Skip to main content

Full text of "The manors of Suffolk; notes on their history and devolution, with some illustrations of the old manor houses"

See other formats




FROM THE INCOME OF THE 

FISKE ENDOWMENT FUND 

THE BEQUEST OF 

lyibrarian of the University 1868-1883 
1905 



3184 



CORNELL UNIVERSITY LIBRARY 




924 092 579 576 




The original of this book is in 
the Cornell University Library. 

There are no known copyright restrictions in 
the United States on the use of the text. 



http://www.archive.org/details/cu31924092579576 



Th* 



Manors of Suffolk 



Notes 



on 



Their History and Devolution 



The Hundreds of Hoxne, Lackford, and Loes 

With some Illustrations of the Old Manor Houses 



BY 



W A. COPINGER. M.A., LLD., F.S.A, F.R.S.A. 

Of the Middle Temple, Barrister-at-law, Professor and Dean of the Faculty of Law in the 

Vicloria University of Manchester, Sometime President of the Bibliographical Society, Author of 

"County of Suffolk : Its History as Disclosed by Elxisting Records," &c. 



Vol. 4. 



Privately Printed 

and obtainable only by Subscribers 

from 

TAYLOR, GARNETT. EVANS, & CO.. LTD. 

IVIANCHESTER 

1909 

(4) 






^ -T' 






l\ ^1 V ^ n 



1 



HOXNE AND LOES HUNDREDS. 



JMendhtn v 

H O X O N,. H V. , '*^ ^y 













yL XT "ncip 



THE 



Manors of Suffolk. 



THE HUNDRED OF HOXNE. 
(HoxA, Hoxana', Hoxe, Hoxene, Hoxon, Hoxons, Oxa.) 

NCIENTLY called Bissopes, or Biscopes, or " Bishop's 
Hundred." It is in the Eastern Division of the County, 
in the Deanery of Hoxne, Archdeaconry of Suffolk, and 
Diocese of Norwich. It averages almost 9 miles in length 
and 4 in breadth, and is bounded on the north by the River 
Waveney which separates it from Norfolk ; on the east by 
the Hundreds of Wangford and Blything ; it borders to 
the south on those of Loes and Plomesgate, and on the west it is bounded 
by Hartismere. It has generally a strong, loamy soil, and rises in pictur- 
esque undulations, but subsides in a champaign tract in the Vale of the 
Waveney. 

It contains 55,655 acres, divided into the following 26 parishes and 75 
manors : — 




Parishes, 


Manors. 


Parishes. 


Manors. 


Athelington 


Athelington or Faw- 
con's. 




' Fressingfield. 
Fressingfield Hall. 




[ Badingham HaU or 




Veales with Launce's 




Carbonel. 




and Thykbrome 


Badingham . . 


Okenhill HaU or Sax- 
ham's. 




al. Veales cum 
membris. 




1 Colston Hall. 




Chepenhall Hall or 




Bedfield. 
] Bull Hall or Bullys- 
haU. 


Fressingfield.. 


Chevenhall. 


Bedfield .... 




WhittiQgham Hall 
with Wakelyn's. 






Wakeljm's now 




[ Bedingfield Hall. 




j oined toWhitting- 


Bedingfield 


Fleming's or Buck's 




ham Hall. 




Hall. 




Ufford Hall. 




/ Brundish with Firn- 




. Launces. 




hall. 




/Horham Comitis. 




Rodestrate or the 




Horham Jemegan's 


Brundish 


Chantry or Pies- 
hall's or Pyeshall. 




or Sherman's. 
Horham, Brodock- 




St. Edmund's House 




slate Copledyke. 




Rounton's. 


Horham 


< Horham, Thorpe 




Wilbies. 




Hall with Wotton. 




^ 




Buckenham or Bo- 


Carlton 


Carlton. 




kenham's. 


Denham 


Denham. 




Horham late 


Dennington .. 


Dennington. 




Pooley's. 



THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 



Parishes. 


Manors. 


Parishes. 


Manors. 




Hoxne, 




' Syleham Comitis. 




Hoxne Parsonage. 




Syleham Monk's 


Hoxne 


Hoxne Priory, or 
late Priory of St. 


Syleham 


Hall or Tylney's 




or Syleham Hall. 




Edmund's. 




Esham. 


Kelsale 


Kelsale. 
Laxfield. 








Studhagh or Stod- 




Tannington or 




hagh. 


Tannington 


Braisworth's. 


Laxfield . 


Laxfield Rectory. 
Wathersdale. 
Burt's or Bourt's 




Osberne's. 




Hall. 




/ Weybread Hall. 




' Mendham Hall. 




Istead al. Hovell's 




Mendham Priory. 




al. Weybread in 




Mendham Kingshall. 


Weybread . . 


WeybreadjEithane 


Mendham , . 


Walsham Hall. 


^ or Earsham al. 




Oakinhill Hall. 




Essam. 




Thorpe Hall. 




Finges in Istead. 




Thotford Hall. 




Weybread Rectory. 


Metfield .... 
Saxstead . . 


Metfield or Metfield 

Jermy. 
Saxstead or Saxsted. 




WHby. 


Soham 

/TIT——! \ 


Soham. 

BlomvUe's or Wood- 


Wilby 


Russel's. 
Jordan's. 


(Monk) 


croft Hall. 




Good's. 


Southolt 


Southolt. 






Stradbroke . . - 


/Stradbroke with 
Stubcroft. 
Shelton Hall. 
Hyllys or Hill's, 
Drawsword's and 
Denney's. 
\ Wootton's. 
Wotton's now called 


Wingfield . . 


/ Wingfield or Wing- 
field Castle. 

Wingfield Old Hall. 

Chickering Hall or 
Chickering with 
Wingfield. 




Thorpe Hall with 


Withersdale 


Withersdale. 




Wotton's. 








Barleugh or Bus- 








laugh Hall. 


Worlingworth 


Worlingworth. 



The fee and chief jurisdiction was in the Bishops of East Anglia before 
the removal of the see to Norwich. By an inquisition taken in the 21st 
of King HenryIII.it was stated that this Hundred ought to repair the 
signal called the "Bekon" standing upon Cache Cliffs in the village of 
Westleton. In the 3rd of Edw. I. the Bishop of Norwich held the fee 
of the King by the annual rent of lis. 6d. (but it was valued at loos.).' 
It is now in the Crown. 



'SeeH.R. ii. 186. 




ATHELINGTON. 3 

ATHELINGTON OR FAWCON'S MANOR. 

JJOBERT Malet was probably the Domesday tenant in chief. 
Roger de Huntingfield held the lordship in the time of 
Edw. I. and was succeeded by his son and heir William, 
who was lord till his death in 1313/ when he was succeeded 
by his son and heir Roger, who was then in custody of John 
de Grey. Roger died in 1337, ^.nd was succeeded by his son 
and heir William, who died in 1376, leaving two daughters 
and coheirs, Margery and Alice. A fine was levied in 1339 °^ this manor 
by Walter Faukouner, of Eye, and Joan his wife against John Talbot, 
parson of the church of Ovurokynghall, and Thomas Gorges, of Glemham, 
chaplain.^ 

Amongst the Bodleian Charters is an appointment made in 1430 by 
Laurence Cheyne, Robert Smyth, and Walter Taylor, of William Smith 
to receive seisin of the manor, and also of lands in Athelington, Combs, 
Mendlesham, &c.^ 

In the time of Henry VIT. the manor was vested in the Broughton 
family, and from John Broughton, who died in 1479, to the death of John 
Broughton in 1529, without issue, the manor passed in the same course as 
the Manor of Denston Hall, in Risbridge Hundred. 

The last-named John Broughton left as his heir his cousin Agnes, 
married to William Powlett. Cludiock Powlett had a grant of the manor 
from the Crown in 1548, but it passed from the Powletts shortly afterwards, 
for Sir William Powlett in 1572 sold to John Wentworth,* and amongst 
the Memoranda Rolls we find an order to remove process from the manor 
in 1575 and to discharge the said John Wentworth.^ 

J. Wythe seems to have acquired the manor from John Went worth 
in 1583,® and Thomas Wythe conveyed it to James Elmy 7th Feb. 1678. 

In the early part of the i8th century the manor was purchased by 
John Brooke, of Aspal, who removed here. 

He married Mary, daughter of George Green, of Brandish, and had issue 
a son and two daughters, namely, George, who married and had issue ; 
Rebecca, who died single ; and Penelope, who married the Rev. Nathaniel 
Rye, of Hepworth. George Brooke died in 1732, and was succeeded by his 
son and heir George, who is said to have died unmarried'' in 1764, and was 
succeeded by his brother and heir Francis Brooke, who in 1772 sold the 
manor to Thomas Green. 



'See Huntingfield Manor, Blything Hun- epine, Easter, 25 Eliz. 

dred. 'A George Brook married a Mary Eames, 

*Feet of Fines, 13, Edw. HI. 10. and there was a settlement of the 

^8 Hen. VI., Bodl. Suff. Ch. 1231. manor by deeds 20th and 21st, Sept. 

♦Fine, Mich. 14 Eliz. 1734, on this marriage. 
=M. 17 Eliz. Mich. Rec. Rot. 31. 




THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

BADINGHAM. 

^N Edward the Confessor's time Edric, of Laxfield, held 9 
carucates of land as a manor. There were in this extensive 
manor 4 villeins, 26 bordars, 10 ploughteams in demesne 
and 7 belongmg to the men, wood sufficient to support 100 
hogs, 20 acres of meadow, i rouncy, 15 beasts, 40 hogs, 20 
sheep, 60 goats, and i hive of bees. There was a church 
with 60 acres and i ploughteam, and i bordar and i acre of 
meadow. The value in Saxon times was £15, but by the time of the Nor- 
man Survey the value had come down to £10. That the condition of the 
place had by no means improved under the altered circumstances is shown 
from the fact that while the villeins had increased to 21 the ploughteam? 
in demesne had been reduced to 5 and those of the men to the like number, 
while the hogs were diminished in number by 8. It was a league and 6 
quarentenes long and a league broad, and paid lod. in a gelt. One Walter 
held of this manor 100 acres, 2 villeins, 6 bordars, and 2 ploughteams, valued 
at 30s. and included in the valuation of the £10. One Loernic held 40 acres 
included in the same valuation, and one Robert 40 acres in the same valua- 
tion of the 10s. (sic) and Edric had the soc and sac. This manor was 
held by Robert Malet's mother of the Queen's fee.' 

The Malet manor subsequently became divided into three manors — 
Badingham Hall or Carbonel, Colston Hall, and Okenhill or Saxham's 
Manor. 

Badingham Hall or Carbonel Manor. 

This belonged, according to Davy, to Joan de Bovile, wife of William 
de Bovile, in 1275, and was the lordship of William Bovile, son and heir 
of William, in 1314. In 1323 Richard de Wingfield was lord during the 
minority of the heir, John de Bovile, son and heir of Sir WiUiam. This 
is not quite correct, but it must be admitted that there is considerable 
difficulty respecting the early descents of the de Boviles. The pedigree 
of the family in Page'' is certainly inaccurate. 

* Davy's statement, however, that William de Boville was lord in 1314 
is quite accurate, for we find that this year he conveyed the manor with 
the advowson of the church to William de Halesworthe, parson of the church 
of " Buge," and Robert du Lay by way of settlement, and that they might 
regrant to him for life with remainder to the heirs male of his body with 
remainder, failing such issue to William' son of William de Boville and the 
heirs male of his body, with remainder to Thomas, son of Thomas le 
Latymer, and the heirs male of his body, remainder to Simon, son of 
Richard and Nicholaa his wife, for her life, remainder to her in tail male, 
with an ultimate remainder to the settlor in fee." 

Page states that by virtue of this settlement the manor ultimately 
became vested in Richard, the son of Simon Fitz Richard and Nicholaa, 
who conveyed his interest in trust for Margery, the daughter of William 
[? John] Boville, and wife of Sir William Carbonel. He gives no authority 
for the statement, and it does not appear in fact that Sir WiUiam de Boville 
had any son named William. His only son appears to have been John, 

'Dom. ii. 3286. "Pat. Rolls, 7 Edw. II. pt. ii. 12, 11.; 

^Hist. of Suffolk, p. 376. Licence to alienate, I.Q.D. 7 Edw. 

^It does not appear who this William was; II. 145; N.R. File loi, 3, 9 Edw. 

he Was not apparently a son of the II. 134. 

settlor, as is obvious from the prior 

limitation. 



BADINGHAM. 5 

and substituting the name of John for William we have a not unusual 
settlement. The actual devolution of the manor is perfectly clear. 
William, the settlor, died in 13 19.' The Davy statement, however, 
that " Richard de Wingfield was lord in 1323 during the minority of the 
heir, John or William de Boville, son and heir of Sir William," does not 
accord with an entry we find on the Close Rolls of 17 Edw. II. the very next 
year, unless we assume that John the son died before this date, and William, 
son of William Boville, had also died without male heirs at this early date, 
and that Thomas le Latimer was dead without male heirs, as also Simon 
Fitz Richard had died and his son Richard had already made an assurance 
to the infant Margaret or Margery. 

The order is to pay to William le Noreys a weekly wage, " it appearing 
that Sir William de Bovill granted to him for life the custody of his park 
at Badingham and of his warrens there, and in Dyngeton, Burndish, and 
Tatington, and that he was seised of the same at the death of Sir William, 
whose manor was in the King's hands by reason of the minority of Margaret, 
daughter of John de Bovill and heiress of the said Sir William.'" 



PEDIGREE OF BOVILLE. 

Sir William Boville, Knt. 
died before 1195. 
I 



William 
of Letheringham. 



: Basilia, dau. of Sir Geoffrey de Glanville, 
Baron de Bromholm. 



Sir John, 
d.s.p. 



Sir William : 
1252-1264, 
heir to brother. 



Isabel, dau, of 
Carbonel. 



Sir William 

of Letheringham, 

1310. 



John, 

died in lifetime 

of father. 



I 
Margaret. 



: Joan, dau. of Sir James 
Creke, al. Glanville, Knt. 



Sir John, 
1277. 



Sir William ■■ 
died 1319. 



: Joan, niece of Sir Herbert 
d'Alion or d'AUison. 



John = Petronilla, dau. of 
or William. I Sir Robert de Eccles. 



Margery ^ 



^ Sir Thos le 
Latimer. 



Nicholaa = Simon Fitz 
I Richard. 



Robert, 
d.s.p. 



(1) Sir Wm. Carbonel = Margaret = (2) Sir Thomas Wingfield, 



of Badingham, 
Knt. 



or Margery. 



second son of Sir John, 
of Wingfield Castle. 



Elizabeth. 



Sir Robert 

Carbonel, 

died 14th Sept., 1397 

I 
Sir John Carbonel 

Sir Richard Carbonel, died 1429, 



Thomas, 
d.s.p. 



Robert, 
d.s.p. 



John Wingfield. 
of Letheringham. 



Richard Fitz Richard, 
1347. 



The fact is that Page, in quoting the settlement of 1314, omits the 
important limitation of the manor by the settlor first to jRichard de Wing- 
field for life, as he granted the advowson first to Roger de Wingfield [for 
life. In 1321 Master Richard Clare, escheator on this side of the Trent, 



' Extent, WiUiam, son of William de Bovile; 
I.P.M., 13 Edw. 11. 19. 



'Close Rolls, 17 Edw. II. 8; see also 
William le Noreys, I.P.M., 17 Edw. 
II. 29. 



6 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

accounted for the issues of Badingham held of the Honor of Eye by Sir 
William de Bovile, and it was found that William de Bovile, son of Sir 
William de Bovile deceased, and Jane his wife lately deceased, held it at 
his death jointly, being enfeoffed by John de Catfield. Disputes arose on 
account of the settlement made in 1314, and in Michaelmas term, I33i,is 
an entry of certiorari upon the fine levied in Trinity term, 1314, and William 
Carbonel and Margery his wife desired a writ to summons Nicholaa, then 
widow of Thomas de Hindringham, or Richard, son of Simon Fitz-Richard 
(her son), who held the manor. 

In 1340 Richard Fitz Simon Fitz Richard bought the King's protection, 
he being then about to sail with the King into foreign parts, so that there 
was a supersedeas ; but in the following year the manor was conveyed by 
fine from Sir William Carbonel and Margery his wife to the said Richard 
and his heirs (from the heirs of Margery), and the said Richard occurs as 
lord in 1346. The next year he granted this lordship and that of 
Letheringham and the advowson of Badingham to Sir John de Ufford, Knt. 

The next lord was Sir Robert Carbonel (son of Sir William Carbonel), who 
married Margaret, daughter and coheir of Sir John de Caston, and died 14th 
Sept. 1397.' On the death of Sir Robert Carbonel, his son John was but 14, 
and his custody was granted by the King to William Feriby and Thomas 
Upton, but upon the petition of the Bishop of Norwich, the grant was 
revoked and a grant made to the bishop in Dec. 1398. By a deed dated 
the Feast of the Apostles Philip and James, 10 Hen. V. [1422], Thomas 
Pecke, clerk, granted to Sir Robert Brewys, Knt., John Fitz Rauff, Ohver 
Groos, WilUam Paston, John Manny ng, and others, the remainder of the 
manors which Sir John Carbonel and Margaret his wife held for his life, viz., 
amongst other manors, this and the manors of Greeting and DaUinghoo. 
And there is an exemplification of this deed on the i8th May, 32 Hen. VI. 
[1454].^ Sir John Carbonel by his will dated Friday next after the Feast 
of St. Martin [ist June, 1423], gave to Margaret, wife of his son Richard, 
a chain of gold ; to Richard, his silver vessels, jewels, and goods in several 
manors mentioning his lordships of Badingham, Saxham, DaUinghoo, 
and Greeting, and £3 per annum in Cratfield. He appoints Margery his 
wife, John Mannyng, and John Boys, executors, and was buried in the 
church of St. John the Baptist, of Badingham. His will was proved 29th 
March, 1425. 

On the death of Sir John Carbonel one-third of the manor passed in 
dower to his widow Margaret for life, and his son and heir. Sir Richard 
Carbonel, succeeded. He married Margaret, daughter of Sir Thomas 
Tudenham, of Oxburgh, Norfolk, and his will is dated 24th March, 1429. 
He bequeaths to Margaret his wife several silver vessels and jewels ; John, 
his son, to have after her decease, the movable altar and the old hair lomb 
called Caston's-Bolle; to Margaret, his daughter, a primar, also a silver 
cup and Salter. Margaret, his widow, was buried in 1431 in the church 
of the Franciscans in Norwich. Sir Richard Carbonel is said to have died 
in 1429 in foreign parts,^ having had but one son, John, who died in 1431-2, 

'I.P.M., 21 Rich. II. 14. Will 13th Sept. 'Add. Ch. 17243. 

1397, proved Sept. 1397. Blome- ^Will dated 24tli Nov. 1429 ; I.P.M., 10 

field states in one place that Sir Hen. VI. .11. 

Robert Carbonel was son of Sir John 

Carbonel, and that his will was 

proved 30th March, 1425, and John 

was his son and heir. 



BADINGHAM. 7 

an infant shortly after his mother, when the manor passed to Robert Lyston, 
son of John, son of Ehzabeth, daughter of Sir William Carbonel and 
Margaret his wife. 

A conveyance was made of the manor and advowson 28th July, 1472, 
by trustees, namely. Sir John Heveningham, John Heydon, Roger Drury, 
Edmund Reneyle, and John Norfold, to Robert Lyston and Isabella his 
wife. Robert Lyston died about 1478,' when the manor passed to his wife 
Isabella, and on her death in 1491 Davy says it passed to George 
Trace, of Moulton, whose mother, Jane, was one of the daughters of 
Robert Lyston, and he sold it to Reginald Rous in 1528. 

Page says that on the death of Robert Lyston the manor passed 
" through one of his daughters and coheirs, Margaret, who married to 
Edward Rous, Esq., 4th son of Reginald Rous, of Bennington, to that 
family." Both these statements cannot well be correct, but, unfortunately, 
neither of them is accurate. An inquisition p.m. 7 Hen. VII. 700, shows 
the real facts. It appears from this that the manor was then worth 20 
marks, and hel^ of John, Duke of Suffolk, as of his Manor of Benhall by 
the service of half a knight's fee. Sir John Heveningham and others, no 
doubt trustees or feoffees in trust, demised the manor to Robert Lyston, 
cousin and heir of the body of Sir William Carbonel and Margaret his 
wife, and to Isabella, then wife of the said Robert Lyston, and the heirs 
of the body of the said Robert, with remainder to the heirs of the body 
of the said William and Margaret Carbonel. 

Isabella having died in 1491, it was found that Joan, wife of Robert 
Trace ; Elizabeth, wife of Leonard Hyde ; Margery, wife of William 
Lindon ; Thomasine, wife of John Goldyngham ; and Margaret, wife of 
Edward Rous, were her daughters and heirs, and also of the body of the 
said Robert. Thus the manor went into five parts. The Trase, or Trace, 
5th Reginald Rous, acquired in 1532, by a fine levied against George Trace,^ 
and John Goldringham, clerk, son of John Goldringham, who had married 
Thomasine, daughter of Robert Lyston, and others, held their first court 
6 Edw. VI. Anthony Rous, son and heir of Reginald, acquired three other 
shares — one in 1538 under a fine levied against Sir Thomas Bedyngfeld 
and others ;^ another under one levied in 1544 against George Hyde and 
WilUam Ryde, jun.,* and a third under one levied in 1552 against John 
Drewrye and others.^ 

Ultimately, all the shares became vested in the Rous family, but as 
late as 1579 a fifth was outstanding, for we meet this year with a fine levied 
of a fifth by George Hyde against William Bonde and others.® 

Anthony Rous in 1556, and was succeeded by his widow Mary, who 
held her first court, 2-3 Phil, and Mary, and was succeeded by Reginald 
Rous, son and heir of Anthony. A fine was levied of the manor against 
him and others in 1587 by J. Harman and others.^ 

He obtained an Act of Parliament in 1609 to enable his uncle, Reginald 
Rous, to sell to him the third part of the manor which he then held.^ 

Reginald Rous, the purchaser, died in 1617. There is a petition in 
1651 of Mary Rous, then aged 84, the widow and executrix of Reginald Rous, 

'I.P.M., 18 Edw. IV. 24; 20 Edw. IV. 12. ^'Fme, Hil. 6 Edw. VI. 

^Fine, Mich. 24 Hen. VIII. I.P.M., spine, Easter, 11 Hen. VIII. 

32-33 Hen. VIII. ; D.K.R. lo 'pine, Mich. 29-30 Eliz. 

App. ii. 127. *7 Jac. C. 30, House of Lords' Journals ii. 
3 Fine, Easter, 30 Hen. VIII. 635, 637, 638, 640. 

♦Fine, Mich. 36 Hen. VIII. 



8 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

of Peasenhall, stating that her husband before the war sold to Reginald 
Rous half (sic) of Badingham Hall Manor, and part of the purchase money 
being unpaid she extended the lands and had possession, but was debarred 
from two-thirds sequestered for Rous's recusancy.' 

On the death of Reginald Rous in 1617 the manor passed to his son 
and heir, Reginald Rous.^ The presentation to the church of Badingham 
belonged to this Reginald, and he being a recusant, sold it to Myles Mayhew. 
The opinion of Mr. Wainsford on this sale is mentioned in the State Papers 
in 1626 and 1629,^ and the opinion itself will be found amongst the MSS. 
of Queen's College.* 

He died in 1629 and was succeeded by his son, and on the death of 
Reginald Rous, the son, in 1653, the manor passed to his son and heir, 
Lawrence Rous, who held his first court for this manor 3rd April, 1654. 
He died in 1699 and was succeeded by his son and heir, Lawrence Rous,, 
who died without issue in 1701. 

Page says that Mary, the sister of this Lawrence, was the wife of 
Waldegrave Alexander, but Davy says she was the wife of Thomas Bloss. 
In any case, the manor was sold to Francis Barker, who held his first court 
in 1720. From this time during a period of 100 years, to the time of Robert 
Sayer, the manor passed in the same course as Peasenhall Manor, in Blything 
Hundred. A sale of this manor and Colston Hall was advertised to take 
place 23rd Aug. 1843.^ It later passed to Sir Edward Hall Alderson and 
his brothers, then to John WiUiam Brooke, of Sibton Park, J. P. and D.L., 
eldest son of John Brooke, of Armitage Bridge, near Huddersfield. 

John William Brooke was High Sheriff for Suffolk in 1864, and married 
ist Feb. 1849, Jemima Charlotte, 3rd daughter of James Brittain, of 
Buenos Ayres, and died 5 th May, 1881, when the manor passed to his son 
and heir, John Kendall Brooke, of Sibton Park, M.A., J.P., barrister-at- 
law, who, the i8th April, 1882, married Helen Beatrice, only daughter 
of Capt. E. W. F. Acton, of Gatacre Park, Bridgnorth, and has, with other 
children, a son, John Acton, bom 5th August, 1883. The manor is now 
vested in the Rev. J. M. Brooke, of 20, Gledhow Gardens, London. 

A rental of the manor in 1705 is given by Davy, and the amount is 
£15. 4s. lod. 

Arms of Carbonel : Gu. a cross Arg. in a bordure engrailed Or. 
Of Brooke : Arg., a cross nebuly per pale, Gu., and Sa. in ist and 4th 
quarters, a boar's head erased of the last. 

Okenhill Hall Manor or Saxham's. 

Another manor, that of Okenhill Hall, was in early times known as 
Saxhams. It was no doubt part of the great Malet holding. It was held 
in the reign of Henry II. by Roger Gulafre, son of William Gulafre, who 
was succeeded by his son and heir, WiUiam, who had a daughter, Philippa, 
married to Robert Brito.^ He gave the tithes in " Hukenhill," to the 
monks of Eye, and was succeeded in this lordship by his son and heir, 
William Brito. He was followed by his son and heir, William le Breton, 
who died seised in 1258, leaving a daughter and coheir, Nicholaa, married 
ist to Sir Robert de Amoundeville (he endowed the Priory of Eye with 

' S.P. 1651, Cal. of Comp. 2828. s Ipswich Journal, 5th Aug. 1843. 

' S.P. 1653, Cal. of Comp. 3169. « See Manor of Mandeville, Sternfield, in 

3 S.P. 1626, 432, 1629, 142. Plomesgate Hundred. 

4CCIV. 279. 



BADINGHAM. 9 

two sheaves of his tithes), and 2ndly to Roger de Huntingfield. About 1300 
we find it stated that Roger de Huntingfield held four fees here. 

He held land here at an earlier date, for an action is referred 
to on the Patent Rolls in 1278 by Thomas Leneband against him and others 
touching a way stopped up in this place.' In 1311 Richard de Amounde- 
ville, son and heir of Sir Robert, was lord, and this year a fine was levied 
of the manor against him and Elizabeth his wife by John de Catefeld and 
Laerus, parson of Stutton church.' He died in 1322,^ and there is an 
order on the Close Rolls in 1324 not to meddle further with this manor, 
as Richard Amoundeville and Elizabeth his wife were jointly seised until 
his death, and as the same was held of the Honor of Eye by the service 
of a knight's fee.* 

Elizabeth Amoundeville was lady of the manor in 1327, for we find 
on the Patent Rolls a commission issued by the Crown on her complaint 
that William Dalisoim, of Cranesford, and others had broken her park at 
Okenhill.' 

She died m 1332, and the manor passed to Sir Richard de Amoundeville, 
the son and heir of Richard. In 1343 a fine was levied against him in respect 
of this manor, by John, son of Geoffrey de Say and Stephen de Brethenham.* 
Sir Richard died in 1350, leaving a daughter, Margery, married to Nicholas 
Fastolf , of Pettaugh. The manor had, in 1344, in Sir Richard AmoundevUle's 
lifetime, been settied upon his daughter, for we meet with a fine levied that 
year by the said Nicholas Fastolf and Margaret against Sir Richard 
Amoundeville.' To Margaret Fastolf succeeded her son and heir, Nicholas 
Fastolf, who married Elizabeth, daughter and coheir of Sir John Braham, 
Knt., and to Nicholas succeeded his son and heir, Thomas Fastolf, who 
married Margaret, daughter of Thomas Denston. In 1381 William de 
Ufford, Earl of Suffolk, was chief lord, he holding at his death four fees here. 
These were held in 1415 by Michael de la Pole, by William de la Pole in 
1451, and by Thomas, Duke of Norfolk, attainted in 1546. The previous 
year, however, we meet with a fine of the manor levied by the Duke against 
John Fastolf and others.^ 

Sir John Fastolf is said to have been lord of tiie manor in 1464, and 
Thomas Fastolf lord in 1529. This Thomas was no doubt son of the previous 
Thomas Fastolf, who had succeeded his father Nicholas. He married Anne, 
daughter of Reginald Rous, of Dennington, and on his death was succeeded 
by his son and heir, John Fastolf. He married ist Eleanor, daughter of 
James Tyrell, of Colombine Hall, and 2ndly, Lettice West, of Sudbury. 
He died in 1548. 

In 153 1 Thomas Hogan, who had had a grant from the Crown of 
the manor, obtained licence to alienate to Edward Rous. In 1564 Thomas, 
Duke of Norfolk, grandson of the above Thomas, had a restoration of 
his ancestor's honours and estates, but was attainted in 1569. Davy 
states that Philip, Earl of Arundell, and William Dix seem in 1581 to 
have granted the reversion of the manor to John Cornwallis and Margaret, 
his wife or mother. But as a matter of fact the sale was made sometime 
between 1582 and 1586. 

'Pat. Rolls, 6 Edw. I. 23«f, zdd, 8d. and * Close Rolls, 17 Edw. II. 17, 16; 18 

yd. Edw. II. 23 ; Originalia, 17 Edw. 

Teet of Fines, 5 Edw. II. 17. II. 22. 

3 Extent of Oakenhill Manor, of Honor ^pat. Rolls, i Edw. III. pt. ii. zd. 

of Eye, Richard de Amoundeville *Feet of Fines, 17 Edw. III. 21. 

and Elizabeth his wife. I.P.M., 'Feet of Fines, 18 Edw. III. 13. 

16 Edw. II. 26. « Fine, Mich. 37 Hen. VIII. 

B 



10 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

Thus in 1582 a fine was levied of this manor by Margaret Cornwallis, 
widow, and others, against Philip, Earl of Arundell,' and in 1585, by the said 
Margaret against Thomas Lord Howard, and others/ But the Tanner 
MSS. state that the purchase was made in 1586 by John CornwalUs of 
the Earl of Arundell.^ 

John Cornwallis certainly held the manor, and on his death was 
succeeded by his son and heir, Thomas, who died in 1627. In 1652 Thomas 
Utber and Anne his wife, and John Wells and Edith his wife, daughter 
of Thomas Corderoy and Elizabeth his wife, only sisters of Thomas Corn- 
walUs, seem to have been owners, and in 1658 John Bence, as purchaser 
from Utber and Wells. 

The next lord we find to be Richard Porter, whose daughter Jane 
married Thomas Kerridge. He died in 1743, and she in 1744, leaving an 
only daughter, Cecilia, who died unmarried in 1747. In June or July, 
1775, the manor was offered for sale, when the rents were stated to amount 
to £10. los. 3d., and with it the farm called Oakenhill Hall, containing 
about 177 acres, let at ;ifi32 per annum.* 

In 1781 the manor belonged to John Baldry, who was followed by 
his widow, and then by John Stow Baldry. In 1855 the manor belonged 
to James Gower, and subsequently to James Collins, and it is now vested 
in the trustees of Mrs. Collins. The customs of this manor are set forth in the 
Davy MSS.^ and a rental from 1719-20 will be found in the same vol., p. 616. 

This is probably the manor called " Bukham Manor," of which a fine 
was levied in 1594 by Charles Cornwallis and others against John Jernegan 
and others.^ 

Colston Hall Manor. 

The third manor, Colston Hall, was formed out of the lands of Robert 
Malet's mother and those of Hervey de Berri. The latter are described 
as in " Coleston," where a freeman under commendation to Edric held 
30 acres, 3 bordars, and half a ploughteam. It was in Saxon times valued 
at los., but by the time of the Norman Survey had increased to 20s. The 
freeman belonged to Cransford, and the land in Colston was then held by 
Warner, under Hervey de Berri, the Domesday tenant.' This manor was 
later held by Stephen, Count of Blois, and passed to Ryk (or William) 
de Hardighteshall, probably in right of his wife Matilda, in the time of 
Edward I.,^ and at her death passed to her son Ralph,' who had a grant 
of free warren here in 1300.'° 

In 1308 a fine was levied between Ralph de HardredeshuU and Alice 
his wife, plaintiffs, and John, parson of the church of Badyngham, and 
Robert Frivel, chaplain, deforciants, of the manor, which Ralph acknow- 
ledged to be the right of John, in return for which John and Robert granted 
the manor to Ralph de HardredeshuU and Alice and the heirs of Robert. 
On the decease of Ralph, however, the manor passed to his son WalkeUn." 

Davy says Walkelin died in 1377, leaving a son and heir, John, 
but he does not trace the descent of the manor between this period and the 
time of Hen. VIII. We entertain great doubt, however, whether John, 
the son of Sir Walkelin (for it seems he was knighted), ever did succeed 

' Fine, Easter, 24 Eliz. ^ Fine, Easter, 36 Eliz. 

" Fine, Trin. 27 Eliz. 7 Dom. ii. 441. 

3 Tanner MSS. Bodleian cclxxxiii. 191, sjj.R. ii. 186. 

192. 9 Feet of Fines, 13 Edw. I. 37. 

* Ipswich Journal, 27th May, 1775. "Chart. Rolls, 28 Edw. I. 5. 

5 Add. MSS. 19091. " Feet of Fines, 2 Edw. II. 6. 



BADINGHAM. ii 

to the lordship of this manor, for there is a fine in 1367' showing that 
the manor passed into the hands of Margaret, the wife of Thomas Wingfield" 
by whom it was sold to John Bakepool, then rector of Badingham. The 
Davy MSS. make Sir Anthony Wingfield,^ Knt., lord in 1539, and we do 
meet with a fine this year levied of the manor by Thomas Derhaugh 
against Sir Anthony Wingfield and others." This manor is specified 
amongst those of which Sir Anthony Wingfield died seised 20th Aug. 1552,^ 
and passed to his son and heir, Sir Robert Wingfield. That the latter 
held in 1568 is clear from a fine levied this year against him by Sir Edmund 
Wyndam and others. ° 

Sir Robert Wingfield died in 1596, but before his death one Arthur 
(? Anthony) Penning, of Kettleburgh, was lord. Arthur Penning was 
the eldest son of John Penning, of Kettleburgh, and married ist Frances, 
daughter of William Stebbing, and resided at Kettleburgh Hall, in 1556. 
By her he had a son John, who died a bachelor in 1591, and a daughter. He 
married 2ndly Catharine, daughter of — Brook, by whom he had four sons 
and seven daughters. He died in 1593 seised of the manors of Brockford 
and Colston Hall, and was interred in the chancel of Kettleburgh church. 
Arthur Penning was succeeded by his eldest son and heir by his second 
marriage, Anthony Penning, who married Elizabeth, daughter of Thomas 
Crofts, of Saxham Parva, and died in 1630, when he was succeeded by 
his son and heir Anthony. Were it not for Davy's direct statement as to the 
manor passing to the Penning family, and the fact of the fine of 1568, and 
that Anthony Penning died seised in 1593, one would have thought that 
under the fine levied against Sir Anthony Wingfield by Thomas Derhaugh 
in 1539 the manor passed to the Derhaugh family. This family was seated 
at Colston Hall as early as 1522. Thomas Derhaugh^ left a son William, 
who married Margaret, youngest daughter and coheir of Edmund Wright, 
of Sutton Hall, Suffolk, and Little Buckenham, Norfolk, and had a son 
Thomas, who married Mary, daughter of Owen Sheppard, of Kirby, in 
Norfolk, and died at Kirby, 25th April, 1619, and was buried there, leaving 
an only daughter Elizabeth, married to Sir Jeffery Burwell, Knt., of 
Rougham, co. Suffolk. In 1631 we meet with an ousterlemain of 
Colston Hall, and lands in Badingham, part of the Manor of Colston Hall, 
in favour of this Jeffery Burwell in right of his wife Elizabeth.^ There 
is also a fine levied of Colston Hall Manor this year by Sir Jeffery Burwell 
and Elizabeth his wife, in which it is stated that the manor was " late of 
Thomas Derehaugh."' 

The manor, it seems, was forfeited for recusancy in 1635." Elizabeth, 
the heiress, died 24th Oct. 1678, and there is a mural inscription to her 
memory in Rougham church, Suffolk. Sir Jeffery Burwell died 6th July, 
1684, leaving an only daughter Mary, who married Robert Walpole, of 
Houghton, CO. Norfolk. 

' 41 Edw. III. 12. -3 See Thorpe Hall Manor, Hasketon, in 
'The fine was levied by Sir Nicholas Carlford Hundred. 

Gemoun, William de Wyngefeld, * Fine, Mich. 31 Hen. VHI. 

John deHarliston, parson of Blakes- si.P.M., 13th Apl. 7 Edw. VI. 

hall Church ; Edmund de ^ pine, Trin. 10 Eliz. 

Brundysh, parson of Castrech ; 'I.P.M., i Mary and i and 2 Phil, and 

William Chamel, parson of Benyng- Mary; D.K.R. 10 App. ii. p. 130. 

ton; Peter Brown, Master of ^ Chancery D.K.R. 34 App. i. p. 197. 

Wyngefield College; and John ^Fine, 7 Chas. I. pt. i. 15. 

Bakepol, parson of Badingham "Add. Ch. 5522. 

Church (Feet of Fines, 41 Edw. III. 

12). 



12 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

Davy states that Francis Burwell sold the manor for ;^6oo to Lawrence 
Rous, nth May, 1657, but this may be the date of the conveyance, for 
he seems to have purchased earher and to have held his first court 3rd 
April, 1654. He died in 1699, being succeeded by his son and heir Lawrence, 
who died without issue in 1701, when the manor passed to Thomas Blosse, who 
had married Lawrence's sister Elizabeth. It did not long continue with 
them, for in 1720 we find Francis Barker to be lord, and this year he held 
his first court. He died in 1734, when the manor passed to his daughter 
and heir Elizabeth, married to Robert Lynch. It was again sold, this time 
to Mileson Edgar, of the Red House, Ipswich, who held his first court 
loth June, 1754, and died in 1770, when his executors. sold to Thomas 
Staunton, who died in 1784, and was succeeded by his son and heir, Thomas 
Staunton. He died in 1791, and the year following his trustees sold the 
manor to John Clayton, who dying in 1798, was succeeded by his son and 
heir, John Clayton, who died in 1819, when the manor was sold to Robert 
Howlett, and later by him to Robert Sayer, who held in 1839. In 1855 
the manor belonged to J. W. Brooke, and it has since passed in the same 
course as the Manor of Badingham Hall, and is now vested in the Rev. 
J. M. Brooke. The manor was offered for sale by private contract in July, 
1827, when the estate was said to consist of 300a. 3r. i5p.' 

Amongst the Chancery Proceedings of the time of Queen Elizabeth 
will be found a claim by Robert Banham against Peter Hadman and 
Margaret his wife as to a close called Bradcrofte held of the Manor of 
Colston, granted by the lord to Thomas Banham and Robert Banham, 
plaintiffs' ancestors, in the time of Hen. VI. ^ The following is a trans- 
lation of an extent of the manor made in 1300 : " Be it known to all manner 
of faithful people in Christ present to come that the Prior and Convent 
of St. Fayghtes, in Horsham, have received all the tithes as well great and 
small of the demesne, lands and pasture of the Manor of Ryk de 
HardighteshuU, which is called Coltone Hall, in the town of Badyngham, 
which lands and pastures and the tenements holden of them after be 
specified, i.e., all tithes, shefes, herbis of curtelages, gardens, wood, and 
hemp, calves, lambs, pigs, hens, geese, donkeys, wool, milk, cheese, and 
eggs, also names of the demesne lands and tenements, i.e., one piece of land 
containing nine acres held by Reynold Ules, Derhogheswent, containing 
seven acres, a way called Derhagheswaye, Greenwaye, two woods called 
Slohege and Ruhege, Sondfield, on the west lands of Roger Westhauge, 
■on the east lands of Sir Olyver Watesham, Smalamedowe, a pasture of 
20 acres called Dernhegefeld, Wylitt grove sometimes called Dernhege- 
wode, Botyld Row, Sponescroft, Whytstock, Wolvine land. Raffe 
holds one mete, Amable de Cause the other mete, George Valence and divers 
persons, Hugh Jakeman, John de Wylyzun, John de Rauloth, and John 
Boche hold pasture called Greneway and Smalway nigh Algereford." 

A rental of the manor when owned by Anthony Penning, 22nd Nov. 
2 Chas. I., and also one in 1705, are set forth in the Davy MSS.^ and the 
amount in 1705 shown to be £22. os. M. per annum. 

Arms of Derhaugh : Sable, three martlets in bend between two 
bendlets Arg. 



' Ipswich Journal, 21st July, 1827. ^ Add. MSS. 19091. 

* Chancery Proceedings, i. 142. 



BEDFIELD. 



13 




BEDFIELD. 

|N the time of the Confessor a manor was held here by 
Godwin, with 4 carucates of land. There were then 18 
bordars, 2 ploughteams in demesne, 8 belonging to the men, 
wood sufficient to support 200 hogs, 9 acres of meadow, 
2 rouncies, 9 beasts, 40 hogs, and the value was then £6. 
By the time of the Domesday Survey the value had risen 
to £7, and the bordars had increased to 23, there was an 

additional ploughteam belonging to the men, 20 beasts, 60 hogs, and 83 

sheep, but one of the rouncies had disappeared. 

The length of the manor was 6 quarentenes and the breadth 5, and 

it paid in a gelt ■^^d. The tenant in chief was Robert Malet's mother, 

who held of the Queen in fee.' 

Bedfield Manor. 

It was given by Malet to Eye priory; and the ministers' accounts 
of the manor for the priory, 18 Edw. II., are in the Public Record Office.'' 
We meet with the manor in a fine levied in 1324 by Robert Weylond against 
Sir William Bole and Joan his wife.^ The prior had free warren here in 
1396,* and there is a conveyance of the manor in 1434 amongst the Harleian 
Charters in the British Museum.^ 

On the dissolution of the religious houses the manor came to the Crown, 
and was granted to Charles Brandon, Duke of Suffolk, for he in 1538 granted 
the same to the King in exchange,^ and it was the following year 
granted by the King to Anthony Rous, who died in 1545, from which 
time to the present the manor has descended in the same course as the 
Manor of Henham, in Blything Hundred. 

Amongst the Exchequer Depositions are the particulars of an action by 
Sir John Rous against William Powell and others as to the fines of the 
manors, and as to customs, metes, and bounds of copyhold lands, &c.,'' 
and also of an action by Sir John Rous against John Barker and others. 
The particulars given are of freehold and copyhold of the manor " lately 
in the possession of J as. Meyhew," metes and bounds, survey, &c.^ 

Bull Hall or Bullyshall Manor. 

This manor belonged in 1316 to the Earl Marshal, and in 1563 Ralph 
Goodwin is said to have died seised of it, when it passed to his son and 
heir, Christopher Goodwin. In 1561 a fine had been levied of the manor 
by William Whetcrofte and others against Ralph " Godwin."' This same 
year John Chapman, alias Barker, seems to have held two parts, and 
he was required to show by what title he held the same. Robert Barker 
appears to have held next, and died in 1571, when he was followed by John 
Barker, who in 1574 levied a fine of the manor against Anthony Russhe 
and others.'" John Barker died in 1582, when he was succeeded by his son, 
Edmund Barker. In 1610 William Linge became the owner of two-thirds 
of the manor on purchase from Barker. In 1657 the manor had passed 
to Edward Dunston, son of Thomas Dunston by Judith his wife, daughter 
of Thomas Artig, of Badingham. Edward Dunston married Elizabeth 
May hew, of Soham, co. Suffolk, and left an only daughter and heir Elizabeth, 
who married Sir Robert Drury, Bart., of Riddlesworth, co. Norfolk. 

'Dom. ii. 328, 3286. estate Papers, 30 Hen. VIII. ii. 1182, i8a. 

* Bundle 1127, No. 4. 7Exch. Dep. 1723, at Debenham. 

3 Feet of Fines, 18 Edw. II. 25. * Exch. Dep. 1727, at Dennington. 

4 Chart. Rolls, 20 Rich. II. 4. sFine, Mich. 3 Eliz. 

5 Harl. 47 C. 44. " Fine, Easter, 16 Eliz. 



14 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

The manor then seems to have vested in the Wattlings, of Worling- 
worth, for it passed on the marriage of Audry Wattling with Robert Clayton, 
eldest son of Robert Clayton, of Exton, and Susan Pulham his wife. They 
had six sons and five daughters. Robert, the eldest son, was an ironmonger, 
and Sheriff of Norwich in 1672, in which year he died without issue. 
William, the second son, was by business a hosier, and married Elizabeth 
Johnson, by whom he had two children, one who died young, and Robert 
Clayton, who succeeded to this lordship. This descent is by no means 
certain, for we meet in 1695 with a conveyance of the manor by James 
Clayton, of the City of Norwich, ironmonger, made on the marriage of 
Robert Clayton, described as " kinsman of James," with Susan, daughter 
of Peter Bosford, of Earl Soham. The manor was settled on James for 
life, with remainder to Robert for life, remainder to Susan for life, and 
then to the heirs of the body of the said Susan begotten by the said Robert, 
and for want of such issue to the right heirs of Robert for ever. Robert 
was rector of Bedfield, and made his will 25th March, 1704. He died 22nd 
Nov. 1708, and his widow remarried William Lord, of Bedfield. She died 
i8th Oct. 1770, and was buried by the side of her first husband in the 
chancel of Bedfield church. The manor passed to his son and heir, Robert 
Clayton, rector of Caistor, next Yarmouth. He married Rebecca Young, 
and seems to have sold the manor to the Rev. John Castell, of Brooke. On 
Castell's death the manor went to his widow Elizabeth, and was sold to 
William Frewer, who held the same in 1820. By his will he directed the trus- 
tees to sell, and they offered the manor by public auction at Framlingham, 
i6th June, 1837, 3-^d again 22nd June, 1838. The Bull Hall farm con- 
sisted of 140 acres with a right of feeding 7 sheep on Bedfield Long Green." 

Arms of Dunston : Gu. a buck's head cabossed Arg. 



^Ipswich Journal, 20th May, 1837; 2nd June, 1838. 




BEDINGFIELD. 15 

BEDINGFIELD. 

|NE manor was held here in the time of the Confessor by 
AluriCj a freeman under Harold, and consisted of 92 acres, 
2 bordars, i ploughteam in demense and i belonging to the 
men, wood to support 10 hogs, an acre of meadow, 12 hogs, 
and 20 sheep. Also the fourth part of a church, with 6 acres, 
the value being 30s. At the time of the Survey the number 
of bordars had changed, they having increased to 4, 
and the manor was held by Ralph de Limesi, its value being i6s. 8d. 

Ralph de Limesi also had an estate of 35 acres, an acre of meadow, 
and a ploughteam valued at 40^., formerly held by 6 freemen, over whom 
Aluric had commendation, except over a half-freeman, who was under 
Robert Malet's predecessor by commendation only.' 

Robert Malet had two small estates here. The first consisted of 20 acres, 
3 bordars, half a ploughteam, and wood sufficient to support 10 hogs, 
valued at 5s. This formerly belonged to a freeman under Edric by com- 
mendation. 

The second consisted of 80 acres and 2 ploughteams, valued at 6s. 
(increased at the time of the Survey to 15s.). There was also the fourth part 
of a church with 6 acres. This had formerly been held by 6 freemen under 
commendation." 

Robert Malet's mother had three estates here held of the Queen's fee. 
The first consisted of 44 acres, a bordar, wood for the support of 20 hogs, 
and an acre of meadow, valued at 5s., the soc belonging to the bishop. In 
Saxon times it was held by 3 freemen under commendation to Stigand. 

The second consisted of 26 acres of land, wood to support 6 hogs, and 

1 ploughteam valued at 4s., the soc belonging to the bishop. This had 
formerly been held by 2 freemen under commendation to Stigand. 

The third consisted of 84 acres and 8 bordars belonging to a freeman 
held by Humfrey of Robert Malet, and a priest by commendation held 
under him, 6 acres, 2 ploughteams, an acre of meadow, and wood sufficient 
to support 10 hogs. Under him were 6 freemen with 25 acres and a plough- 
team, valued at 22s. 8^.^ 

Another holding was that of the Abbot of St. Edmunds, consisting of 
half a carucate of land, 2 bordars, 2 ploughteams among them all, and 
wood sufficient to support 8 hogs. 

The Survey goes on to say : " One of these with 30 acres of land never 
could give or sell the land with the full consent of the abbot : and to this 
the Hundred bears witness : and the nine could give and sell (their) lands." 
The whole was valued at 5s. (at the time of the Survey increased to 8s.). It 
was a league long and 6 quarentenes broad, and paid in a gelt 15^^. It had 
formerly been held by 10 freemen. Others had holding therein.* 

Belonging to the fee of the Bishop of Thetford was a holding of 30 
acres and a ploughteam valued at 6s. (at the time of the Survey at los.) It 
had formerly been held by 2 freemen by commendation.^ 

Hugh de Montfort had two estates here, one consisting of 60 acres, 

2 bordars, i^ ploughteams, and 2 acres of meadow, valued at los., the soc 
belonging to the bishop. It had formerly been held by 5 freemen under 

'Dom. ii. 4286. ■'Dom. ii. 368. 

"Dora. ii. 310. s Dom. ii. 3796. 

^Dom. ii. 3106. 



i6 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

commendation, and the other estate, consisting of a like number of acres, 
I ploughteam and a half, wood sufficient for 40 hogs, formerly held by 7 
villeins. This last estate lay in Occold, and was included in its valuation, 
the soc being in the bishop.' 

Under the heading " These be the freemen of Suffolk who remain in 
the King's hands," was a holding in this place. It is described as follows : 
" In Bedingfield (are) 2 freemen who remain in the king's hand through 
respite of the plea (holden ?) between the Bishop of Bayeux and Robert 
Malet's mother. One was under commendation to Stigand and the other 
half under Leuric, Robert Malet's predecessor, and the other moiety 
(belonged to) Sachs ; and they have 40 acres and 3 bordars, always i 
ploughteam. Wood for 20 hogs — Valued at los. The soc is in Hoxne." 
Of the claims in dispute between the Bishop of Bayeux and Robert Malet's 
mother was a holding in this place consisting of 40 acres in manner afore- 
said, a ploughteam (reduced to half a team), and wood to support 40 hogs. 
And a freeman under commendation to Brictred held 5 acres, the whole 
valued at lis. It was formerly held by Bricter and Cheric.^ 

Amongst the numerous lands of Robert Malet we meet with half an 
acre entered in the Survey under another Hundred. It was valued at 2i. 
and held over him by his mother, the King and the Earl having the soc. It 
had formerly been held by a freeman under sub-commendation under 
Ulveva.^ Of Bedingfield " Honest Tom " says, " A Hellish dirty country 
(God forgive me for this wicked expression). Flat and Clayey." 

Bedingfield Hall Manor. 

The Domesday tenant in chief, Ralph de Limesi, married Christiana, 
one of the sisters of Prince Edgar Atheling,"* by whom he had a son Ralph, 
who married one named Halewise. He does not seem, however, to have 
retained this manor, as we find that in 1099 William Martel and Albreda 
his wife and Jeffrey their son gave the same to the Abbot of St. John's, 
Colchester, to found the pnory of Snape. The deed of gift of the Martels 
was not given effect to immediately by the abbey of Colchester, and in 
fact, the founding of the priory cell of Snape was delayed till 1155. But 
from that time to the dissolution of the smaller monasteries in 1524 the 
manor remained in the priory of Snape. 

In 1395 we find a lease granted of the manor for 7 years by the priory 
to Sir Robert Carbonel, Sir John Skeyton, vicar of Bedyngfeld, and John 
his brother,' and in 1405 the priory was charged in respect of the issues 
taken then into the King's hands.® In 1441 the priory again had 
possession, for in that year they granted a lease for 5 years of the manor 
to John Pakke and others.^ 

At the Dissolution the manor was granted by Hen. VIII. to Cardinal 
Wolsey for the endowment of his college at Ipswich,* and upon his disgrace, 
in 1532, to Thomas, Duke of Norfolk, and in 1553 to Thomas and George 
Golding. It soon after passed to the Bedingfield family, who were seated 
at Fleming Hall. 

Sir Henry Bedingfield,^ of Oxburgh, Knt., had a grant from Henry VIII. 
of certain manors in Yorkshire for his faithful services against his northern 

'Dom. ii. 406. 6 Memoranda Rolls, 6 Hen. IV. Pas. Rec. 

'Dom. ii. 4476. Rot. 17. 

3Dom. ii. 3236. 7 Ancient Deeds, 19 Hen. VI. A. 3339. 

4 See Sayham Hall Manor, in Newton, « State Papers, 17 Hen. VIII. 1834 (27). 
Babergh Hundred. 9 See Manor of Hesteley, in Thorndon, 

5 Ancient Deeds, 17 Rich. II. A. 3338. Hartismere. 



2 



BEDINGFIELD. 17 

rebels in that reign, and was one of the first on the death of Edw. VT. and 
the proclamation of Lady Jane Grey to offer his assistance to Queen Mary, 
she being then at Framlingham Castle. In return for his service he was, 
on the coronation of the Queen, appointed Governor of the Tower of London 
and one of the Privy Council. 

It is said that he later had a grant from Queen Elizabeth of the 
Manor of Caldecot, in Norfolk, but it appears from an old terrier in the reign 
of Edw. VI. that this manor was then in the family, held of Elizabeth, 
the wife of — Denham. 

After the accession of Queen Elizabeth, Sir Henry was summoned 
concerning his rehgion before the Privy Council in 1578, but as it was 
represented to the Council by his son-in-law, Henry Seckford, that on 
account of his sickness and infirmities he could not travel without danger, 
he was given leave to return, being then on his way. A second letter of 
the 17th Jan. 1578, from the Bishop of Norwich, gives him leave to remain 
in his own house till Lady Day, adding : " and also, it is hoped, that within 
the time limited, as aforesaid, you may confirm yourself in matters of 
religion." After exhorting him to this, it proceeds : " for as you are 
favourably dealt with for a time, so if the same do work no amendment 
in you, then to repair with my lords of her Majesty's most honourable 
Privy Council, further to be conferred with, and ordered, &c." In 1581, 
at the suit of his son-in-law, he was permitted to remove to his house for 
a season, " tiU his grief for the recent death of his wife should subside." 

Amongst the Chancery Proceedings in the time of Elizabeth is the 
record of an action by George Pocke against Sir Henry Bedyngfeld, touch- 
ing copyhold of the manor.' Sir Henry Bedingfield married Catherine, 
daughter of Sir Roger Townshend, Knt., one of the judges of the Common 
Pleas, by whom he had a numerous family. He was succeeded 22nd Aug. 
1583/ by his son, Edmund Bedingfield, who married twice, ist, Ann, 
daughter of Sir Robert Southwell, of Hoxne, and 2ndly, Anne, daughter 
of John Moulton, of Thurgarton, co. Norfolk. On Edmund Bedingfield's 
death in 1585, the manor passed to his son and heir Thomas, who married 
Frances, daughter and heir of John Jernegan, of Somerleyton, and dying 
9th April, 1590, the manor passed to his son and heir. Sir Henry Beding- 
field. On the breaking out of the CivU War he joined the Royal Standard 
with his two sons, Thomas and Henry. Thomas was made colonel, and 
Henry a captain of horse, and both distinguished themselves greatly in 
the field. Sir Henry Bedingfield was made prisoner, and committed to 
the Tower, and narrowly escaped death. He married twice — ist, Elizabeth 
or Maud, daughter of William, Lord Howard, of Naworth Castle, in Cum- 
berland, 3rd son of Thomas, Duke of Norfolk, by whom he had an only 
child, the above-named Thomas, steward of the Duchy of Lancaster, who 
married Mary, daughter of Robert Brookesby, of Sheffield, co. Lincoln 
and died without issue at Oxburgh, 26th April, 1665. 

Sir Henry took for his 2nd wife Elizabeth, daughter and coheir of 
Peter Houghton, of Houghton Tower, co. Lancaster, alderman and sheriff 
of London, by whom he had five sons and six daughters. 

Sir Henry Bedingfield died soon after his release from the Tower, 
22nd Nov. 1656, according to Betham, but 1657 according to Cockayne, 
and an inscription at Oxburgh. Against the north wall of the chapel 
there is a lofty monument of black and white marble, ornamented with 

' C.P. Ser, ii. B. cxxxix. 5. ' I.P.M., 7th April, 26 Eliz. (1584). 

C 



i8 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

festoons, &c., below that two shields supported by two angels, on one of 
which is this inscription : — 

"Under this monument lyeth the body of Sir Henry Bedingfield, 
the 17th knight of this family, eminent for his loyalty to his prince and 
service of his country. In the time of the rebeUion he was kept three 
years prisoner in the Tower, and great part of his estate was sold by the 
rebels, the rest sequestered during his life. He had two wives. The first 
Mary, daughter to William, Lord Howard, of the north, by whom he had 
one son, who died without issue. His second wife was Elizabeth, daughter 
of Peter Houghton, Esq., by whom he had five sons and six daughters. 
He died November 22nd Anno Dni. 1657, a^t. 60 and six months." 

On the other shield : " Here lyeth Elizabeth, wife of Sir Henry Bed- 
ingfield, Knt., and daughter of Peter Houghton, of Houghton Tower, in 
Lancashire, Esq. She dyed on the nth of April anno Dni. 1662." 

" Beati mortui qui in Domino moriuntur. — Eccles." 

Henry, the 2nd son and heir to his father, married in April, 1635, 
Margaret, daughter and sole heir of Edward Paston, of Appleton, co. Nor- 
folk, and of Horton, co. Gloucester. 

He survived all his brothers and sisters except one, and enjoyed tran- 
quility after the restoration of Chas. II. At the request of his sovereign 
he laid before him a calculation of the losses his family had sustained in 
the royal cause, and the amount came to 3^47,194. i8s. 8d. His Majesty, 
much concerned, informed Mr. Bedingfield that the amount was far too 
great for him to recompense, to which that gentleman repHed that all he 
begged his majesty was that he might hope for the future to enjoy in quiet 
what little still remained. 

His majesty afterwards conferred the dignity of a baronet upon him, 
for the great and eminent services done by him and his family ; but his 
son being soon after knighted, the father let lie dormant his patent 
for many years, which postponed him to many of the order in point of 
seniority. Sir Henry Bedingfield was esteemed one of the most accom- 
plished men of his age, " the comeliness of his person, the clearness of his 
parts, and that noble sweetness of his temper gave him so great a credit 
and authority in his country, as scarce anything was thought well done 
without his approbation ; and many misunderstandings amongst the 
greatest families, that friends had tried to compromise and coi^d not, 
were referred to him, and happily determined. Yet the most fortunate 
part of his character was his felicity in a companion for a wife, in the person 
of the before-mentioned Mrs. Margaret Paston, who, besides the great 
portion she brought, equalled him in all his merits, aided him through all 
his afflictions, and, in his absence, when forced to fly beyond the seas, 
managed his whole concerns, and a numerous family, all with the utmost 
art and prudence ; and so careful in the whole conduct of her life, as Sir 
Henry, amongst his dying words, declared ' That she had been a wife who 
had never once displeased him ' ; and yet, if he had lived six weeks longer 
they had been married fifty years.'" He died the 6th February,* 
1684-5, and was buried in Oxburgh church^ under a marble monument 

'Wotton's English Baronetage, vol. iii. ^WUl 30th June, 1684, proved March, 

pt. i. p. 215. 1684-5. 

"According to Betham, but 24th Feb. on 

monument. 



BEDINGFIELD. 19 

erected for him by his widow, who lies buried beside him. The manor 
passed to his son and heir, Sir Henry Bedingfield, 2nd Bart. So 
great was his hospitality that it is said not to have been exceeded 
by any gentleman of his rank and fortune ; and " had not the 
religion of his ancestors, in which he was born and bred, obstructed his 
coming into the public stations of his country, no man whatever 
would have been more popular." He was twice married — ist to 
Anne, only daughter and heir of Charles Howard, Viscount Andover, 
afterwards and Earl of Berkshire,' by whom he had no issue. His 2nd 
wife was Elizabeth, youngest daughter and coheir of Sir John Arundell, 
of Lanherne, in Cornwall, Bart., by whom he had three daughters and 
one only son, Sir Henry-Arundell Bedingfield, his successor. Sir Henry 
Bedingfield died the 14th Sept. 1704,'' and was buried at Oxburgh, between 
his two wives, at the foot of a monument erected for them by the said 
Sir Henry in his lifetime. Sir Henry-Arundell Bedingfield, 3rd Bart., 
succeeded to the manor, and married, in Aug. 1719, Elizabeth Boyle, 
eldest daughter of Charles Boyle, 2nd Earl of Burlington, and died the 15 th 
July, 1760,^ when the manor passed to his eldest son, Sir Richard Henry 
Bedingfield, 4th Bart. He married, 30th Mar. 1761, Mary, only daughter 
of Anthony Browne, 6th Viscount Montagu, and dying the 27th March, 
1795,* the manor passed to his only son, Sir Richard Bedingfield, 5th 
Bart. He married, i6th June, 1795, Charlotte Georgiana, daughter of Sir 
William Jemingham, of Cossey, 6th Bart., sister of George Lord Stafford, 
and dying the 22nd Nov. 1829' the manor passed to his eldest son. Sir 
Richard Henry Bedingfield, 6th Bart., who married, 30th Aug. 1826, 
Margaret Anne, only child and heir of Edward Paston, of Appleton, co. 
Norfolk. Sir Richard Bedingfield assumed by royal licence the additional 
surname and arms of Paston, nth April, 1830, and was declared by the 
Lords' Committee for Privileges one of the coheirs to the ancient Barony 
of Grandison, which had been in abeyance for about five centuries. He 
died 4th Feb. 1862, and the manor passed to his eldest son and heir. Sir 
Henry George Paston-Bedingfield, 7th Bart., who married, 27th Oct. 1859, 
Augusta, oijy child of Edward Clavering, of Callaly Castle, Northumber- 
land, and died i8th Jan. 1902, when the manor passed to, and is now vested 
in, the trustees of his will. His son and heir, Sir Henry Edward Beding- 
field, 8th Bart,, was born 29th Aug. i860. 

Arms of Limesi : Gu. 3 eagles displayed Or. Of Bedingfield : Erm., 
an eagle displayed Gu. 

Fleming's or Buck's Hall Manor. 

This manor was carved out of the estates of the Malet family, portions 
being assigned by them as a manor to Ogerus de Pugeys, one of the four 
knights of the Honor of Eye. Ogerus from this place took the name 
of Bedingfield. Peter de Bedingfield, with the consent of Arnold his son, 
about 1156, granted the advowson of the parish church to Snape priory. 

This manor, however, was the lordship of the Flemings in the time 
of Hen. III., being probably called either after William le Fleming or Adam 
le Fleming, the owners in that reign. It continued in the Fleming family, 
according to Davy and Burke, until the middle of the 14th cent., when the 

'She died 19th Sept. 1682. * Admin. April, 1795. 

'Will proved May, 1705. 'Will proved Feb., 1830, and June, 1832. 

3 Will 17th June, 1760, proved 1760. 



20 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

former makes James Bedingfield, 2nd son of Sir Peter and brother of Sir 
Thomas Bedingfield/ who was living in 1350, marry Alice/ daughter and heir 
of Peter de Fleming, and thus acquire Fleming Hall and this manor. But, 
as a matter of fact, we find the Bedingfields had this manor nearly a century 
earlier. In 1309 we meet with a fine levied of the manor by Edmund de 
Bedyngfeld and Maud his wife, daughter of William de Hemenhale,^ and in 
1331 there is an order to the sheriff that all the corn in Bedingfield Manor 
which belonged to Peter de Bedyngfeld be valued and delivered to Walter 
de Haye."* In 1339 a fine was levied by Thoma de Stowe and James de 
Micklefeld v. William Godard, of Wirlyngwirth, chaplain of this manor 
and that of Hesteleye.^ 

In 1348 there is a grant of the manor amongst the Harleian Charters* 
and again in 1381.^ 

On James Bedingfield's death in 1435, the manor passed to his son 
and heir, William Bedingfield, who married Margaret, daughter of Thomas 
Playters, of Sotterley, and on his death to his son and heir, John Beding- 
field, who married Alice, daughter of Walter Stonham, and on his death, 
in 1496, the manor passed to his son and heir, Thomas Bedingfield, who 
took to wife Joan, daughter and heir of Roger Bosard or Busarde, of 
Ditchingham, co. Norfolk, and dying it went to his son and heir, Philip 
Bedingfield, who married Anne, daughter and heir of Richard Yaxley, of 
Yaxley, by Alice his wife, daughter and heir of Stratton, and died in 1543, 
when the manor passed to his son and heir, Thomas Bedingfield, who 
married Mary, daughter of William Methwold, of Langford, co. Norfolk, 
and died in 1571. He was succeeded by his son and heir, another Thomas 
Bedingfield, who married in 1553 Dorothy, daughter of John Southwell, 
of Darsham, and died in 1636, when the manor passed to his son and heir, 
Philip Bedingfield, who married Anne, youngest daughter of Edward Bacon, 
of Shrubland Hall, and granddaughter of the Lord Keeper Bacon, and dying 
was buried at Ditchingham 6th March, 1660. It does not appear how 
long this manor continued with the Bedingfield family. The last-named 
Philip had a son, PhUip, who married Ursula, daughter of Sir John Potts, 
Knt., of Mannington, co. Norfolk, and had issue a son and heir, Philip, 
who married Elizabeth, daughter and coheir of William Strode, of Coventry. 
His son and heir, the Rev. John Bedingfield, LL.D., married Catherine, 
daughter of Clere Gameys, of Hedenham, but dying without issue in 1729, 
his estates passed to his brother James, whose elder son and successor, 
Philip Bedingfield, married ist, Mary, daughter of Sir Edmund Bacon, 
Bart., of Gillingham, and 2ndly, Mrs. Forster, daughter of — Spendlove, 
of Norwich, and died in 1791, when his estates passed to his elder son, Philip, 
who dying without issue in September of the same year as his father the 
estates devolved upon his brother, the Rev. Bacon Bedingfield. He 
married in 1770 Susannah, daughter of Donatus O'Brien, of Blatherwycke 
Park, CO. Northampton, and dying 13th July, 1797, his estates passed to 
his son and heir, John James Bedingfield. 

In 1812 the manor was vested in James Barker, afterwards Hethersett, 
Lieut.-Gen. (younger son of James Barker, of Shropham, co. Norfolk, 
High Sheriff in 1756), who died this year, when the manor passed to his 

'See Manor of Hesteley, Thorndon, in *Originalia, 5 Edw. III. 17. 

Hartismere Hundred. = pegt of Fines, 13 Edw. III. 3. 

* ? Anne, Davy MSS., but inaccurately. «Harl. 55 B. 44. 

3 Feet of Fines, 3 Edw. II. 33. ^Harl. 48 A. 42. 



BEDINGFIELD. 21 

daughter and coheir, Sarah Hethersett, married to the Rev. George Reading 
Leathes, and on her death in 1830, passed to her sister, Jane Maria, the 
wife of Henry D'Esterre Hemsworth, of Shropham Hall, co. Norfolk, Major 
of Militia, Ireland, J. P. and D.L. He died 5th Nov. 1850, when the manor, 
subject to his widow's interest, passed to their eldest son and heir, William 
Henry Hemsworth, of Shropham Hall, who 24th May, 1851, married Ellen, 
daughter of Francis Kemble, of Chesterfield St. Mayfair, and dying 9th 
Nov. 1892, the manor passed to his nephew, Augustus Noel Campbell 
Hemsworth, son of Henry William's brother, the Rev. Augustus Barker 
Hemsworth, rector of Bacton (by Duncana, his wife, eldest daughter of 
Alexander Campbell, of Kilmartin, co. Argyll), who had died 27th Oct. 
1889. 

Augustus Noel Campbell Hemsworth, the present lord, married 4th June 
1891, Augusta Sophia Maude, youngest daughter of Benjamin Hemsworth, 
of Monk Fryston HaU, co. York, and has with other issue a son, Augustus 
Hethersett Hemsworth, bom in 1894. 

Fleming Hall was the property at one time of the Rev. Temple ChevalUer, 
of Aspall, and was sold by him to Lord Henniker. 

Arms of Hethersett : Az, a lion rampant Or, in the paw, a battle-axe 
Arg. Of Hemsworth : Per Saltire Arg. and Or, a leopard's face, Sa. 




22 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

MANOR OF BRUNDISH WITH FIRNHALL. 

IRUNDISH does not appear in the Domesday Survey, but it 
was found in the time of Edw. I. that Brundish was a member 
of Tannington, and it is probable that the former was 
included in the latter at the time of the Survey. If so 
Edric, of Laxfield, was the Saxon proprietor, and Robert 
Malet the Domesday tenant in chief. 

In I22I the lordship belonged to Alicia de Brewes, 
and a little later to Thomas le Parker, from whom in 1275 it passed to his 
son and heir, William le Parker.' In 1322 it was vested in Roger de 
Loudham, and in 1441 Sir William Phelip, Lord Bardolf, died seised of it.'' 
In the inquis. p.m. of Sir William Phelip in 1441, the manor is called 
" Phelippes Manor and le Feme."^ This Sir WiUiam Phelip was a K.G., 
son of Sir John Phelip, Knt.,of Dennington, and is said to have been 
raised to the peerage by letters patent as Lord Bardolph in the time of 
Hen. VI., but was never summoned to Parliament. He married Joane, 
one of the daughters and coheirs of Thomas Bardolph, 5th Baron, and by 
her had issue an only daughter, Elizabeth, who married John, Viscount 
Beaumont, K.G., Lord High Chancellor of England, who was slain at the 
battle of Northampton fighting under the Lancastrian banner in 1459. 
He left a son and successor, William, 2nd Viscount and 7th Baron, who 
was attainted on being made prisoner at the battle at Towtonfield i Edw.lV., 
and his estates confiscated and given to Lord Hastings, but on the accession 
of Hen. VII. he was restored to his family honours and estates by Act of 
Parliament i Hen. VII. He married ist, Elizabeth, daughter of Richard 
Scrope and niece of Lord Scrope, of Bolton, and 2ndly, Joane, daughter 
of Humphrey Stafford, Duke of Buckingham ; but died without issue in 
1507, when ihe viscountcy expired, and the barony fell into abeyance.* 

The manor then seems to have gone to the Willoughby family, for Sir 
Robert Willoughby died seised of it in 1465, and Margery Willoughby 
died seised of it in 1515, when it passed to her son and heir, William, Lord 
Willoughby, of Eresby. A fine of a 5th part of " Brundishall Manor " 
was levied in 1533 by Nicholas Thurstan and others against Alexander 
Sparhawke and others.' From the Memoranda Rolls in 1537 it would 
appear that the reversion of the manor was granted by letters patent of the 
King to Sir Richard Wingfield.* It is said to have passed from Sir Richard 
Wingfield to Richard Wingfield, and from him to Anthony Wingfield, who 
sold the manor to Anthony Rous. But this is not by any means clear ; 
for Anthony Rous himself seems to have had a grant from the Crown in 
1532, and in 1538 we meet with two fines levied of the manor, one in 1538 
and the other in 1538-9. The first was levied by Sir William Sulyard 
against John Wright and Johanna his wife, and is of one-fifth part of the 
Manor of " Brondysshehalle " ;'' the second is by Anthony Rous against 
Charles Wingfield and others.* There was also another fine levied 
of one-fifth of the manor by Richard Chamber, son of Katherine Chamber, 
widow, against Katherine Chamber. Anthony Rous died 8th Feb. 1545, 
when the manor passed to his son and heir, Thomas Rous, who died in 
1573, when it went to his son and heir. Sir Thomas Rous, and on his death 

'H.R. ii. 186. 5 Fine, Easter, 25 Hen. VIII. 

*See Manor of Dennington, in this Hun- ^29 Hen. VIII., Hil. Rec. Rot. i; Hil. 

dred. Rec. Rot. 26. 

'I.P.M., 19 Hen. VI. 30. 'pine, Mich. 30 Hen. VIII. 

♦LP.M., 3 Edw. IV. 30. »Fine,^Hil. ^ojlen. VIII. 



BRUNDISH WITH FIRNHALL. 23 

in 1603 passed to his son and heir, Sir John Rous, who dying in 1652 it 
vested in John Rous, afterwards Sir John Rous, Bart.' 

Manor of Rodestrate or the Chantry, or Pieshall's or Pyeshall. 

This manor seems to have belonged to James de Bedingfield about 1275, 
but was given in 1385 to John de Pyshall, rector of Cawston, in Norfolk, 
one of the executors of Robert de Ufford, Earl of Suffolk, as an endow- 
ment for a chantry here. The foundation charter is dated I2th April, 
1385, and a copy is given in the " East Anglian Notes and Queries " for 
March, igoi." 

The manor was surrendered to the Crown 25th June, 1545,^ by William, 
Bishop of Norwich, and John Person, incumbent, with the consent of 
Richard Fulmerston, patron, and granted to the said Richard Fulmerston, 
but afterwards exchanged,* since which time it appears to have been held 
under lease from the Crown — in 1553 by Christopher GamboU for 21 years, 
in 1582 by Francis Colby for 21 years, in 1661 by Thomas Wood, D.D., 
for 25 years, and in 1785 by James Wyard Gooch. 

Court Rolls 7 Chas. I. will be found in the Public Record Office.' 

It seems occasionally to have been known by the name of " le Feme,'' 
though this is usually appropriated as the name of the main manor ; at 
least it is so called in the Inquisitions 8 Rich. II. 49, and 9 Rich. II. 105. 

We meet with four fines which apparently include this manor under 
the heads " Pysallys," " Pysawes," " Peselles al. Peaselles," and " Peselles 
al. Pesyltes." The first is in 1529, levied by Thomas Turpyn and others 
against Edward Lyghtfote.* The second is in 1536, levied by Sir 
Humphrey Wyngefeld and others against Edward " Lyhtsete."'' The 
third is in 1562, levied by W. Tusser against Philip Wolverstone,' and 
the fourth is in 1571, levied by Robert Chalnor and others against Richard 
Conyngeshye and others.^ 

Manor of St. Edmund's House. 

In 1552 this manor belonged to Robert Rysce, and in 1555 Nicholas 
Wright had a lease of it from the Crown for 21 years. In 1572 Francis 
Colby had a lease for 21 years, which seems to have been renewed from 
time to time ; in 1592 for 21 years, and in 1609 for 38 years. Amongst 
the Salisbury MSS. is a petition of Francis Colbye to the Queen for a lease 
in reversion of lands of the manor called " Sir Edmund's House in Brun- 
dish," of which he was tenant ;'° and amongst the State Papers for 159I 
is a lease for 21 years at a rent of £45. i6s. M." 

In 1618 Randolph Wyard had an assignment of the last lease, and 
in 1631 Randal Wyard held a first court. In 1639 he had a fresh lease for 
60 years or 3 lives, and in 1785 James Wyard Gooch was the lessee of the 
manor. 

Amongst the Exchequer Depositions in 1612 at Framlingham, we 
find an action by the Attorney-General against John Calver and others 
as to the ground used as a common way from the capital messuage called 

I See Henham Manor, in Blything Hun- « Yine, Trin. 21 Hen. VIII. 

dred. 7Fine, Easter, 28 Hen. VIII. 

« 3rd Ser., vol. ix. p. 33. » Fine, Mich. 4 Eliz. 

3D.K.R., 8 App. ii. pp. 6-12. 9 Fine, Trin. 13 Eliz. 

4 Harl. 608. " Rep, on Salisbury, MSS. pt. iv. 168. 

5 Portfolio 203, 9. " State Papers, 1591, 147. 



24 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

St. Edmondes to the chantry and manor called Rochestre, and as to meets 
and bounds, &c. And in 1650 there is a Parliamentary Survey of the 
manor.' 

Manor of Rounton's. 

The manor probably derived its name from the family of Rungeton. 
Walter de Rungeton and John his son were living in 1287, and in 1313 
William de Rungeton was fined to the King in two marks in respect of a 
pardon from the Crown for having acquired the manors of Burnedish and 
Tatington without the King's licence/ and in the same year he again paid 
a fine of 40s. for his pardon in having obtained of William de Bovill the 
Manor of Dallinghoo and the advowson of that parish church without 
the King's licence. In Dennington on the borders of the parish of Brun- 
dish is a large moat called " Runton's Moat/' where, it is said, was formerly 
a mansion and the manor house of Brandish which was burnt down, together 
with the court books, since which time all the lands in Brundish and Tan- 
nington have been free. Court Rolls, however, for the Manor of Brandish 
15 and 16 Jas. I. will be found in the Public Record Office.^ 

Towards the end of the 15th century the manor was held by Henry 
Rous, who died in 1492, when it passed to his son and heir, William. A 
little later it seems to have been acquired by Henry Everard, who died 
in 1541, when it vested in his son and heir, John Everard, who died seised 

in 1573- 

Amongst the State Papers* in 1654 we find that Clement and Wolston 
Paston, as executors of William Paston, sen., by a discharge of Runcton 
Manor and lands in Brundish, demised [? devised] to them by the will of 
William Paston, 30th March, 1649, in trust for payment of debts, and 
annuity of £60 to Edward Paston till of age, two-thirds still sequestered 
for William Paston's recusancy, though he died 19th May, 1652, leaving 
Edward, an infant of 11 years. Petitioners desire to fulfil the trust. 

Later the manor belonged to Turner Calvert, and about 1813 to William 
Rabett, who this year offered it for sale with 245 acres, then in his own 
occupation.^ 

Manor of Wilbies. 

This was the lordship of Robert Kynge in 1552 as lessee of Richard 
Fulmerston, but three years later we find that Thomas Fuller had a lease 
for 21 years ; and in 1623 Sir George Kere or Vere, Knt., had a lease in 
reversion. In 1629 the City of London had a grant of the site of this 
manor in fee farm. 

Amongst the Exchequer Depositions 6 Chas. I., at Woodbridge and 
Hasleworth, we find an action by Sir George Keyer against Sir Walter 
Deveraux and others respecting Brundish, Tadington, and Wilbyes Manor, 
and alleged neglect of defendants to repair premises and scour ditches, &c. 



' D.K.R., App. ii. p. 67. 3 Portfolio 203, 81. 

» Pat. Rolls, 7 Edw. II. pt. ii. 12; O. 7 ♦Cal. of Comp. 2819. 

Edw. II. 18; I.Q.D., 7 Edw. II. Upswich Journal, 27th March, 1813. 

File 94, 24. 



CARLTON. 



25 



CARLTON. 

MANOR was held here in Saxon times by Edric, and con- 
sisted of 80 acres, a villein, 5 bordars, i ploughteam, and an 
acre of meadow. At the time of the Survey it was held 
by Robert Malet. 

In the same township were 158 acres (160 acres less 2) 
of land and 3 ploughteams included in the valuation of 
Leiston, the soc being in Kelsale, Roger Bigot's manor. 
In the time of the Confessor it was held by 10 freemen.' 




Manor of Carlton. 

In 1281 Alice, Countess of Norfolk, wife of Roger Bigot, held the manor 
in dower, and in 1305 Roger Bigot died seised probably of the reversion, 
for it is said that on Alice's death the manor passed to the King. In or 
about 1332 John de Framlingham, rector of Kelsale, founded a chantry 
in this parish for three chaplains to pray for the soul of Alice, ist wife of 
Thomas de Brotherton, Earl of Norfolk, and daughter of Sir Roger Halys, 
of Harwich, Knt. 

The prioress of Campsey acquired the manor in 1334 by virtue of a fine 
levied by her against the said John de Framlingham.' Davy gives the 
following list of lords : 1331, William Taslard and Ric, parson of Stanfield, 
ist court ; 1334, Mary, prioress of Campsey ; 1427, Henry Dowe, Master 
of Chantry, ist court ; 1435, John Boteld, ist court ; 1446, John Cadoun, 
ist court ; 1456, Thomas Atte Hill, ist court ; i486, Thomas Shirley, 
ist court ; 1490, John Kylby, ist court ; 1492, Robert Bumpsted, ist 
court ; 1502, John Spelman, ist court ; 1515, John Hoode, ist court. In 
1544 William Hunnynge^ [or Honing] obtained a grant of the chantry 
together with the lordship of Carleton from the Crown. The grant bears 
date 6th Dec. 36 Hen. VIII. 

This family is supposed to have derived its name from a parish in 
Norfolk so called ; and the above William Honing was Clerk of the Signet 
in the reigns of Hen. VIII. , Edw. VI., and probably Elizabeth ; and it is 
presumed, was introduced into service at court by the circumstance of his 
' father being employed as fishmonger to the Royal Household. In 1547 
he received from Edw. VI. a confirmation of certain tenements in London 
and Suffolk. 

He married Frances, daughter of Nicholas Cutler, of Eye, and in 
1558, during the reign of Philip and Mary, received, in conjunction with 
his brother-in-law, Nicholas Cutler, a grant of the Manor of Rishangles, 
and in 1566 he acquired the Manor of Manton's in Hitcham, both in this 
county. Mr. Honing was returned to Parliament for the borough of 
Orford in 1553. He died 17th November, 1569, and was buried at Eye. 

Edward Honing, his son and heir, was a receiver of Crown rents in 
Suffolk, sat in Parliament for Dunwich in 1588, and for Eye in 1592, 1601, 
and 1603. The Manor of Darsham, in Blything Hundred, was granted to 
him from the Crown in 1575, where he soon after erected a family mansion, 



'Dom. ii. 310. 

'Feet of Fines, 3 Edw. III. 13. 

D 



3 For a pedigree of the family see the 
Collectanea Topographica et Genea- 
logica, vol. vii. p. 394-400. 



26 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

and was a resident in 1579 ; was of Eye in 1589, and of London in 1592. 
He received other Crown grants in 1595 and 1598/ 

Mr. Honing married Ursula, daughter and heir of Anthony Wingfield, 
of Sibton, by whom he had a numerous family. He died in 1609, and 
was buried at Eye, when Wingfield Honing, his son and heir, succeeded. 
Wingfield Honing was Receiver-General of Revenues in Suffolk and Cam- 
bridgeshire jointly with his father, and resided at Eye. 

A curious picture, which represents the portraits of the Clerk of the 
Privy Council (William Honing) and his very numerous family, was pur- 
chased about 1797 by Mr. Robert Loder, of Woodbridge, bookseller, and 
sold shortly after to the Marquis of Donegal. A copy in water colours, 
made by Isaac Johnson, in 1787, for Mr. Nichols, was in 1847 ^^ the 
possession of his son, J. B. Nichols, F.S.A., at Hammersmith, and 
measured 19 inches by 13^ inches ; the original painting measures 4 feet 
4 inches in breadth by 3 feet 3 inches in height. 

For a particular description of this picture see " CoUectanea Topo- 
graphica et Genealogica," vol. vii., p. 394 ; also an excellent pedigree 
of the family of Honing (or Honings) communicated by David Elisha Davy, 
of Ufford. 

The above account is mostly taken from Page's History of Suffolk, 
pp. 382, 383, but is not quite accurate. By a series of deeds 12th Feb. 34 
Eliz., ist May, 34 Eliz., a recovery suffered in Trinity term 34 Eliz. deeds of 
loth March, 35 Eliz., and 15th April, 40 Eliz., 2nd June, 42 Eliz., 15th 
Feb. 45 Eliz., and ist Feb. 10 Jac, the manor became vested in John 
Holland, of Keveninghall, Norfolk, and by indenture dated 20th Dec. 18 Jac. 
Sir Thomas Holland, of Quiddenham, sold for ;f900 to John Bence, of 
Aldeburgh, merchant, the sale being effected by deed dated 14th Feb. 
1620-1. 

John Bence died in 1635, and from this time the manor has descended 
in the same course of devolution as the Manor of Kelsale, in Hoxne. 

Arms of Honing : Quarterly Gules and Vert, a lion rampant. Argent. 



'Davy makes John Euybon farmer or trastee in 1577, and Thomas Ryvett lord 
in 1592, when he says he held his first court. In 1593, however, Davy says Francis 
Honynge was lord, and held his first court, and in 1595 Margaret Caryl, of London, 
who held that year a first court as farmer or trustee. 




DENHAM. 27 

DEN HAM. 

JjOBERT Malet had two holdings in this place. The first 
consisted of a socman with all customs with 50 acres of 
demesne land included in the valuation of Eye, i bordar, 
a ploughteamj and an acre of meadow. The second con- 
sisted of 30 acres and half a ploughteam, valued at 5s., 
formerly held by 4 freemen under commendation. The 
bishop held the soc' 
Among the lands of Stigand kept in hand for the King by William de 
Noers, was one holding in the place, consisting of 30 acres, a bordar, a 
ploughteam, half an acre of meadow, and wood to support 3 hogs, valued 
at 6s. It was held by a freeman under commendation, the soc being in 
Hoxne.' 

Among the lands of Roger Bigot were two estates in this place. The 
first was held of him by Aitard, formerly by Stigand, and consisted of i^ 
carucates of land, 3 villeins, 11 bordars, 2 ploughteams in demesne, 2 acres 
of meadow, wood for the support of 30 hogs, 2 beasts, 10 hogs, 30 sheep, 
and 20 goats. Also a church with 12 acres. Belonging to this land was a 
socman held by Aitard, his land lying in Horham, with 40 acres, a bordar, 
a ploughteam, and 2 acres of meadow, with wood to support 4 hogs, the 
value being 4s. This was through exchange with Isaac's land. It was 
half a league long and 3 quarentenes broad, and paid in a gelt y^d. 

The second holding was a freeman with 10 acres, valued at 2s., the 
commendation formerly belonging to Stigand. This was through the same 
exchange, and also held by Aitard. After the King came the whole was 
held by Bishop Ailmar.^ 

Belonging to the fee of the Bishop of Thetford was an estate con- 
sisting of 60 acres and a ploughteam valued at los., and formerly held by 
5 freemen under Aimer."* 

Manor of Denham. 

Thomas de Hulton gave the advowson of Denham to the prior of 
Norwich, and the manor to Thomas de Multon, of Gillesland, in 1245. 
This must have been the son of Thomas de Multon by Ada, his 2nd wife, 
daughter and coheir of Hugh de Morville by Ada his wife, daughter and 
heir of William Engayn by Ibria his wife, daughter and heir of Robert 
D'Estrivers, Baron of Burgh-upon-the-Sands, and hereditary forester of 
Cumberland. Thomas de Multon the father died in 1240, and this Thomas 
the son, the grantee of the manor, married Maud, daughter and heir of Hugh 
de Vaux, Baron of Gillesland. 

He gave the manor to his daughter, AtheUna, on her marriage to 
William de Brewsa ; but we find that in 1275 Alan Musard was lord, and in 
1276 he sued Roger de Scarning, Bishop of Norwich, and others belonging 
to the church of Trinity, for hunting hares in his free warren with Denham 
Manor, but the jury found that they did so lawfully.^ 

We find the manor included in the inquisitions p.m. of Matilda de 
Multon in 1292/ and in that of Radulphus de Gonshull two years later,' 
an extent of it being given in the first of these inquisitions. 

'Dom. ii. 310. 5 Abb. of PI. 4 and 5 Edw. I. Min. Rec. 

'Dom. ii. 2886. - Mich. 8. 

3 Dom. ii. 331. 6I.P.M., 21 Edw. I. 25. 

*Dom. ii. 3796. 7I.P.M., 23 Edw. I. 61. 



28 



THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 



In 1301 Thomas de Synterton sued Robert de Reydon and three 
others for the manor/ which in 1304 we find vested in Robert de Denham 
and Margaret his wife.' In 1316 John de Castre is said to have been lord; 
but in 1333 John de Denham held the manor, having levied a fine of it this 
year against Robert Parvyng.^ In 1354 the said John de Denham and 
Matilda his wife levied a fine against Stephen de Brokedish and Thomas de 
Parker.* 

In 1428 we meet with the statement that Wilham Harleston held 
what John de Denham had formerly held. William Harleston died seised 
of the manor in 1481/ when it went to his widow, Philippa, and the manor 
was sold to John Sulyard, who brought an action, particulars of which are 
amongst the Early Chancery Proceedings,® claiming the manor as having 
purchased the remainder after the death of the said Philippa Harleston. 
The defendants in this action were Philippa Harleston, Robert Crane, 
Robert Restwold, Richard Yaxle, and Richard Gerard, and included the 
Manor of Flimworth and lands in Denham, Eye, Hoxne, Occold, Benning- 
ham, Brome, Horham, and Redlingfield. 

Later the manor was vested in S. Goddard, of Framlingham, and 
subsequently Sir Edmund Bedingfield died seised of it in 1496,^ from which 
time the manor passed in the same course as the Manor of Hesteley, Thorn- 
don, in Hartismere Hundred, to the time of Sir Henry Bedingfield, who 
died in 1583, and from thence to the time of Sir Henry Bedingfield in the 
like course with the Manor of Bedingfield Hall, in this Hundred. 

The manor was held by Edmund Bedingfield in the time of Hen. VII. 
of Edmund, Earl of Suffolk, as of the Honor of Eye by knight's service. 
The manor was forfeited by Henry Bedingfield in 1651, when it was taken 
by Parliament. A survey of the manor was made on this occasion by 
virtue of a commission granted on an Act of Parliament for sale of estates 
forfeited to the Commonwealth. The value of the rents and royalties 
were then set down at ;;fi8. 19s. 6d. per annum. " Denham Hall " was 
said to consist of " a Hall, a buttery, a Parlour, and a Kitchen with 4 
Chambers over them, a Lather, a Dairy, and a Brewhouse with 3 chambers 
over them, a Gate house, 2 decayed rooms, and 2 corn chambers over them, 
one Greene Court and one small garden within the Moat, a large fould yard, 
two large barns, a Gat house, a Stable, a cow house, a Hayhouse, and several 
other outbarns indifferently stored, and an ancient decayed orchard without 
the moat. Within and without the moat were 5 acres, ir. and 2p., and the 
value was £10 per ann." The " Capital messuage or Mansion House with 
the appurtenances commonly called ' Denham College ' alias ' Denham 
Dungeon,' in the Parish of Denham, consisted of a Parlour, a Hall, a 
Kitchen or Buttery, a Cellar, a Brewhouse, a Bakehouse, a — House and 
one other small room with 6 chambers over them, 2 dairies, and one chamber 
over them, and one Garrett over the said Chamber, one small court yard, 
and a small garden within the moat. The site consisted of 4a. 2r. 2op." 
The survey adds: "The said House is builded with Timber and is old 
small and fit only to accomodate one Tenant and therefore they have not 
valued the materials." The tenant of this last was Thomas Bedingfield, 
on a 21 years' lease from 1635 at a rent of £68. los. 



'Abbr. of PL, 29 Edw. I. Hil. 77. 
"Extent, I.P.M., 32 Edw. I. 39. 
3 Feet of Fines, 6 Edw. III. 31. 
♦Feet of Fines, 27 Edw. III. 11. 
5 1.P.M., 20 Edw. IV. 100. 



6 E.C.P., 5 Edw. IV. ; 49 Hen. VI., Bundle 

35, 48. 

7 Will 12th Oct. 1496, proved 28th Jan. 

following. 



DENHAM. 29 

The manor was subsequently restored to him who had been created a 
baronet in 1660, and Sir Henry Bedingfield died seised in 1684-5, when the 
manor passed to his widow Margaret or Mary, daughter and heir of Edmund 
Paston, who died the 14th Jan. 1702, when their son and heir. Sir Henry 
Bedingfield, 2nd Bart., succeeded, as did subsequently his son and heir, 
Sir Henry Bedingfield, 3rd Bart.' 

In 1764 the manor was the property of Charles, Lord Viscount Maynard, 
who died in 1775,° when he was succeeded by his grandnephew, Thomas 
Hesilaige, who took the name of Maynard, and died without issue in 1817. 
Henry, 3rd Viscount Maynard, to whom the manor went, sold it in 1818 
to Matthias Kerrison, who died in 1827, from which time the manor has 
devolved in the same course as the Manor of Thelnetham, in Blackbourn 
Hundred, and is now vested in Lady Bateman, of Broome Hall. The 
manor is now united with Flimworth Hall, in Eye, under the name of 
Denham cum Flimworth. 

Amongst the Additional Charters in the British Museum is a lease 
dated 26th April, 2 Jac. i [1604] by Henry Jernegan, of Costesy, and Frances 
his wife, to Thomas Hirne, of Heveringland, of the Manors of Denham 
and Flymworth for three years. ^ We are quite unable to explain its 
meaning. 



' See as to these Bedingfields, Beding- » See Hoxne, in this Hundred, 
field Hall, in this Hundred. 3 Add. Ch. 14272. 




30 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

MANOR OF BENNINGTON. 

|HE history and descent of this manor is one of the few 
clearly and correctly traced by Page in his History of Suffolk, 
and we take the present account practically from that work, 
inserting the authorities which, of course, are lacking in 
the Suffolk historian's book. 

William, Lord Malet, who was with the Conqueror at 
the decisive Battle of Hastings, had by Hesilia his wife, a 
son, Robert, to whom the King granted the Honor of Eye, and divers 
manors in this and other counties, amongst which the lordship of this 
parish was included. This Robert Malet was Great Chamberlain of England 
under King Hen. I., but in the 2nd of that reign was banished and deprived 
of his possessions in England, for adhering to Robert Curtois (or Shorthose), 
Duke of Normandy, the King's eldest brother. 

It soon after became the estate of Stephen, Earl of Boulogne, afterwards 
King Stephen, by grant from his uncle, King Hen. I., and subsequently 
became vested in Henry, Duke of Lorraine, who gave it to Godefrid de Warra, 
and it was confirmed to him in the loth of King John.' At the same time 
the men of Laxfield had eight score acres of arable land in the park of 
Deimington, the gift of the said Henry, and forty acres elsewhere in the 
said park. 

In the early part of the reign of King Edw. I. Sir Johri de Bovile died 
without issue seised of this manor, with Badingham, Dallinghoo, Thorpe, 
Alderton, Greeting, Boulge, &c., and though in 1275 Joan de Bovile and 
Maud de Hurdichishall are said to have held the same, and in 1286 Philip de 
Heveningham is said to have died seised of "Dennington,'" the manor 
probably passed in the same course as the Manor of Badingham Hall, in 
this Hundred, to the time of Margaret, daughter of Sir John Bovile, married 
ist to Sir William Carbonel, Knt., and 2ndly. to Sir Thomas Wingfield, 
Knt. The Sir William Wingfield mentioned by Weever as lord of this 
manor and patron of the church where he was buried in 1398, was the 
youngest brother of Sir Thomas Wingfield above-mentioned. That author 
also mentions a William Wingfield buried there. He was son and heir 
of the above Sir William, and died without issue in 1418.^ Sir Robert 
Wingfield, who died in 1409, was also interred in the parish church of 
Dennington. Authority was granted in 1313 to William de Bovill to grant 
his reversion in this manor (except land and the advowson of the church 
there) held for life by WiUiam de Reppes to Richard de Wingfelde and the 
heirs of his body with remainder to Roger de Wingfeld, retaining the Manors 
of Wilby, Letheringham, Alderton, and Thorpe.* 

The family of Phelip became seated here in the time of King Rich. IT., 
if not earlier. William, son of Richard Phelip, of this parish, died in 1407, 
and Sir William Phelip his son succeeded. He married Julian, daughter 
and coheir of Sir Thomas Erpingham, K.G., by Joan, his 2nd wife, the 
beautiful daughter of Sir William Clopton of Wickhambrook in this county, 
by whom he had issue two daughters and coheirs. Catherine, the eldest, 

• Amongst the Close Rolls in the 9th year = I.P.M., 14 Edw. I. 14. 
of Hen. III. (pt. ii. 9, Indorso, ^I.P.M., 6 Hen. V. 20. 

Pat. Rolls of Hen. HI. 2) is an ■* I.Q.D., 7 Edw. II. File 98, 8. 
order for proceedings between 
Herbert de Alencun and Godfryde 
Waure, concerning the holding of 
this manor. 



DENNTNGTON. 31 

married Sir Andrew Boteler, Knt. ; she lived to a great age, and d3dng 
in 1460 was interred by her husband at Sudbury. Elizabeth her sister 
married John Clowtynge, of Laxfield. 

Sir John Phelip, Knt., was son of John, a younger brother of the above- 
named Richard, and William, son of this Sir John Phelip, Knt., succeeded. 
In or before 1408 he married Joane, the youngest daughter and coheir of 
Thomas, Lord Bardolf. 

Sir William was a valiant soldier under Hen. V. and served at Agin- 
court 25th Oct. 1415, and later attended the King in Normandy, and, 
during his absence there, was created a Knight of the Garter in 1418 or 1419, 
and was installed by proxy. At the death of Hen. V. he held the office 
of Treasurer of his majesty's household, and had the chief management of 
the royal funeral. In 1430 he was retained to serve the King in his wars 
in France, with 19 men-at-arms and 60 archers for a year, and performed 
the service. In 1437 he founded a chantry in this parish church. The 
chantry was at St. Margaret's altar in this parish church, and was founded 
for the good estate of himself, Joan his wife, during their lives, and for 
their souls after their decease, as also for the souls of King Hen. IV, and 
King Hen. V-, and all the faithful deceased. He appointed two chaplains 
to officiate daily in the said chantry, and endowed it with the Manor of 
Harolds, in Crettingham, and a farm called Tebbys, in Brandeston, and 
£20 per annum. In 1306 our Lady's chantry in this church is mentioned 
as of the annual value of about £9 ; this was at the altar of St. Mary, in the 
north aisle. 

In 1536 the two chantries called Phelip's and Lady's chantry, the 
capital messuage and mansion of Phelip's, two messuages and tenements 
caUed Lion's and Rook's, in Dennington, a close called Beccles Close, in 
Worlingworth, the closes called Salver's, in Brandeston, the Manor of 
Glemham Parva, and other lands, &c., in Dennington, Tannington, Bad- 
ingham, Laxfield, and Brundish, also the advowson of the rectory and 
church of Glemham Parva, were granted to Sir Richard Fulmerston and 
his heirs of the King in capite by the service of a fortieth part of a knight's 
fee. 

In 1438 Sir William Phelip was appointed Lord Chamberlain of the 
King's Household, and had the title of Lord Bardolf. His will bears date 
the ist of December, 1438, and by it he appointed that he should be buried 
with his ancestors before the altar of St. Margaret, in Dennington church, 
and appointed a thousand masses for his soul should be celebrated by the 
several orders of friars in Suffolk and Norfolk, allowing fourpence apiece 
for each mass. He gave to the parish church of Dennington after the 
decease of Joan his wife a certain mass book called a Gradual, a silver 
censer, and a legend for the souls of Sir John Phehp, Knt., his own and 
his wife's soul, as also for the souls of all his friends, benefactors, and all 
the faithful, appointing that upon the carriage of his body to Dennington 
twenty torches should be borne about it, at the entrance thereof into every 
town through which it should pass. And that at his month's end 24 
torches, as also 24 tapers, each of them weighing 4 pounds of wax, were to 
burn about it during the time of his exequies and mass ; which 24 torches 
should be carried by .24 of his own poor tenants and cloathed in black, 
and the 24 tapers by 24 poor women, his tenants, also cloathed in white, 
every one of them having 8d. for their labour. By a codicil dated 8th July 
following the testator bequeathed his body to be buried in the churchyard 
at Dennington aforesaid, and gave to John, Viscount Beaumont, and 



32 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

Elizabeth his wife (testator's only daughter), one cup of silver gilt. He 
died on the 6th of June, 1441.' 

Lady Bardolf survived until 12th March, 1446-7, and her will was 
proved 3rd April, 1447. By it she bequeathed her body to be buried 
wherever she might die, in the chapel of St. Margaret, at Bennington. 
She assigned a purple gown, with small sleeves, to adorn the sepulchre of 
the body of Christ in the church of Dennington, also she assigned to the 
chantry of St. Margaret, at Dennington, a black bed with eagles of tapestry 
work, &c., and she further wills that out of her rents and goods and 
chattels, her executors should buy lands and tenements to the value of 
twelve marks per annum, and give the same to the Master and Fellows of 
the chantry called Phelip's Chantry, in Dennington, in pure and perpetual 
alms, in augmentation of their revenues, and to find a proper chaplain to 
pray for the souls of her said lord and husband, according to the ordinances 
and statutes of the said chantry. 

Lord Bardolf and his lady were buried at Dennington, and the monu- 
ment to their memory still remains, but the inscription is lost. The 
figures were not engraved in " Gough's Sepulchral Monuments," but are 
described with tolerable minuteness. Tn " Kirby's Views," published in 
1748, this description and a view of the monument also appears. Of certain 
anonymous figures in " Stothard's Monumental Effigies," which A. T. Kempe, 
F.A.S., ascribes to William, Lord Bardolf, and his lady, he observes, " a 
more beautiful specimen of the military and female costume of the 15th 
century than is afforded by this monument can hardly, I think, be found." 

From the death of Sir William Lord Bardolf and Joan his wife to the 
death of William, Viscount Beaumont, without issue, in 1507, the devolu- 
tion of this manor is the same as that of Clop ton Hall, in Carlford Hundred. 

William, Viscount Beaumont's 2nd wife Elizabeth, survived, and 
remarried John, Earl of Oxford, and amongst the State Papers in 1509 is 
a grant of the manors above-mentioned to John, Earl of Oxford, and 
Elizabeth his wife.^ 

Elizabeth held this estate in dower, and Sir Richard Wingfield, Knt., 
in 1518 had a grant of the reversion of the same after the decease of the 
said Elizabeth. In 1525 Thomas, Duke of Norfolk, acknowledged that he 
held of the King in capite the Manor of Dennington, and paid relief ; but 
we find on the Memoranda Rolls for 1537, letters patent to the King to 
Sir Richard Wyngfeld and his heirs male of the reversion of the manor.^ 
Sir Richard Wingfield died shortly after the grant, and his son and heir 
Charles sold the manor to Anthony Rouse in 1538.* Anthony Rouse, 
by deed dated 24th May, 1542, surrendered to the King, who forthwith 
by letters patent the same year granted the said manor to Anthony Rouse 
with Brandish, Tyes in Cretingham, Clopton Hall, Ilketshall Bardolfs, 
and the advowson of Dennington church and chantry to him and his heirs 
for ever. The consideration for the grant in fee was £432. 4s. 4d., and the 
rent £40. 8s. 4d.^ He died 8th Feb. 1545, leaving Thomas Rous his son 
and heir,^ and the lordship has continued in his house ever since, having 
devolved in a like course with the Manor of Henham, in Blything Hundred, 
and is now vested in the present Earl of Stradbroke. 

'I.P.M., 19 Hen. VI. 30. ♦Fine, Hil. 30 Hen. VHI. 

^S.R, I Hen. VHI. 730. =S.P., 1542, 7146. 

3 Memoranda Rolls, 29 Hen. VIII., Hil. ^j pj^j^ j g^j^ yi. 
Rec. Rot., I Hil. Rec. Rot. 26. 



DENNINGTON. 33 

The ancestors of the noble earl had been seated here for many ages 
prior to the above grant, and descend from Peter le Rous, who married 
the daughter and heiress of John Hubbard, of this parish, and who appears 
to be the common ancestor of all the different branches of this ancient and 
distinguished family, seated in divers places in this county. William, 
grandson of the above Peter le Rous, married Adelyne, daughter and heir 
of John Clowtynge, of Laxfield, by Elizabeth his wife, daughter and coheir 
of William Phelip, sen., of Bennington. 

Amongst the Chancery Proceedings are three actions relating to copy- 
holds of the manor. One is an action by John Folkerd against Thomas 
Rouse and Robert Folcard and others to recover possession of land held of 
the manor in right of plaintiff's wife Alice, defendant Rouse being lord of 
the manor.' The second was an action by George Seman against William 
Reynolds, steward of the manor, for relief against distress made under an 
order of Court Leet of the manor of which in the action Nicholas Hare is 
stated to be lord.' The third action is by Simon and George Seman 
against Thomas Rouse touching parcel of the manor. ^ 

Arms of Phelip : Quarterly Gu. and Arg., in the first quarter an 
Eagle, displayed Or. Of Bardolf : Az. three cinquefoils Or. 



'C.P. i. 300. 'C.P. Ser. II. B. ccxviii. 13. 

*C.P. iii. 48. 

E 




34 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

FRESSINGFIELD. 

jNDER the head " Fressingfield " we do not find any lands 
specified as in Hoxne Hundred, and the only place in which 
Fressingfield is mentioned in the Survey is under Hartis- 
mere Hundred, where we find amongst the lands of Robert 
Malet 6 acres in this place valued at i2d. which land had 
formerly been held by Alwin, a socman.' 

The entries relating to Fressingfield really appear under 
the head " Chepenhall," which is in Fressingfield. 

A manor was held here at the time of the Confessor by the Abbot of 
St. Edmunds, consisting of i^ carucates of land with the soc, 6 villeins, 
12 bordars, i^ ploughteams in demesne and 3 belonging to the men, 10 
acres of meadow, wood sufiicient to support 160 hogs. Also a rouncy, 
16 hogs, and 30 goats. There was a church with 20 acres also. The manor 
was valued at 40s. and was i^ leagues long and a league broad, and paid in 
a gelt x^d. At the time of the Survey the manor was held by the Abbot 
of St. Edmunds, and a few details were a little different — the ploughteams 
in demesne had increased to 2 and those belonging to the men to 5, there 
was wood to support only 100 hogs, and there were 16 beasts in addition, 
the value having risen to 60s. Otiiers had holdings here." 

From an entry under the head "Chepenhall," as in Hartismere Hundred, 
we find in the fee of the Abbot of St. Edmunds 12 acres valued at 2s.^ 

Another holding in this place was at the time of the Survey that of 
Robert Malet's mother of the Queen's fee, and consisted of 2J carucates of 
land, 17 bordars, 9 ploughteams, 12 acres of meadow, wood sufficient to 
support 300 hogs, valued at loos. Also a church with 20 acres and a 
ploughteam: It was 2 leagues long and i broad, and paid in a gelt 15^. 

The soc was in Hoxne Bishop's, and formerly Edric held half of it of 
Bishop Ailmar. The manor was held in the time of the Confessor by 9 
freemen by commendation. 

Of this manor Walter held 4 socmen with a carucate of land valued at 
30S. and included in the valuation of the £6 (sic). Robert Malet's mother 
held 3 socmen with 80 acres, valued at 45s. included in the same valuation, 
Humfrey held a socman with 20 acres valued at 20s. as part of the same 
valuation, and Walter Gripp's son, a socman with 120 acres, valued at 40s. 
as a part of the same valuation.* 

Another holding was that of Hervey de Berri, consisting of 60 acres, 
2 villeins, 2 ploughteams, 2 acres of meadow, and wood suf&cient to support 
30 hogs, valued at los. This had at the time of the Survey increased to 
20s. The estate had formerly been held in demesne by a freeman under 
Harold. The tenant of Hervey de Berri was W. Fitz Gorham.^ 

Manor of Veales with Launce's and Thykbrome Veales cum 

Membris. 

This was the lordship of William de Veel who had " bortrem " here 
in the time of Edw. I. and claimed warren.* This manor belonged to the 
De la Poles, for we find it stated on the Rolls of Parliament in 1495 that it 
had been forfeited by John late Earl of Lincoln,^ and that the same year 
it was restored to Edmund, Earl of Suffolk.^ 

'Dom. ii. 321. ^Dom. ii. 441. 

'Dom. ii. 368. «Q.W. 723. 

^Dom. ii. 368. 'R.P. vi. 474. 

♦Dom. ii. 329. ^Ib. 475. 



FRESSlNGFlELt). 35 

In 15 05 the manor was in the Crown, and in 1509 the King held his 
first court for it, and this last-mentioned year a grant of the manor was 
made to Thomas Howard and Ann his wife. Davy says that in 1557 a 
grant of the manor was made to Michael Wentworth and Edward Glemham, 
and the former had licence to alien the same to Thomas Denton and others 
to certain uses. He also states that the manor belonged to Sir Henry 
Jemegan, who held his first court for the manor in 1554. There must have 
been some mistake, for the manor together with that of Syleham was granted 
to Henry Jernegan as early as the first year of Edw. VI. The manor was 
no doubt settled by Sir Henry, for we find that in 1578 Thomas Barrow 
had licence to alien to Michael Wentworth, who had licence to alien 
in 1607 to Henry Jernegan, son and heir of Sir Henry. Both 
Barrow and Wentworth were most probably trustees. From Henry 
Jernegan the son the manor passed on his death in 1619 to his son and 
heir. Sir Henry Jernegan, Bart., who died in 1646. 

We next find the manor vested in 1747 in Robert Onebye, and in 1751 
it was purchased by Thomas WilUs, from whom it passed to his son and 
heir, John Willis, afterwards Fleming, and in 1792 the manor was pur- 
chased by Thomas Etheridge, who died in 18 — . The manor was subse- 
quently purchased by the Rev. Augustus Cooper. 

In 1885 it was vested in T. Dring. It now belongs to Thomas Walker 
Dring. 

Manor of Whittingham with Wakelyn's. 

This was held in Saxon times as a manor by Uluric the thane, and 
consisted of land, g bordars, 2 ploughteams in demesne and 2 belonging to 
the men, wood for the maintenance of 100 hogs, 16 acres of meadow, 4 
acres of free land, 5 beasts, 20 hogs, 30 goats, and a hive of bees. At the 
time of the Survey this manor was held by Roger de Poictou and tiie bordars 
had increased to 14 and the goats to 40, but the ploughteams in demesne 
were reduced to land the hogs had come down to 18. The value was 60s., 
and the soc was in Hoxne.' 

Somewhat later we find the manor vested in Ernold fitz Roger le Rus, 
who held in 1201, and from this time to the death of Wm. le Rus in 1253 
the manor passed as did the Manor of Stradbroke, in this Hundred, and 
to the death of Robert de Brewse in 1325 as the Manor of Hasketon Hall, 
in Carlford Hundred. The manor is specifically mentioned in the inquis. 
p.m. of WiUiam le Rus in 1253, where it is found to be held of Roger Bigot, 
Earl of Norfolk, by the service of los. yearly to the guard of Lancaster 
and one knight's fee." It is also specifically mentioned in the inquis. p.m. 
of Alice de Brewse in 1301,^ also in the inquis. p.m of Giles de Brewse in 
1 310, and Robert de Brewse, who died a minor, in 1325,"^ when the manor 
probably went to bis widow Katherine in dower. We know the chapel 
of Whittingham was so assigned, for there is an order on the Close Rolls 
in 1326 to the Escheator to deliver to Katherine, late wife of Robert de 
Brewosa, who died a minor, the advowson of Whittingham Chapel taken 
into the King's hands on the death of his father, Giles de Brewosa, and 
assigned in dower.^ Subject, however, to the widow's interest (if any) the 
manor passed to Robert's brother and heir. Sir John de Brewse, and from 
him to his son and heir, Sir John de Brewse, and from him in 1403 to his 

'Dom. ii. 349. sI.P.M., 29 Edw. I. 52. 

"I.P.M., 37 Hen. III., File 14 (17); 44 ♦Extent, I.P.M., 19 Edw. II. 95. 
Hen. III., File 23 (17). ' Close Rolls, 19 Edw. II. 10. 



36 



THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 



brother, Sir Giles de Brewse, and from him to Sir Robert de Brewse, son and 
heir of Sir John, and on his death in 1456 went to his son and heir, Sir 
Thomas de Brewse, who died the 17th June, 1482,' when the manor devolved 
on his son and heir, William de Brewse, who married Elizabeth, daughter 
of Sir John Hopton, and widow of Sir John Jermy, who dying 28th Oct. 
1489, the manor descended in moieties to his two daughters and coheirs 
Thomasine and Anne. Thomasine married Sir Thomas Hansard, 
and held the moiety of the manor till her death, when it passed to her son 
and heir, Arthur (? Anthony) Hansard, on whose death in 15 16 it passed 
to his son and heir, Giles Hansard, on whose death in 1531 it passed to 
his daughter and heir Katherine, married to Thomas Rous, of Lud- 
borough, CO. Lincolnshire. She died in 1572. 

William Brewse's other daughter, Anne, married Roger Townshend, 
son and heir of Sir Roger Townshend. In the inquis. p.m. of WilUam 
Brewse,^ it is stated that her grandfather, Sir Thomas BrewSe, being seised 
in fee tail of this manor has agreed on the marriage of his son William with 
Elizabeth Hopton, daughter of John Hopton, to make no assurance other- 
wise than to the use of himself for life with remainder to the use of WiUiam 
in tail. Afterwards he enfeoffed Sir Ralph Shelton and others, and on 
Sir Thomas's death William was allowed by the feoffees to enter, and he 
continued to hold until expelled by Elizabeth Brewse, widow (presumably 
his mdther), claiming a life interest. 

There is amongst the Additional Charters in the British Museum a 
precipe on a covenant concerning this manor in 1552.^ Thomas Rous 
seems to have acquired the whole manor and there are two Chancery 
suits in the time of Queen Elizabeth relating to the manor, one by Charles 
Syngylton and Afra his wife against William Peyrs (or Peerce) and Mary 
his wife,* and the other by the same plaintiffs against Thomas " Rouse."^ 
In 1553 a fine was levied against the said Thomas Rouse and others by 
John Skyfewith and others.* 

In 1580 Thomas Baker held the manor, this year having a fine levied 
against him and others by John Baker and others,' and after him Sir 
Richard Baker,* who about 1618 was succeeded by his son and heir, Sir 
Thomas Baker, who made his will in 1622, in which year he died and was 
succeeded by his son and heir, Thomas Baker, who served the office of High 
Sheriff for Suffolk in 1657, and resided at Whittingham or Withingham 
Hall, as it is sometimes termed. He died without issue, when the manor 
passed to his sister and heir, Elizabeth, married to Sir Thomas Hanmer, 
2nd Bart. On his death in 1678 the manor passed to his son and heir, 
Sir John Hanmer, 3rd Bart., who married Mary, daughter and heir of Joseph 
Alston, of Netherhall, but died in 1707 without issue, when the manor went 
to his nephew and heir, Sir Thomas Hanmer, 4th Bart, (only son of William 
Hanmer, only surviving son of Sir Thos., 2nd Bart., by his second marriage), 
who died 7th May, 1746, when the manor went under his will to his nephew 
William, 2nd son of Sir Harry Bunbiuy, Bart., by Susan his wife, sister of 



• I.P.M., 22 Edw. IV. 50. 
'I.P.M., 6 Hen. VII. 654. 
^Add. Ch. 35273. 
*C.P. Ser. ii. B. clxvii. 16. 
^Ib. B. dxx. 72. 
"Fine, Easter, 6 Edw. VI. 
'Fine, Hil. 22 Eliz. 

^Richard Baker, son of Sir Richard, 
married one of the daughters and 



coheirs of Thos. Leman, of Nettle- 
stead, and left an estate of £3,000 a 
year. Sir Richard Baker dedicates 
" Meditations and Disquisitions on 
the Creed," 1646, i2nio. " to his 
most honoured cosin, Thomas 
Baker, of Fressingfield. in the 
county of Suffolke, esquire." 



FRESSINGFIELD. 



37 



Sir Thomas Hanmer, who upon the death of his elder brother, Sir Charles 
Bunbury, succeeded to the Bunbury Baronetcy. Sir William Bunbury' 
died in 1764, when the manor devolved upon his son and heir, Sir Thomas 
Bunbury, Bart., on whose death in 1821 the manor vested in Sir Henry 
Edward Bunbury, nephew and heir, who sold it in 1836 to Henry Newton 
Heale, who in 1837 was described as of Christ College, Cambridge, and in 
his will dated 24th Dec. 1869, described as of Highfield,Hemel Hempstead. 
By this will he devised the manor to his trustees, the Right Hon. Sir Astley 
Cooper Key, G.C.B., of Greenwich, co. Kent., Robert Heale Gamlen, of 
jGray's Inn, and Anne Judith Heale, of Highfield House, who in 1908 sold 
the manor to WilUam De Caux, son of William De Caux, of Norwich, and of 
Elizabeth Ansell, of Cambridge, his wife. The De Caux family was originally 
of Normandy, and left France at the revocation of the Edict of Nantes, 
to settle in Norwich. The purchaser, who has considerable estates in 
Norfolk, but mainly resides in Paris, married Helen Sarah Wilhams, 
daughter of Peter Orr, of London and Madras. 

The particulars of the Copyhold and Freehold rents of this manor 
are : — 



Copyholds. 



i.-Messuage, buildings, 
and landinFressing- 
field 

2.-Enclosure of land in 
Little Linstead 
called Bakers . . 

3.-A piece of arable land 

4.-TW0 pieces of meadow 
in Little Linstead 

5.-A piece of land called 
Wittingham Little 
Green in Pressing 

field 

And another piece of 
land in Fressing- 
field 

6.-Three pieces of land 
and pasture in 

Fressingfield 

A piece of land in 

Fressingfield 

Land in Fressingfield 



r. p. 



16 o 20 



6 





10 

I 
3 



i 



■0 13 4 



12 6 



Freehold Rents. 

i.-Certain lands and tenements 
formerly of Sir Gerard Vannick 

2.-Land and premises formerly of 
Jennings Booty 

3.-Certain lands and premises 
formerly of Sir John Major 

4.-Premises formerly of John 
Fisher 

5.-Premises formerly of Rev. B. T. 
Norgate 

6.-Licence to continue enclosed 
piece of land formerly waste 
on which cottages built by 
W. Barber 

7.-Tenements late of H. N. 
Micklethwaite 

8.-Licence to continue enclosed 
piece of land formerly waste 
on which cottage erected by 
W. Barber 

g.-Tenements formerly of Alice 

Cotton 

lo.-Lands formerly of Betsy Wills 
1 1. -Tenements formerly of John 

Seaman 

I2.-Divers lands and tenements in 
Linstead formerly of George 
Chase 



198 
076 
076 



o 12 6 



I o 



052 



006 



8 
6 



10 4 



053 



42 3 28 I 15 II 5 14 9 

Arms of Hansard : Gules, three martlets, 2 and i, Argent. Of Baker: 

Azure, on a fesse, between three swans' heads erased Or, ducally gorged. 

Gules as many cinquefoils of the last. Of De Caux : Per pale. Azure and 

Sable surmounted by two swords in saltier points upwards Or. 

Manor of Chepenhall Hall or Chevenhall. 
In Saxon times this manor was given by Manning, son of Swarting, to 
the abbey of St. Edmunds ; in fact, the whole hamlet of Chjepenhall, with 



' See Mildenhall Manor, in Lackf ord Hundred. 



38 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

a moiety of the church of Fressingfield, belonged to the monastery, and 
about the year 1200 this manor with those of Mildenhall and Southwold 
were annexed to the office of cellarer. In 1296 the manor was held by 
William de Chepenhale and Edward de Chepenhale. There is amongst the 
Abbreviation of Pleas this year a judgment for William de Chepenhale 
in respect of i messuage, 80 acres of land, 7 of meadow, and 60 of pasture 
in Fressingfield and Chepenhall, Edward de Chepenhale in mercy.' 

Two years later we find the manor vested in Sir Thomas de Ufford, 
son and heir of Robert de Ufford, who died in 1316, when the manor passed 
to his son and heir. Sir John de Ufford, who died in 1361 without issue, 
when the manor passed to his brother and heir. Sir Edmund de Ufford, who 
died shortly afterwards, when it passed to his son and heir. Sir Robert de 
Ufford, on whose death prior to 1393 it went to his widow Helen or 
Alianor, who the same year surrendered her right of dower in the manor to 
John Strange, Henry Lompnour, John Glemham, and John Raddyng. The 
deed is dated at Fressingfield Tuesday, the Feast of St. Thomas the 
Martyr [29th Dec], 17 Rich. II.' 

In 1411 Elizabeth, daughter of John Winter, of Town Bermingham, 
in Norfolk, and knight of the shire for that county in 1409, by Elizabeth 
his wife, daughter and coheir of William de Hetherset, released to Simon 
de Felbrigge all her right in the Manor of Chepenhall and lands m Fres- 
singfield formerly Sir Wakeline de Herteshale's. 

By letters patent dated 23rd Sept. 1545, the Manor of Chepenhall 
was granted by the Crown to Anthony Rous. Particulars of the farm of 
the manor for grant to him 37 Hen. VIII. are still preserved in the Record 
Office.' Sir Anthony died 8th Feb. the same year, 1545, and the manor 
passed to his son and heir, Thomas Rous,* who in 1559 sold the same to 
George White,' who had licence to alien the same in 1561 to Nicholas 
Barbour and his heirs. Nicholas Barbour was succeeded by his eldest 
son, Francis Barbour, who died in 1597, and the manor passed to his 
son and heir, Nicholas Barbour. He married Anne, daughter of Augustine 
Messenger, and on his death vested in his son and heir, Nicholas Barbour, 
from whom it passed to his son and heir, William Barbour, and from him 
to his son and heir, the Rev. William Barbour. 

In 1695 Francis Sancroft,* son and heir of Thomas, was owner and 
held his first court of the manor in 1698, and upon his decease, in 1708, 
William Sancroft, his son and heir, succeeded. He married Catherine 
daughter of Sir John Cotton, Bart., of Landwade, and died in 1720, when 
the manor passed under his will to Sir Hynde Cotton, Bart., and John 
Sayer as trustees, and was subsequently enjoyed by Catherine, the widow 
of William Sancroft, and upon her death in Oct. 1763, the manor passed 
to her daughters, Elizabeth and Catherine. John Wogan, of Gawdy Hall, 
CO. Norfolk, the husband of Elizabeth, purchased Catherine's moiety, and 
upon the death of John Wogan in 1778, having survived both his children, 
the property was sold. In 1788 Charles Cotton and Anne Cotton, spinster, 
held their first court for the manor, which was subsequently purchased by 
Thomas Etheridge, who held his first court in 1794. 

Subsequently the manor was purchased by Alexander Adair, who 
held his first court in 1827. From this time the manor has devolved in a 

'Abbr. of PI. 24-25 Edw. I. 43. 4I.P.M., i Edw. VI. 

^Harl. 84 B. 10. 'Fine, Hil. i Eliz. 

SD.K.R. 10 App. ii. p. 263. ^See Metfield Manor, in this Hundred. 



FRESSINGFIELD. 39 

like course with the Manor of Cratfield le Roos, in Bly thing Hundred, and 
is now vested in Sir Frederick Edward Adair, Bart., of Flixton Hall. 

Arms of Sancroft : Argent, on a chevron, between three crosses pat6e 
Gules, as many martlets of the field. 

Manor of Fressingfield Hall. 

This was the lordship of Sir John Wingfield in the time of King Edw. II., 
and passed on his death to his son and heir Sir John Wingfield, and from 
him to his widow Alianora, who died in 1375,' when the manor vested in 
her daughter and heir Katharine, married to Michael de la Pole, Earl of 
Suffolk,'' from whom it passed on his death in 1389^ to his son and heir, 
Michael de la Pole, 2nd Earl of Suffolk, and on his death in 1415 to 
Michael de la Pole, 3rd Earl of Suffolk, who was killed at the battle of 
Agincourt, when the manor passed to his brother and heir, William de la 
Pole, who was beheaded in 1449,'* but was ultimately succeeded by his 
son and heir, John de la Pole, Duke of Suffolk. 

The manor appears to have been granted by the Crown to Charles 
Brandon, Duke of Suffolk, for in 1538 it was conveyed back to the Crown in 
exchajige for other lands,' and was rated in 1557 for grant to Sir Rich. 
Freston, Knt.* 

The manor next vested in Michael Wentworth, of Mendham Priory,^ 
who died in 1558, when it passed to his son and heir Thomas, who died in 
1569, when it devolved on Michael Wentworth, who sold it in 1589 to John 
Laurence, who died 2nd Jan. 1610-1. John Laurence had, however, in 
his lifetime granted the manor to his 3rd son, James Laurence, who we find, 
in 1614, wifii his brother Nathaniel Laurence-, aliened it to Henry Barker 
and Robert Girley. This was very likely a settlement only, for we find 
John Laurence, son and heir of John, lord this same year. Towards the 
end of the i8th century the manor was acquired by the Rev. Sir William 
Bunbury, Bart., at whose death in 1764 the manor passed to his son and 
heir. Sir Thomas C. Bunbury, Bart., on whose death in 1824 it vested in 
his nephew. Sir H. E. Bunbury. It was subsequently sold to the Rev. 
Gervas Hobnes Clerk, of Gawdy Hall, in Redenhall, from whom it has 
descended in the same course as the Manor of Walsham Hall, Mendham, 
in tills Himdred. 

Arms of Laurence : Arg. a cross raguly, Gu., on a chief of the 2nd 
a lion passant guardant Or. 

Manor of Wakelin's now joined to Whittingham Hall. 

In 1300 Ralph de Hardricheshall had a grant of free warren here, and 
lived from 12 Edw. I. to 8 Edw. II. In 1334 Sir Walkelin de Hardricheshall 
held the manor, and he probably gave the manor its name.^ His will is 
dated 1376. 

We next meet with the manor as vested in Sir Thomas Hansard,' from 
whom it went to his widow Thomasine, and on her death in 1497 i* vested 
in her son and heir, Anthony (? Arthur) Hansard. 

'I.P.M., 49 Edw. III. pt. ii. 54. 'S.P., 30 Hen. VIII. ii. 1182 (i8a). 

''See Hertz Manor, Saxmundham, *Harl. 606. 

Plomesgate Hundred, and Wing- 'See Mendham Manor, in this Hundred. 

field Manor. 'See Colston HaU Manor, Badingham, in 
3 1.P.M., 13 Rich. II. 41. this Hundred. 

♦I.P.M., 28 Hen. VI. 25. 'See Whittingham Manor, in Fressingfield. 



40 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

The manor next vested in Thomas Brewse, and from him passed to 
his 2nd son, Giles Brewse. Somewhat later the manor was acquired by 
Sir Thomas C. Bunbury, Bart., and from him passed to his nephew and 
heir, Sir Henry E. Bunbury. He sold the manor to Henry Newton Heale, 
and it is now joined to Whittingham Hall. 

Manor of Ufford Hall. 

This was held in the time of Edw. I. by Robert de Ufford of the Manor 
of Chepenhall. It is situate in that part of the parish formerly the hamlet 
of Chepenhall. 

Page says that in the reign of Edw. I. Adam, son of Sir Robert le 
Bevant, Knt., granted and confirmed, by deed without date, to Henry, 
son of William de Sancroft and Margery his wife and the heirs of the said 
Henry a certain messuage together with his houses and buildings in the 
parish of Fressingfield, in the hamlet of Chepenhall, with all his lands and 
tenements in the parish of Fressingfield or in Stradbroke. From this 
Henry the manor and demesnes of Ufford Hall descended through Francis 
Sancroft, the father, and Thomas, the elder brother of the pious and 
patriotic archbishop, to Francis Sancroft, who in 1695 also purchased the 
manor of Chevenhall als. Chepenhall. 

