Keith, Summers. 

Broadcasting station management, principles and practice in radio adver- 
tising. 

180. Broadcasting Station Practice. 1(0-3); I, II, and SS. Prerequisite: 
Ind. Jour. 162. Rogers. 

News' gathering, writing, and broadcasting over radio station KSAC. 

181. Rural Press. 2(2-0); I and II. Prerequisite: Ind. Jour. 152. Lash- 
brook. 

Community newspapers; emphasis on presentation of agriculture and rural 
life. Journalism fee charged. 

183. News Bureau Methods. 2(2-0); I. Prerequisite: Ind. Jour. 152. 
Lashbrook. Journalism fee charged. 

199. Industrial Journalism Lecture. R; I and II. 

Addresses by practicing newspaper workers and members of the department. 
Required of all students in the curriculum in industrial journalism. Journal- 
ism fee charged. 

FOR GRADUATE AND UNDERGRADUATE CREDIT 

252. Language of Journalism* 2(2-0); II. Prerequisite: Ind. Jour. 164 
or permission of instructor. Nock. 

Nature and development of the English language, uses of language, words 
and meaning, jargon. Journalism fee charged. 

254. Copy Reading. 2(0-6); II. Prerequisite: Ind. Jour. 164. Hostetter. 
Krieghbaum. Journalism fee charged. 

255. Contemporary Thought. 3(3-0); I. Prerequisite: for students in 
curriculum in industrial journalism, Ind. Jour. 254; for others, Econ. 101. 
Rogers. 

Correlation and unification of various subjects previously pursued in col- 
lege; contemporary development and contemporary figures in science, the arts, 
and philosophy. 

257. Editorial Practice. 2(2-0); I. Prerequisite: Ind. Jour. 254. Hos- 
tetter. 

Writing of editorials suitable for farm papers, trade papers, and newspapers; 
shaping of editorial policies. Journalism fee charged. 

265. Materials of Journalism. 2(2-0); I. Prerequisite: Ind. Jour. 254. 
Rogers. 

Principal newspapers and magazines; accuracy and adequacy of news re- 
ports and other published matter; materials handled by the publications; 
methods of treatment; character of editorial comment. 

* Effective January 30, 1939. 



214 Kansas State College 

270. Magazine Features. 2(2-0); I, II, and SS. Prerequisite: for stu- 
dents in curriculum in industrial journalism, Ind. Jour. 167; for others, Engl. 
104. Rogers. 

Content of the course varied to suit the needs and desires of the students, 
emphasis upon such types of magazine writing as members of the class wish 
to practice. Journalism fee charged. 

273. History and Ethics of Journalism. 3(3-0); II. Prerequisite: Ind. 
Jour. 255. Rogers, Hostetter. 

278. Journalism Surveys. 2(0-6); II. Prerequisite: Ind. Jour. 254. 
Rogers, Hostetter. 

Careful investigation of the periodical reading matter of communities; tabu- 
lation of information obtained; relation of the reading matter to the industrial, 
economic, social, and moral life of the communities. 

282. Column Conducting. 2(2-0); II. Prerequisite: Engl. 104. Davis. 

285. Contemporary Affairs* 2(2-0); II. Prerequisite: Ind. Jour. 164 or 
permission of instructor. Concurrent registration with Hist. 126 not per- 
mitted. Kreighbaum. 

Contemporary news events and their background. Journalism fee charged. 

287. Current Periodicals. 3(3-0); II. Prerequisite: Engl. 104. Hostetter. 

288. Trade and Technical Writing. 2(2-0); II. Prerequisite: Ind. Jour. 
178. 

Theory and practice writing which pertains to the special interests of in- 
dustry, trade, and business. 

289. Newspaper Management. 2(2-0); II. Prerequisite: Ind. Jour. 178. 
Relation of departments of a newspaper to one another, costs, statistics, ad- 
vertising news, and business methods in publishing. 

295. Problems in Industrial Journalism. Credit to be arranged; I, II, 
and SS. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Staff. 

Investigation of special problems in industrial journalism. 

FOR GRADUATE CREDIT 

351. Research in Industrial Journalism. Credit to be arranged; I and 
II. Rogers. 

Several courses embodying creative literary work or detailed research in 
specialized journalism are arranged to meet the specific needs and desires of 
the individual graduate students. 



Library Economics 

Associate Librarian Derby Reference Librarian Davis 

In order that the Library may perform its functions efficiently instruction 
must be given regarding its use. A course is offered which familiarizes the 
student with scientific methods in the use of books and acquaints him with 
the best general reference books, as well as with standard works. Placed at the 
beginning of his College course, it increases his efficiency in study throughout 
the entire course. 

COURSES IN LIBRARY ECONOMICS 

FOR UNDERGRADUATE CREDIT 

101. Library Methods. 1(1-0); I and II. Derby, Davis. 



Effective January 30, 1939. 



Division \>/ General Science 215 

Mathematics 

Processor Stratton Assistant Professor Holroyd 

Professor Remick Assistant Professor Datjgherty 

Professor White Assistant Professor Munro 

Associate Professor Hyde Assistant Professor Sigley 

Associate Professor Lewis Instructor Rawhouser 

Associate Professor Lyons Instructor Shobe 

Assistant Professor Janes Instructor Hadley 

Assistant Professor Mossman 

COURSES IN MATHEMATICS 

FOR UNDERGRADUATE CREDIT 

101. Plane Trigonometry. 3(3-0); I, II, and SS. Prerequisite: Plane 
geometry and one and one-half units of high-school algebra. Staff. 

102. Solid Geometry. 2(2-0); I, II, and SS. Prerequisite: Plane geometry 
and one unit of high-school algebra. Staff. 

104. College Algebra. 3(3-0); I, II, and SS. Prerequisite: Plane geometry 
and one and one-half units of high-school algebra. Staff. 

107. College Algebra A. 5(5-0); I, II, SS. Prerequisite: Plane geometry 
and one unit of high-school algebra. Staff. 

The third semester of high-school algebra and the chief content of Math. 
104. 

108. General Algebra. 5(5-0); I, II, and SS. Prerequisite: Plane geometry 
and one unit of high-school algebra. Not open to students with credit in Math. 
104 or 107. For students in the curriculums in business administration and 
agricultural administration. Staff. 

110. Plane Analytic Geometry. 4(4-0); I, II, and SS. Prerequisite: Math. 
101 and Math. 104 or 107. Staff. 

112. Elementary Analysis I. 5(5-0); I. Prerequisite: Plane geometry 
and one and one-half units of algebra. Babcock. 

Functional relations, particularly the power function and periodic functions; 
the circle, ellipse, and hyperbola; binomial theorem and progressions. 

113. Elementary Analysis II. 5(5-0); I. Prerequisite: Math. 112. Bab- 
cock. 

Logarithmic and exponential functions; solution of triangles; simple har- 
monic motion; complex numbers; and the conic sections. 

114. Calculus I. 4(4-0); I, II, and SS. Prerequisite: Math. 110. Staff. 

115. Calculus II. 4(4-0); I, II, and SS. Prerequisite: Math. 114. Staff. 

116. Calculus IIA. 5(5-0); I and II. Prerequisite: Math. 114. Staff. 
Similar to Math. 115, with the addition of elements of differential equations 

occurring in engineering. 

121. Differential Equations for Engineers. 2(2-0) ; I, II, and SS. Pre- 
requisite. Math. 115. Stratton, Remick, White. 

126. Elements of Statistics. 3(3-0) ; I and II. Not open to students who 
have credit in Educ. 223. White. 

150. Mathematics of Finance, 3(3-0); II. Prerequisite: Econ. 133 and 
Math. 104 or 107. Janes. 

Interest, annuities, sinking funds, amortization, valuation of bonds, deprecia- 
tion, building and loan, and life insurance. 

FOR GRADUATE AND UNDERGRADUATE CREDIT 

201. Differential Equations. 3(3-0) ; I. Prerequisite: Math. 115. Strat- 
ton, Remick, White. 

202. Higher Algebra. 3(3-0); I, II, and SS. Prerequisite: Math. 115. 
Stratton, Munro, Sigley. 

Material selected from Bocher's Higher Algebra. 



216 Kansas State College 

203. Theory of Statistics. 3(3-0); II. Prerequisite: Math. 126 or per- 
mission of instructor. White. 

Random sampling, frequency curves, correlation theory, curve fitting, sig- 
nificant differences, and analysis of variance; practice with data from biology, 
economics and agronomy. 

207. Solid Analytic Geometry. 3(3-0); II. Prerequisite: Math. 115. 
Stratton. 

Coordinates of points in space and their transformation involving discussion 
of lines and planes; quadric surfaces, their classification and principal prop- 
erties. 

210. Advanced Calculus I. 3(3-0); I. Prerequisite: Math. 115. White. 

Special topics in integral calculus, including various methods of integrating 
elementary forms, definite integrals with attention to gamma and beta func- 
tions, and applications to lengths and areas. 

213. Advanced Calculus II. 3(3-0); II. Prerequisite: Math. 210. White. 
Continuation of Math. 210. 

216. Theory, of Equations. 3(3-0); I. Prerequisite: Math. 115. Stratton, 
Sigley. 

221. History of Mathematics. 3(3-0); I, II, and SS. Prerequisite: Math. 
110. Staff. 

223. Fourier's Series. 3(3-0); II. Prerequisite : Math. 201. White. 

225. Modern Plane Geometry. 3(3-0); II. Prerequisite: Math. 110. 
Stratton. 

Properties of a triangle and its circles, harmonic ranges and pencils, inver- 
sion, poles and polars. 

230. Vector Analysis. 3(3-0) ; I or II. Prerequisite: Math. 115. Babcock. 
Methods of vector algebra and geometry, with applications, and the ele- 
ments of tensors. 

231. Survey of Applied Mathematics I. 3(3-0); I. Prerequisite: Math. 
115. Babcock. 

An introduction to such subjects as determinants and matrices; infinite 
series; Fourier series; multiple, line, and improper integrals; and elliptic in- 
tegrals. 

232. Survey of Applied Mathematics II. 3(3-0); II. Prerequisite: Math. 
115. Babcock. 

A continuation of Math. 231, including ordinary and partial differential 
equations; vector analysis; probability; curve fitting. 

FOR GRADUATE CREDIT 

301. Theory of Functions of a Complex Variable. 3(3-0) ; II. Prerequi- 
site: Math. 201. Stratton, Munro. 

306. Theoretical Mechanics. 3(3-0); I. Prerequisite: Math. 115. Strat- 
ton. 

312. Higher Geometry. 3(3-0); II. Prerequisite: Math. 225. Stratton. 
Linear dependence, homogeneous coordinates, cross ratio, properties of 
conies, elements of projective geometry. 

316. Advanced Differential Equations. 3(3-0); I. Prerequisite: Math. 
201. Munro. 

Special topics, such as the equations of Legendre, Bessel, and Ricatti, with 
applications. 

326. Calculus of Variations. 3(3-0); I. Prerequisite: Math. 201. Remick. 
Some of the standard problems of maxima and minima wherein a definite 
integral affords the fundamental form of expression. 

331. Research in Mathematics. Credit to be arranged; I and II. Re- 
quired of all candidates for the master's degree whose major work is in the 
Department of Mathematics. Staff. 



Division of General Science 217 

Military Science and Tactics 

Professor Kingman, Colonel, Inf., U. S. A. 
Associate Professor Dempewolf, Major, Inf., U. S. A. 
Associate Professor Campbell, Major, Inf., U. S. A. 
Associate Professor Brown, Major, Inf., U. S. A. 
Associate Professor Crews, Major, CAC., U. S. A. 
Associate Professor Holmes, Major, Inf., U. S. A. 
Assistant Professor Aldrioh, Captain, CAC, U. S. A. 
Assistant Professor Frank, Captain, CAC, U. S. A. 
Assistant Williams, Staff Sergeant, D. E. M. L., U. S. A. 
Assistant Larson, Staff Sergeant, D. E. M. L., U. S. A. 
Assistant Wilson, Staff Sergeant, D. E. M. L., U. S. A. 
Assistant McDonald, Sergeant, D. E. M. L., U. S. A. 
Military Property Custodian Peters, 1st Lieut., Inf. -Reserve 

This College is one of the beneficiaries of the act of Congress of July 2, 
1862, known as the Land-grant College Act. Military tactics is required in the 
College curriculums. All male students who are citizens of the United States, 
and not physically disqualified, are required to take military training three 
hours a week for two years. Students entering with 25 hours of advanced 
credit are excused from the second year of military training; those entering 
with 59 hours of advanced credit are excused from all military requirements. 

Requests for excuse from military science, or for postponement, are acted 
upon by the president of the College. Such requests are presented through the 
student's dean, and the president obtains the advice of the professor of military 
science and tactics, who investigates each case on its merits and makes his 
recommendation to the president. Requests based on physical condition must 
be accompanied by a recommendation made by the College physician. Stu- 
dents excused from military science for any reason are assigned an equivalent 
amount of some other College work instead. Students permitted to postpone 
military science are not thereby excused, but must take it later. 

Students enrolled in military courses who were members of junior units, 
R. O. T. C, at military academies or high schools, or those receiving military 
training while enrolled in government-aided schools (section 55c, National De- 
fense Act, and section 1225, Revised Statutes) may apply for advanced-credit 
exemption on the basis of one semester for each year of training at a high 
school or government-aided school; provided there is stationed at these schools 
an officer of the Army detailed as professor of military science and tactics; 
and provided further that no credit will be given beyond the basic course, 
which comprises the first four semesters of the College curriculums (freshman 
and sophomore years). 

An infantry unit and a coast artillery unit of the Reserve Officers' Training 
Corps have been established in this College. 

A laboratory fee of 75 cents per semester is required of all students assigned 
to military training. 

PERTINENT REGULATIONS OF THE R.O.T.C. 

1. Basic Course, (freshmen, sophomores). Each student in these classes 
will be furnished a complete uniform and equipment for his use in the course. 
The articles remain the property of the United States and must be turned in 
by each student at the close of each college year or upon withdrawal from the 
R. 0. T. C. Shoes are not furnished. Tan shoes of smooth leather must be 
worn with the uniform by all basio R. 0. T. C. students. 

To insure the return of this uniform, a deposit of $5 is required of each 
basic course student. The deposit will be refunded when the complete uni- 
form is returned to the military department in good condition. 

In case any article of clothing is lost or because of carelessness or improper 
use becomes unfit for reissue or requires repairs, the student to whom it was 
issued must pay the cost of replacement or of repairs. In any instance, the 
extent and cause of the damage will be determined by the professor of military 
science and tactics or by a member of the regular military faculty designated 
by him. 



218 Kansas State College 

No course in military science will be regarded as completed by any student 
who is indebted to the College for loss of, or damage to, government property. 

2. Advanced Course. The student who continues in the R. O. T. C. after 
completing the Basic Course will receive the following: 

a. A special uniform allowance. 

b. Commutation of subsistence at the rate of 25 cents per day, provided 
he agrees to complete the Advanced Course, including a course in camp train- 
ing. The camp training referred to is without expense to the student. Cloth- 
ing and subsistence will be furnished and he will be paid at the rate of 70 cents 
per day, and five cents per mile to and from camp for travel expenses. 

After graduation he will be eligible for appointment by the President of the 
United States as a reserve officer of the Army of the United States, and if so 
appointed he may, under certain conditions, be appointed and commissioned a 
second lieutenant in the regular army. 

The corps of cadets at present is organized as one regiment with a military 
band. 

Students who are regularly enrolled in the Advanced Course of the Senior 
Division receive three elective hours toward graduation for each semester of 
Advanced Military Training. 

COURSES IN MILITARY SCIENCE AND TACTICS 

FOR UNDERGRADUATE CREDIT 

Senior Division, R. O. T. C. 

BASIC COURSE, INFANTRY 

(For students not in the Division of Engineering and Architecture or in the 
curriculums in Industrial Chemistry and Milling Industry.) 

101A. Infantry I. 1(1-2); I. Staff. 

(a) Practical: Leadership, weapons, infantry drill, ceremonies, rifle marks- 
manship. 

(b) Theoretical: National Defense Act and R. 0. T. C, obligations of citi- 
zenship, military history and policy, military discipline, courtesies and cus- 
toms of the service, military sanitation and first aid, military organization, or- 
ganization of the infantry, weapons, rifle marksmanship. 

102A. Infantry II. 1(1-2); II. Prerequisite: Mil. Sc. 101A. Staff. 
Continuation of Mil. Sc. 101A. 

103A. Infantry III. 1(1-2); I. Prerequisite: Mil. Sc. 102A. Brown. 

(a) Practical: Leadership, infantry drill, ceremonies, automatic rifle, com- 
bat training. 

(b) Theoretical: Leadership, automatic rifle, characteristics of infantry 
weapons, combat training. 

104 A. Infantry IV. 1(1-2) ; I and II. Prerequisite: Mil. Sc. 103A. Brown. 
Continuation of Mil. Sc. 103A. 

ADVANCED COURSE, INFANTRY 

(For students not in the Division of Engineering and Architecture or in the 
curriculums in Industrial Chemistry and Milling Industry.) 

109. Infantry V. 3(2-3); I. Prerequisite: Mil. Sc. 104A. Campbell. 

(a) Practical: Leadership, infantry drill, ceremonies, combat training. 

(b) Theoretical: Aerial photograph reading, combat training, defense 
against chemical warfare, administration I, administration II, care and opera- 
tion of motor vehicles. 

110. Infantry VI. 3(2-3); II. Prerequisite: Mil. Sc. 109. Campbell. 
Continuation of Mil. Sc. 109. 



Division of General Science 219 

111. Infantry VII. 3(2-3); I. Prerequisite: Mil. Sc. 110. Dempewolf. 

(a) Practical: Leadership, infantry drill, ceremonies. 

(b) Theoretical: Military history and policy, military law, company ad- 
ministration and supply. 

112. Infantry VIII. 3(2-3); II. Prerequisite: Mil. Sc. 111. Dempewolf. 
Continuation of Mil. Sc. 111. 

Note.- — Advanced -course students are required to attend one camp. This comes normally 
at the end of the junior year, and is held usually at Fort Leavenworth, Kan. 

BASIC COURSE, COAST ARTILLERY 

(For students in the Division of Engineering and Architecture and in the 
curriculums in Industrial Chemistry and Milling Industry.) 

113A. Artillery I. 1(1-2); I. Aldrich, Frank. 

(a) Practical: Military sanitation, first aid, map reading, rifle marksman- 
ship, leadership, Coast Artillery weapons and materiel. 

(b) Theoretical: National Defense Act and the R. O. T. C, obligations of 
citizenship, military history and policy, organizatino of the Army, military 
discipline, courtesies and customs, map reading. 

114A. Artillery II. 1(1-2); II. Prerequisite: Mil. Sc. 113A or 101A. 
Crews, Aldrich, Frank. 

Continuation of Mil. Sc. 113A. 

115A. Artillery III. (1-2); I and II. Prerequisite: Mil. Sc. 114A or 102A. 

(a) Practical: Leadership; Coast Artillery weapons and materiel; fire con- 
trol and position finding for seacoast artillery; basic gunnery, fire control and 
position finding for anti-aircraft artillery; rigging. 

(b) Theoretical: Leadership; Coast Artillery weapons and materiel; fire 
control and position finding for seacoast artillery ; characteristics of naval tar- 
gets. 

116A. Artillery IV. 1(1-2) ; I and II. Prerequisite: Mil. Sc. 115A. Crews, 
Aldrich. 

Continuation of Mil. Sc. 115A. 

ADVANCED COURSE, COAST ARTILLERY 

(For students in the Division of Engineering and Architecture and in the 
curriculums in Industrial Chemistry and Milling Industry.) 

117. Artillery V. 3(2-3); I. Prerequisite: Mil. Sc. 116A. Frank. 

(a) Practical: Leadership, fire control and position finding for seacoast 

artillery, orientation, applied gunnery for seacoast artillery. 

i 

(b) Theoretical; Leadership, administration, aerial photograph reading, 
defense against chemical warfare; basic gunnery, fire control and position find*- 
ing for anti-aircraft artillery; signal communication, orientation, applied gun- 
nery for seacoast artillery. 

118. Artillery VI. 3(2-3) ; II. Prerequisite: Mil. Sc. 117. Frank. 
Continuation of Mil. Sc. 117. 

119. Artillery VII. 3(2-3) ; I. Prerequisite: Mil. Sc. 118. Crews. 

(a) Practical; Leadership, orientation, field fortifications for sea coast artil- 
lery, technic and elementary tactics for seacoast artillery. 

(b) Theoretical; Leadership, military law, orientation, field fortifications 
for seacoast artillery, technic and elementary tactics for seacoast artillery. 

120. Artillery VIII. 3(2-3) ; II. Prerequisite: Mil. Sc. 119. Crews. 
Continuation of Mil. Sc. 119. 

Note — Advanced-course students are required to attend one camp. This comes normally 
at the end of the junior year, and is held usually at Fort Sheridan, 111. 



220 Kansas State College 

Modern Languages 

Professor Moore Associate Professor Pettis 

Professor Limper Instructor Townsend 

Associate Professor Crittenden Instructor Pyle 

Students who have had German, French, or Spanish in high school may not 
duplicate that work for college credit. One year of a language in high school 
is, as a rule, equivalent to one semester in college. In doubtful cases, the head 
of the department should be consulted. 

COURSES IN GERMAN 

FOR UNDERGRADUATE CREDIT 

101, 102. German I and II. 3(3-0) each; I, II, and SS. Prerequisite: For 
II, Mod. Lang. 101 or equivalent. Moore, Limper. 

111. German III. 3(3-0); I, II, and SS. Prerequisite: Mod. Lang. 102 or 
equivalent. Moore, Limper. 

112. German IV. 3(3-0); I, II, and SS. Prerequisite: Mod. Lang. Ill or 
equivalent. Moore, Limper. 

137. Scientific German. 4(4-0); I. Prerequisite: Mod. Lang. 102 or 
equivalent. Moore. 

138. Advanced Scientific German. 2(2-0); II. Prerequisite: Mod. Lang. 
137. Moore. 

FOR GRADUATE AND UNDERGRADUATE CREDIT 

209. Schiller. 3(3-0); I, II, and SS. Prerequisite: Mod. Lang. 112 or 
equivalent. Moore, Limper. 

213. Goethe. 3(3-0); I or II. Prerequisite: Mod. Lang. 112 or equivalent. 
Moore. 

215. Nineteenth Century German Drama. 3(3-0); I or II. Prerequisite: 
Eighteen hours of college German or equivalent. Moore. 

Rapid reading of dramas by Grillparzer, Hebbel, Hauptmann, and others. 

COURSES IN FRENCH 

FOR UNDERGRADUATE CREDIT 

151, 152. French I and II. 3(3-0) each; I, II, and SS. Prerequisite: For 
II, Mod. Lang. 151 or equivalent. Limper, Pettis, Townsend. 

161. French III. 3(3-0); I, II, and SS. Prerequisite: Mod. Lang. 152 or 
equivalent. Limper, Pettis, Townsend. 

162. French IV. 3(3-0); I, II, and SS. Prerequisite: Mod. Lang. 161 or 
equivalent. Limper, Pettis. 

163. French Composition and Conversation. 3(3-0) ; I or II. Prerequisite: 
Mod. Lang. 162. Pettis, 

FOR GRADUATE AND UNDERGRADUATE CREDIT 

252. French Novel. 3(3-0); II. Prerequisite: Mod. Lang. 162 or equiva- 
lent. Limper. 

257. French Drama I. 3(3-0); I or II. Prerequisite: Fifteen hours of 
college French or equivalent. Pettis. 

Classic French drama, including Corneille, Moliere, Racine, Marivaux, and 
others. 

258. French Drama II. 3(3-0); I or II. Prerequisite: Fifteen hours of 
college French or equivalent. Pettis. 

Modern French drama, including Brieux, Hervieu, Maeterlinck, Rostand, 
and others. 



Division oj General Science 



221 



COURSES IN SPANISH 

FOR UNDERGRADUATE CREDIT 

176, 177. Spanish I and II. 3(3-0) each; I, II, and SS. Prerequisite: For 
II, Mod. Lang. 176 or equivalent. Moore, Crittenden, Townsend. 

180. Spanish III. 3(3-0) ; I, II, and SS. Prerequisite : Mod. Lang. 177 or 
equivalent. Moore, Crittenden, Townsend. 

181. Spanish IV. 3(3-0) ; I and II. Prerequisite: Mod. Lang. 180 or equiv- 
alent. Crittenden, Townsend. 

194. Spanish Composition and Conversation. 3(3-0); II. Prerequisite: 
Mod. Lang. 181. Townsend. 

FOR GRADUATE AND UNDERGRADUATE CREDIT 

275. Spanish Novel. 3(3-0) ; I. Prerequisite: Mod. Lang. 181. Townsend. 

280. Spanish Drama. 3(3-0) ; II. Prerequisite: Mod. Lang. 181. Critten- 
den. 



Music 



Professor Lindquist 
Associate Professor Sayre 
Associate Professor Downey 
Assistant Professor Hart man 
Assistant Professor Painter 
Assistant Professor Jefferson 
Assistant Professor Martin 



Assistant Professor Stratton 

Assistant Professor Pelton 

Assistant Professor Jesson 

Assistant Professor Grossmann 
Instructor Moon 
Instructor Engle 



Instruction in voice, piano, organ, violin, violoncello, double-bass, and other 
instruments, is given in private lessons. All theoretical subjects are taught in 

PRELIMINARY MUSICAL TRAINING 

Applicants for freshman standing in the four-year music curriculums must 
pass an examination over certain requirements, which are as follows: 

CURRICULUM IN APPLIED MUSIC 

Voice majors: A voice of superior quality, ability to sing in time and in 
tune, and a practical knowledge of music notation. 

Piano and Organ majors: A considerable degree of proficiency in the funda- 
mentals of piano technic and in the playing of the easier classics. 

Other Instrumental majors: A practicable knowledge of the fundamental 
technic of playing the instrument in the study of which the student desires 
to major, and a considerable degree of proficiency in the playing of the easier 
classics written for that instrument. 

CURRICULUM IN MUSIC EDUCATION 

School Music majors: A practicable degree of proficiency in the funda- 
mentals of piano technic and sight reading, and the ability to sing in time and 
in tune. 

Band and Orchestra majors: A practicable degree of proficiency in the fun- 
damentals of piano technic. 

COURSES IN THE THEORY OF MUSIC 

FOR UNDERGRADUATE CREDIT 

101, 102. Harmony I and II. 2(3-0) each; I, II, and SS. Prerequisite: 
Mus. 118 or equivalent. Stratton, Jesson. 

I: Major and minor scales; intervals; primary triads and their inversions; 
dominant seventh and its inversions; harmonizing melodies and basses. 

II: Subordinate triads and their sevenths in progressions and inversions; 
elementary modulation; original exercises. 



222 Kansas State College 

103, 104. Harmony III and IV. 2(3-0) each; I and II, respectively, and 
SS. Prerequisite : Mus. 102. Stratton, Jesson. 

Ill: Modulation completed; altered and mixed chords; embellishments. 

IV: Works of the masters; writing of original exercises and small compo- 
sitions. 

105, 106, 107, 108. Ear Training and Sight Singing I, II, III, and IV. 
2(1-3) each; I, II, I and II, respectively. Prerequisite: Mus. 118 or equivalent. 
Hartman. 

Reading and hearing of intervals, chords, and rhythmical forms. 

108A. Counterpoint. 2(2-0); I, II, and SS. Prerequisite: Mus. 104. 
Stratton. 

Melody writing; association of melodies in simple counterpoint, leading to 
the writing of original two-and three-part inventions. 

111. Musical Form and Analysis. 1(1-0); I, II, and SS. Prerequisite: 
Mus. 108A. Jesson. 

Forms used in composition; the music of Bach, Haydn, Mozart, Beethoven, 
Schumann, Chopin, Brahms, Wagner, and others. 

115. Radio Music Appreciation Programs. 1(1-1); I, II, and SS. Prereq- 
uisite : Mus. 130 or concurrent registration. Grossmann. 

Program building, and practical experience in planning and presentation of 
music appreciation programs. 

118. Music Fundamentals. 2(3-0); I, II, and SS. Not open to students 
in music curriculums. Sayre. 

Elementary instruction in the theory of music. 

119. Broadcast Musical Programs. 2(3-0); I, II, and SS. Prerequisite: 
Pub. Spk. 161 or equivalent. Stratton. 

Planning and arranging broadcasts of musical programs; copyright law as 
applied to musical broadcast; theme, transitional, background, and incidental 
music; microphone technic applied to music. 

130, 131. History and Appreciation of Music I and II. 2(3-0) each; I 
and II, respectively, and SS. Lindquist. 

The three periods in the history of music, the style of music peculiar to 
each, and musical contact with the great composers. 

133. Choral Conducting. 1(2-0); I, II, and SS. Prerequisite: Mus. 118 
or equivalent. Lindquist. 

134. Instrumental Conducting. 1(2-0); I, II, and SS. Prerequisite: 
Mus. 104 and 133. Downey. 

136. Instrumentation and Orchestration. 3(3-0) ; I, II, and SS. Pre- 
requisite: Mus. 108A. Downey. 

Instruments of the band and orchestra studied with relation to tone color, 
range, and function; simple and familiar compositions scored for ensemble, in- 
cluding full orchestra. 

138, 139. School Music I and II. 2(2-0) each; I and II, respectively, and 
SS. Prerequisite : Mus. 105 and 106. Hartman. 

I : Methods and materials for teaching music in kindergarten and the pri- 
mary grades. 

II : Methods and materials for teaching music in the elementary grades. 

143. School Music III. 2(2-0) ; I, II, and SS. Prerequisite: Mus. 138 and 
139. Hartman. 

Methods and teaching materials suitable for junior and senior high school. 

149. Methods and Materials for the Studio. 1(2-0); I and II. Staff. 

Methods of teaching fundamental technic; selection of teaching materials, 
and the outlining of courses of study. For students in the curriculum in Ap- 
plied Music; taught in separate divisions for voice, piano, organ, violin, etc. 



Division of General Science 223 

151A to 151H. Orchestral Instruments I to VIII. Ms(l-O) each; I, II, 
and SS. Downey, Martin. 

Methods of tone production of the most important instruments of the 
orchestra. Fee, $2. 

COURSES IN APPLIED MUSIC 

When Mus. 153, 156, 158, 161, 163, 167, or 172 are elected by students out- 
side the music curriculums, a maximum of two hours per semester is allowed. 

153. Instrument. to 4 hours a semester, maximum of 32 hours allowed; 
I, II, SS. For the curriculums in Applied Music and Music Education, and 
elective in other curriculums. Downey, Martin. For fees, see table follow- 
ing Mus. 198. 

156. Voice. to 4 hours a semester, maximum of 32 hours allowed; I, II, 
and SS. For the curriculums in Applied Music and Music Education, and 
elective in other curriculums. Lindquist, Sayre, Grossmann. For fees, see 
table following Mus. 198. 

158. Violin. to 4 hours a semester, maximum of 32 hours allowed; I, II, 
and SS. For the curriculums in Applied Music and Music Education, and 
elective in other curriculums. Martin. For fees, see table following Mus. 198. 

161. Piano. to 4 hours a semester, maximum of 32 hours allowed; I, II, 
and SS. For the curriculums in Applied Music and Music Education, and 
elective in other curriculums. Staff. For fees, see table following Mus. 198. 

163. Violoncello. to 4 hours a semester, maximum of 32 hours allowed; 
I, II, and SS. For the curriculums in Applied Music and Music Education, 
and elective in other curriculums. Downey. For fees, see table following 
Mus. 198. 

167. Double-bass. to 4 hours a semester, maximum of 32 hours allowed; 
I, II, and SS. For the curriculums in Applied Music and Music Education, and 
elective in other curriculums. Downey. For fees, see table following Mus. 198. 

172. Organ. to 4 hours a semester, maximum of 32 hours allowed; I, II, 
and SS. For the curriculums in Applied Music and Music Education, and elec- 
tive in other curriculums. Jesson. For fees, see table following Mus. 198. 

174. Vocal Ensemble. No credit (0-2) ; I, II, and SS. Elective for stu- 
dents of superior vocal talent. Lindquist, Sayre, Grossmann. Fee, $2. 

176. Piano Ensemble. R(l-O) ; I and II. Required of students majoring 

in piano or organ. Painter. Fee, $2. 

i ^ 
178. Instrumental Ensemble. 1(0-3); I, II, and SS. Elective for selected 

students. Downey, Martin. Fee, $2. 

181A to 181F. Recital I to VI. R( - ); I (181 A, C, and E) and II (181 
B, D, and F). Required of all students taking work in the curriculum in Ap- 
plied Music. A joint solo recital appearance in Recital IV, and an individual W,, 
solo recital in Recital VI. V^> 

183. Ensemble. Mj(0-2) each semester. For the curriculums in Applied 
Music and Music Education, and elective in other curriculums. Staff. 

Required ensemble work may be taken in Choral Ensemble (Mus. 194); 
Orchestra (Mus. 195); or Band' (Mus. 198). 

187. Practice Teaching op Music. R(l-O) ; II. Staff. 

Practice teaching in private classes for students in the curriculum in Ap- 
plied Music. 

194 Choral Ensemble. %(0-2) each semester. Weekly rehearsals, all 
special rehearsals, and public performances. Prerequisite : A voice of good 
quality, a knowledge of musical notation, and the ability to sing in time and 
in tune. Lindquist. Sayre, Grossmann. 

Membership in both the College Chorus and the Men's Glee Club or the 
College Chorus and the Women's Glee Club. 



MP> 



224 



Kansas State College 



MUSICAL ORGANIZATIONS 

191. Chorus. Weekly rehearsals. I and II. Prerequisite: Ability to read 
musical notation and to sing in time and in tune. Membership is open to 
the entire student body, and to others who may qualify. Approval of the 
head of the Department of Music must be obtained. Lindquist. 

Men's Glee Club. Membership, by competitive tryouts, is open to the 
entire student body. Lindquist. 

Women's Glee Club. Membership, by competitive tryouts, is open to the 
entire student body. Sayre, Grossmann. 

195. Orchestra. %(0-2); I and II. Weekly rehearsals. Membership, by 
competitive tryouts, is open to the entire student body. Downey. 

198. Band. %(0-2) ; I and II. Weekly rehearsals. Membership, by com- 
petitive tryouts, is open to the entire student body. Downey, Martin. Fee, 
50 cents; deposit, $2. 

FEES IN MUSIC 

Course 
Two lessons each week for a semester : 

Voice $36 $30* $24* $14f 

Piano 36 30* 24* 14t 

Organ 36 30* 24* 14f 

Violin 36 30* 24* 14f 

Violoncello 36 30* 24* 14t 

Other orchestral instruments 30 30* 24* 14f 

One lesson each week for a semester : 

Voice $20 $17* $14* $9t 

Piano 20 17* 14* 9t 

Organ 20 17* 14* 9t 

Violin 20 17* 14* 9f 

Violoncello 20 17* 14* 9f 

Other orchestral instruments 17 17* 14* 9t 

Piano rent, one hour daily — $4 a semester. 
Piano rent, two hours daily — $6 a semester. 
Organ rent, one hour weekly — $3 a semester. 



Physical Education and Athletics 



Professor Ahbarn 
Professor Saum 
Professor Washburn 
Professor Fry 

Associate Professor Williamson 
Assistant Professor Root 
Assistant Professor Geyer 
Assistant Profesor Maytum 
Assistant Professor Haylett 



Assistant Professor Moll 
Instructor Patterson 
Instructor Young 
Instructor Thompson 
Instructor Lyman 
Instructor Cochrane 
Assistant Myers 
Assistant Partner 



Men taking physical education Courses 103, 104, 105, and 106 must furnish 
their own uniforms consisting of white sleeveless shirt, short white trunks, and 
rubber-soled shoes. Men majoring in physical education must purchase a spe- 
cial uniform for their gynasium class work, which costs approximately $9. 

Equipment is furnished to acceptable candidates for varsity and freshman 
athletic teams, who are held responsible for it. Failure to return or replace 
equipment subjects the offender to a fine or other disciplinary action. 

All freshmen and sophomores must enroll for physical education unless ex- 
cused for disability on recommendation of the College physician. Students en- 
tering with 15, 25, 44, or 59 hours of advanced credit are excused from one, 
two, three, or four semesters, respectively, of physical education, no substitution 
being required. 

Each student receives a physical examination before undertaking the work 
of the department. 



* Fees for children. 

t Student assistant fees. 



Division oj General Science 225 

The College is a member of the Big Six Athletic Conference. The Athletic 
Council, consisting of eight faculty members, has supervision and control of 
college sports. Each candidate for an athletic team receives thorough examina- 
tion before he competes, and careful medical supervision throughout the year. 

There is an extensive intramural program of thirteen sports for men and 
nine for women. Awards in the form of emblems, sweaters, placques, and 
medals are made to students on the basis of participation. 

COURSES IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

FOR UNDERGRADUATE CREDIT — MEN 

A deposit of $3 is required of each student enrolled in any course designated 
"Deposit." Only one deposit is required from any student in one semester. 

103, 104. 105, 106. Physical Education M. R(0-2); I, II, and SS. Staff. 

Personal hygiene and social problems; marching, calisthenics, apparatus, and 
games. 

The following activities are offered throughout the year: Swimming: Be- 
ginning, advanced, and Red Cross life-saving (beginning swimming is a pre- 
requisite for advanced swimming and for Red Cross life-saving. Students must 
pass a preliminary test before entering the Red Cross life-saving class unless 
they have passed the test given in the advanced swimming class); boxing; 
wrestling; and corrective gymnastics. Basketball, softball, tennis, touch foot- 
ball, volleyball, handball, golf, and tumbling are offered in season. Deposit. 

107. Introduction to Physical Education. 1(1-0); I. Washburn. 
An introductory survey of the field and study of the principles of health 
and physical education. 

113A. First Aid and Massage. 3(3-0); II and SS. Prerequisite: Zool. 
123A. Moll. 

119. Personal Hygiene. 2(2-0); I and SS. Moll. 

120. Swimming M. 1(0-3); I and SS. Moll. 

Instruction and practice in breast, back, and crawl strokes; diving, treading 
water, and floating. Deposit. 

123. Physiology of Exercise. 2(2-0); I. Prerequisite: Zool. 123A and 130. 
Washburn. 

Effects of exercise on the tissues, systems, and organs of the body. 

124A. Physical Diagnosis and Prescription. 3(3-0); I. Prerequisite: 
Phys. Ed. 107, 137, 138, and 141B. Washburn. 

Normal and physical diagnosis; individual corrective exercise. 

126. Football. 2(1-3); II and SS. Fry. 

Study of rules, theory and practice; methods of coaching. Deposit. 

130A. Basketball. 2(1-3); I and SS. Root. 

Study of rules, theory and practice; methods of coaching. Deposit. 

133. Baseball. 2(1-3); II and SS. Ahearn. 

Study of rules, theory and practice; methods of coaching. Deposit. 

135, 136B. Practice Teaching in Physical Education I and II. 1(0-3) and 
2(0-6), respectively, I and II each. Prerequisite: junior standing. Washburn. 

Under immediate supervision of the teachers, students assist in the physical 
education classes, and officiate in intramural games. Deposit. 

136C. Practice Teaching in Physical Education III. 2(0-6); I and II. 
Washburn. 

Continuation of Phys. Ed. 135 and 136B. Deposit. 

137. Physical Education Activities I. 1(0-3); I. Thompson. 

Theory and practice of soccer, volleyball, and gymnasium games. Deposit. 

15—6529 



226 Kansas State College 

138. Physical Education Activities II. 2(0-6) ; II. Thompson. 
Theory and practice of calisthenics, the gymnastic lesson, and tumbling. 

Deposit. 

139. Physical Education Activities III. 2(0-6) ; I. Thompson. 
Graded exercises on gymnasium apparatus, gymnastic dancing, pyramids. 

Deposit. 

140. Physical Education Activities IV. 1(0-3); I. Patterson. 
Theory and practice of wrestling and boxing. Deposit. 

140A. Track and Field Sports. 2(1-3) ; II. Haylett. 

Study of rules, theory and practice; methods of coaching. Deposit. 

141B. Kinesiology M. 3(3-0); II. Prerequisite: Zool. 123 A. Thompson. 
Elemental body movements analyzed; principles involved applied to teach- 
ing of physical education. 

142. Public-School Program in Physical Education. 2(2-0) ; II. Pre- 
requisite : senior standing. Washburn. 

Educational, health, and recreative significance and content of the school 
program; types of activity to be emphasized in grades and in high school. 

145. Nature and Function of Play. 2(2-0); II. Prerequisite: Educ. 184. 
Washburn. 

Theoretical explanation of play ; age and sex characteristics influencing play ; 
value of play to individual and community. 

146. Organization and Administration of Physical Education M. 3(3-0) ; 
I. Prerequisite: junior standing. Washburn. 

147. Community Hygiene. 2(2-0); I. Prerequisite: Bact. 101 and Phys. 
Ed. 119. Moll. 

Production, improvement, maintenance, and defense of public health. 

149. Teaching Health. 2(2-0); I. Prerequisite: Phys. Ed. 119, Zool. 
123A and 130. Moll. 

for graduate and undergraduate credit 

203. Community Recreation. 2(2-0); II and SS. Prerequisite: Phys. 
Educ. 145. Washburn. 

FOR GRADUATE CREDIT — MEN 

301. Problems in Physical Education. Credit to be arranged. Prerequi- 
site: variable, depending upon problem chosen. Washburn. 

FOR UNDERGRADUATE CREDIT — WOMEN 

A deposit of $2.50 is required of each student enrolled in any course desig- 
nated "Deposit." Only one deposit is required from any student in one se- 
mester. 

151A, 152A, 153, 154. Physical Education W. R(0-3) each; I, II, and SS. 
Staff. 

Modern dancing, swimming, and individual gymnastics offered throughout 
the year; folk and tap dancing, recreational sports, Danish gymnastics, hockey, 
soccer, fieldball. tennis, basketball, archery, baseball, and golf in season. De- 
posit. A refund of 50 cents, each semester, is made upon return of key. 

Recreational swimming is offered on Tuesdays and Thursdays at 4 o'clock 
for those who have registered in the College and paid the necessary fees. 
Swimming fee, $1 each semester. 

Major Courses 

The following courses may be elected by those who wish a minor in Home 
Economics: Art. 101 A, Elementary Design I; Art 130, Costume Design I; 
Food and Nutr. 102, Foods I; Clo. and Text. 103, Clothing for the Individual. 



Division of General Science 227 

155. Fundamental Rhythm. 1(0-3); I. Young. 

Body rhythm, fundamentals of music, and percussion accompaniment for 
rhythmic activities. Deposit. 

157A. General Technic I. 2(1-3); I. Maytum, Lyman. 
Theory and practice of self-testing activities. Deposit. 

157B. General Technic II. 2(1-3); II. Maytum, Lyman. 
Theory and practice of tumbling and recreational sports. Deposit. 

157C. General Technic III. 2(1-3); I. Prerequisite: ability to play 
hockey and soccer. Geyer. 

Methods of teaching soccer, hockey, fieldball, and speedball. Deposit. 

157D. General Technic IV. 2(1-3); II. Prerequisite: ability to play 
volleyball, basketball, and baseball. Geyer. 

Methods of teaching volleyball, basketball, and baseball. Deposit 

157E. General Technic V. 2(0-6); I. Prerequisite: Phys. Ed. 155 and 
one-half semester each of folk dancing and tap dancing. Maytum, Lyman. 
Method of teaching child rhythms and folk dancing. Deposit. 

157F. General Technic VI. 2(1-3); II. Prerequisite: knowledge of 
Danish gymnastics, tennis, and golf. Geyer. 

Methods of teaching Danish gymnastics, tennis, and golf. Deposit. 

157G. General Technic VII. 2(1-3); I. Prerequisite: a semester each 
of beginning dancing and intermediate dancing. Young. 
Methods of teaching modern dance. Deposit. 

157H. General Technic VIII. 2(1-3); II. Prerequisite: a semester each 
of beginning and intermediate swimming; one-half semester of archery. Saum. 
Methods of teaching swimming and archery. Deposit. 

158. First-aid. 1(1-0); SS. 

The prevention of accidents and the treatment of injuries in an emergency. 

163. Principles of Health Education W. 3(3-0); I and SS. Prerequisite: 
Child Welf. 101. Geyer. 

General program of health work ; daily health inspection ; health examina- 
tions; and evaluation of health education material for grades and high schools. 

164. Clog and Character Dancing W. 1(0-3); SS. 

165. Tumbling, Pyramids, and Stunts W. 1(0-3); SS. 

166. Intramural Athletics for Women. 1(1-0); SS. 

This course is offered for teachers who direct intramural activities. Types 
and methods of conducting intramural athletics in high schools will be con- 
sidered. 

167. Camp Craft W. 1(0-3); SS. 

Fire building, outdoor cooking, day and overnight trips, and handicraft. 
Lectures, reports, and practical work. 

168. Games for Grades and High School. 2(1-3); SS. Geyer. 
Methods of teaching games in public schools suitable for recess, noon, and 

after-school periods. Deposit. 

171. Health Examinations W. 2(0-6); I. Prerequisite: Phys. Ed. 184 
and Zool. 123A and 130. Maytum, Lyman. 

Methods of giving health examinations, analysis of normal body mechanics, 
postural deviations; first-aid emergency treatment. 

172. Therapeutics and Massage. 2(0-6); II. Prerequisite: Phj^s. Ed. 171 
and 184 and Zool. 123A. Maytum. Lyman. 

Postural defects studied and exercises given for correction of each; general 
and local massage practiced for cases which can be treated by the Department 
of Physical Education. Deposit. 



228 



Kansas State College 



176. Organization and Administration of Physical Education W. 2(2-0) ; 
II. Prerequisite: Phys. Ed. 157A to 157G, 182 A, and 188. Saum. 

Administrative policies of physical education departments : the staff, ac- 
tivities, basic principles. Construction, equipment, and care of plant. 

178. Folk Dancing. 1(0-3); SS. 

Singing games, rhythms, and folk dancing for elementary and secondary 
schools. Deposit. 

182A. Playground Management and Games W. 2(1-3); I. Geyer. 

Organization and administration of playground activities and equipment; 
history of the playground movement; types of games suitable for different age 
periods. Practice teaching in elementary schools. Deposit. 

183. Adult Recreation W. 2(2-0); II. Prerequisite: Phys. Ed. 182A. 
May turn, Lyman. 

Principles and methods of organizing communities for leisure time activi- 
ties. 

184. Kinesiology W. 2(2-0) ; II. Prerequisite: Zool. 123. Geyer. 
Mechanics of movement; elemental body movements analyzed and princi- 
ples involved applied to the teaching of physical education. 

187A. Technic of Basketball, Baseball, and Volleyball. 1(0-3); SS. 
Rules, duties of officials, organization of squads and teams, equipment. 
Methods of coaching and conducting of tournaments. Deposit. 

188. Teaching and Adaptation of Physical Education. 3(3-0) ; I. Pre- 
requisite: Phys. Ed. 157A to 157F, 161, and 182A. Maytum, Lyman. 

Problems of physical education and general principles of leadership; adap- 
tation of material to meet needs of various groups and to meet aims and ideals 
of physical education. 

FOR UNDERGRADUATE CREDIT MEN AND WOMEN 

192. History and Principles of Physical Education. 3(3-0); II. Pre- 
requisite: sophomore standing. Maytum. 

Physical education from ancient to modern times; aims and ideals of physi- 
cal education and its relations to general education. 



Physics 



Professor Cardwell 

Professor Raburn 

Professor Floyd 

Associate Professor Brackett 

Associate Professor Lyon 

Associate Professor Chapin 

Associate Professor McMillen 



Assistant Professor Hartel 
Assistant Professor Maxwell 
Assistant Professor Avery 
Assistant Professor Hudiburg 
Instructor Hilt 
Assistant Lee 



Courses in the Department of Physics are designed to meet the needs of 
three kinds of students: (1) the general student who desires some knowledge 
of physics; (2) the technical student in engineering, home economics or chem- 
istry who must be well grounded in basic principles; (3) the student who wishes 
to major in physics, looking forward to a career in teaching, industrial physics, 
industrial research, or graduate work. 

Persons classified under the third of the above groups should, at the earliest 
possible date, consult with the head of the department. 

COURSES IN PHYSICS 

FOR UNDERGRADUATE CREDIT 

102, 103. General Physics I and II. 4(3-3) each; I, II, and SS each. Pre- 
requisite: for I, Math. 101; for II. Phys. 102. Not open for full credit to 
students who have credit in Phys. 109. Staff. 

I: Mechanics, heat, and sound. 

II: Magnetism, electricity, and light. Charge, $3 for each course. 



Division of General Science 229 

105, 106. Engineering Physics I and II. 5(4-3) each; I, II, and SS each. 
Prerequisite: for I, Math. 101; for Phys. 105. Not open for full credit to 
students who have credit in Phys. 109, 102, or 103. Staff. 

I: Mechanics, heat, and sound for technical students. 

II : Magnetism, electricity, and light for technical students. Charge, $3 for 
each course. 

109. Household Physics. 4(3-3) ; I, II, and SS. Avery, Hudiburg, Hilt. 
Lectures and demonstrations in which the laws and principles involved in 
household appliances are explained and illustrated. Charge, $3. 

121. Physics for Musicians I. 5(4-3) ; I. Prerequisite: Mus. 101 and 102. 
Floyd, Chapin. 

Selected topics applied to the physics of music and musical instruments. 
Charge, $3. 

122. Physics for Musicians II. 3(3-0) ; II. Prerequisite: Phys. 121, 102, 
or 105. Floyd, Chapin. 

Sound from the musician's point of view. 

125. Architectural Acoustics. 2(2-0); II. Prerequisite: Phys. 103 or 
105. Floyd, Chapin. 

Prediction of acoustic properties of buildings in advance of construction and 
the correction of acoustic defects. 

134. Agricultural Physics. 3(3-0) ; II. Brackett. 

Fundamental principles as related to agriculture. Required of students in 
agriculture who enter without high-school physics. 

136. Descriptive Physics. 3(3-0) ; I, II, and SS. Not for credit if follow- 
ing Phys. 102, 103, 105, or 106. Brackett, Maxwell. 

Non-mathematical explanations and experimental demonstrations of se- 
lected principles in physics. 

141. Descriptive Astronomy. 3(3-0) ; II. Babcock, Hartel. 

146. Meteorology. 3(3-0) ; I and II. Raburn, Hudiburg. 
Weather phenomena and principles of forecasting; climatic factors; relation 
of weather studies to agriculture, general science, and physiography. 

151. Photography. 2(1-3) ; I and II. Hudiburg. 

Chemical and physical principles involved in photography; practice in mak- 
ing good negatives and prints. Charge, $3. 

160. Introduction to Modern Physics. 2(2-0) ; I, II, and SS. Prerequisite: 
a course in physics and in chemistry. Cardwell, Brackett, Lyon. 

A non-mathematical introduction to contemporary problems and theories. 

FOR GRADUATE AND UNDERGRADUATE CREDIT 

201. Laboratory Technic and Apparatus Design. 1(0-3) or 2(0-6); I, II, 
and SS. Prerequisite : Phys. 103 or 106. Hudiburg. 

A course in glass blowing and shopwork designed to meet the needs of the 
individual student. Charge, $3. 

205. Applied X-rays. 3(2-3) ; I or II. Prerequisite: Phys. 103, 106, or 109. 
McMillen, Hudiburg, Hilt. 

Radiology, theory of short waves and of the equipment used in production. 
Laboratory work involving the use and operation of X-ray equipment and 
making exposures and development of X-ray plates and films. Charge, $3. 

210. Astronomy. 3(3-0) ; I or II. Prerequisite: Phys. 103 or 106, 141, and 
Math. 115. Babcock. 

A second course by methods of the calculus. 

217. Geophysics I. 3(3-0); I. Prerequisite: Phys. 103 or 106. Cardwell, 
Lyon. 

Theory of the field work in gravitational, magnetic, electrical, seismic, 
radioactive, and temperature surveys. 



230 Kansas State College 

218. Geophysics II. 3(1-6) ; II. Prerequisite: Phys. 217. Cardwell, Lyon. 
Continuation of Phys. 217 with laboratory work on the use of the torsion 
balance, the dip needle, and the methods of equipotential. Charge, $3. 

220. Applied Spectroscopy. 3(2-3); I. Prerequisite: Phys. 103 or 106 and 
Chem. 103 and 104 or Chem. 110. McMillen. 

Spectrographic methods for detecting, qualitatively and quantitatively, the 
chemical constituents of minerals, metals, and biological specimens. Charge, S3. 

227. Mechanics. 3(3-0); I. Prerequisite: Phvs. 102 or 105 and Math. 115. 
Cardwell, McMillen. 

Theoretical mechanics by methods of the calculus with an introduction to 
generalized coordinates. 

228. Mechanics Laboratory. 1(0-3) or 2(0-6); I. Prerequisite or concur- 
rent: Phys. 227. Cardwell, McMillen. Charge, $3. 

238. Heat. 3(3-0) ; I. Prerequisite: Phys. 103 or 106 and Math. 115. Card- 
well, Chapin. 

239. Heat Laboratory. 1(0-3); I. Prerequisite or concurrent: Phys. 238. 
Chapin. Charge, $3. 

240. Sound. 3(3-0); I and SS. Prerequisite: Phys. 102 or 105 and Math. 
115. Floyd, Chapin. 

243. Light. 3(3-0); II. Prerequisite: Phys. 103 or 106 and Math. 114. 
Cardwell, Chapin. 

244. Light Laboratory. 1(0-3); II. Prerequisite or concurrent: Phys. 243. 
Cardwell, Chapin. Charge, $3. 

253. Electricity and Magnetism. 2(2-0); I or II. Prerequisite: Phys. 
103 or 106 and Math. 115. Lyon. 

Electricity and magnetism by methods of the calculus. 

254. Electricity and Magnetism Laboratory. 1(0-3) or 2(0-6) ; I or II. 
Prerequisite or concurrent: Phys. 253. Lyon. Charge, $3. 

265. Electric Oscillations and Waves. 3(3-0); II. Prerequisite: Phys. 
253. Lyon. 

Radiation field theory and radio circuits. 

266. Electric Oscillations and Waves Laboratory. 2(0-6); II. Prerequi- 
site or concurrent: Phys. 265. Lyon. Charge, $3. 

268. Electron Optics. 2(2-0); II. Prerequisite: Phys. 103 or 106 and 
Math. 115. McMillen. 

Theory of the bending and focusing of electron beams by electric and mag- 
netic fields. 

270. Atomic Physics. 3(3-0; I or II. Prerequisite: Phys. 103 or 100 and 
Math. 115. Cardwell, Lyon, McMillen. 
Contemporary theories and problems. 

297. Problems in Physics. Credit to be arranged; I, II, and SS. Prerequi- 
site : consent of instructor. Staff. 

299. Colloquium in Physics. R; I and II. Required of graduate majors 
and senior undergraduate majors. Staff. 

FOR GRADUATE CREDIT 

302. Introduction to Theoretical Physics I. 3(3-0). Prerequisite: Phys. 
227 and Math. 201. Cardwell, McMillen. 

303. Introduction to Theoretical Physics II. 3(3-0). Prerequisite: Phys. 
302. Cardwell, McMillen. 

A continuation of Physics 302. 

305. Quantum and Wave Mechanics. 3(3-0). Prerequisite: Phys. 103 or 
106 and Math. 201. McMillen. 



Division of General Science 231 

310. General Thermodynamics. 3(3-0); Prerequisite: Phys. 238 and 
Math. 201. Card well, Chapin. 

313. Kinetic Theory of Gases. 3(3-0). Prerequisite: Phys. 238 and Math. 
201. Floyd, Raburn. 

315. Vector Mechanics. 3(3-0). Prerequisite: Math. 230. Babcock. 

390. Research in Physics. Credit to be arranged; I, II, and SS. Pre- 
requisite : consent of instructor. Staff. 



Public Speaking 

Professor Hill Associate Professor Given 

Professor Summers Assistant Professor Trout man 

Associate Professor Heberer Instructor Webster 

FOR UNDERGRADUATE CREDIT 

101. Oral Interpretation. 2(2-0); I, II, and SS. Hill, Given. 
Attainment of some proficiency in the art of reading aloud. Charge, $1. 

102. Dramatic Reading. 2(2-0); II. Prerequisite: Pub. Spk. 101 or per- 
mission of the instructor. Given, Troutman. 

Advanced study and application of the principles of oral interpretation to 
platform reading. 

106. Extempore Speech I. 2(2-0); I, II, and SS. Staff. 

Preparation and delivery of short addresses based on prepared outlines. 
Charge, $1. 

107. Public Speaking. 2(2-0); I, II, and SS. Prerequisite: Junior stand- 
ing. Staff. 

Practical public speaking of the extempore type. Charge, $1. 

108. Extempore Speech II. 2(2-0); I, II, and SS. Prerequisite: Pub. Spk. 
106 or 107. Staff. 

Pub. Spk. 106 continued, with special attention to illustrative material. 

110. Elements of Phonetics. 2(2-0); I. Given. Charge, $1. 

121. Argumentation and Debate. 2(2-0); II. Prerequisite: Pub. Spk. 106 
or 107 or permission of instructor. Summers. 

123, 124. Intercollegiate Debate I and II. 2(2-0) each. Prerequisite: for 
I, Pub. Spk. 121; for II, Pub. Spk. 123 and permission of instructor. Summers. 
Open only to members of the intercollegiate debate squads. 

126. Parliamentary Procedure. 1(1-0); II. Summers. 

130, 135. Dramatic Production I and II. 2(2-0) each; I, I, II, and SS; II, 
II and SS. Prerequisite : for II, Pub. Spk. 130 or permission of the instructor. 
Heberer, Troutman. 

I: Theory of and practice in the fundamentals of acting. 

II: Fundamentals of stage-craft. 

138. Public Speaking for Teachers. 1(1-0); II and SS. Hill, Troutman. 

142. Oratorical Contest. 2( - ); I and II. Hill. 

150, 152. Development of the Theater I and II. 2(2-0) each; I and II, 
respectively. Heberer, Troutman. 

I : The theater to the end of the nineteenth century. 
II: The modern and the contemporary theater. 

161. Elements of Broadcasting. 3(2-3); I and II. Prerequisite: Pub. 
Spk. 106 or 107. Summers. Charge, $2. 

168. Radio Program Participation. 1(0-3); I and II. Prerequisite: Pub. 
Spk. 161. May not be taken for more than four semesters for credit. Summers. 



232 



Kansas State College 



FOR GRADUATE AND UNDERGRADUATE CREDIT 

201. Advanced Phonetics. 4(3-3); II. Prerequisite: Pub. Spk. 101, 106, 
107, and 110. Given. 

222. Advanced Debate. 2(2-0); I. Prerequisite: Pub. Spk. 121 or permis- 
sion of the instructor. Summers. 

Advanced study of and participation in the methods of persuasion in 
public discussion. 

225. Public Program. 2(2-0); II and SS. Prerequisite: Pub. Spk. 106 or 
107 or permission of the instructor. Hill, Troutman. 

Planning, building, and presenting non-radio public programs. 

230. Radio Continuity. 2(2-0); I and II. Prerequisite: Pub. Spk. 161 
and permission of the instructor. Summers. 

Planning and construction of radio programs. 

231. Radio Program Production. 2(1-3); I and II. Prerequisite: Pub. 
Spk. 161 and permission of the instructor. Summers. 

Production and direction of radio programs. 

232. Problems in Broadcasting. Credit to be arranged; I and II. Pre- 
requisite: Pub. Spk. 161 and permission of the instructor. Summers. 

Individual problems in the general field of radio broadcasting. 

FOR GRADUATE CREDIT 

301. Research in Speech. Credit to be arranged; I, II, and SS. Prerequi- 
site: consult instructor. Hill, Summers, Given. 

305. Clinical Problems of Defective Speaking. 4(2-6); II. Prerequisite: 
Pub. Spk. 101, 106, 107, 108, and 201. Hill, Given. 



Student Health 



Professor Husband 

101. Preventive Medicine and Public Health. 2(2-0) ; I and II. Prereq- 
uisite : sophomore standing. Husband. 

Communicable diseases and their control; factors involved in healthful liv- 
ing. 



Division of General Science 



233 



Zoology 



Professor Nabours 
Professor Ackert 
Professor Harman 
Associate Professor Herrick 
Associate Professor Wimmer 
Assistant Professor Harbaugh 
Assistant Professor Goodrich 
Instructor Am eel 



Instructor Edgar 

Assistant Stebbins 

Graduate Assistant Alsop 

Graduate Assistant Pent 

Graduate Research Assistant Case 

Graduate Research Assistant Fineikty 

Graduate Research Assistant Frick 



The courses have been planned to give a fundamental knowledge of the 
structures, functions, and relations of animals; information concerning the 
manner in which animals respond to the conditions of the environment; an 
appreciation of their human values; and a consideration of the problems of 
heredity and evolution. 

COURSES IN ZOOLOGY 

FOR UNDERGRADUATE CREDIT 

105. General Zoology. 5(3-6); I, II, and SS. Staff. Charge, $3. 

123A. Human Anatomy. 5(3-6); I. Prerequisite: Zool. 105. Wimmer. 
General anatomy studied by means of dissectable models, skeletons, and 
charts. Charge, $3. 

130. Physiology. 4(3-3); I, II, and SS. Prerequisite: Zool. 105 and Chem. 
101 or 110. Wimmer. 

See Zool. 238. Charge, $3. 

FOR GRADUATE AND UNDERGRADUATE CREDIT 

203. Problems in Zoology. Credit to be arranged; I, II, and SS. Staff. 

Problems in heredity, parasitology, physiology, cytology, embryology, proto- 
zoology, ecology, ornithology, endocrinology, and neurology. Charge, $2 per 
hour. 

205. Field Zoology. 2(1-3) or 3(1-6); I, II, and SS. Prerequisite: Zool. 
105. Harbaugh. 

Habitat, distribution, and relationship of animals. Charge, $3. 

206. Zoological Technic. 1(0-3) or 2(0-6); II. Prerequisite: Zool. 105. 
Edgar. 

Methods and processes in preparation of microscopical slides; principles of 
photomicrography. Charge, $3. 

208. Animal Parasitology. 3(2-3); I. Prerequisite: Zool. 105. Ackert. 
Biology, pathology, and prophylaxis of the principal external and internal 

parasites of the domestic animals. Charge, $2. 

209. Principles of Parasitology. 2(2-0); I. Prerequisite: Zool. 105. 
Ackert. 

Principles, origin, history, and philosophy of animal parasitism. 

