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Full text of "Documents and biography pertaining to the settlement and progress of Stark County, Illinois : containing an authentic summary of records, documents, historical works and newspapers relating to Indian history, original settlement, organization and politics ..."

DOCUMENTS AND BIOGRAPHY 



PERTAINING TO 



THE SETTLEMENT AND PROGRESS 



OF 



StarkCounty, Illinois, 



t'ONTAINING 



AN AUTHENTIC SUMMARY OF RECORDS, DOCUMENTS, 
HISTORICAL WORKS, AND NEWSPAPERS. 



RELATING TO 



Indian History, Orkjinai. Settlement, Organization and Politics, Courts and 
Bar, Citizen Soldiers, Military Societies, Marriages, Ciuirches, 

Schools, Secret, Bknevoi.ent and Litehahy Societies, Etc. 



together with 



BIOGRAPHY OF REPRESENTATIVE MEN 



PAST AND PRESENT. 



WRITTEN FROM RECORDS AND PERSONAL REMINISCENCES, 

BY 

m'."'1':Yeeson. 



ILLUSTRATKD 



CHICAGO: 
M. A. LEESOX & 00. 

MDCCCLXXXVII. 



DONOHUE & HE^NEBEKKY, Printers and Binders, Chicago. 



■::i;i a 



PREFACE. 



m^ 




I STORY is the pith or substance of collected biographies or of 
the lives of men and women of a State. It is the drama of set- 
tlement and progress — a link of golden truths whicli binds us to 
the past. History is also the monument, built during our own 
a lives, to be our instructor, and beyond this present time it looks 
into the future as a warning teacher. Local history is not only 
history as defined, but also history and l)iography — grasping 
the most minute details connected with the persons and events 
identified with the progress of a county, township or village. 
The past and pi-esent — the whole fabric of society — the home, 
school, church, literary and benevolent societies, governmental 
and military organizations, agriculture, commerce, manufactures 
and all these institutions which draw men's interests together, 
should be traced to their humble beginnings, and every name 
and date placed in such form as to be a treasure for all time; 
for Old Father Time will one day call up such records. Local 
history, while embracing all such details of men alid women and 
events, should not revel in records of vice and decay. Its teach- 
ings should be pure, and, to have them so, he who would lead 
the jDeojile of the present time to a higher nobility of character and purpose 
must ]iot give the story of decay and vice, and shame and crime in detail. 
Tiie introduction to this work is peculiar in its practical character. It 
is not here to enlarge the volume or to comply with any known literary style; 
but to place honestly before the people a concise instruction in the whole 
history of the LTuited States aiul of Illinois, while leading down to the 
period when the little commonwealth of Stark came into existence. 

The general histoiy of the county is embrace'd in the first fifteen chap- 
ters, each one exhausting its subject, without detracting from the details 
of township, village and family history, contained in the eight great chap- 
ters which follow. The plan of township history is sim})]ified by making 
the personal sketches and reminiscences of the people of each division of 
the county, a part of the division chapter, arranging them ali)habetically. 
This plan, however, will not place .before the reader at once all the family 
history of a township ; because, owing to change of location, a pioneer of 
one division, may be an old settler of a second, and a modern resident of a 
third townshijD. To provide a ready reference in this case, a list of the 
families treated in this volume is given and the contents table made very 
complete. 

The material for the entire history of the county and of each township, 
village and hamlet, was collected, written and edited by M. A. Leeson. All 
this is based on official records, private documents, newspaper accounts, 
and. wdiere quoted and credited, on the published historical works and 
reminiscences of local writers who acted justly by the past of their county. 



Ill 



I I 



■i^'jii^i^ 



IV PREFACE. 

lu this work the cemeteries Avere not forgotten, so tliat the monuments 
speak in this vohime of names and dates which might otherwise pass un- 
noticed. 

The biographical collection is the work of many men. Their notes 
were, in the greater nnmber of instances, re- written by the general historian 
and mailed for correction or revision. In a few cases the gentlemen 
engaged in this department proved their notes at the time of writing and 
thus obviated the necessity of total revision. 

While absolute perfection (if thei-e is such a human attribute) is not at 
all claimed for this volume, we feel that the writer has given the people a 
plain, substantial, matter-of-fact work — the most thorough of its class ever 
offered. AVe believe that his desire to exceed all pi'omises has been satisfied, 
and in sending the work on its mission of usefulness we do so with that 
pleasure which always accompanies a dut}' faithfully performed. 

To the county officers of 188(3 and their deputies, to whom the general 
historian is indebted for uniform courtesy and material aid in research, we 
offer expressions of gratitude ; to the gentlemen of the press, our deep 
thanks for the unanimit}" of their endorsement: to the clerks or secretaries 
of the various educational, literary, religious, secret, benevolent, military 
and municipal bodies, our sincere acknowledgements, and to all the people 
— to whose cordial and intelligent cooperation the success of this work is 
due — we send a message of hope and belief that the history of their county 
will prove authentic and be accej^table. 

M. A. LEESON & CO. 

February, 1Ss7. 



CONTENTS. 



Page. 

Title i 

Pheface iii 

Table of Contents v 

Map of Stark County xv 

INTRODUCTION. 

PAKT I. 

Ducovery and Diseorerers: 

Aborininal Inhabitants 17-18 

Wars of the United States 19 

lieginients in the Revohition 19 

AVarof 1812 19 

]\Iexican War 19-20 

War of tlie Rebellion 20 

Chronology of the United States 20 

PART II. 

Derivation of Name — Illinois 32 

Illinois Confederacy . 32 

Chronology, 1655-1750 32-33 

1765-1814 34 

1816-1832 35 

1833-1871 36-37 

Conclusion 37 

Pere Marquette's Map of the 

Mississippi 

Documents op Stark County 

CHAPTER I. 

Topof/rnphy (tnd Natural History: 

Physical Characteristics 43 

Rivers and Streams 44 

Origin of Cooper's Defeat 608 

Economic Geology 45 

Coal Measures 46 

Arclneology 48 

Storm, Flood and Drought 50 

CHAPTER II. 

lndian.i of Illinois : 

Origin of American Indian 52 

Indians of Illinois 53 

French Forts 54 

Pottawatomies and Ottawas 56 

Starved Rock 57 

Destruction of the Illinois 57 

White Settlements 59 

Treaties 59 

Black Hawk Troubles 63 



Page 
CHAPTER III. 

Exploration and Orcujyition : 

American Settlement at Peoria 65 

Travels in the Neighborhood 65 

Isaac B. Essex's First School 65 

Settlement in Stark County 66 

Pioneers of 1830-35 ." 66 

Original Assessment, Dis. No. 1. . . 67 

" 2.... 67 

" 3 68 

" 4 68 

Military Tract 69 

CHAPTER IV. 

Marriage Record 1831-1866: 

Introduction 70 

Record 1831-39 71 

Description of a Wedding 72 

First License and Certificate 72 

Beginning of Marriage Record of 

' Stark 72 

Justices and Ministers 71-105 

CHAPTER V. 

Pioneer Associations and Reminiscences : 

Causes of Association 105 

Mutual Protection Society — OiTicers 

and Members 106 

Beginnings of Old Settlers' Society.. 107 

Organization of the Society 107 

First Annual Meeting 108 

Second " " 108 

Death Record of Old Settlers 108 

Third Annual Meeting 109 

Death Record of Old Settlers 109 

Meeting of 1882 110 

Death Record of i\Ienibers 110 

Reminiscences . . Ill 

Meeting of 1883 Ill 

Record of Deaths 112 

Seventh ^Meeting 115 

Death Roll of Old Settlers 116 

Settlement of David Fast 117 

Eighth greeting 117 

Names of Okl Residents Present . . . 117 

Pioneer Necrolony for 1884-5 118 

Meeting of August, 1886 119 

RecoiTfof Deaths 120 

Underground Railroad , 122 

Receipt for Horse-stealing 124 



VI 



CONTENTS. 



Page. 

Cattle Drivin.-i in Early Days 126 

J. BlancbiU-d's Reminiscences 127 

James B. Witter's Reminiscences.. 128 
H. C. Henderson's " ..128 

S. H. Hendersons " ..129 

CHAPTER VI. 

Organization and Coinmit>sioners' Court: 

Organization of Illinois 130 

" Counties 1-30 

Voters in Spoon liiver Precinct 130 

Acts of Putnam Co. Conunissioners. 133 

First Election in Spoon River 133 

Bribery Act and Plunder 133 

Afritallnoj a New County 133 

Coffee County in the Legislature . . . 134 
Bill for Establishing Stark County . 130 

Life of John Stark 13."") 

Act Providing for :More Territory . . 13.t 
Commissioners' Record, 1839-53 . . . 136 

Organization by Townships 138 

First Supervisors" Board 138 

County Buildings 138 

County Poor Farm 139 

Index "to Legislative Acts 139 

CHAPTER VII. 

Political History: 

Introduction 140 

National Caucus and Convention ... 141 

Precinct Elections, 1839 141 

County Election liecord 142 

Masters in Chancery . 153 

Local Conventions 153 

Douglas and Lincoln 153 

Unconditional Union Men 154 

Union League and Knights of G. C. 154 

Soldiers' Convention 154 

Anti-polvganjv ]\Ieeting 155 

Conventions of 1886 155 

CHAPTER VIII. 

The Courts aad Bar: 

Introduction 159 

First Law Office 159 

Courts of Fulton County 160 

Courts of Putnam County 160 

Courts of Stark County 1 60 

Reminiscences of First Court 161 

Circuit Judij:es 162 

Roll of the "Old" and the "New" 

Bar of Stark County . .' 163 

Brief Reference to a Few Cases .... 167 

CHAPTER IX. 

Journalism and Literature: 

Prairie Advocate, Toulon 168 

News, Toulon 169 

Union. Toulon 169 

News (Redivivus), Toulon 169 

Democrat, Tovdon KiO 

Old-time Billingsgate 170 

Democrat (Redivivus), Toidon 170 



Page. 

Ku Klux Bulletin, Toulon 171 

Molly Stark, Toulon 171 

Herald (Toulon S. W.) 171 

Sentinel, Toulon 172 

Call (Toulon T. W.) 172 

Post-Chronicle, Wyoming 172 

Post, Wyoming 172 

Herald, W s'oming 172 

Post-Heralil, Wyoming 172 

Daily Post-Herald, Wyoming 173 

Bee, Wyoming 173 

Chronicle, Bradford 173 

Times, Bradford 173 

, Independent, Bradford 178 

Annex, Lafayette 178 

Stark County and its Pioneers 174 

Pen Sketches of Service in the Ma- 
rine Artillery 174 

History of the 112th Regiment 174 

Close of Chapter 174 

CHAPTER X. . 

Schools and Institutes: 

School Statistics of State 175 

First School in Stark County 175 

Roll of School Superintendents 175 

School Statistics of County 176 

Teachers' Institute and Association . 177 

S. G. Wright's Reminiscences 177 

William Nowlan's Reminiscences. . . 178 

Roll of Teachers 178 

Statistics of Teachers 179 

Teachers' Normal Class 179 

Teachers" Association 179 

Teachers' Institute, 1882 180 

Normal Institute 180 

CHAPTER XI. 

lielif/ions and Semi-Religious Associations: 

Establishment of Churches 181 

Sunday-school Union 182 

Camp-meeting A.ssociation 185 

Bible Society" 185 

Temperance League. ., 186 

Women's Christian Temperance As- 
sociation 186 

Musical Society 186 

CHAPTER XII. 

Agric ultu ral Societies: 

Socictvof 1843 187 

Stark "County Agricultural Society . 187 

Effort to Esfablish at Wyoming 189 

Central Agricultural Society 189 

CHAPTER XIII. 

Physicians of the County: 
Record of 191 

CHAPTER XIV. 

Railroads: 

Western Air Line 193 

Peoria and Rock Island 194 

Rushville Branch 195 

Proposed Roads 195 



CONTENTS. 



Vll 



Page. 
CHAPTER XV. 

Military History: 

Introduction 196 

War for tlic Union 197 

Statistics 197 

lievolutionarj' Soldiers liere 197 

Black Hawk and Mexican Wars... 197 
First War Meeting in Stark C^ounty. 198 

Organization of Home Guards 198 

County and F.ocal Relief Circles ... 198 

jNniitar}' Disbursing Committee 199 

List of Soldiers killed up to Feb- 
ruary, 1802 199 

Township Relief Societies 199 

Women's Loyal Tjcague 199 

Provost-marshal White and the Ter- 

willigers - . 199 

Bro.Tu's Recruiting Station 200 

The Draft 200 

County Central Aid C'ommittee .... 200 

A Furieral Sermon 200 

Miles A. Fuller's Report 203 

Sundry Paragraphs 204 

Soldiers' Momunent Association. . . . 205 

]\Ieeting to Celebrate Peace 205 

Regimental Sketches and Rosters of 

Infantry C'onunands 205 

Of Cavalry Commands 242 

Of Artillerv Commands 244 

Fourth I. X. G 246 

G. A. R. Post Rosters, pidc town- 
slnpa. 

DOCI'MENTS AND BlOCiRAPHY OF TOWN- 
SHIPS AND Vllil-.'VGES : 

CHAPTER XVI. 

To u Ion Toionsh ip : 

Topography 247 

Original Land Owners 218-251 

Present Land Owners 248-251 

Political Statistics 251 

Supervisors and Justices 251 

Schools and School Officers 254 

Census of Pioneers in 1866 254 

Toulon Cemetcrv and Its Tenants. .. 254 

Modena Hamlet! 257 

Stark Predestinarian Baptists 258 

]\Ioulton 259 

Societies 259 

Toviii of Toulon: 

Introduction 259 

First Settlers 260 

Survey of Town 261 

Sale of Town Lots 261 

Its Selection as County Seat 262 

Improvement Era 26B 

]{. R. Aid Granted 263 

Trustees and Oliicers of Village. . . 263 

Reornanization 263 

Otlicials, 1873-1886 263 

Toulon Postoffice 264 



Page. 

Old Business Houses 265 

Leaf from an Account Book 266 

Hotels 266 

Mauufactm-ing Industries 267 

Banking Houses 267 

Railroad and the Grain Trade 268 

Business Circle 268 

Methodist Church 269 

Congregational Churcli 270 

Baptist'Church 276 

Second Baptist Church 279 

Christian Church 279 

Catholic Church 2^0 

Universalist ( 'hiu'ch 280 

Sabbath Schools 280 

Schools of Toulon 281 

Masonic Lodge 284 

Eastern Star' (Chapter 285 

I. O. O. F. Lodge 285 

Temperance Workers 287 

W. Vs\ Wriiiht Post 288 

Militarv Affairs 289 

Lotus Club 290 

Woman's Club . . 280 

W. C. T. U 291 

Y. :M. C. A 291 

liiterary Societies 291 

Old Court House D. S 291 

Toulon Del)ating Society 292 

Miscellaneous Societies 293 

Toirii of Wyoming: 

Introduction 294 

Survey 295 

Early Lot Buyers 295 

Additions to Town 295 

Sketch of Its Fir.st Days 296 

Otficials, 1872-'86. ..."'. 297 

Schools of Wyoming 297 

Methodist Church 300 

Protestant Episcopal Church 303 

Catholic Church 304 

Baptist Ciiurch 305 

Congregational Church 305 

United Brethren Church 306 

Masonic Lodge 307 

Wyoming Ciiaptcr 307 

Eiistern Star Chapter 308 

Wyo]ning I. O. O. F 308 

Wyoming En(;ampment 309 

DeWolf>ost 309 

DeAVolf Post 418 

Sons of Veterans 660 

National Festivals 310 

Miscellaneous Societies 311 

Postoflice 312 

Wyoming Cemetery and Tenants. . . 313 

Commerce and Mining 314 

Houses in Village in 18S2 315 

Banks and liankers 316 

Business and Manufacturing Circle.. 317 

Opera House 318 

Conflagrations 318 

Biography and Remini.sceuces. ..318-418 



Vlll 



CONTENTS. 



Page. 
CHAPTER XVII. 

Elmira Township: 

lutroduction. . . 420 

Oriirinal Land Owners 421-429 

Present Land Owners 421-429 

First Settlement and Settlers 429 

Scotch Settlement 4:i(» 

Travels of the Turnbulls and Olivers 431 

Elmira Cemetery and Tenants 432 

Osceola Cemetery and Tenants 433 

Pioneer Neighbors 433 

Highlanders and Lowlanders 434 

Schools 434 

Supervisors and Justices 435 

Insurance Company 436 

Elmira Grange ' 437 

Grand Army of the Republic 437 

lioster and Record G. A. R 437 

Elmira Library Association 438 

Elmira Village: 

Introduction ... 439 

L'nited Presbyterian Church 440 

Methodist Episcopal Church 441 

Elmira Bible Society 442 

Presbyterian Church of Elmira 442 

Knox Church 443 

Cumberland Church 444 

Schools of District 3 444 

Business Circle 445 

Osceola Village: 

Introduction 446 

Presbyterian Church 446 

;Methodist Episcopal Church 446 

Baptist Church 447 

Free Will Baptist Church 448 

Other Religious Societies 448 

iliscellaneous ■ 448 

Elmira in the War 449 

Biography and Reminiscences 455 

CHAPTER XVIII. 
Esfie.r Toicnship: 

Introduction 493 

Neighboring Settlements 493 

Original Entries 493 

Present Landowners 493 

3Iadison Winn's Recollections 499 

Sheets Cemetery 501 

Pleasant ValleyCemetery 501 

Schools of Essex 502 

Supervisors and Justices 504 

Railroad Election 504 

Pioneer Postoffice 504 

Methodist Church 505 

Latter Day Saints 505 

United Brethren 505 

Duncan Village 506 

Biography and Reminiscences. . .507-525 

CHAPTER XIX. 
Goslun Township: 

Introduction 525 

Original Entries 525 



Page. 

Present Land Holders 525 

Schools 532 

Cemeteries 535 

Lafayette Village : 

Survey and Purchase 536 

Incorporation of Villaire 537 

Tru.stees, 1869-1887. .'. 537 

Clerks, 1869-1887 538 

Old and New Business Circle 538 

Pioneers of 1848 538 

Pensioners 538 

I. O. O. F. Lodge 538 

Dautrhter.; of Re'bekah 539 

Blue^ Lodge. A. F. & AM 539 

Eastern Suir Chapter 539 

Good Templars 540 

Baptist Church 540 

3Iethodist Episcopal Church 540 

Indian Creek Class 541 

Union Church 541 

Presliyterian Society 541 

Mormon Church 542 

U. :M. p. Church 542 

Universalist Church 542 

Church of Christ 542 

Biography and Reminiscences 542 

CHAPTER XX. 
Osceola Township. 

Introduction 571 

Statistics 571 

Coal and Gas 571 

Original Land Entries 572 

Present Land Owners 572 

Schools 57.5 

Super^^sors 577 

Justices 577 

R . R . Aid Election 577 

Franklin Cemetery 588 

Bradford Vill'ige : 

Survey and Plat 588 

First Lot Buyers 588 

Era of Settlement 588 

Business Circle 588 

Bradford Schools 578 

Village Incorporated 581 

Trusfees and Officials 581 

^lasonic Lodse 581 

Odd Fellows'" Lodge 582 

Good Templars' Lodge 582 

G. A. R. Post and Roster 582 

Universalist Church 583 

Sewing Circle 583 

Methodist Episcopal Church 584 

Baptist Church 584 

Congregational Church 586 

Catholic Church 586 

Protestant Episcopal Church 586 

Bradford Cemetery 587 

LomhardriUe : 

Survey and Plat. 587 

Improvement Society 587 

Biography 588 



ILLUSTRATIONS. 



IX 



Page. 



CHAPTER XXI. 



Penn ToxonsMp : 

Physical Character 603 

Villaiies of 603 

Population 603 

Cooper's Defeat Creek 603 

Original Entries 604 

Schools of Peun 607 

Supervisors 608 

Justices 608 

Castleton : 

S\u-\'ey and Plat 609 

Lot Purchasers 609 

Business Circle 609 

Ntn-mal School 609 

^Methodist Einseopal Church 610 

Drawvcr's Class 610 

liojoate's Class 610 

:\[ethodist Protestant Church 610 

Evangelical Lutheran Church 611 

Societies 611 

Camp Grove 612 

Franklin Cemetery 612 

Snareville Cemetery 615 

Biography and Reminiscences 615 

CHAPTER XXII. 

Valley Township: 

Physical Character 640 

Population 640 

Original Pantries ' 040 

Present Land Ov^-ners 640 

Township Schools 643 

Supervisors -644 

Justices 645 

Pioneer Neighbors. - 645 

Wolf Hunt, 1830 645 

Yallev Cemetery 645 

Stark Village. 645, 659 

Pensioners 646 

Congregational Church 646 

Members of 647 



Page. 

Wady Petra Village 647 

Methodist Church 647 

Grange 647 

Sons of Veterans 660 

Biography and Remiuisceuces 647 

CHAPTER XXIII. 

West Jersey Township: 

Introduction 672 

Physical Character 672 

Popuhition 672 

Original Entries 672 

Present Land Owners 672 

Schools 67(5 

Supervisors 678 

Justices 678 

Pioneer Neighbors 678 

Millbrook Township 678 

Victoria Township 678 

Pioneer ^lemories 679 

First Settlers 679 

Distiilerv 679 

First Ball 679 

First Postoffice 680 

Census of Pioneers 680 

West Jersey Cemetery 680 

Soldiers Buried in Cemeterv 681 

West Jersey Village '. 681 

M. E. Chu'rch...: 681 

Hazen's Class 681 

Finch's Cla.ss 682 

Trickle's Class 682 

Presl)vterirtn Church 682 

Odd Fellows 683 

Starwauo 683 

Burning of Intirraary 683 

Biography and Reminiscences 684 

CONCLUSION. 

Population 1840—80 707 

Township 1855—80 707 

Nationality of Citizens 707 

Population of Villages 708 

Annual Expenditures 1839 — 85 707 



ILLUSTRATIONS. 



Page. 

Map of Stark County 15 

Pere Manjuette's ^lap 39 

Starved Rock 61 

Landing of La Salle 95 

Pioneer Home 113 

Pontiac 131 

Tecuraseh 149 

Black Hawk 201 

First SchooLhouse 495 



Page. 

Oliver Whitaker 255 

James H. Miller 273 

Samuel Burge 323 

Sylvester Otmau 341 

William Sturm 359 

Clinton Fuller 477 

Abner Kerns 529 

Rev. A. C. Miller 649 

L L. Newman 697 



BIOGRAPHY AND REMINISCENCES. 



Torxox Town snip xst> 
Towns of Ton.ox and 
Wyoming. 

Page. 

Jolin W. Agard 319 

John R. Atherton 319 

Julius Barnes 319 

Dr. Bacraeister 191 

James Ballentiue 320 

Eunice Bass 320 

Thomas A. Beall, Sr. . 320 

Thomas Beall 320 

John Berlield 320 

Carson Berfield. (Gen. Hist.) 

Patrick :M. Blair 321 

Elva M. Black 322 

Herbert Blakely 322 

Thomas W. Bloomer. . 322 

Andrew F. Bloomer. . . 328 

William Boggs 322 

3Ia jor Bohanuau 322 

William J. Bond 322 

Orlando Brace 325 

Kezzie F. Brace 325 

Henry C. Bradley 325 

Samuel G. Breese 326 

William Brown 326 

John B. Brown 620 

Capt. John M. Brown. 327 

Samuel Burge 327 

Kev. Benjamin Buree. . 328 

D. S. Burroughs. .":... 328 

Henrv Butler^ 329 

Ed^\ in Butler 329 

C". C. Campbell 330 

Alfred Castle, M. D . . . 330 

Rev. W. W. Carr 331 

Thomas H. Carlin 331 

Wm. Chamberlain, M.D. 332 

Julius F. Chapin 332 

Mary F. Chapin 332 

Joseph Catterlin 332 

John S. Cleveland 332 

Jeffrey A. Coolev 332 

Presley Colwell .' 332 

Mrs. David Cooper 332 

MarvCox 332 

Clara De W. Cox 332 

Jere M. Cox 333 

Polly Crandall 333 

Eliza J. Creighton 333 

P. K. Cross 333 



Page, i 

John Cuthertou 334 

Rev. T.J. Cullen 334 

Dr. Curtiss 334 

L. P. Damon 3:34 

Samuel M. Dewey 335 

Stephen Deaver 335 

Kezzie Dexter 336 

R. J. Dickinson 336 

Henry B. Dorrance. . . . 337 

John Drinnin 337 

Luther Driscoll 337 

Mary E. Dugau 337 

William Dunn 337 

Rev. R. C. Dunn 337 

Benjamin Drummoud . . 365 

Otis T. Dyer 338 

William 5l. Eagelston. 338 

C. L. Eastman 339 

S. W. Eastman 340 

Emory J. Edwards. . . . 343 

B. F. Edwards UA 

John G. Emery 344 

Joseph Essex 344 

Artemus Ewers 344 

Spencer Falconer 344 

Davis Fast 344 

John Finlev 344 

Rev. J. J. Fleharty. . . 344 

Benjamin C. Follett... 344 

Mrs. Pleasant Folktt.. 345 

Sarah E. Fofflesoug. .. . 345 

:Mrs. D. Fos^ter. . .\ . . . 336 

William Fuller 345 

Miles A. Fuller 345 

Ernest C. Fuller 346 

Brady Fowler 463 

Andrew Galbraith 346 

Charles Geesey 347 

Amos P. Gill.' 347 

Hu£rh Y. Godfrey 347 

Joel D. Goodale." 347 

W. H. Gray 347 

Ruby Greenfleld 347 

F. R. Greenwood 347 

W. H.Greenwood 348 

James Grilhn 348 

A. Gross 348 

Robert Grieve 348 

Thomas Hall. M. D ... 349 

J. Knox Hall 352 

Mary 31. Hammett 352 . 

X 



Page. 

John Hanes 352 

Richard Hardin 352 

Mrs. Harty 3.52 

Sarah ]\I. Hazzard ... . 352 
AuEcustus G. Hammond 352 

Charles Hartley 353 

George Hartley 353 

James P Headley 354 

George Harvey 354 

John Hawkes 354 

W. H. Henderson 355 

Thomas J. Henderson. . 223 
John W. Henderson... 356 
Henry C. Henderson. . . 356 
Stephen H. Henderson. 356 
James A. Henderson . . 356 
3Irs. Ann Heywood . . . 356 

Thomas Hevwood 357 

Richard Hight 357 

William Holgate 358 

Henry A. Hoist, ride 

Gtu. Hist. 
Georse E. Holmes. . . . 358 

John^Hook 361 

Frank C. Hook 361 

W. H. Hoover 362 

Augustus Hulsizer .... 362 
Chjirles F. Hamilton . . 591 

Jane Ingham 363 

Ellen Jackson 363 

William S. Johnson . . . 363 
Peyton P. Johnson .... 363 

John Jordan 364 

George Kerns 364 

William Kerns 365 

Martin Keran 365 

James Kinney 365 

Maria Kightlinger 366 

Wesley Kinir 366 

Albert W.King 366 

James E. King 367 

George S. Lawrence... 367 

Davis Lowman 368 

James K. Lashells 368 

William J. Law 368 

Abram Lindsev 368 

Dr. J. L Liiihffall 369 

Caleb :M. S.~"Lyon 367 

Caroline Lvon 369 

William R. Leirir 369 

Leek family . .^^7 369 



BIOGRAPHY AND REMINISCKNCES. 



XI 



Page. 

Elizabeth Long 369 

Mary Ann Lowman . . . 369 

^lincrva Lj'on 369 

Richard Mascall ?69 

William Malianv 369 

William Mahany 694 

Col. I). W. Magce, M.D 369 

William Mason 370 

Wallace McW. Mason . 371 

John A. Maxfield 371 

Thomas H. Maxlield . . 371 

David McCance 372 

Charles P. McCorkle . . 372 
Kolx-rt McKeio-han .... 373 

John INIark :\rc:Millen.. 373 
Stephen W. Maring ... 374 
M. F. Meeker........ 374 

Major W. K. Merriman 374 
Hon. James H. Miller . 375 

Allen P. Miller 376 

William Miller 377 

Royal H. Miller 377 

Wflliam Miner 378 

Rev. John Mitchell .. . 378 

Robert Mitchell 378 

James Montooth 378 

William L. ^Nlooney . . . 379 
J. \V. 3Iorrison ..'..... 380 

Robert Moore 482 

K B. Morse, M. D.... 381 

James H. Newton 381 

Ben j . A . Newton 381 

Jason M . Newton 382 

George Nicholas 382 

Rev.^T. J. Nesmith .. 382 

Elizabeth Nixon 382 

Will E. Nixon 382 

James Nowlan 383 

Thomas A. Oakes 383 

Sylvester F. Otman. . . 383 

William Ogle 519 

Benjamin Packer 384 

Charles S. Pavne 385 

Harve\- Pettit'. 386 

Allen ^IcA. Pierce, M.D 386 

Henry R. Pierce 387 

F. O. Phelps 387 

Mrs. Franklin Pratt... 387 
Henry T. Prentiss.. .. 387 

John Prior 3^7 

James Price, ride mil. ch. 

Nelson Prout 388 

ilrs. Elijah Ransom. . . 388 

Francis Rennick 388 

Joseph D . Rhodes 388 

Eugene Rhodes 388 

John H. Rhodes 564 

Hugh Rhodes 564 

Mr.s". Byrne Riley 389 

Anthonv Robinson.... 389 

George Rockwell 389 

James M. Rogers 389 

Frank Rosseter 389 

William R. Sandham. . 389 



Page. 

Peter Sanner 390 

Wintield Scott 390 

George W. Scott 390 

IVIartin Shallenberger. . 391 
Hopkins Shivvers. . . . 393 
William U. Sickles. . . . 393 

Minott Silliman 565 

Levi Silliman 394 

Perrv H. Smith 394 

John W. Smith 394 

John Smith 395 

Barbara Smith 395 

PhcebeH. Smith 395 

Whitney Smith 395 

Isaac B. Spillman 395 

Nathan Snare 395 

Perrv Stanclitf -. . 396 

Gen' John Stark 135 

Patrick Sullivan 397 

Charles M. Swank .... 398 

Andrew Swartz 398 

Sj'lvester Sweet 398 

]\irs. William Sweet. . . 398 

Bushrod Tapp 398 

Charles M. Teeter 398 

Elias Stout Teeter 399 

Isaac Thomas 400 

James M. Thomas 400 

William F. Thomas... 401 

Frank Thomas 401 

Gen. Samuel Thomas . 401 

Owen Thomas 403 

Harriet Taylor 403 

Brailford F. Thompson 403 

Harriet Ticknor 404 

L. E. Timmons 404 

E. A. Trimmer 404 

W. A. Truax 404 

Benjamin Turner 405 

Jesse T. Turner 405 

Daniel Tvrrell, M.D... 407 

\. F. Stlckney 406 

James M. Sticknev. . . 406 

J. C. Starr ' 406 

Daniel D . Stone 406 

Rev. I). G. Stouffer .. 406 

William Sturm 407 

George C. Van Osdell . 669 

Gertrude Wagner 410 

David J. Walker .... 410 

Dexter Wall 410 

Rev. W. Wallers . 411 

John W. Walters... . 412 

Joseph AValther 412 

Oliver Whitaker 413 

Jolui Whitaker 414 

B. WhiHen 415 

John Whitcher 415 

William Williams 415 

Warren Williams 415 

Marshall Winn 415 

James Woods 416 

Stephen G. Worlev ... 416 
Rev. S. G. Wright ... 416 



Page. 
William W. Wright... 416 
Capt. W. W. Wright.. 570 
Susan D. Wright .... . 416 

John Wriglev 417 

David DeWolf 418 

Hewes White 492 

Keziah I). Young.... 418 
B. F. Young 481 

Elmiha Townsuip. 

John Adams 455 

James Arm.strong, Sr. .. 455 

Louis Austin 455 

Matthew Bell 455 

W. D. Blanchanl 455 

Abhy M. Blanchanl... 456 
Dr. E. R. Boardman. . . 456 
Dr. E. O. Boardman... 456 

Charles Bolt 457 

Myrtle G. Bi-ace , , . . 457 

Lochlin Buchanan 458 

Lochliu ]M. Buchanan. . 458 

Asa A. Bunton 458 

Asa Bunton 461 

James Buswell 461 

James Cinnamon 461 

David Currier 462 

Lsabella Fell 548 

Brady Fowler 463 

Laton Fuller 463 

Ambrose Fuller. ...... 463 

Clinton Fuller 464 

Walter U. Fuller 464 

Wm. W. Fuller 464 

Charles L. Gerard .... 465 

Hall family 466 

Rol)ert Hail 473 

John M. Hatch 473 

Aaron Harvej' 592 

James ^I. Jackson 473 

Thomas Jackson 474 

Col. William Jackson.. 474 

David Jackson 474 

John Jackson 476 

Adam Jackson 476 

James L. Jackson 479 

John Leason 479 

AVilliam Leason 465 

Thomas Lvle... • 461 

Carlos B.'Lyle 479 

Horace E. Lvle 479 

Finlev ^latheson 480 

Geo. S. .Alavnard 480 

Donald Mci)onald 480 

Harriet J. ilcKeuzie... 481 

William Moflitt 481 

Samuel .Montooth 482 

Robert Moore 482 

George ilurray 482 

William Murray 483 

Thomas Nicholas 483 

Adam Oliver 484 

Andrew Oliver 484 

Henrv H. Oliver 485 



XII 



i;io(;kai'iiv and keminisokn^ks. 



Thomas Oliver 

AVilliiim Parks 

Matthew B. Parks . . 
William G. Perkins. 

Gideon Potter 

Jolm F. Reed 

Simon 15. Spencer. . . 

Isaac Spencer 

Charles Stuart 

Sturms family 

John Tiirnbuil 

JohnG. Turnbull..., 
William 11. Turnlmll 
AVilliam Turubull. . . 
Archibald Vandyke . 
Charles V^andyke. . . . 
Ilewes White 



ACJE. 

485 
486 
486 
486 
487 
488 
488 
489 
450 
489 
489 
490 
491 
491 
491 
492 
493 



Page. 

Benson 8. Scott 520 



EssKX Township. 

F. F. Brockway 507 

Thomas ColweH 508 

Henry (V)lwell 508 

JohnColwell 509 

Joseph Cox 509 

Thomas W. Cox .... 509 

W. K. Cox 509 

Malon Cox 510 

Mary E. Cox 510 

I. P. Carpenter 510 

Hannah Dixon 510 

Samuel Dixon 510 

Rosanna Dixon 510 

Philip F. Earhart 510 

Eliza Edwards 511 

Isaac B. Essex 511 

Thomas Essex 512 

Philip Fast 512 

Jane Frail 512 

James M. Estep 512 

George Fautz. . . 512 

Joseph Friedman 518 

Daniel Gini;ricli 513 

Lucinda Giuiirich . . . . 513 

A. E. Gingrich 514 

Thomas Graves 514 

Nancy Graves 514 

James Graves 515 

Joseph S. Graves 515 

Jacob Graves 516 

Lemuel Graves 516 

Argeion Graves 516 

Jerome Graves 516 

James Hartley 517 

Ann Hartley." 517 

n. Ingram." 517 

Jared Jones 517 

Abner Kerns 518 

John Leffler 518 

Jesse L, .Moltiit 519 

Josiah .MoHitt 519 

John II. Ogle 519 

Henry M. Rogers 520 

John" Scott. . .'. 520 



520 
522 

522 
523 



Peter Sheets . 

Henry Springer 

Amelia M. Standard . 
John P. Standard . . 
Christopher Trickle. 

Edward Trickle 523 

Jelfenson Trickle 52a 

]\Iason B, Trickle 523 

Sylvester Wilkinson... 524' 

Alonzo Wilkinson 524 

Solomon Wilkinson... 525 
Thomas Winn 109 

GOSUKN ToWNSIHI'. 

Eric Anderson 543 

Josepll Atherton 543 

Jesse S. Atherton 543 

^[rs. A. Atherton 543 

R. C. Baker 543 

Jeremiah Bennett 543 

xV. R. R. Revier 544 

U. H. Brown 544 

Emory S. Buffum 544 

Jonas Butler 544 

Mrs. P. Cavenaugh .... 544 

Melinda Carver 545 

Dr. J. R. Crawford... 545 
Wm. L. Dalrymple. . . . 545 

Elder Delle ". 545 

Mrs. Dickinson . 545 

Rebecca Dickin.son. . . . 545 

Jeremiah DeMutli 545 

Lotan Dexter 546 

GL'orge F. Dexter 546 

Daniel Dodge 546 

Mrs Dudley 546 

S D. Easton 546 

Elijah Eltzroth 546 

Conrad Emery 547 

John Emery." 547 

Jacob Fall ." 547 

Mrs. Farr 547 

Barnabas Frail 547 

D. K. Fell 548 

Isabella Fell 548 

(Jideon B. Gillette 548 

J. T. (Gardner 549 

Hugh Galbrailh 549 

Epii. Garrison 550 

Luther Geer 550 

Nelson Grant 550 

Orson Grant 550 

Ruth Graves ... 550 

: Thomas Gemmell 550 

' William J. Hamilton. 551 
Andrew Hamilton 551 

j A. IT. Harris. -.. 551 

Harry Hayes 551 

John S, Haxtiui 551 

Martha Hill 551 

i Sabrina Hilliard 551 

Azro Hilliard 552 



Page. 

Charles Himes 552 

Homer II. Himes 553 

Cad. Howell 553 

I). J. Hurd 553 

James Ingels 553 

James Jackson 553 

Barnabas M. Jac'kson. . 554 
Capt. C. P. Jackson. . . 554 

J. M. Jones 555 

Jacob Jones 555 

Sheridan Jones 555 

Capt. F. A. Jones 556 

William Marks 556 

James Martin 557 

William Mason 557 

John A. ^laxfield ... . 557 

Oren Maxtield 557 

Elijah McCleuahau. . . . 557 
Henry McClenalian . . 557 
Elijah J. :McClenahan.. 557 
James McStimpson. . . . 558 

Harris W. Miner 558 

Susanna Miner 109 559 

Robert Moore 559 

Henry S. Newcomer. . . 559 

Dr. J. H. Nichols 559 

James Nicholson 560 

Eric U. Norberg 560 

Michael No wlan 560 

William Nowlan 561 

Philanda Pomcroy. . . . 561 

Elijah Pomeroy 561 

Henry Presler 561 

Samuel Parrish 561 

Squire Parrish 562 

Bethuel Parrish 562 

Joel Parrish 563 

J. H. Quinn 563 

Mrs. Reed 564 

Wm. A. Reed 564 

Isaac C . Reed 564 

Huuh Rhodes 564 

Jolm F. Rhodes 564 

T. W. Ross 565 

Jacob Ross 565 

Lucretia Ruston 565 

Minott Silllman 565 

C . F . Spillman 566 

William Snyder 566 

Alfred .M. Snyder 567 

A. B. II. Snyder 567 

J. F. Thompson 567 

V. Todd 568 

Abbie A. Todd 568 

Smith Tuttle 5(18 

Peter II. Wade 568 

John White 568 

John A. White 569 

John H. White 569 

Samuel M. White 569 

Simeon AVilliams 569 

Rev. J. L. Williams... 570 
Capt. W. W. Wright.. 570 
GadL. Yale "..... 571 



BIOGRAPHY ANT) REMINISCENCES. 



xin 



Osceola Township. 

Page. 

Alviu Abbott 588 

Mary P. Adam,s 588 

Major A. Ames 588 

Z\3bnloii Avery 589 

Dr. J. G. Boardman... 589 

John V. Bevier 589 

John n. Boyd 590 

A. H. Brock 590 

Mrs. Capperune 590 

Mrs. Cashing 590 

James B. Do vie 590 

W. P. Dator! 590 

Mrs. Driscoll 590 

Mrs. Fink 590 

Patrick Finni^an 590 

Wesley T. Foster 591 

Otis Gardner 591 

Charles F. Hamilton.. 591 

Jenny Hartley 592 

Thomas W. Harmon . . 592 

William Harvey 592 

Geo. L. Haskins 592 

Mrs. T. Horan 593 

John Lackie 593 

Emily i^I. Lewis 593 

Francis J. Liggett 594 

Geo. W. Longmire. . . . 595 

Catherine iMcXultv . . 595 

Jolui A. Mielkey.' 595. 

H. R. Mokeler ' 596 

James M. Morris 596 

A. B. j\[or.se 597 

Harmon Pheni.x 597 

Geo. W. Reed 597 

George Reeves 598 

Benjamin F. Rockhold 598 

Asher Smith 599 

Byron Smith 599 

Liberty Stone 599 

Mrs. Herbert Searles. . . 600 

Nicholas Stin-m 600 

Church Sturtevant 600 

Isaac Sturm 600 

A. J. Sturm 600 

Seth Stuart (iOl 

AugiLst S. Thompson.. 601 

Joseph E. Weed 601 

Washino-ton White... 602 

Naomi Wilcox 602 

John Winslow 602 

Calvin Winslow 602 

Penn Township. 

Heniy B. Ackley 615 

John Acklej^ 615 

Humphrey Avery. . .616-18 

S. G. Avery 616-19 

Elizabeth Smith Avery.. 616 

]VIiles Avery 617 

Jo.seph C. Avery 619 

Robert McBocock 619 

Elijah Bocock 620 



Paoe. 

Cyrus Bocock 620 

Thomas J. Bocock. ... 621 
William C. Bocock.... 621 

John B. Brown 622 

Cramincr W. Brown.. . 622 

Erastus Brown 622 

Harlow Brown 623 

Benjamin B. Bunnell. . 623 

Jam'es A. Bunnell 624 

Robert E. Bunnell.... 624 

Daniel Coghlan 625 

Samuel Crum 625 

C. W. Davison 625 

Geo. D. Eaa-elston 626 

William Eagel.ston 626 

Mary P'arwdl 626 

James W. Fleming. . . . 626 

Levi Fonts 027 

Zura Fidler 627 

C. D. Fuller 627 

Ben j . F. Gharrett .... 628 

William D. Grant 628 

George Green 628 

AndiW Harty 629 

James Holeate 630 

Dr. J. R. Holgate 630 

Edwin Holmes 630 

Leo Julg 633 

Michael Ivitterman 634 

Alexander Kissinger . . 634 

Thomas Leadley 634 

"Aiuitie" McLauiihlin. 634 

James McNulty.T 634 

Geo. W. Miller 634 

Warren Pettit 635 

Virdl Pike 635 

Clias. H. Perkins 635 

William Redding 656 

William Rvan 635 

Hcnrv Seeiev 635 

Wm." S. Sniith 635 

John Snare 636 

James Snare 636 

R. S. Snare 637 

Edward Somers 638 

Kliza])e1h Sturm 638 

.Micagv Swiger 638 

Wm! H. Whitlen 638 

C. AVilson 639 

Archibald Wheeler. . . 626 

Lydia White 630 

Abram Zimm 639 

Valley Township. 

Josepli Anderson 648 

Margaret V. Brain 648 

AVm. Atkinson 648 

Perry C. Burdick 651 

Bishop Chase 705 

r^hilander Chase 706 

Pliilander Chase 651 

Heber Chase 651 

Bernard C^olgan 652 

Thomas H. Crone 653 



Page. 

Wm. Da\v.son 653 

John Ij. Dawson 654 

James L. Dawson 654 

Elizabeth Dciwn 654 

AVm. Dow n 654 

Mary A. Dcwlnu-st . . . . 65 > 

James DcAvhurst 655 

L. Duckworth 655 

G. W. Durvea 655 

Joseph Ebv 655 

A J. Faulkner 655 

Ambrose Ghert 656 

A. AV. Hendricks 657 

Henry Hampson ...... 657 

Sai'ah Hampson 657 

Thomas Heaghney.... 658 

David Hodges. . .' 658 

Chas. AI. lIuU 659 

Geo. L. Jackson 659 

James Jack-son 664 

Mrs. Judith S. Job . . . 660 

David Joh 660 

Thomas Kelly 660 

G. Klepfer...' 660 

Alonzo Kengsley 660 

Jonathan Luce 660 

George JIarlatt 661 

Malinda jVIarlatt 661 

AVilliam McConnell 662 

Sarah McGinniss 662 

John Morrissy 663 

William Peterson 663 

John Schanck 664 

Jacob Simmerman 664 

A.J. Sinunerman 664 

Edwin Snare 665 

John Speers 665 

Carl Stagg 666 

James Turner 655 

Charles D. Stisser. ... 669 

Geo. C. Y:\u Osdell. .. 669 
Thomas Wickliara, tide 
Mstort/. 

A.sahel Wihnot 670 

Harriet N. AVilmot 670 

Samuel AVrigiey 671 

West Jeiisioy Township. 

S. V. Addis 684 

D. O. Addis 684 

James P. Addis 685 

Ella Addis 685 

Francis Anthony .... 685 

John H.Anthony 685 

Cyrus Anthony 685 

AVilliam Barr 

]Mrs. Bishop 686 

AVilliam Bishop 686 

Josepli Bodine 686 

John P. Bodine 686 

David J. Bodine 687 

R. A. Bovd 687 

David AV.Bi'own 687 

S. Caskev 



XIV 



BIOaRAPHY AND REMINISCENCES. 



Page. 

Tjudnda Duncer 687 

John Dryden 687 

Rebecca "Dunn 687 

A. A. Duim 689 

aeorge Kckley 689 

Hannah Gaffliev 689 

John Finley 689 

A. .]. Finley 689 

Samuel J. Fox 690 

Sarah George 690 

Jacob N . Hazen 690 

John Ilazen 690 

S. R. Hazen 691 

James R. Henry 691 

Mrs. Ingels 692 

Levi Johnson 692 

A. J. Johnson 692 

Wm . H. Johnson 698 



Page. 

R. W. King, M. D 693 

John Keller 694 

Jacob Kissell 694 

Philip Knoir 694 

James Little 6H4 

William Mahany 694 

James V. B. Mahany. . 694 

W.S.McClauahan, M.D. 695 

Rev. A. C. Miller. . . . 695 

I. L. Newman 696 

Joseph Palmer 696 

Willard Palmer 696 

John Pratz 699 

Jonathan Pratz 699 

S. H. Sanders 699 

John Sargent 700 

Belle Shafer 700 



Page. 

Mary L. Swank 700 

Peter Sheets 700 

George Slieets 700 

.Jacob B. Smith 700 

Jacob Stimmell 701 

Sarah H. Stimmell.... 701 

Robert Stonier 701 

Chas. W. Terry 702 

Washington Trickle... 703 

A. D. Van Sickle 703 

.Tohn Wiley 704 

W. W. Webster 704 

EcclesB. West 700 

Jacob Wygell 698 

Mahala Young 704 

C. W. Young 704 

J. Q. Young 705 



INTRODUCTION 



I'AIIT I. 




CllKO.XOLOGV OF THE UNITED STATICS. 

HE honor of discovering land in the western hemisphere 
has been variously credited. It is said, and on very good 
authority, that it was known to the people of Cartilage, 
as the Atalantis of Plato's ''Critias and Tiniaeus." Again, 
Saint Brendan is credited with its discovery in the sixth 
century ; while Powell, in his history of Wales, assumes 
that the Welch prince, Madoc, left his country in 1170 
with his retainers, and made a settlement here. The 
works of those early settlers and explorers were of such 
little utility that notliing has been transmitted by them 
to posterity which might substantiate the claims of 
their latter day countrymen. Not so with the Tartars and others. 
Tiie ancient inhabitants of Uispaniola, Peru, Mexico, and even Canada, 
who came ma Kamptschatka, from China, Japan, and even from 
Africa, left behind them immutable souvenirs of their coming and 
their stay, and gave to tlie continent two great empires — Mexico and 
Peru. Then followed Sjiain with her Christian hero, the Genoese, Col- 
umbus, 1492; then England with the two Venetians, John and Se- 
bastian Cabot, 1497; then Portugal with the Florentine, Yespucius, 
1501; then the French explorers, Cartier, Marquette, • Joliet, La 
Salle, Allouez, Dablon, and hundreds of other Frenchmen who explored 
and wrote and preached. The record of discovery by Europeans, as 
accepted, is as follows : Christopher Columbus, San Salvador, 1492 ; 
John and Sebastian Cabot, Labradoi-, 1497; Americus Vespucius, 
l^)razil. 1501 ; Caspar Cortereal, Canada, 1501 ; Ponce de Leon, Florida, 
1512 ; Juan Verazani, Coast of North Carolina, 1524; Jaccpies Cartier, 
Gulf of St. Lawrence, 1534; Hernandez Cortes, California, 153() ; Fer- 
dinand de Soto, Mississippi river, 1541 ; Samuel Champlain, River St. 
John, ir;o4; Henry Hudson, Hudson river. 1(509, Marquette, Joliet, La 
Salle, Upper Lake and Mississippi region ; Verandrye, DeSmet, Rocky 
Mountains. 

The aboriginal inhabitants of this continent have left numerous 
evidences of their existence, such as ruins, stone and copper vessels 
3 17 



18 INTRODUCTION. 

an<l instruments. The written records of their occu])atioii'" are scarce 
and uiiintelli*^ibk'. The Indian inhabitants number over a quarter of 
a uiillion (2()0,079j and are gTou])ed as follows : Apaches, New Mexico, 
7,300 ; Arrapahoes. LT])per Platte river, 720 ; Arrapahoes, Upper Ar- 
kansas river, 8,000 ; iVrricarees, Upper Missouri river. 1,080; Assini- 
boines, Upper Missouri river, ;->,280 ; Ulackfeet, I'pper Missouri river, 
2,0S0 ; Bloods, Upper Missouri river, 2,400; Brules, Up])er Missouri 
river, 1,120 ; California Tribes, California, 33,590 ; Canianches, U])per 
Arkansas river, 1.800; Cayugas, Senecas, New York, 147; Cherokees, 
West Arkansas river, 17,530; Cheyennes, Upper Platte river, 1.800; 
Cheyennes, Upper Arkansas river, 1,600 ; Chickasaws, AVest Arkansas 
river, 4,287 ; Chippewas of Lake Superior, Michigan, AVisconsin and 
Minnesota, 4,940; rhi])pewas of the Mississi])|)i river, Minnesota, 4,028 ; 
Chi[)j)ewas and Ottawas, Michigan, 5,0(>6 ; ('liij)])ewas of Saginaw and 
Swan Creek, JVIichigan, 162.<;Chi])})ewas, with Pottawatoniies, Michigan, 
247 ;Choctaws, West of Arkansas, 16,000; Christian, orMunsees, Kansas, 
90 ; Creeks, West of Arkansas, 25,000 ; Crows, U]iper Missouri rivei', 
3,900 ; Delawares, Kansas, 1,071 ; (Iros Ventres, U])per Missouri river, 
1,000 ; lowas, Nel)raska. 291; Kansas Kaws, etc., Kansas, 741 ; Kaskas- 
kias, Weas, Peorias, Weas Miamis, and Piankeshaws, Kansas, 384 ; 
Kickapoos, Kansas, 34o; Kiawas, Upper Arkansas river, 1,800; Man- 
dans, I^])))er Arkansas river, 120; Menominees, Wisconsin. 1,724; Mi- 
amis, Indiana, 384 ; Miss(nii*is ancH)tt<)es. Nebraska, 470; Minnecon- 
goux. Upper Missouri river, 1,280. Muhauche, Utahs, New Mexico, 
5(')() ; Navajoes and Mo(]uis, New Mexico, 15,000 ; Oniahas. Nebraska, 
953 ; Onondagas, New Yoi'k, 422 ; Oniedas. New York, 160; Oniedas 
with Onondagas, New York, 7o ; Oneidas with Stockln'idge, etc., Wis- 
consin, 323 ; Oregon Tribes, Oregon. 13,001) ; Osages, West of Arkan- 
sas, 4,098 ; Pawnees (four l)ands). Nebraska, 3,414 ; Pri dos Mescal- 
eros, etc.. New Mexico, 4oo ; Poncas. Nebraska. 864; Pottawatoniies 
with Kickapoos, Kansas, {'>U ; Pottawatoniies of Huron. Michigan, 50; 
Pottawatoniies at Agency ]iroper, Kansas. 2,25!t; Pueblos. New Mex- 
ico, 10,000 ; Qua])aws, West of Arkansas. 314 : Sacs and Foxes (Missis- 
sippi), Kansas, 1.280; Sacs and Foxes (Missouri), Nebraska, 96; Sans 
Arcs, Uj)per Missouri river, l,(iOO ; Senecas, New York. 2,988; Senecas, 
with Shawnees, West of Arkansas, 159 ; Seniinoles, West of Arkansas, 
2,500 ; Snawnees, Kansas, 830 ; Sioux of the M!ssissip])i, Upper Mis- 
souri river, 8,686 ; Sioux of the Missouri, Upper Platte river, 6,000 ; 
Stockbridge, with Munsees. Wisconsin, 323 ; Tus(^aroras. New York. 
305 ; Two Kettles, Upper Missouri river, 96o ; Utah Tribes, Utah, 
1.200 ; Utahs (New Mexico), New Mexico, 2,500; Uncopapas, Upper 
Missouri river, 2,680; Washington Territory Tril)es, AVashington Ter 
ritory, 14,000 ; AYinnebagoes, Upi)er Missouri river, 2,256; Wyandots, 
Kansas. 435; Yanctonnais (Missouri), Upi)er Missouri river, 3,840. 
Since the Revolution many of these tribes have been constantly u]) in 
arms against the whites. ' The Indian AVar of 1790, the Barbarv AVar 
of lSo;j, the Tecumseh AVar of 1804, the British Indians AVar of 1S12. 
15, tne Algerine AVar of 1815, the first and second rebellions of the 
Seminoles, 1817 and 1835, the Black Hawk War of 1832, the Minne- 
sota Massacre of 1862, the Peigan AVar of 1867, the Sioux War of 



CHRONOLOGY OF THE ITNITEL) STATES. 19 

1875-8, the Nez Perces War of 1877, and the Apaches War of 1883, 
with a thousand other minor affairs convey an idea of the manner in 
which tlie conquest of tlie Indian nations was affected. 

From the tlays of (Joi'tez and Pizarro to our own times war has 
been waged at interv^als throughout the two Americas. In our own 
country the following named wars have engaged the attention of the 
inhabitants from ir>75 to 188)'. : King Phili])'s AVar, 1(375 ; King AYil- 
liani's Wav, 1<)89 ; Dutch War, 1(;78 ; Queen Anne's War, 1744 ; French 
and Indian AVar, 1753 ; American lievcjlution, 1775 ; Indian War, 1790; 
Barl)arv AA^ar, 1803 ; Tecumseli AVar, 1S()4 ; AVar of 1812, 1812 ; Alger- 
ine War, 1815; First Seminole AVar, 1817; Black Hawk War, 1832; 
Second Seminole War, 1835 ; Mexican War, 184f) ; the Southern Rebel- 
lion, 18f)l ; Sioux AVar, 1875-78. Tlie lie volution ary War may be said 
to begin with the agitation against the Stamp Act in 17f>5, and to end 
with the inglorious surrender of Cornwallis to AA'ashington and Lafay- 
ette, October 19, 1781. In April, 1783 Cbngress notihed Washington 
of the treaty of peace just entered into, and on A})ril 18th, at New- 
burg, the commander-in-chief ordered the ^proclamation to be read at 
the head of every regiment, and religious services to be held. On 
April 19th, 20th, 21st and 22(1 festivities were the rule in honor of 
complete victory. Acting under AVashington's order of April 19, 
1 783, preparations for the illumination of the victory building were 
made. The headquarters' regiments, then in Newburg cantonment, 
were ordered to cut and scpiare 124 pieces of timber to seven inches, 
deliver the same to Colonel Gouvion, the French officer in charge of 
the illuminations, and act under his directions in erecting the building. 
The regiments were Maryland Detachment, Fourth Pegiment, Jersey 
Regiment, Jersey Battalion, First New York Regiment, Second New 
York Regiment, Hampshire Regiment, Hampshire Battalion, First 
Massachusetts Regiment, F^ourth Massachusetts Regiment, Seventh 
Massachusetts Regiment, Second Massachusetts Regiment, Fifth Mass- 
achusetts Regiment, Eighth Massachusetts Regiment and Third Mass- 
achusetts Regiment. Tlie shoeless troops worked in the forest until 
the 20th of April, delivered the timber, erected the great frame for 
illumination, and thus celebrated the defeat of the British. 

The troops of the Revolution were made up of 231,075 regular 
infantry and cavalry, and 5(1, (»33 militia. The states contril)uting were 
the free states, 172,819 regulars, and 45,91* > militia. Slave states, 
58,255 regulars, and 10,123 mihtia. 

Notwithstanding the utter rout and defeat of the English, that 
nation reorganized for revenge, and under many guises brought on the 
AVar of 1812. Their motto was, '* we will punish that ujistart Yankee 
nation, take its navv and some of its territory." Toward this end they 
dispatched 1,000 war vessels, fully manned and e(]ui])])ed. to ca])ture 
or destroy the 20 war slii])s of the United States. A few " Yankee" 
sailors swept this fleet from our ocean and sea coasts, destroying for- 
ever all hope in British hearts for the restoration of tyranny here. 
The defeat of Proctor's Enji'lish and Indians in Canada closed this last 
struggle for English su])reniacy. 

The Mexican War brought' otiier successes to the Union, resulted in 



20 INTRODUCTION. 

the acquisition of some territory ; but above all formed a military 
school in which man}' soldiers of the Union studied the art of war, and 
prepared themselves to be of use in the greater struggle, then unseen, 
to preserve the Union itself. 

The War of the Eebellion commenced in ISHl and ended in 1865. 
The fall of Fort Sumter was a signal for the u])rising of the people. 
The news of the calamit}' was flashed throughout the world on April 
14, 1861, and earl}' the next morning the proclamation of President 
Lincoln was telegra])hed to the chief executive officer of each state. 
The prochimatious of the governors were issued April 16, 1861, and on 
that the same day every man within the loyal states was prepared to 
act a citizen's part. The number of men called for by the president 
was 2,942.71:8 and the number obtained 2,690,-101. The reenlistments 
brought the numl)er up to 2,859,132, while the number who commuted 
or obtained sul)stitutes was 86,724. 

The troops furnished by the Southern States were, with the excep- 
tion of those of Louisiana, nearly all white. Florida furnished two 
regiments of cavalry ; Alabama one white regiment ; Mississippi one 
battalion, and Xorth Carolina two regiments, one cavalrv. The calls 
of October, 1868, and February, 1861, were combined, and the product 
of the draft Julv, 1863, credited thereon. 

In addition to above total, 63,322 men were obtained from the 
territories and secession states under the different calls. The draft 
gave 168,619 men. The number of colored troops was 186,097. 

The Confederates succeeded in enlisting 600,000 men, of whom one 
thii'd were killed on the field or died of wounds or disease. The re- 
maining 400,00u were captured, or became prisoners by surrender, or 
deserted. The total losses of the iS^orth and South a])proximated to 
600,000 men. The war cost the United States about $4,000,000,000. 

The Chronological Histoi'v of the United States has been pre])ared 
with great care. It covers the leading events in American history, 
and for this reason it must prove invaluable as a plain record and 
reference. 

1492 Columbus sails from Spain August 3 ; arrives at San Salvador, Oc- 
tober 12 ; at Cuba. October 28 ; and Hayti, December 6. 

1497 Cabot discovers Labrador, July 3. 

1498 Columbus discovers South America, August 10. 

1501 Xegro slaves imported into Spanish America, or Hispaniola. 

Americus Vespucius discovers Brazil. 
1506 Columbus died, May 20. 

1512 Florida discovered by Ponce de Leon, April 6. 

1513 lialboa discovers the Pacific ocean. 

1520 Carolina visited by Lucas Vasquez de Ayllon, September 29. 
1534-5 Cartier came up St. Lawrence to Montreal in June. 

1521 Mexico conquered by Cortez. 

1524 Coast of North America explored by John Verazani. 

1541 De Soto discovered the Mississippi. 

1562 Huguenots settled at Port Royal. 

15()4 Huguenots settled in Florida. 

15G5 St. Augustine, Fla., settled by Spauiards, September 18. 

1583 Henry Gilbert's troops take New Foundlaud. 



CHRONOLOGY OF THE UNITED STATES. 21 

1585 First English colony arrived on Eoanoke Island under Raleigh. 

1587 Second attempt to form the settlement. 

1602 Cape Cod discovered by Bart. Gosnold. May 34. 

1605 Port Royal,, IN. S., settled by the French. 

1606 London and Plymouth Comjianies chartered. 

1607 Jamestown settled by the London Company. 

Plymouth Company settled on the Kennebeck river, August 21. 

1608 Quebec founded by the French under Champlain. July 3. 

1609 Virginia received its second charter, June 2. 
Hudson river discovered by Hudson, September 21. 

1610 Starving time in Virginia. 

1612 Virginia received its third charter, ^Marcli 22. 

1613 Pocahontas married to Kolfe in April. ■ 

1614 John Smith explored New England coast. 
New York settled by the Dutch. 

1616 Tobacco culture commenced in Virginia. 
Father Le Caron in the West. 

1620 Plymouth, Mass., settled by Puritans. 
Negroes introduced as slaves. 

Charter granted to Council of Plymouth. 

A Dutch vessel with first negro slaves entered James river. 

1621 Treaty with Massasoite. April 1. 

1622 First Indian massacre in Virginia. April 1. 

1623 New Hampshire settled at Little Harbor and Dover. 
1627 Delaware and New Jersey settled by Swedes and Finns. 

1632 Maryland settled by Irish Catholics, under the leadership of Lord 

Baltimore at St. Mary's, and Baltimore named after a village of 
that name in Cork county, Ireland. 
1632-4 College founded in Baltimore. 

Nicollet traveled in Michigan and the AVest. 

1633 Connecticut settled at Windsor in October. 

1636 Rhode Island settled at Providence. Harvard College founded. 

1637 The Pequod war. 

1638 Delaware settled, near Wilmington, April. 

1641 New Hampshire settlements united to Massachusetts. 
French mission in tlie Northwest. 

1643 Union of the New England colonies formed, May 29. 

1644 Second Indian massacre in Virginia, April. 

1645 Clayborne's rebellion in Maryland. 

1650 North Carolina settled on the Chowan river. 

1651 The ''Navagation Act"' passed by the British Parliament. 

1652 The Maine settlementG united in Massachusetts. 
1655 Civil War in Mai-yland. 

New Sweden conquered by the Dutch, October. 

1663 Carolina granted to Clarendon and others. 

1664 New York became an English province ; New Amsterdam changed 

to New York, September 8. 
New Jersey settled, at Elizabethtown. 

1665 Mesnard, Allouez and others explore the West. 
1668 Father Marquette at St. Maire. 

1670 South Carolina settled, on the Ashley river. 
1673 Virginia granted to Culpepper and Arlington. 

Marquette and Joliet explore the Illinois country. 



22 INTRODUCTION. 

1675 Kiug PhilliiDp's war begun, attack on Swanzey, July 4. 
Marquette died. May 18. 

1676 Baeon"s Rebellion. 

1680 La ;Salle, Hennej^in and other French explorers on the Mississippi. 

Charleston founded. 

New Hampshire made a royal province, September 28. 
1682 Pennsylvania settled by Quakers. 

Delaware granted by the Duke of York to William Penn, August .31. 
1686 Andros arrived at Boston as Governor of Xew England, December 30. 

1689 King William's war commenced. Attack upon Dover. July 7. 

1690 Schenectady burned by the French and Indians, February 8. Port 

Eoval taken by the English under Phipps, May. 

1692 "Salem Witchcraft"" delusion prevailed. 

1697 King 'William"s war terminated. September 20. 

1702 Queen Anne's war commenced. 

1710 Port Royal, Xova Scotia, captured by the English, October 13. 

1713 Queen Anne's war terminated, April 11. 

1729 Xorth and South Carolina became separate provinces, July. 

1732 Washington born, in Westmoreland county. Virginia, February 22. 

1733 Georgia settled, at Savannah. Februarv 12. 
1741 "The Xegro Plot," in Xew York. 

1744 King George's war begun. 

1745 Louisburg captured by the English, June 28. 
1748 King George's war ended, October 18. 

1753 Washington sent with a letter from Dinwiddle, October 31. 

1754 Washington delivered St. Pierre's reply to Dinwiddle, December 11. 
The battle of Great Meadows, May 28. 

Congress of Commissioners met at Albany, June. 
The battle of Fort Xecessity, July 4. 

1755 French expelled from Xova Scotia by Moncton, June. 
Braddock's defeat at the battle of Monongahela, July 9. 

The British defeated by Dieskau, near Lake (ieorge, September 8. 
Dieskau defeated by the British at Lake George, September 8. 

1756 Great Britain declared war against France, ^lay 17. 
France declared war against Great Britain. June 9. 

The French, under Montcalm, captured Oswego, August 14. 
Indians defeated at Kittaning, Sei)tember 8. 

1757 Fort William Henry suri-eiidered to Montcalm. August 9. 
The massacre at Fort William Henry. August 10. 

1758 Lord Howe killed in a skirmish at Ticonderoga, July 6. 
Abercrombie repulsed by Montcalm at Ticonderoga, July 8. 
Louisburg taken by Amherst and Wolfe, July 26. 

Fort Frontenac surrendered to the English, August 27. 
(xrant defeated by Aubry, near Fort Duquesne. September 21 . 

1759 Ticonderoga and Crown Point abandoned by the French. 
Xiagara surrendered to the English, under Johnson, July 25. 
Battle of Montmorenci, July 31. 

Battle of the Plains of Abraham. Sej)tember 13. 
Quebec surrendered to the English, September 18. 

1760 The F"rench attempted the recovery of Quebec, April 28. 
Montreal and the whole of Canada surrendered to the English, Sep- 
tember 8. 

1763 The Peace of Paris between Great Britain and France, February 10, 



CHRONOLOGY OF THE UNITED STATES. 23 

1763 Florida ceded to Great Bi'itaiii by Spain, Fe1)ruary 10. 

1765 The Stamp Act })assed by the Britisli Pai-lia-ineiit, March 8. 
A Colonial Congress met at New York, October 7. 

1766 The Stamj) Act repealed by the British Parliament, March 1<S. 

1767 A bill imi)osing duties on glass, 2)aper, etc., passed June 2i}. 

1768 A body of British troops arrived at Boston, September 27. 
1770 " The Boston Massacre,'-' March 5. 

All duties, except on tea, repealed by Parliament, April 12. 

1773 The cargoes of tea at Boston thrown overboard, December 16. 

1774 "Boston Port Bill" passed by Parliament, March. 

" The First Continental Congress '' met at Philadelphia, Septembers. 
Declaration of Eights, November 4. 

1775 The battle of Lexington April 19. 

The Revolution; battle of Lexington, April 19; perpetual Union 
of colonies. May 20; Washington appointed Commander in-Chiof, 
in May; Marshal of France, by King Louis, in July, 1776. 

The five sons of Maurice O'Brien made the first naval capture. 

Ticonderoga taken l)y the Americans, May 10; Bunker Hill, defeat 
of Americans — British lost 1,054, Americans lost 453. 

Captain John Barry received the first naval commission. 

Washington takes comnumd at Cambridge, July 3; Continental fast, 
.Tuly 20; Falmouth burned by Bi-itish, October 17; Montreal sur- 
rendered to .Montg(nnery, November 13; Battle of Quebec, Decem- 
ber 31. 

1776 Norfolk destroyed by British, .Tainniry 1; Bostcni evacuated by Brit- 

ish, March 17; Battle of Fort .Moultrie, South Carolina, June 28. 
The Americans took possession of Dorchester Heights, March 17; 
Washington arrived at New York, Api'il 14; Battle of Long Isl- 
and, August 27; New York abandoned by the Americans, Septem- 
ber 15; Battle of Fort Washington, New York, November 16; 
Fort Lee, New Jersey, taken by British, November 18; (leneral 
Lee taken prisoner, Deceml)er 13. 

Independence declared, July 4; commissioners to solicit the aid of 
the French. 

Battle of Brooklyn, August 27; Howe lost 2,000, but succeeded in 
defeating Sullivan and Putnam, who lost oidy 400; New York 
evacuated by Americans; Battle of White Plains, October 28; 
Howe lost 300 or 400, but defeats Washington; Washington re- 
treated beyond the Delaware, November 28. 

Congress adjourned to Baltimore, December 12. Battle of Trenton, 
December 26; Washington defeats Rahl; the Americans lost nine 
men, the Fnglish 1,000. 

1777 Battle near Princeton, January 3; Americans lost 100; Mayhood's 

English command was defeated and lost 400. 

Battle of Bennington; Stark lost 100; but defeats Baiim ami Bre- 
men's English commands, and kills 600 of the enemy. 

