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Full text of "Documentary journal of Indiana 1873"

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ANNUAL REPORTS 



OFFICERS OF STATE 



THE STATE OF INDIANA 



AND OF THE 



TRUSTEES AND SUPERINTENDENTS 



OF THE SEVERAL 



IMOLiUEFiiilOfilliiOmiOMl 



INSTITUTIONS THEREOF, 



KEQUIRED BY LAW TO BE MADE 



TO THE GOVERNOR, 



YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1873. 



B-z- .A.TJa?I^:oI^IT:^. 



INDIANAPOLIS : 

SENTINEL COMPANY, PEINTEKS, 
1874. 



PRKFACE 



THE^STATE OF INDIANA, 

Executive Department, 

Indianapolis, April 1, 1874. 

In accordance with the provisions of an act entitled " An Act to 
provide for annual reports of State officers, branches of the State 
bank and benevolent institutions to be made to the Governor/' 
approved February 3, 1853, and sundry provisions of statutes then 
in force and enacted subsequently thereto upon the same subject, 
the several administrative officers of State, and the Trustees and 
Superintendents of the Benevolent, Reformatory and Educational 
Institutions thereof have submitted to the Governor and filed in 
this Department the reports required of them for the fiscal year 
ending October 31, 1873, and the calendar year ending December 
31, 1873, respectively, and they have been entered of record, at 
length, in the order of their reception. 

By virtue of the further provisions of the act above cited, and of 
the act entitled "An Act to prevent unauthorized printing at the 
expense of the State," approved December 20, 1865, the Governor, 
with the approval of the Secretary of State, has caused the several 
reports to be printed in a style corresponding with the established 
precedents. A sufficient number of each report have been bound 
separately and delivered to the responsible officer, or superintendent 
of the institution, making the same, for distribution by him in the 
manner best calculated to convey the information to the people of 
the State. The remaining twelve hundred copies are now bound in 
the form of this volume and issued to the officers and persons desig- 
nated by law to receive them. 

The reports appear in the following order : 

1. Annual Report of Hon. W. \Y. Curry, Secretary of State, 
for the year ending October 31, 1873, containing a statement of the 
public acts of this department ; a report of public printing executed 
under his authority ; a review of the work of official boards for 
which he acted as Secretary ; and suggestions as to a reorganization 



3 

of his office. Appended thereto are : The constitution cf the State 
as amended ; Indiana Official Register ; Justices of the Peace, 
Notaries Public, Commissioners to the Vienna Exposition, and Com- 
missioners of Deeds to whom commissions have issued during the 
year ; Congressional Districts ; Senatorial and Representative appor- 
tionments ; Governor's Proclamations issued ; List of Fines and 
Forfeitures ; Schedule of Railroad Corporations ; and Articles of 
Association filed. Received November 13, 1873. 132 pages. 

2. Annual Report of Hon. James A. Wildman, Auditor of State, 
showing the receipts and disbursements of the Treasury Department 
during the fiscal year ending October 31, 1873. Received November 
19, 1873. 202 pages. 

3. Annual Report of Hon. John B. Glover, Treasurer of State, 
showing the receipts and disbursements of the Treasury Department 
for the fiscal year ending October 31, 1873. Received November 
8, 1873. 16 pages. 

4. Annual Report of Hon. James C. Denny, Attorney General, 
for the period beginning November 6, 1872, and ending December 
31, 1873, showing the transactions of his office and containing the 
most important of the opinions given during that time. Received 
January 29, 1874. 50 pages. 

5. Annual Report of Hon. Milton B. Hopkins, Superintendent 
of Public Instruction, for the year ending December 31, 1873. 
Received January 23, 1874. 10 pages. 

6. Annual Report of Hon. W. W. Conner, Adjutant General, 
for the year ending December 31, 1873. Received February 23, 

1874. 4 pages. 

7. Annual Report of the Board of Trustees of the Vincennes 
University, for the year ending December 31, 1873. Received 
February 2, 1874. 8 pages. 

8. Annual Report of the Directors and Officers of the Indiana 
State Prison South, for the year ending December 15, 1873. 
Received January 2, 1874. 48 pages. 

9. Annual Report of the Directors and Officers of the Indiana 
State Prison North, for the year ending December 15, 1873. 
Received January 9, 1874, 62 pages. 



10. Second Report of the Indiana Reformatory Institution for 
Women and Girls, being for the period beginning January 18, 1871, 
and ending December 31, 1873, inchiding the first report of the 
Board of Visitors. Received January 1, 1874. 28 pages. 

11. Annual Report of the Commissioners and Officers of the 
Indiana House of Refuge for the year ending December 31, 1873. 
Received January 8, 1874. 64 pages. 

12. Twenty-Fifth Annual Report of the Indiana Hospital for 
the Insane for the year ending October 31, 1873. Received 
November 26, 1873. 40 pages. 

13. Thirtieth Annual Report of the Trustees and Superintend- 
ent of the Indiana Institution for Educating the Deaf and Dumb.. 
Received November 20, 1873. 38 pages. 

14. Twenty-seventh Annual Report of the Trustees and Super- 
intendent of the Indiana Institute for Educating the Blind. Re- 
ceived December 10, 1873. 26 pages. 

15. Annual Report of the Board of Trustees of the Indiana- 
Soldiers' Orphans' Home for the year ending October 31, 1873o 
Received March 13, 1874. 18 pages. 

16. Annual Report of the Trustees and Officers of the Wabash 
and Erie Canal for the year ending December 31, 1873. Received 
March 27, 1874. 12 pages. 

The original manuscripts of the reports have been deposited in the 
office of the Secretary of State. 

SAMUEL R. DOWNEY, 

Private Secretary^ 



ANNUAL REPORT 



I 



OF THE 



SECRETARY OF STATE 



OF 



THE STATE OF INDIANA, 



FOR 



THE YEAR ENDING OCTOBER 31, 1873. 



TO THE c3-0'V"E:E^asroi^. 



INDIANAPOLIS : 

SENTINEL COMPANY, PRINTERS. 
1873. 

Doc. J.— S. S. R.— 1 



ANNUAL REPORT 

SECRETARY OF STATE. 



Indianapolis, Ind., Nov. 1, 1873. 
Hon. Thomas A. Hendeicks, Governor of Indiana : 

Sir — In accordance with the provisions of law, I have the honor 
to submit the following report of the business of this office. 

general work. 

The appended tables will give a view of the routine work, and 
furnish information concerning the official force in the' discharge of 
public duties. There have been issued from the Executive Depart- 
ment, during the year, and attested and registered in this office, 
eight proclamations, one hundred and seventy commissions to State, 
county and district officers, eight hundred and eleven commissions 
to justices of the peace, fifty-seven to commissioners of deeds, eight 
hundred and sixty-seven to notaries public. There have also been 
issued thirty-five warrants and fifty-eight requisitions for fugitives 
from justice, sixty-three pardons, twenty-one remissions, and sev- 
enty-seven patents for land. There have been filed in this office 
one hundred and fifty articles of incorporation and amendments and 
consolidations, and also a great variety of miscellaneous papers. 

The Attorney General has filed in this office a report showing 
eighty-two counties have reported to him an entry of fines to the 
amount of $18,812.59, and of forfeitures of $25,345. 



LAWS AND JOURNALS. 

The acts of the special session of 1872 were printed by the State 
Printer on paper furnished by this office on his requisition, and 
delivered in sheets. Those of the regular session of this year were 
printed by the Indianapolis Journal Company, and the two sessions 
were bound. in one volume. The Journals of the special session were 
printed and bound in the same way. Those of the regular session 
are not yet printed, notwithstanding I have urged all possible haste. 
The Acts, completed Journals, and a large amount of other docu- 
ments, including four volumes of Supreme Court Reports, have 
been distributed according to law ; the remaining Journals, Brevier 
Reports and other documents will be sent out as soon as practicable. 

PUBLIC PRINTING. 

The larger part of the State Printing for the fiscal year M^as done 
by the State Printer, as will be seen from the Auditor's report. 
AVhen that office was abolished by the General Assembly and all the 
proposed bills for the regulation of that important branch of the 
public service failed to become lav/, it was left to the chance of sun- 
dry statutes, each of which had but a special purpose. But, as most 
of them devolved the control of the printing on the Governor, or 
the Secretary, or the two combined, sufficient authority was found ; 
and under the joint action of the two officers all needed printing has 
been done, and in all important cases by competitive bids. The result 
has been, favorable contracts with different parties, and good and 
prompt work, in most cases. But while due care has been used, to 
avoid unnecessary expense, the cost of printing has been large. 
The truth is, that Indiana is a great and growing State, and her public 
service demands a large and increasing line of expenditure in this 
direction. While all waste is to be avoided, the State can not afford 
to be parsimonious in furnishing the people with information of the 
doings of their public servants, as sliown in published acts, reports 
and documents. 

OFFICIAL BOARDS. 

The General Assembly has from time to time devolved on certain 
of the State Officers special duties for their joint action ; but the 
last General Assembly was especially liberal in this regard. So 



numerous are the official boards thus created, that the present offi- 
cers have felt it to be desirable to make regular and permanent 
records of their meetings, which has been done by the Secretary of 
State, except where otherwise provided by laws. The most import- 
ant of these Boards have been : 

1. That for the redemption of the old Internal Improvement 
Bonds. This Board has met frequently, examined, allowed and 
paid bonds and coupons, amounting in the aggregate, with interest 
and all other expenses, to $439,263.07. The duties devolved on 
this Board were iound to be very grave, and to involve the deter- 
mination of many important legal questions, as well as questions of 
fact, and important calculations. 

2. That for Equalization of County Assessments for Taxation, 
and the Assessments of Railroads and other corporations. The 
minutt^s of this Board are, by law, kept in the office of the Auditor 
of State ; and from the report of that officer will be seen the extent 
and gravity of its labors. 

3. That for the erection of a permanent fence around the 
Tippecanoe Battle Ground. After inspecting the grounds in person, 
advertisements for proposals for an iron fence were published. 
From a large number of plans and bids, those of Mr. Thomas 
Harding, of Lafayette, were chosen, and a contract entered into. 
The work on this fence is well advanced, and when completed will 
cost, with grading, changing the creek bed, and all other expenses, 
some '^6,000 less than the sum appropriated for the purpose; and it 
is believed will give complete satisfaction. 

4. That for the purchase of Lot 61, for the extension of the 
State House Grounds. The contract for the purcliase of this lot 
from W. P. & E. P. Gallup, having been approved by the General 
Assembly before its adjournment, was consummated by the receipt 
of a deed to the State, and the payment of the purchase money, 
amounting to $19,o00. This gives the State the ownership of 
the entire block, and the city having vacated Market street, a 
magnificent site of two blocks awaits the new State House so much 
needed. 

5. That for the aj)pointment of a Resident Agent of State at 
New York City, tendered the position to Mr. J. D. F. Lanier, whose 
name is so well and favorably known in connexion with the finan- 



clal aifairs of the State. But that gentleraan feeling compelled to 
decline the position on account of failing health, his son, Mr. Charles 
Lanier, was appointed, with his father as bondsman. 

6. That to determine the furnishing of the new Female Prison 
and Reformatory, and the employment of help therein, after careful 
scrutiny, made allowances on the requisitions of the Superintendent 
endorsed by the Trustees ; and as the building is now occupied, 
opportunity will soon be aiforded to learn the results of its 
workings. 

Besides these formal boards, there have been numerous consulta- 
tions concerning the affairs of the State, general and special, to the 
intent that each officer might have the benefit of the advice of his 
colleagues, and that no private or sinister ends might govern in the 
discharge of official duties. ^ 

There have also been official visits by the officers to several of the 
public institutions^ — Northern Prison, Soldiers' Home, and House 
of Refuge; and it is the intention to include them all during the 
official term, 

RE- ORGANIZATION OF OFFICE. 

At the last session of the General Assembly an act was passed 
authorizing the re-organization of this office, and the division of its 
duties and records into proper bureaus. Progress has been made in 
this direction, and the overhauling and indexing of records and 
papers v/ill go on until completion. My predecessor collected a con- 
siderable amount of old papers from the cellars and elsewhere, and 
in assorting these, enrolled bills and other important documents 
have been discovered. By the end of another year, it is hoped that 
the entire files will be overhauled, arranged and indexed, so that 
every important paper will be immediately accessible to whoever 
may have need of consulting it. 

By your appointment, Mr. Owen M. Eddy is continuing the work 
of indexing the Swamp Land Patents, the vast importance of which 
is continually pressed on the attention of this office. By this means 
we shall not only make the patents accessible, as they are not now, 
but will be able to point out the numerous errors which undoubtedly 
exist, and possibly suggest remedies for many of them. The canal 
and all other land patents are being indexed on the same plan ; and 
the progrsss so far made suggests two important provisions which 



ought to be made by legislative action. One is, that there ought to 
be in this office a Bureau of Public Lands, and all the mapSj deeds, 
records and papers relating thereto collected therein. They are now 
scattered in different oflices, and much labor and annoyance is often 
found in searching for required information. The titles to millions 
of acres of lands held by the people are derived from the State, and 
her records should be in such condition that all questions of entry, 
sale and conveyance could be immediately settled. And as the years 
pass, the lands become more valuable, and first holders pass away, 
much litigation and wrong will ensue, if steps are not taken to pre- 
vent. The second provision, growing out ot this, is that the origi- 
nal records, or duplicate copies, should be filed in this office of the 
disposition made by the Trustees of the Wabash and Erie Canal of 
the 800,000 acres of lands conveyed to them by the State. They 
are Trustees for the State as well as of the stockholders of the canal, 
and the rights of thousands of people are involved in the integrity 
and safe-keeping of these records. 

The Act before referred to required the establishment in this office 
of bureaus of Printing and Statistics. But unfortunately this pro- 
vision is simply mandatory. The bills for the regulation of these 
tvv^o important interests, pending at the time of its passage, and 
which would have provided the working machinery for such 
bureaus, failed to pass ; so that, for the present these departments 
must be nominal. What statistics the State has provided for are 
special, and will be found in the reports of the several officers who 
collect them. The Auditor's tables, though extremely imperfect, 
' will give some important facts concerning our Agricultural interests. 
But for vital, criminal, mining and manufacturing interests, we 
have absolutely no figures. The annual reports required to be made 
by railroads, of their property and business, and from which valu- 
able information might be derived, are entirely neglected by them. 
But two roads have reported during the year, both of which were 
•unfinished, and neither running trains. I suggest that if you will 
direct me to give official notice to each road, that unless they shall 
promptly make the reports to this office required by law, the Attor- 
ney General will be instructed to proceed by (pio warranto to forfeit 
their charters, it will induce them to give heed to their duty. 
I need hardly suggest how much aid the State Board of Equaliza- 
tion would derive from such re])orts, and. how important they would 
be as a guide to legislation. 



DUTIES TOWARDS GENERAL ASSEMBLY, 

There arc several special topics of duty pertaining to this office, 
having reference to the General Assembly, of which proper reports 
will be made next year, in time for its consideration. At present I 
will only say, that in addition to a considerable amount of stationery 
remaining over at the close of the last session, a large quantity of 
letter heads, enrolling paper, envelopes, etc., have been tran^^-ferred 
to my custody by the State Librarian ; and that but little vfill have 
to be purchased for the official use of the next session. 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 

W, W, CURRY, 

Secretary of State. 



THE 



CONSTITUTION 



OF 



THE STATE OF IIDIANA, 



WITH THE FIRST AMENDMENT THERETO. 



Article 1.— Bill of Rights. 
Akticle II. — Suffrage and Election. 
Akticle III. — Distribution of Powers. 
Article IV.— Legislative. 
Aetjcle V. — Executive. 
Article VI, — Administrativp. 
Article VII.— Judicial. 
AnriCLE yill. — EducBtion. 



Article IX. — State Institutiotis. 

Article X. — Finance. 

Article XI. — Corporations, 

Article XII. — Militia. 

Article XIII. — Negroes and Mulattoes. 

Article XIV. — Boundaries. 

Article XV. — Miscellaneous. 

Article XVI. — Amendments and Schedule 



PREAMBLE. 



To THE END that justice be established, public order maintained, and 
liberty jDerpetuated, we, the People of the State of Indiana, grateful 
to Almighty God for the free exercise of the right to choose our 
own form of government, do ordain this Constitution. 

ARTICLE 1. 



BILL OP RIGHTS, 



Section L We declare, That all men are created equal ; that 
they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable rights ; 
that among these are life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness; that 
all power is inherent in the People; and that all free governments 



are, and of right ought to be, founded on their authority, and insti- 
tuted for their peace, safety, and well being. For the advancement 
of these ends, the People have, at all times, an indefeasible right to 
alter and reform their government. 

Sec. 2. All men shall be secured in the natural right to worship 
Almighty God, according to the dictates of their own consciences. 

Sec. 3 No law shall, in any case whatever, control the free exer- 
cise and enjoyment of religious opinions, or interfere with the rights 
of conscience. 

Sec. 4. No preference shall be given, by law, to any creed, reli- 
gious society, or mode of worship; and no man shall be compelled 
to attend, erect, or support any place of worship, or to maintain 
any ministry, against his consent. 

Sec. 5. No religious test shall be required, as a qualification for 
any office of trust or profit. 

Sec. 6. No money shall be drawn from the treasury, for the 
benefit of any religious or theological institution. 

Sec. 7. No person shall be rendered incompetent as a witness 
in consequence of his opinions on matters of religion. 

Sec. 8. The mode of administering an oath or affirmation, shall 
be such as may be most consistent with, and binding upon, the con- 
science of the person, to whom such oath or affirmation may be 
administered. 

Sec. 9. No law shall be passed, restraining the free intercliange 
of thought and opinion, or restricting the right to speak, write, or 
print, freely, on any subject, whatever ; but for the abuse of that 
right, every person shall be responsible. 

Sec. 10, In all prosecutions for libel, the truth of the matters 
alleged to be libellous may be given in justification. 

Sec. 1L The right of the people to be secure in their persons, 
houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable search or seizure, 
shall not be violated ; and no warrant shall issue, but upon probable 
cause, supported by oath or affirmation, and particularly describing 
the place to be searched, and the person or thing to be seized. 

Sec. 12. All courts shall be open ; and every man, for injury 
done to him in his person, property, or reputation, shall have remedy 
by due course of law. Justice shall be administered freely, and 
without purchase; completely, and without denial; speedily and 
without delay. 

Sec. 13. In all criminal prosecutions, the accused shall have the 
right to a public trial, by an impartial jury, in the county in which 



10 

the offense shall have been committed ; to be heard by himself and 
counsel ; to demand the nature and cause of the accusation against 
him, and to have a copy thereof; to meet the witnesses face to face, 
and to have com})ulsory process for obtaining witnesses in his favor. 
Sec. 14. No person shall be put in jeopardy twice for the same 
offense. No person in any criminal prosecution shall be compelled 
to testify against himself. 

Sec. 15. No person arrested, or confined in jail, shall be treated 
with unnecessary rigor. 

Sec. 16. Excessive bail shall not be required. Excessive fines 
shall not be imposed. Cruel and unusual punishments shall not be 
inflicted. All penalties shall be proportioned to the nature of the 
offense. 

Sec. 17. Offenses, other than murder or treason, shall be baila- 
ble by sufficient sureties. Murder or treason shall not be bailable, 
when the proof is evident, or the presumption strong. 

Sec. 18. The penal code shall be founded on the principles of 
reformation, and not of vindictive justice. 

Sec. 19. In all criminal cases whatever, the jury shall have 
the right to determine the law and the facts. 

Sec. 20. In all civil cases, the right of trial by jury shall 
remain inviolate. 

Sec. 21. No man's particular services shall be demanded with- 
out just compensation ; no man's property shall be taken by law 
without just compensation ; nor, except in case of the State, without 
such compensation first assessed and tendered. 

Sec. 22. The privilege of the debtor to enjoy the necessary 
comforts of life, shall be recognized by wholsome laws, exempting 
a reasonable amount of property from seizure or sale for the pay- 
ment of any debt or liability hereafter contracted ; and there shall 
be no imprisonment for debt, except in case of fraud. 

Sec. 23. The General Assembly shall not grant to any citizen, 
or class of citizens, privileges or immunities, which, upon the same 
terms, shall not equally belong to all citizens. 

Sec. 24. No ex jjost facto law, or law impairing the obligation 
of contracts, shall ever be passed. 

Sec. 25. No law shall be passed, the taking efTect of v/hich shall 
be made to depend upon any authority, except as provided in thisi 
Constitution. 

Sec. 26. The operation of the laws shall never be suspended^ 
except by the authority of the General Assembly. 



11 

Sec. 27. The privilege of the writ onuibeas corpus shall not be 
suspended, except in case of rebellion or inv^asion; and then, only 
if the public safety demand it. 

Sec. 28. Treason against the State shall consist only in levying 
war against it, and giving aid and comfort to its enemies. 

Sec. 29. No person shall be convicted of treason, except on the 
testimony of two witnesses to the same overt act, or upon his con- 
fession in open court. 

Sec. 30. No conviction shall work corruption of blood, or for- 
feiture of estate. 

Sec. 31. No law shall restrain any of the inhabitants of the 
State from assembling together in a peaceable manner, to consult for 
their common good ; nor from instructing their representatives ; nor 
from applying to the General Assembly for redress of grievances. 

Sec. 32. The people shall have a right to bear arms, for the 
defense of themselves and the State. 

Sec. 33. The military shall be kept in strict subordination to 
the civil power. 

Sec. 34. No soldier shall, in time of peace, be quartered in any 
house, without the consent of the owner ; nor, in time of war, but 
in a manner to be prescribed by law. 

Sec. 35. The General Assembly shall not grant any title of 
nobility, nor confer hereditary distinctions. 

Sec. 36. Emigration from the State shall not be prohibited. 

Sec. 37. There shall be neither slavery, nor involuntary servi- 
tude, within the State, otherwise than for the punishment of crimes 
whereof the party shall have been duly convicted. No indenture 
of any Negro or Mulatto, made and executed out of the bonds of 
the State, shall be valid within the State. 

ARTICLE IT 

suffeage and election. 

Section 1. All elections shall be free and equal. 

Sec. 2. In all elections, not otherwise provided for by this Con- 
stitution, every white male citizen of the United States, of the age 
of twenty-one years and upwards, who shall have resided in the 
State during the six months immediately preceding such election ; 
and every white male, of foreign birth, of the age of twenty-one 
years and upwards, who shall have resided in the United States one 
year, and shall have resided in this State during the six months 



12 

immediately preceding such election, and shall have declared his 
intention to become a citizens of the United States, conformably to 
the laws of the United States on the subject of naturalization, shall 
be entitled to vote in the township or precinct where he may reside. 

Sec. 3. No soldier, seaman, or marine, in the army or navy of 
the United States, or of their allies, shall be deemed to have acquired 
a residence in this State, in consequence of having been stationed 
within the same ; nor shall any such soldier, seaman, or marine have 
the right to vote. 

Sec. 4. No person shall be deemed to have lost his residence in 
the State by reason of his absence, either on business of this State or 
of the United States. 

Sec. 5. No Negro or Mulatto shall have the right of suffrage. 

Sec. 6. Every person shall be disqualified from holding office 
during the term for which he may have been elected, who shall have 
given or offered a bribe, threat, or reward, to procure his election. 

Sec. 7. Every person who shall give or accept a challenge to 
fight a duel, or who shall knowingly carry to another person such 
challenge, or who shall agree to go out of the State to fight a duel, 
shall be ineligible to any office of trust or profit. 

Sec. 8. The General Assembly shall have power to deprive of 
the right of suffrage, and to render ineligible, any person convicted 
of an infamous crime. 

Sec. 9. No person holding a lucrative office or appointment, 
under the United States, or under this State, shall be eligible to a 
seat in the General Assembly ; nor shall any person hold more than 
one lucrative office at the same time, except as in this Constitution 
expressly permitted: Provided, that offices in the militia, to which 
there is attached no annual salary, and the office of deputy Post- 
master, where the compensation does not exceed ninety dollars per 
annum, shall not be deemed lucrative : And ■provided, also, that 
counties containing less than one thousand polls, may confer the 
office of Clerk, Recorder, and Auditor, or any two of said offices, 
upon the same person. 

Sec. 10. No person who may hereafter be a collector or holder 
of public moneys, shall be eligible to any office of trust or profit, 
until he shall have accounted for, and paid over, according to law, 
all sums for which he may be liable. 

Sec. 11. In all cases in which it is provided, that an office shall 
not be filled by the same person more than a certain number of years 



13 

continuously, an appointment pro tempore shall not be reckoned a 
part of that term. 

Sec. 12. In all cases, except treason, felony, and breach of the 
peace, electors shall be free from arrest, in going to elections, during 
their attendance there, and in returning from the same. 

Sec. 13. All elections by the people shall be by ballot; and all 
elections by the General Assembly, or by either branch thereof, shall 
be viva voce. 

Sec. 14. All general elections shall be held on the second Tues- 
day in October. 

ARTICLE III. 

DISTEIBUTION OF POWERS. 

Section 1. The powers of the Government are divided into 
three separate departments: the Legislative, the Executive, includ- 
ing the Administrative, and the Judicial ; and no person charged 
with official duties under one of these departments, shall exercise 
any of the functions of another, except as in this Constitution ex- 
pressly provided. 

ARTICLE IV. 

LEGISLATIVE. 

Section 1. The Legislative authority of the State shall be 
vested in a General Assembly, which shall consist of a Senate and a 
House of Representatives. The style of every law shall be : " Be 
it enacted by the General Assembly of the State of Indiana ;" and 
no law shall be enacted, except by bill. 

Sec. 2. The Senate shall not exceed fifty, nor the House of Re- 
presentatives one hundred members, and they shall be chosen by the 
electors of the respective counties or districts, into which the State 
may, from time to time, be divided. 

Sec. 3. Senators shall be elected for the term of four years, and 
Representatives for the term of two years, from the day next after 
their general election : Provided, however, that the Senators elect, at 
the second meeting of the General Assembly under this Constitution, 
shall be divided by lot, into two equal classes, as nearly as may be; 
and the seats of Senators of the first class shall be vacated at the 
expiration of two years, and those of the second class, at the 
expiration of four years, so that one-half, as nearly as possible, shall 



14 

be chosen bienially forever thereafter. And in case of increase in 
the number of Senators, they shall be so annexed, by lot, to one or 
the other of the two classes, as to keep them as nearly equal as 
practicable. 

Sec. 4. The General Assembly shall, at its second session after 
the adoption of this Constituton, and eveiy sixth year thereafter, 
cause an enumeration to be made of all the white male inhabitants 
over the age ©f twenty -one years. 

Sec. 5. The number of Senators and Representatives shall, at 
the session next followin<^ each period of making such enumeration, 
be fixed by law, and apportioned among the several counties, ac- 
cording to the number of white male inhabitants, above twenty-one 
years of age in each : Provided, that the first and second elections 
of members of the General Assembly, under this Constitution, shall 
be according to the apportionment last made by the General Assem- 
bly, before the adoption of this Constitution. 

Sec. 6. A Senatorial or Representative district, where more 
than one county shall constitute a district, shall be composed of 
contiguous counties, and no county for Senatorial apportionment, 
shall ever be divided. 

Sec. 7. No person shall be a Senator or Representative, who, 
at the time of his election, is not a citizen of the United State-: ; nor 
any one who has not been, for two years next preceding his elec- 
tion, an inhabitant of this State, and for one year next preceding his 
election an inhabitant of the county or district whence he may be 
chosen. Senators shall be at least twenty-five, and Representatives 
at least twenty-one years of age. 

Sec. 8. Senators and Representatives, in all cases except treason, 
felony, and breach of the peace, shall be privileged from arrest, 
during the session of the General Assembly, and in going to and 
returning from the same, and shall not be subject to any civil pro- 
cess, during the session of the General Assembly, nor during the 
fifteen days next before the commencement thereof. For any speech 
or debate in either House, a member shall not be questioned in any 
other place. 

Sec. 9. The sessions of the General Assembly shall be held 
biennially at the capital of the State, commencing on the Thursday 
next after the first Monday of January, in the year one thousand 
eight hundred and fifty-three, and on the same day of every second 
year thereafter, unless a different day or place shall have been 
appointed by law. But if, in the opinion of the Governor, the 



15 

public welfare shall require it, he may at any time by proclamation, 
call a special session. 

Sec. 10. Each House, when assembled, shall choose its own 
officers, (the President of the Senate excepted,) judge the elections, 
qualifications and returns of its own members, determine its rules of 
proceeding, and sit upon its own adjournment. But neither House 
shall, without the consent of the other, adjourn for more than three 
days nor to any place other than that in which it may be sitting. 

Sec. 11. Two-thirds of each House shall constitute a quorum to 
do business; but a smaller number may meet, adjourn from day to 
day, and compel the attendance of absent members. A quorum 
being in attendance, if either House fail to effect an organization 
within the first five days thereafter, the members of the House so 
failing, shall be entitled to no compensation, from ttie end of the 
said five days, until an organization shall have been effected. 

Sec. 12. Each House shall keep a journal of its proceedings, 
and publish the same. The yeas and nays on any question, shall, 
at the recjuest of any two members, be entered together with the 
names of the members demanding the same on the journal : Provided 
that on a motion to adjourn, it shall require one-tenth of the mem- 
bers present to order the yeas and nays. 

Sec. 13. The doors of each House, and of committees of the 
whole, shall be kept open, except in such cases, as in the opinion of 
either House may require secrecy. 

Sec. 14. Either House may punish its members for disorderly 
behavior, and may, with the concurrence of two-thirds, expel a 
member ; but not a second time for the same cause. 

Sec. 15. Either House dtiring its session, may punish by impris- 
onment, any person not a member who shall have been guilty of 
disrespect to the House, by disorderly or contemptuous behavior in 
its presence ; but such imprisonment shall not at any time exceed 
twenty-four hours. 

Sec. 16. Each House shall have all powers necessary for a 
branch of the Legislative department of a free and independent 
State. 

Sec. 17. Bills may originate in either House, but may be 
amended or rejected in the other, except that bills for raising reve- 
nue shall originate in the House of Representatives. 

Sec. 18. Every bill shall be read by sections, on three several 
days in each House ; unless in case of emergency, two-thirds of the 
House where such bill may be depending, shall, by a vote of yeas 



16 

and nays deem it expedient to dispense with this rule; but the read- 
ing of a bill by sections on its final passage, shall in no case be dis- 
pensed with, and the vote on the passage of every bill or joint reso- 
lution shall be taken by yeas and nays. 

Sec. 19. Every act shall embrace but one subject and matters 
properly connected therewith, which subject shall be expressed in 
the title. But if any subject shall be embraced in an act which shall 
not be expressed in the title, such act shall be void only as to so 
much thereof as shall not be expressed in the title. 

Sec. 20. Every act and joint resolution shall be plainly worded, 
avoiding, as far as practicable, the use of technical terms. 

Sec. 21. No act shall ever be revised or amended by mere refer- 
ence to its title ; but the act revised or section amended, shall be set 
forth and published at full length. 

Sec. 22. The General Assembly shall not pass local or special 
laws, in any of the following enumerated cases, that is to say : 

Regulating the jurisdiction and duties of justices of the peace and 
of constables; 

For the punishment of crimes and misdemeanors; 

Regulating the practice in courts of justice; 

Providing for changing the venue in civil and criminal cases; 

Granting divorces ; 

Changing the names of persons; 

For laying out, opening and working on highways, and for the 
election or appointment of supervisors ; 

Vacating roads, town plats, streets, alleys and public squares ; 

Summoning and empanneling grand and petit jurors, and provid- 
ing for their compensation; 

Regulating county and township business; 

Regulating the election of county and township officers, and their 
compensation ; 

For the assessment and collection of taxes for State, county, town- 
ship or road purposes ; 

Providing for supporting common schools, and for the preserva- 
tion of school funds ; 

In relation to fees or salaries; 

In relation to interest on money ; 

Providing for opening and conducting elections of State, county, 
or township officers, and designating the places of voting; 

Providing for the sale of real estate belonging to minors or other 



17 

persons laboring under legal disabilities, by executors, administra- 
tors, guardians or trustees. 

Sec. 23. In all the cases enumerated in the preceding section, 
and in all other cases where a general law can be made applicable, 
all laws shall be general, and of uniform operation througliout the 
State. 

Sec. 24. Provision may be made by general law, for bringing 
suit against the State, as to all liabilities originating after the adop- 
tion of this Constitution; but no special act authorizing such suit to 
be brought, or making compensation to any person claiming dam- 
ages against the State sliall ever be passed. 

Sec. 25. A majority of all the members elected to each House, 
shall be necessary to pass every bill or joint resolution, and all bills 
and joint resolutions so passed, shall be signed by the presiding 
officers of the respective Houses. 

Sec. 26. Any member of either House shall have the right to 
protest, and to have his protest with his reasons for dissent, entered 
on the journal. 

Sec. 27. Every statute shall be a public law, unless otherwise 
declared in the statute itself. 

Sec. 28. No act shall take effect, until the same shall have been 
published and circulated in the several counties of the State by au- 
thority, except in case of emergency, which emergency shall be 
declared iu the preamble or in the body of the law. 

Sec. 29. The members of the General Assembly shall receive 
for their services, a compensation to be fixed by law; but no in- 
crease of compensation shall take effect during the session at which 
such increase may be made. No session of the General Assembly, 
except the first under this Constitution, shall extend beyond the term 
of sixty-one days, nor any special session beyond the term of forty 
days. 

Sec. 30. No Senator or Representative shall, during the term for 
Avhich he may have been elected, be eligible to any office, the elec- 
tion to which is vested in the General Assembly ; nor shall he be 
appointed to any civil office of profit, which shall have been created 
or the emoluments of which shall have been increased during such 
term ; but this latter provision shall not be construed to apply to 
any office elective by the people. 



Doc. J.— S. S. R.— 2 



18 



ARTICLE V. 

EXECUTIVE. 

Rectioi? 1. The executive power of the State shall be vested in 
a Governor. He shall hold his office during four years, and shall 
not be eligible more than four years in any period of eight years. 

Sec. 2. There shall be a Lieutenant Governor, who shall hold 
his office during four years. 

Sec, 3. The Governor and Lieutenant Governor shall be elected 
at the times and places of choosing members of the General Assem- 
bly. 

Sec. 4. In voting for Governor and Lieutenant Governor, the 
electors shall designate for whom they vote as Governor, and for 
wliom as Lieutenant Governor, The returns of every election for 
Governor and Lieutenant Governor shall be sealed, up and trans- 
mitted to the seat of government^ directed to the Speaker of the 
House of Representatives, who shall open and publish them in the 
presence of both Houses ot the General Assembly. 

Sec. 5, The persons respectively having the hip^he^t number of 
votes for Governor and Lieutenant Governor, shall be cl»*cted ; but 
in case two or more persons shall have an equal and the highest 
number of votes for either office, the General Assembly shall by 
joijit vote, forthAvith proceed to elect one of the said persons Gov- 
ernor or Lieutenant Governor as the case may be. 

Sec. B, Contested elections for Governor or Lieutenant Gover- 
nor, shall be determined by the General Assembly, in such manner 
as may be prescribed by law. 

Sec. 7, No person shall be eligible to the office of Governor or 
Lieutenant Governor, who shall not have been five years a citizen of 
the United States, and also a resident of the State of Indiana dur- 
ing the five years next preceding his election ; nor shall any person 
be eligible to either of the said offices, who shall not have attained 
the age of thirty years. 

Sec, 8, No member of Congress, or person holding any office 
under the United States, or under this State, shall fill the office of 
Governor or Lieutenant Governor. 

Sec. 9. The official term of the Governor and Lieutenant Gov- 
ernor, shall commence on the second Monday of January, in the 
year one thousand eight hundred and fifty-three, and on the same 
fJay every fourth year thereafter. 



19 

Sec. 10. In case of the removal of the Governor from office, or 
of his deatli, resignation, or inability to discharge the duties of the 
office, the same shall devolve on the Lieutenant Governor, and the 
General Assembly shall, by law, provide for the case of removal 
from office, death, resignation, or inability, both of the Governor and 
Lieutenant Governor, declaring what officer then shall act as Gov- 
ernor; and such officer shall act accordingly, until the disability be 
removed or a Governor be elected. 

Sec. 11. Whenever the Lieutenant Governor shall act as Gov- 
ernor, or shall be unable to attend as President of the Senate, the 
Senate shall elect one of its own member as President for the occa- 
sion. 

Sec. 12. The Governor shall be commander-in-chief of the mili- 
tary and naval forces, and may call out such forces, to execute the 
laws, or to suppress insurrection or to repel invasion. 

Sec. 13. He shall from time to time, give to the General Assem- 
bly information touching the condition of the Staie, and recommend 
such measures as he shall judge to be expedient. 

Sec. 14. Every bill which shall have passed the General Assem- 
bly, shall be presented to the Governor ; if he approve, he shall sign 
it ; but if not, he shall return it with his objections, to the House in 
which it shall have originated ; which house shall enter the objec- 
tions at large upon its journals, and proceed to reconsider the bill. 
If, after such reconsideration, a majority of all the members elected 
to that House shall agree to pass the bill, it shall be sent Avith the 
Governor's objections, to the other House, by which it shall likewise 
be reconsidered, and if approved by a majority of all the members 
elected to that House, it shall be a law. If any bill shall not be 
returned by the Governor within three days, Sundays excepted, 
after it shall have been presented to him, it shall be a law without 
his signature, unless the general adjournment shall prevent its 
return, in which case it shall be a law, unless the Governor within 
dve days next after such adjournment, shall file such .bill with 
his objections thereto in the office of the Secretary of State, who 
shall lay the same before the General Assembly at its next session, 
in like manner as if it had been returned by the Governor. But 
no bill shall be presented to the Governor within two days next 
previous to the final adjournment of the General Assembly. 

Sec. 15. The Governor shall transact all necessary business with 
the officers of goveniment;, and may require information in writing, 



20 

from the officers of the adniinistrativc department, upon any subject 
relating to the duties of their respective offices. 

Sec. 16. He shall take care that tiie laws be faithfully exe- 
<!uted. 

Sec. 17. He shall have the power to grant reprieves, commuta- 
tions and pardons after conviction, for. all offences, except treason 
and cases of impeachment, subject to such regulations as may be 
provided by law. Upon conviction for treason, he shall have power 
to suspend the execution of the sentence, until the case shall be 
reported to the General Assembly, at its next meeting; when the 
General Assembly shall either grant a pardon, commute the sentence, 
direct the execution of the sentence, or grant a further reprieve. 
He shall have power to remit fines and forfeitures, under such reg- 
ulations as may be prescribed by law, and shall report to the General 
Assembly at its next meeting, each case of reprieve, commutation, 
or pardon granted, and also the names of all persons in whose favor 
remission of fines and forfeitures shall have been made and the sev- 
eral amounts remitted : Frovkled hotoever, tliat the General Assem- 
bly may, by law, constitute a council, to be composed of officers of 
State, without whose advice and consent the Governor shall not 
have power to grant pardons, in any case, except such as may, by 
law, be left to his sole power. 

Sec. 18. When during a recess of the General Assembly, a 
vacancy shall happen in any office, the appointment to which is 
vested in the General Assembly ; or when at any time, a vacancy 
shall have occurred in any other State office, or in the office of 
Judge of any Court; the Governor shall fill such vacancy by 
appointment, which shall expire when a successor shall have been 
elected and qualified. 

Sec. 19. He shall issue writs of election, to fill such vacancies 
as may have occurred in the General Assembly. 

Sec. 20. Should the seat of government become dangerous from 
disease, or a common enemy, he may convene the General Assembly 
at any other place. 

Sec. 21. The Lieutenant Governor shall, by virtue of his office, 
be President of the Senate, have a right when in committee of the 
whole, to join in debate, and to vote on all subjects; and whenever 
the Senate shall be equally divided he shall give the casting vote. 

Sec. 22. The Governor shall at stated times, receive for his 
services, a compensation, which shall neither be increased or dimin- 
ished during the term for which he shall have been elected. 



21 

Sec. 23. The Lieutenant Governor, while he shall act as Presi- 
dent of the Senate, shall receive for his services, the same compen- 
sation as the Speaker of the House of Representatives, and any 
person acting as Governor, shall receive the compensation attached 
to the office of Governor. 

Sec. 24. Neither the Governor nor Lieutenant Governor shall 
be eligible to any other office, during the term for which he shall 
have been elected. 

ARTICLE yi. 

ADMINISTRATIVE. 

Section 1. There shall be elected, by the voters of the State, a 
Secretary, an Auditor, and a Treasurer of State, who shall, severally, 
hold their offices for two yeais. They shall perform such duties as 
may be enjoined by law: and no person shall be eligible to either 
of said offices more than four years in any period of six years. 

Sec. 2. There shall be elected, in each county, by the voters 
thereof, at the time of holding the general elections, a Clerk of the 
Circuit Court, Auditor, Recorder, Treasurer, Sheriff, Coroner, and 
Surveyor. The Clerk, Auditor, and Recorder, shall continue in 
office four years; and no person shall be eligible to the office of 
Clerk, Recorder, or Auditor, more than eight years in any period of 
twelve years. The Treasurer, Sheriff, Coroner and Surveyor, shall 
continue in office two years; and no person shall be eligible to the 
office of Treasurer or Sheriff, more than four years in any period of 
six years. 

Sec. 3. Such other county and township officers as may be 
necessary, shall be elected, or appointed, in such manner as may be 
prescribed by law. 

Sec. 4. No person shall be elected, or appointed, as a county 
officer, who shall not be an elector of the county ; nor any one who 
shall not have been an inhabitant therepf during one year next pre- 
ceding his appointment, if the county shall have been so long organ- 
ized; but if the county shall not have been so long organized, then 
within the limits of the county or counties out of which the same 
shall have been taken. 

Sec. 5. The Governor, and the Secretary, Auditor and Treasurer 
of State, shall, severally, reside and keep the public records, books, 
and papers, in any manner relating to their respective offices, at the 
seat of government. 



22 

Sec. 6. All county, township and town officers, shall reside within 
their respective counties, townships and towns, aad shall keep their 
respective offices at such places therein, and perform such duties, as 
may be directed by law. 

Sec. 7. All State officers shall, for crime, incapacity, or negli- 
gence, be liable to be removed from office, either by impeachment by 
the Hou.«e of Representatives, to be tried by the Senate, or by a joint 
resolution of the General Assembly ; two-thirds of the members elec- 
ted to each branch voting, in either case, therefor. 

Sec. 8. All State, county, township and town officers, may be 
impeached, or removed from office, in such manner as may be pre- 
scribed by law. 

Sec. 9. Vacanies in county, township and town offices, shall be 
filled in such manner as may be prescribed by law. 

Sec. 10. The General Assembly may confer upon the Boards 
doing county business in the several counties, powers of a local, ad- 
ministrative character. 

ARTICLE VII. 

JUDICIAL. 

Section 1. The Judicial power of the State shall be vested in a 
Supreme Court, in Circuit Courts, and in such inferior Courts as the 
General Assembly may establish. 

Sec. 2. The Supreme Court shall consist of not less than three 
nor more than five Judges, a majority of whom shall form a quorum. 
They shall hold their offices for six years, if they so long behave well. 

Sec. 3. The State shall be divided into as many districts as there 
are Judges of the Supreme Court; audsuch districts shall be formed 
of contiguous territory, as nearly equal in population as, without 
dividing a county, the same can be made. One of said Judges shall 
be elected from each district, and reside therein; but said Judges 
shall be elected by the electors of the State at large. 

Sec. 4. The Supreme Court shall have jurisdiction co-extensive 
with the limits of the State, in appeals and writs of error, under such 
regulations and restrictions as may be prescribed by law. It shall 
also have such original jurisdiction as the General Assembly may 
confer. 

Sec. 5. The Supreme Court shall, upon the decision of every case, 
give a statement in writing of each question arising in the record of 
such case, and the decision of the Court thereon. 



23 

Sec. 6. The General Assembly shall provide, by law, for the 
speedy publication of the decisions of the Supreme Court, made under 
this Constitution; but no Judge shall be allowed to report such de- 
cision. 

Sec. 7. There shall be elected by the voters of the State, a Clerk 
of the Supreme Court, who shall hold his office four years, and 
whose duties shall be prescribed by law. 

Sec. 8. The Circuit Courts shall each consist of one Judge, and 
shall have such civil and criminal jurisdiction as may be prescribed 
by law. 

Sec. 9. The State shall, from time to time, be divided into judi- 
cial circuits, and a Judge for each circuit shall be elected by the voters 
thereof. He shall reside within the circuit, and shall hold his office 
for the term of six years, if he so long behave well. 

Sec. 10. The General Assembly may provide by law, that the 
Judge of one circuit may hold the courts of another circuit, in cases 
of necessity or convenience; and, in case of temporary inability 
of any Judge, from sickness or other cause, to hold the courts in his 
circuit, provision may be made, by law, for holding such courts. 

Sec. 11. There shall be elected, in each judicial circuit, by the 
voters thereof, a Prosecuting Attorney, who shall hold his office 
for two years. 

Sec. 12. Any Judge or Prosecuting Attorney, who shall have 
been convicted of corruption or other high crime, may, on informa- 
tion in the name of the State, be removed from office by the Supreme 
Court, or in such other manner as may be prescribed by law. 

Sec. 13. The Judges of the Supreme Court and Circuit Courts 
shall, at stated times, receive a compensation, which shall not be 
diminished during their continuance in office. 

Sec. 14. A competent number of Justices of the Peace shall be 
elected, by the voters in each township in the several counties. 
They shall continue in office four years, and their powers and duties 
shall be prescribed by law. 

Sec. 15. All judicial officers shall be conservators of the peace 
in their respective jurisdictions. 

Sec. 16. No person elected to any judicial office, shall, during 
the term for which he shall have been elected, be eligible to any 
office of trust or profit, under the State, other than a judicial office. 

Sec. 17. The General Assembly may modify or abolish the 
Grand Jury system. 

Sec. 18. All criminal prosecutions shall be carried on in the 



24 

name and by the authority of the State ; and the style of all process 
shall be "The State of Indiana." 

Sec. 19. Tribunals of conciliation maybe established, with such 
powers and duties as shall be prescribed by law ; or the powers and 
duties of the same may be coulerred upon other courts of justice; 
but such tribunals or other courts, when sitting as such, sliall have 
no power to render judgment to be obligatory on the parties, unless 
they voluntarily submit their matters of difference, and agree to 
abide the judgment of such tribunal or court. 

Sec. 20. The General Assembly, at its first session after the 
adoption of this Constitution, shall provide for the appointment of 
three Commissioners, whose duty it shall be to revise, simplify and 
abridge, the rules^ practice, pleadings and forms, of the courts of 
justice. And they shall provide for abolishing the distinct forms of 
action at law, now in use; and that justice shall be administered in 
a uniform mode of pleading, without distinction between law and 
equity. And the General Assembly may, also, make it the duty of 
said Commissioners to reduce into a systematic code, the general 
statute law of the State ; and said Commissioners shall report the 
result of their labors to the General Assembly, with such recommen- 
dations and suggestions, as to abridgement and amendment, as to 
said Commissioners may seem necessary or proper. Provision 
shall be made, by law, for filling vacancies, regulating the tenure 
of office, and the compensation of said Commissioners. 

Sec. 21. Every person of good moral character, being a voter, 
shall be entitled to admission to practice law in all courts of justice. 

ARTICLE YIII. 

education. 

Section 1. Knowledge and learning, generally diffused through- 
out a community, being essential to the preservation of a free govern- 
ment, it shall be the duty of the General Assembly to encourage, by 
all suitable means, moral, intelectual, scientific and agricultural 
improvement, and to provide, by law, for a general and uniform 
system ot Common Schools, wherein tuition shall be without charge, 
and equally open to all. 

Sec. 2. The Common School fnnd shall consist of the Congres- 
sional township fund, and the lands belonging thereto; 

The Surplus Revenue fund ; 

The Saline fund and the lands belonging thereto ; 



25 

The Bank Tax fund, and the fund arising from the one hundred 
and lourteenth section of the charter of the State Bank of Indiana; 

The fund to be derived from the sale of county seminaries, and 
the moneys and }3roperty heretofore hekl for such seminaries ; from 
the fines assessed for breaches of the penal laws of the State, and 
from all forfeitures which may accrue ; 

All lauds and other estate which shall escheat to the State for 
want of heirs or kindred entitled to the inheritance ; 

All lands that have been, or may hereafter be, granted to the 
State, where no special purpose is expressed in the grant, and the 
proceeds of the sales thereof, including the proceeds of the sales of 
the swamp lands granted to the State of Indiana by the act of 
Congress of the 28th Sej)tember, 1850, after deducting the expense 
of selecting and draining the same ; 

Taxes on the property of corporations, that may be assessed fur 
Common School purposes 

Sec. 3. The principal of the Common School fund shall remain 
a perpetual fund, which may be increased, but shall never be dimin- 
ished ; and the income thereof shall be inviolably appropriated to the 
support of Common Schools, and to no other purpose whatever. 

Sec. 4. The General Assembly shall invest, in some safe and 
profitable manner, all such portions of the Common School fund as 
not hereintofore been entrusted to the several counties ; and shall 
make provision, by law, for the distribution, among the several 
counties, of the interest thereof. 

Sec. 5. If any county shall fail to demand its proportion of such 
interest, for Common School purposes, the same shall be re-invested 
for the benefit of such county. 

Sec. 6. The several counties shall be held liable for the preser- 
vation of so much of the said fund as may be entrusted to them, and 
for the payment of the annual interest thereon. 

Sec. 7. All trust funds, held by the State, shall remain inviolate, 
and be faithfully and exclusively applied to the purposes tor which 
the trust was created. 

Sec. 8. The General Assembly shall provide for the election, by 
the voters of the State, of a State Superintendent of Public Instruc- 
tion, who shall hold his office for two years, and whose duties and 
compensation shall be prescribed by law. 



26 
ARTICLE IX. 

STATE INSTITUTIOMS. 

> 

Section 1. It shall be the duty of the General Assembly to 
provide, by law, for the support of Instiutions for the education of 
the Deaf and Dumb, and of the Blind ; and also for the treatment 
of the Insane. 

Sec. 2, The General Assembly shall provide Houses of Refuge, 
for the correction and reformation of juvenile offenders. 

Sec. 3. The county boards shall have power to provide farms, 
as an asylum for those persons who, by reason of age, infirmity, or 
other misfortune, may have claims upon the sympathies and aid of 
society. 

ARTICLE X. 

FINANCE. 

Section 1. The General Assembly shall provide, by law, for a 
uniform and equal rate of assessment and taxation, and shall pre- 
scribe such regukitions as shall secure a just valuation for taxation 
of all property, both real and personal, excepting such only for 
municipal,- educational, literary, scientific, religious or charitable 
purposes, as may be specially exempted by law. 

Sec. 2. All the revenues derived from the sale of any ot the 
public works belonging to the State, and from the net annual income 
thereof, and any surplus that may, at any time, remain in the treas- 
ury, derived from taxation for general State purposes, after the 
payment of tlie ordinary expenses of the government, and of the 
interest on bonds of the State, other than Bank bonds, shall be 
annually applied, under the direction of the General Assembly, to 
the payment of the principal of the public debt. 

Sec. 3. No money shall be drawn from the treasury, but in pur- 
suance of appropriations made by law. 

Sec. 4. An accurate statement of the receipts and expenditures 
of the public money, shall be published with the laws of each regu- 
lar session of the General Assembly. 

Sec 5. No law shall authorize any debt to be contracted, on 
behalf of the State, except in the following cases : To meet casual 
deficits in the revenue; to pay the interest on the State debt; to 
repel invasion, suppress insurrection, or, if hostilities be threatened, 
provide for the public defense. 



27 

Sec. 6. No county shall subscribe for fstock in any incorporated 
(?ompany, unless the same be paid for at the time of such subscrip- 
tion ; nor shall any county loan its credit to any incorporated com- 
pany, nor borrow money for the purpose of taking stock in any such 
company ; nor shall the General Assembly ever, on behalf the State, 
assume the debts of any county, city, town or township, nor of any 
corporation whatever. 

Sec. 7. No law or resolution shall ever be passed by the 
General Assembly of the State of Indiana that shall recognize any 
liability of this State to pay or redeem any certificate of stocks 
issued in pursuance of an act entitled "An act to provide for the 
funded debt of the State of Indiana, and for the completion of the 
Wabash and Erie Canal to Evansville," passed January 19, 1846, 
and an act supplemental to said act passed January 29, 1847, which, 
by the provisions of the said acts, or either of them, shall be paya- 
ble exclusively from the proceeds of the canal lands, and the tolls 
and revenues of the canal in said acts mentioned ; and no such 
(«rtificates or stocks shall ever be paid by this State. 

Note. — Agreed to by a nuijority of the members elected to each of tlio two liousds of the General 
Assembly, Kegular Session uf 1871, aud referred to the General Assembly to be chosen at the next 
general election. Agreed to by a majority of the members elected to each house of the General 
Assembly, Special Session of 1872. Submitted to 'ha electors of the Sate by an aot approved Jan- 
uary 28, 1873. Katified by a majority of the electors, at an election held on the 18th da of Feb- 
ruary, 1873. Uc' lared a part of the constitution by proclamation of Thomas A. Hendricks, 
(ioveruor, dated March 7, 1873. 

ARTICLE XI. 

CORPORATIONS. 

Section 1. The General Assembly shall not have power to estab- 
lish or incorporate any bank or banking company, or moneyed insti- 
tution, for the pnrjjose of issuing bills of credit, or bills payable to 
order or bearer, except under the conditions prescribed in this 
Constitution. 

Sec. 2. No banks shall be established otherwise than under a 
general banking law, except as provided in the fourth section of 
this article. 

Sec. 3. If the General Assembly shall enact a general banking 
law, such law shall provide for the registry and countersigning, by 
an officer of the State, of all paper credit designed to be circulated 
as money; and ample collateral security, readily convertible into 
specie, for the redemption of the same in gold or silver, shall be 
required, w^hich collateral security shall be under the control of the 
proper officer or officers of State. 

Sec. 4. The General Assembly may also charter a bank with 



28 

branches, without collateral security, as required in the preceding- 
section. 

Sec. 5. If the General Assembly shall establish a bank with 
branches, the branches shall be mutually responsible for each 
other's liabilities, u])on all paper credit issued as money. 

Sec. 6. The stockholders in every bank or bankino- company, 
shall be individually responsible, to an amount over and above their 
stock, equal to their respective shares of stock, for all debts or lia- 
bilities of said bank or banking company. 

Sec. 7. All bills or notes issued as money, shall be, at all times, 
redeemable in gold or silver; and no law shall be passed sanction- 
ing, directly or indirectly, the suspension by any bank or banking 
company, of specie payments. 

Sec. 8. Holders of bank notes shall be entitled, in case of 
insolvency, to preference of payment over all other creditors. 

Sec. 9. Xo bank shall receive directly or indirectly, a greater 
rate of interest than shall be allowed, by law, to individuals loaning 
money. 

Sec. 10. Every bank, or banking company, shall be required 
to cease all banking operations within twenty years from the time of 
its organization, and promptly thereafter to close its business. 

Sec. 11. The General Assembly is not prohibited from invest- 
ing the Trust Funds in a bank with branches; but in case of such 
investment, the safety of the same shall be guaranteed by unques- 
tionable security. 

Sec. 12. The State shall not be a stockholder in any bank, after 
the expiration of the present bank charter ; nor shall the credit of 
the State ever be given, or loaned, in aid of any person, association, 
or corporation ; nor shall tlie State hereafter become a stockholder 
in any corporation or association. 

Sec. 13. Corporations, other than banking, shall not be created 
by special act, but may be formed under general laws. 

Sec. 14. Dues from corporations, other than banking, shall be 
secured by such individual liability of the corporators, or other 
means, as may be prescribed by law. 

ARTICLE XII. I 

MILITIA. 

Section 1. The militia shall consist of all able-bodied white 
male persons, between the ages of eighteen and forty- five years, 



29 

except such as may be exempted by the laws of the Uniterl States, 
or of this State ; and shall be organized, officered, armed, equipped 
and trained, in such manner as may be provided by law. 

Sec. 2. The Governor sliall appoint the Adjutant, Quarter- 
master and Commissary Generals. 

Sec. 3. All militia officers shall be commissioned by the Gov- 
ernor, and shall hold their offices not longer than six years. 

Sec. 4. The General Assembly shall determine the method of 
dividing the militia into divisions, brigades, regiments, battalliong 
and companies, and fix the rank of all staii officers. 

Sec. 5. The militia may be divided into classes of sedentary 
and active militia, in such manner as shall be prescribed by law. 

Sec. 6. No person conscientiously opposed to bearing arms, 
shall be compelled to do militia duty ; but such person shall pay an 
equivalent for exemption, the amount to be prescribed by law. 

ARTICLE XIII. 

IJEGROES AND MULATTOES. 

Sectiox 1. No negro or mulatto shall come into, or settle in,, 
the State, after tlie adoption of this Constitution. 

Sec. 2. All contracts made with any negro or mulatto coming 
into the State, contrary to the })rovisions of the foregoing section 
shall be void ; and any person who shall employ such negro or 
mulatto, or otherwise encourage him to remain in the State, shall 
be fined in any sum not less than ten dollars, nor more than five 
hundred dollars. 

Sec> 3. All fines which may be collected for a violation of the 
provisions of this article, or of any law which may hereafter be passed 
for the purpose of carrying the same into execution, shall be set apart 
and appropriated for the colonization of such negroes and mulattoes, 
and their descendants, as may be in the State at the adoption of this 
Constitution, and may be willing to emigrate. 

Sec. 4. The General Assembly shall pass laws to carry out the 
provisions of this article, 

ARTICLE XIV. 

boundaejes. 

Section 1. In order that the boundaries of the State may be 
known and established, it is hereby ordained and declared, that the 



30 

State of Indiana is bounded on the East by the meridian line which 
forms the western boundary of the State of Ohio ; on the South by 
the Ohio river, from the mouth of the Great Miami river to the 
mouth of the Wabash river; on the West by a line drawn along the 
middle of the Wabash river, from its mouth to a point where a due 
north line, drawn from the town of Vincennes, would last toucli the 
northwestern shore of said Wabash river; and thence by a due north 
line until the same shall intersect an east and west line, drawn througli 
a point ten miles north of the southern extreme of Lake Michigan ; 
on the North by said east and west line, until the same shall intersect 
the first mentioned meridian line, which forms the western boundary 
of the State of Ohio. 

Sec. 2. The State of Indiana shall possess jurisdiction and sove- 
reignity co-extensive with the l}Oundaries declared in the preceding; 
section; and shall have concurrent jurisdiction in civil and criminal 
oases, with the State of Kentucky on the Ohio river, and with the 
State of Illinois on the Wabash river, so far as said rivers form the 
common boundary between this State and said States respectively. 

ARTICLE XV. 

M I S C E 1. 1. A N E O C S . 

Section 1. All officers, whose appointment is not otherwise pro- 
vided for in this Constitution, shall be chosen in such manner as 
now is, or hereafter may be, prescribed by law. 

Sec. 2. When the duration of any office is not provided for by 
this Constitution, it may be declared by law ; and, if not so declared, 
such office shall be held during the pleasure of the authority making 
the appointment. But the General Assembly shall not create any 
office, the tenure of which shall be longer than four years. 

Sec. 3. Whenever it is provided in this Constitution, or in any 
law which may be hereafter passed, that any officer, other than a 
member of the General Assembly, shall hold his office for any given 
term, the same shall be construed to mean, that such officer shall hold 
his office for such term, and until his successor shall have been elected 
and qualified. 

Sec. 4. Every person elected or appointed to any office under this 
Constitution, shall, before entering on the duties thereof, take an 
oath or affirmation, to support the Constitution of this State, and of 
the United States, and also an oath of office. 



31 

Sec. 5. There shall be a Seal of State, kept by the Governor for 
offifiial purposes, which shall be called the Seal of the State of Indiana. 

Sec. 6. All commissions shall issue in the name of the State, 
shall be signed by the Governor, sealed with the State Seal, and at- 
tested by the Secretary of State. 

Sec. 7. No county shall be reduced to an area less than four 
hundred square miles; nor shall any county, under that area, be 
further reduced. 

Sec. 8. No lottery shall be authorized ; nor shall the sale of 
lottery tickets l)e allowed. 

Sec. 9. The fallowing grounds, owned by the State in Indian- 
apolis, namely : the State House Square, the Governor's Circle, and 
so much of out-lot numbered one hundred and forty-seven, as lies 
north of the arm of the Central Canal, shall not be sold or leased. 

Sec, 10. It shall be the duty of the General Assembly to provide 
for the permanent enclosure and preservation of the Tij)pecanoe 
Battle Ground. 

ARTICLE XVI, 

AMENDMENTS. 

Section 1. Any amendment or amendment,'? to this Constitution^ 
may be proposed in either branch of the General Assembly ; and if 
the same shall be agreed to by a majority of the members elected to 
each of the two Houses, such proposed amendment or amendments 
shall, with the yeas and nays thereon, be entered on their jour- 
nals, and referred to the General Assembly to be chosen at the next 
general election ; and if, in the General Assembly so next chosen, 
such proposed amendment or amendments shall be agreed to by 
a majority of all the members elected to each House, then it 
shall be the duty of the General Assembly to submit such amend- 
ment or amendments to the electors of the State ; and if a majority 
of said electors shall ratify the same, such amendment or amend- 
ments shall become a part of this Constitution, 

Sec. 2. If two or more amendments shall be submitted at the 
same time they shall be submitted in such manner that the elec- 
tors sliail vote for or against each of such amendments separately ; 
and while such an amendment or amendments, which shall have 
been agreed upon by one General Assembly, shall be awaiting the 
action of a succeeding General Assmbly, or of the electors, no addi- 
tional amendment or amendments shall be proposed. 



SCHEDULE. 

This Constitution, if adopted, sliall take effect on tlie first day of 
November, in the year one thousand eight hundred and fifty-one, 
and shall supersede the Constitution adopted in the year one thou- 
sand eight hundred and sixteen. That no inconvenience may 
arise from the change in the government, it is hereby ordained as 
follows : 

First. All laws now in force, and not inconsistent with this Con- 
stitution, shall remain in force until they shall expire or be repealed. 

Second. All indictments, prosecutions, suits, pleas, plaints and 
other proceedings, pending in any of the courts, shall be prosecuted 
to final judgment and execution; and all appeals, writs of error, 
certiorari and injunctions, shall be carried on in the several courts 
in the same m.anner as is now provided by law. 

Third. All fines, penalties and forfeitures, due or accruing to 
the State, or to any county therein, shall inure to the State, or to 
such county, in the manner prescribed by law. All bonds executed 
to the State, or to any officer in his official capacity, shall remain in 
force, and inure to the use of those concerned. 

Fourth. All acts of incorporation for municipal purposes, shall 
continue in force under this Constitution until such time as the 
General Assembly shall, in its discretion, modify or repeal the 
same. 

Fifth. The Governor, at the expiration of the present official 
term, shall continue to act until his successor shall have been sworn 
into office. 

Sixth. There shall be a session of the General Assembly com° 
raencing on the first Monday of December, in the year one 
thousand eight hundred and fifty-one. 

Sevcnih. Senators now in office and holding over, under the 
existing Constitution, and such may be elected at the next general 
election, and the Representatives then elected, shall continue in office 
until the first genera! election under this Constitution. 

EightJi. The first general election under this Constitution, shall 
be held in the year one thousand eight hundred and fifty-two. 

Ninth. The first election for Governor, Lieutenant Governor, 
Judges of the Supreme Court and Circuit Courts, Clerk of the 
Supreme Court, Prosecuting Attorney, Secretary, Auditor, and 
Treasurer of State, and State Superintendent of Public Instruction, 



33 

under this Constitution, shall be held at the general election in the 
year one thousand eight hundred and fifty-two ; and such of said 
officers as may be in office when this Constitution shall go into 
effect, shall continue in their respective offices until their successors 
shall have been elected and qualified. 

Tenth. Every person elected by popular vote, and now in any 
office which is continued by this Constitution, and every person who 
shall be so elected to any such office before the taking effect of this 
Constitution, (except as in this Constitution otherwise provided,) 
shall continue in office until the term for which such person has 
been or may be elected, shall expire : Provided, that no such person 
shall continue in office after the taking effect of this Constitution, 
for a longer period than the term of such office in this Constitution 
prescribed. 

Eleventh. On the taking effect of this Constitution, all officers 
thereby continued in office, shall, before proceeding in the further 
discharge of their duties, take an oath or affirmation, to support this 
Constitution. 

Twelfth. All vacancies that may occur in existing offices, prior 
to the first general election under this Constitution, shall be filled 
in the manner now prescribed by law. 

Thirteenth. At the time of submitting this Constitution to the 
eleetors for their approval or disapproval, the article numbered thir- 
teen, in relation to negroes and mulattoes, shall be submitted as a 
distinct proposition in the following form ; '" Exclusion and Coloni- 
zation of Negroes and Mulattoes," "Aye" or " No." And if a 
majority of the votes cast shall be in favor of said article, then the 
same shall form a part of this Constitution; otherwise it shall be 
void, and form no part thereof. 

Fourteenth, No article or section of this Constitution shall be 
submitted, as a distinct proposition, to a vote of the electors, other- 
wise than as herein provided. 

Fifteenth. Whenever a portion of the citizens of the counties of 
Perry and Spencer shall deem it expedient to form, of the contiguous 
territory of said counties, a new county, it shall be the duty of those 
interested in the organization of such new county, to lay off the same 
by proper metes and bounds, of equal portions as nearly as practic- 
able, not to exceed one-third of the territory of each of said counties. 
The proposal to create such new county shall be submitted to the 
voters of said counties, at a general election, in such manner as 
shall be prescribed bylaw. And if a majority of all the votes given 
Doc. J.— S. S. R.— 3 



34 

at said election, shall be in favor of the organization of said new 
county, it shall be the duty of the General Assembly to organize the 
same, out of the territory thus designated. 

iSixteenth. The General Assembly may alter or amend the charter 
of Clarksville, and make such regulations as may be necessary for 
carrying into effect the objects contemplated in granting the same; 
and the funds belonging to said town shall be applied according to 
the intention of the grantor. 

Done in Convention, at Indianapolis, the tenth day of February, 
in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and fifty-one; 
and of the Independence of the United States, the seventy-fifth. 

GEORGE WHITFIELD CARR, 

Attest : President 

Wm. H. English, 

Principal Sec7^etary. 

George L. Sites, ^ 

Herman G. Bark.wf,Ij1j, > Assista7it Secretaries, 

Robert M. Evans, J 



35 



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38 



UNITED STATES SENATORS. 



NAME. 


P. 0. ADDRESS. 








Logansport. 





REPRESENTATIVES IN THE FORTY-THIRD CONGRESS. 



XO. OF CONG. DISTRICT. 


NAME. 


P. 0. ADDRESS. 




Godiove S. Ovth 


Lafayette. 






Warsaw. 




Wiiliam E Niblack 


Evansville. 




Simon K. Wolfe 


New Albany. 


Third 




Lawrenceburgh. 




Jeremiah M. Wilson 


Connersville. 


Fiftli 




Indianapolis. 






Blooinington. 






Lebanon. 


Bijrhth 


James N. Tvuer 

J P C hanks 


Peru. 




Portland. 






Hiintiugtou. 






LaPorto. 









GENERAL ASSEMBLY— FORTY-EIGHTH SESSION. 



SENATORS. 



Senatoetal Dis- 
trict. 


NAME. 


RESIDENCE. 


OCCUPATION, 




M. T. Carnahan 




Farmer. 




H C Go 'd no- 


Evansville 


Lawyer. 


Third 


B F. Fuller 




Farmer. 






Wheatland 




Fifth 


Leroy Cave 


Kellersville 


Farmer. 




Milltown 


Farmer. 


Seventh 

Si'j^lith 


G W Friedley . . 


Bedford 


Lawyer. 






Lawyer. 


Ninth 








Albert W. Hall 




Blanufacturer. 


Eleventh 


J H Friedh'v . 








Wirt 


Farmer. 






Versailh^B 


Lawyer. 




Richard 0. Gregg 


Lawyer. 




Laurel 


Manufacturer. 




Ricliard M. Haworth 


Farmer. 




Geora;e B. Sleeth 


Ruehville 

Shelbyville 


Lawyer. 








Ninete<'nth ■ 


Major R. Slater 


Franklin 


Editor. 



39 
GENERAL ASSEMBLY— FORTY-EIGHTH SESSION. 

SENATOES.— CONTINUED. 



SENATOBiAt Dis- 
trict . 


NAMES. 


RESIDENCE. 


OCCUPATION. 


Tw(;Titieth 


Wiley E. Dittemore 




Lawyer. 


Twenty-lTirst 


M. B. Kingo 


PolHUd 


Harvey 1). Scott 


Lawyer. 


Twenty-Third 














Twcmv-Fifth 


J. H'. Harney 






Twenty- Sixth 


William P. Rliocies 




Lawyer. 


Twenty-Seventh 

Twenty Eighth 

Twenty-Ninth | 


William Taylor 








Farmer nnd Lawyer. 


W. C. Thompson 




D. H. Oliver 

William R. Hough 






Thirtieth 






Tliiitv-First 










A. J. NeiT 






Tliirty-Tliird 








Tliiitv -Fourth i 


William O'Brien 


NobiC'-ville 

Kokomo 




Thirty-Fifth 






Thirtv-J^ixth 


Mllo K. Smith 

K. S. Dwlggius 

K. 0. Wadge 




Tliirty-Seventh 

Thinv-Eighth 


Ri-nsseiaer , 

Hobart 


Lawyer. 
Kailroad Agent. 


Thirty-Ninth...,. 

Fortieth l^f. 


.1. H Winterbotham 




South Bend 


Lav^yer. 


Forty-First ....; 




Elkhart , 








Lawyer. 


Forty-Third 


Robert Miller 






Mitriiju , ... . 


Lawyer. 


Forty-Fifth 




Bluftton 


For y-Sixth 


0. Bird 






Forty Seventh 




Fort Wayne 


Editor. 


Forty-Eighth 








Forty-Ninth 


W. I. Howard 















GENERAL ASSEMBLY— FORTY-EIGHTH SESSION. 

EEPEESENTATIVES. 



Representative 

DiSTKICT. . 


NAME. 


RESIDENCE. 


OCCOPATION. 


First 


James W. Whitworth 




Survey or i 


f 






Second ■ 






Mi Her 


Third 


Stephen D. Dial 




Lawyer, 
Lawyer. 


Fourth 


C. A. Buskirk 




Fifth 


James Barker 

H. S. Cauthorn 

M. h. Brett 


Petersburgh 


Sixth 










Kiffhth 


H A. Peed 




Lawyer. 


Ninth 






Tenth 








Elevnth 




Leavenworth 

Bock"? Mill 


Saddler. 


Twelfth 






Thirteenth 


W. H. Pfrimmer 






Fourteenth 


James H. Willard 




Lawyer. 


Fifteenth 


Joseph Baker 

David C. Branham 




Sixteenth 


Madison .,,.. 


Railroad Contractor, 



40 
GENERAL ASSEMBLY— FORTY-EIGHTH SESSION. 

REPEESENTATIVES. — CONTINUED. 



RepbesentaTive 
District. 



Sevcateeiith 

Eighteenth 

JJiaeieeuth 

Tweutieth 

Twenty-First .... 
Twenty -Second.. 
Twenty- third.... 
Tweniy -fourth . 
Twenty-Fifth .... 
Twenty-Sixth .... 
Twem y- Seventh . 
Twf nty-Kighth ., 
Twenty-Ninth ... 

Thirtieth 

Thirty-First 

Thiriv-Secoiid .... 
Thirty-Third .... 

Thirty-Fourth .... >• 

Thirty-tifth 

Tliirty-Sixth , 

Thirty -Seventh , 

Thirty-Jiighth 

Thirty-mnth , 

Fortieth 

Forty-Fir,-t , 

Forty- Second 

f 

Forty-Third \ 



Forty-Fourth .. 

Forty-Fifth 

Fort.> -Sixth 

Foriy-Seventh . 

Forty-Eighth .. 

Forty-Nintli .... 

Fiftieth 

Fifiy-First 

Fifty-Second.... 

Fifty Ihird 

Fifty-Fourth.... 

Filty-Fil'th , 

Fifty-Sixth 

Fifty-Seventh.. 
Fifty Ki;,'hth,.. 
Fifty >;inth....„ 

Sixtieth , 

Sixty- First 

Sixty-Second .. 
Sixty-Thiid 

Sixty-Fourth ... 



Sixty-Fifih 

Sixty-Sixtli 

Sixty-Seventh.... 
Sixty-Eighth .... 

Sixty-Ninth 

Seventieth 

Seven! y-First .. . 
Seventy-Second . 
Seventj-'l'hird ... 
Seventy-Fourth. 

Seventy-Fifth ..... 



Seventy-Sixih 

Sev(^nty->eventh . 
Seventy-Eighth .. 
Sevenly-Nintl) .... 



Daniel Blocher 

Willinni D. Wilson.... 

Benjamin North 

Noah S. Given 

Adam G. Hoyer 

Israel Noble 

Benjamin F. Tingley. 

George Gondie 

John D. Miller 

James M. Wynn ....... 

John W. Cline 

S. J. Barrett 

James A. McKinney.. 

A. W. Reeves 

William H. Edwards. 
John R. Isenhower....' 

8. S. Coffman ...., 

William K. Edwards.. 

-P. H. Lee 

William H. Gifford 

Jesse H. Reno ..... 

W. B. Smith , 

Allen Furnas 

Jesse Ogden..... 

H. Satterwhite 

T. W. Woolen 

W. S. Shirley 

Nathan Kimball 

J. J. W. Biiliugsley.... 

Edward King 

E. T.Johnson 

Charles G. Offutt 

Samuel i). Speliman.... 
John K. Hedrick. ....... 

W. H. Broaddus 

Williuin Baxter 

Lewis (J. VValker 

N. T. Butts 

A. C. Mellett, 

Thomas N. Jones 

J. O. Hardesty 

Nathan H. Clark 

John E. Rumsey 

WilliHm Strange 

J. P. Richardson 

C. S. Wesner 

M. M. Martin 

J. T. Durham 

John E. Woodard 

John Gronendyke 

H. K. Claypool 

R. G Odle 

Eliliu Hollingsworth.. 

James W, Cole 

Robert Gregory 

C. W. Anderson 

T. M. Kirkpatrick 

John W. Eward 

Gary E. Cowgill 

C. V. N. Lent 

Edward S. Lenfesty.... 

A. Wilson 

John McConnell 

B. M.Cobb 

Jeff. C. Bowser 

-Mnhlon Keller 

C. B. Tullev 

J. D. Thayer 

P. S. Trouiman 

H. C. Stanley 



RESIDENCE. 



Hoi man's Station . 
Versailles.. 
North's Landing. 
Lawrenceburgh 
Batesville.. 
Andersonville , 
Rushville 
Sardinia . 
Greensburgh . 
Scipio.. 
Columbus . 
Columbus . 
Beck's Grove. 
Kllettsville . 
Mitchell 
BlOMmfield . 
Sullivan. 
Terre Haute 
Riley . 

Brazil 

Quincy 

Greencastle 

Danville 

Danville 

Martinsville 

Franklin 

Martinsville 

Indianapolis 

Indianapolis 

Indianapolis 

Indianapolis 

Greenfield 

Winterwood 

Lewisville 

Connersville 

Richmond 

Richmond 

Winchester 

Muncie 

Anderson 

Anderson 

Eagletown 

Tipton 

Micliegantown 

Delphi 

Lebanon 

Middle Fork , 

Waveland 

Bloomingdale 

Eugene 

Covington 

Fine Village 

Far Institute 

Stock well 

Monticello ., 

Royal Center 

Kokomo 

Xeuia 

Wabash 

Wabash 

Marion 

Dunkirk 

Decatur 

Huntington 

Fort Wayne 

Monroev'ille 

Columbia City 

Warsaw 

Ivewanna 

Albion 



OCCUPATION. 



Farmer, 

Lawyer. 

Farmer. 

Law,\ er. 

Farmer. 

Farinei , 

Farmer. 

Farmer. 

Lawyer, 

Farmer. 

Farmer. 

Druggist. 

Farmer. 

Farmer. 

Lawyer. 

Lawyer. 

Farmer and Physician. 

Lawyer. 

Farmer. 

Physician. 

Farmer. 

Lawyer. 

Fruit Grower. 

Lawyer. 

Lawyer. 

Lawyer. 

Lawyer. 

Manufacturer. 

Editor. 

Railroad Treasurer. 

Lawyer. 

Lawyer. 

Farmer. 

Farmer. 

Farmer. 

Farmer. 

Lawyer. 

Farmer. 

Editor. 

Physician. 
Editor. 

Farmer. 

Teacher. 

Physician. 

Physician. 

Lawyer 

Physician. 

Farmer. 

Stock Dealer. 

Farmer. 

Lawyer. 

Farmer. 

Farmer. 

Merchant. 

Lawyer. 

Grain Dealer, 

Farmer. 

Lawyer. 

Lawyer. 

Physician. 

Lawyer. 

Farmer. 

Farmer. 

Lawyer. 

Lawyer. 

Merchant. 

Lawyer. 

Mauiifaeturer, 

Farmer. 

Farmer. 



41 
GENERAL ASSEMBLY— FORTY-EIGHTH SESSION. 

REPRESENTATIVES. — CONTINUED. 



Bepeesentative 

DlSTEICT. 


NAME. 


RESIDENCE. 


OCCUPATION. 




S. S. Shutt 














Eifihty-Srcond 














^JCiglity-Foiirth 


D. S. Scott 






R. B Baton 


Argos 


Physician. 
Physician. 




W. W. Buttcrworth 


Wighth-Scvrnth 

Eighty-Eighih 




South Bend 


Gforgo H. Teeter 








Physician. 
Physician. 




,T. A. Hatch 
















Lawyer. 




•'•'■Deceased. 





JUDGES OF THE SUPREME COURT. 



NAME. 


DISTRICT. 


RESIDENCE. 


TERM EXPIRES. 




First District 




January 2, 1877. 
January 2, 1877. 
January 2, 1877. 
January 2, 1877. 




Second District.... 

Third District 




8amu(l H. Busktrk 






Fourth District 






LaPorte 









CIRCUIT JUDGES. 



NO. OF CIRCUIT. 


NAME, 


RKSIDENGE. 


TERM EXPIRES. 




William F. Barrett , 




October 22, 1879. 






Rockport. 


October 24, 1876. 


Third 




October 22, 1879. 








October 25, 1876. 


Ji'ifth 






October 22, 1879. 


Sixth 






October 28, 1876. 


Seventh 






October 21, 1879. 


Eighth 






Ocjober 24, 1877. 
Gi'.tober 22, 1879. 


Ninth ...... ... 






"Tenth 




Bedford 


October 22, 1879. 


iEleventh. 


Oscar M. Welborn 




October 24, 1879. 


Twelfth 


Newton T. Malott 




November 1 187ti. 


Tliirteenth 






October 22, 1879. 




ChMmhars ft. Patterson.. 




October 26, 1876. 


l<'ifteentU ., ..> William F. Fraukliu 


Spencer 


November G, 1876. 



42 



CIRCUIT JUDGES.— Continued. 



NO. OF DISTBICT. 


NAME. 


BESIDENCi;. 


TEEM EXPIKKS 


Sixteenth 






October 24 187(5, 








October 21, ls79. 


Eighteenth 


Jot^hua H Mellet 




October 24 1876, 








October 2m, 1878, 






Frankfort 


October 24, 1879. 


Twenty- First 


Thomas V\ Davidson 




November 1, 1876, 






October 21, 1879, 


Twenty-Third 


David P. Vintou 




• 'ctober 24, 1877, 


Twenty Fourth 


Hervey Cravens 




October 19, 1S79. 


Twenty- Fifth 




October 22 1879, 


Twonty-Sixih 




Portland 

Wabash 


November 23, 1877, 






October 22 1879 


Twenty Eighth 




October 28, 1879. 








Thirtieth 






October 22 1879 


Thirty-First 


Hiram A. Gillett 




October 22, 1879. 




Thomas S. Stanfield 




October 24, 1876. 


Thirty Third 




Ootober 22 1879, 


Thirty- Fourth 


William A. Woods 




October 22, 1879, 


Thirty Fifth 






October 30 1879. 


Thirty-Si.xth 


Clark N. Pollard 




October 24, 1879, 


Thirty-Seventh 






Oc'ol>er 24, 187G, 


Thirty Ejohih 






October 26. 1876, 











CRIMINAL CIRCUIT JUDGES,,- 



COUNTY,. 


NAME. 


KESIDEHCE. 


TERM EXPIRES, 


Alien ,.... 






October 24, 1874. 








October 26, 1874. 




Chivies H. Teat 




November IH, 1S76, 




Baltzer K. Higinbothani...... 




October 2.3, 1875, 






October 2{i, 187G. 


Yigo 






October 26, 1974, 











SUPERIOR COURT JUDGES, 



NAMK 


RE8II)ENCK, 


TERM EXPIRES. 






October, 1874, 






October, 1874, 






October, ]874, 









43 



CIRCUIT PROSECUTING ATTORNEYS. 



No. 01' Circuit. 



First 

Second 

Third 

Fourth 

Fifth 

Sixth 

Seventh 

Rifrhth , 

Ninth 

Tenth 

Ek'venth 

Twrlfih , 

Tliirte-^nth... 
F'ourteeiitli . 



NAME. 



.To'' n Brownlee 

Edwin R. Hatfield .... 

San'Uel B Voyles 

Kobtrt J. Sliaw 

ChaiWs L. Jcwelt 

.John 0. Cravens 

George R. Brunibhiy. 

Klias R. Moiitlort 

Am 8 Bnrns 

J. W. Tu.kcr 

John C. Scliaefer 

,Johu H. O'Neal 

Courtlaud C. Matsou.. 
Samuel R. Haniill 



Fifteenth Ambrose M. Cunning 



Sixteenth 

Seventeenth 

Eiglite nrli 

Nineteenth 

Twentieth 

Twenty- First .... 
Twenty-Second.. 
Twenty-Third.... 
Twenty-Fourth . 
Twenty-Fifth.... 
Twenty-Sixth ... 
Twenty-Seventh 
Tweuth Eighth . 
Twenty-Ninth .. 

Th rtieth 

Thirty-First 

Thirty-Second.... 
Thirty-Third .... 
Thii tv-Fourth.. 

Thirty Fifth 

Thirty-Sixth 

Tliirty-Seventh . 
Thirty-Eighth .. 



Kendall M. Hord.. 

Iianiel W Conistock 

Charles W. Butler 

Thomas J. Gofer 

William B. \V;.lls 

Rdbert B. Se-rs 

Robert B. F. Pierce 

William E Uhl .^ 

Joel Saffoi d 

John \V. Ryan 

Josepl] L Dai ey 

Alexander Hess 

Alfred Moore 

That! dens S. Rollins 

Simon P. Thomijson 

Thomas J. Wood 

James H. Crawley 

Leiiih H. Haymont 

Wesley C.Gla^cow 

William B. McCouuell. 

James F. Elliott 

Bartemus Burk 

Jacob R. Bittinger 



RESIDENCE. 



Mount Vernon.. 
R.ickport.. 

Salem 

New Albany 

Ije.xiiijitou 

Osg.iod 

Lawrenceburgh 

Greeusburgh 

Columbus 

Paoli 

Jasper 

Washington 

Greencastle 

Sullivan . 

Martinsville 

ShelbyvilU 

Richmond 

Knig!it.*town 

Dnnville 

Lebanon 

Newport 

Crawfordsville . 

Monticello 

Noblesville 

iMuGcie 

Blurttou 

Wabash 

Huntington 

Logansport 

Rensselaer 

Crown Point 

LaPorte 

Warsaw 

LaGrange 

Ang.ila 

Kokomo 

Liberty 

Fort Wayne 



TERM EXPIRES. 



October 22, 1875. 
October 26, 1874. 
October 22, 1875. 
October 26, 1874. 
October 22, 1875. 
November 3, 1874. 
October '2'\, 1874. 
October 26, 1874, 
October 22, 1875. 
Oct..ier 22, 1875. 
October 24, 1875. 

November 6, 1874. 
October 22, 1875. 
October 29, 1875. 
tictober 26, 1874. 
October 26, lb74, 
October 22, 1875. 
Octob r 26, 1^74. 
October ai, 1875. 
October 26, 1874. 
November 3, 1874. 

October 22, 1875. 
October 2ii, 1874. 
November 3, 1874. 
November 3, 1874. 
October 28, 1874. 
Oct >ber 22, 1875. 
November 3, 1874. 
November 15, 1874. 
October 22, 1«75. 
October 26. 1874. 
October 22^ 1875, 
October 28, 1875. 
October 26, 1874. 
October 22, 1875. 
October 27, 1775. 



CRIMINAL CIRCUIT PROSECUTING ATTORNEYS. 



County. 


NAME. 


RESIDENCE. 


TERM EXPIRES. 


.\llen 




Charlestown 




Floj'd and Clark 




Octobi r 26 1874 




Robert P. Parker 












October 26 1874 








October 2fi 1874 


Vigo 

















44 



COUNTY OFFICERS. 



ADAMS — DECATrs. 



Clerk 


A. Jndson Hill. 




Seymour Worden. 
John Dirkson. 








Sheriff. 


David King. 
Harrv B. Knoff. 




John E. Smith. 







BARTHOLOMEW— CoLrMBUs. 



Clerk 


S. Webber Smith. 




James W. Wells. 




Joshua D. McQueen. 


Recorder 

Sheriff 


Joseph Whitten. 




William A. Hayes, 











BLACKFORD— Hartfoed Citi 



ALLEN- Fort Watne. 



Clerk 

Auditor... 
Treasurer 
Rt-corder.. 
Sheriff.. ... 
Surveyor.. 
Coroner. .. 



William S Edsall. 
Henry J. Rudisill. 
Jolin Ring. 
John M. Kach. 
Charles A Zollinger. 
William H. Goshora. 
John T. Waters. 



BENTON— OxFOED. 



Clerk 

Auditor... 
Treasurer. 
Recorder . 
Sheriff".. ... 
Surveyor . 
Coroner... 



Charles M. Seott. 
William Snyder. 
William B. McConnell. 
Isaac H. Phares. 
Henry C. Harris. 
Jesse 6 IMcNeil. 
James W. Barnes. 



BOONE— Lebanon. 



Clork 


Richard G. Steele. 






Treasurer 


Abraham Stahi. 
John Noonan. 


Sheriff. 


Charles A. Rhine. 


Surveyor 


Jonas Perrell. 
David Taylor. 







Clerk 




Auditor 


John M. Ball. 
Samuel S. Dailey. 




Sheriff. 


William R. Simpking. 











BROWN— Nashville. 



CARROLL— Delphi. 



Clerk 






William G. Watson. 




Eli T. Moore. 




Fletcher D. Wood. 


Sheriff. 


Albert T. Sipes. 


Surveyor 


Leonidas S. Alder. 
Martin E. Phillips. 







CASS — LOOANSPOET. 



Clerk 

Recorder.. 
Auditor... 
Treasurer 

Sheriff 

Surveyor.. 
Coroner... 



Noah S. LaRose. 
Simon P. Shuron. 
John F. Doilds. 
Jacob Hebel. 
William T. Manly. 
John C. Brophy. 
Joseph H. Joins. 



Clerk 

Auditor... 
Trcas>)rer 
Recorder. 
Sheriff.. ... 
Surveyor.. 
Coroner... 



James Odell. 
John A. CartTvrlght. 
Henderson Dunkle. 
John W. Fawcett. 
Robert Mitchell. 
Elias Heistarid. 
John Sidenbender. 



CLARKE— CHi RLE8T0WN. 



Clerk 

Auditor... 
Treasurer 
Recorder.. 
Sheriff.. ... 
Surveyor.. 
Coroner... 



.John L. Ingram. 
Michael V. McCann. 
David S. Krons. 
Samuel H. McGinnigal. 
George W. Baxter. 
William W. Faris. 
John J. Roose. 



45 



COUNTY OFFICERS— Continued. 



CLAY — Bowling Green. 



Clerk 

Auditor 

Treasurer .. 
Rncorder.... 

Sheritr 

Surveyor ... 
Coroner 



George E. Hubbard. 
Jiiin<!s M. llaskius. 
Boss S. Hill. 
Edwin A. Rasser. 
.John Slanelu 
Homer Hicks. 
Franklin Tenney. 



CRAWFORD— Leavenworth. 



Clerk 

Auditor. ... 
Treasurer. 
Recorder... 

Sheriff 

Surveyor... 
Coroner ... 



William L. Temple. 
Malaclii Mank. 
Elijah F. Roberson. 
Clark !*". Orecelius. 
John B. Paiiky. 
Samuel G. Hightill. 
Isaac East. 



DEARBORN — Lawkenceburgh. 



Clerk 

Auditor... 
Treasurer. 
Recorder.. 
Sheriff.. ... 
Surveyor . 
Coroner .. 



John A. Conwell. 
Richard D. Slater, Jr. 
Francis hang. 
Frank M. Johnson. 
Louis Weitzel. 
Samuel Allen. 
Daniel M. Skinner. 



DeKALB — Auburn. 



DUBOIS— Jasper. 



Clerk 

Auditor .. 
Treasurer 
Recorder.. 

Sheriff 

Surveyor.. 
Coroner... 



Bazil B. Edmouston. 

August Litschgi. 
Edward Stephenson. 
George J Jutt. 
John VVeikel. 
William R. Osborn. 
George Cox. 



CLINTON— Frankfort. 



Clerk 

Auditor 

Treasurer 

Recorder 

Sheriff 

Surveyor 

Coroner 



DeWitt C. Bryant. 
Cyrus Clark. 
Stephen Shanks. 
John P. Dearth. 
Frederick Tice. 
James R. Brown. 
George W. Morris. 



DAVIESS— Washington. 



Clerk 

Auditor.. . 
Treasurer, 
Recorder.. 

Sheriff 

Surveyor.. 
Coroner .. 



George S. Walters. 
Nathan G. Read. 
William Kenneday. 
Andrew I. Smiley. 
I^aac W. McCormick. 
William Shanks. 
Daniel Ageu. 



DECATUR— Geeensburgh. 



Clerk 


Joseph R. Lanning. 
William Mclntyre. 




Treasurer 


Nicholas Ensley, 
Danii'l Z. Hoffman. 


Sheriff. 


William L. Meise. 




Chauucy C. Clark. 









Clerk 

Auditor... 
Treasurer 
Recorder 
Sheriff.... 
Surveyor. 
Coroner... 



Ira G. Grover. 
Frank M. Weadon. 
Conway 0. Lanham. 
William B. Harvey. 
Giles E. White. 
Samuel L. Anderson. 
Abel Withrow. 



DELAWARE— Muncie. 



Clerk 


George W. Greene. 


Auditor 


Abraham J. Buckles. 






Sheriff. 


Coleman H. Slaitler. 


Surveyor 


Stanton J. Hussey. 
G. W.H. Kemper. 







ELKHART- Goshen, 



Clerk 

Auditor... 
Treasurer 
Recorder. 
Sheriff...., 
Surveyor. 
Coroner.. 



Laporte Keefner. 
Alba M. Tucker. 
Charles T. Green. 
Lewis D. Thomas. 
John W. Egbert. 
James R. McCord. 
William Waugh. 



46 



COUNTY OFFICERS— Continued. 



FAYETTE— CONNEESVILLE. 



Clerk 

Auditor... . 
Treasurer. 
KecordtT... 

Sheriff. 

Surveyor... 
Coroner 



Gilbert Trusler. 
William H. Green. 
George M. Nelson. 
Charles E. Sanders. 
Jonathans. Miller. 
Charles R. Williams. 
Joliu Earner. 



FOUNTAIN— Covington. 



Clerk 

Audi or... 
Treasurer 
Recorder.. 
Sheriff.. .. 
Surveyor.. 
Coroner .. 



Elliott N. Boroman. 
Enoa H. Nebek<-r. 
Henry LaTourette. 
Wil!inm Yountz. 
George VV. Bovd. 
Anhur Nelson. 
Robert H. Landers. 



FULTON— Rochester. 



Clerk 

Auditor.. . 
Treasurer 
Recorder . 

Sheriff 

Surveyor 
Coroner... 



Samuel Kelly. 
Daniel Agnnw. 
Andre > V. House. 
Chester Chamberlain. 
Sidney R. Moon. 
Silas J. Miller. 
Daniel W. Johes. 



GRANT— Marion. 



Clerk 

Auditor... 
Treasurer 
Recorder , 
Sberift'.. ... 
Surveyor.. 
Coroner. .. 



Marcus L. Marsh. 
John Ratliff. 
Jesse H. Nelson. 
Addison M. Baldwin. 
Lancaster D. Baldwin. 
Uavid Overman. 
David Jay. 



HAMILTON— NOBLESVILLE. 



Clerk 


Mariou W. Essington. 
Edward K. Hall. 






Stillman C. Moutgomery. 
John W. Wils-on. 




heriff. 






Elijah Cotiinghum. 









FLOYD— New Albany. 



Clei-k 


Bt-njamin T. Welker. 
Thomas J. Fullenlove. 
S uiuel W. Watts. 


Auditor 

Treasurer 


Sheriff 


Gt-.irge W Jones. 











FRANKLIN— Brookville. 



Clerk 

Auditor. . 
Treasure! 
Recorder. 
Sheriff.. .. 
Survej'or, 
Coroner.. 



Samuel S. Harrell. 
George Berry. 
Casper Fogel. 
Fr;.iicis A. Banman. 
John L. Case. 
Emory G. Glidewell. 
George Speer. 



GIBSON— Princeton. 



Clerk 


William P. Welborn. 














Sheriff. 






Daniel S. W. Miller. 




Robert D. Hussey. 





GREENE— Bloomfield. 



Clerk 


David ^. Whittaker. 




Jason M. Cunley. 






Danit-1 B. Hatfield. 


Sheriff 




Surveyor 


Al'-.xaiiber Plummer. 







HANCOCK— Greenfield. 



Clerk 

Auditor... 
Treasurer 
Recorrler.. 
Sheriff.. .., 
Surve.i or.. 
Coroner .. 



Henr' A. Swope. 
Augustus C. Handy. 
Ernest H. Fout. 
NHthaniel H. Hoberts. 
Robert P. Brown. 
William Fries. 
Harrison L. Cooper. 



47 



COUNTY OFFICERS— Continued. 



HAKRISON— CouYDON. 


• 
HENDRICKS— Danville. 


Clprk 


John Ridlay. 
Anizi W. Brewter. 
Lewis W. Bowling. 
Williiini Zollnian. 
SilaB 1 'I'aydon. 
Ji>l)ii Brewster. 
Joseph Wilsoii. 


Clerk 


I/otan W. Jenkins. 
William M Hesa. 






Hiram T. Storm. 








Sheriff 


Sheriff 








Joseph A. Clark. 
















HENRY— New^-asti-e. 


HOWARD— KOKOMO. 


>Clprk , 


Robert B. Carr. 
Seth S. Bennett. 
Thomas S Lines. 
Milton Brown. 
Hugh L. Mullen. 
William R. HarroW. 
William McDowelL 


Clerk 








Luther S. Gray. 










Samuel Richey. 
Willis Blanch. 


Sheriff 


Sheriff 
























HUNTIKGTON— Huntington. 


JACKSON— Bbownsto'wk. 


-dlerk 

Auditor 


TJiomas L. Lucas. 
Robert Simonton. 
Sexton Emley. 
Isanc K. Schlosser. 
Aaron Mc Kinney. 
James M. Hatfield. 
Tipton .\ilman. 


Clerk „... 


John Scott. 

Ralph Applewhite. 

Joseph J. HortsniHn. 


■~rreasuier„ 




Recorder 




Sheriff'. 


Sheriff 




■Surveyor 




James W. Wayman. 
Martin L. Wicks. 




Coroner „... 








JASPER— Reksselaee, 


JAY — PORTLANB. 


•Clerk 


Marion L. Spitler. 
Frank W. Babcock. 
Lemuel C. James. 
Harvey W. Wood. 
Lewis G. Dougherty. 
Charles A Mayhew. 
Normaa Warner. 


Clerk 


David C Baker 


Auditor 




Christopher S. Arthur. 
Joseph L. Ban' a. 
Francis 51. McLaughlin. 
Justice Green Crowell. 


Treasurer 








Sheriff 


Sheriff 


.Survevor„ 

Ooroner 




Coroner 


Oliver M. Hoyt. 






JEFFERSON— Madison. 


JENNINGS— Vebkon. 


Clerk 


James J Sering. 
Rct'us Gale. 
Robert 0. Jackmaa. 
Joel Dickey 
Gmi^ge G. Fenton. 
William M. Jackman. 
Charles Schussler. 


Clerk 


Joseph L. Reily. 


Auditor 




Treasurer 




Hiram Elliott. 


Recorder 




Sheriff. „ 


Sheriff 


William B Wilson 


:Surveyor 




John H Wright. 
William Swilt 


■Coroner . 


Coroner 









48 



COUNTY OFFICERS.— Continued 



JOHNSON— FuAKKWN. 



Glerk 


Isaac IV[. Thompson. 
Edward N. Woolen. 






John W. Wilson. 






Sheriff 


Robert Gillespy. 
William T. Hangham. 




William S. Ea!>sdale. 







KOSCIUSKO— Warsaw. 



eierk 

Auditor . 
Treasurer 
Recorder.. 
Sheriir.... 
Surveyor , 
Coroner .. 



Reuben Williams. 
Ancil B. Ball. 
Andrew J. Blair. 
William G. Piper. 
Oliver P . .Jones. 
John S. Clark. 
Nathan M. Watkins. 



LAKE— Crown Point. 



eierk 

Auditor... 
Treasurer 
Kecorder , 
Sheriff ... 
Surveyor 
Coroner.. 



William W Cheshire. 
Henrv G. Bliss. 
John Brown, .Jr. 
John M. Dwyer. 
John Dauih. 
John J. Wheeler. 
Alonzo J. Pratt. 



LAWRENCE— Bedford. 



MARION— Indianapolis. 



Clerk 

Auditor ., 
Treasurer 

liecordt^r.. 
Sherifi .. . 
Surveyor,, 
yoronor... 



William J. Wallace. 
Francis W. Hamilton. 
Benjamin F. liiley. 
Daniel 0. Gre(Mifield. 
Nicholis R. Ituckle. 
Oliver W. Voorhis. 
Samuel G. Tomliuson. 



fJlerk 


John M. Stalker. 


Auditor „ 


Charles T. Woolfolk. 
Robert Kelly. 




Sherift 


Isaac Newkirk. 
.John Malott. 




Joseph Stinehager. 





KNOX — VlNCENNES. 



Clerk 

Auditor .. 
Treasurer 
Recorder 
Sheriff .... 
Surveyor 
Coroner... 



AriuiUa P Woodall. 
Andrew J. 'rhonias. 
Charles G. Mathesie. 
James J. Mayes. 
.~iuiiin Pay en. 
James E. Baker. 
John Reiter. 



LAGRANGE— La girange. 



Clerk 










Samuel G. Hoff. 






Sheriff 


Thomas C. Bitts. 




James Turley. 
Elmer Belote 









LAPORTE— Lapokte. 



Clerk 


Charles Spath. 
Harvey R. Harris. 
George W. Mecum. 








Sheriff 






Daniel Kennedy. 
William F. Standiford. 









MADISON— Anderson. 



Clerk 


Thomas J. Fleming. 




i 






Weniis Heagy. 




Sheriff 


Albert J. Ross. 




Martin W. Ryan. 
George W. Maynard. 







MARSHALL— Plymouth. 



Clerk 


Daniel McDonald. 
Hiram C. Biirliivgamo. 
John Soice. 
John W. Houghron. 


Treasurer 

Recorder 

Sheriff 








John Bauer, jr. 





49 



COUNTY OFFICERS.— Continued. 



MARTIN— West Shoals. 



Clerk 












Reeordcr 

Sheriff 


Duvid Garty. 

William H. Holsapplo. 

Jolin J. Quigley. 











MONROE— Bloomington. 



<nork , 

Auditor .. 
Treasurer 
Recorder., 

Sheriff 

Surveyor. 
Coroner... 



John R. East. 
James F. Manley. 
J. Milton Rodgevs. 
Drewry Hodges. 
Lawson K. McKinney. 
Henry Henley. 
George P. Hinds. 



MORGAN— Mabtinsvillb. 



Olerk 

Auditor 


Willis Record. 
Salem A. Tilford 




John N. Gregory. 
Hiram T. Craig. 
William W. Kennedy. 
Benjamin F. Butler. 
Thomas Singleton. 




Sheriff 




Coroner 





NOBLE— Albion. 



Clerk 

Auditor... 
Treasurer 
Recorder.. 
Sheriff.... 
Surveyor 
Coroner... 



William C. Williams. 
James C. Stewart, 
James J. Lash. 
John Boughman. 
David Hough. 
John C. Sweet. 
Charles N. Wyland 



OHIO— Rising Scn. 



Clerk 




Auditor 


Oliver H Miller 




Benjamin F. Miller. 
Joseph B. Pepper. 


Recorder 


Sheriff 






Coroner 


Theophilus Jones. 





Doc. J.— S. S. R.— 4 



MIAMI— MuNciB. 



Clerk 

Auditor... 
Treasurer 
Recorder.. 

Sheriff 

Surveyor 
Coroner... 



Jesse S. Zern. 
Leuis B. Fulwiler. 
Iia B. Myers. 
William F. Ege. 
Willard Griswold. 
William \V. Sullivan. 
William t\ Uauk. 



MONTGOMERY— Cbawfoedsville. 



Clerk 

Auditor... 
Treasurer 
Recorder 

Sheriff 

Surveyor. 
Coroner... 



Isaac M. Vance. 
James H. Watson. 
William P. Herrod. 
Theophilus N. Myers. 
Isaac M. Kelsey. 
John Buck. 
John W. Burke. 



NEWTON— Kent. 



Clerk 


Andrew Hall. 
John S. Veach. 


Treasurer 


Daniel A. Pfrimmer. 


Sheriff 










William P. Handly. 





ORANGE— Paoli. 



Clerk 


John C Lingle. 












Sheriff 






David J. Marity. 
Benjamin P. Chatliam, 







OWEN— Spescbb. 



Clerk 






William H. Troth. 










Sheriff 


Kichard T Abrell 












[Resigned June 13,1873, 



50 



COUNTY OFFICERS.— Continued. 



PARKE — ROCKVILLE. 



eieik 

Auditor ... 
Treasurer 
Recorder.. 

Sherifl' 

Surveyor.. 
Coroner... 



John D. Hunt. 
John H. Tate. 
Norval W. Cummings. 
Elwood Hunt. 
Christian Stoinbaugh. 
Levi Smith. 
John A. Aydelott. 



PIKE — Petebsbuegh. 



Clerk 

Auditor ... 
Treasurer 
Recorder . 

Sheriff 

Surveyor.. 
Coroner ... 



Jefferson W. Richardson. 
Levi Kerguson. 
McCrelles Gray. 
Daniel C. Ashby. 
John Crow. 
William C. Miller. 
Joseph Losey. 



POSEY— Mt. Veknon. 



Glerk 






Frank D. Bolton. 








Field A. Pentecost. 


Sheriff 

















PUTNAM— Greencastle. 



Clerk 

Auditor... 
Treasurer 
Recorder.. 

Sheriff 

Surveyor , 
CBroner... 



Milford B. Rudisill. 
William S. Mulholn. 
Harrison M. Randel. 
John Crane, jr, 
James Stone. 
Joseph Frakeg. 
Th.;mas Talbott. 



RIPLEY— Versailles. 



Clerk 


Rowland W. Holman. 




Philip V. Seiliuger. 






Newton Dickerson. 


Sheriff 


Henry Weber. 
Jesse E. Wells. 




John P. Craig. 





PERRY— Cannelton. 



Clerk 

Auditor.. 
Treasure! 

Recorder. 
Sheriff.... 
Surveyor 
Coroner.. 