212. Invertebrate Zoology. 4(2-6) ; I. Prerequisite: Zool. 105. Goodrich. 
Charge, $3. 

214. Cytology. 4(2-6); I. Prerequisite: Zool. 105. Harman. 
Cells, chromosomes, and heredity. Charge, $3. 

216. Heredity and Eugenics. 2(2-0); I. Prerequisite: Zool. 105. Na- 
bours. 

Human inheritance and the interactions of nature and heredity. 



234 Kansas State College 

217. Evolution and Heredity. 3(2-3) or 4(2-6); II. Prerequisite: Zool. 
105. Nabours. 

Development of the idea of evolution ; evidence and principal theories of the 
causes of evolution; problems of variation, heredity, and experimental evolu- 
tion. 

218. Human Parasitology. 3(3-0); II. Prerequisite: Zool. 105. Ackert. 

219. Embryology. 4(3-3); I, II, and SS. Prerequisite: Zool. 105. Harman. 
Physiology of reproduction and developmental anatomy of mammals, with 

special reference to man. Charge, $3. 

220. Advanced Embryology. 4(2-6); II and SS. Prerequisite: Zool. 219. 
Harman. Charge, $3. 

225. Zoology and Entomology Seminar. 1(1-0); I and II. Prerequisite: 
Zool. 105. 

227. Genetics Seminar. 1(1-0); I and II. Prerequisite: Zool. 105. Nab- 
ours, Warren, Parker, Ibsen. 

237. Advanced Physiology. 3(3-0); I and SS. Prerequisite: Chem. 122 
and Zool. 105. For graduate students and upperclassmen with the consent of 
the instructor. At least one hour of Zool. 238 must accompany this course. 
Wimmer. 

238. Advanced Physiology Laboratory. 1(0-3) or 2(0-6); I and SS. To be 
taken concurrently with Zool. 237; or with consent of the instructor, one credit 
hour may be taken concurrently with Zool. 130. or by students who have credit 
in Zool. 130. Wimmer. Charge, $3 for one credit hour and $1 for the addi- 
tional credit hour. 

240. Taxonomy of Parasites, 2(1-3); 11 and SS. Prerequisite: Zool. 208 
or 218. Ackert. Charge, $2. 

244. Ornithology. 3(2-3); II, or 2(1-3); SS. Prerequisite: Zool. 105. 
Goodrich. Charge, $2. 

246. Comparative Anatomy of Vertebrates. 4(2-6); II. Prerequisite: 
Zool. 105. Herrick. Charge, $3. 

247. Endocrinology. 3(3-0); I and SS. Prerequisite: Zool. 130 and 219 
or 246 and permission of instructor. Herrick. 

248. Applied Zoology. 3(3-0); I and SS. Prerequisite: Zool. 105. Her- 
rick, Harbaugh. 

Valuable and destructive animals in relation to mankind. 

250. Comparative and Human Neurology. 3(2-3); I. Prerequisite: Zool. 
105. Herrick. Charge, $2. 

FOR GRADUATE CREDIT 

301. Research in Zoology. Credit to be arranged; I, II, and SS. Pre- 
requisite : consult instructor. Staff. 

Research problems in the fields of heredity and experimental evolution, 
parasitology, cytology, embryology, ecology, physiology, neurology, endocri- 
nology, and protozoology. 



The Division of Home Economics 

Margaret M. Justin, Dean 



The aim of a collegiate course in home economics is not merely to increase 
the student's stock of information, but to stimulate interest in continued study 
or research, to train in accuracy in detail, to teach discrimination with regard 
to criteria by which to interpret results, and to cultivate an attitude of eco- 
nomic and social responsibility. 

The curriculums as outlined below are arranged to meet the needs of those 
who wish to teach, those who wish to enter graduate courses leading to techni- 
cal or professional work, and those who wish to apply their knowledge to var- 
ious problems of home life, or to industry and social service. The training 
includes the laws of health; an understanding of the sanitary requirements of 
the home ; the study of values of the various articles used in the home ; the 
wise expenditure of money, time, and energy; the scientific principles under- 
lying the selection and preparation of food ; the care of children ; and the 
ability to secure efficient service from others. Life in the residence hall, in 
which the student participates in the numerous duties pertaining to the routine 
of living, is a sustaining influence in the mastery of instruction offered in the 
classroom and laboratory, and is desirable for all students not participating 
otherwise in group life. 

The three four-year curriculums in this Division lead to the degree of 
Bachelor of Science in Home Economics, and a five-and-one-half-year cur- 
riculum leads to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Home Economics and 
Nursing. 

CURRICULUM IN HOME ECONOMICS 

Since scientific training is fundamental in the administration of the home, 
courses in the sciences are given as a foundation for the special training in 
home economics. English, history, economics, and psychology receive due at- 
tention. The time of the student is about equally divided among the purely 
technical subjects, the fundamental sciences, and studies of general interest. 
In the junior and senior years opportunity for choice of electives makes it 
possible for students to specialize in some chosen line. There is provision 
for both options and electives to be chosen in groups approved by the faculty 
or by the students' dean. This choice of electives will be made during the 
first semester of the sophomore year. 

This curriculum is recommended to those who desire general training in 
home economics or who have not yet determined the special fields in which 
they wish to major. It is the curriculum to be chosen by those who wish 
to teach home economics or to engage in home demonstration work. 

CURRICULUM IN HOME ECONOMICS AND ART 

The courses in this curriculum give background for professional work in 
art and for teaching art. 

CURRICULUM IN HOME ECONOMICS AND INSTITUTIONAL 
MANAGEMENT AND DIETETICS 

This curriculum is designed to meet the needs of the student who wishes 
to become a dietitian or director of food services in a college residence hall, 
cafeteria, tearoom, or hotel. It meets the requirements set by the American 
Dietetic Association for entrance to accredited hospitals and at the same time 
provides practical training for the management of the food unit of various 

(235) 



236 Kansas State College 

types of institutions. As a part of the training, residence in the college resi- 
dence hall for one semester is required. Usually after graduation the student 
serves an apprenticeship in a recommended establishment. 

CURRICULUM IN HOME ECONOMICS AND NURSING 

The five-and-one-half-year curriculum is offered in affiliation with the Uni- 
versity of Kansas hospitals. A student wishing to take the degree of Bachelor 
of Science and the full professional training in nursing can complete this work 
in five and one-half years. The first three years are spent in the College. The 
last two and one-half years are spent in the school of nursing of the hospitals, 
where theoretical and practical training in nursing is given. Upon completion 
of the hospital training, the student presents her application for graduation to 
the registrar of Kansas State College. 

The student is approved for the curriculum by the dean of the Division of 
Home Economics. At some time during her freshman year she must be ap- 
proved by the superintendent of the school of nursing. Further information 
may be obtained from the dean of the Division of Home Economics. 

Options for Students in the Curriculum in Home Economics 

In order that the student's interest and efforts be directed toward the ex- 
ploration and mastery of some field, instead of being scattered in a casual 
manner, options of 15 hours, one of which must be filled to meet the require- 
ments of graduation, have been established in the fields of Social Science, 
Modern Language, Mathematics, Music, Physical Education, Journalism, 
Physical or Biological Science, and Art. The student selects courses in one 
of these eight fields with the advice and approval of the dean. 

Option I — Social Science: Economics, Sociology, American History, 
European History, American Government, Economics of the Household, Con- 
sumer Buying, and Family Finance. If desired, this option may be adapted 
to include 12 hours of social science and 3 hours of English. 

Option II — Modem Language: German, French, or Spanish. If the stu- 
dent has had one year of language in high school she will be held for 12 addi- 
tional hours of the same language; if she has had two years of language in 
high school, she will be held for nine additional hours of the same language. 
Three of the hours thus released may be used to secure an additional three 
hours in English. 

Option III — Mathematics: Plane Trigonometry, College Algebra, Plane 
Analytical Geometry, and Calculus I. If she has had only one year of 
algebra in high school, the student must take the five-hour course, College 
Algebra A. 

Option IV — Music: Piano, Voice, and Orchestral Instruments, two hours 
each. Other subjects in the Department of Music are Harmony I and II, 
School Music III, History and Appreciation of Music, and Choral Conduct- 
ing. Ear Training and Sight Singing I and II may be chosen instead of Har- 
mony I and II. In addition to the above, the student should be enrolled in 
Choral Ensemble for two or more semesters. 

Option V — Physical Education: The student has the required physical 
education courses in the first two years as a background for the option in 
this field. Prerequisites for the courses in General Technic included in the 
option are as follows: 

Option Prerequisite 

General Technic IV Basketball and Baseball 

General Technic V Folk Dancing and Tap Dancing 

Other subjects are Principles of Health Education W, Playground Manage- 
ment and Games W, History and Principles of Physical Education, and Teach- 
ing and Adaptation of Physical Education. 



Division of Home Economics 237 

Option VI — Journalism: Elementary Journalism, Journalism for Women, 
and Industrial Feature writing are basic courses. In addition, selection may 
be made from : Industrial Writing, Magazine Features, Principles of Ad- 
vertising, Radio Writing. 

Option VII — Physical or Biological Science: Physics, Chemistry, and 
Geology, or Botany, Zoology, Bacteriology, and Entomology. 

Option VIII — Art: Advanced courses in the various fields of Art, such as 
Design, Interior Decoration, and Costume Design. 

A similar procedure is followed in choosing options in the other curriculums 
in this Division. 

CERTIFICATE FOR TEACHING HOME ECONOMICS 

The student who, in addition to securing the degree of Bachelor of Science, 
is desirous of qualifying for the three-year Kansas state teacher's certificate, 
renewable for life and valid in any high school or other public school in the 
state, should elect certain courses in the Department of Education and other 
technical courses which are essential for vocational home economics and desir- 
able for all teaching of home economics. These courses are as follows: 

Educational Subjects Technical Subjects 

Educ. Psychology, Educ. 109 3(3-0) Child Guidance I, Child Welf. 201, 3(1-6) 

Prin. of Secondary Educ, Educ. 236, 3(3-0) Home Mgmt., Hshld. Econ. 116. .. . 3(1-6) 

Vocational Educ, Educ. 241 3(3-0) Adv. Clothing, Clo. and Text. 123.. 4(1-9) 

Methods of Teach. Home Econom- 
ics, Educ 132 3(3-0) 

Teach. Particip. in Home Economics, 

Educ. 160 3( - ) 

The State Board for Vocational Education issues certificates of approval for 
one year only to teachers of Vocational Homemaking, and reserves the right 
to require individual teachers to return to summer school for further prepara- 
tion when the need becomes apparent. 

HOME ECONOMICS IN THE SUMMER SCHOOL 

In addition to the regular instruction in home economics the Division offers 
numerous courses in the Summer School. These courses apply directly on the 
curriculum in home economics, or on graduate credit. 

Full information concerning the courses offered is contained in the Summer 
School number of the Kansas State College Bulletin, which may be obtained 
upon application to the vice-president of the College. 



238 



Kansas State College 



Curriculum in Home Economics 



FRESHMAN 



First Semester 



College Rhetoric I, Engl. 101 *3(3-0) 

Gen. Chemistry, Chem. 110 5(3-6) 

Elementary Design I, Art 101A... 2(0-6) 

Foods I, Food and Nutr. 102 5(3-6)or 

Gen. Psychology, Educ. 184 S(3-0)and 

Personal Health, Child Welf. 101.. 2(2-0) 

H. E. Lectures, Gen. H. E. 130... R(l-0) 

Phys. Educ. W. Phys. Ed. 151A. . R(0-3) 



Total 



15 



Second Semester 



College Rhetoric II, Engl. 104 3(3-0) 

Gen. Organic Chemistry, Chem. 122, 5(3-6) 

Costume Design I, Art 130 2(0-6) 

Gen. Psychology, Educ. 184 3(3-0)ar*d 

Personal Health, Child Welf. 101.. 2(2-0)or 

Foods I, Food and Nutr. 102 5(3-6) 

H. E. Lectures, Gen. H. E. 130... R 

Phys. Educ. W, Phys. Ed. 152A. . R(0-3) 



Total 



15 



SOPHOMORE 



First Semester 
English Literature, Engl. 172... 

General Zoology, Zool. 105 

Elementary Design II, Art 101B. 
Foods II, Food and Nutr. 107 . . 
Clothing for the Individual, 

Clo. and Text. 103 

Economics I, Econ. 101 

H. E. Lectures, Gen. H. E. 130. . 
Phys. Educ. W, Phys. Ed. 153. . 
Home Projects, Gen. H. E. 140. 



3(3-0) 

5(3-6) 

2(0-6) 

3(l-6)or 

4(1-9) 

3(3-0) 

R 

R(0-3) 

R 



Second Semester 



American Literature, Engl. 175.... 3(3-0) 

Embryology, Zool. 219 4(3-3)or 

Physiology, Zool. 130 4(3-3) 

Clothing for the Individual, 

Clo. and Text. 103 4(l-9)or 

Foods II, Food and Nutr. 107 3(1-6) 

Current History, Hist. 126 1(1-0) 

Household Physics,** Phys. 109... 4(3-3) 

H. E. Lectures, Gen. H. E. 130... R 

Phys. Educ. W, Phys. Ed. 154 R(0-3) 



Total 16 or 17 



Total 15 or 16 



First Semester 

Human Nutr., Food and Nutr. 112, 
The House, Household Econ. 107 . . 

Interior Decoration I, Art 113 

Optionf 

ElectiveJ 

H. E. Lectures, Gen. H. E. 130... 
Home Projects, Gen. H. E. 140... 

Total 



JUNIOR 

Second Semester 

3(3-0) Textiles, Clo. and Text. 116 3(2-3) 

3(2-3) General Microb., Bact. 101 3(1-6) 

2(0-6) Option 3( - ) 

6( - ) Elective 6( - ) 

2( - ) H. E. Lectures, Gen. H. E. 130... R 

R 

R 



16 



Total 



15 



First Semester 
Dietetics, Food and Nutr. 202 . . . 

The Family, Child Welf. 216 

Option 

Elective 

H. E. Lectures, Gen. H. E. 130. . . 



Total 



SENIOR 



4(3-3) 
2(2-0) 
3( - ) 
7( - ) 
R 



Second Semester 

Family Health, Child Welf. 211. 

Option 

Elective , 

H. E Lectures, Gen. H. E. 130. 



16 Total 

Number of hours required for graduation, 124. 



3(3-0) 
3( - ) 
9( - ) 
R(l-0) 



15 



* The number before the parentheses indicates the number of hours of credit ; the first 
number within the parentheses indicates the number of hours of recitation each week ; the 
second shows the number of hours to be spent in laboratory work each week; and the third, 
where there is one, indicates the number of hours of outside work in connection with the 
laboratory each week. 

** General Physics may be substituted if a student plans to pursue research later. 

f See options list on preceding page. 

$ Electives are chosen with the approval of the dean during the sophomore year. They 
give opportunity for special training in the various fields. If the teaching of Home Economics 
is elected, certain educational and technical subjects are required as given under "Certificate 
for Teaching Home Economics." 



Division of Home Economics 



239 



Curriculum in Home Economics with Special Training in Art 



FRESHMAN 



First Semester 

College Rhetoric I, Engl. 101 3(3-0) 

Gen. Chemistry, Chem. 110 5(3-6) 

Elementary Design I, Art 101A... 2(0-6) 

Foods I, Food and Nutr. 102 5(3-6) or 

Gen. Psychology, Educ. 184 3(3-0)and 

Personal Health, Child Welf. 101.. 2(2-0) 

H. E. Lectures, Gen. H. E. 130... R(l-0) 

Phys. Educ. W, Phys. Ed. 151A. . R(0-3) 



Total 



15 



Second Semester 

College Rhetoric II, Engl. 104 3(3-0) 

Gen. Organic Chemistry, Chem. 122, 5(3-6) 

Costume Design I, Art 130 2(0-6) 

Gen. Psychology, Educ. 184 3(3-0)cmd 

Personal Health, Child Welf. 101.. 2(2-0)or 

Foods I, Food and Nutr. 102 5(3-6) 

H. E. Lectures, Gen. H. E. 130... R 

Phys. Educ. W, Phys. Ed. 152A. . . R(0-3) 



Total 



15 



First Semester 

English Literature, Engl. 172 

General Zoology,* Zool. 105 

Elementary Design II, Art 101B. . 
Clothing for the Individual, Clo, 

and Text. 103 

Foods II, Food and Nutr. 107 .. . 
Ancient Civilizations, Hist. 101... 
H. E. Lectures, Gen. H. E. 130. . . 
Phvs. Educ. W, Phvs. Ed. 153. . . 
Home Projects, Gen. H. E. 140.. 



Total 



SOPHOMORE 

Second Semester 

3(3-0) American Literature, Engl. 175.... 3(3-0) 

5(3-6) Intermediate Design, Art. 103 2(0-6) 

2(0-6) Drawing, Art 120 2(0-6) 

Foods II, Food and Nutr. 107 3(l-6)or 

4(1-9) or Clothing for the Individual, Clo. 

3(1-6) and Text. 103 4(1-9) 

3(3-0) Extern. Speech I, Pub. Spk. 106.. 2(2-0) 

R Medieval Europe, Hist. 102 3(3-0) 

R(0-3) H. E. Lectures, Gen. H. E. 130... R 

R Phys. Educ. W, Phys. Ed. 154 R(0-3) 

16 or 17 Total 15 or 16 



JUNIOR 



First Semester 



Second Semester 



Human Nutr., Food and Nutr. 112, 3(3-0) or Costume Design III, Art 138. 

Applied Nutr., Food and Nutr. 121, 2(2-0) 

Advanced Design, Art 105 2(0-6) 

Costume Design II, Art 134 2(0-6) 

Lettering, Art 127 2(0-6) 

Textiles, Clo. and Text. 116 3(2-3) 

The House, Household Econ. 107.. 3(2-3) 

Elective** 1 or 2( - ) 

H. E. Lectures, Gen. H. E. 130 R 

Home Projects, Gen. H. E. 140 R 



Interior Decoration I, Art 113.... 

Design in the Crafts, Art 102 

Art of the S. W. Indians, Art 240, 

Optionf 

Elective 

H. E. Lectures, Gen. H. E. 130... 



Total 



16 



Total 



2(0-6) 
2(0-6) 
2(0-6) 
1(1-0) 
6( - ) 
2( - ) 
R 



15 



First Semester 

Child Guidance I. Child Welf. 201, 

Principles of Art I, Art 201 

Interior Decoration II, Art 115. . . . 

Option 

Elective 

H. E. Lectures, Gen. H. E. 130 



SENIOR 



3(1-6) 
3(3-0) 
2(0-6) 
3( - ) 
5( - ) 
R 



Second Semester 

Principles of Art II, Art 202.. 
Interior Decoration III, Art 117, 

Option 

Elective 

H. E. Lectures, Gen. H. E. 130, 



Total 



16 Total 

Number of hours required for graduation, 124. 



3(3-0) 
2(0-6) 
3( - ) 
7( - ) 
R(l-0) 



15 



* General Botany I and II may be taken as an option for General Zoology and the 
necessary adjustment made in providing the required number of hours each semester and in 
lessening the electives one hour if the option is desired. 

** See footnote regarding electives under curriculum in Home Economics. 

f See list of options. 



240 



Kansas State College 



Curriculum in Home Economics with Special Training in 
Institutional Management and Dietetics 



FRESHMAN 



First Semester 



Second Semester 



College Rhetoric I, Engl. 101 3(3-0) 

Gen. Chemistry, Chem. 110 5(3-6) 

Elementary Design I, Art 101A. . . 2(0-6) 

Foods I, Food and Nutr. 102 5(3-6)or 

Gen. Psychology, Educ. 184 3(3-0)cmd 

Personal Health, Child. Welf. 101. . 2(2-0) 

H. E. Lectures, Gen. H. E. 130... R(l-0) 

Phvs. Educ. W, Phys. Ed. 151A. . . R(0-3) 



College Rhetoric II, Engl. 104 3(3-0) 

Gen. Organic Chemistry, Chem. 122, 5(3-6) 

Costume Design I, Art 130 2(0-6) 

3(3-0)a7id 

2(2-0)or 

5(3-6) 

R 

R(0-3) 



Total 



First Semester 



15 



Gen. Psychology, Educ. 184.... 
Personal Health, Child Welf. 101 
Foods I, Food and Nutr. 102. . . 
H. E. Lectures, Gen. H. E. 130. 
Phys. Educ. W, Phys. Ed. 152A 

Total 



English Literature, Engl. 172... 

General Zoology, Zool. 105 

Current History, Hist. 126 

Clothing for the Individual, 

Clo. and Text. 103 

Household Physics,* Phys. 109.. 

Economics I, Econ. 101 

H. E. Lectures, Gen. H. E. 130. . 
Phvs. Educ. W, Phvs. Ed. 153.. 
Home Projects, Gen. H. E. 140. . 



SOPHOMORE 

Second Semester 

3(3-0) American Literature, Engl. 175.. 

5(3-6) Physiology, Zool. 130 

1(1-0) Foods II, Food and Nutr. 107.. 
Household Physics,* Phys. 109. 

4(1-9) or Clothing for the Individual, 

4(3-3) Clo. and T^xt, 103 

3(3-0) Interior Decoration I, Art 113.. 

R H. E. Lectures, Gen. H. E. 130. 

R(0-3) Phvs. Educ. W, Phys. Ed. 154.. 
R 



Total 



16 



Total 



JUNIOR 



First Semester 
Human Nutr., Food and Nutr. 112, 

Sociology, Econ. 151 

General Micro., Bact. 101 

Meats HE, An Husb. 176 

Electivef 

H. E. Lectures, Gen. H. E. 130 

Home Projects, Gen. H. E. 140. . . . 



Second Semester 



3(3-0) Physiol. Chemistry, Chem. 231 

3(3-0) Inst. Mgmt. I, Inst. Mgmt. 202... 

3(1-6) Inst. Food Buying, Inst. Mgmt. 215, 

1(0-3) Inst. Furnishings and Equipment, 

6( - ) Inst. Mgmt. 230 

R Electivef 

R H. E. Lectures, Gen. H. E. 130... 



15 



3(3-0) 

4(3-3) 

3(1-6) 

4(3-3)or 

4(1-9) 

2(0-6) 

R 

R(0-3) 



16 



5(3-6) 
4(1-9) 

2(2-0) 

2(2-0) 

3( - ) 

R 



Total 



16 



Total 



SENIOR 



First Semester 
Dietetics, Food and Nutr. 202 . . . . 
Meth. of Teaching H. E., Educ. 

132 

Exper. Cookerv, Food and Nutr. 

255 .' 

Inst. Mgmt. II, Inst. Mgmt. 204, 

Electivef 

H. E. Lectures, Gen. H. E. 130... 



Second Semester 



4(3-3) 

3(3-0) 

2(0-6) 

3(3-0) 

2( - ) 

R 



16 



3(1-6) 



Child Guidance I, Child Welf. 201, 
Dietetics for Abn. Conditions, Food 

and Nutr. 205 2(1-3) 

Tea Room Mgmt., Inst. Mgmt. 225, 3(0-9) or 
Field Work in Nutr., Food and 

Nutr. 215 3(2-3) 

Food Econ. and Nutr. Seminar, 

Food and Nutr. 251 2(2-0) 

Inst. Accounting, Econ. 284 2(2-0) 

Electivef 4( - ) 

H. E. Lectures, Gen. H. E. 130.. R 



Total 



14 Total 

Number of hours required for graduation, 124. 



16 



* See footnote regarding Household Physics under curriculum in Home Economics. 
f See footnote regarding electives under curriculum in Home Economics. 



Division of Home Economics 



241 



Curriculum in Home Economics and Nursing 



First Semester 

College Rhetoric I, Engl. 101 

Gen. Chemistry, Chem. 110 

Foods I, Food and Nutr. 102 

Option* 

H. E. Lectures. Gen. H. E. 130.. 
Phys. Educ. W, Phys. Ed. 151A.. 



Total 



FRESHMAN 



3(3-0) 
5(3-6) 
5(3-6) 
3( - ) 
R(l-0) 
R(0-S) 



16 



Second Semester 



College Rhetoric II, Engl. 104 3(3-0) 

Gen. Organic Chemistry, Chem. 122, 5(3-6) 

Gen. Psychology, Educ. 184 3(3-0) 

Personal Health, Child Welf. 101.. 2(2-0) 

Option* 3( - ) 

H. E. Lectures, Gen. H. E. 130... R 

Phys. Educ. W, Phys. Ed. 152A... R(0-3) 



Total 



16 



First Semester 
English Literature, Engl. 172... 

General Zoology, Zool. 105 

Foods II, Food and Nutr. 107.. 

Current History, Hist. 126 

Option* 

H. E. Lectures, Gen. H. E. 130. . 
Phvs. Educ. W, Phys. Ed. 153.. 
Home Projects, Gen. H. E. 140. 

Total 



First Semester 

Human Anatomy, Zool. 123A... 
Physiol. Chemistry, Chem. 231 . 
Dietetics, Food and Nutr. 202. 
H. E. Lectures, Gen. H. E. 130. 
Elective** 

Total 



SOPHOMORE 

Second Semester 

3(3-0) American Literature, Engl. 175 3(3-0) 

5(3-6) Physiology, Zool. 130 4(3-3) 

3(1-6) Gen. Microbiology, Bact. 101 3(1-6) 

1(1-0) Abn. Psychology, Educ. 254 3(3-0) 

3( - ) Economics I, Econ. 101 3(3-0) 

R H. E. Lectures, Gen. H. E. 130... R 

R(0-3) Phvs. Educ. W, Phys. Ed. 154 R(0-3) 

R 

15 Total 16 

JUNIOR 

Second Semester 

5(3-6) Child Guidance I, Child Welf. 201, 3(1-6) 

5(3-6) Extern. Speech I, Pub. Spk. 106... 2(2-0) 

4(3-3) The Family, Child Welf. 216 2(2-0) 

R Sociology, Econ. 151 3(3-0) 

1( - ) Elective** 5( - ) 

H. E. Lectures, Gen. H. E. 130... R(l-0) 

15 Total 15 



SENIOR 

(Replaced by two and one-half years at University of Kansas Hospitals) 
(Equivalent to 31 college hours) 

Theoretical and practical work during the time includes: 



First Year 

History and Ethics of Nursing. 

Hospital Economics. 

Nursing Methods. 

Medical Nursing. 

Communicable Diseases. 

Special Therapeutics and Massage 



Second Year 
Surgery and Surgical Nursing and Bandaging. 
Obstetrics and Gynecology. 
Pediatrics. 

Diseases of Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat. 
Nervous and Mental Diseases. 
Materia Medica. 
Problems in Nursing. 

Number of hours required for graduation, 124. 



See list of options. 
* See footnote regarding electives under curriculum in Home Economics. 



16—6529 



242 



Kansas State College 



Groups of Electives for Students in the Division of 
Home Economics 

The groups given below are selected with a- view to training students for 
the vocations in which home economics may be directly applied. 

A sufficient number of hours may be chosen from any group to fill the 
elective requirement, or a smaller number of hours may be taken from a 
group and, for the remaining elective hours, advanced courses of related sub- 
ject matter may be chosen. 

Music may be added to any group, in a minimum of six hours. 



Child Care and Training 

Sociologv, Econ. 151 3(3-0) History of the Home, Hist. 225. . . 

Social Pathology, Econ. 258 3(3-0) Psyc. of Childhood and Adoles- 

The Family, Child Wei. 216 2(2-0) cenoe, Educ. 250 

Field Work in Nutr., Food and Child Guidance II, Child Welf. 20G, 

Nutr. 215 3(2-3) Problems in Child Welfare and 

Heredity and Eugenics, Zool. 216.. 2(2-0) Euthenics, Child Welf. 221 

Child Guidance I, Child Welf. 201, 3(1-6) Nutr. of Dev., Food and Nutr. 210, 

Seminar in Child Welfare and Family Health, Child Welf. 211... 

Euthenics, Child Welf. 226 1 or 2 Psyc. of Excep. Children, Educ. 266, 

The Tech. of Mental Tests, Educ. 

261 3(1-6) 

Costume Design 



Hist, of Costume, Clo. and Text. 

225 2(2-0) 

Adv. Clothing, Clo. and Text. 123, 4(1-9) 

Historic Textile Design, Art 233... 2(2-0) 

Clothing Econ., Clo. and Text. 201, 3(3-0) 

Costume Illustration, Art 139 2(0-6) 

Problems in Costume Design, Art 

235 2(0-6) 

Oral English, Engl. 232 3(3-0) 



Journalistic Vocations, Ind. Jour. 

140 

Elem. Journalism, Ind. Jour. 152.. 
Industrial Writing, Ind. Jour. 161, 
Ind. Feature Writing, Ind. Jour. 167, 
Radio Writing, Ind. Jour. 162.... 

Sociology, Econ. 151 

Modern Europe I, Hist. 115 



3(3-0) 

3(3-0) 
3(3-0) 

1 to 5 
2(2-0) 
3(3-0) 
3(3-0) 



2(2-0) 
3(3-0) 
2(2-0) 
2(2-0) 
2(2-0) 
3(3-0) 
3(3-0) 



Interior Decoration 



Domestic Architecture, Arch. 124.. 2(2-0) 

The Family, Child Welf. 216 2(2-0) 

Historic Textile Design, Art 233... 2(2-0) 

Landscape Gardening I, Hort. 125, 3(3-0) 

Problems in Design, Art 217 2(0-6) 

Problems in Interior Dec, Art 232, 4(0-12) 

Oral English, Engl. 232 3(3-0) 



Journalistic Vocations, Ind. Jour. 

140 2(2-0) 

Elem. Journalism, Ind. Jour. 152.. 3(3-0) 

Industrial Writing, Ind. Jour. 161, 2(2-0) 
Ind. Feature Writing, Ind. Jour. 

167 2(2-0) 

Radio Writing, Ind. Jour. 162 2(2-0) 

Sociology, Econ. 151 3(3-0) 

Modern Europe I, Hist. 115 3(3-0) 



Home Service and Food Demonstration Work 



Extern. Speech I, Pub. Spk. 106... 2(2-0) 
Radio Spk. and Announcing, Pub. 

Spk. 160 2(1-3) 

Radio Program Partic, Pub. Spk. 

168 1(1-1) 

Oral English, Engl. 232 3(3-0) 

Magazine Features, Ind Jour. 270, 2(2-0) 
Journalism for Women, Ind. Jour. 

172 2(2-0) 

Field Work in Nutr., Food and 

Nutr. 215 3(2-3) 

Inst. Mgmt. I, Inst. Mgmt. 202... 4(1-9) 

Meth. of Teaching H. E., Educ. 132, 3(3-0) 

The House, Hshld. Econ. 107 3(2-3) 



Elem. Journalism, Ind Jour. 152.. 3(3-0) 

Industrial Writing, Ind. Jour. 161, 2(2-0) 

Sociology, Econ. 151 3(3-0) 

Meats, H. E., An. Husb. 176 1(0-3) 

Exp. Cookery, Food and Nutr. 255, 2(0-6) 
Problems in Foods, Food and Nutr. 

245 1( - ) 

Home Mgmt., Hshld. Econ. 116.. 3(1-6) 

Consumer Buying, Hshld. Econ. 270, 2(2-0) 
Hshld. Equipment I, Hshld. Econ. 

203 2(0-6) 

Hshld. Equipment II, Hshld. Econ. 

205 2(0-6) 



Division of Home Economics 



243 



Research in Nutrition 



Pathogenic Bact. I, Bact. Ill 4(2-6) 

Pathogenic Bact. II, Bact. 110 4(2-6) 

Bact. Technic, Bact, 225 3(0-9) 

Chem. I, Chem. 101 5(3-6) 

Org. Chem. I, Chem. 218 4(2-6) 

Org. Chem. II, Chem. 219 4(2-6) 

Physiol. Chem., Chem. 231 5(3-6) 

Biochem. Analysis, Chem. 237 2(0-6) 

Quant, Anal. A, Chem. 250 3(1-6) 



Quant. Anal. B, Chem. 251 3(1-6) 

Plane Trig., Math. 101 3(3-0) 

Col. Alg., Math. 104 3(3-0) 

Plane Analytical Geom., Math. 110, 4(4-0) 

Calculus I, Math. 114 4(4-0) 

Calculus II, Math. 115 4(4-0) 

German I, Mod. Lang. 101 3(3-0) 

German II, Mod. Lang. 102 3(3-0) 

Scientific German, Mod. Lang. 137, 4(4-0) 



Biological Technician 



Hygienic Bact., Bact. 206 

Advanced Serology, Bact. 229 

Physiol, of Microorganisms, Bact. 

222 

Bact. Tech., Bact. 225 

Physiol. Chem., Chem. 231 

Biochem. Prep., Chem. 234 

Pathological Chem., Chem. 235... 
Biochem. Analysis, Chem. 237.... 



4(2- 


6) 


5(3- 


-6) 


3(3 


-0) 


3(0- 


9) 


5(3 


■6) 


2 tc 


> 


2(2 


■0) 


2(0 


-6) 



Quant. Anal. A, Chem. 250 3(1-6) 

Quant. Anal. B, Chem. 251 3(1-6) 

Physiol., Zool. 130 4(3-3) or 

Embryol., Zool. 219 4(3-3) 

Human Parasitol., Zool. 218 3(3-0) 

Comparative Anatomy of Vert., 

Zool. 246 4(2-6) 

Special Histology, Path. 252 3(1-6) 



Homemaking 



Child Guidance I, Child Welf. 201, 3(1-6) 

The Familv, Child Welf. 216 2(2-0) 

Sociology, Econ. 151 3(3-0) 

Com. Organization, Econ. 267 3(3-0) 

Problems in Foods, Food and Nutr. 

310 1 to 3 

Home Mgmt., Household Econ. 116, 3(1-6) 

World Classics I, Engl. 280 3(3-0) 

Nutr. of Dev., Food and Nutr. 210, 2(2-0) 

Familv Health, Child Welf. 211.. 3(3-0) 



Child Guidance II, Child Welf. 206, 3(3-0) 

Principles of Art I, Art 124 3(3-0) 

Adv. Clothing, Clo. and Text. 123, 4(1-9) 

Meats HE, An. Husb. 176 1(0-3) 

Hist, of Engl. Literature, Engl. 181, 3(3-0) 
Psvc. of Childhood and Adolescence, 

Educ, 250 3(3-0) 

Econ. Prob. of the Family, Hshld. 

Econ. 265 2(2-0) 



Social and Welfare Work 



Child Guidance I, Child Welf. 201, 3(1-6) 

Sociology, Econ. 151 3(3-0) 

Com. Organization, Econ. 267 3(3-0) 

Field Work in Nutrition, Food and 

Nutr. 215 3(2-3) 

Family Health, Child Welf. 211.. 3(3-0) 
Econ. Prob. of the Family, Hshld. 

Econ. 265 2(2-0) 



Child Guidance II, Child Welf. 206 
Labor Problems, Econ. 233... 
Rural Sociology, Econ. 156.... 
Social Pathology, Econ. 258.. 
Modern Europe II, Hist. 223. 
Imrai. and Int. Rel., Hist. 228 
Probs. in Child Welfare and 
Euthenics, Child Welf. 221 



3(3-0) 
2(2-0) 
3(3-0) 
3(3-0) 
3(3-0) 
2(2-0) 

1 to 5 



Textiles 



College Algebra, Math. 104 3(3-0) 

General Physics I, Phvs. 102 4(3-3) 

General Phvsics II, Phvs. 103 4(3-3) 

Plane Trigonometrv, Math. 101... 3(3-0) 

Clothing Econ., Clo. and Text. 201, 3(3-0) 

Experi. Textiles, Clo. and Text. 312, 2 to 5 

Plane Analytical Geom., Math. 110, 4(4-0) 

Calculus I, Math. 114 4(4-0) 

Calculus II, Math. 115 4(4-0) 



Phvsical Chemistry I, Chem. 206, 5(3-6) 

Qual. Organ. Analysis, Chem. 224.. 2(0-6) 
Probs. in Clo. and Text, Clo. and 

Text. 215 1 to 3 

Human Physiology, Zool. 235 4(3-3) 

Statis. Meth. Ap. to Educ, Educ. 

223 3(3-0) 

Bact. Problems, Bact. 270 1 to 4 

Adv. Textiles, Clo. and Text. 205, 3(1-6) 



Teaching Home Economics 



See "Certificate for Teaching Home Economics 



244 Kansas State College 

Art 

Professor Barfoot Assistant Professor Darst 

Associate Professor Everhardy Instructor Stalder 

Assistant Professor Harris Instructor Holland 

Assistant Professor Morris Instructor Kedzie 

The curriculum in art is designed to provide a background for homemaking 
or other professional work. Depending upon their interests, the students may 
specialize in design, interior decoration, costume design, or teaching of art. 

COURSES IN ART 

FOR UNDERGRADUATE CREDIT 

101A. Elementary Design I. 2(0-6)*; I, II, and SS. Staff. 
A fundamental course in color and form and the application of their prin- 
ciples to daily living. Charge, $1; deposit, 25 cents.f 

101B. Elementary Design II. 2(0-6); I, II, and SS. Prerequisite: Art 
101 A. Staff. 

A continuation of Art 101A, incorporating a unit in history and apprecia- 
tion of art. Charge, $1; deposit, 25 cents. 

102. Design in the Crafts. 2(0-6) ; I, II, and SS. Prerequisite: Art 101A. 
Staff. 

An application of design principles to various technical processes, as book 
binding, block printing, carving, decorative stitchery, leatherwork, modeling, 
metalwork, and weaving. Projects selected from this group will make up a 
semester's work. Charge, $1.50; deposit, 25 cents. 

103. Intermediate Design. 2(0-6); I, II, and SS. Prerequisite: Art 101B. 
Staff. 

A continuation of Art 101B, with special emphasis on color possibilities and 
different design media. Charge, $1; deposit, 25 cents. 

105. Advanced Design. 2(0-6); I and II. Prerequisite: Art 103. Barfoot, 
Everhardy, Morris. 

A continuation of Art 103, with emphasis on art structure. Charge, $1 ; 
deposit, 25 cents. 

113. Interior Decoration I. 2(0-6); I, II, and SS. Prerequisite: Art 101B. 
Staff. 

The decoration and furnishing of the modern dwelling. Charge, $1; deposit, 
25 cents. 

115. Interior Decoration II. 2(0-6); I. Prerequisite: Art 113. Staff. 

A continuation of Art 113, with attention paid especially to the interplay 
between modern culture and art expression as shown in interior decoration. 
Charge, $1 ; deposit, 25 cents. 

117. Interior Decoration III. 2(0-6); II. Prerequisite: Art 115. Harris, 
Morris, Darst. 

A continuation of Art 115, including a study of house types, furniture, and 
fabric styles. Charge, SI ; deposit, 25 cents. 

120. Drawing. 2(0-6); I and II. Prerequisite: Art 101B. Staff. 

Representative sketching, decorative illustrating, and creative designing in 
which a variety of media and technique is employed. Charge, $2; deposit, 
25 cents. 

* The number before the parentheses indicates the number of hours of credit ; the first 
number within the parentheses indicates the number of hours of recitation each week ; the 
second shows the number of hours to be spent in laboratory work each week ; and the third, 
where there is one, indicates the number of hoursi of outside work in connection with the 
laboratory required each week. I, II, and SS indicate that the course is given the first 
semester, second semester, and summer school, respectively. 

t Only one key deposit is made in a given semester, regardless of the number of art courses 
taken. 



Division of Home Economics 245 

127. Lettering. 2(0-6); I, II, and SS. Prerequisite: Art 101B. Harris, 
Morris, Darst. 

Creative design in the field of lettering in relation to historic and natural 
forms. Charge, $1 ; deposit, 25 cents. 

130. Costume Design I. 2(0-6); I, II, and SS. Prerequisite: Art 101A. 
Staff. 

.Line, form, color, texture in costume design and selection as related to the 
requirements of the individual. This course is a design basis for garment 
selection and construction. Charge, $1 ; deposit, 25 cents. 

134. Costume Design II. 2(0-6); I and II. Prerequisite: Art 130. Staff. 

A continuation of Art 130, with review and application of the principles of 
art in modern costume in relation to the human figure as the structural basis 
for costume. Charge, $1; deposit, 25 cents. 

138. Costume Design III. 2(0-6); I and II. Prerequisite: Art 134. Staff. 
A continuation of Art 134, dealing with the relation between the historic 

background and fabric and costume design. Charge, SI ; deposit, 25 cents. 

139. Costume Illustration. 2(0-6); I or II. Prerequisite: Art 101B and 
130. Staff. 

Costume figures for fashion illustration rendered in various media suitable 
for reproduction. Charge, $2; deposit 25 cents. 

FOR GRADUATE AND UNDERGRADUATE CREDIT 

201. Principles of Art I. 3(3-0); I. Prerequisite: Art 101B. Barfoot, 
Harris, Morris. 

The culture of various peoples and their homes as shown by their use of 
color, line, and form in architecture, sculpture, and painting. 

202. Principles of Art II. 3(3-0); II. Prerequisite: Art 201. Barfoot, 
Harris, Morris. 

A continuation of Art 201, dealing particularly with home crafts and minor 
arts. 

217. Problems in Design. Credit to be arranged; I and II. Prerequisite: 
Eight hours in art or permission of instructor. Staff. 

Problems in design planned to meet the particular needs of the student. 
Charge, $1 ; deposit, 25 cents. 

230. Problems in Teaching Art. Credit to be arranged; I, II, or SS. 
Prerequisite: Art 101B and Educ. 132 or its equivalent. Barfoot, Everhardy. 

For the high-school teacher who is correlating art with home economics, 
particularly for the teacher of art connected with vocational training. Lectures 
and class discussions of methods, consideration of suitable laboratory equip- 
ment, use of illustrative material, and preparation of courses of study. Charge, 
$1 ; deposit, 25 cents. 

232. Problems in Interior Decoration. Credit to be arranged; I and II. 
Prerequisite: Art 117 or permission of instructor. Harris, Morris, Darst. 

Problems planned with the student to meet her particular needs. Charge, 
$1 ; deposit, 25 cents. 

233. Historic Textile Design. 2(2-0) ; I, II, or SS. Prerequisite: Art 101B 
and Clo. and Text. 116. Staff. 

Design employed in fabrics in each of the great art periods. 

235. Problems in Costume Design. Credit to be arranged; I and II. 
Prerequisite : Eight hours in art or permission of instructor. Staff. 

Problems planned with the student to meet her particular needs. Charge, 
$1 ; deposit, 25 cents. 



246 



Kansas State College 



240. Art of the Southwest Indians. 1(1-0); I, II, and SS. Prerequisite: 
Art 101A. Everhardy. 

Discussions of the origin and development of the decorative arts and cere- 
monials of the Southwest area from prehistoric times to the present. Deposit, 
25 cents. 

FOR GRADUATE CREDIT 

302. Advanced Costume Design. Credit to be arranged. I, II, and SS. 
Prerequisite : Consult instructors. Staff. 

Individual research problems which may form the basis for the master's 
thesis. Charge to be arranged with instructor. 

304. Advanced Interior Decoration. Credit to be arranged. I, II, and SS. 
Prerequisite : Consult instructors. Staff. 

Individual research problems which may form the basis for the master's 
thesis. Charge to be arranged with instructor. 



Child Welfare and Euthenics 



Professor 

Associate Professor Kell 
Assistant Professor Williams 
Assistant Professor Raffington 



Instructor Dales 
Instructor Lister 
Graduate Assistant Keim 
Graduate Assistant Burton 
Graduate Assistant Aschmann 



In the Department of Child Welfare and Euthenics, instruction is given in 
physical and mental health, child behavior and guidance, and family relation- 
ships. The instruction in child behavior and guidance is based on work with 
children 2 to 5 years of age in the two nursery schools. 

COURSES IN CHILD WELFARE AND EUTHENICS 

FOR UNDERGRADUATE CREDIT 

101. Personal Health. 2(2-0); I, II, and SS. Williams, Raffington. 
Charge, 25 cents. 

FOR GRADUATE AND UNDERGRADUATE CREDIT 

201. Child Guidance I. 3(1-6); I, II, and SS. Prerequisite: Educ. 184 
and Child Welf. 101 or its equivalent. Staff. 

Laboratory. — Directed observation and assisting in the nursery school. 
Charge, $1. Additional charge for lunches, $2. 

206. Child Guidance II. 3(3-0); II. Prerequisite: Child Welf. 201. Kell. 

211. Family Health. 3(3-0) ; I, II, and SS. Prerequisite: Junior standing 
and Educ. 184; Zool. 105 or 130; Child Welf. 101 or its equivalent. Williams. 
Charge, 50 cents. 

216. The Family. 2(2-0) I. II, and SS. Prerequisite: Educ. 184 and junior 
standing. Charge, 50 cents. 

221. Problems in Child Welfare and Euthenics. Credit to be arranged; 
I, II, and SS. Prerequisite: Child Welf. 201; consult instructors. Staff. 

226. Seminar in Child Welfare and Euthenics. 1 to 2 hours; II. Pre- 
requisite: Child Welf. 201. Kell. 

231. Parent Guidance. 3(3-0); II. Prerequisite or concurrent: Child 
W T elf. 206 and 216. Kell. Charge, $1. 

FOR GRADUATE CREDIT 

301. Research in Child Welfare and Euthenics. Credit to be arranged: 
I, II, and SS. Prerequisite: Consult instructors. Kell, Williams. 



Division of Home Economics 247 

Clothing and Textiles 

Professor Latzke Assistant Professor Fletcher 

Associate Professor Cowlks Instructor Howe 

Associate Professor Hkss Instructor Manchester 

Assistant Professor Cormany Instructor Stotts 

The~tiepartment offers courses designed to furnish essential knowledge for 
the selection of clothing and household fabrics. Design principles and the 
technique of garment construction are presented. Advanced courses are 
offered for students who wish to prepare for vocational, professional, and busi- 
ness positions such as college teachers, research workers, textile chemists, cloth- 
ing consultants, purchasing agents for institutions and department stores, and 
extension workers. 

COURSES IN CLOTHING AND TEXTILES 

FOR UNDERGRADUATE CREDIT 

101. Elementary Clothing. 0(0-6); I, II. Staff. 

Fundamental processes of garment construction. No credit, but is required 
of all home economics students who have not had sufficient high school work to 
enter Clo. and Text. 103. Charge, $1 ; deposit, 25 cents. 

103. Clothing for the Individual. 4(1-9); I, II, and SS. Prerequisite: 
One semester of clothing in high school or its equivalent and Art. 130. Staff. 

Application of design principles to dress; budgeting and buying procedures. 

Laboratory. — Development of foundation pattern; flat pattern designing; 
construction of wool or silk garment. Charge, $2.50; deposit, 25 cents. 

110. Clothing Selection. 2(2-0) ; I and II. Latzke, Cowles. 

Selection of clothing with self-analysis as a basis; budgeting, buying pro- 
cedures. Designed for students not majoring in home economics, or those not 
planning to take Clo. and Text. 103. 

112. Textile Selection and Care. 2(2-0) ; I or II and SS. Hess, Cormany. 
Factors which influence service qualities of common textile fabrics. De- 
signed for students not required to take Clo. and Text. 116. 

116. Textiles. 3(2-3); I, II, and SS. Prerequisite: Chem. 122; Phys. 101 
recommended. Hess, Fletcher. 

Fundamentals of textiles as related to the problems of the consumer. 

Laboratory. — Fabrics for specific uses; identification of fibers; simple fabric 
analysis; the effect on fabrics of various methods of cleaning. Charge, $2; 
deposit. 25 cents. 

123. Advanced Clothing. 4(1-9); I, II, and SS. Prerequisite: Clo. and 
Text. 103. Open to juniors and seniors. Cowles, Cormany, Latzke. 

Social significance of fashion. 

Laboratory. — Designs draped in cotton and then in silk or wool. Charge, 
$3; deposit, 25 cents. 

FOR GRADUATE AND UNDERGRADUATE CREDIT 

201. Clothing Economics. 3(3-0); I or II, and SS. Prerequisite: Clo. 
and Text. 103 and 116 and Econ. 101. Latzke. 

The organization of textile industries and markets ; consumer problems in 
relation to market conditions; standardization of clothing and textiles. 

205. Advanced Textiles. 3(1-6): I or II, and SS. Prerequisite: Clo. and 
Text. 116. Hess, Fletcher. 

Physical, chemical, and optical testing of textiles. 

Laboratory. — Emphasis placed on research technique. Charge, $3; deposit, 
25 cents. 



248 



Kansas State College 



215. Problems in Clothing and Textiles. Credit to be arranged; I, II, 
and SS. Prerequisite: Senior or graduate standing; consult instructors. Staff. 

An assigned problem in clothing or textiles. Charge to be arranged with in- 
structor. 

225. History of Costume. 2(2-0); II. Prerequisite: Hist. 101 or equiva- 
lent. Cowles. 

FOR GRADUATE CREDIT 

301. Research in Clothing and Textiles. Credit to be arranged; I, II, 
and SS. Prerequisite: Graduate standing; consult instructors. Latzke, Hess, 
Fletcher. 

Individual research in clothing or in textiles which may form the basis for 
the master's thesis. Charge to be arranged with instructor. 

304. Clothing and Textiles Seminar. 1(1-0); II, and SS. Prerequisite: 
Graduate standing. Staff. 

Assigned readings and discussion of current developments in the field. 

312. Experimental Textiles. 2 to 5 hours; I, II, and SS. Prerequisite: 
Clo. and Text. 205. Hess, Fletcher. Charge to be arranged with instructor. 



Food Economics and Nutrition 



Professor Pittman 
Professor Kramer 
Associate Professor Vail 
Assistant Professor McMillan 
Assistant Professor Browning 
Assistant Professor Nutter 
Instructor Kunkrth 



Instructor Meyer 

Instructor Mullen 

Instructor Forney 

Instructor Meiller 

Instructor Stewart 

Instructor Sapfry 
Technician Cedarquist 



Selection, preservation, preparation, and service of food suited to individual 
requirements involve the application of principles of chemistry, physics, bac- 
teriology, physiology, economics, and art. Courses in these subjects are re- 
quired and some are prerequisite to courses offered in this department. 

Training is provided for teachers of foods, dietitians, and commercial, ex- 
tension, and research workers. 

COURSES IN FOOD ECONOMICS AND NUTRITION 

FOR UNDERGRADUATE CREDIT 

102. Foods I. 5(3-6) ; I, II, and SS. Staff. 

Elementary nutrition and food economics. Practice in food preparation and 
meal service. Charge, $5; deposit, $1. 

107. Foods II. 3(1-6); I and II. Prerequisite. Chem. 122 and Food and 
Nutr. 102 or equivalent. Staff. 

Chemical and physical properties of food related to preparation and preser- 
vation. Charge, $4; deposit, $1. 

112. Human Nutrition. 3(3 0); I and II. Prerequisite: Food and Nutr. 
107 and Zool. 219 or 130.$ Kramer, Kunerth, Nutter. 

Chemistry of food and nutrition, emphasizing food nutrients, digestion, and 
metabolism. 

121. Applied Nutrition. 2(2-0); I and II. Prerequisite: Chem. 122 or 
permission of instructor. Pittman, Forney. 

Practical nutrition, including food requirements, food selection and food 
habits. For men and women students not majoring in home economics. 

t Students from other divisions desiring to elect Food and Nutr. 112 may substitute an 
equivalent number of hours in other sciences for these requirements. 



Division of Home Economics 249 

176. Meats HE. 1(0-3) ; I and II. 

See Department of Animal Husbandry, Division of Agriculture, An. Husb. 
176. 

— FOR GRADUATE AND UNDERGRADUATE CREDIT 

202. Dietetics. 4(3-3); I, II, and SS. Prerequisite: Food and Nutr. 112. 
Pittman, Meiller, Mullen. 

Food requirements in health during infancy, childhood, adolescence, adult 
life, and old age. Principles of human nutrition applied to adequate diets at 
different cost levels. 

Laboratory. — Calorie, protein, mineral, and vitamin values; shares; diets 
for infants, children, and adults. Charge, $4.50; deposit, $1. 

205. Dietetics for Abnormal Conditions. 2(1-3); I and II. Prerequisite: 
Food and Nutr. 202. Kramer, Meiller. 

Dietetic requirements in pathological and abnormal conditions. (For stu- 
dents who expect to qualify as professional dietitians.) 

Laboratory. — Demonstration of special foods used in such conditions, prep- 
aration of trays, computation of dietaries, consideration of costs. Charge, $1; 
deposit, $1. 

210. Nutrition of Development. 2(2-0); II. Prerequisite: Food and 
Nutr. 202. Pittman. 

Nutrition in pregnancy and lactation. Food requirements of fetus, infant, 
pre-school child, and school child through adolescence. 

215. Field Work in Nutrition. 3(2-3) ; I and II. Prerequisite: Food and 
Nutr. 202. Browning, Mullen. 

Survey of field of child nutrition, field work with school children, special 
work with malnourished and normal individuals. Charge to be arranged with 
instructor. 

245. Problems in Foods. Credit to be arranged; I, II, and SS. Prerequi- 
site: Consult instructors. Staff. 

Problems dealing with preparation, preservation, and storage of food. 
Charge to be arranged with instructor. 

248. Problems in Food Economics and Nutrition. Credit to be arranged. 
I, II, and SS. Prerequisite: Senior or graduate standing. Staff. 

Problems dealing with the nutritive value of foods; feeding experiments; 
dietary studies, practice in methods commonly used in simpler experiments in 
nutrition. Charge to be arranged with instructor. 

251. Food Economics and Nutrition Seminar. 1 to 2 hours a semester; 
maximum, 4 credits; I, II, and SS. Prerequisite: Food and Nutr. 112, Kra- 
mer, Pittman, Kunerth. 

Individual reports and discussion of topics in fields of food economics and 
nutrition. Special attention to recent literature. Charge, $1. 

255. Experimental Cookery. 2(1-3); I and II. Prerequisite or concurrent: 
Food and Nutr. 202. Vail, McMillan, Browning. 

Food preparation from experimental standpoint. Charge, $1 to $3; de- 
posit, $1. 

for graduate credit 

305. Research in Food Economics and Nutrition. Credit to be arranged; 
I, II, and SS. Prerequisite : Consult instructors. Staff. 

Individual research problems which may form the basis for the master's 
thesis. Charge to be arranged with instructor. 

306. Animal Nutrition Seminar. 1(1-0) per year; I and II. Prerequisite: 
Senior or graduate standing. Pittman, Kramer. 

Reports of experiments in nutrition, discussion of methods, and validity of 
conclusions. 



250 Kansas State College 

General Home Economics 

Dean Justin 

Assistant Dean McMillan 

Assistant Professor Raefington 

Assistant Barnes 

Assistant Bare 

COURSES IN GENERAL HOME ECONOMICS 

FOR UNDERGRADUATE CREDIT 

130. Home Economics Lectures. R(meetings by appointment). Staff, de- 
partment heads of the Division, professors of subject-matter departments, stu- 
dents, and invited speakers. Charge, 75 cents. 

Freshmen meet weekly during the fall semester. The purpose of these meet- 
ings is: (1) they orientation of the student to her college environment; (2) 
the development of the ability to study; (3) guidance in choice of one of the 
several fields of home economics for her profession. 

Seniors meet weekly during the spring semester. The opportunities and 
responsibilities of the home economist are presented, and means for profes- 
sional growth and personal advancement of the trained woman are stressed. 

All students in the division meet in a general seminar four times a semester, 
usually the third Thursday of each month. Discussion of general questions in 
the field of home economics and of home economics student affairs. Programs 
presented by speakers from outside, faculty members, and students. As far as 
possible, the course serves as an introduction to the professional aspect of 
home economics. The Home Economics Club is used as a means of expression 
and experience. In the fall (for the freshmen) and in the spring (for the 
seniors) this general meeting will take the place of the meetings of their re- 
spective groups. 

135. Guidance of Freshmen. 1(1-0); I. Prerequisite: Junior or senior 
standing or special permission from the dean. Application for enrollment in 
this class must be made the preceding spring semester. Dean's staff, Division 
of Home Economics, and others. 

Instruction in counseling techniques employed in freshman orientation in 
the Division of Home Economics. 

140. Home Projects. R(meetings by appointment). Each student must 
complete a minimum of two home projects at least one semester before gradu- 
ation, except that students in Home Economics and Nursing and those trans- 
ferring from other colleges and divisions during their junior or senior years 
need to complete only one. Bare. 

COURSES IN HOME ECONOMICS EDUCATION* 

Professor Rust Assistant Professor Baxter 

FOR UNDERGRADUATE CREDIT 

132. Methods of Teaching Home Economics. 3(3-0) ; I. II, and SS. Rust, 
Baxter. 

See Department of Education, Division of General Science. 

160. Teaching Participation in Home Economics. 3( - ) ; I, II, and SS. 
By appointment. Rust, Baxter. 

See Department of Education, Division of General Science. 

FOR GRADUATE AND UNDERGRADUATE CREDIT 

232. Teaching Subjects Related to Home Economics. 1 to 3 hours; I, II, 
and SS. Prerequisite : Educ. 184 and 132. Rust, 

See Department of Education, Division of General Science. 

* The six courses named here are given by the Department of Education for the Division 
of Home Economics. Professor Rust and Assistant Professor Baxter are appointed coopera- 
tively by that department and the Division of Home Economics. 



Division of Home Economics 251 

for graduate credit 

313. Research in Organization and Presentation of Home Economics. 
Credit to be arranged; I. II, and SS. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and 
confirmation of Division of Home Economics. Justin, Rust. 

See Department of Education, Division of General Science. 

314. Problems in Organization and Presentation of Home Economics. 
Credit to be arranged; I, II, and SS. Prerequisite: Senior or graduate stand- 
ing. Justin, Rust. 

See Department of Education, Division of General Science. 

315. Supervision in Home Economics. 2 hours; I, II, and SS. Prerequi- 
site : Educ. 160 and experience in teaching home economics. Rust. 

See Department of Education, Division of General Science. 

316* Seminar in Home Economics Education. 3(3-0); II, SS. Prerequi- 
site: Educ. 160 and experience in teaching Home Economics. Rust and visit- 
ing instructors. 

See Department of Education, Division of General Science. 



Household Economics 

Professor Lindquist Graduate Assistant Ellithorpe 

Associate Profesor Gunselman Graduate Assistant Walbert 

Assistant Professor Agan Graduate Research Assistant Sloan 
Instructor McKinney 

Through the courses in this department an opportunity is offered for study- 
ing the effect of social and economic forces on the home and its management. 
The phases presented for study include housing, home management, equip- 
ment, and economic problems of the household. Graduate students preparing 
to become directors of home management houses, specialists and advisers in 
home management, teachers, homemakers, or research workers in this field find 
suitable courses in this department. 

COURSES IN HOUSEHOLD ECONOMICS 

FOR UNDERGRADUATE CREDIT 

107. The House. 3(2-3); I, II. and SS. Prerequisite: Food and Nutr. 
102; Phys. 109 recommended. Agan, McKinney, Ellithorpe. 

Criteria for judging the adequacy of certain types of dwellings in meeting 
the housing needs of the family; management of time, effort, and income as 
affected by the house chosen ; selection of household furnishings and equip- 
ment. 

Laboratory. — Selection, care, and operation of certain equipment for the 
home. Charge, $1. 

116. Home Management. 3(1-6); I, II, and SS. Prerequisite: Senior 
standing. Lindquist, McKinney, Walbert. 

Application of basic courses in home economics to the management of a 
home. 

Laboratory. — Residence is required in the home-management houses for a 
period of six weeks. 

FOR GRADUATE AND UNDERGRADUATE CREDIT 

203. Household Equipment I. 2(0-6); I. II. and SS. Prerequisite: Phys, 
109. Agan. 

Selection, care, construction, operation, use, and repair of various pieces of 
equipment used in the home. Charge, $2.50. 

* Effective May 31, 1939. 



252 Kansas State College 

205. Household Equipment II. 2(0-6); II. Prerequisite: Hshld. Econ. 
203. Agan. 

Selection, care, construction, operation, and methods of testing mechanical, 
electrical, and heating equipment. Charge, $2.50. 

238. Problems in Household Equipment. Credit to be arranged; I, II, 
and SS. Prerequisite: Hshld. Econ. 203. Agan. 

Special problems in selection, care, operation, or testing of household equip- 
ment. Charge to be arranged with instructor. 

243. Problems in Household Economics. Credit to be arranged; I, II, and 
SS. Prerequisite : Consult instructors. Staff. 

Special problems for individual investigation in standards of living and 
family expenditures; housing; organization and methods of housework; use of 
family resources. 

263. Family Finance. 2(2-0); I, II, and SS. Prerequisite: Econ. 101. 
Gunselman, McKinney. 

Economic problems involved in the efficient management of the family's 
financial resources. 

265. Economic Problems of the Family. 2(2-0) ; II, and SS. Prerequisite: 
Econ. 101. Lindquist, Gunselman. 

Problems of household production and of earning and spending the money 
income; factors determining the purchasing power of the "dollar of the home." 

270. Consumer Buying. 2(2-0); II and SS. Prerequisite: Econ. 101 and 
junior standing. Gunselman and others from related subject-matter fields. 

Problems of the consumer in the present market, aids toward intelligent 
buying of commodities, and the need for protective legislation. 

275. Seminar in Home Management* 2 to 3 hours a semester. I, II, and 
SS. Prerequisite : Senior or graduate standing. Lindquist. 

A review of management literature and trends; the contribution made by 
home management to the family and community. Charge, $1. 

FOR GRADUATE CREDIT 

305. Economics of Consumption. 2(2-0). II and SS. Prerequisite: Econ. 
101 and Hshld. Econ. 263 and 265. Lindquist, Gunselman. 

The consumer and his function; the economic significance of choice and of 
the planes of consumption. 

310. Research in Household Economics. Credit to be arranged; I, II, and 
SS. Prerequisite : Consult instructors. Lindquist, Gunselman, Agan. 

Individual research problems in household economics, housing, equipment, 
or management which may form the basis for the master's thesis. 

* Effective May 31, 1939. 



Division of Home Economics 253 

am 

Institutional Management 

Professor West Instructor Morrison 

Assistant Professor Wood Assistant Price 

Instructor James Graduate Assistant Hadden 

Instructor Fowler Graduate Assistant Oshourn 

Courses in this department provide training for cafeteria, tearoom, and 
lunchroom managers, dietitians, and directors of residence halls. 

COURSES IN INSTITUTIONAL MANAGEMENT 

FOR GRADUATE AND UNDERGRADUATE CREDIT 

202. Institutional Management I. 4(1-9); I, II, and SS. Prerequisite: 
Food and Nutr. 107. Morrison. 

Food problems of institutions, including preparation and serving of food 
in large quantities, menu planning, and food costs. 