The descent from Henry de Sancroft to Francis is as follows : Henry 
was father of Simon living 1304. He was the father of John Uving in 
1338, he of John living in 1414, he of Stephen living in 1432, he of John 
living in 1470, he of John living in 1478, he of Robert living in — , who 
married Alice, daughter and coheir of Robert Godbold, and was the father 
of William living 1528-1534, who married Alice, daughter and coheir of 
Peter, son of Laurence Studhaugh, Lord of Hempstead, and was the father 
of Francis, who married Catherine, daughter of Peter Gooch, of St. 
Margaret's, Ilketshall, and was the father of William, who married Alice, 
daughter of John Stokes, of Drinkstone, and died in 1628-9, and was the 
father of Francis, who married Margaret, daughter and coheir of Thomas 
Boucher, of Wilby, and was the father of Thomas and Archbishop William 
Sancroft. 

Davy, however, in 1428, makes Sir John Ufford lord then or W. Blobold, 
and in 1482 and 1634 the Abbot of Sibton. He further states that in 1554 
John Holdych, of Dennington, held a part which he ordered to be sold on 
his son's coming of age and till then to Alice his widow. Also that John Cutting 
held a part. He agrees with Page as to Thomas Sancroft and his son 
Francis holding. Francis Sancroft died m 1708, when the manor passed 
to his son and heir, William Sancroft, who on his death devised the 
manor to his widow Catherine for life. On her death the manor went in 
moieties to their daughter Elizabeth, married to John Wogan, and 
Catherine Sancroft. 

After John Wogan's death, in 1778, he having acquired Catherine 
Sancroft's moiety, tiie manor was purchased by Sir John Major, and it 
has since descended in the same course as the Manor of Great Thomham, 
in Hartismere Hundred, and is now vested in Lord Henniker. 

Dr. William Sancroft, Archbishop of Canterbury, was bom at Ufford 
HaU, where he resided after he had sacrificed to conscientious scruples the 
high dignify which he enjoyed. He was interred in the chantry and under 
a handsome monument. 



FRESSINGFIELD. 41 

Manor of Fressingfield. 

This was the estate of Robert Malet at the time of the Domesday Survey, 
and upon his founding the priory of Eye he gave all his lands in Pressing- 
field to it. In 1396 the Prior of Ely had free warren here.' And the 
ministers' accounts of the manor as held by the priory in 15 Edw. II. will 
be found in the Public Record Office.^ 

At the Dissolution the manor passed to the Crown, and was in 1536 
granted to Edmund Bedingfield, but the same year also granted to Charles 
Brandon, Duke of Suffolk, who later exchanged the manor with the Crown 
for other property. 

Amongst the Additional Charters in the British Museum will be found 
an extract from Court Rolls in 1500.^ 

Manor of Launces. 

This was the property of John Launce in 1275, who held a market here 
at that time. In 1530 the manor belonged to the King, after which it 
became united to Veales, and is now one of the members thereof. 



' Chart. RoUs, s Add. Ch. 6554. 

« Bundle 1127, No. 4. 

F 




42 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

HOREAM. 

MONGST the lands of Robert Malet's mother held of the 
Queen's fee were three holdings here. 

The first consisted of a carucate of land, 3 villeins, 
4 bordars, 2 ploughteams in demesne and i belonging to 
the men, 4 acres of meadow, and wood to support 30 hogs. 
Of live stock there were i rouncy, 9 beasts, 9 hogs, 40 sheep, 
30 goats, and 2 hives of bees. And 17 acres and half a 
plough team were held by two freemen by commendation. The value of the 
whole was 40s. At the time of the Survey this estate was held of Robert 
Malet by Robert de Glanville, and formerly by Aluric, a freeman. 

The second consisted of three freemen under commendation with 
60 acres, 2 bordars, i ploughteam, 2 acres of meadow, and wood for the 
support of 6 hogs, valued at 12s., held of Robert Malet by Walter de Caen. 

The third consisted of two freemen with a carucate of land, 30 acres, 5 
bordars, 2J ploughteams, 3 acres of meadow, and wood sufficient to support 
28 hogs, valued at 25s. 4^. This was held of Robert Malet by Walter 
Gripp's son.' 

Belonging to the Abbot of St. Edmunds was one holding of four freemen 
with 30 acres and a ploughteam, valued at 5s., the commendation belonging 
to the abbot. The soc was in Hoxne.'' 

Belonging to the fee of the Bishop of Thetford were two holdings. The 
first was of 42 acres, ij ploughteams, and wood for the support of 16 hogs. 
It was formerly held by seven freemen by commendation . The second was of 
ig acres and half a ploughteam, valued at 3s. nod., formerly held by two 
freemen by commendation and soc.^ 

Another estate in this place was that of Hugh de Montfort, held of him 
by Roger de Chandos, a freeman by commendation (?) consisting of 14 
acres and half a ploughteam, valued at 35.'^ 

Another estate was that of Algar, a freeman under Stigand, and two 
others, one a freeman under Bishop Ailmar, and the other under Edric, of 
Laxfield, and consisted of acarucate of land, 7 bordars, a serf, a ploughteam in 
demesne, wood for the support of 24 hogs, 2 acres of meadow, and a plough- 
team in demesne. Of live stock there were 2 rouncies, 8 beasts, 24 hogs, 
24 sheep, and a hive of bees. 24 acres were held by four freemen claimed as 
livery of seisin by Juichel, and half a ploughteam (reduced at the time of 
the Survey to 2 oxen). There was also a church with 22 acres, valued at 
22,d. At the time of the Survey this estate was held by Juichel the priest, 
the only difference in the details bemg that the rouncies, beasts, and sheep 
were not mentioned. The soc was in Hoxne.' 

Under the heading of " These be the Freemen of Suffolk who remain 
in the King's hand,'' was one holding in this place consisting of 6 acres 
valued at zzd. formerly held by a freeman. The Survey goes on to say : 
" Him, Herbert Blacun, held in hand for the King by order of Bishop Arfast, 
but Juichel the priest claims him of the King's gift, and thereof was he 
seised. And his predecessor had the commendation in King Edward's 
time. The soc is in Hoxne."* 



'Dom. ii. 329, 3296. *Dom. ii. 406. 

"Dom. ii. 3716, *Dom. ii. 438. 

^Dom. ii. 3796. ^Dom. ii. 447 



2 



HORHAM. 43 

Manor of Horham Comitis. 

This formed part of the estate of Robert Malet in Norman times, and 
in 1609 was vested in Peter Wood and later it is said to have been vested 
in King Charles I., forming part of the jointure of his consort, Queen 
Henrietta Maria. But we find that Sir Edward Coke held the lordship, 
from whom it descended in the same course as the Manor of Aldham, in 
Cosford Hundred, to Sir Thomas Coke, created 9th May, 1744, Viscount 
Coke, of Holkham, and Earl of Leicester, who sold the manor to Sir Joshua 
Vanneck, Bart., from which time to the time of Joshua, 2nd Baron Hunting- 
field, the manor devolved in the same course as the Manor of Heveningham, 
in Bly thing Hundred. Lord Huntingfield sold the manor, probably to 
Matthias Kerrison, for his son. Sir Edward Kerrison, Bart., held in 1843, 
from which time the manor has passed in the same course as the Manor 
of Thelnetham, in Blackbourn Hundred, and is now vested in Lady Bate- 
man. 

Page, writing in 1847, states that " this estate " belonged to Alexander 
Donovan, of Framfield Park, in Sussex, who married Caroline, youngest 
daughter of Joshua, ist Baron Huntingfield. This may have applied to 
the estate as distinguished from the manor, for this latter seems to have 
passed as we have already indicated. Parliamentary Survey of this manor 
" Horham Comitis " made in 1680 is referred to in the 8th Report of the 
Deputy Keeper of Public Records, App. ii. p. 67. Court Rolls of " Horham 
Manor," 29 Edw. I. to 35 Hen. V. will be found in the Public Record Office,' 
and an extract from a Court Roll of the Manor of Horham 1505 will be 
found amongst the Additional Charters in the British Museum." 

Arms of Huntingfield : Or, on a fesse Gules, three plates. 

MAifOR of Horham Jernegan's or Sherman's. 

This also was part of the estate of the great Suffolk landowner, Robert 
Malet. This manor was early associated with the Jernegan or Jerningham 
family, a family which can be traced to a period anterior to the Conquest. 
It has been thought that the name itself is a derivation from the Celtic, 
and it does no doubt occur as such in the annals of French Brittany, by 
Lobmeau, but the family, according to better authorities, is of Danish 
extraction. In favour of this view there is the authority of both Camden 
and Weever. According to the latter, Canute, King of Denmark and of 
England in 1030, after his return from Rome brought divers captains and 
soldiers from Denmark, " whereof the greatest part were christened 
here in England, and began to settle themselves here, of whom 
Jernegan or Jerningham and Jemihingo, now Jennings, were of the 
most esteeme with Canute, who gave unto the said Jerningham 
certain royalties, and at a Parliament held at Oxford the said King 
Canute did give unto the said Jerningham certain manors in Norfolk, 
and to Jennings certain manors lying upon the seaside near Harwiche in 
Suffolke, in regard of their former services done to his father Sevenus, King 
of Denmarke." It might be interesting to hear how the King called his 
Parliament at this early date ; but at all events it is to be hoped the 
historical portion of Mr. Weever's extract is better grounded than his 
geographical, unless in those days the County of Suffolk absorbed a 
portion of Essex ! 

' Portfolio 203, 86. ''Add. Ch. 7321. 



44 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

The first of the Jernegan family in connection with Horham appears 
to have been one who was witness to a deed without date mentioned in the 
Castle Acre Register/ by which Bryan, son of Scotland, confirmed the 
church of Melsombi to the monks of Castle Acre. He died about the year 
1182 leaving, by Sibilla his widow, a son. Sir Hugh or Hubert Fitz Jernegan, 
who in 1 183 paid a considerable sum of money into the exchequer 
as a gift to the King Ken. II., and was witness to a deed in 1195 by which 
divers lands were granted to Byland Abbey, in Yorkshire.'' He married 
Maud, the daughter and coheir of Thorpine, son of Robert de Watheby, in 
Westmoreland, in whose right he acquired the Manor of Wathe, in North 
Cove. He is mentioned in the Black Book of the Exchequer,^ as one of 
the Suffolk knights who held of the Honor of Eye, and in 1201* he paid 
King John £20 as a fine for three knights' fees and a half, which were 
situate in Yorkshire, and held of the Honor of Brittany. He died in 1203, 
and the King granted the wardship of all his large possessions and the 
marriage of his wife and children to Robert de Veteri Ponte or Vipount, so 
that he married them without disparagement to their fortune. This manor 
passed to his son and heir. Sir Hubert Jernegan. He aided the Barons 
against King John, by which he forfeited a considerable part of his 
estate, but on the accession of Hen. III. he submitted himself and 
obtained his pardon, though he did not recover the whole of his 
forfeited property. He died seised of the manor about 1239. He 
married Margery, daughter and heir of Sir Robert de Herling, of East 
Herling, co. Norfolk, and the manor passed on his death to his 2nd 
son, Sir William Jernegan, who married Julian, daughter and coheir 
of Sir — Gymingham, of Burnham, Knt., but dying without issue, the 
manor vested in his youngest brother. Sir Hugh Jernegan, of Stonham 
Jernegan, Knt. 

Sir Hugh Jernegan in 1243 came to an agreement with his mother 
Margery respecting her dower, and settled upon her in lieu of her dower 
during her life the capital messuage of the Manor of Horham Jernegan, 
with the park, windmill, and demesne lands, and the services and rents of 
Horham Manor with house-bote, hey-bote, and pannage, in consideration 
of which she released all her righ^t'to dower in two carucates of land and a 
messuage in Stonham Jernegan, and in all her husband's other estates in 
Norfolk and Suffolk.^ Sir Hugh Jernegan made Stonham the chief residence 
of the family, which then received the name of Stonham Jernegan. 

Sir Hugh Jernegan died in 1272. His ist wife was named Elizabeth. 
He married 2ndly EUen, daughter and coheir of Sir Thomas Ingledesthorpe, 
of Ingaldesthorpe, co. Norfolk, Knt., and was succeeded by his son and 
heir, Sir Walter Jernegan, Knt., who married Isabel, daughter of Sir Peter 
Fitz Osbert, of Somerleyton, and sister of Robert Fitz Osbert, of Hadeston, 
and widow of Sir Henry Walpole, of Walpole and Houghton in Norfolk. 
On the Patent Rolls for 1272 will be found an action as to lands in Horham 
and Stonham Jernegan by this Walter Jernegan against Edmund "of 
Almaine," Earl of Cornwall.^ 

Sir Walter Jernegan died in 1299, when the manor passed to his son 
and heir. Sir Peter Jernegan. He was sub-escheator of Suffolk in 1283. 
In the year 1334 he sold Uggeshall Manor with the advowson to Sir Edmund 

'Fol. 636. 4 Rot. Pip. Pasch. 3d John Rot. 16. 

« Regr. Abbatise Byland. = Fine, 50 Hen. III. 5. 

3 Vol. i. p. 301, 6 Pat. Rolls, I Edw. I. iid. 



HORHAM. 45 

de Sortelee, Knt. He married three times — ist^ Alice, daughter of Hugh 
Germayne ; 2ndly, Matilda, daughter and heir of Sir Roger de Herling, 
and heir also of Sir Peter Fitz-Mortimer, of Attleburgh ; and 3rdly, Ellen, 
daughter and heir of Sir Roger de Huntingfield, of Huntingfield, and died 
about 1350, when he was succeeded by his son and heir, Sir John Jernegan. 
He married Agatha, daughter of Sir Robert Shelton, of Shelton, co. Nor- 
folk, and was succeeded by his son, Sir John Jernegan, called John 
Jernegan, sen., who upon the death of his cousm. Sir John Noyoun, inherited 
the other moiety of the Fitz Osbert estates, and married Joan, daughter 
and coheir of Sir William de Kelvedon, widow of Sir John Lowdham, of 
Frenze, co. Norfolk, and dying in 1375' the manor passed to his son and 
heir. Sir John Jernegan, aged 12, the 50th Edw. HI. He, in 1374, married 
Margaret, daughter of Sir Thomas Vis de Lou, of Shotley,"" upon which 
marriage his father settled upon them and their heirs the manor and 
advowson of Stonham Jernegan and Horham Jernegan.- 

On Sir John Jernegan's death in 1405 the manor passed to Sir Thomas 
Jernegan, who married Joane, daughter of William Appleyard, of 
Denston, co. Norfolk, and on his death was succeeded by his son, John 
Jernegan, who married ist Jane, daughter of Sir John Darell, of Calehill, 
CO. Kent, Knt.* and 2ndly Agnes . 

Amongst the Bodleian Charters will be found a lease in 1445 by 
Sir John Hevenyngham and others to John Jernegan and Agnes his 
wife of all their manors, lands, and tenements in Horham, Stonham, and 
Bradwell. The lease is dated the Feast of the Invocation of the Cross, 
23 Hen. VI.= 

Sir John, on the marriage of his son John in 1459, settled upon him 
this manor and gave up to him the family seat at Somerleyton, retiring 
himself to Cove, near Beccles, where he was living in 1465.® He died in 
1474, and his will is dated 1473 and proved 9th Dec. the following year. 
The testator describes himself as of Little Worlingham, in Suffolk, and he 
directed his body to be entombed by his wife in the chapel of St. Mary, in the 
priory of St. Olave, where his progenitors had been interred. The Worling- 
ham Manor, as also the Manor of Wathe Hall, in North Cove, he devised 
to his son Osbert for life ; to his eldest son John he devised the manors and 
advowsons of Somerleyton, Stonham Jernegan, Horham Jernegan, and 
Bradwell, and the foundation or advowson of the religious house of St. 
Olave, besides legacies to his three daughters who were nuns. His son and 
heir. Sir John Jernegan,^ married Isabel, daughter and heir of Sir Gervase 
Clifton, of Clifton, Knt., by Isabel his wife, daughter of Vincent Finch. 
He died 26th Oct. 1503," when the manor passed to his son and heir. Sir 
Edward Jernegan, who married ist Margaret, only daughter of Sir Edward 
Bedingfield, of Oxburgh, co. Norfolk, Knt. (she died 24th March, 1504), 
and 2ndly Mary, daughter and coheir of Richard Scroope, 2nd son of 
Henry, Lord Scroope, of Bolton, remarried to Sir William Kingston, 

'I.P.M., 50 Edw. III. 26. =Bodl. Sufi. Ch. 1317. 

^See also Manor of Stonham Jernegan, in ^Feet of Fines, 28 Hen. VI. 25. 

Bosmere and Claydon Hundred. ^A curious letter of this Sir John, signed 
^Fine, 49 Edw. III. " John Jernyngan," has been pub- 

♦ By Florence Chichele, daughter of William Hshed by Sir John Fenn (Orig. 

and niece of Henry Chichele, Arch- Letters, vol. i. p. 157.) 

bishop of Canterbury, the founder ^I.P.M., 19 Hen. VII. 48. 

of All Souls' College, Oxford. 



46 



THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 



K.G.' Sir Edward Jernegan obtained a grant from Hen. VIII. of 
the Manors of Lowestoft and Mutford and others in Suffolk " quae fuerunt 
Edmundi de la Pole/" and died 6th Jan. 1515/ seised of the Manors 
of Horham Jernegan, Stonham Jernegan, Somerleyton, Newton, Corton, 
Wathe, Lowestoft, East, West, North, and South Leet in Gorleston, Mut- 
ford, Ashby, &c., and the manor passed to his eldest son and heir. Sir John 
Jernegan, who married Bridget, daughter of Sir Robert Drury, of Hawstead. 

Amongst the Bodleian Charters will be seen a grant dated loth May, 
13 Hen. VIII. [1521], by John, described as " son and heir of Edward 
Jernegan," to Robert Drury, William Waldegrave, and others of the Manors 
of Little Horham, Stonham Jernegan, Newton, Corton, and Lownde, with 
other lands to the use of Bridget Jernegan, wife of the said John, for her 
life.* 

Sir John Jernegan died in 1558, when the manor devolved on his son 
and heir, George Jernegan. He was a representative in Parliament for 
the borough of Or ford in 1553, and married Ela, 3rd daughter of Sir Henry 
Spelman, of Narburgh, co. Norfolk, one of the Justices of the Court of 
King's Bench. On George Jernegan's death the manor passed to his son 
and heir, Sir John Jernegan, who married the Hon. Catherine Brooke, 
daughter of George Brooke, Lord Cobham, and died without male issue.' 

In 1572 the manor was assigned to William Sherman by Thomas 
Gawdy and others, in whom it was then vested,® and from William Sherman 
it appears to have passed to John Sherman, against whom in 1597 a fine 
was levied by John Tange and others.^ 

In 1609 the manor was acquired by Sir Edward Coke, the great lawyer, 
and has ever since devolved in the same course as the Manor of Horham 
Comitis. 

Amongst the Early Chancery Proceedings [1433 to 1485] is a suit by 
Sir William Brandon, Knt., against Sir John Fogge and others, touching 
the m.anor," and subsequently we meet in the same Proceedings with a 
suit by Sir William Brandon against Richard Corbold, yeoman, as to the 
manor, then stated to be claimed by Sir John Skot.* 

Arms of Jernegan : Argent, three arming buckles. Gules. 

Manor of Horham, Brodocks late Copledyke. 

This was the lordship of William de Huntingfield in 1275, and passed 
on his death in 1282 to the death of William, Lord Huntingfield, without 
surviving male issue, in the same course as the Manor of Huntingfield, in 
Blything Hundred. The manor is specifically mentioned in the inquis. p.m. 
of William de Huntingfield, who died in 1313,'° and of Roger, who died in 



' She died 15th Aug. 1548, seised (as widow 
of Sir Edward Jernegan) of the 
Hundreds of Lothingland and Mut- 
ford, Lowestoft, and Mutford 
Manors (I. P.M., 5th Nov. 2 Edw. 
VI.), and was buried in the church 
of Leyton, co. Middlesex. It ap- 
pears that her 2nd husband, Sir 
William Kingston, in his will proved 
in 1541, bequeathed to his 
son Anthony Kingston six great 
bowls of silver, &c., and to his 
son-in-law {sic), Sir Henry Jernegan, 
;£ao, and a gown of black satin 



furred with sables, which the King 
gave him, and to his son-in-law, 
Edmund Jernegan, £20. 

'Orig. Hen. VIII. 

3 1.P.M., 7 Hen. VIII. i. 

4 Bodl. SufE. Ch. 1318. 

5 See Manor of Ashby, in Lothingland 

Hundred. 

6 Fine, Hil. 14 Eliz. 
'Fine, Easter, 39 Eliz. 
8E.C.P. Bundle 48, 376. 
'E.C.P. Bundle 70, 38. 

" I.P.M., 7 Edw. II. 47, extent. 



HORHAM. 47 

1337 •' On the death of William, last Lord Huntingfield, Davy says the 
manor passed to his daughter and heir Alice, who married Sir John de 
Norwich, and died without issue, when the manor passed to John Copledike, 
cousin and heir of William de Huntingfield, in 1428, vesting in the heir of 
this John Copledike. 

Amongst the Ancient Deeds in the Exchequer and Treasury of the 
Receipt in the Public Record Office, we find a release in 1458 ,by William 
Copuldike to Thomas Salibury, William Babyngton, Richard Pynchebek, 
John Vavasour, John Pynchebek, and Thomas Fitzwilliam the younger of 
his right in Horham Manor and in all other the lands and tenements which 
belonged to John Copledike his father/ 

Somewhat later another John Copledike died seised in 1464. Another 
John " Copledik " died seised 15th March, 1490,^ when the manor passed 
to his son and heir William, then aged 19. Page informs us that Leonard 
Copledike, 2nd son of Sir John Copledike, of Frampton, co. Lincolnshire 
and Horham, married Mary, daughter of Simon Richmond, of Stradbrook, 

and relict of Bradock, in whose right he inherited this lordship. 

Leonard Copledike had no issue by this marriage, and married 2ndly 
Thomasine, eldest daughter and coheir of Thomas Gavel, of Kirby Cane, 
in Norfolk, by whom he had a son and heir, John Copledike. On the death 
of this Leonard she remarried Edward Calthorpe, upon whose decease the 
said John Copledike'^ inherited the lordship and advowson of Kirby Cane 
and removed thither, where he died and was buried in 1593. He, however, 
in 1541 sold the manor to Simon Brodock.^ 

In 1560 the said Simon Brodock died seised, when the manor passed 
to his son and heir, Alexander Brodock, against whom a fine of the manor 
was levied in 1567 by Thomas Gawdy and others.* In 1583 we meet with 
another fine of the manor levied by Sir Robert Woode against George 
Smatheand others,'' and in i6og it appears to have been acquired by the great 
lawyer. Sir Edward Coke, from whose time the manor has devolved in the 
same course as the Manor of Horham Comitis, and is now vested in Lady 
Bateman. 

Arms of Copledike : Arg. a chevron between three crosses botonnee. 
Gules. 

Manor of Horham, Thorpe Hall with Wotton. 

This was the lordship of Robert Fitz John de Thorp, Baron of the 
Exchequer in the time of Hen. III., and Maud his wife, niece of Richard de 
Eye, rector of Fundenhall, in the time of Hen. Ill . Richard de Eye released 
to them all his right after the death of Sir Philip de Eye, his brother, in 
his manors and lands in Horham, Wytton, Hoxne, Stradbrook, &c., and 
Sarah de Sulun, Richard, son of James Suddimere, nephew of Richard de 
Eye, and Philip de Braseworth released all their rights in Horham, Fres- 
singfield, &c. Robert Fitz John de Thorp had a grant of free warren here 
in 1283.* He was one of the King's justices/ and on his death in 1293 
the manor passed to his son and heir, John de Thorp and Alice his wife. 
John de Thorp was a person of great eminence, inasmuch as he had summons 

'I.P.M., II Edw. III. 47, extent. =Fine, Easter, 33 Hen. VIII. 

'36 Hen. VI. A. 8373. *Fine, Easter, 9 Eliz. 

^Inquis. 7 Hen. VII. 722. 7 Fine, Mich. 25-26 Eliz. 

* He married ist Ellen, daughter and heir » Chart. Rolls, 12 Edw. I. 43. 

of John Wodehouse, and 2ndly 9 Pat. Rolls, 8 Edw. I. 41. 

Maud, daughter of John Highfelde, 

of Calls. 



48 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

to Parliament as one of the barons of the realm from the 2nd to the igth 
Edw. II. both inclusive, and in the ist of the same reign as one of the King's 
justices. In 1311 he had a charter for the foundation of the free chapel of 
St. Mary, at Ashwell, co. Norfolk, for a chaplain to perform daily service 
therein for the benefit of the inhabitants, and to pray for his own and his 
wife's soul, as also for the souls of his ancestors and successors. His ist 
wife was Agnes and his 2nd Alice, widow of Sir William Mortimer. He 
settled this manor and the moiety of the church of Fressingfield on Alice 
his 2nd wife previous to 1314, and died in 1323,' though, as we have seen, 
his manor is included in the Lists of Summons of the 19 Edw. II., and on 
the Close Rolls for 1324 we find an order to restore the rents of the manor 
to Alice, late wife of John de Thorp, as they held jointly by gift of Alexander 
de Refham, parson of Stalton church.^ 

The manor passed to John's eldest son, Robert Fitz John de Thorp^ 
(by Agnes, his ist wife), who was about 30 years of age at 
his father's death. He married Beatrix, daughter of Sir Edmund 
Hengrave, and died seised of Horham and Hoxne manors in 1330,'' 
when they passed to his son and heir, John de Thorp, who held at 
his death in 1339 half the Manor of Horham as of the Honor of Eye, 
and rents in Hoxne, Wotton, &c.' John de Thorp was 14 years old 
at his father's death, and in ward to John de Clavering.® He married Joan, 
who (with her sisters Lucy and Maud) was one of the daughters and coheirs 
of Roger atte Ashe. But he died in 1340' without issue, leaving the said 
Joan surviving and Edmund his brother and heir.^ 

There is an order on the Close Rolls in 1340 to the escheator not to 
intermeddle with lands which Joan, late wife of John, son of Sir Robert de 
Thorp, held jointly with him, as the King learns that John at his death held 
jointly with Joan two parts of the Manor of Horham, except ^£4. 3s. yearly 
rent issuing from certain free tenants in Horham, Hoxne, Wotton, Wilbey, 
and Fressingfield, and 20s. of land and rent in the said towns, and that the 
said tenements are not held of the King but of others, and that Edmund 
de Thorp, John's brother, is his next heir and of full age.' 

Edmund de Thorp, brother of John, was Sheriff of Norfolk. He 
married Joan, daughter of Robert and sister and heir of Thomas Baynard 
and in 1380 [?i37o] made a settlement of these manors, and died in 1393, 
being buried in the chancel of Ashwell Thorpe. Joan his widow held them 
for her hfe, and on her death in 1399 Sir Edmund de Thorpe, their eldest 
son, succeeded to the reversion of Horham cum Stradbrook, Wotton, and 
other manors which were " held for hfe by his brother Robert."" 

This Sir Edmund de Thorpe was killed at the seige of Lover's Castle, in 
Normandy, in 1417, being no doubt the same person who by HoUinshed is 
called the Lord Thorpe. His body was brought over and buried in the 
church of Ashwell Thorpe under a stately tomb, where both himself and his 
lady he, their statues being at full length, of white alabaster, under a wooden 
canopy, ornamented with the Thorpe arms and those of the famihes with 
whom they had intermarried. He was twice married — ist in October, 
1368, in the lifetime of his father, to Margaret, daughter and coheir of Richard 

'I.P.M., 17 Edw. II. 61. eorig. 5 Edw. III. Rot. 2, 4. 

= Close Rolls, 17 Edw. II. 3; see, too, ^i.p.M., 14 Edw. III. 16. 

Originalia, 17 Edw. II. 27. ^Orig. 14 Edw. III. 20. 

3 See Manor of Combs, in Stow Hundred. 9 Close Rolls, 14 Edw. III. pt. ii. 5. 

4I.P.M., 4 Edw. III. 34. '"See Blomefield, under Ashwell Thorpe, 
5 1.P.M., 14 Edw. III. 16. 



HORHAM. 49 

de la Riviere, by Maud his wife, sister and heir of John, son of John le 
Breton, Lord of Sporle ; 2ndly to Joan, daughter and heir of Sir Robert 
(or Roger) de Northwode, widow of Roger, Lord Scales, of Neucelles. He 
left by his wife Joan two daughters and coheirs — the elder, Joan, married to 
Sir Robert Echingham, and afterwards to Sir John Clifton, of Buckenham, 
CO. Norfolk, by whom she had a daughter Margaret, who married Sir Andrew 
Ogard, but died without issue ; and Isabel, married to Philip Tilney, of 
Boston, CO. Lincoln, in whom, on failure of issue of Joan, the estate vested. 
From Frederick Tilney their eldest son, who married Elizabeth, daughter 
of Lawrence Cheney, of Ditton, co. Cambridge, it came through his only 
daughter and heir Elizabeth (married to Sir Humphrey Bourchier, eldest 
son and heir apparent of John, Lord Berners, and afterwards to Thomas, 
Duke of Norfolk), to Sir John Bourchier, Lord Berners, whose daughter 
and sole heir Joan married Edmund Knyvett,2nd son of Edmund Knyvett, 
of Buckenham Castle, in Norfolk, who in her right had livery of the Manor 
of Horham, Thorpe Hall, and other manors in Norfolk and Suffolk in the 
26th Hen. VIII. 

Edmund Knyvett died in 1546,' having settled this manor on the 
marriage of his eldest son John in 1538 with Agnes, daughter of Sir John 
Harcourt. This year we meet with a fine, no doubt levied with the object 
of effecting the settlement referred to. It was levied by John Knyvet, 
described as son and heir of Edmund Knyvet, and others against the said 
Edmund Knyvet and Joan his wife.' John Knyvet died in his mother's 
lifetime, leaving Agnes his widow, who died in 1579. Sir Thomas Knyvet, 
of Ashwell Thorp, eldest son of John, appears in 1572 to have sold the 
manor to Ralph Roberts,^ and by 1609 it had passed to the celebrated 
lawyer. Sir Edward Coke, with the other manors of Horham, from which 
time the manor has descended in the same course as the Manor of Horham 
Comitis. 

Manor of Buckenham or Bokenham's. 

This was the lordship of Robert Buckenham in the middle of the 15th 
century. He died seised of it in 1456. Later it vested in Thomas Ridnale 
or Rydnale, who died seised 20th Sept. 1510, when it passed to his nephew 
and heir John Ridnale, son of his brother James Ridnale. Subsequently 
the manor passed to John Lyndesey or Linsey. He acquired the same 
under a fine levied in 1543 against John Croftus and others.* 

Amongst the Chancery Proceedings of the time of Queen Elizabeth 
will be found an action touching this manor between this Robert Lynsey 
and Richard Wythe.' A Robert Linsey died seised of the manor in 1564, 
when it passed to his sisters and coheirs, and in 1589 we meet with a fine 
levied of the manor by William Clubb against Thomas Kent.* In 1751 
we find that Simon Hayle conveyed a fourth part to Bridget Barry or 
Barnes, 

Manor of Horham late Pooley's. 

(Perhaps same as last.) 
In 1750 we find this manor vested in George Pierson and Sarah his 
wife, and in 1783 vested in William Ray, who sold it to one Plant. 



'As to another branch of Knyvets, see 'Fine, Trin. 14 Eliz. 

Mendlesham Manor, in Haxtismere ♦ Fine, Trin. 35 Hen. VIII. 

Hundred. ' C.P. Ser. ii. B. cxiv. 63- 

'Fine, HU. 30 Hen. VIII. «Fine, Hil 31 Eliz. 




50 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

HOXNE. 

IHERE was one manor here in the time of the Confessor. 
It was held by Bishop Ailmar, and consisted of 9 carucates 
of land, 40 villeins, 15 bordars, 4 serfs, 3 ploughteams in 
demesne and 40 belonging to the men, 40 acres of meadow, 
wood for the support of 250 hogs, and 2 mills. Of live stock 
there were 2 rouncies, 12 beasts, 80 hogs, 17 sheep, and 40 
goats. The Survey goes on to say : "In this manor there 
used to be a market in King Edward's time, and (it went on) after King 
William came hither ; and it was set up on Saturdays. And William 
Malet made his castle at the Eye, and on the same day as the market used 
to be held on the Bishop's manor, William Malet made another market 
in his castle, and thereby the Bishop's market has been so far spoilt that 
it is of little worth, and now it is set up on Wednesdays. But the Eye 
market is set up on the Saturday. Now Robert holds it by the King's 
gift." 

There was also a church in this manor, the seat of the bishopric of 
Suffolk in the time of the Confessor. At the time of the Survey the manor 
was held by William, Bishop of Thetford, and its details were different. 
The villeins were reduced to 20, the bordars had increased to 51, the serfs 
were not mentioned, and the ploughteams belonging to the men were 
reduced to 22|. It was Valued at £28 formerly, at the time of the Survey 
at £20, but to Arfast it rendered £30. It was a league long and 8 quarentenes 
broad, and paid in a gelt 22 J^.' 

Manor of Hoxne. 

This was the manor held in Saxon times by Bishop Ailmar, and at the 
time of the Survey was held by William, Bishop of Thetford. A year or 
two later, however, it is found vested in Hubert, Bishop of Norwich, who 
in or about the year iioi gave the parish church here, as also the chapel 
raised to the memory of King Edmund the Martyr, to his priory at Norwich, 
and it was appropriated as a cell to that monastery.'' The gift, however, 
does not seem to have been confirmed, and in 1227 the Bishop of Norwich 
had a grant of free warren here.^ 

Ministers' accounts of the bishop's temporalities, in Hoxne, 18 to 20 
Edw. II. will be found in the Public Record Office.'^ 

In 1535 the manor was given by Act of Parliament to King Hen. VIII., 
it being then taken from the bishopric, and we find amongst the State 
Papers in 1536-7 a lease to Charles Brandon, Duke of Suffolk,^ and in 
1539 to Thomas Southwell. To this manor apparently belonged the 
episcopal palace, the rectory, and the advowson of the vicarage, the 
valuation being in 1534 £92. 19s. It formed part of the ancient revenues 
of the see, and was in 1543 granted by the Crown to Sir Robert Southwell. 
Sir Robert Southwell was Master of the Rolls, and married Margaret, 
daughter and heir of Sir Thomas Nevill, 4th son of George, Lord Aber- 
gavenny. He died 28th Oct. 1559, when the manor passed to his son and 
heir, Thomas Southwell. Amongst the Chancery Proceedings is an action 
by Stephen Lacy against William Bell and Austyne Dyck to complete 
surrender of land held by plaintiff of this Thomas Southwell, of Hoxne 
Manor, agreed to be sold by plaintiff to John Sherwood, sen.* Thomas 

'^ Dom. ii. 379. 4 Bundle 1141, No. i. 

''Cotton Aug. ii. 103 (copy). sS.P. 1536-7, vol. i. 1520, p. 577. 

3 Close Rolls, II Hen. III. 4. ^CP. ii. 157. 



HOXNE. 



51 



Southwell married thrice— ist, Margaret, daughter of Sir Henry Jernegan, 
of Cossey; 2ndly, Mary, daughter of Sir Rice Mansell ; 3rdly, Nazareth, 
daughter of Sir John Newton, of Hautry, in Somersetshire. Thomas South- 
well died in 1567, when the manor passed to his son and heir, Sir Robert 
Southwell, who married Elizabeth, daughter of Charles Howard, Earl of 
Effingham, Lord High Admiral of England. 

Amongst the Chancery Proceedings in the time of Queen Elizabeth 
we find a bill of revivor by Henry Lacy against this Sir Robert Southwell 
and others to obtain admittance to copyholds held by plaintiff's father and 
grandfather of this manor, defendant Southwell being lord.' A fine of 
the manor was levied in 1591 by Robert Houghton and others against Sir 
Robert." Sir Robert Southwell died 12th Oct. 1599, when the manor passed 
to his son and heir. Sir Thomas Southwell, and amongst the Chancery 
Proceedings in the time of Queen Ehzabeth we find three actions relating 
to copyhold of this manor brought against this Sir Thomas Southwell. 
They are by Charles Radclilfe and Alex. Holmes and another, John Truston 
V. George Sampson and Stephen Lacye.^ 

Sir Thomas Southwell married Margaret Fuller, and he and others 
had licence in 1621 to alien the manor to Alexander Prescott, citizen of 
London, on whose death in 1621 it passed to his son and heir, Sir John 
Prescott, Knt., High Sheriff for Suffolk in 1627, who resided at Hoxne, but 
was not lord and patron in 1656, as Page states, for he died in 1640, when 
the manor passed to his son and heir, William Prescott, on whose death in 
1642 the manor passed to his sister and coheir Jane, married ist to Sir 
Thomas Fisher, Bart., and 2ndly to William Maynard, 2nd son of William, 
2nd Lord Maynard. William Maynard having no issue by his ist wife, 
who died in 1675, married Susan, sole daughter and heir of Thomas Evans, 
of Bow, CO. Middlesex, and by her who died in 1727, had two sons, Thomas 
and Prescot, and one daughter Anne. William Maynard died in 1704, when 
the manor passed to his son and heir, Thomas Maynard, who died 6th Sept. 
1742* without issue, and by his will dated in 1734 devised the manor to 
Charles Maynard, afterwards 6th Lord Maynard. 

His real estate was devised to the said Charles upon trust that he 
should lay out a sum not exceeding ;f300 nor less than £200 upon a 
convenient house for a schoolmaster and schoolmistress to reside and keep 
school at Hoxne, and he declared that such house should be kept in repair 
by the said Charles, Lord Maynard, his heirs and assigns, and that he should 
appoint a good schoolmaster and schoolmistress to reside and keep school 
in such house, and that he and they should out of the rents and profits of 
the said estates in Hoxne, pay yearly as a salary to the master £40, and as 
a salary to the mistress £10. The school premises consist of a dwelling- 
house for the master and schoolroom for the boys, and a dwelling- 
house for the mistress and schoolroom for the girls. The master teaches 
between 30 and 40 boys of the parish reading, writing, and arithmetic, 
as free scholars, and the schoolmistress teaches about 20 scholars reading, 
writing, and needlework. The salaries are paid and the buildings kept in 
repair, it is believed, by the present lord of the manor and owner of the 



■C.P. ii. 131. 

* Fine, Mich. 33-34 Eliz. 
3 C.P. Ser. ii. B. cliii. 4 B. ; clxxxi. B. cix. 9. 
■^Sir John Cullum in his MS. notes 
gives the long Latin inscription on 



his tomb at Hoxne, and says : 
" This inscription I am informed 
was drawn up by the deceased, and 
must be read with large allowances 
for the partiality of sdf-love." 



52 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

mansion and estates mentioned in the foundation deed, and the children 
are appointed on his behalf. 

Charles, 6th Lord Maynard, was created Baron Maynard, of Much 
Easton alias Easton and Montem, in Essex, and Viscount Ma3^nard, of 
Easton Lodge, with hmitation to Sir WiUiam Maynard, of Waltons, in Essex, 
Bart., and his issue male by letters patent dated 28th Oct. 1766. He was 
Lord Lieutenant of Suffolk, 1762 to 1769, and died unmarried 30th June, 
1775, devising the manor to his great-nephew, Thomas Hesilrige, who 
took the name and arms of Maynard, but on succeeding to a baronetcy 
resumed the name of Hesilrige. 

He married ist 1805, Mary, daughter of Edmund Tyrell, of Gipping 
Hall, and 2ndly, 30th Nov. 1811, Letitia, 2nd daughter of John Wodehouse, 
1st Baron Wodehouse, of Kimberley. On his death without issue 24th 
April, 1817' the estate reverted to Charles Maynard, Viscount Maynard, 
who sold the same to Matthias Kerrison, of Bungay, whose son, Lieut .-Gen. 
Sir Edward Kerrison, Bart., rebuilt the mansion formerly called Hoxne 
Hall, upon a larger scale in a more splendid style and made it his residence 
under the name of Oakley Park, the greater part of the park being in the 
parish of Oakley. From this time to the present the manor has devolved 
in the same way as the Manor of Thelnetham, in Blackbourn Hundred, and 
now belongs to Lady Bateman. 

Oakley Park is practically the manor house, and is one of the most 
magnificent mansions in the county, having been erected from a design by 
Sidney Smirke, brother of Sir Robert Smirke. It stands on the western 
side of the park, nearly half a mile south of the village overlooking the lovely 
valley of the Dove and surrounded by terraces and pleasure grounds. It 
is a spacious and elegant Grecian structure, and its principal apartments 
are of noble proportion. To the left is seen the river, a branch of the 
Waveney, which traverses the park, winding its way to the main stream 
about half a mile distant. On the right runs a terrace bounded on either 
side with trees and shrubs, and at its upper end is a grotto. Four lofty 
Corinthian columns support the portico, and on the pediment over them 
are placed the family arms of Kerrison elaborately carved ; on each side 
terminating the portico is placed on an octagonal pedestal a large marble 
vase of exquisite workmanship ; the length of this fount is 95 feet, the 
portico forming the centre being 36 feet long. The south front looks into 
the garden and consists of a portico of six columns similar in size and order 
to those of the west portico and two wings, the whole surmounted by a fine 
balustrade. The east front has not a portico, but is very commanding ; a 
handsome sweep of buildings extends from the left of the grand front, and 
forms a wing to it, upon one part of which two large eagles are placed with 
wings extended. The courtyard is at right angles (running west) with this 
wing ; it is entered by an arched gateway, over which is a turret containing 
a clock. A gallery of 80 feet long is supported by eight Italian marble 
columns of unrivalled beauty. 

Court Rolls of Hoxne Manor, 43 Edw. III. will be found in the Public 
Record Of&ce.' 

Arms of Maynard : Arg. a chevron azure, between three sinister hands 
erect couped at the wrist. Gules. Of Hesilrige : Arg. a chevron between 
three hazel leaves proper. Of Kerrison : Arg. a pile Azure charged with 
three galtraps of the field. 



'Will proved 7th June, 1817. "Portfolio 203, 91. 



HOXNE. 53 

Manor of Hoxne Parsonage. 

This manor was the lordship of Bishop Ailmar in Saxon times, and of 
WiUiam, Bishop of Thetford, in Norman days, being in 1088 vested in 
Herbert, Bishop of Norwich. It was in 1542 surrendered to the King by 
William Rugge or Repps, Bishop of Norwich, and granted by the Crown 
the following year to Sir Robert Southwell,' from which time it has devolved 
in the same course as the main Manor of Hoxne and is now vested in Lady 
Bateman. 

Manor of Hoxne Priory, or late Priory of St. Edmunds. 

This was the lordship of Bishop Ailmar, and at the time of the Survey 
vested in William, Bishop of Thetford, a year or so after passing to Herbert 
Losing, Bishop of Norwich. About the year iioi the bishop, as we have 
seen, gave the parish church and chapel of St. Edmunds to his priory at 
Norwich, and it was appropriated as a cell to that monastery. Ralph 
the Dapifer rebuilt the convent soon after the Conquest. In the year 1130 
Maurice de Windsor and Egidia his wife gave the chapel of St. Edmund 
to the house which Ralph the Dapifer had newly built, that therein might 
be placed a convent of monks to pray for the soul of the said Ralph. The 
reception for the monks was not completed until about 1226, when Thomas 
de BlumviUe, Bishop of Norwich, removed the monks from the palace at 
Hoxne and fixed them in their cell or monastery there ; and in 1267 Bishop 
Roger de Skerning consecrated the burial ground of their conventual 
church of St. Edmund. Their endowment was then very small, for in 1291 
the temporahties were only estimated at 14s. iif^. in three parishes. 
Blomefield makes the clear revenues about {,^0, and says the monks kept 
a school at the monastery, and taught and supported two poor children 
of this parish. Speed and Tanner make the valuation 38 Hen. VIII. but 
jfiS. IS. o^d. The oblations at the image and chapel of St. Robert here 
were retiirned at 13s. 'jd. in 1534. 

Prior Castleton sold the priory, manor, and estates about 1538 to Sir 
Richard Gresham, and we find amongst the State Papers for 1538 a patent 
authorising the sale of Hoxne Priory and Yaxley Manor, stated to be of the 
yearly value of ;^i8. os. 2d., to Sir Richard Gresham.'' 

The manor does not appear as part of the endowment, which seems to 
have been limited to a manor in Yaxley and lands and rents in Hoxne, 
Denham, Thrandeston, and Horham, the chapel of RingshaU with tithes, 
and 32 acres of land there, and tithes in Homersfield. In this act of the 
Prior, no doubt prompted by premonition of the coming storm, he obtained 
an absolution from Hen. VIII. under the seal of the King's Vicar-General 
ist April, 1538 ; and in the same year he surrendered the Norwich monastery 
to the King, who refounded it and made prior Castleton the first dean. 

The manor was acquired in 1544 by Sir Robert Southwell from John 
Gresham, son and heir of Sir Richard Gresham.^ The fine included also the 
Manor of Yaxley. On the death of Sir Robert Southwell in 1558 the manor 
passed to his son and heir, Thomas Southwell, and from him in 1567 to his 
son and heir, Sir Robert Southwell, and from him in 1599 passed to Sir 
Thomas Southwell as the main manor. 

' Harl. MSS. 607. ^ Fine, Easter, 36 Hen. VIII. 

"S.P. 1538 i. 652. 



54 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

The site of the priory and the estate afterwards came to the family 
of Thurston/ who had their residence there in the time of Queen Elizabeth, 
and were a family, as Page expresses it; " of good repute." John Thurston 
held the manor at the end of the i6th century, and letters of his to B. Gawdy, 
1586 and 1588," and to W. Foster in 1588,^ will be found amongst the 
Egerton MSS.in the British Museum. John Thurston contributed £2'^ to 
the defence of the country when threatened with the Spanish Armada. 
He probably built the manor house on the site of the demolished priory. 
The Rev. C. R. Manning, in a paper read before the Suffolk Institute in 
1888, gave the following interesting account of the house : — 

"The house in the main, the original Elizabethan one, was probably 
built by this John Thurston on the site of the demolished priory. It has a 
garden front with some good moulded timber, and a large panelled room 
to the left of the porch entrance, over which is another panelled room, with 
the arch for a fireplace, and round the upper part of the walls of this chamber 
were paintings of the arms of the Thurston family and their alliances, 
which, it is much to be regretted, have been papered over some 12 or 15 
years ago. In the porch are four large wooden figures of a semi-classical 
style. They are apparently Elizabethan, and may have guarded the stair- 
case or entrance hall. One is in the costume of a Roman soldier, with a 
crown on his head, and a starry globe and compasses in his hand. The 
second is a somewhat similar figure, but naked, and with a lion's skin 
wrapped round him. He is not crowned, but has a similar starry globe, 
without any compasses. The third is a female, holding a sheaf of corn and 
a sickle, perhaps " Autumn " or Ceres ; and the fourth a female with a 
basket of flowers and a rose on her breast, perhaps " Summer." The wall 
next the road is of old materials, but otherwise there are no remains of any- 
thing older than the domestic buildings of the i6th century." 

John Thurston died seised of the manor 28th Nov. 1606,. aged 89, 
when it passed to his nephew and heir, John Thurston, who died 2nd Dec. 
1613. We next find the manor vested in Sir John Prescott, who died in 
1640, from which time the manor has devolved in the same course as the 
main Manor of Hoxne and is now vested in Lady Bateman. 

A Hoxne Manor is mentioned in the inquis. p.m. of Edward Cornwallis, 
who died 3rd Sept. 15 10, leaving William his brother next heir.* 



' Inquis. p.m. of John Thurston, of Hoxne, 'Egerton, 2713. 

32 and 33 Hen. VIH., is referred to ^Ih. 

in the loth Rep. of the Deputy ♦I.P.M., 7 Hen. VHI. 
Keeper. App. ii. p. 127. 




KELSALE. 55 

KELSALE. 

|W0 manors were held here in Saxon times. The first 
was held by Roger Bigot in demesne, that which Norman 
held in the Confessor's time, and consisted of 4 carucates of 
land, 10 villeins, 7 bordars, 3 ploughteams in demesne and 
10 belonging to the men, 5 acres of meadow, wood for the 
support of 60 hogs, 2 beasts, 30 hogs, and 25 sheep, also a 
church with 30 acres and a ploughteam, valued formerly at 
lOOs. At the time of the Survey the villeins had increased to 15, the bordars 
to 17, and the sheep to 100, while an additional 3 rouncies are mentioned. 

In the same township was a manor held in demesne by Roger Bigot, con- 
sisting of 2 carucates of land, 5 villeins, 4 bordars, 2 ploughteams in demesne 
and 5 belonging to the men, and 3 acres of meadow, valued formerly at 60s., 
when it was held by Ulveva. At the time of the Survey the villeins had 
increased to 7 and the bordars to 9. 

In that manor which Norman used to hold were 35 freemen having 
power to sell and give their lands, over whom Roger Bigot held in demesne 
by soc, sac, and all customs. They had 3 carucates of land, 12 ploughteams, 
an acre of meadow, and at the time of the Survey a market of the King's 
gift. The freemen were formerly valued at £4, and the manor with the 
freemen was valued at the time of the Survey at £24, and the other manor 
at £8. The whole was ij leagues long and a league broad, and paid in a 
gelt /\2d. The soc and sac belonged to Roger Bigot.' 

Robert Malet held here i freeman under commendation, and he had 
30 acres and i bordar, formerly having i ploughteam but at the time of the 
Survey half a team, valued at 5s. Of this Roger Bigot had the soc.^ 

Manor of Kelsale. 

The lordship of the parish appears to have been included amongst 
the 117 manors received from King William I. by Roger Bigot, Earl of 
Norfolk, as his share of the spoil. He was founder of the priory of the 
Virgin Mary and St. Andrew, at Thetford, and gave to that monastery 
amongst other things 20,000 herrings from Cheressala or Kelsale and £20 
rent in land to be assigned when be pleased. The manor passed in the 
same way as the Manor of Framlingham, in Loes Hundred, through the 
Bigots and vested in the Crown. 

Ministers' Accounts of the place in the hands of Roger Bigot, Earl of 
Norfolk, 52 Hen. III. to 23 Rich. II. will be found in the Public Record 
Ofi&ce.^ The manor is specifically mentioned in the inquis. p.m. of Roger 
le Bigod, Earl of Norfolk, in 1270.* 

In 1313 we find on the Patent Rolls a commission issued touching the 
persons who forcibly broke the parks of AUce, late wife of Roger le Bigot, 
Earl of Norfolk, and Marshal of England, at Kelsale and Stowe by " Boug," 
hunted there and carried away deer.^ Alice's husband had died in 1307, 
and an extent of the manor will be found in his inquis. p.m.' 

In 1317 the manor was granted by the Crown to Thomas de Brotherton, 
Earl of Norfolk. Edward de Montecuto and Alice his wife seem to have 
held in 1338, for on the Originalia Rolls for this year we find that the King 

'Dom. ii. 3306. ♦I.P.M., 34 Hen. III., File 38 (17). 

^Dom. ii. 3106. 'Pat. Rolls, 7 Edw. II. pt. i. 2i. 

3 Bundle 1000, No. 8,23; Bundle looi, ^I.P.M., 35 Edw. I. 46. 
No. I. 



56 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

assigned to them, with the assent of John de Segrave and Margaret his wife, 
another daughter of Thomas, late Earl of Norfolk, the Manors of Kelsale, 
Bungay, and Staverton, the Hundred of Loes, and a piece of land called 
Kaye, in Ipswich.' They held until 1361,^ when Mary, Countess of Norfolk, 
and widow of Thomas de Brotherton, held the same. In 1364 the manor 
was vested in William de Ufford in right of his wife Joan, daughter and 
heir of Edward Montecuto and Alice his wife, daughter of Thomas de 
Brotherton. She died in 1375. The lordship then passed in the same 
course as that of Framlingham, in Loes Hundred, until the latter part of 
the reign of Queen Elizabeth. The only particulars specially relating to this 
manor which need be specified are : — 

1400. Thomas, Duke of Norfolk. I. P.M., i Hen. IV. 71a, 72. 

1433. John, Duke of Norfolk. I. P.M., 11 Hen. VI. 43. 

1436. John, Duke of Norfolk, first court. 

1448. John, Archbishop of Canterbury, Humphrey, Duke of Buckingham, 
and others cof coffees, first court. 

1461. John, Duke of Norfolk, and Eleanor his wife. I.P.M., i Edw. IV. 46. 

1477. John, late Duke of Norfolk. I.P.M., 17 Edw. IV. 58. 

1485. The keeping of the park of Kelsale saved by Act of Parliament to 
John Martyndale, and the following year, as we learn from the State 
Papers^ and the Patent Rolls, a grant was made to the said John 
Martyndale for life of the office of keeper of the park of Kelsale 
Manor, " whiche John, Duke of Norfolk, late occupied."* 

1488. Confirmed by Act of Parliament to Duke of Norfolk. Rolls of 

Parliament vi. 411. lb. 529 (1502). 

1489. John, Archbishop of Canterbury, and others co-feoffees, first court. 
1492. See Patent Rolls, 5 Hen. VII. 15. 

1517. Richard, Bishop of Winchester, first court. 

1529. Henry, Earl of Northumberland, Ralph, Earl of Westmoreland, 

and others co -feoffees to the use of Elizabeth, Duchess of Norfolk, 

wife of Thomas, Duke of Norfolk, for her life. 
1549. William Hunynge, first court, after purchase from Lord Grey. 
^554- Thomas, Duke of Norfolk, first court, after his imprisonment by 

Hen. VIII., and his release by Queen Mary. 
1555. Elizabeth, Duchess of Norfolk, widow of Thomas, late Duke of 

Norfolk, first court. 
1559. Thomas, Duke of Norfolk, Earl Marshal, son of Henry, Earl of 

Surrey and grandson of Thomas above, first court after coming 

of age. 
1567. Thomas, Duke of Norfolk and Elizabeth his wife, first court. 
1569. Sir Thomas Cornwalys, Sir Nicholas le Strange, Thomas Tymperley, 

William Barker, Robert Higford, and Edward Pecok, clerk, 

feoffees of Thomas, Duke of Norfolk, first court. 
1572. John Blenerhaysett, Wilham Dix, William Courtrell, and Laurence 

Banastre, assignees of Thomas, late Duke of Norfolk, for the lives 

of Philip, Earl of Arundell, and Lord Thomas and Lord William 

Howard, his sons, first court. 

1588. Edward Carew, John Holdiche, Richard Godfrey, and John Holland, 

on the demise of Philip, Earl of Arundell, for 60 years, first court. 

1589. The Queen, first court. 

- 0. 12 Edw. III. 22. 3 Privy Seal, i Hen. VII. No. 54. 

» I.P.M., Edward, son of Edward de * Pat. Rolls, i Hen. VII. pt. i. 12 (24). 
Montecuto, 35 Edw. III. pt. ii. 7, 



KELSALE. 57 

In 1611 John Holland held his first court on the purchase of the manor 
from Thomas, Earl of Arundell, and Thomas, Earl of Suffolk. He was 
succeeded by Sir Thomas Holland, who held his first court in 161 2. He had 
licence to alien to John Bence, of Ringsfield, who held his first court for 
the manor in 1620. He married Mary, daughter of Edmund French, of 
Kelsale, and died in 1635, when the manor passed to his son and heir, John 
Bence, of Ringsfield. A fine of the manor and advowson was levied by 
him 24th May, 1641.' In the " Kelshall" Bill of 1678 there is a proviso 
saving to the lord of the manor, the fines, rents, and services custo^i^ary in 
the manor.* John Bence was succeeded by Edward Bence, who held his 
first court in 1681, and was succeeded by John Bence, who in 171 9 devised 
the manor to his nephew, Alexander Bence, of Thorington Hall, from 
which time to the present the manor has passed in the same course as 
the Manor of Thorington, in Blything Hundred. Extract from a Court 
Roll in 1742 will be found amongst the Additional Charters in the British 
Museum.^ 

Among the Chancery Proceedings is a claim by Nicholas NoUeth to 
freeholds in Kelsale and copyholds held of this manor, entailed by Nicholas 
NoUeth, plaintiff's grandfather.* 



' Fine, 17 Car. I. pt. ii. 7. 'Add. Ch. 10443 

' 9th Rep. Hist. Com. pt. ii, 115. * C.P. ii. 270. 



U 




58 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

LAXFIELD. 

MANOR was held here in Saxon times by Edric. It con- 
sisted of 6 carucates of land and 80 acres, 14 villeins, 14 
bordars, 4 ploughteams in demesne and 14 belonging to the 
men. Also wood to support 260 hogs, 27 acres of meadow, 
5 beasts, 40 hogs, 6 sheep, and 24 goats. Also a church with 
43 acres and half a ploughteam. At the time of the Survey 
this manor was held by Robert Malet's mother of the Queen's 
fee, and several details were different. 

The villeins had gradually decreased, first to 8 and then to 3, the 
bordars had increased to 37, the ploughteams in demesne had been gradually 
reduced to 3 and 2, and those belonging to the men were reduced to 11, 
while the hogs had come down to 30. The value was formerly ;^i5, but 
only ;;^8 at the time of the Survey. It was i^ leagues long and a league broad, 
and paid in a gelt 6\d. 

Of this manor Walter held 3 villeins with 50 acres valued at 20s. as 
part of the above valuation, and Loernic held 40 acres valued at los. as 
part also of the same valuation.' 

Manor of Laxfield. 

This parish in the reign of the Confessor was possessed, as we have seen, 
by the great landowner, Edric, who assumed his surname therefrom. He 
was also lord of the Honor of Eye, and was deprived of all his possessions 
by the Conqueror, who granted the major part of them, including this 
parish, to Robert Malet, who gave it to the abbey of Leiston. There it 
remained until the Dissolution, when it reverted to the Crown, and was 
granted by King Hen. VIII. to Chas. Brandon, Duke of Suffolk, in 1536, 
as part of the possessions of Leiston abbey. He regranted the same to 
the Crown in exchange for other lands in 1538.' 

The manor subsequently belonged to Sir John Wingfield, of a family 
owning land in the parish from a much earlier date. One John Wingfield 
had obtained from King Edw. IV. a charter for a weekly market and fair 
in Laxfield,^ so their holding in the parish must have been of some extent. 
The church, with its steeple, is a handsome edifice, and from the arms of 
the Wingfields appearing in different parts of the building a member of 
that family is supposed to have been the chief contributor to the cost of 
the erection. The church and porch are considered to be of earlier date. 

Sir John Wingfield was succeeded in 1540 by his son and heir, Sir 
Anthony. Amongst the Chancery Proceedings is an action by Thos. 
Fowks against John Smith to support title by purchase to freeholds and 
copyholds in Laxfield held of this Sir Anthony Wingfield, lord of the manor, 
and purchased by plaintiff of Robert Smith deceased." Sir Anthony Wing- 
field died 2oth Aug. 1552,' when the manor passed to his son and heir. 
Sir Robert Wingfield, on whose death in 1596 it vested in his son and heir. 
Sir Anthony Wingfield, who in 1602 sold it to Sir Edward Coke, Lord Chief 
Justice.® He was succeeded in the lordship by his 2nd son. Sir Robert 
Coke, from whom the manor descended in the same course as the Manor 
of Aldham, in Cosford Hundred, to Thomas Coke, Earl of Leicester, who 
died in 1759. 

'Dom. ii. 3286. "C.P. i. 310. 

"S-P. 30 Hen. VIII. ii. 1182 (iSa). 'I.P.M., 15th April, 7 Edw. VI. 65. 

3 Chart. Rolls, 11-14 Edw. IV. 8, ^¥m&, Hil. 44 Eliz. 



LAXFIELD. 



59 



The Earl presented to the church in 1719, but in 1745 the presentation 
to the Hving was made by Lord Lovel. The manor was subsequently pur- 
chased by Sir Joshua Vanneckj Bart., who died in 1770, and from this time 
the manor has devolved in the same course as the Manor of Heveningham, 
in Blything Hundred. In June, 1845, the manor was offered for sale, it 
being then stated that the fines and quit rents on an average of the 14 
previous years amounted to £106. In 1853, however, we find the manor 
had passed to, and was vested in, Thomas Mayhew, and in 1885 was in the 
Misses Crabtree. It is now vested in Henry Edwin Garrod, of The Grove, 
Diss, Norfolk. 

Manor of Studhagh or Stodhagh. 

This lordship belonged to Henry de Swinesthorp in the time of King 
John, he having received the same as a gift from that King.' From him 
the manor passed to his son and heir, Richard de Swinesthorp, who had a 
grant of a market in his manor here from the King in 1226.'' The manor 
was stiU vested in this Richard in 1236,^ and in 1275 was vested in John de 
Swinesthorp" who sold it. There are three fines levied — 1309, 1314, and 
1347 — of the Manor of Laxfield, and we cannot say more than that these 
probably relate to this Manor of Laxfield : — 

(i) 1309. — Wm. de Wetheringsett and Joan his wife v. William Jayot 
and Joan his wife, of the fourth part of the manor.^ 

(2) 1314. — John of the Bregge, of Laxfield, and Emma his wife v. 

Robert Osbern, of Tatyngston, and Isabella his wife, of a fourth 
part of the manor .^ 

(3) 1347. — Robert Swan, parson of Saxmundham church, Herbert, 

parson of Spykesworth church, John, vicar of Laxfield church, 
and Thomas de Colne v. Emma, who was wife of John atte Brigge, 
of Laxfield, and Adam his son, of a fourth part of the manor .^ 

A hundred years later, in 1375, the manor was vested in Sir Philip 
DeneySj for that year he conveyed it to Sir Robert Carbonel and Margaret 
his wife.^ Sir Robert Carbonel died in 1397,^ when the manor passed to his 
son and heir. Sir John Carbonel, whose will is dated ist Jan. 1422-3," and 
proved two years later. Sir John Carbonel by his will directed that in 
case he and his wife Margaret should die without heirs male Richard his 
son (probably by a former marriage) and his heirs male should have this, 
manor and that of Walpole, and if Richard should die without heirs male 
that the manor should go to his own right heirs. The son. Sir Richard 
Carbonel, succeeded and died in 1429, when the manor went to his son and 
heir, John Carbonel. From an inquis. taken 10 Hen. VII." and probably 
relating to the manor, we learn that Thomas Kebyll and others being seised 
in 1473 gave an annuity of £^ out of Laxford, Flempton, and Westowe 
Manors to Nicholas Geddyng for life, and the same year annuities of £20 
and ^o marks to Margaret, wife of Peter Conyars, and Thomasine, wife of 
Robert Geddyng. 



' H.R. ii. 186. 

« Close Rolls, 10 Hen. III. 22. 

3 Chart. Rolls, 20 Hen. HI. 9. 

*H.R. ii. 186. 

5 Feet of Fines, 3 Edw. II. 35. 

«Feet of Fines, 8 Edw. II. 34. 

''Feet of Fines, 21 Edw. III. 29. 



^Harl. 49, 0. 33. 
9I.P.M., 21 Rich. II. 14. 
"As to these Caxbonels, see Badingham 
Hall Manor, Badingham, in this 
Hundred. 
" I.P.M., 10 Hen. VII. looi, 1018. 



6g the manors of SUFFOLK. 

Thomas Kebyll and others in 1474 demised the manor to Anne 
Geddyng for Hfe, remainder to Robert Gedding. Robert survived, and in 
1490 on an agreement between himself and Robert Drury for erection of 
houses in Laxfield, enfeoffed trustees to the use of Robert Drury for Hfe 
and two years more, and then to the use of himself, Drury paying certain 
rents. Robert Geddyng died 26th Oct. 1493, leaving Margery, aged 5, his 
daughter and heir.' 

" Stodhaugh, in Laxfield," is mentioned in the will of Sir John Brewse, 
of Little Wenham, Knt., dated ist Aug. 1582, and is devised by him to 
his son, Robert Brewse. There was, however, a manor of this name in 
Little Wenham, and one would rather have imagined such to have been the 
subject of the gift. 

Later we find the manor vested in Wolfran Smith, of Studhagh, a 
younger son of John Smith, of Parkfield, and Margaret his wife, daughter 
of Wolfran Dowsing. Wolfran Smith died in 1644, when the manor passed 
to his son and heir, Wolfran Smith, M.D. He died 7th April, 1684, at the 
age of 78, without issue, when the manor apparently went to his cousin, 
Samuel Smith, son of WiUiam Smith and Ehzabeth his wife, daughter of 
John, son of Alexander Bence, of Aldeburgh, which William Smith was son 
of John Smith, of Parkfield, and Alice Borrett his wife, which last John 
Smith was the elder brother of the first-named Wolfran Smith. From 
Samuel Smith the manor passed to his son and heir, John Smith, who by 
his will dated25thjune,i7i8,devisedhis Manorof"Stadhaugh,in Laxfield," 
and all his freehold lands in that parish, upon trusts, that the rents should 
first be applied in the erection of a convenient schoolhouse in the parish, 
and he directed that, towards the endowment of the school, and for the 
teaching and educating of twenty poor boys of the parish in reading, writing, 
and accounts, the yearly sum of £40, part of the income of the estate, should 
be paid to some learned and proper schoolmaster, who should have no 
preferment in the church or otherwise, so as to take him from his attendance 
in the school, and that the yearly sum of £40, other part of the income, 
should be yearly applied towards putting out apprentice eight of such 
twenty poor children, to some good handycraft trade, at £5 per head, and 
the overplus of the income he ordered to be preserved towards keeping the 
estate and premises in repair and good heart, and if not required for that 
purpose, to be yearly employed as an additional sum towards the preferring 
such eight poor children so to be put apprentice as aforesaid to better trades 
and employments. Under this devise the churchwardens and overseers 
receive the profits of the Manor of Stadhagh, amounting to £3. 13s. qd. 
a year in quit rents and free rents, and some occasional fines of small 
amount ; and the rent of the testator's other property, consisting of a 
farm, comprising a house, outbuildings, and about 112 acres of land. Sums 
for the support of a Sunday school, and to a schoolmistress for teaching 
poor girls to read, knit, and sew, have been paid from these funds, and the 
Commissioners for enquiring concerning charities recommended a further 
extension of its benefits, which has since been adopted in an increase of the 
number of scholars, both boys and girls .'' 

Page says that in 1662 John Borrett was owner of Stadhagh and 
resided there. He was a descendant on his mother's side of Serjeant Baker, 
and of a sister of Lord Chief Justice Coke. John Borrett died in 1 691. He 
could not, however, have held the manor. 

' LP.M., 10 Hen. VII. looi, 1018. = Page, Hist, of Suff. 409-10. 



LAXFIELD. 6i 

Manor of Laxfield Rectory. 

This was the lordship of Robert Malet, and was given by him to the 
monastery of Eye. It reverted to the Crown on the dissolution of the 
religious houses, and was granted to Edmund Bedingfield in 1536 as part 
of the possessions of the monastery of Eye. 

Paul Bayning, of St. Olaves, Hart Street, London, merchant, alder- 
man and sheriff of that city, held the manor. He married Susanna, 
daughter and coheir of Edward Noiden, of Mistley, co. Essex, and died ist 
Oct. 1616, when the manor passed to his son and heir, Paul Bayning, who was 
in the lifetime of his father on the 24th Sept. 1611, created a baronet, 
being subsequently 19th July, 1614, knighted. In 1617 he was Sheriff 
of Essex, and the 27th Feb. 1627-8, created Baron Bayning, of Horkesley, 
CO. Essex, and 8th March following. Viscount Bayning, of Sudbury, co. 
Suffolk. He married Anne, Dowager Viscountess Dorchester, daughter 
of Sir Henry Glemham,of Glemham, and dying 29th July, 1620,' the manor 
passed to his son and heir, Paul Ba5m.ing, 2nd Viscount Bayning, of Sudbury, 
and Baron Ba5niing, of Horkesley. He married 25th Aug. 1634, Penelope, 
only daughter and heir of Sir Robert Naunton, Master of the Court of 
Wards and Liveries and Serjeant of State to James I. He died nth June, 
1638, at Little Bentley Hall, Essex." He left two daughters and coheirs, 
who both died without issue — Ann, ist wife of Aubrey de Vere, 20th Earl 
of Oxford, and Penelope, wife of the Hon. John Herbert. The manor passed 
to the elder daughter Ann, who died 27th Sept. 1659, ^^^ ^^r husband in 
1702. A hundred years later, in 1804, we find the manor vested in Joshua, 
Lord Huntingfield, who died in 1816, from which time the manor has 
devolved in the same course as the main manor, and is now vested in Henry 
Edwin Garrod, of Diss. 

Manor of Wathersdale. 

This was the lordship of Robert de Rous in 1305 and remained for two 
centuries in that family. He was succeeded by William Rous, of Denning- 
ton, who married Adeline, daughter and heir of John Clouting, of Laxfield, 
son of John Clouting and Elizabeth his wife, daughter and heir of Sir William 
Phelips, of Dennington, and Juliana his wife, daughter and heir of Sir 
Thomas Erpingham. William Rous was succeeded by his son and heir, 
Robert Rous, who married Margaret, daughter and heir of Richard Roys, 
of North Walsham, co. Norfolk, and was succeeded by his son and heir, 
Reginald or Regnold Rous, who married Elizabeth, daughter of — Denar- 
ston or Denston, and dying in 1464 was succeeded by his 6th son. Sir Henry 
Rous, who married Agnes, daughter of — Denton, of Oxfordshire, and on 
his death the manor passed to his son and heir. Sir William Rous, who 
married AUce, daughter of Sir John Sulyard, of Wetherden, Chief Justice 
of England in 1485, and on his death the manor passed to his son and heir. 
Sir Anthony Rous, the purchaser of Henham Hall. A fine was levied of 
this manor in 1534 by Reginald Rous against Sir Wm. Rous.^ Sir Anthony 
Rous died 8th Feb. 1545,* when the manor passed to his son and heir, 
Thomas Rous,^ who apparently sold this manor, for in 1550 we find it vested 
in Nicholas Smith, and from him it passed to Simon Smith. 

'Will i3th July, proved 14th Oct. 1629; ^Fine, Mich. 26 Hen. VIII. 

I.P.M., 5 and 6 Car. I. '•I.P.M., i Edw. VI. 

« WiU 6th Dec. 1634, proved 9th Oct, 1638. ' See Henham Manor, in Blything Hun- 
dred. 



62 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

In 1601 the manor was vested in Robert Davy, and in 1605 in Thomas 
Greene, and passed from him to his widow Susanna, and then to her son and 
heir George, and from him to his son and heir, Thomas Greene. Thomas 
Greene resided at Wilby, and married Rebecca Mayhew, who died 29th 
Aug. 1728. Thomas Greene died in 1730, when the manor passed to his 
son and heir, Thomas Greene. He married Jane Mould, and was buried at 
Wilby 24th Sept. 1754, the manor passing to his son and heir, Thomas Greene. 
He married Francis Martin, and died 6th Oct. 1794, when the manor passed 
to his widow, and on her death, 27th July, 1819, to her son, Thomas Greene, 
who married Catherine, daughter of Col. Thomas Hartcup, afterwards 
Lieutenant-General. Thomas died in 1825, when the manor devolved on 
his son and heir, a 5th Thomas Greene in succession. He married 
Georgiana, daughter of George Mordaunt, of Aspall, and died in London, 
i8th Nov. 1850, at the age of 39. 

Manor of Burt's or Bourt's Hall. 

This is probably the " Laxfield Manor " of which Thomas de Wynge- 
feld and Margaret his wife were seised in the time of Edw. HI. There are 
three fines in 1361 and 1362 which probably relate to this manor of Laxfield. 

(i) 1361. — ^Thomas de Wyngefeld and Margaret his wife and John 
their son v. John de Brysyngham and Margaret his wife.' 

(2) 1362. — Thomas de Wyngefeld v. John, son of John de Mendham, 

of a third part of the manor." 

(3) 1362. — Thomas de Wyngefeld v. Roger Barham and Rose his wife 

of a third part of a fourth part of the manor .^ 

Sir John Wingfield died seised of the manor in 1481,* from which time 
to 1552 when his great-grandson. Sir Robert inherited, the manor passed 
in the same course as the Manor of Thorp Hall, Hasketon, in Carlford 
Hundred. 

The manor next vested in Henry North, who resided at Bourt's Hall. 
He was the son of Sir Henry North and brother of Sir Roger North, of 
Great Finborough.' Henry North married Sarah, only daughter and heir 
of John Jenour, of Laxfield, and his estate was valued at ;£8oo per annum. 
They are both buried in the vestry of the parish church of Laxfield with 
three of their children who died young. Henry North died in 1623, when 
this manor went to his son and heir, Henry North. Amongst the Tanner 
MSS. in the Bodleian may be seen a letter dated in 1640 from this Henry 
North to John Hobart as to his, the writer's, nephew, Henry North,^ and 
another in 1647 from him to Archbishop Sancroft as to removing from 
Cambridge to the Inns of Court .^ 

This Henry North^ died in 1674, when the manor went, under his will 
dated 4th Feb. 1673, to his widow Elizabeth for life, and then to Edw. 
Norton and one Nicholson in trust for sale and to pay out of the proceeds to 
Elizabeth Carey, Anne Freeman, Dorothy, Martha, and Sarah North £100 
apiece. Elizabeth (her son Thomas having died without issue in 
August, 1679) with her daughters Elizabeth, Anne, Dorothy, Martha, and 

'Feet of Fines, 35 Edw. III. 11. Finborough Magna Manor, in Sto\V 

*Feet of Fines, 36 Edw. III. 33. Huodred. 

^Feet of Fines, 36 Edw. III. 34. ^Tanner, cxv. 131. 

''I.P.M., 21 Edw. IV. 59. 7 Tanner, cccxiv. 6i." 

'See Badmondesfield Manor, Wickham- ^See Manor of Woodbridge Priory, in 
brook, in Risbridge Hundred, and Loes^Hundrcd. 



LAXFIELD. 63 

Sarah North, sold the manor for ;£i,700 in 1683 to John Lee, of Laxfield, 
timber master, from whom it passed in 1697 to his only son, John Lee, by 
will. John Lee made his will 20th Feb. 1726-7,' and was buried at Laxfield 
28th Sept. 1728, when the manor passed by his will to his eldest son, John 
Lee, who died in 1770, having by his will dated 13th Nov. 1769,'' devised 
this manor to his son and heir, John Lee, he paying his mother Elizabeth 
during life £20, to his uncle, Charles Lee, £40 for life, and to his daughter 
Sarah, wife of Thomas Parker, a legacy. On his death the manor passed 
to his son and heir, John Lee, who married Mary Bedingfield, and died 3rd 
March, 1789, at the age of 53 without issue, when the manor passed to his 
widow, who died 20th June, 1800, at the age of 62. The manor was then 
purchased for £6,000 by — Julians, who had married a daughter of Charles 
Lee, 2nd son of John Lee, who died in 1770. 

Amongst the Exchequer Papers mentioned in the ist Rep. on Public 
Records [iSooP is a rental of premises, parcel of the Manor of Laxfield, 
in the 37 Hen. VIIL 



' Proved 6th March, 1728. 3 Page 184. 

'Proved 38th Aug. 1770. 




64 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

MENDHAM. 

|HERE were two manors here in the time of the Confessor 
held by Uluric the thane. One consisted of a carucate of 
land and 40 acres, i villein, 6 bordars, a ploughteam in 
demesne and 3 belonging to the men, wood for the support 
of 100 hogs, 10 acres of meadow, and a mill. Also three 
men with 20 acres of land and a ploughteam (reduced to 
half at the time of the Survey). Also the fourth part of a 
church with 10 acres, and the men could give and sell their land. At the 
time of the Survey this manor was held by Roger de Poictou, when the 
bordars had increased to 10, and the ploughteams belonging to the men 
were reduced to i|-. The soc was in Hoxne. Hereto belonged 60 acres 
lying in Weybread, 2 villeins, 2 bordars, wood to support 6 hogs, and 
3 acres of meadow, valued at £4. 

Another holding of Roger de Poictou consisted of three freemen with a 
carucate of land, and of these William Malet was seised. Two were under 
the commendation of Robert Malet 's predecessor, and the third of Bishop 
Ailmar, with the fourth part of the land, i villein, 6 bordars (increased to 9 
at the time of the Survey), wood to support 60 hogs, and 5 acres of meadow. 

Another holding of Roger de Poictou was of 3 acres and half a plough- 
team, reduced to 2 oxen at the time of the Survey, formerly belonging to 
two men. 

The last holding of Roger de Poictou was a freeman with 15 acres. 
In the time of the Confessor Roger de Poictou' s predecessor Ulf had com- 
mendation and at that time there was half a ploughteam as well. It was 
valued at 56s. Over the whole the soc was in Hoxne Bishops.' Goodrich 
the steward held here a bordar with 4 acres, valued at i2d.' 

The second manor was held at the time of the Survey by Frodo of 
of the Abbot of St. Edmunds, and consisted of 2 carucates, 19 acres of land, 
2 villeins, 18 bordars, a serf, 2 ploughteams in demesne and 6 belonging to 
the men, 18 acres of meadow, a mill and wood to support 360 hogs. Of 
live stock there were i rouncy, 41 hogs, 40 sheep, and 36 goats. At the 
time of the Survey these details were slightly altered, the bordars were in- 
creased to 26 and the ploughteams belonging to the men to 8, there was 
wood sufficient to support 300 hogs, and there were 10 beasts. Also 6 soc- 
men had half a carucate of land, 3 ploughteams, and 2 acres of meadow, 
with wood to support 3 hogs. There were 3 acres valued at 6d. held by a 
freeman. These belonged to the abbot with soc, sac, and commendation, 
nor could they give or sell their land without his licence. There was also 
a church with 20 acres. The manor was valued at £^. los., and at the 
time of the Survey at £12. 4s. It was a league and 9 quarentenes long and 
a league broad, and paid in a gelt i$d. Others had lands therein.^ 

Belonging to the land of Robert Malet' s mother held of the Queen's 
fee were two estates in this place. The first consisted of a carucate of land 
and 5 bordars, formerly held by a freeman under commendation, and under 
him a freeman held 3 acres, a ploughteam in demesne, 2 ploughteams 
(reduced to 2 oxen at the time of the Survey), 5 acres of meadow, and wood 
sufficient to support 100 hogs. Also a church with 8 acres, and the eighth 
part of another with 5 acres. 



'Dom. ii. 349. 3Dom. ii. 368. 

Dom. ii. 3556, 



2 



MENDHAM. 65 

The second estate consisted of a socman with 12 acres, valued at 25s. 
(increased to 30s. at the time of the Survey). Humfrey held this, the soc 
being in Hoxne.' 

Another estate was that of Ulf the thane in the Confessor's time, and 
later Ailmar and Arfast. It consisted of a carucate of land, a villein, 10 
bordars, a ploughteam in demesne, and 3 ploughteams (reduced to i|- at 
the time of the Survey), 6 acres of meadow, wood sufficient to support 60 
hogs,and one mill. There were also two freemen having 11 acres by commenda- 
tion and half a ploughteam. Also the eighth part of a church with 40 
acres and half a ploughteam. More land belonged to it but was accounted 
for in Norfolk. The value was formerly 30s. but was doubled at the time 
of the Survey, when it became part of the fee of the Bishop of Thetford.' 

Robert Malet had a small estate in this place consisting of 10^ acres of 
meadow valued at 24«?.,the soc belonging to the bishop. It had formerly 
been held by a socman.' 

Manor of Mendham Hall. 

Mendham is situate on both sides of the River Waveney, which divides 
Suffolk from Norfolk, and consequently lies in the two counties, the principal 
lordships in both counties belonging to the abbey of St. Edmunds, having 
been given to it in the time of the Confessor by one Alfric Modercoppe, and 
were held by Frodo, the brother of Baldwin the abbot, whose descendants 
probably assumed the surname of Mendham. 

That part of the fee of St. Edmund which was situate on the Norfolk 
side is now comprised in the hamlet of Needham, and a large portion of the 
same fee in Suffolk was subsequently established into the now distinct 
parish or hamlet of Metfield. At the time of Rich. I., and for a long period 
after, the whole of this fee in Suffolk was held of the abbot by the Veres, 
Earls of Oxford, and under them by the lords of the manors into which it 
was divided. 

Mendham Hall was the lordship of the Abbot of St. Edmunds in Saxon 
days, and later was held by Nicholas de Mendham, who Davy states was 
enfeoffed by Hugh de Vere, and in 1205 it was held by William de Mendham. 
In 1239 Benedict, son of Serlo de Mendham, was lord, and in 1285 Thomas 
de Mendham. 

By 1312 John de Mendham died seised,* and the manor subsequently 
passed to his son, John de Mendham, who with Christiana his wife sold it to 
Sir John de Fressingfield, lord of King's Hall, in Mendham. He sold the 
manor to Sir Walter de Norwich, who died seised thereof in 1328. Sir 
Walter's daughter Cecily married Sir Roger de Huntingfield, to whom the 
manor passed. He died in 1337, when it devolved on his son and heir, 
William de Huntingfield, who died in 1376, but it is stated that the manor 
was settled upon Mendham Priory by the trustees of Roger de Huntingfield. 

The manor then passed to Mendham Priory, where it continued until 
the Dissolution, when it vested in the Crown, and Davy states it was granted 
to Charles Brandon, Duke of Suffolk, who in 1536 conveyed it to Richard 
Freston. This, however, does not appear to have been the case, for in the 
time of King Edw. VI. the Princess Mary, afterwards Queen of England, 
resided at Mendham Hall, and Page states that there was an inventory of 

'Dom. ii. 329&. ^Dom. ii. 3106. 

«Dom. ii. 3796. "I.P.M., 6 Edw. II. 24. 



66 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

the furniture used upon the occasion in the possession of the late Dawson 
Turner, of Yarmouth, the well-known collector. This inventory is now in 
the British Museum.' A copy of the inventory is printed in the Proceedings 
of the Suffolk Institute." 

In the reign of Queen Elizabeth the manor was held by Richard Smart, 
who died the 25th Aug. 1559, when it passed to his son, William Smart] 
then aged 30.^ 

Robert Smart was lord in 1609, and in 1625 Richard Smart, and he or 
his descendant sold the manor to Stephen Baxter, who held his first court 
30th April, 1655, from which time till 1737 the manor passed in the same 
course as the Priory Manor. The site of the manor was in that year pur- 
chased from Mr. Whittaker by the governors of Queen Anne's Bounty, 
in augmentation of the vicarage, but the manor is now said to be vested in 
John Sancroft Holmes, of Gawdy Hall, Redenhall with Harleston, co. 
Norfolk.* 

A fine was levied in 1533 of " Mendham Manor " by Thomas, Duke of 
Norfolk, and others against John Bull and others.^ The manor extended 
into Metfield, and the copyholds were very small. 

Arms of Smart : Erm. 3 chess rooks Gu. 2 and i. 

Manor of Mendham Priory. 

This was the inheritance of Roger de Poictou, Earl of Lancaster, in the 
time of William the Conqueror. The manor was probably vested in Wilham 
de Huntingfield, who died in 1155, and was certainly vested in his son, 
Roger de Huntingfield, who died in 1204, and then passed to his son and 
heir, William de Huntingfield, who married Isabella de Freville.^ 

The Red Book of the Exchequer informs us that William de Hunting- 
field's holding here was of one fee held of the Honor of Lancaster. This 
was in 1210 to 1212.^ He can hardly be the same William de Huntingfield 
who held land here at the time of the compiling of the Hundred RoUs.^ 
This latter is no doubt the defendant in a suit brought by William Peyk 
as to a tenement in Mendham as appears from the Patent Rolls in 1276.' 

William de Huntingfield died in 1220, and from this time to the death 
of William de Huntingfield in 1376 without issue the manor passed in the 
same course as the Manor of Huntingfield, in Bly thing Hundred. The 
manor is specifically mentioned in the inquis. p.m. of Roger de Huntingfield 
in 1256,'° and of Roger de Huntingfield in 1302 or 1303." Canon Raven com- 
municated to the East Anglian Notes and Queries in 1894 a curious document 
which had been sent by Mr. W. H. Strickland to Mr. Rider Haggard, by 
which this Roger de Huntingfield handed over to the Manor of Bungay, 
Alveva Brunllan, of Metfield, and her first-born Thomas, like so many 
chattels, save for the formality. It jnust have been given between 1283 
and 1302, and is as follows : Orriibz xpi fidelibs ad q's p'sens sc'ptu puen'it 
Rog de huntingfeud salute. Nou'it vniu'sitas nra me dedisse & c' 
cessisse & hac carta mea p'senti c'firmasse deo & eccl'ie see crucis de 

'Add. 24124. 7132 B. I48d. 

"Vol. ii. p. 243. 8H.R. ii. 186. 

^I.P.M., 2 Eliz. pt. i. 147. 9 Pat. Rolls, 4 Edw. I. 3d. 

*See Walsham Hall post. '°I.P.M., 41 Hen. HI., 29, or File 20 (9). 

5 Fine, Trin. 25 Hen. VHI. " Extent, I.P.M., 31 Edw. I. 31. 
*See Huntingfield Manor in Blything 
Hundred. 



MENDHAM. (i^ 

Bung' &_scimonialibs ibidemdeo seruientibs Alueua vxore Rog'i Brunllan 
& Thoma filiu ei' p' mogenitu cu toto tenem'to suo q' de metenuerunt i 
villa deMedefeud ex p'tinenciis de Mendham i libam & pura & ppetua 
Elemosina p' saluteaie pr'is mei & m'ris mee & ancessor' et successor' 
meor'. Salvo ^ermco dni Regis S. Ad Wardam j den p annu Ad xcc sol. 
& ad Scutagiu dni Regis Ad. xx Sol. ij^. & ad plus plus & ad min' 
min'. Et ut donaco ista & c'firmaco stabilis ac Rata p' maneat p' me 
& he' dibs meis sigilli mei munimine corroboraui. 

Hiis f Will' de huntingfeud, Walt'o Malet petro Walt' Rob' d Hunting- 
feud, Will'o le Curtun, Hub' Walt' {sic), Alano de Wyresdale, Will'o Cantelu, 
G. d. {sic) Drokes, Ada fil' Gault', Walt' rege, Ada Sac, Will'o Sac, Mart. 
Sac, Godefrid' de linburne. At foot a good impression of the seal of Roger 
de Huntingfield, a mailed warrior on horseback.' 

This manor is also specifically mentioned in the inquis. p.m. of 
William de Huntingfield, who died in 1313. (Extent, I.P.M. 7 Edw. II. 
47.) On the Originalia Rolls in 1314 is an order to free the manor "formerly 
belonging to William de Huntyngfeld," and taken into the King's hands, in 
hands of Hugh le Despenser to whom the manor had been granted,* and on 
the Close Rolls of the following year we find an order to the escheator not 
to meddle with the manor, as William de Huntingfield held of Thomas, 
Earl of Lancaster, by knight's service, and Roger his son was 8 years old.^ 
The manor is also specifically mentioned in the inquis. p.m. of Roger de 
Hvmt5mgfield, who died in 1337," when the manor passed to his son and heir, 
William de Huntingfield. It is stated in the inquis. quod damnum in 1338 
that this Roger de Huntingfield and his ancestors were patrons of Mendham 
priory, a cell of the priory of Castle Acre, in Norwich diocese.^ William 
de Huntingfield died in 1376 seised of this manor and the advowson.^ He 
it was who probably gave the manor to the priory of Mendham, which 
enjoyed it until the Dissolution, when it passed to the Crown. Blomefield 
states that the monastery was founded in King Stephen's time, about 1140, 
by William, son of Roger de Huntingfield, with the consent of Roger, his 
son and heir, who gave the whole isle of Mendham (called Meadeu-Ham, 
or the village of Meadows) to the monks of Castle Acre, on condition that 
they should erect a church of stone and build a convent by it, and place at 
least eight of their monks there in a place called Hurst (or Bruniggehurst), 
being then a woody isle on the Suffolk side of the River Waveney. The 
founder further directed that it should be subordinate to Castle Acre priory, 
and he endowed it with various churches, rents, and homages. It 
consisted of monks of the Cluniac order. 

Two charters of the founder are extant, and are printed in the " Monas- 
ticon." By the first he gave to the house of Castle Acre " the island of St. 
Mary, of Mendham," with its appurtenances ; and in the second, by which 
he enlarged the endowment, he describes the recipients of his bounty as 
" the monks of Acre, dwelling at the island of Bruniggehurst." 

He made the first donation with a special agreement that at once as 
many brothers as should be necessary to rule the place should be settled 
in the island ; and afterwards as the place should be increased and improved, 
the number of monks should be augmented, until a convent of monks might 

•E.A. V. 193. ♦!.?.¥., II Edw. III. 47. 

"O. 7 Edw. II. 2. =I.Q.D., 13 Edw. III. 30. 

3 Close Rolls, 8 Edw. II. 28. «I.P.M., 50 Edw. III. 32. 



68 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

be placed there, to hold the order according to rule ; which should then be 
done as soon as possible. 

It was also stipulated that the same subjection which the church of 
Acre owed to the church of St. Pancras at Lewes, in Sussex, or the latter 
to the church at Cluni, in France, the same the abovesaid island should 
perform to the church of Acre ; and should pay in acknowledgment thereof 
half a mark of silver yearly. Yet, although in this subordinate state, few 
religious foundations, for privileges, magnificence, and architectural beauty, 
could vie with the priory of St. Mary of Mendham. 

The value of the estates of this priory at the taxation of Pope Nicholas 
in 1291 was, in six parishes in Norfolk £4. 12s. 2d., and in eight parishes 
in Suffolk {;j. 3s. j^d. — total, {rz. 15s. (^^d. At the Dissolution it was 
valued as part of the possessions of Castle Acre. It was granted to Charles 
Brandon, Duke of Suffolk, and by him conveyed to Richard Freston, by 
deed dated at Mendham, on the 3rd June, in the 28th of King Hen. VIII. 
[1537], and is made to Richard Freston in fee, charged with the payment 
to the said Duke, his heirs, and assigns, of an annual rent of £40. 

Charles Brandon appears at the time of the Dissolution to have had 
some claim to the patronage of this priory, in right of his 4th wife, Catherine, 
Lady Willoughby, of Eresby ; she being lineally descended from Cicely, 
wife of John, Lord Willoughby, the eldest sister and coheir of Sir William 
de Ufford, Earl of Suffolk, on whom the same had been settled by William, 
Lord Huntingfield, the last male descendant of the founder. 

After the decease of Sir Richard Freston, by virtue of some settlement 
made by him, the house and demesnes, with the manors in the Suffolk 
portion, called Mendham Priory and Kingshall, came to Michael Wentworth, 
of Rogersthorpe, in Yorkshire, and the manor of Densons, in Norfolk, to 
Richard Freston his son. The Frestons were a Yorkshire family, and con- 
nected by marriage with the Wentworths.' 

Michael Wentworth, who was cofferer to Hen. VI 1 1., resided at the 
mansion constructed out of the priory, and married Isabel, daughter and 
heir of Percival Whitley, of Whitley, and died 13th Oct. 1558, when the 
manor passed to his son and heir, Thos. Wentworth, who died in 1569.* 
Amongst the Chancery Proceedings in the time of Queen EUzabeth will be 
found an action respecting the manor between Jervys Wentworth and 
Thomas Wentworth.^ Four other actions in chancery relating to the manor 
in the time of Queen Elizabeth are between John Freston and Thomas 
Wentworth and another,* and between Roger Hogeson and Joan his wife 
and Brian Hollande,^ Nicholas Wheathie and Jane his wife y. Wm. Sparkes,^ 
and Thomas Wentworth v. Richard Freston and another.'' 

Thomas Wentworth married Susan, daughter of Christopher Hopton, 
of Armley Hall, co. York, and died about 1569, when the manor passed to 
his son and heir, Michael Wentworth. He in 1595, by deed dated 24th 
Oct., sold the manor and priory to Anthony Gosnold, of Clopton,^ who, 
two years later, by deed dated 29th May, 39 Eliz., conveyed the same to 
Robert Gosnold, of Ottley, and Anthony his son. 

'Amongst the Bodleian Charters we find 'I.P.M., D.K.R. 10 App. ii. 132.. 

a writ dated the i8th Nov. 26Hen. ^C.P. ser. ii. B. cxci. 83. 

VIII. [1534] of the King directed ■*€.?. ser. ii. B. Ixvi. 17. 

to the Sheriff of Suffolk, to the s c.P. ser. ii. B. Ixxxii. 17. 

effect that " Humphrey Wyngefelds ^ lb. B. clxxxviii. 18. 

andothershad recovered the Manors ''lb. B. cxciii. 13. 

of Mendham and Kyngesthall." ^Fine, Trin. 37 Eliz. 



MENDHAM. 69 

Robert Gosnold and Anthony, by feoffment dated 2nd Aug. 1598, 
conveyed the Manors of Mendham Priory and Mendham Kingshall, with the 
advowson and patronage of the vicarage of Mendham Priory, and all lands, 
tithes, &c., purchased of Wentworth, but expressly excepting the site of 
the priory and adjoining demesnes, to Thomas Laurence, of St. James, 
South Elmham, who sold them in 1602 to John Holland, son of Brian 
Holland, of Wortwell Hall, who held his first court 9th Oct. 1600, and on 
his death the manors passed to his son and heir, Sir Thomas Holland, of 
Quiddenham, who held his first court in 1619, when he is said to have sold 
them to Stephen Baxter's trustees. 

Sir Thomas Holland, however, sold to Edward Ward, of Mendham, " the 
site of Mendham Priory Manor now called Mendham's Hall," Ling's Hall 
meadow, &c., the park, the Manor of Mendham Hall, with the letes thereto 
belonging situate in Mendham, Withersdale, and Wayhade, " all which he 
purchased of Anthony Gosnold, of Clopton, Esq., Anthony Gosnold, of 
SwiUington, Robert Gosnold, of Ottley, and others," and the said Sir Thomas 
Holland and Dame Mary his wife sued a fine and passed a recovery to the 
use of the said Edward Ward the elder, and his heirs, together with the 
fishery in the river " Waynenth." 

William Barnard, Richard Frere, jun., and Tobias Frere, the 7th 
Oct. the same year, held their first court " by virtue of an agreement between 
them and Sir Thomas Holland, dated i6th July, i6ig. Stephen Baxter, 
with the said Wm. Barnard and Richard Frere, held a first court 13th 
April, 1626, and from Stephen the manor passed to his widow Cecilia for 
life, who held a court loth April, 1636. On her death the manor passed 
to her son and heir Stephen, who held his first court in 1638. He 
died in 1696, leaving four daughters and coheirs — Penelope, married to 
Edward Eyre ; Anne, afterwards wife of Robt. Drury ; a 3rd daughter 
married to Henry Stebbing; and Cecilia, married to Francis Gardiner. 
The whole ultimately vested in the Gardiners, and passed to Francis's son 
and heir, Stephen Gardiner, of Norwich, whose executor (or the executor 
of his father), Richard Beney, Recorder of Norwich, sold the same in 1729 
to the Rev. Thos. Whitaker, vicar of Fressingfield, on whose death in 1738 
it vested in his widow Ursula for life (her first court 9th Nov. 1738), and on 
her death in 1796 it passed to their grandson, the Rev. Thomas Whitaker, 
who sold the manor to John Ay ton, who in 1803 sold to Alexander Adair, 
of Flixton, and from this time to the present the manor has passed in the 
same course as the Manor of Cratfield Le Roos, in Blything Hundred, and 
is now vested in Capt. Sir Frederick Edward Shafto Adair, 4th Bart., of 
Flixton Hall, the present lord. 

The mansion and estate called the Priory, excepted on the sale by the 
Gosnolds to Thomas Laurence, were sold to Edward Ward, of Knoddishall, who 
had married the widow of Robt. Gosnold, daughter of Robert Forthe, of Had- 
leigh, who by deed dated 3rd Sept. 5 Chas. I. [1629] sold the same to Robert 
Green, of Rishangles,' for £2,470. Robert Green subsequently conveyed 
the manor to James Tyrell, his son-in-law. Tyrell resided at the priory, 
then called Mendham Hall, and died there in 1656, leaving two daughters 
his coheirs, one of whom, Elizabeth, married WilUam Rant, of Yelverton, 
in Norfolk, and through this marriage the estate came into the family of 
Rant, in a branch of which it long continued. 

'A copy of the parcels of this deed is in No. 2407 of the East Anglian 
Miscellany, nth Jan. 1908. 



70 



THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 



" In the Gentleman's Magazine for 1836, part ii., p. 601, is an account 
of this property, with engravings, containing a plan of the priory and 
some interesting architectural portions of the original buildings ; also some 
curious remains of paintings, with which the house was ornamented 
immediately after its conversion to a secular mansion ; communicated by 
J. A. Repton, from drawings taken shortly before the removal of the build- 
ings. The mansion formed out of the monastic buildings, in which were 
the paintings described by Mr. Repton, was probably the work of Sir 
Richard Freston, though it is doubtful whether he ever resided there, for 
having in the ist of King Edward VI. obtained a grant from the Crown of 
the manor and estate of Whitendon (or Wichendon) in the Norfolk part 
of Mendham (late parcel of the possession of the dissolved priory of the Holy 
Trinity, at Ipswich), he built a mansion there, where his descendants 
resided until the extinction of the family in the male line, in 1761. This 
estate was also purchased in 1824 by Alexander Adair, Esq.'" 

The deed of William, son of Roger de Huntingfield, founding the 
priory of Mendham, will be found amongst the Harl. MSS. in the British 
Museum,"" and deeds relating to the priory are referred to in the Proceedings 
of the Society of Antiquaries^ and abstracts relating to the priory will be 
found in the Bodleian.* This manor is referred to in the 38th Rep. of the 
Deputy Keeper of Records in 43 Eliz. amongst the Exch. Spec. Com.' 



Manor of Mendham Kingshall. 

This derived its name from being in the Crown and was settled by 
King Edward I. on Queen Eleanor. Subsequently it was in the possession 
of the de Veres, Earls of Oxford® until Sir Robert de Vere sold it to Sir 
John de Fressingfield, son of Seman de Fressingfield, in 1314. 

Particulars of the lands held by the Earls of Oxford in Mendham will 
be found amongst the Rawlinson MSS. in the Bodleian.^ Sir John Fressing- 
field held land here before he acquired this manor, for we find on the Patent 
Rolls in 1308 a commission issued on his complaint that John de Medefeld 
and others felled his trees and did damage at Mendham.* 

He sold this manor in 13 17 to Sir Walter de Norwich, of Mettingham 
Castle, who died in 1328, when it passed to his daughter Cecily, married to 
Sir Roger de Huntingdon, and from him in 1337' to his son and heir, 
William de Huntingdon, who died in 1376.'° In 1363 it was presented 
that William de Huntingfield held the river " Wayhene " as a separate fishery 
from Mendham Bridge, King's Hall Mill, and that he had a fishery there as 
belonging to his Manor of King's Hall. In 1369 Wm. de Huntingfield held 
it for life, and in 1370 John Deynes, rector of Toft, in Lincolnshire, and 
Richard Wright, of Holbeck, chaplain, his trustees, released to Roger de 
Huntingfield, who, with his trustees, John de Seckford, parson of Somer- 
coles, John de Linstede, parson of Cawston Hoo, Thomas Home, rector of 
Huntingfield, and others soon after settled the same on Mendham priory. 
On the dissolution of the religious houses the manor passed to the Crown, 
and was granted in 1540 to Charles Brandon, Duke of Suffolk. 



' Page, History of Suffolk, p. 414. 

""Harl. 970, 972. 

'2nd series, x. loi. 

*Bodl. 5071. 

5D.K.R., 38 App. p. 66. 



^See Manors of Cockfield and Lavenham, 

in Babergh Hundred. 
^Rawl. B. 319. 

8 Pat. Rolls, 2 Edw. H. pt. i. i8rf. 
9I.P.M., II Edw. in. 4. 
"See Manor of Mendham Priory. 



MENDHAM. 71 

It then seems to have gone in the same course as the Manor of Mend- 
ham Priory, and is now vested in Capt. Sir Frederick Edward Shafto Adair, 
4th Bart., of Flixton Hall. 

Manor of Walsham Hall. 

This manor derived its name from the family of de Walsham, by 
whom it was held of the abbots or, rather, perhaps, of the de Veres under 
them. Davy says : " The de Veres had three quarters of a knight's fee 
distinct from the Manor of Walsham Hall, and retained the seignory of 
these as late as 1632 when Robert, Earl of Oxford, died seised. In the 
description of knights' fees held of Bury Abbey in Jocelin de Brakelond's 
Chronicle [1200] Alberic de Vere, ist or 2nd Earl of Oxford, is mentioned 
to have held 5^ fees, of which one fee was in Mendham and Preston. As 
no other person is mentioned as holding in Mendham, this must have com- 
prised the whole of the abbot's fee there both in Norfolk and Suffolk, and 
the family of de Mendham were perhaps his under-tenants. Sir Thomas de 
Mendham is named* as claiming the office of standard bearer. Although 
they might originally have held of the abbot immediately as descendants 
or successors of Frodo, it was not unusual at that time for a landowner to 
enfeoff some great man in his lands and thenceforth to hold under him for 
the sake of his more powerful protection. Perhaps Alberic de Vere's 
estate escheated or became forfeited, for Robert de Vere, 3rd Earl, does not 
appear to have died seised of anything in Mendham, or, as not having held 
of the King in capite, it would not be mentioned." The manor was held in 
the time of Richard I. by Gilbert de Walsham of the Abbot of Bury, and in 
1228 seems to havebeenheldbyWilliamde Walsham, in the time of Hen. III. 
vesting in Gilbert de Walsham, who is stated in the Testa de Nevill to have 
held here one fee of the abbey of Bury.^ 

In 1258 we find the manor vested in Hugh de Vere, 4th Earl of Oxford, 
who died in 1262, and from this time until the extinction of the male line on 
the death of John, the last Earl, without issue, in 1526, when the inheritance 
of this noble family came to his three sisters and coheirs — Elizabeth, married 
to Sir Anthony Wingfield, of Letheringham ; Dorothy married to John 
Neville, Lord Latimer ; and Ursula, to Sir Edward Knightly. The manor 
passed in the same course of devolution as the Manor of Cockfield, in 
Babergh Hundred. 

By way of addition we may state that Robert de Vere, Earl of Oxford, 
had a grant of free warren here in 1330,^ and lands in Mendham are 
mentioned in the inquis. p.m. of John de Vere, Earl of Oxford, in 1360," 
and of Thomas de Vere, Earl of Oxford, in 1371.^ Acquittances for farm 
of this manor in 1391 will be found amongst the Harleian Charters.^ In 
1395 Elizabeth, wife of John de Vere, died seised,'' and in 1400 Alberic de 
Vere, Earl of Oxford.^ The manor was forfeited by the Earl of Oxford in 
1462,' and granted to the Duke of Gloucester. The manor was, however, 
restored, and in 1475 is mentioned in the inquis. p.m. of John, Earl of 

Oxford.'" 

In 1609 the manor was vested in Sir Thomas Holland, who sold it to 
Robert Berney, under whose will dated 24th April, 1628," it came to his 

I P. 42. 5'I.P.M., 19 Rich. II. 47. 

= T. de N. 291. 8I.P.M., I Hen. IV., 52. 

3 Chart. RoUs, 4 Edw. III. 37. sP.P. vi. 228. 

4I.P.M., 34 Edw. III. 84. ^"I.P.M., 15 Edw. IV. 28. 

5I.P.M., 45 Edw. III. 45. "Proved loth Sept. 1628. 
6Harl. 57C. 13. 



72 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

widow Mary, daughter of James Hobart, of Hales Hall, in Lodne, Norfolk, 
in fee. She died in 1632, and by her will dated 2nd Dec. 1648, devised it 
to her nephew, James Hobart, called Col. Hobart, son and heir of Edward 
Hobart, Mary's brother, in fee. James Hobart made the mansion of 
Walsham Hall his seat, and on his death, in August, 1669, at the age of 57, 
the manor passed to his son and heir, James Hobart, who died in 1673, 
when it passed to his brother and heir, Edward Hobart, and on his death, 
4th Nov. 1711, at the age of 60, vested in his son and heir, Anthony Hobart, 
who sold the manor and demesnes in 1722 to Thomas Bransby, sen., of 
Shottisham, who died in 1731, when it passed to his brother and heir, 
James Bransby, in 1736, who sold the manor to Sarah Elizabeth Wogan,of 
Fressingfield, sister to John Wogan, of Gawdy Hall, in Redenhall, who 
carried it by marriage about 1740 with the Rev. Gervas Holmes,, vicar of 
Fressingfield, into that family. She died in 1760, and devised the manor 
to her husband, who devised the same to his son, the Rev. Gervas Holmes, 
of Ipswich, who died in 1796, having devised the manor to his son and heir, 
the Rev. John Holmes, of Gawdy Hall. He in 1812 married Anne, daughter 
of the Rev. W. Whitear, rector of Ore, near Hastings, Sussex, and dying in 
1831 the manor passed to his son, Wilham Sancroft Holmes, J. P. and D.L., 
who in 1840 married Hester Elizabeth, youngest daughter of Davies Gilbert, 
of Eastbourne, co. Sussex, M.P. He died in 1849, leaving his widow (who 
died 25th June, 1885) and with other issue a son, John Sancroft Holmes, 
and the manor, after passing to his trustees, vested in the said John 
Sancroft Holmes, of Gawdy Hall, co. Norfolk, and Fressingfield, co. Suffolk, 
M.A., J. P. of Norfolk and Suffolk, D.L. for Suffolk, who in 1877 married 
Edith, youngest daughter of Henry Kingscote, 2nd son of Thomas Kings- 
cote, of Kingscote Park, co. Gloucester. 

Davy says : " All these manors of Mendham extend into Metfield. 
The site of Metfield was in the lord of the Manor of Kingshall, but the 
lords of Walsham Hall claim the soil of Metfield Green, and it has been 
suggested that Walsham Hall might have been the capital manor of Bury 
Abbey, Mendham Hall and Metfield being sub-infeudations." 

Arms of Holmes : Barry of six Arg. and Az., on a canton Gu. achaplet 
Arg. 

Manor of Oakinhill Hall. 

This, which is but a reputed manor, derived its name probably from 
Roger de OakenhuU, brother of William de Huntingfield, and was for many 
ages the seat of a branch of the family of Bateman, descended from Sir 
Bartholomew Bateman, eldest brother of the Bishop of Norwich of that 
name. William Bateman died seised of the manor 9th Jan. 1659, when it 
passed to his son and heir, William Bateman, who died in 1674,' when it 
passed to his son and heir, William Bateman, on whose death in 1707 it 
passed to his widow Eliza for life, and subsequently to Ms son and heir, 
William Bateman, who died in 1745, having devised the manor to his wife 
Rebecca in fee. She sold it in 1783 to Wilham Reeve, of Harleston, in 
Norfolk, surgeon, from whom it passed to his son, the Rev. William Reeve, 
vicar of Hoxne and Denham, who died unmarried 21st Sept. 1786, aged 51, 
leaving his nephew, Read Reeve, of Lavenham, heir to his main estates. 
This branch of the Reeve family was descended from Roger Reeve, of Bury, 
clothworker, whose youngest brother was the last lord Abbot of St. 
Edmundsbury, 1540. The manor was purchased from the trustees of 

'WiU nth AprU, 1674, 



MENDHAM. 73 

William Reeve, namely, Le Grice Brown, of Beccles, and Edmund Gilling- 
water, the Harleston author and antiquarian, by John Hill, a farmer, 
who died 23rd Oct. 1847, at the age of 91. Later the estate was divided 
into lots and sold to divers persons. 

Manor of Thorpe Hall. 

This manor lies south of the road leading from Shotford Bridge, in 
Metfield, and is bounded on all sides by the Manor of Withersdale. It 
was the estate of Erasmus de Heveningham, and later of Henry Hevening- 
ham. In 1547 the manor belonged to Erasmus Heveningham, and this 
year a fine was levied against him by John Radley, clerk.' In the year 
1550 Erasmus Heveningham sold the manor to Nicholas Smythe, of Hales- 
worth.'' Nicholas Smythe married Jane, daughter of William Worlyche, 
of Haleswortb, and on his death in 1558 the manor passed to his 6th son, 
John Smith. He married ist Anne, daughter of Robt. Wooddy, of Stow- 
market, and 2ndly Rose Garrard, of Wisset, and on his death the manor 
devolved on his son and heir, Richard Smith, who held in 1568, and in 
1584 levied a fine of it against John Radclyffe and others.^ 

The manor was acquired by John Hobart, of Wey bread Hall, who sold 
it about 1651 to James Hobart, of Walsham Hall, and it passed to his 2nd son, 
Edward Hobart, who devised it to his son, Anthony Hobart,'* who sold it in 
1722 to Thomas Bransby, together with Walsham Hall. From Thomas 
Bransby it passed to his brother, James Bransby, of Shottisham, who died in 
1783, when the manor passed to his two daughters and coheirs, Maria 
Susanna, married to the Rev. Samuel Coope, D.D., of Great Yarmouth, and 
Marguretta, married to the Rev. John Daniel Droyer, of the Middle Temple, 
who sold it to Mrs. Mary Wyard, who devised by her will the manor in 1793 
to Lydia King, daughter of her niece, Lydia King, for life, by the description 
of " her reputed Manor of Thorpe Hall, and h^r capital messuage called 
Thorpe Hall in Mendham, Weybread, and Withersdale." In 1842 the manor 
was vested in Thomas Thornhill, of Ridlesworth, in Norfolk. 

Arms of Smith : Quarterly per pale indented Az. and Or in 2 and 3, 
a greyhound's head erased of the ist collared, on a bend of the 2nd three 
escallops Sable. 

Manor of Shotford Hall. 

This manor, or reputed manor, lies on the Norfolk side of the river, 
but extends into Weybread on the Suffolk side. The first lord we hear of 
is Thomas Smyth, of Winston, in Norfolk, and on his death the manor 
went to his son Nicholas Smyth, of Stochlin, in Norfolk. He died in 1678, 
when the manor went to his sister and heir, Elizabeth Drury, of Tutwood, 
widow of Anthony Drury. On her death the manor went to his son and 
heir, Anthony Drury, who was living in 1703 but died without issue, when 
tiie manor passed to his sisters and coheirs, Catherine Drury and Elizabeth, 
Robert's widow, who had Shotford Hall in 1748. They sold the manor in 
1756 to Cooke Freston for ;^i,8oo, and so it became joined to the Worlington 
Hall estate, of which Shotford Hall was for long the farm-house. The 
manor was subsequently purchased by Alexander Adair, and has since 
gone in the same course of descent as the Manor of Mendham Priory. 

The old mansion in Mendham called Middleton Hall, the seat of a 
family of that name for many generations, is sometimes referred to as a 

'Fine, Easter, i Edw. VI. ^Fine, Mich. 26-27 Eiiz. 

"Fine, Easter, 4 Edw. VI. ''See Manor of Walsham, in Mendham. 

K 



74 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

manor, though in truth but a free tenement. Wm. de Middleton, Bishop 
of Norwich, raised the family to its height. Of this family was Richard 
de Middleton, a monk of Norwich, who in 1424 was rector of Marsham, in 
Norfolk, and had the Pope's dispensation enabling him to hold any 
benefice that he could get with cure of souls although he was a monk. 
From this family the Middletons of Wichingham were also descended. 

Richard de Middleton hved at the hall in 1373, and WiUiam his son in 
1390. Wilham was succeeded by his son William, who on his marriage 
in 1392 settled the hall on Margaret his wife. The family sealed their deed 
with a seal showing a fesse ermine between 3 crosslets. In 1487 William 
Middleton owned the estate, and Robert lived here in 1491. 

Thomas Middleton, the last of that family, died seised of it (held as of 
the Duchy of Lancaster) in 1504. It was afterwards the estate and resi- 
dence of Henry Reppes, of Mendham. The estate went, it is said, to his 
wife Elizabeth, who died 21st May, 1548, leaving Thomas Holland, jun., 
her brother and heir.' In this inquis. Middleton Hall is referred to as 
" Mydelton's Manor, in Mendham." 

Page says Henry Reppes (but evidently a later Henry than the Henry 
Reppes last mentioned)'' married to his 2nd wife Ann, daughter of John 
Wotton, of Tudenham, relict of Sir Thomas Woodhouse, whose third hus- 
band was Bassingbourne Gawdy, and that Mr. Reppes died without issue. 
This Henry Reppes did no doubt give his estate to Anne Woodhouse, 
alias Reppes, for life with remainder to John Reppes, son of his brother 
Francis, with remainder to John Reppes his brother, which obviously impUes 
he had himself no issue. The estate certainly did vest in the Gawdys, for 
amongst the Egerton MSS. we find in 1577 a warrant to Sir B. Gawdy for 
felling oaks at Middleton Hall, and an agreement of his respecting the 
hall itself.^ It appears from the loth Report of the Hist. Com. that the 
warrant, or licence as it is there called, was given by the remainderman 
under the will of Henry Reppes by John Reppes to Bassingbourne Gawdy, 
and that he (B. Gawdy) held the estate in right of his wife. It is dated 
26th Nov. 1577. Davy says : " After the death of Bassingbourne Gawdy 
and Anne his wife this estate went to the Berdwells, the descendants of her 
maternal ancestors, and not to the heirs of her husband Henry Reppes, 
from whom she derived it. In 29 Eliz. James Berdwell and Thomasine his 
wife settled this estate on the said James in fee, and he by will ist March, 
1 60 1, devised it to James his son. He was dead in 1603, and James about 
1609 aliened it to William Heme and to his brother Richard Heme, alder- 
man of London, who was succeeded by Nicholas his son, from whom it was 
purchased by Stephen Baxter." 



'I.P.M., 3 Edw. Vi. 92. ^Eger. 2713. 

"As to Reppes family see Thorney Hall 
Manor, Stowmarket, in Stow Hun- 
dred. 




METFIELD. 75 

MANOR OF METFIELD OR METFIELD JERMY. 

JETFIELD was formerly considered a hamlet of Mendhamj 
but is now a distinct parish. It was anciently of the fee of 
the Abbot of Holn, in Norfolk, of whom it was held in the 
time of Richard I. at half a fee by Hugh Burd, after which 
it became escheated to the Crown, and was granted to Thomas 
de Brotherton, Earl of Norfolk, son of King Edward I., 
whose ist wife was Alice, daughter of Sir Roger Hayles, 
Knt., of Harwich. We meet with a fine of the manor in 1319 levied by 
Thomas, Earl of Norfolk, and Marshal of England, against Adam Brown, 
of Pulham, and Margaret his wife.' 

Sir John Jermy married ist Jane, sister of Alice, wife of Thomas de 
Brotherton, and in 1325 Thomas de Brotherton conveyed to his brother-in- 
law. Sir John Jermy, two parts of this manor and the third part to his wife 
for the assignment of her dower. A fine was levied in 1328 of the manor 
(not of any part thereof) by John Jermy and Joan his wife against Roger de 
Hales and William de Newport.* 

In 1343 Sir John Jermy held the manor at a quarter of a fee of the 
Manor of Kingshall, in Mendham, and he had a grant of free warren here.^ 
The manor passed on his death to his son and heir. Sir Thomas Jermy, 
and on his death in 1359 i* went to his son and heir. Sir William Jermy, 
who married Elizabeth, daughter of John de Hemenhale. He was buried 
at Metfield in 1385, his wife Elizabeth surviving him. Sir William Jermy 
bequeathed his body to be buried in the church of St. John Baptist, of 
Metfield, and gave " cs ad factur campanile de Medefeild, xxs. towards 
repairing the Church of Mendham, and the same Summ to Gosbeck." 

The manor went to Sir William's son and heir, John Jermy, who 
married Margery, daughter of Arnold de Mounteney alias Multney. 

In 1428 Sir John Jermy and Margaret Mounteney his wife were owners 
of this and Withersdale Manor, and they rebuilt the church and manor-house, 
where Sir John placed the marriages of his family in the windows, and his 
arms are carved in divers parts of the roof and in the stone on the font. 
He bequeathed legacies to the church of Metfield, and those of Buckenham 
Ferry and Hasingham, of which he was patron. He ordered 100 marks to 
be distributed to the poor on his burial day, and deposited in the hands of 
Thomas Pakefield, Abbot of St. Bennet, at Hohn, whom he appointed one 
of his executors, 200 marks, as a maintenance for a chantry priest to sing 
mass therein daily for him and his family for ever. He was succeeded by 
his son and heir. Sir John Jermy, of Metfield, who married Elizabeth, 
daughter of William Worth or Wroth, of Enfield, co. Middlesex, and had 
two sons. From Thomas the younger son descended the Jermys of Bayfield, 
in Norfolk, and Sir John Jermy the eldest son continued the family at 
Metfield. He married Isabel, daughter of John Hopton, and on his death 
in 1487* the manor passed to his son and heir, Edmund Jermy, who married 
Ann, daughter of William Booth, and died in 1506, when he was succeeded 
by his son, Sir John Jermy, K.B., of both Metfield and Brightwell, in Carl- 
ford Hundred, who married Margaret, daughter and one of the heirs of Sir 
Thomas Tey, Knt. 

'Feet of Fines, 13 Edw. II. 3. » chart. RoUs, 17 Edw. III. 2. 

^Feet of Fines, 2 Edw. III. 24. ♦I.P.M., 3 Hen. VII. 330. 



76 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

Sir John Jermy, Knt., died in November, 1560. In the Diary of 
Henry Machyn, citizen of London, 1550-1563, edited by Gough Nichols 
for the Camden Society (p. 244) is the following notice of his funeral :— 

" The xxiij day of November [1560] was bered in St. Stephen's in 
Colmanstrett, Sir John Jermy, knyght of Suffolke, beyonde Epwyche 
iiij mylles, the wyche was a good man of the age of iiijxx and ode, the wyche 
he left iiij sunes and iij dowthers, and he had a standard, and a pennon of 
armes, and a cott armur, elmett, targett, and sword, and mantyll, and a 
iij dosen of skochyons and alff a dosen of bokeram ; and the chyrche was 
hangyd with blake, and with armes ; and there was mony morners, and gohyng 
to the chyrche a mornar beyryng the standard in blake, and anodur a pennon 
of armes, and then serten mornars ; then cam master Somersett the harold 
bere the elme and crest, and after cam master Clarenshux beyryng ys cote 
armur, and the clarkes syngyng ; and then cam the corse with the palle 
of blake velvett with skochyons on yt, and then cam the cheyff morners, 
and after ys servandes in blake ; and master MoUens the archdeacon dyd 
pryche ; and after all done hom to a fiecchers howse to dener." 

The manor passed to Sir John's son and heir, Francis Jermy, who was 
High Sheriff in 1587. Amongst the Additional Charters in the British 
Museum is the grant of an annuity of ;^2o out of the manor in 1605, by Sir 
Thomas Jermy, of Feversham, co. Cambridge, Knt., to this Francis Jermy, 
described as of Brightwell, and to his wife for their lives. The deed is dated 
20th Feb. 2 J as. I., but it is difficult to see how if the manor belonged at the 
time to Francis Jermy, Sir Thomas could grant him an annuity out of it.' 
Francis Jermy married Elizabeth, daughter and coheir of Sir William Fitz 
William, Knt., in Ireland, and on his death the manor passed to Sir Thomas 
Jermy, K.B., who married Jane or Joan, daughter and heir of Sir Edward 
St5^ward, of Feversham, and had issue four sons — Thomas, Edmund, John, 
and William, and on Sir Thomas's death the manor passed to his son and 
heir, Thomas Jermy, who was lord in 1643, for i6th Nov. this year he held 
his first court for the manor, and died 21st December, 1652," and was buried 
at Metfield. In 1658 we find Thomas Smallpiece lord, as this year i6th 
April he held his first court. ^ He married Alice, daughter of Francis Jermy, 
of Gunton, in Norfolk (she died 26th May, 1672, aged 36), and died 22nd 
April, 1673, when the manor passed to his executors, Arthur Jermy, clerk, 
Thomas Carnel, clerk, and Thomas Lowe, gent., who this same year 6th 
May held their first court for the manor, and courts also ist May, 1674, 
and 13th Dec. 1675. 

The manor was shortly after acquired by Francis Sancroft, who held his 
first court 27th April, 1682. From him the manor passed to William 
Sancroft in 1711, and before 1724 was sold to Walter Plumer, of Gibston, 
in Hertfordshire, and Chedeston, in Suffolk, who held his first court 28th 
Aug. this year. He died about 1745-6, when the manor passed to his 
brother and heir, William Plumer, who held his first court in 1747, and died 
in 1767, when it passed to his son and heir, William Plumer, who died in 

' Add. Ch. 10458. 3 jje held other courts : 12th Apl. 1659 

'^ It should be mentioned that Davy stated 23rd Apl. 1660 ; 17th Apl. 1661 

that courts were held for this 7th Apl. 1662 ; 26th June, 1662 

manor by John Barker, 5th Apl. 27th Apl. 1663 ; 13th May, 1664 

1642, 6th Oct. 1642 ; and 13th 5th Aug. 1664 ; i8th May, 1666 

April, 1643. 28th May, 1668 ; 12th Nov. 1669 

6th June, 1676 ; 30th June, 1671 
15th Jan. 1671 ; 30th Apl. 1672. 



METFIELD. '^^ 

i822j when it went to his widow Jane Plumer. She married for her 3rd 
husband Robert Ward, who took the name of Plumer, and on the sale of 
the Plumer' s Suffolk estates this manor and the demesne lands were pur- 
chased by William Rayley. From him the manor passed to Capt. Charles 
Rayley, R.N. He held the manor in 1833, S'^d endowed the Church of 
England Schools with £500 consols. 

The manor was in 1885 and 1896 vested in Chauncy Arthur Taylor, 
of Southery, Downham, Norfolk, eldest son of Robert Cunninghame Taylor, 
who died 1879, by Sarah, daughter of James Pycroft, of Wanstead, Essex, 
but is now vested in Lieut .-Col. J. H. Taylor, who is also the owner of 
Metfield Hall, a moated farm-house rebuilt about 1850, 

The lete of the parish belonged to the lord of Mendham Kingshall, 
which manor as well as those of Mendham Priory and Walsham Hall 
extended into this parish. Amongst the Chancery Proceedings in the time of 
Queen Elizabeth we find an action as to copyholds of the manor by Mark 
Oglethorpe against John Freston.' 

Arms of Jermy : Argent, a leopard saliant guardant. Gules. Of 
Smallpiece : Sable, a chevron ingrailed, between three cinquefoils Argent. 
Of Plumer : Party per chevron floury, counter floury. Gules and Argent, 
three martlets counterchanged. 



'C.P. ser. ii. B. cxxxv. 15. 




78 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

SAXTEAD. 

HOLDING in this place was that of Earl Hugh, and con- 
sisted of 60 acres, 11 villeins, 5 bordars, 9 ploughteams, 
4 acres of meadow, and wood sufficient to support 200 hogs. 
At the time of the Confessor it was held by Burchard as 
a hamlet in Framlingham.' 

Manor of Saxstead in Saxtead. 

Saxtead was anciently a berwite or hamlet to Framlingham, and as 
such was returned in the Great Survey as part of the lands of Hugh de 
Abrincis, Earl of Chester, under the head " Bishop's Hundred." It, how- 
ever, soon afterwards was reckoned a parish of itself, but continued to be 
held as a member of Framlingham Manor and participates in its customs 
one of which is the custom of Borough English. 

To each of the manors last mentioned there is appendant a court lete 
which extends through these respective parishes. Page, writing in 1847, 
says : " The common fine for Framlingham lete is 6s. 8d. paid now by the 
churchwardens, but anciently by the tenants possessed of free lands ; but 
the common fine of this parish is 3^. . . . The soil of Saxtead 
Green, which contains about 30 acres and all the waste ground and ways, 
are the property of the lords, but the benefit and feed thereof belong to the 
copyhold tenants, who cannot take down timber without the lord's licence 
to whom a third part belongs." 

In 1275 the manor vested in Roger Bigot, Earl of Norfolk, who died in 
1305- 

In 1316 the priory of Ely held the lordship, and it subsequently went 
to the Crown, and was granted to Thomas, Duke of Norfolk, in 1609, 
passing to Thos., Lord Howard of Walden, Earl of Suffolk. 

Later it was vested in Theophilus, Earl of Suffolk, who held his first 
court in 1626. From 1633 the court for this manor appears to have been 
kept separate from that of Framlingham, with which before that time it 
was held, and therefore probably had the same lords, as it has had, no 
doubt, since. The manor came into the hands of Sir Robert Hitcham, 
and was given to the Master and Fellows of Pembroke Hall, Cambridge, in 
whose hands the manor still is. 

The following property, which is copyhold of the Manor of Saxtead 
and vested in trustees, was given for the maintenance of the church : One 
messuage and nine acres of land of the demesne, parcel of Saxstead Went ; 
one acre and one rood, parcel of 38 acres of Saxstead Went ; and one 
cottage, with the yards, containing eight perches, and to which Humphry 
Button and others were admitted in 1547, ^^ trust for this parish, who were 
to apply the rents accordingly, and the overplus to the use of the poor. 
This gift, Mr. Hawes states, was made prior to the reign of King Edward III., 
but by whom is unknown ; the probability, however, is that the parish 
had it of Thomas de Brotherton, the patron, and that the gift is coeval 
with the founding of the church. 

Court Rolls of the manor in the time of Edw. III. are in Pembroke 
College," and an extract from Court Rolls of the manor in 1575 will be found 

' Dom. ii. 299. * I Rep. Hist. Com. 70. 



SAXTEAD. 79 

amongst the Additional Charters in the British Museum/ and an Act relating 
to this manor is referred to in the 7th Rep. of the Hist. Com. p. 166. A 
lease for 21 years to Sir George Carey of rents of assize and lands/ &c., 
belonging to the manor will be seen from the State Papers to have been 
granted in 1591.^ Amongst the Chancery Proceedings in the time of 
Queen Elizabeth will be seen an action by John Borrett against John 
Rosyer^ touching parcel of the manor. ^ The confirmation of the manor to 
the charitable uses limited by Sir Robert Hitcham is referred to in the 
State Papers in 1654.* The Bill for the establishment of the uses and trusts 
was the 13 and 14 Chas. IL' and papers relating to the manor between 
1682 and 1808 will be found amongst the Additional MSS. in the National 
Collection.* 



'Add. Ch. 10457. *S.P. 1684, p. 385- 

'S-P. 1591, 129. 'H.L. xi. 433, 435> 438. 

3C.P. sen ii. B. xxi. 42. * Add. 23960. 




8o THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

SOHAM (MONK). 

I HERE were two manors in this place in Saxon times. The 
first was that of the Abbot of St. Edmunds, and consisted 
of a carucate of land with its soc, 8 villeins, ii bordars, 
2 serfs (reduced to i at the time of the Survey), 2 plough- 
teams in demesne and 6 belonging to the men, 6 acres of 
meadow, wood sufficient to support 40 hogs, i horse, 5 beasts, 
31 hogs, 31 sheep, and 21 goats. Also a church with 50 
acres of land. The manor was valued at £4, increased to £5 at the time of 
the Survey. It was 7 quarentenes long and 6 broad, and paid in a gelt 10^. 
Others had holdings therein.' 