Battle of Brandy wine, September 11; Howe defeats the Americans. 
Philadelphia possessed by the British, September 27; Battle of 
(Jermantown, October 4; defeat of Washington l)y Howe. The 
battle of Stillwater; l^urgoyjie defeated by Ciates, October 7. Sar- 
atoga, October 17; Burgoyne surrenders with 5,752 men. 

On April 25, Lafayette landed at the little port of Georgetown, at 
the mouth of the Great Pee Dee river in South Cai'olina; and 



24 INTRODUCTION. 

from that day forward the career of Marie Jeau Paul Koch Yves 
Gilbert Motier, Marquis De Lafayette, has held a place in the his- 
tory of America, and in the interest and affection of the Ameri- 
can people. 

1778 Treaty with France, February 6. Jnne 18, Philadelphia evacuated 

by British. June 28, battle of Monmouth; Americans defeat 

their enemies. 
The French troops under Count d'Estaing, with twelve ships-of-the 

line and six frigates, arrived in July. Counts, Dillon, Mac^Iahou, 

Walshe, Koche, Lafayette. Kochambeau were among the officers. 

Battle of Khode Island, August 21»; Sullivan defeats Pigott. 
Savannah taken by British, December 29. New Haven plundered 

by the British."^ Wyoming massacre, July 3. Cherry Valley 

massacre. 

1779 The battle of Stony Ferry, South Carolina, June 20. 
Tryon's third expedition against Connecticut, July. 
The battle of Stony Point, New York, July 15. 

British garrison at Paulus Hook surprised by Lee, July 19. 
The battle of the Penobscot, Maine, August 13. 
Sullivan's expedition against the Indians. 
" The Battle of the Chemung," New York, August 29. 
Savannah besieged by the French and Americans, September, Octo- 
ber. 
Paul Jones' naval battle off the coast of England, September 23. 
D'Estaing and Lincoln repulsed at Savannah, October 9. 

1780 Charleston besieged by the British, April, May. 

The battle of Monk's Corner, South Carolina, April 14. 

Charleston surrendered to the British, May 12. 

The battle of Waxhaw, South Carolina, May 29. 

The battle of Springfield, New Jersey, June 23 . 

French Fleet arrived at Newport, Rhode Island. July 10. 

The battle of Rocky Mount, South Carolina, July 30. 

The battle of Hanging Rock, South Carolina, August 6. 

The battle of Sanders' Creek, South Carolina, August IG. 

The battle of Fishing Creek, South Carolina, August 18. 

Arnold's treason. 

Andre executed as a spy at Tajtpan, New York, October 2. 

The battle of King's Mountain, South Carolina, October 7. 

The battle of Fishdam Ford, South Carolina, November 12. 

The battle of Blackstocks, South Carolina, November 20. 

1781 Revolt of the Pennsylvania troops, January 1. 

The battle of the Cowpens, >Jouth Caroliiux, January 17. 

The revolt of New Jersey troops, January 18. 

Arnold's depredation in Virginia, January. 

Cornwallis's pursuit of Morgan and (Jreene, January, Fel)ruary. 

The battle of Guilford Court House, North Carolina, March 10. 

Articles of Confederation ratified by the States. 

The battle of Hobkirk Hill, South Carolina, April 25. 

Siege of Ninety-six by General (h-eene. May, Jnne. 

The battle of Ninety-six, South Carolina, June 18. 

Colonel Hayne executed by the British, at Charleston, July 31. 

Arnold's expedition against Coniu'cticnt, September. 

The battle of Fort Griswold, Connecticut, September G. 



CHRONOLOGY OF THE UNITED STATES. 25 



1781 



The battle of Eutaw Springs, South Carolina, September S. 

The siege of Yorktown, Virginia. Oetol)er. 

The surrender of Cornwallis, at Yorktown, October 11). 

1782 Preliminary articles of peace signed at Paris, November 30. 

1783 Cessation of hostilities proclaimed in the American army, April 111. 
Savannah, Georgia, evacuated by the British, July 11. 

Definite treaty of peace signed at Paris, September 3. 
American army disbanded by orders of Congress, November 3. 
New York evacuated by the British. November 2"). 
Charleston, South Carolina, evacuated by the British, December 14. 
Washington resigns his commission, December 23. 
1785 John Adams, ambassador to England. 

1787 Shay's Eebellion, in Massachusetts. 

Constitution of the United States agreed on by the convention of 

delegates at Philadelphia, September 17. 
Cotton introduced into Georgia. 

1788 Ratification of Constitution by all States excejjt Khode Island and 

North Carolina. 

1789 The first Congress under the Constitution met at New York. 

March 4. 
Washington inaugurated President of the United States, April 30. 

1790 Harmar defeated by the Indians, in Indiana, October 17, 22. 

1791 United States bank established at Philadeljihia. , 
Vermont admitted into the Union, March 4. 

St. Clair defeated by the Indians, in Ohio, November 4. 

1792 Kentucky admitted into the Union, June 1. 

1793 The difficulties with France. 

1794 Wayne defeated by the Indians, on the Maumee, August 20. 
'• Whiskv Insurrection" in Pennsylvania. 

1795 '•' Jay's treaty " with Great Britain ratified, June 24. 
Treaties with the Western Indians, Spain and Algiers. 

179G Tennessee admitted into the Union, June 1. 

1797 John Adams inaugurated President of the United States, March 4. 

1799 The death of Washington. December 14. 

1800 The seat of govei'nment removed to Washington. 
Treaty of peace concluded with France, September 30. 

1801 Thomas Jefi'erson inaugurated President, March 4. 

War declared against the United States by Tripoli, June 10. 

1802 Ohio admitted into the Union, November 29. 

1803 Louisiana purchased of France. April 30. 
(^ommodore Preble sent against Trijioli. 

1804 The frigate Philadelphia destroyed by Decatur, February 15. 
The duel between Hamilton and Burr. July 11. 

1805 Derne. a Tripolitan city, captured by Eaton, April 27.' 
Treaty of peace concluded with Tripoli, June 3. 

180fi British blockade from the Elbe to Brest declared. May 1*!. 

Bonaparte issued his "'Berlin Decree" November 21. 
1807 liritish " Orders in Council '" ])rohibited coast trade with France, 
January 7. 
American frigate Chesapeake attacked by the Leoi)ard. June 22. 
British armed vessels ordered to leave the United Stales. July. 
British " Orders in Council" prohibited all trade with France ami 
her allies, November 11. 



26 INTRODUCTION. 

1807 Aaron Burr tried for treason, and acquitted, September. 

Bonaparte issued his ''Milan Decree," December 17. 

Embargo on American ships laid by Congress. December 22. 
1809 Commerce with Britain and France interdicted by Congress, 
March 1. 

James Madison inaugurated President, March 4. 

1811 Action between the frigate President and Little Belt. May IG. 
Battle of Tippecanoe, Indiana, November 7. 

1812 Louisiana admittted into the Union. April 8. 

War against Great Britain proclaimed by the United States, 

June 19. 
Invasion of Canada by General Hull, July 12. 
Surrender of Fort Mackinaw, Michigan, July 17. 
'j'he first battle of Brownstown, Michigan. August 5. 
The second battle of Brownstown. August 9. 
Surrender of Detroit, Michigan, by General Hull, August 16. 
British sloo}) Alert taken by the frigate Essex, August lo. 
British frigaie Guerriere taken by the Constitution, August 19. 
The battle of Queenstown, C-anada, October 13. 
British brig Frolic taken by the Wasp, October 18. 
British frigate Macedonian taken by the United States, October 25. 
British frigate Java taken by the Constitution, December 29. 

1813 The battle of Frenchtown, Michigan. January 22. 
British brig Peacock taken by the Hornet, February 24. 
31adison commenced a second presidential terin, March 4. 
The battle of York, Canada. April 27. 

Fort Meigs, on the Maumee, besieged by Proctor, May 1. 

The battle of Fort Meigs, Ohio, May 5. 

Fort George, Canada, taken by the Americans, May 27. 

The battle of Sackett's Harbor, New York, May 29, 

American frigate Chesapeake taken by the Shannon, June 1. 

The battle of Fort Stephenson, Ohio, August 2. 

American brig Argus taken by the Pelican, August 14. 

Creek AVar commenced by the massacre at Fort Mims, August 30. 

British brig Boxer taken by the Enterprise, September 5. 

Perry^s victory on Lake Erie, September 10. 

The battle of the Thames, Canada, October 5. 

The battle of Chrysler's Field, Canada, November 11. 

1814 The battle of Tohopeka, the last of the Creek War, March 27. 
American frigate Essex taken by the Phoebe and Cherub, March 28. 
The battle of La Colle Mill, Canada, March 30. 

British brig Epei'vier taken by the Peacock. April 29. 

British sloop Keindeer taken by the American sloop Wasp, June 28. 

Fort Erie captured by the Americans, July 3. 

The battle of Chippewa, Canada, July 5. 

The battle of Lundy's Lane, or Bridgewater, Cana<la, July 2o. 

The first battle of Fort Erie, Canada, August 15. 

The battle of liladensburg, Maryland. August 24. 

The city of Washington taken by the British, August 24. 

British sloop Avon taken by the American sloop Wasp, September 1. 

McDonough's victory on Lake Champlain, September 11. 

The battle of Plattsburg, New York, September 11. 

The battle of North Point, Maryland, September 12, 



CHRONOLOGY OF THE UNITED STATES. 27 

1814 The battle of Fort McHenry, :\raiTl:uid, September 13. 
The battle of Fort Bowyer, Alalxuiia. 8epteml)er 15. 
The second battle of Fort Frie, Canada, September 17. 

The British driven f rom Pensacola by General Jackson, November 7. 
The battle on Lake Borgne, Louisiana, December 14. 
Hartford Convention, December. 

The battle nine miles from New Orleans, December 23. 
Treaty of peace between the United States and Great Britain. De- 
cember 24. 

1815 The battle of New Orleans, January 8. 

American frigate President captured by a British squadron, Jan- 
uary 15. 
The Cayanne and Levant taken by the Constitution, Febi'uary 20. 
Tlie British brig Penguin taken by the Hornet, March 23. 
War with Algiers declared by Congress, March. 
Commodore Decatur sent against Algiers, May. 
181(i Bank of United States re-chartei'ed for twenty years, April 10. 
Indiana admitted into the Union, December 11. 

1817 James ]\Ionroe iuangurated President, Marcli 4. 
Mississip]n admitted into the Union, December 10. 
The Seminoles and Creeks commenced depredations. 

1818 General Jackson went against the hostile Indians, March. 
Pensacola seized by General Jackson, May 24. 

Illinois admitted into the Union, December 3. 
1810 Alabama admitted into the Union, December 14. 

1820 Maine admitted into the Union, March 15. 

Florida cedcil to the United States by Spain, October. 

1821 Missouri admitted into the Union. August 10. 

1824 Lafayette visited the United States. August. 

1825 John Quincy Adams inaugurated President, ]\Iarch 4. 

182G Death of the two ex-presidents. Adams and Jefferson, July 4. 

1829 Andrew Jackson inaugurated President, March 4. 

1831 Death of ex- President Monroe, Jiilv 4. 

1832 "The Black Hawk War." "Nullification" in South Carolina. 

1833 Eemoval of tlie government funds from the United States Bank, 

October. 

1835 War with the Seminoles commenced. 

General Thompson and friends massacred by the Seminoles, Decem- 
ber 28. 
Major Dade and party massacred by the Seminoles, December 28. 

1836 Arkansas admitted into the Union, June 15. 

1837 Michigan admitted into the Union, January 26. 
Martin Van Buren inaugurated President, March 4. 
The battle of Okechobee, Florida, December 25. 

1841 William Henry Harrison inaugurated President, March 4. 
Death of William Henry Harrison, April 4. 

John Tyler inaugurated President, April (i. 

1842 The war with the Seminoles termin;ited. 
The "Dorr Rebellion" in Rhode Island. 

1845 Joint resolutions for the annexation of Texas signed. March 1. 
James K. Polk inaugurated President, March 4. 
Florida admitted into the Union, March 3. 
Texas admitted into the Union, December 29. 



28 INTRODUCTION. 

1840 'riiornton's part}' captured b}' the Mexicans, Texas, April 26. 
Fort Brown bombarded bv the Mexicans, Mav. 
The battle of Palo Alto, Texas, May 8. 
The battle of Kesaca de la Palma, Texas, May 9. 
Congress declared "war existed by the act of Mexico." May 11. 
Taylor crossed the Eio Grande and took Matamoras, May 18. 
Monterey, Mexico, surrendered to General Taylor. September '24. 
The battle of Bracito, Mexico, December 25. 
Iowa admitted to the Union, December 28. 

1847 The battle of Buena Vista, Mexico, February 23. 
The battle of Sacramento, Mexico, February 28. 

The surrender of Vera Cruz to General Scott, March 27. 
The battle of Cerro Gordo, Mexico, April 18. 
The battles of Contreras and Churubusco, Mexico, August 20. 
The battle of Molina del Key, Mexico, September 8. 
The battle of Chapultepec, Mexico, September 13. 
The city of Mexico entered by the Americans, nnder Scott, Septem- 
ber 14. 
The battle of Huamantla, Mexico, October 9. 

1848 Treaty of peace signed at Guadalupe Hidalgo, February 2. 
Wisconsin admitted into the Union, May 29. 

1849 Zacharv Taylor inaugurated President, March 5. 

1850 The death of President Taylor, July 9. 
Millard Fillmore inaugurated President, July 10. 
California admitted into the Union, September 9. 

1853 Franklin Pierce inaugurated President, March 4. 

1854 "Kansas-Nebraska Bill " passed, June. 

1857 James Buchanan inaugurated President, March 4. 

1858 Minnesota admitted into the Union, May 11. 

1859 Oregon admitted into the Union, February 14. 
John Brown's raid into Virginia, October 16. 

1860 Secession ordinance passed by South Carolina, December 20. 

1861 Secession of ^Mississippi, Florida, Alabama, Georgia, Louisiana, 

Texas, Virginia, Arkansas and North Carolina declared. 

Steamer Star of the West, off Charleston, fired into, January 9. 

Kansas admitted into the Union, January 29. 

"Southern Confederacy" formed at ^Montgomery, Alabama, Febru- 
ary 4. 

Jefferson Davis inaugurated President of the Confederacy. February 
18. _ 

Abraham Lincoln inaugurated President of the United States, 
March 4. 

Fort Sumter attacked by the Confederates, April 12, 13. 

President Lincoln calls for 75.000 troojDs, April 15. 

Volunteer troops attacked in Baltimore. April 19. 

The President issues a second call for troops. May 4. 

Confederate victory at Big Bethel, Virginia, June 10. 

Union victory at Romney, Virginia, June 11. 

Union victory at Booneville, Missouri, June 17. 

Meeting of Congress in extra session, July 4. 

Battle of Carthage, Missouri, July 5. 

Battle of Rich ^Mountain, Virginia. July 11. 

Battle near Centreville, Virginia, July i8. 



CHRONOLOGY OF THE UNITED STATES. 29 

1801 Confedenite Congress meets at Riclimond, July 30. 

Battle of Bull Run, Virginia, July 21. 

Battle of Dug .Spring, Missouri, August 2. 

Battle of Wilson's Creek, Missouri, August 10. 

Forts Hatteras and Clark, North Carolina, captured, August 29. 

Confederates take Lexington. Missouri. September 20. 

Battle of Edwards' Ferry, or Ball's Bluff, Virginia, October 21. 

Capture of Port Royal, entrance by Union fleet, November 7. 

Battle of Belmont, Missouri, November 7. 

Mason and Slidel taken from English steamer, November 8. 
1S(;2 Battle of Mill Spring, Kentucky, January 19. 

Fort Henry c-apiured l)y I^nion fleet, February (J. 

Roanoke Island captured by Union forces, February 8. 

Fort Donelson cajitured by Union forces, February l(i. 

Battle of Pea Ridge, Arkansas, March 6, 8. 

United States vessels, (!ongress and Cumbei'hind sunk by the Merri- 
mac, March 8. 

Engagement between the Monitor and Merrimac, March 9. 

Newbern, North C^arolina, cai)tured by Union trooj)S. March 14. 

Battle of Winchester, Virginia, March 23. 

Battle of Pittsburg Landing, or Sliiloh. Tennessee, April (i, 7. 

Capture of Island No. 10, Mississippi river, April 7. 

Fort Pulaski, (leorgia, captured by Union fleet, April 11. 

New Orleans captui-ed by Union forces, April 25. 

Battle of Williamsburg. Virginia, May 5. 

Norfolk, Virginia, suri'endered to the Unionists, May 10. 

CoJifederates retreat from Corinth, Mississippi, May 28, 29. 

Battle of Seven Pines or Fair Oaks, May 31, June 1. 

Memphis, Tennessee, surrendered to the Unionists, June 0. 

Seven days' contest on the Virginia peninsula, June 25 to July I. 

The President calls for 300. (I0() luore troops, July 1. 

Battle of Cedar Mountain, Virginia, August 9. 

Pope's battles between ^lamissas and Washington. August 23-30. 

Battle near Richmond, Kentucky. August 30. 

Invasion of Maryland by Lee's army. September 5. 

Battle of South Mountain, Maryland, September 14. 

llai-i)er's Ferry surreiulered to the Confederates, Se})tember 15. 

Battle of Antietam, Maryland, Sei)tendier 17. 

Battle of Munfordsville, Kentucky, September 17. 

Battle of luka. Mississi[)])i, September 19. 

Battl^i of Corinth, Mississi})pi, October 4. 

Battle of Perryville, Kentucky, October 8. 

Battle of Fredericksbui'g, Virginia, December 13. 

Union repulse at Vicksburg, Mississippi. I)ecend)er 29. 

Battle of Stone Iiiver, or Murfreesboro', Tennessee, Deceiidx'r 31. 
1803 The President's Emancipation Proclamation issued, January 1. 

Biittle of Murfreesboro' resumed and ended, January 2. 

Arkansas Post ca])tui'e(l by Union forces, January 11. 

Bombardment of Fort Sumter. South Carolina, Ai)i'il 7. 

Union cavalry raid, under Crierson, in Mississippi, Ai)rii. 

Battle at Port Oilison, Mississippi, May 1. 

Battle of Chancellorsville, Virginia, May 2, 3. 

Battle of Raymond, Mississippi, May 12. 



30 ■ INTKODUCTION. 

18H3 Union victory near Jackson. Mississippi, May 1-4. 

liattle of Champion Hill. Mississi})])i; Montana organized. May 16. 

Battle at Big Black River. Mississipi)i, May 17. 

Second invasion of Maryland by Lee's army, June. 

West Virginia admitted into the Union, June 20. 

Battle of Gettysburg. Pennsylvania, July 1,3. 

Vicksburg surrendered by the Confederates, July 4. 

Port Hudson surrendered by the Confederates. July 8. 

Great riot in ]Sew York, July 13, 10. 

Morgan defeated near Kyger's Creek. Ohio, July 31. 

Morgan captnred near New Libson. Ohio, July 2G. 

Fort Wagner, South Carolina, captured by Union troops, September 6. 

Battle of Chickamauga, Georgia, September 19, 20. 

Knoxville. Tennessee, invested by the Confederates, November 18. 

Union victory at Lookout Mountain, Georgia, November 24. 

Union victory at Mission Ridge, Georgia, November 25. 

Union victory at Knoxville, Kentucky, November 29. 

1864 The President orders a draft for more men, February 1. 
Battle of Olustee, Florida, February 20. 

Grant created Lieutenant-General, March 3. 

Fort De Russy. Louisiana, captured l)y Union troops. March 14. 

Battle of Cane River, Louisiana, ^March 26. 

Battle of Mansiield. or Sal)ine Cross Roads. Louisiana, A})ril 8. 

Battle of IMeasant Hill. Louisiana. April 9. 

Fort Pillow, Tennessee, captured by the Confederates. April 12. 

Plymouth, North Carolina, surrendered to the Confederates, April 20. 

Army of the Potomac commenced a forward movement, May 3. 

Battle of the Wilderness. Virginia, May 5. 7. 

]\Iarcli from Chattanooga against Atlanta commenced. May 8. 

Battle near Spottsylvania Court House, Virginia, May 7, 12. 

Battle of Resaca, Georgia. May 15. 

Battle of Newmarket, Vii'ginia, May 15. 

Army of the Potomac crossed to south side of the James, June 14. 

Battle between the Kearsarge and Alabama, June 19. 

Invasion of Maryland by Farly's army, July 5. 

Battle of Monocacy. Maryland, July 9. 

The President calls for five hundred thousand volunteers, July 18. 

Battles before Atlanta. Georgia, July 20, 22, 28. 

Chambersburo". Pennsvlvania. sacked and burned. Julv 30. 

Fxplosion of mine and Union rej)uloe at Petersburg. July 30. 

Confederates defeated in Mobile Bay. Alabama, August 5. 

Wei don railroad seized by Union troops, August 18. 

Atlanta. Georgia, captured by L^nion army. September 2. 

Battle of AVinchester. Virginia, September 19. 

Battle of Fisher's Hill, Virginia, September 22.- 

Battle of Cedar Creek. Virginia. October 19. 

Confederate ram Albemarle destroyed by torpedo. October 4. 

Plymouth, North Carolina, recaptured by Union troops. October 31 . 

Nevada admitted into the Union, October 31. 

Battle of Franklin, Tennessee, November 30. 

Battle near Nashville, Tennessee, December 16. 

Savannah, Georgia, cajitured by Union army, December 21. 

1865 Fort Fisher, North Carolina, ca])tured January 15. 



CHKONDHMiV (;F TllK UNITED STATES. 31 

1865 Constitutional Amendment abolishing slavery, January 31. 
Columbia. South Caroliiui, cai)tured, February 17. 
Charleston. South Carolina, captured by Union troops, February liS. 
Wilmington, North Carolina, captured bv Union troops, February 

22. 
Battle of Bentonville, North Carolina, ]\larch 10, 20. 
Battle near ([olds])oro', North Carolina, March 21. 
Battle of Fort Steadman, Virginia, March 25. 
Petersburg and Richmond ca])tured, April 3. 
Surrender of Lee's army, April 9. 
Mobile, Alabama, captui-ed by Union forces, April 13. 
President Lincoln assassinated, April 14. 
Andrew Johnson inaugurated l^resideut. A|iril 15. 
Surrender of Johnston's army, April 2G. 
Jett'erson Davis captured in Georgia, May 10. 
Close of the Gi'eat Bebellion ; hist battle at mouth of liio Grande, 

May 12, 13. 
Slavery declared abolished, December 18. 

1867 Nebraska admitted into the Union, March 1. 

Alaska purchased from Bussia for *7, 200.000. June 20. 

1868 The House of liepresentatives impeached President Johnson, Febru- 

ary 24. 

The President was declared acquitted. April 26. 
1861) Ulvsses S. Grant imiugurated Pi-esident, March 4. 
1871 The "• Alabama Treaty '' was concluded. May 8. 

The great fire of C-hicago occurred, ()ctol)er 0, 10. 
1873 Second Chicago tire. 

1876 The Centennial Anniversai'V of American Independence. 

The " World's Fan- " in Ph'iladeli)hia, May 10 to Novembei- 10. 
Colorado admitted into the Union. August 1. 

1877 Rutherford B. Hayes inaugurated President, March 5. 

1881 James A. Garfield inaugurated President. March 4. 

James A. Garfield shot hy Charles J. Guiteau. at Washington, July 2. 
James A. Gai'field died at Long Branch, Septeml)er 1!». 
Chester A. Arthur inaugurated President, September 20. 

1882 'J'he Two Cents Postage^Bill introduced, December 8. 

1883 Centennial of the evacuation of New York by the l^ritish, Novem- 

ber 26, following the capture of Coniwallis at Yorktown. 

1884 James G. Blaine, the Republican nominee for president, defeated. 

A small majority giving New York State to G rover Cleveland, the 
nominee of the democratic party. 
1885-6 The "Canadian Fisheries" and the "Cutting Affair" claimed 
some attention from the State Department. The press and people 
prevented a wanton attack on the sister republic of Mexicto. 



PART II. 



CHRONOLOGY OF ILLINOIS. 



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[TE origin of tlie name Illincjis is variously credited. Some 
persons maintain that the early French explorers called it 
/.s/e a'fi,e JVois or JVut hiau(h while others are equally 
certain that the aborigines applied the name niini or Land 
of tixiperior Men. The first ]:)arty state that, while the 
ex])lore7's were en yoxte down the Mississi])pi, they camped 
on an island covered with a heavy growth of pecan trees, 
and there gfave this name to the countrv. The second 
party give the authority of Algonquin annals for the word 
Tl'tnrw(>l\ meaning men, and also quote the Otciiijiwe and C-ree adajita- 
tion of the word Jnln'ncol' and Itjlntiri)l\ as a})j>lied to the })rairie Indians 
in the same manner as Chicagok was ap]ilied to the red settlers along 
C/hicago river and their neighl)orli()()(l. This latter definition is accepted 
with very just reason ; for the once ])()wei'ful confedeiacy of tlie Illinois 
was in truth a race of superior Indians. This confederacy comprised 
the Tamaroas, Michigans, Kaskaskias, (Jahokas and Peorias, with 
representatives of the Miamis and Delawares, wiio, l^etween 1670 and 
1675 retur'ned from the West and settled in this State. Some years 
]>rior to ir>7<», in HJSS, those tribes inhabited the country south of lakes 
Erie and JMichigan, but were driven westward beyond the Mississippi 
by the Iroquois, where their eight towns stood in 1670, when Father 
Manjuette visited St. Es])rit, on Lake Superior. In 1673 Marcpiette 
and .foliet met them here, and two years later the former established 
the Mission of the Immaculate Conce])tion among them at Kaskaskia, 
seven miles below the present town of Ottawa. Four years after the 
establishment of this mission, in 1671>, La Salle found at least six thou- 
sand persons tlierc^ and four hundred and sixty lodges; and there they 
resided until the Pottawatomie war. when the power of the confederacy 
was shattered at Starved P,ock. The Sacs and Foxes inhabited the 
northwestern part of this State, and in later years became notorious as 
the allies of tlie Eno'lish. In 1S32 there were twelve Sac families and 
eight Foxes; while Kickapoos, Shawnees, Mascoulins, J^iankishaws, 
Pottawatomies, Otchipwes and Ottawas were represented in other })arts 
of the State, as related in the histoiy of tlie county. 

1055 First li'oquois Invasion of Illinois. 
1671 Exploration by Nicholas Perrot. 
]67Si Exploration by Fathers Allouez and Pablon. 

32 



CHRONOLOGY OF ILLINOIS. 33 

1G73 Return of the Illinois tribes. 
Exploration by Louis Joliet. 
Exploration by Father Mar()uette. 
Marquette's A'oyage up the Illinois and Desplaines Rivers. 

1674 Establishment of the Mission of the Immaculate Conception near 

Utica. La Salle county. 

1675 Death of Marquette. May IS. 

1680 Fathers Ribourde and Membre at Starved Rock. 

Chevalier La Salle takes possession of Illinois for France. 

La Salle at Lake Peoria, January 3. 

La Salle returned to Fort Frontenac (Canada.) 

Henry Tonti. the Italian, and fifteen men at Fort Crevecoeur. 

Second Invasion of Illinois by the Irocpiois. 

Father Louis llennepin left Fort Crevecanir in February for the 
Uppei' Mississippi . 

Father Riboui'de murdere<l by Kickapoo Iiulians. 
1680 Authony Au([uel and Michael Ake explored the Illinois river country. 

Tonti retui'ued to (Ireen Bay. 

Annihilation of the Illinois and Tamaroas by the Iroquois. 

La Salle returned to Illinois. 
1682 Building of Fort St. Louis. 

La Salle descended the Mississippi, and named the country Louisiana. 
1682-7La Salle visited France; brought out a colony to the Gulf States; 

explored New Mexico. 
1687 La Salle and twenty men left Fort St. Louis (Matagorda Bay) for 
Illinois, January 12. 

Assassination of La Salle's nephew by Du Ilaut and Leotat, en route 
to Illinois. 

Assassination of La Salle by Du Haut and Leotat. 
168- Tonti's expedition in search of La Salle and colonists. 

1689 Execution of Du Haut and Leotat, the assassins. 

1690 The Mission of the Immaculate Conception removed from Old Kas- 

kaskia. or Fort St. Louis, on the Illinois river, to Kaskaskia, six 
miles above the mouth of the Kaskaskia river. 

1690-lSettlement of Cahokia, five miles below St. Louis city, near mouth 
of Cahokia. 

1698 Kaskaskia founded by Rev. Father Gravier. Father Pinet at Ca- 
hokia. 

1712 M. Crozat, of Paris, granted a monopoly of trade in Illinois. 

1717 Settlement of St. Philip, forty-five miles from Cahokia. 

Philip Renault, 1719. 
M. Crozat surrendered his charter. Company of the West organized. 

1718 Settlement of Fort Chartres, twelve miles above Kaskaskia, by Mis- 

sissippi Company . 
Settlement of Kaskaskia, six miles above confluence of Kaskaskia 

and Mississippi. 
Settlement of Prairie du Rocher, near Fort Chartres. 

1720 Philip Renault introduced Negro slaves into Illinois. 

1730 Total population of settlements: 1*0 French families, 200 French 
traders. 600 converted Indians. 

1750 Father Vivier preaching to the Illinois tribes. He places the popu- 
lation of the five French villages at 1,100 whites, 300 blacks, and 
60 red savages. The three Indian villages did not then contain 



34 INTKODUCTION. 

more than 800 souls, all tokl. There was not a settlement between 
the Arkansas and Illinois rivers at that date. 

1765 The French flag replaced by the British flag on Fort Ohartres, Octo- 
ber 10. 
Pontiac and two hundred French families settled on the Kankakee, 
near Wilmington, 

1769 Pontiac assassinated by Illinois Chief at Joliet Mound after the 
Council. Extermination of the Illinois. 

1773 The Illinois Land Company organized. Purchased lands from the 
Peorias and Kaskaskias. 

1775 The French trader Viviat organized the Wabash Land Company of 

Virginia, aided by Pere M. Clibault, July 4, Total defeat of the 
British, 

1776 Shabbonee bom near Wilmington, Illinois, 

1778 La Ville de Meillet founded near Lake Peoria. 

Capture of Kaskaskia by the Americans under Colonel George Kogers 
Clarke. 

M. Clibault negotiates for the surrender of Vincennes, tlie establish- 
ment of American courts, etc. 

Establishment of the county of Illinois in October. John Todd ap- 
pointed Lieutenant-Commander by Patrick Henry, December 12. 

1779 Surrender of the l^ritish Grovernor and General Hamilton (the hair- 

buyer) to General Clarke, February. 

1780 The Illinois and AA'abash Land Companies consolidated, 

1784 Virginia ceded all her territory north of the Ohio to the United 

States, when a territorial form of government was instituted, 
1787 Ordinance for the government of the Northwestern Territory, 
Major-General Arthur St, Clair appointed Governor by Congress, 
Illinois a county of Indiana Territory. 
1796 J. V>. Poiute au Sable, a resident of Chicago. 
Old Peoria abandoned. 

1804 Building of Fort Dearborn at Chicago. 
Treaty with Sacs and Foxes. 

1805 First mail route (Vincennes to Cahokia) established. 

1809 The Territory of Illinois organized. John Boyle, of Kentucky, ap- 
pointed Governor by President Madison. Boyle declined this 
})osition, when it was offered to Ninian Edwards. 
St, Clair and Eandolph counties only political divisions of Ter- 
ritory, 

1811 Peace Convention with Pottawatomies at Peoria. 
Battle of Tippecanoe, November 7. 

1812 Building of Fort Russell, near the present village of Edwardsville. 
Massacre of Fort Dearborn, August 16. 

Governor Edwards' militia attack the Pottawatomie village at Peoria, 
August. Captain Craig burned Peoria, November. 

1813 General Howard's command of nine hundred men build Fort Clarke, 
at Peoria. 

1814 Illinois Herald established at Kaskaskia. 
Governor Clarke's expedition up the Mississip])i. 

The Sixty-sixth Illinois Rangers' terrific figiit near Rock Island. 
Major Taylor, Captains Rector and Whiteside attack the English 

and Indians near Rock river. Defeat of the Americans, 
Peace of Ghent, December 24. 



CHKONOLOGY OF ILLINOIS. 35 

1816 Treaty of St. Louis. Lands between Illinois and Mississij)pi rivers 
ceded. 

1818 Fort Clarke destroyed by fire. 

Territorial Legislature petitioned Congress for admission as a State 

in January. 
Tbe Enabling Act was passed April IS. 
Convention of Kaskaskia, July. 
Illinois admitted, December 3. 

Change of northern boundary so as to secure Chicago. 
Adoption of whipping, stocks, pillory, and gibbet for punishment 

of criminals. 
First State election. Shadrack Bond, Governor ; Pierre Mesnard, 

Lieutenant-governor. 

1819 Peoria reoccupied and settled by American citizens. 

A^andalia. tlie seat of government. (Removed to Springfield in 
1837.) 

1820 Reverend J. M. Peck was the first educated Protestant minister in 

the State. He settled in St. Clair county. 

1821 Appropriation of $10,000 by State Legishiture for survey of Illinois 

and Michigan canal. 
Incorporation of the Bank of Illinois. 
Henry R. Schoolcraft and party at Fort Joliet. 

1822 The slavery and anti-slavery questions raised for election purposes. 

1824 Direct mail route from Vandalia to Springfield ; and to Chicago in 

1832. 
Aggregate vote polled, 11,612. 
The proposition to make Illinois a slave State defeated at the polls 

by 1,800 votes. 

1825 Lafayette accepted invitation of Assembly and visited Kaskaskia in 

February. 
Bills for the support of schools and construction of roads by pub- 
lic tax passed. 

1826 Sanganash, or Billy Caldwell, appointed Justice of Peace of Peoria 

cou nty . 
Congress granted 800,000 acres of land to the State to aid in build- 
ing the canal. 

1827 Winnebago War under Chief Red Bird. General Cass, of Michigan, 

visited Illinois. 

1828 Line of Illinois and Michigan canal resurveyed. 

The Methodist Ejuscopal college, Lebanon, established. First in 
State. 

1830 The legal rate of interest established. Previously 150 per centum 

was reached. 

1831 Criminal code adapted to penitentiary punishment. 

Black Hawk established himself upon his disputed territory. 

General Gaines, commanding 1,500 Illinois volunteers, destroyed the 
Indian town, and forced Black Hawk's people to cede all lands east 
of the ^Mississippi, and settle on the west side of the river. 

1832 General Zachary Taylor, Abraham Lincoln, Jeff Davis and Lieu- 

tenant Robert Anderson, at Dixon, Illinois, in re Black Hawk's 

war. 
Black Hawk recrossed the Mississi])pi to war on the whites. 
Building of Fort Joliet. 



3(5 INTRODUCTION. 

183'^ (iovenior Keviiolds collected 1.800 volunteers under comnuind of 
]ii-ig!i(lier-(ieueral Wliiteside. This command destroyed Prophets- 
town, and })i-oceeded to join General Atkinson's division. The 
flight from Stiliman's Kun was one of the comicalities of this war. 
The assault on Apple Kiver fort. June, 183:2. Black Hawk and 
150 wai'riors defeated by 25 men. (ienerals Henry and Atkinson 
at the battle of Eock river. Three hundred savages killed and 50 
made prisoners, iigainst 17 whites killed and 12 wounded. Black 
Hawk and his special warriors, who escaped from the Rock river 
affair, were captured by the Winnebagoes and handed over to 
(ieneral Street. He was interned in Fortress Monroe with other 
hostile Sacs, until June 4, 1833. when the chief and his party 
were conveyed to Rock Island. Illinois, and there set at liberty. 
He settled near Des Moines, Iowa. In 1838 this old ally of the 
British died. 

Massacre of the settlers on Indian ci'eek. 

Rachel and Sylvia Hall captured by Indians. Ransom, 12,000 
and a number of horses. 

1833 Treaty of Chicago. 

1834—5 Beginning of Governor Duncan's administration. Ajjpropriations 
aggregating i|10,230,0()0 made by the State. Town lot fever. 
Railroads for every man, or a money compensation. Legislators 
magnificently reckless. 

1834 First payment of annuity, at Chicago, under treaty of 1833, in 

October. 

1836 The construction of the Illinois and Michigan canal commenced. 

1837 Elijah P. Lovejoy, Abolitionist, mobbed and killed at Alton, No- 

vember 7. 

1838 The first locomotive run on Northern Cross railroad. November 8. 
Thomas Carlin elected Governoi', opposed by Cyrus Edwards, Whig. 

1839 The Illinois Institute for Deaf and Dumb was founded, and the 

buildings erected at Jacksonville in 1842. 

1840 Settlement of the Mormons at Nauvoo. 

Improvement laws rejiealed, after a debt of 115,000.000 was con- 
tracted 



1841 



Arrest of Joe Smith, and his release by Judge Douglas. 

Pirates of the Prairie before the law. The regulators administering 



law 



1842 Second arrest of Joe Smith and his escape. 

Adam W. Snyder nominated for (governor; died previous to election, 

when Thomas Ford was nominated to oppose Duncan. 
T'he Mormon war. Joe Sniitli and Hiram Smith killed at Carthage. 
End of Nauvoo Mormonism. Septembei", 1840. The action of 
the Gentiles narrow and unconstitutional. The Mormon exiles 
reached Salt Lake, July 21, 1847. 
Woi'k on canal resumed l)y Illinois and Michigan Canal Com})any. 
184(3 Nine regiments (8,370 men) answered the call for troops to serve 
against Mexicans. Four regiments, or 3,720 men, accepted, 
(ienerals James Shields, Baker, Coffey, Harris, Hardin. Bissell, 
Houghton, McKee, are Uiirnes identified with this state in the 
Mexican war. 
1847 River and Harbor Coiiveiitioii at Chicago. Jnlv5. 
State Constitutional Convention. 



I~ 



CHRONOLOGY OF ILLINOIS. 3 

1847 The Illinois Hospital for the Insane was established bv the act of 

March 1, 1847. 

1848 Opening of the Illinois and Michigan canal. 

1850 The Galena railroad opened to Elgin. 

1851 In 1851 the hospital buildings were commenced near Jacksonville. 
1852-54 Railroad building era in the West. 

1855 Chicago the focal point of 2,933 miles of railroad. 

1858 The Chicago Eye and Ear Infirmary Association, in May. Was 

ma<le a state institution in 1871. 

1859 Selection of Lincoln's name for President at the Springfield caucus. 
18G0 Abraham Lincoln elected President. 

1801 Ten thousand volunteers offered before April 24. and -il^LOOO.Ono 
tendered by patriotic citizens. 
Captain Stokes and 700 men, of the Seventh Illinois Infantry, took 
10,000 stand of arms from St. Louis arsenal. 
1862 State Constitutional Convention. 

18G5 T'he Asylum for Feeble-minded Children established by the act of 
February 15. 
First steel rail rolled in America at Chicago, May 25, 18(15. 
Illinois was represented in her own regiments by 256,000 men, and 

in other states by about 30,000 men. 
Great State Fair at Chicago netted $25().0()0 for soldiers' aid and 
military jmrposes. 
1867 The Illinois Industrial University at Ilrbana was chartered. 

1869 The Norther.. Asylum for the Insane was established at Elgin. 

1870 State Constitutional Convention 

1871 Chicago destroyed by fire, October 9. The mimber of buildings 

burned was 17,450, and amount of direct loss, $190,000,000, of 
which $44,000,000 returned from insurance. 
State resumed control of Illinois and Michigan canah 

The events since ISTl are of such a character as to come under the 
head of ordinary news. The return of the Illinois and Michigan canal 
into possession of the state, its cession by the state to the general gov 
ernment, and the redemption of the ])nblic debt, or state bonds, form 
the leading- events. The great strikes of 1877, 1886, and the anarchist 
troubles at Chicago last year, while engaging nuich attentK)n troni the 
]H'ess, did not affect the course of business materially. Among the 
acts of the legislature, the most beneficent was tiiat regulating regis- 
tration and voting at Chicago. Though sectional in its direct influ- 
ence, it forms the entering wedge for equal justice tiiroughout the 
state. 



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DOCUMENTS AND BIOGRAPHY OF 
STARK COUNTY. 



CHAPTER I. 



TOPOGRAPHY AND NATURAL HISTORY. 




TAPvK COUNTY is Iwunded on tlie north hy nenrvand Bu- 
reau counties, on the south b\' Peoria county, on the west 
by Henry and Knox counties and on the east by Bureau 
and Marshall counties. The area is 288 square miles or 
184,820 aci-es, of which 1S2,B5!) acres were snrveyed, and 
180,125 acres assessed. The population in 1S8<» was 11,207, 
increased in 1885 to over 12,000. Toulon, the seat of jus- 
tice, is 14 miles from the southwest corner, 8-| miles from 
the northwest corner, t>-| from the extreme northwest cor- 
ner, 20|^ from the northeast corner, 20 miles from the south- 
east corner, and 8 miles from the south line, on tlie line of 
the R. I. & P. R. R. Wyoming, the leading commercial 
town, is equally outside the geograpliical center, l)ut has 
the advantages of two railroads, the R. I. & P. and the 
C. B. it Q. bi-anch between Buda and liushville. Lafayette 
is situated near the western county line, and Bradford near 
the east line, each having railroad facilities. Duncan, Castle- 
ton and Lombardville are villages on the C. B. ife Q., while 
Wady Petra and Stark are on the R. I. Oc P. R. R. The villages of 
Elmira, Osceola, Pleasant Green, Modena, Waldron, Camp Grove, Val- 
ley, Slackwater, Starwano and West Jersey are without railroad facil- 
ities. 

The surface of the county is undulating, except in the neighbor 
hood of Spoon river, where it is decidedly broken. Of the entire area, 
no less than 173,711 acres were under cultivation in 1885, and it may 
be said with truth that the total area offers one great fertile field of 
wealth to the cultivator. Along the streams and around old Osceola 
the primeval forest still stands, a reminder of the past. South of 
Toulon, too, the old, old woods continue sentinel, but throughout the 
county, the trees of fifty years ago have given place to ornamental 
grove's of walnut, elm, maple, and, in a few instances, red and white 
])ine. Osage orange hedges guard each field instead of the old rail 
fence ; large and elegant residences have taken the place of the 

43 




44 HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY. 

pioneers' homes ; Avell-kept floAver and vegetable gardens are common 
in the towns and villages, and are often seen in the country districts, 
wliile the mown lawn, always jileasing to the eye. greets the traveler 
in both town and country. Within tifty years this wilderness of waving 
prairie has been transformed into one of the most beautiful garden 
s]wts of Illinois. A few groves and the streams remain as landmarks 
of the olden time. 

Rivers and Streams. Spoon river has its head waters in 
Xeponsett township. Bureau county, where the stream known 
as "East Branch" rises, and in Kewanee township, Henry 
county, where the "West l)ranch has its source. The east fork entere 
Stark" county in three divisions, so to speak, the central stream 
being known as Silver creek. The streams unite in section 

10. Osceola, forming the East Branch. Hall creek flows into 
it in the northwestern Cjuarter of section 22, and Cooper's Defeat 
creek in the northeastern quarter of section 31. A confluence with 
the West Branch is formed just north of the village of Modena in Tou- 
lon township and thence to its estuary, the name Spoon river is ap- 
plied. In Essex township it receives the united waters of two creeks, 
flowing westward, known as Mud Run and Camping Pain and near the 
village of Slackwater receives the waters of West Indian creek. From 
this Spoon river flows through a tortuous channel to the parent Illi- 
nois, Avhich it entei*s at Point Isabelle, opposite Havana. In the days 
of the Indians it was known as " Feather River '" or Maquon. Its 
present name is said to have Ijeen given by Dr. Davison, the hermit, 
on account of a bayou resembling a spoon in the formation of its shores 
near what is now the village of Waterford in Fulton countv. 

Walnut creek has its source near Xekoma in Henry county, whence 
it flows southeast to West Jersey township, and thence to its confluence 
\vith Spoon river, just north of Rochester. Peoi'ia county. To the char- 
acter of the trees founl along this stream is to be attributed its name. 

Camping Run rises in Marshall county, east of Camp Grove, and 
dates its name l)ack to ante-railroad days, when prairie schooners 
anchored there, while their crews feasted round the camp flres. 

Indian creek rises just northeast of Galva, winds like a trail 
through Goshen. Toulon and Essex townships, and enters Spoon river 
in section 2S, Essex. Prior to the negotiation of the treaty of Chi- 
cago, a few Pottawattomie and mongrel Indian lodges were scattered 
along its banks, owing to which fact the pioneers of the county gave it 
this name. This creek is not to be confounded with Indian creek. La 
Salle county, where the massacre of settlers, by the British Indians, 
took place in 1832. 

Cooper's Defeat creek may be called the east Ijranch of the East 
Foi'k of Spoon river. It is a tributary of that stream, rising near Milo 
in Bureau county, and flowing east through Osceola townshi]). except 
for two miles where it wanders, as it were, through the nortiiern sec- 
tions of Penn township. The name is credited to a leamster of the 
surveying party, who never failed before to drive his hoi*ses across or 
through a creek, until tliis point was reached, as related in sketch of 
Penn township. 



TOPOGRAPHY AND NATURAL HISTORV. 45 

Muddy Run parallels ram])ino- Tlim. It also rises in Mai'shall 
county, flows through the southern sections of Vallev townshi]) and 
forms a confluence with (Janiping Run, near the nioutli of that stream 

Jack creek is the name given to a small stream I'li lining eastward 
to Spoon river, which it enters in the northwest quartei- of section 12, 
Toulon township. 

Fitch creek rises in Grove township, Knox county. Its various 
feeders flow generally eastward, forming the main stream near the 
west line of Goshen township, and watering the northwestern sections 
of that township. 

There are found in every division of the county numerous small 
streams, some of which flow from springs. As noticed in the historv 
of the townships, many ponds or miniature lakes are found through- 
out the county. 

Altitudes^ soil and tree^. — The altitudes are not very marked, vet it 
is stated that in the neighhorhood of Lawn Ridge the highest elevation 
in the State is reached. At Bradford, too, a decided elevation occurs. 
Prof. E. W. Claypole's ])a])er on Buffalo and Chicago, read some 
time ago before the American Association for the Advaiu'ement of 
Science, contained a suggestion which goes to show what nari-ow 
margins nature sometimes makes in her geogra})hical and geological 
ai'rangements. It also shows what a narrow escape Ghicago has had 
from a flood that would have revealed no friendly Ai-ai-at and that 
would have discouraged the most resolute of doves on its quest for 
terra-firma. The professor's statement in brief is tiiat the great lakes 
are banked u])on a table land about r»00 feet above the sea, and that 
the drainage flows over the dam at Black Rock, the lowest ])oint. 
Hence a dam twenty-five feet high across the river at Black Rock 
would be sufficient to tlii-ow the waters of the upper lakes into the 
Mississippi by the Illinois river. The professor complacently stated 
that the result of this would be to annihilate the St. Lawrence river, 
make Buffalo the head of navio'ation. aiul Ghica<>'o the outlet. In 
other words, the conditions of Chicago and Buffalo would have been 
reversed had the rim of the basin at l)lack Rock been originally a few 
feet higher. 

A large portion of the county is prairie, but on account of the 
numerous intersecting streams, the prairies usually contain but few 
square miles of area. There are, however, some large prairies in 
townshi])s 12 and 13, range 7. The soil is a common dark-colored 
loam, and when properly drained and cultivated is everywhere ])ro- 
ductive, except the '' barrens," a small ti'act of sandy soil. The subsoil 
is usually a brown or yellow clay. The soil of* the timber lands along 
the water-courses is usually of less depth and lighter in color. Along 
the water courses comuKm oak, hickory, ash, maple, black walnut, 
butternut, cottonwood, sycamore, coffee tree, buck-eye, box-elder, red 
bud, wild ])lum, cherry and crab ajjple trees abound. 

Eeonoiide (Jeologji. — Let us fancy ourselves visiting Stark county, 
away back in the days when the foundations of the present coal beds 
were made. What do we behold? An immense marsh stretching to the 
horizon — a wilderness of reeds and weeds, and mosses, inhabited, if we 



4r; HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY. 

iimv SO speak, with amphibians, alive with ten thousand species of 
re])tile ; but not a man in tlie whole great waste — not even a bird flew 
hither to look in upon the loathsome wilderness. How manv years 
this stagnant sea required its drying ])rocess to continue cannot now be 
cU'termined with certainty. Tliere ai-e at least five to eight feet of 
vegetable debris requii-ed to form one foot of coal, and since there are 
thi-ee feet, representing the seam in this county, it must have required 
t went v-f our feet in depth of rich vegetable debris to form our ])resent 
coal bed, and the suljsequent growth or carriage hither of sufficient 
material to make that natural hydraulic j)ress which pressed this coal into 
its shape and texture. Volumes might be written on the formation of 
oui' ])rairies. of our coal beds, of tlie great trains of sand and rock and 
forests which the drift brought hither to press down the original 
stagnant mass of vegetable matter, water and the animal life which 
they supported ; hut where is the use of speculative wi'iting { Our 
reason points out one natural method l)v which our rich prairie soil 
and everything beneath it were formed, namely, an immense lake, 
gradually filling up of the same by sediment and shore growth, slow 
lifting- up of lake bottom and annual decay of vegetable debris ; slower 
drainage and tlien the jirairie. 

The quaternary divisions of the county are the alluvium and drift, 
the former com|)rising all the bottom lands or stream valleys from a 
few rods to 6,000 feet in width ; the latter comprising a series of 
brown and blue clays with sand or gravel mixings with granite 
bowlders of ancient rock — the uplands. This drift varies in dejith 
from twenty to sixty feet. Through this formation an abundant 
su]i])ly of good water is reachefl before the bed-rock is tapped. 
Tliroughout the county there is no exposure of rock other than the 
lower series of coal measures. Of this series No 7 shows on the north 
line of section 10, township 14, range 7, along the east branch of Spoon 
river. In this section the S. C. Francis shaft shows sixty-four and one- 
fourth feet. This was sunk in 1868, and from the record shows the 
following formation : 

Yellow clay, 2 feet; red sand, 2 feet; limestone (nodular), 2-^ feet; 
clay, light- colored, 7 feet ; clay shale, 2 feet ; sandstone, 8 inches ; blue 
clay shale, 8 feet ; dark colored clay shale, 5f feet ; coal, 2 inches ; 
blue clay shale, 12 feet ; impure limestone, 3 inches ; clay shale, 8 feet ; 
impure limestone, 2 inches ; blue clay shale, 1^ feet ; dark colored clay 
shale, 3 feet ; coal, 2 feet, 7 inches ; clay (penetrated). If feet. 

In section 32, townsliip 1<>, range 7, the exposure was worked. In 
section 21, Townshi]^ 14, range 7, series No. 6 is far below the surface 
Mithout a sign of outcro}). 

In the southeastern part of section 3, township 14, range 10, No. 
6 coal appears in the l)luft of West Branch, along the creek to the 
southeastern corner of section 16. This series has been worked along 
the western ])lateau, where there are several outcrops above water 
level of over four feet in depth with a regular clay pai'tition of two 
inches in thickness. 

In the southeastern part of section 3, township 14, range 6, No. 6 
coal appears on the bluff of AYest Branch. Along the creek to the 



TOPOGRAPHY AND NATURAL HISTORY. 47 

southeastern corner of section 16, this series has been worked along the 
western plateau, where there are several ontcro])s a])()ve water level of 
over four feet in depth with a regular clay partition of two inches in 
thickness. 

The mine of No. 6 series in township 14, range 7, section 28, on the east 
bank of the East Branch, ])i'esents a shaft of over ninetv feet, of which 
eighty-nine and two-thirds feet i)resent the following strata: Vellow 
clay, 8 feet; limestone, 4 feet ; light colored clay, 4^ feet ; light colored 
clay shale, S-Jfeet ; limestone 2|feet ; clay shale, 1(» feet ; coal, 2 inches ; 
soft black slate, 4 inches ; clay, 4^ feet ; sandstone, 22^ feet ; clay shale, 
feet ; limestone, 4 feet ; light colored clay shale, feet ; green clay 
shale, 2i feet ; dark colored clay shale, 3 1-6 feet ; impure limestone, H 
foot ; dark colored clay shale, 2i feet ; coal vein, 3 to 6 feet, with a 
clay ])artition of 3 inches in de])th. The slips or " horsel)acks" peculiar 
here tend to retard miners' enterprise ; but with the coming of the coal 
cutter and other modei'u ap])liances this o1)stacle will vanish. 

In the northern portion of section 1, township 13, range 6, a few 
shafts have been made to the depth of several feet. Near Modena, at 
a depth of ab<^ut thirty feet, a 1-foot vein was struck. Westward, on 
section 4, the Jack creek beds have been worked, and in sections 2, 11, 
and 12, the out-crop appears in the banks eight to ten feet above water- 
mark, ^ 

Near the north line of section 14, Toulon townshiji, about twelve feet 
above the water of a little rivulet, the following formation may be 
seen: Sandstone ; clay shale, 15 feet ; im})ure limestone, clay shale, 
black slate, coal, average 3 feet ; clay partition, coal, 1^ foot ; clay 
shale, partial outcrop of sandstone. The strata above the three feet 
vein of coal is replete in its deposit of imperfect fossils, such as the 
rardin ia fragilis^ pleurotomaria grayviUensis, and fossils of fish. On the 
section coal and a strata somewhat similar to that given above, are 
outcropping. From section lo along the courses of the river and 
tributary rivulets to sections 25 and 26, where the seam is over 
twent}" feet above watei*-mark, the miner has left traces of his work, 
and backward from tlie stream on section 26, coal has been found at a 
depth of sixty-nine feet in solid strata, four to five feet in thickness, 
wdiile just east the miners had to sink a shaft to a depth of ninety-six 
feet to reach the seam. 

In Essex township, section 23, the following strata- a])])ears in a 
shaft sunk a few years ago : Clay, 21 feet ; cla\' shale, 8 feet ; lime- 
stone, 1 foot ; clay shale, interslated. If foot ; coal, 2^ feet, with thin clay 
partition. Although this belongs to series No. 6, horsebacks or slips 
render mining for moi'e than local use, un})rofitable. A seam of series 
No. 2 coal is found on section 17, at the base of the bluifs of Indian 
creek, which was very little woi-ked u]) to four years ago. 

In West Jersey township, on section 11), coal of the No. 4 Illinois 
series has been struck at a depth of fifteen feet. Here the vein is from 
four to six feet deep, underlaid by about ten inches of im[)ure cannel 
coal, and this by a clay l)ed. Fish and ])lant fossils abound here, 
including one almost perfect form of iha palaa>)iiscii-'<. The teeth and 
imperfect form of a diplodus have also been exhumed. The coal 



48 HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY. 



ohtained is very gootl. On section 17 a one and one-lialf foot vein of 
the Ts'o. 2 series was found at a depth of fiftN^-nine feet. It lies in the 
bed of the creek, and is woi'kable only at low water. On section No. 10, 
Toulon, a ([uany yields al)un(hintly of building stone of more than fair 
(jualitv. On Wahiut creek, in West Jersey townshij), a quari-y on 
section 20 produced a fair hard sandstone, very well ada])ted to buildei's' 
uses. 

The rock in sections 21 and 22, Osceola townsliip, is a limestone six 
to twelve feet thick, of thin layers. This is an uneven, (Iral)-colored. 
weatiier-proof stone, found in tiie first section, its lower strata resting 
thirtv-nine feet above a two-inch coal seam and sixt^^-three feet above 
a two-feet seven inches vein of No. 7 series coal. As a stone for build- 
ing purposes, or for lime for building j)ur})oses, it cannot be excelled. 

The sandstone measures of Elmira township ai'e f)utcropping, and 
hidoen beds of this valuable rock abound. In section 1<> is found a 
light-colored soft rock about twelve feet above a measure of No. series 
coal. In Toulon township, section 14. tiie sandstone is l)elow No. i) 
series coal, but of a very superior quality, and approaching the Parma 
stone of Michigan in compactness. 

In Essex townshij), section 14, a sandstone quarry of the finest 
grade has been worked for some years, wliile that on section 17 (from 
which the stone was taken fo^* l)uikling the first stone house in the 
neighborhood years ago) yields plenty of good material for ordinary 



ouildings. 



Osceola, Elmira. Toulon, and West Jersey furnish the greater part 
of the coal su})ply ; Essex furnishes a little, and A'alley less ; Penn and 
Goshen are reported non-productive m the matter of coal ; but what 
future exploration may credit these townships with in this connection 
must be left to the future. 

The miners' estimate of coal deposits is l.OOU.UOO tons of coal to 
every section or square mile per foot of thickness of seam, which, it 
])laced at an average of a three-feet seam, as in this county, would give 
108.000,(100 tons to each township, or 864,000,000 tons to the entire 
county of No. 6 series coal alone, exclusive of series Nos. 1, 2, -1 and 7. 
some (^f which have not yet l)een ex])lored at all, and others only })ar- 
tially. Allowing five tons per annum to each voter in the county in 
1885, or 12,000 tons annually, there is a supply of No. 6 coal here to 
viehl them fuel for 72,0(>0 years. 

ArcJuHjhjgy — The general prevalence in IlUnois of the existence of 
ancient mounds has excited no inconsiderable interest in the mmds of 
scientists since their discovery was first made. Nearlv every county 
has these interesting vestiges of a numerous people long since gone to 
rest, about whose history there pends a veil — an impenetrable mystery 
— of whom the later Indian tribes possessed neither knowledge, myth 
nor tradition. Those in iStark county are as numerous as elsewhere, 
for s})eai' and arrow-heads, human l)ones, and sometimes pottery have 
been found here. They are so ccmimon as to excite little interest among 
those who have resided in the county for any length of time, and are 
driven over and plowed up as if Ijut a rise in the ground, not all that 
remains of the history of a past race. A piece of native copper AA^as 



TOPOGKAPHY AND NATUKAL HISTORY. 49 

found in blue clay, twenty-five feet below the surface, on Samuel Sturm's 
farm, one mile south of Bradford. In other places several evidences 
of the drift, as well as of prehistoric settlements, have been uiieai'thed. 
T. M. Shallenberger, now of Nebraska, W. II. Adams, of Eochester, 
Peoria county, and others, have given the study of arehfeology some 
attention; but their research in this county has been limited to surface, 
I'ather than excavatorv work. Prior to the removal of the Indians, 
thev visited all tlieir old camp-grounds and villages, and leveled even 
with the ground all the little mounds denoting the graves of their 
dead. 

W. II. Adams, in a pa])('r addressed to the regents of the Smith- 
sonian Institute, and pul)lished in 1885, on the mounds in the valley 
of Spoon river, says : " On the north side of Si)oon river, seventv- 
five yards distant, eighty rods west of the east line, and twenty rods 
south of the north line of section 12, townshi]) 11 north, vange 4;^ 
east of the fourth ])rincipal meridian, is a round numnd about thirty 
feet in diameter, called l)y those in the neighborhood a '•hogl)ack.''' 
On the highest of this hogback, at the surface, is some evidence of fire. 
The evidences of a former hi'e increase very rapidly. At a depth of 
twelve to sixteen inches I found live skeletons, nearly all the bones of 
which were calcined by hre, and numy of them entirely consumed. 
One of the skulls lay to the north, one to the northwest, one to the 
southwest, one to the south, and one to the northeast. With the bones 
were fragments of sandstone bui"ned red. At or near each skull, and 
neaiiv on a line between the point of the shoulder and ear, was a 
water-worn ])ebble, excei)t in one instance, and that was an angular 
piece of flint. The ])el)b]es had not l)een acted u])on by the lire, so 
that they evidently must have been placed there after the intense heat 
of the "tire had ' subsided. From the appearance of the earth 
one would be strongly inclined to believe that the Are in this instance 
had been one of unusual intensity. From the position of the skulls to 
each other, the feet of one body would reach to his neighbor's head, 
if laid at full length. One of tlie skulls was rather thinner than those 
we usually And in other mounds. Some of the teeth evidently be- 
longed to' a person of great age; others of the teeth were very small, 
but I cannot say that they belonged to an infant. The skulls were in 
fragments, the' largest piece obtained being about t\vo inches scjuare. 
On another hogback, east of the one described, commencing on sec- 
tion 12, township 11, range 4 east, extending across the northwest cor- 
ner of section 7, township 11, range 5, and also some distance on sec- 
tion *), township 11, are thirteen common round mounds, varying in 
height from eighteen inches to live feet. As far as examined these 
are burial mounds, and in one I found nineteen skeletons. ^ Tiiis one 
was forty-five feet in diameter and five feet in height. The l)ones 
were in a fair state of ])reservati()n. I o})ened four or five of this 
grouj), and in each were found pieces of trap rock from one and one- 
half to two inches square ; ])ieces of Imrned sand I'oclv, small watei'- 
worn pebbles, and in the largest mound a very small IVagment of red 

potterv." 

A stick of cedar was exhumed in March, 18(52, and brought to 



50 HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY. 

Toulon by E. S. Kincade. It was foiiiKl while digging- a well in 
the eastern part of the coimt3% twenty-eight feet. below the surface. 
While placing a sewer across'^Main St., Toulon, in June, 1SS4, one 
of the two trees, cut near the site of the court house, and placed there 
l>v Oliver Whitaker over forty years ago to bridge the slough, was 
unearthed. The piece taken out is about three feet in length. This 
was smoothed off and is held as a relic of the early years of the 
county. 

StofiH , Flood a Jill JJrouyht. — The big snow of 1 830 will be vividly re- 
membered l)y all the old settlers. The snow began falling on the night of 
the 29th of December, and continued to fall for three days antl nights, 
until it reached an average depth of about four feet, but drifting in ])laces 
as high as from eighteen to twenty feet. Great suffering was ex})erienced 
in consequence. The settlers relied for their daily food upon Indian corn 
which they were enabled to raise, together with wild game which was 
abundant "at that time. Plenty of the former was raised to su])ply the 
wants of all until the next season's cro]); but when the snow fell very 
little had been gathered. Game could not l)e had. The great depth 
of snow was a barrier to all ti'avel. and it may be well imagined the 
sufferings of the people were very great indeed. This was the heavi- 
est snow that ever fell in Illinois within the memory of the oldest 
settler of this part of the State. According to the traditions of the 
Indians, as related to the })ioneers. a snow fell from fifty to seventy- 
live years before the settlement by the white people, which swept 
away the numerous herds of buffalo and elk that roamed over the vast 
prairies at that time. This tradition was verified by the large num- 
l)er of bones of these animals found in different localities on the prai- 
ries when first visited by the whites. The deep snow is one of the 
landmarks of the pioneer. 

The cold winter of 18-t'2-3. commenced on Xov. 7. 1842, and con- 
tinued until May. 1843. This season of ice may be said to end the 
days of profitable hunting in Illinois. 

The storm of June, 1877, swept across West Jersey, Elmira, and 
j)arts of Goshen, blowing off house i-oofs and rooting \\\) trees. The 
county is not in tlie storm trail. 

The greatest flood ever known in the county was that of February 
16, 1883. xVs a general rule bridges were swept away, and in the 
wreck of the l)rid"-eon the Toulon and Wvomino- road three men nearlv 
lost their lives. In the s])ring of 1831 there was a great flood conse- 
({uent on the break of the "Big Snow." and in the fall of 1835 another 
flood. 

The drought of 188() has no pai'allel m the history of the county. 
It was broken on August 12th. 13th, lltli and 15th. On the night of 
the 15th a rain and thunder storm swe])t over the county, but at nine 
o'clock the moon ])eered down from a l)right blue sky, while a rainbow 
of peculiai'ly bi'illiant colors illumined the west. The average rainfall 
during the fifteen years, including 187"). for the months of April, ^lay, 
June and July, was 15.(59 inches, the minimum 8.59 (in 1884) and the 
maximum 22.16 inches (1883). For the corresponding period of 1886 
the average was 4.82, or less than one-third of the average of the fif- 



TOPOGRAPHY AND NATURAL HISTORY. 51 

teen years. The rainfall of July was only 1.5 inches, while the aver- 
age for the same month during the fifteen years was 3.84 inches. 

Zo()h)(jy. — Of the s])ecies of native animals that once roamed the flow- 
ery prairies and wild forests of the county, but few of the smaller remain, 
and none of the larger. Of the latter we cannot even find a specimen 
preserved in taxidermy. The buffalo which grazed u])on the verdant 
])rairies has been di'iven westward. With or before it went the ])eaver, 
elk, badger, panther, black wolf and black bear. Some animals which 
were quite numerous have become very rare, such as the gray fox, the 
catamount, otter, lynx, coon, and the Virginia deer. 

There still remain many of tlie different species, mostly inhabiting 
the country adjacent to the Illinois and Spoon rivei's and a few of the 
other larger streams. These are, however, fast disappearing, and be- 
fore long will be known only in history, as are the deer, the beaver, 
and the l)ison. Among those still to be found here, as tra-mps, are the 
gray wolf, the opossum, raccoon, mink, muskrat, the common weasel, 
the small brown weasel, skuidc, woodchuck, or Maryland marmot, 
prairie mole, common shrew mole, meadow and deer mouse, and the 
gray rabbit. Of squirrels there are the gray timber sijuii-rel. the fox, 
chi])munk. the large gray prairie squirrel, the striped and the spotted 
prairie squirrel, and the beautiful flyiug scjuii'rel. The dai'k-brown and 
the reddish bat are common. ( )ther small animals have been fouiul 
here which have strayed from other localities. A.n American eagle, 
weighing eleven j)ounds and measui'ing seven feet from tij) to i\\) of 
wings, was killed by Robert (-iiurch, in October, lS(iT, neai' Indian 
creek bridge, on the Toulon and Lafayette road. The bii-ds common 
to Illinois find a home in this county, and between residents and visit- 
ors, show themselves in multitudes. On Ueceml)er 18. 1S84, a large 
wolf was killed by Jason Oziah, on the Nowlan farm, west of Toulon. 
On May 23, 1885, E. H. Bates, of (Xsceola, presented County Clerk 
\/alker with fourteen young wolf scalps, and received $24 bounty. 
In S])oon river and tributary streams the fisherman is sometimes 
rewarded for skill and patience ; but like the wikl aniuuds the fish 
have almost disappearet 



CHAPTER II. 




INDIANS OF ILLINOIS. 

FIE origin of the American Indian is a subject of deep inter- 
est to the etlinoloo-ist, even as it is one of instruction and 
entertainment to the general reader. The ei'a of their 
establishment as a distinct and insulated people must be cred- 
ited to a ])eriod immediately subsequent to the division of 
the Asiatic .peo])le and the oi-igin of languages. No dou])t 
whatever can exist when the American Indians are regarded 
as of Asiatic origin. They are descended directly from the 
survivors of that people who, on being driven from their 
fair possessions, retired to the wilderness in sorrow, reared 
their children under the saddening influences of their 
unquenchable griefs, and, dying, bequeatiied them only 
the habits of the wild, cloud-roofed homes of their exile. 
From that time forward the America Indian, as we know 
him, has existed. 

That there were a widely ditferent people here is not dis]nited ; 
for there are existing numerous evidences of a civilization akin to that 
of the lumbering districts of the Canadas, ]\Iichigan and Wisconsin. 
The question of prehistoric settk^nents on the Pacific coast and the 
statement of tiie ])artial occupation of the Mississi])pi valley by Cau- 
casians in the dim past, are ])oints well sustained. M. L. Page du 
Pratz, a French savant, met, in his travels among the Natchez, the cel- 
ebrated and aged Indian antiquarian, Moucacht Ape, who, in 1745 
crossed the MTssissippi and reached the Pacific by the Columbia river. 
Moucacht related, among other experiences that, after visiting many 
nations, he shortly came to the last, a people one day's journey from the 
(xreat Water and'al)Out a league distant from the Beautiful I'iver. who 
were hiding themselves in the woods from white-bearded men who came 
everv vear in a i)ark for a vellow, stinking' wood, and to steal the 
young women foi' slaves. By tliis ])eople the traveler was at once 
received as a chief by his own family, '' because they thought with rea- 
son that one who had seen white men and many nations should have 
more mind than one who had never been from home and had seen 
none but red men." These bearded disturbers of their peace, the natives 
furtlier infoi-med him, went always clothed, no matter how warm tlie 
weather : their wea])ons also made a great noise and sent forth hre, 
and they came from where the sun sets. Seeing that it was the yel- 
low wood wliich seemed to l)ring theih there, following the counsel of 
the old men, the ])eo])le were fast destroying that odorous attrac- 
tion, so that they hoped in time they should be no more molested. 