Laboratory. — Carried on in College cafeteria where food is prepared and 
served in large quantities. Charge, $2.50. 

204. Institutional Management II . 3(3-0) ; I, II, and SS. Prerequisite 
(or concurrent for graduate students) : Inst. Mgmt. 202. Wood. 

Organization and administration problems of the food and house depart- 
ments of certain institutions such as the school lunchroom, residence halls, 
hospitals, cafeteria. Concurrent residence in Van Zile Hall gives opportunity 
for actual managerial experience. 

210. Problems in Institutional Management. Credit to be arranged; 
I, II, and SS. Prerequisite or parallel: Inst. Mgmt. 204; consult instructor. 
Staff. 

Individual investigation of problems in institutional management. Confer- 
ences and reports at appointed hours. 

215. Institutional Food Buying. 2(2-0); I and II. Prerequisite: Inst 
Mgmt. 202. James. 

Producing areas; distribution of food products; methods of purchasing 
food in large quantities. 

218. School Lunchroom Management. 2(1-3); II and SS. Prerequisite: 
Food and Nutr. 107. Fowler. 

Organization, administration, equipment, food buying, food costs, and menu 
planning for the school lunch; banquet service for secondary schools. 

225. Tearoom Management. 3(0-9); I and II. Prerequisite or concurrent: 
Inst. Mgmt. 204 and 215. Fowler. 

Practical experience in planning, preparing, and serving food for the public. 
The College tearoom serves as a laboratory for this course. Charge, $2.50. 

230. Institutional Furnishings and Equipment. 2(2-0); I and II. Pre- 
requisite : Food and Nutr. 107. Fowler. 

Selection, arrangement, installation, and care of the different types of equip- 
ment for the house and food departments of institutions. 

235. Institutional Housekeeping. 2(1-3); II. Prerequisite or concurrent: 
Inst. Mgmt. 204. Wood. 

Problems involved in the management and care of the house departments 
of various types of institutions. Charge, $1. 

FOR GRADUATE CREDIT 

301. Research in Institutional Management. Credit to be arranged: 
I, II, and SS. Prerequisite : Consult instructor. Staff. 



254 Kansas State College 

Bureau of Research in Home Economics 



The Bureau of Research in Home Economics conducts investigations in the 
scientific, economic, and social problems of the home. The purpose of this re- 
search is to discover new facts and new methods in the application of scientific 
knowledge bearing upon the welfare of the members of the family and . the 
conditions under which they live. 

The fields of research included in the bureau are : Child welfare, clothing 
and textiles, food economics, household administration, institutional manage- 
ment, human nutrition, dietetics, and public health. 

The laboratories of the Division of Home Economics include equipment 
suitable for work on certain of the problems. Opportunities for surveys and 
investigations of conditions in the state are found through the cooperation of 
various educational and social agencies. 

The results; of all investigations are published from time to time and are 
available on request to all citizens of the state. 

The personnel of the bureau staff includes members of the teaching faculty 
in home economics. Several of the departments in other Divisions of the Col- 
lege advise or collaborate with officers of the Bureau on problems of related 
interest. 

Among the investigations in progress are the following: 

*A study of calcium and phosphorus in various forms of milk and cheese. 
*Effeet upon the animal bodv of varving the amount of vitamin in the 

diet. 
*Vitamin content of foods relating to human nutrition : 

a. Fruits. 

b. Vegetables. 

c. Cereals. 

d. Eggs. 

e. Dairv products, 
f. Meat. 

Utilization by human subjects of the nitrogen and phosphorus of dif- 
ferent cuts of meat. 

Factors affecting the quality of cakes. 
*Composition of cooked meats. 

Dietary studies — group, individual. 
*Nutritional status of college women as related to dietary habits. 
*A study of the factors affecting service qualities of certain textile fabrics. 
*A study of service qualities of fabrics with regard to adequate labeling. 
*A study of the coefficient of protection of clothing and household fabrics. 
*A study of the silk fiber, weighted and unweighted, as affected by: 

a. Light. 

b. Light and moisture. 

c. Light and perspiration. 
Coefficient of absorption of textile materials. 
Comparative study of certain body measurements: 

a. With those of selected commercial patterns. 

b. With those of certain commercially made garments. 
Methods in parent education. 

Behavior records for nursery school. 

The difference in individuals in maintaining physical equilibrium under 

varying conditions. 
Studies of factors affecting the expenditures for family living. 

* The investigations starred are being supported in part by funds from the Agricultural 
Experiment Station. 



The Division of Veterinary Medicine 

Ralph R. Dykstra, Dean 



Professional men, such as veterinarians, are placed in a more or less public 
relation to the communities they serve. They must have a broad groundwork 
in culture and ethical training, which will win them the confidence and respect 
of their communities. Success is measured in something more than dollars and 
cents, and the man whose view of life is no broader than his profession adds 
but little to the world and its happiness. The training given by the College in 
veterinary science seeks to emphasize the value of the man as a man, as much 
as his value as a specialist. 

VETERINARY ENROLLMENT LIMITED 

By authority of the State Board of Regents, enrollment in the curriculum 
in Veterinary Medicine is limited to a total of 200 students. Persons wishing 
to enter this curriculum should apply several weeks in advance of the opening 
of the college year. Admission to each of the four years is based on the ap- 
plicant's scholarship record and other evidence of his fitness. When all other 
factors are equal, first preference is given to applicants who are residents of 
Kansas, and second preference to applicants who are residents of those states 
having no standard college of veterinary medicine. In general, no requests for 
admission will be approved after August 15. Application blanks may be ob- 
tained from the dean of the Division of Veterinary Medicine. 

Applicants must offer: (1) the high-school units required for admission to 
the pre-veterinary adaptation of the freshman year of the curriculum in Gen- 
eral Science; (2) thirty-two hours of college work as prescribed in or equivalent 
to the pre-veterinary year in the Division of General Science. This work may 
be done here or in any approved junior college, college, or university. 

CURRICULUM IN VETERINARY MEDICINE 

The curriculum in veterinary medicine in Kansas State College was es- 
tablished to give the young men of this state an opportunity to pursue these 
studies in an agricultural environment, where the facilities offered by other 
branches of the College would be at their command. While the instruction in 
this curriculum is largely technical, enough subjects of a general character are 
included to give a sound education and a broad outlook. Better to fit the 
veterinarian to deal wisely with the livestock problems which he has to meet, 
he is required to take the work in livestock feeding, breeding, and judging, 
in milk inspection, and in zoology, in addition to his purely professional work. 

Work must be taken as prescribed, except that certain courses may be se- 
lected from the list of extracurricular electives if the student has the pre- 
requisites. 

Curriculum in Veterinary Medicine 

FRESHMAN 

First Semester Second Semester 

Anatomv I, Anat. 104 *4(3-3) Anatomy II, Anat. 110 8(4-12) 

El. Histology, Path. 103 1(0-3) Histology I. Path. 104 3(1-6) 

El. of An. Husb., An. Hu-b. 125. . 3(2-4) Path. Pact. I, Pact. Ill 4(2-6) 

Gen. Org. Chemistry, Chem. 122.. 5(3-6) Infantry IV, Mil. Sc. 104A 1(1-2) 

Medical Rotanv, Pot. 126 2(1-3) Phys. Educ. M, Phys. Ed. 106 R(0-2) 

Infantrv III, Mil. Sc. 103A 1(1-2) 

Phys. Educ. M, Phys. Ed. 105 R(0-2) 



Total 16 Total 16 

* The number before the parentheses indicates the number of hours of credit ; the first 
number within the parentheses indicates the number of hours of recitation each week; the 
second shows the number of hours to be spent in laboratory work each week; and the third, 
where there is one, indicates the number of hours of outside work in connection with the lab- 
oratory each week. 

(255) 



250 



Kansas State College 



SOPHOMORE 



First Semester 

Anatomy HI, Anat, 112 4(1-9) 

Comp. Physiology I, Anat. 222 4(3-3) 

Histology II, Path. 106 3(1-6) 

Path. Bact. II, Bact. 116 4(2-6) 

Dairy Cattle Judg., Dairy Husb. 

104 1(0-3) 

Total 16 



Second Semester 

Pathology I, Path. 203 5(3-6) 

Comp. Physiology II, Anat. 227... 4(3-3) 
Farm Poul. Prod., Poul. Husb. 101, 2(1-2, 1) 
Feeds and Feeding, An. Husb. 189, 3(3-0) 
Dairy Inspec. II, Dairy Husb. 119, 2(1-3) 



Total 



16 



JUNIOR 



First Semester 
Surgery I, Surg. 102 


5(5-0) 
4(3-3) 
4(3-3) 
3(2-3) 
2(0-6) 


Second Semester 
Surgery II, Surg. 107 


5(5-0) 


Materia Medica, Surg. 158 

Pathology II, Path. 208 


Dis. of Large Animals I, Surg. 175, 
Pathology III, Path. 211 


5(5-0) 
3(2-3) 


Parasitology, Zool. 208 


Therapeutics, Surg. 163 


3(3-0) 


Clinics I, Surg. 138 


Clinics II, Surg. 141 


2(0-6) 








Total 


18 

SEN 

5(5-0) 
2(2-0) 
1(0-3) 
3(3-0) 
3(2-3) 
4(0-12) 
R(0-12) 


Total 


18 


First Semester 

Dis. of Large Animals II, Surg. 177, 
Dis of Small Animals, Surg. 186.. 


IOR 

Second Semester 

Inf. Dis. of Large Animals, Surg. 
181 


5(5-0) 


Meat Hygiene, Path. 217 


Obst. and Breed. Dis., Surg. 130.. 

Med. Econ. and Law, Surg. 191 . . . 
Clinics IV, Surg. 147 


5(5-0) 
2(2-0) 


Pathology IV, Path. 214 

Clinics III, Surg. 144 


2(2-0) 
4(0-12) 


Clinical Path. I, Path. 225 


Clinical Path. II, Path. 226 


R(0-12) 


Total 


18 


Total 


18 



Number of hours required for graduation, 136 

Extracurricular Electives 



First Semester 
Vaccine Manu. I, Path. 228. . . 



-5( - ) 



Second Semester 
Vaccine Manu. II, Path. 231 2-5( - ) 



First or Second Semester 

Special Histology, Path. 252 3(1-6) 

Pathological Technic and Diagnosis I, Path. 222 2 to 5( - ) 

Pathological Technic and Diagnosis II, Path. 223 2 to 5( - ) 

Special Anatomy, Anat. 202 2 to 4( - ) 

Applied Anatomy, Anat. 206 1(0-3) 

Research in Pathology, Path. 302 Credit to be arranged 

Problems in Physiology, Anat. 215 Credit to be arranged 

Research in Medicine, Surg. 310 Credit to be arranged 

Research in Surgery, Surg. 301 Credit to be arranged 

Senior Seminar, V. M. 101 2(1-3) 

Applied Veterinary Parasitology, Path. 250 2(1-3) 



Division of Veterinary Medicine 257 

Anatomy and Physiology 

Professor Burt 
Professor McLeod 
Professor Leasure 
Instructor Link 
Instructor Wagers 

The classroom instruction consists of lectures, quizzes, and recitations, and 
special dissection of the part under discussion; also a study of dissected speci- 
mens, various models, and the Azoux model of the horse. Mounted skeletons 
and limbs and loose bones are abundant in the museum. The horse is taken 
as a type, and the other domestic animals are compared with the horse. As 
often as necessary parts of other animals are dissected to show the differences. 

The equipment for instruction in physiology is ample to give the student a 
thoroughly comprehensive course in laboratory study. 

COURSES IN ANATOMY 

FOR UNDERGRADUATE CREDIT 

104. Anatomy I. 4(3-3)*; I. McLeod, Wagers. 

A detailed study of the bones of the horse, and a comparative study of the 
bones of other animals and of man. Deposit, $3. 

110. Anatomy II. 8(4-12); II. Prerequisite: Anat. 104. Burt, McLeod, 
Wagers. 

Dissection of the trunk and limbs of the horse ; study of the muscles, vis- 
cera, and joints, and of the blood and nerve supply of the same. Deposit, $8. 

112. Anatomy III. 4(1-9); I. Prerequisite: Anat. 104. Burt, Wagers. 

Dissection and study of all structures of the head of the horse with ex- 
ception of the bones; the comparative anatomv of other domestic animals. 
Deposit, $8. 

101. V. M. Senior Seminar. 2(1-3); II. Prerequisite: Senior standing. 
Staff. 

Given cooperatively by the several departments of the Division; largely a 
review of the courses in the professional curriculum, and a study of recent 
developments in veterinary medicine ; special emphasis on preparation for 
federal and state examinations. Deposit, $3. 

FOR GRADUATE AND UNDERGRADUATE CREDIT 

202. Special Anatomy. 2 to 4 hours; II. Prerequisite: Anat. 104 or 110 
or 112 or 131 or equivalent. Burt, McLeod. 

Study of any part of the horse (as the digestive system, the genital system), 
ox, sheep, pig, dog, cat, or poultry; adapted to the work in which the student 
is specializing. Deposit, $5. 

206. Applied Anatomy. 1(0-3); I. Prerequisite: Anat. 112. Burt, McLeod, 
Wagers. 

Dissection of certain areas embraced in performing the various surgical 
operations, and study of all the structures in each area and their relation to 
one another as they would present themselves during an operation. Deposit, $2. 

* The number before the parentheses indicates the number of hours of credit ; the first 
number within the parentheses indicates the number of hours of recitation each week-; the 
second shows the number of hours to be spent in laboratory work each week ; and the third, 
where there is one, indicates the number of hours of outside work in connection with the lab- 
oratory each week. I, II, and SS indicate that the course is given the first semester, second 
semester, and summer school, respectively. 



17—6529 



258 Kansas State College 

COURSES IN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY 

FOR UNDERGRADUATE CREDIT 

131. Anatomy and Physiology. 3(2-3); I. Adapted to students majoring 
in Animal Husbandry. Link. 

Physiology of the domestic animals, with special emphasis on digestion, 
absorption, metabolism, and excretion; sufficient anatomy to give a thorough 
understanding of the correlation betweeen the two subjects and of the physio- 
logic relations existing among the various organs of the body. Charge, $1. 

COURSES IN PHYSIOLOGY 

FOR GRADUATE AND UNDERGRADUATE CREDIT 

215. Problems in Physiology. Credit to be arranged; I and II. Prerequi- 
site: Anat. 131 or 222 or 227 or its equivalent. Leasure, Link. 

Individual investigational problems in the physiology of digestion, repro- 
duction, endocrine glands, etc. Charge, $1.50' per semester hour. 

222. Comparative Physiology I. 4(3-3); I. Prerequisite: For veterinary 
students, Anat. 104 and 110 and Chem. 122; for others, an approved course in 
organic chemistry. Leasure, Link. 

Physiology of domestic animals; the blood, heart, and blood vessels, the 
ductless glands and internal secretions, respiration, digestion, and absorption. 

Laboratory.— A practical application of the knowledge derived in the class- 
room. Laboratory directions furnished the student. Deposit, $5. 

227. Comparative Physiology II. 4(3-3); II. Prerequisite: Same as for 
Anat. 222. Leasure, Link. 

The urine and urinary system, nutrition, animal heat, muscular and nervous 
systems, locomotion, generation and development, growth and decay. De- 
posit, $5. 

FOR GRADUATE CREDIT 

301. Animal Nutrition Seminar. 1(1-0) ; I and II. Prerequisite: Consult 
Burt. 

Study and criticism of experimental work in animal nutrition, of the meth- 
ods employed, and of validity of conclusions drawn. 



Pathology 

Professor Roderick Assistant Professor Thompson 

Professor Kitselman Assistant Professor Whitlock 

Associate Professor Farley Technician Kimball 
Associate Professor Morrill 

The Department of Pathology presents courses in histology, pathology, and 
meat inspection. Instruction is by lectures, recitations, laboratory work, and 
demonstrations with the aid of lantern slides and autopsies. 

COURSES IN HISTOLOGY 

FOR UNDERGRADUATE CREDIT 

1.03 Elementary Histology. 1(0-3); I. Prerequisite: Zoology 105. Whit- 
lock. 

Form, structure, organization, and activities of the cell and its parts. De- 
posit, SI. 

104. Histology I. 3(1-6); II. Prerequisite: Pathology 103. Whitlock. 

Origin, development, structure, and appearance of the various cells and 
tissues of the animal body. Particular attention is paid to the relationships 
between structure and function and to the fundamental similarities and dif- 
ferences of cells and tissues. Deposit, $3. 



Division of Veterinary Medicine 259 

106. Histology II. 3(1-6); I. Prerequisite: Pathology 104. Whitlock. 

Origin, development, structure, and microscopic appearance of the various 
organs and systems of the animal body. Particular emphasis is laid on the 
correlation of tissue distribution and regional function. Deposit, $3. 

101. V. M. Senior Seminar. See "Courses in Anatomy." 

FOR GRADUATE AND UNDERGRADUATE CREDIT 

252. Special Histology. 3(0-9); I, II, and SS. Prerequisite: Anat. 131 or 
equivalent. Whitlock. 

Fundamental histological technics studied by means of problems. Deposit, $3. 

COURSES IN PATHOLOGY 

FOR GRADUATE AND UNDERGRADUATE CREDIT 

203. Pathology I. 5(3-6); II. Prerequisite: Anat, 222, Bact. 116. Chem. 
122, and Path. 106. Roderick, Morrill. 

General pathology, treating of the history of pathology, predisposition, im- 
munity, congenital and inherited disease, etiology, course and termination of 
disease. Deposit, $3. 

208. Pathology II. 4(3-3); I. Prerequisite: Path. 203 and Anat. 227. 
Roderick, Morrill. 

Special pathology, study of specific pathological processes occurring in the 
various organs of the body. Deposit, $3. 

211. Pathology III. 3(2-3) ; II. Prerequisite: Path. 208. Roderick, Mor- 
rill. 

Special pathology; continuation of Pathology II. Deposit, $3. 

214. Pathology IV. 3(2-3); I. Prerequisite: Path. 211. Roderick. 
Pathology of the infectious diseases and laboratory diagnosis. Deposit, 
$2.50. 

217. Meat Hygiene. 3(3-0) ; I. Prerequisite: Path. 211. Kitselman. 

Kinds and classes of stock, transportation of animals, inspection before and 
after slaughter, disposition of the condemned carcasses from economic and-" 
hygienic standpoints, different methods of preservation, adulterations, arid*:" 
sanitary laws and regulations dealing with healthful meat production. / ^ 

222, 223. Pathological Technic and Diagnosis I and II. 2 to 5 |\&urs 
each; I and II each. Prerequisite: For I, Path. 203; for II, Path. 2ll^nq^< 
222. Roderick, Morrill. Im- V 

Pathological technic; collecting, fixing, hardening, embedding in ceUoTtlm 
and paraffin, also freezing and sectioning of tissues; methods of preserving 
gross specimens; practice in post-mortem and laboratory diagnosis. Deposit, 
$3 to $7.50 for each course. 

225, 226. Clinical Pathology I and II. R(0-12) ; I and II. Credit in Clinics 
III and IV. Open only to senior students in veterinary medicine, and to 
graduate students. Prerequisite: Surg. 138 and 141. Staff. 

The unification and practical application of the various laboratory test 
procedures to clinical diagnosis. Pathological examinations will include autop- 
sies, biopsies, and hematological, bacteriological, serological, chemical patho- 
logical, and parasitological diagnosis. If the student is simultaneously enrolled 
in Clinics III and IV, the grade reported for these courses will include the 
grade for the courses in Clinical Pathology I and II. 

228, 231. Vaccine Manufacture: I and II. 2 to 5 hours each; I and II 
each. Prerequisite: Bact. 116. Farley. 

I: Theory and practice of immunization as applied to blackleg and hog 
cholera. 



260 Kansas State College 

Laboratory. — Isolation and identification of the blackleg organism and of 
related anaerobes, and practical production of blackleg immunizing agents and 
antihog-cholera serum and virus. Deposit, $3 to $7.50 for each course. 

II: Preparation and standardization of various veterinary biological prod- 
ucts, such as tuberculin, bacterial vaccines, and bacterins. 

Laboratory. — Production of some of the products mentioned and special 
work on blackleg immunizing agents and antihog-cholera serum and virus. 
Deposit, $3. 

250. Applied Veterinary Parasitology. 2(1-3); II. Limited to veterinary 
students. Prerequisite: Zool. 208. Whitlock. 

Identification and diagnosis of parasites and parasitoses in living and dead 
animals; important parasitic diseases of livestock in the United States; animal 
parasites of public-health importance; field trips. Charge, $2. 

FOR GRADUATE CREDIT 

302. Research in Pathology. Credit to be arranged; I and II. Prerequi- 
site: Path. 214 and 222, Bact. 116, and Chem. 235 or equivalent. Roderick, 
Morrill. 

Individual research problem in pathology of the nervous system, eye, and 
ear; investigational work on disease caused by a filterable virus. This work 
may form the basis for a master's thesis. Deposit, $1.50 to $15. 

310. Animal Nutrition Seminar. 1(1-0); I and II. Prerequisite: Consult 
Roderick. 

Study and criticism of experimental work in animal nutrition, of the meth- 
ods employed, and of validity of conclusions drawn. 



Surgery and Medicine 



Professor Frick Instructor Roberts 

Professor Frank Instructor Moore 

Professor Dykstra 

The veterinary hospital is equipped with every modern appliance for surgical 
operations and diagnosis of animal diseases. The hospital has capacity for 
more than fifty horses or cattle, and in addition it can accommodate fifty small 
animals, such asf sheep, swine, cats, dogs, etc. Members of the clinical staff, 
accompanied by students, make trips into the surrounding country to treat 
patients. In this way the students come in contact every year with the diseases 
of animals and their treatment. 

COURSES IN SURGERY 

FOR "UNDERGRADUATE CREDIT 

102. Surgery I. 5(5-0); I. Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing in veter- 
inary medicine. Frank. 

Lectures, recitations, and demonstrations on the fundamental principles of 
surgery, methods of restraint, asepsis and antisepsis, anaesthesia, division of 
tissues, union of tissues, control of hemorrhage, neoplasms, and animal den- 
tistry. 

107. Surgery II. 5(5-0); II. Prerequisite: Surg. 102. Frank. 
Lectures, recitations, and demonstrations on the surgical diseases of domes- 
ticated animals; horseshoeing is included. 

112. Surgical Exercises. 1(0-3); I. Prerequisite: Surg. 107. Staff. 
Major surgical operations on anaesthetized domesticated animals and on 
cadavers. Charge, $5. 

101. V. M. Senior Seminar. See "Courses in Anatomy." 






Division of Veterinary Medicine 261 

FOR GRADUATE CREDIT 

301. Research in Surgery. Credit to be arranged; I and II. Prerequisite: 
Anat. 104, 110, and 112 and Surg. 102, 107, and 163. Dykstra, Frank. 

The purpose of this course is to attempt to solve many of the surgical prob- 
lems confronting the average veterinary practitioner. Offered especially for 
graduates in veterinary medicine. 

COURSES IN OBSTETRICS 

FOR UNDERGRADUATE CREDIT 

130. Obstetrics and Breeding Diseases. 5(5-0); II Prerequisite: Senior 
standing in veterinary medicine. Roberts. 

Physiology of reproduction, principles of normal and abnormal parturition, 
special attention given to handling of reduced fertility. 

COURSES IN CLINICS 

FOR UNDERGRADUATE CREDIT 

138, 141. Clinics I and II. 2(0-6) each; I and II, respectively. Prerequi- 
site: Junior or senior standing in veterinary medicine. Staff. 

All species of domestic animals are treated at a free clinic. Students assist 
in the restraint of animals, in bandaging, in compounding prescriptions, and 
in preparing antiseptics and other medical agents. Deposit, $5 for each course. 

144, 147. Clinics III and IV. 4(0-12) each; I and II, respectively. Pre- 
requisite : Junior or senior classification in veterinary medicine. Staff. 

Diagnosis and treatment of hospital patients, including keeping clinical 
records, administering medicines, changing dressings on surgical wounds, X-ray 
technique, etc.; assisting clinicians in out-clinic work. Deposit, $5 for each 
course. 

150. Extra Clinics. 1(0-3); I, II, and SS. Prerequisite: Surg. 141 or 147. 
Staff. 

A course in clinics intended for those undergraduate students desiring clin- 
ical training in addition to that offered in the curriculum in veterinary medi- 
cine. Deposit, $2.50. 

COURSES IN MATERIA MEDICA 

FOR UNDERGRADUATE CREDIT 

158. Materia Medica. 4(3-3); I. Prerequisite: Junior standing in veteri- 
nary medicine. Moore. 

A detailed study of important drugs; their origins, properties, and classifica- 
tion; their physiological actions, clinical administration, and dosage; metrol- 
ogy, prescription writing, pharmaceutical processes, and pharmaceutical prepa- 
rations; compounding of prescriptions. Deposit, $3. 

163. Therapeutics. 3(3-0); II. Prerequisite: Surg. 158. Moore. 

History of therapeutics; healing methods; types of therapy, including me- 
chanical, chemical, electrical, biological, dietetic, and thermal; toxicology as 
encountered in veterinary practice. 

COURSES IN MEDICINE 

FOR UNDERGRADUATE CREDIT 

175, 177. Diseases of Large Animals I and II. 5(5-0) each; II and I, re- 
spectively. Prerequisite: Surg. 158 and junior or senior standing in veterinary 
medicine. Frick, Roberts. 

I: Different diagnostic methods employed for the detection of disease; 
noninfectious diseases of the digestive, circulatory, and respiratory organs of 
the larger animals. 



262 Kansas State College 

II : Noninfectious diseases of the urinary organs, diseases of metabolism, of 
the nervous system, of the organs of locomotion, of the skin, and of the eye. 

181. Infectious Diseases of Large Animals. 5(5-0); II. Prerequisite: 
Surg. 177 and senior standing in veterinary medicine. Frick. 

186. Diseases of Small Animals. 2(2-0); I.. Prerequisite: Surg. 158 and 
163 and senior standing in veterinary medicine. Frick. 

Infectious and noninfectious canine and feline diseases; breeds of dogs, cats, 
and fur-bearing animals, erection of kennels, the breeding and care of puppies, 
care and feeding of dogs in general, and the hygienic measures pertaining 
thereto. 

191. Medical Economics and Law. 2(2-0); II. Prerequisite: Senior stand- 
ing in veterinary medicine. Staff. 

The veterinarian's legal responsibilities; national and state livestock laws; 
quarantine regulations; principles of business law. 

FOR GRADUATE CREDIT 

310. Research in Medicine. Credit to be arranged; I, II, and SS. Pre- 
requisite: Surg. 158, 175, 177, and 181. Frick. 

An attempted solution of some of the medical and parasitological problems 
confronting the practitioner of veterinary medicine. Offered especially for 
graduates in veterinary medicine. 



Division of Veterinary Medicine 263 

The Division of College Extension 

Harry Umberger, Deem and Director 



The Division of College Extension offers the benefits of the College to farm 
people throughout Kansas. It is active in every county in the state. By 
means of institutes, training schools, publications, correspondence courses, and 
radio programs, information on agriculture, home economics, and rural engi- 
neering is made readily available to everyone. 

In the beginning, this work was informal. Members of the College staff 
answered inquiries by mail and occasionally met with small groups at various 
places in the state. The exchange of information thus made possible proved 
valuable both to the citizens of the state and to the College investigators. 
In 1914, with the passage of the Smith-Lever Act, this type of work became 
a cooperative undertaking of the federal and state governments, through the 
United States Department of Agriculture and the agricultural colleges. 

There now are six major departments in this Division, each with its own 
head and staff. Cooperatively employed extension agents are located in 103 
counties of the state. The extension organization, which reaches more than 
800,000 Kansas people each year, still serves its original function of a two-way 
communication system between the College and the general public. Extension 
workers take to the people of the state information developed by the experi- 
ment stations, b}^ the United States Department of Agriculture, and by the 
experience of the best farmers and homemakers. They bring to the state and 
federal research workers information concerning problems that are of im- 
mediate general interest. Their goal is to assist in making agriculture more 
prosperous and rural living more satisfying. 



26-i Kansas State College 

Extension Schools 
In Agriculture and Home Economics 

L. C. Williams in Charge 

W. G. Amstein, Horticulture John G. Bell, Crops 

Lloyd M. Copenhafer, Landscape Gardening Vance M. Rucker, Marketing 

Lloyd F. Smith, Farm Forestry J. Warren Mather, Marketing 

C. G. Elling, Animal Husbandry Charles E. Dominy, Marketing 

J. J. Moxley, Animal Husbandry , Farm Management 

J. W. Ltjmb, Veterinary Medicine L. M. Schrtjben, Farm Management 

E. G. Kelly, Entomology C. R. Jaccard, Agricultural Economics 

M. A. Seaton, Poultry Husbandry G. B. Railsback, Fieldman, 

E. R. Halbrook, Poultry Husbandry Farm Management Association 

John O. Miller, Plant Pathology J. H. Coolidge, Fieldman, 

James W. Linn, Dairy Husbandry Farm Management Association 

D. M. Seath, Dairy Husbandry W. J. Conover, Fieldman, 

L. E. Willotjghby, Crops Farm Management Association 

E. A. Cleavinger, Crops W. H. Meissinger, Fieldman, 

L. L. Compton, Crops Farm Management Association 

This department includes those members of the extension staff who conduct 
and supervise programs in agricultural education throughout the state. The 
programs are developed in cooperation with the residents of the counties 
through their designated leaders. The department also has charge of the 
program and arrangements for Farm and Home Week, annual state-wide 
farmers' meetings, and the scheduling of judges for county and local fairs. 

FARM AND HOME INSTITUTES 

A farm and home institute is an association of farmers and farm home- 
makers with regular officers, constitution, and bylaws. Some organizations 
hold six or more meetings during the year and no institute can obtain state 
aid unless, in addition to the annual meeting at which representatives of 
the College must be present, it also holds at least three local meetings. It 
is the plan of the College to send two specialists, one in agriculture and one 
in home economics, to the annual meetings to present certain well-defined 
lessons and to give the results of demonstration work for the county or locality. 
The specialists and their subjects are chosen because of known need or interest 
of a particular community or because of a plan to start or encourage certain 
definite lines of work. 

EXTENSION SCHOOLS 

Extension schools are meetings of one or two days' duration conducted for 
the purpose of giving practical instruction in agriculture, rural engineering, and 
home economics. Most of these schools are organized on a project basis, 
and they are an important feature in the yearly program of work conducted 
by each specialist. Results of demonstrations and experiments are given at 
these meetings and suggestions are made for their practical application under 
local conditions. 

Extension schools are classified according to the subject matter presented. 
Each year schools are held in horticulture, animal husbandry, veterinary medi- 
cine, entomology, poultry husbandry, dairying, agronomy, marketing, farm 
management, plant pathology, and farm forestry. In addition to these special- 
ized meetings, schools of a more general character are held, and these are 
designed to present the extension program best suited to the communities of 
the county. Home economics and 4-H club work have an important place on 
the program of these schools. 

EXTENSION PROJECTS 

The specialists of the Division work in extension schools and institutes dur- 
ing the winter months only, and a portion of this time is devoted to co- 
operative demonstration work in agriculture and home economics. During 
the remainder of the year, they conduct special extension programs in soil 



Division of College Extension 265 

management and crop production, plant pathology, horticulture, animal hus- 
bandry, dairying, veterinary medicine, poultry husbandry, entomology, farm 
management, marketing, and farm forestry. This phase of the work of the 
extension specialist is being supplemented by cooperative demonstration work. 
In much of the cooperative work each specialist has from 10 to 100 or more 
cooperators in each county. These men and women work under the direction 
of the specialist and the county agent. They keep records of the work and 
demonstration meetings are held at their farms. 

The extension specialist takes to the farm and farm homes the results of 
the research work of the Agricultural Experiment Station and the United 
States Department of Agriculture in a practical, effective, and usable form. 
He brings back reports of the progress of demonstration work in the field. 
He seldom makes a trip without coming in contact with agricultural problems 
requiring the attention of research workers. 

COUNTY AND LOCAL FAIRS 

The agricultural specialists devote some time each year to judging livestock 
and agricultural products at county and local fairs. An excellent opportunity 
for lectures and demonstration work is furnished and each specialist endeavors 
to make his judging work as instructive as possible. 

FARM AND HOME WEEK 

The purpose of Farm and Home Week is to interest the farmers of the 
state in methods of production and management that will increase farm 
profits, to demonstrate to farm women methods of home management that 
will add to the comfort and enjoyment of farm life, and to encourage farm 
folks in social organization that will enrich the social life of the rural com- 
munity. 

All meetings, lectures, and demonstrations during Farm and Home Week 
are free of charge. The United States Department of Agriculture, the Agricul- 
tural Experiment Station, the Extension Service, agricultural specialists, and 
leading farmers bring to those in attendance the latest results of investigations 
in agriculture, home economics, and rural engineering. Problems concerning 
crops and soils, dairying, beef cattle, horses, hogs, sheep, poultry, horticulture, 
community service, beekeeping, and diseases of animals are discussed by some 
of the leading agricultural authorities in America. In addition to these lectures 
and demonstrations there are other interesting features. 



County Agent Work 



* 



F. Q. Blecha, District Agent Harry C. Baird, N. W. District Supervisor 

J. V. Hepler, District Agent Otis B. Glover, E. District Supervisor 

A. F. Turner, District Agent (Organization) , S. W. District Supervisor 

E. H. Teagarden, District Agent M. L. Robinson, District Supervisor (Wheat) 

The county agent constitutes a direct and continuous contact of the College 
and the United States Department of Agriculture with the rural population 
of the state. The program of county-agent work is as broad as the interests 
of rural life. It includes the farm as a business, the farm home, the farm 
youth, and the rural community. The program for the farm as a business 
involves those things that may be done by the individual farmer and those 
that require extensive cooperation among farmers. On the one hand it includes 
organization and management, and production problems such as soil manage- 
ment, erosion control, cropping systems, crop pests, adapted crop varieties, and 
livestock management. On the other hand it includes cooperative financing, 
cooperative marketing of farm products, and agricultural adjustment procedure. 

* To find an alphabetical list of county agricultural agents, see Index. 



266 Kansas State College 

The first county agent in Kansas was employed by the Leavenworth county 
farm bureau, August 1, 1912. At first county agents were financed by mem- 
bership dues, private subscription, and a small state appropriation. In 1914 
Congress enacted the Smith-Lever law and in 1915 the Kansas legislature 
passed the farm-bureau law. These statutes remain the basis of county-agent 
work. Additional federal funds have been made available in recent years 
under several other statutes such as the Capper-Ketcham, CI ark- Mc Nary, 
and Bankhead-Jones acts. 

On October 1, 1938, there were 103 county agents and thirty-two assistant 
count}' agents. Six of the assistant county agents are cooperating with soil 
conservation associations, twelve serve as testers for dairy herd improvement 
associations, and fourteen are securing training in various counties under the 
leadership of county agricultural agents. 



Home Economics* 

Georgiana H. Smurthwaite. State Home Demonstration Leader 

DISTRICT HOME DEMONSTRATION AGENT LEADERS 

Ellen M. Batchelor Rachel Markwell 

Maude E. Deely Vernetta Fairbairn 

SPECIALISTS IN HOME ECONOMICS 

M. Christine Wiggins. Clothing and W. Pearl Martin, Home Health and 

Textiles Sanitation 

Lora V. Hilyard, Clothing and Textiles Eunice Pardee, Home Management 

Gertrude Allen, Foods and Nutrition Ellen Lindstrom, Home Management 

Mary Fletcher, Foods and Nutrition Doris Compton, Recreation 
Rachel Martens, Home Furnishings 
Mae Farris, Home Furnishings 

Extension work in Home Economics is carried on in counties through or- 
ganized groups and through extension schools, particularly those of the more 
general type. Organized programs are pursued throughout the year in connec- 
tion with county farm bureaus. Material furnished by the specialists and by 
home demonstration agents is used by local leaders in their respective com- 
munities. 

Home demonstration work was made possible in August, 1917, when Con- 
gress provided funds for the employment of emergency home demonstration 
agents. The work was instituted under the auspices of city or county organi- 
zations, but after a short time the placing of home demonstration agents was 
deferred until the counties were properly organized for this specific purpose. 
Since August, 1918, the organization of an ideal farm bureau, providing mem- 
bership for women as well as for men, has been required; and since July 1, 
1921, a county desiring a home demonstration agent has had to provide a 
well-equipped office with adequate stenographic help, transportation facilities, 
and a county appropriation of not less than $2,400 toward the salaries and ex- 
penses of the agricultural agent and the home demonstration agent. 

The program of work for the home demonstration agent is based on the in- 
terest and the needs of the communities in the county. It is evolved through 
community and committee meetings and includes the development of ac- 
tivities pertaining to the farm, the home, and the community. Such programs 
of work become a part of the state program. On October 1, 1938, forty 
counties had home demonstration agents. 

* To find an alphabetical list of home demonstration agents, see Index. 



Division of College Extension 267 

Boys' and Girls' 4-H Club Work 

M. H. Coe, State Club Leader 
Mabel R. Smith, Assistant State Club Leader 
J. Harold Johnson, Assistant State Club Leader 
Mary Elsie Border, Assistant State Club Leader 
Roger E. Rbgnier. Assistant State Club Leader 
Dorothy Bacon, Assistant State Club Leader 
Albert A. Pease, County Club Agent, Rice County 
Wayne Evving, County Club Agent, Sedgwick County 
Claude L. King, County Club Agent, Shawnee County 
I. H. Davies, County Club Agent, Wyandotte County 
Richard King, County Club Agent, Crawford County 
John B. Hanna, County Club Agent, Butler County 

The 4-H club work is conducted by the College in cooperation with the 
counties, the county farm bureaus, and the United States Department of Agri- 
culture. Community 4-H clubs are open to all young people between the ages 
of ten and twenty years, inclusive. They work under the direction of the 
county agents with the help of local voluntary 4-H leaders. Local organiza- 
tions also give important assistance. County 4-H councils assist the county 
agents in the supervision and promotion of the 4-H program. 4-H members 
receive visits from their county agents and from their local leaders; written 
material is prepared by specialists and sent out by the state club leader to 
give members definite information and suggestions regarding farm and home 
practices recommended by the College. 

The origin of the 4-H club work is obscure. Shortly after 1900, farmers' in- 
stitutes, farm leaders, and educators, in various parts of the country, made 
efforts to bring about a more definite connection between real life and school 
life. They assisted boys and girls to conduct, at home, various educational 
demonstrations or contests, centering around improved agricultural practices. 

It became evident that the educational development of the boys and girls 
was of greater importance than the spread of improved farm and home prac- 
tices. Hence the 4-H club program was broadened to include not only projects 
of a farm and home nature, but also many activities such as health, music, con- 
servation of wild life and natural resources, recreation, parliamentary prac- 
tices, and art. The present 4-H club program is designed to develop whole- 
some citizenship and leadership among rural young people and to provide them 
with the opportunity to participate with their parents and friends in the adop- 
tion and spread of better farm and home practices. Cooperation with the 
group is promoted, leadership is encouraged, exhibitions and contests are con- 
ducted, accurate records and reports are required, and achievements are 
suitably recognized. Wholesome recreation is promoted and county and state- 
wide round-ups, camps, and conferences are arranged. 



Rural Engineering 

Walter G. Ward, Extension Architect, in Charge 
Eugene D. Warner, Extension Architect 
Hal F. Eier, Extension Agricultural Engineer 
Harold E. Stover, Extension Agricultural Engineer 
John M. Ferguson, Extension Agricultural Engineer 

The function of this department is to assist in the application of engineer- 
ing principles to various phases of agriculture. In the beginning, in 1910. it 
dealt chiefly with drainage and irrigation. Other subjects have been added, 
including the control of soil erosion, farm buildings, conveniences for the 
farm home, and farm machinery. Annually thousands of direct inquiries 
on these subjects are answered by mail. 

Much of the work is conducted in cooperation with the county farm bu- 
reaus. All counties in the state are cooperating with the department in dem- 
onstration work involving drainage, irrigation, or the control of erosion. 
Standardized plans for hundreds of farm buildings are furnished each year. 
One-dav builders' schools are held in various counties to supply information on 



268 Kansas State College 

the planning, construction, and maintenance of farm buildings. Advice is 
given on the selection, installation, and operation of systems of water supply, 
sewage disposal, lighting, and heating for the rural home. The choice, use, 
adjustment, and repair of farm machinery are discussed with distributors and 
farmers in one-day and two-day schools. 



Home Study 

George Gemmell, Head of Department Jesse M. Schall, English 

Bbatty H. Fleenor, Education Floyd Pattison, Industrial Subjects 

Ada Billings, History and Government Chester B. Billings. Agriculture 

The Department of Home Study is a member of the National University 
Extension Association comprising forty-eight leading universities in America 
with whom extension credits are interchangeable. The members of the de- 
partment devote their entire time to the work of teaching by correspondence. 
They keep in close touch with the various departments of the College, and all 
credit courses which are offered by correspondence must first meet the require- 
ments of the regular College departments handling the courses in residence. 

There are many people in Kansas and elsewhere who cannot attend classes 
on the College campus, but who can use the facilities of the College to great 
advantage. The Department of Home Study is designed through correspond- 
ence courses to enable the College to go to those who cannot come to it. The 
gross time required to complete correspondence courses is practically the 
same as would be necessary for the same courses in residence. 

FOR WHOM INTENDED 

Though credit courses offered by the Department of Home Study are lim- 
ited, it is the purpose of the department to add courses whenever a demand 
for them becomes evident. The following groups in particular should profit by 
the courses offered: 

1. Those who have completed a common-school course but who are unable 
to attend high school. 

2. High-school graduates unable to attend college. 

3. Students who have fallen behind in their work and wish to use their 
spare time catching up. 

4. Students whose attendance at high school or college has been interrupted. 

5. The strong, aggressive student who does not wish to halt his progress for 
vacation and other interruptions. 

6. High-school and grade classes in practical courses that need supplement- 
ing and enrichment. 

7. Teachers who wish further training or who need help in planning and 
conducting their work. 

8. Professional and business men who wish to keep growing along some line 
of interest, industrial or avocational. 

9. Clubs and other organizations that wish to make systematic studies. 

10. Men and women who wish effective help in meeting the demands of 
their vocations for technical and scientific knowledge and training. 

HOW THE WORK IS CONDUCTED 

In correspondence courses the work usually takes the form of assigned 
readings, studies, problems, and investigations, together with a list of questions 
and directions for a written report. The correspondence lesson is usually much 
longer than the common lesson in resident class work, eight such lessons being 
the equivalent of one semester hour of college credit. When necessary, the 
lessons are supplemented by lectures prepared by the instructor containing 
outlines and explanations, additional subject matter, and such special direc- 
tions as seem desirable. 



Division of College Extension 269 

As soon as an enrollment card and fee are received at the Department of 
Home Study, the first assignments are sent out. As reports are received, ad- 
ditional assignments are mailed. The plan keeps work always at hand for the 
student and makes it possible for the instructor to keep in close touch with 
the student's progress and to offer suggestions to guide the student in his work. 
The student should make careful study of the corrections, comments, and 
suggestions upon receiving a returned paper before going further with suc- 
ceeding lessons. 

The progress made by the student depends entirely upon his ability, pre- 
paredness, and application. In general, an hour a day spent in systematic 
study should enable the average student to complete an assignment a week. 
Students may work more rapidly if their opportunities permit. Lessons will be 
received as rapidly as is consistent with good work, provided not more than 
eight assignments are sent in one week. Under no circumstances will hastily 
prepared manuscripts, showing superficial knowledge, be accepted. 

The questions accompanying each assignment are intended to help the 
student to a better understanding of the subject. After careful study of the 
assignment, the student is required to write his manuscript, answering the 
questions carefully and concisely. The manuscript is then mailed to the De- 
partment of Home Study, where all lesson papers are read carefully, criticized, 
marked, and returned to the student with such comments, suggestions, advice, 
and additional references as may be deemed necessary. Each student is in- 
vited to ask questions, relate his personal experience, and in every way pos- 
sible get into close contact with his instructors. 

No effort is spared by the department to bring about the nearest possible 
approach to personal acquaintanceship between each instructor and his stu- 
dents. To this end the student is required to fill out and mail to the depart- 
ment with his first lesson a personal acquaintance blank giving full informa- 
tion about himself, his aims, ambitions, and previous experience and education, 
as well as the conditions of his daily work that necessarily affect his responses 
to the lessons. This information enables the instructor to enter at once into 
cordial, sympathetic, and helpful relations with the student. 

EXAMINATION 

At the close of each course, before a grade is issued, a final examination is 
necessary. The final examination may be taken in the office of the Depart- 
ment of Home Study at the College, or other arrangements may be made by 
the student to take it locally under the city or county superintendent of 
schools or the principal of the local high school. In the latter case, the ex- 
amination questions and instructions for conducting the examination are 
mailed from the department to the examiner, and the student's paper is sent 
in by him. 

FEES 

For residents of Kansas there is an initial enrollment fee of $10 for a course 
of three semester hours of credit or less, with $3 additional for each added 
hour of work ; for nonresidents of the state an initial enrollment fee of $15 
for a course of three semester hours of credit or less and $4 for each addi- 
tional hour of work. 

For courses of secondary school (high school) grade there is an initial en- 
rollment fee for residents of the state of $6 for the first half-unit course and 
$5 for each additional half-unit course; for nonresidents of the state an initial 
enrollment fee of $9 for the first half-unit course, with a fee of $7 for each 
additional half-unit. 

Each student pays the postage on his lessons, manuscripts, and communi- 
cations sent to the department. The department pays the postage for the re- 
turn of all such papers to students. 



270 Kansas State College 

REGULATIONS 

1. Enrollments for correspondence study will be received at any time 
during the year, and students may continue their work throughout the entire 
year. 

2. Correspondence students are expected to complete any course for which 
they are enrolled within twelve months from date of enrollment. 

3. Not more than two courses are advised at any one time. It is recom- 
mended that a student carry but one subject at a time, particularly where 
only part of the time is given to the work. 

4. Each subject listed under the various departments constitutes what is 
known as a correspondence "course." 

5. Students enrolling for correspondence courses must meet the prerequi- 
sites the same as if undertaking the work in residence. 

6. A student may not be enrolled for correspondence work while in at- 
tendance at any institution of learning without special permission from the 
dean or proper authorities in the institution of which he is a student. 

7. No correspondence student will be permitted to complete a three-hour 
course in less than three weeks, a two-hour course in less than two weeks, 
or a one-hour course in less than one week. 

8. Where there is evidence that any correspondence student has copied any 
part of the lessons from the papers of another student who has previously 
taken the course, such student will be automatically and permanently dropped 
from the course and a failing grade will be sent to the registrar's office with 
notation of the cause. 

9. Credit for correspondence courses is determined by a final examination 
prepared by the Department of Home Study. 

STUDY-CENTER EXTENSION CLASSES 

Study-center classes conducted by regular instructors from the College may 
be organized if the demand is sufficient. Regulations concerning such classes 
are obtainable from the Department of Home Study. 

HIGH-SCHOOL COURSES 

(College Entrance Credit Work) 

In offering the following work for high-school credit, there is no intention 
of competing with high schools of the state. It is not the purpose of those 
who have planned the work to present a full four-year high-school course. 
Students who can attend high school should do so, for in such attendance they 
will have the benefits to be derived from association with fellow students as 
well as many other advantages which will be helpful to immature students 
of high-school age. 

These courses are offered as an aid to those who may be temporarily out of 
high school, who may not find the work which they desire offered locally, or 
who wish to work for high-school credit during vacation periods It is not to 
be expected that a student can progress as rapidly by correspondence-study 
methods as he can by devoting his full time to his work when attending high 
school. Any student who completes a half year of high-school work in a year 
by correspondence may feel that he has done exceedingly well. 

The high-school courses will be especially advantageous to prospective col- 
lege students who have entrance deficiencies and to school teachers who may 
not have had the opportunity to do this type of work. No effort has been 
spared to make the work as nearly as possible parallel with the course offered 
by the accredited high schools of the state. The same textbooks have been 
used wherever feasible, and the credits issued by this department are recog- 
nized by the colleges and State Board of Education. 



Division of College Extension 



271 



List of High-school Courses 

Number of 
Course No. assignments 

AGRICULTURE 

PCA 1. Elementary Agriculture 1 20 

PCA 2. Elementary Agriculture II 20 

DRAWING 

PCD 3. Shop Mechanical Drawing 1 20 

PCD 4. Shop Mechanical Drawing II 20 

ENGLISH 

PCE 1C. Grammar and Composition (first year) 20 

PCE 2L. Literature (first year) 20 

PCE 3C. Composition (second year) 20 

PCE 4L. Literature (second year) 20 

PCE 5C. Composition (third year) 20 

PCE 6L. Literature (third year) 20 

HISTORY AND CIVICS 

PCH 1. Ancient History I 20 

PCH 2. Ancient History II 20 

PCH 3. Modern History 1 20 

PCH 4. Modern History II 20 

PCH 5. American History 1 20 

PCH 6. American History II 20 

PCH 7. Community Civics 20 

PCH 8. Constitution of United States 20 

PCH 9. World History 1 20 

PCH 10. World History II 20 

MATHEMATICS 

PCM 1. Algebra 1 20 

PCM 2. Algebra II 20 

PCM 3. Algebra III 20 

PCM 4. Plane Geometry 1 20 

PCM 5. Plane Geometry II 20 

PCM 6. Solid Geometry 20 

PCM 7. Bookkeeping 20 

SCIENCE 

PCS 1. Physical Geography 20 

PCS 2. Botany 20 

PCS 4. Physiology 20 

PCS 5. General Science 20 

PCC 1. Commercial Geography 20 

PCC 2. Elementary Economics 20 

PCC 3. Elementary Sociology 20 

PCC 4. Elementary Psychology 20 



Unit H. S. 

credit 

% 

y 2 



% 
% 
% 

i / 2 



y 2 
y 2 
y 2 
y 2 
y 2 
% 
y 2 
y 2 
y 2 



y 2 
y 2 
y 2 
y 2 
y 2 
y 2 
y 2 



y 2 
y 2 
y 2 
y 2 
y 2 
y 2 
y 2 
y 2 



COLLEGE COURSES 

Numerous college courses paralleling resident courses and carrying the same 
credit are offered through the Department of Home Study. These will be 
found especially advantageous for college students who desire to make up de- 
ficiencies or to gain credits during the vacation season; for teachers who wish 
to further their professional training; and for men and women who wish to pro- 
mote their cultural, technical, or vocational interests. The prerequisites are 
the same as for corresponding courses in resident instruction. 

The following course is available through resident enrollment for graduate 
and undergraduate credit. Graduates may be enrolled for from one to six 
hours of research or problem work in absentia, on the recommendation of a 
member of the graduate faculty and with the approval of the dean of the Di- 
vision of Graduate Study. 

Edtjc. 249. Problems in Extension Education. Credit to be arranged. 
Prerequisite: Econ. 151 or CS 3, and Educ. 184 or CP 8 or EXT 5. Dr. Gem- 
mell and Dr. Fleenor. 

Problems in extension met by director, supervisor, county agricultural agent, 
county home demonstration agent, 4-H club leader, or specialist. 



272 Kansas State College 

List of College Courses 

DIVISION OF AGRICULTURE 

Course No. agronomy Assignments 

CA 3. Farm Crops 16 

ANIMAL HUSBANDRY 

CL 2. History of Breeds 16 

HORTICULTURE 

CH 1. Elements of Horticulture 16 

CH 2. Vegetable Gardening 16 

CH 3. Floriculture 16 

CH 5. Landscape Gardening 8 

CH 6. Small Fruits 16 

POULTRY HUSBANDRY 

CPP 1. Farm Poultry Production 8 

DIVISION OF ENGINEERING 

MACHINE DESIGN 

CE 2. Engineering Drawing 16 

CE 6. Machine Drawing 1 16 

CE 4. Mechanism 24 

CE 11. Descriptive Geometry 16 

CIVIL ENGINEERING 

CE 1 . Highway Engineering 1 16 

SHOP PRACTICE 

CE 7. Metallurgy 16 

AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING 

CE 3. Gas Engines and Tractors 16 

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 

CE 9. Steam Turbines 16 

DIVISION OF GENERAL SCIENCE 

ECONOMICS AND SOCIOLOGY 

CEc 1. Economics 24 

CS 2. Rural Sociology 24 

CS 3. Sociology 24 

CS 4. Community Leadership 16 

EDUCATION (PROFESSIONAL) 

CP 2. Educational Psychology 24 

CP 3. Educational Sociology 24 

CP 4. History of Education 24 

CP 5. School Management 24 

CP 6G. Methods of Teaching in Elementary Graded Schools and Rural 

Schools 24 

CP 6H. Methods of Teaching in the High School 24 

CP 7. Educational Administration 24 

CP 8. Psychology 24 

CP 14. Vocational Education 24 

CP 17. Introduction to Philosophy 24 

ENGLISH 

CCE 1. College Rhetoric 1 24 

CCE 2. College Rhetoric II 24 

CCE 3. Commercial Correspondence 24 

CCE 4. The Short Story 24 

CCE 6. English Literature 24 

CCE 7. American Literature 24 

JOURNALISM 

CCJ 1. Agricultural Journalism 24 



Semester 

hours of 

credit 

2 



Division of College Extension 273 



Semester 
hours oj 
Course No. geology Assignments credit 
CG 1. Geology 24 3 

HISTORY AND CIVICS 

CHC 1. Community Civics 16 2 

CHC 2. Modern Europe 1 24 3 

CHC 3. Modern Europe II 24 3 

CHC 4. English History 24 3 

CHC 5. Medieval History 24 3 

CHC 6. Ancient Civilizations 24 3 

CHC 7. History of Latin America 24 3 

MATHEMATICS 

CM 6. Solid Geometry 16 2 

CM 7. Plane Trigonometry 25 3 

CM 8. College Algebra 24 3 

CM 9. College Algebra A 40 5 

DIVISION OF COLLEGE EXTENSION 
EXT 5. Extension Education 24 3 

Prerequisite: Educ. 184 and junior standing. Dr. Fleenor. Origin and develop- 
ment of extension work, its aim and purposes, and its relation to other general 
educational activities ; organization and administration of extension work under 
the Smith -Lever law and the part taken by colleges and the Department of Agri- 
culture; psychological and sociological bases and various methods employed in 
extension teaching; achievements and future problems of extension work. 



18—6529 



Degrees Conferred 

In the Year 1938 

Seventy-fifth Annual Commencement 

May 30, 1938 

DEGREES CONFERRED 

Honorary Degrees 

DOCTOR OF ENGINEERING 

William Lester Enfield, B. S., Kansas State College, 1909; Cleveland Ohio. 

DOCTOR OF LAWS 

William Marion Jardine, B. S., Utah State Agricultural College, 1904; University of Wichita, 
Wichita, Kan. 

DOCTOR OF SCIENCE 

Juliet Lita Bane, B. S., University of Illinois, 1912; A.M., University of Chicago, 1919; 

University of Illinois, Urbana, 111. 
Ula May Dow, B. S., Kansas State College, 1905; A.M., Columbia University, 1913; 

Simmons College, Boston, Mass. 
David Grandison Fairchild, B. S., Kansas State College, 1888; M.S., ibid., 1891; Coconut 

Grove, Fla. 
William Arthur Hagan, D. V. M., Kansas State College, 1915 ; M. S., Cornell University, 

1917; Cornell University, Ithaca, N. Y. 
Merritt Finley Miller, B. S. A., Ohio State University, 1900; M. S., Cornell University, 1901; 

University of Missouri, Columbia, Mo. 

Professional Degrees in Engineering 

ELECTRICAL ENGINEER 

Charles Louis Jobe, B. S., Kansas State College, 1923 ; Oklahoma City, Okla. 
Gilbert Haven Sechrist, B. S., Kansas State College, 1916; Laramie, Wyo. 
Clarence LeRoy Zimmerman, B. S., Kansas State College, 1921; Chicago, 111. 

Division of Graduate Study 

DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY 

Abram Eldred Hostetter, B. S., McPherson College, 1925; M.S., Kansas State College, 

1932 ; Manhattan. 
George Nathan Reed, B. S., Oklahoma Agricultural and Mechanical College, 1922; M.S., 

University of Oklahoma, 1924 ; Manhattan. 

MASTER OF SCIENCE 

Kling LeRoy Anderson, B. S., University of California, 1936; Turlock, Calif. 
§Buell Wesley Beadle, B. S., Kansas State College, 1935; Talmage. 
§Glenn Hanse Beck, B. S., University of Idaho, 1936; Aberdeen, Idaho. 

Arnold Ervine Chase, B. S., Kansas State College, 1930; Washington, D. C. 

Chen Ohih-Yine (Jean Chen), B. A., Hwa Nan College, 1933; Cik Coi Yuan, Futsing, 
Fukien, China. 

Donald Risdon Cornelius, B. S., Kansas State College, 1935 ; Wheaton. 
§Chevalier Francis Crandell, B. S., Kansas State College, 1935; Falls City, Neb. 

Frederic Tyson Dines, B. S., Colorado State College, 1936; Manhattan. 

Glenn Sylvester Fox, B. S., Kansas State College, 1933; Manhattan. 

Margaret Rose Goodyear, B. S., Kansas State College, 1931; Wichita. 

Edison Greer, B. S., Kansas State Teachers College, Emporia, 1936; Council Grove. 

Elmer Georee Hevne, B. S., University of Nebraska, 1935; Wisner, Neb. 
§LeRoy William Home, B. S., Kansas State College, 1936; Alma. 

Mable Joan Jones, B. S., West Texas State Teachers College, 1935; Quail, Tex. 

Althea Leonore Keller, B. S., Kansas State College, 1935 ; Enterprise. 

Everette Jesse Kreizinger, B. S., University of Nebraska, 1932; Bellwood, Neb. 

Roger Paul Link, D. V. M., Iowa State College, 1934; Manhattan. 

Sarah Jo Lister, A. B., University of Kansas, 1937 ; Wamego. 

Charles Howard Lockhart, B. S., Kansas State College, 1934; Junction City. 

Russell Lloyd Mellies, B. S., Kansas State College, 1936; Wellington. 

§ Requirements for degree completed and diploma presented January 29, 1938. 

(274) 



Degrees Conferred 



275 



Rudolph Dixon Michael, B. S., Virginia Polytechnic Institute, 1926; Blacksburg, Va. 

Leonard Fred Miller, B. S., Kansas State College, 1936; Agra. 
§Lois Marie Oberhelman, B. S., Kansas State College, 1926; Barnes. 

Charles Alfred Patterson, B. S., Kansas State College, 1938; Kansas City. 
§01iver Pearson, B. A., Bethany College, 1925; Lindsborg. 

Wilfred Harold Pine, B. S., Kansas State College, 1934; Lawrence. 

Helen Marjorie Reed, B. S., Kansas State College, 1934; Circleville. 

Mott Luther Robinson, B. S., Kansas State College, 1923; Manhattan. 

Dale Servetus Romine, B. S., Kansas State College, 1934; Oswego. 
*Ella Schalansky, A. B., Municipal University of Omaha, 1933; Bunker Hill. 

Lydia Andres Skeen, B. S., Kansas State College, 1931; Linn. 

Charles Philip Walters, B. S., Kansas State College, 1936; Manhattan. 

Division of Agriculture 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN AGRICULTURE 



Walter Abmeyer, Grantville 

William Redmond Allen, Cummings 

Jay Donald Andrews, Bloom 

Ernest Raymond Ausherman, North Topeka 

Walter Worth Babbit, Willis 

*Joe Wendell Baker, Ozawkie 
Dale Rainier Bathurst, Abilene 
Dorman Carroll Becker, Durham 
Frank Gearhart Bieberly, Dodge City 
Leonard Willam Bird, Hill City 
Francis Leroy Blaesi, Abilene 
Blaine Barton Brandenburg, Riley 
Frank Louis Brooks, Jr., Scott City 
Jewell Colbert Campbell, Rossville 
Robert Junior Cassidy, Marion 
Earl Stephen Chicken, Manhattan 
Charles Burton Crook, Ogden 
Wilbur Russell Crowley, Burden 
Verner Ephaim Danielson, Lindsborg 
Eugene Price Davies, Winchester 
Herbert Smith Davies, Manhattan 
Elmer A. Dawdv, Washington 
Clarence Wendell Dickhut, Scott City 
Vernon Lloyd Doran, Macksville 
Marshall Wayne Dutton, Harlan 
Roland Baker Elling, Manhattan 
Forrest Raymond Fansher, Hutchinson 
Kenneth Adrian Fisher, Newton 
Donald Eugene Flenthrope, St. George 
Wayne Henry Freeman, Kirwin 
Daniel Ross Haney, Manhattan 
Alfred Eugene Harris, Grinnell 
Ralph Jay Hathaway, Chase 
William Andrew Hemphill, Chanute 
Roger Lyman Hendershot, Hutchinson 
Paul Wilson Hensleigh, Winchester 

§Kenneth Verle Hill, Bloom 
John Harvey Hyde, Augusta 

*Raymond Whitfield Isle, Independence 
Zara Walter Johnson, Beeler 
Frank Boone Kessler, Newton 
Richard Franklin King, Jr., Manhattan 
Robert Edgar Kitch, Winfield 

§Dwight David Klinger, Ashland 



Milton Clarence Kohrs, Elmo 
Alvin George Law, Hill City 

JiWilliam Laurance McKnight, Oxford 
Vernon Franklin Maresch, Nekoma 
Floyd J. Maynard, Kansas City, Mo. 
William Lorenzo Moore, Manhattan 
Frederick Harold Muret, Winfield 
Lester Duane Murphy, Sublette 
Howard Cecil Myers, Abilene 
Hugh Garry Myers, Barnard 
Joseph Pleasant Neill, Miltonvale 
Allen Nottorf, Abilene 
Robert Fred Nuttelman, Great Bend 
Charles Patrick Olomon, Jr., Garden City 
Charles Herman Olson, Dwight 
Gustaf Clark O'verley, Belle Plaine 
Earl Foster Parsons, Max, Neb. 
Rollin Chester Parsons, Manhattan 

§Charles Alfred Patterson, Kansas City 
Richard Donald Patton, Newton 
Charles William Pence, North Topeka 

§Harold Allen Perkins, Kansas City 
Edward Wilson Pitman, Scott City 
Waldo Weaver Poovey, Oxford 
Addison Doyle Reed, Manhattan 
Clyde Cadwell Reed, Kanopolis 
John William Reynolds, Winfield 
Leroy Edward Schafer, Valley Center 

§Deane Robert Seaton, Abilene 
Robert Fred Sloan, Leavenworth 
Robert J. Steele, Manhattan 
Elmore Gregory Stout, Cottonwood Falls 
Lewis Sweat, Cedar 

Gilbert Leroy Terman, Columbia City, Ind. 
Wayne T.iaden, Wichita 
Carl Saylor Warner, Whiting 
Ralph Dale Warner, Arlington 
Marion Chalmer West, Blue Mound 
Loren Edgar Whipps, Belleville 
Irving Bennett Wilcox, Manhattan 

§Charles Peairs Wilson, Anness 
Richard Gordon Wiltse, Altoona 
George Henry Works, Humboldt 
James Leroy Young, Cheney 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN MILLING INDUSTRY 



Robert John Anderson, Lyons 
§Wilbur Golden Brainerd, Whitewater 
John Haves Collett, Pratt 
Paul William Hodler, Beloit 



Jack Haynes Koster, Salina 

Roy Albion Robinson, Jr., Larned 

Joseph Leo Wetta, Colwich 



Division of Engineering 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING 



Walter Enos Boyer, Kinsley 
Walter Monroe Carleton, Coldwater 
Merwin Blake Cook, Monument 
§Carl Czaplinski, Lawrence 



Daniel Philip Heigele, Wilsey 
James William Martin, Manhattan 
Elbert' Lindon Mundhenke, Lewis 
William Henry Walker, Junction City 



* In absentia. 