The second manor was that of Oslac the thane in the time of the 
Confessor, and consisted of a carucate of land, a villein, 3 bordars, a serf, 
a ploughteam in demesne and half a team belonging to the men, 4 acres of 
meadow, wood sufficient to support 10 hogs, 10 hogs (increased to 12 at 
the time of the Survey), 5 beasts, and 4 sheep (increased to 12 at the 
time of the Survey). The value was 20s. At the time of the Survey this 
manor was held by Roger de Candos of Hugh de Montf ort, the soc belonging 
to the Bishop.* 

A holding in this place was that of a freeman by commendation in 
the Confessor's time, and consisted of a carucate of land, 2 villeins, 3 bordars, 
2 ploughteams, 5 acres of meadow, wood sufficient to support 10 hogs, 
valued at 20s. (increased to 25s. at the time of the Survey). The soc was in 
Hoxne. This land belonged to the Abbot of Ely, and at the time of the 
Survey Robert Malet held it of the King, the abbot proving his right, and 
Robert Malet holding it of him.^ 

Manor of Monk Soham. 

Alfred, Bishop of the East Angles, made a grant of the manor and 
advowson of Monk Soham to the monks of Bury abbey, hence called 
Monk's Soham. At the dissolution of that house the manor was granted 
to Anthony Rous, the grant being made in 1545. Particulars for the grant 
37 Hen. Vni. are still preserved in the Public Record Office.* 

Anthony Rous died 8th Feb. 1545, when the manor passed to his son 
and heir, Thomas Rous,' who in 1561 disposed of the manor to Lionel 
Talmach, of Helmingham.^ He died in 1571, when it passed to his son and 
heir, Lionel Talmach, on whose death in 1575 it passed to his son and heir. 
Sir Lionel Talmach, created a baronet in 1611. On his death the manor 
passed to his widow Katherine for life, and on her death in 1620 went to 
her son and heir. Sir Lionel Talmach, 2nd Bart., who died in 1625, and was 
succeeded by his son and heir. Sir Lionel Talmach, 3rd Bart., on whose death 
in 1640 the manor passed to his widow Elizabeth, and on her death in 1661 
vested in her son and heir. Sir Lionel Talmach, 4th Bart., who dying in 1669 
the manor passed to his son and heir Lionel, ist Earl of Dysart.^ 

The manor was subsequently acquired by Edmund Clench, and passed 
to Andrew Clench, of London, M.D., from whom it passed to his widow 
Rose, who sold the same with other property for ^^400 by deed dated 3rd 

'Dom. ii. 368. 6 Fine, Mich. 3 Eliz. 

^Dom. ii. 4056. 7 For fuller particulars, see Helmingham 

3 Dom. ii. 385. Hall Manor, in Bosraere and 

4D.K.R. 10 App. ii. p. 263. Claydon Hundred. 

5 1.P.M., I Edw. VI. 



SOHAM (MONK). 8i 

Nov. 1696, to Sir Anthony Deane, of London. He was the grandson of 
Dene Deane, the owner of Onehouse Manor in 1616, being the son of 
Anthony Deane and Anne his wife, daughter of— Sparrow. Sir Anthony's 
will is dated loth Feb. 1710, and he was buried at Crutched Friars, London, 
the same year, when the manor passed to his son and heir, William Deane, 
on whose death it devolved on his son and heir, Anthony Deane, of Whit- 
tington. Anthony's son, Anthony Deane, married Anna Sophia, daughter 
of Sir Thomas Whitmore, of Apsley, co. Salop, K.B., and the marriage 
settlement was dated 24th Dec. 1760. On Anthony's death the manor passed 
to his son and heir, the Rev. Henry Deane, Fellow of Merton College, 
Oxford, 1801, and vicar of Eckington, co. Derby, in 1830. In 1844 the 
manor was vested in Anthony Deane, and in 1855 in W. Deane, and it is 
now [1904] vested in Major Clare Charles Anthony Deane. 

Compotus Rolls of the manor when belonging to the abbey of St. 
Edmunds will be found amongst the Additional Charters in the British 
Museum. These are as follows : 1329-80' ; 1391, 1394^ J i394-5^ ; 
1401-2'^ ; 1414, 1416^ ; 1426-7.* 

Papers relating to the manor 1389-1647, including Court Books 1563 
to 1572, and valuation of the manor taken in October, 1597, and observa- 
tions on fines and customs, with extracts from Court Rolls, Sec, will be found 
amongst the Additional MSS. in the same collection.'' In the National 
Library are also extracts from the Court Act Books and Court Rolls of 
the manor 35 Edw. I., 39 Eliz. [1306-1597] with pleadings in an action at 
law in re Robert Hawes and Lionel Tallemache.' 

Amongst the Chancery Proceedings is an action by John Beddingfield 
against Edward Taylor concerning lands held of this manor stated to be 
the inheritance of plaintiff and his ancestors, Lionel Talmage being lord of 
Monk Soham Manor, ^ and an action (no doubt the one above referred to) by 
Robert Hawes and Robert Mayheughe against Lionel " Tallmache " and 
John White to establish a fine certain on alienation of land in Monk Soham 
held of defendant as of his Monk Soham Manor." 

There is also amongst the Chancery Proceedings in the time of Queen 
EUzabeth an action by William Lawghtons and Mary his wife against Lionel 
" Talmage " and another touching copyhold of this manor." 

Arms of Deane : Sable, a fesse Ermine between three chaplets. Argent. 

Manor of Blomvile's or Woodcroft Hall. 

This was the estate of Oslac the thane in the Confessor's time, and 
formed part of the lands held by Hugh de Montfort in early Norman days. 
In 1275 the lordship seems to have been in Adam le Carpenter, for he had 
" bortrem " and assize of bread and beer here. It subsequently passed to 
John Blomvile, and in 1460 was vested in John Caldewell. 

About 1567 the manor was acquired by Lionel Talmach, who died in 
1571, from which time the manor has descended in the same course as the 
main manor. 

'Add. Ch. 10449. ^AM. 3959. 

^Add, Ch. 10450. ^Add. 21049. 

^Add. Ch. 10451. 9C.P. i. 112. 

*Add. Ch. 10452. '°C.P. ii. 33- 

5 Add. Ch. 10453, 10454. "C.P. ser. ii. B. cix. 

6 Add. Ch. 10455- 

L 



82 



THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 




MANOR OF SOUTHOLT. 

lOUTHOLT was accounted a hamlet of Worlingworth, and 
appears to have been vested in the Abbot of Bury as that 
parish was. It is now, however, a separate parish. In 1263 
it was the lordship of Wilham de Bovile, and it is said that 
he gave it to the abbey of St. John's, Colchester, though 
Davy suggests they had it of the gift of WiUiam de Rolle- 
stone. Amongst the inquis. quod damnum in 1319 we meet 

with the following entry : " WiUiam de RoUestone for St. John's Abbey, 

Colchester.'" 

It vested in the Crown at the dissolution of the religious houses, and 
was granted by Hen. VIII. to Anthony Rous in 1545. Particulars for this 
grant are still preserved in the Public Record Ofhce." 

On Anthony Rous' s death it passed to his son and heir, Thomas Rous, 
who with his wife had licence to alien the manor in 1558 to John Sherwood, 
but no assignment or conveyance seems to have been made, for in 1565 
Thomas Rous sold the manor to John Thurston,^ and in 1567 the pur- 
chaser was called upon to show title to the same.* He died in 1607, when 
the manor passed to his nephew, John Thurston, who died in 1613 ; but 
in 1610 John Thurston and his wife MiUicent had licence to alien to Bartholo- 
mew Brooke and John Brooke. John Brooke seems to have survived, and 
on his death the manor passed to his brother and heir, William Brooke, 
and amongst the Chancery Papers for 1630 in the Record Office will be 
found the order for livery of the manor to this William Brooke.^ 

In 1664 the manor seems to have been vested in one Cudworth, and to 
have passed in 1690 to John Cudworth, who died in 1726, when it passed 
by his will to his nephew and heir, Francis Cudworth Masham, a Master in 
Chancery, and Accountant-General of the said court, only surviving son 
of Sir Francis Masham, Bart., who died 3rd March, 1702-3, and his 2nd 
wife Damaris, daughter of Ralph Cudworth, D.D.^ 

Francis Cudworth Masham died 17th May, 1731, and devised the 
manor to Samuel, Lord Masham. He was page of honour to Queen Anne 
whilst Princess of Denmark, and to Prince George, to whom he was also one 
of the equerries, and afterwards a groom of the bedchamber, in which post 
he attended at the funeral of that prince, 13th Nov. 1708. In 1710 he 
became a brigadier-general and was chosen member of Parliament for 
Ilchester. He was made cofferer to her household by Queen Anne in May, 



'I.Q.D., 13 Edw. II. 36. 

237 Hen. VIII. D.K.R. 10 ; App. ii. p. 263. 

3 Fine, Trin. 7 Eliz. 

♦ Memoranda RoUs, 9 Eliz. Trin. Rec. Rot. 
60. 

5 1630, Chancery D.K.R. 43 App. ii. p. 172. 
Her monument in the cathedral church 
of Bath states that "to the soft- 
ness and elegancy of her own sex 
were added several of the noblest 
accomplishments and qualities of 
the other. She possessed these 
advantages in a degree unusual to 
either, and tempered them with 
an exactness peculiar to herself. 
Her learning, judgment, s^acity, 
and penetration, together with her 



candour and love of truth, were 
very observable to all that con- 
versed with her or were acquainted 
with those small treatises she 
published in her lifetime, though 
she industriously concealed her 
name. Being mother of an only son, 
she apphed all her natural and 
acquired endowments to the care 
of his education. She was a strict 
observer of all the virtues belonging 
to every station of her life, and only 
wanted opportunities to make those 
talents shine in the world which 
were the admiration of her friends." 
She was born i8th January, 1658, 
and died 20th April, 5700. 



SOUTHOLT. 83 

1711, when he was re-elected to Parliament for Windsor, and on the ist 
January following created a peer of the realm by the title of Lord Masham 
of Otes, in the County of Essex. Having obtained a grant in reversion 
of the office of Remembrancer of the Exchequer it fell in on the death of 
Simon, Lord Fanshaw, the 23rd Oct. 1716. He married Abigail, daughter 
of Francis Hill, an eminent Turkey merchant, and sister to General John 
Hill, of Envil Green, near Egham, co. Surrey, and dying i6th Oct. 1758, 
was interred at High Laver, and the manor passed to his only surviving 
son and heir Samuel, 2nd Lord Masham. In 1739 he was appointed groom 
of the bedchamber to Frederic, Prince of Wales, in which quality he walked 
at his funeral procession the 13th April, 1751. In 1756 he was appointed 
Auditor-General to the then Prince of Wales, in which post he was con- 
tinued till the death of King George II. He succeeded his father 
as Remembrancer of the Exchequer, and in 1762 was appointed one of the 
lords of the bedchamber to the King. 

The i6th Oct. 1736, he married Harriet, daughter of Salway Winning- 
ton, and sister to Thomas Winnington. She died ist July, 1761, and was 
buried at High Laver. The 4th Feb. 1762, Samuel, 2nd Lord Masham, 
took for his 2nd wife Charlotte, daughter of John Dives, of Westminster, 
one of the maids of honour to the Princess Dowager of Wales, and in 1763 
sold the manor to Robert Palmer. Robert Palmer devised the manor to 
his son, Richard Palmer, who sold it in 1789 to James Cordy. James 
Cordy died 2nd July, 1808, and devised the manor to his son and heir, John 
Cordy, for life, with remainder to his son-in-law, George Edwards, the husband 
of the testator's daughter Anne. John Cordy died i8th Jan. 1828, at the 
age of 68, his only child Elizabeth having died an infant, when the manor 
vested in the said George Edwards, who resided at Framlingham. He died 
in 1836, and devised the manor to his wife Anne for life, directing it to be 
sold after her death. It was accordingly sold by the executors of George 
Edwards loth July, 1840, for £150 to Edgar Chenery, of Eye, and is now 
vested in Mrs. Chenery, of Eye. At the time of the sale in 1840 the yearly 
quit rents amounted to £2. 14s. 7d., and the manor extended over a 
messuage and 22 acres.' 

The manor is now vested in the Rev. J. M. Brooke, of 20, Gledham 
Gardens, South Kensington. 

Arms of Masham: Or, a fesse humette Gules, between two lions, 
passant and guardant, Sable. 



' Ipswich Journal, i8th July, 1840. 




84 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

STRADBROKE. 

jHERE was one manor in this place in Saxon times, that of 
Edric. It consisted of 5|- carucates of land, i6 villeins, ii 
bordars, ii plough teams in demesne and 12 belonging to 
the men. At the time of the Survey these details were 
different ; the villeins were reduced to 11, and the bordars 
had increased to 30, the ploughteams in demesne had been 
gradually reduced to 6, and then to 5, but 12 might be 
restored. [And Winburgh (?) was a hamlet included in the same account 
and valuation.] Altogether 20 acres of meadow, wood sufficient to support 
400 hogs, 3 rouncies, 16 hogs (increased to 30 at the time of the Survey), 
and 30 sheep. There were also 2 churches with 40 acres and a half a plough- 
team. Also a carucate of land, 3 ploughteams, wood for the support of 
40 hogs, and 5 acres of meadow, held by 17 socmen. 

Over them the sac and soc was in Hoxne, the bishop's manor, and Edric 
held half of it of the bishop. The value was ;^I4, increased to £16 at the 
time of the Survey, when Walter held of this manor 2 socmen with 40 acres 
valued at 8s. as part of the said valuation ; Robert de Glanville held 4 
with 20 acres, valued at 5s., as part of the said valuation ; Walter Gripp's 
son held i with 15 acres valued at 30^^. as part of the same valuation ; 
and Loernic held i with 20 acres valued at 3s., as part of the same valua- 
tion. The soc and sac belonged to Edric. The manor was 2 leagues long 
and I broad, and paid in a gelt i4^d. At the time of the Survey this manor 
was held by Robert Malet's mother of the Queen's fee. Others had 
holdings here.' 

Roger Poictou held here 30 acres and half a ploughteam, with wood 
sufficient for the maintenance of 8 hogs, which estate had formerly been 
held with a ploughteam by two freemen under commendation. The value 
was 10s.' 

Manor of Stradbroke with Stubcroft. 

The ancient family of Le Rus (or Rufus) was enfeoffed of the parish 
of Stradbroke soon after the Conquest. King Stephen, when Earl of 
Morton, granted to Ernald Rufus, son of Roger, the whole Manor of Strad- 
broke, part of the Honor of Eye, with the soc and advowson of the church, 
and King John, in 1199, confirmed the said grant to Ernald Rufus to hold 
as his grandfather held it. This Ernald in 1201 gave by deed for his soul's 
health and that of Isabel his wife and his ancestors, &c., in pure alms to 
God, St. Mary and the church of Woodbridge and the canons thereof, all 
the tithe of Northaghe and Hunteswyk in this parish, saving a pension of 
4s. per annum to be paid to the prior and convent of Eye. The deed is 
dated at Wytingham. He is called in the register of Eye priory, patron of 
Woodbridge, and his ancestors are declared founders of the priory there. 

In 1253 WiUiam le Rus, son of Hugh le Rus, son of Ernald, died seised 
of the lordship, and from this time to the death of Robert de Brewse in 
1325 the devolution of the manor is identical with that of Hasketon Hall, 
in Carlford Hundred. 

There are two inquisitions of William le Rus, who died in 1253. In 
the one the manor is found to be held of R., Earl of Cornwall, by socage, 
and 5 carucates at the rent oi£2. 6s., whereof the said Earl rendered 2 
marks yearly to Roger de Huntingfield and 3 marks elsewhere in small 

'Dom. ij. 328&, 329. 'Dom. ii. 349. 



STRADBROKE. 85 

amounts. His heir is found to be his daughter Alice, then aged 6 years at 
Christmas." In the second inquisition in 1260 the manor was found to have 
been held of Richard King, of Almain, of the Honor of Eye, by fee farm 
rendering 40 marks yearly, and Byrcholt, pertaining to the manor, to have 
been held of William de Huntingfield by the service of 2 marks yearly. 
Alice is found to be William le Rus's daughter and heir to be then aged 14 
or 15 years of age.'' 

Richard de Brewse is said to have held Stradbroke at the time of the 
compiling of the Hundred Rolls returns,^ and we learn from the Patent Rolls 
in 1280 that a commission was issued to enquire as to the persons who broke 
by night the doors and fences of the park of Richard de Brewse, of Strad- 
broke, and carried away deer.* 

It is said that Sir Richard died in 1296, but this seems doubtful, as 
we find in 1309 a grant of free warren and of a fair in Stradbroke made to 
Richard de Brewse this year.' In 1357-8 a fine was levied of the manor by 
Richard Brewse, chaplain, against Robert Bosevill and Thomas de Bergham. 
This fine included the advowson of Stradbroke and Wingfield churches,^ 
and the following year a fine was levied both of this manor and the Manor 
of Wingfield by Sir John de Wingfield andAlianora his wife against David 
de WoUore, clerk, and Gilbert de Debenham. From this fine the advow- 
sons of the churches were excepted.'' 

The manor then passed to Sir John Wingfield,^ and from him passed 
to his widow Eleanor, who died seised in 1375,' held as of the Honor of 
Eye. On her death the manor passed to Sir John Wingfield's daughter 
and heir Katherine, married to Michael de la Pole, Earl of Suffolk, who died 
in 1415, and through the de la Poles" and Charles Brandon to the King 
the course of devolution is the same as that of the Manor of Eye or Eye 
Sodemere, in Hartismere Hundred. In 1430 we find the manor included 
in a release of aU right from Henry Beaufort, Cardinal ; Humphry, Duke of 
Gloucester ; Richard Beauchamp, Earl of Warwick ; Robert Lord de 
Wyllughby and others to Sir John Shardelow, Thomas Hoo, John Golafre, 
Richard Wyot, Andrew Sperlyng, and Robert Dan vers," and the following 
year a deed by which John Golafre, Andrew Sperlyng, and Robert Danvers 
demise to John Hampdene, Thomas Hasley, and others this and other 
manors. The deed is dated the 20th Sept. 10 Hen. VI. [1431], and letters 
of attorney to deliver seisin of the manor to John Hampdene, Thomas 
Hasley, Richard Rostwold, Thomas Walsyngham, and William Hervy 
bearing even date are also amongst the Harleian Charters." By a writing 
dated the loth Oct. 10 Hen. VI. [1431] WiUiam de la Pole, Earl of Suffolk, 
Sir John Shardelowe, and Thomas Hoo release the manor to John Hampden, 
Thomas Hasley, Richard Rostwold, Thomas Walsingham, and William 
Hervy.'^ The manor is mentioned in the inquis. p.m. of William de la Pole, 
Duke of Suffolk, in 1450.'* 

From the State Papers for 1510 we learn that a grant was made of 
the manor by the King to Thomas, Lord Howard, and Anne his wife in 

'I.P.M., 37 Hen. III. File 14 (17). sI.P.M., 49 Edw. III. pt. ii. 54, Extent. 

'I.P.M., 44 Hen. III. File 23 (17). "See Manor of Hertz in Saxmundham, in 

^H.R. ii. 186. Plomesgate Hundred. 

"Pat. Rolls, 8 Edw. I. i6d. "Harl. 43 E. 19. 

5 Chart RoUs, 3 Edw. II. 23. '^Harl. 50 H. 28. 

''Feet of Fines, 31-32 Edw. III. 39. 'sHarl. 54 I. 15, and see 54 I. ic 

7 Feet of Fines, 33 Edw. III. '4l.p.M., 28 Hen. VI. 25. 

8 See Fressingfield Hall, in this Hundred, 



86 



THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 



exchange for the inheritance of the said Anne in the hands of Edw. IV., 
the said Thomas to take no benefit after the decease of Anne as tenant by 
the curtesy.' The grant by Charles Brandon, Duke of Suffolk, to the 
Crown of the manor was made in exchange by deed dated iSS^-" 

In 1610 the manor was granted to Henry, Prince of Wales, but three 
years later was again in the Crown, in 1650 forming part of the jointure oi 
Queen Henrietta Maria. This same year a Parhamentary Survey was made 
of the manor ,^ and subsequently a lease granted Of it by the Crown to Sir 
WiUiam Morden Harbord, K.B. 

In 1810 the manor was vested in Charles, Marquis Cornwallis, and then 
passed like the Manor of Lings Hall and Broome Hall, in Brome, in the 
Hundred of Hartismere, and is now vested in Lady Bateman, of Broome 
Hall. 

Court Rolls of the Manor of Stradbroke 15-16 Jac. I., will be found in 
the Public Record Of&ce.'* Grants, &c., of Stradbroke Manor will be found 
in the British Museum as follows : 1408, Harl. 54 1. 7 ; 1430, Harl. 43 E. 19 ; 
1431, Harl. 45 I. 12 ; 50 Harl. 27, 28 ; 1435, Add. Ch. 2016. 

Shelton Hall Manor. 

This was the lordship of Henry de Scelton or Shelton in 1271. He 
was succeeded in 1304 by his son. Sir Robert, who died in 1305, and he by 
his son, John de Shelton. On this John's death in 1315 he was succeeded 
by his son and heir, John de Shelton. John de Shelton, who died in 1333, 
by deed without date tied this manor to the prior of Butley to excuse 
that house from all suit and service to the county courts or Hundred courts, 
and John his son confirmed the same. On the last John's death the manor 
appears to have passed to his son, Robert de Shelton, and in 1328 we meet 
with a fine levied of the manor by Robert, son of John de Shelton and 
Matilda his wife against Stephen, parson of Lound church, and Laurence, 
son of Sir John de Shelton.^ 

The manor somewhat later seems to have passed to the Wingfield 
family, for we find that in 1405 Robert de Wingfield presented to the 
chapel belonging to this manor. He was probably the Sir Robert Wingfield, 
of Letheringham, who held the manor of Thorpe Hall, in Hasketon, in Carl- 
ford Hundred, in 1409, and was M.P. for Suffolk in 1428, and from this 
time to the time of Anne Wingfield, widow of Sir Anthony, 1638, the 
devolution is identical with that manor. 

A fine was levied of the manor in 1534 by Thomas Godbold and others 
against Sir Anthony Wyngfeld and others,^ no doubt on the occasion of 
some settlement. There is also a fine in 1537 levied by William Reckeman 
against the said Sir Anthony Wyngfeld which included the advowson of 
the free chapel of Shelton.'' The manor is specifically mentioned in the 
inquis. p.m. of Sir Anthony Wingfield, who died the 20th Aug. 1552,^ and 
Sir Anthony Wingfield's first court was held 17th April, 1628 ; Anne Wing- 
field's 19th Dec. 1638. 

Amongst the Chancery Proceedings is a claim by John Grynelynge, 
2nd son of Robert Grynelynge, deceased, against Thomas Grynelynge and 
others to a share of 204 acres, parcel of this manor of Shelton Hall, purchased 



•S.P. 2 Hen. VIII. 1129. 

»S.P. 30 Hen. VIII. ii. p. 1182 (i8«). 

3D.K.R. 8 App. ii. p. 67. 

* Portfolio, 203, 81. 



^Feet of Fines, 2 Edw. III. 20. 
«Fine, Trin. 26 Hen. VIII. 
'Fine, Easter, 29 Hen. VIII. 
n.PM., 7 Edw, VI. 65. 



STRADBROKE. 



87 



by Robert Grynelynge and Richard Grynelynge his brother of Sir Anthony 
" Wynckfelde.'" 

A fine was levied of this manor and that of Wilby in 1602 by Edward 
Lord Zone he and others against Thomas Wingfield.'' 

The 22nd June, 1659, a first court was held by Edward Carewe, and the 
following year the manor vested in Sir William Blois^ as mortgagee, and he 
held his first court 31st March, 1659, and on his death the manor passed 
to his widow Jane, who held her first court 5th Aug. 1676. 

In 1683 the manor was held by Robert Thompson,* son of Robert 
Thompson and Elizabeth Harfleet his wife, for 26th April this year he held 
his first court. He resided at Newington, co. Middlesex, and died in 1694, 
when the manor passed to his son and heir, Joseph Thompson, who in 1699 
acknowledged that he held the manor, which extended into Fressingfield, 
in free socage of the Manor of Chevenhale, alias Chepenhall.^ On Joseph's 
death the manor probably passed to his nephew William, son of Joseph's 
brother William and of Elizabeth Glover his wife, for ist June, 1744, we 
find William Thompson held his first court. ^ He married Judith, daughter 
of Sir William Ashurst, alderman of London, and on his death the manor 
seems to have devolved on his younger son Robert, who held a court 8th 
Jvme, 1767.' 

In 1789 the manor was held by Stamford Brooksbank and Thomas 
Corbett, for i6th April this year they held their first court as executors and 
trustees of the will of Robert Thompson.* The 24th Nov. 1803, Thomas 
Corbett was lord;' in 1809 William Corbett, from whom the manor passed to 
his widow, EUzabeth Corbett. In 1829 ^'^d ^847 it was vested in William 
Thompson Corbett, and subsequently passed to Thomas George Corbett. 
He by his will dated 27th July, 1861, devised the manor to Arthur, Earl of 
Essex, WiUiam Hulton, Andrew Corbett, and Bartle John Laurie Frere 
upon trust for sale. Andrew Corbett died 9th May, 1864, and Thomas 
George Corbett 25th July, 1868, his will with two codicils being proved 5th 
Sept. 1868, by B. J. L. Frere. A decree in the Court of Chancery was made 
19th Dec. 1868, for administration of the trusts of his will, and 6th May, 
1876, an order for sale. 

Customs : " Custom giveth to the eldest son licence to demise ; timber 
sold by the load ; and licence to sell ; licence to pull down a house ; custom 
permitt recoveries." 

Arms of Thompson : Or, on a fesse indented Az, 3 estoiles Arg. a can- 
ton of the 2nd charged with a sun in his glory. 



' C.P. i. 385 ; see also Chancery Actions 
John Grylynge v. William Hardie. 
C.P. ser. ii. B. Ixx. 43; Robert 
Grenlyng v. Roger and Robert 
Grenlyng touching this manor. lb. 
B. Ixxvii. 23. 

'Fine, Trin. 44 Eliz. 

*See Manor of Blythburgh, in Blything 
Hundred. 

*See Manor of Thorpe Hall, Hasketon, in 
Carlford and Colneis Hundred. 

5 He held Courts 7th July, 1726; 25th 
June, 1734 ; 26th May, 1741. 

^He held Courts also : loth April, 1750 ; 
31st Dec. 1751 ; 38th April, 1782 ; 



24th June, 1752 ; 9th Aug. 1753 ; 
4th June, 1759; 7th Sept. 1759; 
4th July, 1763. 

7 He held Courts also : 27th June, 1768; 

24th July, 1769 ; 2ist April, 1777 ; 
15th Dec. 1778 ; nth April, 1780 ; 
3rd April, 1781 ; 2nd May, 1781 ; 
26th — , 1781 ; 14th Oct. 1784 ; 
nth July, 1786 ; 5th Aug. 1788. 

8 And further Courts 25th Aug. 1789; 

2ist Nov. 1792; 3rd July, 1793; 
i8th Nov. 1795 ; 24th Nov. 1800 ; 
22nd Oct. 1801. 

9 He held further Courts : 17th May, 1804 ; 

29th July, 1808. 



88 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

Manor of Hyllys or Hill's, Drawsword's and Denney's. 

Probably this was the lordship of Maurice Drawsword in 1336, for he 
held lands at that time if not in this parish in that of Denham. In the 
sixteenth century the manor belonged to Thomas Gyrling, who died seised 
of it loth Feb. 1516/ when it passed to his son and heir, John Girling, who 
died in 1587, when it passed to his brother and heir, William Girhng. He 
married Mary, daughter and coheir of George Soane, and died in 1627, 
when the manor went to his son and heir, George Girling, who dying without 
issue the same year it devolved on his brother and heir, William Girling. 
He died 12th May, 1653, at the age of 42, without leaving issue, his only 
son William and daughter Susan having died in their father's lifetime. 

Manor of Wootton's. 

In 1236 Richard de Eye, rector of Fundenhall, in Norfolk, released 
all his manors and hereditaments after his death to Robert Fitz John de 
Thorp and Maud his wife, niece of Richard de Eye. This manor appears 
to have been one of those included in this assurance, and it passed in the 
same course as the Manor of Thorpe Hall, in Horham, in this Hundred, until 
the time of Sir Thomas Knevett, eldest son of John. He died in 1605, 
when this manor vested in Sir Thomas Knevett, who sold it. 

In 1845 we find the manor held by Sir Edward Kerrison, Bart., from 
which time it has devolved in a hke course with the Manor of Thelnetham, 
in Blackbourn Hundred, and is now vested in Lady Bateman. 

Manor of Wotton's now called Thorpe Hall with Wotton's. 

Amongst the early deeds in the Court of Chancery preserved in the 
Record Office is one dated 1359, which is a grant of land in Stradbrooke 
by Lelia, daughter of Andrew de Wottone, of Stradbrooke, to John de 
Lay.^ 

This in 1343 was the lordship of Walter de Wottone, who was hanged 
for felony,^ and his lands were ordered to be delivered to Beatrix, widow 
of Sir Robert de Thorpe. Her son and heir. Sir Edmund de Thorpe, in 1358 
enfeoffed his lands and settled this manor upon his son John, and from this 
time to the time of Sir Thomas Knyvett, son of John Knyvett, who sold the 
manor, it devolved in the same course as the Manor of Thorpe Hall, in 
Horham, in this Hundred. 

We next find the manor vested in Sir Edward Coke, the celebrated 
Lord Chief Justice, from whom it descended to Thomas Coke, Earl 
of Leicester, who sold it to Sir Joshua Vanneck, Bart., from whom it 
descended in the like course with the Manor of Heveningham, in Blything 
Hundred, and is now vested in Lord Huntingfield. 

On the Patent Rolls in 1390 we meet with a grant for life to Queen 
Anne of a fee farm of 40 marks from Stradbrook Manor, but from which 
of the Manors of Stradbroke we are not able to determine.* 

Manor of Barleugh or Buslaugh Hall. 

This is probably the manor intended when it is stated that Robert 
Malet had the manor in Stradbroke called Bradley and gave the tithes 
thereof to Eye priory. 

'I.P.M., 21 Hen. VIII. 73. 'I.P.M., 17 Edw. III. 2d, No. 87. 

^13 Edw. III. C. 3413. *Pat. Rolls, 14 Rich. II. pt. ii. 45. 



STRADBROKE. 89 

The manor was held at the opening of the i6th century by Thomas 
Huntingfield, of Stradbroke, who died seised of it 5th Oct. 1555/ leaving 
two daughters and coheirs, namely, Elizabeth, who married Andrew 
Rivett,' of Brandeston Hall, escheator for Queen Mary and Queen Elizabeth 
in the counties of Norfolk and Suffolk. The other daughter married John 
Vere, by whom she had issue Richard Vere. The said Andrew Rivett 
commenced a suit against this Richard Vere, his nephew, both claiming 
the above manor as heirs to Huntingfield, and the nephew to be revenged 
upon his uncle and prevent a trial at the assizes forged a treasonable letter 
in his uncle's name, and directed it to his attorney, William Bygot, dated 
Feb. loth, 1556, part of the contents of which were as follows : — 

" Also I pray you send me word how the Queen's grace doth, for I 
hear say that she is out of her wits, and like to dye, because she hear say that 
King Edward is alive, the which I pray God it be true, for we never had 
no quiet since she was Queen, but burning and hanging and heading, and 
Popish rehgion, wherefore I trust it will not continue long. I pray you send 
me word most justly, also I pray you look on this closely." 

This epistle was wilfully dropped in Serjeant's Inn, London, and being 
found, was given into the hands of Nicholas Heth, Archbishop of York, 
and then Lord Chancellor, who immediately issued orders for Richard's 
arrest, and committed him to the Tower, where he continued 15 weeks ; 
but the forgery being discovered, he was acquitted, and Richard Vere for 
his offence was branded on the face with the letters F. A. for " false 
accuser," and stood in the pillory at Norwich, London, and Ipswich, when 
he was again remanded to prison ; yet Mr. Rivett could not obtain his own 
pardon until the ist of Queen Elizabeth. Mr. Rivett died in 1572, and was 
buried at Brandeston.^ Mr. Rivett, however, and his wife sold this manor 
in 1564 to Thomas Grenlynge,* and in 1602 it passed under a fine levied 
by John Lemain against Richard Grenlinge and others to the said John 
Lemain.' 

In 1805 John, Lord Henniker, was lord, from which time the manor has 
devolved in the same mode as the Manor of Gt. Thornham, in Hartismere 
Hundred. 

Precipe on a covenant concerning this manor in 1564 will be found 
amongst the Additional Charters in the British Museum.* 



'I.P.M., 2 and 3 P. and M. 202. ♦Fine, Mich. 6 Eliz. 

''See Manor of Brandeston Hall, in Loes ^pine, Trin. 44 Eliz. 

Hundred. *Add. Ch. 25322. 
^See Brandeston Manor, Loes Hundred. 

M 



90 



THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 




SYLEHAM. 

MANOR in this place was held in Saxon times by Olf, with 
the soc. It consisted of 2|- carucates of land, 8 villeins, 12 
bordars, 3 ploughteams in demesne and 12 belonging to the 
men, wood for the support of 150 hogs, 8 acres of meadow, 
and a mill. Of live stock there were 2 rouncies, 8 beasts, 
80 hogs, 3 goats, and a hive of bees. At the time of the 
Survey the manor was held by Robert de Todeni, and the 
details were different. The villeins were reduced to 3, the bordars had 
risen to 13, there was a serf, and the ploughteams belonging to the men had 
come down to 4. Of the live stock the rouncies were reduced to i, the 
beasts to 2, the hogs to 44, and there were 7 sheep. The value was los. 

In the same township was a holding of five freemen, the commenda- 
tion belonging to R. de Todeni's predecessor, and consisted of 30 acres, a 
ploughteam (reduced to half a team at the time of the Survey), an acre of 
meadow, valued at 5s. Also a church with 16 acres valued at 2s. It was 
half a league Ipng and 8 quarentenes broad, and paid in a gelt y^d. The 
soc was in Hoxne, the bishop's manor. At the time of the Survey this 
holding was that of Robert de Todeni.' 

Another holding was that of a freeman under Stigand, and consisted 
of 2 carucates of land, 12 bordars, 2 ploughteams in demesne, and 4 belong- 
ing to the men (reduced to half at the time of the Survey), 5 acres of 
meadow, wood sufficient to support 60 hogs, and a mill, the whole valued 
at 60s. Ailmar and Arfast held this, and at the time of the Survey it was 
of the fee of the Bishop of Thetford.* 

Manor of Syleham Comitis. 

This was the estate of Olf in Saxon times, and of Robert de Tony or 
Todeni at the time of the Great Survey. In 1275 Roger de Clifford 
exercised manorial rights here. The manor belonged in the time of Edw. II. 
to the family of Seymour or St. Maur, and in 1316 Alice, wife of Ralph de 
Seymour, was seised. In 1335 Sir Edmund de Seymour enfeoffed Sir John 
Wingfield of the manor as trustee, and this same year there was a grant of 
free warren to him in Syleham.^ 

Lawrence Seymour, parson of the churches of Syleham and Esham 
(a hamlet of Syleham), and Ralph his brother, released their right ; and in 
the next year Sir John Wingfield released the manor to John, son and heir 
of Sir Edmund Seymour. 

On the Close Rolls in 1339 we find an order to the escheator to 
dehver to Mary, late wife of Thomas, Earl of Norfolk, in dower a fee, and a 
moiety in Syleham which John de " Sancto Mauro " held extended at 
£y. los. yearly.* The manor, however, was soon after conveyed absolutely 
to Sir John Wingfield, whose widow and executrix Alianora settled Esham 
chapel and the advowson of the church of Syleham on the chantry or 
college founded by her at Wingfield in pursuance of the will of her late hus- 
band. She died in 1375 seised of the manor held as of the Castle of Fram- 
lingham,' when it passed to Sir John Wingfield'sdaughterandheirKatherine, 
married to Michael de la Pole, Earl of Suffolk, from which time until the 



'Dom. ii. 4296. 

"Dom. ii. 379&. 

3 Chart. Rolls, 9 Edw. III. 30. 



■* Close Rolls, 13 Edw. III. pt. i. 33. 
5 Extent, I.P.M., 49 Edw. Ill, pt. ii. 54. 



SYLEHAM. 91 

attainder of Edmund de la Pole, Duke of Suffolk, in 1513, the manor passed 
in the same course as the Manor of Stradbroke with Stubcroft. 

The manor is specifically mentioned in the inquis. p.m. of Michael de 
la Pole in 1389/ and of William de la Pole, Duke of Suffolk, in 1450.* It 
was forfeited by John, Earl of Lincoln, and restored to Edmund, Earl 
of Suffolk, in 1495.^ 

In 1510 the manor was granted to Sir Thomas Howard and Anne his 
wife by the King in exchange for the inheritance of the said Anne in lands 
in the hands of Edw. IV., her father, the said Thomas, to take no benefit after 
the death of Anne as tenant by the curtesy.* The grant was in tail.^ 

In the year 1553 the manor is said to have been vested in Robert 
Sanderson, but it was the following year granted by Queen Mary to Sir 
Henry Jernegan, of Cossey, and Frances his wife. 

Amongst the Chancery Proceedings in the time of Queen Elizabeth 
is a bill by Thomas Heringe to protect the title to copyholds against Henry 
Jernegan and others, as to lands held of this manor granted to plaintiff by 
King Henry VIII., the then lord of the manor, which manor has since 
become vested in the defendant,^ and another claim amongst the same 
proceedings is found made by the said Thomas " Heringe " under a will 
against Dame Frances " Jermingham," widow, and others as to lands in 
Syleham held this manor " late the estate of William Hearinge plaintiff's 
father the testator, the manor formerly belonging to the Crown having been 
granted by Queen Mary to Sir Henry " Jermingham" and Dame Frances 
his wife."' 

Davy states that Sir Henry Jernegan had licence to alien in 1577 ^^ 
Thomas Barrow, but having regard to the fact that the grant of the manor 
was made to Sir Henry and his wife Frances, and the fact of her being the 
survivor, and the allegation of the latter of the above-mentioned chancery 
suits, this seems strange ; but we do meet in 1577 ^^^^ ^ ^^^ levied of this 
manor by Thomas Barrowe against the said Henry Jernegan.' 

The manor was next held by Sir Michael Stanhope, and from him 
passed to his daughter and coheir Elizabeth, married to George, Lord 
Berkeley, who sold the said manor to Sir Henry Wood, Bart., eldest brother 
of Thomas, Bishop of Lichfield. Sir Henry was knighted loth April, 1644, 
and accompanied the Queen Henrietta Maria to France as treasurer to her 
household, an office he retained till her death. He was probably created a 
baronet in 1657 by King Chas. II. when in exile. He married ist Anne 
Webb, and 2ndly Mary, 4th daughter of Sir Thos. Gardiner, of Cuddeston, 
Oxon., maid of honour to Queen Henrietta Maria. Sir Henry Wood died 
25th May, 1671,^ leaving an only child Mary his sole heir. She married 
Charles Fitzroy, Duke of Southampton, but died without issue, and was 
buried in Westminster Abbey i6th Nov. 1680. From this time the manor 
passed as the Manor of Blythford, in Blything Hundred,'" until the death 
of Sir WiUiam Chapman, Bart., in 1785, when the heirs sold this manor 
to Wilham Mann, a flour factor here, on whose death it was purchased by 
John Dyson, a banker and brewer, of Diss, who sold. Mr. Bransby Cooper 
held in 1843. 

'I.P.M., 13 Rich. II. 41. 7C.P. ii. 72. 

T.P.M., 28 Hen. VI. 25. 'Fine, Mich. 19-20 EUz. 

3R.P. vi; 474, 475. ^Will 24th and proved 29th May, 1671. 

♦ S.P. 2 Hen. VIII. 1129. '°^^^ Dunningworth Manor, in Plomesgate 

5 S.P. 2 Hen. VIII. 1344. Hundred, and Staverton Manor, in 

^C.P- ii. 58. Eyke, in Loes Hundred. 



92 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

In 1885 the manor belonged to Miss Mary Taylor, and is now vested in 
Capt. Sir Frederick E. S. Adair, Bart., of Flixton Hall. 

Syleham Hall is a handsome mansion standing in pleasant grounds, 
and is the residence of H. Palgrave Raven. It belongs to Miss Annie H. 
Fairbrother, she having inherited the same from E. J. Fairbrother, who 
purchased it of the Rev. A. Cooper in 1866. 

Manor of Syleham, Monk's Hall or Tylney's or Syleham Hall. 

This manor no longer exists. Herbert de Losinga or Losing, first Bishop 
of Norwich, gave to Roger Bigot, or rather to the Cluniac priory, at Thet- 
f ord, then lately founded by him, this manor and the church of Syleham, 
being his own private property with all that belonged to them, as the water- 
mill, fishery, &c., in exchange for Tombland and other possessions settled 
by Roger on the Cathedral at Norwich. 

Ministers' Accounts of the manors in 1324 while held by the priory 
will be found in the Public Record Office.' Extents of the manor as be- 
longing to the priory in 1379-80, time of John de Fordham, prior, and 1433, 
time of Nicholas Fouldon, will be found amongst the Additional Charters 
in the British Museum.'' 

This manor was called from the monks at Thetford "Monk's Hall Manor," 
and the impropriation was at the dissolution of that monastery granted to 
Thomas, Duke of Norfolk. In 1544 the manor was sold by the Duke of 
Norfolk to Thomas Tylney, who is said to have granted out all the copy- 
holds upon long leases, and thus extinguished the manor. ^ We fail to see 
how the granting of long leases would have operated to extinguish the 
manor, and we find that in 1565 the manor (dead or alive) passed from 
Thomas Tylney to his 2nd son, Emery Tylney.* 

Amongst the Chancery Proceedings is a claim by descent of Nicholas 
Statforde against Emery Tylney and others for relief against pretended 
forfeiture of messuage and land in Syleham, parcel of this manor, claimed 
by plaintiff from his grandfather ; but defendant Tylney, lord of the 
manor, refused to admit him, alleging forfeiture by virtue of a lease being 
made to his father by his grandmother and Agnes. ^ In 1564 a fine was 
levied of the manor by Nicholas Everard and others against this Emery 
Tylney and his wife,* and the following year a claim was made by the Crown 
on the said Emery Tylney for forfeiture of the manor.^ 

Emery Tylney had licence to alien the manor to Nicholas Everard and 
others, probably trustees, for in 1592 Philip Tilney was, according to Davy, 
lord, and from him the manor passed to his son and heir, Thomas Tilney. 
But see Shelley Hall Manor, in Samford Hundred, which throws doubt 
on this devolution of Davy's. The old manor-house and demesne lands 
were in 1847 ^^ ^^e Wollaston family, Henry Septimus Hyde WoUaston, 
of South Weald, in Essex, being the then proprietor. 

Amongst the Additional Charters in the British Museum is a precipe 
on a covenant concerning this manor in 1564.* 

The Rev. E. Farrer, writing in the East Anglian Miscellany, 13th 
June, 1908, says of Monk's Hall manor-house : " It is a nice old house, 

'18 Edw. II. Bundle 1127, No. 4. 'C.P. iii. 104. 

"Add. Ch. 16561, 16562. «Fine, Mich. 6 Eliz. 

^Page, Hist, of Suff. 421. ^Memoranda Rolls, 7 Eliz. Trin. Rec. 
*See Manor of Shellev Hall, in Samford Rot. 50. 

Hundred. ^Add. Ch. 25327. 



SYLEHAM. 93 

and lies quite close to the road leading from Syleham Mill to Hoxne. It 
consists of one long block, with a fine stack of ornamental brick chimneys, 
and a two-storied porch ; on the west side is a wing, with a stack of plain 
chimneys, and a crow-footed gable of the southern end. On this gable 
is a curious small circular opening like a window. There are some early 
paintings on the walls inside, dated about the latter end of the 17th century, 
one of them representing Solomon's notorious judgment, and some 
panelling." 

Manor of Esham. 

In 1285 Thomas Charles had free warren here, and in 1301 we learn 
from the Patent Rolls that a commission was issued on his complaint that 
Ralph de Sancto Mauro and Alice his wife, Roger de Clyfton, Richard de 
Gosebek, WiUiam Cokerd, of Harleston, and Avice his wife, Hugh le Proster, 
of Thrandeston, Robt. de Raveningham, Richard le Prestre, of Neuton 
Floteman, and Richard Rannespalefreyur assaulted him at Syleham and 
carried away his goods.' 

In 1316 the manor belonged to the prior of Thetford. In 1335 it was 
vested in Sir Edmund de Seymour, and from him passed to his son and 
heir John Seymour, and from him to Laurence Seymour, who sold the 
manor to Sir John Wingfield. 

In 1349 John Garlek and Sarah his wife conveyed their third part 
of the Manor of Esham to Sir John Wingfield. 

Amongst the Additional Charters in the British Museum is a grant in 
Esham in 1425.'' 

This manor is probably the manor included under the name Charles 
Manor in a fine levied by Thomas Mene and others against Anthony Yaxley 
and others in 1545. The fine included lands in Essam, Wey bread, Wing- 
field, and Fressingfield.^ 



'Pat. Rolls, 29 Edw. I. zM. 'Fine, Mich. 37 Hen. VIII. 



'Add Ch. 19330 




94 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

TANNINGTON. 

|HERE was one manor in this place, that of Edric, which con- 
sisted of 8 carucates of land, 13 villeins, 17 bordars, 3 
ploughteams in demesne and 12 belonging to the men, 
and wood sufficient to support 200 hogs. Also 20 acres of 
meadow, 11 beasts, 16 hogs, 16 sheep, 20 goats, and 3 hives 
of bees. There was a church with 30 acres and half a 
ploughteam, the value of the whole being £14. It was 
a league and 3 quarentenes long and a league broad, and paid in a gelt lod. 
At the time of the Survey it was held by Robert Malet's mother of the 
Queen's fee, and some details were altered — the villeins were increased to 
15, the bordars to 19, the ploughteams reduced to 8, the hogs were 
increased to 60, and the sheep to 20. Richard held of this manor 30 acres 
valued at los, a part of the above valuation, and Garin held 24 acres valued 
at 5s. as part of the same valuation.' 

Manor of Tannington or Braisworth's. 

This was part of the great estates of Edric of Laxfield in Saxon times, 
and of Robert Malet in the time of the Conqueror. In 13 16 the lordship 
was held by William Rune ton or Rungeton, and later by Peter de Brise- 
worth, who was outlawed in 1367. William de Briseworth, his son and heir, 
had the custody granted to him of a messuage and 160 acres of land, &c., 
" late of Peter." Another Peter de Briseworth then held, and from him 
the manor passed to his daughter and heir Maud, wife of Roger Deneys, of 
Tannington. Her will is dated in 1414.'' To her succeeded her son and 
heir, John Deneys, and on his death the manor went to his daughter and 
heir Anne, married to Thomas Playters, of Thorndon. They both died 
the same year, 1479, and their successor was their son and heir, William 
Playters, of Sotterley, who died in 1512, when the manor passed through 
Christopher, Thomas, William, and Sir Thomas Playters in the same course 
as the Manor of Uggeshall, in Biything Hundred. In 1538 we meet with a 
fine levied of the Manor of Tannington by Edward Mostyn, serjeant at law, 
and others against Alexander Aeylmer.^ In 1659 the manor was vested 
in John Wyard, and in 1673 in Philip Wyard, and then in James Wyard. 
This information is derived from Loder's account of the freeholders of the 
Manor of Saxstead, where he has the following entries : " John Woods, 
holdeth freely lands in Tannington ; which were John Woods', 1691 ; 
John Jeffrys', 1659 •, Simon JeSrys', 1621 ; George Jeffrys', 1608 ; and 
William Peter's, i. E. 6. by the annual rent of i6s." 

" James Wyard, Gen., hold the Manor of Bruseworth, alias Bruis- 
yards, in Tanington, with the lands thereto belongmg, freely in socage, 
by suit of Court, and paying double the rent for a relief ; which was Philip 
Wyard's, Gen. 1673 ; John Wyard's, Esq., 1659 '> Sir Thomas Playters 
in 1608 ; and — Playter's, Esq., i. E. 6, by the annual rent of 43s. 2d." 

In 1792 the manor was vested in William Cooper, of Parham, who died 
in 1833, when it passed to his daughter and heir, Elizabeth Cooper, who 
died in 1834. The following year, 2nd June, the manor was offered for 
sale at the Crown and Anchor, Framlingham, described as " late the 
property of WiUiam Cooper, Gent.," subject to an annuity of £100 to Mrs. 

'Dom. ii. 328. ^Fine, Hil. 30 Hen. VIII. 

^Blomefield mentions that the Manor of 

Briseworth is included in the will of 

Sir Simon de Felbrigg in 1431. 



TANNINGTON. 95 

Cooper for life, her age being then 71. The manor with Braisworth Hall 
and 219a. 3r. and 29p. and a double cottage, sold for ;^5,5oo to John 
Meadows, of Stanstead.' Before 1855 it was acquired by the Earl of Strad- 
brooke, and in the present Earl the lordship is now vested. 

A rental of the manor in 1731 will be found in the Davy MSS., Hoxne, 
Vol. ii, fol. 286b. 

Manor of Osberne's. 

This was the lordship at some time held by Robert Osberne, and 
passed to his daughter and heir Maud. In 1478 it was held by Thomas 
Playters and Anne his wife, from whom it passed to Robert Broun and 
Alianora his wife." In 1609 the manor was held by Michael Fuller, gent. 

We find Tannington Manor mentioned in the inquis. p.m. of Sir 
Anthony Rous, who died 8th Feb. 1545, leaving Thomas Rous his son and 
heir.^ 



'The manor had been offered for sale in per annum. I-pswich Journal, 27th 

Oct. 1792, at the Crown, Fram- May, 1820. 

lingham, and also in 1820, when 'Feet of Fines, 18 Edw. IV. 10. 

the rents — all free rents— were 'I.P.M., i Edw. VI. 
stated to amount to jfi. 19s. 7d. 




96 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

WEYBREAD. 

^ MANOR here was held in Saxon times by a freeman under 
commendation, and consisted of 2 carucates of land, 10 
bordars, 2 ploughteams in demesne and 2 belonging to the 
men (reduced to i^ at the time of the Survey), 10 acres of 
meadow, wood for the support of 60 hogs, a mill, a rouncy, 
4 beasts, 30 hogs, 30 sheep, and 4 hives of bees. At the 
time of the Survey this manor was held by Humfrey of 
Robert Malet's mother of the Queen's fee. Also a freeman held 20 acres 
and half a ploughteam. The whole was valued at 30s. increased to 50s. 
at the time of the Survey. The soc was in Hoxne (half a church with 
8 acres and half a ploughteam valued at i6d.). 

In the same township were three freemen under commendation having 
91 1- acres, 17 bordars,3 ploughteams (reduced to 2 at the time of the Survey), 
6 acres of meadow, a mill, and 3 fourth parts of another. Valued at 40s. 
It was held by Humfrey, the soc being in Hoxne. 

In this place was another holding of six freemen (Humfrey holding over 
five and Walter over one) valued at los., with 72 acres, 5 bordars, 2 plough- 
teams (reduced to half at the time of the Survey), 4^ acres of meadow, 
wood for the support of 14 hogs, and a mill, valued at 17s. It was the land 
of Robert Malet's mother of the Queen's fee. 

Another holding was that of Humfrey over three socmen, with 90 
acres, 2 bordars, 2 J ploughteams (reduced merely to an ox at the. time of 
the Survey), 4 acres of meadow, wood for the support of 20 hogs, and a 
mill, valued at 15s., increased at the time of the Survey to 25 s. 6d.' 

Among the lands of Roger de Poictou were two holdings here. The 
first consisted of 35^ acres, 2 ploughteams (later i), and at the Survey only 
half a team, valued at 4s., formerly held by four freemen and a half under 
commendation. The other consisted of 4 acres of demesne land.' Among 
the lands of Earl Ralph kept for the King by Goodrich the steward was a 
holding of i bordar and a half with 7^ acres of land and half an acre of 
meadow, wood sufficient to support 6 hogs and half a ploughteam. It was 
included in the valuation of Redenhall, the soc being in Hoxne. ^ 

Belonging to the Abbot of St. Edmunds were 30 acres, 2 villeins, a 
ploughteam, 3 acres of meadow, wood for the support of 10 hogs, valued 
at los.* 

Belonging to WiUiam, Bishop of Thetford, was a socman with 2 acres 
valued at 10^.^ 

Under the heading " Instead," which is in Wey bread, we find the 
entry, "These be the freemen of Suffolk who remain in the King's hand." 
It consisted of a freeman over whom Bishop Ailmer had commendation 
with 10^ acres, the fourth part of a mill, a bordar, and half a ploughteam 
(reduced to 2 oxen at the time of the Survey). It was held by William 
Malet, later by Robert his son, who supposed that it belonged to his father's 
fee." 

Manor of Weybread Hall. 

This was the lordship of Robert Malet at the time of the Great Survey, 
Humfred being the tenant. In 1215 Nicholas de Shelton had purchased 

'Dom. ii. 3296 (ter.). •'Dom. ii. 3686. 

*Dom. ii. 349 {ter.). 'Dom. ii. 379. 

'Dom. ii. 286. 6Dom. ii. 447. 



WEYBREAD. 



97 



all the estate of Robert Maloysel and Alexander his son in the parish, A 
little later we find the manor vested in Sir Oliver de Ingham, who died 
seised of it in 1281/ when it passed to his widow Elizabeth in .dower, and 
then to his son and heir. Sir John de Ingham, who died in 1308,' when the 
manor passed to his son and heir. Sir Oliver de Ingham, who died in 1343,^ 
when it went to Elizabeth his widow in dower, from whom it passed to 
Sir Oliver's daughter and coheir Joan, married to Sir Miles Stapleton, who 
died in 1364 (?), and on the pavement of the chancel of the church at Ingham, 
in Norfolk, was formerly to be seen a portraiture of a knight in complete 
armour and his lady on the right hand in brass, and round the gravestone : 

" Priez pour les almes Monsieur Miles de Stapleton et Dame Johanne sa 
femme, fille de Monsieur Olvier de Ingham, fondeurs de ceste mayson, que 
Dieu de leur almes eit pitee." 

Joan the widow seems to have died about 1383,* when the manor 
passed to her son and heir. Sir Miles Stapleton. He levied a fine of the manor 
in 1417, in which he himself was pet. and Robert Brewse, Oliver Gross, 
John Boys, WilUam Sheffeld, clerk, were deforciants.^ 

Sir Miles Stapleton married Ela, daughter of Sir Edmund Ufford, 
brother of Robert, Earl of Suffolk, by Eva his wife, daughter of Sir John 
Pierpoint, and died in 1417,® when the manor devolved on his eldest sur- 
viving son and heir. Sir Bryan Stapleton, who in 1430 levied a fine of the 
manor against Henry, Earl of Northumberland, John Talbot, Thomas 
Scales, Will. Phelip, Thomas Kerdeston, Henry Inglose, Thomas Chancers, 
Edmund Stapilton, William Paston, John Brakle, and John Lynford, of 
Staleham.' In the fine Sir Brian Stapleton is described as of Ingham, in 
Norfolk. He married Cecilia, daughter of William, Lord Bardolf, and 
died in 1438,' when the manor passed to his son and heir, Sir Miles 
Stapleton. 

It should be pointed out that the inquisition p.m. of Brian " Stapilton " 
throws doubt on his holding the " Manor of Weybred." It does include 
the manor, but also includes shortly, a messuage, 40 ac. of land, 20 ac. of 
pasture^ 8 ac. of meadow, 6 ac. of wood in Weybread, called " Hardegraves, 
as of Manor of Weybred." He could hardly hold land as tenant of his own 
lordship. He may, however, have held as trustee, which seems possible 
from two deeds amongst the Stowe Charters in the British Museum dated 
in 1455 and 1456. One is a power of attorney from Thomas Sakvyle, 
Richard Doget, and John Waynflet to Thomas Alger, jun., to deliver 
seisin to Sir Miles Stapilton, Richard Fryston, Robert Estley, and Nicholas 
Capon, of all the lands in Weybread which formerly belonged to William 
Hardegrave.^ The other is a conveyance by Sir Miles Stapilton, Richard 
Fryston, Robert Estley, and Nicholas Capon to Nicholas Stanton, 
" clericus," John Rippes, John Goodwyn, and John Chaumbers, of Wey- 
bread, of all lands (except 5 roods called Hardgrave Howe) lately owned 
by WiUiam Hardgrave, in Weybread, which the grantors lately held jointly 
by feoffment of Thomas Sakvyle and others, also a messuage in Weybread 
caUed " Juddys " conditionally on payment of £30 within 6 years.'" Sir 
Miles Stapleton married twice — ist Ehzabeth, daughter of Sir Simon 



'I.P.M., 10 Edw. I. 4. 
^I.P.M., 3 Edw. II. 57. 
3I.P.M., 18 Edw. III. 49. 
4I.P.M., 8 Rich. II. 55. 
5 Feet of Fines, 5 Hen. V. 35. 



6I.P.M., 7 Hen. V. 47. 
7 Feet of Fines, 8 Hen. VI. 10. 
8I.P.M., 17 Hen. VI. 34. 
'33 Hen. VI., Stowe Ch. 273. 
'°34 Hen. VI., Stowe Ch. 274. 



98 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

Felbrig, by whom he had no issue, and 2ndly Katherine, daughter of Sir 
Thomas de la Pole, who survived him, and married Sir Richard Harcourt. 
Sir Miles Stapleton died ist Oct. 1466,' leaving two daughters and coheirs.^ 
Elizabeth the eldest married Sir William Calthorpe, and Joan became the 
2nd wife of, ist Christopher, son of Sir Richard Harcourt by Edith his 
1st wife, and 2ndly of Sir John Hudleston. The manor went ist to the 
widow Katherine (who was Sir Miles's 2nd wife), a settlement having been 
made upon Sir Miles Stapleton and Katherine, and the heirs of the body of 
the said Miles, the granting trustee or feoffee being Richard Freston, clerk. 

Katherine died 31st July, 1490,^ and the manor, probably on a division 
of the property, passed to Sir William Calthorpe in right of his wife. She 
is said on the death of Sir William to have married Sir John Fortescue, 
Chief Justice of the King's Bench, who with her resided at Ingham. On 
his death she was again married to Sir Edward Howard, Lord High 
Admiral. On Sir William Calthorpe's death in 1494," the manor passed to 
his son and heir. Sir Francis Calthorpe, against whom a fine was levied of 
the manor in 1535 by Richard Southwell and others.' This was no doubt 
on the occasion of some settlement. Sir Francis Calthorpe married ist 
Elizabeth, daughter of Sir John Wyndham, by whom he had no issue, 
and 2ndly Elizabeth, daughter of Ralph Berney. On the death of Sir 
Francis the manor passed to his widow Elizabeth for life by way of dower, 
and then to his son and heir, Charles Calthorpe. We meet with two fines 
of the manor in the time of Queen Elizabeth. The first was levied in 1573 
by Charles Calthorpe against William Calthorpe,® and the second in 1576 
by the said William Calthorpe against Edward Shelton.' About this time 
Charles Calthorpe with William Calthorpe, his brother, who had married 
Thomasine, daughter of Sir Thomas Tyndale, of Hockwold, sold the manor 
to Sir Thomas Gawdy, of Gawdy Hall, one of the judges of the Common 
Pleas. Letters of Ruth Gawdy, of Wey bread, to her cousin. Sir B. Gawdy, 
without date, will be found amongst the Egerton MSS.,and letters of Thomas 
Gawdy, of Weybread, to his brother Bassingbourn in 1584 and to Sir B. 
Gawdy 1594-1605 in the same collection.^ 

On Sir Thomas Gawdy's death the manor went in dower to his widow. 
Dame Frances Gawdy, for life, and then to his son and heir, Henry Gawdy, 
of Weybread. Henry Gawdy married Elizabeth, daughter of Robert 
Warner, and was created K.B. at the coronation of King James I. He 
assigned the manor to Elizabeth de la Fontaine and Geo. Blomefield. 

Elizabeth de la Fontaine married Sir Daniel Deligne, and in 1658 we 
find the first court of Dame Elizabeth Deligne, widow of Sir Daniel, held. 
She had an estate for life, and the manor on her death passed to her 2nd 
son, Thomas Deligne, who held his first court for the manor 30th April, 1683. 
From Thomas the manor passed to his brother, Edward Deligne, who held 
his first court 19th May, 1693, and by deeds 19th and 30th Oct, this year, 
and a recovery Mich, term 5 W. and M. barred the entail. From Edward 
the manor passed to his nephew, Daniel Deligne, who held his first court 6th 
July, 1703. On the death of Daniel Deligne the manor is said to have passed 

' I.P.M., 6 Edw. IV. 19. William Calthorpe dying this same 

*Sir Miles Stapleton's will was proved year and leaving a different heir. 

2ist Dec. 1466. 5 Fine, Trin. 27 Hen. VIII. 

^I.P.M., 10 Hen. VII. 1096. «Fine, Hil. 15 Eliz. 

*In Lound Manor, Lothingland Hundred, 'Fine, Trin. 18 Eliz. 

and in Brome Hall Manor, in ^Egerton, 2713-2716. 

Hartismere Hundred, we have a Sir 



WEYBREAD. 99 

to his cousin and heir-at-law, Anne Orton, who married George Gregory the 
younger, and she did indeed hold a court 20th Sept. 1733, and her husband 
Gregory a first court nth June, 1739 ; but, as a matter of fact, it was by deed 
dated 15th April, 1710, conveyed to trustees upon trust to sell to pay 
debts of Daniel Deligne, and was by deeds dated nth and 12th Feb. 1746, sold 
to John Lucas, who held a first court 14th May, 1747, and dying in 1760 
devised the same by will 20th Nov. 1760, to Dame Elizabeth Deligne, 
apparently for life, and then to Edmund Pepys, eldest son of John Pepys, 
deceased, in fee. Edmund Pepys held a first court 14th June, 1762, and 
by deed 29th Jan. 1765, sold the manor to Richard Aytors, of Lombard 
Street, for £11,900.' 

He held a first court 8th April, 1765, and taking the additional name 
of Lee, devised the manor and estate, together with another manor in 
this parish called Irstede, or Istead Hall, by will dated 5th July, 1802,* 
to his son Robert Lee, of Walthamstow, in Essex, who sold them both, 
the Weybread Hall Manor and estate to Jennings Booty, yeoman/ and 
this Istead Manor to William Cook, the owner of the water mill. 

Page says that this manor passed from the Gawdys to the Hobart 
family, and that John Hobart, of Lincoln's Inn, son of Sir John Hobart, 
who was 4th son of James Hobart, of Hales Hall, in Loddon, in Norfolk, 
was lord of the Manor of Weybread Hall, and resided at the manor house, 
where he died in 1683, leaving an only surviving child Barbara, married to 
Herbert Astley, LL.D., Dean of Norwich, who was succeeded by their son, 
Hobart Astley. " This gentleman/' says Page, " sold the manor and 
demesne to Edward de Ligne, gent., and in 1703 Daniel de Ligne was lord." 
This, of course, may have been the case, but the writer has seen a court 
roll of the manor for a court held 27th April, I. W. and M. [1689], in which 
it was stated that at that time Thomas de Ligne was lord. 

In 1855 Jennings Booty was lord, and in 1885 it is stated that it 
belonged to Mrs. Hazard. 

The custom of the manor is : A moiety to widow for dower ; the eldest 
son is heir, and one-third of the timber to the lord. A rental of the manor, 
Mich. 1700, is given in the Davy MSS., Hoxne, vol. ii. fol. 325. From this 
rental it appears that the manor extended into the parishes of Withersdale, 
Fressingfield, Mendham, and Weybread. 

Weybread Hall is a fine old mansion now occupied as a farmhouse. 
It was formerly encompassed by a moat. 

There are papers relating to Weybread Manor and rectory in a suit 
between Francis Norris v. Francis Burley amongst the Tanner MSS. in the 
Bodleian.* 

Arms of Ingham : Per pale. Or and Vert, a cross moline. Gules. Of 
Stapleton : Argent, a lion rampant, Sable. 

Manor of Istead al. Hovell's al. Weybread in Weybread 
EiTHANE or Earsham al. ESSAM. 

This manor was held by Robert Hovel, of Wyverstone in 1225, and it 
devolved in the same course as the Manor of Wyverstone, in Hartismere 

1 Fine, Hil. 5 Geo. III. 1814, and the estate then consisted 

2 Proved, P.C.C. llth Dec. 1802. of 207a. 31. 34p. Ipswich Journal, 

3 The manor was offered for sale at the 23rd April, 1814. 

Swan Inn, Harleston, nth May, * Tanner, ccxvii. 35; ccxix. 36. 



100 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

Hundred, to the time of Sir llugh Hovel, who succeeded his father Robert 
about 1292. In 1314 Sir Hugh Hovel,' and Agnes his wife levied a fine 
of the manor against Robert de Todenham/ 

In 1442 Henry de Walpole, of Houghton, in Norfolk, fifth of that name 
in lineal descent, held the manor, and gave it by will to John his son by 
Margaret his wife, daughter of Sir John Haricke, Knt., of Southam, co. 
Norfolk, which John de Walpole is said by Blomefield to have granted the 
same about 1481 to his brother William, who died without issue. 

John Walpole, however, married Elizabeth, daughter of Robert Shawe, 
of Derby, and died seised 12th April, 1494,^ when the manor passed to his 
son and heir, Thomas Walpole. Thomas was then 38 years of age, and the 
manor was stated to be worth £5, and to be held of Sir William Calthorpe 
as of the Manor of Weybread Hall by knight's service. Thomas Walpole 
by his will dated 24th May, 1512, left the manor to his widow Alice for life. 
It appears from the will that John his eldest son died before him, and had a 
wife Anne who survived him, likewise that his daughter Agnes was married 
to William Russell, and Edward Walpole was his eldest surviving son and 
heir, but he constitutes executors of his will his son Henry Walpole 
(ancestor of the Walpoles in Lincolnshire) and his brothers-in-law Geffery 
and William Cobb. His first wife was Joan, daughter of William Cobb, of 
Sandringham, by whom he had issue. The will was proved 7th April, 1513, 
the testator having died 24th Jan. The widow died in 1537, when the 
manor passed to Thomas's son and heir, Edward Walpole. He married 
Lucy, daughter of Sir Terry Robsart, sister of Sir John Robsart, of Siderston, 
and heir to Amy his daughter, ist wife of Sir Robert Dudley, the great Earl 
of Leicester, in Queen Elizabeth's time, daughter and heir of Sir John 
Robsart. Edmund Walpole was buried at Houghton with his ancestors 
2nd Jan. 1558, and the manor went to his widow Lucy, who this year held 
her first court. 

She died ist Feb. 1559, and this year her son and heir, John Walpole, 
inherited also the manor of Siderston, in Norfolk, and other lands as cousin 
and heir to Amy Dudley, who had died without issue. He married 
Catharine, daughter and coheir of William Callybut, of Coxforth, co. 
Norfolk, and was buried with his ancestors at Houghton 29th March, 
1585, when the manor passed to his widow Catharine, who held her first 
court loth April, 1589. She died 25th Sept. 1612, and her will is dated 
i6th June, 5 Jac. I., and was proved at Norwich nth Jan. 1612.* 

The manor, subject to Catharine's life interest, passed to her son and John 
Walpole's heir, Edward Walpole. He left England shortly after his father's 
death, having a licence to travel for the Lords of the Council, and proceeded 
to Rome, where he received minor orders, and in 1592 was ordained to the 
priesthood. Under the impression that his ordination was unknown in 
this country, he returned the following year, and stayed for some time with 
his brother Callybut ; but the fact of his being a " seminary priest " 
becoming known, he hastily fled to Belgium, where he was admitted to the 
Society of Jesuits. In 1595 he was indicted in the court of Queen's Bench 
for a supposed treason done at Rome on the ist April, 1593, and on 29th 
May was outlawed at Norwich. His estates were confiscated to the Crown, 
but his mother Catharine being stUl in possession of the manor, two years 

I See Manor of Weston Market, in Black- ^LP.M., 10 Hen. VII. 1020. 

bourn Hundred. "'Coker fol. 269. 

»Feet of Fines, 8 Edw. II. 26. 



WEYBREAD. loi 

elapsed before the Queen made any attempt to profit by the confiscation. 
In 1597 (3rd Aug.), however, the manor was granted to James Hussey 
and John Goodman in consideration of the services of Sir Anthony Ashley, 
Clerk of the Privy Council. The manor, however, or rather the rever- 
sion, was bought back from the grantees by Edward Walpole's brother 
Callybut, by deed dated 27th Sept. 1597, he paying for the estate a fine of 
£1,600.' Callybut Walpole married Elizabeth, daughter and coheir of 
Edmund Bacon, of Hessett, and had several children. 

Edward Walpole in 1598 returned to England, and received a pardon in 
1605. On his mother's death in 1612 he executed a deed of gift dated 2nd May, 
1613, renouncing all claims to his paternal estates to his brother Callybut. 
Callybut Walpole died 3rd Nov. 1637, in his 78th year, and was buried at 
Houghton 4th May, 1646, when the manor passed to his son and heir, Robert 
Walpole, born 23rd Sept. 1593. He married Susan, daughter of Sir Edward 
Barkham, Knt., Lord Mayor of London, 19 James L, and had issue three 
daughters and a son Edward christened at Houghton 9th Nov, 1621. 
Susan his wife died, and was buried at Houghton 9th Nov. 1622, her husband 
surviving 41 years, and dying ist May, 1663. The manor passed to his son 
and heir. Sir Edward Walpole, who in 1649 ^^^ married Susan, 2nd daughter 
and coheir of Sir Robert Crane, of Chilton, Knt. and Bart., and had been 
elected a member for the borough of King's Lynn in the Parliament begun at 
Westminster, 25th April, 1660, which voted the return of King Charles II. 
He and his father joined with Sir Horatio Townshend (afterwards Viscount 
Townshend) in fortifying the haven of King's Lynn and raising forces for 
His Majesty's reception to meet the contingency of the King not being 
peaceably restored, for which service he was made one of the Knights of the 
Bath at the coronation of the King, and being again elected a member for 
Lynn in the Long Parliament died during the sitting thereof in the 46th 
year of his age, and was buried at Houghton 9th March, 1667-8. Sir Edward 
was highly esteemed by all who knew him, and the Corporation of Lynn 
had such a sense of his integrity and services in the House of Commons that 
they made him a present of a magnificent piece of plate bearing an inscrip- 
tion expressing their esteem of his great abilities. Sir Edward had 13 
children, and the manor passed to his son and heir, Robert Walpole, born 
i8th Nov. and baptised 28th of the same month, 1650. He was elected to 
Parliament for the borough of Castle Rising from the first year of King 
William and Queen Mary till his decease in Nov. 1700. He was Deputy- 
Lieutenant and Colonel of the Militia in the County of Norfolk, and held 
other offices, being distinguished amongst the most eminent of his day. 
He married Mary, only daughter and heir of Sir Jeffery Burwell, of 
Rougham, co. Suffolk, and was father of Sir Robert Walpole, ist Earl of 
Orford. Robert Walpole sold the manor in 1684 to Nicholas Jacob. 

The Jacob family had held lands in Wey bread at least 150 years 
earlier, for amongst the Stowe Charters in 1538 we find a grant from John 
Coke, heir of Margaret Coke, widow (being son of Henry Coke, brother and 
heir of John Coke, heir of the said Margaret) to Nicholas Jacob, of all the 
lands in Weybread which descended to him after the death of the said 
Margaret to the use of himself (the grantor) and his heirs ;' and a grant in 
1542 from Nicholas Jacob, of Weybread, in pursuance of the will of John 
Coke to John Coke, son of the said John Coke, of all lands in Weybread 

'See Dr. Jessopp's " One Generation of a '30 Hen. VIII., Stowe Ch. 679. 
Norfolk House," Norwich, 1878, 
pp. 274-277. 



102 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

which descended to him after the death of Margaret Coke to the use of 
himself (the grantor) and his heirs.' 

Nicholas Jacob, by his will dated 2nd Jan. 1705/ gave the manor to 
his godson, Nicholas Jacob, of Laxfield, who sold it by deeds dated 23rd 
and 24th March, 1748, to John Lucas, of the Inner Temple, from which time 
it has passed in the same course as the main manor to Robert Lee. 

In 1855 the manor was vested in William Richards, in 1885 in Daniel 
Garner-Richards, and is now vested in Daniel Richard Garner- Richards. 

Istead manor-house is an ancient residence now occupied as a farm- 
house, but having several apartments lined with fine oak wainscot. 

Arms of Walpole : Or, on a fesse between two chevrons Sable, three 
cross-crosslets of the field. 

Manor of Finges in Istead. 

The manor was the subject of a fine levied in 1594 by Frances Paulett, 
widow, against Francis Gawdy,^ and also of one levied in 1602 by Roger 
Branche and others against Sir John Petre and others."* 

This was in 1609 the lordship of Thomas Paulett. 

A covenant concerning this manor in 1628 will be found amongst the 
Tanner MSS. in the Bodleian. It is by Edward Hobart and Thomas 
Freston, with Elizabeth Felton.'' 

The manor was conveyed in 1633 under the name Fyngesmill al. 
Fryersmill to John Hobart,* and a letter of Henry North as to the assess- 
ment of Hobart's house at Weybread in 1643 will be found amongst the 
Tanner MSS.' 

In 1764 Philip Coleman was lord, and also impropriator of the great 
tithes. This manor was devised by his will to Miss Ralphe, of Ipswich, 
who married the Rev. John Edge, and on her death to the Clements, of 
Dovercourt. The advowson of the vicarage was given to John Edge, son 
of Admiral Daniel, of Ipswich, but the great tithes were sold to the estate 
owners. The manor was offered for sale at the Manor Inn, Harleston, 
26th June, 1828, under the name of Manor of Finges, in Istead, hamlet of 
Weybread."^ 

In White's Gazetteer for Suffolk, 1855 and 1885, a manor called 
" Hoblins " is mentioned, and then said to be vested in one William 
Cook. In other places this manor is called "Hoblins." 

Manor of Weybread Rectory. 

This manor, Davy suggests, was given by Hervey Walter to Butley 
Abbey. It came to the Crown at the dissolution of the religious houses, 
and was in 1544 granted to Giles Bridges, citizen and woollen draper of 
London, and William Harris. In 1560, however, we find another grant from 
the Crown in favour of John Norden and Clement Roberts. 

In 1626 the manor was vested in John Colman, and in 1628 (21st Oct.) 
a William Colman held his first court. In 1633 William Sancroft, S.T.P., 
Master of Emmanuel, was lord, and held his first court 22nd Oct. this year, 

'34 Hen. VIII., Stowe Ch. 280. 'i3th Sept., 1628, Tanner, xcvii. 122. 

'Proved in Chancery, 21st May, 1706. "Tanner, xcviii. 135. 

3 Fine, Trin. 36 Eliz. 'Tanner, Ixix. 92. 

♦Fine, Mich. 44-45 Eliz. ^Ipswich Journal, 14th June, 1828. 



WEYBREAD. 103 

and gth April, 1638, a first court for the manor was held by Francis San- 
qroft. In 1643 the manor had passed to Anthony Grenling, for 27th Oct. 
this year he held his first court. On his death the manor passed to his 
widow Frances, and 12th June, 1656, she held her first court. 

Frances remarried Giles Borrett who held the manor in her right in 
1666. Ten years later her 2nd husband must have passed away, for we find 
her in 1676 described as again a widow. In 1708 the Bancroft family again 
occur in connection with the manor, and Davy states that Francis San- 
croft was then lord, being succeeded by William Bancroft, who was lord in 
1712. 

In 1720 we find the manor vested in Sir John Hind Cotton, Bart., 
and John Sager, who 14th Nov. this year held their first court for it. By 
28th Aug. 1724, however, the manor had passed to Walter Plumer, for 
he then held his first court. From this time to the marriage of Jane, widow 
of William Plumer to Robert Ward the manor passed in the same course 
as the Manor of Metfield, in this Hundred. Robert Ward, who took the 
name of Plumer after the death of his wife, succeeded to the manor, and 
sold it in 1834 to John Cutts. 

In 1855 the manor was vested in Henry Crabtree, and it is now vested in 
Henry Edwin Garrod, of Diss, in Norfolk. 

The custom is that the eldest son is heir, and tenants may not cut 
timber without licence. The court books beginning in 1626 state that 
"The stile of the manor is "Manerium de Way bridge aZs. Way bred — in 
English, the Manor of the Rectory of Weybridge, otherwise Way bread." 




104 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

WILBY. 

JlT the time of the Confessor Aluric held 20 acres and a bordar 
in this place, which at the time of the Survey was held by 
Loernic under Robert Malet's mother as tenant in chief. 
It was included in the valuation of Horham. Horham was 
12 quarentenes long and 4 broad, and paid in a gelt lo^d^ 

Another holding in this place was that of William, 

Bishop of Thetford, consisting of 40 acres, a bordar, a 

ploughteam, and 2 acres of meadow, with wood for the support of 20 

hogs, the value being los., and at the time of the Survey 8s. It was 

formerly held by a socman.'' 

Belonging to the fee of the Bishop of Thetford was an estate of 10 acres 
formerly held by a freeman. Also 40 acres by commendation and soc, a 
bordar, a ploughteam, 2 acres of meadow, wood for the support of 10 hogs, 
valued formerly at los., and at the time of the Survey at 8s. It had 
formerly been held by a freeman.^ 

Among the lands of the Abbot of Ely, but under the head " Winburgh," 
were two holdings in this place. The first was formerly held by a freeman 
over whom the abbot had commendation, and consisted of 2 carucates of 
land, 7 bordars, 2 ploughteams in demesne (reduced to i at the time of the 
Survey), 2 ploughteams belonging to the men, 11 acres of meadow, and wood 
for the maintenance of 140 hogs. Of live stock there were 2 rouncies 
(reduced to i at the time of the Survey), a beast, 60 hogs (reduced to 20 at 
the time of the Survey), and 20 sheep. There were also 2 rushbaskets. 
Also a church with 24 acres valued at 4s. 

The second holding was formerly that of 13 freemen, over one of whom 
Robert Malet's predecessor had commendation. They held 80 acres and 
4 ploughteams (reduced to 3 at the time of the Survey). The value was 
£4. 13s. 4d., but at the time of the Survey only £/[. Roger Bigot claimed 
this as the King's gift, but the Abbot of Ely proved his right against him. 
Roger Bigot, however, held it at the time of the Survey on account " of 
the respite of plea." The soc was in Hoxne. It was a league and 2 quaren- 
tenes long, and 4 quarentenes broad, and paid in a gelt iijrf., and others 
held land here." 

Manor of Wilby. 

There does not appear to have been any manor here in Saxon times 
or at the time of the Survey. The earliest instance we are aware of in which 
a manor is referred to is in 1282 amongst the Campbell MSS. in the British 
Museum (iii. i), where we find a bequest of goods in Wilby Manor by M. 
de Crek. No doubt the manor belonged to the Crek family, and was acquired 
from Margaret de Crek this very year, for amongst the Feet of Fines 
there is one which was levied of the manor in 1282 by William de Boville 
and Joan his wife against this Margaret de Crek.' Certainly WiUiam de 
Boville had the manor by 1314, for this year licence was granted him to 
alien it or to retain it on grant of other lands,^ and it is included in the settle- 
ment made by him as mentioned in the account of Badingham Hall Manor, 
in this Hundred. 

'Dom. ii. 329. 'Feet of Fines, 10 Edw. I. 10. 

""Dom. ii. 379. 61.P.M., 7 Edw. II. 139, 145; I.Q.D., 7 
'Dom. ii. 3796. Edw. II. File 98, 8; lb. 100, 12; 

♦Dom. ii. 385. lb. loi, 3. 



WILBY. 105 

Sir William de Boville' died seised of the manor in 13 19, when it passed 
to his son and heir, John de Boville. His daughter and heir, Margaret or 
Margery, married ist Sir William Carbonel, and to them this manor passed.* 
Upon Sir William's death the manor devolved on his son and heir, Sir Robert 
Carbonel, who died in 1397.^ 

The manor is then said to have gone to Sir Thomas Wingfield, the 2nd 
husband of Margaret or Margery, daughter and heir of John de Boville and 
widow of Sir William Carbonel, and on his death to have passed to Sir John 
Wingfield his son, and from him to his son, Sir Robert Wingfield, who died 
in 1409, when it passed to his son, another Sir Robert Wingfield. We have 
not, however, found any evidence in support of this devolution. 

The manor later vested in Sir William Phelip, Lord Bardolf ,* who died 
in 1441, when it passed to his widow, Joan, who died in 1446, 
when it devolved on their grandson and heir, William, Viscount 
Beaumont, who was attainted in 1461,' when the manor passed to the 
Crown, and was granted to John Nevil, Lord Montague, grandson of Thomas 
Montague, Earl of Salisbury, for having stoutly adhered to the House of 
York, with Richard Nevil, Earl of Salisbury, his father, and his brother 
Richard, Earl of Warwick.* 

In 1465 this estate was further confirmed to him and the heirs male 
of his body,' and in 1470 he was advanced to the dignity of Marquis 
Montague. He, however, soon after joined with his brother Richard, 
Earl of Warwick, in revolt against the King, and was with his brother 
slain at the battle of Barnet in 147 1, when his estates became forfeited to 
the Crown. We find on the Patent Rolls in 1473 a grant to Anthony 
Widevile, Earl Rivers, and the heirs male of his body of the manor with 
knights' fees, &c., in the King's hands to hold by service of as many knights' 
fees and other rents and services as they were held by before i Edw. IV.* 
There is, however, the same year on the Patent Rolls a grant in fee of the 
manor to John Glemeham. 

The grant includes not only the manor but also 8 acres of land in Wilby 
and the advowson of the church of Wilby, with courts leet, liberties, &c., 
" late of Wm. Beaumont, Knt.," and in the King's hands by forfeiture.' 

The manor next appears as vested in Sir John Wingfield, son of Sir 
Robert, last mentioned above as alleged to have held before Lord Bardolf. 
Sir John Wingfield died seised of it in 1481," when it passed to his son and 
heir, Sir John Wingfield, from which time to the time of Sir Richard Wing- 
field, 2nd Bart., the devolution is identical with the Manor of Thorpe Hall, 
in Hasketon, in Carlford Hundred. 

The manor is specifically mentioned in the inquis. p.m. of Sir Anthony 
Wingfield, who died 20th Aug. 1552, when it passed to his son and heir 
Sir Robert. 

Amongst the State Papers in 1594 we find a grant to Hugh George of 
a lease in reversion for 21 years of the site and lands of Wilby Manor." 

■ See Pedigree, Badingham Hall Manor, in 5 1.P.M., 5 Edw. IV. 36. 

this Hundred. «Stat. i Edw. IV. 

«See Feet of Fines in 1341. William 'Pat. Rolls, 5 Edw. IV. pt. ii. 5. 

Carbonel v. Richard Fitz Simon of »Pat. Rolls, 13 Edw. IV. pt. ii. 11. 

the manor and advowson, 15 Edw. 'Pat. Rolls, 13 Edw. IV. pt. ii. 14. 

III. 15. '"I.P.M., zi Edw. IV. 59. 

3I.P.M., 21 Rich. II. 14. "State Papers, 1594, p. 483. 
•* See Manor of Dennington, in this Hundred, 



io6 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

A fine was levied of this manor in 1602 by Edward Lord Zouche and 
others against Thomas Wingfield/ 

By 1658 the manor had passed to Edward Carewe, for this year he held 
his first court. In 1659 the manor belonged to WiUiam Blois, afterwards 
Sir William Blois,who this year held his first courts and it passed on his 
death to his widow, Jane Blois, who in 1676 held her first court. From 
this time the manor has devolved in the same course as the Manor of 
Shelton Halljin Stradbroke, in this Hundred, and is now vested in the trustees 
of Thomas George Corbett, of Elsham Hall, co. Lincoln. 

The customs of this manor from Court Rolls : " Eldest son successor to 
father ; tenant may not cut timber without licence ; the manor permits 
recoveries ; licence to pull down houses." 

Manor of Russels. 

The manor was, in the early part of the i6th century, vested in the 
Wingfields, and in 1538 was acquired by Anthony Rous from Charles Wing- 
field.^ From Anthony Rous it passed in 1545 to his son, Thomas Rous, 
who in 1556 had licence to alien to Robert Staunton. From him it seems 
to have passed to John Waller, who in 1575 sold it to Humfrey Adderley.^ 
A little later we find the manor in John Bayle Bayles, who died in 1588, 
when it passed to his son and heir, Thomas Bayles, who had hvery of the 
manor in 1591, when he sold it to Martin Bates.* To Martin Bates 
succeeded Thomas Bates. In 1628 the manor was vested in Anthony 
Wingfield, for 7th April this year he held his first court. In 1658 it was 
vested in Edward Carewe, as 22nd June this year he held a first court. 
The manor then passed to the Blois family, and then to the Thompson 
family like the main manor until the time of Wm. Thompson, who held 
his first court 21st June, 1744. Wm. Blois's first court was 31st March, 
1659, Jane's 25th Aug. 1676, and Robert Thompson's 26th April, 1683. 

In 1764 we find the manor vested in William Stane (married to 
Elizabeth, daughter and coheir of Sir William Button Colt), who died in 
1771, when the manor passed to his daughter and heir Mary Alice, married 
to John Westbroke, of Forest Hall, High Ongar, Essex. She died without 
issue, and bequeathed it by her will dated ist Dec. 1796,' to the Rev. John 
Branston, 2nd son of Thos. Berney Branston, of Skreene's, Essex, who took 
the name of Stane. In 1837 the manor was offered for sale by private 
contract.* 

In 1847 the manor was vested in the Rev. Thomas Branston Stane, 
of Essex, who was holding still in 1855. 

Page informs us that his (Stane's) estate was formerly that of W. T. 
Corbett, but he quotes no authority. 

Manor of Jordan's. 

This was the lordship of John Goldsmith in 1589, and passed to his 
son and heir, John Goldsmith, who died in 1669. 

Manor of Good's. 

We find a deed without date relating to lands in Wilby witnessed by a 
John le Gode, probably of the family from which the manor derived its 

'Fine, Easter, 44 Eliz. "Fine, Easter, 33 Eliz. 

'Fine, Hil. 30 Hen. VIII. 5 Proved 27th Feb. 1801. 

'Fine, Trin. 17 Eliz. ^ Ipswich Journal, nth Feb. 1837. 



WILBY. 107 

name. This manor was no doubt held by a Good, of Wilby, about the 
middle of the 15th century, for we find a daughter of a Good, Joan by name, 
marrying William Sulyard, of Eye, holding the same. She was succeeded 
by her son and heir John Sulyard, and he by his son and heir, Sir John 
Sulyard. 

Sir John Sulyard died in 1487,' leaving Edward Sulyard, aged 28, his 
son and heir. His inquis. p.m. states the manor to be worth ^10, and held 
of Sir John Wingfield by socage service." 

In the time of Queen Elizabeth the manor had passed to Thomas 
Garneys, of Kenton, for he died seised of it in 1566, being then held, as 
stated in his inquis. p.m., 26th May, 9 Eliz. (1567) of Thomas Rowse as of 
the Manor of Russels by fealty, and the rent of iiiji. per annum, and worth 
40S. a year. The manor was on Thomas Garneys's death assigned to his 
widow Frances, daughter of Sir John Sulyard, of Wetherden, and sister 
of the last-named Edward, in dower, and subsequently passed to Thomas's 
brother and heir, Nicholas Garneys.^ 



'See Manor of Rawlings, in South Elmham, 'I.P.M., 4 Hen. VII. 439. 

in Wangford Hundred. 3 See Manor of Kenton, in Loes Hundred. 




io8 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

WINGFIELD. 

lELONGING to the fee of the Bishop of Thetford was a holding 
in this place of lo acres valued at 2od., formerly that of a 
freeman by commendation and soc' 

Belonging also to the fee of the Bishop of Thetford were 
four holdings in Chickering^ in Wingfield. The first was 
held at the time of the Confessor by a freeman, and consisted 
of i6 acres, 2 bordars, half a ploughteam, and a church 
with 8 acres, valued at 20s. 

The second was formerly held by a freeman by commendation, and 
consisted of 28 acres, 3 bordars, and half a ploughteam, valued at 5s. 

The third in the same township was formerly held by a freeman, and 
consisted of 30 acres, half a ploughteam, wood to support 12 hogs, and 
half an acre of meadow, valued at 6s. 8d. 

The fourth was formerly held by a freewoman, and consisted of 8 acres 
valued at i6d. At the time of the Confessor Robert Malet's predecessor 
had commendation. The soc and sac belonged to Ailmar.* 

Robert Malet's mother held of the Queen's fee two estates in this 
place. The first consisted of 36 acres, a ploughteam (reduced to half at 
the time of the Survey), and i^ acres of meadow, valued at 6s. This was 
formerly held by three freemen under commendation over whom Walter, son 
of Grip, held. The second consisted of 60 acres, a ploughteam (reduced to 
half at the time of the Survey), 2 acres of meadow, and wood sufficient to 
support 6 hogs, valued at los. This was formerly held by a freeman over 
whom one had commendation, and had the land in pawn for 60s. The 
freeman seems to have been held by the said Walter, son of Grip.^ 

Among the lands of Roger de Poictou was a small estate, consisting of 
24 acres, wood sufficient to support 4 hogs, half an acre of meadow, and half 
a ploughteam (which had disappeared at the time of the Survey), valued 
at 4s. It had formerly been held by a freeman under commendation.* 

Manor of Wingfield or Wingfield Castle. 

The knightly family of Wingfield is supposed to have been seated here 
at the period of the Norman Conquest. Sir Robert de Wingfield, lord of 
this manor by Joan his wife, daughter of Sir John Fastolf, Knt., had 
issue Thomas, who married Alice, daughter of Sir Nicholas Weyland, Knt., 
by whom he had issue Sir John Wingfield, who married Alice, daughter of 
John Peche, by whom he had Sir John Wingfield, his eldest surviving son 
and successor. This Sir John Wingfield the son was living in the reign of 
King Edward III., and had a grant of free warren here in 1335.' He married 
Elizabeth, daughter of John Honeypot, of this parish, and left issue three sons. 
Sir John, the eldest, presented to the church of Saxmundham in 1348, 
Richard, the next brother seated himself at Bennington, to the church of 
which parish he presented in 1342, and Sir Thomas the younger was possessed 
of Letheringham by marriage with Margaret, sole daughter and heir of Sir 
John de Bovile of that parish, and widow of Sir John Carbonel. 

The above Sir John Wingfield, Knt., eldest son of Sir John Wingfield 
the son, levied a fine of the manor with Alianora his wife against David de 

'Dom. ii. 3796. ♦Dom. ii. 349. 

^Dom. ii. 3796. 5 Chart. Rolls, 9 Edw. III. 30. 

^Dom. ii. 330. i 



WlNGFIELD. 



log 




M 
>-l 
H 

< 
O 

Q 
>J 
W 

b 
O 



110 



THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 



WoUore, clerk, and Gilbert de Debenham,' and left an only daughter and 
heir, Katharine, who married about 1360 Michael de la Pole (son of Sir William 
de la Pole), the first of that name, created 6th Aug. 1385, Earl of Suffolk. 
By virtue of this marriage this manor and the extensive estates attached to 
it, were carried into that noble family on the death of Alianora, Sir John's 
widow, in 1375," and Michael de la Pole is mentioned as lord on the Patent 
Rolls in 1387.^ 

Four years earlier he had obtained licence to convert the manor-house 
into a castle, and to enclose and impark all the woods and lands belonging 
to the same.* Michael de la Pole was Chancellor of England 1383-86. 
He was impeached and convicted by Parliament in 1386, though the proceed- 
ing was declared void by the Judges in August, 1387. In Feb. 1387-8, 
however, the Parliament found him guilty of high treason, whereby aU his 
estates became forfeited, but he escaped to France. 

He died at Paris 5th Sept. 1389,' and on the Patent Rolls this year we 
find a commission issued on the petition of Michael de la Pole, son and 
heir of Michael de la Pole, Earl of Suffolk, to have livery as next heir of the 
Manors of Wyngfeld, Stradebrok, Silham, Fresyngfeld, Sternefeld, and 
Saxmondham, of the Manor of Wyngefeld, called "Old Hall," the advowson 
of Stradebrok and Saxmondham and chantry of Wyngefeld, 70 ac. of land, 
20 ac. of meadow, 100 ac. pasture, 20 ac. wood, 100 ac. heath, 100 ac. marsh, 
and loos. rent in Wingfield, Silham, Esham, Fresyngfeld, Waybred, 
Mendham, Hoxne, Sternefeld, Saxmondham, Benhall, Farnham, Rendham, 
Freston, and Snape.* 

Sir Michael de la Pole was restored to his father's dignities by Parliament 
in 1397, but the Parliament of 1399 having annulled the proceedings of those 
in 1397 and confirmed those of 1388 all his honours were again forfeited, 
but he obtained a restoration of most of his family estates, and 15th Nov. 
i399j was created Earl of Suffolk, and married Catherine de Stafford, 2nd 
daughter of Hugh, 2nd Earl of Stafford. He spent most of his time in the French 
wars and died at the siege of Harfleur, 14th Sept. 1415,'' when the manor 
passed to his son and heir, Michael de la Pole, 3rd Earl of Suffolk, who died 
a short time after his accession to the title 25th Oct. 1415, being slain at the 
battle of Agincourt. Leaving daughters only, the manor passed to his brother, 
William de la Pole, 4th Earl of Suffolk. He was the most memorable 
historical character in connection with this manor,' and, indeed, it may be 
presumed, was the builder of the castle in the reign of Hen. VI. His grand- 
father, the 1st Earl, had acquired the lordship as above stated, and at this 
place, William, 4th Earl and ist Duke of Suffolk, reigned in all his power. 
It was within his own county, at St. Edmunds, Bury, hejaused the Parlia- 
ment to be assembled in 1446, at which time the goodTlSuke of Gloucester 
was arrested and murdered. This manor was among those released by the 
Duke with Sir John Shardelowe and Thomas Hoo to John Hampden, Thomas 
Hesley, Richard Rostwold, Thomas Walsyngham, and William Hervy in 
1431, on the occasion, no doubt, of some resettlement of the De la Pole 
estates." 

The Duke of Suffolk suffered a violent death four years later, on 
the sea between England and Calais, by having his head struck off on 



'Feet of Fines, 33 Edw. III. 
n.P.M., 49 Edw. III. pt. ii. 54. 
^Pat. Rolls, 12 Rich. II. pt. i. 32. 
*Pat. RoUs, 8 Rich. II. 16. 
5I.P.M., 13 Rich. II. 41. 



6 Pat. RoUs, 13 Rich. II. pt. ii. 29^. 

7 Will 1st July, 1415. 

^See Manor of Gyfford's, Wattisfield, in 

Blackbourn Hundred. 
9Harl. 54I. 15. 



WINGFIELD. 



Ill 



the gunwale of a boat, and his body thrown into the sea.' He was accused 
of having been concerned with the Cardinal of Winchester in the murder 
before mentioned, and after the death of the latter as he governed everything 
with uncontrolled sway every odious and unsuccessful measure was attri- 
buted to him. He was charged with mismanagement, waste of the public 
treasure, the foul murder of the Duke, and the loss of divers provinces in 
France, with many other high crimes and misdemeanours, for which he was 
committed to the Tower, and though Queen Margaret interposed, and effected 
his release, the popular resentment against him was so strong that to screen 
him as much as possible, the King sentenced him to five years' banishment. 
This was considered by his enemies as an escape from justice, and when the 
Duke left his castle at Wingfield and embarked at Ipswich, with the intention 
of sailing to France, the captain of a vessel was hired to intercept him on his 
passage, and he was seized near Dover and beheaded in the manner already 
specified, on the 2nd May, 1450.^ He is interred under a purfled arch, with 
a bouquet on the point and a quatrefoil on the pediment, and on a freestone 
altar-tomb is his figure recumbent, with whiskers, painted helmet, gorget 
of mail, gauntlets, square-toed shoes, a lion at his feet, and under his head a 
helmet without a crest.^ 

He had married Alice, daughter and heir of Thomas Chaucer, of Ewelme, 
CO. Oxford, by Matilda, daughter and coheir of Sir John Burghersh and widow 
of Thomas de Montacute, Earl of Salisbury. John de la Pole, son and successor 
of William, was re-created or confirmed as Duke of Suffolk by letters patent 
dated 23rd March, 1462-3, and married Elizabeth, sister of King Edward IV. 
He died in 1491, and was buried at Wingfield. 

The manor was forfeited in 1487 by John, Earl of Lincoln, son of John 
de la Pole, Duke of Suffolk, or rather the reversion for his forfeiture occurred 
four years before his father's death,* but it was restored to Edmond de la 
Pole, 2nd Duke of Suffolk, of the new creation, the same year in 1495.^ 

Edmond de la Pole married Margaret, daughter and coheir of Sir 
Richard le Scrope, a younger son of Henry, 4th Lord Scrope, of Bolton, and 
sister of Elizabeth, Countess of Oxford. Soon after the marriage in 1501 of 
Prince Arthur, Edmund left the realm without having first obtained the royal 
licence, and being suspected of disloyalty was surrendered by his cousin, 
the Duke of Burgundy, to the King, and attainted in Parliament, January, 
1503-4^ when all his honours were forfeited and the manor went to the 
Crown.® After imprisonment in the Tower for some years he was beheaded 
on Tower Hill, 5th April, 1513. The manor was subsequently granted by 
Hen. VIII. to Charles Brandon, Duke of Suffolk, who by deed in 1538 
exchanged the manor with the Crown for other property.^ 

The manor in 1544 was granted by the Crown to Sir Henry Jermingham 
and his wife.^ While the manor and castle were in the possession of Sir 
Henry Jermingham an action in the Court of Chancery was brought agamst 
him by one Henry Seckford respecting them.' He died in 1571, when the 
manor does not seem to have passed to his son Henry, but probably was sold 
by Sir Heiuy, for we find that in 1563 John Keene had licence to alien the 
manor to Thomas Cornwallis and John Smarte. 



'I.P.M., 28Hen. VI.25. 

"Will 17th Jan. 1448-9. 

3 Excursions in SufE., vol. ii, p. 

"R.P. vi. 474. 

5R.P. vi,475. 



18. 



»R.P. vi. 545. 

''S.P. 30 Hen. VIII. ii. p. 1182 (i8a). 
»0. 1-2 P. and M. i Par's. Rot. 112. 
'C.P. ser. ii. B. clxix. 14. 



112 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

Henry Jermingham seems to have had the manor and sold it in 1619 to 
Thomas Jones and Robert Leman. 

Wingfield Castle subsequently became the estate of the Catelyn family, 
who derive from Richard Catelyn, Sheriff of Norwich, in 1531, and alderman 
of that city, 1566. Thomas, 2nd son of Richard Catelyn, sergeant-at-law, 
was lord here about 1625. He married Judith, daughter of Edward Elling- 
ton, of Theydon Bois, in Essex, and died in 1636, when Richard Catelyn his 
son succeeded, and married ist Mary, daughter of Sir Robert Houghton, 
one of the judges of the King's Bench, and 2ndly Dorothy, daughter of Sir 
Henry Nevil, of Billingbere, in Berkshire, Knt. By his 2nd marriage 
he had issue a son and heir Sir Nevil, and Richard, who died without issue ; 
also Anne, who married Thomas Leman, of Wenhaston, in Blything 
Hundred, and three other daughters. 

Sir Nevil Catelyn was knighted by King Charles II. at Somerset House, 
in London, in 1662, and was owner of this estate. He married ist Dorothy, 
daughter of Sir Thomas Bedingfield, of Darsham ; his 2nd wife was Elizabeth, 
daughter of Robert Houghton, of Ranworth ; he married srdly Mary, 
daughter of Sir William, and sister of Sir Charles Blois, Bart., of Cockfield 
Hall, in Yoxford, and of Grundisburgh. Sir Nevil Catelyn died in 1702, 
and was buried in Kirkelyham church, in July, without surviving issue, and this 
manor passed to Sir Charles Turner, Bart., in right of his wife, widow of Sir 
Nevil Catelyn, and subject to such widow's life interest to Thomas Leman, 
of Wenhaston, grandson of Sir Nevil's sister Anne, wife of Thomas Leman, 
and on his death in 1735 passed to Thomas's sister, Philippa Leman, who 
died in 1758, and devised by will the manor to Robert Leman, D.D., rector of 
Pakefield, 2nd son of Robert Leman, of Brampton, and after his death to 
Henry William Wilson, of Didhngton and Ashwellthorpe, in Norfolk, who 
accordingly inherited on the death of Robert Leman in 1779. Henry William 
Wilson married in 1757 Mary, daughter of Sir John MiUer, Bart., and dying 
in 1796 the manor passed to his son and heir, Robert Wilson, afterwards 
Lord Berners. On his death unmarried in 1838 the manor passed to his 
brother, the Rev. Henry Wilson, Lord Berners. He married ist May, 1788, 
Elizabeth, daughter of Thomas Sumpter, of Histon Hall, co. Cambridge, 
and died 26th Feb. 1851, when the manor passed to his elder son and heir, 
Henry William, Baron Berners, who married ist, 24th Feb. 1823, his cousin, 
Mary Letitia, elder daughter and coheir of Col. George Crump, of Alexton 
Hall, CO. Leicester, and 2ndly, 21st July, 1857, Henrietta Charlotte, only 
daughter of Lord Delamere. In 1856 Lord Berners sold the manor to 
Sir Robert Shafto Adair, and it subsequently passed as the Manor of 
Mendham Priory, in this Hundred, and is now vested in Capt. Sir 
Frederick E. Shafto Adair, 4th Bart., of Flixton Hall. 

Page says : " The chancel of this [Wingfield] parish church contains 
some fine monuments of the De la Poles, whose arms adorn the font, the 
east window, and the pulpit ; against the south wall of the same hangs a 
pedigree of that family, neatly written on parchment, with their arms 
beautifully emblazoned, to which is prefixed the following title : ' An exact 
account of the most noble family of the De la Poles, from their first settling 
at Wingfield until the extinction of the family ; collected by William 
Bedford, M.A., appointed and licensed curate of Wingfield, April 26th, 
1684. This monumental table was drawn and fixed up here by the said 
William Bedford, July 14th, 1701, and since transcribed by Thomas 
Folkard, July 22nd, 1725.'" 



WINGFIELD. 



113 



The churchj built of flints and stones of different colours, exhibits a 
very singular and beautiful appearance. One of the monumental effigies 
here has been ascribed to William de la Pole, Duke of Suffolk ; but this 
appears incorrect, for the three effigies in Wingfield church, all of which 
are engraved in " Stothard's Monumental Efi&gies," belong to other 
generations of the family. Here are besides, several brasses for other 
members of this family. Weever mentions some to Richard and John 
de la Pole, sons of Michael de la Pole, ist Earl of Suffolk, who deceased in 
1403 and 1415 ; also John de la Pole, son and heir of William de la Pole^ 
Duke of Suffolk, who died in 1491 ; and some members of the Letheringham 
branch of the family.'" 

In the year 1362 the executors of Sir John de Wingfield procured, in 
pursuance of his will, the parish church of St. Andrew, in Wingfield, to be 
made collegiate ; and at the south-west corner of the churchyard they 
erected a college for priests or canons. Previously to this there was a 
chantry here, which was founded a short time before by Sir John and Lady 
Wingfield. 

It was dedicated to the Virgin Mary, St. John Baptist, and St. Andrew, 
and consisted at first of a provost (or master) and three priests ; afterwards 
of nine priests and three choristers ; in 1405 another priest was added. In 
1438 Henry Trevylian, rector of Walsoken, in Norfolk, was Custos of this 
college. According to the ordinance of the founder, three boys were 
supported here, and the funds for their maintenance were valued at the 
Dissolution at £8 per annum. 

It was endowed with the appropriated churches of Wingfield, Sileham, 
with the chapel of Esham and Stradbroke ; the Manors of Benhall, Sileham, 
Stradbroke, Walpole, with Chekering, and Middleton Chekering, with 
lands and rents in divers other parishes. Its gross value in " Valor 
Ecclesiasticus," is £82. los. 4d. In the time of King Edward VI. it became 
vested in the Bishop of Norwich, in exchange for other property. The 
site of this college and the arable, meadow, and pasture lands in;imediately 
attached thereto, contained about 60 acres, and were valued, with the 
rents appertaining, at £8. 6s. 2^d. in 1534. 

The Bishop of Norwich is proprietor of the site, and patron of the 
church of St. Andrew, in Wingfield. It is a perpetual curacy, which Bishop 
Reynolds endowed with an additional annuity of £25 per annum during 
his life.^ 

Arms of Catelyn : Per chevron. Azure and Or, three lions passant 
guardant, in pale, counterchanged, on a chief. Argent, as many snakes, 
mowed. Sable, stinged. Gules. Of Wilson : Sable, a wolf valiant. Or, in chief, 
a fleur-de-lis, Argent, between two bezants. 

The castle of Wingfield is situate about a quarter of a mile north-west 
of the church. It stands low, without any outworks for its defence. The 
south front or principal entrance, is still entire, and is a noble gateway 
flanked with towers, and an outer wall following the inner line of a moat, 
which encloses the site of the building. The west side is a farmhouse.^ 



'Page, Hist, of Suf£. p. 436, 437. 

^Page, Hist, of Suff. p. 437. 

3 See Arch. xx. 507; Tanner cxxxviii. 
12 ; S.I. vii. (xxxvi.); B.A.A. xxxvi. 
209 ; And particularly the castle 
(Gent. M. 1775, 512) ; Sketch of 
castle Add. 8987; Plan and ruins 
of castle (Add. 6753); Wm. 



Stafford keeper of castle and park 
(S.P. I Hen. Vin. 669); John 
Sharpe, keeper of manor and park 
(lb. 620; lb. 2 Hen. VHI. 1333, 
1345) ; Grant to Thomas, Earl of 
Surrey, of 100 oaks in parks, of 
which lie is tenant for life (S.P. 
6 Hen. VIH. 5644). 



114 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

WiNGFiELD Old Hall Manor. 

This manor was vested in King Stephen, and in 1275 was the lordship of 
Sir Richard de Brewse.' An entry on the Hundred Rolls informs us that 
King John enfeoffed Frimsbald in Wingiield, "which land was held by 
Richard de Brewse and the prior of Thetford.'" Sir Richard de Brewse 
had a grant of free warren here in 1309.^ The manor remained in the family 
of de Brewse until the time of Rich. II., when it appears to have gone to 
the holders of the main Manor of Wingfield. 

There are two fines relating to this manor in 1357-8 and 1377. In the 
former the manor is called " Wingfield Manor," in the latter " Wingfield 
Hall Manor." The first was levied by John de Wynewyk, clerk, David de 
WoUore, clerk, Sir John de Wengefeld, Thomas de Wengefeld, and Gilbert 
de Debenham against Sir Richard Brewse.* The second was levied by 
John de Fordham, clerk, John Baconn, clerk, John Daventree, parson of 
Brome church, Walter, vicar of Kymberle, Edmund de Lakyngheth, 
Stephen de Langham, Richard Nootz, and John Cranewys against 
Katherine Brewse.^ 

In 1408 the manor was vested in Michael de la Pole, Earl of Suffolk, 
who by a deed dated ist June, g Hen. IV., appointed Roger Gryss to deliver 
seisin of this, manor with others to Master Edmund de Stafford, Bishop of 
Exeter, Randulph de Nevylle, ist Earl of Westmoreland, Sir Thomas 
Erpyngham, Sir Edmund de la Pole, Master John de la Pole, Robert de 
Boltone, and others. No doubt this was on the occasion of some settlement, 
and we find the manor included in a demise in 1430 by William de la, Pole, 
Earl of Suffolk, Robert Boltone, clerk, and Robert Boltone, to Sir John 
Shardelow, Thomas Hoo, John Roys, and others. The deed is dated 
20th Oct. 9 Hen. VI ." 

The manor is also included in a release dated 20th Nov. 9 Hen. VI. 
[1430], and made between Cardinal Henry Beaufort, Humphrey, Duke of 
Gloucester, Richard Beauchamp, Earl of Warwick, Robert, Lord Willoughby, 
and others, to Sir John Shardelow, Knt., Thomas Hoo, John Golafre, 
Richard Wyot, Andrew Sperlyng, and Robert Danvers,^ and a quit claim 
dated ist Feb. 9 Hen. VI. between Richard Beauchamp, Earl of Warwick, 
and Robert, Lord Willoughby, and the releases under the last deed.* The 
manor is likewise included in a demise the following year dated 20th Sept. 
10 Hen. VI. by John Golafre, Andreas Sperlyng, and Robert Dan vers to 
the said John Sperlyng, Thomas Hasley, and others,® and also in a release 
by William de la Pole, Earl of Suffolk, Sir John Shardelowe, and Thomas 
Hoo to John Hampden, Thomas Hasley, Richard Rostwold, Thomas 
Walsyngham, and William Hervy the same year. This deed is dated loth 
Oct. 10 Hen. VI." 

Manor of Chickering Hall or Chickering with Wingfield. 

This was not a manor at the time of the Survey, but was subsequently 
formed out of the lands belonging to Roger de Poictou. In 1311 Jeffrey 

'See Hasketon Hall, Hasketon Manor, in *Harl. 54 I. 10. 

Carlford Hundred. ^Harl. 43 E. 19. 
"H.R. ii. 186. sHarl. 45 I. 12. 

3 Chart. Rolls, 3 Edw. H. 22. sHarl. 50 H. 27, 28. 

*Feet of Fines, 31 and 32 Edw. HI, 40. "Harl. 54 I. 15. 
^Feet of Fines, i Rich. II. 12. 



WINGFIELD. 115 

de Chickering seems to have held the manor and given lands here to the 
priory of Hoxne. Davy mentions William de Chickering, and in 1356 
the heir of William de Chickering as lords. 

In 1436-40 Wilham de la Pole, Earl of Suffolk, gave this manor, a 
moiety of the Manor of Walpole, and lands in Wingfield, Hoxne, Stradbroke, 
Horham, Syleham, Weybread, Walpole, Huntingfield, Middleton, Darsham, 
and Yoxford to the college of Wingfield/ However this may be, in 1534, 
on the dissolution of the religious establishments, the manor vested in the 
Crown, and in 1539 was granted to Thomas Southwell. This grant seems to 
have been of little account, as a grant from the Crown was made in 1544 
to Giles Bridges, citizen of London, and Robert Harrys, of London, and 
they had licence to alien it to Sir Robert Southwell, from which time this 
manor has devolved in the same course as the main Manor of Hoxne, in 
this Hundred, and is now vested in Lady Bateman. 



■I.Q.D., 7, 14, i8Hen. VI. 5. 




ii6 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

MANOR OF WITHERSDALE. 

jHIS lordship was in 1275 vested in Ranulph de Arderne, or at 
least at that time he exercised manorial rights here. In 
T292 Robert de Benhall had a charter of free warren in all 
his demesne lands here/ but it is doubtful if he held the 
manor. 

In fact, the manor seems to have continued in the 
Arderne family until 1314, when William de Arderne released 
to Sir Hervey de Stanton " all his right in the manor, and also in the 
advowson of the church of Withersdale.'' 

In 1291 we meet with a fine levied of the manor and advowson by 
Robert de Wenhale against Ralph de Ardern, sen., and Katherine his wife, 
and Ralph their son.^ 

In 13 16 the manor was vested in Oliva de Ingham, who died seised of 
it in 1343 or 1344.* In 1347 a fine was levied of it and the advowson by 
Alexander, parson of Horham church, Robert de Martham, Richard de 
Boghay, and William de Felmyngham against Alexander de Walsham 
and Margaret his wife.^ Shortly after this the manor was acquired by 
Sir William Jermy, who died in 1385, from which time to the present time 
it has passed in the same course as the Manor of Metfield, in Mendham, in 
this Hundred, and is now vested in Lieut.-Col. J. H. Taylor, the present lord. 

From the inquis. p.m. of John Jermy, who died in 1487 or 1488, we 
learn that this manor and advowson were worth £10, and held of Elizabeth 
Harecort, widow, and that the manor was held by trustees to the use of 
John Jermy in fee, John Jermy his son and heir being then aged 40.* 



' Chart. Rolls, 20 Edw. I. 29. 4 1.P.M., 18 Edw. III. 49. 

= Close Rolls, 8 Edw. II. 23^. speet of Fines, 21 Edw. III. 35. 

'Feet of Fines, 19 Edw. 1. 19. n.^M., 3 Hen. VII. 330. 




WORLINGWORTH. 117 

WORLINGWORTH. 

MANOR was held here in the time of the Confessor by 
the Abbot of St. Edmunds, and consisted of 6 carucates of 
land with its soc, 16 villeins, 14 bordars, a serf, 2 plough- 
teams in demesne and 12 belonging to the men, 16 acres of 
meadow, wood to support 100 hogs, 2 horses, 8 beasts, 
24 hogs, 25 sheep, 33 goats, and at the time of the Survey 
6 hives of bees. 
There was also formerly a socman with 20 acres. Also a church with 

10 acres of free land. The value was £6, and at the time of the Survey £8. 

It was a league long and 5 quarentenes broad, and paid in a gelt lod.^ 

Manor of Worlingworth. 

Athulf (Adulf or Eadulf) gave a third part of the lordship and advowson 
of this parish to Bury abbey.'' He was Bishop of Elmham after the union 
of the sees, and constantly resided there. He signed the King's Charter to 
the church of York. Ailfric, the 2nd Bishop of the see of that name, was 
also a great benefactor to that monastery, and gave lands in this parish to 
the same. At the Dissolution Anthony Rous, of Dennington, obtained 
a grant of the said estate. The grant was made in 1539, ^^^ particulars 
for it will be found in the Public Record Office.^ 

Sir Anthony Rous died 8th Feb. 1545,* and the manor passed to his son 
and heir, Thomas Rous, who with John Rous had licence in 1565 to alien 
to John Thurston, and passed the manor by fine this same year.' A claim 
was made by the Crown on the said John Thurston for forfeiture of the manor 
the following year.^ 

On John Thurston's death in 1607 the manor passed to his nephew, 
John Thurston, who died in 1613, when it passed to his widow Millicent, 
and she and her son, John Thurston, sold the manor to John Gardener and 
Robert Morse. 

The manor in 1689 seems to have been vested in James Clarke, for 
we find amongst the Exchequer Depositions taken at Worlingworth i W. 
and M. an action by Edward Barker against him relating to the manor 
and demesne lands, " late of John Thruston (sic), of Hoxne, deceased," 
as to whether parcel of dissolved monastery of St. Edmunds, Bury, also 
rectorial tithes. 

In 1764 John, only surviving son of John Major, of Bridlington, in 
the County of York, was in possession of this property. He was advanced 
to the dignity of a baronet 15th July, 1765, by the title of Sir John Major, 
of Worlingworth Hall, in Suffolk, Bart., and from this time the manor has 
descended in the same course as the Manor of Great Thornhara, in Hartis- 
mere Hundred, and is now vested in Lord Henniker. 

There are two Chancery actions in regard to copyholds held of this 
manor. One is a claim under a will by Thomas Monshippe to land in 
Worlingworth part freehold and part copyhold held of Worlingworth Manor 
and the Manor of Hoxne near adjoining, late the estate of William 
Monshippe, sen.'' The other action is by Thomas Rouse against Robert 
Armiger.' 

'Dom. ii. 368. ^Fine^ Xrin. 7 Eliz. 

'See Cot. Aug. ii. 85. ^Memoranda, 8 Eliz. Hil. Rec. Rot. 51. 

'31 Hen. VIII. D.K.R. 10 App. ii. p. 262. ^C.P. ii. 245. 

*I.P.M., I Edw. VI. ^C.P. ser. ii. B. cxlix. 24. 



ii8 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

In order to complete the entries from the Domesday Survey, we give 
here the entry under "Newton " which we are unable to identify with any 
place in Hoxne Hundred, and which we cannot say belongs with certainty 
to either of the two well-known Newtons in Suffolk. 

It is enumerated amongst the lands of Robert Malet's mother held of 
the Queen's fee. 

In Newton, Edric of Laxfield, held in King Edward's time as a manor 
6 carucates of land and 20 acres. Then and later 12 villeins, now 16. 
Then and later 16 bordars, now 15. Always 2 serfs. And 4 ploughteams 
in demesne. Then and later 12 ploughteams belonging to the men, now g. 
Wood for 160 hogs. And i park, 20 acres of meadow. And then 2 rouncies, 
now I. And 20 beasts. Then 60 hogs, now 40. Then 40 goats, now 30. 
Now 30 sheep. Always 5 hives of bees. A church with 40 acres of free 
land and half a ploughteam. Then valued at £14 and now the like. It 
is a league and 2 quarentenes long, and 6 (quarentenes) broad. And (pays) 
lod. in a gelt.' 



'Dom. ii. 




IPSWICH. 119 

IPSWICH. 

MONGST the lands of Stigand which WiUiam de Noers kept 
in hand for the King in the Borough of Ipswich were two 
burgesses in the Confessor's time over which Stigand had 
jurisdiction J the King having the customs. By the time 
of the Survey these two burgesses were deadj and the King 
had the customs and jurisdiction. Amongst the lands of 
which Roger Bigot had charge in hand for the King, the 
Survey has the following entries : — 

" From the Half Hundred and from the Borough of Ipswich in King 
Edward's time Queen Edith had two-thirds and Earl Gurth one-third. 
The Queen also had in her demesne a grange to which in King Edward's 
time belonged 4 carucates of land, and the like now. Of this land 12 free- 
men dwelling upon other land of their own always hold 80 acres (bound) 
to (do) service and (render) custom to the King. And there are 10 other 
men, bordars, who have not land of their own, but dwell upon 86 acres of 
the aforesaid land. Furthermore to the demesne of the aforesaid grange 
belong two burgesses who render to the King 6d. by way of custom. And 
(there were) then 2 plough-teams in demesne, and the like later, now i. 
Then 3 beasts, now 8. Then 2 rounceys, now i. Then 14 goats, now 7. 
Then 40 sheep, now 13. And the villeins always have 6 plough-teams. 
This land is 8 quarentenes in length, and the like in breadth. And renders 
nothing to the King's gelt. 

In the borough there were in King Edward's time 538 burgesses 
rendering custom to the King, and they had 40 acres of land. But now 
there are no burgesses who render custom, and 100 poor burgesses who 
cannot render to the King's gelt but one penny a head. And among the 
whole of them in like manner they have 40 acres of land. And 328 home- 
steads within the borough lie waste,, which in King Edward's time used to 
pay scot towards the King's gelt. 

In the said borough Alnulfus the priest has a church, Holy Trinity, 
to which belong 26 acres in alms. And one CoUings a burgess has a church, 
St. Mary's, with 26 acres. Tumbius a church, St. Mary's, with 2 acres. 
Lestan the priest a church, St. Augustine's, with 11 acres. Ulwin the 
priest a church, St. Michael's, with 8 acres. In Thurlston, in Claydon 
Hundred, Goodrich a church, St. Botulf's, with i acre. Turchil and Edric 
hold a church, St. Lawrence's, with 12 acres. At the feast of St. John it 
was half a year since one Lefflet, a freewoman in King Edward's time, 
held this church, whom Earl Alan claims as having belonged to the fee 
of Earl Ralph, and vouches Ivo TaiUebois as having made the Uvery. But 
Turchil and Edric vouch to warrant Roger the Sheriff saying that through 
him they had this church, and Roger stands to them as such warrant as 
any Sheriff could rightfully be in the time of King Edward. Ascer i church, 
St. Peter's, with i acre, Goodrich a church, St. Stephen's, with i acre. 

All this rendered in King Edward's time £15 and 6 sextars of honey, 
and 4s. towards the custom of honey, and 8s. to the prebendaries. And 
Roger the Sheriff gave the whole to farm for £40 (payable) at the feast of 
St. Michael. Later he could not have the sum agreed upon, and of it he 
excused 60s. It now renders £37. And the moneyers rendered annually 
in King Edward's time £4 for the (privilege of coining) money. Now they 



120 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

ought to render £20. But for four years they have rendered only £27. 
And the Earl always has the third part.'" 

Amongst the lands of Earl Alan is the following : " Half Hundred 
of Ipswich. In the town of Ipswich Earl Gurth in King Edward's time 
held a grange to which belong 2 carucates of land. (There were) always 
7 bordars. Then and later i plough-team, now none. Always 3 plough- 
teams belonging to the men. 4 acres of meadow. The third part of a mill. 
This land is 4 quarentenes long and 4 broad. Then valued at lOos. with 
the third penny of the borough, and it was delivered as of the value of ;^20 
with the third penny of the borough, and with the third penny of the two 
Hundreds ; now, however, it renders but £15. 

Claydon Hundred. In Westfield (were) 6 free-men in King Edward's 
time with 20 acres. Always i plough-team. And they are included in 
the valuation of Ipswich. The Earl has them in demesne. The King and 
the Earl have jurisdiction."' 

In the borough Robert Malet had one burgess whom his predecessor 
had by commendation in King Edward's time. The King had the customs. 
The Bishop of Bayeux had in Ipswich a house with half an acre, and in 
Toft Edwi a freeman (held) 2^ acres valued at 6d., the soc being in 
Bergholt. At the time of the Survey Roger Bigot held these of the Bishop 
of Bayeux.^ 

Wisgar in the Confessor's time held a church, St. Peter's, to which 
belonged 6 carucates of land as a manor. There were then and later 6 
villeins, 5 bordars, 4 serfs, 2 ploughteams in demesne and 3 belonging to 
the men ; also wood for 8 hogs, a mill, 3 acres of meadow, i beast, g hogs, 
80 sheep. At the time of the Survey the villeins were 8, the bordars 15, 
4 ploughteams belonging to the men, 4 hogs, i rouncy. " Furthermore," 
adds the Survey, " To this church belong 5 burgesses, and 15 acres of free 
land within the borough, and 6 vacant homesteads. Out of the aforesaid 
6 carucates of land Roger the Sheriff claims 100 acres, and 5 villeins, and a 
mill (as belonging to) the King's manor of Bramford. And 5 villeins of 
the said manor bear witness for him. And they offer trial of law by any 
mode by which anyone will adjudicate. But the Half Hundred of Ipswich 
bear witness that this belonged to the church in King Edward's time, and 
Wisgar held it, and they offer to prove it. Then valued at loos., now at 
£15, with other lands which belong to this church. In the said borough 
Richard has 13 burgesses, whom Phin held in King Edward's time. Over 
4 of them he had jurisdiction and commendation. One of them was a serf. 
And over 12 he had commendation only. But they dwelt on land of their 
own, and rendered within the borough the whole customs."'* 

In the borough Robert Suane, of Essex, had in the Confessor's time 41 
burgesses within his jurisdiction and under his commendation, and the King 
had the other customs. Of the burgesses by the time of the Survey 15 
were dead, and Suane had lost the commendation, but had the jurisdiction, 
and of the others in like manner. And the King had the other customs.^ 
In the same borough Hugh de Montfort had in demesne one homestead 
and it belonged to Nacton, the King having all the customs ; Geoffrey de 
Magnaville had only one homestead belonging to Mosa.^ 

'Dom. ii. 289. ''Dom. ii. 392&. 

''Dom. ii. 294. 5Doju_ jj ^qj_ 

^Dom. ii. 2786. *Dom. ii. 410. 



IPSWICH. 121 

Roger de Rheims's holding in the town was the church of St. George's 
and 4 burgesses and 6 homesteads lying waste. One of these homesteads 
was adjudged to the use of the Abbot of Ely, and he was seised thereof, as 
the Hundred bore witness. Roger de Rheims, however, alleged that he 
held of the King. To the church belonged an acre of land and the whole 
was valued at los., the King having the customs.' Ranulf Ilger's brother 
had in Ipswich a vacant homestead and another occupied rendering Sd." 
Walter the Deacon had in the borough 5 houses and 3 vacant homesteads, 
which the Queen held in the Confessor's time. They rendered customs 
and were valued at 2od.^ 

The last holding was that of Norman the Sheriff, who had in the 
borough 2 burgesses, one in security against himself and the other on 
account of a debt. But the King had his customs.* 

Brokes Manor. 

Brokes Manor lies in Ipswich, Bramfield, Whitton, Thurlston, and 
Westerfield. Broke Hall stands in the parish of St. Matthew, Ipswich. 
The manor was given by Edward the Confessor to Aluric de Clare at the 
rent of £10. Later Robert de Badele held the same of the Earl of Clare 
by the service of one knight's fee.^ It passed to William, son of Robert. 
He married Beatrice. It was subsequently vested in Robert de Badele, 
and then in his son. Sir Geoffrey de Badele, who is styled " lord of Beeches " 
in a grant of land here to St. Peter and St. Paul's canons, Ipswich, in the 
12th cent.* 

In 1234 it was clearly the lordship of Geoffrey de Badele, whose son, 
Ralph de Badele, was his successor. Ralph was succeeded by his son and 
heir Geoffrey, and Geoffrey by his son and heir, Robert de Badele, who 
appears to have been the last of this family holding the manor. We next 
, find it vested in Baldwyn de Pesynhall, who was followed by Alice Holbrook. 
In 1285 Robert de Bosco or De Boys was lord, and died seised about 1299.' 
He was succeeded probably by his son Robert, who married Christiana, 
and they were parties to a fine levied of the manor in 1307. (Bernardus, 
vicar of Grantemerthe church and Edmund Gannevill and Robert de 
Boys and Christiana his wife.)^ Robert de Boys died seised in 1334,' leaving 
Alice his daughter, who on the death of her brother, Sir Robert de Boys, 
of Fersfield, in Norfolk, succeeded to the Boys' inheritance, and 
by marrying Sir John Howard, son of Sir John Howard, of Wiggenhall, 
carried this manor into the Howard family. Alice's husband. Sir John 
Howard, was in the time of Edw. III. Admiral and Captain of the King's 
Navy from the mouth of the Thames northward, and 10 Edw. III. had 
an assignation of ^^153. 7s. 6d. for the wages of himself with his men-at-arms 
and archers in that service. His son Sir Robert, of Fersfield, in the 
2 Rich. II. was committed to the tower for detaining Margery de Narford 
from Ahce, Lady Nevil, his grandmother, with whom on her petition to 
the King and Council she had been appointed to remain till the case 
of divorce between her and John de Brewer should be determined 
in the Court of Rome. Sir Robert married Margery, daughter of Robert, 

'Dom. ii. 43I&. ^ Ancient Deeds, A. 3826. 

^Dom. ii. 425. 'I.P.M., 27 Edw. I. 31. 