52 



INDIANS OF ILLINOIS. 53 

Exceeding!}' curious to see these white-bearded men who were neither 
English, French, nor Spanish, Moucacht Ape entered heartily into a 
plan to attack those who should next come. It was now about the 
time of their annual arrival. All the families in the vicinity of their 
landing-])lace liad retired from the coast lest their young women should 
be captui-ed. Our hero had smelt gunpowder and was not afraid. 
Leaving their camp, near the Beautiful river, the warriors journeyed 
five days to a point on the coast where were two great i-ocks, between 
which em])tied into the sea a shallow stream on whose banks grew the 
yellow wood. It was between the t\v() rocks that the foreigners ran 
their vessel when they came ashoi'e. Seventeen days the warriors now 
waited the arrival of their prey. All had been arranged in council for 
the attack. Presently they espied the vessel in the distance, and hid- 
ing themselves, they watched an o]>])()rtunity foui' days more. At 
length two boats, containing thirty men, put olf from the ship and 
entered the little stream between the rocks. When the strangers were 
well scattered gathei'itig wood and taking in water, the natives fell 
upon them and killed eleven, the rest escaping. Having slaughtered 
the strangers like a savage, Moucacht Ape examined their dress and 
physique like a scientist. The bodies vvere thick, short and very 
white ; the head was heavy, the hair short, and instead of hats they 
were clotli wound round the head. The dress was neither of wool nor 
bark, but of a soft stuff like the old cotton shirts of Europeans. That 
which covered the leg and foot was of one piece. Only two of the 
dead had firearms, with powder and balls. Joining some northern 
natives, who had come to assist at the slaying of the strangers, Mou- 
cacht Ape continued his journey along the coast until lie reached their 
village, when the old men of the place dissuaded him from proceeding- 
farther, saying that the country beyond was cold, barren, and tenant- 
less. Therefore he returned to his own ])eople by the route he went, 
having been absent on the westei'n tour hve years. 

Such is one of the many stories related by old Indians of a })ast age 
and handed down to the present race of savages. 

The Illinois Indians were of the Algonquin family, and were divided 
into live tribes — the Teorias, Kaskaskias, Moingwenas, Kahokias, and 
Tamaroas. The}' had gained possession of their lands by subduing 
and driving away the Quapays, a Dakota tribe, and in 16-10 they nearly 
exterminated the Winnebagos, after which time they held undisputed 
possession of the domains until l(i56, when the Irocpiois Indians began 
a long-continued war with them, which was soon followed by a hot 
contest Avith the Sioux tribe. The Illinois at this time formed one of 
the strongest Indian confederacies, and were ex})ert bowmen, but not 
canoemen. They would move to the broad plains bcN'ond the Missis- 
sippi each year for a, summer-hunt, and in the wintei' would s])en(l four 
or live months on a southern chase — returning to rest at Kaskaskia, 
their beautiful city of arbor-like cabins, covered with double water- 
])roof mats. Each cal)in. as a rule, would contain four fires, around 
each of which the families would gather. The population of their 
city in its best days was about 8,000 people. Although they were con- 
stantly at war, and were greatly addicted to vice, they listened to th(^ 
4 



54 HIS'IOKV OF STAKK ('(UXTY. 

earnest teachings of Marquette and other French raissonaries. were 
finally converted, and were much improved in their conversion. The 
name of their chief was Chicago, lie visited France in 1700. and was 
hio-hlv esteemed and entertained bv the I'rench Government officials. 

a" little over two hundred years ago. in the summer of 1680, the Iro 
quois Indians made an attack upon the Kaskaskia and Peoria tribes of 
the Illinois confederation. They drove Lieut. Tonti, who was under 
the command of La Salle, from Creve ( 'oeur Fort, near the outlet of the 
Peoria lake. The chief object of the Iroquois was to destroy the 
Illinois Indians and lay claim to their lands, as they had done to those 
belono-intr to manv other tribes, always fighting their way and leavintj 
their battle-fields — which extended from the Atlantic coast to the 
Wal)ash river, and from the Ohio river to and even north of the Great 
Lakes — strewn with their victims. It was with a great slaughter that 
they con(]uered the hitherto strong and im])ortant ])eople, laid waste 
their great city of Kaskaskia. and drove them from their wigwams to 
wander in broken Ijands over their broad domain. Many of the Illinois 
were murdered and their homes burned to ashes, while as many as 9< >0 
Avere taken prisoners. The young corn in the field was cut down and 
burned ; the pits which contained the products of the ])revious year 
were opened and their contents scattered with wanton waste ; the 
graves had been robbed of their dead and the bodies dragged forth to 
be devoured by buzzards. In the center of all this devastation and 
ruin, the spoilers, says La Salle, had built for themselves a lodge, and 
covered it with human bones and the scalps of the Illinois. A few of 
the lodge-poles that had esca})ed the fire and renuiined standing, were 
adorned Avith human skulls, thus presenting a most frightful scene, 
with all these ghastly relics, where only a few days previous had stood 
the proud city of the Illinois, the largest ever built by northern 
natives, its extent being over a mile square. It was a lovely place in 
the bosom of the beautiful valley, and was Nveli chosen for a home. 
Just on the opposite side of the river stood the sandstone blulf, tall and 
stately, its summit overlooking the broad valley of many woodclad 
islands up and down the river, and the swift current of the water 
rushing along at its base as it had done for thousands of years gone 
by. AVeU had the Illinois looked on this majestic rock as a fit place of 
refuge in case of danger. But little did they think that it would 
remain after them as a monument of their last battle, and that it should 
be the scene of the final extermination of their })roud and powerful 
})eople. From this great battle the Illinois never fully recovered. 
They were constantly at war with the Iroquois and Sioux, and later 
with the Pottawatomies. The allies of Pontiac, the Ottawa chief, 
after the assassination of that chieftain by the hands of the Illinois, 
nearly exterminated the latter — a part of them taking refuge on the 
sandstone bluff. "When first visited bv the whites, the Pottawatomie 
confederation numbered nearly 12. Odd souls, and were divided into five 
tribes; in 1S50 only eighty-four of them remained. 

In the Avinter of 1680-81, being the next winter after the destruc- 
tion of the city of Kaskaskia, La Salle formed a plan of a colony on 
tlie sandstone bluff. The design AA-as to include French and Indians of 



INDIANS OF ILLINOIS. 55 

various tribes as a protective coalition against the dreaded Iroquois. 
This colon}^ was left in charge of Lieut. Tonti. 

La Salle made a trij) down the Mississip})i river, and, when he reached 
its month, on the Gth day of April, 1682, he took formal i)ossession of 
all land drained b}' the great river in the name of his sovereign, Louis 
XIV. of France, and called the new acquisition Louisiana. After his 
return up the river he and his lieutenant, Tonti, began, in December, 
1682, the work of clearing off the top of the sandstone bluff to build 
a fort, which ^vas afterward called Fort St. Louis. The weather was 
bitter cold, and the wind blew terrifically ; but they worked steadily 
on, and soon had completed a number of storehouses and dwellings, all 
of which were inclosed in a stockade. On the bottoms around the 
rock were domiciled 20,0(»0 Iroquois souls, 4,iM»u of whom were warriors. 
In March, 168-1, the Iroquois attacked this rocky citadel ; but, after a 
six days' fight, withdrew, taking with them a few prisoners, who after- 
ward made their escape. Tonti commanded Fort St. Louis, upon the 
rock, until 1702, when, it is said, he was forcibly displaced from the 
command on account of some alleged irregularity ; after which he 
wandei'ed through the Southern wilds until 1748, when, shattered in 
health, he returned to the scene of his former glory — dying in the fort 
the following spring, and being bui-ied on tlie west side of the rock. 
It has been stated that, after his death, the Frenchmen in control of 
the fort treated the Indian maidens so scurvily that their fathers and 
brothers destro3^ed the fort and drove away the Frenchmen. Charle- 
voix says that in 1721 he saw palisades upon the rock, which he sup- 
posed were built by the Illinois ; but no authentic account is given of 
the rock being used as a fort other than from 1682 to 1719, previous to 
the last battle of the Illinois, at Avhicli time it was merely used as a 
place of refuge, and not of fortification. 

Patrick Kennedy, who made a voyage up the Illinois river in 1773, 
speaks of the French as residing on an island at Joliet, and of their 
making salt from the salt ponds on the south bank of the Illinois river 
opposite Buffalo Rock, which is about tln-ee miles above the sandstone 
bluff. A few of the principal actors in the Black Hawk war of 1832 
were considered by the whites to be of French and Indian ancestry; 
and there are families living yet in the Illinois valley that trace their 
lineao'e as far back as to the davs of Tonti. 

The earliest accounts I find of the Pottawatomie Indians south of 
Lake Michigan is in 167I-, when Marquette mettiiemon liis return with 
La Salle from the ^[ississi]>i)i, on a part of which journey he was 
attended by a band of IlHnoisand also a band of Pottawatomie Indians. 
So far as lean learn, they were the first of the tribe who ever saw the 
countr}^ south of Lake Micliigan, as their former home was about 
Green Bay. In the following year, 1675, Marquette, after spending 
the winter at Chicago, established at Kaskaskia on Easter Sunday, his 
mission, which was called by its zealous founder, ''The Immacuhite 
Conceiition." This mission was continued here until 1690, when it 
was moved to Soutliern Kaskaskia, on the Kaskaskia river, which 
empties into the Mississi])pi river in St. Clair county. 

From 1675 it is proljable that the Pottawatomies emigrated very 



5f) HISTOKY OF STAKK COL^'TY. 

fast from their old home on Green Bay into the more hospital)le 
ro^-ions south of Lake Michigan. As they were found in tlieir southern 
homes in different bands and under different names and leaders, thei)roh- 
abilities are that they left in parties. The number of the Pottawato- 
mies is hard to determine ; but as near as I can discover there must have 
been 1,800 of them at the time of the asseml)Iy of the Algon(|uin Confed- 
eration at Niagara in 1783, when there were 450 Pottawatomie 
warriors present. The fraternal relations existing between the Potta- 
watomies and Ottawas were of the most harmonious character ; 
they lived almost as one people, and were joint owners in their hunting 
o-rounds. Their relations were scarcelv less intimate and friendlv with 
the different bands of the Sioux tribe. Xor were the Chippewas more 
sti'angers to the Pottawatomies and Ottawas than the latter were to 
each other ; they claimed an interest in the lands occu})ied to a certain 
extent Ijy all jointly, so that all three tribes joined in the joint treaty 
for the lirst sale of their lands ever made to the United States, which 
was made in Chicago in 1821, when the tribes named, except the Sioux, 
ceded to the United States 5,000,000 acres in Michigan. Xorthern 
Illinois was particularly the possession of the Pottawatomies: but. as 
before stated, it is hnpossible to fix the time when they first settled 
here. Thev undoul)tedlv came bv degrees, and by deo^reesestal^lished 
themselves, encroaching at first upon the Illinois tribe, advancing more 
and m«)re. sometimes by good-natured tolerance and sometimes bv 
actual violence. But they did not come into exclusive possession here 
until the final extermination of the Illinois tribes, which must have 
been some time between 1766 and 1770, when all but eleven were 
destroyed in the siege of '' Starved Rock." The only authentic account 
of this great tragedy that is obtainable is from Meacheile, an old 
Pottawatomie chief, through Judge J. D. Caton, who was an intimate 
acquaintance of the chief. Meacheile associated his earliest recollec- 
tions with their occupancy of the country. lie remembered well the 
battle of ''Starved Rock," and the final extinction of the lllin(jis tribe 
of Indians. He was present at the siege and final catastrophe ; and 
although but a boy at the time, and used to the war and Woodshed 
that were continually going on between the tribes, the terrible event 
made such a strong impression ujion his young mind that it ever 
remained fresh and vivid. 

The cause of the dreadful destruction of the Illinois tribe is 
attributed to the death of Pontiac, the great Ottawa chief, which 
occurred in 1766. He was the idol of his peo])le, and was lieloved and 
obeyed scarcely less by the Pottawatomies. They believed the Ilhnois 
Indians were at least accessory to his murder and so held them res])on 
sible; consequently the Ottawas and Pottawatomies in connection 
with the Chippewas, united all of tlieir forces in an attack upon those 
whose deadly enemies they liad now become. 

The Illinois Indians had never fully recovered from the great 
catastrojihe they had suffered nearly a century before at the hands of 
the terrible Iroquois. Their spirit and their courage seemed broken, 
and they submitted U) encroachments from the north In* their more 
enterprising neighbors — Avith an ill-will, no doubt, but 'without pro 



INDIANS OF ILLINOIS. 57 

tecting their rights by force of arms, as they would have (U)ne in for- 
mer times — and songlit to revenge themselves upon those whom they 
i-egarded as their actual enemies, in an underhaiuied and treacherous 
way. In the war thus waged by the allies against the Illinois the latter 
suffered disaster after disaster, till the sole remnant of that once proud 
nation, whose uame had been mentioned with respect from Lake Supe- 
I'ior to the mouth of the Ohio, and from the Mississip])i to the Wabash 
river, now found suiticient space upon the half acre of ground which 
crowns the summit of " Starved Rock." 

As the sides are })erpeiulicular, except on the southeast, where oue 
may ascend with difficulty by means of a sort of natural stairway, and 
where some of the ste])s are only a few inches wide and as miich as 
three feet in height, not more than two persons can ascend abreast, 
and ten men could easily re[)el ten thousand with the means of warfare 
then at their command. Of late, as was probably the case when Lieut. 
Tonti commanded Fort St. Louis u})on the rock, a broad staii'way has 
been erected over the worst places, so that it may be easily ascended 
In' touris^. 

The length of time that the Illinois were confined u})on the rock it 
is hard to determine ; but it is easy to imagine that they had not pi'e- 
])ared provisions enough for a very extended encampment, and that 
their enemies depended upon their lack of the same, wliich we can read- 
ily appreciate must occui- soon to a savage jieople who rarely antici- 
])ate the future by storing up suj)})lies. On the noi'th or river side the 
upper rock overhangs the water somewhat, and tradition tells us how 
the confederates placed themselves in canoes under the cornice-like 
rocks, and cut the thongs of the besieged when they lowered their ves- 
sels to obtain water fi'om the I'iver, and so reduced them by thirst as 
well as by starvation. At last the time came when the unfortunate 
I'emnant of the once honored Illinois Nation could hold out no longer, 
and they awaited but a favorable opportunity to attempt their escape. 
This was at last afforded by a dark and stormy night, when, led by 
their few remaining warriors, all stole in profound silence down the 
steep and narrow declivity, to be met hy a solid wall of their enemies. 
The horrible scene that then ensued is easier to imagine than to 
describe. No quarter was asked and none was given. For a time the 
howling of the tempest was drowned by the yells of the combatants 
and the shrieks of their dying victims. It is difficult to judge of the 
number of the Illinois that were quartered u])on the rock. During 
this awful battle the braves fell one by one, fighting like very fiends ; 
and fearfully did they avenge themselves upon their enemies. The 
few women and children, whom famine had left but enfeebled skel- 
etons, fell easy victims to the war clubs of the terrible savages, who 
deemed it almost as much a glory to slaughter the emaciated women 
and helpless children as to strike down the men who were able to 
make resistance with arms in their hands. They were bent- upon the 
utter extermination of their hated enemies, and most successfully did 
they bend their savage energies to the bloody task. 

Soon the victims were stretched upon the slo[)ing ground south and 
west of the rock ; there their bodies lay stark U})on the sand which had 



58 HISTOKY OF STARK COUNTY. 

been th^o^YU up by the \vil(l prairie-Avinds. The wails of the feeble 
and the shouts of the strong liad ceased to fret the air, and the night- 
Avind's mournful sighs througli the neighljoring pines sounded like a 
requiem, the Hash of the hghtning in the dark and clouded sky lit up 
the a^vful scene like tall funeral tapers. Here AYas enacted the fitting 
finale to the work of death which had been commenced by the de- 
struction of the city of Kaskaskia — scarcely a mile away on the op])o- 
site side of the riYer — nearly a century Ijefore by the still more saY- 
age and terrible Iroquois. Yet all were not destroyed, for, in the dark- 
ness and confusion of the fight, elcYen of the most athletic warriors 
broke through the besieging lines. From their high ])erch on the isa- 
lated rock they had marked well the little nook below into which 
their enemies had moored at least a part of their canoes, and to these 
they rushed with headlong speed, unnoticed by their foes. They threw 
themselYes into the boats, and rowed hurriedly down the rapids 
below. They had been trained to the use of the paddle and the canoe, 
and knew cYery intricacy of the channel, so that they could safely 
naYigate it CYen in the dark and boisterous night. They k^ew their 
deadly enemies would soon be in their wake, and there was no safe 
refuge for them short of St. Louis. They had undouljtedly been with- 
out food for many days, and had no proYisions with them to sustain 
their waning strength ; and yet it was certain death to stop l)y the 
way. Their onl}^ hope was in pressing forward by night and by day, 
without a moment's pause — scarcely looking back, yet cYer fearing 
that their pursuers would mjike their appearance from around the 
point they had last left behind them. If they could reach St. Louis, 
there they would be safe ; if overtaken they would perish, as had the 
rest of their tribe. It was truly a race for life, and, as life is sweeter 
than reYenge, we may safely presume that the pursued were impelled 
to greater exertions than the pursuers. 

Until the morning light revealed that their canoes were gone the 
confederates belicYed that their sanguinary work had been so thor- 
oughl}'" done that not a living soul of the Illinois people remained. 
But as soon as the escape was discoYered a hot pursuit was commenced. 
But those who ran for life won the race. They reached St. Louis 
before their enemies came in sight, and told their appalling tale to the 
commandant of the fort, from whom they receiYed protection and a 
generous sujiply of food, which their famished condition so much re- 
quired. This had barely l)een done when their enemies ap})eared and 
fiercely demanded their victims, that no drop of huinan blood might 
longer circulate in the Yeins of their hated enemies. This was re- 
fused, and they retired with thi'eats of future vengeance upon the fort — 
which, however, they never had the means of executing. 

After their epeniies had gone, the Illinois, who never afterwards 
claimed that name, thanked their white friends for their kind enter- 
tainment, and. full of sorrow that words cannot express, they slowly 
])addled their way across the river to seek a new home and new friends 
among the tribes who then occujned the southern part of Illinois, and 
who listened to their sad story with sympathy and kindness. This is 
the last that we really know of the last of the Illinois. We do not 



INDIANS OF ILLINOIS. 59 

know that a drop of their blood now animates a human being; but 
their name is perpetuated in tliis great state, of whose record in the 
l)ast all are so proud, and as to whose future the hopes of all are so 
sanguine. 

Proclamations affecting the Indian tribes here were issued as earlv 
as 1764, land sales registered as earl\^ as 1773, and the regulation 
Indian treaties in 1795. 

On Decern l)er oO, 1764, General Thomas Gage issued his proclama- 
tion respecting lands in Illinois. It provided liberty for the Catholic 
I'eligion, for the removal of the French inhabitants should they not 
desire to become subjects of the British, etc., etc., and other stipula- 
tions entirely foreign to the spirit of the British. 

In 1773 the Indian deeds to the Illinois com])any were made. 
The tracts deeded to the Illinois compsmy included hinds along the 
Illinois river to Chicago, or Garhck creek, and thence fifty leagues 
north to the battle-ground of tlie Bewaria and Eenard Indians in 1727. 

By the treaty of Greenville, 1795, 640 acres where Chicago now 
stands, 1,280 acres at the mouth of the Illinois, 640 acres at the old 
Piorias village, near the south end of Illinois lake, were reserved to the 
savages concerned in that treaty. 

On August 13, 1803, the United States negotiated a treaty with the 
Kaskaskia Indians, at Vincennes, with the remnant of several Illinois 
tribes then grou])ed undei* the name of Kaskaskias. By this treaty all 
their lands were ceded exce})t 350 acres near the town (which 'was 
secured to them by Congress in 1791), and also 1,280 acres, to be 
selected by them. The annuity promised was $1,000, or $500 more 
than allowed in the Greenville treaty of 1795 ; $100 per annum toward 
the supj)ort of a ]H*iest who would also act as school teacher ; $300 
toward the erection of a church, and $580 to pay off their debts. 
This cession comprised all lands from the mouth of the Ohio to twelve 
miles below the mouth of the Wal)ash, to the ridge between the head 
waters of the Wabash and Kaskaskia and along this ridge until it 
reaches the waters flowing into the Illinois, to the mouth of that river, 
and thence down the Mississippi to the Ohio. 

The treaty of St. Louis between the United States and the Sacs 
and Foxes made ]Sroveml)er 3, 1804, ])rovided for the cession of all the 
country bounded by the Mississippi, Wisconsin, Fox and Illinois rivers, 
on condition of the first ])arty paying in goods $2,234.50, and an 
annuity of $600 to the Sacs and $400 to the Foxes. It was also stipu- 
lated that their wars with the Great and Little Osages should forever 
cease, and that amity should forever exist between the first and second 
parties. The chiefs signing were Layauvois, Pashepahoe or The Giger, 
Quashquame or Jumping Fish, Outchequaha or Sun Fish, Ilahshe- 
quaxhiqua or the Bear. The witnesses were Pierre Choteau, Aug. 
Choteau, Charles Gratiot, John Griffin, Wm. Prince, secretary to 
General Harrison, who signed for the United States. 

The treaty of Portage des Sioux, of September 14, 1815, was signed 
by Black Hawk, May 13, 1816, at St. Louis. It was siiiq)ly a 
renewal of the treatv of 1804, and the chief declared he was wheedled 



into sio-ning- it. 



60 HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY. 

At the Council of Chicago, held August 17, 1821, General Louis 
Cass defined tlie Pottawatomie country as extending along both sides 
of the Illinois river and all its triljutaries and along the western shore 
of Lake Michigan to Green Bay, with other possessions south of Lake 
Erie. This treaty was concluded after much dela}' and five millions 
acres of land became the property of the United States. Tlie last 
treaty with the Pottawatomies prior to their removal was made at 
Chicago, September 26, 1833. At this treaty the Indians were actu- 
ally made drunk, and signed away their possessions' in this condition. 
In'l835 thev received their last annuitv in Illinois, and shortlv after 
were removed to Northwestern Missouri. 

In 1831 a missionarv. Rev. Jesse Hale, was sent into the military 
tract to labor among the Indians. Louis Bailey was his interpreter. 
Hale delivered his sermon all right ; so did Bailey interpret it correctly. 
Shaubena then said : " To what white preacher say, I say, maybe so ! 
Are all white men good ? I say, maybe so. Do white men cheat 
Indian i' I sav, maybe so. Governor Cole gave me, Shaubena, hunt- 
ing grounds and told me to hunt. Your big AVhite-sides (Gen. White- 
side) come along and tell Shaubena jn/eA'-a-c/tee (clear out).'' Having 
said this he tore and tramped upon Governor Cole's agreement with 
him. Hale adopted conciliatory measures, and stated : " Whiteside is 
a bad white man." Shaubena replied : '' If Avhite man steal Indian's 
land, hang him I '' This last sentence settled Hale's life among tlie 
tribes. Running toward Hennepin, he arrived there safe, continued his 
return trip east, and Shaubena never heard of him again. 

In early years it was tlie custom of the Indians to spend a part of 
the vear along the streams in this part of Putnam countv. Indeed 
thev were known to visit Harris W. ^Miner's cabin in herds, stav 
several days, complete a series of trades, and pui'chase meal. He 
rememl)ers seeing the chief rolled in liis blanket, s]ee])ing or loafing 
for days, while the young men of the band were engaged in foraging 
or hunting. 

In 1830 the band moved from Walnut to Indian creek, and for a 
short time made Avhat is now Stark county their main hunting ground. 

The Ottawa chief, Pontiac, and the remnant of his tril)e, who, after 
the Franco-British war, selected the country in the vicinity of Wil- 
mington for his principal village, and there located in 1764-5. In 17<)9, 
he was killed by a chief of the Illinois, Kineboo, during the council 
of Joliet Mound, held that year. In this Indian village, the first full- 
l>lood Indian friend of the whites. Shabbonee, Avas born about 1 77<i. 
Although an Ottawa, he married a daughter of the Pottawatomie chief, 
Spotka, at the moutli of Fox river. At that village he was declared 
chief of the Pottawat(miies, and shortly after removed the tribe 
to the head of Big Indian creek, in DeKalb county. In 1807 he 
visited Tecumseh. which visit was returned in 181<». In 1811 he was 
l)resent at the council of Tincennes. presided over by (xcneral Harri- 
son. In 1812, the couriers of Tecumseh arrived in Illinois, offering 
largesses to the tribes who would aid the British against the United 
States. Shabbonee resisted the offer until the fall of 1812, when he 
and twenty-tAvo of his warriors left to aid Tecumseh. He was present 



,_... :y 

UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS 
URBANA 



INniAXS OF ILLINOIS. 63 

at the battle of the Thames, in Canada, as was also Billy Caldwell or 
SaiH/cnu/.sJ/. During the Winnebago and Black Hawk war, he rendered 
incalculable good to the settlers, and died regretted in (Trundvconntv, 
July 17, 1859. His wife, Pokanoka. was drowned in Mazen creek, 
(Trundy county, Xovember ?>(), 18G4. It is related that in 1832 he 
visited this part of the niilitarv tract, warning the people to leave. 
Acting on this information. John Essex, David Cooper, Tliomas Essex, 
Sr., and Thomas, Jr., with their families set out for the fort near Pekin, 
but all returned to their pioneer homes with the exception of Tliomas 
Essex, Jr., who settled near Peoria. 

It is related that one of the jUMmary causes of the l^lack Hawk war 
was from an incident that ha})pened in Liverpool townshi[), Fulton 
county. Joseph Farris, Asa Smith, and Bird Ellis, while out hunting, 
espied a youno- Indian, caught him, cut switches and whi])ped him 
with tliem. lie attem]>ted to escape and while doing so one of the 
])arty struck him on the head with a gun, and they left him near the 
Indian camp. He recovered so as to get to his friends, but died just 
as they arrived at Peoria, where they had carried him on a litter. 

The immediate cause of the Indian outbreak in 1830 was the occu- 
]>ation of Black Hawk's village, on the Rock river, by the whites, 
dui'ing the absence of the chief and his braves on a hunting expedition, 
on the west side of the Mississi])pi. AVlien they returned, they found 
their wigwams occu]ned by white families, and their own women and 
children were shelterless on the banks of the river. The Indians were 
indignant, and determined to re])Ossess their village at all hazards, and 
early in the spring of 1831 recrossed the ]\Iississippi and menacingly 
took possession of their own cornfields and cabins. It may be well to 
remark here that it was expressly sti})nlated in the treaty of 18(»1, to 
which they atti'ibuted all their troubles, that the Indians should not be 
o])lio-ed to leave their lands until tliev were sold bv the United States, 
and it does not appear that tliey occupied any lands other than those 
owned bv the government. If this was true, the Indians had good 
cause for indignation and complaint. But the whites, driven out in 
tui-n by the retui-ning Indians, became so clamorous against what they 
termed the encroachments of the natives, that Governor Ileynolds, of 
Illinois, oi'dered General Gaines to Rock Island with a military force 
to drive the Indians again from their homes to the west side of the 
Mississippi. Black Hawk says he did not intend to be provoked into 
war by anything less than the blood of some of his own ])eo})le; in 
other words, that there would be no war unless it should IxM-ommenced 
by the ])ale faces. But it was said, and probably tliought by the mili- 
tary connnanders along the frontiei", that the Indians intended to unite 
in a general war against the whites, from Rock river to the Mexican 
boi-ders. But it does not appear that the hardy fi-ontiersmen them- 
selves had any fears, for their ex|)erience had been that, when well 
treated, their Indian neighboi's were not dangerous. i>lack Hawk and 
his band had done no more than to attempt to repossess the old homes 
of which they had been deprived in their absence. No blood liad been 
shed. Black Hawk and his chiefs sent a fiag of truce, and a new ti-eaty 
was made, by which Black Hawk and his band agreed to remain for- 



64 HISTORY OF STA^RK COUNTY. 

ever on tlie Iowa side and never recross the river without the per- 
mission of the -President or the Governor of Illinois. Whether the 
Indians clearly understood the terms of this treat}^ is uncertain. As 
was usual, the Indian traders had dictated terms on their Ijehalf, and 
tliey had received a large amount of provisions, etc., from the govern- 
ment, but it may well be doubted whether the Indians comprehended 
that they could never revisit tlie graves of their fathers without violat- 
ino- their treatv. Thev undoul)tedlv thought tliat tliev had agreed never 
to recross the Mississip])i witli liostile intent. However this may be, on 
the 6th day of April, 1832, Black Hawk and his entire l)and, with their 
women and children, again recrossed the Mississippi in plain view of 
the garrison of Fort Armstrong, and went up Rock river. Although 
this act was construed into an act of hostility by the military author- 
ities, who declared that Black Hawk intended to recover his village, or 
the site where it stood, by force ; but it does not appear that he made 
any such attempt, nor did his appearance create any special alarm 
among the settlers. They knew that the Indians never went on tlie 
war })ath encumbered with the old men, their women and their chil- 
dren. The war commenced, however, and among the enemies of the 
Hawk, there were none more j^ronounced than the early settlers of 
Spoon I'iver precinct, as shown in the military history. 



CHAPTER ITT. 



EXPLORATION AND OCCUPATION. 




W 



IIP]X the illustrious Mur([uette was on his return voyao'e u[) 
the Illinois river, it is related that he met many of the orig-- 
inal Indian occupiers of the valley, just returned from their 
trans-Mississip})i exile, to which the Iro(}uois had driven 
them. When La Salle came here over two hundi'ed years 
ago, he found the Peorias in full })ossession of the 
country, with their })rincipal town at the outlet of the lake. 
There a great trading post was founded by the French, and 
continued down to the war of 1812. At this time Governor 
Edwards ordered the destruction of the seventy dwellings 
constituting the town and the banishment of the inhabitants, 
owing to their known sympathy with the Jh'itish. In 1S14 
Fort Clark was constructed, then deserted, and four years 
later Abner Eads and Josiah Fulton settled there as the first 
white American pioneers. This was the actual beginning of 
' settlement on the military tract in April, 1819, by the advance 
guard of the '' Shoal Greek Golony.''' 

Harvey L. Ross, in his youthful days, was fond of hunting and 
trading with the Indians. When but seven years of age he had killed 
wild turkeys, geese, and small game of almost every kind, and at twelve 
thoug-ht nothino- of killino- a deer. lie savs he also remembers catching 
twelve wolves in less than a month in steel traps placed near a dead 
iiorse. He relates some incidents of the first trading ex])edition in 
which he was eno-ao-ed, which occurred in 1828. He started from 
Lewistown in com])anv with Edward Plude, a Frenchman and Indian 
inteq)reter, and ''BiU"' Eveland, son of John Eveland. Eveland was 
a large, powerful man, \vell actpiainted with the country and familiar 
with the Indian character. They loaded a t\\'o-horse wagon at Lewis- 
town with o-oods and ti'aveled through what is now known as Knox. 
Stark and Peoria counties, where they found a large number of Indians 
and traded their goods to advantage. They returned home with their 
wagon loaded with furs and deer skins. They were gone three weeks 
and had traveled about one hundred and fifty miles, meeting only with 
two white settlers after leaving the neigh l)orhoo(l of C^anton. 

Among the men who came about this time was Isaac I>. Essex, who 
was a})pointed Indian teacher by Jesse Walker, the first Methodist 
preacher in the State. Although the school was for the benefit of the 
Indians, white chddren. what few there were, were permitted to attend. 
The names of the white scholars, as far as remend)ered by Ga plain 
Haacke, were Lawson Holland, N. Smith, Sally Eads, J. Sharp, J. and 

«5 



fiC, HISTORY OF STAKK COIXTV. 

KoWert Latham, J). Avery. Andrew Avery, John and James Dixon, 
Wilham, M. C, and Warren Bogardus. Essex taught several terms 
and then moved to a claim a little below Rock Island. His claim was 
made on the top of a blntf overlooking the jNIississippi river, where he 
attempted to build a city, which he called Quebec. But the attempt 
failed, and Quebec was lost. In later years he returned to Peoria, and 
in the fall of 1828 visited this county, staked his claim on the northeast 
(piarter of section 15, Essex townshi]), prepared the logs and siding for 
liis future house, and, returning to "Shoal creek," remained thereuntil 
April, 1829, when he set out to settle finally in the wilderness. AVith 
him were his wife and children, and accompanying him from Prince's 
Grove were Daniel Prince, Frank Thomas, Stephen French, Simon 
Reed, and Revs. Silliman and Allen, P)aptist preachers. They formed 
the " Building Bee," who raised the first cabin in Stark county within 
twenty-four hours after arriving on the spot, where the first settler had 
pre})ared the lumber a few months before. Following the Essex family 
came John B. Dodge, a son-in-law of Benjamin Smith, and a relative 
of Elder Silliman. He built his cabin on section 14, near the Essex 
cabin, and took all the parts credited to him in other chapters, until 
killed at Rock Island b}^ a desperado from Kentucky. 

In ]\[arch, 1830, Squire Benjamin Smith. William P. Sewell, and 
Greenleaf Smith arrived and erected the third building in the county, 
near that of Dodge, who left his cabin to John E. Owings in 1831. 
William D. Grant built a shanty on what Avas known as ''The James 
Ilolgate Farm," in 1881, and in this year also came Thomas and Eliza- 
beth Essex, parents of the pioneer settler, with their children, Thomas, 
David, AVilliam, and Joseph Essex, and Mrs. Cooper with her husband 
David. Harris W. Miner, mentioned at the beginning of the marriage 
record, Peter Miner, and Sylvanus IMoore, named in the military, or- 
ganic, legal and political chapters, and the quiet David Gregory, were 
all here. 

In 1832 Major McClenahan came to Spoon river early in the spring, 
with nine of his children. He took possession of Peter Miner's cabin 
near Wyoming, and resided there for a fcAV months until the first im- 
provements were completed in Goshen township, known as the "■Mc- 
Clenahan Settlement." The male adults of the family then were 
Elijah, Elijah, Jr., James and Robert. AVithin this and the succeeding 
two 3"ears came James Holgate, Miss Marsh, Thomas AVinn, Hugh 
AYliite, Lewis Sturms, ]\Iinott Silliman, John Love, James ACorrow. 
John P. Hayes, Jesse Heath, John AlcClure, Jason Hopkins, Hugh 
Alontgomery, Elias Love, Thom. Leeks, A. Baker, Pardon B. Dodge, 
and Henry and Samuel Seeley, some of whom l^rought large families. 
Henry AlcClenahan came late in 1834, and the next year, Thomas 
Bradford and Geo. Parker. 

In December, 1835, a party arrived at Osceola Grove under the lead- 
ership of Alajor Robert Moore. This })arty comprised the leader, with 
James Buswell, Isaac Spencer, Thomas AVatts, Giles C. Dana, Peter 
Pi-att, and Dr. Pratt, but all did not settle jiermanentlv there. In June, 
1830, came William Hall, Mrs. AVilliam Hall, Robert and Mary Hall, 
Archil)ahl A^andyke and wife, Charles A^andyke, Myrtle G. Brace,'^ Brady 



EXPLORATION AND OCCUPATION. 67 

Fowler, E. S. Brodhead, John Davis family, Henderson family, Thomas 
family, William Mahany. William Godle}^ the Don-ance family. Will- 
iam and Henry Dunbar, David and George ISinimerman. Motfetts, 
Plodg-esons, Dunns, Wyckoffs, Websters, Emerys, Chatfields, Trickles, 
Ecklevs, Likes or Lakes, Barnetts, and Jacob Sniitli, Henry Butler, Jar- 
ville Chaffee, W. E. Buckingham (called by General Thomas the " Buke 
of Duckingham" ), Simeon Ellis, Dextei' Wall, Ira and Cyril AVard, 8. G. 
Worley, William Ogle, Adam Da}^ Henry Sweet, Asher W. Smith, 
Lewis and Chris. Sammis, Ephraim Barrett, William Bowen, Adam 
Perry, Eliphalet Ellzworthor Ellsworth, Samuel Love, Peter Sharer. L. 
Townsend, Henry lireese, Samuel Butler, Henry Sweet, Hugh Frail, 
Joseph Newton, Israel Seeley, Daniel Dobbins, and Henry and Matthias 
Sturms. All may be said to be here prior to the close of the year 1836, 
with others younger and less ])rominent, whose names appeal' in other 
cha})ters. From the beginning of 1S3T to the spring of IS3I> numv 
others joined the settlers here, com|)leting the picmeer circle, aud ready 
to accept the res})onsibility of the local government granted to them m 
the latter year. The following copy of the original assessment roil 
almost covers the whole list of the pioneers of Stark county : 

The assessment of 1839, for the first district of the new county, 
was made by Isaac Spencer. In the following list the names of own- 
ers and values of ])ersonal properties are given, the figures denoting 
dollars: Avery, Zebulon. 344; Aveiy, Jose])h, r)(i(); Bayard, Epln-aim, 
164v Bus well, James, 3o4; Brace, Mvrtle, 343; Currier, Asa, 22U; Currier, 
David, 73; Carter, Timothy, 389; Dukes, Martin, 228; Davis, John, 364; 
Ferris, Svlvanus, 55; Fowler, Brady, 144; Gruthage, Tlionias, <'.0; 
Greenfield, Charles, 123; Gray, Sarah, 10(»; Hall, Robert, 4()9 ; Hall, 
Thomas, 150; Hall, Langley, 43; Hall, AVilliam, 296; Harvey, Aai'on, 
311 ; Hamilton, John, 15 ; Lyle, John and Thomas, 73(5 ; Lyle, William. 
152 ; Leeson, John, 460 ; Moore, James M., 216 ; Moore, William, 310 ; 
Moore, Robert, 229 ; Orsman, Morris, 30 ; Orsman, J^ennett, 40 : Oliver, 
Thomas, 273 ; Parks, William, 3()6 ; l^ratt, Peter, 106 ; Ricker, Benja- 
min, 342 ; Sweet, Henry, 118 ; Sturm, Henry S.. 340 ; Sturm, Samuel, 
97; Sturm, Matthew, Jr., 97 ; Sturm, Nicholas, 295; Seeley, Israel, 59; 
Seeley, Henry, 327; Smith, Asher, 196; Sturm, Matthias,' 257 ; Stone, 
Liberty, 112; Spencer, Isaac, 347: Sharer, Robei't, 125; Turnbull, 
Robert, 155; Turnl)ull, John, 203; Van Dyke, Arch, 113; Whitaker, 
Oliver, 333 ; Winslow, Calvin, 312 ; Woodard, Daniel, 151 ; Woodard, 
Smith, 125 ; Winters, John, 265 ; White. Hugh. <)(') ; White. Henry, S4 ; 
Whitcher cV Vance, 135; Woodard. Alfred. 117 ; the total valuation 
being |3,094. 

The list of ])ersonal proi)erty in district No. 2. in the county of 
Stark, with the names of the owners and value of the personal j)i'oj)erty, 
assessed by John AV. Agard, for the year 1S39, is as follows, the tigui'es 
denote value in dollars : John W. Agard, 3<>5 ; Moses IJoai'dnum, 71<>; 
Thomas Bradford, 115; Henry Breeze, 197; Henry Butler, 682; 
George Cargill, 375; Samuel Cam]), 4() ; Lewis L)avenport, loo ; 
Lemuel S. Dorrance, 6lO; William W. Drnmniond, S8 ; Fli])halet 
Ellsworth, 359 ; Chauncy Fiellen, 306); Jesse W. Heath, 125; James 
Ilolgate, 775 ; Moses Jordan, loo ; Samuel Love, 224 ; Elijah McClena- 



68 HISTOKY OF STAKK COLNTY. 

han, -1:4:4 ; Nehemiah Merritt, 310 ; Sylvaniis Moore, 359 ; Benjamin 
Newton, 120; Benjamin Newton, Jr., 45; Joseph Newton, 25Y ; George 
Parker, 25 ; Virgil Pike, 149 ; Christopher Samas, 4,110 ; Samuel 
Seely, 345; Peter Shafer, 104; AVhitne.y Smith, 653; Benjamin Smith, 30G; 
Sewell Smitli. 148; Greenleaf Smith, 475; John Spencer, 230; Samuel 
Thomas, 1,159 ; Leman Thurston, 123 ; Thomas Timmons, 170 ; Horace 
Vail 201 ; Dexter Hall, 274; John A. Williams, 75; Thomas Winn, 
357 ; the total valuation l)eing Sl5,916. The real estate in district No. 
2 Avas also assessed by John W. Agard at ^14,880. The names of the 
greater number of actual settlers are given in the list of original 
entries. 

The assessment of Massilon precinct or disti'ict No. 3 was made in 
1839 bv J. H. Barnett. In the following list the names of owners and 
values of personal ]iroperty are given : Arnold, Philander, 184 ; 
Brown, John, 278; Burtield. Benjamin, 243 ; Burfield, Carson. 106; 
Burfield, Jolm, 75 ; Barnett. Ephraim, 755; Barnett, James H., I(i4 ; 
Clark. TlKjmas S., 280; Coldwell. Washington, 225 ; Coldwell, Thomas, 
271 ; Coldwell, Presley, 135 ; Coldwell, Henry, 141 ; Cooley, Abraham, 
442; Cox, Nathan, 308; Drummond, Benjamin, 419; Drummond, 
Zorib. 152; Davis. Daniel. 190; Dunn. Augustus A., 230; Ecklev, George, 
352 ; Emery. Fred W.. 250 ; Finch, Lewis, 216 ; Finley, John, 299 ; 
Greenlee, Allen, 143 ; Greenfield, Bethnel, 75 ; D. and C. Gingrich, 
326 ; Hanna, Kobert, 250 ; Janez, Michel, 218 ; Moler, John, who moved 
to Iowa, 27 ; ]\Iatthews, Newton, 284 ; Ogle, Howard, 328 ; Powell, 
Colvin, 235 ; Porter, William, 258 ; Porter. Edward, 141 ; Mounts, 
Pero, 204; McClure, Joini, 8o8 ; Pratts, John, 395; Sheets, Peter, 970; 
Smith, William, 435 ; Smitb, Jacob, 293 ; Shaw, Sumner, 188 ; Sturges, 
David, merchant, 325; Simmerinan, Jacob, 75; Treekell, Jefferson, 
<*>77 ; Treekell. Ste]:>lien, merchant, 736 ; Treekell, Edward, 399 ; Tree- 
kell, Washington, 399 ; Thompson, Thomas, 9(» ; Wvckoff, Nehemiah, 
301 ; Webster, William W., 230 ; Wriggan. William W., 100 ; and John 
Whitzell, 135. 

The list of ])roperty in district No. 4, in the county of Stark, with 
the names of the owners and the value of the property, assessed by 
Silas Richards for the year 1839. is as follows : Albright. George, 80; 
liennett, Jeremiah, 2ln ; Brink. James, 47 ; Cue, William. 360 ; Cundiff, 
John. 330; Coburn. William. 270; Dunbar, William, 693 ; Dunbar, 
Henry, 419; Driscoll, Luthei', 615; Emery, Conrad, 538; Emery, 
Jacob, 571 ; Emery. Jose])h ; 339 ; Emery, Jesse, 128; Eltgroth, Elijah, 
40 ; Grant, Joshua, 145 ; Grant. Nelson', 155 ; Hodgson, Daniel, 425 ; 
Ilodg-son, Jonathan, 726; Hester, John, 440; Hays, Harry, 845 ; Ives, 
Henry, 220; Jackson, Barnabas M., 2,092; Jackson, George, 115; 
Lundy, John, 254; Lake. William, 144; Lake. Reuben, 179; Miner, 
Peter F., 485 ; Miner, Harris AV., 460; Miner, J. Ot. C. H., 1,336; 
Miner, Jesse, 35; Maiming. Al)iah, 50; McClenaghan, Henrv, 455; 
Mason, AYilliam. 397; McWilliams. John, 238; Parrish. Samuel. 270; 
Parrish, Joel. 135; Palmer. Joseph, 320; Richards, Silas, 461; Rich- 
ards, Milton, 392; Reed, Ira C, 50; Russell, John, 64; Shnmerman, 
David, 535; Simmerman, George, 205 ; Sellen, Edward, 255 ; Stoddard, 
Israel, 315; Stoddard, Marcus A., 125: White, John. 562; Wheeler, 



EXPLORATION AND OCCUPATION. 69 

William, l(i8 ; Pulhanioiis, Isaac, 24; Wilson, James J., 117. The 
total \vi\s $17,824. The list of lands in the fourth district, in the 
county of Stark, with the names of the owners and the value of the 
lands assessed by Silas Richards, for the year 1839, comiirised the 
names of Daniel Frost. Thomas G. Williams and Isaac Foster. 

' At the close of the war between the United States and Fnglaiul in 

1812, our government laid off a tract of land in Illinois for the sol- 
diers who participated in that war. The land thus a}>pro))riated was 
embraced in the region between the Mississi])pi and the Illinois rivers, 
and extended as far northward as the north line of Bureau and Henry 
counties. To it the name "Military Tract" was given, and by that 
name this section is still known. Within this boundary is emlDraced 
one of the most fertile regions of the globe. Scarcely liad Congress 
made the proper provisions to enable the soldiers to secure their land 
ere a few of the most dai'ing and I'esolute started to })ossess it. There 
were only a few, however, who at first regarded their '' (juarter sec- 
tion " of sufficient value to induce them to endure the hardships of 
the ])ioneer in its settlement and im])rovement. ]\Iany of them sold 
their patent to a fine ''prairie quarter" foi* one liuiuh-ed dollai's. 
others for less, while some traded* theirs for a horse, a cow, or a watch, 
regarding themselves as just so much ahead. This was a source of no 
little trou])le to the actual settlers, as shown furthei' on in tliis volume, 
for they could not always tell which quarter of land belonged to a 
soldier, or which was " Congress land '' and could be ])re('m])ted. 
Even when a settler found a suitable location known to be " ])atent 
land," with a desire to purchase, he experienced great difficulty in 
finding the owner, and often did nc^t find him until he had j)ut Imn- 
di'eds of dollars' worth of improvements on it, when the patentee was 
sure to ttirn up. It was seldom that a "patentee" could be found at 
the time of settlement, and many of the early settlers presumed that 
the owner never would be known ; but in many instances, after a 
patent quarter section was made valuable by improvement, the original 
patent would be brought on by some one, who would oust the occu- 
pant and take ])ossession, sometimes })aying him something for his 
improvements and sometimes not. Many holders of ]iatents had no 
])ity. This condition of affairs presented a tem])tation to mei'ciiess 
"land sharks," who would come intcj this section and woi'lv \\\) cases, 
ostensibly for the original ])atentees, but really for theii- own pockets. 
The most notorious of these was one Toliver Craig, who actually made 
it a business to forge patents and deeds. This he cai-ried on exten- 
sively from 1847 to 1854, especially in Knox and Fulton counties. He 
had forty bogus deeds put on record in one day at Knoxville. He 
was arrested in New York State in 18.54, by O. M. Boggess, of Mon- 
mouth, and taken to the jail at Cincinnati, Ohio, where he attempted 
suicide by arsenic ; but at the end of a year he was released on bail. 
The settlers around Osceola Clrove, with men from other townships, 
organized an anti-claim jumpers' society, which chc-cked, effectually, the 

1 operations of the claim jum])ers, and enabled them to hold their lands 

1 until purchased from the government. 



CHAPTEK TV. 




MARRIAGE RECORD 1831-1860. 



AKIIIA(4E was not always tlie voluntary proceedin*^- we 
now find it. It ^vas compulsory among the Greeks. The 
Spartans could not tolerate celibacy, and by the laws of 
Lvcurgus criminal proceedings could be taken against those 
wiio married too late or nnsuital)ly, as well as against those 
who did not many at all. It went hard with the latter. 
Should any man remain single bevond a certain age he was 
])nblicly scorned, and was made to do penance by walking- 
naked in the winter through the marketplace, singing a sati- 
i-icid song on himself. In the French settlement of Canada women 
were sent over after the men, and the single men, that they might be 
forced to marry, were subjected to heavy taxation and to restrictions 
on their trade and their movements generally. Those who married 
were dealt with, on the other hand, in a generous s])irit. Not only 
were thev ])rovided with a good wife and comfortable home, but they 
were awarded according to the number of their offs]3ring. The father 
of ten children was pensioned for life at the rate of 3o0 livresa year. 
If he had twelve cliildren the allowance was increased to 400 livres, 
and it went up to 1,2(>0 livres when fifteen children blessed the union. 
The conditions were reversed in the English colonies, for there the 
settlers eagerly welcomed the other sex, and did not hesitate to pay 
traders heavily in tobacco weight for every marriageable woman they 
In'ought over. As far l)ack, however, as 1695 the local authorities of 
Eastham in Massachusetts voted that every unmarried man in the 
township should kill six blackbirds or three crows yearly while he re- 
mained single, ])rodncing the scalps in proof, an<l as a penalty for not 
ol)eying the order he was forbidden to marry until he had made up all 
ai-rears. The requirement in this case was almost nominal ; but it was 
not so in'Marvland, where half a century later the Colonial Assembly 
imposed a tax of five shillings yearly upon all bachelors above thirty- 
five years of age (and on widowers without children) who were pos- 
sessed of 4'3oo. There was a similar oraduated tax on bachelors in Eno-- 
land in tiie I'eign of William III. Any commoner who was a bach- 
elor at twenty-five had to i)ay a shillint)- fine, yearly, and the amount 
was mcreased in accor'(hince with rank or title, any ducal ofi'ender 
being taxed t(j the extent of i;12 lOs. yearly. The taxes grew heavier 
l)efore they were removed, and the time came when bachelors were 
called upon to ])ay an extra tax on their servants. Thus we see the 
olil states as well as young ones have found out that their prosperity 
depends u[K)n its married citizens. The best subjects, as Lord I>acon 

70 



MAKKIAGE KECOKD 1881-1866. 71 

points out, are those in this relationship, the reason he o-ives for this 
conclusion being that single are " light to runaway," while " he that 
hath a wife and children hath given hostages to fortune." 

The marriage record of Spoon River precinct of Putnam county, 
from 1831 to 1839, is as follows : 

1832. 
Feb. 16. Daniel Warren and Luoy Skeel, by Samuel 1). Laughlin, J. P. 

1833. 
Jan. 1. Richard Hunt and Ruth Harram, by Samuel D. Laughlin, J P. 

1834. 
Nov. Ki, Emanuel Hitclujock and Rebecca Merrill, by Benj. Smith, J. P. 

1836. 

Dexter Wall and Sarah Starks, by Benj. Smith, J. P. 
Nero W. Mounts and Nancy Martindale, by Benj. Smith, J. P. 
Geo. F. Thomas and Elizabeth Romble, by W. M. Stewart, J. P. 
Martin Batterton and America Taylor, by Benj. Smith, J. P. 

1837. 

Henry James and Margaret Wilkinson, by Luther Driscoll, M. G. 
Jerry R. Larkins and Sarah Ann Davis, by J. B. Chenoweth. 
Nelson Dugan and Mary A. Stroude, by W. M. Stewart, J. P. 
Wm. M. Young and Nancy H. Glenn, by J. B. Chenoweth, M. G. 
John P. Judson and Maria Wattles, by J. B. Chenoweth, M.G. 
Isaac Baker and Eliza Ash, by J. B. Chenoweth, M. G. 
Joseph Cox and Catherine Edwards, by J. W. Agard, J. P. 
Langley Hall and Sarah Ligo, by M. G. Brace, J. P. 

1838. 

April 10. W. W. Drummond and Jemima McClenahan, by Jonathan 
Miner, M. G. 
Samuel Love and Catherine Taylor, by J. W. Agard, J. P. 
Jacob Zenor and Elvira Skeels, by B. Harris, M. G. 
Joseph K. Lane and Emily Chaffee, by J. W. Agard, J. P. 
W. A. Drummond and Ruth Cox, by J. W. Agard, J. P. 
Samuel Sterne and Elizabeth Phenix, by M. G. Brace, J. P. 
Thomas Timmons and Mary Jane Davis, by J. W. Agard, J. P. 

1839. 

Robert W. Clanahan and Lucy A. Richards, by Jonathan Miner. 
David Currier and Rebecca Jane Parks, by W. G. Vail, M. G, 
Geo. Simmerman and Phcebe Richmond, by Jonathan Miner. 
Mar. 13. Dan. Woodward and Mary A. Haditat, by M. G. Brace, J. P. 

During this time a license was issued to Minott Silliman, hut as the 
ceremony was not jjerfornied in Putnam county the document and 
certificate were recorded at St. Louis in 1833. 

The marriage of llai-ris W. Miner and Miss Nancy C-Ji'oss, in the 
winter of 1831-2, was the lirst between white American settlers within 
the bounds of Stark county. Squire Hiram M. Curry, of Peoria 
5 



Mar. 


17. 


April 
May 

Oct. 


38, 
19. 
10. 


April 
July 


5. 
4, 


i ( 


15, 


Aug. 


17. 


h b 


34. 


Oct. 


31. 


Nov. 


13. 


Dec. 


13. 



a 


15. 


May 


31, 


Sept. 


35, 


Oct. 


3. 


(( 


4, 


Dec. 


16. 




o 


Jan. 


O, 


it 


8. 


Feb. 


38. 



72 TIISTOKY OF STAKK COUXTY. 

county, was the celebrant. In 1832 Nero W. Mounts married the 
AVi(h)\v ]\rartindale. Squire Benjamin Smith officiating. 

"In Febrnarv. 1S3-1-." says Mrs; Shallenl)urger. •* thei-e was a wed- 
ding' at tlie house of James Ilolgate. of which we can still learn some- 
thino". This was between a ii-entleman bv the name of ]\IcClure and a 
sister of Airs. Holgate. Miss Marsh. The guests were Mr. and Airs. 
Sylvanus Moore, Mr. and Airs. Greenleaf Smith, Air. and Airs. John 
Dodofe, Air. and Airs. Samuel Seelev and Jesse Heath. AVhether 
Squire Smith or some wandering jireaclier performed the ceremony, 
Mr. Holgate did not inform us, but said he had, in 1834. but a cal)in 
sixteen feet square, and well filled with the usual comforts of })ioneer life. 
They took the door from its hinges to add to the tal)le. and as tlie 
weather was mild for the season, the men stood outside while the 
feast was spread. Then ' bee gums ' were brought in and puncheons 
laid on them for seats, and the}" had an excellent dinner, no scarcity of 
anything Init room. The re]iast over, the men had again to retire to 
the ' sky parlor " until the table could be cleai'ed and the door restored 
to its place, when the}' all managed to get inside and had a gay time. 
But the toilets must be left to the imagination of the reader." 

The first marriao'e license in this countv was issued bv the first 
clerk, over forty years ago. AVe give the form of the license and cer- 
tificate in full : 

State of Illinois, Stakk County, ss. — 

I, Oliver Wliitaker, Clerk of the County Commissiouers Court of the County of 
Stark, do hereby authorize any regular minister of the Gospel. Judge or .Justice of the 
Peace, to unite in marriage William Charles and Esther Stoddard ; and the minister. 
Judge or Justice of the Peace who may unite the above named parties shall make a certiti- 
cate of the same and return it to me within thirty days, as the law directs. 

In testimony whereof. I have hereunto set mv hand and private seal (there being no 
official seal provided) at Osceola, this 16th day of April, A. D. 1839. 

Oli\ter Whitakek, 
Clerk: 
State of Illlsois, Stark Coixty. 

I hereby certify that, on the IStli day of April. A. I). IX'Si), I joined in the holy state 
of matrimony, 'Sir. ^^'illiam Charles and Miss Esther .Stoddard, according to the usual 
custom and law of the State of Illinois. Given under my hand and seal this 18th day of 
April, A. D. 1839. " Lutiieu Dkiscoll, " 

Minixti r of the Gospel. 

The record of nuirriage certificates entered in tliis county from 
this time to the close of 1866 is as follows : 

1831). 

Wm. Ch;irle.s and Esther Stoddard, by Litther Dri.scoll, AI. (i. 
Le^vls Peny and Clarrissa AI. Elliot, by Jonathan Aliiier, AI. G. 
Egbert Ellsworth and Sarah Parrish, by J. W. Agard, J. P. 
Robert Colwell and Afaria AleCTenahan. bv Jonathan Afiner, 

M. G. 
Abel Stevens and Kosaniia Davis, by W. F. \'ail. M. G. 
Jacob Simmennan anrl Alalinda Sheets, bv Jonathan Hodgson, 

J. P. 
Luther Driseoll and Lydia Parrish. by Luther Driscoll, AI. G. 
Joseph Sloeum and Eliza AIcKellogg, by Silas Eiehards, J, P. 
Wm. F. Thomas and Alarv Butler, bv John W. Asfard. J. P. 



April 


1 IS. 




18. 


Alay 


10. 


a 


30. 


July 


8. 


Aug. 


15. 


Oct. 


16. 


a 


20. 


Nov. 


21. 



MARRIAGE RECORD 1831-1866. 78 

Nov. 21. Ira Ward, Jr., and Elizabeth Butler, by John W. Agard, J. P. 

" 28. Andrew Dray and Parmelia Winter, by John W. Agard, J. P. 

Dec. 9. John Rickey and Clarrissa Sweet, by John AV. Agard, J. P. 

1840. 

Jan. 2. Josiah Drummonds and Lucretia Colwell, by Joseph Perry, J. P. 

" 9. Robert Hall and Harriett Marsh, by Samuel Camp, J. P. 

" 29. Oaks Turner and Rebecca G. Butler, by AVilson Pitner, M. G. 

April 2. James K. McC-leniuiban and Anna Pollock, bv W. F. Vail, M. G. 

" 14. AVm. H. Butler and :\Iary Fuller, by Wilson Pitner, M. G. 

'' 23. John Riggen and Anna Botliwell, by Washington Trickle, J. P. 

May 5. Wm. Porter and Eleanor Hamilton, l)y W. F. Vail, M. G. 

April 30. Ezekial Dukes and Margaret Wright, ^by W. P. Vail, M. G. 

" 29. James Pollock and Mary Parrish, by W. F. Vail, M. G. 

May 14. Alex. B. Hamilton and Mary C. Pratz, by John Finley, J. P. 

" 3. Wm. E. Elston and Eliza Sweet, by Samuel Camp, J. P[' 

July 5. Everett Elston and Mary Howard, by Samuel Camp, J. P. 

Aug. 24. Stephen Ordaway and Phtebe Stiles, by Jonatban Hodgson, J. P. 

Sept. 5. Ira C. Reed and Maria Charles, by Luther Driscoll, M. G. 

" 21. William Tener and Christiana Coleman, by John Miller, P. J. P. 

'* 24. Samuel Maycock and Augusta Currier, by Samuel Camp, J. P. 

Oct. 4. Henry S. Cooper and Elizabeth Manter, by Silas Richards, J. P. 

" 11, Theodore F. Hurd and Catherine M. Driscoll, by Luther Dris- 
coll, M. G. 

" 25. JohnAV; Henderson and Mary Perry, by Jonathan Miner, M. G. 

Nov. 26. Sylvester Glass and Oliver Electa Lane, by John Miller, P. J. P. 

" 'ZQ. Ira T. Dibble and Lucretia Elmira Lane, by John Miller, P. J. P. 

Dec. 8. W. F. White and Juliana i\[urphy, by Edward Trickle, J. P. 

" 23. Charles C. Blish and Elizabeth Boner, by Luther Driscoll, M. G. 

1841. 

Jan. 3. Joseph Newton and Jane White, by James B. Chenoweth, M. G. 

" 7. C. D. Fuller and Lydia Avery, by Samuel Camp, J. P. 

j\Iar. 4. Samuel G. Butler and S. L. Ward, by Jonathan Miner, M. G. 

" 13. Joseph C. Avery and Martha Marsh, by Wm. Parks, J. P. 

'' 18. Thomas G. Pattison and Sarah Stinbrook, by Jonathan Hodg- 
son, J. P. 

" 18. Marcus A. Stoddard and Lucinda A. Geer, by Jonathan Miner, 
M. G 

April 8. John Burfield and Emily Colwell, by Edward Trickle, J. P. 

" 18. LTrial T. Simmerman and Juliet Richards, by Jonathan Hodg- 
son, J. P. 

" 22. James Albro and Amy Lake, by Luther Driscoll, M. G. 

May 9. Carson Burfield and Eliza McClenahan, by Joseph Perry, J. P. 

June 24. Zarah Sweet and Sarah Stevens, by Samuel Camp, J. P. 

" 24. Gabriel Bowen and Nancy Carter, by Aug. Richards, J. P. 

July o. J. A. Parker and Ann Eliza Manning, bv Jonatban Miner, M. G. 

" 15. John C. Albro and Mary A. Chatfield, by Luther Driscoll, M. G. 

" 27. Patrick Neval and Jane Pounds, by Jonatban Hodgson, J. P. 

No date. Noah Fogg and Eliza Smith, no record. 

Sept. 26. Daniel Smith and Henrietta Eagon, by AVashington Trickle, J. P. 

Oct. 17. John Bishop and Clariuda Williams, by Edward Trickle. ,7. P. 

'' 4. Minot Sillimau and Henrietta Bathen, by Junatlian Hodgson. 

" 24. Joseph Blanchardand Ann AVliite, by AVm. Parks, J. P. 



74 HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY. 

Thomas Graves and Xancy A. Cox, by Edward Trickle, J. P. 
Eugenus Frum and Elizabeth Barnett, by Jonathan Miner. 
G. A. Hough and Elizabeth Clark, by Samuel G. Wright, M. G. 
John Pryor and Mary Ilalsted, by Jonathan Hodgson, J. P. 
Joseph N. Benedict and Martha Bui-field. by Jonathan Hodg 

son, J. P. 
Imri Merchant and Martha Brotjks, by Jonathan Miner. M. G. 
Miles A. Fuller and Ann Avery, by Wni. Parks, J. P. 

1842. 

Charles Bolt and Catherine Slifer, by W. F. Yail, M. G. 
Seth B. Bristol and Rebecca Pollock, by S. G. Wright, M. G. 
B. S. Helvard and Sabrina Logan, bv John Miller, P. J. P. 
L. 0. Riddle and Eliza Smith, by John Miller, P. J. P. 
W. G. Knaggs and Laura Ann A. Little, by Samuel G. Wright. 
James H. Beebe and Lucy A. Stoddard, by Samuel G. Wright. 
Solomon Geer and Xancy Phenix, by Peter S. Shaver. J. P. 
Daniel P. Reed and Leanna Carter, by Edward Trickle, J. P. 
Reuben Col well and Elizabeth Springer. l)y Edward Trickle. 
April 21. James B. Witter and Margery Eckley,t)y Edward Trickle, J. P. 
Henry Sweet and Melinda Stevens, by Samuel Camp. J. P. 
Isaac Pulhamons and Lutitia Dunbar, by Jonatlum Miner, M. G. 
Simon Sturm and S. S. ]\[iller, by Wm. Moore, J. P. 
W. W. Winslow and Lucy M. Fuller, by Wm. Parks, J. P. 
John Stewart and Aurrilla Parrish, by Jonathan Hodgson, J. P. 
Alex H. Swiger and Xancv L Jolinson. bv Wilson Pitner. M. G. 
Wm. Clark and Emeline Walter, by John M. Miller, M. G. 
James Davis and Sarah Jane Dunbar, by Jonathan Hodgson. 
James P. Denby and Lucinda Bostwick. by Augustus Richards. 
James McXaught and Elizabeth Durana. by Jonathan Hodgson. 
Robert Rule and Charlotte Oliver, by W. F. Vail, M. G. 
Smith Hays and Jane Dray, by Samuel Camp, J. P. 

1843. 
Henry Sellon and Phcebe Stoddard, by Jonathan Miner, M. G. 
Wm. Ackley and Angeline Scofield, by Samuel G. Wright, M. G. 
Samuel Ridgeway and Icy B. Miller, by Peter S. Shaver, J. P. 
Lewis Bayley and Mary Lake, by Levi Chase, M. G. 
Egbert Ellsworth and Olin E. Glass, by John Sanders. M. G. 
John Swab and Mary Jane Emery, by AVashington Trickle. J. P. 
Oliver Moore and Hester Ann Thurston, by Peter S. Shaver. 
David Essex and Xancy E. Wilkison, by Jonathan Anthony, 

Pastor M. E. church. 
Bevel Beardsley and Martha Xixon. by Luther Driscoll, M. G. 
Edmund Winslow and Eliza P. Currier, by Alfred H. Murray. 
Charles Lake and Eliza Ann Davis, by Edward Trickle. J. P. 
John Cundiff and Ruth Stites, by Jonathan Miner. M. G. 
John Augur and Lucinda Snyder, by Jonathan Hodgson. 
Smith Woodward and Sarah Jordan, by Lewis Austin, J. P. 
Lucius E. Miner and M. Louisa Culbertson, by Jonathan Miner. 
Thomas Hinges and Ann Carney, by John \V. Agard, J. P. 

1844. 

Jan. 29. Lyman Hanchett and Lucinda Jane Simmerman, by George W. 
Jackson, J. P. 



Oct. 


28. 


<( 


28. 


Dec. 


3. 


(( 


5. 


a 


24. 


a 


30. 


a 


31. 


Jan. 


17. 


Feb. 


3. 


a 


10. 


ii 


10. 


a 


24. 


i .' 


24. 


Mar. 


3. 


a 


31. 


'' 


2T. 


April 21. 
" 21. 


* .' 


21. 


i I 


28. 


June 


8. 


(.' 


30. 


July 


14. 


fc t 


31. 


Oct. 


10. 


i( 


26. 


Xov. 


8. 


Dec. 


25. 


ti 


22. 


Jan. 


2. 


Feb. 


9. 


<• 


19. 


Mar. 


20. 


April 
July 


1 5. 

6. 

20. 


Aug. 


17. 


Sept. 
Oct. 


4. 
12. 


<( 


18. 


a 


22. 


Xov. 


30. 


Dec. 


3. 


ii 


12. 


et 


28. 



MARRIAGK KKUORD 1831-1866. 75 

Feb. 6. Jonathan Prattz and Eliza Jane Murphy, by Samuel G. Wright. 

'- 30. David Emery and Mary Albright, by John Berfield, J. P. 

•' 25. (leorge 1). Sturm and Marian Jordan, by Lewis Austin, J. l\ 

Mar. 34. Caleb A. Mounts and Naomi Newton, by James B. Clienoweth. 

" 38. James H. Dunn and Patty Ann Sturm, by Lewis Austin, J. P. 

May 0. Theo. Pulhanunis and Elfza L. Hodgson, by A. E. Phelps, M. G. 

"• 14. Ansel Fuller and Lydian Sweet, by James Buswell, J. P. 

" 31. Levi Leek and Emily M. Pomery, by Jonathan Miner, M. (1. 

June 1. John Murphy and ^lartha Hester, by Jonathan Hodgson, P. J. P. 

'•' 6. Amza Newman and Sylva Jackson, by Lewis Austin, J. P. 

" 39. Jeremiah P. Ward and Almira Day, by Jonathan Miner, M. G. 

Aug. 11. James Jackson and Elizabeth Sturm, by Lewis Austin, J. P. 

Oct. 1. Vickery Nation and Kosanna Pro, by Lewis Austin, J. P. 

Nov. 31. Isaac C. Reed and Luna A. Pomeroy, by Daniel Bagley, M. G. 

Oct. 14. Robert M. Moore and Maria White, by James lk;swell, J. P. 

Nov. 38. Alexander W. Albro aiul Hester Ann Wilcox, by Hervey J. 

Rhodes, J. P. 

Dec. 5. David H. Long and Eliza J. Simmerman, by Edward Trickle, J. P. 

'' 14. James Greenough and Ellen Barrett, by Jonathan Anthony. 

" 34. George Sheets and Charlotte Simmerman, by Edward Trickle. 

1845. 

-Jan. ID. J. H. Martindale and Rachel Ricketts, by John Bertield, J. P. 

" 36. James Bishoj) and Charlotte J. Arnold, by John Bertield, J. P. 

Feb. 33. David Gv/yre and Sarah Colwell, by Edward Trickle, J. P. 

Mar. 30. Samuel Bad ham aiul Marv Richards, by Robert McClenahan. 

April 34. Oliver B. Manley ami Eliza Prattz, by Samuel G. Wright, M. G. 

'• 13. John Louis and Ellen Howard, by James Holgate, J. P. 

May 5. Hall S. Gregory and Flora Newton, by James 13. Chenoweth. 

'' 8. John A. Maxtield and Jane Winter, by Jonathan Anthonv. 

'•• 37. Stephen W. Eastman and Susana M. Gill, by Elisha Gill, M. G. 

June 5. Thomas B. Donnelly and Margaret Wilhelm. by John Bertield. 

•• 1(5. Therrygood Riggen and Mariah Hubbell. by John Miller, J. P. 

Aug. 3. Hosea Bulkley and Mary Nicholson, by Daniel l^agley, M. G. 