§ Requirements for degree completed and diploma presented January 29, 1938. 



276 



Kansas State College 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN ARCHITECTURE 



Glenn Edwin Benedick, Manhattan 
Earl Cox, Downs 
Paul McConnell Dean, Manhattan 
Reinhold Paul Henry Fensch, Lincoln 
John Worth Hines, Manhattan 
Laurence Calvin Horton, Wichita 



Jack Morris Lawson, Wichita 
Joseph Buel Reynolds, Chetopa 
Joseph Duane Ward, Peabody 
Jean Washburn, Manhattan' 
Perry F. Wendell, Manhattan 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN ARCHITECTURAL ENGINEERING 



Glenn Edwin Benedick, Manhattan 
§Stanley Edward Goodwin, Hiawatha 



Ray Merle Harmon, Jr., Wichita 
James Trevor Lewis, Emporia 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE 

§John Wayne Tonkin, Topeka 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN CHEMICAL ENGINEERING 



Harold George Deters, Cawker City 
Robert Roy Freeman, Manhattan 
George Clifford Henderson, Herington 
Aimison Jonnard, Manhattan 



Roy Scott Martin, Pratt 
James Carlile Osten, Herington 
John Gilbert Powers, Casper, Wyo. 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN CIVIL ENGINEERING 



Perry Charles Arnold, Winfield 
Ted Collings Barnes, Manhattan 
Ross Henry Bird, Elk City 
Delber Lloyd Blackwell, Rozel 
Sanford David Blattner, Rozel 
Ralph Edward Breeden, Latham 
Max Theodore Bruner, Burns 
Harold F. Claassen, Newton 
Morris Jackson Coolbaugh, Stockton 
§Thomas Cantwell Cory, Parsons 
Russell Louis Culp, Kansas City 
Myron Winterstein DeGeer, Lake City 
Edwin Dale Ebright, Lyons 
Max Eugene Foote, Ottawa 
Harold Kenneth Howell, Quinter 
John Jay Jewett, Halstead 
Chester Herman Johnson, Manhattan 
William Robert Jones, Wichita 
Clifford Ray Krabbenhoft, Emporia 



§Aaron Joseph Lane, Manhattan 

*Lyman Max Lyon, Sabetha 
Cecil Earl McClaren, Mullinville 

§Loren Wilson McDaniel, Garden City 
Harris Leo Mackey, Caldwell 
Carl William Morgan, Long Island 
Wilson Muhlheim, Ellis 
Martin Oren Pattison, Manhattan 
Raymond R. Sollenberger, Manhattan 
Kay Vern Spear, Leoti 
Robert Jacob Spiegel, Topeka 

§James Madsen Towner, Dwight 
Loyal Van Doren, Hays 
Evan Watts, Havensville 
Leonard Eugene Weckerling, Manhattan 
Charles Poe Weeks, Wichita 
James Richard Westmacott, Chase 
Thaine Daniels Williams, Pawnee Rock 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 



John Bernard Alfers, Denton 

Neils Kay Anderson, Leavenworth 
§John Alden Angold, Bethel 
*David Ford Biven, Kansas City 

Charles Graham Blakely, III, Topeka 
*Norman Garver Branson, Belleville 

William Henry Carr, Jr., Kansas City 

Floyd Harvey Clark, Florence 

Nelson Earl Davidson, Yates Center 
§Harold Thomas Engleman, Indianapolis, Ind. 

James Hugo Giovagnoli, Girard 

Lawrence Isador Haller, Alma 

Bryant Glenn Harris, Topeka 
§John Russel Harrison, Sterling 

Karl Miller Hemker, Great Bend 

James Leonard Hollis, Holton 

Edward Groh Johnson, McPherson 

Raymond Carroll Kent, Manhattan 

Chung Keun Lee, Seoul, Korea 
§John Knepper Leidy, Wichita 



§John Frederick Levin, Jr., Atchison 
Louis Barber McManis, Kingman 
William Allen Mayfield, Soldier 
Carl MilleT, Charley, Ky. 
Harry Clifford Morton, Winfield 
Lorin Edward Oberhelman, Silver Lake 
Carl Meredith Osborne, Council Grove 
Russell Eugene Phillips, Wichita 
Charles Eugene Roper, Atchison 
Leland Jay Rose, Council Grove 
Forrest Hamer Roulund, Melvern 

*Elmer Ellison Scott, Kansas City 
Thomas Richard Shaw, Kansas City 
Edwin Joseph Shellenberger, Ransom 
Keith Carter Walton, Peck 
Arthur Eugene Watson, Hutchinson 
Wallis Christian Wetlaufer, Montello, Wis. 

§Thomas Charles Wherry, Sabetha 

§David George William Willich, Hamlin 
Jack Frederick Wynne, Salina 



* In absentia. 

§ Requirements for degree completed and diploma presented January 29, 1938. 



Degrees Conferred 



277 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 



John Dean Armstrong, Hutchinson 
Clarence Arthur Balwanz, El Dorado 
Charles Tulloch Carter, Topeka 
Hyle Keith Claflin, Kansas City, Mo. 
John Lewis Deffenbaugh, Moline, 111. 
Newton A. Eaton, Jr., Chanute 
Walter Edo Folkerts, Timken 
Charles William Frick, Jr., Kansas City 
Floyd Wilson Fulton, Kansas City, Mo. 
Maynard Melvon Furney, Manhattan 
Louis McDonald Gasche, Hartford 
John Robert HarcleTode, Sycamore 

§ Lester Lee Harmon, Jetmore 
Milford Felix Itz, Osage City 

*Robert Compton Johnston, Manhattan 
Mac Kappelman, Athol 



Harold Roy Martin, Salina 
Jaccard Matchette, Kansas City, Mo. 
Clayton Matney, Garden City 
Wilbur Charles Page, Hesston 
Lawrence Almon Piatt, Junction City 
Claude Floyd Ross, Dover 
Walter Scott Schultz, Augusta 
Dean Shepherd, White City 
Charles Leon Simmons, Strong City 
George William Smith, Sugar Creek, Mo. 
Beverly Earl Steadman, Junction City 
Elden Russell Stensaas, Concordia 
Ray Harold Tackett, Parsons 
Ross Bingham Vandever, Fredonia 
^Donald Edward Wick, Hunter 



Division of General Science 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 



Woodrow L. Ainsworth, Wichita 
Annette Alsop, Manhattan 
Dorothy Jane Bell, Manhattan 
Lois Virginia Black, Attica 
Esther Irene Chitwood, Meriden 
Edward Alphonse DeClerck, Carmen. Okla. 
Ben Diamond, New York, N. Y. 
Elizabeth Virginia Dukelow, Hutchinson 
Betty Frances Frederick, Hutchinson 
Caroline Ruth French, Lyndon 
Chester Martin Gull, El Dorado 
Herbert Frank Haas. Manhattan 
ICharles Hal Harned, Manhattan 
Janie Mae Hood, Washington 
Leora Belle Hubbell, Fredonia 
Florence Esther Jensen, Manhattan 
Shirley Aileen Johnson, Winfield 
Isobel Margaret Kittell, McPherson 
Rhoda Evelyn Lebow, Salina 
Frederick Lee McDonald, Horton 
Vergil Miller Mcintosh, Manhattan 
Wayne Wesley Mcintosh, Manhattan 
Louis Fullington Meek, Idana 



Lois Alma Michelstetter, Hutchinson 
Hans David Oliver Miller, Manhattan 
John Junior Minnis, Manhattan 
Tom Allen Montgomery, Hill City 
Ruth Eleanor Newell, Junction City 
Charlotte Clair Norlin, McCracken 
Kenneth Sidney Norton, Oberlin 
Marie Louise Ostendorf, Blue Island. 
Sara June Owens. Neodesha 
Eldon Edwin Reichle, Riley 
Opal Bernice Ruddick. Manhattan 
Roger Turner Shepherd, Manhattan 
§Eleanore Evelyn Spencer, Whiting 
Frances Evelyn Spurlock, Louisburg 
Vernon McKee Stevens, Abilene 
Eleanor Tibbetts, Westmoreland 
Joseph Benjamin Tuck, Morrisville, 
Elinor Lucile Uhl, Smith Center 
Evelyn Maxine Walker, El Dorado 
Mary Ann Wall, Mahaska 
Irene Margaret Wassmer, Garnett 
Solon Luther Willsey, Anthony 
Harry Lester Wimmer, Robinson 



111. 



Mo. 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN COMMERCE 



Gerald Ellsworth Abbey, Russell 
Herbert Harner Blevins, Clay Center 
jAlvin Herbert Block, Bavaria 
James Henry Cannon, Salina 
Ralph Elias Cole, Alton 
Marjorie Ellen Cooper, Stafford 
William Hammond Cost, Jr.. Salina 
Maurice Russell Coulson, Wichita 
William Bradford Danford, Hutchinson 
Margaret Sarah Daum, Manhattan 
James Paul Dillingham, Alma 
William Roy Dillingham, Jr., Salina 
Don Alva Duckwall, Abilene 
Lloyd Samuel Eberhart, Topeka 
Paul Arnold Ehrsam, Enterprise 
Lester Lloyd Fankhouser, Haviland 
Charles Frederick Frey, Topeka 
H. Selby Funk, Arkansas City 
Evan Dalton Godfrey, Joplin, Mo. 
Mary Louise Gudgell, Edmond 
Lenore Marie Hatter, Abilene 
Dean Howig, Topeka 
Paul Emlyn Huff, Salina 
George McCloud Hutcherson. Manhattan 
Kenneth Emil Johnson, Newton 
Harold Buhrer Keller, Enterprise 



Homer Wilbur Kerley, Lawrence 
Dorothea Klinger, Ashland 
Harold G. Lortscher, Sabetha 
Clara Wilhelmina Niemoller, Wakefield 
David DeYoe Olive, Leavenworth 

*Eugene Edmond Perkins, Independence 
Velma Irene Peterson, Manhattan 
Hardy Wilson Pitts, Amarillo, Tex. 
Hugh Patrick Quinn, Salina 
Kenneth Edwin Rail, Wichita 
George Carlson Rankin, Gardner 
Max Calvin Rankin, Highland 
John Gilbert Reel, Manhattan 
John Jacob Rhodes, Topeka 
Imogene Theresa Ruch, Kansas City 
Carl Robert Sandstrom, Herington 
Frank Lee Schneider, Wichita 
Phyllis Marian Shuler, Hutchinson 
Clarence McPherson Skaggs, Dodge City 
James Cornelius Slattery, Wright 
Roy Ivan Smith, Lincoln 

§Herbert August Sperling, Inman 
Mary Marjorie Stephenson, Little River 
Ernest William Whitney, Kansas Citv 

§Harry Albert Woodbury, Abilene 



* In absentia. 

§ Requirements for degree completed and diploma presented January 29, 1938. 



278 



Kansas State College 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN INDUSTRIAL CHEMISTRY 



Murray Dean Dougan, North Kansas City, 

Mo. 
Richard Harry Hageman, Hollenberg 
John Donald Peterson, Enterprise 
Ralph Thornton Rankin, Manhattan 
Dan Arnold Richert, Newton 



Ervin Walter Segebrecht, Kansas Citv 
John Lawrence Taylor, Kansas City 
Gilbert John Wagner, La Crosse 
Harold Clifford Walters. Wetmore 
§Charles Jesse West, Fort Scott 
Joseph Arthur Weybrew, Wamego 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN INDUSTRIAL JOURNALISM 



Julia McNeill Absher, Fort Riley 
Gerald Iden Biggs, Potwin 
Mildred May Buckwalter, Manhattan 
Elizabeth Achten Campbell, Wetmore 
Janet Courtright, El Dorado 
Wayne Vorine Dexter, Waterville 
George Thaine Engle, Abilene 
June Fleming, Council Grove 
Ruth Genevieve Freed, Scandia 
Sylvester Thaine Freeman, Severy 
Dorothy Belle Gudgell, Edmond 
^Marjorie Eleanor Holman, Santa Ana. Calif. 
Dorothy Judy, Kansas City 
William Mosier Kelley, El Dorado 
Juanita Joan Looney, Winfield 



*James William Lutz, Sharon Springs 
Allan William McGhee. Centralia 
Thomas Cruise Palmer, Kansas City 
William Raymond Peterson, Manhattan 
Howard Daniel Pierce, Kansas City 
Jackson Chilcott Remmele, Manhattan 
James Newell Seaton, Manhattan 
Dorothy May Shrack, Pratt 
Harriette Caroline Simpson, Fort Lewis, 

Wash. 
Charlesanna Dorothea Stewart. Hutchinson 
Darrella Lynette Stewart, Hutchinson 

*Byron Gilman Swain, McPherson 
Robert Edward Tate, Downs 
Gertrude Lola Tobias, Lyons 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN MUSIC EDUCATION 



Matthew Thornton Betton, Bethel 
Donald Leroy Engle, Manhattan 
Sadie Alma Graham, Republic 



Elizabeth Christine Lechner, Salina 
Lloyd Murle Mordy, Delia 



BACHELOR OF MUSIC 

Donald Leroy Engle, Manhattan Wilma Kathryn Price, Manhattan 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION 



Dorothy Anne Alspaugh, Wichita 
Allen Warwick Burns. Kansas City 
Virginia Aline Case, Nickerson 
John Carl Crawley, Elkhart 
Dale Leroy Duncan, St. Francis 
Mabel Lenora Foy, Hutchinson 



Maxine Gibbs, Quinter 
George William Hawks, Holton 
Kathryn Patricia Scheier, Everest 
Charles Raymond Socolofsky, Tampa 
John Amos Stephens, Wichita 
Winifred Lois Whipple, Omaha, Neb. 



Division of Home Economics 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN HOME ECONOMICS 



Lillian Emma Adams, Leavenworth 
Esther Verneada Allen, Wellington 
Hazel LaVergne Angus, Sterling 
Georgiana Martha Avery, Coldwater 
Nora Alice Babb, Broughton 
Guenndolyn Alberta Beeler, Kansas City 
Alma Lois Bennett, Sterling 
Florence Elaine Bergmann, Axtell 
Mary Louise Black, Independence 
Zeurita Elaine Bonar, Washington 
Doris Boyle, Spivey 

§Ruth Geraldine Burcham, Kansas Citv 
Stephanna Burson, Manhattan 
Beatrice Allene Burton, Kansas City, Mo. 
Iona Marie Clennin, Tulia, Tex. 
Barbara Ellen Costin, Wichita 
Audrey Louvina Cramer, Webber 
Verda Mae Dale, Coldwater 
Eleanor Dales, Eureka 
Frances Louise Davis, Fort Scott 
Erma Charlyene Deck, Circleville 
Esther Marie Dilsaver, Athol 

§Charlotte Gail Diver, Chanute 
Blanche Pauline Drysdale, Severy 
Helen Lucille Dunbar, Arkansas City 
Janet Elizabeth Dunn. Oxford 



Isabel Gifford Fell, Fellsburg 

Mary Elizabeth Fink, Osborne 

Ermina Jane Fisher, Holton 

Hazel Thelma Frager, Wamego 

Bettie Jane Freeland, Wichita 

Nancy Genevieve French, Emlenton, Pa. 

Beulah Blaser Germann, Fairview 

Sallie Burnette Gilbreath, Hereford. Tex. 

Rosethel Grimes, Manhattan 
§Grace Mary Gustafson, Manhattan 

Waneta Beulah Guthrie, Fort Scott 

Jacqueline Hanly, Manhattan 
§ Thelma Alta Harman. Indianapolis, Ind. 

Frances M. Heaton, Partridge 

Ruth Mae Hofsess, Partridge 

Wilma Draper Hollis, Westmoreland 

Norma Holshouser, Dwight 

Betty Ruth Houser. Grainfield 

Agnes Irene Jenkins. Jewell 

Mary Christine Jorgenson, Manhattan 

Alma Belle Karns, Bucklin 

Mary Margaret Keller, Clyde 

Irene Vivian Kenadv, Nevada, Mo. 

D'elpha Alberta Klint, Clifton 

Helen Margaret Koestel, Partridge 

Dorothv Maxine Kubin, McPherson 



* In absentia. 

§ Requirements for degree completed and diploma presented January 29, 1938. 



Degrees Conferred 



279 



Bachelor of Science in Home Economics — Continued 



Virginia Kathryn Laskie, Bucyrus 
Helen Louise Liflibridge, Hutchinson 
Violet Eleanor Linville, Chase 
Eleanor Emma Long, Stockton 
Mary Mabel McCoy, Iola 
Mary Doris McVey, Hill City 
Abby Lindsey Marlatt, Manhattan 
Wilma Nina Marsh, Columbus 
Sara Lee Alice Mastin, Stotesbury, Mo. 
Marion Louise Meyer, Salina 
Olive Agnese Miller, Mahaska 
* Alice Carol Mitchelson, Baxter Springs 
Mary Margaret Montgomery, Sedalia, Mo. 
Ilene Anna Morgan, Manhattan 
Olga Adelle Morgenson, Vesper 
Esther Mae Musil, Blue Rapids 
Celeste Wilhilmenia Nelson, Topeka 
Dorothy Leona Nichol, Concordia 
Joeuetta Orlena Owens, Manhattan 
Lora Neudeck Patterson, Kansas City 
Arlene Marie Perkins, Kansas City 
Lois Maureen Peterson, Garrison 
Mildred Florence Peterson, Kingman 
Elma Helen Regier, Newton 
Anna Reimer, Buhler 

Christine Eleanor Robinson, Nash, Okla. 
Mina Louise Ross, Wamego 
Mary Gertrude Sardou, Topeka 



Julia Rebecca Sawtell, Topeka 
Edna Margaret Schroeder. Lorraine 
Hazel Marie Scott, Manhattan 
Huldah Vernice Shipman, Kansas Citv 
Patricia Walsh Shoaf, Topeka 
§Elsie Belle Sloan, Manhattan 
Alice Pearl Sloop, Nortonville 
Eleanor Stahlman, Potwin 
Jeannette Elizabeth Stearns, Wichita 
Alice Mary Stockwell, Manhattan 
Evelyn Emma Stout, Lone Elm 
Katherine Elizabeth Taylor, Osborne 
Lila Elaine Taylor, Enterprise 
Virginia Mae Teichgraeber, McPherson 
Leona Zoe Tibbetts, Wheaton 
Wilma Maurine Tonn, Haven 
Pauline Ernestine Umberger, Manhattan 
Vida Schmidler Warner, Arlington 
Lucy Eliza Whiteman, Sedgwick 
Wilma Grace Wilkins, Milford 
Eleine Mae Wilson. Towanda 
Evelyn Ruth Wilson. Towanda 
Margaret Alleyne Wilson, Valley Center 
Victoria Helen Jennie Wilson, Manhattan 
Virginia Iyone Winkler, Randolph 
Edith Mabelle Woods, Kensington 
Rose Woods, Kansas City, Mo. 
Laura May Young, Cheney 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN HOME ECONOMICS AND NURSING 
Christine Louise Overley, Belle Plaine Ruth Leona Regier, Buhler 



Division of Veterinary Medicine 

DOCTOR OF VETERINARY MEDICINE 



Jacob Antelyes, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Vincent Clinton Bevenue, Kansas City 

Arthur Randolph Blythe, White City 

Grafton Diddle Bowers, Manhattan 

Hugh Burkett Campbell, Geneva, Ind. 

Francis Adam Caspar, Alida 

Donald Louis Cassidy, Cedar Rapids, Iowa 

Merwyn Pierce Chapman, Fredonia 

George Edward Cottral, Savanna, 111. 

Joseph Abraham Farney, Kiowa 

Merle LeRoy Farris, Ottawa 

Joseph George Feinberg, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Lon E. Foote, Brush, Colo. 

Merwin Jack Gregg, Caney 

John Steward Haley, Delphos 

Hyman Joseph Harkavy, New York, N. Y. 

David Jacobson, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Sidney Levine, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Ernest Leland Love, Macon, Mo. 

Ian Currie McDonald, Petaluma, Cal. 

Raymond Leroy McMahan, Manhattan 

George Badsky Maichel, Overbrook 



Lloyd Burdette Mobiley, Kansas City 
Wilbur Henry Mowder, Sabetha 
Victor Thomas Oliver, St. Louis, Mo. 
Hyman Parrell, Los Angeles, Cal. 
Elton Vernon Parsons, Emporia 
Charles Bernard Randal', Bethel 
Harold Daniel Rodabaugh, Manhattan 
Andy John Sargent, Colton, Cal. 
Maurice Anthony Schooley, Morganville 
Albert V Schwartz, Winkler 
§LaGrande Clarence Shaw, Geneva, Neb. 
Clarence Franklin Shelby, Columbus 
Warren Lang Skinner, Beverly 
William Daniel Smith, Fredonia 
Joseph Robert Sterling, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Cleon Orel Tackwell, Phillipsburg 
Raymond Woodrow Wann, Kingman, Ind. 
Wayne Ross Witter, Brookfield, N. Y. 
Herald George Wixom, San Bernardino, Cal. 
Tit Wong, Canton, China 
James Elias Ziegler, Junction City 



* In absentia. 

§ Requirements for degree completed and diploma presented January 29, 1938. 



280 



Kansas State College 



COMMISSIONS AWARDED 

LIEUTENANT, OFFICERS' RESERVE CORPS 



Kirk Eiler Adams (Inf), Oak Mills 
Edward Ira Allen (CAC), Michigan Valley 
Jay Donald Andrews (Inf), Bloom 
Victor Pierson Archer (Inf), Kansas City, Mo. 
Dewey Axtell (Inf), Manhattan 

^Russell Lee Belrlower (CAC), Dodge City 
Herbert Harner Blevins (Inf), Clay Center 
Arthur Randolph Blythe (VC), White City 
Grafton Diddle Bowers (VC), Cowgill, Mo. 
Ralph Edward Breeden (CAC), Latham 
George Gray Breidenthal (Inf), Kansas City 
Russell Conwill Buehler (CAC), Seneca 
Hugh Burkett Campbell (VC), Geneva, Ind. 

f Wayne Rodeen Carlson (CAC), Topeka 
Charles Tulloch Carter (CAC), Topeka 
Francis Adam Caspar (VC), Alida 
Donald Louis Cassidy (VC), Cedar 

Rapids, Iowa 
Merwyn Pierce Chapman (VC), Fredonia 
George Edward Cottrall (VC), Savanna, 111. 
Arthur Howard Costain (CAC), Fort Riley 
Maurice Russell Coulson (Inf), Wichita 
Fred Butcher Crist (CAC), Brewster 

$Roger McKee Crow (CAC), Topeka 
Harold George Deters (CAC), Cawker City 
Murray Dean Dougan (CAC), North 

Kansas City, Mo. 
Lester Lloyd Fankhouser (Inf), Haviland 
Joseph Abraham Farney (VC), Kiowa 
Merle LeRoy Farris (VC), Ottawa 
Walter Edo Folkerts (CAC), Timken 
Lon E. Foote (VC), Brush, Colo. 
Merwin Jack Gregg (VC), Caney 
Russell Herman Gnpp (Inf.), Hill City 
Richard Harry Hageman (Inf), Hollenberg 
John Steward Haley (VC), Delphos 
John Fenwick Hall (CAC), Junction City 

$Lawrence Isador Haller (CAC), Alma 
Hyman Joseph Harkavy (VC), New York, 

N. Y. 
Harold Vincent Henderson (CAC), Eskridge 

fCharles Matthew Heizer (CAC), Hamilton 
Harold Kenneth Howell (CAC), Quinter 
Milford Felix Itz (CAC), Osage City 

JRobert Bright Jaccard (Inf), Manhattan 
David Jacobson (VC), Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Chester Herman Johnson (CAC), Manhattan 
Aimison Jonnard (CAC), Manhattan 

*Mac Kappelman (CAC), Athol 
Robert Verne Kellogg (Inf), Wichita 

fFred Vinton Klemp (CAC), Leavenworth 
Sidney Mercer Levine (VC), Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Ernest Leland Love (VC), Macon, Mo. 

*Max McCord (CAC), Manhattan 

*Frederick Lee McDonald (Inf), Horton 
Ian Currie McDonald (VC), Petaluma, Cal. 
Vergil Miller Mcintosh (Inf), Manhattan 
Wayne Wesley Mcintosh (Inf), Manhattan 
Raymond Leroy McMahan (VC), Manhattan 



George Badsky Maichel (VC), Overbrook 
Roy Scott Martin (CAC), Pratt 
Clayton Matney (CAC), Garden City 
Louis Fullington Meek (CAC), Idana 

$Edward Martin Mertel (Inf), Salina 
Francis John Moore (Inf), Ashland 
Carl William Morgan (CAC), Long Island 
Wilbur Henry Mowder (VC), Sabetha 
Fred Harold Muret (Inf), Winfield 
Victor Thomas Oliver (VC), St. Louis, Mo. 
Hyman Henry Parrell (VC), 
Los Angeles, Cal. 

*Earl Foster Parsons (Inf), Max, Neb. 
Elton Vernon Parsons (VC), Emporia 
Martin Oren Pattison (CAC), Manhattan 

*Charles Belden Percival, Kansas City 
William Raymond Peterson (Inf), Manhattan 
James Maxwell Pierce (CAC), Burden 
Joseph Curtis Prentice (Inf), Manhattan 
Charles Bernard Randall (VC), Bethel 
Ralph Thorton Rankin (CAC), Manhattan 
John William Reynolds (Inf), Winfield 
John Jacob Rhodes (Inf), Topeka 
Charles Eugene Roper (CAC), Atchison 
Claude Floyd Ross (CAC), Dover 
Carl Robert Sandstrom (Inf), Herington 
Maurice Anthony Schooley (VC), Morganville 
Paul A. Schoonhoven (CAC), Manhattan 
James Newell Seaton (Inf), Manhattan 
Clarence Franklin Shelby (VC), Columbus 
Fred William Sims (Inf), Salina 
Clarence McPherson Skaggs (Inf), Dodge City 
Warren Lang Skinner (VC), Beverly 
Raymond R. Sollenberger (CAC), Manhattan 
Kay Vern Spear (CAC), Leoti 
Ralph Norman Spencer (Inf), Leavenworth 
Beverly Earl Steadman (CAC), Junction City 

fDarrell Stanley Steele (Inf), Treynor, Iowa 
Joseph Robert Sterling (VC), Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Everett Wilson Stewart (Inf), Talmage 

*Clarence Arthur Swanson (CAC), Loveland, 
Colo. 
David Ambrose Thompson (Inf), Cheney 

*James Madsen Towner (CAC), Manhattan 
Kenneth Wible Tudor (CAC), Holton 
Raymond Woodrow Wann (VC), Kingman, 

Ind. 
Charles Poe Weeks (CAC), Wichita 
Homer Theodore Wells (CAC), Marysville 
Hilary John Wentz (CAC) Concordia 

$Riley Russell Whearty (Inf), Rossville 
Floyd Eugene Wiley (CAC), Junction City 
Arthur Charles Willis (CAC), Stafford 
Solon Luther Willsey (Inf), Anthony 

*Richard Gordon Wiltse (Inf), Altoona 
Wayne Ross Witter (VC), Brookfield, N. Y. 
Hern'd George Wixom (VC), San Bernardino, 
Cal. 



* Requirements for commission completed January 29, 1938. 

f Certificate in lieu of commission- — not 21 years of age. 

t Commissioned at end of summer camp — 1937. 

CAC — Coast Artillery Corps. 

Inf — Infantry. 

VC — Veterinary Corps. 



Degrees Conferred 281 

Fourteenth Annual Summer School Commencement 

July 29, 1938 

DEGREES CONFERRED 

Division of Graduate Study 

MASTER OF SCIENCE 

Mildred Laura Ahlstrom, A. B., Park College, 1925 ; Reading. 

George Howard Bain, A. B., Park College, 1934; Kansas City. 

Everett George Barber, B. S., Kansas State Teachers College, Pittsburg, 1926; Salina. 

Esther Kathryn Beachel, A. B., Kansas Wesleyan University, 1930; Norcatur. 

Hazel Eirene Buck, B. S., Kansas State College, 1930; Derby. 

Harold Robert Callahan, A. B., Columbia College, 1925; Junction City. 

Ernest Vernon Carson, B. S., Kansas State Teachers College, Emporia, 1935; Emporia. 
*Chi Chen, B. S., University of Nanking, 1928; Zakow, Hangchow, China. 

Madelyn Crawford, B. S., University of Kansas, 1929 ; Spring Hill. 

George Franklin Dillon, A. B., Friends University, 1936; Wichita. 

Raymond Joseph Doll, B. S., Kansas State College, 1935 ; Manhattan. 

Kenneth Joseph Ekdahl, B. S., Kansas State College, 1933; Manhattan. 

Theodore Allan Fleck, B. S., Kansas State College, 1929; Wakefield. 

Willard LeRoy Gillmore, B. S., Kansas State College, 1927; Yates Center. 

Earl Todd Goodfellow, B. S., Kansas State College, 1928; Wells. 

Loren Dwight Grubb, B. S., Kansas State College, 1937; Phillipsburg. 

Virgil Lee Haas, B. S., Kansas State Teachers College, Emporia, 1929; Severy. 

Virginia Frances Harger, B. S., Washington State College, 1934; Spokane, Wash. 

Merle Preston Haymond, B. S., Kansas State College, 1933; Plevna. 

Madge Delia Hildreth, B. S., Kansas State Teachers College, Pittsburg, 1928; Parsons. 

Maurice Wilson Horrell, B. S., Kansas State College, 1935; Manhattan. 

Marion Ray Hottell, B. S., Kansas State Teachers College, Emporia, 1925; Americus. 

Lois Elda Howard, B. S., Kansas State College, 1934; Cut Bank, Mont. 

Walter Henry Hukriede, B. S., Kansas State College, 1925; Lewis. 

Geraldine Wanda Jones Hurd, B. S., Kansas State College, 1937 ; Junction City. 

Ethel Hannah Keith, A. B., Southwestern College, 1926; Attica. 

Eva Elizabeth Lisk, B. S., Kansas State College, 1933; Manhattan. 

Mary Enid Meek, B. S., Kansas State Teachers College, Emporia, 1924; Emporia. 

Clark Carlisle Milligan, B. S., Kansas State College, 1932; Linn. 

Nelle Ruth MacQueen Morgan, B. S., Kansas State College, 1936; Manhattan. 
*Elmer Lewis Munger, B. S., Kansas State College, 1936; Manhattan. 

Donald LeRoy Murray, B. S., North Dakota State College, 1934; Edgely, N. Dak. 

Donald Baker Pairish, B. S., Kansas State College, 1935; Manhattan. 

Paul Clutter Perry. B. S., Kansas State College, 1932; Little River. 

Myron Loyd Sallee, B. S., Kansas State College, 1927; Manhattan. 

Olive Elizabeth Schroeder, B. S., Kansas State College, 1937; Lorraine. 

Hamilton Arlo Stewart, B. S., Kansas State College, 1926; Topeka. 

Altha Tedrow, B. S., Kansas Wesleyan Universitv, 1929; Salina. 

Arlie Todd, A. B., Kalamazoo College, 1937; Bangor, Mich. 

George Edward Truby, B. S., Kansas State College, 1925; Lane. 

Katherine Ann Tucker, B. S., Kansas State College, 1912; Topeka. 

Martha Jane Ulrich, A. B., Universitv of Kansas, 1930; Hamilton. 
*Mabel Stella Westcot, B. S., Iowa State College, 1927, Linden, Iowa. 

Harold Wierenga, B. S., Kansas State College. 1935; Cawker City. 
*Eleanor Mav Wilkinson, B. S., Kansas State College, 1936; Howard. 

Chester Stanley Wood, B. S., Kansas State College, 1923; Pratt. 

Gene Neill Woodruff, B. S., Kansas State College, 1934; Kansas City. 

Millard Yantzi, B. S., Kansas State College, 1937; Kansas City. 

Division of Agriculture 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN AGRICULTURE 

Wilbur Leo Alvey, Kansas City Frederick Vincent Kilian, Detroit 

Russell Herman Gripp, Hill City Rodney Keith McCammon, Esbon 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN MILLING INDUSTRY 
David Ramsey Page, Topeka Verlin Willis Randall, Haddam 

Division of Engineering and Architecture 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING 
Fred Morton Crawford, Madison George Anthony Hellmer, Olpe 



* In absentia. 



282 



Kansas State College 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN ARCHITECTURAL ENGINEERING 

Charles Matthew Heizer 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN CHEMICAL ENGINEERING 
Fred Butcher Crist, Brewster Thomas Charles Wherry, Sabetha 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN CIVIL ENGINEERING 



*John Henry Bateman, Lawrence 
Wayne D. Branick, Fredonia 
Evert Eric Ericson, Clyde 



John Fenwick Hall, Junction City 
Clyde Donald Hoover, Macksville 
Harry Stevens, Jr., Sycamore 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 

Walter Francis Cronin, McCune *Mander Xenophon Yonts, Ivan, Ky. 

Theodore Franklin Emerson, Wellington 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 



Clarence Neil Brigham, Topeka 
Nelson Lewis Buck, Dover, N. J. 



Robert Jerome Frick, Kansas City 
Joseph Waker Reeves, Burlington 



Division of General Science 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 



Wilma Mildred Barr, Manhattan 

Charles Wilmot Benkelman, McDonald 

Paul Wendell Cassell, Salina 

James Richard Cowan, Wichita 

Florine Fay Craig, Protection 

Lee Shriver Fent, Newton 

Corbin Carter Goff, St. Joseph, Mo. 



Elmer Floyd Hampl, Luray 
Eunice Ruth Justis, Washington 
Roy C. Knappenberger, Penalosa 
Dorothy Geraldine Leach, Wellington 
Elvera Marlene Lundine, Woodbine 
Claudia Maxine Maxwell, Topeka 
James Otis Thompson, Emporia 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN COMMERCE 



Irvin Leroy Cantrall, Olathe 
Harry M. Flagler, Manhattan 
Eleanor Letitia Foncannon, Ashland 
Bernard Harry Holmgren, Kansas City 
Edward Fred Klahr, Topeka 
'Charles Beldon Percival, Kansas City 



Gordon Skiver, Burr Oak 

Paul Eugene Spears, Belle Plaine 

John Mitchel Stevens, Waterbury, Conn. 

Norman Dunning Wiltrout, Logan 

Emery Donald Wright, Parsons 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN INDUSTRIAL CHEMISTRY 



Howard Hayden Belew, El Dorado 
Allen Payne Crowley, Manhattan 
James Franklin Ellis, El Dorado 
Richard Leon Henderson, Earleton 



Homer Ensley Mayo, Kansas City 
William Morrow Proudfit, Powhattan 
Eldon Eugene Retzer, Manhattan 
Max Wolf, Manhattan 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN INDUSTRIAL JOURNALISM 



Barbara Rairden Carr, Hutchinson 
Edna Marie Gaston, Centralia 
Kenneth M. Heywood, Summerfield 



Charles Morris Piatt, Manhattan 
Willard H. Scherff, Kansas City 
'Adrian Ramsey Sorrells, Kansas City 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN MUSIC EDUCATION 

Annie Elizabeth Fraser, Manhattan 



BACHELOR OF SCENCE IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION 



Donald Wilson Beeler, Mankato 

Darwin L. Berry, Wilmot 

Delia Margaret Call, Mount Vernon, Mo. 



Ray LaVern Ellis, Wichita 
*Joseph Curtis Prentice, Manhattan 
Iva Maxine Zook. Wichita 



* In absentia. 



Degrees Conferred 



283 



Division of Home Economics 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN HOME ECONOMICS 



Violet Mae Bauer, Clay Center 

Mary Eliza Burt, Manhattan 

Lenore Joan Childers, Kansas City, Mo. 

Elizabeth Cowie, Kansas City, Mo. 

Pauline Bernice Curtis, Manhattan 

Edna May Decker, Holton 

Deda Harriet De Young, Prairie View 

Marjorie Forbes, Columbus 

Avis Charlotte Hall, Agra 

Pauline Louise Hallman, Danville 

Margaret McClintock Heath, Wichita 

Eleanor Ruth Jenkins, Springfield, 111. 



Helen McCune Jones, Herington 
Mildred Lucille Mundell, Nickerson 
Ethel Ohr, Portales, N. Mex. 
Edith Alfreda Sellberg, McPherson 
Hazel Shoemaker, Fort Scott 
Dorothy Dawn Stagg, Manhattan 
Mary Ethel Stewart, Oak Mills 
Theresa Mae Ward, Langdon 
Marjorie Ellen Williams, Marysville 
Frances Evelyn Wolf, Nickerson 
Beulah Marie Woodcock, Manhattan 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN HOME ECONOMICS AND NURSING 

Alice Louise Denton, Green River, Wyo. 






■■'< 





















r 



Jti 




£?7100 



HONORS 



PHI KAPPA PHI 

1937-1938 



Kling LeRoy Anderson 
Esther K. Beachc-l 
Raymond Joseph Doll 
Earl Todd Goodfellow 



Division of Graduate Study 



Elmer George Heyne 
Rudolph Dickson Michael 
Charles Alfred Patterson 
Millard Yantzi 



Division of Agriculture 



Wilbur Leo Alvey 
Jay Donald Andrews 
Dewey Axtell 
Frank Louis Brooks, Jr. 
Wayne Henry Freeman 



John Bernard Alfers 
Perry Charles Arnold 
Delber Lloyd Blaokwell 
Sanford David Blattner 
Carl Czaplinski 
Edwin Dale Ebright 
Robert Roy Freeman 
Charles William Frick 



Alvin George Law 
Rollin Chester Parsons 
Elmore Gregory Stout 
Gilbert LeRoy Terman 
Wayne Tjaden 



Division of Engineering 



John Worth Hines 
Harold Kenneth Howell 
Aimison Jonnard 
Harris Leo Mackey 
Carl William Morgan 
Jean Washburn 
Arthur Eugene Watson 
Evan Watts 



Division of General Science 



Annette Alsop 
*Drussilla Madge Beadle 
Dorothy Jane Bell 
Edward Alphonse DeClerck 
Murray Dean Dougan 
Donald Leroy Engle 
Ruth Genevieve Freed 
Edna Marie Gaston 
Lenore Hatter 
Thelma Holuba 



Paul Emlyn Huff 
Marie Louise Ostendorf 
Thomas Cruise Palmer 
John Donald Peterson 
Hugh Patrick Quinn 
Opal Bernice Ruddick 
Eleanor Evelyn Spencer 
Irene Margaret Wassmer 
Joseph Arthur Weybrew 



Division of Home Economics 



Erma Charlyene Deck 
Esther Marie Dilsaver 
Ermina Jane Fisher 
Marjorie Forbes 
Mary Christine Jorgenson 
Alma Belle Karns 
Abby Lindsey Marlatt 



Lora Neudeck Patterson 
Ruth Leona Regier 
Anna Reimer 

Jeannette Elizabeth Stearns 
Evelyn Emma Stout 
Edith Maybelle Woods 



Jacob Antelyes 
David Jacobson 



Division of Veterinary Medicine 

Joseph Sterling 
George Harold Wixom 



* Class of 1936. 



(2S4) 



Honors 



285 



SENIOR HONORS 

1938 

In each Division of the College, high honors are awarded at commencement to not more 
than three percent of the senior class having the highest standing in scholarship during their 
junior and senior years. Honors are also awarded to not more than an additional seven percent 
of the senior class. 

Division of Agriculture 

HIGH HONORS 



May Donald Andrews 
Rodney Keith McCammon 
Rollin Chester Parsons 



Walter Abmeyer 
Wayne Henry Freeman 
"Alvin George Law 



Charles Alfred Patterson 
Wayne Tjaden 



HONORS 



Elmore Gregory Stout 
Gilbert Leroy Terman 
Charles Peairs Wilson 



*Perry Charles Arnold 
*Delber Lloyd Blackwell 



*Sanford David Blattner 

Carl Czaplinski 
*Robert Roy Freeman 

Charles William Frick, Jr. 
*Harold Kenneth Howell 



*Annette Alsop 
*Donald Leroy Engle 
Annie Elizabeth Fraser 



William Bradford Danford 
Edward Alphonse DeClerck 

*Edna Marie Gaston 
Dorothy Belle Gudgell 

*Lenore Marie Hatter 
Paul Emlyn Huff 
Tom Allen Montgomery 



Division of Engineering 

HIGH HONORS 

*John Worth Hines 
Jean Washburn 

HONORS 

*Aimison Jonnard 
*Lyman Max Lyon 
*Carl William Morgan 

Arthur Eugene Watson 
*Evan Watts 

Division of General Science 

HIGH HONORS 



Eleanor Evelyn Spencer 

Irene Margaret Wassmer 

^Joseph Arthur Weybrew 



HONORS 



Marie Louise Ostendorf 
*Thomas Cruise Palmer 
*John Donald Peterson 
*William Morrow Proudfit 

Hugh Patrick Quinn 

Opal Bernice Ruddick 

Gordon Skiver 



Erma Charlyene Deck 
Marjorie Forbes 



Edna May Decker 
Alice Louise Denton 
Ermina Jane Fisher 
Grace Mary Gustafson 
Lora Neudeck Patterson 



Jacob Antelyes 
*David Jacobson 



Division of Home Economics 

HIGH HONORS 

*Abby Lindsey Marlatt 
Anna Reimer 

HONORS 



Jeannette Elizabeth Stearns 
Evelyn Emma Stout 
Katherine Elizabeth Taylor 
*Edith Mabelle Woods 
Rose Woods 

Division of Veterinary Medicine 

HIGH HONORS 

Charles Bernard Randall 
HONORS 

Herald George Wixom 




* These persons were awarded sophomore honors at the end of their sophomore year. 




Kansas State College 

SOPHOMORE HONORS 

1938 

In each Division of the College, honors are awarded at commencement to not more than 
five percent of the sophomore class having the highest standing in scholarship during their 
freshman and sophomore years. 



Division of Agriculture 



Glenn Arnold West 
John Alex Shaw 
Donald Irvine McCoy 
Joseph Edmond Robertson 
John Henry McCoy 



John G. Dean 
Delbert Earl McCune 
Melvin Raymond Peterson 
Roland Andrew Kruse 
Harold Eugene Jones 



Division of Engineering and Architecture 



Carroll Dean Owensby 
Robert Lansdowne Teeter 
Joseph James Redmond 
Robert Glenn Lake 
Charles Elmer Webb, Jr. 
Elmer Rollin, Jr. 
Orven Harry Armstrong 



Carl Theodore Besse 
Clarence Leaman Abell 
John Parke Ransom 
Ralph Emanuel Samuelson 
Lloyd Bryon Tribble 
Park Laurence Morse 



Division of General Science 



Harold Edward Engle 
Helen Isabel Peterson 
Ruth Helen Hammel 
Beryle Elizabeth McCammon 
Marvin Ray Shetlar 
Ruth Adelaide Getty 
Dorothy Dean 



Margaret Helen Blevins 
Fern Bair 
Carlos Irving Cole 
Merle Edward Dowd 
Frederick Allen Heskett 
Walter Woodrow Martin 



Division of Home Economics 



Maxine Beryl Bishop 
Elnora Jane Thomas 
Luella Velva Siek 
Agnes Marie Smith 
Genevieve Eleanor Schroer 
Mildred Blanche Bozarth 



Dawn Lorraine Hornbaker 
Iola Verna Houdek 
Vivian Ethel Anderson 
Elizabeth Maude Brooks 
Abbie Maurine Miller 



Division of Veterinary Medicine 



Roger Guy Spencer 
Max Leon Greenberg 



Orin Ellis 



GENERAL INDEX 



PAG II 

Absence and Tardiness 74 

Accounting, Courses in 194 

Accounting, Curriculum in Business Administration with Special Training in, 173 

Administrative Officers 10 

Admission, Late 68 

Admission, Methods of 66 

Admission, Requirements for 64 

Advanced degrees 97 

Agricultural Administration, Curriculum in 108 

Agricultural agents, Alphabetical list of 47 

Agricultural agent work 265 

Agricultural Economics, Courses in 112 

Agricultural Engineering, Courses in 141 

Agricultural Engineering, Curriculum in 132 

Agricultural Experiment Station 127 

Agricultural societies 84 

Agriculture, Curriculum in 106 

Agriculture, Division of 103 

Agriculture in the Summer School 105 

Agronomy, Courses in 114 

Aims and purposes of the College 61 

American Chemical Society 84 

Anatomy, Courses in 257 

Animal Husbandry, Courses in 116 

Applied Mechanics, Courses in 143 

Applied Music, Courses in 223 

Applied Music, Curriculum in 169 

Aptitude tests for freshmen 73 

Architectural Engineering, Curriculum in 133 

Architecture, Courses in 145 

Architecture, Curriculum in 134 

Architecture, Division of Engineering and 129 

Art, Courses in 244 

Art, Curriculum in Home Economics and 239 

Assembly of students and faculty, College 78 

Assignment and registration schedules 9 

Assignment to studies 73 

Assignments, Changes in 73 

Assistantships 92 

Athletic Organizations 87 

Athletics 224 

Auditing classes 74 

Bacteriology, Courses in 181 

Bands, The College 86 

(287) 



288 General Index 



PAGE 



Bible study 78 

Board and rooms 72 , 79 

Board of Regents, The State 10 

Botany and Plant Pathology, Courses in 183 

Boys' and Girls' Club work 267 

Branch Agricultural Experiment Stations 128 

Buildings and grounds 62 

Bureau of Research in Home Econom ics 254 

Business Administration, Curriculum in 172 

Business Administration and Accounting, Curriculum in 173 

Business directions 69 

Calendar, The College 7 

Certified Public Accountant, Certificate of 191 

Chemical Engineering, Curriculum in 135 

Chemistry, Courses in 186 

Chemistry, Curriculum in Industrial 163 

Child Welfare and Euthenics, Courses in 246 

Chorus, The College 224 

Christian Associations, The 83 

Civil Engineering, Courses in 148 

Civil Engineering, Curriculum in 136 

Classes, Minimum size of 78 

Classification of students 77 

Clinics, Courses in 26 1 

Clothing and Textiles, Courses in 247 

Colby Branch Agricultural Experiment Station 128 

College Assembly 78 

College buildings, Descriptions of the 62 

College calendar 7 

College Extension, Division of 263 

College Library, The 96 

College Post Office 79 

Colleges accredited, Junior 68 

Collegiate 4-H Club 86 

Commissions awarded in 1938 280 

Conditions, How removed 76 

Correspondence study 268 

Cosmopolitan Club 87 

County agent work 265 

County agricultural agents 47 

Course — see, also, Curriculum, and Special courses. 

Course numbers 78 

Credit courses, in Extension 270 

Credits for extracurricular work 78 

Curriculum in Agricultural Administration 108 

Curriculum in Agricultural Engineering 132 

Curriculum in Agriculture 106 

Curriculum in Applied Music 169 

Curriculum in Architectural Engineering 133 



General Index 289 

PAGE 

Curriculum in Architecture 134 

Curriculum in Business Administration 172 

Curriculum in Business Administration and Accounting 173 

Curriculum in Chemical Engineering 135 

Curriculum in Civil Engineering 136 

Curriculum in Electrical Engineering 137 

Curriculum in General Science 165 

Curriculum in Home Economics 238 

Curriculum in Home Economics and Art 239 

Curriculum in Home Economics and Institutional Management and 

Dietetics 240 

Curriculum in Home Economics and Nursing 241 

Curriculum in Industrial Arts 138 

Curriculum in Industrial Chemistry 166 

Curriculum in Industrial Journalism 167 

Curriculum in Mechanical Engineering 139 

Curriculum in Milling Industry. 110 

Curriculum in Music Education 168 

Curriculum in Physical Education for Men 170 

Curriculum in Physical Education for Women 171 

Curriculum in Specialized Horticulture 109 

Curriculum in Veterinary Medicine 255 

Dairy Husbandry, Courses in 118 

Deans, List of 10 

Deficiencies, When made up 74 

Degrees conferred by the College, Graduate 97 

Degrees conferred by the College, Undergraduate 81 

Degrees, Recipients of, in 1938 274 

Department of Agricultural Engineering 141 

Department of Agronomy 114 

Department of Anatomy and Physiology 257 

Department of Animal Husbandry 116 

Department of Applied Mechanics 143 

Department of Architecture 145 

Department of Art 244 

Department of Bacteriology 181 

Department of Botany and Plant Pathology 183 

Department of Boys' and Girls' 4-H Club Work, in Extension 267 

Department of Chemistry 186 

Department of Child Welfare and Euthenics 246 

Department of Civil Engineering 148 

Department of Clothing and Textiles 247 

Department of County Agent Work, in Extension 265 

Department of Dairy Husbandry 118 

Department of Economics and Sociology 191 

Department of Education 195 

Department of Electrical Engineering 150 

Department of English 202 

Department of Entomology 205 

19—6529 



290 General Index 

PAGE 

Department of Extension Schools, in Extension 264 

Department of Food Economics and Nutrition 248 

Department of Geology 207 

Department of History and Government 208 

Department of Home Economics, in Extension 266 

Department of Home Study, in Extension 268 

Department of Horticulture 121 

Department of Household Economics 251 

Department of Industrial Journalism and Printing 211 

Department of Institutional Management 253 

Department of Machine Design 154 

Department of Mathematics 215 

Department of Mechanical Engineering 156 

Department of Military Science and Tactics 217 

Department of Milling Industry 124 

Department of Modern Languages 220 

Department of Music 221 

Department of Pathology 258 

Department of Physical Education and Athletics 224 

Department of Physics 228 

Department of Poultry Husbandry 125 

Department of Public Speaking 231 

Department of Rural Engineering, in Extension 267 

Department of Shop Practice 159 

Department of Student Health 232 

Department of Surgery and Medicine 260 

Department of Zoology 233 

Division of Agriculture 103 

Division of College Extension 263 

Division of Engineering and Architecture 129 

Division of General Science 163 

Division of Graduate Study 97 

Division of Home Economics 235 

Division of Veterinary Medicine 255 

Doctor of Philosophy degree, Requirements for 99 

Dormitory (Van Zile Hall) 79 

Drawing — see Architecture, Art, and Machine Design 145, 244, 154 

Dressmaking — see Clothing and Textiles 247 

Duties and privileges of students 69 

Economics, Courses in 192 

Education, Courses in 196 

Electives in Division of Agriculture 107 

Electives in Division of General Science 174 

Electives in Division of Home Economics 242 

Electives in Division of Veteririary Medicine 256 

Electrical Engineering, Courses in 150 

Electrical Engineering, Curriculum in 137 

Employment bureau for students 83 

Engineering, Curriculums in 129 



General Index 291 

PAGE 

Engineering and Architecture, Division of 129 

Engineering Experiment Station 162 

Engineering in the Summer School 131 

Engineering societies 85 

English Language, Courses in 202 

English Literature, Courses in 203 

Entrance to College, Requirements for 64 

Entomology, Courses in 205 

Euthenics and Child Welfare, Courses in 246 

Examinations 75 

Expenses of students 72 

Experiment Station, Agricultural 127 

Experiment Station, Branch es of the Agricultural 128 

Experiment Station, Engineering 162 

Expression — see Public Speaking „ 231 

Extension Schools 264 

Extension Service society 86 

Extension — see College Extension 263 

Extra work, Credits for 78 

Faculty, Alphabetical list of 11 

Faculty, Standing committees of the 60 

Fairs, County and local 265 

Farm and Home Week 265 

Farm Crops, Courses in 114 

Fees and tuition : 69 

Floriculture, Courses in 123 

Food Economics and Nutrition, Courses in 248 

Forestry, Courses in 122 

Fort Hays Branch Agricultural Experiment Station 128 

French, Courses in 220 

Freshman Induction 67 

Garden City Branch Agricultural Experiment Station 128 

General Agriculture, Courses in : 120 

General Engineering, Courses in 153 

General Home Economics, Courses in 250 

General information 69 

General Science, Curriculum in 165 

General Science, Division of 163 

Geology, Courses in 207 

German, Courses in 220 

Government, Courses in 210 

Grades, Reports of 76 

Grading, System of 76 

Graduate assistantships 92 

Graduate Study, Division of 97 

Graduation, Requirements for 81 

Grounds and buildings 62 

Health, Course in 232 

Histology, Courses in 258 



292 General Index 

PAGE 

History and location of the College 61 

History, Courses in 208 

Home demonstration agents, Alphabetical list of 56 

Home Demonstration agent work 266 

Home Economics, & Bureau of Research in 254 

Home Economics Club 86 

Home Economics, Curriculum in 238 

Home Economics, Division of 235 

Home Economics Education, Courses in 250 

Home Economics, Extension work in 266 

Home Economics in the Summer School 237 

Home Study, Department of 268 

Honorary and professional organizations 84 

Honor societies 83 

Honors awarded for scholarship 77 

Honors, Recipients of, in 1938 284 

Horticulture, Courses in General . 121 

Household Economics, Courses in 251 

Industrial Arts, Curriculum in 138 

Industrial Chemistry, Curriculum in 166 

Industrial Journalism and Printing, Courses in 212 

Industrial Journalism, Curriculum in 166 

Institutes and extension schools 264 

Institutional Management, Courses in 253 

Institutional Management, Curriculum in Home Economics and 240 

Instruction and Administration, Officers of 11 

Journalism — see Industrial Journalism 211 

Junior colleges accredited 68 

Land, College 62 

Landscape Gardening, Courses in ■ 122 

Late admission 68 

Late assignment 73 

Library Economics, Course in 214 

Library, The College 96 

Literary societies 87 

Loan funds 88 

Machine Design, Courses in 154 

Master of Science degree, Requirements for 98 

Materia Medica, Courses in 261 

Mathematics, Courses in 215 

Mechanical Engineering, Courses in 156 

Mechanical Engineering, Curriculum in 139 

Medals and prizes 93 

Medicine, Courses in 261 

Men's Glee Club 224 

Military Science and Tactics, Courses in 218 

Milling Industry, Courses in 124 

Milling Industry, Curriculum in 10.4 

Milling Industry, Limited Enrollment in 104 



General Index 293 

PAGE 

Modern Languages, Courses in ; 220 

Musical organizations 224 

Music, Courses in 221 

Music, Curriculums in 163 

Music Education, Curriculum in 168 

Newman Club, The 83 

Numbering of courses 78 

Nursing, Curriculum in Home Economics and 241 

Nutrition, Courses in Food Economics and 248 

Obstetrics, Courses in 261 

Officers, Administrative 10 

Officers of Administration, Instruction, and Research 11 

Orchestra, The College 87 

Organizations, Honorary and Professional 83 

Painting, Courses in 180 

Parking regulations 79 

Pathology, Courses in 259 

Physical Education and Athletics, Courses in 225 

Physical Education, Curriculums in 170 

Physical Education for men 225 

Physical Education for women 226 

Physics, Courses in 228 

Physiology, Courses in 258 

Point System, The 77 

Pomology, Courses in 122 

Post Office, The College 79 

Poultry Husbandry, Courses in 125 

Preveterinary courses 165 

President of the College 10, 21 

Printing, Courses in 212 

Prizes and medals 93 

Psychology, Courses in 199 

Publications of the College 79 

Public Speaking, Courses in 231 

Refund of fees 71 

Regents, The State Board of 10 

Registration and assignment schedules 9 

Reports of grades 76 

Research assistantships 101 

Residence hall for women 79 

Rooms and board 72, 79 

Rural Engineering, Extension work in 267 

Rural Sociology, Courses in 113 

Scholarship deficiencies 74 

Scholarships 92 

Science Club 84 

Scientific societies, Literary and 84 

Self-support, Opportunities for 80 

Seniors and graduate study 101 



294 General Index 



PAGE 



Shop Practice, Courses in 159 

Sociology, Courses in 193 

Soils, Courses in 115 

Spanish, Courses in 221 

Specialized Horticulture, Curriculum in 109 

Standing committees of the faculty 60 

State Teacher's Certificate in Agriculture 105 

State Teacher's Certificate in Home Economics 237 

Student Governing Association 83 

Student Health 95 

Student loan funds 88 

Student organizations 83 

Summer School 102, 105, 131, 200, 237, 281 

Surgery, Courses in 260 

Table of contents 3 

Tardiness, Absence and 74 

Teacher's Certificate, State 195 

Tribune Branch Agricultural Experiment Station 128 

Tuition and fees 69, 224, 269 

Unit of high-school work defined 65 

Van Zile Hall, residence hall for women 79 

Vegetable Gardening, Courses in 123 

Veterinary Medical Association 86 

Veterinary Medicine, Courses in 261 

Veterinary Medicine, Curriculum in 255 

Veterinary Medicine, Division of 255 

Veterinary Medicine, Limited Enrollment in 255 

Vice-president of the College 10, 35 

Vocational Agriculture, Certificates for teachers of 105 

Women's Glee Club 224 

Young Men's Christian Association 83 

Young Women's Christian Association 83 

Zoology, Courses in 233 



□ 

17-6529 



List of Students 



SEVENTY-SIXTH SESSION 
1938-1939 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



PAGE 

Students Pursuing Graduate Work in Regular Session 5 

Graduate Students 5 

Undergraduate Students in Regular Session 7 

Seniors 7 

Juniors 14 

Sophomores 20 

Freshmen 28 

Special Students 39 

Summer School Students 40 

Nine-week Summer School -. 40 

Graduate Students 40 

Undergraduate Students 41 

Four-week Summer School 46 

Graduate Students 46 

Undergraduate Students 46 

Statistics 47 

Record of Registration and Degrees Conferred, 1863-1939 48 

College Registration, 1938-1939 50 

Degrees Conferred in the Year 1938 51 

Analysis of Registration, 1938-1939 52 

(3) 



LIST OF STUDENTS** 



Students Pursuing Graduate Work 
In Regular Session 



Graduate Students 



Gerald Ellsworth Abbey; Russell 

*Coral Kerr Aldous ; Manhattan 
Annette Alsop ; Manhattan 
Edith Evelyn Ames ; Brewster 
Essie Jane Anderson ; Lawrence 
John Edmond Anderson ; Manhattan 
Kling LeRoy Anderson ; Manhattan 

*Adelaide Anne Aschmann ; Charleroi, Pa. 
Thomas Burt Avery; Coldwater 
John Dewey Axtell ; Manhattan 

f Norman Davis Ball ; Manhattan 
Nora Elizabeth Bare ; Protection 
Laura Belle Baxter; Manhattan 
Buell Wesley Beadle; Manhattan 

*Edgar Sidney Beaumont ; Amherst, Mass. 
Mary Estelle Blackman; Manhattan 

*Clarence E. Bley; Chester, Pa. 

* James O. Blodgett ; Corvallis, Ore. 
Everett George Blood; Garnett 
Phyllis Irene Boyle; Manhattan 
Carl William Brown ; Mildred 
Vira Brown ; Edmond 
Loren Aldro Bryan ; Emporia 
Harry Ray Bryson ; Manhattan 
Harry Copley Buchholtz ; Olathe 
Lucile Beatrice Burt ; Manhattan 

*Marjorie Louise Burton; Ames, Iowa 

f Raymond Cecil Bushland ; Menard, Tex. 
Marion John Caldwell ; Manhattan 

fOren Emery Campbell ; Valley Falls 
Arthur Adam Case ; Manhattan 
Ralph Boyd Cathcart ; Manhattan 
Mildred Edna Chappell ; Plains 
Carl Ernest Claassen ; Newton 
Eugene Frederick Collins ; Manhattan 
Tate Benton Collins, Jr. ; Kutlawa, Ky. 
Esther Margaret Cormany ; Manhattan 
Robert Edwin Cress ; Manhattan 
Alfred Charles Curtiss ; Beeler 
Reyhold George Dahms ; Verden, Okla. 

*Ruth J. Dales; Manhattan 
Rose Marie Darst; Radnor, Ohio 
Floyd Ewing Davidson ; Parsons 
f*Benjamin Ammon Davis; Seneca 
Marion Price Dawley; Manhattan 
John Wesley DeMand ; Lincolnville 

tLois Estelle Dennhardt; Sheboygan, Wis. 
Arthur William Devor ; Manhattan 
James Paul Dillingham ; McFarland 

. George Franklin Dillon; Wichita 
Paul Lawrence Dittemore ; Manhattan 
Raymond Joseph Doll ; Manhattan 
Vernon Lloyd Doran ; Macksville 

*Ralph Gonzales Dunmire; Sterling 
Keith Barber Dusenbury ; Manhattan 
Samuel Allen Edgar; Sterling 

*Harold Russell Ekroth ; Chicago, 111. 
Vera May Elhthorpe ; Russell 
Donald Leroy Engle ; Manhattan 



*Warford Wendling Farrar ; Frankfort 

Lee Sh river Fent ; Newton 

Doris Hays Fenton ; Manhattan 

Miscal Leon Fierke; Manhattan 

John Charles Finerty ; Chicago, 111. 
*Alva L. Finkner; Akron, Colo. 

Karl Frederick Finney ; Manhattan 

Hazel Marie Fletcher ; Modoc, Ind. 

Vernon Daniel Foltz ; Manhattan 
t*Lorena Catherine Foreman ; Hutchinson 

Jean Dobbs Frank ; Manhattan 
f Thomas Henry Fraser, Jr. ; Moro, Ore. 

Forest Sheldon Frick; Albion, Ind. 
*Lyman Philip Frick ; Kansas City, Mo. 