Sidney B. Hatfield. 
Alfred Vaughn. 
Gu.stave Huthsteiner. 
James I'eter. 
James A. Biirkett. 
Daniel R. McKinn, 
John W. Fell. 



PORTER— Valparaiso. 



Clerk 

Auditor... 
Treasurer 
Recorder.. 

Sheriff 

Surveyor . 
Coroner... 



Rufus P. Wells. 
Reason Bell. 
Frederick F. B. Coffin. 
Henry Stoddard, 
liobert P. Jones. 
V\5alter DeCourcey. 
William C. Paraniore, 



PULASKI— WiNAMAC. 



Clerk „.. 


Patrick J. Falvey. 








yylvcrttei Bracker. 


Sheriff 








William H. Tliompson. 





RANDOLPH— Winchester, 



Clerk 

Auditor... 
Treasurer 
Recorder- 
Sheriff 

Surveyor . 
Coroner... 



Richard A. Leavett. 
William E. Murray. 
Simon Ramsey. 
William C. Brown. 
Doctor F. Ford. 
James H. Hiatt. 
Robert H. Grooms. 



BUSH— Rush viLLE. 



Clerk 

Auditor 


James W. Brown. 
Edward H. Wolfe. 
William B.ale. 


Recorder 

Sheriff' 


Daniel M. Kinney. 
John <iowdy. 
John C. Gregg. 
John H. Spurrier. 









51 



COUNTY OFFICERS— CY)NTiNUED. 



SCOTT— Lexington. 



Clerk 


Henry M. Wilson. 






Richard W. Slontgomery. 




Peter S. Dykons. 
John Jlalick. 
Edward .J. Gasaway. 
Sion M. Kogers. 


Sheriff 

Survi'yor 





SPEXCER— KocKPOET. 



Clerk 

Auditor ... 
Treasurer 
Recorder.. 

Sheriff 

Surveyor.. 
Coroner. .. 



Joseph C. Richardson. 

lUiani A. Richardson. 
William Jacobs. 
Levi E. Riggs. 
Anthony Stevenson. 
William I. Huff. 
Thomas H. Lynes. 



ST. JOSEPH— South Bend. 



Clerk 


George W. Matthews. 




Alfred Wheeler. 


Treasurer 


David B. Crinston. 
Andrew H. Long. 
Joseph Tumock. 
William M. Whitten. 


Sheriff 






Andrew H. Long. 





SULLIVAN— Sullivan. 



Clerk 


Jesse Bicknell. 
Robert McGriffith. 
David Crawley. 
James L. Griffin. 
John F. Curry. 








Sheriff 






Samuel T. Trout. 







TIPPECANOE— Lafayette. 



Clerk 

Auditor ... 
Treasurer 
Recorder.. 

Sheriff 

Surveyor.. 
Coroner... 



Daoiel Royce. 
Smith Lee. 

Richard H. Goodman. 
James H. Jones. 
Christian M. Xisley. 
Philemon C. Vawter. 
William W. Vinnedge. 



SHELBY — Shelby viLLE. 



Clerk 


John Elliott. 




Robert W. Wiles. 




James M. Sleeth. 




Thomas J. Cherry. 


Sheriff 


Tillman A. H. Lee. 


Surveyor 


Jeremiah I)uf;an. 







STARKE— KN9X. 



Clerk 


Willoughby M. McCormick 




Robert H. Bender. 








Austin P. Dial. 


Sheriff 


William H. H. Coffin. 




John E. Short. 




George W. Scofield. 





STEUBEN— Angola. 



Clerk 

Auditor. .. 
Treasurer 
Recorder . 

Sheriff 

Survejor.. 
Coroner... 



Germ Brown. 
Marvin B. Butler. 
Charles D. Chadwick. 
Robert V. Carlin. 
Leander Chuse. 
Elbert N. Woodford.. 
William D. French. 



SWITZERLAND— Vevay. 



Clerk 


J. H. Netherland. 






Treasurer 


Augustus Welch. 
John P. White. 


Sheriff 

Surveyor 


John Armstrong. 
George H. Keeney. 







TIPTON— Tipton. 



Clerk 

Auditor .. 
Treasurer 
Recorder. 
Sheriff.... 
Surveyor. 
Coroner .. 



Ensley A. Overman. 
Walter S. Armstrong. 
William M. Grishaw. 
Archibald E. Small. 
Alexander McC'leary. 
John Van Buskirk. 
Andrew Swope. 



52 



COUNTY OFFICERS— Continued. 



UNION— Liberty. 


VANDERBURGH— EvANSViLLE. 


Olerk 


William M. Casterline. 
James M Duvall. 
Thomas F. Hnddleston. 
James McMauus. 
Emmett B. Goned. 
John J. Leonard. 
Henry Husted. 


Clerk 








Philip De. ker. 












Sherifif 


Sheriff , 


Adolph Pfafflin. 










Robert Smith. 












VEKMILLION— Newport. 


VIGO— Teere Hatjte. 


Clerk 


William Gibson. 
Thomas Cushman. 
James A. Folaiid. 
Robert E. Stephens. 
Lewis H. Beckman. 
John Henderson. 
Thomas Brinilley. 


Clerk 


Martin Hollinger. 
Samuel Royce. 














John B. Meyer. 




Sheriff 






.^.lexander Cooper. 
William D. Mull. 
















WABASH— Wabash. 


WARREN— WiLLIAMSPOKT. 


Clerk 


James M. Amoss. 
John R. Polk. 
Elias B. McPherson, 
James M. Hann. 
George J. Stephenson. 
Samuel S. Ewing. 
Benjamin Sayre. 


Clerk 


Thomas Fry Bryant. 
\\ illiam Moflitt. 










Cyrus Romine. 
James D. Livengood. 
Malone .7. Haines. 






Sheriff 


Sheriff 






Thomas J. Webb. 


















WAKRICK— BooNViLLE. 


WASHINGTON— Salem. 


Clerk . . .... 


Andrew J. Honeycutt. 
John Nester. 
William J. Hargrare. 
Thomas Scales. 
David L. Hart. 
Jasper N. Dubois. 
John J. Knapp. 


Clerk 






Auditor 


J('hn L. Williams. 




Treasurer 

Recorder 


Andrew I. Parker. 




Leander G. Davis. 


Sheriff 


Sheriff 


Thomas J. Meadows. 






Evans H. Wright. 




Coroner 


Samuel McClanahan. 






WAYNE— Richmond. 


WELLS— BuiFFTON. 


Clerk 


William W. Dudley. 
Elihu M. Parker. 
Joseph 6. Lemon. 
Jesse E. Jones. 
William H. Study. 
Robert A. Howard. 
John J. Roney. 


Clerk 


James R. McClary. 
Michael C. Blue. 








Treasurer 


John Ogden. 






James 11. Bennett. 


Sheriff 


Sheriff 


Wilson AV. Wisell. 


Surveyor... 




Coroner 


William W. McBride. 









53 



COUNTY OFFICERS— Continued. 



WUITE— MONTICELLO. 


WHITLEY— Columbia City. 


Clerk 


Dani(-1 D. Dale. 
George Uhl. 
Israel Nordyke. 
William W. McCoUock. 
William E. Saunflerson. 
.lames H. Edwards. 
John A. Wood. 


Clerk 


Eli W. Brown. 






Theodore Reed. 






Henry McLallen, Jr. 
Jeremiah L. Hartsock. 




Recorder 


Sheriff a 


Sh-iriff 


Jacob W. Miller. 


Surveyor 








John B. Firestone. 









JUSTICES OF THE PEACE 



Commissioned Subsequent to October 18, A. D. 1872. 



ADAMS COUNTY. 



NAME. 


P. 0. ADDRESS. 


TERM EXPIRES. 






April 24, 1877. 
October 30, 1876. 






Jeremiah Archbald 




October 30, 1876. 


S. S. Muckle 




April 19, 1877. 
October 30, 1876. 




Decatur..... . 




April 16, 1878. 
October -30, 1876. 






David Eley 




May 8, 1877. 
January 13, 1878. 
April 19, 1877. 
April 16, 1878. 










William Brokaw 


Wellshire, Ohio 




October 30, 1876. 




Berne 


April 19, 1877. 
April 16, 1878. 
Aprilie, 1878. 
June 12 1877 






Vincent D. Bell 




J. G. French 




James Nelson 




October 30, 1876. 


A. B. Woodward 




October 30, 1876. 




Skeels Cross Roads, Ohio .... 









54 
JUSTICES OF THE PEACE.— Continued. 
ALLEN COUNTY. 



James E. Graham 

John Dolan 

James A. Work 

Ludwick Welsheimer.. 

James McComes 

Edward Foster 

Eli Ringwalts 

Luke Lavanway 

John Blown 

M. S. Morrison 

M. L. Baker 

A. A. Baker 

Charles Noyer 

William Keller , 

Nichohis Ladig 

Henry Elhert , 

John P. Hedges 

S. H. Ambler 

J. B. Daws 

Owin D. Rogers 

John Dougall 

Francis Sweet 

Joseph Kichhart 

William \V. Smith 

Joseph G. Eock 

David R. Archer 

Theodoie Couklin 

CheRter Shive 

Edmund Peter Edsall. 
Charles H. Smith 



P. 0. ADDRESS. 



Fort Wayne 

Fort Wayne , 

Areola 

Areola 

Hiuitertowu 

Woodburn 

Chamberlin 

Fort Wayne 

Rout P. 

Monroeville 

Monroeville 

Monroeville 

Monroeville 

Monroeville 

Maples 

Fort Wayne 

Nine Milr P. 0. 
Roanoke 



Perry 



Fort Wayne. 
New Haven.. 



TERM EXPIRES. 



September IT, 1^77. 
June 23, 1877. 
October 21, 1876. 
Ap«-il 17, 1877. 
October 21, 1876. 
October 21, 1876. 
May IT, 1877. 
Blay 6, 1877. 
October 21, 1876. 
October 21, 1876. 
October 21, 1876. 
April 17, 1877. 
October 21, 1876. 
October 21, 1876. 
October 21, 1876. 
October 21, 1876. 
October 21, 1876. 
October 21, 1876. 
October 21, 1876. 
November 1, 1876. 
October 23, 1877. 
October 27, 1877. 
October 27, 1877. 
October 27, 1877. 
October 27, 1877. 
October 27, 1877. 
October 27, 1877. 
October 27, 1877. 
October 27, 1877. 
October 27, 1877. 



BAETHOLOMEW COUNTY. 



NAME. 


P. 0. ADDRESS. 


TERM EXPIRES. 






February 22, 1878. 






February 22, 1878. 


Willard Phelps 


Taylorville 


October 21, 1876. 




Clifford 


April 15, 1877. 


D S UUery 




October 21, 1876. 




L<iwell MiUs 


October 21, 1876. 




South Bethany 


October 21, 1S76. 




October 21, 1876. 




Newbern 


October 21, 1870. 




Octob>r21, 1876. 


Stephen A. Bayless 




October 21, 1876. 




April 16, 1877. 






April 16, 1877. 






Ottober 21, 1876. 






October 21, 1876. 






April 22, 1877. 
April 22, 1877. 










April 22, 1877. 






May 27, 1877. 






October 24, 1877. 






October 24, 1877. 









65 
JUSTICES OF THE PEACE.— Continued. 

BENTON COUNTY. 



NAME. 


P. 0. ADDRESS. 


TERM EXPIRES. 




Bosw. 11 

Oxford 


October 30, ISTfi. 


John Lii' 


October :J0, 187G. 


Gt orgc M Pine 


Ayilitall 


April 21, 1877. 
April 21, 1877. 
April 21, 1877. 
October 30, 1876. 




Aytlitall 




Oxfuid 








Oxford 


October 30, 1876. 




Boswell 


April 21, 1877. 
October 30 1876. 


H M Bfckwitb 


Earl Parke 









BLACKFORD COUNTY. 



NAME. 


P. 0. ADDRESS. 


TERM EXPIRES. 


William M. Stahl 


Hartford City 


April 27, 1S77. 
April 20, 1877. 
December 10 1876 




Hartford City 










April 24, 1877. 







BOONE COUNTY. 



NAME. 

• 


P. 0. ADDRESS. 


TERM EXPIRES. 


James Sandlin 




October 30 1876 


.Tohn E. Coggswell 




October 30 1876 


.John r Alford 




April 17, 1877. 
October 30 1876 


.fohn H. Allen 




Jobn V. Young 




April 2-1, 1877. 
November 26, 1877 


John M Reed 


Northtield 






October 30 1876 












April 24, 1877. 
October 30 1876 


Matthew E. Shirley 




Robert D. Youelt 




October 30, 1876 


William W. Trout 




October .30 1876 


Thomas Shilling 




October 28 1876 









56 
JUSTICES OF THE PEACE.— Continued. 

BROWN COUNTY. 



NAME. 


P. 0. 


ADDRESS. 


TEEM EXPIRES. 






October 
Apr 1 27 
April 28 
Slav 19, 
April 17 
October 
April 17 
October 


29, 1876. 






, 1877. 






, 1877. 






1877. 






1877. 




(d 


ecoased). 








27, 1876. 


Timothy D. Calvin 








, 1877. 


T. 


L 


Lucas 


de 


d) 




24, 1877. 











CARROLL COUNTY, 



NAME. 


p. 0. ADDRESS. 


TERM EXPIRES. 




Delphi 


October 30, 1876. 


William H Sleeth 


Delphi 


October 30, 1876. 






April 25, 1877. 
October 30, 1876. 








D'-lphi 

Rockfteld , 


October, 30, 1876. 




October 30, 1876. 




Rorkfield 


October 30, 1876. 




October 30, 1876. 




Delphi 


October 30, 1876. 


John Q Cline .... 


Delphi 


Oc'ober 30, 1876. 




Carroll P. 


October 30, 1876. 






April 27, 1877. 
October 30, 1876. 










October 30, 1876. 




Camden 


October 30, 1876. 




October 30, 1876. 




Carroll P. 


April 25, 1877. 







CASS COUNTY. 



NAME. 


P. 0. ADDRESS. 


TERM EXPIRES. 






October 31, 1876. 






April 20,1877. 






October .31, 1876. 






October 31, 1876. 






October 31, 1876. 






October 31, 1876. 






October 31, 1876. 






OcioDer 31, 1876. 


C A Brandt 




October 31, 1876. 






October 31, 18,6. 






September 5, 1877. 






October 31, 1876. 


Kobert M. Carney 


Logansport 


April 21, 1877. 



57 
JUSTICES OF THE PEACE— Continued. 

CASS COUNTY— Continued. 



NAMK. 



DtiTid McElratli 

WaRhiiigton Ncff. .. 
Williiun T. Conrad . 

Thomas Hill 

J. H. Walters 

William G. Keys..., 

Elijah Tilman 

Kaston Cotrier 

John Reed 

Robert Rhea 

Michael Reed 

Thomas J. Flynn ... 
Noah F. Surlace 



P. 0. ADDRESS. 



Logansport . 

Logansport . 
Logansjiort . 
Logansport . 



TERM EXPIRES. 



October 
April 20 
October 
October 
October 
October 
October 
October 
October 
October 
October 
October 
October 



1, i87i;. 

, 1877. 
31, 187fi. 
31, 187r,. 
31, 1870. 
27, 1877. 
27, 1877. 
27, 1877. 
27, 1877. 
27, 1877. 
27, 1877. 
27, 1877. 
27, 1877. 



CLARKE COUNTY. 



NAME. 


P. 0. ADDRESS. 


TERM EXPIRES. 






Octobers:, 187C. 






October 31, 1870. 






October 31. 1870. 






October 31, 1876. 






October 31, 1876. 






October 31, 1876. 






December 8, 1876. 


Tbonias Lewis 

John Stiles 




October 31, 1870. 




October 31, 1876. 








Bethlt^hem 


March 13, 1877. 






March 13, 1877. 


Jesse D. Baker 




March 13, 1877. 







CLAY COUNTY. 



NAME. 



Charles W. Bailey 

Robert M. Holliiigsworth 

Silas Terry 

Robert Caldwell 

Archibald McMichael 

Andrew H. Nees 

Samuel Slaven 

William Sarvice 

William Tennis 

William W. McGregor 

Francis A. Horner, (failed to qualify) 



P. 0. ADDRESS. 



Staunton 

Knigbtsville . 

Harmony 

Carbon 

Centre Point. 



Howesville. , 

Coffee 

Martz 

Martz 



TERM EXPIRES. 



November 22, 1877. 
October 31. 1876. 
April 22, 1877. 
October 31, 1870. 
April 22, 1877. 
April 22, 1877. 
November 1, 1877. 
October 31, I87G. 
October 31, 1876. 
Otober31, 1876. 
October 31, 1876. 



58 

JUSTICES OF THE PEACE— Continued. 

CLAY COUNTY— Continued. 



p. 0. ADDRESS. 



TERM EXriKES. 



John M. Molton 

David A. Orman 

George W. Lafliam 

EvauW. Williams, viceF. A. Horner 
Benj. Coppock, vice Wm. Sarvice.... 
Robert M. Rose, vice A. McMichael 
James F. Casteel, vice Silas Ferry... 
Philip Boor, vice J. D. Woods 



Bowling Green 
Bowling Green. 
Bowling Green. 



October 31, 1876. 
October 31, 187fi. 
October 31, 1876. 
Ociober 24, 1877. 
October 24, 1877. 
October 24, 1877. 
October 24, 1877. 
October 24, 1877. 



CLINTON COUNTY. 



James McDonald 

Edward Kramer , 

Isaac Cook 

.Toseph Baum 

John Stiller 

Abraliam W. Skidmore 

George W. Unger 

George W. Smith 

Benjamin Pegg 

Alexander James 

John 0. Scott, (resigned) 

Henry Strange 

Edward Bowman 

Frank MeCray 

.Tames Coulter 

Elijah W. Amos 

.Tames L. Hickerson 

David Holiday, (vice J. 0. Scott).. 



P. 0. ADDRESS. 



Kirk's Cross Roads. 

Frankfort 

Frankfort , 

Franklort 

Rossville 

Middlefork 

Middlefork 

Michegantown , 

Jefferson 

Burget's Corner 

Burget's Corner 

Frankfort 

Frankfort 

Kilmore 

Mulberry 

Pickard's Mills 

Colfax 



TERM EXPIRES. 



April 27 
April 17 
October 
.Tanuary 
October 
July 19, 
July 19, 
April 22 
October 
October 
October 
October 
October 
October 
April 17 
April 22 
May 27, 
October 



1877. 
, 1877. 
22, 1876. 

16, 1877. 
22, 1876. 
1878. 
1878. 
, 1877. 
22, 1876. 
22, 1876. 
22, 1876. 
22, 1876. 
22, 1876. 
22, 1876. 
, 1877. 
, 1877. 
1877. 
24, 1877. 



CRAWFORD COUNTY. 



NAME. 



Anthony Conrad 

Lewis B. Stewart 

Levi Trusty 

F. S. Preble 

Hamilton Martin 

William Wilkiws 

George T. Jenkins.... 
John M. Cummings. 

Daniel Haskins 

Joseph K. Landiss... 



P. 0. ADDRESS. 



Leavenworth . 

Maringo 

Mt. Prospect.. 

Fredonia 

Leavenworth. 

Alton , 

Alton 

Fredonia 



TERM EXPIRES. 



April 22, 1S77. 
October 21, 1876. 
October 21, 1876. 
October 21, 1876. 
April 21, 1877. 
November 10, 1876. 
February 21, 1877. 
•ebruarv 21, 1877. 
June 2d, 1877. 
September 29, 1877. 



59 

JUSTICES OF THE PEACE— Continued. 

DAVIESS COUNTY. 



KAME. 


p. 0. ADDRESS. 


TERM EXPIRES. 






OctobfT 31, 1876. 






October 31, 1870. 






October 31, 1876. 






October 31, 1870. 






October 31, 187tl. 






October 31, 1876. 






AdHI 19, 1877. 






October 31, 1870. 


Jitnu's Heiub!iU};h 




October 31, 1876. 




April 10, 1877. 






April 19, 1877. 









DEARBORN COUNTY. 



NAME. 



James M. Sherrod 

Jereaiiah Grosley 

John Graham 

Johh A. Spicknall 

John Voglcgesang 

Benjamin E. Gossiue.... 

Mason J. Clond 

Jonathan Barber 

George S. Williams 

John Cairns 

Jasper Ross , 

Aaron Miller , 

Enoch Kerr 

Lawrence D. Stanford. 

Isaac H. Oarbangh 

Frederick Huckery 

Aquilla Carson 

George W. Lane 



P.O. ADDRESS. 



Lawrenceburgh 

Lawrencebiirgh 

Lawrenceburgh 

Guilford 

New Alsace 

Harrison, Ohio 

Harrison, Ohio 

Logan's Cross Roads . 

Lawrenceville , 

Hnbbell's P. 

Manchester 

Dillsboro 

Aurora 

Aurora 

Aurora 

Aurora 



TERM EXPIRES. 



October 31, 1876. 
October 31, 1871). 
October 81, 187i>. 
October 31,1876. 
October 31, 1876. 
October 31, 1876. 
April 17, 1877 
October 31, 1876. 
October 31, 1876. 
October 31, 1876. 
November 23, 1877. 
November 23. 1877. 
October 31, 1876. 
Octtber 31. 187G. 
October 31, 1876. 
May 10, 1878. 
October 24, 1877. 
October 24, 1877. 



DECATUR COUNTY. 



NAME. 


P. 0. ADDRESS. 


TERM EXPIRES. 






October 31,1876. 






April 22, 1877. 






April 22, 1877. 






October 31, 1876. 


Alfred G. Thompson 


St Paul 


April 22, 1877. 


St. Paul 


October 31 1876. 


William H Black 


Clifty 


October 31, 1876. 


Samuel Thomas 


Sarditiia 


October 31, 1876. 



60 
JUSTICES OF THE PEACE— Continued. 

DECATUR COUNTY— Continued. 



NAME. 


P. 0. ADDRESS. 


TERM EXPIRES. 


James Fowler 




October 21 1876. 


Henry C. Miller 




(). tober 21, 1876 






June 17, 1877 


John Kromer 




April M, 1«77. 
April 22, 1877. 
March 28, 1877 






Hiram Bruce 


Forest Hill 









DEKALB COUNTY. 



NAME. 


P. 0. ADDRESS. 


TERM EXPIRES. 


Frank M. Bacon 




October 21, 1876. 






May 2, 1877. 
October 21, 1876. 


Isaac Farver 




Henry H. Fales 




October 21, 1876. 






October 21, 1876 


I. Calvin Larue 




October 21, 1»76. 






November 1, 1876. 


George W. Swartz 


Butler 


April 25. 1877. 
May 2, 1877. 
October 17, 1877. 


Daniel E Attenberg 




John M. Uril 








May 2, 1877. 
October 21, 1876. 






Emanuel R. Shoemaker 


Waterloo 


October 21, 1876. 


John McOscar 




April 25, 1877. 
April 25, 1877. 




Butler 




Butler 


April 20, 1877. 







DELAWARE COUNTY. 



NAME. 


P. 0. ADDRESS. 


TERM EXPIRES. 






November 9, 1876. 






November 9, 1876. 


Betijimin F. Youngs 




November 9, 1876. 






November 9, 1876. 






April 17, 1877. 
September 18, 1877. 










November 9. 1876. 






April 17, 1877. 
November 9, 1876. 










April 17, 1877. 
April 2ii, 1877. 
October 28, 1877. 














October 28, 1877. 


John S. Ellis 




October 28, 1877. 






October 28, 1877. 






October 28, 1877. 


F. M. Hardwick 




October 28, 1877. 






October 28, 1877. 


Samuels. White 




October 28, 1877. 






October 28, 1877. 









61 

JUSTICES OF THE PEACE— Continued. 
DUBOIS COUNTY. 



NAME. 


P, 0. ADDRESS. 


TERM EXPIRES. 






October 31, 1876. 






AuRUBt 28, 1877. 






Aupust IS, 1877. 






NovcmlK-i- 25, 1876. 






October 22, 1877. 


Gerhart II. Shipnian 


H'.lland 


September 21, 1877. 
October 31, 1876. 






November 25, 1876. 






October 24, 1877. 






October 24, 1877. 









ELKHART COUNTY. 



NAME. 


P. 0. ADDRESS. 


TERM EXPIRES, 






October 25, 1877. 






April 27, 1877. 
April 27, 1877. 
October 31 1876. 


George W. UaU 




Jolin W. Albin 


Lock P. 






October 31, 1870. 






DeceraVjor 2 187'). 








William Pollock 




October 31, 187ri. 






September 22, 1877. 
October 31 1876 








Elkhart 


October 31, 1876. 




Elkhart 


April 27, lfe77. 
October 31, 1876 








Bristol 


October 31 1876. 




Lock P. 

Lock P. 


December 2 1876 


H.arry F. Eley 


October 31 1876 




Etkhart...! 






Elkhart 


April 27, 1877. 
October 31 1876 




Elkhart , 




Elkhart 


July 26, 1877. 







FAYETTE COUNTY. 



NAME. 


P. 0. ADDRESS, 


TERM EXPIRES. 






October 31 1876 






December 16 1877 






April 20, 1877. 
April 14, 1878. 
July 24, 1877. 















62 

JUSTICES OF THE PEACE— Continued. 

FLOYD COUNTY. 



NAME. 


P. 0. ADDRESS. 


TERM EXPIRES, 


PliirioAs H. Barrett 




Octobf r 31 1876. 






October 31 1870 






October 31 1876 






April 22, 1877. 
October 31, 187G. 


G. W. Dailev - 









FOUNTAIN COUNTY. 



NAME. 


P. 0. ADDRESS. 


TERM EXPIRES. 






Ajiril 19 1877 


Juun A. McBroom 




April 10, 1877. 
October 31 1876 


Williiiin A. Soujer 


Veeders 


Jonatlian S. Gotten 


October 31 1876 






Ociober 31, 1876 






April I'J, 1877. 
August 25, 1878 


H. H. Stilhvell 








October 31, 1870. 


Juip.es G. Mofifitt 


Wallace ., . 


November 2 1877. 




Wallace 


November 2, 1877. 


diaries S. Peck 




October 31, 1870. 






October 31 1876 








John W. Nevvliu 




April 19, 1877. 
October 31 1876 














Attica 


October 31 1876 






Au'^ust 30 1877. 









FEANKLIN COUNTY^ 



NAME. 


P. 0. ADDRESS. 


TERM EXPIRES. 


John N. Senefelt., 




October 18, 1876 


Henry C. Selmeyer 


Oldenburgh 


October 18, 1876. 






April 2. 1877. 
October 18 1876. 




Laurel 

Fairfield ,. 


William A. I Gliflewell 


October 18 1876 






October 18 1870 


King D. Stepher s 




October 18, 1876 






April 21, 1877 




1\U Carmsl 


October 18, 1870. 






October 18, 1870. 








John Webb 


Blooming Grove 


March 8 1877 







63 

JUSTICES OF THE PEACE— Continued. 

FULTON COUNTY. 



GIBSON COUNTY. 



NAME. 


P. 0. ADDRESS. 


TERM EXPIRES. 






November 14, 187G. 






November 14, 1876. 


C. A. Eatoibruok 

H B \iit 




November 15, 1870. ■ 


Kewaiia 

Kewaiia 


Novembi-r 1, 187r.. 




November 14, 187i5. 




November 1, 1870. 






November 1, 187ii. 


William Leonard 




November 1, 187'i. 




November 1, 187i;. 


E T Reod . 




November 1, 187C. 









NAME. 


P. 0. ADDKESS. 


TERM EXPIRES. 






November 1, 1870. 


\. G Cole 




November 1, 1870. 






November 1, 1876. 




Oakland Citj' 


April 2(1, 1877. 






April 20, 1877. 






November 1, 1870. 






November 1, 1S76. 






November 1, 1876. 






November 1, 1876. 









GKANT COUNTY. 



NAME. 


p. 0. ADDRESS. 


TERM EXPIRES. 






April 17, 1877. 


William H Hite .. 




April 17, 1877. 


Richard .T. Reed 




April 17,1877. 


Mler 


November 1, 1870, 


Ambrose W. Miller 

James H. Poirce 




November 1, 1877. 




April 17,1877. 
November 1, 1876. 


Arcana 




April 12,1877. 






November 1, 1870. 






November 1, 1870. 






November 1, 1870, 




Upland 


November 1, 1876. 






April 17,1877. 









64 

JUSTICES OF THE PEACE— Continued. 

GREENE COUNTY. 



NAME. 


P. 0. ADDRESS. 


TERM EXPIRES. 




Bloomfield 


November 1, 1876. 




Bloomfield 




Alfred F. riiillips 






Henrv H McUiilcy. 


Bloomtield 


November 1, 1876. 


George Walls „ 




April 26, 1877. 
November 1, 1876. 


Bloomfield 






November 1, 1876. 




Bloomfield 


April 23, 1877. 
November 1, 1876. 








Bloomfield 


November 12, 1877. 






November 1, 1876. 






November 1, 1876. 


Daniel Millir 




November 1, 1876. 






April 10, 1877. 







HAMILTON COUNTY, 



NAME. 



LeT! H, Cook 

John Wellans 

Je88e A. Ballard 

Pleasaat Nance 

John Cay 

Isaac Edwards 

Smith D. Shannou ... 
M. R. Armstrong .... 
Urban B. McKenzie. 

Amos Carson 

George H. Baker 

.John Burk 

John E. Moore 



P. 0. ADDRESS. 



Noblesville. 
Clarksville.. 

Carmel 

Carmel 

Strawtown. 

Omega 

Cicero 

Deming 

Arcadia 

Deming 



Noblesville, 



TERM EXPIRES. 



December 16, 1877. 
December 1, 1877. 
April 18, 1878. 
January 5, 1878. 
August 23. 1878. 
August -iS, 1877. 
January 5, 1877. 
November 9, 187G. 
March 17, 1878. 
April 21, 1877. 
November 21, 1876. 
Jauuary 26, 1877. 
October 1, 1877. 



HANCOCK COUNTY. 



Edward S. Coffin , 

Urial Low 

George W. Parker 

Joseph Wright 

Dennis Tobin , 

Cyrus Leamon 

Elijah C Keeves 

George W. Landif, Jr. 

James B. Galbreath 

James M. Trueblood.... 

Hugh L. Morrison , 

John M. Shelby , 



P. 0. ADDRESS. 



TERM EXPIREB. 



November 4, 1876. 
November •!, 1876, 
November 4, 1876. 
April 24, 1877. 
November 4, 1876. 
November 4, 1876, 
November 4, 187G. 
November 4, 1876. 
November 4, 1876. 
April 24, lh77. 
April 24, 1877. 
November 4, 1876. 



65 
JUSTICES OF THE PEACE— Continued. 

HARRISON COUNTY. 



NAME. 


P. 0, ADDRESS. 


TERM EXPIRES. 


Philip Shrork. . ... 




Nov?mlier 8, 1876. 


William B. I)eiil)o 




Novi-mbiT 8, 1870. 


Curtis B. Udlcy 




April 20, 1877. 
May 4, 1877. 
November 8, 1876. 










Tetor Eiidris 




November 8, 1870. 






February 2, 1878. 
November 8, 1876. 






Richard F. Bell 




April 22, 1877. 
April 22, 1877. 
April 22, 1877. 
April 22, 1877. 
August 22; 1877. 










Philip D. Windell 




William Rush 








October 24, 1877. 









HENDRICKS COUNTY. 



NAME. 


P. 0. ADDRESS. 


TERM EXPIRES. 






April 22, 1877. 
November 5, 1876. 


Barney Goseett 






Plainfield 






Belleville 


November 5, 1876. 


.1. Ballard 




November 5, 1876 




Stilesville 


November 5, 1876. 




Stiles ville 


November 5. 1876. 


•Tohn S. Roberts 


Coatpville 


November 5, 1876. 


Robert D. Covey 






Thomas B. Hall 




October 24, 1877. 


William S. Marsh 




November 5, 1876. 








Israel L. C. Bray 








Plainfield 


February 20, 1877. 
April 22, 1877. 


James M. Wells 









HENRY COUNTY^ 



NAME. 


P. 0. ADDRESS. 


TERM EXPIRES. 




Millville 


April 25, 1877. 
November 9 1876 










November 9, 1876. 






November 9, 1876. 






November 9 1876 




Ogden 










Frank W. Fitzbu^Ii 




April 17, 1877. 
April 25, 1877. 
April 17, 1877. 
.January 10, 1878. 
January 15, 1877. 
April 22, 1877. 










William H. Kesling 

















Doc. J.— S. S. R.— 5 



66 
JUSTICES OF THE PEACE— Continued. 

HOWAED COUNTY. 



NAME. 


p. 0. ADDRESS. 


TERM EXPIRES. 






November 5, 1R76. 






December 28, 1876. 








D s Spraker . 




November 5, 1876. 






November 5, 1876. 






April 17, 1877. 
April 17, 1877. 
November 5 1876. 




Center P. 










April 17, 1877. 
March 8, 1877. 










March 8, 1877. 









HUNTINGTON COUNTY. 



NAME. 


P. 0. ADDRESS. 


TERM EXPIRES. 






November 8, 187G. 






November 8, 1876. 


Thomas Boliiiger 

J. W. Smith 




April 28, 1877. 
November 8, 1876 




A. D. Turtelotte 




April 17, 1877. 
December 10, 1876 










April n, 1877. 
November 8 187G 








Markle 


November 8, 1876. 


N. L. HollowcU 




November 8, 1876- 






April 17, 1877. 
April 17, 1877. 
November 8, 187G. 


Georire Carll 


Mt. Etna 


William Scott 


Warren _ 


David Little 


Mav 6 1877. 















JACKSON COUNTY. 



KAME. 


P. 0. ADDRESS. 


TERM EXPIRES. 






November 1, 1876. 






November 1, 1876. 






November 1, 1876 






April 17, 1877. 
















November 1 1876 












November 1 1876 






May 12, 1877. 
November 1 1876 




Ketreat 


Jamt'S H. Hall 




April 17, 1877. 










May 11, 1878. 













67 

JUSTICES OF THE PEACE— Continued. 

JASPER COUNTY. 



NAME. 


P. 0. ADDRESS. 


TERM EXPIRES. 




Francisville 

Medaii'villc 

McdMiyvillc 


November 9, 187G. 


William B. QiKTiy 


October 28, 1877. 
November 9, 187S. 






November 9. 187<;. 








IlDldiedge Clark 


Ken-iKC-laer 


April M, 1877. 
November 9, 1S79. 




Elflridge T. Harding 


RoQsselaer 


October 27, 1877. 




November 9, 1876. 






Novembers, 1870. 






November 9, ]87t). 


F W Mancb 




November 9, 187(j. 






November 9, 1876. 


M. B. Scott 




November 9, 1876. 






November 9, 1876. 






November 9, 1876. 






N(n-ember 9, 1876. 


Matthew F. Connett 


Monroe ^ 


November 9, 1876. 



















JAY COUNTY^ 



NAME. 


p. 0. ADDRESS. 


TERM EXPIRES. 




Red Key 




Jazcrcl D. Barr 




November 4, 1876. 




Ponnville 






Portland 








April 27, 1877. 






William H. Moore 


Bluff Point 


November 2-i, 1876. 






October 25, 1877. 




Bear Creek 


April 19, 1877. 


William F. Burkhamer 








April 19, 1877. 







JEFFERSON COUNTY. 



NAME. 


P. 0. ADDRESS. 


TERM EXPIRES. 












April 7, 1877. 




Vi'lga 




Kent 


November 5, 1876. 




Saluda 


April 7, 1877. 
March 29, 1877. 


S. N. Gilpin 









68 
JUSTICES OF THE PEACE— Coktinued. 

JENNINGS COUNTY. 



NAME. 


P. 0. ADDRESS. 


TERM EXPIRES. 




Butlerville 


November 0, 1876. 


Benjamin F. Grinstead 


Butkrvillc 


April 17,1877. 
November 9,1876. 








April 27, 1877. 
April 17, 1877. 


M. E. Bland 








June i, 1877. 


Albert W. Robhins 




>ovember 9, ISTO. 






November 0, 1876. 


William H McGuire 




November 9, 187C. 




Lovett 


November 9. 187u. 


George Nodlei' ( eceased) 


November 13, 1870. 







JOHNSON COUNTY. 



NAME. 


p. 0. ADDRESS, 


TERM EXPIRES. 


Samuel H Tetrick 




October 21, 1876. 






October 21, 187U. 






October 21, 1876. 






April 21, 1877. 
April 21, 1877. 
October 21, 1876. 


"William W. Hiibbaid 












February 1, 1878. 


AVilli?m Raffin 




November 1, 1878. 




Trafalg.-.r 


April 21, 1877. 
October 21, 1876. 








Greeuwood 


October 21, 1876. 




October 21, 1876. 






October 21, 1876. 






October 21, 1876. 









KNOX COUNTY. 



NAME. 


p. 0. ADDRESS. 


TERM EXPIRES. 






November 9, 1876. 






April 14, 1877. 


















April 28, 1877. 
November 9, 1876. 










November 9, 1876. 






April 12, 1877. 
April 28, 1877. 
November 9, 1876. 




\Vhe;itland 


.Ti)hn M Riley 


Oak town 


T F Tounsley 




November 9, 1876. 


Heiirv Miller 




November 9, 1876. 






April 28, 1877. 







69 

JUSTICES OF THE PEACE— Continued. 
KOSCIUSKO COUNTY. 



NAME. 


P. 0. ADDRESS. 


TERM EXPIRES. 


Natliiin Hartshorn (rpsigiied) 

Ami row Strilicry 

John S Van Vk>ct . . . 




OctoT)or 21, 187G. 




August 31, 1878. 




April 2'., 1877. 






April 21, 1«77. 
April 21,1877. 
October 21, 1876. 










Jeremiah Myors... 


Boy ds ton Mills 


April 21, 1877. 




October 21, 1876.' 




Milford 


Oetobi'r 21, 1876. 






April 21, 1877. 
October 21, 1876. 






William L Webster 




October 21, 1870. 






April 21, 1877. 
June 2, 1877. 


John K. Haddix 








June 2, 1877. 


Hugh Callender (vice N. Hartshorn) 




October 24, 1877. 







LA GRANGE COUNTY. 



NAME. 


p. 0. ADDRESS. 


TERM EXPIRES. 


James Hagertj' 

John Butt 


Scott 


August 23, 1877. 
November Hi, 1876. 








April 5, 1877. 
November Id, 1876. 










April 25, 1877. 
April 15, 1877. 
June 11, 1877. 










George B. Hull 




April 20, 1877. 
May 2, 1877. 
May 16, 1877. 
May 25, 1877. 
November l(i, 1876. 












South Milford 










December 12, 1876. 






October 24, 1877. 


Wm. H. Depuy (vice H. H. BasKler) 
John H. Ladd (vice George D. Hull) 




October 24, 1877. 




October 24, 1877. 




October 24, 1877. 









LAKE COUNTY. 



NAME. 


P. 0. ADDRESS. 


TERM ERPIRES. 


Steven Reed 


Ross Station 


April 21, 1877. 


John Vader 




Seymour Way man 


M( rrillsville 


July 8, 1877. 






George W. Handley 






John V. Bates 










November 6, 1876. 


James Tanner 


Uver 


November 5 1876 









70 
JUSTICES OF THE PEACE— Continued. 

LAPOKTE COUNTY. 



NAME. 



Henry Ocher 

Eugene W. Davis , 

Oraigie Sharpe 

Eli Smith 

William H. H. Whitehead. 

Bavid Gulp , 

Oeorge Bosserman 

Ziba Bailey 

Alfred Rodgers 

•Teronie B Closser , 

William Reynolds 

William W.'Bugbee 

William Eaton , 

A. B. Campbell 

Daniel Shaw 

Z. T. Hariue 

Robert Armstrong 

James Learne 

C. J. Kinseley 

Alfred Rodgers 

Jonathan Snook 



P. 0. ADDRESS. 



Michigan City... 

LaPorte 

Kolling Prairie. 

LaPorte 

LaPorte 

Union Mills , 

LaPorte 

Westville 

Salem Crossing. 



Wanatah 

Kingsbury 

Hanna Station. 
LaPorte 



Union Mills 

Michigan City 



LAWRENCE COUNTY. 



TERM EXPIRES. 



November 8, 1876. 
April 21, 1877. 
November 8, 1870. 
November 8, 187H. 
November 8, 1876. 
Novembers, 1875. 
November 8, 1876. 
Novembers, 1876. 
April 21, 1877. 
November 8, 1870. 
November 8, 1870. 
November 8, 1876. 
November 8, 1876. 
November 8, 1870. 
November 8, 1876. 
November 8, 1876. 
November 8, 1876. 
November 8, 1876. 
November 8, 1876. 
April 21, 1877. 
July 9, 1877. 



NAME. 


P. 0. ADDRESS. 


TERM EXPIRES. 




Fort Ritner 


November 4. 1870. 






November 4, 1870. 






June 25, 1877. 


John W. Eager 




November 4, 1876. 




November 4, 1876. 






November 4, 1876. 


.Tohn W Judah 


Guthrie 


November 4, 1870. 




Mitchell 


November 4, 1876. 




Mitchell 


April 28, 1877. 




Mitchell 


April 24, 1877. 




Mitchell 


November 4, 1876. 






November 4, 1876. 




Bedford 






Bedford 


February 15, 1878. 




Bedford 


November 4, 1876. 









MADISON COUNTY. 



NAME. 


P. 


0. 


ADDRESS. 


TERM EXPIRES. 




Anderson 
Anderson 
Anderson 
Anderson 
Ovid 






November 26, 1876. 








October 28, 1877. 








November 9, 1876. 








November 9, 1870. 


James Moneyhun 






November 9, 1876. 



71 
JUSTICES OF THE PEACE— Continued. 

MADISON COUNTY— Continued. 



NAME. 


P, 0. ADDRESS. 


TERM EXPIRES. 


Kdmumi H. Pt-ters 


Rigdon 


Xovember 9, 1876-. 






November 9, 187G. 






November 9, 1870. 




P('n(Uetou 


April 2S, 1877. 
November 9, 187('i. 


\ Went 




«:. E. (ioodrich 


Pendk'toii 


November 9. 1876. 




Florida 


.\pril 28, 1877. 
November 9, 1876. 










November 9, 1876. 






April 21, 1877. 
April 28, 1877. 
November 9, 1876. 














April 21, 1877. 
November 9, 1876. 




Chesterfield 


W. T. Trublood 


Chesterfield 


April 21, 1877. 
November 9,1876. 






John Little 




June 11, 1877. 






June 11, 1877. 









MARSHALL COUNTY, 



NAME. 


P. 0. ADDRESS. 


TERM EXPIRES. 


Jobn W. Leland 




April 24, 1877. 
April 27, 1877. 
October 21, 1876. 


Elisha K. Earl 




Charles II. Lehr 




Abel W. Chew 




October 21, 1876. 






April 26, 1877. 
December 19, 1876. 













MARTIN COUNTY. 



NAME. 


P. 0. ADDRESS. 


TERM EXPIRES. 


John Schooley 

.lames W. Strarge 




April 30, 1877. 
April 22, 1877. 
October 22, 1876. 




.loseph Luckey..(failed to qualify)... 
Samuel Reeve 




Shoals 


September 13, 1878. 
October 22, 1876. 


Elijah W. Jinierson 


Shoals 






Ociober 22, 1876. 


Hiram McNanney 




October 22, 1876. 




Shoals 


April 30, 1877. 
March 8, 1877. 






Isaac T. Bridges 




June 2. 1S77. 






June 2, 1877. 


Nathan P. Calvin 




June 2, 1877. 


.Tohn C. Richman 




June 2, 1877. 


William Graybill 




June 2, 1877. 









72 
JUSTICES OF THE PEACE— Continued. 

MARION COUNTY, 



William H. Schmitte 

William T. Curd 

Leonard Aveiis 

Austin B. Harlan 

Jolin Simpson 

Alexander D. Reading 

Uazawaj' Sullivan 

John Myers 

Albert Culbertson 

Francis M. Hollingsworth. 

AVilliam T. Wliitesideg 

John Vansyoc 



P. 0. ADDRESS. 



Indianapolis 
Indianapolis , 
Indianapolis . 

Julietta 

Indianapolis 



Indianapolis ... 
Indianapolis ... 
Broad Hippie... 
Traders Point.. 



TERM EXPIRES. 



October 21, 1875. 
October 2], 1876. 
October 21, 1876. 
April 1(3, 1877. 
November ICi, 1877. 
October 22, 1S76. 
October 2-!:, 187(5. 
Novf-mber 1, 1876. 
April 21, 1877. 
Oetober 28, 1876. 
October 31, 1876. 
April 16, 1877. 



MIAMI COUNTY. 



NAME. 


P. 0. ADDRESS. 


TERM EXPIRES. 






October 22, 1876. 


William P. Ireland 




December 20, 1876. 


L. H. Willson... 




October 22, 1876. 


Georo'e M. Gamble 


Perrysburgb ...'. 

Chili 


April 24, 1877. 
October 22, 1876. 




J C Ballon 


Chili 


October 22, 1876. 






April 24, 1877. 
October 31, 1876. 




Bunker Hill 




Peru 


October 22, 1876. 




Peru 


October 22, 1876. 




October 22, 1876. 






October 31, 1876. 




Peru 


April 24, 1877. 
Nuvember 18, 1876. 










November 22, 1877. 






April 18, 1877. 
October 24, 1877. 













MONEOE COUNTY. 



NAME. 


p. 0. ADDRESS. 


TERM EXPIRES. 






April 29, 1877. 
November 5, 1876. 




Bloom ington 




April 20, 1877. 
November .5, 1876. 










April 29, 1877. 






Apiil 17, 1877. 






April 29, 1877. 
November 5, 1876. 










November f , 1876. 









73 



JUSTICES OF THE PEACE— Continued. 

MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



NAME. 


P. 0. ADDKESS. 


TERM EXPIRES. 






October 2G, 1870. 




Pleasant Hill 


October 2fi, l>S7iJ. 


William J Cord' 




April 22, 1877. 






April 22, 1S77. 






October 2(1, 187G. 






October 2i;, l«7(i. 






October 2(1, 187i;. 






April 22, 1877. 
April 22, 1877. 
October 2(), 1876. 






Alb rt ri"<»'()lt 








October 20, 1876. 






April 24, 1877. 
October 20, 1876. 










October 26, 1876. 


William II Allhertijick . 




October 26, 1876. 






April 22, 1877. 


William B. Work 











MORGAN COUNTY. 



NAME. 


P. 0. ADDRESS. 


TERM EXPIRES. 


William 0. Smith 




April 17, 1877. 
October 27, 1877. 




Martinsville , 






Aprill7, 1877. 
February 1, 1877. 
July :^1, 1877. 














Apiil 17, 1877. 
N..vcmber ft, 1876. 










November 9. 1876. 






April 17, 1877. 
June 1, 1878. 






Robert W. McNaugbt 


Hall 


April 17, 1877. 
November 9, 1876. 


William G Gray 




William P. Gosa 




October 26, 1877. 




Alaska 


November 9, 1876. 


William J. Brap:^: 


November .30, 1876. 


Andrew J. Whitesett 










November 9, 1876. 









NEWTON COUNTY. 



NAME. 


P. 0. ADDRESS. 


TER.\I EXPIRES. 




Pilot Grove 


November 9, 1876. 






November 9, 1876. 


William Beckwith 



















74 
JUSTICES OF THE PEACE— Continued. 

NEWTON COUNTY— Continued. 



NAME. 


P. 0. ADDRESS. 


TERM EXPIRES. 


Samuel Hurst 






Hamlet D. Thayer 






.Tosiali E. Brown 






John B. Best 




KovenibtT 9 1876 












>fovember 9, 1876. 
November 9, 1876. 
April 23, 1877. 
July 19, 1877. 






John Stoncr 













NOBLE COUNTY. 



NAME. 


P. 0. ADDRESS. 


TERM EXPIRES. 






June 1, 1878. 






May 1, 1877. 
June 1, 1878 


Albert Banta 








April 28, 1877. 


Jamt'« M. Applegate 




AVilliam Dixon 


Rome City 


November 5, 1876. 












April 28, 1877. 
April 28, 1877. 




Swan P. 




Nelson Prentiss 




April 28, 1877. 
November 5 1876 








Albion 


November 6 1876. 









OHIO COUNTY. 



p. 0. ADDRESS. 



TERM EXPIRES. 



Eup;ene A. Laseur 

William E. Jelley, (Resigned) 

AVilliam Buzette, (vice W. K. .lelley, 
resigneil) 



Aberdeen .. 
Rising Sun 

Rising Sun 



November 4, 1876. 
January 7, 1877. 

October 24, 1877. 



75 

JUSTICES OF THE PEACE— Continued. 

ORANGE COUNTY. 



NAME. 


p. 0. ADDRESS. 


TERM EXPIRES. 


William H Kearley 




Novembor 4, 1870. 


lac N Stultz 




December 15, 1876. 






November 4, 1876. 




Orange villf 


November 4, 1876. 


Williaui M Hoggatt 


April 24, 1877. 
April 24, 1877. 
June 8, 18';7. 














April 18, 1877. 







OWEN COUNTY. 



NAME. 


P. 0. ADDRESS. 


TERM EXPIRES. 






April 2o, 1877. 
April 17. 1877. 
November 4, 1876. 


Weeloy Coffee 






Cuba 






April 17, 1877. 










November 4, 1876. 


















Nouomber 4, 1876. 
























November 4, 1876. 


•Taeon W. Heath 


Poland 


November 4, 1876. 








Albert W. Dvar 










Marcb 1, 1877. 






March 1, 1877. 






June 18, 1877. 






June 18, 1877. 






October 24, 1877. 






October 24, 1877. 






October 24, 1877. 






October 24, 1877. 









PAEKE COUNTY. 



NAME. 


P. 0. ADDRESS. 


TERM EXPIRES. 


Scott Noel 




May 20, 1877. 
April 28, 1877. 




Rockville 


William F. Titsworth 




April 28, 1877. 
November 9, 1876. 






Benjamin F. Engle 


Anuapolis 


May 7, 1877. 



76 
JUSTICES OF THE PEACE— Continued. 

PARKE COUNTY— Continued. 



NAME. 


P. 0. ADDKESS. 


TERM EXPIRES. 


Thomas K. Hanley 


Delta 


Novembor 8, 1877. 




April 17, 1877. 
April 17,1877. 
November 9, 1876. 






William J. Donnin, Sr 








November 9 1876. 


Eli Stalker 




November 9, 1870. 




Catlin 


Mav 22, 1877. 




Maustield 


November 9 1876. 












November 9, 1870. 




Bellmore 


November 9, 1876. 


William 0. Pkilips 






Portland Mills 


November 9 1876. 


Clark E. McDaniel 


Bethany 


November 9, 1876. 




Portland Millls 


July 9, 1877. 
July 9, 1877. 




Portland Mills 







PEERY COUNTY. 




PIKE COUNTY. 



James T. Scantand 

John S. Barnett , 

Matthevif Risley 

Kobert M. Stewart 

George M. Chambers... 

William E. McKew , 

James A. Shephard 

Robert Richardson 

Asbury H. Alexander. 

John 0. VVildman 

Edward G. Lindsey 

Quincy A. Harper 



P. 0. ADDRESS. 



Otwell 

Otwell 

Otv/ell 

Petersburgh , 

Union 

Union 

Spurgeon P.O. 

Petersburgh 

Petersburgli , 

Pikesville 



Petersburgh. 



TERM EXPIRES. 



November 8, 1876. 
November 8, 1876. 
November 8, 1876. 
November 8, 187ii. 
November 8, 1876. 
November 8, 1876. 
October 31, 1877. 
November 8, 1876. 
November 8, 1876. 
November 8, 1876. 
July '26, 1877. 
October 4, 1877. 



77 



JUSTICES OF THE PEACE— Continued. 

PORTER COUNTY. 



NAME. 


P. 0. ADDRESS. 


TERM EXPIRES. 






November 9, 1876. 


Jolm B. Dpctow 




November 9, 1876 




November 9, 1876. 




Valparaiso 


November 9, 187C. 


.Samuel C. Hackett 


May l^, 1877. 
November 9, 187G. 








April i;8, 1877. 
April 28, 1877. 
November 9, 1876. 










Williain C Wells 




April 28, 1877. 
November fl, 1876. 




Salt Creek P. 




Salt Creek P. 


Novemlier 9, 1876 






April 28, 1877. 
November 9, 1876. 
April -/S, 1877 




Wheeler 














November 9 1876. 


Jamos H True.. 




May IS, 1877. 







POSEY COUNTY. 



NAME. 


P. 0. ADDRESS. 


TERM EXPIRES. 


William P. Daniels 




November 8, 1876. 


J. B. Williams 




April 28, 1877. 
April 2'i, 1877. 
November 8, 1876, 












August 31, 1877. 


Floriau Gabel 




November 8, 1876. 






April 28, 1877. 
April 28, 1877, 
April 28, 1877. 
November 8, 1876. 


















November 8, 1876. 









PULASKI COUNTY. 



NAJIE. 


P. 0. ADDRESS. 


TERM EXPIRES, 


•Tesse D. Clark 


__ 


April 22, 1877. 


Henry H. Bossard 


Pulaski 


•Johnson D. Loring 






John R. Riley 






Josliua Bvers 




November 6 1876 


Samuel Adam* 


Star Citv 




I.siali Brook 


.Star City 




Michael Blew 




November 6, 1876. 


Nathan S. Hazau 




.'oiin Whiilen 






Levi B. Jenkins 






Joseph Gelker 


Pulaski 


November 6, 1876. 
November 9, 1876. 
December 1, 1876. 


Leslie Hazlett 


Jacob Scott 


Medaryville 





78 
JUSTICES OF THE PEACE— Continued. 

PUTNAM COUNTY. 



NAME. 


P. 0. ADDRESS. 


TERM EXPIRES. 






November 12 187G 


John H. Miller 




November 12, 1876 






November 12, 187li. 






April 21, 1877. 
November 12, 1877. 




Cairo 










Bainbridge 


November 12, 1876. 


Slacey L. Reeves 

Wickliff Mason 




Green Castle. 


November 12, 1876. 




November 12, 1876. 






iVovember 12, 1876. 


John R. Miller 




November 12, 1876. 










Reelsville 


April 2:!, 1877. 


John H. Hendrix 




Ju^l W. McGrew 




April 21, 1877. 
April 21, 1877. 
November 12, IS'70. 










]>;ivid A. Blue 




April 23, 1877. 
April 23, 1877. 
April 21, 1877. 
November 12, 1876. 






Prior II. McChire 




Jotin W. Dunkin 











KANDOLPH COUNTY. 



NAME. 


P. 0. ADDRESS. 


TERM EXPIRES. 


George McGriff 




November 4, 1876. 




January IB, 1878. 
April 20, 1877. 
3Iay 1, 1877. 
November 4, 1876. 












S ilem 


A. B. Vv'ebb 


Ridgeville 


November 4, 1876. 


lohn 31. Collett 










November 4, 1876. 


Thomrs W. Thoneburgli 




November 4, 1876. 






Mays, 1877. 
May 1, 1877. 
June 2, 1877. 














November 4. 1876. 


Thomas W. Mills 




3Iay 9, 1878. 
November 4, 1876. 










May 31, 1878. 
October 24, 1877. 













79 
JUSTICES OF THE PEACE— Continued. 

EIPLEY COUNTY. 



NAME. 


p. 0. ADDRESS. 


TERM EXPIRES. 








William S Rice 








Elrod 


















Hoi ton 










E R Cook 



















ETJSH COUNTY, 



NAME. 


P. 0. ADDRESS. 


TERM EXPIRES. 






November 4, 1876. 




Rushville 


November 4, 187G. 


John W. Feim 


Milrov 


November 4. 1876. 


John H. M( Key 


Rn^hvillc 




Columbns Talbott 




November 4, 187ti. 






April 10, 1877. 
April 19, 1877. 
November 4, 1876. 








Ralt'igh 






November 4. 1876. 


Willirtiii Reed 




November 4, 187G. 






November 29, 1876. 




Buehville 


April 10, 1877. 







SHELBY COUNTY. 



p. 0. ADDEESS. 



TERM EXPIRES. 



Joshua Nevyrcomb.. 
.lames L. Midkift... 
William Patterson 
Thomas Robuck.... 

Samuel Steirs 

Aaron Fix 

Jesse Shaw 

Francis M. Ayers. 
George H. Reed .... 
John L. Monjar.... 
Thomas B Caroy... 



Shelbyville .... 

Blue Ridge 

Boggstown 

St. Paul 

Morristown ... 
Lewis Creek .. 

Marietta 

Fountaintown 

Fairland 

Fairland 

Fairland 



November 6, 1876. 
April 28, 1877. 
November 6, 1876. 
April 22, 1877. 
November 6, 1876. 
April 22, 1877. 
April 19, 1877. 
April 19, 1877. 
April 22, 1877. 
November 6, 1876. 
November 6, l§76. 



80 
JUSTICES OF THE PEACE— Continued. 

SPENCEK COUNTY. 



KAME. 


P. 0. ADDRESS. 


TERM EXPIRES. 






.July 1.3, 1877. 
October 26 1876 


J. M Bouvland 


Lake 






May 29, 1877. 
October 28, 187T. 
October 25 1877 






.Tamet* Vickers 






Fulda 


May 1, 1877. 
May 1, 1877. 
April 20, 1877. 
October 27 1876 




St. Meinrad 




Maria Hill 


Ptrry Phillips 











STAEKE COUNTY. 



p. 0. ADDPtESS. 



William Case 

Thomas W. Batsou.. 

Stephen Cole 

William B. Shirley.. 
Alexander Horner.. 
W. D. S. Rodgers... 

William House 

William C. Boyles... 
Nimrod West 



Knox , 
Kno.x , 
Knox . 



Monterey 

Toto 

Toto 

Knox 

Hanna 



TERM EXPIRES. 



November 4, 1876. 
November 4, 1876. 
November i, 1876. 
November 4, 1876. 
October 28, 1877. 
October 28, 1877. 
October 28, 1877. 
October 28, 1877. 
October 28, 1877. 



STEUBEN COUNTY. 



NAME. 



John McClung 

Eben P. McAllister .. 

Tosepli H. Hall 

Samuel Wolf. 

Lewis I. C. Youna;.... 
William R. Mitchell. 

Nelson Hutchins 

Gera L. Goodale 

Daniel E. Palmer 

Lucius \V. Hall 

.To.'^.'ph C. Mead 

.Tohn Brown 

.Samuel L. Clark 

•John Beriugton 

.fames Robinett 

George A. Milnes 



P. 0. ADDRESS. 



Orland 

Crooked Creek. 

Freemont 

Freemont 

Ray 

York Center 

Angola , 

Angola 

Angola 

Flint 

Salem Center...., 

Hamilton 

Hfimilton 

Hamilton 



TERM EXPIRES. 



April 2(5, 1877. 
April 26, 1877. 
November 8, 1876. 
April 26,1877. 
April 26, 1877. 
November 8, 1876. 
May 16, 1877. 
November 8, 1876. 
April 10, 1877. 
May 16, 1877. 
November 8, 1876. 
April 26, 1877. 
November 8, 1876. 
November 8, 1876. 
April 26, 1877. 
May 17, 1877. 



81 
JTTSTTCRS OF THE PEA (!E.— Continued. 

ST. .TOREPH COUNTY. 



1 
NAME. 


]'. (). ADDltESS. 


TKKM EXPIRES. 






April 24,1877. 
April 24, 1877. 
November (i, 1876. 




Sou til Bcud 


.In-^iah G Kcltiicr 


Soiitli IJciid 


riiilii» B. Boon 


Sou til Bcnil 


Novemlit'i- (i, 1876. 




Soutli Bfiid 


NoTfiubfr ti, 187fj. 


Uobi rt Ki'iiiKily 


South Bcjid 


November 6, 187fJ. 




South Bcud 


November C, 187(i. 






November 6, 1876. 




South Bpnd 


November (i, 1870. 




South Bcud 


November G, 1876. 




Soutli Bcud 


November 6, 1876. 






April 24, 1877. 
November 6, 1870. 










December 4, 1870. 




Pcnu 


December 4, 1876. 






April 24, 1877. 







SULLIVAN COUNTY. 



NAME. 


P. 0. ADDRESS. 


TERM EXPIRES. 


Greeuberiy Shepherd 




November 8, 1876 








Gideon N. Badger 


Turman's Creek 


April 28, 1877. 
November 8 1876 






November 8 1876 


George W. Wilks 


Sullivan 


October 28, 1877 






April 28, 1877. 
.July 19, 187S. 














November 8. 1876 


Henry Wood 




Mav 6, 1877. 


Walter S. Maple 


Sullivan 


October 27, 1877 









SWITZEELAND COUNT\^ 



NAME. 


P. o. ADDRESS, 


TERM EXPIRES. 


Samuel Butler. , 






Thomas B. Dow 




April 22, 1877. 
November 6 187G 


William H. Lamb 


Craie P. O 










Patriot 


April 22, 1877. 


William Cunniiinhani 








April 22, 1877. 













Doc. J.— S. S. R.— 6 



82 
JUSTICES OF THE PEACE.— Continued. 

TIPPECANOE COUNTY. 



NAME. 


P. 0. ADDRESS. 


TERM EXPIRES. 




Tjafavetie 


November 8, 187G. 






April -27, 1877. 
November 8, 187(5. 


Sylvanus Hedrick - 




Sugar Grove 


November 8, 1876. 






November 8 187C 


George M. Blackstock 




November 8, 1S7C 




November 8, 1876. 


John'Sullins, (refused to qualify)... 




April 27, 1S77. 
April 22, 1877. 
Januarj' 15, 1877. 
June 11, 1877. 




William Freeman', (vica W. K. Todd) 






William K. Ellis, (vice J. Sullins)... 




June 25, 1877. 







TIPTON COUNTY. 



NAME. 


P. 0. ADDKESS. 


TERM EXPIRES. 






November 5, 1876. 


E A Arnett 


Windfall 


April 17, 1877. 




V/indfall 


November 5, 1876. 




Windfall 


November 5, 1876. 






November 5, 1876. 






May 26, 1877. 






January 11, 1878. 






November 5, 1876. 






February 18, 1877. 


Robert S Fish . 




July 3, 1877. 







UNION COUNTY. 



NAME. 


P. 0. ADDRESS. 


TERM EXPIRES. 






November 4, 1876. 






April 26, 1877. 


William Smith 




April 26, 1877. 






May 20, 1877. 






November 4, 1876. 






November 4, 1876. 









JUSTICES OF THE PEA CE— Continued. 

VANDERBURGH COUNTY. 



NAME. 


r. 0. addrp:ss. 


TERM EXPIRES. 






April 24, 1877. 










June 17, 1877. 






November 5, 1876 


Goorge B. McOntchon 




April 1^4, 1877. 
November 5, 1876. 






April 34, 1877. 
April '24, 1877. 
November 9, 1876. 


R. R. Bixler 












April 17, 1877. 







VERMILLION COUNTY 



NAME. 


P. 0. ADDRESS. 


TERM EXPIRES. 






November 8, 187G. 






November 8, 1876. 






November 8, 1876. 






NovembT 8, 1876. 


John W. Parrott 




Junel, 1877. 









VIGO COUNTY. 



NAME. 


P. 0. ADDRESS. 


TERM EXPIRES. 


Oliver Morrell 


Terre Haute 


October 29, 1876. 


William P. WcCarty 








Terre Haute 


November 9 1876 


Joseph R. Scott 




November 9, 1876 


T. K. Underwood 






Clinton H. McGrew 




April 4, 1877. 
April 17, 1877. 
April 10, 1877. 


Bluford Steele 




Temple Shaw 




S.J. \V. Foster 


Riley 




Rilev 


November 9, 1876. 












April 17,1877. 
Sep' ember 2, 1877. 
April 11, 1877. 
December 2o, 1876 


Geerge P. Shanks 


Terre Haute 




Terre Haute 

Terre Haute 






October 24 1877 









84 

JUSTICES OF THE PEACE— Continued. 

WABASH COUNTY. 



NAME. 


P. 0. ADDRESS. 


TERM EXPIRES. 








Samuel C. Sweet 




April 21, 1877. 






John Fodge 




April Ifi, 1S77. 
April 19, 1878. 


Dell Bird, (office declared vacant on 
the 9th of July, 187?.) 


La Fountain 


Daniel E. McNeil 






Wabash 






Wabash.. 


April 29, 1877. 
April 29, 1877. 
May G, 1877. 
July 30, 1877. 
September 16, 1877. 


A. W. Huffman 








Benedict W. Lowry 













WARKEN COUNTY. 



NAME. 


P. 0. ADDRESS. 


TERM EXPIRES. 






April 24, 1877. 
November 16, 1876. 




Attica 




November 16, 1876. 




Marshfield 


April 24, 1877. 
November 16, 1870. 
















April 24, 1877. 
April 21, 1877. 
November 16, 1876. 


Nathaniel M. Grelvios 












November 16, 1877 






November 16, 1876. 






Aprir24, 1877. 
April 21, 1877. 
November 16, 1876. 




CovingtoD 











WARRICK COUNTY. 



NAME. 


P. 0. ADDRESS. 


TERM EXPIRES. 






November 4, 1876. 


Philip U Miller . 




February 18, 1877. 
July 26, 1877. 
April 22, 1877. 






William F Wilson . 




.\ B White 


Polk Patch 


W W Hunt 
















April 20, 1877. 
November 4, 1876. 




Polk Patch 




Polk Patch 


December 26, 1876. 






w ■ 



85 

JUSTICES OF THE PEACE— Continued. 

WASHINGTON COUNTY. 



NAME. 


p. 0. AUDKESS. 


TEEM EXPIRES. 




Littli^ York 


November 4, 1876. 




Salem 


NovLmber 4, 187(i. 






April 25, 1877. 






April 27, 1877. 




Cambellsbiirgh 


NovoiiibiT 4, 187ii. 


Williiuu ('Oopor 


April 30, 1877. 
November 4, 1870. 




William H VauMeter 


New Philadelpliiii 


November 4, 1870. 












November 4, 1870. 






November 4, 187(1. 






November 4, 1870. 









WAYNE COUNTY. 



p. O. ADDRESS. 



TERM EXPIRES. 



Jacob F. Rhinehart... 

James P. Bnrgess 

Lorenzo D. Anderson. 

Winston E. Harris 

Ezekiel H. Johnson ... 

Isaac N. Beard 

Milton Harris 

Isaac M. (rlines 

Jobn H. Frazee 

JohnL. Hartley 

Frederick K. Jenks... 
Elijah Coate 



Boston 

Boston 

White Water.... 
Williamsburgh. 
Williamsburgh. 
Jacksonburgh... 

Nevvf Garden 

Economy 

Milton , 

Hagerstown 

Hagerstown 



April 19, 1877. 
April 21, 1877. 
November 4, 1870. 
April 19, 1877. 
November 0, 1876. 
April 21, 1877. 
February 26, 1877. 
November 4, 1876. 
June 6, 1877. 
November 4, 1876. 
November 4, 1876. 
May 27, 1877. 



WELLS COUNTY. 



NAME. 


P.O. ADDRESS. 


TERM EXPIRES. 


















April 21, 1877. 
September 1, 1877. 
April 25, 1877. 




Blufffon 


David B. Waid 




Nathan M. Scott 






Vera Cruz 


November 4, 1870. 
April 20, 1877. 
April 27, 1877. 
May 10, 1878. 
April 21, 1877. 








BIutTlon 


Jacob H. C.Smith 


Bluft'ton 


William W. Edington 


Bluifton 







86 
JUSTICES OF THE PEACE— Continued. 

WHITE COUNTY. 



NAME. 


P. 0. ADDRESS. 


TERM EXPIRES. 






November 6 1876 






April 26, 1877. 
November 30 1877 










November 6 1876 












November <i 1876 






February 24, 1874. 
November 6, 1876. 


Edvrard Churchhill 












IdaTille 


April 25, li-77. 
April 26, 1877. 
November 6 1876 




Burnett Creek 


Jamos S. Ellis 




Albert Ball 


Bradford 









WHITLEY COUNTY. 



NAME. 


P. 0. ADDRESS. 


TERM EXPIRES. 




South Whitley 






South Whitley 


April 28, 1877. 
November 11, 1876. 




Larvcell 


.Tames M. Nicely 

Jos. Welker 


April 28, 1877. 


Hecla P. 


November 6, 1876. 




Hecla P. 


January 19, 1878. 
November 6, 1876. 














October 27, 1877. 






Novepiber 11, 1876. 






January 19, 1878. 
April 28, 1877. 
May 22, 1877. 
November 6, 1876. 


Robert L. Pence 


Laurel P. 










Alpbeus B. Gaff 




October 27, 1877. 






March 13, 1877. 






May 1, 1877. 
May 27, 1877. 
October 24, 1877. 










David N. Hart 




October 24, 1877. 









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r^ooooooooQOX xco, 

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90 

NOTARIES PUBLIC. 

ADAMS COUNTY. 



NAME. 


RESIDENCE. 


TERM EXPIRES. 


Thomas J. Steele 




June 22, 1877. 









ALLEN COUNTY. 




Edward O'Rourke 

David S. Redels emer. 
G. F. L. Rayhouser.... 

Robert S. Peterson 

Joseph M. Mayer 

Frederick Heiber 

Bayless Swift , 

Lewis Newberger 

Francis M. Bloomhuff 

Perry A. Randall 

John Shaffer 

Samuel M. Hench 

Homer C. Hartnian ... 
Henry H. Robinson... 

John Stahl 

John Hough , 

Augustus J. Stater 

Christian Tresselt 

Joseph T. Poole , 

Charles M. Barton.... 
Robertson J. Fisher... 
William T. Jennison.. 

Henry Fous 

David C. Fisher 

Edward D. Oary 

Edgar Kemp 

Peter J. Mettler 

William F. Wiemeyer 



Fort Wayne..., 
Fort Wayne..., 
Fort Wayne..., 
Fort Wayne... 
Fort Wayne.. ., 
Fort Wayne..,, 
FortAVayue.. ., 
Fort Wayne... 
Fort Wayne... 
Fort Wayne..., 
Hairs Corner 
Fort Wayne..., 
Fort Wayne... 
Fort Wayne... 
Fort Wayne.. 
Fort Wayne.. 
Fort Wayne.. 
Fort Wayne.. 
Momoeville... 
Fort Wayne.. 
Fort Wayne.. 
Fort Wayne.. 
Fort Wayne. . 
Fort Wayne.. 
Fort Wayne.., 
Fort Wayne.. 
Fort Wayne.., 
Fort Wayne.. 



November 2.3, 1870. 
Iiecember 1!, 1S76. 
December i::!, 1876. 
December iB, 1S76. 
Decem.ber 24, 1876. 
January 7, 1877. 
February 4, 1877. 
March 4, 1877. 
April 2, 1877. 
April 16, 1877. 
April 21,1877. 
April 23. 1877. 
April 24, 1877. 
June 5. 1877. 
June 20, 1877. 
July 3, 1877. 
July 9, 1877. 
Juh 10, 1877. 
July 14, 1877. 
July 14, 1877. 
August 28, 2«77. 
September 15, 1877. 
September 25, 1877. 
September 25, 1877. 
October 20, 1877. 
October 21. 1877. 
October 23, 1877. 
October 25, 1877. 



BAKTHOLOMEW COUNTY, 



NAME. 


RESIDENCE. 


TERM EXPIRES. 


W. F. Norton 




April 9, 1877. 
May 14, 1p77. 
July 19, 1877. 


John B. Petilliotl 












September 18, 1877. 
October 8, 1877. 








Elizabethtown 


October 27, 1877. 







91 
NOTAKIES PUBLIC— Continued. 

BENTON COUNTY. 





NAME. 


EESIDBNOE. 


TERM EXPIEES. 




Oxford 


December 24, 187G. 






August 19, 1877. 
August 2(3, 1877. 
September 6, 1877. 
September 10, 1877. 




Oxford 















BLACKFORD COUNTY. 





NAME. 


RESIDENCE. 


TERM EXPIRES. 




Hartford City 


November 18, 1876. 






April 16, 1877. 




Hartford City 


May 20, 1877. 
May 20, 1877. 




Hartford City 




Hartford City 


June 3, 1877 




Hartford City 


August 14, 1877. 







BOONE COUNTY 



NAME. 


RESIDENCE. 


TERM EXPIRES. 






December 31, 1876. 






December 31, 1876. 






.January 8, 1877. 
January 10, 1877. 
February 10, 1877 










William B. Walls 




Febru&rv 13, 1877. 


Nathaniel S. Caldwell 




February 21, 1877. 
May 12, 1877. 
May 17, 1877. 
August 19, 1877. 
September 2, 1877. 
September 18, 1877. 
September 22, 1877. 
October 27, 1877 


Fielding Denney 


















Elihu Cox 















92 
NOTARIES PUBLIC— Continued. 

BKOWN COUNTY. 



NAME. 


KESIDENCB. 


TERM EXPlllES. 















OARKOLL COUNTY 





NAME. 


RESIDENCE. 


TERJl ICXPIRES. 


Philip Ray 




January 80, 1877. 
March 2.i, 1877. 




Delphi 


Arthur P. McFarliuid 




June 27, 1S77. 


Reuben R. Bright 




August 21, 1877. 




Delphi •. 


October 2, 1S77. 









CASS COUNTY". 



NAME. 


RESIDENCE. 


TERM EXl'IRES. 












March 1, 1S77. 






February 28, 1877. 
March i 1877. 






William V. Beall 


Walton 


May 7, 1877. 
May 23, 1877. 
June 23, 1877 








Logausport 




July 16, 1877. 
July 19, 1877. 
August 6, 1877 


Thomas J. Tuley 


LogansiJort 








August 6, 1877. 
September 2, 1877. 
September 5, 1877. 






Thaddeus S. Rollins 









CLARKE COUNTY. 



NAME. 


RESIDENCE. 


TERM EXPIRES. 


Solon Russell 




January 27, 1S77. 
February 4, 1877. 
February 13, 1877. 
March 3, 1877. 


William H. Sands 




Patrick 11. Jewett 




William W. Borden 











/ 93 

NOTARIP: S public— Continued. 



CLAY COUNTY 



NAME. 


RESIDBNCK. 


TERM EXPIRES. 


David W. Foulke 


f-ory - 


November 9, 1876. 




November IG, 1876. 








Walter D. Clarices 


Brazil 


Deiember 9, 1876. 


Peter S. Lutlier 


Bowling Green 






February 8, 1877. 
February 14, 1877. 
March 17, 1877. 






Walker R. Guthcrie 


Brazil 






March 27, 1877. 


George W. Riddell 




April 3, 1877. 
April 8, 1877. 
April 16, 1877. 
April 22. 1877. 
May 2, 1877. 
May IB, 1877. 
May 24, 1877. 
June 23, 1877. 




Brazil 

Brazil 


.lohii W. Stewart 


.lohn B. Husaev 

A. .T. Kodifer...! 


Brazil 








Charle.^j H. Knight 


Brazil 


George A. Knisjbt 

Elias S. Holliday 


Brazil 




June 25, 1877. 


Jlartz 


July 1, 1877. 
July 14, 1877. 
August 1, 1877. 


Will P. Blair 


Brazil 


.Tefferson McAuelly 






August 19, 1877. 


Benjamin S. Henderson 


Brazil 


September 23, 1877. 
September 16, 1877. 
October 4, 1877. 








Hiram Teter 




October 27, 1877. 









CLINTON COUNTY. 



name'. 


RESIDENCE. 


TERM EXPIRES. 


Benjamin F. Douglass 








November 16 1876 


Henry Gaddis 


Frankfort 


December 31, 1876. 


Frankfort 






Frankfort 


February 8, 1877. 
April IS, 1877. 
May 8, 1877. 
May 8, 1877. 
June 6, 1877. 








Frankfort 








Frankfort 


David B.Carter 


Frankfort 


September 2, 1877. 







CRAWFORD COUNTY. 



NAME. 


RESIDENCE. 


TERM EXPIRES. 


John J. McOollister 




November 9, 1876. 




Leavenworth 


November 9, 1876. 




February 17, 1877. 
March 3, 1877. 








Milltown 


March 25, 1877. 






August 16,, 1877. 




Alton 


August 26, 1877. 









94 
NOTARIES PUBLIC— Continued. 

DAVIESS COUNTY. 




DEARBOEN COUNTY. 



NAME. 


RESIDENCE. 


TERM EXPIRES. 




Dillsboro 


December 4, 1876. 






Novembf^r 15, 187*i. 






April 8, 1877. 
Aprils, 1877. 
April 8, 1877. 
May 28, 1877. 
June 17, 1877. 






George B. TebDs 
















June 18, 1877. 






June 27, 1877. 






October 11, 1877. 









DECATUR COUNTY. 



NAME. 


RESIDENCE. 


TERM EXPIRES. 






December 24, 1876. 




Greensliurgh 


.Tanu ry H, 187r. 




March 5, 1877. 




Greensbuigh 


April 30, 1877. 




May21, 1877. 






July 30, 1877. 









DEKALB COUNTY. 



NAME. 


RESIDENCE. 


TERM EXPIRES. 






November 18, 1876. 






December 30, 1876. 






February 21, 1877. 









96 
NOTARIES PUBLIC— CoiiTiNUED. 

BK K .VLB COUNTY— Continu ed . 



NAMK. 


RESIDKNOK. 


TERM EXPIRES. 


SilaB H Bnrtlett .. 




May 1, 1867. 






April ao, 1877. 
May li, 1877. - 
Jlay 1'), 1877. 


Oharlos \ MrCellau 






Butler 






May 21, 1877. 
June 4, 1877. 






John \V Riukel 




.hiiie 7, 1877. 






September 19, 1877. 






September 20, 1877. 







DELAWAEE COUNTY. 



NAME, 


RESIDENCE. 


TERM EXPIRES. 


WlUliam Triiitt 




November 18, 1870. 


.Inhn M.Kirby 




January 10, 1877. 
January 30. 18 'i 7. 
March 27, 1877. 


Georpc R. G eeii 


Royerfon 


William H. Younts 




April 2+, 1877. 
May 17, 1877. 
July 25, 1877. 




Wheeling 

Muncic 


William W. Orr 





DUBOIS COUNTY. 



NAME. 


RESIDENCE. 


TERM EXPIRES. 






February 10, 1877. 
April 8, 1877. 


Arnold H. Miller 









ELKHAET COUNTY. 



NAME. 


RESIDENCE. 


TERM EXPIRES. 


M. F. Shuev 


Elkhart 


January 31, 1877. 
April 2c, 1877. 
Mnrch 27 1877 


Samuel B. Bomaine 


Bristol 


Brice Larrimer 




Christian Shrock 




March ^'9 1877 






April 24, 1877. 
April 25, 1877. 
May 23, 1877. 
May 29. 1877 


Isaac A. Simmons 

Elipbalet F. Dod^e 


Goshen 

Elkhart 


Samuel E. Barney 


Elkhart 


Joseph V. Cowan 




August 19, 1877. 
September 18, 1877. 


John E. Griggg 


Elkhart.. 







^6 

NOTARIES PUBLIC— CoNTTNT ED. 

FAYETTE COUNTY. 



NAME. 


RESIDENCE. 


TERM EXPIRES. 


Thomas M. Little 


Counersville 


January 14, 1877. 





FLOYD COUNTY. 



NAME. 


RESIDENCE. 


TERM EXPIRE.S. 






May 29, 1877. 
July 2, 1877. 
September 11, 1877. 
September 2('., 1877. 
September 26, 1877. 























FOUNTAIN COUNTY. 



NAME. 


RESIDENCE. 


TERM EXPIRES. 






Janaarv 22, 1877. 
January 22, 1877. 
May 14, 1877. 
June 10. 1877. 


Milton F. Milford 




George W. McDonald 


Attica 




Marshal M. Milford 




July 3, 1877. 
October 22, 1877. 




Attica 









FRANKLIN COUNTY. 



NAME. 


RESIDENCE. 


TERM EXPIRES. 






December 30, 1876. 






February 10, 1877. 
March 15, 1877. 








Brookville , 


April 21, 1877. 




Mav 6, 1877. 




Laurel 


May 17, 1877. 
May 28, 1877. 


Thomas H Smitli 









97 
NOTARIES PUBLIC— Continued. 

FULTON COUNTY- 



NAMK. 


EKSIDENCE. 


TERM EXPIRES. 


George W. Uolman 

.Jacob 8. Slick 




January 24, 1877. 
September 4, 1877. 


RochoBter 



GIBSON COUNTY. 



NAME. 


RESIDENCE. 


TERM EXPIRES. 


WilliRjn L. Dorsey 




November 5, 187fi. 




Patoka 


November 6, 1876. 


WilllMin M. Land 


January 15, 1877. 
April 2, 1877. 
April 2. 1877. 
Aprils, 1877. 
April 12, 1877. 
May 25. 1877. 
August 26, 1877. 






S. M. Holcomb, Sen 


















Ft. Blanch 




Oakland City 






January 16, 1877. 
February 10, 1877. 











GKANT COUNTY. 



NAME. 



Qeorpe F. B. Carr .... 

Josepb L. Cu?ier 

Ifaac Vanrievanter... 
George L. McDowell. 

Jamee H. Fr.rd 

John M. WHllace 

Rubert D. Fornsbell. 

Enoch BcftlR 

William L. Lenfesty 



RESIDENCE. 



Marion .. .. 

Marion 

Marion 

Marion 

Jonesl'oro.. 
Mariun .... 

Marion 

Marion 

Marion 



TERM EXPIRES. 



November 7, 1876. 
Jnnuaiy 8, 1877. 
January 11, 1877. 
May 2, 1S77. 
June:3, 1877. 
June 7, 1S77. 
Septenibt-r 11, 1877. 
September 16, 1877. 
September 21, 1877. 



GREENE COUNTY. 



NAME. 


RESIDENCE. 


TERM EXPIRES. 


William I. Baker 


Bloomfield 


November 21, 1876. 
January 10, 1S77. 
January 25, 1877. 
February 26, 1877. 


Frank 0. Wadswortb 


Worthina;ton..' 


Jiimes G. Hert 




William Wines 









Doc. J.— S. S. R.— 7 



98 
NOTARIES PUBLIC— Continued. 

GEEENE COUNTY— Continued. 



NAME. 


RESIDENCE. 


TERM EXPIRES. 


Godfrej' Sliyei- 




April 6, 1877. 
March 31 , 1877 




Bloomfield 


Freling H. Bryan 




May 21, 1877. 
3Iay 29, 1877. 
July 27, 1877. 
September 17, 1877. 






David H. Solliilay 






Switz City 







HAMILTON COUNTY. 



NAME. 


RESIDENCE. 


TERM EXPIRES. 


William C. Cloud 




January 28, 1877. 
May 12, 1877. 
June 26, 1877. 


Elwood Wilson 




Joel Stafford 








August 9, 1877. 
August 19, 1877. 











HANCOCK COUNTY. 



NAME. 


KESIDENOE. 


TERM EXPIRES. 






December 10, 187G. 


William M. Babcock 


McOordville 


April 28, 1877. 
May 27, 1877. 
July 5, 1877. 
September 9, 1877. 


Montgomery Marsh 








Lemuel W. Gooding 









HAERISON COUNTY. 



NAME. 


RESIDENCE. 


TERM EXPIRES. 




Milltowii 


Marsh 29, 1877. 


Strother M. Stockslager 




April 9, 1877. 
April 11, 1877. 
June 5, 1877. 












Elizabeth 


June 27, 1877. 









99 
NOTARIES PUBLIC— Continued. 

HENDRICKS COUNTY. 



NAME. 


KKSIDENOE. 


TEr>M EXPIRES. 






December 3, 1870. 




Danville 


December 16, 1876. 






February 10, 1877. 
June 2, 1877. 


Daniel F. Hill 











HENRY COUNTY. 



RESIDENCE. 



TEEM EXPIRES. 



Leander P. Mitchell. 

James T. Mellett 

Benjamin S. Parker., 

Jacob Tajlor 

Albert H. Johnson .... 

Elwood Vickrey 

David W. Kinsey , 

Jonathan Ross 

Josiah P. Bogne 

David W. Chambers.. 
John W.White 



Spartansburgh . 
Newcastle 



Spicoland 

Lewisville 

Straugh's Station . 

New Castle 

Bloutsville 

New Castle , 

New Caslle 

Knightstown 



December 31, 1876. 
January 10, 1877. 
January 30, 1877. 
January 31, 1877. 
January 31, 1877. 
March 27, 1877. 
April 7, 1877. 
May 9, 1877. 
June 4, 1877. 
June 6, 1877. 
October 10, 1877. 



HOWARD COUNTY. 



NAME. 


RESIDENCE. 


TERM EXPIRES. 






December 19, 1876. 






March 4, 1877. 




Oakford 


March 25, 1877. 






March 31, 1877. 


J. W. Leeds 




April 22, 1877. 






May 27, 1877. 
May 28, 1877. 
June 5, 1877. 




Kokomo ^ 


J II Kroh.. 






June 10, 1877. 




Kokomo 


June 10, 1877. 


Millard McDowell. . . 


Julv 1, 1877. 






July 24, 1877. 
Aua;ust -5, 1871. 










August 26, 1877. 
September 6, 1877. 











100 
NOTARIES PUBLIC— Continued. 

HUNTINGTON COUNTY. 



NAME. 



William 11. Williams . 

William Knndolph 

Lo lis tli zli-ld 

Bovnaii C. Vancamp... 
Briijaiiii-i F. II«n rix 
Benjamin F. Ibaok,... 
Jaaies C. Bramyan.... 



RESIDENCE. 



Huntington 

Antioch , 

Huntington 
Huntington 
iiuntington 
Huntington 
HuLiington 



TERM EXPIRES. 



December 2, 1879. 
January 3, 1877 
February 24, 1877. 
May 22, 1877. 
June 10 1877. 
Aueust 2, 1877. 
September 2, 1877. 



JACKSON COUNTY. 



NAME. 


RESIDENCE. 


TERM EXPIRES. 


Robert M. Patrick 


Seymour 


November 27, 1876. 
>ebrr.ary 5, 1877. 
Fehruarv F,. 1877 




Albert P. Charles. 




Elias M. Alier 




April iti, 1877. 
A^■J■.1 22, 1877. 
July 3, lb77. 
October 2. 1877. 






Henry C. Dannectell 















JASPEE COUNTY. 



NAME. 


RESIDENCE. 


TERM EXPIRES. 












March 11, 1777. 






March 29, 1877. 






April 1F>, 1877. 


William H. Sh^w 




ApiiriS, 1877. 
Blay 3, 1877. 
May 15, 1877. 
July 11, 1877. 



















JAY COUNTY. 



NAME. 


RESIDENCE. 


TERM EXPIRES. 




Portland 


March 14, 1877. 




P inland 


March 13, 1877. 






April 2d, ;877. 







101 
NOTARIES PUBLIC— Continued. 

JEFFERSON COUNTY. 



NAME. 


RESIDENCE. 


TERM EXPIRES. 






November 27. 1876. 






January 10, 1877. 
February !J, 1877. 










February H, 1877. 






May 3, 1877. 






May 23, 1877. 
June 20, 1877. 






E. S. Dickey 




June 2.0, 1877. 






July 1,5, 1877. 







JENNINGS COUNTY. 



NAME. 


RESIDENCE. 


TERM EXPIRES. 


William B. Goble 










December -30, 1876. 


ThomHS C. Batohfilor 




January 8, 1877. 
February 18, 1877. 
March 4 1877 










El. P. Nellis 




June 13 1877 




Sciiio 


June 14, 1877. 


Alonzo G. Smith 




June 14, 1877. 


David Overmyer 




June 25 1877 


Amos R. Shepherd 


Paris 


July 1, 1877. 







JOHNSON COUNTY. 



NAME. 


RESIDENCE. 


TERM BXPIEKS. 


G. M. Overstreet- 


Franklin 


January 8, 1877. 
February 8, 1877. 
Aprils, 1877. 
Juue 2 1877 


Samuel P. Oyler 


Franklin 


A. B. Hunter 


Franklin 


Samuel A. Wilson 


Franklin 


William A. Johnson 




August 20, 1877. 







102 
NOTARIES PUBLIC— Continued. 

KNOX COUNTY. 



NAME. 


BESIDENCE. 


TERM EXPIRES. 






November 9, 1876. 






January .31, 1877. 






July 18, 1877. 


John T Willis 




July 22, 1877. 






July 30, 1877. 






August 29, 1877. 






September 16. 1877. 









KOSCIUSKO COUNTY. 



NAME. 


RESIDENCE. 


TERM EXPIRES. 






December 4, 1876. 






February 3, 1877. 
April 24, 1877. 










July 5, 1877. 






Juiy 7, 1877. 
August 16, 1877. 








Milford 


August 19,1877. 






August 26, 1877. 






September 8, 1877, 
October 15, 1877. 













LA GRANGE COUNTY. 



NAME. 


RESIDENCE. 


TERM EXPIRES. 






April 4, 1877. 




Walcottville 


May 28, 1877. 









LAKE COUNTY. 



NAME. 


RESIDENCE. 


TERM ERPIRES. 






November 9, 1876. 


Julius W, Youche 




February 25, 1877. 




March U, 1877. 






May 13, 1877. 


George W. Waters 




September 16, 187T. 







103 
NOTARIES PUBLIC— Continued. 

LAPORTE COUNTY. 



NAME. 


EESIDENCE. 


TERM EXPIRES. 




La Porte 


November 21, 1870 




La Porte 


December 2, 1870 






December 4, 1870. 






December 12, 187G 






December 13 1870 






January 10, 1877. 
February 24 1877 






Edwin W. Canficld 


La Porte 


April 4, 1877. 
Aprils, 1877. 
April 5, 1877. 
April 21, 1877. 
April 20, 1877. 
May 23, 1877. 
September 30, 1877. 






Thomas S. Cogley 












Edmund S. Bariy 













LAWRENCE COUNTY. 



NAME. 


RESIDENCE. 


TERM EXPIRES. 


Robert N. Palmer 


Bedford 


January 21, 1877. 
January 22, 1877. 
January 24, 1877. 
February 21, 1877. 
March 19, 1877. 




Bedford 




Bedford 




Bedford 




Bedford 




Bedford 

Bedford 


April 1, 1877. 
May 8, 1877. 
July 9, 1877. 






Mitchell 







MADISON COUNTY. 



NAME. 


RESIDENCE. 


TERM EXPIRES. 






November 26, 1870 






February 13, 1877. 
March 11 1877 


John W. Lovett 




C. D. Thompson 




April 2, 187r. 
April 10, 1877. 
April 10, 1877. 
May 29. 1877. 
June 18, 1877 






Floyd S. Ellison 




.Tohn H. Pegge 


Elwood 


David Kilgore, Jr 




James. M. Deharity 


Elwood 


October 15 1877 









104 
NOTARIES PUBLIC— Continued. 

MA.ETON COUNTY. 



William H. Wppks 

BsnJHmin A. Wilson ..... 

Wil irtin K. Euglisli 

Jdhn B. Elam 

John J. Hawps 

Theodore V. Harrison... 

H.-nrv C. Diiruall 

John G. Webb, , 

Peicv HoibrO'ik 

Heni-y U. Guffin 

John A. Leiiritter 

Jacob .McOord 

J'hn H. Stewurt 

George W. T. House 

John Deutnn.. 

Jam's M. iSIyers 

Willium E. Mick 

John F. JulL^n 

Gilbert B. Hanlove 

Willi;»m M. Blake. 

R Deveieux D'iyle 

Samuel E Pt-rkins, Jr.,. 

JoliD 0. Brush 

Franc-ie Sniiih 

William C. S 'ortridge... 

Ed.gar A. Biown 

Pli-asant B.'nd 

Oscnr B. H.'rd 

Wilbern K. Bradbury... 

William .1. Elliott 

Hei mail Tilley 

William A. Penile, Jr... 

William V. Hawk 

John A. Hei'iey 

George W. Sp^lir 

Isaac L. Bloomer 

Wickliffe Bellville 

Charles B. Davis 

D.<vid -tephenson 

Oren S. Hadley 

William F. JlMson 

Frederick W. Winter.... 

Howard D. Sterr-tt 

Alexander Van Siclen... 

James P. Wilder 

Wilbur F. Hitt 

John Kattenhorn 

Thomas F. Br.gg 

William H. Duugan 

Rnb^rt E. Duncan 

William S. tSarkle.y 

James T. McKim 

Jo-eph F. Mathews 

Granville S. Wright 

William V. T.dley, 

John W . Thompson 

Cyrus T. Nixon 

Samuel S. Anderson 

William PmwbII 

Ht-nrv L>. Pierce 

Charles D. Wilcox 

James M. Kipliiiger 

William 0. Anderson 

William H. Lester 

James K. Mirk 

Vierlinz K. Morris 

Ansel 0. Groom^.. 

Newton A Trueblood... 

Samuel Barbour 

William H. H. McCurdy 
Henry B. CoUey 



RESIDENCE.. 



TERM EXPIRES. 



Indianapolis ....„ I November 1, 187(5. 

Indianapolis j November 7, 1876. 



Indianapolis. 

Inc ianapolis. 

Indianapolis 

Indianapolis.., 

Indinnapolis . 

Indianapolis .. 

Indianapolis... 

Indianapolis... 

Indianapolis .. 

Indianapolis . 

Indianapolis .. 

Indianapolis.., 

Indianapolis.. 

Iiiiiianapolis... 

Indianapolis... 

Indianapolis... 

Indianapolis... 

Indianapolis . 

Indianapolis... 

Indianapolis... 

In Jianapolis .. 

Indianapolis... 

Indianapolis.. 

Indianapolis .. 

Indianapolis... 

Indianapolis... 

Indiauap.dis.. 

Indianapnlis . 

Indianapolis.., 

Indianapolis... 

Indianapolis... 

Indianapolis... 

Indianapolis... 

Indiaiiapo is... 

Indianapolis.., 

Indianapolis... 

Indinnapolis .. 

Indianapolis... 

Indianapolis... 

Indianapolis... 

Indianapolis... 

Indianapolis... 

Ind;anap lis... 

Indianapolis... 

Indianapolis... 

Indianapolis... 

Indianapidis... 

Indianap'dis... 

Indianapolis... 

Indianapolis.,. 

Indianapolis... 

Indianapolis .. 

Indianapolis... 

Indianapolis. .. 

Indianapolis .. 

Indianapolis... 

Indianapolis... 

Indianapolis .. 

Indianapolis... 

Indianapolis... 

Indianapolis... 

Indianapolis .. 

Indianap lis... 

Indianapolis... 

Indianaprdis... 

Indianapolis... 

Indianapolis .. 

Indianapolis.... 

Indianapolis... 



NovembL-r 8, 187(3. 
NovemOer 18, 1876. 
December 4, 1876. 
Dectm'ier ti, 1S76. 
Di'cember 11, 1870. 
December i:^, 187G. 
December 13, 187ii. 
D^O' mber I'J, 187ii. 
Decemher 27, 187B. 
December -,^8, 1876. 
January 9, ls77. 
Jinuaiy 15, 1877. 
January 21, 1877. 
January 21, 1877. 
January 81, 1877. 
February 3, 1877. 
February 5, 1877. 
February 5, 1877. 
February 8, 1877. 
Febr .ary 8, 1877. 
February 11, 1877. 
February II, 1877. 
February 13, 1877. 
February U, 1877. 
February 18, 1877. 
February 21, 1877. 
February 24, 1877. 
February 2r>, I8i7. 
March 1, 1S77. 
March I, 1877. 
March 4, 1877. 
March 5, 1877. 
March 6, 1877- 
March 6, Ds77. 
March 7, 1877. 
March 13, 1877. 
March 17, 1877. 
Marrh li), 1877. 
March 20, 1877. 
March 22, 1877. 
March 27, 1S77. 
March 29, 1877. 
March 31, 1877. 
March 31, 1877. 
April 4, 1877. 
.\pril3. 1S77. 
Aprils, 1877. 
April 10, 1877. 
Apiil 10, 1877. 
April II, 1877. 
April 14, 1S77. 
April 14, 1877. 
April 16, 1877. 
April l,"), 1877. 
April Ifi, 1877. 
April 17, 1877. 
April 17, 1877. 
April 18, 1877. 
\pril 21, 1877. 
April 21, 1877. 
April 24, 1877. 
May I, 1877. 
May .5, 1877. 
May 7, 1877. 
May 8, 1877. 
Mav 8, 1877. 
May 19, 1877. 
May 20, 1877. 
May 21, 1877. 



105 
NOTARIES PUBLIC— Continued. 

MARION COUNTY- Continued. 



NAME. 



John G. Greenawalt 

Kells S. BolHiid 

Edwin B. Steele 

Jiiiues A. Ilarailtou 

Geoigf 'iV Breimii 

Diiviil S. Dinbiii 

Clark H. HHdlHj 

EIi;is G. Ho IrtdHy 

Dajiel Wait H j\ve 

Philip A. B Keunedy.,.. 

Hiiaiii J Cnift 

John li. Pearson 

John R. Cusbmaii 

John H. Masters 

John Shaw 

Ernst B. Cole 

Geor e W. Johnston 

Peter H. Lemon 

Frank D. Everts 

Howard M. Foltz 

A. H. Dickey , 

Allen B. Thraslier 

John N. Seott 

James E. Heller 

Thomas H. Stevenson.... 

Daniel Martin 

George P. Anderson 

William W. Noland 

John S. Carpen'er 

Columlus D Whitehead. 

Ambrose P. Sranton , 

J hnson H. Ewick 

Jnseph S Peden 

William H. Corbaley 

Bennett F. Witt 

Joseph W. Wharton 

Thomas H Spmn 

James A. Pritohard 

Geurge C. Butler 

Frank B. McDonald 

John R. Elder 

Genrge W, Wilson 

William E. Bell 

John L. McMaster 

Edwin Ta.vlor 

William F. Keay 

Jonathan S Harvey 

Vinson Carter 

Will F. X. Bernhamer 

James E. Franklin 

John C. Adkinson 




Indianapolis 
Indiana|jolis 
Indianapolis 
Indianapiilis 
Indianapolis 
Indianapolis 
Indianapolis 
Judiaiiapolis 
Iniiianapulis 
Indianapolis 
Indian'polis 
Indianapolis 
Indianapolis 
Indianapolis 
Indianapolis 
Indianapolis, 
Indianapolis 
Indianapolis. 
Indianapolis 
Indianapolis. 
Indianapolis, 
Indianapolis. 
Indianapolis, 
Indianapolis. 
Indianapolis. 
Indianapolis 
Indianapolis. 
Indianapolis. 
Indianapolis. 
Indianapolis. 
Imiianapolis. 
Indianapolis. 
Indianapolis. 
Indianapolis. 
Indianapolis. 
Indianapi-dis. 
IndianatiOlis. 
Indianapolis. 
Indianapi'li.?. 
Indianapolis. 
Indianapolis. 
Indianapolis. 
IndianapO'iB 
Indian ipolis. 
Indianapolis. 
Indianapolis . 
Indianapolis. 
In<lianai>olis. 
Indianapoli". 
Indianapolis. 
Indianapolis. 



TERM EXPIKE3. 



Mav 28, 1877. 
Mav 29, 1877. 
.May 31, 1877. 
June 3, 1877. 
Juno 9, 1877. 
Juno IB, 1877. 
June li;, 1877. 
June Hi, 1877. 
•Mine 17, 1877. 
June 18, 1877. 
June 19, 1877. 
June 20, 1877. 
Jun 20, 1877. 
June 21, 1S77. 
June 21, 1877. 
June 23, 1877. 
June 2l), 1877. 
July 5, 1877. 
July 8, 1877. 
July 9, 1^.77. 
July 10, 1877. 
July IK, 1877. 
July 23, 1S77. 
July 25, 1877. 
Jnly 2ii, 1877. 
July 29, 1877. 
August (J, 1877. 
AntiMst 12, 1877. 
August 14, 18'i7. 
August 15, 1877. 
August 23, 1877. 
September 2, 1877. 
September i, 1877. 
September 2, 1877. 
Sepiember 2, 1877. 
Septembers, 1877. 
September 11, 1877. 
September 17, 1877. 
September 19, 1877. 
September 19, 1877. 
September 23, 1S77. 
September 25, 1877. 
September 2ri. 1877. 
October 4, 1877. 
October 6, 1877. 
October U. 1877. 
Octuber 18, 1877. 
Octoi^er zl, 1877. 
October 23, 1S77. 
October 31, 1877. 
October 31, 1877. 



MAESHALL COUNTY. 



NAME. 


RESIDENCE. 


TEEM EXPIEE8. 


Cour'land L. Morris 


Plymouth „ 

Plymouth 


November 18, 1876. 
November 27, 1876. 
February 11, 1877. 
February 14, 1877. 


William B. Hess _ 


Daniel E. Snyder 


John F. Langanbaugh 


Plymouth 



106 

NOTARIES PUBLIC— Continued. 

MAESHALL COUNTY— Continued. 



NAME. 


RESIDENCE. 


TERM EXPIRES. 






February 2i, 1877. 
April 4, 1877. 
May 8, 1877. 
May 15, 1877. 
May 23, 1877. 
August 7, 1877. 
















Plymouth 










September o, 1877. 
September 17, 1877. 











MAKTIN COUNTY. 



NAME, 


RESIDENCE. 


TERM EXPIRES, 




Shoals 


.January 29, 1877. 
February 1,1877. 
February 5, 1877. 
April 16, 1877. 






Oliver S. Moore 


Shoals 











MIAMI COUNTY. 



NAME. 


RESIDENCE. 


TERM EXPIRES. 




Xenia «.. 


November 9, 1876. 




November 18, 1876. 






November 25 1876 




Peru 


December 13, 1876. 


William W. Ross 


Peru 


December 13, 1876. 




Peru , 


March 6, 1877. 




Peru 


March 14, 1877. 






April 9, 1877. 
September 22, 1877. 
October 30, 1877. 




Peru 













MONEOE COUNTY. 



NAME. 


RESIDENCE. 


TERM EXPIRES. 






December 5, 1876. 


Levi W Ritter 


Elk'ttsville 


May 22, 1877. 
June 14, 1877. 


William H. Pollard 






Smith villf^ 


•Tune U, 1877. 


John Miller 


Smithville 


June 18, 1877. 






September 25, 1877. 






September 27, 1877. 






October 24, 1877. 









107 
NOTARIES PUBLIC— Continued. 

MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



NAME. 


RESIDENCE. 


TER.M EXPIRES. 






Dece]nbcr 4, 1870. 






January 7, 1877. 
January 17, 1877. 
February 8, 1877. 
February 18, 1877. 










William F Brush 




Hugh .1. Webster 




March 7, 1877. 






Ayril 19, 1877. 
July 1, 1877. 


William F Edwards 








July 1, 1877. 
August 11, 1877. 
August 12, 1877. 


Melville W. Bruncr 




John F. Tribby 








August 14, 1877. 






October 23, 1877. 









MORGAN COUNTY. 



NAME. 


RESIDENCE. 


TERM EXPIRES. 




^ 


December 4, 1870. 






December 13, 1876. 






February 16, 1877. 
Vpril26, 1877. 
March 14, 1877. 










Francis P. A. Phelps 




April 30, 1877. 
May 3, 1S77. 
May 13, 1877. 
May 16, 1877. 
May 24, 1877. 
Juue 10, 1877. 


Willliam E IMcCord 






Hall 










H. N. Short 








October 1, 1877. 









NEWTON COUNTY. 



NAME. 


RESIDENCE. 


TERM EXPIRES. 






February 24, 1877. 
March 4, 1877. 


Wyatt Chappell 




Elliott G. Fountain 




March 29 1877 






October 13, 1877. 






October 17, 1877. 









108 
NOTAETES PUBLIC— Continued. 

NOBLE COUNTY. 



NAME. 


RESIDENCE. 


TEEM EXPIBES. 


Zeru C. Tlioma'i 


Kendallville 1 Novemhpr 13. 187n. 






Februiiry \f>, 1K77. 
Mav 29. 1877. 






M. M. Ritterband 




August b, 1877. 
August 2B, 1»77. 