8. Oliver S. Avei-y and Eliza Jane Atherton, by John Miller, J. P. 

Sept. 0. Bushrod Tapp and Mary Jane Essex, by Jonathan Anthony.- 

Nov. 11. George A. Worley and Mary A. Carter, by I. G. Whitcomb. 

" 18. Henry Seeley and Amanda Boardman, by I. G. Whitcomb, M. G. 

"' 17. William Fenn and Anna Hester, by Jonathan Hodgson, P. J. P. 

Dec. 11. James White and Anna Parmer, by Daniel Bagley, M. G. 

1840. 

Jan. 15. Amza Newman antl Sarah AVoodward, by Jonathan Hodgson. 

'' 18. John Springer and Sarah Coleman, by Edward Trickle, J. P. 

Feb. 35. Jacob W. Blake and Susan L. Powell, by Daniel Bagley, M. G. 

" 19. Adam Oliver and Polly Ann Parks, by W. J. Eraser, M. G. 

Mar. 10. David Bedford and Mary Knapp, by H. R. Halsey, J. P. 

April 19. Avery A. Reed and Orselia Pomeroy, by Daniel Bagley, M. G. 

'' 11. William Kinsey aiul Pauline Wilson, by Samuel G. Wright. 

June 2. William E. Foster and Sylvia C. Arnold, by Samuel G. Wright. 

July 3. Orrin Bates and Elizabeth Vail, by John Miller, J. P. 

Aug. 38. Thomas A. Leonard and Harriet E. McClure, ])y Luther Dris- 

coll, M. G. 

Nov. 19. Jackson Dunbar and Mary Ann Wright, by Freeborn Haney. 



76 HISTORY OF STAKK COUNYY. 

John Hodgson and Abigail Hester, by John Miller, J. P. 
Washington Dunbar and Anna Lee, by John Miller, M. P. 

1847. 

Thomas P. Camron and Cynthia Hyler, by Edward Trickle, J. P. 

David Howard and Thankful A. Elston, by John Miller, J. P 

Benjamin Brooks and Amanda J. Rounds, by Harvey J, Rliodes. 

Charles W. Todd and Abby Ann Dudley, by Samuel G. Wright. 

Henry Colwell and Clarinda Ebby,by John Berfield, J. P. 

Thomas Riggen and Maria Roiands, by John Berfield, J. P. 

David P. Wintro and Louisa Edwards, by H. J. Rhodes, J. P 

Joel Thurston and JNIalinda Ratcliff, by John Miller, J. P. 

David D. DriscoU and Josephine jM. Berger, by Luther Driscoll. 

Sylvanus AV. Warner and Emeline Otis, by James M. Stickney. 

Amza Newman and Phoebe Greenfield, by John Miller, J. P. 

Nathan H. Jones and Susan S. Hubbell, by Samuel G. Wright, 

David H. Long and Angela M. Thompson, by Edward Trickle. 

Stephen Frye and Sarah E. Essex, by John Miller, J. P. 

Lyman 0. Riddle and Margaret Runyan, by John Miller, J. P. 

Samuel Thomas and Ann Oziah, by Isaac Thomas, J. P. 

Henry F. Miller and Elizabeth P. Winslow, by Charles M. 
Johnson, J. P. 

Minott Silliman and Lutetia Oziah, by Isaac Thomas, J. P. 

George D.Young and Catherine Parmenter, bv John Miller, J. P. 

Caleb M. S. Lyons and S. Eliza Rhodes, by S. G. Wright, ^1. G. 

Charles W. Caswell and Christiana Tenen. by Charles M. John- 
son, J. P. 
Dec. 28. Peter Nyberg and Louisa Anderson, by I. I. Headstrom, J. P. 

1848. 
Jacob Springer and Samantha L. White, by C. M. S. Lyons, J. P. 
Emanuel Gunsaul and Missouri Ann Dunbar, by Moses Jared. 
David M. Taylor and Suey Ann Powell. byC. M. S. Lyons, J. P. 
Robert Bathan and Jeruslia Berger. by John ^liller, J. P. 
Daniel Phenix and Jane Moore, by Elisha Gill. M. G. 
Mnr. T. Michael Newell and Mary Emery, by Rev. Raphael Rainaldi. 

priest. 
April '2. Jeduthan S. Hopkins and Ann L. Rouse, by Josiah Moffit, J. P. 

2. Cyril Ward and Mary McNaught, by C. M. S. Lyons, J. P. 
May -1. Javil Chaffee and ]Mary Jane Boardman, by Josiah Moffit. J. P. 
4. James Essex and Elizabeth Essex, by Josiah Moffit, J. P. 
" 25. Albert B. Butler and Catherine Atherton, by Richard Radley. 
" 30. Alexander Rule and Betsey Oliver, bv John Turnbull. J. P. 
June 3. Luther Geer and Polly ^loore. by Luther Driscoll. M. G. 
" 5. Alexander Christy and Irena Sheets, by Josiah Moffit, J. P. 
" 15. Jacob Simmerman and Amelia Lane, by C. M. S. Lyons, J. P. 
July 4. AVilliam A. Sweet and Jane Persons, by H. I. Humphreys. M. G. 
" 19. John Barnhill and Penninah Hockenbarrv.bv S. G. Wright. M.G. 
Aug. 17. Perry Stancliff and Marthv Davis, bv Josiah ]\Ioffit, J. P. 
'' 17. Elder Abv and :\rarv AnnMuri^hv, bv W. P. King, M. G. 
" 31. William Waddell and Esther Neelev," by John R. Rounds. J. P. 
'' 30. William Lyie, jr., and Margaret McCreath, bv S. G. Wright, M. G. 
Sept. 10. Charles Rood and Elizabeth Lyle, by S. G. Wright, M. G. 
" 17. David W. Bennett and Mary Ann Dodge, by Moses Jared, M. G. 



Dec. 


20, 


(( 


24. 


Feb. 


27. 


Mar. 


18. 


li 


30. 


Apri: 


I 4. 


a 


5. 


May 


6. 


i\ 


25. 


June 


19. 


July 


9 


a 


8. 


a 


IG. 


a 


20. 


Aug. 


2. 


a 


2. 


a 


26. 


Sept. 


29. 


i i 


30. 


Nov . 


4. 


Oct. 


25. 


Nov. 


20. 


a 


2G. 



Jan. 


2. 


Feb. 


8. 


ii 


13. 


a 


24. 


a 


24. 



MARRIAGE RECORD 1831-1866. 



t i 



Sept. 21. Charles B. Smith and Sarah J. Snyder, by H. K. Halsey, J. P. 

Oct. 1. George Prsson and Marta Erie Dotr, by I. I. lledstrom, M. G. 

" 31. Aaron Tyler, jr.. and Elizabeth Buswell, by S. G. Wriglit. M. G. 

Nov. 5. George Elston and Mary Ann Imes, by Joshua Gilfinan, J. P. 

" 9. Argelon Graves and Lucy Ann Boardman, by John Miller, J. P. 

Dec. 12. Peter Johnson and ^lary Johnson, by I. I. Hedstrom, M. G. 

1849. 

Jan. 1. Walter Fuller and Chloe M. Rowe, by S. G. Wright, M. G. 

" 7. Jeffrey A.Cooley and Louisa Culbertson, by S. G. Wright, M.G. 

" 18. AVilliam A. Stites and Lovice Hodgson, by Absalom AVoolescroft. 

Feb. 8. Stanley Morgan and Lydia Long, liy Charles M. Johnson, J. 1*. 

" 10. Bennett C. Lee and Elizabeth Knight, by John Miller, J. P. 

March 1. John Snyder and Susan S. Wright, by H. R. Halsey, J. P. 

" 15. William E. Dunn and Angelina H. Wvckoff, by Samuel (!. 
Wrio-ht, M. (i. 

" 11. Isaac Sturms and Jane Stedham, bv Joshua Gilfinnan, J. P. 

'' 30. William B. Smith and Eliza McXaught, by John :\[iller, J. P. 

" 27. John Potter and Charity Ann Young, by S. G. Wright, M. G. 

April 1. Banajah Orsman and Mary Jane Sturm, by James Holgate, J. P. 

" 9. Andrew Parker and Adeline D.Knowlton, by James Holgate, J. P. 

" 26. Willard F. Clark and Sarah Haekenberry. by John Cummings. 

May 7. Jacob Holgate and Alvena Williams, by John Miller, J. P. 

'' 27. Thomas W. Ross and Margaret J. Armstrong, by Samuel (r. 
Wright, M. G. 

" 29. Thonuis J. Henderson and Henrietta Butler, by Richard Radley. 

June 14. William P. AVilliams and Joanna Stidham, by S. G. Wright. 

'' 20. Jones Wai'd and Martha Wicksals, by Jonathan Hodgson, M. G. 

*' 25. Martin Shallenberger and Eliza Jane Hall, by Samuel G. 

Wright. M. (i. 

July 4. Craig Headley and Emeline Garner, by H. J. Rhodes, P. J. P. 

5. James H. ("onley and Alinerva Ann Hall, by J. F. Thompson. 

Aug. 13. George Ilammon and Konar Reader, by C. M. Johnson, J. P. 

Sept. 27. Hirain H. Drawver and Mary Phenix, by S. G. Wright, M.G. 

" 23. Charles H. Turner and Eliza" Ricketts, by S. G. AV right, M. G. 

Oct. 12. Albert Peters and Martha Crex, by I. I. Hedstrom, M. G. 

'' 30. Avery A. Reed and Rhoda AV alters, by Luther Driscoll, M. (i. 

Nov. 15, John Leffler and Frances A^'ilkinson, by John Miller, J. P. 

" 27. Andrew Oliverand Helen Turnbull, by Samuel G. AVriglit, M.G. 

Dec. 24. John P. Barnett and Catherine Miller, l)y .lohn ^liller, J. P. 

1850. 

Jan. 1. Peter Nelson and Clarinda Haskins, by John Miller, J. P. 

" IG. Abner Sturm and Eliza Sturm, by AV." AV. AVinslow, J. P. 

" 31. AVm. G. Thompson and Alary Stiles, by Absalom Woolescroft. 

Feb. 14. AVelleston K. Fuller and Sarah" Oziah, by John Miller, J. P. 

April 1. Ethan A. Corn well and Edith Emery, by Milton P^ckley, J. P. 

" 7. Benj. F. Edwards and Catherine Eckley, by Milton Eckley, J. P. 

'■' 14. Perry AVinn and Sarah Graus, by John Miller. J. P. 

" Ki. 0. B. Mauley ami Elizabeth Aton, by M. P. King, M. G. 

'' 11. Miles A. Fuller and Elizabeth S. AA^alker, by James B. Chenoweth. 

" 21. Robert Cox and Susan Guyre, by Isaac Thomas, J. P. 

May 11. James C. Egbert and Catherine Swank, by Jacob Young, J. P. 

" " Julius Ives and Eliza Newton, by Sam. G. AV right, M. G. 



78 HISTORY OF STAKK COl'NTV. 

Nathan Snare and Lydia Davidson, by Absalom Woolescroft, M.Gr. 
Henry Clay Henderson and lantha Fuller, by Sam. G. Wriglit. 
James A. 5lorris and ALce (Jreenougli, by Isaac Thomas. J. P. 
Mardonius Durand and Mahala M. St. Peters, by Jacob Young. 
Verness Brown and Phoebe Stofer, by Eev. James M. Stickney. 
Peter A. Grass and Elizabeth Ann Wooley, by John Miller, J. P. 
Daniel Gingrich and Lucinda Porter, by M. P. King, M. G. 
Daniel McKee and Sarah Jane Sturm, by Miles A. Fuller, J. P. 
Elis Deas and Mary A. Simmerman, by Jacob Young, J. P. 
Benj. C. Leonard and Susan Durand, by John Miller. J. P. 
Edwin E. Boardman and Hannah Fuller, by Sam. G. Wright. 
John Miller and Hannah Swank, by Jacob Young, J. P. 
John L. Blanchard and Esther Stowell, by Joseph Catterlin (Seal). 
James K. Lashellsaud Saraii M. Williams, by Wm. M. Clark, M. G. 
Wm. L. Howard and Susan Wright, by James Holgate, J. P. 
Andrew J. Finley and Margaret J. Carter, by John Miller, J. P. 
David Simmerman and Sarah A. Durand. by Jacob Young, J. P. 
Henry Hitchcock and Adaline Newton, by Miles A. Fuller. J. P. 
James Wolf and Tiantha Livermore, by Jacob Young, J. P. 
James D. Hodgson and Eoxanna Eisdon. by Eev. Wm. Gaddis. 
Elijah Greenfield and Mary F. Winter, by Miles A. Fuller, J. P. 
Sylvester Greenfield and Mahala Winter, by Miles A. Fuller. 
Hugh Y. Godfrey and Frances E. McCance. by Eev. A. Gross. 
Wm. E. Jones and Elizabeth W. Littell, by Joseph Catterlin, J. P. 
Wm. Newton and Malinda Shaw, by W. W. Winslow, J. P. 
Aaron N. Fitch and Martha Martz, by Eev. A. Gross. 
Newton Eussell and Susan M. Blake, by Joseph Catterlin, J. P. 
Leonard C. Drawyer and Catherine ^l. Shavers, bv Wiles A. 
Fuller, J. P. 

1851. 

Jesse Williams and Mary Ann Green, by Jacob Young, J. P. 
Stephen D. Brees and Julia Drawyer, by Miles A. Fuller, J. P. 
Homer Laird and Olive Carothers, by John Miller, J. P. 
George M. Hazen and Margaret Prattz, by M. P. King, M. G. 
William F. Berrian and Ann Barnhill, by Sam. G. Wright, M. G. 
James Osterliout and Filicia Malvina Shaver, bv Miles A. Ful- 
ler, J. P. 
Joseph W. Halsted and KeziaB. Gaddes, by John Sinclair, M. G. 
Caleb Brooks and Mary Thompson, by Luther Driscoll, M. G. 
Joseph C. Jackson and Susan Dalrymple. by Miles A. Fuller. 
Thomas N. Fitch and Clarinda Taylor, by Dan. J. Hurd. J. P. 
Jonas Eimes and Marv Lacev, bv Sam. G. Wright. M. G. 
Zelur Snell and Elizabeth Sturm, by W. W^. Winslow, J. P. 
John J. Shockley and Melissa Pound, by Jacob Young, J. P. 
Abram Phenix and Esther C. Moore, by W. W. Winslow, J. P. 
Christopher Trickle and Agnes Dwire, by Jacob Young, J. P. 
Silas Pound and Louisa D. Smith, by Jacob Young, J. P. 
Thomas J. Elliot and Mary C. Dudley, by A. Gross, M. G. 
Wm. M. Miner and Mary Miner, by A. Gross, ^I. G. 
Wm. Morrison and Esther Colwell,"by John Miller. J. P. 
Jefferson Winn and Larinda Wheeler, by John Miller, J. P. 
James H. Newton and Hester Ann McCance, by A. Gross, M. G. 
Jacob Emery and Lydia Driscoll, by S. G. Wright, M. G. 



May 
June 


25. 
12. 


July 


25. 


Aug. 


11. 


ee 


a 


a 


15. 


i i 


18. 


i< 


25. 


C( 


29. 


Sept. 


3. 

12. 


ii 


15. 


a 


17. 


a 


22. 


li 


26. 


Oct. 


6. 


a 


10. 


Nov. 


17. 


a 


14. 


ii 


21. 


a 


28. 


a 


28. 


Dec. 


20. 


Nov. 


28. 


Dec. 


8. 


i< 


8. 


a 


9. 


a 


15. 


Jan. 


30. 


Feb. 


8. 


a 


20. 


a 


a 


Mar. 


28, 


a 


30, 


Apri 
May 


1 3, 

1, 

21 


a 


28, 


June 


1 15, 


>( 


25, 


July 

Sept, 


14, 
i 
9, 


< i 


21 


a 


21, 


i( 


21 


a 


25, 


. a 


28 


i i 


28 


Oct. 


9, 



Oct. 


12, 


i. 


12. 


a 


23. 


i( 


22. 


I e 


26. 


Nov. 


4. 


i( 


5. 


i k 


27. 


Dec. 


1^ 


>• 


Ki. 


i i 


24. 


k i 


28. 


a 


;50. 


Jan . 


8. 


'• 


19. 


a 


21. 


a 




a 


25. 


Fol). 


12. 


^* 


13. 


i b 


18. 


.Mar. 


11. 


•• 


15. 


a 


18. 


i i 


18. 


a 


20. 


i i 


21. 


•• 


25. 


April 


[ 1. 


a 


4. 


i< 


rv 
1 . 


a 


13. 


i i 


15. 


ie 


31, 


May 


2, 


i k 


2. 


i e 


12, 


a 


22. 


cc 


25, 


" 


15. 


July 


4, 


June 


20, 


July 


18, 




22 


*' 


25, 


Aug. 


8 


(t 


16, 


i I 


22 



JVIAERIAGPJ KKCOKI) 1831-1866. 79 

Isaac Dimmick and Xancy Sturm, by W. A¥. Winslow. J. I*. 
Jarvis S. Berger and ]\Iary 11. Smith, l)y John F. Tliompson. 
Samuel G. Avery and Marietta Day, by Sam. (i. Wright. J. 1*. 
John Motes and Lucretia Drummond, by Johu Miller. J. \\ 
Stoughton Lamoree and Rosanna Sheets, by Jolin Miller. .1. !'. 
John Chatt'ee and Mary Ann Fast, by John Miller, J. \\ 
Patrick M. Blair and Harriet M. Hall, by Sam. Cf. AVright. M. (;. 
David Oziah and Lydia Ann Updike, by John Miller. J. P. 
Wanton Briggs and Temperance ])avidsou. by C. Lazenby. 
John Pouse and Lydia Wooden, by Isaac 'I'homas, J. P. 
Addison G. Blanchard and Mary M. Bagley, by John P. Fckles. 
Linens I). Piehmond and Elizabeth A. Pouse, "by Isaac Thomas. 
Daniel Keim and Sarah llai'twell, by C. Lazenby, M. (J. 

1852. 
James Biggs and Eliza Ann Tapp, by G. Lazenby, M. G . 
Calvin Butler and Eliza Ilarter, by John Finley. J. P. 
Charles II. Winter and Sarah A. E. Dray, by C'. Lazenby. M. G. 
Peter Fast and Elizabeth Atlierton, by A. (iross, M. (i." 
Noah Springer and Elizabeth Eby, by John Finley, J. P. 
John Deadly and Marv Albro, by Joseph Catterlin, J. P. 
Nicholas C."Buswell and Ellen Fowler, by \V. W. AVinslow, J. P. 
Sylvester M. Armstrong and Elizabeth Eedfield. by II. H. llal- 

sey, J. P. 
Pobert Jordan and Sarah Dixon, by John xMiller, J. P. 
Nathan Graves and Emily Boardman, by John Finley, J. P. 
Samuel C. Neal and Asenath L. Matthews, by Robert Cameron. 
Alphonzo Gooding and Harriet Lacey. by Sam. G. Wright, M. (i. 
Johnston Breese and Mary Besette, by Miles A. Fuller, J. P. 
Leonard Duffer and Sarah J. Emery, by Sam. G. Wright, M. G. 
Wm. P. Finley and Cynthia J Witter, by Jacob Young, J. V . 
Wm. Benjamin and Mary A. Parcells, by James Ilolgate, J. P. 
Andrew Jackson and Sarah Newton, by Miles A. Fuller, J. P. 
Arch. Ayers and Catherine 0. Becker, by Christopher Lazenby. 
Hugh (Jreenough and Sarah Eliza Miller, by Sam. G. Wright. 
Wm. S. Sliockley aiul Hannah Losey, by .Jacob Young, J. !'. 
John A. White and Marcia E. Baldwin, by Sam. G. Wright. 
John Hiner and Elizabeth Williams, canceled. 
DeWitt C. Mears and E. Anne Armstrong, by A. Gross, M. (J. 
Benj. Baldwin and Elizabeth Williams, by M". P. King, M. (i. 
James M. Flint and Margaret F. Hart. l)y Sam. G. Wright. 
John W^rigley and Ann Buckley, by Isaac Thomas, J. P. 
Havilah \^. Johnson and Judith '^rapj), by C. Lazenby, M. (i. 
Samuel M. Eldridge and Caroline F. Gardner, by A. Gross, M. G. 
Orrin M. (^iross and Lucia Perkins, by A. Gregg. M. G. 
Wm. S. Johnson and I^elinda Tapp, by C. Lazenby, M. G. 
Edward Durand and ^lartha Halsted. byrl. Hodgson, M. G. 
Thomas Col well, Jr., and Josey E. Graves, by James Ilolgate. 
Anson H. Rutherford and Charity Dixon, by John Finley. J. P. 
Chauncev D. Fuller and Electa Ann Westfall, bv Miles A. I^'iil- 

ler, J. P. 
Henry CuUiertson and Margaret Dill, by C. Lazenby, M. (J. 
David Springer and Mary K. (J handler, by C. ('. AVilson. J. I'. 
19. James H. Tull and Rachel (^'arter, by John P'inley, J. P. 



80 HISTOKY OF STAKK COUNTV. 

Levi Holiium and Lucy llollister. by Miles A. Fuller. J. P. 
Abiali Butler and Elizabeth Emery, by Jacob Young, J, P. 
David Straiiilit and Sarah Elston. by Miles A. Fuller, J. P. 
John Lewis and Eebecca Ann Eagon. by M. P. King. M. G. 
Orville Blanchard and Julia Ann Stimpson, by A. Gross, M. G. 
Isaac ]\Ioore and Abigail Moore, by Samuel Ordway, M. G. 
Samuel Dixon and Hannah Cox, by John Miller, J. P. 
Geo. Y. Eose and Eurance Parrish, by A. Gross. M, G. 
Charles Howater and Eachel Bennett, by G. Edwards. M. G. 
^\m. Taylor and ^lilly Morrison, by Joseph C. Tozier. J. P. 

1853. 
Levi A. Hodgson and Isadore Hodgson, by C. Lazenby, M. G. 
Horace F. Howard and Lovenia F. Fitch, by M. P. King, M. G. 
Joshua Eound and Wilmyrth Worley. by Joseph Catterlin, J. P. 
Luther P. McCoy and Eel )ecca J. Eogers, by Jacob Young. J. P. 
John A. Leeson and Martha hnus. by John B. Fast, M. G. 
Jeremiah Patch and Julia E. Morgan, by James Holgate, J. P. 
Lyman Thurston' and ^fartha Durand, Ijy J. M. Hinman. ^l. G. 
Henry Jones and Ellen White. l>y Samuel G. Wright, M. (J. 
Cyrus Pratt and Phoebe Ann Atherton, by Jacob Young, J. P. 
Henrv S. Godfrey and Susan Eobertson, by A. Gros?, M. G. 
Philip Earhart and Floretta Sheets, by John Miller. J . P. 
Lewis W. ^^'illiams and Lucy A. Johnson, by Chris. Lazenln'. 
John Kelsey and Breta Johnson, by Chris. Lazenby, M. G. 
Stewart Jordan and Catherine Sturm, by W. W. AVinsloAv. J. P. 
John M. Hatch and Eoxanna Lyle. by H. E. Halsey, J. P. 
Ira Ward, jr. and Jane Stimson. by J. M. Hinman, M. G. 
James Triplett and Barbery Ball, by Joseph Catterlin, J. P. 
James Culbertson and Emily B. Ogle, by Samuel G. "Wright. "SI. G. 
George W. Leeson and .Mary M Leeson. by John B. Fast, M. G. 
Sylvester H. Jackson and Beularh A. Leeson, by John B. Fast. 
Clark S. Hitchcock and Thersey A. White, by Miles A. Fuller. 
W. H. Eutherford and Mary A. Springer, by Charles C. Wilson. 
Amos Lester and Olive Bennett, by Isaac Edwards, M. G. 
David Colwell and Lina Mott, by Isaac Thomas, J. P. 
Thomas W. Xewland and Mary Buclianan, by A. Gross, M. G. 
Aaron Porter and Harriet Y. Matthews, by E. Cameron, M. G. 
Nicholas Sturm and MauA'inia Saxton, by Retes Sturm, M. G. 
Henry E. Colburn and Phoebe A. Lutz, by C. Lazenby. M. G. 
Elijah Fitch and Esther Whipple, by A. G. Lucas, M. G. 
Levi Francis and Charity W ilkinson. by Isaac Thomas, J. P. 
Alonzo W Bunce and Emily Dawson, by Joseph Catterlin, J. P. 
Benjamin Todd and Frances D. Jones, by A. Gross, M. G. 
Thonms J. Wright and Susan D. ]\IaxHeld, by C. Lazenby, M. G. 
Wm. C. Lee and Harriet J . Leeson. by John B. Fast, M. G. 
James Slater and Almira Drury. by Peter Sturm. ^[. G. 
Alfred Gierliart and Wealthy Ann Dugan, by H. J. Eliodes. 
4.^ Israel Thurston and Sylvia Paine, by Joseph Catterlin, J. P. 
J. C. Lambert and Mary R. Wright, by C. B. Donaldson. J. P. 
John J. Boyd and Eflfa Poysher. by C. Lazenby, M. (J. 
Fernando Jones and Jane Graham, by C Lazenby, M. G. 
Alexander Turnbull and Sophia Turnbull. by Joseph Catterlin. 
Jacob Clemmer and Ann Stowell, by S. G. Wright, M. G. 



Sept. 
Aug. 


29. 


Sept. 


•i. 

G. 


i c 


18. 


Oct. 


23. 


Nov. 


4. 


• • 


13. 


a 


25. 




•21. 


Jan. 


1. 


Fel). 


o 


a 


1. 


a 


• > 
O. 


Api-i 
Feb. 


1 10. 
25. 


t ( 


10.' 


ec 


ir. 


i . 


ICi. 


Ci 


13. 


ii 


20. 


il 


17. 


t ( 


24. 


ii 


22. 


il 


24. 


ii 


22. 


ii 


•Z(j. 


:\Iar. 


2. 


• > 


13. 


ii 


13. 


i i 


24. 


, i 


14. 


ii 


31. 


ii 


2G. 


ii 


27. 


Apri 


1 8. 
14. 


<. 


16. 


May 


12. 


Apri 
ii 


1 23. 
29. 


May 


5. 


••" 


12. 


a 


22. 


t i 


22. 


ii 


26. 


June 


4. 


il 


25." 


Julv 


i . 


• •' 


?. 


b It 


11. 


Aug. 


18. 



MARRIAGE RECORD 1831-1 8<i(!. 81 

Aug. 16. Washington Brady and Julia C-. Denny, by Samuel (1. Wright. 
Matthew H. liounds and Eliza Headly,' by IT. J. IJhodes, j" \\ 
Harrison Newton and Olive M. Gierhart. by W. '\\ Miller, J. P. 
Augustus J. Hammond and Cecilia B. Wynkoo]). by James M. 

8tickney, M. G. 
David Fast aiul Lydia Moffit, by Isaac Thonuis. J. 1'. 
Liberty Stone and Thankful B. Leeson, by James l^uswcll, J. P. 
Moses Snodgrass and Elizabeth A. McClenahan, by Henry Breese. 
John H. Taylor and Del:)orah A. Barrett, by James B. C'henowith. 
Julius Ives and Sarah L. Carothers, by S. (I. Wright, M. (J. 
John Mortley and Mary A. Knotts, by Alex. Moncrief, J. P. 
Cyrus Sweet and Armindia Ives, by A. Cross, M. C. 
John E. Stanbury and Mary Johns Dotr, by Washington Tric^klo. 
Thaddeus S. Thurston and Mary Jane Ellis, by Isaac Thomas. 
Cialvin Hart and Mnvj A. Holgate. by S. (I. Wright, M. C. 
Frederick J. Brown and Rachel Pike, by A. G. Lucas, M. G. 
Benjamin Ilawarten and Elizabeth Newman, by H. R. Ilalsey. 
John Bates and Sarah Harvey, by Rev. S. C. Wright. 

1854. 
Samuel Maddox and Mars^aret F. Jennino-s, bv Alex. Moncrief. 
James Belangey and Elizabeth Riley, by Henry Breese, J. P. 
S. S. Kaysfier and Hannah Whitaker, by Rev. A. Gross, Baptist. 
Aaron Curfman and Rachel Wilkinson, by S. S. Walker, ^l. G. 
Edward Besett and Melvina L. Hochstrasser, by M. P. King. 
Ambrose Fuller aiul Alice J. Woodward, by Rev. S. G. Wright. 
Sereno E. Donaldson and Francis E. Gushing, bv Rev. S. CJ. 

Wright. 
Albion P. Hurd and Clarrissa Porter, bv Sam. Ordwav, J. P. 
Stephen W. Lyle and Eliza W. Hatch, by Sam. R. Tlirall, M. G. 
Leven E. Timmons and Eliza A. Lake, by Isaac Thomas, J. P. 
Adam Gardner and So])hronia Weaver, by James Bus well, J. P. 
John Snare and ^laria T. Holgate, by C. W. Walker, M (L 
Peter Kigles and Helen Rutherford, by E. ScudderHigh. M. G. 
Joseph Glaze and Mary A. C'hamp, by Isaac Tliomas, J. P. 
Nelson C. Shaver and Mary Unibaugh, by John Finley, J. P. 
Joseph Jacobs and Mary jane Emery, by J. S. Mahan, M. G. 
Charles Potter and Lucinday Emery, by S. G. Wright, M. G. 
Wm. W. Warner and Caroline A. Greeley, by Alba Gross, M. G. 
A\m. Oliver, and Eliza Turnbull, by N. C. Weede, M. G. 
Daniel J. Hodgson and Jane A. Miller, bv H. R. Halsey, J. P. 
Alex. Buchanaii and Marv McClennan, l)v S. G. Wright, M. G. 
Luther S. Milliken and F, A. Brodhea(l,'by Phil. (Muise, M. G. 
John A. White and Mary J. Anderson, by S. G. Wright, M. G. 
John Q. A. Thomas and Kate M. Douglass, by Alex. Moncrief. 
Samuel Earhart and Catherine A. Porter, by A. G. Lucas, M.(r. 
James ^I. Stimpson and Sai'ah Parrish, by Alba Gross, M. G. 
George Dawson and Bashebe Graves, by Isaac Thomas, J . P. 
Charles C. Allen and Mrs. N. Elmira Culbertson. l)y All)a Gross. 
Sylvester H. Stofer and Eliza J. Snell, l)y Jacob E. Jones, J. P. 
James Cakhal and Martha Fitch, by S. (J. Wright, M. G. 
John D. Carter and Julia Ann Dray, by Isaac Thomas, J. P. 
Wm. Bonar and Mary Ann Lewis, by John B. Fast, M. (J. 
G. W. Longmire and Thankful Elston, by Jacob E. Jones, J. P, 



<. < 


25 


Sep. 


10. 


Oct. 


2. 


it 


4. 


a 


4. 


i i 


G. 


Nov. 


0. 


a 


29. 


Dec. 


3. 


a 


4. 


a 


14. 


i( 


18. 


(C 


29. 


a 


22. 


i i 


25. 


Jan. 


n. 


Jan. 


0. 


a 


31. 


Si 


29. 


Feb. 


9. 


a 


5. 


a 


8. 


a 


14. 


(C 


17. 


i< 


19. 


i i 


26. 


Mar. 


1. 


•• 


6. 


i( 


16. 


i( 


12. 


a 


16. 


a 


31. 


ii 


23. 


iC 


27. 


April 3. 
" 18. 


( i 


19. 


a 


20. 


a 


26. 


a 


23. 


a 


27. 


a 


28. 


a 


30. 


May 


7. 


a 


6. 


i i 


15. 


i< 


18. 


i< 


21. 



82 IirSTOKV OK STAHK COUNTY. 

Fred Mawbey and Hannah E. Baldwin, by Alex. Moncrief, J. P. 
Wilson Smith and Mary M. Dennis, by A. Gross, M. G. 
John Kerr and JMary H. Kerr, by Alex. Moncrief. J. P. 
C'has. Leverton and Mary Jane Graves, by C. C. Wilson, J. P. 
Alexander Taylor and Susan Hnrlbnrt, by Thomas M. Pattin. 
Adrian K. Atin and Sarah Jane Prattz, by M. P. King, M, Of. 
Wm. H. Hall and Harriet E. Hill, by David James, M. G. 
David M. Leeson and Sybil P. Leeson, by Alex. Moncrief, J. P. 
Thomas Dunn and Henrietta Geer, by John B. Fast, M. G. 
Finlev Murchison and Marv Turner, bv X. C. Weede, M. G. 
Wm. P. Buswell and Eliza llolgate, by^'S. G. Wright, M. G. 
Geo. AY. Mahan and Harriet Xewton, by T. S. Vail, M. G . 
Anderson Yelm and Priscilla E. Aby, by M. P. King. M. G. 
Wm. Leeke and Hester H. Higgins, by John Morey, M. G. 
Benjamin Anderson and Mary Ellen Addis, by John Morey. 
Jason G. Duncan and Abigail Smith, no record of marriage. 
John A. Gilfillenand Lucinda Buswell, l)y S. G. Wright, M. G. 
Wm. Kaler and Mary Leonard, by Herrick P. Halsey, J. P. 
Lewis Olmsted and Martha Pratt, by John Morey, M. G. 
Wm. Harter and Clarissa Carter, by John Finley, J. P. 
Henry S. Hinerand Mary C. Grolf. by John Turbett, M. G. 
John E. Smith and Sarah J. Updyke, by Alex. Moncrief, J, P. 
Thomas Riggin and Julia Ann Stargett, by Jacob Young, J. P. 
John B. Roosd and Sarah E. Avery, by John B. Fast, M. G. 
Eufus Stites and Eacliel Hodgson, by H. P. Halsey, J. P. 
John Peterson and Julia Hayes, by Myron H. Xegus, M. G. 
Wm. Snell and Emily Taylor, by Henry Brees, J. P, 
John Davis and ]S'ancy J. Albertson, by Isaac Thomas, J. P. 
Wilson Price and Eliza Graif, by John Morey, M. G. 
Norman Pomeroy and Lydia Anthony, by Isaac Thomas, J. P. 
John P. Freeman and Rachel Freeland, by John B. Fast, M. G. 
Nathan Field, and Abigail E. Pratt, by James Holgate, J. P. 
Royal A. Tanner and Emilv Eady, by Alex. Moncrief, J. P. 
Philip Gless and Charlotte S. White, by Alex. Moncrief, J. P. 
James Howard and Martha Snnggs, bv S. G. AA^right. M. G. 
Hiram P. Geer and Mary Jane Stewart, by A. G. Lucas, M.G. 
Levi Craine and Nancy Stephens, by S. G. AVright, M. G. 
Samuel M. Jones and Martha Redfield, by S. G. AV right, M. G. 

1855. 
Ben. F. Smith to Mary R. AAliite, by Andrew Gregg, M. G. 
Henry C. Blanchard and Mary E. Albertson, by Isaac Thomas. 
Austin Smith and Sarah K. McNaught, by Alba Gross, M. G. 
Joshua Gilfillen and Lucy A. Sawyer, by Samuel R. Thrall, i\I. G. 
Stephen AV, Eastman and Martha Merchant, by Alba Gross, M. G. 
EdAvard Colgan and Drusilla Marlatt, by H. R. Halsey, J. P. 
Milton P. King and Mary A. Lucas, by A. G. Lucas, M. G. 
Alex. Sunburg and Mrs. P. Nelson, by Jacob Young, J. P. 
Andrew Tull and Sarah Carter, by John Morey, M. G. 
David Olmsted and Rachel A. Fraker, by John Morey, M. G. 
John Hook and Nancy Jane Swarts, by Alex. Moncrief, J. P. 
Amos Dennis and Margaret A^an Sickle, by John Morey, J. P. 
John Wiley and Eunice M. Trickle, by R. C. Dunn, M"". G . 
Jacob AA'iley and Julia Ann Murphy, by Jacob Young, J. P. 



May 


27. 


June 


18. 


>'•' 


25. 


i ( 


18. 


a 


22. 


July 


4. 


a 


1. 


June 


30. 


July 


9. 


a 


20. 


a 


24. 


a 


26. 


Aug. 


3. 


<>' 


3. 


a 


12. 


ii 


4. 


a 


IT. 


a 


IG. 


Oct. 


5. 


a 


5. 


a 


8. 


a 


11. 


a 


15. 


a 


21. 


a 


25. 


a 


25. 


a 


28. 


Nov. 


9. 


i. 


11. 


a 


11. 


a 


17. 


a 


30. 


Dec. 


8. 


a, 


14. 


t i 


21. 


a 


28. 


a 


26. 


a 


28. 


Jan. 


1. 


ii 


3. 


a 


10. 


a 


11. 


a 


16. 


a 


16. 


a 


17. 


a 


29. 


Feb. 


1. 


t( 


15. 


a 


15. 


i( 


22. 


a 


27. 


Mar. 


1. 



MAKKIAGE RECORD 1831-18(U). 83 

Mar. 3. Eeuben Swank and Martha Ileaten, by Joliii Morey, M. G. 
Croft Pilgrim and Susanna Swank, by John Morey, M. ({ . 
Samuel P. Shannon and Snrah E. Ilazen, by .John Morey, M. (1. 
Thomas McNaught and Rachel E. Riggins, bv Jacob Young. J. P. 
Joseph D. Taylor and Elizabeth Ward. l)y \y. M. Fuller"; J. P. 
Elijah Eagan and Luna Stevenson, by Jolni Sargent, M. G. 
Duncan Mathesonand Catherine Buchanan, by Chas. Donoldson. 
Matthias A. Sturm and Matilda Sturni, by Jacob E. Jones, J: P. 
Robert Colwell and Abigail Vinson, by John Finley. J. P. 
Matthias Sturm and Eliza Stratten, by Jacob E. , I ones. J. P. 
Isaac E. Dennis and Margaret L. Wiley, by John Morey, M. G. 
Herman Geiscnhoiner and ^[argaret Fall, by Alex. Moncrief. 
Wm. Ives and Julia A. Brown, by Myron II. Negus, J. P. 
Elijah McCleiiehan and Elizabeth Wilson, by James M. Rogers. 
Marshall Gustin and Marv Ann Ansman, by R. C. Dunn, M.G. 
McCandless Moffitt and Annie Moffet, by W. F. Vail, M. G. 
John Marshall and Eliza Patoh, by Christian lirinkerholf, M.G. 
John Eavans and Ann Briton, by John Moncrief, M. G. 
John Woodward and Rebecca E. Shimey. bvR. C. Dunn, M.G. 
Merritt Jamison and Sally Jay, by Isaac Thomas, J. P. 
John Elliss and Leanna Francis, Isy Isaac Thomas, J. P. 
John Davison and Mary Ellen Shull. by John Morey. M.G. 
Albert Ellsworth and Cornelia Elliott, by John Morey. M G. 
Cornelius Denham and Mary P. Buswell, by S. G.AVright, M. C 
James Spillman and Sarah JE. Athala, by A. G. Lucas, M.G. 
Henry Stofer and Nancy Jane Briton, by Alex. Moncrief, J. P. 
Horace A. Johnson and Amelia A. Creighton, by (J. Brinkerholf. 
Henry Colwell and Sarah Ann Vinson, by John Finley, J. P. 
Wm. Dunn and Susan Dorrance. by Jacob E. Jones, J. P. 
Geo.C. Boardman and Martha J. York, by H. J\. Halsey, J. P. 
Jelferson Win and Olive Jane Beers, by C. Brinkerholf, M. G. 
Israel Thurston and Rhoda Deats, by C. Brinkerholf, M. G. 
Sylvester F. Otman and Emma Deuchfield. by R. C. Duim, M. G. 
Newton Shepler and Mandy Glen, by Sands Perkins, J. P. 
Samuel Penwell and Olive Leighton, by Alex. Moncrief, J. P. 
Gideon G. Goodale and ^lary Ann Sweet. Ijy C. Briiikerhoff. 
John Mills and Georgianna Slygle, by Washington Trickle. J. P. 
Wm. H. Worley and Sarah F. Armstrong, by Wm. R. Stowe. 
Harris ]\[iner and Mary Burd, by W. Haney, M. G. 
Adam Dick and Mary Pumersey, by W. itaney, M. G. 
John Collison and C!hristianna l\eeder, by Samuel G. Wright. 
Jonathan Nicolas and Emily Humphrey, by A. G. Lucas, M. G. 
Wm. Winn and Nancy Sheffer. by Wm. Haney. M. G. 

1850. 
Morgan Risedorph and Francis Avery, by dolin B. Fast, ^L (i. 
W. il. Davidson and H. J. Hazen, Ijy Wm. Haney, M. G. 
John West and Caroline Lacy, by Jacob ^'oung, J. 1*. 
Abner Aldav and Edith Dixon, bv Isaac Thomas. .). P. 
Wm. P. Fenn and Lucv J. Wooden, bv R. C. Dunn, A[. G. 
Vincent 1'app and Catherine Stargell. bv W. 'I'rickle, d. P. 
Elias Wilcox and Clarissa Sillamaii. I)y II. 'W Ives, ,1. P. 
John Miller and Sarah Shuts, by David McCance, J. I'. 
Benj. Newton and Sarah Roberts, by Wm. G. Gordon, M. G. 



( I 


3 


a 


9 


a 


8 


fa i 


15 


•• 


15 


a 


14 


a 


21, 


April 

fa i 


1, 

8, 


(( 


16. 


i i 


4 


May 


15 

27, 


( i 


28, 


June 13, 


May 


28 


<"( 


30, 


June 


2, 


a 


19, 


July 

i i 


3. 
3, 


i i 


11, 


Sept. 
Aug. 


19. 
10. 


fa fa 


25. 


i( 


29. 


i ( 


30. 


Sept. 

fa ( 


5. 
2. 


a 


9. 


i . 


10. 


Oct. 


11. 


a 


18. 


*^Nov. 


25, 
1 


li 




ii 


15. 


Dec. 


5. 


ii 


10, 


fa < 


25. 


a 


27. 


fa fa' 


30. 


Jan. 


1. 


fa < 


31. 


a 


31. 


i i 


31. 


Feb. 


5. 


(( 




a 


14, 


•' 


15. 


a 


16. 



84 IIISTOKY OF STAKIv COUNTY. 

Jesse Vinson and Diana Hickman, by S, W. Bates, M. G. 
Jolm E. Jones and Louisa Jane Stacy, by J. E. Jones, J. P. 
(Teoro;e Ludliini and Sarah E. Sturm, bv Peter Sturm, M. G. 
Edward P. Wright and Ahna J. Wright, by S. G. AVright, M. G. 
Berien Snyder and Clarissa Buck, bv Samuel G. Wright, M. G. 
James J. Dickey and Caroline Jones, by W. Trickle, J. P. 
Xewton Carter and Amy McDanel, by Wm. Haiiey, M. G. 
James Caneday and Margaret Sturdham, by D. McCaiice, J. P. 
Richard Hare and Elizabeth Fintz, by D. McCance, J. P. 
Wm. Sargent and Margaret Nelson, by M. P. King, M. G. 
Thomas Kvan and MaiT Pixlar, by Isaac Thomas, J. P. 
Henrv Presler and Sarah Ann Gillett, by A. G. Lucas, M. G. 
^[arcus D. Smith and Emiline Jordan, by James Buswell, J. P. 
Josiah Jaques and Isabell Pratz. by A. G. Lucas, M. G, 
William P. Bacon and T. S. Briggs, by E. C. Dunn, M. G. 
John Riley and Joannah Griftin, by Thomas Lynch, M. G. 
James Ilartlev and Ann Mellor. bv William Beardslev, M. G, 
Thomas Zinnn and Xaney .M. Wheeler, by S. G. Wright, M. G, 
Gideon A. Barlow and Martha B. Peterson, by T. S. Bennett,M.G. 
Ezekiel Enniss and Polina Davis, by Isaac Thomas, J. P. 
Fred. Kalzenberger and Frances' Y. Whili'en, by P. Case, M. G 
John Wilder and Louisii Wood, by M. P. King, M. G. 
George W. Edwards and Mary M. Spellinan, by D. ]\IcCance, J.P 
Calvin B. Proud and Xancy\l. Graves, by D. McCance, J. P. 
Levi IIop])ock and Sarah M. Davison, by S. G. Wright, M. G. 
Bennett C, Lee and Missouri Gnnsanl, by C. Brinkerhoff, M. G 
John W. Jones and Susaniia Fei'braehe, by Jason Wells, M. G 
Gideon D. Hitchcock and Sarah J. Shaver, by J. A. Pratt, J. P, 
Cyrus Jacobs and Elizabeth Jones, by W. H. Whitten, J. P. 
Jacob Dawson and Isabell Eby, by D. D. Firbrache, J. P. 
Brookens ^I. Strong and Lydia A". Sturdevant. by C. A. Hewitt 
Abner Adkins and Mary Jane Bogard, by J. M. Rogers, J, P. 
Thomas Eagleston and Ann V. Ettis, by J. M. Rogers, J. P. 
Geo. S. ]Maynard and Esther A. Durgin. by Milton McDonald 
Wm. II. Johnson and Lydia Sturm, by W. II, Whitten, J. P. 
Harrison Cox and Margaret Stricklen, by S. G. Wright, M. G. 
George AV. Reed and Phoebe D. Webster, by Peter Sturm, M. G 
Joseph Buchanan and Sophia J. Truitt, by Rd. Dunning, M. G 

Dan. Alward, Jr., and Amanda Rennick, 

Joshua J. Round and Columbia A. Riggin, by R. C. Dunn, M. ( 
John Adams and Sarah J. lues.. by AY. H. Whitten, J. P. 
Jonas Johnson and Christine Anderson, by C. Brunkerhoff. 
Thomas Oliver and Jane Turnbull, by N. O. Weede, M. G. 
S. R. Hazen and Mary J. Ban. by R. C. Dunn, M. G. 
Solomon Dixon and Mary J. Pratt, by James M. Rogers, J. P. 
Ellis AVilson and Mary Jane Fredericks, by Jason AVells, M. G. 
Wm. Matthews and Lydia Brown, by R. C. Dunn, M. G. 
Henderson Edwards and Matilda Mounts, by Isaac Tliomas, J. P 
Jas. Cummings and Catherine ^I. Sharer, by Milton McDonald 
Wm. Thomas and Martha Ann Shaver, by Milton McDonald, 
('has. Telitson and E, L. Burd, l)y AA^m. Ilaney, M. (r. 
("has. E. Stone and Fanny L. Huckings, by R. (J. Dunn, M. (i 
Benj. A. Newton and Susanna Dunn, by J. E. Jones, J. P. 



Feb. 


ir. 


(k 


21. 


'■• 


n. 


• • 


25. 


, ( 


28. 


Mar. 


13. 


,'< 


13. 


" 


18. 


a 


20. 


•• 


20. 


(> 


27. 


( ( 


29. 


April 


10. 


a 


18. 


a 


17. 


•' 


28. 


May 


8. 


• ' 


19. 


a 


20. 


a 


22. 


i i 


25. 


k i 


25. 


June 


11. 


t i 


28. 


July 


4. 


, 4 


10. 


•• 


U. 


•• 


24. 


Aug. 


3. 


a 


14. 


iC 


1^ 


a 


14. 


,' ,' 


10. 


•• 


24. 


Sept. 

k 4 


15. 
16. 


Oct. 


11. 


Sept. 


17. 


Oct. 


3. 


Sept. 

4 b 


28. 
27. 


i * 


30. 


Oct. 


10, 


• ' 


K). 


• V 


22. 


•• 


21. 


•• 


23. 


«• 


24. 


i< 


24. 


i i 


30. 


Nov. 


6. 


■ i 


10. 



T. 



MARRIAGE RECORD 1831-1866. 85 

Wm. Sill and Matilda Jane Jenkins, by P. S. Shaver. J. P. 
Chas. Case and Lneinda Hill, by R. C. Dunn, M. (I. 
Samuel Sturm and Aby Elstone, by Peter Sturm, M. (J. 
Jeremiah Wilcox and Buthany Moats, by C. Brinkerhotf. M. (J. 
Zara K. Bennett and Lydia Seeley, ])y Jo. E. Jones. J. 1'. 
John Reed and Emihne Ifeadley, by H. H. llalsey. J. P. 
Thomas Cross and Sarah Harvey, by M. P. King, M. G. 
Patrick Oavin and Marg-aret J. Farding, by Alex. Hochstrassei-. 
Anna C. More and Lydia A. Batcheloi-, by 1). McCJance, J. P. 
Lewis J. Jordan and Catherine Sturm, by J. E. Jones, J. P. 
Francis T. Brockvvav and Catherine J. Trickle, by W. S. Bates. 
Wm. A. Knight and Mrs. Lovina Swift, by R. C. Dunn. M.d. 
Andrew J. Barns and Sarah Barren, by I). McCanc(\. J. P. 
Nelson C. Shaver and C-ontent Chapman, by A. Taylor, J. P. 

1857. 
Lochlin liuchanan and Christina McClennan. by K*. C. Dunn. 
Leonard S Severance and Eunice O. (leer, bv Milton .McDon- 
ald, M. G. 

Henry Wald and Jane Frazer, . 

James Prather and Ann Johnson, by J. Ferguson. M. G. 
James Roberts and Laura Fi-edeiicks, by Jason Wells, M. G. 
Lafayette Dunbar and Almira Wells. l)y D. McCance, J. J'. 
Aaron A. Garnor and Hari'ict Willianis, byl). McC'ance. J. P. 
Peter Suavely and Catherine Conner, by D. McCance. J. P. 
Samuel McAughean and Mary Fell, by D. McCance, J. P. 
Wm . Round and Mary Jane Reed, by Abner Mason, M . (i . 
A\in. W. Atkins and Sylvina C. Hurlbert, by Peter S. Shaver. 
-John K. Mealnuin and Jane Hoar, by D. McCance, J. P. 
John Rarick and Esthei' Alward. l)y W. Haney, M. G. 
Roger Greenougli and MaiT Saljins. by Isaac Thomas. .1. 1*. 
Zenas Justice and Catherine Morgan, by David McCance. J. P. 
Daniel Kelley and Ann Flinn, nuii-ried at Catholic Mission. 
Joseph Dyress and Hanna Crosby. 
'Zb. F. A. Jones and Marie Lacy, by Wm. Haney. M. G. 
•^6. Wm. Reed and Mai'\ Gingricdi. bv W. S. liates. >L G. 
■■iC. Albert Rouse and Harriet^Ray. l)y J. M. Rogers. .1. W 
irch 8. John Demuth and Sarah Whiplev. bv J. I'acker. M. <l. 

7. Edward Bliss and Mai-garet U. Clarson, by D. McCance. d. P. 
1:3. Jienj. Brown and Maria Kane. l)v H. T. Ives, J. P. 
\-l. Wm'. Laton and Matilda M. Danu)n. by W. S. Bates. M. C. 
r.). Eli ('. .Jones and Susan J. Moore, by C. A. llewett. ^L (i. 
PJ. Andrew Stevenson and Mai-tlia Ann Johnson, by Mellon P. King. 
•^(!. J.icol) Ovei-landci' and Abigail Case, bv W. Trickle. . I. P. 
.John C Eckley and Marv J. Wardiu'. 
Aj)i'il II. Jonas Eltzratb and Maria Ridgcwav. by \l. C. Dunn. M.(i. 
'• 13. Henry C. Shull and Lucy Ann Cnives.'by W. S. l^atewell. M.<;. 
•• 10. Henry Greenawalt and .\laria Colwell. Dy" D. McCance. .1. I'. 
May ;J. George Barber and Sarah J. Kirkpatrl(d<. by W. II. Wliitten. J. P. 
G. Henrv Ligram and .bine Wrigley. by .1. M. Rogers. .1. P. 

26. S. S. Stephens and Marv -L Sturtevant. hy Alveii AljUotr. M. (i. 
22. Saiidford M. Whitt inu'ton and Eliza .1. Annsti-ong. bv D. Mc- 
Cance. J. P. 

27. David Courier and Caroline K. C. Patridge, by R. C. Dunn. M.(i. 



Nov. 


6 


• i 


e 


i i 


9 


b « 


17 


ii 


20 


ii 


22 


b ( 


25 


Dec. 


11 


i i 


16 


ii 


21 


"^ 


21 


i k 


25 


4 b 


25 


i ( 


28 


.Jan. 


1 


. « 


1 


a 




a 


6 


a 


1 


. . 


8 


'' 


11 


'• 


20 


'' 


22 


* i 


29 


•' 


31 


••' 


29 


Feb. 


19 


a 


12 


<k 


12 



M 



( i 



86 HISTORY OF STAKK COUNTY. 

lieiijuuiiu Turner and Ruth A. Myers, by R. C. Dunn, M. ii. 
Morris Fowler and Elizabeth Hamilton, by R. C. Dunn, M. G. 
Franklin Rhodes and Catlierine M. Wood, bvS. G. Wright. M.G. 
Elias Eby and Elizabeth Cox, by W. 8. Bates, M. G. 
George Oziah and Rachel A. Barnbill, by W. Haney, M. G, 
Stephen A. Munson and Sarah Ann Hotchkiss, by James Fer- 
guson. M. G. 
Russell C. Briggs and Percy Weaver, by W. W. Jones, M. G. 
Martin Keran and Mary S. Langford. byE. Ransom, Jr., M. G. 
Michael Flynn and Johanna Hogan. by Rev. Peter Corcoran. 
Leonard Wolf and Catherine Lane, by Jacob Young, J. P. 
John White and Lena Banewey, by W. F. Vaill, M. G. 
John Young and Julia Ann Vines, by A. Taylor, J. P. 
Jacob Morrison and Phebe A. Johnson, by John Finley, J. P. 
John 'Grady and Ellen Farrell, by Rev. John O'Gara. 
\\'iIson Price and Caroline E. Sipes, by Rev. Wm. Haney. 
Michael ^IcCarty and Fanny ]\fartin. married at Catholic Mis. 
George W. Dunbar and Eunice Broiigliton, In' I). ^IcCance. J. P. 
Thomas Wilson and Sarah Shade, by Jas. M. Rodgers, J. P. 
Farquhar Bain and Jenet McDonald, by R. C. Dunn. M. G. 
Gus. L. Goodale and Clarissa Jackson, by Jacob W. Rodgers, J. P. 
1'heo. Truman and Marv Matthews, bv James Ferguson. M. G. 
Henry H. Oliver and Mary Murchison, by David A. Wallace, M. G. 
Darius S. Wiley and Mary Ann Aten. by E. Ransom, M. G. 
Robt. J. Dickenson and Lauraitte M. Chapman, by R. C. Dunn. 
David 0. Toothaker and Catherine E. White, by Jacob Y^oung. 
Francis Kline and ]\Iargaret O'Xeal, ])y Rev. Thomas O'Gara. 
James Greenougli and Sarah Bash, by S3'lvester F. Ottman. J. P. 
Wm. S. Hiner and Betsy Twiss, by Rev. James Ferguson, 
John C. Gore and Mary Ann Gage, b}' Rev. Amos Morey. 
Wm. A. Boyer and Elizabeth J. Cooper, by Rev. A. J. Jones. 
Freeman Besett and Mahala Dorrauce, by C. W. Wood, J. P. 
Wm. Drummond and Ellen Timmons, by D. D. Ferbrache, J. P. 
Herman Page and Rachel Hodgson, by E. Ransom, M. G. 
John Hazen and Eliza Anthony, by James Ferguson, M. G. 
Seth Davison and Mary E. Donovan, b}' E. Ransom, M. G. 
Henrv S. Stone and Martha L. Stacy, by R. C. Dunn, M. G. 
Jephthah E. Tucker and Hachel R. Todd, by Amos Morey, M. G. 
Leonard C. Drawyer and Elma J. Rickey, by C. D, Fuller, J. P. 
Alex. Y. Fuller and Amy Breese, bv C. D. JFuller, J. P. 
John W. Tuttle and Maria J. Fleming, bv R. C. Dunn. M. G. 
C. X. Bangs and Xancy Fowler, by A. Abbott, M. G. 
Lewis Williams and Mary Alexander, by C. D. Fuller, J. P. 
Xelson Jones and Sarah Munson, by R. C. Dunn, M. G. 
Frank Walk and Hannah Xortman, by Rev. Father Griffith. 
George F. Dexter and Laura Miner, by Rev. Amos Morey. 
Thomas A. Foster and ^laria J. Winslow, by Rev. A. Abbott. 
Charles Wilson and Julia ]\Iix. by Rev. A. H. Lewis. 
Warren Chaffee and J. Proud, by John Finley, J. P. 
T. Warrington and Charlotte blasters. License issued Xov. 26. 
John S. Moffit and Melvina L Bunnell, by A. J. Jones, M. G. 
.Tames Eagleston and Almeda Whitman, by Rob. M. Bocock. J. P. 
Lafayette Gra}* and Lydia E. Morey, by E. Summers, M. G. 



June 




a 


12, 


•• 


23 


July 


3. 


(( 


9, 


i i 


8, 


• • 


12 


• • 


12, 


Aug. 


15, 

20, 


Aug. 


20. 
23, 


£.' 


23. 


Sep. 


1, 
3. 


a 


9. 


•• 


11. 


4 i 


20. 


i( 


17. 


i 6 


23. 


•• 


21. 


• i 


22. 


Oct. 


1. 


Sep. 


24. 
27. 


a 


27. 


•'• 


27. 


Oct. 


1. 


•• 


3. 


•• 


11. 


a 


21. 


i , 


14. 


. i 


15. 


i i 


17. 


•• 


28. 


Xov. 




. t 


3. 


a 


3. 

(1 


•• 


3. 


4 W 


8. 


•' 


11. 


i 4 


.11. 


Xov. 


23, 


• • 


19, 


•• 


r.i. 


•■ 


26, 


. < 


20, 


Dec. 


1, 


k i 


20, 


a 


24. 



MAKKiAGPJ KECOBD 1831-1860. 87 

Dec. 20. John Cole and Mary A. Rowell, by James M. Rogers, J. P. 

" 19. Jackson Church and Julia liotchkiss, by John Finley, J. P. 

"^ 22. Dewitt Stevens and Mary Welsie, by David McCance, J. P. 

" 31. PI. P. Grant and L. W. Norton, by R. C. Dunn, M. G. 

" 31. Thomas D. Church and Sarah White, by Amos D. Morey, M. G. 

31. Zura Hall and Harriet E. Bower, by R. C. Dunn, M. C. 

" 24. Nathan C. Bolin and Lucinda A. Harlow, by John Finley, J. P. 

1858. 

Jan. 1. Champlin Lester and Ann McReath, by J. N. Graham, M, G. 

" 2. James Kennedy and Hannah Shockley, by Jacob Young, J. P. 

" 7. Thomas Alday and Martha Dixon, by James M. Rogers, J. P. 

" 12. Isaac N. Tidd and Elizabeth Green, bv A. J. Jones, M. G. 

" 10. P. Resedorph and Mahala Board man," by W. H. AVhitten, J. P. 

'' 10. Chas. H. Fuller and Theda Gillette, bv J. W. Rogers, J. P. 

" 17. R. E. Westfall and Sarah Ann Woods," by E. Ransom, M. G. 

14. W. S. Ilixon and Melissa Lutes, by Myron H. Negus, M. G. 

14. Michael Vanaky and Melinda Riley, by C. D. Fuller,' J. P. 

" 15. Franklin J. Bush and Abba Gillett, 

" 23. Henry Scott and Catherine Turnbull, by John N. Graham. 

27. David Lyon and Mary Jordan. l)y W. B. Harris, M. G. 

Feb. 4. Benj. F.'Gharrett and Eliza Griffin, by R. C. Dunn, M. G. 

*' 5. Jolm H, Turnbull and Mary Armstrong, by J. M. Graham. 

" 5. Andrew M. Ewing and Phebe Briggs, by W. H. Jones, M. G. 

" 5. Milton Morrow and Lvdia Briggs. by W. H. Jones, M. G. 

'-' 7. Asher W. Avery and Martha Rickey, by C. D. Fuller, J. P. 

" 18. John Murchison and Jemima Chisholm, J. M. Graham, M. G. 

" 18. John T. Thornton and Helen Lyle. by R. C. Dunn, M. G. 

Feb. 21. David Colwell and Eliza Updyke, by Jacob Young, J. P. 

Mar. 11. Oliver Smith and Eliza Warren, by "C. M. Wright, M. G. 

Feb. 28. David J. Courtis and Harriet E. Dewey, by Phila. Chase, M. G. 
25."-' Luther J. JMcIlvain and Eliza Ridgeway, by A. J. Jones, M. G. 

Mar. 14. Adolphus Ribley and Ellen Eagleston, by J. M. Rogers, J. P. 

" 2. Asa A. Bunton and Mary Lyle, by R. C. Dunn, J. P. 

'' 0. C. D. Hichell and ^Margaret Sturm, bv Bernard Wagner, M. G. 

8. David R. Gilvin and Eunice M. Trickle, bv R. C. Dunn, M. G. 

8. Alfred M. Snyder Mand ary E. Hayes, by C. Brinkerhoff, M. G. 

" — Anthony Dennis and Betsy Piester. ■ — ■- 

Feb. 25. W. 11. Adams and Sarah J. Anthony, by Jas. Ferguson, M. G. 

Mar. 14. Harvy B. Harris and Mary J. Wall, by A. J. Jones, M. G. 

16. Bethuel Parrish and Eliza Strayer, by James Ferguson, M, G. 

" 15. Joseph H. (ioxand Nancy Wilkinson, bv David M. Cance. J. P. 

" 17. Ira F. Dewey and Isabella Knapp, by R. C. Dunn, :\I. G. 

'•' 18. David Tinlin and Sarah E. Armstrong, by E. Ransom, M. G. 

" 23. David Crumb and Mary Headley, by D. j\IcCance, J. P. 

25. Joseph Robb and Agnes Murnan, by A. J. Jones, M. G. 

" 25. H. N. McConaughy and Ann N. White, by Jacob W. Rogers. 

30. Joel Hester and Lydia Ann Hodgson, by Amos Morey, M. G. 

April 4. Wm. Dixon and Hannah Wright, by S. F. Ottman, J. P. 

(1. Allen T. Parrett and Maria Nichols, by A.J. Jones, M. G. 

" t>. George Van Pelt and Amanda M. Brown, by E. Summers, 

" 14. I'd ward J. Wyman and Susan E. Bradford, by J. II. Anthony. 

'• 4. Anson H. Curtis and Elizabeth Imes, by Jas. M. Rogers, J. P. 

May 11. Robert Growl and Mrs. Eliza Todd, by Amos Morey, M. G. 
6 



88 HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY. 

James Buckley aud Susanna Mills, by A.J. Jones, ]\I . G . 
Wm. H. Ely and Ahnira Summerman, by Jacob Young, J. P. 
Eobt. H. Worley and Margaret Anthony, by Jas. Ferguson, M. G. 
Geo. Shotzen and Euth A. Drummond, by James M. Rogers. 
Jno. Snethen and Christina C. Benedict, by Peter Sturm, M. G. 
Spencer Cox and Rebecca Lamb, by Jacob Young, J. P. 
David P. Winter and ]^ancy Haxon, by Jacob AV. Rogers, J. P. 
W. H. Turnbulland Margaret Turnbull, by J. M. Graham, M. G. 
George Jackson and Margaret Coltliar, by J. j\I. Rogers, J. P. 
Jos. E. Loring and Mildred L. Johnson, by Wm. McDermand. 
Roswell Jordan and Rebecca Cade, by Peter Sturm, J. P. 
George Phenix and Susan Jane Drawyer, by R. C. Dunn, M. G. 
Josiali Cogall and Tacy Graves, by John Finley, J. P. 
Thomas V. Olmsted and Sarah A. Sherwood, by Geo. F. Hill. 
Augustus Kelsey and Anne J. Hodgson, by D. McCance, J. P. 
Noah Springer and Eve Gingrich, by B. Wagner, M. G. 
Henry B. Dorrance and Mary E. Powell, by Chancy D. Fuller. 
Dennis Lee and Elizabeth F. Garrison, by 1). McCance, J. P. 
Humphrey Avery and Emma J. Davison, by C. D. Fuller, J. P. 
Elias L. Emery and Mary E. Lowman, by J. Ferguson, M. G. 
John G. Turnbull and Helen Scott, by D. McCance, J. P. 
Chas. N. Crook and Helen R. Goodrich, by R. McBocock, J. P. 
Nelson Allen and Margaret Lindsey, by John Finley, J. P. 
John Morris and Catherine Schanck, by S. F. Otman, J. P. 
Benj. Cleveland and Melissa Thirston, by M. P. King, M. C. 
Peter Peterson and Christina Nelson, by Jacob W. Rogers, J. P. 
Walter B. Bettis and Mary F. Jay, by John Snethen, J. P. 
Edward Cleveland and Caroline Bangs, by David McCance, J. P. 
John AY. Riggs aud Jane Stowe, by R. C. Dunn, M. G. 
Isaac Nicholas and Martha Humphreys, by James M. Rogers. 
John A. Leeson and Margaret A. Coon, by Joseph P. Gilbert. 
Richard Hight and Ann Bunnell, by C. D. Fuller, J. P. 
John Brooks ami Judith A. Hall, by D. McCance, J. P. 
Peter C. Johnson and Martha Vixel, by Amos Morey, M. G. 

Charles B. Foster and Charles ^by Alvin Abbott, M. G. 

John Jackson and Polina A. Mahony, by E. Ransom, M. G. 
James H. Hickok and Harriet L. Pomeroy, by Isaac L. Hart. 
Darius Dermand and Sarah A. Iliner, by James Ferguson, M. G. 
Charles Rhodes and Caroline Cram, bv R. C. Dunn, ^I. G. 
Joseph Ridle and Mary Bennett, by T. S. Bennett, ^L G. 
Mason Stofer and Candace Stine, by R. C. Dunn, M. G. 
David Cumming and Marv A. Anthonv, bv Amos Morev. M. G. 
AVilliam Calhoun and Mary J. Stanley, by Amos Morey, ]\[. G. 
Andrew Anderson and Christiana Pierson, by Amos Morey, M. G. 
Elias Muller and Lucy Redding, by A. G. Gridley, J. 'P."^ 
James D. ]iallentine and Rlioda AA'alter. by Jacob W. Rogers. 
James B. Russell and Mary J. Bevier, by Alvin Abbott, M. G. 
Isaac Grant and Harriet Snyder, by M. H. Negus, M. G. 
A\ m. H. Harris and Anna Harmon, by W. H. Whitten, J. P. 
Esthner Rounds and Eliza Smeggs, by Jacob AV. Rogers, J. P. 
Andrew J. Brodi and Sarah R. Stedham, by J. T. Linthicum. 
Eli Ferris and Nancy J. Fitch, by Peter Sturm, M. G. 
Richard Hill and Lucy A. Stiles, by George F. Hill, M. G. 



May 22. 

June 10. 


li 


10. 


a 


9. 


a 


26. 


li 


27. 


ei 


27. 


July 


1. 


a" 


3. 


a 


4. 


(t 


4. 


(C 


8. 


a 


11. 


Sept. 
July 


14. 
15. 


ii 


25. 


Aug. 


1. 
6. 


ii 


8. 


i( 


8. 


li 


16. 


ii 


26. 


Sept. 


2. 
11. 


ii 


4. 


ii 


7. 


ii 


23. 


it 


21. 


a 


19. 


ii 


27. 


ii 


23. 


i( 


30. 


a 


30. 


Oct. 


2. 


ii 


9.- 


a 


14. 


i i 


17. 


i i 


23. 


ii 


23. 


ii 


21. 


ii 


25. 


ii 


27. 


ii 


31. 


ii 


■)■) 


Nov. 


4. 


ii 


3. 


<. 


G. 


a 


25. 


ii 


28. 


a 


26. 


i i 


30. 


Dec. 


1. 


i i 


4. 



MAKKIAGE KECOKD 1831-1806. 89 

Dec. IG. John Eickey and Rebecca A. Speers, by S. P. Kezerta, M. G. 

" 23. James A. Goodrich and Leah Redding, by W. H. Whitten, J. P. 

'• 8. Simon Dixon and Sarah Bateman, by W. J. Smith, M. G. 

" 9. Aaron Smitli and Lydia Dah-yniple, by P. S. Shaver, J. P. 

" 15. John Martin and Jane B. Fowler, bv R. C. Dunn, M. G. 

" 18. Wm. Wrio-lit and Ellen Jarvis, bv S!^ F. Otman, J. P. 

" 23. Charles H. Lake and ]\Iarv A. Boice, by Jacob W. Rogers, J. P. 

•' 23. George AY. Scott and Marv C. Cox, by W. J. Smith, M. G. 

" 23. —Alex. Headley and Ilannali Rhodes, by Thos. S. Bennett, M. G. 

"■ 30. Jesse S. Atherton and Lois Grant, by M. H. Negus, M. G. 