Robert Jerome Frick; Kansas City 

Roy Fred Fritz ; Manhattan 
*Mary Louise Gephart; Peabody 
*John H. Gibson ; Gower, Mo. 

Clarence Lee Gish ; Manhattan 

Galen Francis Glessner ; McPherson 

Otis Benton Glover ; Manhattan 
*George H. Gries ; Conover, Ohio 

La Motte Grover; Manhattan 

Loren Dwight Grubb ; Phillipsburg 
*Ralph L. Gustafson; Bagley, Minn. 
*Anna. Lucille Hadden ; Pringhar, Iowa 
*Charles W. Hadley; Winfield 

Virginia Kay Haggart ; Topeka 

Hubert C. Hahn ; Alma 

Charles Hal Harned ; Manhattan 

Ellen Anita Hawke; Irving 

Kenneth Marion Heywood ; Manhattan 

Leona Thurow Hill ; Manhattan 

Wilma Marguerite Hilt ; Sabetha 

Leonard Casper Hoegemeyer; Hooper, Neb. 

Hilton Delos Hollembeak ; Manhattan 

Helen Pansy Hostetter ; Manhattan 
*Miriam Althea Hill Houston ; Rosendale, Wis. 

Wai Lan Fluang ; Canton, China, 
f Dolf Jesse Jennings ; Burlingame 
t Julian Almon Johnson ; Buhler 
*Robert W. Jugenheimer ; Manhattan 
*Eneas Dillon Kane ; San Francisco, Cal. 

Virginia Voigt Keim ; Lincoln, Neb. 

Alvin Lawrence Kenworthy; Mounds, Okla. 

Alice Day Kimball ; Manhattan 

Eunice Leola Kingsley ; Manhattan 
*Glenn Charles Klingman ; Chappell, Neb. 
*James M. Koepper ; Meclora, Ind. 

John Theodore Kroulik ; Belleville, Tex. 
^Raymond John Ladd ; Paton, Iowa 

Alvin George Law; Hill City 
*Henry H. Lee; Chanute 
*Kud Chen Lee ; Wenan, China 

Peter Henry Leendertse ; Wichita 
^Florence May Lehman ; Abilene 

Alice Charlotte Linn ; Clyde 

James Walton Linn ; Manhattan 
*Morrison Loewenstein; Kearney, Neb. 



**June 1, 1938, to May 30, 1939. 
* Matriculated 1938-1939. 
t In absentia. 



(5) 



Kansas State College 



Graduate Students — Concluded 



Sam Long ; Abilene 

*Ercell Vernon Lynn ; Manhattan 
Naomi Sue Lyon ; Manhattan 
Majorie Sellers McCall; Manhattan 
Max Elton McCluggage; Manhattan 
Patricia Fleming McCluggage; Manhattan 
Frederick Lee McDonald ; Horton 

*Edith Lucile McGraw; Hope 
Virgil Miller Mcintosh ; Manhattan 
Wayne Wesley Mcintosh ; Manhattan 
Florence Elizabeth McKinney ; Manhattan 

*Helen Christie Malcolm ; Almena 
Abby Lindsey Marlatt ; Manhattan 
Rachel Martens; Manhattan 
Edgar Martin ; Manhattan 
Ella Jane Meiller; Minneapolis 
Hans David Oliver Miller ; Manhattan 
Kenneth William Miller; Manhattan 
Leo Albert Moore; Manhattan 
Francis Earl Mordy; Manhattan 

*Allen Clareth Morine ; McPherson 
Shige Namba ; Tokyo, Japan 
Arthur Leslie Neal ; Manhattan 
Clayton Omar Obenland ; Manhattan 
Chester Winfield Ofelt ; Minneapolis, Minn. 
Daisy Marietta Osborn ; Elmont 
Maxine Josephine Osbourne; Manhattan 

fCarl Gerhardt Ossman ; Greenleaf 

fGustaf Clark Overley; Belle Plaine 

* Jasper Earl Pallesen ; Manhattan 
Dan Partner; Manhattan 
Buel R. Patterson; Manhattan 
Marion Herfort Pelton ; Manhattan 
Charlotte Penny ; Manhattan 

fiver Eugene Peterson ; Phillipsburg 

*Maurice Lewellen Peterson; Oakland, Neb. 

fRoland Winfield Peterson ; Riley 

*Eugene Harold Pietsch ; Chicago, 111. 

*Clarence Andrew Pippin ; Decatur, 111. 
Mary Mabry Porter; Russell Springs 
Roland Wagner Portman ; Manhattan 
Imogene Price ; Manhattan 
William Morrow Proudfit ; Powhattan 

f Glen Bradshaw Railsback ; Clay Center 
Addison Doyle Reed ; Manhattan 

*Luella May Reeve; Midian 
Esther Catherine Relihan ; Smith Center 

*Clarence Walter Rice; Buchanan, Mich. 

*Martha Richardson ; Kansas City, Mo. 
Dan Arnold Richert ; Newton 

*Betty Jane Harris Roberts ; Manhattan 
Charles Pearson Roberts ; Manhattan 
June Roberts; Manhattan 
Christine Eleanor Robinson; Nash, Okla. 

*Jayne Glenn Robinson; Houston, Texas 

*Frances May Rogers ; Tulsa, Okla. 
Ralph Rogers; Manhattan 



*Seth Leonard Root ; Topeka 

*Joy Belle Sinyard Ross ; Bryan, Texas 

Marshall Minton Ross; Wichita 
*George Edgar Ruggles ; Pittsburg 

Olga Barbara Saffry; Alma 

Jesse McKinley Schall ; Manhattan 
f William Henry Schindler; Winchester 
*Milton Otto Schmidt; Manhattan 

William George Schrenk; Manhattan 

Luke Michael Schruben ; Manhattan 
fHerbert Henry Schwardt ; Ithaca, N. Y. 

Myra Edna Scott; Manhattan 
fRoger Turner Shepherd; Tulsa, Okla. 
*Rowena Hammons Sherrill ; Brownell 

Christina Marie Shields; Lost Springs 

* Louis Raymon Shobe; Waverly 
Charles Leon Simmons ; Strong City 

*Laurence Nelson Skold ; Haxtun, Colo. 
Bernice Ethel Sloan ; Manhattan 
Robert Fred Sloan ; Leavenworth 

* George Lee Smith ; Prairie View, Texas 
Mabel Rachel Smith ; Eskridge 
Raymond R. Sollenberger ; Manhattan 

*William Zanvil Sosna ; Manhattan 
Clark Bernard Stephenson ; Sedan 

*Elizabeth Amelia Stewart ; Marion 
Charles William Stratton ; Manhattan 
Francis Joseph Sullivan ; Manhattan 
William Augustus Tanner; Aurora, 111. 
Delos Clifton Taylor ; Manhattan 
Howard Lee Taylor ; Norton 
Warren Chalmer Teel ; Morland 

*Mary Ellen Thayer; Manhattan 
James Otis Thompson; Emporia 
Eleanor Tibbetts ; Manhattan 
Joseph Benjamin Tuck ; Morrisville, Mo. 
Marvin John Twiehaus ; Manhattan 
Pauline Ernestine Umberger ; Manhattan 

*Charles Edmond Wagoner ; McPherson 
Elizabeth Daniel Walbert ; Columbus 
Harold Clifford Walters ; Wetmore 
Norman Coates Webster; Manhattan 

*George Harvey Wellington ; Springport, Mich. 
Otto Ernest Wenger; Basehor 
Marion Chalmer West ; Blue Mound 
Robert Dean West ; Coffeyville 
Joseph Arthur Weybrew ; Wamego 
Hugh Erwin White ; Kingsdown 

*Gailey Arthur Whitney; Manhattan 

fKathryn Whitten ; Topeka 
Jennie Williams : Manhattan 

*Samuel Lonnie Williams; Sparta, North 
Carolina 
Charles Peairs Wilson ; Anness 
Mannie Ray Wilson ; Manhattan 
Tit Wong; Canton, China 
Joseph Nathan Wood ; Manhattan 



* Matriculated 1938-1939. 
f In absentia. 



List of Students 



UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 
In Regular Session 

The following lists include seniors, juniors, sophomores, freshmen and spe- 
cial students in College. For students in Summer Schools see lists following 
these. 

Abbreviations here used denote curriculums as follows: AA, agricultural 
administration; Ag, agriculture; AE, agricultural engineering; AH&V, animal 
husbandry and veterinary medicine; Ar, Architecture; ArE, architectural engi- 
neering; C, commerce; C&A, commerce and accounting; CE, civil engineering; 
ChE, chemical engineering; EE, electrical engineering; GS, general science; 
GS&V, general science and veterinary medicine; HE, home economics; HE&A, 
home economics and art; HE&J, home economics and industrial journalism; 
HE&N, home economics and nursing; IA, industrial arts; IC, industrial chem- 
istry; IJ. industrial journalism; IM&D, institutional management and dietetics; 
LA, landscape architecture; M, applied music; MuE, music education; ME, 
mechanical engineering; MI, milling industry; PE, physical education; PVM, 
preveterinary medicine; SH, specialized horticulture; VM, veterinary medicine. 

SENIORS 



John Elden Abbott (VM) ; Manhattan 
Margaret Elizabeth Abbott (HE); 

Manhattan 
Neil LaValle Adams (EE) ; Sun City 
George Wilson Aicher (Ag) ; Hays 
Lois Geraldine Aldous (GS) ; Manhattan 
Elizabeth Ennis Allbee (IM&D); 

Marshall, Mo. 
Edward Allen (CE) ; Michigan Valley 
Philip Tingley Allen (Ag) ; Circleville 
Marion Calvert Alson (VM) ; 

Carthage, Mo. 
William George Alsop (AA) ; Wakefield 
*Elwyn Lavern Alter, Jr. (IJ) ; Manhattan 
Bruce Logue Amos (CE) ; Arkansas City 
Hilding August Anderson (Ag) ; Cleburne 
Alta Margaret Ansdell (HE) ; Jamestown 
Victor Pierson Archer (SH); 

Kansas City, Mo. 
Fernando Edmundo Armstrong (AH&V) ; 

Ponce, Puerto Rico 
Robert Lee Armstrong (ME) ; Manhattan 
Dean Franklin Arnold (IJ) ; Kansas City 
Edna May Arnold (SH); Wichita 
Rose Lee Arnold (IJ) ; Emporia 
f Cynthia Elizabeth Askren (MuE); 

Manhattan 
William Gerald Auer (CE) ; El Dorado 
Jane Alleyne Auld (IJ) ; Wichita 
Ruth Avery (HE) ; Concordia 
fjohn Dewey Axtell (Ag-1; Grad-2) ; 

Manhattan 
Nelta Evelyn Axtell (HE); Manhattan 
Allan Vincent Ayres (AA) ; Augusta 
Robert Oris Baber (MI) ; Oakley 
Margaret Elizabeth Bacon (GS) ; 

Atchison 
*William Pratt Bacon (AA) ; Emporia 
Georgene Elizabeth Baird (GS) ; Formoso 
James Annison Baird (IC) ; Dodge City 
Ellwood Tvler Baker (Ag) ; Abilene 
Richard Clair Banbury (PE) ; Wichita 
James Walter Barger (PE) ; Blue Mound 
Bruce Warren Barker (Ag) ; Burns 
Lawrence Newton Barker (Ag) ; 

Louisburg 



John Wilson Baska (CE); Kansas City 
Esther Alba Baxter (HE) ; Manhattan 
Virginia Faye Baxter (HE); Manhattan 
Charles Benjamin Bayles (CE) ; 

Manhattan 
Donald Gordon Beatson (EE) ; 

Arkansas City 
Emil William Beckman (CE) ; Phillipsburg 
Robert Gale Beckwith (LA) : Hiawatha 
Glenn Lester Beichley, Jr. (CE); 

Minneapolis 
fStella Lucille Beil (HE) ; Bavaria 
Rov Swan Belcher (ME); Topeka 
Clair L. Belden (C) ; Kansas Citv, Mo. 
Russell Lee Belflower (EE) ; Dodge City 
Anna Lora Bell (C&A); Silver Lake 
Charles Arthur Bell (AA) ; Fort Scott 
Garnetta Lavia Bell (IJ) ; Haven 
George Henry Benson (ME) ; Grainfield 
William Ellsworth Berger (GS) : Manhattan 
Frances Mildred Berggren (HE) ; 

Morganville 
Donald Deane Berkev (C&A) ; Rossville 
Israel Berkowitz (VM); Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Helen Louise Berridge (HE); Fostoria 
Raymond E. Bert (MI) : Neodesha 
Anna Elizabeth Betts (HE) ; North Topeka 
Ruth Helen Bishop (HE) ; Atchison 
Byron Woodrow Black (IC) : Utica 
fMary Estelle Blackmail (Grad-1 ; H. E.-2); 

Manhattan 
Dorothy Grace Blaesi (HE) ; Abilene 
Helen Mae Blake (C) ; Kansas City 
Frank LeRov Blakelv (C) ; Waterbury, Conn, 
f Everett George Blood (GS-1; Grad-2); 

Garnett 
Gerald Martin Boatwright (ME); Valley 

Center 
Arthur Emil Bock (ME) ; Wamego 
Glenn Harold Boes (CE); Pretty Prairie 
Jesse Edward Bogan (IJ) ; Manhattan 
Vernon Glenn Boger (ChE) ; Junction City 
Chester Llovd Boles (CE) ; Turon 
Hubert Paul Bolks (VM) ; Hull, Iowa 
Joseph Michael Bonfield (MI); Elmo 



* Matriculated 1938-1939. 

t Also pursuing graduate study. 



Kansas State College 



Seniors — Continued 



f Glenn Ivan Booth (Ag) ; Paradise 
t Phyllis Irene Boyle (HE-1; Grad-2) ; 
Manhattan 
Dean Eugene Braden (ChE) ; Junction City 
Dean Thompson Bradley (IO) ; 

Belle Plaine 
Raymond Thomas Bradley (CE) ; Belle 

Plaine 
Elliot Wilson Brady (ME); Manhattan 
William Raymond Brady (AA) ; Vermillion 
John Robson Brainard (Ag) ; Carlyle 
Leo James Brenner (AA) ; Bazine 
Vernon L. Brensing (CE) ; Mullinville 
Ray DeLore Brent (AA) ; Alton 
Hubert Ross Breuninger (C&A) ; Manhattan 
John A. Brewer (ME); Concordia 
Robert Allen Briggs (PE) ; El Dorado 
Wade Oberlin Brinker (VM); Massillon, O. 
Carroll Wright Brooks (AA) ; Manhattan 
Robert James Brossamer (ChE) ; Topeka 
David Wilson Brower (ChE); Emporia 
Katherine Elizabeth Brown (HE) ; Emporia 
Elizabeth Grace Brown (HE) ; Manhattan 
Gordon Wonnacott Brown (EE) ; 

Manhattan 
Grover David Brown (EE) ; Kansas City 
Harold Eugene Brown (CE) ; Salina 
Paul William Brown (PE) ; Manhattan 
fZona Barbara Brown (C) ; El Dorado 
Elvin Stanton Brumfield (ME); Jetmore 
Thomas Rudolph Brunner (C) ; Wamego 
fHarry Coplev Buckholtz (C & EE-1; Grad- 
2); Olathe 
Eilene Harriet Buck (HE); Welda 
Pauline Clare Budde (HE) ; Albert 
Russell Conwill Buehler (CE) ; Seneca 
Alice Geneva Buikstra (GS) ; Cawker City 
Robert Harlan Bull (PE) ; Marysville 
John Earl Bullock (CE) ; Glasco 
Howard Ernest Bumsted (ChE) ; Clay Center 
Raymond Earl Burdge (MI) ; Parsons 
George Frank Burditt (IC) ; Coldwater 
Anthonv Michael Burdo (VM) ; 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Virgil Alfred Burgat (GS) ; Peabody 
Harry Dale Burkholder (CE) ; Wamego 
Ruth Elizabeth Burnet (PE); 

Manchester, Okla. 
Gilbert Harold Burnett (ChE) ; McPherson 
Franklin Harold Burr (VM) ; 

South Orange, N. J. 
Walter Eugene Burrell (ME); Emporia 
Linus Homer Burton (SH) ; Belle Plaine 
Margaret Elizabeth Busch (HE) ; Manhattan 
Beth Alice Byers (IM&D) ; Jewell 
Martha Marie Caldwell (HE) ; El Dorado 
f Marjorie Willis Call (HE) ; Manhattan 
Augustus Caesar Cardarelli (PE) ; 

Republic, Pa. 
Ena Jeanette Carlisle (HE) ; Mount Hope 
fBula May Carlson (HE) ; Manhattan 
Glenn Alvin Carlson (EE) ; Manhattan 
Wayne R. Carlson (CE) ; Topeka 
Harold Eugene Carpenter (ME) ; Coffeyville 
Norwood Harry Casselberry (VM) ; 

Savanna, 111. 
Earl Everett Certain (C) ; Dodge City 
Donald Evon Charles (Ag) ; Republic 
Eunice Sarah Christenson (HE) ; Olsburg 
Richard Binford Christy (AE) ; Scott City 
Marybelle Churchill (iJ) ; Topeka 
fCarl Ernest Claassen (Ag-1 ; Grade-2); 
Newton 
Robertha Jeanette Clack (HE) ; 

Arkansas City 
Allen Roland Clark (AA) ; Miltonvale 



Forrest William Clark (VM) ; Jewell 
Mayselle LaVerna Clark (C) ; Independence 
Owen Earl Clark (IJ) ; Hoisington 
Theodore Stanley Clark (C) ; Penokee 
*Vera Louise Clarke (HE) ; Le Grand, Gal. 
Rosamond Clay well (HE&J) ; Kansas City 
Clarence Bruce Clevenger (CE) ; Kingsdown 
Helen Beth Coats (HE) Topeka 
Neva Fern Coble (HE) ; Sedgwick 
Alton Monroe Coddington (VM); Alexander 
*Harold Hedrick Coffman (IC) ; Overbrook 
Lawrence Donaldson Colburn (C&A) ; 

Manhattan 
Alice Rosalind Coldren (IJ) ; Oberlin 
Carlos Irving Cole (C&A) ; Logan 
Carol Eugene Coleman (AA); Sylvia 
Wayne Devere Collins (VM); Marysville 
Donald Raymond Conard (GS) ; Coolidge 
Jessie May Conard (GS) ; Coolidge 
Harry Jacob Conrad (VM) ; Kansas City 
William Kenneth Conwell (ChE) ; Manhattan 
Earl Jesse Cook (Ag) ; Parker 
Margaret Florence Cook (HE) ; Newton 
James Fenimore Cooper (IJ); Manhattan 
Jess Ralph Cooper (AA) ; Preston 
Edwin Courtney (Ag) ; Danville 
Frank Andrew Cowell (EE) ; Hutchinson 
Maynard Gerald Cox (C&A) ; Colony 
Howard Allen Crawford (C) ; Stafford 
*Margaret Louise Crawford (MuE) ; Hugoton 
Delbert Clair Creighton (MI) ; Denison 
Mary Elizabeth Crocker (HE) ; White City 
Geraldine Lucille Cross (GS) ; Wilson 
Margaret Jane Culbertson (C) ; Long Island 
Walter LeRoy Culbertson (ME); Wichita 
Philip Henry Curry (VM); Kansas City 
Ralph Roy Daggett (IJ) ; Reading 
Eugene Francis Darner (VM) ; Webb City, 

Mo. 
William L. Daniels (EE) ; Kansas City 
Maxine Evelyn Danielson (HE&A) ; 

Manhattan 
Lois L. Darby (MuE) ; Washington 
Hyatt Lynne Davidson (IC) ; Manhattan 
Albert A. Davies (VM) ; Kansas City, Mo. 
Charles Willard Davis (Ag) ; Halstead 
Dale Davis (CE) ; Dodge City 
Frances A. Davis (HE) ; Hutchinson 
Mary Frances Davis (HE) ; Chardon, Ohio 
Valoris Aeolia Davis (HE); Hutchinson 
Clifton Dawson (Ag) ; Norcatur 
Ermal Irene Dearborn (GS) ; Manhattan 
Peter DeCinque (VM) ; Woodbine, N. J. 
Clifford N. Decker (VM) ; Arlington, Neb. 
Ernest Wilson Decker (Ag) ; Tecumseh 
Everett John Degenhardt (C) ; Alma 
t Myron Samuel Dendurent (ChE) ; Goodland 
John Patton Denton (VM) ; Manhattan 
John Russell DeRigne (ME); Kansas City 
Otis Gerald Dewey (AA) ; Hollenberg 
Darwin Newcomb DeYoe (MuE); Hiawatha 
John Benjamin Dickens (IJ); Manhattan 
*t Dorothy Lou Dickson (GS) ; El Dorado 
William Hyde Dieterich (VM) ; Spivey 
John Dunham Dietrick (AE) ; Kansas City, 

Mo. 
Rose Geraldine Diller (GS) ; Manhattan 
Evelyn Leone Dilsaver (HE); Kensington 
Loren John Dilsaver (AE) ; Athol 
John Perrv Dilworth (IC) ; Winfield 
*Veona Ruth Dixon (MuE); Moran 
Vivian Aline Doak (IM&D); Kansas City 
Leslie Doane (Ar) ; Osborne 
Rowland Maxwell Dolan (C&A); Clifton 
Vincent Wendell Doll (C) ; McPherson 
Clifford Jerrold Drake (EE) ; Corbin 



* Matriculated 1938-1939. 

f Also pursuing graduate study. 



List of Students 



Seniors — Continued 



Clarence Joseph Dreier (CE); Kansas City 
Yale V. Druley (VM) ; Muncie 
Robert Harrison Dubois (AE) ; Burlingame 
Samuel Griffith Dukelow (ME); Hutchinson 
Clifford Elias Duncan (PE); St. Francis 
Forrest Lemoin Duncan (MI) ; Penalosa 
L. Jack Duncan (ArE) ; Wichita 
Robert Frederick Dundon (EE) ; 

Junction City 
Mary Lou Dunkerley (IM&D); Holliday 
Marguerite DuPree (MuE) ; Salina 
Augustus Milton Duvall (ME) ; Abilene 
Stanley Naismeth Dwyer (IJ) ; Manhattan 
George Washington Eberhart (AH&V) ; 

Jewell 
Cecil Harold Eberle (GS) ; Alta Vista 
f Grover William Eddy (PE) ; Havensville 
Ruth Wilma Edgerton (GS) ; Iola 
Thomas Richard Edgerton (GS) ; Iola 
Luella Edith Effland (GS) ; White City 
Elnita Ella Ehler (C&A); Holyrood 
Albert Henry Eikelberger (ME) ; Scott City 
Irene Fay Eisenhower (HE) ; Manhattan 
Howard Surber Elliott (AA) ; Manhattan 
Mary Elliott (C) ; Manhattan 
*Lewis Edward Emery (GS) ; Manhattan 
Merton Vincent Emmert (AA) ; Manhattan 
George Albert Engelland (IC) ; Sterling 
Harold Edward Engle (GS) ; Manhattan 
Shirley Irene Englehart (GS) ; Bronson 
Frederick Dale Engler (Ag) ; Topeka 
Kenneth Leroy Enright (AA) ; El Dorado 
Earl Albert Erickson (Ag) ; Wilson, Pa. 
*Robert Nathaniel Erickson (GS.); 

Orland, Cal. 
Hamel Kai Eshelman (EE) ; Wichita 
James Eskeldon (VM) ; Raniona 
Hoy Boyd Etling (AA) ; Copeland 
David Edward Evans (VM) ; 

Montrose, Colo. 
Albert Ross Ewing (EE) ; Great Bend 
Willard Halsey Eyestone (AH&V); 

Pittsburg 
Frank Webster Farley (AA) ; 

Kansas City, Mo. 
Henry Horatio Farrar (GS); Beattie 
Willis Bert Faulkender (Ag) ; Holton 
Harold A. Fechter (C) ; Aurora 
Murray Feldman (VM) ; Brooklvn, N. Y. 
Naomi Grace Fent (HE&A) ; Newton 
Mary Helen Filley (IM&D); 

Kansas City, Mo. 
Paul Carey Fisher (GS) ; Belleville 
Mary Helen Fitzgerald (C) ; Wamego 
Beattie Harris Fleenor (MI) ; Manhattan 
Merlin J. Fleming (C&A) ; Oaklev 
Homer Wendell Fleming (GS) ; Pratt 
Chester Alanson Foreman (CE) ; Wichita 
Dolores Coraleen Foster (IJ) ; Manhattan 
Mary Jane Foulston (C) ; Wichita 
Emma Helen Frick (HE) ; Lamed 
Paul Delbert Fuller (C&EE) ; Kansas City 
Paul Willis Furst (IJ) ; Atchison 
Robert Wade Furtick (MI); Salina 
Paul Gabler (EE) ; Salina 
John William Gambv (C&A) ; Everest 
Garrett Gardner (CE) ; Belvidere, N. J. 
Harold Alfred Gardner (ME); 

Garden City 
Howard E. Gardner (EE) ; Manhattan 
Arthur Raymond Garvin (Ag) ; Ogden 
John Franz Gaumer (EE) ; Manhattan 
Frances Macv Gebhart (IJ) ; Salina 
Merrill D. Geraghty (GS) ; Selden 
Peter Joseph Germanio (VM) ; 

Belleplain, N. J. 



Richard Mills Gillispie (EE) ; 

Junction City 
Golda Lucile Gish (HE) ; Manhattan 
Barbara Jean Glenn (GS) ; Amarillo, Tex. 
James Banks Godin (GS); Wamego 
Charles Martin Good (IC) ; Plevna 
*Kenneth Max Gould (GS) ; 

Broken Bow, Neb. 
Lawrence Grauerholz (IJ) ; Kensington 
Mary A. Gray (IM&D) ; Topeka 
Roy Raymond Green (AA) ; Wichita 
Beverly Stubbs Greene (C) ; Dodge City 
Robert Harnett Griffin (EE) ; 

Chilocco, Okla. 
Addie Maurine Grizzell ((IM&D); Claflin 
Glenn Gordan Gross (VM) ; Russell 
Hilbert August Grote (Ag) ; Manhattan 
Thomas Joseph Guilfoil (VM) ; 

Kansas City 
Lois Virginia Gwin (HE) ; Washington 
Beatrice Habiger (HE) ; Bushton 
Herbert Fred Hackett (ME); McCracken 
Kenneth M. Hale (EE) ; Wichita 
Donald Eugene Hall (AA) ; Macksville 
Daniel Clell Hallmark (ChE) ; 

Arkansas City 
Clare C. Hamilton (VM) ; Geneseo 
Frank Frederick Hamilton (CE); Norton 
Pauline Chandler Hammack (HE); 

Parsons 
Paul Leo Hammann (EE) ; Independence 
Robert Lyman Hammond (EE) ; Parsons 
Rolland Brooks Hammond (ArE) ; Pratt 
August Martin Hanke (ME); Wathena 
f Emmett Benjamin Hannawald (AA) ; Pratt 
John Vernon Hansen (Ag) ; Hiawatha 
Ailene Laurentia Hanson (HE); Olsburg 
Walter Edmund Hanson (CE) ; Lyndon 
Harris Warren Hantman (VM) ; 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 
John Thomas Harrell (C&A) ; Paradise 
John Wendell Harrell (EE); Wichita 
fCarl A. Harris (ChE); Mullinville 
t John Harris, Jr. (Ag) ; Havenville 
t Meade Cecil Harris, Jr. (MI); Tecumseh 
Warner Harris (C) ; Burrton 
Sidney Lloyd Harry (C) ; Home 
George William Hartter (IC) ; Sabetha 
Albert Leo Havlik (VM) ; Tampa 
fEllen Anita Hawke (GS-1; Grad-2); 

Irving 
Lucile Esther Hawks (HE&A) ; Hiawatha 
Edward Millin Hayes (EE) ; Anthony 
Eldon Francis Hays (VM) ; Newton 
Edna Alletta Heaton (PE) ; Buford, Ark. 
Robert M. Heaton (C&A); Norton 
Paul Milton Hefty (ME); Valley Falls 
Powell H. Heide (AA) ; Wilmore 
Harold Arthur Heimerich (EE); 

Clay Center 
Hannah Lee Hemphill (HE) ; Chanute 
Elizabeth Fern Henderson (HE) ; Dover 
Harold Vincent Henderson (CE) ; Eskridge 
Tom Knight Henderson (ME); Wichita 
Merle Logan Henrikson (VM) ; Manhattan 
Margaret Jane Henry (GS) ; Belleville 
Walter Hermann (AA) ; Offerle 
Earl Francis Hertach (AA) ; Claflin 
Arlene Herwig (GS) ; Kansas City, Mo. 
Helen Ethel Heter (HE&A); Sterling 
Michael Earl Hickey (CE) ; Hoisington 
Helen Vivian Higbee (HE); Eureka 
Norman Walter Hildwein (AA) ; Fairview 
Benjamin George Hildyard (CE); Nickerson 



* Matriculated 1938-1939. 

f Also pursuing graduate study. 



10 



Kansas State College 



Seniors — Continued 



Arthur Wayne H.iort (C) ; Manhattan 
George Hofsess (CE); Partridge 
Margene Verena Holmes (IJ) ; Manhattan 
Thelma Frances Holuba (IJ) ; Manhattan 
William Henry Honstead (ChE) ; Topeka 
Harvey J. Hoover (C) ; Kansas City 
Garth Conner Hopkins (C) ; Parsons 
Louis John Horn (IJ) ; Horton 
Dawn Lorraine Hornbaker (IM&D) ; 

Artesia, N. Mex. 
Cecil Earl Hornbuckle (Ag) ; Hillsdale 
f Charles Fred Home (IC) ; Alma 
Lehnus Lloyd Horst (CE) ; Holyrood 
Richard Eugene Hotchkiss (MI) ; 

Manhattan 
Blanche Margaret Howe (C&A) ; Stockdale 
Archie Willard Howell (GS) ; Manhattan 
Fung Kuang Huang (VM); Canton, China 
William Joseph Hudspeth (C) ; Parsons 
Elizabeth Laura Huev (IM&D); Atchison 
Vearl Nathan Huff (EE) ; Norton 
Flora May Hulings (HE) ; Sidney, Mont. 
Frank Carrol Hund (CE) ; Leavenworth 
Jesse Richard Hunt (GS) ; Arkansas City 
Dallas T. Hunter (ME); Newton 
Lena Marie Hurst (HE) ; Clearwater 
Roberta Laurine Hutchinson (MuE); 

Wamego 
Aubrey Means Hutton (VM) ; 

St. Joseph, Mo. 
Donald Clayton Innes (VM) ; 

Philadelphia, Pa. 
Mary Grace Ioerger (C) ; Harper 
Glenn Reben Irey (ME) ; Riverton 
Margaret M'Lee Isenbart (HE) ; Wilmore 
Clifford Clinton Isom (MI); Baldwin, 111. 
James Thomas Jackson (C&A) ; Manhattan 
Paris Shedrick Jackson (C) ; Ness City 
Warren Cowan Jackson (ME) ; Manhattan 
Duane George Jehliik (CE) ; Cuba 
Calvin M. Jenkins (GS) ; Manhattan 
Avis E. Johnson (HE) ; Sterling 
Dale Edward Johnson (Ag) ; Manhattan 
Earl William Johnson (EE) ; Salina 
James Elbert Johnson (Ag) ; Winfield 
Jean Frances Johnson (MuE) ; Olsburg 
Keith Cleon Johnson (Ag) ; Sylvia 
Kenneth Edward Johnson (AA) ; Emporia 
Kenneth Eugene Johnson (Ag) : Norton 
Mae Maxine Johnson (GS) ; Manhattan 
Virginia Veile Johnson (HE) ; Circleville 
Walter Lee Johnson (ME) ; Emmett 
Herman August Jokerst (VM) ; Waco, Neb. 
Charles Fenwyck Jones (GS) ; Irving 
Charlotte E. Jones (HE&A) ; Leavenworth 
Gomer Wood Jones (ME) ; Reading 
Raymond Albert, Jones (VM) ; Penalosa 
Van Chaffin Jones (EE) ; Parsons 
Frank Wilson Jordan (VM & AH&V) ; 

Beloit 
Jane Miner Julian (IM&D); Kansas City 
Patricia Catherine Kail (HE) ; Longford 
Wendell Lee Kanawyer (VM) ; 

Cucamonga, Cal. 
Milton Kaslow (ChE) ; New York, N. Y. 
Fred Detter Kaths (C) ; Hutchinson 
Virgil Roscoe Kelley (AH&V) ; 

Arkansas City 
Robert Verne Kellogg (C) ; Wichita 
f Grace Lorene Kendrick (IM&D) ; Topeka 
Anita M. Kensler (IM&D) ; Manhattan 
Charles Isaac Kern (Ag) ; Smith Center 
Glenn Walter Kerr (IC): Rossville 
Joseph Boston Key (VM1; Kansas City 
Lewis Andrew Kidder (AH&V) ; Pittsburg 
Grace Louise Kiene (GS) ; Topeka 



fEmile Frederick Kifntz ''Ag^ ; Manhattan 
Marion A. Kilian (C&A) ; Holyrood 
Anthony Kimmi (MuE) ; Everest 
Dora Grey King (HE); Manhattan 
Elwood Chase King (Ag) ; Potwin 
Ray Carlyle King (IJ) ; Olsburg 
Virginia Lee King (IM&D) ; 

Kansas Citv, Mo. 
Dean Carl Kipp (GS) ; Manhatan 
Wayne Klamm (Ag) Bonner Springs 
Fred Vinton Klemp, Jr. (IJ) ; Leavenworth 
Jack Ross Knappenberger (VM) ; Penalosa 
Merle Ashton Knepper (EE) ; Winfield 
Robert Samuel Knight (AE) ; 

Medicine Lodge 
George Robert Kramer (IC) ; Mankato 
Iden Frederick Krase (CE) ; Cheney 
Ralph Edward Krenzin (Ag) ; Kinsley 
Hilda Mae Kroeker (HE) ; Hutchinson 
fKenneth Ernst Kruse (Ag) Barnes 
Max Morton Kurman (PE) ; 

Woodbine, N. J. 
Charles Davis Labahn (VM) Sedalia, Mo. 
Emory Harmon Lackey (AE) ; Melvern 
Gerald August Lake (ChE) ; Manhattan 
Colter Adiel Landis (ChE) ; St. George 
Lewis Emsley Landsberg (AA) ; 

Bonner Springs 
George Herbert Larson (AE) ; Lindsborg 
William Eugene Larson (IC) ; Wichita 
Beatrice Olive Lasswell (HE&N) ; Emmett 
Jean Marty Lawson (IM&D) ; McPherson 
f Robert Marvin Lay (AA) ; Higginsville, Mo. 
Fern Adele Layman (HE&A) ; Arlington 
Opal M. Leach (HE) ; Bird City 
Robert Jerome Lee (VM) ; New York, N. Y. 
Wayne Howard Lee (CE) ; Junction City 
Margaret Elizabeth Leger (HE) ; 

Peiping, China 
Edward Lyle L°land (AA) ; Manhattan 
Walter John Leland (Ag) Manhattan 
Clifford Alonzo L men (GS&V^; Manhattan 
fKenneth Ray Leonard (AA) : Manhattan 
Arthur Frank Leonhard (AA) ; Lawrence 
.Toe W. Lewis ( Ag) : Lam^d 
Paul Allen Lichty (EE) ; Sabetha 
Howard Brice Li bengood (VM); 

Kentland, Ind. 
R : chard Edgar Lindgren (CE) ; Dwight 
Marceline Carroll Link (HE) ; Chase 
Wayne Arnold Linville (Ag) ; Chase 
Vere Oakley Lipperd (ME) ; Udall 
John Wheeler Livingston (Ag) ; Vliets 
Charles William Lobenstein (Ag) ; 

Edwardsville 
Robert Emil Loebeck (ChE) ; Kansas City 
Dorothy M. Lohmeyer (HE) ; Newton 
*Marie Donnasue Lohmeyer (IJ) ; 

Kansas City, Mo. 
Donald Kenneth Long (Ag) ; Neodesha 
Glenn Richard Long (EE); Arlington 
Susanne Long (IJ) ; El Dorado 
Henry Loughridge (VM) ; Lyndon 
Florence Elmo Lovejov CHE"! : Almena 
John Wilson Loy (ChE) ; Chanute 
James Stanley Lucas (EE) ; Kansas City 
Ruth Maxine Lund (HE) ; Green 
Chauncey Karl Lundberg (GS) ; Manhattan 
Elizabeth May Lyman (IM&D); 

Northfield, Minn. 
William Joseph McAllister (VM & GS) ; 

Santa Barbara, Cal. 
LeRoy Lloyd McAninch (MI); Manhattan 
Robert James McCall (AE); Wakeeney 
Dale Edwin McCarty (AA) ; Oneida 
Elizabeth Ann McComb (GS) ; Stafford 



♦Matriculated 1938-1939. 

t Also pursuing graduate study. 



List of Students 



11 



Seniors— Con tinued 



John Clark McComb (EE); Wichita 
Max McCord (CE) ; Manhattan 
Charles Murry McCormick (ArE) ; 

El Dorado 
Edward LeRoy McCoy (C) ; Manhattan 
Nancy Ellen McCroskey (HE) ; Kansas City 
William Edward McCune (AE) ; 

Leavenworth 
Norris J. McGaw (MuE); Topeka 
Joseph Clark McGonagle (IJ) ; Manhattan 
Helen E. McGuire (HE&A) ; Burlington 
Dean Elwyn Mclntire (GS); Manhattan 
f Virginia Addie Mclntire (GS) ; Kansas City 
Dorothy Carol McKeen (HE&A); 

Manhattan 
fJohn Thomas McKenna (ME) ; Narka 
Helen Ruth McKenzie (GS) ; Solomon 
John Leonard McKenzie (C) ; Solomon 
Maxine Doris McKenzie (HE) ; Wayne 
James William McKinley (ME) ; Manhattan 
William George McKinley (CE) ; Parsons 
Elsie Marie McLendon (HE) ; Kansas Citv 
Hugh Otis McMillen (GS) ; Topeka 
John D. McNeal (GS) ; Boyle 
Betty Lee McTaggart (IJ) ; Belleville 
Machlett Neal Mc Vay (Ag) ; Sterling 
Helen Frances Macan (HE) ;' Edwardsville 
Lewis Francis Madison (A A) ; Fort Scott 
Herman Paul Madsen (ME) ; Corbin 
Richard Hamilton Magerkurth (MI) ; 

Salina 
Hazel Mahon (HE); Silver Lake 
Albert Leon Malle (VM) ; Mulberry 
Clayton Wilson Marker (AA) ; Topeka 
Mary Frances Marron (HE) ; 

Jacksonville, Fla. 
Ralph Marshall (ChE) ; Manhattan 
Harold Doig Martin (Ag) ; La Cygne 
Helen Elizabeth Martin (HE); Wichita 
Samuel Page Martin (CE) ; Kinsley 
Theodore Vernon Martin (Ag) ; Kingsdown 
Robert Edwin Marx (AA) ; Emporia 
Joseph Raymond Massey II (VM) ; 

Sun City 
Minnie Isobel Matthias (HE) ; Atchison 
Robert Lewis Mawdsley (EE) ; Hoisington 
William Allen Mayfield (C) ; Soldier 
Galen Elmer Meckfessel (ME) ; Lewis 
Edith Magdalena Meisner (HE) ; Wichita 
Fred Howard Merrick (CE) ; Wichita 
Helen Hope Merryfield (IM&D); 

Minneapolis 
Beatrice Lillian Meyer (GS) ; Lillis 
Dean Ivard Mever (CE) ; Bison 
fFred Meyer, Jr'. (AE); Jewell 
Harry Harrison Meyer (C&A); Basehor 
Ivan John Meyer (C) ; Basehor 
Carl William Miller (C) ; Manhattan 
fEarl Edward Miller (AA); Sublette 
*Esther Iola Miller (HE); Walton 
Irwin Alvin Miller (AA) ; Oberlin 
John William Miller (ME) ; Almena 
Leonard John Miller (VM); Clarkson, Neb. 
Verna Irene Miller (HE) ; Milford 
Wayne Ishmael Miller (ChE) ; Kansas City 
June Winifred Milliard (Ar) ; Manhattan 
Arthur Ben Mills (EE) ; Lakin 
Stanley Cole Miner (C) ; Ness City 
John Ludwig Mitcha (ME) ; Rossville 
Charles Edward Mitchell (GS); 

Ordway, Colo. 
Dorothy Mize (HE) ; Atchison 
Gordon Ray Molesworth (IJ) ; Colony 
Darrel Emmett Moll (EE) ; Hutchinson 
Harry Earl Molzen (AA) ; Newton 



Frances Jeannette Montgomery (HE) ; 

Sedalia, Mo. 
Edward Fox Moody (Ag) ; Greeley 
Margaret Louise Moon (PE) ; Emporia 
Edward Cooper Moore (C&A) ; 

Westmoreland 
Francis John Moore (Ag) ; Ashland 
f John Richard Moore (Ag) ; Alliance, Ohio 
June Alice Moore (HE) ; Great Bend 
William Hugh Moore (AA) ; Munden 
*Oren Albert Morris (C) ; Manhattan 
Vern Vencil Morris (C) ; Manhattan 
Ethel Clarine Morton (HE); Coldwater 
Lynus Robert Morton (VM) ; Yates Center 
Leland Mark Moss (ArE) ; Miltonvale 
Donald Fleet Mossman (VM) ; Manhattan 
Vera May Mowery (HE) ; Salina 
Benn Michael Moyer (C&A) ; Columbus 
Clyde Dewey Mueller (Ag) ; Sawyer 
James Franklin Mugglestone (Ag) ; 

Berkeley, Cal. 
Harold Hawley Munger (CE) ; Manhattan 
William Minor Murfin (IC) ; Fort Scott 
Elinor Adelle Murphy (HE) ; Manhattan 
Grayson Elwood Murphy (Ag) ; Norton 
Hylen Myers (HE) ; Burns 
Mervin Wilson Myers (MI) ; Anson 
Elizabeth Frances Nabours (HE) ; 

Manhattan 
Leslie Clyde Nash (Ag) ; Hays 
Samuel Siskind Nebb (VM) ; Brooklyn, N.Y. 
Winifred Gene Needels (IM&D); Salina 
Beulah Burnetta Nelson (IM&D); Manhattan 
Harold Eugene Nelson (IJ) ; Holton 
Robert William Nelson (C) ; Leavenworth 
Walbert Oscar Nelson (VM) ; Olsburg 
Theron Andrew Newell (IJ); Manhattan 
Charles Clarence Newhart (GS&V) ; 

Delaware Water Gap, Pa. 
fJoseph William Newman (IJ) ; Manhattan 
John Hard Nicholson (C) ; Newton 
Willa Dean Nodurfth (IM&D); Wichita 
Fern Aileen Norbury (IM&D) ; Hume, Mo. 
Kenneth Leroy Nordstrom (MI) ; Norton 
Morris Aaron Nossov (VM) ; 

New York, N. Y. 
Robert William Nottorf (IC) ; Abilene 
LaDonna Jean Ober (MuE) ; Hiawatha 
Leona Venetta Ochsner (HE); Tribune 
Auston Edward Olderog (Ag) ; Omaha, Neb. 
Annette Olson (HE) ; Manhattan 
Dorothy Mae Olson (IM&D) ; Oberlin 
Wayne Edward Olson (EE) ; White Citv 
Ernest E. Opitz (CE) ; Arcadia 
Robert Orpin (ArE) ; Newton 
LaVon Klein Painter (C&A); Kansas City 
Joseph Palen (VM) ; Hays 
Wilfred Leroy Park (EE) ; Oakley 
Merle Jay Parsons (Ag) Emporia 
William David Paske (Ag) Toronto 
fArthur Eli Patterson (C) ; Kansas City 
Eugene Victor Payer (Ag) ; Westphalia 
Jay Henry Payne (AE) ; Delphos 
Kenyon Thomas Payne (Ag) ; Manhattan 
Mary Margaret Pejsa (IM&D) ; 

St. Joseph, Mo. 
Sarah Ann Pence (HE) ; North Topeka 
fJohn Wesley Pennington (ME); Wichita 
Alonzo Easton Perkins (ME) Wellington 
f John Paul Perrier (Ag) ; Olpe 
Lester Leroy Peterie (CE) ; Kinsley 
Grant Waldemar Peterson (C&A) ; Healy 
Lee Richard Peterson (CE) ; Kinsley 
Forrest Wavne Pettev (C&A) ; Clay Center 
Wendell John Pfeffer (EE) ; Clifton 



♦Matriculated 1938-1939. 

f Also pursuing graduate study. 



12 



Kansas State College 



Seniors — Continued 



Anna Caroline Pfrang (GS) ; Goff 
Betsy Phelan (IJ); Kansas City, Mo. 
Cecil Vernon Phillips (EE) ; Marion 
Marv Martha Phillips (C) ; Manhattan 
Morris William Phillips (AA) ; Stockton 
James Meriden Phinney (EE) ; Russell 
John Robb Pickett (Ag) ; Galena 
Elton Chester Pieplow (IJ) ; Hutchinson 
James Arthur Pierce, Jr., (Ar) ; 

Orangeburg, S. C. 
James Maxwell Pierce (CE); Burden 
Eleanor Marion Pincomb (HE) ; 

Overland Park 
Staley Leon Pitts (Ag) ; Willard 
Sidney Smith Piatt (Ar) ; Junction City 
Frieda Ann Ploger (HE) ; Kinsley 
Margaret Henrietta Ploger (HE&N) ; 

Kinsley 
Viola Ruth Plush (GS) ; Penalosa 
Heien Louise Poole (HE) ; Manhattan 
Curtis Albert Poppenhouse (VM) ; 

Manhattan 
Gerhard Charles Poppenhouse (VM) ; 

Manhattan 
Ruthe Christine Porter (C) ; Mount Hope 
George Eldon Powell (C&A) ; Manhattan 
George Francis Preston (C) ; Cuba 
Rhoda Putzig (HE&A); Sylvan Grove 
Hontas Quarles (IM&D); Los Angeles, Cal. 
Norma Lee Rebecca Quinlan (IJ) ; Lyons 
Earl Albert Ragland (EE) ; Herington 
Guy Arthur Railsback (VM); Langdon 
Rolla Glenn Raines (AA) ; Manhattan 
Ruby Randall (HE); Ashland 
George Alfred Randel (AE) ; Lewis 
Leonard James Rawson (ME) ; Wamego 
Don Gilbert Reames (C&A) ; Independence 
David Vernon Rector (Ag) ; Topeka 
Leondis J. Redwine (ME) ; Lake City 
Lois Anita Reed (HE); Wichita 
Herman J. Reitz (Ag) ; Belle Plaine 
Robert Arthur Remington (EE); 

Hutchinson 
Mathilda Rempel (HE); Hillsboro 
Glen Stanley Remsberg (VM) ; La Harpe 
Mabel Evelyn Ressel (HE) ; Colony 
Cecil Raymond Rhorer (IC) ; Lewis 
Claire Rickenbacker (GS) ; Turlock, Cal. 
Marvin G. Riddell (GS) ; McPherson 
Juanita Louise Riley (HE) ; Ogallah 
Robert Edward Rion (C&A) ; Wetmore 
Frances Susan Ripley (HE) ; Salina 
Eugene Arman Ripperger (CE) ; Merriam 
Clifton Allan Risinger (AA) ; Neodesha 
William Armour Roark (ME) ; Lake City 
Noel Neville Robb (Ag) ; Dodge City 
Bruce Everett Roberts (CE) ; Chanute 
f Charles Pearson Roberts (GS-1; Grad-2); 

Manhattan 
Donald Edwin Rodabaugh (VM) ; 

Norborne, Mo. 
Mary Margaret Rodgers (IM&D) ; 

Cincinnati, Ohio 
f Charles Willard Roe (CE) ; Parsons 
fMax Fenton Rogers (CE) ; Glasco 
Herman E. Rohrs (SH) ; Oakley 
Myron M. Rooks (IJ) ; Salina 
Verlin Rosenkranz (Ag) ; Washington 
William Ronald Rostine (CE) ; Hutchinson 
Louis Rotar (ChE) ; Kansas City 
Marjorie Kathrvn Rothfelder (HE); 

Axtell 
Harold Albert Rothgeb (AE) ; New Albany 
Barnerd R"vn c r (VM) : Philadelphia, Pa. 
Lloyd Findley Rov (CE) ; Wilsey 
Virginia Eleanor Royston (HE) ; Newton 



Anelda Rich Runnels (GS) ; Wichita 
Lois Roberta Rust (HE) ; Manhattan 
Ernest Dale Sadler (MI) ; Wagner, S. Dak. 
Orville William Saffrey (IJ) ; Alma 
Eugenia Carolyn Sanderson (IM&D) ; 

Arkansas City 
Granville Boyd Scanland (ME) ; Hutchinson 
Marjorie Rose Schattenburg (M) ; Riley 
Stewart Claude Schell (GS) ; West Lawn, Pa. 
Charles Eugene Scherzer (CE) ; Larned 
Dallas Glenn Schmidt (EE) ; Lorraine 
Paul Angel Schoonhoven (GS) ; Manhattan 
Leonard William Schruben (AA) ; Dresden 
f Lawrence Curtis Schubert (IC) ; Hutchinson 
Edwin Whitcher Schumacher (ME); Jewell 
Marjorie Aileen Schwalm (GS) ; Paxico 
Henry Schweiter (Ag) ; Wichita 
Richard Schwitzgebel (IJ) ; Kansas City 
Walter O 'Daniel Scott (Ag) ; Westmoreland 
Willa Mae Searl (IM&D); Hutchinson 
Dorothy Alice Sears (HE&A) ; Kansas City 
Robert Paul Seidel (GS) ; Morrowville 
Thomas Joseph Sette (CE) ; 

Jackson Heights, N. Y. 
Hillard Weston Shaffer (ME); Newton 
James McCabe Shaffer (ME); Humboldt 
Leslie Maurice Shaw (IA) ; Bloomington 
John Aaron Sheetz (C) ; Topeka 
Robert Baker Shepherd (Ag) ; Alden 
Ralph Vernon Sherer (Ag) ; Mullinville 
John Allen Shetlar (Ag) ; Bayard 
Harold Davis Shull (Ag) ; Manhattan 
Robert D. Sieg (ChE) ; Greensburg 
Catherine Augusta Siem (PE); 

Rochester, Minn. 
Woodrow Bryan Sigley (ME) ; Canton 
Gerald Edward Simms (IC) ; Republic 
Carl Simpson (Ag) ; Milton 
Mary Margaret Simpson (HE) ; Barnard 
Fred William Sims (MI); Salina 
Marialice Singleton (HE) ; Tribune 
Ethel Sklar (Ar) ; Manhattan 
Ruth Arline Slagg (GS) ; Manl^attan 
William Leonard Slater (Ar) ; Manhattan 
Aubert Charles Slocomb (ME) ; 

Kansas City, Mo. 
Gwendolyn Maxine Small (MuE) ; Neodesha 
Ramond Edward Small (ME) ; 

Conway Springs 
Edward George Smerchek (Ag) ; Garnett 
Walter William Smirl (PE) ; Wilsey 
Carlton Smith (EE) ; Columbus 
Doris Maurine Smith (HE) ; Atlanta 
Edward Paul Smith (EE) ; Morrill 
Evelvn Averv Smith (IM&D) ; Salina 
Mary Isabel Smith (IM&D) Manhattan 
Orville Roland Smith (EE) ; Neodesha 
Pauline Dorothea Smith (HE) ; 

Shreveport, La. 
Stephen Milton Smith (ArE) Girard 
Morton Smutz (ChE) ; Manhattan 
Bertel Emanuel Soderblom (Ag) ; Delphos 
Norma Elizabeth Spealman (IJ) ; Manhattan 
Whitcomb Glenn Speer, Jr. (PE); 

Manhattan 
Betty Bertha Spoelstra (GS) ; Prairie View 
Charles Cecil Spore (SH) ; Halstead 
Max Raymond Springer (MI) ; Manhattan 
James Porter Sproul (AE) ; Penokee 
Darrell Stanley Steele (VM) ; Treynor, Iowa 
Thurston William Stein (ME) ; Gvpsum 
f Floyd Dean Stevens (ChE) ; Topeka 
Alfons Alfred Stiebe (AA) ; Rozel 
Billy Neil Stone (C) ; Hiawatha 
Clifford William Stone (AA) ; El Dorado 
Richard Shellev Storer (GS) ; Herington 



f Also pursuing graduate study. 



List of Students 



13 



Seniors— Concluded 



William Eugene Story (IJ) ; Winfield 
William Frank Stoudenmire (VM); 

DeLand, Fla. 
James John Stout (CE) ; Belvidere, N. J. 
Howard Roy Stover (ME) ; Manhattan 
Virginia Elizabeth Stratton (HE) ; 

Minneapolis 
Elwood Malcolm Strom (Ag) ; Dwight 
Kenneth Lee Stuckey (EE) ; Kansas City 
Edna Evangeline Stullken (IM&D) ; Bazine 
Barbara Ellen Sturman (HE) ; Ulysses 
Raymond Lyle Surtees (EE); Wichita 
John Bennett Sutherland (ChE) ; Burlingame 
Frank Maynard Sutton (ME) ; Midian 
Clarence Arthur Swanson (CE) ; 

Loveland, Colo. 
Thiel Holmes Sweet (ArE) ; Formoso 
Donald Dexter Swenson (CE) ; Clav Center 
Buford Delmont Tackett (EE) ; Topeka 
George Gilbert Tanenbaum (VM) 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Donald Eugne Tannahill (GS) ; Phillipsburg 
Edgar Lewis Taylor (VM) ; Henryetta, Okla. 
Harold Edward Tavlor (GS); Norton 
f Howard Lee Taylor (MuE-1; Grad-2); 

Norton 
tWarren Chalmer Teel (Ag-1 ; Grad-2); 

Morland 
f William Theis (CE) ; Dodge City 
Beulah Thomas (IM&D); Manhattan 
Buford Lewis Thomas (IC) ; Manhattan 
Dudley Percy Thomas (ME); Marysville 
Edmond Clyde Thomas (ME) ; 

Kansas City 
James Marcus Thomas (MI); Garnett 
Marshall H. Thomas (ME); Belleville 
Mary Eleanora Thomas (IJ); Easton, Pa. 
Arthur Henry Thompson (AE) ; Delia 
Charlotte Thompson (HE); Iola 
Dorothy Leah Thompson (HE) ; 

Manhattan 
Joe Earl Thompson (CE) ; Almena 
Kermit Karl Thompson (ME); Wichita 
Robert Stewart Todd (VM) ; Tulsa, Okla. 
Dwight Seibert Tolle (AA) ; Norcatur 
John Elwyn Topliff (Ag) ; Jewell 
t Richard Earl Totten (EE) ; Clifton 
William Paul Trenkle (C&A) ; Topeka 
Harry Elmer Trubev (EE); Ellsworth 
Marion Ruth Tucker (HE); 

Kansas Citv, Mo. 
Kenneth Wible Tudor (ME); Holton 
Gay Stanley Tuis (Ag) ; Fredonia 
Robert Lee Turner (AA) ; Oskaloosa 
Harold Preston Ulrickson (EE) ; 

Kanopolis 
Elizabeth Jeanne Underwood (HE) ; 

Hoisington 
Selma Unruh (HE); Newton 
Wilma H. Van Diest (C) ; Prairie View 
Phillip Harris Vardiman (VM) ; 

Salisbury, Mo. 
Leland Austin Viar (C&A) ; Dunlap 
Elmer Leroy Vinson (EE) ; Garfield 
Roland Emil Vollmar (VM); 

Montgomery, Minn. 



William Alvis Wade (AA) ; Hoxie 
Simon Rosson Wagler (EE) ; 

Hutchinson 
Keith Bennett Wagoner (Ag) ; 

Blue Rapids 
Ella Larine Wait (C) ; El Dorado 
Samuel Paul Wallingford (MI) ; 

Manhattan 
Carl William Walsten (C) ; Inman 
Edna Walters (IM&D) ; Vining 
LeRue Wangerin (AE) ; Kensington 
Irving Wangrofsky (Ag) ; New York, N. Y. 
Lee C. Ward (Ar) ; Manhattan 
Kenneth McKinley Warren (PE) ; Delphos 
Arlene Lois Waterson (HE) ; Dighton 
Horace Cledus Watson (AA) ; Lake City 
Donald Louis Webb (EE) ; Cedar Vale 
Mary Ann Katherine Weiler (HE); 

Manhattan 
Homer Theodore Wells (ME) ; Marysville 
tOtto Ernest Wenger (Ag-1; Grad-2); 

Basehor 
Willis Raymond Wenrich (Ag) ; Oxford 
D C Wesche (CE); Manhattan 
Homer Triss Wesche (AE) ; Manhattan 
Helen Ruth Westin (HE); Courtland 
Melford Marcelle Wheatley (GS); 

Gypsum 
Richard H. Wherrv (ME); Sabetha 
Alice Marguerite Whetsel (IM&D); 

Uniontown, Pa. 
DeLaura V. Whipple (GS) ; Manhattan 
Oren Dale Whistler (AE) ; Independence 
f Edith Mary White (GS) ; Kingsdown 
*Roger Ferris White (GS) ; Buda, 111. 
Robert Louis Whiteside (ME) ; Topeka 
Loyd Elbert Wildman (Ag) ; Manhattan 
Floyd Eugene Wiley (ChE) ; Junction City 
Doris Katherine Wilhelm (HE) ; 

Mount Hope 
Josephine Marv Williams (HE) ; Meriden 
Arthur Charles Willis (ChE); Larned 
Grant Noble Willis (EE) ; Manhattan 
Morris B. Willis (EE) ; Kirwin 
Clifford Eli Wilson (ME); Caney 
Marshall Edward Wilson (C) ; Kansas City 
Wilbert John Wilson (AA) ; Manhattan 
Fred Wiruth (CE) ; Manhattan 
Kenneth Carman Witt (EE) ; Independence 
John Edmond Wolfe (EE) ; Kansas City 
James Longwell Woodruff (IC) ; Dodge City 
James Kelly Woods (IC) ; Burden 
Martha Ann Wright (HE&J) ; Salina 
Carl Edward Wristen (EE) ; Garden City 
f Helen lams Wroten (GS); Beattie 
Hulda Bertha Yenni (HE); Ogden 
Clinton Volney Young (ME); Salina 
fjohn Henry Young (CE); Centralia 
Frederico Sison Zamora (AH&V) ; 

Santa Maria, P. I. 
Abraham Zatman (ME) ; Philadelphia, Pa. 
Edward Bonjour Zickefoose (VM); 

Rossville 
Ruth Virginia Zirkle (HE) ; Jamestown 
Fred L. Zutavern (MI) ; Great Bend 



* Matriculated 1938-1939. 

f Also pursuing graduate study. 



14 



Kansas State College 



JUNIORS 



Clara Adelaide Abell (HE&N) ; Oakley 
Clarence Leaman Abell (CE) ; Oakley 
Edward Linn Abernathy (ArE) ; 
Sharon Springs 

*Robert Jefferies Acker (ME); Wichita 
William Benton Ackley (Ag) ; Portis 
Betty Margaret Adams (GS) ; Manhattan 
Lawrence Douglas Adams (EE) ; Mount Hope 
Michael Bartley Adams (ME) Newton 
Vance Ellsworth Aeschleman (Ag) ; Sabetha 

*Julia Jane Alderman (HE) ; Ottawa 

*Eugene Alford (EE) ; Arkansas City 
Earl Walter Amthauer (ChE) ; Junction City 
Alfred Eugene Anderson (Ag) ; Courtland 
Karl Manfred Anderson (AE); Walnut 
Madeline Blanche Anderson (MuE); 

Courtland 
Vivian Ethel Anderson (HE) ; 

Kansas City, Mo. 
Carter Howell Anthony (VM) ; LaJolla, Cal. 