Joseph Pardee 






September 16, 1877. 
October 15, 1377. 













OHIO COUNTY. 



BESIDENCE. 



TERM EXPIRES. 



John B. Coles 

Koriman L. Davis 
James S. Jelley... 



Hartford : April 15, 1877. 

Rising Sun j May 21, 1877. 

Rising Sun October 17, 1877. 



ORANGE COUNTY. 



NAME. 


RESIDENCE. 


TERM EXPIRES. 




Paoli 


January 8, 1^77. 
January 21, 1877. 
May iT, 1877. 
September 9, 1877. 




Paoli 




Paoli 




Paoli 





OWEN COUNTY. 




Isaac E. Johnson. 

John Heath 

Warren E. Meek . 
Joeeph H. McKee 



Spencer . 
Spencer . 
Spencer.. 
Freedom 



July 1, 1877. 
August 5, 1877. 
August 5, 1877. 
August 18, 1877. 



109 
NOTA.IIIES PUBLIC— Continued. 

PARKE COUNTY. 



VAME. 


UESIDEXCE. 


TERM EXPIRE3. 






January 29, 1877. 






April 9, 1877. 






April 20, 1877. 









PERRY COUNTY. 



KESIDENCB. 



TERM EXPIRES. 



Samuel K. Conner 
James C. Newton.. 

James C. Galey 

Gabriel Cooper 

Heber J. May 

Jobn V. Allard.... 



Troy 

Oil Creek... 
Rono 

Adyeville .. 
Caniielton. 
lipopolil 



March 7, 1877. 
April 17, 1877. 
May 24, 1877. 
May 2'J, 1877. 
May 24, 1S77. 
September 15, 1877. 



PIKE COUNTY. 



RESIDENCE. 



TERM EXPIRES. 



Adam .\bel 

Edward P. Richardson.. 

Cliailes H. McCarty 

Charles W. Chambers ... 



I Otwell ' HecembFr 9, 1?76. 

Peier^burgh ! Kebruary 27, 1877. 

Peterrburgh July ■'>. I8i7. 

Petersburgh July 11, 1877. 



PORTER COUNTY. 



NAME. 


RESIDENCE. 


TERM EXPIRES. 


1 


November 27, 1876. 




January 27, 18;7. 




June 2, 1877. 


Charles Kiddle 


Valpiimiao 


August 29, 1877. 




October ■/2, 1877. 


Edward D. Crumpacker 




October 25, 1877. 







110 
NOTARIES PUBLIC— Continued. 

POSEY COUNTY. 



NAME. 


RESIDENCE. 


TEEM EXPIRES. 












March 4, 1877. 






March 27, 1877. 


William P. Edson 




March 27, 1877. 






October 11, 1877. 






October 15, 1877. 









PULASKI COUNTY. 



NAME. 


RESIDENCE. 


TERM EXPIRES. 






January \i, 1877. 
March 4, 1877. 










June 30, 1877. 






July 3, 1877. 
July 3, 1877. 
July 21, 1877. 


John C. Nye 













PUTNAM COUNTY. 



NAME. 


RESIDENCE. 


TEEM EXPIRES. 


William W. Walden 




November 18, 1876. 






November 27, 1876. 


Henry B. Martin 




December 18, 1876. 






Februarv S, 187T. 






April 2, 1877. 
May 3, 1877. 






William H. Burk 




June 9, 1873. 


Henry H. Matthews 




June 13, 1877. 






July 12, 1877. 
October 24, 1877. 


James S. Nutt 


Greencastle 







11] 

NOT Alii KS PUBLIC— CoNTiNTiED. 
RANDOLPH COUNTY. 



NAM 10. 


RESIDENCE. 


TERM EXPIRES. 




Winoliestei- 


Dcccmbur 30, 187(i. 


E/.ra S. Kellcy 


Winchpsttii- 


.lanuiiiy 7, 1877. 


William P. DeBolt 


Jiinnary 28, 1877. 
April 18, 1877. 
May 2.J, 1877. 
Juno 11, 1877. 






Levi W. Study 


WincheBtor 

Ridgeville 


Elisha B. Wood 


I. P. Watts 


Soiitember 20, 1877. 
September 30, 1877. 











RIPLEY COUNTY. 



NAME. 


RESIDENCE. 


TERM EXPIRES. 






December 5 187G. 


Elias D. MuUan 


Rei 














January 29, 1877. 
February 21, 1877. 
April 13, 1877. 
April 24, 1877. 
May fi, 1877. 
June 18, 1877. 














William Will 












June 18, 1877. 









RUSH COUNTY. 



NAME. 


RESIDENCE. 


TERM EXPIRES. 


Frederick E. Gliddon 




February 18, 1877. 
October 8, 1877. 


Frank J. Hall 











SCOTT COUNTY. 



NAME. 


RESIDENCE. 


TERM EXPIRES. 


Allen H. Whitsett 




November 9, 1876. 






November 9 1876 









112 
NOTARIES PUBLTC—CoNTmtJED. 

SHELBY COUNTY. 



NAME. 


RE8IDKNCK. . 


TEKU EXPIRES. 




Sh'lbyville 


November 9, 1876. 






Novembar 19, 1S76. 


Hmiv T. Gaines 


Shelbyville 


.Jnnuaiy 27, 1877. 
March 3, 11^77. 








Shelbyvillo 


March c,, 1877. 






April 21, 1877. 
March 8, 1877. 




f^helbyville 






June 14, 1877. 


Isaac Odcll 


Fiiirliind 


July 2:i, 1877. 






October 2, 1877. 




Shiilbyville 


Octiiber 4, 1877. 


Tolbert Barte 


Shelbyville 

St. Paul 


October 4, 1877. 




Ociober 4, 1877. 









SPENCER COUNTY. 



NAME. 


KESIDEKCE. 


TERM EXPIRES. 




St. Mainard 

Fulda 


January 29, 1877. 
r-brnarv4, 1877. 








BVbrnary 4. 1877. 
Februiiry n, 1877. 
Jlarch (i, 1877. 


iBaac N. Shrode 


Oakland 




Tioy 


Mavch 10, 1K77. 






Jlarcli 25, 1877. 


Job Hatfield 




March 27, 1877. 




Dale 


July 22, 1877. 






July 3(1, 1877. 






Ociober 21. 1877. 















STARKE COUNTY. 



NAME. 


RESIDENCE. 


TERM EXPIRES. 


J. D. McClareu 




.faniiary 14, 1877. 
January 24, 1»77. 











118 
N0TARTP:S public— Continuet). 

ST. JOSEPH COUNTY. 



NAME. 


RKSIRENOE. 


TKRM EXPIRKS. 






November 13, 1876. 




North Liberty 


November 13, 187fi. 






.January 1, 1877. 






January 31, 1877. 
March 7, 1877. 








South Bend 


April 1,1877. 
April 21. 1877. 
April 21, 1877. 
April 23, 1877. 
April 23, 1877. 
May 2, 1877. 
May 9,1877. 
June 13, 1877. 




South Bend 




South Bend 


David Haslangt-r 


South Bend 






South Bend 


Willard A. Place 




AlvinS Dunbar 








June 13, 1877. 






August 29, 1877. 
October 22, 1877. 













STEUBEN COUNTY, 



NAME. 


RESIBENCK. 


TERM EXPIRES. 












January 13. 1877. 
January 18, 1877. 
February 24. 1877. 















SULLIVAN COUNTY. 



NAME. 


RESIDENCE. 


TERM EXPIRES. 






November 26, 1876. 


Perry H. Blue 










March 4, 1877. 









SWITZERLAND COUNTY. 



NAME. 


RESIDENCE. 


TERM EXPIRES. 






December 13, 1876. 






February 10, 1877. 
May U, 1877. 
October 30, 1877 








Patriot 









Doc. J.— S. S. R.— 8 



114 

NOTARIES PUBLIC— Continued. 

TIPPECANOE COUNTY. 



NAME. 


EBSIDBNCE. 


TEEM EXPIKES. 






November 11, 1876. 


John A. Wilstach 




December 2, 1875. 


William L. Penfi^ld 




December 2, 1876. 




Lafayette 


December 6, 187C. 


Gf^orge A. Shaffer 




December 20, 1876. 


Jacob F. Marks 




December 24, 1876. 






December 26, 1876. 






December 24, 1870. 


Samuel T.Stafford 


Laliij'ette 


December 24, 1876. 


\Vilbern F. Taylor 




January 10. 1877. 
January 14, 1877. 
January 21, 1877. 
Fc-bruarv 1, 1877. 










Eug<-iK^ J. Ball 


Lafayette 

Lafayette 


Timothy J ^IcOartby 


February 15, 1877. 
March 27, 1877. 










March 27, 1877. 






April 4, 1877. 
May 2, 1877. 
May 28, 1877. 
June 10, 1877. 






William H. Bryan 








Frederick S. Williams 




July 1, 1877. 
July 16, 1877. 
August 4, 1877. 
Vuo-ust 18, 1877. 


















September 13, 1877. 
September 13, 1877. 
October 13, 1877. 






Charles S. Warner 








September 16, 18T7. 
October 7, 1877. 


John F. McHugh 








October 21, 1877. 









TIPTON COUNTY. 



NAME. 


RESIDENCE. 


TERM EXPIRES. 






December 30, 1876. 




Wind Fall 


February 6, 1877. 
February 24, 1877. 
February 24, 1877. 
April 10, 1877. 
September 15, 1877. 
September 22, 1877. 




Tiptoii 

Tipton 






Tipton 




Tipton 




Tipton 







UNION COUNTY. 



XAMii;. 


RKSIDKNCK. 


TERM. EXPIRES. 


Elijah VansaDdt 




March 20, 1877. 


William E Burton 




August 9, 1877. 







115 
NOTARIES PUBLIC— Continued. 

VANDERBURGH COUNTY. 



NAME. 



RESIDENCE. 



KouDtiiin 8. Yager 

August BranUB 

OaHpor Tonihcnielt 

I'liomuH E Garvin 

.lameB M. Warren 

b>anciti Cuscli 

C'harlcH <.'. Gonning ., 

*."ii't;ro Buchanan 

Azro Dyer., 

(ieorge W. Moore 

George W. McBridge. 

Dttviil B. Kumler 

Frank P. (3onn 

William H. Gudgel.... 

John E. Inglehart 

Joseph B. Elliott 

Anthony C. Hawkins 
Peter Muier 



Evansville 

EvaiiBville «., 

Hvansville 

Kvansvillo 

EvauBville 

Evansville 

Evansville 

Evansville 

Evan.svillc 

Evansville 

Evansville 

Evansville 

Evansville 

Evansville 

Evansville 

Evansville 

Evansville 

Evansville 



TERM EXPIRES. 



November 1, 1870. 
November 9, 187fi. 
November '2.?,, 1876. 
.lanuary 22, 1877. 
February 4, 1877. 
February 13. 1877. 
April 1, 1877. 
April 18, 1877. 
April 21, 1877. 
May 4, 1877. 
May 24, 1877. 
May 29, 1877. 
,Tune 5, 1877. 
.lune .'■), 1877. 
September 2, 1877. 
September 4, 1877. 
October 2, 1877. 
October 20, 1S77. 



VERMILLION COUNTY. 



NAME. 


KESII^KNCE. 


LERM EXPIRES. 






September 15, 1877. 






September 27, 1877. 









VIGO COUNTY. 



RESIDENCE. 



TERM EXPIRES. 



George E. Farringtun . 

Samuel Duncan 

Miss Lida Showalter... 

John 0. Briggs 

Lewis B. Martin 

Samuel E. Kisk 

Charles McBridge 

John W. Davis 

David S. Donaldson .... 
Toussant C. Buutin .... 
Joseph W. Wharton.... 
Thomas A. Anderson... 

Samuel C. Stimson 

Nelson W. Marshall... 

Philip G. Berry 

William W. Ramsey... 

Warrick H. Ripley 

John R. Kester 

Wra. E. Hendrick 

Frederick A. Ross 

Charles S. Voorhees... 

Leslie D. Thomas 

Marvin M. Hickcox... 
Benjamin F. Havens.. 
Beuna Vista Marshall 



Terro Haute 
Terre Haute, 
Terre Haute, 
Terre Haute, 
Terre Haute, 
Terro Haute, 
Terre Haute, 
Terre Haute, 
Terro Ha'ite, 
'lerro Haute 
Terre Haute. 
Terre Haute 
Terre Haute, 
Terre Haute, 
Terre Haute 
Terre Haule 
Terre Haute 
Terre Haute 
Terre Haute 
Terre Haute 
Terre Haute 
Terre Haute 
Terre Haute 
Terre Haute 
Terre Haute 



November 1, 187t). 
November 9, 1876. 
November 21, 187«. 
November 21, 187(1. 
December U, 1870. 
December 31, 1870. 
January 23, 1877. 
February 3, 1877. 
February 13, 187'. 
March 13, 1877. 
March 11, 1877. 
March 25, 1877. 
April 21, 1877. 
April 22, 1877. 
May 29, 1877. 
May 29, 18T7. 
July 16, 1877. 
July 19, 1877. 
August 5, 1877. 
August 5, 1877. 
August 9, 1S77. 
August 20,1877. 
September 26, 1877. 
October 1, 187T. 
October 30, 1877. 



116 
NOTARIES PUBLIC— Continued. 

WABASH COUNTY. 



RESIDENCE. 



TEEM EXPIRES. 



Beuj«min F. Lines 

Herman G. DePuy .... 

Lewis H. Goodwin 

Trevanon F. Weir 

Edward Smith 

Alexander Duncan 

Meredith H. Kidd 

Henry Comstock 

Harvey B. Shively 

Benjamin F. Williams 

Joseph B. Barter 

Francis M. Eagle 



Wabash 

Wabash , 

Wabash 

Wabash 

La Gro 

Laketon 

Wabash 

Liberty Mills 

Wabash 

Wabash 

North Manchester 
Wabash 



November 1, 1876. 
November 18, 1876. 
January 22, 1877. 
January 23, 1877. 
April 9, 1877. 
May 2, 1877. 
May 17, 1877. 
July 29, 1877. 
August 7, 1877. 
September 4, 1877. 
October .5, 1877. 
October 26, 1877. 



WARREN COUNTY. 



Loriu T. Miller 

James C. Hall 

John R. Johnson.. 
Robert H. Wycoff. 
Walter H. Coon.... 
John F. Sale 



EESIDEXCE. 



Williamsport 
Williamsport 

Williamsport 
Williamsport 
Pine Village.. 



TERM EXPIRES. 



December 27, 1876. 
January^ 28, 1877. 
March 3, 1877. 
May 28, 1877. 
September 16, 1877. 
September 17, 1877. 



WARRICK COUNTY, 



NAME. 


RESIDENCE. 


TERM EXPIRES. 






January 4, 1877. 
March 4, 1877. 










May 23, 1877. 
August 1.5, 1877. 










September 23, 1877. 







WASHINGTON COUNTY. 



NAME. 


RESIDENCE. 


TERM EXPIRES. 




Salem 


December 23, 1876. 






April 16, 1877. 






May 7, 1877. 
September 2, 1877. 




Saltilloville 







, 117 
NOTARII^ PUBLIC— Continued. 
WAYNE COUNTY. 



NAME. 


RESIDENCE. 


TERM EXPIRES. 






November 21, I871:. 






Deceuilier 4, 1870. 


William A. VeoWe 


Ceiitreville 


December 24, 187G. 






February 15, 1877. 
February 19, 1877. 
February 20, 1877. 
March 1, 1877. 










Calvin B. Walker 




William W. Wood 




March 11, 1877. 


Georgo W. Shultz, Jr 




March 26 1877 






April 1, 1877. 


Henry C. Fox 




April 4, 1877. 
April 8, 1877. 
May 20, 1877. 
May 21, 1877. 






O. W. Reynolds 




Robert B. Fletcher 








May 20, 1877. 
June 5, 187V. 










June 1877 






June 14, 1877. 






August 14, 1877. 
October 18, 1877. 


William H. Bradley 











WELLS COUNTY. 



NAME. 


KESIDBNCK. 


TERM EXPIRES. 


William J. Hilligass 


Bluttton 


May a, 1877. 
October 21 1877 


John K. Rinehart 


Blufifton 




Blufl'ton 


December 1 1877 









WHITE COUNTY 




Hugh B. Ijogan 

H. r. Owens 

John H. W.illace .... 
lieander H. Jewott 
T. Fayette Palmer... 
Orlando McConahav 



TERM EXPIRES, 



Idavllle ] Diceniber 24, 187H. 

Brookstoii 1 February 14, 1877. 



Monticello. 
Reynolds .. 
Reynolds .. 
Monticello. 



February 19, 1877 
March 3, 1877. 
April 9, 1877. 
June ti, 1877. 



118 



NOTARIES PUBLIC— Continued. 



WHITLEY COUNTY. 



NAME. 


BESIDENCK. 


TERM EXPIRES. 




Columbia City „... 


November 13, 1876. 








Walter Olds 


Columbia City May 13, 1877. 

Columbia City June 6, 1877. 







CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICTS 

Under Act of General A,ssembly passed at Special Sessio7i of 
1872, together with the Population and Vote. 

FIRST DISTRICT. 



COUNTIES. 


POPDLATIOS. 


VOTE. 




19,185 
33,145 
17,653 
17,998 
14,801 
17,371 

120,153 


3,074 




7,699 
3,715 






4,411 


Perry . 


2,822 




4,198 


Total . 


26,819 









SECOND DISTRICT. 



COUNTIES. 


POPUL.ITIOX. 


VOTK. 






9,851 
16,747 
12,597 
19,514 
21,562 
11,103 
13,497 
13,779 
18,453 


2,275 




3,828 




2,655 




4,270 




4,7.57 




■1,2'>0 




2,643 


Pike 


2,982 




3,858 










137,103 


29,518 







119 
CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICTS— Continued. 

THIRD DISTRICT. 





COUNTIES. 


PdPULATtON. 

•ii,i:is 

8,(;8i 

24,770 
23,30(1 
19,913 
18,974 
18,49.-. 


VOTB. 






4,744 




1,630 


{^arke 


5,432 


Flovd 


4,679 




3,797 




4,065 




3,623 








Total 


135,266 


29,970 









FOURTH DISTRICT. 





dOtJNTIES. 


POPULATION. 


TOTK. 






19,053 
29,741 
16,218 

6,837 
20,977 
17,626 
12,134 

7,873 


4,402 
5,385 






3,437 


Ohio 


1,210 
4,304 
4,137 
2,789 




Rush 


Switzerlaud 


Scott 


1,572 






Total 


129,4S9 


27,2;Jl> 









FIFTH DISTRICT. 



COUNTIES. 


POPULATION. 


VOTE. 




24,116 

10,476 

20,223 

22,862 

6,311 

.•U,04S 


5, Via 


Fayette 


2,.511 




4,242 




4,980 




1,644 




7,675 








Total 


118,066 


26,187 









120 

CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICTS— Continued. 

SIXTH DISTRICT. 



COUNTIES. 


POPULATION. 


TOTE. 




19,030 
18,487 
16,123 
22,986 
18,366 
22,770 
21,892 


4,282 


Grant 


4,351 
3,391 






5 124 




3,972 
5,247 
5 018 




Shelby 








Total 


138,654 


31,385 







SEVENTH DISTEICT. 





COUNTIES. 


POPULATION. 


VOTE. 




20,278 
71,939 
17,52S 
21,514 


4,bll 
17 893 






3 930 




4,759 






Total 


131,268 


31,193 





EIGHTH DISTKICT. 





COUNTIES. 


POPULATIO.N. 


VOTK. 


Clay 


19,084 
14,628 
14,168 
16,137 
18,166 
18,840 
33,549 


4 902 




3,552 




3,208 




.",192 


Paik(^ 


3,909 




2 242 


Vigo 


7,792 






Total 


126,572 


28,797 







121 

CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICTS— ( 'o.ntinued. 

NINTH DISTRICT. 



COUNTIES. 


POPIL.VTION. 


VOTE. 




5,015 
22,593 
17,330 
1C,:}89 
23.Tr.5 
33 515 
1('.204 


1,4«8 
5,707 






* 4,345 




4,094 




5,08.". 
7. 930 






2.18^ 








Toial 


129,411 


31 778 









TENTH ])ISTRICT. 



COUNTIES. 


POPULATION, i 

i 


VOTE. 






10,152 i 

6,354 
27,002 ! 
12,339 1 

5,829 1 
13,942 1 

7,801 i 
25,322 1 

3,888 1 
10,554 ! 


3,?S(> 




1,552 
0.1.54 






2,452 


Newton 


1.452 


Porter 


2.973 


Pulaski 


l.OOS 




081 


Starke 


807 


White 


2,57(; 








Total 


129,243 j 


2' 1,59.". 









ELEVENTH DISTRICT. 







COUNTIES. 


Popn.ATION. 


VOTE. 


Cass 




24,193 
12,726 
i;0,882 
15,847 
21 ,052 
11,953 
21,305 


5,025 


Fulton 








4,772 
3,813 
5 lOi 






Miami 


Tipton 


2 794 


Wabash 


4,897 






Total 


127,958 


29,704 





122 

CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT— Continued. 

TWELFTH DISTRICT. 



COUNTIES. 


POPULATION. 


VOTE. 




11,382 
43,494 
6,272 
19,036 
15,000 
13,585 
14,399 


2,175 


Alleu 


9,777 


Blackford 


1,474 




4,247 
3,390 




Wells 


2,984 


Whitley - 


3,257 








Toial 


123,168 


26,904 







THIETEENTH DISTRICT. 



COUNTIES. 


POPULATION. 


YOTK. 


DeKalb 


17,167 
26,026 
23,531 
• 14,148 
20,211 
20,389 
12,854 


3,816 


Elkhart _. 


5,891 




4,974 




2,870 




4,169 

4,630 


Noble 




2,798 








Total 


134,326 


29,14« 









123 



SENATOR! A L DISTRICT 



Under Act of Geneixil Asfievibly, pasficd at the Speoinl Session 

of 1872. 



2(i 
27 
•28 
29 
30 
31 
:V2 
33 
34 
35 
36 
37 
38 
39 
40 
41 
42 
43 
44 
15 
4fi & 47 
48 
49 
50 



COIJNI'IKB. 



I'osny and Gllison 

Vand('ibiir(;li 

Warrick niid I'iko 

Spencer and P^rry 

Sullivan and Kuox 

Davloss and Groeno 

Martin, Orange and Dubois 

Crawford and Harrison 

Floyd and Clark 

Washington and Jackson 

Lawrence and Monroe 

Brown and Bartholomew 

Scott, Jennings and Decatur 

Jefl'erson 

Switzerland. Ohio and Kipley 

Decatur and Rush 

Vigo 

Owen and Clay 

Shelby and Johnstuu 

Putnam aud Hendricks 

Parke and Verniillion 

Fountain and Warren 

Tijipecaii oe , 

Benton, JJewton, Jasper ami Whit 

Lake and Porter 

La Porte 

St. Joseph and Starke 

Marshall, Fulton and Puhieki 

Kosciusko and Whitley 

Elkhart 

Noble and La Orange 

Steuben and Delvalb 

Allen 

Allen, Adams and Wells 

Huntington and Wabash 

Grant, Blackfmd and Jay ^ 

Miami and Howard 

Cass aud Carroll 

Hamilton and Tipton 

Boone and Clinton 

Madison and Delaware 

Randolph 

Wayne 

Henry and Haucook , 

Fayette, Union and Rush 

Marion 

Marion and Moi'gan 

Dearborn and Franklin 

Montgomery 



124 



REPRESENTATIVE DISTRICTS 

Under Act of tJie General Assembly passed at the Special Session 

of 1872. 



COUNTIES. 


> 

3 

d 

i 

& 


COUNTIES, 


> 
a 

u 

6 






Porter . 






















Pike 












Perry 






Whitley 




Knox 


Elkhart 






Noble . . 


















DeKalb ... 






\llen 




Floyd 






Clark 






















































Ripley, Decatur, and Rush 
























Rush 






Vigo 












Clay 






Morgan 












Putnam 






Hendricks 




1 


Putnam and Hendricks 






Parke 






Vermillion 












"VVarron 


Shelby 




Fountain 








Franklin 




Benton and Ni^wton 


Noble and Elkhart 




.Jasper and White 








Miami and Howard 









125 
GOVERNOR'S PROCLAMATIONS ISSUED. 

1. January, 1873 — For an election to determine for or against 

a proposed amendment to tlie Constitution forbidding the 
General Assembly to resume the Wabash and Erie Canal, or 
to pay the certificates of the Stockholders. 

2. February 28, 1873 — Notifying the 2)eople of tlie proposed In- 

ternational Exposition at Vienna, Austria, and that a United 
States vessel would convey free all specimens sent for exhi- 
bition. 

3. March 7, 1873. — Declaring the adoption by the people, of the 

proposed amendment to the C-onstitution concerning the 
Wabash and Erie Canal. 

4. July 9, 1873 — Declaring that the Acts of the General Assem- 

bly of the Special Session of 1872, and also of the Regular 
Session of 1873, took effect on the 7th day of July, 1873. 

5. July 11, 1873 — Declaring that certain lawless acts have been 

perpetrated in the counties of Crawford and Washington 
by disguised men, and commanding such to disperse, and the 
officers to execute the laws. 

6. September 9, 1873 — Announcing that the Reformatory Insti- 

tution for Women and Girls is ready to receive inmates. 

7. September 23, 1873. — Directing the closing of the State offices 

in respect of the memory of the death of John H. Farquhar, 
late Secretary of State. 

8. October 23, 1873 — Recommending the observance of Thursday, 

November 27th, as a day of Thanksgiving, as appointed by 
the President of the United States. 



126 

FII^ES AND FORFEITURES. 

The following is a list of the Fines and Forfeitures entered up in the 
Circuit Courts, since the 10th day of March last, as reported to 
this office by the Attorney General: 



COUNTIES. 


Pines. 


Forfeitures. 


COUNTIES. 


Fines. 


Forfeitures. 




$ 27 00 

No rep't 

44 25 

39 00 

No rep't 

09 00 

13 01 
80 01 

177 52 

1,153 00 

64 00 

431 00 

52 00 

125 00 

34 00 

179 00 

400 00 

.307 50 

No rep't 

441 00 

Xo rep't 

149 (14 

8 16 

22 00 

130 02 

309 01 

7G5 00 

144 00 
50 

21 00 
38 00 
76 00 
386 00 
52 00 
No rei)'t 

145 00 
189 00 

66 55 

296 01 

46 00 

286 01 

No rep't 

96 00 

70 00 

61 00 

14 01 


9 IdO 00 




$ 1(51 00 

No rep't 

3.305 01 

25 00 

114 00 

46 00 

No rep't 

51 00 

135 00 

99 00 

142 00 

None 

737 00 

No rep't 

54 00 

254 00 

520 00 

482 00 

107 00 

79 01 

289 00 

67 00 

67 52 
635 00 

81 00 
150 75 
691 00 

36 00 
239 00 

None 
106 00 
187 53 
281 04 

34 00 

17 00 
979 00 
110 00 
No rep't 
160 00 
110 00 
662 75 
180 00 
118 00 
204 37 

68 01 
14 00 


1 
8 350 00 


Allen 










Marion 

Marshall 


935 00 




100 00 




Blackford 


Martin 


500 00 




1,100 00 








Monroe 








100 00 




400 00 










1 000 00 


Clay 


<;25 00 
750 00 

100 00 

50 00 
50 00 








Ohio 


















Parke 








100 00 


DeKalb 


Pike 


200 00 




2,150 00 


Porter 






Posey 

Pulaski 


1,000 00 


iJlkhart 


125 00 








Floyd 


200 00 
6(.l 00 

550 00 
50 00 

125 00 












Rush 

Scott 




Fulton 






Shelby 


250 00 










200 00 

300 00 

50 (10 

125 00 


Starke 








1,000 00 
















250 00 




1,085 OO 
50 00 




2,200 00 




Tipton 


700 00 


















800 00 








Vigo 

Wabash 






150 1^0 
600 00 

1, '560 00 


75 00 




550 00 






1,350 00 














Wells 








White 






3,400 (10 

1 













Total amount of Fines assessed 

Total amount of Forfeitures assessad. 



.S18,812 59 
.§25,345 00 



127 






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9 

ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



AUDITOR OF STATE 



OF 



THE STATE OF INDIANA 



SHOWING THE RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS OF THE TREASURY 

DEPARTMENT DORIN<i THE FIStiAL YEAR 

ENDING OCTOBER 31, 1873. 



TO OTHIE OO'VE^BITOIi. 



INDIANAPOLIS : 

SENTINEL COMPANY, PRINTERS. 

1873. 
Doc. J.— A. S. E,.— 1 



OFFICE OF THP] AUDITOR OF STATE, 

Indianapolis, Ind., Nov. 1, 1873. 

To Honorable Thomas A. Hendricks, 

Governor of the State of Indiana: 

Sir: — I have the honor to transmit herewith to your Honor 
my annual report for the fiscal year ending October 31, 1873, which 
shows the operations of this department for the past year, and 
exhibits the condition of the finances, revenues, taxables, funds, 
resources, incomes and property of the State. 

Very respectfully, 

JAMES A. WILDMAN, 

Auditor of State^ 



REPORT. 



A GENERAL STATEMENT of the Receipts and Disbursements 
of the Treasury Department during the fiscal year commencing 
November 1, 1872, and eliding October 31, 1873. 

RECEIPTS. 

Tlivirt- was remaining in thi- Treasury Xovember I, 1872 ?755,024 87 

During the year ending October 31, 1873, the following sums 
have been received : 

REVENUE. 

On account of Ktneuue of 1^7'2 5373,373 16 

On account of llelinquent Revenue of 1872 22,557 7X 

Ou accountof Dflinqutnt Revenue of 1871 30, +51 O.i 

On account of Delinquent Sinking Fund Tax o) 1S70 2,gOS 27 

?t38.iyl U 



COMMON SCHOOL REVENUE. 

On account of Tax of 1872 §971,009 98 

Ou account of Tax of 1861 6,572 32 

On account of Delinquent Tax of 1871 109,590 69 

On account of Delinquent Tax of 1S60 334 98 

On account of School Fund Interest 115,460 31 

On account of Interest on Bonds 113,921 00 

On account of Liquor Licenses 50,0C2 50 

On account of Unclaimed Fees _ 6,041 52 



SL,5 



COLLEGE FUND. 

On account of Principal 55,314 10 

On account of Interest 6,304 98 

On account of Damages 51 25 

On account of Costs '. 42 00 

On account of Excess of Bids 935 92 

On account of University Land^ 3,474 81 



§16,123 06 



SALINE FUND. 

On account of Principal 

On account of Interest 

On account of Damages 

On account of Costs 

On account of Excess 



1880 00 

237 47 

55 00 

24 00 

839 38 

$2,035 85 



BANK TAX FUND. 

On account of Principal ; S379 00 

On account of Interest i 49 

Ou account of Costs.... k. 0(\ 



SURPLUS REVENUE FUND. 



$389 is 



On account of Principal gyo 00 

On account of Interest 17 50 

On account of Costs , 9 00 



S72fi 50 



PUBLIC INSTITUTIONS. 



On account of Hospital for Insane $T.6,32;j 00 

On account of Institution for Deaf and Dumb ."ijOSS 45 

On account of Institution for tlie Blind 2,055 92 

On account of House of Refuge 24,455 52 

On account of State Prison, North (;7,993 82 

On account of State Prison, South 76,716 88 



5i90,fia3 59 



MISCELLANEOUS. 



(>n accoant of the General Fund S77ii,902 iO 

On account of the Temporary Loan 707,948 05 

On account of the Insurance Tax of 1S73 17,552 62 

On account of Estates without heirs 4,198 23 

On account of Swamp Lands 3,299 82 

On account of Docket Fees, Circuit Court 9,338 67 

On account of Docket Fees, Supreme Court 1,416 00 

On account of Public Printing 900 25 

On account of Excess of Bids, Sinking Fund 2,733 26 

On account of Contingent Fund 71 00 

On account of Agricultural College 9 40 

On account of Military Fund 175 52 



J 1,524,545 22 



Total Receipts from Xovember 1, 1872, to Octobsr 31, 1873, including balance on hand 
>'ovemb«r 1, 1872. 



S4,300,633 02 



5 
DISBURSEMENTS. 

ORDINARY EXPENDITURES. 

On account of .ludkiary $97,510 94 

On account of Prosfcuting Attorneys 14,334 53 

On account of Kxecutive 20,137 'M 

On acconnt of State House 27,594 M 

On account of State Library 718 Oi) 

On account of Public Printing 57,328 3'J 

Ouaccoumtof Indianii Reports.. 12,098 88 

On account of Sberirt's niileagi' 10,704 .55 

On account of Gineral Fund 23,095 33 

On account of Contingent Fund 1,357 78 

On account of Kxpenses Supreme Court 14.752 12 

On account of Telegraphing 153 07 

On account of Distribution of Laws 1,089 20 



S289,934 77 



OFFICE EXPENSES. 

On account of Governor's Office •. §4,574 39 

On account of Secretary's Office 750 

On account of Auditor's Office 3,850 OS 

On account of Treasurer's Office 2,499 98 

On account of Superintendent's Office 1,027 91 

On account of Attorney General's Office 916 GO 



$13,r,19 ir2 



Note. — Of the amount charged to Aiiditor's office, 52,829.25 was allowed by Ibe Legislature to 
.lolin C. Shoemaker, for expenses of 1871 and 1872. 

Of the amount charged to Treasurer's office. Sl,8t;l.ln. was allowed by the Legislature to James 
B. Uyaii, for expenses of 1871 and 1872. 



BENEVOLENT INSTITUTIONS. 

On account of Hospital for the Insane 3209,339 47 

On account of Deaf and Dumb Institution 70,584 57 

On account of Institution for the Blind 38,674 29 

On account of Soldiers" Home 3:5,977 98 

8.552,576 31 

XoTE.— The expenditures for the Hospital for the Insane include those for current expenses, 
repairs, erecting new boiler lionse, laundry and bakery, enlarging and remodeling the south wing 
and placing a new heating apparatus therein. For the improvements and repairs the Legisla- 
ture appropriated eighty-three thousaml didlars. 



COT.LECtE FUND. 

On account of Principal 12, 640 97 

On account of Interest 11 98 

On account of Costs 66 00 

On account of Excess „ 114 15 

On account of Expense 030 32 

On account of Professors' Salaries ■ 7,500 00 

$10,983 42 



SALINE FUND. 

On account of Principal 85,947 26 

On account of Interest 237 47 

On account of Damages 55 00 

On account of Costs 24 00 

On account of Excess 839 38 



BANK TAX FUND. 

On account of Principal $1,72J 94 

On account of Interest 4 49 

On account of Coats 6 00 



81,737 43 



SURPLUS REVENUE FUND. 
On account of Costs S6 00 

COMMON SCHOOL FUND. 

On account of School Distribution $1,300,987 48 

On account of Interest refunded 344 59 

On account of School Tax 1872 9 15 



$1,361,341 2S 



GENERAL REVENUE. 

On account of Eevenut- of 1871 refunded $233 00 

On account of Revenue of 1870 refunded 170 56 

On account of Revenue of 1872 refunded 30,477 66 

On account of Erroneous Appraisement of 1809 89,271 47 



$120,158 69 



REFORMATORY INSTITUTIONS. 

On account of State Prison, North $81,216 20 

On account of State Prison, Souih 95,769 08 

On account of House of Refuge 68,203 72 

On account of Female Prisou.. 50,991 37 



$296,180 43 



EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS. 

On account of Stale Normal School §10,117 43 

On account of State University 45,000 00 

On account of Agricultural College 31,445 10 

On account of State Board of Education 847 85 



$87,410 38 



INDUSTRIAL INTERESTS. 

On account of Geological Survey $8,000 00 

On account of Agricultural Premiums 1,500 00 

On account of Vienna Exposition 3,000 00 

On account of State Horticultural Society 175 00 



$12,675 00 



PUBLIC INDEBTEDNESS. 

Onaeconnt of State Debt Slnkinp Fund $(503,221 08 

On account of Expenses State Debt Sinking Fund..." 161 11 

On account of Interest on War Loan Bonds 8,340 00 

On account of Salary of Agent of State Wr-i 78 

On account of Interest on School Fund Bonds 113,921 OU 

On account of Internal Improvement Bond, principal 77,000 00 

On account of Internal Improvement Bonds, interest 301,184 24 

Oh account of Internal Improvement Bond, expenses 1,078 83 

On account of Temporary Loan Interest 26,8j0 00 

On account of State Debt Principal 1,783 33 



$1,193,442 37 



MILITARY EXPENDITURES. 

On account of Military Fund S385 42 

On account of Adjutant General's Pay 941 18 

On account of Quartermaster General's Pay 300 00 



81,626 60 



LEGISLATIVE EXPENDITURES. 

On account of Sessions of 1872 and 1873 •. 8199,503 33 

On account of Specific Appropriations 78,810 43 



8278,373 74 



MISCELLANEOUS. 

On account of Pwamp Lands $41,088 05 

On account of Estates without Ileirs 17,114 40 

On account of Superintendent's traveling expenses 000 00 

On account of Free Banking 2,304 16 

On account of Law Library 516 75 

On account of Governor's House 5,164 40 

On account of Presidential Election 1,.509 40 

On account of State House and State Offices G,144 30 

On account of Governor's Private Secretary 716 oo 

On account of State Board of Equalization 690 00 

On account of Tippecanoe Battle Ground 11,030 10 

On account of purchase of Laws 25 00 

On account of Expenses Calumet Dam 50o 00 



88,309 06 



Total amount audited from November 1, 1872, to October 31, 1873 ^,115,4.')7 66 



CONDITION OF THE TREASURY. 

Balance on hand Kovember 1, 1872 $755,024 87 

Receipts during the year ending October 31, 1873 3,545,608 15 

Total $4,300,633 Oil 

Total warrants drawn on the Treasury during the year ending October 

31, 1873 4,115,457 56 



Balance in Treasury November 1,1873 $ 185,175 47 



$ 

REMAKKS. 

It is proper to add, in relation to the receipts for the fiscal year, 
ending October 31, 1873, that a' large proportion, as shown in the 
statement following, was not an actual receipt of money in the 
Treasury, but the transfer of the moneys of the State Debt Sinking 
Fund into the General Fund, 

There was on hand to the credit of the State Debt Sinking Fund, at the close of the 

fiscal year of 1872 $603,221 08 

And this amount appeared in the balance on hand in the Treasury at that date. 

There were also several Trust Funds closed up as such, and turned over to the Gen- 
eral Fund, which funds amounted to Cti,938 01 

These sums were transferred to the General Fund, as previded for by an act of the 
Legislature. The transfer was effected by making a disbursement from the funds 
named, and a receipt at the Treasury, though the change did not diminish or 

increase the amount in the Treasury. ' ^—^ 

Total of the funds transferred $670,159 09 

Total receipts of the Treasury during the fiscal year ending October 31, 1873 $4,300,633 02 

Deduct apparent receipts on account of the transfer of funds 670,159 09 

Actual receipts, including balance November 1, 187'J $3,630,473 93 



A similar explanation is necessary in relation to expenditures. 
The transfer of the funds named was made by warrants upon the 
respective funds, which, therefore, appeared upon the books as dis- 
bursements. 

Total disbursements during the fiscal year ending October 31, 1873 $4,115,457 55 

Deduct apparent disbursements on account of the transfer of funds 670,159 09 

Actual disbursements $3,445,298 46 



i 



THE TRUST FUNDS. 



A STATEMENT of the Beceipts and Disbursements on acommt 
of the various Trust Funds. 



COLLEGE FUND. 

Receipts. 

„ . . , 85,314 10 

Triucipal ' 

, . , G,304 98 

InteroBt.... 

-. 51 25 

^""^'^Ses ^2 00 

^"^'^ ::"ZZZ 935 92 

Excess 

University Lands •'• ' ' 

Disbursements. 

„ . . , $2,640 97 

Principal ' 

, ^ , 11 98 

IntereHt 

Costs 

Excess 

„ 630 32 

Expense 

Profresors' Salaries "^ '""^ ^" 

LOAN ACCOUNT. 

Ontstauding November 1, 1872 8100,002 07 

Of which there was due to the General Fund ■ 1.C02 68 

Total ?104,399 49 

Collected during the year 

899,085 39 

•> g4o 97 
Loaned during the year "' 



816,123 06 



810,903 42 



8101,720 36 



.; 

} 
SALINE FUND. 

Receipts. 

Balance on hand November 1, 1872 §5,067 26 

Principal 880 00 

Interest 237 47 

Damages 55 00 

Costs 24 00 

BxcesB 839 38 

S7,103 11 

Disbursements. 

Principal 55,947 26 

Interest 237 47 

Damages 55 00 

Costs 24 00 

Excess 839 38 

S7,103 11 

BANK TAX FUND. 

Receipts. 

Balance on hand November 1, 1872 $1,347 94 

Principal 379 00 

Interest 4 49 

Costs G 00 

$1,737 43 

Disbursements. 

Principal $1,726 94 

Interest 4 49 

Costs 6 00 

Sl,T37 43 

SUEPLUS REVENUE FUND. 

Receipts. 

Balance on hand November 1, 1872 81,287 02 

Principal 700 00 

Interest 17 50 

Costs 9 00 

— 82,013 62 

Disbursements . 

Costs SC 00 

Balance November 1, 1873 „_ 82,007 62 



11 



ESTATES WITHOUT HEIRS. 

Receipts. 

Balance on hand November 1, 1872.. 817,066 56 

Received during the jear 4,198 23 

821,204 78 

Disbursements. 

Turned over to General Fund 817,060 55 

Refunded to appearing beirs ; 47 85 

S17 114 40 

Balance on baud November 1, 1873 $4,150 38 

THREE PER CENT. FUND. 
Balance same as last year $32 13 

COMMON SCHOOL REVENUE DERIVED FROM CURRENT TAXES, 
INTEREST ON TRUST FUNDS, INTEREST ON BONDS, LIQUOR 
LICENSES AND UNCLAIMED FEES. 



Receipts. 

Ta.x of 1872 5971,009 98 

Tax of 1861 0,572 32 

Delinquent Tax of 1871 109,590 G9 

Delin-iuent Tax of 1860 334 98 

School Fund Interest 115,460 31 

Interest on Bonds 113,920 00 

Liquor Liceuses 50,062 50 

Unclaimed Fees 0,041 52 

— — - $1,372,99 3 3" 

Disbursements. 

Distributed to counties ?1 ,360,987 48 

Interest Refunded 344 59 

Tax Refunded 9 15 

Overdrawn November I, 1872 ^. 48,683 66 

SI ,410, 024 88 

Overdrawn November 1, 1873 §37,031 5j 

I 

SWAMP I AND FUNDS. 

Receipts. 

alance on hand November 1, 1872 838,203 82 

. eceived during the year 3,299 82 

541,503 64 

Disbursements. 

Turned over to the General Fund 538,077 59 

Expended during the year 3,010 40 

§41,088 05 

Balance Novemb<T 1, 1872 $415 59 



12 

CONDITION OF THE FUNDS. 
There was remainiug in the Treasury November 1, 1873 $185,175 47 

The following balances are due from the General Fund : 

To the Surplus Revenue Fund $2,007 5iJ 

To the Fund from Estates vfithout heirs 4,150 38 

To the Three Per Cent. Fund 32 13 

To the College Fund ■'',,159 64 

To the Swamp Land Fund 415 59 

■ $11,765 20 

Showing an excess of $173,410 21 

There is due to the General Fund: 

From the Common School Fund P7,031 58 



8210,441 79 



' SUMMARY. 

Receipts. 

From State Revenue $438,191 14 

From Common School Revenue 1,372,993 30 

From College Fund 16,123 OG 

From Saline Fund 2,035 85 

From Bank Tax Fund 389 49 

From Surplus Revenue Fund 720 50 

From Public Institutions 190,603 59 

From Miscellaneous Sources , 1,524,645 22 

$3,545,608 15 

Balance November 1, 1872 755,624 87 

Total $4,30(^633 02 

Expenditures. 

Ordinary Exiwnses $289,934 77 

Office Expenses 13,619 02 

Benevolent Institutions 352,576 31 

College Fund 10,963 42 

SaUne Fun I 7,103 11 

Bank Tax Fund 1,737 43 

Surplus Revenue Fund 6 00 

Common School Fund 1,361,341 22 

General Revenue 30,887 22 

Erroneous Appraisement, 1809 89,271 47 

Reformatory Institutions 286,180 43 

Educational Institutions.... 87,410 38 

Industrial Interests 12,675 00 

Public Indebtedness 1,193,442 .37 

Military Kxponditures 1,626 00 

Legislative 278,373 74 

Sliscellanoous 88,309 06 

Tatai $4,115,457 55 



GENERAL REMARKS. 



The following statement shows the relative position of the Gen- 
eral fund to the various Trust Funds in the Treasury, from October 
31, 1858, to October 31, 1873. 

Deficit. Excess. 

October 31, IS-JS $552,.366 79 

October 31, 1859 861,2^5 01 

October 31, 18(iO 854,528 .^6 ' 

October 31, 1861 637,701 37 

October .31, 1862 234,870 52 

October 31, 1863 2.50,509 42 

October 31, 18G4 8454,515 91 

October 31, 1865 477,748 4r, 

October 31, 1866 111,660 8:i : 

October 31, 1867 84,.349 26 

October 31, 1808 262,883 73 

October 31, 1869 148,.332 39 

October 31. 1870 272,289 72 

October 31. 1871 482,337 .38 

October 31, 1872 139,721 12 

October 31, 1873 210,441 79 

) 
VALUE OF PROPERTY. 

The total valuation of the real and personal property in the State 
during the last eighteen years, together with the increase or decrease 
each year, are shown as follows: 

Total. 

For the year 1»56 $270,032,209 

For the year 1857 317,932,958 

For the year 1858 318,204,964 

For tlie year 1859 43r, 367,862 

For the year 1860 : 455,0ll,.378 

For the year ISGl 441,.562,.339 

For the year 1862 421,406,936 

For the year 1863 443,4.io,036 

For the year 1864 516,805,999 

For the year 1865 56T,381,5o:i 

For the year 1866 578,484,109 

For the year 1867 •577,86y,079 

For the year 1868 387,970,.54? 

For the year 1869 655,521,479 

For tlie year 1870 662,283,178 

For the year 1871 653,944,1,59 

For the year 1872 653,367,451 

For the year 1873 950,467,854 



Increase. 


DecroaBO. 


S38,900,749 
272,006 






117,162,898 
19 643,516 








313,499,039 




20,1.55,403 


22,048,100 
73,.359,963 
3(l,.575,56-t 
11,102,556 










615,030 


111,101,470 

67,550,936 

r,,761,699 








8,339,019 




.576,708 


297.100.40:< - 





14 

r 

TREASURY STATEMENTS. 

The following statement shows the annual Receipts and Disburse- 
ments of the treasury during the eighteen years commencing Novem- 
ber 1, 1855, and ending October 31, 1873, together with the balance 
on hand at the close of each fical year : 

Balance on hand November 1, 1855 $468,224 15 

Beceipta during the year ending Gotober 31, 1856, 1,495,486 99 

Total 51,963,711 14 

Expenditures during the year ending October 31, 1856 1,338,976 11 

Balance on hand November 1, 1S56 $624,735 03 

Kewipts during tbe year ending October 31,1857 1,774,675 14 

Total ?2,399,4in 17 

Expenditures during the year ending October 31,1857 1,748,756 t9 

Balance on hand November 1, 1857 5650,653 48 

Keceipts during the year ending October 31, 1858 844,416 84 

Total •; $1,435,070 32 

Expenditures during the year ending October 31, 1358 1,363,728 04 

Balance on hand November 1, 1858 $131,342 28 

Receipts during the year ending October 31, 1859 -. 1,283,445 72 

Total $1,419,788 00 

Expenditures during the year ending October 31, 1859 1,218,185 64 

Balance on hand November 1. 1859 S201,602 36 

Keceipts during the year ending October 31, 1860 1, ('58, 217 88 

Total Sl,859,820 24 

Expenditures during the year ending October 31, I860 1,621,107 48 

Balance on hand November 1, 1860 1238,712 76 

Receipts during the year ending October 31, 18ol 3,672,657 04 

Total 1^3,911,370 40 

Expenditures during the year ending October 31, 1861 3,546,224 07 

Balance on hand November 1, 1861 §365,146 33 

Receipts during the year ending October 31, 1802 3,486,304 55 

Total .'... S3,85l,450 88 

Expenditures during the year ending October 31, 18ii2 2,974,976 46 

Balance on baud November 1, 1862 8870,474 42 

Receipts during the year ending October 31, 1863 2,232,899 33 

Total 83,109,373 75 

Expenditures during the year ending October 31, 1863 2,503,246 53 

Balance on hand November 1, 1863 S0O0|,127 22 

Receipts during the year ending October 31, 1864 " 2,391,291 15 

Total 12,997,418 37 

Expenditures during tbe year ending October 31, 1864 1,752,520 70 

Balance on hand November 1, 1864 $1,244,888 67 



15 

Balance on hand November 1, 1864, brought forward ?1, 844, 888 67 

Receipts during tho yiar ending October 31, 1805 2,742,989 19 

• 

Total 53,987,877 8d. 

KxpenditureB during the yeftr ending October 31, 1805 3,901,826 52 

Balance on hand November 1, 18(15 886,051 34 

Receipts during the yuar ending October 31, ISliO 3,957,036 23 

Total f4,043,086 57 

Kxpeuditurca during the year eudinp; Octobir 31, 1806 :i, 001,664 68 

Balance on hand November 1, 1866 8381,521 89 

R-eceipts during the year ending October 31, 1807 4,210,336 44 

Total 8^,591,858 33 

Kxponditures during tlie year ending October 31, 1S07 4,446,505 54 

Balance on hand November 1, 18C7 $145,352 79 

Receipts during the year ending October 31, 1868 4,279,687 OT 

Total S4,425,039 86 

Expenditures during tho year ending October 31, 1868 3,842,605 92 

Balance on hand November 1, ISS.s 5582,433 94 

Receipts during tho year ending October 31, 1869 4,197,489 21 

Total S4,779,923 l.'i 

Kxponditures during the year ending October 31, 1889 4,473,271 11 

B:ilance on hand Noverober 1, 1809 8300,652 04 

Keueipts during the year ending October 31, 1S70 3,589,889 40 

Total 83,896,541 44 

Expenditures during the year ending October 31, 1870 3,532,406 79 

Balance on hand November 1, 1870 55304,134 65 

Eeceipts during the year endidg October 31. 1871 ;i,00o,ri39 23 

Total $3,969,773 88 

Bxpenditures during the year ending October 31, 1871 2,943,416 90 

Balance on hami October 31, 1871 81,026,356 98 

Keceipts during the year ending October 31, 1872 2,415,269 59 

Total 83,441,626 57 * 

■Expenditures during the year ending October 31, 1872 2,686,601 70 

Balance on hand November 1, 1872 8755,024 87 

Receipts during the year ending October 31, ISTj 3,545,008 15 

Total $4,300,633 02 

Expenditures during the year ending October 31, 1873 4,115,457 65 

Balance on hand November 1, 1873 $185,175 47 

ABSTRACT OF TAXES LEVIED. 

No abstract of taxes levied on the duplicates for 1873 can be 
given in this report, County Auditors having, under the law, until 
Xhe 1st of January to make their returns to this office. 



TEMPORARY LOAN. 



In pursuance of the provision of an act entitled '^ an Act author- 
izing the Governor, Auditor and Treasurer of State to make a tem- 
porary loan," approved March 10, 1873, money has been borrowed 
to meet the appropriations for the present fiscal year, amounting to ' 
seven hundred and ten thousand dollars. 

The first certificates issued by the State oiFicers were for two 
hundred thousand dollars, executed March 12, 1873, due two. years 
from date, and bearing interest at the rate of eight per cent, per 
annum, payable semi-annually on the presentation of the proper 
coupons at the Banking House of Messrs. Winslow, Lanier & Co., 
New York City. 

The next certificates were for one hundred thousand dollars, and 
bear date April 15, 1873, due three years from date, with interest 
at seven per cent., payable semi-annually in New York City. 

The next issued were for three hundred thousand dollars, July 
11, 1873, interest the same, and payable in New York. 

The last issued were for one hundred and ten thousand dollars, 
July 30, 1873, interest payable as in the preceding. 

These loans became necessary for carrying on the government of 
the State, for meeting ordinary expenses, and for paying extraor- 
dinary appropriations made by the General Assembly in special and 
regular session in 1872 and 1873. 

The acts of the Legislature provided for the payment of the old 
Internal Improvement Bonds, and certain sums to the counties on 
account of the erroneous appraisement of 18(39, which, of themselves, 
made it necessary to have at least a half a million of dollars in the 
Treasury for immediate use for those purposes. To these were to 
be added the large appropriations to the Benevolent and Educational 



17 

Institutions, tlie ordinary expenses of the government, and the 
appropriations to pay the expenses ineurred by the Legislature of 
1871, for the payment of which no provision had been made by 
tliat Assembly. These latter expenses, which could no longer pass 
without recognition, amounted in the aggregate to more than one 
iiundred thousand dollars. 

The levy for State purposes lor the years 1871 and 1872, was 
placed by the Legislature at five cents on the hundred dollars of 
taxable property, which, upon a full collection could only produce 
three hundred and twenty -five thousand dollars of Revenue ])er 
year. Out of this, however, were to be deducted the usual propor- 
tion of delinquencies, and certain credits allowed to counties in the 
spring settlement (»f 1871, in pursuance of a decision of the Supreme 
C'ourt, which materially reduced the amount of revenue which other- 
wise would have come into the State Treasury. 

The following statement shows the condition of the Treasury from 
October 31, 1872, to March 1, 1873, at which time most of the 
•extraordinary obligations referred to had to be met and canceled: 

Tlie total biiUiine in tlie Treasury at the close of tlio fiscal year ending October r,!, 

187-2, wuR $755,024 87 

'!'ho receipts at the Stat-e Treasury from Nov«inb«!r \, 1S72, to 3!arrh 1, 1873, from all 

Hourees, a mounted to 889,757 29 

Total 51,644,782 16 

The disburKenients from Novenibi-r 1, 187'J, to Manjh 1, l8V.i, amounted to 1,475,148 26 

l.eavius on Imnd March I S109,()33 90 



The $755,024.29 on hand October 31, 1872, included $603,221.08 
•of the State Debt Sinking Fund, which was subsequently transferred 
to the General Fund of the Treasury, as provided for by an act of 
the Legislature abolishing the State Agency in New York. The 
transfer required a warrant upon the Treasury to pay the amount 
viU of the State Debt Sinking Fund, and a receipt to show its pay- 
ment i7ito the General Fund. The receipts and disbursements, 
therefore, as given above, included this transaction, and make the 
receipts and expenditures appear larger than they really were, in 
order to close up the State Debt Sinking Fund, and place the proper 
amount to the credit of the General Fund. This much in explana- 
tion is deemed necessary to show why the receipts and expenditures 
during the time named are, apparently, unusually large. 

In this relation it should be distinctly borne in mind that a large 
proportion of the receipts and disbursements of the Treasury Depart- 
Doc. J.— A. S. R.— 2 



18 

ment are on account of Common School Revenue. This revenue i& 
for an especial^use, and is never encroached upon for ordinary State 
purposes. The whole amount which appears as School Revenue in 
a fiscal year, comes into the State Treasury, and is therefore a receipt, 
and at the distributions made by the Superintendent of Public 
Instruction, is paid out upon the warrant of the Auditor to the 
counties, and consequently appears as a disbursement, though it is in 
no Avise a part of the receipts of money for " State " purposes, and 
is only expended and used for the benefit of the Common Schools. 

The whole amount of Common School Revenue received during 
the fiscal year ending October 31, 1873, was $1,372,993.30 of which 
amount over one million was from taxes alone, levied for that 
particular purpose. The entire amount came into the Treasury, 
and was in a very short time paid out to the counties for the benefit 
of the Common Schools. In fact the distribution trespassed upon 
the General Fund of the Treasury to the amount of $37,031.38. 

The whole amount of receipts at the Treasury for all purposes, 
during the fiscal year of 1873, including the balance on hand Nov. 
1, 1872, was 14,300,633.02; of this amount only $438,191.14 was 
received for State purposes from the State levy. 

It will be seen from the foregoing that with one hundred and 
sixty-nine thousand dollars in the Treasury March 1, 1873, and 
with recent appropriations amounting to nearly three-quarters of a 
million of dollars there was no alternative but to make a temporary 
loan to meet the ''casual deficit in the Revenue," and carry out the 
intentions of the Legislature as expressed in its acts and appropria- 
tions. The loans were obtained from time to time as was deemed 
best for the public interests, and on terms as advantageous as could 
be secured. 



PUBLIC PRINTING. 



The Legislature in January, 1873, repealed the act of March, 
18-59, which provided for the election of a State Printer, and form- 
ally abolished the office. 

By a jo?nt resolution, passed January 28, the Secretary of State, 
and the chairman of the Senate and House Committees on Printing, 
were authorized to have the necessary public printing done for the 
use of the General Assembly. 

Also, by joint resolution, the late State Printer was authorized, 
under inspection of the Secretary of State, to finish the work then 
under contract and in his hands as State Printer. 

The effect of the repeal of the law providing for a State Printer 
was to leave the matter of all Public Printing where it was placed 
by the act of December 20,1865, "to prevent unauthorized printing 
at the expense of the State." All vouchers presented to this office, 
and for which warrants have been issued, have been approved as pro- 
vided for in the resolutions, and the act named. 

The total amount paid out on account of public printing during 
the fiscal year ending October 31, 1873, is ^57,328.39. 

Of this amount there was paid to the State Printer up to and 
including the final settlement with him S40,431.31. 

Since the office of State Printer was abolished and the final settle- 
ment made with that officer, public printing has been done and 
paid for to the amount of $16,897.08, all of which was authorized 
by the General Assembly. 

The printing of the acts of 1872 and 1873, as ordered by the 
Legislature, has cost in the aggregate, §6,297.71. 

The printing of the Brevier Reports of the Assemblies of 
1871, 1872 and 1873, for which payment has been made during 



20 



the past fiscal year, as ordered and provided for by joint resolutions, 
has cost as follows : 

Report of Session of 1871 $0,589 40 

Report of Session of 1872 4,853 33 

Btport of Session of 1873 7,810 36 

Total 819,253 09 

The printing of the Indiana Reports of the decisions of the 
Supreme Court, during the fiscal year of 1873, has cost $19,171.30. 

The Brevier Reports are charged to Legislative expenses, and 
the decisions of the Supreme Court to Indiana Reports, as provided 
for bv law. 



THE NEW ASSESSMENT. 



The act for the assessment of property, and for the levy and 
collection of taxes, which was approved December 21, 1872, took 
eifect immediately after its passage. 

At the regular session of the Legislature in January following, 
however, many amendments to the law were offered, and some were 
finally made, which made it impracticable for this department to 
take decided steps towards carrying out the provisions until the 
Legislature had completed its revisions of the enactment, and 
adjourned. 

The General Assembly adjourned on the 10th day of March, 1873, 
and the first duty to be performed under the new law was to advise 
county officers of its requirements, and prepare the forms and blanks 
for those officers, and for railroads and corporations, to make the 
proper returns. 

Inasmuch as the work of assessing had to begin on the first day 
of April there was but little time in which to prepare the forms 
required, and for county officers, especially the assessors and their 
assistants, to become acquainted with the provisions of the new act. 

The old acts governing the assessment of property seemed to pro- 
vide for assessments on a basis of actual cash vahie. It is well 
known, however, that such an assessment was seldom or never 
made, and that the taxable value of property has been much less 
than the value as determined in ordinary business transactions. 
The present law was evidently designed to secure the assessment of 
property at its fair, cash value, if it were possible to do that by 
statutory provisions. The law has the merit of combining under 
one title most of the legal provisions pertaining to the assessment 
of property, and the levy and collection of taxes. It will not be 
claimed by any one that the enactment is, in all respects, perfect ; 
there are known ambiguities, omissions, and imperfect provisions ; 



22 

it is not strange, therefore, if mistakes have been made under its 
many and various requirements. I am pleased to say, however, 
that county officers, and the county Boards of Equalization, who 
were more directly charged with carrying out the provisions of the 
law, as a rule, manifested a disposition to do what was in their power 
to secure a full and fair assessment, and to do so as promptly as 
circumstances would permit. Through their efforts, and those of 
the State Board of Equalization, we have to-day an assessment of 
property which approximates more nearly its cash value than ever 
before; and many thousands of dollars of capital stock, and tangible 
property are upon the duplicates, which, heretofore have been 
omitted, and have escaped taxation almost entirely. 

The practical experience of this year, we may reasonably expect, 
will secure much better results in the future. As previously stated, 
the limited time which assessors had in which to learn their duties, 
and proceed with the labors imposed upon them, necessitated rapid 
work, under new conditions and imperfect knowledge; and the 
results cannot be as satisfactory as those which came from experi- 
ence and uniformity of procedure. 

I am of the opinion that the time for making the assessment, 
to-wit : from the first day of April to the first day of June, is too 
short. In the larger counties, perhaps in all, the work must be 
pushed rapidly forward, and a number of persons must be employed, 
to canvass all the townships, and enable the principal assessor to 
make up his returns for the County Auditor. Under such circum- 
stances property is not so apt to be equally and uniformly assessed, 
as it would be by a smaller number of officers. It is probable that 
when the assessment of the present year is carried out upon the 
duplicates by County Auditors the aggregate will show some differ- 
ence, compared with the aggregate of the returns made to this office 
in June last. The difference will be in a larger aggregate than now 
appears. 

It is therefore necessary that longer time should be given for 
assessing property, and for making up the returns in a business-like 
manner, that they may stand any test, and give satisfaction to all 
communities by showing an equal and uniform valuation of 
property. 

From the fact that the new assessment was not fully understood 
in the earlier part of the year, the rate of taxation in some counties 
is probably unnecessarily large. In many instances levies of taxes 
were made upon the old standard of values, though those values 



23 

were materially increased ])efore the levies were placed upon the 
'books. Believing this to be a matter to which special attention 
should be directed, I addressed a circular letter, of which the follow- 
ing is a copy, to each County Auditor in the State, and to INIayors of 
<!ities, and at a time when any reduction of levies could be made 
without delaying the preparation of tax duplicates : 

Office of Auditor of State, 
Indianapolis, May 15, 1873. 

To the Auditor of County : 

Dear Sir : 

r.;< ;lc ^jc :ic :^ ;;; tj; ^ ^ ;;; ;,'; ^; 

From the statements made to this office, in relation to the pro- 
gress of Assessors, I am of the opinion that the assessment ot prop- 
erty will be largely increased over any assessment ever made in this 
State; in some counties it will perhaps be doubled. 

In view of this, I take the liberty of calling your attention to 
the importance of having local levies of taxes made in proportion 
to the assessment as now indicated. As the Township Trustees 
levied their taxes in Ma^h, taking the old values as a basis, I am 
of the opinion that at the June term of the Commissioners' Court 
the Trustees should reduce the March levies in proportion to the 
increase of assessment. As none of the taxes have yet been placed 
upon the duplicates of 1873, it is undoubtedly the duty of the 
proper authorities in counties, townships, and cities to reduce their 
levies to correspond with the assessment now being made. If this 
is done, the new valuation of property will not bring with it an 
unnecessary increase of taxation; and I respectfully call the atten- 
tion of the authorities upon whom the duty of levying taxes devolves, 
to the necessity of taking promptly such action as will fully carry 
out the requirements of the law, and at the same time meet the 
wishes and subserve the interests of the people of the State. To 
this end it should be made known that there will be a reduction of 
tax levies to correspond with the increased valuation of property. 
Very Truly, 

JAMES A. WILDMAN, 

Auditor of State. 

Immediately after the passage of the act in March last, it was 
determined to hold a convention of County Auditors in this city, to 



24 

discuss the law, examine and compare views in regard to interpreta- 
tion and eoostruction, and to have such deliberations as would lead 
to uniformity of views, and harmonious action, under its provisions. 
But upon further reflection it was found that such a convention 
would occupy time that would trespass seriously upon the few 
weeks allowed the County Assessors, and the County Auditors, to 
make the assessment, and complete the returns required. I was 
therefore compelled to yield to the latter emergency, and did not 
call the convention, as at first was decided. 

Such legislation as the experience of the years 1873 and 1874 
suggest, for modifying or improving the assessment law, will be 
recommended in the next annual report of this ofiicCj directed to 
the Legislature. 



STATE BOARD OF EQUALIZATION. 



As the full proceedings of the State Board of Equalization appear 
in this repoit, and have already been published in pamphlet form 
and distributed as required by law, it is perhaps not necessary to do 
more than to refer briefly to its labors during the present year. 

The Board should be known in the law as the State Board of 
Equalization and Assessment. It is charged with not only the duty 
of equalizing the assessment of real estate in the several counties, 
but, also, of making the assessment of the tracks and rolling stock 
of railroads and the capital stock of all corporations organized under 
the laws of the State. This latter duty was especially onerous, 
owing to the fact that the law had not been before the people long 
enough to be thoroughly understood, and to the fact that the reports 
received at this office from county officials were, in some instances, 
incomplete, and did not furnish the information necessary to make 
a full and satisfactory assessment of the capital stock of corporations. 

The Board, as provided in the act of December 21st, 1872, con- 
sists of the Governor and Ijieutenant Governor, the Secretary, Aud- 
itor, and Treasurer of State. These officers, with Mr. J. C. Burnett, 
Deputy Auditor, acting as Secretary, met at the office of Auditor of 
State on the 16th of June, at which time the Board was organized, 
and continued in session until the ninth day of September. 

Inasmuch as the action and progress of the Board depended upon 
the returns of the county assessments, as equalized by the County 
Boards, much delay was caused by the tardiness of County Audi- 
tors in reporting to this office, a delay whicli was in many cases 
made unavoidable by the magnitude of the work to be done and 
the difficulties to be encountered by those officers. These difficul- 
ties are more apparent when it is known that the State Board was 
required to meet on the third Monday in June and begin the work 



26 

of equalizing and assessing, while the same act required County 
Boards to meet on the first Monday of the same month to make the 
equalization for their respective counties. This gave the County 
Auditors less than two weeks to make up their returns from the 
assessors, perfect the equalization as required of County Boards, and 
report in carefully tabulated statements to the Auditor of State. 
In some cases the County Boards found it necessary to order a 
re-assessment in particular townships, and an unavoidable delay was 
the consequence. In all the counties the work of the Auditors 
required great care and application, and permitted no delay that 
could be obviated in the preparation of the tables designed for this 
office. 

With such returns as were received, however, the State Board 
proceeded with its work, and continued its labors until the equaliza- 
tion of the assessments in all the counties was completed, and the 
assessment of the capital stock of corporations was made as 
thoroughly as the incomplete reports received would permit. 

In equalizing the assessment of real estate the Board made a 
careful and deliberate examination of the assessments as returned 
from the several counties, and by*taaps and statistics, and from 
information received from county officers and others who were pres- 
ent from time to time at the sittings of the Board, such calculations 
and comparisons were made as were deemed most essential in secur- 
ing a just and equitable revision and equalization of the assessment 
of real estate for the year 1873. 

As previously stated one of the greatest difficulties encountered 
by the Board was the assessment of the capital stock of corporations. 
The law provides that the Board shall make the assessment of the 
capital stock of companies or associations ineorporated under the laws 
of Indiana, and it was at once apparent that many companies and 
associations doing business in the State, though organized under the 
laws of other States, would not properly come under the action of 
the Board in making the assessment of stock. 

The process of arriving at the value of capital stock subject to 
assessment is, through official returns, as follows: 

First — The sworn statement of the company or association, as 
made to the Auditor of the county, giving the true value of the 
stock. 

Second — The assessed value of the company's tangible property, 
as returned by the County Assessor, and forwarded to this office. 

If the true value of the capital stock exceeds the amount of tangi- 



27 

ble property, the difference shows the amount of capital stock to be 
assessed by the State Board, and to be placed upon the duplicate for 
taxation in the county in which the company is doing business. 

If the tangible property of the company, which is taxed in the 
county in which it is located, is greater tlian the true value of the 
capital stock, there is no stock for assessment, and it does not appear 
upon the duplicate. 

It was, therefore, necessary to have reports from County Auditors 
giving the sworn statements of companies in relation in their capital 
stock, and the assessment of the tangible property of the companies, 
as made by the local assessors. 

These reports were received from comparatively few counties, and 
the power of the Board was therefore crippled and limited, and 
though every effort was made to get full returns, the Board was 
finally compelled to adjourn with the conviction that a number of 
companies and associations doing business in, and organized under 
the laws of the State, were not assessed, as contemplated in the law. 

In making the assessment of the tracks and rolling stock of rail- 
roads in the State, the Board proceeded diligently to ascertain the 
fair cash value of all such property. To this end the cost and 
present value of right of way — the acres of land included in such 
right — was determined as nearly as was deemed possible ; also the 
cost and present value of iron and steel in rails, joints and chairs; 
of the road-bed and ties; of the bridges, water-tanks, station-houses, 
depots, machine-shops, and other structures on the right of way, 
and all other property pertaining to the railroad track. Also the 
cost and present value of locomotives, passenger, freight, coal, plat- 
form, hand and other cars, and rolling stock of every kind. 

In addition to this, it was necessary to take into consideration the 
commercial or business value of each railroad, in determining the 
cash value of the whole property of the road. 

It is proper to say that in most cases the reports made by the 
railroads to this office, and upon which the assessment as made by 
the Board was based, were evidently prepared with the view of 
complying fully with the requirements of the law. 

The time allowed this office to prepare the several forms and 
blanks upon which the companies were to make their returns, and 
for the roads to collect the information required, was short — that 
was from the 10th of March, when the Legislature adjourned, to 
the first day of May. Much of this time was necessarily consumed 
in the preparation of the blanks, and after the blanks were received 



28 

by many of the companies' officers, in correspondence with this 
office in relation to proper interpretations of the provisions of the 
act. 

It is believed, however, that the reports received, and the inform- 
ation obtained by personal examination, enabled the State Board to 
make as fair and equitable an assessment of the railroad property of 
the State as could be done in the first year of a new law. 

The work of the Board has gone to the {)eople. If it meet with 
their approval, its months of arduous labor will have been produc- 
tive of great good. 



TRANSPORTATION COMPANIES. 



Section 6 of an act supplementary and amendatory of an act 
entitled "an act to provide for a uniform assessment of property," 
etc., approved March 8, 1873, provides that corporations, whether 
foreign or domestic, firm or individual, engau'ed in the business of 
transporting or carrying passengers or freight on any railroad in the 
State of Indiana, upon any contract or agreement with such railroad 
company, shall, in the months of January and July of each year, 
report to the Auditor of State, under oath, the gross amount 
of all receipts in the State of Indiana on account of the trans- 
portation of passengers or freight for the six months last preceding, 
and shall at the time of such report pay into the Treasury of the 
State the sum of three dollars on every one hundred dollars of such 
receipts for passenger fare, and the sum of one dollar on every one 
hundred dollars of such receipts for transporting freights. 

In order to carry out the provisions of the law as above set forth, 
blanks for the proper reports were forwarded to all the freight 
transportation and sleeping car companies doing business in the 
State. 

The following are copies of the blanks forwarded to the principal 
offices of the several companies : 

REPORT OF TRANt^PORTATIOX COMPANIES 

Statement of gross receipts of the 



for the six months preced- 
ing the first day of July, 1873, in the State of Indiana, as re(piired 
by a supplemental act amending the assessment law, approved March 
8, 1873.' 



30 



GROSS RECEIPTS. 


DOLLARS. 


CENTS. 


/ 













State of — 
County of 



The undersigned, being duly sworn, deposes and says that the 

above is a full and true exhibit of the gross receipts of the 

of during: 

the six months ending June 30, 1873, on account of the transporta- 
tion of freight, and that the statement is based upon a correct appor- 
tionment of the receipts of the company governed by the ])roportion 
that tlie distance traversed in the State of Indiana bears to the whole 
distance paid for. 



Subscribed and sworn to before me this 
1873. 



dav of 



REPORT OF TRANSPORTATION COMPANIES. 



Statement of gross receipts of the 
of 



for the six months preced- 



ing the first day of July, 1873, in the State of Indiana, as required 
by a suplemental act amending the assessment law, approved March 
S, 1873. 



GROSS RECEIPTS. 


DOLLARS. 


CENTS. 















Stare of — 
Countv of- 



The undersigned, being duly sworn, deposes and says that the 



31 

above is a full and true exhibit of the gros.s receipts of the 

of (luring 

the six months ending June 30, 1873, on account of the transporta- 
tion of passengers, and that the statement is based upon a correct 
apportionment of the receipts of the company, governed by the pro- 
portion that the distance traversed in the State bears to the whole 
distance paid for. 



Subscribed and sworn to before me this day of ■ 

1873. 



On the back of each blank was printed the section of the law 
previously referred to. 

Of the sleeping car companies, to whom the blanks were for- 
warded, only one made a report of gross receipts and paid the tax 
required. The company which so reported and paid the tax was 
the Lake Shore and Michigan Southern Sleeping Car Company, 
principal office at Buifalo, New York. 

Of the "fast line" and other freight transportation companies, to 
whom blanks were forwarded, none of them reporteu gross receipts 
or paid the tax. Various reasons were advanced for not making 
the report as required, and one of the companies returned the fol- 
lowing statement, subscribed and sworn to : 

"The freight on shipments by this company is collected by the 
different roads forwarding our shipments and is not accounted for to 
this company in any way. Our receipts for freight are nothing." 

The substance of the objections made by the companies to 
making the report and paying the tax, was that the freight lines 
and sleeping car companies are not transportation companies. The 
freight lines, it was urged, were solicitors of business for the rail- 
ways which carried the freight and were, therefore, not liable for 
any tax on account of transportation, and the sleeping car companies 
did not collect fare for transportation of passengers on any railwav. 
Not feeling satisfied with the reports of the companies, however, and 
believing the Legislature designed that they should pay a tax for the 
privileges enjoyed by them, and one sleeping car company having 
reported and paid the tax imposed, I have submitted the question 
to the Attorney General, and he will take such stej>s as may be 
necessary to have it settled by the courts. 



LANDS AND LOTS BELONGING TO THE STATE. 



The following described lands and city and town lots are tiie 
property of the State. Some of the pieces as set forth in the con- 
veyances, have been acquired, and are held for special purposes, and 
some have been conveyed to secure the State against loss through 
defalcation. 

It has been thought proper to make and publish a list of the 
several tracts so that definite and more general knowledge could be 
had of them 5 and also for the purpose of directing the attention of 
the General Assembly, at the proper time, to the necessity of 
providing by law for the disposal or proper care of those lands 
which have not been conveyed to the State for special uses. 

So far as relates to lands acquired through the defalcation of 
public officers, and to make good certain claims against individuals, 
no one has the custody or disposals of the lands, and no one of the 
State officers is delegated to look after them, or to exercise any power 
in their care and m-anagcment. 

In consequence of this lack of authority there are several tracts 
which are entirely uncared for, and which must necessarily be 
exposed to damage and permanent injury, through the cutting and 
loss of timber. 

1. The south-west quarter of the north-west quarter of section 
3, township 16 north, range 5 west, in Putnam county, containing 
45 40-100 acres. 

Conveyed to the State by Sheriff's deed, and by quitclaim from 
Mason and Mary Griffith, on judgment obtained against Hiram E. 
Talbott and others. 

No. 2. ivots 18, 19 and 20, in Morton, Caffin and Wright's 
subdivision of out lot No. 149, in the city of Indianapolis. 



33 

Conveyed to the State by John Stumph and wife and Samuel 
Ivefevre. 

No. 3. One acre in out lot No. 28, Clarksville, Clarke county, 
for grave yard lot for the State Prison south. Conveyed by Jane 
Keigwin. 

No. 4. The east half of the south-west quarter 5, 30, 3 west. 

The we.st half of the south-east quarter 5, 30, 3 west. 

The east half of the north-west quarter <S, 30, 3 west. 

The west half of the north-east quarter 8, 30, 3 west. 

The southeast quarter of the northeast quarter 8, 30, 3 west, 
containing 360 acres, all in Pulaski county. 

No, 5. The south half of the north-east quarter of section 15, 
township 34, range 2 west, containing 80 acres in Newton county. 

Tliese lands in Pulaski and Newton counties were conveyed to 
the State by Daniel A. Farley, ex-Treasurer of Pulaski county, to 
reimburse the Swamp Land funds, and University Land funds, in 
which funds losses to the amount of two thousand dollars had 
occurred while the said Farley was Treasurer of Pulaski county. 

No. 6. The north-east quarter of the north-east quarter of 
.section 1, township 12, range 7 west, containing 40 acres in Clay 
county. 

Conveyed to the State by Aquilla Jones. 

No. 7. Lots 242 and 243 in the " North Burying Ground," in 
Marion county, conveyed to the State by E. J. Peck and wife. 

No. 8. One hundred acres in the south-east quarter of section 1, 
township 15 north, range 2 east, in Marion county, conveyed to the 
State by James P. Drake and wife, and by quitclaim from James H. 
McKernan. 

This land was originally purchased as a site for a House of Refuge, 
but, under an act in relation to the House of Refuge, approved 
March 8, 1867, it was sold to one McCaslin, who subsequently 
forfeited it by non-payment of purchase money, and the title reverted 
to the State. 

The above are lands held in fee simple. There are others, the 
principal of which are the Beaver Lake lands, and the canal lots in 
this city, which are in litigation, and consequently not enumerated 
with the foregoing. 

Doc. J.— A. S. R.— 3 



STATE STATISTICS. 



The importance to all classes of business, and to intelligent and 
prudent legislation, of a full and accurate exhibit of the annual pro- 
ducts of the industries of the State, not only of the agricultural, but 
the manufacturing, mining and commercial industries, is so obvious, 
yet so inadequately provided for in this and most other States, that 
a few suggestions as to the information needed and the mode of 
obtaining it cannot be out of place in this report. 

At the present we are dependent on three sources for the little we 
may learn of this vital subject. 1st, the national decennial census ; 
2d, the reports of the National Agricultural Bureau; 3d, the collec- 
tion of facts and estimates in use by commercial papers in the 
interests of special classes of business. Of the first it is enough to 
say that it is worse than inadequate, — it is practically false in that 
it rarely reaches the public in detail until the State generally, and 
most of its political divisions, have outgrown its statements ; and 
being decennial, it supplies no information, good or bad, for the 
intervening years. It is quite useless to business and misleading to 
legislation. Second, the reports of the Agricultural Bureau are 
limited to the industry it is especially charged with, and they never 
pretend to give even of that, more than an average estimate of 
annual results, made up from information gathered at different 
points of the State. Accurate enough they probably are, as averages, 
but that is not the kind of information, even if it embraced all 
forms of industry, that the l)usiness man, and especially the Legis- 
lature want. Both need to know the industrial condition and 
products of localities, what they have done and what they require. 
Third, the facts and estimates — mere guesses, however shrewd — of 
papers devoted to special industries, fail at the same points that 



35 

the Agricultural Bureau fails. They give us a general view of the 
State's industries, and not very safe views even of those they prac- 
tically apply themselves to. 

In this condition of knowledge of our own labors, achievement*} 
and resources, no man can guide his action by better directions than 
conjectures. What a particular county has produced in corn, or 
wheat, or root crops, or mining products, or in manufactures, or 
what the amount of its commercial business has been, he does not 
know except by vague comparison of individual statements with 
each other, and by conclusions loosely built upon them. It cannot 
be necessary to enlarge upon the value to a legislator of such an 
exhibit as has been indicated, by which he may know exactly the 
industrial condition of his own county, or district, and of all the 
counties of the State. 

To a business man its value is even more appreciable. But this 
is not all. More is needed than a knowledge of the State's indus- 
tries. Its health, its educational and moral condition, its crimes, 
and all that facts can display of the domestic concerns of the people, 
ought to be fully reported. We ought to know the diseases, the 
localities especially affected, and their fatality. We ought to know 
the crimes committed, the nativity and previous condition of the 
criminals, the terms of punishment and the periods within which 
convictions are made. We ought to know the intellectual state of 
each county so far as it is exhibited by the support of and attend- 
ance upon schools. These and other points of information that will 
readily suggest themselves to all intelligent men are indispensable 
to the proper direction of legislation and the wise application of 
public charities. We know practically nothing about them. This 
great and urgent need should be met by the provision of adequate 
means to collect all desirable information, to prepare it promptly, 
by careful condensation in tabulated statements, or otherwise, for 
publication, and to give it as speedily as possible general diffusion 
among the people. 

An attempt to supply this want was made a number of years ago, 
but the collection of facts was entrusted to the local assessors, under 
no penalty for neglect or refusal to act, and it failed so utterly that 
the enterprise was abandoned as impracticable except at a cost 
deemed too great for the service. A general but ill-founded appre- 
hension that the information solicited was to be used to increase the 
assessment for taxes, or to impeach the returns they were to make 
or had made, also greatly obstructed the operation of the law. No 



36 

successful attempt to reinstate the work was made till last winter, 
although attention was directed to it repeatedly by the Executive in 
messages, and by ray predecessors in this office. Measures were 
devised in one form or another, but in the press of what was deemed 
more important business they were overlooked or pushed aside. 
Last December, however, at the special session of the Legislature, a 
provision was inserted in the act reconstructing the system of assess- 
ing property for taxation, requiring a return to the County Auditors 
from local assessors, and from County Auditors to this office of " tlie 
number of domestic and farm animals of all kinds, and the quan- 
tities in bushels and tons of every kind in each civil township of 
agricultural products, also manufactured products, bushels of coal 
mined, and such other items of product as may be directed by the 
Auditor of State," and of the number, names, age, and parentage of 
the deaf and dumb and blind. This provision, with the discretion 
allowed the State Auditor to enlarge the "items of product" to be 
reported by the Assessors, and with the exaction from him of a 
speedy preparation of the returns in a tabular form, exhibiting the 
products of each county, and of the aggregate for the entire State, 
and its subjection to public inspection and embodiment in the 
annual report of this office, would seem to meet the larger portion of 
the necessity. But, admitting the successful operation of the law, 
it still leaves an indispensable class of information unprovided for. 
The diseases and deaths, the prevalence of diseases in particular 
localities and at particular times, and their comparative fatality, can 
only be learned by a stretch of construction of the State Auditor's 
authority, which he can not assume the responsibility of making. 

The language of the act clearly confines his discretion to industrial 
products and to the addition of such as the Legislature did not 
deem it necessary to name speciiically. He can not safely require 
assessors to report the number of sick, of deaths, and the kinds of 
diseases, as a part of the permission to add " other items of product." 

The educational or intellectual condition of the State may be 
accurately learned from the reports of the Superintendent of Public 
Instruction, so far as it is exhibited by the condition of the schools; 
but there are other indications, as the number of newspapers circu- 
lated, which can not be ascertained from any authentic source. 
Besides, the annual "tabular statement" required of the State Aud- 
itor should embody a condensed view of the details presented by the 
reports of the Superintendent of Public Instruction. It should 
contain, also, a condensed statement of the criminal statistics 



37 

obtained by the Attorney General enlarged by the additions above 
suggested. 

The local taxation of the State, county, township, and municipal 
should he required of the proper authorities in full, as it is now a 
part. 

Tiie operations of railroads as more fully set forth elsewhere, 
should be ])resented. In short the annual exhibit should display, 
as far as possible, the year's work, health, wealth, progress and 
general condition. The existing conditions of the law are inade- 
quate to this object, though better than those previously made. 
But these like the former, are made dependent on local assessors, 
who are not compelled to regard them, and they are open to the 
same misconstruction that so greatly impaired the operations of the 
former — that is the belief that the information required is meant 
to affect taxation. This misapprehension is probably, in a measure, 
corrected, but it will remain more or less an obstruction to any 
attempt to gather State statistics by local assessors. Whether the 
value of full and accurate information of the kind described is 
sufficient to v?arrant the expense of a special organization, or the 
popular misapprehension may be so far disabused as to make no 
serious obstruction to the existing one, is for the Legislature to 
determine. 

Appreciating the importance of the information provided for by 
the act of December 21, 1872, I addressed a letter on the 10th of 
February, to the Auditor of each county, calling attention to this 
provision of the law, and designating the statistics desired. la 
response returns have been made, as shown in the table appended, 
which though incomplete and often negligently made, show the 
germ of a valuable final result, if the law is persistently and syste- 
matically enforced. 

It may not be safe to assume that even these apparently full 
returns are accurate, but enough is presented to indicate the impor- 
tance of such a table, complete and trustworthy. It shows that this 
year there were in the State 514,438 horses, 54,307 mules, 1,211,246 
cattle, 1,235,874 sheep, 2,999,139 liogs; that it had 1,902,599 acres 
in wheat, yielding an aggregate of 22,149,527 bushels or an average 
of nearly 12 bushels to the acre; that it had 2,627,980 acres in corn, 
yielding 81,185,485 bushels, an average of nearly 31 bushels to the 
acre; that it had in oats 624,795 acres, producing 11,434,628 bushels, 
or an average of 18 J bushels; of potatoes there were produced 
3,412,159 bushels; but the acres are not given, and the average 



38 

cannot be ascertained. 570,382 tons of coal are reported mined, 
but the returns cannot be accepted as accurate. 

It is unnecessary to notice the details further as they can be 
seen at a glance in the table. But as each county's product, acreage 
and average is there exhibited, it may be easily seen that, enlarged 
by the suggested additions touching health, crime and education, 
with the usual tax statements, made doubly valuable by full reports 
of all local taxation, and by returns of railroad operations and other 
matters of general interest, such a condensed view of the year's 
history of the State may be of inestimable value. And being 
annually compiled and promptly published, it would supply as far 
as human means can, such information in the form and at the time 
when it can be made most serviceable. 



RAILROADS. 



The immense railroad interests of the State make of obvious value 
the tables in this report, exhibiting as far as possible, a succinct 
history of our roads, the counties they traverse or enter, the date of 
their construction, acres of right of way, miles of track, weight and 
miles of rail, both steel and iron, miles of side track and weight of 
iron, number of ties per mile, kinds of joints and chairs, number of 
buildings and other structures, kinds of ballast, number of locomo- 
tives, passenger cars, sleeping and drawing room cars, express and 
baggage cars, box, stock, coal and platform, wrecking, pay and hand 
cars, with the totals of all, and the names of the chief officers. Such 
a table made complete would present a view of our railroad interests 
which, combined with the tabular results of the assessments made by 
the State Board of Equalization, would be of general interest and 
great value. But to make such an exhibit of this vast interest as 
sshould be made, there should be required for annual tabulating and 
publication a statement of the cost of right of way, construction, 
equipment, receipts from passengers, freight, mail and expressage, 
expense of maintaining tracks, buildings, officers, agents, engineers, 
laborers and others employed, the number and kinds of accidents to 
passengers or other persons, with cause, time and place, and to stock 
with amounts paid, and the amount of taxes paid. These returns 
should be required, not to trespass upon the private affairs of com- 
panies, but to furnish to the public, to other roads, and to the Leg- 
islature, such knowledge as is always valuable and often indispens- 
able in directing private or corporate action, or public legislation. 

With an annual display of the State's condition and industrial 
operations which such a collection of statistics as has been consid- 
ered in this report Indiana will stand among the foremost of the 
governments of the civilized world in the knowledge of herself and 
in the diffusion of that knowledge wherever it can be of service. 



40 

The existing acts, as already indicated, will supply a large portion 
of these statistics when they are fully understood among the people 
and fully executed by the local officers. But in their best construc- 
tion and operation they must still leave imperfectly reported, or 
wholly omitted, some of the most important particulars of our con- 
dition. 

What amendments the acts need to supply the deficiency, how the 
desired information may best be obtained, and how the popular 
misapprehension of the object of obtaining such facts may be 
removed, as well as the department by which the whole business of 
gathering and publishing statistics should be conducted, are for the 
Legislature to determine. 

It is pertinent in this connection to give a partial exhibit of the 
assessment of railroads in. the years 1872 and -1873. As the railroad 
property in the State forms the larger portion of the assessment 
made by the State Board of Equalization, I give the railroad prop- 
erty as it appeared on the tax duplicates for 1872, and the amount 
assessed for 1873, in the following counties: 



NAIIE OF COUNTY. 


1872. 


1873. 


1. Allen 


8420,360 
325,410 
152,700 
324,450 
290,070 
249,490 
848,040 
437,122 
709,396 
230,000 
365,260 
341,900 

$4,694,198 


51,798,441 
623,462 


2. Deaib' rn 


3. Delaware 


494,4ii:'. 

l,0r.2,7U5 

ti25,484 

348,192 


4. Elkhart 






7. Lake 


1,611,738 
1,665,012 
1,519,160 

802,852 


8. La Porte 




10. St. Joseph 


11. Vigo 


854,024 
738,928 

$12,374,521 


12. Wayne 


Total 





The figures under the year 1873 are the amounts of the assess- 
ment as made by the State Board of Equalization. In addition to 
these amounts there was property in each county which was assessed 
by the local assessors, and of which no report was made to this 
office. It will be seen, however, that in the twelve counties given 
the assessment of 1873, not counting the local assessment, exceeds 
that of 1872 by seven million six hundred and eighty thousand 
dollars. 

For further information in relation to railroads attention is espec- 
ially directed to the tables in this report and the proceedings of the 
State Board, which are also included in these pages. 



LOCAL TAXATION. 



In order to make as complete an exhibit of the condition of the 
State as possible, I have sought to obtain statements of all the local 
taxes, not only the taxes usually returned to this office and annually 
reported, but those assessed by cities and towns. The appended 
table containing a condensed view of the incomplete returns received, 
show that local taxation always and greatly exceeds that imposed 
for State purposes. Where municipal are added to county and 
township levies the aggregate not unfrequently amounts to three or 
four times the legislative tax. 

A correct knowledge of the burdens imposed by local necessity 
or enterprise or taste, upon property, or by existing indebtedness, 
is important to the capitalist looking for investments, and to emi- 
grants looking for homes. A serious diiference in the rate of taxa- 
tion may easily make all the diiference between a paying and losing 
enterprise. When the aggregate of local and general taxes amounts, 
as it does in many cases, to two per cent, of the cash value of prop- 
erty, under the new assessment law, so large an abstraction from 
available resources becomes an item of importance in calculating 
the chances of a manufacture, or other application of capital. It 
will effect real estate investments, especially when, as in cities, it 
may be additionally charged with the cost of improvements which 
the owners neither ask for, nor see any necessity for. So will the 
amount of indebtedness, not only as exhibiting the diversions of a 
portion of the revenue from other services, but as exhibiting the 
prudence or incaution of the city's policy. 

County and township debts, as well as those of cities, ought to be 
fully reported every year. These with the taxes, the assessments, 
and the reports of agricultural and other industrial products, and 



42 

the hygienic, educational, and moral condition of the county er 
township or city, will give every inquirer full information of the 
circumstances both of advantage and disadvantage in which he will 
place himself by locating in either. It is such information as every 
State should be able to gilre and which few or no States can give. 
Letters are constantly received at this office asking it, but, excepting 
occasionally and imperfectly, it cannot be furnished. 

The amount of local taxation will readily suggest the importance 
of some limitation of the power of imposing it. The taxes for 
general purposes, in cities, is limited, but for special purposes muni- 
cipal and county and township authorities are allowed the rather 
liberal range of their owe discretion or fancy, to say nothing of the 
occasional improper uses of the revenue. Such abuses exists, every- 
body knows, and the permission of unlimited taxation for special 
purposes encourages them. The expedient of increasing a special 
levy is too frequently the step that leads to official irregularities, 
and improper diversion of the people's money. Thoroughly honest 
and reasonably prudent men cannot be expected to be put in control 
of local or municipal affairs always, by so miscellaneous a popula- 
tion as is usually found in cities, and one bad administration will 
undo the good of a dozen honest ones, and set an example of mis- 
chief to a dozen more. It is not easy for a general law to bene- 
ficially limit the revenue a city or other local government may 
raise for particular purposes, but no reasonable limitation can do 
so much mischief by restricting the means of possible good as the 
absence of all limitation may do in opening the way to probable evil. 
Cities, towns and townships should be required to report their taxes 
and their indebtedness. 



43 



STATEMENT shoiomg the average rates of Local Taxation 
the Coutities of Indiana, for 1873. 



m 



3 


Names ok Counties. 

• 


i 


a 
H 

"o 
o 

Si 


s 


X 

a 
H 

.a 

c 

o 

H 


a 
H 

5 
o 


"o 
o 

.a 

1 


x' 

a 

_o 

3 

H 


X 

H 

a 

o 




Total. 


^ 




Cts. 
15 
15 
i5 
15 
15 
15 
15 
15 
15 
15 
15 
15 
15 
15 
15 
15 
15 
15 
15 
15 
16 
15 


Cts. 
1(J 
1') 
1(J 
IG 
l(i 
Ki 
16 
16 
16 
16 
16 
16 
16 
16 
16 
16 
16 
16 
16 
16 
16 
16 


SI 00 

60 
24 
60 
67 
15 
80 
50 
75 


Cts. 

r^ 

10 

5 

4 

3 
10 

5 
15 


cts. 

10 

14 7-10 

15 

10 

il 
10 
12 


Cts. 
19 5-12 
16 
20 
19 
20 
20 
17 
::5 
7 


Cts. 
10 

5 
10 

5 

4 
10 


CtB. 


Cts. 


SI 90 5-12 


<>, 


Allen 






1 31 


3 






40 


1 45 


4 






1 24 7-10 


5 


BiHckford 




58 


I 99 


fi 






89 


7 








1 47 


8 




10 
13 




16 


1 46 


1 






1 53 


10 










11 


Clay 


















T) 




40 
1 00 
30 
75 
40 
40 
70 
65 
34 
18 
65 


6 
12 2-9 

5 
15 

2 7-9 
2 

8 


5 
10 

5^ 
20 

12 7-9 
15 

8 
10 

9 

14 4-9 
10 


18 

24 4-9 

15 10-11 
20 

h 

16 2-10 
29% 


18 






1 17 


V.\ 








1 11% 


u 


Daviess 


8 1-7 
10 

183-. 

6 
20 
10 
12 
11 

'3>2 




15 


1 13 8-15 


l^i 




1 71 


1(1 


Decatur 






1 23 5-^ 


17 


DeKalb 






1 15 


IS 




1 63 


I'l 








1 53 1-12 


"11 


Elkhart 






1 09% 


"1 






2 
10 


87 1-9 


0;> 


Floyd 




1 67V, 


W 








•?4 




15 
15 
15 
15 


16 
16 
16 

16 


50 
60 
30 
50 


8 6-13 
4 

5 6-13 


16 9-13 

'I 

10 8-13 


9 
15 
20 5-9 

20 


6 7-13 
16 
19 






1 21 9-13 


•'.f\ 








1 3H 


%\ 








95 2-9 


•'7 








1 17 1-13 


"8 












'« 




15 


16 


25 


4 5-9 


3 7-9 


13 






10 


87 -.i 


'to 










31 
























?.''> 




15 
15 
15 
15 
15 
15 
15 
15 
15 
15 
16 
15 
15 
15 
15 
15 
15 
15 
15 
15 
15 
15 
15 
16 
15 
15 
16 


16 
16 
16 
16 
16 
16 
16 
16 
16 
16 
16 
16 
16 
16 
16 
16 
16 
16 
16 
16 
16 
16 
16 
16 
16 
16 
16 


26 

25 
55 
80 
25 
50 
60 
















s-^ 


H'^ury 


4 7-ioO 

5 

6 

6 


7 46-100 
12 
15 
7 10-11 

10 


1890-100 

25 

20 

17 1-13 

20% 

1*% 


9 9-100 

18 






95i.i 


3+ 






1 46 










151 


:i(i 




15 

■.1 




10 


1 14% 
1 48 


:!7 






38 








1253^ 


3<t 








4(1 


Jennings 


50 
20 
25 
30 
20 
45 
35 
55 
16 
35 
50 
75 
65 
60 
70 
45 
30 
30 
00 


4 

2 4-17 

a 

5 

2 4-7 
6 

12 2-5 
6 4-7 
8 
5 
7 

4 8-10 
4 4-10 
8 


16 
10 
9 

11 10-17 
15 3-11 
16 
19 

2>3 

6 

4 3-7 
11 

10 10-11 
10 3-7 

8 

5 

9 
20 
13 
12 


15 

19 

18 

16 4-5 

21 

9 1-9 
18 3-14 

14 
18 

25 


19 
18 






1 45 


41 




15 


1 14 


4? 






84 


43 




11 

10 7-10 
13 

6 
10 

18% 
15 8-15 






1 0414-lT 


44 








9514 


45 








1 25' 7 10 


4r. 








1 24% 
1 13 5 18 


4V 








48 






8 


90 


4') 






88 1 9 


Wl 


Marshall 






1 25 3 14 


51 


Martin 




80 


2 72-'-~ 


,V^ 






1 l'^ 
1 24 


53 


Monroe 

Montgomery 






54 


8 

14% 
14J4 

10 






1 33 








1 24% 
1 19 S-10 


5(1 


Newton 

Noble 

Ohio 






57 

58 


351^ 




1 46% 
1 40 


5f| 










i;u 




15 
15 
15 
15 
15 
15 
15 
16 
15 


16 
16 
16 
16 
16 
16 
16 
16 
16 


20 
25 

1 05 
40 
25 
60 


8 
6 
9 
7 
3 
9 


10 
10 
12 
10 
12 
10 


15 
15 
33 
23 
13 
'i2 


18 
18 
4 

10 
13 






1 02 


(il 


Parke 






1 05 


n? 


Perry 

Pike 






1 94 


r,3 






1 121^ 
94 


(;4 


Porter 






H5 








1 35 


fi(i 










07 




16 

5 


1^ 


10 3-13 


11 

19 1-5 


10 8-13 
12 2-15 




6 


ZIK 


68 


Kandolph 




So'lO-18 



44 



STATEMENT of Local Taxation— Cont'maed. 



s 

S3 


Names of Counties. 


H 


o 


O 


s. 

O 


1 


o 


o 

1 ' 


H 

■a 


O 


Total. 


69 


Kipley 


Cts. 
15 
15 
15 
15 
15 
15 
15 
15 
15 
15 
15 
15 
15 
15 
15 
15 
15 
15 
15 
15 
15 
15 
15 
15 


s 
Hi 
16 
16 
10 
16 
16 
16 
16 
16 
16 
16 
16 
16 
16 
16 
16 
16 
16 
16 
16 
16 
10 
16 
16 


80 
25 
60 
30 
70 
SI 30 
30 
20 
35 
40 
1 00 
75 
50 
80 
30 
.35 
60 
25 
30 
30 
35 
00 
30 
50 


CtB. 

10 
4 
9 

10 
10 
3 

7 

5 10-13 
5 

5 

9 7-12 
5 

3% 
14>^ 

5 8-13 
3 6-11 

7 
2Ji 


(Jts. 
16 9-11 
12 
11 

5 2-13 
14 
25 
18 
15 

5 

8 

10 2-13 
15 
10,5-6 

^m 

8 

11 3-12 
15 

4 

r% 

9 8-11 
17 
13^ 


Cts. 
20 5-11 
18 
25 
20 
26 
25 
20 
23 
23 
22 

22 4-13 
15 
7 
13 
17 8-10 

20 
15 

18 

16 17-23 

10 10-1 1 

21 

13 


cts. 


Cts. 


Cts. 


81 58 3 11 


70 




16 

"f^ 

11 
10 

16 

19 8-13 

10 

20 
10 

11 13-2- 

i4 






1 00 


71 


Scott 




40 


1 76 


T?^ 


Shelby 


99 


73 








1 60^ 

2 62 


74 


Staikti 




30 


75 


St. Joseph 




1 19 


76 






20 " 
10 


93>^ 
1 33 


77 






78 






122>^ 
1 88 11-13 


70 




80 


Tipto(i 






1 51 


*81 






1 081.^ 


f.-'f 






3 


1 bJ'^A 
1 11 S-10 


83 






t84 

85 


Vigo 






1 10 








1 31 


80 








1 04^ 

1 30-% 

94 


87 


Wai'iick 

Washington 

Wajne 

Wells 






88 






80 






1 07 


90 






1 21 2 11 


91 


Wliite 


1 13 


q9 


Whitley 






1 10 















■^'Two Townships levied a Railroad Tax of 50 cents and 75 cents, respectively, 
t Three Townships levied a Railroad Tax, averaging 64 cents. 



45 

STATEMENT of Local Taxation in Cities and Towns of Indiana 
for the year 1873. 



Name or Corfiry. 


Name oi" Towv. 


is 
o 

a/ o 


"a 

o 

3 r. 


p 




>4 
a 
H 

3 
o 

'3 


H 

O 


3 


Ad«mB 




Cts. 
20 


Cts, 
10 


Cts. 
10 


Cts. 
20 


CtH. 


Cfs. 


(.0 
1 40 


Allen 








BartliiiLmew 
















BcMtoH 


Oxford 




35 

i"o' 

15 
35 










35 

U8 
41 
45 

Co 


Blarkl'ord 




16 
16 
15 
15 


is'"' 

15 
15 




58 


26 






Boone 










Boono 


Zionsville 


















Carroll 


Delphi 


90 












90 


CasB 














Clarke 


















Clinton 


Frankfort 




35 








50 
20 


85 

69 


Clinton .' 






25 


24 




Clav 










Crawford. 






















i;6 


10 










75 
90 




LaWreucebiirgh. ... 
















73 












75 


DeKalb 














Delaware 


















Dubois 


















Elkbart 




iJO 

yd 










4U 


60 
95 
20 
60 


Fayette 












Floyd 




10 
25 








10 
10 


no d 






15 
















'^rauklin 


Mt. Carmel 


10 
20 
10 
30 


5 
15 
15 
15 
25 




12 
6 

26 
30 






.y^'" 


Franklin 


Brookville 








40 

50 

25 

74 
50 


Franklin 








Franklin 
























16 








59 














JreiTie 
















Jamil ti 11 






23 
17 

34 
17 

17 










17 
34 


ianiilton 


Westfield 












laniilton 
















Boxley 

Clarksville 












ianiilton 


17 








34 


Saucuck 






























leudricks 


















Henry 


































1 28 


















lackson 


















usper 




20 












20 






lay 


















efferaon 


















ennings 


Vernon 




10 
25 
25 
26 
25 
50 
10 




25 
20 








ennings 










1 00 


1 45 

50 
40 


oliuson 






25 
15 
26 
26 




olinson 












obnsou 






obnson 












75 

1 37 

30 


<nox 




85 

no 

25 

20 






42 












iosciiisko 














jaGrange 




20 
90 
23 


jake 




22.1/^ 

30 
25 
20 

1 


10 

8 
20 






5T>^ 


jaPorte 




1 






jaPorte 












50 


jaPorto 


Westvillo 










2.5 
45 


-ttwreuce 


Bedford 




26 























46 



STATEMENT of Local Taxation in Cities and Towns — Continued. 



Name of Counti'. 


Name of Townb. 




o 
o 

•J3 


S 


o 


■3 
at 
p 

'3 


O 


"3 

o 


Madison 


Anderson 


Cts. 
80 
75 
5 


Ots. 


Cts. 


CtB. 


Ct8. 


Cts. 


80 




Indianapolis 


23 
50 


10 

6 






2 


1 10 
65 




Irvington 


•' 




Mart-hall 












Peru* 














2 25 




Xenia* 














75 


Monroe 


Blooniington 


20 










50 


70 


















Marlinville 


40 













40 


















Noble 



















Ohio 






















































Parke 




















Cannelton 


1 00 
1 00 












1 00 




Tell City 












1 00 


Pike" 
















Porter 




30 










72>^ 


1 Oi",, 




Mt. Vernont 










2 36 


Pnlaski 














•. 