3Dom. ii. 427. "Feet of Fines,- i Edw. II. 19, 

*Dom. ii. 438. ^J.P.M.. 8 Edw. Ill, 41. 
s T. de N. 296, 



122 



THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 



Lord Scales, of Newcells, and in 1386 settled the reversion of the 
manor on Margery his wife, and upon his 2nd son Edmund, and he dying 
without issue it reverted to his elder brother, Sir John Howard. Sir 
Robert died 3rd July, 1388,' in the lifetime of his father. Sir John 
Howard, the grandson, was steward of the Liberty of St. Edmunds in 

1399-'' 

Sir John was High Sheriff of the counties of Essex and Hertford 2 
Hen. IV. and again in the 3 and 7 Hen. V. and in the 9 Hen. V. one of the 
knights of the shire for the County of Cambridge. He married ist 
Margaret, daughter and heir of Sir John Plaiz, of Tofte, in Norfolk, by whom 
he had issue another Sir John, who married Joan, daughter and heir of 
Sir Richard Walton, of Wyvenhoe, in Essex, and left an only daughter 
Elizabeth, who married John de Vere, 12th Earl of Oxford. Sir John 
Howard married 2ndly Alice, daughter and heir of Sir William Tendring, 
Knt., and Catherine Clopton his wife, who died in 1426, and was buried 
in Stoke Nayland church by her father, Sir WiUiam Tendring, and in 1437 
when Sir John her husband died he was buried there also. Sir John had 
in 1398 settled this manor upon himself and his 2nd wife Alice by deed 
dated at Fersfield, the trustees being Sir Simon de Felbrigge, John de 
Rockford, Michael Beverlye, dean of Midelham College, and others. There 
is an extent of the manor in the inquis. p.m. of Sir John, who died in 1437.' 

On Sir John Howard's death, the manor passed to his daughter 
Elizabeth, wife of John de Vere, 12th Earl of Oxford. She paid a relief 
for the manor, then held of the Honor of Clare. Sir John de Vere was 
attainted and beheaded in 1461, and the manor forfeited, but restored to 
his son and heir John, 13th Earl of Oxford, who enjoyed till his death in 
1512, when the manor went to his daughter and coheir Elizabeth, married 
to Sir Anthony Wingfield. He held of the Honor of Clare, and died in 1552, 
when we find the manor passed to Sir John Neville, Lord Latimer, and 
Sir Robert Wingfield. In 1576 we find Sir Robert Wingfield sold a moiety 
of the manor to Richard Wingfield.* 

In 1609 the manor was vested in Sir William Cornwallis, but in 1644 
it is found to be in Gilbert Havers, of London, citizen and woollen draper, 
as that year he was a bankrupt, and it was sold by the commissioners 
under his bankruptcy for £600 to Edmund West, of Masworth, co. Bucks. 
In 1764 the manor was vested in one Alpes, and in 1837 i^ John Orford. 

There is amongst the Chancery Proceedings in the time of Elizabeth 
a bill by one William Dyer against John Hawes and others to protect title 
by purchase to Brokes Manor stated to be sometime part of the possessions 
of the prior and convent of St. Peter's, in Ipswich, afterwards granted by 
the Crown to Thomas Alvard,^ and there is also amongst the Exchequer 
Depositions mention of an action by one Joseph Alston v. Geo. Stinton and 
others in which the manor is referred to as " late of Gilbert Havers."* 

In 1566 we meet with a fine of " Bromfeld and Brockehall Manors " 
levied by Sir Robert Catlyn against Sir Nicholas Bacon and others, and it 
is possible it may relate to this manor.' 

Arms of Badele : Arg. a cross, Sa. 



'I.P.M., 12 Rich. II. 26. 
'Placite Coram Reg. i Hen. 
3 16 Hen. VI. (56). 
*Fine, Mich. 18-19 Eliz. 



IV. 



^Chan. Proceed. 1254. 

«At Ipswich, 31 Chas. II., Exch. Dep. 

7 Fine, Trin. 8 Eliz. 



IPSWICH. . 123 

ST. CLEMENT'S. 

Manor of Pond's or Pond's Hall. 

In 1298 we find a Roger de la Pond living here, and in 1466 a John 
de la Pond. In 1513 this manor was conveyed by George Fastolf ^ of Ipswich, 
to Walter Champion, citizen of London, Thomas Young, LL.D., John 
Champion, clerk, Thomas Champion, Richard Watts, and John Southwood, 
and the following year the manor is found vested in Sir James Hubbard 
and Humphrey Wingfield, and held of the Manor of Greenwich. We find 
nothing further respecting it. 

Manor of Greenwich or Cranwich. 

This lordship was held by the Fastolfs, of Nacton, and probably 
devolved in the same course through that family as the Manor of Brokes 
Hall, in Nacton, in Colneis Hundred, to the heir of George Fastolf who 
succeeded to the lordship in 1506. He in 1509 conveyed the manor to 
Walter Champion, Thomas Young, LL.D., and others. Probably this was 
by way of settlement, for in 1573 we find he conveyed it to John Reyner, 
and the following year it is found in Sir James Hubbard and Humphrey 
Wingfield. 

In the early part of the 17th century the manor was acquired by Sir 
Richard Broke, who died 23rd March, 1639, when it passed to his son and 
heir, Robert Broke, of Nacton, who was created a baronet, and died in 1693, 
from which time it has devolved in a like manner with the Manor of Cow- 
haugh al. Cow Hall al. Brokes Hall, Nacton, in the Hundred of Colneis, 
and Lawshall, Babergh Hundred, and is now vested in Lord de Saumarez. 

ST. HELENS. i 

Manor of Caldwell Hall or Cold Hall. 

This was the lordship of the Holbroke family in the beginning of the 
14th century, and possibly earlier. John de Holbroke, son of Rich, de 
Holbroke, held the manor about 1300, from which time to the time of John 
de Holbrook, who died in 1376, the manor passed in the same course as the 
Manor of Holbrook, in Samford Hundred. For a time the manor seems 
to have been in the Withepoles, but the early part of the 17th century 
it had — or rather the site of the manor had — vested in Robert Leman, 
who died in 1637, when it passed to his son and heir, Robert Leman.' 

In 1822 the manor was vested in John Rivers, and in 1837 in James 
Morrison. 

There is an advertisement of a sale to be made of " Cauldwell Hall " 
and 400 acres in the Ipswich Journal, 22nd June, 1828. 



'See Darmsden Manor, in Bosmere and Claydon Hundred. 



124 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

ST, MARGARET'S. 

Manor of the Holy Trinity al. Christ Church al. Ipswich Withipol 
al. Withipol House, voc. Greyhurst. 

Norman Gaskode, the founder of the priory of the Holy Trinity, 
Ipswich, probably in 1177, gave this lordship to the monks, with whom 
it remained until the Dissolution, when it vested in the Crown. 

The revenues of Holy Trinity priory, as well as the building itself, 
were given to Cardinal Wolsey for the purpose of assisting towards the 
building and endowment of his Ipswich College, but they were never actually 
appropriated, for while the transfer was pending Wolsey was disgraced, 
and Hen. VIII. granted a lease of the priory to Sir Humphrey Wyngfeld 
and Sir Thomas Russhe in 1536-7,' but 21st May, 1544, the manor, &c., 
was granted to Sir Thomas Pope, who was subsequently distinguished for 
his gifts to Oxford University." Sir Thomas Pope did not long retain the 
Holy Trinity priory, but shortly afterwards parted with it to Sir Edmund 
Withepole and Paul Withepole. The latter was called upon in 1546 to show 
by what title he held the manor,^ and died this same year. Sir Edmund 
Withepole was in 1552 also called upon to show by what title he held the 
manor.* 

Sir Edmund Withepole in 1549 erected on the site of the ancient priory 
adjoining to the churchyard a spacious brick mansion called Christ Church, 
and surrounded it with a pale, as appears by the following inscription over 
the porch of the entrance : " Frugalitatem sic servas -ut dissipationem 
non incurras, 1549." The entrance hall to Christ Church is very fine ; it 
is overlooked by a gallery on two sides, is adorned with a great number 
of family portraits, and is fitted up in old baronial style ; and over a 
niche in the wall opposite the entrance is the following inscription : " Rex 
mihi non me rebus submittere conor, 1548." There are several suites of 
elegant apartments of large dimensions and good proportion, containing 
many excellent portraits, two of which are beautifully painted and are 
charming pictures ; the artist's name and the date of their execution are 
unknown, but they bear the following inscription in old-fashioned letters : — 

" Chas. De Yvery, Earl of Yvery, in Normandy, 1418." 
" Mary of Montmorency, Wife of the Earl of Yvery, 1418." 

On the lawn before the house were formerly two well-executed figures 
of gladiators, as large as life, cast in lead, and are said to have been brought 
from Italy. 

The mansion commands a fine view of the river, the town, and 
adjacent country. The grounds contain some of the largest beech and 
Spanish chestnut trees in the kingdom, and were formerly stocked with 
some peculiarly handsome deer of a white colour, spotted with black. 

There was formerly to be seen in the park a large bowling green, con- 
sidered as a necessary appendage to a gentleman's mansion, and it is 
somewhere recorded that when the celebrated Lord Rochester was on a 
visit at this house, the park-keeper was driving two donkeys attached to a 
large roller for the purpose of keeping the turf smooth and level, and that 
their hoofs might not penetrate the soil he had contrived to put boots upon 

'S.P. 1520-5, p. 580. 3 Memoranda, 38 Hen. VIII., Mich. Rec. 

'O. 36 Hen. Vlll. 4, Pars. Rot. 72, 3 Rot. 23. 

Pars. Rot. 120. ♦Memoranda, 6 Edw. VL, Hil. Rec. 

Rot. 49. 



IPSWICH. 125 

their feet, which induced the facetious Earl to observe that " Ipswich was 
a town without people, that there was a river without water, and that 
asses wore boots.'" 

Edmund Withepole married Elizabeth, daughter of Thomas Kyme, 
of London, and made his will ist May, 1582, which was proved in the 
principal registry 26th May the same year. His eldest son, Paul Withe- 
pole, having died in his father's lifetime' the manor passed to his grandson, 
Paul Withepole, by Dorothy, daughter of Thomas, Lord Wentworth, of 
Nettlestead. Paul Withepole died in 1585 without issue. His will is 
dated 3rd April, 27 Eliz., and was proved in the principal registry 14th 
April, 1585. The manor passed to his brother and heir. Sir Edmund 
Withepole, Knt. He married Frances, the daughter of Sir William 
Cornwallis, Knt., and had a son. Sir William Withepole, whose daughter 
Elizabeth was married to Leicester Devereux, 6th Viscount Hereford,^ 
son and heir of Sir Walter Devereux, of Eye Court, Worcestershire. We 
meet in 1643 with a petition of Sir William " Withypole " as to this Leicester 
Devereux, who, he states in the petition, had married " Elizabeth, 
his sole daughter and heiress," having entered the house at Ipswich and 
taken goods to the value of £3,000 and deeds. He mentions also that 
Leicester's father. Sir Walter Devereux, was aiding and abetting his son.* 
In the following January there is a petition of Sir Walter Devereux in the 
same matter, and his answer to the petition of Sir William Withypole.^ 

The parties seem to have been a somewhat quarrelsome set, and perhaps 
the excitement affected old Withepole's health, for he seems to have died 
in 1644 or 1645, and we meet with a petition dated 19th August, 1645,^ of 
the said Leicester Devereux and Elizabeth his wife praying that Ptolemy 
ToUemache, who they allege had procured letters of administration of Sir 
William Withepole's estate by perjury, may be made to answer.'^ 

Elizabeth, Lady Hereford, died without male issue, when his lordship 
married a 2nd wife, Priscilla, daughter of John Catchpole, of this county, 
by whom he had a daughter Anne, who became sole heir to Christ Church. 
Leicester, Viscount Hereford, died in 1676, and his daughter Anne married 
Leicester Martin, by whom she had an only daughter Elizabeth, who married 
in 1720 the Hon. Price Devereux, the only son of the then Lord Viscount 
Hereford, and dying without issue i6th August, 1735, she was interred at 
Sudbourne. After her death Lord Hereford sold this estate to Claude 
Fonnereau, an eminent London merchant, descended from a noble Hugenot 
family in France, deriving, it is supposed, from a branch of the Earls of 
Ivry, of Poictiers, in Normandy. Claude was the son of Zachary Fonnereau, 
who had fled from the city of La Rochelle at the revocation of the Edict 
of Nantes and settled in London. On Claude's death the manor passed 
to his son and heir, Thomas Fonnereau, who died without issue, when it 
devolved on his brother and heir, the Rev. Claudius Fonnereau, D.D. He 
in 1725 married Ann, daughter and coheir of the Rev. William Bunbury, 
rector of Catworth, co. Huntingdon (grandson of Henry Bunbury, of Bunbury 
and Staney, who suffered such great hardships for his unshaken loyalty to 

' Clarke's Hist, of Ipswich, pp. 328-30. ^ 6 Rep. Hist. Com. App. ii. pp. 6, 10. 

'He Was buried in St. Margaret's Church, ^The date of the burial of Sir William 

Ipswich, 9th Dec. 1577. Withepole in the Register of St. 

^See Manor of Earl Soham, in Loes Margaret, Ipswich, is 23rd Sept., 

Hundred, and Chillesford Manor, 1645, so the date of the petition 

in Plomesgate Hundred. can hardly be correct. 

■*3ist Aug. 1643, 5 Rep. Hist. Com. 103. 7 6 Rep. Hist. Com. 74. 



126 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

Chas. I.), by Anne his wife, daughter of Sir ViUiers Chernocke, Bart., of 
Hulcote. Dr. Fonnereau had twelve children, all of whom died young 
or without issue, excepting Ann, married to Sir Booth Williams, Bart., of 
Clopton, in Northamptonshire, and the Rev. William Fonnereau, his eldest 
son and heir, who succeeded to this lordship on the death of his father in 
1804. He married in 1758 Anne, only daughter and eventual (her brother 
dying without issue) heir of Sir Hutchins Williams, Bart., of Clopton. 
WiUiam Fonnereau died 28th Feb. 1817, and there is a marble tablet on th,e 
north chancel wall of St. Margaret's, Ipswich, to his memory. He is there 
stated to have enjoyed a constant flow of cheerfulness and good humour, 
with a body and mind actively engaged in manly and rational pursuits, 
and never allowed himself to view the crosses and disappointments of life 
through a discouraging medium. He must have had a very happy dis- 
position, and seems to have been successful in closing his eyes to the ills of 
life where the more sympathetic fail. His happy disposition was evidently 
conducive to health, for he departed in his 85th year, when the manor 
passed to his 2nd son, the Rev. Charles William Fonnereau. He married 
in 1764 Harriette Deborah, eldest daughter of Thomas Neale, of Freston 
Tower. 

Mr. Fonnereau served some time in His Majesty's navy during the 
first American war, and was lieutenant of the "Conqueror" under Admiral 
Rodney in the action 12th April, 1782. He retired afterwards and entered 
into holy orders. He died in 1840, when the manor passed to his son and 
heir, William Charles Fonnereau, D.L., who in 1832 married Katherine 
Georgiana, daughter of John Cobbold, of Holy wells and The Cliff, Ipswich, 
and dying 31st July, 1855, the manor passed to his son and heir, Thomas 
Neale Fonnereau, who in 1861 married Blanche Editha, youngest daughter 
of the Rev. George Pearse, vicar of Martham, Norfolk, and died in 1890, 
when he was succeeded by his son, William Neale Fonnereau, of The Moat, 
who married in 1894 Audine, only daughter of the Ven. Archdeacon 
WooUey, of East Bergholt. 

There are two Chancery suits on the books relating to this manor in 
the time of Queen Elizabeth. The first is by Robert Burcher against 
Edmund " Wythpol " touching the manor,' and the other by Edmund 
"Wythepoole" against Sir Hugh Powlet, Dame Ehzabeth his wife, and 
another touching the site of the Trinity Priory.'' 

Arms of Fonnereau : Quarterly, 1st and 4th Gu. three chevronels, 
Arg. on a chief Az. a sun in splendour. Or ; 2nd and 3rd quarterly ist and 
4th Gu. a wolf issuing out of a rock, from the sinister side of the escutcheon ; 
all Arg. 2nd and 3rd Az. three boars' heads, couped, Arg. 



'C.P. ser. ii. B. xxiii. 6. ^C.P. ser. ii. clxxxiii. 41. 



IPSWICH. 127 

ST. MATTHEW. 

Manor of Castle Hill, in Brokes. 

All the information we have respecting this manor is that in the 2nd 
year of King Edw. VI. Sir Anthony Wingfield held the site. 

ST. PETER. 
Manor of St. Peter's, Ipswich. 

In the reign of King Henry II. this was the lordship of the priory of 
St. Peter and St. Paul, Ipswich. In 1527 Cardinal Wolsey obtained its 
suppression, and a grant to him of the site upon which the following year ! 
he began the erection of Cardinal College, which, however, upon the 
Cardinal's disgrace, was suppressed, and the site or a part thereof granted in 
1530 to Thomas Alvard. The manor was included in a fine levied in 1552 
by Anthony Aldburghe against Richard Alexander alias Milward.' 

We meet with a :&ne of " Seynt Peters Manor " in 1573 levied by 
Thomas Sekford against John Holdryche and others.'' The moiety granted 
to Thomas Alvard seems subsequently to have been known as the Manor 
of St. Peter in Ipswich, alias Alwards, as contra-distinguished from the 
other moiety known as Ipswich St. Peter only. Some admissions to the 
former manor were referred to in the " East Anglian Notes and Queries " 
in 1886.^ 

Amongst the Additional Charters in the British Museum is a precipe 
on covenants concerning " St. Peters al. Alverd's Manor " in 1589. ■* And a 
fine this year was levied of the manor by Sampson Wolfreton and others 
against Robert Snellinge and others.' 

In 1611 a grant of the manor was made to Richard Perceval and 
Edmund Duffield, but two years later (in another place earlier) Davy states 
that one W. Dyer was lord. 

The manor subsequently passed to William Beeston, M.D. He was 
the son of the Rev. Edmund Beeston, rector of Sproughton i6go, and of What- 
field 1711, who died in 1735. This Edmund Beeston was the son of an 
Edmund Beeston, also rector of Sproughton, who died in 1713. Dr. 
William Beeston died without issue 4th Dec. 1732, at the age of 60/ and 
the manor passed to his sister and heir Margaret, married to the Rev. 
WiUiam Coyle, rector of Sproughton, Wenham, and East Bergholt. 
Margaret died in 1756, and was buried at Hintlesham. Her son and heir, 
William Coyle, M.D., married in 1736 Elizabeth Cobbold, and died in 1775, 
when the manor devolved on his son and heir, William Beeston Coyle, 
M.D., who died in 1810, at the age of 69. 

He left the mansion house by his will to his widow Hester for life, with 
remainder to the Rev. William Frilland, son of his daughter Sarah, who 
sold it in 1824 to Samuel Alexander. 

Arms of Beeston : Arg. a bend between 6 bees Sa. 

ST. MARY STOKE. 
Manor of Hanford Hall. 
In the 2nd year of King Edw. VI. we find this manor vested in the 
Bailiffs of Ipswich, and in 1609 in the Dean of Ely. In 1602 we find amongst 

'Fine, Mich. 6 Edw. VI. 'Fine, Hil. 31 Eliz. 

^Fine, Mich. 15 Eliz. *Will 19th Feb., 1731, proved nth Dec. 

3N.S., vol. i. 331. 1732. 

*Add Ch. 25403. 



128 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

the Duchy of Lancaster Calendar to Pleadings' a suit as to ingress fine for 
this manor. The parties are Lay ton v. Corporation of Ipswich. 

Manor of Stoke Hall al. Weyland's. 

Edgar gave the manor to the Abbot of Ely about the year 970, and 
an entry in the Domesday Survey is as follows: — 

"At Stoke Saint Etheldreda held three carucates of land as a 
manor in King Edward's time. There were always 9 villeins^ and then 

5 bordars, now 15. Then i serf. Always 2 plough teams in demesne. 
And 6 ploughteams belonging to the men. And i church living with 
40 acres of free land. And i mill. And 20 acres of meadow. And 12 
beasts. And 20 hogs. And 24 sheep. And 14 goats. Furthermore 
Saint Etheldreda has a moiety of the jurisdiction which lies beyond the 
bridge. Then valued at £4, now at loos. It is 6 quarentenes long and 

6 broad. And pays 4d. in a gelt of 20s." 

In 1109 Hervey, ist Bishop of Ely, assigned this manor to the monks. 
In 1168 Roger de Munchensy claimed the manor, but the decision went 
against him and in favour of the monks, to whom it was formally confirmed 
by Pope Nicholas III. in 1279. 

In the reign of Hen. V. we find one William Andrewe holding the 
manor, and it passed on his death in 1402 to his widow Elizabeth, who 
died in 1419, when it passed to her son and heir, Thomas Andrewe,* then 
aged 40. Thomas Andrewe died in 1437 without issue, leaving his nephew 
Nicholas, son of Thomas's brother John, who, however, died without issue, 
and two nieces, daughters of his (Thomas's) brother William, viz., 
Margaret and Joan, wife of Robert Codlinge, his coheirs. It is quite 
possible the Andrewe family had but a lease of the manor for a term. In 
1595 Edward Sulyard held, also probably as a lessee. He died in 1605, 
and his interest passed to his son. Sir John Sulyard.^ 

In 1696 we find that Thomas Glemham, of Glemham Hall, Jiad a 
lease for a term of 21 years, and in 1782 Nathaniel Acton held under a lease 
from the Dean and Chapter. In 1824 Ambrose Harbord, steward of Stoke 
Park, seems to have held, possibly as lessee. He died 8th Oct. 1837, aged 
67. 

A " Stoke near Ipswich Manor " was included in a fine levied in 1597 
by Richard Targrest against Thomas Abbott and others.'* 

Manor of Godlesford now Gusford Hall. 

In the time of the Confessor this was the estate of Edna, and at the 
time of the Great Survey was held by the Countess of Albemarle, wife of 
Odo de Campania, with the Manor of Manningtree, in Essex, by the service 
of half a knight's fee. From her it passed to her son and heir Stephen, 
Earl of Albermarle. Nearly two centuries later we find the manor held by 
Hubert de Ruilly, whose son and heir in 1275 claimed view of frankpledge 
here and liberties in Guthelisford. He gave the manor to Maud, Countess 
of Gloucester, who held the same in 1286. It subsequently passed to the 
prior of Canons Leigh, co. Devon, where it remained until the Dissolution, 
when it passed to the Crown, and was in 1540 granted by King Hen. VIII. 
to Sir John Raynesford in fee to hold by the service of the tenth part of a 
knight's fee. He had licence to alien in 1548 to Sir WiUiam Windsor, Lord 
Windsor.^ 

'40 Eliz. II. 4 Fine, Hil. 39 Eliz. 

'I.P.M., 7 Hen. V. 5 Fine, Trin. 3 Edw, Vj, 

3 See Manor of Haughley, in Stow Hundred, 



IPSWICH. 129 

He married ist Margaret, daughter and heir of William Sambourne, 
of Southcote, CO. Berks, and 2ndly Elizabeth, daughter of Peter Cowdry 
and widow of Richard Paulet. Sir William, Lord Windsor, by his will 
dated loth Aug. 1558 (he died 20th Aug. 1558) gave the manor to his 5th 
son. Sir Edward Windsor, Lord Windsor, who married Catherine, daughter 
of John Vere, Earl of Oxford. He had summons to Parliament from 5 to 
18 Eliz., and died abroad. By his will he directed that his body should 
be buried at Liege, and his heart at Bradenham, which was performed, 
and contained in an oval-shaped leaden vase, and occupies a niche in the 
vault beneath the patron's chancel at Bradenham, and bears the following 
inscription : — 

" Herein is the heart of Edward, Lord Windsor, who died at Spa, 
January 24, I574-" 

Frederick, his eldest son, was his successor, and had summons to 
Parliament 23 Eliz., and died in 1586 unmarried, when the manor devolved 
upon his brother and heir, Henry, Lord Wmdsor, who married Anne, 
daughter and coheir of Sir Thomas Rivett, of Chippenham, co. Cambridge, 
and had four sons and five daughters, whereof three only lived to maturity 
— Thomas, his successor to the title, and two daughters, of whom Elizabeth 
senior married Dixie Hickman, and Elizabeth junior married her cousin, 
Andreas Windsor. 

By 1597 the manor had passed to Edward Sulyard, and from him it 
went to the Crown. 

In 1609 the manor was vested in Nicholas Barker. 

Gusford Hall is situate in the parish of St. Mary Stoke, in a hollow 
towards the extremity of the parish towards Belstead, and therefore cannot 
boast much of its situation. It was for some time about 1824 the property 
of Jonathan Waspe, who resided there and farmed the land. At no great 
distance from Gusford Hall is a small house which in 1824 was the property 
and residence of Mr. Pretyman. 

Manor of Wicks Bishop. 

King Richard I. gave this manor to John of Oxford, Bishop of Norwich 
1 175 to 1200, and it was confirmed by the King to John Le Gray, Bishop 
of Norwich. The succeeding bishops held the manor until 1535, and 
frequently resided here in a house near the Nacton Road, of which house 
nothing now remains. 

In 1535 the manor was vested in the King by Act of Parliament, and 
in 1545 Sir John Jermy' had a grant of it from the Crown. From Sir John 
the manor passed to his son and heir, Francis Jermy, and from him to his 
son and heir. Sir Thomas Jermy, and from him to his son and heir, Thomas 
Jermy, who conveyed it to Sir William Hewitt, who died in 1667. Davy 
queries whether the manor then went to the Wingfield family or not, and 
he gives doubtfully as lord Sir Thomas Wingfield, Sir Anthony Wingfield, 
who died 30th July, 1638, and his son and heir. Sir Richard Wingfield.* 
However this may be, the manor was clearly vested in Sir Samuel 
Barnardiston, Bart., on his death in 1707,^ and from this time to the time 
of Sir John Gregory Shaw, Bart., the manor passed in the same course as 
the Manor of Brightwell, in Carlford Hundred. 

' See Manor of Metfield, in Hoxne Hundred. ^ See Manor of Waldringfield, in Carlford 
■"See Manor of Thorpe Hall, Hasketon, in Hundred. 

Carlford Hundred. 

R 



130 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

The 26th Aug. 1812, the manor was offered for sale, when the amount 
of the quit and free rents were stated to have amounted on an average to 
;^ii. 6s. dd., and the amount of fines stated to have been received in 181 1 
was £96. 4s. The manor was purchased by John Cobbold. 

Manor of Wicks Ufford. 

In 1231 Peter, Earl of Richmond, had livery of this manor, and in 
1241 Peter de Savoy. The latter surrendered it into the King's hands, 
who confirmed it to his eldest son. Prince Edward, in 1261. 

A few years later the manor was vested in Robert de Ufford, who died 
seised of it in 1298, when it passed to his son and heir, Robert de Ufford, 
who died in 1316, from which time the manor passed in the same course 
as the Manor of Parham, in Plomesgate Hundred, to the time of Margery 
or Maria, widow of Sir Christopher Willoughby, 8th Lord Willoughby. 
She died in 1515, when this manor passed to William, Lord Willoughby, 
the son and heir of Christopher. 

We find a deed amongst the Harleian Charters dated the ist Oct. 18 
Hen. VL [1439], by which King Hen. VI. granted licence to Sir Robert 
" Wylughby " to assign this manor and the castle and town of Orford, and 
also the advowson of the church of Ufford held of the King in chief to Sir 
Thomas Combirworth, Robert Sheffield, John Langholm, Thomas Fitz 
William, John Stayndrape, and Robert Foranan,' and by deed dated i8th 
June, 1516, Sir Edmund Jenney, Knt., pursuant to the terms of the will of 
Christopher, Lord Willoughby D'Eresby, assured the same with other 
manors to his son William, Lord Willoughby D'Eresby." 

William, 9th Lord Willoughby's will is dated 1526, and under it his 
widow Mary, Lady Willoughby, took the manor for life, after which it went 
to William Willoughby, her nephew, who sold it in 1541 to Sir John Brewse,^ 
who dying in 1585* it passed to his nephew, Giles Brewse, who dying in 
1596 gave it to his sister Alice Brewse, afterwards married to^ Thomas 
Wingfield, of Brantham. Davy mentions without date, but a'fter this 
Thomas Wingfield, " Thomas Brewse, son of Robert," as lord, and then in 
1609 he makes Sir Edmund Withipol lord, he having married Elizabeth, 
daughter of Sir John Brewse. There is certainly in 1597 a fine levied of 
the Manor of Ipswich by Edmund Withipol against Benjamin Withipol,' 
but there is another in 1601 levied of the manor by Sir Edmund Withipol 
against Humphrey Wingfield and others.^ 

In 1 61 4 Davy places as lord Edmund Poley (son of Mary, wife of 
Richard Poley and sister of Giles Brewse), Humphrey Wingfield and Anne 
his wife, James Hill and Prudence his wife, John Lucas junior and Margaret 
his wife, and Alice Brewse, sisters and coheirs of Giles Brewse. Probably 
the manor was held in shares. Sir William Withipol, son and heir of Sir 
Edmund, succeeded to his share, and indeed seems to have acquired the 
other shares, for the whole manor apparently passed to his daughter and 
heir Elizabeth, married to Leicester, 6th Viscounti^Hereford, who died in 

'Harl. 43 E. 43. An annuity of ^£40 was ^Harl. 52 B. 10. 

granted out of this and other ^Fine, Trin. 33 Hen. VIII. 

manors to Sir William Oldhall and *See Manor of Vaux, Great Wenham, in 

Margaret his wife, sister of Robert Samford Hundred. 

Lord Willoughby, by deed ist 'Fine, Easter, 39 Eliz. 

Jan. 1430 (Harl. 57 A. i ; see ^Fine, Trin. 43 Eliz. 

too 58 B. 17). 



IPSWICH. 131 

1676, after which time the manor descended and devolved in the same 
course as the Manor of Holy Trinity al. Christ Church, Ipswich. 

The following is a copy of an interesting rental of this manor made in 
1552 by Henry Goodwyn from copies of old rentals and other evidences, 
and now in the writer's possession : — 

The Rental of the same made by Henry Goodwyn from copies of the 
old Rentals and other evidences, belonging to the same^manor, in the month 
of July, in the sixth year of King Edward the VI. forgone year (1552). 

The Bailiffs or Stewards of the Town of Ipswich, for certain 

Rents call'd " Mallesmil " £4 10 o 

Edmund Withypolle Esq. for different lands in Ipswich in the 
Parishes of St. Margaret, and John de Cauldwell at Fairs. 
Rushmere, Westerfield, Thurleston, parcel of the Manor of 
Christchurche, situated in divers places, that is to say, for 
the Dairy lane, on the West of the said Manor, three different 
pieces on the road leading from Ipswich towards Akenham 
and Thurleston, at Goldinggabe, Hawes medowe in Thurleston 
by the road leading towards Westerfield, one piece on 
Cleypitts, one piece of Meadow, on the west of the Manor 
of Wikesbishop, called Balton Medow. Divers pieces 
abutting upon Markeswey towards the East. One piece 
by the road leading from Ipswich to Westerfield, abutting 
on the North upon the lands called Christe-churche, 
" called Saynt Mary lands " estimated at half an acre .... o 27 o 

Anthony Wyngfeld Esq. for his Manor of Westerfield Hall late 
Waylonds, and y^d. for the tenement call'd Hawkeswade 
in Westerfield late . . . Shribbe with a piece of land, 
call'd Overwellers with divers pieces of land containing 
3J acres, abutting upon Merkesweye towards the North 
and for another piece called Tackeslond at per acre yd. 
and zb\d o 7 o 

Cecillia Sampson, Widow late Widow to Thomas Tilton Esq. for 
certain lands, parcel of the Manor of Rushmere Hall 
formerly George Fyllbrgges o 2 o 

The Lord of the Manor of Dale Hall, for a piece of enclosed land 
in Thurleston with a piece of land adjoining it, towards the 
north, containing 3 acres, situated between the land of 
Lawrence Stysted, late Cobetts towards the west, and the 
lands of Edmd. WithipoUe Esq. formerly William Knapton, 
towards the north and on the south side abutting upon the 
lands of the said Edmund, formerly in the fee of William 
Knapton, and on the north of the lands of the said Edmund, 
and for one Rodd of Meadow situated in Hawkesmedowe, 
between the fields of the said Edmd. Withypolle, late the 
Priory of the Holy Trinity on the north and south part o o 8 

Lawrence Stysted, for lands late William Walworthe, situated 
in divers places, that is to say, in the Parishes of St. 
Clements, St. Helens, St. Margarets, St. John de Cauldwell, 
Westerfield, and Thurleston, at gd. and yd. per annum, and 
for one piece of pasture, Pictle abutting upon Cauldwell 
Brook, late Richard Boyde, formerly Thomas Byrdes 6d. . . o 10 i 



132 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

Robert Daundy for 3^ acres of land in Rushmere call'd 

" Rayscrop " £0 o 14 

Robert Brooke Esq. for his Tenement called Granwiche with 
3 rodds of land belonging thereto. For six pieces of land 
late Joan Rous's for Downinge Clere and Granwiche Woods 
and other lands in Allesburne Hamlett of Granwiche, in 
the parish of St. Clement's, late Richard Filawes formerly 
Robert . . . containing 25 acres of land, as by the 
rental of 19 Edward IV. appears for the year o 811 

The Tenant of the land late Thomas Sabyn for one close, 
situated in Cauldwell, abutting upon Cauldwell Brook, 
towards the West, and situated by the side of the lane lead- 
ing from Cauldwell towards Rushmere, lately Thomas 
Mansers o o 11 

John Clerke for three acres of land in two pieces in the Town 

fields towards Rushmere o o 12 

The Guardians of St. Mary Quay, for the Redely ff, in the parish 

of St. Clements let Gapies by the year o o 2 

William Fourth for a piece of land in the Parish of St. Clements 

late William Chestons o o ij 

Thomas Burnard alias Godfrey for another parcel of the same 
piece late William Chestons, called a Garden Plott, situated 
on the south of the tenement of Robert Grymbyll, by the 
year o o oj 

The tenant of the land, late Thomas Baldrys, for 13 pieces of 
land, formerly Robert Shribbes, situated in Westerfield, 
Thurleston, and the Parish of St. Margarets containing about 
12 acres, and 4 Shillings for three pieces of land late John 
Shribbes containing 2 J acres. For the tenement Kenton's 
in Tuddenham with divers lands belonging to the same 
Tenement, and two acres of land late William .... 
in the parish of St. Clements, and for 3 acres and 3 roods of 
land late William Markes, Clerk, in the whole by the year . . o 12 2 

John Usherwode Jun. for the Tenement Pitts at the Hille, with 
divers lands belonging to the same Tenement late WilUam 
Lady's 4s. 3^. and for other land in a close between Bexley 
and Hallow — tree-way containing 4 acres call'd Cheston's 
land i6d o 5 7 

John Usherwode Sen. for certain lands in Rushmere late William 

Cady's by the year o o 19 

Edward Bacon for divers lands in Rushmere late Isabella Bacon's 

formerly Thomas Dennes o 2 i 

Robert Daund)^, Mirehort for 6 acres and i rood of land in divers 
pieces in Rushmere late Thomas Bacon's formerly Thomas 
Sewell's, and before him, Benhalls o 2 i 

John Dameron for divers lands in Bexley formerly Thomas 
Sewells 7s. 2d. and for three acres in different pieces, 
situated in the TowneFieldjinthe Parish of St. Margareti2(?. 082 



IPSWICH. 133 

John Tame for three acres of land in Rushmere late Simon 

Fuller's before Thomas Blyth, formerly Tanners £0 o 12 

Henry Goodwyn for 2^ acres of land in Kesgrave, formerly Cole's 

and Jessoppes o o 10 

William Dameron for the tenement Carter's in Rushmere and id. 
for divers lands in the Town field in the Parish of St. 
Margaret, late Byrd's 2s. lod. for 2 acres of land in Wester- 
field late Robert Dameron's, called Warden's land and 8d. 
for a piece of land abutting upon the Road leading to 
Westerfield Church to Rushmere, late the Guardians of the 
Church of Westerfield 4d o 311 

Thomas Medowe for the tenement Richard Shribbes in Wester- 
field, with a certain close, and a wood adjoining on the north 
of the said tenement Deyes with a Garden and 3 roods of 
land annexed to the same upon Westerfield Green, towards 
the south o o 6 

Henry WhytopoU in right of his wife for 7^ acres of land, in 8 

piecesof land in Westerfield and Thurleston late John Cady's 026 

George Harman for the tenement lately built in Westerfield by 
the Hall Garden, and for one piece of land at Melhill 
formerly the Guardians of St. Margarets o o 4 

Edward Cooke for 2 acres of land in Rushmere in the fields .... o o 8 

John Brende for an acre of land in her close, towards the north, 

by her Messuages in the parish of St. Margaret late Amigerds 004 

William Curteys for a shop in the Parish of St. Clements 

formerly held by Copy, late Edward Gilgetts o o 4 

Richard Dean, tinker, for one Pichtle called Erleshall in the 

parish of St. Helen's formerly held by o 3 4 

Matthew Goodynge for a small Close called Le Teyntors close 
late William Halls, in the Parish of St. Margaret, between 
Cauldwell Brook and Stabeller's lane o o 4 

Thomas Barber for ^ an acre of land in St. Clements Parish o o 2 

William Scrotton for a messuage in Rushmere called Yonnes 

formerly John Manser's o oj 

John Carver of Witnesham for 6 acres of land in Witnesham late 

Davermeyets o 7 o 

William Barber-draper-for the south part of the tenement 
called the Greunde in Brook Street, in the parish of St. 
Margaret o o 3 

The tenant of the land late Sir Thomas Russhe Knyght for one 
acre and one rood of land in the close called Milhell upon the 
north of Stabellers lane late William Baker, Notary o o 5 

The Sum total £g. lys. lod. with 3s. /[d. for Erleshall as appears by 
Copy of the Court RoU. 



134 



THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 



Fines, &c. 

William Barber for a close called the " Hemplond " with Garden 
and Stable and other houses on the north of the Messuage 
called the " Greunde " in the parish of St. Margaret abutting 
towards the north upon the lane leading from " Camestreet" 
to the Grammar Scole £o 6 8 

Robert Dameron for a Sawynge Pett, in St. Clements by Saynt 

Tamy's Chapill o 2 o 

Catherine wife of William Bullock for a messuage in the parish 

of St. Nicholas late in the occupation of Robert Swayn o 2 3 

The sum is los. iid. 

Total of Rent and fines, £10. 8s. gd. 




Christ Church, Ipswich. 



LACKFORD HUNDRED. 







MtiU/ifutU Dtitifi 



/^ -r^ 












'\rmM>..»? t'ehii^^rufto .s^c '.rW;-. ''■?^- ^.;^.. f - 












'i^-L^^ S^-T" ^^^"^ 



.>"'' 



BOW DEN, 

Mil. 





LACKFORD HUNDRED. 

I HIS Hundred is in the North-western Division of the County, 
and is of a triangular figure extending about 15 miles in 
length on each of the three sides, being divided by the River 
Ouse from the County of Cambridge. It is bounded on the 
North by Norfolk, on the West by Cambridgeshire, and on the 
East and South by the Hundreds of Blackbourn, Thingoe, and 
Risbridge. It is in the franchise or Liberty of St. Edmund, 
Diocese of Ely, Archdeaconry of Sudbury and Deanery of Fordham, and 
includes parts of Thetford and Newmarket, near the latter of which it has a 
small detached member, nearly surrounded by Cambridgeshire. It is watered 
by the Rivers Lark and Little Ouse, the latter of which separates it from 
Norfolk, and the former, after crossing it near IckUngham and Mildenhall, 
flows northwards, and forms its western boundary. The central and 
eastern parts of Lackford Hundred consist chiefly of light, sandy moor 
and heath land, rising in bold undulations, and resting on a thick stratum 
of chalk and flint. The Hundred consists of 77,159 acres in the following 
17 parishes and 48 manors : — 



Parishes. 



Manors. 



Parishes. 



Manors. 



Barton 

(Little) 

Brandon . . 
Cavenham 

Downham 

Elvedon . . . 
Eriswell . . , 

Exning . , . 



Barton Mills or 

Monk's Hall. 
Shardelowe's. 
W. Bonner's and 

Torkley's. 
Pooley Barton. 
Brandon. 
Cavenham al. Can 

ham. 
Shardelowe's. 
Downham. 
Downham al. 

Monk's Hall. 
Marsier al. Meicies. 
Elvedon. 
Stanes al. Monk's 

Hall. 
Gelham. 
Hastings. 
Eriswell. 
Chamberlaines . 

Exning called Val 
ence or Cotton's. 

Exning called Well 
Hall or Cogges- 
hall's. 

Jarden's al. Garden- 
er's al. Jardin's. 



Freckenham. 
Herringswell. 



Icklingham 



Lakenheath 



Mildenhall 



Newmarket 



Freckenham. 

Herringswell. 
Blunt's or Blounck's 

al. Waywashyard 

al. Lanes. 

Icklingham Berners 
Hall al. Ickling- 
ham Capell's. 

Icklingham St. 
James. 

Thamhill al. Quaned 
al. Quamell's al. 
Cressener's, Har- 
ling and Cutt's 

Sexten's. 

( Lakenheath. 
UndleyHall. 
Radmere or Red- 
mere al. Rodmere. 

f Mildenhall. 
Aspall's. 
Wamhill. 
Carrill's. 

Newmarket, Argen- 
tines. 
Boteler's. 



136 



THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 



Parishes. 


Manors. 


Parishes. 


Manors. 




/ Thetford, commonly 




/ Wangford or Wang- 




called Lancaster's. 




ford Grange. 


Thetford . . 


Halwick orThetfordj 
Westwickj Brayes, 


Wangford . . 


I Hakbeck or Hag- 
beche. 




and Northwic or 




Flemming's. 




I Norwich. 




I Crepping. 




/ Tuddenham cum 








Badgecroft's al. 




/ Worlington, Aber- 




Hengrave's al. 




gavenny, other- 


Tuddenham 


I Shardelowe's. 


Worlington , . 


wise Bergavenny. 

Worlington, Scales, 

otherwise Tindall's 




Banstead or Ben- 






stead's. 






\ Netherhall. 







The fee of this Hundred is in the Crown, and the government in the 
Sheriff and his officers. 




LITTLE BARTON. 137 

BARTON (^LITTLE) OR BARTON MILLS. 

O manor is mentioned in Domesday as in Little Barton, but 
there were several separate holdings which ultimately 
formed the greater portion of the manor. 

The first was that held by Richard, son of Earl Gisle- 
bert, in chief. In the time of Edward the Confessor, Godeva, 
a freeman under Wisgar by commendation only in the 
Abbot of St. Edmund's soc held 60 acrels of land, 4 bordars, 
and I serf, half a ploughteam in demesne, and i acre of meadow, of the 
value of 5s., and a socman also under Wisgar held 60 acres and 4 bordars, 
half a ploughteam, and i acre of meadow, valued at 5s. Of this Wisgar 
had the soc. There were also 30 acres of land in Wisgar's demesne, and 

2 oxen valued at 3s.' 

Another estate was that of William de Wateville. This was of con- 
siderable extent, and was held from the Queen. It had been held by a free- 
man, Alued, but at the time of the Domesday Survey seems to have been 
held by Alveve of the King. It consisted of 5 carucates of land, in the 
time of the Confessor having 10 villeins, 9 serfs, 4 ploughteams in demesne, 

3 belonging to the men, 2 fisheries, 2 acres of meadow, i rouncy, 10 beasts, 
200 sheep, 40 hogs, valued at £8. Subsequently the value was £6, but at 
the time of the Survey 30s. only. The details had altered, for the villeins 
at the time of the Survey had come down to 7, there were 5 bordars, the 
rouncy had disappeared, but there were 2 horses. There had also been a 
reduction in the beasts, sheep, and hogs, which had come down respectively 
to 5, 3, and 3. It was a league in length, and half a league broad, and in a 
gelt paid 2od., the soc and sac belonging to the Abbot of St. Edmund's." 

" This parish," says Page,^ " was sometimes designated in old writings 
' Barton Togryng ' (that is, Twa-grind), because there were two mills, or 
else one mill and two pair of stones, which was not usual in early times." 

Barton Mills Manor or Monk's Hall. 

This manor belonged to the abbey of St. Edmund's by the grant of 
Richard Hoo, and on the suppression of the monasteries came to the Crown, 
and there remained until 1553, when it was granted to Simon Steward, of 
Lakenheath, son of Nicholas Steward, of Upwell, co. Norfolk.* 

Amongst the Chancery Proceedings of Elizabeth we find an action by 
this Simon " Sty war de " against Leon. Tylott relating to this manor, ^ 
and amongst the Parker MSS. in Corpus Christi College, Cambridge, is a 
letter from this " Simeon " desiring the archbishop to give the living ot 
Little Barton to his kinsman, which Simeon had promised him under the 
mistaken impression that he had bought the patronage with the manor.^ 
Simon Steward married Joan, daughter and coheir of Edward Bestuy, 
and died 30th April, 1568, when the manor passed to his widow, who was this 
year called upon to show by what title she held the same.'' 

The manor on Joan's death in 1609 passed to Simon's 4th son, Thomas 
Steward, of Mildenhall, who married Frances, daughter of William Butts, 
of Norfolk and Shouldham, and on his death the manor passed to his son 
and heir, Thomas Steward. He married Susan, daughter of — Wendy, 

' Dom. ii. 3916, 392. ' C. P. Ser. ii. B. clxiv. 6. 

^Dom. ii. 4356. ^1560, Parker MSS. cxiv. 285. 

3 Hist, of Suff. p. 827. 7 Memoranda Rolls, 13 Eliz. Hil. Rec. Rot. 

*Originalia, 7 Edw. VI. i Pars. Rot. 85. 17. 



138 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

and sister of Sir Thomas Wendy, of Haselingford, and died about 1676. 
He left a son Thomas, who married Lucy, daughter of — Hulton, of London, 
merchant, but died without issue, and a daughter EHzabeth, married to. 
Robert King, of Great Thurlow, by whom she had a daughter Letitia, 
married to Sir Robert Kemp, of Guisney, whose daughter Letitia married 
Sir Edmund Bacon, of Garboldisham, Bart. 

In 1786 we find the manor vested in one Thomas Thoresby, who 
died in 1790, and in 1796 Josiah Rodwell and Wilham Dalton were joint 
lords. In 1835 this manor belonged to WiUiam Walker, in 1855 to the 
Rev. Charles Jenkin, D.D., and in 1885 to O. T. Read, of Mildenhall, but it 
now seems to be extinct. 

Shardelowe's Manor. 

This manor belonged to William de Talsham in early times, and was the 
lordship of the Shardelowe family in the time of Hen. III. 

Sir John de Shardelowe, of Little Barton, was one of the Justices of 
the Common Pleas, and sat for a time in the King's Bench. Robert de 
Shardelowe, another of the family, was one of the Justices of the Common 
Pleas in the reign of Hen. III. 

Sir John Shardelowe died seised in 1335,' and was succeeded by his son 
and heir. Sir John Shardelowe,' who died the 5th March, 1344,' when his son 
Edmund having died in his father's lifetime, the manor passed to Edmund's 
son and Sir John's grandson, Sir John Shardelowe, and by the inquis. p.m. 
of Sir John the grandfather it was found that he had conveyed to his sons 
John and Thomas, his brother Edmund de Shardelowe, parson of Herrings- 
well, and his grandson John, son of Edmund de Shardelowe, deceased, for 
himself for life, with remainder to his grandson John in tail male. 

The grandson Sir John Shardlow, who was a knight of the shire of 
Suffolk in 1372 and collector of the fifteenths two years later, by his will 
dated 20th Nov. 1391, and proved the same year, ordered his body to be 
interred in the church of Thompson, in Norfolk,'* near his parents and 
ancestors, gave to the college of the same church loos. ; to a,, chaplain to 
celebrate there for a year after his decease, seven marks ; to the high altar 
of the church of All Saints, of Fulburn, Barton, near Mildenhall and Flemp- 
ton, half a mark ; to each clerk of the said parishes i2d. ; and half a mark 
for the repairs of each of the same churches, and after various bequests to 
religious houses, he gave to Elizabeth, his daughter, 100 marks on her 
marriage, or 50 marks if she became a religious ; and ordered £20 to be 
expended at his funeral in charity. The manor passed to his son. Sir 
Robert Shardlow, who married ist Margaret, daughter of Sir Roger Grey, 
and 2ndly Ela, whose will is dated 8th Nov. 1457. He died in 1399, when 
the manor went to his son. Sir John Shardlow, who was knight of the 
shire for Suffolk in 1432. He married Margaret, daughter of William 
Loveneye, of Stratton, and died in 1433 without issue,' leaving Sir Thomas 
Brewse, son of Robert Brewse and Ela his wife, daughter of Sir Miles Staple- 
ton, of Ingham, co. Norfolk, which Robert was son of Sir John Brewse, 
of Wenham Parva and Joan his wife, daughter of Sir John Shardlow 
the grandfather, father of Sir John Shardlow, his cousin German, his heir. 

' I.P.M., 8 Edw. III. 37. * Sir Thomas de Shardelowe, Knt., and Sir 

*The pedigree given by Davy is in- John, his brother, had in 1349 

accurate. endowed the college or perpetud 

3 1. P.M., 18 Edw. III. 37. chantry at Thompson with the 

church of St. Martin there. 
5I.P.M., II Hen. VI. 12. 



LITTLE BARTON. 139 

Sir Thomas Brewse by Mary his ist wife, daughter of Sir John Cal- 
thorp, had a son and heir, William Brewse, who, dying 28th Oct. 1489, was 
buried at Fressingfield, and left by Isabel his wife, daughter of Sir John 
Hopton (relict of Sir John Jermy), two daughters and coheirs — Thomasyne, 
married to Sir Thomas Hansard, Knt., and Ann, married to Sir Roger 
Townshend, of Rainham. Sir Thomas Brewse, by his 2nd wife Elizabeth, 
daughter of Sir Gyles and sister and heir of Sir Gilbert Debenham, left 
also a son, Robert. Sir Thomas Brewse died in 1482. 

In 1437 we meet with the following fine relating to this manor : " Robert 
Cavendysh, Robert Crane, John Heigham, clerk, Ralph Bokkyng and John 
Cuttyng V. John Shardelowe and Margaret his wife.' 

In 1547 we find the manor vested in one Reginald Tillot, at whose death 
it passed to his son and heir Leonard Tillot, who died in 1574, when it went 
to his son and heir Leonard Tillot. In 1600 a Leonard Tillot had livery of 
the manor, but we fail to discover any further trace. 

Court Rolls' will be found amongst the Bodleian Rolls.' 

Arms of Shardelowe : Arg. a chevron between 3 cross-crosslets Az. 

W. BONNERS AND TORKLEYS MANOR. 

All we learn of this manor it that it was vested in John Swale and 
William Finch Palmer as joint lords in 1796. 

PooLEY Barton Manor. 

This manor was vested in Henry Poley, of Badley,"* who died in 1487, 
and was succeeded by his son, Edmund Poley, who died seised in 1548, 
when the manor passed to his son, John Poley, who died in 1589.^ 



I Feet of Fines, 15 Hen. VI. 29. 5 See Woodhall Manor, Stoke Ash, in 
* I Edw. IV. to 14 Hen. VII. Hartismere Hundred, and Little 
3 Bodl. Suff. Rolls, I ; Proceedings of the Bradley Manor, in Risbridge Hun- 
Suffolk Institute, iv. 373. dred. 
+ For this family see Boxstead Hall Manor, 
in Babergh Hundred. 




140 THE MANORS OF^SUFFOLK. 

BRANDON. 

MANOR was held here in the Confessor's time by the Abbot 
of St. Edmund's, with 5 carucates of land. There were 
8 villeins, 4 bordars, 7 serfs, 3 ploughteams in demesne, 
and 4 ploughteams belonging to the tenants, which by the 
time of the Survey had come down to 3. There were 
also 3 acres of meadow, and a fishery, 2 asses, 11 beasts, 
200 sheep, and 20 hogs, and a church with 30 acres. The 
value in Saxon times was £6, but at the time of the Survey it had 
increased to £8. The area was a league long and half a league broad, 
and paid in a gelt 2od.' Eudo the steward also at the time of the Survey 
had land here, but it was joined together with his land in Lakenheath, so will 
be enumerated when we come to deal with the manors of that township. 

Brandon Manor. 

The manor and estate were in the Crown in the time of Hen. HI., 
and were by this King granted in his 35th year to Hugh, Bishop of Ely, 
and his successors, together with free warren in all their demesnes in this 
part of the county. 

In 1259 William de Wendling farmed the lordship of the bishop. This 
William de Wendling is said to be the same personage who was one of the 
King's justices and the founder of Wendling abbey, in Norfolk. Hugh, 
Bishop of Ely, obtained a grant for market and fair in 1271,'' as did also 
John de Hotham, Bishop of Ely in 1319.^ The manor and advowson 
became detached from the bishopric in 1562, and vested in the Crown. 
No less than 20 suits were instituted connected with this vesting of the 
Brandon property in the Crown, and in one a commission issued out of the 
Court of Exchequer directed to Sir John Heigham and Robert Peyton to 
enquire into the subject of controversy and to return a certificate of their 
opinion thereon. The result of this investigation was an award in favour 
of the Crown, in which it was declared that the manor with all warren 
rights and royalties had vested. Under this recognition Jas. I., in 1605, 
granted the manor to his 2nd son, Charles, Duke of York, and his heirs 
male. 

In 1616 both manor and advowson were granted by the Crown to 
George Villiers, Duke of Buckingham,* who sold them two years later to 
William Pleasance. 

It is strange that amongst the Exchequer Depositions taken at Brandon 
in 1605-6, we find mention of an action pending between a Thomas 
Pleasance and John Rock and others relating to the customs of this manor, 
and again in 1612 between Robert Wright and another against Thomas 
Pleasance, and another as to the manor, customs, common of pasture, and 
meets and bounds and free warren. 

We next find Brandon in possession of Lord Villiers, Viscount Purbeck, 
elder brother of the celebrated Court favourite and grantee of 1616, and it 
remained with the Wrights, who claimed to be Lord Purbeck's descendants, 
and long sought the family honours until 1727, when John Wright alias 
Villiers who assumed the title of Viscount Purbeck and Earl of Buckingham, 

1 Dom. ii. 3816. sChart. Rolls, 13 Edw. II. 22 ; confirmed 

2 Chart. RoUs, 53 Hen. III. i. Pat. Rolls, 5 Hen. VI: pt. i. 14. 

*I2 Rep. Hist. Com. pt. i. 103. 



BRANDON. 141 

becoming the associate of gamblers and dissipating his inheritance sold the 
lands and manor to the trustees of the will of the Lord Chief Justice Holt, 
and from his time to the time of George Wilson the manor devolved in 
the same course as the Manor of Hinderclay, in Blackbourn Hundred. 
George Wilson sold in 1828 to Edward Bliss, son of Edward Bliss, M.D., 
by Mary Clark his wife, and grandson of Edward Bliss and Elizabeth Browne 
his wife. 

Edward Bliss the purchaser was a man of great opulence and public 
spirit who, devoting increasing attention to the improvement of his purchase, 
was enabled to improve the district to a most remarkable extent, and to 
ameliorate to an equal degree the condition of the poor by occupying them 
advantageously for their own interest as well as that of the community at 
large. Not long after the acquisition of Brandon he commenced planting, 
and in less than six months covered a large portion of the land with no fewer 
than 8,000,000 of trees, thus transforming tracts hitherto wild and sterile 
into richly wooded plantations and productive farms. Mr. Bliss, who was 
a justice of the peace and served as High Sheriff of Suffolk in 1836, married 
Sarah, 2nd daughter of the Rev. Aquila Scatchard, and died 2nd April, 1845, 
possessed of immense wealth. Desirous of being buried on his own estate, 
he had erected a spacious mausoleum near to the house, embowered in 
plantations, and there now repose his mortal remains. Brandon Park, 
with its fine mansion and estate, and his other property (subject to some 
life annuities) passed by his will to his nephew, Henry Aldridge (son of 
James Aldridge by Elizabeth his wife, and grandson of John Aldridge, 
of Hampshire, D.L.), who by royal sign manual changed his name to Bliss. 
On succeeding to the title and estates in Portugal of his cousin. Baron 
Alreyo, he obtained permission of the King of Portugal, by royal letters 
patent dated 5th June, 1855, to succeed to the title in the name of Bliss. 
He married, 30th April, 1868, Katharine Eliza, eldest daughter of the Rev. 
Robert Baker, rector of Freston and Aldringham, and niece of Edward 
Wilson, of Rigmaden Park, Westmoreland, and had a son, Henry Edward 
Ernest Victor D'Alreyo. The baron on succeeding to the estate in Spain 
left him by Colonel Carlo-Antonio Barreto, pursuant to the terms of the 
colonel's will, assumed the surname of Barreto in 1869, and died in i8go, 
when the manor passed to his son, 4th Baron, who is the present lord, and 
resides at Brandon Park. He married Ethel, eldest daughter of Arthur 
Wolton. 



142 



THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 




CAVENHAM. 

HIS place was held in the Confessor's time by Wisgar with 
5 carucates of land and the soc as a hamlet to Deseling. 
There were 25 villeins, 5 ploughteams, a church with 
60 acres of free land, 5 mills (reduced to 4 at the time of 
the Survey), and 3 acres of meadow. The Domesday tenant 
was Richard, son of Earl Gislebert. It was a league long 
and 4 quarentenes broad, and paid in a gelt 2od.' 
Another small estate here consisted of 60 acres, a bordar, and a plough- 
team, valued at 5s. It had in Saxon times belonged to a freeman under 
Canute by commendation only in the soc of the Abbot of St. Edmunds, 
but at the time of the Survey was the estate of Eudo the steward.* 

Manor of Cavenham alias Canham. 

'' From the Domesday tenant, Richard Fitz Gilbert, the lordship of 
Cavenham passed to the eldest son, Gilbert de Clare, by Rohesia his wife, 
daughter of Walter Gifford, Earl of Buckingham. From this Gilbert de 
Clare to the death of Gilbert de Clare, 8th Earl of Hereford, at the battle of 
Bannockburn, in 1314, without issue, the manor passed in the same course 
as the Manor of Sudbury, in Babergh Hundred. 

We learn from the Patent Rolls in 131 1 that a commission was issued 
this year touching a breach of the fishing rights of this Gilbert de Clare in 
Cavenham.^ 

On the 8th Earl of Hereford's death the manor passed to his widow, 
Maud, and on her death two years later it passed with the other property 
of the last earl to his three sisters and coheirs, this manor being taken by 
Margaret, who had married ist Piers Gaveston, but was then married to 
her 2nd husband, Hugh de Audley, who was eventually created Earl of 
Gloucester, 23rd April, 1337. On the death of Hugh de Audley in 1347* 
the manor passed to his only daughter and heir, Margaret, married in 1336 
to Sir Ralph, Lord Stafford, one of the founders of the Order of the Garter, 
created Earl of Stafford, 3rd March, 1350-1. He had been constituted 
Seneschal of the Duchy of Aquitaine and Governor of Aguillon in 1345. 
He died 31st Aug. 1572, when the manor passed to his only surviving son, 
Hugh de Stafford, 3rd Baron and 2nd Earl of Stafford, and K.G. In 
early life he was in the retinue of the Black Prince, and was subsequently 
distinguished in all the wars of Edw. III. and those of the early part of the 
reign of Rich. II. He was a Knight of the Garter in 1375, lord carver at 
the coronation of Rich. II. i6th July, 1377, steward and bailiff of Maccles- 
field in 1385, and sheriff for the county of Chester the same year. He 
undertook a pilgrimage to the Holy Sepulchre, and on returning died at 
Rhodes 26th Sept. 1386,^ leaving, with the other issue, by Philippa Beau- 
champ, 2nd daughter of Thomas, 3rd Earl of Warwick, Ralph, who was 
murdered by John Holland, half-brother to King Rich. II., Thomas ,William, 
and Edmund successors alternately to the honours of the family. The 
manor passed to the eldest surviving son, Thomas de Stafford, 4th Baron 
and 3rd Earl of Stafford, who served in the wars of France in 1391 under 
the command of Thomas of Woodstock, Duke of Gloucester, whose daughter 



'Dom. ii. 3916. 

'Dom. ii. 403. 

'Pat. Rolls, 5 Edw. II. pt. i. 2od. 

♦I.P.M., 21 Edw. III. 59. 



= Will 6th and 15th April to 22nd Sept. 
1386, proved at Lambeth i8th 
Feb. 1386-7. 



CAVENHAM. 143 

the Lady Anne Plantagenet, he married, but dying without issue 4th 
July, 1392,' the manor passed to his brother William, 5th Baron and 4th 
Earl of Stafford, who, being but 14 years of age, was in ward to the Duke 
of Gloucester. He died 6th April, 1395, unmarried," and the manor 
passed to his brother and heir, Edmund de Stafford, 6th Baron, and 5th 
Earl of Stafford, who in 1398, by virtue of the King's special licence, married 
Anne, Countess of Stafford, widow of Thomas, 2nd Earl, his eldest brother, 
which marriage of the said Thomas and Anne had never been consummated 
owing, it is said, to the tender years of the Earl, though it appears he was 
old enough to serve in the wars in France, and as Edmund was born in 1377, 
William his brother before him, and Thomas necessarily before William, 
and Thomas did not die till 1392, his years could not have been so very 
tender. 

On the coronation of Hen. IV. Edmund was made a Knight of 
the Bath and later a Knight of the Garter and Constable of England, but 
was soon after slain at the battle of Shrewsbury, 21st July, 1403,^ when 
the manor passed to his widow Anne, who remarried Sir William Bourchier, 
Count of Eu, in Normandy, and died i6th Oct. 1438, when it passed to 
Humphrey, 7th Baron and 6th Earl of Stafford, son and heir of Edmund 
5th Earl. Humphrey was knighted by Hen. V. 22nd April, 1421, and was 
installed a Knight of the Garter 22nd April, 1428. He was bearer of 
the sword of state at the coronation in 1419, and created Earl of Perche 
loth Oct. 1442 ; he was created Earl of Buckingham, and 14th Sept. 1444, 
Duke of Buckingham, with precedence before all dukes except those of 
the royal blood, which caused a dispute between him and Henry Beau- 
champ, Duke of Warwick, not satisfactorily arranged until the passing of 
a special Act of Pariiament giving them precedence alternately. 

He married Lady Anne Neville, loth daughter of Ralph, ist Earl of 
Westmoreland, and fell at the battle of Northampton loth July, 1460, 
fighting under the Lancastrian banner, when the manor passed to his 
grandson and heir, Henry Stafford, 2nd Duke of Buckingham, son of Hum- 
phrey (styled Earl of Stafford) by Margaret his wife, daughter and coheir 
of Edmund Beaufort, Duke of Somerset, the said Humphrey having been 
slain in his father's lifetime at the battle of St. Albans, 22nd May, 1455. 
Henry Stafford for his assistance in elevating Rich. III. to the throne was 
made Constable of England 15th July, 1483, by that monarch. He married 
Katherine W^idville, daughter of Richard Widville, Earl of Rivers, and 
sister of Queen Elizabeth, and taking part in a conspiracy to place the Earl 
of Richmond upon the throne was seized through the treachery of a servant 
whom he trusted, and beheaded in the market place of Salisbury 2nd Nov. 
1483, without any arraignment or legal proceeding. 

He was Shakespeare's Buckingham in the celebrated tragedy of 
Rich. III. The manor passed to his son and heir, Edward de Stafford, 
who was restored by Hen. VII. to the Dukedom of Buckingham, Earldom 
and Barony of Stafford, and all the other honours of his house. Fresh 
honours were showered upon him. He was installed a Knight of the 
Garter in 1495, made Lord High Constable of England 23rd June, 1509, 
and Lord High Steward of England at the coronation of Hen. VIII. 

Cardinal Wolsey, as is well known, brought about the duke's ruin, and 
being accused of seditious language respecting the King, the duke pleaded 

'I.P.M., 16 Rich. II. 27. ^I.P.M., 4 Hen. IV. 41, admin. 19th May, 

*I.P.M., 22 Rich. II. 46. 1405, at Lambeth. 



144 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

his own cause with great judgment and much eloquence, showing the 
falsity of the indictment and the weakness and inconclusiveness of the 
evidence ; but he was nevertheless found guilty, and was thereupon 
beheaded on Tower Hill, 17th May, 1521. When the Emperor Chas. V. 
heard of the fall of the great duke he is said to have exclaimed : " A 
butcher's dog has killed the finest buck in England," alluding to Cardinal 
Wolsey and the mistaken idea of his being the son of a butcher. 

A bill of attainder followed the judgment and execution of the duke, 
and under that all his honours and lands were forfeited. The duke had 
married Lady Alianor Percy, eldest daughter of Henry, 4th Earl of 
Northumberland. The manor vested on the attainder of tiie last Stafford, 
Duke of Buckingham, in the Crown [but by 1590 it had been granted to or 
otherwise acquired by Thomas Bedingfield, for he apparently died seised 
of it gth April, 1590]. The manor shortly afterwards passed to Sir Edmund 
Lewkenor, of Denham, for he died seised of it in 1618, from which time to 
the time of George Townshend, 4th Viscount and ist Marquis^ who died 
in 1807 the manor devolved in the same course as the Manor of Denham, 
in Risbridge Hundred. 

We next find the manor vested in Charles, 1st Marquis Cornwallis, and 
later in Charles, 2nd Marquis Cornwallis, who sold it in 1811 to Henry 
Spencer Waddington, M.P. for the Western Division of the county. He 
was the son of George Waddington and Caroline his wife, daughter of — 
Horsey, which George was the son of John Waddington, of Ely, son of 
George Waddington, of Doddington. Henry Spencer Waddington married 
Mary Anne, daughter of Richard Slater Milnes. of Fryston Hall, co. York, 
M.P., and on his death 26th Feb. 1864, the manor passed to his son and 
heir, Henry Spencer Waddington. of Cavenham Hall, High Sheriff in 1876, 
J. P. and D.L. for Suffolk. He married, i8th March, 1852, Caroline, 3rd 
daughter of Vice-Admiral Sir William Beauchamp Proctor, 3rd Bart., of 
Langley Park, and dying 20th May, 1895, the manor passed to his trustees, 
who held in 1896, but the same is now vested in his son and heir, Spencer 
Beauchamp Waddington, of Cavenham Hall. 

The hall known as Cavenham Hall is a modern mansion of brick situate 
in a small park. 

Manor of Shardelowe's. 

In 1344 Sir John de Shardelowe died seised of this lordship,' from which 
time to 1435 the manor passed in the same course as that of Shardelowes, 
in Little Barton, in this Hundred. It is specifically mentioned in the 
inquis. p.m. of Sir John de Shardelowe, who died in 1433.? 

In 1435 a fine was levied of the manor by Anna, Countess of Stafford, 
Robert Cavendish, Robert Crane, Thomas Higham, Robert Asey, Clerk, 
John Clerk, chaplain, John Higham, clerk, John Fotour, chaplain, John 
Curteys, John Cornewall, John Cobbe, and John CuUyng against John 
Shardelowe, of Ockle, and Margaret his wife,^ and under this fine the 
manor passed to the Stafford family with the main manor. It was vested 
m Humphrey, Duke of Buckingham, who was killed at the battle of 
Northampton in 1460, and is mentioned in his inquis. p.m.* being then held 
as of Desning Manor, but the following year it was vested in Sir Thomas 

' I.P.M., 18 Edw. III. 37. styled " Dounham Manor, called 

''I.P.M., II Hen. VI. 12. Shardelowes." 

3 Feet of Fines, 13 Hen. VI. 13. It is '*I.P.M., 38-39 Hen. VI. 59. 



CAVENHAM. 145 

Tuddenham. Sir Thomas Tuddenham taking part with the House of 
Lancaster against that of York, was convicted of treason by the Pariia- 
ment without hearing his defence, and was beheaded 23rd Feb. 1461/ and 
this manor appears to have formed part of his real estate which for want of 
issue of his body according to an entail thereof descended to his sister, 
Margaret Bedingfield, then 60 years of age. Margaret Bedingfield* died 
about 1471,^ when the manor seems to have passed to Edmund Bedingfield, 
of Eriswell, son and heir of Thomas Bedingfield, the son and heir of 
Margaret. He died in 1503, and it seems to have passed to Roger Darcy, 
for we find he died seised of it 3rd Sept. 1507,* when it passed to his son 
and heir Thomas Darcy. The manor shortly afterwards vested in the 
Crown, and was granted by King Hen. VIII. to Charles Brandon, Duke of 
Suffolk, and Mary his wife, Queen Dowager of France, in special tail male, 
and after their death and failure of male issue was in 1535 granted to the 
Duke of Suffolk in fee,' who in 1538 sold the manor to Sir Thomas Audley, 
Lord Chancellor, afterwards Lord Audley. On the death of Lord Audley 
in 1544 his only child Margaret, Duchess of Norfolk, succeeded to this 
lordship, which passed from her to her son and heir. Lord Thomas Howard, 
who became Earl of Suffolk. He in 1592 sold the manor to Sir Edward 
Lewkenor,* though shortly after this, in 1597, it is stated in the Rawlinson 
MSS. in the Bodleian that the manor was vested in Thomas Cleere.' How- 
ever, from Sir Edward Lewkenor the manor passed to his son and heir. 
Sir Edward Lewkenor, who died in 1618.^ It was in the Court of Wards 
and Liveries in the time of King Chas. I.,' and in 1633 was the property 
of Thomas, son of Sir Martin Stuteville, of Dalham, in Risbridge Hundred. 
Probably this was the manor which in 1734 was vested in Richard Webb, 
and on his death in 1746 passed to his brother William, who died in 1754,' 
and was buried in the parish church of Cavenham. 

The manor was in 1896, and is now, vested in William Robert Gamul 
Farmer, of Nonsuch Park, Cheam, Surrey. . 

Arms of Webb : Argent, a cross wavy ; in the first quarter, an eagle 
displayed. Sable. 



'I.P.M., 5 Edw. IV. 34. 6 Add. Ch. 25444. 25445- 

''See Manor of Brandeston, in Loes Hun- ^Rawl. B. 319. 

dred. *See Manor of Denham, in Risbridge 
3 1.P.M.^ 15 Edw. IV. 38. Hundred. 

" I.P.M., 24 Hen. VII. 80. 9 D.K.R., 6 App. ii. p. 82. 
= S.P. 1535. p. 1063 (7). 




146 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

DOWN HAM. 

MANOR was held here in Saxon times by the Abbot of St. 
Edmunds. It consisted of 3 carucates of land, a bordar, 
5 serfs (reduced to 3 at the time of the Survey), 3 plough- 
teams in demesne, 5 acres of meadow, a fishery, an ox, 21 
hogs, and 900 sheep ; also there were 2^ carucates and 60 
acres of land and 3 bordars held by 9 freemen ; also 8 plough- 
teams (reduced to 4| at the time of the Survey) and 4 acres 
of meadow. These men could give and sell, but the sac, soc, and com- 
mendation and all customs remained in the possession of the abbot. The 
value was 35s. There was also a church with 20 acres of land. The manor 
(excepting the freemen) was valued at £8, formerly and at the time of the 
Survey at ;£ii . It was a league long and 8 quarentenes broad, and paid in a 
gelt 20^. The Domesday tfenant was Frodo, brother of the abbot. Others 
had land therein.' 

Among the lands of the Abbot of Ely was a holding of half a carucate 
of land, 3 bordars, an acre of meadow, and half a ploughteam, valued at 5s. 
It had formerly been that of a half freeman with his soc under the Abbot 
of Ely.^ 

Manor of Downham. 

This belonged to Ixworth Priory, and at the Dissolution, vesting in 
the Crown, was granted in 1538 to Richard Codington by way of exchange. 
He had licence in 1546 to alien to John Cutler, but probably as trustee only, 
for we find the manor passed under the will of Richard Codington to his 
widow Elizabeth, who had licence to alien to Thomas Higham,^ of 
Higham, who died in 1557, leaving three daughters and coheirs, but the 
manor passed to his widow, Martha Higham, who apparently died 
seised of it m 1592, when it went to her daughter Anne, who married 
Thomas Clere, of Stokesby, who sold the manor to Robert (? Thomas) 
Wright. This Thomas Wright is the man who drew up the 
account of a remarkable sand flood which occurred in 1668 at 
this place. The account was published in the " Philosophical Trans- 
actions," No. 17, and reprinted in the " Suffolk Traveller " in 1764. 
Mr. Wright died in 1669, and was buried at Downham, when the manor 
passed to his son and heir, Robert Wright. He married Anne, 
daughter of Sir George Wenyeve, of Brettenham, by Christian his 
wife, daughter of Dudley, Lord North, by whom he had Thomas Wright, 
his successor in the manor, who married Anne, daughter of Roger North, of 
Rougham, in Norfolk. She died without issue, and Thomas Wright took 
for his 2nd wife Frances, daughter of Thomas Wright, of East Herlington, 
Norfolk, by whom he had issue. He died in 1754, and in 1764, Kirby 
informs us, the estate was in his heirs. The heir seems to have been a 
Thomas Wright, who died in 1777, when the manor passed to his widow 
Ann, who died in 1807. The manor, however, had in 1778 been offered 
for sale ; accompanying were 24a. ir. 4p. with rights of fishing, and also 
3,134a. 3r. 38p. in two farms.* It is said that the estate subsequently 
became the property of Charles Sloane, 3rd Baron Cadogan, who was created 
Viscount Chelsea and Earl Cadogan in 1800, and died at his seat in this 

'Dom. ii. 339. 3 See Manors of Denham and Higham 

^Dom. ii. 382. Hall, Gazeley, both in Risbridge 

Hundred. 
* Ipswich Journal, 4th April, 1778. 



DOWNHAM. 147 

parish, 3rd April, 1807, in his 79th year, when the manor passed to his 
son, Charles Henry Sloane, 2nd Earl Cadogan, who died unmarried 23rd 
Dec. 1832. He probably sold during his Ufetime or perhaps the trustees 
of his father, for we find that " The Downham Hall estate, manor, and 
nearly 6,000 acres " were offered for sale by public auction, 30th June, 
1825, the property being described as " Estate, late of Earl Cadogan.'" 

In 1847 the manor was the property of Lord William John Frederick 
Poulett, who resided at Downham Hall. In January, 1864, he succeeded 
his brother as 3rd Duke of Cleveland, and married 3rd July, 1815, 
Caroline, 4th daughter of William, ist Earl of Lonsdale, K.G., and died 
6th vSept. 1864, when the manor seems to have passed to his widow, for we 
find that in 1869 the Dowager Duchess of Cleveland sold the manor to 
Edward Mackenzie, of Fawley Court, Buckinghamshire. He married 
Mary, eldest daughter of William Dalziel, of The Craigs, co. Dumfries. 
Edward Mackenzie died 27th September, 1880, when the manor passed to 
his eldest son, Wilham Dalziel Mackenzie, of Fawley Court and of Thetford 
Manor, Norfolk, who is the present lord and impropriator and patron of 
the benefice. His brother. Col. Edward Philippe Mackenzie, D.L., resides 
at the hall, a spacious mansion of white Suffolk brick in a park of 1,000 
acres on the southern bank of the Little Ouse. 

Mr. Mackenzie the present lord, who was High Sheriff for Oxford in 
1873, married ist December, 1863, Mary Anna, eldest daughter of Henry 
Baskerville, of Crowsley Park, Oxon., and has with other issue WiUiam 
Roderick Dalziel Mackenzie, who married in 1888 Maud Evelyn, eldest 
daughter of General Sir G. Higginson, K.C.B., and has with other issue 
Douglas Alexander William Dalziel Mackenzie. 

Arms of Cadogan : Quarterly, ist and 4th Gules, a lion ramp, reguar- 
dant Or. ; 2nd and 3rd Arg. 3 boars' heads couped Vert. Of Mackenzie : 
Or, a cross parted and fretty Az. betw. in the ist and 4th quarters a stag's 
head cabossedof the last, in 2nd and 3rd quarters a mountain in flames ppr. 

Manor of Downham al. Monk's Hall. 

This was the lordship of the Abbot of St. Edmunds at the time of the 
Survey, having been given to the abbey by William the Conqueror at the 
desire of Abbot Baldwin, and at the suppression of the monastery was 
granted by the Crown in 1539 to Sir Thomas Kytson, and about the same 
time Richard Codington and Elizabeth his wife obtained the grant of the 
main manor in this parish as parcel of the possession of Ixworth Priory, 
to which the impropriation was attached. Sir Thomas Kytson had licence 
to alienate in 1540 to William Maltyward. The assurance was effected 
by fine this same year.* From William the manor passed to Thomas 
Malt5Avard, who died in 1596. It seems to have then passed to another 
Thomas Maltyward, who had licence in 1597 to ahen to Thomas Warner 
and Bartholomew Allen, possibly as trustees. 

In 1804 we find the manor vested in Charles Sloane, Lord Cadogan, 
who died in 1807, when it passed to his son, Charles Henry Sloane, 2nd 
Earl Cadogan, who died in 1832. 

Manor of Marsier al. Meicies. 

In 1360 we find Nicholas Mersey holding half a fee here of the Earl of 
Oxford, and in the time of Hen. V. a John Bagot holding half a fee called 
Meiseyer. 

^Ipswich Journal, 21st May, 1825. '^Fine, Trin. 32 Hen. VIII. 



/ 



148 "the manors of SUFFOLK. , 

A manor in Downham was at the end of the 13 th century held by 
John de Luvetot, and as it could not have been either of the last two manors 
by reason of their being at this time in the hands of Ixworth Priory and 
the Abbey of St. Edmunds respectively the manor could hardly have been 
any other than this. John de Luvetot died seised in 1295/ and on the 
Close Rolls in 1349 we find an order to deliver to Agnes, late wife of Lawrence 
de Hastynges, Earl of Pembroke, tenant in chief " Downham Hall Manor/' 
to hold in dower as she has besought the King to order dower to be assigned 
to her as the earl was seised in fee after his marriage with her, and demised 
the same to William de Hastynges " le neveu" for life.* Probably this 
was thesamemanorof which Sir John de Shardelowe died seised in 1433.^ 

In 1550 this manor was granted by the Crown to Thomas, Earl of 
Warwick, who had licence in 1560 to alienate to Richard Fulmerston, who 
sold it about 1609 to Thomas Howard, Earl of Arundel and Surrey, who 
died in 1646. 

The manor in 1804 became vested in Charles Sloane, Earl Cadogan, 
who died in 1807, when it passed to his son and heir, C. H. Sloane, 2nd 
Earl Cadogan, who died in 1832. 



'I.P.M., 23 Edw. I. 33. ^I.P.M., II Hen. VI. 12. 

Close Rolls, 23 Edw. III. pt. i. 7. 




ELVEDON. 149 

ELVEDON. 

|HERE were three manors in this place in Saxon times. The 
first was held by Alsey, later by Ingelric, and at the time of 
the Survey by Earl Eustace, and consisted of 2 carucates 
of land, 3 villeins, 3 bordars, 2 serfs, 2 plough teams in 
demesne (reduced to i at the time of the Survey), a 
ploughteam belonging to the men, and the fourth part of 
a fishery. Also a church with 15 acres of land. Also 4 
hogs and 150 sheep, valued at 30s., and at the time of the Survey at 40s.' 

The second was that of the Abbot of St. Edmunds, and consisted of 2 
carucates of land, 4 villeins, 4 bordars, a serf, 2 ploughteams in demesne 
(reduced to i at the time of the Survey), 4^^ ploughteams belonging to 
the men, 4 beasts, 12 hogs, 260 sheep, 13 goats, and the fourth part of a 
fishery. Also a church with 15 acres of free land. At the time of the 
Survey the manor was held by the abbot, and there were an additional 
2 rouncies. There were also a carucate of land, 3 bordars, 3 ploughteams 
(reduced to 2 at the time of the Survey) held by 4 freemen and a hali, who 
could give and sell their lands,the soc, sac, and commendation, and the service 
remaining in the possession of the abbot. The value was formerly los., 
but at the time of the Survey had increased to 15s. The manor, with the 
exception of the freemen, was valued at 30s. formerly, and at 40s. at the 
time of the Survey. It was a league long and a league broad, and paid 
in a gelt 2od. Several persons had land tiierein.* 

The third manor was held by a freeman under Wisgar by commenda- 
tion only, in the soc of the Abbot of St. Edmunds, and consisted of 2 caru- 
cates of land*, 4 villeins (reduced to half at the time of the Survey), 3 bordars, 
a serf, 2 ploughteams in demesne (reduced to i at the time of the Survey), 
and half a ploughteam belonging to the men. Also the fourth part of a 
fishery, a house, 12 hogs, and 150 sheep, valued at 30s. There was also a 
church with 15 acres of free land. The Domesday tenant was Richard, 
son of Earl Gislebert.^ 

Another holding in this place was that of a freeman under the Abbot 
of Ely by commendation only in the soc of the Abbot of St. Edmunds, 
and consisted of 2 carucates of land by virtue of the Lewes exchange held 
at the time of the Survey by Nicholas of William de Varennes. At the 
time of the Confessor there were 4 villeins, 2 bordars, a serf, 2 ploughteams 
in demesne, a ploughteam belonging to the men, and the fourth part of a 
fishery. Also a church with 15 acres of land, 4 hogs, 200 sheep, and 50 
goats, valued at 30s. At the time of the Survey the villeins were reduced 
to 3, the ploughteams in demesne to i, the hogs to 2, the sheep were 
increased to 300, and the goats to 94, the value being 50s.* 

i Manor of Elvedon. 

We find that Sir Richard de Lerling, lord of Lerling, in Norfolk, had 
a charter of free warren in this lordship in X252 and in 1280. 

WiUiam de Lerling, rector and lord of Lerling, granted the manor to 
William, Richard, and Robert, his sons, who conveyed to the Gonviles 
and the assurance was confirmed to William de Gonvile in 1286. He 
married Maud de Lerling in 1304, heiress-general of that house. 

'Dom. ii. 303. ^Dom. ii. 391&. 

*Dom. ii. 3586. *Dom. ii. 398. 



150 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

In 1342 Edmund de Gonvile, of Gonvile Hall, in Cambridge, and 
founder of Rushworth College, seems to have given these lands in respect 
of which manorial rights were exercised to the latter college by whom 
they were held until the Dissolution, when they vested in the Crown. 
Page, in his History of Suffolk,' says : " In 1354 John and Edmund de Gonvile 
granted to Master Walter de Staines, of this (Elvedon) parish, all their 
lands, tenements, &c., in Elvedon, which they had of the feoffment of 
William de Lerling ; it being Ihe whole they had there, except the manor 
and other revenues settled on Rushworth College. This was called Staines 
Manor." What ' this ' refers to is not very clear, but presumably the 
reference is to what was granted to Master Walter de Staines. 

In the I. P.M. of Sir Richard Fulmerston, subsequently referred to. 
mention is made of the Manor of Elvedon and the Manor of Elvedon Monks 
Hall and Staynes, in Elvedon, not manors, rather regarding the two 
latter named as one. 

The manor was surrendered to the Crown by Rushworth College in 
1541,' and the same year was granted by Hen. VIII. to Henry, Earl of 
Surrey, in tail,^ and he, four years later, had licence to alien to Thomas, 
Duke of Norfolk,* who sold it to Sir Richard Fulmerston.' 
Amongst the Chancery Proceedings in the time of Queen Elizabeth will 
be found a suit respecting the manor between him and Simon St5rward.* 
On the death of Sir Richard Fulmerston, 3rd Feb. 1567, the manor passed 
to his daughter and heir Frances, married to Edward Clere, son and heir 
of Sir John Clere, of Ormesby, in Norfolk, who in her right inherited Sir 
Richard's large possessions. In his inquis. p.m. it is stated that the Manor 
of Elvedon (or Elden) was worth £26. 14s. 2d., and the Manor of Elvedon, 
Monks Hall, and Staynes in Elvedon, and the advowson of the church 
there, &c., of which he also died seised, were worth £29. His daughter, 
Frances Clere, died in 1579, leaving a son. Sir Edward Clere. 

We next find the manor in Thomas Crispe, of Perbold, co. Lancaster, 
whose daughter and heir married Sir John Tyrell, 5th Bart., of Springfield, 
CO. Essex, son of Sir John, 3rd Bart., and brother of Sir Charles, 4th Bart., 
who became lord of the manor in her right. He died without male issue 
5th Jan. 1766. In 1786 the manor was vested in the Right Hon. Augustus 
Viscount Keppel, 2nd son of William, 2nd Earl of Albemarle, and Anne 
his wife, 2nd daughter of Charles, ist Duke of Richmond and Lennox. 
He adopted the naval profession, and for his distinguished and gallant 
service as admiral was created Viscount Keppel, of Elvedon, in Suffolk. 
His lordship resided in Elvedon for many years, and died unmarried 2nd 
Oct. 1786, being interred in the chancel of the Elvedon parish church, 
where there is a small marble monument to his memory erected by George 
Rogers. He left the manor to his nephew, William Charles, 4th Earl of 
Albemarle. He resided here, and for some time had in his own occupation 
about 4,000 acres in the parish, which he greatly improved by planting and 
drill-husbandry, though it consisted chiefly of a blowing sand. He sold 
the manor in 1813 to William Newton, whose executors sold it in 1863 to 
His Highness the late Prince Duleep Singh, formerly Maharajah of the 
Punjab, India. He resided at Elvedon Hall, a large and elegant mansion 
in the Indian style of architecture, which was rebuilt in 1870. It is of red 
brick with stone dressings, and the decorations of the interior were carried out 

'P- 832- ♦S.P. 1540= 942 (94)- 

^S.P. 1541, 1417. 5 Baker MSS. Camb. Univ. Libr. xxxiv. 

^S.P. 33 Hen. VIII. 1488 (18). ^ c.p. Ser. ii. B. Ixii. 12. 



ELVEDON. 



151 



from designs by Mr. William Norton, architect, of London, comprising 
marble inlaid and encaustic floors, and chimney pieces, ceilings, and wall 
panelling of the most elaborate character. It is situated in a small park 
adjoining a rabbit warren of about 1,000 acres. 

Subsequently the manor was acquired by Edward Cecil Guinness, ist 
Viscount Iveagh, K.P., LL.D., 3rd son of Sir Benjamin Lee Guinness, M.P., 
1st Bart., by Elizabeth, 3rd daughter of the late Edward Guinness, of 
Dublin. He married in 1873 Adelaide Maud, daughter of the late 
Richard Samuel Guinness, M.P. 

Arms of Fulmerston : Or, on a fesse between 3 doves (or seamews) 
Azure, a rose between two garbs of the first. Of Keppel : Gules, three 




ELVEDON Hall. 



escallop shells. Argent. Of Iveagh (Guinness) : Per Saltire Gu. and Az. 
a lion rampant Or, on a chief Ermine a dexter hand couped at the wrist 
of the first. 

Manor of Stanes al. Monk's Hall. 

In the Confessor's time this was the estate of the abbey of St. Edmunds, 
and is so entered in the Great Survey. Wluard, a tenant in chivalry of 
Baldwin, Abbot of Bury, to whom Baldwin granted Elvedon, which had 
been the demesne of the monastery, and his immediate issue gave back 
Elvedon to the monastery in exchange for Ickworth, and this family .Mr. 
Gage, in his History of Thingoe Hundred, presumes assumed the name of 
De Ickworth.' The same author also states* that it was agreed between 
Abbot William and Thomas Lucas, that upon the appropriation by 
Thomas of the church of St. Andrew, of Elvedon, to the use of the con- 
vent, the abbot would release to Lucas £12, part of a yearly rent charge 
of £13. 19s. 6d. reserved to the monastery out of Lackford. In 1540 with 
other possessions of the abbey it was granted by the Crown to Thomas, 
Duke of Norfolk.^ The particulars for this grant are in the Record Office, 
and include also Elvedon Manor." In 1544 the manor was held by Henry, Earl 



■ Hist. p. 275. 
'P. 34- 



3S.P. 1540, 942, 94. 
*D.K.R. 10 App. ii. p. 



242. 



152 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

of Surrey, who had Hcence to aUen it in 1549 ^o Sir Richard Fulmerston 
in exchange. Sir Richard died in 1567, when the manor passed to his 
daughter and heir Frances, married to Sir Edward Clere, but Davy queries 
whether Thomas Heigham did not hold it in 1560. 

In 1601 Edward Peacock and others held, and they had licence to alien 
to Robert Buxton and others, and a fine was the same year levied by 
Robert Buxton against Edward Peacock and others.' These last two sets 
probably held as trustees, for we find a little later that Sir Edward Clere 
(who was son of Edward Clere and Frances his wife) and others had licence 
to alien to Robert Cocke, who was lord in 1610, and from him the manor 
passed to his son and heir, Robert Cocke, who had livery of the manor in 
1624. 

In 1786 we find the manor in Augustus, Viscount Keppel, from which 
time it passed in the same course as the main manor. 

Two other manors are mentioned as in Elvedon, one Gelham Manor, 
as to which we meet with a fine of the sixth part of it in 1359 levied by 
William de Newton and Elizabeth his wife, against William Fyn, of 
Aylesham, and Margaret his wife," and as to which we find a deed in the 
British Museum dated at Westminster 26th Nov. 34 Edw. III. [1360], by 
which the Manor of Gelham Halle is assured by William de Scothowe and 
Elizabeth his wife to Peter Rolf, of Elvedon,^ and another deed dated the day 
of the Translation of J. Westam, bishop and confessor, 12 Rich. II. [1389] by 
which the said Peter Rolf, then parson of the church of Fakenham Parva, 
granted to Adam Foxle, of Thetford, parson of the church of Etheldreda, 
Roger Cornewayle, of the same, and Thomas Bray, of Euston, his manor 
in Elvedon, called " Gelham Halle," to hold of the chief lord of the fee* ; 
the other, Hastings Manor, as to which amongst the same Charters are 
two deeds, one dated loth Feb. 13 Rich. II. [1390], and the other dated 
Monday before the feast of the Beheading of St. John the Baptist, 15 Rich. 
[1391], the operations of which were the carrying into effect of tiie gift of 
the manor by Peter Roolf, sometime parson of the church of Fakenham, 
to the college of Rushworth.^ 

From the three last deeds referred to it might be inferred that Gelham 
and Hastings were one and the same manor. 



' Fine, Easter, 43 Eliz. " Add. Ch. 15749. 

= Feet of Fines, 33 Edw. III. 7. s Add, Ch. 15750, 1575 1. 

'Add. Ch. 25256. 




ERISWELL. 153 

ERISWELL. 

MANOR was held here in Saxon times by Godwin, King 
Edward's thane, and consisted of 6 carucates of land, 11 
villeins (which later became 16, and at the time of the Survey 
were again 11), 4 bordars, 11 serfs, 5 ploughteams in 
demesne (reduced to 3 at the time of the Survey), and 5 
belonging to the men. Also there were 14 acres of meadow, 
2 mills and a half, a church with 60 acres of land, 2 fisheries, 
and 2 horses at the hall. The live stock consisted of 20 beasts, 40 hogs, 
and goo sheep, all of which were reduced in number at the time of the 
Survey — the beasts to 13, the hogs to 20, and the sheep to 800. The 
value was £10, and at the time of the Survey £16, when it was held by 
Eudo the steward. It was a league long and 6 quarentenes broad, and 
paid in a gelt 10^. 

To this manor was attached a hamlet, Coclesworth, with 8 carucates of 
land, 15 villeins, 4 bordars, 11 serfs, 22 acres of meadow, 5 ploughteams in 
demesne and 6 belonging to the men, 2 horses at the hall, and 200 sheep, the 
value being £x2. At the time of the Survey some of these details were 
altered — the vUleins were reduced to 11, the serfs to 8, the ploughteams in 
demesne to 4 and those belonging to the men to 5, while the sheep were 
increased to 880. The value was then £24, and it was held by Eudo the 
steward. This hamlet was a league long and 8 quarentenes broad, and 
paid in a gelt yd. The soc and sac belonged to the Abbot of St. 
Edmunds.' 

Manor of Eriswell. 

In the time of Hen. III. this manor was vested in Ralph de Rouetustre, 
or Rochester, or Rosset, who held the lordship of the King in chief as of 
the Honor oif Boulogne by the service of two knights' fees. From Ralph 
de Rochester or Rosset the manor passed to his son and heir, William de 
Rochester, who in the Testa de Nevill is stated to hold two fees here.'' He 
died without issue in 1249,^ when the manor passed to his brother and heir, 
Peter de Rochester, and on his death in 1275 devolved on his son and heir, 
Henry de Rochester, and on his death went to his son and heir, Sir Ralph 
de Rochester. He died withput issue, and devised the manor to his wife 
Eva, daughter and heir of Gilbert Peche, and niece of Hamon Peche. She 
remarried Sir Robert Tuddenham, who in right of his wife became lord. 

Robert de Tuddenham and Eva his wife are stated in the Hundred 
Rolls to have held 2 fees here of the King in chief.* It is said by Blome- 
field that in 1270 Sir Robert de Tuddenham and Eva his wife granted 
Barton Burial Manor, in Norfolk, by fine to Robert de Weston and Hawise 
his wife in exchange for a lordship in Eriswell, but which manor does not 
appear.' 

Sir Robert de Tuddenham died in 1308,^ leaving Eva his wife surviv- 
ing, and on the Close Rolls is an order to deliver to the said Eva this manor, 
which had been taken into the King's hands on the death of her husband; 
it had been found that Robert de Tuddenham and Eva had been jointly 

' Dom. ii. 4026. ■* H.R. ii. 151. 

2 T. de N. 291. 5 D.K.R. App. i. p. 250. 

3 1.P.M., 33 Hen. III. 52 or File 8 (12). « I,P.M., 2 Edw, II. 38, 

V 



154 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

enfeoffed by Robert de Weston and Hawisia his wife.' Eva de Tudden- 
ham died in 1311/ when the manor passed to her son and heir by her 
second marriage, Robert de Tuddenham/ and we learn from the Originaha 
Rolls the following year that the King took homage of this Robert in respect 
of the said manor."* The overlordship of the manor is included in the 
inquisition p.m. of Robert de Scales and Egelina his wife in 1324/ and in 
1334 there is on the Close Rolls an order to the escheator to supersede 
exaction made on Robert de Tuddenham, son and heir of Eva, late wife of 
Robert de Tuddenham, for doing homage, &c., as it had been found that 
Robert held this manor of Robert de Scales, and not of the King in chief .^ 
Robert de Tuddenham died about 1332, and his eldest son Robert died 
a minor in 1337,'' when the manor passed to his cousin. Sir Robert, son 
of Thomas de Tuddenham, brother of Robert, who died in 1332, and from 
an order on the Patent Rolls the following year we learn that this Robert 
was an infant. There is a commission to seize into the King's hands this 
manor, on the ground that it was held by the elder Robert de Tuddenham. 
in his demesne as of fee of Sir Robert de Scales, and belonged to the King 
by reason of the minority of the heir.' 

Sir Robert de Tuddenham died in 1362,^ when the manor vested in 
his son and heir. Sir John de Tuddenham," who died in 1392." On Sir 
John's death a third of the manor passed to his widow Margaret" in dower, 
and subject thereto vested in his grandson, Robert Tuddenham, son and 
heir of Sir Robert de Tuddenham, who had died in his father's lifetime. 
Robert Tuddenham, the grandson, died without issue in 1417,'^ when the 
manor passed to his brother and heir. Sir Thomas de Tuddenham. He 
was beheaded in 1461,'* and neither he nor his brother Robert leaving any 
issue, the manor passed to their sister Margaret, who had married Edmund 
Bedingfield, of Bedingfield, which Edmund had died in 1451.'^ 

Margaret Bedingfield died in 1474.'^ Her will is dated at Eriswell, 
24th May, 1474, wherein she bequeathes her body to be buried before the 
image of the Holy Cross, near the altar of the Virgin, in the nave of the 
church of St. Peter, of Eriswell, £^0 for vestments, books, and necessary 
ornaments, and to the repair of the said church; 53s. ^d. for a vestment 
in which her chantry priest was to officiate on high festivals before the 
altar of the Blessed Virgin ; 40s. for another to officiate in on other holidays. 
She also gave to St. Lawrence's chapel, at Eriswell, 53s. ^d. ; ten marks 
to the poor dwelling in her Manor of Eriswell, and other her manors in 
Suffolk and Norfolk ; a house with gardens, pastures, meadow grounds, 
and 42 acres of land, with liberty of foldage and certain rents and services 
thereunto belonging, for a chantry priest to officiate daily in the church 
of St. Peter for her soul and those of her father, mother, grandfather, grand- 
mother, husband, children, brother, &c. ... a silver cup to the altar 
of the Virgin in the church of Eriswell ; to every priest assisting at mass on 

' Close Rolls, 3 Edw. II. 24. ^° See Manors of Great Bealings, in Carlford 
' I.P.M., 5 Edw. II. 43, extent. Hundred, and Brandeston Manor, 

^D.K.R. 32 App. i. p. 250; see Manor in Loes Hundred, also Newton 

of Great Bealings, in Carlford Manor, Corton, in Lothingland 

Hundred. Hundred. 

^O. 6 Edw. II. I. " I.P.M., 16 Rich. II. 30. 

' I.P.M., 18 Edw. II. 61. '^ She died in 1416. I.P.M., 10 Hen. V. 38. 

« Close Rolls, 8 Edw. III. 6. '3 1.P.M., 5 Hen. V. 42. 

'I.P.M., II Edw. III. (2nd nos.) no. ^ I.P.M., 5 Edw. IV. 34. 

' Pat. Rolls, 12 Edw. III. pt. i. jd. }i His will is dated at Bedingfield in 1446. 

'I.P.M., 36 Edw, III. pt. ii. 50. '6I,P.M., 15 Edw. IV. 38, 



ERISWELt. 155 

the day of her sepulture 8d., to every clerk 2d., every poor man and woman 
at her burial praying for her soul 2d., to every poor boy 2d., to the Lady 
Alice Tuddenham, a nun at Crabhouse, ten marks, besides divers bequests 
to various religious houses. The manor passed to Margaret's grandson 
and heir, Sir Edmund Bedingfield,' son of her son Sir Thomas Bedingfield, 
and on his death 15th March, 1538,'' his next brother and heir, Robert 
Bedingfield, being in holy orders, passed to his third brother, Sir Edmund 
Bedingfield, and from him to his son and heir, Sir Henry Bedingfield. 

The manor was still vested in the Bedingfields in i56o, for we learn 
from the State Papers this year that a sale to the Society for the Propaga- 
tion of the Gospel in New England of this manor and that of Chamberlaines 
was void, and that Colonel Thomas Bedingfield, son and heir of Sir Henry 
Bedingfield, had entered on the manors, and he prayed for the title to be 
secured.^ 

Later the manor was vested in the Dean and Chapter of Ely. 

In 1829 tiie manor was acquired by the New England Company for 
Propagating the Gospel in Foreign Parts.* 

In 1869 the society sold the manor and their property here to His 
Highness, Prince Duleep Singh, for about £120,000, and His Highness 
subsequently sold to Lord Iveagh, the present lord of the manor. 

Manor of Chamberlaines. 

We learn little of this manor save that it was vested in Sir Thomas 
Tuddenham, who was beheaded in 1461,^ and passed to his sister, Margaret 
Bedingfield, widow, who died seised thereof in 1475.^ The following year 
we find the manor mentioned in the inquis. p.m. of John Mannok.'' 

We next find the manor vested in Sir Thomas Bedingfield, who died 
seised of it 15th March, 1538, when it passed to his brother and heir, Robert 
Bedingfield.^ It later passed to Sir Henry Bedingfield, who in 1554 sold 
it to Sir Clement Higham.^ 

This manor in 1829 became vested in the New England Company 
with the main manor, and has since followed its devolution to the present 
time. 



' See Manor of Hesteley Hall, Thorndon, s I.P.M., 5 Edw. IV. 34. 

in Hartismere Hundred, and Manor « I. P.M., 15 Edw. IV. 38. 

of Flemings, Bedingfield, in Hoxne 5" I. P.M., 16 Edw. IV. 76. 

Hundred. « i.rm., 31 Hen. VIII. 5- 

= I.P.M., 31 Hen. VIII. 5. 9 Fine, Mich. 3 Mary I. 

3 S.P. 1660, p. 390. 

4 The Trust Deed will be found duly en- 

rolled 1550, 118, I ; 1863, 30, 10. 




156 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

MANOR OF EXNING CALLED VALENCE OR COTTONS. 

|HE village of Exning, or Ixning^ is about a mile from New- 
market, in the centre of a small portion of Suffolk, joined 
only by the high road to the rest of the county, and other- 
wise surrounded by Cambridgeshire, to which in the reign 
of Edw. I. it gave the name of a half hundred. This village 
situated in a small vale, has a rivulet running through the 
midst of it, and is well shaded with fine poplars, producing 
an agreeable contrast to the monotony of the surrounding country, which 
in general presents one uniform naked plain. 

In the middle ages the parish of Exning comprehended the whole of 
what is now that of Newmarket, and its church was the mother church, 
to which the congregation of the latter resorted. As late as the year 1200 
there was something like a royal residence at the former place, but in 1227 
a contagion or plague breaking out its market was removed to the latter 
place, and became the origin of the appellation " New Market." One of 
the churches in Newmarket is, in fact, in this parish, which comprehends 
the north side of the town. 

Exning was the birthplace of St. Ethel dreda, a daughter of Anna and 
Hereswitha, King and Queen of the East Angles in 630. There is no name 
in the calendar of female British saints more fertile of strange incident 
and marvellous adventure than that of our Saint Etheldreda, and one of 
the most curious manuscripts in the kingdom still in existence (the Liber 
Eliensis) forms the precious repository of her achievements. 

This manor was granted by Hen. II. to Matthew, Count of Boulogne. 
In 1212 it was held by Reginald Danmartin, Earl of Boulogne,' and in 1227 
was vested in Robert de Danmartin. In 1258 it was in William de Valence,^ 
Earl of Pembroke, who this year had a grant of a market and fair here.^ 
On his death in 1296 it passed to Aylmer de Valence, Earl of Pembroke, who 
died without issue in 1322* when the manor passed as her share in the 
inheritance to Elizabeth, daughter of Joan, sister of Aylmer de Valence, 
Earl of Pembroke, the wife of Sir Richard Talbot, Lord Talbot, but subject 
to the life interest of Maria de St. Paul, Countess of Pembroke, widow of 
Aylmer, who had it in dower. ^ 

The manor was then held in chief of the King by knight's service. It 
seems clear that Maria de Sancto Paulo, Countess of Pembroke,^ had an 
estate in the manor, for in 1377 Sir Gilbert Talbot, afterwards 5th Baron, 
son of the above-named Richard, Lord Talbot, granted it immediately 
after her decease to John Kingsfield. The transaction was effected by a 
fine of the manor levied this year by John " Kyngesfeld " against Sir Gilbert 
Talbot.'' It must be remembered that Sir Gilbert's father. Sir Richard 
Talbot, was not then dead, and did not, in fact, die until 1396. 

On the death of John Kingsfield in 1381^ the manor became divisible 
into three parts between his three sisters — Alicia, wife of Thomas Aldrich 
or Eldrych, Agnes Wolf, and John Ashfield, son of Isabella Ashfield, 
another of the sisters of John Kingsfield. Davy states that in 1390 Geoffrey 
Michel held two parts of the manor and John Ashfield the remaining 

'Close Rolls, 14 John, 9. s Close Rolls, 18 Edw. II. 22. 

^See Manor of Kentwell, Long Melford, ^I.P.M., 51 Edw. III. 28. 

Babergh Hundred. ''Peet of pj^gg, 51 Edw. III. 28. 

3 Chart. Rolls, 42 Hen. III. 3. 'I.P.M., 5 Rich. II. 31. 

^I.P.M., i7Edw. II. 75. 



EXNING. 157 

part, consequently Geoffrey Michel must have acquired the shares of Thomas 
Aldrich and Alice his wife and of Agnes Wolf. No doubt this was the 
case, and the interests of Alice and Agnes and their husbands were acquired 
under a fine which we meet with in 1381 levied of two parts of the manor 
between Sir Nicholas Twyford, of London, and Margaret his wife against 
Thomas Eldrych and Alice his wife and Agnes Wolf.' 

On the Patent Rolls this year we find a pardon to Sir Nicholas de Twy- 
ford and Margery his wife for acquiring by fine two parts of Exning Manor 
from Thomas Eldrich, Alice his wife, and Agnes Wolf, tenants in chief,'' 
and three years later on the same Rolls we meet with a licence to this Sir 
Nicholas Twyford and Margery his wife to enfeoff Geoffrey Michel and others 
of these two parts of the manor described as "late of Mary de Sancto Paulo, 
late Countess of Pembroke," and also of the " Manor of Ixnyng called 
' Jardyn's.' "' 

A fine had been levied of a moiety of the manor as early as 1374 by this 
Nicholas de Twyford and Margaret his wife against Sir Thomas Giffard 
and Margaret his wife.* The licence for the grant will be found on the 
Originalia Rolls this year.^ 

John Ashfield the son, died in 1409, when his interest passed to his two 
daughters — ^Alice, married to Thomas Veseden, and Isabel, married to John 
Warecamp. 

Page, copying from Blomefield, says, " In the nth of King Hen. IV- 
[1410] Edward Attehale, released to John ' Warncamp ' and to Isabella 
his wife, the daughter of John Ashfield, and the heirs of Isabella, this 
lordship and the third part of the Manor of North Barsham, in Norfolk, 
with all the lands and tenements late John Kingfield's."^ 

In 141 1 we meet with a fine levied of a third part of the manor by 
John Fray, John Speleman, Thomas Rolf, and William Cher veil against 
Robert Porter and Alice his wife, then held, it is said, by Drugo Barantyn 
for a term of 32 years. ^ 

In 141 2 there is a fine of a third part of a third part of this manor 
levied by Drugo Barantyn, of London, John Hale, clerk, Henry James, 
clerk, John Stodesbury, clerk, John Blok, clerk, William Randolf, John 
Frensh, Thomas Senyole, John Selman, John Fray, John Gredy, William 
Est, Guido Katermayn, William Beel, and John Wyssyngsete against 
Andrew Home, of Slendesolde, in Sussex, and Alianora his wife.^ 

In 1429 we meet with another fine of a third part of a third part of this 
manor. It is levied by William Porter, John Burgoyn, John Rynell, and 
William Loksmyth, against Alexander Snellyng and Isabella his wife.' 

The manor, or rather a moiety of it, seems then to have been acquired 
by Edmund Botiller, for he died seised of it in 1412,'° when it passed to Dame 
Farrington, who died in 1416, when it or parts of the manor (for the whole 

' Feet of Fines, 5 Rich. II. 5. licence to Thomas Giffard to enfeoff 

2 Pat. Rolls, 5 Rich. II. pt. i. 9. Thomas Arderne and Robert Newe- 

3 Pat. Rolls, 8 Rich. II. pt. ii. 42. . man of a moiety of the manor. 

4 Feet of Fines, 48 Edw. III. 5. ' O. 42 Edw. III. 33. 

5 O. 48 Edw. III. 33 (I). See the follow- ^ Hist, of Suff. p. 533- 

ing: John Gifford's I.P.M., 7 Feet of Fines, 12 Hen. IV. 24. 

34 Edw. III. (2nd nos.) 93. Moiety « Feet of Fines, 14 Hen. IV. 36. 

of manor, Thomas Giffard enfeoffed 9 Feet of Fines, 7 Hen. VI. 7. 

Thomas Arderne and others (I.P.M., '° I.P.M., 14 Hen. IV. 16. 
41 Edw. III. (2nd nos.) 23.), and 



158 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

does not seem to have been vested in Farrington) went to his widow 
Christian, who died in 1428. 

A little later the whole manor was vested in Walter Cotton, and a Roll 
of a Court Leete for this manor held by him in 1440 will be found in the 
British Museum.' He married Joan, daughter of Sir Robert Read, of 
Oxfordshire, Knt., and died seised of the lordship 14th May, 1445,^ when it 
passed to his son and heir, William Cotton, who had a grant of free warren 
and other liberties here in 1448.^ He was Vice-Chamberlain to Hen. VI. 

William Cotton married Anne, daughter and coheir of John Abbot, 
and was slain at the Battle of St. Albans, 22nd May, 1453, fighting for 
King Hen. VI. On his death the manor passed to his son and heir. Sir 
Thomas Cotton, of Landwade, who was Sheriff of Cambridgeshire and 
Huntingdon 16 Edw. IV. He married ist, Margaret, daughter of Sir Philip 
Wentworth, of Nettlestead, and 2ndly Joan, daughter and heir of Nicholas 
Sharp. He died 30th July, 1499, when the manor passed to his son and heir 
Sir Robert Cotton, who received the honour of knighthood from King 
Hen. VII. in his chamber at Baynard's Castle. He married ist, Dorothy, 
daughter of Sir Robert Clere, Knt., and 2ndly, Alice, daughter of John 
Thornburgh, and widow of Sir Nicholas Griffin, Knt. He died i8th July, 
1519,* when the manor passed to his son and heir, Thomas Cotton, who died 
without issue, when it devolved on his brother and heir. Sir John Cotton. 
He was Sheriff for Cambridgeshire and Huntingdon 3 Edw. VI. and 4 and 5 
Ph. and M., and married Isabel, daughter of Sir William Spencer, of Al thorp, 
CO. Northampton, Knt., and died 21st April, 1593, at the age of 81. The 
manor passed to his son and heir, Sir John Cotton, who married three times — 
1st, Elizabeth, daughter of Thomas Carryl, of Warnham, co. Sussex ; 2ndly 
Elizabeth, daughter of Sir Humphrey Bradburne, of Bradburne, co. Derby, 
Knt., and 3rdly, Anne, daughter of Sir Richard Hoghton, of Hoghton 
Tower, co. Lancaster, ist Bart. 

He died 5th March, 1630, at the age of 77, when the manor passed to 
his only surviving son. Sir John Cotton, who was created a baronet 14th 
July, 1641. He was Sheriff of Cambridgeshire when the rebellion broke 
out, and proclaimed the Earl of Essex as a traitor in every market town in 
that county. He took up arms for the King, to whom he conveyed the 
plate sent by the University of Cambridge. He married Jane, 3rd 
daughter and eventual heir of Edward Hynde, of Madingley Hall, co. 
Cambridge, and died 25th* March, 1689, aged 74,' being buried in the 
south transept of the church of Landwade. The manor passed to his son 
and heir. Sir John Cotton, 2nd Bart., Recorder of and M.P. for Cambridge, 
who married 14th Jan. 1678-9, at Westminster Abbey, Elizabeth, daughter 
and coheir of Sir Joseph Sheldon, Knt., some time Lord Mayor of London. 
He died 20th Jan. 1712-3^ in his 66th year, and she 3rd Dec. 1714, in her 
57th year, when the manor passed to their son and heir. Sir John Hynde 
Cotton, 3rd Bart., M.P. for the town and county of Cambridge. He married 
1st, Letitia, second daughter of Sir Ambrose Crowley, Knt., of Greenwich, and 
2ndly Margaret, third daughterof James Craggs, Secretary of State to Geo.L, 
and widow of Samuel Trefusis, of Trefusis, in Cornwall. His monument 
in Landwade states that " he was not less distinguished for his integrity 
and manly conduct, than for his eloquence in debate. He was popular 

' Add. Ch. 26063. * I.P.M., 10 Hen. VIII. 97. 

= I. P.M., 23 Hen. VI. 6. 5 will proved June, 1689. 

3 Chart. Rolls, 26 Hen. VI. ; O. Rot. 22. ^ Admin. 24th Apl. 1716. 



EXNING. 



159 



without the aid of faction, strenuous without descending to invective, and 
had the singular good fortune to be at the same time admired and respected 
by both parties. In his private life the character of the country gentleman 
was embellished by a knowledge of the world, by polished manners, and by 
various and extensive reading. " He died 4th Feb. 1752, aged 66, and 
was succeeded by his son and heir by his ist wife, Sir John Hynde Cotton, 
4th Bart., who in ist July, 1745, married Anne, daughter of Humphrey 
Parsons, twice Lord Mayor of London. He was M.P. for Cambridge in 1765 
and 1771, and died 23rd Jan. 1795, when the manor passed to his 2nd son. 
Sir Charles Cotton, 5th Bart., Admiral of the Blue and Commander of the 
Channel Fleet in 1808. He married 27th Feb. 1798 [1788] Philadelphia, 
eldest daughter of Sir Joshua Rowley, ist Bart., and died 24th Feb. 1812,' 
when the manor passed to his widow, who died at Madingley Hall 5 th April, 
1855, aged 92.' He left a son. Sir St. Vincent Cotton, Bart., who married 
Hephzibah Dimmick, and having dissipated all his property died without 
issue 25th Jan. 1863, leaving his widow, who died 12th May, 1873. 

In 1853 we find the manor vested in Alexander Cotton, and in 1896 
in his widow, Mrs. Cotton. The manor is now vested in Henry E. Paine, 
of Chertsey, Surrey. For further particulars, see Manor of Lidgate, in 
Risbridge Hundred. There ^is a fine of " Vallence Manor " levied in 1575 
by Robert Cobb against William Whatcrofte and others.^ 

Manor of Exning called Well Hall al. Coggeshall's. 

Davy says that Edmund or Edward de Kemesech held this lordship 
in the time of Edward I.,* and died seised in 1288.' 

The manor passed on his death to his daughter and coheir, Isabella, 
married to Philip de Welle. Philip died in 1332,^ and his estate is found to 
have been a capital messuage, with a dovecot, a garden, 20 acres of land, 
6 acres of pasture, and i8s. rent of assize in the parish, held by the service 
of half a knight's fee, William de Welle being his son and heir. From the 
fact of the service being half a knight's fee it would look as if Edward de 
Kemesech's estate here had been divided between two daughters. William 
de Welle died in 1349,'' when the manor passed to his daughter and heir 
Joan, married to Sir Henry Coggeshall, who dying in September, 1375, it 
passed to his widow Joan, and on her death the same month" vested in her 
son and heir. Sir William Coggeshall, who married Antiochlia, daughter and 
heir of Sir John Hawkwood, and is said by Davy to have died in 1424;, leav- 
ing four daughters. But we find the manor as early as 1388 in John de 
Coggeshall and Ricarda his wife, and in 1428 in John " Roppley " and 
Margaret his wife, and the following year a fine was levied of the manor 
against them by Edmund Morys and John Grene.' Probably by virtue 
of this fine the manor passed to John Grene, and later to William Grene, 
for in 1480 we meet with another fine levied of the manor in which Sir 
William Tynderne, Thomas Tyrell, Henry Teye, Humphrey Tyrell, Richard 
Bendysshe, and Thomas Hall, clerk, were plaintiffs, and the said William 
Grene and Margaret his wife were deforciants.'" 



' Will proved 1812. 

^Will proved July, 1855. 

3 Fine. Mich. 17, 18 Eliz. 

*H.R. ii. 199. 

sj.P.M., 16 Edw. I. 24, Extent. 



«I.P.M., 6 Edw. III. 21, Orig. 6 Edw. 

III. 7. 
7I.P.M., 23 Edw. III. 165. 
n.P.M., 49 Edw. III. pt. i, 24. 
speet of Fines, 7 Hen. VI. 6. 
"Feet of Fjnes, ?o Edw, IV. 15, 



i6o THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

We meet this year with a pardon on the Patent Rolls to Sir William 
Tynderne and the others above named for having acquired for themselves 
and the heirs of the said Thomas Hall from William Grene and — Margaret 
his wife the " Manor of Exning called Coggeshales " held in chief, without 
licence.' The assurance would apparently have been by way of settlement 
only, for we find that Margaret Grene in 1494 died seised of the manor, 
and it passed to her son and heir. Sir John Grene, who had a grant of it from 
the said William Tynderne. On Sir John Grene's death the manor passed 
to his son and heir, Edward Grene, from whom in 1547 it passed to Robert 
Grene, and in 1576 Richard Grene and others had licence to alien the 
manor to Anthony Cage and others. 

From the Memoranda Rolls it appears that the following year poor 
Anthony Cage was called upon to show why the manor should not be seized 
into the hands of the Queen for alienation without licence,^ but he seems to 
have been able to show good cause against the threatened seizure, and in 
1585 had licence to alien to John Cotton, afterwards Sir John Cotton. This 
was carried into effect by a fine levied the same year between the parties.^ 
A fine was in 1596 levied of the manor by Thomas Spencer and others 
against John Cotton and others.* 

We do not gather anything subsequently respecting this manor, but 
it probably went in the same course through the Cotton family as the jmain 
manor, and is now vested in Henry E. Paine, of Chertsey, Surrey. 

This manor Davy calls Cotton Manor, but this is clearly an error, as 
it did not come to the Cotton family until 1620, whereas we find the main 
manor called Cottons Manor as early as 1440.^ 

Arms of Coggeshall : Arg. on a cross between 4 escallop shells Or. 
a mallet. 

Manor of Jarden's al. Gardener's al. Jardin's. 

This was the lordship of William de Gardinis in 1275, he holding there 
10 librat. of land of the King in chief by half a knight's fee.^ The manor 
passed from him to Thomas de Gardinis, who in 1303 sued Henry de Cum- 
peigne and 43 others for cutting down his woods at Exning, the defendants 
justifying themselves on the ground that the same interfered with their 
common at certain periods over a meadow called Flash.'' In 1325 he had 
licence to enfeoff Richard de Gardinis, clerk, with certain lands in Exning,' 
but it is not certain the grant was ever effected, for two years later we find 
on the Patent Rolls a licence for him to enfeoff William Wyggepirie of the 
same lands, namely, 5 messuages, 5 tofts, 160 acres of land, 6 acres of 
meadow, and £4 rent in Exning held in chief, and for the feoffee to regrant 
to the said Thomas de Gardinis and Constance his wife for their lives with 
an ultimate remainder to the right heirs of Thomas.' On the death of 
this Thomas de Gardinis the manor passed to another Thomas de Gardinis, 
by whom it was conveyed to Drugo Baren tine, and on his death, in 1416," 
the manor, or rather two parts only, for this is all he seems to have held, 

'Pat. Rolls, 20 Edw. IV. pt. i, 13. ^h.R. ii. 199. 

= Memoranda, 19 Eliz. Pas. Rec. Rot. 80. 7 Abbr. of Pleas. 31 Edw. I. East. 53. 

3 Fine, Easter, 27 Eliz. ^O. 19 Edw. II. 21. 

* Fine, Hil. 38 Eliz. 9 Pat. Rolls, i Edw. III. pt. ii. 14. 

5 See Add. Ch. 26063; I.P.M. of Walter '°I.P.M., 4 Hen. V. 43. 
Cotton, 33 Hen. VI. 6. 



EXNING. i6i 

passed to Christiana his widow for life. She died in 1428,' when the manor 
devolved on her heir, William Wroth. 

There is a precipe on a covenant concerning this manor in 1561 amongst 
the Additional Charters in the British Museum/ and this year a fine was 
levied by Richard Kyng against Thomas Kelde and others.^ We find a 
third part of the manor mentioned in the inquis. p.m. of John Atte Feild 
in 1409.* 



• I.P.M., 6 Hen. VI. 44. ^ Fine, Easter, 3 Eliz. 

"Add. Ch. 25295. +I.P.M., 10 Hen. IV. 8. 



W 




i62 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

FRECKENHAM. 

MANOR was held here in Saxon times by Orthi, Harold's 
thane, and later Lanfranc by the King's command decided 
that it should belong to the bishopric of Rochester. 

It consisted of lo carucates of land, i6 villeins, 8 bordars, 
6 serfs, 5 ploughteams in demesne and 6 belonging to the 
men (but 8 might be stocked). Also 20 acres of meadow, 
a mill, 2 fisheries, and a church with 20 acres. Of live 
stock there were 3 horses, 13 beasts, 40 hogs, 230 sheep, and 6 hives of bees. 
The value was £12 (increased to £14 at the time of the Survey). It was a 
league long and half a league broad, and paid in a gelt 20^. To this manor 
Earl Ralph added 4 freemen whom he invaded, with 8 acres of land and 
half a ploughteam, valued at %d. The soc of this manor belonged to the 
Bishop of Rochester, and the soc of the freemen to the Abbot of St. 
Edmund's.' 

Manor of Freckenham. 

King Alfred gave this estate in 895 to the diocese of Rochester.'' Harold 
seised it, and in 1066 it was vested in William the Conqueror, who granted 
it to Lanfranc, Archbishop of Canterbury, in 1071, and he restored it in 1087 
to the Bishop of Rochester. There is an order in 1207 on the Close Rolls 
that this manor be committed to the Bishop of Rochester.^ In 1218 the 
bishop had the grant of a fair and market here, and in 1249 ^ grant of free 
warren. 

In 1537 John, Bishop of Rochester, had licence to alien the manor to 
Sir Ralph Warren and Christiana his wife and their heirs, and they had 
licence the same year to alien to Edward Crome and Nicholas Wilson. This 
last assurance was by way of settlement, and Crome and Wilson were but 
trustees,* for the manor passed beneficially on the death of Sir Ralph Warren, 
who was a Lord Mayor of London, to his daughter and heir, Joan, married 
to Sir Richard Cromwell. He died in 1546, and she survived until 1584, 
when, dying, the manor passed to her son and heir. Sir Oliver Cromwell, 
who had licence to alien it in 1600 to Sir Stephen Soame, and carried it into 
effect by a fine in 1600.^ He died 23rd May, 1619,* when the manor passed 
to his son and heir. Sir William Soame, who married Bridget, daughter and 
coheir of Benedict Barnham, of London, alderman, and died in 1655, when 
the manor passed to his 3rd son. Sir Thomas Soame. He was Sheriff of 
London 1635, M.P. for London, April-May, 1640, in the Long Parliament, 
and knighted 3rd Dec. 1641, Alderman of Ventry and then of Cheap from 
1640 till deprived in 1651, reinstated 1660. He married Joan, eldest 
daughter of William Freman, of London,^ and on his death ist Jan. 1670, 
aged 88, the manor seems to have devolved upon his two daughters (?) 
Bridget, married in 1670 to Robert Russell, of Freckenham, and Cicely. 
Cicely, being then a widow, on her marriage to Thomas Cage con- 
veyed the manor (or presumably her interest in it) to the said Robert Russell 
and Bridget his wife, and by her wUl appointed them executors, and directed 

' Dom. ii. 381. «See Manor of Cometh Hall, in Bures, 

2 Cotton, viii. 19. Cartularium Saxonicum Babergh Hundred, and Little Thur- 

11,212. low, Risbridge Hundred. 

3 Close Rolls, 9 John, 6. ''See inscription on a large slab on the floor 
*S.P. 1538 (i) p. 190 (28) ; Fine, Easter, of the chancel of the church of 

30 Hen. VIII. Throcking, in Herts. 

= Fine, Hil. 42 Eliz. 



FRECKENHAM. 163 

amongst other legacies ;f5oo to be paid to Seckford Cage, her son, on his 
coming of age, and ^^30 a year maintenance meanwhile. By a codicil she 
provided that if her then husband should refuse to release to her executors all 
her goods and chattels her son should only have ;^5, and she revoked the 
other legacy given to him and gave the same to her executors. . After hei: 
death her husband refused to execute fhe release, notwithstanding which 
her son sued for his legacy and maintenance, and obtained a decree in 
Chancery in his favour. Petition and appeal of Robert Russell and Bridget 
his wife is dated 9th Dec. 1680.' 

Robert Russell sold the manor to Sir Samuel Clarke, created a baronet 
25th July, 1698. He was of Snailwell, co. Cambridge, and married Mary, 
daughter of Major Robert Thompson, of Newington Green, in Middlesex, 
distinguished in the Civil Wars. Sir Samuel Clarke died 8th March, 1719, 
having had two sons, Sir Robert Clarke his successor, and Samuel, who died 
unmarried, and three daughters, Frances, Margaret, and Mary. The 
manor passed to Sir Robert Clarke, 2nd Bart., who represented the county 
of Cambridge in Parliament in 1717, and married Mary, daughter of Arthur 
Barnardiston, youngest son of Sir Nathaniel Barnardiston, of Barnardiston, 
the 23rd knight in a lineal descent of that family. Sir Robert Clarke died 
in 1746, and was succeeded by his son and heir, Sir Samuel Clarke, 3rd Bart. 
He died in 1753, when the manor passed to his brother and heir. Sir Robert 
Clarke, 4th Bart., who dying in 1770 left the manor with his other estates 
after his son and wife's death to Nathaniel Barnardiston, his relative. Sir 
Robert Clarke's widow died in 1797, surviving her son, Sir John Clarke, 
5th Bart., who had died in 1782, and the manor passed to Nathaniel Bar- 
nardiston. From this time the manor has descended in the same course 
as the Manor of Thorndon Parva, in Hartismere Hundred, and is now 
vested in Colonel Nathaniel Barnardiston, of the Ryes, Sudbury. 

Arms of Clarke : Or on a bend, engrailed, Azure, a mullet. Argent. 

A Beck or Bek Manor in Freckenham is mentioned in 1349 in a deed 
amongst the Harleian Charters,* and we find a moiety of the Manor of 
" Beckhall as of Freckenham Manor" mentioned in the inquis. p.m. of 
Thomas Wodehous in 1452.^ Subsequently the manor vested in Roger 
Woodhouse, against whom a fine was levied in 1531 by John Bowles and 
others.* From Thomas Bowles it seems to have passed to George Frevile 
under fines levied of the manor in 1548 and 1550,* and in 1556 from George 
Frevile to Robert Payton under a fine levied this year.^ In 1559 this 
manor was acquired from Robert Payton by Robert TovuU and others.^ 

There appears to have been a Burton or Burtyus Manor in this place, 
at least no lands in any other place but Freckenham are seen in connection 
with it, and there are three fines relating to it— one in 1526 levied by 
Edward Mirfyn and others against Richard Southewode and others ;^ a 
second levied in 1562 by Grif&n Jones against Thomas North and others ;' — 
and the third in 1563 by Robert Webbe against Thomas North and others.'" 
The manor in 1641 would appear to have belonged to Simon Ffolkes, of 

' nth Rep. Hist. Com. pt. ii. 244. ^ Fine, Mich. 4 Mary I. (vol. iv.). 

^Harl. 48 D. 9. ^Fine, Easter, i Eliz. 

3I.P.M., 30 Hen. VI. 16. ^Fine, Easter, 18 Hen. VHI. 

*June, 23 Hen. VIII. sFine, Easter, 4 Eliz. 

5 Fine, Trin. 2 Edw. VI. ; Mich. 4 Edw. VI. " Fine, Hil. 5 Eliz. 



i64 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

Chevely, co. Cambridge, for by his will dated 20tli Feb. 1641, he devises 
his " Manor of Burtons in Freckenham " to his kinsman, John Ravens for 
life with remainder to his kinsman, Simon Ffolkes, the 2nd son of his 
(testator's) brother William, deceased, and for default of issue male to the 
right heirs of the testator in fee. 