1859. 
John C. Laurence and Martha Crawford, by A. H. Hepperly. 
Valentine B. Thornton and Lodema E. Rhodes, by R. C. Dunn. 
John O'Neil and Catherine McKiggins, by Father O'Gara, M. G. 
Andrew Stone and Eliza C. Clark, by Alvin Abbott, M. G. 
John Buchanan and Emeline Beers, by M. H. Negus, M. G. 
Timothy E. Bailey and Sophia E. Smith, bv Sylvester F. Otman. 
John Weir and Jennette E. Fell, by J. A. McCulleh, J. P. 
Cornelius Stevenson and Tyrilla Bedford, by D. McCance, J. P. 
John Pilgrim and Isabella Coleman, by A. H. Hepperly, M. G. 
Soloman Dixon and Mary F. l^ateman, by W. J, Smith, M. G. 
Ephraim N. Pardee and Sarah Stone, by A. Wedge, ]\L G. 
Walter T. Hall and Emily Shinn, by A. H. Heperly, M. G. 
John A'ernon and Aurora Madearis, by Peter Sturm, M. G. 
N. Wright Dewey and Harriet P. Dewey, by R. C. Dunn, M. G. 
Nelson G. Gill and Missouri E. Whitford, by Elisha Gill, M. G. 
John Corkhill and Annie Quayle, by Jacob W. Rogers, J. P. 
Leander H. Hewitt and Hannah W. Morey, by George F. Hill. 
Samuel Bolt and Mary Snell, by C. D. Fuller, J. P. 
William Lopeman and Lydia A. Freeland, by Jas. Buswell, J. P. 
John H. Oliver and Lizzie C. Poole, by A. H. Hepperly, M. G. 
Orson B. Stowell and Harriet R. Church, by A. H. Hepperly. 
Theo. T. McDaniel and Sarah Curfman, by James M. Rogers. 
Cuthbert Blakely and Melinda Price, by James M. Rogers, J. P. 
John Maxfield and Sarah Shockley, by C. Brinkerhoff, M. G. 
Chester W. Woodman and Ann Porter, by W. H. Whitten, J. P. 
Benjamin S. Hall and Juliet Truitt, by W. H. Wliitten, M. P. 
John Seeley and Sarah Willison, by W. J. Smith. M. G. 
Joseph Slott and Mary Jilewer, by Elijah S. Brodhead, P. M. 
■ Michael Gallagher and Catherine Clifford, by Rev. AV. H. Power. 
William Taylor and Catherine McCarty, by Francis Loomis, J. P. 
Jolni Green and Maria E. Gentry, by Jacob A^oung, J. P. 
Orvill Baker and Alartba Given, by Jacob AV. Rogers, J. P. 
Jasper M. Morris and Catherine E". Bolt, by J. W. Smith, M. G. 

David J. Welch and Elizabeth Jones, 

Tiiomas J Wright and Ann Moncrieff, by Rev. R. C. Dunn. 
Simon Peter Smith and Elmira Stevens, by David McCance, J. P. 
Sim])son Syfert and Sarah A. Newton, by James B. Chenoweth. 
David Jones and Harriet Leseur, l)y W. S. Bates. M. G. 
Albert AI. Oliver and Mary D. Grifhn, by John L. Scott, M. G. 
David S. Miller and Margaret A. Cross, by AVm. Leggett, M. G. 
Samuel Smith and Nancy Ellison, by AV. S. Bates, M, G. 
Wm. Headley and Emily R. Rhodes", by R. C. Dunn, M. G. 



Jan. 


4. 


a 


6. 


a 


10. 


it 


20. 


a 


30. 


Feb. 


G. 


• • 


13. 


a 


IG. 


a 


22. 


i( 


24. 


Mar. 


2. 


n 


3. 


ii 


13. 


ii 


23. 


April 14. 


i i 


IG. 


a 


20. 


i< 


20. 


i ( 


24. 


May 


1. 


i i 


28. 


.lune 


G. 


(.' 


9. 


i < 


21. 


ii 


30. 


July 


3. 


i i 


3. 


-' 


11. 


Aug. 


5.' 


i i 


15. 


i i 


18. 


ii 


23. 


ii 


31. 


Sept. 


1. 


i fc 


1. 


i i 


4. 


Sept. 


11. 


i i 


15. 


ii 


11. 


a 


25. 


ii 


29. 



90 HISTORY OF STAKK COUNTY. 

Harve}' 0. Slnyter and Melvina McDaniel, by Jacob W. Rogers. 
Mathusaleh Bevier and Eliza F. Foster, by A. Abbott, M. G. 
Thomas Proctor and Melita Armstrong, by Elijah 8. Brodhead. 
Harlan Craig and Minerva Jane Xelson, by John Snethen, J. P. 
John Jackson and Ellen Flanagan, by E. S. Brodhead, Pol. Jns. 
Alfred Edwards and Harriet A. Clark, by A. Abbott, M. G. 
David Barrett and Mary McSherry, b}' James M. Rogers, J. P. 
Henry Olmsted and Celestia Aten, by Jacob Matthews, M. G. 
James Coleman and Charlotte Kane, by Jacob Matthews, M. G. 
Jacob Vandike and Mary E. Blood, by C. H. Case, M. G. 
Amos Hodge and Hattie E. Hood, by Samuel Ordway, M. G. 
Felix Inman and Sarah A. Cole, by K. C. Dunn, M. G. 
Charles 0. Wilson and Laura A. Earle, by E. S. Brodhead, Mag. 
Benj. G. Homer and Catherine Winters, by C. D. Fuller, J. P. 
Clark Wooden and Maiy Jackson, by James ]\I. Rogers, J. P. 
Silas R. Swarts and Nancy Ely, by Thos. S. Bennett, M. G. 
Ed. H. Champion and Hannah A. Drawyer, by H. B. Foskett. 
John M. Brown and Maggie R. Hawks, by Andrew J. Jones. 
Charles Dickinson andLydiaA. Church, by Thomas S. Bennett. 
Geo. Colwell and Sarah ]iarr, by John H. Anthony, J. P. 
Robt. Smith and Sally A. Schockley, by John H. Anthony, J. P. 
Sam. D. Lindley and Sarah C. Hixinbaugh, by Jacob W. Rogers. 
Wm. Shepley and Catherine ]\Iyers, by W. J. Smith, M. G. 
Thomas L. Coll well and Ellen Xicholas, by W. S. Bates, M. G. 
John Sidner and Phebe Libbey, by Jacob Young, J. P. 
August C. Bergman and Catherine M. Johnson, by J. W. Rogers. 
James F. Thompson and Mai"garet A. Todd, by Jacob Matthews. 
Henry J. Otman and Carrie Hall, by R. C, Dunn, M. G. 
Micagy Swiger and Eliza Sturm, no record. 

18G0. 

Oliver R. Newton and Abbee H. Pettee, by Samuel Ordway. 
Samuel Smeggs and Mahetable Rhodes, by Jacob W. Rogers. 
Thomas T. Wright and Nancy J. Dawson, by Robt. McCutchen. 
Henry Garner and Tabitha Stevenson, by ^I. P. King, M. G. 
Wm. Blake and Matilda Spillman, by W. H. Whitten. J. P. 
John Kelley and Ellen Carr, by Rev. AValter H. Power. 
David Woodard and Orritta Rhodes, by J. L. Hawkins, Y. D, M. 
Seth F. Rockwell and Hannah E. AVoodard, by J, L. Hawkins. 
Samuel White and Nancy A. Jones, by John Finly, J. P. 
James AV. Ratliffe and Olive Rouse by James M. Rogers, J. P. 
James Truitt and Prudence A. Drake, by Jas. M. Rogers, J. P. 
James Tucker and Hannah N. Six, by E. S. Broadhead, P. M. 
Henry Emery and Hannah Emery, by James E. Gaston, M. G. 
John H. Lane and Lydia A. Hall, by R. C. Dunn, M. G. 
Henry M. Hall and Anna A. Hubbard, by R. C. Dunn, M. G. 
Charles T. Bennett and Lucinda Sturm, by Peter Sturm, M. G. 
Edward S. Talladav and Martha Maveock, bv J. L. Scott, M. G. 
Thomas Tinimons and Lucy A. Graves, by W. S. Bates, M. G. 
Bradford F, Thompson, and Eliza A. Bevier, by Alvin Abbott. 
John W. Smith and Almira A. Vedder, by James Sheldon, M. G. 
Almon AY. AA'ilder and ^Mury A. Coleman, by S. C. rium])hrey. 
Lewis AA". AVilliams and Mary Atherton, by R. C. Dunn, M. (L 
John E. Gharrett and Harriet H. Holgate, by J. L. Scott, M. G. 



Oct. 


9, 


(C 


11 


a 


8, 


i< 


9 


it 


19 


li 


23, 


e< 


2G, 


i: 


29, 


Nov. 


1, 


a 


6, 


iC 


3. 


a 


6 


a 


5, 


<( 


18, 


<> 


10 


a 


15. 


, . 


20, 


a 


17, 


a 


17, 


a 


20, 


a 


19, 


iS 


24, 


a 


24. 


Dec. 


11 


a 


17. 


ie 


27. 


a 


27. 


a 


31. 


a 


17. 


Jan. 


4. 


a 


1. 


a 


1. 


a 


5. 


( i 


15. 


Feb. 


5. 


,' . 


\. 


a 


1. 


a 




a 


12. 


a 


8. 


i( 


13. 


ii 


23. 


«•• 


23. 


Mar. 


1. 


•• 


0. 


a 


8. 


ii 


8. 


Apr. 


4. 


Mar. 


21. 


a 


22. 


,' i 


28. 


Apr. 


4. 



MARRIAGE RECORD 1831-1 S^J^i. 91 

Wm. Kineade and Margaret Kernieeu, hy J. W. Rogers, J. P. 
Samuel E. White and Mary A. Marlin, by E. C. Dunn, M. Gr. 
David K. Michael and Susan Sturm, by C. H. Case, M. Gr. 
George Ely and Carrie Johnson, by D. McCance, J. P. 
Amasa Sawyer and Rebecca D. Sawyer, by E. C. Dunn, M. Gr. 
Frank (r. Drew and Sophia L. Clark, by E. C. Dunn, M. Gr. 
Chas, McCumsey and Mary E, Godfrey, by J, W, Eogers, J, P. 
John D. Essex and Mary J. Gierhart, by E. C. Dunn, M. G. 
Geo. E. Mercer and Harriett Ballard, by J. W. Eogers, J. P. 
Lewis H. Kerns and Mary M. Kern, by Syl. F. Otman, J. P. 
George Kerns and Alice Wrigley, by W. J. Smith M. G. 
Jas. D. Lundy and Martha A. Mathews, by John Morey, M. G. 
Amos Bennett and Hannah Bunton, by D. McCance, J. P. 
Berry Edmiston and Delila Shenefelt, by J. L. Scott, M. G. 
John T. Eagieston and Eliza Wrigley, by W. J. Smith, M. G. 
John Maine'and Abi. W. Eagen, by M. P. King, M. G. 
Edward W. Stewart and Hannah Craft, by John Finley, J. P. 
John L.Jennings and Mary J. Collins, byE. S. Broadhead, J. P. 
Jerome B. Thomas and Harriet X. E. Tasker, by E. C. Dunn, 
Samuel W. Eagan and Sarah E. AViley, by E. C. Dunn, M. G. 
Stej)hen Young and Clarista Lorman, by Henry Allen, M. G. 
John Jackson and Eliza A. Montooth, by E. C. Dunn, M. G. 
Erastus Stanton and Martha Armstrong, by E. S. Brodhead. 
Charles Brown and Hannah A. York, by E. S. Brodhead. 
William Wilson and Lois Sweet, by E. Eansom, M. G. 
John McKenzio and Hectorina McGregor, by W. F. Vaill, M, G. 
Eobert W. Hall and Sarah A. Olmsted, by E. S. Brodhead. 
Joab Nicholas and Alcinda Colwell, by E. C. Dunn, M. G. 
GHiarles W. Carter and Sarah Carter, by Samuel Ordway, M. G. 
James Greenough and Mary A. Eraser, by D. McCance, J. P. 
AYilliam Atkinson and Hannah Eobson, by J. M. Glraham, M. G. 
William K. Morgan and Mary J. Winter, by E. S. Brodhead. 
James 0. AVilliamson and Emilene Wilson, by C. H. Case, M. G. 
Moses H. Weaver and Virginia Clark, by (■. A. Hewitt, M. G. 
George Graen and Isabella Fell, by J. M. Graham, M. G. 
William Wilson and Mary E. Falconer, by Jacob Matthews. 
Eachel H. Todd and Margaret Brangle, by A. J. Wright, jM. G. 
Jasper Taylor and Eliza Ann Pyle, by AVilliam Leggett, M. G. 
Dewitt C. Green and Almira Greenough, by E. S. Brodhead. 
Adam S. Murchison and Xancy Fuller, by John M. Graham. 
AVm. Slick and Mahala Harrott, by E. S. Brodhead, Magistrate. 
John B. Kay and Mary Currier, by William Leggett, M. G. 
JSTathan D. Stewart and Julia C. Kenyon, by John Snethen, J. P. 
William A. Wooden and Martha F. Allison, by J. Woodward. 
Aug. S. Thompson and Sarah Fowler, by C. H. Case, M. G. 
Gleo. A. Dudley and Sarah E. Dudley, by Issaac L. Hart, J. P. 
Gavin L. Eenwick and Mary Harvey, by Joseph Woodward. 
Eufus Woodcock and Olive Green, by E. S. Brodhead, Mag. 
-James B. Matthews and Susannah M. Matthews, by J. Matthews. 
David Murray and Susannah M. Turnbull, by John M. Graham. 
Patrick Smitli and Jane Flanigan, by Catholic Missioner. 

1861. 

Jan. 1. James Martin and J\Iary E. Nichols, by G. F. Hill, M. G. 



Apr. 
May 


30. 
3. 

8. 


(( 


9. 


i( 


12. 


ii 


26. 


ec 


28. 


a 


29. 


June 


IG. 


a 


17. 


a 


24. 


July 


o 
O. 

4. 


a 


18. 


a 


22. 


Aug. 


2. 


July 
Aug. 


25. 
13. 


Sept. 
Aug. 


6. 
30. 


Sept. 


2. 

10. 


a 


12 


li 


12. 


a 


23. 


Oct. 


4. 


a 


4. 


Sept. 
Oct. 


30. 
9. 


a 


8. 


a 


13. 


ii 


24. 


a 


28. 


Nov. 


14. 


Oct. 


31. 


Nov. 


2. 


a 


8. 


a 


8. 


a 


11. 


a 


1-9. 


a 


19. 


(( 


25. 


a 


26. 


a 


22. 


c< 


28. 


Dec. 


2. 


<i 


2. 


a 


11. 


te 


20. 


a 


20. 


ei 


IV 

< 1 



92 HISTORY OF 8TAKK COUNTY. 

Charles L. Lane and Mary E. Finley, by R. C. Dunn, M. G. 

Charles F. Blood and Rachel A. Sturm, by Peter Sturm, M. G. 

Wm. Rhodes and Betsy Rounds, by Isaac L. Hart, J. P. 

Thomas Zinn and Sarah A. Wilson, by Jacob W. Rogers, J. P. 

Dix Ryan and Sarah Smith, by R. C. Dunn, J. P. 

Colburn J. Robbins and Sarah M. Bennett, by E. S. Brodhead, 

Magistrate. 

Daniel Mcintosh, and Mary E. Riggan, by R. C. Dunn, M. G. 

Carlos Miner and Laura Pomeroy, by R. C. Dunn. M. G. 

Frederick Hartsock and Sinthey Carpenter, by D. McCance, J. P. 

Presley Terrell and Lavena R. Curfman, by R. C. Dunn, M. G. 

Orlando H. Brace and Lucy Hudson, by I. I, Fleharty, M. G. 

Jacob M. Jones and Catherine Atherton, by Jacob Young, J. P. 

Elisha Elston and Maria Rickey, by ^Y. J. Smith, M. G. 

Royal J. Curtiss and Achsa Rhodes, R. C. Dunn, M. G. 

James M. Virtue and Elizabeth Chandler, by John Finley, J. P. 

Artemus E. Ewers and Anna D. Hochstrasser, by E. S. Brod- 
head, P. Mag. 

Orastus Alden and Salome Rhodes, by R. C. Dunn, M. G. 

James P. Headley and Gate Kindle, by I. L. Hart, J. P. 

Harmon Imes, and Lydia Shade, by James Snare, J. P. 

Benjamin Aby and Prinnah H. Bodine, by M. P. King, M. G. 

Cyrus Avery and Phebe Xewton, by James B. Chenowetli, M. G. 

James Shrouf and Charlotte Bunnell, by Syl. F. Otman, J. P. 

John Finley and Sarah Adams, by W. J. Smith, M. G. 

Xathaniel Kissell and Martha P. Burns, by AVm Leggett, M. G. 

Geo. Strayer and Urena L. Parrish, by A. J. Wriglit, M. G. 

Allen M. Pierce and Marx W. Thomas, by Jacob JMatthews. jM. G. 

Charles Plummer and Louisa Callwell, by E. S. Brudliead, P. 
Mag. 

Morris Kirkpatrick and Hannah A. Elston, by Peter Sturm, M. G. 

Michael Plankeal and Francis Williams, b}^ L". J. Giddings, M. G. 

Asa Currier and Mary L. King, bv Wm. Lesfgett, M. G. 

Spencer S. Elston and Polly M. Sturm, by Peter Sturm, M. G. 

Hiram D. Sturm and Catherine A. Williams, by Peter Sturm. 

Phillip Webber and Caroline Ames, Jacob Mathews, M. G. 

Edwin Youngkin and Matilda Hart, by U. P. Aten, M. G. 

Robt. G. Williams and Labella Hollingshead, by E. S. Brod- 
head. P. Mag. 

John Colgan and Maria Goldsberry. Xo record. 

James S. Patterson and Margaret J, Rule, bv D. A. Wallace. 

Wilson Trickle and Elizabeth J. Miller, by E. Ransom, M. G. 

George W. Miller and Mana Cross, by Jacob Matthews, M. G. 

Alex. Crowl and Mary J. Espey, by J. M. Graham, M. G. 

Stephen A. Cornish and Isabella Marlin, by J. M. Graham. M. G. 

David 0. Dufur and Elizabeth Drunim. bv R. C. Dunn. M. G. 

D. S. Main and Rebecca Coon, by W. J. Smith, M. G. 

Christian South and Susanna Straver, bv Joseph S.Williams, J. P. 

Walter Lyle and Julia A. Ferris, 'by R^ C. Dunn. M. G. 

John Shaver and Mary P. Greenman, by Jacob Matthews. M. G. 

Nathan B. Foster and Clara L. Wethersby, by J. B. Russell, J. P. 

John Fowler and Sarah E. Xorris. by R. C. Dunn, M. G. 

Michael Alderman and Jayey E. Colwell, by W. S. Bates, M. G. 



Jan. 


9. 


a 


13. 


<< 


13. 


c< 


17. 


a 


19. 


a 


23. 


<i 


24. 


(( 


27, 


a 


28. 


Feb. 


7. 


a 


13. 


e i 


14. 


iC 


14. 


a 


14. 


a 


14. 


.< 


14. 


a 


17, 


a 


21. 


a 


24. 


a 


26. 


Mar. 


o 
O 


a 


5. 


(e 


13. 


(( 


14. 


i( 


17, 


a 


17, 


a 


20. 


ii 


24, 


tc 


30, 


April 2 


(C 


7, 


a 


13. 


a 


17. 


a 


28. 


ee 


29. 


May 


1, 


("( 


1. 


a 


8. 


a 


9, 


a 


22, 


a 


23. 


a 


23. 


June 


10, 


a 


27, 


July 


4, 


• •' 


o. 


i i 


4, 


a 


•J 



July 


27. 
38. 


Aug. 


7. 
19. 


i< 


20. 


Sept. 


0. 

5. 


a 


9. 


a 


12. 


•' 


12. 


a 


12. 


a 


19. 


(I 


94 


<< 


25. 


a 


2G. 


••' 


26. 


Oct. 


1. 


t>' «>' 


8. 



MAERIAGE RECORD 1831-1866. 93 

Warren Williams and Eliza C. Perry, by R. C. Dunn, M. G. 

William Eby and Lovina Hull, by David Wlieffiu. J. P. 

Franklin Pross and ]Margaret E. Pruitt, by Jacob Matthews. 

Josejili P. Hall and Jane Carse, by Wm. L. Leggett, M. Gr. 

Roswell F . Woodwortli and Charlotte E . VanVelsen, by Wm . 
Colwell, M. G. 

Eugene M. Gallup and Mary E. Merchant, by A. J. Wright. 

Shepherd P. Westphall and Elizabeth Aumick, by E. S. Brod- 
head, P. Mag. 

Wm. J. Gamel and Anna J. Wave, by E. S. Brodhead, P. M. 

Harry C Johnson, and Susan Todd, by A. J. Wright, M. G. 

David H. Eobbins and Martha Cole, by E. S. Brodhead, P. M. 

Matthews Gillan and Jeunette Graham, by C. A. Hewitt, M. G. 

Edward S. Force and Eliza Aten, by W.J. Smith, M. G. 

Joseph Curtiss and Mary E. Farding, by Jacob Matthews, M. G. 

Hiram Parrish and Martha J. Hoj^pock, by J. A. Pratt, P. M. 

Samuel G. Seranton and Julette J. Westfall, by E. S. Brod- 
head, P. ^lag. 

Lawrence McNamee and Martha Armstrong, by D . McCance. 

Henry B. Upton and Jannet Scott, by I. M. Graham, M. G. 

Whitfield D. Matthews and Mary K. Chaddock, by W. J. 
Smith, M. G. 
" 13. Wunel S. Thurston and Clarinda McKinniss, by E. S. lirod- 

head, P. Mag. 
" 17. Samuel A. Fitch and Mary E. McDaniel, by D. McCance. 
" 24. Walter M. Dexter and Alida J. Bennett, by Edward Sellen. 
" 24. WiUard Palmer and Elsie Gamer, by A. C. "Miller, M. G. 
" 27. Miner Y. Smitli and Harriet Lee, by James Bnswell, J. P. 
Nov. 1. Milo W. Fargo and Marv ^l. Reeger, bv Jacob Matthews, M. G. 
" 4. Wm. Luce, jr., and Jane McVickers, bv J. B. Russell, J. P. 
'' 7. Wm. D. Cuinming and Martha E. Anthony, by A. C. Miller. 
'" 12. Patrick McSherry and Ellen McGuire, by Catholic Missioner. 
'" 19. Horatio G. Scribner and Hannah Scholes, by W. W. Winslow. 
" 14. Robert L. Scott and Isabella Happock, by Daniel M. Kelly, J. P. 
'•' 14. Harrison Miner and Alice Parrish, by H. B. Foskett, M. G. 
" 14. Charles B. Thorp and Harriet Riddle, by W. J. Smith, M. G. 
'' 14. Tyrus Matthews and Climena Scribner, by E. S. Brodhead. 
" 18. Lewis Redding and Cvnthia Ann Walling, bv John E. Evans. 
" 18. Franklin Runnells and Lenora E. Blood, by'^C. A. Hewitt. M.G. 
" 16. Ambrose W. Matthews and Sarah Ann Wilsey, by D. McCance. 
" 17. Hiram P. Mallory and Hannah Redding, by John R. Evans. 
Dec. 4. Chas. T. Edwards and Eunice V. Spencer, by C. A. Hewitt. 
" 4. Jesse J. Flahartv and Annie Bruce, by W. J. Smith, M. G. 
" 11. Chas. H. Barce and Kesiah Y. Flint, by W. J. Smith, M. G. 
" 19. Thomas S. Jones and Margaret J. Jones, by W. J. Smith, M. G. 
" 17. George Miller and Mary Ely, by D. McCance, J. P. 
" 22. Andrew Oliver and Betty Armstrong, by John M. Graham. 
'' 23. John Arganbright and Latitia Ray, by Minot Silliman, J. P. 

1862. 
Jan. 1. John Buchanan and Ann McBeth, by John M. Graham. M. G. 
" 1. R. C. Baker and Mary A. Shore, by J. T. Westorer, M. G. 
*' 1. Moses H. Weaver and Sophia Stuart, by Charles P. Blake, J. P. 
" 5. David II. Anderson aiui Sarah A. Veeder, by Jacob Matthews. 



94- HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY. 

Thomas C. McChesney and Rosetta A. Palmer, by W. J. Smith. 
Moses B. Robinson and Mahala Swift, by Jefferson Raymond. 
Robert M. Finley and Mary A. Hum, by W. J. Smith ^ M. G. 
Roderick McKenzie and Margaret Ross, by Geo. Stebbins, M. G. 
John Jones and Kanc}' Jane White, by Minott Silliman, J. P. 
Levi Eckley and Charlotte S. AVhite, by John Finley, 0. J. 
John Shaner and Cordelia Flook, by John Xeff, M. G. 
Wm. Pratt and Mary A. Snethen, by Peter Sturm, M. G. 
John H. Taylor and Isabella Galley, by M. P. King, M. G. 
Albert P. Terwilliger and Margaret Willey, by Peter Stnrm. 
Charles Janes and Christina Baglon, by D. McCance, C. J. 
Joseph Patterson and Caroline Price, by W. J. Smith, M. G. 
Patrick Hanlev and Margaret Al worth, by Lewis Lightner, 
Caleb S. Heaton and Mary E. Knoff, by Allen C, MHler, M, G, 
Betherel Parrish and Celestia Ferris, by W, J, Smith, M, G. 
Jacob L. Young and Julia A. Gardner, by W. J. Smith, M, G. 
John Colwell and Almira Fast, by W. S. Bates, M. G. 
Donald McKae and Christy McLennan, by John M, Graham. 
Xils Xelson and Parmelia Paulson, by D. McCance, J. P. 
AVm. J. Morey and Josephine Driscoll, by D. M, Kelly, J. P. 
Adam Jackson and Agnes ^lurray, by John M. Grabam, ]\L G. 
Wm. Dickinson and ]\Iary Atkinson, by J. S, Millsapps, M. G. 
Joseale Bevier and Eliza McKibbins, by Louis Lightner. M. G. 
Wm. Redding and Hannah L. L. Atkinson, by John R. Evans. 
Milner P. Davidson and Lora A. Lyon, by John XeiT, M. G. 
Peter Roberts and Sarah N. Clifton, by Levi Lapham, J. P. 
Robert Faulds and Catherine Courtney, by James M. Stickney. 
Wm. A. Lawson and Sina Mott. by E. S. Brodhead, Pol. Mag. 
Elias Nuller and Rlioda Jenkins, by Sylvester F. Otman, J. P. 
David D. Coombs and Eliza Applegate, by B. F. Fuller, J. P. 
Francis Baxter and Jane A. Wardell, by A. J. Wright. M. G. 
Wilson Spencer and Caroline Brace, by Jacob Matthews. M. G. 
Richard F. Williamson and Louisa Nicholson, by A. J. Wright. 
Jobn Butler and Mary Cavenagh. by Catholic Missioner. 
Charles W. Coe and Julia A. Bennett, by Alvin Abbott, M. G. 
Xicholas Sturm and Martha Sturm, by Peter Sturm, M. G. 
Albert Vail and Sylvia Stockton, by E. S. Brodhead. Pol. Mag. 
John Smith and Bridget McComisky, by Louis Lightner, M. G. 
Wm. H. Drennin and Lucy A. Chatfee, by W. S. Bates, M. G. 
Wm. H. Ansman and Ruth A Xelson, by Peter Sturm. M. G. 
Harrod Murnan and Gertrude A. Lyon, by E. S. Brodhead. 
Samuel Montootb and Hannah S. Stnrm, by Peter Sturm, yi. G. 
Jacob McDaniel and Louisa Hall, by Ahab Keller. M. G. 
]\richael liargin and Celia Xoble, by E. Delaharty, M. G. 
Jeremiah Wagoner and Laura Culton, by R. McBocock, J. P. 
Benjamin Mehew and Marietta Ellenwood, by John Xeff, M. G. 
Robert Alexander and Melissa R. Mix, by Peter Sturm. M. G. 
Gersham Bunnell and Ellen Cooper, by James Snare, J. P. 
James A. Long and Rosina Glitch, by Peter Sturm, M. G. 
Charles Kezer and Sarah J. Smith, by Josiah Kerns, M. G. 
Josiali Miner and Lydia A. Houck, by Jetf. Raymond. J. P. 
Wm. Higginson and Mary Evins, by D. McCance, J. P. 
Lemuel F. Mattbews and Lucretia S. Trickle, by W. J. Smith. 



Jan. 


1. 


t< 


1. 


(I 


2. 


<( 


1. 


a 


G. 


a 


14. 


a 


15. 


a 


19. 


i( 


23. 


( i 


2G. 


a 


30. 


a 


30. 


Feb. 


3. 


a 


1. 


i< 


4. 




6. 


a 


20. 


a 


21. 


Mar. 


1. 


ii 


2. 


a 


3. 


a 


4. 


(< 


5. 


a 


6. 


a 


10. 


ii 


8. 


a 


13. 


ii 


17. 


i( 


26. 


April 


1. 


a 


16. 


May 

ii 


rv 

2(i. 


i I 


20. 


a 


29. 


June 


14. 


ii 


22, 


ii 


25. 


July 

a 


4. 
12. 


Aug. 


1 . 


ii 


10. 


ii 


11. 


>• 


10. 


, ,' 


18. 


a 


16, 


a 


15. 


ii 


19. 


ii 


20. 


ii 


21 


ii 


26. 




"A 

o 

P3 
O 

^5 
cc 

W 

Iz; 
o 

H 

Hi 

►J 

< 

O 

o 
;?; 

O 

Iz; 

<! 



MARRIAGE RECORD 1831-1866. 07 

Aug. 27. Newton Baiighn and Irene Simms, by D. McCance, C. J. 

" 28. Ephraim W.Smith and Sarah M. Addis, by D. McCance, J. P. 

'^ 30. James N. Davison and Mary C. Eicliards, by B. F. Fuller, J. P. 

Sept. 2. Alvah Sturtevant and Rebecca Pratt, by Jacob Matthews, M. G. 

2. Thomas Corlitt and Mary Zinne. by D.' McCance, J. P. 

'' 9. Robert Allen and Alice Holt, by R^. C. Dunn, M. G. 

" 12. Jacob Williams and Sarah Saxton, by Peter Strum, M. G. 

" 21. W^ellington H. Boyer and Anna P. Hinson, by D. Hitchcock. 

" 21. George'W. Gharrett and Alice Fuller, by James Snare, J. P. 

" 14. Geo. (*ooper and Rebecca Bunnell, by James Snare, J. P. 

" 25. Geo. H. McClenahan and Martha L. Atherton, by J. Raymond. 

Oct. o. Thomas Wickluini and Mary Welch, bv P. McGregor. Cath. Pas. 

1. Philip C. Rhea and Eliza j". Parks, by John Neff^ M. G. 

'' 2. Charles Stephens and Hannah J. Jewell, by I). McCance, J. P. 

" 2. Ira H. Ilochstrasserand Margaret Driunin, by M. P. King, M. G. 

"' 5. George Holmes and Martiia E. Carney by John Neff, M. G. 

" 15. Neri McDaniel and Finiah Mcintosh, by D. McCance, J. P. 

" 21. Michael S. Smith and Nancy Bateman, by W. J. Stubble, M. G. 

" 23. Joseph P. Gibbs and Hannah B. Gibbs, by R. C. Dunn, M. G. 

" 29.- Lewis Corson and Lydia A. Buck, by E. C. Brodhead, P. Mag. 

Nov. 8. Ziba Hackett and Lucinda Smith, by Thos. Grattridge, J. P. 

" 9. John M. Ilurd and Mahala R. Swank, by S. A. Elliott, M. G. 

" 12. Wian E. Clough and Jennie Thornton, by R. C. Dunn, M. G. 

'' 27. Samuel White and Lucinda Harris, by R. C. Dunn, M. G. 

Dec. 2. Wm. E. Thomas and Elmira Myers, by D. Cance, J. P. 

" 15. Geo. M. Adams and Hannah R. Adams, by R. C. Dunn, M. G. 

" 15. D. H. Dalrymple and Louisa Harmon, by Peter Sturm, M. G. 

" 24. John E. Dack and Jane Wiley, by John Neff, M. G. 

" 28. Stephen Halsey and Delia H." Lacey, by D. M. Kelley, J. P. 

" 29. Isaac Welch and Catherine L. Baldwin, by R. C!. Dunn, M. G. 

"• 31. J. C. Capestake and Sarah C. Hulsizer, by R. C. Dunn, M. G. 

1863. 

Jan. 5. George Board man and Lvdia Smith, bv Peter Sturm, M. G. 

" 15. Wm. Coleman and Eliza'Leigh, by S. A. Elliott, M. G. 

" 11. John Freeland and Emilene Hall, by James Snare, J. P. 

" 14. Norman Malcom and Elvira Straight, by R. C. Dunn, M. G. 

" 23. Geo. E. Richmond and Eliza N. Simmerman, by S. M. Farrar. 

" 27. Jolm H. Ogle and Diantha W. Sturm, by A. C. Price, V. D. M. 

Feb. 5. Albert M. Frisbie and Harriett Hines, by M. P. King, M. G. 

5. G. H. H. Q. Dalrymple and Mary Griffin, by Peter Sturm, M. G. 

" 10. Richard J. Crodder and Eliza A. Tofflemoyer, by John Sargent. 

'• 11. Ellis W. Gaskill and Jane McBride, by J. A. Graham, M. G. 

" 11. John Besler and Anna Jopig, by E. S. Broadhead, Pol. Mag. 

" 13. Wm. Murray and Isa])ella Fairbairn, by J. M. Graham, M. G. 

" 19. Geo. Rutherford and Jane Armstrong, A. J. Wright, M. G. 

" 22. Francis S. Clark and Malvenia Powell, by W. R. Stowe. M. G. 

" 23. Reed Spencer and Sarah J. Greenman, by James Snare, J. P. 

" 25. Farquhar Bain and Ann ]\[urehison, no record. 

Mar. 16. William McCormick and Mell French, by James Snare, J. P. 

" 9. James H. Springfield and Martha E. Geer, Benj. M. Lombard. 

"' 26. Madara D. Fezler and Marv B. Whitaker, by R. C. Dunn. 

'' 25. John C. Emery and Louisa C. Hall, by R. C. 'Dunn. M. G. 

" 31. John Smilie and Mary A. Burns, by D. M. Kelly, J. P. 



08 HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY. 

JSTatliaii Downing and Ilaniiali F. Eiter, S. P. Unntiiigtoii. 
Murdow Murchinson and Sally Matheson, no record. 
Wm. H. Thwiss and Hannah Witter, by A. C. Price, M. G. 
Jacob H. Sanders and Mary M. Brace, by W. J. Smith, M. G. 
Daniel B. Glark and Eliza A. Kent, liscence returned. 
David L. Ash and Eliza Messenger, by Lemuel Pomeroy, M. G. 
Francis M. Timmons and Eliza Rush, by A. G. Hammond, J. P. 
George Smith and Adelia A. Greenman, by Jos. Woodward. 
Thomas Scavenger and Ann E. Corner, by James W. Hewett. 
Thomas Eobinson and Lucy G. Lyle, W. J. Stubbles, M. G. 
David Collins and Sarah Burns, by John Nelf, M. G. 
Calvin Vulgamot and Catherine (Jingrich, by W. S. Bates. 
W. L. Straharn and Harriet E. Reed, by D. Whiflfen, J. P. 
Aaron S. Atherton and Mary J. Sanders, by W. J. Smith, M.G. 
Wm. S. Hixon and Lucv Oziah, A. J. AVright, M. G. 
Wm. P. Hall,and Louisa J. Hadsell, by D. M. Kelly, J. P. 
rienry Caruthers and Lucinda Simmerman. by S. M. F. Farrar. 
Thomas C Hepperly and Selina A. King, by John ]\"et¥, M. G. 
Jothan Rounds and Martha Cypler, by B. F. Fuller, J. P. 
John C. May and Rebecca A. Trickle, "^A. C. Price, M. G. 
Chas. H. Maxfield and Helen Fuller, by A. J. Wright. M. G. 
Robert Riddle and Betsy Cameron, R. C. Dunn, M.G. 
Geo. Boale and Lydia Mix, by Peter Sturm, M. G. 
Samuel Hewett and Mary J. Sapp, Ijy James W. Hewett, P.M. 
■'John W. Emery and Lizzie Livingstone, by D. McCance, J. P. 
Jacob IF Simmerman and Levina Durand, J. W. Hewett. 
Robert M. Masters and Ijouisa Lundy, by Jacob Matthews. 
Thomas Dawson and Jane Meadows. Jos. Woodward, J. P. 
Cornelius L. Lupert and Laura Halsey, A. Gross, M.G. 
W. H. Gray and Eliza Traphagan, by D. McCance, J. P. 
Thomas Homer and Charlotte Dew-ey, by A. J. Wright, M. G. 
Aug. B. Kirkjjatrick and Fannie Redding, l)y Jesse Redding. 
David Magee and Eliza Jewell, by D. McCance, J. P. 
John Black and Eliza Mason, by E. Ransom, jr., M. G. 
Cornelius Horn and Lienor Newton, by N. Y. Giddings, M. G. 
Wm. Peterson and Marv Wooden, bv Robt. McCutcheon, ^f. G. 
Geo. A. Clifford and Mary C. Clifford, by A. C. Price, M. G. 
Charles H. Grimm and Catherine McLennan, by J. M. Graham. 
Reuben Gardner and Marv McGee, bv AV. W. Winslow, J. P. 
Wm. P. McGilliard and Eliza J. Torrance, by A. C. Miller, M. G. 
Chester Lyon and Chloe A. Austin, by R. C. Dunn, M. G. 
Peter Nelson and Lucinda A. Smith, by Peter Sturm, M. G. 
George Currier and Sarah Drury, by A. M. Gardner, M. G. 
Dan.Drawver andLucia A. Wilson, by D. A. Falkenburg 

M. G.^ ^ ' 

James A. Edwards and Susan Lee, by A. C. Price, M.G. 
Isaac Shepherd and Mary A. Cockshot, by D. McCance, J. P. 
Daniel McClure and Matilda Case, by R. C. Dunn, M.G. 
J. B. Cochran and Sarah C. Goodspeed, by Ansel J. Wright. . 
James Pace and Bell McLain, by George Stebbins, M.G. 
Bainbridge Ray and Mary Prather, by D. McCance, M.G. 
George Boardman and J. C. Updike, by W. S. Bates, M. G. 
Wm. P. Caverley and Elizabeth Hartley, by A. E. Wells, M. G. 



Apri 


112, 
17. 


(I 


22, 


May 


6 
2. 


a 


vi. 


a 


o\. 


June 


14 


a 


11, 


a 


30, 


July 




a 


2, 


a 


I 


ce 


!>, 


(V 


12 


Aug. 


i 


a 


4, 


i i 


16. 


a 


IG. 


a 


20. 


a 


23. 


i i 


20. 


Sept. 


5, 
3. 


i i 


23, 


i i 


10. 


i e 


13. 


t i 


Ifl. 


a 


21. 


a 


24. 


a 


22. 


Oct. 


1. 


a 


4. 


a 




I i 


13. 


a 


18. 


i i 


19. 


a 


15. 


Nov. 


10. 


•• 


19. 


a 


10. 


a 


15. 


e i 


'ib. 


(( 


22. 


a 


20. 


a 


30. 


" 


30. 


Dec. 


12. 


a 


8. 


a 


10. 


a 


17. 


ii 


17. 



Dec. 


24. 


i( 


24. 


t i 


30. 


a 


31. 


Jan . 


3. 


• • 


G. 


a 


21. 


ee 


14. 


a 


19. 


.i 


20. 


(( 


26. 


a 


29. 


Feb. 




it 


10. 


(< 


10. 


a 


IG. 


a 


14. 


i i 


18. 


a 


22. 


a 


25. 


a 


27. 


iC 


29. 


Mar. 


10. 


<e 


9. 


a 


13. 


a 


12. 


a 


17. 


a 


22. 


(< 


23. 


(< 


2G. 


i i 


25. 


a 


27. 


i( 


27. 


a 


31. 


April 

i i 


3. 
3. 


a 


13. 


a 


17. 


a 


11. 


ii 


13. 


a 


19. 


a 


19. 


c. 


30. 


May 


10. 
12. 


a 


15. 


a 


17. 


i I 


11. 


June 


4. 


i ( 


15, 


I c 


18. 


a 


21. 



MARRIAGE RF.CORD 1 831-1 86t). 99 

Joseph Smith and Sarah Armentrout, Ijy S. M. F. Farrar, J. P. 
John H. Houzo and Susannah Gingrich, by I). McCance, J. P. 
Wm. S. Kimball and ^lai-garet P. Conistock, by James W. Hewett. 
Thos. T. Leacox and Hannah Y. Wilson, by Delos S. Main, M. G. 

18G4. 

Geo. C. Maxfield and Cynthia C. Parrish, by R. C. Dunn, M. G. 
Isaac S. Whitaker and Sarah A. Shinn, by I\. C. Dnnn, M. G. 
Miles Colwell and Amanda Barr, by D. McCance, J. P. 
James Kerns and Sarah J. Bristoll, by N. J. Geddings, M. G. 
James R. Lawson and Ophelia Lafferty, by J. W. Hewett, P. M. 
Nathan Shulze and Eliza A. Culbertson, by R. C. Dnnn, M. G. 
Wm. C. Phelps and Rachel Snyder, by Jos. Woodward, J. P. 
Thos. Turnbull and Margaret Montooth. by J. M. Graham, M. C. 
Thomas Baskin and Nancy Simmons, J. B. Clhenoweth, M. G. 
Thomas W. Embleton and Kate Beach, by F. F. Perkins, M. G. 
Wm. Miller and Mary E. Miller, by S. M. F. Farrar. J. P. 
Geo. P. Gerard and Nancy E. Leeson, by A. H. Hepperly, M. G. 
Martin Medearis and Margaret J. Robinson, by Jas. Snare, J. P. 
Daniel Keller and Mary VV. Wright, by E Ransom, M. G. 
Cyrus A. Anthony and Charlotte Shaw^, by Allen C. Miller. M. G. 
Ezra J Griffin and Rel)ecca L. Nicholas, bv J. M. Ford. M. G. 
John Dawson and Jemima Detman, by B. F. jNIiller, J. P. 
Robert Cinnamon and Jane McClane, by F. F. Perkins, M. G. 
Anthony Sturm and Nancy Bogard, by Peter Sturm, M. G. 
Jas. M. Harwood ami Rebecca Wall, by A. H. Hepperly, M. G. 
Edwin H. Tyrrell and Elizabeth Rockwell, by F. Bascom, M. G. 
Abe. Loudenburg and Lydia Phenix, by Peter Sturm, M. G. 
Jesse Redding and Sarah Fulk, by Peter Sturm, M. G. 
Alfred S. Hemmant and Mary E. Kavanaugh, by J. W. Agard. 
'JMiomas J. Townsend and Maria L. Bevier, byA. C. Price, M. G. 
Albert Vansickle and Rachel A. Oziah, by S. M. F. Farrer, J. P. 
Thomas Imes and Cynthia A. Harmon, by Peter Sturm, M. G. 
Charles Hall and Sarah Carter, by Thomas Beall, J. P. 
Peter J. Allison and Mary A. Williams, byA. J. Wright, M. G. 
James F. Holmes and Mary Richardson, by A. J. Wright, M. G. 
Daniel E. Markland and Hannah E. Miller, by James Snare, J. P. 
Geo. H. Hurd and Cynthia J. Wilson, by K. C. Price, M . G. 
Harry Hull and Alice Somberger, by Jacob Matthews, M. G. 
Chas. H. Colwell and Hester Miller, by D. McCance, J. P. 
Ira C. Reed and Sarah M. Barnell, by'S. M. F. Farrar, J. P. 
AVm. Calhoon and Ann M. Beayer, by A. C. Price, M. G. 
Theo. Bacmeister and Laura L. Ogle. byA. C. Price, M. G. 
Ira Newton and Oliye E. Smith, by R. C. Dunn, M. G. 
Americus Jones and Hannah Messenger, by R. C. Dunn, M. G. 
Abram Vandike and Henrietta R. Blood, byA. C. Price, M. G. 
W. H. (iibbs and Julia A. Grant, by J. W. Hewett, Pol. Mag. 
John Drew and Atlanta Lyle, by Ehud Fordyce, M. G. 
Emery Buffom and Anna Ilimes, by A. C. Price, M. G. 
Henry H. Emery and Sarah A. Swab, by D. M. Kelly. J. P. 
James Abates and Martha Baritt, by J. W. Hewett, Pol. Mag. 
Henry Rhodes and Carrie Johnson, by R. C. Dunn, M. G. 
Seidell Miner and Eliza C. Smith, by A. C. Price, M. G. 
Oloff H, Johnson and Sarah Swift, by E, McCance, J, P, 



100 niSTdKV OF STARK COUNTY. 

James II. Dexter and Eliza M. Johnson, by S. L. Hamilton. 
Jesse AV. Hawk and Susan Locey, by D. McCance, J. P. 
Wm. Murnan and ]Mary Coe, by I). MeCance, J. P. 
John Kermeen and Annie McCain,, by 1>. F. Fuller, J. P. 
John Graves and Rebecca J . Hurry, by E. B. Barker, M. G. 
Francis G. Lego-itt and Katv Long, by A. C. Price, M. G. 
W. 0. Dalrymple and Ellen"^ Conner, by W. W. Winslow, J. P. 
Francis W. Funis and Ellen Cooper, by J. W. Ilewett, P. M. 
Henry Lassing and Josie Marker, by P. C. Dunn, M. G. 
JohnW. Rounds and Missouri A. Davis, by D. M. Kelley. J. P. 
Robert A. Turnbull and Rebecca Montooth, by R. C. Dunn. 
Thomas A. Colvin and Sarah Willeson, by S. B. Smith, M. G. 
Stephen Roberts and Susaniia Hogan, by J. W. Hewett, P. M. 
Daniel 0. Addis and Margaret Caskey, by Allen C. Miller, M. G. 
Eugene B. Lyon and jMartha Cox, by E. P. Barker, M. G. 
Thomas Xicliols and Marv J. Cohvell, bv J. W. Hewett, P. M. 
John A. Cowell and Charlotte Gridley, by E. P. Baker, M. G. 
Fred P. Bloom and Charlotte Curfman, by R. C. Dunn, M. G. 
Israel Dawson and Effie McMillen, b}' J. W. Hewett, P. M. 
Philip Arganbright and Josephine Boggs, by R. C. Dunn, M. G. 
Lorenzo Waldron and Clarrissa Reed, by Edward Aril on, M. G. 
AVm. W. Stuart and Delphine ISTewton, by James B. Chenewith. 
AVm. 0. Flaharty and Margaret Kelly, by John Kilkenny, Priest. 
Abram Buifiugton and Susan A. Pettit. by A. H. Ilepperly. ' 
Wm. W. Hylton and Adelaide Phenix, by Peter Sturm, M. G. 
Calvin R. Smythe and Armentia Triiilett, by R. C. Dunn, M. G. 
Wm. A. Cade and Fannie E. Simpson, bv J. M. Van Wagner. 
Geo. B. Vansickle and Alziria Barnhill, by A. C. Miller. M. G. 
John Hoppock, Jr., and Ilattie Conklin, by Horace Worden, 
John Imes and Mary Asburn. by Peter Sturm, M. G. 
James Boland and Eleanor Boyd, by R. C. Dunn, M. G. 
Daniel McCrady and Mary Dixon, no record. 
Marion Davis and Ellen Boardman, by J. W. Agard, M. G. 
Bela H. Curtiss and Alary Sliaw, by Alvin Abbott, M. G, 
Joel Straight and Eliza Whitcher, by A. G. Hammond, J. P. 
John M. Cole, and Christenah Peterson, by D. M. Hill, M. G. 
Charles C. Gleeson and Mary Bolt, by James Snare, J. P. 
John Barler and Xancv J. (rraves, bv D. McCance, J. P. 
Hugh Rhodes and Hannah Beatty, by R. C. Dunn, M. G. 
Cuthbert Driscoll and Sarah J. Davis, by M. H. Negus M. G. 
D. McLennan and Catharine JMurcliison, by Lemuel Pomeroy. 
Hiram AA^yatt and Rebecca Newmyer, by James Darsie. 
John AV. Dickenson and Delia AI. Drawyer, by Peter Sturm, M. G. 
Jacob Rogers and ]\Iary W. Reujanington, by A. C. ^Miller, M. G. 
AV. II. Fleming and Sarah A. AVilson, by AVm. Leber, M. G. 
Harrison I). Gill and Sarah Britten, by E. P. Barker, M, G. 
Sidney F. Harding and Mary A. Irwin, by J. M. Graham, M. G. 
Alonzo Luce and Catherine Miller, by J. AV. Hewitt, J. P. 
Robt. G. Stowe and Martha E. Pope, by E. Ransom, Jr., M. G. 
John F. Greenfield and Thurza Hitchcock, by D. McCance, J. P. 

1865. 
Henry Newton and Cynthiana Harvey, by J. AV. Hewitt, J. P. 
Daniel Lundy and Catherine Emery, by Jacob Matthews, M. G. 



dune 


30. 


July 


4. 
4. 


i i 





a 


4. 


i i 


17, 


Aug. 


3. 


( i 


11. 


( i 


15. 


i e 


31. 


Sept. 


1. 

rv 
i . 


a 


8. 


a 


13. 


a 


20. 


ei 


23. 


<i 


24. 


a 


29. 


ii 


29. 


a 


29. 


Oct. 


3. 


i i 




i i 


14. 


ii 


16. 


a 


13. 


a 


17. 


a 


24. 


a 


^1. 


a 


18. 


a 


30. 


i i 


29. 


a 


29. 


Nov. 


3. 


a 


5. 


a 


12. 


a 


17. 


a 


14. 


a 


24. 


a 


26. 


a 


26. 


a 


29. 


({ 


29. 


Dec. 


4. 


i< 


5. 


a 


8. 


a 


11. 


a 


22. 


a 


22. 


a 


25. 


a 


27. 


Jan. 


4. 


a 


5. 



Jiin. 


21 


i k 


')0 




/V'.V 1 


a 


23, 


a 


23, 


a 


28, 


a 


31 


Feb. 


9 


a 


9 




/C, 


a 


2. 






a 


3! 


a 


6. 


a 


14, 


I i 


15, 


ei 


15, 


a 


15, 


w • 


10, 


a 


16, 


a 


19, 


• k 


99 




/v'w . 


.Mar. 


2. 


i ( 


5 


a 


9, 


. i 


12, 


a 


18, 


April 


6 


b i 


9, 


a 


19, 


<i 


12, 


* • 


22 


Mu}' 


9, 


4 h 


19, 


June 


10, 


a 


18, 


a 


9?^ 




/^O. 


. . 


97 




~ < . 


July 


4, 


iC 


4, 


i 1. 


0, 


ee 


22, 


a 


9 7 




/v 1 , 


a 


28, 


Aug. 


0. 


a 


G, 


a 


1 , 


i « 


1», 


■' 


20, 


li 


30, 


ii 


31 


"' 


31, 


Sept. 


1, 


" 


4 


• • 


4 



MAKKIAGE KECOKD 1831-1866. 101 

John Greenwood and Susan Wright, hy J. W. Agard. M. G. 
Kowland F. Washbnrn and Ijucinda Williams, by E. P. Barker. 
James P. McGuyre and Mary J. Collins, by J. W. Hewitt, J. P. 
Thomas Hick and Margaret Cockshoot, by J. W. Hewitt, J. V. 
Adam Fletcher and ]Mary Pees, by J. W. Hewitt. P. Mag. 
John Armstrong and Jane Pule, by J. M. Van Wagner, M. G 
Geo. W. Kirkpatrick and ]\[artlia A, Taylor, by James Darsie. 
Wm. 0. Johnson and Hannah L. Fitch, by James Darsie, M. G. 
Wm. J. Lamperand Mary Clayton, by C. Selden, M. G. 
Joseph F. Lewis and Catlierine Buckley, by I). McCance, J. P. 
Poss Colwell and Mary J. Gierhart. by A. J. Wright, M. G. 
Mathusalah Bevier and Fanny L. Hicks, by Alvin Abbott, M. G. 
Wm. W. l^uswell and lone Beckwith, by J. M. Grciham, M. G. 
Daniel Moon and Hester A. Lord, by John M. (Jraham, M. G. 
James A. Henderson, and Fi'ancis A. Dewey, by P. C. Dunn. 
John Harvie and Melinda Jane Simmerman, by James Snare. 
Aron J. Anderson and Susan Updyke, by J. W. Hewett, J. P. 
Wm. A. Ellis and Adaline W. Davis, by A. G. Hammond, J. P. 
Wm. Warhurst and Lydia Umbaugh, by Geo. W. Brown, M. G. 
Alex. Ballentine and Isabella Templeton, by P. C. Dunn. M. G. 
Simon Cox and Mary E. Graves, by A. G. Hammond, J. P. 
John H. Brown and Mary Holmes. l)y James Darsie, M. (i. 
Albert G. Hilliard and Euplnmia Clark, by W. J. Beck, M. (i. 
Miles S. Williams and Pollv M. Elston, bv W. W. Winslow, J. P. 
Eli Wilson and Mary M. Morris, by J. W. Hewitt, P. Mag. 
Thomas Mayborn and Pebecca Jerrems. by A. G. Hammond. 
Lewis Hoppock and Hnldah Cross, by W. J. Beck, M. G. 
Henry C. Morris and Mary Burnam. by E. Pansom, Jr., ]Vr. G. 
George P. Harris and Jane Page, by J. W. Hewett, P. Mag. 
Abel T. George a]ul Rhoda E. Sharer, by J. B. Chenoweth. M. (J. 
Wm. Delay and Martha Patrick, bv C. M. S. Lvon, J. P. 
Geo. W. Goodnow and Mary Harmsehild, by D. McCance, C. J. 
John T. Kinmonth and Henrietta Atherton, by James Darsie. 
Wm. M. Pilgram and ^larv Waslibui'ne, bv E. P. Barker. M. (\. 
Oliver White and Mattie L. Mercer, bv Darius M. Hill, :\r. G. 
Geo. Atwood and Catherine M. Foster, by A. J. Wright. M. G. 
Jacob Umbaugh and Sarah E. Dudley, bv A. J. Wright, M. G. 
Wm. Boyd and Mary Colthar, by A. C. Miller, M. G^ 
Simi)son Simmons and .Margaret Hull, by C. A. Hewett, 31. (i. 
John Frey and Eliza Jane l^'ulk. liy Peter Sturm, ]\L G. 
James Montooth and Mary Wilson, by Wm. Leber, M. G. 
Ezra Ferris and ^lai'v C. Cummings. No I'ecord. 
Chancey E. Ballard and Mary E. Zink. l)y James Buswell, J. P. 
Charles H. Newman and Alvira \. Jordan, bv Alvin Abbott. 
Harlan P. Wyckoft' and Phebe Ackley, by li.\) Dunn, M. G. 
Wm. Mowon and Lucinda Potts, by C. M. S. Lyon. J. P. 
John McKee and Madeline Bradford, bv A. H. Hep})erlv. M. (i. 
George A. Smith ;ind .Mary E. Wolf, by A. C. Price, M.^ G. 
Chris G. Birlemeyer and Ann B. Wenger, l)y E. Pansom, jr. 
Jas[)er Dollison and Lydia Klli.son. by C. M. S. Lyon, J. P. 
JMorris C. Lampson and Mary J. Fi'ancns, by A. (i. Hanimund. 
Andrew Creighton and Hannah Atkinson, In' Jos. Woodward. 
P.enjamiu C.'Follett and Helen Phodes, by A. J. Wright, .AL (i. 



h)2 HISTOKY OF STAKK COUNTY. 

Sept. 5. Eli Emery and Mary C Johnson, by J. W. Hewitt, J. P. 

" 5. Stephen AV. Marring and Sarah Porter, by A. J. Wright, M. G. 

'' 5. Hiram A. S, Kane and Marv E. Burns, bv J. ^\ . Hewett. P. M. 

0. Geo. W. Peed and Mrs. Jan'e Hunter, by AVm. A. Clark, M. G. 

7. Philip F. Earhart and Lucretia Dollison, bv C. M. S. Lvon. 

" 11. George Phelps and Sarah Choate, by E. P. Barker. M. G. 

• • 1-J-. Sylvester Hall and Catherine Harding, by A . H . Hepperly, M. G. 

" 14. Joseph A. Webster and Susan E. Saxton, by J. B. Russell, J. P. 

'• 14. Benj. F. Hersh and Love S. Fox, by A'. G. Hammond. J. P. 

•• 16. Bnrdiek Kinvon and Silvina Wilson. G. W. Shaffer. M. G. 

•• IG. David M. Poor and Matilda Witter.' by D. M. Hill. M. G. 

••' 18. Job Mahaffy and Ann E. Broughten, by H. R. Halsey, J. P. 

'' 21. Stephen (jreen and Francis S. Hunt, bv James W. Hewett, J. P. 

•'•' 24. Royal H. Miller and Arabella Kisseil,*by R. C. Dunn, M.' G. 

Oct. 1. Charles M. A\^ilson and Jane A. Lawson, by Wm. Leber, M. G. 

" 2. Joseph C. Hiner and Eleanor A. Eagan, by A. P. Aten, M. (J. 

" 2. Orange F. Dorranee and Ada Hicks, by J. Milligan, M. G. 

" 4. James A. ]\rcKenzie and Louisa Thomas, by J. AV. Agard, M. G. 

7. Joseph H. Gi7igrich nnd Marv A. Finch, bv D. M. Hill, M. G. 

■' 10. Demetrius E. Morris and Mavy Vandyne, by G. AA' . Shaffer, M. G. 

12. Samuel Happock and Sarah J. Likes, by E. Ransom. Jr., M. G. 

14. AA"m. C. \\'right and Susan C. Casky, by J. AA" . Hewitt. P. 3[ag. 

17. Hector M. Lamb and Athalia Barlow, 1)y C. M. S. Lyon, J. P. 

19. Erastus E. Reed and Clarinda AVood, by James Snare, J. P. 

" 19. H. H. Ballentine and Mary Trimmer, by Aug. G. Hammond. 

" 19. Chauncev R. Miner and Chloe R. Parrish, bv A. J. Wright. 

" 19. Richard R. Luce and Eliza McVicker, by D.' McCance, J. P. 

•' 23. Duncan G. Ligraham and Eliza A. Sticknev, bv J. M. Sticknev. 

'• 2(J. Wm. B. Thompson and Ellen Toothaker, by R.^ C. Dunn, M. G. 

" 26. Anson R. 'J'anner and Catherine Oxenberger, bv Peter Sturm. 

■• 26. Oliver P. Crowell and Mary .M Hiner, by D. M. Hill, M. G. 

" 2ij. James AVall and Ann Carroll, by Missionary Priest. 

" 29. Henry S. Crook and Mattie Hanchett, by Robt. McBocock, M. G, 

31. Gideon Murray and Jane Fairbairn. by A. J. AA' right. M. G. 

Nov. 2. Aaron Schmuck and Julia A. Hill, by E. Ransom. Jr., M. G. 

" 5. James M. Lowman and Mary E. Thomas, by D. M.Hill, M. G. 

12. Samuel Redding and Letitia Boffard, by Sam. Stoughten. ^L G. 

'• 13. Ninirod C. Bishop and Auliana AVinslow. bv Alvin Abbott. M. G. 

'•' 19. Joseph B. Armentrout and Pollv A. Fantz'. bv D. M. Hill. M. G 

" 11). Wm. 11. Hazard and Sarah M. "Caskev, bv A C.Miller. M. G. 

•■ 23. (ieoro-e H. Martin and Ruth AVhite. bv D." M. Hill. M. G. 

•• 26. Fred'. .Al. Talbott and Melissa R. Alexander, by L. R. AVinn, J. P. 

Dec. 5. Geo. W. Botkin and Jane B. Potter, by E. Ransom, M. G. 

" — . Joel Dixon and Hannah Putnam, bv 0. (i. AA'ood. J. P. 

" 24. Robert Hall and Jane AVrag, by R. AIcBocock, J. P. 

25. Jonathan Graves and Rachel Graves, by A. G. Hammond. J. P. 

'• 25. Henry 0. Ackley and ^lelvina Simmerman, bv C. AA'. Young. 

•• 28. James R. (ielvin and Martha 0. Trickle, by D. M. Hill. M. G. 

28. Samuel Mechm and Almeda A. Cheeseman, bv J. AV. Hewitt. 

'• 28. John L. Finley and Rebecca Trickle, by D. M. Hill. M. G. 

31. John McCarthy and Mary Poll, by A. G. Hammond. J. P. 

1866. 

Jan. 1. Uzias 1'. Smith and Valina E. Miller, by Louis Benedict, M. G. 



Jan. 


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MAKRIAGE EECOKD 1831-180f». 1 (>') 

Williarcl B. Foster and Mary Ciirtiss, by Alvin Al)bott, M. Or. 

Patrick McGuire and Sarah Harty, by Father Kilkenny. 

Jos. 0. H. Spinney and Jnlia Bevier, by Alvin Abbott, M. G. 

Harry Fornian and Susannah Schanck, by A. C. Price, M. G. 

Archibald Wade and Elizabeth Lyman, by E. Kansom, Jr. 

Wm. H. Barton and K. M. Standard, by A. G. Hammond. 

Lewis Halsted and Harriet A. Jackson, by E. Ransom, Jr. 

Laban M. Diigan and Susan A. Cook, by R. C. Dunn, M. G. 

Wm. L Cross and Delia M. Fuller, by D. M. Hill, M. G. 

Charles D. Shaver and Delia Bourlier, by J. B. Chenowth. 

Henry Zimmerman and Jacobin Wilt, by A. G. Hammond. 

Orrin Kinmouth and Hester Atherton, l)y F]. Ransom, M. G. 

Oarin Maxfield, Jr., and Cynthia Stone, by R. C. Dunn, M. G. 

Charles Dudley'and Eliza C. Bevier, by M. H. Megus, M. G. 

Peter F. Gregory and Rachel Bird, by J. W. Hewitt, P. M. 

George Leigh and Margaret Knotf, by Wm. Leber, M. G. 

W. J. Hamilton and Annette Bryan, by A. J. Wright, M. G. 

Franklin Stanton and Ellen Riggin, by R. C. Dunn, M.G. 

Newton Dollison and Mary White, by C. M. S. Lyon, J. P. 

Peter J. Riner and Martha L. Graves, by R. C. Dunn, M. ({. 

Nathan Snare and Isabella Williamson, by AV. E. Martin. 

Joel Hendrick and Henrietta Wilson, by W. Leber, M. (r. 

John I). Essex and Mary Bunnell, by A. G. Hammond. P. P. 

Ira F. Hayden and Marietta Vinson, by J. W. Hewitt, J . P. 

Nicliolas Fiber and Wyonia Anderson, by J. W. Hewitt, J.- P. 

Hiram Thurston aiurOrmilda White, by C. M. S. Lyon, J. P. 

Charles 0. Wilson and Lucinda Acer, by J. W. Hewitt, J. ^P. 

AVm. Johnson and Mary Y. P)arrett, by J. W. Hewitt. J. P. 

Clayton A. DeWolf and Lusetta Atherton, by David R. Gelviii. 

W^m. Turnbull. Jr., and Catharine McLennan, by J. R. Harris. 

Milton Trickle and Drusilla Shirver?, by E. Ransom, ^l. G. 

.John Wiley and Sarah C. Aten, by W. Leber, M. G. 

Ephriam S. Garrison and Sarali C. Pratz, by D. McCance. 

Carlos B. Lyle and Mary S. Eiigles, by J. R. Harris, M. G. 

Andrew Galbraith and Hannali R. Thomas, by E. P. Barker. 

Jacob Carr and Rhoda Miller, by A. (J. Hammond, J. 1*. 

Michael Hurim and Angeline Overlander, by AVilson Trickle. 

James Morris and Henrietta Little, by Calvin Seldiii, M. G. 

Henrv Scott and Ellen linswell. bv J. R. Harris, M. G. 

Wm.'Moffittand Elizabeth J. Hall, by R. C. Dunn, M. G. 

Elwood DeWolf and Nancy Atherton, by C. M. S. Lyon, J. P. 

James Swank and Henrietta, Kissel, by W"ni. Leber, M. G. 

John Farrell and Harriet Poil, 1)y C. A. Shurtleff, J. P. 

Calvin B. Rockwell and Maria L. AVhitt'en, by S. A. Estee. 

AlvaW. Brown and Francis Hodgson, by R. C. Dunn, M. G. 

Wm. H. TL Myers and Mary E. Shannon, by A. J. Wright. 

Samuel K. Leacox and Flora Kirkpatri(;k, by J. R. Harris. 

Alfred Christie and Margaret Grife, by G. W. Gue, M. G. 

Charles E. Shinn and Rebecca J. Pollok, l)y E. Ransom., Jr. 

D. J. Stimmell and Adeleide Triplett, by S. A. Estel, M. G. 

Ezekul Ayres and Nette Bell, by Wm. Leber, M. G. 
26. Lyman B. Smith and Clara Rhynhart, l)y R. C. Dunn. M.(L 
30. C. Svvackhammer and Eliza Warden, by C. W^ Young, J. P. 



10 J: HISTORY OF STAKK COUNTY. 

June G. Eoderick Matlieson and Mary A. McLennan, by N. C. Weede. 

'• 9. James Smith and Ann Rees. by C. M. S. Lyon. J. P. 

•' 0. Clayton A. Gibbs and Julia Bevier. by E. Ransom, M. G. 

" 10. Elezer Lafl'ertv and Margaret A. Harkness. bv C. M. S. Lvon. 

. •' 12. Mark M. Lucy and Mary Berfield. by R. 0. Dunn. M. G.' 

" 26. Edffar W. Curtiss and Kate McKibbon. by Father Kilkenny. 

19. AVni. J. Galbertson and x\una Bevier, byR. G. Dunn, M.J. 

20. Abel Armstrong and Annie Reed, by X. C. Weede, M. G. 
Juh^ 3. Andrew J. Rushing and Emma Dugan, byD. M. Hill. 

" 3. Luman P. Himes and Lucinda BufEum. by L. D. Gowen. 

'' 3. Alex. Murchison, Jr., and Maggie Wede, by John H. Montgomery. 

4. Joseph M. Cree and Phebe Christopher, by "William Leber. 

'' 4. Isaac E. Ensley and Eliza J. Barnell, by'C. M. S. Lyon. 

" 4. William D. Freeman and Xancy .Stacy, by C. M. S. Lyon. 

" 4. Peter M. Harkness and Marcella Reed, h\ Hugh Rhodes, J. P. 

13. Jiniathan Thompson and Melenda Parsons, by C. ^I. S. Lyons. 

24. Hugh Stoekner and Anna Beers, by A. J. Wright, M. G. 

'• 22. Henry W. Moore and Hester Spelman, by James B. Russell. 

29. Samuel G. Butler and Susan Hotchkiss, by Philander Chase. 

Aug. 9. Solomon Leighton and Sarah Snell, by James Snare. J. P. 

•' . 15. Henry C. Griffin and Ellen Green, by A. H. Hepperly, M. G. 

'' 30. Henry Seelev and Alma South. 1)V J. W. Aaard, M. G. 

•• 29. Charles Shaner and Bell Warner." by W. J. "Smith, M. G. 

29. James Burris and Susan A. Eastes. by James Snare. J. P. 
Sep. 3. SaxtonT. Kellogg and Honer Piester, by G. AV. Shaffer. 

'• 2. Oscar G. Hixson and Sarah A. Cox, bv A. G. Hammoml. 

0. Albert P. Finley and Rachel Hiner. by"D. M. Hill. M. G. 

G. Geo. H. Simmermauand Eliza C. Richmond, by C. M. S. Lyon. 

''' G. Asa Tavlor and Catherine Umbaugh. by C. M. S. Lvon. 

"' 20. John M. Roach and Adeline Funk, by W. A. Clark, ^l. G. 

'' 27. Thomas \\ . Ross and Happalonia Wiiber, by W. J. Beck. ■ 

"■ 30. Elijah Terwilliger and Mary F. Sturm, by Peter Sturm, M. G. 

'• 30. John Whitcher and Alma Hall, by A. G. Hammond. J. P. 

Oct. 3. Samuel S. Havden and Maria Wilson, bv William Leber. ^[. G. 

4. Jacob Young and Mary J . Kirkbuff, by Allen C. Miller, M. G. 

8. Chas. A. Ketchen and Abbey E. Gardiner, by L. D. Gowan. 

■■ 14. XewillH. IManchard and Ellen F. Stone, by S"am. G. AVright. 