Putnam 


New Maysville 




10 
15 
25 
12 
10 
20 
50 


25 
15 


25 
15 






60 












15 




Bainbridge 








25 




Fillmore 




10 
15 
20 
10 








22 




15 






40 




Putnamville 








40 








10 






70 






35 
8S 
40 






35 




Ui.ion Citj" 












So 
















40 


Ripley 
















Rusb 


Rusliville 


90 












90 


Bcott 
















Shelbv 


Shelbyville 


CO 


20 
50 
10 


15 


15 






1 10 




Rockport 






1 00 








10 


Starke 
















Bt. Joseph 

Steuben 


































Sullivan 






















30 
15 












30 




Patriot 


25 
25 
5 
15 
25 


15 


15 






70 




LaFayette 






25 
















5 




Battle Ground 












15 








:":::::':: :::::::::::. 






^5 


















Liberty 


20 


10 
20 
30 


20 
20 


1" 
15 






60 








55 










1 oi) 


32 














1 00 


Vigo 












32 


32 


Wabafh 


Wabash 






25 






25 








15 








15 


















Warrick 
































50 
1 00 


5'i 






15 
35 










1 15 


Wells 


Bhiffton 


25 








60 


White 














Whitley 





































*0n old assegsmeiit. 

f Including Township and County levies. 



THE STATE DEBT, 



The condition of the public debt of tlie State at the date of this 
report, October 31, 1873, is as follows : 

FOEEIGX DEBT. 

Fivo per cent, certificates of State stock 82fi,9C9 99 

Two and one-half per cent, certificati-s of State stock 4, ''00 13 

War Loan Bonds 139,000 W 

Temporary Loan 710,000 W 

loternul Improvement Bonds 114,000 tX' 

Total 3994,030 12 

DOMESTIC DEBT. 
School Fund, non-nogotiable Bonds $3,904,7*3 'Jri 

These Bonds are five in number, as follows: ■ 

Xo. 1. January 1, 1867 9700.024 85 

No. 2. January 20, 1807 2,t;58,('67 30 

So. 3. May 1, 1868 184,234 00 

No. 4. January 2(i, 1871 177,700 00 

No. 5. May 3, 1873 175,767 07 

_. 83,904,783 2-J 



REDEMPTION'S. 

During the fiscal year ending October 31, 1873, certificates of 
State stock, and Internal Improvement Bonds, have been redeemed 
as follows: * 

Five per cent, certilicates $-3,9W 

Two and one-bait per cent, certificates 9tiO 

Internal Improvement Bonds 77,0<10 

Total 883,800 

As stated in previous reports the Five and Two and one-half 
per cent, certificates of State Stock ceased to bear interest on the 1st 
day of September, 1 870, and notice was then given that all out- 



48 

standing certificates of State Stock would be paid in full on presen- 
tation at the office of Agent of State. Notwithstanding ample notice 
has been given from time to time during the past eight years, there 
are still outstanding Five and Two and one-half per cent, certifi- 
cates amounting to thirty- one thousand and thirty dollars and 
twelve cents. 

INTERNAL, IMPROVEMENT BONDS. 

Under the provisions of an act of the General Assembly entitled 
"an act to provide for the payment of sundry bonds or stocks of the 
State of Indiana issued prior to the year 1841, and declaring an 
emergency," approved December 12, 1872, the State assumed the 
payment of Internal Improvement Bonds outstanding, amounting 
to one hundred and ninety-one thousand dollars, to which was to 
be added at the time of redemption the accumulated and unpaid 
interest on the same. 

Previously to the passage of this act the Internal Improvement 
Bonds were taken up and canceled as provided for in the acts of 
1846 and 1847, known as the " Butler Bill." One-half of the prin- 
ciple of the surrendered bonds was paid for with a new certificate 
of State Stock, bearing five per cent interest per annum, and one- 
half of the unpaid interest with a new certificate of State Stock 
bearing two and one-half per cent, interest per annum. The other 
half of the j)rineipal and unpaid interest, were paid by the issue of 
certificaten of Canal Stock, for the payment of which the holders 
were to look to the revenues and income of the Wabash and Erie 
Canal. 

As provided for in the act of December 12, 1872, seventy-seven 
sterling and dollar bonds have been paid in full, together with the 
accumulated interest, as shown in the statements of the Governor, 
Secretary and Attorney General appended hereto. 

The causes which led to the act referred to providing for the pay- 
ment of the Internal Improvement Bonds are recited at some length 
in the preamble to House Bill No. 129, of the Special Session of the 
Legislature, December, 1872: 

" Whereas, There are still outstanding certain Wabash and Erie 
Canal bonds or stocks, and certain Internal Improvement Bonds 
issued by authority of this State, prior to the year 1841, and which 
have never been surrendered under the legislation of 1846 and 1847, 
commonly known as the Butler Bill ; and, whereas, a suit was com- 
menced in 1869 in the C/arroil Circuit Court, of this State, by John 



49 

W. Garrett, agaiuvSt the trustees of the Wabash and Erie Canal, and 
also against the owners of other public works formerly owned by 
this State, for the purpose of enforcing an alleged lien, which the 
said Garrett insists the holders of said bonds have on said canal, or 
on some part thereof, a-! well as on said other public works; said 
suit being brought by said Garrett as one of the holders of said 
bonds or stocks, as well as for his own benefit' as for the benefit ot 
all others holding similar bonds and standing in the same relations, 
the whole number of bonds thus outstanding being one hundred and 
ninety-one, all coupon bonds, and some of them being dollar bonds 
for one thousand dollars each, and the residue being sterling bonds 
for two hundred and twenty-five pounds sterling each, the precise 
number of each of these descriptions of bonds being unknown; and, 
whereas, the said action of the said Garrett has been removed by 
change of venue to and is now pending in the Cass Circu t Court, 
and other holders of such bonds have, at their own request, been 
made parties to said actions; and, whereas, said Cass Circuit Court 
has made an interlocutory decree in said cause pending, that the 
equities are with the plaintiffs, and that said bonds held by said 
Garrett and others are a lien on said canal, its tolls and revenues, 
and directing that if said lien is not satisfied before the 27th day of 
December, 1872, a sequestrator, to be appointed by said court in said 
cause, shall then take possession of said canal and all its appurten- 
ances and collect the tolls, revenues and water rents thereof, and 
apply the same to the satisfaction of said lien." 

It '>vas the opinion of the Attorney General, expressed in a com- 
munication to Hon. W. K. Edwards, Speaker of the House of 
Representatives, December 5, 1872, that "the 22d section of the 
svipplemental Butler Bill of January 27, 1847, makes it the dutv of 
the State to protect the trust property from the lien of Garrett's 
bonds, and having the ability to do this, if she fails to do it, and 
allows the trust to be destroyed by standing by and seeing the trust 
property subjected to the payment of her own debts, she will put 
herself decidedly in iho wrong," 

Moreover it was the opinion of prominent attorneys, and of those 
who liad given the matter much attention, that if the sequestratioii 
of the tolls and revenues and property of the canal was permitted by 
the State, her alleged liability for the payment of the Wabash and 
Erie Canal stock, amounting, with the interest thereon, to twenty 
millions of dollars, would appear in a more formidable light, and 
be cause for apprehension in that relation. 
Doc. J.— A. S. R.— 4 



As will be seen in the statement in relation to the domestic debt ' 
of the State, an additional non-negotiable bond, amounting to one 
hundred and seventy-five thousand, seven hundred and sixty-seven 
dollars and seven cents, has been executed in favor of the School 
Fund. The bond was provided for by an act of the Legislature 
entitled '* an act to consolidate certain mortgage loans, forfeitures, 
bills receivable and other debts and accounts due the School Fund," 
etc., approved March 11, 1873. 

The details of the transaction are given in full in this report under 
the head of the Sinking Fund. 

The resources of the State applicable to the payment of the 
foreign debt, were, on the 31st day of October, 1872, as follows: 

In Siate Treasury - §603,221 Os" 

In the hands of the State Agent 99,480 40 

Total 3702,701 48 

Bv the act of December 13, 1872, entitled "an act in relation to 
the Funded Debt of the State of Indiana therein mentioned " the 
assets of the State Debt Sinking Fund, in the Treasury and in the 
hands of the Agent of State in New York, were turned over to the' 
General Fund. It was also provided that no further redemptions 
of War Loan Bonds should be made for two years from the taking 
effect of the act, but that the semi-annual interest should be paid 
promptly in New York as the same became due. It was further 
provided that any certificates of State Stocks presented for payment 
at the office of the Treasurer of State should be redeemed and can- 
celled by warrant uptm the General Fund. 

By the same act the State Agency in New York, as it then existed, 
was discontinued, and provision w^as made for the appointment of 
an Agent of State, by the Governor, Secretary and Treasurer, at a 
salary not exceeding five hundred dollars per annum, which agent 
ghould perform the duties heretofore devolving upon the Agent 
elected by the General Assembly. 

Mr. Charles Lanier, of New York City, was the duly appointed 
agent, as provided for in the act. 

There being no further necessity for a Board of State Debt Sink- 
ing Fund Commissioners, as originally created by an act of the 
Legislature, approved June 18, 1852, the Board ceased to exist, as 
get forth in the act of December 13, 1872, on the first day of Febru- 
ary of the present year. 



51 



INTERNAL IMPROVEMENT BONDS. 

The following is a list of the Internal Improvement Bonds and 
Coupons, and accrued interest thereon, paid under the provisions of 
an act to provide for the payment of sundry bonds or stocks of the 
State of Indiana, issued prior to the year 1841, and declaring an 
emergency, approved, December 12, 1872. 



BOND. 



Bond due July 1, 18iil 

Interest on bond since dale to January 1, 1873 

Forty-one Coupons at S25 

Interest on Coupons to January 1, 1873 

Bond due July 1, 1801 

Interest on Bond since due to January 1, 1873. 

Fortj'-one Coup .ns t $i5 

Interest on Coupons to January 1, 1873 

Bond due July 1, 18(11 

Interest on Bond since due to January 1, 1873 

Forty-one Coupons ai $2.5 

Interest ou Coupons to January 1, 1873 

Bond due July 1, ISHl 

Interest on bond since due to January 1, 1873.. 

Forty-one Coupons at Sio 

Interest on Coupons to January 1, 1873 

Bond due July 1, 1862 

Interest on Bond since due to January 1, 1873 

Forty-three Coupons at §25 

Interest on Coupons to January 1, 1873 

Bond due July I, 1862 

Interest on Bond since due to January 1, 1873 

Forty-three Coupons at 825 

Interest on Coupons to January 1, 1873 

Bond due .Tuly 1, 1862 

Interest on Bond since due to January 1, 1873. 

Forty-three Coupons at $25 

Interest on Coupons to January 1, 1873 

Bond due July 1, 1862 

Int'^rest on Bond since due to January 1, 1873 

Forty-three Coupons at 825 

Interest on Coupons to January 1, 1873 

Bond due July 1, 1862 

Interest on Bond since due to January 1, 1873 

Forty-three Coupons at $25 

Interest on Coupons to January 1, 1873 

Bond duo July 1, lh62 

Interest on Bond since due to January 1, 1873 

Forty-three Coupons at §25 

Inteiest on Coupons to January 1, 1873 

Bond due July 1, 1862 

Interest on Bond since due to January 1, 1873. 

Forty-three Coupons at $25 

Interest on Ceupons to January 1, 1873 

Bond due July 1, 1862 

Interest on Bond since due to Jsnuary 1, 1873. 

Forty-three Coupons at 825 

Interest on Coupons to January 1, 1873 



$1,000 00 

69(1 HO 

1,025 00 

1,322 25 



1 ,000 


00 


690 


00 


1,025 


00 


1,322 


26 


1,000 


00 


690 


(10 


1,025 


00 


1 ,322 


25 



1,000 00 

690 00 

1,025 00 

1,322 25 



1,000 00 
630 00 


1,075 00 
1,354 50 


1,000 00 
630 00 


1,075 00 


1,354 50 


1,000 00 


6.30 on 


1,075 00 


1,354 60 


1,000 00 
630 00 


1,075 00 
1,354 50 


1,000 <J0 
630 00 


1,075 00 
1,354 50 


1,000 00 
630 00 


1,075 00 
1,3.54 50 


1,000 00 


630 00 


1,075 00 
1,351 50 


1,000 00 


630 00 


1,076 00 
1,354 50 



4,a59 60 



52 



INTERNAL IMPROVEMENT BONDS— Contixued. 



Total. 



Bond due July 1, 1862 

Interest on B'>nd since due to January 1, 1873.. 

Firty-ttiree Coupons at 82,=) 

Interest on Coupons to January 1, 1873 



Bond due July 1, 1803 

Interest on Bond since due to January 1, 1873 

Forty-iive Coupons at $2^^ 

Interest on C upons to January 1, 1873 



Bond due July 1, 1863 

Interest on Bond since due to Jauurry 1, 1873.. 

Forty-five Coupons at $25 

Interest on Coupons to January 1, 1873 



Bond due July 1, 1863 

Interest on Bond since due to January 1, 1873.. 

Forty-five Coupons at $25 

Interest on Coupons to Januaiy 1, 1873 



Bond due July 1, 1863 

Interest on Bend since due to January 1, 

Forty-five Coupons at $25 

Interest on Coupous to January 1, 1873.... 



Bond due July 1, 1863 

Intel est on Bond since due to January 1, 1873.. 

Forty-five Coupons at |25 

Interest on Coupons to January 1, 1873 



Bond due July 1, 186.3 

Interest on Bond since due to January 1, 1873.. 

Forty. five Coupons at $25 

Interest on Coupons to January 1, 1873 



Bond due July 1, 1863 

JiitereHt on Bond since due to January 1, 1S73.. 

F' rty-five Coupons ar $:o 

Interest on Coupons to January 1, 1873 



Bond due July 1, 18!;3 

Interest on Bond since due to January 1, 1873.. 

Forty-five Coupons at $25 

Interest on Coupons to January 1, 1873 



Bond due July 1, 18r,.'5 

Interest on Bond since due to January 1, 1873.. 

Forty-four Coupons at $25 

Intere.>t on Coupons to January 1, 1873 



Bond due July 1, 1864 

Interest on Bond since due to January 1, 1873 

Forty -seven Cotipons at $25 

Interest on Coupous to Januarj- 1, 1873 



Bond due July 1, 1864 

Interest on Bond since due to January 1, 1873.. 

Forty -seven Coupons at $25 

Interest on Coupons to January 1, 1873 



Bond due July 1, 1864 

Interest on Bond since due to January 1, 1873. 

Forty-seven Coupons at $25 

Interest on Coupons to January 1, 1873 



Bond dueJuly 1, 1804 

Ititerest on Bonil since due to January 1, ;S73.. 

Forty-seven Coupons at $25 

Interest on Coupons to January 1, 1873 



Bond due July 1, 1804 

Interest on Bond since duo to January 1, 1873... 

Forty -seven Coupons at $25 

Interest on Coupons to January 1, 1873. t 



$1,000 00 

030 00 

1,075 00 

1,354 50 



1,('00 00 

57, 1 00 

1,125 00 

1,383 75 



1,000 00 

570 00 

1,125 00 

1,383 75 



l.OOi) 00 

.=■70 00 

l,12."i 00 

1,:'.S3 75 



1,000 00 

570 00 
1,125 00 
1,38; 75 

1,000 00 

570 00 

1,1 2.i 00 

1,383 75 

1,0(10 (10 

.570 00 

1,125 (JO 

1,383 75 



1,000 00 

570 00 

1,125 00 

1,:!83 75 

1,000 00 

570 00 

1,125 00 

1,383 75 



1,000 00 

570 00 

1,100 00 

1,33>1 50 



1,000 00 

510 00 

1,175 00 

l.HO 00 



1,000 00 

510 00 

1.175 00 

1,410 00 

1,000 00 

510 00 

1,175 00 

1,410 00 

1,000 00 

510 00 

1,175 00 

1,4V0 00 

1,000 00 

510 00 

1,175 00 

1,410 00 



i,0.-)9 .50 



4,078 75 



4,078 75 



4,078 75 



4,078 75 



4,078 75 



4,078 75 



4,078 75 



4,006 60 



4,0!>5 00 



4,035 00 



4,096 00 



4,095 00 



4,095 00 



53 



INTERNAL IMPROVEMENT BONDS— Continued. 



No. 



BOND. 



Boud due July 1, 18(i4 

Interest en Bond since due lo January 1, IST'!. 

Korty-sev'jii Coupons at S-5 

lutori'St on Coupons to January 1, 1873 



Bond due July 1, 18G5 

Interesi on Bond since due to Jauiiary 1, IbVi. 

Forty-nine Coupons at Sl'5 

Inierest on Coupons to January 1, 187:^ 



Bond due July 1, 1805.. 

Interest on Bond since due to January 1, 1873. 

Forty-nine Coupons at S26 

Interest on Coupons to January 1, 1873 



Bond due July 1, 1865 

Interest on Bond since due to January 1, 1873. 

Forty-nine Coupons at $25 

Interest on Coupons to January 1, 1873 



Interest on S(;5,000 from January 1, 1873, to February 



Bond due July 1, 1864 

Interest on Bond since due to January 1, 187 

Forty-seven Coupons at §25 

Interest on Coupons to JaiiUary 1, 1873 



Bond due July 1, 18:4 

Interest on Bond since due to January 1, 187 

Forty-seven Coupons at 825 

Interest on Coupons to January 1, 1>*73 



Bond due July 1, 1804 

Interest on Principle from due to Janu.iry 1, 187 

Forty-six Coupons at S25 

Interest on Coupons to January 1, 1873 



Bond due Jnly 1, 1873 

Interest on Principal from due to January 1, 1873 

Forty-sevi-n Coupons at §25 , 

Interest on Coupons to January 1, 1873 , 



Bond duo Jnly 1, 1864 

Interest on Bond since due to January 1, 1873. 

Forty-seven Coupons at S-5 

Interest on Coupons to January 1, 1873 



Bond duo July 1, 1873 

Interest on Bond since due to January 1, 1873. 

l'"orty-seveu Coupons at §25 

Interest on Coupons to January 1, 1873 



Bond due July 1, 18C4 

Interest on Bond since due to January 1, 1873. 

fUrty-seven Coupons at $25 

Interest on Coupons to January 1, 1873 



Bond due July 1, ]8fi2 

Interest on Bond since due to January 1, 187 

Forty-tbree Coupons at $25 

Interest on c upons lo January 1, 1873 



Bond due July l, lSi;2 

Intere^con Bond since due to January 1, 1873 

Forty-three Coupons at $25 

Interest on Coupons to January 1, 1873 



Bond due July 1, lSn3 

Interest on Bund since due to January 1, 1873., 

Forty-five Coupons at $35 

Interest on Coupons to January 1, 1873 



1,000 00 

510 ()(J 

1,175 UO 

1,410 00 



1,000 00 

450 00 

1,225 00 

1,433 25 



1,000 00 

450 00 

1,225 00 

1,433 25 



1,000 00 

4.^0 00 

1,225 00 

1.433 25 



415 4.5 



1,0(10 01) 

510 00 

1,175 00 

1,410 00 



1,000 tlO 

510 On 

1.175 O.J 

1^4 10 00 



1,01)0 00 

510 UO 

1,150 00 

1.362 75 



1,000 00 

610 00 

1,175 10 

1,410 00 



1,000 00 

510 00 

1,175 00 

1,410 00 



1,000 00 

510 00 

1,175 00 

1,410 00 

1,000 00 

510 00 

1.175 00 

1,411) 00 



l,OnO 00 

i;30 Oil 

1,075 00 

1,354 50 



1,000 o;} 

630 00 

1,075 00 

1,354 50 



1,000 00 

570 00 

1,125 OO 

1,38:3 75 



54 



INTERNAL IMPROVEMENT BONDS— Continued. 



Bond due July 1, 1853 

Interest on Bond since due to January 1, 1873. 

Forty-five Coupons Ht 825 

Interest on Coupons to January 1, 1873 



Bond due July 1, 1863 

Interest on Bond since (iue to January 1, 1873. 

Forty-five Coupons at S25 

Interest on Coupons to January 1, 1873 



Bond due July 1, ISfiS 

Interest on Bond since due to January 1, 1873. , 

Fort)' five Coupons at 52i 

Interest on Coupons to January 1, 1873 



Bond due July 1, 18r,4 .. 

Interest on Bond since due to January 1, 1873.. 

Forty-Seven Coupons at $2b 

Interest on Coupons to January 1, 1873 ... 



Bond due July 1,1835 

Interest on Bond since due to January 1, 1873.. 

Forty-nine Coupons at S25 

Interest on Coupons to January 1, 1873 



Bond due .July 1, 1865 

Interest on Bond since <lue to .January 1, 1873.. 

Forty-nine Coupons at S25 

Interest on Coupons to January 1, 1873 



Bond due July 1, 1865 

Interest on Bond since duo to January 1, 1873.. 

For*y-njne Coupons at $-^5 

Interest on Coupons to Jauuarj' 1, 1873 



Bond due July 1, 1865 

Interest on Bond since du> to January 1, 1873.. 

Forty-eight Coupons at S25 

Interest on Coupons to January 1, 1873 



Principal due July 1, 1863 ,. 

Interest on principal from July 1, 1863 to January 1, 1873 

Forty-five (Joupons at $-5 

Interest on Coupons to January 1, 1873 

Interest on Bonds and Coupons from January 1, 1873 to February 

13, 1873 

Exchange at 10 per cent 

Premium at I334 per cent 



$i,noo 00 

570 110 

1,125 00 

1,383 75 



1,0110 00 

5711 00 

1,125 00 

1,383 75 

1,000 00 

570 00 

1,125 00 

1,383 75 

1,000 00 

.•ilO 00 

1,175 00 

1,410 00 



1,000 CIO 

45(1 00 

1,225 00 

1,433 25 



Bond, Principal due July 1, 1865 

Interest oii Principal from July 1, 1865 to January 1, 1873 

Forty-nine Coupons at $25 

Interest ou Coupons to January 1, 1873 

Interest on Bonds a..d Coupons from January 1, 1873 to February 
13, 1873 



Bond Principal due July 1, 1865 

Interest on Principal from July 1, 1865, to January 1, 1873 

Forty-nine Counons at $25 , 

Interest ou Coupons to January 1, 1873 

Interest on Bonds and Coupons from January 1, 1873, to Febru- 
ary 13, 1873 , 



Bond Principal due July 1, 1865 

Interest on Principal from July 1, 1865, to January 1, 1873 

Forty-nine Coupons at 825 

Interest on Coupons to January 1, 1875 

Interest on Bonds and Coupons from January 1. 1873, to Febru 
ary 13, 1873 



1,000 00 

450 00 

1,225 00 

1,433 25 

1,000 00 

450 00 

1,225 00 

1,433 25 

1,000 00 

450 00 

1,200 00 

1,386 00 

1,000 on 

475 00 

1,125 00 

1,509 37 

13 00 
412 23 

612 17 

1,000 00 

375 00 

1,225 00 

1,340 62 

13 60 

1,000 00 

375 00 

1,225 00 

1,340 02 

13 00 

1,000 00 

375 00 

1,225 00 

1,340 62 

13 60 



00 



INTERNAL IMPROVEMENT BONDS— Continued. 



BOND. 



ToUI. 



Bonrl, princiital due, July!, 1865 

Intt-rost on p incipal from July 1, 1865, to January 1, 187o 

Forty-iiioe Oo iip ns, at $Z5 

Interest on (Joupon- to January 1, !87:i.. 

Iiiti/rest on Boml and Coupons, from January 1, 187'i, 10 Feb- 
ruary 13, 1873 



Boud, Principal due July 1, 1865 

Intert'st on Principal from July 1, 1865, to January 1, 187^5 

Fcirty-nine Coupons nt$25 -. 

Interest on Coupons tip January 1, 1873 

Interest on Bond and Coupons, from January 1, 1865, to Feb 
ruary 13, 1873 



Bond, Principal due July 1, 18C5 

Interest on Principal fnim July 1, 18l>5, to January 1, 1873 

Koi tj'-nine Coupons al $25 

Interest on Coupons to January 1, 1873 

Interest on Bond and Coupons, from January 1, 1873, to Feb- 
ruary 13, 1873 



Bond, Principal due July 1, 1865 

Interest "n Principal from July 1, 1865, to January 1, 1873 

Forty-nine Coupons at §25 

Interest on Coupons to January 1, 1873 

Interest on Bond and Coupons, from Januai v 1, 1873, to Feb- 
ruary 13, 1873 f. '. 



Bond, Prineipal due July 1, 1865 

Int"rest on Principal frotn July 1, 1865, to January 1, 1873 

Forty-nine Coupons at $25 

Interest on Coupons to January 1, 1873 

Interest on Bond and Coupons, from January 1, 1873, to Feb 
ruary 13, 1873 



Exchange on above eight Bonds, at 100 per cent.. 
Premium on above eight Bonds, at 13J^ per cent. 



Bond due Ju y 1, 1863, £-22o 

Interest on Bond since due to January 1, 1873.. 
Forti-tive Coupon at $i' 



1.000 00 
475 00 
1,125 OU 
Interest on Coupons to January 1, 1873 1,153 123^2 



Sl.OOO 00 

375 00 

1,225 00 

1,340 02 

13 60 



1,000 00 

375 00 

1,225 00 

1,34© 62 

13 00 




13 t;o 



1,000 00 

.375 00 

1,225 01) 

1,340 02 

13 60 



1,000 00 

375 00 

1,225 00 

1,310 62 

13 60 



3,103 36 
4,697 60 



Bond due July 1, 1863, £>25 

Interest on Bonil since due to January 1, 1873.. 

Fortj'-five Coupons at $25 

Interest on Coupons to January 1, 1873 



Bond due July 1, 1863, £225 

Intere.-^t on Bond since due to January 1, 1870.. 

Forty-flve Coupons at $25 

Interest on Coupons to .fanuary 1, 1873 



Bond due July 1. 1863, £225 

Interest, on Bond since due to January 1, 1873.. 

Forty-live Coupons at 825 

Interest on Coupons to January 1, 1873 



Bond due July 1, 18()3, £225 

interest on Bond since due, to January I, 1873. 

F.irt.v-tive Coupons at giy 

Interest on Coupons to January 1, 1873 



Bond due July 1, 1863, £22.5 

Interest on Boi-d since ilue, to January 1, 1873. 

Forty-five Coupons at S.'5 

Interest ou Coupons to January 1, 1873 



Bond due July 1, 1865, £225 

Intere,-^t on Bond since due, to January 1, 1873. 

Forty-nine Coupons at $25 

Interest, on Coupons to January 1, 1873 



1,000 (10 

475 00 

1,125 00 

1,1.53 12V.- 



1,000 00 
475 00 
1,125 00 
1,153 121,4 



1,000 00 
475 00 
1,125 00 
1,153 121-2 

1,000 00 
475 00 
1,125 00 
1,153 12i<< 




S3,954 28 

3,964 22 

3,954 22 

3,9.54 22 

3,954 22 
7,800 96 

3,753 121^ 

3,75 5 12'^ 

3,753 12>^ 

3,753 Vi% 

3,753 I2».i 

3,753 12V. 

3,794 3T'i 



56 



INTERNAL IMPROVEMENT BONDS— Continued. 



Bond due July 1, 1865, £225 

Intorest on Bund since due, to Janiiai-y 1, 1873. 

Forty-nine Coupons at $25 

Interesi on Coupons to January 1, \STd , 



Sixty-four Coupons at $25, bonds not due., 
Intorest on Coupons to January 1, 1873 



Sixty-four Coupons at $2o 

Interest on Coupons to January 1, 1873 

Interest on 820,400 from January 1, 1873, to February 7, 1873. 

Exchange at 10 per cent, on Si35,935 25 

Gold Premium on §39,528 78 at ISJ^ per cent 

Due July 1, 18il4 

Interest after maiurity to January 1, 1873 

Forty sevi-n Coupons :it |2J 

luiereht on Coupons to January 1, 1873 



Due July 1, 18G4 

Interest after maturity to January 1, 1873. 

Forty-seven Coupons at S25 

Iiilcrest on Coupons to January 1, 1873 



Dm- July 1, 181.3 

Interi-st to January 1, 1873 

Forty-five Coupons at $25 

Interest on Coupons to January 1, 1873. 



Due July 1, 1863 

Interest to January 1873 

Foriy-five Coupons at |25 

Interest on Coupons to January 1, 1873 

Interest on Principal and face of Coupons from January 1 ti 
February 13, 1873 



Principal due July 1, 18ii5, £225 

Interest on Principal from July 1, 18ti5, to January 1, 1873. 

Forty-nine Coupons at $25 , 

Interest on Coupons to Januarj' 1 1873 

Sixty-four Coupons at $25— Bond du9, 1874 

Interest on Coupons to January 1, 1873 



Interest on $3,825, from January 1 to February 7, 1873. 

Exchange on $!i,674 27, at 10 per cent 

Premium on $7',341 70 at loJ^J per cent 



Principal due July 1, 1852 

Forty-three Coupons at $30 

Intere.-^t on Bond from maturity to January, 1 1873 

Iiiieri-st on Coupons to January 1, 1873 

Interest on face of bond and Coupons to February 13, 1873. 



Same as above. 
Same as above. 
Same as above. 



Bond — Principal 

Forty- hree Coupons 

Ten Coupons, Nos. 853, 8o7, 874, 981, 981, 98(), 987, 989, 990 and 

996, at $25 each 

Exchange at 10 pei' cent 

Premium at 13^^ per cent 



Coupon, Bond No. 310 Indiana Bank Loan. 

Exchange at 10 per cent 

Premium at 13J^ per cent 



$1,000 00 
375 00 
',225 OO 
,191 373^ 

,r,(io 00 
,2i'.0 00 

,(;()() 00 

,200 00 

107 7(i 
3,593 52 
6,33(3 38 



1,000 00 

510 00 

1,175 no 

1,410 00 

1.1 100 (10 

510 00 

1,175 00 

1,410 00 

1,000 00 

570 00 

1.125 00 

1,383 75 

1,0110 00 

570 00 

1,125 00 

1.383 75 



62 98 

1,0110 00 

375 00 

1,225 00 

1.149 siy, 

l.i:0(t 00 

I,2o0 00 

19 8ii>i; 

667 43 

991 13 

■1,000 00 

1,290 00 

630 00 

1,625 40 

16 41 

4,561 81 

4,561 81 

4,561 81 

1,000 00 

3,541 34 



250 00 
25 00 
37 12 

25 00 

2 83 

3 37 



57 



INTER>^AL IMPROVEMENT BONDS-Coxtinued. 



Amount. Tolal. 



Two Coupons. Bonds Nos. 611 and 70S at Sif) 

Kx ;liiiHKi' at I'l piT cent 

I'lviiiinni at rj|^ percent 



Piincipil iliii- .Inly 1, 18t)2 

Forfj'-iliri- (^oiip'ins at TV) , 

InH'iesi on Bond from maturity to January 1, 1873 

Iiitire.si .11 Couptin-' to Juni' 1, 187.3 

Iiuerust on face of Bond and Coupons to February K3, 1873. 



DETACHED COUPONS. 



Sixty-four Coupon* at S25— Bond du.s 1874. 
Interest on Coupons to. January 1, 1873 



Si\tv.fum- Coupon- at S2n— Bond due 1874. 
I merest oil Coupons to January 1, 1873 



Sixty-four Coupon.? at S^.-i— Bono due 1S74.. 
InrerusLon Coupons to January '2, 1873 



Sixt.v-ot,e ':"Up ns at S2o, due July 1, IS-V) 
Interest '.n C.iup ns to January 1, 1870 



Sixty-one Coupons Mt Si:"), (Jup July 1, IS.iO 
Intt-i'est on Coupons to January 1, 1873 



Sixty-one Ciiipons at $25, due July 1, 18.^1 
In erost on Coupons to January 1, 1873 



Sixiy-tlireu Coupons at S'2J, due July 1, 1851 . 
Interest on Coupons to January 1, 1873 



Sixty-three (!oupons at $25, due January I, 18'i2.. 
luteresi ou C>oupons to January 1,1873-. 



Sixty-three Coupons at $25, due July 1, 18i2. 
Interest on Coupons to January I, 1873 



Sixty-three Coupons at S25, due January 1, 1853.. 
Interest on Coupons lo January 1, 1873 



Sixty-three Coupons at 82.''., due July 1, IS'' 
Interest on Coupons to January 1, 1873 . .. 



Sixty-three Coupons at S25, due January 1, 1854. 
Interest on Coupons to January 1, 1S73 



Twenty -six Coupons at 325, due July 1, 1S41 . 
Interest on Coupons to January !, 1873 



Fifteen Coupons at $25, dtie January 1, 1843., 
Interest on Coupons to January 1, 1873 



850 00 

5 Oil 

7 42 

I.OtiO Oil 

1,2!)0 (HJ 

Ii30 00 

1,625 40 

li> 41 



l,r;()n no 
1,512 00 



l,t;oo Oil 
1,512 IK) 



Interest on S5S,775 from January I to Feb. 2, 1873, at G per cent. 

Sixty-four Coupons at $25— Bond due J.ily 1, 1874 

Intere.-it ou Coupons to February 13, 1873 

Excliauge at lo per c*>nt , 

Premium at 13)^^ per cent... 



Sixty-four Coupons at 325 — Bond due July 1. 1874.. 

Interest ou Coupons to February I.'!, 1873 

Exchange at lo pa- cent .....' 

Preiuiuni at 13)^ per cent 



Sixty-four Coupun^ i-t $25 — Bond due July I, 1874 

Int rest on Coupons to February 13, 1873 

Exclianjre at lo percent , 

Premium at H^ per cent 



1 


,( 00 


on 


1 


,512 


CO 


1 


,525 


III) 


2 


Ii4 


/.o 


1 


,525 


00 


2 


058 


75 


1 


52.T 


(II) 


- 


,013 


00 


1 


575 


nil 


2.031 


,< 


1 


.575 


00 


1 


1)81 


50 


1 


575 


00 


1 


:t37 


25 


1 


575 


on 


1 


S'jo 


1 


1. 


575 


00 


1 


842 


"1 


1 


575 


no 


1, 


705 


50 



650 00 
1,228 50 



375 


on 


Gy7 


50 


3112 


30 


1,1100 


o:i 


l,2iW 


77 


28 ii 


97 


421 


li 


1,111)0 


no 


1,20'.) 


77 


280 


!I7 


42.1 


15 


l,':Oi' 


00 


1,2 .0 


. / 


28 11 


97 


42(5 


15 



4,5.;l SI 



3,112 00 

3,112 00 

3.112 iKi 

3,629 .50 

3,583 75 

3,538 W 

3,606 7.5 

3,559 5<) 

3,512 2.5 

3,465 iKi 

3,417 75 

3,370 6<t 

1,878 5!) 

1,072 50 
3';2 3« 



3,582 ») 



58 



INTERNAL IMPROVEMENT BONDS -Continued. 



Sixty-four CoupoiiB at $25— Bond due July 1, 1874 81,600 00 

Interest on Coupons to February 13, 1873 1,269 7Y 

Excliana;f at 10 per cent 280 97 

Premium at 13J-2 per cent 426 15 

Sixty-four Coupons at 325— Bond due July 1, 1874 

Interest on Coupons to February 13, 1873 

Exchange at 10 per cent 

Premium at 133'2 per cent 



Sixiy-four Coupons at S25— Bond due July 1, 1874.. 

Interest on Coupons to February 13, 1873 

Exchange at ten percent 

Premium at 13)^ per cent 



Sixty-four Coupons at $2"i — Bond due July 1, 1874. 

Interest on Coupons to February 13, 1873 

Exchange at 10 per cent 

Premium at 133^ per cent 



Sixty-four Coupons at S25 — Bond due July 1, 1874. 

Interest on Coupons to February 13, 1873 

Exchange at lo per cent 

Premium at 1334 P^' cent 



Si.xty-four Coupons at S25 — Bond due July 1, 1874 . 

Interest on Coupons to February 13, 1873 

Exchange at M per cent 

Premium at 1334 P'^i' cent 



Sixty-ibur Coupons at 525 — Bond due July 1, 1874. 

Interest on Coupons to February 13 1873 

Excliauge at 10 per cent 

Premium at 1334 P^^ cent 



Nine 
Nine 
Niae 
Nine 
N i ne 
Nine 
Kine 
Nine 
Nine 
Nine 
Nine 
Nine 
Nine 
Nine 
Nine 
Nine 
Nine 
Nine 
Nine 
Nine 
Nine 
Nine 
Nine 
Nine 
Niti-! 
Nine 
Nine 
Nine 
Nine 
Nine 
Nine 
Nine 
Nine 
Nine 
Nine 
Nine 
Nine 
Nine 



Coupons at 
Coupons at 
Ci'Upuns at 
Coupons at 
Coupons at 
Coupons at 
Coupons at 
Coupons at 
Coupons at 
Coupons at 
Coupons ai 
Coupons at 
Coupons at 
Coupons at 
Coupons at 
Coupons at 
Coupons at 
Coupons at 
Coupons at 
Coupons at 
Coupons at 
Coupons at 
Coupons at 
Coupons at 
Coupons ai 
Coupons at 
Coupons at 
Coupons at 
Coupons at 
Coupons at 
Coupons at 
Coupons at 
Coupons at 
Coupons at 
Coupons at 
Coupons at 
Coupons at 
Coupons at 



-Bond No. 
-Bond No. 
-Bond No. 
-Bond No. 
-Bond No 
-Bond No. 
-Bond No. 
—Bond No. 
-Bond No. 
-Bond No. 
-Bond No. 
—Bond No. 
—Bond No. 
—Bond No. 
—Bond No. 
— Bond No. 
—Bond No. 
-Bond No. 
— B .nd No. 
—Bond No. 
— Bond No. 
—Bond No 
—Bond No. 
— Bond No. 
—Bond No. 
— Bond No. 
— Bon ) No. 
—Bond No. 
-B md No. 

Boud No. 

Bond No. 

Bond No. 

Bund No. 

Bond No. 

Bond No. 

Bond No. 

Bond No. 

Boud No. 



13.55.... 
13.56.... 
1357.... 
blank. 
1823 ... 
1824... 

501 

502 , 

503 

504 

505 

500 

507 

508 

509 

510 

511 

512 

513 

514 

515 

516 

517 

518 , 

519 

520 

521 

522 , 

523 , 

524 

525 

526 

527...., 

528 

529...., 

630...., 
, 531 

532 



1,600 


00 


1,269 


77 


286 97 


426 


15 


1,600 00 


1,269 


77 


286 97 


426 


15 


1,600 


00 


1,209 


77 


286 97 


426 


15 


1,600 UO 


1,269 


77 


286 


97 


42d 


15 


1,600 


00 


1,209 


77 


2S6 


97 


420 


15 


1,600 


00 


l,2u9 


77 


286 97 


420 


15 


225 


00 


225 


00 


225 


00 


225 


00 


225 


110 


225 


00 


225 


00 


225 


00 


225 


00 


225 


00 


225 


00 


225 


00 


225 


00 


22.T 


00 


225 


00 


225 


oo 


225 


00 


225 


00 


225 


00 


225 


00 


225 


oo 


225 


00 


225 


00 


225 


00 


225 


00 


225 00 


225 


00 


225 


00 


22.J 


00 


225 


00 


225 


00 


225 


00 


225 


00 


225 00 


2-5 00 


225 


00 


225 


00 


225 00 



59 



INTERNAL IMPROVEMENT BONDS— Continued. 



COUPONS. 



I Coupons 

I Coiiiions 

I Coupons 

: Coupons 

I Coupons 

Coupons 

Coupons 

! Coupons 

Coupons 

Coupons 

Coupons 

Coupons 

Coupons 

Coupons 

Coupons 

I Coupons 

: Coupons 

Coupons 

: Coupons 

: Coupons 

Coupons 

Coupens 

I Coupons 

Coupons 

Coupons 

I Coupous 

Coupons 

Coupons 

Coupons 

Coupous 

Coupons 



at $25- 
iit S25- 
at $25- 
at S25- 
at 125- 
at $25- 
at $25- 
at 825- 
aj $25- 
at $25- 
at $25- 
at $25- 
at $2i>- 
at $25- 
at $25- 
at $25- 
at $25- 
at $2i- 
at $25- 
at $25- 
at $25- 
at $25- 
at $25- 
at $25- 
at $25- 
at $25- 
at $25- 
at $25- 
at $25- 
at $25- 
at $25- 



-Bond 
-Bond 
-Bond 
-Bond 
-Bond 
-Bond 
-Bond 
-Bond 
-Bond 
-Bond 
-Bond 
-Bond 
-Bond 
-Bond 
-BouN 
-Bond 
-Bon<l 
-Bond 
-Bond 
-Bond 
-Bond 
-Bond 
-Bond 
-Bond 
-Bond 
-Bond 
-Bond 
-Bond 
-Bond 
-Bond 
-Bond 



533. 
534. 
535. 
536. 
537. 
538. 
53a. 
540. 
541. 
542. 
543. 
544. 
545. 



54(j. 

547. 

548., 

511). 

550. 

551. 

552. 

553. 

554. 

555. 

651!. 

557. 

558 

55'J. 

5(iO. 

5iil. 

562. 

563. 



Less amount overpaid, November 5, 1858. 
Total 



$225 00 
225 00 
225 00 
225 00 
225 00 
225 00 
225 00 
225 00 
225 00 
225 00 
225 00 

225 00 

226 00 
225 00 
225 00 
225 OO 
225 00 
225 00 
225 00 
225 00 
225 00 
225 00 
225 00 
225 00 
225 00 
225 00 
225 00 
225 00 
225 00 
225 00 
225 00 



$15,525 00 
1,346 80 



$14,178 20 



$438,184 20 



The several statements from which the foregoing was tabulated 
were each accompanied by the following certificate: 



Auditor of State : 

Sir: — You are Dotified that the above described Bonds and 

Coupons, have been redeemtd, this day of , A. D. 

1873. 

(Signed.) THOMAS A. HENDRICKS, 

Governor. 
(Sigaed.) W. W. CURRY, 

Secretary of State. 



THE COLLEGE FUND. 



Under an act of the General Ass'^mhly approved June 17, 1852, 
the proceeds of the sa'es of the University lands in ]\[onroe and 
Gibson counties, and all donations for the use of the University- 
made without special provisions, are kept as a principal, which is 
known as the College Fund. The principal is loaned by the 
Auditor of State, upon real est ite security, at seven per cent, per 
anuum, and the interest so received is paid over to the University 
for the use of that institution. The amount of the principal ot the 
Fund is, at the date of this report, $104,399 49, all of whi.tu is 
loaned and earnicg interest. 

Names of Borroioers from the College Fund, with the amount loaned 

to each. 



Amount. 


J^oOO 00 


500 00 


800 0(1 


500 00 


500 00 


500 00 


500 00 


?.b•^ ciO 


500 00 


500 Oil 


400 0,1 


400 00 


500 00 


500 00 


500 00 


500 00 


500 00 


500 00 


6.35 23 


250 00 


500 00 


5ui) 00 


500 00 



Hiram E. Gaston 

Andrew E. Richardson 

Lewes F. Coppersmith 

Isaac Powell 

Woodford 11. Adams 

Mrs. N. C. Bolioa 

James M Ray 

C. S. Hascall 

Ebenez r Brown.... 

Havmond W. Clark 

J. W. lioudv ^nd 0. H. P. Mcdrniick 

John B. Stuniph 

Thomas J. Norvell 

Sampson McConnell 

Samuel Henderson 

James H. (Jlierrv 

George MciJaslin 

Joseph Poyner 

J. P. McCormick 

James Ritter 

W. J. H. Rohinson 

Lewis Sebastian 

Calvin F. Rooker ,. 



S300 00 
200 00 
300 00 
2"0 00 
300 00 
300 00 
500 00 
300 00 
500 00 
500 00 
400 00 
500 00 
100 00 
400 00 
500 00 
200 00 
500 00 
200 00 
500 00 
500 00 
500 00 
500 00 
150 00 I 



John F. Freeland.... 

Robert Freeland 

John A. Bradshaw... 
r,eviS Revuold.s .... 

Lloyd B. Harris 

Samuel Beck 

George Myerlv 

M. A. Horn...l 

Levi Leary...., 

George A. JUlner... 

R. E. Palmer 

T. G. Palmer 

J. dm S. Williams.... 

John F. Hall 

Martha E. Snvrler... 
William E. Talbutt 

John Milner 

Cynthia Ann Baggs 

G. M. Ballard 

William Johnson 

.lames Est'pp 

Josephus Holmes 

Justin Darling 



61 

Names of Bori'owers from the College Fund, with the amount loaned 
to each — Continu' d. 



NAMES. 



Stephen S. Brown 

Williiim H. HaiiiiJton 

David Machett 

Harry Pears'iQ 

Zadci-k Smi;h 

TLiimas I> McC'lain 

Joseph Guar '' 

John S. Apple 

Esquirn Hiitching8 

Eli >m\-\\ 

Jacob fill mm el 

Alfred Dana 

Ba/.el Hunt 

Sarah A. Vail 

All. u Way ,. , 

Olive-- y Koeley 

Williams. Butt 

Wiisi.n Parker 

Tbeophilus H. Barlow 

George W. Kirby 

Abner Ball 

E. W. H. Ellis 

John Leffler 

John Lefller 

George W. MeCoiinell 

Harris Ri-ynoUis 

Clinton Keyiiolds 

John D. Jones 

Henry W. Simons , 

Mary H. Barr 

Sylvest. r S. Fitch 

"SVilli;,m H. 8njitb..... 

Peter Buwan , 

Harmiiii Newman _ 

James and iKaacB. McNutt. 

Oliver B Gilkey 

Pttvid H Chas-^ 

John J. L' masters 

John VV. Miller 

John T. Bryan 

.Fosepli R is line 

Henry F. Fletcher 

Joseph Elki.is 

H(finy El kins 

iiliza J. Bnndy 

New ton Ii wi^i 

John Hamniitcher 

Jacob Rub sh 

Thomaa J. Noi-vell 

beoii-ird Carter 

Laura Kai ton horn 

John W Vanscyoc 

William B. Bradley 

Lncy 0. Witt 

William Rouse 

Jame H. Learv 

James S. Wall'. 

J. J. Ilaydeii 

A. D. K .He 

Sebastian Barth 

John A. Broiise 

WilliMni W. Johnsiin 

!5. W. Elliott 

Narcis.-j t Cook 

Fletcher tiubush.... 

iHaric Coonfield 

Marion K. Clark 

Joseph Gilmore 

John Ttiornburg 

Thomas M Kirkpatrick 

Christian Deeker 

Jacob Turner... , 



Amount. 


$300 on 


500 no 


250 00 


260 00 


200 09 


300 00 


200 00 


2(10 00 


200 00 


1011 00 


400 00 


150 00 


400 00 


074 00 


500 00 


187 50 


300 00 


300 00 


500 00 


250 00 


500 00 


500 00 


400 no 


500 00 


500 00 


500 00 


500 00 


500 00 


5U0 00 


500 .jO 


5011 no 


500 on 


5(i0 00 


500 00 


400 (10 


;5(io 00 


500 00 


385 00 


500 00 


500 00 


35(1 00 


5(10 00 


5(J0 no 


600 00 


100 00 


(300 00 


500 00 


500 00 


500 00 


500 00 


400 00 


5O0 00 


500 00 


500 00 


500 (10 


400 00 


1-27 no 


:-86 on 


4tlO 00 


500 qO 


500 00 


500 00 


500 00 


500 00 


500 00 


400 CO 


400 00 


500 on 


500 00 


500 no 


500 00 


500 00 



NAMES. 



E. D. Bnsick 

William Moody 

Corncilious W. VauHouton 

Charles A. Ray 

Ellen Parker 

Dewitt C. Reynolds 

Joiin Smjtb 

David yliuler 

H. A. Morricon 

William H. White , 

J sepii 'I'arkiugton 

Jay Mix 

John A, Hunt , 

William I'earce 

James G^bbs 

Nalhau Perry and Wm. Thompson. 

Th. mas H. Findley 

James M. Tlioti'.pson 

Heniy Kishei , 

William L. Lingenfelter 

John W. Thompson 

Robeii F. Cattersou 

.lacob Dillmau 

Leon. das M. Pbipps 

Joseph W. Chase 

.lohn W. Brough 

Elizalelh Luarlc. 

Job.i B Vail 

Si.rali Greeji 

I.yman M. Greer 

Jolin Yi.ung 

B. S. Hnys 

William stuck 

Mary A. Wilson 

Ht-nr-,y fiiaukediek 

Nelson Ti ntl-r 

Lucinda Trucksess 

J M. Leeds 

Henry C'. leman 

John J. Smith 

N. P. Richmond 

William J. Brown 

Jacob Tinner 

Sarah A. Daniel 

J.,hn Bales 

Hairiett A. Elliott _.. 

Sarah A. Vail 

Cieo ge F. (Jhittenden 

Samuel H. Vandeman 

Martha Burley 

Silas H. Farry 

Jeflets.in H. Foxworthy 

(ieorge Wuodtield 

Thomas Westlake 

Ivizzie Galloway 

Pet r Huft'man 

Frank White 

William Harvey 

Matilda A. Stiuers 

T'homas Mason 

Levi Ferguson 

Jobeph E. Allison 

G. M. Ballard 

John Hoop 

Jacob Spahr 

A. C. Neal 

Jonathan W. Evans 

Emily Gresh .. 

Eriistus F. Hunt 

John 01 1 

A. H. Gibson 



Amount. 



$500 00 

500 00 

31.(1 no 

500 00 

40(1 00 

851 38 

44(1 00 

K5n no 

5(10 no 

4.(1 00 
51 d 00 
5(1(1 00 
500 00 
6(H1 00 
4( !i 00 
400 00 
160 00 
50(1 00 
1 00 
500 00 
4(0 00 
50 1 00 
40(1 (JO 
5(10 00 
500 00 
500 00 
500 00 
Gil 78 
(.95 67 
50tl 00 
500 00 
5 HO 00 
200 00 
500 00 
4 on 00 
500 CO 
500 00 
5(!0 00 
4(,-0 no 
500 00 
600 (JO 
600 00 
300 00 
500 ( 
500 00 
6(10 00 
600 00 
400 00 
£00 00 
500 00 
400 00 
500 00 
5{J0 00 

500 no 
5on 00 

500 (.10 
5no 00 
500 00 
500 00 
5(.iO 00 
.'^.00 00 
50(J 00 
500 00 
500 00 
500 00 
5(-!() 00 
500 00 
500 00 
500 00 
500 00 
500 00 



62 

Names of Borrowers from the School Fund, and the amount loaned 
to each — Continued. 



NAMES. 



William T. Brunifield 

Chas. \V. Brouee 

James T. Miller 

Oliver P. Gooding 

Samuel Albright 

John M. H;irmon 

John Mart Sleikel 

John Hauck 

William B. Fordyce... 

William Jenuings 

James B. McFiidden.. 

Mary A. Mallon 

Jonathan Irons 

Nancy K. Igoe 

Samuel Lamb 

Charles Sage 

James M. Ray 

T. A. Wylie 

Matthew Arbu< kle.... 
James M. Buchanan. 

Fred'-rirk Friese 

Nancy E. Merrymau. 

Mehilable Crum 

John Shearer , 

Thomas M. Elliott.... 
Frederick Lang 



$400 CO 
500 00 
500 00 
585 00 
400 00 
300 00 
500 00 
500 00 
450 00 
600 00 
600 00 
500 00 
500 00 
500 00 
500 00 
500 00 
500 00 
500 00 
500 00 
250 00 
200 00 
100 00 
400 00 
490 47 
500 00 
500 00 



H. F. Fuertenicht .... 

Jackson Kecord 

Ruhama Moores 

S. E. Catterson 

James Morgan 

Henry H. Nelson 

George W. Pettit 

James S. Hester 

Hannah Maloney 

Jeremiah V. Meek.... 
Cynthia E. Veatch... 
Margaret R. Youart 

Sarah Perratt 

John W Ryan 

J. M. Clark 

Tliomas J. Wood 

Henry Holmes 

Matthias Bicii 

Joseph F. Daugherly 

Ward & Graham 

E. L. Davis 

John S. Veatch 

H. and J. Maloney... 

Annie G. Young 

Granville S. Wright.. 
George Bruce 



$400 00 
500 00 
.300 00 
500 00 
500 00 
500 00 
500 OO 
500 00 
500 00 
400 00 
330 94 
500 00 
600 00 
6O0 00 
300 00 
500 00 
600 00 
500 00 
500 00 
390 97 
350 00 
500 00 
400 00 
213 00 
500 00 
500 00 



COLLECTIONS BY THE ATTORNEY GENERAL. 

The following amounts have been paid into the State Treasury 
by Hon. James C. Denny, Attorney General, on account of unpaid 
fees, and other moneys, collected by him from county officers and 
others, as provided for by an act prescribing the duties of the 
Attorney General, approved March 10, 1873. 



On account of unclaimed witness fees $4,715 90 

On account of Docket fees 2,048 55 

On account of Estates without Heirs 4,150 38 

On account of sale of land in Clay county 3,103 58 

Total »n,918 41 



INSURANCE. 



Section eight of an act approved March 8th, 1873, makes the 
following requirements of foreign insurance companies: 

Sec. 8. Every insurance company not organized under the laws 
of this State, and doing business therein, shall in the months of 
January and July of each year report to the Auditor of State, under 
oath of the President and Secretary, the gross amount of all receipts 
received in the State of Indiana on account of Insurance premiums 
for the six months last preceeding, ending on the last days of 
December and June of each year, and shall, at the time of making 
such report, pay into the treasury of the State the sum of three 
dollars on every one hundred dollars of such receipts less losse?^ 
actually paid within the State. 

The following form was furnished all foreign Insurance Com- 
panies transacting business in Indiana to make report to this of[ic« 
of their gross receipts and losses paid up to and including June 
30th, 1873. 

TAX STATEMENT BY INSURANCE COMPANIES. 

Statement of gross receipts and actual losses paid by the 

-Insurance Company of- 



for the six months preceding the first day of July, 1873, in the 
State of Indiana, as required by a supplemental act amending the 
Assessment law, approved March 8, 1873. 



64 





GROSS KECEIPTS, 


Dol. 


Cts. 




! 






















Total 









ACTUAT, LOSSKS I'AID. 


Dol. 


Cts. 


















• 












«_- 


-==.^ 




To'al 





8tate of 



County of 



The undersigned, President and Secretary of the 
Insurance Company of 



being duly sworn, depose and say that the foregoing is a true 
exhibit of gross receipts of said Company, and the true amount of 
actual losses paid, in the State of Indiana, from March 8th to and 
including June 30th, 1873. 

President. 

, Secretary. 



Subscribed and sworn to before me, this 



day of 



I herewith present a tabular statement, showing the receipts of, 
and losses paid by each company doing business in the State, with 
the amount of receipts upon wliich tax has been paid, and the 
amount of tax paid by each; which shows the total amount received 
in premiums to June 30th, 1873, |1, 169,413.20. Paid for losses, 
$608,950.71. Amount upon which three per cent, tax was paid, 
§583,300.09. Tax paid |17,498.45. 



65 



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BANK DEPARTMENT, 



CONDITION OF THE FREE BANKS. 

The following statement shows the condition of the Free Banks 
of the State, on the 31st day of October, 1873: 

BANKS CONTINUING UNDER THE LAW. 

BANK OF SALEM, SALEM. 



Circulation all redeemed. 



BANK OF SALEM, NEW ALBANY. 

United States 5.20's... S2,000 

Circulation ,..., 81, 80* 



\ 



BANKS CLOSING» 

SALEM BANK:, GOSHEN. 

Greenbacka S379 

Circulation S379 

PEAIEIE CITY BANK, TERRE HAUTE. 

United States 5-20'8 $100 

Circulation S'r.Z 

CAMBRIDGE CITY BANK. 
Circalation all redeemed. 



69 

BANKS THAT HAVE WITHDRAWN THEIR SECUR- 
ITIES AND FILED BONDS. 

INDIANA BANK, MADISON. ^ 

Circnlatloa , 84,199 

HUNTINGTON COUNTY BANK. 

Circulation ^4 

EXCHANGE BANK, GREENCASTLE. 
Circulation 4,793 

INDIANA FAEMEES' BANK, FRANKLIN. 
Circulation , 1,045 

BANK OF GOSHEN, GOSHEN. 
Circulation „ 1,704 

PARKE COUNTY BANK, ROCKVILLE. 
Circulation 2,350 

BANK OP ELKHART. 
Circulation 3 021 

BANK OF CORYDON. 
Circulation....... 1,528 

BANK OF MOUNT VERNON. 
Circulation... 3,146 

SOUTHERN BANK, TERRE HAUTE. 

Circulation all redeemed. 

BANK OF ROCKVILLE, WABASH. 
Circulation 1 205 

EXCHANGE BANK, ATTICA. 
Circulation , 1 074 



70 



merchants' and mechanics' bank, new ALBANY. 



Circulation. 



Circulation. 



Circulation. 



Circulation.. 



Circulation. 



farmers' bank, westfieid. 



LA GRANGE BANK, LIMA. 



CANAL BANK, EVANSVILLE. 



HOOSIER BANK, LOGANSPORT. 



BROOKVILLE BANK, BROOKVILLE. 



BANK OF INDIANA, MICHIGAN CITY. 



FAYETTE COUNTY BANK, CONNERSVILLE. 



INDIAN RESERVE BANK, KOKOMO 



BANK OF MONTICELLO. 



BANK OF SYRACUSE, GOSHEN. 



1,150 



2,003 



Circulation. 



1,743 



CRESCENT CITY BANK, EVANSVILLE. 



Circulation. 



1,843 



KENTUCKY STOCK BANK, COLUMBUS. 



Circulation. 



3,481 



BANK OF PAOLI, PAOLI. 



Circulation. 



5,466 



71 

SUSPENDED BANKS. 

BANK OF NORTH AMERICA, CLINTON. 



Rcdeemetl at. 



STATE STOCK BANK, PERU. 
Redeemed at Bank of Goshen at 



NEW YORK AND VIRGINIA STATE STOCK BANK. 

Rt'deemed at par. 



Redeemed at par. 



Redeemed at par. 



Proceeds exhausted. 



WAYNE BANK, RICHMOND. 



WAYNE BANK, LOGANSPORT. 



BOONE COUNTY BANK. 



traders' bank, NASHVILIiE. 



Redeemed at. 



BANK OF GOSPORT. 

Redeemed by F. W. Argenbright, Gosport, at par. 



SUSPENDED BANKS REDEEMED BY AUDITOR OF 

STATE. 

Agricultural Bank par. 

Bank of Albany 90e 

Bank of Albion par^ 

Bank of Perryville par. 

Bank of T. Wadsworth 91c 

Bank of Rockport par. 

Central Bank par. 

Farmers' Bank, Jasper 91 c 

Kalamazoo Bank 90c 

Orange Bank par. 

State Stock Bank, Marion 90c 

Savings Bank of Indiana (genuine) 60e 

Note. — No other Bank Notes than those enumerated under the head of "Suspended Banks 
Redeemed by the Auditor of State," are redeemed at this office. 



72 



BANKS OF DISCOUNT AND DEPOSIT. 

. In accordance with the provisions of section nineteen ot an act 
entitled "an act to authorize and regulate the incorporation of bauks 
of discount and deposit in the State of Indiana," approved February 
7, 1873, blanks were prepared and forwarded to the several banks 
which had organized as provided in said act, and filed articles of 
association in the office of the Secretary of State, asking for a report 
of the condition of each of the banks at the close of business on the 
30th day of September, and that the return be made to this office 
within five days from the receipt of the request for such report. 
The blanks, with the request accompanying, were forwarded on the 
1st day of October. The following are the reports received : 



73 



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SINKING FUND. 



The General As^sembly in regular session, March, 1873, passed 
an act entitled "an act to consolidate certain mortgage loans, for- 
feitures, bills receivable and other debts and accounts due the School 
Fund into one non-negotiable bond, and making other provisions in 
relation thereto." 

" The principle of the " other provisions " referred to in the above 
title, was the discontinuance of the Sinking Fund as a separate 
department. 

It was provided in said act that the Auditor of State shall pay 
into the Treasury of the State, four thousand four hundred and 
forty dollars and forty-two cents, money in hand belonging to the 
Sinking Fund, which shall be placed to the credit of the General 
Fund of the State, and that the said Auditor shall also pay into the 
Treasury the further sum of two thousand seven hundred and 
thirty-three dollars and twenty-six cents, which shall be placed to 
the account of excess of bids, the same to be retained in the Treas- 
ury for the benefit of the persons entitled thereto by law, to whom 
it shall be paid upon the warrant of the Auditor of State upon 
proper application therefor; and the Auditor of State shall surrender 
to the Treasurer of State all the bills receivable, mortgage loans 
and forfeitures enumerated in the act, together with all books and 
papers therewith connected and necessary to the sale or safety, collec- 
tion or settlement of said indebtedness or forfeitures. 

It was also provided in the act that all the proj)erty in the 
mortgage loans and forfeitures herein enumerated, is hereby directed 
to be sold, on such terms, in such manner, and at such times, 
not later thau the first day of January, 1874, as the Governor, 
Auditor and Treasurer of the State shall deem for the public interest, 
and the money arising therefrom shall be placed to the credit of the 
General Fund ; also, that in further consideration of the execution 
of the uon- negotiable bond prescribed and directed to be issued by 



78 

the act, the two safes now in the office of the Auditor of State, the 
property of the Sinking Fund, are hereby transferred to the State, 
* * * * >i< and the Governor, Auditor, and Treasurer oi State 
are authorized and required to make such disposition of said safes 
and other property as shall by them be deemed for the public 
interest. 

The act referred to required the payment of four thousand four 
hundred and forty dollars and forty-two cents, cash assets of the 
Fund, and two thousand seven hundred and thirty-three dollars 
and twenty-six cents, to be placed to the account of excess of bids, 
making together seven thousand one hundred and seventy-three 
dollars and sixty-eight cents, to be paid into the General Fund of 
the Treasury. 

But between the time the bill was prepared, and the date of its 
approval, when it became a law, expenses had been incurred in the 
management of the Fund, as provided for by law, amounting in all « 
to six hundred and eighty dollars and twelve cents. It was not 
possible, therefore, to turn over the full amount of cash assets 
designated in the act; but the amount on hand, after paying the 
legal expenses of the Fund up to tiie date of the approval of the 
law, together with the books and cash items, were turned over to 
the Treasurer of State, as shown in the receipt given herewith. 

''Indianapolis, April 23, 1X73. 

"Received of James A. Wiklman, Auditor of State, the following 
papers, bills receivable, and money belonging to the Sinking Fun' : 

No. 1. Mortgage ot James L. Bradley to the School Fund for 
the payment of four notes of ten thousand dollars each, dated x4.pril 
30, 1870. 

No. 2. Five notes of ten thousand each (each with a credit of 
twelve hundred dollars endorsed thereon) dated April 30, 1872, 
signed by S. H. Patterson and J. L. Bradley. 

No. 3. One note for $5,300, one for $6,200, one for |5,600, and 
one for $6,500, all signed by John Fishback, President, and dated 
May 23, 1871. The said four notes arc held as collateral security. 

No. 4. Conveyance of Indiana and Dillard Ricketts to James L. 
Bradley. 

No. 5. The sum of six thousand four hundred and ninety-three 
dollars and fiftv-nine cents ($6,493.59.) 

(Signed.) " JOHN B. GLOVER, 

Treasurer of State. 



79 
NON-NEGOTIABLE BOND. 

The act provided for the issue of a uon-negotiable bond, for the 
sum of one hundred and seventy-six thousand five hundred and 
seventy-three dollars and forty-two cents, with six per cent interest 
thereon from date, for the benefit of the Common School Fund, 
which bond was to absorb the assets of the Sinking Fund, Saline 
Fund, Bank Tax Fund, Swamp Land Fund, and the Fund from 
Estates without Heirs, and provided for the payment into the gen- 
eral fund of the Treasury of all the cash assets of the Sinking Fund, 
as hereinbefore set forth. 

The amounts of said funds, as enumerated in the act, are as ol- 
lows : 

ginking Fund Sli3,346 63 

Saline Fund 6,211 45 

Bank Tax Fund 1,741 94 

Swamp Land Fund.. 38,203 82 

Estates without Heirs 17,0f)6 55 

Total ?17fi,673 42 



The funds, it v/as found, after a careful examination after the 
approval of the act, did not show the same amounts upon the books 
of the Auditor of State as set forth in the act, there having been 
some payments from the Sinking Fund, as before named, and the 
Swamp Land Fund, between the time th.e bill was prepared and its 
passage and approval as a law. Six hundred and eighty dollars and 
twelve cents had been paid out of tlie Sinking Fund, and warrants 
had been issued as duly provided by law, upon the Swamp Land 
Fund, amounting to one hundred and twenty-six dollars and twenty- 
three cents, making it necessary to write the non-negotiable bond 
for eight hundred and six dollars and thirty-five cents less than the 
amount named in the act. 

The following were the amounts on hand, and upon the showing 
as herein set forth, the non-negotiable bond was made May 3, 1873: 

Sinking Fund S112,(i6e 54 

Saline Fund, cash . 4,431 45 

Saline Fund, loans 1,780 00 

Bank Tax Fund, cash 1,.'3.17 94 

Bank Tax Fund, loans 397 00 

Swamp Land Fund 38,077 50 

Estates with' ut Heirs 17,066 55 

Total $175,767 07 



80 

There were at the time of the transfer of the property of the Sink- 
ing Fund, two large safes in that department, one of which is in use 
in the office of the Attorney General, and the other, a large burglar 
and fire- proof sale, is in the office of the Auditor of State, and used 
for the safe keeping of valuable records and papers which have here- 
tofore been kept in ex])osed situations in wooden cases. 

In order to dispose of the forfeited lands of the Sinking Fund, 
as provided for in the act, a meeting was held at the office of the 
Treasurer o(" State on the 21st day of September, 187fS, and the 
Treasurer of State was delegated to dispose of said lands by public 
sale, and make payment of the proceeds to the credit of the General 
Fund. As directed at said meeting, the sale of the forfeited lands 
in Jefierson county is to take place on the 4th day of November; in 
Pulaski county on the 7th day of November, and of the forfeited 
lands of ether counties at the office of the Treasurer of State, in 
the city of Indianapolis, on the 11th day of November, 1873. 

OEIQIX OF THE SINKING FUND. 

Inasmuch as the Sinking Fund, as a separate department, has 
been closed as herein set forth, it may not be amiss to refer briefly 
to its creation and management. 

The sinking Fund of the State had its origin in a provision of 
the charter or act creating the State Bank, granted by the General 
Assembly and approved January 28, 1834. 

Sections 113 and 114 of that charter read as follows: 

"Sec. 113. There shall be created a fund to be called the 
Sinking Fund, which shall consist of all unapplied balances of the 
loan or loans procured on the part of the State for its stock in the 
State Bank ; or, for the purpose of being loaned to stockliolders to 
enable them to meet their stock installments in the bank; the semi- 
annual payment of interest on the State loans to stockholders, and 
the sums that shall be received in payment of said loans; the divi- 
dends that shall be declared and paid by the State Bank on State 
stocks, and the dividends accruing on such portions of the stock 
belonging to other stockholders as shall have been paid for by the 
loan on the part of the State, and which shall not have been repaid 
by such stockholders. 

"Sec. 114. The principal and interest of said Sinking Fund 
shall be reserved and set apart for the purpose of liquidating and 
paying off the loan or loans and the interest thereon, that shall be 



81 

negotiated en the part of the State for payment of its stock in the 
State Bank, and the second and third installments on the shares of 
the other stockholders in said Bank, and shall not be expended for 
any other purpose, until said loan or loans, and the interest thereon, 
and incidental expenses shall have been fully paid, and after the 
payment of said loan or loans, the interest and expenses, the residue 
of said fund shall be a permanent fund and be appropriated to the 
eause of Common Sehool Education in such manner as the General 
Assembly shall hereafter direct.'- 

The unapplied balances of the loans provided for, and the divi- 
dends declared, resulted as contemplated in a permanent fund^ 
which, through many changes in official management and State 
administrations, has been carefully preserved and guarded until it 
has grown to be a fund of several millions of dollars, held in trust 
and controlled by the State for the beneiit of the Common Schools, 
Section 115 of the same act provided that the President and 
Directors, on the part of the State, of the State Bank, sliould con- 
stitute a standing Board of Commissioners of the Sinking Fund, 
and that the cashier of the Bank should be Clerk of the Board. 

The Sinking Fund, as thus provided for, M^as managed by a Board 
of Commissioners until January, 1867, when, in pursuance of an 
act of the Legislature, the management of the Fund was turned 
over to the Auditor of State, who was clothed with all the powers 
which had been conferred upon the Board, and the rather cumber- 
some and expensive management by a Board of Commissioners was 
abolished. 

It was also provided that all outstanding loans should be called 
m and paid in three annual installments, so that the money might 
be invested in United States or State stocks and bonds, and the 
means of the Fund reduced to the simplest practicable form and 
condition. 

By the act entitled " An act to consolidate certain bonds and 
mortgages, etc.," approved March 11, 1873, previously referred to, 
the act of January 20, 1867, clothing the Auditor of State with the 
powers heretofore held by the Board of Sinking Fund Commission- 
ers, was repealed, and the Sinking Fund, as a separate department, 
ceased to exist. The Fund, however, as provided in the constitu- 
tion, and by law, remains intact for the benefit of the Common 
Schools. 

Doc. J.— A. S. R.— 6 



TIPPECANOE BATTLE GROUND. 



An act was approved December 18, 1872, which authorized and 
empowered the Governor, Secretary, Treasurer, and Auditor of 
State to proceed at once to have a permanent enclosure placed 
around the Tippecanoe Battle Ground, and for this purpose there 
was appropriated the sum of ^24,100. 

The Secretary of State was authorized to advertise for proposals 
for an iron fence, and on the 2d day of June the Board met to 
receive the bids and plans proposed. The contract was awarded to 
Thomas Harding, of LaFayette, at $4.50 per lineal foot. 

On the 11th of November the fence Avas formally received by the 
Board, and the final payments ordered to be made. The entire cost 
is ^17,848.17, leaving of the appropriation on hand $6,251,83. 

In Section 10, Article 15, of the Constitution of the State, which 
took effect in 1851, it is set forth as the duty of the General 
Assembly to provide for the permanent enclosure of the Tippecanoe 
Battle Ground, but twenty years elapsed before steps were taken to 
carry the provision into effect. The historic spot is now perman- 
ently enclosed, and the land, which was deeded to the State by 
General Tipton, one of the heroes of the battle there commemorated, 
will be preserved and guarded as a sacred heritage. 



OBITUARY. 



It is meet and proper that honorable mention should be made i^ 
this report of Major John D. Evans, ex-A_uditor of State, and Mr. 
T. G. Palmer, late Deputy Auditor of State, who departed this life 
during the present year. 

TRUMBLE G. PALMER. 

Mr. Palmer died on the 22d day of April, 1873, after many weeks 
of painful illness. He was the son of Hon. Nathan B. Palmer, 
formerly Treasurer of State, who is still living, a venerable and 
honored citizen of Indianapolis. 

Trurable Palmer was born at Madison, Jefferson county, Indiana, 
January 28, 1828, and at the time of his death was in his forty-sixth 
year. In the year 1855 he was appointed Deputy Auditor of State 
by Auditor Hiram E. Taibott, and held the position through suc- 
ceeding administrations for a period of nearly seventeen years. His 
thorough knowledge of all the duties and requirements of the office, 
and his faithful and efficient performance of them, together with his 
courteous and considerate attention to all with whom he came in 
contact, made him a valued and esteemed public officer. He will be 
long and favorably remembered by the many persons who tran- 
sacted business with this office during the years of his incumbency. 

HON. JOPIN D. EVANS. 

Major Evans died at Noblesville on the 22d day of May, 1873' 
shortly after his return from the South, where he had gone in hopes 
of being benefited by the climate. 

Major Evans was born in Harrison county, Kentucky, April 21, 



84 

1835. In October, 1868, lie was elected Auditor of State, and in 
January, 1869, took possession of the office, succeeding the Hon. 
Thomas B. ^McCarty. As a soldier he had served his country well 
in the field, and came home with honors bravely won. ' In a public 
position, in an office of grave responsibility, he labored with the 
same zeal and energy to discharge every duty devolving upon him. 
The principal features of his administration were the closing up, as 
nearly as could be done, of the State's foreign indebtedness, and the 
transactions of the State Board of Equalization. 

Major Evans was a thorough gentleman and a courteous, affable 
officer. In his official relations he maintained the respect and good 
will of all parties, and bore with him from office the just enconiums 
bestowed upon a faithful servant. 



APPENDIX 



Doc. J.— A. S. E.-^7 



b 



I 



■^ 



/a- 



PROCEEDINGS 



OF THE 



STATE BOARD OF EQUALIZATION. I 

1873. 



Office of Auditoe of State, 
Indianapolis, Indiana, June 16, 1873. 

Agreeably to an act of the General Assembly of the State of 
Indiana, entitled '^An act for the assessment of property and for 
the levy and collection of taxes," approved December 21, 1872, the 
State Board of Equalization, within and for the State of Indiana, 
convened at the office of the Auditor of State, at 2| o'clock p. m. 

The following members were present : Thomas A. Hendricks, 
Governor ; W. W. Curry, Secretary of State ; James A. Wildman, 
Auditor of State. 

• The members of the Board apd J. C. Burnett, Deputy Auditor 
of State, as Secretary, respectively took the oaths prescribed by law., 
as iollows : . 

Office of Auditor of State, 

Indianapolis, June 16, 1873. 

We, and each of us, do soleumly swear that we will support the 
Constitution of the United States, and of the State of Indiana, and 
that we will faithfully and impartially discharge our duties as 
members of the State Board of Equalization, to the best of our 
ability. 

(Signed) THOMAS A. HENDRICKS, 

W. W. CURRY, 

JAMES A. WILDMAN. 
_„1 



I solemnly swear that I will support the Constitution of the 
United States and of the State of Indiana, and that I will faithfuUy 
perform my duties as Secretary of the State Board of Equalization. 

J. C. BURNETT. 

STATE OF INDIANA, 1 ^^ 
Marion CoUiSTY, j 

Before me, Moses G. McLain, a Notary Public, in and for the 

county of Marion and State of Indiana, personally appeared the 

within named Thomas A. Hendricks, W. W. Curry, and James A. 

Wildman, members of the State Board of Equalization, and J. C. 

Burnett, Secretary of the State Board of Equalization, and were 

duly sworn according to law, and subscribed their names herewith. 

[seal.] Witness my hand and Notarial seal this 16th day 

of June, A. D. 1873. 

(Signed) MOSES G. McLAIN, 

Notary Public. 

On motion of Mr. Curry, Governor Hendricks was chosen 
President of the Board. 

The Auditor of State, for the information of the Board, stated 
that of the ninety-two counties only thirty had reported, or made 
returns of assessment of property, and that therefore little more 
could be done at present than to organize and adjourn to another day. 

Adjourned till 2 o'clock, Tuesday, June 17, P. M. 



June 17, 2 p. m. 

Board met pursuant to adjournment. 

Present, Messrs. Hendricks, Curry and Wildman. 

On motion of Mr. Wildman it was ordered that in the absence of 
the President of the Board, Mr. Curry act as President ^^ro tcm. 

On motion of Mr. Wildman it was agreed that the abstracts of 
assessments ot the several counties be taken up for consideration 
next Monday, the '23d instant, at 2 o'clock, p. m. 

On motion of Mr. Curry it was ordered, 

1. That inasmuch as the abstracts of asssessment of the counties 
are not yet ready for examination, the Board will proceed to the 
assessment of Railroads, then Telegraphs, then other corporations 
in the order of section 59 of the assessment law. 



2. That the assessment of corporations shall be suspended at the 
close of any class of corporations as soon as the county abstracts are 
ready, and such abstracts taken up and disposed of, 

Adjourned to 9 o'clock to-morrow morning. 



June 18, 1873. 
Board met pursuant to adjournment. 
Present, Messrs. Hendricks, Curry and Wildman. 
Lieutenant Governor Leouidas Sexton appeared and took the oath 
prescribed as a member of the Board, as iollows : 

"I solemnly swear that I will support the Constitution of the 
United States and of the State of Indiana, and that I will faithfully 
and impartially discharge my duties as a member of the State Board 
of Equalization to the best of my ability." 

(Signed) LEONIDAS SEXTON. ' 

Sworn and subscribed to before me this 18th day of June 1873. 

(Signed) CHARLES SCHOLL, 

[seal.] Clerk Supreme Court. 

The Board then took up for further consideration the assessment 
of the capital stock and tangible property of railroad companies. 
Gentlemen representing companies were admitted to express their 
opinions upon the suliject under cousiideration, after which the state- 
ments of railroads as ma^de to the Auditor of State were examined, 
which occupied the time till 5 P. M. The Board then having the 
same matter under consideration, adjourned till 9 o'clock to-morrow 
moniins'. 



June 19, 1873. 

Board met pursuant to adjournment. 

Present, Messrs. Hendricks, Curry, Sexton and Wildman. 

Th.e Board resumed the consideration of questions and calcula- 
tions in relation to the assessment of the tangible property and 
capital stock of railroads. 

The entire day was occupied in due examination of persons and 
the statements of railroads, and making such further calculations 
and estimates as the Board deem necessary to ascertain the cash 
value of railroad property. 

Adjourned till 9 o'clock to-morrow morning. 



June 20, 1873. 
Board met pursuant to adjournment. 
Present, Messrs. Hendricks, Curry and Wildman. 
The Board continued its labors, making examinations and inves- 
tigations, as on previous days. 

Adjourned at 4 p. m. to 9 o'clock to-morrow morning. 



June 21, 1873. 

Board met pursuant to adjournment. 

Present, Messrs. Hendricks, Curry and Wildman. 

The morning was occupied in the examination of Mr. Gazley, of 
the Ohio and Mississippi Railroad Company. 

After which the Board adjourned to Monday, June 23, at 2 
o'clock p. M. 



June 23, 1873. 

Board met pursuant to adjournment. 

Present, Messrs. Hendricks, Curry, Wildman and Sexton. 

The Board, as agreed at the meeting on the 17th, took up for 
consideration the abstracts of assessment of counties. After making 
some examinations, and finding that eighteen counties have not yet 
made returns, the matter was laid on the table for the present. 

The assessment of railroads was then taken up, and, with the 
subject under consideration, the Board adjourned to 9 o'clock 
to-morrow morning. 



June 24, 1873. 
Board met pursuant to adjournment. 
Present, Messrs. Hendricks, Sexton and Wildman. 
The assessment of railroad property was further considered. On 
motion it was determined that the assessment of the Indianapolis, 
Peru and Chicago Railroad (being the line from Indianapolis to 
Peru be made as follows : 

72,87 miles. Main track, per mile $7,500 

Rolling stock, per mile. 1,673 

That the Chicago, Cincinnati and Louisville Railroad (being the 
line from Peru to LaPorte) be assessed as follows : 

71.47 miles. Main track, per mile $4,000 

Rolling stock, per mile 1,673 



5 

That the Michigan City and Indianapolis Railroad (being the 
line from LaPorte to Michigan City) be assessed as follows : 

12.75 miles. Main track, per mile $4,000 

Rolling Stock, per mile 1,673 

The Rolling Stock of the Indianapolis, Peru and Chicago was fix- 
ed for assessment at $3,600 per mile ; as this road operates both the 
other roads, this rolling stock, under the law, is distributed to each 
county, in the proportion that the main track in each county bears 
to the whole length of the lines operated by the Railroad Company 
in the State, being in the present case, the road from Indianapolis to 
Michigan City. 

On motion, it was ordered that the assessment of the Cleveland, 
Columbus, Cincinnati and Indianapolis Railway Company, be assess- 
ed as follows : 

83.52 miles. Main track, per mile $11,250 

Rolling Stock, per mile 4,750 

On motion, it was ordered that the assessment of the Jefferson- 
vile, Madison and Indianapolis Railroad, (including the branches to 
New Albany, to Madison, and to Cambridge City,) be made as 
follows : 

218.87 miles. Main track, per mile.. $7,750 

Rolling Stock, permile 4,000 

Ordered, that the assessment of the Lake Shore and Michigan 
Southern Railroad, be assessed as follows : 

167.70 miles. Main track, per mile, $14,000 

Rolling Stock, per mile 6,000 

Ordered that the assessment of the Michigan Central Railroad be 
made as follows : 

76.82 miles. Main track, per mile $14,000 

Rolling Stock, per mile 6,000 

Ordered that the assessment of the Pittsburg, Fort Wayne and 
Chicago Railroad be made as follows : 

152.57 miles. Main track, permile $15,000 

Rolling Stock 6,000 

In all assessments made, and ia all to be made, of Railroad prop- 
erty, unless otherwise ordered, the assessment of side and second 
tracks, is to be put at 40 per cent, off* from the assessment of the 
main track. 

Adjourned to 9 o'clock tomorrow morning. 



6 

June 25, 1873. 

Board met pursuant to adjournment. 

Present, Messrs Hendriclss, Sexton and Wild man. 

Major John B. Glover, Treasurer of State, appeared and toolf the 
oath as a member of the Board, as follows : 

"I solemnly swear that I will support the Constitution of the 
United States and of the State of Indiana, and that I will faithfully 
and impartially discharge my duties as a member of the State Board 
of Equalization to the best of mv ability." 

(Signed) ' JOHN B. GLOVER. 

Subscribed and sworn to before me this 25th day of June, 1873. 

(Signed) CHARLES SCROLL, 

[Seal.] Clerk Sup. Court. 

On motion it was ordered that the assessment of the Terre Haute 
and Indianapolis Railroad be made as follows : 

78.91 miles. Main Track, per mile §11,000. 

Rolling Stock, per mile 6,688. 

Ordered that the assessment of the Ohio and Mississippi Railroad 
be made as follows : 

225.08 miles. Main Track (including branches), per mile $10,000. 
Rolling Stock, per mile 4,000. 

Ordered that the assessment of the Indianapolis and St. Louis 
Railroad be made as follows: 

80 miles. Main track, per mile §9,000. 

Rolling Stock, per mile 4,000. 

Ordered that the assessment of the Indianapolis, Bloomington 
and Western Railroad be made as follows: 

77.72 miles. Main Track, per mile §9,000. 

Rolling Stock, per mile 3,000. 

Ordered that the assessment ot the Evansville and Crawfordsville 
Railroad be made as follows : 

108.34 miles. Main Track, per mile §5,000. 

Rolling Stock, per mile 2,500. 

Ordered that the assessment of the Evansville, Terre Haute and 
Chicago Railroad be made as follows : 

43.18 miles. Main Track, per mile §4,500. 

Rolling Stock, per mile 2,000. 



Ordered that the assessment of the Cincinnati, Hamilton and 
Indianapolis Railroad be made as follows: 

78.70 miles. Main Track, per mile $5,500. 

Rolling Stock, per mile 1,500. 

Adjourned to 9 A. M. Friday, the 27th. 



June 27, 1873. 
Board met pursuant to adjouiyiment. 

Present, Messrs. Hendricks, Curry, Wildman and Glover. 
Assessment of railroad resumed. 

Ordered that the Indianapolis and Vincennes Railroad be assessed 
as follows : 

115.97 miles. Main Track, per mile |4,500. 

Rolling Stock, per mile 1,000. 

Ordered that the Detroit, Eel River and Illinois Railroad be 
assessed as follows: 

112.80 miles. Main Track, per mile $4,000. 

Rolling Stock, per mile 1,000. 

Ordered that the Logansport, Crawfordsville and Southwestern 
Railroad be assessed as follows : 

110 miles. Main track, per mile $4,500 

Rolling stock, per mile 1,000 

Ordered that the Fort Wayne, Muncie and Cincinnati Railroad 
be assessed as follows : 

104 100.17 miles. Main track per mile $4,500 

Rolling stock per mile....... 1,100 

Ordered that the White AVater Valley Railroad be assessed as 
follows : 

61.80 miles. Main track, per mile $4,500 

Rolling stock, per mile 1,200 

Ordered that the Cincinnati, Richmond and Fort Wayne Railroad 
be assessed as follows : 

85.88 miles. Main track, per mile $5,000 

Rolling stock, per mile 40 

Ordered that the Grand Rapids and Indiana Railroad be assessed 
as follows : 

50.37 miles. Main track, per mile $7,500 

Rolling stock, per mile 2,500 



8 

Ordered that the Fort Wayne, Jackson and Saginaw Railroad be 
assessed as follows : 

53.17 miles. Main track, per mile $6,300 

Rolling stock, per mile 1,500 

Adjourned to Monday, June 30, at 9 a. m. 



June 30, 1873. 
Board met pursuant to adjournment. 

Present, Messrs. Hendricks, Curry, Wildmau and Glover. 
Ordered that the Pittsburgh, Cincinnati and St. Louis Railroad 
be assessed as follows : 

1. Columbus, Chicago and Indiana Central Branch, 

73 miles. Main track, per mile $11,000 

Rolling stock, per mile 2,500 

2. Chicago and Great Eastern Branch, 

196.50 miles. Main track, per mile |9,000 

Rolling stock, per mile 2,500 

3. Logansport and Union City Branch, 

93 miles. Main track, per mile $7,500 

Rolling stock, per mile 2,600 

4. Logansport, Peoria and Western Branch, 

61 miles. Main track, per mile $7,500 

Rolling stock, per mile 2,500 

Ordered that the Cincinnati and Martinsville Railroad be assessed 
as follows : 

38.50 miles. Main track, per mile $3,750 

Rolling stock, per mile 750 

Ordered that the Indiana North and South Railroad be assessed 
as follows : 

8.63 miles. Main track, per mile $5,000 

Rolling stock, per mile 1,000 

Ordered that the Indianapolis, Cincinnati and Lafayette Railroad 
be assessed as follows : 

158.50 miles. Main track, per mile $7,500 

Rolling stock, per mile 2,500 

Ordered that the Cliicago and Canada Southern Railroad be 
assessed as follows : 

$50.00 per acre of right of way through the counties of Porter, 
LaPorte, St. Joseph, Elkhart and Steuben. 



9 

Ordered that the St. Louis and South Eastern Railroad be assessed 
as follows: 

28.11 miles. Main track, per mile .^5,500 

Rolling stock 1,500 

Ordered that the Louisville, New Albany and Chicago Railroad 
be assessed as follows: 

288.26 miles. Main track, per mile ^3,500 

Rolling stock 500 

Adjourned to 9 o'clock to-morrow morning. 



July 1, 1873. 
Board met pursuant to adjournment. 

Present, Messrs. Hendricks, Curry, Wildman and Glover. 
Ordered that the Carbon and Otter Creek Valley Railroad be 
assessed as follows : 

1.11 miles. Main track, per mile $3,500 

Rolling stock, none. 

Ordered that the Chicago, Danville and Vincennes Railroad be 
assessed as follows: 

19.45 miles. Main track, per mile $4,500 

Roiling stock 600 

Ordered that the Cincinnati, Wabash and Michigan Railroad be 
assessed as follows : 

56.76 miles. Main track, per mile $4,000 

Rolling stock 550 

Ordered that the Cincinnati, Richmond and Chicago Railroad be 
assessed as follows: 

4.85 miles. Main track, per mile $5,000 

Rolling stock 1,600 

Ordered that the Louisville, New x4.1bany and St. Louis Air Line 
Railroad be assessed as follows: 

]2.63 miles. Main track, per mile $5,000 

Rolling stock 800 

Ordered that the Toledo, Wabash and Western Railroad be 
assessed as follows: 

166 miles. Main track track, per mile $13,000 

Rolling stock 4,000 

Adjourned to Monday, July 7, at 9 a. m. 



10 

July 7, 1873. 
Board met pursuant to adjournment. 

Present, Messrs. Hendricks, Sexton, Curry, Wildman and Glover. 
The equalization of the assessment of lands was taken up for con- 
sideration, and occupied the attention of the Board during the day. 
Adjourned to 9 o'clock to-morrow morning. 



July 8, 1873. 
Board met pursuant to adjournment. 

Prt'sent, Messrs, Hendricks, Sexton, Wildman and Glover. 
Equalization of assessment resumed. 

With ihe matter still under consideration, the Board adjourned 
to 9 o'clock to-morrow morning. 



July 9, 1873. 

Board met pursuant to adjournment. 

Present, Messrs. Hendricks, Sexton, Curry, Wildman and Glover. 

The day was occupied in making such calculations as would de- 
termine the rate per cent, of increase, and the rate per cent, of 
reductivm, of assessments in the several counties necessary to secure 
a proper equalization throughout the State. 

Adjourned to 9 o'clock to-morrow morning. 



July 10, 1873. 

Board met pursuant to adjournment. 

Present, Messrs. Hendricks, Sexton, Curry, W^ildman and Glover. 

The Board continued its examinations and calculations as on the 
previous day. 

It was ordered that the rates of increase and reduction made by 
the Board apply to the aggregate assessment of lands and improve- 
ments, and lots and improvements, in the several counties in which 
such changes are made. 

Adjourned to 9 o'clock to-morrow morning. 



July 11, 1873. 
Board met pursuant to adjournment. 
Present, Messrs. Hendricks, Sexton, Curry, Wildman and Glover. 



11 

Ordered, that the Auditor of State *be, and he is, hereby author- 
ized to fix the equalization of any county which may not furnish 
the proper returns of the a-jsessments tlierein before the adjourn- 
ment of the State Board of Equalization. 

Ordered, that the rolling stock of the Terre Haute and Indian- 
apolis Railroad be assessed at $(5,000 per mile. 

It is ordered by the State Board of Equalization, that the total 
value of lands and improvements in the following named counties 
be increased in the following ratio, to-wit : 

Bartholomew county 12 per cent. 

Cass county 5 per cent. 

Franklin county 5 per cent. 

Greene county 12 per cent. 

Harrison county 5 percent. 

Huntington county 25 per cent. 

Jackson county 10 per cent. 

Knox county 5 per cent. 

Kosciusko county 50 per cent. 

LaGrange county 5 per cent. 

Madison county 6 jier cent. 

Marshall county 10 per cent. 

Clay county 5 per cent. 

Decatur county 5 per cent. 

Miami county 5 per cent. 

Morgan county 10 per cent. 

Ohio county 10 per cent. 

Parke county 10 per cent. 

Posey county 10 per cent. 

Putnam county 5 per cent. 

Spencer county 10 per cent. 

Sullivan county 10 per cent. 

Vermillion county 30 per cent. 

Yigo county 5 percent. 

White county -. . . 10 per cent. 

It is further ordered by said Board, that the total value of lands 
and improvements, and lots and improvements, in the following 
named counties^ be decreased in the following ratio, to wit: 

Allen county 10 per cent. 

Elkhart county 15 per cent. 



12 

Floyd county 5 per cent. 

Hendrick's county 5 percent. 

Henry county - 6 per cent. 

Howard county 10 per cent. 

Joh nson county 20 per cent. 

Lawrence county 10 per cent. 

Sh e 1 by c o u n ty 2 per c e n t . 

Stuben county 20 percent. 

Switzerland county 20 per cent. 

Vanderburg county 5 percent. 

"Whitley county 20 per cent 

It is further ordered by said Board, that the value of lands and 
improvements, and lots and improvements, in the following named 
counties, remain as reported to the Auditor of State : 

Adams, Benton, Blackford, Boone, Brown, Carroll, Clarke, Clin- 
ton, Crawford, Daviess, Dearborn, DeKalb, Delaware, Dubois, Fay- 
ette, Fountain, Fulton, Gibson, Grant, Hamilton, Hancock, Jasper, 
Jay, Jefferson, Jennings, Lake, LaPorte, Marion, Martin, Monroe, 
Montgomery, Newton, Noble, Orange, Owen, Perry, Pike, Porter, 
Pulaski, Randolph, Ripley, Rush, Scott, Starke, St. Joseph, Tippeca- 
noe, Tipton, Union, Wabash, Warren, Warrick, Washington, and 
Wells. 

It was ordered, that the equalization of the assessment of Wayne 
county shall be fixed by the Auditor of State, unless the proper re- 
turns of said county are made previously to the adjournment of said 
Board. 

Adjourned to 9 o'clock to-morrow morning. 



July 12, 1873. 

Board met as ordered. 

Present, Messrs Hendricks, Curry, Wildman and Glover. 

The orders of the preceding meeting were read and approved, 
Whereupon, the Board adjourned to Monday, the 14th inst. at 9J 
A. M. 



July 14, 1873. 
Board met as ordered. 
Present, Messrs Hendricks, Curry, Wildman and Glover. 



13 

Ordered that the Cincinnati, Lafayette and Cliicago Railroad be 
assessed as follows : 

20.53 miles. Main track, per mile , §5,000 

Rolling Stock, per mile.. 2,500 

Ordered, that the Cineinnati and Terre Hante Railroad, be assess- 
ed as follows : 

Main Track, per mile... ......$8,500 

Rolling Stock per mile 500 

Ordered^ that the Chicago and Illinois Southern Railroad, be 
assessed as follows : 

5 miles Main track, per mile |o,500 

The Board then proceeded to a revision and equalization of the 
assessment of railroads. 

It was ordered that the main track of the following named rail- 
roads be assessed as follows : 

Cleveland, Columbus, Cincinnati and Indianapolis, per milefl 2,000 

Lake Shore and Michigan Southern, per mile 16,000 

Michigan Central, per mile.......... 16,000 

Pittsburgh, Fort Wayne and Chicago, per mile.. 17,000 

Louisville, New Albany and Chicago, per mile.... 3,000 

Carlon and Otter Creek Valley, per mile 3,000 

New Albany and St. Louis Air Line, per mile 4,500 

Cincinnati and Martinsville, per mile 3,000 

JefPersonville, Madison and Indianapolis, main line, per mile 9,000 
" . " ." " Branches, " '' 4,000 

Adjourned to 9 o'clock to-morrow morning. 

JuiY 15, 1873. 
Board met. 
All present. 
And adjourned to 9 o'clock to-morrow morning. 



July 16, 1873. 
Board met as ordered. 

Present, Messrs. Hendricks, Sexton, Curry, Wildman and Glover. 
Ordered, that the Indiana and Illinois Central Railway be assessed 
as follows : 

8.63 miles. Main track, per mile. $4,500 

Rolling stock, per mile. , , 1,075 



u 

Ordered, that the Lake Erie, Evansville and Southwestern Rail- 
road be assessed as follows: 

1 1,000 per mile of grading completed on the first day of April, 
1873, and that the Auditors of Vanderburgh and Warrick counties 
be notified accordingly, by the Auditor of State. 

The Board then proceeded to consider the assessment of the 
capital stock of Telegraph and other companies. With the matter 
still under advisement, the Bora-d adjourned to 9 o'clock to-morrow 
morn in 2:. 



July 17,1873. 

Board met pursuant to adjournment. 

Present, Messrs. Hendricks. Curry, Sexton, Wildman and Glover. 

In a further revision and equalization of the assessment of rail- 
roads, it was ordered that the main track of the lines of the Pitts- 
burgh, Cincinnati and St. Louis Pailroad be assessed at §8,750 per 
mile. 

The State Board of Equalization failing to find any capital stock 
of any street railroad, plank road, gravel road, turnpike or bridge 
company, in excess of its tangible property, it is ordered by said 
Board that the schedules required by Section 59, Chapter 37, laws 
of Indiana, approved December 21, 1872, and forwarded to the 
Auditor of State under Section 60 of said act, be returned to the 
several County Auditors, frona whom said schedules were received, 
directing that said several companies be assessed and taxed accord- 
ing to the provisions of Section 26 of said act, and as otherwise pro- 
vided for in said law. 

Adjourned to 9 o'clock to-morrow morning. 



July 18, 1873. 

Board met pursuant to adjournment. 

Present, Messrs. Hendricks, Sexton, Curry, Wildman and 
Glover. 

The assessment of capital stock was again taken up for consider- 
ation, no definite conclusion being reached, the Board proceeded 
with a further revision of and equalization of the assessment of 
railroads. 

Ordered that the side track of the Terre Haute and Indianapolis 
Railroad be assessed at $4,500 per mile. 



15 

Ordered that the main track of the Indianapolis and Vincennes 
Railroad be assessed at $4,000 per mile. 

Adjourned to 9 o'clock to-morrow morning. 



July 19, 1873. 

Board met pursuant to adjournment. 

Present Messrs. Hendricks, Curry, Wildman and Glover, 
. Ordered that the rolling stock of the Jeffersonville, Madison and 
Indianapolis Railroad be assessed $3,300 per mile, instead of $4,000 
as heretofore agreed upon. 

Ordered that the Cairo and Vincennes Railroad be assessed as 
follows : 

Smiles. Main Track, per mile............ $4,500. 

Roiling Stock, per mile. ............... 3,000. 

Ordered that the Rockport and Cincinnati Railroad be assessed at 
$1,000 per mile of the graded portion, 

Adjourned to 2 o'clock p. m., Monday 21st, inst. 



JuLT 21, 1873. 
Board met pursuant to adjournment. 

Present, Messrs. Hendricks, Sexton, Curry, Wildman and Glover. 

Ordered that the Joliet and Northern Indiana Railroad reported 

by the Michigan Central Railroad Company, be assessed as follows: 

Main Track, per mile ...$4,500. 

Rolling Stock, none. 

The Board proceeded to consider the assessment of capital stock. 
Adjournment to 9 o'clock to-morrow morning. 



July 22, 1873, 
Board met as ordered. 

Present, Messrs. Hendricks, Sexton, Curry, Wildman and 
Glover. 

Ordered that the Auditor of State be, and he is hereby, author- 
ized to assess any railroad which may not, have reported to the 
Auditor, and which has not been assessed by the State Board, -the 
Auditor to be governed in making the assessment by the rules 
observed by the Board in such cases. 

Adjournment to 9 o'clock to-morrow morning. 



16 

July 23, 1873. 
Board met as ordered. 

Present, Messrs. Hendricks, Curry, Wildman and Glover. 
Adjourned to Monday, the 28th instant, at 2 p. m. 



July 28, 1873. 

Board met pursuant to adjournment. 

Present, Messrs. Hendricks, Sexton, Wildman, Curry and Glover. 

The time was occupied by the Board in making examinations 
relative to the capital stock of private and miscellaneous corpo- 
rations. 

Adjourned to 9 o'clock to-morrow morning. 



July 29, 1873. 

Board met pursuant to adjournment. 

Present, Messrs. Hendricks, Sexton, Curry, Wildman and Glover. 

Ordered, that the capital stock of the Western Union Telegraph 
Company be assessed at $800,000 for the State of Indiana, and that 
said stock, less the tangible property of said company in the State, 
be apportioned for taxation among the counties of the State as 
required by Section 292 of the Assessment law. 

Ordered by the State Board of Equalization, that the Auditor of 
State send to the counties from which full returns of corporations 
have not been received the following circular letter: 

Indianapolis, August 1, 1873. 
Auditor. County : 

Sir— As a. number of the counties of the State 
have failed to make reports of corporations as required by Section 
59 of the Assessment law, it is ordered by the State Board of Equal- 
ization that county auditors be requested to report to the Auditor of 
State at as early a day as possible, all corporations in their respective 
counties (excepting railroads, street railroads, plank roads, and turn- 
pike and bridge companies), as provided for in Sections 59 and 60 of 
the Assessment law. Auditors who have reported such corporations 
need not report again unless it has appeared that some corporation 
was overlooked in the first returns. Inasmuch as some of the coun- 
ties have reported in full and the State Board has made the assess- 
ment of their corporations, it is unjust to them that any corporation 



17 

subject to assessment should not be taxed as the law requires. To 
enable counties to make full returns of companies incorporated 
under the laws of the State, the State Board stands adjourned to the 
11th day of August, instant, by which time it is hoped complete 
reports will be made as ordered. Auditors will therefore use all 
diligence in procuring the desired information, and making returns 
to the Auditor of State. 

Very respectfully, 
(Signed) THOMAS A. HENDRICKS, 

J. C. BURNETT, President of the Board. 

Secretary. 

Ordered, that the rolling stock of the Jefferson ville, Madison and 
Indianapolis Railroad be assessed at ^3,000 per mile, instead of 
$3,300, as heretofore ordered. 

Adjourned to Monday, August 11, at 2 p. m. 



August 11, 1873. 
Board met pursuant to adjournment. 
Present, Messrs. Curry, Wildman and Sexton. 
It was ordered, that the LaFayette, Muncie and Bloominglon 
Railroad, in Benton and Tippecanoe counties, making 35.73 miles of 
main track, aud 1.67 of side track, be assessed as follows : 

Main track, per mile $6,500 

Side track, per mile 3,900 

The Board having had under consideration the application of the 
Fort Wayne,, Jackson and Saginaw Railroad Company, and of cer- 
tain citizens of Vermillion county, for a reduction of the assessment 
of said Railroad Company's property, and of the lands and lots and 
improvements in said county of Vermillion, and not having deter- 
mined the same, adjourned until to-morrow morning at 9 o'clock. 



August 12, IS 73. 
Board met pursuant to adjournment. 

Present, Messrs. Curry, (President pro tern) Wildman and Sexton. 

It was ordered by the Board, in reference to the application of 

the Fort Wayne, Jackson and Saginaw Railroad Company, and to 

the application of citizens of Vermillion county, for a reduction on 

the assessment of the property of said Railroad Company, and on 

—2 



18 

the lands and lots and improvements in said Vermillion county, 
that it is impracticable to make such reduction. 

And the Board adjourned until Monday, August 18, 1873. 



August 18, 1873. 

Board met pursuant to adjournment. 

Present, Messrs. Curry, Wildman and Sexton. 

The Board considered the assessment of the South Bend Branch 
of the Michigan Central Railroad, all in St. Joseph county, 5.12 
miles in length, and assessed the same at $4,500 per mile. 

Also considered the Peninsular Railroad, running through and 
into Porter, LaPorte and St. Joseph counties, and not being suffi- 
ciently advised concerning the same, the Board adjourned until 
to-morrow morning at nine o'clock. 



Aug. 19, 1873, 

Board met pursuant to adjournment. 

Present, Messrs. Curry, Wildman, Glover and Sexton. 

The Board makes the following assessment of the capital stock of 
corporations in the State of Indiana, so far as returned to said 
Board, to wit : 

^(See table on pages following.) 

Ordered by the Board, that the Auditor of State prepare the nec- 
essary classified tables and statements, showing the assessments and 
findings of the Board, and that he certify to County Auditors the 
amount of capital stock of corporations liable to taxation, as found by 
the Board. 

Also, that he prepare, to be published with the proceedings of the 
Board, a statement of the defects in the assesment law, and the dif- 
ficulties the Board has encountered in the performance of its duties. 

In the matter of the Peninsular Railroad Company, the Board af- 
ter due deliberation, have, and do appraise the same at $5,000 per 
*nile. Rolling Stock $250 per mile. 

Adjourned to Monday, September 1, 1873. 



September 1, 1873. 
State Board of Equalization met. 

Present, Messrs, Hendricks, Curry, Wildman_and Glover. 
Ordered, that the Auditor of State notify County Auditors that it 



]9 

is absolutely necessary that they return the total county assessments 
of all kinds of railroad property, so that the State Board can ascer- 
tain if there is not capital stock which ought to be taxed. 
Adjourned to Friday afternoon at 2 o'clock. 



Septenber 5, 1873, 
Board met as ordered. 

Present, Messrs. Hendricks, Curry, Wild man and Glover. 
Ordered, that the following additional assessments of capital stock 
be made, upon reports received since the last meeting of the Board : 

CLAY COUNTY. 

Morris Coal Company, Brazil, Capital Stock $36,000 

Clay Coal Company, of Indiana |86,916 

Ordered, that the capital stock of the Indianapolis Car Company 
be assessed at |24,250, instead of $500,000 as heretofore ordered, to 
correct error made in first assessment of said capital stock, and that 
the Auditor of Marion county be notified accordingly. 

Adjourned to Tuesday, September 9, at 2 p. m. 



September 9, 2 p. m. 

Board met pursuant to adjournment. 

Present, Messrs. Hendricks, Wildman and Curry. 

Ordered, that the capital stock of the Springfield Building, Loan 
and Savings Association, of South Whitley, Whitley county, of 
which a report has been received since last meeting, be assessed at 
$3,300, and the Auditor of Whitley county be notified of said 
assessment. 

Whereupon, the Board adjourned. 



TABLE No. 1. 