HERRINGSWELL. 165 

HERRINGSWELL. 

|HERE was one manor here in Saxon timeSj held by the 
Abbot of St. Edmunds, and consisted of 4 carucates of land, 
7 villeins, 6 bordars, a serf, 3 ploughteams in demesne and 
3 belonging to the men, 4 acres of meadow, and a mill 
(increased to 2 at the time of the Survey). Of live stock 
there were i rouncy, 5 beasts, 12 hogs, and 80 sheep. There 
were also 2 socmen having 54 acres of land, ij ploughteams, 
and an acre of meadow, and over them the abbot had sac, soc, and com- 
mendation with all customs, but they might give and sell their land without 
the abbot's licence. There was also a church with 30 acres of free land. 
The manor was valued at ^^6 (increased to £7 at the time of the Survey). 
It was a league long and 6 quarentenes broad, and paid in a gelt 2od. 
Several persons held land therein. The Domesday tenant was also the 
Abbot of St. Edmunds.' 

Two estates in this place were those of Richard, son of Earl Gislebert. 
The first consisted of 60 acres and half a ploughteam, formerly the estate of 
three socmen under Wisgar. This holding was valued under " Desehng " 
(Risbridge Hundred). 

The second consisted of a carucate of land, 5 bordars, and a ploughteam 
among them all, valued at 15s. This estate was formerly held by a socman 
with half his land with soc under Wisgar, " witness the Hundred," and 
half his land with soc under the Abbot of St. Edmunds.^ 

Amongst the lands of William de Varennes were two estates here. 
The first was held by Roger and by the steward, and belonged to Toke, a 
freeman, who would not sell it, and consisted of a carucate of land, 2 bordars, 
a ploughteam, and 60 sheep, valued at i6s. It belonged to Frederic's fee 
in the soc of the Abbot of St. Edmunds. 

The second consisted of 40 acres, and half a ploughteam (which had 
disappeared at the time of the Survey) valued at 40^. It had formerly 
been held by a freeman under Frederic's predecessor in the soc of the Abbot 
of St. Edmunds.^ 

Manor of Herringswell. 

Ulfric gave the lordship to the monastery of St. Edmunds, and the 
abbot held at the time of the Great Survey. 

In 1311 it was held by Walter de Norwich, Baron of the Exchequer, 
who had a grant of free warren here that year.* From his death in 1329 
to the time of William de Ufford, Earl of Suffolk, who held in 1382, the 
descent of this manor is identical with that of the Manor of Dalham, in 
Risbridge Hundred. 

The manor later went to the Crown and was granted in 1542 to Sir 
Thomas Audley, Lord Audley. Particulars for this grant are still preserved 
in the Public Record Office,^ and the grant is referred to in the State Papers 
this year.^ 

Later it appears to have vested in Thomas, Lord Howard, for he and 
others had licence in 1595 to assure it to William Stone. Two fines were 
levied of the manor bearing upon this sale, one in 1591 where Reginald 

•Dom. ii. 3586. 4 Chart. Rolls, 5 Edw. II. 44. 

2 Dom. ii. 392. ' 33 Hen. VIII. D.K.R. 9 App. ii. p. 159. 

3 Dom. ii. 398. ^S.P. 1542, 285 (2). 



i66 



THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 



Stone and others levied a fine against the said Sir Thomas Howard/ and 
the other in 1595 when Wilham Stone levied one against Thomas Howard, 
Lord Howard, and others.* 

Amongst the Chancery Proceedings we find a bill to establish title to 
four tenements copyhold of this manor, by Richard Hibbell, and another 
against John Reycrofte and others stated to be sometime the estate of 
William Gowlston.^ 

On the opening of the 17th century the manor had passed to Sir Stephen 
Soame, who died seised of it in 1619, when it passed to his son and heir, 
William Soame. By 1653 tb^ manor had vested in Robert Bade, Doctor of 
Physic, for 22nd Sept. this year he held his first court. In 1673 it was vested 
in his widow Anne, for ist April this year she held her first court, and from 
her the manor passed to Robert Eade, on whose death it vested in his six 
daughters and coheirs, who sold it to Thomas Folkes by deeds dated 28 th 
and 29th June, 1704. He seems, however, to have been a trustee only 
(though he held a first court 26th April, 1707), for Henry Jermyn, Lord 
Dover, by his will dated 4th Jan. 1707,* gave the manor to Jermyn Davers, 
in fee, who sold to Robert Surman for ;^3,8oo by deeds dated 6th and 7th 
Dec. 1720, and his trustees by deed 24th Dec. 1724, sold to Richard Burton, 
who held his first court 13 th May, 1726. Richard Burton, by his will dated 
6th May, 1726,' gave the manor to his son, William Burton, whose will is 
dated 27th June, 1732.^ He married Grace Phillipson, and died 17th June, 
I733> aged 35, and is buried at St. Helen's, Ipswich. His eldest son, 
Richard Burton, was then but nine years of age, and the manor seems to have 
been vested in John Holden,'' who had married Grace, daughter of William 
Burton, in the year 1747, for he, 12th Oct. this year, holds a first court. 
As at this date Richard Burton would have been 23 years of age 
this is difficult of explanation. 

In 1789, however, the manor was certainly vested in Richard Burton 
PhiUipson, the son and heir of William, he having assumed the additional 
surname of Phillipson. He was Lieut.-Gen. of His Majesty's Forces, Colonel 
of the 3rd Regiment of Dragoon Guards, and one of the representatives in 
Parliament for the Borough of Eye. He died i8th Aug. 1792, in his 68th 
year, and was buried in St. Helen's, Ipswich. He left no issue, and by his 
will dated 27th Jan. 1789, he left the residue of his estate, including this, 
to his niece Susanna, daughter and heir of John Holden and Grace his wife, 
who had married the Rev. Charles Wright, of Peterborough, their settle- 
ment being dated 12th and 13th Sept. 1776. He took the name of Burton- 
Phillipson, and died in May, 1799, his widow surviving until 5th Jan. 1803, 
having remarried the Rev. A. D. Hake. On Susanna's death she was 
succeeded by her son and heir, the Rev. Richard Burton Burton-Phillipson, 
rector of Herringswell, who married Eliza Partridge, only daughter of John 
Thorp, of Chippenham Park. 

The manor then seems to have passed to Robert, son of Hutchinson 
Mure, of Great Saxham, a younger son of the Mures of Caldwell, in the 
county of Renfrew, N.B. He died in 1815 when the manor passed 



' Fine, Mich. 33-34 Eliz. 

^Fine, Easter, 37 Eliz. 

3C.P. ii. 83. 

"Proved P.C.C. 26th June, 1708. 

5 Proved 14th Jan. 1738. 

^Proved 21st June, 1733. 



^In his will 6th May, 1760 (proved P.C.C. 
9th Dec. 1765) he describes him- 
self as "Surgeon of his Bit. Maj. 
ship the Chester, then a prisoner 
in France." 



HERRINGSWELL. 167 

to George Mure (in 1829 ^^^ manor was vested in Samuel Mure). George 
Mure married in 1835 Fanny Eliza, only daughter of Wright Thomas 
Squire, and died without issue in 1868, when the manor vested in his 
widow. She, in 1873, married William Edmund Image, of St. Margaret's 
Gate, Bury St. Edmunds, High Sheriff for the County in 1887. 

The manor was in i8g6 vested in the trustees of Mrs. Mure-Image, and 
is now the lordship of Leopold Frederick Davies, of 6, Bentinck Mansions, 
Bentinck Street, London, W. 

There is a fine of " Herringswell and Tytfall Manors " levied in 1601 
by W. Syders and others against John Tennys and others.' 

Arms of Phillipson : Sa. a chevron Ermine betw. three bats displayed 
Or. 



Manor of Blunt's or Blouncks als. Waywashyard als. Lanes. 

At the time of the Great Survey this was the estate of Richard Fitz 
Gilbert. It is specifically mentioned and an extent given in the inquis. 
p.m. of Joan, wife of Gilbert de Clare, Earl of Gloucester, in 1307.'' 

In 1428 Henry Trass or Trace^ held the third part of a fee formerly 
of Sir John de Norwich, and the manor seems to have been held by Robert 
Trass or Trace, who died 13th July, 1519,* and was succeeded by his son 
and heir, George Trace, who in 1545 sold the manor to William Pleasaunce.^ 

We next find the manor vested in Florence " Pleasance," and then in 
Clement Pleasance. 

There is amongst the Duchy of Lancaster Calendar to Pleadings notice 
of a suit undated, but probably in the year 1588, by John Layton against 
this Clement " Pleassaunce " as to the ingress fine and suit and service to 
the Honor of Clare in respect of this manor.* The manor contained 190 
acres of land and 20 li. pasture, and 10 acres meadow, and was held by the 
service of half a knight's fee. 

Clement Pleasance died in 1609, and was succeeded by his son and 
heir, WiUiam Pleasance. 

This is probably the manor vested in 1747 in John Holden. 

Fines relating to the manor will be found amongst the Additional 
Charters in the British Museum.^ The 13 Geo. I.e. 14 is an Act to vest this 
manor in trustees for sale under the will of Sir Edward Turnour, Knt., 
deceased. 



'Fine, Hil. 43 Eliz. tl.P.M., 12 Hen. VIII. 25. 

' I.P.M., 35 Edw. I. 47. 5 Fine, Easter, 37 Hen. VIII. 

3 See Manor of French Hall, Moulton, in ^ d_ of L. Cal. to Pleadings, N.D. 9. 
Risbridge Hundred. 'Add. Ch. 6244-6266. 




i68 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

ICKLINGHAM. 

IHERE were two manors here in Saxon times. The first was 
held by Seward, of Maldon, under the Confessor, but in the 
soc of the Abbot of St. Edmunds, and consisted of 3 caru- 
cates of land, 6 villeins, 2 bordars, 4 serfs, 3 ploughteams 
in demesne, and 2 belonging to the men, a mill, a horse, and 
3 beasts. Also 30 hogs and 250 sheep, valued at £4. At 
the time of the Survey this manor was held by Ranulf 
Peverell, and some of the appurtenances were different. The bor- 
dars were reduced to i, the serfs to 3, the horse had disappeared, 
the beasts were reduced to 2, and the hogs to 21, while the sheep had 
increased to 350, the value being loos. The soc belonged to the Abbot of 
St. Edmunds." 

The second manor was held by Moruant, of Eudo, son of Spiruic, at the 
time of the Survey, and in the time of the Confessor by Anant, a freeman 
under the Abbot of Ely. It consisted of 2 carucates of land which the 
freeman might not sell and which Eudo held from his predecessor, Hing- 
frid, the soc and sac belonging to the Abbot of St. Edmunds. There were 
7 villeins (reduced to 6 at the time of the Survey), 6 bordars, a serf, 2 
ploughteams in demesne and i belonging to the men, 5 acres of meadow, 
a mSl, and at the time of the Survey 84 sheep. The value was formerly 
£4, reduced to 60s. at the time of the Survey.' 

Manor of Icklingham, Bernes Hall als. Icklingham Capells. 

This was the manor held in the time of the Confessor by Anant, a free- 
man under the Abbot of Ely, but by Moruant under Eudo, son of Spiruic, 
at the time of the Survey. 

In the time of King Edw. I. the manor was held by Christian, daughter 
of — Wyndson, sister of Sir Hugh, married to Sir Ralph Berners,^ and on 
his death in 1297* passed to his son and heir. Sir Edmund Berners, from 
whom it went to his son and heir. Sir John Berners. He married Elizabeth, 
daughter of Sir John Stonor, Lord Chief Justice of the King's Bench, and 
on his death in 1359 the manor passed to his son and heir. Sir John Berners, 
and on his death, about 1376,^ to his son and heir. Sir James Berners, who 
married Anne, daughter of John Borew, and was attainted and beheaded 
12th May, 1388, when the manor was forfeited to the Crown. 

In 1389 the manor was granted to John de Holand, Earl of Huntingdon, 
3rd son of Thomas, ist Earl of Kent, who in 1391 granted the manor to 
Robert, Bishop of London, " except knight's fee and the advowson of the 
church."^ 

In 1397, however, Richard Berners, of West Horsley, co. Surrey, son 
and heir of Sir James Berners, was restored and the manor subsequently 
revested in him. 

According to Dugdale he had the reputation of a Baron, but Banks 
asserts that there is not any record of his having ever been so created or 
having had summons to Parliament. 

' Dom. ii. 416. and heir of Radolphus held half a 

^ Dom. ii. 434. fee of Isabella de Brus, and she of 

3 There is an entry in the Testa de Nevill the King (T. de N. 292). 

which suggests an earlier date for ♦ I. P.M., 25 Edw. I. 39, Extent. 

the Berners, holding in Icklingham. sI.p.M., 50 Edw. III. 10. 

It is that the guardians of the land ^ 15 Rich. II. A. 5925. 



ICKLINGHAM. 169 

He died in 1417, when a third of the manor went to his widow Philippa 
in dower. She remarried Sir Thomas Leukenor, and died in 1421, when 
the whole of the manor went to her daughter and heir Margery, married 
ist to John Ferreby, who died without issue in 1443/ and 2ndly to Sir John 
Bourchier, 4th son of William, Count of Eu, by Anne, daughter of Thomas 
of Woodstock, Duke of Gloucester, in his wife's right Lord Berners. He 
was summoned to Parliament from 26th May, 1455, to igth Aug. 1472, as 
" John Bourchier de Berners Chevalier," and was present at the battle of 
St. Albans, on the Lancastrian side, while in the time of Edw. IV. we find 
him under the white rose. He was constituted Constable of Windsor 
Castle by Edw. IV., and later attended the King into the north. He died 
i6th May, 1474,'' leaving amongst other bequests in his will to the monks 
of the abbey of St. Peter, at Chertsey, where he ordered his remains to be 
interred, a cross of silver gilt, having a foot whereon were the images of Mary 
and John, as also other jewels and ornaments to the value of £^0 to the 
intent that they should pray for his soul and the soul of Margery his wife 
and aU their children's souls. The manor passed first to his widow, 
Margery, who died the following year,^ and then for life to Elizabeth, widow 
of Sir John's eldest son. Sir Humphrey Bourchier, who had been slain at 
the battle of Bamet in his father's lifetime. This Elizabeth was daughter 
and sole heir of Sir Frederick Tilney, of Boston, co. Lincoln, and she after- 
wards married Sir Thomas Howard, and made her will 6th Nov. 1506. 

Subject to Elizabeth's life interest, the manor vested in her son. Sir 
John Bourchier, 2nd Baron Berners,* who appears to have sold the same 
to Sir William Capel, for he died seised 6th Sept [? March], 1515.' 

From this time to the time of Arthur Capel, eldest son of Lord Capel, 
executed in 1648, the manor passed in the same course as the Manor of 
Stonham Aspal, in Bosmere and Clay don Hundred. On the restoration, 
Arthur Capel was advanced to the dignity of Viscount Maiden and Earl of 
Essex 20th April, 1661, with remainder for want of male issue to his brother 
Henry, and to the heirs male of his body, and for want of such issue to 
Edward Capel, his youngest brother. He was a Privy Councillor in 1672, 
and made Lord Lieutenant of Ireland, receiving the sword of state from 
the hands of Lord Berkeley, his immediate predecessor in that high office. In 
1679 he was appointed first and chief Commissioner of the Treasury. In July 
1683, he was accused with the Lord Russell of treason, and sent prisoner to 
the Tower, where on the 13th of the same month he was found with his 
throat cut,^ no doubt murdered, the King and the Duke of York being at the 
very time in the Tower, into which it is said they had not been previously 
for 15 years. 

His lordship's death is stated to have greatly affected the King, who 
on hearing of it said, " My Lord of Essex needed not to have despaired 
of mercy, for I owed him a life." And he afterwards declared in print 
thus : "As for the deplorable death of the said Earl, His Majesty freely 
owns there was no man in his dominions more deeply affected with it than 
himself. His Majesty having been thereby deprived of an extraordinary 
opportunity of exercising his royal clemency, and to testify to all his loyal 
subjects and old friends how highly he valued the memory and sufferings 
of the Lord Capel." The jury brought in a verdict of felo de se. 

'I.P.M., 21 Hen. VI. 16. ''See Manor of Stonham Aspal, in Bos- 

^Wili 2ist March, 1473-4, proved 21st mere and Claydon Hundred. 

June, 1474. 'I.P.M., 7 Hen.Wni. 48. 

^I.P.M., 15 Edw. IV. 35- «Will proved 1684. 



170 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

His widow Elizabeth, 5th daughter of Algernon Percy, loth Earl of 
Northumberland, survived until 5 th February, 1717-8,' and this manor 
passed to her eldest son, Algernon, 2nd Earl of Essex, who was Gentleman 
of the Bedchamber to King William, Constable of the Tower of London, 
and Lieut.-General of the armies under Queen Anne in 1707. The 29th July, 
1693, he was present at the battle of Landen, in Flanders, being then Colonel 
of the 4th Regiment of Dragoons, and upon that occasion, as well as in 1697, 
when he served another campaign in that country, was justly admired for 
his skill and intrepidity. Queen Anne named him one of her Privy Coun- 
cillors 25th Nov. 1708. He married, 28th Feb. 1691-2, Mary Bentinck, eldest 
daughter of William, ist Earl of Portland, and dying loth Jan. 1709-10* 
the manor passed to his son and heir William, 3rd Earl of Essex, a minor at 
the time of his father's death. He married ist 27th Nov. 1718, Jane Hyde, 
3rd daughter of Henry, 4th Earl of Clarendon, by Jane his wife, youngest 
daughter of Sir William Leveson Gower. After her death he married, 
3rd Feb. 1725-6, Elizabeth Russell, youngest daughter of Wriothesley, 
2nd Duke of Bedford. His lordship was appointed Ambassador extra- 
ordinary and plenipotentiary at the Court of Turin, in 1732, and remained 
there till the end of 1734. In 1734-5 he was sworn of the Privy Council, 
and was installed a Knight of the Garter 15th June, 1738. He died 
8th Jan. 1742-3,^ when the manor passed to his only surviving son, John 
William Ann Holies, 4th Earl of Essex, then but 10 years of age, John, 
Earl Gower, Elizabeth, Countess Dowager of Essex, and Thomas Bowen 
being his guardians. The ist Aug. 1754, his lordship married Charlotte 
(? Frances), eldest daughter and coheir of Sir Charles Hanbury-Williams, 
K.B., by his lady, Frances, daughter of Thomas, Earl of Coningsby. 

Shortly afterwards the manor was acquired by John Gwilt, who held 
his second court in 1763 . He held other courts 21st April, 1763 ; 3rd April, 
1765 ; 24th April, 1766 ; 7th Oct. 1768 ; iith Oct. 1769 ; i8th June, 
1772 ; 14th Sept. 1772. 

In 1775 the manor was vested in the trustees of his will, namely 
Herbprt Mayo, D.D., and George Barnes, who held courts 21st Oct. 1775; 
6th Jan. 1776; 23rd Feb. 1776; and Mayo alone 21st Oct. 1780 ; 2nd Oct. 
1781; 24th Oct. 1781 ; 26th Oct. 1782. From and after 1773 the style of 
the manor is " Icklingham Berners " only. In 1784 the manor was vested 
in Charles Gwilt, who held courts 23rd Oct. 1784; 22nd Oct. 1785; 28th Oct. 
1786 ; 27th Oct. 1787 ; 28th Oct. 1788 ; 31st Oct. 1789 ; 3rd Dec. 1791 ; 
13th Jan. 1792; 7th July, 1798; 30th Nov. 1799; 4th Jan. 1800; 25th 
April, 1801 ; 3othApril, 1803 ; 2nd Nov. 1805 ; ist Nov. 1806 ; 4th Jan. 
1812. 

In 1844 the manor was vested in Daniel Gwilt, rector of Icklingham, 
son of Rev. Robert Gwilt and Penelope Burridge his wife. Daniel Gwilt 
married Mary Ann, daughter of Rev. R. Birch, rector of Widdington, co. 
Essex, and had two daughters, Jane and Louisa. On the death of Daniel 
the manor apparently passed to his brother, Robert Gwilt, of the Royal 
Hospital, Chelsea, and of Icklingham, who married Mary, daughter of Major 
Williams, of South Carolina, and on his death the manor passed to his 
son and heir, Robert Gwilt, who held in 1896. The manor is now vested 
in Lord Iveagh, K.P. 

There is a compotus of this manor 1476-7 amongst the Additional 
Charters in the British Museum.* 

'Will proved April, 1718. ^WiH proved 1743. 

'Will proved June, 1710. 4 Add. Ch. 25810. 



ICKLINGHAM. 171 

Robert Gwilt about 50 years ago rebuilt Icklingham Hall in brick and 
stone in the Italian style. 

Arms of Capel : Gules, a lion rampant between three cross-crosslets 
fitchee Or. Of Gwilt: Per pale Gu. and Az. on a chevron embattled between 
three estoiles Or, as many lozenges Sa. 

Manor of Icklingham St. James. 

This was the lordship of Seward, of Maldon, held by him under the 
King in the Confessor's time, and formed part of the possessions of Ralph 
Peverell at the time of the Survey, though the abbey of St. Edmunds had 
the soc and sac. It subsequently vested in the Abbot of St. Edmunds. 
We learn from the Hundred Rolls that it was vested in the Sacristan of St. 
Edmunds before the time of Edw. I., for there is a statement in these Rolls 
that it was at the time of their compiling so held of the King in chief by the 
service of celebrating for the souls of the King's ancestors.' 

Immediately before the dissolution of the monasteries by an indenture 
dated i8th Oct. 1538, the abbot and convent of St. Edmunds granted a 
lease of this manor for 60 years to George Rowse at an annual rent of £24. 
This lease was surrendered the following year, and by an indenture made 
between King Hen. VIII. and the said George Rowse dated 12th Dec. 
i539j a fresh lease was granted for 21 years at the same rent.^ A grant of 
the manor was subsequently made to the said Geo. Rowse with reserva- 
tions by the Court of Augmentations.' The manor is very generally stated 
to have been granted to Anthony Rous, and both Davy and Page make 
this statement. It is quite true that particulars for such a grant in 1539 
are stiU in existence, and may be seen in the Record Office,* but we have 
not met with any actual grant. Possibly George Rowse may have been a 
trustee for Anthony Rous, but the point is not of much importance, as the 
manor must have been very shortly afterwards transferred to Robert Spring, 
who died seised 20th April, 1549.^ From this time to the time of Robert 
Spring, who succeeded his father in 1556, the devolution is identical with 
that of the Manor of Pakenham, in Thedwestry Hundred.^ w 

Robert Spring, who resided at Icklingham, married ist the daughter 
and coheir of — Foster, of Birch, and 2ndly Anne, daughter of — Hogon, of 
Norfolk, and dying in 1593 the manor passed to his eldest surviving son, 
Thomas Spring, who married Anna, daughter and coheir of — Eden, of 
Norfolk. 

A little later the manor was vested in Sir Thomas Holland, who died 
seised of it in 1625, when it passed to his son and heir. Sir John Holland, 
created a baronet 15th June, 1629, who married Alathea, daughter and 
coheir of John Panton, of Bruinshop, co. Denbigh, widow of William, 
Lord Sandys of the Vine, and died 19th J an. 1701, at the age of 98. Probably 
the manor descended to his grandson and heir. Sir John Holland (son of 
Thomas Holland, son and heir of the ist Bart.), who married Rebecca, 
daughter of William, Earl of Yarmouth, and died about 1724, when he was 
succeeded by his son and heir. Sir William Holland, 3rd Bart., who married 
Mary, daughter of Arthur Upton, merchant, and died without issue 17th 
Feb. 1729. 

"H.R. ii. 151. =I.P.M., 3 Edw. VI. 141. 

''Bodl. Sufi. Ch. 1322. °See also Manor of Netherhall with 
'S.P. 1534-40, p. 1032. Waldingfield, in Babergh Hundred. 

♦31 Hen. VIII. D.K.R. 10 App. ii. p. 262. 



172 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

In 1738 we find the manor vested in Daniel Gwilt, who married ist a 
daughter and coheir of the owner of Elvedon, and 2ndly Jane Gibbs. He 
died nth April, 1776, at the age of 83, when the manor passed to his son 
andheirDaniel, who died 31st Oct. i8oi,at the age of 81, without issue, when 
it went to his brother and heir, John Gwilt, who died unmarried 27th Dec. 
1810, at the age of 84, when it vested in the Rev. Herbert Mayo, D.D., 
and George Barnes, the trustees of his will. The manor then passed to 
John's half-brother, Robert Gwilt, rector of Icklingham, who died 13th 
May, 1820, from which time it devolved in the same course as the main 
manor, and is now vested in Lord Iveagh, K.P. 

The quit and free rents in 1506 were £6. 75. 7^., and the Custom 
of the manor Borough English. 

Manor of Thamhill als. Quaned als. Quamell's als. Cressener's, 

Harling and Cutts. 

The earliest lord of this manor we meet with is Ralph de la Cressener, 
but of whom we have no particulars. Possibly this was the manor men- 
tioned in the inquis. p.m. in 1330 of Edmund, Earl of Kent, and Margaret 
his wife.' In 1428 John Quamyll held the manor, and from him it passed 
to Ralph Quamyll, and amongst the Early Chancery Proceedings, 1450-2, 
we find an action respecting the manor under the name " Cressener's Manor " 
between William Skarlet and Ralph Quamyll." In the time of Hen. VIII. 
the manor seems to have been vested in the Poley family, and in 1542 we 
meet with a fine levied by John Jeffery against Edmund Poley and 
others.^ 

In the time of Philip and Mary the manor belonged to William Poley, 
and passed to Thomas Poley, who sold it in 1572 to Robert Spring.* Robert 
Spring died seised of the manor in 1593, when it passed to his son and heir, 
Thomas Spring.^ In the time of King Charles I. the manor was vested in 
Sir Thomas Holland, from whom it went to his son and heir. Sir John 
Holland, who died in 1701. 

In 1813 the manor seems to have been acquired by Edward Gwilt,^ 
son of Daniel Gwilt and Jane Gibbs his wife, who died 8th May, 1826, at 
the age of 78 unmarried, leaving Robert Gwilt, rector of Icklingham, his 
brother, his next heir. 

Manor of Sexten's. 

It is possible that this was one of the manors held by Hervey 
de Staunton in 1325, when he had authority to retain the service on granting 
other lands.'' 

In the time of King Charles I. the manor was vested in Sir Thomas 
Holland, from whom it passed to his son and heir. Sir John Holland, 
and then devolved as did the last manor mentioned. 



3 



I.P.M., 4 Edw. III. 38. 5 See Manor of Rowheads, Shimpling, in 

E.C.P., 28-31 Hen. VI., Bundle 19, 184. Babergh Hundred, and Pakenham 

Fine, Easter, 34 Hen. VIII. Manor, in Thedwestry Hundred. 

*Fine, Easter, 14 Eliz. ^Davy makes John Gwilt to have held 

before Edward. 
7 1.Q.D. 19 Edw. II. File 183, 2. 



LAKENHEATH. 



173 




LAKENHEATH. 

MANOR was held here in Saxon times by the Abbot of Ely. 
It consisted of 3 carucates of land, 6 villeins, 5 bordars, 4 
serfs, 3 ploughteams in demesne (reduced to 2 at the time of 
the Survey) and 2 belonging to the men. Also 5 acres of 
meadow, half a mill, 2 fisheries, 2 horses at the hall, 5 beasts, 
100 sheep, and 17 hogs. Also a church with 60 acres, the 
whole being valued at £4 (increased to £6 at the time of the 
Survey). It was a league long and half a league broad, and paid in a 
gelt 20^.' 

An estate in this place was that of Richard, son of Earl Gislebert, and 
consisted of a carucate of land, 8 villeins, a ploughteam in demesne (increased 
to ij at the time of the Survey), 4 fisheries in Ely, a fishing boat, and an 
acre of meadow. This holding was included in the valuation of Deseling.^ 

Another estate here and in Brandon was that of six socmen under the 
Abbot of Ely and in his soc, and they could not sell. They were delivered 
to Lisia, the predecessor of Eudo, as having 2 carucates of land, and the 
Survey says : " Yet he afterwards made recognizance (that he held) under 
Saint Etheldreda ; and Eudo held them with soche and sache and 4 bordars." 
There were 3 ploughteams, 3 acres of meadow, and 3 fisheries, valued at 
30S., but it rendered 20s. at the time of the Survey, and was held by Eudo 
the steward.^ 

In the Survey a place called Undely is mentioned, and no doubt this 
is Undley Manor, in Lakenheath. There was an estate of the Abbot of 
Ely consisting of a carucate of land, 3 bordars, 4 serfs, 2 ploughteams in 
demesne, and 13 acres of meadow. Also 2 fisheries, a horse, 24 beasts, 
and 62 sheep, valued at 26s. There was also a church without any land. 
This estate was 2 quarentenes long and 2 broad, and the gelt was included 
in that of Lakenheath." 

Manor of Lakenheath. 

This was the estate of the Abbot of Ely, both in Saxon times and at 
the time of the Survey. Hervey, ist Bishop of Ely, upon dividing the 
possessions of the church, assigned or confirmed this estate to the monks.' 
and the Prior of Ely had a grant of a fair here in 1201.^ To this grant the 
Abbot of St. Edmunds objected, and gave the King 50 marks for an inquest 
to be had to try the question whether the market at Lakenheath, then 
recently granted to the monks of Ely, was or was not an injury to the town 
and market of St. Edmunds. The return to the inquisition finding the 
market to be an injury was made in the 4,th year of King John.'' The 
inquisition was hardly worth the 50 marks to the abbey of St. Edmunds, 
for the monks of Ely obtained another grant in 1309 for a market and fair 
held here.^ 

The prior had in 1252 obtained a grant of free warren in his manor 
here,® and in 1279 the rights of the Ely monks had been confirmed by a 
Bull of Pope Nicholas III." On the dissolution of the religious houses the 
manor passed to the Crown, and was in 1541 granted to the Dean and 



'Dom. ii. 382. 
^Dom. ii. 392. 

3 Dom. ii. 402&. 

4 Dom. ii. 382. 

5 1109-31, 1133-1139. Harl. 43. 
^2 John, pt. i. 7, 32. 



7 Abbr. of PI. 4 John, 6, in dor so, Placita 

Mich. Term. 

8 Chart. RoUs, 3 Edw. II. 29 ; Add. 5829 ; 

Add. Ch. 15749. 

9 Chart. Rolls, 36 Hen. III. 11. 
"Add. 5819. 



174 



THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 



Chapter of Ely/ in whom the lordship long continued, and it is now vested 
in tile Ecclesiastical Commissioners. 

Court Rolls of the manor will be found in the Public Record Office 
for the II, 12 Edw. II. and 3, 4 Edw. III." 

Manor of Undley Hall. 

This lordship in the time of William the Conqueror belonged to Richard, 
son of Earl Gilbert, and passed from him to his son and heir, Gilbert de Clare, 
and descended in the like course as the Manor of Sudbury, in Babergh 
Hundred, to Gilbert de Clare, Earl of Gloucester, in 1295. It is specifically 
mentioned in the inquis. p.m. of Richard de Clare, Earl of Gloucester, in 
1263.^ From the Patent Rolls in 1311 we learn that the Earl had a moiety 
of the town of Lakenheath, in which he had the liberty of " infangenethef," 
and a commission was issued that year on his complaint that John, Prior 
of Ely, and others, rescued Richard Batheman from custody of the Earl's 
bailiff, who had arrested him for the larceny of an ox in the Earl's moiety 
of the town.* Lands here were restored to the heirs of the Earl in 1317.^ 

From Gilbert de Clare, the last-mentioned Earl, the manor passed to his 
sister and coheir, Elizabeth de Burgh, who had licence to amortice the manor 
to the prior and convent of Ely. This was in 1327, and the particulars 
were 15 messuages, 220 acres of land, 2 acres of meadow, and 2^d. rent 
and fishery in Wyndelee Mere, in Lakenheath.^ 

In 1331 the assurance was actually effected by fine levied by the Prior 
of Ely against Elizabeth de Burgh.^ The prior and convent then charged 
the manor with the payment of a rent of £20 in favour of the said 
Elizabeth.^ With the priory the manor remained until the Dissolution. 

Elizabeth de Burgh reserved a rent of ^^20 out of a further grant of a 
messuage and 24 acres here to Ely priory,* and this she granted, three years 
later, to Anglesey priory." The obligation, or rather part of such, was to 
find two secular chaplains to celebrate, from which obligation on the ground 
of poverty they were subsequently relieved.'' On the vesting of the manor 
at the Dissolution in the Crown it was sold in 1540 to Edward North, who, 
with Alice his wife, had licence to alien in 1542 to Simeon Steward," and 
the sale was effected by a fine levied the same year.'^ Simeon Steward 
had licence to alien in 1555 to his son, Edward Steward. He married ist 
Margery, daughter and coheir of Richard Kylbrie, of Landbeach, co. 
Cambridge, and 2ndly Eleanor, daughter of William Steward, of Ely, and 
died 28l£ Dec. 1596. He had, however in 1558 licence to alien to his 
brother, John Steward, but does not seem to have made any conveyance 
of the manor, for in 1583'* Edward Steward and Margery his wife had licence 



'S.P. 1541, 1226 (12). 

° Portfolio 203, 94, 95. 

^I.P.M., 47 Hen. III., File 27 (37). 

♦Pat. Rolls, 5 Edw. II. pt. i. 22d. 

= Close Rolls, 10 Edw. II. 4. 

"I.P.M., I Edw. III. 115; Pat. Rolls, i 

Edw. III. pt. i. 8 ; 5 Edw. III. 

pt. i. 14 ; I.Q.D. 5 Edw. III., File 

215, 17- 
7 Feet of Fines, 5 Edw. III. 18. 

8 I.Q.D. 5 Edw. III., File 215-17. 

9 Pat. Rolls, 5 Edw. III. pt. i. 14. 



"Pat. Rolls, 4 Edw. III. pt. ii. 13; 5 
Edw. III. pt. ii. 27 ; Harl. 47, 

E.37- 
" Pat. Rolls, 15 Edw. IV. pt. i. 20 ; see 

Add. 15664. 
"See Manor of Barton Mills, in this 

Hundred. 
•3 Fine, Hil. 34 Hen. VIII. 
"> There is a letter of Edward Montagu, 

Earl of Manchester, to Dr. Rich. 

Love, Dean of Ely, amongst the 

Tanner MSS. on behalf of John 

Steward, a tenant of the manor. 

(Tanner xlvi. 79.) 



LAKENHEATH. 175 

to alien to Francis and Thomas Jermy (his son), the latter having married 
Joane, only child and heir of the first Edward Steward, and to the heirs of 
Francis, and the conveyance was effected by a fine levied this same year/ 
On Sir Francis' death the manor vested in his son. Sir Thomas Jermy, 
K.B., who died 21st Dec. 1652.' Joane had died 6th May, 1649, at the 
age of 87. 

In 1796 the manor was vested in Thomas Brome Evans, and this year 
he died seised of it, when it passed to his son and heir, Thomas Brome 
Evans. 

In 1818 the manor was purchased by the Rev. Joseph Turner, D.D., 
Dean of Norwich, and on his death passed to his son and heir, the Rev. 
William Hamilton Turner, of Barly rectory, Royston. The 21st July, 
1836, the manor was offered for sale, with the hall farm of 916 acres, let at 
;^8oo, and sold for 21,700 guineas.^ 

Arms of Steward : Or, a fesse chequy Azure and Argent. 

Manor of Radmere or Redmere al. Rodmere. 

Fotheringhay College, in Northamptonshire, held this lordship and 
continued to do so at the time of the Dissolution, when the manor passed 
to the Crown. It was granted by Hen. VIII. to Sir Richard Lee, and 
particulars for the grant will be found in the Public Record Office.* In 
1553 the King gave licence by letters patent to Sir Richard Lee to alienate 
a moiety of Redmere, being a moiety of 164 acres lying in Feltwell, Helgay, 
and Southrey, in Norfolk, and Lakenheath, in Suffolk, with the rights of 
fishery in those parishes, and the moiety of all the lode, called Barlode, 
and the moiety of 25 acres of marsh called Norlands, to Nicholas Bacon, 
and a fine was accordingly levied of the moiety by Nicholas Bacon against 
the said Sir Richard Lee.' 

The other moiety was also held by Sir Richard Lee, and conveyed by 
him in 1553 to Sir Ambrose Jermyn, of Rushbrooke,® from whom in 1577 
it passed to his son and heir. Sir Robert Jermyn, who had licence in 1583 
to alienate it to Henry Warner. The conveyance was effected by fine 
levied Trinity term 25 Eliz. Henry Warner, Sir Nicholas Bacon, and 
Edward Coke had licence to alienate a moiety in 1590 to Sir Robert Wing- 
field and Anthony Wingfield, and Sir Robert Wingfield this year levied 
a fine against Henry Warner,^ and died seised of this moiety in 1596. By 
1640 the whole manor of Redmere became vested in Henry Warner, son and 
heir of the above-mentioned Henry Warner, and on his death in 1645 the 
same passed to his son and heir, Henry Warner, then aged 8 years. 

In 1685 we learn from the Exchequer Special Commission what sums 
were assessed in Lakenheath in the suit of Warner v. Bradbury.* 

One of the Manors of Lakenheath is mentioned in the inquis. p.m. of 
Robert Spring, who died 20th April, 1549, leaving Thomas his son and 
heir aged 30.' 



' Fine, Easter, 25 Eliz. s Fine, Mich, i Mary. 

*See Manor of Metfield, in Mendham, in *Fine, Mich, i Mary. 

Hoxne Hundred. 7Fine, Hil. 33 Eliz. 

i Norfolk Chronicle, i8th June, 1836, and ^x Jac. II. Exch. Spec. Com. D.K.R., 38 

Ipswich Journal, 30th July, 1836. App. p. 142. 

4 D.K.R. 10 App. ii. p. 230. 9I.P.M., 3 Edw. VI. 141. 




176 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

MILDENHALL. 

|HERE was a manor held here in Saxon times by the Abbot 
of St. Edmunds, given him by the Confessor ; later it was held 
under the abbot by Stigand, and at the time of the Survey 
William de Noers kept it in hand for the King. It consisted 
of 12 carucates of land, 30 villeins, 8 bordars, 16 serfs, 6 
ploughteams in demesne and 8 belonging to the men. Also 
20 acres of meadow, a church with 40 acres, a mill, 
and 3^ fisheries. Of live stock there were 31 forest mares, 37 beasts, 
60 hogs, and 1,000 sheep. Two of these details were slightly different at 
the time of the Survey — the villeins had increased to 33 and the bordars to 15. 
There were also 30 acres and half a ploughteam held by 8 socmen. To this 
manor lay Icklingham, a hamlet with 6 carucates of land, 6 villeins (reduced 
to 4 at the time of the Survey), 7 bordars (reduced to 5 at the time of the 
Survey), 8 serfs, 3 ploughteams in demesne and 4 belonging to the men, 
which latter had gone down to half at the time of the Survey. Also a mill, 
a church with 24 acres, 2 rouncies, 3 beasts, 4 hogs, and 500 sheep. Therein 
were also 30 acres and a ploughteam held by a socman. The whole 
was valued at ;£40, and at the time of the Survey at ^jo by tale. The 
township was a league long and a league broad, and paid in a gelt iij^. 
Severed persons held land therein. The hamlet was 2^ leagues long and 
2|- leagues broad, and paid in a gelt iij^.' 

The other estate here was that of Richard, son of Earl Gislebert, and 
consisted of 60 acres, a bordar, and 2 ploughteams, valued at 5s. formerly 
held by 2 socmen, belonging to Deseling, and they might not sell." 

Manor of Mildenhall. 

The charter by which Edward the Confessor gave the lordship to the 
abbey of St. Edmunds will be found referred to in the 29th Report of the 
Deputy Keeper of the Records.^ The mode in which this manor was 
acquired by the monastery from the Confessor is thus stated by Yates*: — 

" In the first year of his reign the King came to Bury on St. Edmund's 
Day, and the next morning seeing the young monks eating barley bread, 
enquired of Abbot Baldwin, why these young men of his kinsman (as he 
was pleased to call St. Edmund) were no better fed ? ' Because,' replied 
the abbot, ' our possessions are too weak to maintain them with stronger 
food.' 

" ' Ask what you will,' said the King, ' and I will give it to you, that 
they may be better provided for and better enabled to perform the service 
of God.' The abbot, having consulted with his monks, asked of the King 
the Manor of Mildenhall, with its appurtenances, and the jurisdiction of 
the eight Hundreds and a half, with all the royalties, afterwards called 
the Franchise. The King observed that his request was indiscreet, because 
the grant of these liberties would involve him and his successors in continual 
trouble ; that he would wilhngly have granted him three or four manors, 
if he had required them, and would, out of respect to his kinsman, grant 
this request, however indiscreet." 

Stigand, when Bishop of Elmham, took the manor from the abbot, 
and as Archbishop of Canterbury, held it under the abbot during the life 

' Dom, ii. 2886. 3 Royal Charter, App. p. 30, see lb. 38 ; 

^Dom. ii. 392. S. I. iv. 351. 

"Hist, of St. Edmund's Bury, p. 75, 
quoting " Collect. Buriens." 



MILDENHALL. 177 

of the King. William the Conqueror deprived Stigand of it, and at the 
time of the Survey it was in the Crown, and then valued at £70. Among 
the Crown lands sold by King Richard I. immediately after his accession 
was this manor, which Sampson, Abbot of St. Edmunds, who assisted at 
the coronation, bought for 1,000 marks. 

In 1198 King Richard confirmed by charter to Abbot Sampson this 
manor and the advowson of the parish church as the right of the monks, 
which they held in the time and as the gift of King Edward the Confessor ; 
and by another charter the same manor was placed at the disposition of 
the sacrist so that he paid yearly 12s. to the hospital of St. Saviour for the 
relief of the poor ; 60s. on the anniversary of the King and the abbot, for 
pittances to the monks, and 20s. on those days to the poor. 

At the accession of King John the abbot gave him £200 for a confirma- 
tion of the charter of his predecessor, and especially in respect of Mildenhall.' 
The account of Bartholomew Bernard, provost for the manor in 1323, 
will be found amongst the Bodleian Suffolk Rolls .^ In 1341 we find a commis- 
sion issued on complaint of the Abbot of St. Edmunds of persons opposing 
offices of the abbot as lord of the manor in imposing judgment of the timbril 
on brewsters, staying and brewing within the lordship and leet.^ 

In 141 1 and 1412 the Abbot of Bury had a grant of two fairs and 
markets.* 

At the Dissolution the manor vested in the Crown, and in 1557 was 
granted to Thomas Reeve and Christopher Ballet. The manor would seem 
to have been annexed to the Duchy of Lancaster, and to have been vested 
in Sir Nicholas Bacon before 1560, for we find a grant made 24th Nov. 1560, 
by Queen Elizabeth to him of certain stock and stawe of the manor 
formerly demised by the abbey and convent of Bury St. Edmunds to 
Robert Gierke, Nicholas paying to the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster 
£54.^ The following year we meet with an action by John Hill, farmer 
of the leet of Mildenhall Manor, against John Craske as to the customs of 
the manor,^ and two years later an action by the Attorney-General of the 
Duchy against Robert Clerke, sen., and grantee of Robert Gierke, lessee 
of John, late Abbot of Bury, as to the demesne lands of the manor. ^ 

Two years later still we find that Sir Nicholas Bacon had assigned 
his interest to William Pope, for there is an action by the latter styled 
" the Queen's underfarmer of Mildenhall Manor, by assignment from Sir 
Nicholas Bacon " against Thomas Cotes and Robert Suckerman, claiming 
title to two parts in three of a messuage called the Angell, as to a right of 
way through Goplow Fenn.^ 

There are other actions connected with the manor in 1567, 1568, 1571, 
1576, 1577, 1584, 1585, 1587, 1588, &c.' 

In 1614 the site and grange of the manor, with free warren of conies 
there, were purchased by Sir Henry North and the grant was made to him and 

' Chart. Rolls, i John, pt. ii. 23, 114 ; Ih. ^ Duchy of Lancaster, Pleadings, 4 Eliz. 7. 

44 Hen. III. 4. 7/6. 6 Eliz. 9. 

'17 Edw. II. 21. 8 Duchy of Lancaster Cal. to Pleadings, 8 

3 Pat. Rolls, 15 Edw. III. pt. ii. 330!. Eliz. 3. 

♦Chart. Rolls, 13 and 14 Hen. IV. 5. 9 See Duchy of Lane. Cal. to Pleadings ;;. 

53 Eliz. Bodl. Suff. Ch. 171. Elizabeth. 



178 ' THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

bis heirs.' Sir Henry was the 2nd son of Roger, Lord North. He erected 
the present manor house, and married in 1574 Mary, daughter and coheir 
of Richard Knyvet, son and heir of Christopher Knevit^ younger son of 
Sir William Knevit, Knt. Sir Henry took part in the expedition to Norem- 
berger under Sir Humphrey Gilbert, and in 1581 served with his father in 
the Low Country wars, where he received the honour of knighthood from 
Robert Dudley, Earl of Leicester. He was first seated at Wickhambrook. 
He died 20th Nov. 1620, and was buried at Mildenhall, having had three 
sons. Sir Roger, Henry, and John, and three daughters, Elizabeth, Mary, 
and Dorothy. The youngest son died young, and Henry, the 2nd son, 
resided at Laxfield, having married Sarah, daughter and heir of— Jennor 
of that place. The manor, on the death of Sir Henry North in 1620, passed 
to his eldest son, Sir Roger North. A letter of this Sir Roger North will 
be found amongst the Egerton MSS. in the British Museum." 

Sir Roger North served in Ireland for a short time under Lord Deputy 
Oliver St. John, and later in subordinate command under the Earls of 
Oxford and Essex in the army sent in 1619 to protect the possessions of 
Frederick, the Elector Palatine of the Rhine, then asserting his right to 
the throne of Bohemia. Sir Roger was a staunch supporter of church and 
King, and was amongst those who placed their estates at the disposal of 
Kmg Charles at Newmarket in 1641. He died 7th June, 1651, and was 
buried at Mildenhall. He had married twice, ist in 1608 Elizabeth, daughter 
and coheir of Sir John Gilbert, of Great Finborough, distantly related to 
Sir Walter Raleigh, with whom he had that estate; and 2ndly Thomasine 
daughter of Thomas Clenche, of Holbrook. He had two sons by his ist 
wife— Sir Henry and Dudley North, and also a daughter Mary, married to 
Colonel Blagge, Governor of Yarmouth. The manor passed to Sir Roger's 
son and heir. Sir Henry North. He in 1627 sailed with the Duke of Buck- 
ingham m his ill-planned and ill-starred expedition against La Rochelle 
and m 1642 he joined the King's army, supporting the royal cause as a 
devoted champion. 

. ^ J* ^°S^ ^°* appear that he took any part in the Royalist rising in favour 
ot Chas. II. which terminated in the battle of Worcester, but he seems to 
have assisted his sovereign when in exile in Holland. In the seclusion of 
his Manor House of Mildenhall, Sir Henry seems to have devoted himself 
to the study of literature, which he reUeved by indulging in several law 
suits. Much cannot be said for the quaUty of the stuff which flowed from 
his pen, but the amount displayed considerable perseverance, "Eroclea- 
or, the Maid of Honour," his main production, has well-nigh faded out of 
memory, and it cannot be said the loss is a matter of moment. It has been 
suggested that the style is a mixture of Amadis de Gaul and the French 
romancers with a dash of the " Pilgrim's Progress." 

4.U }^,^^^' ^^^°' -^^^S ^^^^- ^^- was restored and as early as the 14th of 
the toUowmg month Sir Henry as some recompense for his loyal conduct 
and the assistance afforded to the royal exile, was created a baronet and 
on one occasion subsequently King Charles came over from Newmarket 
and spent a day and a night at the manor house in which there is a room 
stiU called King Charles s room. Sir Henry lost his wife in 1670, and seems 
subsequently to have sunk into despondency, and been afflicted both bodily 
and mentally. He is said to have committed suicide at the manor house 

'S.P. 1614. p. 247. ^Eger. 2717. 



MILDENHALL. 179 

by shooting himself on the 29th August, 1671. The words on the tablet 
erected to his memory in the church of Mildenhall are rather confirmatory : 
" Mortuus dum vivens O quam durum/' and again, "In fehx miser ipse 
qua non datur ultra vita tibi in terris nee mihi posse mori." 

Sir Henry North, by Sarah his wife, eldest daughter of John Rayne 
or Rayney, of West Mailing, Kent, whom he married in 1631, had a son 
and heir. Sir Henry North, who succeeded his father as 2nd Bart., and 
three daughters — ^Thomasina, who married Thomas Holland, son and heir 
of Sir John Holland, of Quiddenham, in Norfolk, who died at the age of 28, 
in 1661, and was buried at Mildenhall ; Dudleia, married to Sir Thomas 
CuUum, of Hawstead ; and Peregrina, married to William Hanmer, of Han- 
mer, in the County of Flint, a lineal descendant of Sir John Hanmer, who 
settled in Flintshire in the time of Edw. I. 

Amongst the Exchequer Depositions taken at Mildenhall in 1678 we 
find notice of an action respecting the Manor of Mildenhall and fenns and 
wastes, right of common between Henry Warner and others, v. Sir Henry 
North (a John Inwood is mentioned as lord of manor but ?)/ And six years 
later we find another action as to improvements in wastes of the manor 
and fences, &c., thrown down in the night, and rights of common, &c., 
between the said Henry Warner and Richard Booker and others." 

Sir Henry North,^ 2nd Bart., died 5th July, 1695, without issue, leaving 
by wUl" the manor to his sister Peregrine, married 2nd Nov. 1675, to WilUam 
Hanmer at Sir Thomas CuUum's house, at Hawstead. Her son. Sir Thomas 
Hanmer, born at Bettisfield House, in Flintshire, 24th Sept. 1677, succeeded 
as 4th Bart, of that house in 1701, inheriting through his mother this manor. 
Sir Thomas Hanmer was returned to Parliament for Thetford 1701-2, 
for Fhntshire 1702-5, for Thetford again 1705-8, and for Suffolk 1708-27. 
He was in 17 13 unanimously chosen Speaker of the House of Commons. 
In reference to that event is the following couplet of Dr. Johnson, which 
we take second-hand from Page' : — 

" Illustrious age ! how bright thy glories shone. 
When Hanmer fill'd the chair, and Anne the throne." 

Sir Thomas distinguished himself in the literary as well as the political 
world, and his splendid edition of Shakespeare's plays, published by the 
University of Oxford, to which he presented the MS., testify to his critical 
acumen and refined judgment. 

Sir Thomas appears as the " Montalto " of Pope's satirical portrait. 
He was celebrated as a patron of the literary men of his day, and occupied 
a prominent station in public affairs at an important crisis in modern English 
history. He is also known as the leader of that section of the Tories which 
during the reign of the first George was nicknamed " the flying squadron," 
and who, after courting the dissatisfied heir apparent in his father's 
lifetime, retired entirely from the political sphere when the prince changed 
into a king and took up with the Whigs and Walpole. Sir Thomas's two 
most marked characteristics were hatred of the Whigs and a detestation 
of Dissenters. Before his election to the Chair, he was one of the most 

'Exch. Dep. 30 Chas. II. at Mildenhall. amongst the Tanner MSS. in the 

' 36 Chas. II. Exch. Dep. at Newmarket. Bodleian. (Tanner xxv., xxvi.) 

^ His correspondence with Archbishop * loth June, proved 12th Sept. 1695. 

Sancroft, 1691-3, will be foimd *Hist. of Suff. p. 844. 



i8o THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

influential members of the Commons, and leader of that section which 
Swift has styled " the Hanover Tories " and BoUingbroke sneered at as 
the " Whimsicals." Sir Thomas was one of the most independent men 
that ever sat for the County of Suffolk, but at the same time both cautious 
and reserved. He is said to have been one of the most graceful and 
accompHsbed speakers of his day, being implicitly trusted by the High 
Church party. The ascendancy of the Church of England outweighed in 
his mind the divine right of Kings and the legitimate succession of the Crown. 
A writer in 1799 says : " Not all were flowers when pompous Hanmer 
spoke." 

He married ist in 1698 Isabella, dowager Duchess of Grafton, only 
daughter and heir of Henry Bennet, ist Earl of Arlington. She was one 
of the most striking beauties of the Court. He married 2ndly Elizabeth, 
only daughter and heir of Thomas Folke, of Great Barton, who after a few 
years eloped with her husband's cousin, the Hon. Thomas Hervey. 

Suckling, in his MS. notes, says : "He left no family ; he had married 
an old woman for love and a young one for money, and was not very 
fortunate with either of them. His epitaph by Dr. Friend, Master of West- 
minster School, was composed in Sir Thomas's lifetime, and was found in 
his edition of Shakespeare after his death, and then supposed to have had 
his approbation was accordingly put on his monument." 

In 1723 he founded an almshouse in Mildenhall for four poor widows. 
The deed of gift recites that " he had erected an Almshouse, consisting of 
four several dwellings in Mildenhall, adjoining to the west side of the church- 
yard." These he conveyed to eleven trustees, to the intent that four 
persons should have each of them one of the said houses, and he also granted 
two yearly rent charges of £38 and 40s. to be issuing out of certain property 
in] the town, upon trust, with the sum of £38 to pay each of the poor 
persons in the almshouse 2s. 6d. weekly and 40s. at Michaelmas yearly to 
provide for each of them a suit of clothes and linen, and £2 yearly at or 
before Michaelmas for providing three loads of turf for each, with the sum 
of 40s. to repair the almshouse, and recruit the bedding and household 
goods therein. 

Sir Thomas Hanmer died 7th May, 1746,' without leaving any issue, 
devising his Suffolk estates to his nephew William, 2nd son of Sir Harry 
Bunbury, Bart., by Susan his wife, sister of Sir Thomas Hanmer, whom 
he had previously adopted, and who upon the decease of his elder brother, 
Sir Charles Bunbury, eventually succeeded to the baronetcy. 

The original name of the Bunbury s was St. Pierre. A younger scion 
of this Norman family settled in this country had come over with the 
Conqueror. He or his immediate descendants acquired lands of considerable 
extent under Hugh Lupus, the great Earl of Chester, and in the time of 
Stephen we find Henry de St. Pierre, Lord of Boneberi (Bunbury), in the 
Hundred of Edisbury, co. Chester. From this lordship the family adopted 
their present surname, though some members of the family retained the 
original name of St. Pierre as late as the time of Edw. I. In the time of 
Edw. III. David de Bunbury acquired by marriage the Manor of Stanneye, 
in which lordship the family had previously held land, and the manor and 

' Will proved 1746. 



MILDENHALL. 



i8i 



estate of Stanneye are still retained by the family. The following is the 
Bunbury descent :— 

ALEXANDER DE BUNBURY. 

Lord of Bunbury, co. Chester, t. Hen. III. 
William = Maud. 



Hugh = Christina, dau. of David, 
I Baron of Malpas. 

Richard t. Edw. II. 
I 
David = dau. and heir of David de Stannick 
orStanney, of Wirral, near Chester. 

Wii: 



Roger 
d. s. p. 



Henry 

Richard 
d. 1458. 



Alice, dau. of Edw. Dutton. 



r 



John, d. 1469 = Catherine, dau. of John Hooks, of co. Fhnt. 



John, d. 1505 = Agnes, dau. of Wm. Norris, of Speke, 
j CO. Chester. 

Richard, d. 1540 = Blanche, dau. of Sir Thos. Poole, of 
Poole, CO. Chester. 



Henry, d. 1 546 = Margaret, dau. and heir of Hugh Aldersey, 
I of Chester, Mayor in 1528, 1541, and 1546. 



Thomas = Bridget, dau. of John Aston, of Aston, 

d. 5th May, 1601. | co. Chester. 



I. Anne, dau. of Jeffery Shackerley, = Sir Henry = 2. Martha, dau. of Sir William Norris, 
of Shackerley, co. Lancaster, and I of Speke, Knt. 

Hulme, CO. Chester. 



Henry 



Ursula, dau. of Sir John Bailey, 
of Hoddeston, co. Herts. 



I. Sarah, dau. of John Chet- = Thomas, created a Bart. = 2. Mary, dau. of Humphrey Kelsall, 



woode, of Okeley, co. 

staff. 



29th June, 168 1, d. 
22nd Aug., 1682. 



of Heathside, co. Chester. 



Sir Henry, 2nd Bart., 
d. 20th Dec, 1687. 



Mary, dau. of Sir Kendrick Eyton, of Eyton, 
CO. Denbigh, Knt. 



Sir Harry, 3rd Bart., = Susanna, only surv. dau. of Wm. Hanmer, and sister to Sir 



d. I2th Feb., 1732-3. 



Thos. Hanmer, of Hanmer and Bettisfield, co. Flint and 
Mildenhall, Bart., d. 23rd Sept., 1744. 



Sir Charles Bunbury, 
4th Bart. 



Sir William Bunbury was vicar of Mildenhall from 1736 to 1740. He 
married Eleanor, daughter and coheir of Samuel Warner, of Holbrooke 
Hall, and dying nth June, 1764' the manor passed to his elder son, Sir 
Thomas Charles Bunbury, 6th Bart., of Barton, M.P.for Suffolk for 43 years. 



' Will proved 4th July, 1764. 



i82 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

He married 2nd June, 1762, Lady Sarah Lennox, 4th daughter of Charles, 
2nd Duke of Richmond, which marriage was dissolved by Act of Pariiament, 
14th May, 1776.' He married 2ndly, at the parsonage house of Great 
Whelnetham, by special licence, 21st Nov. 1805, Margaret Cocksedge, and 
died 31st March, 1821, when the manor passed to his nephew. Sir Henry 
Edward Bunbury, 7th Bart., K.C.B., son of Henry William Bunbury, the 
well-known caricaturist, brother of the 6th Bart. Sir Henry Edward 
Bunbury was aide-de-camp to the Duke of York in 1799, taking part in 
the short campaign against the French in North Holland. In 1807 he was 
Quartermaster-General at the Battle of Maida, and from 1809 to 1816 
Under-Secretary of State for War, for some years representing Suffolk in 
Parliament. In 1814 Sir Henry was promoted to the rank of Major- 
General, and created K.C.B. in the following year. 

He married ist, 4th April, 1807, Louisa Amelia, daughter of General 
the Hon. Henry Edward Fox, and 2ndly, 22nd Sept. 1830, Emily Louisa 
Augusta, daughter of the Hon. George Napier, by his 2nd wife. Lady Sarah 
Lennox, daughter of the 2nd Duke of Richmond. Sir Henry Bunbury 
died 13th April, i860, in his 82nd year, when the manor passed to his 
eldest son. Sir Charles James Fox Bunbury, 8th Bart., High Sheriff for 
Suffolk in 1868. He married 31st May, 1844, Frances Joanna, daughter 
of Leonard Horner, of London, and dying i8th June, 1886, without issue, 
the manor passed to his brother. Sir Edward Herbert Bunbury, 9th Bart., 
M.P. for Bury 1847-1852, and on his death, unmarried, 5th March, 1895, 
passed to his nephew, Sir Henry Charles John Bunbury, loth Bart., eldest 
son of Col. Henry William St. Pierre Bunbury, C.B., of Marchfield, Berks, 
(who died i8th Sept. 1875), brother of the 8th and 9th Barts., and of Cecilia 
Caroline, his wife, daughter of Lieut.-Gen. Sir George Thomas Napier, 
K.C.B. He married nth March, 1881, Laura Lavinia, 3rd daughter of 
Gen. Thomas Wood, of Littleton, Middlesex, and Gwernyfed Park, Brecon. 

Court Rolls of the manor are referred to in the 3rd Rep. of the Hist. 
Com. p. 242, and see Report of Record Commissioners 1837, P- 97- 

Arms of North : Azure, a lion passant. Or, betw. 3 fleurs-de-lis. 
Argent. Of Hanmer : Arg. two lions passant, guard, Az. armed and 
langued Gu. Of Bunbury : Argent on a bend, Sa. three chess rooks of 
the field. 

Manor of Aspall's. 

This manor is situated between Beck and Holywell Rows,* and was 
anciently held by Sir Robert de Aspal, who died in 1326, from which time 
to 1375 the manor passed in the same course as the Manor of Stonham 
Aspall, in Bosmere and Claydon Hundred. In 1375 Dame Katherine de 
Hemenhale granted the manor to her sister and her sister's husband, namely, 
to George de Felbrigge and Dame Marjorie his wife. The deed is dated 
25th May, 49 Edw. HI.' 

In 1445 the manor appears to have been vested in Thomas Walbar, 
clerk, and John Bertram, who gave it to the abbot and convent of Bury." 
The particulars as appearing in an inquis. p.m. in the time of Hen. VI. 
would seem to be the manor and 70a. of land, 14J acres of meadow, and 
10 acres of marsh in Mildenhall.' 

' The lady remarried in 1781 the Hon. ' For a Map of these Rows, see Add. MSS. 
George Napier, son of Francis, 5th Brit. Mus. I1742. 

Lord Napier, and was the mother ^Harl. 51 E. 10. 

of eight children, the three elders ^I.Q.D., 19-23 Hen. VI. 84. 

being well-known Generals. 'I.P.M., t. Hen. VI. D. 56. 



MILDENHALL. 



183 



In 1467 we meet on the Patent Rolls with an exemplification made at 
the request of the abbey of St. Edmunds of letters patent granting licence 
for acquisition in mortmain by the abbey of Aspall Manor and land in 
Mildenhall.' Six years later we find the manor mentioned in the inquis. 
p.m. of Elizabeth, wife of Anthony, Earl of Ryviers,* but this must have 
been in respect of a holding under the Abbot of Bury. At the dissolution 
the manor vested in the Crown, and was held for some time by Mary, 
afterwards Queen of England. We find that in 1553 there is an action 
referred to in the Duchy of Lancaster Calendar of Pleadings^ by the Queen's 
farmers and tenants of Soham Meare against William Yaxley, claiming under 
the late Abbot of Bury certain rights of fishery in Mildenhall Manor. We 
learn from the Harleian MSS. (607) that the manor while in the hands of 
the Queen was rated 3rd July, 1557, for John Walkelate. This year 
however, it seems to have been granted to Thomas Reeve and Christopher 
Ballet, and they in 1565 had licence to alienate to Thomas Poley and 
the assurance was effected by a fine levied this same year.* ThX)mas Poley 
had hcence to alienate in reversion in 1577 to Roger, Lord North, 
and this sale was carried into effect by a fine levied in 1581.^ Roger, Lord 
North, and his son Henry had licence in 1584 to alienate to Sir Thomas 
Browne and Henry Warner, which alienation, no doubt by way of settle- 
ment, was effected by a fine levied the same year.® We find an action as to 
Holmesey Meadow or Halle Meadow apparently belonging to this manor, 
amongst the Duchy of Lancaster Proceedings in 1582.^ The action is 
between the attorney-general and Henry Warner. But the alienations 
above referred to were apparently by way of settlement only, as Sir Roger 
North, Lord North, did not part absolutely with his interest in Mildenhall, 
for in 1583 we find a petition by Sir Roger North, Lord North, to the Queen 
for the Court Rolls and other evidences of title to Mildenhall and Aspall 
Manors,^ and in these Duchy Proceedings in 1590 we find a suit by Lord 
North against Robert and Richard Pecheye for breach of ordinances of 
the town, and as to lands and common in Holmesey Field,® while the 
following year he brought an action in right of the Abbot of Bury against 
Henry Warner in right of Robert Clarke as grantee as to specified lands 
and the parsonage barns.'" 

A little later the manor was vested in Sir Henry North. A letter of 
his to Sir B. Gawdy in 1600 is amongst the Egerton MSS. in the British 
Museum." In 1607 Sir Henry North and his wife had licence to alienate 
the manor to Sir John Peyton and others. This alienation was no doubt 
by way of settlement only, for in 1609 we find from the Exchequer Deposi- 
sitions taken at Mildenhall that a suit was in progress respecting the site 
and demesnes of the manor called Mildenhall Grange, and as to tithes and 
tracts and bounds between Sir Henry Warner and this Sir Henry North 
and others. In 1614 Sir Henry North had a grant in perpetuity from 
the Crown, and from this time to the present the manor has devolved in 
the same course as the main manor, and is now vested in Sir Henry 
Charles John Bunbury, loth Bart. 



'Pat. Rolls, 7 Edw. IV. pt. ii. 5. 
*I.P.M., 13 Edw. IV. 45. 
3 1 Mary, 3. 

4 Fine, Hil. 7 Eliz. 

5 Fine, Mich. 23-24 Eliz. 
fiFine, Hil. 26 Eliz. 

1 24 Eliz. I, Cal. to Pleadings. 



* Duchy of Lancaster, Cal. to Pleadings, 

25 Eliz. I. 
5 Duchy of Lancaster, Cal. to Pleadings, 

32 Eliz. I. 

'° Duchy of Lancaster, Cal. to Pleadings, 

33 Eliz. 4. 
" 2714. 



i84 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

Manor of Wamhill. 

This manor lies between the town of Mildenhall and West Row, the 
manor house lying about a mile to the north-west of Mildenhall. In old deeds 
the name appears as Twamhill or Twamil— in some old maps as Twn-mel. 

In the reign of Hen. IV. when the north aisle of the church was being 
built, we find the Manor of " Twanmil " belonging to one Henry Pope, 
whose residence is believed to have been an old timber house in Thremil, 
at the beginning of the last century still known as " Pope's farm." 

In the time of Hen. VI. the family of Pope is said still to have held the 
manor. There is a Henry Pope whose will is dated ist Feb. 1535, proved 
ist May, 1536, who left two sons, Thomas and WiUiam. Thomas Pope's 
will is dated 12th March, 1559, and it was proved 8th Feb. 1566. He left 
five sons, William, Henry, Thomas, Robert, and Richard, and two daughters, 
Frances and Margaret, married to Nicholas Bakket, son of Thomas Bakket. 

In a paper read before the Suffolk Institute in 1851 by the late Samuel 
Tymms, he mentions that the earliest notice that he had met with of the 
manor was a roll of accounts of the twelfth year of Rich. II., in the possession 
of Sir Henry E. Bunbury, Bart., kept by John Kelfynch, steward at Milden- 
hall, for the cellarer of Bury abbey, in whom the manor of Mildenhall 
was vested. It is there, as in most subsequent documents, called Twamhill, 
and appears to have been leased in small parcels. The steward accounts 
for "7s. received for one acre of land in Twamhelf eld, late of Robert Bernard, 
3a. of land there of the same tenement, la. ir. of land there of the tene- 
ment Heywardes. . . . and for 3s. for la. 2r. of the tenement Rewes 
abutting upon the barn late of Robert Bernard .... let for the term 
of ten years . . . and for 4s. 6d. for la. ir. of land, Malotes, in two 
pieces, in Twamhylfeld." There are many similar entries.' 

Later WamhiU Hall became the seat of the Warner family. This 
family originally came from Besthorpe, in Norfolk. Page says that by an 
ancient pedigree of this house it appears that in 1374 John Warner, of 
Besthorpe, deceased without issue or relations, and devised his paternal 
estate to Thomas, a younger son of his most intimate friend, Sir James 
Whetenhall, Knt., of Cheshire, upon condition of his assuming the name 
and arms of Warner. This Thomas therefore became seated at Besthorpe, 
to whom succeeded Henry Warner, to whom succeeded Robert Warner, of 
Besthorpe, who died in 1488. 

The Norfolk Visitation' states this Warner to be the first of the Whitnall 
family calling himself Warner. He married Margaret Burton, of 
Besthorpe, and was succeeded by his eldest son, Henry Warner, who married 
Mary, daughter of John Blennerhassett, of South Hill, in Bedfordshire. 
Page says : "Sir Edward Warner, Knt., their eldest son. Lieutenant of 
the Tower of London, resided here until his marriage in 1560 with Audrey, 
daughter and heir of William Hare, of Beeston, in Norfolk, and relict of 
Thomas Hobart, of Little Plumstede, in the same county, when he removed 
thither. Sir Edward deceased in 1565 without leaving issue, all his three 
sons having died before him without issue, and Sir Robert Warner, Knt., 
his brother and heir, then 55 years of age, succeeded to the Mildenhall 
estate. He is styled a knight in some accounts, but in an early pedigree 
in the College of Arms he is styled "esquire" at the time of his death, which 

'Suff. Inst. i. 297. ^Harl. 1552, intr. fol. p. 



MILDENHALL. 185 

took place in 1575, leaving as his heir a son Henry, who had livery of his 
lands and manors in 1578. 

The Visitation of Norfolk" varies from this by making Robert Warner 
(described as of Norwich) the elder son, and Sir Edward Warner, of 
" Plomsted," the younger. 

The Norfolk Visitation is inaccurate and Page not quite correct. 
Henry Warner, the son of Thomas, married Cecily, daughter of William 
Spany. It was his son Robert who married Margaret, daughter of John 
Blenerhasset, of Frenze, and died 20th Nov. 1488, being succeeded by his 
son Henry, who died 23rd April, 1519, when the manor passed to his eldest 
son and heir, Sir Edward Warner, of Plumstead, co. Norfolk. He married 
1st Elizabeth, daughter of Thomas Brook, Lord Cobham, and 2ndly 
Audrey, daughter of William Hare, of Beeston. He died without issue 
7th Nov. 1565, when the manor passed to his brother and heir, Robert 
Warner, of Norwich. He married Anne, daughter of Sir Humphrey 
Wingfield, and was succeeded in the lordship by his son and heir, Sir 
Henry Warner. 

The Mansion House of Wamhill (now a farmhouse) was probably 
built in the time of Queen Elizabeth by the last-mentioned Henry Warner, 
who married ist Frances, daughter of Edward Glemham, of Benhall, and 
widow of Robert Forthe, and 2ndly Mary, daughter of Sir Robert Wingfield, 
Knt., of Letheringham. This lady died gth Nov. 1601, and was buried in 
the chancel of Mildenhall church, where is a gravestone to her memory. 
Her husband represented Thetford in 1601, and was at another time High 
Sheriff. In 1592 he had bought the great tithes and advowson of the 
vicarage of Sir Francis Gawdy, Knt., and Edward Latimer, and other 
properties in Mildenhall. On the 23rd July, 1603, on the occasion, or just 
before the coronation of King James I., he received the honour of knight- 
hood at Whitehall. 

In a paper read before the Suffolk Institute (vol. iv. p. 352), it is stated 
that this Henry Warner had already received the honour of knighthood 
from Queen Ehzabeth about 1590. The writer also mentions that from 
his brother Edward, who married an Irish lady, and settled in Ireland, is 
descended the present Irish branch of the family. Sir Henry Warner, by 
his will dated ist June, 1616, directed his body to be buried in the chancel 
at Mildenhall, near to his ist wife, and devised to his eldest son Edward a 
Ufe interest in all his estates ; but as his son was a young man of dissolute 
habits, provision was carefully made to check his inclination for gaming. 
The provision was " that should he in any one day' lose more than £1 by 
play he should for the first offence forfeit his manor of Mildenhall to 
the then Lord Justice of England " ; for the second, his Manor of Thorn- 
hill (? Wamhill); and for the third the whole remainder of his property, 
to his heirs, as one already dead, and ' played out ! ' " 

A copy of the will is given in the ist vol. of the Proceedings of the 
Suffolk Institute in 1851 (p. 299). Sir Henry Warner died 6th May, 1617, 
and the manor passed to his son, Edward Warner. He married Mary, 
daughter of John Wentworth, of Gosfield, in Essex, and dying 14th May, 
1618, the manor passed to his son, Henry Warner. Henry Warner married 
17th Feb. 1633, Lydia, daughter of Sir Thomas Playters, of Sotterley, 
Bart., and died 29th March, 1644,^ when the manor passed to his son and 

'Harl. 1552, intr. fol. 9. °Will 12th March, 1642. 

Z 



i86 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

heir, Henry Warner. His ist wife was a daughter of one Hubbard, of 
Gloucester, and his 2nd wife, whom he married in 1658, was one Dorothy 
Gaell. He is said to have inherited his grandfather's extravagance, for a 
very few years afterwards he began to encumber the property, and then 
to sell it piecemeal. Henry Warner had no male issue, but five daughters 
by his 2nd marriage. He was living in 1706. The writer of the article 
above referred to, says : "Before parting altogether with a family that has 
gone out so discreditably, it may be well to add from how high a stock 
they had fallen, and that no less than a Royal one, for the Whetendales 
were a branch of the royal family of Sweden." 

Over the stone gateway of the Basse-cour, which a little resembles 
the entrance of the gate of honour to Caius College, Cambridge, and in 
which the original oaken gate studded with iron still hangs shrivelled and 
lined, are carved the arms of the Warners quartered with those of Wheten- 
dale and others.'" 

The following interesting account is given of the manor-house of Wam- 
hill by the writer above referred to : " The manor-house itself is a square 
and solid edifice of four floors. It has in its northern elevation three corre- 
sponding tiers of broad-muUioned windows ; and above, three dormer 
gables, the centre one carried up square for a certain distance, and flanked 
with rude pilasters, the other two springing from the floor level ; all these 
gables and the pilasters above mentioned, and the corners of the whole edifice 
are crowned with globes of stone. The front is but little changed from 
its original appearance. Strongly constructed of Isleham clunch, grouted 
with quoins and mullions of freestone ; generally but nowhere coarsely 
clad with ivy ; approached by the original gate and gateway ; fronted by 
the basse-cour, of which the enclosure is yet standing ; there with its grass- 
piece without, yet dight with immemorial elms, in whose branches still 
swing the ancient vassalage of rooks, that chatter on eternally with the usual 
' haut-ton'-ned voices of their kind, and its pleasaunces stretching away to 
the rear, the old mansion has something about it unusually suggestive of 
the past. The south front of the mansion looking towards the river and 
the opposite parish of Worlington, is less regular, and is marred by the great 
square projection which contains the original staircase. 

" Within, the alterations are, of course, more numerous than without. 
Our ideas of comfort and even of convenience have altered greatly since the 
days when the great dining-room of Wamil Hall, rush-strewn, and affording 
kennel-room for dog and hawk and what-not, besides the human 
inhabitants, including the present entrance-hall and all the base of the main 
building to the east of it. A considerable part, however, of this space 
is still occupied by the dining-room of the present house, a noble apartment 
which is entirely panelled out of the original wainscot. Even more strange 
to us would seem the arrangements of the next floor, where two bedrooms 
and a portion of the only passage from the staircase to the chambers on this 
floor occupy the space of the original State bedroom, which was over the 
dining-hall, and of equal size with it, and through which the occupants 
of the other chambers must have passed as a matter of course, though it 
may be, behind a curtain. The original cornices and some part of the 
panelling of this great chamber remain, though, unfortunately, disguised 
with paint. But is it not just possible that this large apartment may have 
been to the ladies what the hall was to the gentlemen on the ground floor, 

' Suffolk Inst, iv, p. 353. 



MILDENHALL. 187 

for much more consideration for the other sex set in with the reign of the 
Maiden Queen. The rest of the chambers on this floor are spacious and 
lofty, but uninteresting to the archaeologist. 

" We arrive last at the most interesting feature of the manor-house. 
The garret storey, dismantled and disused perhaps for nearly a couple of 
centuries, gives us a picture untouched save by the flaws of age, of the 
nature of the arrangements made for the sleeping accommodation of a 
numerous train of domestics in their manor-houses in the country, by the 
squires and knights of earlier generations. 

" We have here a'gallery the length of the whole house, lighted at either 
end ; three small chambers, occup3dng the dormers noticed without, 
project on either side, six in all — these seem to have been curtained off as 
apartments for female domestics ; whilst at the floor level, along the side 
walls of the gallery, are six recesses under the tiles resembling the bunks 
on board of a fishing smack, which probably served for the resting-places of 
servants of the nobler sex. 

" The original still stands throughout ; it is a plain oaken stair, very 
broad and easy. Portions of the wall of the pleasure gardens remain to 
the south-west of the residence. To leave the ground of fact, and pay, 
before closing, a moment's attention to the voice of tradition and super- 
stition, let me say that this manor-house has the respectability of possessing 
' A Ghost's Walk.' To the north-east of Wamil will be noticed past the 
mound called Fremel, a spot marked as Mondes. This is covered with plan- 
tations, under whose shade no rustic will walk at night, for fear of looking 
upon the appearance of a certain Lady Rainbow who is said ' to walk ' 
there. Mondes is off the present high road, but a small plantation having 
grown up opposite the gate to' Wamil, the children of Mildenhall still keep 
up a pretence of audacity, which has been a favourite sport for centuries 
by rushing in and out of this, and crying, ' One, two, three, old 
Lady Rainbow can't catch me ! ' Now, curiously enough, I learn 
from the will of Robert Warner, father of the builder of this mansion, 
that his sister Anne, the aunt of the latter gentleman, was married 
to a gentleman of the name of Raynbow, and had a daughter, Elizabeth 
Raynbow, cousin therefore of Sir Henry Warner. The said Lady Raynbow 
is also held to haunt the manor-house itself, and to perambulate the 
country between there and Mondes.'" 

The manor is now vested like the main manor in Sir Henry Charles John 
Bunbury, loth Bart. 

A fine was in 1570 levied of " Wamell Manor," and it related also 
to lands in Mildenhall, consequently it may refer to this manor. It was 
levied by Henry Veyse against William Pope and others. ° 

Arms of Whetendale : Vert, a cross engrailed Argent. Of Pope : 
Arg. two chevrons Gu. on a canton of the last an escallop Or. Of Warner : 
Party per bend indented Argent and Sable. 

Manor of Carrills. 

Probably this was the lordship of which Sir Robert Mortimer, of Attle- 
burgh, in Norfolk, Knt., died seised in 1387, when his inheritance became 
divisible between his three granddaughters and coheirs, and the manor 
was appropriated or allotted to Margery, the youngest, who married Sir 

'Suffolk Inst. iv. p. 354. ^Fine, Easter, 12 Eliz. 



i88 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

John Fitz Ralph, of Great Elingham, in Norfolk, and the same was settled 
on him for Ijfe. 

One of the Manors of Mildenhall, but which we cannot say with 
certainty, belonged to the Mohun family, and in 1327 was vested in John 
de Meriet in right of his wife, for he died seised of it this year,' and on the Close 
Rolls this same year we find an order to the escheator not to intermeddle 
further with the manor, and to restore the issues and profits, as John de 
Meriet held at his death by the curtesy of England of the inheritance of 
Mary, his late wife, and that Reginald de Mohun, late lord of the manor, 
gave to William his son and the heirs of his body, and that Eleanor and 
Mary, William's daughters, died without heirs of their bodies, and that the 
manor ought to revert to John de Mohun, kinsman and heir of the said 
Reginald, by the form of the gift aforesaid/ 

We also find that John Strange died seised, of " Mildenhall Manor " 
in 1467.^ 

Amongst the ancient deeds in the Court of Chancery preserved in the 
Record Office we find a lease for 12 years dated 26th April, 1469, by Anne, 
late wife of Sir Thomas Hungerford, to Sir George Darell, of her rabbit 
warren of Berrigge by Mildenhale, and of all rabbits within the Manor of 
Mildenhall, paying 5 marks yearly." 

Also that WiUiam Risbie^ died seised of Mildenhall Manor 23rd Sept. 
1552,® leaving Robert his son and heir, and that Robert Risbie died seised 
3rd May, 1557,^ leaving William his son and heir. 

Rent roll of Mildenhall Manor in 1662 will be found amongst the 
Tanner MSS. in the Bodleian.^ 



'I.P.M., I Edw. III. 51. 5 See Manor of Thorpe Morieux, Cosford 

''Close Rolls, I Edw. III. pt. ii. 24. Hundred. 

3I.P.M., 7 Edw. IV. 34- ^I.P.M., 6 Edw. VI. 63. 

*C. 2506. T.P.M., 3 and 4 P. and M. 137. 

^cdxxxiv. 66. 




NEWMARKET. 189 

MANOR OF NEWMARKET, ARGENTINE'S. 

|HE town of Newmarket is divided into two parishes, All 
Saints and St. Mary's, the former being in Chiveley Hundred, 
Cambridgeshire, and the latter in Lackford Hundred, 
Suffolk, the High Street dividing the two counties. The 
manor was held by Robert de Insula, or L'Isle, in the time 
of Hen. HI., and was given by him to his daughter 
Cassandra on her marriage with Richard de Argentine. 
Richard was Sheriff of the County of Essex and Hertford, and was in 1223 
constituted Governor of the Castle at Hertford. Later he was Sheriff 
of the Counties of Cambridge and Huntingdon, and in 1227 one of the 
stewards of the King's household. This year he had a grant of a fair 
for the manor, a literal translation of which grant, which is dated 17th 
Feb. 1226-7, is given in Hore's History of Newmarket.' Richard de 
Argentine a few years later went a pilgrimage to the Holy Land, and 
dying there in 1246 the manor passed to his son and heir. Sir Giles de 
Argentine. From this time to the time of Hildebrand, 4th Lord Alington, 
the devolution of this manor is the same as that of the Manor of Hales- 
worth, in Bly thing Hundred. 

On the death of Hildebrand, 4th Lord Alington, the manor seems to 
have passed to Charles, 6th Duke of Somerset, K.G., commonly called the 
" Proud Duke," son and heir of Charles Seymour, son of Francis, Lord 
Seymour, of Trowbridge, and Elizabeth his wife, sister of the said Hilde- 
brand, Lord Alington. The 6th Duke of Somerset died in 1748 at the 
advanced age of 87, leaving the manor to his daughter Frances (by his 2nd 
wife. Lady Charlotte Finch, daughter of Daniel, Earl of Winchelsea), who 
was married to John, Marquis of Granby. The Marquis attained high 
military reputation as Commander-in-Chief of the British Forces, serving 
under Prince Ferdinand, of Brunswick, in Germany, and dying in 1770, 
in the lifetime of his father John, 3rd Duke of Rutland, the manor passed 
to his son and heir Charles, who in 1779 succeeded his grandfather as 4th 
Duke of Rutland. He was installed a Knight of the Garter, married 
in 1775 Mary Isabella, youngest daughter of Charles, 4th Duke of Beaufort, 
and dying while holding the office of Lord Lieutenant of Ireland, 24th Oct. 
1787, at the early age of 33, the manor passed to his son and heir John 
Henry, 5th Duke of Rutland, K.G., who in 1799 married Lady Elizabeth 
Howard, daughter of Frederick, 5tli Earl of Carlisle, and dying 20th Jan. 
1857, the manor passed to his son and heir, Charles Cecil John Manners, 
6th Duke of Rutland, who dying in 1888 without issue the manor passed 
with the title to his brother, John James Robert Manners, 7th Duke of 
Rutland. His lordship married in 185 1, ist Katharine Louisa Georgiana, 
daughter of Col. Marlay, C.B., and 2ndly in 1862 Janetta, daughter of 
Thomas Hughan, of Airds, co. Kirkcudbright. He was a K.G., 
G.C.B., and P.C, and was formerly Postmaster-General, Chancellor of the 
Duchy of Lancaster, and First Commissioner of Works and Buildings. 
The 7th Duke died in 1906, when the manor passed to his son Henry John 
Brinsley Manners, 8th Duke, who 25th November, 1882, had married Marion 
Margaret Violet, daughter of the late Col. the Hon. C. H. Lindsay, C-B. 

, Court Rolls of the manor are referred to in East Anglian Notes and 
Queries (N.S.) iii. 343. 

'Vol. i. p. 38; Chart. Rolls, 11 Hen. III. pt. i. 26; Close Rolls, 11 Hen. III. 



190 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

This manor is specifically mentioned in a fine levied in 15 16 by Sir 
Robert Drury and others against Sir Giles Alyngton and Maria his wife, 
but only a moiety of the manor was included.' Also in a fine levied in 1554 
by Richard Catlyn and others against Sir Giles Alyngton and others/ and 
a fine levied in 1567 by Sir William Cordell against Sir Giles Alyngton.^ 

Boteler's Manor. 

This was the lordship of Ralph Boteler in the time of King Edw. III., 
and passed to his widow Joan for life. 

Her holding seems to have been the moiety of a messuage, 40 acres of 
land, 2 of meadow, and 30s. rent, with the appurtenances in Newmarket 
and Exning held in chief of the King by the service of one spear per annum. 
She died in 1360."* 

Davy makes this Ralph Boteler to have married Hawise, daughter and 
coheir of Richard Gobin, whom he says is Joan, and died in 1360. The 
manor passed to Ralph's son. Sir John Boteler, who married Joan, daughter 
of Sir John de Argentine, of Wymundley, co. Herts, and passed on his death 
to his son. Sir Edward Boteler, who married Anne, sister and heir of Hugh 
le Despencer, and died without issue in 1412/ when the manor passed to his 
great-nephew. Sir Philip Boteler. He was the son of Philip, the son of 
Ralph Boteler and Katherine his wife, daughter and heir of Sir Philip de 
Peletot, Lord of Woodhall, which Ralph was the brother of John, the 
father of Sir Edward Boteler. Sir Philip Boteler, the great-nephew, 
married Elizabeth, daughter of John Cockayne, of Bury Hatley, co. Bedford, 
and died 6th Nov. 1420, leaving Edward Boteler, his son and heir, aged 
eight years. 

The next lord we meet with is Anthony Boteler, from whom the manor 
passed to his widow for life. She remarried Charles Sanford, and in 1529 
we meet with a fine levied by Philip Boteler or Butler, William Drury, 
John Jermyngham, and Robert Drury, against Christopher Sanford and 
Emma his wife of a moiety of the manor.® The following year Sir Philip 
sold this moiety to Giles Alington/who seems also to have acquired in some 
way the other moiety. In 1569 the manor was vested in William Alington, 
for this year he released all right in the manor to Sir Giles Alington, who 
died in 1586. From this time the manor appears to have devolved in the 
same course as the main manor. The manor is included in the fine levied 
in 1554 by Richard Catlyn and others against the above-mentioned Sir 
Giles Alington and others.^ 



'Fine, Trin. 8 Hen. VIII. sl.p.M., 14 Hen. IV. 16. 

= Fine, Easter, 3 Mary I. sFine, Trin. 21 Hen. VIII 

3 Fine, Easter, 9 Eliz. ''Fine, Easter, 22 Hen. VIII. 

4I.P.M., 34 Edw. III. 40. 8 Fine, Easter, 3 Mary I. 




THETFORD. 191 

MANOR OF THETFORD, COMMONLY CALLED LANCASTER'S. 

JHETFORD formerly contained 20 parishes, 13 of which 
were situated on the Suffolk side of the Little Ouse, only one 
of which now remains, that of St. Mary. 

The priory of Cluniac Monks was first founded on the 
Suffolk but soon removed to the Norfolk side. The house 
of Benedictine Nuns and those of the Canons of the Holy 
Sepulchre and Dominican Friars continued on the Suffolk 
side until the Dissolution. 

This manor was granted by the Conqueror to William de Warenne, 
created about 1088 Earl of Surrey, who had extensive grants in every part 
of the kingdom. About 300 manors fell to his share of spoil, nearly one- 
half of which were in Norfolk. In 1067 he was, during the Conqueror's 
absence in Normandy, one of the Council of Regency, and in 1074 was 
joint Justiciar. He stood firm to William Rufus, and married the lady 
Gundreda whose parentage has been the cause of so much discussion and 
controversy. She died 27th May, 1085, and was buried in the priory of 
Lewes, co. Sussex. His 2nd wife was a daughter of William and sister to 
Richard Goet or Guet, of MontmiraU. He was wounded in the siege of 
Pevensey, and died of his injuries 24th June, io8g, when the manor passed 
to his son and heir William, 2nd Earl of Surrey, or Earl Warren as he was 
usually styled. 

Taking part with Robert Curthose against Hen. L he was deprived of 
his earldom about iioi, but restored the following year. He married 
in 1118 Isabel, daughter of Hugh, the great Count of Vermandois, widow 
of Robert, Earl of Mellant, and died nth May, 1138, when the manor passed 
to his son and heir William, Earl of Surrey, and 3rd Earl of Warren. He 
had command in the army of King Stephen at Lincoln, 2nd Feb. 1141, and 
to his flight from the battle the defeat is mainly attributed. On his 
retiring into Normandy, Hen. I. seized the castle and manor of Thetford 
into his own hands, and held them during his life, and after him King 
Stephen had possession of the lordship. 

The 3rd Earl of Warren married Ela, daughter of William called Talves, 
Count of Alengon and Ponthieu, by Ela, daughter of Odo, Duke of 
Burgundy, and left an only daughter Isabel, who married William de 
Blois, son of King Stephen. He surrendered all his possessions to Hen. II. 
on his accession, and was knighted 24th June, 1158, when he had all those 
estates held by his father King Stephen previously to his accession to the 
throne regranted or confirmed to him. He died without issue in October, 
1159, and his widow Isabel' remarried Hamelin Plantagenet, natural son 
of Geoffrey, Count of Anjou, half-brother to Rich. I. This Hamelin had 
the Manor of Thetford granted him by that King in exchange for lands in 
Torone, in France, and William, his son and heir, consented to the exchange. 
The following is a translation of the deed of exchange : "I Hamelin, Earl 
of Warren, by the consent of William, my son and heir, have received of 
my lord, Richard I., King of England, his town of Thetford with all thereto 
belonging, in exchange for my lands in Torone, to wit, Columbers, Balan, 
and Clamberi, on this condition, that if the town of Thetford with its 
appurtenances shall amount yearly to more than £35 sterling, I and my heirs 
shall pay the overplus to the exchequer of my lord the King ; but if the 

'She died 13th July, 1199. 



192 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

town of Thetford, &c., do not amount to £35 sterling, then the deficiency 
to be made good wherever it shall please the King to appoint in any other 
part of England." 

It was witnessed by the Bishop of Ely and many others.' 

The Earl died in April, 1202, and the manor passed to his son William, 
5th Earl of Surrey and Warren. He was one of the barons by whose advice 
Magna Charta was signed ; warden of the Cinque Ports in 1216, and in 
command at Gascony and Poictou in 1224. He probably married ist 
Maud de Albini, daughter of William, 2nd Earl of Arundel, and 2ndly 
Maud, eldest daughter of William, Marshal Earl of Pembroke, and widow 
of Hugh le Bigod, Earl of Norfolk. He died the 27th May, 1240, when the 
manor passed to his son and heir John, 6th Earl of Surrey and Earl of 
Warren. " In his Time," says Blomefield, " the Bailiffs of this Lordship 
were accused to the King of diverse Transgressions committed against 
him, particularly that they had seized the Goods of divers Felons and 
detained them, upon which there was a Writ issued to the Sheriff to take 
them from them; this was in 1256, but it seems the Earl claimed them, as 
belonging to his Dominion here, for the Sheriff did not proceed in it. In 
1267 there was a Man tried in the Earl Warren's own Court at Thetford 
and hanged, for which the Earl was impleaded, but justified the proceeding 
by proving that the Court of his Lordship and Dominion of Thetford had 
that power. In 1274 the Earl's Bailiffs took Toll in Thetford Market of 
one of the Tenants of Gerard de L'isle, Lord of the Moiety of Mundford 
Manor, for which Gerard brought his Action against the Earl, and recovered 
upon it, by proving that most of the Towns in Grimshoe Hundred, and 
especially all of the Earl Warren's Fee, were exempt from paying Toll in 
Thetford Market. In 1278 the Earl had Free-warren allowed him in all 
his lands that he possessed, or that he or his heirs should ever purchase, in 
regard of his Surname De Warrena. In 1286 the Jurors for the Half 
Hundred of Teford present that John de Warren, Earl of Surrey, holds the 
Lordship of Theford, in Chief of the King, and hath belonging to that 
Lordship, Thol, Them, Soh, Sah, Infangenethef, View of Frank-pledge, 
Assize of Bread and Ale, a Pillory, Ducking-stool, Weyf , separate Coroner for 
the Lordship, and a Market on Wednesday and Saturday in every Week, 
besides Toll and Custom every day in the Week."^ 

John, Earl of Warren, was an adherent of Hen. III. in the barons' wars, 
but deserted him at the battle of Lewes. He took the Cross in 1268, and in 
1296 had a leading command in the battle of Dunbar, when the Scots were 
defeated. He was at the siege of Carlaverock. He married Alice, daughter 
of Hugh de Lusignan, Count of La Marche, and uterine sister of Hen. III., 
and died the 27th Sept. 1305, when his eldest son William having died in 
his father's lifetime, the manor passed to his grandson (William's son by 
Joan, daughter of Robert de Vere, Earl of Oxford), John, 7th Earl of 
Surrey and Warren. He was engaged constantly in the Scotch 
wars, and having assisted his cousin, Edmund Balliol, was by him created 
Earl of Stratherne. He married in 1306 Joanna, only daughter of Henry 3rd, 
Count of Barre, by the Lady Eleanor Plantagenet, eldest daughter of Edw. I., 
but died without issue the 30th June, 1347.^ He did not, however, die 
seised of this manor for it appears that in 1318 he obtained the King's 

'Martin's Hist, of Thetford, p. 43. ^'v^ill 24th June and proved 25th July, 

^Blomefield, Hist, of Norfolk, I347, at Scroby. 



THETFORD. 193 

licence, and actually granted the manor to Ralph, Lord Cobham, for life, 
and after his decease to Thomas, Earl of Lancaster, in fee. 

Martin, in his History of Thetford, gives a somewhat different account. 
He says that the last Earl of Warren and Surrey having no issue by his wife 
gave the inheritance of most of his estates to King Edw. II., but the Manor 
of Thetford he had by deed granted to Ralph, Lord Cobham, for life, and 
after his decease to Thomas, then Duke of Lancaster, but after the Duke 
of Lancaster was beheaded at Pomfret for treason, Edw. II. in the i8th 
year of his reign [1325] granted the manor to Ralph, Lord Cobham, and 
his heirs. There can be no doubt that the King seized and granted as 
Martin states above, except that the grant was made not in fee simple, 
but to Sir Ralph de Cobham and his heirs male.' Sir Ralph de Cobham 
died seised the 5th Feb. 1325, when the manor passed to his son and heir, 
John de Cobham, then one year old. John was seized by the King as his 
ward, but never enjoyed the estate, as in 1327 Henry, Earl of Lancaster, 
was restored and the lordship revested in him. Shortly afterwards the 
manor was conveyed by the Earl of Lancaster to John, Earl of Warren, for 
life, with remainder to the Earl of Lancaster in fee. The Earl of Lancaster 
died in 1345, and the Earl of Warren, on Tuesday the eve of St. Peter and 
Paul, 1347, without issue, being the last Earl of his name and family. At 
his death an inquisition was taken concerning the lordship, from which it 
appears that he held the manor and town of the King in chief in free socage 
by the yearly service of a rose, and that there were a head messuage and 12 
score acres of land valued at 12 marks per annum, 20 acres of meadow, 
worth 33s. a year, the pasture inclosed and the common worth 26s. 8d., 
two watermills value £5, a free fishery value 3s. 4d., the rents of assize 
£7, a market and travers with the toll yearly worth 10 marks, two fold 
courses value 20s., the pleas, perquisites, and liberties of the courts, with one 
lete to be held every Easter value £^, also the market or fair at Santon 
parcel of this manor, valued with the water toll there at i8s., also a certain 
custom or toll in Brandon caUed " Travers," parcel of this manor valued at 
13s. 4^?., also at Honeweton or Honington-Bridge, a like custom or toll 
called " Travers " worth 2s. 6d. per annum, all which descended to Henry, 
Earl of Lancaster, son and heir to Henry, Earl of Lancaster, who in 1347 
renewed his charter of free warren in this and all his other manors in the 
county. He was installed a Knight of the Garter, " And not long after," 
says Dugdale,^ " viz., 25 Edw, III. [1350], having merited so highly, by 
bis prudent conduct, and renowned exploits in the [French] Wars, he was 
farther advanced to a higher Pitch of Honour, by the King's special charter, 
bearing date the 6th of March the same year, viz., to the Title and Dignity 
of Duke of Lancaster, which being done by the general Consent of all the 
Prelates and Peers then sitting in Parliament at Westminster, for his 
Life ; he was invested therewith by the Cincture of a sword, with power 
to have a chancery in the County of Lancaster, and to issue out Writs there, 
under his own Seal, as well touching Pleas of the Crown, as any other, rela- 
ting to the common Laws of this Realm: as also to enjoy all other Liberties 
and Regalities, belonging to a County Palatine, in as ample a Manner as 
the Earl of Chester was known to have within that County." Thus this 
manor became part of the Duchy of Lancaster, and was soon after called 
" Lancaster's or the Duchy Manor in Thetford." 

Henry, Duke of Lancaster, obtained a charter of free warren in his 
lordship here, and in Grimmingham, Methwold, and Keston, in 1349, ^^^ 

'D.K.R. 31 App. p. 23. 'Part i. 786. 

AI 



194 



THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 



the 24th March, 1360, died of the plague, leaving his estate to be divided 
between his two daughters and coheirs, and this manor with the advowsons 
of the Canons of the Friars Preachers of Magdalen Hospital and St. John's 
which always belonged to it, together with all the revenues above 
mentioned, were allotted to Maud, the eldest daughter and coheir, married 
to WiUiam, Earl of Hainault, Holland, Zealand, Friseland, and Leicester. 

The grant was made by the Earl of Arundel, Bishop of Lincoln, and 
other trustees of the late Duke of Lancaster, to William, Earl of Hainault, 
and Maud his wife and the heirs of their bodies, and for want of such issue 
to the heirs of Henry, late Duke of Lancaster, her late father, for ever. Maud 
d3dngthe next year, loth April, 1362, without issue, the whole estate of Henry, 
Duke of Lancaster, came to John of Gaunt, Earl of Richmond, 4th son of 
Edw. HL, in right of Blanche his wife, the surviving daughter and then sole heir 
of Henry, Duke of Lancaster, her late father. John of Gaunt was created 
Duke of Lancaster in 1361 in Parliament, the King girding him with a 
sword and putting a cap of fur on his head, with a circlet of gold and pearls. 
This Manor of Thetford was entailed upon the heirs of the bodies of the 
Duke and Duchess, by virtue of which entail on his death in 1398 his son 
and heir Henry, Earl of Derby, afterwards King. Hen. IV., by Blanche, 
had the said manor, which passed later to King Hen. V. King Hen. V. 
demised the demesne lands, except the manor house called the Earl's 
House' and the Earl's barns, to the prior of the monastery of Thetford and 
his successors in fee, who were to hold them by the annual fee-farm rent 
of £28. 6s. 8d. a year. In 1414 he settled the lordship on the Archbishop 
of Canterbury, the Bishops of Winchester, Durham, Norwich, and many other 
trustees, who were to hold it for him and his heirs, during the continuance of 
which feoffment we meet with courts, &c., held by many different persons, but 
they were only feoffees or farmers under them. In 1415 Edmund Oldhall, 
receiver of the duchy, received of John Wirlingworth, the King's baiUff 
of Thetford, by the prior of the monks there, the fee-farm rents of the 
demesne, viz., £28. 6s. 8d., and also by the hands of the farmer of the toll 
of the market and bridges £6, and by the rest of the profits of his office for 
this year £4. 16s. yd. ; the total being ^53. 16s. yd., out of which there 
was paid to John Woodhouse, head steward of all the dominion of the 
King's Duchy of Lancaster in Norfolk and Cambridgeshire, ;£io per annum, 
and also 16 marks more, which the King had added to his yearly salary by 
way of reward for his faithful service, both which sums he was to receive 
as long as he held his office, which was during the King's pleasure. The 
bailiff of this town also paid £10 a year to William Gaston for fife out of 
the fee-farm rent of the demesne, which sum the King granted the said 
William when he retained him on condition that he was retained by no 
other person, but served the King only in his wars 'during his life. The 
gaol for the duchy as well as lordship, was kept in this town, and in 1455 
Edmund Clere was made (under) bailiff, feodary, and gaol-keeper of the 
duchy. The manor remained in the hands of King Hen. VI. and Edw. IV. 
and was by the latter assigned in jointure to Elizabeth his queen, after 
whose death it continued in the Crown during the lives of Edward V., 
Rich. III., Hen. VII. and Hen. VIII., until the latter demised to William 



'Blomefield informs us that the site of 
the manor being the Earl Warren's 
seat in Thetford, was where Sir 
John Wodehouse's house, com- 
monly called the King's House, 



in Blomefield's time stood, and 
the Earl's barns stood against 
Earl's Lane, which in his time 
was corruptly called Alice's Lane. 



THETFORD. 195 

Duyte, mayor of Thetford, and the commonalty thereof, the fairs and 
markets, the toll of Brandon Ferry, and other bridges, on condition they 
took no more than 4d. per score for sheep or hogs, &c., and paid the King 
his rent, who was to maintain the bridges, the lease being for 40 years. 
From Hen. VIII. the manor passed to King Edw. VI., who by letters patent 
dated the nth July, 1548, granted to Edward, Duke of Somerset, and his 
heirs for ever, " All that the Domynion and Mannor of Thetford with the 
Rights, Members, and Appurtenances thereof, Parcell of the Dutchie of 
Lancastre, and all Edifices, Waters, Landes, Tenements, Meddowes, Feedings, 
Commons, Wastes, Hereditaments, &c., in Thetford or ellsewhere, to the 
said Domynion or Mannor, or any Part thereof belonginge or appertey- 
ninge, or as Member or Parcel of the same, before that Tyme reputed or 
used, and all Rents and Yearley Profitts whatsoever reserved upon any 
Demyses or Grauntes of the Premises or any Parcell thereof, &c., as largely 
as any Dukes of Lancaster, or any of their Predecessors enjoyed the same, 
or that the King by Lineal Descent, or by any other Means, might have 
the same, viz., the King's Ponds along the Rivers, adjoining to the Grove 
of the Abby, and all that severed Fishing, sometime in the Occupation of 
John Corbett, parcel of the Dominion or Manor of Thetford, and also 400 
acres of the Demeans in Wether's-Course, and Halwich-Course, and also 
all that yearly Reservation from the Monks, for other Tenements and Lands, 
that were the Tenants copyholds, gathered in by the Monks of Thetford, 
accounted parcel of the Value of Thetford Manor, which at about 2d. an 
Acre, extend to the yearly value of 32s. zd. per Ann. and also the Fishing 
of the Lord's River, used by the Abbot and his Holders or Tenants." The 
Duke, by deed enrolled dated 31st July the same year, conveyed to Sir 
Richard Fulmerston and his heirs, who were to hold it of the Crown in 
socage by fealty only, as parcel of the Duchy of Lancaster. 

Sir Richard Fulmerston' was probably a native of Norfolk, and born 
at or in the neighbourhood of Lopham ; for in 1566 Thos. Fulmerston, 
his relation, resided in that parish, and had two sons, Thomas and Richard, 
and a brother Christopher, who had a son named John. Sir Richard was 
marshal of the King's Bench in the time of Edward VI. After the disso- 
lution of the monasteries, he appears to have obtained various grants of 
lands, &c., belonging to those houses. 

He obtained a lease from the Crown, under the duchy seal, for 30 
years, at the yearly rent of ;^8. 6s. 8^. of the toll of the bridges in Thetford, 
Brandon, Euston, and Honington, with the profits of the market, and 
such other things as were not granted to the Duke with the dominion or 
manor, but remained still in the Crown, in right of the duchy, and there 
continued till Queen Elizabeth granted them in 1574 to the Corporation ; 
and thus Sir Richard enjoyed the whole dominion, and lordship of Thet- 
ford, and all the rights belonging to the duchy to his death. He received 
the honour of knighthood between the years 1557 and 1565. By Alice 
his wife he had a daughter Frances, aged at his death 28 years, and married 
to Edward Clere, who in her right became heir of Sir Richard's great 
possessions. By his will, which is dated 23rd Jan. 1566, he directed his 
body to be buried in the parish church of St. Mary, in Thetford, on the 
north side of the chapel there, without pomp and vain glory. 

Amongst the Exchequer Depositions taken at Thetford in 1591 is 
notice of an action by Sir Edward Clere against WilUam Dix as to 
lands and tithes in Thetford. 

'See Manor of Elvedon, in this Hundred. 



196 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

Sir Edward Clere, Knt., was forced by his extravagance to part with a 
great portion of his estate, and amongst other property the manor and 
advowson of Bickling, to Sir Henry Hobart, the Attorney-General. He 
assigned the remainder of the term of his lease of this manor to the Corpora- 
tion, and died 4th June, 1606, leaving the manor to Frances his widow, who 
died in 1616, when it was found by the inquisition taken at her death that 
Sir Edward Clere, Knt., her son, was above 31 years old, being heir both to 
his father and mother, and that he held the manor, among other things, 
of the Duchy of Lancaster ; and soon after, in performance of a contract 
he had previously made, he conveyed it to Thomas Howard, Earl of Suffolk,' 
and Henry, Earl of Northampton, who settled it on John Holland, Robert 
Causfield, and other trustees, and thus the manor passed to the Howard 
family. 

In 1701 Thomas, Duke of Norfolk, kept his first court, and afterwards 
conveyed the manor to his youngest brother, the Honourable Philip 
Howard. He married 7th Jan. 1724-5, Winifred, daughter of Thomas 
Stonor, of Watlington Park, co. Oxford, and had issue Thomas, who died 
in 1763, and Winifred, who married in 1749 the Honourable William 
Stourton, afterwards Lord Stourton. Philip Howard married 2ndly 
Henrietta, daughter and coheir of Henry Blount, of Blagdon, in Devon, 
and widow of Petre Proti, of Antwerp, by whom he had a son Edward, 
born in 1743-4, and died 1767, and Anne, married in 1762 to Robert Edward, 
Lord Petre, 9th Baron. The manor passed on Philip Howard's death to 
his daughter Anne, who died in her husband's lifetime, and on his death 
in 1801 the manor passed to their eldest son and heir, Robert Edward, loth 
Baron Petre, who married in 1780 Mary Bridget, daughter of Henry 
Howard, of Glossop, sister of his stepmother, and of Bernard, 12th Duke 
of Norfolk, and dying 29th March, 1809, the manor passed to his son and 
heir, William Francis Henry, nth Baron Petre, who married first 2nd 
June, 1815, Frances Charlotte, eldest daughter of Sir Richard Bedingfield, 
Bart., and 2ndly 14th April, 1823, Emma Agnes, 2nd daughter of Henry 
Howard, of Corby Castle, Cumberland, and died 3rd July, 1850. He had, 
however, in 1822, disposed of the manor to Alexander Baring, 2nd son of 
Sir Francis Baring, Bart., who loth April, 1835, was raised to the peerage 
as Baron Ashburton, of Ashburton, co. Devon, having held office during the 
previous four months as President of the Board of Trade and Master of 
the Mint. He married 23rd Aug. 1798, Anne Louisa, eldest daughter 

of Wilham Bingham, of Philadelphia, and died 13th May, 1848, when the 
manor passed to his son and heir, William Bingham, 2nd Baron Ashburton, 
P.C, who married ist 12th April, 1823, Harriet Mary, eldest daughter of 
George John, 6th Earl of Sandwich, and 2ndly, 17th Nov. 1858, Louisa 
Caroline, youngest daughter of the Rt. Hon. Innes Stewart Mackenzie, 
nephew of the Earl of Galloway. His lordship died 23rd March, 1864, and 
his only son having died an infant in his father's lifetime the manor passed 
to the last lord's brother Francis, 3rd Baron Ashburton, M.P. for Thetford, 
who in Jan. 1833, had married Claire Hortense, daughter of Hugues 
Bernard Maret, Duke of Bassano, Minister of Napoleon L, and dying 6th 
Sept. 1868, the manor passed to his son and heir, Alexander Hugh, 4th Baron 
Ashburton, who the same year sold the manor by private contract to 
William Amhurst Tyssen Amhurst, of Didlingston Hall, Norfolk, together 
with the Buckenham and Ashill estates, &c. W. A. T- Amhurst resold the 
manor and estates in Oct. 1869, to Edward Mackenzie, of Fawley Court, 

' See Framlingha^, in Loes Hundred. 



THETFORD. 197 

CO. Bucks. The Thetford estates then consisted of the Abbey farm 1,105a. 
or. I7p., the Canon's farm 1,354a. ir. i8p., and the Croxton Park farm 
ij354a. ir. 28p., comprising 6,960 acres, and were sold for ;f84,5oo. The 
estates were described as the Manors of Thetford-cum-Halwick and Sibton, 
all entirely freehold. Besides the acreage above there were several smaller 
allotments of about 830 acres. On this sale Mr. Amhurst reserved the 
" Castle Hill." From this time the manor has descended in the same 
course as the Manor of Downham, in this Hundred. 

Arms of Fulmerston : Or, on a fesse Azure, a rose between two garbs. 
Gules, between three seamews of the 2nd beaked and membered of the 3rd. 
Of Petre : Gu. a bend Or, between two escallops Arg. Of Baring : Az. 
a fesse Or, in chief a bear's head, ppr. muzzled and ringed, gold. 

Manor of Halwick or Thetford, Westwick, Brayes, and 
NoRTHWic OR Norwich. 

The account following is mostly taken from Blomefield, who treats of 
this manor in his History of Norfolk under the head Thetford. 

Halwick Manor was given to the priory of the monks of Thetford by 
Roger Bigot, their founder, and in 1286 it was found to be of the annual value 
of 20 marks, the prior holding it by the service of finding two foot soldiers for 
service in the wars in Wales for 40 days together. The gift of Bigot was 
confirmed by King Hen. I., who further granted to the prior free warren 
in all his lands here. The manor remained with the monastery until its 
dissolution, and on coming to the Crown was granted by King Henry VHI. 
in 1539, among other large possessions and the site of the monastery, to 
Thomas, Duke of Norfolk, and his heirs in exchange for certain other manors. 
Upon the attainder of the Duke shortly after the 8th King Henry's death, 
the manor was seized into the King's hands, and remained in the Crown 
tUl the first year of Edw. VI., when it was granted to Edward, Duke of 
Somerset, who immediately after disposed of it to Sir Richard Fulmerston 
and his heirs. Upon the Duke's death in 1554 Thomas, his grandson, 
being restored in blood, Blomefield states that he (Thomas) had livery 
of the inheritance of his grandfather, notwithstanding the former grants, 
and among others of this manor, but Martin, in his History of Thetford, 
gives the transcript of an indenture which discloses an arrangement in 
the nature of a compromise between the Duke and Fulmerston, and as it 
shows so clearly the particular possessions of the Duke here, we venture 
to set it forth at length : — 

" Indenture between Thomas Duke of Norfolk Earl Marshall of England, 
next heir of Thomas Duke of Norfolk his grandfather deceased of the one 
part and Richard Fulmerstone of the other part : reciting. That whereas 
King Edward VI . by colour of a supposed act of attainder of the late Duke made 
38 Hen. VIII. by divers letters patent &c. gave &c. unto divers of his 
subjects, divers manors, lands, and tenements of the said Duke ; which 
attainder was declared void by act of parliament made the first of Mary, 
Yet as well the said Duke as the said Richard, amongst other the patentees, 
grantees &c. of such part of the possessions of the said late Duke as were 
so granted to them by the late King Henry, or King Edward, and the assigns 
of the said patentees did submit themselves unto the order and arbitrement 
of Stephen late Bishop of Winchester, Henry Earl of Arundel, Sir William 
Peter Knight, Sir Edward Waldgrave Knight, of and upon the premises : — 
which arbitrators made an award of the premises dated the last day of 
April I Mary. In accomplishment whereof, and to avoid all doubts that 



198 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

may arise between the said Duke and the said Richard concerning the 
premises, it is agreed between the said parties as follows : — the said Richard 
granteth that he and his wife Alice, shall, during the space of seven years, 
do all reasonable acts. Sec, for the assuring to the duke, his heirs, etc., the 
liberty of warren and foldcourse, called Bowdsling (if the same have been, 
or ought to have been, parcel of Westwick warren in Suffolk, and also of 
the Manor of Halwick in Thetford in Norfolk and Suffolk) and all the lands, 
tenements, &c., called Halwick and Earls weather ; and also the pasture 
for 400 sheep in Westwick warren, called the Lodge Flock : and also all 
those marshes, and a close of land, a meadow nigh unto Swan's Close in 
Thetford, some time belonging to the monks ; and all the manor of Croxton, 
late parcel of the monks in Thetford, and, before that, of the surrendered 
abbey of Sibton in Suffolk ; and also all those lands, meadows, fold- 
courses, &c., called Blacdon Canons, Blacdon Shifts, Bray's Pasture, and 
Norwic, with their appurtenances, now or late in the tenure of the said 
Richard, lying in Croxton, Thetford, and Tofts ; also the manor of Lindford, 
formerly belonging to the monks ; also the manor of Downham Mersies, 
late Thomas Baggets, gentleman ; and the foldcourse called the Thorn-flock, 
there and in Thetford, part of which flock, for 400 sheep, was the monks 
of Thetford, and the rest belonged to Downham Mersies manor, and the 
scite and house of the monastery of Thetford, also of the scite 
of the manor of Halwick, some time belonging to the monks ; and 
the lands called the Vanary and Grange, to the said monks also belonging ; 
and the house called the Dairy-house, next to the said monastery ; also 
Halwick meadow, and all other the possessions of the late Duke Thomas 
deceased, in Thetford, Croxton, Tofts, Santon, Stanford, and Linford in 
Norfolk and Thetford, and Downham in Suffolk (excepted always out of 
such assurance to the said Richard, all that sheep pasture called Bowdsling 
and the lands called Mersies lands, in the said sheep pasture) other the 
liberty of Warren, and feed for conies in the said fold-course called Bowd- 
sling, as ought to be parcel of Westwick Warren, Broad Meadow in Thetford, 
Sixteen Acres, Castle Meadow, the scite of St. Margaret's Chapel, and one 
acre of land near to it ; the feeding of one hundred ewe sheep in the Bottom 
flock, late parcel of the Canons ; all the lands, tenements, &c., called Cote- 
ground ; and Sibton Pasture in Croxton, Stanford, and Wretham ; and one 
meadow eight acres in Thetford, late in the occupation of Thomas Judy, 
lying near Broad Meadow ; and one meadow twelve acres next Judy's 
meadow ; two pieces of meadow, one acre between Nun's Bridges near 
Castle Mill ; ten acres of arable land in the occupation of John Allen ; the 
Castle-yard, enclosed with stone walls ; Spigotte Meadow ; a parcel of 
ground, with a barn thereon, and thirty acres of land in Thetford, late in the 
tenure of John Basinwaite, and Calk-pit Garden ; all which premises 
(except as before excepted) by these indentures, have been assigned, 
limited, and appointed to be assured to the said duke that now is his heirs, 
and assignes for ever. And further the said Richard covenants with the 
said duke, that he will acquit and bear harmless the said duke, his heirs 
and assigns ; and all the said premises (except; &c.) against all former 
bargains, sales, &c., done by the said Richard, or his assent (except such 
title of dower as the third) which Alice the wife of the said Richard may 
have therein ; and also except leases for twenty-one years, or for four 
years, and grants by copy of court-roll made of any part of the premises, 
whereupon the old rents to be reserved and yearly payable during the same 
leases and grants ; and that the said Richard, within two years, shall give 
unto the said duke, &c., all those letters patent, deeds, &c., which concern 



THETFORD. 199 

the premises to be assigned to the said duke made by king Edward VI., 
and also all court-rolls, rentalls, &c., concerning the above manor ; and 
also copies of other letters patent, &c. Whereas the said duke is indebted 
to the said Richard in three thousand pounds, the said Richard hereby 
releases him of the same by these presents. And in accomplishment of 
the said award, &c., the said duke doth sell to the said Richard the manors 
of Elden and Stanes, which were the said late duke's, and the tenement 
called Wallers or Walters, and the advowson, &c., also Snareshill manor 
warren, &c., with the appurtenances and all other his lands and tenements 
in Snareshill and Elden ; also two pieces of land called Snareshill Yard 
and Whittle Yard, also White Yard, and a meadow called Fortypenny 
Meadow in SnaresMU ; a meadow containing five acres, sometime belonging 
to the nuns, with the fishing in Snareshill River, &c. (the boundaries of 
Snareshill Manor and Warren), and Bishop's Mill and Melford Mill in Thet- 
ford ; also the said meadow called Broad meadow, sixteen acres, Castle 
Meadow ; scite of St. Margaret's Chapel, with one acre of land adjoining ; 
Bowdsling Sheep course, and Mersies lands in Bowdsling ; the feeding of 
one hundred ewe sheep in Bottom flock. Cote-ground, and Sibton in Croxton; 
Judy's meadow eight acres, and another meadow twelve acres ; the two 
pieces between Nun's Bridges, and ten acres of arable land : the Castle 
Yard, Spigot meadow, and the said parcel of ground, with a barn, thirty 
acres of land, and Calkpit garden, with all the liberties, &c., thereof, to hold 
to the said Richard &c. for ever. The said duke covenants to do all acts 
for seven years of the premises hereby bargained and sold, and also 
covenants to do all acts &c. to secure to the said Richard all the 
possessions of the late dissolved Canons and Westwick, and the Lows 
thereto adjoining &c. and that within two years he will deliver to the 
said Richard aU evidences &c., and copies of others &c., and that the said 
Duke will pay all rents and tenths to the King for ever, except fifty-four 
shillings per annum for the manors of Elden and Stanes, which the said 
Richard agrees to pay. And that the said Duke shall do all acts &c. for 
the better performance of the covenants ; and that the said Duke shall 
within two months after request made to him, make good lease to the said 
Richard of all the manors lands &c. hereinbefore limited by the said Duke, 
&c., and also of the manor of Westwick, with the appurtenances in Norfolk 
and Suffolk, and Westwick Warren to hold to the said Richard for twenty- 
one years with other corroborating covenants, &c." This is taken from an 
original parchment copy formerly in the possession of the said Thomas Martin. 
Sir Richard Fulmerston was a great benefactor to Thetford, and he lies 
interred in the church of St. Mary's there under a large tomb of freestone. 
The chapel, in which is the tomb, is only a partition made of steelwork 
out of the upper end of the north aisle of the church. The tomb is about 
8 feet 4 inches in length and 3 feet 4 inches in breadth, and 4 feet high, 
upon it being the following inscription in capitals : — 

IN . MEMORIAM . RICHARDI. FVLMERSTON . EQVITIS . AVRATI . 
DOMIN.1EQVE . ALICIE . VXORIS . EJVS . HEREDIS . IPSIVS . RI- 
CARDI . MARITVS . EDWARDVS . CLERE . ARMIGER . HOC . 
TVMVLVM . EREXIT . ANNO . DOM . I567. 

Under that in larger characters : — 

TRANSIT SICVT FVLMERSTON GLORIA MVNDI. 
At the feet are these words, much defaced : — 

PROPITIETUR DEVS ANIMABVS MORTVORVM. 



200 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

Gere's arms and crest at the head and feet ; and over one coat at the 
head clere, impaUng Fulmerston, over which tl. fl. on the south side 
arms of Fulmerston. In Martin's day the tomb was hid by pews, except 
the slab and west end. 

From the time of this arrangement the fee of the manor has always 
been in the Norfolk family, though sometimes in trustees', mortgagees', 
and lessees' hands. About the time of the arrangement with Fulmerston 
the scite of the monks commonly called " the Abby," with the Manors of 
Halwyh, Brayes, and Norwich were valued at £23. 6s. 3d., the Manor of 
Westwick at ^^31. 3s. 4d., the Castle Mill at £8. 13s. ^d., the Pit Mill at 
jf5. 6s. M., the free farm rents and pentions at £7. 4s. ^d., and the 
rectories of St. Mary's and St. Nicholas's at nothing, because they were in 
decay. 

In 1603 Thomas Howard, Earl of Suffolk, and Henry Howard, Earl of 
Northampton, settled on John Holland and other trustees the Manors of 
Westwick, Halwich, &c., and in 1604 they purchased of Sir Edward Clere, 
Knt., " to the use of the said Earls and their heirs, the scite of the canons, and 
of Mason Dieu, with the feed and common of pasture for 12 milch cows 
or neat and a bull, with their followers in Faverton Field, Baxters, and 
Thorro Grounds in Westwick, in Thetford and Downham, together with the 
waters, fishing, and keeping of swans in Thetford River, and the common 
pasture, soyle, turbary, reed bruary, and pasture for great cattle on the 
heaths and lawns of Westwick and Downham aforesaid, and all commons, 
profits and privileges, to the late dissolved monastery of canons and Mason 
Dieu and scites thereof, belonging and appertaining, together with the 
fairs, called Canons Fairs," which were then worth ,^3 per annum. In 1641 
the manor was settled on Thomas, Earl of Arundel and Surrey, and his 
heirs. 

In 1642 Lionel, Earl of Middlesex, Henry, Lord Peirpoint, Edward, 
Lord Newburgh, Sir William Pla3^ers, Knt. and Bart., and Sir Richard 
Onslow, Knt., held their first court as trustees. 

In 1682 Francis, Lord Howard of Effingham, and his trustees, granted 
a lease of their royalty of fishing in the River Viessy, alias Ouze the Less, 
running through the town of Thetford extending from Melford Bridge to 
Thetford Bridge upon the said river, for 20 years, at los. per annum. 

In 1691 the Honourable Henry Howard, brother and heir-apparent 
of Thomas, Duke of Norfolk, held his first court. 

In 1701 Thomas, Duke of Norfolk, held his first court, and some time 
after conveyed the manor to the Honourable Philip Howard, his youngest 
brother. 

The customs of all the manors in Thetford are that the eldest son is 
heir j the free tenants pay a year's free rent at any death by way of relief. 
There is, however, but very little copyhold. 

Amongst the Harleian MSS. in the British Museum is a deed relating 
to the Manor of Thetford between Thomas Allen and Thomas Saunders 
and John Child.' 



'Harl. 4115.; 




TUDDENHAM. 201 

TUDDENHAM. 

MANOR was held here in Saxon times by Canute, a freeman 
under Earl Algar, and consisted of 3 carucates of land, 6 
villeins, 4 serfs, 3 ploughteams in demesne and i^ belonging 
to the men, 3 acres of meadow, a mill, and a fishery, also 
a church with 30 acres, 11 beasts, and 200 sheep, the whole 
valued at £4. At the time of the Survey this manor was held 
by Eudo the steward, and the appurtenances were different. 
The villeins having later become 4 had increased again to 6, the serfs were 
reduced to i, the ploughteam in demesne after having become only half a 
team had risen again to 2 teams. The fishery had disappeared, there were 
10 horses at the hall and 40 hogs, and the sheep were reduced to 60, while 
the value was iocs. It was a league long and 6 quarentenes broad, and 
paid in a gelt 2od.^ 

Another estate was that of Leuric, a freeman under Earl Algar, and 
consisted of i J carucates of land, 2 villeins, 2 bordars, 2 serfs, a ploughteam 
in demesne and half belonging to the men, i| acres of meadow, a mill, 
and 160 sheep, valued at 40s. At the time of the Survey this estate was 
that of Frodo, the abbot's brother, and there were an additional 6 hogs, 
while the sheep were reduced to 80, the value being 60s. The soc and 
sac belonged to the Abbot of St. Edmunds." 

The only other estate here was that of Wisgar, Richard's predecessor, 
and consisted of ij carucates of land, 9 villeins, 2 ploughteams, and 1^ 
acres of meadow, rendering 50s. at the time of the Survey, being the estate 
of Richard, son of Earl Gislebert.^ 

Manor of Tuddenham cum Badgecrofts al. Hengrave's 

al. Shardelowe's. 

This was the estate of Canute, a freeman of Earl Algar, in the Con- 
fessor's time, and the estate which Eudo Dapifer owned at the time of 
the Survey. In 1236 it was apparently the lordship of Eborard de Trum- 
pington, who granted half a fee by fine to William de Knapwell or Snapewells 
and Sara his wife. The Testa de Nevill states that Sara de Knapwell 
held half a knight's fee in Tuddenham of William de Kentwell, and he of 
the King.* Later we find the manor vested in John de Leyham, and his 
successor, Peter de Leyham, sold or gave it to Sir Thomas de Hemegrave,' 
son and heir of William de Hemegrave. It was given with the manor to be 
held of Peter de Leyham by the service of two knights' fees, and at the 
time William de Clara held £4 of land in Tuddenham of the manor by the 
service of half a knight's fee and 2od. for a scutage of 40s., and the other 
tenants gave 32s. id. for scutage. Sir Thomas de Hemegrave died in 1264." 

In 1288 Roger de Trumpeton appears as lord, dying in 1289/ but 
possibly as trustee only ; for in 13 16 the manor was certainly vested in 
Sir Edmund de Hemegrave, son and heir of Sir Thomas de Hemegrave. 
Sir Edmund was High Sheriff for Norfolk and Suffolk in 1321 and governor 
of Norwich Castle. He died 9th Sept. 1334, when the manor passed to 
his son and heir. Sir Thomas de Hemegrave, who died 3rd May, 1349, ^^^ 
was buried in the church of the Black Friars, at Yarmouth, being succeeded 

'Dom. ii. 402. 'See Manor of Hengrave and Leo's Hall 
"Dom. ii. 355. in Westley, Thingoe Hundred. 

3 Dom. ii. 392. ^I.P.M., 48 Hen. III. 21 or file 30 (17). 

*T. de N. 292. ^I.P.M., 17 Edw. I. 13, 



202 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

by his son and heir, Sir Edmund de Hemegrave.' Mr. Gage-Rokewode, in 
his History of Thingoe Hundred, mentions a deed dated at Tudenham 
in 1352 whereby this Sir Edmund de Hemegrave conveyed to Richard 
de Brews, Thomas de Shardelowe, Edmund de Thorpe, knights, and other 
trustees, his Manors of Hemegrave, Tudenham, Westle, and other property. 
He was one of the knights returned to Parhament for the counties of Nor- 
folk and Suffolk in 1372. He married ist Joan, cousin and heir of James 
de Cockfield, and 2ndly Alice, daughter of John de LTsle.^ His will is 
dated in Vig. S. Laurentii, 1379/ and he died the day following, when 
the manor passed to his only surviving son. Sir Thomas de Hemegrave,* 
whose will is dated 12th Aug. 1419. He died 17th Oct. following, his son 
Edmund de Hemegrave having predeceased him in 1417 without issue. 

It seems that Sir Thomas de Hemegrave had in his lifetime sold the 
reversion in this manor to William Ampleford, and in his will he bequeaths 
to 24 of his poor tenants of his Manor of " Todenham " 40s. His widow Joan 
died in 1421, and directs in her will that her 2nd husband, Richard Vewetre, 
should have the disposition as he thought fit of the moneys arising from 
the sale of the Manor of " Tudenham," which had been sold to William Ample- 
ford. The will was apparently executed under the influence of her husband, 
Richard Vewetre, and by constraint, for by a testamentary disposition she 
solemnly protested against her former will.' William Ampleford, the 
purchaser of this manor, held in 1428, but before 1475 it had passed to 
Thomas Wellys, of Upwell, in Norfolk, son of William Wellys and Alice 
his wife, daughter and heir of John, son of Robert Cavendish. 

Amongst the early deeds preserved in the Record Office is one dated 
1475, which is a release by Thomas Heigham the elder, of Heigham, to this 
Thomas Wellys of all his right in all the lands and tenements, &c., with 
foldage in Tudenham which formerly belonged to Robert Shardelowe, 
Knt.^ This same year Thomas Wellys made a settlement of the manor, 
for amongst the same series of deeds is a feoffment by him to John Wellys 
his son. Master John Selst, archdeacon of Sudbury, Master Thomas Cooke, 
rector of Upwell ; John Clopton, William Clopton his son, Thomas Higham 
the younger. Sir WiUiam Redycke, rector of Outwell, Master William 
Dunthorn, and Sir John Stonham, of "Tudenham" Manor and advowson.'' 
Thomas Wellys the settler died in 1477.^ John Wellys the son died 14th 
Feb. 1481-2, and the surviving feoffees of the settlement enfeoffed his 
son and heir, Thomas Welles, and Lucy his wife, daughter of Robert Wyset, 
and the heirs of their bodies, with remainder to the said Thomas Welles in 
fee.' The manor and advowson in 1495 were said to be worth £6. 13s. 4^. 
and were held of Thomas, Earl of Ormond, as of the Manor of Leyham 
by. fealty and 3s. ^d. rent. 