15. Freeman R. Davison and Susan A. Jewell, by James Buswell. 

•' IG. Hurmon H. Hochstrasser and Cristina Drinnin, by A. J. A\'right. 

18. Wm. McKinstrv and Esther Bovd, bv B. C. Dennis, M. G. 

" 21. Amas P. Gill and Anne V. Stoddard' by A. J. Wright. M. G. 

''' 25. (ieorge ^Lu■ray and Lucetta Woodward, by J. H. Montgomery. 

19. Arch. D. Thorp and Araand Perry, by E. Ransom, Jr., M. G. 
24. James C. Powell and Rose Holmes, by J. H. ^Montgomery, M. G. 

" 30. Wm. H. nines and Rachel Lemoine. by J. W. Errett, M. G. 

30. Samuel M. Lemoine and Alma Hines. bv J. W. Errett. iL G. 
'' 30. Alfred Foil and Mary C. Lemoine, by J. W. Errett, M. (L 

30. Ebenezer M. Armstrong and ^[artha Walliker. by Baxter C. 
Dennis. M. (i. 

Nov. 1. Daniel M. Beers and Eliza Bowers, by A. S. Estee. M. G. 

'• T. Albert Shoemaker and Maggie J. Snare, bv W. E. Martin, ^f. G. 

'-' 11. (ieo. W. Pate and Martha Gintry, by H. R. Halsey, J. P. 

11. Wm. W. Morse and Mary J. More, by B. L.Lombard. M. G, 



PIONEER ASSOCIATIONS AND REMINISCENCES. 105 

Nov. 8. Shelden P. Mayhew and Rosa Dickenson, by E. Eansom, Jr. 

7. John L. Addis and Margaret E. Coleman, by II. Tiffany. M. G. 

" 10. Royal Lafferty and Sarah Jane Atherton, by E. Ransom, M. G. 

" 15. Henry B. Perry and Rebecca 0. Dewey, by R. C. Dunn, M. G. 

" 29. Daniel J. Walker and Stella D. Rhodes, by L. Dow Gowan, M. G. 

Dec. 5. Patrick O'Donnell and lionora Shea, by Father Kilkenny, C. P. 

'' 3. Jasper N. Kitterman and Philinda Mix, by I. W. Searle, J. P. 

" 16. John L. Kennedy and Amanda Shaw, by J. Cavitt, M. G. 

" 12. Rowland T. Lake and Jennie E. Hurd, by Horace Tiffany, M. G. 

" 18. Lewis E. Morton and Charlotte J. Christopher, by II. Tiffany. 

" 24. Simeon C. Chamberlain and Sarah Jane Cress, H. R. Halsey. 

" 27. Thomas A. Foster and Nancy Bangs, by Alyin Abbott. M. G. 

" 29. Wm. Nicholas and Mary M. Colwell, by R. C. Dunn, M. G. 

What a fund of history tliere is in this plain record of the begin- 
nings of many families wliose lives are linked with the progress of 
this county. Fortunately for the comity, the lessons inculcated of 
temperance and virtue bore fruit, and in almost every instance carried 
^yith them happiness and prosperity. 




CHAPTER V. 



PIONEER ASSOCIATIONS AND REMINISCENCES. 



T seems as if there were something in partial isolation of 
mankind that develops the kindlier feelings of the human 
, soul, enlarges its better impulses, and recreates mankind 
into more nearly the image of the true man. And this is 
^"/^true even of these men, some of whom led wild lives, and 
this was but the excrescent growth of the circumstances in 
which they were placed, and in no way affected the manli- 
ness of character wdiich developed itself. It seems, indeed, 
as if it were a wise provision of nature that the opening of 
new countries should l)e attended with a renewal of the sim- 
pler life of man, and thus introduce new blood into the 
Avorld of civilization. Few today can understand the feelings which 
animated the pioneer men and sustained them under every difficulty. 
Fewer still are they who comprehend the feelings of the pioneer women 
as they contemplated their surroundings and looked into the future, 
the horizon of which was darkened by discouragement and gloom. 
And vet thev faltered not, but sustained their husbands bv a trust in 
the outlook that was constant, and bore an abundant harvest. As 
wives, they Avere the most agreeable of companions ; as friends, the 
most faithful and affectionate ; as mothers, gentle as children ever had 
the misfortune to lose, who corrected the most pernicious of evils by 
the most tender management. Prudent from affection, though most 




106 HISTOKT OF STARK COUNTY. 

liberal of nature, they practiced econoni}' from the love they Ijore 
their husbands, and at critical periods, preserved order in affairs from 
the care of which those husbands were relieved ; she reclaimed her 
choice from despair, urged his indolence to exertion, and constantly 
admonished him to industry, integrity and manhood. The early set- 
tlers of Stark were naturally temperate and religious, and to them is 
due in greater measure, the enviable place which tlie county holds 
today in moral and physical, as well as financial strength. 

The Stark Count v Mutual Protection Society, organized August 12, 
ISlrS, to oppose the operations of horse-thieves and gamblers, may be 
credited as being the initial association of pioneers, which led to the 
formation of many, if not all, of the secret and l^enevolent. agricult- 
ural and religious associations of the county in after years. The first 
meetins" was held in the court house at Toulon. Mvrtle G. Brace was 
temporary President ; Hugh Rhodes, Secretary, and Wheeler B. Sweet, 
Organizing Secretary. Pi-ecinct committees were a))pointed as fol- 
lows: Toulon — AVilliam Ogle, O. Whitaker and George Buchanan. 
Mamlllon — Edward Trickle, Thomas S. Clark and Allen Greenlee. 
La Fayette — Jacob Emery, AVilliam Pratt and M. Atherton. Tr^c- 
iidng — Capt. Butler, James Holgate and Joseph Xewton. Osceola — 
William Dodd. John Lyle and Walter Fuller. Constitution and by- 
laws were reported. At this juncture Dr. Chamberlain moved the 
adoption of a resolution favoring an anti-gamWing society in conjunc- 
tion with the anti-horse-thief organization. The report was amended 
so as to cover this resolution, and the constitution adopted and signed. 
The original members were : Conrad Emery, George A. Worley, 
Henrv Butler. Thomas Hall, Minott Sillijnan, Joseph Emerv. Lewis 
Perry, Elijah McClenahan, E. Trickle, M. Chamberlain. T. S. Clark, 
William Bowin. David Emery. Henderson Truman, J. Emery, Jesse 
Emery. John Dodd, I. Acklev, J. Kichty. John Pollok. Peter E Pratt, 
]\[. Atherton, William M. Pratt, Jose})h Atherton, Hiram S. AUn-ight, 
Joseph Cox, Henry Price, O. Whitaker, Joseph Xewton, Lemuel Dor- 
rance. W. H. Butler, John Prvor. Thomas Lyle, A. R. Butler. William 
Ogle, AV. T. FuUer. Andrew Ilroy. W. ]\L Pose, Jacol) Sumner. George 
Sumner, George Sheets, Hugh lihodes, W. B. Sweet, J. AV. Hender- 
son, J. H. Barnett, H. White, Henry T. Ives, Nathan Snare, W. E. 
Elston, Joseph P. Xewton, Philip Munson, Tliomas J. Henderson, 
William O. Sment. John Turnbull, Brady Fowler. AValter Fullei". .la- 
cob Holgate. M. G. Brace. Isaac Thomas. S. G. AVright. William Hall, 
Samuel G. Butler, Samuel Thomas. Ira Ward.AVilliam Moore. William 
Lyle, A. W. Harod, Matthias Sturm, Henry Sturm. Joseph Blanchard, 
Christian Gingrich and Thomas Dugan. 

The revival of the anti-horse-thief organization was attejnpted 
August 10, ISGO, and on the 21th, resolutions were adopte<l, asking 
the supervisors to consider the sul)ject General Henderson delivered 
an historical address before a meeting of old settlers in 1805, ])ut there 
is no account whatever of the meetiii"; beino' dulv organized. A meet- 
ing of old settlers was held at Toulon. January 2. 18»;«;. for the 
pui'pose of organizing a society. Dr. Tliomas Hall presided, with 
Oliver White as Secretary. A committee was ajjpointed to take a 



i 



PIONEEK ASSOCIATIONS AND KEMINISCENCES. 107 

census of all the persons then in the county who were here April 4, 
1839. The members were: W. W. AVinslow, Osceola; M. G. Brace, 
Elmira; Lewis Perr}". Goshen ; C. L. Eastman, Toulon; James Hol- 
gate, Penn; W. Trickle, W. Jersey ; Hariy Hull, Valley; and W. H. 
Butler, Essex. At this meeting, also, T. J. Henderson, C. L. Eastman 
and C. M. S. Lyon were a])p(nnted to arrange for a meeting on April 
4, 1866. The census referred to was taken in a few townships, as 
noted in township history, and there the subject dropped not to be 
revived for twelve years. 

The following letter addressed to Oliver Whi taker l)y W. H. Butler, 
dated, Brayton, Audubon C^o., la., June 21, 1880, accompanied a history 
of the Ijcginnings of tlie Old Settlers' Association : " For several months 
I have been so unsettled that I have not felt inclined to attend to any 
business, though I have ke})t constantly in view my responsibilities as 
secretary of the Stark C-ounty Old Settlers' Society, and my duty to 
you as its president. At last, from copious notes, I have niatle out my 
report and send it herewith. "^ * * * * * There is an omission 
of Mr. Phelps' name as to the executive committee, who you know was 
appointed the year previous. * * * * Please fill as you would 
have it done. 1 would ask it as a personal favor that you would allow 
my friend, E. H. Phelps, to read these minutes at the next meeting. 
* * * -X- J send also proceedings of the initial meeting of the 
society. ''" * * * They are to he signed by the temporary pres- 
ident and secretary. With my best regards to Mr. Whitaker, etc., etc." 

From the original document referred to in this letter, we learn that 
long prior to the fall of 1878, a number of old settlers meditated a per- 
manent organization, and with that ol)ject before them held one or two 
meetings of a festive business character. The War of the Union was 
the principal obstacle to organization. A decade and a half had passed 
away before the subject of permanent organization was again seriously 
considei'ed. On December 13, 1878, a day when *' the sev^erest snow- 
storm that had been experienced for years was raging," about 150 old 
settlers and their friends assembled at the Toulon House, and there 
shared with one anotlier the pleasures which old acquaintance under 
olden circumstances coukl alone summon up. A feast was held, and 
then the asseml^letl men and women moved to the town hall to con- 
sider the question of organization. There the meeting Was called to 
order by Benjamin Turner. Oliver Whitaker was chosen temporary 
chairman, and E. H. Phelps, secretary. Minott Silliman, Benjamin 
Turner and James Holgate were a]>pointed a committee on resolutions 
expressive of the sense of the meeting in re organization. This com- 
mittee reported in favor of organizing ''The Stark County Old Settlers' 
Society" and of making a quarter century's residence a test of mem- 
bershij). This resolution was adopted and the election of officers ju'O- 
ceeded with. Oliver Whitaker was chosen president; W. H. Butler, 
secretary ; Benjamin Turner, treasurer ; Edwin Butler, E. H. Phelps 
and Dr. W. T. Hall, executive committee. It was then agreed that the 
first annual meeting of the society should l)e held September 1, 1879, 
at the County Court House. 

After business, Charles Myers, the toast-master, presented the follow- 



108 HISTOKT OF STABK COL■^TY. 



ing special subjects to bespoken to: (1) "The Pioneer Ministry," 
responded to by Elder Keane ; (2) '' Our Earliest Settlers,'' by Deacon 
Korman Butler ; (3) '• The Stark County Bar,"' by Hon. ]\L Shallen- 
berger ; (4) '• The Press."' by E. H. Phelps; (5) "Education." by B. F. 
Thompson ; (6) " The Physician."' by Dr. AV. T. Hall. Benjamin 
Tm^ner moved a vote of thanks to the several committees and 
especially to the ladies. Mr. Shallenberger moved a vote of thanks 
to Mr. Stockner for his kindness in opening his house to the old 
settlers so o-enerouslv and freelv. The motions were carried and the 
first meetino: of the old settlers of Stark county was somethino- of the 
past. 

The first annual meeting of the society was held in the court house 
square, Septemljer 3, 1879. The ofhcers present were Oliver AVhitaker, 
Toulon, president : vice-presidents : Levi Eckley. "West Jersey : D. J. 
Hurd, Goshen; Jefferson Trickle, Essex; Brady Fowler. Toulon : M. 
B. Parks. Elniira ; E. Colgan, Valley ; James Holgate. Penn ; W. 
"NV. AVinslow, Osceola: treasurer. Benjamin Turner: secretary, 
AV. H. Butler. The executive committee were Dr. T. AV. Hall. Edwin 
Butler and E. H. Phelps. The officers having taken their places with 
the invited guests upon the platform, and the audience comfortaUy 
seated, a thousand strong, the Toulon cornet band, Eugene Shallen- 
beroer, leader, delio-hted tlie assemblao-e with some verv excellent 
music. The secretary then read the report of the initial meeting of 
the society, held the year previous, E. H. Phelps acting as secretary, 
after which the president read the programme of exercises for the day. 

By request, the venerable Elder Stickney offered prayer, which was 
followed by the Toulon Glee Club singing •• "We Come Home Again." 
This club comprised Mrs. A. T. Higgins. organist ; Mrs. Lawrence, Miss 
Pauline Shallenberger. Miss Ada JPhelps. Miss Ida Mosher. ]\liss Ida 
Smith, Mr. X. J. Smith, Mr. D. J. Walker and Mr. Clyde Lyon. The 
election of officers for the ensuing year resulted as follows : President, 
Oliver Whitaker of Toulon : vice ])residents : John Finley of Toulon. 
Levi Eckley of West Jersey. Jefferson Trickle of Essex, J. D. Phodes 
of Goshen. Andrew Oliver of Elmira. E. Colgan of Valley. James Hol- 
gate of Penn, W. Winslow of Osceola ; treasurer. Benjamin Turner of 
Toulon ; secretary, W. H. Butler of Wyoming. 

Hon. Martin Shallenberger delivei'ed the address of welcome. The 
executive committee elected were Orlando Brace. Levi Silliman and 
Henry Perry. At this meeting Captain Thompson brought up the 
resolution to erect a monument to Dr. Hall. This was carried and a 
committee on subscriptions appointed. (General Henderson delivered 
an address. 

The second annual and third general reunion of pioneers was held at 
Toulon, September 9, 1880. Oliver Whitaker presided, Avith Captain 
Thompson acting secretary. Judge Wright delivered the address of 
welcome, and Miles A. Fuller, the annual or historical address. The 
election of officers resulted as follows : Oliver Whitaker, president ; 
. B. F. Tliompson, secretary; Benjamin Tui-ner. treasurer. D. J. Ilui'd 
of (ioshen, I. W. Shaw of Osceola. B. P. Brown of West Jei'sey. Itobei-t 
Hall of Elmira, Henry Colwell of Essex. Wui. Eagelston of Toulon. AV. 



PIONKER ASSOCIATIONS AND REMINISCENCES. 109 

H. Whitten of Penn. Win. Dawson of Valley, were all elected vice- 
])residents. The president appointed Thomas IT. Maxfield, J. F. 
Rhodes and F. W. Fuller, executive committee. Elder Stickney was 
chaplain, while the Toulon Choral Union, with Miss Lottie Brace at the 
organ, discoursed the music. 

Captain Thompson read the list of deaths during the year 1879-80, 
giving ages, as follows : Mrs. Elmira Allen, 47 ; Dennis 'Maw bey, 63 ; 
Miss Louisa M. Culbertson, 25 ; Mrs. Sibella E. Armstrong, 76 ; Mrs. 
Sarah Deifenderfer, 58 ; Otis T. Gardner, 71 ; Ansel M. Gardner, 78 ; 
Joseph D. Ehodes, 60 ; John Schenck, 57 ; Mrs. S. Callisson, 26 ; Mrs. 
John 11. Ogle, 40; Thomas Winn, 79; Peter Sheets, 91; Lewis Perry, 73. 

Thomas Winn, at tlie time of his death, had been a resident of this 
state 48 years, and of this county 45 years. He had six sons, Madison, 
Jefferson, Perry, William, Warren and Marsh, all of whom are now 
living except Jefferson. The oldest, Madison, attended the first regu- 
larly organized school in this county, and is the oldest person now 
living who attended school as a pupil in this county. He resides near 
West Jersey, has been 49 years a resident of this state, and 30 years a 
school director. The oldest pioneer of Stark county now living is]\Irs. 
Susannah Miner, the widow of Harris W. Miner. Mrs. Miner's maiden 
name was Smith. She was born in Lincoln count}^ Massachusetts, 
March, 11,1 798, and is therefore over 82 years old. From Massachusetts 
she moved to AVheeling county, A^irginia, April, 1814 ; from tliere to 
Licking county, Ohio, April, 1816 ; and thence to Essex in this county, 
Se})tember, 1829, since which time, for 51 years, she has been a resident 
of this count}^ She was married to Harris W. Miner, October 29, 1832. 
She still enjoys good health. Mr. Perry H. Smith is the oldest living- 
native of Stark county, he being the first child Iiorn in the territory 
now composing this county, who is now living. 

The third annual or fourth reunion of the association was held Sep- 
tember 1, 1881. The officers elected were: president, Oliver Whitaker ; 
vice-presidents: West Jersey, Jonathan Pratz ; Goshen, E. S. Buffom ; 
Essex, Henry Colwell ; Toulon, Major M. Silliman ; Elmira, Andrew 
Oliver; Valley, Wm. Dawson; Penn, James Snare; Osceola, Edward 
P. Wright; treasurer, Benjamin Turner; secretary, B. F. Thompson; 
executive committee, J. M. Brown, W. W. Wright and Samuel Burge. 
Miles A. Fullei' delivered the address of welcome. General Thomas J. 
Henderson, the annual address, Rev. D. G. Stouffer, the prayer, and 
the Toulon Glee Club, consisting of Messrs. Samuel Burge and Adna 
Smith, Mrs. LaAvrence and Miss Phelps, Mrs. Burge, organist, then sang, 
" We Come with Song to Greet ,you.'' The secretary read the list of 
deaths, giving name, residence and date of death as follows : Wyoming. 
— John B. Brown, May 18, 1881; Mrs. J. B. Brown, June 30, 1881 ; 
Miss Kellie Johnson, Feliruarv 11, 1881 ; Mrs. B. Crone, August 28, 
1880; Mrs. Anna Curfman, March 22, 1881. Elmira.— John Grife, 
April 18,1881; Wm. D. Blanchard, May 11,1881. Osceola.— Mary 
T. Gardner, March 27, 1881; Mrs. Phoebe Smith, June 29, 1881. 
Goshen. — Michael Nowlan, March 5, 1881; Mrs. Ann Bradley, July 9, 
1881 ; Mrs. Susannali Miner, July 16, 1881 ; Mrs. Thomas Dugan, May 
10, 1881 ; Luther Geer, June 27, 1881 ; Robert Moore, August 26, 1881. 



110 HISTORY OF STARK OOI'XTY. 

West Jersey. — Jose])li DeWolf, 1881. Toulon. — A. R. Remington, 
May 6, 1881 ; Mrs. Elizabeth Fast, July 28, 1881. Essex.— Mrs. Jeff- 
erson Trickle. Auo-ust 28, 1881. Kansas. — Mrs. Samuel G. AVright. 
1880. Toulon. — Benjamin Packer, Sr.. August 31. 1881. Penn.— 
Mrs. Jane Xewton, ]\larcli 11, 1881 ; Alex. Kissenger, October 18. 1880. 
Modena. — Mrs. J. H. Yernon, 1881. Toulon. — Mrs. Joseph Perry, 
March 30, 1881 ; Elisha Mosher, March 0, 1881 ; Jacob Wagner, Mav 
12, 18>!1: Mrs. S. Cowperthwaite, May 20, 1881: Oliyer Mahany, 
April 19, 1881. Osceola. — Alex. H. Brock. January 11.1881. Goshen. 

— Jonas Butler, July 20, 1881. Essex. — Wm. R. Shinn, December 12, 
1880. Lamar, Mo. — Xancy Perr}^ Xoy. 5, 1880. Grinnell, Iowa. — 
Elizabeth Maryin. April IT. 1881. Red Oak, Io^ya. — James W. Hewitt, 
Xoyember 9. 1880. Victoria, 111. — Le\yis Finch, July 30, 1881. 
Southern 111. — Isaac B. Essex, 1878. Peoria. — Archibald Ayers, 
December 21, 1880. Essex.— Mrs. Clarinda Colwell, January 22, 1880. 
Goshen. — Mrs. B. M. Jackson, December 24. 1880 ; Simeon L. Williams. 
August l«i, 1881. Shelby Co., 111.— John C. Jones. February, 1881. 
At this meeting Dr. Chamberlain announced that sill were collected 
toward the Dr. Hall monument. Tlie four county clerks, O. Whitaker, 
T. J. Henderson, Miles A. Fuller and D. J. Walker were present, while 
Messrs. Henderson. Shallenberger and Andrew Baldwin sang " Auld 
Lang Syne." 

The meeting of September 7, 1882, was one marked by social and 
intellectual success. A large contingent from Kewanee and neighbor- 
ing towns helped to swell the ranks of the old settlers of Stark, so that 
when President Whitaker called the meeting to order, a number of 
these, to him familiar faces of olden times, turned toward the chair. 
Addressing them he explained the wide difference between the chair- 
man's gayel — nothing less than one of Judge Finley's croquet mallets 

— and the mallet of olden days, and made sundry quaint comparisons 
between the past and present. The Toulon band discoursed sweet 
music, Rey. E. C. Cady offered prayer, and the Glee Club, represented 
by Samuel Burge, Carrie Burge, John Walker. Mrs. G. S. Lawrence. 
Lucretia Flint and Newton Smith, rendered one of their fayorite songs 
Letters were then read from S. A. Dunn and J. M. Dunn, Grinnell, la., 
one fi'om Amelia M. Perry, announcing the death of James L. Perry on 
August 1, 1882; one from "Long John'' WentAyorth to Samuel Burge: 
one from Branson Lowman, dated Hastings. Xeb.: one from S. S. 
Ka3'sbier, Seneca, Ivan.: one from S. G. Butler, Farragut, la.; one from 
W. H. Butler. Cheney, Xeb.: one signed "Joseph Blanchard and 
family," Island Lake. Burton, P. O. Ivan.; one from (\ H. Brace, Pekin. 
m.; and one from S. G. Wright. Brookyille, Ivan. A list of deaths 
in the old settler's circle \yas also read, coyering the ])eriod from Sep- 
tember, 1881, to date of meeting. The list of deaths comprises the 
names of Rey. J. G. Agard, who came in 1836 and died at Chicago, 
October 11, 1881; Ruloff Parrish, of Goshen, died March 12, 1882, 
settled here in 1837; Mrs. Tlieodosia Moon, settled in 1833, died Octo- 
ber 1. 1881, at Elmira ; Robert Mitchell settled in 1838, died at Toulon 
in July, 1881. Mi*s. Lydia MagbA^'s death osyas reported with dates; 
Ellis Deyine died at Galya in August, 1882, settled here in 1841 ; John 



PIONEER ASSOCIATIONS AND EEMINTSCENCES. Ill 

Drinnin died at Toulon in 18S1, settled here in lS4tt; JIug-h Rhodes, 
who came at this time, died in Goshen Julv 14, 18S2; AVilliam Turn- 
bull died at Elmira July 12, 1882, settled there in 1819; Mrs. Judith 
Tap]), of Toulon, died in 1882, settled here in 1851; Elder John Sar- 
geant came in 1853, died in Peoria in July, 1882; Mrs. Isabella 
8hrivers, of Essex, settled here in 1853, died in 1882; John Mcintosh 
died in West Jersey in 1882, settled here in 1853; Mrs. Deborah Rat- 
cliff died at Wyoming in 1882, settled here in 1852 ; Stephen D. Easton, 
a settler of 1853, died in Goshen in 1882; J. S. Ilaxton came in 1858, 
died in Goshen in September, 1881; James L. Perry came in 1857, 
died in Iowa in 1882 ; Joel S. Wilson came in 1858, died in Penn town- 
ship in 1882 ; James G. Armstrong- died in Iowa in 1881 ; Mrs. Frail 
died in Goshen in 1882 ; Havilah B. Johnson at Peoria in October, 
1881 ; Mrs. Julia Xewton at Elmira, August 24, 1882; Squire Parrish, 
without dates ; David L. Sterling died at Bradford, June 23, 1882, and 
Mrs. Vernon at Modena, July 3, 1882. 

The election of officers resulted as follows : O. Whitaker, presi- 
dent ; Benjamin Turner, treasurer; John M. Brown, secretar}- ; Wells 
White, II. M. Ilall and Dexter Maxfield, executive committee. The 
vice-presidents were John Lackie, Osceola ; Theo. Whitten, Penn ; 
Henr}^ I'lood, Valley; Andrew Oliver, Elmii'a; Geo. W. Dewey, 
Toulon ; Edward Tricle, Essex ; Minot Silliman, Goshen ; Levi Eckley, 
West Jersev. Addresses were delivered bv James A. and D. W. Hen- 
derson, Norman Butler and others. 

In the letter of S. G. Wright the following historical facts are given : 
" I I'emember spending my first niglit in Stark county, July 2, 1840. 
On the morning of the 3d, in passing through Osceola Grove, I saw a 
pleasant-looking old lady walking amid the tall shady oaks, knitting 
as she walked and ready to give the information which we needed, viz.: 
' the dii-ect road to Providence.' It was good Mother Parks. I learned 
from her of several settlers there from Vermont, remembering espe- 
cially James Bus well, Isaac Spencer, Riley Chamberlain and diurch 
Sturtevant. I did not move my family into the county until the fall 
of 1841, nor l)ecome much acquainted Avith any of these families until 
the fall of 1842." Speaking of the soldiers of Stark, he writes : " May 
we profit by the inheritance their toil and blood liave secured us." 
Speaking of temperance, he writes : " In Kansas we secured a consti- 
tutional amendment to prohibit the manufacture and sale of intoxicat- 
ino- drinks. God hasten the dav when vou shall achieve the same for 
Illinois. May Stark county be foremost for it." 

In S. S. Kaysbier's letter, he says: "As the first druggist in Stark 
county, and one among the first in journalism, I may rank as a pioneer. 
Thirty-one years ago (now 36) I rented of John Culbertson the old 
' Red End,' on north side of public square, at $5 per month. It Avas 
in that building that Mr. Culbertson made most of his fortune, but a 
second fortune was too much to ask of that rickety wooden house. 
* "" * " I sat on the porch of Cooley's hotel the night of my 
arrival, and there I heard Prof. Donaldson's singing school pupils' 
voices distinctly, as they were wafted from the old court house." 

The meeting of September 6, 1883, was held in the public square 



112 HISTORY OF STA.EK COUNTY. 

at Toulon. The following named officers were elected : O. Whitaker, 
president; Dr. H. M. Hall, secretary; Benjamin Turner, treasurer. 
The vice-presidents are : A. J. Finlev. West Jersey ; Minott Silliman, 
Goshen ; Henry Colwell, Essex ; Isaac Thomas, Toulon ; Col. AVilliam 
Jackson, Elmira ; George Marlatt, Yalley ; Daniel Phenix, Penn, and 
E. P. Wright, Osceola. Executive committee : Perry Winn, Chauncey 
Miner and William H. Xewland. 

Elder Stickney offered prayer, the Glee Club rendered the music, 
giving Todhunter's pioneer song among others. James A. Henderson 
delivered the address of welcome, and Captain Brown read the death 
roll as follows : Xames of old settlers who died during the year ending- 
September (\ 1883, and reported at the annual reunion, 1883 : John C. 
O wings, died in Cherokee county, la., Septemher 16, 1882, aged 83 
years; originally settled in Fulton county in 1825, resided in Stark 
county a snort time, removed to Carroll county, where he resided 40 
years,*^ removed to Iowa; voted at the first election in this county. 
Sarah Thomas, wife of Owen Thomas, died at Toulon township, Sep- 
tember 20, 1882, aged 62 ; a resident of this county 29 years. Polly 
Crandall died at Caput, Mo., October 1, 1882, aged 85 ; became a resi- 
dent of this county in 18-10, removed to Missouri in 1880; a resident 
of this county 40 years. Isaac W. Searl died at Bradford, October 2, 
1882, aged 69 ; a resident of this county 44 years. Kebecca Fowler, 
wife of Brady Fowler, died in Toulon township, October 14, 1882, 
aged 76 years'; a resident of this county 46 years. Jane Johnson, wife 
of Aaron Johnson, died at West Jersey, Xovember 3, 1882, aged 72; a 
resident of this county since 1849. AVilliam Chamberlain died at Tou- 
lon, November 2, 1882, aged 65 ; resident of this state 41 yeare and of 
Toulon 36 years. Finley Matheson died in Elmira, December 26, 1882, 
aged 63 ; came to this county 30 years ago. Mrs. Jehile Kissell, 
daughter of John Mcintosh, died at West Jersey, December 12. 1882, 
born in Stark county, aged 29. Royal L. Pratz died in West Jersey 
township. January 16, 1883. born m Stark county, aged 26 years. 
James S. Jackson,' son of H. II. Jackson, died in Taylor county, Iowa, 
January 7, 1883; removed to Iowa in 1882. Mrs. Clinton Fuller died 
at Elmira. January 25, 1883, aged 63 years; resided in county about 30 
years. James In gels, of La Fayette, died in Florida. January 27. 1883, 
aged 63: resident of this county 29 years; his death was caused Ijy the 
accidental discharge of his gun while hunting. Daniel D. Stone died 
in Toulon townshi}), February 7, 1883, aged 70 ; resident of county 27 
years. Sylvester Sweet died at Toulon. February 8, 1883, aged 88 ; a 
resident of the county 42 years: a soldier in the war of 1812. James 
Darby died in Henry county. 111.. Februery 12. 1883, aged 78; came to 
this county in 1848.' JohnFinle}^ died at Toulon, Feljruary 28, 1883, 
aged 81 ; a resident of the state 49 years and of this county 45 years ; 
he was clerk at the first election held in the county ; was the second 
sheriff of the county, served three terms; was county judge one term, 
and justice of the peace for many years. Susanna McCoy died in 
West Jersey township. May 6, 1883,' aged 57; resident of county 30 
years. Edward Nixon died' at Toulon, May 8, 1883, aged 59 ; resided 
in this state 53 vears and in this county 27 years. Belle Grieve, 




^AnN-" 



r^^ 



THE PIONEER S FIRST HOME. 



LIBRARY 
UNIYERSITV OF ILLINOIS 



i 



PIONEER ASSOCIATIONS AND REMINISCENCES. 115 

daughter of Rol>ert Grieve, died in Toulon township, April 23, 1883, 
aged 20; born in Stark county, Owen Thomas, Jr., died at Oska- 
loosa, la., March 30, 1S83, aged 32; came to this county in 1854, re- 
moved to Iowa in 1879. William R. Legg died at Clark, ISTeb., May 11, 
1883; a former resident of Toulon. Tihoda E. George died in Eimira 
township, March 24, 1883, aged 51 ; resided in county 48 years. 
Charles II. Maxfield died in Jefferson county, Neb., M;'iy 23. 1883, 
aged 40 ; born in the county. Catherine Porter died in West Jersey 
township, May 26, 1883, aged 96; resident of state and county 49 
years. Mahala Young, wife of C. W. Young, died at West Jersey, 
June 1, 1883, aged 54; came to Illinois in 1844 and to this county in 
1854. Robert McClenahan died at Sigourney, la., June 11, 1883, aged 
45; born in the county and removed to Iowa about 1856. Presley 
Col well died in Nodaway county, Mo., June, 1S83, aged 72; came to 
this county in 1837, removed to Missouri in 1879. Charles M. Teeter 
died at Wyoming, June 13, 1883, agetl 66 ; came to IVfarshall county in 
1855 and to Stark in 1858. Orson Grant died at La Fayette, June 14, 
1883, aged 39; born in the county. Charles Jordan, father of Robert 
and John Jordan, died at Wyoming, June, 1883, aged 83; settled in 
Ohio in 1812, afterward went to Iowa, where he remained until a few 
years ago, when he came to Wyoming, and resided witli his sons. 
Mrs. Mary C. Riggen died in Iowa, June 23, 1883, aged (')o; came to 
this county about 1844. Eliza A. Henry, wife of James R. Henrv, 
died at West Jersey, July 1, 1883, aged 62; resided in county 32 years. 
Eleanor Trickle, wife of Washington Trickle, died at Elmwood, Peo- 
ria county, July 15, 1883, aged 76; came to this county in 183(), re- 
moved to Peoria county in 1866. Thomas Nichols died at Eimira, 
July 22, 1883; resident of state and county about 49 years. Mrs. Al- 
len Atherton, daughter of Lewis Williams, died in Goshen township, 
July 31, 1883, aged 22; born in this county. Jonas I>. Pallentine, of 
Toulon, died at Monica, Peoria county, August 3, 1883, aged 6S ; resi- 
dent of county 40 years. ]\[arian Grieve, daughter of Robert Grieve, 
died in Toulon township, August 17, 1883, aged 22; born in the county. 
Ora E. Pratz, son of Jonathan Pratz, died at West Jersey, August 23, 
1883, aged 21 ; born in the county. J. M. Ilurd died at'West Jersey, 
August 25, 1883, aged 65; resident of county 27 years. John Pilgrim 
died at Galva, September 1, 1883, aged 77; came to county in 1852. 

A number of valuable historical letters were read before this meet- 
ing, references to which are made in other pages. 

The old mill brought here in 1836, and owned by S. G. Breese, was 
placed on the grounds during the old settlers reunion of 1883. 

The seventh annual reunion of the old settlers was held at Toulon, 
August 26, 1884. A. P. Miller delivered the address of welcome. Dr. 
Co])estake described Stark county as he found it on his arrival here. 
A, G. Hammond, who settled at Wyoming thirty -four years before this 
meeting when a boy of sixteen years, delivered an historical address. 
Henry G. Little was here at the organization of the county, and 
related some pleasing facts of that time. C. C. Wilson, the iirst super- 
visor from Valley township, delivered an interesting speech; and the 
president, Oliver Whitaker, explained all about the exhumed log, which 



11 (i HISTOKY OF STAKK COUNTY. 

lay on the platform ; the time it grew where the conrt-house noAV 
stands, wlien it was used in bridging the slough on Main street, and 
its discovery while repairing a bridge at this place in 1S84. George 
X. Brown, then of the Wyoming Jferahh now of the Peoria Transcript^ 
said some ])retty things of the pioneers. A list of men and women 
who died since the last reunion was read, and next a large number of 
interesting letters from old settlers, who could not respond to invita- 
tions to be ])resent, were read. The Glee Club, represented by R. J. 
Dickinson, i). J. Walker, F. W. Lyon, L. L. Long, Mrs. Ida Ml Swee- 
deen, Mrs. M. S. Higgins, Misses Editli Dickinson, Bird Thornton, and 
Mattie White. The officers elected were: Oliver Whitaker, president; 
Dr. H. M. Hall, secretary; Benjamin Turner, treasurer; the vice-presi- 
dents chosen were: Eccless West, W. Jersey; G. H. Retllield, Goshen; 
P. P. Johnson, Toulon; Henry Colwell, Essex; Cyrus Bocock, Penn; 
Samuel Wrigley, Valley; John Locker, Osceola, and Myrtle Brace, 
Elmira. 

The death-roll for the year ending August 1, 1884, is made up as 
follows : Mrs. Mary Hoffman, of W. Jersey, died September 10, 1883, 
aged 71 years. Mrs. Barbara E. Smith, daughter of John Emery and 
a resident of the count}^ for forty-four years, died April 21, 1883, aged 
52 years. Mrs. Frances Barnes, daughter of Sewell Smith, formerly of 
Essex township, died at Lincoln, ]Keb., August 10, 1883. Mrs. Mary A. 
Cruchfield, daughter of the late David Cooper and for tw^enty-seven 
years a resident here, died in Essex township, January 1, 1881-, aged 7fi 
years. Mrs. Elizabeth Chaffee, widow of Jarvil Chaffee, formerlv of 
Essex township, died in Taylor county, la., March 3, 1884, aged 80 
years. Allen Stimmell, died in A¥est Jersey township, January 4, 1884. 
Mrs. Joseph De Wolf died in AV^est Jersey township, January 19, 1884, 
aged 54 years. Mrs. Martha A. j\[yers, (bed in Toulon, January 23, 
1884; she came here in 1855. Mrs. Kate llogle died near Toulon, 
January 23, 1884, in her 33d year. David McCance died at Toulon, 
Februarv 19, 1884, aged 69 vears; he resided here thirtv-six vears. 
The death of Charles W. Wrfght, J. F. C^ha]n"n, Mrs. Philander Pome- 
roy, Darius Panders, Miss Sarah Anderson, Mrs. Ruby Greenfield, 
Mrs. Gertrude Wagner. C. S. Fulper, H. S. Johnson, James A. Hender- 
son, Stacy Cowperthwaite, Mrs. Amelia Tkitler, Jefferson Trickle, S. P. 
Fast, George Harvey. Andrew Swartz, Lucy P. Cooley, John Miller, 
Mrs. Margaret P. Hawkes, I^atrick Cavanaugh, Cy renins Dewey antl 
William Thomas — each one is noticed in the township histories. Let- 
ters Avere read from N. P. Cross, of Pleasanton, Kan.; John M. Burns, 
of Orion. 111.; Cyrus Shinn, of Eagle S])rings, Kan.; B. F. Fuller, Wash- 
ington, D. C; J. E. Bush, Beatrice, Xeb.; David Fast, Irwin, Mo.; 
Daniel W. Henderson, Jefferson, la.; A. J. Whitaker, AYashington, 
D. C; Henry G. Little, Grinnell, la.; AV. E. Dunn, Galesburg, 111,; 
AA^ AV. AA^inslow, Osceola, 111.; S. G. Butler, Farragut, la. 

Henry G. Little, writing in 1884, sa3"s: " A"ou first tried for Coffee 
county, taking one township from Henry and some from Knox. I 
worked hard to help defeat it, and we did so." David Fast, writing 
fi'om Irwin, Mo., says : " On September 28, 1850, I came to Stark and 
lived there until September 28, 1881. In 1850 I started a harness 



PIONEER ASSOCIATIONS AND REMINISCENCES. 117 

shoj) ill an old frame l)uil(ling south of uncle Norman liutler's house, 
and at■tel■^^'al■d used by B. ( '. Follett as a staV)le." 

The eighth annual reunion of old settlers was hekl August 25, 
1885. Miles A. Fuller delivered the address of welcome; Martin 
Shallenberger spoke on the subject of pioneer manners and customs; 
(Captain Thomson read letters from al)sent friends; T. J. Henderson 
also delivered an address, and the list of all settlers, who died since 
the last meeting, was read. The officers elected were : Oliver Whit- 
aker, president; Henry M. Hall, secretary; Benj. Turner, treasurer; 
John F. Rhodes, Wm. F. Xiciiolson, and Harlan Pierce, members of 
executive committee. The vice-presidents chosen were C. W. Young, 
New Jersey ; Barney Frail, Goshen ; Henry Colwell, Essex ; Eugene 
Lyon, Toulon; David Currier, Elmira; Edward Colgan, Valley; Wes- 
leV Brown, Penn ; and John Lackie, Osceola. Among those present 
were Perry Smith, of Wyoming, the first white child born in this 
county, fifty -four years before this meeting; M B. Parks, who built 
the first house in Elmira township ; Adam Perry, who taught the first 
school in the county ; Samuel O. Brees, of Wyoming, whose parents, 
on coming here, moved into a stable, where he was born on Chi-istmas 
day; Dr. and ^Mrs. L. Hurd, who were the first cou})le married in 
Henry county. Jerome B. Thomas, of Ohio, who settled here forty- 
one years prior to this meeting, was here. O. P. Emery, of Galva, 
and Little, of Kewanee, were also here. The pioneers of fifty years 
ago or more, present at this meeting, were Perry Smith, came fifty- 
four years ago; JSlrs. Jonathan Pratz, Perry Winn, N. W. Holmes, 
Minot Silliman, each fifty -one years ago; NeJson Grant, Jacob Emery, 
Barnabas Frail, Hiram 'All n-ight, G. H. Redfield and wife, R. H. 
Moore, each came fifty years ago. The old settlers, who were here 
forty vears ago or more at date of eighth reunion, are named as 
follows: M. B. Parks, Wm. Sheets, John Fowler, Wm. Ogle, Levi 
Eckley, Jonathan Pratz, ]\rrs. George M. Hazen, Miles A. Fuller, 
Washington Trickle, each fortv-nine years. 

Archiljald Vandyke, Uncle Johnnie Turnbull. Dr. H. M. Hall, 
Perry Grant, Wallace Mason, Mrs. Josiah ]\[offit, JMrs. John Black, 
Samuel Brees, AVm. Mason, Henry Colwell, each forty-eight years. 

Calvin Eastman, Oliver Whit.iker and Mrs. Whitaker, Wm. Oliver, 
Wells AVhite, Barney Jackson, Wm. Sturms, Andrew Oliver, W. T. 
Leeson, Thomas Oliver, Orlando Brace, Benj. Brown, each forty-seven 
years. 

Amos Bennett, Mrs. Sarah Bennett, Mrs. Colburn Roblnns, Walter 
M. Fuller, AY. P. Currier, each forty six years. 

Mrs. D. R. Gelvin, J. P. Head'ley, Harrison Miner, Benj. Turner, 
Orin Maxfield, Dr. Walter Hall, each forty-five years. 

Mrs. A. M. Snyder, A. J. Finley, Edward Xowlan, Mrs. AY. M. 
Fuller, each forty-four years. 

Mrs. Charles "^E. Sh'inn. S. R. Hazen, John and G. M. Hazen. Eli 
Emery, Charles Rhodes, Alichael Emery, each forty -three years. Wm. 
White. R. C. Briggs and A. J. Maxfield. each forty-two years. Mason 
Trickle. Isaac Thomas, Jerome B. Thomas, Charles Sturtevant, and 
Jackson Lawrence, each forty-one years. John Ogle, AYm. Sweet, 



118 HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY. 

Samuel Jones, L. P. Hiiiies, Joseph Atherton, ]Mrs. C. E. Harrington. 
AVillard Palmer, Samuel Thomas, Sylvester H. Saunders, A. C. Himes. 
AVm. Allen, David Oziah. Mrs. John R. Atherton, each forty years. 

The above seventy-live named, with others mentioned hereafter, 
constituted the pioneer circle in September, 1885. 

The ]uoneer necrology for the year was reported as follows: — Jacob 
Stimmel died in West Jersey township March 24, 1885 ; aged 66 years. 
Ca])t. George W. Buchanan died September, 188-4 in the STth year of his 
age; he came with his familv to this county in 1837 and remained 
here until 1853, when he moved to Davis count v, Washington terri- 
torry, where he resided up to the time of his death. Christopher 
Tlin'er, of Clienoa. 111., died Xovember 8. 1884. in the 80th vear of his 
age: he was a resident of West Jersey township from 1849 to 1866. 
W. L. Shirts of Galva, died November 14, 1884, aged 62 years. He 
was a citizen of Toulon from 1854 to 1867, since which time he has 
resided in Galva. IMrs. Mary E. Austin died at her home in Elmira, Stark 
county, November 18, 1884, aged 65 yeai's; she was the daughter of 
John Leeson, Avas married to Lewis Austin in 1838, moved to Elmira 
in 1840, where she resided to the time of her death. Mrs. Hannah 
Guller died in Elmii-a, Stark county, December 30, 1884 ; she was 
married to Ambrose Fuller in 1816, and they settled in Elmira in 1839 ; 
her husband died in 1845, and his was the first grave in Elmira ceme- 
tery. Mrs. Lydia Fuller Shivvers died in Toulon, December 20, 1884, 
aged 60 years ; in 1844 she was married to Ansel Fuller in Osceola, 
but thev moved to Wethersfield township, where they resided until his 
death in I8r)3 ; Se])tember 5, 1882, she married Hopkins Shivvers and 
resided in Toulon until her death, Mary Pierson AVhite, daughter of 
J. D. Pierson, died September 8, 1884, in the 22d vear of her age. H 
Blakely died in Toulon, December 26, 1884. Walter H. Blair died in 
Toulon, December 26, 1884, in the 23d year of his age. Isaac P. Spen- 
cer died in Osceola, December 27, 1884; he was one of the first comers 
to the grove early in the thirties. William Williams died at the resi- 
dence of David' Lowman. in Hastings, Xeb., January 6, 1885; Mr, 
Williams was a native of England, was born in 1794; came to Amer- 
ica 1839, to Stark county in 1855, where he resided until Davis Low- 
man and family moved to Nebraska, he accompanying them. Capt. 
John R. Atherton died at his residence in Toulon, January 31, 1885, 
in the 83d year of his age ; He moved from Kentucky, his native state, 
to Illinois, in 1831, and to Stark county in 1845. Daniel Woodward 
died near Bradford, January 20, 1885 ; he was an old time settler of 
Stark county. Mrs. Mary Shannon died near Des Moines, Iowa, Feb- 
ruary 6, 1885 ; she had but recently moved to Iowa from West Jersey, 
where the remainder of her life had been passed. Zara Newton died 
in Elmira township, Feb. 6, 1885, aged 78 years ; he came to Stark 
county many years ago. Charles Bolt died in Osceola township, Feb- 
ruary 23, 188.5, aged 70 years ; he came to this county in 1845, settling 
in the township in which he died. Thomas Faulconer died in Yalley 
township, March 18, 1885. He was a long time resident of that town- 
ship. P^lijah Bocock died at Castleton, March 18, 1885, in the 87th 
year of his age; moved to Illinois in 1837, and to Stark county in 



PIONEER ASSOCIATIONS AND KEMINISUENCES. 119 

1866. Solomon "Wilkinson died in Essex townshi}), April 2^ 1885, aged 
88 years ; he came to this county in 18-19, and settled on the farm 
where he died. Mrs. Peter Shaffer died near Starwano. March 16, 
1885, an early settler in Stark county. Robert Patterson died near 
Fairmount, ISTeb., April 15, 1885, ag'ed 71 years; he came to this 
countv in 1855 and remained here until about two 3^ears ago, when he 
moved to Nebraska. William Henry Butler ^vas born in New Haven, 
Conn., October 5, 1811, emigrated to Putnam, now Stark count3% in 
1835, and in September of that year married Mary Fuller, of Elmira; 
in 1880 he moved on to a farm near Lincoln, Nelj., where he died, March 
29, 1885; he was a printer by trade, learing to set type in the old 
Franklin printing ottice in Richmond, Va., in 1823; worked seven 
years with Harper Brothers and on dailies in Wall street ; after he 
came west he was connected with the Peoria Iieyister, and afterward 
with what is now the Stark County iV^<?ms. Josiah Mottitdied in Essex 
township, April IT, 1885, in the 76th year of his age; he came to this 
countv in 1837, settling on the farm where he died. Adam Oliver 
died in Elmira townshi]). May 8, 1885, in the 70th year of his age ; he 
settled in tliat townshi}) in LS38. Jacol:> Smith died in Oalva last fall, 
in the 82d year of his age ; he settled in West Jersey townshi]) in 1835 
and lived there until 1876, when he moved to Galva. Airs. Catherine 
Buchanan, wife of Capt. Geo. W. Buchanan, died in Havis county, 
W. T., July 23,1885, in the 84th year of her age. Nathan Bevier died 
in Lafayette, July 23, 1885, in the 8Sth year of his age ; he moved to 
Lafayette in 1856 and has since resided there. Daniel Gingrich died 
in Essex townshi]), August 20, 1885, aged 76 years ; he came to this 
county in 1837. Joel Goodale died in Toulon townslii]), August 21, 
1885, "in the 76th year of his age; he came to Stark county in 1876^ 
Branson Lowman died in Hastings, Neb., March 13, 1885, aged <)7 
years ; he came to Illinois in 1832, to. Stark county in 1857, where he 
lived until 1882, when he moved to Nel)raska. Mrs. Rachel Brown, 
daughter of Yirgil I^ike, tlied at Frazee. Minn., -January 10. 1885, one 
of Stark county's pioneers. II. B. Dori-ance died near Modena, March 
23, 1885, in the 48th year of his age ; he was a native of this county. 
Mrs. Robert Grieve died in Ehiiira townslii]), March 3(», 1885, in the 
55tii year of lier age. Mary Ann Woodward died in Osceola town- 
ship, March 13, 1885. Mrs.' Sarah M. Smitli, formerly wife of the late 
Sewal Smith, died in Lafayette, March 22, 18S5. aged 77 years ; she 
came with lier husband to Stark countv at a verv earh' da v. Mrs. 
Al)by Ann Todd, wife of Maj-)r C. W. Todd, died at Lafayette, Marcii 
1<>, ill the 76th year of her age ; she came to this county with her 
husband in 1840.' Samuel Montooth, senior, died near Modena, Feljru- 
ary 16, 1885, aged 76 years. Total number: 38 — six more than last 
xear. 

The meeting of August 19, issij, sur})assed all other reunions in 
method of organization and number of persons present. The weather, 
too, was delightful, and tiie old courtJiouse grove was clothed in all 
the richness of sunnner. The dinner Avas excellent in matei'ial and 
arrangement. This important ])art of the ])rograinnie was carried out 
under the auspices of the Congregational society, and earnetl for the 



120 HISTORY OF STAJ^K COUNTY. 

uses of that church over $100. The officers elected were : Oliver Wit- 
aker, president; Jonathan Pratz, West Jerse}' ; Minott Silliman, Go- 
shen ; John McMillan, Essex; Isaac Thomas. Toulon ; John Turnlmll, 
Elniira ; Samuel Wrigley, Valley ; Cyi'ns Bocock, Penn ; and .lohn 
Lackie, Osceola, vice presidents ; Benjamin Tui'uer, treasurer; B. F. 
Tliompson, secretary. The executive committee comprised Orlando 
Brace, AVilliam Xolan and Chester M. Turner. Capt. Thompson acted 
as secretary of the meeting, vice Dr. Hall, removed to Kansas. To 
him is entirely due the compilation of the deatii roll, given as follows: 
William Dawson died at Stark, September 10, 1885, aged 75 years, lo 
months and 3 days; came to Illinois from Ross county, Ohio, in 1839, 
and lived in Valley township since 1S50. Miss Louisa Col well, daugh- 
ter of Henry Colwell, died at her home near Duncan, October 21, 1885, 
aged 21 years ; her entire life was sj)ent in the vicinity where she died. 
Abram Bowers died in Penn township, Xovember i4, 1885, aged 74 
years; came to Stark county in 1856, and lived in the county until the 
time of his death. Robert McKinney Boccjck died at his home in Penn 
townshij), January 19,1886, aged 60 years; came from Ohio to Fulton 
county in 1837, and in 1854 moved to Stark county, where the re- 
mainder of his life was spent ; he sei'ved as justice of the ))eace in his 
township for sixteen years, and was serving his thii'teenth year as a 
member of the county board of su])ervisors, of which he was chairman. 
Anthony Robinson died at his home near Wyoming, May 21, 1886, 
aged 61 years. Warren Pattee died at his home in Penn townshi]). 
May 4, 1886, aged 74 years. Mrs. Sarah Bennett, wife of Jeremiah 
Bennett, died at Saxon, Febrnary 3, 1885, aged 83 years, 2 months and 
22 days; moved to Fulton county in 1838, and the year following came 
to Stark count}', where her remaining days were sjient, a resident for 
forty-eight years. ]\Irs. Keziah Young, wife of St(^phen Young, died 
at Toulon, Fel)ruarv 3,1886, aged >i^'} years and 11 months; came from 
Maine to Iowa in 1854, and in 1858 moved to Toulon, where her days 
were ended. Thomas A. Oakes died near Toulon, iMarch 15, 1886, 
aged 74 years, 8 months and !<• days. Mrs. Lucretia Ruston died at 
her daughter's, Mrs. Anderson, in Toulon, February 28, 1886, aged 65 
years; came to Lafayette in 1851, and lived there about one year; 
her lirst husband was Homer 1 limes. Mrs. Sophia S., wife of Moses 
II. AVeaver, died at Osceola. .Vpril 24, 188(5. Hon. James Ilolgate died 
at the home of his daughter. Mrs. John Snare, at Snareville, ]\Iai'ch 22, 
1886, aged 81 yeai-s. 7 months and 24 days; came from Pennsylvania! 
to Penn townsJiip in is^'.o ; he was one of the three commissioners that 
managed the county aifairs until 1849, when he was elected judge, and 
served until 1S53 ; he was assessoi' of Penn townshi]) for sixteen yeai'S, 
and the lirst supervisoi' from the township and the first chairnum of 
tlie boai'd.of supervisors in the county; in 1863 he served one term in 
the state legislature. Mrs. Ann Dixon died near Stark, March 28, 
ISSC), aged 72 years; came to Stark county in 1851. Jose])h Atherton 
died near Lafayette, May 1, 1886, aged 72 years, 4 months and 13 
days; came from Ohio to Hancock county in 1836, and from there to 
Stai"k county in 1845, Avhere he terminated his life. John Whit*^ died 
at Lafayette, May 8, 1835, aged 54 years, 6 months and 2S days; came 



PIONEEK ASSOCIATIONS AND KEMINISUEI^OES. 121 

from Ohio to Stark county in 1836, and lived on the same place till 
the time of his death. Geo. Springer died May 16, 1886, aged 70 
years, 7 months and 9 days; came from Ohio to Stark county in ISil, 
settling in Essex township, and there lived to the time of his death. 
Thomas Graves died in Essex, December 12, 1885, aged 68 years, 11 
months and 14 days. Mrs. Rel)ecca Dickinson, widow of Win T. Dick- 
inson, died at Lafayette, Sei)teml)er 12, 1885, aged 85 years, 11 months 
and 28 days. Mrs. Sarah Ileadley, wife of James Ileadley, died in 
Toulon, June 11, 1886, aged 85 years, 9 months and 17 days. Mrs. 
Jane P. Sweet, wife of William Sweet, died at Toulon, June 15, 1886, 
aged 60 years, 4 months and 6 days. Geo. B. llarlau died in Wyo- 
ming, November 15, 1885, aged 72 years and 2 months. Mrs. Mai'tha 
A. Mori'is, wife of Geo. Morris, died in Toulon, December K), 1885, 
aged 48 years. Anthony Hol)inson died near Wyoming, May 2, 1886, 
aged 61 years. Mrs. Elmira F. Eastuum, wife of Calvin L. Eastman, 
died at Toulon, July 3, 1886, aged 63 years; was a resident of Stark 
county for forty two years, and an occupant of the same house for 
thirty-four vears. Benjamin F. Young died at Toulon. July 21, 1886, 
aged 59 years. Solomon B. Bass died in Toulon, July 30, 'l8S(;, aged 
76 years, 1 month and 2<) days. S})encer Faulconer died in Valley, 
May 22, 1886, aged 77 years.' Mrs. Margaret Ih-ain died near AYady 
Petra, July 2. 18S<i, aged 67 years, 1(> months and 5 days. Mrs. Mary 
P. Adams died near Bradford, November, 1885, aged 85 years. John 
V. Bevier died at Bradford, January 30, 1886, aged 81 years. Nicho- 
las Sturm died in Osceola, March 2i, 1886, aged 78 years. Mrs. Dorcas 
Gushing, wife of Geo. Cusliing, died at Bradford, March 29, 188<Naged 
64 years. Micagy Swiger (lied in Penn, February i», 1886, aged 63 
years, 8 months "and 15 days. Mrs. Hannah F. Downing, wife of 
Nathan Downing, died in Penn, Mai'ch 5, 188(), aged 44 years. James 
McNultv dietl in Penn, June 29, 1886, aged 72 years." Mrs. Sarah 
Hartv. wife of Andrew Harty, died in Penn, July "28, ISSf.. William 
Miner died in Southern Missoui'i, July 31, 1885. Mi's. Kosannah 
Dixon died at Peoria, September 2, 18"85, aged 77 years. Mrs. Jane 
Sturm, wife of Peter Sturm, died at Cambridge, March 21, 1886. Mrs. 
Fanny Smith, nee Silliman, wife of AVilliam P. Smith, died at Princa- 
ville. "April 2, 1886, aged s-2 years. Jesse T. Turnei- died at Marietta, 
Fulton county, April 28, 188V), aged 74 years, 7 months and 13 days. 
Mrs. Porter,' wife of V/illiam Porter, died at Atkinson, May, 1886. 
Mrs. Sarah F. Brown, nee Hodgson, wife of Alva W. Ih'own. died at 
Medale, llari'ison county, Iowa, June 23, ISSd; born in Stark county, 
in 1840. Mrs. Rebecca' Dickinson died at Galva, 111., June 24, 1881), 
aged 81 years; Mr. Dickinson was licr fourth husband. Mrs. Rebecca 
Nelson, wife of Upton Nelson, and sister of Peter Sturm, died in AFis- 
souri about the 1st of August, 188<i; born December i8, bsbs. ^Mrs. 
Elizabeth AVhitman, motliei- of Thomas Gemmell, died at Peoria while 
on a visit, A])ril 18, 1 88(5, aged O'J years, 8 mcmtlis and 14 days; she 
came from Scotland to this country in 1866. and lived here most of 
the time till her death. Mrs. S. A'. Miller died in Fai-ragut, Iowa, 
while on a, visit. May 19, 1SS6, aged 48 years; eaiuc IVoui Ohio to 
Knox county in 1849, and moved to Stark county in 1861. Joseph 



122 HISTOKY OF STAKK COUNTY. 

Catterlin died at Abilene, Kansas, May 21, 188G, aged 96 years, 7 
niontlis and 15 days; moved from Virginia to Springfield in 1885; 
came to Tonlon in 1849. Mr, Silas Moody died at Perry, Iowa, July 
10, 1886, aged 7C» years, 6 months and 9 days. William Walker died 
at Eldora, Iowa, July 30, 1886, aged 65 years. Mrs. Sabrina (Chat- 
field) Ililliard died at New Virginia, Iowa, Januar}^ 28, 1886, aged 69 
years; slie came to Stark county in 1834, and lived near Lafayette 
until 1873, and was the first female that taught school in Stark county. 
Mrs. Maria Kightlingei-, wife of Jacob Kightlinger, died at her home 
in Yates City, July 16, 1886, aged 84 years; she came from Pennsyl- 
vania to Stark county in 1837, Jiving liere two years, then removing 
to Knox county, and later to Yates City. Henry G. Kinkade died at 
Starwano, August 19, 1886, aged 31 years, 9 months and 1 day ; has 
lived in Stark county since he was one year of age. 

M. A. Fuller's historical address, delivered at the meeting of 1880, 
stands as one of the most elaborate ])ortrayals of ])ioneer life ever 



given 



The underground railroad must not be (overlooked. About the 
time Stark county was organized this line began to assume practical 
form in the neighborhood, and was })atronize(l by a few passengers. 
A few years later the road grew in favor with i-efugee slaves, and ulti- 
mately became an im])ortant highway between the Sunny South and 
the bleak Canadas. (Talesburg Station was one of the best organized 
on the line of the Underground Paib'oad. There Nehemiah West, 
George Davis, P. Neeley and Samuel Hitchcock were the permanent 
conductors on the division extending to Ontario, in Knox county, and 
through Stark county. In Ontario township the house of C. F. Camp 
was the depot, and'llod Powell conductor. Rev. John Cross, con- 
nected with the railroad in 1843, was charged with aiding in the escape 
of slaves, but before the trial he removed to liureau county, where a 
deputy sheriff was sent to arrest him. Mr. Cross offered to go with- 
out op])Osition. ])ut there were no means at the dis])osal of the deputy 
to travel, so that his ])risoner agreed to su])ply his own team. They 
started or. Saturchiy, stayed with Oliver Whitaker at Osceola Grove 
next day, where the ]irisoner preached. On Monday they left en route 
for Knox county, where Mr. Cross defended himself. Prior to this, 
in 1839 or 1840, he was imprisoned in the (4alesl)urg jail, but was 
bailed out by the abolitionists. 

From liev. S. G. Wi'ight's journal the following extract is taken, as 
bearing on this I'ailroad system: '' December 24, 1S41 ; started for 
Walnut Creek; gi-eat i-ain ;' the creek was swimming; llichard C. and 
William Dunn were with me; difficulty in crcjssing branch above 
Trickle's mill ; had to bi-eak ice for near an hour, and go around by 
Traker's Grove; ])reached at Mr. Foster's Friday, April, 1842; went 
to Knoxville to hear debate between Kinney and Frazer ; also to ob- 
tain a teachei-; May 2, went to Lafayette to' hear Mi'. Harris expose 
Moi-monism ; I'ehearsed his lecture to my people at Mr. Webster's. 
" -"• * -=<- ■" February <), 1843: On I'ri day another fugitive from 
slavery came along, making twenty-one that have passed through this 
settlement on their wavto Canada'; the ink freezes on my pen as I try 



PIONEER ASSOCIATIONS AND REMINISCENCES. 123 

to Avrite. May 22, 1843 : Saturday Avent to Emery settlement, but 
foimtl so strong an antipathy against abolitionists that few would hear 
me preach, so I went on and preached at Toulon Sabbath morning ; 
report saitl the Mormons meant to dra\v^ me into deliate here. May 
20 : The grand jury found a bill against me and my elder, W. W. 
Wel)ster, for harboring runawa}^ slaves. June 24: Witness in case of 
The People vs. Cross, for harboring runaway slaves. January 5, 1847 : 
Arrived home on Fridav : found that two fugitives were along with 
only Christmas papers." 

W. II. Adams, in one of his pioneer sketches j)ublished in the Senti- 
nel, speaks of Fountain Watkins, " the laughing Abolitionist," and of 
his connection with the Underground Railroad, better known as the 
" Great Southern and Canadian Underground Railway." In his sketch 
he refers to Dave Frisby, the first school-teacher in the Elm wood dis- 
trict, Knox county ; Mrs. Watkins, wife of Fountain Watkins ; Eli 
Wilson, an old abolitionist ; Peter, a colored fugitive ; George Pierce 
and John Dalton, anti-abolitionists; Elias Wycoff and IXeliemiah 
Wycoff, well-known names in Stark county. One of Watkins' stories 
as told to Mr. Adams is as follows: '' Some time late in the forties, Eli 
Wilson brought quite a likely young man to my place, who said he 
had been a waitei' on a Mississippi river steamboat. Fie stayed with 
us for about a week, and played with the boys in the ^voods. Some of 
our kind of men at Farmington sent me word one evening to push the 
l)oy ahead, as hunters were on his track. It would not answer to start 
that night, as it would be certain to invite pursuit. I finally con- 
cluded to wait until morning, and studied out a plan how the old 
woman and me would go visiting' the next dav on horseback. As the 
fall winds were kinder hard on the 'wimin's' faces, it was no more 
than natural for her to have on a veil. So the next morning I saddled 
a gray team I owned, and had Peter put on one of my wife's dresses 
and veils, and helped him to mount the horse with the side-saddle 
just as though it was my wife. I mounted the other horse, and 
admonished Peter not to talk unless I spoke to him. AVe struck out, 
taking a road that led in the direction of the east side of the mound 
west of the town of Elm wood. The road across the Kickapoo bottoms 
was lined on each side with a dense growth of high weeds and brush. 
While in this place we saw a team coming towards us with George 
Pierce and John Dalton in the wagon. I had been toll that Dalton 
had l)een blowing around that if ever he cauglit me 'running off a 
nigger,' he would arrest me- I ]iulled out to the right and Peter to 
the left to let the wagon pass. I said: 'Good morning, ha! ha!' and 
they said ' good morning.' We had not got more than a rod from 

them when I heard (Tcorge say : ' I'll be d d if I don't believe 

''Fount" has got a nigger with him.' Here the road made a sharp 
turn, the ground was soft, and didn't we ply the bud and let the horses 
go until we reached the high ground at the mound. Here we ]uilled 
rein and looked back. Not a soul was in sight. I told Pete that it 
was twelve miles to the next timber, and we had to travel, ns there 
was danger of them cusses following us We reached the hazel brush 
south of Rochester, on Spoon river, where I hid Pete and started for 

8 



124 HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY. 

town to find something to eat for the horses, the rugitive and myself. 
Meeting Dave Frisby, I did not pretend to notice him ; but he recog- 
nized me and said, 'Helo, Fount; how do you do? Wiiere are you 
going?' I rephed : 'Just down here to find a girl ; my wife is not 
very well.' Dave said : ' You don't want a girl; you have a runaway 
somewhere in the brush, and are now looking for something to eat. 
I know you, eld fellow ; you can't fool this child. Fount. How is the 
wife and babies, anyhow ? I said : ' Dave, where have you been l ' 
He re])lied that he was in business at Eochester, and, continuing, said : 
' Say, Fount, you've got a fugitive hid somewhere ; don't you deny it. 
Do you see that house over there? I board there with Eli as Wycoff, 
brother to ]^ehemiah, of Stark county, both sound abolitionists.' I 
said : ' Dave, Wycoff may be all right, but you always said it was not 
right to help the slaves get away from their masters.' He replied : 
' Fount, you know I always said slavery was wrong ; then it is right to 
free them. Here is my hand.' I could tie to Dave." 

I turned about and went with Dave. Wycoff was not at home, but 
was expected shortly. The horses were cared for, Dave and I went 
out to the fugitives retreat. I gave the signal and the woman stejjped 
out. We introduced her to the family and Mr. Wycoff. Mr. Wycoff 
then came and was delighted to help any one out of bondage. Fete 
and I had supper, and afterwards I informed W^'coff that the lady 
wished to make some change in her dress. She was shown into a 
room, I followed after and said, " Pete, take off your dress." Wycoff 
said, " Is that a man ? " I replied that it was, that he had on my wife's 
dress, and that I wished to take it home with me as dresses were not 
over plenty at my house. Peter slipjjed out of the dress and stood be- 
fore us in a suit of broadcloth. All laughed, the women came, and 
seeing the joke, also laughed. I waited until late that night, bade 
Pete and his new friends adieu, and arrived home just before daylight. 
Ha! ha! ha! You don't hear the crack of the slave-driver's whip now- 
a-days. Ha ! ha ! ha ! " 

In the histories of West Jersey, Elmii'a, Osceola, and other town- 
ships, many of the conductors on the Great Southern and Canadian 
Underground 11. R. find proper mention. 

In the first pages of this cliapter reference is made to the anti- 
horse-thief and gambler associations. There luis always hovered 
around the frontier of civilization bold, desperate men, who prey u))on 
the unprotected settlers rather than gain a livelihood by honest toil. 
Theft, robbery and murder were carried on by regularly organized 
bands in Ogle, Lee, Winnebago and DeKalb counties, who moved 
through other sections of the State. The leaders of these gangs of cut- 
throats were among the first settlers of that ]wrtion of the State, and 
consequently had the choice of location. Among the most ])rominent 
of the leaders were John Driscoll, William and David, his sons ; John 
Brodie and three of his sons ; Samuel Aikens and three of his sons ; 
William \\. Bridge and Norton B. Boyce. These were the i-epresenta- 
tive characters, those who })lanned and controlled the movements of 
the combination, concealed them when danger threatened, nursed them 
when sick, rested them when worn bv fatigue and forced marches, fur- 



PIONEER ASSOCIATIONS AND REMINISCENCES. 125 

iiished hiding places for their stolen booty, shared in the spoils, and, 
under cover of darkness and intricate and devious ways of travel, 
known only to themselves and subortlinates, transferred stolen horses 
from station to station; for it came to be known as a well-established 
fact that they had stations, and agents, and watchmen scattered 
throughout the country at convenient distances, and signals and pass- 
words to assist and govern them in all their nefarious transactions. 