Abstract of the Appraisement of Property in the State of Indiana 
for the year 1878, as revised by the State Board of Equalization. 



COUNTIES. 



Adams 

Alien 

Bartholomew.. 

Benton 

Blackford 

Boone 

Brown 

Carroll 



Clark 

Clay 

Clinton 

Crawford 

Daviess 

Dearborn 

Decatur 

DeKalb 

Delaware 

Dubois , 

Elkhart , 

Fayette 

Floyd 

Fountain 

Frankiin 

Fultnn 

Gibson 

Grant 

tjreene 

Hamilton 

Hancock 

Harrison 

Hendricks... 

Henry 

Howard 

Huntington. 

•Jack.-'on 

■Jasper 

Jay 

■/efferson 

-Jennings 

■John.son 

Knox 

Kosciusko ... 

Lagrrange 

Lake 

Laporte 

Lawrence.... 

Madison 

Marion 

Marshall 

Martin 

Miami 



213, 
411 
25i, 
252, 
102, 
2(j5 
1!<8, 
233 
259 
233, 
221, 
257 
194, 
268, 
191, 
231, 
227 
249 
209 
292 
185, 
92. 
250, 
247. 
224. 
302 
2C5 
341, 
250, 
intJ 
303 
2.';6 
247 
1 

240 
:-,20 
351 
239 
22ii 
23; 
200, 
31 1 
341 
236 
304 
309 
283, 
283 
23i 
If'-. 
208 
235 



,707.50 
856.49 
^487.66 
619.08 
,080.09 
165.00 
,478.98 
,965.0.5 
,014.76 
,282.05 
582.77 
8(i.60 
,327 01 
973.18 
224.00 
508.00 
186.0^ 
,6.33.73 
,757.55 
,130.57 
952.26 
179.08 
,021.00 
,763,91 
,793.50 
,970.59 
,278 14 
,203.40 
,301.00 
,599.00 
,0.52.48 
,067.82 
,732.91 
,282.68 
,756.60 
,489.76 
,729.88 
i,249.8H 
013.16 
,909.74 
414.28 
: ,.329 .7 7 
i,OLi3.41 
,700.59 
,788.05 
,114.41 
,171.98 
;, 353.28 
.901.^4 
,192.6 
681.25 
•,344.76 



S;2,1T7,205 
9,611,177 
6,383,055 
3,77(',848 
1,345,816 
6,510.805 

882,304 
4,237,925 
4,510,475 
3.783,880 
3,822,235 
4,424,279 

752,771 
3,470,528 
4,073,686 
5,822,630 
4,315,246 
5,490 .328 
l,509,344i 
7,910,769| 
4,210,1351 
1,280,230 
6,128.996! 
4,626,078 
2,6.'>9,595 
5,105,155 
4,930,050 
3,794,5.51 
7,882,080 
4,939.296 
2,793,609 
8,872,921 
8,168, 138J 
3,506,670 
3,735,100 
3,944,339 
2,052,981 
3,201,875 
2.656,874 
1,885,525 
6.789,956 
4,146,4i;6 
6,367,267 
3,802,5.51 
3,896,145 
6,203, Iil2 
3,558,087 
6,806,348 
21,585,859 
4,798.118 

900,531 
4,420,862 



$087,670 

1,600,600 

951,474 

499,647 

281,028 

1,874.385 

248,018 

1,273,577 

1,394,885 

622,377 

1,105,732 

1,331,461 

170.222 

892,280 

768,922 

628,068 

591,925 

1,431,120 

.306,010 

1,282,284 

5O9.6.50 

338.057 

508,839 

797,676 

794,940 

1,154,452 

1,427,820 

995,214 

1,069,300 

815,484 

591,724 

885,400 

1,376,494 

1,083,785 

1,109,538 

821,144 

382,197 

1,056,130 

550,650 

368,39' 

898,332 

947,740 

1,271,843 

1,633,473 

574.745 

629,048 

742,424 

806,017 

1,415,311 

031,108 

384, -.52 

1,096,562 



= s 



$2,864 

11,211 

7,3.34 



77 
529 
4.276,495 



1,626 
8,385 
1,130 
5,611 
5,905 
4,406 
4,927 
5,755 
922 
4,362 
4.842 
t,450 
4,907 
0,92! 
1,815 
9,193 
4,779 
1,618 
6,637, 
5,423 
3,454, 
6,259 
6,.357, 
4,7>9 
8,951 
5,754 
3,385, 
9,758 
9,534 
4,590 
4,844 
4,705, 
2,435 
4,058 
3,207 
2,253 
7,688 
5,094, 
7,639 
5.430 
4,470 
0,832 
4,300 
7,731 
2,300,170 
5,429,220 
1,284,683 
5,517,414 



Sf^ i^^-t 



4,091 
2,225 
1,088 
1,847 
3,426 
2,561 
2.489 
2,287 

4,093 



2,373 

2,062 



2,905 
1,431 



TABLE No. 1— Continued. 

Abstract of the Appraisemeiit of Property in the State of Indiana 
for the year 1873, as revised by the State Board of Equalization. 







V. 
















o 


a 


s 


X 






• o 

g 
O . 


3 

O c 


3 

> 


p 

> ^ 

:5 __• 


a 
ti 




3 

"5 






Equalization. 


-S 


^ 


M w 


M„ -2 


Q. 


> ^ 


V 




ffi s 


a o. 




sS a 


» 




-0 






3 S 


C o 




s 2 


ri "^ 


g 




s 3 




?^ 


l^ 1 


"(^ 


o* 






r- 


> 


<l 


< 


> 


H 


;? 




§157, 330 


$400,910 


§182 32 


$300 08 


$1,340,300 


5f4,60e,0S5 


2,051 




2,985,250 


8,510,791 


647 01 


995 00 


5 091,9.55 


24.814,523 


6,34H 


10 per cent, decrease. 


827,170 


1,362,-390 

144,520 






2,928,578 


11,625,497 


3,527 


12 per cent, increase. 


81.733 


'24 '46 


56"36 


1,149,083 


5,570,098 




175,241 


341,986 


149 26 


291 30 


805,212 


2,774,042 


1,19". 




648,975 


1,119,495 


152 60 


363 10 


3,652,495 


13,157,210 


4,060 




24,490 


35,877 


32 44 


' 102 21 


578,448 


1,744,647 


1,221 




432,168 


773,984 


130 11 


294 62 


2,256,432 


8,541,918 


2,663 




1,452,314 


3,318,148 






3,105,187 


12,328,695 


3,761 


5 per cent- increase. 


1,495,781 


2,807,393 
674,167 






2,950,291 


10,163,941 


3,441 




438,789 


"57 53 


i'64'79 


2,088,336 


7,690,470 


3,939 


5 per cent, increase. 


32(;,441 


681,394 


15 95 


30 62 


2,939,344 


9,376,478 


3,190 




(i8,182 


92,957 


22 71 


85 43 


643,215 


1,659,165 


1,638 




417,410 


741,332 


175 37 


401 37 


1,923,679 


7.027,819 


2,657 




1,408,509 


2,413,824 


275 92 


704 54 


2,888,282 


10,144,714 


3,-.i58 




623,694 


1,093,065 


183 23 


42ii 80 


3,279,238 


10,823.001 


2,904 


5 per cent, increase. 


282,650 


497,249 


86 21 


199 77 


1,398,707 


6,803.127 


2,681 




415,937 


947,741 


232 53 


410 33 


2,580,-330 


10,449,519 


3,031 




161,550 
1,138,615 


226,775 
2,352,921 






983,941 


3,026.070 


1,915 




296' 62 


575'05 


4,072,270 


15,618,244 


4,692 


15 per cent, decrease. 


379,100 


683,230 






2,483,895 


7,926.910 


1,774 




2,126.147 
470,545 


4,437,942 






4,78C.O70 


10.841,299 


2,681 


5 per cent, decrease. 


7l-4,853 


88 35 


■i'io'e'i 


2,5( 0,361 


9,903,049 


2,885 




516,999 


700,600 


78 05 


300 30 


2,835,854 


8,960,208 


2,649 


5 per cent, increase. 


193,135 


365.915 


144 65 


306 46 


1,205,335 


5,085,785 


1,940 




759,999 


1,105,534 


120 77 


265 63 


2,906,302 


10,271,443 


3,092 




422,815 


747,095 


216 62 


499 07 


2,491,960 


9,596,925 


3,365 




263,108 


390,911 


.341 71 


955 38 


2,211,110 


7,391,786 


3,331 


12 per cent, increase. 


481.772 


790,9.59 


289 00 


714 00 


2.763,831 


12,506,176 


3,571 




222,408 


437,155 


82 69 


193 26 


2,240,636 


8 432,571 


2,5.55 




191,222 


267,721 






1,579,398 


5,232,452 


2,823 


5 per cent, increase. 


430,289 


620,119 


"7i"25 


232"75 


3,601,159 


13,979,599 


3,226 


5 per cent, decrease. 


763,077 


l,09;i,598 


97 50 


323 25 


3,941,161 


14,568,311 


3.474 


6 per cent, decrease. 


533,007 


997,785 


219 85 


471 99 


2,140,520 


7,728,760 


2,909 


10 per cent, decrease. 


462, 2u3 


859,494 


178 12 


385 36 


1,797,485 


7,501,617 


3,009 


25 per cent, increase. 


495,902 


832,346 


128 32 


317 45 


2,158,374 


7,756,203 


3,041 


10 per cent, increase. 


102,478 


184,532 


49 88 


112 17 


1,237,693 


3,857,403 


1,150 




235,545 


370,110 


75 51 


207 69 


1,457,280 


5,885,395 


2,489 




1,535,623 


2,286,459 
373,363 






3,795,034 
1,341,085 


9.289,017 
3.968,371 


3,374 
2,238 




200,490 


'V'fso 


iesos 




589,028 


897,236 


184 89 


53S 23 


3,884,035 


12,469,559 


2,924 


20 per cent, decrease. 


1,220,342 


2,283,120 






2,837,690 


10,215,016 


3,363 


5 per cent, increase. 


650,152 


1,114,132 


i26 06 


306 50 


2,474,145 


11,227,387 


3,587 


50 per cent, increase. 


20i;,906 


341,346 






2,145,180 


7,922,550 


2,147 


5 per cent, increase. 


17->,145 


306,195 


'42' 96 


"gs'T-i 


1,460,575 


6,243,660 


1,647 


1,461, 4.i7 


3,091,930 






3,010,548 


12,935,138 


4,103 




464,132 


691,863 


9.5 97 


29i"52 


2,467,772 


7,460,146 


2,4.50 


10 per cent, decrease. 


883,53'', 


1,444,420 


266 34 


700 49 


2,653,720 


11,830,103 


3,748 


6 per cent, increase. 


13,914,47'i 
458,799 


51,067,259 






18,772,330 
1,719,335 


92,840,7.59 
8,114,003 


13,704 




965,442 


iVi'l'i 


332"33 


3,218 


10 per cent, increase. 


127.030 


172,854 


32 02 


120 79 


740,186 


2,197,723 


1,681 




502,787 


1,110,517 






2,449,200 


9,077,1.31 


3,377 


5 per cent, increase. 



22 



TABLE No. 1 — Continued. 



Absti^act of the Appraisement of Pi^operty in the State of Indiana 
for the year 1873, as revised by the State Board of Equalization. 



COUNTIES. 



Monroe 

Montgomery 

Morgan 

Newton , 

Noble 

Ohio - 

Orange , 

Owen 

Parke 

Perry 

Pike 

Porter 

Posey 

Pulaski , 

■ Putnam 

Kandolph 

Ripley 

Rush 

Scott 

Shelby 

Spencer 

Starke 

St. Joseph .... 

Steuben 

Sullivan 

Switzerland . 
Tippecanoe... 

Tipton 

Dnion 

Vanderbnrg . 
Vermillion.... 

Vigo 

Wabash 

Warren 

Warrick 

Washington . 

Wayne 

Wells 

White 

Whitley 

Total 



255,973.00 

317,775.00 
253,189.64 
249,482.00 
251,601.57 
54.()9l.60 
241,871.97 
242,534.00 
279,428,32 
235,320.46 
209,414.00 
255,943.46 
253,932.00 
265,874.113 
302,307.00 
283,325.60 
279,085.16 
248,755.00 
115,243.00 
254,196.00 
247,991.58 
188,635.00 
286,969.41 
192,245.78 
278,373.73 
140,670.79 
313,022.26 
16(1,569.81 
103,202.90 
146,335.41 
159, 772.90 
252,068.48 
248,143.71 
229,874.43 
2.39,129.11 
322,-543.00 
253,387.02 
233,909.66 
314,296.78 
205,749.64 



82,938,637 
9,014,825 
5,869,330 
2,303,886 
3,611,926 

940,.308 
1,877,619 
3,049,523 
7,657,083 
1,01)2,310 
1,831,615 
3,925,8.30 
4,663,428 
1.482,396 
8,079,847 
5,737,813 
2,619,890 
8,^06,760 

785,272 
8,880,992 
2,538,873 

737,969 
5,355,270 
2,612,740 
3,582,651 
2,610,690 
9,385,473 
2,1.54,410 
3,092,760 
4,100,609 
3,998,982 
7,187,024 
4,286,885 
5,238,185 
2,907,007 
3,179,510 
9,509,620 
2,987,685 
4,009,846 
3,094,239 



22,390,865.99 S412.760,682 $78,201,010 $491,921,692 



> 



$627,908 

1,309,610 

1,018,144 

484,057 

1,749,581 

187,672 

478,88f: 

830,078 

790,042 

213,420 

437,404 

556,700 

959,655 

381,218 

1,883,062 

1,147,076 

689, .390 

1,033,230 

185,951 

814,504 

765,185- 

109,594 

• 724,205 

1,310,520 

874,012 

366,648 

1,317,72(1 

415,585 

407,255 

634,676 

776,730 

9.32,496 

2,077,780 

842,495 

627,984 

546,488 

1,838,-307 

881,395 

881,397 

451,023 



o p 

o 3. 
> 



$3,566,545 

10,984,435 
6,887,474 
2,787,943 
5.361,507 
1,127,980 
2,356,505 
3,885,601 
8,453,725 
1,215,7.3( 
2,209,019 
4,482,530 
5,623,083 
1,803,614 
9,962,909 
6,884,889 
3,209,280 
9,4-39,990 
971,223 
9,695,490 
3,304,058 
847,563 
6,079,475 
3,923,200 
4,4.56,663 
2,977,338 

10,703,193 
2,569,995 
3,500,015 
4,735,285 
4,775,712 
8,119,520 
6,.364.305 
0,080,680 
3,534,991 
3,725,998 

11,347,927 
3,860,080 
4,891,243 
4,145,202 



$11 48 
30 25 
23 18 
9 16 

14 36 

17 19 
8 25 

12 57 

27 40 

4 2b 

8 74 

15 34 

18 24 

5 57 
26 72 
20 25 

9 40 

33 39 

6 81 

34 93 
10 23 

3 91 
18 66 

13 59 

12 47 
18 5G 
29 73 

13 41 
29 96 

28 02 
25 01 
28 51 
17 27 
22 78 
12 11 

9 85 
37 53 
12 77 
12 75 
17 95 









S13 93 
34 56 
27 19 
11 18 
21 31 

20 63 

10 36 
16 02 
29 85 

5 1 

11 41 
17 

21 70 

7 05 

32 95 

24 30 
11 49 

37 95 

8 41 

38 14 

13 32 
4 49 

21 18 

20 4(1 
16 00 

21 16 
74 21 
16 00 

33 91 
32 36 
29 89 
32 23 

25 64 

26 45 

14 78 
11 15 
44 78 
16 54 

15 55 
20 15 



S ° 
sir* 



1,487 



1,701 
1,194 
2,678 

452 
1,328 
1,441 
1,570 
9,472 
1,794 
2,153 
2,200 

958 
2,322 
2,801 
2,516 
1,287 

985 
2,178 
2,965 

613 
5,752 
2,075 



1,145 
7,341 
1,022 
655 
11,148 
1,485 



3,444 
1,6.5(1 
1,850 
1,330 
8,078 
1,534 
2,331 
1,556 



$350,583 

684,805 

286,517 

115,350 

380,930 

55,170 

61,650 

199,445 

194,717 

422,585 

82,975 

466,100 

425,070 

23,189 

416,387 

435,045 

48,115 

155,785 

13,275 

397,180 

258,092 

17,067 

1,897,820 

252,400 

224,502 

114,048 

3,593,295 

123,655 

67,245 

6.175,.386 

170,127 

3,00-1,196 

466,110 

54,570 

233,519 

110,866 

1,779,481 

230,690 

136,452 

222,362 



$90,209,823 



23 



TABLE No. 1— Continued. 



Abstract of the Appraisement of Property in the State of Indiana 
for the year 1873, as revised by the State Board of Equalization. 



> 
o 


-a 

a 


o 


o 


c3 

a 









p. 

3 


o a 


"3 


Is 


&4 





■3 




tt-t 


S 




•a 


•si 


3 





Equalization, 


o ^ 




cS S 


o =* m 

ce 5 a 


^ 




.0 




•ii 


3 S 




>- o o 


s 2 


* 


s 

3 . 




> 


> 


< 


< 


> 


H 


^ 




8594,297 


$944,880 


.f235 76 


$635 42 


82,147,756 


S6, 659, 181 


2,170 




801 ,945 


1,486,810 






4,416,570 
2,627,580 


16,887,815 


2,546 




455,609 


742,126 


i02 63 


42i"42 


10,257,180 


2,550 


10 per cent, increase. 


154,545 


269,895 


64 42 


189 48 


1,073,165 


4,131,003 


1,090 




599,996 


986,926 


144 48 


368 53 


2,638,712 


8,987,145 


3,156 




167,943 


223,113 


122 05 


493 60 


614,817 


1,965,910 


775 


10 per cent, increase. 


166 709 


228,365 


19 47 


82 16 


1,569,669 


4,154,539 


1,985 




295,925 


495,370 


138 40 


343 76 


2,163,333 


6,541,304 


2,395 




342,182 


536,899 


124 01 


341 97 


3,568,750 


12,559,374 


3,177 


10 per cent, increase. 


476,410 


898,995 






1,040,610 
1,101,243 
1,741,186 


3,155,335 


2,156 




165,949 


248,924 




138 "75 


3,619,186 
7,239,991 


2,334 




550,175 


1,016,275 


216"48 


472 00 


2,207 




651,705 


976,775 


J 88 03 


383 53 


2,241,538 


8,841,396 


2,895 


10 per cent, increase. 


141,385 


164,574 


23 25 


307 28 


780,813 


2,809,001 


1,183 




874,778 


1,291,165 


179 32 


556 05 


3,856,620 


15,110,694 


3,344 


5 per cent, increase. 


598,171 


1,033,216 


155 32 


368 87 


3,008,091 


10,926,199 


3,666 




188,550 


236,665 


19 12 


94 06 


1,256,435 


4,702,380 


3,769 




380,430 


536,215 


121 04 


213 49 


3,813,580 


13,819,785 


2,933 




55,771 


69,046 


13 47 


70 09 


550,466 


1,590,735 


1,151 




625,656 


1,023,836 


182 35 


287 72 


3,249,145 


13,968,477 


3,568 


20 per cent, decrease. 


399,281 


657,373 


87 03 


221 70 


2,149,440 


6,110,871 


3,123 


10 per cent, increase. 


28,841 


45,908 


27 80 


74 89 


201,877 


1,095,318 


558 




1,692,090 


3,589,910 


329 94 


624 12 


4,562,490 


11,231,875 


4,443 




292,576 


544,976 


121 63 


259 17 


1,6(J8,500 


6,076,73(! 


. 2,106 


20 per cent, decrease. 


401,135 


625,637 






2,138,901 
1,232,769 


7,221,201 
4,548,951 


2,725 


10 per cent, increase, 
20 per cent, decrease. 


224,796 


338,844 


"99"50 


295' 90 


1,954 


2,026,330 


5,619,625 


489 48 


765 23 


7,232,618 


23,555,436 


4,177 




134,820 


258,475 


12" 99 


253 00 


1,054,396 


3,882,866 


2,045 




129,100 


196,345 


102 66 


299 76 


1,516,830 


5,213,190 


1,090 




3,780,341 


995,727 


553 95 


893 08 


8,753,619 


23,444,631 


4,837 


5 per cent, decrease. 


360,185 


530,312 


114 55 


257 97 


1,955,737 


7,261,761 


1,628 


30 per cent, increase. 


4,801,538 


8,405,734 






7,809,850 
2,743,116 


24,335,104 


5,124 


5 per cent, increase. 


74i,830 


1,208,940 


135 33 


35i"02 


10,316,721 


3,501 


217,470 


272,040 


33 07 


164 85 


1,992,635 


8,345,355 


1,704 




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126 22 


327 14 


2,203,129 


6,134,461 


2,834 




303,205 


414,071 


83 44 


311 33 


2,195,408 


6,335,477 


2,533 




2,538,833 


4,318,314 


220 28 


534 57 


8,430,801 


24,097,042 


4,525 




229,675 


460,365 


150 38 


30O 10 


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5,991,580 


2,456 




247,021 


383,473 


58 49 


164 50 


1,829,590 


7,104,306 


1,923 


10 per cent, increase. 


210,528 


432,890 


142 91 


278 20 


1,792,825 


6,370,977 


2,434 


20 per cent, decrease. 


f72,377,501 


5162,597,321 






$247,146,331 


$900,765,347 


293,469 





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40 



TABLE No. 4. 

Assessment of Corporations. 



NAMES OF COUNTIES AND COMPANIES. 



ADAMS COUNTY, 
ghackley Wheel Company. 



AliLBN COUNTY. 



Citizens' Street Eailroad, Fort Wayne 

Fort Wayne Organ Company- 

Fort Wayne Gas Light Company 

German Building, Loan & Savings Association 
Ft. W. Germ. Buil., Loan & Sav. Ass., No. 1... 
Ft. W. Germ. Buil., Loan & Sav. Ass., No. 2... 
Ft. W. Germ. Buil., Loan & Sav. Ass., No. 3... 

Summit City Build., Loan & Sav. Ass 

Germ. Washington Build., Loan & Sav. Ass.... 

Hibernia Building, Loan & Savings Ass 

Railroad Building, Loan & Savings Ass 

Mechanics' Building, Loan & Savings Ass 

Franklin, Building, Loan & Savings Ass 

Citizens' Building, Loan & Savings Ass 

Ft. W. Germ. Buil., Loan & Sav. Ass., No. 4... 
Ft. W. Germ. Buil., Loan & Sav. Ass., No. 5... 
Ft. W. Germ. Buil., Loan & Sav. Ass., No. G... 
Lafayette Ger. Bull., Loan & Sav. Ass 



BARTHOLOMEW COUNTY. 

Columbus Blackman Militarj' Wheel Co.... 
Columbus Gas Light and Coke Company... 

CASS COUNTY. 

Logansport Gas Light and Goke Company. 

CLARKE COUNTY. 



Ohio Falls Hydraulic Manufacturing Co.. 

Ohio Falls Manufacturing Company 

Ohio Falls Car and Locomotive Company. 

Southwestern Car Company 

Jefl'ersonville Gas Company 

Jeffersonville Savings and Loan Ass 



CLAY COUNTY. 

Watson Coal and Mining Co. 

Brazil Block Coal Co 

Lafayette Iron Co 

Otter Creek Block Coal Co.... 
Indiana Coal and Iron Co .... 



CLINTON COUNTY. 
Frankfort Building and Savings Ass., 



DEKALB COUNTY. 

Aubnrn Building, Loan and Savings Ass. 
DELAWARE COUNTY. 



Muncie Buil., Loan Fund & Sav. Ass., No. 1. 
Muncie Buil., Loan Fund & Sav. Ass.. No. 2. 

ELKHART COUNTY. 

Bristol Milling and Manufacturing Co 

Bristol Hydraulic Co 

Manufacturing and Mech. Ass. of Goshen ...., 

Goshen Manufacturing Co , 

Ball & Sage Wagon Co 

Elkhart Furniture and Desk Mfg. Co 

Elkhart Hydraulic Co , 

Elkhart Gas Light and Coke Co 



Amount 
of Capital 
Stock au- 
thorized. 



$50,000 00 



50,000 00 
24,000 00 
150,000 00 
100,000 00 
100,000 00 
100,000 00 
100,000 00 
100,000 00 
100,000 00 
100,000 00 
100,000 00 
100,000 00 
100,000 00 
100,000 00 
100,000 00 
100,000 00 
100,000 00 
100,000 00 



50,000 00 
25,000 00 



300,000 00 
50,000 00 

450,000 00 

250,000 00 
25,000 00 

100,000 00 



150,000 00 

150,000 00 

80,000 00 

50,000 00 

550,000 00 



100,000 00 



100,000 00 
100,000 00 



20,000 00 
50,000 00 

100.000 00 
50,000 00 
60,000 00 
50,000 00 

200,000 00 
50,000 00 



Value of 

Capital 

Stock 

paid up. 



$26,989 69 



11,000 00 
12,000 00 
150,000 00 
10,000 00 
10,000 00 
10,000 00 
10,000 00 

8,200 50 
10,000 00 
10,000 00 
10,000 00 

8.686 00 
10,000 00 

8,820 00 
10,000 00 
10,000 00 
10,000 00 

5,383 00 



14,000 00 
8,137 50 



15,775 00 



10,000 00 



210,000 00 

120,000 00 

21,350 00 

3,398 36 



65,600 00 
60,000 00 
66,000 00 
31,900 00 
55,000 00 



7,000 00 



4,950 00 
4,830 70 



12,000 00 
14,000 00 



18,000 00 
12,960 00 
19,000 00 
30,000 00 
27,000 00 



Amount 

of 
Tangible 
Property, 



14,774 00 
29,000 00 
32,810 00 



18,750 00 
200 00 



16,457 50 



10,000 00 

17,000 00 

238.575 00 

122,900 00 

5,000 00 

40 00 



65,600 00 
14,400 00 
36,062 00 
1,900 00 
20,750 00 



1,365 00 
8,960 00 
11 ,760 00 
20,684 00 
15,200 00 
26,900 00 
27.000 00 



Taxable 
Stock. 



126,989 69 



117,190 00 
10,000 00 
10,000 00 
10,000 00 
10,000 00 

8,200 50 
10,000 00 
10,000 00 
10,000 00 

8,68B 00 
10,000 OO 

8,820 00 
10,000 00 
10,000 00 
10.000 00 

5,383 00 



7,937 50 



1,425 00 



16,350 00 
3,358 36 



45,600 00 
29,938 00 
30,001) 00 
34,250 00 



7,000 00 



4,950 00 
4,830 70 



12,000 00 
12,635 00 



3,800 00 
3,100 00 



Tot'l Tax- 
ables tobe 
placed on 
Tax Dup- 
licate. 



$26,989 69 



14,774 00 
29,600 00 
150,000 00 
10,000 00 
10,000 00 
10,000 00 
10,000 00 

8,206 50 
10,000 00 
](),0(.)0 00 
10,000 00 

8,680 00 
10,000 00 

8,820 00 
10,000 00 
10,000 00 
10,000 00 

5,383 00 



18,750 00 
8,137 50 



16,457 50 



10,000 00 
17,000 00 
240,000 00 
122,900 00 
21,350 00 
3,398 36 



65,600 00 
60,000 00 
66,000 00 
31,900 00 
55,000 00 



7,000 00 



4,950 00 
4,830 70 



12,000 00 
14,000 00 
8,950 09 
18,000 OO 
20,684 00 
19,000 00 
30,000 00 
27,000 00 



41 



TABLE No. 4 — Continued. 



NAMES OF COUNTIES & COMPANIES. 



FLOYD COUNTY. 



Amount | Value of 
of Capital I Capital 
Stock au- Stock 

thorized. paid up. 



C>hio Falls lion Works 

New Albany Woolen Mills 

Star Glass Co 

New Albany Steam Forge Co 

Ledger-Standard Co 

New Albany Hub and Spoke Co 

New Albany Insurance Co 

New Albany Gas Light and Coke Co. 

FRANKLIN COUNTY. 



The Speer Manufacturing Co.. 

Stewart Paper Mill 

Franklin Savings Association. 
German Savings Association... 

JENNINGS COUNTY. 



O. and M. Woolen Mills Co 

Yernon Woolen and Flouring Mills Co. 

JOHNSON COUNTY. 

Joint Stock Agricultural Association.... 



KNOX COUNTY. , 

Agricultural and Mechanical Society.. 
LAPORTE COUNTY. 



Laporte Car Manufacturing Co 

Laporte Chair Manufacturing Co.. 
Laporte Wheel Manufacturing Co. 

Haskell & Barker Car Co 

Laporte Gas Light Co 



MADISON COUNTY. 



Eagle Chair Co 

Michenor's Machine Works. 



$187,650 00 

250,000 00 

200,000 00 

75,000 00 

22,500 00 

50,000 00 

200,000 00 

GO.OOO 00 



80,000 00 
24,000 00 
100,000 00 
30,000 00 



26,000 00 
18,000 00 



40,000 00 



200,000 00 
100,000 00 

50,000 00 
100,000 00 

30,000 00 



20,000 00 
30,000 00 



MARION COUNTY. 



Indianapolis Rolling Mill 

Agricultural, Mech'cal & Horti'tural Ass. 

Indianapolis Car Co , 

Indianapolis Sentinel Co 

Indianapolis Journal Co 

Indianapolis Malleable Iron Works 

Indianapolis Chair Co 

Indianapolis Cotton Mills Co 

Sinker, Davis & Co 

Shaw & Lippincott 

Eagle Machine Works 

Higgins' Bentwood School Furniture Co... 

Gatling Gun Co 

Water Works of Indianapolis , 

Ind'polis Manuf rers' & Carpentere' Union 

Indianapolis Cement Pipe Co 

Franklin Fire Insurance Co 

Buildei's' and Manufacturers' Association 
Ind'polis Steam Lumber & Seasoning Co... 

-•=Woodburn Sarven Wheel Co 

Citizens' Street Railway Co 

Indianapolis Printing and Publishing Co., 

Greenkaf Manufacturing Co 

Ind'polis Wagon and Agricultural Work's. 
Indianpaolis Gas Light Co 



Amount 

of 
Tangible 
Property. 



840,850 00 
10,000 00 



600,000 00 

33,075 00 
500,000 00 
100,000 00 
200,000 00 
100,000 00 

75,000 00 
150,900 00 
200,000 00 
100,000 00 

73,000 00 
100,000 00 
250,000 00 
500,000 00 

75,000 00 

30,000 00 
500,000 00 
200,000 00 

30,000 00 
250,000 00 
500,000 00 

50,000 00 
150,000 00 
100,000 00 
350,000 00 



60,000 00 
60,000 00 



80,000 00 

24,000 00 

14,127 45 

5,527 50 



8,667 .30 
17,600 00 



1,000 00 



21,725 00 
20,000 00 
21,000 00 
100,000 00 
14,500 00 



9,000 00 
7,500 00 



300,000 00 
27,485 00 
500,000 00 
100,000 00 
155,000 00 
20,000 00 
.48,200 00 



$140,520 00 

169,200 00 

104,245 00 

34,095 00 

10,000 00 

36,830 00 

1,780 00 

60,000 00 



38,000 00 
38,000 00 



200,900 00 

100,000 00 

109,500 00 

20,000 00 

50,000 00 

100,000 00 

75,000 00 

30,000 00 

54,000 00 

182,733 33 

30,000 00 

250,000 00 



15,000 00 

150,000 00 

7,610 33 

600,000 00 



Taxable 

Stock. 



8,625 00 
5,632 00 



4,000 00 



5,800 00 



20,000 00 
20,000 00 
30,000 00 
76,550 00 
475 00 



8,135 00 
7,375 00 



172,910 00 
48,700 00 

489,600 00 
75,000 00 

115,000 00 
18,367 00 
44,936 44 
50,000 00 
91,882 00 
71,582 37 
50,000 00 



500 00 

100,000 00 

55,410 00 

13,900 00 

22,700 00 

80,400 00 

30,000 00 

161,500 00 

62.000 00 

15,000 00 

34,400 00 

58,500 00 

463,000 00 



Tot'l Tax- 
ables to be 
placed on 
Tax Dup- 
licate. 



3,755 00 



58,220 00 



42,000 00 



14,127 45 
5,527 50 



42 30 

11,968 00 



1,725 00 



23,450 00 
14,025 00 



865 00 
125 00 



127,090 00 



10,400 00 

25,000 00 

40,000 00 

1,633 00 

3,263 56 



108,118 00 
28,417 63 
59,500 00 
20,000 00 
49,500 00 



19,590 00 

16,100 00 

31,300 00 

102,333 33 



115,600 GO 
'i37',000 00 



140,520 00 
169,200 00 
104,24.5 00 
40,850 00 
10,000 00 
36,830 00 
60,000 00 
60,000 00 



80,000 00 
38,000 00 
14,127 45 
5,527 50 



8,667 30 
17,600 00 



4,000 00 



21,725 00 
20,000 00 
30,000 00 
100,000 00 
14,500 00 



9,000 00 
7,500 00 



300,000 00 

48,700 00 

500 000 00 

100,000 00 

155,000 00 

20,000 00 

48,200 00 

50,000 00 

200,000 00 

100,000 00 

109,500 00 

20,000 00 

50,000 00 

100,000 00 

75,000 Oo 

30,000 00 

54.000 00 

182,733 33 

30,000 00 

161,500 00 

62,000 00 

15,000 00 

150,000 00 

58,500 00 

600,000 00 



-This company has $88,500 tangible property taxable in other States, additional to the amount 
stated above, making a total of $2^,000. 



42 



TABLE No. 4— Continued. 



NAMES OF COUNTIES & COMPANIES. 



MARTIN COUNTY: 
Sout ern Indiana Coal and Iron Co.... 

MONKOE COUNTY. 
Peoples' B'l'd'g Loan Fund & Savings Ass 

NOBLE COUNTY. 
Kendallville Circle Co 

PERRY COUNTY. 

American Canal C al Co 

Cliairmakers' Union 

Cabiuel makers' Union 

Cannelton Paper Mill Oo 

Tell City Furniture Co 

Indiana Cotton Mill Co 

Tell City Planing Mill Co 

SHELBY COUNTY. 

Manufacturers' and Builders' Association 

ST. JOSEPH COUNTY. 

South Bend Ftirniture Manufacturing Co 

South Bend Woolen Co 

South Bend Gas Co , 

South B.nd Iron Wo ks 

T. M. Biswell Manufacturing Co 

Studebakers Bros. Manuiacturing Co 

Birdcall Manufacturing Co 

Huey Chair Co 

Walworth & Lawton Manufacturing Oo... 

Variety Bracket Works 

Eagle Manufacturing Co 

Odd Fellows' Hall Association 

Knoblock Bros. Manufacturing Co 

Union Cabinet Manufacturing Co 

St. Joseph Manufacturing Co 

Milburn Wagon Co 

Andrews' School Furniture Co 

Mishawaka Furnitura Co 

SWITZERLAND COUNTY. 

Union Furniture Co 

VANDERBURGH COUNTY. 



■Co.. 



Ev Misville Cotton Manufacturins 

Kvansville Street Railroad Co , 

Evansville Gas Light Co •■ 

Evansville, Cairo & Memphis Packet Co., 

Evansville & New Orleans Packet Co 

Evansville Rolling Mill Co 



VIGO COUNTY. 

Terre Haute Street Railroad Co. 

Terre Haute Wa.er Works 

Terre Haute Gas Co 



WAYNE COUNTY. 

Cambridge Ciiy Agricultural Association 

Cambridge Manufacturing Co 

Clieney L' wistou & Co 

Ezra Smith & Co 

itaar, Scott & Co 

Hoosier Drill Co 



Amount 

of 

Capital 

Stock 

Aut r'zd. 



$250,000 00 

100,000 00 

8,000 00 



176,600 00 
3,000 00 
18,000 00 
22,000 00 
38,000 00 
750,000 00 
2,000 00 



25,000 00 



25,000 00 
40,000 00 
50,000 00 
100,00(' 00 
10,000 00 
75,000 00 
50,000 00 
30,000 00 
10,000 00 
10,000 00 
35,0(10 00 
9,725 00 
75,000 00 
35,500 00 
100,000 00 
300,000 0(1 
50,000 00 
60,000 (lO 



30,000 00 



Unlimited 

70,000 00 

unlimited 

72,000 00 

60,000 00 

300,000 00 



200,000 00 
220,000 00 



10,000 00 
35,000 00 
10,000 00 
60 000 00 

4oo,(ieo uo 

80,000 00 



Value of 

Capital 

Stock 

Paid up. 



8160,000 00 



3,000 00 



70,640 00 
3,000 00 
12,095 00 
22,000 00 
38,000 00 
450,000 00 
2,000 00 



25,000 00 
40,000 00 
41,360 00 

119,700 00 
10,000 00 

425,000 00 
65,000 00 
7,187 00 
10,000 00 
10,000 00 
26,250 00 
9,725 00 
51,350 00 
26,625 00 

100,000 00 

300.000 00 
25,000 00 
60,000 00 



22,500 00 



107,500 00 
31,500 00 

156,530 00 
72,0(30 00 
60,000 00 

150,000 00 



161,040 00 



9,812 50 
19,695 25 
18,087 00 
55,250 00 
400,000 00 
39,300 00 



Amoun of 
Tangible 
Property 



393,918 00 



105,460 00 
4,075 00 
12,095 00 
12,000 00 
4,.5O0 00 
217,000 00 
1,800 00 



12,740 00 



9,650 00 
14.900 00 
21,595 00 
91,610 00 

6,305 00 
211,875 00 
51,005 00 

7,100 00 
11,355 00 

1,000 00 
17,500 00 
10,500 00 
18,205 00 
10,800 00 
5i;,622 00 
262.550 00 
16,750 00 
53,000 00 



19,950 00 



104,500 00 
31,000 00 

150,800 00 
80,000 Of' 
50,000 00 
98,233 64 



11,182 00 
50,000 00 
161,040 00 



5,000 00 

2,350 00 

10,000 00 

45,005 CO 

224,100 00 

4,300 00 



Taxable 
Sto k. 



166,082 00 



14,875 00 



10,000 00 

33,500 00 

233,000 00 

200 00 



15,150 

25,100 

19,7u5 

28,090 

3,695 

213,125 

13,9!i5 

87 



9,000 
8,750 



33,145 
15,825 
43,378 
37,450 
8,250 
7,000 



2,550 00 



3,000 00 

500 00 

5,730 00 



10.000 00 
51,766 36 



4,812 50 
17,345 25 

8,087 00 
10,:i45 00 
175,900 00 
35,000 00 



Tot'lTax- 
ables to be 
placed on 

Tax 
Duplicate 



160,000 00 



14,875 (X) 



4,600 00 



105,460 00 
4,075 00 
12,095 00 
22,000 00 
38,000 00 
450,000 00 
2,000 00 



12,740 00 



,000 00 
,000 00 
,350 00 
,700 00 
,000 00 
000 00 
,000 00 
,187 00 
,355 00 
,000 00 
,250 00 
,.500 00 
,350 00 
,625 OO 
,000 00 
000 00 
,0110 00 
,000 00 



22,500 iKt 



107,500 00 
31,500 00 

156,530 00 
80,000 00 
60,000 00 

150,000 00 



11,182 00 

50.000 00 

161,040 00 



9,812 50 
19,695 25 
18,087 00 
65,250 00 
400,000 00 
39,3C0 00 



43 



TABLE No. 4 — Continued. 



NAMES OF COUNTIES & COMPANIES, 



Amount of 

Capital 

Stock 

Aiithoriz'd 



WAYNE COUNTY— CoNTiNXJED. 



A. N. Hadlcy & Co 

J. M. flutton & Co 

Lancaster, Thompeoa <fe Co 

Nor lyke, Mar^.on & Co 

Kobinson Macli ne Works 

Kic.'imond Malleable Iron Works 

Kiclimonri Fiirnitiire Manufacturing Co... 

Kirhmoiid Industrial Association 

Bayli'S, Vaaghan & Co 

Wayne Agricultural Co 

Biclimond Gas Co 

Cambri ig« City Building Association 

Lyceum Hall Company 

I. 0. 0. 1'. Building Association 



WELLS COUNTY. 

Bluffton BuiMing, Loan & Savings Ass., 
Ossian Building, Loan & Savings Ass..., 



WHITE COUNTY. 

Monticello Loan, Sa,v'gs Fund & Bldg Ass. 
Tippecauoe Loan, Sav'gs Fund & Bldg Ass 

WHITLEY COUNTY. 



Columbia City Bldg, Loan & Savings Ass.. 100,000 00 
German Building, Loan & Savings Ass 100,000 00 



U-i5 

100. 

14 

80, 

I'O 

40. 

30. 
100, 

80. 

loo! 

100, 
40. 



,000 00 
000 00 
,000 00 
,000 00 
,000 00 
,000 00 
,000 00 
,000 00 
,000 00 
000 00 
,000 00 
000 00 
000 00 



100,000 00 
60,000 00 



I'lQ.OOO 00 
50,000 00 



Value of 

Capital 

Stock 

Paid up. 



.'i0,000 00 
100,000 00 
10,500 00 
72,950 00 
76,400 00 
17,400 00 
12,000 00 

7,000 00 
12,000 00 
56,170 0© 
00,500 00 

5,871 00 
25,000 00 
13,500 00 



7,805 26 
8,716 60 



2,000 00 
22,400 00 



7,000 00 
7,500 00 



Amount of 
Tangible 
Property. 



8i38,000 00 

71,218 00 

10,500 00 

15,868 00 

28,212 53 

13,350 00 

5,700 00 

7,000 00 

12,000 00 

2,900 00 

60,500 00 



15,000 00 
13,500 00 



2,615 00 



10 00 
10 00 



Taxable 

Stoek. 



112,000 00 
28,782 00 



57,082 00 

48,187 47 

4,050 00 

6,300 00 



53,276 00 



5,871 00 
10,000 00 



7,805 26 
6,501 60 



1,990 00 
22,390 00 



7,000 00 
7,500 00 



Tjt'lTax- 
ables to be 
placed on 

Tax 
Duplicate 



$50,000 00 

100,000 00 

10,500 00 

72,950 00 

76,400 00 

17,400 00 

12,000 00 

7,000 00 

12,000 00 

56,176 00 

60,500 00 

5,871 00 

25,000 00 

13,500 00 



7,805 26 
8,716 60 



2,000 00 
22,400 00 



7,000 GO 
7,500 00 



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46 

TABLE 
Combined Abstracts of the Assessment of 



CLASSIFICATION. 


Number 
of 

Acres. 


Value 

of 
Lands. 


Value of 
Improve- 
ments. 


Value 

of 
Lots. 


Value of 
Improve- 
ments. 


Value of 
Personal 
Property. 


No. 

of 

Polls. 


Eeal and personal pro- 
perty and polls 


22,390,866 


1412.760,682 


$78,261,010 


$90,219,823 


872,377,501 


$247,146,331 


263,469 


Western Union & Pa- 
cific & Atlantic Tel- 


* 














































Grand Total 


22,390,866 


8412,760,682 


178,261.010 


190,219,823 


$72,377,501 


f-347,U6.331 


263,469 





Office of Auditor of State, 
Indianapolis, Ind., September 9, 1873. 

Hon. James A. Wildman, Auditor of the State of Indiana : It is 
hereby certified that the foregoing record, from pages No. 1 to No. 
71, inclusive, is the true, full and complete record of the proceed- 
ings of the Board of Equalization, organized under the act entitled 
" An act to provide for a uniform assessment of property, and for 
the collection and return of taxes thereon, approved December 21, 
1872, for the year 1873, and that the same is a full and correct state- 
ment of the rates fixed and finally determined by said Board to be 
added to the assessed value of each class of property in the several 
counties in which an addition was ordered by the Board; and that 
the same is a full and correct statement of the rates fiixed and finally 
determined by said Board to be deducted from the assessed value of 
each class of property in the several counties in which a reduction 
^^as ordered by said Board; and the same is a correct statement 
of the equalization made among the counties, and of the counties 
increased in rates, and of the counties decreased in rates; and the 
same is a correct statement of the assessments made by said Board 
of Equalization. 

(Signed), THOMAS A. HENDRICKS, 

Governor of Indiana, and Chairman of the State Board of Equalization. 

J. C. BURNETT, 

Deputy Auditor of State, and Secretary of the Slate Board of Equalization. 

NoTB.— " Pages 1 to 71, inclueiTe," uaraed in the certificate, are pages of the Becord in the oflSco 
of the Auditor of State. 



47 
No. 6. 
Property in Indiana, for the year 1873. 



KAILROAD TRACK. 


Rolling 
Stock. 


Property of Corporations. 




Miles 

of 
Main. 


Miles 

of 
Side. 


Value 

of 
Main. 


Value 

of 
Side. 


Value 

of 
Lands, 

right 
of way. 


Capital 

Stock 

paid up. 


Tangible 
Property. 


Capital 
Stock 

Assessed. 


I'otal. 




















8900,765,347 
39,279,752 

807,875 
9,614,880 


3,653.84 


424.76 




827,652.621 


$2,479,229 


S54,846 


89,093,056 










649,062 fiO 
8,804,953 00 


168,812 40 
6,585,771 Ot 
















3,029,108 




424.76 






854,846 




3,()53.84 


827,652.621 


82,479,229 


$9,093,056 


89,454,015 60 


86,744,583.41 


§3,029,108 


8950,467,854 



Office of Auditoe of State, 
Indianapolis, Ind., September 9, 1873. 

I, James A. Wildman, Auditor of the State of Indiana, hereby 
certify that the within and foregoing is a true copy of the returns 
of the equalization and assessments made by the State Board of 
Equalization of Indiana for the year 1873, as certified to me by 
the President and Secretary of said Board, on the 9th day of Sep- 
tember, 1873. 

Witness my hand and seal, this 9th day of September, 1873. 

JAMES A. WILDMAN, 

Auditor of State. 



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ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



TREASURER OF STATE 



OF 



THE STATE OF INDIANA. 



FOR THE YEAE ENDING OCTOBER 31, 1873. 



TO THE a-0"VEI?.ljTOI?.. 



INDIANAPOLIS : 

SENTINEL COMPANY, PEINTERS, 
1873. 

Doc. J.— T. S. R.— 1 



Office of Treasurer of- State, 
Indianapolis, Nov., 1, 1873. 

Hon. Thomas A. HENi>RiCKri, Governor: 

Sir: — In obedience to the requirements of law, 1 have the honor 
to transmit, herewith, the following report of the receipts and dis- 
bursements of this department for the fiscal year ending October 
31,1873: 

Balance in the Treasury November 1,1872 $ 763,356 37 

Receipts during the fiscal year 3,545,608 15 



S4,308,9§4 52 
Disbursements during fiscal year S4,123,789 05 



Balance in Treasury, November 1, 1878 ^ 185,175 47 



Statements in detail of above report, and also a general balance 
sheet of the ledger of this department will appear in the following 
pages. 

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

JOHN B. GLOYEE, 

Treasurer of State, 



REPORT 



STATE DEBT. 

The condition of the public debt of the State at the date of this 
report is as follows : 

FOREIGN DEBT. 

Five per cent, stock outstanding $ 26,969 99 

Two and one-half per cent, stock outstanding 4,060 13 

Six per cent. War Loan Bonds 139,000 00 

Seven per cent. Temporary Loan Bonds, due 1876 510,000 00 

Eight per cent Temporary Loan Bonds, due 1875 200,000 00 

Internal Improvement Bonds 114,000 00 



§ 994.030 12 



DOMESTIC DEBT. 



Six per cent, non-negotiable bonds due the School 

Fund $3,904,783 22 



Total debt $4,898,813 34 



SALE OF FORFEITED LAJfDS. 



In pursuance of an act of the General Assembly "to consolidate 
certain mortgage loans, forfeitures, bills receivable and other debts 
and accounts due the School Fund into one non-negotiable bond, and 
making other provisions in relation tKereto/' approved March 11, 



6 

1873, the following balances standing to the credit of the several 
named funds on the books of this department were tmnsferred to 
and became a part of the General Fund : 

Saline Fund $ 4^431 45 

Swamp lands 38,077 59 

Bank Tax Fund 1,347 94 

Estates without heirs 17,066 55 

Total 160,923 53 

To this amount should be added the remaining assets of the 

Sinkiug Fund, amounting to fll2,666 54 

Saline Fund loans 1,780 00 

Bank Tax Fund loans , 397 00 

Amounting in the aggregate to one hundred and seventy-five 
thousand seven hundred and sixty-seven dollars and seven cents, for 
which sum a non-negotiable bond was issued on the 3d day of May, 
payable to the Common School Fund of the State of Indiana. 

By virtue oi this transfer and consolidation all the books and 
papers of the Sinking Fund were turned over to this office, and all 
its assets became the property of the State, and whatever shall be 
realized therefrom will be passed to the credit of the General Fund. 
Included in those assets were certain forfeitures of lands, mort- 
gaged to the Sinking Fund and current loans, amounting to 
twenty-one thousand and twenty-four dollars and forty-eight 
cents, which were directed in the above recited act to be sold on 
such terms, in such manner and at such times, not later than Janu- 
ary 1, 1874, as the Governor, Treasurer and Auditor of State 
should deem for the public interest. Accordingly, the officers above 
named directed that the Treasurer of State should advertise that the 
forfeited lands situated in Jeffisrson county would be sold by him at 
public sale, in the city of Madison, on the 4th day of November, 
1873; that the lands in Pulaski county would, in like manner, be 
sold at Winamac, on the 7th day of November, 1873; and the 
remaining lands situated in the counties of Brown, Jasper, Mar- 
shall, Porter, Knox, St. Joseph and Tippecanoe would be sold at 
the office of the Treasurer of State, on November 11, 1873; to be 
sold for one-third cash in hand, one-third in one year and one-third 
in two years from date, deferred payments to be secured by notes 
bearing six per cent, interest, with good freehold security. 



Advertisements have been duly made in accordance with above 
instructions, and at the specified times the Treasurer of State will 
attend to the sales and make due conveyance to purchasers as 
directed by law. 

OLD CLAIMS ON ACCOUNT OF PUBLIC PRINTING. 

During the present fiscal year, the sum of nine hundred dollars 
and twenty-five cents has been paid into the Treasury and credited 
to the " Public Printing/' account. 

This amount was collected on notes taken by the lat€ Attorney 
General Hanna in settlement with A. H. Conner, late State 
Printer, and placed in the hands of the Treasurer of State. 

There are yet remaining unpaid of those notes §13,262.82, not 
including interest. Two of the notes are overdue, the principal 
amounting to ^1,520, which have been placed in the hands of the 
Attorney General for collection. 

auditor's and treasurer's OFFICE FUNDS. 

I deem it proper to remark that there is included in the amount 
charged to "Auditor's office," the sum of $2,829.25, which was 
paid Hon. John C. Shoemaker, late Auditor of State, on account of 
an appropriation made to him by the Legislature at its last session., 
And the sum of |1,861.10 is included in the amount charged to 
"Treasurer's office," which was paid Hon. James B. Ryan, lat€ 
Treasurer of State, by virtue of a similar appropriation. 



STATEMENT, 



Shoioing the receipts and disbursements on account of the several funds 
for the fiscal year commencing the \st day of November, 1872, and 
ending the Zlst day of October, 1873. 



RECEIPTS. 

From balance in Treasury November 1, 1872 % 763,356 37 

From Swamp Lands 3,299 82 

From College Fund, principal 5 314 10 

From College Fund, interest *. 6,304 98 

From College Fund, damages 51 25 

From College Fand, costs 42 00 

From College Fund, excess of sales 935 92 

From Saline Fund, principal 880 00 

From Saline Fund, interest 237 47 

From Saline Fund, damages 55 00 

From Saline Fund, costs 24 00 

From Saline Fund, excess of sales 839 38 

From Bank Tax Fund, principal 379 00 

From Bank Tax Fund, interest 4 49 

From Bank Tax Fund, costs 6 00 

From vSurplus Revenue Fund, principal 700 00 

From Surplus Revenue Fund, interest 17 50 

From Surplus Revenue Fund, costs 9 00 

From Estates without heirs 4,198 23 

From Common School Fund 113,921 00 

From School Fund Interest 115,460 31 

From Unclaimed Fees 6,041 52 

From Liquor Licenses 50,062 50 

From Delinquent School Tax, 1871 109,590 69 

From School Tax, 1872 971,009 98 



From Docket Fees, Circuit Court $9,338 67 

From Docket Fees, Supreme Court 3,416 00 

From Military Fund 175 52 

From Insane Hospital 16,323 00 

From Deaf and Dumb Institution 3,058 45 

From Blind Asylum 2,055 92 

From State Prison, South 76,716 88 

From State Prison, North 67,993 82 

From House of Refuge 24,455 52 

From GeneralFund 776,902 40 

From Contingent Fund 71 00 

From Public Printing.... 900 25 

From Delinquent Sinking Fund Tax, 1870 2,808 27 

From Delinquent Revenue, 1871 , 39,451 93 

From Revenue of 1872 373,373 16 

From School Tax, 1861 6,572 32 

From Delinquent School Tax, 1860 334 98 

From University Lands 3,474 81 

From Temporary Loan 707,948 05 

From Excess of Bids, Sinking Fund 2,733 26 

From Insurance Tax, 1873 17,552 62 

From Delinquent Revenue, 1872 22,557 78 

From Agricultural College 9 40 



$4,308,964 52 

DISBUESEMENT8. 

For Swamp Lands $41,088 05 

For College Fund, principal 2,640 97 

For College Fund, interest 11 98 

For College Fund, costs 66 00 

For College Fund, excess of sales 114 15 

For College Fund, expense 630 32 

For Saline Fund, principal 5,947 26 

For Saline Fund, costs 24 00 

For Saline Fund, damages 55 00 

For Saline Fund, interest 237 47 

For Saline Fund, excess of sales 839 38 

For Bank Tax Fund, principal 1,726 94 

For Bank Tax Fund, interest 4 49 



IQ 

For Bank Tax Fund, costs $6 QG 

For Surplus Revenue Fund, costs 6 00 

For Tippecanoe Battle Ground 11,930 10 

For Estates without heirs 17,114 40 

For School Distribution 1,369,311 18 

For School Fund, interest 344 59 

For School Tax, 1872 9 15 

For War Loan Bonds, interest 8,340 00 

For Military Fund 385 42 

For Free Banking 2,304 16 

For Insane Hospital... 209,339 47 

For Deaf and Dumb Institution 70,584 57 

For Blind Asylum 38,674 29 

For State House 27,594 64 

For State Library 718 00 

For State Prison, South 95,769 08 

For State Prison, North 81,216 26 

For State Board of Education 847 85 

For Soldiers' Home 33,977 98 

For House of Refuge 68,203 72 

For Agricultural Premiums 1,500 00 

For General Fund 23,095 33 

For Contingent Fund 1,357 78 

For Sheriff's mileage. 10,764 55 

For Judiciary 97,510 94 

For Prosecuting Attorneys 14,334 53 

For Executive 29,137 34 

For Expenses of Supreme Court , 14,752 12 

For Law Library 516 75 

For Secretary's Office 750 00 

For Auditor's Office.' 3,850 08 

For Treasurer's Office 2,499 98 

For Attorney General's Office 916 66 

For Quartermaster General's Pay 300 00 

For Governor's Office 4,574 39 

For Adjutant General's Pay 941 18 

For Superintendent's Traveling expenses 600 00 

For Superintendent's Office 1,027 91 

For Public Printing 57,328 39 

For Professors' Salaries 7,500 00 

For Legislative 199,563 32 



11 

IB^or Distribution of Laws |1,089 20 

For Specific Appropriations 78,810 42 

For Salary of Agent of State 902 78 

For Indiana Reports 12,098 88 

For Presidential Election 1,517 20 

For Telegraphing 153 07 

For State University 45,000 00 

For Female Prison 50,991 37 

For State Normal School 10,117 43 

For Geological Survey 8,000 00 

For State Debt Sinking Fund 603,221 08 

For Erroneous Appraisement of 1869 89,271 47 

Expense of State Debt, Sinking Fund 161 11 

For Interest Common School Fund Bonds 113,921 00 

For Delinquent Revenue, 1871, refunded 233 00 

Revenue of 1872, refunded 30,477 66 

For Agricultural College 31,445 10 

For Governor's House 5,164 40 

For Internal Improvement Bonds, principal 77,000 00 

For Internal Improvement Bonds, interest 361,184 24 

For Internal Improvement Bonds, expenses 1,078 83 

For State Debt 1,783 33 

For State House and State offices 6,144 30 

For Vienna Exposition 3,000 00 

For Governor's Private Secretary 716 50 

For State Board of Equalization 696 00 

For Temporary Loan, interest 25,850 00 

For Purchase of Acts 25 00 

For State Horticultural Society 175 00 

For Revenue of 1870, refunded 176 56 

For Expense of Calumet Dam 500 00 

$4,123,789 05 

Balance in Treasury November 1, 1873 185,175 47 



$4,308,964 52 



12 

AN ABSTRACT of the receipts and disbursements for each month 
of the fiscal year ending October 31, 1873. 

EECEIPTS. 

1872, November 1, Balance in Treasury $763,356 37 

" November $64,746 80 

" December 663,345 76 

1873, January , 24,553 20 

'' February 137,11153 

" March 234,498 62 

" April 194,079 54 

" May 1,390,704 32 

" June 409,848 03 

" July 227,473 84 

" August 121,186 17 

" September.... 35,628 34 

" October... 42,432 00 

-$3,545,608 15 

4,308,964 52 



DISBUESEMENTS. 

1872, November $130,807 94 

" December 807,305 25 

1873, January 125,174 09 

" February 419,883 48 

" March.! 157,445 02 

" April 227,013 29 

" May 851,67734 

" June 949,696 41 

" July 129,801 62 

" August 47,075 Q6 

September 139,109 33 

" October 138,799 62 

—$4,123,789 05 

Balance in Treasury Nov. 1, 1873 185,175 47 

$4,308,964 52 



GENERAL BALANCE SHEET, 1873. 



DEBITS. 

November 1, 1872. 

To balance cash OD hand $763,356 37 

To balance College Fundj principal 1,602 58 

To balance Common School Fund 40,359 96 

To balance Suspended Debt 61,226 05 

October 31, 1873. 

To balance Swamp Lands...... $415 59 

To balance Surplus Revenue 2,007 52 

To balance Three per cent. Fund 32 13 

To balance Estates without heirs 4,150 38 

To balance Circuit Court Docket Fees 9,338 67 

To balance Supreme Court Docket Fees 1,416 00 

To balance General Fund 753,807 07 

To balance Delinquent Sinking Fund Tax, 1870 2,808 27 

To balance Delinquent Revenue, 1871 39,218 93 

To balance Revenue, 1872... 342,895 50 

To balance Delinquent Revenue, 1872 22,557 78 

To balance Temporary Loan...., 707,948 05 

To balance Excess of Bids, Sinking Fund 2,733 26 

To balance Insurance Tax, 1873 , 17,552 62 

To balance College Fund, principal , 3,557 06 

$2,776,983 79 



14 

CREDITS. 

November 1, 1872. 

By balance Swamp Lands $38,203 82 

By balance Saline Fund 5,067 2(> 

By balance Bank Tas Fund 1,347 94 

By balance Surplus Revenue — 1,287 02 

By balance Three per cent. Fund 32 13 

By balance Estates without heirs 17,066 55 

By balance State Debt Sinking Fund 603,221 08 

October 31, IS 73. 

By balance Suspended Debt $61,226 05 

By balance Tippecanoe Battle Ground 11,930 10 

By balance War Loan Bonds, interest 8,340 00 

By balance Military Fund 209 90 

By balance Free Banking 2,304 16 

By balance Insane Hospital 193,016 47 

By balance Deaf and Dumb Institution 67,526 12 

By balance Blind Asylum 36,618 37 

By balance State House 27,594 64 

By balance State Library 718 00 

By balaace State Prison, North 13,222 44 

By balance State Prison, South 1 9,052 20 

By balance State Board of Education 847 85 

By balance Soldiers' Home 33,977 98 

By balance House of Pwefuge 43,748 20 

By balance Agricultural Premuims . ] ,500 00 

By balance Contingent Fund 1,286 78 

By balance SherilTs' Mileage 1 0,764 55 

By balance Judiciary... 97,510 94 

By balance Prosecuting Attorneys 14,334 53 

By balance Executive 29,137 34 

By balance Expenses Supreme Court 14,752 12 

By balance Law Library 516 75 

By balance Secretary's Office 750 00 

By balance Auditor's Office 3,850 08 

By balance Treasurer's Office 2,499 98 

By balance Attorney General's Office 916 66 

By balance Quartermaster General's Pay 300 00 



16 

By balance Governor's Office 4,574 39 

By balance Adjutant General's Pay 941 18 

By balance Superintendent's Traveling Expenses 600 00 

By balance Superintendent's Office 1,027 91 

By balance Public Printing..... 56,428 14 

By balance Legislative 199,563 32 

By balance distribution of Laws 1,089 20 

By balance Specific Appropriations 78,810 42 

By balance Salary of Agent of State 902 78 

By balance Indiana Keports 12,098 88 

By balance Presidential Election 1,517 20 

By balance Telegraphing 153 07 

By balance State University 45,000 00 

By balance Female Prison 50,991 37 

By balance State Normal School 10,117 43 

By balance Geological Survey 8,000 00 

By balance Purchase of Laws 25 00 

By balance Erroneous Appraisement of 1869 89,271 47 

By balance Expense State Debt Sinking Fund 161 11 

By balance Interest Common School Fund Bonds 113,921 00 

By balance Agricultural College.... 31,435 70 

By balance Revenue of 1870 176 56 

By balance Expense of Calumet Dam 500 00 

By balance Governor's House , 5,164 40 

By balance Internal Improvement Bonds, principal... 77,000 00 

By balance Internal Improvement Bonds, interest 361,184 24 

By balance Internal Improvement Bonds, expense.... 1,078 83 

By balance State Debt 1,783 33 

By balance State House and State Offices 6,144 30 

By balance Vienna Exposition 3,000 00 

By balance Governor's Private Secretary 716 50 

By balance State Board of Equalization 696 00 

By balance State Horticultural Society 175 00 

By balance Temporary Loan Interest 25,850 00 

By balance Common School Fund 37,031 58 

By balance Cash in Treasury 185,175 47 

$2,776,983 79 
All of which is respectfully submitted. 

JOHN B. GLOVER, 

Treasurer of State. 



REPORT 



ATTORNEY GENERAL 



The State of Indiana 



THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1873. 



TG THE O-OVE-RIl^OS,. 



IKBIANAPOLIS : 

SENTINEL COMPANY, PRINTERS. 
1874. 

D, J.— 1 



REPORT. 



Office of Attorney General, 
Indianapolis, January 1, 1874, 

His Excellency, Thomas A. Hendricks, 

Governor of the State of Indiana. 

Siii:_I have the honor to submit to your Excellency the follow- 
ing report : 

TEflM begins — calumet DAM. 

My official term began on the 26th day of November, 1872. On 
the 13th day of the same month the Legislature convened in extra 
session. A large part of my time was occupied in performing duties 
imposed by resolutions of the Senate and Hous • .»f Representatives 
during the continuance of the extra and regular sessions, the two 
covering a period of four months. Full reports were made to those 
bodies of my action, except that imposed by a resolution of the 
Senate passed on the last day of the regular session, requiring Sen- 
ator Wadge and myself to repair to Springfield, Illinois, and pre- 
sent to the Legislature of that State the importance of some decided 
action by that body, which would cause the removal of the feeder dam 
across the Calumei river, at Blue Island, in that State. Th is dam causes 
the overflow of about 75,000 acres of land in Lake and Porter counties, 
in this State, rendering the same valueless. These lands wouhl be- 
come tillable and valuable if this obstruction were out of the river, 
and would be reclaimed by tke owners of the same. We accordingly 
appeared before a committee composed of members of both branches 
of the Illinois Legislature having the matter in charge, and present- 
ed to it the facts and our grievances. A bill was pve.-ented provid- 
ing compensation to Messrs Pfeiifer & Roll, parties owning a mill at 
Blue Island, and who held a lease from the Commissioners of the 
Illinois and Michigan canal of the water-power afforded by said dam, 
for the loss they would sustain by reason of the removal of it, and 



providing that the dam should be removed. We were assured by 
leading members of both branches of the Legislature that a bill 
wholly relieving our people, from said nuisance, would be passed. 
Subsequently, however, I learned that favorable action had not been 
taken. Consequently the people of the counties above named are 
still suffering fr-.m the nuisance occasioned by the existance of this 
dam. After the dissolution of the injunction which M^as in force 
when I came into office, about seventy feet of the dam were remov- 
ed, and while the remainder was in progress of removal, Pfeiffer & 
Roll obtained another injunction. I then learned that they were 
making preparations to repair it. I at once went to Chicago and 
filed a bill and obtained an injunction in the name of a Mrs. Fair- 
child, restraining them from rebuilding the dam. But before this 
writ was served, partial repairs had already been made, which have 
prevented its destruction by the spring and summer freshets. In the 
proceeding now pending the removal of the dam is prayed for. We 
hope to have a hearing soon, and if successful, will again present the 
matter to the Legislature of Illinois, which meets the present month. 
Prior to the passage of the act of March 10th, 1873, the Attorney 
General of this State was not required to reside or have an office at 
the Capital. Consequently, prior to that time, few holding the of- 
fice of Attorney General have had an office at Indianapolis. No 
record has ever been kept by my predecessors, so far as I iiave been 
able to ascertain, and thereiore it was somewhat difficult for me to 
learn what had been done by them, and the condition of the business 
of the office;' 

PENDING SUITS. 

State vs. John D. Evans,— State vs. Thomas B. McCarty,— 
State vs. Nathan Kimbal. 
I found several suits pending, which had been instituted bv my 
predecessor; some in the courts of Marion countv and some in tlie 
Supreme Court of the State. The case of The State of Indiana on 
the relation of the Attorney General, against John D. Evans (and 
the sureties on his bond) as Auditor of State, was pending in the 
Superior Court of Marion county. Evans died shortlv after I came 
into office, as also one of the sureties on his bond. Their represen- 
tatives were made parties, and the case will come on for trial during 
the January term. There was also a suit against Thomas B. Mc- 
Carty (and his sureties), former Auditor of State, in which a ruling 
had been made in the Superior Court in favor of the State. These ■ 



suits were bronglit to recover interest alleged to liave been received 
by Evans and McCarty on the funds of the State in their hands, 
respectively, while acting as Auditor of State and ex-officio Com- 
missioner of the Sinking Fund. The cfiect of the ruling of the 
Superior court was, that they were liable for the interest received 
by them on said funds. There has been no trial on the merits. 
The ruling was on a demurrer to the complaint. The case against 
McCarty is pending in the Supreme Court on appeal from the 
Superior Court. If the decision of the Superior court be sustained, 
then it will be remanded for trial on the merits. There was also a 
case pending in the Supreme Court that had been brought by my pre- 
decessor against Gen. Nathan Kimball, former Treasurer of State,' 
for interest claimed to have been received by him on money in his 
hands while acting as such Treasurer. In this case there had been 
a ruling bv the Sup.erior Court adverse to the State, and an appeal 
taken to the Supreme Court. These cases are still pending. 



TERRE HAUTE RAIL ROAD CASE. 



There was likewise a case pending in the Putnam Circuit Court, 
commonly known as the Terre Haute Railroad Case. The title of 
the case is, The State of Indiana on the relation of John C. Robin- 
son, Prosecuting Attorney, vs. Th.e Terre Haute and Indianapolis 
Railroad Company, in the nature of a quo loarranto. The information 
charges several violations of the company's charter. At the last 
regular session of the Leoislature a ioiiifc resolution was passed, mak- 
ing it the duty of the Attorney General to take charge of, conduct, 
manage, prosecute, discontinue or dismiss, and otherwise have 
charge ot any and all suits and proceedings against railroad compa- 
nies and other corporations in the nature of a quo loarranto, and to 
;adjust, settle and compromise any claim the State may have against 
.such companies, etc., with this proviso: "That any suit or suits | 
now pending, or whicli may hereafter be brought, shall be dis- 
missed, adjusted, settled or compromised whenever the same shall be 
directed in writing by the Governor and Lieutenant-Governor, and 
'Upon such terms and conditions as they shall direct." Shortly after 
the passage of this resolution an application was made to your Excel- 
lency and the Lieutenant-Governor to direct the dismissal of this 
proceeding, which application was not sanctioned by a dismissal, 
;and I was permitted to prosecute the same. Mr. Robinson^ who 
-was the Prosecuting Attorney at the time this proceeding was insti- 



luted in the Putnam Circuit Court, had em])loyed Judge Solomon 
Claypool and Hon. W. R. Harrison, two able attorneys, to assist him 
in the prosecution of said cause, and who had been engaged with 
hiin in ils prosecution up to the time said resolution was passed. 
Sijice that time they and Mr. Robinson have acted with me in all the 
steps that have been subsequently taken in the case. The company 
changed the venue from Putnam to Owen county; then from Judge 
Franklin. Judge Malott was then called to try the case. At an 
adjourned term of the Owen Circuit Court held in May last, on 
demurrers filed to each separate cause of forfeiture in the complaint. 
Judge Malott sustained the demurrer to the 1st, 2d and 3d, and 
overruled it as to the 4th, 5th and 6th. Court convenes again in 
Owen county on the first Monday in March, when we hope to have 
this case trit d. Judge Hester, of the ninth judicial circuit, has been 
called to try the case. Tiiis is a very important case to the State, in 
my opinion, for the reason that I believe a large amount of money 
is due from this company to the school fund. The State claims that 
her right grows out of the 23d section of the charter of the company, 
pas-ed by the Lgislature in 1847. 

WATER WORKS CASE. 

I also found a suit pending in the Hendricks Circuit Court, in 
which the State was plaintiff and the Indiana Central Canal Com- 
pany was defendant, to recover a parcel of ground 809 by 125 feet 
in the city of Indianapolis, adjoining the Military Reservation. 
This property is said to be worth one hun(ked thousand dollars. 
This case was tried at the April term of that court. The trial lasted 
some. three weeks. A verdict was rendered in favor of the State and 
against the Canal Company, and judgment has since been rendered 
on the verdict, 

MINOR CASES. 

A complaint was filed and judgment obtained against the Clerk 
of Orange county for |1,468.75, being for moneys unclaimed in 
estates and guardianship and unclaimed witness fees due the State. 

A claim was filed against an ex-clerk of Washington county, for 
S2,000 due the State. The statute of limitations was pleaded. The 
cor.rt held that tlie statute does not begin to run as against the State 
until a demand is made. This cause was continued to adjust amount, 
which could be done without further litigation. 

I filed a claim against the estate of an ex-clerk of Johnson county. 



The questions of law arising in the case were argued and submitted 
at the November term of the Johnson Circuit Court. The Judge 
has the matter under advisement. These suits against clerks and 
ex- clerks are all for moneys due the State and Counties on account 
of court docket fees, unclairafd witness fees, fines, forfeitures, etc., 
which were retained by said officers while acting in their official 
capacities. 

SINKING FUND, AND STATE VS. JOHN C. SHOEMAKER, ETC. 

In 1871 the Legislature passed an act requiring the sinking fund 
in the hands of the Auditor of State, to be distributed to the sev- 
eral counties of the State, to be loaned by the auditors and treasu- 
rers of the counties respectively. A suit was instituted in Marion 
county to enjoin the distribution of this fund. The Auditor of 
State, Hon. John C. Shoemaker, was made a defendant. An in- 
junction was granted by the court. The cause was appealed to the 
Supreme Court and the judgment of the court below reversed. The 
effect of the decision was to sustain the act of the Legislature re- 
|ui]'!ng- the money to be distributed. The effect of this litigation 
;vas to retain |636,207.75 in the hands of the Auditor, fr.)m Feb- 
ruary 24, 1871, the greater part of which was not distributed until 
April, 1872, and the balance until October, 1872. I v/as in- 
formed that the Auditor of State had this money deposited in banks, 
upon which interest was paid or agreed to be })aid him. And know- 
ing that the school fund had sustained a loss to the amount of eight 
per cent, interest, whic^i would have accrued had the sum been dis- 
tributed and loaned, two suits were instituted, one upon the injunc- 
tion bond and one againct Mr. Shoen-rAker, individually, to recover 
the interest rfceived. These cases are set for hearing at the Janu- 
ary term, 1874, of the Marion Circuit Court. 

STATE BOARD OF EQUALIZATION 1869. 

The Supreme Court in the case of the State, &c. v. McGinnis, 
&c., 34 Ind., 452, held that the action of the State Board of Equal- 
ization was illegal. They had increased the value of real estate in 
some counties and decreased it in others. Since that decision the 
State has been compelled to refund to the counties the State tax col- 
lected and paid into her treasury, prior to the rendition of that de- 
cision, amounting to about §175,000. There is now due the State 
from counties in which the assessed value of real estate was de- 
creased, the sum of $127,999.03, made up as follows : 



From Allen County ^ 79 20 

" ElkhartCo 6,004 86 

" FloydCo 628 12 

" Fountain Co 5,049 52 

" Johnson Co 18,183 36 

" Knox Co 676 63 

" Lagrange Co 3,442 24 

" Ohio Co 49 11 

" Pike Co 1,251 20 

" Posey Co 4,49128 

" Starke Co 1,259 22 

" Steuben Co 476 84 

From Vanderburgh Co 82,756 00 

" Wells Co 9 57 

" White Co 1,407 4C 

'^ Whitley Co 2,234 48 

$127,999 03 

I attempted to adjust this ma'ter with some of the counties owing 
the largest amounts, but found the county authorities unwillin to 
do so. The amount due from Vanderburg county being largest of 
all, and the County Board unwilling to pay urdess compelled to do 
so, suit was instituted in the Superior Court of Marion county for 
the amount claimed to be due the State. A demurrer was filed to 
the complaint, two causes being assigned : one as to the right of the 
State to recover, and the other as to the jurisdiction of the Court in 
this county over the defendant. The questions raised by the 
demurrer were argued at the November term of the Superior Court, 
Judge Blair holding that the State has a right to recover of the 
defendant, but sustaining the demurrer as to the jurisdiction of said 
court. An appeal has been taken to the General Term of the 
Superior Court. It will be seen by examination of the reports ot 
the Board of Equalization, that if the amou r, claimed cannot be 
collected, those counties in which the reductions were made, will be 
released from their just proportion of the burthens of State taxation. 
Other amounts are also due from railroad companies, which, when 
added to the amounts due by the counties, will approximate the 
amount refunded by the State. Suits are likewise pending in Bar- 
tholomew, Scott, Johnson, and Clark counties to enjoin the collection 
of taxes assessed against the Jefferson ville, Madison and Indianap- 
olis Eailroad Company. An effort is now making to collect this 



tax, and the company has brought suit to enjoin the proper officers 
from collecting it. A suit will be brought in Marion county against " 
this company to recover the amount of State tax due, which will 
test the question and save litigation in the several counties through 
which this road passes, and the legal questions arising as to this and 
other railroad companies can be fully tested in this one case. 

OTHER SUITS. 

Other suits have been brought in different parts of the State, but 
as they embrace the same questions as those mentioned, are not 
deemed of sufficient public interest to mention in this report. When 
finally determined, proper report of each will be made. 

clerk's reports of fines and forfeitures. 

The act of March 10th, 1873, referred to in the first part of this 
report, further defining the duties of the Attorney General, etc, re- 
quires the clerks of the Circuit Courts of the several counties to 
make report to the Attorney General within ten days after the ex- 
piration of each term of Court, of all fines assessed and forfeiture of 
recognizances entered at such term. A majority of the clerks in the 
State have been prompt in making these reports, while others have 
been somewhat negligent, and a few have failed to report at all. I 
made report by counties to the Secretary of State of these statistics 
on the first day of November, as required by law; and subsequently 
on the 7th day of the same month, made a supplemental report to 
that officer, giving him all the information received up to that date. 
Other reports have since been received for the November term, 1873, 
of the courts. These reports show an aggregate amount of fines as- 
sessed at the various terms of the Circuit Courts in the State, since 
the taking effect of the act referred to, of $27,072.36 fines assessed, 
and $32,480 forfeited recognizances entered. 

ACT OF MARCH 10, 1873 — DOCKET PEES, FINES^ UNCLAIMED 
WITNESS FEES, ETC. ^ 

Another feature of the act of March 10, 1873, requires attention. 
By this statute is made the duty of the Attorney General "to ascer- 
tain from time to time the amounts paid to public officers of the 
State, county officers, or other persons, for unclaimed witness fees, 
court docket fees, license, money unclaimed in estates or guardian- 
ships, fines and forfeitures, or moneys that escheat to the State for 



9 

want of heirs, or from any other source where the same is by any 
law required to be paid to the State, or any officer in trust for the 
State," it is made the duty of the Attorney General to recover the 
same for the State. Altliough the collections from such sources have 
thus far hardly met ray expectations, partly owing to the failure to 
get the work of investigation thoroughly done in some of the coun- 
ties, and partly to the fact that many officers and ex-officers have, 
since the passage of said act, paid over to the county treasuries large 
sums of money heretofore withheld by them, yet the State and 
county treasuries will have been augmented, I think, when the v^ork 
is finally completed, by the addition of near $75,000, The total col- 
lections made by me up to and including December 31, 1873, is ^43,- 
710.94, as follows: 

On account of fines ,.....|;12,019 03 

On account of circuit court docket fees 9,855 09 

On account of common pleas court docket fees.... — . — 3,285 25 

On account of moneys unclaimed in estates G,97o 54 

On account of unclaimed witness fees.... 10,964 09 

On accouct of jury fees. 651 33 

$43,710 94 

Besides the above, near $4,000, being in notes and county orders, 
have been collected, of which no itemised report has yet been made 
to me, the work not having been completed in the counties in which 
the said amount was collected. Owing to the closeness of money 
matters, collections for the past three. months have been very small. 

UNCLAIMED BALANCES IN ESTATES. 

It has never been the practice heretofore to make any report oi 
the names of decedents, on account of whose estates moneys have 
been paid into, and are now in, tiie State Treasury, duM and owing 
to unknown heirs. I have therefore thought proper to give the 

names of all decedents on account oi wliose estates moneys have 
been by me collected and paid into the State Treasury, with the 
amounts. In many instances the amounts are very small, and the 
total amount collected on this account is comparatively small; but, 
nevertheless, it seems but just that the unknown heirs should be 
furnished with some means of ascertaining that there is money due 
them, to recover which it is only necessary for them to prove their 
heirship in some court of record. The following is the list, the 
names of the counties in which collected being first given : 



10 

Brown county — James P. Cooufield, $5.60 ; George Barkhardt, 
$20.00. 

Cass county — Lambert Bonean, $33.19 ; Jonathan W. Bough- 
ton, $29.00 ; William T. Shaffer, $43.00 ; John W. Coin, $7.00 ; 
Chauncey Ward, $3.95 ; Philip Keever, $82.60 ; Elam Jones, 91c. ; 
Joseph Henderson, $1.09 ; Ruth Corbit, $9.30; Benjamin Autrine, 
85c. ; Charles Townsend, $70.09 ; Henry Miller, $34.83 ; Richard 
Brown, $4.62 ; Thomas Vernon, $2.82 ; Minor Saxon, $9.76 ; 
George Hamilton, $5.00. 

Clay county— David Mosteller, $31.25; Henry Crist, $7.12; 
Matthew Jenkin, $91.32; V. T. Stewart, $9.10. 

Fayette county — Daniel Murphy, $62.34. 

Floyd county — Julius Teschemaker, $22.03 ; Michael Schwartz, 
$12.46; for Jacob Tucker (a minor), $6.23; Theresa Rape, $8.22; 
Nancy Brown, $2.70 ; William Rossman, $31.72 ; David Edward, 
$45.80; Christian Munns, $21.20; Elizabeth Harmond, $5.47; 
Lawson Very, $10.12; William Budd, $8.55; Isaac N. Akin, 
$21 65 ; James T. Duncan, $6 90; for Madaline Heiring (a minor), 
$4.30; V.Grostephan, $167.00; Lewis Holli§, $32.86 ; D.P.Porter, 
$165.45 ; Mary Eddleraan, $3.75. 

Franklin county — Jacob Hedrick, $25.75 ; Anna Skinner, $3.96 ; 
Eli Stringer, $23.85; James Bartlow, $27.93; Catharine Key, 
$9.71; Argus Newhiney, $38.29; Cromwell Brundriff, $25.25; 
Lewis Launing, $10.50; John Butz, 49.42; Mary Terry, $18.76 ; 
Elizabeth Hancel, $5.92 ; Abraham Cartel-, $6.30 ; Elizabeth Shil- 
lingsford, $62.06; Elizabeth Linville, $39 53; William R. Simpson, 
$7.09 ; Eliza Lattimore, $152.59 ; for William SeeieVj $9.83 ; for 
Louisu, Socley, $9.83 ; for Mary E. Seeley, $9.83; for Plannah Gule, 
$9.83; William Terry, $12.89; Jans Sofer, $12.89. 

Ilamilion county— George West, $65.19; Lewis BrowH, $7.42. 

Hancock county— J. H. Bartlow, $1,213.55. 

Lagrange county — Newell D. Hariland, $60.86. 

Orange county — Henry Magner. $5.20; James White, $5.17 ; 
Simon Denny, $7.98; William A. Self, 75 cents; John Hallowell, 
70 cents; Arthur Massey, $5.42; Moses Trimbley, $1.50; Daniel 
Lindley, sr., $8 00; Jeremiah Reynolds, $52.18; Thomas Maxe- 
don, $4.20; Samuel Lynn, $4.54; Juda Kenley, $56.93; John 
Williams, $18.97; Amariah Regney, $7.70; John Reynolds, 
$154.56; Wesley Jones, $1.00; John B. Lomax, $2.83; John 
Brown, $2.54; J. McBride, $69.85 ; Henry AVestfall, $39.27; Ta- 
mar Reynolds, $4.83; Elizabeth Hallowell, $8.20; John M. Lemis^ 



11 

$73.38; Isaac Scott, |3.25; Joseph Roberts, $5.00; Polly Gallo- 
way, $48.68 ; Grafton Wheeler, $9 00; Isaac Chasten, $4.91 ; Mo- 
ses T. Ficklen, $33.16; Henry Hall, $54.76^; Robert True, $42.76; 
William Curry, $24; A. H. Forrester, $44.90; James Beasley, $4.80; 
Esek Ross, $25.20; John Sevedge, $40.32; Hugh Atkinson, 
$56.91; Mary A. Bishop, $22.11; John Felkner, $3.80; Sarah 
Coleman, $3.80; David F. Porter, $8.75; William Bennett, $2.00; 
Hiram Kerr, $15.73; Elias Roberts, $9.63; John Mills, $26.75; 
John S. Gifford, $27.96; William Bennett, $11.25; Samuel Hack- 
ney $5.00; D. Sappen'neld, $4 85; John Mahan, $6.38; John 
Midifer, $19,38; Thomas Carr, $18.80; Sarah Wood, $1.00; Sa- 
foit vs. Jeffreys et al. in partition, $50.10. 

Porter county— Miron H. Clark, $237.16. 

Tippecanoe county — David P. Harvey, $24.69; Jonatha Bab- 
cock, $7.55; John Obenchain, $4.34; John Johnson, $15.57; Ma- 
tilda Hoover, $101.27 ; George L. Hunter, $209.95; Isaac Stryker, 
$25.09 ; Noah Washburn, $7.55 ; Greenberry Shoot, $39.39 ; Reese 
Thompson, ef)45.16. 

Warren county — Catharine Isley, $25.54^ Geo. Murphy, $5.60 ; 
EliPritehetfc., $22.70; Jacob Murphy, $17.05 ; James T. Crawford, 
$51.24; Charles J. Wamsley, $108.80; Wm. Lawrence $40.25. 

CLAY COUNTY LAND. 

The State owned one undivided third of forty acres of land in 
Clay county, near the town of Brazil, which had been conveyed to 
the State by John P. Dinir, in paymeiic of a claim held by the State 
against birn. The other t^'o tliiniB was .owned by Messrs. Root 
and Ivuijiht. Tiiey dfsired to subdivide the land as an addlLion to 
the iuv/n of Brazil, and after advising with your Excellency, it v.-as 
thonght advisable to have the sauie sold. A petition was filed pray- 
ing tor partition. The court found that it could not be divided, and 
entered a decree directing the sale of same at public auction. It was 
sold for $3,333.33 the proceeds collected by me and paid into the 
State Treasury. 

The money collected by me from time to time was at once depos- 
ited in bank, and so remained until the times arrived to report the 
same — sometimes for a few days, and at times small amounts Avould 
thus remain for weeks. On these deposits I have been allov/ed in- 
terest, and the sum of $55.18 thus accrued I will account f)r in my 
report to the Treasurer of State at the end of the present month. 



12 



INDIA XA ^YAR CLAIMS. 



Since preparing the above, in company with your Excellency and 
the otlier officers of State, I visited Washington for the purpose of 
hooking after the interests of the State in reference to the claiaas due 
the State from the United States. There is a balance of the suspen- 
ded war claim amounting to something near two hundred thousand 
dollars. While in Washington I made such examinations and in- 
quiries into the claim, as that I am now prepared to proceed in the 
prosecution of the satne, and am satisfied that quite a large sum can 
be collected without further legislation by Congress, and will tliere- 
fore proceed at once to make the additional proofs and explanations 
required. There is also a claim filed with our war claim for interest 
and discount on our war loan bonds announting to S600.000, This 
claim cannot be paid without legislation by Congress. An eifort will 
be made to procure tlie necessary legislation. A bill was presented 
at the last session of Congress making provision for its payment, but 
was not acted upon. The claim seems just and should be paid. 

TWO PER CENT. FUND. 

The State has been pressing a claim for several years known as 
'^'The two per cent, fund." This is surely a just claim and I have 
no doubt will ultimately be recognized by Congress and paid. In 
the present condition of the Treasury there maybe some question as 
to the propriety of pressing it at the present session of Congress. 

I will keep your excellency advised of any and all steps proposed 
to be taken in reference to all claims against the United Suites, and 
advise wit-i vou from time to time as to tlieir prosecution. 

Respectfully submitted. 

J. C. DENNY, 

Attorney General of Indiana. 



OPINIONS 



At the request of your Excellency, I append hereto such of 
my opinions to the State and county officers as effect the public at 
larffe : 



NOTARIES PUBLIC — REPBE8ESTATIVES. A Notary 
Public accepfivg the oJi.ce of Pepresentative in the General Ascmbly, 
thereby vacates the former. 

Office of Attokney General^ 

Indianapolis, April 7, 1873, 

His Excellency, Hon, Thomas A. Hendricks, 

Governor of Indiana : 

Dear Sir — Yours, enclosing letter from Hon. L. Dow Glazebrook, 
to hand. You request me to give my opinion as to whether he hav- 
ing been elected, qualified, and acted as a representative in the late 
General Assembly, he thereby vacated the office of Notary Public, 
and especially as to whether he can hold the office of Notary Public 
and Representative at the same time. 

Sec. IX., Article 2 of our Constitution, provides tliat no person 
sh' 11 hold moi-e than one lucrative office at the same time. Our Su- 
preme Court in the case of Dailey vs. The State ex. rel. Huffer, 8tli 
Blackford, p. 329, say "that the acceptance by an incumbent of one 
lucrative office, of another such, vacates the former office.'^ 

Is the office of Notary Public a lucrative office? Blackstone de- 
iinesan office *'to be a right to exercise a public or private employ- 
ment, and take the fees, an> i emoluments thereunto belonging." Under 
this definition, it appears clear that the right to exercise the duties, 
and take the fees of a Notary Public is an office. There can be no 
question, tested by the same rule that a Representative in the General 
Assembly is an office. So in my opinion they are both lucrative 



14 

offices. Pay, supposed to be ati adequate compensation, is affixed to 
the performance of their duties. Therefore I conclude that when 
the Dr. acepted the position of Representative, lie vacated the office 
of Notary Public, and his right to exercise the duties of Notary 
Public, will not revive on the expiration of his term as Representa- 
tive, but before he can do so, he must be re-appointed and qualified. 



NOTARIES PUB LW.— When a Notary PahUc removes from the 
County in which he resided at the time he ivas appointed, he thereby 
vacates his office. 



Office of Attorney General, Indiana, 

Indianapolis, April 8, 1873. 

Hon. Thomas A, Hendricks, 

Governor of Indiana : 

Dear Sir : — -In yours of the 8th instant, you propound the 
following question: ^'Can a Notary Public, appointed and qualified 
while a resident of one county, remove to and continue to act as 
such in another under the same comniission ?'' 

Article 6, Sec. 6, of the Coiistitution provides that "All county, 
^township and town officers shall reside within their respective 
'counties, townships and towns; and shall keep their respective 
' offices at such place therein, and perform such duties, as may be 
* directed by law " 

Sec. I. of the " Act providing for the appointment of Notaries 
Public and defining their duties," 1 G. & H., p. 445, the following 
language is used : " Notaries Public shall be appointed and commis- 
sioned by the Governor, upon a certificate of qualifications and 
moral character from tlie Judge of the Circuit or Common Pleas 
Court of their countks respectively, and shall, before they enter upon 
their duties as such, take an oath of office before the Clerk of the 
Circuit Court of their counties respectively, and file in his office, to 
be approved by said Clerk, an official bond," &c. 

It would seem from the constitutional provision and the section 



15 

of the statute above referred to, that it was intended by the Con- 
vention and the Legislature that the officer should reside in the 
county when appointed ; and it surely cannot be presumed that he 
could, as soon as he was appointed in one county, remove to an- 
other county and there exercise the functions of his office without 
being again appointed. My opinion, therefore, is that, when a 
Notary removes from the county in which he resided at the time 
he was appointed, he thereby vacates the office. 



REPRIEVES. — The Governor has the power to grant repineves in 
all cases. 

Office of ATTor.NEY General, 
Ikdianapoi.ts, July 7th, 1873. 

His Excellency Thomas A. Hendeicks, 

Governor of Indiana : 

Sir: — In yours of the 5th inst., you state: ''I respectfully 
respectfully request your opinion in v;riting upon the following 
question : 

"Is the Governor of Indiana authorized by the Constitution to 
suspend the execution of sentence upon a party convicted of the 
crime of seduction and sentenced to confinement in the State Prison, 
until the case can be examined by the Supreme Court upon appeal?" 

I have examined the question you present with as much care as 
the circumstances would admit of. Section 17, Article 5 of the 
Constitution provides that "He (the Governor) shall have the 
power to grant reprieves, commutations, and pardons, after convic- 
tion, for all offenses, except treason and cases of impeachment, sub- 
ject to such regulations as may be provided by law." 

Tiic ,:5upreme Court, in 9 lud. p. 20, say : "The power of the 
Governor, under the present Constitution, to remit fines and for- 
feitures is not absolute. It can only be exercised pursuant to 
legislative direction." But it has never been understood that it 
was necessary to the exercise of the power to grant reprieves 
and pardons that legislation was necessary before the power 
could be exercised. No provision has ever been made by the Legis- 
lature on this subject, and the power of granting pardons has 
been continually exercised by all the Governors of the State from 



16 

the time of the formation of the Constitution to the present time. 
The Legishiture in 1852, shortly after the adoption of the Constitu- 
tion, provided a mode of proceeding as to remissions of fines, &c., 
by the Governor. 

For the above reasons I eonckide that if the Governor has the 
power to grant pardons without any regulation on the subject by 
the Legislature, by the same provision of the Constitution the power 
to stay the execution of a sentence, or in other words, grant 
reprieves, is conferred; and in a proper case may and should be 
exercised. 



STATUTE OF LIMITATIONS— A temporary absence on business 
is not sucli an absence as is contemplated by the 13/A section of the 
Criminal Code. 

Office of Attorney General, 
Indianapolis, Nov. 21, 1873. 

Hon. THOMA.S A. Hendricks, 

Governor of Indiana: 

Sir: — In your communication of the 18th inst., addressed to me, 
you say : "At the recent term of the Hancock Circuit Court, John 
' C. Atkinson v/as convicted of the crime of perjury and sentenced 
*to thirty days' imprisonment in the county jaiL An application is 
'pending before me for his pardon. The indictment was found on 
'the 20th day of September, 1871, and assigns perjury upon false 
'testimony givin in that court on the 26th day of August, 1869, 
'and upon the trial the State proved the date as alleged. To take 
'the case from under the statute ot limitations, the indictment 
'alleges that, after the commission of the crime, the defendant was, 
'at several different times, absent from this State, in all amounting 
'to five months. To support this averment, it was proven upon the 
'trial that, at one time, he was at Cincinnati, Ohio, for as much as 
' fifteen days, and, at another time, from two to four weeks, but that 
'he was at home in the meantime; so that no one absence was more 
' than from eight to fifteen days. In the months of February and 
'March, 1870, he was in the State of Illinois two or three times; in 
'all, three or four weeks; and in 1871 he was in that State from two 
'to two and one-half months, returning home once or twice during 



17 

^that time. During the entire two years from the 26th of August, 
' 1869, his home was in Hancock county, in this State, and his fum- 
' ily remained there. His trips to Cincinnati and Illinois were 
'exclusively upon temporary business. At Cincinnati, he was 
'engaged in the sale of hogs bought by himself and others in this 
' State and shipped to that city for sale. In Illinois, he was en- 
' gaged in purchasing and collecting cattle, to be brought to this 
' State to be fed and pastured here for market. 

" I will be obliged if you will give me your opinion, whether such 
'au absence from the State is shown as to take this case out of the 
'statute of limitations under section 13, page 393, 2 Gavin & 
' Hord." 

In reply thereto I have the honor to state that section 13 of the 
criminal code provides : " If any person who has committed an 
offense, is absent from the State, or so conceals himself that process 
cannot be served upon him, or conceals the fact of the crime, the 
time of absence or concealment is not to be included in computing 
the period of limitation." In my opinion the facts proven as to the 
absence of the defendant were not sufficient to take the case out of 
the statute. His absence was only temporary, and on business. He 
did not flee from the State to avoid service of process upon him. 

It seems clear to my mind that a temporary absence on business is 
not such an absence as is contemplated by this statute. Was the 
State prevented from instituting the prosecution because the defend- 
ant went to Illinois to purchase hogs or cattle, or because he went to 
Cincinnati on business? It seems tome, to construe the statute 
thus would be unreasonable, and would lead to absurdity. It could 
not have been the intention of the Legislature to provide that a 
mere temporary absence for a few days, for business purposes alone, 
would take a case like this out of the statute of limitations. I am, 
therefore, of opinion that the facts proved were not sufficient to pre- 
vent the statute of limitations being relied on as a bar to the prose- 
cution. 

D. J.— 2 



18 

STATE LIBRARY. — State ojicei's may take the booh from the 
State Library to their several offices in the State buildinCjS, token 
their use is required in the discharge of their official duties. 

Office of Attorney General, 

Indianapolis, Dec. 15, 1873. 

Hon. Thos. a. Hendricks, 

Governor of Indiana : 

Dear Sir: I am in receipt of yours of the 13th inst., wherein 
you state : " I have the honor to request your opinion in writing, 
whether or not, under the provisions of an Act of the General 
Assembly, entitled, "An Act regulating the duties of the Si^tate 
Librarian, and providing penalties for a violation of the provisions 
of this Act," approved March 9, 1863, as modified and affected by 
the Act of March 9, ! 867, entitled, "An Act providing for the erec- 
tion of a suitable building for the use of the Supreme Qourt and 
State officers," etc., approved March 9, 1867, * * * the 
offices of the Governor and « ther officers of State may properly be 
taken and held by the State Librarian, to be included in the term 
"Capitol buildings," and thus permit the books in the State Library 
rooms to be used by the several officers mentioned in the former 
Act, " when required" by them "in the discharge of their official 
duties." 

In answer thereto I have to state that the first section of the Act 
of March 9, 1863, (3 G. & H., 325.) authorizes and requires the 
State Librarian to allow the Governor and other State officers, 
Judges of the Supreme Court, members of the General Assembly, 
and Judges of the United States Court, when required in the dis- 
charge of their official duties, the use of the books, &c., in the State 
Library. By this same section it is also provided that " in uo case 
shall any such book, &c., be taken outside of the capitol buildings." 

At the time this act was passed the State officers (except the 
Governor,) occupied rooms outside of the capitol building proper, 
near where they are now kept in the new State building. This new 
building was erected under the Act of March 9, 1867, (3 G. & H., 
507.) All the State offices are now in the new building. It is now 
one of the " Capitol buildings." The Legislature could not have 
intended, when they authorized the erection of the new building, to 
prevent the Judges of the Supreme Court and the State officers from 
using the books in the State Library. To prevent them from taking 



19 

the books, &c., from the old capitol building would practically have 
this eflfect. 

In my opinion, the officers named in the Act of March 9, 1863, 
may properly take books, &c., belonging to the State Library to 
their offices, when required to use them in discharge of their official 
duties . 



THE WORDS "one thousand eight hundred arid seventy-three," as 
used in the 1st, 3d, 4th, 12th, I'ith and Ibth sections of the act of 
Ifarch 10, 187S, maJcing general appropriations, and similar acts of 
former years, mean a Calendar year, and the year under this, and 
similar appropriation acts begins on the first of January of 
each year. Money appropriated by an act providing that 

" dollars or so much thereof as may he necessary ," approj^ri- 

utes the money, and if there is a balance of the fund, at the end of 
the year remmning unexpended, it laps over into the following year's 
appropriation. In appi^opriations all accounts should be kept as 
an entirety; all appropriaiions credited and all drafts charged. 
There should be no rests in the account. 

Office of Attorney General, 

Indianapolis, January 8, 1874.- 

Hon. Thomas A» Hendricks, 

Governor of Indiana : 

Sir:— In yours of the 26th ult., you ask : 

" 1. What is the meaning of the words, ^ for the year one thou- 
sand eight hundred and seventy-three' and ^for the year one thousand 
eight hundred and seventy-four,' as used in Sees. 1, 3, 4, 12, 14 and 15 
of ' an act making general appropriations for the years one thousand 
eight hundred and seventy-three and one thousand eight hundred and 
seventy-four,' approved March 10th, 1873, and of similar lan- 
guage in the appropriation. Acts of 1865, 1867 and 1869. Is the 
year thus named the calendar year? If not, when does the year 
commence?" 

"2. Do unexpired balances of the ' Governor's Office Fund ' and 
of the' Civil Contingent Fund of the Governor, ' accrue and stand 
to the credit of the Governor, subject to his drafts for office and inci- 



20 

denlal| expenses in transacting the public business, as limited in the 
acts making the several appropriations ? " 

" 3. The annual reports of the Auditor of State, and the month- 
ly statements of the Auditor and Treasurer of State, show a total 
disbursement on account of the construction of the Female Prison, 
up to December 31, 1872, inclusive, of ^51,686 91. This was an 
excess and overdraft of $1,686 91, upon the appropriation made by 
section 34 of the Act establishing the Institution ; approved May 
13, 1869. By the first section of the supplemental act approved 
February 3, 1873, as explained by the joint resolution approved 
February 6, 1873, the further sum of $50,000 was appropriated and 
placed to the credit of the building fund. An accrued indebted- 
ness of $19,376 23, evidenced by certificates of the Board of Man- 
agers, was immediately paid out of that appropriation. ^Yas the 
overdraft of $1,686 91 also chargeable to said last appropriation? 
That is to say, is the account to be kept by the Auditor with that 
fund (and others like it) an entirety, to which all appropriations are 
to be credited and all drafts charged, or are there rests in the ac- 
count? If so, when do such rests occur?" 

The 1st section of the act of June 18, 1852, (2 G. and H., 337,) 
provides that " the constuction of all statutes of this State shall be 
by the following rules, unless such construction be plainly repug- 
nant to the intention of the Legislature, or of the context of the 
same statute." And by the 5th clause (or rule) of this section it is 
provided that 'the word "year" shall mean a calendar year, unless 
otherwise expressed.' This act fixes a rule of construction of the 
statutes of this State. Therefore, I conclude that the words " for 
the year one thousand eight hundred and seventy-three" and "for 
the year one thousand eight hundred and seventy-four," as used in 
the statute referred to in your letter, mean a calendar yeai ; and 
that therefore the year under these appropriation Acts begins on the 
1st day of January of each year. 

The application of this rule may be the cause of much inconven- 
ience ; but inasmuch as it is provided by the statute making the rule 
that the word " year " shall mean a calendar year, unless otherwise 
expressed, I feel compelled to so construe it. 

As to the unexpended balances of the " Governor's Office Fund " 
and the " Civil Contingent Fund of the Governor, " accrued and 
standing to the credit of the Governor, subject to his draft for inci- 
dental expenses in transacting the public business as limited in the 
Acts making the several appropriations, my opinion is, that, 



21 

although each of the acts appropriating money for the purposes 

above stated provide that " dollars, or so much thereof as may 

be necessary, etc., be, and the same is hereby appropriated," yet, it 
is in fact an appropriation of the amount named in the act. When 
an appropriation is made for a continuous service, or for an object 
that is continuous, and there is a balance of the fund at the end of 
the year remaining unexpended, it laps over into the following 
year's appropriation. So, if an appropriation be made for a given 
year, and at the end of the year, it proves to be in excess of the 
necessary expenditure of that year, it is applicable to the same con- 
tinuous objects during a subsequent year. If, therefore, in a par- 
ticular year, the appropriation for a given service prove deficient, a 
balance remaining of the appropriation for the same service, made 
for a previous year, may be drawn upon to fill up the deficit. 

In this State we have no statute providing that any balance of an 
appropriation, unexpended at the close of the year, shall go into the 
general or surplus fund. 

The rule as to appropriations seems to have been understood by 
Congress as above stated ; and to provide against such contingency, 
in 1795, 1820 and 1852, acts were passed, providing that all bal- 
ances remaining unexpended for two years after the close of the 
year for which such appropriations were made, shall be carried into 
the "Surplus Fund," except for a purpose in respect to which a 
longer duration is specially designed by law ; and in 1870 an Act 
was passed providing that all such balances should go into the gen- 
eral fund at the expiration of one year. 

The appropriations made for the years 1873 and 1874 for the Gov- 
ernor's Contingent Fund are one thousand dollars for each year. 
From 1865 to 1873, inclusive, the total amount appropriated is 
$25,000. The amount drawn is ^19,286 88, leaving a balance not 
drawn of $5,713 12. 

The Governor's Office Fund, for the same years aggregate $44,000. 
Amount drawn $40,575 89 ; leaving a balance not drawn of 
$3,424 11. 

I am informed by Hon. Asbury Steele, an eminent lawyer, and 
who was the Chairman of the Finance Committee of the Senate at 
the late Special Session of the Legislature, and Chairman of the 
Judiciary Committee at the regular session, that the question as to 
the appropriation for the Civil Contingent Fund of the Governor, 
was discussed by the members of said Finance Committee; that 
they found by examining the condition of the fund that had before 



22 

been appropriated for said purpose, that a considerable balance re- 
mained of said fund which had not been drawn, and which in their 
opinion could legally be drawn upon by the Governor ; and for this 
reason they appropriated only one thousand dollars for each of the 
years 1873 and 1874; which, when added to the balances remaining 
of former appropriations, would be sufficient. The above amount 
of $5,713 12, may, in my opinion, be drawn upon by the Governor 
for said purposes. 

An appropriation is the setting apart a sum of money for a given 

purpose, and while each of these acts provide that dollars are 

appropriated for the year, they also provide that the same are appro- 
priated for a certain specified service. The Legislature could not 
have supposed that $1,000 a year would be sufficient for the Gov- 
ernor's Contingent Fund. 

I therefore conclude that the Legislature intended that the bal- 
ances remaining of former appropriations could and should be 
drawn upon to pay the Contingent expenses of the Executive. 
Also, for the necessary expenses of the Executive Department. 
The balances remaining of former appropriations should be first 
drawn before drawing upon the appropriations for the year for which 
they are made. See opinion of Att'y Gen'l Gushing, 7 Vol., opin- 
ions Att'y Gen'l U. S., pp. 1 and 14. 