In 1548 Edmund Smyth was lord, and from him the manor passed to 
Robert Smyth. We meet with two fines of the manor to which these two 
individuals are parties. The first was levied in 1553 by William Underbill 

'I.P.M., 23 Edw. III. 166. will is dated in 1373, and it was 

= Will I2th Aug., proved 19th Jan. 1401. proved 29th March, 1374. 

3 See Manor of Mutford, in Mutford 5 Gage's Thingoe, p. 177. 

Hundred. 615 Edw. IV. A. 5355. 

4 His eldest son, Sir Edmund, had married 7 15 Edw. IV. A. 9147. 

Mary, daughter and coheir of Sir sj.p.M., 17 Edw. IV. 11. 
Thomas Felton, but died without sl.p.M., 10 Hen. VII. 1017. 
issue in his father's lifetime. His 



TUDDENHAM.' 



203 



and others against Edmund Smyth and others/ and the second in 1581 
by Robert Smyth against Michael Goodwyn and others." 

Amongst the Chancery Proceedings will be found an action by this 
Robert Smyth against Joh;n Reeves and John Norman for discovery as to 
premises parcel of this manor to which the defendants claimed to be 
admitted on an alleged surrender.^ Robert Smyth died in 1590 or 1598, 
when the manor devolved on his daughters and coheirs Mary and Jane, 
the former married to Charles Lovell. 

By 1698 the manor appears to have passed to John Hervey, son of Sir 
Thomas Hervey, M.P., who this yfear presented to the living. He was 
created 19th Oct. 1714, Earl of Bristol, and presented to the living in 1745. 
From this time the manor has descended in the same course as the Manor of 
Ickworth, in Thingoe Hundred, and is now vested in Frederick William Lane 
Hervey, 4th Marquis and Earl of Bristol, Earl Jermyn, and Baron Hervey, 
of Ickworth, the present lord. 

Arms of Welles : Sa. a lion rampant Or. Of Smyth : Az. a bend 
Arg. betw. 7 billets Or. 4 and 3. 

Manor of Banstead or Benstead's. 

The first lord we meet with of this manor is Thomas de Burgh who held 
of the Earl of Gloucester. The next lord we meet with is Edmimd de 
Benstede or Benstead, who was dead in 1334. He was the son of Sir John 
de Benstede, a Justice of the Common Pleas in 1310, in 1314 summoned 
to Parliament as a Baron of the Realm, and died in 1323. Edmund de 
Benstead was succeeded in the lordship by his son and heir, John de 
Benstead. He died in 1359, during the minority of his two sons, John and 
Edward, and the manor passed to his son and heir, John de Benstead, who 
died without issue in 1368, when the manor devolved on his brother and 
heir, Sir Edward Benstead, who attained 21 the 25th Jan. 1377, and on his 
death in 1432* passed to his son and heir, Sir Edmund Benstead, who dying 
gth Feb. 1439, the manor devolved on his grandson and heir. Sir John 
Benstead, son of Sir Edmund's eldest son Ralph, who had died in his 
father's Ufetime. Sir John Benstead died 20th July, 1471." The manor 
was then held of the Honor of Clare. He was succeeded by his son and 
heir, WiUiam Benstead, against whom a fine was levied in 1484 by John 
Wyndham, John Paston, Roger Drury, Henry L'Estrange, John Garneys, 
Robert Drury, Richard Coote, William Hervy, and John Busshop,^ and 
the said William Benstead died 23rd Nov. the following year at the age of 
31 without issue, when the manor passed to his aunt and heir Eleanor. 
In 1540 the manor was included in a fine levied by Henry Payne and others 
against Sir William Drury and others.'' This fine included lands in Tudden- 
ham, Ashfield, Wetherden, and elsewhere. In 1548 and 1558 we find the 
manor vested in John Pleasaunce (2nd son of William Pleasaunce, of 
Tuddenham), who married Agnes, daughter of Edmond Boldero, of Forn- 
ham, and died seised in 157-, when it passed to his son and heir, Thomas 
Pleasaunce. He married Grisell, daughter of William Humerston, of 
Dunwich, and a fine was levied of the manor in 1600 by Anthony Drury and 
others against this Thomas Pleasaunce, no doubt on some settlement,^ 



' Fine^ Mich, i Mary. 

2 Fine, Easter, 23 Eliz. 

3C.P. iii. 43. 

^I.P.M., II Hen. VI. 38, Extent. 



5LP.M., II Edw. IV. 57. 
«Feet of Fines, i Rich. III. 
''Fine, Trin. 32 Hen. VIII. 
'^Fine, Mich. 42-43 Eliz. 



20. 



204 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

for Thomas died seised of it in 1609, and was succeeded by his son and 
heir, William Pleasaunce. He married Ann, daughter of Anthony Drury, 
of Besthorpe, in Norfolk, and on his death was succeeded by his son and 
heir, Thomas Pleasaunce. A Thomas Pleasaunce and Anthony Pleasaunce, 
of Tuddenham, were admitted at Caius College 9th Feb. 1591-2.' 

The manor later passed to Thomas Shelley, and he died seised of it in 
1680, and also of the Manor of Netherhall, in Thetford, and was buried in the 
chancel of Tuddenham St. Mary's church, where 15 years later Frances 
his widow, daughter and heir of Edward Asty, was laid by his side. The 
manor passed to their daughter and heir Frances, who married Henry 
GoldweU, one of the burgesses of St. Edmund's Bury. He died in 1693, 
and she survived until 1712, both being buried at Tuddenham. In 1832 
this manor and the Manor of Netherhall, with the fines (which were stated 
to be arbitrary), quit rents, and royalties, and 818 acres, sold for 11,850 
guineas.'' 

Arms of Benstead : Gu. 3 bars gemelles Or. Of Pleasaunce : 
Sable, a cross Ermine between four escallops Argent. 

Manor of Netherhall. 

This manor, like the main manor, was granted in 1236 by fine by 
Eborard de Trumpinton to William de Snapersell or Snaperevell and Sara 
his wife, and in 1289 was vested in Roger de Trumpinton. Later we find 
the manor in John de Frevile, who died in 1312.^ There is an order on the 
Close Rolls this year directed to the escheator not to intermeddle with the 
manor, it appearing that John de " Frivell," tenant in chief, and his wife 
Eleanor were jointly enfeoffed and held of Aymer de Valencia, Earl of 
Pembroke.* The manor on the death of Eleanor passed to her son and 
heir, Richard Freville, who seems to have died about 1325,' for the manor 
this year had passed to John de Freville, as on the Close Rolls we find an 
order to deliver to Mary, late wife of Aymer de Valencia, Earl of Pem- 
broke, in dower, a moiety of a fee in Tuddenham " held by John de 
Frevyll."' 

In 1370 a fine was levied of the manor by John Trace, of Multon juxta 
Kentford, Walter Cliter, and William de Metton, against Sir John 
" Freyle," of Parva Shelford, and Elena his wife,^ and in 1386 the manor 
was apparently vested in John atte Lane and Beatrice his wife, for this 
year a fine was levied against them by John Bachecroft and Margaret his 
wife, to whom the manor then passed.* 

In the next century the manor vested in Sir Thomas Tudenham, from 
whom on his death in 1461' it passed to his sister and heir Margaret, married 
to Edmund Bedingfield." She died in 1475," when the manor went to her 
grandson. Sir Thomas Bedingfield, and on his death, 15th March, 1538,'* 
passed to his brother and heir, Robert Bedingfield. The manor continued 
in the Bedingfield family as the Manor of Great BeaUngs, in Carlford 
Hundred, until 1585, when it was acquired from Edmund Bedingfield by 
Robert Yong.'^ 

'E.A. (N.S.) ii. 41. 7 Feet of Fines, 44 Edw. JII. 14. 

'Ipswich Journal, nth Feb. 1832. speet of Fines, 10 Rich. II. 12. 

3I.P.M., 6 Edw. II. 54. 9I.P.M., 5 Edw. IV. 34. 

■♦Close Rolls, 6 Edw. II. 22. "See Manor of Eriswell, in this Hundred. 



5 1.Q.D., 18 Edw. II. 81, 166 ; N.R. File " I.P.M., 15 Edw. IV. 38. 
174. 15; lb. File 178, II. "I.P.M., 31 Hen. VIII. 5. 

Close Rolls, 18 Edw. II. 14. '3 Fine, Trin. 27 Eliz. 



6 



TUDDENHAM. 205 

In 1680 Thomas Shelley died seised of the manor, when it passed 
to his daughter and heir Frances, married to Henry Goldwell. This is 
probably the manor which Page refers to when he says the Rev. George 
Boldero, late of Ixworth, held a manor and freehold estate in this 
(Tuddenham) parish which were purchased by the Rev. Thomas Ellis 
Rogers, rector of Hessett and Lackford. 

Arms of Frevile : Gu. 3 crescents Erm. 2 and i. 




2o6 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

WANGFORD. 

MANOR was held here in Saxon times by the Abbot of 
St. Edmunds. It consisted of 2 carucates of landj 4 villeins, 
4 bordarSj 5 serfs, 2 ploughteams in demesne and i 
belonging to the men, and 8 acres of meadow. Of live 
stock there were 5 rouncies, 18 beasts, 26 hogs, 20 score 
and 13 sheep, and at the time of the Survey 2 hives of bees. 
Also there was a church with 15 acres of free land. The 
value was 40s., and at the time of the Survey, when it was held of the abbot 
by Ulwart, the value was 60s. It was a league in length and 5 quarentenes 
in breadth, and paid in a gelt 6d. Others had holdings therein.' 

The other estate here was that of 4 socmen with the soc under Wisgar, 
and consisted of a carucate of land, a bordar, a ploughteam among them 
all, and 3 acres of meadow, valued at los. [They] belonged to Deseling. 
At the time of the Survey this holding was that of Richard, son of Earl 
Gislebert.'" 

Manor of Wangford or Wangford Grange. 

This was the estate of Ulwart under the Abbot of St. Edmunds at 
the time of the Great Survey, and it passed in the same line of descent from 
this Ulwart to Katharine Cokerell, who died 10 Hen. VI. without issue, as 
the lordship of Ickworth, in Thingoe Hundred. Land here is mentioned 
in the inquis. p.m. in the time of Hen. III. of Philip de Ikeworth.^ In 
1253 free warren was granted to Thomas de Ickeworthe here.* In 1337 a 
fine of the manor and advowson was levied by Thomas de Ikeworth and 
Joan his wife against the parson of Ouseden church and Ralph de Ouesden, 
chaplain.' Amongst the Harleian Charters is a deed by which John Bolt, 
parson of the church of Hemptone, quits claim to William le Hore, Robert 
de Kodytone, Geoffrey de Hovedene, and Richard le Whyte, of all right in 
the Manor of Waiunford (presumably this manor) and the advowson of the 
church of Wanford. The deed is dated " die Martis pp. fest. S. Trin. 50 
Edw. III." [1376]. An extent of the manor and church is given in the 
inquis. p.m. of Katherine, wife of John Cokerell, in 1428." In 1435 will 
be found amongst the Early Chancery Proceedings in the Record Office 
three suits respecting the Manor of Wangford and the reversion of the 
Manor of Ickworth, all by John Brockley, alderman of London, claiming to 
be heir of Katharine, late wife of John Cokerell. The first is against John 
Bonde.'' The second is against William Drurye, Knt., William Sekynton, 
clerk, Piers Audeley, and others;^ and the third is against the said Sir 
William Drurye, Knt., William Sekyngton, clerk, James Andrewe, Stephen 
Wedryngsete, Esmond Shroul, and Piers Audeley, described as late feoffees 
to uses of the manors, stated to have been obtained by George Heth as being 
son of Agnes, sister of Katherine, late wife of John Cokerell. The plaintiff, 
John Brockley, in his last suit is described as " son of Agnes, daughter of 
Alexander, son of Agnes, sister of Thomas, father of Thomas, father of 
Katherine, late the wife of John Cokerell, mother of John, father of 
Katherine, who died in the King's ward.'" 

In 1461 the manor was vested in Sir Thomas Tudenham, who by his 
will dated 22nd Feb. this year" directed it to be sold by John, Lord Wenlock, 

'Dom. ii. 3586. "I.P.M., 6 Hen. VI. 23; 7 Hen. VI. 63. 

•Dom. ii. 392. ''E.C.P. 14 Hen. VI. Bundle 9, 316. 

^I.P.M., t. Hen. III. 164. 'E.C.P. Bundle 12, 165. 
♦Chart. Rolls, 37-38 Hen. III. pt. ii. lol ^E.C.P. Bundle 68, 14. 

5 Feet oi Fines, 11 Edw. III. 6. "Proved 23rd Oct. 1461. 



WANGFORD. 207 

but we find amongst the Patent Rolls the same year the appointment of a 
person by the Crown to take into the King's hands this manor and the 
advowson of the church said to be "late of Sir Thomas Tudenham, a rebel.'" 
The manor was acquired by Ralph Shelton,' who died in 1499, when it went 
to his widow Margaret for life, and on her death i6th Jan. 1499, passed to 
their son and heir, Sir John Shelton,^ who died in 1539. The manor was 
acquired from John Shelton in 1541 by Sir John Croftes, of Little Saxham, 
son of John Croftes, of Westow,* who levied a fine against John Drury in 
1547,^ and had in 1554 a fine levied against himself by Lady Alice Burghe 
and others.^ Sir John died 15th Jan. 1557-8,^ when the manor passed to 
his son and heir, Edmund Croftes, of Little Saxham and Westow, who died 
14th Feb. 1557.° Ill the inquis. p.m. taken after the death of Sir John 
and Edmund Croftes, hi,s son, 4th June, 1558, at Stowmarket, the jurors 
found that the said Edmund was seised of the Manors of Wangford, Hake- 
beche, and Cryppyngs, and the advowson of Wangford and liberty of two 
f aldayes or right of setting up folds there, and of a manor called Flemyngs 
in fee tail to him and his heirs by Eleanor his wife deceased, and that the 
said Manors of Wangford, &c., were held of the King and Queen as of their 
barony of St. Edmunds by half a knight's fee, and were worth per annum 
;fio. And the Manor of Flemynges was held of John Sulyard, knight, as 
of his Manor of Haughley by a yearly rent of 18 pence, by what services 
they knew not, and worth per annum £6. 13s. 4^. On Edmund Croftes's 
death the manor passed to the eldest son of his 2nd marriage, John Croftes, 
of Wangford, who dying 26th Dec. 1561, without issue, the manor went 
to his sister and heir Margaret, married to John Southwell, of Barham, in 
Norfolk, who in 1564 levied a fine of the manor and advowson.' On 
Margaret Southwell's death the manor passed to her sister Alicia, who died 
unmarried. The manor was then acquired by John Doubs, who died 
seised of it in 1577, when it passed to his daughter and heir Anne, who with 
her husband, William Barwich, sold the manor in 1597 to Thomas Wrighte, 
of Kilverstone, in Norfolk, and others.'" 

Thomas Wrighte married Jane, daughter of John Jermyn, of Depden, 
by Anne his 2nd wife, daughter of Sir Robert Drury, of Hawstead, and 
was succeeded by his son and heir, Jermyn Wright, who married Anne, 
daughter of Richard Butchcroft, of Bexwell, in Norfolk, and dying in 1681 
the manor devolved on his son and heir. Sir Robert Wright, who resided 
at Wangford Hall. He was first one of the Judges of the Common Pleas, 
and afterwards in the reign of J as. H. Chief Justice of the King's Bench. 
Sir Robert married ist Dorothy, daughter of Thomas Moor, of St. Qer man' s, 
Wigenhale, Norfolk, who died without issue, and was buried there m"i552. 
His 2nd wife was Susan, daughter of Matthew Wren, Bishop of Ely, by whom 
he had a son Robert, who emigrated to South Carolina, and three daughters. 
His 3rd wife was Elizabeth, daughter of Sir William Scroggs, Lord Chief 
Justice of the King's Bench. Sir Robert Wright died i8th Jan. 1689," 
when the manor went to his son and heir, Robert Wright. The manor was 
later acquired by Sir John Holt. He was the son of Sir Thomas Holt, of 
Reading, Berks, serjeant-at-law, a Bencher of Gray's Inn, and Recorder of 

'Pat. Rolls, I Edw. IV. pt. v. 16. 5 Fine, Trin. i Edw. VI. 

'See Manor of Brent Eleigh, in Babergh «Fine, Mich. 2 Mary I. 

Hundred. 5'I.P.M., 4 and 5 P. and M. 54. 

3 1.P.M., 18 Hen. VII. 83. « i.p.M., 4 and 5 P. and M. 21. 

4 See Manor of West Stow, in Blackbourn s Fine, 6 Eliz. 13. 

Hundred; Fine, Easter, 33 Hen. '°Fine, Easter, 39 Eliz. 

VIII. "D.N.B. Ixiii. 125. 



2o8 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

Abingdon, in the grammar school of which town he had been educated. 
He was knighted i6th April, 1679, and buried in St. James's, Clerkenwell, 
in 1686, leaving by Susan his wife, daughter of John Peacock, of Cumnor, Berks, 
two sons — Sir John, the purchaser of this manor, and Rowland Holt, both 
lawyers of eminence. Sir Thomas Holt was a descendant of Ralph Holt, 
of Grislehurst, co. Lancaster, by Ellen his wife, daughter and coheir of 
John Sumpter, of Essex, by Margaret, daughter and sole heir of Jeffry 
BrokhuU, being son of Rowland, son of John, son of John, son of Francis, 
son of Sir Thomas, son of Ralph, son of John, son of the said Ralph Holt. 
The last-mentioned John Holt had married Isabell, daughter and heir of 
John Abraham, of Abraham, co. Lincoln. 

Sir John Holt, the purchaser of the manor, was Lord Chief Justice of 
the King's Bench in 1689, and admitted a member of the Privy Council 
the same year. Perhaps of all the judges in the annals of English History 
Sir John Holt gained the highest reputation merely by the exercise of 
judicial functions. He was not a statesman like Clarendon, he was not a 
philosopher like Bacon, he was not an orator like Mansfield ; yet he fills 
nearly as great a space in the eye of posterity, and some enthusiastic lovers 
of jurisprudence regard him with higher veneration than any English judge 
who preceded him. The respect in which he was held by all is strongly 
shown when William 111. ascending the throne was desirous of elevating to the 
Bench the most upright lawyers to be found in the country. After great 
deliberation the plan adopted was that every privy councillor should bring 
in a list of the twelve persons he thought to be the fittest twelve judges, 
and that the individuals who had the greatest number of votes should be 
appointed. It is a curious fact that whatever variety appeared in the lists 
all agreed in first presenting the name of Sir John Holt, and he was 
accordingly appointed Chief Justice of the King's Bench. He was the 
first judge to lay down the doctrine that the status of slavery cannot exist 
in England, and that as soon as a slave breathes the air of England he is 
free. He also did away with the practice of trying prisoners in fetters, and 
on his suggestion an Act was passed allowing witnesses called for a prisoner 
to be examined on oath. When Will. HI. in 1700 took the Great Seal 
from Lord Somers who refused voluntarily to resign it, the King sent for Sir 
John Holt to Hampton Court, and showing him the " bauble " offered 
immediately to deliver it into his hands with the title of Lord Chancellor, a 
peerage to follow. The royal astonishment was great when Holt 
pronounced these memorable words : "I feel highly honoured by your 
Majesty's gracious offer, but all the time I was at the bar I never had more 
than one cause in chancery, and that I lost, so that I cannot think myself 
qualified for so great a trust." The King in vain attempted to shake his 
resolution ; all that Holt could be induced to promise at the interview was 
that if there should be a necessity for putting the Great Seal into commission 
for a short time, he would act as one of the Lords Commissioners. Sir 
John Holt married Anne, daughter of — Cropley, of Clerkenwell, sister of 
Sir John Cropley,' Bart., and died without issue at his residence in Bedford 
Row, 5th March, 1709-10, when the manor descended through the Holts 
in the same course as the Manor of Hinderclay, in Blackbourn Hundred. 
The manor seems to have become extinct, but in 1885 Wangford Hall and 
half the parish belonged to WilUam Angerstein, of Westing Hall, who in 
1896 was stated to have the manor. All the land in the parish now belongs 
to Lord Iveagh, of Elvedon Hall. In 1827 the manor with other property 

' She died 25th Jan. 1712, and was buried at Redgrave. 



WANGFORD. 



209 



was offered for sale. The sale was of " a freehold estate comprising the whole 
parish of Wangford and manor, containing upwards of 3,600 acres. The 
hall farm had 3,300 and the church farm 310 acres. The sale took place 
29th Nov. 1827, ^^^ the property (but stated to be 3,200 acres only) sold 
for £21,800.' 

There is amongst the Additional Charters in the British Museum a 
release of Wangford Manor and advowson in 1376.'' 

The hall is an ancient mansion house now occupied as a shooting box. 

Arms of Wright : Sable, a chevron, engrailed between three fleurs- 
de-lis. Or, on a chief of the 2nd, three spear heads, Azure. 

Manor of Hakbeck or Hagbeche. 

This was the lordship of Sir Adam de Hackbeck, of Hogbeach in 
Enneth, in Norfolk, in 1277. ^^ the i6th century the manor was vested 
in the Shelton family, and in 1541 in John Shelton, being acquired from 
him by Sir John Croftes that year.^ From Sir John it passed in the like 
course of descent to Alice Croftes, who died a spinster in 1563, when it was 
acquired by Robert Bedingfield. Davy states that in 1609 John Southwell 
was lord, but we find nothing further respecting this manor. Both the 
parties above mentioned as owners are associated in a fine levied of the 
manor in 1570, Robert Bedyngfeld and others being petitioners and John 
Southwell and others being deforciants.* 

Manor of Flemming's. 

This manor also was vested like the main manor in Sir John Croftes, 
who died 15th Jan. 1557-8, and it is specifically mentioned in his inquis. 
p.m.,^ and passed in the same line of descent to Alice Croftes, who died 
unmarried in 1563, in which year we find the manor, like the Manor of 
Hakbeck, vested in Robert Bedingfield. 

Manor of Crepping. 

The manor probably derived its name from a family holding here in 
the time of Hen. HI. 

In the Testa de Nevill we find that Alice, wife of William de Crippinges, 
held the eighth part of a fee of Bartholomew de Stanham, and Bartholomew 
of Earl Warren, in Wangford.^ 

This manor was acquired from John Shelton in 1541 by Sir John Croftes,'' 
who died in 1557-8, and passed in the same course as the Manor of Hakbeck 
so far as we are able to trace the same. 

The manor is included in the fine levied in 1570, as mentioned in the 
account of Hakbeck Manor, by Robert Bedyngfeld and others against 
John Southwell and others.' 



^Ipswich Journal, ist Dec. 1827. 
^Add. Ch. 5510. 
3 Fine, Easter, 33 Hen. VIII. 
*Fine, Easter, 12 Eliz. 

CI 



5I.P.M., 4 and 5 P- and M. 54. 
6T. de N. 292. 

7 Fine, Easter, 33 Hen. VIII. 
*Fine, Easter, 12 Eliz. 



210 



THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 




WORLINGTON. 

HE only holding in this place was that of Ormer, and con- 
sisted of 6 carucates of land^ i6 villeins, 6 bordars, 2 serfs, 
2 ploughteanis in demesne and 4 belonging to the men, 
12 acres of meadow, 2 fisheries, and a mill. There were also 
a church without land, a horse, 20 beasts (which were 
reduced to 8 at the time of the Survey), and 80 sheep (which 
were increased to 100). The value was formerly £6, and 
at the time of the Survey £8. It was 10 quarentenes long and 6 broad, 
and paid in a gelt 2od. The Domesday tenant was Frodo, the abbot's 
brother.' 

Manor of Worlington, Abergavenny otherwise Bergavenny. 

In the time of Hen. III. this manor was vested in Agnes de Rivill, 
whose daughter and heir married Ur. de Wichenton. He was succeeded by 
his son and heir, William de Wichenton, who enfeoffed William de Valence, 
Earl of Pembroke, 4th son of Hugh le Brun, Seigneur de Lusignan, in 
Poictou, in 1258. The Earl had a grant of a market and fair this year,^ 
and died 13th June, 1296, when the manor passed to his widow Joan, only 
daughter of Warine de Monchensy, of Swaneschamp, co. Kent, by Joan, 
sister and coheir of Anselm Marshal, Earl of Pembroke, and on her death 
in 1307 went to their 3rd son and surviving heir, Aylmer de Valence, 2nd 
Earl of Pembroke. From this time to 1375 the descent is the same as that 
of Reydon Manor, in Blything Hundred, until the death of John, Lord 
Hastings, 3rd Earl of Pembroke, in 1389, when Anne, widow of John de 
Hastings, 2nd Earl of Pembroke, had the manor assigned to her in dower. 
Land in Worlington and the manor we find specified in the inquis. p.m. of 
Adomarus de Valencia, Earl of Pembroke, and Maria his wife in 1323,^ of 
John de Hastynges the following year,* of Lawrence de Hastynges, Earl of 
Pembroke, in 1348,' of William de Hastynges, with extent, in 1349,* o^ J^^^ 
de Hastynges, Earl of Pembroke, in 1375,'' and of Anna, Countess of Pem- 
broke, wife of John de Hastynges, Earl of Pembroke, in 1383.' 

It is also mentioned on the Close Rolls in 1349, when an order was 
made to deliver to Agnes, late wife of Lawrence de Hastynges, the manor, 
to be held in dower, as she had besought the King to order dower to be 
assigned to her as the Earl was seised in fee after his marriage with her and 
demised the same to WilUam de Hastynges " le nevew " for life.' 

The manor then devolved upon William Beauchamp, created in 1392 
Lord Bergavenny by writ, he being the 4th son of Thomas Beauchamp, 
Earl of Warwick, by Katharine his wife, daughter of Roger Mortimer, 
1st Earl of March, and sister of Agnes, wife of Laurence, Lord Hastings, 
and Bergavenny, Earl of Pembroke, the grandmother of John, last Earl 
of Pembroke. This WilUam Beauchamp, Lord Bergavenny, made his 
first campaign in 1366 under the famous John of Gaunt, Duke of Lan- 
caster, with whom he continued to serve throughout the whole reign of King 
Edward III. In 1377 he was appointed governor of the castle and county 
of Pembroke, and in 1380 Lord Chamberlain, with an annual pension of 



'Dom. ii. 355. 

'Chart. Rolls, 42 Hen. III. 3. 
3I.P.M., 17 Edw. II. 75. 
tl.P.M., 18 Edw. II. 83. 
5I.P.M., 22 Edw. III. 47. 



6I.P.M., 23 Edw. III. 37. 
a.P.M., 49 Edw. III. pt. i. 70. 
8I.P.M., 7 Rich. II. 67. 
9 Close Rolls, 23 Edw. III. pt. i. 7. 



WORLINGTON, 211 

;;f200 for life. In 1383 he was captain of Calais, and continuing in that 
service he was, in 1386, constituted captain of the castles of Pembroke and 
Kilgaran, in Wales, and King's Commissioner to treat with the Earl of 
Flanders. It was at this juncture that he distinguished himself in a singular 
manner. Among other base schemes put into the head of Rich. II. by his 
favourites, one was to retire, when the Duke of Gloucester and the other 
lords were near London with an army, to France, and there purchase the 
assistance of that monarch by giving up to him most of the fortresses he 
then held in that realm. When all things were ready at home for carrying 
this dark design into execution, and the King sent orders to William 
Beauchamp to quit his command at Calais and transmit certain letters to 
the Court of France, he stoutly refused both. He declared, with respect 
to the former that he was entrusted with this important fortress by the 
advice and consent of the nobility, and without their approbation he would 
not render up his command. As for the letters, guessing at their tenor, 
instead of sending them to Paris he transmitted them to the Duke of 
Gloucester, in England. Afterwards when John de la Pole, brother of 
the great favourite, Suffolk, came with the King's orders to take from him 
the command of Calais, he not only refused to yield it into his hands, but 
seized him, and carried him prisoner to England, which at that time incensed 
the King to such a degree, as it entirely defeated the scheme of his ministers, 
that he caused him immediately on his arrival to be arrested and committed 
to close custody ; but soon after, either through fear or choice, he set him 
at liberty again. 

John Hastings, Earl of Pembroke and Baron Bergavenny, had in 1375, 
with the King's licence, entailed the castle and lordship of Bergavenny, 
and other his lands in England and Wales, on his cousin, this Sir William 
Beauchamp, in the event of failure of the heirs male of the body of the said 
John ; and in that case enjoined him not only to bear the arms and take 
the name of Hastings, but to endeavour to obtain the Earldom of Pem- 
broke. The same year this John, Earl of Pembroke, died, leaving issue only 
one son, John Hastings, his successor in the earldom and barony, who 
was slain in a tournament 13th Dec. 1391, leaving no issue. 

In 1399 William de Beauchamp was made a Knight of the Garter, and 
constituted Justiciary of South Wales for life. He was also restored to 
the government of the town and castle of Pembroke, and lordship of 
Tineby, with the addition of the castle and lordship of Kilgaran and 
county of Osterlow also for Ufe, paying into the exchequer seventy marks 
per annum. 

On the Patent Rolls we find a licence for Robert Braybrok, Bishop of 
London, and others to grant the manor to WiUiam de Beauchamp, Lord of 
Bergavenny, and Joan his wife, for life, with remainder to his right heirs.' 

He died 8th May, 1411, and, as directed by his will, dated 25th April, 
1408, was buried in the church of the Black Friars, in Hereford, next and 
beneath the tomb of John Hastings, Earl of Pembroke, his cousin and 
benefactor. By his wife Joane, daughter of Richard Fitz Alan, Earl of 
Arundel, sister and coheir of Thomas, Earl of Arundel, and widow of 
Humphry de Bohun, Earl of Hereford, Sussex, and Southampton, he left 
issue Richard, his only son, who succeeded him, and two daughters — Joane, 
married to James Butler, Earl of Ormond, and Elizabeth. On WilUam's 
death' the manor passed to his widow Joane for life. She kept the manor 

'Pat. Rolls, 2 Hen. IV. pt. ii. 15. "I.P.M., 5th June 1411, at Hereford, 

12 Hen. IV. 34. 



212 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

from her son Richard all his life, for she did not die until 1435. The son, 
Richard Beauchamp, in reward of the many signal services which he did to 
King Henry V. in his wars abroad, was by* that monarch in Feb. 1420-1, 
advanced to the title of Earl of Worcester, and for the better support of that 
dignity obtained a grant of lands in Normandy and other parts of France. 
He did not long live to enjoy these marks of Royal favour, for shortly 
afterwards he was wounded by a stone from a sling at Nusembry, in France, 
and after languishing for some time died the i6th April, 1422. His body 
was interred at Tewkesbury at the end of the choir, near to the chapel of 
Roger Fitz-Hamon, and in him ended the male line of this branch of the 
family. 

By Isabel his wife, daughter of Thomas le Despencer, Earl of Gloucester, 
K.G. (by his wife Constance, daughter of Edmund Plantagenet, Duke of 
York, and sister and heir of Richard le Despencer), he left issue an only 
daughter Elizabeth, who afterwards married Sir Edward Nevill, 6th son of 
Ralph Nevill, ist Earl of Westmoreland, by Joane Beaufort, daughter of 
John of Gaunt, Duke of Lancaster, 3rd son of King Edw. IH., and carried 
with her all the lands whereof her father died seised, except the castle and 
lordship of Bergavenny, which by a special entail made in 1395-6 by 
William Beauchamp, then Lord Bergavenny, was, on failure of issue male 
of his body, to resort unto Thomas Beauchamp, Earl of Warwick. 

Joane, widow of William Beauchamp, died 14th Nov. 1435,' when the 
manor passed to their granddaughter the said Elizabeth (only child of their 
son, Richard Beauchamp, Lord Abergavenny, Earl of Worcester). EUza- 
beth died i8th June, 1447, and was buried at the Carmelites, Coventry. 
Her husband, Edward Nevill, was summoned by writ as Lord Bergavenny, 
5th Sept. 1450. In 1454 he marched with Edward, Earl of March (after- 
wards King Edw. IV.), the Earl of Warwick, and others, with an army of 
20,000 men, and being refused admittance to the King, the battle of 
Northampton ensued, when the Royalists were vanquished with the loss 
of 10,000 men. After Edward, Earl of March, obtained the crown, he was 
one of his most faithful adherents, and went with him in the 2nd year of 
his reign towards Scotland, when several places were reduced in the north. 
In 1470 he was commissioned to muster and array all men fitting to bear 
arms in the county of Kent, and to march and oppose George, Duke of 
Clarence, and Richard, Earl of Warwick, then rebels. In 1448 he married 
Katharine, daughter of Sir Robert Howard, Knt., by Margaret, daughter 
of Thomas Mowbray, Duke of Norfolk, but for this marriage they were both 
excommunicated on the ground of having committed adultery together in 
the lifetime of his ist wife, and also on the ground of their being within 
the third degree of consanguinity. However, they made application to 
Pope Nicholas V., by whom they were absolved, and from whom they 
obtained a special dispensation for the marriage, which dispensation was 
dated 15th Oct. 1448. 

On Edward Nevill's death, i8th Oct. 1476,° this manor and the Manors 
of Lidgate and Otley, passed to his son and heir. Sir George Nevill, Lord 
Bergavenny, then 26 years of age, for Richard, the eldest son, had died 
before his father at the Castle of Raby, being buried in the south aisle of 
the Collegiate Church at Stanedrope, co. Durham, under a flat marble stone, 
with his portraiture in brass. Sir George Nevill was summoned to Parlia- 
ment 15th Nov. 1482, to May, 1492, and was found to be one of the heirs 

'Will loth Jan. 1434-5. proVed 19th Nov. ^I.P.M., 16 Edw. IV. 66. 
1435 ; I.P.M., 14 Hen. VI. 35. 



WORLINGTON. 213 

and cousins of Sir Rowland Lenthale, Knt., viz., son of Elizabeth, Lady 
Bergavenny, daughter of Richard Beauchamp, Earl of Worcester, son of 
Joan, sometime Lady Bergavenny, one of the three sisters and coheirs of 
Thomas, Earl of Arundel, brother of Margaret, mother of Edmund Lenthale, 
son of the said Sir Rowland and Margaret. Sir George being with his 
father in the great battle of Tewkesbury, had then the honour of knighthood 
conferred on him by King Edward, and was one of the barons who 
attended at the coronation of King Rich. IIL He married ist Margaret, 
daughter and heir of Sir Hugh Fenne, Knt., of Sculton Burdeleys, in Norfolk, 
and of Braintree, Essex, sub-treasurer of England, and 2ndly Elizabeth. 
He died 20th Sept. 1492,' and the manor passed to his son and heir. Sir 
George Neville, 3rd Lord Bergavenny, of this family. He was created a 
Knight of the Bath 4th July, 1483, and in the time of Hen. VIL by his 
credit and power preserved the county of Kent from joining with the 
Cornish rebels then in that county, and had a share in the victory obtained 
over them at Blackheath, 17th June, 1497. Nine years later, being 
under suspicion of favouring Edmund de la Pole, Earl of Lincoln, at that 
time in banishment, he was committed to prison, but was shortly afterwards 
released, and received into greater favour than ever. " The Lord 
Burgeyney," says an old historian, " for hys modestie, wyt, and probatie 
(because the Kinge found hym lyke hymselfe) always true, faythful, con- 
stant, was of hys sovereigne lorde more esteemed, favoured, and regarded 
than he was before." 

In 1510 he was made Constable of Dover Castle, and Warden of the 
Cinque Ports by Hen. VHL, and 7th May, 1513, installed a Knight of the 
Garter. He commanded one of the wings of the army at the siege of 
Terouanne, and at the Battle of the Spurs, after which he was at the 
siege of Tournay, and on the surrender of the place was appointed by the 
King to take possession of it with 6,000 men. In 1514 he was in command 
of the men sent over to strengthen the garrison of Calais and other 
fortresses within the English pale, and six years later was present at the 
memorable interview between his Sovereign and Francis I. of France. 

He was summoned to Parliament in 1529 as premier Baron of England 
by the title of " George Nevyle de Bergavenny Chivaler," and was chief 
larderer at the coronation of Queen Anne Boleyn. 

He married ist Joane, daughter of Thomas Fitz Alan, Earl of Arundel ; 
2ndly Margaret, daughter of William Brent, of Charing, Kent ; and 3rdly, 
Mary, daughter of Edward Stafford, Duke of Buckingham. He died in 
1535/ when the manor does not seem to have gone to his son and successor 
in the title, Henry, 4th Lord Bergavenny (who died without issue in 1516-7), 
but to his (Sir George's) brother. Sir Edward Nevill, of Addington Park, 
in Kent, a man of a high military reputation and a Knight Banneret in 
the time of Hen. VIII. He was one of the three the King chose to be 
challengers with himself on the marriage of the King's sister with the 
French King, when the Dauphin had proclaimed solemn jousts to be kept 
at Paris where he with nine aids would answer all comers. Sir Edward, 
with the Duke of Suffolk, the Marquis of Dorset, and others had the King's 
licence to go over and accept the challenge, and, as the historian says : 
" Preparing themselves for the purpose, they departed all in green coats 
and hoods, and landing at Calais 20th Oct., were at the coronation of the 

'Will dated ist July, 1491, proved 1492. ^Will 4th June, 1535, proved 24th Jan. 

1535-6. 



214 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

Queen, and gained great honour, not only at the jousts but also at the torney 
and barriers." In 1523 Sir Edward was one of the principal commanders 
of the forces sent into France under the Duke of Suffolk. He was, however, 
eventually attainted and beheaded on Tower Hill, 9th Jan. 1537-8, on the 
charge of " devising to maintain, promote, and advance one Reginald Pole, 
late Dean of Exeter, enemy of the King beyond the sea, and to deprive 
the King." 

Sir Edward Nevill had married Eleanor, daughter of Andrews, Lord 
Windsor, and widow of Ralph, Lord Scrope, of Upsal, and left amongst 
other issue a son Edward. The manor was however, forfeited to the Crown, 
but was granted to this son Edward by the King in 1551, with the title 
later of 5th Baron Bergavenny. He married ist Catherine, daughter of 
Sir John Brome, of Halton, in Oxfordshire, by whom he had four sons, 
and 2ndly Grisold, daughter of Thomas Hughes, of Uxbridge, co. Middlesex, 
by whom he had no issue. We meet with a fine levied of the manor in 1579 
by Francis Nevill and others against Edward Nevill.' Sir Edward Nevill, 
5th Baron Bergavenny, died loth Feb. 1589-9," and the manor seems to 
have gone to his son, Edward Nevill, 6th Baron Bergavenny. But it is 
clear that in 1611 an Edward Nevill and Francis Nevill' had licence to 
alienate this manor to James Baldwyne and Thomas Hearne. 

In 1707 the manor with the mansion house, the sheepwalk, farm, and 
premises, of the yearly rent of about £146, was offered for sale.* 

In 1799 the manor was vested in Sir Grey Cooper, Bart., of Gogar, 
in Midlothian, who died at his seat here 30th July, 1801, in his 76th year. 
He represented Rochester in Parliament in 1765, and was distinguished as 
a zealous adherent of the Marquis of Rockingham. When that nobleman 
attained office. Sir Grey, then Mr. Cooper, was appointed Secretary of the 
Treasury, which office he held during the subsequent administration of the 
Duke of Grafton and Lord North. In April, 1783, he was made one of the 
Commissioners of the Treasury, and in April, 1796, sworn a member of the 
Privy Council. He was a political writer of considerable notoriety, 
an able speaker in Parliament, and the warmest of his political opponents 
have " never branded his character with any charge of moral dishonour." 

Amongst his political writings may be mentioned : "A Pair of 
Spectacles for Short-sighted Politicians," and "The Merits of the New 
Administration fairly stated." He married ist Miss Grey, sister of Sir 
Henry Grey, of Howick, Bart., and 2ndly Elizabeth Kennedy, of Newcastle- 
upon-Tyne. 

On his death the manor passed to his widow Elizabeth, and on her death 
3rd Nov. 1809, vested in their son and heir, the Rev. Sir William Henry 
Cooper, Bart. He was appointed to a prebendal stall in Rochester 
Cathedral in Dec. 1793, and married 21st May, 1787, Isabella Ball, daughter 
of Moses Franks, of Teddington, co. Middlesex. 

He died in 1835, when the manor passed to his son and heir. Sir William 
Henry Cooper, Bart., who dying in 1836 without issue it vested in his uncle 
and heir. Sir Frederick Grey Cooper, 6th Bart., of Barton Grange, Somer- 
setshire. 

'Fine, Trin. 21 Eliz. Francis had married Mary, daughter 

"I.P.M., 7th July, 31 Eliz. of Thomas Lewkenor. 

^Probably the brother of Edward. This * Ipswich Journal, 19th Dec. 1707. 



WORLINGTON. 215 

In 1853 George Gataker and P. M. Honeywood were lords of the manor. 
The manor is now vested in the Marquis of Bristol. 

Arms of Nevill : Gules, on a saltire Argent, a rose of therfirst barbed 
and seeded proper. Of Cooper : Argent, a chevron, Gules charged with 
another Ermine, between three laurel leaves, slipped proper. 

Manor of Worlington Scales, otherwise Tindall's. 

This seems to have been the estate also of Ormer under Frodo, and to 
have been later vested in Agnes de Rivell, from whom it passed to her 
daughter and heir Agnes, married to Roger de Scales in the time of Hen. II. 
He had a son Robert living in 1198, who had a son, Roger de Scales, who died 
in 1219, leaving a widow named Maud, who remarried William de 
Beauchamp, and in 1218 we meet with a fine levied by her against Robert, 
son of the said Roger, her ist husband, for 40s. rent in this parish claimed 
with two marks in Wetherden as dower. This Robert, son of Roger, married 
Margery, daughter and coheir of Fulk de Beaufoe, and was succeeded by 
his son and heir, Robert Scales, who paid £21. 5s. relief for the lands which 
he held in chief in 1250. He married Alice, daughter and eventual heir of 
William de Roucestre, and died in 1266,' in which year Sir William de 
Clifford, escheator, accounted for £31. 8s. 4^. issues of the land of the said 
Robert in this place, Middleton, and Rainham, in Norfolk, to the use of 
John de Britannia. The manor passed to his son and heir, Robert de 
Scales, who married Muriel, daughter and coheir of Jeffery de Liscuris, and 
had a grant of markets and fairs in this manor in 1270.'' He distinguished 
himself in arms both in France and Scotland in the time of Edw. I. He 
married Isabel, daughter of Sir — Burnell, Knt., and niece of Robert 
Burnell, Bishop of Bath and Wells, Lord Chancellor and Treasurer of 
England in 1292. He was summoned to Parliament as Baron Scales by 
that monarch from 1299 to 1305, in which latter year he died, and the 
manor passed to his son and heir, Robert de Scales, 2nd Baron, who was 
in 1306 made a Knight of the Bath with Prince Edward and others, attending 
him in the expedition made at that time into Scotland. He married 
EgeUna, daughter of Sir Hugh de Courtney, and sister of Hugh, ist Earl 
of Devon, and died about 1324,^ when the manor passed to his son and 
heir, Robert de Scales, 3rd Baron, then a minor, for whose guardianship 
his mother paid a fine of 200 marks to the King. 

On the Close Rolls in 1323 we find an order to deliver to Mary, late 
wife of Aylmer de Valencia, Earl of Pembroke, in dower, a fee in the manor 
held by the heir of Robert de Scales and John de Pakenham of the yearly 
value of loos.,* and on the same Rolls three years later an order to deliver 
to Hugh le Despencer the younger a moiety, of the manor during the 
minority of the heir of John de Hastynges, saving to Egelina, late wife of 
Robert de Scales, her dower, Robert having held at his death of the heir of 
John de Hastynges. On this Roll it is stated that Robert de Scales, son of 
Robert, was but 13 years of age.^ 

Robert de Scales, 3rd Baron, served in the wars in Scotland in the 
retinue of Wilham de Ufford, and later attended the King into Flanders. 
From this time he was -almost unremittingly engaged in France. He 

'I P.M., t. Hen. III. 229. "* Close RoUs, 18 Edw. II. 14, \\d. 

''Chart. RoUs, 54 Hen. III. 6. s Close RoUs, 19 Edw. II. 13. ^ 

^I.P.M., 18 Edw. II. 61. 



2l6 



THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 



married Catherine, sister and coheir of WilUam de Ufford, Earl of Suffolk, 
and dying in 1369' the manor, or rather a moiety, according to the inqui- 
sition, passed to his son and heir, Roger de Scales, 4th Baron. His lordship 
was in the expedition made into France in 1372, and upon the breaking 
out of the insurrection under Jack Straw in the time of Rich. II. was one 
of the persons whom the insurgents seized and compelled to march along with 
them. He married Joane, daughter and heir of Sir John de Northwode, 
and dying in 1396 the manor passed to his son and heir, Robert de Scales, 
5th Baron, at his accession to the title in his fourteenth year. In 1399 he 
was one of the lords in Parliament who voted for the safe custody of King 
Rich. II., and afterwards took part in the expedition into Aquitaine. He 
married Elizabeth, daughter of William, Lord Bardolf, and dying in 1402 
the manor passed to his son and heir, Robert de Scales, 6th Baron, who 
died unmarried ist July, 1417, when the manor devolved on his brother 
and heir, Thomas de Scales, 7th Baron, who attained high military renown 
in the time of Hen. V. and Hen. VI. On ist May, 1421, he was retained 
by indenture to serve the King in the wars in France, and to be at Dover 
on the 23rd of that month with 20 men at arms, 60 archers on horseback, 
to be paid a quarter's wages down and after from month to month in 
English gold or money current in France by the Treasurer of War there, 
to have all prisoners except Kings, princes, Kings' sons, and especially 
Charles, called Dauphin, of Vienne, and other great captains of Royal blood, 
and chieftain and lieutenants under him, the said Charles, and except all 
those who had a hand in the murder of the Duke of " Burgoyn." In 1424 he 
was elected Knight of the Garter at St. George's Feast at Windsor. Four 
years later he was taken prisoner in France and redeemed. He married 
Emma, daughter of Sir Simon Walesburgh. On the arrival of the Earls of 
March, Warwick, and Salisbury, from Calais, and their entry into London 
2nd July, 1460, he took possession of, and secured, the Tower, and by some 
is said to have been murdered there 25th July, 1460, but seems to have been 
killed in endeavouring to effect his escape from the Tower."" The manor 
passed to his only surviving child Elizabeth (his only son Thomas having 
died in his father's lifetime), married ist to Henry Bourchier, 2nd son of 
Henry, Earl of Essex, who died without issue, and 2ndly to Anthony, son 
and heir of Richard Widvile, Earl of Rivers, who was summoned to Parlia- 
ment in her right as Lord Scales, but afterwards succeeded to the Earldom 
of Rivers. 

In 1464 Anthony Widvile, Lord Scales, and his wife Elizabeth had con- 
veyed by fine to Simon Baxter and others in trust this manor and Stonham 
Aspal with all the other estates which were of her inheritance, settling the 
same on the said Anthony and Elizabeth and the heirs of their bodies. Lady 
Elizabeth died 2nd Sept. 1473, without issue,^ and in 1483 Anthony WidviUe 
was arrested by the Duke of Gloucester at Northampton in coming to 
London with the young King Edw, V., of whom he had the custody, and 
was soon after brought to the scaffold. Lord Scales, who is said to have 
been one of the most accomphshed noblemen of his day,* left no legitimate 
issue, and a grant of the issues of the manor was made by King Rich. III. 
in his first year, to John, Duke of Norfolk, during pleasure,' and the following 
year a grant of the manor was made to the said John in tail male.* 



' I.P.M., 43 Edw. III. pt. ii. 22. 
'I.P.M., 2 Hen. VI. 36. 
^I.P.M., 13 Edw. IV. 45. 
*See Walpole's Noble Authors. 



5 Pat. RoUs, I Rich. III. pt. i. 6 ; D.K.R. 

9 App. ii. 14. 
^ D.K.R. 9 App. ii. p. 113..; 



WORLINGTON. 217 

On the accession of King Hen. VII. Elizabeth, daughter and heir of 
Sir John Howard, wife of John de Vere, Earl of Oxford, was found to be 
one of the heirs of Elizabeth, late Lady Scales, viz., as great-granddaughter 
of Margaret, daughter of Robert, Lord Scales, wife of Sir Robert Howard, and 
sister of Roger, Lord Scales. The other heir was Sir William Tyndal 
(made a Knight of the Bath on the creation of Arthur, Prince of Wales, 
eldest son of Hen. VII.), descended from Elizabeth, sister to the said 
Margaret Scales, which Elizabeth married Sir Roger Felbrigge, and had 
Sir Simon Felbrigge, whose daughter and heir Alana married Sir William 
Tyndal, grandfather to Sir William above named. 

This descent will be best seen thus : — 

Robert, Lord Scales = Cath., dau. of Robert and sister of William 
I de U£ford, Earl of Suffolk. 



I I , 

Margaret = Sir Robert Howard Elizabeth = Sir Roger de Felbrigge. 



Sir John Howard = Margaret de Plaiz. Sir Simon = Margaret, said to be a dau. of 

de Felbrigge I the Duke of Silesia. 



John Howard = Joane, sister and heir Alana de Felbrigge = Sir William Tyndal 



ob. vi. pat. I of John Walton. dau. and heir 



of Dean, co. Northants. 



Elizabeth, = John de Vere. Thomas Tyndal. 

only dau. and heir Earl of Oxford. | 

Sir William Tyndal. K.B., 
t. Hen. VH. 

Between the heirs the Scales possessions were divided, and this manor 
allotted to Sir William Tyndal.' He died in 1497, when the manor passed 
to his son and heir. Sir John Tyndal, who seems to have been succeeded by 
Sir Thomas Tyndal, who with Ann his wife sold the manor in 1564 to Henry 
Payne,'' son of William Payne and Margaret his wife, daughter of Thomas 
Ashe, of Thurlow. Amongst the Chancery Proceedings we find an action 
by WiUiam Payne to protect his title by lease of this manor demised to him 
by Henry Payne, the owner of the fee,^ and subsequently we meet with 
another action respecting the manor between John Chetham and this 
Henry Payne.* 

By an inquisition taken in 1568 it was found that Henry Payne, late 
of Nowton, died seised^ of this manor and lands in the parish of WorUngton, 
Mildenhall, and Barton, purchased from Sir Thomas Tyndal, and which 
the deceased had settled by indenture successively upon Henry and Thomas, 
sons of his brother Edward in tail male, remainder to Nicholas, another 
brother of the deceased, remainder to the right heirs of Anthony Payne, 
the brother of the deceased. It is probable that Henry and Thomas, the 
sons of Edward, left no issue, and that the manor went to William, the 
son and heir of Nicholas Payne. He married Elizabeth, daughter of John 
Cheney, of co. Cambridge. 

' See Manor of Old Hall, Braiseworth, in ^ C.P. ii. 310. 

Hartismere Hundred, and Munde- ^C.P. ser. ii. B. xxxvii. 74. 

ford, in Barrow, in Thingoe Hun- 525th June, 1568. 

dred. 

^See Manor of Nowton, in Thingoe Hun- 
dred. Fine, Mich. 6 Eliz. 

DI 



2i8 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK, 

Davy evidently adopts for this manor the statement which Kirby 
intends for the main manor, namely, that " it became part of Herbert, Earl 
of Orford's estate, then of Lord Sandys, who married the heiress of the 
Earl, and it was sold by him to George Montgomery" (a statement not 
particularly enlightening), " late one of the representatives in Parliament 
of the Borough of Ipswich in 1799." John Sivale seems to have held the 
manor, and to have died seised in 1831. 

Arms of Scales : Gu. six escallop shells Arg. three, two, one. 




LOES HUNDRED. 

(LOSA) 

p is in the Deanery of Loes and Archdeaconry of Suffolk, 
and of a very irregular figure, varying from six to two miles 
in breadth, and extending about 15 miles southward from 
its broadest part around the town of Framlingham and 
near Debenham to the estuary called Butley River. It is 
bounded on the east by Plomesgate Hundred, on the north 
by Hoxne Hundred, and on the west by Hartismere and 
Thredlmg Hundreds, and on the south-west and south by Thredling and 
Wilford Hundreds. It is watered by the Deben, the Ore, and their 
tributary streams, and has generally a good loamy soil. 

The lords of Framlingham for the time being were seised of this 
Hundred, with many extensive privileges, and they appointed bailiffs in 
succession. It was held in the nature of a franchise, and was exempt from 
the Crown, being held with right to hold pleas and leets or courts of view of 
frankpledge, to enjoy the goods of felons and fugitives, to appoint a coroner, 
and have estrays, &c., within certain limits. From the time of Roger Bigot, 
his successors, lords of Framlingham, enjoyed the above privileges, in the 
several parishes within this Hundred, except in the parishes of Marlesford 
and Kenton, until the Manors of Earl Soham, Ash, Eyke, Hacheston, Hoo, 
and Kettleburgh were sold. 

On the surrender in 1541 by the prior and convent of Ely, a Dean and 
Chapter was incorporated, and Hen. VIII. granted to it "Omnia ilia 
quinque Hundreda nostra et dimidium unias Hundred!, de Plomested, 
Carleford, Wilford, Trylling, Colnes et Loes " ; and it obtained a con- 
firmation from Jas. I. in 1619 ; but Loes had not been one of the old 
possessions of the abbey of Ely, and was not indeed in the King's hand 
until the Duke of Norfolk's attainder, five years after the grant to the 
Dean and Chapter, consequently could not have passed by that grant nor 
by the subsequent confirmation of Jas. I., for this sovereign had in the 
first year of his reign restored the estates of the Norfolks to the Earls of 
Suffolk and Northampton. The Hundred of Loes will be found specified 
in the inquisitions post mortem of the Bigots, Mowbrays, and Howards 
without exception, and ultimately passed with the Framlingham estates 
in 1635 to Sir Robert Hitcham, Knt., who by his will dated 8th August, 
1636 devised the Hundred to the Master, Fellows, and Scholars of the College 
or Hall called Pembroke Hall, in the University of Cambridge, and their 
successors for ever. The heir-at-law of Sir Robert Hitcham managed to 
keep them out of possession until 1650, but ultimately their right prevailed. 
The Hundred consists of 30,938 acres, divided into 19 parishes and 50 
manors, as follows : — 



Parishes. 


Manors. 


Parishes. 


Manors. 


Brandeston . . 
Butley 


Brandeston. 
Brandeston Ryboffs 
Butley originally 
called Brochons. 
Tangham, 


Campsey 
Charsfield . . 


( Campsey. 
J Priory of Campsey. 
1 Morehall Hall, 
i Ash. 
Charsfield. 



220 



THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 



Parishes. 



Cretingham 



Dallinghoo 



Eari Soham . 



Easton . . 



Eyke 



Framlingham 



Manors. 



Crethingham al. 

Tye's. 
Harolds. 
St. Margaret. 
< Kettlebars. 

Little Gretingham. 
Cretingham al. Sul- 
yard's. 
V St. Peters. 

Dallinghoo. 
Dallinghoo (Camp- 

sey). 
Earls Dallinghoo. 
Bast Brodish. 

Earl Soham. 

Easton. 
Martley Hall. 

Eyke. 
Staverton. 
The Rectory. 

Framlingham Hall. 

Clubald's al. Clar- 
vals al. Clarvaald 
le Clerbold's. 



Parishes. 



Hacheston 



Hoo 



Kenton . . . 

Kettleburgh 

Lethering- 
ham. 

Marlesford . 

Monewden . 



Rendlesham 



Woodbridge 



Manors. 



( Hacheston. 
Glevering Hall. 
Canell's or Wicklow's 
Blomvile's. 

( Hoo Hall. 
Godwin's. 
Hoo Charsfield. 
Hoo Kettleburgh. 

Kenton. 
Suddon Hall. 

[ Kettleburgh. 
Kenton's. 

Letheringham. 

Marlesford. 

Monewden with 
Sulyards. 

( Naunton Hall. 
Colvile's. 
Bavent or Bavent's 

Hall. 
Caketon's. 

Woodbridge late 

Priory. 
Woodbridge Ufford. 
, Kingston. 




BRANDESTON. 221 

BRANDESTON. , 

MANOR was held here in Edward the Confessor's time by 
Edmund the priest, under commendation to the Abbot of 
Ely. The Domesday Survey goes on to say : " And the 
land which he took with his wife in Brandeston and in 
Clopton he granted to the church with the lady's consent 
by such agreement that she could not sell or give it away 
from the Church." The manor consisted of 60 acres of 
land, 5 bordars, 2 serfs, a ploughteam in demesne and i belonging to 
the tenants, 5 acres of meadow, wood sufficient for the support of 6 hogs ; 
and to the manor were added 80 acres of land in the Confessor's time as a 
manor, 4 bordars, wood sufficient for the maintenance of 8 ^ogs, 4 acres of 
meadow, i mill, 20 hogs, 16 sheep, 30 goats, and 3 hives of bees, valued at 
loos. 

By the time of the Domesday Survey the value was 60s. only, though 
the bordars had increased to 12, and there was amongst them a ploughteam 
and a rouncy. 

The two manors of the Confessor's day here were held at the time of 
the Survey by William de Arcis as one manor. There was also a church 
with 12 acres valued at 2s. It (probably the whole place) was a league 
long and 3 quarentenes broad, and paid in a gelt 5^d.' 

Another holding here was that of Hervey de Berri under the Abbot of 
Ely, consisting of 8 acres valued at 4s. formerly held by a freeman." 

Amongst the lands of Earl Alan enumerated in the Great Survey we 
find a " Brodertuna " specified. This seems to be Brandeston. The estate 
was 56 acres which had been held by 7 freemen by half commendation to 
Edric the Grim and half commendation to Edric of Laxfield. To the holding 
were in Saxon times attached 2 ploughteams and 8 acres of meadow, but 
by the time of the Survey there was one and a half ploughteam only. The 
Survey adds : " And of the moiety of this land was Robert Malet seised on 
the day on which Earl Ralph made forfeiture ; but Earl Alan had it by 
livery of seisin."^ Robert Malet also had 3 acres valued at 8d., which had 
belonged to a freewoman under Edric of Laxfield by commendation." 

Brandeston Manor. 

This manor with the advowson was granted by Hen. III. to Alan, 
Lord Burnell, of Acton Burnell, and he in 1259 granted the same to Sir 
John de Weyland, the son of Sir Nicholas de Weyland and Dame Beatrix, 
his wife. A fine was levied of the manor and advowson the same year 
between the said John Weyland and Richard Goroye,' and the same year 
John de Weyland had a grant of free warren here;" 

Sir John de Weyland had by his wife Mary issue Thomas de Weyland 
and Nicholas de Weyland, and dying seised of the manor in 1274, was succeeded 
by his eldest. son. Sir Thomas de Weyland. The Hundred Rolls says : 
" held by Thomas Weyland, brother of John,"' and there is an order on 
the Close Rolls this year to restore the manor, not being held in chief of the 
King, to Thomas de Weyland, brother and heir of " William " de Weyland.^ 

'Dom. ii. 4316. 'Feet of Fines, 43 Hen. III. 78. 

*Dom. ii..2886. ^ Chart. Rolls, 43 Hen. III. 3. 

^Dom. ii. 294. 'H.R. ii. 188. 

*Dom. ii. 3266. 'Close Rolls, 2 Edw. I. 5 



222 



THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 



We cannot explain this, but our information is derived from the 
" Memoirs of the Manors and Churches of Brandeston and Cretingham in 
1725," a MS. compiled by Robert Hawes for John Rivett, then lord of 
those manors. 

Sir Thomas Weyland became Lord Chief Justice of the King's Bench, 
and was accused in the reign of Edw. I. of attempting to screen his servants 
from justice in respect of a murder they had committed. He was arrested 
and delivered into the custody of Sir Robert Malet, but escaping took sane - 
tuary in the church of the Friars Minor at Bury St. Edmunds, and was 
admitted into their habit, which the King hearing of within 40 days gave 
order that no kind of victuals should be conveyed into their house. This 
forced all the friars except three or four to depart thence. At length Sir 
Thomas himself was constrained to take a layman's apparel, and coming 
forth was delivered again to Sir Robert Malet, who brought him to London, 
where three things were proposed to him — either to be tried by his peers, 
or to remain in perpetual imprisonment, or to abjure the realm. He chose 




Brandeston Hall 



the last, and so barefooted and bareheaded was conveyed from the Tower 
to Dover and from thence transported beyond the sea, where he died about 
1290' leaving issue by Margaret his wife, WiUiam, John, and Richard.' 
His body was buried with his ancestors in the priory church at Woodbridge, 
but his heart in the priory church at Sudbury. 

In 1316 a fine was levied between Master Robert de Baldcock, arch- 
deacon of Middlesex, Chancellor to King Edw. II., and Bishop of Norwich, 
against Sir William de Weyland, the eldest son of Sir Thomas Weyland, 
of this manor, and Westerfield, by which they passed to the said Robert, 
who regranted the same to Robert, son of the said Sir William de Weyland, 
and Cecilia his (Robert's) wife, daughter of Thomas de Baldcock, and the 
heirs of their bodies, being a marriage settlement.^ Sir William de Weyland 
had a grant of free warren here in 1325." He had issue Robert de Weyland, 
and died 1327.' Sir Robert de Weyland, William's son, had issue Edmund 
de Weyland, and Margaret, married to Sir John Tudenham. Sir Edmund 
de Weyland married in his father's lifetime Alianor, upon whom and the 



'I.P.M., 18 Edw. I. 51. 
^ For descent see Manor of Onehouse, in 
Stow Hundred. 



^Feet of Fines, 9 Edw. II. 25. 
■* Chart. Rolls, 19 Edw. II. 18. 
n.P.M., I Edw. III. 79. 



BRANDESTON. 223 

heirs of their bodies the Manors of Brandeston and Westerfield were settled 
by a fine levied in 1347/ but Sir Edmund de Weyland dying without issue 
in 1369 these manors descended to his sister Margaret. She by Sir John 
Tudenham' had issue John, Robert, and Oliver. John died 1478 without 
issue ; Robert Tudenham died in his father's lifetime, but leaving two sons^ 
and one daughter, viz., Robert Tudenham, Thomas, and Margaret, married 
to Sir Edmund Bedingfield. But Margaret their grandmother survived 
her husband. Sir John Tudenham, and died m 1416, seised in fee tail of 
the Manors of Brandeston, Great Bealings, Charsfield, Grundisburgh, 
Tuddenham, Sutton, Newton juxta Ipswich, Fenn Hall, Elvedon, and 
Shardelowe, and was succeeded by her grandson, Robert Tuddenham, who 
however, died the following year [1417] without issue, when the manor 
passed to his brother and heir. Sir Thomas. Sir Thomas Tudenham taking 
part with the House of Lancaster against York, was convicted of treason 
by Parliament, and without being allowed opportunity of making his 
defence was beheaded 23rd Feb. 1461,'* whereby part of his real estate for 
want of issue according to the entail descended to his sister Margaret, wife 
of Sir Edmund Bedingfield, who thereupon became lady of the manor in 
her 6oth year. She held her first court in 1461, and died about 1474,' when 
the manor descended to Sir Edmund Bedingfield, of Eriswell, the son and 
heir of Thomas Bedingfield, the son and heir of the said Margaret. 

Edmund Bedingfield, for assisting the House of York against Lancaster, 
obtained from Edw. IV. a grant of Oxburgh Hall, in Norfolk, and other estates 
forfeited by his great-uncle, Sir Thomas Tudenham. He died in 1496 and 
left issue Sir Thomas Bedingfield, Robert Bedingfield, and Edmund Beding- 
field. Sir Thomas held his first court in 1504, and at the court granted the 
site of this manor with the Houses Calf-pightal, Hal-Close, Goose-hill, 
Stone-hill, Styscroft, Langland, Bondmans-Meadow, Fivebridge-acre, 
Haighegge-Wood, Hookwood, and with the wards, marriages, escheats, 
fines, reliefs, &c., to John " Revet, of Monewoden " Park, gent., and his 
heirs, to be holden according to the custom of the manor, paying annually 
five pounds, one shilling, and one farthing to the lord and his heirs, and 
acquitting him and them from three shillings and four pence and a fifteenth 
to the King. 

Sir Thomas Bedingfield died 15th March, 1538,^ without issue ^eised of 
the Manors of Brandeston, Bedingfield, Grundisburgh, Sutton, Newton, 
Tudenham, Greeting, Gosbeck, Charsfield, Westerfield, Eriswell, &c., which 
passed to his brother, Robert Bedingfield, clerk, who held his first court 
for this manor in 1540, and soon after died without issue, and was succeeded 
in the lordship by his youngest brother, Sir Edmund Bedingfield. He had 
been knighted by Charles Brandon, Duke of Suffolk, upon the taking 
of Montdelier, in France, in 1524. He obtained livery of the manor as 
" brother and heir of Robert Bedingfield, brother and heir of Sir Thomas," 
28th May, 33 Hen. VIII.^ and held his first court this year, when he also 
settled the manor upon his son, Henry Bedingfield, and Catherine his wife, 
and their heirs male. 

He seems to have obtained as early as 1539 a licence to alienate for the 
purposes of this settlement under which the remainder in default of male 

' Feet of Fines, 21 Edw. III. 4. * I-P-M., 5 Edw. IV. 34. 

» He was High Sheriff of Suffolk in 1382. s I.P.M., 15 Edw. IV. 38. 

3 See Great Bealings Manor, in Carlford si.P.M., 31 Hen. VIII. 5- 

Hundred, and ErisweU Manor, Lack- '' S.P. 1341, 1056 (11). 

ford Hundred. 



224 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

issue was limited to John Bedingfield/ and the settlement was carried into 
effect by a fine levied in 1540 between Henry Bedingfield and others and 
Sir Edmund Bedingfield and others/ 

Henry Bedingfield and Catherine his wife held their first court in 1541, 
and the same year Sir Edmund Bedingfield and Grace his wife. Henry 
Bedingfield and Catherine his wife, Francis and John obtained a hcence to 
alien the manor to Andrew Rivett, the son of John Rivett, of Monewden 
Park, by Christiana his wife.^ 

The assurance was effected by a fine levied the same year by Andrew 
Rivett against Sir Edmund Bedingfield and others.* Andrew Rivett made 
his seat at Brandeston Hall, and probably built the parlour and the porch 
on to the front of the house, for over the curve of the door are fairly cut in 
stone the two initial letters of his name. He was escheator for Philip and 
Mary and Elizabeth in Suffolk and Norfolk. 

Amongst the Chancery Proceedings of the time of Queen Elizabeth 
will be found a suit by Margaret Goldinge agamst this Andrew Rivett 
touching copyholds of this manor,^ and an action by Andrew Rivett against 
Margaret and Robert Goldynge also touching copyholds of the manor.^ 

Andrew Rivett married Elizabeth, eldest daughter and coheir of Thomas 
Huntingfield, of Buslaugh or Barleugh Hall, Stradbroke, and had issue 
three sons and two daughters, namely, John, George, Anthony, Margaret, 
and Agnes. 

The other daughter and coheir of Thomas Huntingfield married John 
Vere, by whom he had issue Richard Vere, against whom his uncle Rivett 
commenced a suit for the Manor of Buslaugh Hall, both claiming as the 
heirs of Huntingfield. The nephew's vain attempt to incriminate his 
uncle will be found under the account of " Barleugh" Manor, in Stradbroke, 
in Hoxne Hundred. 

Andrew Rivett died in 1572, and was buried in the chancel of the 
church of Brandeston. John Rivett his eldest son was next lord, and held 
his first court in 1573. He married Anne, daughter of James Bacon, 
alderman of London, the younger brother of Sir Nicholas Bacon, Lord 
Keeper, by whom he had issue five sons and seven daughters, and died in 
1616, being succeeded by his eldest son Nicholas. Nicholas Rivett was a 
barrister and a person of great reputation in the county. He married 
Mary, daughter of Thomas Sicklemore, Portman of Ipswich, and had issue 
three sons and two daughters. He died 5th Oct. 1643, and was succeeded 
by his eldest son John. Living in troublous times, this John Rivett con- 
ducted himself so judiciously that while he escaped the plundering so many 
suffered he sustained unblemished his reputation, and was on the accession of 
Charles the Second made a Justice of the Peace for Suffolk. He married 
Alice, the only daughter and heir of Thomas Leak, of London, merchant, 
by whom he had issue eight sons and two daughters, viz., Nicholas, who 
married Elizabeth, daughter of Thomas Dade, of Tannington ; Leah, John, 
Robert, another Leah, Mary, married to Thomas Bright, of Bricett, and 
Anne to John Spencer, of Rendlesham. All his sons (except Thomas) 
died without issue male in the lifetime of their father, of whom it is quaintly 
said : " Although he had married a London lady, yet he would not permit 

'1539, S.P. 619 (51); 1540, S.P. 733 (23). 4 Fine, Easter, 33 Hen. VIII. 

= Fine, Trin. 32 Hen. VIII. s C.P. ser. ii. B. Ixxv. 12. 

3i8th May, Pat. Rolls, 33 Hen. VIII. ^Ib.B. cli. i. 
p.Lm. 7, 1541 ; S.P. 878 (43). 



BRANDESTON. ! 225 

the fashions of the city to be introduced at Brandeston Hall, to displace the 
old furniture of his ancestors, but caused those of the procurement to take 
their station in the garret." 

He survived his wife and died 25th Oct. 1671, and was buried in the 
chancel of Brandeston.. The manor passed to Thomas Rivett, his 4th son, 
but heir, who held his first court in 1673. He married Anne, 2nd daughter 
of John Braham, of Campsey Ash, by whom he had issue three sons and 
seven daughters, viz., John, Nicholas, Thomas, of Pembroke Hall, Camb., 
Anne, Elizabeth, another Anne, Deborah, Annie, Alice, and Eleanor. He 
died 25th Aug. 1704, and was buried in the vault he had made on the north 
side of the chancel of Brandeston. His wife Anne survived, and as 
guardian for her eldest son kept her first court the same year her husband 
died. 

John Rivett the eldest son on attaining 21 held his first court for the 
manor in 1714, and some time after married Elizabeth, the only daughter 
and heir of Edward Fauconberge, citizen of London, and great-niece and 
heir of Dr. Fauconberge, of Beccles, and had issue two sons and two 
daughters, viz., Mary, John, Nicholas, and Elizabeth. 

Of the 2nd son Nicholas Rivett, Page informs us that he was born at 
Brandeston Hall in 1720, and was an ingenuous draftsman, fellow traveller 
with James Stuart, and a joint editor of the " Antiquities and Ruins of 
Athens," where they resided many years. " Mr. Revett," says the same 
author, " also travelled through Asia Minor, &c., with Dr. Chandler, 
published the ' Ionian Antiquities,' having been engaged for that purpose by 
the Dilettanti Society. He returned in 1766, and appears to have passed 
his time in preparing the drawings for publication, and in superintending 
some works of architecture." 

Among the edifices which he designed are, at Lord le Despencer's, 
West Wycombe, the eastern and western porticos, the Temple of Flora, and 
the temple in the island, the church of Agot St. Lawrence, in Hertfordshire, 
and the portico of the eastern front of Hondlinch, in Wiltshire, the seat of 
James Dawkins. Nicholas Rivett died in London 3rd June, 1804, at the 
age of 84, and was buried in the churchyard at Brandeston, where an altar 
tomb with an inscription was erected to his memory. 

John Rivett died in 1756, and the manor passed to his son and heir, 
John Rivett. He married Mary, daughter of Thomas Warner, of Fram- 
lingham, and dying in 1773 the manor went to his son and heir, John Rivett. 
He married twice, ist Catherine, natural daughter of Sir William Chapman, 
Bart., and 2ndly, Catherine, daughter of — Doggett, and died in 1809, 
when the manor passed to his widow Catherine, on whose death in 1820 it 
passed to the last John Rivett's daughter, Catherine Anne, wife of John 
Pytches, of Alderton Hall, and Groton Hall, Sudbury, M.P. for Sudbury in 
1805, 6th son of Thomas Pytches, of Alderton. John Pytches died 14th 
May, 1829, when the manor passed to his eldest surviving son and heir, 
John Pytches, of Brandeston, who assumed the name of Rivett 4th April, 
1820. He married Eleanor, daughter of — Argent, of Romford, and on 
his death 31st Jan. 1830, the manor went to his son and heir, John Pytches, 
who died without issue 26th March, 1897. 

The manor and estate were, however, purchased about 1845 by Charles 
Austin, a well-known barrister and Q.C., J. P. of Suffolk, and Chairman of 
Quarter Sessions, who commenced the restoration of the old hall. In 
April, 1847, when still in the workmen's hands, the hall was almost entirely 

EI 



226 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

destroyed by fire, the porch and the outer walls of the east wing being all 
that was left standing. The rebuilding of the mansion was shortly after- 
wards commenced in the same style, but on a larger scale than the old one. 
Such portions of the latter as remained were restored, and the hall is now a 
fine stately mansion surrounded by beautiful grounds. Many of the 
apartments are lined with richly-carved oak wainscot, and the style of th6 
Elizabethan age is carried out even in the minutest fittings such as hooks, 
hinges, fenders, &c. 

Mr. Austin married loth June, 1856, Harriet Jane, daughter of Capt. 
R. Mitford Preston Ingilby, and niece of Sir Henry Ingilby, Bart., of Ripley, 
CO. York, by whom he had issue two sons and one daughter, Charles, John, 
and Jane. Charles, the son, succeeded his father in 1874, and is now the 
owner of the manor and the advowson. 

Court Rolls of the manor are in St. John's College, Cambridge.' 

Arms of Tuddenham : Lozengy, Argent and Gules. Of Rivett : 
Argent, three bars Sable, in chief as many trivets of the last, quartering 
per pale Argent and Sable, on a chevron between 3 mascles as many 
martlets all counterchanged. Of Pytches : Arg. two chevronels Gu. 
between three guttes de poix. 

Manor of Brandeston Ryboffs. 

We do not know much of this manor. In the time of Queen Elizabeth 
it was vested in Andrew Rivett, from whom it passed in the same course 
as the main manor to Nicholas Rivett, who died in 1643. The manor was 
no doubt called after Walter de Ribof, who granted 40 acres of land in 
Brandeston about 1200 to the church of St. James, of Dunwich, and to 
Herbert, the minister there, and others for the health of the soul of Hugh 
de Cressi and himself.' 

On the Close Rolls of the time of King John we find a command to 
the sheriff to let William Sancmesle have the land which belonged to Walter 
de Riboef his uncle in Brandeston and Clopton which the King had granted 
him.^ 



'S. 40. ^ 3 Close Rolls, 17 John, pt. i. 5. 

'Bodl. Suff. Ch. 196. 




BUTLEY. 227 

BUTLEY. 

|HERE was no manor here in Saxon times. At the time of 
the Survey Earl Alan had two estates here. The first con- 
sisted of 34 acres and a ploughteam, reduced to half at the 
time of the Survey. 

William Malet was seised of these when he died, and 
Earl Ralph when he made forfeiture. It had formerly been 
held by seven freemen and a half under commendation to 
Edric the Grim. 

The second consisted of 8 acres formerly held by two freemen under 
commendation of Edric the Grim. They are included in the valuation of 
Carlton.' 

Robert Malet had a holding in this place at the time of the Survey, 
consisting of 38 acres and i^ ploughteams (reduced to i at the time of the 
Survey), valued at 5s. It was 6 quarentenes long and 4 broad, and paid 
in a gelt y^d. It had formerly been held by three freemen of Walter, son 
of Aubrey, of Robert Malet." 

Another estate here was that of Roger de Poictou, consisting of 32 acres, 
and i^ ploughteams (reduced to i at the time of the Survey); They were 
valued with Sudboume. This had formerly been held by five freemen 
and a half, the Abbot of Ely having commendation over four and Edric 
over two.^ 

This parish is in two Hundreds, the church being in Loes, but the 
abbey in Plomesgate. 

Manor of Butley originally called Brochons. 

The manor was the lordship of Theobold de Valoines, Baron of Parham, 
and from him passed to his daughter Bertha, who married Ranulph de 
Glanville, Feudal Baron of Benhall, Treasurer of England, Lord Chief 
Justice of England in 1180, and portions of it became the property of his 
daughter, Maud de Glanville, who married Sir William de Auberville, who 
in 1236 gave certain lands in Butley to Adam, prior of Butley. There seems 
to have been some question as to whether the lordship of the place was 
vested in the priory, and the prior sued in the King's name and defended 
his right to a manor in 1290.* The priory of Butley and all its lands, 
including this manor, were surrendered to the Crown in 1538,^ and in Easter 
term 30th Hen. VIII. a fine was levied by the King against Thomas, Bishop 
of Ipswich, prior of the monastery of St. Mary, of Butley, of this manor, 
and 12 other manors in the county. . The same year the King granted 
this manor to Thomas, Duke of Norfolk,^ and in 1544 Wilham Forthe, of 
Hadleigh, purchased the same.' The grant of the site of the priory to 
WiUiam Forthe and Richard Morison or Moryson was made 36 Hen. VIII. ^ 

On the death of William Forthe in 1560 the manor passed to his widow 
Elizabeth, and in 1562 to Robert Forthe, son of Wilham, who levied a 
fine 15th June, 1569,' and died in 1601, when the manor passed to his 2nd 
son. Sir William Forthe. He married Dorothy, eldest daughter of Sir 
John Gilbert, Knt., of Finborough, sometime Lord Mayor of London, and 

'Dom. ii. 294. * State Papers, 30 Hen. VIII. 942 (44). 

^Dom. ii. 3276. 'Particulars for grant, 35 Hen. VIII., 
^Dom. ii. 348. D.K.R. 9 App. ii. p. 209. 

■♦Rolls of Pari. i. 38. ^Originalia, 4 Pars. Rot. 10. 

5S.P. 1538, i. 393, 394- 'Pi"e, II Eliz. 59. 



228 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

grand-nephew of Sir Thomas Gresham. On the death of Sir William Forthe, 
whose will was proved by his widow nth Dec. 1621, the manor passed to 
her, and she remarried ist Gresham Ferkins, and 2ndly William Tirrell, of 
Bury abbey. On Dorothy's death the manor passed to Sir WiUiam 
Forthe's 2nd son (Henry the eldest having died 22nd Aug. 12 Jac. I.), Capt. 
William Forthe. He married Anne, daughter of Thomas Browne, of Elsing 
Hall, in Norfolk, and died in 1643,' when the manor passed to his widow 
Anne, who remarried William Tirrell, who had been the 3rd husband of 
Dorothy, the widow of her father-in-law, and on her death went to her 
daughter Anne, who married Walter Devereux, 2nd son of Sir Walter 
Devereux, Knt., Viscount Hereford. Walter Devereux was M.P. for 
Orford in 1660, and he and his wife, on the death of their only son, Leciester 
Devereux, who died about 1680, settled the manor upon their eldest 
daughter Elizabeth, respecting whom Mr. J. J. Muskett tells a charming 
story in the "East Anglian Notes and Queries.'" She married 13th April, 
1682, John Clyatt, and dying in May, 1685, having had but one child, 
Leicester Clyatt, who died and was buried at Ipswich, 20th Oct. 1684, 
devised the manor to her husband, John Clyatt. He died loth Oct. 1691,^ 
and by his will proved 27th Sept. 1694, devised the manor to his cousin, 
Samuel Clyatt. 

Samuel Clyatt died in 1693, and Frances Clyatt his widow held a life 
interest in the same. In 1737 George Wright, who married the heir of 
Clyatt, inherited this estate, and fitted up and converted the old gateway 
of the priory into a mansion house. 

After the death of George Wright's widow, Elizabeth, the property 
went to John Clyatt, heir-at-law, who sold it to William Strahan, printer 
to Geo. III. He died in 1785. The manor then passed to the Marquis 
of Donegal, and subsequently passed to Lord Archibald Hamilton, 7th 
Duke of Hamilton, who sold it to Peter Isaac TheUusson, whose son was 
created Lord Rendlesham. From this time the manor has devolved in the 
same course as the Manor of Naunton Hall, in Rendlesham, in this Hundred, 
and is now vested in the present Lord Rendlesham. 

A Survey of the manor was made in 1594,* and the Court books of 1625, 
1630, 1635, 1682, 1714, 1736, will be found amongst the MSS. in the British 
Museum.^ Extracts from the Court Rolls of 1755 will also be found 
amongst the Charters preserved there.^ There were numerous law suits, 
in which this manor was involved, between the Clyatts and others — Clyatt v. 
Carr,^ Clyatt v. Hook,^ Clyatt v. Devereux,^ Clyatt v. Bateson," particulars 
of which are given in the communication made to the " East Anglian Notes 
and Queries " by Mr. Muskett above referred to. 

Arms of Clyatt : Arg. a bend betw. 2 cotises Sa. I 

Manor of Tangham. 

The Manor of Tangham, in Butley, seems to have passed in the same 
course as the main manor, and was included in the fine levied in 1538 and 
mentioned under that manor, with the exception that it formed part of the 

' Will proved loth May, 1645. s Add. MSS. 23951, 23954, 23955. 

''N.S. vol. iii., p. 138. 6 Add. Ch. 10293. 

3 He was buried at Ipswich, and in the ''Whittington, ii., B. and A. No. 11. 

Church of St. Laurence is an ^Mitford, ii. ccxcix. 144. 

inscription to his memory. s Whittington ii. B. and A. No. 215. 

-tEgerton MSS. Brit. Mus. 2789. "Mitford iv. D. vi. 26. 



BUTLEY. 229 

possessions for life of Anne of Cleves, wife to King Hen. VIII.' Ralph 
Agas's survey and plan of this manor, when held by Rich. Forthe, will be 
found in the Egerton MSS. in the British Museum.'' Particulars of farm of 
" Tangham " Manor for grant to Nicholas Fortescue in 1347 are in the 
Record Office.^ Court book of the manor 1654-1712, 1713-1738 is in the 
British Museum.* Amongst the Chancery Proceedings in the time of 
Queen Elizabeth we meet with a bill by Robert Forthe against the Earl 
of Surrey and others to perpetuate testimony as to plaintiff's right to a 
sheepwalk called the Lord's sheep walk belonging to his Manor of Tangham 
adjoining to the Manor of HoUesley, in Sutton, and encroached upon by the 
defendant.^ 



'1540-1, S.P. 1500. ♦Add. 23956, 23957. 

« Egerton MSS. 2789. 'C.P. i. 298. 

336 Hen. VIII. D.K.R. App. ii. p. 209. 




230 THE^ MANORS OF] SUFFOLK. 

CAMPSEY. 

MANOR was held here in Saxon times by two freemen, 
Swarting and Edric, under commendation to Edric of Lax- 
fiield, and consisted of 60 acres of land, 3 villeins, 2 plough- 
teams and half a team belonging to the men, 8 acres of 
meadow, and a mill. Of live stock there were 2 rouncies, 
8 hogs, 20 sheep, and 3 straw skeps of bees, valued at 205., 
and at the time of ithe Survey at 30s. 
And 12 freemen under commendation to Edric held 38 acres of land and 

2 ploughteams, reduced to i at the time of the Survey. Thie value was 
formerly 8s. At the time of the Survey this manor was held by Hervey de 
Berri, and valued at los. It was 6 quarentenes in length and 4 in breadth, 
and paid in a gelt yd. William Malet had been seised of it on the day he 
died.' 

Another estate at the time of the Survey was that of Earl Alan, who 
had 32 acres of land, ij of meadow, and a ploughteam, formerly held by 

3 whole and 3 half freemen under commendation to Edric the Grim.^ 

A small estate here was that of Robert Malet consisting of 4 acres 
valued at 8^., held of him by Gilbert (de Colville).^ 

The last holding mentioned here was that in the time of the Confessor 
of a freeman under Edric's commendation, and consisted of 10 acres 
included in the valuation of Kenton (?). At the time of the Survey this 
was the estate of Robert Malet." 

There were two holdings mentioned in the Survey as in Loes under 
the head " Ash," and they probably relate to Campsey Ash. These are 
as follows : A carucate of land, 2^ ploughteams (reduced to ij at the time 
of the Survey), valued at 20s., which at the time of the Survey formed part 
of the estate of Robert Malet. ^ This estate had in the Confessor's time 
been held by 12 freemen under Edric's commendation. 

The second holding consisted of 17 acres, 3 bordars, and half a plough- 
team, valued at 3s., formerly held by a freeman under Edric's commendation. 
This Norman the sheriff held of Robert Malet at the time of the Survey.^ 

Manor of Campsey. 

This was the estate of Hervey de Berri at the time of the Survey. 
Later it was held by John de Moese, and passed to his son and heir, John de 
Moese, who died without issue in 1293, when it passed to his brother and 
heir, Thomas de Moese, and from him to his daughter and heir Margaret, 
married to Thomas de Weyland, Lord Chief Justice, who abjured the realm 
for felony in 1288.'' The manor went subsequently* to his 2nd son, John de 
Weyland, and then to his (John's) brother, Richard de Weyland, and on his 
death in 1319 to his daughter and heir Cecily, married to Bartholomew, 
Lord Burghesh, from whom it passed on his death in April, 1369, to their 
daughter and heir EUzabeth, married to Edward le Despencer. 

The manor then passed to the priory of Campsey, where it is said to 
have continued until the dissolution of the religious houses. 

'Dom. ii. 4436. ''See Brandeston Manor, in this Hundred. 

"Dom. ii. 293J. *But one would have thought that the 
Dom. ii. 3266. widow, Margaret, had for life, and 

■* Dom. ii. 327. she did not die until 1324, surviving 

5 Dom. ii. 3266. both her sons John and Richard. 

*Dom. ii. 327. 



3 



CAMPSEY. 231 

This, however, does not seem to be the case, for we find that Maria 
Willoughby died i6th May, 1515, seised of the manor, leaving William 
Willoughby, Lord de Eresby, her son and heir/ 

Page says that the manor was granted by the Crown in 1543 to Sir 
William Willoughby, who sold it to Anthony Bull, of Ipswich ; but Davy 
says the grant was made to Margery de Willoughby and Sir William, and 
they had licence to alienate in 1543 to John Soone, who had licence to 
alienate to John Valentine, apparently a moiety, as Page states they each 
held such. Soone had licence to alienate to Robert Vesey in the year 1553. 

In 1556 William Vesey held his first court for this manor, and had 
licence to alienate in 1565 to William Hunwick. The assurance was 
carried into effect by a fine levied by the said WiUiam " Hunwyck " against 
William Veysey and others in Michaelmas Term 7 Eliz. William Hunwick 
sold the manor in 1569 to John Bull, who died loth Sept. 1574, when it 
passed to his 3rd son Anthony Btdl.' This manor Davy refers to as 
" Campsey in Ash." 

Manor of the Priory of Campsey. 

In the year 1203 Theobald de Valoines gave his estate in this parish 
to his two sisters Joan and Agnes for the purpose of founding a nunnery 
here, wherein they and other pious women might live to the service of God.^ 
The foundation charter will be found amongst the Ashmolean MSS.'' 

This design having been put into execution, Joan de Valoines became 
the first prioress of the house. 

The nunnery was seated in a fruitful and pleasant valley on the east 
side of the River Deben, and on the north it had a large lake of water, so 
that the inmates of the house were well supplied with fish and wild fowl. 

Among the annual charges upon the endowment according to the wills 
of the founder and succeeding benefactors, were these : " For three wax 
candles, of the weight of three pounds, on the anniversary of Lady Anne 
Waylond, in the church of Ash ; and at the mass of the blessed Virgin, in 
the church of Campsey, 3s. 6^." 

" For seven flagons of oil, for burning in the lamps in the chapel of the 
blessed Virgin Mary and St. Nicholas, 5s. lod. ; and three flagons of wine, lor 
celebrating masses in the chantry, 2s. M. per annum." " For annual 
alms to poor persons on certain days, 19s." The sum of £lo was annually 
divided between the prioress, sacrist, camerarius, almoner, celarer, and 
infirmarer ; and £6. 13s. ^d. between nuns of this nunnery, according to 
ancient custom. 

In " Valor Ecclesiasticus," 1534, the gross value is ;^2i3. os. ^\d. 
It contained a prioress and nineteen nuns, previously to the Dissolution. 
Amongst the Additional Charters in the British Museum are some Court 
Rolls of the manor in the time of Hen. VI., and one is of the first court of 
Margery Rendelisham, prioress, held in 1448.^ The last prioress was 
Elizabeth Buttry, who died in 1543, and was buried in St. Stephen's church, 
in Norwich. On the dissolution of the religious houses this manor with 
the priory and demesne lands were granted to Sir WiUiam Willoughby. 
Davy says that the next lord was William Hunwick. Certainly, we find 

' I.P.M., 7 Hen. VIII. 29. ^ Close Rolls, 5 John, 15, 123. , 

«See Boss Hall, Sproughton, in Samford 4846, Lansdowne MSS. 447. 

Hundred, and Glevering Hall, s Add, Ch. 10514. 

Hacheston, in Loes Hundred. 



232 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

that a William Hunwick was called upon to show title to the manor in 
1566.' Davy then mentions John Bull, of Hacheston, from whom the manor, 
he says, passed in 1574 to his son and heir, Anthony Bull, as the main 
manor did. We find from the Memoranda Rolls that in 1570 John Bull 
and his wife and Anthony Bull were called upon to show title to the manor/ 

Page says the priory with the demesne lands (it is true he does not 
specify the manor) was sold by Sir William Willoughby to John Lane,^ who 
made the abbey his residence until his death. He married Margaret Castle, 
and died in 1560, when the manor descended in the same course as the 
Manor of Colville, in Rendlesham, in this Hundred, until the time of King 
Chas. I., when Robert Lane's father having removed to Mendlesham, in 
Hartismere Hundred, his son Robert sold this estate to Frederick Scot, 
a descendant from the Scots of Glemsford, in this county. He resided 
here in 1655, but afterwards sold the same to Sir Henry Wood, of Loudham, 
Knt., and removed to Leiston, where he died in 1662, and was buried there. 
From the Woods it passed to William Chapman, and subsequently 
descended in the same course as the Manor of Ufford, in Wilford Hundred, 
and is now like that manor vested in Colonel Howard Whitbread, C.B. 

There is evidently confusion between two manors. There appears to 
have been another manor, " Campsey Haugh and Northland." Amongst 
the State Papers in 1536 we find a petition of Sir Anthony Wyngfeld for 
Campsey Ash Manor," and in the loth Rep. of the Deputy Keeper of Public 
Records,' a note of particulars of farm of Campsey Ash Manor on an 
exchange with Sir WiUiam Willoughby in 35 Hen. VIH. [1543]. 

Further, we find from an inquis. p.m. of the time of Edw. VI. that 
Robert Downes died seised of the manor 26th Feb. 1547, leaving Francis 
his son and heir,* and that John Soone also died seised in 1551, leaving 
Francis his son and heir.' From another inquis. p.m. we learn that 22nd 
Dec. 1626, John Lanegen died seised and that Robert Lanegen was his 
son and heir.^ 

Arms of Lane : Arg. 3 chevrons Sa. 

Manor of Morehall Hall. 

Richard Wentworth held this manor and died in 1529, when it passed 
to his son and heir. Sir Thomas Wentworth. In 1570 Anthony Stringer 
and another passed it by fine to Sir Thomas Gresham and Ann his wife, 
who had licence to alien it to Sir Edmund Jenney in 1577. 

We find amongst the Additional Charters in the British Museum a 
precipe on a covenant concerning the manor in 1578,' and amongst the 
Chancery Proceedings an action by John Glover against Geoffrey Armiger, 
for performance of an agreement as to the manor in such action, stated to 
have been purchased by Sir Thomas Gresham, and of which purchase he 
had agreed to convey a moiety to John Glover." 

A second action in the Court of Chancery is by the said John Glover 
and William Glover his son against John Brame and Rose his wife for 
performance of an award in which it is stated that the Manor of Morehall 

'Memoranda, 8 Eliz. Hil. Rec. Rot. 61. «I.P.M., 2 Edw. VI. 62. 

'Memoranda, 12 Eliz. Pax. Rec. Rot. 3. 'I.P.M., 6 Edw. VI. 74. 

3 See Manor of Colville, Rendlesham, in ^I.P.M., 2 Car. I. pt. iii. 91. 

this Hundred. 'Add. Ch. 25335. 

*S.P. 1536, 1493. "C.P. i. 328. 
'App. ii. p. 300. 



CAMPSEY. 233 

and lands in Campsey Ash whereof Sir Thomas Gresham, deceased, was 
owner being to be sold, plaintiff and one Jeffry (sic) Armiger, deceased, had 
agreed to purchase the same jointly upon certain terms of dividing between 
them.' 

In 1578 we meet with a fine of the manor in which John Glover was 
plaintiff and Francis Armiger and Alicia his wife were deforciants.' A 
William Glover left the manor by his will in 1628 to his widow Elizabeth 
for life. She died in 1633, when it passed to his son and heir, William Glover, 
who died in 1641, when it went to his son and heir, William Glover, who sold 
to John Sheppard about 1654. He died in i66g, when the manor devolved 
on his only son, John Sheppard. He died unmarried in 1671, when it 
vested in Edmund Sheppard by devise from his cousin John. Edmund 
died in 1708, when the manor passed to his son and heir, John Sheppard, 
who died without issue in 1747, having devised to his cousin, John Sheppard, 
of Monewden, who died in 1793, when the manor passed to his only son, 
John Sheppard, who died in 1824, when it vested in his only son, John 
Wilson Sheppard, who dying in 1830 it devolved on his son and heir, John 
Sheppard, born in 1824.^ 

Manor of Ash. 

This manor is the manor to which the advowson of the parish was 
attached. It was parcel of Bigot's, and devolved as did the Manor of 
Framlingham, in this Hundred. It was formerly held by William de Hoo 
at half a knight's fee, and in 1560 belonged to Lord Abergavenny. 

The manor was in 1604 apparently granted to Thomas, Earl of Suffolk, 
and Hemy, Earl of Northampton, as part of the estate of the Duke of 
Norfolk.* 

The manor ultimately became vested in Theophilus Howard, Earl of 
Suffolk, who sold the same to John Braham or Brame. As the Earl died in 
1640 the sale must have been made prior to this date. This John Braham 
married Rose Armiger, and on his death the manor passed to his son and 
heir, John Braham, who married Anne, daughter of — Nash, and widow of 
— Shardelowes, of Felton, in Norfolk. He died in 1670, when the manor 
passed to his son and heir, John Braham, who married 20th Aug. 1662, 
Deborah, daughter and heir of Thomas Jacobs, of Mendham, and died in 
1684 (he was buried 6th May, 1684), when the manor passed to his widow 
Deborah, who survived until 19th Nov. 1729. John Braham had a son, 
John Braham, barrister-at-law, who married Jane, eldest daughter of Sir 
John Duke, of Benhall Lodge, Bart., and was killed in a duel by Capt. 
Tyrrel, 5th April, 1706, leaving two daughters and coheirs, EUzabeth and 
Jemmy, who, according to Page, were in 1764 residents in Campsey .= The 
manor was certainly held in 1729 by Deborah Braham or Brame, for she by 
her will dated this year directed it to be sold. 

As in 1757 we find the manor held by John Rivett, of Brandeston, it 
is not unlikely that the manor was acquired by John Rivett, who died m 
1756, he being the son of Thomas Rivett and Anne his wife, daughter of 

'C.P. i. 370. "S.P. 1604, p. 117- 

^20 Eliz. ^See Manor of Valence, in Blaxhall, in 

3 See Manor of Bawdsey, in Wilford Plomesgate Hundred. 

Hundred. 

FI 



234 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

John Braham and Deborah, the testatrix of 1729. The purchaser's son 
the year after his father's death, namely, in 1757, conveyed the manor to 
William Shuldham, of Marlesford. By 1817 the manor had passed to Lord 
Rendlesham, and he this year presented to the living. The manor has since 
devolved in the same course as the Manor of Naunton Hall, in Rendlesham, 
in this Hundred. 




CHARSFIELD. 235 

CHARSFIELD. 

|HERE were several holdings in this place. One was that of 
16 freemen, 12 being under commendation to Edric the Grim, 
one under the Abbot of Ely, and over three others the abbot 
had half commendation. It consisted of a carucate of land, 
5 ploughteams (reduced to 4 at the time of the Survey), 
and an acre of meadow. At the time of the Survey this 
was the estate of Earl Alan.' 

Another was that of Thurstan, son of Wido, who held Brihtmar, a free- 
man, who was under the commendation of the Abbot of Ely in the time of 
the Confessor. He had 30 acres, a ploughteam, and an acre of meadow, 
rendering 30s. Under the same commendation were five freemen, one being 
under commendation to Earl Ralph, and he was seised thereof, having 
16 acres included in the same valuation, but they could not render their 
share. 

One of them was under Edric's commendation, and William Malet 
was seised thereof. The value at the time of the Survey was 20s., and it 
was held by Thurstan of Roger Bigot.' 

Another estate was that of 14 freemen having a carucate of land, 13 
acres, 5 ploughteams (reduced to 3 at the time of the Survey), and an acre 
of meadow. 3^ of these were under the commendation of the Abbot of 
Ely and Edric of Laxfield. 

William Malet was seised thereof on the day of his death. The others 
were under the commendation of the abbot only. The value was 60s. 
When the Survey was taken this was the land of the Bishop of Bayeux, and 
was held of Roger Bigot by Ralph de Savigni. 

The Bishop also held here two socmen under the Abbot of Ely having 
7 acres included in the above valuation. He also held a freeman Marculf 
formerly under commendation to Edric of Laxfield, William Malet being 
seised thereof on the day he died. 

This freeman had one bordar, and formerly a ploughteam and an acre 
of meadow, and under him were four freemen having 4 acres. The value of 
the whole was los., reduced at the time of the Survey, when it was held by 
the Bishop of Bayeux, to 5s. " It," the Survey says, " was 8 quarentenes 
in length and 6 in breadth, and paid in a gelt iid. Others had holdings 
therein.^ 

Hugh de Montfort had an estate in this place consisting of 2 freemen 
under commendation to the Abbot of Ely, over one the half commendation 
being held by Hugh de Montfort's predecessor, consisting of 7 acres valued 
at z6d.^ ; 3 acres also were held by the Countess of Albemarle.' 

Several holdings of land in Charsfield appear under the adjoining 
Hundred of Wilford. 

They are as follows, beginning with the largest estate, that of Robert 
Malet : Of him Robert de Glanville held 24 freemen, who had been under 
Edric's commendation in King Edward's time. There were 2 carucates 
of land, and 5 bordars. In Saxon times there had been 7 ploughteams 
and the holding was valued at 30s. At the time of the Survey there were 

'Dom. ii. 2936. *Dora. ii. 4066. 

='Dom. ii. 343&. ^Dom. u. 431. 

3Dom. ii. 373^- 



236 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

only 4 ploughteams and 4 acres of meadow, but the value was increased 
by IDS. " It," says the Domesday entry, " is i league long and 5 quaren- 
tenes broad," and paid in a gelt 13!^!. The size cannot refer to Charsfield, 
for we have already had different dimensions given under the Bishop of 
Bayeux holding. To the church, however, belonged 36 acres valued at 3s.' 
Earl Alan had here 9 acres and half a ploughteam with i acre of meadow, 
and 18 acres, half a ploughteam, and half an acre of meadow, formerly 
held by a freeman under Edric's commendation.^ Earl Alan also held in 
what was called Little Charsfield 16 acres, formerly having half a plough- 
team when held by 9 freemen under Edric Grim's commendation, except 
one, who was under commendation to Robert Malet's predecessor.^ 

The Abbot of Ely held 2 freemen under commendation with 33 acres, 
I ploughteam, and i acre of meadow, valued at 55.* 

Hugh de Montfort held in demesne 60 acres and i acre of meadow 
with I ploughteam valued at 22s. 8^., which had formerly been held by 
10 freemen, half under Edric's commendation and half under the Abbot of 
Ely, with 2 ploughteams valued at 245.^ Geoffrey de Magnaville held 30 
acres and 2 bordars, with i ploughteam and 2 acres of meadow, valued at los., 
which estate had been held in the Confessor's time by a freewoman Leveva 
under Haldein's commendation. He also had 11 acres valued at 2s., which 
had formerly been held by a freeman under the said Haldein's commenda- 
tion.^ 

Manor of Charsfield. 

Though we find several persons holding land here at the time of the 
Great Survey, no manor is mentioned. However, as the manor was after- 
wards found to be held of the Castle of Framlingham, and as Roger Bigot 
was at the time of the Survey one of the tenants in chief here, he was 
probably chief lord. 

In the time of King John the lordship was vested in Wilham de Wey- 
land, who fined for his villeins here and in Westerfield. 

In 1259 John de Weyland held the lordship and had a grant of free 
warren,^ and Nicholas de Weyland had the grant confirmed to him in 1285.* 

The manor then passed through the Weylands and Bedingfields in the 
same course with the Manor of Brandeston in this Hundred, until Sir Henry 
Bedingfield, son and heir of Edmund Bedingfield, died seised of it in 1546, 
when it passed to Sir Henry's son and heir. Sir Edmund Bedingfield, who 
in the 2nd of Queen Elizabeth held the Manor of Charsfield Hall at half a 
knight's fee, and paid castle guard rent to Framlingham Castle. On his 
death the manor passed to his son and heir. Sir Thomas Bedingfield, who 
held his first court for this manor in 1586, and dying 9th April, 1590,' was 
succeeded by his son and heir. Sir Henry Bedingfield, who is said to have 
held his first court in 1592. He could then, however, have been not more 
than six years of age. He obtained a grant from the lord of the Manor of 
Framlingham that the Manor of Charsfield should not in future be holden of 
Framlingham by knight's service, but by fealty only. He sold the manor 

' Dom. ii. 319. 7 Chart. RoUs, 43 Hen. III. ; 53 Hen. HI. 4. 

Dom. u. 293 J. 8 Chart. RoUs, 13 Edw. I. 102. 

^- 9 See Manor of Flemworth, in Eye, in 

Dom. II. 387. Hartismere Hundf^d, and Beding- 

= Dom. u. 4066. field Hall, in Hoxne Hundred. 

"Dom. n. 4116. 



CHARSFIELD. 237 

of Chaxsfield Hall and the demesne lands belonging thereto in 1613 to Sir 
John Leman, Knt., Lord Mayor of London. 

Sir John Leman' was the son of William Leman. He was knighted 
by King Jas. I. in the 12th of his reign, and the same year kept his first 
court for this manor. By deed dated 7th April, 1629, he settled this estate 
upon his great-nephew William Leman (the eldest son of John Leman, 
eldest son of William Leman, of Beccles, the eldest brother of Sir John), and his 
heirs for ever. Sir John Leman died 26th March, 1632,^ and was buried 
under an elegant monument in the Fishmongers' Chapel in St. Michael's, 
Crooked Lane, London, having been a considerable benefactor to that city. 

William Leman, after the death of Sir John, kept his first court for 
this manor in 1640. He died in Oct. 1647, and was buried at Beccles, having 
by his will given the manor to Margaret, his 2nd wife, the daughter of 
Matthew Trot, of Hargrave, in this county, for life ; the reversion thereof 
to John Leman his eldest son by his ist wife Anna, daughter of Henry 
Rede, of Weston. John Leman was baptised at Beccles 24th Nov. 1636, 
and was the first of this family who resided here. He married at Lethering- 
ham 5th July, 1660, TheophUa, daughter of Robert Naunton, and held his 
first court in 1662. He died in 1688, and his eldest and youngest sons, 
after his decease'^without issUe, leaving William their brother, who 
succeeded to his father's inheritance. 

He married Elizabeth, the only daughter and heir of Robert Starling, 
of Charsfield, a family of good repute here for several ages, descendants of 
the Starlings of Witnesham and Brandeston. In or about 1735 the said 
Elizabeth, as widow of the above William Leman, inherited this estate, 
and resided here.^ 

It was soon afterwards purchased from the Lemans by William 
Jennens, of Acton Place, in this county. 

From this time the manor has devolved in the like course with the 
Manor of Acton, in Babergh Hundred. It is now vested in Earl Howe. 

A fine of the manor was levied in 1325 by Robert, son of William de 
" Weylond," and Cecilia his wife, daughter of Thomas Baldok, against William 
de Weyland,'* and the same year William de " Weylond " had a grant of 
free warren here.^ In 1327 the manor is specifically mentioned in the 
inquis. p.m. of William Weylond.^ In 1377 Sir Robert de Weyland granted 
a lease for 7 years of the manor to Thomas Staunnok, of Grundisburgh, at a 
rent of £18 per annum. It bears date Oxburgh, 12th August, i Rich. 11.^ 
The manor is also mentioned in the inquisitions p.m. of Sir Thomas Tudenham 
in 1465,* of Margaret Bedingfield, widow, in 1475,^ of Sir John Wingfield in 
1481,'° of Sir Thomas Bedingfield, who died 15th March, 1538," and of 
Sir Anthony Wingfield, who died 20th Aug. 1552, leaving Robert his son 
and heir,'" the last two probably as trustees. 

' See Manor of Brampton, in Blything which he repaired, but which was 

Hundred. subsequently taken down by Wm. 

2 See certificate of Edward Henyeve, Jennens. 

feodary for Suffolk, of the lands of " Feet of Fines, 19 Edw. II. 4. 

which Sir John Leman died seised, 5 Chart. Rolls., 19 Edw. II. 18. 

amongst the State Papers in 1635 ^ I.P.M., i Edw. III. 79. 

(S. P. 1635, P- 69). 'Add. Ch. 5511. 

3 Davy says, but we are unable to verify ^ I.P.M., 5 Edw. IV. 34. 

the statement, that on WiUiam ol.p.M., 15 Edw. IV. 38. 

Leman marrying the heiress of ■" I.P.M., 21 Edw. IV. 59. 

the " Sterlings " he removed from " I.P.M., 31 Hen. VIII. 5. 

Charsfield Hall to her seat near the " I.P.M., 7 Edw. VI. 65. 
church, called the White House, 




238 THE MANORS^ OF SUFFOLK. 

CRETINGHAM. 

MANOR was held here in Saxon times by Brihtwald under 
commendation of the Queen, and consisted of 83 acres, 
a villein, a bordar, a serf, a ploughteam in demesne and 
half belonging to the men, and 4 acres of meadow. Also 
a church with 8 acres valued at i6d. Of live stock there 
were 3 rouncies, 3 beasts, 24 hogs, 40 sheep, 25 goats, and 
4 hives of bees, valued at 20s. At the time of the Survey 

the value was 30s., and the manor was held by Amund of Humfrey the 

Chamberlain. 

This Humfrey also had an estate of 66 acres of landj 2 ploughteams, 
and an acre of meadow, the value being 20s., formerly held by eight whole 
and four half freemen under commendation to Brihtwald. At the time of 
the Survey there was but a ploughteam and a half, and the value was 21s.' 

Another estate was that of Earl Alan, and consisted of 24 acres, a 
ploughteam, and 2 acres of meadow, formerly held by five freemen under 
commendation to Anand.'' 

Earl Hugh had three estates here. One consisted of a carucate of land, 
7 bordars, a serf, i^ ploughteams belonging to the men, and the same in 
demesne, wood for the maintenance of 12 hogs, and 8 acres of meadow. 
Of live stock there were i rouncy, 4 beasts, 16 hogs, 23 sheep, and 7 goats. 
Also a church with 18 acres, valued at 3s. The value of the whole being 
40s. This estate had in the Confessor's time been held by Edric, a freeman, 
by commendation half under Edric and half under Athestan. The second 
estate consisted of 6\ acres and half a ploughteam included in the same 
valuation, and formerly held by three freemen under the said Edric's commen- 
dation. The third estate consisted of 48 acres of land, 4 bordars, 2 plough- 
teams, and 4 acres of meadow, valued at 20s. This estate had been held by 
four freemen under Athestan' s commendation in the Confessor's time, when 
there was but i ploughteam, and the value was 15s. only. Earl Hugh 
also had 8 acres of waste land valued at i.6d.^ 

The Bishop of Bayeux had two small estates here at the time of the 
Survey. The first was held by Ralph de Savigni, having been formerly 
held by Balchi, a freeman under commendation of Athestan. It consisted of 
24 acres of land, an acre of meadow, and half a ploughteam, valued at 4s. 
The second had been formerly held by a freeman under Athestan' s com- 
mendation, and consisted of 38J acres, a bordar, 2 acres of meadow, and a 
ploughteam, valued at 125.* 

Another estate was that of the Abbot of Ely, consisting of a villein 
with 16 acres and half a ploughteam, valued at 35.^ 

Amongst the lands of Hugh de Montfort at the time of the Survey 
were two estates here. The first was that of Roger de Candos, and had 
been the estate in the Confessor's time of Aluric, a freeman under Harold. 
It consisted of 2J carucates of land and 15 acres, 6 villeins, 21 bordars, 
2 ploughteams in demesne, and 6 belonging to the men, 8 acres of meadow, 
wood for the maintenance of 8 hogs, a mill, 2 beasts, 20 sheep, and 20 hogs. 

'Dora. ii. 433. *Dom. ii. 3736. 

»Dom. ii. 294. ^Dojjj y ^SSft. 

^Dora. ii. 300. 



CRETINGHAM. 239 

The value was formerly (when we find also 2 serfs and a rouncy) roos., 
but at the time of the Survey the value had risen to £8 and an ounce of gold. 
The holding was a league in length and 3 quarentenes in breadth, and paid 
in a gelt 11^. It is said in the Survey that others had holdings here. 

The second estate was also held by Roger de Candos, and had been 
formerly held by 10 freemen under commendation to (Harold or Aluric ?). 
It consisted of 46 acres (9J being claimed by William de Arcis and 2 half 
freemen), and a ploughteam valued at 20s. One of these freemen was 
under commendation to Edric of Laxfield, and William Malet was seised 
thereof on the day of his death.' 

Manor of Cretingham al. Tye's. 

This was the estate of Brihtwald in Saxon times, and of Amund holding of 
Humfrey the Chamberlain at the time of the Domesday Survey. The 
village of Cretingham was anciently divided into two, the one called Great 
Cretingham, the other Little Cretingham next Otley, which latter had 
formerly a chapel attached. But the smaller was long since swallowed up 
by the greater, and in the general name of Cretingham, which in Domesday 
times and later appears as Gretingham. There are seven manors here : 
(i) Manor of Cretingham al. Tye's ; (2) Manor of Harolds ; (3) Manor of 
St. Margaret ; (4) Manor of Kettlebars ; (5) Manor of Little Gretingham ; 
(6) Manor of Cretingham al. Suly aid's ; (7) Manor of St. Peter. 

The lordship of Cretingham al. Tye's in or near the Conqueror's time 
was vested in the Gretinghams, and Nicholas de Gretingham levied a fine 
of this manor 1251. From the Gretinghams it passed to John de Hoo, 
who was lord in 1341, and a fine was levied this year of the manor in which he 
and Dionysia his wife were plaintiffs, and John del Brok, parson of the 
church of Easton, and Robert Baret were deforciants.'' From John de 
Hoo the manor passed to his daughter Dionysia, who married Sir Peter de 
Tye,^ son of Peter. He died seised in 1375, when the manor passed to his 
son and heir. Sir Robert Tye. He made his will 1382,* and died in 1383, 
when the manor passed to his son and heir. Sir Robert Tye (born after his 
father's death), who held his first court in 1407, and was the last lord of 
this manor of the surname of Tye. He sold the manor to Sir William 
Phelip, of Denyngton, Knt., son of St. John Phelip, of Denyngton, Knt. 
The court he first kept for the Manor of Cretingham alias Tyes was in 1415. 
From this time the manor passed in the same course as the Manor of Clopton, 
in Carlford Hundred to the time of Sir Anthony Rous, except that we 
find that this manor was on the attainder of William, Viscount Beaumont, 
granted by King Edw. IV. to that nobleman's wife Joan for life, with 
remainder to John Mowbray, Duke of Norfolk, and she held her first 
court for the manor under the name of " Joan Beaumont, the wife of 
William Beaumont, Knt." (then so called), in 1462. 

Sir Anthony Rous held his first court for this manor in 1543, and loth 
September, 1544 sold this manor to Andrew Rivett, of Brandeston, in 
fee, whose estate therein was confirmed 4th May, 1555, by Thomas Rous. 

Andrew Rivett kept his first court for the Manor of Cretingham alias 
Tyes 1547. 

'Dom. ii. 4066. ^See Manor of Kessingland Itchingham, 

'Feet'of Fines, 15 Edw. III. 14. in Mutford Hundred. 

♦Proved 24th Aug., 1383. 



240 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

From this time to the present the manor has devolved in the same 
course as the Manor of Brandeston, and is now vested in Charles Austin, 
of Brahdeston Hall. 

John de" Welond" had a grant of free warren here in 1259.' 

The following is a copy of a rental of this manor in 1725 :— 
Francis Goulston Esquire for Copyhold Lands late Crapnells 

2s. 6d. late Wades los. And for Freehold Lands late 

Wades called Dawbneys id. the whole 00 12 07 

Thomas Hawes gent, for Copyhold lands late Crapnells £2. 5S- 

late Hubberdes 5s. And for a Freehold Mesuage and 

Lands anciently Barnags is. 6d 02 11 06 

Martin Harsaut, for Copyhold land late Godmans 9s. 2d. 

And for Freehold Lands late Kings 4s. 8^. and 2 Capons . . 00 13 10 
Thomas Woolnough for Copyhold land late Heywards 4s. And 

for a freehold Tent, called Gowers late Reynolds is 00 05 00 

Robert Sf arrow gent for Copyhold Lands late Stevensons and 

formerly Churchills 3s. 9^ 00 03 09 

Robert Stevenson, for Copyhold lands late Revans lis. id., and 

I Capon and late Aldrich formerly Dows ^d 00 11 05 

John Raydon for Copyhold lands late Stebbings 8s. 2d. And 

for Freehold lands late Stebbings is. 4^ 00 09 06 

John Firmin for Copyhold lands late Meares 5s. 2d. And for 
Freehold lands late Popes is. 11^. Gowers Tenement 
2d., and a Piece next Reedings -^d. and 2 Capons 00 07 06 

John and Mildred Edwards, for Copyhold Lands called Turpins 
io<:^. And for Freehold lands late Packard Turners, &c., 
Tod 00 01 08 

William Bradlaugh for Copyhold lands late Peirses i6s. And 

for Freehold lands late Fullers 2d 00 16 02 

Joseph Sparrow Clerk for Copyhold Lands late Nelsons, 

formerly Raydons 2s 00 02 00 

Elisabeth Bigsby Widow for Copyhold Lands late Lovells M.. . 00 00 08 

John Chatten, for Freehold lands late Blomfields, formerly 

Geytons 3d 00 00 03 

Henry Chamberlain for a Freehold Tenement or Cottage late 

Mans, 6d 00 00 06 

Brandeston Inhabitants, for one piece of Copyhold-Town-Land 

^d 00 00 04 

The foUowing is an account of the customs of this manor as the same 
are stated in Chap. xiv. of the Rivett MS. with references to the Court 
Rolls :^ 

The Wife, after her Husband's decease, shall be endowed of the Third 
Part of such Copyhold Lands and Tenements holden of this Manor, as her 
Husband died seised of, during the Coverture. (Rot. Cur. 31 EUz. 49 H. 6.) 

Copyhold Tenents of this Manor are punished for not repairing their 
Copyhold Houses (Rot. Cur. 5, 4, 3, i Eliz. 5 B. 6, 26, 23, H. 6.). But the 
Copyhold Tenents may take down Timber or rather Trees growing upon 

'Chart. Rolls, 43 Hen. III. 3. 



CRETINGHAM. 241 

their Copyhold Lands, without Forfeiture, or the Lords Licence : Which 
encouraged Thomas Hawes gent, in order for a Wood, to plant with Acorns 
Parcell of his Copyhold land, holden of this Manor, called Woodfield, abutting 
upon the Lands of Robert Fenny Esquire, towards the North and West 
in 1724. Where a Father dieth seised of Copyhold Lands holden of this 
Manor, leaving two or more sons alive at his death, the youngest son is heir 
to such Lands and not the Eldest Brother (Rot. Cur. i Eliz. 34, 20, H. 8, 
2 E. 4, 5 H. 5.). 

The Stewards of the Manor have been : — 

Henry Rows Esquire (7 E. 4). John Astak (7 H. 4). 

Humphry Wingfield Esquire (14 H. 8).' Brother to Sir Richard Wingfield, 
then Lord of this Manor : He was of Gray's Inn, and Speaker of the 
House of Commons (24 H. 8), Serjeant at Law, and Knighted, and 
from him are descended the Wingfields of Brantham. 

Robt. Tovell gent. (31 Eliz.). 

Henry Sterling of Occold gent, 1635. 

George Sterling of Charsfield Esquire, 1642. 

John Spencer of Rendlesham, Esquire, 1673. 

Thomas Dade of Tannington Esquire, 1680. 

Thomas Redgrave of Woodbridge gent. 1699. 

Roht. Hawes of Framlingham gent. 1720. 

In St. John's College, Cambridge, is a manor roll, free tenants, &c., 
copyholders, &c., of Cretingham al. Cretingham Hall Manor,' and amongst 
the Additional Charters in the British Museum a release of this manor in 
1476,'' also deeds relating to the manor in 1577 and 1598.^ 

This manor is mentioned specifically in the inquis. p.m. of Sir William 
Phelip, who died in 1440 ;* in that of William, Viscount Beaumont, Lord 
Bardolf, in 1463 f and there is a Chancery suit respecting the manor 
amongst the proceedings in the time of Queen Elizabeth between Andrew 
" Revette " and John " Revette."® There is also a Chancery suit in the 
same reign relating to this manor, Barlow Hill Manor, and Brandeston, 
between Andrew " Ryvett " and Elizabeth his wife plaintiffs and Thomas 
Wyngfeld defendant.' A fine was levied of the manor in Trinity Term, 
1549, by John Haton and others against Andrew Rivett. 

Arms of Tye : Argent, a chevron Gules. 

Manor of Harolds. 

This manor was settled by Sir William Phelip, Lord Bardolf, on his 
chantry at Dennington, and was held by it until the Suppression, when it 
vested in the Crown, and was in 1536 granted to Richard Fulmerston. In 
1541 we meet with a fine of the manor levied by John Redgrave against 
Andrew Rivett and others.' Subsequently we find it vested in Thomas, 
Lord Wentworth, and Jane his wife, for they had licence to alienate the 
manor in 1581 to Reginald Barker. In 1592 the manor was again in the 
Crown, and in 1607 granted to Robert Mildmay and others, and Robert 
held his first court in 1614. Possibly the grant was limited in duration, 

« S. 40. 1748, the plate being dedicated to 

*Add. Ch. 10074. Sir John Rous, Bart. 

'Add. Ch. 32907, 32908. ^Ib. 3 Edw. IV. 30. 

*I.P.M., 19 Hen. VI. 30. A drawing of « C.P. ser. ii. B. cxlix. 7. 

the tomb of himself and his wife 'C.P. ser. ii. B. cl. 7. 

was published by Joseph Kirby in 'Fine, Trin. 33 Hen. VIII. 

G I 



242 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

for we find the Crown again granting the manor in 1614, this time to William 
Whitmore and George Whitmore who immediately granted it to Robert 
Mildmay, who thus apparently had a grant from the Crown direct of the 
manor in 1607, and subsequently in 1614 acquires it from other grantees of 
the Crown. Robert Mildmay sold the manor to John Cotton, of Soham 
Lodge, 16th. May, 1642. He held his first court this year, and died in 
1655, when the lordship passed to his son and heir, Allen Cotton. He 
resided at the Marlesford Old Hall, and married ist Frances Smith, probably 
daughter of Thomas Smith, of Walsoken, co. Norfolk, and 2ndly — Wyard, 
widow. By deed 14th April, 1662, Ralph Cotton released to his brother 
Allen all interest in the manor. 

His will is dated i8th Dec. 1696, and the manor on his death in 1699 
passed to his son and heir, Ralph Cotton, of Marlesford Old Hall, who 
married Frances, daughter and heir of Francis Herbert (Harbert), and was 
buried at Easton 24th April, 1735, when the manor devolved under his 
will, dated 12th Feb. 1731, upon his eldest son, Frederick Cotton, who sold 
it about 1744 to Robert May,' who about two years later disposed of it to 
John Rivett, of Brandeston. On his death in 1756 the manor passed to his 
son and heir, John Rivett, who held his first court in 1756, and died in 1773, 
when the manor vested in his son and heir, John Rivett, who held his first 
court for this manor in 1775.'' 

There is a Survey of the manor taken in 1607 in the Public Record 
Office, having come from the Chapter House. 

Manor of St. Margaret. 

This was the lordship of Hugo de Naunton in the time of King Edw. HL 
In 1428 we find it vested in James Joce or Joyce, who was succeeded by his son 
and heir William Joce, who died in 1483, from which time until the time 
of Sir Lionel ToUemache created a baronet 22nd May, 161 1, the manor 
passed in the same course as the Manor of Helmingham, in Bosmere and 
Claydon Hundred. The manor was included with the Manor of Helming- 
ham and other manors in a fine levied in 1516 by Sir Richard Wentworth 
and others against Lionel " Talmage " and Edith his wife.^ 

On the death of Sir Lionel Talmash or ToUemache this manor passed to 
his 2nd son, Robert ToUemache, and on his death in 1673 passed to his son 
and heir, Stotbury ToUemache, who died without issue in 1690, ^yhen the 
manor devolved upon his sister and heir Elizabeth, married to Edward 
Duke, of London, M.D. She died in 1704, when the manor passed to her 
grandson, Talmash Duke, son of Talmash Duke and Margaret Palmer his 
wife,* on whose death without issue in 1713 the manor passed to his sister 
and heir, who sold the same to William Acton, of Bramford, by deeds 
dated 29th and 30th Nov. 1715. On his death in 1743 without issue the 
manor passed to his brother, Nathaniel Acton, who died in 1745, when it 
vested in his son and heir, Nathaniel Acton.^ 

' Frederick Cotton had, by deeds ist and 5 See Manor of Illarius, in Bentley, in 

2nd May, 1746, made a conveyance Samford Hundred, and Manor of 

to John " Revett " in trust to sell Baylham, in Bosmere and Claydon 

for payment of debts. Hundred. His marriage settlement 

' See Manor of Brandeston, in this Hun- with Caroline Weary is dated 19th 

dred. and 2oth March, 1753. 

3 Fine, Mich. 8 Hen. VHI. 

* Marriage settlement, 17th and i8th 
December, 1685. 



CRETINGHAM. 243 

He and his son by deeds 12th and 13th Feb. 1779, sold and conveyed 
the manor to William Legget, of Bramford, in fee, and he by will 7th March, 
1780/ devised the same to his daughters, Sarah Legget and Frances. 
Frances by her will 2nd April, 1792, devised her estate in the manor to her 
sister for life, and then to John Crabb and John Miles in trust for sale.^ 

Sarah Legget by her will ist May, 1792,^ devised the manor to the 
said John Crabb and John Miles to be sold, and died in 1795. The sale was 
effected by the executors and trustees of the wills of both Frances and 
Sarah Legget, and the manor passed by purchase to Thomas Morse, of 
Lound, by deed dated loth Oct. 1793. This is probably the manor now 
said to be vested in Lord Rendlesham. 

Arms of Legget : Arg. a saltire engrailed Azure. 

Manor of Kettlebars. 

This lordship was held in the time of King Hen. HL by Richard de 
Kettlebars, who by himself or his ancestors gave name to the manor and 
built the manor house, encompassing it with a moat. This was the seat 
of the Kettlebars family, and the demesne lying in that part of the parish 
nearest Earl Soham consisted of 100 acres of land, pasture, and wood 
held of the Honor of Chester. Richard de Kettlebars was patron of the 
church of Monewden and held in 1219 20 acres of land in Kettleburgh and 
40 acres of land in Easton. He. left issue John de Kettlebars, his son and 
heir, who sold the advowson of Monewden and 18 acres of land there in 
1263 to William de Weyland. John de Kettlebars was succeeded by his 
son and heir, Thomas de Kettlebars, on whose death in 1306 the manor 
passed to his son and heir, John de Kettlebars, on whose death it went to 
his son and heir, Thomas de Kettlebars, on whose death without issue it 
devolved on his sister and heir Margaret who died without issue about 
1329, and was succeeded by her cousin and heir, Thomas de Kettlebars. 
He was the son of Thomas, 2nd son of Thomas, the grandfather of Margaret. 
Thomas Kettlebars the cousin died in 1359, when the manor passed to his 
daughter and eventual heir Margaret, her two brothers John and Thomas 
having died without issue. Margaret de Kettlebars did homage for her 
lands in Kettleburgh at Framlingham Castle, and afterwards married 
Thomas Mulso, to whom the manor passed in 1381, On Thomas's death 
the manor vested in his son and heir, William Mulso, whose only daughter 
and heir by Anne his wife married Lionel Lowthe, and Margaret, their 
only daughter and heir, married Richard Cornwallis (about the commence- 
ment of Queen Elizabeth's reign), who in her right inherited the manor. 

He was the 3rd son of Sir John Cornwallis, of Brome, in Hartismere 
Hundred, Knt., by Mary his wife, daughter of Edward Sulyard, and brother 
of Sir Thomas Cornwallis, Comptroller of the Household to Queen Mary, 
whom he greatly aided. 

In the parish church of Cretingham are monuments to Lionel Lowthe 
and Margaret his daughter, widow of Richard Cornwallis, who was buried 
at Shotley, in this county, and also memorials to some other members of 
the Cornwallis family. 

Richard CornwaUis died before 1587, and his widow Margaret survived 
until 1603, when the manor passed to their son and heir, John Comwallis, 

'Proved 1781. 3 Proved 1795. 

"Will proved July 1792. 