*Fred Edwin Appleton (ME); Hays 
Orven Harry Armstrong (EE) ; Garden City 
Mary Margaret Arnold (HE) ; Newton 

*Edwin M. Aronson (ME) ; Fort Scott 
Clarence Lafayette Ash (ME) ; Wetmore 
Lenora Lucille Ash (HE&A); Wichita 
Neville LaVon Astle (VM); Manhattan 
Earl William Atkins (C) ; Topeka 
Ethel Evelyn Avery (HE) ; Riley 
Dale Deyo Ayers (C) ; Sabetha 
John Henry Babcock (EE) ; Manhattan 

*Ardine Virginia Bailes (HE) ; Ft. Dodge 
Fern Bair (C) ; Wamego 

*Eugene Ware Baird (SH) ; Kansas City 
Ruth Elizabeth Baldwin (IM&D) ; 
Manhattan 

*William Joseph Ball (MI); Oswego 
Evans Eugene Banbury (AA) ; Pratt 
Marian Phyllis Barnes (IJ); Manhattan 

*Mayme Pearl Barnett (IJ) ; 
Kansas City, Mo. 
Melvin Lester Barrett (MuE) ; Dodge City 
Tom Bruce Bash (EE) ; Kansas City, Mo. 
Howard Nelson Batchelder (GS) ; Hiawatha 
Dale Weslev Baxter (CE); Manhattan 
Metta Lucille Baxter (PE) ; Manhattan 
Ross Beach (EE-1; GS-2); Hays 
Alice Lucille Beal (GS) ; Eureka 

*Vesta Geraldine Beam (HE) ; Esbon 
Theo Mason Beard (VM); Topeka 
Victor Bernard Beat (VM) ; Kingman 

*DeElroy Beeler (ME); Kansas City 
Ellwood Herschel Beeson (C) ; Parsons 
William Millington Beezlev (Ag) ; Girard 

*Carroll Lee Bell (ME); Hutchinson 
William Goddard Bensing (EE) ; Manhattan 

*Ina Jean Bentley (IC) ; Coffeyville 
Floyd Willis Berger (AA) ; Barnes 
Eileen Bergsten (Ar) ; Randolph 
Marylee Berry (HE) ; Kensington 
Carl Theodore Besse (CE) ; Clay Center 
Frank H. Betton (ArE); Bethel 
Edwin Lerov Betz (AA) ; Enterprise 
Carl Frederick Beyer (ME); Glen Elder 

*Ronald Leroy Biggs (MI); Potwin 
Maxine Bervl Bishop (HE) ; Abilene 

Moan Ellen Black (GS) ; Chanute 
Martha Ann Black (IJ); Independence 
Charles Wilson Blackburn (EE); Topeka 
E. Joseph Blackburn (ME); Alma 
Jack Blanke (MI); Atchison 

*Russell William Blessing (MI); Emporia 
Margaret Helen Blevins (IC) ; Manhattan 
John Kermit Blythe (Ag) ; White City 
John Mathew Boalen (GS) ; Miltonvale 



Ralph Arthur Boehner (AA) ; Glen Elder 
Betty Bonnell (HE) ; Kansas City, Mo. 
Warren Harvey Boomer (C) ; Portis 
Maurice Eugene Bostwick (C) ; Manhattan 
Lawrence Ralph Bowdish (ArE); Wichita 
Jean Boyle (PE) ; Topeka 
Louise Evelyn Boyle (IM&D) ; Spivey 
Andrew Jack Bozarth (Ag) ; Liberal 
Mildred Blanche Bozarth (HE); Liberal 
Edward Leo Brady (C&A) ; Fredonia 
DeVere Emil Brage (EE) ; Emporia 
James Richard Brandon (CE) ; Wichita 
Jack Wallace Branson (GS) ; Belleville 
Albert Wade Brant (Ag) ; Sawyer 
"Alfred Merle Brecheisen (GS) ; Hugoton 
Richard Harold Breckenridge (ME) ; 

Woodston 
William Ormond Breeden (AA) ; Quinter 
Margaret Keith Breneman (HE) ; 

Wichita Falls, Tex. 
Marjorie Bee Breneman (HE); Macksville 
Eleanor Stanton Brinton (HE); 

DeKalb, Mo. 
James Charles Brock (Ag) ; Glasco 
John Richard Brock (C) ; Glasco 
Elizabeth Maude Brooks (HE) ; Scott City 
Travis Epps Brooks (Ag) ; Junction City 
Paul Louis Brose (EE) ; Marion 
*Donald Sefton Brown (ChE) ; Manhattan 
Elwood Cameron Brown (EE) ; Atchison 
Francis Richard Brown (AA) ; Fall River 
James Milton Brown (VM) ; 

Los Angeles, Cal. 
*Lewis Ernest Brown (ME) ; Chanute 
Edith Carey Brownlee (HE); Hutchinson 
Dorothy May Buchanan (HE) ; Abilene 
Jean Louise Buchanan (IM&D) ; Abilene 
Frederick Louis Buente (VM) ; 

Evansville, Ind. 
Richard Melven Bullock (Ag) ; Glasco 
*Curtis Ames Burgan (EE) ; Hoisington 
Wesley Lorenzo Burgan (ArE) ; Hoisington 
Thomas Orland Bush (C&A) ; Salina 
Jack DeLos Butler (CE) ; Hutchinson 
Tarlton Aura Caldwell (C&A); Manhattan 
Walter Jackson Campbell (Ag) ; Wilsey 
Lester Wendell Cannv (C) ; Mound Valley 
Howard Sidney Cantwell (VM) ; 

Riverside, Cal. 
Fred Granger Carman (IA) ; St. Francis 
Bill Milton Carnes (VM); Henryetta, Okla. 
Charles Otis Carter (Ag) ; Morrowville 
Glenn Irville Case (GS&V-l; VM-2); 

Nickerson 
Richard A. Case (VM) ; Nickerson 
Harlan Wendell Casper (ME); Clifton 
Esther Ruth Cassity (HE&N) ; Clifton 
Margaret Bessie Cassity (IM&D) ; Clifton 
Margaret Annabelle Caughey (HE) ; 

Manhattan 
Helen Frances Chambers (IJ) ; Chanute 
*Elizabeth Kerr Chickering (GS) ; 

Hutchinson 
LeRoy Christopher (ME) ; Ellis 
Doris Winona Christophersen (IJ); 

Manhattan 
John York Christy (Ag) ; Meriden 
Frank Adelbert Churchill (ME); 

Detroit, Mich. 
Margaret Wilma Clark (HE) ; Manhattan 
Thainfi Alvin Clark (AA) ; Concordia 
Cecil Eugene Cleland (AA) ; Eskridge 
Robert George Clendenin (MI) ; 

Kansas City 
Paul Lawrence Clingman (C) ; Harlan 



* Matriculated 1938-1939. 



List of Students 



15 



Juniors — Continued 



♦Alonzo Leon Cloninger (E'E); Chanute 
Walter Harvey Closson, Jr. (ArE) ; 

Edwardsville 
John Leslie Clow (AA) ; Goodland 

*Elmond Redell Cobb (GS) ; Galva 
Ruth Elizabeth Cochran (HE) ; Topeka 
Robert Benson Coder (EE) ; Manhattan 
Dorothy Frances Cole (HE) ; Fowler 
Stanley Elbert Combs (Ag) ; Wilson, N. C. 
Rachael Jane Congdon (HE); Sedgwick 

*Helen Leberta Connely (IM&D) ; 
Kansas City, Mo. 
Irene Beardwell Cook (HE) ; Wakeeney 
Oscar George Cook (AE) ; Larned 
Louis Wilton Cooper (Ag) ; Peabody 
Barbara Jane Corbett (C) ; Emporia 
Corinne Ruth Corke (HE); Studley 

*Mary Ellen Corman (HE); El Dorado 
Lucile Mae Cosandier (IM&4); Onaga 
Keith Lundy Cowden (C) ; Kansas City, Mo. 

*Virginia Lee Coy (HE); Kansas City 
Agatha Neoma Crawshaw (HE) ; Maplehill 
Edith Marie Crist (HE&N); Brewster 
Joseph Celester Crofton (Ag) ; Kansas City 

*Edgar Crowley, Jr. (ChE) ; Kansas City 
Don Eldon Crumbaker (Ag) ; Onaga 
Ray Earl Cudney (Ag) ; Trousdale 
Rex Edgar Cudney (Ag) ; Trousdale 
Paul Stromquist Danielson (Ag) ; Lindsborg 
June Darby (IJ) ; Wamego 
Robert Vernon Darby (IJ) ; Morrow ville 
Charles James Davidson (C) ; Madison 
Lawrence Roy Davidson (C); Manhattan 

*Margaret May Davidson (IM&D); Madison 

*Charlene Mildred Davis (C) ; Kansas City 
D. C. Davis (ChE); Sedalia, Mo. 
Ileene Genevieve Davis (HE) ; Marysville 
Dorothy Dean (GS) ; Manhattan 
George Thomas Dean (CE) ; Manhattan 
John G. Dean (Ag) ; Manhattan 
LaRue Eldred Delp (CE) ; Lenora 

Mean Chandler DeVault (ChE); Kansas City 
Jean Frances DeYoung (HE&A) ; Manhattan 
Paul Rutherford Dickens (PE); Long Island 
Clarence Eugene Dickson (CE); Manhattan 
Roger Stephen Dildine (GS) ; Delphos 

♦Richard Francis Dilley (CE); Topeka 
Hubert Merill Dimond (EE); Smith Center 

*Betty June Doan (IJ) ; Manhattan 
Darold Ardale Dodge (AA) ; Dighton 
Mildred Faith Dodge (HE); Manhattan 
Theodore Orice Dodge (O&A); Dighton 

♦John James Dooley (ChE); Parsons 
William Earl Doty (Ar) ; Manhattan 
Mary Agnes Doverspike (HE&N) ; 

Cottonwood Falls 
Stanley James Dowds (VM) ; Gypsum 
Merrill Edward Downer (C) ; Manhattan 
Donald Fredrick Dresselhaus (CE); Lincoln 
Helen Amelia Droll (MuE); Alta Vista 
Wilbert William Duitsman (AA); 

Washington 
Grace Helen Dunlap (HE); Manhattan 
Iona Marie Dunlap (MuE) ; Manhattan 
Harriet Mayer Duvanel (MuE); Alta Vista 
John Page Earle (AA) ; Washington 
Joe A. Eckart (MI) ; Topeka 

*Fay Albert Edwards (EE) ; Arlington 
Robert Joseph Edwards (GS) ; Jewell 
Adah Lou Eier (C) ; Manhattan 
John Wallace Elling (MI); Manhattan 
Forest Ellis (ME); Garden City 
Orin Ellgene Ellis (VM); Phillipsburg 

*Dwight Kendall Ellison (Ag) ; Ogden, Utah 

*Ruth Trousdale Ellison (HE); Ogden, Utah 
Martha Elnora Emery (HE&A) ; 
Manhattan 



Burt Walter English (VM) ; Manhattan 
John Henry Eppard (ChE) ; Kansas City 
Carl Frederick Erickson (VM) ; Aurora 

*Frank Howard Estabrooks (ME) ; 
Riverton 

♦Ralph Edgar Evans (C) ; Kansas City 
Richard Cameron Evenson (EE) ; Claflin 
Clair Eugene Ewing (CE) ; Blue Rapids 
Doris Muriel Ewing (C) ; Sabetha 
Lottie Caroline Ewing (HE) ; El Dorado 
John Madison Eyer (EE) ; Larned 
Paul Fagler (PE) ; Uniontown, Pa. 
Gustave Edmund Fairbanks (AE) ; Topeka 
Lyle Willis Falkenrich (ME) ; Manhattan 
Farland Edgar Fansher (Ag) ; Manhattan 
John Robert Farmer (ME); Manhattan 
Arthur Anthony Farrell (C) ; Manhattan 
Leora Aliene Fencl (C&A) ; Haddam 
Everett Leroy Fiedler (GS); Enterprise 

*Austin J. Fink (EE) ; Lafontaine 
Betty Lou Fisher (HE&A) ; Manhattan 
Dean Lewis Fisher (AE) ; Mankato 
Roy Mac Fisher (IJ) ; Belleville 
George Howard Fittell (MI); Beloit 
Truman Brandon Fleener (VM) ; 

Tulsa, Okla. 
Wilbert John Foos (ChE); Manhattan 

♦Donald Galen Forbes (IJ) ; Kansas City 
Marie Annette Forceman (HE) ; Vliets 
John Cotterill Foster (Ar) ; Manhattan 
Robert Clare Foulston (GS); Wichita 
Paul Edwin Fowler (Ag) ; Independence 
R. Grant Freeman (AE) ; Tonganoxie 
William B. Freeman (ChE) ; Manhattan 
George W. French (AE); Augusta 
Clarence Albert Frese (AE) ; Hoyt 
Leland Samuel Frey (Ag) ; 

Sacramento, Cal. 
James Phillip Frick (ME) ; Kansas City 
Francis Loyd Friedli (MI); Roscoe, Ohio 
LeRoy Frank Fry (AA) ; Little River 
Jack Pearson Fuller (CE) ; Kansas City 
William Borland Fullerton, Jr. (Ar) ; 
Independence, Mo. 

♦Betty Lane Gage (IM&D); 
Kansas City, Mo. 
Janis Leigh Gainey (GS) ; Manhattan 
Phil McNabb Gainey (EE) ; Manhattan 
Freddie Joe Galvani (CE) ; Pittsburg 
Chester Wilson Gantz (AA) ; Nickerson 
Merle Leon Garber (Ag) ; Dennis 

*Alva Rodell Gardner (ME); Pomona 
Frederick James Gardner (Ar) ; 
Manhattan 

*William Arthur Gardner (CE) ; Chanute 
Jess Dudley Garinger (ME); Harveyville 
Clement Garrelts (CE); McPherson 

*John William Geddis (MI); Larned 

♦Roger Keith Ghormley (EE) ; Hutchinson 
Helen Jean Gibbs (IJ) ; Kincaid 
Elvin Vance Giddings (CE) ; Manhattan 
Frank Glendon Gillett (VM) ; Wichita 
Robert Newton Gist (ME) ; Manhattan 
Mae Florence Glanville (HE&N); 

Cottonwood Falls 
Leslie Rav Glassburner (ME) ; Leon 

♦Marshall Fred Glenn (EE) ; Elk City 
William Jack Glover (C) ; Syracuse 

♦Frances Louise Gonder (GS); Coffeyville 

♦William Gerald Gordon (EE) ; Robinson 
James LeRoy Gould (IJ) ; Manhattan 
Henry Clifford Graefe (VM); Elwood 

♦Betty Deli Grant (IM&D) ; Iola 
Harold Ellsworth Gray (AE) ; 

North Stonington, Conn. 
Richard Loy Gray (C); Wichita 
Gaylord George Green (Ag) ; Whiting 



♦ Matriculated 1938-1939. 



16 



Kansas State College 



Juniors — Continued 



Gordon Charles Green (Ag) ; Whiting 
Mulia Louise Green (IM&D) Iola 
Mark Leon Greenberg (VM); Camden, N. J. 
Murray Greensaft (VM) ; Belmar, N. J. 
Dorothy Helen Greeson (GS) ; Partridge 
*Harold Allen Gregg (GS) ; Oil Hill 
C. Lyndon Griffith (ME); Elkhart 
Ivan Charles Griswold (IJ) ; Marysville 
Eugenia Louise Grob (HE) ; Randolph 
Ralph Lewis Gross (Ag) ; Oakley 
Raymond Harry Groth (IC-1; ChE-2); 

Bushton 
Alice Ruth Gulick (HE); Olathe 
*Celia Camilla Guthrie (IM&D); Walton 
*Marie Louise Haberthier (HE) ; Wichita 
Elmer Loyd Hackney (PE) ; Oberlin 
Robert Monroe Hackney (ChE) ; Parsons 
Lucille Haley (PE); Kansas City, Mo. 
Orlena Cook Hall (HE); Manhattan 
Mulia Helen Hamm (HE); Humboldt 
Ruth Helen Hammel (GS); Clay Center 
Florence Marie Hammett (HE) ; Manhattan 
James Russell Hammett (C&A) ; St. John 
Paul V. Hannah (ME); Osborne 
Warren Thomas Hanne (IJ) ; Bucklin 
Frederic William Hansen (VM) ; 

Pelican Rapids, Minn. 
Rose Eileen Harman (HE&N) ; 

Indianapolis, Ind. 
Theron Banco Harmon (C); Arkansas City 
*Harold Raymond Harris (ChE); 

Geuda Springs 
Isaac Keith Harrison (A A) ; Ottawa 
Robert Carl Harvey (IC) ; Minneapolis 
Everett Erskine Haskell (Ag) ; Topeka 
Gilbert Marri Hassur (GS) ; Hanover 
*Paul Clement Hauber (EE) ; Kansas City 
Otto Ambrose Hauck (EE) ; 

Jackson Heights, N. Y. 
Gordon Graham Hazell (Ar) ; 

Kansas City, Mo. 
Frank Conrad Hefner (C&A); Gove 
Richard William Heikes (Ag) ; Wakefield 
*Lewis Ernest Heiney (ME); Bloom 
Charles Eldon Heitz (ME); Fort Scott 
Carl Helm (CE) ; Chanute 
John G union Helm (IJ) ; Simpson 
Dorothy Mary Henderson (HE) ; 

Bloomington, Neb. 
*Marion John Hennessy (C) ; Hutchinson 

Albert Raymond Henry (C) ; Salina 
*Kenneth Dean Henry (CE) ; Robinson 
Sarah Ann Herning (PE) ; Kansas City 
Frederick Allen Heskett (C&A); Alton, 111. 
Vann Hess (CE) ; Manhattan 
John Emmett Hesselbarth (ME); Abilene 
Betty Jane Higdon (HE) ; Goodland 
Marjorie Higgins (Ag) ; Linn 
Halsey Hines (ME); Salina 
Marcella Genevieve Hobbie (HE) ; Tipton 
Edward Vaughn Hobbs (ME); Manhattan 
Belle Arvice Hoffman (IM&D); Hope 
Lester John Hoffman (AA) ; Haddam 
Charles Edwin Hofman (VM) Manhattan 
Albert Sidney Holbert (GS) ; Newton 
Charles Harris Holm (AA) ; Dwight 
*Arthur Vernon Holman (E) ; Wichita 
Frances Elizabeth Holman (SH) ; 

Leavenworth 
*Flovd Arthur Holmes (GS) ; Prescott 
Helen Elizabeth Flood (HE) ; Salina 
Leo Michael Hoover (AA) ; Greenleaf 
Raymond Wells Hopkins (ME); 

River Forest, 111. 
Iola Verna Houdek (HE); Cuba 
James Lvnn Hourrigan (VM); Langdon 
Tom Clark Houston (AE); Goodland 



Horton Kent Howard (VM) ; Canton, N. Y. 
Walter Roy Howat (Ag) ; Codell 

*Gerald Albert Hoyt (EE) ; Thayer 
Howard McCune Hughes (Ag) ; Formoso 
Dena Everett Huitt (AE) ; Talmage 
Wilma Vivian Humbert (HE); Danville 
Arlyn Morris Humburg (C); Bison 
Alice Claire Hummel (IJ); Kanopolis 

*Hannora Maude Hummel (HE) ; 
Towanda 
Frank Raymond Hunter (ME); 

Kansas City, Mo. 
Thomas Conrad Hutcherson (C) ; 

Manhattan 
Ann Estella Hutter (HE) ; Neodesha 
Lucille Opal Ifland (HE); Gaylord 
Gerald Howard Ingraham (IC-1; MI-2); 

Manhattan 
Margaret Edith Iverson (IM&D); 

Wilmette, 111. 
Richard Alonzo Jaccard (Ag) ; Manhattan 
Clifton Edward Jackson (AA) ; Elsmore 
John James Jackson (PE) ; Manhattan 

*Marjorie Louise Jacobs (GS) ; 
Kansas City 
Ruth Mildred Jameson (GS) ; Garrison 
Lawrence F. Jarvis (C&A) ; Winfield 
Morgan Knott Jarvis (VM) ; Minden, Nev. 

Mack Wilton Jeakins (EE); El Dorado 

Elizabeth Ann Jenkins (IM&D) ; Wamego 
Grace Gladys Jenkins (HE) ; Jewell 

*Irvin Brown Jenkins (C&A) ; Kansas City 
Ross Lyman Jewell (VM) ; Irving 

*Charles Franklin Johnson (EE) ; 
Kansas City, Mo. 

*Earl Clinton Johnson (ChE); Coffeyville 

*Eleanor Lee Johnson (HE) ; Salina 
Kenneth Lowell Johnson (VM) ; 

Fresno, Cal. 
Martha Josephine Johnson (IM&D) ; 

Simpson 
Ruth Ella Johnston (MuE) ; Remsen, Iowa 
Helen Henrietta Johnstone (PE) ; Wamego 
Betty Jean Jones (IM&D) ; Salina 
Elgie Gerald Jones (Ag) ; Tonganoxie 
Harold Eugene Jones (Ag) ; Concordia 
John Russell Jones (AA) ; Sterling 
Mary Eleanor Jones (IJ) ; Garden City 

*Mary Margaret Jordan (IM&D); Wichita 
Thelma Louise Joss (HE) ; Burlingame 
Robert Harry Joyce (AE) ; Ulvsses 

*CharIes Ellsworth Kaiser (ArE); 
Kansas City 
Ralph Clayton Kantz (ArE) ; Wichita 
Robert Landis Kauffman (C) ; Salina 

*Alvin Daniel Kaufman (CE) ; Moundridge 
Roland Harry Kaufman (IA) ; Galva 
Eldon C. Kaup (MuE); Holton 
Grace Lea Kellogg (HE) ; Lecompton 
Charles Alvin Kennedy (Ag) ; 

Kansas City 
Chester Hennessy Kennedy (VM) ; Chase 
Frances Maxwell Kennedy (VM) ; 

Lawrence 
William Thomas Keogh (ChE) ; 

New York City 
Osborn Arthur Kershner (ME) ; Paola 
Jean Elizabeth Kessler (IM&D); 
Excelsior Springs, Mo. 

*Lyman DuVall Ketchum (MI) ; 
Kansas City 

*Paul Laurence Kewley (EE) ; Stockton 
George Wendell Kilian (EE) ; Detroit 
Perle Everett Kimball (VM) ; Eskridge 

*Donald Eugene King (EE) ; Wichita 
Mildred King (GS) ; Minn^ola 
Muriel Ruth King (HE&A); Ottawa 



Matriculated 1938-1939. 



List of Students 



17 



Juniors — Continued 



Ronald Bishop King (Ag) ; Council Grove 
Jane Elizabeth Kininmonth (MuE) ; 

Winfield 
Donald Benton Kinkaid (AA) ; 

Medicine Lodge 
John Wallace Kirkbride (Ag) ; 

Medicine Lodge 
Wesley Charles Kirschner (Ag) ; Humboldt 
*Gerald Kiser (MuE) ; Excelsior Springs, Mo. 
Roy Wilber Kiser (Ag) ; Manhattan 
George William Kleier (Ag) ; Oxford 
Dell James Klema (EE) ; Wilson 
*LeRoy Vernon Kleppe (EE) ; Everest 
Donald A. Kliesen (Ag) ; Dodge City 
Olga Alma Knapp (HE); Topeka 
Ralph Wesley Knedlik (C&A); Belleville 
Karl Knoche (VM) ; Adrian, Minn. 
Hildegard Charlotte Knopp (IM&D) ; 
Kansas City 
*Mary E. Koehler (HE); Paola 
*Isaac Henry Kriebel (EE) ; Liberty 
Harold Anderson Krig (VM) ; Manhattan 
Glenn Homer Kruse (AA) ; Morrill 
Roland Andrew Kruse (Ag) ; Barnes 
Henry Fred Kupfer (SH) ; Kansas City, Mo. 
Robert Glenn Lake (EE) ; Lake City 
Eleanor Jane Lambert (GS); Hiawatha 
Oliver Diston Lambirth (ME) ; 

Elida, N. Mex. 
Annie Gertrude Lancaster (HE&N); 

Hutchinson 
Shelvy Harrison Lane (ArE) ; Bucklin 
Chris' William Langvardt (AA); Alta Vista 
Robert Byron Lank (AH&V); Kansas City 
Arthur Robert Laughlin (ME); Turon 
Oliver Ned Laurie (EE) ; Mulvane 
Sidney Jean Lawson (C&A) ; Sylvan Grove 
Kenneth Lebsack (C&A) ; Hutchinson 
Gwendolyn Lucille Lee (GS) ; Lyons 
Russell Arden Leeper (VM) ; Argos, Ind. 
*Lee Raymond Leggitt (ME); Hutchinson 
Ernest Wayne Leive (EE) ; Brookville 
Dorothea Leland (HE) ; Manhattan 
*Harold McKee Lemert (C) ; Arkansas City 
Dorothy Merle Lerew (HE); Portis 
Max Clarence Leuze (EE); Sabetha 
Carol Byron Lewis (ArE) ; Salina 
Alvina Freida Licht (HE); Ludell 
Ethel Iona Lienhardt (IM&D); Manhattan 
Gordon Grigsby Lill (GS) ; Mount Hope 
*Wayne Lill (CE); Mount Hope 
*Mildred Florence Limb (HE) ; 
Kansas City, Mo. 
Charles Ashcom Lindsav (IJ) ; Junction City 
*Leulla Elizabeth Lint (HE); Wichita 

Freda Ellen Lipper (GS) ; Sterling 
*Maxine Elizabeth Lippy (C) ; Independence 
William Allen Ljungdahl (Ag) ; Menlo 
Wilbert Lloyd Loewen (ME); Goessel 
Harry Wilbur Longberg (AA) ; Soldier 
Daniel Martin Longenecker (EE) ; Kingman 
Paul Torrence Loyd (VM) ; Valley Center 
* James Herbert Lundsted (ME) ; 
Kansas City, Mo. 
Virginia Ethel Lupfer (GS) ; Earned 
Margaret Eva McAllister (IM&D); 
Garden City 
*Maurine Myrl McCann (HE&A) ; Newton 
Edward Joseph McCarthy (ChE); St. Marys 
Marjorie Loretta McCaslin (GS) ; 

Manhattan 
Donald Irvine McCoy (AA) ; Manhattan 
John Henrv McCoy (AA) ; Manhattan 
Charles Melvin McCrann (PE) ; Wichita 
Raedine McCullev (HE) ; La Harpe 
Delbert Earl McCune (Ag) ; Stafford 



Lowell Elvis McCutchen (PE) ; Kingman 
Ernest Raymond McDonald (C) ; Salina 
Velma Maycle McGaugh (HE); Garden City 
Joseph Thomas McGinity (EE) ; Humboldt 
Charles Lynn Mclnnes (C&A) ; Manhattan 
Donald Leslie Mclnteer (CE) ; Minneola 
Dorothy Lucille Mcintosh (GS); Palmer 
Robert Glenn McKay (ME); Winfield 
Wanda Marie McKeeman (GS); Manhattan 
*Percy Herbert McKinley (EE) ; Kansas City 

Carrie McLain (GS) ; Kansas City 
*Marjorie Ellen McLenon (C) ; Effingham 
Gerald Orestes McMaster (AA) Eskridge 
Mewell Thelma McVay (GS) ; Kansas City 
Marcel Dale McVay (Ag) ; Sterling 
Robert MacDonald (VM); Newburgh, N. Y. 
Manoutchehre Mahin (Ag) ; Teheran, Iran 
Julius Henry Mai (Ag) ; Tribune 
Alfred Eugene Makins (IJ) ; Abilene 
Donald Regis Makins (IJ) ; Abilene 
Richard Merrill Mall (IJ) ; Manhattan 
Gail Andrew Malson (C) ; Chanute 
Walter Farrel Maninger (VM) ; Harper 
Manford Edward Mansfield (AA) ; McCune 
Charles Franklin Manspeaker (MI) ; Topeka 
*Wyatt Parkman Marbourg (CE) ; Emporia 
Gordon John Marold (VM) ; 

Saguache, Colorado 
*Louie Marshall (CE) ; Minneola 
Harry Eugene Martin (ChE) ; Manhattan 
Maxine Jeanne Martin (IJ) ; Manhattan 
Ruth Eleanor Martin (HE); 

Kansas City, Mo. 
Walter Woodrow Martin (IJ) ; Pratt 
Robert Dale Masters (C) ; Latham 
Grace Elizabeth Mather (HE); Grinnell 
Kenneth William Matthews (CE) ; 

Mullinville 
Betty Lou Maupin (HE); Silver Lake 
John Stephen Maurer (C&A); Winfield 
Thurmon Adrian Mayhew (GS) ; 

Trousdale 
Jeanne Eloise Meadows (GS) ; Gaylord 
Robert. Frank Mears (SH); Kansas City 
Henry John Meenen (AA) ; Clifton 
Lester Lee Mehaffey (ME) ; Farmington 
Joseph Eugene Meier (C&A); Clay Center 
Raymond L. Meisenheimer (EE) ; 

Hiawatha 
Ethel Marie Melia (IM&D); Ford 
Roy Leonard Mesenbrink (VM); 

St. Louis Mo. 
Carrol Louise Meyer (HE&A) ; 

Ft. Leavenworth 
Frances Lucille Meyer (HE); Lillis 
Margaret Louise Meyer (HE); Jewell 
Virginia Roget Meyer (HE&A) ; 

Ft. Leavenworth 
William Christopher Mierau (ChE) ; 

Wichita 
Abbie Maurine Miller (HE) ; Agra 
*Doris Louise Miller (GS) ; Sterling 
Ernest William Miller (CE) ; Independence 
Lester Isaac Miller (ChE) ; Le Roy 
*Lucile Evelyn Miller (HE&A) ; Parsons 
Robert Dunlap Miller (ChE); 

Junction City 
*Roger Gray Miller (GS); Kansas City 
Albert Peter Mitchell (VM); Osborne 
Lee Roy Mitchell (AA) ; Manhattan 
Lucille Eleanor Mollhagen (HE); Frederick 
Charles Carson Moore (VM) ; Louisburg 
*Katherine Marie Moot (IJ) ; Abilene 
William Dennis Moran (EE) ; Weir 
Virgil Fred Morford (Ag) ; Olsburg 
Patrick Exum Morgan (ME) ; Wichita 



* Matriculated 1938-1939. 



2—8766 



18 



Kansas State College 



Juniors — Continued 



Vera Lorene Morgan (HE) ; Hugoton 
Wayne Delos Morgan (Ag) ; Ottawa 
Manuel Morris (Ar) ; Kansas City 
Margery Byrd Morris (IM&D) ; Topeka 
Park Lawrence Morse (ChE) ; Emporia 
Ronald Morton (Ag) ; Green 

*Karl J. Mosbacher, Jr. (ME); Wichita 
Robert Clark Mossman (AH&V) ; 

Manhattan 
Leonard Housden Moulden (GS) ; 

Manhattan 
Robert Adair Moulthrop (ME) ; 

Kansas City, Mo. 
Robert Lee Mueller (ChE) ; Anthony 
William Lloyd Muir (C&A) ; Norton 
Martha Jean Mullen (HE) ; Manhattan 
Claude Franklin Murphy (VM) ; 

Conway Springs 
Joe Kenneth Murphy (EE) ; Chapman 

*Shirley Elizabeth Murphy (HE); Emporia 
Robert Howard Musser (Ag) ; 

Des Moines, Iowa 
Ellsworth Dale Mustoe (AA) ; Rexford 
Barbara Jane Myers (IM&D) ; Topeka 
Homer Samuel Myers (MI); Salina 
John Alvin Myers (MI) ; E'dgerton 
Willis Roy Myers (C) ; Abilene 
Evelyn Victoria Nagel (HE) ; Wichita 
Betty Neill (MuE) ; Clay Center 
James Thomas Neill (Ag) ; Miltonvale 
Conrad Lundsgard Nelson (GS&V) ; 

Oklahoma City, Okla. 
Frances ElVera Nelson (GS) ; McPherson 
Glenn Russell Nelson (CE) ; McPherson 
Junior Andrew Nelson (MuE) ; Gypsum 

♦Louis Daniel Nelson (ChE); Chanute 
Richard Albert Nelson (EE) ; 

Susquehanna, Pa. 
Rex Alan Neubauer (GS) ; Manhattan 
Shervl Arthur Nicholas (Ag) ; La Harpe 
William Philip Nichols (PE); Waterville 
Chester Dale Nielson (C) ; Manhattan 
Albert Louis Niemoller (ME) ; Wakefield 
Theo Beatrice Nix (IJ) ; Kansas City, Mo. 
James Ancil Nixon (ME) ; Eureka 
Paul Richard Noller (VM); Mankato 
Dean Nonamaker (EE); Osborne 
Pearl Signe Jane Norberg (GS) ; 

Winfield 
Ingrid Leone Nordin (HE) ; Marquette 
Avery Albert Norlin (ME) ; McCracken 
John Patrick Nultv (ME); Jewell 

♦Janet Yvonne Nutter (IM&D) ; 
Shelton, Neb. 

♦Charles Fredick O'Brien (IC) ; Iola 
George Herbert O'Brien (ME) ; Iola 
LaVerne Maurice Odden (MI) ; Buffalo, N. Y. 
Barbara Maria Okerberg (IM&D) ; Ottawa 
Angela Lillian Oliva (HE) ; Kensington 
Earl Laverne Olson (IC) ; Elsmore 

*Margery Louise Olson (IM&D) ; Chanute 
Raymond Winzenried Olson (MI); Atchison 
Max Charles Opperman (C) ; Yates Center 
Arlene Octavia Orme (HE) ; Kansas City 
Miriam Sophia Ostlund (HE) ; Washington 
Dorothy Frances Ott (GS) ; Wichita 
Carolyn Jane Overholt (HE) ; 

Milwaukee, Wis. 
Walter Clyde Owen (C) ; Council Grove 
Margaret Louise Owen (HE) ; Edson 

*Thomas Bernard Owens -(C); McPherson 
Carroll Dean Owensby (ChE) ; Manhattan 
Everett E. Oyster (Ag) ; Paola 
Mary Anne Pafford (GS); Salina 

*Enid Lillian Palmer CC) ; Parsons 
Rex Lewis Parcels (EE) ; Hiawatha 



Rosemary Parisa (HE&A) ; Lansing 
William Thomas Parrott (C) ; Colby 
Kenneth Frederick Parsons (Ag) ; Manhatan 
♦Jane Lillian Partridge (HE) ; 

Kansas City, Mo. 
Kent Leonard Patton (AA) ; Chase 
L. Bruce Patton (EE) ; Solomon 
♦Willis Dey Payton (ChE) ; Arkansas City 
James Russell Peddicord (AA) ; Belvue 
Grace B. Pennington (MuE); Manhattan 
Viola Anna Peter (HE) ; Manhattan 
Harvey Lee Peterson (Ag) ; Wellington 
Helen Isabel Peterson (GS) ; Howard 
Melvin Raymond Peterson (Ag) ; Riley 
Ralph Edward Peterson (GS) ; Manhattan 
Winzer J. Petr (AA); Waterville 
Kenneth Osier Pettijohn (Ar) ; Lamed 
Carl Leo Pettvjohn (IC) ; Talmo 
Paul Edward Phillips (VM) ; Ottawa 
Buford Doyle Philpy (VM) ; Manhattan 
♦Victor Raymond Piatt (ChE); 

Santa Fe, N. Mex. 
♦Wayne Frederick Pickell (ChE); 

Kansas City 
Gerald E. Pierce (AA) ; Garrison 
Katherine Amelia Piercy (HE); Lenexa 
Melvin Clark Poland (AA) ; Barnes 
Maurine Pollom (HE&A) ; Manhattan 
Charles Edward Porter, Jr. (ME) ; 

Junction Citv 
Kathleen May Porter (HE) ; Stafford 
Kenneth Boyd Porter (Ag) ; Stafford 
Leland Cyril Porter (CE) ; Dellvale 
Clarence Arthur Powers (ME); Alta Vista 
Kenneth Herbert Praeger (AA) ; Claflin 
♦Charles Albert Pray (GS) ; Hope 
John Clyde Pretzer (AA) ; Elmdale 
Glenn Emerson Pribbeno (ME); 

Sharon Springs 
Albert Paul Price (CE) ; St. Paul 
Donald Calvin Pricer (MuE) Hill City 
Marvin Andrew Pringle (ME) ; Scranton 
Virgil Lvle Pyke (C&A) ; Enterprise 
Robert Howard Pyle (ME) ; Wellington 
Bvron White Quinby (AH&V); Lake City 
Kenneth Willard Randall (CE); Haddam 
William Harvey Rankin (C&A) ; Idana 
Wilbur Abe Rawson (AA) ; Wamego 
Virginia Ray (HE) ; Kansas City 
Arline Florence Raynesford (HE) ; Salina 
Lucy Josephine Reader (HE); Sterling 
Eric Lerov Reardon (C&A) ; Minneapolis 
Donald Reber (C&A); Sabetha 
Matthew Allen Reber (ME); Sabetha 
Earl Llwyn Redfield (GS) ; Bucklin 
Joseph James Redmond (EE) ; Lillis 
Thomas Morse Reed (AA) ; Circleville 
Harlan Edward Rees (EE); Beloit 
Donald Dorman Reid (CE) ; Manhattan 
Ervin Ellis Reid (GS) ; Manhattan 
Ralph Emery Reitz (C&A); Shady Bend 
Frank Lauren Reppert (ME) ; Bryan, Tex. 
Leon Merle Reynard (PE) ; Alamo, Tex. 
Elizabeth Richardson (HE) ; Cawker City 
Maxine LaJune Richardson (PE) ; 

Sharon Springs 
James Otto Ridenour (ME); Moscow 
Merton Alvin Rietzke (AE) ; Kensington 
Ralph Roy Roberts (ME) ; Downs 
Joseph Edmond Robertson (MI); 

Brownstown, Ind. 
Cecil Redford Robinson (Ag) ; Nashville 
Walter Stuart Robinson (Ag) ; Nashville 
Carl Robert Rochat (IJ) ; Wilsey 
♦Jane Helpn Roderick (HE) ; Manhattan 
Elmer Rollins (ChE); Manhattan 



* Matriculated 1938-1939. 



List of Students 



19 



Juniors — Cont in ued 



Gwendolyn Frances Rorhine (IJ) ; Abilene 
Martha Barbara Roots (HE'&N); 

Manhattan 
*Helen Rosander (IM&D) ; Lindsborg 
Russel Leon Rose (ME) ; Kiowa 
Nathan Matthew Rosenbaum (VM) ; 

Yonkers, N. Y. 
Stephen Francis Rosner (VM) ; Bucyrus 
William Rosner (VM); Philadelphia, Pa. 
Francenia Routt (HE) ; Paola 
Brace Donald Rowley (Ag) ; La Cygne 
*George Richard Rugger (IC) ; Topeka 
Orel Dale Rundle (IM&D); Axtell 
Wayne Allard R utter (IC) ; Kensington 
*Joseph Peter Sachen (ChE) ; Kansas City 

William Roy Sachse (CE) ; Easton 
*Grant Angus Salisbury (EE-1; IJ-2); 

El Dorado 
Ralph Emanuel Samuelson (ChE) ; 

Manhattan 
*Arthur LeRoy Saylor (Ag) ; Langclon 
*Melvin Eugene Scanlan (CE) ; Manhattan 
Leroy Edward Schafer (VM) ; 

Valley Center 
Walter Schanfeldt, Jr. (IJ) ; Cimarron 
Genevieve Estella Scheier (IM&D); 

Everest 
George Walter Schiller (IC-1; MI-2) ; 

Frankfort 
*Leon Washington Schindler (ME'); 

Topeka 
Francis Noel Schlaegel (VM); Olsburg 
*Aaron Kurt Schmidt (AA) ; Newton 
Winston Albert Schmidt (CE) ; Lyons 
Ruth Lillian Scholer (HE) ; Manhattan 
Anna Martha Scholz (HE) ; Huron 
Alice LaVerne Schroeder (HE) ; 

Lorraine 
Genevieve Eleanor Schroer (IM&D) ; 

Manhattan 
Vincent Joseph Schweiger (VM) ; Lenexa 
Myron Carl Scott (C) ; Newton 
Cleo Marie Sealey (HE) ; Hutchinson 
Melvin Harry Seelve (PE) ; Fort Scott 
Edward Frank Sefcik (ME) ; Cuba 
Bert Eugene Sells (ME); Wichita 
Ruby Juanita Shamburg (HE) ; 

Scottsville 
Donald Henry Sharp (C) ; Hutchinson 
John Alden Shaver (Ar) ; Salina 
John Alex Shaw (Ag) ; Joes, Colo. 
Charles Junior Sheetz (CE); Topeka 
*Kenneth Thomas Sherrill (AA) ; 

Brownell 
Marvin Roy Shetlar (IC-1; MI-2); 

Bayard 
Merle Mathias Shilling (CE) ; Westphalia 
Gladys Morgan Shoffner (HE); 

Manhattan 
Robert Nurman Shoffner (Ag) ; 

Manhattan 
Francis Benjamin Shoup (AA) ; Udall 
George William Shrack (C) ; Pratt 
Philip Newton Shrake (EE) ; Topeka 
Frank Everett Sicks (PE) ; 

Okmulgee, Okla. 
Ernest Christian Sieder (ME) ; 

Schenectadv, N. Y. 
Luella Velva Siek (HE); Hope 
Ernest Harold Simpson (Ag) ; 

Conway Springs 
Virgil Leonard Simpson (ChE) ; Towanda 
Walter Turner Singleton, Jr. (ME) ; 

Tribune 
Damaris Irene Sipes (IM&D) ; 

Neosho Falls 
Ralph Murray Skinner (C) ; Topeka 



Samud D wight Slentz (AA) ; Lewis 
Milan William Smerchek (Ag) ; Topeka 
Agnes Marie Smith (HE&A) ; Fredonia 
Clarence Paul Smith (ChE) ; Marys ville 
George Harmon Smith (ChE); Longf6rd 
Ivan Roland Smith (ChE) ; Highland 
William Edgerly Smith (VM) ; Fowler 
Charles Henry Snider (VM); 

St. Louis, 111. 
*Galen Max Sollenberger (ArE) ; 

Hutchinson 
*Mary Jayne Solt (GS) ; Waterville 

James Wilmeth Speers (MI) ; Manhattan 
*Dorothy Elizabeth Spencer (GS) ; Whiting 
Otto Franklin Spencer (Ag) ; Leavenworth 
Roger Guv Spencer (VM); Whiting 
*Mar.jorie Nell Spillman (C&A) ; 

Coyville 
Kenneth Earl Spring (GS) ; Sabetha 
Charles Willis Stafford (GS); Republic 
Beverly David Stagg (Ag) ; Manhattan 
Raymond William Stanzel (VM) ; 

La Harpe 
Lloyd Arnold Starkweather (C&A); 

Clay Center 
Allen Edward Starosta (Ag) ; Iola 
Merwin Milton Stearns (AA) ; Haddam 
*John Weslev Steffens (IC) ; Kansas City 
Herbert Carl Steinhausen (AH&V) ; 

Omaha, Neb. 
*Ann Steinkirchner (HE) ; Newton 
George Stevens (Ag) ; Waterbury, Conn. 
Vivian Lorraine Stewart (HE) ; Hartford 
William Francis Stewart (MI) ; 

Saffordville 
*Everett Clarence Stidham (C) ; 

Manhattan 
Harry Wayne Stockhoff (MI); Bethel 
Harry James Stockman (ME) ; Wichita 
*Ray Elmer Stokely (C) ; Hutchinson 
Enid Lorraine Stoops (HE) ; Sawyer 
Melvin Andrew Stoner (GS); Edson 
Warren Wallace St. Pierre (EE) ; Ames 
Joseph Jacob Straut (AA) ; Wathena 
Charles Lyman Streeter (AA); 

Wakefield 
Swanna Lee Suits (IM&D) ; 

Odessa, Mo. 
Harold Eugene Summers (ME) ; Pittsburg 
Robert Edward Summers (IJ) ; 

Manhattan 
Roy William Swafford (IJ) ; Topeka 
Robert Vernon Swanson (C) ; 

Waterbury, Conn. 
Ralph Wilson Swearingor (EE) ; Courtland 
Linn Meredith Swenson (EE) ; 

Council Grove 
Eldon Derry Swing (EE) ; Wichita 
Eaymond Shields Tanner (AA) ; St. John 
Waldo Tate (Ag) ; Junction City 
Lloyd Campbell Teas (CE); Manhattan 
Robert Lansdowne Teeter (ChE); 

McPherson 
Morgan William Tempero (VM) ; 

Clav Center 
Donald Bland Thackrey (IJ) ; 

Camden, Ark. 
Elnora Jane Thomas (HE) ; Salina 
Daniel Max Thompson (GS) ; Almena 
*Leslie Earl Thompson (ChE); 

Manhattan 
*Jane Elizabeth Thomson (GS) ; Irving 
Robert Sanders Thornburrow (ArE) ; 

Wetmore 
Celeste Jane Throckmorton (HE) ; 

Manhattan 
Orval Elmer Thrush (AA) ; Wakefield 



* Matriculated 1938-1939. 



20 



Kansas State College 



Juniors — Concluded 



*Henry Albert Thurstin (ME); Chanute 
*Mina Fay Tillman (HE); Topeka 
Robert John Tindall (C) ; Lakin 
Helen Tipton (IM&D) ; Paola 
Hobart Tipton (ME); Paola 
Harold George Todd (AA) ; 

Manhattan 
Rex Franklin Toomey (ChE) ; Neodesha 
Floy Frances Toothaker (HE) ; 

Protection 
*Fred Franklin Townsend (CE) ; Waverly 
Leland Mark Townsend (C&A) ; 

Junction City 
Lloyd Bryon Tribble (EE); Soldier 
Harden Halleck Tubbs (ME); 

Wilburton 
*Mildred Darlene Tuttle (GS) ; Coffeyville 
Dorothy Ann Uhl (HE); Smith Center 
Harold Wertz Underhill, Jr. (ArE) ; 

Wichita 
John Lee Urquhart (MI) ; Wamego 
Eloise Utterback (C) ; Oberlin 
*Jane La Verne Utterback (HE) ; 

Yates Center 
Helen Louise Van Der Stelt (PE) ; 

Wakefield 
Glenn Benton Van Ness (VM) ; 

Harrison 
Gerald Thomas Van Vleet (AE) ; 

Danbury, Neb. 
George Willits Vaught (CE) ; Iola 
William Wafler (CE) ; White City 
Howard Oscar Wagner, Jr. (C) ; 

Wellington 
Dan W. Wagoner (EE) ; Lenora 
Ralph John Wahrenbrock (ME); 

Enterprise 
Ruth Elizabeth Walker (HE&N); 

Manhattan 
Evelyne Elnore Ward ,(HE) ; Langdon 
Verna May Ward (HE); St. Joseph, Mo. 
John Henderson Washburne (C) ; 

Waterbury, Conn. 
Faith Ella Watts (IM&D); Havensville 
Charles Elmer Webb (ChE); Hill City 
Katherine Evelyn Weldon (HE) ; 

Smith Center 
Elvera Welk (HE) ; Pratt 
William Walter Wempe (AH&V); 

Frankfort 
Roma Mae Wenger (HE) ; Sabetha 
Glenn Arnold West (MI); Manhattan 
Arthur Wexler (GS) ; New York City 



Florence Josephine Wheeler (GS) ; 

Jewell 
Louis Monroe Wheeler (C) ; Plevna 
John Robert Wheelock (ME); 

Missouri Valley, Iowa 
Alfred Marvin White (EE) ; Topeka 
James Robertson White (Ag) ; Burlington 
Roby Byron White, Jr. (EE) ; Neodesha 
Charles Kenneth Whitehair (VM) ; 

Abilene 
Ray Murrell Whitenack (ChE) ; 

Manhattan 
Merle Ray Whitlock (Ag) ; Elmdale 
Dean Duane Whitmore (Ag) ; Portis 
*Lola Christine Whitney (HE&N); 

Phillipsburg 
Walter Robert Wichser (MI) ; 

Beardstown, 111. 
Edgar Havard Wilkerson (ME); Wichita 
Donald Keith Wilkin (EE) ; Nortonville 
Frances Mildred Wilkins (HE) ; Chapman 
John Herron Williamson (EE) ; Topeka 
Thomas Phil Williamson (C) ; Topeka 
Anna Eileen Willis (HE) ; Newton 
iSolon Luther Willsey (ChE) ; Anthony 
Alice Margaret Wilson (HE) ; 

New Cambria 
Evelyn Agnes Wilson (HE) ; Grantville 
George Lincoln Wilson (ME); 

Hoisington 
Joe James Winderlin (AA) ; Scott City 
Leonard Charles Witt (VM); 

Scribner, Neb. 
Francis Bamford Woestemeyer (EE) ; 

Bethel 
Sylvester Harlan Womer (Ag) ; Bellaire 
Keith Woodard (ME); Glen Elder 
*John Robert Works (Ag) ; Humboldt 
*Ray Edmond Wright (IC) ; Osawatomie 
Norma Geraldine Wunder (HE); 

Valley Falls 
*Erna Gene Wunderlich (HE&A) ; 

Kansas City, Mo. 
Vera Lucille Wycoff (MuE); Norcatur 
Mack Yenzer (Ag) ; Saffordville 
Irl Clarence Yeo (EE) ; Ellsworth 
Dale J. Yokum (VM) ; Colony 
Kenneth Morton Yoos (EE) ; Atwood 
*Donald Allan Yost (Ag) ; La Crosse 
George Otis Young (CE) ; Centralia 
Doyle Leroy Youngs (E) ; Norton 
Nellie Leone Yount (GS) ; Bazine 



SOPHOMORES 



*Marilyn Elaine Abel (IJ) ; Wichita 
Merrill Glee Abrahams (Ag) ; Wayne 
Finley Acker (C) ; Philadelphia, Pa. 
Warren Harlin Acker (ChE) ; 
Junction City 

* Anita Clare Adams (HE&N) ; Hutchinson 
Charles Henry Adams (Ag) ; Wilsey 
James Otis Adams (CE) ; Eureka 
John Beal Adams (IJ) ; Osborne 
Raymond Voiles Adams, Jr. (GS) ; 

Manhattan 
Walter Alfred Adams (IA) ; Leavenworth 
Charles Warren Adcock (ME); 

Fort Leavenworth 
Donald Dwight Adee (PE) ; Wells 

*DeWitt Benard Ahlerick (AA) ; Winfield 
Louis Fred Akers (C) ; Atchison 
Wilfred John Alden (EE) ; Talmage 
Thomas James Alexander (IJ) ; 
Herington 

*Ruth Adelia Aley (M); Blue Rapids 



Genevie Elizabeth Allen (HE); 

Manhattan 
Richard Carl Allen (EE) ; Carthage, Mo. 
Lueva Eleanor Alsop (GS) ; Wamego 
Enid Alene Altwegg (IJ); Junction City 
Loren Edward Amerine (EE) ; Great Bend 
Charles Cornelius Anderson (ME) ; 

Emporia 
Eugene Elria Anderson (GS) ; Greenleaf 
Wilfred Ira Anderson (CE) ; Clay Center 
Mary Louise Arbuthnot (C&A) ; 

Morrowville 
Robert Arbuthnot (Ag) ; Morrowville 
George Rankin Armstrong (VM); 

Gastonia, N. C. 
Oliver Wendell Armstrong (C) ; 

Mound Valley 
Beverly Junior Asher (AE) ; Stafford 
Delmar Wallace Atchison (CE) ; 

McPherson 
Richard Elton Atkins (Ag) ; Manhattan 



* Matriculated 1938-1939. 



^ 



List of Students 



21 



Sophomores — Continued 



Wanda Marian Atkins (HE) ; Manhattan 
Leroy Nichols Atkinson (VM) ; 

Hutchinson 
Ellita Bernice Atwell (HE); Utica 
*Betty Hamilton Augur (HE); 

Fort Leavenworth 
Dorothy Elizabeth Axcell (IM&D) ; 

Chanute 
Merton Bierman Badenhop (AA) ; 

Kensington 
Lawrence Roy Bain (VM) ; Pittsburg 
Mary Ann Bair (IJ) ; Wamego 
Bruce Walter Ball (C&A); Topeka 
*Jack Junior Banks (C) ; Winfield 
*John William Banks (Ag-1; C-2); 

Independence 
*Wendell Glenn Barcroft (IJ) ; 

Coffeyville 
Virginia Lee Barnard (IM&D); Belleville 
Arthur C. Barney (ME); South Haven 
Wallace DeArmond Barry (AA) ; 

Manhattan 
Eugene Henry Bartell (EE); Topeka 
Clyde Jennings Bateman (ME); 

Herington 
Willis Clarke Bateman (Ag) ; Herington 
Frank Alexander Bates (ME); Topeka 
Fremont H. Baxter (SH) ; Larned 
Winifred Jean Bayer (HE); Manhattan 
Annabelle Bays (C&A) ; Onaga 
Edwin Howard Beach (IC) ; Marysville 
Marcella Marie Beat (HE); Kingman 
Clarence August Bechtold (AA) ; Gaylord 
*Wi!liam Daniel Beeby (ME); Topeka 
Maurice Wayne Beichley (C&A) ; Longford 
Rena Lauretta Bell (HE&N) ; McDonald 
William Perry Bell (EE) ; Silver Lake 
George Robert Belt (EE) ; Lane 
Wesley Gale Benda (AA) ; Achilles 
Welcome A. Bender (HE) ; Plains 
Bette Marv Benjamin (IJ) ; Nowata, Okla. 
Philip Frank Bennett (CE); Eskridge 
Maurice Wittry Bergerhouse (C&A) ; 

Greeley 
Minnie Josephine Bergsma (HE) ; 

Goodland 
Helen Elizabeth Berlin (C) ; Wakefield 
Clifford Lee Bertholf (AA) ; Spivey 
James Grant Betts (VM) ; Randall 
Clifford Duane Beyler (Ag) ; Harper 
Keith Daniel Bird (CE) ; Albert 
Roy Thomas Bird (AE): Great Bend 
Verne Emil Bistline (C&A) ; Topeka 
Jean Olivia Black (IM&D); Attica 
Frances Blackert (IC) ; Marysville 
Bettv Jane Blackman (HE&A) ; 

Tulsa, Okla. 
Pauline Isabel Blackwell (HE); Rozel 
Robert Hale Blair (IJ) Ottawa 
Victor Ross Blanks (IJ) ; Manhattan 
Leon Phillip Blender (Ag) ; 

Kansas City, Mo. 
Kathryn Elizabeth Blevins (IC) ; 

Manhattan 
Kenneth Gardener Blim (GS) ; 

Council Grove 
Betty Boehm (IM&D); Kansas City, Mo. 
Wayne Columbus Bogard (Ag) ; 

Junction City 
*Oirol Ann Bogart (IM&D) ; Wichita 
Ralph Edwin Bonewitz (Ag) ; Meriden 
Poss W. Booth (ME): Paradise 
Pauline Marie Borth (HE); Plains 
*David Eugenp Bourassa f Ag) : Topeka 
*Marie Joan Bourdon (HE) : Topeka 
William Dale Bnwerman (VM) ; 

Oklahoma City, Okla. 



Edward Allan Bowman (IJ) ; Pawnee Rock 
Muriel Elaine Bowman (IM&D) ; 

Neosho Rapids 
Harold Henderson Bozarth (ME); 

Eskridge 
James Thomas Bradley (EE) ; Sedan 
Virginia Lenore Brand (HE) ; Basil 
*Gordon McClellan Braun (GS) ; 

Kansas City 
Geo. Gray Breidenthal (CE-1; GS-2); 

Kansas City 
Edward Francis Brenner (AA) ; Bazine 
David Henry Breuninger (C) ; Beattie 
George Daniel Brewer (ME); Wichita 
Albert Brickell, Jr. (Ag) ; Saffordville 
Harold Brickev (ChE); Emporia 
*William Blount Briggs (MI); 

Landrum, S. C. 
*Frances Lorraine Brooks (HE) ; Norton 
Arthur William Brower (VM) ; Emporia 
Jacquelyn Lenore Brower (HE&A) ; Attica 
Arlo Allen Brown (Ag) ; Almena 
Clarence Bernard Brown (EE) ; 

Kansas City 
*Dwight Carl Brown (ArE) ; Osborne 
*Eileen Brown (C) ; Ingalls 
Lester Earl Brown (AA) ; Circleville 
Paul Lawson Brown (Ag) ; Sylvan Grove 
Sara Davidson Brown (IM&D) ; 

Manhattan 
Sealy Mark Brown (C&A) ; Manhattan 
Sidney Goodell Browne (AA) ; Burdett 
Wendell Lewis Brubaker (MI); Manhattan 
Kenneth Lee Bruce (VM) ; Orchard, Neb. 
Ruth Miller Bruner (GS) ; Wamego 
Robert William Brush (Ag) ; Wichita 
Joe Bryske (IC) ; Mankato 
Edith Louise Buchholtz (HE); Olathe 
*Kenneth Oliver Budd (ME) ; Wichita 
Laurence Theodore Buening (C&A); 

Valley Falls 
*Elinor Althea Buenning (MuE) ; Hope 
Raymond Martin Bukaty (ME); 

Kansas City 
Elizabeth Mav Burchinal (C) ; Formoso 
Max Morris Burger (IA) ; Randall 
Orville Brown Burtis* (Ag) ; Hymer 
Bernard Busby (VM) ; Wakefield 
Glen Morton Busset (AA) ; Le Roy 
Sarah Jane Buster (HE); Larned 
Wilma Hortense Cade (GS) ; Manhattan 
Leslie James Callahan (GS) ; Manhattan 
Bessie Marie Campbell (HE) ; Concordia 
*Gen-va Ruth Campbell (IM&D) ; 

Hiawatha 
Marv Alice Campbell (HE) : Concordia 
Ralph Ernest Campbell (CE) ; Wilsev 
Ruth Pearl Campbell (HE); Lakin 
Leonard Walter Canfield (C&A) ; 

Miltonvale 
*Keith Milton Cantrell (CE) ; Parker 
Gilbert Wilson Carl (VM) ; Hutchinson 
Doris Virinia Carlson (HE) ; Osage City 
*Lavone M. Carlson (C) ; Morganville 
Henry James Carothers (C&A) ; Topeka 
Dean Robert Cassitv (SH) ; Clifton 
Richard John Cech (ChE-1; IJ-2); 

Kansas City 
Severo Jose Cervera (Ag) ; Junction City 
Edward Eldridge Chambers (VM); 

Parsons 
Howard Wendell Channell (Ag) ; 

Kansas City 
Robert George Chapman (GS) ; 

Manhattan 
Clayton Ralph Chartier (MuE); 

Concordia 



* Matriculated 1938-1939. 



22 



Kansas State College 



Sophomores — Continued 



Garland Baxter Childers (CE) ; Augusta 
Clara Katharine Chubb (IJ) ; Topeka 
Betty Jean Clapp (IM&D) ; Manhattan 
Bonnie Lue Clapp (HE&N) ; Manhattan 
Jack Kenneth Clark (C) ; Manhattan 
Lowell Warren Clark (MuE) ; Waterville 
Robert Hugh Clark (VM) ; Manhattan 

♦Margaret Ann Clarke (HE); Winfield 
Harold Clay (AA) ; Meade 
Donald Ernest Cleland (AE) ; Eskridge 
Marion Fulton Clevenger (EE) ; Clifton 
George Wilson Cochran (Ag) ; Topeka 
Charles Edwin Coffman (ME-1; C-2); 

Allen 
Robert Christian Colburn (AE) ; 

Spearville 
Robert Lee Collard (C) ; Leavenworth 
Wayne Robert Colle (AA) ; Sterling 
Joyce Collier (C&A) ; Hugoton 
Clark C. Collins (VM) ; West Point, Neb. 
Dale Collins (CE) ; Kingman 
Jessie Margaret Collins (IM&D) ; Dwight 
Lawrence Keith Collins (AE) ; 

Junction City 
Lee Wilson Collinsworth (Ag) ; Rosalia 
Kenneth Harold Colvin (ChE) ; Topeka 

*Dorothy Marian Considine (GS) ; 
Fort Leavenworth 

*Jeanne Eleanor Considine (HE'&A) ; 
Fort Leavenworth 

♦Catherine Alice Cook (HE&A) ; Eskridge 
Norma Elizabeth Cook (MuE); Monument 
Norman Travis Cook (CE) ; Monument 

♦Willard Dwight Cook (AA) ; Louisburg 
Carleton Cooper (C&A) ; St. John 
Richard Warren Cope (Ag) ; Holton 
Keller Cordon (AE) ; Circleville 
Robert Vaile Corns (ME) ; Greensburg 
Charles Joseph Correll (C) ; Manhattan 
Francis Lee Cosgrove (C) ; Oketo 
Robert Thomas Cotton (GS) ; 

Manhattan 
Donald Wallace Coulson (ME) ; Wichita 
Carl J. Coulter (IA) ; Leon 
Arlene Ruth Cowan (IM&D); Athol 

*Marie Jane Cox (IM&D) ; Iola 

♦John Dudley Grain (EE) ; Fort Scott 
James Jacob Cram (CE) ; St. Francis 
Elvin Wavne Cramer (GS) ; Glasco 
Myrtle Madena Cranston (IM&D) ; 

Manhattan 
Virgil Eugene Craven (C) ; Erie 
Arthur Joseph Crawford (ArE) ; Clements 
David Frankhn Cre^s (MI); Manhattan 

♦Leo Edward Cross (PE) ; Midian 
Sarah Ann Crotinger (HE) ; Bison 
Chester Lee Crotts (AA) ; Turon 
Robert Earhart Crow (GS) ; Harper 
Betty Jane Curtis (IM&D) ; McPherson 
Fay Anne Dale (GS) ; Coldwater 

♦Elizabeth Clara Danford (HE); 
Hutchinson 
Durward Clair DanHson (ChE) ; Clyde 
John Cecil Dart (GS) ; Newton 
Clayton Cunningham David (AA) ; 

North Topeka 
MacDowell Davidson (C) ; Manhatan 
Duane Richard Davis (EE) ; Beloit 
Shirlev LeRoy Davis (VM) ; Fort Scott 
Thomas Clayton Davis (VM-1; Ag-2) ; 

Thomasville, Ga. 
Joseph Dale Davison (EE) ; Newton 
Max Lawrence Dawdy (Ag) ; Washington 
Robert Price Dawlev (EE) : Manhattan 
Walter Wilson Dawley (IC) ; 
Lakewood, Ohio 



Byron Dawson (C) ; Russell 

♦Lorene Dawson (IM&D) ; 
Kansas City, Mo. 
Clarence Arthur Day (ChE) ; Ottawa 
Wayne Xavier Deaver (MI); Sabetha 
Warren James Dedrick (VM); 

Kansas City 
Donald Pitman Deibler (IC) ; Manhattan 

♦William Charles Deitchman (CE) ; 
Kansas City 
Richard M. DeMoss (CE) ; Topeka 
Anne Margaret Dewhirst (HE&N) ; Salina 
Myron Henderson Dick (IJ) ; Inman 
Alma Lorraine Dickerhoof (IM&D) ; 

Chanute 
Howard Lyle Dickson (IJ); Carbondale 
Lois Florence Diehl (IJ) ; Manhattan 
Marvle Dale Deitz (C) ; Esbon 
George Edward Dillenbeck (AH&V) ; 

Poultney, Vt. 
Millard Fay Dilsaver (AE) ; Athol 
Virgil Dilsaver (EE) ; Kensington 
William Francis Dixon (AE) ; 

Junction City 
George Lafayette Doak (AA) ; Stockton 
Jane E. Dodge (GS) ; Manhattan 
Robert Hollister Dodge (ME-1; C&A-2) ; 

Kansas City 
Terryll Doughertv (ME); Manhattan 

♦Charles Sharp Drew (ChE); Garden City 

♦Richard Eugene Dreyer (ME); Newton 
Leslie Albert Droge (PE) ; Seneca 

♦Joyce Lenore Dryden (HE) ; Stockton 
Alva Lease Duckwall (C) ; Abilene 
Lillian Ruth Dumler (IM&D); Gorham 
John Wallace Dummermuth (AA) ; Barnes 
Glenn E. Duncan (VM); St. Francis 
Jane Cuthbert Dunham (HE) ; Topeka 
Wellington John Dunn (AA) ; Tescott 
Walter Elsworth Dwy (CE) ; 
Waterbury, Conn. 