As to the 3d question propounded, my opinion is, that the appro- 
priations for 1869 and 1873 to the Female Prison, should be added 
together, and that not more than the $iOO,000 can be drawn ; and 
that the amount drawn prior to the appropriation of 1873, should 
be deducted from the amount appropriated for that year. The 
account should be kept as an entirety. All appropriations are to be 
credited and all drafts charged. There should be no rests in the 
account. 



23 

THE SUPPLEMENTAL Act of March 8th, 1873, authorizes the 
collection of State and County taxes in two installments, and 
requires penalty to be added if the first installment be not paid on 
or before the 15th of April — this penalty to be added by County 
Treasurer. On failure to pay the second installment, the penalty 
of ten per cent, attaches as fully as on failure to pay the first. It 
is the duty of County Treasui^ers to make two settlements uith 
the Treasurer of State in each year : one on or before the 1st 
day of January — one on or before the Ibth day of May. The 
Auditor of State may require other settlements. 

Office of Attorney General, 
Indianapolis, April 9, 1873. 
Hon. James A. Wildman, 

Auditor of State: 

Drar Sir : — The questions presented in the letter addressed to 
you bj the Auditor of Bartholomew County, and which was referred 
to me for my opinion, are as follows : 

1. Does the new assessment law (Act of December 21, 1872,) 
since the changes made by the Supplemental and Amendatory Act 
of March 8, 1873, authorize the collection of the State and 
County tax in two installments ? 

2. Does the law provide that any penalty be attached to the second 
installment, to wit : the installment to be paid in November, if it 
be not paid on or before the 15th of November? 

3. Does the law now in force require County Treasurers to make 
settlement and pay over to the Treasurer of State any tax collected 
by him after April settlement, other than the taxes which are delin- 
quent on the third Monday in April ? 

4. Does the law require the County Auditor to add to the next 
year's duplicate any unpaid tax on the second installment, to wit : 
that which should be paid on or before the 15th day of November? 

I will answer the questions in the order they are presented in the 
letter : 

The Supplemental and Amendatory Act of March 8, 1873, 
does require and authorize the collection of the State and County 
tax in two installments. Sec. 1 of said act provides that per- 
sons or tax-payers may pay the full amount of tax charged to them 



24 

on or before the third Monday in April, or may at his option pay 
one-half thereof on or before the third Monday in April, and the 
remaining half on or before the 15th day of November following. 
It farther provides that, in all cases where as much as one-half of 
the amount of tax charged against a tax-payer shall not be paid on 
or before the third Monday in April, the whole amount charged 
shall become due and be returned delinquent, and collected as pro- 
vided by law. The 155th section of the act of December 21st, 
1872, provides that, in case any person shall refuse or neglect to 
pay the tax imposed on him, the County Treasurer shall, after the 
third Monday in April, levy the same, together with ten per cent. 
costs, etc. The Supplemental Act of March 8, 1873, defers this action 
by the County Treasurer until after the 15th day of November, 
provided one-half be paid on or before the third Monday in April. 

To the second question proposed, my opinion is that the penalty 
does attach, in case of failure to pay the second installment, as fully 
and completely as it does in case of failure to pay the first. The 
Supplemental and Amendatory Act does not attempt to amend the 
whole revenue law, but only a part of it; therefore, the act of 
December 21st remains in force, except in so far as the same may 
be changed by the Supplemental Act. Section 172 of the act pro- 
vides : " That there shall be a penalty of ten per cent, upon the 
' amount of taxes returned delinquent, which the person or prop- 
' erty assessed shall be liable to pay, together with interest upon the 
' whole amount until paid." 

To the third question my opinion is, that it is the duty of the 
County Treasurer to make two settlements in each year — one on the 
1st day of January, and one on the 15th day of May. Sec. 160 
of the act of December 21st, 1872, provides that each County 
Treasurer shall, on or before the first day of January in each year, 
pay over to the State Treasurer, all moneys found due for State, 
revenue, school tax, and all other State purposes, according to the 
certificate of settlement with the Auditor of his county, etc. And 
Sec. 181 provides that County Treasurers shall pay over to the 
State Treasurer all such money as is due to the State on or before 
the 15th day of May in each year. Sec. 166 provides that the 
County Treasurer shall proceed to collect the said taxes, damages 
and fees, and when the same is collected, shall pay the same ' into 
the State Treasury. These three sections provide for two settle 
ments, and fix the time each shall be made; and sec. 166 provides 



25 

♦ 
for the payment of the delinquent tax collected, but does not fix 

the time of payment ; so that, if the amount of tax collected should 

be paid at the time of settlement, or the Auditor of State may 

direct the payment ot the same at any other time, if an amount 

sufficient to justify such settlement be collected between the January 

and May settlement. 

To the fourth question my answer is, that the law now in force 
does require the County Auditor to add to the current year's dupli- 
cate any unpaid tax on the second installment; that is, the install- 
ment which falls due on the 15th day of November. If there was 
no provision in the act of December 21, 1872, on the subject, the 
act of 1852, with the amendments thereto made since, would be in 
force ; because, if there is no provision in the new law uu the 
subject, there would be no act in conflict with said acts — and the 
new law only repeals such laws as conflict with it ; and, therefore, 
the old law would be in force. But Sec. 261 provides that, if the 
tax on any property liable to taxation is prevented from being col- 
lected!^for any year or years by reason of any erroneous proceeding, 
or other cause, the amount of such tax which such property 
should have paid shall be added to the tax on such property for the 
next succeeding year. And Sec. 138 makes it the duty of the 
County Auditor, in making out the duplicate, to " set down in a 
separate column the amount of taxes on all property returned delin- 
linquent for any preceding year and remaining unpaid, and a pen- 
alty of ten per cent, on the same, and shall carry out the aggregate 
amount into a column of totals." 

It does seem to me that, taking all these provisions together, the 
law is clear and explicit on all the propositions made in said Audi- 
tor's letter. The law is long and much more prolix than is neces- 
sary, and is consequently more difficult of comprehension than it 
would have been if it had been more skillfully prepared. It was 
passed, at the close of the Special Session, in great haste, and conse- 
quently could have been revised and abridged, as it might and no 
doubt would have been, had more time been allowed for the consid- 
eration of the same ; but, in its crude shape, if properly executed, 
it is a great improvement on the former revenue laws of this State. 



26 

TOWNSHIP TRUSTEES :— Are liable for interest received by them 
on trust Junds. 

Office of Attorney General, 
Indianapolis, March 20, 1873. 

Hon. Milton B. Hopkins, 

Siq^t. Pub. Instruction : 

Sir : — In your communication, addressed to me, you state that 
the following is a copy of a letter written by the County Examiner 
of Clark County, Indiana, to your office : 

Jeffersonville, Ind., January 23, 1873. 

Hon. Milton B. Hopkins, 

Supt. Pub. Instruction. 

"Dear Sir : — In case there should be several thousand dollars 
raised by taxing the people of a Township for the purpose of erecting 
a Township school house, and the money should be in the hands of 
the trustee several years, and he should put the money at interest 
and appropriate the interest as his own, what should be done and 
by whom ? Does not the interest belong to the Township, and 
should not the Prosecuting Attorney for the County take the case in 
hand ?" 

And further. You request of me an official opinion upon the fol- 
lowing question : If a School Trustee receives interest on trust 
money in his possession, is he responsible for that interest ? And 
if so, is he responsible on his bond or as an individual ? And 
whose duty is it to bring suit to recover the same ? 

In answer, I have to state that a Township Trustee is an officer 
having charge of the funds of the township ; he is a trustee for 
the public within the Townships for which he acts, and is respon- 
sible and should be held to answer as such. If a Township Trustee 
use the trust funds in his possession so as to make a profit, and he 
appropriate the same to his own use, he and his sureties are liable 
on his bond for the amount of the profit thus realized. 

If he mixes the trust funds with his private moneys and employs 
them both in a trade or adventure of his own, the cestui que trust may, 
if she prefer it, insist upon having a proportionate share of the 
profits, instead of interest on the amount of the trust fund so 
employed, or interest may be received on the money during tlie time 



27 

the same was thus used by the Trustee. The following authorities are 
in point : 8 English Chancery Reports, p. 172 ; 3 Brown Chancery 
E. by Belt, p. 41 ; 3 Howard U. S., 133 ; 16 Howard U. S., 544; 
Hilt on Trustees, side pp. 374, and note 2, 522, note 1. 

Oar Supreme Court, in 34 Ind., pp. 323 and 324, say that Sec. 4 
of the Act providing for the election and prescribing the duties of 
Prosecuting and District Attorneys, imperatively requires them to 
prosecute suits against Township snd County officers to recover any 
of the trust funds, etc. It is the duty of Prosecuting Attorneys to 
institute and prosecute suits to recover funds of the description 
referred to by you, and by the Act approved March 10, 1873, pre- 
scribing the duties of the Attorney General, it is provided that if the 
Prosecuting Attorney shall fail for twelve months after the cause of 
action in any such matter shall have accrued, to institute and prose- 
cute such suits, that then and in that case it shall be the duty of the 
Attorney General to do so. 



COUNTY SUPERINTENDENTS.— Attorney General Ads of 
March 8, 1873, and JIarch 10, 1873, coristrued. Act of March 
10th repeals such parts of Acts of 3Iarch Sth as conflict lolth it. 

Office of Attorney General, 

Indianapolis, July 22, 1873. 

Hon. Milton B. Hopkins, 

SupH Pub. Inst. : 

Dear Sir : In yours of the 19th inst. addressed to this office, 
you state that " The last Legislature, by the 6th section of an Act 
approved March 8, 1873, (see page 78, of the late Acts,) made it 
the duty of the County Superintendent, at least once in each year, 
and as much oftener as he may deem proper, to examine carefully 
the dockets, records and accounts of the Clerks of Courts, Countjy 
Auditors, County Commissioners, Justices of the Peace, Prose- 
cuting Attorneys, and Mayors of Cities, and see that all fines, for- 
feitures, unclaimed fees, liquor licenses and surplus dog tax are 
promptly collected, reported and paid over to the proper fund and 
revenue. 

" On the 10th of March, and just two days after the approval of 
the act referred to, another act was passed and approved, supple- 



28 

mental to certain acts mentioned in the title, making it the duty of 
the Attorney General, in certain cases, to institute proceedings and 
collect, and have paid into the proper treasury, all fines and forfeit- 
ures due the school fund. (See page 17, sections 2 and 9.) 

"In the practical administration of the law of March 8, 1873, 
some confusion and doubt have arisen in the minds of County 
Superintendents and the officers mentioned in the law, as to the 
effect of the Act of the 10th of March upon that of March 8th. 

" Does it repeal it ? If so, in part or in whole ? If in part, 
what particular part?" 

I will state, in answer to your questions, that the 9th section of 
the act of March 10 — Sess. Laws, 1873, p. 20 — covers the greater 
part of the subject matter of the act of March 8, and embraces 
other. It requires the Attorney General " to ascertain the amount 
paid to any public officer, or other person." It also requires him to 
collect all the items mentioned in the act of March 8 (with the 
exception herein mentioned), together with all other funds due the 
State from certain officers mentioned, and other persons, " or from 
any other source where the same is by any law required to be paid to 
the State, or any officer in trust for the State." 

The above quoted language follows the enumeration of the differ- 
ent classes of funds to be collected by the Attorney General. It 
also requires him to institute and prosecute such proceedings as may 
be necessary to collect the same. It seems clear, therefore, that this 
latter act, though passed at the same session, embraces the subject 
m'atter of the former act; that is, it requires the Attorney General 
to do all the acts that by the act of March 8, are required to be per- 
formed by County Superintendents, with the exceptions hereinafter 
mentioned. 

The 13th section of the act of March 10, repeals all laws in con- 
flict with it. 

Sections 6 and 7 of the act of March 8, and sections 2 and 9 of 
the act of March 10, do conflict ; and in so far as they do conflict, 
the latter act is in force, and the former sections are repealed as to 
all that in which they do conflict. There are, however, portions of 
said sections 2 and 9 that do not conflict with sections 6 and 7 of the 
act of March 8. The 2d section of the act of March 10 provides 
" that in all cases where the prosecuting attorneys have failed for 
one year after the assessment of any fine or the forfeiture of any 
recognizance, or may hereafter for one year after the assessn^ent of 
any fine or forfeiture of any recognizance, fail to institute proceed- 



29 

ings to collect and pay into the proper treasury any fine or forfeit- 
ure, it shall be the duty of the Attorney General to institute pro- 
ceedings and collect and have paid into the proper treasury all fines 
and forfeitures." 

Therefore, when fines assessed have remained uncollected for a less 
time than one year after judgment, and forfeitures have remained 
without suit for a less time than one year after having been taken, 
the Superintendent may have proper proceedings instituted to secure 
their collection ; but in cases where the time above stated has elapsed, 
then the matter is beyond the control of the County Superintendent, 
and the act of March 10, above referred to, makes it the duty of the 
Attorney General to make the collections. 

The Supreme Court, in 22 Ind., p. 20->, say : " That a later law 
embracing the subject of a former one, by implication repeals the 
former so far as they conflict with each other." 

In 7 Blackford, p. 313, they say : *'' If two statutes be inconsistent 
with each other, the latter must govern." 

Where a new or subsequent statute covers the subject matter of an 
old one, and makes different provisions, the new repeals the old. 6 
Ind., pp. 146 and 432. 1 Ind. Dig. (Davis) p. 774, sees. 50 and 51. 

If the Legislature provide in one act for the discharge of a speci- 
fied duty by an officer therein named, and subsequently provide for 
the discharge of the same duty by another officer, the subsequent 
act of the Legislature being inconsistent with the former, and being 
the last expressed will of the law-making power, must govern. 

The two acts do not conflict in this farther particular, viz : By 
the act of March 8, it is made the duty of the County Superinten- 
dents to "see that the full amount of interest on school funds is 
paid and apportioned, and when there is a deficit of interest on any 
school fund or a loss of any school fund or revenue by the county, 
that proper warrants are issued for the reimbursement of the same." 

They should also look after and see to the prompt enforcement of 
fines assessed where executions are in the hands of sheriffs, con- 
stables and marshals, see that executions are promptly issued, and 
see that no unnecessary delay is allowed in such collections ; and 
to see that suits are promptly instituted on forfeitures, in all cases 
where such judgment has not been entered, or forfeitures taken more 
than one year before making the investigation. Where judgments 
have been taken or forfeitures have been entered more than one 
year, the act of March 10, makes it the duty of the Attorney Gene- 
ral to make the examination and collection. 



30 

The act of March 8 does not authorize County Snperlutendents to 
make any collections. It only authorizes them to make exami- 
nations and reports, and to cause suits to be institutetl by the proper 
law officer of the State, the Prosecuting Attorney, or Attorney Gen- 
eral in certain cases mentioned in the act of March 16. 



COUNTY TREASURERS AND AUDITORS. --Their fees^A 
part of sec. 107 of the act of March 6, 1865, repealed by act of 
3Iarch 8, 1873 — Act of March 6, 1865, remains unchanged. 

Office of Attorney General, 

Indianapolis, April 2, 1873. 
Hon. M. B. Hopkins, 

SupH Pub. Inst. 

Dear Sir : — Your communication in these words has been 
received : 

"Section 107 of the school law act, approved March 6th, 1865, 

* III Statutes, Ind., p. 461, provides that the County Auditor shall 

* receive for his services ' four per cent, on all disbursements of 

* interest,' and sec. 6 of the fee and salary act, approved March 8th, 
M873, provides that Uhe Auditor shall be allowed one-fourth of 
^one per cent, on all school funds disbursed by said Auditor.' Also, 

* the act of 1865, sec. 107, it?, prescribes the Treasurer's fees, and sec. 
'5 of the fee and salary act, t(i. provides as follows: ' Also, five 
*per cent, for receiving and disbursing all funds other than taxes 
' and school funds,' etc. 

" I desire your opinion as to how much of sec. 107 of the act of 

* March 6, 1865, is repealed by the act of Mar jh 8th, 1873, and 

* what are the fees which an Auditor and Treasurer are entitled to 
' for disbursing the school funds and revenues. 

There is no provision in the act of March 8th, 1873, repealing 
any part of the act of March 6th, 1865, in direct terms. Section 41 
of the fee ana salary act does repeal certain acts therein named, but 
no reference is made to the said act of March 6th, 1865. Therefore, 
if any part of this act is repealed, it is done by implication. In the 
act of March 8th, 1873, in the latter part of section 6, the following 
languao;e is used: "The Auditor shall be allowed one- fourth of 
one per cent, on all school funds disbursed by said Auditor." 



31 

I am satisfied tliat it was the intention of the Legislature to repeal 
that portion of sec. 107 which is in these words: "And four per 
cent, on all disbursements of interest/' and to substitute therefor the 
latter clause of section 6 ot the act of March 8th, 1873, in these 
Words : " The Auditor shall be allowed one-fourth of one per cent, 
on all school funds disbursed by said Auditor; so that section 107 
as amended would read substantially as follows : 

" County Auditors shall receive for their services in managing the 
schools funds the two per cent, damages accruing on all sales for 
non-payments of loans, two per cent, on all loans on which the 
mortgaged premises are advertised for sale and not sold, and one- 
fourth of one per cent, on all school fuuds disbursed by said Aud- 
itor.'^ 

I came to this conclusion for the following reasons : The interest 
accruing from the fund, license tax. State school tax, unclaimed 
fees, and local tuition tax, are the only moneys disbursed, — -that is, 
paid out. Money loaned is not paid out. Loaning money for trust 
funds is not disbursing it. Therefore, tlie only moneys that are or 
can be "disbursed" by the Auditor, are those mentioned above. 

I am of the opinion that it was the intention of the Legislature to 
amend said section as above indicated, and to give.to the Auditor 
one-fourth of one per cent, on all disbursements instead, or in lieu, of 
the amount allowed for disbursing the int^erest alone as allowed by 
act of 1865. This provision was evidently intended to repeal the 
provision allowing four per cent, as fixed in the act last referred to. 

The law of March 6th, 1865, fixing the fees of Treasurers for the 
handling of school fund moneys, remains unchanged. 



DELINQUENl TAXES— Fees and Mileage of County Treas- 
urers, how paid, <&;d. 

Office op Attorney Geneeal, 

Indianapolis, June 26, 1873. 
Mr. Henry J. Rudisill, 

Auditor of Allen County : 

Dear Sir : — In your letter addressed to the Auditor of State^ 

you request him to procure my opinion on the following questions ; 

1. Are the provisions of Sec. 161 of the Act of December 21; 



32 

1872^ as to the payment of fees and mileage, to be collected from the 
delinquent tax-payer, still in force, or are tiie same repealed by the 
" fee and salary bill?" 

2. If repealed, what portion, if any, of the fees for the collection 
of delinquent taxes is to be collected from the tax-payers, and what 
portion is to be paid from the funds ? 

3. Can the Treasurer, as the law now stands, when demand is 
made of the deliquent tax-payer, at his place of residence, and the 
taxes then paid without levy, charge mileage and other fees of con- 
stables for making such demand ? And, if so, is such mileage and 
other fees to be paid by the delinquent tax-payer, or to be deducted 
from the taxes collected ? 

In as much as the questions you propound, with others by County 
Treasurers and Auditors in different counties of the State, in rela- 
tion to the fees, etc., to be allowed Treasurers for the collection of 
delinquent taxes, have within the last few days been submitted to 
me, I will, in answering your questions, attempt to cover the entire 
ground. 

The 4th Sec. of the Act approved March 8, 1872, entitled, '^ An 
Act supplementary and and amendatory of an Act, entitled, 'An 
Act to provide for uniform assessment ' " etc., approved December 
21, 1872, provides that " The County Treasurers be and are hereby 
required, immediately after their April settlement with the County 
Auditor, either in person or by deputy, to call upon every delin- 
quent taxpayer," etc. 

Sec. 161 of the act to provide for a uniform assessment, etc., 
approved December 21, 1872, provides that " The said Treasurers 
shall be allowed for their services in making such collections, five 
per cent, on the amount of all such collections of delinquent taxes, 
payable in just proportions out of each fund collected, and shall also 
be allowed Constable's fees and mileage from the place of holding elec- 
tions in each township, to the residence of such delinquent tax-payer, 
which shall be collected from such tax-payer." 

By section 5 of the " fees and salary bill," approved March 8, 
1873, it provided as follows : 

" The County Treasurers of the several Counties, shall receive the 
fees below enumerated, and no others, to wit : * >[; ^ * 
Also, five per centum on all delinquent taxes collected, when paid 
uoluntarily and without levy; and the Treasurer shall also be 
allowed the same fees and charges, except mileage, for making dis- 
tress and sale of goods and chattels, for the payment of taxes, for 



33 

the payment oi taxes^ as may be allowed by law to Constables/' etc. 

The statute, when properly construed, gives mileage and other fees 
allowed by law to constables, when the taxes are collected without 
distress and sale ; but if distress and sale be made, then, in as much 
as the Treasurer is allowed ten per cent, for collections made in this 
manner, he is not entitled to charge mileage. These two sections, 
when construed together, would read as follows : Also, five per 
cent, on all delinquent taxes collected, when paid voluntari-ly and 
without levy, and such mileage and other fees as now allowed by 
law to Constables. In other words, the Act of March 8, 1873, does 
not repeal that portion of the Act of December 21, 1872, allowing 
mileage from the place of holding each Township election to the 
residence of the tax-payer, when collection is made without distress 
and sale. The " fee and salary bill " fixes the fees of Constables, 
and this Act authorizes County Treasurers to charge the same fees 
that Constables are authorized to charge for like services, including 
conimissions for collections. 

When collections are made by distress and sale, the same fees are 
allowed as above stated, except mileage. The total fees in such case 
will be ten per cent., as fixed by said Sec. 5, and Constables' com- 
missions and other fees allowed by law to Constables. So that on 
sums exceeding six dollars, the commissions will be fifteen per cent., 
to which should be added the other fees allowed by law to Con- 
stables, as above stated. 

The five and ten per cent, specified in said Sec. should be paid «>ra;t 
of the delinquent tax collected, ratably out of each fund, and the 
mileage, commissions, etc., as allowed to Constables, should be col- 
lected from the delinquent tax-payer. The evident purpose of the- 
Legislature by the use of these words in Sec. 5, above quoted to wit:: 
" The County Treasurers of the several Counties shall receive the 
fees below enumerated, and no others," intended to provide that no. 
other allowance should be made by the County Board or paid out of 
the funds, but in construing the last Act above referred to, it must- 
be done in the light of all the enactments of the Legislature on this- 
subject. The mode of payment provided for in the Act of Decem-r- 
ber 21, 1872, is not changed by the Act of March 3, 1873, and in, 
my opinion, the amount of fees to be taxed against the delinquent 
tax-payer is not changed except to provide that when the taxes are • 
collected after levy, mileage should not be charged. 

In case the money is made without sale, the commissions to be.- 
charged to the tax-payer would be two and one-half pex^ cent., instead* 
of five, as allowed on sales. -' 

Att'y G.— 3 



34 

A TOWN hoard has no power to exact and enforce a license fee for 
the sale of intoxicating liquors. The act giving such authority declar- 
edj.inconstitutional by the Supreme Court, 33 Indiana 608. 

I find that the Legislature by an act passed in 1867 (3 G. and H., 
122) attempted to give towns the power to require a license to sell 
liquors. But the Supreme Court in 33d Indiana, p. 608 say, 
"There is nothing in the original act on the subject of incorporated 
towns etc., (G. and H. p. 619,) that confers such power. A municipal 
corporation can no more exercise such powers not conferred upon it, 
than can any other corporation ; they are all creatures of the law, 
and can exercise such powers, and such only, as are conferred upon 
them by the law." 

I find that the act of 1859 (G. and H. p. 518 Sec. 16) contained a 
provision substantially the same as Sec. 21 of the new Temperance 
Law. This act was in force at the time this decision was made. 

They then go on and hold that the act of 1867 is unconstitutional. 
Under the ruling of the Supreme Court, the question is, does the 
Temperance Bill, Sec. 20, '' confer upon it, " (a town) the right to 
require a license ? Do these words : " but nothing in this ac shall 
be so construed as to prohibit the Common Councils of cities, and 
the Boards of Trustees of incorporated towns, from demanding and 
enforcing a fee for permits, " confer upon towns the power to exact 
a license or charge a fee for a permit? It would seem under the 
ruling of the Supreme Court above referred to, that it would not. 
This ruling of the Supreme Court is the law, until overruled by 
that court ; and, therefore, my opinion is that the law does not au- 
thorize Town Boards to require or exact a license fee for selling 
liquor within the limits of such town. 



TREASURERS' FEES for handling funds derived from sale of 
County bonds and from loans, d'c, — The County Board of Equal- 
ization the oidy lawful body to appraise lands and R. R. property. 

That portion of section five of the fee and salary act of March 8, 
1873, in reference to Treasurer's fees on funds borrowed by the 
County or realized from the sale of County bonds, which are one and 
the same thing, taking that portion of the section which has refer- 
ence to the subject matter now under consideration would read as 



35 

follows : For receiving and disbursing funds arising from the sale 
of County bonds, <&c. The County sells her bonds, or borrows 
money and issues her bonds for the amount borrowed, and for 
receiving and paying out this fund the Treasurer is entitled to one 
per cent and no more. No other fee or compensation is provided for 
in this section. 

The Supreme Court in the case of the State on the relation of 
Evans, Auditor of State, vs. McGinuis, 34 Ind. p. 452, decides that 
the action of the State Board of Equalization of 1869 was void. 
And by the several acts of the Legislature since passed, the appraise- 
ment of lands and railroad property made by the County Board of 
Equalization seems to be recognized the only legal appraisement or 
valuation, and indeed under the law it would seem without the sub- 
sequent recognition of the same by the Legislature that the County 
a,ppraisement is the only legal and valid one for the year 1869 and 
subsequent years including the year 1872. 

Railroad Companies should pay tax for the years 1869, 1870, 
1871 and 1872, on the value of its property, as fixed by the County 
Board of 1869. 



THE BOARD OF SCHOOL COMMISSIONERS constitute a 
part of the County Board of Education, and are entitled to take 
part as such in the proceedings of said County Board. 

I am satisfied that the Act of March 3, 1871, substitutes the 
Board of School Commissioners for that of " School Trustees," and 
such Board has all the rights and privileges of the officers for which 
they are substituted ; and that in all cities where such Boards are 
legally organized, they do constitute a part of the County Board of 
Education, and are entitled to take part as such in the proceedings 
of said County Board. 



36 

JURY FEES — Act of 1852 still in foree, providing for the taxing 
of a jury fee of $4 50 against the losing party. There is no 
Statute repealing the act authorizing the taxation of docket fees 
in criminal cases. 

By 2 G. and H. p. 31, Sec. 5, Act of 1852, it is provided that 
$4 50 shall be taxed in every case tried by a jury in the Circuit 
Court, etc. In the fee and salary act of 1871 p. 31 it is provided 
that a fee of $5 00 shall be taxed for jury fee. No provision is 
made in the new fee bill for a jury fee to be taxed. As the bill 
was originally drafted, it provided that ^2 50 per day should be 
taxed for such juror. This was stricken out, and the Legislature 
evidently intended to leave the law of 1852 or 1871 in force. 

If the act of 1871 by implication repealed the act of 1852, and 
the present act repealed that of 1871, under the ruling of the Su- 
preme Court in 2d Blackford p. 32, the repeal of the repealing clause 
would revise the original act of 1852, and, therefore, the act of 1852 
under this view of the law is in force ; and I am satisfied that this is 
a correct representation of the effect of a repealing act. 

You will see by reference to the act of March 8, 1873, Sec. 41, 
that the act of February 21, 1871, is repealed with certain exceptions 
and the point now under consideration is not one of those excepted, 
and that, therefore, the portion requiring a jury fee of $5 00 
to be. taxed is repealed. 

I am therefore of opinion that a jury fee of f 4 50 should be 
taxed against the losing party of such case tried by a jury. 

I can find no statute repealing the act authorizing the taxation of 
a docket fee in criminal cases. 



A TOWNSHIP TRUSTEE^Has power to purchase books, maps, 
school furniture, &c.,for school houses. 

You ask my opinion as to the following questions : 

" 1st. Have Trustees authority to purchase school furniture, appa- 
•^ratus, etc. at their option and without reference to the County 
^ Board?" 

** 2d. Is it the duty of the County Board to determine what school 
'^furniture, maps, etc., the Trustees shall purchase?" 

Sec. 10, Act of March 6, 1865, provides that the Trustees shall 



37 

take charge of the educational affairs of their respective townships, 
towns and cities, employ teachers, and shall establish and otherwise 
provide snitable houses, furniture, apparatus and other articles and 
educational appliances necessary for the thorough organization 
and efficient management of said school. 

,In Sec. 8 of amended school law approved March 8, 1873, it 
is provided that " Said Board shall consider the general wants and 
needs of the schools and school property of which they have charge, 
and all matter relating to the purchase of school furniture, books, 
maps, charts, etc. The amendment authorizes the Trustee to advise 
with the Board, but in the purchase of furniture, maps, etc. the 
Trustee may act upon his own judgment without advising with the 
Board. The Legislature have provided this advisory Board. The 
Trustee may submit the question as to furniture, maps, etc., to said 
board, or act upon his own judgment. The statute does not compel 
the Trustee to so act, as is done in reference to the purchase of 
books, etc. 



COUNTY TREASURERS' FEES for handling School Funds- 
Act of March 6, 1865, still in force — Constitution lUty of the Act 
of Feb. 21, 1871. 

You will find by examining the Act of Februarv 21. 1871, 
that the Act of March 6, 1865, is not referred to in any way. It 
seems to have been the purpose of the Legislature at all times to 
keep the fees of officers, so far as the School Fund is concerned, 
separate and apart from other fees, &c. You will by a carefnl 
examination of the several acts see this very plainly. 

And the same purpose is plainly indicated in the latter part of 
Sec. 5, Acts 1873, p. 121. The following language is there used : 
" For securing and disbursing all funds other than taxes, or school 
funds/' &c., thus showing that it was not the intention to change 
the fees of Treasurers as to that fund. It therefore seems perfectly 
clear to my mind, for the reasons above stated, and for reasons stated 
in my letter to Mr. Hopkins, that the Act of March 6th, 1865, is 
still in force. 

Quite a number of the Circuit Courts have decided that the Act 
of Feb. 21, 1871, was unconstitutional. The Supreme Court was 
divided in opinion on the question ; therefore, to say the least, its 



38 

constitutionality is questionable. I think a majority of the Courts 
held it to be unconstitutional. 

In 2d Blackford, p. 32, the Supreme Court say, " That if a stat- 
ute be repealed, and the repealing act itself be afterward repealed, 
the original act is revived." 

In Sec. 802, 2 G. & H., p. 336,'a different rule is provided as to the 
law repealed by that act, but is not adopted as a rule of construc- 
tion, except as to the acts repealed by said act. Therefore, it would 
follow that the repeal of the Act of 1871, if it could be construed 
as repealing the Act of March 6, 1865, would revive the last 
named Act; but my opinion is that the Act of March 6, 1865, was 
not repealed by that of Feb. 21, 1871. 



TAXATION OF RAILROADS.— Act of December 21, 1872, 
construed. 

Sec. 79 of the Act of December 21, 1872, requires Railroad Com- 
panies to furnish to the Auditor of State a list of all their tangible 
property ; also, a statement as to their stock, etc., as required by the 
several subdivisions of Sec. 79, and the total amount of all indebted- 
ness, except iui- curi-eat expenses. It will be seen by a careful 
examination of the several section'^ '^^ thi- law, that much of the 
information required to be furnishetl is for the purpose of inform- 
ing the State Board of Equalization, and to enable them to act 
advisedly in the premises. 

I do not understand that it is the purpose of this act to tax rail- 
road companies for all their property, and then tax them a second 
time on the amount of the capital stock. The provisions of this 
law are not as eomprehensive as they might have been. My opinion 
is, that the true intent and meaning of this act is to require rail- 
road companies to be taxed as individuals are taxed. Any 
other system could not be enforced under the Constitution. Article 
X., Sec. 1, is as follows : "The General Assembly shall provide by 
law for a uniform and equal rate of assessment and taxation, and 
shall prescribe such regulations as shall secure a just valuation for 
taxation of all property, both real and personal, excepting such 
only for municipal, educational, literary, scientific, religious, or 
charitable purposes, as may be specifically exempted by law." 



39 

This provision of the Constitution requires : 

1. That the assessment shall be uniform ; and, 

2. That it shall be equal on all persons whose property is subject 
to taxation ; that is, that the burthen of taxation shall be imposed 
on all classes of persons owning property subject to taxation equally. 
It cannot be said that an individual's property shall be valued at 
its fair cash value, and that a corporation shall not only pay tax 
upon the value of its property, and then again upon the stock, 
which is the mere representation of the value of the property of the 
company. A corporation is merely an association of persons asso- 
ciated together, uniting their funds, purchasing the stock in such 
corporation, and thus uniting and consolidating the capital of each 
into one common enterprise. So at last the company is composed 
of individuals. The company does not own the stock, but the indi- 
viduals composing the company own it. 

Railroad companies and other corporations are required to list 
and return the property and stock of the company as a matter of 
convenience and information. But can such company be required 
to pay tax on all the property owned by it, and then pay on the 
capital stock? I think not. But the company may, and properly 
should be, required to give the Board of Equalization all the infor- 
mation of which it is possessed, to enable them (the Board) to make 
a just valuation and assessment of the property of the corporation ; 
and I am of opinion that the blanks prepared and furnished to 
railroad companies by the Auditor of State, if properly filled out 
by such companies, will accomplish the object intended; that is, to 
secure a just and equal assessment of the railroad property in the 
State. 

I am satisfied that the Board of Equalization will not attempt to 
require a literal enforcement of the 292d section of the said Act of 
21st December, 1872, but that they will construe it as required 
by the 12th section of the Act; and that they will not hold that the 
property of railroad companies, or any other corporation, shall pay 
double tax, but that they will require such corporation to be assessed 
and pay tax just as individuals are assessed and taxed. Tiiis, and 
this only, will be " uniform" and "equal" taxation. 

I do not understand the law as the late Auditor, who prepared 

the bill, seemed to understand it. (See his Report to the General 

Assembly for 1873, pp. 4G and 47.) I cannot understand why, in 

sti mating the stock, that you should add to the cash value of the 

ock of the Company the amount of the debts due and owing by 



40 

the Company. Under the law, as applied to individuals, you can 
not deduct from the yalue of his property the amount of his debts. 
Now, if a company give in all their property, and owe one million 
of dollars, for the purpose of determining the value of the stock, 
why should this be added to the cash value of the stock ? I can 
not understand why. 

In some instances, railroad companies have property worth two 
or three times as much as the amount of their stock would indicate ; 
in others, the amount of stock far exceeds the value of the property. 
Therefore, it seems but just and proper that the facts required to be 
stated in said blanks prepared by the Auditor of State, should be 
furnished for the information of the Board, as before stated ; so that 
they may have all the facts before them when they begin the work 
of equalization. They should know who owns the stock, the 
amount paid on same, its value, etc. 

I am satisfied that justice will be done to all Railroad Companies 
by the Board, and that no Company will have just cause to com- 
plain, and that they will be taxed as individuals are taxed uader 
like circumstances. 

It seems to me that subdivision 4 of section 12 of said act makes 
this matter perfectly plain. It provides : " The capital stock of all 
companies," etc., " shall be so valued by the State Board of Equal- 
ization as to ascertain and determine, respectively, the fair cash 
value of such capital sto ;k, including the franchises, over and above 
the assessed value of the tangible property of such company or 
association." 



THERE MUST be a uniform rate of Assessment and Taxation. 

The law requires property to be appraised at the fair cash value. 
Nothing short of this will comply with the law. I cannot under- 
stand how an officer acting under oath can appraise wheat that has 
a fixed cash value at so much less than the same is selling for in 
cash. 

I read your letter to the Auditor and he tells me that Counties 
adjoining your County make the same complaints against you, that 
you make against them. May there not be some misunderstanding 
about this matter? 



41 

But I am satisfied that your County Board of Equalization can 
remedy the defects complained of. The Constitution, Article X, 
Sec. 1, provides that the General Assembly shall provide by law for 
a uniform and equal rate of assessment and taxation, and shall pre- 
scribe such regulations as shall secure a just valuation for taxation 
of all property, both real and personal. 

Now, the provisions of the law if properly executed would secure 
the result intended to be provided for in this section of the Consti- 
tution ; but if not attained by the Assessor, it may be done by the 
County Board of Equalization. 

But I am satisfied that if it can be shown to the Auditor of State 
that the inequality of which you complain exists to any considerable 
extent that he will take the proper steps to remedy the defect. 

You will see by sec. 269 of the act of Dec. 21, 1872, that he has 
the power to do so. 



DESCRIPTION OF LANBS.—Sec. 272 of Assessment Act of 
1872 construed. 

My opinion is that the proper construction of Sec. 272 of Assess- 
ment Act of December 21, 1872, in cases where a tract of land is 
divided in parcels so that it cannot be described without giving the 
metes and bounds, then, and in all such cases, it is the duty of the 
owner to cause it to be surveyed and platted into lots ; not as town 
lots, but it may be done as Lot No. 1, 2, &c. of subdivision of south- 
east quarter of southeast quarter, of Sec. 1, Town. 1 north, range 
15 west; or, say lot No. I of subdivis-ion of a tract east one- half 
of Sec. 1, Town. 1 north, range 15 west; made by A. B. and 
recorded in book (give name of record, 1, B, or in any way so as to 
designate the record where the plat may be found) ; or, say lot No. 
1 of that part of northwest quarter, of sec. 28, Town. 16 north, range 
12 west, containing three acres, as designated on plat recorded in 
book (give the description of record as " Record B " or " Record 1. ") 

The section referred to provides that the description if made in 
accordance with the number and description set forth in the 
recorded plat shall be deemed a good and valid description. The 
evident object was, to get upon the duplicate such descriptions as 
would not be void (in case of sale) for uncertainty. 



42 

If a tract of land be described as "part of the northwest quarter, 
Sec. 28, Town. 16, range 12/' this would be void for uncertainty. 
It does not designate what part of the quarter is owned by the 
taxpayer. 

This section does not apply to towns and cities alone, but to all 
subdivisions which cannot be accurately described without des- 
cribing by metes and bounds. 



COUNTY COMMISSIONERS.— PeriivM to sell intoxicating liq- 
uors — Can only grant permits at RE,GULiLR sessions of said Board. 

The 2d Section of the Temperance Liw, approved February 27, 
1873, provides that any person desiring a permit to sell intoxicating 
liquors, &c., shall file in the office of tlie Auditor of the proper 
County, not less than twenty days before the first day of the term of 
any regulae session of the Board of Commissioners of such County, 
a petition in writing, &o. 

The license provided for in this law can only be granted on the 
order of the County Commissioners made at a regular session of 
the Board. The Auditor Has the right under act approved February 
2d, 1855, to call a meeting of the County Board; but such meeting 
would not be a regular session as provided for in this law. 

I am therefore of the opinion that no order can be made until the 
regular session in June. 

If a party should file a petition and bond, without the order of 
the Board of Commissioners authorizing the permit to issue, he 
would be liable to be prosecuted and convicted under the law. 

The action to be taken by the Board on the filing and presenta- 
tion of the petition are judicial acts, and therefore their action in 
passing upon all the questions mu-^t be performed before a legal per- 
mit can issue. 



43 

3IARBIAGE LICENSE may issue in any County of the State 
where male is 21 years of age and female 18 — In sueh case actual 
residence in the County where license issues is not necessary. 

You ask two questions : 1st. " Is a residence of the lady for 30 
days in the County actually necessary when parties are twenty-one 
years of age?" 2d. "If the lady resides in one County of this 
State can license issue out of another County ?" 

In answer to your first question my opinion is, that if the female 
be over the age of 18 years, and the male ov^er the age of 21 years, 
actual residence in the County is not necessary. 

In answer to your second question my opinion is, that if the par- 
ties be over the age above stated, license may issue in any County in 
this State. 

But tlie Clerk, before he issues such license, should require these 
facts, viz: the ages of the parties to be proved as required bv Sec- 
tion 6, 1 G. & H., p. 430. 



THE RATE OF TAXATION may be reduced, but not increased, 
by Town Trustees. 

I am satisfied that the rate of taxation may be reduced, but that 
it can not be increased. If a state of facts should arise, such 
as an increase of the value of the taxable property after the 
rate is fixed by the Trustees, so that to collect the amount fixed 
would exceed the absolute necessity for the purpose intended, it 
would be unjust to the people to collect more than is absolutely 
needed for the purpose. My opinion is that the rate of taxes may be 
reduced. 



AN ORDER made by Town Board after their election, and within 
ten days thereafter for the levy of corporation tax, valid — Acts 
done by them after the expiration of ten days invalid, if certificate 
of election be not filed as required by statide. 

The law only requires me to give opinions to State officers, but 
inasmuch as the question you present is one of some interest, I have 
examined it with as much care as I could, and my time would allow. 



44 

In the case of Dinwiddle, et al., vs. The President, &c. of the 
Town of Rushville, (37 Ind., pp. QQ and 67,) the Supreme Court 
say: "This was a complaint * * * to enjoin the 
making of certain improvements in the town of Rushville, at the 
expense of the property holders, under an ordinance passed by the 
corporate authorities. 

" Demurrer to the complaint sustained, and exception. Judg- 
ment for defendants." 

In this case no certificate of the election of town officers was filed 
in the clerk's office as required by statute. (I do not attempt here 
to give the opinion in full, but only a statement of the point, and so 
much of the opinion as is necessary to show what they hold.) " We 
must hold that the ordinance is void, and the improvements are 
being made without competent legal authority." They also say : 
" Where a statute expressly prohibits a thing, until another has been 
done, the prohibition cannot be disregarded without judicial legis- 
lation." They hold the ordinance void because the certificate had 
not been filed as required by the statute. 

But your case presents a different question. Here your election 
was held on the 5th day of May. The law required the assessment 
to be made before the third Tuesday in May. The return of the 
certificate should have been made on the 15th day of May, All the 
requirements of the act had been substantially complied with so far 
as was necessary, prior to the time the levy was made. 

Therefore, I am of opinion that the assessment was properly and 
legally made. 

All acts done by the Board between the 5th day of May and the 
7th day of July, will be void. 



CIRCUIT COURTS have jurisdiction to -punish persons for vio- 
lation of the 9th Section of the Temperance law of 1873. 

The 16th Section of the act of February 27th, 1873— Acts of 
1873, p. 156 — provides that "The penalty and provisions mentioned 
in the 14th section of this act may be enforced by indictment in any 
court of record having criminal jurisdiction; and all pecuniary 
fines and penalties provided for in any of the sections of this act 
except the eighth and twelfth may be enforced and prosecuted for 



45' 

before any Justice of the Peace of the proper county, in an action 
of debt, in the name of the State of Indiana as plaintiff." 

The Circuit Court is a court of general jurisdiction, and has com- 
petent jurisdiction of all misdemeanors, except only such petty 
offenses over which justices of the peace have exclusive jurisdiction, 
simple assaults, &c. 

Justices have only such jurisdiction as is conferred by Statute. 
They have no common law jurisdiction. See Ist lud. Digest, p. 548 
Sec. 4. 

The first part of the sentence above quoted is meaningless, or at 
least it merely re-enacts what was the law before. Does not change 
the law as it stood before its passage. Without it Circuit Courts 
had complete jurisdiction. See G. and H. pp. 181 and 182, Sec. 1. 

The 16th section gives justices jurisdiction to enforce pecuniary 
fines or penalties only. This does not extend their jurisdiction, but 
I'raits it to fine or pecuniary punishment. 

The 9th section provides that "It shall be unlawful for any person 
to get intoxicated. * ^ . -i^ Any person convicted of intoxica- 
tion shall be required upon the trial to designate the person or per- 
sons from whom the liquor, in whole or in part, was obtained. In 
default of so designating such person, he or she shall in addition to 
the fine above mentioned, and as a part of his or her punishment 
for the offense, be imprisoned, " &c. 

How can a justice execute this penalty when by the 16th section 
they are only authorized to inflict " pecuniary fines and penalties ? " 
This section, then, in my opinion, limits the jurisdiction of justices 
of the peace to cases in which fines only can be assessed. 

If, then, I am correct in this construction, Circuit Courts are the 
only courts in which section 9 can be fully executed. That court 
having general jurisdiction of all crimes and misdemeanors, except 
as limited by 1st Section of Statute 3, G. and H., pp. 181 and 182, 
has jurisdiction of drunks. 



SECTIONS 2 AND 4 OF Temperance Law of February 27th, 
1873, construed — Whose names must be signed to the petition for 
permits f — Those who voted at last election. 

" Does the petition for a permit to sell intoxicating liquor under 
the act of February 27th, 1873, require a majority of the voters in 
the township at the time the petition is circulated, or a majority of 
the voters who voted at the election mentioned in the section ? " 



46 

In the 2d section of the act— in that part of the section in which 
reference is made to the petition and the petitioners — -the following 
language is used : " Which petition shall be signed by the applicant, 
and also by a majority of the legal voters resident in the warJ," &c. 
In the 4th section it is provided, " That the whole number of votes 
cast for candidates for Congress at the last preceding Congressional 
Election in the township ii< ^p * ^ shall be deem- 
ed to be the whole number of legal voters of such ward, town or 
township, a majority of whose names shall be signed to the petition 
of such applicant. " 

It is a rule of construction that the whole statute must be con- 
strued together; it is one act, and is to be construed as if it were 
but one section. Suppose you take Sees. 2 and 4, and paraphrase 
the portion referring to the subject matter, as follows : (Sec. 2)" Which 
petition shall be signed by the applicant, and also by a majority of 
the legal voters resident in the ward, &c., (Sec. 4,) and that the 
whole number of votes cast for candidate for Congress at the last 
preceding congressional election in, &o,, shall be deemed to be the 
whole number of legal voters of such ward, town or township, a 
majority of whose names shall be signed to the petition of such ap- 
plicant." A majority of what names? Surely, of the legal voters. 
Who, for the purpose of this act, are to be deemed legal voters ? 
The answer seems plain. They are those whose names are found 
on the poll books ; those who voted at the election referred to. If 
in a township, those who voted for Congressman ; if in a city, those 
who voted for Councilman ; if in a town, those who voted for Trus- 
tees. 



If one side of a county newspaper be printed in a city distant from 
the county, it is nevertheless a printing and publishing of the same 
in the county where the other side is printed, and where the paper is 
distributed. 

The point you make is this: A part, or one side of a paper is 
printed in Chicago or some other city, containing miscellaneous and 
literary matter, the other side being filled up with home news, 
advertisements and such other matter as the editor deems expedient 
and best. Would this be a printing and publication of the paper in 
the County ? My opininion is that it would. Suppose you should 



47 

purchase paper with the name of your newspaper printed on it and 
you print the balance of the paper in your office, would this be a 
printing and publication of the paper in your county? Clearly it 
would be. 

If the paper be one of general circulation and a part of it printed 
in your office and it be circulated, or published from your office, 
I am satisfied this would make your paper a proper medium for the 
publication of legal notices. The words "printed" and '"published" are 
used as synonymous terms. Sometimes the one and sometimes the 
other is used, and in some States the words " printed and pub- 
lished" are used. The object and purpose of the law is to give 
notice to the public of the facts, and I think this object is effected 
when the notice and one- half of the paper is "printed" in the 
County as fully as it would be if both sides of the paper were pririted 
in the County. 



EA CH MEMBER of the County Board of Equalization entitled to 
a vote in fixing value to be placed upon land in each Toicnship in 
the County — The County Board may change values fixed by them 
in their final order, and the value fixed will be concludve and bind- 
ing on the Auditor, unless changed by Sta'e Board. 

1st. If an Assessor is instructed by the Board of Equalization to 
re-assess a certain township, or townships, by such a per cent, as 
will reduce the average value, say from ^60 per acre to $55, can he 
make any different assessment, or reduce the average, gay to $50 
per acre ? 

My opinion is that the Assessor is the agent of the Board, with 
limited powers. He can do what he is directed to do by the order, and 
n 'tiling more. The order of the Board must be complied with. 

2d. If the Assessor disregards the instructions of the Board, and 
two of them are in favor of receiving said re-assessment, and two 
opposed to its reception, would the Assessor have a vote on its recep- 
tion or rejection? 

3d. If the Assessor would have no vote, and ten of the Board 
vote for and ten against the reception of the assessment, in what 
condition would that leave the assessment ? 

4th. Should the assessment not be received by the Board what 
would be the legal course to pursue ? 



48 

5th. In case the assessment should not be received as re-assessed, 
would it be legal for the Auditor to put the property upon the 
duplicate returns ? 

I will attempt to answer your questions, 2, 3, 4 and 5. It seems 
that the Board may by their final order regulate the appraisement of 
land, etc., in any township. They may then adopt or reject the ap- 
praisement made by the Assessor. It is the final order made by the 
Board that governs, and the value thereon fixed will be binding 
upon the Auditor, unless changed by the State Board. 

Eich member of the Board has a right to take part in all its 
deliberations, and, as such member, may vote upon all questions that 
legitimately come befjre it. He would therefore have a right to 
vote upon the question as to the value to be fixed upon the land in 
any Township. 

Upon the first question you make I am well satisfied that he must 
comply with the order of the Board, but practically this is not 
important, for the reason that the Board may subsequently change 
the order then made. And for this reason they may, and perhaps 
do, during their entire session, from day to day, receive new lights, 
and obtain knowledge not possessed by them before, as to the value 
of property ; and if they, before their final adjournment find that 
they have committed errors, such errors may be corrected. 



PROSECUTING ATTORNEYS for Judicial Circuit and Crim- 
inal Circuit Court entitled to appear and prosecute crimes and mis- 
demeanors before Justices and Mayors or Cities and have fee taxed 
for same. 

The office of Prosecuting Attorney is of Constitutional creation, 
and the point made that he has no right to appear and prosecute 
before Justices of the Peace and Mayors of cities, would be that of 
a Constitutional officer shorn of all duties in the prosecution of 
crimes and misdemeanors. 

Did the Legislature in the act of April 23, 1869—3 G. & H., 178— 
intend to take from him the right to appear for the State or as the At- 
torney for the State, in all the Courts of the State, including Justices' 
and Mayors' courts ? It is not contended that any subsequent act gives 
to Criminal Court Prosecutors any new or additional rights or powers 
not conferred by the act of April 23, 1869. The 1st section of said act 



49 

provides that " the Criminal Circuit Court shall have original exclu- 
sive jurisdiction of all felonies and of all misdemeanors, except as 
provided by law for Justices of the Peace, and shall have such 
appellate jurisdiction in criminal actions as is or may be provided 
by law for the Circuit Court." This section makes this further 
provision : " The said criminal courts shall in all things, not oth- 
erwise provided by law, be governed by the law in force in regard 
to Circuit Courts ; and the Judge, Prosecuting Attorney, Clerks, 
and Sheriffs of said criminal Circuit Court shall receive the same 
salaries and fees allowed by law to the Judges, Prosecuting Attor- 
neys, Clerks and Sheriffs of the Circuit Court." 

The office of criminal Prosecuting Attorney, or the Prosecuting 
Attorney for the criminal Circuit Court, is of statutory creation. 
He has no rights, powers or privileges not given or created by this 
statute. 

Does the fact that the criminal Circuit Court has "exclusive 
jurisdiction of felonies and misdemeanors, except as prescribed by- 
law for Justices of the Peace, and such appellate jurisdiction as is 
or may be provided by law for the Circuit Court," take away from 
the Prosecuting Attorney the right to appear and represent the 
State before Justices in the prosecution of felonies and misdemean- 
ors ? My opinion is, that it does not. 

The criminal prosecutor being of statutory creatioa can have no 
powers except such as are created by the above quoted statute. The 
evident intention of the Legislature was to furnish the State with a 
representative in the Criminal Court. He has no power or rights 
except such as are given by said statute, except it be conferred by 
subsequent legislation. Has it been so conferred ? 

Section 16 of the new fee bill — acts of 1873, p. 130 — provides that 
" The Circuit, Criminal Circuit, and District Prosecuting Attorneys' 
fees shall be as follows, to- wit : 

" * * * Docket fee before Justice of the Peace, on 

plea of guilty, or on conviction, $5.00." 

This act, then, provides a fee for each of these officers before 
Justices of the Peace. Indeed, all the laws passed since the office 
of Prosecuting Attorney was created, has given him a fee for prose- 
cuting before Justices. See act June 16, 1852, 1 R. S. 1852, p. 280; 
acts 1855, 1 G. & H., p. 335; fee and salary law of 1871, statutes 
1871, p. 27. See, also, act above referred to of 1873. The act of 
February 22, 1871, statutes 1871, p. 24, gave Justices jurisdiction 
Doc. J. Att'y G.— 4 



60 

of violations of the fish law, and required Prosecuting Attorneys to 
see that the provisions of the act were enforced. 

Can it be said that the Legislature provided that an officer should 
receive a fee for doing a thing he had no right to do ? 

Laws are to be construed so as to make sense. Can it be that 
when the Legislature provided that he should see that the fish law 
was enforced before Justices of the Peace, that he had no right to 
appear in that Court to prosecute, when at the same session they 
gave him a fee for appearing and prosecuting in that Court? I 
think not. I therefore conclude that either of said officers may 
appear and prosecute criminal causes, either felonies or misdemean- 
ors, before Justice's or Mayor's, and when one of them appears for 
the State, or has instituted the proceeding before a Justice, the other 
is excluded. I cannot cannot conclude that an officer created by the 
fundamental law of the State can be shorn of all right to exercise 
all the powers and functions of his office unless the legislative intent 
is very clearly manifested. 



BIENNIAL REPORT 



OF THE 



SUPERINTENDENT 



OF 



PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 



OP 



THE STATE OF INDIANA. 



TO THE G-0"^E]E^nsrOK.- 



INDIANAPOLIS : 

SENTINEL COMPANY, PRINTERS. 
1874. 



REPORT. 



Depaetment of Public Instruction, 
Indianapolis, January 22, 1874. 

To his Excellency, Thomas A. Hendricks, 

Governor of Indiana : 

lu compliance with the one hundred and twenty-second section of 
the school law, making it the duty of the Superintendent of Public 
Instruction to make a brief report in writing to the Governor, in the 
month of January, in each year when there is no regular session of 
the General Assembly, indicating in general terms the enumeration 
of the children of the State for common school purposes, the additions 
to the permanent school fund within the year, the amount of school 
revenue collected within the year, and the amount apportioned and 
distributed to the schools, I herewith submit my biennial report for 
the year ending December 31, 1873. 

The last legislature, by an amendment of the fourteenth section of 
the school law, approved as late as the 8th of March, required that 
the enumeration of the children of the State for common school 
purposes should be made in that same month and April following 
instead of July and August as heretofore. This required great expe- 
dition and consequently notice of the change, with the proper blanks, 
was immediately sent to the trustees thoroughout the State, wh« 



have discharged the duty with energy and promptitude, the results 
of which are indicated by the figures below : 



1. ENUMERATION. 



Number of white males between 6 and 21 years of age... 324,082 

Number of white females between 6 and 21 years of age...... 307,067 



Total number of white children... ..631,149 

Number of colored males between 6 and 21 years of age 4,589 

Number of colored females between 6 and 21 years of age 4,594 

Total number of colored children 9,1 83 

Whole number 640,332 

Whole number enumerated in the preceding July and 

August 681,54^ 

Increase in our schoolastic population within six months 8,783 

II. ADDITIONS TO THE SCHOOL FUNDS. 

1. Common School Fmid. 

Amount of Common School Fund in June, 1872 $2,239,502 22 

Amount of Sinking Fund distributed 56,140 09 

Amount since added from other sources 2,453 20 

Amount in June, 1873 2,341,267 12 

These figures show that the increase of the Common School Fund 
rrom the first day of June, 1872, to the same date in 1873, is 
$101,764.90. More than one half of this amount, however, is from 
the Sinking Fund, which is now exhausted, and consequently no 
additions in the future can be made from this heretofore fruitful 
source. 

2. Congressional Township Fund. 

Amount of Fund June, 1872 .$2,269,867 61 

Amount since added from sale of lands 19,316 15 

Amount June, 1873 2,289,183 76 

Add the value of 12,925 acres unsold lands 83,697 18 

Total Congressional Fund 2,372,880 94 



This fund, with the exception of the $83,697.18, the estimated value 
of the unsold congressional school lands, is productive of interest. 
In a very few instances these lands are cultivated, and the rents 
and profits are applied to the education of the children of the proper 
township. 

Our school funds have become very much simplified. They are 
now embraced under the two heads. Common School Fund, and 
Congressional School Fund. 

The former embraces the various funds mentioned in the Consti- 
tution of the State and set apart by it for educational purposes, such 
as the surplus Revenue Fund, Saline Fund, Bank Tax Fund, 
Sinking Fund, and the fund derived from the sale of county semi- 
naries, the last dollar of which has found its way into the fund, and 
is at the present time productive of interest. This fund embraces 
also, fines, forfeitures, escheats, etc., which continue to augment it 
from year to year. A part of this fund is held in trust by the 
different counties of the State, the rest is held by the State herself, 
which debt she has acknowledged by the issuance of certain non- 
negotiable bonds, bearing six per cent, interest. 

The Congressional Township Fund includes the proceeds of the 
sales of the sixteenth sections, as well as the present value of such 
of those lands as remain unsold. Both of these funds may be sum- 
marized as follows : 

Non-negotiable bonds 13,904,783 21 

Common School Fund 2,341,267 12 

Congressional Township Fund... 2,372,880 94 

Total 18,618,931 27 

III. COMMON 8CHOOJL BEVENUES. 

The principal sources of our common school revenue are taxes 
upon the property and poll of the State, interest upon common 
.school fund, liquor licenses, and unclaimed fees. 

The following table exhibits the revenue derived from each of 
these sources for the year ending November 15th, 1873 : 

Apportioned by the Superintendent of Public In- 
struction, collected by tax $1,190,626 65 

Interest on common school fund...... 189,455 47 

Liquor licenses,, 40,212 50 



Unclaimed fees 7,193 7.2 

State's interest on bonds paid.... 231,064 50 

Other sources 27,382 86 

Total revenue collected for apportionment $1,685,935 70 

Amount apportioned... 1,646,913 83 

Apportioned by County Auditors, interest on the 
Congressional fund collected and appropriated 

by the counties ^8,988 12 

Amount derived from local taxation..... 530,667 80 

Total 629,655 92 

Grand total of school revenue for tuition for the year 

ending November 15, 1873 |2,276,569 75 

The revenue of 1873 compared with that of 1872, 

Increase by State tax......... 120,324 96 

Increase by interest on Fund..................... 28,615 37 

Increase by unclaimed fees 6,693 34 

Increase by local taxation 118,689 15 

Increase by interest on bonds 7,323 54 

Total increase $281,641 36 

Decrease by abolishing fees for liquor licenses 68,067 50 

Decrease in Congressional revenue (only one distri- 
bution) 47,992 09 

Total decrease 116,059 59 

Net increase $165,581 77 

The increase derived from taxation is due to an increase in the 
wealth of the people and the number of taxable polls. 

The increase in the amount of interest is caused partly by an 
increase in the productive school fund itself, in accordance with the 
act of March 11, 1873, and partly by a change of the rate of interest 
from 7 to 8 per cent. 

The increase in the amount derived from unclaimed witness fees 
is the result of the energy of the Attorney General and County 
Superintendents, in accordance with the legislation of last winter. 

The interest on the Congressional Fund is the amount appor= 



tioned in June, and does not include the distribution made in 
January of this year, and is therefore only about half the usual 
amount reported from this source. 

The same is true of the amount derived from local taxation. 

IV. MISCELLANEOUS. 

Average length of schools in days 1 05 

Average length of schools in months 5^ 

Number enrolled in primary schools 4il,259 

Number enrolled in high schools 13,895 

Average daily attendance of white children 295,931 

Average daily attendance of colored children 2,920 

Number of districts in which schools were taught 8,918 

Number of districts in which colored schools were taught 90 

Number of white male and female teachers emj)loyed. .. 11,965 

Number of colored male and female teachers employed 91 

Number of school houses in the State 9,202 

Number of school houses built within the year 465 

Cost of same $872,900 73 

Whole number of persons licensed by the County 

Superintendents 9,575 

Quite a number of changes were made in our school law by the 
Legislature at its last session, the wisdom of which can be certainly 
determined only by a practical test. Among these changes the 
most important is the abolition of County Examiner, and the crea- 
tion in its stead of that of 

COUNTY SUPERINTENDENT. 

The law devolved the selection of this officer upon the township 
Trustees, who, from their relation to the public schools, were supposed 
to be peculiarily fitted for making such selection. These appoint- 
ments were made by the trustees in every county in the State on 
the first Monday of June last, the day designated by the law. 
Persons were generally appointed by the Trustees wnth exclusive 
reference to their qualifications, and in all such cases the results 
have been eminently satisfactory, and the law itself lias been 
rendered popular. In a few instances, however, I regret to rej)ort, 
that fealty to political party rather than to common schools, was 
made the one essential qualification for the office. In such counties 



the law has failed in a great measure to respond to public expecta- 
tion. The fault in this case is not in the law itself, but in the 
administrators of the law. 

COUNTY BOARD OF EDUCATION. 

This Board is composed of all the township and school trustees 
of the county, together with the County Superintendent, and is 
another new feature in our school system. It takes its origin in 
certain "general wants and needs of the sehools and school property 
of which they have charge." It is the special province of i iis Board 
to secure the best possible text books for the schools, to relieve the 
parent of the burden of frequent changes, and to secure uniformity 
in text books in the same school. 

Under the law creating it this Board was r.ot called into existence 
until as late as September last. It has, th^-reiore, but fairly entered 
upon its work. Most of its decisions . c merely advisory. "In a 
multitude of counsellors there is safe .' 

TOWNSHT. INSTITUTES. 

Experience had abundantly shown that it was impossible to secure 
the attendance of all the teachers at the County Institutes, inasmuch 
as the law made such attendance voluntarily, and that, as a general 
rule, those teachers who needed the advantages of these institutes 
most, were the ones who failed to attend. For the purpose, there- 
fore, of reaching all the teachers, and making the benefits of insti- 
tutes universal, the legislature, at its last session, enacted a law requir- 
ing the township trustee to cause to be held in his township "town- 
ship institutes or model schools, for the improvement of teachers, at 
least one Saturday in each month during which the public schools 
may be in progress." This law requires the attendance of all the 
teachers in the township aud for non-attendance imposes a penalty. 

Thus far these institutes have been almost universally attended, 
and they have awakened an interest and a rivalry among teachers 
which must result in great good to the schools of the State. 

CHANGE IN RATE OF INTEREST. 

County Auditors inform me that they are now collecting interest 
at the rate of eight per cent upon all expired loans and new loans, 
and that they have no difficulty in finding borrowers at the increased 
rate. 



STATE INSTITUTES. 

Under the auspices of the State Board of Education three State 
Teachers' Institutes were held during the past summer. One at 
Muncie, one at Franklin, and one at Vincennes. These institutes 
were largely attended by teachers from various parts of the State, and 
the instruction which was given by experienced educators of our own 
State and from abroad was invaluable. 

COUNTY INSTITUTES. 

These have been more generally held than in any former year, and 
more generally attended by the teachers. With our people they are 
now a fixed fact. They have given a fresh impetus to the cause of 
popular education in every county in the State. Perphaps not less 
than ninety-five per cent of our teachers receive all their professional 
training in these temporary Normal schools. Trustees in the employ- 
ment of teachers discriminate in favor of those who attend these 
institutes and against those who neglect or refuse to attend them. 
The money used in their support greatly increases the teaching power 
of the State, and is therefore wisely expended. 

NOEMAL SCHOOL.. 

The State Normal school has not only maintained its own high 
character as a professional school, but likewise that of the class of 
institutions which it represents. "A written pledge on the part of 
the applicant for admission, filed with the principal, that said appli- 
cant will, so far as may be practicable, teach in the common schools 
of Indiana a period equal to twice the time spent as a pupil in the 
Normal school," is a condition of admission. In the number of 
pupils, each year gains upon its predecessor. Its growth has been 
constant. Each term enrolls from twenty-five to forty per cent more 
students than the corresponding term of a preceding year. During 
the past year about three hundred students were in attendance. 
Twenty of this number graduated, and each of these is faithfully 
carrying out the condition of admission. The universal verdict in 
reference to their teaching is that their work is thorough. 

The influence of the school is not limited to its graduates. There 
are many under-graduates whose ideas of school work and methods 
of instruction have been greatly improved by an attendance at the 
institution. 



9 

This school must ever be regarded as the heart of our common 
school system. 

Chauncy Rose, Esq., a distinguished and weallhy citizen of Terre 
Haute, generously donated to the institution last year the sum of 
four thousand dollars for the purchase of a library of reference. 
More than one half of that sum has been expended in accordance with 
his wishes, and the institution is now in possession of a very valuable 
library. 

SCHOOL HOUSES. 

The reports now on file in this office show that our people have 
expended during the year past |872,900.73 in the erection of school 
houses, which is more than has been expended for the same purpose 
in any preceding year. 

The average cost of these is something over $1,800.00, which 
indicates very clearly the character of these buildings. 

Not a child in Indiana, so far as known to me, has been deprived 
of school privileges for the want of a school house in which to attend 
school. 

CONCLUSION. 

Almost every department of our school system indicates progress 
rluring the past year. Our permanent school fund has been 
augmented ; our annual school revenue has been increased ; more 
than the usual amount of money has been raised by local taxation ; 
the school houses erected have been more substantial, and more in 
accordance with true architectural taste ; the schools have been better 
attended, graded and organized ; the teachers, been better qualified 
for their profession, and better paid for their services. 

In respect to the average duration of the school term, the year 
past suffers in comparison with the year immediately preceding ; 
for while as compared with all other years it shows a decided gain, 
in this instance there is a loss of eleven days. This is much to be 
regretted, and shows the necessity at once of a law fixing the mini- ' 
mum length of a school term. 

In view of the fact that common schools are the only hope of the 

poor to obtain an education at all, and in view of the additional 

fact that nineteen-twentieths of our population obtain from common 

schools all the education they ever do obtain, and that most of our 

B. J.— S. P. I.— 2 



10 

public men receive from these the first elements of thought and 
their rudimental conceptions of men and things, permit me, in the 
conclusion of this brief report, to congratulate your Excellency, and 
through you the entire people of the State, upon the generally pros- 
perous condition of our free public school system. 

MILTON B. HOPKINS, 

Superintendent of Public Instruction. 



b 



REPORT 



ADJUTANT GENERAL 



THE STATE OF INDIANA 



YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1873. 



TO THCIB G-0-V^EI2,Z5rOia. 



INDIANAPOLIS: 

SENTINEL COMPANY, PRINTBBS. 
, 1874. 



REPORT 



EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, INDIANA, 
Adjutant General's Office, 

Indianapolis, December 31, 1873. 

To His Excellency, Thomas A. Hendricks, 

Governor of Indiana : 

Sir — I have the honor to submit, herewith, the Annual Report 
of this Department for the year ending December 31, 1873. 

Of ordnance and ordnance stores there was on hand on the first 
of January last : 

Springfield rifles 649 

Enfield rifles 440 

Total 1,089 

718 light cavalry sabres. 

716 Kitridge, Smith & Wesson carbines. 

One bronze six-pounder cannon, so badly powder-burned as to 
be deemed unsafe for firing salutes. 

There has been received upon requisition on the Ordnance 
Department, U. S. A., under the act of Congress of April 23, 1808 : 

500 Springfield breech-loading rifle muskets. 

150 Spencer repeating rifles. 

2 light bronze twelve-pounder cannon. 

There has been issued to independent companies within the last 
year: 

100 Springfield rifles to the Evansville Zouaves, Evansville, 
Indiana. 



100 Springfield rifles to the German Sharp-shooters, Evansville, 
Indiana. 

Remaining on hands : 

Springfield rifles 449 

Enfield rifles 440 

Springfield breech -loading muskets 500 

Spencer rifles , — 150 

Total 1,539 

There are in the Arsenal two new twelve-pound bronze cannon, 
one of which has been used for firing salutes, besides one six-pounder 
badly damaged, and one six-pound Mexican trophy. 

There was remaining due this State, after the last requisition for 
rifles had been filled, the sum of $14,326. 

Since then a requisition has been made for six Gatling guns, 
complete, at an estimated cost of $8,370, leaving still due the State 
the sum of $5,956, to which must be a(ided this State's distributial 
share ol the $200,000 annually distributed among the several States 
under an act of Congress of April 23, 1808. 

During the past year there have been two occasions for calling on 
the military force of the State to suppress domestic violence. The 
first, at Knightsviile, in Clay County, on the 15th of April ; and 
the second, at Logansport, Cass County, on the 27th of December. 
To the former place were sent a detachment of City Police, under 
command of Chief Thompson, and a detachment of the Emmett 
Guards under command of Capt. Barry. Sixty Springfield 
rifles, and 2,000 rounds of ammunition were furnished this expe- 
dition. The guns and about one-half the ammunition were 
returned to the Arsenal. To the latter place were sent a detach- 
ment of the City Police, a detachment each of the Guards and 
College Guards — all under command of Gen. Macauley. This force 
was furnished with seventy-six (76) Spencer rifles and about 1,500 
rounds of ammunition. On the return of this expedition, the arms 
and ammunition were left with the Sheriff of Cass County, to be used 
by him, if necessary, in preserving the public peace. These guns and 
ammunition have not yet been returned to the Arsenal. About 
this time, 34 Spencer rifles and one box of ammunition were fur- 
nished the Sheriff' of this County, in order that he might be the 
better prepared to suppress any violent demonstrations that were 



then seriously apprehended, in consequence of the railroad engineers^ 
strike. These guns are still in the custody of the Sheriff. During 
the troubles in Wayne County, growing out of the removal of the 
County seat, one box, 1,200 rounds, of ammunition was sent to the 
Sheriff of Wayne County on his requisition. This box was after- 
wards returned to the Arsenal ; but the original packages had been 
opened, and in returning the cartridges, they failed to return the 
gun caps, thereby rendering the ammunition useless to the State. 

Thanking you for advice and assistance rendered me in the dis- 
charge of the duties of this office, I am, 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

W. W. CONNER, 

Adjutant General, Indiana. 



7 

ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



VINCENNES ONIVERSITY 



YEAR ENDIiNG JANUARY 1, 1874. 



TO THK QOVKliNOIl. 



INDIANAPOLIS : 

SENTINEL COMPANY, PRINTERS. 

1874. 
Doc. J. — Viu. Uni. — 1. 



REPORT. 



To the Hon. T. A. Hendeicks, 

Governor of the State of Indiana, 

And Members of the Legislature t 

In accordance with the requirements of the Charter of the Vin- 
cennes University, we, the Trustees of said University, herewith 
respectfully submit the yearly report of the affairs of said Univer- 
sity to your honorable body, for the year ending January 1, 1874. 

There has been an average attendance since the opening of the, 
school, January 1, 1873, of fifty-two scholars. 

The branches taught have been Writing, Orthography, Descrip- 
tive Geography, Grammar, Algebra, Arithmetic, Natural Philoso- 
phy, Physiology, I/atin, German, English Literature, Geology,, 
Botany and Singing. 

The Board have employed Prof L. Prugh, President of the 
University, at a salary of fifteen hundred dollars ; Miss L. V. 
Stewart, first assistant, at a salary of one thousand dollars; Miss 
Ray Piety, second assistant, at a salary six hundred dollars. 

The funds of the University are invested in Knox County audi 
City of Vincennes, Indiana, Bonds, as reported. 

It is the purpose of the Trustees to add to the apparatus as fast as 
needed, so that the pupils may have every advantage which such a 
school should give. 

The real estate and buildings belonging to the University are 
valued at seven thousand dollars. 

The chemical and philosophical apparatus is valued at about 
three hundred and twenty-five dollars. 

There is a library of several hundred volumes belonging to the 
University. The pupils have, in addition, the use of the Vincennes 
Library. 

To the Geological specimens already owned by the University, a 



iiumW, in addition, have been contributed by the Smithsonian 
Institute, Washington City, and also by the pupils. 

Accompanying this report you will find the Annual Circular of 
the school. 

Respectfully submitted, 

W. W. HITT, 

President Board of Trustees. 

H. T. ROSEMAN, 

Secretary. 



jLisritsrtTjLXi OTjaatT:L.j^i^ 



OF THE 



ACADEMIC DEPARTMENT 



VINCENNES UNIVERSITY 



VINCENNE8, INDIANA. 



FOR THE YEAE 1873--4, 



OFFICERS OF BOARD OF TRUSTEES. 



W. W. HITT, M. D., Pres't. H. T. ROSEMAN, Sec'y 

AVM. BURTCH, Treasurer. 



OFFICERS OF BOARD OF INSTRUCTORS. 



LEWIS PRUCtH, a. M., Pres., LOUISE V. STEWART, 

Teaoher of Languages and Xatnral Scien('e.«. Teacher of Mathematics and Grammar. 

RAY PIETY, B. F. PETERS, 

Teacher of Geography and Keading. Teaoher of Music. 



ACADEMIC DEPARTMENT 



VINCENNES UNIVERSITY. 



This School afiords an opportunity of acquiring a thorough 
knowledge of the branches usually taught in the High Schools and 
Academies. It comprises two Departments: a Preparatory and 
an Academic. The course of study in the Preparatory Department 
is the same for all pupils. In the Academic Department, there are 
two courses of study, Classical and Scientific. Upon the completion 
of either course, pupils will receive appropriate diplomas. 



COURSE OF STUDY. 



PREPARATORY DEPARTMENT. 



FIRST YEAR. ^ 
Grammar, Geography, Arithmetic, Reading, and Spelling. 



SECOND YEAR. 



FIRST TERM. 

Arithmetic, 
Grammar, 
Geography, 
Reading:. 



SECOND TERM. 

Arithmetic, 
Grammar, 
History U. S., 
Reading. 



THIRD TERM. 

Arithmetic, 
Grammar, 
History U. S., 
Readine;. 



ACADEMIC DEPARTMENT. 



CLASSICAL COURSE. 



FIRST TERM. 

Latin Grammar, 

Arithmetic, 

Physiology. 



FIEST YEAR. 

SECOND TERM. 



THIRD TERM. 



Latin Gram, and Reader, Latin Reader, 
Algebra, Algebra, 

Zoology. Zoology. 



SECOND YEAR. 



Caesar, 


Cseear, 


Cicero, 


Geometry, 


Natural Philosophy, 


Nat. Philosophy, 


Geology, 


Ancient History, 


Modern History, 


Greek Grammar. 


Greek Reader. 
THIRD YEAR. 


Greek Reader. 


Cicero, 


Virgil, 


Virgil, 


Astronomy, 


Chemistry, 


Chemistry, 


Logic, 


Constitution U. S., 


Constitution U. S, 


Anabasis. 


Anabasis. 





SCIENTIFIC COURSE. 



FIRST YEAR. 



FIRST TEEM. 



SECOND TEEM. 



Analysis Eng. Lang., Rhetoric, 
Arithmetic, Algebra, 

Physiology. Zoology. 



THIED TERM. 



Rhetoric, 
Algebra, 
Zoology. 



SECOND YEAR. 

English Literatnre, English Literature, Botany, 

Geometry, Natural Philosophy, Nat. Philosophy, 

Geology, Ancient History, Modern History, 

French or German. French or German. French or Germazi. 



THIRD YEAR. 



Astronomy, 



Chemistry, Chemistry, 

Logic, Constitution of U. S., Constitution of U. S., 

Mental Philosophy. Moral Science. Moral Science. 

Rhetorical Exercises and Composition will be required throughout 
the Course. Vocal Music will be taught twice in each week. 

When a sufficient number desire to pursue any study not laid 
down in the course, classes may be formed in that study. 

For admission to any class, pupils must have completed the 
studies of the preceding classes. 

Any one beginning the study of any language, will continue it for 
two years. 



TEXT BOOKS. 



Felter's Arithmetic, 

Harvey's Grammar, 

Guyot's Intermediate Geography, 

Kerl's Compo.sition, 

Steele's Astronomy, 

•Steele's Cliemistry, 

Steele's Physiology, 

Steele's Geology, 

Steele's Philosophy, 

Hooker's Natural tlistory, 

Wood's Botany, 



Davies' Algebra, 

Davies' Geometry, 

Venable's History United States, 

Worcester's TTniversal History, 

Shaw's Er.glish Literature, 

Townsend's Constiintion JTnited States, 

Ilarkness' Latin (rrammar, 

Harkness' Latin Reader, 

Ahn's German ]\Iethod, 

Sciiuyler's J^ogic, 

Croaby's Greek Grammar and Lessons. 



Tuition in Pre[)aratoi'y Depai-tiuent — per term $:] (K) 

Tuition in Academic Department — per term 4 00 

Tuition must he paid within two weeks after the beginuiug oj 
tlie term. 



CALENDAR FOK 1878-'74. 

Fail Term opens September 1 ; closes December 19, 1873 
Winter Term o])ens January o ; closes Marcli "20, 1874. 
Spring Term opens Marcli 30; closes June 17 1874. 

For further information, addi'e.-s 



H. T. rosp:man, 

Yl.NCF.NNES^ L\D. 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OP THE 



DIRECTORS AND OFFICERS 



OF THE 



INDIANA STATE PRISON 



S O TJ T H 



December 15, 1873 



TO THE C3-ovEs,isroia. 



INDIANAPOLIS : 

SENTINEL COMPANY, PRINTERS. 

1874. 
Doc. J.— S. P. S.— 1 



DIRECTORS' REPORT. 



Indiana State Prison South, 
Jeffersonville, Dec. 15, 1873. 

Thomas A. Hendricks, Governor of Indiana: 

Sir: — In accordance with the provisions of law we herewith 
submit this our first annual report for the year 1873 ending this 
date. 

Accompanying this, please find the Warden's and other officers' 
reports of the Indiana State Pri.son, South. From an examination 
of them it will be seen that the earnings of the prison, from convict 
labor and all other sources, are in excess of the ordinary running 
expenses. 

The amount expended in repairs of the prison during the 
year, $17,802.05, is not large; in fact, falls short of the amount 
which we anticipated at the beginning of the year, not only from 
taking into view what was set forth by the Warden and the Direc- 
tors in former reports regarding the dilapidated condition of the 
prison, but from our own personal observation and from a thorough 
examination of the condition of the shops, the walls, and in short, 
the whole structure previous to the repairs having been made. 
These, as well as the removal of the barn and stables in order to 
protect them from fire, and re-fencing the garden grounds, together 
with the various improvements and repairs made, we believe were 
all necessary and were authorized by us. The prison now appears 
to be in a very good state of repair, and will not require an extra- 
ordinary amount of money to keep it so for some time to come. 

The earnings of the prison for the past year are in excess of the 



ordinary expenses, and, although the excess is small, yet taking into 
account the great amount of sickness, and necessarily the loss to the 
labor account from this cause, we think the showing is fully up to 
what we could reasonably expect, and believe, under the present 
contracts and management, without any drawbacks from extraor- 
dinary sickness or other causes, the prison will be entirely self-sus- 
taining in the future. 

It will be remembered that the last legislature elected Mr. Samuel 
Piatt as one of the directors of the prison, in place of Captain John 
Kirk, believing him ineligible to hold said office for cause. This 
state of affairs rendered it somewhat embarrassing for the present 
Board to decide just how to act, under the then existing complica- 
tions, as both of these gentlemen claimed to be entitled to a seat in 
the Board. 

It was finally agreed between these gentlemen that during the 
time their case was before the courts and until decision was made 
as to which was legally entitled to hold the office, that neither 
should be recognized or officiate in the business of the Directory. 

As no decision has yet been made in the case, the other two mem- 
bers of the Board transact the official business without apparently any 
dissatisfaction or unpleasant feelings existing between any of the 
parties. 

Owing to existing complications, as mentioned above, at the time 
the present Board assumed the duties of their office, it was agreed 
that no election should take place for the offices of Moral Instruc- 
tor and Physician until such time as the case in litigation between 
Messrs. Kirk and Piatt should be decided. Therefore, the then 
present incumbents, the Rev. J. W. Sullivan, Moral Instructor, and 
Dr. Wm. H. Sheets, Physician, were continued in their positions. 
And we would desire here to say that we do not think that we could 
have made any change in either of these departments that would 
have been more satisfactory to us, or whose efforts could have been 
more conducive to the moral or medical welfare of the institution. 
In order that we might become better acquainted with the internal 
workings of prisons and be better prepared to decide in regard to 
such internal workings and management, we visited various prisons 
from time to time, and after a careful observation we can say, with- 
out hesitation, that, in our opinion, there is no prison which we 
have visited that is superior to this in its general management, and 
we believe the present Warden of this prison, Colonel L. S. Shuler, 



has no superior as a disciplinarian and in the general management 
of convicts. 

To tlie officers of the prison and their assistants we would extend 
our thanks for the faithful performance of their duties, and espec- 
ially to Col. L. S. Shuler, Warden; Capt. A. M. Luke, Deputy 
Warden ; and R. J. Forsyth, Clerk, for their systematic and able 
management of the important trusts committed to their care. 

Referring to the Warden's repoit for details, etc., we respectfully 
submit the matter for consideration. 

A. L. MUNSON, 

B. F. HILL, 

Directors. 



WARDEN'S REPORT. 



Indiana State Prison South, 
December 15th, 1873. 



To tJie Board of Directors . 



Gentlemen— As the above date ends the Prison year, 1 am 
reminded that the time has again arrived, provided by law, for the 
annual reports of this Institution. In accordance therewith, I 
hereby submit this, my fifth annual report, for the fiscal year ending 
this date. 

By reference to the clerk's reports it will be seen that the total 
receipts of cash from all sources have been $63,793 66, and the total 
expenditures $66,796. 29, thereby showing an excess of $3,002.63, 
advanced by the Warden. 

The total ordinary expenses for running the Prison during the 
year is $66,806.23, and the total earnings from convict labor and 
all other sources is $67,088.39, showing the earnings $282.16 in 
excess of ordinary expenses. 

The expense for repairs done to the Prison during the same time is 
$17,802.05. This expenditure may appear at first sight to be large, 
but when you come to take into consideration the great amount of 
labor on various repairs, it is not excessive. 

You will doubtless remember, in reading my last annual report, 
I called attention to the dilapidated condition of the Prison gener- 
ally. The walls were decaying and falling to pieces; the shops 
were in a leaky condition for want of roofing. 

I have had the walls which surround the entire grounds thoroughly 
repaired, and the roofs have been put in a good condition, as well as 
various minor repairs done, in fact a general overhauling of th« 
entire concern. The walls now are in a good state of repair, and 



will last so for many years to come, and the various shop roofs, are 
now, I think, in a better condition than they have been for ten 
years. 

The new addition to the Prison shops on the east side of the 
Prison yard, and adjoining the buildings occupied by the Warden and 
Deputy Warden, was converted by the car company into a foundry, 
for casting car wheels and the State barn and stables, situate in 
the rear of the Warden's house, were in constant danger of being 
burnt by sparks from the foundry cupola, as they, as v/ell as 
the back buildings attached to the dwellings of the Warden and 
Deputy Warden were on several occasions set on fire from this cause. 
I therefore found it absolutely necessary to remove the barn and 
stables some distance accross the avenue on the Prison garden 
groiinds. I also removed the wooden roofs from all the back build- 
ings and replaced them with fire-proof n>aterial, which with remov- 
ing the old fence round the garden grounds, which had become unfit 
to turn stock, and erecting a new fence. These improvements have 
therefore, very considerably swelled the repairs account. 

Ttie large warehouse erected by Hall, Moore & Burkehardt, 
during their time as contractors of Prison labor, on the west side of 
the Prison grounds (and which has been greatly in our way, and 
has much impeded the work of the car company,) I have had 
removed at some expense, at the same time amicably adjusted 
matters of difference existing in regard to this with Hall, Moore & 
B., and thereby avoiding litigation likely to accrue out of this. 

After the removal of the female convirts from here, I found it 
neces-ary to make some change to facilitate the labor in cleansing 
the convicts' clothing. I therefore had a furnace erected in the 
wing of the Prison lormerly occupied, by the females, suitable for 
washing purposes, and have connections made with the machinery 
in the shops, and by the n)eans of shafting extending into the 
laundry, we will do the washing by machinery erected for' this 
purpose, and will by this improvement reduce the number of men 
required for this work about one-half. 

By I'eference to the report of assets and liabilities, I find that 
there is due to sundry parties $27,684.74, and the assets are includ- 
ing .^17,848.31, the amount of the invoice ^36,741.09. The item of 
bills receivable is for paper which we hold of the car company, 
they being unable just at the present to liquidate their indebtedness 
for labor. 

The convict labor account for the year is ^65,650.40. The daily 



average of convicts is 395, which is three less than last year. The 
females were removed to the Keformatory at Indianapolis, on the 
8th day of October; otherwise the daily average would have been 
just about the same as the year previous. 

During the month of July the dysentery made its appearance 
among the convicts, and in a short time assumed an epidemic char- 
acter, and only during the present month has the last case been 
discharged from the hospital. During the season there were about 
two hundred eases treated for this malady alone; eight convicts died 
during the prevalence of the epidemic. Over one thousand cases; 
M'ere treated in the hospital from this and all other causes during ihe 
year. I would refer you to the Pi)ysi(;ian's report for details in tiiat 
department. 

After a lapse of two years since the labor of the Prison has been 
employed in the manufacture of cars, I am fully satisfied that there 
is no branch of manufacturing now carried on in prisons, that is more 
suitable or better adapted to convict labor than car manufacturing. 
In the various departments, v> here n:iechanical labor is requii'ed in 
wood and iron work, the men skilled in these branches can be 
employed, and tho^e who are not mechanics, and whose terms of 
sentence are too short to instruct them in such mechanical \vt)rk 
can be emj)loyed in the varif)us departments to a good advantage 
where ordinary laboring work is required. 

The discifdine throughout the Prison has been good, in fact better 
than could reasonably be expected in an institution of this character. 
Tlie use of the "cat" as a means of enfoi^cing discipline has almost 
entirely been abolished — is only used in very extreme cases. 

I would refer you to the report of the Rev. J. W. Sidlivan, Moral 
Instructor, for all inf>rmation connected with his department, and I 
would take this opportunity of expressing my warmest thanks, and 
deeply sympathize with him in his arduous labors, and his untiring 
etforts put forth in endeavoring to ^'eform those unfortunate men 
over whom he has been phiced as a "good shepherd." 

Before closing this I desire to make special mention of the Prison 
Physician, Dr. William H. Sheets, and would say that during the 
past year his duties have been extremely arduous, and I feel highly 
gratified for the faithfulness displayed by him at all times, and more 
especially for his zeal and untiring attention in administering to 
relieve the suflering victims under his care during the prevalence of 
the late epidemic in ihe Prion. 

I am under many obligations to Captain A. M. Luke, Deputy 



8 

Warden ; E.. J. Forsyth, Clerk ; and my Assistant Keepers, for the 
faithful manner in which they have discharged their several duties. 
And to you, gentlemen, [ would express my warmest thanks for 
the kind manner in which you have received ray suggestions in the 
various matters of business which have presented themselves to my 
mind from time to time, and I sincerely hope that all our business 
and social intercourse may continue as pleasant in the future. 
Your obedient servant, 

L. S. SHULER, Warden. 



PHYSICIAN'S REPORT. 



Hospital Department, 
Indiana State Phison South. 
Jeffersonville, December 15th, 1873, 

To the Board of Directors: 

Gentlemen: — At the time I submitted my last annual report 
that fearful disease small-pox was raging in our city to an alarming 
extent, but by thorough vaccination, and other precautionary means, 
we escaped its invasion within the walls of the Prison until the" 
month of February. To our astonishment it found its way into the 
Prison under circumstances altogether unaccountable, which resulted 
in two cases, one proving fatal. We were fortunate in preventing a 
general spread of the disease through the Prison. We have had 
rather more than a usual tendency to febrile diseases, especially of 
the ]iernicious type, having treated two hundred and thirty-eight 
cases. 

About the time the cholera made its appearance in our country, a 
very malignant form of dysentery made its appearance in the prison, 
and, notwithstanding the strict sanitary precautions which were ob- 
8« rved. the disease almost became an epidemic, and continued through- 
out the summer, until late in the fall. Of this disease we treated 
one hund ed and six cases, and lost eight. In addition we treated 
one hundred and ninety cases of diarrhoea. A larger number of men 
were exempted from work, on account of injuries received, than last 
year. 

Our mortuary list is much gri ater than last year, having lost thir- 
teen bj'' death. At first sight this number would appear very large^ 
or thought to be unprecedented in the history of the Prison, but on 
examination of the record you will find this not the case. The death, 
rate this year will be three and two-tenths per cent, to three hun^ 



10 

(Irc'd ar.d ninety-five, which is the average number of convicts in 
prison, and only one and two-tenths to one thousand and ninety-five 
.cases treated. You will also find, on instituting a comparison 
between the death rate under my predecessor, and that of my own, 
for the same length of time, or number of years, that mine has b. en 
two and one-ibuith less per year than his. This difference is n< t to 
be attributed to the superior skill of one physician over the other, 
but rather to the superior manag<mient of one general administration 
over the other, and is only another one of the good results of a 
policy which seeks to elevate the feelings and inspire the hopes of 
the convict, and assures him if he is only faithful and obedient, he 
will be recognized and treated as a man. 

The following are the names of those who died during tlie year: 

Ira Dines, died of phthisis-pulmonalis, March 17. 

James Glover, colored, died of small-pox, February 22. 

Isaac McCarty, died of dysentery, August 2. This man had not 
been long in prison before attacked, and for some cause did 
not come to the sick call until he was almost prostrated, when he 
was at once placed in hospital and put under treatment. 

James Donehue, died of chronic inflammation of the bowels, Sep- 
tember 13. This man was serving out his second term, but so dis- 
eased that he was under treatment about all the time while in prison. 

Larkin l^amar, died of typhoid fever, September 15. This man 
was insane and before conviction had been a patient in the Insane 
Asylum and should have been kept tiiere. 

Cadwell Emmons, died of dysentery, October 3. This man was a 
usedup old syphilitic case. 

George Reed and John Bateman died o dysentery, October 4. 
These were both old syphilitic cases. Bateman was well advanced 
in years. 

Albert Johnson, died of dysentery, October 5. This was a young 
man who felt keenly his imprisonment, and through diffidence or 
some other cause did not come to the sick call for a week or more 
after he was attacked with the disease. 

William Cross, died of dysentery, October 6. This man led a 
kard life; his whole system was diseased. Pie was among the 
first who took tlie dysentery and recovered so as to go about, but 
relapsed and died. 

Independence Rork, died of phthisis-pulmonalis, October 31. 

Ugene Sullivan, died of dysentery, November 8. This man also 
bore the marks of a diseased bo'^y and a dissipated life. 



11 

John Burns, died of dysentery, November 20. This man was 
sentenced the second time. May 1, 1873, and at once admitted to 
the hospital and treated for syphilis, where he remained fur s"me 
time and was finally sent out to work. In September he took the 
lever and was just convalescing from that when he took the dysen- 
tery and died. 

It is a matter of history in this prison that the large majority of 
deaths that occur are among those who have led lives of dissipa- 
tion and debauchery, having contracted disease before they came. 
At this time we have four in hospital and they are all chronic 
cases. Our department was very much relieved on the removal of 
the females to their prison at the capital, both by way of expense 
and annoyance. 

Our hospital steward resigned his position and on the 1st ot Octo- 
ber the place was filled by securing the services of Mr. Ed. Gilpin . 
a young man who has studied medicine and attended one cour.'^e of 
medical lectures. He manifested great interest in his duties, and 
under his direction, with the consent ot the Warden, he Ivds 
thoroughly renovated and repainted the hospital and its adjoining 
rooms, and indeed has looked after all the sanitary matters connected 
with the prison. 

At this date the general health of the prison is very good. Every 
facility has been afforded for the treatment and comfort of the con- 
victs when under my care. 

I agkin acknowledge my indebtedness to the Warden, Deputy 
Warden and other officers of the prison for their kind assistance in 
the discharge of my duties. And, gentlemen, accept my sincere 
thanks for the kindness you have extended to me. With this you 
will find a summary of complaints. 

Very respectfully, 

WILLIAM H. SHEETS, 

Physician. 



12 

List of cases treated at the Indiana State Prison, South, for the year 
ending December 15, 1873. 



Diseases. 




Abcess 

Amputations (fingers). 

Asthma 

Boils 

Burns 

Cephalalgia 

Colds 

Colic 

Cholera Morbus 

Corns 

Cystitis , 

Diarrhoea 

Dropsy 

Dys[tppsia 

Dysentery , 

Debility 

Erysipelas , 

Epilepsy 

Earache 

Eye, foreign body in.. 

Fever, malarial , 

Fever, typho-malarial 

Felon 

Frostbite, chronic 

Fracture 

Gleet 

Gonorrhea 

Gastrf) entritis 

Heart disease 

Hemorrhoids , . . . 

Hepalitis 

Hydrocele 

Hernia , 

Lumbago 

Neuralgia 

0|)hthalmia , 

F^hthisis Pulmonalis.., 

Prolapsus, ani , 

Purpura 

ilheumatism 



24 
5 
6 

17 

52 
9 

55 

9 

8 

1 

1 

190 

2 

3 

106 

3 

5 

3 

3 

3 

223 

15 
1 
3 
1 
2 
4 
1 
8 
7 
3 
2 

8 
6 

29 
3 
6 
1 
2 

59 



13 



List of Cases — Continued. 



Diseases. 




Fatal. 



Suppression of urine 

Syphilis 

Sprain 

Sty 

Spermatorrhea 

Stricture of Uretha 

Splenitis 

Tonsilitis 

Tetter 

Ulcer of leg, (chronic) 

Vaccination 

Variola 

Varioloid 

Wounds 

Total number of cases treated 

Percentage of deaths to the number treated 

Percentage of deaths to the average number of con 

victs, (395) 

Treated in Hospital 

Treated out of Hospital 

Number remaining in Hospital 

Number remaining out Hospital 



1 

8 
26 
] 
1 
2 
2 
9 
8 
2 

9 
1 
1 

141 

1095 
1.2 

3.2 

107 

988 

4 

12 



13 



WILLIAM H. SHEETS, 

Physician. 



CHAPLAIiN'S REPORT. 



Indiana State Prison, South, 
Chaplain's Office, December 15, 1873. 

ISlEssns. A. L. Munson and B. F. Hill, Directors: 

Gentlemen: — In preseoting this, my thirteenth annual report, 
as ('haplain of this prison, I would desire, first of all, to acknowl- 
edge the hand of a kind providence by which we have been sustained 
through the labors of another year. 

While it is my object and aim to secure the moral enlightenment 
and .spiritual reformation of the prisoner, it is the occasion of sorrow 
that so many of the inmates are found "seeking death in the error 
of their ways." Notwithstanding this is fearfully true, yet there is 
a good mo)'al influence pervading to some extent the entire prison, 
while more or less success has attended the efforts made and instru- 
mentalities employed to lead the unfortunate victims of temptation 
and crjime into the paths of virtue and religion. 

Quite a number of those who have left the prison this year have 
gone out redeemed and saved, who, as we learn, still maintain their 
integrity, while many who still remain are preparing to follow in 
their footsteps. 

Our library is in a good state of preservation although sonie of our 
books have fallen into bad hands and badly used, yet as a general 
thing they are well taken care of; they are regularly distributed, 
of which a strict account is kept. 

We gratefully acknowledge a valuable acquisition to our library 
through the kindness of the Society of Friends at Plainfield, by a 
donation of fifty-three Bibles and sixty-six Testaments. Also from 



15 

other sources a large number of most valuable magazines which has 
added greatly to our fund of reading matter. 

Our Sabbath school is growing in interest of late. We are fav- 
ored with the assistance of several gentlemen from the outside who 
have kindly offered their services as teachers and the result has been 
a larger attendance on the part of prisoners, which promises great 
good. 

There is an unusual amount of religious interest in the prison at 
the present time, and our prayer meetings are well attended. Great 
respect is paid to all services of the chapel, while to many the Gospel 
has not come in word only, but in demonstration of the spirit and 
of power, who now rejoice in the assurance of the forgiveness of sins. 

I would express my high appreciation of the valuable aid afforded 
me while in the discharge of my responsible duties in the counte- 
nance and support of the Warden and his subordinates. 

Respectfully submitted, 

JOHN W. SULLWAN, 

Chaplain. 



16 



Receipts and Disbursements from Deo. 15, to Dec. 31, 1872. 



Receipts. 


Amount. 


Disbursements. 


Amount. 




84,00(1 00 

25 Oi 

333 39 




$l,8fi6 47 






135 00 






2-23 75 




nfficers and Guards... 

Team 


l,H(i5 99 
27 00 
175 00 






32 59 






172 61 






120 00 










$4,358 41 


$4,358 41 



Receipts and Disbursements from Jcmuary 1, to February 1, 1873. 



8outliwestei-n Car Company 

United States 

Hopkins & Stanton 

Excess carried forward 



,387 95 
500 00 
312 52 
560 86 



$7,701 33 



DiSBUKSEMESTS. 



Excess brought forward 

Provision 

Interest 

(Uo thing 

Henry Same 

W. E. Liston 

R. E. Hiirran , 

George Holzbog , 

Loro & Whitney 

D. Harper & Co 

Hibbet & Armstrong 

May & Dudley 

Discharged Convicts 

Fuel and Light 

J. W. Hopkins 

Library 

Expense 

Rei'airs Prison 

D. S. Barman 

Myers & Brother 

R R. Glover & Co 

McCord, Bradley & Co... 
Hawkins & Thornton — 

Team 

Salary Officers 

Garden 

Ho-ipital 

Stationery & Printing... 



$333 39 
232 26 

28 

413 

50 

]5(' 



114 

326 

80 

98 

54 

345 

3.=i0 

200 

20 

.,934 

39 

500 

55 

68 

21,3 

196 

135 

,539 

50 

74 

53 



7,761 33 



17 



Seceipts and Disbursements from February 1 to March \, 1873. 



Receipts. 


Amount. 


DiSBUBSEMENTS. 


Amount. 




$822 62 

5.334 30 

289 19 


Excess bro't forward 


$560 86 






165 35 






390 51 






1(15 00 






1,.329 24 
107 G3 








Team 


149 15 






60 00 




Clothing 


53 86 






13 10 






1,539 99 






58 30 






4 83 




B. C. Kent 


379 67 




J. W. Hopkins 


200 00 






5('0 00 






322 62 










$5,946 11 


$5,946 11 



Receipts and Disbursements from March 1 to April 1, 1873. 



Receipts. 



South Western Car Company 

State of Indiana 

Visitors' Fund 



S4,497 03 

5,000 00 

10 25 



»9,507 28 



DiSBtJRSEMENTS. 



Excess from last month 

Garden 

J. W. Kane 

Provision 

Repairs prison 

Team 

Henry Dillinger 

Hospital 

Discharged convict 

Expenses 

Escaped convict 

W. E. Liston 

Fuel and light 

J. W. Hopkins 

Salary officers 

G. Layer 

Furniture and bedding. 

Library 

Adams & Hatch 

Browning & Sloan 

Balance 



$289 19 

86 00 

186 ,30 

2,087 15 

321 68 

381 48 

136 30 

143 18 

150 00 

130 35 

50 00 

146 35 

413 30 

300 00 

1,390 00 

915 43 

12 50 

20 00 

198 38 

212 54 

1,937 15 



3,507 28 



Doc. J.— S. P. S.— 2 



18 



Receipts and Dlshursements from April 1 to May 1, 1873. 



Balance from last montb 

CJlothing 

South Western Car Company 
Visitors' Fund , 



Amount. 



$1,937 15 

5 00 

.5,030 70 

10 00 



$6,982 85 



DlSBURSEMKNTS. 



Provision 

Discharged convict 

Garden 

Repairs Prison 

J. L. Bradley & Co 

Team 

Library 

Clothing 

Salary officers 

Escaped convict 

Expense 

Hospital 

Balance 



S977 8G 

ISO OO 

113 \b 

138 38 

1,93G Ih 

117 84 

10 00 

46 40 

1,510 OO 

100 00 

18 45 

18 00 

1,815 72 



$ii,082 85 



Receipts and Disbursements from May 1 to June 1, 1873. 



Balance from last month 

State of Indiana 

il'lothing 

Provision 

J^outh Western Car Company 
Vieitors' Fund 



51,815 72 

7,000 00 

10 00 

21 45 

5,043 30 

18 75 



813.909 22 



Disbursements. 



Salary officers 

R. R. Glover & Co 

Team 

Fuel and light 

Provision 

Repairs prison 

Mantle & Corran 

Discharged convict 

Garden 

Clothing 

R. P. Main 

T. J. Martin & Son 

.leffersonville Gas Company 

Kxpense 

Stationery and Printing 

Furniture and bedding 

J. W. Hopkins 

D. S. Barmore 

Library 

James Haas 

.1. Steel 

Holmes & Thias 

Hospital 

Balance 



$1,.3C0 00 
80 0(1 
92 
82 
72 
50 
00 



$13,909 22 



19 



Receipts and Disbursements from June 1 to July 1, 1873. 



BaKuce brought forward 

Clothing , 

Fuel and Light 

Visitor's Fund 



81,605 82 

5 00 

3 80 

14 00 



$1,628 62 



DiSBUBSEMENTg. 



Hospital 

Repairs of Prison 

Provisions , 

Discharged Convicts 

John Yarbrough 

Teams 

Library 

Expense 

Escaped Convict 

Balance 



SU 00 
129 10 
598 08 
105 00 
128 39 
363 33 
15 00 
:B 73 
119 65 
122 34 



51,628 62 



Receipts and Disbursements from July 1 to August 1, 1873. 



Keceipts. 


Amount. 


DiSBUKSEMEKTS. 


Amount. 


Balance from last month 


$122 34 

5,319 90 

22 00 

662 37 

25 00 


Salary of Officers 


81,360 00 
50 00 






Clothing 




375 00 


United States 


Team 








286 40 






20 00 




Repairs of Prison 


204 12 




Thos. J. Martin & Son 


1.000 00 






200 00 




Provisions 

Escaped Convict 


131 71 

100 00 






1,500 00 




Fuel and Light 


75 42 




J. Steel 


300 00 




R. R. Glover & Co 


86 64 




Furniture and Bedding 


27 00 






19 25 




j Clothing 


12 00 






50 32 










86,051 6ll 


$6,051 61 



20 



Receipts and Disbursements from August 1 to September \, 1873. 



Receipts. 



Balance from last month 

South Wcstei-n Car Company 

Clothing 

Viaitois 



$50 32 

10,371 60 

15 00 

18 25 



9,4.55 17 



DtSBURSEMENTS. 



Salary officers 

Discharged convicts 

Garden 

Repairs prison 

Librwry 

Team 

Expense , 

Hospital 

Provision 

J. Steel , 

Interest 

Escaped convict 

R. P. Main 

Kennedy & Co 

Balance , 



$2^ 



550 83 
435 00 
100 00 
395 83 

30 00 
325 03 

32 GO 
244 91 
930 43 
731 21 
8 45 
100 00 
000 00 
000 00 
570 88 



$10,455 17 



Rcceipfs and Disbursements fi'om September 1 to October 1, 1873. 





Receipts. 


Amount. 


Disbursements. 


Amount. 


Balance brought forward 


«{2,570 88 

75 

24 21 

53 75 




$83 55 


Clothing 




300 84 


South Western Car Company 




20 50 






36 75 






225 00 






82 50 






24 21 






1,876 24 










«2,fi49 59 


§2,649 59 



21 



Receipts and Disbursements from October i to November 1, 1873. 



Receipts. 


Amount. 


DiSBUESEMENTg. 


Amount. 




SI, 876 24 
52 50 




360 00 






600 00 






110 84 






96 85 






85 00 




Team 


61 67 






12 f 5 






901 73 










81,928 74 


$1,928 74 



Receipts mid Disbursements from November 1 to December 1, 187.3. 



Receipts. 


Amount 


DiSBUKSEHENTS. 


Amount. 