244 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

of Earl Soham. He married ist Catherine, daughter of John Blennerhasset, 
of Barsham, and 2ndly Elizabeth, 2nd daughter of — Wolsey and widow 
of William Tuttell, of Saxlingham, in Norfolk, and died 13th June, 1615,' 
when the manor passed to his son, Thomas Cornwallis, of Ipswich, who 
married Mary, daughter of Edward Grimston, of Beadfield, co. Essex, 
sister of Sir Harbottle Grimston, and died without issue 23rd April, 1627,' 
when the manor devolved upon her cousin, John Cornwallis, the son of 
Thomas and Elizabeth his wife, daughter of Richard Molineux, which 
Thomas was the brother of John, the father of Thomas, who died in 1627. 
John the cousin married EUzabeth, daughter and heir of Charles Grimston, 
and died and was buried at Cretingham, 12th Aug. 1672, when the manor 
passed to his son and heir, John ComwaUis. He married Grace, daughter 
of Thomas Bishop, of Hesteley Hall, in Thomdon, widow of Henry Marsham, 
of Stratton, and died 4th Dec. 1698.^ 

The manor passed to his widow Grace for life, and subject to this 
interest descended to Margaret,* their daughter, married to J ohn Rabitt, 
who in right of his wife held a first court for this manor in 1701, and died 
25 th Sept. 1702, when Margaret his widow became lady, and held until her 
death 4th Mar. 1718, when the manor passed to her son and heir Reginald 
Rabitt, of Bramfield Hall, High Sheriff in 1737. He married Elizabeth, 
daughter and heir of — Rust, of Battisford, who died 15th July, 1760. 
Reginald Rabitt died 25th Jan. 1763,' when the manor passed to his son 
and heir, Reginald Rabitt, High Sheriff in 1778. He married ist Mary 
Ingall, who died without issue, and 2ndly in 1771 Mary Newson. He 
died 1st Oct. 1786, and the manor passed to his son and heir, another 
Reginald Rabitt, who married 15th Jan. 1793, Mary, only daughter of 
Matthias Kerrison, of Bungay, and of Hoxne and Broome Hall, and sister 
of Gen. Sir Edward Kerrison, Bart., M.P., of Oakley Park, and on his 
(Reginald's) death 31st May, 1810, the manor devolved on his son and 
heir, the Rev. Reginald Rabitt, of Bramfield Hall, vicar of Thomton-cum- 
Bagworth, co. Leicester who 28th Aug. 1828, married Mary, eldest 
daughter of Richard Bickerton, of Roden, Salop, and died without issue. 

The manor was in 1853 vested in Charles Austin and has since gone 
with the main manor. 

Arms of Mulso : Ermine, on a bend. Sable, three goats' heads erased 
Argent, armed, Or. Of Rabitt : Arg. a chevron Sa., charged with five 
guttes d'or, between 3 rabbits' heads couped of the second, each charged on 
the breast with a gutte d'or. 

Manor of Little Gretingham. 

This was the estate of Nicholas de Gretingham in the time of King 
Hen. III. In 1287 it was held by Simon de Gretingham, and successively 
passed through the hands of Robert de Gretingham and his son and heir, 
Geoffrey de Gretingham. In 1361 it was held by WiUiam Clere. 

Manor of Cretingham al. Sulyards. 

We learn nothing of this manor save that it was held by Sir Henry 
Kingsmill, Knt., who died seised of it in 1624, and it is probably the manor 
called "Sulyardes Manor" involved in the Chancery action Lionel 
Talmache v. John Hastinges.* 

'Will 8th June, 1615. *Davy says Mary, and so on inscription. 

'Will 25th July, 1625. 'Will 22nd Sept. 1761. 

3WiU 13th Sept. 1698. 6C.P. ser. ii. B. clxxix. 31. 



CRETINGHAM. 245 

Manor of St. Peters. 

This manor belonged to St. Peter's Priory, Ipswich, until the dis- 
solution of the religious houses, when, passing to the Crown, it was granted 
in 1528 to Cardinal Wolsey as an endowment for his college at Ipswich.' 
The Cardinal granted the manor in 1528 to the dean of Cardinal college, 
Ipswich. On Wolsey's disgrace the manor went again to the Crown, and 
was probably granted to one of the Bacon family, for before 1577 
we find that George Bacon, of Hessett, died seised of it, described as the 
manor or rectory of Cretingham, called Cretingham Parsonage. Thomas 
Badbie and Thomas Andrews, executors of the said George Bacon and 
others, i6th Sept. 19 Eliz. [1577] sold the manor to John Coggeshall and 
John Bacon,'' who parted with the same to Lionel Wythe, who by deed dated 
20th Sept. 40 Ehz. [1598] in which he is described as "senior" of Creting- 
ham, " yeoman," granted the same to his son John.' 

In 1837, if any manor then existed, it probably was vested in Henry 
Chenery, of Eye. In 1855 the manor was stated to be vested in Thomas 
Chenery, and in 1885 in E. Chenery, of Eye. It is probably now vested 
in the Rev. J. M. Brooke. 

One of the manors of Cretingham is now stated to be vested in Lord 
Rendlesham — it may be either this manor or St. Margarets. 



'S.P. 20 Hen. VIII. 4259 (2). ^Add. Ch. 32908. 

^Add. Ch. 32907. 




246 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

DALLINGHOO. 

|HERE were several estates in this place. One was held 
by Robert de Glanville of Robert Malet at the time of the 
Survey, and had formerly been held by 4 freemen under 
Edric's commendation. It consisted of 97 acres, a bordar, 
2 ploughteams, 2 acres of meadow, and wood sufficient to 
support 4 hogs, the value being 21s. 

Another estate of Robert Malet was held of him by 
William de Caen, having been formerly held by a freeman half under Edric's 
commendation and half under the Abbots of Ely. It consisted of 13 acres, 
half a bordar, and half an acre of meadow valued at 2s. 8^. Robert Malet 
also had in that part of the place in the Hundred of Wilford, the fourth 
part of an acre valued at 2d. which had in Saxon times belonged to a 
freeman.' 

Earl Alan had two estates in this place at the time of the Survey. 
The first consisted of 4J acres, formerly held by a freeman under commenda- 
tion to Edric the Grim. The second consisted of an acre included in the 
valuation of Soham, held by a half freeman under Amand's commendation. 
Also a church with 29 acres and 2 acres of meadow." 

Among the lands of Roger de Poictou was a small holding of 6 acres 
valued at 30^., formerly that of a half freeman under commendation to 
Edric the Grim.^ 

Another estate was that of the Abbot of Ely, held by four freemen under 
his commendation, consisting of half a carucate of land, 2 ploughteams, and 
an acre of meadow, valued at 8s. The abbot also held a half freeman 
having 16 acres valued at 2s. 8f?.* 

The Abbot of Ely also had in that part of Dallinghoo which is in Wilford 
Hundred a freeman with 19 acres of land, half a ploughteam, and i acre of 
meadow, valued at 5s. It is under the head " Hoi " in the Domesday 
Survey.^ 

Among the lands of Hervey de Berri when the Survey was taken were 
three holdings. The first consisted of 40 acres valued at 6s., being the 
estate of three freemen in the time of the Confessor. The second was 
formerly that of two freemen under commendation, half to Swarting 
and half to Bruman, and consisted of 20 acres and formerly half a plough- 
team, valued at 3s. It was a league long and 3 quarentenes broad, and 
paid in a gelt y\d. The last was formerly the estate of two half freemen 
under Edric's commendation, and consisted of 5 acres valued at izd.^ 

The parish is not entiriely in Loes Hundred, but part lies within Wilford 
Hundred known by the name of the Hamlet, and for distinction's sake 
Earl Dallinghoo. The part in which the church is situated is in Loes 
Hundred and called Dallinghoo without any addition. It was held of the 
Honor of Eye with three parts in four of the advowson, and Earl Dallinghoo 
held one turn in four of the presentation of an incumbent as of ancient 
right. 

It seems more convenient to treat of all the manors under this 
Hundred. There are four manors : (i) The Manor of Dallinghoo ; (2) 
Dallinghoo Campsey; (3) Manor of Earls Dallinghoo; (4) Manor of 
Bast Brodish. 

• Dom. ii. 325, 327. 4 Dom. ii. 3886. 

^Dom. ii. 294. r ^Doijj jj ^Slfi. 

3 Dom. ii. 348. ^Dom. ii. 446. 



DALLINGHOO. 247 

Manor of Dallinghoo. 

There is an order on the Close Rolls in 1214 made by the King that 
William Malet have full seisin of this and Finborough Manor.' 

William de Glanville, t. Rich. I., died without issue. Geoffrey the 
brother succeeded, and was lord of this manor and Alderton. Geoffrey died 
in the early part of the reign of Hen. III. and was succeeded by his son 
and heir Geoffrey, who died without issue, leaving this manor to his five 
sisters and coheirs — Agnes, wife of Baldwin, a Norman ; Emma, wife of 
John de Grey ; Basilio, wife of William de Bovile ; Elizabeth, wife of Almaric 
Peche; and Juliana, who died without issue. This manor seems to have 
been allotted to the Boviles, and in 1252 we meet with a fine levied between 
John de Bovile and William de Bovile of this manor whereby it was con- 
veyed to William de Bovile for life, remainder to John and the heirs of 
his body, remainder to the right heirs of William, and in 1279 John de Bovile 
was found to hold it of the Honor of Eye. 

Sir William de Bovile, son of William, sold the manor in 1313 to 
William de Rungeton, and on the Patent Rolls for this year we find a pardon 
to William de Rungeton and Mary his wife for acquiring without licence 
to them and their heirs from William de Bovile this manor with the advow- 
son of a foiirth part of its church held in chief as of the Honor of Eye in the 
King's hands. '' 

The " advowson of a fourth part of its church " seems strange in the light 
of what has been said respecting the advowson. Before 1326 the manor 
had vested in Sir Walter de Norwich and Katherine his wife, and from 
this time to the time of William de Ufford, 2nd EarFof Suffolk, the manor 
passed in the same course of devolution as the Manor of Dalham, in Risbridge 
Hundred, and we find that in 1357 Sir John de Norwich had a grant of free 
warren in this manor. ^ The manor is also mentioned in the inquis. p.m. 
of his grandson and namesake in 1374.* 

The manor then seems to have passed to Sir Williarh Carbonell, who 
married Margaret or Margery, daughter and heir of Sir John Bovile. From 
him it passed to Robert Carbonel, his son and heir, who died in 1397,^ 
when the manor passed to his son and heir, Sir John Carbonel. By a deed 
dated the Feast of the Apostles Philip and James 10 Hen. V. [1422], Thomas 
Pecke, clerk, granted to Sir Robert Brewys, Knt., John Fitz Rauff, Oliver 
Groos, and others the remainder in his manor expectant on the death of 
Sir John Carbonell and Margaret his wife, or rather subject to their interest 
during the life of Sir John, and there was an exemplification of this deed 
i8th May, 32 Hen. VI. [1454].* It was no doubt a settlement merely, for on 
Sir John Carbonell's death in 1423 the manor went to his son, Sir Richard 
Carbonell, who died in 1429.^ 

The manor then passed to Sir Robert Wingfield, of Letheringham, 
and on his death in 1431^ passed to his son. Sir John Wingfield, of Lethering- 
ham. He levied a fine of the manor with WiUiam Jenney and John Glem- 
ham against Robert Lyston and Isabella his wife in 1472.' 

'Close Rolls, 16 John, pt. ii, T3- *Add. Ch. 17243. 
"PatRolls,7Edw. Il.pt.ii, 9; Originalia, ^I.P.M., 10 Hen. VI. 11. 

7 Edw. II. 18. ^ For full particulars as to this Sir Robert 

3 Chart. Rolls, 31 Edw. III. 2. and his son, Sir John, see the 

"I.P.M., 48 Edw. III. 52. account of Thorpe Hall Manor, in 

5 1. P.M.! 21 Rich. I. 14; see Manor of Hasketon, in Carlford Hundred. 

Badingham, in Hoxne Hundred. s Feet of Fines, 12 Edw. IV. 26. 



248 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

He died in 1481,' when the manor passed to his widow Elizabeth for 
life, and subject thereto vested in his 12th son, Sir Humphrey Wingfield,' 
of Brantham Hall, Speaker of the House of Commons in 1532, and ancestor 
of the Wingfields of Brantham, of Wakefield, and of Norton, &c. He died 
23rd Oct. 1545 .^ In his inquisition p.m. the manor is said to have been held 
by Sir Humphrey of Sir Anthony Wingfield, and it is not mentioned in 
the inquis. p.m. of Sir Anthony Wingfield, who died 20th Aug. 1552.* The 
manor passed to his eldest brother, Sir John Wingfield, son of Sir John. 
From Sir John Wingfield's death in 1509 until the time of Sir Robert 
Wingfield's (3rd Bart.) death in 1671 the manor descended in the same 
course as the Manor of Thorpe Hall, in Hasketon, in Carlford Hundred. 

On the death of Sir Robert Wingfield, 3rd Bart., unmarried, he was 
succeeded in the lordship by his half-brother. Sir Heru-y Wingfield, 4th 
Bart., who married Eleanor Touchet, daughter of Mervyn, afterwards Earl 
of Castlehaven, and died in 1677. He appears to have parted with the 
manor during his lifetime, for we find that 7th June, 1659, William Blois ^^Id 
his first court for the manor. Davy states that in 1663 William Coleman 
held in right of his wife Anne, but he does not say who Anne was, also that 
in 1671 Anthony Applewhite was farmer of the manor, and in 1673 William 
Coleman lord. 

In 1709, 30th May, William Churchill held his first court. Page says 
he purchased an estate here of John Dade, M.D., in 1698, and made it his 
seat. He represented Ipswich in Parliament in Queen Anne's reign, and 
married Rose, the daughter of John Sayer, of Woodbridge, by whom he 
had issue one daughter Elizabeth, married to Francis Negus, secretary to 
the Earl Marshal, the Duke of Norfolk. He died in London 4th Feb. 1711, 
when the manor passed to his son and heir, Francis Negus, who held his 
first court 4th Feb. 1717. He was M.P. for Ipswich 1722 and 1727, and 
died 9th Sept. 1732, and in the Ipswich Gazette for this year will be found 
some verses beginning " Is Negus gone ? Ah ! Ipswich, weep and mourn." 
This year we find John Bernard mentioned as lord, but it was probably in 
a fiduciary character, as in 1738 we find the manor vested in William Negus, 
of Melton, son of Francis. William Negus married Margaret Nordauld, 
and died 2nd June, 1773, having by his will dated 8th March, 1771, left 
this manor after the death of his widow, who died 23rd Aug. 1776, to Thomas 
Negus and John Negus ; and 29th May, 1790, we find John Negus and 
Charles Negus holding a court as lords. The nth March, 1808, John 
Wood held a first court for the manor. In 1855 the manor was vested in 
another John Wood, and in 1885 in Frederick Wood ; but in 1896 it had 
passed to and is now vested in the trustees of G. Largent. 

The manor house of this manor was burnt down in 1729. It had 
been erected by William Churchill. 

We meet with a fine of a fourth part of the manor and the advowson 
levied in 1352 by Sir Edmund de Ufford and Adam de Scakilthorp against 
William Malore and Amy his wife.^ 

The customs are : The youngest son heir ; Curtesy, dower one-third ; 
Gavelkind {sic in Court books), Timber one-third; Pollard, one-third. 

■ I.P.M., 21 Edw. IV. 59. 3 1.P.M., 37 Hen. VIII. 74 ; D.N.B. 

^For descent from him, see Brantham Ixii. 184. 

Manor, in Samford Hundred. 4 1.P.M., 13th April, 1553. 

5 Feet of Fines, 26 Edw. III. 5. 



DALLINGHOO. 249 

The quit rents in 1660 came to £17. i8s. lo^d., and the tenants were 36 ; 
in 1669 the rents were £20. os. 8d. and the tenants 47 ; in 1717 the rents 
were £20. los. 2^d. and the tenants 42 ; and in 1747 the rents were 
£16. i8s. 3ld. 

Court Rolls for Dallinghoo Manor for 9 Hen. VI. ; 1, 2, 4, 6, 8 to 10, 12, 
18, 21, 25, 29, 38 Hen. Vin. ; 3, 4 Edw. VI. ; 2 and 3, 3 and 4, 4 and 5, 5 
and 6 Phil, and Mary ; and 2 to 5, 10, 16 Eliz. are in the Public Record Office.' 

Arms of Churchill : Sable, a lion rampant, Argent, debruised with a 
bendlet Gules. Of Negus : Erm. on a chief nebulee Az. three escallops Or. 

Manor of Dallinghoo Campsey. 

This manor was vested in Henry Reignolds and Dame Elizabeth 
Wingfield, widow of Sir Thomas Wingfield, the executors of Sir Thomas' 
will, and probably passed in the same course as the last manor from that 
date to the present time, being now vested in the trustees of G. Largent. 

Manor of Earls Dallinghoo, 

This was the lordship of Richard, Earl of Gloucester, and later of 
Edmund, Earl of Cornwall, who died in 1301, when Margaret, sister of 
Gilbert de Clare, Earl of Gloucester, and widow of Edmund Plantagenet, 
Earl of Cornwall, had it assigned to her in dower for life. On her decease 
the manor passed to the Crown, and in 1319 Isabel, Queen of England, had 
it in dower. In 1330 John de Eltham, 2nd son of Edw. III., Earl of Corn- 
wall, had a grant of it, and on his death it revested in the Crown. 

In 1556 the manor was vested in Thomas Seckford, and in 1577 in 
Matilda Bull, for this year she held her first court for this manor. 

William Bull, son of George Bull, of Harlow, co. Herts., succeeded, and 
held in 1579, ^ which year a claim was made by the Crown on him for 
forfeiture.^ On his death the manor passed to his son and heir, John Bull, 
who married Maud, daughter of John Faukon, of Edwardstone, and died 
loth Sept. 1574, when it passed to his grandson and heir, John Bull, son 
of John by a daughter of Thomas Blosse, of Ipswich, which John had died 
in his father's hfetime. John Bull, the grandson, being under age the 
manor vested in the King as guardian. This last John Bull married Ann, 
daughter of — Kemp, of Dallinghoo, and died in 1643, leaving a son 
Anthony, who married a daughter of Edward Marryot, of Boulge, by whom 
he had two sons, William and John, 

In 1812 the manor was held by John White, and in 1831 it was vested 
in the Rev. George Turner and others as trustees of Andrew Arcedeckne, 
and was in 1855 vested in Andrew Arcedeckne.^ By 1885 the manor had 
vested in Lady Huntingfield, who was lady in 1896, but the manor is now 
vested in Arthur Hayward, of Glevering Hall, Hacheston. 

Manor of Bast Brodish. 

This manor was in 1616 vested in Henry Reignolds and Dame Ehzabeth 
Wingfield, widow of Sir Thomas Wingfield, the executors of Sir Thomas 
Wingfield's will. 

'Portfolio 203, 76, 77, 100. ^See Manor of Glevering Hall, Hacheston, 

* Memoranda, 21 Eliz. Mich. Rec. Rot. 131. in this Hundred, and Boss Hall, 

Sproughton, in Samford Hundred. 

H I 



250 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

In 1628 it was held by Sir Anthony Wingfield, who this year held his 
first court, from which time the manor descended in the same course as the 
main Manor of Dallinghoo to John Wood, who held his first court in 1808, 
and from this time to the present, being now vested in the trustees of G. 
Largent. 

The manor is specifically mentioned in the inquis. p.m. of Sir John 
Wingfield in 1481.' 



'I.P.M., 21 Edw. IV. 59. 




EARL"^ SOHAM. 251 

EARL SOHAM. 

MANOR was held here in Saxon times by Anand, a freeman 

by commendation under the Abbot of St. Edmunds. It 

consisted of 4 carucates of land, 15 villeins, 8 bordars, 2 serfs, 

2 ploughteams in demesne and 6 belonging to the men. 

Also wood sufficient to support 100 hogs, 12 acres of meadow, 

2 rouncies, 4 beasts, 30 hogs, 42 sheep, and 60 goats, valued 

at £10. At the time of the Survey this manor was held in 

demesne by Earl Alan, the bordars were increased to 21, and the serfs 

reduced to i, the ploughteams belonging to the men had come down to 5, 

while the value had been gradually increased to £16, and then to £18. 13s. 4^. 

It was a league long and half a league broad, and paid in a gelt 8|(^.' 

Another estate in this place was that of a socman under Edric's com- 
mendation, consisting of 8 acres valued at 2s. At the time of the Survey 
Walter de Risbon held this of Robert Malet.' 

Manor of Earl Soham. 

In 1140 the lordship was vested in Hubert de Montcheney, who sold 
it to Hugh Bigot, Earl of Norfolk, who died in 1177. From this time to 
1382, when it was vested in Margaret, Countess of Norfolk, the devolution 
is the same as the Manor of Framlingham in this Hundred. 

The Countess died in 1400, when the manor passed to Elizabeth, 
Duchess of Norfolk, married to Ralph GonshuU, and in 141 passed to 
the Crown. 

In 1425 John Mowbray being restored as Duke of Norfolk, the manor 
revested in him, and on his death in 1432 passed to his widow Catherine, 
who remarried John, Viscount Beaumont, and srdly married Sir John 
Widvile. Subject to his widow's life interest, the manor vested in John 
de Mowbray, 3rd Duke of Norfolk, son of the 2nd Duke. He married 
Eleanor, daughter of William, Lord Bourchier, and dying in 1461 the manor 
passed to his son and heir John de Mowbray,, 4th Duke of Norfolk, and 
Earl Marshal, K.G. He married the Lady Elizabeth Talbot, daughter of 
John, Earl of Shrewsbury, and on his death in 1475 this manor passed to 
his widow Elizabeth for life. 

We next find the manor in Thomas Howard, 3rd Duke of Norfolk, 
who died i8th July, 1554. The Duke had been attainted in 1546, when 
his lands became forfeited, and he was not restored until 1553. While 
the manor was in the Crown, in the year 1547, King Edw. VI. granted it 
to Frances, widow of Henry, Earl of Surrey, son and heir of Thomas, Duke 
of Norfolk. She was daughter of John de Vere, 15th Earl of Oxford, and 
remarried to Thomas Steyning, of Woodbridge, and afterwards of Earl 
Soham, by whom she had issue a daughter Mary, who in 1575 married 
Charles Seckford, M.P. for Aldeburgh in 1572. Mr. Steyning was steward 
of the Manors of Framlingham and Saxstead from 1563 to 1577. In 1554 
he and Lady Frances presented to the rectory of the parish of Earl Soham. 
Frances died 30th June, 1577, her son, Thomas Howard, 4th Duke of 
Norfolk, having been attainted of high treason and beheaded five years 
previously. Page says that John Cornwallis purchased of the Earl of 
Suffolk the manor, advowson, lodge, and park of Earl Soham and 

'Dom. ii. 294. "Dom. ii. 327; 



252 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

removed to this parish from Badingham, in Hoxne Hundred. He 
was trustee of Thomas Howard, only son and heir of Philip, Earl of 
Arundel. If the purchase were made from the Earl of Suffolk, the manor 
could not have passed to the heirs of the 4th Duke, but must have gone to 
his eldest son by his 2nd wife Margaret, daughter and heir of Thomas, Lord 
Audley, of Walden, Thomas, for he it was who succeeded to the barony 
of Walden in right of his mother, and was created Earl of Suffolk. Davy 
says a grant was made by the Crown of the manor to Thomas Howard, 
Earl of Suffolk, in 1617,' but the date cannot well be correct, as the purchaser, 
this John Cornwallis, died seised two years previous to this. However 
acquired, John Cornwallis held the lordship in the time of King Jas. L He 
married twice— ist Catherine, daughter of John Blennerhasset, of Barsham, 
who died in 1584, and was buried in Baddingham church. His 2nd wife 
was Elizabeth Wolsey, widow of William Tuthill, by whom he had no 
issue. Mr. Cornwallis died in 1615, and was buried in Cretingham. His 
eldest surviving son, Thomas Cornwallis, succeeded to the lordship. He 
was M.P. for the county in 1623, and married Mary, daughter of Edward 
Grimstone, of Bradfield, in Essex, by whom he had no issue. By his will 
dated 1625 he devised his estate in this parish to Elizabeth his sister, the wife 
of Thomas Corderoy, of Hampshire. Mr. Cornwallis was buried at 
Cretingham. Elizabeth Corderoy afterwards married Edward Nynchrion, of 
Whittle, in Essex, who sold the manor in 1625 to John Cotton, of London. 
He was the 2nd son of Sir Alan or Allen Cotton, Knt., Lord Mayor of London 
in 1625'' and of Ellen his wife, daughter of Edmond Moore, of London. 
John Cotton served the office of High Sheriff for the county in 1644. He 
married five times, but had no surviving issue except by the 4th wife, 
namely, Anne, the daughter of Nicholas Rivett, of BrandestOn, by whom 
he had several children. 

A copy of the Custom Roll of the manor "used ther tyme oute of mynde 
of man renewed uppon viewe and searche of the auncient Court Rolls of 
the sayd Mannor and made att the speciall commaund of John Cotton, 
Esquire, lord of the sayd Mannor by Francis Coleman Gent, his Steward 
ther this first daye of September Anno Dni. 1635 and in tyme to be 
prfectlie fynyshed as shal be agreed betwen the Lord and the Tenantes," 
is given by Mr. G. F. Beaumont, the present lord, in certain communications 
made to the " East Anglian Notes and Queries."^ It is an exceedingly 
interesting document, and shows that the custom of Borough English 
prevailed in the manor, and that there were bondmen of blood within the 
manor who paid chevage for liberty to dwell out of the lordship. 

John Cotton died in 1655 niuch in debt, having disbursed large sums 
in support of the Royal cause which were never repaid. His losses com- 
pelled Alan, his eldest surviving son, who had married Frances, daughter 
of Thomas Smith, of Walsoken, in Norfolk, to sell the manor and estate to 
Leicester Devereux, 6th Viscount Hereford.* He married ist 6th June, 

' A copy of the letters patent will be found fee "of a Gold Cup and Ewer." 

in the Davy MSS. Add. MSS. 19096, The sceptre is said to be still in the 

fol, 251. possession of a Mr. Cotton, in 

""On the 2nd February the Lord Mayor America. 

assisted at the coronation of King ^N.S. vol. ii. 215, &c. A fuller copy is 

Chas. II., in the procession of which in the Davy MSS. 19096, fol. 246. 

he carried the short sceptre, and '*See Manor of Chillesford, in Plomesgate 

after having served as butler, re- Hundred, 
turned to the City with the usual 



EARL SOHAM. 



353 



1642, Elizabeth, daughter and heir of Sir William Withipole, Knt.' (who 
brought him the lordship of Christ Church, in Ipswich) by whom he had 
one daughter Frances, married to William, Viscount Tracy. His lordship 
married 2ndly Priscilla, daughter of John Catchpole, by whom he had two 
sons and two daughters. He died ist December, 1676,* and the manor 
passed to his eldest son, Leicester Devereux, 7th Viscount Hereford, who 
died in his ninth year in March, 1682-3,^ when the manor devolved on his 
only brother Edward, 8th Viscount Hereford, who dying without issue 
gth August, 1700,* the manor passed to his widow Elizabeth, daughter and 
coheir of Walter Norborne, of Calme, in Wilts, and subsequently, on her 
death in Nov. 1742,' followed the title and vested in his cousin and heir, 
Price Devereux, 9th Viscount Hereford.* He married about 1693 Mary, 
2nd daughter of Samuel Sandys, of Ombersley Court, co. Worcester,'' by 
whom he had a daughter Mary, wife of WilUam Price, of Vaend, co. Flint, and 
a son. Price Devereux, who on his father's death 3rd Oct. 1740, in his 77th 
year, succeeded^ to this lordship and to the title as loth Viscount. 

He married ist 3rd Jan. 1720-1, his cousin Elizabeth, only daughter 
and heir of Leicester Martin, of Christ Church, in Ipswich, by his wife Anne, 
younger daughter of Leicester, the 6th Viscount, and 2ndly 30th July, 
1740, Eleanor Price, of Rhicolas, co. Merioneth, but died without male 
issue 2gth July, 1748,' and his executors sold the manor in 1753 to John 
Boyfield. It was offered for sale with the advowson of the rectory in 1786.'° 

The manor was subsequently purchased by John Ay ton, of Missenden 
Abbey, co. Buckingham, who died in 1806, when it passed to his son and 
heir, — Ayton, who died in 1836. In 1838, 30th May, the manor was 
offered for sale by public auction, when it was stated to extend over the 
greater part of the parish of Earl Soham, and to comprise 70 messuages, 
6 cottages, and upwards of 1,200 acres of copyhold land, subject to arbitrary 
fines. The quit rents then amounted to £39. 12s. "jA., and the fines were 
stated to average about ;£i5o per annum." 

In 1896 the manor was vested in Charles Henry Capon, but it is now 
vested in George Frederick Beaumont, of The Lawns, Coggeshall, Essex. 

A particular of the manor in 1655 or 1656 of considerable interest will 
be found in the Davy MSS." 

Arms of Devereux : Arg. a fesse Gules, in chief three torteauxes. 



'Her mother was Jane, daughter and 
coheir of Sir Michael Stanhope, and 
widow of Henry Retcliffe, Lord 
Fitzwalter. 

^Will 29th Sept. 1676, proved 1677. 

'Admon. 21st June, 1683. 

"Will 26th July, 1700, proved 8th Aug. 
1700. 

'Will proved Dec. 1742. 

«He was son and heir of Price Devereux, 
of Vaynor, co. Montgomery (who 
died in his father's lifetime), by Mary 
his wife, daughter of — Stephens, 
of the City of Bristol, which last- 
mentioned Price Devereux was 
eldest son of George Devereux, 



of Sheldon Hall, co. Warwick, and 
of Vaynor, by Bridget his wife, 
daughter and sole heir of Arthur 
Price, of Vaynor, and the said George 
Devereux was son and heir to Sir 
George Devereux, Knt., of Sheldon 
Hall, by Blanche his wife, daughter 
and heir of John Ridge, of Ridge, co. 
Salop, which Sir George was younger 
brother of Walter, 5th Viscount. 
'She died 14th Jan. 1728-9. 

8 Adm. 15th Nov. 1740, and 9th April, 1754. 

9 Will proved 1748. 

'° Ipswich Journal, 4th Feb. 1786. 
" Ipswich Journal, 28th April, 1838. 
"Add. MSB. 19096, fol. 245. 




254 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

EASTON. 

^N the Confessor's time there was a freeman in this place 
under Edric's commendation, having 15 acres, included 
in the valuation of Bennington. At the time of the Survey 
this was the estate of Robert Malet.' 

The only other holding here under Easton was that 
formerly of a freeman under Woolmar's commendation, 
and consisted of 10 acres valued at 2s. At the time of the 
Survey this was the estate of Roger de Poictou.* 

A considerable portion of the land in Easton appears in the Domesday 
Survey under the head " Hartley," which no doubt is Hartley Hall, one of 
the manors of Easton. 

A manor was held here in the time of the Confessor by Brihtmar under 
Harold's commendation. It consisted of 80 acres, 5 bordars, 2 plough- 
teams in demesne, g acres of meadow, a rouncy, a beast, 9 hogs, 17 sheep, 
and 30 goats, valued at 40s., which value had decreased at the time of the 
Survey to 30s. There were also 10 freemen and 2 half freemen under 
Brihtmar's commendation having 60 acres, 2 ploughteams, and 1^ acres 
of meadow, valued at los., one of these being claimed by Robert Halet. 
This estate was a league in length and half a league in breadth, and paid 
in a gelt iid. At the time of the Survey it was in the estate of Hervey 
de Berri.^ 

Another holding was that of 12 freemen and a half under Edric the 
Grim's commendation, and consisted of a carucate of land, 2 bordars, and 
4 ploughteams, held when the Survey was taken by Earl Alan.* 

Another consisted of a church with 12 acres, valued at 2s., and 2 acres 
held at the time of the Survey by two freemen under commendation to Edric 
the Grim. Also 45 acres and a ploughteam were held by five freemen under 
Edric's commendation. All this was included in the valuation of Kettle- 
burgh, and at the time of the Survey was the estate of Earl Alan.^ 

Another holding was that of a freeman under Edric's commendation, 
and consisted of 20 acres and half an acre of meadow, 5 bordars, and half 
a ploughteam, valued at 8s. At the time of the Survey this was held of 
Robert Halet by William Gulafra.' 

Hanor of Easton, 

The lordship and advowson were anciently the inheritance of the 
family of Charles, who resided at Kettleburgh, in this Hundred, and the 
descent from Sir WiUiam Charles, Knt., who died in 1273 to 1463, when 
Thomas Charles, son and heir of Sir Thomas Charles, succeeded to the 
lordship, is practically the same. The manor then passed to Sir John 
Wingfield, who died in 1481, and the devolution to the death of Sir Henry 
Wingfield, 4th Bart., in 1677, is identical with that of the Hanor of Dalling- 
hoo, in this Hundred, and Thorpe Hall, in Hasketon, in Carlford Hundred, 
except that it did not pass on the death of Sir John Wingfield in 1481 to his 
I2th son. Sir Humphrey Wingfield, the Speaker, but directly to his (Sir 
John's) eldest son. Sir John Wingfield, after the death of Lady Elizabeth 

'Dom. ii. 326. tDom. ii. 2936, 294. 

^Dom. ii.347^- 5 Dom. ii. 2936, 294. 

3 Dom. ii. 443. 6 Dom. ii. 3276. 



EASTON. 255 

Wingfield. Sir Anthony Wingfield, who was created a baronet in 1627, 
built the mansion called the White House, pulled down the old seat, in 
Hoo, called Goodwins, and removed to Easton, making this his principal 
seat. When the old mansion at Letheringham became ruinous the family 
continued this as their chief place of residence. 

On the death of Sir Henry Wingfield, 4th Bart., in 1677, the manor 
passed to his son and heir. Sir Henry Wingfield, 5th Bart., who sold it 
with Letheringham to Mrs. Anne Wroth in trust for William Henry 
Nassau, Lord of Zuleistein,' son of Frederick de Nassau, Lord of Zuleistein, 
in the Province of Utrecht, by Mary his wife, daughter of Sir William 
Killigrew, of the County of Cornwall, Bart., Chamberlain to Queen Catharine, 
a consort of King Chas. II. This Frederick was an illegitimate son of 
Henry Frederick, Prince of Orange, the grandfather to William III. King 
of England. William Henry Nassau was one of the principal persons 
coming to this country. He was appointed a member of William and 
Mary's first privy council in 1688-9, and at the same time constituted 
Master of the Robes to the King. 

In 1690 he was appointed lieutenant-general of horse and foot, and 
was continually attendant upon his royal master both in Ireland and 
Flanders. Besides the particular favour of the sovereign, the singular 
services he performed at the battle of Landen, 29th July, 1693, rescuing 
his Majesty at a time he was surrounded by the enemy, and in the most 
imminent danger, at the expense of several wounds, and with the loss of 
his own liberty, were the foundations of the peerage to his family ; for the 
King by letters patent, dated loth May, 1695, advanced him to the dignity 
of a peer of the realm by the titles of Baron of Enfield in the County of 
Middlesex, Viscount Tunbridge in Kent, and Earl of Rochford, in the County 
of Essex. Whenever his Majesty visited Holland the Earl was in his 
retinue, and so great was the King's affection for him that in 1697, finding 
the Earl ill, he went to Zuleistein and continued with him till his recovery. 
After the King's death he settled again at Zuleistein, where he died in 
January, 1798-^.* His wife was Jane, daughter of Sir Henry Wroth, Knt., 
of Durans, in Enfield, co. Middlesex, and of Loughton Hall, co. Essex, 
great-grandson of Sir Robert Wroth, Knt., by his wife Mary Sidney, eldest 
daughter of Robert, Earl of Leicester, which Sir Robert Wroth was son 
and heir of another Sir Robert and Susan his wife, sole heir of John Stonard, 
of Loughton, and which Sir Robert was son of Sir Thomas Wroth, by Mary 
his wife, daughter of Robert, Lord Rich. 

The ist Earl of Rochford was succeeded by his eldest son, William 
Henry, 2nd Earl of Rochford. He served in 1702 under the Duke of 
Ormond, and afterwards under the Duke of Marlborough, with distinction, 
and was raised to the rank of a brigadier-general, in which capacity he 
served a campaign in Spain in 1710 being slain at the battle of Almenara, 
27th July of that year.^ He died unmarried, when Frederick his brother 
succeeded to the title and to this lordship as 3rd Earl of Rochford. He 
spent the greater part of his time in this country, choosing a retired but at 
the same? time practising an exemplary life. He married Bessy, illegitimate 
daughter of Richard Savage, 4th Earl Rivers, and by her, whose father 
died in 1712, and by his will devised to her his estate, he had issue two 
sons, William Henry Nassau and Richard Savage Nassau. The 3rd Earl 

I Zuleistein is about 15 miles from Utrecht. ^ ^ill proved April, 1711. 
'Willj)roved Nov. 1709. 



256 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

of Rochford died 14th June, 1739,' and the manor passed to his eldest son 
William Henry Nassau, 4th Earl of Rochford, who immediately upon his 
father's death was appointed lord of the bedchamber to the King, and made 
Vice-admiral of the coasts of Essex. In 1749 he was appointed envoy- 
extraordinary and plenipotentiary to the King of Sardinia, at whose court 
he served his country well, and received the approbation of his Sovereign. 
In 1754-5 he was appointed groom of the stole to his Majesty, and sworn 
a member of the privy council. The 26th April, 1755, he was appointed 
one of the lords justices for the administration of the Government during 
the King's stay abroad. In 1756 he was appointed Lord Lieutenant and 
Gustos Rotulorum of Essex, in 1763 was ambassador extraordinary to the 
Court of Spain, and to Paris in 1766. He married in 1740 Lucy, daughter 
of Edward Young, of Durnford, near Tarum, co. Wilts, maid of honour 
to the Princess of Wales, and sold the manor to the Hon. Richard Savage 
Nassau, his brother, who made it for several years his constant residence. 
He married 22nd Dec. 1751, Anne, daughter and coheir of Edward Spencer, 
of Rendlesham, and widow of James, 3rd Duke of Hamilton. By this lady, 
who died 9th March, 1771,' he had issue William Henry, born 28th July, 
1754, who on the decease of his uncle, William Henry, 4th Earl, in 1781, 
succeeded him in his honours as 5th Earl of Rochford. The 5th Earl of 
Rochford died 3rd September, 1830, at his seat called the White House, 
in his 77th year, and dying unmarried the peerage became extinct. By 
his will dated 8th April, 1824, the manor was, subject as therein mentioned, 
devised in trust for Alexander, Duke of Hamilton and Brandon, for life, 
remainder to William Alexander Anthony Archibald, Earl of Angus and 
Arran, afterwards called Marquis of Douglas and Clydesdale (the only son 
of the said Duke of Hamilton and Brandon), and his ist and other sons in 
tail male, then in trust in like manner for Lord Archibald Hamilton (brother 
of the said Duke of Hamilton and Brandon), and his issue male with 
ultimate remainder to the testator's own right heirs. The Earl made three 
codicils dated 23rd Feb. 1826, i8th May, 1826, and 28th Jan. 1831, but they 
did not affect the devise of the manor, and the will and codicils were proved 
in the Prerogative Court of Canterbury 31st Dec. 1831. 

The lordship of this manor accordingly devolved on Alexander Hamilton 
Douglas, loth Duke of Hamilton and 7th Duke of Brandon, K.G. He 
was M.P. for Lancaster 1802-3, s^nd ambassador to St. Petersburg 1802-7, 
and was Lord High Steward at the coronations of Will. IV. and Queen 
Victoria. He was installed a Knight of the Garter 5th Sept. 1836, having 
26th April, 1810, married Susan Euphemia, 2nd daughter and coheir of 
William Beckford, of Fonthill Abbey, Wilts, by Margaret, daughter of 
Charles Gordon, 4th Earl of Aboyne, and dying i8th August, 1852, the 
manor passed to his son and heir, William Alexander Anthony Archibald, 
nth Duke of Hamilton and 8th Duke of Brandon, who married 23;rd Feb. 
1843, the Princess Marie Amelie Elizabeth Caroline, of Baden, youngest 
daughter of Charles Louis Frederick, Grand Duke of Baden, and the cousin 
of the Emperor Napoleon III., and dying 8th July, 1863, the manor passed 
to his son and heir, William Alexander Louis Stephen Douglas Hamilton, 
12th Duke of Hamilton and 9th Duke of Brandon, premier peer of 
Scotland. He married loth Dec. 1873, Mary Louise Elizabeth, eldest 
daughter of William Drogo Montagu, 7th Duke of Manchester, and died in 
1895, and was succeeded in the title by his kinsman, Alfred Douglas 

'Will proved 1738. ^Will loth Nov. 1767, proved 20th March 

1771. 



E ASTON. 



257 



Douglas Hamilton, 13th Duke of Hamilton and loth Duke of Brandon, 
only son of Captain Charles Henry Douglas Hamilton, R.N., by his 2nd 
wife, Elizabeth Anne, only child of the Venerable Archdeacon Hill, but the 
manor passed to the trustees of the will of the 12th Duke of Hamilton. 

A writer in 1833 says of the hall : " Easton Hall is now a very 
comfortable residence, but contains no rooms of a large size, and they want 
light. The hall, which is in the centre, was floored by the late Rochford 
with stucco, but it did not succeed ; the stucco has cracked and dried very 
unevenly. In the hall is a chimney-piece carved by Grinling Gibbon, 
supported by two caryatides, and in the centre a female face very beauti- 
fully carved, with flowers and fruit. There is a wind dial. In the drawing- 
room are numerous prints containing the history of Anne de Medici ; over 
the fireplace is a picture of the battle before Granlines in which the ist Earl 




Easton Park. 

of Rochford was killed. The park, including the house, gardens, &c., 
contained 143 acres, but the net profitable land amounted to 125 acres only. 
The last Lord Rochford planted a grove here which in remembrance of his 
descent from the family of Lulestein in Holland he called Lulestein Grove. 
This is now by the inhabitants corrupted into Wolverston Grove." 

Arms of Nassau : Azure, a lion rampant and semee of billets. Or. 
Of Hamilton : Gules, three cinquefoils pierced Ermine. 



Manor of Martley Hall. 

This was the estate of Brihtmar in the Confessor's day, and of Hervy de 
Berri at the time of the Great Survey. In the time of King Hen. III. it 
was vested in Hugh Peche,who resided at Martley Hall, and by Ide his wife 
had issue a daughter Margery, who married Roger de Celtey, upon whom 
the said Hugh Peche settled the Manor of Martle or Martley Hall with a 
messuage, 26 acres of land, 2 acres of meadow, 2^ acres of wood, and 14s. 
rent in Hacheston and Easton in tail. Davy mentions that in the 37 
Edw. III. Richard de Gosbek held two knights' fees in Gosbeck and Easton, 
and possibly might have had this lordship. Page mentions that in 1332 



258 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

Nicholas de Eston and Alice his wife were owners of messuages, lands, and 
rents in this parish and in Kettleburgh, and in 1364 the name of John, 
the son of Nicholas Eston occurs. 

The manor passed to Sir Anthony Wingfield.' Amongst the Additional 
Charters in the British Museum is a quit claim by Sir Anthony Wingfield, 
K.G., to William Naunton and Elizabeth his wife of a manor of " Estone," 
which may refer to this manor. It is dated 27th June, 2 Edw. VI. [1548]." 
However, Sir Anthony Wingfield apparently died seised of the manor 
without issue, when it passed to his brother and heir, Sir Thomas Wingfield,^ 
who died in 1609, when it vested in Sir Anthony Wingfield, ist Bart., and 
on his death 30th July, 1638, passed to his son and heir. Sir Richard Wing- 
field, 2nd Bart. 

It is quite possible it passed in the same course from this time as 
the main manor, but all we know for certain is that it was vested in Richard 
Savage Nassau, who died in 1780, from which time it has devolved with 
that manor, and is now vested in the trustees of the will of the 12th Duke 
of Hamilton. 

In Nov. 1833, a visitor to Martley Hall writes : " It is now a 
respectable-looking farmhouse, in the form of a half H. It stands in a small 
plot of ground surrounded by a very broad and deep moat, which is not as 
is usual of a square parallelogram form, but round or nearly so. The entrance 
to the farmhouse is on the north side, but there is no appearance of there 
ever having been a bridge. The site is on high ground to the N.W. of 
the church." 

Arms of Peche : Argent, a fesse between two chevrons, Gules. 



' See Manors of Bredfield and Bing.Pettistre, ^See Manor of Thorpe Hall, Hasketon, in 

in Wilford Hundred. Carlford Hundred. 

'Add, Ch. 14991. 




EYKE. 259 

EYKE, 

[HERE is no entry under the heading Eyke in the Great 
Survey, but we|find Staverton as an important adjacent 
parish under the name of Staureton. Staverton adjoins 
Bromeswellj and the manors of the two parishes became 
united and subsequently formed the Manor of Staverton 
cum Bromeswell. When the Saxon church of Staverton fell 
into decay, one of Norman architecture was erected in 
the new village of Eyke about the year 1150. Mr. Redstone points out in 
an able paper in the Proceedings of the Suffolk Institute' that there is one 
connecting link between the old parish and the new. Upon the south 
wall of Eyke church is a brass, without any inscription, which once marked 
the burial place of John Staverton, Baron of the Exchequer in the days 
of Rich. II. and Hen. V." The Great Survey mentions the manor of 
Staverton, held in Saxon times by Edric of Laxfield. It consisted of 4 
carucates, 14 villeins, 6 bordars, 4 serfs, 4 ploughteams in demesne and 4 
belonging to the men. Also 8 acres of meadow, wood for the maintenance 
of 30 hogs, a mill, 2 beasts, 12 hogs, 80 sheep, 20 goats, and 4 hives of bees, 
valued at £6. At the time of the Survey this manor was held of Robert 
Malet, by Hubert, the villeins were reduced to g, the bordars had increased 
to 15, there were only 2 ploughteams in demesne, but 2 might be made up 
again, and the value was £4. There was also a church with 10 acres valued 
at 22^.^ 

Another estate here was of 13 freemen under commendation of Edric 
of Laxfield, and consisted of 57 acres, 3 acres of meadow, and 2 ploughteams 
(reduced to i| at the time of the Survey). The value was 10s. when the 
Survey was taken, and Humbert de Monte Caniso (Munchensi) held the 
same of Robert Malet.*- 

Robert Malet had two other small estates in Staverton. The first 
consisted of 30 acres, a bordar, a ploughteam, and i^ acres of meado^y, 
valued at los., formerly held by a freeman under commendation of Edric 
of Laxfield.^ 

The second held of Malet by Hubert consisted of 14 acres and half a 
ploughteam valued at 2s. /i^., formerly held by two freemen under Edric's 
commendation.® 

Manor of Eyke. 

In the time of WiUiam Rufus, Davy states that W. de Rovillis was 
lord of Eyke, but he queries it as Boville. 

In 1286 William de Montcaniso, of Edwardston, was the chief lord 
here, it being held of his Manor of Edwardston.' In 1313 Robert de 
Furneux or Furneaux* died seised of the manor, and it passed to his son 
and heir John. 

In 1316 Alice, Countess of Norfolk, widow of Roger Bigot, last Earl 
of Suffolk, held the manor, and in 1609 it was vested in Sir Michael Stanhope. 
From this time it probably descended with the Manor of Staverton, in Eyke. 

'Vol. X., p. 56, 72. 'Dom. ii. 3266. 

"Monumental brasses; Add. MSS. 92484, ^Dom. ii. 326J. 

32490. i'l.p.M., 14 Edw. I. 

3Dom. ii. 325. ^See Manor of Furneaux, Whatfield, in 

"•Dom. ii. 325. Cosford Hundred. 



26d THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

In the middle of the i8th century, however, it appears to have been 
held by Anthony CoUett, who 19th Feb. 1743, married Mary, daughter 
of Robert May, of Westwood Lodge, High Sheriff of Suffolk, and died 
27th Feb. 1785.' 

Manor of Staverton. 

This manor, on Robert Malet's disgrace, became the property of Earl 
Bigot. In 1200 Hubert de Munkanesia or Montchansey claimed possession 
of the manor in right of his wife Muriell, daughter of Peter de Valoignes. 
The right of ownership was again a matter of dispute in 1225, between 
WilUam of York, praepositus, of Beverley, and William de Munkanesi, 
the son of Hubert, who, with his family, was killed by the fall of his castle 
in Wales ."^ The provosts of Beverley, of whom Thomas a Becket, Archbishop 
of Canterbury, was the fifth, and the aforesaid William of York, the eleventh, 
held an office which was instituted by Thomas, ist Archbishop of York. 

A John Beverle was one of the jurors for the Hundred of Loes^ who 
sat at the trial of William Bernard, of Copdock, for inciting the rioters who 
destroyed the house of John Staverton in 1381. The followers of John 
Wraw seized the person of William Fraunceys, in Ipswich, and beheaded 
him. Bartholomew Fraunceys was a collector of the subsidy granted 22 
Edw. III. On the following day, Sunday, the mob, headed by John de 
Batisford, parson of Bucklesham, marched through Woodbridge, attacked 
and laid waste the house of Fraunceys at Melton, and then divided into 
two parties. One company remained to ransack the ruins, and the other, 
led by William Bernard, marched to the house of John Staverton, at Eyke, 
which they plundered, carrying away goods to the value of lOOS.* 

Davy does not deduce the title in this way, but says that in 1225 the 
manor was held by Roger Bigot, Earl of Norfolk, and on his death in 1270,^ 
passed to his nephew, Roger Bigot, Earl of Norfolk, whose widow Alice held 
it in dower in 1290. Further, Davy states that in 1305 the manor passed 
to the Crown by the grant of Roger Bigot, as explained under the 
account of the Manor of Framlingham, and was granted like that manor to 
Thomas de Brother ton. Earl of Norfolk. 

Davy gives the following list of successive lords of this manor : — 

1338. Edward de Monte Acuto and Alice his wife, one of the daughters 
and coheirs of Thomas de Brotherton, had this assigned to them. 
Edward, son and heir of Edward de Monte Acuto, died 1361.^ 
Margaret, Duchess of Norfolk, daughter and heir of Thomas 
de Brotherton, died i Hen. IV., married William de Ufford, Earl 
of Suffolk, who died 1381. In 1367 a fine was levied of the 
manor by Sir Ralph de Hemenhale, John de Harleston, clerk, 
Reginald de Eccles, and Hugh Bandon, clerk, against Wm. de 
Ufford.^ 

1400. Thomas Mowbray, Duke of Norfolk, grandson of Margaret. 

1400. Elizabeth, his widow, had it as dower, married to Sir Ralph 
Goushall. She died 1425. 

1425. John Mowbray, Duke of Norfolk, son and heir of Thomas, died 1432. 

' Will P.C.C. 180 Ducarel, 15th June, 1783 3 Powell's Rising in East Anglia, p. 128. 

{sic), Muskett's Manorial Families ■tSufE. Inst. x. 73. 

of Suffolk, vol. ii. p. 361. 5 1.P.M., 54 Hen. III. file 38 (17). 

^Dugdale's Monasticon i., p. 171, pub. ^I.P.M., 35 Edw. III. 

1692- 'Feet of Fines, 41 Edw. III. 2. 



EYKE. 261 

1432, John Mowbray, Duke of Norfolk, son and heir. 

1461. John Mowbray, Duke of Norfolk, son and heir, died 1475. 
The Crown. 

1544. Thomas Howard, Duke of Norfolk, and Henry, Earl of Arundel, 
by exchange with the King. He died 1556. William Latton, 
died 1550. 

Page, on the other hand, states that in the reigns of King Rich. II. 
and Hen. IV. John Staverton resided at Staverton Hall and was lord of the 
Manors of Staverton, Chesylford, Cotton, Newton Skeyth, and mees and 
perquisites of messuages and lands in Ash, Rendlesham, Blaxhall, and 
Marlesford. The Manor of Chesylford he gave to the prior and convent 
of Butley to pray for his soul and those of his ancestors. Page also states 
that several of that name and family resided at Staverton Hall long before 
this John Staverton's time. In 1534 the manor was vested in Thomas 
Alvurd who this year died seised of it. In support of Davy's list of lords 
we meet with a fine in 1558 levied of Staverton Manor by Sir Edward Fynes, 
Lord Clynton, against Thomas, Duke of Norfolk.' The manor, however, 
seems to have been in the Alexander family, for in 1552 we meet with a fine 
levied of it under the name " Staff erton Hall Manor," by Anthony 
Aldbroughe against Richard Alexander alias Milward,'' and it was included in 
a fine levied in 1587 by John Eyston and others against Margaret Alexander, 
widow', and others.^ 

By 1599 the manor had passed to Sir Michael Stanhope and Edward 
Stanhope, LL.D. There can be no doubt of Sir Michael Stanhope being 
lord, for a survey of the land belonging to him by Norden in 1601 is still 
in existence. The park is shown as a circular belt of trees with a wide belt 
passing diametrically through it. The intervening spaces are marked as 
marsh lands, and extensive fens drained by the Butley River or " Run" 
enclose the wood to the north, east, and south. The stream was deviated in 
its course to form three retting pits wherein to steep the flax cultivated in 
the fields lying westward. Wantisden Hall, represented with a four-gabled 
front, and a lofty wall surrounding numerous farm buildings, occupied the 
site of the present hall. Staverton Hall is pictured as a small farm, standing 
more remote from the park than Wantisden Hall." From Sir Michael 
Stanhope the manor passed to Elizabeth, his youngest daughter and coheir, 
married to George, Lord Berkeley. He sold the manor to Sir Henry Wood, 
Bart., of Loudham Park, who held his first court as lord of Staverton- 
cum-Bromeswell Manor, 21st April, 1669, and died in 1671, when it passed 
to his daughter and heir Mary, married to Charles, then bearing the surname 
of Palmer, Earl of Southampton, and subsequently that of' Fitzroy, Duke 
of Southampton, and from this time to the allotment under the division 
made pursuant to the Commission for Partition issued in 1747 the manor 
passed in the same way as the Manor of Blythford, in Blything Hundred, 
being then allotted to Robert Onely. Robert Onely died in 1753 without 
issue, when the manor passed to Sir John, son and heir of Sir William 
Chapman, Bart., by Elizabeth his wife, sister of Susan, wife of Robert 
Onely, subject to the life interest of Mary, widow of Robert Onely. She 
died in 1757. 

On the division of the Chapmans' estate this manor was allotted to 
William Morris, who sold it to Edward Leeds, who left it by will to Nathaniel 

'Fine, Trim. 5 Mary i. ^Fine, Hil. 29 EJiz. 

^Fine, Mich. 6 Edw. Vi;. ''Suff. Insjt. x, 72. 



262 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

Barnardiston, from which time the manor has descended in the same course 
as the Manor of Thorndon Parva in Hartismere Hundred, and is now vested 
in Lieut.-Colonel Nathaniel Walter Barnardiston, of The Ryes, Sudbury. 

An ancient custom of the manor was that land was measured by a 
rod of eighteen instead of sixteen and a half feet.' 

Arms of Staverton : Argent, a bend raguled between two mullets, 
Gules. 

The Rectory Manor. 

All we can gather respecting this manor is the following list of lords : 
John Pyerson, first court April, 1546 ; Richard Awger, first court 13th 
July, 1564 ; Ran. Garthe, first court 14th Nov. 1583 ; Rich. Longhlyn, 
first court 27th June, 1608 ; Nich. Stonham, first court ist May, 1640 ; 
William Barker, first court 2nd March, 1654 ; Nathaniel Boad, first court 
12th March, 1723 ; Rich. Chilton, first court, 8th May, 1744 ; Thomas 
Chilton, not first but another court 14th July, 1746 ; Jacob Chilton, first 
court 25th Oct. 1754 ; Rich. Chilton, first court 24th Aug. 1767 ; Thomas 
Gooding, not first but another court ist July, 1775 ; Jacob Chilton, first 
court 8th May, 1777. 

The custom of this manor is to the eldest son. The quit rents were at 
the end of the i8th century los. lod., and the free rents yd. = iis. $d. 

The manor is now held by the Rev. James George Reginald Darling, 
M.A., of Jesus College, Cambridge. 



'Norden's Survey, 1601, cited Suff. Inst. x. 75. 




FRAMLINGHAM. 263 

FRAMLINGHAM. 

|HERE were four manors here in Saxon times. The first was 
held by Ailmar the thane, and consisted of 9 carucates of 
land, 24 villeins, 16 bordars, 5 ploughteams in demesne and 
20 belonging to the men. Also wood sufficient to support 
100 hogs, 16 acres of meadow, 2 rouncies, 4 beasts, 40 hogs, 
20 sheep, and 60 goats, the whole valued at £16. When the 
Survey was taken there were a good many alterations in the 
details of this manor, which was now held by Roger Bigot, of Earl Hugh. 
The villeins had increased to 32, the bordars to 28, the ploughteams in 
demesne were reduced to 3, and those belonging to the men to 16. The 
rouncies had increased to 3, the beasts to 7, the hogs were reduced to 10, 
and the sheep increased to 40, while there were an additional 3 hives of 
bees, the value of the whole having increased to £36.' 

The second manor was formerly held by Monulf, under commendation 
half to Ailmar and half to Malet's predecessor. It consisted of a carucate 
and 40 acres of land, 4 villeins, 12 bordars, 2 ploughteams in demesne and 
2^ belonging to the men, wood for the maintenance of 100 hogs, 6 acres of 
meadow, 8 beasts, 20 hogs, 60 sheep, 40 goats, and 4 hives of bees, valued 
at 40S. The Survey says " William Malet was seised " of this manor, but 
at that date it was amongst the lands of Earl Hugh. 

Earl Hugh also had 30 acres of land, a ploughteam, and an acre of 
meadow included in the above valuation, formerly held by six whole freemen 
and 4 half freemen under Monulf. Also 40 acres and a villein dwelling in 
Ethereg, 3 bordars, an acre of meadow, a ploughteam, and wood for the main- 
tenance of 4 hogs, valued at 8s. formerly held by a freeman under com- 
mendation. Earl Hugh also had another estate here formerly held by three 
freemen under commendation. It consisted of 56 acres, 3 ploughteams, 
2 acres of meadow, and wood for the maintenance of 4 hogs, valued at 17s. 
There was also a church with 60 acres, a villein, 4 bordars, and 2 plough- 
teams, valued at 15s. This estate was 14 quarentenes in length and 12 in 
breadth, and paid in a gelt 2od. The soc belonged to the Abbot of Ely, 
and Earl Hugh's predecessor had it from him.^ 

The third manor in Saxon times held by Brictmar, a freeman under 
Harold, and consisted of 50 acres of land, 3 bordars, a serf, a ploughteam 
in demesne and half a team belonging to the men, the value being 15s. At 
the time of the Survey this was the estate of Ralph de Limesi.^ 

The fourth manor was held at the time of the Survey by Walter de Caen 
of Robert Malet, and in the time of the Confessor by leva, a socwoman under 
Edric's commendation. It consisted of 80 acres, a villein, 4 bordars, a 
ploughteam in demesne and i belonging to the men, wood sufficient to 
support 4 hogs, and 4 acres of meadow, the whole valued at 13s. /^d.* 

Robert Malet had several other holdings in this place when the Survey 
was taken. The first was formerly that of Edric of Laxfield, and consisted 
of 94 acres as a hamlet, 2 villeins, 4 bordars, 2 ploughteams in demesne and 
I belonging to the men, wood for the maintenance of 4 hogs, and 2 acres 
of meadow. Also a rouncy, 4 beasts, 4 hogs, and 5 hives of bees. It 
was included in the valuation of Dennington. 

'Dom. ii. 3026. 3Dom. ii. 429. 

^Dom. ii. 302f. tDom. ii. 3256. 



264 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

Another was formerly that of a half freeman under Edric's commenda- 
tion, and consisted of 4 acres included in the valuation of the said Benning- 
ton. Another was formerly that of Brihtnoth, a half freeman under Edric's 
commendation, and consisted of 2 acres, held in demesne by Robt. Malet 
when the Survey was taken. 

Another was of 4 acres valued at 2s., formerly held by Turcketel, a 
freeman under Edric's commendation. It was held of Robert Malet by 
Walter de Caen when the Survey was taken. 

Another of Robert Malet's holdings and held by him in demesne was 
formerly that of a freeman under Edric's commendation, consisting of 2 
acres valued at 8d. in Bennington, and another, that of Herewold, a freeman 
under Edric's commendation, also consisting of 2 acres, included in the 
valuation of Bennington. Also 10 acres valued at 2s. held of Malet by 
Fulchered, a freeman formerly under Edric's commendation.' 

Belonging to the fee of the Bishops of Thetford at the time of the 
Survey was an estate of 20 acres of land and half a ploughteam, valued at 4s. 
formerly in the possession of a freeman under the commendation of Bishop 
Almar.* 

Framlingham Manor. 

It has been supposed by some that there was an Honor of Framlingham 
of which the castle was the centre and head, but though it is true we 
occasionally find a reference to the Honor of Framlingham, as in the 17th 
John [1215] when the King committed to Master Henr. Cerne and Nicholas 
Fitz-Robert the custody, there is nothing to show that as a castle it was 
ever more than a manor. The castle within the waUs now standing contains 
an area of la. ir. up. of land, but according to Robert Hawes, who was 
a steward of the manor, it anciently contained a much larger quantity 
before the other walls, enclosing the same, were demolished. Camden gives 
a brief description, and says : " This is a very beautiful castle fortified 
with a rampire, a ditch, and a wall of great thickness with thirteen towers ; 
within it has very convenient lodgings." The castle is said to have been 
built in the time of the Saxons, and was one of the principal seats of St. 
Edmund the King and Martyr. The erection may probably be assigned 
either to Uffa the ist or to Fitulus or Redwald, the two succeeding kings 
at some period between 571 and 624. When in 866 the Banes under the 
command of Hingwar and Hubba proceeded into the East Anglian 
territories and made themselves masters of King Edmund's capital at 
Thetford, he retreated before them with the remains of the army into his 
castle at Framlingham, wherein he was beseiged, and being hard pressed 
and without hope of succour he again fled, but was closely pursued towards 
Hoxne, where he was defeated and made captive under circumstances 
which are too well knowii to be recounted here. Upon the death of 
Edmund, the Banes obtained possession, which they abandoned and regained 
at various times, pending the many miserable wars which prevailed during 
the remainder of the Anglo-Saxon period. We learn little more of Fram- 
lingham until we find it in the hands of the Saxons under Edward the 
Confessor in the course of whose reign it has been shown from the extract 
from the Bomesday Survey that at some time between 1041 and 1066 
Silmarus the Thane held Framlingham, who, as the Survey shows, had also 
very extensive possessions in Norfolk as well as Suffolk. At the Conquest 

'Dom. ii. 3256327. "Dom. ii.380. 



FRAMLINGHAM. 



265 



Hugh de Abrincis had the lands of FramUngham of the gift of the Conqueror, 
but the castle itself, on account of its strength and its proximity to the coast, 
was retained by the King in his own hands, Roger Bigot merely having his 
9 ploughteams as a manor as tenant to Earl Hugh, who was tenant in chief 
to the King. 

Roger Bigot was the son of Robert le Bigot, a companion of the 
Conqueror. He had received no less than one hundred and seventeen lord- 
ships in the County of Suffolk alone. It is said of his assistance at the 
battle of Hastings : "he had a large troop and was a noble vassal. He was 
small of body, but very brave and daring, and assaulted the English with 
his men gallantly." He seems to have been mostly occupied with his vast 
possessions during the reign of the first William. 

Upon the Conqueror's death his son, William Rufus, also kept the 
possession of the castle through the whole of his reign, a wise proceeding 
considering that Roger Bigot espoused the cause of Duke Robert. 

The ingratiation of Hen. I. with the nobles in order to secure 
effectually his power and Crown induced him to bind Roger Bigot as closely 




FRAMLINGHAM CASTLE. 

as possible to himself and secure his great influence, as he still held the 
lands of Framlingham as tenant of Earl Hugh. The King in iioi granted 
to him the castle and lordship, and appointed him to an official position in 
his regal establishment, making him a witness to the promulgation of his 
new laws. 

He founded the priory of Black Canons at Thetford, and dying 
in 1107 was buried there." By his wife Adeliza, one of the daughters 
and coheirs of Hugh de Grentmesnil, seneschal of England, he had 
amongst other chil(h:en William, his son and heir, who in his charter 
confirming his father's gift to Thetford styles himself " Dapifer regis 
Anglorum," and Hugh le Bigot, the ist Earl. William perished in the 
disaster which befel the White Ship 27th November, 1119, on its return 
from Harfieur, in Normandy, when the King's children and 140 of the 
nobility lost their lives. The Prince had by means of a boat practically 
got clear of danger, but hearing the cries of his sister insisted on returning 
to the wreck to take her off, when the rush of water was so terrible that the 
boat sank and all save a butcher, kept alive by floating on a mast, perished. 

' See for inscription on his tomb, Trimley St. Mary's Manor, in Colneis Hundred. 
KI 



266 



THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 



The manor and other estates passed to William's brother and heir, Hugh 
Bigot, who in time became steward of the King's household. He was 
Governor of Norwich till 1222, and one of the foremost in supporting the 
cause of Stephen, and on his accession was rewarded with the earldom of 
the East Angles. Later, however, he joined with Geoffrey Magnaville, 
Earl of Essex, Robert, Earl of Gloucester (Henry I.'s natural son), 
Ralph, Earl of Chester, and others in supporting the claims of the 
Empress Maud, and at the battle of Lincoln succeeded in taking King 
Stephen prisoner ; but on Stephen's being exchanged for Robert, Earl 
of Gloucester, the fortunes of war turned in favour of Stephen. On 
the accession of Hen. IL Hugh Bigot was obliged to compound with the 
King for a large sum and give hostages. In 1166 it was certified that this 
powerful noble had knights' fees to the amount to 125 " de veteri feoifa- 
mento " and 35 " de novo " upon the occasion of the assessment in aid of the 
marriage of the King's daughter. He obtained many marks of the King's 
favour, but arraigning himself under the banner of Robert, Earl of Leicester, 
in the insurrection incited by that nobleman in favour of the King's son, 
his treason cost him the surrender of both Bungay and Framlingham castles, 
and a fine of 1,000 marks. Framlingham castle was, however, dismantled 
by the King, and rendered incapable of defence. 

Hugh, having sufficiently disturbed the peace of his native country, 
endeavoured to make peace with heaven by making war on the infidels, and 
accordingly sought fresh fields in the Holy Land, returning from which he 
died before 9th March, 1 176-7, and was buried in the monastery of the 
Black Monks at Thetford. It is said that he was as much hated and 
detested for his crimes as he was feared for his prowess and persevering 
spirit. By his wife Juliana,' daughter of Alberic de Vere and Adeliza, 
his wife, daughter of Gilbert de Clare, he had two sons, Roger and 
William. Roger Bigot inherited the manor and other estates. He 
was Sheriff of Norfolk 1 156-7, and appears to have quietly enjoyed dur- 
ing the remaining years of Hen. II., and upon the accession of Rich. I. 
in 1189, on payment of 1,000 marks he was restored by special grant both to 
the earldom and stewardship and the whole inheritance of his father by 
charter 27th Nov. 1189. The same year he was joint ambassador to Philip, 
King of France, to solicit aid towards the recovery of the Holy Land. He 
attended WiUiam de Longcamp, Bishop of Ely, on his going to Richard 
in captivity, and was one of the four knights who carried the canopy of 
state of the King's head at his second coronation 17th April, 1194. He deserted 
King John, and was one of the hostile barons at Stamford and afterwards 
at Brackley. He married Ida or Isabel, daughter of Hamelyn Plantagenet, 
Earl of Warren and Surrey, illegitimate son of Geoffrey, Earl of Anjou, and 
half-brother to King Hen. II. , and dying between May and August, 1221, 
left his son and heir, Hugh Bigot, who performed homage this same year, 
and had livery of his father's inheritance. He married Maud, eldest 



'William Segar gives him two sons by a 
wife named Gundreda, who married 
afterwards Roger de Glanville, 
but Juliana is said to have survived 
the Earl and to have remarried 
Walkeline de Maminot. We have 
given the usually received descent, 
but have httle doubt that the MS. 
(Vincent 10) in the Coll. of Arms, to 
which Mr, Cockayne referred in his 



Complete Peerage, vol. vi., p. 38, 
is correct, and that there were two 
Hughs ; Hugh Bigot, who died 
in 1136, and his son Hugh, who died 
in 1 177. This fact would dispose of 
the difficulty of the second Hugh 
having died 70 years after tiie 
death of his father and the 
evidence assigned to the single 
Hugh. 



FRAMLINGHAM. 267 

daughter of William Mareschal, Earl of Pembroke, and Marshal of England, 
by Isabel, daughter and heir of Richard de Clare, called Strongbow, Earl of 
Pembroke. In 1223 he was with the King's army in Wales, but dying in 
Feb. 1224-5 his inheritance passed to his son and heir, Roger Bigot, 4th 
Earl, who was knighted by the King 22nd May, 1233. His possessions were 
so considerable that upon the levying of the aid to marry the King's eldest 
daughter he paid £1^2. us. for 125 knights' fees of the old feoffment and 
37^ of the new. This nobleman distinguished himself in arms, and in 
1245 was one of the five commissioners sent to the Council of Lyons to com- 
plain of the heavy burden under which the kingdom lay in consequence of 
the exaction of the see of Rome, the Pope receiving at that time 60,000 
marks annually more than the revenues of the Crown of England at the time. 
He joined in the well-known letter to the Pope. He was granted the of&ce 
of marshal in right of his mother 26th Aug. 1246, the staff, the emblem of the 
office, being delivered by the King to Maud, and she to her son Roger, who 
did homage to the King forthwith in respect of the honour. In 1253 
he was present when the King confirmed the two charters called The Great 
Charter, or Magna Charta, and Carta de Foresta, and the following year 
attended the King into GaScoigne. His dispute with the King respecting 
Robert de Ros, one of the barons, shows the power and independence 
of the nobles in that age. The incident is thus related by Dugdale : 
" In the 39 Henry III. the Earl of Norfolk making a just apology 
for Robert de Ros (a great baron of that age) then charged with some 
crime which endangered his life, he had very harsh language given him by 
the King being openly called ' traytor,' whereat, with a stern countenance 
he told him (the King) that he lied, and that he never was, nor would be a 
traytor, adding, ' if you do nothing but what the law warranteth, you can do 
me no harm /' ' Yes,' quoth the King, ' I can thrash your corn, and sell it, 
and so humble you.' To which he replied, ' If you do so, I will send you the 
heads of your thrashers.' " But by the interposition of the lords then present 
this heat soon passed over, so that shortly after he was, together with the 
Earl of Leicester and some others, sent on an embassy to the King of 
France to treat with him for restoring some rights which he withheld from 
the King." 

Roger Bigot was appointed by the barons after their victory at Lewes 
governor of Orford' Castle. He married, at Alnwick, May, 1225, Isabel, 
daughter of William, King of Scotland, and sister of Alexander II., King of 
Scotland, who had been his guardian, but dying 4th July 1270,' without 
issue, was succeeded by his nephew, Roger Bigot, son of his brother Hugh, 
(who was Justiciar of England in 1257-60), by his ist wife Joan, daughter of 
Robert Burnet. In 1293 Roger Bigot, 5th Earl, was licensed to embattle 
his castle or mansion house at Bungay, and he was as zealous as his ancestor 
in standing out against the Crown for the liberties of the subject. 

He was chief of those who opposed Edw. I. in his arbitrary impositions 
upon lands and wool, and not only opposed the levy demanded by the King 
for his expedition into Flanders, but actually refused his personal attendance 
thither. He obtained confirmation of the two great charters, the Great 
Charter and the Charter of the Forest, and the Statute of Articuli super 
Chartas, which explained them, together with a pardon for all offences in 
Feb. 1301. Having no issue he constituted King Edward his heir, deliver- 

' I.P.M., 54 Hen. III. 25, File 38 (17). An pastures of Oldfreth, Bradhage, and 

extent is given, and the manor was Buthehaye of Adam de Bedingfeld, 

held with the advowson, including rendered 6d. 



268 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

ing to him his marshal's rod, on condition that it should be returned to his 
children if he had any, he to have £i,ooo down and ;^i,ooo per annum 
during life. By some it is alleged this was done under compulsion or 
through fear. Hawes, in his History of Framhngham, says it was done to 
spite his brother, John Bigot. The settlement was effected by a deed 
dated at Colchester in the abbey of St. John the 12th April, 1302. Not 
long after he had a regrant of the earldom, marshalship, and constableship 
of Norwich Castle and all his estate in tail special to himself for life and 
to his heirs male if he had any by Alice' his wife, daughter of John de 
Abeunes, Count of Hainault, with remainder to the King, who, as the Earl 
died nth Dec. 1306, without issue, inherited the whole."" 

The Earl's brother and heir was entirely disinherited, taking but the 
Manor of Stockton, in Norfolk, and Seteringham, in Yorkshire, with a few 
more estates not included in the above settlement. 

Blomefield, the historian of Norfolk, however, quotes from an old MS. 
called the Book of Pleas, in the Guildhall of the City of Norwich, which seems 
to justify the former view. The extract runs thus : " Roger (Bygot) Erie 
of Norfolke, in the Tyme of Kyng Edward the first, had nou Heirs of his 
Body, and the seid Edward had iij Sonnes, whereof von was Edward which 
was setheu King Edw. the second with the long Shanks : the second sonne 
was Thomas of Brotherton, the 3rd Sonne was Edmond, the which Edward 
the Fader, thought that his Son Edward schuld be his Heir, and Kyng after 
hym, and so he was, and Thomas of Broderton, Edmond his other Sones 
Schuld no Syfelod have, but he get to hein, and in that Tyme, the Erie, 
Sire Roger Bigott Erie of Norfolke, and his Wif, come to London to the 
ParUament, in gay curl gret Aray, and with gret Peple that passed his 
Estate, and the Kyng and the Lordes of this Lond, in that Tyme hadden 
gret Envye thereof and the Kyng cast a Wrath to the Sere Roger and 
arrested hym, and put hym in strong Hold, saying he was a Traitor, to that 
Entent, for to do hym yelden up his Landes with the Kyngs Hond, that he 
schuld thereof don his Will ; and the seid Sere Roger was in gret Distres, 
many Day and long, and at the last, to be in Ese and in Rest, he gaf up all 
his Londes into the Kynges Hond, that he schuld thereof don his Will, 
and theune the Kyng havyng thereof seson, of his speciall Grace graunted 
agen, all the seid Londes to the seid Sire Roger Bigott, and to his Wif, to 
holden Ferme of their Lifes, and after their Disses to runeyndre to Thomas 
of Brodoiton, the secund Son of the seid Kyng Edward the first, and to the 
Heirs of his Body, the which Thomas Brodirton after the Deth of the seid 
Sir Roger Bigott, and of his Wife, possessed thes Londs, and was Erie of 
Norfolke." 

On the death of Ahce, widow of the last Bigot, Earl of Norfolk, in 1309, 
the manor passed in possession to King Edw. II. and was granted i6th 
December, 1312, to Thomas Plantagenet, surnamed de Brotherton, 5th son of 
Edw. I., but his eldest son by Margaret his 2nd Queen, daughter of Philip 
the Hardy, and sister to Philip the Fair, King of France, called Thomas 
after Thomas de Corbridge, Archbishop of York, who christened him. In 
1313 Thomas de Brotherton, who had been created Earl of Norfolk, obtained 

' She was his 2nd wife, his ist wife having "I.P.M., Roger Bigod and Alicia, 35 
been AUva, daughter and heir of Sir Edw. I. 46. 

Philip Basset, of Wycombe, and 
widow of Hugh le Despenser, Lord 

Despenser. 



FRAMLINGHAM. 269 

a grant for a fair yearly at Framlingham upon Monday, Tuesday, and 
Wednesday in Whitsun week, and for a free warren in all his demesne lands 
there.' The loth Feb. 1315, the Earl had a patent at Lincoln for the 
office of Marshal of England in special tail. 

In 133 1 he obtained a confirmation in tail general of all the castles, 
manors, and lands late of Roger Bigot, then valued at 6,000 marks (£4,000) 
per annum, and was also made the King's Server. Thomas de Brotherton 
resided at Framlingham Castle, and dying in 1338 was interred in the 
abbey church of Bury St. Edmunds. 

He married twice — ist Alice, daughter of Sir Roger Halys, of Harwich, 
Knt., and by her had and left issue Edward, Margaret, and Alice. Edward 
was after his father's decease Earl of Norfolk and Marshal of England, but 
died the King's ward the same year as his father, having married Beatrix, 
daughter of Roger Mortimer, Earl of March, whereon the manor went to 
his sisters Margaret and Alice as coheirs. 

Alice the younger married Edward de Montacute, by whom she had 
issue the lady Joan, her only daughter and heir, born at Bungay on 
Candlemas Day, 1348, and died without issue in 1375. Mary, the daughter 
of Wilham, Lord Roos (widow of Sir William Braose, of Bember and Gower) 
the 2nd wife of Thomas de Brotherton, survived her husband, and had for 
her hfe the Castle and Manor of Framlingham by another grant of Edw. IL 
to the said Thomas and Mary his wife and the heirs of the said Thomas, 
and on the Rolls of the Manor she is styled Maria Comitissa NorfolcicB 
et Marischalla AnglicB. She afterwards married Ralph Cobham, Lord 
Cobham, by whom she had Sir John Cobham, Knt., and died in 1362. After 
her decease an assignation being made of the castles, manors, and lands, 
of the inheritance of the daughters and coheirs of Brotherton, her former 
husband which she held for life, the Castle of Framlingham, with the Manors 
of Hoo, Hollesley, Donningworth, and Cratfield, were assigned to the lady 
Joan de Montacute, then the wife of William de Ufford, Earl of Suffolk, 
as the only daughter and heir of Alice, one of the coheirs, who had died in 
the hfetime of her mother-in-law. Wilham de Ufford (whose grandfather, 
Robert, a younger son of John de Peyton, assumed the surname from the 
lordship of Ufford, where he then had his residence) survived his wife Joan 
and held the manor for life by the curtesy of England. 

The Earl built Parham church, about two miles from Framlingham. 
By his will dated on Tuesday next after the Festival of St. Barnabas the 
Apostle, 4 Rich. II., he bequeathed his body to be buried at Campsey abbey j"" 
in Suffolk, under the arch of St. Nicholas's chapel, behind the tomb of his 
father and mother, and not many months after, being made choice of by the 
Commons in Parliament, to represent to the lords what they deemed of 
great importance for the welfare of the realm, in ascending the steps up 
to their house, he fell down dead, to the great amazement and sorrow 
of all persons, rich and poor (being well before to all appearance), which 
surprising accident happened 15th Feb. 1381-2.^ 

William de Ufford leaving no issue surviving, the issue of his three 
sisters were his heirs, viz., Sir Robert Willoughby, Knt., the son of Cecily ; 
Robert, Lord Scales, the son of Catherine ; and Henry, Lord Ferrers, of 
Groby, the son of Margaret, daughters of Robert Ufford, late Earl of Suffolk; 

'Chart. Rolls, 7 Edw. II. ^ Baker, 144. 

""Dugdale's Bar., ii. 47-49. 



270 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

but the castle and manor of Framlingham and other manors, according to 
the grant of King Edw. III., descended to the Lady Margaret, the other 
daughter of Thomas of Brotherton. She kept her first court at FramUng- 
ham in i38i-2,and in the Rolls of that court she is styled MargaretaMari- 
schalla Comitissa Norfolcice. 

Her ist husband, whom she married before 15th Dec. 1338, was John, 
3rd Lord Segrave, of Folkestone, in Kent, whose ancestors adopted that 
surname from a lordship in Leicestershire, where they had their chief 
residence. He died in 1353, leaving issue by this lady Margaret, Anne, 
abbess of Barking, in Essex, who no doubt died unmarried, and Elizabeth, 
who married John, Lord Mowbray, of Axholm, descended of an ancient 
family originally called D' Albini, from Nigil D' Albini/ whose mother 
was a Mowbray. 

After the death of John, Lord Segrave, his widow, the Lady Margaret, 
married Sir Walter Manny, Lord Manny, of the town of Manny, in the 
diocese of Cambray, and Knight Companion of the most noble Order of the 
Garter. He founded the Charterhouse, and was buried there the 13th Jan. 
1371-2.^ His funeral obsequies were performed with great solemnity. 
King Edw. HI. and all the Princes and Princesses his children being present, 
with the greatest prelates and barons of the realm, for though he was a 
foreigner yet with singular commendations he had served that King in his 
French wars, and had been employed by him on several embassies. 

At the coronation of Rich. H. the Lady Margaret exhibited a petition 
for the marshalship of England to be executed by deputy, and to have the 
fees and emoluments belonging thereto. But that office having been 
granted to her father and his issue male, and the time before the coronation 
being too short to determine the matter, Henry, Lord Percy, Earl of 
Northumberland, was appointed to execute the office, and though her prayer 
was not then granted yet the King subsequently conferred on her 29th Sept. 
1397, the title of Duchess of Norfolk, " for life, with an assignation of 40 
marks per annum out of the issues of that county." She died at Framling- 
ham Castle, 24th March, 1399-1400, and was buried with her last husband 
in the Charterhouse,' having had issue by him Thomas Manny, their only son, 
drowned during his minority in a well at Deptford, in Kent, or at Chester- 
field, and a daughter Anne Manny, married to John, Lord Hastings, Earl 
of Pembroke. Elizabeth by her ist husband, John de Mowbray, 4th 
Baron, had issue two sons — John, 5th Lord Mowbray, her eldest son and 
heir, who at the coronation of Rich. 11. was created Earl of Nottingham, 
but died three years later under age, namely, loth Feb. 1381-2, leaving the 
other son of Elizabeth, namely, Thomas de Mowbray, his brother and heir, 
to whom this manor passed. 

Thomas, 6th Lord Mowbray, was advanced to the Earldom of Notting- 
ham, by King Rich. II. 12th Feb. 1382-3," per cincturam gladii" habendum, 
to him and the heirs male of his body. And the title and office of Earl 
Marshal of England was granted to him for life 30th June, 1385. In 
1393 he was appointed King's Lieutenant of Calais in the parts of Picardy, 
Flanders, and Artois, and Governor of Calais. 

' See an excellent account of this family in ^I.P.M., 46 Edw. III. 38. His will is 

East Anglian Notes and Queries, dated 30th Nov. 1371, and was 

vol. ii. proved at Lambeth 13th April,i372. 

^ Leland Collect., fol. 193 ; Cockayne says 
buried in the Grey Friars, London. 



FRAMLINGHAM. 271 

This Earl, in July, 1395, was sent ambassador with the Earl of Rutland 
and other lords to the French King to treat of a marriage between the 
King of England and the Lady Isabella, daughter of the French King 
Charles VI., where they were honourably entertained, and there the Earl 
Marshal, by letters of procuration, married that lady, in King Richard's 
name. In 1396 he obtained a charter from the King in Parliament, by which 
the of&ce of Earl Marshal was granted to him and the heirs male of his 
body as entirely as Thomas de Brotherton, Earl of Norfolk, or Roger le 
Bigot, had held that office ; he had also at the same time a grant of the 
reversion of the offices of Marshal of the King's Bench, Marshal of the 
Exchequer, and Marshal Cryer before the Steward, and Marshal of the 
King's Household in like manner. 

In 1397 he attended the meeting of the Duke of Gloucester, the Earls 
of Derby, Arundel, and Warwick, at Arundel Castle, where they agreed to 
seize the King, the Dukes of Lancaster and York, and commit them to prison, 
and to hang such of the other lords attendant upon the King as they con- 
ceived to be his evil advisers. This plot was, however, discovered by the 
Earl Marshal to the King, on the very day on which it was to have been 
carried into execution, and the Duke of Gloucester was by an artful con- 
trivance drawn from his house at Pleshy, in Essex, carried by the Earl 
Marshal to Calais, and there smothered to death by feather beds. Later in 
the same year the Earl Marshal attended the decapitation of his father-in- 
law, the Earl of Arundel, of which the King himself was a spectator, and if 
the account of Froissart is to be credited the Earl Marshal had the singular 
lack of taste to bandage his father-in-law's eyes and himself perform the 
duties of executioner. 

For his many services to the Crown and in particular his zeal in the 
apprehension and execution of his father-in-law, the Earl of Arundel, he was 
29th Sept. 1397 {i.e., eight days after the execution) created Duke of Norfolk, 
the patent being made to hmi and his heirs male, and he had also conferred 
upon him the honour of bearing the arms of King Edward the Confessor 
(which were Az. a cross Patonce, between five martlets Or " Id circo, armabi 
partita portavit, (viz.)Sancti Edwardi, et domini Mareschalli Angliae, cum 
duabus pennis scamonis erectis, et super cristam leonem, et duo parva 
scuta cum leonibus, exutraque parte-predictorum Armorum.'" 

The circumstance of the Duke's quarrel with the Duke of Hereford 
and their meeting before the King to determine by force of arms the justice 
of their respective causes is well known. The result was the banishment 
of Hereford for ten years, four of which were subsequently released, and of 
Norfolk for life. Within a year Hereford, then Duke of Lancaster, was 
crowned King as Hen. IV., and about the same time the Duke of Norfolk 
died at Venice of a pestilence 22 Sept. 1400, on his return from Jerusalem, 
and was buried in the abbey of St. George, in Venice.' He had married twice — 
1st EHzabeth, daughter and heir of John le Strange, Baron le Strange, of 
Blackmere, who died 23rd Aug. 1383, without issue, and 2ndly Elizabeth Fitz 
Alan, daughter of Richard Fitz Alan, Earl of Arundel, and sister and coheir of 
Thomas Fitz Alan, Earl of Arundel, and widow of WiUiam Montacute, son 
and heir of William, Earl of Salisbury, by whom he had two sons, Thomas 
and John, and two daughters, Margaret, married to Sir Robert Howard, 
Knt., and Isabel, to Sir James Berkeley, Knt. 

'Holinshead 485, 486; Pat. Rolls, 21 'I.P.M., i Hen. IV. 71a, 72. 
Rich. II. lib. 



272 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

The Castle and Manor of Framlingham, the Manors of Walton, Soham, 
and Kenet, the Manor and Borough of Bungay, the Manors of Stonham, 
Doningworth, Kelsale, Staverton, HoUesley, Hoo, with the Hundred of 
Loes and the Manor of Peasenhall, amongst others in various counties, 
were assigned to EUzabeth, the Duke's widow, as part of her dower, but as 
the castle stood near the sea and was subject to the incursions of enemies, 
Henry IV. gave her in exchange for the same an equivalent in the Counties 
of Derby, Buckingham, and Leicester. 

She remarried Sir Gerald Ufflete, and finally took a 4th husband. Sir 
Robert Gowsell or Coushill, Knt., of Hoveringham, co. Notts, who had been 
an esquire to her former husband, the late Duke. She died the 8th July, 
1425, having issue by Sir Robert Gowsell, Johanna, married to Thomas, 
Baron Stanley, and Ehzabeth, married to Sir Robert Wingfield, Knt., 
eldest son of Sir Robert Wingfield, Knt., of Letheringham ; their daughter 
Elizabeth married Sir John Paulet. 

After making the exchange above mentioned, Hen. IV. granted the 
Castle and Manor of Framlingham to Sir Thomas Erpingham, of Erpingham, 
in Norfolk, Knt., who held his first court for the manor in 1400. Erpingham 
exercised the of&ce of Lord Great Chamberlain at the King's coronation, 
and gave him water, when he washed both before and after dinner, taking 
for his fees the bason, ewer, towels, and other things belonging to his office, 
and not long afterwards was made Knight Companion of the Order of the 
Garter. He had the management of the English army at the battle of 
Agincourt, and led the main body himself. The grant to Sir Thomas 
Erpingham was apparently merely during the minority of Thomas Mowbray, 
eldest son and heir of the banished Duke, who after his marriage to Constance, 
daughter of John de Holand, 1st of the name, Duke of Exeter, and niece 
to Hen. IV., was received into the King's favour and had the Castle and 
Manor of Framlingham expressly granted to him in 1404, in which yea.r he 
held his first court. But conspiring with Henry Percy, Earl of Northumber- 
land, Richard Scroop, Archbishop of York, the Lords Hastings, Faulcon- 
bridge, Bardolf, and others, he was treacherously taken by Ralph Nevil, 
Earl of Westmorland and brought prisoner to the King at Pontefract, whence 
he was taken to York and beheaded loth June, 1405, his head being set upon 
the walls of that city, but his body buried in the minster there.' The Earl's 
property was forfeited to the King, who seized the same, together with a 
white horse then valued at £40 and a grey horse at £20 (enormous sums in 
those days), both in Framlingham Castle. His Countess, the Lady 
Constance, survived, and subsequently married Sir John Grey, K.B., eldest 
son of Reginald, 3rd Lord Grey, of Ruthyn, and died in 1438. 

The King gave the Castle and Manor of Framlingham to his eldest 
son, Henry Prince of Wales, who kept his first court there in 1405. But 
in 1412 his majesty granted all the castles, manors, and lands which the late 
Earl of Norfolk had forfeited, to John Mowbray, the brother and heir of 
Thomas, who held his court the same year as '' John, Earl Marshal, Notting- 
ham, Lord of Mowbray, Segrave, and of Gower." In 1413 the King con- 
firmed the Earldom of Nottingham and office of Earl Marshal to the said 
John Mowbray. He missed the battle of Agincourt by illness, but recover- 
ing commanded part of the army at the siege of Caen. The 14th July, 1424, 
he was on his petition to Parliament restored to the Dukedom of Norfolk as 
next heir male, his father having died without attainder. Banks, in his 

'I.P.M., 8 Hen. IV. 76. 



FRAMLINGHAM. 273 

Baronia Anglica Concentrata, says : " But as the act of banishment 
against his fatheif was not attended with any attainder, there was no for- 
feiture incurred, and therefore it does not appear that, although his elder 
brother Thomas only used the title of Earl Marshal, he was incapable to 
succeed his father in the dukedom. The proceedings in the Parliament 
at Westminster do not contain any enactment of restoration ; the decision 
was merely a recognition of right, they originated in a controversy between 
this John, Earl Marshal, and this Earl of Warwick, for precedence ; the 
Earl Marshal alleging that he was Earl of Norfolk by descent, as heir as 
well to that title as to the arms royal of England from Thomas of Brotherton, 
Earl of Norfolk, younger son of King Edw. I., and so created by his brother 
of the half-blood Edw. II., anno 6th of his reign, to him and his heirs for 
ever. But this dispute, after divers hearings, was terminated by reason 
that the said John, Earl Marshal, was heir to the Dukedom of Norfolk, 
and as such was adjudged to bear that title, with a reservation to his heirs, 
as to the question of precedence as Earl of Norfolk.'" John de Mowbray, 
Duke of Norfolk, died igth October, 1432,'' and was buried in the abbey of 
the Carthusians within the Isle of Axholm, leaving issue by Katharine his 
wife, daughter of Ralph Nevill, ist Earl of Westmorland, John, 5th Duke 
of Norfolk. Catherine, the widow, remarried three times — Sir Thomas 
Strangways, then John Viscount Beaumont, and 4thly and lastly Sir John 
WidviUe, Knt., brother of Anthony, Earl Rivers, and of Elizabeth, Queen 
Consort to Edw. IV. John de Mowbray, the 5th Duke, being under age 
was committed to the guardianship of Humphrey, Duke of Gloucester, 
Earl of Hainault, Holland, Zealand, and Pembroke, Great Chamberlain of 
England, the 4th son of King Hen. IV., who held his first court for the 
Manor of Framlingham in 1433. The Duke attained his majority in 1436, 
and the following year held his first court for the manor. In 1439 and 1447 
he was sent ambassador into Picardy, to treat of a peace between the Kings 
of England and France, and by patent 4th March 1444-5, upon confirmation 
of the title of Duke of Norfolk to him and the heirs male of his body, he had 
a grant of place and seat in Parliament and elsewhere next to the Duke 
of Exeter. In 1448 the Duke, for securing his estates as far as possible, 
against the forfeitures so constantly occurring in those days, settled the 
Castle and Manor of Framlingham upon John Stafford, Archbishop of 
Canterbury, Humphrey Stafford, Duke of Buckingham, and other feoffees, 
who kept their first court there in trust for the Duke of Norfolk and his 
heirs this same year. The Duke married Eleanor, daughter of William, 
Duke of Gloucester, youngest son of King Edw. III. She was sister of 
Henry Bourchier, Earl of Essex, in Normandy, by Ann his wife, widow of 
Edmund, Earl of Stafford, and daughter of Thomas of Woodstock, and dying 
6th Nov. 1461,^ was buried near the high altar at Thetford, when the manor 
passed to his son, John de Mowbray, 6th Duke of Norfolk, created in his 
father's lifetime,* 24th March, 1451, Earl Warren, and Earl of Surrey, 
titles which had been enjoyed by the Fitz Alan family. He was installed 
a Knight of the Garter, and died 17th Jan. 1475,^ in Framlingham Castle, 
and was buried at Thetford, leaving issue by Elizabeth his wife, daughter 
of John Talbot, ist Earl of Shrewsbury (by his 2nd wife Margaret, daughter 
and coheir of Richard Beauchamp, Earl of Warwick), an only daughter, 

'Rolls of Pari. iv. 267, 275. ♦Cockayne. 

'I.P.M., II Hen. VI. 43. His will is ^jp^^ j^ g^w. IV. 58. His will is 

dated the 20th May, 7 Hen. VI. dated 28th Oct. 1461. 

3I.P.M., I Edw. IV. 46. 

LI 



274 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

Anne Mowbray. By reason of the titles of Duke of Norfolk and Earl 
Warren and Surrey being limited to issue male she could not succeed to 
either, but the Baronies of Mowbray and Seagrave with a moiety of the 
Barony of Braose of Gower, being derivable from writ of summons, devolved 
upon her as heiress general of the family. 

She was 15th Jan. 1477-8, at the age of five years, married to Richard 
Plantagenet, Duke of York, King Edw. IV.'s 2nd son, but died before the 
consummation of the marriage. The Castle and Manor of Framlingham 
were settled by Act of ParHament upon Thomas Bourchier, Cardinal and 
Archbishop of Canterbury, William de Waynfiete, Bishop of Winchester, 
and others, in trust for the Duchess and her heirs, and they by deed dated 
1st March, 16 Edw. IV. [1477-8] granted the manor and those of Kettle- 
burgh and Hacheston to the Duchess for payment of the debts of John 
Mowbray, late Duke.' 

Upon the death of the Duke of Yor.k and Anne without issue (she died 
i6th Jan. 1480, in the lifetime of her husband, and was buried in Westminster 
Abbey) the inheritance of the Norfolk family fell to Sir John Howard and 
William, Lord Berkeley, descended from the two daughters of Thomas 
Mowbray, first of that name, Duke of Norfolk. 

Sir John Howard"" was the son and heir of Sir Robert Howard, of 
Stoke Nayland, and Margaret his wife, the eldest daughter of Thomas 
Mowbray, ist Duke of Norfolk, of that house. On the 28th June, 1483, 
being six days after Richard was proclaimed King, he appointed him Earl 
Marshal and conferred on him also the title of Duke of Norfolk, as next 
cousin in blood, and one of the heirs of the late Duchess of York and Norfolk. 
He was likewise constituted Lord Admiral of England, Ireland, and Aquitaine 
for life. At the coronation, which took place on the 4th July following, he 
carried the Imperial Crown, and his son, the Earl of Surrey, as High 
Constable of England for that day only, bore the sword of state in a rich 
scabbard. The Duke made partition with William, Lord Berkeley, of all 
the estates of the late Duchess of Norfolk, the Castle and Manor of Fram- 
lingham cum Saxsted, Kelsale, Hacheston, Peasenhall, Bungay, Litelhaugh 
(in Norton), Kettleburgh, Soham, Cratfield, HoUesley cum Sutton, Staverton 
cum BromesweU, Stonham, Walton cum Trimley, Donningworth, Hoo, and 
the Hundred of Loes were allotted and assigned to the Duke of Norfolk 
and his heirs. ^ This partition was subsequently confirmed by Acts of 
Parliament in 1488 and 1503. 

The great battle of Bosworth was fought 22nd Aug. 1485, between the 
contending houses of York and Lancaster. There had been already twelve 
battles, and some of them most sanguinary, but this was the decisive day. 
The leaders were both crafty, equally ambitious, and alike strangers to 
probity. When the armies met Richard's front line was commanded by 
the Duke of Norfolk, assisted by his son Thomas, Earl of Surrey, the second 
by Richard himself, and in the right of this line Henry, Earl of Northumber- 
land led a considerable body. The Lancastrian's front was commanded by 
John de Vere, Earl of Oxford, 2nd cousin of the Duke of Norfolk, the earl's 
mother being of the Howard family. The shock of the contending parties 
under the leadership of these powerful men was dreadful, and in the melee 
Norfolk and Oxford found themselves at sword's point with each other. 

'Add. Ch. 26598. 3 Pat. Rolls;_4 Hen. VII. m. 14 (18). 

^See Tendring Hall Manor, Stoke Nay- 
land, Babergh Hundred. 



FRAMLINGHAM. 275 

After breaking their spears in the assault they drew their swords and con- 
tinued the personal engagement with great impetuosity. It is recorded 
that the first blow with the last-named weapon was struck by Norfolk, 
which sliding from the helmet of Oxford glanced on the shoulder and 
wounded him in the left arm. This advantage was returned by Oxford, 
who with the strength of a lion hewed the beaver from the helmet of his 
adversary and left his face bare. Here, however, the chivalrous feeling of 
Oxford would not allow him to take advantage of Norfolk's unequal position, 
and he retired a few paces from his adversary in order to parley. But the 
hand of fate had marked the moment of Norfolk's end, and upon the very 
instant of Oxford's retiring an arrow from a distant unknown hand struck 
the defenceless head of the former, and penetrating to the brain he expired 
on the spot. 

A contemporary tribute to the virtues of the fallen is expressed in the 
following hnes : — 

"A braver Knight there did not fall 
Than Howard, in red Bosworth's brawl. 
A better man, a closer friend, 
God upon earth did never send ; 
Though John to York's foul cause did stick. 
And fouled his hand for Bloody Dick.'" 

The Duke was buried first at Leicester and was subsequently removed 
to the abbeiy of Thetford, leaving issue, by Catherine his ist wife, the 
daughter of William, Lord Molins, Thomas, Earl of Surrey, and four 
daughters. 

Margaret, the Duke's 2nd wife, daughter of Sir John Chedworth, 
survived her husband and died in 1494,' being buried in the church of 
Stoke by Nayland, where the Duke's ist wife had been buried in 1452. 
The late Duke and his son Thomas, Earl of Surrey, were attainted by 
Parliament 7th Nov. 1485, when all their honours were forfeited, and 
Thomas was committed to the Tower, where he continued a prisoner 
three years and a half. 

The Framlingham property was granted by the Crown to John Vere, 
Earl of Oxford. The Earl of Oxford had fought for Hen. VI. and had been 
attainted with his brothers by Act of Parliament in the reign of Edw. IV. 
who had granted part of his estates to John Howard, Duke of Norfolk, 
and imprisoned the Earl. The Earl had, however, contrived to escape, 
and proved himself, as we have seen, of great assistance to the Earl of 
Richmond in his successful fight for the Crown. The Earl was rewarded 
accordingly being made Constable of the Tower, and Lord High Admiral of 
England, Ireland, and the Duchy of Aquitaine for life. But in Jan. 1489-90 
Thomas was restored by Act of Parliament to the dignity of Earl of Surrey, 
and to those castles, manors, and estates which were of his wife's inheritance 
or the late Duke, his father's, and which had been granted to John, Earl of 
Oxford.^ 

This same year a court was held for the manor by John Morton, Arch- 
bishop of Canterbury, and other feoffees, to the use of the said Earl of 
Surrey. 

' Cited Wodderspoon's Historic Sites, p. the will may be seen in Nicolas' 

13. Testamenta Vetusta. 

'Her will wis dated 13th May, 1490, and ^R.P. 4 Hen. VH. i. 
proved 3rd Dec. 1494 ; a copy of 



276 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

In 1507 the Earl of Surrey had a special livery of all the lands of which 
his father had died seised, and was left one of the King's executors. In 1509 
he was made a privy councillor, and the following year, loth July, 1510, 
had the office of Earl Marshal confirmed on him for life. For his military 
services, in particular his victory over King James of Scotland at Flodden, 
9th Sept. 1513, when that monarch was slain, with three of his bishops, 
two a.bbots, 12 earls, 17 lords, 400 knights, and about 8,000 persons, 
the Earl of Surrey was created Duke of Norfolk and Earl March, ist Feb. 
15 13-4, and also installed a Knight of the Garter. 

He died at the castle 21st May, 1524, and was buried with great pomp 
at Thetford, though subsequently removed to FramUngham, and later to 
the Howard Chapel, at Lambeth. The following is a copy of his will dated 
31st May, 1520, and proved 26th July, 1524 : — 

" In the name of God, Amen— We Thomas, Duke of Norfolk being hole 
of mind and of good memory, &c. My body to be buried in the Priory of 
Thetford. For levying cxxxii^. vis. viii^. for making of our tomb 
before the high altar at Thetford, as devised by us. Master Gierke Master 
of the Kinge's werkes at Cambridge and Wasselt free mason of Bury, 
and pictures of us and of Agnes our wife to be set together thereupon as 
well as may be for the saide sum. I bequeath ;^ccc. each for the marrying 
of our doughters ; to our sonne and heire apparent that shall be living at 
our decease our great hangede bedde, palyd with cloth of golde, whyte 
damask and black velvet and browderedwith these two letters T. A. (Thomas 
and Agnes) ; and our hangyng of the story of Hercules, made for our great 
chamber at Framlyngham. — ^To our wyfe Agnes all manner of plate, jewels, 
garnyshed and ungarnyshed with all our goods, that is to say, all our house 
hold stuff, beddings, hangings, sheets, fustians, blankets, pelows, cusheons, 
hanged beds of gold and silk, or what other stuffe that ever they be of, 
and all other stuflEe belonging to bedding and apparelling of chambers. — 
Item, we give her all our naprie, and all our chapell stuffe, with aU maner 
of kechyn stuffe. Item, we give and bequeath unto Agnes our said wyfe 
all our apparel for our body, with all our horses, geldings, &c. Item, we 
give and bequeath unto Agnes our said wyfe all our harness and other abilla- 
ments of warrys, with long-bowes, crossbows, and bendings, all our rynges, 
jewels of gold, garnyshed and ungarnyshed, and all other plate of 
gold and silver and silver and gilt, with all our wyne, gold and silver, 
and all other our goods and chattels. All maner of detts owing to 
us, as well the revenues of our lands and their arrerage of the same, as other 
detts by specialties, obligaciones, bills or otherwise due to us at the 
time of decease, and she therewith to pay the charges of our burial and 
costs borne. — We will that our said wyfe have and enjoy all our said goodes 
of our bequest above written to hir own behove and use. And in our most 
humble wyse we beseech my Lord Cardinal York (Cardinal Wolsey) good grace 
of his charitie to be good and gracious Lord unto our said wyfe in hir right 
that she may enjoy such things as we have given hir by this our last Will 
and Testament, and we beseech his grace that for a poor remembrance he will 
take our gift a pair of our gilt pots called or Skotish pots. — In witness whereof 
we the said Duke have subscribed our name and sette our seale, &c. this 
the last day of May 1520, 12 Hen. VIII. And I constitute Agnes our said 
wyfe and Sir Thomas Blenarhasset, our servant, our executors. All these 
persons whose names be here subscribed were present at the subscribing 
and ensealing of this testament by the said Duke, and required specially 
by him to set their names hereunto, to thintent they may at all tymes 



FRAMLINGHAM. 277 

hereafter witness the same. T. Norfolk, John Berners per me John Jenny, 
Henry Eward, John Uyedale, William Asheby." 

The manor passed to the 2nd Duke's eldest son, Thomas Howard, 3rd 
Duke of Norfolk, who had special livery of the castle and manor with the 
Hundred of Loes in 1524, and the same year William Warham, Archbishop 
of Canterbury, and his cofeoffees kept their first court in trust for the Duke. 

The Duke, with Charles Brandon, Duke of Suffolk, was commissioned 
to demand the Great Seal from Cardinal Wolsey on the fall of this great states- 
man who had been Norfolk's father's inveterate enemy. Norfolk's name 
appears amongst those of the lords who signed the articles of impeachment 
against the Cardinal, and he was shortly afterwards rewarded with the 
grant of the monastery of Felixstowe, which formed part of the endowment 
of the Cardinal's colleges. The Duke bore an active part in promoting the 
divorce of the King from Catherine of Arragon, and signed the declaration 
sent to Rome threatening the assumption of the King's supremacy in the 
event of the Pope's opposition. His services were recompensed in 1534 by the 
office of Earl Marshal, and the grant of a vast number of monastic estates. 
The lust of the King was the occasion of the ruin of his wisest counsellors. 
Wolsey fell for opposing the first divorce or not sufficiently favouring it. 
Cromwell fell in 1540 for opposing the divorce from Anne of Cleves, and 
the Duke of Norfolk indirectly through his niece, Catherine Howard, for 
the disgust which the King entertained for her after his short union extended 
itself to her family. The Earl of Surrey fell a victim to the King's dis- 
pleasure, and the Duke, his father, was saved only by the intervention of 
the timely death of the King, the warrant for the execution having been 
signed, but those to whom it was directed avoided putting it into execution, 
not wishing to stain the opening of the new reign with an event of blood. 

The Duke and his son, the Earl of Surrey, were both attainted by 
special Bills in Parliament, the Bills passing 20th January, 1546-7. Just 
before the King's death the Earl was executed, 21st January. Upon the 
death of Hen. VHI. the castle and manor of Framlingham and the Duke's 
other estates having been forfeited by the attainder to that King, descended 
to his son and successor, Edw. VI'., who kept his first court at Framlingham 
and caused a survey to be made of the manor in the first year of his reign. 

By letters patent dated 3rd May, 1553, the King granted the castle and 
manor of Framlingham and Hundred of Loes and other estates late 
belonging to the Duke of Norfolk to the Princess Mary and her heirs. 

On the decease of Edw. VI. 6th July, 1553, the unfortunate Lady 
Jane Grey was elevated to the throne in virtue of her cousin's will, and 
Mary immediately sought the castle of Framlingham as the most favourable 
spot for asserting her rights. For here she had not only a place of defence 
in which she might be secure and free from threatened attacks, but a place 
which by reason of its proximity to the coast was suitable in the event 
of flight to the Continent becoming necessary. On the 20th July she issued 
her commands as Queen from Framlingham, and she soon found herself at 
the head of 40,000 men brought together by her Norfolk and Suffolk adherents. 
We find the names of Sir John Sulyard, of Wether den. Sir Thomas 
Cornwallis, of Brome, Sir Williani Drury, of Hawstead, Sir Henry Beding- 
field, Sir Henry Jerningham, and others. Mary continued at the castle until 
31st July, and then left for London, where she arrived on the 3rd August, 



278 THlE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

and was proclaimed Queen. The same day the Duke of Norfolk was released 
from his long imprisonment in the Tower, and by an Act of Parliament, 
I Mary, his attainder was reversed and his estates restored. The Duke 
in 1554 held a court for the Manor of Framlingham, the style being : 
" Prima curia Thomae Ducis Norfolcise tum post prisonamentum dicti Ducis 
per Dominum Henricum nuper Regem anno tricessimo octavo regni, quam 
post de liberationem per dominam Mariam." 

He died 25th Aug. 1554,' and was buried at Framlingham, and a tomb 
erected on the right of the altar in that church. The effigy of the Duke 
upon the tomb bears a collar formed of twelve medaUions placed upon the 
breast, bearing this motto : — 

M d. 
G . R . A . C . I . A . DE . I . SV . Q . SV . M. 

i.e., " By the grace of God I am what I am," in illustration of which it has 
been said that the Duke, finding his life was miraculously spared by the 
providential death of his unmerciful sovereign, who had on the previous 
night whilst himself lying in the agonies of death, signed a warrant for the 
Duke's execution on the following morning, threw aside his collar of S.S. 
and wore for the remainder of his days another bearing the truly appropriate 
motto as shown upon his effigy. The dots show the separation of the letters 
upon the medallions. 

On the 3rd Duke of Norfolk's death the manor passed to his grandson, 
Thomas Howard, 4th Duke of Norfolk, K.G., the eldest son of Henry, Earl 
of Surrey, by Frances, daughter of John de Vere, Earl of Oxford, but being 
under age he became a ward of King Philip and Queen Mary, who kept 
their first court at Framlingham in 1554, and continued to hold the manor 
until the Duke attained majority. This event occurred two years later, 
when he himself held a court there. He married ist in 1556 Mary, daughter 
and eventually heir of Henry Fitz-Alan, Earl of Arundel (by his ist wife 
Catharine, daughter of Thomas Grey, Marquis of Dorset), by whom he had 
a son Philip ; and 2ndly, in 1557, Margaret, eldest daughter and eventually 
sole heir of Thomas Audley, Baron Audley, of Walden, and widow of Henry, 
younger son of John Dudley, Duke of Northumberland, by whom he left 
a daughter Margaret and two sons, Thomas and William. His 3rd wife 
was Elizabeth, daughter of Sir Francis Leybourne, and widow of Thomas, 
4th Lord Dacre, of Gillesland. The 4th Duke was attainted of high treason 
for his communication with Mary Queen of Scots, and beheaded on Tower 
Hill 2nd June, 1572, when all his estates became forfeited, and Queen 
Elizabeth, as lady of the manor, the 24th July, 1579, made a lease for 21 
years to William Dix and William Cantrell, a former lease for 16 years 
dated ist June 1569, held by them from the late Duke not being then 
expired. On the 20th May, 1588, William Dix demised the manor to 
Edward Cantrell, John Holdyche, Richard Godfrey, John Holland, and 
John Kepar for the residue of his term then unexpired, and they, the assignees, 
held their first court for the said manor 30th July following. 

The Queen 29th November, 1591, made a lease to her cousin. Sir George 
Carey or Carewe, afterwards 2nd Lord Hunsdon, of the site of the Manor of 
Framlingham and the Hundred of Loes for 21 years "in as ample manner 

' His will is dated 33rd (? i8th) July, same year, and again in the nth 

1554, and was proved 8th Nov. the June, 1589 ; I. P.M., 31 Mar. 1555. 



FRAMLINGHAM. 279 

and form as any Duke of Norfolk ever had or ought to have." Sir George 
Carey was a Knight of the Garter, Governor of the Isle of Wight, Lord 
Chamberlain of the Queen's Household, and one of her privy council. After 
the decease of his father he became Baron of Hunsdon, and died 9th Sept. 
1606, leaving issue by Elizabeth his wife, daughter of Sir John Spencer, 
of Althorp, CO. Northampton, Knt., Elizabeth who was married to Sir 
Thomas Berkley, Knt., son and heir of Henry, Lord Berkley. 

Before the expiration of this lease King J as. I. by letters patent dated 
27th June, 1603, granted to the late Duke of Norfolk 2nd son of Thomas, 
Lord Howard, afterwards Baron of Walden, and to his grace's brother, 
Henry Howard, the youngest son of the unfortunate Surrey, in equal 
moieties, the inheritance of the castle and manor of Framlingham and other 
manors. [A copy of this grant is given in Loder's History of Framlingham, 
p. 193.] Henry, Lord Howard, the Earl of Surrey's 2nd and youngest 
son, brother to Thomas last Duke of Norfolk, and uncle to Thomas, 
Lord Howard, Baron of Walden, was restored in blood i Eliz., and 
in the month of May i Jas. was chosen for one of the King's privy 
council and later constituted Warden of the Cinque Ports and 
Constable of Dover Castle. He subsequently became a Knight of the 
Garter and Earl of Northampton, and by indenture dated 30th 
May, 1605, he made partition with Thomas, Earl of Suffolk, whereby his 
moiety of the castles, manors, &c., in Suffolk lately granted to him by the 
King were assigned and allotted to the said Earl of Suffolk and his heirs. 
About a year afterwards he held his first court for the Manor of Framling- 
ham, being then Lord Chamberlain of the King's Household. He married 
1st his sister-in-law Mary, 2nd daughter of Thomas, Lord Dacre, of GiUes- 
land, by whom he had no issue ; and 2ndly Catherine, eldest daughter and 
coheir of Sir Henry Knevitt, of Charlton, in Wiltshire, Knt., by whom he 
had with other issue Theophilus, Lord Howard, of Walden. The Earl died 
at Suffolk House, near Charing Cross, in London, 28th May, 1626, and was 
buried at Walden, when the manor passed to his eldest son and heir, 
Theophilus Howard, Earl of Suffolk, K.G., who the same year held a court 
for the manor. He married Elizabeth, daughter and coheir of George, Lord 
Hume, of Berwick, Earl of Dumbar, in Scotland. By indenture dated 14th 
May, 1635, the Earl together with Sir Giles Alington, Knt., Sir Nathaniel 
Napper, Knt., Sir Edmund Sayer, Knt., Lawrence Whitacre and Marma- 
duke Moor, in consideration of £14,000, granted the castle and manors of 
Framlingham and Saxted, the woods and demesne lands there, and the 
Hundred of Loes to Sir Robert Hitcham, Knt., Richard Keeble, Francis 
Bacon, William Butts, Robert Butts, and James Revit, and their heirs 
and assigns for ever with covenants to levy a fine and suffer a recovery 
accordingly which was done in Trinity term the same year. 

Sir Robert Hitcham was born at Levington and was a scholar in the 
free school at Ipswich, and sometime of Pembroke Hall, in Cambridge. 
He entered at Gray's Inn, and became reader there in 1604, and attorney 
to Queen Ann of Denmark, and in 1616 was made the King's senior serjeant- 
at-law, upon which he was knighted. In 1623 he was chosen one of the 
representatives in Parliament for Orford, and was again returned at two 
subsequent elections for that borough upon the accession of King Charles 
in 1625, and represented that place until 1628. He held his first court for 
this manor the 29th July, 1635, and about the same time purchased a 
house in Ipswich formerly called and well known as " Seckford House " or 



28o THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

" The Great House " in St. Matthew's Mace, and passed the remainder of his 
life there. Reyce, in his account of Suffolk families, speaking of Sir Robert, 
says : "He was not borne to ;f200 per annum (not to ;f20 nor to £2 in the 
margin), and rose to an estate of ;^i,5oo per annum. He was a passionate 
man, but was very learned in the lawes, and spoke to admiration." His 
will is dated 8th August, 1636, and is as follows :— 

" In the name of the Glorious and Incomprehensible Trinity. I, Sir 
Robert Hitcham, of Ipswich, in the County of Suffolk, Knight, the King's 
majesties Serjeant-at-law, this present Monday, being the 8th of August, 
1636, in the 12th year of King Charles, Do make this my last Will and 
Testament in Writing as foUoweth. 

First, I will, after my death, that all my debts be first paid, and the 
profits of all my lands and hereditaments be committed only to that use, 
my debts being only £3,000, the remnant of my purchase of my Lord of 
Suffolk ; other debts, I do not know that I owe ;^20 ; saving ;^5oo, which is 
in my hands in trust for my sister. Item, I will, for the payment of my 
debts and legacies, that my Lease of the Manors of Walton and Felixstow, 
and my houses in Ipswich, all my Jewells, houshold stuff, and plate, there 
and elsewhere, and all other my goods and chattells whatsoever, be sold for 
the payment of my debts and legacies, by my Executors hereafter named, 
and the survivor of them. My Manor of Burvall's, in Levington, the 
Impropriation, mill, fish-ponds, park, and other roialties whatsoever, and 
all my lands and tenements whatsoever there, or in any Towns thereabouts, 
or thereunto used, now leaten to Mayhew (except the Farm called Watkins, 
and that which is therewith leaten, as it is now ye lease) I give unto my 
nephew Robert Butts, and his heirs, upon condition, and to the intent and 
purpose, that he pay unto my sister, £1,000, that is to say £500 a year 
yearly after my decease ; and for my Farm Watkins, I give the same 
unto my sister and her heirs, the one presently after my decease, to release 
and convey their right in either of the other part to the other, and their 
heirs ; and if either of them shall fail so to do, then this my devise to him 
so failing, to be void ; and then I devise the same unto the other, and his 
or their heirs. 

For my Castle and Manors of Framlingham and Saxted, and all 
other the Lands, Tenements, and Hereditaments, which I and my Feoffees 
purchased of my Lord of Suffolk and his Feoffees, I wiU, that my Feoffees 
and their Heirs, and the survivors of them, after my debts paid, Do presently 
stand seised as in Trust, to the Use of the Master and Fellows of Pembroke- 
Hall, in Cambridge, and their Successors, according to their Incorporation, 
and that upon Request, to be made by them, my Feoffees, and their Heirs, 
and the survivors of them, do make good and perfect assurance unto them 
accordingly. Of which said Castle, Manors, and Premises, my meaning is, 
and I will, that the said College shall only have to the use of Them, and 
their Successors for themselves, only the Castle, Roialties, and Rents of 
Tenure, with the Mere, and all other Fish-ponds, the Advowson of the 
Church, the Hundred of Loes, and the Fairs and Markets there ; but no 
part of the other Lands or Hereditaments : and this my Legacy, I will, 
shall be imployed for the Good of the College, as my Gift alone by itself, 
and not to be imployed to the Increase of their Fellowships, or Buildings, 
or of any other Thing, belonging to their House, And all the Demeans 
of Lands of the said Manors, and all other the Hereditaments, and Lands 
purchased of my Lord of Suffolk, and his Feoffees besides, and whatsoever 



FRAMLINGHAM. 



281 



parcel thereof, or belonging thereunto, I do give unto them, only in Trust, 
to be committed by them, to the Uses and Intents following, and they to 
have no manner of other Benefit thereby. Item, I will, that presently 
after my decease, all the Castle (saving the Stone-Building) be pulled 
down, and the materials thereof coming, to be converted, as foUoweth : 
First, I will, that the said College do presently after my death, erect and 
build at Framlingham, One House to set the Poor on work, the Poor and 
most needy and impotent of Framlingham (and) Debenham (in Suffolk), 
and Coxall (Coggeshall) in Essex first, and after them, of other Towns, if 
they see cause ; and to provide a substantial stock to set them on work, 
and to allow to such needy Persons of them, so much as they shall further 
think fit, and likewise I will, that they do build One or Two Almshouses, 
consisting of Twelve Persons, viz.. Six a piece for Twelve of the poorest and 
decrepid People there, which I will shall have' Two Shillings a Week, during 
their Lives, and also Forty Shillings a year for a Gown and Firing every 
year, the said Two Shillings to be paid weekly, and the other yearly. Item, 
I will that a School-House be built there at Framlingham, and a Master 
appointed, whom, I will, shall have Forty Pounds by the year, during his 
life, to teach Thirty, or Forty, or more of the poorest and neediest Children 
of the said Towns of Framlingham, Debenham, and Coxall, to write, read, 
and cast accounts, as the said College shall think fit ; then to give them, 
Ten Pounds apiece, to bind them forth Apprentices, at the discretion of the 
Four Senior Fellows of the said College ; and the said School-master not 
to take any other, upon Penalty of loosing his Place and Stipend. Item, 
I will, that there be presently built after my decease. One Almshouse at 
Levington, for Six Female Persons, of the poorest and impotent of Leving- 
ton and Nacton, the same to be built upon my Tenement near the Street 
there, and they to have the like allowance in all Things, as the Poor of 
Franilingham are appointed to have ; To begin First, with the Poor of 
Levington ; and so successively. Item, I will, that there shall be for ever 
One that shall read Prayers in the Church of Framlingham daily, at the 
Hours of Eight in the Forenoon, and at Four in the Afternoon, unto whom 
I give Twenty Pounds by the year ; and to the Sexton, Five Pounds 
yearly ; and such of the Poor People aforesaid, and the School-master, or 
Scholars there, as shall make Default in coming to hear Prayers there, I 
will, that their Allowance shall be proportionately abated for the same 
neglect (except their excuse be allowed of by the Minister of the Parish of 
Framlingham for the time being). And whatsoever shall or may further 
come of this, which I have formerly given and devised in Trust to the said 
College, I will, that they convert the same to the like Use or Uses, to con- 
tinue as before for ever." 

Then followed what the testator called " A Codicil of my Legacies." 

Sir Robert died seven days after making his will in his 64th year, and 
was buried in the south aisle adjoining to Framlingham chancel where a 
monument is erected to his memory. It consists of a table of black marble 
sustained on the shoulders of four angels of white marble (their hair and 
wings gilt with gold) each having one knee to the ground. Under the table 
is an urn after the Roman fashion enriched with a mantling and two 



'Later augmented to four shillings a 
week, and a further allowance of ij 
chaldron of coals a year. The 

M 1 



habit is a blue coat, with the arms 
of Hitcham, in colours, worn upon 
the left shoulder. 



282 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

cherubim. At the west end is this inscription in gold letters upon black 

marble : — 

READER. 

In expectation of the coming of ovr Lord lesus, here 

lyeth y body of S' Robert Hitcham K'. borne at Leving- 

ton in y^ Covnty of Svff : SchoUor in y" Free-Schoole 

at Ipswiche and sometime of Pembroke Hall in Cambridge ; 

and after of Grayes Inne ; Attorney to Qveene Anne 

in y^ first yeare of King lames, then knighted ; and 

afterward made y' Kings senior Serieant at Lawe, and 

often Ivdge of Assise ; Aged 64 years, Dyed 

the 15 day of Avgvst Anno. 

1636. 

The Children not yet borne, with gladnesse shall 

thy piovs Actions into Memorye call ; 

And thov shalt live as long as there shall bee, 

either poore, or any vse of Charitie." 

At the east end are his Arms, Gules on a Chief Or, three Torteauxes. 
His Crest, a Buck saUant proper attired Or, among leaves, and the trunk 
of a tree also proper. And upon the upper edge — Fr. Grigs fecit anno 
1638. These two last monuments are likewise fenced, and adorned with a 
screen of wood painted of a blueish colour, and enriched with the arms and 
crest of Hitcham. 

On Sir Robert Hitcham's death various chancery suits ensued. A 
claim was set up by Sir Robert's heir-at-law, and difficulties were encoun- 
tered in carrying into effect the testator's charitable intentions. After 
considerable litigation a petition was presented from the inhabitants of 
Framlingham and the other towns interested to Oliver Cromwell, then 
Lord Protector, on which he caused an ordinance dated Monday, March 
20th, 1653, to pass the Great Seal, which has been made the basis in great 
measure of all the future transactions connected with the bequests. It 
was ordained that the Manors of Framlingham and Saxted, and the other 
lands, tenements, &c., in Suffolk should be, and they were, thereby vested 
in the Master, Fellows, and Scholars of Pembroke Hall and their successors 
for ever, to the intent that the castle, royalties, manors, lands, &c., and the 
rents, issues, and profits thereof should be employed and disposed of to 
the several persons, and to and for the several uses thereafter mentioned, 
viz., That the Master and Fellows should receive the rents of the said 
royalties, rents of tenure, and other things which were devised to the college 
for their own use, as well as all the arrears, as also the growing rents and 
profits thereof, and should employ the same for the good of the college, as the 
gift of Sir Robert Hitcham, and to be known by the name of Sir Robert 
Hitcham's gift for ever. And it was further ordained that all and singular 
the demesne lands of the same manors and premises should be, and they 
were, thereby settled upon the same Master, Fellows, and Scholars and their 
successors for ever upon trust that the rents thereof should from time to 
time for ever be of them and their successors employed for erecting one or 
two almshouses at Framlingham for the relief of 12 persons of the poorest 
and most needy inhabitants there who were to have 2s. apiece by the 
week, and 40s. apiece for a gown and firing yearly during their lives. Pro- 



FRAMLINGHAM. 283 

visions were also made as to another almshouse for Levington, and for the 
erection and support of a workhouse and school in Framlingham. The 
ordinance also contained a provision that all deeds, charters, evidences, 
and writings touching on or in any ways concerning the castle, manors, 
hereditaments, and premises should be delivered up to the master of the 
College to be kept and preserved with the rest of the College evidences. 

This ordinance having fully established and confirmed the rights of 
Pembroke College, the Master and Fellows have ever since held undisturbed 
possession, and are still lords of this manor. 

The demesne lands of Framlingham and Saxted, which is a member 
thereof, were, according to a survey made in the time of Edw. VI., 
as follows : The park, containing about 600 acres, and three miles in circum- 
ference ; Botenhall Wood, 68 acres, i rood, and 10 perches ; a meadow 
adjoining to Botenhall Wood, 6 acres, i rood, and 13 perches ; Botenhall 
Lawns, 73 acres and 47 perches ; Bradley Wood,' 82 acres and 10 perches ; 
Bradley Lawns, 46 acres and 3 roods ; Newhall Wood, 100 acres ; Oldfryth 
Wood, 120 acres and 2 roods ; a meadow under Oldfryth Wood, 6 acres ; 
a piece of land, by Lincoln Barn, 3 acres ; three meadows near Herbalde- 
shaw Green, 7 acres ; a meadow adjoining to Bull's Hedge Lane, 2 acres ; 
and four pieces towards Kettleburgh, 16 acres. 

The whole of the above was in 1712 rented at f,^^6. 4s. ocL. clear 
without any deductions. The copyholds consisted of 590 acres and i rood. 
The freeholders of this manor'' and the woodich-silver holders were obliged 
to no other service than to suit of court ; but every burgens holder who 
held houses in the borough paid yearly for every house' or burgens there 
$d. and was bound also to turn over and put in the lord's grass in the Hall 
Meadow ready to cock after it was tedded from the hands of the mowers, 
by the copyholders ParvcB Tenures ; and the coliarholders, having an 
allowance of a halfpenny for every fork or rake, and finding themselves, 
were to cock it into grass cocks ; and then the copyholders Magnce Tenune 
were to tend the same and make it ready to be carried. 

These coliarholders paid annually for every acre z^d. and also bore 
the office of collector of the lord's rents, of moUand, increased land, 
burgens-hold, coliarhold, free rents, woodich-silver, and moot fees ; and 
were charged to gather of every acre Magnce Tenurce 2ji. over and besides 
Sd. and i egg, of the same acre, in the charge of the Hayward or Messor, 
without fee ; and there were 270 acres and i rood of coliarhold land, divided 
into 9 heads, each head containing about 30 acres. And the principal or 
first man of the head was bound to bear the office, though he had not the 
full number of 30 acres ; but then he had contribution from such as held 
the residue thereof, to make up that number, and every contributor paid 
to his head i6d. for every acre he had, and once in nine years every head 
was charged therewith. 

The tenants Magnce Tenwce were obliged also to bear the office of 
Hayward or Messor in Framlingham and Saxted, who were to receive for 
every acre Magnce Tenurce M. and i egg, over and besides the 2\d. of the 
same acre in the charge of the collector, and to gather all rents Parvce 
Tenurce, fee farms, sythes, and hens without fee ; and were also to see the 
lord's hay cut and made by the tenants ; and there were in Framlingham 

' Bradley and Oldfryth Woods were for- ' K.E. 6 Survey, 9, 12, 21, 23, 33. 
merly parks, Stockt cum feris, Esch. 
35 Edw. 1. 46. 



284 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

261 acres Magnce Tenurce divided into 21 heads ; but in Saxted there were 
383 acres and i rood Magntz Tenurce divided into 32 heads ; and 12 acres 
was a head both in Saxted and Framlingham, and did bear the office for 
one year, and once in 21 years every head in FramHngham was charged 
therewith, and once in 32 years every head in Saxted. And if the head fell 
short of the number of 12 acres, then he had contribution from others of 
the same head, at the rate of i2d. an acre, whereby the contributor was dis- 
charged, and the head did take the charge of collection wholly upon himself. 

And these tenants Magnce Tenures were also bound to bear the office of 
Prsepositus, or Reeve, an officer both of FramUngham and Saxted, charged 
with gathering the demesnes without fee, and chosen as the Hayward, 
and charged but one year in Framlingham, and two years in Saxted ; and 
12 acres of that tenure did also bear that office.' 