♦Malcolm Roger Easterday (EE) ; Atchison 

♦Kenneth Gilbert Eastman (C) ; Wichita 
Max Paul Eaton (ChE); Coldwater 
Howard Clayton Eberline (EE) ; 

Manhattan 
Mvrton Talmadge Ebright (CE) ; Lyons 
Robert Luther Edsall (C) ; Stafford 

♦Paul Raymond Edwards (SH); Meade 
Theodore Max Ehlert (Ag) ; Neodesha 
Millie Jennie Elias (GS) ; Manhattan 
Vincent Henry Ellis (ME) ; Leavenworth 

♦Lester Ernest Elmore (C&A) ; Kinsley 

♦Rush Elmore, Jr. (Ag) ; Topeka 
Helen Louise Ensign (IM&D) ; Garrison 
John Ernest Erickson (VM) ; Wilson, Pa. 
Aven Lamar Eshelman (CE) ; Abilene 
Harry Slater Eshelman (AE) ; Wichita 

♦Elizabeth Sharlane E'stes (HE); 
Clever, Mo. 
Melvin Eugene Estey (ME); Langdon 
Lola Grace Evans (HE) ; Hutchinson 
Wilnia Florine Evans (HE) ; Hutchinson 

♦Francis Max Every (ArE) ; Parsons 
Robert Stephenson Eyestone (ME); 

Pittsburg 
Shirley Frederick Eyestone (E) ; Wichita 
Harrv Eugene Fair (Ag) ; Alden 
Charles Edward Fairman (PE) ; 

Manhattan 
James Madison Fallis (ChE) ; Luray 

♦Jack Featheringill (AA) ; Independence 

♦Elizabeth Anne Ferrier (GS) ; Sabetha 
Lois Maureen Filson (HE&N) ; Bartlett 
Taylor Leland Fitzgerald (Ag) ; 
Silver Lake 



♦ Matriculated 1938-1939. 



List of Students 



23 



Sophomores — Continued 



Helen Elaine Fleming (HE) ; Ottawa 

♦Patricia Fleming (HE-1 ; IJ-2); 
Council Grove 
Horton Fletcher (ME) ; Council Grove 
Reed Charles Fleury (Ag) ; Manhattan 
Frank Abram Flipse (VM) ; Monument 
Naomi Clestine Flipse (HE-1; MuE-2); 

Monument 
Margery Anne Floersch (IJ) ; Manhattan 

*Franklin James Flynn (C) ; Wamego 

♦Bettie Fogelstrom (PE) ; Junction City 
Merle Everett Foland (CE); Almena 
Louis Spencer Foltz (AE) ; Blue Rapids 
William Roy Ford (EE) ; Frankfort 
Barbara Anna Foster (C) ; Enterprise 

♦Harry Edward Foster (ArE) ; Hiawatha 
James Robert Foster (AA) ; Effingham 
William Larry Fowler (CE) ; Wakeeney 
Harold Robert Fox (AA) ; Rozel 
Hobart William Frederick (Ag) ; Burton 
Lawrence Dale Freel (GS) ; Goff 
Sam Henry Freeland (C) ; Wichita 
Forrest Elroy Freeman (Ag) ; Simpson 
Ray Day Freeman (ME); Paola 
Evalyn Mae Frick (HE); Larned 
Eleanor Rand Fritz (HE) ; Kansas City 
John Henry Frohn (EE) ; Manhattan 
Paul Louis Furbeck (AE) ; Larned 
Bertram Wallace Gardner, Jr. (AA) ; 

Carbondale 
Joseph Boswell Garinger (ME) ; 

Harveyville 
Neva Marguerite Garrett (GS) ; 

Clay Center 
Warren Harley Garrett (C) ; Manhattan 
John Van Atta Gates (ME); Goff 
Ann Willis Gaumer (HE) ; Manhattan 
Lloyd Reed Gebhart (CE) ; Culver 
Bill Burris Geery (CE) ; Burrton 
Gerald Geiger (C&A) ; Belvidere, N. J. 
Frank Leroy Gentry (CE) ; Manhattan 
Frank Jackson George (Ag) ; Lebo 
Dale Edsel Gibson (GS) ; Winchester 
Gerald Bowen Gibson (C&A) ; Kensington 
Guy Edgar Gibson, Jr. (CE) ; 
Kensington 

♦Harlan Henry Giese (EE) ; 
Cottonwood Falls 
Mahlon H. Griffin (ME) ; Sedgwick 
Paul Junior Gilbert (CE) ; Pawnee Rock 
Robert Albert Gilles (CE) ; Kansas City 
Robert Currie Gilliford (Ag) ; Garrison 
John Gifford Gish (VM) ; El Dorado 

♦Margaret Jane Goble (IJ) ; Riley 
George William Godfrey (ME); Haven 

♦Frank Orin Good (Ag) ; Hutchinson 
Florence Clarice Gosnev (HE) ; Mulvane 
Virginia Lee Goss (IM&D) ; Dwight 
Kenneth Herbert Graham (PE) ; 

Framingham, Mass. 
Madalene Mildred Graves (IM&D) ; 

Clifton 
Anita Maye Green (HE-1; GS-2) ; 
Mankato 

♦Dorothv Mae Green CHE) ; Wichita 
John Wyeth Green (EE); Mound City 
Wilbert Greer (Ag) ; Council Grove 
Truman DeRoam Gregory (AA) ; 

Woodston 
Mary Jenn Grentner (IJ) ; Junction City 

♦Emorv Allen Groves (AA) : Burlingame 
Warren Gerald Grubb (ChE) ; Phillipsburg 
Melvin Ferdinand Gruber (Ag) ; Hope 
Frank Whaley Gudgell (C) ; Edmond 
David Edward Guerrant (IJ) ; Manhattan 
Richard Ward Gundv (IJ) : Manhattan 

♦Mildred Joyce Gurtler (HE); 
SummerfHd 



Mary Alice Guy (HE); Longford 
Ralph Edward Guyton (C) ; Salina 
Robert Thomas Guyton (C); Salina 
Florence Verda Gwin (HE) ; Junction City 
Dorothy Elizabeth Hacker (HE) ; Pratt 
Richard Henry Hagadorn (GS) ; Gaylord 

♦William August Hagen (ME); Atchison 
Robert John Haggerton (ME) ; 

Junction City 
Leighton Edgar Hale (AE) ; Manhattan 

♦Eugene Hicks Hall (EE) ; Amoret, Mo. 
Lester James Hall (C) ; Salina 
Ethel Dorothy Haller (IM&D); Alma 
Glenn Clough Halver (VM); Crane, Mont. 
Kenneth Blaine Hamlin (EE) ; Manhattan 
Merrill E. Hamman (AE) ; Hartford 
Opal Marjorie Hammond (HE&A) ; 

Woodston 
Donald Frederick Hansen (ME); Topeka 
Lois Jeanette Hanson (IM&D) ; Olsburg 

♦Irene Mayfield Harbour (HE) ; Osage City 
Orval Albert Harold (AA) ; Oberlin 
Caroline Elizabeth Harris (C) ; McPherson 
Paul Eugene Harrison (EE); Gridley 

♦Wilton Eugene Harry (AA); Home 

♦Eleanor June Harsh (HE&A); Argonia 
Evelyn Annetta Hart (C&A) ; Blue Rapids 
Harlan Dayton Harter (ME); St. John 
Donald Edward Hassler (IC) ; Chapman 
Jane Louise Hastings (HE) ; Lakin 
Eugene Edmond Haun (AE); Larned 
Joan Elizabeth Hawkinson (IJ); Larned 
Pattie Patrice Hay (HE) ; Eskridge 
Robert E. L. Hayes (ArE); Topeka 
John Norris Haymaker (MI); Manhattan 
Richard Neil Heaton (C) ; Norton 
Ruth Opal Hefty (HE&N); Valley Falls 
Eldon Heinschel (ME); Smith Center 
Sherman Nelson Helm (GS); Abilene 

♦Philip Calvert Hendricks (EE-1; C&A-2); 
Iola 
Richard Thomas Hernlund (IC) ; 

Chicago, 111. 
Laura Elizabeth Herr (HE) ; Abilene 

♦Donald Dwight Hesselbarth (ME-1 ; C-2); 
Abilene 
Waid Heter (Ag) ; Manhattan 
Edith Hewitt (HE); Pleasanton 
William Herbert Hickman (IJ) ; Kirwin 

♦Verdie Eugene Hicks (HE) ; Sterling 
Thaine Robert High (AA) ; Abilene 
Russell Lacy Hightower (EE) ; Centralia 

♦Bert Junior Hildreth (EE) ; Leon 

♦Orville Slocum Hill (AA) ; Bloom 

♦Viola May Hill (HE) ; Hodb 
John Albert Hineman (CE) ; Dighton 
Leigh Clesson Hines (Ag) ; Kanorado 
James Robert Hoath (GS) ; Anthony 
Eva Mae Hodgson (MuE) ; Little River 
Irvin George Hodgson (ChE); Little River 
Robert Milton Hodgson (A A) ; Little Rivei 
Elwin Dean Hoffman (C) ; Hope 
Robert Earl Hoffman (IJ) ; Manhattan 
Vincent Benedict Holbert (C) ; Manhattan 
Herbert Dale Holling°r (IJ) ; Chapman 
Gertrude Lucille Hollis (Ar) ; Holton 
Norris Everett Holstrom (C) ; Topeka 
Lawrence Gard Holuba (EE) ; Manhattan 
Raymond L. Hook (ME) ; Osborne 
John Wentworth Hopkins (CE) ; 

McPherson 
Jack Louis Horacek (ChE-1 ; C-2); 

Tone^n 
Charles Kendal Hom^r (MuE) ; Abilene 
W^arren Thomas Hornsby (C) ; Topeka 
William Mixon Horton (EE) ; Wichita 
Gilbert Edwin Hotchkiss (CE) ; 
Manhattan 



Matriculated 1938-1939. 



24 



Kansas State College 



Sophomores — Continued 



Harry Earl House, Jr. (ME) ; 

Cheyenne, Wyo. 
Frank Wilson Howard, Jr. (Ag) ; Oakley 
Vaughn Henrv Howard (AA-1; GS-2); 

Wallkill, N. Y. 
Dorothy Elizabeth Howat (HE) ; 

Wakeeney 
Gordon Clarke Howell (VM); Kansas City 
Herbert Winston Howell (VM); 
Kansas City 
*Fred Morrison Huey (C) ; Louisville 
Ralph LaVern Huffman (Ag) ; Chanute 
Le Roy Lyman Hughes (ArE) ; Topeka 
*Rees Woodford Hughes (AA); Fort Scott 
Harriette Edna Hull (HE); Reece 
Billie Dee Hunt (HE); Boone, Iowa 
♦Gorman Earl Hunt (ME); Leavenworth 
Dale Craig Hupe (Ag) ; Perry 
David Henry Hurst (C&A); Kirwin 
♦Margaret Jean Hurst (IJ-1; IM&D-2); 

Atchison 
*Flora Elizabeth lies (HE); Manhattan 
Robert Donald Immenschuh (VM) ; 

San Diego, Cal. 
Frank Henry Immroth (EE) ; Hutchinson 
♦Helen Maurine Jackson (GS) ; Salina 

Ruth Christine Jacobs (HE&N); Harper 
*Don Guy James (ME); Parsons 
Kenneth Ralph Jameson (AA) ; Ottawa 
Kenneth Donald Jenicek (ME); Holyrood 
Jack Baker Jenkins, Jr. (C) ; Topeka 
Neal Mike Jenkins (VM-1; GS-2); 
Manhattan 
*Don Tallard Jensen (EE); Leavenworth 
Herbert Donald Johnson (Ag) ; 

Maxville 
Neil Theodore Johnson (ArE) ; Topeka 
*Samuel Thomas Johnson (C&A); Oswego 
Robert Fones Johntz (CE) ; 

Winston-Salem, N. C. 
Charles Fisher Jon-s (VM) ; Lisbon, N. Y. 
Dale Carl Jones (CE) ; Simpson 
Delmar Doyle Jones (Ag) ; Mulvane 
Llovd Charles Jones (Ag) ; Frankfort 
♦Wilbur Fred Jones (ME); Wichita 
Tom Edward Jovce (ME) ; Ulysses 
Martin Kadets (VM) ; Natick, Mass. 
Jean Margaret Kallenberger (HE) ; Edna 
Lester Loyd Kammerer (EE) ; Manhattan 
John Pershing Kane (C&A) ; Rock Creek 
*Mary Marvel Kantz (PE) ; Wichita 
♦Jacob Landers Karnes (VM); Benton, Ky. 
Walter Marvin Keith (SH) ; Manhattan 
Edward Jacob Keller (VM) ; St. Francis 
Lawrence Edward Kelley (AA) ; Chapman 
Harold Eugene Keltner (ArE) ; Hoisington 
James Merlin Kendall (IJ) ; Dwight 
*Mary Evelyn Kennedy (SH); Lawrence 
♦Mary Keturah Kennedy (IM&D) ; 

Neodesha 
*Lyman DuVall Ketchum (MI); 
Kansas City 
Ruth Virnita Keys (HE); Winchester 
Raymond Lloyd Kieffer (ArE) ; 

Independence, Mo. 
Richard John Kilian (ME); Detroit 
Ruth Ella Kindred (C) ; Bonner Springs 
Beatrice Burnette King (MuE) ; 
Manhattan 
♦Elizabeth Windsor King (HE&N); Ottawa 
Theron Lambert King (C&A) ; Manhattan 
William Gregg King (CE); Fort Dodge 
Arthur Stuart Kininmonth (C) ; Winfield 
Alan Dean Kinney (CE) ; 

Hainesburg, N. J. 
Helen Eunice Kirk (IM&D); Wellington 
♦On-il'e Kenneth Kirkoatrick (Ag) ; Bucklin 



Marianna Kistler (HE); Manhattan 
Doris Marie Kittell (PE) ; Topeka 
Wilma Margaret Kjellin (HE); Garrison 
Frederick John Kleymann (ME); Leoti 
♦Dorothy Maye Knaus (HE) ; Neodesha 
♦Jean Marie Knott (IM&D); Independence 
♦Hugo Adolph Koester (ChE) ; Herington 
Richard Benton Koger (VM); Belvidere 
Louis Daniel Kottmann (ChE) ; Ellsworth 
Grace LuAnna Kozak (HE) ; Silver Lake 
♦Benno Arnold Krause (ME); Herington 
Anne Marie Kristof (C) ; Collyer- 
Thomas Frederick Kropf (ME); 
Wamego 
♦Albert Kushner (GS) ; Topeka 
Frank William Ladd (C) ; Sabetha 
Glover Wilson Laird (VM); 

Kansas City, Mo. 
Floreine Edith Langenegger (IM&D) ; 

Burns 
Josephine Estell Lann (HE) ; Axtell 
Betty Lou LaPlante (MuE); Minneapolis 
Robert Dean Lara me v (Ar) ; 

Pueblo, Colo. 
John Henry Larkins (EE) ; Le Roy- 
Doyle Wayne LaRosh (AA) ; Natoma 
Harlan Ray Larson (IJ) ; Topeka 
Carl Ernest Latschar (IC) Manhattan 
♦Yvonne Joy Bugg Lemen (IJ) ; 
Kansas City 
Emery John Levin (ChE) ; Lindsborg 
Ernest Eber Lewis (ME); 

Mansfield, Pa. 
Frank Everett Lichlvter (VM) ; El Dorado 
Leonard V. Lille (C) ; Ellsworth 
♦Sarah Elizabeth Lillibridge (HE&N); 
Hutchinson 
James Worth Linn (GS) ; Manhattan 
Mary Jo Linscott (HE); Cummings 
Ealph Iden Lipper (AE); Sterling 
Bennie Lee Lohman (C&A) ; Lansing 
Kenneth LeeRoy Lohmeyer (GS) ; Bern 
Frank Robert Lonberger (C) ; Manhattan 
Dudley Randolph Londeen (C&A) ; 

Abilene 
David Hale Long (Ag) ; Abilene 
Roscoe Dean Long (Ag) ; Drexel, Mo. 
William Maurice Long (EE) : Wichita 
♦Frances Margaret Loomis (HE) : Jewell 
Calvin Frederic Lorentz (CE); Fredonia 
Charles Clarence Lucy (EE) ; Wichita 
Cecilia Emma McCandless (HE&N); 

St. John 
Dean McCandless (GS); St. John 
John Donnely McClurkin (ME) ; 

Clay Center 
Robert James McColloch (GS) ; 

Manhattan 
Bovd Homer McCune (Ag) ; Stafford 
Margaret Ella McCutchan (HE); 

St. George 
Wesley William McDowell (ME) ; 

Garfield 
Curtis Carey McFarland (ME); Chase 
Leo Melvin Mcllvain (ChE) ; 

Smith Center 
Noel LeRov McKee (AA) ; Havensville 
Martha Roseline McKenna (C-l; HE-2); 

Kingman 
James King McKie (ChE) ; Salina 
William Carr McLaughlin (ME); 

Junction City 
V. Keith McMahon (VM); Manhattan 
Harold William McMillan (ME); 

Formoso 
William Dwight McMurry (GS) ; Idana 
Wilbur Doyle McNeese (ChE); Atchison 



♦Matriculated 1938-1939. 



List of Students 



25 



Sophomores — Continued 



Freda Lenore McNickle (HE) ; Zenith 
Raymond Charles McPeek (VM) ; 
Ramsey, N. J. 
*Nancy Sevier Madden (IJ) ; Hays 
Jennie Marie Madsen (IJ) ; Dwight 
Kenneth Edwin Makalous (AA) ; Cuba 
*Marian Frances Mallonee (HE&A) ; 
Wichita 
Arthur Charles Mangelsdorf (AA) ; 

Atchison 
David Oscar Mauley (VM); Wakarusa 
Milton Lloyd Manuel (AA); 

Havensville 
Melvin Wayne Marcoux (Ag) ; 

Havensville 
Hazel Marguerite Marlow (GS) ; 

Manhattan 
John Everett Martin (GS); Lyons 
Marlin Wrav Martin (EE) ; Hutchinson 
*Mary Alice Matchette (HE) ; 

Kansas Citv Mo. 
*Bette Helen Mattes (HE) ; 
Kansas City, Mo. 
Donald Bain Mayhew (Ag) ; Belpre 
William Arthur Meade (EE); Moline 
Waldene Hastings Meadows (GS); 
Gaylord 
*Forrest Eugene Mears (AA) ; Eskridge 
Jack Lewis Medaris (VM); Parsons 
Lewis Howard Medlin (C); Oakley 
Friedrich Edward Meenen (Ag) ; Clifton 
*Carl Arthur Mehl (ChE) ; Robinson 
Willard Henry Meinecke (MI); Herkimer 
George Athlestun Mellard (ME) ; Russell 
Victor Graham Mellquist (ME); 
Leavenworth 
*William Edwin Mentlick (C) ; Colby 
Bert Meriweather (VM); Chetopa 
Douglas Neol Merritt (CE); Atchison 
Richard G. Merryfield (AA) ; 

Minneapolis 
Donald Herman Merten (GS) ; 

Morganville 
Mary Henrietta Mever (HE&N) ; Lillis 
*Kathryn Louise Millard (HE); Zenda 
Frank Miller, Jr. (GS) ; Milford 
Norman Clark Miller (ME); Lyons 
Russell Wayne Miller (AA) ; Lebanon 
Harold Elwin Milligan (Ar) ; Wichita 
Maxine Mae Milner (GS) ; Republic 
Alden Borthwick Miner (EE-1; GS-2); 
Ness City 
*Evan Lynn Mitchell (IA) ; Greenwich 
Mary Margaret Mohr (HE) ; La Cygne 
Virginia Monahan (IM&D) ; Leavenworth 
Dorothy Mae Montgomery (HE) ; Sabetha 
Ralph Ungeheuer Moody" (EE); 

Mound City 
Dale Lewis Moore (Ag) ; Ashland 
Daniel James Moore (ArE) ; Salina 
*Ellen Wauneta Moore (HE) ; Burden 
John Richard Moore (C) ; Atchison 
Willis E. Moore (EE) ; Goff 
*Carl Henry Morales (ME); Leavenworth 
Marjorie Lucile Moree (MuE); Belleville 
Ray Morrison (AA) ; Lamed 
Willard Lee Morrison (EE) ; Liberal 
Donald Lee Morrow (VM-1 ; C-2); 

Concordia 
Marylee Mossman (HE) ; Manhattan 
William John Mount (ME) ; Osawatomie 
Wendell Austin Moyer (Ag) ; Manhattan 
Delores Anna Louise Mueller (HE) ; 

Topeka 
Glen Edward Mueller (C&A) ; Anthony 
John Thomas Muir (C) ; Norton 
Earl Lawrence Mundell (VM) ; 
Kansas Citv 



Margaret Lucille Munger (HE) ; 

Manhattan 
Donald Lee Munzer (C) ; Herington 
Joseph Andrew Murphree (EE) ; 

Kansas City, Mo. 
Barbara Beth Murphy (PE); Manhattan 
Dennis Everett Murphy (IC) ; Little River 
Mabel Lois Murphy (IM&D); Manhattan 
Donald James Murray (C) ; Beloit 
Joseph Donald Musil (EE) ; Manhattan 
Arthur Thomas Mussett (Ag) ; 

Leavenworth 
Byron Eugene Myers (ME) ; Richland 
Walter M. Naylor (CE); Burr Oak 
Eugene Jesse Nease (EE); Jamestown 

*Eugene Crawford Neelancl (MI); Salina 
Alice Belle Neilson (IJ); Mankato 
Edwin Lee Nelson (EE) ; Allen 
Willard Dean Nelson (MI); Haddam 
Donnelle Nesbitt (IM&D); Manhattan 
Joan Nethaway (HE&A) ; Salina 
Richard Carl Nethaway (C) ; Salina 
David Edgar Newman (C) ; Junction City 
John Porter Newman (GS) ; Manhattan 

*Mac Donald Newsom (CE) ; Scott City 
Elmer LeRov Nieman (C) ; Herkimer 
Mildred Elsie Nipper (GS) ; 

Jefferson, Okla. 
Robert Muclge Niquette (Ag) ; 

Garden City 
Robert Spalding Nixon (AA); Manhattan 
Norman Lvnn Noble (CE) ; Johnson 
Louis Etzold Noel (ME); 
Webster Groves, Mo. 

*Robert Bruce Norton (Ag) ; Wichita 
Philip Fredrick Novak (EE) ; Ottawa 
Charles Novich (GS); Yonkers, N. Y. 

*Joseph Wesley Nunemaker (Ag) ; Langdon 
Mabel Ruth O'Brien (IM&D); Muscotah 
Marvin Alvin Ochsner (MI); Tribune 

*Lester Elvin Oertle (AA); Opolis 
Frederick Connell Officer (C&A); Topeka 
Richard Henry Ogle (ME); Scotia, N. Y. 
Dorothy Ruth O'Loughlin (HE) ; Lakin 
Kenneth Dill Olson (C&A); Frankfort 
Dennis Gordon O'Neill (CE) ; Ransom 
Maxine Alma O'Neill (IJ) ; Manhattan 
Lloyd Rueben Orrell (Ag) ; Peck 
Barbara Osborn (HE&A) ; Medicine Lodge 

*Harold Leon Osborne (MI); 
Oklahoma Citv, Okla. 
Aileen Ozment (IM&D); Manhattan 
George VanNoy Packer (ChE) ; Manhattan 
Robert Kerr Page (MI); Topeka 
Corliss Athol Paramore (Ag) ; Delphos 
John Marchbank Parker (GS); Manhattan 

*Wallace William Parker (C) ; Leavenworth 

*Thornton Jones Patton (Ar) : Hamilton 
Cecil Lewis Paulsen (VM); Onaga 
Frank George Paulson (CE) ; Whitewater 
James Wilbur Paustian (C) ; Manhattan 
Loyal Cobb Pavne (VM) ; Manhattan 
Ivan Carlton Peck (AA) ; Soldier 
Velva Aldene Penny (IM&D); Waldron 
George Henry Peircey (C&A) ; 

Waterburv, Conn. 
Keith Pohl Pendergraft (AE) ; Emporia 
Laura Louise Perrv (C) ; Greenleaf 
Ralph Hamilton Perry (C&A); 

Oskaloosa 
Orland Joseph Peterka (IA) ; 

Manhattan 
Carl Adolph Peterson (GS) ; 

Kansas City, Mo. 
Emily Jean Peterson (HE) ; Garrison 
Vernon Hendrick Peterson (EE); 

Weskan 
Everett Wendell Pettit (GS) ; Lyons 



* Matriculated 1938-1939. 



26 



Kansas State College 



Sophomores — Continued 



Maxine Lesta Pickering (HE-1; IJ-2); 

Pratt 
LeRoy Albert Pierce (VM); Manhattan 
Robert Stevens Pierce, Jr. (SH) ; 

Topeka 
Helen Leona Pilcher (IM&D) ; Gridley 
Harry F. Plotkin (Ag) ; Swissvale, Pa. 
Ray Hamlin Pollom, Jr. (GS) ; 

Manhattan 
John Germann Poole (Ag) ; Manhattan 
Cheryl Gertrude Poppen (HE) ; 

Burr Oak 
Rodney Iverson Port (VM) ; 

Cheyenne, Wyo. 
Winfred Laurine Porter (IJ); Belleville 
Herman Albert Praeger (Ag); Claflin 
Elwin Raymond Prather (VM) ; Eureka 
Dale Clarke Prentice (Ag) ; Manhattan 
Frank Robinson Prentice (EE) ; 

Clay Center 
Hubert Glen Priddy (ME); 

North Topeka 
LaVone Anna Puckett (PE) ; Manhattan 
Vinton Wvlie Puckett (C&A) ; Manhattan 
*Paul Archie Puttroff (C&A) ; Newton 
Louis Earl Raburn (EE) ; Manhattan 
Donald Henry Raine (C) ; Maplehill 
Marion Albert Ramage (PE); Manhattan 
Cleda Doris Rambo (IM&D); Paola 
Charles Winston Ramey (C) ; 

Protection 
*Ruth Pauline Ramsay (IM&D) ; Beloit 
Laura Virginia Randall (HE); Ashland 
Wallace Edward Rankin (ChE) ; 

Manhattan 
John Parke Ransom (ME) ; Hom?wood 
Robert B. Rathbone (IC) ; Manhattan 
William Joseph Ratliff (MI); Manhattan 
Lowell Robert Ray (IC) ; Wilson 
*Tom M. Redding (Ag) ; Garden City 
Mary Campion Redner (GS) ; Ft. Riley 
Myron Dale Reed (VM) ; Smith Center 
Arden Reiman (Ag) ; Byers 
Charles Dixon Renfrow (VM); 

West Plains, Mo. 
Gerald Dale Ressel (Ag) ; Colony 
Melvin Ramsom Reust (GS) ; Frankfort 
*Meredith Hooker Reynolds (Ar) ; 

Chicago, 111. 
*Mary Josephine Rhine (HE&A) ; 

Manhattan 
William Dewitt Rhodabarger (ChE); 

Russell 
Ralph Warren Rhodes (AA) ; Silver Lake 
Doris Louise Rice (C) ; Smith Center 
Vivian Pauline Rice (IM&D) ; Greensburg 
Harriett Frances Richardson (HE) ; 

Oswego 
Frank Edgar Rickel (GS) ; Manhattan 
Oliver Virgil Riley (EE); Stafford 
Charles William Rindom (ME); Liberal 
Martha Louise Riordan (IJ) ; Solomon 
Jerry Burr Riseley, Jr. (C&A) ; 

Stockton 
Kathleen Roberts (IM&D); McPherson 
Paul Frederick Robison (C) ; 

Miltonvale 
Alice Harriet Rodkey (HE) ; Manhattan 
Mary Alice Roe (HE) ; Kansas Citv 
Clifford Albert Rogers (C&A) ; Caldwell 
Robert Rex Rogers (IJ) ; Wamego 
John Richard Romig (ChE) ; 

Bethany, Mo. 
Virginia Belle Rooks (HE&A) ; Manhattan 
Bueford Talmage Roper (MuE) ; Atchison 
♦Joseph Jackson Rosacker (AA) ; Emporia 
James Leroy Rose (EE) ; Council Grove 



Margaret Frances Roseman (HE); 
New Cambria 

♦William David Ross (ArE) ; Coffeyville 
Donald Lee Rousey (ME) ; Horton 
Frances Lillian Ruhl (IJ); Hiawatha 
Ruth Roberta Ruhlen (HE) ; Madison 
Wayne Winston Rumold (C&A) ; Elmo 
Fred Lafayette Melvin Runsey (SH) ; 
Kinsley 

*John B. Rush (ChE); Haviland 
Robert Truman Rush (MI); Neodesha 
Eula Jean Rutherford (IM&D); Anthony 
Ruth Elizabeth Salley (HE); Silver Lake 
Moutrie Wilbur Salter (Ag) ; Wakefield 
Ivan Wilbur Salts (AE) ; Mayetta 
Charles Riley Sanford (Ag) ; Milford 
Paul Everett Sanford (Ag) ; Milford 
Alice Mary Santner (HE) ; Gaylord 
Ruth Elouise Santner (HE); Gaylord 
Richard Victorian Sardou (ME); Topeka 
Harold Elwood Saum (C&A) ; Oberlin 
Cleman Luvester Sawyer (EE) ; Wichita 
Norris Elwood Sayre (C) ; Ensign 
Charles Paul Schafer (IC) ; Vermillion 
Paul Frank Schalansky (CE) ; Bunkerhill 
Samuel Arthur Schendel (VM); Richmond 
Keith Merrill Schmedemann (C&A) ; 

Junction City 
August Mangelsdorf Schmeling (EE) ; 

Atchison 
Donald George Schmidt (C) ; Lorraine 
Frances Maxine Schmidt (MuE); Lorraine 
Virginia Helene Schmidt (HE) ; Raymond 
Bernard Lee Schmitt (ME-1; C&A-2); 
Powhattan 

♦Clara Isabel Schnellbacher (IM&D) ; 
Colby 
Marcue Marion Schowalter (IJ) ; Halstead 
George Davis Schumacher (GS); Lyons 
Harold Edward Schwartz, Jr. (ME); 

Wichita 
Daniel Scott (ChE) ; Garfield 
Jean Jewett Scott (HE) ; Manhattan 

*E'ldon Ralph Sechler (ArE); Hutchinson 
Richard Joe Seitz (Ag) ; Leavenworth 
Helen Marie Sellens (HE) ; Hoisington 
William Bain Sellers (ME); Winfield 

*John Victor Sette (CE); Corona, N. Y. 
Manette Sexson (HE) ; Goodland 
Emerson Hugh Shade (ChE) ; Rantoul 
Ophelia Deborah Sharp (HE); Great Bend 

♦Harriett Frances Sharpe (HE) ; 
Cleveland Heights, Ohio 
William Dean Shearer (MI); Abilene 
Jack Sheets (EE) ; Cozad, Neb. 
Claude Wesley Shenkel (C&A) ; Lyons 
Helen Aileen Shepard (HE) ; Erie 
Lorrayne Gladys Shepardson (HE) ; 

Junction Citv 
Kathleen Olive Sheppard (IM&D) ; 

Manhattan 
Lois Mae Sherman (PE) ; Grantville 
ValGene K. Sherrard (MuE) ; Great Bend 
Tasker Bryan Sherrill (GS); Republic 
Grant Burks Sherwood (CE) ; 

Independence 
Mary Louise Sherwood (IJ) ; Great Bend 
Joseph Clyde Short (Ag) ; Manhattan 

*DeArline LaVere Shull (PE) ; Kansas City 

♦Raymond Lee Sigg (AA) ; Soldier 
Jenning Wilson Sigley (ME) ; Canton 

♦Norma Margaret Simons (HE) ; Stockton 

♦Henry Lyman Singer (AA) ; Parker 
Robert Edward Sink (EE) ; Culver 
Harry C. Sipe (ME); Wichita 
George Sklar (ChE) ; Manhattan 
Loran Alvin Slaughter (C&A); Manhattan 



* Matriculated 1938-1939. 



List of Students 



27 



Sophomores — Continued 



Laurence Oscar Slief (EE) ; Greensburg 
Irene Eloise Sloan (HE) ; Stratford, Tex. 
Fred Victor Small (Ar) ; Eudora 
Norma Marie Smedley (IJ) ; Kensington 
Robert Milton Smickle (ME); 

Belvidere, N. J. 
Henry Joseph Smies (Ag) ; Courtland 
♦Beth Aileen Smith (HE) ; Bloomington 
Charles Combie Smith (VM) ; 

Kansas City, Mo. 
Charles Lewis Smith (VM) ; Harveyville 
Clifford Edward Smith (ME); Wakeeney 
John Francis Smith (AA) ; Summerfield 
Paul Elbert Smith (Ag) ; Lebanon 
Vernon Eugene Smith (AA) ; Bloomington 
Allen Ellwood Smoll (EE); Wichita 
*Dean Waldron Snow (ChE) ; Neodesha 
Frederick Robert Snyder (PE) ; 

Junction City 
Veryle Edwin Snyder (PE) ; Mayetta 
Mary Pauline Spain (HE&A); Beloit 
Hazel Aldine Spessard (IM&D); 

Junction City 
Margaret Elaine Sramek (HE&N) ; 

McDonald 
Rollin Max Starosta (AA) ; Iola 
Ray Virgil Stauffer (ChE); Onaga 
*Elizabeth Ann Steinheimer (IJ) ; 

Hutchinson 
*Dorothy Jane Steinkirchner (HE) ; Newton 
Robert Charles Stephens (AA) ; Manhattan 
♦Ruth Elaine Stevens (IM&D); Manhattan 
Mary Louise Stevenson (HE) ; Waterville 
Kathleen B. Stewart (IM&D); Stockton 
Jamie B. Stewart (ChE); Gre nsburg 
Mary Lauetta Stewart (IM&D); 

Saffordville 
Raymond Stewart (AA) ; Manhattan 
Ross Merrit Stewart (ChE) ; Greensburg 
Marvin Dean Stitt (VM) ; Clearwater 
*Lawrence Iver Stoland (GS) ; Lawrence 
Arthur Emerson Stoskopf (ME) ; 

Hoisington 
John Quentin Stratton (Ar) ; Minneapolis 
*Mailand Rainey Strunk (ChE); 
Kansas City 
Floyd Jay Stryker (ME) ; Blue Rapids 
George Lester Sundgren (Ag); Coldwater 
Earnestine Alice Sutter (HE); Leon 
Wallace Albert Swanson (GS) ; 

Sharon Springs 
Elver Henry Swart (GS) ; Seneca 
Richard William Swart (VM); Manhattan 
Cecil LeRoy Sweeney (Ag) ; Coldwater 
Perrin Kent Svmns (Ag) ; Atchison 
Fred Saddler Talbot (AA) ; Manhattan 
Arlene Grace Taylor (HE) ; Enterprise 
Maribelle Teichgraeber (HE) ; Eureka 
Robert Arthur Teichgraeber (MI) ; 

McPherson 
Benjamin Wickham Tempero (Ag) ; 

Clay Center 
Wilbur Bevard Tendick (Ag) ; Kismet 
Allis Margaret Terrel (HE) ; Eudora 
James Dow Thackrey (ME) ; 

Camden, Ark. 
John Otis Thisler (IJ) ; Chapman 
Donald James Thomas (VM) ; Oswego 
John William Thomas (ME); Wichita 
♦Ralph Theodore Thomas (ChE); 
Independence 
Walter Ross Thomas (GS) ; Belleville 
Clarence Henry Thompson, Jr. (VM); 
Ozawkie 
♦Ernest Willard Thompson (ChE) ; 
Manhattan 
Harley Franz Thompson, Jr. (C) ; Kinsley 



Wilbur Gerald Thompson (ME); Goff 
Constance Patricia Thurston (IM&D); 

Elmdale 
Elizabeth Lurene Titus (HE); 

Cottonwood Falls 
Jack William Tompkins (C) ; Salina 
Richard Allen Toole (IJ); Goodland 
Raymond Dwayne Topham (AA) ; Wichita 
Theodore Torkelson, Jr. (EE) ; Everest 
Beatta Elizabeth Totten (HE) ; Clifton 
Earl Clair Toynton (VM); Dodge City 
Earlene Eleanor Trekell (HE&A) ; 

Manhattan 
♦Thomas Edmund Trenkle (C) ; Topeka 
Frederick Cecil Trippel (AE) ; Burrton 
Wilbur Gerald Trostle (VM); Hope 
Lewis Mack Turner (PE) ; El Dorado 
*Lois Belle Turner (GS) ; Manhattan 
Donald Radell Tutcher (ChE); Overbrook 
R. V. Tye (GS); Hanover 
Joseph Uhrin (Ag-1 GS-2); 

New York, N. Y. 
Donald Dean Urquhart (IA) ; Wamego 
Wilbur David Van Aken (VM-1; C-2); 

Lyons 
William Henry Vanderbilt (VM) ; Eureka 
Cornelius John Vanderwilt (ArE); 

Solomon 
Loren Loeffler Van Patten (Ag) ; 

Washington 
Dorothy Mae Van Tuyl (HE); Basehor 
Chester Edwin Van Voorhis (C) ; Bucklin 
Blossom Rose Vaughn (HE); Newton 
Roberta Viola Vawter (HE) ; Oakley 
♦Merlyn Everlv Voshell (GS); Dodge Citv 
Catherine Jean Wadlev (IM&D); 

Silver Spring, Md. 
Mirian Lucille Wagaman (HE&A) ; 

Manhattan 
Arthur Edgar Wagar (EE) ; Webber 
Gerald Sigurd Wagstad (MI); Osseo, Wis. 
Norma Irene Waits (PE) ; Wichita 
Carolee Walker (HE); Kansas City, Mo. 
*James Harvev Walker (ME); Emporia 
Ruth Marie Wall (GS); Mahaska 
Frieda Wallace (HE&A); Douglass 
Manet Ross AVallace (IM&D); Hays 
Joe Harrison Walser (CE) ; Manhattan 
John Austin Walters (CE) ; Manhattan 
Dixson Irving Wands (GS) ; Manhattan 
Guv Edward Warner, Jr. (EE) ; Bucklin 
Jack Winfred Warner (EE) ; Clav Center 
Robert Buchanan Washburn (EE) ; 

Manhattan 
Edward Ernest Watkins (AA) ; Wellington 
Lindley Eugene Watson (Ag) ; Peck 
Garold Benjamin Way (EE) ; Wichita 
John Franklin Weary (EE) ; Junction City 
Robert Earl Weatherholt (IA) ; Augusta 
Kenneth Wilson Webb (GS) ; 

Sharon Springs 
Robert Mason Webb (AH&V) ; Neodesha 
Vanora Avelene Weber (HE) ; Caldwell 
♦John Raymond Weddle (AA) ; Fort Scott 
♦Albert George Wehrley (GS) ; Wichita 

Oliver Rex Wells (C) ; Marvsville 
♦Robert Blaine Wells (Ag) ; Manhattan 
William Henry Wells (GS) ; Colony 
Leo Theodore Wendling (AE) ; Halstead 
Cecil Monroe Wenkheimer (SH) ; 

Hutchinson 
Morris Windfred Werner (Ar) ; Corning 
Burton Burge West (AA) ; Meriden 
Robert Wilson West (CE) ; Manhattan 
Don Oliver Whitney (VM) ; Phillipsburg 
Elaine Wicker (MuE); Manhattan 



♦Matriculated 1938-1939. 



28 



Kansas State College 



Sophomores — Concluded 



*Charles Joseph Widman (Ag) ; 
Mead, Neb. 
Wallace Frank Wiehe (MI); Piper 
Margaret Ann Wilkerson (GS) ; 

Smith Center 
George Theodore Wilkie (ChE) ; Topeka 
Nancy Patricia Wilkins (MuE) ; 

Steelville, Mo. 
Harold Luther Williams (C) ; 
Council Grove 
*Jane Williams (IJ) ; Topeka 
*Ralph Williams, Jr. (AE-1; Ag-2) ; 
Dodge City 
Robert Dean Williams (GS); Manhattan 
Ruth LaNelle Willis (IJ); Manhattan 
Abbie Jeanette Wilson (HE) ; Manhattan 
Byron Kimble Wilson (Ag) ; Manhattan 
*Carl Alton Wilson (Ag) ; Quenemo 
John Albert Wilson (EE) ; Webber 
John Hoffman Wilson (ME); Augusta 
Mark Francis Wilson (AH&V); Ashland 
William Horn Wilson (ME) ; Augusta 
Marjorie B. Windhorst (GS); Glasco 
Blanche Maida Winkler (HE) ; Riley 



William Howard Winner (AA) ; Topeka 
John Stanley Winter (Ag) ; Dresden 
Leslie Donald Wise (AA); Clearwater 
Carlyle Philip Woelfer (MI); Manhattan 
Bettv Catherine Wolf (HE) ; McPherson 
Joy Edna Wolffing (HE&N); Manhattan 
Thomas Richard Woods (ChE); Burden 
Frank Edward Woolf (PE) ; Wichita 

'Eugene Ellsworth Woolley (IC-1; MI-2); 

Osborne 
Martha Jane Wreath (HE) ; Manhattan 
Elizabeth Barclay Wright (HE) ; Salina 

'Robert Warren Yeoman (GS) ; Kingman 
Ben Colby York (Ag) ; Manhattan 
Ralph Edgar York (EE-1; C&A-2); 

Dunlap 
Ruth Marie York (HE&N); Dunlap 
Evelyn Ernestine Yost (HE) ; Downs 
Burneta Lucile Young (HE) ; Cheney 
Norman Alfred Young (C&A) ; Hutchinson 

'Albert Warren Yoxall (AA) ; Woodston 
Dale Edwin Zabel (IA) ; Westmoreland 
Joseph Brewer Zahn (GS) ; Miltonvale 
Lawrence Ray Zoberst (AA) ; Gem 



FRESHMEN 



*Maynard Lynn Abrahams (Ag) ; Wayne 
*Harry Clyde Achenbach (C) ; Manhattan 
*Duane Arnold Achenbach (C); Manhattan 
*Archie Reginald Adams (C); Derby 
*Mitchel Eugene Adams (MI); Osborne 
*Mary Kathleen Ahearn (HE) ; Manhattan 
Francis George Ahrendes (VM) ; 

Miltonvale 
*Martha Lou Alexander (HE) ; Hutchinson 
*Robert Harry Alexander (Ag) ; 

Council Grove 
*David Keith Allen (ME); Glen Elder 
*Marjorie Adell Allen (HE); Manhattan 
*Paul L. Allison (CE) ; Delphos 
*Frank Leonard Alquist (GS) ; 

Clay Center 
*Sheldon Duane Alquist (PVM) ; 

Wakefield 
*Margaret Ellen Alsop (HE) ; Manhattan 
*Dorothy Jeanne Amos (IJ); Manhattan 
*AddoLee Mae Anderson (GS) ; Topeka 
Howard Rowles Anderson (EE-1; AA-2); 

Partridge 
*Mary Bernice Anderson (MuE) ; 

Manhattan 
*Paul Quentin Anderson (AE) ; 

Waterville 
Chester Laroy Andres (EE) ; Newton 
*Marshall Dean Angst (GS) ; Enterprise 
*Robert Warren Annis (EE) ; Gypsum 
*Arthur Allen Apnleton (GS) ; Manhattan 
*Wayne Leroy Appleton (VM); Manhattan 
*Harold Eugene Armstrong (PVM) ; 

Centralia 
*James William Armentrout (PE) ; 

Plainville 
*John Peter Asbill (PVM); Davis, Cal. 

Merle James Ashton (GS) ; Salina 
*John Mitchell Atherton (ME); 

Waterbury, Conn. 
*Quentin Leon Ault (PVM); Esbon 
*Ruth Margaret Ausherman (HE); 

North Topeka 
Mack Shupe Austin (ME) ; Wilmore 
*William Hough Avery (Ag) ; Coldwater 
*Floyd Arnold Bacon (Ag) ; Sylvan Grove 
*John Mardie Bail (PE) ; Uniontown, Pa. 
*Shirley Louise Baker (HE&N); 

Hutchinson 



*Benjamin Stockwell Baldwin (IC) ; 

Anthony 
*Bernice Grace Bale (PE) ; Clay Center 

Maurice Ball (VM) ; Newport, R. I. 
*Jean Louise Banbury (HE) ; Wichita 
*Ralph Edward Barker (Ag) ; Douglass 
*Nathalie Darline Barnes (HE); Manhattan 
*Robert Lee Barnett (CE-1; C&A-2); 

Glen Elder 
*Frank Henry Barnhart, Jr. (CE) ; 

Fort Riley 
Maida Levell Barnhart (IJ) ; Fort Riley 
*Shirley Ruth Bartholomew (C) ; Norton 
*William John Bassler (Ag) ; 

Valley Stream, N. Y. 

* Wendell Ross Baxter (ChE) ; Larned 
*Robert C. Bayles (CE) ; Manhattan 
*EVelyn Belle Bearman (HE); Wamego 
*Kermit Edwin Beary (GS-1; AA-2); 

Edson 
*Larry Beaumont (C) ; El Dorado 

* Kenneth Lewis Bechtold (ME) ; 

Courtland 
*Henrv Vorce Beck (GS) ; Colby 

Lee Wilson Beck (VM); EIReno, Okla. 
*Neil Dwane Beckenhauer (PVM) ; 

Delavan 
*Marv Margaret Behrent (MuE) ; Selden 
*Robert Verle Behrent (AE) ; Selden 
*Elizabeth Louise Bell (HE); Osborne 
Mames Bell, Jr. (EE-1; C-2) ; 

Cottonwood Falls 
*Harold Nolan Benham (CE-1; GS-2); 

El Dorado 
*Marjorie Jane Benson (IM&D); Sabetha 

Tod Frances Benson (C) ; Herington 
*RosaIie June Benton (HE); Norton 
*Dale Vernon Berger (MuE); Abilene 
Or do Frank Berges (CE') ; Onaga 
*Sylvia Louise Bergling (C&A) ; Ludell 
*George Albert Berlin (IJ); Wakefield 
*Waldemar T. Berner (VM) ; 

Santa Rosa, Cal. 
*Grant Winfield Berry (PVM); Mankato 
*Donald Earl Berthall (Ag) ; Spivey 
*Leo Russel Best (ChE); Bushong 
*John Richard Bicknell (PVM); Parsons 
*Hedden L. V. Biffer (EE); Wichita 
*Phvllis Evelyn Billings (IM&D); Topeka 



* Matriculated 1938-1939. 



List of Students 



29 



Freshmen — Continued 



*Clara Jane Billingsley (M) ; Belleville 
*George J. Bird (A) ; 

Fajardo, Puerto Rico 
*Lee Edwin Bird (AE) ; Great Bend 
*Gladys EmaLou Biriline (IJ) ; Lewis 
*William Royce Bixler (ME) ; Emporia 
*Lloyd Harris Bjurstrom (Ag) ; Marysville 
*Wilbur Eugene Black (ChE) ; Mulvane 
*Dan Miller Blair (Ag) ; Belleville 
*Joseph Loren Blattner (CE); Rozel 

Ralph Willard Blazier (VM) ; 
Junction City 
*Helen Marie Blanberg (IM&D); 

Manhattan 
♦Wilbur Francis Boeh (PVM) ; Wathena 

Lyle Thomas Boley (PVM); Manhattan 

* Marian Frances Boomer (C) ; Kansas City 
♦Myron Allison Boone (Ag) ; Neal 

*Jean Evelyn Botkin (HE) ; Harper 
*Harry Phillips Bouck (IJ) ; Manhattan 
♦James Alfred Bower (MI); Norton 
*Don Raymond Bowers (GS); Downs 
William Franklin Bowers (C) ; Paola 

* James Marston Bowyer, Jr. (ME) ; 

Courtland 
♦Douglas Fleurnoy Box (MI) ; 

McKinney, Tex. 
*Gordon Frank Boy (Ag) ; Raymond 
♦Willis Gray Boyd (EE) ; Meade 
♦Darrell Ray Bozarth (Ag) ; Liberal 
*Gilbert Branda (Ag) ; Wilson 
♦Edward Charles Brann (EE) ; Wichita 
♦George William Brannan (ChE); Larned 
♦Goodwin Bennett Branstad (PVM); 

Grantsburg, Wis. 
♦Lester Joseph Brenneis (GS); Hollenberg 
♦Normazee Jeraldine Brent (IM&D); Alton 
♦Archie Norman Brewer (PVM) ; 

Concordia 
♦Elizabeth Louise Brewer (MuE); 

Minneapolis 
♦Wilbur Raymond Brewer (AE) ; Topeka 
♦Lorene Bricker (C) ; At wood 
♦John Hooper Briggs (PE) ; Collyer 
Cruger Lane Bright (VM) ; Junction City 
James Eugene Bright (VM); 

Arlington, N. J. 
♦Allen Lee Brite (VM); Kansas City 
♦Felix Bronner (IC) ; Berlin. Germany 
♦Jack Pennock Brooks (C) ; Norton 
♦Marcene Irene Brose (PE) ; Clay Center 
♦Acton Richard Brown (Ag) ; 

Sylvan Grove 
♦Allen Oscar Brown (Ar) ; Osborne 
♦Almira Josephine Brown (HE) ; 

Junction City 
♦Dale Edward Brown (Ag) ; Manhattan 
♦Donald Wayne Brown (C&A) ; Paradise 

Douglas Wilbur Brown (C) ; Abilene 
♦Francis Hoyt Brown (PVM) ; Manhattan 
♦Gordon Michael Brown (CE) ; Lawrence 
♦James Seba Brown (ME) ; Sterling 
♦John Leon Brown (EE) ; Great Bend 

Lloyd N. Brown (C) ; Manhattan 
♦Martha Jane Brown (HE) ; Manhattan 
♦Robert Myron Brown (E) ; Natoma 
♦Thomas Ragan Brown (ME) ; Manhattan 
♦Wayne Edward Brown (C) ; Manhattan 
♦Doris Mathalie Brubaker (HE&A); 

Manhattan 
♦Ralph A. Bruce (VM) ; Prescott 
♦Jeanette Merrium Brunscher (PE) ; 

Mulvane 
♦Clara Ellen Brush (HE) ; Wichita 
♦Benjamin Raleigh Brvant (GS) ; Garnett 
♦Weslev F. Buchele (AE) ; Cedar Vale 
♦Carroll La R hue Buck (HE) ; Welda 



♦Raymond Elmore Bull (ME); Marysville 
♦Herbert Lawrence Bunker (GS) ; 

Junction City 
♦Margaret Ellis Bunker (C) ; 

Kansas City, Mo. 
♦Orley Glade Burgess (ME); Arnold 
♦Maurice Owen Burke (MI); Whitewater 
♦Wilfred Eugene Burnham (IJ) ; St. Francis 
William Harold Burns (C) ; Arkansas City 
♦Cornelia Lee Burtis (IM&D); Hymer 
♦Margie Marion Burton (IJ) ; White City 
♦Schelte John Bus (PVM); 

Edgerton, Minn. 
♦Burson George Busset (PVM) ; Le Roy 
♦Martin Eugene Butler (ME) ; Clayton 
♦Arden Byers (CE) ; Jewell 
♦Cecil Eugene Byers (ME); Ulysses 
♦Mildred Mussette Cade (IM&D); 

Manhattan 
♦Richard Lee Cadwell, Jr. (Ag) ; 

Marquette 
♦John Dale Cady (VM) ; Arlington, Neb. 
♦Eugene Haile Callahan (Ag) ; Wichita 
♦Robert James Callahan (IJ) ; Manhattan 
♦Hugh Port Callaway (VM) ; 

Grand Pass, Mo. 
♦George Baldwin Callow (EE) ; Garnett 
♦John Carl Campbell (AE) ; Wilsey 
♦Ronald Wayne Campbell (Ag) ; 

Cherryvale 
♦Vivian Pauline Cann (HE-1 ; C-2); 

Atchison 
♦Everett Elwin Cannon (EE) ; Thrall 
♦Hugh Louis Caraway (PVM) ; 

Shreveport, La. 
♦Robert William Caraway (SH); 

Shreveport, La. 
♦Joseph Icon Carpenter (PVM) ; 

Mulberry 
♦Robert Alfred Carpenter (ChE) ; Oswego 
♦Harvey Russel Carsen (ME); 

Council Grove 
♦Clifford Erie Case (Ag) ; Coldwater 
♦Jessie Marie Cassidy (HE&N); Cummings 

Juan Loza Castillo (PE) ; Spearville 

♦Shirley Marie Castor (HE); Topeka 

Ward Elmer Cavender (C) ; Abilene 

♦Edward Sherman Chandler (PVM) ; 

Independence, Mo. 
♦Beverly Ross Chapin (ME); Wichita 
♦Doryce Lillian Chapin (GS); Manhattan 
♦Chatalyn May Chapman (PVM); 

Manhattan 
♦Cora Margaret Chapman (HE) ; 

Scotia, N. Y. 
♦Leo Ramey Chapman (C&A) ; Clay Center 
Rodney Elmer Chapman (Ag) ; Manhattan 
♦William Edward Charlson (GS); 

Manhattan 
♦Maurice Edward Chase (Ag) ; Effingham 
♦Richard George Checksfield (EE) ; Topeka 
Brainerd Glenn Cherry (PVM) ; 

Redwood Falls, Minn. 
Dale Lloyd Cherry (VM) ; 

Redwood Falls, Minn. 
♦Robert Eugene Chestnutt (EE) ; Concordia 
Donald Keith Christian (VM) ; 

Manhattan 
♦Paul Quintin Chronister (Ag) ; Abilene 
♦Edwin James Chubb (CE-1; C&A-2); 

Nickerson 
♦Thomas Riley Church (EE) ; Minneola 
♦Clifford Lawrence Claar (Ag) ; Rexford 
♦Buford Lorain Clark (GS) ; Norcatur 
♦Charles Eldon Clark (AA) ; Paxico 

James Edward Clark (Ag) ; Effingham 
♦Otis Lvle Clark (AE) ; Webber 



* Matriculated 1938-1939. 



30 



Kansas State College 



Freshmen — Continued 



♦Shirley Louise Clay (C) ; Meade 
*Lorraine Florence Clements (IM&D); 

Havensville 
♦Keith Smith Clevenger (PVM) ; 

Kingsdown 
♦Glen Edwin Cline (ArE) ; Fredonia 
*Albert Swift Coates, Jr. (PVM); 

Kansas City 
♦Charlotte Jean Cockerill (IM&D) ; 

Frankfort 
Ralph Eldon Cogswell (AA) ; Topeka 
*William Glenn Collie (GS) ; Jewell 
Cleve Harris Collinsworth (ME); 

Rosalia 
*James Dennison Colt III (GS) ; 

Manhattan 
*Max Raymond Col well (ME); Centralia 
*Henry Larsen Comley (MI-1 ; C-2) ; 

Wichita 
*Neel Leon Conley (PVM) ; Wellington 
*Arlon Duane Conrad (Ar) ; Clay Center 
*Harry Hunt Converse (AE) ; Eskridge 
♦George Henry Cook (GS) ; Concordia 
John Allen Cook (VM) ; Lamed 
John Daniel Cook (AA) ; Abilene 
*Norman Eugene Cooley (C) ; Newton 
♦Robert Kenneth Cooper (ME) ; Riverdale 
♦Wilson Dale Cooper (ChE) ; Riverdale 
♦Donald Rolfe Corbet (C) ; 

Little Rock, Ark 
Arthur LaRue Couch (C&A) ; Phillipsburg 
*Marjorie Jean Courter (HE) ; Severy 
* James Harry Cowie (I J) ; Herington 
*Harrv Cowman, Jr. (AA) ; Lost Springs 
*Lyle Ashton Cox (ChE) ; Atchison 

Glen Thomas Crawford (Ag) ; Manhattan 
♦Ralph Hamel Creager (GS) ; 

West Alexandria, Ohio 
♦Riley Tieman Crow (Ag) ; 

independence, Mo. 
♦James Robert Cushing (Ar) ; Manhattan 
♦Kenneth Marion Cusick (IC-1 ; ChE-2) ; 

Wichita 
♦Max William Dail (C&A); Fulton 
♦Edna Marguerite Dailey (IJ-1; HE&A-2); 

Manhattan 
George Ted Dalziel (VM) ; 

San Francisco, Cal. 
♦Sylves Carroll Dam (PVM-1; ME-2); 

Marysville 
♦Carl Virgil Danielson (CE) ; Lindsborg 
♦Edwin Speight Darden (C&A) ; Manhattan 
John Henry Darnell (MI); 

Los Angeles, Cal. 
♦William Elsworth Daseler (VM) ; 

Oroville, Cal. 
♦William Russell Davis (EE) ; Topeka 

Lail Keith Dawley (PVM) ; Manhattan 
♦Clifford Wayne Day (AE) ; Weir 
♦Nelson Woodrow Dayhoff (CE) ; Abilene 
♦William Paul Deam (Ag) ; Manhattan 
♦Willits Clarkson DeArmond (GS) ; 

Manhattan 
Joseph William DeBord (C) ; Centralia 
♦Charles Richard Dedrick (AA) ; Parker 
♦Leonard Austin Deets (AA) ; South Haven 
♦Cleo Edward Delaney (GS-1 ; Ag-2) ; 

Alton 
♦Martha Lorraine DeMand (HE) ; 

Lincolnville 
♦Ethel Dorothy Denio (IM&D); 

Woodston 
♦Anita Romona Denison (HE) ; Salina 
Walter Eugene Dent (ME) ; 

Junction City 
♦Catherine Eileen Detrich (MuE) ; 

Chapman 



♦Hiram Benjamin Dickson (PE) ; Admire 
♦Charles Diehl, Jr. (GS) ; Manhattan 
♦LeRov Ernest Dietrich (PVM); Wichita 
♦Evan Davis Dildine (GS); Delphos 
♦Dwight Francis Dill (EE); Winchester 

Robert Preston Dille (GS) ; 
Tacoma, Wash. 
♦Richard Owen Disnev (EE) ; Topeka 
♦Allen Arthur Divilbiss (GS) ; Winfield 
♦Charlotte Baenen Dixon (C) ; 

Junction City 
♦John Sayler Doak (C) ; Olathe 
♦Bettv Lee Doctor (IM&D); Belleville 
♦Morris John Dodrill (MI); Ottawa 

Richard Wilbur Dodrill (AE) ; Ottawa 
♦Maxine Frances Dolan (HE) ; Clifton 
♦Harold Ravmond Domoney (ArE) ; Downs 
♦Dennis Ralph Donahue (PVM); 

Bonner Springs 
♦Mary Jane Donham (HE) ; Manhattan 
♦George Edgar Douros (ME); Topeka 
♦Keith Warnell Downey (VM) ; 

Appleton, Wis. 
♦Gene Plesse Doyle (IC) ; Wamego 
♦Roy Dean Drown (GS) ; Manhattan 
♦Donald Kenneth Dubois (MI); 

Burlingame 
♦Esther Tabea Dumler (HE) ; Gorham 

William Emanuel Dumler (AA); Russell 
♦Dean Cuthbert Dunham (EE) ; Topeka 
♦Olivia Alfleda Dunham (HE); Jewell 

Harrv Harold Dunlap (EE) ; Liberal 
♦Robert Matthew Dunlap (ME); Liberal 
♦Carlyle Richard Dunn (CE) ; Manhattan 
♦Donald Kent Duwe (ME) ; Lucas 
♦Dale Hamlin Dyer (C) ; Clearwater 
♦James Francis Eagn (EE) ; Axtell 
♦Leonard LeRoy Easterday (Ag) ; 

Englewood 
♦Virginia Lind Eastman (IJ) ; 

Bucklin 
♦Von Eloise Eastman (HE) ; 

Matfield Green 
♦Norman Curtis Eatinger (Ag) ; Raymond 
♦John Springer Eaton (AE) ; Hutchinson 
♦Harry Leslie Eddv (GS) ; Topeka 
♦Lyle Harris Edelblute (GS) ; Manhattan 
♦Arthur Calvin E'dinger (ME); Caney 

Leslie Ruel Edrington (VM); Manhattan 
♦Alger Rex Ehrsam (Ag) ; Bern 

Melvin Leroy Ehstein (Ag) ; Perry 
♦Victor Einsel (Ag) ; Greensburg 
♦Edward Himes Elling (MI); Manhattan 

Charles Robert Elliott (C&A); 
Osawatomie 
♦Albert Murray Ellis (PVM); 
Fort Leavenworth 

Keith Eldred Elmore (C) ; Lewis 
♦Lucille Elizabeth Elmore (C) ; 

McCracken 
♦Beth Kathleen Emmert (HE) ; Manhattan 
♦Perry C. Emmons (PE) ; Lenora 

Elton A. Endacott (Ag) ; Manhattan 
♦Barbara Ruth Enlow (PE) ; 

Silver Spring, Md. 
♦Winifred Jane Enns (HE) ; Inman 
♦Glenys Marie Erichsen (HE) ; Manhattan 
♦Dorothy Rachel Erickson (HE) ; Cleburne 

Loren Dean Eshelman (ArE) ; Abilene 
♦Raymond Keith Eshelman (C&A) ; 

Sedgwick 
♦Phyllis Loretta E'step (HE) ; Marysville 
♦Kendall Wayne Evans (IJ); Manhattan 
♦Richard Lewis Evans, Jr. (Ag) ; 
Hutchinson 

Calvert Lewis Evins (ME); St. Francis 

Wallace Aurie Fager (AE) ; Wakarusa 



♦ Matriculated 1938-1939. 