The "Keceipt for Hoi'se Stealing'' published in 1SS<! in the Brim- 
field News from the pen of W. H. Adams, conveys a good idea of some 
of the troubles and clangers to which the early settlers were subjected 
by horse-thieves. He introduces his poper by a mention of the Laffertys, 
Slocum's, Driscolls, George Eckley, Ileniy McClenahan, James ]\[ont- 
gomery, John Miller, Joe Swalm, Wesley Fraker and others ; follows 
up the emigration of the Laffertys from Ashland count}", Ohio, to 
Knox county, Illinois, in 18)^0, and then enters upon the story of horse- 
stealing in 1838. Three men came to Lafferty's in A})ril, 1838, stating 
that they were land-buj'ers, and asking to stay all night. The evening 
of the next day they returned with all their ''land papers" wet, claim- 
ing that their vehicle upset while crossing the creek. Mr. L. dried the 
pa})ers. On next morning which was Sunday, one of the young men 
brought forth a fiddle, when Mrs. Lafferty said, "■ we have noise and 
racket enough on week days, I want a little rest on Sunday." That 
night her husband's team of "blacks" was stolen, and early on May 2, 
John Latfert}^ entered U]wn the pursuit of the thieves. He returned 
next morning and met John IMiller, who lived in w4iat is now Frince- 
ville towniship, Sew^el Smith of Mud Eun, in Putnam, and Bob Colwell, 
who lived south of Frince's Mill, on Spoon river, each of whom lost 
horses. When they heard that two of Lafferty's and two of Fraker's 
horses were stolen the same night, they proposed that all would return 
to their homes, get arms and supplies, and give pursuit, appointing 
Montgomery's house at Sugar Tree Grove, the starting place. This 
a])])()iutment was kept, and Laffert_y, Swalm, Fraker, Colwell, Miller 
and Smith started in search of the thieves. Meantime, one Iloantree 
of Henderson Grove, arrived at Miller's house with tlie information 
that two horses in charge of a boy were at Washburn's Grove. John 
McCoy was dispatched, identified the horses, and pushed forward in 
'search of Laffertv and friends, whom he met returnino- to Washburn's. 
Arriving there, they relieved the landlord of the horses, aiul pi'epared to 
make preparations for hanging the boy. Meantime, Miller led the boy 
some distance away, and got a promise from him to give full inform- 
ation if his life would Ije spared. Lafferty and Colwell questioned him, 
and learned that the rendezvous was in the Winnel)ago swamp. At 
midnight the party set forth to capture the robbers, Lafferty and ]\Iiller 
leading with the boy between them. Toward morning they arrived 
near tlie rendezvous. At daylight all the party got within a few yards 
of the camp and waited for the robljers to appear, which one did just 
before sunrise. He was captured by John Miller; two others jumj^ed 
out of the bush hut and were captured. Then all the horses and saddles 
were got together and the victors and vanquished proceeded to another 
grove to try the robbers. The court was organized, the boy's state- 



126 HISTORY OF STAKK COFXTV. 

ments were noted, each of the settlers identified his horses, and the trio 
were fonnd guiltj and hanged. At Spring Creek, on their homeward 
journey, they were fired npon 1>} friends of thieves, the fire was re- 
turned Ijrisklv and thus ended the adventure of the earlvdays of Mav, 
1838. Lafferty and party merely stated to their friends that '* the boy 
gave a receipt that he would never steal another horse." In June, 1838, 
Colwell, Joe Drummond and others visited the Winnebago swam]>, 
where they saw three bodies swinging from a tree. Colwell said. *' 1 
wonder if them ere injuns were hung by the whites during the Black 
Hawk War?" Drummond turning to him said, "Dad, you fellers 
didn't shoot him, you hung him." Colwell replied, '' I guess they're 
dead," and the party left the scene of the tragedy. 
, "' Cattle Drivino- in Earlv Davs " is the title of a storv from the 

^ ])en of W. II. Adams in Xhe Brlmjield JSeics. John Emery, now of 
Galva, is made the hero. It appears that in al)out ls44or 1815, one 
Ther^'good Smith, a dealer of Rochester, resolved to change the 
farmer's notes in his possession into something more tangil>le. and thus 
acquired possession of 225 head of cattle. This herd he placed in 
charge of John Emerv of Stark Countv, with orders to drive them to 
Chicago. Eraervwas assisted on the drive bv John P. Pratz, Elias Laf- 
ferty and Michael Smith, notorious '* l)ull-whackers." At "Xine Mile 
House," on the Des]ilaines. he sold a few head and received s2(>(i in 
gold, then pushed on to Chicago, where the cattle were slaughtered 
and Emery paid 81, KK) in " wildcats " for the quarters, the only jiarts 
then weighed in the market. During the da^^s passed at Chicago, he 
boarded at the City Hotel, corner of State and Lake streets, a mile 
distant from the old slaughter house. On leaving Chicago, he passed 
the first night at the " Nine Mile House," and there met Jack and 
Bill Britts of New Bradford on Green River. Pushing forward with 
the Britts, Jack remained at Paw Paw while Emery and Bill Britt 
went forward to Princeton. They had no sooner arrived there than 
two men, well mounted, appeared. They were robbers on his track. 
At Princeton he was introduced to a ladv and her son from Meadville, 
Pa., who wished to learn the way to Carson Berfield's home in Stark. 
He volunteered to accompany them, and next day set out on the jour- 
nev. Noticing the carriage and the saddled hoi'se, one of the robbei's 
exclaimed: " What ! off so soon t and rushed in hot haste to the stable 
for their horses, quickly a])pearing again, one patting on the bridle 
and the other with the saddle away up on his horse's shoulders was 
vainlv striving to tighten the surcingle as the horse plunged about. At 
this juncture the lady and son stepped into the cari'iage. As soon as 
seated she requested Mr. Emery to hand her his valise and overcoat, a 
request which he lost no time in complying witli. The landlady had 
informed almost every guest of the jeopardy that the stalwart looking 
drover was in, with the solemn admonition not to mention it as they 
valued their lives. As a matter of course every guest in the house 
was on deck to see the outcome. ]\[en and women were all in favor 
of the drive, most particularly the women. When Mr. Emery handed 
his valise to the occupants of the carriage, one of the robbei's said, 
" AVhat, are you going with them folks ?" Emery i"e})lied. ** Yes ; look 



riONfiER ASSOCIATIONS AND REMINISCENCES. 127 

liere — here is one thousand dollars in paper (reaching into his vest 
])ocket and pulling out the wallet)." Replacing this, he reached into 
his trousers pocket and withdrew the gold, saying: "Here is two hun- 
dred dollars in gold ; I would like to see you get it. As soon as you 
approached me last evening I knew what your business w^as, and who 
set you dirty, contemptible, thieving skunks on my track. You can 
come and go with me if you think it will be healthy, or you can go 
back to Paw" Paw Grove and tell Jack Britt that you didn't get my 

money — or you can go to h 1." As Mr. Emery swung himself into 

the saddle and rode awav, he was observed bv all eves. 

Hundreds of stories, more or less of this character, are current, 
some of which are briefly told in the pages devoted to towmship and 
personal history. 

J. Blanchard, writing from Burrton, Kas., to Captain Brown, in 
1883, recites the following reminiscences: "In the fall of 1841 the 
writer married one of the fair daughters of Osceola. Soon after the 
ceremony, which was performed by the venerable Square Parks, I 
took my bride to our cabin away out on the prairie, even before the 
windows and doors were adjusted. But, contrary to the present 
custom of wedding tours, we went to work fixing things and getting 
ready for real housekee])ing. Our household then consisted of my 
wnfe and I and my bachelor brother. At the commencement we laid 
in a toleral)le supply of groceries and provisions, and things went on 
swimmingly, yes lovingly, for a time. But near the end of the next 
summer our stores run alarmingly low% and we were reduced to 
'pumpkins and ])otatoes.' In those days there were no w^ater-mills 
nearer than the Kickapoo or IVIackinaw rivers except an old log mill 
on Jack creek, known as Parker's mill. But at that time there was no 
w^ater behind, and the only way to get a little corn cracked was for 
two or three men to get on the water-wheel and tread it out. But 
about this time Lemuel Dorrance built a saw and grist mill on Spoon 
river, about one mile distant. And a year or two previous to 1811 the 
steam mill was put in operation at Wethersfield. So I tramped out 
some smutty spring wheat with my oxen and started to the latter 
])lace to mill. And though it was but seven or eight miles on a bee 
line (for there were no farms in the way) from Myrtle G. Brace's to 
AYethersfield, yet I was three days making the round trip. While I 
was there, a gaunt-looking man from Victoria came in, having on a 
very long face, and he said, ' Pherris, when can you grind my grist ? 
We have eaten the last ])umpkin.' 'Don't know,' said Pherris, the 
miller. 'Perhaps in two or three days.' 'Why, God bless you! my 
family will starve in that time,' exclaimed the gaunt man. 'I can't 
help it,' replied the miller. But if the bottom had not dropped out of 
the well at the steam mill the ^vater had, and we had to haul water 
from a S])ring near Squire Blish's, ami })our it into the well. How- 
ever, in the course of two or three days, we all got our grists, and 
went on our way rejoicing. And the flour was soon kneaded, set on 
the coals in the big stove or sod fire-place (for we had no quick meal 
stoves in those days), but it came out a real short cake or light biscuit. 
Not long after we set up housekeeping, we had a kind of infair, and. 



128 HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY. 

our cabin not being finished, I deLayed putting on the wedding gar- 
ments until the guests had arrived. I asked Mrs. B. where I should 
change ray clothes. Mrs. Oliver Whitaker being present, and alwa3^s 
ready for a joke, said, 'Why, Blanchard, go up-stairs.' But, lo and 
behold! there was nothing up there but sleepers and rafters. So I 
resorted to the haystack, and soon came back as good as new." 

James B. "Witter, writing to Oliver Whitaker, from Fairmont, 
Neb., in 1883, says: "AVhen I received j^our card of invitation, 
instantly my mind ran back over the years when I first came to Stark 
county. It was in the fall of 1839 that I first came into the county; 
it gave me an opportunity to see the growth of that little count}^ u]) 
to 18C9. The first few years of my residence there, the places of 
almost every man were familiar. I passed over almost every road 
that was used in the county, knew almost every house and the names 
of the persons residing in it. But what a change in thirty 3^ears ; still 
more in forty. The settlements were fia'st made along the streams 
and near the timber, and in passing from one settlement to another it 
was often a lonely tramp,, not hearing a sound excej^t the birds that 
were used to a prairie countr}^, or perhaps some wild animal would 
jump up and dash away and would soon l^e out of sight in the tall 
grass. But those things have long since disap])eared, and now ap])ear 
cultivated fields, fine houses, with herds of different kinds of stock, 
which serve to enrich the farmer and to give life and activity to the 
people of the county. I would further say that my wife came to 
Illinois in the year 1835, and her father came to Stark county in 1837. 
AVe were married in 1842, and together we toiled through those hard 
years which followed the early settling of Stark county." 

The letter of H. C. Henderson, dated Marshalltown, Iowa, August 
25, 1883, is a model pioneer letter, such a one as every old settler sliould 
write. It was addressed to Dr. Henry M. Hall, then secretarv of the 
Old Settlers Association, and from it the following extract is made : 
" I think of the broad, uncultivated prairies of old Stark, of the lieauti- 
ful hills and valleys, the woodlands and streams, that delighted my 
boyish fancy, when the young blood coursed freely through a frame 
quivering with strong, happy life. I remember well the wcjods and 
prairies decked with many-hued fiowers, and carpeted with native 
grass. I remember the waving fields and golden harvest, I recall the 
summer's heat, the smoky autumn, Avith its foliage of fire and gold ; 
I think of snowy winters and ice-bound streams, of the caljin and barn, 
of the log-cabin school house, of fun and frolic, of work and play ; how 
I used to go barefoot, and often was compelled to do so; of the thi'eatl- 
l)are clothes and sometimes scanty fare at the family Ijoard ; of the 
spelling-schools, of the singing-schools, and, after awhile, of the Sunda}^- 
school, in the organization and direction of which your venerable father 
took an active part; of the campmeetings and celebrations; of the 
elections and the courts. Well I rememl)er the first county meeting at 
Major McClenahan's to organize the county ; and the first courts held 
in m}' father's old cabin, when all the county were our guests. How 
lonesome it used to be in the old cabin after court, or the meeting of 
the count}^ commissioners, composed of Jonathan Hodges, Calvin 



PIONEER ASSOCIATIONS AND REMINISCENCES. l29 

Winslow and Jefferson Trickle, or William Ogle (I forgot which now), 
with Augustus Dun as sheriff and Oliver Whitaker county clerk. 
As I glance back at those times how those venerable forms come up 
before me. I remember when the county seat was located at Toulon, 
and Carson Berfield staked out tlie lots through the hazel and plum 
thickets, so dense that a way had to be cut with brush scythes to enable 
them to carry the chain and point the compass. I recall also the old 
court house built by Elder Mott, who, it was said, painted it with 
])uttermilk. ITo^v well I remember when Ben Turner opened up a 
hotel in the northwest corner of the puljlic square, and Mr. Whitaker 
kept l)oarders in the northwestern ])art of the town ; when Dr. Hall 
moved his old eccentric cabin from Osceola to town, and rebuilt it with 
its quaint angles and odd proportions, on the hillside south east of the 
court house. In those days I knew nearly everybody in the county, 
and had at one time and another been at nearly all their cabins. I 
could now almost name them all : Wesley Miner, William Bowen, 
William Mahany, Major McClenahan and Stephen G. Worley on the 
west and south sides and Andrew Swartz, Minot Silliman, William 
Ogle, Adam Perry, and "old man Leak," on the east side, composed 
the entire settlement on Indian creek above the old town of Moulton, 
not now known to the younger generations. At Wyoming, with only 
one house in it, I think, resided General Thomas and his family, the 
Butlers and Whituey Smith. Above them, east of S]ioon river, Elijah 
McClenahan, Syl. Moore, Jesse Heath, James Holgate, Lemuel Dor- 
rance and Mr. Breese made up nearly the entire settlement east of 
S])oon river between the Osceola and Wyoming settlements, and the 
Winslows, Buswells, Sturms, Myrtle G. Brace and the Lyle brothers 
made most of the settlement on upper Spoon river. The Woods, Adam 
Day, Essex, Chaffees, Coxes, Smiths, Boardmans and Trickles were 
nearly all the inhabitants of the southeast part of the county. I might 
mention many others whom I remember with pleasure, who then, or 
shortly after, resided there — the Olivers, Fullers, Turnbulls, and many 
others whom I have neither the time nor space to mention now. I 
knew them all well for a number of years and have heard of them often 
since, and always with pleasure. They laid the foundations of society 
deep and strong, and fifty years have I'olled away since, but the in- 
fluence of these good fathers and mothers is still felt, and their works 
follow them in the prosperity and glory of the present time." 

S. II. Henderson, of Hastings, Neb., writes: "More than forty- 
seven years ago (July 2, 1836) on a rainy day, my father, with his 
family, and the family of Mrs. Jane Elliott arrived at the place selected 
for our home on Indian Creek, just one mile south of Toulon. Not 
one of the Elliott family remains, and the descendants of the widow 
are scattei'ed far and wide. And 1113^ dear father and mother are long- 
since passed away. Their children are remembered for their sakes. 
Many who are regarded as old settlers in Stark county settled there, 
after our family emigrated to Iowa in 184:5, nearly thirty-eight years 
ago. I regret exceedingly that I cannot be with .you. For a quarter of 
a century I have been an itinerant ])reacher in the Methodist Episcopal 
church, and in that time I have missed roll-call l)ut twice, and then I 



130 



HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY. 



was in the service of my country, lielping to put do\vn the great 
rebellion." 

Many reminiscences might be introduced here ; ])ut as innumerable 
references to pioneer days are found throughout this Avork, moi*e 
particularly in the pages devoted to township history and biography, 
the writer selected the foregoing as a fair resume of ]noneer history 
for the country's pioneer circle. 



CHAPTER VI. 



ORGANIZATION AND COMMISSIONERS COURT. 




i^ the organization of Illinois Territory in 1809, it was 
divided into the counties of Randolph and St. Cllair. In 
1818 the whole northwest part of the state belonged to 
Madison as set off from St. Clair on the establisliment of 
state government. In 1821 Pike county was founded, aiul 
in 182?> Fulton county was organized. When this (Fulton) 
county was established and for over two years thereafter, it 
extended east and west from the Illinois to the Mississi])})i 
rivers, and from the base line near where Rushville, Schuy- 
ler count}^, now stands, to the northern boundary of the 
state, including the country where Rock Island, Galena, 
Peoria, Joliet and (Chicago now are. It was indeed a large 
county, and embraced wliat is Jiow the wealthiest and most 
populous portion of the great West. The great lead mines 
of Galena had not yet been discovered, and Chicago was 
only a trading and mditary post. In 1825 the Legislature 
created Peoria county and attached to it for all county 
purposes all the country lying north of it within this state 
on l>oth sides of the Illinois river as far east as the third principal 
meridian. The Commissioners' Court of that county convened for the 
first time March 8, 1825. In this year also, Schuyler county was es- 
tablished, and the same >'ear the counties of Adams, Hancock, MoDon- 
(jugh, Warren, Mercer, Knox, Henry and Putnam were set off from 
Fulton. In 1839 Stark county was formed out of six congressional 
townsliips of Putnam and two of Knox county. On A])ril 2, 1831, 
Putnam was divided into four precincts, one of which, Spoon River, 
included all the county south of the direct line from the head of Crow 
Prairie to Six Mile Grove, thence northwest to the oi-iginal county 
line; Bureau precinct, all the present county of that name and })arts 
of Stark and Marshall counties, with nineteen voters. The voters in 
the Spoon River precinct of Putnam county, August 1, 1831, were W. 
1). Grant, Sewell Smith, John B. Dodge, Sylvanus Moore, Benjamin 
Essex, Thomas Essex, Thomas Essex, Jr., Daniel Cooper, Harris W. 





l-ONTIAO — CHIEF OF TUK OTTAWAS. 



ORGANIZATION AND COMMISSIONERS' COURT. 133 

Miner, Isaac B. Essex, Greenleaf Smith, AViii. North, Benjamin Smith, 
John C. Owings. 

In September, 1831, a road from Hennepin to Smith's Ford on 
Spoon Itiver, was ordered to be re-snrveyed and marked. 

Dnring the Black Hawk war, in May, 1832, the miHtary companies 
known as Eads', Barnes' and Bangliman's, with a detachment of Ignited 
States infantry nnder CoL Zacli. Tavlor, and Lients. Jeff Davis and 
Sidney Johnson, camped at Boyd's Grove. It is related that many of 
the Spoon River voters nltimately '-were taken with the war fever " 
and entered the ranks, l)ut of this the writer has no anthority, be^'ond 
the rosters given in the military chapter. 

In March, 1831, the commissioners of Pntnam laid off the county 
into road districts. All the settlements in the Spoon river neighbor- 
hood formed No. lY, with Sylvanus Moore, supervisor. At this 
time James Holgate, Samuel j\[eri'ill and James McGlenahan were 
appointed fence-viewers for townshij) 13 north, range 6 east. 

In June, 1834, Benjamin Smith, James Holgate and Elijah McClen- 
ahan were appointed judges of election in the Spoon Iliver precinct. 
The first election after organization was held August 1, 1831, when the 
following named voters were recorded in Spoon Iliver precinct: W. D. 
(larrett, Sewell Smith, John B. Dodge, Sylvanus Moore, Benjamin 
Essex, Thomas Essex, Thomas Essex, Jr., David Cooper, Harris W. 
Miner, Isaac B. Essex, Greenleaf Smith, B. Smith, Wdliam Smith, 
Benjamin Smith and John C. Owings. The judges of election were 
William and Greenleaf Smith and W. B. Essex, with John C. Owings 
and Benjamin Smith clerks. The meeting was held at Benjamin 
Smith's house. 

Little or nothing was accom})lished in the way of ]>ublic improve- 
ments in Spoon Biver precinct. The towns of Wyoming, Osceola, 
IMoulton, Massillon and Lafayette Avere jilatted in 183P)-7, but beyond 
this ])ublic enteri)rise did not lead. 

The, bribery act of 1837, granting millions of dollars to public 
woi'ks which were never completed, and loans of money made to 
counties, so as to win the people's approval, resulted in Putnam 
receiving $10,000 as her share of the public plunder. Amnion Moon, 
who Avas then county treasurer, loaned this sum Avithout proper 
security, and thus Putnam lost her spoils. Stark, however, received 
the portion of this fund to Avhich she Avas entitled. 

The time had now arrived when the people of Avestern Putnam 
resoh^ed to haA^e a little commonwealth of their own. This period 
and events belonging are well portraj^ed by Mrs. Shallenberger, 
thus: ''At the session of the legislature in 1836-7, an act "for the 
formation of the county of Coffee" Avas approved. Noav, as Colonel 
AVilliam Henderson Avas from his first settlement here prominent 
in local politics, and known to be an enthusiastic admirer of the 
Tennessee hero. General Coffee, Avith or under Avhom he had done 
military serAnce, it is hi^'hlv iirobable that this, as Avell as siibse- 
(|nent acts for the same purpose wei-e secui-ed thi'ough his instru- 
mentality. The ncAV county was to be eighteen miles scpiare, com- 
prising nine full toAvnships — six Lo be taken from Putnam, two from 



134 HISTORY OF STAKK ("OFNTV. 

Knox and one from Henrv. Benjamin Mitchell. Eicbard X. Cullom 
of Tazewell, and Samuel Hackleton of Fulton, were the commission- 
ers to select the site for the county seat, which, if located on ground 
not alread\^ laid out as a town, should be called Eipley. This act, 
however, was not to take effect unless a majority of the voters in 
Knox and Henry counties, at an election on tlie K'tb day of April. 

1837, should sanction it. Putnam was allowed no voice in these 
proceedings, and the ])roject failed on the vote; so ''Coffee county*" 
was no more, although it had already appeared on several maps of 
that day. A more vigorous attempt was made during 1838, con- 
tinuing through a great part of the year. Much feeling was excited 
by this contest, as is usual in local questions. Both parties in the 
struo-u-le had weif-'htv arouiments to wield. Those wisliino- to make 
the Illinois river a boundary on the east, urging the increased tax- 
ation that must result to the residents in a small county ; the other 
side uro'ino- the convenience of a county seat near at hand. So the 
question of a new county was made the leading issue in the canvass 
for another representative from the Spoon river country. As early 
as February. 1838, a meeting was held at the house of James Hol- 
gate, near AVyoming. when it was "Tlesolved. to petition the next 
legislature for a new county, and to protest against the Illinois river 
as a boundary on the east," and "to nominate Colonel WiUiam H. 
Henderson, in order to the success of their plans." After adjourn- 
ment, a meeting of the disaffected minority, some fifteen or twenty, 
was held and resolutions passed "to accept the Illinois river as a 
boundary on the east, and to put Thomas S. Elston, Esq., of Bureau. 
in nomination for the legislature.*' Mr. Elston, however, does not 
appear to have become a candidate. Others were nominated in dif- 
ferent parts of Putnam and Bureau ; but only the names of Colonel 
Henderson. Amnion Moon. B. M. Hays of Hennepin, and Andrew 
Burns of Magnolia, were conspicuous in the canvass. In an address 
to the electors of the district, puldished in the nearest papers. Colonel 
Henderson stated that '"he sliould lay down as a basis for his action, 
two lines, to-wit: the lines dividing ranges 8 and 9, east of the fourth 
principal meridian, and another which had reference to the formation 
of Marshall county.'' He was elected bv a plurality of nearly a 
lumdred over his competitors, receiving the almost unanimous vote 
of Spoon river, Lacon and Lafayette precincts. Notice for a petition 
for a new county was again advertised according to law, in October. 

1838, and on the sixteenth of January, 1839, Colonel Henderson pre- 
sented this petition from citizens of Putnam. Henry and Knox coun- 
ties, praying the formation of a new county. 

The subsequent proceedings are summarized from legislative and 
other documents as follows : In 1837 the vote of Eastern Knox county 
for division and annexation to Coffee county was 77, while against the 
measure ISO votes were cast, thus effectually closing the road which 
earliei' appeared open to the success of the measure. On January 23, 

1839, Mr. Moore reported a bill for an act to establish Stark county, 
which was twice read, and on motion of Mr. Stapp, referred to a com- 
mittee composed of Stapp, Henderson, Alexander, Compher and Jar- 



ORGANIZATION AND COMMISSIONKRs' COURT. 135 

rott. On Febniarv 5, Jarrott I'ejiorted the bill, Stap]> moved indefinite 
postponement ; Init on motion of Henderson the bill and amendment 
were laid on the table. ()n P'ebruar}- 7, on motion of Otwell, tliev 
were referred to a committee, composed of ]\[urphy, Otwell, Duljois, 
Jarrott and Kercheval. On Febrnarv 11, Duljois reported the bill, etc., 
and recommended ado])ti()n. Forty three votes were recorded in favor 
and 31 contra. On Febrnarv 15, the engrossed l)ill was read a third 
time, but its passage was negatived. On Febrnarv K!, the question — 
"Shall the bill passT' was again negatived. On February 28 a mes- 
sage from the senate announced that that bod v amended a bill for "an 
act to dispose of the territoi'v lying west of the Illinois I'iver in the 
county of Putnam and for other ])nr])oses," so as to read, " an act for 
the formation of Stark and for other purposes," and further asked the 
concui'i'ence of the house. On March 2, the council of revision 
reported approval of the act, and Stark county was established. 

John Stark, after whom the county is named, was born at London- 
derry, N. H., August 28, 1728, of Irish parents, who came to the 
colonies in 1719, and in 1730 moved to Derrvfield, now Manchester. 
In 1752 John joined a hunting expedition through the wilds of North- 
ern New Hampshire, was captured l)y the Al)enaquoies, carried 
to Canada, released by a Ijoston friend on payment of $103, and the 
vear following visited the headwaters of the Androscoo-o-an. Durino- 
the Ivevolntion he was at Saratoga, and was of the council which stipu- 
lated the surrender of Bui-goyne. He also served in Ilhode Island in 
1778, and in New Jersey in 178(». In 1781 he Avas a])pointed comman- 
der of the northern department of the American army and served until 
he greeted the birth of the United States. In his Irish rifle brigade 
were seventy-one Irishmen, who r.erved at Bunker Hill, where four of 
them were killed. Stark's order was, '• wait till you see the white of 
their eyes," and on another occasion, "We must win today, boys, or 
tonight ]Molly Stark is a widow.'' The name has not suffered in its 
present connection, for in later years the sons of Molly Stark obeyed 
luany an order, with a much nobler foe in front than Stark fought 
against. 

The act approved Fel)ruary 1, 18-l:(), provided that Cyrus Walker, of 
McDonough county, D. G. Salisbury, of Bureau county, and William 
Fenn, of Marshall county, be commissioners to locate the seat of jus- 
tice for Stark county, they to meet at W, H. Henderson's house in 
1840. It was further jirovided that that ])ortion of Henry county 
within the following-named boundaries be attached to Stark, viz.: " Be- 
ginning at the southeast corner of Henry county, running north on 
line dividing ranges 5 and (! to the northeast corner of section 2-I-, T 
15 N., R. 5 E., thence west with the section lines to the northwest cor- 
ner of section 22. in B. 4, thence along the section 22, thence south 
along line dividing towns 13 and l-t N., thence east to beginning." 
This addition was sul)ject to a vote of Henry county, ordered to be 
taken in March, 1840. Another act, a]>]n'oved February 1, 1840, 
declared valid the assessment of taxes taken in Stark and Henry coun- 
ties in 1839, as if taken regulai-ly under the act concernino- ]Hd)lic rev- 
enue, as approved February 26, 1839. The act approved February 27, 



136 HIP'rOK'Y OK STARK rOFXTV. 

1S41, provided that the east ^ of E. 4 and all of R. 5 in townships 14 
and 15 N. constitute a part of Stark, and be taken from the southeast 
corner of Henry county, on condition that the people of Henry 
county would vote in favor of such addition to Stark. It was further 
provided that John Dawson, Peter Van Bergen and AVilliani F. Elkin, 
all of Sangamon county, be ap]winted conimissionei's to locate the 
town of Toulon, the county seat, and they were instructed to meet at 
"\V. H. Henderson's house in April, 18-1-1. The action of those com- 
missioners was also made liable to a vote of the ])eople of Stark. The 
sale of lots in the town, and the transfer t)f school funds from Henry 
and Knox counties to Stark county, were also provided for. A refer- 
ence to the ])ioneer chapter will point out the opposition this question 
met with from the citizens of Henry county, concerned an anti-square 
opposition which still persists in denying a ninth township to Stark. 

Co7nmiss{o7iers^ Record. — The first meeting of the County Commis- 
sioners was held at Elijah McClenahan's house, April 4. ISMO, under 
the act establishing the county, approved March l\ that year. Calvin 
AVinslow, Stephen Trickle and Jonathan Hodgson present. The two 
first named qualified before the latter, who was a justice of the peace, 
and he. in turn, before Calvin AVinslow. Oliver Whitaker was aji- 
pointed clerk j>/r> tern. Mmott Silliman qualified as treasurer and Oli- 
ver Whitaker as clerk. On April 5th. T. 14, R. 6 and 7 E. was laid 
off as justice district Xo. 1 ; T. 13, R. 7 E., as district Xo. 2 ; T. 12 X., 
R. 5 E., as district Xo. 3; T. 13, R. 5 E., as Xo. 4, and T. 13, R. 6 E., 
as Xo. 5. The boundaries were not exactly those of the congressional 
townships. Xine road districts were established on this day also. The 
road supervisors then appointed were John Lyle, James Holgate, 
AVhitney Smith. Jefferson Trickle, W. ^ . "Webster (June term), Joseph 
Palmer, Peter F. Miner, S. G. Worlev and John ^Miller. It was then 
ortlered that every able-bodied man should perform three days' work on 
the roads. There were five assessors' districts established. Isaac 
Spencer. J. "W. Agard, I. H. Barnett, Silas Richards and Adam Perry 
were appointed justices of the respective justice districts. 

On A^n'il 5. ISoO, James Holgate was appointed school commis- 
sioner. The school lands trustees appointed on April 6, 1839, were I. 
C. Avery, Henry Seely and A. M. Smith, for Osceola ; Henry Breese, 
Samuel Camp and I. Spencer, for Penn : J. W. Heath, Samuel Seely* 
and Adam Perry, for Toulon : Calvin Powell. Sr.. Moses Boardman 
and AVhitney Smith, for Essex ; AY. W. AVebster, Jose]jh Palmer and 
Milton Richards, for AVest Jersey : C. H. ]^Iiner. Luther Driscoll and 
Samuel Pari'ish, for Goshen. The first tleeds recorded in the county 
were as follows: AVilliam Dunliar to Ruliff Parrish. June 24, 1839, for 
lots 1, 2 and 8, in block 38, La Fayette village; Henry and Eliza Seely 
to Xicholas Sturm, February 28, 1839, for the X. -J-,'X. AY. \. Section 
27, T. 14, R. 7, the consideration being 8187.50. 

Robert AlcClenahan was appointed county collector. A lottery 
was held to determine the terms of the commissioners, which resulted 
in giving Stephen Trickle one year, Jonathan Hodgson two, and Cal- 
vin AYinslow three years. The board decided that the county and cir- 
cuit courts should be held hereafter at AA". H. Henderson's house. On 



ORGANIZATION AND COMMISSIONERS' COURT. loT 

June 4th a tax of 40 cents per |100 valuation was ordered. At this 
session live election })recincts were established, grand and ])etit juroi's 
were appointed, and the assessors ordered to be paid. In Sej)tend)er. 
1839, William Ogle replaced Commissioner Trickle. John Hester, 
Adam Perry and Joseph D. Lane were commissioned to locate a road, 
commencing at Boyd's Grove toward L. S. Dorrance's mill. This was 
the introduction to road-makmo- undei" the new local government. On 
September 3d a number of orders were issued for $1 each, to judges 
and clerks who presided at the August election, and the day after a 
resolution was recorded granting 75 cents per day to each grand and 
petit juiyman who would be called to serve in court. On December 2, 

1839, an order was issued for $2.50 to B. M. Jackson, to cover freight 
and other charges on eleven record books, from Cincinnati, O., to 
Stark county, and one for 75 cents for conveying seven record books 
from La Fayette to Colonel Henderson's house was issued to Philip 
Anshute. 

The ilrst regular bridges over Spoon river on the Peoria and Galva 
road were erected in the fall of 1839, L. S. Dorrance supplying the 
lumber. In March, 1840, William Lyle was paid ij^l().50 for the origi- 
nal book-case in clerk's office. At this session the following names 
were bestowed on the five election precincts respectively, viz : No. 1, 
Osceola, Wyoming, Massillon, La Fayette and C.entral. On March 7, 

1840, Minot Silliman presented his account as follows: $L2C)8.7<) from 
September !2, 1839, to date, including ^505.(50 of the internal improve- 
ment fund ]iaid over by the Stai'k count}^ commissioners as agents for 
Putnam county; contra jurors' certificates, $27; county orders paid 
out, $528.49; commission, $n.lO; total expenditure, $5r)«).59 ; cash on 
hand, $702.17. Henry P)reese was appointed collector of the county. 
The iirst overseers of the ])Oor were appointed September 9, 1840, as 
follows: William Mahany, Central township; Henry McClenahan, La 
Fayette townshi]); Brady Fowler, Osceola township; Nehemiah ]\Ier- 
ritt, Wyoming township. In October. 1840, a special election for jus- 
tice of the peace was held in Massillon township, which cost the county 
$5.50 judges' and clerks' fees. The total expenditures for the year 
ending March 7, 1841, amounted to $l,2!ts.o2. and the total revenue, 
incliuling balance from 1840, $2,111.00. 

On July 12, 1841, John Dawson, P. V. Bergen and' AV. F. Elkin, 
appointed under the act of February 27, 1841, to locate the county 
seat of Stark county, made theii- repoi't, stating that on Afay 17, 1841. 
they did locite the Town of Toulon as the county seat, on ninety rods 
of land then owned by John Miller, being a ])art of the southwest 
quarter of section 19. in townshi]) 13, noi'th, range 0, east, being twelve 
rods east and twelve rods noi-th of the west and south boundaries of 
the (piarter section ui)on the c(jndition that John AEiller execute to the 
commissioners a good deed in fee sim])le for the tract. This de(Ml was 
made July 28, 1841. by John and Mary Ann Millei", r(^s(M"ving only 
such timber and shrubs, buildings, rails and fruit trees, to be removed 
by him l)efore April 1. 1842, and hke property when the owner of any 
lot shall commence buildino- on and enclosing'' the same. This {\iH'i\ 
was acknowledged by Joseph Peri-y. In Se[)tember, 1841, Heady 



138 HISTORY OF STAKK COUNTY. 

Fowler re})laced Calvin Winslow on the county board. The expendi- 
tures for the year ending March 9, 1842, exceeded $1020, still leaving a 
balance in favor of 1843 of $1,053.19. 

Tlie commissioners in 1843 were AVm. Ogle, Brady Fowler and F. 
AV. Emmery. In 1844, L. S. iJorrance took Wni. Ogle's ))lace; in 1845. 
Joseph Palmer replaced Brady Fowler; in 1 846, Jefferson Trickle took 
F. W. Emery's place; in 1847, James llolgate, Joseph Palmer and 
Jefferson Trickle formed the Ijoard, and the last named with Theo. J. 
Hurd and Thomas Lyle in 1848. They were the last commissioners 
of Stark and its five precincts, Toulon, Osceola, Lafayette, Massillon, 
and Wyoming. 

During the year 1849 the commissioners' court was abolished and 
the l)usiness of the county ])laced in charge of tlie county court. 
James Holgate, deceased, was judge, and Wm. F. Thomas, slieriff. and 
ex officio, collector of taxes. Calvin L. Eastman, Theo. F. Hurd and 
Henry Breese were ap])ointed commissioners in r)eceml)er, 1852, to 
divide the county into townships in accoidance with the act of Feb- 
ruaiy 17, 1851, pi'oviding for townslii[) organizati(jn. One of tlie last 
acts of the old board, June fi, 1853, was a resolution favoring $50,000 
aid to the "Western Air Line Raih'oad. In August. 1853, 534 voters 
sanctioned this aid, and 141 op]Mjsed tlie ]>roposition. 

The justices of the ])eace holding office in 1849 were: W. W. Win- 
slow. Dan. J. Ilurd. Walter M. Fuller. Isaac Thomas, ]\riles A. Fuller, 
Jacob Young, John F. Thompson. James B. Lewis. John Miller. Wm. 
Ogle. Alilton Eckley, JosejJi Catterlin. John Finley and Heri'ick A. 
Ilalsey were elected in 1851; James Hathaway. Chas. C. Wilson and 
John F. Thompson in 1852. -lauies llolgate was county judge, and 
Oliver Whitaker notary public. The names of the pioneer justices 
from the days of Squire Owens and St[uire Benjamin Smith down to 
1806. are given in the marriage record, while from 1853 to the jiresent 
time the I'ecord is given in the histories of the several townships. 

The committee on division of the county re])orted in January, 1853. 
the following names for seven of the eight divisions : Essex, Valley. 
(Toslien, Toulon. Penn, Elmira and Osceola. The su])ervisors subse- 
(piently chosen, were Lemuel Dixon, Charles C. Wilson, Lewis H. 
Fitch. Calvin L. Eastman, James Holgate, Thomas Lyle and Bradford 
Foster. AVest Jersey was subsequently organized in 1853, anti AV. AV. 
AVebster elected first =;u]iprvisor. James Holgate was elected 
first chairman of the board. -June 7. 1853. The committee above 
named received $1.50 for their services, and the new organization was 
completed. The justices elected in LS53 are named as follows : Alfi'ed 
Fi-cemaii, Clins. B. Donalson. John Millei-, Jacob E. Jones, Hervey J. 
Phodes. Henry Breese, John Snare. James Buswell. W. AL Fuller, 
Isaac TJjonias, John Finley, Herrick P. Ilalsey. AVashington Trickle, 
Jacob Young, Alex. Moncreif, James Holgate. county judge. From 
1S54 to the ])resent time the names of sii])ervisors ;iiul justices are 
given in the histories of the townships. 

('ounty Bidldingfi. — The county courthouse and jail are noticed by 
Mis. Shallenberger. thus: "The first courthouse, a plain wooden 
sti'iictui'c built to meet present wants, was completed in 1S42. and 



OKGANIZATION AND COMMISSIONERS' COUHT. 181) 

served many important pur])oses for the county and town, not only as 
a seat of justice, but sometimes as church and sclioolhouse too. The 
old jail was built a year or so later, perhaps, in isl-t, by Ira Ward, Jr.; 
a man from Knox county by the name of Hammond, doing the mason 
work. This still serves to hold, rather insecurely, however, Stark 
county criminals, and it can hardly be said ihat its accommodations or 
management, reflect any great credit upon the county officials who 
control this matter. The present courthouse is a substantial and well 
proportioned brick edifice, with airy and convenient offices on the 
first floor. Standing, as it does, on a square shaded by a fine growth 
of young trees, it is a pleasant and comel}" picture foi' the eye to rest 
upon ; one for which a good many of our citizens would be willing to 
fight valiantly should its possession ever be seriously disputed — as 
some see fit to predict. Tt was erected in ISSP) at a cost to the countv 
of $12,000." On July 14, 1SS4, the l)id of J. Volk & Co. for imilding 
a fire proof office structure for the county was accepted, and Messrs. 
Caverly, Jordan and Armstrong were appointed a building committee. 
This building contains the offices of the county clerk, circuit clerk and 
treasurer onlv, the other offices with tlie court rotmi beino- in the old 
building. 

The Poor Farm. — In the notice of the old commissioners' court, 
reference is made to the establishment of an almshouse. Mrs. Shallen- 
berger, speaking of this institution, says : "The first county ])ooi'-house 
was located a little noi'theast of Toulon, on what was long famibarly 
known as ' Adam Perry's ])lace;' indeed, the house was but the old 
residence enlarged, and ada])te(l in various ways to its new duties. 
But tliis beino' deemed insufficient to meet the demands bable to be 
made by the increase of })au})ers, as the county grew in years and 
numbers, it was decided in ]S()8 to 1)U3" a larger farm, farther from 
town, and to erect upon it a good, substantial and commodious ])()or- 
house. Accordingly a ti-act of land described as the noi'theast cjuarter 
of section 12, in township 12 north, range 5 east, in Stark county, 
was purchased from Davis Lowman, at a cost of al)out $8,000, and 
early in the following year i)reparations for building l)egan — the 
committee in charge being (\ M. S. Tyons, J. 11. (^uinii and II. Shiv- 
vers." Hewes A¥hite was appointed superintendent in March, 18()2. 
The old poor-farm was sold June 27, 18(58, in lots of five and ten acres, 
bringing $7,865. A few months ])rior to this the county ])urchased 
from Davis Lowman 160 acres for $f),(»00, and on this the present 
county j)oor-house stands. I'he biiihlings were erected l)y William 
(laverly at a cost of $16,00(». In August, 1870, J. S. Green, superin- 
tendent, reported nine inmates. Tewis Lacy died there. July 20, 1870, 
in his 80th year. From f 80S to June. 188(). two hundred and two per- 
sons were received into this institution. For a number of years Suj)er- 
inteudent jMorrison has managed the house, and by methodical business 
means placed it at th(^ pinnacle of all county charitable houses in the 
state. In December, 1880, the house was destroyed by fire; no lives 
were lost, l)ut the superintendent lost his personal property. 

The index to legislativ(^ acts alfecting Stark county, tVoni |s;;i»to 
ISO)!), is as follows: county formed, boundary and organization, L. 



140 



HISTOKV OF STARK COUNTV. 



1889 (^ Mar.), 2ii9; locate county seat and extend county limits, after 
vote, L. 1840 (1 Feb.), 62; share in internal improvement fund. Id. (29 
Jan.\ ()5 : assessments for 1839 legalized, h\. (1 Fel).). 77; Toulon to 
l)e county seat, L. 1841 (27 P^eb. ), 98; records made by B. Turner, 
deputy of B. M. Jackson, legalized, L. 1845 (18. Feb.), 8(i4; township 
from Henry and added to this county, vote thereon, L. 1849 (12 Feb.), 
55; shee]) and swine not to run at large, L. 1855 (14 Feb.), 154; school 
lands, T. 12. R. (>, sold by Isaac B. Essex, deeded by governor, L. 1851, 
township law, L. 1853 (8 Feb.), 151; Osceola plat vacated, Pr. L. 1855 
(14 Feb.), 46; Wyoming chartered, 2 Pr. L. 1865 (16 Feb.), 642; Tou- 
lon chartered, Pr. L. 1859 (11 Feb.), 688; amendment, offenders com- 
mitted, 2 Pr. L. 1865 (16 Feb.), 583; Washington street partly vacated, 
Pr. L. 1847 (2() Feb.), 2(i4; same, Pr. L. 1851 (28 Jan.), 18;'coimtv to 
sell town lots, Pr. laws 1849 (12 Feb.), 133, and Pr. L. 1855 (14 Feb.), 
526; Toulon Lodge No. 93 A. F. and A. M. chartered, Pr. L. 1853 (lo 
I'"el).), 569 ; trustees First Baptist cliurch. acts legalized. Pr. L. 1859 
(12 Feb.), 33; supervisoi's sell seminary, 1 Pr. L. 1867 (^18 Feb.) 4. 



CHAPTEK YII. 






POLHICAL HISTORY. 




OLITK'S, or the science of government, occupies a first 
])]ace in the estimation of all free peoples, and of those wlio 
would be fi'ee, even as it does in that of the governing- 
classes of countries where little or no freedom exists. 
Fnder our own Hag, in every county and nuniici})ality in 
the Union, ])olitics is an ever-recurring subject. For this 
reason a large sjmce is devoted to this chapter, and the 
folh)wing summar}" of the history of conventions inti'o- 
duced. Previous to 1796 the nominations for President 
and A'ice President were entirely in the hands of the 
Electoral College: subsecjuently. tlie nominating ])ower 
became one of the pi'ivileges of the sevei'al [)arties in 
Cono-ress. Georo-e Washiiit>ton was nominated as the first 
President without any formality of convention in 1788. It 
is, ])erhaps, forgotten that John Adams had nearly half as many votes 
in the Electoral ("olle"'e. Washini'ton was renominated for a second 
term in 1792, but not without consideral)le o])position. Probably 
most I'eaders of this o-eneratioii do not Icnow that in the first Electoral 
College the names of Lincoln and Harrison wei-e presented as rival 
canditlates for election. K H. Harrison, of Maryland, received six 
votes; and Benjamin Lincoln, of Massachusetts, one vote. The sharp 
contrast between the method of nominating candidates now and in 
the early da\'s of the Ke]nil)lic is shown l)y the following sketch of 
the contest for the Presidency in isoo; The method, as the Constitu- 



POLITICAL HISTORY. 141 

tion then stood, of voting for two candidates without distinction as to 
the office for which they were intended — the one receiving the highest 
number of votes to be President — furnished pecuhar facihties for 
quietly displacing Adams without seeming to make any open attack 
ujion him; and even without tlie necessitv that more than a limited 
numljer of influential politicians should be in the secret. The names 
of Adams and Pinckney being brought forward in a private caucus of 
the Federal members of Congress held for the purpose of agreeing 
upon candidates to be supported by the party, it was recommended 
pretty unanimously that both should be voted for equally ; but the 
opponents of Adams secretly hoi)ed that means might be found to 
secure Pinckney the larger vote. A similar caucus of the opposition 
members selected as their candidates Thomas Jefferson and Aaron 
Burr — with the distinct understanding, however, that Jefferson was 
the choice of the party for President. Both these caucuses were held 
with profound secrec}^ — this sort of dictation being not yet recognized 
as a part of the institutions of the country. Their proceedings, instead 
of being formally reported, were communicated to local leaders by 
letters. 

In 1804, for the first time, the electors balloted separately for 
President and Vice-President, Jefferson being chosen by the adminis- 
tration party, and Charles C. Pinckney by the Federalists. In 1808 a 
Democrat ic-Pepublican congressional caucus nominated Madison, and 
a Federalist, Charles C. Pinckney. In 1812 a congressional caucus 
renominated Madison, while an op])osition caucus at New York 
selected DeWitt Clinton. In 1810 Monroe received the nomination 
of the Democratic-Republican congressmen, and liufus King, of the 
Federalist caucus. In 1820 the power of the caucus waned, failed, 
and Monroe was reelected. In 1824 Crawford, nominee of a congress- 
ional caucus, failed, and the revolt against the system threw the onus 
of nomination on State legislatures. C'la}^ Jackson, and J. Q. Adams 
were nominated, and the latter was ultimately elected b}" vote of the 
House. In 1828 Jackson was nominated bv the Tennessee Legislature, 
and Adams by the National Eepulilicans. Two years later the Anti- 
Masons' C(nivention was called, met in September, 1831, at Phila- 
delphia, and nominated William Wirt for President. In December 
the National Repuljlicans nominated Clay at Baltimore, and the 
national nominating convention was at last a fact. Since 1830 the 
national convention has grown in popular favor, until in our own 
time it forms a meeting that claims the attention of the whole world. 
In the following record of elections mention is made of the candidates 
for President, and the vote each received in this county. 

Prec'incf Ehti'ions. — The election of 1839 for precinct No. 4 was 
held at T. J. Ilurd's house, when fifty-five voters were ])resent. The 
August elections for justice of the peace resulted in the choice of Silas 
Picliards. Israel Cummins was elected constable. The election of 
1830 for district No. 2 was held at James Holgate's Ijouse. Forty-four 
votes were recorded for county officers. The election of township 
officers resulted in the choice of Washington Trickle and John Finley, 
justices, and Lewis Finch, constable. The elections of 1839 for pre- 
9 



142 ITISTOKY OF STARK COUNTY. 

cinct Xo. 5. at the house of Wm. II. Henderson, resulted in the choice 
of Wm. Mahoney and Joseph Perrv, justices, and David Gwinn, con- 
stable. In September, David Gwinn, or Gwire. was elected justice. 
In precinct No. 1. fifty-three voters Avere of record. Wm. Parks and 
James Buswell received equal votes for justice, and Nicholas Sturm 
was elected constable. In September, Wm. Pai'ks was elected over 
BusweU b}^ six votes. 

County Elections. — The first general election after organization was 
held August 5, 1839. For some months prior to election day the 
county was kept at fever heat not only by the democrats and whigs, 
as distinct parties, but by sectional and personal influences Avithin each 
partv. An account of the condition of the county at that time is given 
in chapter Y. In the following pages a complete record of elections 
is given : 

August 5, 1839: Commissioner — Calvin Winslow, w.. 120; Jonathan 
Hodgeson. d., 224; William Ogle, d., 116; Calvin Powell. ^\., 10; Stephen 
Trickle, d'., 114. Clerk— Oliver Whitaker. d.. 98: Adam Perry, av., 31: 
Eobert McClennahan, w., 85. Treasurer — Minott Sihinian, d., 150; Enoch 
Cox, w., 71. SnrAeyor — Josej^h C. Averv, 72; J. W. Agard. d., 2; Charles 
H. Miner, w., 73; Carson Berfield, d., 7G. Judge— John Miller, d., 109; 
Augustus Eichards, w.. 37. Eecorder — Jesse Heatli, d., 109: B. M. Jack- 
son, d., 114. 

August 3. 1840: Commissioner — William Ogle, d., 184; Ste])hen 
Trickle, d., 104. SherifE— John Finley. d., ICO; Samuel Butler, av.,'130. 
Coroner — Adam Day, d., 178; Moses Boardman, il., 24; James Holgate, 
d., 29; B. Essex, d., i. Eepresentative — Elisha Swan, d., 103; W. H. 
Henderson, w., 139. 

November 2, 1840: President — W. H. Harrison, av., 187: Martin 
Van Buren, d., 154. 

April 19, 1841: County seat — For location, 202; against location, 65. 

August 2, 1841: Congress — James. H. Ealston, d.. 140: .Tolin T. 
Stuart, Av., 130. Commissioner — Brady FoAvler, d., 138; AV. ^^'. A^'ebster, 
w. , 124; Calvin AVinsloAV, av., 6. School commissioner — Samuel Camp, d., 
i3: Benjamin Turner, d., 65; Charles H. ]\Iiner, w., 122. 

August 1, 1842: Governor — Thomas Ford d.. 189; Joseph Duncan, 
AV., 152. Lt. -governor — John ^loore. d., 183; W. H. Hejiderson, av., 133. 
State senator, \Ym. H. Thompson, d. 173; Charles Ballance, av.. 154. Eep- 
resentative — B. ^I. Jackson, d.. 188: Henry Breese, w.. 155: Cyrus Lang- 
Avorthy, 119. Con. conA'ention — For convention, 288: against convention, 
27. Sheriff — John Finley. d., 220; LeAvis Perry, av., 105. Coroner — 
Adam Day, d., 180; Liberty Stone, av.. 10(i. Commissioner — Jonathan 
Hodgeson d., 140; scattering. 2. 

October 31. 1842: Sheriff— John Finlev, d., 80; J. K. McClennahan, 
w.. 4. 

August 7, 1843: Congress— J. P. Hoge. d., 160; Cyrus Walker, w., 
180; Matthew Chambers, 13. School commissioner — Charles II. ^liner, 
AV., 176; William F. Thomas, d.. 155. Probate justice — Jonathan Hodge- 
son, d., 1G4; Thomas Hall. d.. 139. Commissioner — Lemuel S. Dorrance, 
AV., 187: Joseph Palmer, d., 170. Clerk— Oliver Whitaker, d.. 185; Jesse 
Heath, d.. 165. Eecorder — J. W. Heiiderson, w., 195; Benjamin Turner, 
(1.. 101. Treasurer— Minott Sillinuin. d., 302; Sylvester Schofield, 0. 
Surveyor — Carson Berfield. d., 258; Charles H. ^Miner. av., 33. 



POLITICAL HISTORY. 143 

August 5, 1844: Congress — Joseph P. Hoge, d., 215; Martin B. 
Sweet, w., 178; John Crass, a., 33. Commissioner — Joseph Palmer, cL, 
200; Harry Hays, w., 189; Hugh Rhodes, a., 27. Representative — B. M. 
Jackson, d.. Bureau, 22G; C. H. Miner, w., Peoria, 144; W. W. Webster, 
a., Stark, 31. Representative — Benjamin L. Smith, d., Bureau, 203, 
Harvey Hadley, w., Peoria, 173; Lazarus Reeves, a.. Stark, 6. Slieriff — 
John W. Henderson, w., 201; John Finley, d., 198; W. W. Winslow, a., 
29. Coroner— John Miller, d., 193; M. S. Hubl)ard, w., 183; Liberty 
Stone, a., 28. 

November, 4_, 1844: Presideut— J. K. Polk, d., 206; Henry Clay, w., 
187; James G. Birney, a., 33. 

August 4, 1845: Commissioner — Jefferson Trickle, d., 145; W. W. 
Webster, a., 28; Scliool commissioner — James B. Lewis, d., 172; CM. 
Garfield, d., 29; Hugh Rhodes, a., 17. 

August 3, 181(3: Governor— Augustus C. French, d., 217; Thos. M. 
Kilpatrick, w., 205; Richard Eells, a., 59. Lt. governor — J. B. Wells, 
d., 218; N. G. AVilcox, w., 204; Abram Smitli, a., 59. Congress — 
Thomas J. Turner, d., 220; James Knox, w., 207; Wait Talcott, a., 57. 
Senator— Peter Sweet, d., 214; L. B. Knowlton, w., 196; Moses Pettin- 
gill, a., 58. Representative, Bureau, Peoria and Stark — Thomas Epper- 
son, d., 210; R. E. Thompson, w., 207; Albert G. Porter, a., 58. Repre- 
sentative, Bureau and Stark — Sauiuel Thomas, d., 184; Theodore F. Hurd, 
w., 227; Augustus A. Dunn, a., 60. Sheriff — J. W. Henderson, w., 
264; Benjamin Turner, d?, 173; Henry J. Rhodes, a., 32. Commissioner 
— James Holgate, d., 222; Myrtle G. Brace, w., 207; Giles C. Dana, a., 
50. Coroner— Philip Anschutes, d., 217; E. M. Garfield, d., 192; Lib- 
erty Stone, a., 52. 

April, 1847: Constitutional Convention — B. M. Jackson, d., 154; 
George H. Shaw, 11; Henry D. Palmer, w., 92; Hugh Rhodes, a., 23. 

August 2, 1847: Conimissioner — Thomas Lyle, d., 213; H. R. Hal- 
sey, w., 200; W. AV. Webster, a., 19. Clerk — T. J. Henderson, w., 231; 
James B. Lewis, d., 212. Recorder — Samuel G. Butler, w., 223; John 
Berfield, d., 203. Treasurer — Minott Silliman, d., 223; John Miller, d., 
173; Joseph Blanchard, a., 49. Probate Judge — S. W. Eastman, d., 182; 
Thomas Hall, d., 138; Harvey J. Rhodes, a., 49. Surveyor — Carson Ber- 
field d., 316; William Buswell, a., 40. School Commissioner — James B. 
Lewis, d., 278; Samuel G. AYright, a., 87. 

March 6, 1848: j^ew Constitution — For, 233; against, 84. Article 
on colored perscms — For, 148; against, 135. Two mill tax — For, 250; 
against, 54. 

August 7. 1848: Governor — Augustus C. French, d., 246; J. L. D. 
Morrison, w.. 36; Charles V. Dyer, a., 57. Lieutenant Governor — Will- 
iam McMurtry, d., 243; Pierre" Menard, 36; Henry H. Snow, 56. State 
Secretary — Horace C. C!orley, d., 241; L. C. Payne Freer, 55; Levi Davis, 
31. Auditor — Benjamin E. Vail, 54; Milton Carjoenter, d., 243; Enoch 
Moore, 31. Congress — Joseph B. Wells, d., 224; E. D. Baker, w., 
220; Joseph C^all, f. s., 39. Senator— R. H. Spicer, d., 229; John 
Denny, w., 216; Joseph Jackman, f. s., 37. Representative — Lemuel 
Andrews, d., 216; AVilliam Bailev, w., 223, Harvev J. Rhodes, a., 40. 
Commissioner — Theodore F. Hurd, w.. 239; Milton Atherton, d., 211; W. 
W. Webstei'. a., 34. Slieriff — John Finley, d., 231; C. M. S. Lyon, w., 
225; Giles C. Dana, a., 24. Coroner — William Ciuimberlain, w., 226; 
John A. Williams, d., 186; Liberty Stone, a., 35. 



144 HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY. 

September 4, 1848: Supreme Judge — John D. Caton, cL, 200; Jesse 
B. Thomas, w., 55. Clerk of Supreme Court- — Lorenzo Lehind, w., 206; 
John M. Mitchell, d., 14. Judge of Circuit Court — Benjamin F. Frid- 
lev, d., 133; Theoplins L. Dickey, w., 130: Onslow Peters, d., 10. States 
Attorney — Burton C. Cook, d., 179; Edward S. Holbrook, d., 38. 
Circuit Clerk — Oliver Whitaker, d.. 199; Jefferson Winn, d., 49; N. W. 
Khodes, w., 12. 

I*sovEMBER, 7, 1848: President — Taylor, w., 214; Cass, d., 174; Van 
Buren, f . s., 84. 

December 23, 1848: Eepresentative — John Henderson, w., 218; 
Barnabas Jackson, d.. 130. 

April 14, 1849: Prcuitc Justice — Harvey J. Rhodes, a., 105; Philij) 
J. Anschutes. d.. 10: Jonathan Hodgeson, d., 45. Adding Township 
14-5 — For, 172; against, 7. Adding S i of 14-5 — For, 154; against, 19. 

November G, 1849: County Judge — James Holgate, d., 26G; Harvey 
J. Rhodes, a., 127. Additional Justice — James B. Lewis, d., 231; 
AVilliam Ogle, d., 238: Herrick P. Halsey, w., 189: Henry Breese, w., 
157. County Clerk — T. J. Henderson, w., 245; Edward K. Wilson, d., 
178. Treasurer — Benjamin Turner, d., 219; Samuel C. Butler, w., 194. 
Surveyor — Carson Bertield. d.. 325; James Egbert, d., 25. School Com- 
missioner — Samuel CI. Wright, a.. 199; M. Shallenberger, d., 189. 
Township Organization — For, 103; against, 103. 

January, 14, 1850: Circuit Judge — Onslow Peters, d., 193: William 
Kellogg. Av., 131. States Attorney — Aaron Tyler jr., 156; Lewis W. 
Ross, 115; Harmon C. Reynolds, 46; John T. Lindsay, 3. 

November 5, 1850: State Treasurer — John Moore, 160; Ebenezer 
Fuller, 23. Congress — Thompson Campbell, 157: Martin P. Sweet, 123. 
Representative — James M. Allan, w., 122; W. W. Drummond, d.. 137. 
Sheritf— William F. Thomas, d., 142; Stephen G. Worley, w.,' 129. 
Coroner — Minott Silliman, d., 166; Hiram Nance, w.. 100. 

November 4. 1851: Bank Law — For. 172; agiiinst, 118. State Sen- 
ator — Samuel Webster, w., 161; Reuben H. Spicer, d., 154. Treasurer 

— Benjamin Tui'ner, d., 264; six others, 13. Surveyor — Carson Berfield, 
d., 256; eight others, 11. School Commissioner — Samuel G. Wright, a., 
152; T. J." Henderson, w.. 26: G. A. Clifford, w., 30. 

November 2, 1852: President — Pierce, d,, 350; Scott, w., 336; 
Hale, f.s.,82. Governor — Joel A. Mattison, d., 357; Edwin B. AVebb., w., 
338; D. A. Knowlton, f. s., 73; Lt. Governor — Gustavus Koerner, d., 
356; James L. D. Morrison, av.. 338; Philo Carpenter, f. s., 73. State 
Secretary — Alexander Starne, d., 356; Buekner S. Morris, av., 337; 
Erastus Wright, f. s., 72. Auditor — Thomas H. Campbell, d., 356; 
Charles Betts, av., 339 ; E. J. Smith, f. s., 71. Treasurer — John Moore, 
d., 357 ; Francis Arenz, w., 343 ; Moses Pettingill, f. s., 53. Senate — 
Benj . Graham, d., 358; Samuel Webster, av., 337; Geo. A. Clifford, f. 
s., 64. Legislature — Wm. Marshall, jr.. d., 358; James M. Allan, w., 
384. Congress — Lewis W. Ross, d.. 361 : James Knox, w.,338 ; L. W. 
Curtis, f. s., 71. Court Judge — H. M. Wead. d., 362; H. 0. Mevri- 
man, w., 318: Elisha N. Powell, av.. 59. States Attornev — E. G. 
Johnson. d..418 : Geo. W. Stipp, w., 34(i. Sheriff— Clinton "Fuller, w., 
359 ; John Berfield, d.. 356 ; Joseph Blanchard, f. s., 49. Court Clerk 

— Milton Ecklev, av., 269 ; Jefferson AVinn, d., 298 ; Oliver AAHiitaker, i.. 
192. Coroner — Ebenezer Fuller, d., 330; David MeCauce, d.. 369; 

Amos Hodgeson, d.. 52. Associate Judge John F. Thompson, d., 355 ; 

Herrick R. Halsev, w., 334; Harvey J. Rhodes, a., 65. 



rOLITICAL IIISTOHY. 145 

Marci] 14, 1S53 : Court Judge — Onslow Peters, d., 175; Elihu X. 
Powell, w., 4o ; Jonatlian K. Cooper, av., 00. 

August 13, 1853 : P. P. Sub. — For, 534 ; ugaiust, 141. 

November 8, 1853 : County Judge — James Holgate, d., 237; Her- 
rick P. Halsey, w., 236 ; Harvey J. Phodes, a., 9. Clerk — Milton War- 
ren, d., 240 ; "Miles A. Fuller, w., 268. Treasurer — Benj. Turner, d., 
246; Davis Lowman, w., 255. Surveyor — Sylvester F. Otman, d., 264; 
James Perry, Av.. 237. School Commissioner — S. CI. Wright, a., 218 ; 
Lucius E. Miner, \v., 110. 

April 4, 1854 : 'I'ownship organization — For, 389 ; against, 104. 

November, 1854: Congress — William McMurtry, cl., 213; James 
Knox, w., 300. Senate — John Moore, d., 233 ; Janies Miller, w., 272. 
Pepresentative — Henry Grove, w., 347 ; T. J. Henderson, w., 395 ; Wni. 
S. Moss, d., 182; Alexander Moncrief, d., 237. Sheriff — David 
McCance, d., 248; Joseph Blanchard. w.. 327. Coroner— Minott Silli- 
man, d., 251 ; Luther S. Milliken, w., 348. 

JuxE 4. 1855 : Suppress intemperance — For, 428 ; against, 359. Su- 
preme Judge — John Dean Caton, d., 749; E. S. Leland, w., 29. 
Supreme Court Clerk — Lorenzo Leland, w., 425. Circuit Judge — 
Onslow Peters, d., 42 L ; Elihu N. Powell, w., 334. 

November 6,1855. Treasurer — Davis Lowman, av., 237; Mathew 

B. Parks, d., 136. Surveyor — Sylvester F. Otman, f. s., 285; James 

C. Egbert, d., 63. School Commissioner- P. C. Dunn, a., 381; C. 
M. S.Lyon, w., 67. 

April 1, 1856: Circuit Judge — Jacob Gale, d., 372; scattering, 98. 

Novi:mber 4, 1856: President — Buchanan, d., 353; Fremont, r., 
718; Filmore, Am., 152. Governor — Wm. A. Pichardson, d.,352; Wm. 
H. Bissell, r., 747; Buckner S. Morris, Am., 128. Lt. Governor — -P. 
J. Hamilton, d., 356 ; John Wood, r., 749 ; Parmenas Bond, Am., 128. 
State Secretary — Wm . H. Snyder, d., 357; Ozias M. Hatch, r., 744; 
Wm. H. Young, Am., 128. Auditor — Samuel K. Casey, d., 356; Jesse 
K. Dubois, r., 744. State Treasurer — John Moore, d., 357; James Mil- 
ler, r., 870. Supei'iutendent of Instruction — J. H. S. Mathews, d., 355; 
Wm . H. Powell, r., 744; Ezra Jenkins, Am., 128. Congress — James 
W. Davidson, d., 465; AVm. Kellogg, r., 757. State Senate — John 
Dickson, d., 436 ; T. J. Henderson, r., 767. Pepresentative — Wm . S. 
Moss, (1., 339; M. Sliallenberger, d., 458; John T. Lindsay, r., 747: Cal- 
vin L. Eastman, r., 726. Circuit Judge — Elihu N. Powell, r., 786; 
Amos Merriman, d., 80. States Attorney — Joseph AV. Parker, d., 466; 
Alexander McCoy, r., 760. Sheriff — William Lownum. d., 588; Henry 
.]3reese, r., 615. Clerk — Jefferson Winn, r., 807; Milton Dwire, d., 406. 
Coroner — Benj. Hilliard, 742; John P. Atherton, r., 472. Constitu- 
tional Convention — For, 1,008; against, 133. 

November 3, 1857: Countv Judge — Jamo^; Holgafe, d., 264; John 
Finley, r., 396; C. W. Young, Am., 78. Cler>' — Warluim Mordoff, d., 
190; Miles A. Fuller, r., 479; Jas. G. Armstjoug, Am., ',2. Treasurer 
— William Lownum, d., 275; Davis Lowmaii. r., 3 70; ISIathan Snare, 
Am., 97. School (Commissioner — P. C. Dunn, r., 424; James Fergu- 
son, Am., 74; Charles Mvers, d.. 229. Surveyor — Sylvester F. Otman, 
r., 404; John H. Anthony, d., 238; B. F. Fuller, Am.. 94. 

November 2. 1858: State Treasurer— James ]\[iller. r., 933; Wm. F. 
Fondey, d., 589; John Dougherty, d., 2. Superintendent Instruction — New- 
ton Bateman,r ., 933; August C . French, d ., 588; John Reynolds, d., 2. Con- 



146 HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY. 

gress — Wm . Kellogg, r . , 929 ; James A\' . Davidson, d . , 584: Jacob Gale, d . , 
8. Eejjresentative — Thomas C. ]\[oore, r., 930; Myrtle G. Brace, r., 930; 
Jacob Jamison, d., 585; Ebon C. Ingersoll. d., 583; ^Mathew McReynolds, 
d., G: Wash. Corrington, d., 4. Sheriff — Oliver P. Emery, r., 543; 
Mark Blanchard, d.. 511; Benj. F. Fnller, i., 408. Coroner — Benj. L. 
Hilliard, r., 930; Henry M. Hall, d., 588. 

NoYEMBER 1,1859: Treasurer — Win. Lowman, d.,445: Hugh Rhodes, 
r., 466. Surveyor — S. F. Otman, r., 485: J. H. Anthony, d., 425. School 
Commissioner — R. C. Dunn, r., 511; Wm. H. Butler, d,, 401. 

NoYEMBER 6, 1860: Constitutional Convention — For, 1,481: Against, 
59. President — Lincoln, r., 1.1G4: Douglas, d., 059; Bell, 23. Governor 
— James C. Allen, d., 671; Richard Yates, r,, 1,167; Wm. Brown, 8. 
Lieutenant-Governor — Lewis W. Ross, d., 673; F. A. Hoifman, r., 1,164; 
H. C. Blackburn, 8, State Secretary — Geo. H. Campbell, d., 673; Ozias 
]\I. Hatch, r., 1,172. Auditor — Bernard Artzen, d., 673; Jesse K. Dubois, 
r., 1,172. State Treasurer — Hugh Malier, d., 673 ; Wm. Butler, r. , 
1,172. Superintendent Instruction — Edward R. Roe, d., 673; Xewton 
Bateman. r., 1,172. Congress — R. G. Ingersoll, d., 672; Wm. Kellogg, 
r., 1,174.' State Senate — Albert C. Mason, d., 673; Thomas J. Pickett, 
r., 1.172. Rejjresentative — John T. Lindsay, d., 669; Jacob Jamison, d., 
671; E. S. Johnson, r., 1,172; Theodore Hurd, r., 1,173. State's Attor- 
ney — Henrv B. Hopkins, d.."674; Alexander McCov. r., 1,170. Circuit 
Clerk — Theo. A. Foreman, d., 698; P. M. Blair, r., 1,128. Sheriff — 
Ephraim Marklev, d., 710; Elisha Greenfield, r., 1,123. Coroner — Henrv 
M. Hall, d., 680': Jerome B. Thomas, r., 1,160. 

JuxE 3, 1861: Circuit Judge — Elihu X. Powell, r., 219; Amos L. 
Merriman, d.. 111. Clerk Supreme Court — Lorenzo Leland, r., 180; 
David L. Hough, d., 141. 

NoYEMBER 5, 1861: Specie Basis — For, 7; Against, 566, Delegate 
Constitutional Convention — Thos. J. Henderson, r.,476: Julius Manning, 
d., 153; jSTorman Purple, d., 73. County Judge — David McCance, d., 
534; John Finley, r., 19. County Clerk — Miles A. Fuller, r., 525. Treas- 
urer — AVilliam Lowman, d., 546. School Commissioner — Charles ^Myers. 
d., 260; ]Sr. F. Atkins, r., 314. Surveyor — William Xowlan, d., 505; 
James C. Egbert, r., 53. 