5901 73 

8 00 

17 75 

905 74 




S180 00 


Clothing 




1 402 67 






."17 05 






62 15 






50 50 






40 85 










$1,833 22 


$1,833 rl 



Receipts and Disbursements from December 1 to December 15, 1873. 



Reckipts. 


Amount. 


DiSBUKSEMENTS. 


Amount. 




$3,750 89 
3,002 63 




$905 74 






1,000 00 
675 00 




Team 






loO 00 




Discharged convict 


150 00 
\>\ S9 




Kennedy & Co 


3,750 89 










36,753 52 


$6,753 52 



22 

Summary of Heceipts and Disursements for year ending Dec. 15, 1873. 



South Western Car Company 

Fuel and light 

United States 

State of Indiana , 

Visitors' Fund 

Clothing , 

Hopkins & Stanton 

Provision 

Excess advanced by Warden. 



649,759 88 

28 82 

1,384 99 

12,000 00 

220 25 

Co 75 

312 52 

21 45 

3,002 63 



$66,796 29 



DiSBDESEMKNTS. 



Excess a 'vanced brought forward. 

Repairs prison , 

I'rovision 

Team 

Expense 

Hospital , 

Discharged convicts 

Salary officers 

Furniture and bedding 

Clothing 

Fuel and light 

Library , 

Interest 

Escaped convicts 

Officers and Guards 

B. C. Kent 

J. L. Bradley 

Garden 

Stationery and Printing 

J. W Kane 

! Henry Dillinger , 

j Henry Same , 

I W. E. Listen 

I R. E. Curran 

J. W. Hopkins 

May & Dudley , 

Geo. Holzbog 

Low & Whitney , 

D. Harper & Co 

Hibbett it Armstrong 

Adams & Hatch 

Gotleib Layer 

Hawkins & Thornton 

McCord, Bradley & Co 

R. R. Glover & Co 

Myers & Bro 

D. S. Barmore 

Browning & Sloan 

Mantle & Cowan 

B. P. Main 

T. J. Martin & Son 

Jeffersonville Gas Company 

James Haas 

J. Steel 

Holmes & Thias 

John Yarbrough 

Kennedy & Co 



51,866 47 

5,414 60 

6,293 24 

3,153 01 

3,097 19 

880 78 

2,550 00 

11,370 81 

6.54 84 

976 41 

2,410 51 

130 00 

36 70 

612 15 

1,61'5 99 

379 67 

1,936 75 

548 75 

65 25 

186 30 

311 30 

50 50 

296 35 

52 20 

1,024 92 

54 80 
114 .55 
326 75 

80 00 
98 54 
521 00 
915 43 
196 92 
263 03 
2a5 19 

55 28 
2,032 82 

212 54 
1,500 00 
2,000 00 
2,700 00 
1,500 00 

146 25 
1,306 21 

323 01 

128 39 
6,250 89 



$66,796 29 



Indiana State Prison South, 
December 15, 1873. 



E. J. FORSYTH, 

Clerk. 



23 



Assets and Liabilities December 15, 1873. 



Abskts. 


Amount. 


Liabilities. 


Amount. 




$17,848 31 

395 37 

2,914 67 

664 00 

414 08 

31 87 

990 00 

13,482 79 




$398 72 


United States 


D. S. Barmore 


145 25 




R. P. Main 


2 458 30 




W. E. Listen 


481 07 






381 28 


Hall, Moore & B 


Henry Dillinger 


393 32 


A W Hall & Co 


P. C. Kent 


406 76 




Jefferson ville Gas Company 


1,495 76 






1,569 44 
1 385 86 




R. R. Glover & Co 






2 194 04 




J. W. Hopkins 


102 4« 






119 73 




J. W. Kane 


66 00 




J. Steel 


912 00 




T. J. Martin & Son 


672 00 






5,478 00 
672 18 










916 37 






166 89 






329 16 






544 44 






77 9S 




J. T. Tompkins & Co 


123 95 




McCord, Bradley & Co 


150 2S 






89 82 




F. & A. Bodenstein 


14 90 




E. S. Diltz 


27 55 




Joel Black 


694 50 






36 00 




H. N. Durall 


77 00 




D. C. Hill & Co 


81 94 




W. Horr & Co 


153 60 




J. E. Crane 


113 88 




S. H. Patterson 


33 92 




S. C. Warder 


49 30 






104 10 






112 OO 






42 98 






192 80 




Hawkins & Thornton 


456 22 






84 OS 




Henry Same 


20 80 




B. Hulse 


170 Oft 




J. E. Withers & Co 


100 88 




C. Lutz 


384 71 




L. S.Shuler (Warden), Advanced... 


3,002 63 
9,056 36 








§36,741 09 


836,741 09 



Indiana State Phison South, 
December 15, 1873. 



R. J. FORSYTH, 

Clerk. 



24 



Expense and Earnings for year ending December 16, 1873. 



Expense 

Salary officers 

Provision 

Clothing 

Furniture and bedding.. 

fiepairs prison 

Discharged conTicts 

Fuel and light 

Team 

Hospital 

Interest 

Library 

Garden 

Stationery and printing, 
Escaped convict 



S3,392 19 

16,848 81 

22,228 85 

10,31)4 60 

152 39 

17,802 05 

2,550 00 

4,598 83 

2,734 74 

1,436 29 

1,118 38 

130 00 

548 75 

90 25 

612 15 



S84,C08 28 



Convict labor account 

Rent account 

Suspense account 

Visitors' Fund 

Excess of Expenses..., 



865,650 40 

180 00 

957 74 

220 25 

17,599 89 



884,608 28 



Indiana State Prison South, 
December 15, 1873. 



R. J. FORSYTH, 

Clerk. 



25 



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34 



Counties where Convicts were Convicted, and Number of Each. 



Counties. 



Vigo 

Vanderburg. 

Jeiferson 

Knox 

Clark 

Floyd 

Hendricks... 

Posey 

Ripley 

Bartholomew 

Decatur 

Marion 

Pike 

Clay 

Warrick 

Morgan 

Daviess 

St. Joseph... 

Martin. 

Monroe....... 

Switzerland . 

Hancock 

Crawford 

Rush 



No. 



60 
58 
16 
16 
16 
20 

6 
13 

3 
10 



1 
4 
4 
6 
4 
2 

3 
3 
11 
2 
1 
1 



Counties. 



Gibson 

Franklin 

Parke 

Orange 

Wayne 

Owen 

Dubois 

Washington .. 

Henry 

Sullivan 

Fayette 

Spencer 

Johnson 

Jackson 

Dearborn 

Greene — . — 

Lawrence 

Putnam 

Perry . 

Jennings 

Shelbv 

U. S.' District 

Total 



No. 



12 
3 
6 
3 

11 

1 

4 

1 
•-> 
o 

3 

3 



15 
6 
1 
2 

1 
3 

9 
6 



383 



35 
Crimes of Convicts and Number of Each. 



Crime. 



No. 



Murder 

Manslaughter 

Rape 

Grand Larceny 

Burglary 

Assault and Battery, with intent to kill 

Assault and Battery, with intent to rape 

Assault and Battery, with intent to commit felony. 

Robbery 

Larceny and Burglary 

Petit Larceny 

Burglary, Larceny, and receiving Stolen Goods 

Perjury 

Obtaining Money by False Pretenses 

Obstructing Railway 

Embezzlement ' , 

Bigamy 

Arson 

Intermarrying with a White Woman 

Forgery 

Obtaining Goods by False Pretenses 

Total 



48 

15 

10 

193 

20 

27 

10 

1 

5 

6 

19 
2 
1 
5 
1 
1 
1 
3 
1 
13 
1 

383 



36 



Term of Sentence and Number of Eaeh. 



Teem. 



No. 



Life 

Twenty-one years 

Twenty years 

Nineteen years 

Eighteen years 

Seventeen years 

Sixteen years 

Fourteen years 

T wel ve years 

Ten years 

Nine years 

Eight years 

Seven years 

Six years 

Five years 

Four years and six months..... 

Four years 

Three years and six months... 
Four years and eleven months 
Four years and nine mouths... 

Three years 

Two years and six months 

Two years 

One year 

Total 



34 

11 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 
6 
1 

14 
2 
2 
8 

]I 

33 
3 

19 
2 
1 
1 

47 

3 

lo9 

20 



383 



37 



Nativity of Convicts and Number thereof. 



Nativity. 



No. 



Nativity. 



No. 



Indiana , 

Kentucky 

Ohio 

Pennsylvania... 

Ireland 

Germany 

New York 

Virginia , 

Maryland 

Mississippi 

England , 

Canada 

Georgia 

Connecticut 

Tennessee 

North Carolina 



115 
55 
34 

26 

26 

20 

21 

17 

6 

2 

7 

6 

6 

2 

7 

6 



Iowa 

Massachusetts 

France 

Illinois 

Denmark 

Missouri 

Texas 

Michigan 

Prussia 

Scotland 

Louisiana 

Delaware ■ 

New Jersey.. 

Total 



1 
3 
1 
10 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
3 
1 
2 
1 



383 



38 



convicts Discharged by Expiration of Sentence, for the year ending 
December 15, 1873. 



No. 



'Names. 



Date of Discharge. 



1 
2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 
10 
11 
12 
13 
14 
15 
16 
17 
18 
19 
20 
21 
22 
23 
24 
25 
26 
27 
28 
29 
30 
31 
32 
33 
34 
35 
36 
37 
38 
39 
40 
41 



Frank Kuhn 

Willis J Laidley 

John J. Wright 

John Doyle 

Japhtha Downs 

Oliver C.Perry , 

George W. Jackson , 

James Spann 

Henry E. Davis 

Isaac Richardson 

Edw. Sutherland 

Samuel Gray 

Ly dia Evans 

Levi Overholzer, (U. S.). 

Charles Prine 

John T.Price 

Charles A. Kennedy 

Charles Elton 

Kate Scott 

Scott McKee 

Charles Bowler 

Oliver Hall 

Nancy Cain 

Thomas Madden 

Jesse Ijair 

Robert M. Reeves 

Thomas Denney 

Michael Colran 

Samuel Hendricks 

James Williams 

John Callahan 

Sandy Terry 

Joseph E. Bowers 

' John Tarpley 

Pleasant Puckett 

James Allen 

J. W. McCorkle 

Allen Clark 

Lewis Holder, (U. S.).... 
A. W. Denny, (U. S.).... 
Thomas Williams 



December 16, 1872. 
December 17, 1872. 
December 18, 1872. 
December 19, 1872. 
December 20, 1872. 
December 21, 1872. 
December 21, 1872. 
December 22, 1872. 
December 26, 1872. 
January 3, 1873. 



January 
January 
January 
January 
January 
January 
January 
January 
January 
January 
January 
January 
January 
January 
February 



7, 1873. 
12, 1873. 

14, 1873. 

15, 1873. 

16, 1873. 

17, 1873. 
17, 1873. 
17, 1873. 
23, 1873. 
23, 1873. 
23, 1873. 
25, 1873. 
28, 1873. 
31, 1873. 

1, 1873. 



February 4, 1873. 
February 14, 1873. 
February 15, 1873. 
February 16, 1873. 
February 25, 1873. 
February 28, 1873. 
March 6, 1873. 
March 16, 1873. 
March 17, 1873. 
March 23, 1873. 
March 26, 1873. 
March 27, 1873. 
March 28, 1873. 
March 31, 1873. 
March 31, 1873. 
April 2, 1873. 



39 

Convicts Discharged by Expiration of Sentence for the year evding 
December 15, 1873 — Continued. 



Names. 



Date of Discharge. 



Ira Wilson 

Thomas King 

Fanny Hill 

Peter Miller 

John Blake 

William Smith 

Charles Bell 

Francis Ireland 

Andrew Wilson 

Henry Moore 

Charles Ford 

William Smith 

Nancy Reed 

John W. Elkins 

Joseph C. Watson.... 
Michael McMahan . . . 
Charles Birkenmeyer 

Mary Clark '.... 

Andrew Gibson 

Alfred Harden 

Charles Williams 

Henry Frenchy 

Thomas Martin, 

William Collins 

Robert Scott 

Meuton Prall 

John Loyd 

Frank Stevens 

James Scott 

Thomas Smith 

Sampson Parker 

Pat McCarty 

David Delashmidt ... 

Jerry Hay den 

Thomas Moliar 

John Rose 

Charles H. Johns 

Robert Ballon 

Mary Robinson 

August Sorin 

Mat Winstered 



April 2, 1873. 
April 4, 1873. 
April 8, 1873. 
April 20, 1873. 
April 22, 1873. 
April 23, 1873. 
April 25, 1873. 
April 25, 1873. 
April 26, 1873. 
May 6, 1873. 
May 8, 1873. 
May 13, 1873. 
May 15, 1873. 
Mav 17, 1873. 
May 22, 1873. 
June 5, 1873. 
June 7, 1873. 
June 9, 1873. 
June 13, 1873. 
June 27, 1873. 
June 28, 1873. 
July 2, 1873. 
July 4, 1873. 
July 5, 1873. 
July 6, 1873. 
July 8, 1873. 
July 8, 1873. 
July 10, 1873. 
July 13, 1873. 
July 13, 1873. 
July 15, 1873. 
July 15, 1873. 
July 17, 1873. 
July 17, 1873. 
July 18, 1873. 
July 19, 1873. 
Jul'v 22, 1873. 
July 22, 1873. 
July 23, 1873. 
July 23, 1873. 
July 24, 1873. 



40 

Convicts Di'icharged by Expiration of Sentence for the year ending 
December 15, 1873 — Continued. 



Names. 



Date of Discharge. 



Robert Hall 

Katie Mozier 

John James 

Lucius Holby 

H. H. Sare 

Joseph Rappalee 

Richard Wells 

Edw. O'Brien 

Charles Martin 

Ernie Roberts 

J.L.White 

Mike Orriger 

John W. Lacey 

William Nealey 

F. M. Douglass 

John D. Smith 

John Trader 

James Shaffer 

Mary Ann Osborn 

William Woods 

Moses Farnshell 

Jehiel Washington 

Alexander Douglass 

Charles B. Foster 

Charles Johnson 

Ed. McGregor 

Charles A. Parker 

William Rodgers 

William Trumbull 

William Keeler 

Pat Keating 

Robert Kaiser 

Charles Porter 

William A. McCammon 

John Hines 

George Franklin 

William Broughton 

John Maudley 

John Toben 

Richard Bard 

John P. Weddell 



July 26, 1873. 
July 31, 1873. 
August 2, 1873. 



August 
August 
August 
August 
August 7 
August 8 
August 8 
August 8 
August 9 
August 10 
August 10 
August 10 
August 10 
August 12 
August 14 
August 20 
August 20 
August 22 
August 24 
August 25 
August 26 
August 27 
August 29 
August 31 
August 14 



1873. 
1873. 
1873. 
1873. 
1873. 
1873. 
1873. 
1873. 
1873. 
1873. 
1873. 
1873. 
1273. 
1873. 
1873. 
1873. 
1873. 
1873. 
1873. 
1873. 
1873. 
1873. 
1873. 
1873. 
1873. 



September 1, 1873. 
September 4, 1873. 
September 5, 1873. 
September 6, 1873. 
September 7, 1873. 
September 8, 1873. 
September 9, 1873. 
September 10, 1873. 
September 12, 1873. 
September 13, 1873. 
September 14, 1873. 
September 17, 1n73. 
September 17, 1873. 



41 



Convicts Discharged by Expiration of Sentence for the year ending 
December 15, 1873 — Continued. 



No. 



124 

125 
126 
127 
128 
129 
130 
131 
132 
133 
134 
135 
136 
137 
138 
139 
140 
141 
142 
143 
144 
145 
146 
147 
148 
149 
150 



Names. 



Lyle S. Levi • 

Henry Bachman 

Chenney Marshall 

Charles Lamonte 

E. W. Tennery 

Archibald Good 

"^Thomas Kallahan 

James Armstrong 

Chancey Green • 

Charles Clark 

William H. Carroll. 

Charles Klein 

Monroe Nash > 

Edw. Heighland 

John Bowman — 

Curtis Er win 

Daniel Harry 

Daniel Bryant — 

Joseph Du vail 

Richard Tabliu. 

John Roberts 

John Davis 

M. J. McMahan 

John Metzgar 

E, B. Henderson 

Joseph Montgomery, (U. S.) 
William Bercher 



Date of Discharge. 



September 25, 1873. 
September 26, 1873. 
October 4, 1873. 
October 5, 1873. 
October 14, 1873. 
October 16, 1873. 
November 3, 1873. 
November 3, 1873. 
November 3, 1873. 
November 3, 1873. 
November 10, 1873. 
November 13, 1873. 
November 15, 1773. 
November 25, 1873. 
November 28, 1872. 
November 30, 1873. 
November 30, 1873. 
December 1, 1873. 



December 


2, 


1873. 


December 


2, 


1873. 


December 


6, 


1873. 


December 


7, 


1873. 


December 


7, 


1873. 


December 


9, 


1873. 


December 


9, 


1873. 


December 


9, 


1873. 


December 12, 


1873. 



42 



Convicts Discharged by Pardon during the year ending December 

15, 1873. 




1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 

13 

14 

15 

16 

17 

18 

19 

20 

21 

22 

23 

24 

25 

26 

27 



John Evans 

John Thompson 

Samuel Dixon , 

Ruius M. Norton.... 

Ann E. ShaiFer 

Zachariah Wade 

Samuel Rea , 

John L. Phipps 

Thomas Tungate 

Charles N. Campbell 

John Reed 

John T. Mathews 

Eli Johnson 

Frank Holler 

Redin Corn 

Eli J. Engleman 

Louis H. Buzan 

Hiram Hall 

James W. Cook 

William L. Ballard.. 

Cyrus P. Town 

George O. Wolven... 

Thomas Walker 

Owen Walter 

William Crowell 

Moses Bidderman.... 
Harris Haskel 



December 27, 1872. 
December 28, 1872. 
December 31, 1872. 
January 5, 1873. 
January 7, 1873. 
January 11, 1873. 
January 11, 1^3. 
January 15, 1873. 
January 15, 1873. 
January 15, 1873. 
January 15, 1873. 
February 19, 1873. 
April 3, 1873. 
April 21, 1873. 
April 22, 1873. 
May 6, 1873. 
July 2, 1873. 
July 25, 1873. 
July 28, 1873. 
July 28, 1873. 
July 28, 1873. 
July 31, 1873. 
August 1, 1873. 
August 10, 1873. 
September 13, 1873. 
October 16, 1873. 
October 16, 1873. 



43 



Convicts Transferred to the Female Reformatory at Indianapolis^ 
during the Year ending December 15, 1873, Names and Number. 




1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 

13 

14 

15 

16 

17 



Sarah Hubbard 

Mary A. Longanecker 

Sarah J. Williams 

Amanda Seibert 

Mary A. Adams 

Sarah J. Stevens 

Mary Lewis 

Amanda Turner 

Bridget Mulholland..., 

Nelly Walters 

Georgiana King 

Nelly Howard 

Cynthia Gray 

Bell Evans • 

Ella Johnson 

Fanny Hill 

Jennie Harper 



October 8 
October 8 
October 8 
October 8 
October 8 
October 8 
October 8 
October 8 
October 8 
October 8 
October 8 
October 8 
October 8 
October 8 
October 8 
October 8 
October 8 



1873. 
1873. 
1873. 
1873. 
1873. 
1873. 
1873. 
1873. 
1873. 
1873. 
1873. 
1873. 
1873. 
1873. 
1873. 
1873. 
1873. 



44 



Convicts Deceased During the Year ending December 15, 1873. 



No. 



Names. 



Date of Death. 



1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 

13 



James Glover 

Isaac McCarty , 

James Donuahue.... 

Larkin Lamar 

Cadwell Emmons... 

George Reid 

Albert Johnson 

John Bateman 

Wm. Cross 

Ira Dines 

Independence Rork 
Eugene Sullivan — 
John Burns — 



February 22, 1873. 
August 4, 1873. 
September 13, 1873. 
September 15, 1873. 
October 4, 1873. 
October 4, 1873. 
October 5, 1873. 
October 5, 1873. 
October 6, 1873. 
March 17, 1873. 
October 31, 1873. 
November 9, 1873. 
November 20, 1873. 



Convicts Remanded for New Trial During the Year ending Decem- 
ber 15, 1873. 



No. 


Names. 


Date op Remand. 


1 


Nancy E. Clem 


June 21, 187S. 


2 


Fielding Carpenter 


December 15, 1873. 



45 



Occupation of Convicts when Convicted and Number of Each. 



Occupation. 


No. 


Occupation. 


No. 


Laborers 


126 
5 
8 
6 

97 
(j 
5 
1 
2 
3 
8 

11 
1 
9 

15 
1 
5 
2 
2 
8 
2 
3 
4 
2 
3 
1 
3 
1 
1 
3 
1 


Brewer 


1 


Cooks 


Cabinet Makers 


3 


Barbers 


Whip Maker 


Blaoksm iths 


Engineer » 




Farmers 


Cigar Maker 

Hoop Skirt Makers 

Slater and Gas Fitter 

Locksmith ,. 

Polisher 




No Occupation 

Clerk 




Sewing Machine Agent 

Bookkeepers 




Butchers 


Painter and Bookkeeper.. 
Cflrnno'P Makpr 




Mach inists 


Painters 


Tobacconist 


Collar Maker. 


Scale Maker 




Coopers.. 


Wa^on Makers 






Gardener 




Pedler 


Tailor 






Physician 

Boatmen 




Printers 


Ham ess Makers 


Chair Maker 


Shoem ak ers 


Stone Mason 




M oulders 


Spinner 

Trader 




Brick Masons 


Miners 


Shin Carnenter 




Millers 


Saddle Tree Maker 

Photopraiihpr 




Baker 


Saloon rCpf^npr 


Railroaders 


Bit Maker 


Carriage Painter 


Engraver 




Bartender 


Plasterer 




Sailors 


Total 


Lightning Rod Agent 


383 







46 

Grade of Education of Convicts, and number of Each. 



Grade. 



No. 



Read and Write. 

Read only 

No Education 

Total 



248 
49 
86 



383 



Former Habits of Convicts, and Number of Each. 



Habits. No. 



Intemperate. 
Moderate ... 
Temperate .. 

Total . . . 



162 
119 
102 



383 



Social Relation of Convicts, and Number of Each. 



Relation. 



No. 



Married... 

Single 

Widowers . 
Divorced.. 

Total, 



123 

237 

22 

1 



383 



47 
Recapitulation. 



In confinement, December 15, 1872... 

Since received 

Recaptured 

Discharged by expiration of sentence 

Pardoned 

Died 

Remanded — 

Escaped 

Transferred to the Reformatory 

Total in confinement 



403 
183 



150 

27 

13 

2 

2 

17 



594 



211 



383 



Convicts Escaped During the Year Ending December 15, 1873. 



No. 


Name. 


Date of Escape. 


1 


Daniel Harry 


February 25, 1873. 
September 1, 1873. 


')^ 


Bridget Mulholland 







Convicts Recaptured During the Year Ending December 15, 1873. 



No. 



Names. 



Date of Recapture. 



John Benbow Februai-y 11, 187^ 



Daniel Harry 

Thomas W. Hensley, 

John Howard 

James H. Applegate. 

Moses Farnshell 

John Bright 

Bridget Mulholland. 



March 11, 1873. 
April 24, 1873. 
April 26, 1873. 
July 11, 1873. 
June 26, 1873. 
August 29, 1873. 
September 7, 1873. 



ANNUAL REPOKT 



OF THE 



DIRECTORS AND OFFICERS 



OP THE 



NORTHERN INDIANA PRISON, 



FOR THE 



YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 15, 1873. 



TO THIE C3-0VE:RIT0I2.. 



INDIANAPOLIS: 

SENTINEL COMPANY, PRINTERS. 
1874. 

Doc. J.— N. S. P.— 1 



DIRECTORS' REPORT. 



DiEECTORs' Office, Northern Indiana Prison, 

Michigan City, Indiana, Dec. 16, 1873. 

To His Excellency, Thomas A. Hendricks, 

Governor of Indiana. 

Sir: — We have the honor to submit at this time to your Excel- 
lency our first Annual Report of the condition of the Northern 
Indiana Prison, for the current year ending December 15, 1873. 

We may congratulate your Excellency and the State upon the 
present condition of the prison financially and otherwise. 

Entering upon the discharge of our duties as Directors on the 
11th of March, 1873, we are enabled to state, that during the time 
elapsing since, we have sustained no losses which were not at once 
repaired with little expense. We have met as yet no depressing 
circumstances aiFecting in any manner the good order, discipline or 
economical management of the Institution ; but have every reason 
to be gratified at the faithful, efficient, prompt and humane manner 
in which the several officers of the prison have discharged their 
duties. 

We believe we may refer with satisfaction, if not with pride, to 
the fact that there has been but a single death from natural causes 
in the prison during this year; and this was from disease contracted 
prior to the admission of the prisoner. This we attribute to the 
constant care and attention, bestowed on the convicts by the prison 
physician, Dr. Charles C. Hamrick, and to the sanitary measures 
adopted and strictly enforced by the officers; not the least of which 
is the superior quality of the provisions furnished for the convicts, 
of which we have made personal and satisfactory inspection. We 



have a further cause for congratulation, in the fact that during the 
year there has been but little sickness of any character in the 
prison. 

One death from violence was and is cause of much regret, 
although, under the circumstances, unavoidable. Joseph Simpson, a 
convict whose term of imprisonment would have expired in Novem- 
ber, 1873, became, from some cause unknown, incensed at the Deputy 
Warden, Mr. Charles A. Manning; procuring a coopers' broad 
ax from one of the shops, he passed rapidly across the yard, entered 
the guard room, where Mr. fanning and one of the directors were 
alone. Not heeding the order to retire, he at once made a most 
murderous attack upon the Deputy Warden, who to preserve his 
own life, was compelled to take that of the prisoner, which he did. 
A Coroner's inquest fully exonerated Mr. Manning from all blame 
in the premises. 

We have every reason to be gratified at the financial condi- 
tion of the prison, while we are satisfied it has not been attained by 
a parsimonious or niggardly management, but by a careful, judicious 
and economical expenditure of money. The prisoners are comfort- 
ably clothed, well fed, and in general as well contented as from 
their circumstances could reasonably be expected. 

We desire in this connection to acknowledge to Mr. Charles 
Mayne, Warden, the obligations of this Board and of the State for 
his honest and economical management of the financial affairs of 
the prison, and for the efficient manner in which he has discharged 
the various and onerous duties devolving upon him; also to Mr. 
Charles A. Manning, Deputy Warden, to whom for the present 
admirable discipline, and thorough yet cheerful subordinntion of the 
convicts, we are largely indebted; a discipline and subordination 
brought about by means as mild and humane as the necessities of 
the institution would admit <»f. 

We wish further to express our approbation of the faithful and 
efficient administration by Captain Taylor, of the steward's depart- 
ment, and of the office of Clerk, by J. H. Bowes, Esq., two important 
interests of the prison. 

The moral deportment of the prisoners has been and is as good 
perhaps as can be found in most institutions of similar character. 
We may in justice, say that much of this is due to the kindly 
influences exerted by Rev. G. C. Beeks, moral instructor, whose 
teachings and example we trust will continue to influence the lives 
and characters of these unfortunate men who have had the benefit 



of his instructions, long after they shall have left the prison and 
again taken up the burden of life with better hopes and purer 
motives. 

The only official changes which have occurred during the year 
are those of physician and steward. Dr. J. P. Sinclair resigned 
the office of physician, and Dr. Charles C, Hamrick was chosen. 
George McDonell resigned the office of steward, and Captain Joseph 
Taylor was appointed and confirmed. 

A most important branch of the prison government is that com- 
mitted to the assistStUt keepers, who come continually in contact with 
tlie prisoners. In this respect we have been fortunate in securing 
in most instances men in whom the officers may repose confidence; 
men of good moral standing, gentlemanly yet firm in their inter- 
course with the men, requiring a ready obedience to the rules and 
regulations of the prison. 

The following is a summary of the financial transactions of the 
prison for the year as appears from the clerk's repoit, to which 
reference is made for details of the same : 

Amount received from income of prison $57,465 23 

Amount disbursed for current and ordinary expenses 49,743 86 

Leaving an excess of receipts over expenditures $ 7,721 37 

A result especially gratifying in view of the fact that no pains 
have been spared to furnish the convicts with an abundant supply 
of wholesome food, and to make such improvement in their clothing 
as seemed necessary. 

The total receipts from all sources, including 

Appropriations for water, clothing and library, are $62,965 23 

Total expenditures 53,127 90 

$9,837 33 
Balance on hand at last report 1,580 49 

Showing balance on hand December 15, 1873 $11,417 82 

The appropriation made by the last Legislature of $10,000 a year 
for current expenses of the prison has not been drawn, and as there 
is no probability of its being required for that purpose it seems very 
desirable that the appropriation be so changed as to permit the fund 



to be used for such permanent improvements and buildings as are 
urgently needed. 

Two contracts only have expired during the year, one of J. H. 
Winterbotham, Sons & Co., of fifty men at fifty cents per day, and 
one of Ford & Johnson of one hundred men at same price. Both 
of these contracts were extended for five years at an advance of ten 
cents a day. 

For accounts more in detail relating to these several departments, 
we beg to refer to the reports of the officers in charge. 

One of the most important matters which claimed our attention, 
was the means of furnishing a supply of water for protection against 
fire, and for sanitary purposes. Investigations were at once insti- 
tuted to ascertain the best and cheapest means of obtaining the 
necessary supply and the probable cost of the same. After careful 
examination it was determined to sintc an artesian well. A contract 
was accordingly entered into with Messrs. Beach & Miller, of 
Chicago, and work commenced in July last. The estimated cost of 
the well, taking the wells at Chicago as a basis, was about §6,000, 
but fortunately at a depth of five hundred and forty-one feet a vein 
of water was reached which furnishes an ample supply for all present 
or probable future needs of the prison. Arrangements were at once 
made to utilize the supply of water, which rises tvveuty-fuur feet 
above the surface of the ground and flows about three hundred gal- 
lons per minute. 

A -steam force pump was purchased of Messrs. Dean Brothers, of 
Indianapolis, and the work of laying down mains and hydrants is 
now in progress. The entire cost of the water works, including the 
necessary hose, etc , will reach about $5,000. The appropriation of 
§2,000, made by the last Legislature for this purpose has been used ; 
the balance of three thousand we shall be able to pay from the cur- 
rent receipts of the Prison, which, we believe, will be ample to 
defray all current expenses as well as to meet the demands for per- 
manent improvements which are being made and contemplated. 

We desire earnestly to call your Excellency's attention to the 
absence of all facilities for the proper care and treatment of insane 
convicts. There is no apartment in the Prison where such persons 
can be confined, except in the cell- house, where their presence can 
not but be injurious and demoralizing to the prisoners generally and 
detrimental to the welfare of the insane. 

AVe would recommend that a suitable building be erected within 
the prison walls where such unfortunates may be confined and 



receive at the same time such treatment as will induce improvement 
and cure if possible. Instances have already occurred in which the 
patients had to be removed from their cells, on account of their 
noisy demonstrations, and confined in the hospital or the M'ash-room, 
requiring the constant attention of a guard, at additional expense 
and to the detriment to the good order of the institution. Economy 
and humanity alike demand that this improvement be made, and as 
speedily as circumstances will admit of. 

In making his Report, the Warden has considered it better to 
omit the names of the convicts, for various reasons, which we 
indorse, one of the strongest perhaps being the fact that it answers no 
profitable purpose, (the same facts and statistics being found in 
the tabular exhibits,) and serves as an advertisement to the public 
that those whose names appear, have served in the penitentiary ; 
weakening the incentives to honest industry, which we believe many 
carry with them when discharged. From our limited intercourse 
with the men confined in this prison, we do not believe that its 
discipline and teachings, as some assert, are calculated to deepen 
their moral degradation. There are those whose characters will not 
be reformed by any term of service here. There are yet others, 
whose crimes have been more their misfortune than a willingness 
voluntarily to violate the laws. To such, the publication of their 
names in a prison report will doubtless prove an injury, which 
policy as well as humanity dictates we should avoid. 

R. T. ST. JOHN, 
A. W. SMITH, 
A. B. CAPRON. 

Directors. 



WARDEN'S REPORT 



Office of the 
Warden of the Northern Indiana Prison, 

Michigan City, Indiana, Dec. 15, 1873. 

Messrs. R. T. St. John, A. W. Smith and A. B. Capron, 

Board of Directors for the Northern Indiana Prison : 

Gentlemen: — In compliance with the provision of the law 
governing State Prisons, I have the honor to respectfully submit 
ray Third Annual Report, for the year ending December 15, 1873. 

The average number of prisoners the past year was 354. 

At the date of my last report there were in prison 341 

Escapes since recaptured 2 

Received during the year., 175 

Total 518 

Discharged by expiration of sentence 108 

Pardoned by the Governor 24 

Pardoned by the President 1 

Transferred to the House of Refuge 7 

Escaped , 2 

Died. 2 

Remanded for new trial 6 

Total 150 

Number now remaining in prison 368 

The following statement shows the condition of contracted labor : 
J. H. Wiuterbotham & Sons, on cooperage, at 57J cents 

per day 100 men 

Contract expires April 1, 1878. 



Ford, Johnson & Co., on chairs, at 50 cents per day, at 

52 cents after Decerab«r 19, 1872 50 men 

Contract expires August 3, 1874. 
J. H. Wiuterbotham & Sons, on cooperage, at 60 cents 

per day 50 men 

Contract expires May 12, 1878. 
Ford, Johnson & Co., on chairs, at 60 cents per day 100 men 

Contract expires November 1, 1878. 
Ford, Johnson & Co., on chairs, at 52 cents per day 25 men 

Contract expires August 3, 1874. 

Total number 325 men 

The receipts of the prison for the year are as follows: 

For labor $50,069 96 

For expense account, use of engine 634 00 

From sales of supplies 6,037 64 

From rents 200 89 

From United States, convict keeping 243 99 

From visitors 278 75 

Total receipts of prison $57,465 23 

Disbursements on account of current expenses : 

Discharged convict account $2,025 00 

Guard account 16,046 93 

Provision account 20,041 82 

Clothing account 4,997 06 

Bedding account 434 1 9 

Drugs and medicine account 328 59 

Stationery and newspaper account for prisoners 697 64 

Fuel account 1,697 64 

Escaped convict account 97 00 

Expense account including physician's salary. 3,378 09 

Total current expenditures $49,743 86 



Excess of receipts over ordinary expenditures 

of the past year $7,721 37 



1 



9 

Received from the State of Indiana : 

On account of supply of water $2,000 00 

On account of additional clothing 3,000 00 

On account of library 500 00 

$5,500 00 

Making $13,221 37 

Expended : 

For supply of water $ 2,565 07 

For permanent improvements 407 17 

For library 411 80 

$3,384 04 

Leaving balance receipts over expenditures during year. $9,837 33 
Amount due as per my last report 1,580 49 

Balance due State December 15, 1873 $11,417 82 

Amount due prisoners for overwork and deposite account. 1,828 90 

Total amount due $13,245 82 

For further information regarding details of financial condition, I 
would respectfully refer you to the report of the clerk, Mr. John H. 
Bowes. 

It is a subject of congratulation that I am thus enabled to report 
so favorable a condition of the financial status of the prison, show- 
ing that the receipts for the past year over and above the disburse- 
ments for current and ordinary expenses were $7,721.37, besides 
having on hand a large amount of supplies, including about one 
thousand and six hundred yards of cloth valued at one thousand and 
six hundred dollars, more than we had the same time last year. 
The amount of outstanding indebtedness will not exceed one hundred 
dollars. 

In the foregoing financial statement I have not included as a 
matter of revenue the labor of a large number of prisoners that are 
employed for the State in the hospital, kitchen, dining room, tailor 
and shoe shops, cell house, and yard, who, with invalids and cripples, 
number about fifty men. If, however, the value of such labor should 
be fairly estimated it Treuld not fall much short of five thousand 
dollars. 



10 

The increased amount paid the guards arises from an additional 
compensation to each of five dollars per month. Through the 
extension of two of the contracts, which has recently taken effect, 
at an increased rate of ten cents per day, the receipts for the coming 
year will be greatly increased. 

The sanitary condition of the prison for the past year has been 
unusually good, and for a full statement of which I would refer you 
to the report of Dr. Charles C. Hamrick. Only two deaths have 
occurred within the walls of the prison during the year: Timothy 
Foley, who died from inanition after a long and protracted illness, 
and Joseph Simpson, who made a murderous attempt upon the life 
of the Deputy Warden with a coopers' broad ax. Although Simpson 
was repeatedly warned by the Deputy to desist, and still persistently 
with murderous and fearful intent, endeavored to kill him, the 
latter, to save his own life, shot him, from the effects of which he 
died. A C(jroner's jury was immediately impanneled, which, after 
hilly examining the case, rendered a verdict justifying the Deputy 
Warden in his acst. 

In accordance with the order of your honorable Board, Hon. A. 
B. Capron, Director, Dr. G. C. Beeks, Moral Instructor, and myself, 
after (careful selection, purchased an addition to our almost depleted 
library of about thr^e hundred volumes of books, at a cost of 
^411 80, leaving a balance of $88 20 still on hand of the amount 
appropriated therefor, applicable for the further increase thereof. 

The last Legislature made an appropriation of ten thousand dol- 
lars for the current expenses of this prison. As no additional funds 
have been re([uired therefor, more than that received from the labor 
of the prison for that purpose, of course it was not necessary to 
draw upon that appropriation. In fact, when it is considered that 
the institution has, for the last three years, made a surplus, and that 
during that time no appropriation has been asked for, for that 
object, it seems quite unnecessary that the appropriation should have 
been made. 

The contract made by you with Messrs. Beach & Miller, for 
ginking an artesian well within the prison w^alls, was fully carried 
out, and after going to a depth of 541 1 feet, there was obtained a 
flow of water, of mineral composition, of an average quantity of 
about 300 gallons a minute, at a cost of S2,565.07. I have also 
contracted for pipe, mains, hydrants, and one of Dean & Bro.'s 
No. 9 steam pumps, which, including hose, will cost altogether about, 
f2,500 additional. When the work in connection therewith, is 



11 

entirely completed, which will be by the 10th of January next, we 
will have a sufficient and reliable means at hand at all times for the 
extinguishment of fires, and also for sanitary purposes in cleaning 
out all the sewers of the prison. These advantages have long been 
needed and are of inestimable benefit. 

The long list of the names and descriptions of the prisoners has 
been omitted for the reason that I. do not think it right to publish it. 
It is an injustice to the prisoners to publish to the world their shame, 
and degrading their relatives and posterity. For any matters 
relating to them, our books are open to any one who takes an 
interest in them. A full and concise statement of the prisoners, 
nativity, crimes, terms, etc., will be found in the statistical tables 
appended to the clerk's report. 

It is a matter of congratulation that I am able to report favorably 
in regard to the discipline of the prison. With but few exceptions 
the conduct of the prisoners has been good and the rules of the 
prison have been generally closely regarded. All of the prisoners 
seem, as a general thing, as cheerful and contented as possible under 
the circumstances. 

It is very necessary that a suitable building should be erected for 
the confi-uement of prisoners who are more or less insane, or who 
pretend to be so. As there is almost always one or more such 
cases among the number of those sent to the prison, it frequently 
occurs whilst in the cell house, where, only, they can be safely con- 
fined, that they greatly disturb the other prisoners and thereby have 
a very bad effect upon the discipline of the prison. 

To the officers of the institution, Charles A. Manning, Deputy 
Warden ; John H. Bowes, Clerk ; Dr. Charles C. Hamrick, Physi- 
cian; Rev. G. C. Beeks, Moral Instructor; Joseph F. Taylor, 
Steward, and the Guards, I return my sincere thanks for the very 
efficient manner in which they have all faithfully performed the 
various duties entrusted to them, and by whose assistance I have 
been enabled to successfully manage the prison. 

In concluding this report, I wish to express to you, gentlemen, 
my sincere thanks for the very cordial support you have extended 
to me, and I attribute to your co-operation much of the success of 
the institution. 

I remain your obedient servant, 

CHAS. MAYNE, 

W^arden. 



PHYSICIAN'S REPORT. 



Hospital Department, 
Northern Indiana State Prison, 

Michigan City, Ind., December 15th, 1873. 

To the Honorable Board of Control: 

Gentlemen — I herewith transmit for your consideration, the 
usual annual Sanitary Report. Having each mouth (luring the 
year presented to you, a written report of the aifairs of my depart- 
ment, as provided for by law, a lengthy statement at this time will 
not be necessary. 

The health of the prisoners, compared with former years has been 
good. We have had the usual run of endemic and epidemic diseasss, 
incident to this climate and locality. We have had but two deaths 
during the year. Timothy Foley, life prisoner, died of inanition, 
May 2d, 1873. He was a man, old beyond his years, and 
extremely infirm. He had been slowly dying to use his own 
language, for a year. Joseph Simpson was instantly killed, by a 
pistol shot, i^ugust I5th, 1873. The ball entered his body in the 
epigastric region, touching the heart in its passage. As his death 
was the result of his own murderous action a post mortem examina- 
tion was not considered necessary. This I think is the smallest 
mortuary list ever known at this prison. The number of deaths for 
the two preceding years, were six for each year. 

In looking over the reports of other prisons I am satisfied that 
the percentage of deaths, at this prison, is less than at almost any 
other prison in the United States. This is due perhaps in a great 
measure to our healthy location. Imperfect ventilation and crowd 
l^uen are crying evils in many public institutions. Our system of 
ventilation is good, more perfect in fact than that of most dwellings. 



13 

Our sewerage is also excellent. Scrupulous cleanliness has been 
enforced among the prisoners. Every department of the prison has 
been daily, thoroughly policed and cleaned, and at no time has any 
noisome or disagreeable odor been observable. Every condition 
conducive to health has been observed. Disinfectants were freely 
used about all the premises during the hot weather, when we feared 
a visitation of cholera. 

The prisoners have been better fed this year, than at any time 
previous, since my first connection with the institution. A greater 
variety of plain, common food has been furnished. Our Warden, 
Mr. Charles Mayne, deserves great credit for supplying the prisoners 
wiih an abundance of fresh, healthy vegetables in their season. To 
this fact is due in a great measure the universal healthy condition 
of the men. We have lost less time than usual, this year, on account 
of sickness. 

I earnestly hope your honorable Board will not delay longer in 
providing some better means for heating our hospital. I would also 
recommend that some arrangement be effected, whereby the men 
can have better facilities for bathing. I have before recommended 
that they be given more time for that purpose. 

I am under obligations to all the prison officials, for the hearty 
and kindly manner in which they, have supported me in the 
discharge of my duties. I thank them all. I have only to hope 
that my association with them, and with you, gentlemen, will be as 
pleasantin the future as in the past. 

CHARLES C. HAMRICK, 

Resident Physician. 



MORAL INSTRUCTOR'S REPORT. 



Michigan City, December 15, 1873. 

To the Honorable Board of Directors: 

Gentlemen — In submitting to you my report for the year now 
closing, I am glad to have it in my power to say that I have nothing 
of a discouraarinw nature to write. 

c5 o 

The moral status of the prison is certainly no less encouraging 
than at the commencement of the year, and I think I may in truth 
say it is improving rather than deterioriating. 

A number have professed conversion daring the year, whose 
subsequent conduct evinces a change of heart, which I sincerely 
hope may be permanent, and afford them protection both from the 
repetition of crime and from suffering further shame. 

The Sabbath School was never in a more hopeful condition than 
at present. Many, who at the beginning of the year, were unable 
to spell words of two letters, are now reading and some of them 
writing. 

While 1 would not make invidious comparisons, without flattery 
to myself or unmeritCv: praise to the officers and guards, I may be 
permitted to say that the order of the prison was never better than 
at present and will compare favorably with the best regulated 
prisons of the country. 

The Prison Library has been replenished during the year, and 
though not to the extent that was desired, it is much better than 
ever before, both in the number of books, and in the variety and 
quality of the reading matter. 



15 

In conclusion, gentlemen, allow me to say that I am under many 
obligations, both to yourselves and to the officers and guards of the 
prison, for the very many acts of kindness shown me during our 
present relations to each other. 

Very respectfully your obedient servant, 

G. C. BEEKS, 

Moral Instructor. 



CLERK'S REPORT. 



Clerk's Office, Northern Indiana Prison, 

Michigan City, December 15th, 1873. 

Messrs. R. T, St. John, A. W. Smith, and A. B. Capron, 

Directors of the Northern Indiana Prison: 

Gentlemen — I have the honor to herewith submit for your 
consideration a full statement of the financial and statistical opera- 
tions of the Northern Indiana Prison, for the year ending December 
15th, 1873, as compiled from the books of the Prison. 

I remain your obedient servant, 

JOHN H. BOWES, Clerk. 



17 

TABLE No. I. 

Exhibit of Counties Where Convicted and Number from Each. 



County 



No. 



County. 



No. 



Adams — 

Allen 

Benton .... 
Blackford 

Boone 

Carroll .... 

Cass 

Clay 

Clinton 

Delaware.. 
DeKalb.... 
Elkhart... 
Fountain.. 

Fulton 

Grant 

Hamilton 
Howard... 

Jasper 

Jay.. 

Kosciusko 
LaGrange 
LaPorte . . . 



2 

38 
2 
2 
9 
4 
5 
1 
6 
5 
3 

10 
9 
4 

11 
6 
1 
1 
1 
5 
4 

14 



Madison 

Marion 

Marshall 

Miami 

Montgomery.. 

Newton 

Noble , 

Porter 

Pulaski 

Randolph 

St. Joseph 

Steuben 

Tippecanoe . . . . 

Tipton 

U. S. C. Court 

Wabash 

Warren 

Wayne 

White , 

Whitley.. 

Wells 

Total 



4 

149 
2 
1 
4 

2 
2 
1 
8 
9 
3 
22 
2 
1 
5 
7 
1 
1 
1 




368 



D. J.— N. S. P.— 2 



18 
TABLE No. II. 

Different Crimes and Number of Each. 



Crimes against Property. 



No. 



Crimes against Persons. 



No. 



Arson 

Burglary 

Burglary & grand larceny. 

Concealing stolen goods.... 

Embezzlement 

False pretences 

False pretences & larceny.. 

Forgery 

Grand 1 arceny 

Grand larceny and receiv- 
ing stolen goods 

High way robbery 

Petit larceny 

Robbery 

Robbery and assault and 
battery with intent to 
kill 

Total 



4 
15 

12 
1 
4 
8 
1 
8 
220 

1 

1 

11 

10 



297 



Assault and battery with 
intent to commit mur- 
der 

Assault and battery with 
intent to commit rape .. 

Attempt to murder... 

Incest 

Manslaughter 

Marrying white woman... 

Murder." 

Obstructing railroad 

Perj ury 

Rape 

Total.. 

Whole total 



12 



4 
1 
3 

1 

38 



71 



368 



19 



TABLE No. III. 

Periods of Sentence of Convicts now in Prison. 



Period of Sentence. 



For one year 

For one year and six months..... 

For two years 

For two years and three months 
For two years and six months ... 

For three years 

For four years 

For four years and six months... 

For five years. 

For six years — . . 

For seven years — 

For eight years........ , — •• 

For nine years 

For ten years 

For twelve years 

For thirteen years 

For fourteen years. . . . — • 

For fifteen years 

For six teen years 

For seventeen years 

For twenty years 

For twenty-one years 

For life.... 



No. 



22 

1 

160 

1 

8 

68 

19 
1 

2-2 
5 
7 
3 
2 

10 
5 
1 
3 
1 
1 
1 
1 
3 

23 



Total 



368 



20 



TABLE No. IV. 
Pu7'suits followed before Convietion. 



Occupation. 



No. 



Occupation. 



Bakers 

Barbers 

Bar-keepers 

Blacksmiths 

Boatmen 

Book-keepers . . — • . . 

Brakemen 

Brewers. 

Bricklayers 

Brick-makers 

Brush-makers . . 

Buggy-makers. .. . . — 

Butchers , 

Carpenters 

Carriage-makers 

Chair-makers 

Cigar- makers 

Cistern -makers 

Clerks 

Coal Miners. 

Cobblers 

Confectioners 

Cooks 

Coopers — 

Curriers 

Dry Goods Finishers 

Engineers 

Engravers 

Farmei's 

Firemen 

Fiax-breakers 

Furriers 

Gardeners 

Gas Meter Makers... 

Harness-makers 

Hatters 

Hod Carriers 

Hostlers 

House Servants 

Hotel-keepers 

Jewelers 



2 

13 

2 

7 
1 
1 
2 
1 
1 
1 
6 

15 
1 
7 
3 
1 
4 
1 
1 
1 
4 

12 
1 
1 
5 
1 

77 
2 

1 
1 
1 
1 

2 
1 
1 
4 
2 
1 
1 



Laborers 

Loafers 

Lumpers 

Machinists 

Marble Cutters 

Millers 

Moulders 

Painters 

Paper-makers 

Patent Pight Agents 

Peddlers 

Piano Finishers 

Plasterers 

Porters 

Printers 

Professors 

Puddlers — .. 

Pu mp-makers 

Quarry men 

Pailroad Men 

Pailroad Clerks 

Saloon-keepers ■ 

Lawyers 

Shoe-makers. 

Showmen 

Stone Cutters.......... 

Stone Masons. ........ 

Strikers 

Tailors 

Teamsters 

Telegraph Operators. 

Tinkers 

Traveling Agents 

Traders 

Varnishers 

Wagoners 

Wagon-makers 

Waiters 

Total 



21 



TABLE No. V. 

Place of Birth of each Convict. 



STATE OR COUNTY. 



Alabama 

Connecticut 

Illinois 

Indiana 

Kentucky ....... 

Louisana 

Maine 

Maryland 

Massachusetts.. 

Miciiigan 

Mississippi 

Missouri 

New Jersey 

New York 

North Carolina 

Ohio 

Pennsylvannia. 
South Carolina. 

Tennessee 

Texas 



Number. 



2 

2 

11 

65 

13 

2 

2 

3 
4 
4 

4 

5 

33 

7 

68 

12 

1 

1 

1 



o 
O 



10 

18 



STATE OR COUNTY. 



Number. 



Vermont 

Virginia 

Wisconsin 

United States, total, 

Canada 

England 

France 

Germany 

Holland 

Ireland 

Poland 

Scotland 

Switzerland 

West Indies 

Foreign, total 

Whole total 



248 



10 
4 

23 
1 

19 
1 
3 
4 



73 



o 
o 
O 



46 



321 



47 



22 
TABLE NO. VI. 



Age at Time of Conviction. 



No. 



Number fifteen years of age and under 

Number twenty years of age and under, above fifteen 

Number twenty-five years of age and under, above twenty 
Number thirty years of age and under, above twenty-five.. 
Number thirty-five years of age and under, above thirty... 

Number forty years of age and under, above thirty five 

Number forty-five years of age and under, above fi^rty 

Number fifty years of age and under, above forty-five 

Number fifty-five years of age and under, above fifty 

Number sixty years of age and under, above fifty- five 

Number sixty-five years of age and under, above sixty 

Number over seventy-five years of age , 

Total ' 



3 

56 

107 

87 

47 

19 

19 

15 

8 

3 

3 

1 

368 



TABLE NO. YII. 



Grade. 



No. 



Number who can read and write 

Number who can read only 

Number who can neither read nor write. 

Total 



275 
62 
31 

368 



23 
TABLE NO. VIII. 



Habits. 



No. 



Number of temperate habits.... 
Number of moderate habits.... 
Number ot intemperate habits. 

Total 



121 

68 

179 

368 



TABLE NO. IX. 



Relations. 



No. 



Number single 

Number married .. 
Number widowers . 

Total 



216 

123 

24 

368 



24 

TABLE NO. X. 

Number- of Convicts During Year. 



Month. 



!^ 




O 


u 


^ 


Oi 


a 

3 


g 


a 


3 

a 






CO 


-u 


q; 


w 




O) 


bJO 


^ 


K 


O 


346 


337 


345 


330 


338 


332 


343 


337 


343 


333 


353 


338 


373 


353 


376 


371 


375 


S59 


368 


353 


370 


362 


370 


361 


373 


368 


376 


330 



c3 



> 



December 16th, 1872, to January 1st, 1873 

January, 1873 

February, 1873 

March, 1873 

April, 1873 

May, 1873 

June, 1873 

July, 1873 

August, 1873 

September, 1873 

October, 1873 

November, 1873 

December 1st to December 16th, 1873 

During entire year 



340 
336 
335 
340 
338 
342 
360 
374 
367 
367 
365 
367 
370 
354 



25 



Inventory of Property on hand December 15, 1873. 



No. 


ARTICLES. 


Condition. 


2 


GUAED HOUSE. 

Iron bedsteads 


Good. 


8 


Wooden bedsteads 


Good. 


3 


Wooden bedsteads 


Old. 


57 


Blankets 


Good. 


20 


Bedticks 


Good. 


5 


Hickory quilts 


Good. 


60 
20 


Sheets = 

Pillows 


Good. 
Good. 


40 


Pillow cases 


Good. 


12 


Lamps 


Good. 


13 


Chairs 


Good. 


2 


Rocking chairs 


Worn. 


2 


Wardrobes 


Worn. 


10 


Tables 


W^orn. 


20 




Good. 


1 


Towel rack , 


Good. 


2 


Looking glasses 


Good. 




Measuring rod 


Good. 




Cell house guide board 


Good. 




Ice box 


Good. 






Worthless. 




B read tray , 


Good. 






Good. 


2 


Cupboards 


Good. 


1 




Good 


2 


Slop sinks , 


Good. 


2 




Good. 


4 


Wooden pails 


Old. 


5 




Old 


7 


Rubber spittoons 


Good. 


1 




Good 


2 


Excelsior fire extinguishers 


New 


1 


o 


New. 


1 


Shackle chest 


Good 


1 




Good 


4 


Pairs handcuffs 


Good 


12 
3 


Balls and chains. 


Good. 
Good 


1 




Good 


1 


Waste paper basket 


Good. 



26 



Inventory of Property on Hand — Continued, 




GUARD HOUSE — CONTINUED. 

Tin pails. 

Wash basins 

Tin cups 

Tub 

Water buckets 

Lanterns , 

NIGHT BUCKET HOUSE. 

Night buckets. 

Night buckets. . . — 

Wheelbarrow r 

Large excrement buckets 

Axe 

Stove and pipe 

Tin pails 

Tin cups 

Tub 

Water pails 

Hand saw 

Wood pump 

Empty pork barrels 

TOWERS. 

Stoves 

Chairs 

Double-barreled shot guns 

Spencer rifles 

Navy revolvers 

Water pails 

Wash basins 

Brooms 

A xes 

Tin cups 

Night buckets 

Spencer cartridges 

Ely's cartridges 

Tower ropes 

Tube Wrench 



Good. 
Good. 
Good. 
Good. 
Good. 
Good. 



Good. 

Worthless. 

Worthless. 

Serviceable. 

Serviceable. 

Serviceable. 

Serviceable. 

Good. 

Good. 

Worn. 

Worn. 

Good. 

Good. 



Good. 
Good. 
Good. 
Good. 
Good. 
Good. 
Good. 
Good. 
Good. 
Good. 
Good. 
Good. 
Good. 
Good. 
Good. 



27 



Inventory of Projierty on Hand — Continued. 



No. 



ARTICLES. 



Condition, 



OIL AND TOOL HOUSE, 

Barrels kerosene oil 

Mortar hod 

Trowel — 

Rakes 

Axes 

Stone hammers 

Ben ch sere \vs. 

Brick kiln fronts 

. BAEN AND STOCK. 

Pair bob sleds 

Hay racks 

Log Chain , , , , 

Harrow 

Spring wagons 

Stone boat 

Span of horses 

Yoke of oxen 

Two-seated open buggies 

Covered carriage 

Two-seated sleigh 

Buffalo robes 

Sets double harness 

Strand sleigh bells 

Halters 

Scythes ...., 

Pitchforks 

Hoes 

Plows 

Cradles , 

Cutting boxes , 

Dirt scrapers , 

Saddle 

Riding bridle , 

Curry combs , 

Horse brushes , 

Ox yoke , 

Tons Hays , 

Bushels Corn 



New. 

Worn out. 
Worn out. 
Good. 
Worthless. 
Badly worn. 
Badly worn. 
Worthless. 



Serviceable. 
Serviceable, 
Broken, 
Good, 
1 old,l new. 
Worn. 
Good. 
Good. 
1 old. 
Good. 
Old. 

1 worthless. 
Good. 
Broken. 
Good. 
Worn. 
Worn. 
Worn. 
Worn. 
Worn. 
1 good. 
Worn. 
Worn. 
^Vorthless. 
Worn. 
Good. 
Good. 
Good. 
Good. 



28 



Inventory of Property on hand. — Continued. 



No. 


ARTICLES. 


Condition. 


1 


BARN AND STOCK. CONTINUED. 

Meal chest 


Good. 


2 


Water buckets 


Good. 


25 


Bushels rye shorts 


Good. 


1 


Lantern 


Good. 


1 


ENGINE HOUSE AND CARPENTER SHOP. 

Pipe plate 


Good. 


3 


Sets dies and taps 


Good. 


3 


Pairs blacksmith's bellows 


2WorthFss. 


1 


Anvil 


Good. 


1 


Set shoeing tools. 


Broken. 


1 


Sledce 


Good. 


1 


Set blacksmiths tools ... 


Good. 


1 


Lantern 


Good. 


1 


Grindstone 


Good. 


1 


Slack tub 


Good. 


1 


Ash kettle 


Good. 


2 


Scoop shovels 


Worn, 


1 


Monkey wrench , 


Good. 


1 


Iron vise 


Good. 


3 


Shavinar rakes 


Good. 


2 


Axes 


Good. 


1 


Ci rcular saw and frame. 


Good. 


5 


Bench planes.. 


Good. 


2 


Hand saws 


Good. 


2 


Buck saws 


Worn. 


3 


Two feet so uares 


Good. 


2 


Drawino" knives 


Good. 


10 


Chisels 


Good. 


2 


Braces 


Good. 


6 


Bitts 


Good. 


2 


Broad axes 


Good. 


3 


Screw drivers 


Good. 


3 


Mallets 


Good. 




Coi)per oil can 


Good. 




Two incii an O'er 


Good. 




Match plane 


Good. 




Tool chest 


Good. 




Step ladder 


Good. 



29 



Inventory of Property on hand — Continued. 



ARTICLES. 



Condition, 



ENGINE HOUSE AND CAEPENTEE SHOP CON. 

Pairs pipe tongs...' 

Chains 

Fl ue scraper. . 

Brooms 

Slio vels 

Fire scraper 

S wrenches 

Trowels 

Paint brushes 

Iron pump 

SteanT injector 

Feet steam piping. 

FIEE ENGINE HOUSE. 



Hand fire engine. 
Feet rubber hose.. 

Hose reels ., 

Iron pump 



OFFICE AT NOETH GATE. 



Stove......... 

Shovel 

Pick axe 

Water pail... 

Tin cup 

Wash basin. 

Brcom 

Arm chair... 



APvMOEY, 



Armory case 

Stove 

Chairs 

Cupboard 

Coal box 

Water, pail.... 
Tin cup 



Good. 

Good. 

Good. 

Worn, 

Good. 

Good. 

Good. 

Worn. 

Worn. 

Good. 

New. 

Good. 



Good. 
200 Good. 
Good. 
Good. 



Good. 
Worn, 
Worn, 
Worn. 
Worn. 
Worn. 
A¥orn, 
Worn. 



Good. 
Good. 
Good. 
Good, 
Good, 
Good. 
Good. 



30 



Inventory of Property on hand. — Continued. 



No. 



ARTICLES. 



Condition. 



1 

2 

4 

6 

4 

3 

200 

90 

75 

7 

1 



11 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
5 
2 
2 
1 

13 
3 
2 
2 
1 
2 
1 
3 
2 
1 



AEMOUY CONTINUED. 



Oilcan 

Double barreled shot guns.. 

Sharp's carbines 

Navy re vol vers 

Smith & Wesson revolvers. 

Rubljer spittoons , 

Spencer cartridges. ........... 

Ely'.- cartridges ........ 

Sluirp's cartridges 

Bullet moulds 

Broom 



WASH HOTTSE. 

Em [If V barrels » 

Skid." 

W li eel barrow 

Cleav<T .................... 

Me it hook.... 

Stove and pipe 

Table- 

Chairs 

Brooms . 

Hatchet ., 

'J'ubs ...■. 

Water pails. — 

Pounders 

Washboards 

Barrel soap, ,soft 

Sets stencil plates and brushes. 

Cuj) and brush 

Clothes lines 

Tin cups 

Wrin<rer 



SURGERY AND HOSPITAL. 



Case of araptitating instruments. 

Drug case 

Case pocket instruments 



Good. 
Good. 
Good. 

Gr;od. 

Good. 
Good. 
Good. 
Good. 
Good. 
Good. 
Good. 



Good. 

Worn. 

Worn. 

Worn. 

Worn. 

Good. 

Good. 

Good. 

Good, 

Good. 

Good. 

Good. 

Good. 

Good. 

Good. 

Good. 

Good. 

Good. 

Good. 

Good. 



Broken. 

Good. 

Good. 



31 



Inventory of Property on Hand — Continued. 



ARTICLES. 



Condition. 



SURGERY AND HOSPITAL — CONTINUED. 



Pill machine • 

Spatula • • ••• 

Pairs scales • • • • • — • • 

Set dental instruments 

Tincture,glass stopper and common bottles^ass't'd 

Mortars and Pestles • •■• 

Demijohns • — • •••• 

U. S. Dispensatory • • • • • 

Truss (in use) • • • 

Cork screw • • • • • — • 

Hospital chair. • ■ . ■ • 

Tables ■- — • 

Cupboards • ••• 

Carpet ■ 

Rubber spittoon...... 

Step ladder • — • ••• •• 

Wash stands. ...... — . - • • — 

Benches ... • • • • • • 

Case splints ■ • — • 

Bed pan • • • 

Night buckets • 

Water buckets • • . • • 

Hospital bed ticks. • 

Quilts ■ • • • ■ 

Blankets • •• • — ••••• 

Pillows • • - 

Sheets • • 

Pillow cases • • 

Towels • • • • 

Cook stove and trimmings 

Lamps • 

Tin cups • • 

Tin plates 

Crockery plates 

Four gallon crock • 

Rolling pins ••■. • 

Potato masher 

Iron spoons • 

Knives 

Forks 



Good. 

Good. 

1 good. 

Worn. 

Good. 

Good. 

Good, 

Good. 

Good. 

Good. 

Good. 

Good. 

Good. 

Good. 

Good. 

Good. 

Good. 

Good. 

Good. 

Good. 

Good. 

Good. 

Good. 

Good. 

Good. 

Good. 

Good. 

Good. 

Good. 

Good, 

Good. 

Good. 

Good. 

Good. 

Good. 

Good. 

Good. 

Good. 

Good. 

Good. 



32 



Inventory of Property on Hand. — Continued. 



No. 



ARTICLES. 



Condition. 



1 

12 
1 
1 
2 
2 
1 



4 

2 

1 

1 

2 

2 

2 

16 

24 

11 

9 

13 

4 

25 

20 

545 

20 

20 

2 



SURGERY AND HOSPITAL — CONTINUED. 

Brooms 

Copy Bennett's Practice.... 

Copy H artshorn's Practice 

Copy Ellis' Medical Formulary 

Anatomical Atlas.. 

Copy Froune's Chemistry 

Cam mon's Stethescope 

Lot of drugs and medicines .... 

CHAPEL. 

Cabinet organ 

Cane seat chairs 

Set m aps 

Planetarian , 

Bi ack boards 

Guards' chains 

Carpet for rostrum 

TAILOR AND SHOEMAKER SHOP. 

Tables 

Chairs 

Stove and pipe 

Sink 

Se wing machines. , 

Shoemakers' benches .... 

Pressing boards 

Pairs pants 

Pairs pants 

Coats 

Coats 

Vests 

Vests 

Shirts, striped 

Shirts, striped 

Shirts, hickory 

Pairs shoes 

Pairs shoes 

Sets shoemakers' tools 



Good. 
Good. 
Good. 
Good. 
Good. 
Good. 
Good. 
Good. 



Good. 

Good. 

Good. 

Broken. 

Good. 

Good. 

Worn. 



Old. 

Old. 

Serviceable. 

Old. 

Good. 

Good. 

Good, 

New. 

Old. 

New. 

Old. 

New. 

Old. 

New. 

Old. 

Good. 

Old. 

New. 

Worn. 



33 



Inventory of Property on Hand — Continued. 



ARTICLES. 



TAILOR AND SHOEMAKER SHOP CONTINUED. 

Flat irons 

Brooms 

Tubs 

Clothing rack 

Shoe rack 

Pairs tailor's shears^ large 

Pairs tailor's shears, small 

Gross pants buttons 

Sewing machine needles 

Pairs suspenders 

Pairs lasts... 

Sacks shoe pegs, assorted 

Sides upper leather 

Papers shoe nails 

Balls thread 

Gallon j ugs 

directors' ROOM. 

Bedsteads and bedding 

Center table 

Bureau and glass. 

Hair cloth sofa. 

Hair cloth chairs 

Hair cloth rocker 

Wash stand, bowl and pitcher 

Cane-seat arm chairs 

Stove , 

Coal hod 

Rubber spittoons 

Brussels carpet 

Draughtsman's table 

WARDEN AND CLERK's OFFICE. 

Cane-seat chairs 

Hair cloth lounge 

Bedstead and bedding: 

Round table 

Cupboard 

D. J.— N. S. P.— 3 



Condition. 



Good. 
Good. 
Good. 
Good. 
Good. 
Good. 
Good. 
Good. 
Good. 
Good. 
Good. 
Good. 
Good. 
Good. 
Good. 
Good. 



Good. 

Good. 

New. 

Worn. 

Worn. 

Worn. 

Good. 

Good. 

Good. 

Good. 

Good. 

New. 

Good. 



Worn. 

Worn. 

Worn. 

Good. 

Good. 



34 



Inventory of Property on Hand. — Continued. 



No. 



ARTICLES. 



Condition. 



362 

46 

380 

1150 

50 

380 

370 

370 

8 

4 

2 

2 

2 

300 

200 

500 

1 



WARDEN AND CLERK's OFFICE. CONTINUED. 



Waste paper baskets 

Washstaud 

Square tables 

Safe 

Letter press, brush, etc 

Eyelet fastener and punch. 

Letter heads and boxes 

Maps 

Matting carpet 

Stove 

Clock 

Screen 

Rubber spittoons 

Coal box 

Water cooler 



CELL HOUSE. 



Iron bedsteads 

Wooden bedsteads 

Bed ticks 

Blankets : 

Blankets 

Pillows , 

Wash basins 

Water pails 

Lamps and reflectors 

Watering pots 

Arm chairs 

Stoves and pipe 

Book cases 

Library books 

School books 

Library and school books. 

Barber's chair 

Razors 

Ladder , 

Wooden pails 

Barrels 

Brooms 



Good. 

Old. 

Good. 

Good. 

Good. 

Good. 

Good. 

Good. 

Good. 

Good. 

Good. 

Good. 

Good. 

Good. 

Good. 



Good. 

Good. 

Good. 

Good. 

Old. 

Good. 

Good. 

Good. 

Good. 

Good. 

Good. 

Good. 

Good. 

Good. 

Good. 

Worn out. 

Good. 

Good. 

Good. 

Good. 

Good. 

Good. 



35 



Inventory of property on Hand. — Continued, 



ARTICLES. 



Condition. 



CELL HOUSE. 

Table. 

Scrubbing brooms 

Dust pans. 

STOEE ROOM. 

Barrels pork = — . . . . . 

Barrels syrup 

Barrels vinegar 

Pounds saleratus 

Large coifee mills 

Yards of heavy stripe.. 

Yards of light stripe 

Boxes star candles 

Chest tea 

Barrels crackers 

Barrel pepper 

Dozen brooms 

Barrels hominy 

Barrel rye coffee 

Barrels salt 

Sack rice 

Pounds corn meal. 

Pounds flour 

Bushels potatoes 

Barrels brown sugar 

Dozen patent scrub brooms..,, 

Pounds tobacco 

Barrel dried apples 

Pounds cheese 

Bushels bean s 

Sack hops 

Bushels turnips 

Cabbages 

Pounds codfish 

Barrels peas 

Bushels onions 

Yards hickory stripe 

Yards toweling 

Dozen undershirts 



Good, 
Good. 
Good, 



Good, 

Good. 

Good. 

Good. 

Good. 

New. 

New. 

Good. 

Good. 

Good. 

Good. 

Good. 

Good, 

Good. 

Good. 

Good, 

Good. 

GoQji. 

Good. 

Good, 

Good. 

Good, 

Good. 

Good. 

Good. 

Good, 

Good. 

Good, 

Good. 

Good. 

Good. 

Good. 

Good. 

Good. 



36 



Inventory of Property on Hand. — Continued. 



ARTICLES. 



Condition. 



STORE EOOM. CONTINUED. 



Dozen pairs drawers 

Woolen stockings, pairs. 



MISCELLANEOUS. 



Bell in yard 

Fairbanks' scales, one large, one small. 

Tons coal 

Cords wood 

Beef. 



Empty barrels. 

Soap kettles 

Pails in soap house. . . 
Shovel in soap house. 

Box for hard soap 

Barrels soft soap 



DINING ROOM AND KITCHEN. 



Tin plates 

Tin cups 

Iron spoons 

Large baking pans 

iTubs 

Large baskets 

Buckets 

Large si earn cooking kettles. 

Lot of cooking utensils 

Lamps 

Clock 

Secretary 

Tables 

Guards chairs 

Arm chairs 

Bottles pepper sauce 

Pepper boxes 

Bell 



Good. 
Good. 



Good. 
Good. 
Good. 
Good. 
Good. 
Good, 
Good. 
Good. 
Good. 
Good. 
Good. 



Good. 

Good. 

Good. 

Good. 

Good. 

Worthless. 

Good. 

Good. 

Good, 

Good. 

Good. 

Good. 

Good. 



OrHCDCOOOOOCl 
CO c^Z! d Tj) CO CO <M 



C^ i-l 



37 









c 
s 

■5 


+3 

a 

3 


c 


a 
o 

£ 

o 


"3 



"S * S 3 g 



' o b 



a p a § 

5 o "C >i ci -o 

S a § * =* g 2 g 



CM (M C 



I O O f-i lO 



'(Moot 
s CO CO O tH O CO 

< 1-ii-c ■ -- 

O^CO CM 

CO codes' 



-* 1-11 



■ C^ (M ' 



!:; =1 S 

o 3 aj 

ce o X 



c»t»-ga3 



: So 



g 



5^ -a 



j2 a ^ • .-c 
§Sg|2ag 
Pi a^a o o^ 

CS . O . CD -^ .2 



38 



Detailed Statement 



of Expenditures from 
January 31, 1873. 



December 15, 1872, to 



TO WHOM PAID. 



ON WHAT ACCOUNT. 



George Thomas 

James Dailey , 

Amos Ponnall 

William Dowdy 

John Kennedy 

Harvey Stewart , 

Charles Anderson 

Samuel Huison 

Peter H. Brandon , 

Samuel Staton 

John Driscoll 

James Henley , 

Patrick Williams 

Asa Perigo 

Edward Shoaff. , 

Nelson Drake 

Edward Burns 

James McDonald 

James Jacobs 

Henry C. Smith , 

John Tucker 

Chicago Pack. & Prov. Co. 



Casper Kuhn 

Mich. Central R. R. Co. 

E. F. Way 

J. Hamburger & Bro .... 



W. & J. G. Flint, 



Schoenaman & Ashton.. 
Mich. Central K. R. Co. 

Durand & Co 

Ghas. Mayne 



Toigt & Herpolsheimer., 

John Boozy 

Patrick Cooney 

Dennis Purvis , 

Post Office Department., 

C. S. Goodhue , 

Haddock & Son 

Regular Guards 

Lewis Mitten , 

Haddock & Son 

William Sortman 

G. C. Bceks 

Hillborn k Colborn 

W. U. Telegraph Co 

Ames & Holliday 

E. Sweet 

J. H. Winterbotham& Sons 

H. F. Benham 

Geo. H. Wood 



Geo. Staiger 

Wm. Oehming 

Peter Velilen 

John B. Bouchard. 

Isaac Sinclair 

Dan. Kennedy 



Manny and Messer 

W. U. Telegraph Co 

Mich. Central R. R. Co. 
A. M. U. Express Co.... 
Haddock & Son 



John Tucker 

R. Conden 

H. J. Willits, P. M. 



Gateage on discharge 

Gateage on discharge 

Gateage on discharge 

Gateage on dischai-ge 

Gateage on discharge 

Gateage on discharge 

Gateage on discharge 

Gateage on discharge 

Gateage on discharge 

Gateage on discharge 

Gateage on discharge 

Gateage on disoharge 

Gateage on discharge 

Gateage on discharge 

Gateage on discharge 

Gateage on discharge 

Gateage on discharge 

Gateage on discharge 

Gateage on discharge 

Gateage on discharge 

Gateage on discharge 

35 barrels prime pork, $385; 10,408 pounds dry salted 
shoulders, $390 30 

Bill of flour and corn meal 

Freight on provisions and supplies December, 1872 

4 bushels beans at $2 per bushel 

7 barrels, $1 each; 306}^ gallons vinegar at 11 cents per 
gallon ; cartage, 50 cents 

6 barrels ground coffee, 1,004 pounds, at 12 cents per 
pound; less difference on freight, $1 70 

Bills of groceries and supplies 

Freight on provisious and supplies for January, 1873... 

Bill of groceries, supplies and leather 

17 barrels prime mess pork at $10 50 per barrel, $17/^ 50 ; 
bread and yeast, $3 50 ; paid for needles, $1 ; two 
trips to Chicago, $8 80 ; mileage to Indianapolis, 
$24 64 

Bill of goods for clothing andbedding accounts 

39 5-6 cords of wood at $3 60 per cord 

193^ cords of wood at $3 50 per cord 

68^ cords of wood at $3 75 per cord 

550 postage stamps 

Bill of Newspapers for prisoners 

Bill of Stationerj' for prisoners 

Pay-roll from December 15, 1872, to January 31, 1873... 

13 days guarding 

Bill of drugs and medicines 

Overwork for State 

Bill of flower plants and bulbs 

Bill of lumber 

Bill of telegraphing, December, 1872 

Bill of window glass and putty ., 

Bill of repairing harness 

Bill of poplar lumber and wrought nails 

39^ tons of ice at $1 50 per ton 

Fare and expenses to Chicago to purchase steam in- 
jector 

Bill of hardware and tinware 

2 barrels of lime 

1 set double harness 

Bill of horseshoeing 

Salary as physician, $111 11 ; as usher, $29 71 

For making plats and description of land for transfer 
with Donnelly 

Bill of Hardware 

Bill of telegraphing, month of January, 1873 

Bill of freight and Express charges 

Bill of Express charges 

Bill of stationery, $G 4-5; lamp chimneys, whitewash 
brush, ifcc, $12 24 

Overwork for State 

Bill of axes and tinware 

Post-office box rent and postage 



39 

Detailed Statement of Expenditures from December 1, 1872, to 
January 31, 1873.— Continued. 



TO WHOM PAID. 



ON WHAT ACCOUNT. 



Casper Kuhn , 

John H. Bowers... 

J. J. Smiley 

W. B. Loughridge, 
6. Bloch 



Bill of flour and meal for January 

Extra services and night work during October, No- 
vember and December, 1872 

For fare and expenses from Greencastle to Lafayette, 
from Greencastle to Chicago and return, $29 95 ; 
from Michigan City to Chicago and return, $4 40, all 
on prison business , 

For fare and expenses from Peru to Indianapolis and 
return, $8, and from Peru to Lafayette and return 
on prison business, $5 

For fare and expenses to Chicago and return, $5, and 
one trip to Indianapolis and return on prison busi- 
ness, $8 75 

Total 



$283 82 
40 00 

34 35 
13 00 

13 75 



3,308 57 



40 



OOi-tr-'OSCOiOcsiO 
OOOOr-iCOOOiOCO 

r- CO CD 00 i-H -t:H O 



; S-S-^S -"i 



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a 



o 

a 


15,282 65 

1,755 15 

1,742 17 

48 00 

18 CG 

535 48 

12 75 


00 

CO 



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41 

Detailed Statement of Expenditures for Ilonth of February, 1873. 



TO WHOM PAID. 



OX WHAT ACCOUNT. 



William Baldwin 

Enoch Harrold 

Lee Brown 

Louis Miller 

Henry Carl 

Gustave Hartong 

George Gardner 

John Burns 

John A. Barker 

Robert Johnson 

George McKnight 

George M. Deardorff. 

Regular Guards 

'William Schoenaman 

Schoenaman & Ashton. 

Fred Schmutzee 

Caspar Kuhn 

L. Woods 

Armour & Co 



Durand & Co 

Charles Mayne., 



John Boozy 

Henry Blue 

W. W. Higgins 

G. W. Palmer 

Frank Swinduskie 

Charles Erk , 

Fred Bobzien 

Ford, Johnson & Co 

Jacob Weiler 

Voigt & Herpolsheimer. 



Haddock & Son 

Charles S. Goodhue 

Post Office Department... 

Alfred Earl 

Indianapolis Sentinel Co. 
Harris & Messenger 



James J. Walworth. 



Manny & Messer 

George Staiger 

Michigan Central R.R. Co 
Mich. C'y & Ind'pls R.R. Co 

George W. Durgin, Jr 

Western Union Tel. Co. . . 
Am. Mer. Union Ex. Co. . 
George H. Wood 



John Tucker 

Haddock & Son... 
William Wardle.. 

H. O'Brien 

Isaac Sinclair 



Gateage on discharge 

Gateage on discharge 

Gateage on di.scharge 

Gateage on discharge 

Gateage on discharge 

Gateage on discharge 

Gateage on discharge 

Gateage on discharge 

Gateage on discharge 

Gateage on discharge 

Gateage on discharge 

Gateage on discharge 

Pay roll for the month 

193^ bushels of apiiles, at 45 cents per bushel 

Bill of groceries and supplies 

Bill of fresh meat and soup bones , 

Bill of flour and corn meal 

10 barrels salt, at $2 45 per barrel , 

10 barrels mess pork at $9 per barrel ; 10 barrels prime 
mess pork at $\.2 per barrel ; cartage $2 

Bill of groceries, supplies, leather and carbon oil 

25 barrels prime mess pork at §10 50 per barrel, 
$2G2 50 ; mileage Indianapolis and return, on 
prison business, 308 miles, 124 64; paid for wash- 
ing for prison, $3 ; carriage axle-tree, 60 cents 

29 cords of wood at $3 50 per cord 

1% cords of wood at §3 

5U% cord.s of wood at 34 per cord 

30 cords of wcod at 33 50 per cord 

43'^ cords of mixed wood at $2 62 per cord 

20% cords of wood at §3 per cord 

51 cords of wood at $'S per cord 

Bill of coal 

6 pair of shoe lasts 

Bill of dry goods and ticking, on account of clothing 

bedding 

Bill of drugs and medicines for month 

Bill of newspapers for prisoners.. 

600 postage stamps 

For livery bill 



1 S quire medinm time book. 
Bill 1 



for boarding 21 persons, 2 days each, at $2 50 per 

day, 3105 ; board of one person 1 day $2 50 

1 steam injector 355 ; bill of iron attachments to steam 

pipes in prison 34 62 , 

Bill of hardware , 

Bill of night buckets, solder and hardware , 

Bill of freight on provisions and supplies , 

Bill of freight and express charges 

Overwork for State 

Bill of telegraphing for month , 

Bill of express charges on goods 

For extra services in attending to heating prison nights 

13^ months 

1 month's labor for State 

Bill of stationery 

Overwork for State , 

Overwork for State , 

Salary as physician $88 89; as usher 32171 



Total. 



315 00 

15 GO 
15 00 
15 00 
15 00 
15 00 
15 00 
15 00 
15 00 
15 00 
15 00 
15 CO 
1,335 00 
8 77 

124 54 
24 79 

292 40 
24 50 

212 00 
880 38 



290 74 
101 50 
5 62 
203 00 
105 00 
114 62 

61 87 
153 00 

96 50 

3 50 

35 99 
25 08 
40 05 
18 00 
15 00 
28 00 

107 50 

59 62 

9 87 

27 72 

23 19 

4 03 
10 00 

2 80 
1 15 

7 50 
13 00 
18 20 

5 GO 

3 00 
110 60 

34,783 01 



OCiOlOiCCOrfcOOC^ 
OC:<NiOrH(M(M(MOO 



42 



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4S 



Detailed Statement of Expenditures for Month of March, 1873. 



TO WHOM PAID. 



William Huff. 

Nelson Loomis 

John Plush 

Joab Woodruff 

James Surplus 

W. A. Jones 

Jas. Dunn 

Daniel Lehan 

Thos. O'Brien 

James Owens 

Regular guards 

Ernest Kimball 

Armour & Co 

Schoenamau & Ashton 

Caspar Kuhn 

Michigan Central Pv. E. Oo. 

Fred'k Schauitzer 

Armour & Co 

Z. W. Palmer 

Haddock & Son 

Vojgt & Herpolsheimer 

C. S. Goodhue 

Post office department 

Haddock & Son 

F. H. Penfield 

James Surplus 

Ames & Holliday 

Manny & Messer 

W. B. Owen 

American Express Co 

Mich. City c% Ind'pls K B Co 
Geo. Staiger 

Chas Mayne 

Chas. C. Hamrick 

John Tucker 



ON WHAT ACCOUNT. 



Gateage on discharge 

Gateage on discharge 

Gateage on discharge 

Gateage on discharge 

Gateage on discharge 

Gateage on discharge 

Gateage on discharge 

Gateage on discharge 

Gateage on discharge 

Gateage on discharge 

Pay roll for the month 

Services as guard, 18 days at $60 per month 

Ten barrels prime mess pork, at $13 25—8132 50. Ten 
barrels mess pork at $9 00— S90 00. Cartage, $2 00... 

Bill of groceries and supplies 

Bill offlour and corn meal 

Bill of freight on provisions and supplies 

Bill of beef shanks for soup 

Thirty-five barrels of hocks at $6 00—^210 00. Fifteen 
barrels prime mess at $13 00— $195 00. Fifteen barr-els 
mess at $9 00— $135 00 

Seven cords of wood at $3 50 per cord 

Bill of drugs and medicines 

Bill of dry goods for clothing 

Bill of stationery. Newspapers for prisoners 

450 stamps and postage 

Bill of hops and sundries expense account $8 97. Sta- 
tionery $4 37 

Bill of 5 barrels of carbon oil 

Overwork for State 

Bill of one gallon lard oil. Blank book and sundries. 
Expense account 

Bill of hardware 

Bill of 5,000 brick at $8 00 per 1,000, for new oven 

Bill of express charges 

Bill of freight and express 

Bill of 24 sheet iron bread pans, $18 00. One dozen 
■wash basins, $4 20 

Fare and expense of one trip to Chicago, $4 40. Repair- 
ing harness, $1 60. Expense of fare of Geo. Wood 
buying brick, $1 95 , 

Salary as physician, $44 44; as usher, $12 00 

Work tor State 

Total 



Amount. 



$15 00 


15 00 


15 00 


15 00 


15 00 


15 00 


15 00 


15 00 


15 00 


15 00 


1,315 15 


34 84 


224 50 


172 ^ 
298 OD 


61 00 


7 59 


540 00 


24 50 


30 15 


37 23 


32 37 


13 83 


13 34 


46 80 


5 OU 


8 20 


12 35 


40 00 


3 10 


12 89 



7 95 
56 44 
19 00 



$3,188 56 



CO 
00 



5» 



44 



iC(Mcoooor^oo-*co 

CiiCOCOTt^OQDO"-— I 
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^ 



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45 



Detailed Statement of Expenditures for Month of April, 1873, 



No. 



TO WHOM PAIB. 



ON "WHAT ACCOUNT. 



Joseph Smith 

Kobert Chism, 

Jerry Eoberts,. 

C. H.Carl 

Peter Carter 

James Alberts 

W. H. Jones 

Isaiah P. Smith 

T. A. Seeley 

Chas. Beazley 

Carpenter Williams 

James Boddy , 

Thomas Jones 

Regular Guards 

W. S. Kaufman 

George McDowell 

Wm. P. Woodward 

L. T Harding , 

Armour & Co 

McKindley, Gilchrist & Co. 



C. Lay 

Culb-irtson, Blair & Co.. 

Caleb Vanness 

Schoeuaman & Ashton,.. 
F. Petsch. 



Casper Kuhn , 

F. Schmutzer 

McKindlev, Gilchrist & Co. 

ly'ich. Central R. R. Co 

Haddock & Sou 

Field, Leiter & Co 

Voigt& Herpolsheimer 

H. E. &C. F. Sterne & Co., 



Haddock & Son 

Post OfSce Department 

C. S. Goodhue 

Culver, Page, Hoyne & Co. 

Wm. Brinckman 

John Tucker 

Oehming & Yoss 

Manny & Messer 

George Staiger 

W. U. Telegraph Co 

Haddock & Son , 

Charles C. Hamrick 

Chas. Mayne 



Gateage on discharge.... 

Gateage on discharge 

Gateage on discharge 

Gateage on discharge , 

Gateage on discharge 

Gateage on discharge 

Gateage on discharge 

Gateage on discharge 

Gateage on discharge 

Gateage on discharge 

Gateage on discharge 

Gateage on discharge 

Gateage on dissharge 

Paj'-roll for month 

Services as guard, nine days, at $C0 per month 

Services as Steward one-half of month, at $75 per month 

Services as guard, 123^ days, at S60 per month 

.32 bushels of onions at SI per bushel 

36 barrels hocks at $7 per barrel 

6 caddies 136J^ pounds tobacco at 55 cents per pound, 

$75 08; cartage, 25 cents 

Bill for baking bread 

5 barrels mess beef at $7 per barrel 

42 bushels of turnips at 3U cents per bushel 

Bill of groceries and supplies 

40 bushels Early Rose potatoes at 60 cents, $24 ; 19>^ 

bushels Peach Blow potatoes et 55 cents, $10 72 

Bill of flour and corn meal 

Bill of beef shanks for soup 

Bill of groceries, supplies and sheepskins for aprons 

Freight on provisions, supplies and brick 

Bill of drugs and medicines 

Bill of striped shirting ..nd toweling 

Bill of drv goods for clothing 

68954 yards 6-4 satinet stripe cloth at $2 20, $1,516 35 ; 

384 yards 6-4 shirting stripe cloth at $1 50, $576 37 ; 

boxing and cartage, '$b 05 

Bill of stationery 

Bill of postage stamps and postage 

Bill of newspapers for prisoners 

Bill of stationery 

Bill of masonry work, building oven in prison 

Work for State. 

10 barrels of lime 

Bill of hardware 

Bill of sheet iron and sheet iron pipe 

Bill of telegraphing for month 

Bill of linseed oil and sundries expense account 

Salary as physician, $66 66 ; as usher, $17 14 

Mileage to Indianapolis, settling quarterly accounts 

with Auditor, 308 miles, 8 cents, $24 64 ; one trip to 

Peru on prison business, $S ; 1 trip to Chicago, $4 40. 

Total 



$15 00 


15 


00 


15 


00 


15 


00 


15 


00 


15 


00 


15 


00 


15 


90 


15 


00 


15 


00 


15 


00 


15 


00 


15 


on 


1.271 56 


18 


00 


37 50 


25 


00 


32 


00 


252 


00 


75 


33 


15 


00 


35 


00 


12 


60 


102 


49 


34 72 


186 86 


8 


40 


309 39 


24 95 


48 


63 


199 


88 


27 08 


2,097 


77 


7 


07 


10 


80 


29 


27 


60 


61 


33 


68 


9 


06 


15 00 


33 


29 


11 


30 


4 


91 


5 


60 


83 80 



37 04 



$5,410 59 



46 





OoO'^ir-CvlOOOCOT^CO 


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47 



Detailed Statement of Expenditures for Month of May, 1873. 



No. 



TO WHOM PAID. 



ON WHAT ACCOUNT. 



Amount. 



Michael Williams.. 
Charles H. West.... 

Regular guard 

Armour & Co 



Z. W. Palmer 

John Horan 

Casper Kuhn 

Michigan Central E. R. Co 

August Bettke ... 

Schoenaman & Ashman 

Fred. Schmertzer 



Durands & Co.. 



Jacob Meyer , 

Toigt & Herpolsheimor. 

Haddock & Son 

C. S. Goodhue 

Post Office Department. 
Hsddock k Son , 



Georgo Stai.ger. 



Manny & Messer 

J. H.Winterbotham & Soni 



Thomas J. Shaw 

John W. McCleary... 
Charles C. Hamrick. 
A. W. Smith 



Charles Mayne 

William R. Jones. 
Total , 



Gateage on discharge 

Gateage on discharge 

Pay roll for the month 

20 barrels mess pork at $9, $180; 20 barrels prime mess 
pork at 816 75, S335 ; cartage, S4 

19 bushels turnips at 30 cents per bushel 

16 bushels potatoes at 50 cents per bushel 

Bill of ilour au I corn meal 

Bill of freight on provisions and supplies 

97 bushels potatoes at 45 cents per bushel 

Bill of groceries and supplies 

Bill of soup bones and onions, $12 19 ; 602 pounds salt 
beef at 5 cents per pound, $30 10 

Bill of groceries and supplies, $390 11 ; 35 barrels flour 
at $5, 8175; leather and sheep skins, $123 35 

1 sewing machine, $32 50; 1 dozen straw hats, $2 

Bill of dry goods for clothing account 

Bill of drugs and medicines 

Bill of newspapers for prisoners 

400 stamps, postage and box rent 

Bill of white glue, etc., expense account, $4 57 ; 1 
dozen copy books, $1 44 

Bill of night buckets, tinware and hardware, $36 78 ; 
for materials and labor, repairing gutter and conduc- 
tors of cell house 

Bill of hardware and shoe nails 

Bill of lumber, iron and work on Wagon, etc., expense 
account, $35 81; bill of hickory hearts and pole ends 
for fuel, $84 50 

5 dozen brooms at $2 25 per dozen 

Bill of flower bulbs and seeds from Vicks, Rochester,NT 

Salary as physician, $66 06 ; services as usher, $17 71.. 

Fare and expenses to Chicago and return, $4 60; fare 
and expenses to Paxton, Ills., and return, $13 25 ; on 
business regarding supp'.y of water for prison 

Fare and expense 1 trip to Chicago, $4 40 ; paid for 
hunting escaped convicts, $4 ; paid for washing for 
prison, $3 

1 key, $1; 1 bucket, 50 cents; 123^^ pounds butter at 17 
cents per pound, $21 



$15 00 


15 00 


1,350 00 


519 00 


5 70 


8 00 


224 12 


28 38 


43 65 


56 33 


42 29 


688 46 


34 50 


13 84 


8 75 


35 86 


15 43 



113 85 
8 35 


120 31 

11 25 

12 40 

84 37 



17 85 

11 40 
22 50 

$3,512 60 



iC O i-< -^ (M J 
t- iC t~- 00 rO : 



48 



i_ — w u ^ 
00^2o33ci 

a f =„'S t?=^ ^'S 
^ ;i CO P oQ a ^ M 



CO O ^ O O t' 

CO o CM o o r- 

CC IM ^ O OO O 
(M -^ 'X O O 



¥f 



: o o o 

; O O O 

■ oo o 

:o o o 

"*co~im" 



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49 



Detailed Statement of Expenditures for Month of June, 1873. 



TO WHOM PAID. 



James McKnight... 

George Eager 

Alonzo Weidel 

Charles Boyd 

John Childers 

Regular guards 

Michael Badour.... 
Michael McAuIiie. 
David C. Eitemour 
L. Woods 

Armour <fe Co 



H. Jewell 

Durands & Co 

Michael Badour 

Caspar Kiihn 

J. H. Winterbotham 

Schoenaman & Ashton 

W. & J. G. Flint 

Fred'k Schmutzer 

John A. Glass' r 

Mich. Central K. S.. Co 

H. K. k C. F. Rterne 



Voigt & Herpolsheimer. 

Jacob Weiler 

Ames & Holliday 

Haddock &Son 

C. S. Goodhue 

Haddock & Sou 

Post office department . 
Geo. Staiger 

James McKnight 

Rudolph Arndt 

Peter Vehlen 

Manny k Messer 

P. Deran, agent 

Thornton & Orr 

Mich. City & Ind'pls R.R Co 
West'n Union Telegraph Co 

J. B. Bouchard 

Haddock & Son 

Chas. C. Hamrick 

Chas. Mayne , 



ON WHAT ACCOUNT. 



Gateage on discharge 

Gateage on discharge 

Gateage on discharge , 

Gateage on discharge 

Gateage on discharge 

Pay roll for month 

18% bushels of potatoes at lOcts per bushel 

13 a8-60 bushels of potatoes at 40cts per bushel 

59 bushels of potatoes at 40cts per bushel 

5 barrels of Saginaw salt at ?2 45— $12 25. 7 barreli 
salt at $2 20— $15 40 - 

20 barrels of prime mess pork at $14 50—8290 00 ; cart 
age S2 00. 20 barrels mess beef at 89 00— $180 ; cart- 
age $2 00. 8 barrels clear beef at $5 00— 8S0 00 ; 
cartage 50cts. 10 barrels mess beef, 850 00. 14 
tierces hocks, 8147 00 less freight 87 79— $189 21 

Bill of cabbage and tomato plants, onion and radish 
seed 



Bill of groceries and supplies 

23% bushels of potatoes 

Bill of flour and corn meal 

1 cow for beef 

Bill of groceries and supplies 

Bill of shorts — tobacco 

Bill of beef shanks for soup and 13 Iba beelfor hospital. 

1,850 cabbage plants 

Freight bill on provisions and supplies 853 57. Supply 

of water account 

555% yaids e-4 satinet stripes at $2 20-81,222 C5- 
Boxing and packing %b 25. 61 vards 6-4 shirting 
stripe at 81 .50—91 50. 146 yards' % shirting stripe 

at 75cts— 8109 50 , 

Bill of dry goods — clothing account 

Bill of leather, wax and slippers — ek thing account 

Bill ot drugs and medicines $29 96. Glass, paint brush, 

blank book, oil— expense account 

Bill of drugs and medicines 

Bill of newspapers for prisoneis 

Bill of tooth brushes for prisonern, $4 00 Pencils 38cts. 

563 stamps, box rent and postage 

Bill of night buckets, tin cups, tin pails and wash 

basins 

Over work for State 

F'or services of self with team and mower 

Bill of harness, repairing 

Bill of tinware, hardware and glass 

Bill of express charges on goods and packages 

Insurance paid on Warden's house 

Bill on express and freight packages 

Bill telegraphing for month 

Bill of horse shoeing 

Bill of whiting, paris green, coloring materials and 

sundries — expense account 

Services as physician, 866 60; as usher, 817 14 

Mileage to Indianapolis to make quarterly settlement, 
308 miles at Sets 824 64 One trip to Chicago and 
return, prison business, 84 40. One trip to Chicago 
and return, account of library, 87 40 



Total. 



815 00 

15 00 

15 00 

15 00 

15 00 

1,350 00 

7 50 

5 45 

23 80 

27 65 



693 71 

39 23 

402 90 

9 40 

319 75 

44 00 

45 77 
83 61 
10 82 

4 35 

85 57 



1,428 90 
40 29 
17 C9 

37 66 
7 12 

28 93 
4 38 
19 25 

38 90 

10 00 

4 50 

5 00 
22 08 

2 30 

11 25 

3 60 

3 50 

4 25 

12 19 
83 80 



36 44 
$5,049 94 



D.J.— N. 8. P.-^4. 



50 






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W 1-5 fa f-j W IB r^ 



51 



Detailed Statement of Expenditures for Month of July, 1873. 



TO WHOM PAID. 



ON WHAT AOCODNT. 



Ben. Dowell 

5Iike Burns 

Joseph Hookmyer 

Charles Young 

Albert Hart 

Frank Howe 

Regular Guards 

Patrick Murphy 

John Lefler 

Wrn. Tetzloff 

Ed. Harding- 

John Schmutzer 

Gilbert Sly 

Charles Bowman 

Duraiids & Co 

McKindley, Gilchrist & Co 

Schcenaman & Ashtun 

Armour & Co 

Casper Kuhn 

William Brown 

J. H. Doud 

F. Frier 

Mieh Central R R. Co .... 

Charles A. Manning 

Haddock k Son 

C. S. Goodhue 

Post Office Department.... 

H. F. Benham 

A. B. Capron 

Janseu, McClurg <fe Co 

Beach & Miller 

Beach & Miller 

Mich. Central R. R. Co...., 

F. Knubbe 

Voigt & He4-polsheimer 

Manny & Messer 

Oehnig & Voss. 

W. U. Telegraph Co 

P. Dorau, Agent 

Thornton & Orr 

W. H. Hopper 

Geo. Staiger 

Haddock & Son 

Chas. C. Hamrick 

Chas. May no 



Gateage on discharge 

Gateage on discharge 

Gateage on discharge 

Services as guard, 18 days at $fiO per month 

Services as night guard. V' days, at 865 per month 

Services as night guard, 20 days, at $65 per month 

Pay-roll for mon'h .' 

57;>-^ bushels potaioes a,t oU cents per bushel 

8,772 pounds (griiss) sheep at Hj^ cents per pound 

15?^ bushels potatoes at 60 cents per bushel 

8% bushels potatoes at 80 cents per bushel 

One cow for beef 

16 bushels potatoes at (0 cents per bushel 

One cow for beef 

Bill of groceries, supplies and leather 

Bill of groceries and supplies 

Bill of groceries and supplies ; 4 barrels flour and corn.. 

2.5 barrels prime mess pork at $14 50, $362 50 ; cartage, 

$2 50 ; 20 barrels' mess pork at |15 50, $310 ; cartage, 

n. 

Bill (if flour and corn meal 

liushels of Potatoes at 60 cents per bushel 

Bill for threshing 120 bushels rye at 7 cents 

Bill for services of two teams and drivei'S threshing rye 

Freight on groceries and supplies 

Bill for boarding m-n threshing rye, 18 meals, at 25 cts. 

Bill of drugs and medicine 

Bill of newspapers for prisoners 

450 postage stamps 

Time and expenses hunting escaped convict 

Fare and expenses to Chicago', (in matter ol artesian 

well) $4 75 ; fare and xpenses to Chicago (to purchase 

books for prison library,) $12 25 

Bill of b'loks for prison library 

On account of artesian well as per contract 

On account of artesian well as per contract 

Bill of freight on account of artesian well as per contract 

3 dozen straw hats at $2 per dozen 

Bill of dry goods for clothing, $00 20 ; bill of carpet for 

Directors' room, $114 60 

Bill of hardware, barber's razors and shears, white 

lead, etc 

5 barrels of lime at $1 25 per barrel 

Bill of telegraphing for month. 

Bill of Express charges for month, A. & M. U. Express 

Company 

Insurance on guard's residences 

Services self and team one day 

Bill of two rakes, night buckets, oil cans and rivets. 
Bill of whitewash brushes, $4 ; Paris Green, $4 50 ; hops 

time books and copperas 

Services as physician. $66 C6 ; as usher, $17 71 

Fare and exepnse to Chicago and return, $4 40 ; wash 

ing fir prison, two months, $2 

Total 



$15 


00 


15 


00 


15 


00 


34 34 


33 


04 


41 


93 


1,216 


61 


28 


Vo 


307 


02 


9 


45 


7 00 


22 


00 


9 


60 


22 


00 


503 


90 


318 


80 


134 86 


677 


00 


272 


i7 


3 


>0 


8 40 


7 


OC 


33 


10 


4 50 


23 


0-5 


29 


02 


13 


50 


3 


00 


17 


00 


392 


15 


100 


0) 


250 


00 


9 


71 


6 


00 



Y8 18 
6 25 
6 55 


5 15 

7 50 

4 00 

10 65 


15 80 
84 37 


6 40 



1,974 91 



52 



iCOO-flr-'^ifriOiC'^i— *iO 
CO ^^O^ as C-l Oi^ 

^ (-T c^ o" 



9 2 



s3>^g>a=?rB 



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S2« 

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53 



Detailed Statement of Expenditures for Month of August, 1873. 



TO WHOM PAID. 



ON WHAT ACCOUNT 



Amount. 



George W. Cogliill 

Caleb Jacksnn 

Nathaniel Reddin 

Charles Robinson 

John Dolan 

William S. Eaton 

James Elmslie ... 

John Snavel 

William Morris 

Thomas McLaughlin 

James Ormond 

John W. Wilson 

Frank Sperry 

James Keezee 

Columbus C. Btck.. . . 

Jlack Mallory 

David Nottage 

Thomas J. Shaw 

James Donnelly 

W. L. Bennett 

A. Beyer 



Regular Guiudermu.. 
Gustavo Nitmer 



J: B. Conkey 

John Letler 

Rudolph Arndt. 

J. B. Conkey 

Gilbert Sly 

John Lefler 



Michael Blessin 

Carl Pietz 

.Michael Badour 

Fredk Schmutzer 

Robert Earl 

McKindley, Gilchrist A Co. 

Diirauds & Co 

Caspar Kuhn 

Armour & Co 



C. S. Goodhue 

Post Office Department. 



Haddock & Son.... 
Mannj- it Messer. 
George Staiger.... 
John On & Sons , 



Harrison Jewell 

SchoeTiamaJi & Ashton 

Michigan Central R.R. Co. 

Page, Brother & Co 

Voigt & Herpolsheinier 

Haddock & Son 

Beach & Miller 

Samuel Brown 



Western Union Tel. Co 

David Meachanj, 

Charles C. Hamrick 

Ind'pls & Mich. C'y E R.Co 

P. Doran, Agent 

Charles Mayne 



Spring, Robertson & War- 
wick 

Lamley & Rosenthal 



Gateage on discharge 

Gateage on discharge 

Gateage on discharge 

Gateage on discharge 

Gateage on discharge 

Gateage on iischarge 

Gatf-age on discharge 

Gateage on discharge 

Gateage on discharge 

Gateage on discharge — 

Gateage on discharge 

Gateage on discharge 

Gateage on discharge' 

Gateage on discitarge 

Gateage on dischiirge 

Gateage on discharge 

Gateage on discharge 

18 days services as guard, at SGO per month 

3 days' service as guard, at S6ii per month 

11- days" service as night guard, at S'JS per month.... 

13 dayn' and G night's service as guard, at $U0 and SOo 
per month 

Pay roll for the month 

Bill of saleratus and potatoes $54 ; less '.^2 old barrels, 

50 cents each, ^Iti 

26 bushels potatoes at 60 cents per bushel 

8,870 pounds (.gi'oss) sheep at 3}^ cents per pound 

Use of mower for cutting hay 

16 bushels potatoes at tO cents per bushel 

18 bushels potatoes at GO cents per bushel 

7,^;8f' pouuds (gross) sheep at 3^ cents per po'iud 
$2d8 97 ; 1 cow 730 pounds at 3J^"cents $2G 25 

li^^ bushels pota^.oes at 50 cents per bushel 

46 bushels potatoes at 40 cents per bushel 

.4 23-60 bushels corn at 45 cents per bushel 

1 cow for beef 

35J<J bushels apples at 50 cents per bushel 

Bill of groceries and supplies 

Bill of groceries, supplies and leather 

Bill of flour and corn meal 

20 barrels prime mess pork at $14 50, $290 ; 10 barrels 
mess beef, $9, S90 ; cartage $3 

Bill for 2,300 cabbage plants 

Bill groceries and supplies 

Freight on provisions and supplies 

Bill of leather and tanned sheep skins 

Bill dry goods; clothing account 

Bill drug? and medicines 

On account of sinking artesian well as per contract 

Reward for returning Elias Shipp, an escaped couvic 
to prison 

Bill for newspapers to prisoners 

Bill of postage stamps $22 50 ; paper wrappers and 
postage $5 50 

Bill of stationery $4 50 ; sundries expense account $4 18 

Bill of hardware 

Bill of tinware and hardware 

Making and hanging 3 sets inside Blinds for Director's 
Room 

Bill of lelegraphing for month 

Bill lor repairing carriage and shoeing "norses 

Service as physiciai. $66 66; as usher $17 71 

Freight on vinegar, carbon oil, package and casting 

Express bill on packages 

Fare and expenses 2 trips to Chicago, $8 80 ; paid 
expenses bringing fire engines t© tire at prison, $12 
paid for livery hire $4 



2 pair hand cuffs, $8 ; 2 leg irons, $13. 
Bill of Vinegar 



Total S5,020 63 



64 



« C » O w C-l o • 



OQOCOQOr-OOOOG<lcO 

; 00 r-^ -S^ -tH O fM lO 

■ ' iO -^ Ci -^ tr~ -^ 

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S a 



^ r^ ^' > o 

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s 


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55 

Detailed Statement of Expenditures for Month of September, 1873. 