The custom of Borough English prevails here, under which, if a copy- 
holder dies intestate leaving sons, the youngest son inherits. If, however, 
an ancestor dies without issue the descent is no longer controlled by the 
principles of that particular custom, but is governed wholly by the rules of 
common law, whereby an elder brother inherits. Where the custom of 
Borough English prevails to its full extent, as in some manors, the estate is 
carried upon the death of the youngest son intestate to the youngest brother, 
and as descent was subject to its operation in the case of sons, it seems 
strange that it was not made to bear equally so in this manor as to brothers. 
In cases where daughters only survive they take by common law and not 
by custom, in equal portions as coparceners. 

To the Manor of Framlingham as well as Saxted there was a court 
leet, each of which had jurisdiction throughout their respective parishes ; 
these, however, fell into disuse about 1703. The courts baron of Fram- 
lingham with the leet were on every occasion attended not only by the 
homage, which consisted of some of the principal copyhold tenants, but by 
two juries for the leet. 

Arms of Bigot : Gu., a Hon passant, Or. Of Thomas de Brotherton : 
Gules, 3 lions passant guardant, Or a file of three points Arg. Of Segrave : 
Sa. a lion rampant Arg. crowned Or. Of Manny : Or, 3 chevronels, Sa. 
Of HiTCHAM : Gules, three torteaux's in chief, Or. 

Manor of Clubald's al. Clarvals al. Clarvaald le Clarbold's. 

This was the lordship of Roger de Clerlband in the time of Hen. III., 
and in the time of Edw. I. it passed to his son Sir James. To him 
succeeded Tristan de Kettleburgh, his son and heir, who held in 13 13. To 
him succeeded Thomas de Kettleburgh, who held in 1346. 

In 1381 the manor belonged to Sir John Wingfield, and passed to his 
son and heir, Sir Robert Wingfield, who died in 1409. From this time to 
the time of Sir Anthony Wingfield, son and heir of Sir Robert Wingfield, 
who succeeded in 1560, the descent of the manor is identical with the Manor 
of Dallinghoo, in this Hundred, and Thorpe Hall, Hasketon, in Carlford 
Hundred. 

In 1564 we meet with a fine levied of the manor by Thomas Cole against 
Sir Robert Wyngfeld.' Afterwards the manor was acquired by Sir John 
Leman,' who died 26th March, 1632, without issue, when it devolved on 

'Loder, Hist, of Framlingham, pp. 330, "Fine, Easter, 6 Eliz. 

331- ^See Charsfield Manor, in thjs Hundred, 

and Brampton Manor, in Blything 
Hundred, 



FRAMLINGHAM. 285 

his cousin and heir, WilUam Leman, who died in 1647, having by his will 
given the manor to his second son, William Leman. 

A little later we find the manor vested in Richard Porter, who conveyed 
it about 1679 to Samuel Wightman, who died in 1696, having left it by 
will to his son, Samuel Wightman, who died in 1741, when it passed under 
his will, dated 3rd Nov. 1740, to his trustees and executors, Robert Wight- 
man and William Syred, upon trust to sell ; and Robert Wightman in 1770 
sold the manor to Thomas Simpson, of Wantisden, farmer, who gave it by 
will dated 19th Nov. 1770, to his daughter Mary, who married Joseph 
Bennington. He died about 1831. 

The manor was subsequently purchased by Frederick Corrance, and 
has since descended in the same course as Parham Manor, in Plomesgate 
Hundred, and is now vested in Captain Frederick Snowdon Corrance, of 
Parham Hall. 

The manor house is supposed to have been on Cole's Green. 

Arms of Kettleburgh : Gu. a chevron betw. 3 fleurs-de-lis Arg. 




286 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

HACHESTON. 

MONO the lands of Earl Ralph kept in hand for the King by 
Godric the steward was an estate here held by three freemen 
under Turmodj of Parham's commendation. It consisted 
of 19 acres, half a ploughteam, and i^ acres of meadow, 
included in the valuation of Parham, and in Marlesford 
were 35 acres in demesne. Also a church with 16 acres 
valued at two ores. It was a league long and 4 quarentenes 
broad, and paid in a gelt 15^?.' 

Earl Alan had an estate here consisting of 80 acres of land, 2 plough- 
teams, and 3 acres of meadow, which had formerly been held by 10 freemen 
and 2 half freemen under commendation to Edric the Grim, who had held it 
with 3 ploughteams.^ 

Robert Malet had several holdings here at the time of the Survey. 
The first was held by him in demesne, and consisted of 88 acres, 6 bordars, 
I J ploughteams, and 2 acres of meadow, included in the valuation of Den- 
nington. This estate, but with 2 ploughteams, had formerly been held 
by 12 whole freemen and 9 half-freemen under Edric's commendation. 

The second consisted of 30 acres formerly held by a socman under 
Edric's commendation, with a bordar, a ploughteam, and 2 acres of meadow 
valued at 5s. This value had at the time of the Survey increased to 8s. 

Another holding was of 6 acres valued at T2d. formerly held by a 
freeman under Edric's commendation. 

Another was a holding of 40 acres, a ploughteam, and 2 acres of 
meadow, valued at 6s., formerly held by four freemen under Edric's com- 
mendation, when it was valued at 7s. 

Another estate was held of Robert Malet by Gilbert de Wishant, and 
consisted of 24 acres, half a ploughteam, and an acre of meadow, valued 
at 4s. This was formerly the estate of seven freemen under Edric's commen- 
dation with ij ploughteams.^ 

The only other estate here was that of the Abbot of St. Edmunds, 
which consisted of 21 acres and half a ploughteam, valued at 8s. which 
estate had formerly been held by four freemen half under the abbot's 
commendation.* 

Manor of Hacheston. 

This was part of the estate of Robert Malet, and on his disgrace was granted 
to Roger Bigot, Earl of Norfolk. Collectors' accounts of the lands held here 
by Roger Bigot, Earl of Norfolk, in 11, 16, 21, and 29 Edw. I., i Edw. II., 
20 to 21 Rich. II. will be found amongst the Ministers' Accounts in the 
Public Record Ofi&ce.' 

From this time to 1308 the course of descent is identical with the 
Manor of Framlingham, in this Hundred ; in fact, it is practically the same 
tOl the time of Theophilus, Earl of Suffolk, in 1626, as the manor was a 
member and parcel of Framlingham, and both were held to this time by the 
same lords. In 1569, however, we find John Blennerhassett, William 
Dygge, William Contrell, and Laurence Banastre holding a first court for 
this manor, and in 1595 a grant was made of it by the Crown to John Wells 

'Dom. ii. 286&. ♦Dom. ii. 3696. 

"00111.11.2936. ^Bundle 998, No. 11-13. 

^Dora. ii. 3266. 



HACHESTON. 



287 



and Henry Best. It returned, however, to Thomas, Earl of Suffolk, in 1616, 
and about 1626 Theophilus, Earl of Suffolk, sold the manor to John Braham, 
of Campsey Ash. He was the son of George Braham, the son of Sir John 
de Braham. 

From John Braham the purchaser the manor passed to his son and heir, 
John Braham, who died in 1670, and from this time to the time of William 
Shuldham, of Marlesford, the devolution of the manor is the same as that 
of the Manor of Ash, in Campsey, in this Hundred, William Shuldham 
having purchased of John Rivett, of Brandeston, in 1788. Land here 
(half a fee) is mentioned in the inquis. p.m. of Roger le Bigot in 1307,' and 
a grant of free warren here was made to Thomas de Brotherton, Earl of 
Norfolk, in 1313.' Land here is also mentioned in the inquis. p.m. of 
Maria, wife of Thomas de Brotherton, in 1362 y" also half a fee in the 
inquis. p.m. of William Ufford and Joan his wife in 1381.* The 
Collector's Accounts of lands in Hacheston of Margaret, Duchess of Norfolk, 
22 to 23 Rich. n. will be found amongst the Ministers' Accounts in the 
Public Record Ofl&ce.^ The manor is specifically mentioned in the inquis. 
p.m. of John, Duke of Norfolk, in 1477.* Amongst the Additional 
Charters in the British Museum is an assignment of the manor made this 
same year,' and also one made subsequently in 1548. This was a quit 
claim of all right in the manor by Sir Anthony Wing&eld to William Naunton 
and Elizabeth his wife.* The confirmation by Act of Parliament of this 
manor to the Duke of Norfolk in 1488 is mentioned in the Rolls of Parlia- 
ment for that year,' and also in 1503." 

Manor of Glevering Hall. 

Under the head Glevering we find in the Great Survey a manor 
mentioned. It was held in Saxon times by Brihtmar under commendation 
to Edric, and consisted of 40 acres, a bordar, a ploughteam, 3 acres of 
meadow, a mill, and 20 sheep, valued at 8s. (increased to los. at the time 
of the Survey). Hervey de Berri was the Domesday tenant. 

Here also was an estate of 60 acres held by 17 freemen and a half under 
Brihtmar's commendation. It had 2 ploughteams (reduced to i at the time 
of the Survey) and an acre of meadow valued at 17s. (reduced to 15s. when 
the Survey was taken). William Malet was seised of it on the day of his 
death, and at the time of the Survey Odo held it of Hervey de Berri. It 
was a league in length and half a league in breadth, and paid in a gelt 22^^." 

In the time of King Edw. III. the lordship was held by Sir Gilbert de 
Peche, who gave it in 1312 to the Abbot of Leiston, and on the Patent 
Rolls for this year we find a confirmation of this grant. It included lands 
in Hacheston, Glevering, Easton, Wickham, Pettaugh, and Framsden." 
The manor will also be found specified in the Escheat Rolls in 1357, 
" William Scarlet and others for Leiston Abbey." '^ 

We find in 1461 John de Sprotting, Abbot of Leiston, exercising 
manorial rights, in 1479, Richard Dunman, also abbot, and in 1527 John 
Green, also abbot, doing likewise. 



' I.P.M,, 35 Edw. I. 46. 
^ Chart. Rolls, 7 Edw. II. 
3I.P.M., 36 Edw. III. pt. 
4I.P.M., 5 Rich. 11- 57- 
5 Bundle 998, No. 14. 
6 1. P.M., 17 Edw. IV. 58. 
7 Add. Ch. 26578. 



II. 
ii. 



8 Add. Ch. 14991. 

9R.P. vi. 411. 
'°R.P. vi. 529. 
"Dom. ii. 444. 

" Pat. Rolls, 6 Edw. II. pt. ii. 10. 
'3I.P.M., 31 Edw. III. (2nd Nos.) 



40. 



288 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

The manor on the dissolution of the rehgious houses vested in the 
Crown, and was granted to Charles Brandon, Duke of Suffolk. A little 
later Anne of Cleves had a grant of the manor for Ufe. The 3rd April, 1560, 
a grant by the Crown was made of it to Thomas Seckford, junior, and 
amongst the Chancery Proceedings in the time of Queen Elizabeth will be 
found an action respecting this manor by the said Thomas Sekeford against 
Richard Hall.' 

He did not long enjoy the property, for the following year we find the 
manor vested in John Bull," of Sproughton, and amongst the Chancery 
Proceedings in the time of Queen Elizabeth will be found an action as to 
lands in Hacheston by this John Bull against Margaret Jones.^ 

By Maud his wife John Bull had several children, and dying loth 
September, 1574,* the manor went to his 3rd son, Anthony Bull, portman 
of Ipswich, and bailiff in 1600. He built Boss Hall, in Sproughton, and 
married Ehzabeth, daughter of Thomas Lambe, of Trimley, and dying 24th 
Sept. 1615, was buried in the chancel of the parish church of Hacheston, 
near to his parents. The manor passed to Anthony's widow for life or 
widowhood under her husband's will dated 30th Aug. 1610. By this will 
the manor was given after the death of the widow to his (testator's) nephew, 
Thomas Bull, son of Roger Bull, his brother in tail male. 

Amongst the Additional Charters in the British Museum will be found 
a covenant for recovery, &c., of this manor in 1618, to which she the 
said Elizabeth, widow, and Thomas Bull are parties.' 

In 1630 we find a lease from Thomas Bull to Charles Vesey, of 
Hintlesham, of the manor, as a security for the payment of part of the 
marriage portion of Thomas's daughter Mary, betrothed to Thomas, son of 
the said Charles Vesey. It is dated 2nd August, 6 Chas. I. Elizabeth Bull 
the widow died in 1634, when the manor vested in possession in the nephew 
Thomas Bull, who left three daughters, Mary, Jane, and Ann. In 1682 the 
manor vested in Chavering Radcliffe, 10 years later passing to Mary his 
widow, guardian of Hugh Radcliffe, a minor. It was subsequently enjoyed 
by Hugh Radcliffe. 

In 1744 the manor was vested in Thomas Thurston Whimper, who 
married Elizabeth Cage, widow, and on his death passed to his son, John 
Whimper, of Alderton, who sold the manor. About 1791 it was acquired 
by Chaloner Arcedeckne, and on his death in 1809 passed to his son and 
heir, Andrew Arcedeckne, who in 1819 served the office of High Sheriff for 
the County of Suffolk. 

The manor passed on his death to his only surviving child Louisa, who 
married 6th July, 1839, her cousin, Sir Charles Andrew Vanneck, Lord 
Huntingfield,* 2nd son of Joshua, 2nd Lord, by his ist wife Catherine, eldest 
daughter of Chaloner Arcedeckne, of Glevering Hall. Lord Huntingfield 
died 2ist September, 1897, and was succeeded by his son and heir, Joshua 
Charles Vanneck, 4th Baron Huntingfield, of Heveningham Hall. The 
manor, however, is now apparently vested in Arthur Heywood, D.L., J. P., 
of Glevering Hall. 



2 



C.P. Ser. ii. B. clx. 16. ♦I.P.M., 17 and 18 Eliz. D.K.R. 10 App. 

He was the son of Thomas. See Boss Hall, ii. p. 133. 

Sproughton, in Samford Hundred. 'Add. Ch. 9787, 9788. 

3 C.P. Ser. ii. B. xxix. 86. ^See Manor of Heveningham, in Blything 

Hundred. 



HACHESTON. 289 

Glevering Hall is an ancient mansion standing about a mile south- 
west from the village of Hacheston, on the north-east bank of the river 
Deben, and is surrounded by a park of about 300 acres. 

Arms of Bull : Argent, three bulls' heads erased, Sable. Of 
Whimper : Or, a lion rampant Gu. Of Huntingfield : Arg. a torteau 
betw. 3 bugle-horns, Gu., stringed. Or. 

Manor of Canell's or Wicklow's. 

In 1286 a Roger Wicklow lived here. Page says on an estate belonging 
latterly to the Nauntons, of Letheringham, and John Wicklow died seised 
of the same in 1306, and in 1362 another of the same name died seised thereof*. , 

Roger Bigot, Earl of Norfolk, was in 1307 seised of a fee here, and in 
1362 Mary, Countess of Norfolk, died seised of the same fee. In 1362 John 
de Wykeline held a fee, and it is quite possible that the holdings of the 
Earls of Norfolk were merely holdings in chief. 

In 1428 Sir Andrew Butler was lord, and three years later John Hoo 
or Koo enfeoffed Sir William Phelip and others. 

About the middle of the 15th century the manor had passed to Reginald 
or Reynold Rous, of Dennington, who married Joan (or Elizabeth) Denston, 
and (fied in 1464, when the manor passed to his son, Edward Rous, of Bad- 
inghain, who married Margaret, daughter and coheir of Robert Lyston, of 
Badingham, Edward Rous, by his will dated 13th Oct. 1503,' left the 
manor to Margaret his wife for life, and to her succeeded their son and 
heir, Reginald Rous. He married Elizabeth, daughter of Robert Ashfield, 
of Stowlangtoft, and on his death the manor devolved on his son, Anthony 
Rous, who married Mary, daughter of Robert Sexton, of Lavenham, and in 
1537 sold the manor to Thomas Derehaugh.'' In 1615 William Derehaugh 
is mentioned as lord. The manor then became vested in Sir Robert 
Naunton,^ from whom it passed in 1635 to his widow Dame Penelope for 
life, and subsequently to his brother William Naunton, on whose death, 
also in 1635, it passed to his son and heir, Robert Naunton, of Letheringham, 
who died in 1665, when it vested in his son and heir, Robert Naunton, who 
by deed dated 29th Sept. 1681, in consideration of £1,600 mortgaged to 
John Corrance, of Rendlesham, under the description of the " Manor of 
Wicklows al. Cannells with all the rights, &c., all that manor house or 
messuage called or known by the name of Cannells in Hacheston," and 
certain lands amounting to 190a. 2r. The mortgage term was 1,000 years. 

Robert Naunton died in 1719. 

Manor of Blomvile's. 

The first lord of this manor with whom we meet is Henry Blomvyle. By 
1398 the manor had passed to Campsey priory,* where it continued until 
the suppression of that house, when the manor reverted to the Crown, and 
was granted by Hen. VIII. to Sir WilHam Willoughby in 1543. The 
following year Sir William Willoughby conveyed it to John Rosier. He 
married Alice, daughter of John Morso, of Ottley, and widow of Robert 
Coleman, and died and was buried at Hacheston 5th Dec. 1572, when the 
manor passed to his son and heir, Roger Rosier, who married Alice, daughter 

' Proved 2ist May, 1506. ^ See Letheringham Manor, in this Hun- 

*Fine, Trin. 29 Hen. VIII. dred. 

"I.P.M., 22 Rich. II. 94. 

NI 



290 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

of Thomas Read, of Beccles, and is said to havp sold the manor to Jeffrey 
Langrey. The fact, however, seems to have been that Roger Rosier in 
1576 conveyed the manor by way of settlement to Charles Radcliffe and 
Ralph Samphord, for this year we find a licence for Roger to alienate to 
them, and in 1607 Roger Rosier and others sold to Jeffrey Langrey, as this 
year we find a licence enabling the alienation to be made. 

Frances, granddaughter of the said Roger Rosier, died in 1698, aged 
82, and was buried in the nave of the church of St. Andrew the Apostle, in 
Norwich. 

We next find the manor vested in Sir Martin Folkes, Bart., who sold it 
to Nathaniel Barthropp, son of Nathaniel Barthropp, of Marlesford. He 
died in March, 1790, when the manor passed to his son and heir, Nathaniel 
Barthropp, who married Mary, daughter of John Goss, of Rendlesham, 
and died in June, 1826, when it devolved on his son and heir, another 
Nathaniel Barthropp, who married Beliza, daughter of George Bates, of 
Blaxhall, afterwards of Marlesford, and sold the manor for £23,000 to 
William Henry, last Earl of Rochford, taking from him a lease of the 
estate for 21 years at a moderate rent. From this time the manor devolved 
in the same course as the Manor of Easton, and is now vested in the trustees 
of the Will of the 12th Duke of Hamilton. 

Arms of Rosier : Argent ; on a cross formee. Sable, five stars of the 
field. Of Barthropp : Paly of 6 Or and Az., over all a bend Gu. 3 wings, 
each pierced with an arrow Or. 




HOO. 291 

HOO. 

MANOR was held here by the Abbot of Ely in Saxon times, 

and also at the time of the Survey. It consisted at the 

earlier period of 3 carucates of land, 18 villeins, a bordar, 

6 serfs, 3 ploughteams in demesne and 6 belonging to the 

men. Also wood for the support of 20 hogs, 7 acres of 

meadow, a mill, 7 beasts, 24 hogs, 30 sheep, and 40 goats, 

the whole valued at iocs. 

When the Survey was taken some of the details had changed. The 

villeins were reduced to 10, the bordars increased to 16, the serfs were 

reduced to 2, the ploughteams in demesne to 2, and those belonging to the 

men to 5. 

The value of the whole was then £4. The Survey goes on to say : 
" And W. de Boimville took one of these carucates before its possession was 
decided by the King's precept and seisin given to the church ; but as to 
his lordship he vouches Geoffrey de Magnaville as guardian ; and gave 
security thereupon ; now the land is in the King's hand." To this manor 
belonged 6 acres of land valued at i2i. held by four freemen under commenda- 
tion of the Abbot of Ely. 

There was also a church with 8 J acres valued at i6i. The manor was 
8 quarentenes long and 4 broad, and paid in a gelt 3^^.' 

Only two small holdings were in this place in Saxon times, one consisting 
of a freeman with the fourth part of an acre valued at 2d., in the possession 
of Robert Malet at the time of the Survey,'' the other consisting of a freeman 
with 19 acres of land, half a ploughteam and an acre of meadow, valued 
at 5s., the estate of the Abbot of Ely when the Survey was taken.^ 

Manor of Hoo Hall. 

On the opening of the 13 th century , the manor belonged to WiUjam de 
Chesneto or Chensey, and passed about 1218 to his daughter and coheir 
dementia, who married Jordan de Sackville, and they in 1225 sold the 
reversion to Vitalis Engaine. 

In 1253 Henry Engayne had a grant of free warren here.'' 
Page says that the manor was parcel of Hugh Bigod's barony (but he 
does not state of which Hugh Bigod) held of the King in capite ; and that 
the lords of Framlingham were owners of this lordship and patrons of the 
church. We know that by 1268 the manor had become vested in Roger 
Bigot, and Ministers' Accounts of his lands here this year will be found in 
the Public Record Office.^ He died seised of the manor in 1270,^ and it is men- 
tioined in the inquis. p.m. of Roger " le Bygot" in 1307,'' and from that time 
to the death of John de Mowbray, Duke of Norfolk, who died seised of it in 
1475, the manor descended in the same course as the Manor of Framlingham, 
in this Hundred. John de Mowbray leased the manor with the Hundred of 
Loes to Sir Robert Wingfield, and by virtue of this lease Sir John Wingfield 
appears as lord,* but the fee in the manor does not seem to have left the 

' Dom. ii. 368. 38 (17). An extent is given in this 

^Dom. ii. 3176. inquisition, and it is said to beheld 

3 Dom. ii. 3876. of . Robert, son of Roger, heir of 

♦Chart. Rolls, 37 Hen. III. 5. Hugh .. Notelsie, paying 58s. 

552 Hen. IJI. to 34 Edw. I., Bundle ggg, 8id. yearly. 

No. 6-18. 'Extent, I.P.M., 35 Edw. I. 46. 

^See Manor of Framlingham, in this *I.P.M., 21 Edw. IV. 59., 

Hundred; I.P.M., 54, Hen. III. fUe 



2g2 



THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 



Norfolk family until Thomas, Earl of Suffolk, in the time of King Jas. I., 
sold it to Sir Robert Naunton, of Letheringham, Knt. It should be 
mentioned that Davy states that this was the manor which Thomas Howard, 
3rd Duke of Norfolk, and Henry his son. Earl of Arundel and Surrey, in 
1524 exchanged with the King. No doubt a lordship in this parish is 
mentioned in the exchange made with the Sovereign for the Castle Rising 
estate, though this exchange would seem to have been made in 1544 and 
not 1524. There seems to be considerable doubt as to whether Davy or 
even Page are to be relied on so far as they treat of this manor ; for the 
manor is specified in the inquis. p.m. of Edward Cornwallis, who died 3rd 
Sept. 1510, leaving his brother William his heir,' and also in the inquis. p.m. 
of the said William, who died 20th November, 1519, leaving John, his son 
and heir.'' 

From the time of the purchase of this manor by Sir Robert Naunton about 
1623 (and he seems to have acquired from Thomas, Earl of Suffolk) to the time 
of WiUiam Naunton, who held in 1719, the descent of the manor is identical 
with that of Letheringham, in this Hundred, when this manor was acquired 
by WiUiam Henry Nassau, 4th Earl of Rochford, from which time to the 
present the manor has descended in the same course as the Manor of Easton, 
in this Hundred, and is now vested like that manor in the trustees of the 
12th Duke of Hamilton. 

A grant of free warren in the manor was made to Thomas de Brotherton, 
Earl of Norfolk, in 1313,^ and the manor is included in the inquis. p.m. 
of Maria his wife, widow of Sir Ralph de Cobham, in 1362 ;* also of Thomas, 
Duke of Norfolk, in 1400,^ of John, Duke of Norfolk, in 1433,^ of John, Duke 
of Norfolk, and Eleanor his wife in 1462,^ and of John, Duke of Norfolk, in 
1478.^ The Manor of White Notley, in Essex, was holden of Hoo Hall Manor 
by fealty and a yearly rent of 5gs. 8d., worth £10 per annum clear. The 
quit rent of £2. 19s. 81^. was purchased by John Wright of the Earl of 
Rochford, when owner of this manor. 

Manor of Godwin's. 

This was the lordship of Thomas de Brotherton, Earl of Norfolk, and 
was demised or granted by him in 1346 to Thomas de Hoo, son of Robert 
Hoo and Hawise his wife, daughter of Fulk, Lord Fitzwarrin. He resided 
in the parish and owned a considerable amount of property here. This 
manor he held, whether as lessee or grantee does not appear clear, but 
certainly under the chief lord Brotherton. Hoo was collector of the Norfolk 
revenues. He married Isabel, daughter and heir of John St. Leger, Lord 
of Offley St. Lye, co. Herts., and died i8th Sept. 1380, leaving two sons, 
William and Thomas. Sir WiUiam de Hoo, Knt., the eldest son and heir, 
married ist Alice, daughter and coheir of Sir Thomas de St. Omer, of Mul- 
barton, co. Norfolk, and 2ndly Eleanor, daughter of Sir Thomas Wingfield, 
and dying 22nd Nov. 1410, left issue Thomas and Hugo. Thomas de Hoo 
succeeded to his father's estate in the parish of Hoo. He was a citizen 
and grocer of London, and died 23rd Aug. 1420, and was interred in the 
parish church of Hoo. Matilda his widow had the manor during her hfe. 

John Godyn or Godwin purchased the reversion expectant on the 
decease of Matilda the widow, who attorned tenant to him. He was a 



' I.P.M., 2 Hen. VIII. 
''I.P.M., 12 Hen. VIII. 6. 
3 Chart. Rolls, 7 Edw. II. 11. 
4I.P.M., 36 Edw. III. pt. ii. 9. 



5 1. P.M., II Hen. IV. 71a, 72. 
6I.P.M., II Hen. VI. 43. 
7I.P.M., I Edw. IV. 46. 
'I.P.M., 17 Edw. IV. 58. 



HOO. 293 

citizen and grocer of London, and built the house in this parish (which had 
probably been the site of the seat of the Hoo family) since called Godyns. 
A fine was levied of the manor in 1434 by this John Godyn against William 
Whytehed and Elizabeth his wife, daughter of Thomas Hoo.' 

We next find the manor vested in Sir Anthony Wingfield, and a fine was 
levied of it in 1544 by Sir Arthur Hopton against this Sir Anthony Wingfield 
and others. It included lands in Hoo, Charsfield, Brampton, and elsewhere.* 
Sir Anthony Wingfield died seised 20th August, 1552,^ when the manor 
passed to his son and heir, Sir Robert Wingfield, from which time till 1638 
when it vested in Sir Richard Wingfield, 2nd Bart, the course of descent is 
identical with that of the manor of Thorpe Hall, Hasketon, in Carlford 
Hundred. When Anthony Wingfield was created a baron 17th (12th) May, 
1627, it was as Anthony Wingfield, of Godyns, he having removed from 
Letheringham, pulled down most of the house at Hoo, and erected a new 
one near Easton church called the White House, where he and his posterity 
afterwards resided. Godyns, however, continued in the Wingfield family 
untU 1706, when Sir Henry Wingfield, Bart., sold the same and the residue 
of their family estate to William Henry Nassau, ist Earl of Rochford, from 
which time the descent of this manor is the same as the Manor of Easton, 
in this Hundred. 

Arms of Hoo : Azure ; a chevron between three escallops Argent. 

Manor of Hoo Charsfield. 

This was also the lordship of William de Hoo, who died in 1362,* when 
it passed to his son and heir, Sir William de Hoo, who died in the time of 
Rich. II., when it passed to his son, Thomas de Hoo. 

The manor was later acquired by Sir Anthony Wingfield, who died in 
1552, and was succeeded by his son and heir, Sir Robert Wingfield, from 
which time till the time of Sir Henry Wingfield, 4th Bart., who died in 1677, 
the course of descent is the s^me as the Manor of Thorpe Hall, in Hasketon, 
in Carlford Hundred. 

On Sir Henry Wingfield's death this manor passed to his son and heir. 
Sir Henry Wingfield, who about 1708 sold the same to William Henry 
Nassau, ist Earl of Rochford, from which time to the present the manor 
has devolved in the like course with the Manor of Easton, in this Hundred, 
and is now vested in the trustees of the 12th Duke of Hamilton. 

Manor of Hoo Kettleburgh. 

Little is known of this manor save that it was in 1609 vested in Sir 
Thomas Wingfield, who this year died seised of it, when it passed to his 
son and heir. Sir Anthony Wingfield, ist Bart., and on his death in 1638 
vested in his son and heir. Sir Richard Wingfield, 2nd Bart.^ 



' Feet of Fines, 12 Hen. VI. 11. ^ See Manors of Bredfield Bing, in Pettis- 

2 Fine, Trin. 36 Hen. VIH. tree, in Wilford Hundred; and 

3 1.P.M., 13th April, 7 Edw. VI. Thorpe Hall, Hasketon, in Carlford 

*See Manor of Godwin's, in Hoo, which Hundred. 

seems to have been held by another . 

branch of the family. 




294 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

KENTON. 

I WO manors were held here in Saxon times. The first by 
Brihtmar under Edric's commendation, consisting of 82 
acres, a villein, 5 bordars, a serf, a ploughteam in demesne 
and 2 belonging to the men, wood for the maintenance of 
12 hogs, and 2 acres of meadow ; also a rouncy, 16 beasts, 
40 hogs, and 3 hives of bees, valued at 20s. 

There were also 30 acres, held by two freemen, one under 
Brihtwold's commendation and the other under Brihtmar's commendation, 
and also 4 acres and a ploughteam valued at 7s., held by three freemen under 
Edric's commendation. At the time of the Survey this manor was held of 
Robert Malet by his mother.' 

The second manor here was held by William Gulafra over Woodbrun, a 
freeman formerly under Edric's commendation, and consisted of 30 acres, 
a ploughteam, and half an acre of meadow, valued at 20s. It was a league 
long and half a league broad, and paid in a gelt (^d. There was also a 
church with 30 acres valued at 5s. The domesday tenant was Robert 
Malet. Several persons had shares therein. 

In the same township was a holding of Huna, a freeman under Edric's 
commendation, the estate of Tiger at the time of the Survey. It con- 
sisted of 30 acres, half a ploughteam, and a bordar, valued at 75.^ 

Among the lands of the Abbot of St. Edmunds was an estate in this 
place of Durand, consisting of two freemen with 80 acres, 2 viUeins (reduced 
to I when the Survey was taken when there Were an additional 3 bordars), 
2 ploughteams in demesne, and half a team belonging to the men, wood 
sufficient to support 10 hogs, and an acre of meadow. Of live stock there 
were i rouncy, 3 beasts, 16 hogs, 80 sheep, 25 goats, and 3 hives of bees. 
The value was 20s., which was increased to 30s. at the time of the Survey. 
The soc and sac belonged to the Abbot of Ely.^ 

One more holding in this place was that of five freemen (four being under 
commendation to the Abbot of Ely and one under Sachs the predecessor of 
Ralph de Savigni). It consisted of 30 acres of land, and a ploughteam valued 
at los., reduced at the time of the Survey to 6s., when it was included 
amongst the lands of the Bishop of Bayeux, and said to be held by Ralph 
de Savigni of Roger Bigot.* 

Manor of Kenton. 
This formed part of the estate of Robert Malet at the time of the Survey. 

In the time of King John, Sir Peter Braunch, Knt., married Joan, the 
inheritrix of the lordship, held of the family of De Limesey by knight's 
service, but in the same reign the manor passed to Ivo de Kenton, who 
resided at Kenton Hall, and was the owner of the greater portion of the 
village. By Alice his wife he left a son, Robert de Kenton, on whom 
the manor devolved, and on his death about 1240 it passed to his son and 
heir, Ivo de Kenton, a minor at his father's death. Ivo afterwards became 
seised of a messuage and 60 acres of land in Kettleburgh, and claimed 
before the justices in Eyre in 1286 to have warren in his Manor of Kenton. 
He died in 1313,^ and Nigel de Kenton, his eldest son succeeded, being at 
the time of his father's death 40 years of age. We meet, however, with a 

'Dom. ii. 326. •*Dom. ii. 3736. 

"Dom. ii. 326. =I.P.M., 7 Edw. II. 2. 

^Dom. ii. 3696. 



KENTON. 



295 



fine of this manor levied by this Nigel de " Keneton " against Peter de Keneton 
as early as 1307/ He was living in 1327, and from the Patent Rolls this 
year we find a confirmation to him described as " Nigel, son of Hivo, son of 
Robert de Keneton," of a quit claim by Henry Engayne to the said Hivo 
and his heirs of his right in bortrem and view of frankpledge in Kenton in 
return for a rent of li/ He left by Maud his wife issue, Nigel de Kenton, 
called by Davy in his pedigree of the farnily Ivo. In 1335 a fine of the 
manor was levied by Nigel de " Keneton" against William de Hoo, parson of 
the church of Dallinghoo, and [John] parson of the church of Easton,^ 
Nigel de Kenton married Agnes, the daughter of Adam Tastard, of Crans- 
ford, by whom he had issue, Ivo de Kenton, who died a bachelor in 1355," 
Robert and John. He was seised of lands and rents in Bramford, Burstall, 
Sproughton, Hintlesham, Whitton, Broke, and Blakenham ; and, by fine 
settled his Manor of Kenton and lands there and in Debenham, Winston, 
and Thornham, upon himself and his wife during their lives, with remainder 
to his three sons successively, and the heirs of their bodies. Sir Robert 
Kenton, Knt., his 2nd son, by Alice his wife, had issue an only daughter 
and heir, Alice, who married Sir Roger Willisham, Knt. No doubt a 
settlement of the manor was made in 1379, f°^ we meet with a fine that year 
levied of the manor in which Sir John de Ulveston, Sir Roger " Welasham," 
and Roger Cristean, chaplain, are plaintiffs, and in the second Sir Robert 
de Kenton and Alice his wife deforciants.' Sir Robert died in 1382. Sir 
Roger Willisham, by the said Alice his wife, had issue Alice an only 
daughter and heir, who married Ralph Ramsey, by whom he had issue 
two daughters — Alice, the eldest, married to Sir Thomas Charles, of 
Kettleburgh, Knt., and Anne, to Peter Garneys, the eldest son of Robert 
Garneys, of Beccles, and Heveningham, in this county. By this latter 
marriage the Kenton Hall estate came into the possession of the family of 
Garneys. 

Peter Garneys died in 145 1,* when the manor passed to his son and 
heir, Thomas Garneys. He married Margaret, daughter and coheir of Sir 
Hugh Fraunceys, of Giffard's Hall, in Wickhambrook, Knt., who after 
Thomas's death remarried Sir Thomas Peyton, of Iselham, co. Camb. 
Thomas Garneys died 12th Dec. 1489, when the manor passed to 
his widow for Hfe, and on her death 3rd June, 1492, went to their son and 
heir, John Garneys, who married Elizabeth, daughter and heir of Sir John 
Sulyard, of Wetherden, Knt., Chief Justice of England 1484-88. 

In the inquis. p.m. on the death of Margaret Garneys in 1492, it is 
stated that Sir John Heveningham and others being seised enfeoffed Thomas 
Garneys and Margaret his wife, and the heirs of the body of Thomas, with 
remainder to Edmund Garneys in tail, and that John Garneys, son and 
heir of Margaret and Thomas, was 38 at the death of the former. The 
manor is also in the same inquisition stated to be worth £20, and to be held 
of the heirs of the Duke of Suffolk as of the Honor of Eye by one-twentieth of a 
knight's fee.^ A fine was levied of the manor in 1517 by Sir Edmund Jenney 
and others against John Garneys and Elizabeth his wife, no doubt by way of 
settlement only.^ It was a member of this family, Charles Garneys, who 
saved the life of Mary, Queen of France (later the wife of Charles Brandon, 
Duke of Suffolk), who is buried in St. Mary's church. Bury St. Edmunds, 



' Feet of Fines, 35 Edw. I. 2. 
*Pat. Rolls, I Edw. III. pt. ii. 26. 
3 Feet of Fines, 8 Edw. III. 11. 
4I.P.M., 29 Edw. III. I. 
5 Feet of Fines, 3 Rich. II. 14. 



^ His will is dated 3rd Sept. 1451, and was 
proved at Norwich 5th Feb. follow- 
ing. 

J'l.P.M., 8 Hen. VII. 810. 

8 Fine, Easter 9 Hen. VIH, 



296 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

by jumping into the sea, into which she had fallen by reason of her foot 
shpping. John Garneys died in 1524/ and there is a mural brass to him 
and his wife Ehzabeth in the aisle of Kenton church. On John Garney's 
death the manor passed to his son and heir, Robert Garneys, who married 
Anne, daughter and coheir of Thomas Bacon, of Spexhall and Baconsthorp, 
in Norfolk, and dying in 1558 was buried at Kenton 3rd August that year, 
when the manor passed to his grandson and heir, Thomas Garneys, son of 
his son John Garneys by Anne his wife, daughter of Edmund Rookwood, 
of Euston, which John had died in his father's lifetime in 1553.' Thomas 
Garneys married Frances, daughter of Sir John Sulyard, of Wetherden, 
Knt., who remarried in 1567 John Lenthall. We meet with a fine of the 
manor levied nth November, 1560, in which the manor is described as 
belonging to " Thomas Garneys, late of Robert Garneys."^ Thomas 
Garneys died without issue 20th Oct. 1566,'* and the manor passed to his 
brother and heir Nicholas, 4th son of John Garneys, and we meet with a fine 
of the manor levied 6th Feb. 1567-8, to which this Nicholas " Garnishe " 
(sic) is a party, and the estate is described as late of Thomas his father.^ 
He married Anne, daughter of Charles Clere, of Stokesby, in Norfolk. 
Amongst the Bodleian Charters we find a quit claim dated 27th March, 
1602, by Francis Colby, of Kenton, to this Nicholas Garneys, described as 
of Little Redesham, and Charles Garneys his son of all his right to the whole 
of a mansion called Kenton Hall, in Kenton.® 

Amongst the Chancery Proceedings in the time of Queen Elizabeth, 
we find an action by John Lentall (the 2nd husband of the defendant's 
brother's widow) against this Nicholas Garneys, called in the pleadings 
" Garnyshe," touching lands in Kenton, Barsham, Redesham, and Weston 
Manors.^ Nicholas Garneys died about 1623, for his will was proved at 
Norwich 20th January, 1623, when the manor passed to his son and heir, 
Charles Garneys, who married Elizabeth, daughter of John Wentworth, 
sister of Sir John Wentworth, of Somerleyton, Knt, the great lawyer. He 
removed to Boyland Hall, in Moring-Thorp, Norfolk, and appears to have 
been the last of the family who resided in Kenton, though the manor 
remained in the family for some time after. He was High Sheriff for Norfolk 
in 1652, and died 30th January, 1657,* when the manor passed to his son 
and heir, John Garneys, who removed to Somerleyton after the decease of 
his uncle. Sir John Wentworth. John Garneys married ist Anne, daughter 
of William Rugge, of Felmingham, Norfolk, and 2ndly Ehzabeth, daughter- 
of Sir Stephen Soame, of Great Thurlow, Knt., alderman of London, and 
died 15th Dec. 1661, when the manor passed to his son and heir, Wentworth 
John Garneys. He married ist Anne, daughter of Sir Charles Gawdy, of 
Crow's Hall, Debenham, who died in 1681, and 2ndly Mary, daughter of 
Sir Thomas Abdy, of FeKx Hall, Kelvedon, in Essex. On his death in 1685, 
without issue,'' his estates were divided between his sisters and coheirs, 

■ His will was dated 20th July, 1522, and = Fine, 10 Eliz. 

was proved at Norwich 8th August, « Bodl. Sufi. Ch. 1330. 

1524- 'C.P. Ser. ii. B. cix. 4. 

" His will is dated 29th July, 1549, and was « ^jg ^ju j^ ^^^^^ ^^.^^ ^^g j.^^, and was 

proved at Canterbury 7th June, proved at Canterbury 6th May, 

1553- 1658. 

3 Fine, 2 Eliz. 63. 9 His will is dated 25th Mar. 1684, and was 

*His will is dated 26th Nov. 1566, and proved 17th Feb. 1712. 

was proved at Canterbury 17th 

Oct. 1567. I.P.M., Bury, 26th 

May, 9 Eliz. 



KENTON. 297 

and the manor vested in his niece, Elizabeth Colt, daughter of Mary 
Garneys, whose 2nd husband was Sir Wm. Button Colt, Knt. Wentworth 
Garneys by his will in 1684 devised a messuage, farm, and lands in this 
parish to the minister, churchwardens, and overseers ot the poor of this 
parish and Debenham ; the rents thereof to be distributed amongst such 
poor people of the said parishes as they should see fit. This property 
consists of a messuage, farm, and lands, containing about 22 acres, and a 
cottage, formerly let at ;^3i. los. a year. 

Elizabeth Colt married William Stane, of Forrest Hall, co. Essex. 
She died in 1763, and he 20th Nov. 1771, when the manor passed to their 
daughter and heir, Mary Alice Stane, who married John Westbrook, and they 
sold the manor about 1774 to Sir Joshua Vanneck, Bart.,' at whose death 
in 1777 it passed to his son and heir, Sir Gerard W. Vanneck, Bart., on whose 
death in 1791 it vested in his brother and heir. Sir Joshua Vanneck, Bart., 
who sold it to Thomas Mills, of Great Saxham, in Thingoe Hundred. The 
sale was of both manors of Kenton. The annual rental, including fines 
and quit rents but exclusive of royalties, amounted to £223. 8s. g^. 
The quit rents and fines amounted to £23. 8s. gd. per annum. With 
the Hinton Hall farm of 242a. 2r. 26p. the properties sold for £5,800. 
At the time of this purchase the only remaining male issue of the family 
of Garneys occupied the hall, and from this time to the time of Thomas 
Richard Mills, of Saxham, in Thingoe Hundred, who held in 1896, the 
manor devolved in the same course as that manor. The manor, however, 
is now vested in Robert Nesling, 

In 1519 we meet with a fine levied of Kenton Manor by Christopher 
Harrriian and others against Robert Bolton, and it includes also tenements 
in Bramford, Sproughton, Intilsham (? Hintlesham), Bristowe, Wyttington, 
Brokes, and Blakenham." In 1556 we meet with another fine of 
" Kenton Hall Manor " levied by Francis Colby against Thomas Glemham. 
It includes land in Kettleburgh, Branston, &c.^ 

Arms of Kenton : Sable ; a chevron between three cinquefoils. 
Ermine or Or. Of Garneys : Argent ; a chevron engrailed. Azure, between 
three escallops, Sable. 

Manor of Suddon Hall. 

No doubt this manor derived its name from a family residing in Kenton 
in the time of Edw. I. We find on the Patent Rolls in 1275 an action 
pending between John de Shelton and Richard de Suddon and Katherine 
his wife touching possessions in this place." 

In 1428 this was the lordship of William Haningfield, and later Thomas 
de Clopton held a part. Subsequently the manor vested in John Garveys, 
who died seised of it in 1524, since which time it has passed in the same 
course as the main manor, though from the death of John Garneys in 1661 
to the holding of it by Sir Gerard W. Vanneck, Bart., who died in 1791, 
we find no indication of its holdership. A fine in 1570 was levied of the 
manor by Richard Kemp and others against Nicholas Garneys,^ and it is 
possible the manor may have then changed hands. 



' See Heveningham Manor, in Blything 3 Fine, Trin. 4 Mary I. 

Hundred. t Pat. Rolls, 3 Edw. I. 28 ; 4 Edw. I. 8. 

'Fine, Mich. 11 Hen. VHI, sFine, Mich. 12 Eliz. 

01 




298 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

KETTLEBURGH. 

I HERE were three manors in this place in Saxon times. One 
was that of Edric the Grim, and consisted of 4 carucates of 
land by commendation, half to the Abbot of Ely and half 
to Edric of Laxfield. It had also 10 villeins, 5 bordars, 4 
serfs (reduced to 2 at the time of the Survey), 4 plough- 
teams in demesne (reduced at the time of the Survey to 3, 
but another might be restocked). There were also 5 
belonging to the men, wood sufficient to support 8 hogs, 10 acres of meadow, 
2 rouncies, 6 beasts, 30 hogs, and 32 sheep. Also a church with 16 acres, 
valued at 3s. 

The Caput of this manor was then valued at loos. The Domesday 
tenant was Earl Alan, and the manor was a league in length and half a 
league in breadth, and paid in a gelt T.zd. 

In the same township was a holding of 6 socmen having 36 acres and 
2 ploughteams, and two freemen under the commendation of the Abbot of 
Ely, having a carucate of land, a ploughteam, and 2 villeins reduced to i at 
the time of the Survey.' 

The second manor was that in the time of the Survey of Humphrey, 
held of Robert Malet, and consisted of a freeman formerly under Edric's 
commendation, with 100 acres of land, 3 bordars, a ploughteam, 3 J acres of 
meadow, 4 beasts, 7 hogs, and 30 sheep, valued at los., increased when 
the Survey was taken to 155.^ 

The third was that of Ulmar, a freeman under the Abbot of Ely, and 
consisted of 80 acres of land, 2 villeins, 2 bordars, a ploughteam in demesne 
and I belonging to the men, and 3 acres of meadow valued at 20s. To 
this manor a freewoman under Ulmar's commendation held 14 acres, and 
x^ acres of meadow, valued at 2s. ^d. The Domesday tenant was Roger 
de Poictou.^ 

Another estate in this place was that of a socman under Edric's com- 
mendation, consisting of 9 acres, included in the valuation of Dennington. 

At the time of the Survey this was the estate of Robert Malet." 

Manor of Kettleburgh. 

This was the estate of Edric the Grim in Saxon times, but seems before 
the Conquest to have been acquired by the priory and convent of Ely. 

At the time of the Great Survey, Alan, Earl of Britanny, held the 
chief lordship, having deprived the prior and convent of both manor and 
advowson. Page says that these descended to the brothers of the Earl 
and their posterity until the time of Hen. III. Davy, however, states 
the manor vested in Wyde de la Vale, and escheated to the Crown. 

He is supported by an entry in Testa de Nevill, which states that the 
town is escheat of Wyde de la Vale to the King, and Richard Aguilun 
holds the same as his bailiff, and William de St. Albans the church as the 
gift of the King.^ Davy also states that in 1229 Bertram CryoU exchanged 
the manor with the King for the Manor of Cropton. We are not able to 
explain Davy's somewhat vague and inconsistent statement. We learn 

■Dom. ii. 2936, 294. tDom. ii. 326. 

''Dom. ii. 325. 5 -p. de N. 300. 

3Doin. ii. 3476. 



KETTLEBURGH. 



299 



from the Close Rolls that the manor was in the early part of the reign of 
Hen. III. in the Crown, for in 1224 we meet with an order to give seisin 
to Peter de Maulay of the manor ;' and in 1228 we find a grant by the King 
of the manor to Richard "Aguillum" during pleasure and stated on the 
Roll to be what Peter de Malo (Maulay) Luca had.'' Three years later we 
find a grant by the King of the manor to William de Kerdeston during 
pleasure.^ 

In 1 241 we know that the manor was vested in the Crown, and by 
letters patent dated May ist, 1241, was granted to Peter le Savoy and his 
heirs, then created Earl of Richmond. He was uncle to Queen Eleanor, 
and in 1257 settled on Ingeram de Feynes and Isabel his wife, nine score 
pounds per annum, in this parish, Nettlestead, &c., and the following year 
they reconveyed them to the said Peter, with 250 marks, land, &c. In 
1261 Peter de Savoy surrendered into the hands of the King (Hen. III.) to 
the use of Prince Edward his eldest son, the manors of Kettleburgh, Wissett, 
Nettlestead, and Wyke by Ipswich, with the fees of £4. 13s. 4d., rent in 
Ipswich ; and the King confirmed them to the Prince and his heirs, and so 
to the Kings of England in succession for ever ; but the Prince, with his 
father's consent, made divers grants of the same. 

Soon after this resignation. Sir William Charles, Knt., obtained from 
King Edw. I. a grant of both the manor and advowson,'* with free warren 
here, to him and his heirs, to be held of the King in capite by the service 
of the 20th part of a knight's fee.^ He also had a grant of a market and 
fair here in 1265 and 1292.* 

The Charles family derive their descent from William de Jernemuth 
(or Yarmouth), he being in fact the father of Sir William Charles. Sir 
William Charles, Knt., having obtained this estate, resided here, and erected 
a large house, as appears from the site of the foundation, at the north-west 
end of the church. It was surrounded with a moat, and called Kettleburgh 
HaU. He was also patron of the church of Easton, and by Joan his wife 
had issue Edward Charles. 

Joan, widow of the above Sir William Charles, married Sir John 
Tuddenham, Knt., who held this manor in her right, and the advowson 
of this church and Easton in 1286 ; she survived him also, and died in 
1305.' Sir Edward Charles, Knt., succeeded, and was 36 years of age at his 
mother's decease, when the King took homage of him.* 

To this Sir Edward Charles and Alice his wife Henry de Hales and 
Trista de Kettleburgh surrendered by fine the Manor of Milton, in North- 
amptonshire, remainder to WiUiam their son. They had issue William, 
Robert, Edmund, and Edward ; and in 1309 Sir Edward the father settled 
this estate to the use of himself and Alice his wife during their lives, with 
remainder to his son William in tail ; in default thereof to his son Robert 
in tail, with remainder to his son Edmund in tail, with an ultimate remainder 
to the settlor in fee .' Another settlement was effected in 1314 of a somewhat 
similar character, but with some pecuhar variations. It appears from the 
licence which is on the Patent Rolls this year. This licence authorises 
Edward Charles to enfeoff Thomas de Elyngham and William de Ingelose 



'Close Rolls, 8 Hen. III. pt. i. 7. 
'Close Rolls, 12 Hen. III. 8. 
3 Close Rolls, 15 Hen. III. zo. 
^H.R. ii. 188. 
5 Chart Rolls, 48 Hen. III. i. 



6 Chart Rolls, 49 Hen. III. 6 ; 20 Edw. I. 

59- 
n.P.M., 33 Edw. I. 54. 
8 0., 33 Edw. I. II. 
9I.Q.D., 2 Edw. II. iii.; N.R. File, 74, 

20. 



300 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

of Kettleburgh Manor and the advowson of the churches of Kettleburgh 
and Easton, held in chief, and for the feoffees to regrant to him and Alice 
his wife for their lives, with remainder to his (the settlor's) son Robert and 
the heirs of his body, and failing such issue with remainders successively 
to his sons Edward, Edmund, and John in tail, with remainder to his (the 
settlor's) daughter Joan and her heirs.' For effectuating this settlement a 
fine was levied in 1315 by the said Edward Charles and Alice his wife against 
Thomas de Elingham and William de Ingelose. It included the advowsons 
of the churches of Kettleburgh and Easton." 

In 1327 we find from the Originalia Rolls that in that year proceedings 
were taken by Edward Charles and Alice his wife against Agnes Heyron 
and others as to lands in Kettleburgh, Rendlesham, Tunstal, and various 
other places in Suffolk.^ 

Sir Edward Charles the father died in isaS.* 

Sir Edward Charles, the 4th son, succeeded (according to the entail) 
about 1329 ; we learn how this was from the Close Rolls in 1328, where 
there is an order not to interfere with the manor by reason of the death of 
Edward Charles as he held no lands at the time of his death of the King in 
chief in his demesne as of fee, but he held the manor for life of the King in 
chief by knight's service, and it ought to remain by fine levied on Edward's 
son and the heirs of his body.^ The entry also states that William Charles, 
son of Wilham, son of the aforesaid Edward Charles, was the heir, and then 
aged 16.^ 

It is not therefore correct to state, as Page does, that the elder brothers 
of Sir Edward Charles, the son, had all died " without issue " ; for it is 
clear that the eldest son William had left issue one son at least. The son, 
however, seems to have died under age, for on the same Rolls in the same 
year we find an order to deliver to Edward, son of Edward Charles, the issues 
of the manor.'' Of course, this might have been to him as guardian of his 
nephew. This Edward Charles, by Dyonyse his wife, had issue Robert, 
Edmund, and Edward. Their tather died in 1337 5' Dyonyse his widow 
remarried Sir William de Tye, of Easton, Knt., and died in 1376. The manor 
passed to Sir Robert Charles, the eldest son, who died about 1359' without 
issue, when the manor passed to his younger brother. Sir Edmund. Davy 
says " uncle," and this is supported by entries on the Close Rolls in 1359 ^^^ 
1360, where we find an order to accept security from " Edmund " Charles, 
uncle and heir of Robert Charles deceased, for a reasonable relief in respect 
of two parts of the manor held of the King in chief.'" The following year 
Edmund Charles died," when the manor passed to his youngest brother. Sir 
Edward Charles. He died seised 3rd September, 1375,"' leaving issue one 
son, Robert. 

He succeeded, and died seised of the manor and advowson of this 
church and Easton in 1401,'^ and devised the same to Anne his wife, she 
paying £20 per annum to Thomas, his eldest son, and having the education 

'Pat. Rolls, 8 Edw. II. pt. ii. 6; 0.,8 7 IJ,. 18. 

Edw. II. 11; I.Q.D., 8 Edw. II. U.VM., 11 Edw. III. 37. 

File 109, 6. 9 1.P.M., 33 Edw. III. (2nd Nos.) 97. 

'Feet of Fines, 9 Edw. II. 9. "Close Rolls, 33 Edw. III. 6; 34 Edw. III. 

3 0., I Edw. III. 35. 8. 

t I.P.M., 3 Edw. III. 40. « I.P.M., 34 Edw. III. 56, two parts extent. 

5 Close Rolls, 3 Edw. III. 19. "Extent, I.P.M., 49 Edw. III.; pt. i. 21. 

^Ib. '3I.P.M., 2 Hen. IV. 20. 



KETTLEBURGH." 301 

of her other son. He was buried in the chapel of Kettleburgh church, near 
the tomb of his father. His will is dated on the Feast of St. Peter's, 
1400. 

Sir Thomas Charles succeeded. He married Alice, daughter of Ralph 
Ramsey, of Kenton, by whom he had issue an only son, Thomas. He 
died 13th Dec. 1418,' and Alice his wife survived, who by virtue of a settle- 
ment made by her husband, was lady of the manor of this parish, and 
patroness of the church and that of East on. 

Thomas Charles, son of Sir Thomas, was 15 years of age at his father's 
decease, and it appears that in 1468 he and Elizabeth his wife conveyed the 
manor and 60 messuages, 600 acres of land, 40 ol meadow, 200 of pasture, 
40 of wood, £40 rent and a rent of 50 capons in Kettleburgh, Easton, Ash, 
Rendlesham, Eyke, Bromeswell, Wantisden, Chesilford, Butley, Boyton, 
and elsewhere, with the advowsons of the churches of Kettleburgh and 
Easton held in chief, to John Mowbray, 4th Duke of Norfolk, and his heirs.'' 
As the Duke's only daughter, married to Richard, son of King Edw. IV., 
died in tender years, as did her husband, there may have been some dealing 
with the manor ; but it seems strange that after the disposition ol the manor 
and advowson to the Duke of Norfolk we find that in 1489 Elizabeth Ciere 
and Margery Marshall presented to the living, and Elizabeth Clere was the 
daughter of the last-mentioned Thomas Charles, who had married Edmund 
Clere. An inquisition in the time of Hen. VII. seems to suggest that there 
are two manors continually being confused and mixed up together. 

The inquisition last referred to was taken in 1496, and was on Margery 
Marshall, widow, who had died 29th October, 1493. It stated that Kettle- 
burgh Manor al. Ketylberow Hall, and advowson and lands in Ketilberg, 
Butley, Glemham, Swiftling, Godston, Boyton, Parham, and Framlingham, 
were held of the King in chief by the service of one-nineteenth of a knight's 
fee. Margery Marshall widow and Elizabeth Clere widow being seised 
enfeoffed John, Cardinal Archbishop of Canterbury, David Orell, and others 
of a moiety to hold to them and the heirs of David Orell to the use of the 
said Margery, the use of the said David and Elizabeth his wife and the 
use of his heirs. Margery it states, died 29th October, 9 Hen. V. 12, 
having received her moiety of the premises, viz. : 40s. yearly, the said 
Elizabeth Orell, aged 42, being her daughter and heir.^ 

The property specified in this inquisition was considerable. It included 
300 acres of land, 40 of meadow, and 200 of pasture in Kettleburgh, Butley, 
Glemham, Swiffling, Godston, Boyton, Parham, and Framlingham, held 
60 acres of the Earl of Surrey by fealty and y^d. rent, 160 acres held 
of John Glemham by fealty and 5s. rent, 107 acres held of John Batysford 
by fealty and 18^. rent, and 13 acres held of Thomas Barton by fealty 
and jd. rent.* 

The manor is mentioned in the inquis. p.m. of Sir Robert Willoughby 
in 1465,' and of his son Robert in 1467, and in 1477 of John, late Duke of 
Norfolk,* and there is a conveyance of the manor in this last-mentioned 
year amongst the Additional Charters in the British Museum.^ It is by 
Thomas Bourchier, Archbishop of Canterbury, William de Waynflete, 

'I.P.M., 7 Hen. V. 23. ^i.p.M., 5 Edw. IV. 35. 

»Pat. RoUs, 8 Edw. IV. pt. ii. 22. «I.P.M., 17 Edw. IV. 58. 

3I.P.M., 9 Hen. VII. 939. ''Add. Ch. 26598. 
■* Inquis. 9 Hen. VII. 939. 



302 THE i^ANdRS OF SUFFOLK. 

Bishop of Winchester, and other feoffees of John Mowbray, Duke of Norfolk, 
for payment of his debts to ^^Hzabeth, Duchess of Norfolk, his widow. It 
bears date ist March 16 Edw. IV. 

Again we find the manor specified in the inquis. p.m. of Maria 
Willoughby, who died the i6th May, 1515,' leaving William Willoughby, 
Lord de Eresby, her son and heir. 

The following year a conveyance of the manor was made by Sir Edmund 
Jenney in execution of the last will of Sir Christopher Willoughby, Lord 
WiUoughby de Eresby, to Sir WilUam Willoughby, his son and successor. 
The deed is dated i8th June, 8 Hen. VIII. [1516].* The assurance includes 
also the manors of Ufford, Sogenhoe, Wynderbyle, Woodbridge, Bradfield, 
Combs, Orford, and Wykes Ufford. 

Davy makes Thomas Howard, Earl ot Surrey, lord, who died in 1524, 
and states that William, Lord Howard, presented to the living in 1540 and 
1553, and Thomas, Lord Howard, Earl of Suffolk, in 1619. 

The manor is mentioned in two inquis. p.m. of the Glemham family,^ no 
doubt by reason of their being overlords as to part, the inquis. p.m. of Sir 
John Glemham, who died 15th October, 1537,* and of Christopher 
Glemham, of Glemham, who died i8th October, 1549, leaving Thomas 
Glemham his son and heir.' The manor had also been included by name 
in a settlement made in 1513 by which John Glemham and Elizabeth Bacon 
conveyed certain manors to Charles Brandon, then Viscount L'Isle, Sir 
Robert Brandon, Knt,, Christopher Willoughby, Humphrey Wingfield, and 
Christopher Jenney. Thomas Glemham, the last mentioned, who died in 1549, 
was a cousin and heir to Charles Brandon, the Duke of Suffolk. Thomas 
Glemham, the son of Christopher, died in Sept. 1571, and his wife Amy the 
month following, leaving issue Henry, Thomas, and Elizabeth. The manor 
is also included in a fine levied of it in 1573 by Roger Warren and others 
against Margaret Cornwallis, widow.* 

The manor was purchased from Thomas Howard, Earl of Suffolk, 
by Sir Robert Naunton in 1623. He presented in 1630, held his first 
court 5th Oct. 1635, and died the same year, when and from this time to 
the present it has passed in the same course as the Manor of Letheringham, 
in this Hundred, to the time of Margaret Syrer, who held her first court for 
this manor in 1762, and died in 1763. The manor passed to William Leman, 
who held his first court in 1764. It was subsequently purchased by 
Chaloner Arcedeckne, who died in 1809, when the manor passed to his 
son and heir, William Arcedeckne, on whose death it passed to his son and 
heir, Andrew Arcedeckne, and on his death passed to his only surviving 
child. 

In 1855 the manor was vested in the Duke of Hamilton, and it has since 
descended in the same course as the Manor of Easton, in this Hundred, and 
is now vested in the trustees of the 12th Duke. A rental of the manor in 
1441 will be found on the Harl. Rolls in the British Museum.' 

The first court of Robert Naunton, son of Robert, was held 26th March, 
1666 ; the first court of Beeston Long and the Rev. Geo. Turner 7th Dec. 
1812. 

'I.P.M., 7 Hen. VIII. 29. Glemham Church states he died 

"Harl. 32 B. 10. in 1535. 

^See Manor of Fornham, in Plomesgate sj.p.M., 5 Edw. VI. 55. 

Hundred. epine, Mich. 15 Ehz. 

^I.P.M., 30 Hen. VIII. i. Apparently 7 Harl. Rolls, C. 15 dors. 

the monument to him in little 



KETTLEBURGH. 303 

A schedule of the copyhold tenants in 1677, and a list of their immediate 
predecessors from whom they took them with the several courts at which 
they were admitted, is given Add. MSS. 19097, fol. 167. 

Arms of Charles : Ermine ; on a chief, Gules, five lozenges Argent, 
each charged with an Ermine spot. 

Manor of Kenton's. 

This seems to have been held by Ivo de Kenton in the time of Edw. II. 
Ivo died in 1313,' from which time to the death of Alice, wife of 
Ralph Ramsey, the manor passed in the same course as the Manor of 
Kettleburgh, in this Hundred. In 1394 we meet with a fine, probably of this 
manor, but under the head " Kettleburgh Manor," levied by John de 
Thorp, clerk, John de Pykynhale, clerk, William Rees, Henry Lomenour, 
and Nicholas de Blakeneye against the said Ralph Ramsey and Alice his 
wife." Alice Charles seems ultimately to have obtained the whole manor. 
Page writing of her states that surviving her husband she granted that 
parcel of land whereon Kettleburgh Hall (now so called) stood in trust to 
Simon Brook, of Easton, and his heirs, which afterwards came to Robert de 
Tye, of Easton, by his marriage with Alice her daughter, and their son 
George de Tye sold it to William Stebbing, of Kent. He adds that William, 
son of John Stebbing, in the beginning of the reign of King Hen. VII. was 
proprietor of the above and divers other lands in Kenton. He had two sons, 
William and Thomas, and by his will dated in 1500 charged a close in Kettle- 
burgh with the finding of a lamp in that parish and Hoo Chancels, called 
hence Lamp Close. 

William Stebbing, his eldest son, increased the paternal estates by the 
purchase of New Kettleburgh Hall of George de Tye, of Easton, in the i8th 
of King Hen. VIII. He died about 1542, leaving two daughters his coheirs — 
Frances, married to Arthur Penning, and Elizabeth, who in 1560 sold her 
moiety of the estate to the said Arthur Penning, her brother-in-law. 

This Arthur Penning it was who acquired the Manor of Kenton's. 
He resided at Kettleburgh Hall in 1556, and had issue a son John, who died 
in 1591 unmarried, and a daughter Elizabeth, w:ho married Simon Blom- 
field, of Monk's Eleigh ; their mother died in 1559 . The said Arthur Penning 
took for a 2nd wife Catherine, daughter of — Brook, by whom he had six 
sons and seven daughters. He died 23rd Dec. 1593, seised of this manor 
and the manors of Brockford, in Hartismere Hundred, and Colston Hall, in 
Baddington, in Hoxne Hundred, and was interred in the chancel of Kenton 
church. 

Anthony Penning was his eldest son by his 2nd marriage. He married 
Elizabeth, daughter of Thomas Crofts, of Saxham Parva, and served the 
office of High Sheriff for this county in 1607. He was in the Commission 
of the Peace in 1618, when this estate was valued at £1,500 per annum. 

He resided subsequently at Ipswich, and dying there nth Jan. 1630,^ 
was interred in the chancel of the parish church of St. Matthew, in that 
town, on the north side of which is a handsome mural monument to his 
memory containing figures of himself, his lady, and their numerous family. 

Anthony Penning and his wife kneel facing each other, in two round- 
headed recesses. He is in a red portnian's gown with hanging sleeve and 
large ruff, his arms passed through slits in the sleeves, and his hands in 

'I.P.M., 7 Edw. II. 2. 3 Will 7th Jan. 1630. 

» Feet of Fines, 18 Rich. II. 17. 



304 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

position of prayer. His gown is faced with white and his undersleeves 
show four buttons of the wrist with a white cuff turned back. The wife is 
a matronly-looking person in a red gown with full sleeves, tied in the midst 
with a black ribbon in a bow. Over a close hood, showing the hair slightly 
puffed at the sides, hangs a black veil that falls down her back, and she 
wears a small ruff and ruffles. Both kneel on cushions. Below are nine 
small figures of sons kneeling two and two beneath their father in cloaks 
and deep falhng bands, one wearing a gown like his parents, with hanging 
sleeves. Three small infants in swaddling clothes lie by their brothers. 
Under the mother are four daughters in close caps, and with deep bands 
falling over their shoulders, but otherwise dressed like her. They are 
represented alternately in black and red, the two centre ones holding skulls 
in their hands. 

Three black marble columns in front of the monument support a 
shelf, at each end of which reclines a cherub resting his elbow, the one on 
a horn-glass, the other on a skull. In the centre is a shield : Gu, three 
stags' heads cabossed Arg. 2 and i, a chief indented Ermine. Penning : 
the crest is a stag's head erased. Over the man's head are these lines : — 

" His fay the by Works he dayly did declare 
In life for death himselfe he did prepare. 
Now being dead ye world sings of his praies. 
And fame proclames his workes to fvtvr days." 

Beneath him is : — 

" Here lieth the body of Anthonie Penning, Esq. 

Sonne of Arthvr Penning, of Ketleberge, in the 

covnty of Svffolke, Esqr. 

who had issve by 

Ehzabeth his wife (davghter of Thomas 

Croftes of Saxham, in the said covnty, Esqr.) 

14 sonnes and 4 davghters, he departed this 

life the nth day of Janvary. Ano. Dni. 1630 

being of the age of 65 

years." 

Lines below the lady's figure continue her husband's praises : — 

" His fayth by love he did express. 
His love by works he did approve. 
The poore men's loynes him blesse. 
The rich and poore did him love."' 

Anthony Penning was succeeded in this lordship by his son and heir, 
Anthony Penning, who married ist Alice, daughter of Robert Wood, of 
Thurton, Norfolk, and 2ndly Bridget, daughter of Sir Henry Mildmay, of 
Moulsham Hall, Essex. By his 2nd wife he had a son Henry, to whom on 
the death of his father this lordship passed. He was dead by 1681, when 
the manor passed to his son and heir, Anthony Penning, who sold it to 
Richard Porter. 

' East Anglian Notes and Queries, vol. ix. 363. 



KETTLEBURGH. 305 

The manor subsequently passed like the main manor to Andrew 
Arcedeckne, of Glevering Hall, Hacheston, and has since descended in a like 
course with that lordship, being now vested in the trustees of the 12th 
Duke of Hamilton. 

Arms of Stebbing : Quarterly Or and Gu., on a bend Sable five bezants. 
Of Penning : Gules, three stags' heads cabossed Argent, a chief indented. 
Ermine. 



PI 




3o6 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

LETHERINGHAM. 

|W0 manors were held in this place in Saxon times. The 
first was held by Haldein under commendation of Harold, 
and consisted of 80 acres, 5 bordars (increased when the 
Survey was taken to 10), a serf (increased to 2 at that period), 
2 ploughteams in demesne and 2 belonging to the men, 
wood sufficient for the support of 4 hogs. Also 6 acres of 
meadow, a mill, 2 rouncies, 6 beasts, 30 hogs, 80 goats, and 
5 hives of bees. There was also a church with 20 acres valued at 2od. The 
value of the entire manor was 20s. 

The second manor was held by a freeman under commendation, half of 
the Abbot of Ely and half of Haldein, and consisted of 60 acres, 2 bordars, 
a ploughteam, and 4 acres of meadow, valued at 20s. 

In the same township was a holding of 13 freemen and 2 half-freemen 
under commendation of Haldein (with the exception of 6 who were under 
commendation of the Abbot of Ely). It consisted of 60 acres, 4 plough- 
teams, and 2 acres of meadow, valued at 17s. 

These two manors and the other estate were aU in the possession of 
Geoffrey de Magnaville at the time of the Survey.' 

Another holding was that of a freeman under Woolmar's commenda- 
tion, and consisted of ij acres valued at 4^. This was the estate of Roger 
de Poictou when the Survey was taken. ^ 

Another small estate in this place consisted of 3I acres in demesne 
valued at M., and held when the Survey was taken by the Abbot of Ely .^ 

LETHERINGHAM MANOR. 

How this lordship passed from Geoffrey de Magnaville or Mandeville 
does not appear, but it is stated to have been part of the great 
estate bestowed on Robert Malet by William the Conqueror ; in fact, one 
of the two hundred and twenty manors granted to him with the Honor of 
Eye.* 

On the forfeiture of the lands and Honor of Eye by Robert Malet in 
the time of Hen. I. the Glanvilles became lords and the Boviles held under 
them in the time of Hen. II., the two families becoming allied later by 
marriage. Sir Philip Bo vile gave lands in the reign of Hen. I. to the priory 
of Wykes, in Essex. 

In the year 1195 William de Glanville gave 100 marks to have the custody 
of the heir of William de Bo vile until of age, with his lands, &c. This heir 
was most probably the WiUiam Bovile who married the Glanville heiress, 
sister and coheir of Geoffrey de Glanville, Lord of Bacton, in Norfolk, 1309. 

We find that William de Boville petitioned Geoffrey de GlanviUe as his 
superior lord from whom he held the Manor of Letheringham as in fee, 
that he would confirm to the canons of St. Peter, Ipswich, his donation of 
the church of St. Mary de Crew and the tenth part of Letheringham and 
Thorpe.' Having given these tithes, he founded a small priory of three or 
four Black Canons as a cell to that house to the honour of the Blessed 
Virgin, whose yearly income was valued at £26. i8s. ^d.^ The manor no 

'Dom. ii. 412. Richards, Records of the Anglo- 

'Dom. ii. 348. Norman House of Glanville, p. 

'Dom. ii. 3886. 18. 

*Page, Hist, of Suffolk, p. 116 ; Glanville- 'Tanner MSS., Norwich. 

«26 Hen. I. 



LETHERINGHAM. 307 

doubt descended in the same way as the Manor of Badingham, in Hoxne 
Hundred, from William de Boville, who married Basilea de Glanville, till 
the time of Margaret or Margery, daughter of John de Boville. In 1272 a 
fine was levied between John de " Bovile " and Wilham de " Bovile " of this 
manor, together with Alderton, Greeting, DaUinghoo, and Thorpe, which 
formed portion of the Glanville lordships, whereby they became settled on 
William for life, remainder to John and the heirs of his body, remainder to 
the right heirs of WiUiam, which John was brother to William, for in 1277 
John de Bovile held these lordships of the Honor of Eye, and had right of 
gallows and assize of bread and beer, &c. 

In 1310 William de Boville and his wife Joan, daughter of Sir James 
Creke al. Glanville, Knt., levied a fine of the manor, in which John de 
Catfield and William de Reppes were deforciants,' and four years later 
another fine was levied by the said William de Boville and Joan against 
the said William de Reppes and John de Catfield." 

In 1217 a settlement was made whereby the said William de Boville 
and Joan his wife were to be seised of a moiety of their estate for life, 
remainder to Simon Fitz- Richard and Nicholaa his wife, one of the daughters 
of the said WiUiam de Boville. Sir William de Boville was succeeded by 
his son and heir, John de Boville, who left an only daughter and heir 
Margaret or Margery, and in 1347 Richard Fitz-Simon, son of the above 
Simon Fitz- Richard and Nicholaa his wife, granted the lordship and advow- 
son of Letheringham with the advowson of the priory there, or most probably 
the moiety accruing to him under the settlement of 1317, to Sir John de 
Ufford in trust for the said Margery. This Margery married ist Sir William 
Carbonell, Knt., and 2ndly Thomas, 2nd son of Sir John Wingfield, Knt., of 
Wingfield Castle, and Elizabeth his wife, daughter and heir of John Honey- 
pot, of Wingfield, by which marriage the said Thomas Wingfield in his wife's 
right became seised of the lordship of Letheringham about 1358, in which 
year we meet with a fine levied of the manor by this Thomas " de Wyngef eld " 
and Margery his wife against Wilham Charnel, parson of Dynyngton church, 
and Phihp Denys. This fine included the advowson of the priory of 
Letheringham,^ where Page, Glanville-Richards, and other authorities state 
his descendants of the elder branch continued until the time of King 
WiU. III. 

The knightly house of Wingfield derive their origin from Wingfield 
Castle, and were lords of many manors in the county. It is said that in the 
time of Hen. VIII. there were eight or nine knights, all brothers, and two 
Knights of the Garter of this house. Sir Thomas Wingfield"* died about 
1378, from which time the manor passed in the same course as the Manor 
of Thorpe Hall, in Hasketon, in Carlfdrd Hundred, until the death of Sir 
Anthony Wingfield, 20th of August, 1552,' when the manor was given by Sir 
Anthony to his 3rd daughter Elizabeth, then the widow of Wilham Naunton. 
Page rather suggests that all that was given by Sir Anthony Wingfield to 
his daughter was 20 acres of arable land, 30 acres of pasture, and 10 acres of 
meadow attached to the site of the priory, valued at £6. 13s. 4^., which 
at the Dissolution had been granted to Sir Anthony Wingfield. 

We find from the State Papers that in 1539 a lease was granted out of 
the Augmentation Office of Letheringham Priory to Sir Anthony Wing- 

'Feet of Fines, 4 Edw. II. 26. *See Manor of Wingfield, in Hoxne Hun- 

^ Feet of Fines, 8 Edw. II. 27. dred. 

3 Feet of Fines, 31 and 32 Edw. III. 44. ^i^p^., 7 Edw. VI. 65. 



308 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

field,' and in 1552-3 amongst the Acts of the Privy Council is a letter to 
Mr. Chancellor of Augmentations for fee farm to Elizabeth Naunton, of 
Letheringham Priory, with certain lands, tenements, and parsonages thereto 
belonging." And that the grant of the priory was made directly from the 
Crown to Elizabeth Naunton, widow, in 1552-3 is evidenced from the 
OriginaUa Roll this year, where the grant appears.^ 

Elizabeth Naunton died in 1592, when the manor passed to her son 
and heir, Henry Naunton, who married ist Elizabeth, daughter and heir 
of Everard Asheby, and 2ndly Bridget Pallgrave, and died 5rd Aug. 1599, 
when it vested in his son and heir, Robert Naunton, afterwards Sir Robert. 
He was the author of " Fragmenta Regalia," and born in 1563. Of the 
occurrences of his early years no account remains ; the following is tran- 
scribed from Fuller's " Worthies of Suffolk " : — 

" Sir Robert Naunton was born in this county, of right ancient extrac- 
tion ; some avouching that his family were here before, others that they 
came in with the Conqueror, who rewarded the chief of that name for his 
service with a great inheritrix, given him in marriage ; insomuch that his 
lands were then estimated at (a vast sum in my judgment) seven hundred 
pounds a year. For a long time they were patrons of Alderton, in this 
county, where I conceive Sir Robert was born. 

" He was bred Fellow Commoner in Trinity College, and then Fellow 
of Trinity Hall, Cambridge. He was Proctor of the University, Anno 
Domini 1600-1, which office, according to the Old Circle, returned not to 
that College but once in forty-four years. He addicted himself from his 
youth to such studies as did tend to accomplish him for public employment. 
I conceive his most excellent piece called ' Fragmenta Regalia,' set forth 
since his death, was a fruit of his younger years. 

" He was afterwards sworn Secretary of State to King James, on Thurs- 
day the eighth of January, 1617 ; which place he discharged with great 
ability and dexterity. He died Anno Domini 1630, and was buried at 
Letheringham." 

Sir Robert* married Penelope, the daughter and sole heir of Thomas 
Perrot, Knt.,^ by Dorothy, the daughter of Walter, Earl of Essex. The only 
surviving offspring of this marriage was a daughter Penelope, who was 
1st married to Paul, Viscount Bayning, and afterwards to Philip, Lord 
Herbert, 5th Earl of Pembroke. 

Sir Robert Naunton erected in Letheringham an alms-house of brick, 
one storey high, for the reception of his " decayed" servants, wherein were 
apartments for five persons, but there being no endowment, it long since 
became ruinous and useless. 

On Sir Robert Naunton's death in April, 1635,^ the manor devolved on 
his brother William,' who married 6th Feb. 1612, Anne, daughter and coheir 
of Laurence Pells, of Kettleburgh (she died ist Nov. 1628), and died, nth 
July 1635,' when the manor passed to his son and heir, Robert Naunton, a 
captain in the Royal Navy. He married ist Mary, daughter and coheir 
of Arthur Coke, and 2ndly 25th Sept. 1625, Jane, daughter of Robert 

'S.P. 1539, p. 1355. 6Wm 3rd Mar. 1634, proved 12th Nov. 

"Acts of P.C. 1552-3. p. 226. 1635. 

3 0., 7 Edw. VI. 2, Paxs. Rot. 58. 7 See H. Walpole's Correspondence, vol. i., 

*See Kettlebaston Manor, in Cosford pp. 290-1. 

Hundred. sWill nth July, 1635. 

5 He was the son of Sir John Perrot, 

Deputy of Ireland. 



LETHERINGHAM. 309 

Spencer, of Rendlesham, and died in Jan. 1665, being buried on the 30th 
of that month, when the manor vested in his son and heir, Robert Naunton, 
who married 30th May, 1686, EUzabeth Goodchild. 

From the Exchequer Depositions in 1712 we learn that there was in 
that year an action pending between this Robert Naunton and John Clark 
as to the rectory impropriate and parish and lands called " Letheringham 
Parke," &c., and as to tithes.' Robert Naunton dying in Sept. 1719, the 
manor devolved on his son and heir, William Naunton. He died without 
issue 2ist Aug. 1758, leaving the manor to his widow Margaret (who remarried 
William Syrer) for life, and then to his next heir. The widow died in July, 
1763, when the manor devolved on the next heir, a cousin of William 
Naunton's, William Leman. He died in 1789, when the manor passed to 
his daughter and heir Theophilia, married to Robert Rede, of Beccles, who 
sold the manor in 1811 to Andrew Arcedeckne, of Glevering Hall, in 
Hacheston. In 1855 the manor was vested in the Duke of Hamilton, and 
has since passed in the same course as the Manor of Easton, in this Hundred, 
and is now vested in the trustees of the 12th Duke of Hamilton. 

The old mansion was pulled down about 1770. The manor is men- 
tioned in the inquis. p.m. of Humphrey de Bohun, Earl of Hereford, and 
Joan his wife, daughter of Richard, Earl of Arundel, in 1372,'' and in that 
of Sir John Wingfield in 1481.^ 

Sir John Suckling in his MS. notes, says : " On 3rd Oct. 1780, a friend 
of mine visited this church (Letheringham) and found the roof of it and 
much of the waUs entirely down. The roof of the chancel was standing, 
but all the statues and monuments so broken and battered to pieces that the 
havock must have been purposely committed. The stones that had been 
inlaid with brasses were taken up and the brasses gone, and nothing but the 
smallest fragments of glass remained in the windows. The miserable state 
of the fine series of the monuments of the Wingfield and Naunton families 
at Letheringham is a sad memorial of controverted inheritance. I have 
heard of a church (Campsey Ash) in Suffolk where all the monuments of 
former lords of this manor were sacrificed to the vanity of the present possessor 
(John Sheppard, Esq.), who having no train of ancestry to boast of, could 
not bear the memorials of those who had."* 

Arms of Glanville : Argent, a chief indented, Azure. Of Boville : 
Quarterly Or and Sable. 



' Exch. Dep. taken at Wickham Market 3 1.P.M., 21 Edw. IV. 59. 

and Easton in 1712. * Cough's Sep. Mon., cxxi. pp. 143 and 218. 

a.P.M., 46Edw. III. 10. 




310 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

MARLESFORD. 

IWO manors were held here in Saxon times. The first was 
that of a freeman under Edric's commendation, and con- 
sisted of 36 acres, a ploughteam (reduced to half at the 
time of the Survey), and an acre of meadow, valued at los., 
which value was reduced to half when the Survey was taken. 
There were also six freemen under Edric's commendation 
having 21 acres, and half a ploughteam, valued at 2s. M. 
The Domesday tenant was Robert Malet.' 

The second manor was that of the Abbot of St. Edmunds, and con- 
sisted of a carucate and 12 acres of land, 5 bordars, 2 ploughteams in demesne, 
and half a team belonging to the men. Also 5 acres of meadow, a mill, 

2 rouncies, 4 beasts, 14 hogs, 50 sheep, and 3 hives of bees. The value was 
formerly 30s., increased when the Survey was taken to 40s. 

There were also 9 whole freemen and 2 half freemen having 83 acres, 

3 ploughteams (reduced to 2 at the time of the Survey), and an acre of 
meadow. The Domesday tenant was also the Abbot of St. Edmunds.^ 

x^mong the lands of Earl Ralph kept in hand for the King by Godric 
the Steward was a holding of 25 acres of land and half a ploughteam 
formerly held by six freemen under commendation to Turmod, of Parham.^ 
Amongst the lands of the said Earl Ralph was also a small estate held in 
demesne of 35 acres." 

Another small holding was that of a half freeman consisting of 13 acres 
and half a ploughteam, belonging to Earl Alan at the time of the Survey.' 

Manor of Marlesford. 

The Crown had the church, the advowson of which afterwards went with 
the manor till the time of Sir Walter Devereux. But Robert Malet held a 
manor here, as did also the Abbot of St. Edmunds. 

At one time Hugh de Cressy seems to have held the lordship, and later, 
in 1236, Jordan de Sackvile and dementia^ his wife had the manor. She 
was daughter of William de Chesneto or Cheney. They had a son and heir 
Jordan, but were, it is said, succeeded by Sir Robert Sackvyle, after which 
the manor would appear to have gone to his widow Maud, as she presented 
to the living. In 1328 a fine was levied of the manor and the advowson by 
Thomas de " Sakevill " against John de Sakevyll, chaplain.' 

By 1331 Sir Thomas de Sackvill was dead, for amongst the early deeds 
in the Court of Chancery we find a deed of sale by John de Whittefeld and 
Maud his wife, executrix of the will of Sir Thomas de " Saukeville," her 
late husband, to Sir John de Stonore of all the goods and chattels, corn and 
stock, within this manor that belonged to Sir Thomas. The deed is dated 
London, the Friday after St. Barnabas the Apostle 4 Edw. IIL* 

In 1357 Robert Ufford, Earl of Suffolk, presented ; in 1383 Sir Thomas 
de Sackville, and in 1414 and 1469 Thomas de Sackville, but of these Sack- 
villes and their relationship one to another we have no particulars. The 



2 



^Dom. ii. 3266. 6 A Sir Jordan de Sackville, who died in 

" Dom. ii. 369&. 1208, married a Clementia, who was 

^Dom. ii. 286, 2866. daughter of Alberic deVere.Earl of 

"^Ib. Oxford. He died without issue. 

5 Dom. ii. 294. 7 Feet of Fines, 22 Edw. III. 28. 

»C 2155. 



MARLESFORD. 311 

name cannot be identified upon the pedigrees of the family of the name who 
held the Manor of Sackvilles, in Debenham, in Thredling Hundred. The 
manor was certainly vested in these Sackvilles, and in 1485 was possibly 
vested in Thomas Rokes or Rokys, as he presented to the living in 1485 
and 1493. Thomas Rokys held until 1515, when he and his wife Ehzabeth 
seem to have parted with this manor and the Manor of Flowton to Sir 
William Waldegrave, and we meet with a fine levied this year of the manor 
in which Rokys and his wife are deforciants.' 

In 15 18 the manor was vested in Sir Robert Drury, of Hawsted," on 
whose death 2nd March, 1535-6, it passed to his son and heir, Sir William 
Drury, on whose death it passed to his grandson and heir. Sir William 
Drury, who held his first court 28th March, 1570, and was slain in France 
by Sir John Borbough in 1589. Two years prior to his death, however, 
in 1587, we meet with a fine which seems to show that he had parted with 
this manor and the Manors of Parham and Glemham at this time. The 
fine was levied by Margaret, Viscountess Hereford, against Sir William 
Drury and others.^ This Margaret, Viscountess Hereford, must have been 
the daughter of Robert Garneys, of Kenton, and widow of Walter Devereux, 
Viscount Hereford, who died in 1558, and grandmother of Sir Walter 
Devereux, 5th Viscount. 

Amongst the Chancery Proceedings we find an action by this Margaret, 
Viscountess Hereford, against Robert Dymer and Christopher Bayman 
to fulfil a contract for sale of land in Marlesford and other towns adjoining, 
part freehold and part held of the Manor of Marlesford, in Marlesford, 
agreed to be sold to the plaintiff by the defendant Bayman. 

A little later the manor seems to have been vested in Sir Walter 
Devereux, the eldest son of Sir Edward Devereux, of Castle Bromwich, in 
Warwickshire, Bart., by Catherine his wife, daughter of Edward Arden, 
of Park Hall, in the same county. 

Sir Walter Devereux, Knt., by deed dated in 1610 granted a yearly 
rent charge of £6 out of a messuage, formerly called Mapee's, and the lands 
thereto belonging in this parish and httle Glemham, subsequently the 
property of George Bates, to the use and benefit of the poor inhabitants 
of Marlesford and those of most need. 

He claimed to be Viscount Hereford, and had that title allowed and 
confirmed to him as 5th Viscount, by Parliament 14th Sept. 1646. He 
lived at Marlesford Hall, a view of which is engraved in Davy's " Suffolk 
Seats." He married ist Ehzabeth, daughter and heir of Robert Bays- 
poole, of Aldeby, in Norfolk, by whom he had no issue ; by Ehzabeth 
his 2nd wife, the 2nd daughter of Thomas Knightly, of Borough Hall, in 
Staffordshire, he had issue five sons. Robert the eldest, with both his 
children, were drowned during his father's hfetime, and Leicester Devereux 
succeeded to the honour and estates upon the decease of his father as 6th 
Viscount Hereford. He died in 1676. 

This manor, however, does not seem to have passed to the 6th Viscount, 
but to have been sold by Sir Walter Devereux with all his estates here to 
one Barber, a portman of Ipswich. 

Barber, the purchaser, was succeeded in 1655 by his son and heir, 
John Barber, who married Alice, daughter of John Sicklemer, portman of 

' Fine, Easter, 7 Hen. VIII. ^ Fine, Trin. 29 Eliz. 

" See Manor of Hawstead, in Thingoe Hun- 
dred. 



312 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

Ipswich ; but by 1677 the manor seems to have passed to Simon Dove, 
of Barham. He married twice, and by his ist wife had three sons— Edmund 
Dove, who died before his father, Simon Dove, and the Rev. Fynn Dove. 
By his 2nd wife Ehzabeth, only daughter of John Haughfen, of Barham, 
and Ehzabeth his wife, daughter of Robert Fynn, of Barham, he had a 
son, Fynn Dove. On the death of Simon Dove the father before 1717, the 
manor apparently passed to his 2nd but eldest surviving son, Simon Dove, 
who died i6th Sept. 1759, at the age of 87, when his only son, Simon Dove, 
jun., of Stowmarket, having died 22nd Oct. 1757, in his father's hfetime, 
the manor went to Simon the elder's brother, the Rev. Fynn Dove, who 
died in 1770. The manor was then purchased' by John Thomas Sandys, 
probably in 1789, for we find it advertised for sale 25th Sept. 1784, and 
23rd Dec. 1786, also put up for sale by public auction in London, with two 
farms containing 228 acres, let at £271, 2nd April, 1788,* and again offered 
for sale at the White Hart, Wickham Market, 14th July, 1789.^ John 
Thomas Sandys died in 1793, after which the manor was purchased by 
William Shouldham about 1805. 

William Abraham Shouldham died at Marlesford Hall in 1845, aged 
102 years, and in 1885 Miss Shouldham was lady. 

The manor is now vested in the Schreiber family, and Captain Charles 
S. Schreiber resides at Marlesford Hall, a plain mansion of brick standing 
in a small park near the church. 

The manor is mentioned in the inquis. p.m. in 1302 of Henry de 
Bradenham.* 

A fine of the manors of Marlesford and Hanyngfeldys was levied in 
1541 by Henry Payne against Lady Anne Grey and others.^ 

Arms of Dove : Sa. a fesse dauncettee Erm. betw. 3 doves close, Arg. 
beaked and legged Gu. 



' In the Ipswich Journal, loth July, 1779, ^ Ipswich Journal, 9th Feb. 1788. 

is an advertisement for sale of 3 Ipswich Journal, 20th June, 1789. 

"Marlesford Hall and ii6a. 3r. * I.P.M., 30 Edw. I. 189. 

28p." 5 Fine, Trin. 33 Hen. VIII. 




MONEWDEN. 313 

MONEWDEN. 

|W0 manors were held here in Saxon times. The first was 
that of a freeman under commendation of Edric, and con- 
sisted of a carucate of land, 2 borders (increased to 3 when 
the Survey was taken), 2 ploughteams (which were reduced 
to I at that period), half a team belonging to the men, 3 acres 
of meadow, and 3 beasts (which had disappeared at the 
time of the Survey, but there were then an additional 6 
goats). The value was formerly 40s., and at the time of the Survey only 
30S., when the manor was held of Robert Malet by Humphrey. Under 
him a freeman had 5 acres valued at lod. The manor was a league long 
and 4 quarentenes broad, and paid in a gelt gd.^ 

The second manor was that of Ulmar, a freeman under the Abbot of 
Ely, and consisted of a carucate of land and 40 acres, 2 villeins which had 
disappeared at the time of the Survey, when there were 9 bordars, 2 plough- 
teams in demesne (reduced to i at the time of the Survey) and i belonging 
to the men. Also 3 acres of meadow, and when the Survey was taken 
2 beasts. The value was formerly 40s., but at the time of the Survey 30s. 
The Domesday tenant was Roger de Poictou. 

A holding in this place was that of 14 freemen and a half (at the time 
of the Survey 10) under Ulmar's commendation. It consisted of 84 acres, 
and 4 ploughteams (reduced to 2 at the time of the Survey). The value 
was formerly 20s., and at the time of the Survey only i6s. The Survey 
goes on to say : " The moiety of one of these Humfrey the Chamberlain (?) 
held ; but Ertald took it away from him." There was also a church 
with 30 acres and i-| acres of meadow, valued at 5s. The Domesday tenant 
was Roger de Poictou. He also possessed half an acre here with half an 
acre in Hartley, valued at 8d., formerly held by a freeman.'' 

Belonging to the Abbot of Ely was an estate of 18 acres, and in Chars- 
field another valued at 3s., formerly held by a freeman.^ 

There was an estate here of 5 acres and in Charsfield 3 acres valued at 
I2d., being the estate at the time of the Survey of the Countess of Albamarle.* 

Manor of Monewden with Sulyards. 

This was probably the holding of Humphrey under Robert Malet at 
the time of the Survey, though Page states that a moiety of this lordship 
was held of Framlingham Castle by knight's service and the other moiety 
of the Honor of Lancaster, by the same service, and that it was in the 
Conqueror's time the possession of Odo de Campania, ist Earl of Albemarle 
and Holderness, whose wife Matilda was half-sister by his mother to King 
WiUiam I.' 

The manor in the middle of the 13th century vested in the Weylands, 
and in 1259 seems to have been held by John Weyland, who had a grant of 
free warren here this year." 

Page says that near the church towards the north-west there was 
anciently a park, and in the reign of King Hen. HI. Henry de Mungehedon, 
who lived in the parish of Monewden, held land here of the above John de 

'Dom. ii. 3256- *^°^- iV. 431- ^ ^ 

''Dom. ii. 3476. 'Page, Hist, of SufE. p. 121. 

3Dom. ii. 3886. 'Chart. RoUs, 43 Hen. HI. 3. 

91 



314 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

Weyland by knight's service, which probably was this park, for that was not 
part of the demesne of the said manor. Jn 1263 WiUiam Weyland (not 
apparently a lord here) purchased the advowson of the parish church of 
John de Kettlebars to be held of the Manor of Kettlebars. 

This manor and the advowson, however, seems to have come into the 
same hand, and Thomas de Weyland, who was banished the country and 
died about 1290, held a moiety." 

We learn from the Patent Rolls, and also from the Rolls of Parliament, 
that a moiety of the manor was claimed as an escheat by reason of Thomas 
de Weyland having abjured the realm for felony," both by Edmund, the 
King's brother, as of the fee of Lancaster, and by Roger le Bigot, Earl of 
Norfolk, as held of him. A commission was issued to try this question.^ 
Roger le Bigot seems to have obtained a verdict in his favour by a packed 
jury, and on petition to Parliament by John le Weyland a new inquest 
was granted touching the question.'* We find that in 1291 by letters patent 
Roger Brabazun and John de Mettingham were appointed to hear the cause 
between the two claimants.' The affair was not concluded for some time, 
for in 1294 a new commission was issued to try the same point.® From the 
inquis. p.m. of Edmund, Earl of Lancaster, it would seem that the moiety 
was decided to have been held by Roger le Bigot of the Honor of 
Lancaster.' 

The whole manor appears a little later to have been vested in Sir John 
Ap Adams or Albadams. He certainly held in the early part of the 14th 
century. Sir John was succeeded by his son and heir, Thomas Ap- Adams, 
who presented to the living in 1322. 

Shortly after this Thomas Ap Adams, described in the Close Rolls in 
1326 as " Thomas Apadams, son and heir of Sir John Apadams," granted 
the manor with the advowson of the church to Lady Isabella de Hastings, 
late wife of Robert de Monte Hermerii.^ 

In 133 1 we find on the Patent Rolls a hcence to Thomas Ap Adam 
to grant to Thomas de Berkeleye and Margaret his wife and the heirs of the 
said Thomas, both the manor and the advowson, said to be held in chief.' 
Of course, only the reversion could have been dealt with, as Lady Isabella de 
Hastings was still living. This is clearly expressed in the fine which was 
levied the same year to effect the assurance, which was by the said Thomas 
de Berkeleye and Margaret his wife against the said Thomas Ap Adams." 
This was probably a purchase as trustees for the Hastings family, for on 
Isabella de Hastings's death in 1335," we find on the Close Rolls an order to 
the escheator not to intermeddle with this manor, as Isabella de Hastings 
held the same at her death, it being held of Thomas, Earl of Norfolk, 
by the service of a moiety of a knight's fee, and Hugh de Hastings, Isabella's 
son, was her next heir, and of full age." 

Sir Hugh Hastings was of Gressing Hall, Norfolk, and married Margery, 
daughter and heir of Sir Richard Foliot, and died 30th July, 1347, when 
the manor vested in his son and heir. Sir Hugh Hastings, of Fenwick, co. 
York, who married Anne, daughter of Sir Adam de Everingham, and 
died before 1386,'' when the manor passed to his widow Anne, who married 

'I.P.M., 18 Edw. I. 51. 7I.P.M., 25 Edw. I. 51. 

= See Manor of Brandeston, in this « Close Rolls, 19 Edw. II. 31*^. 

Hundred. 9 Pat. Rolls, 4 Edw. III. pt. i. 32. 

3 Pat. Rolls, 19 Edw. I. i2d. "Feet of Fines, 4 Edw. III. i. 

4 R.P. 1. 466. " I.P.M., 9 Edw. III. 44. 

5D.K.R., 31 App. p. 16. "Close Rolls, 9 Edw. III. 32. 

6 Pat. Rolls, 22 Edw. I. 23d. '3i.p.M., 10 Rich. II. ai. 



MONEWDEN. 315 

Thomas, Lord Morley, who in right of his wife presented to the Hving in 
1390 and 1412. The reversion in the manor devolved on her grandson, 
Hugh Hastings, son of Sir Hugh, who had married Anne, daughter of 
Edward, Lord Spencer, and died in Spain about 1370 in his father's hfe- 
time. Hugh Hastings, 4th of the name, married Constance, daughter of 
Sir Walter Blount, but died at Calais in 1396 without issue, when the 
reversion vested in his brother. Sir Edward Hastings. Anne, Lady Morley, 
died in 1428, and Sir Edward Hastings presented to the living in 1434. He 
married Margery, daughter of Sir John Denham, and died in 1437, when the 
manor passed to his son and heir, John Hastings. He presented to the 
living in 1465, and died in 1477,' when the manor passed to his eldest son 
by his 2nd wife Anne, daughter of Thomas, Lord Morley, Sir Hugh Hastings. 
He married Anne, daughter of Sir William Gascoigne, and presented to the 
living in 1488, in which year he died, being succeeded in the lordship by his 
son and heir. Sir George Hastings. Sir George married Anne, daughter and 
heir of Alexander Brabazon, and died in 1512, when the manor passed to 
his son and heir, John Hastings, who died without issue in 1514, the manor 
devolving on his brother and heir. Sir Hugh Hastings. He married 
Catherine, daughter of Robert Le Strange, of Hunstanton, and died in 
1540,^ when the manor devolved on his son and heir, John Hastings, who 
died without issue in 1542. 

The manor then seems to have devolved on John Hastings, of Kin- 
thorp, CO. Lincoln, who presented to the living in 1558, and was succeeded 
by John Hastings, of Christ Church, co. Southampton, who presented to 
the living in 1582. 

There are amongst the Chancery Proceedings in the reign of Queen 
Elizabeth three actions respecting copyholds of this manor, one by John 
Goldinge and the other two by Robert Stebbinge against John Hastings.^ 

By the end of Queen Elizabeth's reign we find the manor vested in 
William Reve, son of Thomas Reve, alderman of Colchester, who had died 
in 1550. He resided at the hall, and by Rose his wife, daughter of Thomas 
Armiger, of Canewdon, co. Essex, and widow of William Bishop, of Thistle- 
den Hall, in Burgh, had issue ten sons and five daughters. He died 27th 
Nov. 1567, and was buried in the parish church of Monewden, as was also 
Thomas his 4th son. Senior Fellow of Gonville and Caius College, Cam- 
bridge, who died 3rd Sept. 1595, in the 35th year of his age. William Reve 
was succeeded by his son and heir, George Reve, who married Anne, daughter 
of George Freake, of Wigton, co. Norfolk. In 1588 we meet with a fine of 
the manor by John Cordrey and others against Eustace Moone and others.* 

Though George Reve appears to have had two sons and two daughters- 
William, married to a daughter of one Payne, George, Rose, and Anne— and 
William was living in 1618, yet from George the father the manor appears 
to have passed to his brother Francis Reve, who resided at Hubbard's 
Hall, Harlow, Essex, and married Joan, daughter of Richard, son of Sir 
Richard Josselin, K.B., and we meet with a fine of it in 1597 levied by George 
Reve against him and others.^ 

'I.P.M., 17 Edw. IV. 43. "Fine, Mich. 30-31 Eliz. 

' Will 14th Dec.1540, proved 9th Feb. 1540-1 = Fine, Mich 39-40 Eliz. 
3C.P. Ser. ii. B. Ixxv. 15, B. clvii. 16, 
B. clxv. I. 



3i6 



THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 



Davy states the following were the successive lords, but if the dates are 
correct, and Lord Zouche held till 1625, it is difficult to see what estate Sir 
Henry Kingsmill held : — 

1624 Edward, Lord Zouch, died 1625. 
Sir Henry Kingsmill, died 1624. 

1640 Lionel Talmash. 

It is clear that in 1679 the manor was vested in Sir Philip Meadow 
and Dame Constance his wife, for by a conveyance dated 21st Nov. this 
year they sold to Tallemach Duke in fee for £8,400. The property con- 
veyed is described as " the Manor and scite of the Manor of Monewden 
cum Sulyards and Manor of Dodnash al. Dodnesh otherwise Dodnish." 
Davy says that in 1703 Philip Sidney, Earl of Leicester, in right of Anne 
his wife, daughter and coheir of Sir Robert Reeve, Bart., presented. This 
last statement, however, is of little help, as it is clear that before this time 
the advowson had become separated from the manor. 

The manor was later held by Richard, Lord Gorges, of the Kingdom of 
Ireland, who had the manor, the hall, and the demesne lands for life. In 
the library of St. John's College, Cambridge, is a roll of the free tenants, 
copyholders, and rental of the manor, which was this Lord Gorges's.' From 
this the manor seems to have passed to one Currie. This unfortunate 
gentleman was a lunatic, and his committee had a considerable accumulation 
of money in their hands from the rents of the estate. They laid out part of 
it in building farm-houses upon the property, and amongst others the present 
Monewden Hall, which is a large substantial farm-house of red brick, was 
erected. Admiral Kingsmill married a near relation of the lunatic, either 
an aunt or a sister, and with her had a large fortune. Mr. Currie's trustees 
sold the manor to William Adair," of Flixton, from whom it passed at his death 
under his will to his cousin and heir, Alexander Adair, and on his death in 1836 
passed to his cousin and heir, William Adair, who held in 1853. By 1885 
the manor had been acquired by Charles Austin, of Brandeston Hall, who 
is the present lord. Somewhat strangely, a house now called the Folly 
in Monewden is enclosed in what appears to be a circular moat, and raised 
considerably above the surrounding lands •, it stands in a commanding 
situation, and was the seat of the Rivetts before they went to reside at 
Brandeston. 

Arms of Reve : Gules ; a chevron, wavy, between three roses Argent. 



'Camb. St. John's Coll. s. 40. 



^ See Mendhaih Priory, in Hoxne Hundred. 




RENDLESHAM. 317 

RENDLESHAM. 

|HREE manors were held here in Saxon times. The first was 
by Ulchetal under commendation to Edric of Laxfield. It 
consisted of a carucate of land, 7 villeins, 3 bordars, 2 plough- 
teams in demesne and i belonging to the men (reduced to 
half a team when the Survey was taken). Also 4 acres of 
meadow, a mill, 2 rouncies (which had disappeared at the 
time of the Survey, when there were 2 beasts), also 26 hogs 
(reduced to 8 at the time of the Survey), and 36 sheep (reduced to 10 at that 
time). The value was 40s. At the time of the Survey this manor was 
held by Gilbert de Colville of Robert Malet. 

In the same township was a holding of nine freemen under commenda- 
tion of Edric. It consisted of 30 acres of land, 2 ploughteams (reduced to 
I when the Survey was taken), and 2 acres of meadow, valued at 55. At 
the time of the Survey this was also the estate of Robert Malet.' 

The second manor was that of a freeman under commendation half to 
Edric of Laxfield, thereof was William Malet seised on the day of his death, 
and half to Edric the Grim. It consisted of 34 acres, 2 bordars, an acre of 
meadow, and a ploughteam. The Domesday tenant was Earl Alan." 

. The \ bird manor was that of Godgeva, a f reewoman under commenda- 
tion, half of the Abbot of Ely and half of Edric of Laxfield. It consisted 
of 60 acres, 2 ploughteams (reduced to i at the time of the Survey), 2 acres 
of meadow, and a villein, valued at 20s. And a freeman and a half held 
10 acres and half a ploughteam, under commendation of Godgeva, included 
in the same valuation. At the time of the Survey Bernard D'Alencon 
held this manor of Hervey de Berri. William Malet was seised on the day 
he died. It was a league long and half a league broad, and paid in a gelt 
14^.^ 

Another estate was that of five whole and seven half freemen under 
commendation to Edric the Grim. It consisted of 50 acres, a bordar, 2 
ploughteams (reduced to i at the time of the Survey), and 2 acres of meadow. 
At the time of the Survey this was the estate of Earl Alan." 

Another holding in this place was that of four half freemen under 
Eric's commendation. It consisted of 33 acres, a bordar, and a plough- 
team (reduced to half a team at the time of the Survey), and half an acre 
of meadow. Two freemen under them had 2 acres ; and they were 
included in the valuation of Bennington. The Domesday tenant was 
Robert Malet. 

Robert Malet also held here a freeman and had two other estates in 
this place. The first was held of him by Gilbert de Wishant, and was 
formerly held by a freeman under Edric's commendation. It consisted of 
30 acres, a villein, a bordar, and a ploughteam, valued at 5s. Also a church 
with 20 acres valued at /\od. 

The second was formerly held by a freeman under Edric's commen- 
dation, and consisted of 12 acres and half a ploughteam, valued at 2s.= 

Another holding here was that of Roger Bigot at the time of the Survey 
and formerly that of a freeman under Edric's commendation. It consisted 
of 18 acres of land and a bordar, valued at 2s. M.^ ^ 



'Dom. 11.2936. "Dom. u. 2936. 

'Dom. 11. 293ft. =Dom. u. 326, 3266. 

3Dom. 11. 4436. *Dom. 11. 393J. 



3i8 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

The last holding mentioned was that of a half freeman with 6 acres 
valued at I2d., at the time of the Survey being the estate of the Abbot of 
Ely.' 

Manor of Naunton Hall. 

There are four manors in Rendlesham, namely : i, Naunton Hall'; 
2, Colviles ; 3, Bavent's ; and 4, Caketon's. 

Naunton Hall Manor was the estate of Godgeva, a freewoman under 
the protection of Edric of Laxfield in the time of Edward the Confessor, 
and was held by Bernard D'Alencon of Hervey de Berri. The ancient 
family of Naunton settled in the parish of Rendlesham not long after the 
Conquest, and gave the name to this manor. In the time of Hen. HI. 
Henry de Naunton married Emma, daughter of — Tye or Tay, and by her had 
issue two sons, Hugo and Richard ; the former resided in Rendlesham in 
the time of Edw. I. He had a grant of free warren in 1308,' and married 
Eleanor, daughter of Robert de Vere, Earl of Oxford, by whom he had 
issue Hugo de Naunton, from whom descended the Letheringham branch, 
$ir Bartholomew Naunton and Sir Thomas de Naunton, Knt., who settled 
at Rougham, near Bury St. Edmunds. Sir Bartholomew Naunton, the 
2nd son, resided at Naunton Hall, dying about 1374. He married Joan, 
daughter and coheir of Sir John Argentein, by whom he had issue an only 
daughter and heir Margaret, who married Robert Bokerton or Bokenham, 
and subsequently married Sir Robert Fitz- Ralph, Knt. Margaret's only 
daughter, named Margaret, married Bartholomew Bacon, whose only 
daughter Margaret married Robert Fitz-Ralph, who was lord in 1428, 
and living in 1461, and on his death the manor apparently passed to 
his two daughters and coheirs — Elizabeth, married to John Alec, 
and Cecily, married to Christopher Harman. This Christopher Harman 
was the son of Reginald Harman, of Tunstall, and occupied Naunton Hall, 
and on Christopher's death the manor (for he seems to have acquired the 
whole) passed to his son and heir, John Harman. 

John Harman sold off parts of the demesne, as we gather from a deed 
in 1532, still preserved in private hands, of which the following is a trans- 
lation : "To all the faithful in Christ to whom this present writing shall 
come John Boon greeting. Know ye I the said John give grant and by 
this present deed confirm to Thomas Heyward of Ipswich and William 
Boyston a certain piece of pasture or marsh called Buries ffen parcel of the 
Manor of Naunton Hall with its appurtenances lying and being in the village 
of Rendlesham as by metes and bounds enclosed and lies between the 
lands of the Prior of the Blessed Mary of Butley called Staverton park on 
the south part and lands of Thomas Alverd and John Harman Esquire on 
the north part and one part thereof abutts upon the lands of John Jaye 
on the east part, and containing by estimation thirty acres more or less 
which portion of pasture or marsh with its appurtenances were formerly 
purchased of the said John Harman as appears by a certain indenture made 
between the said John Boon on the one part and the said John Harman 
on the other part which bears date the loth day of November in the 23 
year of the reign of King Henry viiith and as in the same indenture more 
fully appears. To have and to hold the said piece of pasture or marsh with 
its appurtenances unto the said Thomas and William their heirs and assigns 
to the use and behoof pf the said John Boon his heirs and assigns of the 

'Dom. ii. 3886. = Chart. RoUs, 2 Edw. II. 35. 



RENDLESHAM. 319 

chief lords of the fee by the summe then due and of right accustomed for 
ever by these presents. In Witness whereof to this present deed I have 
athxed my seal. Given at Rendlesham aforesaid the sixteenth day of 
August in the year of the reign of King Henry the viii. after the Conquest 
twenty fourth. ^ 

The manor itself John Harman by deed of bargain and sale in i-^^a 
conveyed with Caketon's to James Spencer, his brother-in-law, husband of 
his sister Elizabeth and his heirs, who made Naunton Hall his seat. There 
cu ^ J 1 ® relating to this and Caketon Manor in 1559 levied by Leonard 
bhardelowe against the said James Spencer,' and three years later a like 
hne levied by Richard Brend and others against the said James Spencer 
and others." James Spencer died in 1567 seised of the manor, which 
passed to his son and heir by his ist wife, EHzabeth Andrews, of Stowmarket 
Leonard Spencer. He married 1st Agnes, daughter of John Bokeswell' 
of Bokeswell, Norfolk, and 2ndly Anne, sister to Sir Henry Lee and widow 
2j — Read, and died in 1600, when the manor vested in his son and heir 
Robert, who married ist Ehzabeth, eldest daughter of Henry Wingfield 
of Cransfield, and 2ndly Elizabeth, daughter of Robert Reynolds, of Ashj 
and a fine was levied of the manor in 1601 by Henry Williams and others 
against W. Sutton and others.^ 

On the death of Robert Spencer in 1633 the manor passed to his son 
and heir, Edward Spencer, who married Judith, daughter of John Scrivener, 
of Sibton, and died in 1670, when the manor passed to his son and heir] 
John Spencer. He married ist Anne, daughter of John Rivett, of 
Brandeston, and 2ndly Elizabeth, daughter of Frederic Scot, of Campsey 
Ash, widow of. John Brand, of Edwardstone, and died in 1709, aged 76, 
when the manor devolved on his son and heir, Edward Spencer, who married 
Anne, only daughter of William Baker, of Layham, and died 25th March, 
1728,* leaving two daughters only, Anne and Elizabeth, and this manor 
passed to Anne, who married ist in July, 1737, James, 5th Duke of 
Hamilton, and 2ndly the Hon. Richard Savage Nassau, 2nd son of Frederick, 
3rd Earl of Rochford. 

The Duchess died in 1771, when the manor went to her 2nd son, Lord 
Archibald Hamilton, afterwards 9th Duke of Hamilton, who sold it 15th 
June, 1786, to Sir George Wombwell, Bart., who sold it for £51,400 to Peter 
Isaac Thellusson, of Broadsworth, co. York, eldest son of Peter Thellusson, 
a merchant of London, by Anne, daughter of Matthew Woodford, of Carleby, 
CO. Lincoln, and sister of Sir Ralph Woodford, ist Bart. The purchase 
included the manors of Bavents and Colville's, Butley, and Tongham. 
The quit rents and fines on an average of the previous 20 years amounted 
to £44. I2S. yd.^ 

Thellusson's immense fortune was tied up by limitations with the 
object of effecting accumulations of income to such an extent that an Act 
of Parliament,* was subsequently passed to interdict in future accumu- 
lations beyond the period of 21 years from the testator's decease. He had 
directed land of the annual value of ;t4,5oo and a sum of ;^6oo,ooo to be 
accumulated during the lives of his sons and of their sons (living at the time 
of his death) for the benefit of the eldest male descendant of each of his 

'Fine, HO. i Eliz. ^Ipswich Journal, 27th May, 1786, 24th 
"Fine, Trin. 4 Eliz. June, 1786. 

3 Fine, Easter, 43 Eliz. * 39 arid 40 Geo. Ill, 
*WiIl 24th Jan. 1726. 



320 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

sons. The limitation as the law then stood was perfectly good, and the Will 
was confirmed by the House of Lords 25th June, 1805. 

Peter Isaac Thellusson was elevated to the peerage of Ireland ist Feb. 
1806, as Baron Rendlesham, of Rendlesham, and 14th June, 1783, he married 
Elizabeth Eleanor, 3rd daughter of John Cornwallis, of Hendon, m 
Middlesex, and dying suddenly on a shooting party at Gosfield with 
Louis XVIII. of France, when he fell from his horse and expired i6th 
September, 1808,' the manor passed to his eldest son, John Thellusson, 
2nd Baron, who married ist in 1809 Mary Andalusia, 2nd daughter of 
Lieut .-General Samuel Trevoi Dickins, by whom he had no issue, and 
2ndly in 1816 Ann Sophia, 2nd daughter and coheir of Wilham Tatnall, 
of Leiston Old Abbey, by whom he had a daughter only, and dying 3rd 
July, 1832,' the manor passed to his brother, William Thellusson, 3rd Baron 
Rendlesham, in Holy Orders, who married in 1826 Lucy, daughter of Edw. 
Roger Pratt, of Royston Hall, in Norfolk, but had no issue, and dying 




Rendlesham Hall. 



13th September, 1839,' the manor passed to his brother, Frederick 
Thellusson, 4th Baron Rendlesham, who in 1838 married Eliza Charlotte, 
eldest daughter of Sir George Beeston Prescott, 2nd Bart., and widow of 
James DuS, and dying 6th April, 1852,* the manor passed to his son and 
heir, the present Lord Frederick William Brook Thellusson, 5th Baron 
Rendlesham, who was High Sheriff of Suffolk in 1870, M.P. for East Suffolk 
1874-85. He married in 1861 Egidia Montgomerie, eldest daughter of 
Archibald William, 13th Earl of Eylington and Winton, K.T. 

The noble mansion known as Rendlesham House was entirely destroyed 
by fire in February, 1830. The fire originated in the conservatory, which 
was warmed by flues passing under a suite of rooms. The damage was 
estimated at £100,000, and no part of the property was insured. 

Arms of Naunton : Sable, three martlets Argent. Of Harman : 
Azure, a chevron between six rams, accroosted, counter lopping, Argent, 



■ Will 1808, proved 1811. 
' WiU proved Nov. 1832. 



3 Will proved Nov. 1839. 
t Will proved May, 1852. 



RENDLESHAM. 321 

2, 2, and 2. Of Spencer : Quarterly, Argent and Gules ; on the 2nd and 
3rd a fret. Or ; over all a bend, Sable, three mullets of the first within a 
bordure, counterchanged. Of Rendlesham : Gules ; three bucks' heads 
cabossed, Argent ; attired. Or. 

Manor of Colvile's. 

This was the estate of Ulchetel under the protection of Edric of Lax- 
field in King Edward the Confessor's day, and of Gislebert de Colevilla 
under Robert Malet, the Domesday tenant in the time of WiUiam the 
Conqueror. 

In 1204 we find William de Colvile recovering 40 acres of land here 
against Robert de Colvile. In 1262 the manor was held by Ernald de 
Colvile and Joan his wife, and was acquired with the advowson from them 
or rather from Ernald de Colevile alone, by Richard, son of William de 
Holbeck, in 1260.' It was also held by Richard de Holbroke, who died 
in 1290, when the manor vested in Sir John de Holbroke, and in 1304 he 
presented to the living, which was at that time and indeed until the time. of 
J as. I. appendant to this manor. 

The manor passed, as did the Manor of Broke Hall, in Nacton, in 
Colrieis Hundred,"" from Sir John de Holbroke in 1306 to his widow Ahcia, 
who presented this year. She died in 1309, and we find the presentation 
in 13 1 2 to the living made by his son, Sir John de Holbroke. He died in 
1316, and in 1330 Margaret his widow claimed a moiety of the manor in 
dower, and subject to her interest the manor passed to Sir Thomas de Hol- 
broke, son and heir of Sir John. He is mentioned on the Patent Rolls in 
1336 in connection with Rendlesham,^ and presented to the living in 1332. 
He levied a fine of the manor in 1353 against John Caperon, parson of 
Tattingstone church, and Henry White, of Tattingstone,* and died in 1360,' 
when the manor passed to his son and heir. Sir John de Holbroke, who 
married Matilda, daughter of Sir Robert Bourdrill (?), and died in 1375.^ 
In the inquis. p.m. of this John Holbroke, the manor is said to have been 
held as of Haughley Honor by the service of los. to the Castle of Dover. 
The manor seems to have devolved upon his two daughters and coheirs — 
Margery, married to John, son of Hugh Fastolf, and Elizabeth, married to 
Robert Fitz-Ralph. 

The manor was like the Manor of Broke Hall, Nacton, in Colneis 
Hundred, allotted to Margery, for we find Sir John Fastolf, her husband, 
after her death, which occurred nth July, 1387, holding until his death in 
1406,'' and from this time to the time of George Fastolf the manor devolved 
in the same course as the Manor of Broke Hall, Nacton, in Colneis Hundred. 
It is specifically mentioned in the inquis. p.m. of Matilda in 1437,^ of Sir 
John Fastolf in 1445,^ and of John Fastolf in 1506.'" 

In 15 10 a fine was levied of the manor by Thomas Russhe and others 
against George Fastolf," and in 1512 another fine was levied of the manor 
by Richard Lloyd and others against "George Fastolf, son of John 

'Feetof Fines, 44Hen. III. 91. n.VM., 50 Edw. III. 31; wiU I375> 
" See Manor of Holbrook, in Samford Hun- proved 6th Dec. 1375. 

dred. "I-P-M., 7 Hen. IV. 34- 

3 Pat. RoUs, 9 Edw. III. pt. ii. 13. "I.P.M., 15 Hen. VI. 37- 

* Feet of Fines, 27 Edw. III. 10. ^LRM., 26 Hen. VI 15. 

= I.P.M.. 34 Edw. III. 75. :: i-p-M-.fl ^.^?i5U?- 



'« Fine, Mich. 2 Hen. VIII. 



RI 



322 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

Fastolf." This latter included lands in Rendlesham, Eyke, Wantisden, 
and other places, and the advowson of the church of Rendlesham.' 

About 1543 the manor vested in Thomas Howard, Duke of Norfolk, 
who presented to the living in 1558, as did Philip, Earl of Arundel, in 1584. 
The manor but not the advowson was acquired by John Lane, jun., of 
Thomas, Duke of Norfolk, in 1557.* John Lane married Margaret Castle, 
and died in 1560, when the manor passed to his son and heir, John Lane, 
who married 23rd Sept. 1577, Dorothy, daughter of Thomas Fastolf, of 
Pettaugh, and was buried at Ash, 24th Dec. 1625, when the manor passed 
to his son, Robert Lane, who married the daughter and heir of — Futter, 
of Runcton, Norfolk, and died 1644, being buried at Ash the 30th June. 
The manor passed to his son, Robert Lane, who married Anne or Lucy, 
daughter of Allen Corrance, of London, merchant, and sold the manor to 
his brother-in-law, John Corrance, M.P. for Aldborough. From the 
Exchequer Depositions taken at Woodbridge in 1665 we learn that there 
was an action by Francis Burwell and others against this John Corrance 
involving the estate, goods, will, &c., of this Robert Lane, including the 
Manors of Colvile and Bavents in Rendlesham.^ 

John Corrance was succeeded by his son and heir, John Corrance,* 
but Page, following Davy, says the manor went subsequently to WiUiam 
Long, of Dunston, near Norwich, who married a daughter and coheiress 
of that house. Subsequently the manor came to Edward Spencer, whose 
daughter and heir Anne married James, 5th Duke of Hamilton, from which 
time the manor has devolved in the same course as Naunton Hall Manor, 
in Rendlesham, and is now vested in Lord Rendlesham. 

Davy has a note 20th March, 1824 : " I was this day informed by Mr. 
Thomas Steming, who occupies the farm a short distance to the N.W. of 
the Church that his house was the Manor house of Naunton Hall, and that 
the Courts have there been held as long as he can remember. It is more 
probable, however, that this is the site of the Manor of Colvilles, and that 
of Naunton Hall, if not situated on the spot where Rendlesham House 
now stands, was at the farm now occupied by Adams. This house has the 
appearance of antiquity about it, and Mr. Steming told me that tradition 
assigned this as the residence at a distant period, of a King, and that when 
he lived there himself, as I understood him, several vaults and subterranean 
buildings were discovered about the premises. He also told me that the 
space between this house and the Church and Parsonage was not long ago 
an open green, and was about four years ago inclosed, and that in making 
the fences of the inclosures a large quantity of bones had been found in 
different places. I must make some further inquiries as to the correctness 
of this information." 

Arms of Corrance : On a chevron Sable betw. 3 ravens ppr. as many 
leopards' heads. Or. 

Manor of Bavents or Bavents Hall. 

This manor appears to have been held of Colvile's. It was the estate 
of Adam de Bavent in 1212. A little later it passed to Robert de Rendenhale, 
rector of Eyke, for on founding a chantry there in 1355 he gave to it this 
manor of Bavent's Hall.' 

'£P®' I™- 4 Hen. VIII. 4 See Manor of Parham, in Plomesgate 

'|;>ne.Trin. sMary. Hundred. 

3Exch. Dep. 16 Chas. II. at Woodbridge. 5 i.p.M., 28 Edw. III. (2nd Nos.) 34. 



RENDLESHAM. 323 

On the suppression of the chantries it passed to the Crown, and was 
granted to Thomas Alverd, of Ipswich, against whom a fine was levied by 
Sir Thomas Russhe in 1533.' Thomas Alverd, however, died seised,' 
the 12th Feb. 1534-5- He appears to have had but a hmited grant, possibly 
to his heirs male, and he left daughters only. Amongst the Chancery 
Proceedings we find a claim by John Lutton, as heir, against Thomas Bam- 
burghe and another as to manors and tenements called Randleshams, Staver- 
ton Hall, and Sheringhams, containing 400 acres in Rendlesham, Eyke, Wan- 
nesden, Ufford, Lowdham, and Pistre " the inheritance of Thomas Alwarde, 
father of Margaret, plaintiff's mother."^ Thomas Alward, or Alverd, must 
therefore have left at least three daughters and coheirs,* for one Elizabeth 
married William Bamburgh, who inherited an estate in Rendlesham, in 
right of his wife, which subsequently passed to Head, Alexander and Holdish. 
In any case we find the manor granted in 1549 to Michael Stanhope and 
John Belhowe. Davy enters William Lutton who died in 1577 ^^ lord. 
Later we find it vested in John Lane, junior, and John Lane, senior, who 
had Ucence to alienate it in 1608 to Thomas Shance and John Herbert, 
probably by way of settlement only, for the following year we find John 
Lane, junior, lord, and from his death in 1625 the manor has passed in the 
same course as the Manor of Colvile's, in Rendlesham. 

We meet with a fine of " Baventeshalle Manor " levied in 1355 by 
Gilbert de Debenham and John de Lakyngheth against Sir John de 
Furneaux, Knt., sen., which William Neweman held for life, and this may 
relate to this manor.^ 

Manor of Caketon's. 

A Richard Caketon, of Rendlesham, is mentioned on the Patent Rolls, 
in 1345.® This manor was in the time of King Hen. VIII. vested in Chris- 
topher Harman, son of Reginald Harman, of Tunstall, and passed to his son 
and heir, John Harman, who sold it to his brother-in-law, James Spencer, 
in 1552, from which time this manor has descended in the same course as 
the manor of Naunton Hall, in Rendlesham, and is now vested in -Lord 
Rendlesham. 

A fine, probably connected with the last-mentioned sale, was levied in 
1553 by Edward Feevre against the said John Harman.' 

There are three fines in which " Rendlesham Manor " is included, 
but which Manor of Rendlesham we are unable to say. The first was levied 
in 1549 by Richard Alexander against William Lutton and others of a 
moiety ;' the second was levied in 1552 by Anthony Aldbroughe against 
the said Richard Alexander alias Milward f and the third was levied in 
1587 by John Eyston and others against Margaret Alexander, widow, and 
others." 



' Fine, Mich. 25 Hen. VIII. = Feet of Fines, 29 Edw. III. 3. 

'I.P.M.. Ipswich, loth July, 35 Hen. VIII. «Pat. RoUs, 16 Edw. III. pt. i. 11. 

[j^A^l. ^Fine, Mich. 6 Edw. VI. 

3 C P ii 156. ^ Fi"6' Easter, 3 Edw. VI. 

4 See' Manor' of Pistries, in Sutton, in 'Fine, Mich. 6 Edw. VI. 

Wilford Hundred. '"Fine, Hil. 29 Eliz. 




324 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

WOODBRIDGE. 

fHERE was no manor in this place at the time of the Domesday 
Survey, but several holdings. One was that of three freemen 
by commendation to Edric, and consisted of ii acres included 
in the above valuation (?) (whole of the manor). The 
Domesday tenant was Earl Alan.' 

Another estate was that of a freeman under commenda- 
tion to Robert Malet's predecessor, and consisted of 20J acres 
and half a ploughteam, valued at 5s. 8d., held at the time of the Survey 
by Humphrey of Robert Malet. 

Robert Malet had two other holdings here. The first was formerly 
that of two freemen, and consisted of 43 acres, and a socman with 8 acres, 
all formerly under Edric' s commendation. There was also a ploughteam 
and an acre of meadow, valued at 8s. It was 10 quarentenes long and 5 
broad, and paid in a gelt iid. 

Also a church with 19 acres valued at 2s. The second consisted of 
2 acres belonging to the demesne of HoUesley .'^ 

Another holding here was that of a freeman under Aluric's commen- 
dation, and consisted of 4 acres valued at 8d., held at the time of the Survey 
by William de Nemours, of Roger Bigot. ^ 

Another estate was that of 16 freemen under commendation of the 
Abbot of Ely. It consisted of a carucate of land, 2 acres, 2 bordars, 3 
ploughteams (reduced to 2 at the time of the Survey), and ^ acre of meadow, 
valued at 24s., which value was reduced to 20s. at the time oi the Survey. 

In the same township were 10 acres in demesne. These holdings were 
those of Roger de Poictou at the time of the Survey.* 

Among the lands of the Abbot of Ely were three holdings in this place. 
The first was that of seven freemen in the Confessor's time (reduced to two 
under commendation of the Abbot of Ely at the time of the Survey), having 
40 acres and a ploughteam, valued formerly at 6s., and at the time of the 
Survey at 5s. The second estate was that of a freeman with 16J acres 
and half a ploughteam valued at 5s. At the time of the Survey Robert 
Malet held this. The third holding was that of 2 bordars, and consisted of 

10 acres valued at 2s.' 

Another estate in this place was that of two freemen under com- 
mendation of Haldein, and consisted of 33 acres, half a ploughteam, and 
a bordar, valued at 3s. At the time of the Survey William [a Boville], 
son of Sahala, held this of Geoffrey de Magnaville.^ 

Among the lands of Roger de Rheims or Raimes was an estate of 

11 acres and half an acre of meadow, valued at 2yd., formerly that of a 
freeman under commendation of Alwin.' 

Manor of Woodbridge late Priory or Woodbridge-Hasketon. 

Ernald Rufus or Rous founded the priory which stood on the south 
side of the church. It was probably founded about 1193, and was of t