List of Students 



31 



Frbs h m en — Contin ued 



Mean Elaine Falkenrich (IM&D); 

Manhattan 
*Clifford Earl Fanning (AE) ; Melvern 
*Violet Hazel Farmer (GS) ; Fredonia 
*Max Clifford Farrar (ME); Norwich 
♦Seymour Feldman (PVM) ; Camden, N. J. 
♦George J. Fetters (EE) ; Manhattan 
*Jack Byron Fields (SH) ; Onaga 

John Edward Fieser (VM) ; Norwich 
♦Raymond Elmer Fincham (Ag) ; Waterville 
*John Finlay (ChE) ; West Mineral 
*Gerald Keith Fish (AA) ; Neodesha 
*Robert Haydn Fisher (GS) ; Belleville 
*William Halpin Fitzsimmons (ME 1 ) ; 

Macksville 
*James Patrick Fitzwilliam (EE) ; Wichita 
*Donald Edwin Fleming (C) ; Ottawa 
♦Eugene Miller Fletcher (ME) ; Meade 
Lynn Dewell Fleury (Ag) ; Jamestown 
*Robert Carl Floersch (C&A) ; Manhattan 
♦Mary Jane Flower (IJ) ; Junction City 
♦Max Wayne Floyd (Ag) ; Ottawa 
*Bill Page Folck (GS) ; Junction City 
♦Patsy Forbes (HE); Topeka 
♦Virginia Maye Ford (IM&D); Manhattan 
♦Thomas Earl Forster (ME); Wichita 
♦Loyal Delbert Fortmever (EE) ; Ruleton 
Mack Elbert Fox (VM) ; Kansas City 
*Lowell Enos Fox (Ag) ; Kansas City, Mo. 
*Carl Harmon Francisco, Jr. (Ag) ; Edna 
♦Harold William Frasier (AA) ; 

Sharon Springs 
*Helen Mae Frasier (HE) ; Sharon Springs 
♦Ralph Kellum Fredrickson (EE) ; 

St. Francis 
*June Elizabeth Freed (IJ) ; Scandia 
♦Elgena Eoy Freeman (ChE); Eureka 
♦Homer Woodrow Freeman (CE) ; Chapman 
*True B. Fretzs (ME); Wichita 
♦George Henry Fritz (Ag) ; Lake City 
*Alma Dean Fuller (IJ) ; Courtland 
*Evelvn Dorothy Fuller (HE-1 ; GS-2) ; 

Courtland 
♦Mabyn Beth Fuller (HE); Manhattan 
♦Esther Elizabeth Fulmer (HE) ; Wamego 
'Walter Dale Furst (C&A) ; Goff 
Mane Frances Galbraith (HE&N); 

Cottonwood Falls 
♦Samuel Jackson Galloway (PVM) ; 

West Plains, Mo. 
♦Glen Gilbert Gardner (EE) ; Clifton 
Mohn Pershing Garrett (VM) ; Joplin, Mo. 
♦Theodore Elden Garrett (EE) ; Shawnee 
*Bettie Irene Garrison (HE) ; Waverly 
*Scott Harold Gasche (ME); Hartford 

William Samuelson Gaston (VM) ; Axtell 
♦Nancy Katharine Gentry (HE) ; Salina 
*Donald Wayne George (Ag) ; 

North Topeka 
♦Robert Homer George (AA) ; Burlingame 
*Merrill Claiborne Gerkin (Ag) ; Fredonia 
*Warren Leo Gibbs (AE) ; Kansas City 
♦Falcnor L. Gifford (Ag) ; Haviland 
♦Henry Cleveland Gile, Jr. (ME); 

Wellington 
Mane Giles (GS) ; Abilene 
*Robert Wesley Gilger (GS) ; Montezuma 
*Emma Lou Gillett (IJ) ; Westmoreland 
♦Chester William Gist (ME); Manhattan 

Jay Edwin Givens (AA) ; Manhattan 
♦Eldon Dale Gladow (AA) ; Alma 
♦Margaret Jane Glass (HE) ; Wichita 
♦Charles Jerome Glotzbach (GS) ; Paxico 
♦Oscar Joseph Glotzbach (Ag) ; Paxico 
Charles Richard Goff (C) ; 

Estelline, S. Dak. 
♦Meyer Ben Goldfarb (Ag) ; 

Newark, N. J. 



*William Arnold Gonser (Ar) ; 

Leavenworth 
*Nellie Jane Goodhue (IJ) ; Edson 
♦Foster Samuel Goodlett, Jr. (PVM); 

Omaha, Neb. 
♦Vesta Kathleen Goodman (C) ; 

Ness City 
*Edythe Elaine Goodwin (HE) ; Gypsum 
♦Virginia Alberta Goodwin (IM&D); 

Hiawatha 
♦Leonard Earl Gordon (Ag) ; Manhattan 
Richard John Gorman (VM) ; 

East Hartford, Conn. 
*Peter Earl Gory (PVM); Hoisington 
♦Francis Baxter Goss (GS) ; 

Osawatomie 
♦Alice Elizabeth Grandfield (HE); 

Manhattan 
♦Rex Demonte Grauerholz (GS) ; Esbcn 

Lowell Glen Graves (ME); Clifton 
♦Robert Medless Graves (ME); 

Independence 
♦Loren Courtney Gray (ChE) ; Salina 

Charles Francis Green (C&A) ; Wichita 
♦Frances Elaine Green (GS); Westmoreland 
♦James Michael Green (Ar) ; Manhattan 
♦Robert Eugene Green (C) ; Wichita 
♦Blanche Marie Greene (HE&A) ; 

Manhattan 
♦Frederick Dempcy Greenleaf (ME); 

Greensburg 
Fredrick Hamilton Greenway (ME) ; 

Kansas City 
♦William Randolph Greenwood (ArE) ; 

Topeka 
♦Paul Eugene Griffin (Ar) ; Manhattan 
♦Norman Jay Griffith (AA) ; Clayton 
♦Gordon B. Grimwood (C&A); 

Sedgwick 
♦Mary Elizabeth Griswold (IM&D); 

Marysville 
♦Carolyn Grogger (IJ) ; Solomon 

Harold William Grote (Ag) ; Manhattan 
♦James Gordon Groves (ChE) ; McPherson 
♦Geraldine Gundy (M) ; Manhattan 
♦Alice Crosby Gunn (HE&A) ; 

Kansas City, Mo. 
♦Lyle Woodrow Gunter (EE) ; White City 
♦Gerald Gurss (PVM) ; Burlingame 
Hugh Leon Gurwell (C) ; Wichita 
♦James Wylie Guy (ME); Chicago, 111. 
♦Roy Emerson Gwin (GS) ; Leoti 

John Henrv Haeberle (GS); Clearwater 
♦Eula Marie Hagan (IJ) ; St. Marys 
♦Arden Kenneth Hale (IJ); Mankato 
♦Frances Margaret Hall (GS); 

Junction City 
Freeman Milton Hall (VM) ; Kansas City 
Mack Lee Hall (ChE); Salina 
♦Milton C. Hall, Jr. (IJ) ; Leavenworth 
♦Charles Ham, Jr. (ME); Marysville 
♦Harold John Hamilton (CE) ; Corning 
♦Stanley Darwin Hammett (C) ; 

Blue Rapids 
Mohn Harvey Hancock (C&A) ; 

St. Francis 
♦Robert Thomas Handel (PVM) ; 

Napa, Cal. 
William A. Hanly (GS) ; Manhattan 
♦Wilma Mae Hannah (HE); Osborne 
♦Ardyce Louise Hanson (GS) : Garrison 
Sophia Nora Hantman (IM&D) ; 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 
♦Randall Olen Harbour (ME) ; Osage City 
♦George Harner (PVM) ; Memphis, Tenn. 
♦Ernest Owen Harris (Ag) ; Havensville 



* Matriculated 1938-1939. 



32 



Kansas State College 



Freshmen — Continued 



*Lela LaVetta Harris (IM&D); Fowler 
*Wilbur Wynn Hart (AA) ; Mayetta 
*William Eugene Hartman (Ag) ; Hoxie 
Basil Orman Hartwell, Jr. (ME); 

Drexel, Mo. 
*Roy Sears Harvey (C&A) ; Junction City 
Edward Harry Hashagen (GS) ; 

Leavenworth 
Robert Emmett Hauke (VM) ; Meriden 
*John Gilbert Hayden, Jr. (PVM); 

Twin Falls, Idaho 
♦Jane Haymaker (HE) ; Manhattan 

Wayland Bradford Haynes (EE) ; Topeka 
♦Jeanne Francees Hayward (HE); Rolla 
♦Charles Edward Haywood (Ag-1; AE-2) ; 

Fowler 
♦Marie Katherine Healy (HE) ; Herington 
*Virginia May Hecht (IJ); Seneca 

Don C. Heffelbower (VM); Newton 
*Ervin Lawrence Hefner (GS) ; St. Francis 
*Harvey Harlan Hefner (C&A); Gove 
*Compton Ervin Heggv (EE) ; Stafford 
*Kenneth Eugene Hein (EE) ; Rose Hill 
♦Vernon Lee Heitman (Ag) ; Dellvale 
*Alice Marie Hejtmanek (IM&D); Delia 
*Robert Henry Hellener (Ag-1; C-2); 

Wichita 
*Herman Delford Heltzel (MuE) ; 

Atchison 
*John Mearl Hemphill (ME); Greensburg 
*George Wilson Hendershot (C-l ; ME-2); 

Lone Elm 
*Wilbur Ellis Hendershot (Ag) ; 

Hutchinson 
Elmer Henderson (AA) ; Iuka 
♦Irma Ruth Henderson (HE); Topeka 
♦Lester Joe Henderson (CE); Hollenberg 
*Neva Nadine Hendricks (HE); Oberlin 
♦Keith Donald Henrikson (PVM); 

Manhattan 
*Alma Katheryn Henry (HE) ; Lecompton 
*Robert Wayne Hentzler (PVM); Topeka 

William Carl Hentzler (PVM); Topeka 
♦Eugene Charles Hersche (MI) ; Bucyrus 
*James Sterling Hervey (PVM); 

Belle Plaine 
♦Robert William Hester (AE') ; Kansas City 
*Jack Heter (Ag) ; Sterling 
Frank Albert Hetzke (ChE); Moundridge 
Julius A. Heyer (MI) ; Marysville 
George Hickman (VM); Atchison 
*Jess William Hicks (C) Herington 
*Robert Lester Higginbottom (GS) ; 

Fredonia 
♦Albert Lyle Higgins (IJ) ; Linn 

Harold Marvin Hildwein (C) ; Fairview 
*Margaret Louise Hill (HE); Topeka 
♦Wayne Lester Hill (ME); Topeka 
*Dale Lee Hills (ME); Simpson 
♦Clyde Ivan Hinricks (EE) ; Leonardville 
♦Eulene Gayle Hirmon (HE); Cuba 
*Kermit Blair Hobbie (Ag) ; Tipton 
♦Lawrence Leland Hobson (ME) ; Kingman 
♦Charles Willis Hodgson (AE) ; Little River 
Clovis Foreaker Hodgson (AA) ; Jamestown 
♦Etta Mav Hodgson (HE 1 ' : Harvpvville 
Mack Coyle Hodshire (ME); Coffeyville 
*Lucille Eileen Hoffman (C) ; Haddam 
William Maurice Hoge (Ar) ; 

Carthage, Mo. 
♦Hellen Virginia Holbert (HE&N); Solomon 
♦Wilber Glen Hole (EE) ; Topeka 
*Orvin Hugh Holler (GS) ; Conway 
♦Don Franklin Holshouser (EE) ; D wight 
♦Arthur Herman Holste (AE) ; Ludell 
♦Henry Van Hoover (C&A) ; Macksville 



*Howard Kenneth Hoover (ChE) ; 

Arlington, Va. 
♦Joseph Benedict Hoover (IC-1 ; ChE-2); 

Greenleaf 
♦Julia Janes Hoover (IM&D) ; Kansas City 
*Leonard Ralph Hoover (CE); Manhattan 
*Lola Laura Hoover (IM&D); Ford 
♦Ruth Elsie Hopper (C&A) ; Manhattan 
*Anna Marie Horn (HE&A) ; Horton 
*Myron Finley Hornbaker (EE-1; Ag-2); 

Hutchinson 
♦Dorothy May Horstick (HE); Richmond 
♦Harold William Hossfeld (EE); Willis 

LaMonta June Hough (HE) ; Holton 
*Daniel Frederick Howe (AE) ; Stockdale 
*Murlin Thomas Howerton (ChE) ; Newton 

Robert H. Hubbell (EE); Fredonia 
*Eula Merna Hudson (HE) ; Wilsey 
*H. Paul Hudson (ME); Topeka 
♦Edward Barrett Huff (GS); Marysville 
*Robert Vern Huffman (ME); 

Kansas City, Mo. 
Ansel Elvin Hugunin (Ag) ; Manhattan 
♦Norris Arthur Hulett (PVM); 

Kendallville, Ind. 
*Joseph Seymour Hull, Jr. (PVM); 

West Plains, Mo. 
♦June Delore Hull (GS) ; Dodge City 
*Phillip Hamilton Humfeld (ME); 

Clav Center 
♦Orville William Hundley (MI); 

Leavenworth 
*Almond Dean Hunt (MI); Osborne 
*Bruce Harper Hunt (AE) ; Topeka 
♦Donald Munro Hunt (Ag) ; Manhattan 
♦Charles Calvin Hunter (EE); Ottawa 
♦Howard Edwin Hunter (AE) ; Emporia 
*Betty Elaine Hutchinson (HE); Goddard 
*Joe Gene Hutchison (PVM) ; Natoma 
♦Thomas Junior Hutchison (ChE) ; 

Burlingame 
♦Archie Richard Hyle (CE); Madison 
*George Nelson Inskeep (Ag) ; Manhattan 
*Kenneth Edgar Ireland (ChE); Toronto 
*Loyd Scott Irwin (PVM); Wilsey 

Newton Kelly Irwin (VM) ; Highland 
♦Donald Keith Issitt (ME); Woodbine 
♦Oliver Conrad Jackson (Ag) ; Elsmore 
*Virgil Le Roy Jackson (GS) ; Frankfort 
♦Brutus Leonard Jacobs (Ag) ; Harper 
*George Preston James (Ag) ; 

East Greenwich, R. I. 
♦Jeanne Frances James (HE&A) ; 

Manhattan 
*Gerald Alwin Jamison (PE); Wichita 
*Henry Lawrence Janssen (ME); Lyons 
♦Walker John Jelinek (Ar) ; Beloit 
*Dwight Hillis Jenkins (CE) ; Woodbine 
♦Ralph Vincent Jennings (ME); Arnold 
*Quentin Ellsworth Jeppesen (VM) ; 

Garden City, Minn. 
*James Edward Johns (EE) ; Topeka 
*Alice Marie Johnson (HE) ; Olsburg 
*Bruce Phillip Johnson (IJ) ; Salina 
*Cecil Loring Johnson (ChE) ; Wamego 
*Dorothy Ruth Johnson (HE) ; Manhattan 
♦Eldon Max Johnson (AA) ; Canton 
*Herbert Warren Johnson (IJ) ; Scandia 
♦John Berton Johnson (AA) ; 

Saffordville 
♦John Franklin Johnson (GS) ; 

Nemaha, Neb. 
♦Lorraine Lawrence Johnson (ME) ; 

Concordia 
♦Mary Lucile Johnson (HE) ; Osage City 
♦Maxine Elinor Johnson (GS) ; Manhattan 



♦ Matriculated 1938-1939. 



List of Students 



33 



Freshmen — Continued 



*Melvin Louis Johnson (EE) ; Quinter 
*Morris Lyle Johnson (MI) ; Manhattan 
♦Raymond Ernest Johnson (GS) ; 

Manhattan 
Raymond Marion Johnson, Jr. (C) ; 

McPherson 
♦Romaine Edwin Johnson (GS) ; Manhattan 
William Pitner Johnson (VM); Manhattan 
♦Charles Otis Johnston (Ag) ; Manhattan 
*Max Edward Johnston (Ar) ; Iola 
*LeRoy Jule Jolley (IJ) ; Abilene 
*Earl Dwight Jones (EE) ; Wichita 
♦Edmund Wesley Jones (IC) ; Fredonia 
Gladys Irene Jones (HE) ; Reading 
Herbert Andy Jones (C) ; Mulvane 
♦Joyce Javene Jones (HE) ; Hanover 
*Mona Marie Jones (HE&A) ; Wichita 
*Robert Jonathan Jones (MI) ; Wichita 
*Salem Ford Jones (ChE) ; Junction City 
*Gladys June Jorden (HE) ; Goff 
*Betty Virginia Jorgensen (MuE) ; 

Manhattan 
*Walter Robert Joy (Ag) ; Hays 
May Hans Kalin (EE) ; Belleville 
♦Emil William Karl (IJ) ; Detroit 
♦David Edwin Karnowski (AA) ; Paxico 
♦Ed Karns, III (ME) ; Coffeyville 
*Doris Mae Kastner (HE&A) ; Manhattan 
♦Robert Junior Katz (GS) ; Manhattan 
♦Philip Gibbs Kaul (ME) ; Holton 
♦Fred Anthony Kays (CE) ; Eureka 
*Ray Albert Keen (GS-1; SH-2); 

Topeka 
Herbert Jack Keene (VM) ; Junction City 
♦Vernon Dennis Keim (Ag) ; Detroit 
*Evelyn Davies Keiter (HE) ; Manhattan 
*Richard McClanahan Keith (M) ; 

Manhattan 
*William Gibbens Kelly (MI) ; Hutchinson 
♦Scott Winfield Kelsey (Ag) ; Topeka 
♦Raymond Orville Keltner (ChE) ; 

Hoisington 
♦Margaret Belle Kerr (HE&A) ; 

Hackensack, N. J. 
♦Dale Lee Kershner (EE-1; GS-2); 

Douglass 
♦Milroy Vencil Kesl (ME) ; Cuba 
♦John Leonard Kidwell (ArE) ; Wichita 
♦Gerald Ingvard Kier (GS) ; Mankato 
♦Kenneth E. C. Kimbell (PVM); Caney 

Lyle Kimsey (C) ; Smith Center 
♦Marjorie Vivien Kimsey (HE&A) ; 

Simpson 
♦Janet Elizabeth King (PE) ; Wichita 

Leo Floyd King (Ag) ; Lewis 
♦Reva Alma King (IM&D-l; GS-2); 

Council Grove 
Virginia Lee King (HE) ; Manhattan 
Harry Melvin Kingsley (AA) ; Hays 
♦Murray Luther Kinman (AA) ; Wamego 
♦Carlton Miller Kinzler (Ag) ; 

Sturgis, Mich. 
♦Maxine Elizabeth Kirgis (IM&D) ; 

Cawker City 
Arthur Durward Kirk (VM) ; Scott City 
♦Edward Earl Kirkham (ME) ; Topeka 
♦Doris Charlotte Klaumann (IM&D) ; 

Belleville 
♦Glenn Clifford Klimek (Ar) ; Manhattan 
♦Arthur Junior Kliwer (MI) ; Abilene 
♦George Klover (GS) ; Ramona 
*Lyle Herman Knapp (ME); Topeka 
♦Virginia Carolyn Knauer (I J) ; Barnard 
♦William Frederick Knetter (PVM) ; 

Piper 
♦Ralph William Knoche (PVM) ; 
Adrian. Minn. 



♦Arthur William Knott, Jr. (Ar) ; 

Independence 
James William Knox (VM) ; 

Overland Park 
Joseph L. Ko (Ag) ; Canton, China 
♦John Marshall Koger (GS) ; Cheney 
♦Lawrence Kolarik (GS) ; Caldwell 
♦Donald Ely Kortman (C) ; Manhattan 
♦Virgil Albert Kraisinger (C&A) ; Timken 
♦Wilbur Stephen Kraisinger (Ag) ; Timken 
♦Charles Edward Krause (Ag) ; Belleville 
♦Elberta June Krehbiel (HE); Detroit 
♦Bette Jane Kreikenbaum (IJ) ; 

Phillipsburg 
♦William Daniel Kretsinger (ME); 

Emporia 
Laura Lee Kubin (HE) ; McPherson 
♦Ralph Jennings Kueker (Ag) ; Belleville 
♦Helen Kunkel (IM&D); Waverly 
*Leona Marie Kurtenbach (GS) ; 

Herington 
♦Robert Byrd Kyle (Ar) ; Wellsville 
♦Catherine Rosalie LaMont (HE-1; IJ-2); 

Clifton 
♦Jack Duncan Lamont (GS); Manhattan 
♦Sherman Luis Lampl (EE) ; Wichita 
♦Freda Martha Landis (GS) ; St. George 
♦Charles William Lane (C) ; Manhattan 
Philip Roscoe Lane (PE) ; Manhattan 
William Irl Lane (CE) ; Manhattan 
♦Herschel Rex Larkin (ME-1; C-2); 

Beattie 
♦Marion Joseph Larkin (PE) ; Baileyville 

Dean David Lawellin (Ar) ; Oswego 
♦Kathleen Lo.uise Lawson (HE) ; 

Sylvan Grove 
♦Talmadge Esbern Leach (PE) ; Vesper 
♦Harold Francis Leckron (CE); Abilene 

George Edward Lee (C) ; Topeka 
♦Marjorie Ruth Lee (HE); Jetmore 
♦Junia Elaine Leonard (HE&N); 

Manhattan 
♦Marvin Weisman Leslie (PVM) ; 

Passaic, N. J. 
♦Theodore William Levin (Ag) ; Agra 
♦George Eldred Lewis (ChE); Phillipsburg 
♦John Kenneth Lewis (EE) ; Arlington, Va. 
♦Mildred Josephine Lewis (HE); 

Dodge Citv 
♦John Leonard~Libby (MI-1; C-2); 

Fostoria, Ohio 
♦Don Malcolm Liebengood (VM) ; 

Kentland, Ind. 
♦James March Light (ME); Liberal 
♦June Elaine Light (HE) ; Liberal 
♦Carl Andrew Liljeberg (PVM) ; 

Grantsburg, Wis. 
♦Henry Rufus Lillard (Ag) ; Rossville 
♦Lona Faye Lille (HE) ; Atwood 
♦Grace Burnham Limbocker (HE) ; 

Fort Riley 
♦Gilbert Leonard Lindeman (GS) ; Hanover 
♦Mar.jorv Anne Lindgren (C) ; Dwight 
♦Fred Rav Lindsey, Jr. (ME); 

Scotia, N. Y. 
♦Merlin Elmer Line (AA) ; Sabetha 
♦Mervin Coram Line (AA) ; Sabetha 
♦Edward Lininger (ME); Fort Riley 
Leland Le Roy Linn (VM); Clyde 
Mabell Elvia Littell (HE); Colby 
Campbell Fackler Logan (ME) ; Paola 
♦Arnold Edward Lohmeyer (Ag) ; Linn 

Lyman Parker Long (IC) ; Fowler 
♦Joe Grove Loriaux (GS) ; Herington 
♦Rector Philip Louthan (ChE); Simpson 

Clarence Alvin Love (VM) ; Coffevville 
♦Rov Clyde Lovell (GS) ; Manhattan 



Matriculated 1938-1939. 

3—8766 



34 



Kansas State College 



Freshmen — Continued 



♦Hal Arthur Lund (ChE) ; Manhattan 
*Margaret Ann Lupfer (IJ) ; Larned 
♦Arlene Minnie Luthi (IM&D); Wakefield 
*Thomas Joseph Lynch (PVM) ; 

Allendale, N. J. 
♦Charles Franklin Lyon (ArE); Greensburg 
*William Allen Lytle (Ag) ; Wellsville 
*Irwin Brooks Lyttle (PE); Council Grove 
*Hazel Juanita McAninch (HE) ; 

Stockdale 
♦Clarence Bennett McCall (AE) ; 

Wakeeney 
*Harold Clvde McCall (GS); Wakeeney 
♦Patty McClaskev (HE); Arapahoe, Colo. 
♦Howard Bruce McClellan (ME-1; GS-2); 

Emporia 
♦Verle Orlo McClellan (C&A); Wichita 
♦Arlan Wilbur McClurkin (Ag); 

Clay Center 
♦Brvce E'ldon McCormick (ME); Abilene 
♦Mary Ruth McCoy (HE); Pratt 

James Eli McCullough (VM); Solomon 
♦Dale Fredric McCune (Ag) ; Stafford 
♦Ivan Earl McDill (Ag) ; Paola 
Edward James Peter McDonald (VM) ; 

Peabodv, Mass. 
♦Julian William McDonald (PVM); 

Highmore, S. Dak. 
♦John Gerald McEntvre (CE) ; Topeka 
♦Eileen Rose McGhee (HE); Centralia 
♦Robert Arthur McGhghy (ME); 

Sharon Springs 
♦Arthur Douglas McGovern (ME) ; 

Schenectady, N. Y. 
♦Marvin Woodrow McGuire (Ag) ; Onaga 
♦Fred Harmon McHugh (ChE); Liberal 
♦Robert Beitzel Mclntire (GS) ; 

Manhattan 
♦William Albert McKinley (ME); 

Greensburg 
Max Massey McLain (C) ; Sun City 
Paul Edwin McManis (MI) ; Manhattan 
♦Mary Rowene McMaster (HE&N) ; 

Eskridge 
♦Donald Wallace McMillan (C&A); 

Wamego 
♦Joseph Allen McMillen (C) ; Coldwater 
♦Phyllis Laurine McNeillev (HE); Norton 
♦Burton Keith McNickle (Ag) ; Zenith 
♦William Basil McQuerry (PVM) ; Leona 
♦Lois Marie McVay (HE') ; Junction City 
♦Helen Jane Macredie (HE) ; Clearwater 
♦Roderick Elvyn MacRae (VM) ; 

Evanston, 111. 
♦Ed Jay Mahler (VM) ; Salinas, Cal. 
♦James Philip Mahuron (IJ) ; Liberal 
♦Mildred Marie Major (IM&D); Wilson 
♦Hurst Kreek Majors (IJ) ; Manhattan 
♦Ben Verden Makinney (EE) ; Columbus 
John William Mallory (VM) ; 

Kansas City, Mo. 
Robert Drury Manly (GS) ; Manhattan 
Frank Lucius Marcy (Ag) ; Milford 
♦Ethlyn Lorraine Marks (HE) ; 

Council Grove 
Darwin Elton Markwell (IA) ; Kingman 
♦Ramon Frescas Marquez (ME); Mulvane 
♦Kenneth Marrs (EE) ; Harveyville 
♦Ann Marie Marshal (IJ); Manhattan 
♦Daniel Claire Marshall, Jr. (EE-1; IJ-2); 

Manhattan 
♦Gerry Lenore Marshall (GS) ; 

Clay Center 
♦Audwin Joseph Martin (CE); Norwich 
♦William Russell Martin (IJ); Severy 

Dwight Murray Mason (IJ) ; Manhattan 
♦Arlene Venita Mayer (MuE); Alta Vista 



♦Ben H. Mayer, Jr. (ME); Ellsworth 
Orval H. Meinecke (VM); Marysville 
Newell Clyde Melcher (Ag) ; Ottawa 
Howard Kermit Melchert (AE) ; 
Loraine 
♦Virgil Lurav Menzie (ME); Montezuma 
♦Betty Jean Merrill (IJ); Ellis 
♦Frank William Meserve (IJ) ; Ellis 
♦Charlotte Jeanne Metcalf (HE&N); 

Coffeyville 
♦Everett Russel Meyer (C); Basehor 
♦Leonard Milton Meyer (C); Basehor 
♦Virgil Maynard Meyer (C) ; Carlton 
♦Hugh Truman Meyers (C) ; Atchison 
Kenneth Benton Middleton (VM) ; 
De Soto 
♦Bob Glenn Miller (ChE-1; GS-2); 

Belleville 
♦Dorothy Miller (HE) ; Kansas City 
Dorothy Eaton Miller (HE&A) ; 
Manhattan 
♦Joan Miller (HE); Milford 
♦Marion Andlauer Miller (AE); Topeka 

R. Leone Miller (GS) ; Manhattan 
♦Victor Raymond Miller (C) ; Miltonvale 
♦Carroll Renshaw Mills (PVM); 
Frankfort 
Andres Peter Mindedahl (ME); Bethel 
♦Harriette Louise Minton (HE&N); 

Harper 
♦Evelvn Elnora Mitchell (HE); Topeka 
♦Louis Fred Moeller (C&A); Hill City 
♦Carroll Alvin Mogge (Ag) ; Goodland 
♦Naomi Elizabeth Monaghan (HE) ; 

Haviland 
♦Beatrice Marie Montgomery (HE) ; 

Hazelton 
♦James Earl Moon (PE) ; Greenleaf 
♦Barbara Caroline Moore (HE) ; 

Great Bend 
♦Ellen Lucille Moore (HE) ; Manhattan 
♦Ida Isabel Moore (GS); Alta Vista 
♦Robert Emery Moreen (C&A) ; Salina 
♦Keith Franklin Morey (Ag) ; Manhattan 

Herbert Carl Morgan (AA) ; Greenleaf 
♦Lois Lorraine Morgan (GS) ; Manhattan 
♦Mary Belle Morris (IJ) ; Chapman 
♦Charles Richard Morrison (C) ; Topeka 
♦Larry Lee Morrow (AA) ; Liberty 

Ruthe Eileen Morrow (HE); Larned 
♦John Robertson Morse (PVM) ; 

New Hampton, N. Y. 
♦Harriet Louise Mortensen (HE) ; Willis 
♦Robert Melvin Mortimer (C) ; Delphos 
♦Neil Alden Morton (Ag) ; Green 
♦Donald George Moss (EE) ; Miltonvale 
♦John Inman Moss (GS); St. Marys 
♦George Edward Mount (CE) ; 

Sharon Springs 
♦Bernard Francis Mowery (PVM) ; 

Wilsey 
♦Joseph William Mudge (Ag) ; Gridley 
♦Betty Eloise Muir (HE); Salina 
♦Harry Acea Muir, Jr. (ChE) ; Manhattan 
♦William Lowe Mundy (GS); Salina 
♦Raymond Patrick Murray (EE) ; 

St. Marys 
♦Raymond Lee Mussatto (ME); 

Burlingame 
♦Hiram Clawson Mussett (Ag) ; 

Leavenworth 
♦Donald Kivett Myers (EE) ; Topeka 
♦Imogene Gale Myers (HE) ; 

Sharon Springs 
♦Richard Bright Myers (PVM); Bethel 
♦Verne Levi Mvers (CE) ; Windom 
♦William John Myers (PVM); Bethel 



♦ Matriculated 1938-1939. 



List of Students 



35 



Fresh m en — Contin ued 



*Franklin Conrad Nagle (ChE) ; Topeka 
*Neil Norman Neely (EE) ; Topeka 

Kenneth Edwin Neidigh (C&A) ; Salina 
*Merven Leland Neis (ME); Abilene 
*Elva Ann Nelson (HE) ; Concordia 

Jean Maurine Nelson (IJ) ; Topeka 
*Nora Beth Nelson (HE); Manhattan 
*Robert Kenneth Nelson (PVM) ; 

Chicago, 111. 
*Warren B. Nelson (Ag) ; Manhattan 
*Donald Orion Neubauer (ME) ; 

Manhattan 
*Margaret Anne Newcomb (C) ; 

Kansas City, Mo. 
*Lloyd Edward Newcomer (EE) ; Russell 
*Carrol Brent Newell (Ag) ; Stafford 
*Clarence Eugene Newell (ME) ; 

Wellington 
*Mary Evelyn Nielson (IM&D) ; Atchison 
*Lee Albert Ninemire (Ag) ; Wakeeney 

John William Nininger (EE) ; Olathe 
*Russell Bernard Nixon (C) ; Manhattan 
*Wilburt Gates Nixon (Ag) ; Manhattan 
*Oscar Woodrow Norby (AA) ; Pratt 

Lela Genevera Nordeen (HE&A); Dwight 

Richard William Nordeen (MuE); 
Manhattan 
*Marjorie Minnie Norlin (HE); McCracken 
*Harold Sylvester Novak (ME) ; Ottawa 
*Harold Le Roy Nus (ME) ; 

Arlington, Iowa 
*Wilmer Hardy Oakes (ArE) ; 

San Fernando, Cal. 
*Marion Ernest Oberhelman (C) ; 

Manhattan 
*Otto Fredrick Oberhelman, Jr. (EE) ; 

Manhattan 
*Charles Offen (EE) ; Topeka 
*Zoe Elizabeth Oliver (HE) ; Junction City 

Albert Willard Olson (Ag) ; Dwight 
*Anna Bernice Olson (HE); Manhattan 
*Benjamin Eric Olson (ChE) ; Manhattan 
*Bruce Wallace Olson (ME); White City 
*George Norman Olson (ChE) ; Wichita 
*Earl Leroy Olson (GS-1 ; EE-2); Axtell 
*Mary Marie Olson (HE&A) ; Dwight 
*Effie May Orr (HE) ; Kanona 
*Jennie Catherine Orr (HE); Kanona 
*Lois Orrell (HE) ; Peck 
*Ina Elizabeth Orrick (M) ; Manhattan 

Robert Earl Orsbern (PVM); Manhattan 
*Robert Leo Osborne (Ag) ; Rexford 
*Leo Benedict Osterhaus (C) ; Marvsville 
*Edward John Otto, Jr. (IC) ; Riley 
*Wilbur Keith Owen (EE) ; Meade 
*Lindell Cook Owensby (GS) ; Manhattan 
*Peggv Louise Paddock (M); Manhattan 

Erma Lucille Paget (HE&A); Covert 
Mames Thomas Painter (EE); Meade 
*Albert Earl Palmberg (ME) ; Meriden 
*Charles Robert Palmer (Ag) ; Anness 
*Patricia Palmer (IJ) ; Kansas City 

Orlando Karl Pan-Kratz (ME); "Stafford 

Victor Eugene Parisa (Ag) ; Lansing 
*Aubrey Glen Park (ME) ; Oakley 

Comer Lloyd Parks (EE); Chautauqua 
*Ernest Newton Parvin (ME); Croweburg 
*Gerardo Anthony Pascale (ChE); 

Coffeyville 
*David Junior Patterson (ChE) ; 

Marysville 
*William Henry Patterson (Ag) ; Holton 
*Martha Ann Pattison (IM&D) ; 
Manhattan 

George Ralph Pauling (CE) ; Manhattan 
*Doris Elaine Paustian (HE) ; Manhattan 



*Martha Marie Payne (HE) ; Manhattan 
*Ellen Peak (IM&D-l ; IJ-2); Manhattan 
*Mary Jean Peak (IM&D) ; Manhattan 
*Lee Owen Pearl (EE) ; Columbus 
*Donald Lee Pearson (EE) ; Topeka 

Carson Stewart Peck (C) ; Salina 
*Marla Eileen Pendergraft (GS); Emporia 

Paul Warren Pennock (EE); Salina 
*Helen Catherine Perkins (IM&D) ; 

Kansas City 
Charles Ross Perry (PE) ; St. George 
*Clyde Finley Peters (C) ; Mayetta 
*Richard Lewis Peters (AE) ; Valley Falls 
*Esther Peterson (HE&A) ; Kinsley 
*Harold Elof Peterson (Ag) ; Bridgeport 
*Ronald Thornton Peterson (EE) ; 

Courtland 
Mohn Richard Petford (AA) ; Saffordville 
*Blanche Eleanor Petracek (IM&D); 

Jennings 
*Benjamin Rankin Petrie, Jr. (ChE) ; 

Greensburg 
*Charles Louie Pfenninger (AA) ; Nekoma 
*Harlan Ralph Phillips (PVM); 

Manhattan 
*Roger Neil Phillips (Ag) ; Manhattan 
*Marjorie Clara Pierson (HE); Clay Center 
*Russell Herbert Pierson (PVM); 

East Haven, Conn. 
*Edwin Moats Pincomb (GS) ; 

Overland Park 
Mohn Russell Piper (ME); Emporia 
*Charles Irving Piatt (C) ; Junction City 
*Kenneth Eugene Plumb (Ag) ; 

Manhattan 
*Leighton Edmond Poague (IJ) ; 

Wakeeney 
*Claude Arthur Poland (ChE); 

Manhattan 
*Robert Milton Polley (C) Abilene 
*Earl Rothwell Pool (Ag) ; Belleville, 111. 
*William Bryant Poole (Ag) ; Manhattan 
*Arthur Wayne Pope (Ag) ; Durham 
*Irma Lucille Popp (HE) ; Marion 
*CharIes Homer Porter, Jr. (GS) ; Moline 
Merald Gorman Porter (CE) ; Dellvale 
*Walter H. Porter (Ag) ; Council Grove 
*Ethan Potter (GS); Peabody 
Mohn Warren Powell (GS) ; Lamed 
Mohn William Prager (PVM); 

Irvington, N. J. 
Anthony Joseph Prasnikar (VM); 

Mulberry 
Louis Arthur Prchal (EE) ; 

Omaha, Neb. 
*Alma Lenora Pressgrove (HE&A) ; 

Tecumseh 
*Allan Eugene Preston (Ag) ; Baldwin 
William Earl Pretzer (ME); Elmdale 
*Harrison Thomas Price (GS) ; 

Chicago, 111. 
Mohn Henry Price (ME); Kansas City 
Mohn Henry Price (VM) ; Triplett, Mo. 
Dorothy Wynne Pritchard (HE) ; 

Hiawatha 
*Earl Carleton Pugh (PVM); 

Phillipsburg 
*Clarence Alfred Quigley (ME); 

Great Bend 
*Norbert La Verne Raemer (MI) ; 

Herkimer 
*Emma Belle Randall (HE); Ashland 
^Raymond Henrv Randolph (C) ; Leona 

DeVere Frank Ratliff (VM) ; Portis 
*Emily Jane Rawson (HE) ; Wamego 
*Virginia Lee Ray (HE); Wilsey 
John Bierer Reamer (PE) ; Holton 



* Matriculated 1938-1939. 



36 



Kansas State College 



Freshmen — Continued 



*Cordelia Jane Reazin (HE&A) ; Harper 
*Edward Purcell Redmond (AA) ; 

Marysville 
♦Edward Anthony Reed (Ag) ; Lyons 
*Eleanor Edith Reed (HE&N) ; 

Circleville 
♦Nyla Frances Reed (HE); Selden 
♦Quentin Stephen Reed (IJ) ; Topeka 
*Wilbur Bernell Reed (ChE) ; Marysville 
♦Morris Griffith Rees (GS) ; Grantville 
♦Jerome Alexander Rehberg (ME) ; 

Bennington 
*Norma June Reid (GS) ; Topeka 
♦Helen Florence Reiman (IJ-1; HE-2); 

Byers 
Marie Katherine Reinhardt (HE) ; 

Russell 
♦Jane Ray Reinhart (IJ) ; Ottawa 
*Glenn Meredith Revell (ArE); Chase 
*Jay Reynolds (VM) ; Parsons 
*Vernon Edward Reynolds (ME) ; 

St. Francis 
*Wilma Elizabeth Reynolds (HE); 

Kansas City 
♦Charles O. Rhea (ME); Drexel, Mo. 
*Ava Maurine Rice (HE); Hill City 
*John Lenhart Rice (CE) ; 

Fort Leavenworth 
*Mildred Joyce Rice (HE); Alma 
* Allen Elmer Richardson (A A) ; Oswego 
♦Jack Hartman Rickenbacker (EE) ; 

Turlock, Cal. 
*Robert Wendell Riley (SH) ; Emporia 
*Earl Stratton Ripley (ME); Salina 
♦Paul Roach (ME); La Crosse 
*Arthur Donald Robb (PVM) ; Wamego 
♦John Morris Roberts (ChE) ; Hoisington 
♦Lewis Paul Roberts (IJ); Council Grove 
*Robert Hugh Roberts (ME) ; Wellington 
♦Claire Milton Robertson (ME); Holton 
*Ellen King Robertson (IC) ; Wichita 
*John Lovell Robertson (Ag) ; 

Nowata, Okla. 
♦Lois Mary Robinson (IJ) ; La Crosse 
Marshall Samuel Robinson (C&A) ; 

Topeka 
*Ralph Raymond Robinson (PE) ; Wilsey 
*Andrew Scott Robson, Jr. (EE) ; 

Westmoreland 
*Glen Earl Rochat (PE); Wilsey 
*Raymond Francis Roemer (AA) ; Gove 
♦Joseph Samuel Rogers (Ag) ; Horton 
*Marjorie Jane Rogers (IJ) ; Manhattan 
*Mae Catherine Rogg (HE) ; Bunkeer Hill 
*Raymond Ruben Rokey (Ag) ; Sabetha 
*Virginia Elizabeth Roller (HE); 

Circleville 
*Sylvia Frances Roper (GS) ; Manhattan 
*Lillian Yvonne Roseman (IM&D) ; 

New Cambria 
♦Lucille May Rosenberger (HE) ; 

Greensburg 
♦Richard Carl Roswurm (EE) ; Manhattan 
*Margaret Maxyne Rugg (HE) ; 

Scottsville > 
George Harold Russell (VM) ; Paola 
♦Floyd Allen Rutherford (ME-1; C-2); 

Baldwin 
♦Francis Joseph Ryan (EE) ; 

Waterbury, Conn. 
*Joyce Carmel Sahlberg (IM&D) ; Wichita 
♦Vergil Edward Salts (Ag-1; PE-2); 

Mayetta 
♦George Arthur Sample (ME) ; 

Council Grove 
*Harold Jay Santner (GS) ; Gaylord 
♦Lorraine M. Sawyer (HE) ; Kensington 



*William Ferdinand Schaefer, Jr. (CE-1 ; 

C-2); Topeka 
*Kent Navarra Schaffer (EE) ; Lucas 
*Marvin Jerome Scheidel (PVM) ; 

Platte Center, Neb. 
*Marguerite Mary Scheier (GS); 

Manhattan 
*Alvin Jacob Scherzer (Ag) ; Larned 
♦Henry Frederick Scheuch (Ag) ; Ellsworth 
♦Annabeth Marguerette Schlotzhauer (HE) 

Bucyrus 
♦Clarence Wilbur Schmitz (GS) ; Alma 
♦Raymond Clinton Schneider (Ar) ; 

Manhattan 
♦Dean Creighton Scholes (ME-1; C-2); 

Council Grove 
♦Mildred Hester Schrepel (HE) ; 

Cunningham 
*Alva Esther Schroeder (IM&D) ; 

Hillsboro 
*Billy Gene Schulz (ME) ; Greensburg 
*Norman Francis Schulz (PVM) ; 

Liberty, Mo. 
*Lloyd Joseph Schurr (C&A) ; Wamego 
*Glenn Orville Schwab (AE); Gridley 
*Lucille Marie Scofield (IM&D); Perrv 

John Neill Scott (IA) ; Neosho Falls 
♦Margaret Lenore Scott (HE) ; Louisville 
♦Ralph William Scott (ME); Garnett 
Richard Quiley Scott (CE) ; Hill Citv 
♦Robert DeForest Scott (ChE) ; 

Manhattan 
*James Harris Sealey (ArE) ; Pratt 
♦Lorrain Oscar Sebree (PVM) ; 

Kansas City 
*Evelyn Margaret Seeberger (GS) ; 

Hanover 
*Marjorie Maxine Segrist (HE&A) ; 

Manhattan 
♦Edward George Seufert (AE) ; 

Tonganoxie 
♦John William Sexson (EE) ; Weskan 
Ben Shambaugh, Jr. (VM) ; Ottawa 
*Richard Lowell Sharp (Ag) ; Neodesha 
♦Mary Ellen Shaver (HE); Salina 
*Harley Donald Shaw (AEl ; Ag-2); 

Selden 
♦Robert Ulrich Shaw (Ar) ; Topeka 
♦Richard Alan Shea (VM) ; Kansas City 
♦Ruth Alberta Shepherd (HE); 

White City 
♦Elizabeth Mae Sherlock (HE&N); 

Manhattan 
*Nadine Shields (IM&D) ; Council Grove 
*James Franklin Shirck (ME); Waterville 
*Gladine Tiny Shirley (IM&D) Perry 
*Johnny Dale Shoemaker (IJ) ; Centralia 
♦Pauline Lelia Shoffner (HE); 

Junction City 
*Ross Truman Shook (GS); Sterling 
♦George Edward Short (PVM) ; 

Concordia 
*Glenn LeRoy Shriver (AA) ; 

Medicine Lodge 
♦Irene Esther Shriver (HE) ; 

Medicine Lodge 
♦Beldora Mae Shultz (HE); Wamego 
♦Elsie Mae Shuman (HE) ; Plains 
♦Charles Otho Shumaker, Jr. (ChE) ; 

♦Virginia G. Siebert (HE&N) ; 

Pretty Prairie 
♦Ernest Allen Siegel (VM); 

San Francisco, Cal. 
♦Claredon Hickman Sigley (ME) ; Canton 
♦William James Simic (PVM) ; 

Superior, Neb. 



♦ Matriculated 1938-1939. 



List of Students 



37 



Fresh m en — Continued 



*Ruth Viola Simpson (HE); Manhattan 
♦Kenneth Iden Sinclair (Ag-1 ; C-2); 

New Brunswick, N. J. 
*Robert Ralph Singleton (Ag) ; Kansas City 
*Henry Augustine Sirridge (ME); Topeka 

Leland Richard Skaggs (GS) ; Salina 
*Harold Milton Skalla (CE) ; Blue Rapids 
*Otis Otto Skubal (ME); Dresden 
♦Eugene Smerchek (GS-1 ; ME-2) ; 

Cleburne 
♦Margaret Smies (HE) ; Courtland 
♦Clyde Hobert Smith (IJ) ; Frankfort 
*Dulcie Madge Smith (HE) ; Atlanta 
*Floyd William Smith (Ag) ; Shawnee 
*Glenn McKinnis Smith (EE) ; Uniontown 
♦James Taylor Smith (C) ; Wichita 
♦Lewis Hadley Smith (AE) ; Burdett 
♦Marcia Gertrude Smith (HE) ; Amy 
♦Peter Anthony Smith (EE) ; Marysville 
♦Rex Nevielle Smith (EE) ; Burdett 
♦John Christopher Sobba (EE) ; Fowler 
♦Eugene Lowell Solt, Jr. (C-l; Ar-2); 
Waterville 
Ralph Andrew Sonday (CE) ; 
Sharon Springs 
*Reed Clement Sparks (C) ; Stafford 
*Robert Junior Spatz (CE-1 ; C-2); Lebo 
♦James Rodney Spaulding (ChE) ; 

Casper Wyo. 
♦Lawrence Eldon Spear (ME); 

Kansas City, Mo. 
♦Nadine Alfreda Spellman (HE) ; Salina 
♦Marjorie Faye Spiller (GS) ; Frankfort 
♦Charles Eldon Springer (GS-1; CE-2); 

Stockdale 
♦Marjorie Jean Spurrier (GS) ; Kingman 
♦Blanche La Vaughn Stacy (GS-1; HE-2); 

Byers 
♦George Jacob Stadler (PE) ; Rossville 
♦Wilma Marie Staehli (HE) ; Abilene 
♦Daniel Rector Stanton (Ag) ; Rushville 
♦Elizabeth Harriet Steele (IM&D) ; 

Waterville 
♦Warren Hardy Steffey (AE) ; Ozawkie 
♦Viola Alice Stein (HE&N) ; Chicago, 111. 
♦Roy Edward Steinhoff (C) ; Osage City 
♦Ivan Verne Stephen (Ag) ; Hill City 
♦Lenora Jeanne Stephenson (HE) ; Larned 
♦James Roy Sterling (IA) ; Clay Center 
♦Homer Albert Stevens (Ag) ; Silver Lake 
♦Betty Jean Stewart (HE) ; Topeka 
Katharine Clestia Stewart (HE) ; 
Talmage 
♦Kemp Graham Stiles (GS) Wichita 
♦Evelyn Irene St. Lawrence (IJ) ; Fowler 
♦Edward Donald Stoddard (PVM) ; 

Manhattan 
♦Jean Maxine Stoltenberg (HE) ; Hiawatha 
♦James Mark Stoneberger (ME) ; 

Lindsborg 
♦Kenneth Eldon Storer (ME) ; Manhattan 

Kenneth Paul Storey (Ag) ; Mulvane 
♦Marshall Leslie Stover (PE) ; Manhattan 
♦Clyde Roe Stratton (CE) ; 
Greeneville, Tenn. 
Raymond Edward Streeter (ME) ; 
Hutchinson 
♦John Strick (ME) ; Kansas City 
♦Nita Mae Stricklin (HE) ; Webster 

Keith Phillip Studer (VM) ; Atwood 
♦Iris Velna Surtees (HE) ; Wichita 
♦Ralph Herman Swart (GS-1; AA-2); 
Riley 
Robert Allen Swartz (Ag) ; Everest 
♦Melvin John Swenson (PVM) ; Concordia 
♦Dorothy Jean Swingle (GS); Manhattan 



♦Virginia Symns (GS-1; HE&A); 

Whiting 
♦Opal Lorena Tabler (HE&A) ; Wamego 
♦Esther Marie Taddiken (GS) ; Clay Center 
♦Lenora Jean Taddiken (HE) ; Morganville 
♦Jeanne Marie Tarvin (GS) ; Marysville 
♦Delbert Gail Taylor (Ag) ; Meade 
♦Evelyn Marie Taylor (HE) ; Bethel 
♦James Lewis Taylor (ME) ; Paola 
♦John Craig Taylor (PVM) ; 

Morristown, Tenn. 
♦Ocie Alice Taylor (IM&D) ; Tribune 
♦Roy J. Tebo, Jr. (Ag) ; Morland 
♦Robert Crowley Tedrow (CE) ; 

Kansas City, Mo. 
♦Margaret Ruth Teel (IM&D); Morland 
♦Joye Jean Teeple (IM&D) ; Manhattan 
♦George Louis Templeton (EE) ; Great Bend 
♦Laverne Oma Templeton (C) ; Great Bend 
♦John Harvey Tennery (PVM) ; Belle Plaine 
♦Donald George Tepfer (ME-1 GS-2); 

Fort Dodge, Iowa 
♦Alice Mae Teply (IM&D) ; Hanover 
♦Joyce Jacqueline Terrass (HE) ; Alma 
♦Keith Lewis Thompson (Ag) ; Wichita 
♦Wilma May Thompson (HE) ; Almena 
♦Glenn Steuart Tibbetts (PVM) ; Wheaton 
♦Max Eugene Timmons (AA) ; Fredonia 
♦Olin Leslie Tippett (EE) ; Kansas City 
♦Merrill Wayne Toburen (IC) ; Manhattan 
♦Melvin Kenneth Todd (EE) ; Kansas City 
♦Harold Theodor Toll (IC) ; Sharon Springs 
♦Robert Tull Toothaker (PVM) ; Wheaton 
♦Leland Oscar Townlev (EE) ; Kirwin 
♦Jim Tozier (GS) ; Salina 
♦Dorothy Jean Triplett (GS) ; Humboldt 

George Kendrick Turner (GS) ; Waterville 
♦Robert Emmett Turkleson (ChE) ; Troy 
♦William Dick Turner (ME) ; Manhattan 

William Leonard Turner (Ag) ; Plevna 
♦Howard Robert Turtle (ME) ; Quinter 
♦Dorothy Jane Underhill (IJ) ; 

Kansas City, Mo. 
♦Roy Walter Upham (PVM) ; 

Junction City 
♦Edna Matilda Uppendahl (HE) ; 

Scott City 
♦Duane Oscar Urbom (IJ) ; McDonald 
♦Rosemarie Van Diest (HE) ; Prairie View 
♦Thelma Laverne Vandiver (IJ); Norton 

Doris Van Landingham (HE); Kingman 
♦Robert Edward Van Scoyoc (C) ; 

Manhattan 
♦Charley Raymond Vavrock (Ag) ; Oberlin 
♦Clyde Maurice Venneberg (Ag) ; 

Havensville 
♦Norman Allen Vick (IA) ; Wellsville 
♦George Edgar Visser (Ag) ; Riley 

Carl Joseph Voelker (VM); Manhattan 
♦Eugene Wilbur Voigt (Ag) ; Basehor 
David Roland von Riesen (IC) ; 
Marysville 
♦Anna Dean Wagaman (IM&D) ; 

Manhattan 
♦Eleanor Joan Wagenrodt (HE) ; Topeka 
♦Margaret Lucile Wagner (HE-1; IJ-2); 
Galesburg 
Merribel Wahl (HE) ; Wheaton 
♦Paul John Waibler (ME); Great Bend 
♦Edwina Carol Wait (HE); Centerville 
♦Mary Jane Wakeman (HE&A) ; Fowler 
♦Frederic Barber Walker, Jr. (VM); 

Santee, Cal. 
♦John Lewis Walker (PVM-1 ; AA-2); 
Dresden 



♦ Matriculated 1938-1939. 



38 



Kansas State College 



Freshmen — Concluded 



*Paul Lauren Walker (ChE) ; 

Sharon Springs 
*Mary Elizabeth Walters (GS) ; 

Manhattan 
Theo Parker Walton (ME); Manhattan 
♦Arlin Bruce Ward (GS) ; Manhattan 
♦Charles Everett Ward (ME) ; Burlingame 
♦Oliver Howard Wardlow (ArE); Topeka 
♦Alice Elizabeth Warren (Ar) ; Manhattan 
♦Leon Arthur Warta (CE) ; Ellsworth 
*Robert Glenn Waters (C) ; Junction City 
*James Wesley Watkins (PE); Manhattan 

Bruce Cornell Watson (VM); Shawneee 
*Charles Gordon Waugh (PE) ; Mankato 
*Lowell Madison Webb (PVM); Beverly 
*Charles Junior Weber (GS) ; Manhattan 
♦Edwin August Weber (GS); 

Annapolis, Md. 
*Valena Glee Weber (IM&D); Clifton 
*Willadean Zola Weber (HE) ; 

Kansas City, Mo. 
♦Rhena Corwin Webster (PE); Manhattan 
*Maurice John Weckerling (ME) ; 

Manhattan 
♦Dean Keats Weckman (Ag); Holton 
♦Harry Leroy Weil (ME) ; St. John 
Bernard Morris Weiner (VM) ; 

Irvington, N. J. 
*Homer Glen Weller (CE) ; Abilene 
♦Richard Gale Wellman (Ag); Sterling 
*William Beecham Wellman (GS) ; 

Bird City 
Charles Maurice Wempe (VM) ; Seneca 
♦Francis Russell Wempe (Ag) ; Frankfort 
Delbert Oscar Wendt (VM); 

Bonner Springs 
*George Willis Wenger (AA) ; Sabetha 
♦Max Miller Wenrich (ME); Oxford 
♦William Joseph Werts (AE-1; Ag-2); 

Smith Center 
Gordon B. West (IJ) ; Manhattan 

William Roger West (VM) ; Manhattan 
♦William Earl West (GS); Hiawatha 
♦Marvin Lloyd Westerman (Ag) ; 

Moundridge 
♦Hazel Ruth Weygandt (HE) ; Manhattan 
*Everett Johnson Whearty (GS-1; AA-2); 

Rossville 
*Pierce Uhlman Wheatley (GS) ; Gypsum 
*Gertrude Eunice Wheeler (MuE) ; 

Manhattan 
♦John Parsons Wheeler (ME); Fort Riley 
♦Louise Newton Wheeler (IJ); Fort Riley 
♦Francis Ivan White (Ar) ; Manhattan 
*Irene White (GS) ; Kingsdown 
♦Robert Blair White (ArE); 

Greeneville, Tenn. 
*Norman Vincent Whitehair (AA) ; Abilene 
Richard Victor Whiteside (CE); Topeka 



*Fairy Faye Wickham (GS); Oberlin 
*Henry Jacob Wiebe (EE) ; Meade 
♦Kathleen Floy Wilkie (HE); Topeka 
*Ray Franklin Wilkie (ME); Topeka 
*Lvsle Max Wilkins (PVM); Delphos 
*Earle Ellwood Wilkinson (AE) ; 

Quinter 
*Charles Homer Williams (GS) ; 

Marysville 
*Edwin DaCosta Williams (MuE) ; Holton 
♦Evelyn Lucile Williams (HE&N); Topeka 
*Glenn Lawrence Williams (IJ); Manhattan 
♦John Jasper Williams, Jr. (CE) ; 

Pawnee Rock 
LaVerne Chiles Williams (Ag) ; Hill City 
Mercedes Jane Williams (HE) ; 

White City 
*Perry Alexander Williams (IJ) ; Johnson 
*Robert E. Williams, Jr. (Ag) ; 

Rocky Ford, Colo. 
*Nellie Lou Willis (HE) ; Manhattan 
*Frank Ance Wilson (Ag) ; Maplehill 
*Guy Wilson (ME); Cottonwood Falls 
♦Robert Dolan Wilson (ME); Manhattan 
♦William Frederic Wilson (AE-1; AA-2); 

Strong City 
"Shirley Maycele Wing (IM&D); 

Columbus 
*Rosaline June Winger (HE) ; Johnson 
*Mary Elizabeth Wingfield (HE); 

Norton 
♦Harlan Clark Wingrave (Ag); Severy 
John Edward Winter (GS) ; Manhattan 
Vernon Winfield Woestemeyer (Ag) ; 

Bethel 
♦Lucille Nell Wolford (C) ; Eskridge 
*Richard August Wolgast (PE) ; 

Alta Vista 
♦Margery Wood (HE-1; IJ-2); 

Omaha, Neb. 
♦Helen Iona Woodard (HE); Topeka 
♦Berniece Lucille Woodcock (HE) ; 

Manhattan 
♦Milton Maurice Woodrick (AA) ; 

Scott City 
♦Harold Duane Woods (ChE) ; 

Greensburg 
♦Pauline Henrietta Worland (IM&D) ; 

Topeka 
♦George Carl Wreath (Ag) ; Manhattan 
♦Paul Lee Wright (C-l ; Ar-2); 

Osawatomie 
♦Wendell Orlin Wuthnow (C) ; Hope 
♦Jack Seymour Young (AA) ; Clearwater 
♦William Arthur Young (Ag) ; Clearwater 
♦Robert Oscar Yunghans (Ag) ; Piper 
*Harrv Burton Zech (C&A) ; Wellington 
♦Dorothy Mae Zerbe (HE) ; Salina 



Matriculated 1938-1939. 



List oj Students 



39 



SPECIAL STUDENTS 



*Ethel Valeria Anderson (HE) ; Manhattan 
Vina Clifford Anderson (HE) } 

Pinev Woods, Miss. 
Wilbur Eldon Ashton (GS); Manhattan 
Robert Dean Bonnell (EE) ; Frankfort 
John Francis Cramer (GS); Gardner 
Thomas Doryland (GS) ; Manhattan 
Charles S. Dornberger (GS) ; Topeka 
*Phyllis Wells Edgar (HE); Manhattan 
Ziflah Lee Feleav (GS) ; Manhattan 
Louise Ann Frank (GS) ; Colby 
*Wilma Estell George (GS) ; Edwardsville 
*Catherine Elizabeth Gleason (GS) ; Norton 
Twylah Felice Grandfield (HE) ; 

Manhattan 
John Jacob Groody (GS) ; Manhattan 
James H. Guard (GS); Manhattan 
Charles William Ham (GS) Manhattan 
Milruth Hawkinson (GS) ; McPherson 
*John Joe Helmke (Ag); Preston 
Aurella Mae Hilt (GS) ; Sabetha 
Jack Dexter Hollinger (GS); Chapman 
Mildred Charolette Jackson (HE) ; 

Manhattan 
Ula Jaedicke (HE); Hanover 
*Alvin Marrs Johnson (Ag) ; Eudora 
*Don Melvin Johnson (Ag) ; Manhattan 
*Earl Edward Justis (GS) ; Washington 

Allys Joe Kasten (GS) ; Fort Riley 
*Kay Louise Key (HE) ; Kansas City 
*Patricia Ann Kininmonth (Ar) ; Winfield 
*Hubert John Konopaeki (GS) ; 
Fort Riley 
Lucile Gray Lafferty (HE); 
Fort Lea ven worth 



*Lois Elizabeth Lee (HE) ; Jetmore 
Mark Dean Lewis (GS) ; Conway Springs 
Doris Josephine McCammon (HE) ; Esbon 

*Frank John Mares (Ag) ; 
Taos, N. Mex. 

*WilIiam Ernest Mason (ME); Tescott 

*Margery Meister (HE) ; Manhattan 

*Charles Lehman Mohler (Ag) ; 

Mildred Moore (HE); Elkland, Mo. 
*Richard Gottfried Muggli (Ag); .-- 
Zurich, Switzerland 
Elbert Lindon Mundhenke (Ag) ; Lewis 
*James C. Mustain (GS); Hutchinson 
*Robert R. Newman (GS) ; Enterprise 
*Twila Reece Nunemaker (HE); Langdon 
*Arthur Fredrich Otte (IA) ; Herington 
Lorena Freda Otte (HE); Great Bend 
Pauline Gwendolyn Paddleford (HE) ; 
Manhattan 
*Vietor Leo Pennington (GS) ; Oberlin 
*Ruth Areta Persell (HE) ; Harper 

Nancv Elizabeth Poole (HE); Manhattan 
*Clarence Dale Ross (ME); Kansas City 
Ruth Elaine Salisbury (GS) ; Manhattan 
Marcine Elizabeth Scheurer (GS) ; Gypsum 
*Fred Seymour (IA) ; Linn 
*Veva Marker Stewart (HE); Manhattan 
Dorothy Miles Sumner (Ag); Fort Riley 
Bette Louise Thomas (HE); Portis 
*Vaulien Juil Timberlake (GS) ; Colby 
*David Salem Totah (Ag) ; Victoria, Tex. 
Elinor Lucile Uhl (GS) ; Smith Center 
Ira M. White (GS) ; Effingham 
Homer Eugene Withee (GS); Manhattan 



* Matriculated 1938-1939. 



40 



Kansas State College 



Summer School Students 



Nine-week Summer School 

June 1 to July 30, 1938 
GRADUATE STUDENTS 



Orval J. Abel ; Manhattan 
Mildred Laura Ahlstrom ; Reading 
Agnes M. Angell ; Plains 
Thomas Burt Avery ; Coldwater 
George Howard Bain; Kansas City 
Georgia Frances Ballard ; Kiowa 
Sally Virginia Bancroft; 

Wichita Falls, Tex. 
Everett George Barber ; Salina 
Nora Elizabeth Bare; Protection 
Ethel Barthold ; Nickerson 
Esther Kathryn Beachel ; Norcatur 
Eloise Bloome; Rexford 
Francis Woodrow Boyd ; Mankato 
Hazel Eirene Buck ; Derby 
Lucile Beatrice Burt ; Manhattan 
H. Milo Cameron ; Smith Center 
Elsie Brezo Campbell; Orient, Iowa 
Ernest Vernon Carson ; Emporia 
Merrill Levern Carter ; Toronto 
Ralph Boyd Cathcart ; Manhattan 
Ralph Cole ; Alton 
Orville Wesley Connett ; Peoria, 111. 
Hildred Ann Cooper; Lyons 
Majel Muriel Cooprider ; Wichita 
Hazel Sophia Cox ; Blue Mound 
Golda Mildred Crawford ; Manhattan 
Madelyn Crawford ; Spring Hill 
Lucile Florence Dauner ; Junction City 
Aubrey Elbert Davidson ; Miltonvale 
Benjamin Amnion Davis; Seneca 
Marguerite Rose Davis ; Independence 
Lois Estelle Dennhardt ; Neenah, Wis. 
E. Faye Dennis ; Cheney 
Wayne V. Dexter ; Waterville 
Raymond Joseph Doll ; Manhattan 
Gladys Charline Draper; Kansas City 
Barbara Alice Eales ; Wichita 
Nina Edelblute ; Manhattan 
Samuel Allen Edgar ; Sterling 
James Bernard Edwards ; Manhattan 
Percy Nelson Eland ; South Haven 
Ruby Nance Emery ; Manhattan 
Miscal Leon Fierke ; Manhattan 
John Charles Finertv ; Chicago, 111. 
Theodore Allen Fleck ; Wakefield 
Hazel Marie Fletcher; Modoc, Ind. 
Lorena Catherine Foreman ; Hutchinson 
Caroline Ruth French ; Lyndon 
Esther Clara Gabriel ; Eudora 
Emma Thompson Galbraith ; 

Cottonwood Falls 
Lee Gemmell ; Marysville 
Willard LeRoy Gillmore ; Yates Center 
Dora Eloise Gilmore ; Chetopa 
Clarence Lee Gish ; Manhattan 
Otis Benton Glover; Manhattan 
Mabel Lillian Hall Good ;