No. 



TO WHOM PAID. 



ON WHAT ACCOUNT. 







$15 


00 


16 00 


15 


00 


15 


00 


15 


00 


15 


00 


15 


00 


16 


00 


15 


00 


15 


00 


15 


00 


15 


00 


15 


00 


15 


00 


15 


00 


15 00 


15 


00 


15 


on 


15 


1-0 


15 


00 


1,322 


00 


3 


87 


28 


00 


1,118 11 


30 


00 


18 


88 


9 


50 


oo 


50 


2(j 


03 


7 


00 


26 


02 


22 


09 


18 


11 


23 


50 


20 


45 


11 


96 


7 


95 


4 95 


14 no 


83 


80 



William Talby 

Thomas Callahan... 

C. C. Cai-ter 

Richard Smith 

Gideon Klinclc 

George F. Maher... 
Wallace Kaynoldg. 

J. C. Radford 

Ira Thompson 

"alvin Weaver 

James Ross 

Jolin Stonerode 

Thomas Cahoe 

William Bnll 

George Wisbey 

Charles Williams... 

H. B. Moord 

Thomas Mullin 

Lewis Jackson 

Henry Crossley 

Regular guards 

H. F. Benham 

H. J. Parker 

Beach & Miller 



Haddock &. Son.. 

Voigt & Herpolsheimer.. 

Robert Earl 

0. Hanson & Co.. 

Schoenaman & Ashton... 

Robert Ear! 

Michigan Central R. R. Co 

C. S. Goodhue 

Post Office Department... 
Indianapolis Sentinel Co 

George Stuiger 

Manny & Messer 

West. "Union T legraph Co. 
American Blxpresa Co... 
George W. Dnrgin, Jr... 

Charles C. Hannick 

Charles Mayne 



Haddock & Son.. 
Ludwig Greiger.. 



Casper Kuhn 

E. Palmer 

Edwin Valentine 

Peters, Colborn & Co. 



Gateage on Discharge 

Gateage on Discharge 

Gateage on Discharge 

Gateage on Discharge 

Gataage on Dischargu 

Gateage on Discharge 

Gateage on Discharge 

Gate'ige on Discharge 

Gateage on Discharge 

Gateage on Discharge 

Gateage on Discharge 

Gateage on Discharge , 

Gateage on Dischar;;e 

Gateage on Discharge 

Gati-age on Discharge... , 

Gateage on Discharge 

Gateage on Discharge 

Gateage on Discharge 

Gateage on Discharge 

Gateage ou Diseharge 

Pay roll for the month 

Services as guard — 2 days in August 

Services as guard — 14 days in September 

Balance due on confact for sinking and completing 

artesian well in prison 

Bill of drugs and medicines 

Bill of dry goo Is, clothing account 

19 bushels apples at 50 cents per bnshel 

lOOn pounds fresh fish 

Bill of groceries and supplies 

14 bushels apples at 50 cents per bushel 

Bill of freights on provisions, supplies, etc 

Bill of newspapers for prisoners 

500 postage s amps, $15 ; bo.^ rent and postage, $3 11 

Bill of envelopes 

Bill of tinware, nails and solder 

Bill of hardware 

Bill of tele ra'ihing for month 

Bill of express charges on packages 

Overwork for State 

Services as phVRician, SiJ6 06; as usher, $17 14 

Mileage to Indianapolis, making quarterly settlement, 

308 miles at 8 cents, $24 64 ; fare and expenses 1 t;ip 

to Chicago, SI 40 

Bill of sundries, expense account, 82 16; bill of sta 

tionery, $6 92 i 

Reward paid for returning John Williams, an escaped 

convict, to prison 

Bill of fionr and corn meal 

1 steer for beef 

44^4 bushels onions at 75 cents per bushel 

Bill of lumber 



Total $3,626 94 



29 04 



40 00 
313 42 
15 00 
33 19 
65 49 



56 



O <M CQ O UD C 



- 5 .s ; § -s g 2 >■- s 

- 'S — bD_ "C -2 ffl p. - 
3 T3 ^ O o "^ ^ Qh-2 





s 


^ Td 00 o o -■ o 

m => 00 o o :ri i:- 

O CO O -* 00 X 00 


i 



- ts - 

c b; c 

r- o § o 

5 '•'•' "3 <» 

s 3 d a 



o ;^ 



r^ IS --s "s; ^ " " 



57 
Detailed Statement of Expenditures for Month of October, 1873. 



No. TO WHOM PAID. 



ON WHAT ACCOUNT. 



Amounfe. 



Samuel Soper 

Henry Spenoe 

William Hanlin 

William Brown 

James Glllen 

J. N. Carpenter 

Geo. W. Holland 

Theodore Blakey 

John Gore 

Wm. Mallory 

John D. Burns 

Geo. M. Davis 

Regular guards 

August Beyer 

Thomas Greenwood 

Ernest Kimball 

Kichards, Shaw & Winslow 

Voigt & Herpolsheimer 

Page Bro. & Co 

Haddock & Son 

Frank Leminoskey 

Ford, Johnson &. Co 

Geo. Bradt 

Wm. Brummitt 

Peter Donnelly 

Edward Grunke 

Wrob Lewski 

F. Fened 

Christ Yonka 

August Bettke 

Michael Kasube 

Frank Wasnoskie 

Levi Fogle 

Thomas Dickinson 

H. Malchow 

Louis Kunkle 

A. Furness 

Carl Swanson 

Michael Badour 

H. M. Hopkins 

Armour & Co 

Schoonaman &, Ashton 

W. & J.G. Flint 

F. Schmutzer 

Eobert Earl 

Caspar Kuhn 

K. Learning 

Durauds & Co 

T. W. Francis 

McKindley, Gilchrist & Co. 

Mich. Central E. E. Co 

C. S. Goodhue - 

Post office department 

Haddock & Sou 

F. H.Penfield 

Manny & Messer 

Geo. Staiger 

J. E. DeWolfe & Bro 

Ford, Johnson & Co 

J.H.Winterbotham & Sons 

American Express Co 

Wes'n Union Telegrajjh Co. 

Chas. C. Hamrick 

Chas. Mayne ,, 



Gateage on discharge 

Gateage on discharge 

Gateage on discharge 

Gateage on discharge 

Gateage on discliarge 

Gateage on discharge 

Gateage on discharge 

Gateage on discharge 

Gateage on discharge , 

Gateage on discharge 

Gateage on discharge 

Gateage on discharge 

Pay roll for the month 

Sarvices as guard, 22 days at $60 00 per month 

Services as night guard, one month at S5t;5 00 per m'tli. 

Services as guard, 9 days at 160 00 per month 

Bill of blankets and socks for prisoners 

Bill of dry goods, clothing aacount 

Bill of sole leather 

Bill of drugs and medicines 

26 cords of dry oak wood at $3 50 per cord 

Bill of coal S192 93. 1 barrel lime S5 00 

23 1-0 bushels potatoes at 80cts per bushel 

9434 bushels potatoes at 80 cts per bushel 

12 bushels potatoes at SOcts per bushel 

29}.^ bushels potatoes at 75cts per bushel 

2734 bushels potatoes at 75cts per bushel 

29 65-60 bushels potatoes at SOcts per bushel 

26 50-60 bushels potatoes at 75ctg per bushel 

213 25-60 bushels peach blow potatoes $202 74. 116 

bushel.s russet potatoes $98 60 

28 55-60 busliels potatoes at SOcts per bushel 

12 25-60 bushels potatoes at SOcts per bushel 

36 25-60 bushels potatoes at 85cts per bushel 

17 35-60 bushels potatoes at 85 cts per bushel 

253^ bushels potatoes at 90cts per bushel 

25 35-60 bushels potatoes at 85cts per bushel 

28 35-60 bushels potatoes at SOcts per bushel 

llj^ bushels potatoes at 60cts per bushel 

122% bushels potatoes at SOcts per bushel 

Carx-iage hire and expense 2 days purchasing potatoes.. 
12 barrels prime mess pork at $14 50— $174 00. 8 barrels 

mess at »16 25— $130 00. 20 barrels mess at $16 00— 

$320 00. 25 barrels mess at $15—375 ; cartage $6 50.. 

Bill of groceries, supplies and corn 

Bill of ground coffee $39 72. Tobacco $8 80, less freight 

30ct9 

Bill of cattle for beef 

22 bushels apples at 55cts per bushel 

Bill of flour and corn meal 

3 bushels apples at 50 cts per bushel 

Bill of groceries and supplies 

2,975 lbs cattle (gross) 

Bill of groceries and supplies 

Freight on groceries and supplies 

Bill of newspapers for prisoners 

500 postage stamps 

Bill lamp chimneys aud burners, sundries expense 

account $8 45 ; stationery $6 17 

Bill carbon oil 

Bill hardware, glass and repairing stove 

Bill hardware, tinware and sheet iron 

Bill hardwai-e and glass 

Bill chairs and repairing chairs, sundries furnished, 

expense account, 11 gallons boiled oil 

Bill lumber and buggy repairing, cell house buckets 

$21 57, apples $5 50 

Bill of charges, express packages 

Bill of telegraphing for month 

Services as physician $66 67 ; usher $17 71 

Fare and expense two trips to Chicago $8 80 ; 1 trip to 

Indianapolis and return $24 64 ; paid for livery hire 

$3 00 ; screeeu for smoke stack, 75cts ; bell for guard 

house $2 00 , 



$15 09 
15 00 
15 0« 
15 00 
15 00 
15 00 
15 00 
15 00 
15 00 
15 00 
15 00 
15 00 
1,207 58 
42 58 
65 00 

17 42 
483 63 

89 05 
78 96 
25 60 
91 00 
197 93 

18 53 
75 40 

9 60 

21 81 

20 50 
23 93 
17 4o 

301 34 

23 13 

9 93 

30 95 

14 94 

22 57 

21 74 

22 87 
6 90 

98 13 
8 00 



1,005 50 
128 68 

48 20 

195 00 
12 10 

307 31 
1 50 

434 29 
89 25 

217 20 
18 36 
24 77 
15 00 

14 62 

39 24 

35 27 

36 98 
10 87 

74 56 

27 07 
1 15 
5 71 

84 37 



39 19 



Total $6,093 11 



D. J.— N. S. P.— 5. 



53 



r^ M o t- 1 



• M UD 



~i (M CC b- r " " *" 

J O O .- 



o 53 



■ 01 (N iC " 00 r- 00 



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59 



Detailed Statement of Expenditures from Nov. 1 to Dec. 15, 1873. 



No. 



TO WHOM PAID. 



ON WHAT ACCOUNT. 



Samuel Moore 

George Melville 

.Jacob Shaffner 

James Ashcraft 

Allen Shupe 

James L.Taylor 

James Officer 

W. F Gray 

James Ryan 

Robert Swain 

George W. Wilson 

Caleb Tarrish 

Peter Anderson 

Charles C. Washburn , 

Charles Brooks 

John Wilson 

John Strait 

Charles Henry 

Joseph Sayles 

Charles Robson 

Regular guards 

Chicago Packing and Pro- 

vision Co 

Nussbaum & Mayer 



Palmer, Warner & Co.. 



F. Schmutzer 

L. Woods 

I., P. & C. R.B. Co 

Michigan Central R. R. Co 
Schoenaman & Ashton.. 
McKindley, Gilchrist <& Co 

E. & H. Dolman 

Caspar Kuhn 

Durand <fc Co 

Jacob D. Williams 

Levi Fogle 

Page, Bro. & Co 

Jacob Weiler 

Voight & Herpolsheimer... 

Haddock Sc Son 

Daniel Kennedy 



A. W. Smith. 



6. H. Wood.. 



Walworth, Brooks & Co.... 

Peters, Colborn & Co 

Haskell Barker Car Co 

Post Office Department 

C. S.Goodhue 

Culver, Page, Hoyne & Co. 

Manny & Messer 

P. Doran, agent 

Peck & Son 



Haddock & Son.. 
George Staiger... 



George Marsh & Co 

West. Union Telegraph Co. 

Charles C. Hannick 

Charles Mayne 



Gateage on discharge , 

Gateage on discharge 

Gateage on discharge 

Gateage on discharge 

Gateage on discharge 

Gateage on discharge 

Gateage on discharge 

Gateage on discharge , 

G'teaffe on discharge 

Gateage on discharge 

Gateage on discharge 

Gateage on discharge 

Gateage on discharge 

Gateage on discharge , 

Gateage on discharge 

Gateage on discharge 

Gateage on discharge 

Gateage on discharge 

Gateage on discharge 

Gateage on discharge 

Pay roll for the month 

30 barrels prime mess pork at $10 ,50, .f315 ; 25 barrels 
extra prime pork at $8 -50, $212 50 

76 32-60 bushels beans at f 40, $183 68 ; 8 bushels 
beans at $2 25, $19 35 , 

199 pounds ground coffee at 15 cents, $29 85; less dif- 
ference of freight, 74 cents 

Bill of meat and soup bones , 

5 barrels of salt at $2 15 per barrel 

Freight on 5200 pounds beans 

Freight on provisions and supplies , 

Bill of groceries and supplies 

Bill of groceries and supplies 

Bill of flour and corn meal 

Bill of flour and corn meal , 

Bill of groceries and supplies 

408 pounds of beef at 5 cents per pound 

93J^ bushels turnips at 25 cents per pound 

Bill of leather , 

Bill of shoe-pegs and shoemaker's stock 

Bill of dry goods, underclothes and quilts 

Bill of drugs and medicines 

Bill for making survey, plans and plats and estimates 
for water works 

Fare and expenses 1 trip to Chicago and return on ac- 
count of supply of water, $4 40 ; fare and expenses 1 
trip from Wabash, Ind., to Indianapolis and return 
on account of supply of water 

Fare and expenses 1 trip to Chicago and return on ac- 
count of supply of water, $4 40 

Bill of iron pipes, fittings, etc., for steam pipe la prison 

Bill of lumber 

Bill for iron casting, lumbei and iron door 

Bill postage stamps 

Bill of newspapers for prisoners 

Bill of stationery , 

Bill of hardware t. 

Express charges on packages 

8 barrels kerosene oil, 391 gallons at 17/^ cents per 
gallon ^ f. 

Bill of hops, sulphate of lime, emery, tooth brushes and 
slate pencils 

Bill copper tank for water tank, hardware, 1 gallon 
iron slop pail 

Bill of lime, fencing, lumber and plaster 

Bill of telegraphing for month 

Services as physician, $100; as usher, $25 71 

Fare and expenses 2 trips to Chicago and return, $8 80; 
paid for hunting and returning stray cow, $5; paid 
for repairing harness, $4 ; 2^ pounds hops, $1 25 ; 
paid for washing bedclothes at prison, $3 



Total $5,059 04 



60 










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D, J.— N. S. P.— 6. 



SECOND REPORT 



OF THE 



INDIANA HEFORMATORY INSTITUTION 



FOR 



^^^OMEN AND GIRLS. 



JANUARY 1, 1874. 



TO OTHiE a-o"VE:E^3sro:E^.„ 



INDIANAPOLIS : 

SENTINEL COMPANY, PRINTERS. 
1874. 

Doc. J.— I. REF.— 1 



OFFICERS AND EMPLOYES. 



BOARD OF MANAGERS. 



S. A. FLETCHEK, Jr., President, Indianapolis. 
JOS. I. IRWIN, Columbus. 
F. G. AEMSTEONG, Camden. 



BOARD OF VISITORS. 



Hon. cone ad BAKEE, Indianapolis. 
Mrs. RHODA M. COFFIN, Richmond. 
Mrs. ADDISON L. EOACHE, Indianapolis. 



SUPERINTENDENT AND ASSISTANTS. 

Mrs. SAEAH J. SMITH, Superintendent. 

JAMES SMITH, Steward. 

Mrs. ELMIEA JOHNSON, Matron. 

Miss MAETHA PRAY, Teacher. 

Miss ANNIE MATHER, Assistant Teacher. 

ROBERT GRAY. Engineer. 

WILLIAM GRAY, Assistant Engineer. 

W. W. MOORE, Watchman. 

And one female domestic servant. 



PHYSICIAN. 



De. THEOPHILUS PARVIN, Indianapolis. 



MANAGERS' EEPORT. 



Indianapolis, January 1, 1874. 

To His Excellenoy, Thomas A. Hendricks, 

Governor of Indiana : 

Sir: — In pursuance of the provisions of section eleven of the act 
establishing a Female Prison and Reformatory Institution for 
Women and Girls, the undersigned. Managers of said Institution, 
have the honor to make and submit to you the following detailed 
report of their doings as such Managers, and of the receipts and 
expenditures of said Institution, and of the results so far attained 
and other information relatiye thereto. 

buildings and improvements. 

The first and only previous report of this Board was made to His 
Excellency, Governor Baker, January 18, 1871, and was by him 
communicated to the General Assembly, January 25, 1871. It 
reported the progress made up to December 31, 1870, inclusive. 
From it a full and detailed description of the buildings then in pro- 
cess of erection may be gained. Since that time an unexpected 
delay has occurred in completing the work, on account of a want of 
appropriations. After the close of the legislative session, in 1871, 
when it was found that the means were not in their hands to proceed 
with the building, the Board, with the assistance of the supervising 
architect, estimated the existing indebtedness to contractors and 
issued certificates therefor, as follows : 

To Messrs. Boedeker & Nieman, on account of carpenter work 
done and materials furnished, the sum of $1,522.27; to the 



Indianapolis Gas Light and Coke Company, for gas mains fur- 
nished and laid from the National Road, near the Deaf and Dumb 
Asylum, to the Reformatory building, cast pipe, wrought pipe, 
etc., the sum of $1,518.10; to Messrs. Tutewiler & Sutton, for 
work done and materials furnished on account of their contract 
for the plastering of the Institution, the sum of $1,520.02 ; to 
Messrs. Boiler & Knierim, for work done and materials furnished 
on account of their contract for painting and glazing, the sum of 
$750.32; to John G. Hanning, on account of steam heating and gas 
fitting, the sum of $8,746.46; to Isaac Hodgson, architect, for pro- 
fessional services, $1,127.96, and to Messrs. Foster & Wiggins, for 
cement furnished, the sum of $222.08. These allowances were made 
April 28, 1871. At the same time, the Board took account of and 
sold the brick remaining unused and not needed in the construc- 
tion of the building, amounting in all to the sum of $832 50. It was 
ordered that this amount be used in payment of the bills for hauling, 
the wages of the engineer and watchman, and the bill for fitting up 
the rooms in the residence of the engineer. The account of the dis- 
bursement of this money, which was not returned to the Treasury, 
is given elsewhere. On the 28th of June, 1871, a further allowance 
was made to Messrs. Tutewiler & Sutton, on account of plastering, 
and the amount thereof, namely, $690.56, was certified to them as 
before, making the entire indebtedness then found in their favor, 
$2,210.58. At the same time a like certificate of indebtedness was 
executed to Messrs. Bramhall, Deane & Co., for the sum of $630, on 
account of two cooking ranges furnished the Institution. Thence- 
forward until the meeting of the last General Assembly, the labors 
of the Board were limited to the supervision and protection of the 
valuable property acquired by the State. 

In his message to the Special Session, November 14, 1872, 
Governor Baker used the following language: 

"The Indiana Reformatory Institute for Women and Girls. The 
building for this much needed institution has remained in an unfin- 
ished condition for the last two years, no ai)propriation having been 
made to complete it. It is highly important that the building 
should be speedily completed and furnished, to the end that the 
female prisoners now in the State Prison at Jefferson ville should be 
removed thereto, pursuant to the requirements of the act for the 
establishment of the institution. It is also highly important that 
the reformatory department of the institution should be open for the 
reception of girls at the earliest practicable period. 



''There is an existing indebtedness of about $20,000, contracted 
in the erection of the building, and I trust that an appropriation 
will be made to pay this, and also to complete and furnish the build- 
ing, fence the grounds, and put the institution in operation," 

In his messa^re to the Regular Session, January 10, 1873, he said: 

" I beg leave to again call your attention to the unfinished condition 
of the Indiana Reformatory for Women and Girls, and to urge the 
passage of the bill which passed the House at the late session and is 
now pending in the Senate in relation thereto. A bill, of which 
this is a copy, received tlie sanction of the proper committees two 
years ago, and the passage of the pending bill was recommended by 
the Senate committee at the late special session. The debt due on 
account of the construction of the building ought to be paid without 
further delay, and the building should be completed and the female 
prisoners now in the State Prison at Jeffersonville ought to be 
removed to the Reformatory at the earliest practicable time." 

The supplemental act, which became a law February 3, 1873, fully 
met the foregoing recommendations of your predecessor and received 
your approval. By its first section was "appropriated the sum of 
fifty thousand dollars for the purpose of completing and finishing 
the building already erected for said institution, a::d for fencing and 
])Uit!ng in order the grounds appurtenant t(^ said building." Doubts 
having arisen as to whether that appropriation could be applied to 
the payment of existing indebtedness, it was declared by a joint res- 
olution subsequently passed and approved February 6, 1873, "that 
said appropriation was intended to be applied, so far as necessary, 
to the payment of all just debts contracted in the erection of the 
building of said institution," and that such is "the true intent and 
meaning of said first section." 

By the use of this liberal appropriation the buildings and ground 
have, since that time, been placed in such condition as to admit of 
their use for the ])urposes contemplated by the original act. A more 
])articular report is respectfully submitted: 

On the third day of February, 1873, the Board estimated the 
, amount of principal and interest due each of the contracting parties 
on the certificates of indebtedness before issued to them and fixed 
the several sums in their favor as follows: 

To Messrs. Boedeker & Nieraau, $1,763.28 ; to the Indianapolis 
Gas Light and Coke Company, ^1,758.46; to Messrs. Tutewiler 
& Sittton, 12,560.57; to Messrs. Boiler & Knierim, $869.11; to 
John G. Banning, $10,131.30; to Isaac Hodgson, -^1,306.53; to 



Messrs. Foster & Wiggins, 1257.23; and to Messrs. Bramiial], Deane 
& Co., $729.75; making an aggregate indebtedness of $19,376.23. 

These several amounts were immediately certified to the Execu- 
tive Department for your Excellency's approval and payment in 
the manner prescribed by the act. 

At a meeting of the Board held February 25, 1873, the architect 
was instructed to prepare })laus and specifications for the remainder of 
the work necessary to complete the Institution, and the President of 
the Board was authorized and directed to advertise for sealed propo- 
sals for the work and materials necessary to be done and furnished 
to prepare the building for occupancy. The notice to contractors 
and builders having been given by the President, as ordered, tlie 
Board, on the eighth day of April, 1873, opened and considered the 
bids made in response thereto and awarded contracts as follows: 

To D. Coulter, for the plumbing, at $3,500; to Tutewiler & Sut- 
ton, for plastering, calsimining, whitewashing and repairing of deaf- 
ening, $1,917; to Henry Nieman, for carpenter work, including 
materials, hardware, etc., $5,850; to Boiler & Knierim, fur paint- 
ing, varnishing, etc., $938. 

The President was authorized to and did contract with John 
Stumph & Co., for rubble masonry, etc.; with Haugh & Co., for 
iron work and materials; with Johnson Brothers, for galvanized iron 
work and slating; and with other bidders for several jobs of less 
important work. 

On the 10th day of June, 1873, the President presented a con- 
tract with John Martin for brick work, amounting to $325, wliich 
was approved by the Board, and Messrs. Cleveland & French were 
allowed $141 for professional services, including a landscape design 
for the grounds, letter of instructions, etc., and traveling expenses. 

A more comprehensive view of the work accomjilished n)ay be 
gained from the account of disbursements accompanying this report 
and f()rming a part of it. 

The descri])tion of the building already published in the first 
report, is so full and minute that it is unnecessary to occupy further 
space by a repetition of it. The original plan has not been materi- 
ally changed. Those parts which had not then been reached have 
since been completed. Except in a few small particulars the entire 
structure, as designed, has been finished. It remains for the people 
of the State and their representatives to determine how faithfully, 
economically, and well it has been done. We anticipate a favorable 
opinion of this most recent undertaking of the State in architecture. 



7 

APPOINTMENT OF omCERS. 

The Board on the 12th clay of June, 1873, appointed Mrs. Sarah 
J. Smith, of Indianapolis, to l)e Superintendent of the Institution 
and the appointment was approved by your Excellency on the 
twenty-seventh day of the same month. Before entering upon the 
discharge of her duties, she gave a bond to the State of Indiana 
in the sum often thousand dollars, executed by her husband James 
Smith, and ample security approved by the Board, conditioned for 
the faithful performance of her duties as such Superintendent and 
that she would faithfully account for all moneys, pj'operty and effects 
entrusted to her as such. The bond, as approved, has been filed in 
the office of the Secretary of State. She has also taken and sub ■ 
scribed an affirmation to discharge the duties of her said office with 
fidelity. The affirmation has also been fiL d in the office of the 
Secretary oi State. 

On the twenty-ninth day of July, 1873, the Board appointed sub- 
ordinate officers of the Institution, and fixed the salaries of the Super- 
tendent and other persons employed, as follows: James Smith, the 
husband of Mrs. Sarah J. Smith, to be Steward, at a salary of four 
hundred dollars per annum from the date of his appointment, with 
the consent of the Board that he may reside in the Institution ; Mrs. 
Elmira Johnson to be Matron, at a salary of five hundred dollars per 
annum from the date of her appointment; Miss Martha Pray to be a 
teacher, at a salary of four hundred dollars per annum, to commence 
when ordered by the Board ; Robert Gray, to be Engineer at a salary 
of seven hundred and twenty dollars per annum from July 13, 1873. 
The salary of the Superintendent, Sarah J. Smith, was fixed at the 
sum of eight hundred dollars per annum, to begin at the date of her 
appointment, namely, June 10, 1873. On the eighth day of Octo- 
ber, 1873, the Board appointed Dr. Theophilus Parvin, of Indiana- 
polis, to be Physician of the Institution, at a compensation of four 
hundred dollars per annum ; William Gray to be Assistant Engineer, 
at a salary of fifty-five dollars per month; W. W. Moore to be a 
watchman at a salary of six hundred dollars per annum ; Annie 
Mather, to be an assistant teacher, at a salary of fifteen dollars per 
month; and a domestic servant at twelve dollars per month. These 
several appointments and orders of the Board have met with the 
approval of your Excellency. 



APPOINTMENT OF VISITORS. 

In accordance with the requirements of section thirty-nine of the 
act estaiilishing the Institution, Hon. Conrad Baker, Mrs. Addison 
L. Roache and Mrs. Rhoda M. Coffin, were, by your Excellency, on 
the seventeenth day of July last, appointed a Board of Vistors to 
vieit and inspect the Institution and examine as to its treatment, the 
employment and condition of its inmates and the management of 
its affairs, including; the expenditures. To enable the Board to 
propeily discharge its delicate and responsible duties, the members 
thereof have been afforded all needful facilities. The result of their 
visitations will doubtless be submitted to your Excellency in the 
report requirfd of them by law. 

OPENING OF THE INSTITUTION. 

On the sixth day of September last, the Board had the honor to 
lay before you a communication informing you that the Institution 
was then so far completed as to admit of the reception of inmates. 
Thereupon your Excellency issued the proclamation contemplated by 
the statute announcing that the Institution was opeu for the reception 
of inmates. Thereupon, your Excellf ncy is-ued the {)rocIamation con- 
templated by the statute, announcing that the Institution was open 
for the recepti(m of inmates from and after tlie ninth of that month. 
Your Excellency afterwards, namely, on the fourth day of October, 
instructed the Warden of the State Prison South to transfer all the 
female convicts in his custody and deliver them to the Superinten- 
dent of the Reformatory Institution. This was accomplished on the 
eighth day of the same month. The report of the Superintendent 
will sliow the inner management of the Institution from that date. 

APPROPRIATIONS AND DISBURSEMENTS. 

Bv the thirty- fourth section of the act approved May 13, 1869, 
the sum of fifty thousand dollars was appropriated to carry out the 
provisions of that act. The first report exhibits the disbursements 
made by the Board up to and including December 31, 1870, as fol- 
lows: 

Excavation ^721 20 

Rubble stone work 3,892 25 

Cut stone work 1,751 66 



Brick making $9,188 55 

Brick laying 11,726 58 

Carpenter work 11,000 00 

Iron work 1,825 00 

Galvanized work and slating 3,100 00 

Lumber 518 63 

Plastering 3,000 00 

Lime 1,241 64 

Painting 112 00 

Printing 139 90 

Salaries 1,571 00 



■$49,788 41 



The expenditures on account of the Institution, at the close of 
the calendar year 1872, as appears from the several annual reports 
and the monthly statements of the Auditor and Treasurer of State, 
amount to $51,686.91. This sum includes the disbursements above 
set forth and also, four hundred dollars paid on account of galvan- 
ized iron work, etc., salaries of Managers and Secretary and pay of 
watchmen employed to protect the buildings, and shows an overdraft 
of $1,686.91. During the year ending December 31, 1873, dis- 
bursements from the building fund appropriation were made us 
follows : 



DATE. 



February 

March 

April 

May 

a 
a 
a 

June 



ON WHAT ACCOUNT. 



Old indebtedness.. 

Salaries 

Advertising 

Salaries 

Plumbing 

Plastering 

Digging cellar 

Salaries 

Plastering 

Carpenter work. . . . 
Rubble stone work 



AMOUNT. 


$19,376 23 


420 


00 


17 


50 


120 


00 


1,300 


00 


500 


00 


88 


25 


140 


00 


500 


00 


2,500 


00 


340 


00 








TOTAL. 

,376 23 
420 00 
17 50 

2,008 25 

3,480 00 



10 

Dlshursernenfs from the Bnildvng Fund Approjyriation. — Continued. 



DATE. 



uly 



Ausfust , 



September 



Oetoher 



Xdvember. 



Def-eraber.. 



OX WHAT ACCOUNT. 



Salaries 

Brick making 

Plumbing 

Pla.stering 

Carpenter work 

Digging trendies 

Cement 

Brick and brick work 

Painting and glazing. 

Carpenter work 

Tile 

liubble masonry 

1 ron work 

Plumbing 

Lal)()r 

Cement 

Paving 

Galvanized iron work 

Stone work..... 

Labor 

Salaries 

Carpenter work .... . 

Plastering. 

Chimney tops and labor.... 

Plumbing 

Ij'ayiiig water pipe 

Paintiiio' and glazing 

o c* o 

Galvanized iron work, etc. 

Labor 

Plumbing and materials... 

Salary of architect, in full 
Iron work and materials. 

Landscape design 

Advertising 

Total 



AMOUNT. 



60 

390 

1,000 

500 

2,000 

92 

89 



00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
65 
40 



580 50 



800 

2,500 

42 

148 

2,000 

800 

487 

31 

734 



00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
30 
80 
40 



500 
129 
20 i 

75 

2,000 

417 

44 
618 
400 
800 



00 
00 
21 
00 
00 
00 
50 
35 
00 
00 



400 

16 

580 



00 
25 
59 



1,372 
595 
141 

18 



04 
70 
00 
00 



TOTAL. 



4,132 05 
580 50 



7,543 50 



5,188 06 



996 84 



2,126 74 
$45,869 67 



11 

RECAPITULATION. 

RECEIPTS. 

Appropriation of 1869.... .....$50,000 00 

Appropriation of 1873 50,000 00 

Total........................... $100,000 00 

DISBURSEMENTS. 

Daring the years 18(39, 1870, 1871, 1872...$51,686 91 
During the year 1873 45,869 67 

Total...... , 97,556 58 

Balance January 1, 1874.............. |2,443 42 

The following further statement shows the amounts of money 
derived from the sale of surplus building materials and certain 
furniture not required in the Institution: 

From sales of brick... $963 80 

Di.-ibursed for incidental expenses during 1871 

and 1872, as heretofore stated $963 80 

From sale of a range to the officers of the Blind 

Asylum 398 07 

Applied on other accounts for furniture... 398 07 

Total received and disbursed.. S.,-.^.,.. o. 

Tliese amounts were not returned into the Treasury and do not 
appear in the accounts of the Auditor and Treasurer of State, except 
as embraced in the payments made for the articles from which they 
were realized. 

ESTIMATES FOR FURNITURE. 

On the tv.enty-ninth day of July, 1873, in pursuance of the 
requirements of the second section of the supplemental act, the 
Board submitted to the Auditor of State a communication showing 
that a part of the Institution was then ready to be furnished and 
setting out an itemized estimate of the articles needed for that pur- 



12 

pose, with the estimated cost of each item or article, which estimate 
was verified by the oath of the President of the Board and required 
the sum of five tiiousand six hundred and seventy-four dollars 
and seventeen cents. Upon the submission of this estimate, the 
Board constituted by the act, composed of your Excellency, the 
Secretary of State and the Treasurer of State, authorized the Audi- 
tor so to do, and he caused a warrant to be issued to the President 
of the Board for the amount asked and the same was paitl. 

On the eleventh day of December, 1873, a second estitnate was 
in like manner made, approved and paid, amounting to two thou- 
sand and ninety-one dollars and ninety cents. These several 
amounts have been applied to the purposes for which they were 
asked. A detailed account of the proceedings under said section 
two may be gained from the full record thereof which the act 
requires to be kept and preserved by the Auditor of Stare. The 
aggregate of drafts so made upon the Treasury is as follows: 

July 31. First estimate S5,67-i 17 

December 11. Second estimate 2,091 90 

Total $7,7(i6 07 

ESTIMATES OF CURRENT EXPENSES. 

As required bv the third section of the supplemental act, the 
Superintendent, at the commencement of each month, has prepared 
and verified by her affirmation, an estimated itemized statement, in 
writing, of the amounts required to meet the current expenses of the 
Institution during tlie month, setting forth in each the number of 
inmates in each of the departments of the Institution, and, also, the 
number of officers and persons employed therein on the first day of 
the month. These several estimates were presented to tb.e Auditor 
of State and by him submitted to the Board, consisting of your 
Excellency, the Secretiiry of State and Treasurer of Siate, and were 
by it approved and allowed, the Auditor of State, being directed in 
writing so to do, drawing his warrant for the amount thereof and 
the Treasurer of State paying the same to the Superintendent. An 
accoimt of these proceedings, which is required to be kept and pre- 
served by the Auditor of State, will afford more complete informa- 
tion. The "account of current expenses" kept by the Steward and 
reported to the Board of Managers, a copy of which is f-ubniitted 



13 

herewith, will afford a clear view of the management of the financial 
affairs of the Institution. 

As required by section four of the supplemental act, the Board of 
Managers and Superintendent, at the close of the six months ending 
December 31, 1873, made their itemized report to the Auditor of 
State of the expenditures of money drawn from the treasury under 
the provisions of sections two and three of the act. It is substan- 
tially the same as that contained herein. The record of proceedings 
required to be kept by him will more fully show the particulars 
thereof. 

ESTIMATE OF EXPENSES OF INMATES. 

As required by section thirty-one of the original act, the Board, 
with your approval, has estimated and determined "the actual 
expense per annum of clothing and subsisting an infant committed 
to the reformatory department of the Institution" and has fixed the 
amount thereof at two hundred dollars. 

CONSTITUTION OF THE BOARD. 

At the making of the last report, the Board of Managers was com- 
posed of James M. Ray, who served as President, F. G. Armstrong 
" and Joseph I. Irwin, with John M. Commons, Governor's Private Sec- 
retary, acting ex ojficio and by special appointment, as its Secretary. 
Mr. Ray having resigned, Stonghton A. Fletcher, jr., was appointed 
and, after qualifying, assumed the duties of a manager February 3, 
1873. On the twenty-fifth day of the same month he was chosen 
President and has continued to act as such. Captain Commons 
faithfully served as Secretary until October 31, 1873, when his res- 
ignation deprived the Board of his valuable experience and practical 
business management of its records and accounts. 

CONCLUSION. 

For details, statistics, accounts current, and other matters more 
immediately within the province of the Superintendent, Steward and 
Physician, we ref^r to the reports of those officers, copies of which 
are submitted herewith. The report of the Board of Visitors will 
afford some suggestions of improvements that should be well con- 
sidered and, if possible, carried out. The next report will more 
properly contain any recommendations to be laid before the General 



14 

Assembly. The means necessary to put the grounds in proper con- 
dition should be placed at the disposal of the Board, when the more 
important work of completing the buildings shall have been disposed 
of. It is the ardent wish of the Board that the Institution may be 
so successful as to commend it alike to the generous support of the 
Legislature and the good will and confidence of the people of the 
State. 

Respectfully, 

S. A. FLETCHER, Jr., 
JOSEPH I. IRAVIN, 
F. G. ARMSTRONG, 

Board of Managers. 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT. 



To the Board of Managers of the Indiana Reformatory Indltidlon 
for Women and Girls: 

On receiving the appointment, tenth of seventh month, I visited 
the penitentiary at Detroit, the better to understand the workings of 
a model prison. Many similar institutions had been visited in 
England; yet the American character, life and habits ditJer so widely, 
I thought best to have a precedent near our field of operation. On 
the eighteenth, we occupied the unfinished building, the better to 
superintend some necessary changes and prepare for the inmates. 

The twefth of ninth month, the Reformatory department was 
opened to take two girls out of jail, as they could be more profita- 
bly employed clearing the rubbish from the new building. The 
Prison Department opened on the eighth of tenth month, with 
seventeen prisoners received from Jetfersonville penitentiary, accom- 
panied by the Warden, Chaplain and Matron, all of whom feared 
we should have trouble, as the moral character of some was beh)w 
hope, and two were dangerous. Our first great trial was the sup- 
pressing of t bacco. When told they, could not use it in any form, 
gloom and sadness settled like a pall upon them which taxed all our 
ingenuity to dispel. Our superior accommodations sank in utter 
insignificance, and with little exception, they wished themselv^y 
back to " old Jeff! " We soon got to work, having reserved wash- 
ing, sewing and house-cleaning for them, and though our rules 
seemed hard, they have complied more willingly and cheerfully than 
we anticipated. There have been four added to the number, and 
am glad to state after the completion of the laundry we were able to 
procure washing to keep those able employed. Sewing and knitting 



16 

have been furnished others. Several have been on the sick list since 
their arrival. 

There are twenty-one girls in the Reformatory, taught half the 
flay in a well organized school, the other half devoted to cane- 
pealing chairs and household duties in rotation. Some of the girls 
are committed for larceny, or incorrigible conduct, and the change in 
some of the worst is striking, convincing us that many of these 
little wails go to ruin from surrounding circumstances. We regret 
to find'theage — fifteen — is preventing a large number from entering 
the Reformatory, having received letters from several counties 
making the inquiry what steps to take to commit over fifteen, stat- 
ing they must go to ruin if not admitted. The only answer that 
can be given is: "The law forbids," and the girl on the brink of 
ruin is robbed of the care, restraint, education and prouer training 
the State* has so wisely provided for her rescue, and our expenses 
are necessarily much larger in proportion, to care for a small 
family. 

Our daily religious exercises have been greatly blessed; Sabbath 
school enjoyed; and regular services on the Sabbath conducted by 
the Young Men's Christian Association ; who express themselves 
highly gratified at the apparent change from week to week in the 
family; and we feel that it is a problem no longer unsolved " that 
the power of kindness" with the religion of Jesus is sufficient to 
subdue the most hardened. A library is much needed. As the 
reading prisoners have been supplied with the "New York Weekly," 
interesting and ])rofitable reading is wanted to supply its place. 

I can thankfully record that in both Departments I am assisted 
l)v earnest Christian workers, who labor faithfully for the temporal 
and spritual improvement of those under their charge. 

With gratitude for the kindness with which my many wishes have 
betn responded to, 

Respectfully, 

SARAH J. SMITH, 

Superintendent. 



17 
SUPERINTENDENT'S TABLES. 

JREFOEMATORY DEPARTMENT. 

Counties from which girls were received since the opening of the 

Institution. 

Marion 12 

Wayne 3 

Parke 2 

Perry 1 

Floyd 1 

Johnson 1 

Vigo 1 

Total 21 

CONDITION OF INMATES, 

Number of orphans 8 

Number of half orphans 10 

Number parents separated 2 

Number whose parents are living 1 

Number who can not read 5 

Number who read indifferently 11 

Number who read pretty well 5 

Number who can write 5 



Doc. J.— I. Ref.— 2. 



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19 

ACCOUNT OF CUERENT EXPENSES. 

Steward's statement of the receipts and disbursements from. July 22, 
1873, to December 31, 1873, inclusive. 

RECEIPTS. 

August 5, from State Treasury = ... $474 00 

September 5, from State Treasury , 373 33 

October 18, from State Treasury 1,403 98 

November 13, from State Treasury 732 00 

December 15, from State Treasury 1,092 55 

Total receipts $4,075 86 

DISBUKSEMENTS . 

July. 

Provisions $20 39 

Hay and corn 6 40 

Salaries 141 06 



$167 86 



August. 

Provisions $52 59 

Hay and corn 16 74 

Salaries 213 65 

September. 

Provisions •. $88 69 

Hay and corn 14 50 

Drugs and medicines 10 70 

Salaries 246 98 

October. 

Provisions $226 67 

Hay and corn 12 00 

Clothing 58 41 

Fuel and light 645 50 

Stationery and stamps 10 65 

Salaries. 296 88 



$282 98 



$360 87 



1,250 11 



20 

November. 

Provisions ..$265 06 

Hay and corn 32 76 

Drugs and medicines 33 59 

Smith work 5 80 

Dispatch and stamps 3 70 

Fuel and light 194 80 

Salaries 342 00 

Clothing 87 58 

Reward for the arrest of two girls who escaped.. 25 00 

$940 29 

December. 

Provisions ...$256 22 

Clothing 47 90 

Drugs and medicines 7 20 

Brooms and hammer 8 90 

Fuel and light 239 25 

Hay and corn 10 50 

Water 70 00 

Conveying prisoners from the depot 6 00 

Discharged prisoner 15 00 

Salaries 366 99 

$1,027 96 

To balance 45 80 

Total disbursements 4,075 86 

January 1, 1874, to balance on hand , 45 80 



21 



DETAILED STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURES. 



DATE. 



ON WHAT ACCOUNT. 




TOTAL. 



1873. 

July 22... 



August. 



September 



Paid Smith & Long, groceries.... 

Paid Hanna, Caldwell & Co., gro- 
ceries 

Paid Becker & Schwinge, groceries 

Paid Danmeyer & Co., groceries. 

Meat, $2.25; fruit, 95; milk and 
butter, $1.75 

Sarah J. Smith, one month's salary 

James Smith, 12 days, steward... 

Elmira Johnson, 12 days, matron 

Robert Gray, engineer, 18 days... 

Two scrubbing girls 



W. S. Bingham, flour, corn, etc 

Smith & Jones, groceries 

Becker & Schwinge, groceries.. 
Hanna, Caldwell & Co., groceries 

H. Coleman, meat........ 

Martin Roth, meat 

Wm . Ripley, groceries 

Sarah J. Smith, salary 

James Smith, salary 

Robert Gray, salary , — . 

Elmira Johnson, salary 

Scrub girls 



13 25 

4 70 

2 96 

10 93 

4 95 
66 QQ 
13 33 
16 67 
36 00 

8 40 



24 05 

16 77 

6 95 



A. Barnes, groceries 

Wm. I. Ripley, groceries 

Smith & Jones, groceries 

Ignatz Forger, meat 

Becker & Schwinge, tea, etc 

H. S. Bingham, flour, etc 

H. S. Bingham, flour, etc 

Potatoes, butter and fruit, (per 

note) 

VanCamp & Jackson, provisions. 
Browning & Sloan, medicines, etc.. 

Sarah J. Smith, salary 

James Smith, salary 

Robert Gray, salary 

Elmira Johnson, salary 



7 


58 


1 


60 


2 


35 


10 


03 


66 


66 


33 


33 


60 


00 


41 


66 


12 


00 


12 


50 


11 


29 


13 


39 


5 


98 


8 


45 


17 


11 


16 


44 


3 


75 


14 


28 


10 


70 


(i6 


66 


33 


33 


60 00 


41 


66 



$167 85 



$282 98 



22 



Detailed Statement of Expenditures — Continued. 



AMOUNT, 



ON WHAT ACCOUNT. 



1 
am't. 


33 


33 


12 


00 


64 


96 


53 


25 


26 


58 


9 


10 


7 


10 


22 


75 


24 


14 


13 


12 


2 


40 


15 


27 


17 


86 


15 


55 


25 


00 


590 


00 


55 


50 


7 


45 


3 


20 


66 


66 


33 


33 


60 


00 


41 


66 


33 


33 


22 


00 


39 


90 


139 


00 


31 


00 


16 


25 


31 


91 


35 


57 


13 


46 


22 


71 


7 


20 


18 


35 


53 


75 


9 


40 


5 


30 


10 00 



TOTAL. 



1873. 

September 



October 



November 3 

a 

November 7 
(( 

November 14 

(( 

November 24 

a 

(C 

November 25 

it 

November 26 



Mattie Pray, salary 

Girl, salary 

Haniia, Caldwell & Co., groceries 

Sliillen & Sullivan, flour 

Ignatz Forger, meat 

McGuire & Gillespie, coiiV-e, etc. 

Becker & Schwinge, tea, etc , 

A. A. Barnes, provisions 

Bingham, hay, corn and meal 

C. Beck, butter, eggs and fruit.... 

E, W. Carson, pumpkins 

Smith & Jones, groceries 

Murphy & Johnson, clothing 

George Pea & Co., dry goods — 

W. P.. Hogshire, shoes 

Cobb, Branham & Co., coal 

Gas for the month 

Jesse Carmichael, stationery 

Two dispatches, $1.20; stamps, $2 

Sarah J. Smith, salary 

James Smith, salary 

Robert Gray, salary 

Elmira Johnson, salary 

Mattie Pray, salary 

Two girls, cleaning house 

Watchman 

Butsch, Dixon & Co., coal 

J. Lackey, potatoes 

Thomas Rouse, apples 

R. S. Foster 

M. L. Coyner, potatoes 

A. A. Barnes, provisions 

G. G . Howard, hay 

Becker & Swinge, tea, etc 

Wiles Bro. & Co., groceries 

Sohl, Gibson & Co., flour and bran 

McGuire & Gillespie, cofiee 

Pea & Co., dry goods 

W. R. Hogshire, shoes 



560 8^ 



,250 11 



28 



Detailed Statement of Expenditures. — Continued. 



AMOUNT. 



ON WHAT ACCOUNT. 



AM'T. 



TOTAL. 



1873. 
November 26 



December 19 

a 

December 21 
December 23 



December 26 



December 27 



Murphy & Johnson, dry goods... 

Tousey & Wiggins, bacon, etc 

Ignatz Forger, meat 

Wm. Spotis, horse feed 

Browning & Sloan, drugs and 

medicines 

Raymond & King, blacksmiths... 

Bank checks and stamps 

Krause & Reumsdune, worsted... 

Sundries, (as per note) 

Postage stamps 

Gas 



19 18 
15 80 
29 79 
10 05 

33359 



Al. Taffe, arresting two girls who 

escaped 

Sarah J. Smith, salary 

James Smith, salary 

Robert Gray, engineer, salary 

Elmira Johnson, salary 

Mattie Pray, teacher, salary 

Annie Mather, assistant, salary... 

One girl 

W. W. Moore, watchman 

Wm. Gray, assistant engineer 



Cobb, Branham & Co., coal 

Richard & Thoruburg, brooms... 
McGuire & Gillespie, coiFee, etc.. 

Wm. Spott, corn and bran , 

Tousey & Wiggins, bacon, etc — 
Hanna, Caldwell & Co., groceries 

John M. Davis, dried fruit 

George F. Smith, groceries 

W. R. Hogshire, shoes 

Foster & Darnall, needles, etc — 

Fred Hergt, meat 

Sohl, Gibson & Co., flour, etc 

Haskitt & Morris, drugs 

Conveying prisoners from the 

depot 

Singer Sewing Machine Company, 

repairs 



5 


80 


2 


25 


3 


10 


2 


55 


1 


45 


55 


80 


25 


00 


66 


68 


33 


33 


60 


00 


41 


66 


33 


33 


15 


00 


12 


00 


50 


00 


30 


00 


178 


25 


6 


50 


6 


20 


10 


50 


15 


52 


92 


29 


4 


00 


6 


76 


24 


15 


5 


00 


24 


13 


m 


50 


7 


20 


6 


00 


2 


40 



$940 29 



24 



Detailed Statement of Expenditures. — Continued. 



DATE. 



ON WHAT ACCOUNT, 



AM'T. 



TOTAL. 



1873. 
December 27 



Discharged prisoner 

Pettis, Dixon & Co., clothing 

Krause & Kiemenschmede, yarn. 

Becker & Swinge, tea, etc 

Two loadsjof kindling wood 

S. J. and ijames Smith, salaries.. 

Engineer's salary 

Assistant engineer 

Matron, salary 

Teacher, salary 

Assistant, salary 

Girl, salary 

Watchman , salary 

A. A. Barnes, provisions 

Gas for the month 

Water for October, November and 
December 



To balance. 



Total. 



$ 15 


00 


12 


00 


6 


75 


6 


85 


4 


00 


100 


00 


60 


00 


55 


00 


41 


Q6 


33 


33 


15 


00 


12 


00 


50 


00 


33 


97 


57 


00 


70 


00 







,027 96 
45 80 

t,075 86 



SUMMARY. 

Expended in July I 167 85 

Expended in August 282 98 

Expended in September 360 87 

Expended in October 1,250 11 

Expended in November 940 29 

Expended in December 1,027 96 

To balance 45 80 



,075 86 



I have this day paid into the State Treasury the sum of seventy - 
seven dollars and ninety cents ($77.90) being the amount of earn- 
ings of the prisoners so far received by me. 

JAMES SMITH, 

Steward. 
Indianapolis, December 31, 1873. 



PHYSICIAN'S REPORT. 



Indianapolis, Ind., January 1, 1874. 

% the Managers of the Indiana Reformatory Institution for Women 
and Girls: 

Gentlemen : On the eighth of last October, appointed by you 
Physician to the Institution under your charge, it aifords me pleas- 
ure to state that there has not been, thus far in the period of my 
service, a death; not, indeed, an immediately dangerous case of 
illness, among the inmates of the Reformatory. A few of the pris- 
oners when brought from the Southern Penitentiary were convales- 
cing^from dysentery, a disease which has been quite prevalant there 
and this convalescence soon ended in complete recovery. In regard 
to other forms of disease occurrins: in the Institution, they have 
generally been malarial in character and yielded readily to treat- 
ment. The general physical condition of those in the prison depart- 
ment and in the other, is excellent. I can not terminate this brief 
report without expressing my opinion as to the great value of the 
Reformatory and of the admirable manner in which its affairs are 
conducted. 

Yours respectfully, 

THEOPHILUS PARYIX, M. D. 

Physician to the Indiana Reformatory. 



Doc. J.— I. REF.— 3 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF VISITORS. 



To His Excellency, Thomas A, Hendricks, 

Governor of Indiana : 

The undersigned, one of the members of the Board of Visitors of 
the Indiana Reformatory Institution for Women and Girls, by 
direction, and on behalf of vsaid Board, begs leave respectfully to 
report that the Board recently visited the Reformatory and inspected 
the building and examined into the affairs of the Institution in the 
Reformatory as well as the Penal Department thereof There are 
twenty prisoners in the penal department, nearly all of whom were oa 
the opening of the lastitution, on the 8th day of October last, trans- 
ferred from the southern prison at Jeflf'ersonville, 

It was very gratifying to those members of the Board of Visitors 
who had seen some of these same women in the prison at Jeiferson- 
ville to observe how greatly their condition and surroundings have 
been improved by the transfer. 

In the short time of less than three months they seem, judging 
from their appearance and deportment, to have made considerable 
progress towards the regaining of their own self-respect, which is 
the first step in th^ reformation of their lives and characters. 

The unwomanly vice of tobacco smoking to which they were all 
addicted to excess, was at once prohibited on their admission to the 
Reformatory, and although much murmuring was for a time the 
result, the prisoners now seem to be reconciled to this measure oi 
compulsory reform, and we believe it will be the forerunner or 
other voluntary reforms that will in not a few instances lead to a 
restoration of an effaced or lost womanhood. The cells and work 
rooms of the prisoners are comfortable and well ventilated and the 
women themselves are constantly under the influence of pure 



27 

womanly examples, and the best moral and religious training and 
influence. 

There is every reason to hope and believe that not a few of the 
prisoners will, with such surroundings and under such influences 
as are now afforded them, be thoroughly reformed and fitted for 
usefulness in the world when they simll have regained their 
liberty. 

It is already demonstrated that woman is competent to govern 
the depraved and desperate of her own sex by womanly measures 
and appliances without a resort to the rigorous means which are 
generally supposed to be necessary in prisons governed by men^ and 
intended wholly or chiefly for male convicts. 

There are, in the reformatory department, twenty-one girls whose 
ages range from ten to fourteen years. It is believed at least four- 
fifths of these can be completely reformed and become worthy mem- 
bers of society when they are discharged. A part of the time of 
each girl is employed in the school room of the Institution and a 
part devoted to industrial pursuits, the object being to impart the 
rudiments of a good elementary education, as well as industrious 
habits to every inmate. 

The Institution has been too recently opened to say much about 
practical results ; but thus far we have discovered nothing in its 
management to provoke or justify censure. 

As long as there are so few inmates the expenses of the Institu- 
tion must unavoidably be comparatively high, and it is to be hoped 
that the different counties will, in view of this, avail themselves of 
the advantages of the Institution by committing to its guardianship 
some at least, of the girls which are to be found in every community 
who need and are entitled to such guardianship. 

It is believed that the people as yet, do not generally understand 
that a girl need not be an offender against the penal laws of the 
State to justify her committal to the guardianship of the Reforma- 
tory Department of this Institution. If the fact could be generally 
made known that vagrancy, or incorrigible, or vicious conduct on 
the part of a girl coupled with the fact that from moral depravity 
or otherwise her parent or guardian, is incapable or unwilling to 
exercise the proper care over her; or that she is destitute of a suita- 
ble home and adequate means of obtaining an honest living, or 
that she is in danger of being brought up to lead an idle or vicious 
life, will justify her committal to the guardianship of the Institu- 
tion, it cannot be doubted that many girls, some of them mere 



28 

children, that are now on the sure road to ruin would be placed 
under the saving influence of the reformatory department of this 
Institution. 

There is one defect, as the Board of Visitors believe, in the law 
governing the reformatory department of the Institution which 
ought to be remedied by amendatory legislation. We allude to that 
portion of the act which requires a girl to be under the age of fifteen 
years to justify her committal to the Reformatory Department of 
the Institution and which compels her discharge when she attains 
the age of eighteen years, whether she is reformed or not. In the 
judgment of the Board of Visitors, the law sb.ould be so amended 
as to allow the committal of girls up to the age of eighteen years, 
and so as to justify their detention until twenty-one years of age, 
if not sooner reformed. In this regard a reformatory for girls is 
very different from a reformatory for boys. At the age of eighteen 
many boys cannot be governed in a reform school without convert- 
ing it into a prison and thereby destroying its reformatory charac- 
ter; but with girls the case is far diflferent. We therefore submit for 
the consideration of your Excellency, the propriety of an amend- 
ment of the law governing the Institution such as we have sug- 
gested, to the end that the attention of the General Assembly may be 
directed thereto, if the suggestion should receive your approval. 
Respectfully submitted, 

CONRAD BAKER, 
By direction and on behalf of the Board of Visitors. 

December 27th, 1873. 



ANNUAL REPOET 



wO 



YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1873. 



TO amiE o-o-v^iEi^i^roT-?. 



INDIANAPOLIS : 

SENTINEL COMPANY, PRINTEES. 
1874. 

D. J.— I. H. R.~l 



LIST OF OFFICERS. 



COMMISSIONEES. 

CHAELES F. COFFIN, Richmond. 
JOHN W. RAY, Indianapolis. 
AMOS S. EVANS, Fort Wayne. 

SUPERINTENDENT. 

FRANK B. AINSWORTH. 

assistant superintendent. 
C. W. AINSWORTH. 

HOUSE fathers. 

W. C. KILVINGTON. 

B. F. HOWE. 

E. H. SHUMWAY. 

PHYSICIAN. 

J. T. STRONG. 



COMMISSIONERS' REPORT. 



To his Excellency, Thomas A. Hendricks, 

Governor of Indiana : 

The Commissioners of the House of Refuge for the correction and 
reformation of Juvenile Offenders, respectfully submit their seventh 
Annual Report. 

The liberal appropriation of our late Legislature has enabled us 
to carry forward the Institution to its full capacity, and also to 
make extensive repairs about the main building, (which was in very 
bad condition owing to the imperfect character of the work, and 
defective materials used in its construction,) and upon the family 
and other buildings. The total amount expended in these repairs 
and improvements has been |10,497.31. 

INMATES. 

At the time of the last annual Report, January 1st, 1873, 

there were boys in the Institution 191 

Admitted during the year 78 

Discharged during the year. 

Escaped during the year 4 

Deceased during the year none 

Out on "ticket of leave" 53 

JSTumber remaining January 1st, 1874 216 

Good health has prevailed, discipline has been well maintained 
and we believe the work has progressed satisfactorily and the Insti- 
tution has been effecting, in good degree, the object of its erection. 

OFFICERS. 

The officers are as follows, viz : Superintendent, Matron, Assis- 
tant Superintendent, three " House Fathers," and three " Elder 
Brothers." 



We have arranged to have a well qualified man and wife at the 
head of each family, so as to preserve in this respect, as near a 
natural state of things as possible, the wife being emjiloyed a part of 
the day as teacher. These are assisted by an Elder Brother. 

The Superintendent has assigned each House Father to the over- 
sight of some special portion of the outdoor work, in addition to his 
care of the family, so as to lessen as much as possible, the expense, 
and at the same time to bring about efficiency in the conduct of the 
Institution. One has been assigned to the care of the farm, another 
to the Garden, another to the fruit, and flowers, while the Assistant 
Superintendent and Clerk in the office, both have charge of families. 

EXPENSE. 

The total amount expended the past year is $56,244.76, from 
which deduct repairs and improvements $10,497.21, leaving the 
expense of the Institution, $45,747.55, the items of which are fully 
shown in the Superintendent's report annexed. We have carefully 
examined the accounts and vouchers and books of the Institution, 
and find them correct and carefully kept, accurately showing the 
various items of expenditure. 

We estimate the expense per annum, of keeping and taking care 
of each infant in the Institution at $200 per annum, as required by 
section 20 of the act establishing the House of Eefuge. 

boys' laboe. 

The boys have been employed on the farm, in the garden, at cane 
seating chairs, in tailor shop and iu the different parts of domestic 
and farm labor, as will be more fully shown in the Superintendent's 
report. 

In regard to mechanical employment we have found it impossible 
to carry on a very great variety of labor, the difficulty of procuring 
suitable persons to oversee, and the great expense of carrying on 
mechanical business with unskilled labor, being unsurmountable 
obstacles, hence we rely more upon the formation of good habits 
and teaching the boys self-reliance and energy of character, as well 
as accustoming them to manual labor, so that they may, after 
discharge, find suitable places for a permanent trade or business. 
A part of each day is employed in school, under careful, well qual- 
ified teachers, and the progress of the boys in their studies has been 



quite commendable. In addition, every effort is made to give tliem 
a careful moral and religious training. 

Scientific lectures are delivered every week during the winter by 
suitable persons. One hour each evening is spent in each family in 
moral and religious reading and instruction. 

The Sabbath is thoroughly occupied by an efficient Sabbath 
schooj in the morning, conducted by the Superintendent, in which 
the Bible is so thoroughly taught that we doubt whether an equal 
number of boys outside the Institution, promiscuously selected, can 
be found as well versed in it. 

Meeting for worship is also held in the afternoon. and conducted 
by a regular minister, when one can be had, and when not by the 
Superintendent himself. 

We have kept steadily in view the three great means of reforma- 
tion: Industrial habits and steady application to some useful 
employment, education and mental training, and the Bible and 
religious instruction. The success of Reformatory Schools in Eng- 
land is said, in a recent official report, to depend on " firm discipline, 
honest and hard work, coupled with moral and religious training, so 
arranged as to bring out the better natures of the pupils, which 
cannot at so tender an age be always dead." 

The results, thus far, have quite equaled our expectations, and 
most of the boys who have been discharged are doing well. The 
greatest difficulty we have to encounter is in finding suitable places 
for those discharged, most of them have been sent to the Institution 
from very bad homes and evil surroundings j after reformation and 
discharge they are subject, from natural love, to work their way 
back to those nearest connected with them, and thus are thrown 
under influences unfavorable to their continuance in the path of 
virtue'. We do believe, however, that in any event, the instruction 
received in the Institution is not lost, but like bread cast upon the 
waters, will be found after many days. 

CHARLES F. COFFIN, 
A. S. EVANS, 
JOHN W. RAY, 

Commissioners. 
House of Refuge, Jan, 1, 1874. 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT. 



To the Board of Commissioners of the House of Refuge : 

Gentlemen :-• -In conformity to the custom of the House of 
Kefuge and the law organizing said In-stitution, I beg leave to 
present the report of the superintendency thereof, for the year 1873, 
together with the subjoined reports of the subordinate officers: 

NUMBER OF INMATES. 

Kumber present January 1, 1873 191 

Number admitted during the year 78 

Number discharged during the year 2 

Number ticketed during the year , 53 

Number escaped during the year 4 

Number remaining January 1, 1874 216 

During the early part of the year, the number admitted was less 
than the number released, which reduced the attendance to 172. 
From the 23d of May, the number began to increase and there are 
now present two hundred and sixteen inmates. 

The boys received during the year are mostly small and young. 
The large and more unpromising oiFenders heretofore so numerous, 
being excluded in the revision of the organic act. The maximum 
age is reduced to sixteen years, instead of eighteen as heretofore. 
It will be seen by reference to the tables in the appendix, that forty- 
one boys received were twelve years old and under, who are too 
young to do much toward earning their own support. 

Receiving so largely of this class has materially increased the 
expense of support as we could not rely upon such boys to do the 
heavy work of the establishment, and were therefore compelled to 
employ men for that purpose. 

The admissions of the year have been more of the class of delin- 



quents that ouglit properly to be placed under the guardianship of 
the Institution, than the admissions of previous years. They are 
younger, less vicious, more ductile, and plastic, and in every moral 
respect better adapted to the methods and appliances employed here 
for the correction and rearing of children than many previously 
received. 

There is more hope of effecting permanent improvement in this 
class, for being younger they take impressions better and retain 
them longer. 

Many are ready to suggest that the Institution, even with this 
class of boys, ought to be self-supporting. It might not be imper- 
tinent to say that any suggestion that would lead the officers of this 
Institution to so conduct it as to attain such desirable results would 
be thankfully received both by the management of the Institution 
and the State at large. We would esteem it a very desirable acqui- 
sition to our experience to know just what employment these boys, 
nine-tenths of whom are under sixteen years of age, could be placed 
at where they will do all of their own house work, room work, 
washing, ironing, mending, cooking, dining room work, make 
their own clothing and attend school two and a half hours daily, 
and in addition to earn money enough to defray all expenses. It 
is our aim to utilize the labor of the boys in the best methods possi- 
ble, and to employ them at such industries as produce the best 
financial results, consistent with their reformation and improve- 
ment. The condition our boys are in, when admitted, prevents 
them from being of any utilitarian value to the Institution. They 
are restive, unused to work and unfamiliar with the methods of 
doing it; in a word, they are useless, unreliable, and untrust- 
worthy. 

They require the closest supervision and watchfulness of the 
officers until they reach a period when they become settled in their 
feelings and fixed in their purposes. This period varies with boys 
from three months to twelve, and in isolated cases during the greater 
portion of their stay here. While this continues their labor is not 
worth so much as the official oversight costs, and when this period 
of official vigilance ceases and the boys become trustworthy and 
useful the time left, after performing the work detailed above, is too 
brief in which to earn enough to defray expenses of support. 

Their physical and intellectual as well as their moral condition 
tends to increase their inability to make the institution self-sup- 
porting. 



8 

They do not come to us in the full possession of all their physical 
powers. 

Their minds too are weak and distracted, and both must be toned 
up and developed. This, however, is slow work, as the intellect 
expands slowly until its main characteristics are manifested, then it 
goes out in search of its favorite objects. And then an ambition to 
do something and be somebody worthy of admiration is often kindled 
and gives its possessor a thirst for knowledge, energy, and clear 
purpose. 

We feel much gratified in being able to report the Institution in a 
thriving and prosperous condition in all of its various departments. 

With feelings of gratitude to our good Father in^Heaven we desire 
to acknowledge the general healthfulness of the inmates of the Insti- 
tution, the few cases of prevailing sickness and the almost absolute 
freedom from casualties. The visits of the practicing physicians 
have necessarily been few, the matron having brought relief to all 
simple cases of sickness and minor accidents. 

i 

CHAIR SHOP. 

This department furnishes employment for all the boys not needed 
in carrying forward the necessary work of the Institution. The 
number of boys herein employed varies from eighty to one hundred 
and twenty, according to the work there is to be done in the other 
departments of the Institution. In this department the smallest class 
of boys capable of working are employed together with a portion of 
those who are larger. The proceeds of this department were not as 
large this year as last on account of doing more outside work, thereby 
reducing the number of shop boys. Besides the average number in 
attendance for the first five months of the year was much smaller 
than the average attendance for the same period last year. This 
department is well managed, and we think will ultimately become 
our leading industry and principal source of revenue. 

SHOE SHOP. 

This bi-anch of industry we concluded was too expensive and 
troublesome to continue longer, or at least until ihe number of 
inmates should be largely increased. 

Our experience discloses the fact that it was nearly impossible, at 
a reasonable expense, to employ a man with suitable character and 



capabilities to take the charge of the shop, and also that we could 
furnish the boys with shoes for a year for what it cost for official 
supervision for the same period. 

Therefore we discontinued manufacturing, bought our shoes, and 
detailed a boy to do the mending, paying him small wages for his 
services. 

This course we think is best for the Institution for the present, 
but in view of the fact of teaching boys trades in the future we may 
conclude to resume manufacturing. We think it best, however, not 
to do so until we can furnish employment to a full shop of boys who 
are anxious to learn this business. 

DOMESTIC DEPARTMENT. 

This department is divided into the following divisions, each of 
which is presided over by a suitable woman, and employs boys as 
follows, viz. : Tailor shop employs six boys ; bake house and milk 
house, three ; boys' dining room and pantry, five ; officers' dining 
room, two ; kitchen, six ; family buildings, eight. And boys are 
employed on other jobs as follows, viz.: Office, one; lamps, one; 
main building, three : teams, six ; live stock, five ; garden, four ; 
fruit department, two. 

LIYE STOCK. 

The number (20) of milch cows is the same as at last annual 
report, which is not too large to meet the demands of the Institution, 
though half of that number of a better breed of milkers might serve 
us as well, and had we not taken the precaution to rent an adjoining 
pasture early in the spring and planted about sixteen acres in corn 
for late pasture, this number would have been too great for the dry 
season. 

IMPROVEMENTS. 

Many improvements have been made that have added greatly to 
the convenience and usefulness of the Institution. We will only 
mention such as are of the most value and importance. 

Preparatory to construct some necessary out buildings during 
the fall, when our attention would be withdrawn from the farm and 
other industries carried on in the spring and summer, we put a force 
at work on the north side of the farm and manufactured about three 



10 

hundred thousand brick. This being 'completed^ we commenced at 
once to construct the buildings and to make other needed improve- 
ments. The milk house not being in the right place, and not being 
well adapted to our wants, we demolished it and used the material 
in the construction of a new house with a double aspect at the head 
of the south ravine, in which there is a fine spring, the overflow of 
which is to pass through troughs to be prepared for keeping the pans 
of milk. The principal part of this building is eighteen by thirty- 
two, and one story and a half above the basement. The basement, 
not yet completed, will contain the troughs mentioned above and 
will be used exclusively for milk and butter. The rooms on the 
floor above are a pantry, flour room, wood room, and the mixing- 
room for the bake house, which is an L fifteen by seventeen feet and 
joins the milk house on the south side. The bake house contains 
two ovens, one large and one small. This structure is a great con- 
venience, as both departments can be managed by the same person. 

A very convenient ice house, twenty-four by thirty-two feet, has 
been constructed upon the most improved plan, with ventilators and 
a central room for fresh meats, fruits, vegetables, and other perish- 
able articles. 

A two story hog pen, thirty by forty feet, and an adjoining room 
for cooking feed has been erected and now furnishes shelter for about 
one hundred and twenty head of hogs. 

A set of scales three tons draught, of the Fairbank's pattern, have 
been set up and enclosed with a plank building sixteen by eighteen 
feet. This will be a great convenience in the future purchases for 
the Institution as stock, hay, and other heavy commodities can be 
weighed. Two privies, seven by twelve feet, have been erected 
, adjacent to one of the coal houses and other similar improvements 
made. The barn has been thoroughly overhauled and repaired. 
The floor in the cow stable, extending the length of the entire barn, 
one hundred feet, was taken up and new underpinning and new sills 
put in, the old joists removed, a new floor of gravel put in, and 
stanchions and feed boxes erected for the cows. This aflbrds ample 
room for our entire herd of cattle. 

The main building has just been supplied with nine inch number 
twenty-six galvanized iron guttering, and from four to eight inch 
galvanized iron conducting pipes. These conducting pipes are to 
connect with tiling at the base of the building and empty into two 
one thousand barrel cisterns, which are not, at this time, completed. 



11 

The tin glittering and spouting to the family houses and the shop 
have been thoroughly repaired and are now in good working order. 

The interior of the main building, which had more of the appear- 
ance of an antiquated castle, caused by the imperfect material used 
in its construction, than a recently constructed edifice, has been most 
completely renovated. New smoke flues have been constructed, the 
walls and ceilings to the rooms and halls either painted, pannelled 
or calcimined, and all the wood work grained. The building is now 
much improved in appearance and we think is more creditable than 
formerly. The floor in the main office, which was no longer servic- 
able, was taken up and a substantial quality of variegated tiling, laid 
in cement, substituted. 

The interior of the family houses has also been overhauled. The 
ceilings and walls of each building whitewashed and the wood work 
painted, thus making them more desirable homes, both for boys and 
officers. 

New open board fences have been made as follows, viz: Along 
the line of the National road; east of the orchard and west of the 
vegetable garden, and along the line of the creek running north and 
south, amounting in all to eighteen hundred and seventy-two feet. 

During the fall with our own force we have widened and recoated 
with gravel one hundred and three rods of road, giving an average 
width of twenty feet, and an average thickness of eighteen inches of 
fresh gravel. 

FAEM PRODUCTS. 

The farm has been ordinarily productive, and the crops were all 
carefully secured and disposed of, or garnered for future use. The 
following statement shows the arable ground tilled during the year : 

Corn pasture, sixteen (16) acres. 

Corn, thirteen (13) acres. 

Oats, seventeen (17) acres. Orchard, 

Beans, ten (10) acres. 

Wheat, eighteen (18) acres. 

Vegetable, garden and berry-patch, twelve (12) acres. 

Vegetable patch, three (3) acres. 

Potatoes, twelve (12) acres. 

The exact amount of the products of these different fields we catt 
not give, but we feel assured of a fair yield. 



12 

THE FUTURE OF THE BOYS. 

The greater portion of the boys when released are immeasurably 
better than the circumstances into which they pass, and as they do 
not long continue happy without being in harmony with their sur- 
roundings, they seek to adapt themselves to the various relations 
of their condition. 

As to whether the discharged boys maintain the integrity of the 
training they received while here, depends much upon circumstances. 

Good Christian homes are difficult to find for the boys, and but few- 
can really lay claims to such a possession of their own, and when by 
reason of meritorious conduct they are ready for dismissal, unpleas- 
ant disappointment ensues if a home is not provided for them. 

If they return to their own homes and there find the same habits 
of intemperance, profanity and criminality they had left, there can 
be but little hopeof their maintaining the integrity of their character, 
and from the day they cross the threshold of that home, there is a 
gradual breaking away from moral and religious principles, until 
they finally relapse into their former dilapidated moral condition. 

Under such unfavorable auspices many failures may be expected. 
We hope for all the boys to do well after being discharged, and we 
do our utmost to give them a favorable start in life. Some give 
more flattering promise of success at first than others. Some fail at 
first and succeed afterwards, and the contrary is the case. 

We think it may be laid down as a general rule that where the 
parental or home influences are bad, the boys will ultimately become 
bad. 

It seems almost impossible for a boy to keep himself above the 
moral level of his home influences. 

The conditions under which our boys succeed best are when 
placed in homes where the moral and religious sentiments largely 
predominate and where all wrong doing and misconduct are discoun- 
tenanced and frowned down. 

Boys have gone out with good characters, intending to lead lives 
of respectibility and usefulness, and perhaps before they have been 
absent a week some former associate has made overtures of evil to 
them, or some parent while in a state of debauch has so conducted 
as to materially lessen their standard of demeanor or discourage them 
entirely in right dn'ni- 

With such boys an uj^riglit life begins to be a matter of doubtful 
propriety, and the continued pressure of evil influences the 



13 

absence of friends to properly advise, the torture of the pangs of a 
troubled hearty the stinging reproaches of his associates, all combine 
soon to undermine the moral tendencies and prepare the unfortunate 
child for an early and certain career of debauchery and dissipation. 

Idleness and the want of industrial enterprise often produce an 
insane desire for mischief, and thus frequently boys are driven back 
to vicious habits that industry would save from such a course. 

So far as practicable, the guardian care of the Institution is 
extended over the boys after they have gone out ; but we cannot, in 
all cases, make such oversight as complete as we would desire. 

We do not expect that all our boys will fill positions of public 
trust or become eminent ; but we hope to at least prepare them to be 
plain, simple and industrious craftsmen. Several have married, 
have families, are well located, and are surrounded by scores of 
friends. For these happy relations in life, they look back and attri- 
bute them all as springing directly or remotely from the blessed 
influences of the Reform School. Many visits have been received 
during the year from discharged boys whose gentlemanly deport- 
ment and kind social bearing clearly illustrate the usefulness of the 
training they received while here, and lends encouragement to the 
desire to extend the same wholesome treatment to others as they 
may come to us. 

MOEALE. 



As has been stated before, nearly all the admissions of the year 
were small boys, and it Avould seem that many are too young to 
need the reformatory influences of such an institution. Frequent 
admissions and releases have occurred, and, notwithstanding this, I 
feel free to say that the morale and discipline of the establishment 
have been generally well maintained. 

Oar punishments are more curative than punitive, and, in the 
main, have been awarded with discretion. 

Severe and unauthorized punishments have been closely guarded 
against ; and all the officers have been given to understand that any 
infringement or violation of these instructions would not be toler- 
ated. 

In a few instances officers have been hasty and rough in the treat- 
ment of those under their charge; but when a case of this kind has 
come to the knowledge of the Superintendent, a reprimand or an 



14 

absolute discharge, as the case seemed to demand, was given the 
offender. 

It is our aim, as far as possible, to maintain a parental govern- 
ment, but the completeness of such a government can only be had 
where the subjects are filial and comparatively innocent. In an 
institution of the magnitude of this, where the inmates are unfilial 
and vicious, parental government is difficult to administer, and we 
think, can only be done by the employment of the best class of men 
for executive officers. 

The position of a reform school laborer is by no means an envi- 
able one, in all respects. To be successful in the work he must 
commence at the lowest round in the official ladder, on small pay 
and without distinction. 

The hope of obtaining something better, stimulates and encour- 
ages him to prepare for a higher salary and broader fields of 
usefulness, and if he has perseverance and application his efforts 
will ultimately be crowned with success, and his merits suitably 
rewarded, but if he has not these qualities the ranks of efficient 
reform school officers are not likely to be materially augmented. 

Occasionally a man without such training and experience can be 
found who possesses the power to command — and such magnetic 
force as to control by his personal presence, but few of such have 
ever made application for official positions in this Institution. We 
can not hope to turn the delinquent youth from the indulgence of 
his vicious propensities by attempts at deterrent, coercion, repression, 
or the removal of temptation. These appliances are superficial in 
their effect, merely producing an outward compliance with whole- 
some rules adopted as bounds to restrain their conduct, but do not 
remove or extinguish the tendency. 

The tendency should be the objective point, and if this source of 
evil be not reached there can be no positive reclamation. To dis- 
cover this requires skillful and ingenious operators — in fact 
practical physiognomists, able, when a subject is placed under their 
care, to at once point out and individualize each of his prevailing 
weaknesses, become acquainted with his elementary powers, pecul- 
iarities and inclinations, and their reciprocal play, powers and 
influences. 

The importance of this knowledge is patent to every observer of 
human character, and we feel safe in saying that without it no one 
can succeed as an officer in reclaiming delinquent youth. 

A clear diagnosis of each case must be made, and he who is thus 



15 

able to act intelligently with the moral elements and mental facul- 
ties, and knows the full power and extent of their reeiprocal 
influences is master of his calling, and able to construct out of this 
demoralized material, a perfectly balanced man. 

A stereotyped course of treatment will not meet the wants of a 
reformatory. The methods and appliances must be as varied as the 
classes themselves. 

The distinctive lessons taught are self-direction and self-govern- 
ment, and when evidence is shown of a purpose to be benefitted the 
boys are placed in positions to exercise the principles these teach- 
ings are calculated to develop. The first positive evidence of the 
workings of reformation is discovered in the secret workings of the 
heart, as shown by repentance, and the increased activity of the con- 
science in discriminating between right and wrong, the gradual 
development of the principles of true manhood, the strengthening 
of the moral principles and the formation of good resolutions, and 
the alienation from former habits of vice and immorality. 

There are many elements in our treatment that cmbine to draw 
forth, develop and elevate the boys' better nature. Their moral 
reviews, sociables and family lectures, their training in secular 
school and the Sabbath school, their excellent system of industry, 
combined w^th their rational and sportive amusements, all combine 
to instruct, dignify, enoble and develop their manhood. These are 
privileges which most of the boys appreciate and strive to realize 
benefit from. 

This Institution is a colony brought together for a common 
object, the correction of erroneous habits, the acquisition of useful 
knowledge, the cultivation of courteous manners and a general 
preparation for all the duties relating to good citizenship. 

The laws of the establishment are the consciences, reason and sense 
of propriety of the boys themselves, and the ingenuity to invent 
suitable appeals to develop these is nice and delicate. 

The boys are recognized as constituent parts of the establishment 
and understand that its good order, cleanliness and prosperity are 
things for which they will be held responsible. 

Each is thus involved in a responsibility that secures his interest 
and when a new boy enters he soon discovers that he has not only 
the officers, but the boys themselves to deal with, and the impres- 
sions thus early received prepare him to bear his part of the burden. 
Each day thus draws him unconsciously into habits that improve 
him and fits him for usefulness. 



16 

EESUME. 

The successful workings of the Institution for six years have fully 
attested the excellency of the methods and the efficiency of the 
appliances employed in the curative treatment of these otherwise 
hapless children. Of this no one who will give the subject a 
patient examination will doubt. 

We feel that the past year has been one of rare success in every 
department of the Institution. 

The farm in all its departments — except the fruit department, 
which suffered much from the effects of the extreme cold weather 
last winter — has been unusually productive ; the finances are in a 
sound and healthy condition, and the current expenses of the 
Institution have been kept within the limits of the appropriation 
and $10,497.31 saved for improvements and buildings, which was 
expended as hereinbefore set forth. The moral and religious tone 
of the Institution has been well maintained and we think perceptibly 
improved. 

The introduction of suitable female teachers in all the deparments 
of school has proved a veritable blessing. We think that there is 
nothing that so strengthens and invigorates the moral tone of our 
institution as the presence of good women, thoroughly imbued Avith 
a desire to devote themselves to promoting the happiness of the 
boys and to rendering all cheerful and pleasant 

We close the year with the Institution in excellent condition, and 
we think the incoming year presents an unusually favorable outlook, 
and with the prestige of six years' experience, we think by prudences 
economy and application, much more may be done during the com- 
ing year to develop and improve the entire establishment than has 
been accomplished in any previous year. 

The permanent improvements that have been made have materi- 
ally added to the convenience and efficiency of the Institution, and 
will aid much in reducing the current expenses in the future. 

Next in importance to the improvement and proper development 
of our important charge, we have held before our view the necessity 
of exercising economy. 

In all of our improvements, and in carrying forward the ordinary 
work of the establishment, we have utilized the labor of the boys 
as far as practicable. In the construction of the outbuildings here- 
tofore mentioned, the rough work has been performed by the boys, 



17 

under the supervision of our own officers, which was a great pecuni- 
ary saving to the institution. 

We have laid out for the employment of our forces for the winter 
a vast amount of necessary work, and improving which we hope to 
carry forward to completion, and which, if done, will render the 
Home still more attractive and beautiful. 

We trust that the same kind Providence which has hitherto been 
above us and round about us, and has so closely guarded and pro- 
tected us, will, in the future, extend the same guardian care and 
direction that even greater success may be attained and more 
precious souls saved. 

Thanking you, gentlemen of the Board, for your indulgence, 
counsel and earnest co-operation, and profoundly acknowledging 
my obligations to all associated with me in this work so vast, so 
stupendous, and even sublime, for the hearty support and timely 
assistance in every purpose, 

I am, respectfully, 

FRANK B. AINSWORTH, 

Superintendent. 



D. J.— I. H. R.— 2 



ASSISTANT SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT. 



To the Superintendent of Indiana House of Refuge : 

SiE — The Assistant Superintendent respectfully submits the follow- 
ing as his annual report for the year ending, December 31st, 1873: 

On taking a retrospective view of the Indiana House of Refuge 
and its workings for the past year, we find much to commend and 
great cause for encouragement. It has been a year of constant toil 
and anxiety to the real worker for the benefit of the fallen and 
^yayward youth — it has also been a year of general prosperity in 
our work of ameliorating suffering and crime — and it has also been 
a year of almost continued good health in the Institution, for all of 
which I trust we are all truly thankful to the Giver of every good 
and perfect gift. While there has been considerable sickness in the 
community around about us, our large and interesting household 
has been, comparatively speaking, free from epidemics and diseases 
of any kind. 

The angel of Death, although visiting this neighborhood often, 
has not entered our family circle and claimed his victim, except in 
the case of a boy who was visiting his friends and former school 
fellows at the Institution, last July, when he was accidentally killed 
while in swimming in the creek near the buildings on the farm. 
The progress of the House of Refuge has been steady and sure. 

CHANGES 

There have been among the officers and teachers, but no serious 
results followed such changes. We now have quite an efficient 
corps of officers and instructors, men and women who realize the 
importance attached to their situations, and feel something of the 
responsibility resting upon them as teachers in a reformatory, and 
have entered upon the discharge of the duties pertaining to their 
positions with a determination that the efforts put forth in behalf 



19 

of tlie had boys shall be crowned with success. There has been a 
vast amount of work done on the farm, in the garden and in the 
diiferent shops, by the boys, under the supervision and direction of 
competent persons, whose duty it has been to instruct and aid them. 
Large crops of wheat, potatoes, corn, and garden vegetables have 
been raised and harvested, for all of which there is always a ready 
market at the House of Refuge. Fences, hog pens, and out-houses 
have been built, adding very much to the convenience of the place. 

THE LIVE STOCK, 

Consisting of farm and driving horses, cows and hogs have had 
good care. Our horses are in good health and fine spirits, the hogs 
compare favorably with the best swine in the neighborhood. The 
cows, as usual, have kept the school supplied with good, rich milk 
all of the time. After having slaughtered fifty head of fattened 
hogs, we have over one hundred store hogs that will be ready for 
use in the spring. 

The inmates have been very well provided with suitable clothing, 
two suits of summer and winter clothing for each boy, with shoes 
and socks for most of them, while those working in the forces, and 
with the teams have had boots. Every thing has been done that 
could be done to improve the condition of the boys entrusted to our 
care and keeping. Lectures have been delivered quite frequently. 
All of the boys are regularly exercised in the rudiments of music 
and have made commendable progress in singing. There are charms 
in music for the boys that have left their homes to reform their evil 
ways. 

THE BAXD, 

composed of boys, is an interesting feature of the school. It is 
pleasant, indeed, to notice the deep interest taken in the band by 
every boy on the farm. Mr. Thomas P. Westendorf has been untir- 
ing in his efforts to instruct the members of his musical organization, 
and now he can take a just pride in listening to an excellent class of 
performers, as they make music for the officers and boys on the 
pleasant summer evenings and holiday occasions. The band enjoyed 
a rich treat last June; by special invitation to accompany the Indi- 
ana editors on their excursion to Wyandotte Cave, in the southern 
part of the State ; free passes being furnished for the occasion by 
the officers of the Yandalia, and L. N. A. & C. roads, and by the 



20 

Packet company from Louisville, Ky. They fully appreciated the 
kindnesses shown them while on the trip, and quite frequently refer 
to it with pleasant remembrances. The whole school was taken to 
Indianapolis and visited the Exposition on the 6 th of October last. 
That was indeed a gala day for the boys ; a ride on the cars ; a walk 
through the city, and a visit to the Exposition, with dinner on the 
ground. Fears w'ere entertained by some of the more incredulous 
and skeptical ones, unacquainted with reform school boys, that the 
confidence reposed in them would be betrayed, and the escapes from 
our numbers would be numeious. The sights were seen and 
the boys all returned to the Institution, without the loss of one, or 
even an attempt at escape, highly pleased with the efforts of their 
friends to gratify them. The influence of the teacher is very great, 
greater, we suppose, than many think it could be, and greater, we 
fear, than some teachers think it is. The person undertaking to 
instruct youth, should be a type of good morals and a worthy exam- 
ple in manners. In the school-room the teacher's influence is the 
moving power, as it were, to the school, he is carefully scrutinized 
and weighed accordingly, by each and every pupil. The system in 

THE DAY SCHOOL, 

adopted some three years ago, Avith a few modifications, is thought 
to be very good. The boys evince an active interest in anything 
that tends to improve their minds or better their conditions, and 
hence the teachers are encouraged to labor on. It is quite surpris- 
ing to know that boys admitted to the Institution a year since, with 
vague and indifferent ideas of education, can read and spell very well, 
cipher some, and wu'ite a legible and fairly composed letter. These 
boys, as a general thing, possess fertile minds, and when enlisted and 
interested in the cause of education and reformation, make a 
decided improvement. The religious and moral agencies brought to 
bear upon the hearts and minds of the boys, are of untold value to 
them. The ministry of the surrounding country come often to dis- 
course to them on the great interests of religion and the priceless 
gift of redemption. They are impressed witli, the idea that actions, 
looks, words and steps form the alphabet by which 

CHARACTER 

May be spelled. They are taught that truth is the bond of union 
and the basis of human happiness, and that without this virtue there 
is no reliance on language, no confidence in friendship, no security 



21 

in promises or oaths. They are also taught that truth is more 
valuable than gold; that it is easy, clear, and requires no study. 
It does not have to be watched like falsehood, which has no real and 
permanent power. Truth triumphs at last. The simplest soul can 
conquer life to himself by truth, but it is not in the Avit and power 
of man to bring beauty and good up out of a reeking corruption of 
lies. And just here I am reminded of a few earnest words that may 
be useful for us all to remember : 

" Guard well the lips, for none can know, 
What evils from the tongue may flow ; 
What guilt, what grief may be incurred 
By one incautious, hasty word." 

The well conducted Sunday school is a valuable and indispensible 
auxiliary in the work of reform, and I am sure that our boys 
esteem it a great privilege to attend the Sabbath school and partici- 
pate in the exercises. Verses are committed and recited; answers 
to questions previously given out are found ; songs of praise are 
sung by the school; expositions of the lessons are given by the 
Superintendent, and all are happy in doing what they can to honor 
and worship God aright, and keep his day holy. In addition to my 
other duties it has been pleasure unfeigned for me to be continued 
in charge of 

FAMILY EIGHT, 

Composed in the main of trusty or "job boys." This family con- 
tains fifty-five bright, intelligent, healthy boys, ranging from seven 
to eighteen years of age. It has been my aim to do them good, 
and to this end no pains have been spared to make the Family home- 
like, realizing that some of them have never known what it was to 
have a pleasant home. What a misfortune I How sad the thought I 
There are thousands of children who know nothing of the blessed 
influence of comfortable homes, merely because of a want of thrift 
from dissipated habits. No home to fly to when wearied with the 
struggles incident to their youthful days, spent in frivolous amuse- 
ment and demoralizing associations; no virtuous household to give 
zest to the joys of life. All is blank to such an unfortunate child, 
and there is no hope or succor except that which is given out by the 
hands of public and private charities. It affords me much gratifi- 
cation to notice every effort on the part of the boys to advance in 



22 

morals and education. Nothing is of more importance in dealing 
with a difficult child than prompt praise of his earliest endeavors to 
overcome a fault. The commendation should not be measured by 
the success attained in the effort to do better, but by the endeavor. 
Not uufrequently weeks are spent in persuading a child to make 
one step toward a purer and a higher life. But is not the victory 
worth the battle ? Is not the patient endeavor to cure a moral defect 
rewarded by any success, however small ? No doubt but we some- 
times feel discouraged and are almost ready to give up, as we cannot 
see the fruit of our labors, for it seems like an oft repeated story to 
talk, labor and pray with the subjects of our care so much — and we 
are forcibly reminded of the truthfulness of the following words, 
found in the hymn of " The old, old story : " 



" Tell me the storj'' often, 
For I forget so soon; 
The early dew of morning 
Has passed away at noon." 



But we know not the future of any of these boys, that they are 
educated and reformed is the work of the laborers in the harvest. 
The soil must be tilled, the seed sown, but we must wait God's time 
for the increase. And a family is not made perfect without those 
in charge of it entering into the confidence and sympathy of all its 
members. The inmates of a family should have unbounded confi- 
Oeaoe 111 the management, and the head of the household should 
uve great sympathy for every object of his care. Sympathy is one 
of the most imposing and sacred emotions of an intelligent mind, 
and is equally consonant with the genius of refined humanity and 
the spirit of true religion. To the soul it is what the lucid beams of 
the moon are to the pleasing features of nature, which are not essen- 
tial to their existence, but which add brilliancy to their beauty and 
sublimity to their grandeur. The boys occasionally feel that they 
are forsaken and forgotten, and that no one careth for them. At 
such times they need words of encouragement, and to be told how to 
live in order to deserve friends. The world is teeming with kind- 
hearted people, and one has only to carry a kind, sympathetic heart 
in his bosom to call out goodliness and friendliness from others. 
When playing games they have been urged to cultivate considera- 
tion for the feelings of others, that their own might not be injured. 
The evenings in the Family are devoted to a variety of exercises, 



sucli as singing, spelling, historical recitations, aritlimetical reviews^ 
and a 

MORAL EEVIEW 

Every evening, wlien every boy's number is called, and lie is 
expiScted to giA^e a synopsis of his conduct during the day — report- 
ing the bad as well as the good, that all may be benefitted by the 
advice given, and punishments administered. They are not 
encouraged in tattling — but are required to report the misconduct of 
their play-fellows for the good of offenders. The Family is divided 
into two grades for school, according to their advancement — being 
taught in an acceptable manner by Mrs. C. W. Ainsworth. In the 
management of the family during the past year, I have been quite 
ably assisted by George Sauers, a former inmate — to whom I am 
indebted for much of the success attending my efforts to lead the 
boys into the smoother and pleasanter walks of life. To Mr. J. C 
Smith, who has taken so much pains to instruct the boys of Xo. 8^ 
in singing, are they placed under obligations, and I take this 
method of expressing their grateful appreciation of the services so 
cheerfully rendered. 

Trusting and praying, that the Indiana House of Refuge has a 
bright future, and that much, very much good, may be done by the 
means here used, for the rising generation in need of wholesome 
restraint, 

I am, respectfully, 

C. W. AINSWORTH, 

Asst. Supt. Indiana House of Refuge. 
pLAiiy'FiELD, Ikd., December 31, 1873, 



REPORT OF 

HOUSE FATHER, FAMILY OIVE. 



To the SuiJerintendent of the House of Refuge : 

The following is the report of Family one, for the year ending 
December Slst, 1873. 

There are now in this Family fifty-three boys, whose ages range 
from six to fourteen years. They are smart, active, little fellows, 
giving but little trouble, and conforming to the rules of the Family, 
and Institution, as well as any class of boys of their age and under- 
standing. 

The morning and afternoon grade has been regular, and the edu- 
cational interest of the family well maintained. There has been a 
marked advancement in the different branches taught them, and the 
boys seem more ambitious to learn and more eager to obtain know- 
ledge, as they steadily progress in their studies. 

The Sabbath school lesson has been regularly committed, and 
close attention given to its teachings. Ko doubt can exist, but what 
this lesson regularly committed and recited, as it is, works much 
good amongst this class of boys, they are made familiar with its 
truths and precepts, and we trust that many of them, will in after 
life, use them for guide and counsel. 

The sanitary condition of the Family has been excellent. The 
weekly bathing, together with warm and sufficient clothing, and out 
door exercise have contributed to that result. These combined go 
far towards making better dispositions, and are valuable aids in the 
work of reform. As the majority of this Family work in the chair 
shop, of which I am foreman, I feel competent to testify of their 
ability and M'illingness to perform their allotted tasks, they work 
cheerfully, and take pride in doing what is required of them in a 
masterly manner. 



25 

Moral review has been held every alternate evening, the results of 
which have had a salutary eifect upon the boys' morals and charac- 
ters. All cases of misconduct have been carefully investigated 
before awarding punishment, that no injustice be done. The repri- 
mands and punishments are administered in such a manner that 
much good is hoped for, and better discipline encouraged. With 
comparatively good ground before us, wherein to sow good seed, 
with the promptings of an honest conscience to guide and direct, 
with the Bible to read for wisdom and strength, failure in this work 
seems impossible. So we enter upon the duties of another year 
trusting that the end may bring happiness to all. 
Respectfully submitted, 

E. H. SHUMWAY, 
House Father, Family One, 



REPORT or 



HOUSE FATHER, FAMILY TWO. 



To the Superintendent of the House of Refuge : 

Sir : — I respectfully submit the following report of Family Two 
for the year ending December 31, 1873 : 

Many changes have taken place in this family during the year. A 
large number of the boys have been transferred to Family One and 
Family Eight. The boys that were transferred to those families 
were those w^hose demeanor merited promotion. Five boys whose 
conduct did not merit the privilege of remaining in this family were 
transferred to Family Three. Thirty-tw^o of the boys received dur- 
ing the past year were classed in Family Two. The ages range 
between eight and fifteen years. The Family at the present time 
consists of fifty-two boys; the lowest number in the family any time 
during the year, forty-eight. 

The boys when first received often show a spirit of discontent, 
and frequently talk about leaving in a clandestine manner ; but by 
watchfulness and the assistance of the boys who have been with us 
a few months, it takes but a short time to dispel such intention. 
Many of the boys received here have not been accustomed to labor ; 
neither have they been in the habit of attending school, Sabbath 
school and church ; hence it should not be expected that boys who 
have been spending their time in the streets of towns and cities 
would be satisfied when first brought under the restraints of the 
Reform School, where they have to work, attend school and 
religious exercises. Such regularity is too much like business 
for them ; but I am happy to say that in most cases it does not 
take many weeks before they become interested in their school, 
labor, etc., and in a short time are contented and happy in 
their new home. It has been my purpose to impress upon their 



27 

minds the importance of being polite, truthful, honest and indus- 
trious, showing them the probable results that are in store for those 
who live an upright and honorable life. 

I have had no trouble in the discipline of the Family ; the boys 
cheerfully conform to the rules governing the school. 

Hoping our efforts to reclaim the unfortunate and wayward to the 
paths of peace and holiness will receive God's blessing, 

I am respectfully, 

B. F. HOWE. 



REPORT OF 

HOUSE FATHER, FAMILY THREE. 



Plainfield, Ind., December 31, 1873. 

To the Superintendent of the House of Itefiige : 

SiE: — Permit me to present to you the following report for the 
year ending December 31, 1873. 

Having but recently entered upon the duties connected with this 
Family, I feel it almost impossible to make a report commensu- 
rate with the work accomplished the past year. We have now fifty- 
four boys under our care, varying in age from ten to twenty years. 
It is, indeed, surprising to notice the salutary effects of your prin- 
ciples of reformation. A few years ago, it was my province to 
watch over the conduct, and care for some of the boys now consti- 
tuting a part of this Family. With these the work has been slow 
but progressive, and while they yet remain fixed monuments of 
their own weakness, others, more recently adntitted, have attained 
while here, a wholesome standing and have returned to society to 
put in practice the lessons so well and wisely taught them. 

The most interesting features of our daily routine are school, 
music, recreation, religious exercises, and work, all of which take an 
important part in the reformation of our erring boys. To enter 
into the minutia of these several auxiliaries would occupy too much 
space. We have had no school for the past few weeks, but our 
school grade for the ensuing year will be made as attractive and 
profitable as possible. Music has become to us an almost indispens- 
able luxury. We devote one or two evenings each week to sacred 
music, while many little intervals are profitably employed teaciiing 
pieces both comic and sentimental. The boys devote their spare 
evenings to studying Sabbath school lessons, declamations, dia- 
logues, etc., and exhibit a strong desire to excel in these branches of 



29 

study and improvement. During work hours all are industriously 
employed, and it is wonderful to see how earnestly most of them 
apply themselves. This truly is commendable, whether in boys of 
this class or those more highly favored. Honest labor is a strong 
barrier against crime, and when a boy exchanges idleness for indus- 
try, he has certainly made progress in the way of true reformation. 
The hours of recreation are eagerly looked forward to, and are 
enjoyed as boys can only enjoy them. The games in which they 
engage are diversified, and while they amuse and contribute their 
quota of fun and frolic, they do not fail to make good impressions. 
At morning and evening we have devotional exercises in which the 
boys participate and evince a deep interest, and it is our constant 
prayer that while they find their faculties brightened by education, 
their sensibilities enlivened by music, their muscles developed by 
industry, and their means of usefulness enlarged, they will not for- 
get that good Father iu Heaven, who has drawn all these influ- 
ences around them, in order that they may be fitted for careers of 
usefulness in this life and to enjoy His presence in the life to come. 
Most respectfully submitted, 

W. C. KILVINGTON, 

House Father, Family TJiree. 



PHYSICIAN'S REPOET. 



To the Superintendent of the Indiana House of Mefuge : 

SiE — The Physician would respectfully submit the following as 
his sixth annual report of the sanitary condition of the Indiana 
House of Refuge, for the year ending December 31, 1873. 

The health of the Institution during the past year has been com- 
paratively good, being free from epidemic or contagious influence ; 
and while there has been a large number of cases of typhoid fever 
and several deaths therefrom in the town and neighborhood, there 
has been no cases in the Institution. 

The following is a tabular list of the diseases and the number of 
cases in each : 

Ascites 1 

Billions Fever 6 

Dysentery, Acute 3 

Erysipelas 1 

Cerebro Spinal Meningetis 1 

Hamoptysis 1 

Jaundice 2 

Pneumonitis 4 

Phthisis Pulmonalis 1 

Typho-Malarial Fever 2 

Ul cerative Stomatitis 2 

Wounds 2 

Fracture Uima and Radius 1 

Fracture Humurus 1 

This list does not include a number of cases which were prescribed 
for at my office, not being of sufficient gravity to demand my pres- 
ence at the Institution. The case of Cerebro-spinal-meningetis was 
Sporadic, end run a severe course for two weeks. The boy was 
discharged from hospital and the Institution, physically and mor- 
ally convalescent. 

The case of Phthisis Pulmonalis was in the person of a mulatto 
boy who probably inherited it, and brought it with him into the In- 



31 

stitution. He was discharged from the Institution in a hopeful 
condition. 

The fractures were simple oblique of the bones named, and were 
caused while playing. The recoveries were good, and the useful- 
ness of the limbs not impaired. The wounds were simple incised, 
produced while the boys were laboring with edged tools. 

No deaths have occurred in the ranks of the Institution this year. 
Yet the fell destroyer has in two instances layed his blighting hand 
on the Institution and chose for his victims Robert McRea and 
Sargent. 

The first, Robert, who departed on February 8, was a promising 
youth in appearance, sent from the jail at Columbus, with the hope 
of entering him as an inmate, which his over age prevented. 
While waiting some other legal turn he was suddenly attacked with 
a violent congestion of the lungs, a result of cold contracted in jail, 
which caused his death in four days. Daring his affliction he fre- 
quently spoke to me of the kindness of the Matron and officers, 
who faithfully ministered to him in his last days, and compared his 
comfortable surroundings to the cold jail. 

Sargent was formerly an inmate, who returned on a visit to cele- 
braie the Fourth of July in the home of his reformation. While 
bathing in the creek near by, he struck his head against a stone, 
injuring his spine, paralyzing his extremities and causing death in 
five days. Thus, on the day and the very hour in which he was to 
partake of the luxuries and joys of the day, a few friends were at 
his bedside weeping over the departure of his spirit. 

It has been the fate of the institution to be imposed upon by con- 
sumptives and epiliptics in several instances, being passed through 
carelessness or misrepresentations made to the examining physicians. 
These cases burthen the institution with extra expense and care, 
w^hile little benefit may be expected either morally, mentally or 
physically. 

With the farm and shop work to develop habits of industry and 
physical endurance; the school and library to expand and fertilize 
the mind ; and the Sunday school and religious services to form a 
moral and religious character and prepare them for a future life, 
these boys may be truly brought up in the nurture and admonition 
of the Lord. And if after these boys leave the Institution, the 



32 

friends of them, and the world, would manifest half the kindness, 
fervency, and zeal, they receive here, the reformation would be per- 
manent and quite universal ; and it might be truly said of them the 
world is the better of their having lived. 

Hoping, sir, that the Great Reformer of all men may prosper your 
good work, 

I am, very respectfully, 

J. T. STRONG, M. D. 



GARDENER'S REPORT. 



To the Superintendent of the House of Refuge : 

Sir :— In compliance with your request, I submit a statement of 
the products of the vegetable garden for the year 1873. 

We commenced operations with our hot beds late in February 
(on account of the severe weather). We had a fair supply for the 
tables of vegetables usually raised in hot beds, besides an abundant 
supply of plants to remove to the open ground, consisting of cabbage, 
cauliflower, egg plants, tomato, lettuce, celery, jxjppers, cucumbers' 
sweet potatoes, etc. 

The amount of vegetables used was as follows, (exclusive of those 
raised in hot beds) : 

Asparagus a good supply (considering the age of bed.) 

Beets, rhubarb, early onioii, lettuce, spinach, etc 

Cabbages (heads) ^ 2 780 

Corn (dozens of ears) 225 

Beans (bunch) bushels. _,_ 3g 

Beans (Lima) bushels , _._, 2g 

Peas, bushels ,,_^ ig 

Tomatoes, bushels ^^ 

Sweet potatoes, bushels gQ 

Turni|3s, bushels , 25 

Onions, bushels i -i 

Early potatoes, bushels 3q 

Parsnips, bushels g 

Melons, (musk) in number 1 gOQ 

Melons, (water) in number jgQ 

Vegetables on hand January 1, 1874;- 

Cabbages (heads) 5 79Q 

Celery (bunches) gQQ 

Cucumbers (pickles) bbls 9 

Musk Melons (pickles) bbls 1 

Doc. J.-— I. H. R.-~3 



34 

Squashes and Pumpkin