JuxE 17, 1862: Xew Constitution — For, 485; Against. 993. Art. 
on Bank, etc. — For, 529; Against. 916. Sec. 1. Xegroes— For. 715: 
Against, 693. Sec. 2, Xegroes— For, 1,382; Against, 39. Sec. 3, Xe- 
groes — For, 1,072; Against. 237. Congressional Apportionment — For. 
482; Against, 955. 

iSi^OYEMBER 4, 1862; State Treasurer — Wm. Butler, r., 801; Alexan- 
der Starne, d., 566. Superintendent Instruction — Xewton Bateman, r., 
801; John P. Brooks, d.. 565. Congress — E. C. Ingersoll, r.. 815; 
James C. Allen, d., 544. Congress — Owen Lovejoy, r., 564; T. J. Hen- 
derson, u., 763; Benj. Graham, d., 28. State Senate — Mark Bangs, r., 
794; John T. Lindsay, d.. 564. Representatives — Enoch Emery, r., 
777; Calvin L. Eastman, r., 796; Wm. W. O'Brien, d., 545; James Hol- 
gate, d., 590. Sheriff — B. Frank Fuller, r., 703; Thos. W. Ross. d.. 
650. Coroner — Jeffrev A. Coolev, r.. 743: Theo. Bacmeister. d.. 682. 

XoYEMBER 3, 1863: ' Treasurer— C. M.S. Lyon. r.. 695; R. J. Dick- 
enson, d., 206. Surveyor — Henry Oliver, r.. 693; John H. Anthony, d., 
208. School Commissioner — X. F. Atkins, r., 697; Robert S. Barr. d., 
210. 



POLITICAL HIST()K^'. 147 

November 17, 1SG3: Circuit Judge — M. Sluilk'iil)ergei\ d., 443; M. 
AV illiuuLsoiu v., 887. 

XovKMBEU 8. 1864: JVesideiit — Geo. B. McClell.m, d., 013; A. Lin- 
coln, r.. 1,174. (lovenior — rlumes C. liobinson. d.. 014; li. J. Oglesby, 
r., 1,174. Lieuteuiint-Govenior — S. Corning Jndd.. d.. 014; AVilliam 
Bross, v., 1,173. Secretary State — Wm. A. Turney, d., 014; Sharon 
Tyndale, r., 1,174. Auditor — John Hise, d., 614;'0. H. Miner, r., 
1,174. Treasurer — Alexander Starne, d., 014; J. II. Beveridge, r., 
1.174. Sujierintendent Instruction — John P. Brooks, d., 614; Newton 
liatenian, r., 1,174. Congress at Large ^ — -James C. Allen, d., 614; Sam- 
uel W. Moulton. r., 1,174. Congress — James S. Eckles. d., 613; E. C. 
Ingersoll. r., 1,174. Kepresentative — AVm . Ronnseville, d.. 01:5; .lacol) 
-Jamieson, d., 012; Alex. McCoy, r., 1,173; R. (.-. Dunn, v., 1,17<). 
State's Attorney — Geo . E. Ford, d., Oil; Chas. P. Taggert, r., 1,174. 
Sheriff — James Nowlan, d., 014; Jolin M. Brown, r., 1,100. Circuit 
Clerk — Chas. Mvers, d., 009; P. :\[. Blair, r., 1,17!». Coroner — H. M. 
Hall, d., 014; John F. Rhodes, r., 1,170. 

May 7, 1864 : Congress.— E. C. Ingersoll, r. 871 ; Hezekiah M. Wead, 
d., 400. 

June 0, 1864 : Supreme Judge. — Charles B. Lawrence, r., 483 ; scat- 
tering, 14. 

November 7, 1805 : County Judge. — Hugh Rhodes, r., 358. Clerk — 
M. A. Fuller, r., 363. Treasurer— R. J. liickinson, r., 366. Supt. of 
Schools— B. G. Hall, r., 300. Surveyor— Edwin Butlei', i-., 370. 

November 0, 1800: State Treasurer — George W. Smith, r., 1,293; 
Jesse J. Philips, d., 585. Supt. Instruction — Newton Bateman. r., 1,294; 
J. M. Crebs, d., 585. Congress at Large. — John A. Logan, r., 1,292; T. 
D. Dickey, d., 585. Congress — E. C. Ingersoll, r. , 1,280 ; Silas Ramsey, d., 
585. State Senate— G. L. Fort, r., 1,292; W. E. Cook, d., 585. Repre- 
seutativQ— S. F. Otman, r., 1,289 ; Thos. C. Moore, r.. 1,291 ; Wm. T. Dow- 
dall, d., 584; J. M. Rogers, d., 585. Sheriff— Jesse Likens, r,, 1,277; Cy- 
rus N. Anthony, d., 590. Coi'oiier — John Finley, r., 1,292; David Fast, 
Jr., d., 579. 

June 3, 1867: Clerk Supreme Court— W. M. Taylor, r., 575; S. J. 
McFadden, d., 8. Circuit Judge- S. I). Puterbaugh, r.,'437 ; H. M. Wead. 
d., 209; J. K. Cooper, i., 21. 

November 5, 1807: Keeping up Stock — For, 005; against, 401. 
Treasurer — R. J. Dickinson, r., 705 ; Patrick Nowlan, d., 327. Survevor 
—Edwin Butler, r., 058; John H. Anthony, d., 328. 

November 3. 1808: President— Seymour, d., 705; Grant, r., 1,394. 
Governor — John R. Eden, d., 719 ; John M. Palmer, r., 1,381. Lieutenant 
Governor^ — Wm. H. Van Epps, d., 717; John Dougherty, r,, 1,381. Sec- 
retary of State — G. Van Horebeke, d., 713; Edward Rummel, r., 1,384. 
Auditor — John R. Shannon, d., 716; Charles E. Lippincott, r., 1,377. 
State Treasurer— Jesse J. Phillips, d.. 716; Erastus N. Bates, r., 1,382. 
Attorney-General— Robert E. Williams, d., 716 ; Wash. J^ushnell, r., 1,381. 
Penitentiary Commissioners — J. W. Connet, d., 716; W. M. Gai'rard, d., 
710; Calneli Zarley, d., 710; Andrew Shuman, r. , 1,382; John Reid, r. , 
1,382 ; Robt. E. Logan, r., 1,383. Congress at Large— W. W. O'lirien, d., 
715; John A. Logan, r., 1,382. Congress— John N. Niglas, d., 717; E. 
C. Ingersoll, r., 1,351 ; Samuel Dorr, t., 3. Board of Equalization — Wm. 
French, d., 615; Ela H. Clapp, r., 1,380. Constitutional Convention — 
For, 582; Against, 664. States Attorney — J. W. Cochran, d., 720; Chas. 



148 HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY. 

P. Taggart^ r., 1,301. RepresentatiA^e — Patrick Xowlan, d,. 'ioS; Ileury 
Truitt, d., 731 ; B. F. Thompson, r., 1,352 ; W. E. Phelps, r., 1,360. 
Circuit Clerk — Wm. Lowman, tl., 768 ; John M. Brown, r.. 1,302. Sheriff 
— C. P. Jackson, d., 726: S. M.Adams, r., 1,365. Coroner — Wm. Brad- 
ley, d., 716; Thomas Hall, r., 1,376. 

]S^0VEMBER 2, 1869 : Constitutional Convention — Ilenrv N. Wells, r., 
704; M. A. Fuller, r., 723; Henry Grove, d., 260; M. Shallenberger, d., 
274. County Judge — Hugh Rhodes, r., 600 ; James Snare, i., 273. Countv 
Clerk— Oliver Whitaker, r., 737; Thos. J. Wright, d., 234. Treasurer— 
R. J. Dickinson, r. . 706: Benj. A. Newton, i., 254. Superintendent of 
Schools— B. G. Hall, r., 681 ; John W. Agard, d., 280. Survevor— Edwin 
Butler, r., 702; J. H. Anthony, d., 268. 

July 2, 1870 : New Constitution — For. 609 ; Against, 65. 

November 8, 1870: State Treasurer— E. N. Bates, r., 768: Charles 
Ridglv, d., 494; R.J. Hammond, t., 3. Penitentiary Commissioners — 
Elmer Washburn, r., 767; Casper Butz, r., 767: Frank T. Sherman, d., 494; 
Thomas Redman, d., 493 ; J. F. Simson, t., 3 ; Josej^h Smith, t., 3. Sujaer- 
intendent of Public Instruction — Carl Feinse, d., 495 : Newton Bateman, 
r., 762 ; D. AVilkins, t., 3. Sheriff— S. M. Adams, r., 665 ; E. B. Lyon, d., 
581. Coroner — P. P. Johnson, r., 490; James Culbertson, i., 406; Madi- 
son Winn, d., 348. State Senate. — Lucien H. Kerr, r., 691 ; Mark Bangs, 
r., 766; J. W. Cochran, d., 514; W. E. Cook, d., 494; Lucien E. Kerr, 
error, 49. Representative — M. A. Fuller, r., 759; James M. Rogers, d., 
496. Congress at Large — John A, Logan, r. , 763, Wm. B. Anderson, d., 
495; J. AV. Nicholson, t., 3. Congress— E. C. Ingersoll, r., 547; B. N. 
Stevens, d., 586; F. B. Ives, t., 63. 

November 7, 1871 : Congress at Large — John L. Beveridge, r., 640 ; 
Samuel S. Hays, d., 343. Surveyor — Edwin Butler, r. . 615; John An- 
thony, d., 351. Treasurer — R. J. Dickinson, r., 489; Geo. Nicholas, d., 
486; Alex. Hepperly, i., 5. 

November 5, 1872: President — Grant, r., 1218; Greeley, 1. r., 606: 
O'Connor, d., 5. Governor — R. J. Oglesby, r., 1217; Gustavus Koerner, 
1. r., i]6o; Sidney Creese, d., 5. Lieutenant Governor — J. L. Beverage, 
r., 1221; Charles Black, 1. d., 663; S. B. Allen. 6; B. S. Storrs, d., 5. 
Secretary of State — Geo. H. Harlow, r.. 1218; Edward Rummel, 1. r., 
664; J. W. Wallace, 7; Ethan Sutton, d., 5. Auditor — C. E. Lippen- 
cott, r.,1192; Daniel O'Harra, 1. d., 670; 0. E. Burch, 6; C. H. Weit- 
man, d., 5. State Treasurer — Edward Rutz, r., 1220; C. H. Lanphier, 1., 
664; Geo. Dietrich, 7; Henrv West, d., 4. Attornev General — Jas. K. 
Edsall, r., 1219: John Y. Eustace. 1. d., 663; John 6. Robinson, 7: Geo. 

A. Meach, d., 4. Board of Equalization — Rufus W. Miles, r.. 1,222; 
Samuel P. Marshall, 1. d., 669. Clerk of Supreme Court — C^ario D. 
Trimble, r., 1223; Eli Smith, ]., 664; J. K. Malburn, d., 5. Congress 
— N. E. AVorthington, 1. r., 677; Granville Barrere, r., 1210; J. H. 
Nicholas, d., 4. State Senate — L. B. AVhiting, r.. 1213: Milo Ken- 
dall, 1., 668. Representative — Cvrus lioeock, r., 1864: Joab R. A[ul- 
vane, r., 1834i^; M. R. De^^■e\, 1. r., 1946+. Circuit Clerk — J. M. 
Brown, r., 1144; H.J. Cosgrove, 1. r., 697. Sheriff— S. M. Adams, r., 
1138: E. B. Lvon, 1. d., 746. States Attornev — J. H. Miller, r., 1156; 
P. M. Blair, 1. r., 697. Coroner — P. P. Johnson, r., 1165; W. T. 
Hall, 1. r., 662; James Culbertson, i., 43. 

June 3, 1873: Circuit Judge — Henry B. Hopkins, r., 420; J. W. 
Cochran, a. m. d., 273; Henry AY. AVells, i., 76. Supreme Judge — C. 

B. Lawrence, r., 470; A. M. Craig, a. m. d., 299. 




TECDMSEH — CHIEF OP THE SHAWNEES. 



L!B!?ARY 
UNIVERSITY or IkLINOIS 



POLITICAL IIISTOKY. ir>l 



November 4, 1873: County Judge— W. W. Wright, r., TC3; D. Low- 
man, a. m. v.. 088. Clerk — D.'ivid J. A\'alkei', r. . 787: J. Arui^^trong, a. 
m. r., (55!). 1'reasurer — Orlando Brace, r., 733: (1. W . Nicholas, a. ni. 
d., 700. Superintendent Schools — Alonzo Abbot, r., 78G; E. H. Phelps, 
a. m., (535. 

JSTovEMBEE 3, 1874: State Treasurer — T. S. Eidgeway, r., 770; David 
Gore, a. m. d.,571. State Superintendent Schools — Wm. B. Powell, r,, 
705; S. M. Etter, a. m. r., 553. Congress — R. II. Whiting, r., 711; 
L. F. Ross, a. m. d.,(j30. State Senate — L. D. Whiting, r., 773; J. 
Benedict, a. m., 574. Representative — A. G. Hammond, r., 1208; Jonas 
H. Moore, r., 087; Davis Lowman, a. m. r.. 007; J. J. Herron, a. m. 
d., 810. ' Sheriff — S. M. Adams, r., 803; A. A. Gingrich, a. m. d., 
481. Coroner — W. H. Butler, r. 801; S. Grimshaw, a. m. r., 540. 

November 2 1875. Treasurer — Orlando Brace, r., 403; W. K. Fuller. 
1. r., 457. Survevor— Edwin Butler, r., 501; John II. Ogle, 1. d., 437. 

Electioxs, 1870 : Twenty-one Presidential Electors, r., 1 ,440 ; d. , 780; 
g. b., 00 ; pro., 4. Governor ^ — Shelby M. Collum, r., 1,403; Lewis 

Steward, d., 880; James F. Simpson, g. b., ; Samuel B. Allen, 

pro., 4. Congress — Thomas A. Boyd, r., 1,307; George A. Wilson, d., 
842; William AV. Mathews, g. b., 104. Representatives — Daniel J. 
Ilurd, r., 2,078; Charles Baldwin, r.. 2,027+; James Nowlan, d., 2,020^; 
James J. Herron, g. b., 6444. State's x\ttorney — Bradford F. Thompson, 
r., 1.101; John E. Decker, d., 1,111. Clerk of Circuit (Wrt — John M. 
Brown, r., 1,418; David Tinlin, d., 880. Sheriff — Samuel M. Adams, r., 
1,477; James M. Lawman, d., 827; William J. Yance, — ., 1. Coroner 
— Wilson Trickle, r., 1,433 ; William B. Armstrong, d., 870. 

Elections, 1877: Judge 8th Circuit— David McCulloch, r., 300; 
Elbridge (I. Johnson, — , 42 ; Geaser A. Roberts, d.. 172 ; John B. Cohns, 
d., 5. County Judge — Wiiliam W. Wright, r., 800; Patrick M. Blair, 
d., 400. Clerk — David J. Walker, r., 1,221; David Lowman, pro., 4; 
Treasurer — Orlando Brace, r.. 070; Donald Murchinson, r., 137; P. S. 
Mattox, d., 150 ; Williston K.' Fuller, g. b., 251. 

Elections, 1878: Congress — Thomas A. Boyd, r., 007; George A. 
Wilson, d., 332; Alex. McKeighan, g. b.,452. State Senator — Lorenzo 
D. Whiting, r., 006 ; James McGinnis, g. b., 580; Alex. H. Thompson, 
— , 311. Representatives — Simon Elliott, r., 1,000+; Martin Shallen- 
berger. d., 020+ ; Albert G. Scott, g. b.. 1.301 ; Sylve^ster F. Ottman, r., 
1,703. Sheriff— C. F. Hamilton, d., 800; S. M. Adams, r., 1,005; 
Andrew Galbraith, r., 1. Coroner — W. B. Armstrong, g. b., 802 ; John 
F. Rhodes, r., 1,017. Constitutional Amendment — To amend sec. 31, 
art. 4, 1,704; against, 60. 

♦Electioxs, 1870: Treasurer — Orlando Brace, r., 842 ; Absolam D. 
Perrine, g. b., 000. Surveyor — Manning A. Hall, r., 002; John W. 
Agard, d., 536. 

Elections, 1880 : Pres. Electors — Twentv-one Electors, r., 1.383; 
d., 081 ; g. b., 380; pro., 4. Governor — Shelby McCulloin, r.. 1,378; 
L3mian Trumbull, d., 084; Alvin J. Streeter, g. b.,382; Uriah Copj^, 
pro., 4. Congress, 0th — John II. Lewis, r.. 1,303 ; John S. Lee, d , 
004; Wm. H.^Revnolds, g. b., 372. Board of Equalization — A¥m. Mel- 
lor, r., 1,383 ; Charles F. Robisou, d., 083 ; Matthew H. Mitchell, —, 370. 
Representatives — Charles Baldwin, r., 1.010+ ; Svlvester F. Ottman. r.. 
2.313+ ; John II. Welsh, g. b., 1,080; Simon Elliott, d., 1,077+; C' 
Otman, 0. State's Attorney — Bradford F. Thompson, r., 1,201 ; Wm. 



152 HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY. 

E. Scott, d., 1,110. Circuit Court Clerk — Jolm M. Brown, r., 1,35; ; 
Samuel G. Brees, d.. 1,046. Sheriff — Samuel W. Adams, r.. 1,397; Eugene 
B. Lyon, d . , 1 ,032. Coroner — John F. Rhodes, r. . 1,378 : Ilobert AV. King, 
g. b., 1,052. Constitutional Amendment — For amendment of sec. 8, 
art. 10. 863; against, 656. 

Elpxtioxs 1882 : Congress 10th — John H. Lewis, r.. 1,148: Nicholas 
E. Worthington, d., 553: Matthew H. Mitchell, g. h., 320. Senator 
25th — Lorenzo I). Whiting, r., 842; John E. Decker, d., 785: Jolm C. 
Copestake, g. b., 329; Representative 25th — John Lackie, r., 1.895^: 
James V. Thomson, g. B.. 1,391: Jolm H. Welsh, d., 1.4514^: A. B. 
Avcrv. r.. 1,153^: John T. Thornton, pro., 53^. County Judge — Wil- 
liam W. Wright, r., 1,178; David McCance, d., 517; George W. Bradlev. 
g. b.. 327. Clerk — David J. Walker, r.. 1.230: Patrick M. Blair, dV. 
461: S. 11. Hazen, g. b.. 318. Sheriff — Andrew Galbraith, r., 1,278; 
Ira G. Foster, d., 396: Thomas Gemmell, g. b., 352. Coroner — Charles 
W. Teeter, r., 1,172: David G. Plummer. d.. 512; E. W. Young, g. b.. 
302. Treasurer- Orlando Brace, r., 1,137: John H. Anthony, d., 401: 
Jolm Dexter, g. b., 476. Superintendent Schools — William E. Saudham, 
r., 1.129: Amelia L. Halsey, ind., 610; B. F. Jackson, g. b., 229. Ap- 
propriation — For the $531,712.18, 862: against, 558. Canal Cession — 
For, 1,435; against, 181. 

Electioxs 1884: President — James G. Blaine, r.. 1.365: Grover 
Cleveland, d., 784; B. F. Butler, g. b., 99; St. John, pro., 212. Gov- 
ernor — Eichard J. Oglesby, r., 1,384: Carter H. Harrison, d., 796; James 
B. Hobbs, g. b., 92; Jesse Harper, pro., 190. Congress — Nicholas A. 
Worthington, d., 1,102; Julius S. Stan*, r., 1,336. Board of Equaliza- 
tion — William Meelor, r., 1,379: E. A. Perkins, d., 791. Eepresenta- 
tives— Simon Elliott, g. b.. 905^: James H. Miller, r., 2,066; Albert W. 
Boydon, r., 2,038; Eli V. Eally, d.. 2,057. States Attorney— John E. 
Decker, d., 1,268; Bradford F. Thompson, r., 1,084. Circuit Court 
Clerk — Jolm M. Brown, r.. 1,403: Paul Xewton, ind., 1,032. Coroner 
Sedgwick E. Hazen, g. b., 1,038: David S. Burroughs, r., 1,375. Sur- 
veyor — Carson Berfield, d.. 1,082; Edwin Butler, r., 1,376. Committee 
on Amendments — For amendment of sec. 16, art. 5, 1,207; against, 258; 
for state house appropriation, 850: against. 1,249. 

Elections 1885: Judge Circuit Court — David McCullougli, r., 898; 
X. M. Laws, r., 874: Thomas M. Shaw, d., 692; Sanmel S. Page, d., 734: 
Xathan W. Green, d,., 641 . 

Election OF 1886: State Treasurer — Tanner, r., 1,233: Eicker, d., 
785: Austin, j^ro., 134. Superintendent Instruction — Edwards, r., 1,232; 
Oldt. d.. 779: Gilmer, pro.. 136. Congress— Post, r., 1.194: 'Worthinsr- 
ton, d.. 890: .AlcCulloch. pro.. 123. Senate — Washburn, r.. 1.227: Bry- 
ant, d., 851; Triinble. pro.. 131. Representative — James H. Miller, r.. 
2.238: Pomerov. d., 1,148: Morrasy, pro., 33: Dexter, r.. 2,684: Bloom, d., 
351. Judge — Fuller, r., 1,280; Sliallenberger, d . , 770; Xowlan, pro., 133; 
Clerk — Walker, r.. 1.250: Xowlan. d.. 830: Callison, pro., 123. Treas- 
urer—Hawks, r.. 1,263; Colwell. d., 801; Oliver, pro., 136. Sheriff — 
!Montooth, r.. 1.254: Hamilton, d., 639; Xewton, pro., 296. Superin- 
tendent Schools — Sandham, r.. 1,280: Sherman, d., 591: Mrs. Stouffer, 
jjro., 308. Coroner — Sprague. r.. 1.217: Eogers, d.. 775: Xewland, 
pro., 157. 

In Xovember, 1886, a majority of 308 votes opposed the proposed 
constitutional amendment. It is stated on good aiithorit}' that Benja- 



I'OLI'l'JC'Al. IIISTOKY. 153 

mill Turner, James M. Thomas, and Wni. Lowman were delegates to 
the Ohicag-o River and Harbor c(niventioii of 1S41); but there is no 
mention of a Starlv County delegation in tlie reports of tliat meeting 
made by Horace Greeley. 

The office of Master in Chancery was established here in 1853, 
when H. J. Drummond was appointed. In 1854 Martin Shallenberger 
^vas commissioned, and served until 1850, when James A. Henderson 
received the appointment, but I'esigned ]n May, 1802. George A. 
Clifford was appointed, but did not file bonds. In 18(55 he was 
succeeded by James W. Hewitt, and he by Judge W. AV. Wright in 
] 809, who filled the office until 1875. In this year John E. ])ecker 
received the ])osition. In 1870 Allen P. Miller was commissioned 
Master, and served until the appointment of Patrick M. Blair in 1880. 

Local Political Conventions. — The first convention or caucus ever 
held in Stark county was in 1838, followed b}" the more imjiortant one 
of 1830. For the decade and a lialf succeeding' there is nothino- on 
record to show who participated in political organization bevond the 
election returns embraced in this chapter. 

The Democratic convention for Peoria and Stark counties assem- 
bled at Princeville, August 11, 185G. James Ilolgate presided, with 

E. P. O'Donnell and lioswell Bills, secretaries. The delegates from 
Stark county were Benj. Turner, J. Jamieson, Elislia Barton, Sylvester 

F. Otman, Paul Pouse, jr., Nicholas Sturm, W. D. Blancliard, and 
James Ilolgate. The delegates-at-large were B. M. Jackson, E. M. 
Emery, W. B. Armstrong, and W. Ogle. J. W. Parker was nom- 
inated for prosecuting attorney, and Martin Shallenberger for repre- 
sentative. The following notice a])peared under date, Wyoming, 111., 
September 20, 1850 : "The Old Line Whigs of Stark are requested to 
meet at Toulon, October 8, 1850, for the purpose of organizing the old 
Whig party." This was signed by Henry Butler. This meeting was 
duly held, and the repulJican ticket of that year approved. The 
American caucus followed with their nominations, and the officers of 
three parties were named for the thrilling campaign of that year. 

Stephen A. Douglas visited Toulon, October 20, 1858. The next 
day Abraham Lincoln arrived. The first Lincoln man in Stark county 
was Hugh Godfrey, the wagon-maker, who, in 1858, after Lincoln's 
visit to Toulon, wrote with chalk on the cross-beam of his shop: "For 
President in 1800, Abraham Lincoln." When asked was he in earnest, 
he said, "Old Abe is the man I am going to vote for in 1800," and he 
did vote for him. E. W, Blaisdell, Avho is still living in Pockford, 111., 
claims to be the first man who ])ublicly suggested Abraham Lincoln 
for President. This he did in a "rinoino- editoriaP' in the Pockford 
Mepioblican, of which he was editor during the memorable Lincoln- 
Douglas senatorial campaign. The joijit discussion Ijetween R. C. 
Ingersoll and Judge Kellogg took place at Toulon, Se])tember 25, 1800. 

Throughout the winter of 18GU-1, "Kansas Meetings" were held 
in every township, when moneys and supplies were liberally con- 
tributed for aid of the Kansas sufferers. 

The Democrat, in noticing the republican ratification meeting at 
Toulon, says : " We are informed that the Hon. M. G. Bi'ace has a 



154 HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY. 

si^linter of the veritable rail that "• Old Hanks "' brought into the Re- 
|)ul)lican State Convention. If a rail can make Lincoln president, cer- 
tainly a splinter ought to send Mr. Brace to the legislature. Readers, 
the genuineness of this splinter is well authenticated. There has been 
a question about the rails which the Republicans had at their ratifica- 
tion meeting, some people saying they were stolen from Culbertson's 
fence, but you can rely on this splinter." 

The unconditional Union convention of Stark county assembled 
October 19, 1S63, with (). Whitaker president and Dr. A. M. Pierce 
secretary. The Union convention of 1861 assenil)led Au^ist 20, Georo-e 
AV. Dewey president. The delegates were: Toulon — George W. 
Dewey, IJrady Fowder, George W. Scott, R. 0. Dunn, James Johnson, 
('. ]\r. S. Lyon and Hiram "Willett. AVest Jersey — Jacob Young, J. 
Raymond, S. H. Sanders, I. L. Xewman and E. B. Pomeroy. Osceola 

— John Lackie. I. AV. Searle, Alfred Foster and J. G. Fowler. Goshen 

— J. H. Wilbur, Hugh Rhodes, I). M. Kelly, Charles Hines and J. IL 
Barnett. Elmira — Walter M. Fuller. James Buswell. Lewis Austin 
and George Grey. Penn — George Moss, William Eagelston. John 
Acklev and Robert M. Bocock. Yalley — Joseph Woodward, H. 
McYicker and J. M. Rogers. Essex — H. A. Hoist, O. C. Walker, 
Jose])h Cox, Ho])kins Shivers and Edward Trickle. The delegates to 
congressional convention elected were P. M. Blair, W. H. Butler, John 
Schank and James Blanchard. Davis Low^nan. Isaac Thomas and P. 
M. Blair w^ere elected members of the central committee. 

The Chicago Trilmne, published September, 1876, gave an account 
of the Sons of Lil)erty in Illinois, and their design to capture Camp 
Douglas and release the Confederate prisoners in Xovember, 1861. In 
the list of prominent members of the order the present postmaster 
(Judd) of Chicago, Martin Shallenberger of Toulon, and a half a dozen 
of men from Putnam, Henry, Knox and Marshall counties are men- 
tioned. In reference to those terrible days, it might be added that 
had not cool heads led the people of Stark their zeal would have 
l)rouo-ht them to the execution of four or five neiglibors, and thus 
blacken one of the proudest w\ar records in Illinois. It is a fact that 
neither Judd, Shallenberger, or any of the men named in the report, 
entertained the idea, of rescuing the prisoners. 

The Union League, then in full force here, embraced almost the 
entire numl)er of republican voters residing here. The differences ex- 
istino- between the Knio'hts and Leamie did not rest at all on the 
former's sympathy with the reljellion, but were grounded mainh' on 
plans for a settlement between the Xorth and South. The Uncondi- 
tional Union party of Stark county called a convention for Septeml)er 
23, 1865, which call was signed b}" P. ]M. Blair. Davis Lowman and 
Isaac Thomas, L'nion Central Committee. 

Tlie first soldiers convention of Stark county was held October 21, 
186.5, and nominated a soldier's ticket for county officers. Rev. A. J. 
Wright, nominated for county judge, S. F. Ottman for county clerk 
and Oliver White, for superintendent of schools, declined the nomina- 
tion. 

On August 27, 1869, the temperance convention held at Buda, 



rOLITICAL HISTORY. 155 

1 

noiiiiiiated Rev. F. B. Ives, for congress. It is related tliat up to this 
time temperance ideas grew apace under the genial guidance of tem- 
perance associations ; but now ])ohtics crept into each meeting room, 
organization deca3xd, so to speak, and men wlio were recUiimed solely 
1)V association, fell back into their drunken ^vays. 

The anti-polygamy meeting, held at Toulon on February, 1882, was ^' 
addressed by Judge ' Wright, A. P. Miller, B. F. Thompson and Rev- 
erends Myers and Stouffer. J. II. Miller offered the resolution as 
follows: '• Resolved, by the citizens of Toulon in nuiss meeting assem- 
l)led, irrespective of sex, political parties, or religions creeds ; being 
fully impressed with the belief that all citizens, no matter where situ- 
ated, should and do look with horror upon the encroachment of any- 
thing that tends to invade our homes, or the homes of our fellow^ citi- 
zens ; as w^ell as any teaching or ])ractice that tends to set at defiance 
the sanctity of the niai'riage relation, oi' doctrine that under the pre- 
tense of a revelation defies the laws of l)oth God and man, which have 
declared from time immemorial in all civilized nations and govern- 
ments. ' that one man should have but one wife, and one woman l)at 
one husband ; except in case of death or a legal sepai-ation in conform- 
ity with the laws of civilized legislation, when either is at liberty to 
marry again.' And we denounce in unmeasured terms any doctrines 
or teachings that recognize any invasion (^f the sanctity of the nuir- 
riage relation, or endangers social order as understood in all enlightened 
governments; l)eing without precedent in the past, and in utter defi- 
ance of all that is pure or sacred.-' The second resolution denounced 
niormonism and its practices, and called upon the journalist, lu'eacher 
aiul orator to act and speak in favor of the bill then before congress. 
In the fall of 1882 the differences between the republicans of Stark 
and ]?nreau counties in re the senatorial convention, were amicably 
juljusted. 

The greenback county convention held at Wvoming, in August, 
1881, endorsed the county ticket of the proliibition and democratic 
parties. The democratic and republican conventions of that year par- 
took in a great measure of the interest attached to the presidential 
canijiaign. 

llie first prohibition convention <»f the loth congressional district '^ 
assembled at Elmwood, September 28, 1880. Stark \vas represented 
by R. C. Baker, J. M. Jones, Wm. A. Newton, E. B. Lvon, Eli Emer- 
ick, J. C. Atherton, Rev. D. 0. Stouffer, II. Y. Godfrey.' ludge David 
McCuUoch received the nomiiuitiiui for congress, Williain Xolan is 
])i'esident of the central committee. 

The greenback district convention was held at Beoi'ia, Se])tember 
15, 188<;. The Stark county delegates were Jacob Shnhiw, W. II. 
Sherman, C. F. Hamilton, Dexter G. I). Eagleston, Anton Sundguist, 
riiili]) Bromer, ]\Iicliael Ryan, Allen Burl, J. B. Robinson, Richard 
Iloadley, John Foster Coulson. Some discussion followed the pro[)0- 
sition to nominate a greenl)ack ticket, and in the confusion which fol- 
lowed, Richard Iloadley, chairman of the Stark county delegation, 
announced that, "as it was YQvy })lain to be seen that the convention 
was being run by bulldozers, that they could h()[)e for no impartial 



156 IIISTOKY OF STjVKK COUNTY. 

decisions br the chair they should witlidraw from tlie convention." 
This they immediately (tid, followed l)y a large portion of the Knox 
county delegation and a ]);irt of tlie Peoria county delegation. Fif- 
teen delegates remained, nominated W. T. A^allace, and resolved to 
call their ticket " The National Labor Party." The thirty-nine who 
withdrew, met in John Brady's office as a regular convention, adopted 
four resolutions, one of which was an approval of Mr. Wortliington's 
course in Congress, and one expressive of adhesion to the greenback 
party. The committee on resolutions comprised J. T. Thoni])son, C. 
F. Hamilton and Irwin J. Clark. The nominee for Cono-ress declined 
and A. M. Clark was subsequently selected. 

The Pepublican convention of the tenth district was held at Gales- 
Imrg, August 26, 1886. Col. William Jackson, :\Iiles A. Fuller, and 
I>. F. Thompson represented the county on the committees of creden- 
tials, organization, and resolutions respectively. A. G. Hammond's 
motion to ])roceed with an informal ballot was carried, and the roll of 
counties for nomination l)eing called, J. A. Leeper, of Fulton, nom- 
inated Hon. G. Barrere; G. W. Price, of Knox, nominated Gen. P. S. 
Post ; and B. F. Thompson, of Stark, nominated Judge W. W. Wright 
as the unanimous choice of Stark county. Mr. John McGinnis, of 
Peoria, seconded the nomination of Mr. Wright. The I'oll was then 
called and stood as follows: Fulton, 23 for Barrere; Knox, 25 for 
Post; Peoria, 15 for Post and 15 for Wright; Stark, 7 for Wright, 
making a total of 2o for Barrere, 40 for Post, and 22 for Wright. 
Before the announcement of the vote by the chairman, the Fulton 
county delegates changed their votes from Barrere to Wright, making 
the total vote stand 45 for Wright and 40 for Post. A motion to 
adjourn was lost by a vire voce vote, but carried by a rising vote. On 
reassembling, the first formal ballot was taken as follows: Fulton, 
Wright 21, Post 2; Knox, Post 25: Peoria, Wright 12, Post 18; 
Stark, Wright 7; total. Post 45; Wright 40. On motion of Capt. 
Thompson, (tcii. Post's nomination was made unanimous. Mi". 
Thompson's speech in nominating Judge AVright was highly c-omj^li- 
mented by the Galesburg and Peoria ]iapers. Judge AVright made a 
speech, promising his best support and that of Stark county to the 
successful candidate. 

The Democratic Congressional convention of the tenth district for 
1886 was held at Canton. X. E. AVorthington was ]-enominated. S. 
Y. Thornton, of the Fulton county Ledger^ called the convention to 
order. Dr. Walter Hall, of Toulon, was made chairman of the con- 
vention, and J. E. AValsli, of Peoria, secretary. The delegates to the 
convention from this C(junty were U. H. Brown, Dr. AV T. Hall, Ed 
Colgan, and Frank Thomas. The alternates were J. AI. Kogers, AY. 
T. Ditmon, T. AY. Ross, and Alatthew McKeighan. The delegates 
were instructed for X. E. AA^»rthin<i'ton. 

The Stark county prohibition convention. Avhich met at Toulon, 
June 12, 1886, made the following nominations for county officers: 
AVm. Xowlan, of Lafa3'ette, for coujity judge; G. E. Callison, of 
Toulon, for county clerk; Mrs. D. G. Stouffer, of AYyoming, for sii])er- 
intendent of schools; AY. A. Xewton, of Toulon, for sheriff; AYm. 



POLITIC A I. IIISTOKY. 157 

Newland, of Toulon, for coroner. The following were ap]iointed 
delegates to attend the state })rohibition convention held at 8])ring- 
field. June 23, 1886: J. M. Jones, Lafayette; Eli Emery, Toulon; 8. 
E. Ilazen, "West Jerse}^ ; and J. C. C bpestake, AYj^oming. 

The Greenback county convention assembled August 28, 188(5, with 
W. P). Armstrong as chairman, and C. F. Hamilton as secretary. 
Jacob Shulow, Henry CV)hvell, and W. H. Sherman composed the 
committee on organization. Dr. King, of West Jersey; J. B. Robin- 
son, of Essex; and Eicluird Iloadley were the committee appointed to 
confer with a committee fi'om the Democratic convention on the ticket 
to be indorsed bv this convention. The report of this committee was 
received, and upon motion adopted, to indorse the ticket nominated 
bv the Democratic count}^ convention. The following Avere appointed 
delegates to the congressional convention, with instructions to vote for 
the renomination of IS". E. Worthington : Jacob Sliulow, of Valley; 
Philip Beamer and Andrew Kamerer, of West Jersey; Michael Ryan 
and Allen Beall, of Valley; W. H. Sherman. John Dexter and G. D. 
Eagleston, of Penn; Richard Iloadley, Foster Goulson aiul Antony 
Sundquist, of Toulon ; Henry Colwell, of Essex. The following were 
appointed a committee to attend the representative and senatorial 
convention, to be held at Princeton, September 21, 188G: Dr. R. W. 
King, George VanSickle, J. W. Cole and Thomas Dryden, of West 
Jersey; C. F. Hamilton, of Osceola; AV. B. Armstrong, J. I>. Robinson 
and A. J. Smith, of Essex ; John Black, Xathan Snare and Fred 
Greenwood, of Toulon; Frank ]vissinger and Elbert Drawyer, of 
Penn; John A. Colgan, of Valley; James JacKson, of Elmira. The 
delegates chosen to the state convention ^vere Henry Colwell, of 
Essex; W. II. Sherman and John Dexter, of Penn. 

The members of the Greenback county central committee were 
chosen as follows: J. B. Robinson, of Essex; Elisha Swank, of West 
Jersey; Jacob Shulow, of A'alley; W. II. Sherman, of Penn; Henry 
Colwell, of Essex. 

In 1884 the prohiljition vote of this county was 99, and of the dis- 
trict, 583, increased in 1886 to 123 and 869 respectively. 

The Democratic County Convention assendjled at Payne's Opera 
House, Wyoming, August 30, 18S(;. Pati'ick M. Ijlair, of Toulon, was 
elected temporary chairman, and George Nolan, of Toulon, temporary 
secretary. Harmon Phenix, F. II. Brown, John II. Ogle, S. II. 
j\IcKeighan, and William Stevenson were cliosen a committee on cre- 
dentials ; and A. J. Sturm, T. AV Ross and James Fi'ail a committee 
on ]iermanent organization. They rej^orted in favor of F. II. Brown, 
of Goshen, for chairman, and George oVolan, of Toulon, for secretary, 
and these gentlemen were chosen. Frank Thomas, John E. Decker, 
AVill A. Scott, and AV. A. Truax were made a committee to confer 
with a similar committee of the Greenback convention in session. The 
following were made a committee to select the names of candidates for 
the county offices, to be tilled at the coming election : AVillis Pierson, 
IT. C. Brown, James Estej), J. M. Rogers, P. M. Blair, James G. 
Brady, W. T. Ditmon, Humphrey Avery, A. J. Sturm. The confer- 
ence committee had ao-reed with the Greenback committee that onlv 



158 HISTOliV OF STAKK COUNTY. 

one ticket should be nominated by both conventions, and also had 
agreed ii])on the names of candidates for the oifices to be filled, and 
the committee to name candidates reported in favor of the names 
agreed n])on, which were: For County Judge, Martin Shallenberger ; 
County Clerk. James Nowlan ; County Superintendent of Schools, 
Wm. ll. Sherman; C-ounty Treasurer, Henry Colwell; Slieriff, Henry 
Hamilton; CV^roner, James M. Rogers. The delegates to the legislative 
convention were : J. E. Decker, Harmon Phenix, ]>enjamin Turner, 
T. W. Ross, AVinfield Scott, Dr. O. C. Darling, Chester Turner, and C. 
P. Jackson. 

To fill vacancies on the county central committee, the following 
wei'e chosen : Edwin Ferris for Penn, Willis Pierson for West Jersev, 
and Madison Winn for West Toulon, vice Winfield Scott, A. W. Pal- 
mer, and J. Knox Hall, resigned. 

The democratic senatoiial convention at Princeton, September S.'^, 
nominated John P. Pi'yan for state senator and A. Morrasy and J. M. 
liogei's for I'epresentatives. Benjamin Turner was a delegate from 
Stark county, and was accompanied thither by his son Chester. 

The republican county convention, held in August, 1886. The 
meeting w^as called to order Ijy J. M. Brown, and E. S. Buffum, of 
Lafayette, chosen temporary chairman, and F. C. Willson, of Brad- 
ford, secretary. C. W. Young, Cyrus Bocock, and A. G. Hammond 
were apjiointed a committee on credentials. J. D. Quinn, John 
Lackie, Jacolj Graves, William Jackson and S. F. Otnian, committee 
on permanent organization, who reported in favor of the officers 
named. I). J. Walker was declared in nomination for county clerk, 
John Hawks for county treasurer. W. R. Sandham for county superin 
tendent of schools, and Dr. L. T. S})rague. of Lafayette, for coroner. 
An informal ballot was now taken for candidates for county judge, and 
the following were brought oiit : M. A. Fuller, B. F. Thompson, G. 
C. VanOsdel, A. P. Miller. On vote Ijeing taken, M. A. Fuller received 
37; B.. F. Thompson, 22; A. P. Miller, 11; G. C. YanOsdel, 3. Mr. 
Fuller having received a majority of all the votes cast was declared in 
nomination. An informal ballot was next taken for candidates for 
sheriff, and the follo\v]ng presented : James Montooth, John F. 
Rhodes, B. A. Newton, J. R. Jones. On vote being taken, Montooth 
received 25; J. F. Rhodes, 20 ; J. R. Jones, 10; B. A. Newton, 12. 
Second l)alloting, Montooth received 35 ; Rhodes, 20 ; J. R. Jones, 10 ; 
C. R. Miner, 2. Montooth having received a majority of all the votes 
cast was declared in nomination. (\ W. Young, \V. T. Dickinson, and 
N. J. Smith were appointed a committee to select delegates to tlie 
congressional convention, which selection was as follows and accepted 
bv the convention : E. S. Buffum, A. G. Hammond, C^'rus Bocock, 
William Jackson, M. A. Fuller, D. S. Hewitt, B. F. Thompson. The 
following were the delegates appointed to the re[)ublican state con- 
vention : fJohn Lackie, W. F, Price. O. Brace. The following were 
selected as the county central committee : B. R. Brown, of AYest Jer 
sey ; E. S. Buffum, <^f (4oshen ; Perry Winn, of East Goshen ; Jacob 
Graves, of South Essex; A. (i. Hammond, of North Essex; ,) . IVf. 
Brown, of Toulon; Marsh Winn, of East Toulon; AVilliam Jackson, 



THE OOUKTS AND BAR. 



159 



of Eliiiirji ; Samuel Wrigley, of Yalley ; Cyrus Bocock, of Penn ; 
Josepli Flemmiug, of Osceola. The committee was organized with 
J. M. Brown chairman and E. S. Buffum secretary. The following 
were appointed by the caucus as delegates to the legislative conven- 
tion, to be held at Princeton; September 7: Xewton J. Smith, Xiles 
A. Fuller, A. W. King. J. A. Clock, C. W. Brown, B. F. Garrett, T. FI. 
Crone, A. G. Hammond, Wilson Trickle, L. Egbert, Perrv Winn, Sam- 
uel White. 

At the republican legislative convention held at Princeton Septem- 
ber 7, Edward A. Washburn, present county treasurer of J>ureau 
county, was nominated for state senator. Sterlino- Pomerov, of Bureau 
county, and James H. Miller, of Stark county, were nominated for 
re[)resentatives. 

The victors and vanquished of the campaign, which followed the 
several nominations, are referred to in the pages devoted to election 
returns ; \vhile in the pages devoted to family history tlie greater num- 
ber of them hnd mention. 



CHAPTER YIIL 




THE COURTS AND BAE. 



ROM the earliest ])eriod in the history of the world the ad- 
vocate has existed and made his presence known where men 
of other trades were silent and unfelt. The author of 
'' Paradise Lost " lived at a time when mental revolutions 
reduced humanity to a state of skepticism and left the con- 
science of the peo])le uncontrolled by that spiritual govern- 
ment which for centuries ruled the Christian world, and 
judging from the experiences of tliat time declared that 
'' most men are allured to the trade of law, grounding their 
])ui"])oses not on the ])rudent and heavenly contemplation of justice and 
etjuity, which was never taught them, but on the promising and pleas- 
ing thoughts of litigious terms, fat contentions and flowing fees." The 
advances made by society in after years fostered certain ambitions, 
and among the highest of them was to attain the ])rofession of the law. 
It became a great never-ending study, and thus in Johnson's time the 
bar end>raced 

" ]V[en of that large professipu, who can speak 
To every cause, and tliing-s indeed contraries, 
Till they are hoarse again, yet all be law : 
That with most (juick agility can turn. 
And return, make knots, and undo them. 
Give forked counsel, take provoking gold 
From either side and p>it it up." 

In the earlier years of tlie county the circuit hiwyers, [)iMnci})ally 

from Peoria, Galesburg, Canton, and other old pioneer centers of the 

military tract were well known' in tlie courts of Stark. The coming 

of W. W. Drummond to establish an <»ttice formed an introduction to 

10 



160 IIISTOKY OF STARK COUNTY, 

a permanent local bar, l)ut not until 1847, when Martin Sliallenberger 
settled at Tonlon, did the nnmbers of circuit lawyers attendino- Stark 
county courts decrease. Within the last four dec:ides Stark county 
has claimed many excellent lawyers, and even furnished a few to the 
new states and territories. In the following pages brief notices of the 
old and new bar are made. 

The Circuit Court of Fulton county, the first connected with 
Northern Illinois, was held April 20, 1824. There was not another 
term of the court held until iS^ovember, 10, 1825, when John York 
Sawyer, presided. Judge Sawyer was one of those early judges Avho 
had no finely furnished and fitted room in which to hold court. It was 
the humble cabin, or plain board building, in which this al)le judge 
])resided. He has been known to hold court upon the liank of the 
Mackinaw river in Tazewell county. He was a man eminently suited 
to the times. John Twing, attorney general jpro tern., acted ks pros- 
ecuting attorney at this term, and Stephen Dewey, clerk. Ossian M. 
Itoss oificiated as sheriff. This was the first circuit at that time, and 
extended throughout the northern pai't of the state. A few years 
later it was changed to the fifth, and included all the country in the 
military tract, even the counties of Cook and Jo Daviess. 

In ^lay, 1831, Judge Young opened the first session of the first 
circuit court for Putnam county. Among the ])etit jurors present were 
John Whitaker, Wm. Boyd, Wm. AYright, Ezekiel Thomas and Justus 
Anient. A number of fines were imposed on absent juroi's, most of 
whicli were remitted. In Septeml^er, 1831, the names of Benjamin 
Smith, Sylvanus Moore. AYm. D. Grant, Ilari'is Miner, Isaac B. Essex, 
Aaron Whitaker, Jolin B. Dodge, James Garvin, Eoswell Blanchard, 
Wm. Smith and David Cooper appear as grand jurors. At this term 
Clark Hollanbeck was chai'ged with "malfeasance in office*' as justice 
of the peace, but tlie case was subsequently quashed. The first indict- 
ment in May, 1831, was that of Resin Hall for l)iganiy, and ^Martha 
Wright, one of liis wives. Before the September session was held, 
Hall, wives, cal)in and all disappeared. 

The first entry in the record A of the circuit court of Stark county 
(held at the house of W. H. Henderson, October 11, 1839, with Tiiomas 
Ford, judge of the ninth judicial circuit, presiding; Norman J. Purple, 
states attorney; Augustus A. Dunn, sheriff, and John W. Henderson, 
clerk), is as follows: Luther Driscoll having been duly summftned as 
a grand juror was appointed l)y the court, forenuin of the grand jury ; 
and Asa Currier, Henrv Seelev, Samuel Love, John Hester, David 
Simmerman, Nathan Swartz, Adam Day, Adam Perry, Wm. ^Mahany 
being also (hdy summoned, also gave their attendance, and tliere not 
being a sufficient number to constitute a grand jury, it is ordered that 
the sheriff summon two others from the bystanders to complete tlie 
panel: and the sheriff, thereupon, returned the names of James K. 
McClenahan and Wm. W. Di'ummond, who also gave their attendance, 
■" "■ " who with tlie others were sworn to enquire for the body of 
the county of Stark aforesaid, and retired to consider of their indict- 
ments and presentments. This jury brought in a true l)ill against 
Frederick Ulard, and having no further business received discharge. 



THE COURTS AND BAK. 161 

J allies Pollok, who left Ireland in 1832 and came to Philadelpliia, 
declared his intention to l)ecome a citizen of the United States, October 
12, 1839, before Judge Thomas Ford of the ninth judicial circuit. 
This is the first declaration of record in Stark county. Tlie Turnbull 
and Oliver declarations bear date October, 1810. 

James A. Henderson in his address before tlie Old Settlers in 1882, 
describes graphically this first court. It is as follows : 

"It is Frulay morning, Octol)er 11, A. D. 1839, and the early set- 
tlers of Stark county have met at a private residence, about one mile 
due south of where tlie court-house now stands, to be present, as 
officers, jurors, suiters, Avitnesses or spectators, at the first term of the 
Circuit Court held in the county. Tliomas Ford, Esq., is judge, ISTor- 
man H. Purple, states attorney, and Onsk)w Peters and Tlieophilus 
Lyle Dickey are the lawyers present. John W. Henderson is clerk, 
pro tern.; Augustus Dunn is sheriff, and Luther Driscoll as foreman, 
Asa (Jurrier, Ilenry Seeley, Samuel Love, Samuel Seeley, John Finley, 
Adam Day, William Mahaney, "William Porter, Sumner Shaw, John 
Hester, David Simmerman, i^athan Swartz, Adam Perry, James K. 
McClanahan and William W. Drummond constitute the grand jury, 
while Washington Colwell, Calvin Powell, sr., Elijah Eltzroth, Daniel 
Hodgson, Henry McClanahan, Milton Richards, Jeremiah Bennett, 
Minott Silliman, William P>owen, David Cooper, Josiah Moffit, Samuel 
llai-ris, Ilobert Sharer, Nicholas Sturms, Isaac Spencer, James Buswell, 
Horace \i\\\, Nehemiah Merrit, Christopher Sammis, Thounis Timmons, 
Thomas S. Clark, Washington Trickle, George Eckley and Jacob Smith 
form the petit jury. And scattered here and there in groups upon the 
grass beneath the magnificent trees which sheltered the home upon the 
hill, we will imagine we see the Arnolds, Websters, liarnets, Lyons, 
Piddles, Nichols, Jones, Dawsons, Pratz, Dunbars, Lakes, Grants, 
Cummings, Bonhams, Chatlields, Camps, Wykoffs, Dunns, Berhelds, 
Trickles, Uicliards, Emerys, Pigins, Powells, Clarks, Eckleys, Egberts, 
Finches, llurds, Jacksons, I) wires, Ilodgesons, McWilliams, Masons, 
Turners, llilliai'ds, Halseys, Farrs, Stodclards, Geers, Sillimans, Ogles, 
McC'lanahans, Peeds, Mascalls, Greenleafs, Coopers, Essexs, Eastmans, 
AVards, Smiths, Coxes, Colwells, Sheets, Graves, Mounts, Moffitts, 
Thomas, Ihitlei's, Agards, BaiTetts, Dorrances, Averys, Shavers, Stur- 
tevauts, Parkers, Holgates, Walls, Fullers, Breeses, Pikes, Moores, 
Phenixs, Sturms, Searles, Dalrymples, Parks, Whitakers, Halls, Spen- 
cers, Ihiswells. Woodwards, J^races, Turnbulls, Olivers, Pules, Lyles, 
Blanchards, Whites, Fowlers, Parrishes. Miners, Perrys, Austins, 
Heaths, AViuns, Alillers, Maxlields, Days, Williams, Polk^cks, Mitchells, 
Nowlans, Frails, Gradys, Drays, Worleys, Winters, Littles, Potters, 
Lesons, AVlieelers, Ames, Van Dykes, and man\' others whose names 
1 cannot now recall. They are laughing, talking, shaking hands 
and telling of each othci's welfai'e. Some have journeyed hither on 
foot, others on horseback or in wagons. Some have come from afar, 
while others live 'near by, and that may mean a mile or six away. 
The fainily, as was the custom with all the early settlers, has made 
expensive ])reparations to I'eceive and care for all who may come — 
judge, lawyers, jurors, suitors, witnesses and people. AVe will suppose 



162 HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY. 

that all have come, and as we look back and remeinljer how many 
grown people had to eat before the boys were admitted to the table, 
it seems as if none were absent. 

The court has opened, the grand jnry has been im]')anelled and 
charged, and after a brief absence in a corn-crib ]iear by, has returned 
into court with a ' true bill,' charging a member of one of the most 
respectable families of the county with the crime of larceny, on the 
testimony of Christopher Sammis. a merchant of IMoulton, Avhose goods 
had been stolen. Joseph K. Lane, Moses Boardman, John Pryor, Daw- 
son and J. Chaffee were here. The grand jury has been discharged. 
The prisoner made his escape before trial, and perhaps never was in 
the county afterwards. If his attorneys. Peters and Dickey, had been 
as longheaded then as they afterwards ]3rove(l themselves to be. pos- 
sibly they might have cleared him, by picking a flaw in the indictment. 
In another room there stands a long table whicli has been covered Avith 
a bountiful supply of the humble fare of the pioneer's home. And all 
are expected to enter and partake of it as freely and as heartily as if 
it were their own. At last the sun has readied tlie highest point in 
the heavens, and paused, as it were, for a moment's rest ere starting 
down the westward grade. Sheriff Dunn has, in obedience to tlie 
order of the court, just cried an adjournment for dinner. The out- 
siders have been duly summoned, and as those Avho have been fortu- 
nate enough to gain admission to the little court-room file out, the 
doors leading to the other rooms are thrown wide open, and. in the 
name of the liead of that hospitaWe home, who is here iio more to per- 
form that office, I bid you, Mr. President, and each one of you old 
settlers, to enter the o])en door, and beg to assure you of a hearty, 
earnest welcome from all witliin. Walk in and be seated, and as you 
partake of the noon-day meal, talk of the events of 1839 — of the years 
long gone 1)V. But, as I step aside to ]iermit your entrance, I am 
reminded that almost fortv-three vears have passed awav since that 
table was spread and that dinner was eaten by the early settlers of 
Stark county. I am also sadh" reminded that many of those who^e 
names have been called and who were there on that day, are not here 
now." 

Among the first circuit judges was Richard M. Young, a native of 
Kentuckv, who settled in Illinois at an early date. He was appointed 
circuit judge in 1S28, and served until January. 1837, when he accejited 
a seat in the United States senate. In matters relating to the consti- 
tution and laws of the state he took a very active part, until stricken 
down b}^ insanity. Thomas Ford, who served as prosecuting attor- 
ney prior to 1835, was appointed judge of the nortliern circuit. He 
was born in Pennsvlvania in the vear 1800: was brought bv his wid- 
owed mother to Missouri in 1804, and shortlv afterward to Illinois. 
He received a good education; studied law; was elected four times 
judge — twice as circuit judge, judge of CMiicago, and judge of supreme 
court. He was elected governor by the democratic party in 1842 ; 
wrote his history of Uhnois in 1847, and died in 18r)0. John Dean 
Caton was ap])ointed judge of this circuit in August, 1842, and served 
until 1848. Mrs. Shallenberger speaks of him thus: "During tlie 



TiiK conns AM) i!AR. 1(;3 

administration of Caton, there was quite a strife over the appoint- 
ment of circuit clerk, tlie aspirants heinii' John AV. Hendei'son, whio-, 
and Oliver AViiitaker, democrat. Caton being a democrat, appointecl 
Mr. Whitaker, \vh(j lield the office under tliis ai)pointment until a 
change of law made it elective, when he was again chosen by the peo- 
]>le, and served every term till ]N"ovember, 1852, when he was defeated 
by Jefferson AVinn." Thomas Lyle Dickey was the first judge of the 
ninth district, over which he presided until Stark was placed in the 
tenth district, with Judge Kellogg presiding, from 1849 to 1852. Judge 
Onslow Peters presided over the sixteenth circuit in 1855. His death 
occun-ed at AYashington, D. C, in February, 185(1. In April, 185(>, 
Jacob Gale was elected, but did not serve, when Elihu X. Powell was 
;i])pointed. He was defeated, in June, 1861, by Amos L. Merriman, 
who gave place in 1863 to Marion AVilliamson, who defeated Martin 
Shallenberger in the contest for the judgeshi]). In 1867 Sabin I). 
Puterbaugh was elected; resigned in 1873, when Henry B. Hopkins 
was chosen judge. In 1873 Jose])h AV. Cochrane was elected on the 
A. M. D. ticket, and served until June, 1879. David AlcCulloch, nom- 
inee of the prohibition party in 1886 foi' congress, was elected on the 
I'epublican ticket in 1877, and, Avith X. J>. Laws and Judge Burns, was 
reelected in 1879 for the eighth judicial circuit. In Se]:)tember, 1886, 
Judge Samuel S. Page [)resided here, with John AI. McAIillen, foreman 
of gi-and jury ; S. G. Brees, clerk of grand jury, and the circuit clerk 
and sheriff. In 1885, Judges Page, Thomas M. Shaw and Xathan AV. 
Green were elected. A reference to the ])olitical ciiapter will point out 
the names of court oflftcers here since 1839. The greater number of 
the lawyers of Stark countv being closely connected with public affairs 
here, are noticed at some length on other ])ages ; but, lest any of the 
old or present bar might not be mentioned, the following personal 
notices are made : 

Benj. F. Fridley, state's attorney in 1846, resided at Ottawa, but 
traveled through the circuit. He moved to Anrora snbsequentlv. 
AVhile ])ossessing little educational ti'aits, he was a man of strong nat- 
ural ability. Julius Alanning, an old lawyer of Ivnoxvdle, practiced 
liere in 1846 ; died at Peoria. He was a very able lawyer, and gener- 
ally, if not always, assisted AV. AV. Drummond, first resident attorney 
of Stark. H. O. Merriman, of Peoria, who attended court here in tlie 
forties, died at Peoria "Lawyer" Bangs was admitted to the bar at 
Peoria; practiced at Toulon in 1845-6, when he moved to Iowa. AV. 
J. Phelps, the second la\vyer who estal)lislied himself at Toulon, left 
here in 1846 for the AVest. Onslow Peters, a Afassachusetts man, of 
the Peoria bar, was one of the old bar ; subsequently elected circuit 
judge; died in 1856, at AVashington, D. C. In his office Martin Shal- 
lenl)erger read law in 1846-7. Silas Ramsey resided at Lacon, but 
i)racticed in Stark occasionallv in the forties. " C. K. Ilarvev, a circuit 
lawyer, practiced here tlirough several terms. He was one of the lead- 
ing lawyers of those times. His daughter married A. AI. Craig, judge 
of the supreme court. Aaron Tyler, jr., read law with Onslow Peters ; 
came to Toulon in 1845, and practiced here for some two years, when 
he moved to St. Louis ; thence to Knoxville, Avhere he was appointed 



164 HISTORY OF STAKK COUNTY. 

circuit judge, and thence to Cliicago, where he died. Another lawyer, 
the senior Tyler, had a large list of cases here in 1S4:C). Lincoln B. 
Knowlton, a Peoria pioneer lawyer, was prosecuting attorney for this 
circuit, and continued in ])ractice there until his death, about 1S55. 
He was an eloquent and logical s])ealver, eccentric in a])pearance. 
Benton C Cook was state's attorney in 1847. Martin Shallenbero'er, 
the senior member of the Stark County Bar, settled here in IS-tT. His 
reputation of being the best read man in the eighth judicial circuit is 
generally admitted. Lawyer Taylor was present here in 1847; but 
whether it was J. L Taylor, of JPrinceton, or not, is even yet unde- 
cided. J. S. Fancher, who practiced at Peoria for a short time, prac- 
ticed here in 1847. Amos L. Merriman, subsefjuently circuit judge 
here, resigning in 1863, now a resident of AVashington, D. C, was a 
circuit lawj^er in 1847, with his brother. E. N. Powell, of the Peoria 
bar, who was judge for this circuit subsequently, practiced here in 
1848; died at Peoria, July 15, 187L AVm. A. Chumasero, a lawyer of 
La Salle county, now of Helena. M. T.. was here in 1848. Ira J. Fenn, 
of Lacon, practiced here occasionally from 1848 to 1860. 

H. G. Reynolds came from Rock Island to Knoxyille about 1851, 
moved to Springfield in 1854, and is now a citizen of Kansas. At 
Knoxville he served as state's attorney and postmaster. George A. 
Clifford, who came from Massachusetts at an early" date and settled at 
Rochester, practiced law at Knoxville; then was city editor and re- 
porter on the Chicago Democrat; next practiced law at Toulon, en- 
tered the service of the Union, and afterward was em])lo3^ed as steno- 
grapher and legal adviser and again as official reporter of court martials 
and other heavy cases. In I860 he was assistant editor of tlie cam- 
paign paper called the Stark County Democrat^ and in 1862 was ap- 
pointed master in chancery. He fell into intempei'ance, and it is said 
that wliile suffering under a nervous attack he di'op]:)ed from a window 
at Washington, D. C., and was killed. His widow now resides at 
Albert Lea, Minn. Xorman H. Purple was distinguished for high 
legal abilities, served as judge of Fulton county from 1845 to 1849, 
refused official positions and devoted his whole time to his office. 
Harvey J. Rhodes, a pioneer justice of Stark county, began practicing 
law in 1851 ; died some years ago. Ezra G. Sanger, a Peoria lawyer, 
visited this court in 1851, and for some years after. Robert Wilkin- 
son, of Rock Island was here in 1852; like his brother, Ira O. Wilkin- 
son, he was one of tlie reliable lawyers of thirty years ago. E. Gav 
Johnson, a Peoria lawyer and state's attorney, ])racticed law here 
occasionally from 1852 to the period of his death. George Blakely, his 
partner, Avas here also in 1852, Dr. Roberts, of Pekin, who later be- 
came a lawyer, is credited with being here in 185: . Leander Douglas, 
of Knoxville, afterward of Galesburg, where he died a few years ago, 
practiced here in 1852. Thomas J. Henderson is noticed throughout 
the history of the county and particularly in the sketch of Toulon. 
William F. Bryan, of Peoria, practiced in the courts of Stark county 
in 1853. Lorin G. Pratt, of Peoria, visited Toulon in 1853, moved to 
Chicago many years ago, where he is still in practice. William Kel- 
logg's name appears on the circuit coui-t docket in 1854. He was 



THE COURTS AND BAR. lf)5 

judge of this circuit from 1849 to 1852 ; elected to congress; died at 
Peoria some yem's ago. He was considered a very able lawyer. Judge 
J. W. Hewitt, practiced liere in 1855. H. N. Keightly, of Knoxville, 
at one time a partner of G. A. Clitford, practiced in tlie courts of 
Stark county in 185-1-. Geo. ~\V. Stip]), l^etter known as Judge Stipp, 
of Uureau county, practiced here in 1855. John II. Howe, of Kewanee, 
practiced in 1857; was electetl colonel ISItli 111. Yol. Inf.; served as 
circuit judge; died some 3'ears ago, Hiram Bigelow, of Galva, ap- 
jieared in the courts here in 1857 and has been an occjisional visitor 
since that time. Alex. JMcCoy, state's attorney, practicetl here in 1857. 
He moved from Peoria to Chicago some years ago. John Burns, who 
presided here recently as circuit jndge, practiced here in 1859. C. C. 
Wilson's name appears on the list of lawyers in 1857. He was a 
pioneer of A^alley township; moved to Princt^tori, and ultimately 
settled at Kewanee, Avliere he now resides. John I. Bennett, now of 
Chicago. ])racticed here in 1801. Judge Bailey, of Macomb county, 
practiced here in 18<)1. Levi North, of Kewanee, is a name connected 
witli the courts here since 1801. He is said to be as good a portrait 
painter as he is a lawyei". 

Ira O. Wilkinson practiced here in 1802, was subsequenth^ circuit 
judge of the Rock Islaud circuit. Geo. W. Pleasants, who also prac- 
ticed here in 1802. is now circuit judge. Henry B. Hopkins, of Peoria, 
was here in 1802. He served as circuit judge by ap])ointment, succeed- 
ing S. D. Puterbaugh. - ]\[iles A. Fuller, a pioneer of the county, was 
admitted to the bar in 1862. A sketch of his life is given in the his- 
tory of Toulon. Julius Starr, of Peoria, practiced herein 1804. D. C. 
Young came here in 1805 ov 18(i0, ])racticed law here for a few years. 
Ivol)ert Barr studied law under JSlartin SluiUenberger, was admitted an 
attorney in 18<><;. moved to Adell, la., where he is now. Vi. W. AVriglit, 
noticed in tlie history of Toulon, as well as in other cha])ters, has tilled 
an honoral)le place among the members of tlie bar. Ford D. Smith 
read law under Martin Shallenberi>er, was admitted to the bar in 1808. 
practiced here until 1872 or 1878, when he returned to his home near 
Ilackettstown, N. J. J. H. Miller, one of the leading members of 
the state legislature, ju'acticed in the circuit court here in 1809. 
Nicholas E. Worthington, who came from Maryland to Peoria, en- 
tered the practice of law in the sixties, practiced here in 1869, was 
elected member of congress in 1882, reelected and received the unan- 
imous nomination of his ]iarty for a third term in 1880. Tiiomas E. 
Milchrist, of Galva, practiced here as early as 1808, and is still a visi- 
tor. He is states attorney at Galva. Sabin D. Puterbaugh, author of 
"Pleading and Practice," came here first in 1869, served as judge of 
this circuit until his resignation in ]87o. Mariou AVilliamson, circuit 
judge from 18(^2 to 1800, born in Adams county, Ohio, died at Peoria 
in 1868. C. K. Ladd, of Kewanee, ])racticed here in 1871. Jos. W. 
Cochran, judge of this circuit, practiced here in 1871. He preceded 
Judge McCulloch on the bench. AV. H. Adams, whose name is iden- 
tified with archaeological discovery in this district, practiced in the 
circuit coui't here in 1872. Tillottson and Guiteau opened a law office 
at Bradford in 1874, and a branch office at Toulon, over which Guiteau 



166 HISTORY OF STAKK COUNTY. 

presided. Thomas Cratty, of Peoria, practiced here in 1878. He is 
now at Chicago. A. P. Miller's name a])pears as an attorney on the 
circuit court docket in 1881. Frank Thomas was admitted to the l)ar 
in 1878, now of W3^oming. Bradford F. Thom]>son's name ap])ears as 
attorney before the circuit court in 1878. F. N. Pi'out studied under 
J. H. Miller, is now engaged in law practice at Blue Spring, Neb. 
James E. Bush, admitted in 1878, practiced law at Bradford, now at 
Beatrice, Neb. Thomas D. Higgs studied under Martin Shallenberger 
in 1878, now at Storm Lake, Iowa. W. W. Hammond, son of A. (1. 
Hammond of Wyoming, is now in practice at Peoria. Lawyer Kerns, 
read law at Peoria. Frank Marsh read law under Martin Shallon- 
berg-er, was admitted to the bar, is now in Neljraska. Ilenrv 0. Fuller 
was admitted to the bar here and ]s now a resident lawyer of Peoria. 
Harry Pierce was admitted to the bar in May, 1883. Gi'ant Newell, a 
son of Dr. O. W. Newell, of Bradford, studied law at Chicago in 1885. 

Among the lawyers who practiced here, not hitherto mentioned, 
were Shill, Fraser, Kinners and Mirrin, 1818-50; Fleming, Hazard, W. 
Sandford, Craig, H. L. Miller, Perley, Davidson, Blair, Keed, Sanders, 
Fenice, Porter, Richmond, Stone, Bishop, AVilliams, Farwell, Hinman, 
Walshe and Page, 1851-61 ; Jolinson, P. S. Pei'ley, D. C. Young, Ste- 
phens, George Puterlmugh, Cooper, Worrell, Moss, M. Kendall, Ide, 
G. G. Gibbons, 1862-9; J. C. Maclin, G. E. Ford, Shaw, Ingersoll, 
Brawbey, Herron, Fargo, Hannaman, Kretzinger, F. W. Wright, Bas- 
sett, Cornell, Emerson, Wear, Jack and G. M. Dixon, in 1870-1 ; 
McKinzie, F. S. Potter, J. S. Starr, in 1872 ; J. E. Busli, M. M. Lucy, 
L. Allen, Winchester, J. E. Cone and Ulrich, are names of attorneys 
on the docket in 1878; Talliaferro, Pepper, Gannon, Olson, Pettee, B. 
P. Duffy, C. C. Wilson and J. P. Miller, in 1879 ; Price, Shepherd, 
Marston, Foster, Raum, in 1881-2; M. M. Bassett, in 1883; F. S. Bos- 
settei-, C. W. McGovernand Muckle, in 1881 ; W. S. Brackett, Moore, 
Bradford and Prince, in 1885. 

While many important civil cases have been tried and disposed of 
here, a large number have been carried to the Supreme Court, and be- 
fore that court some of the most elaborate ai-guments on i-ecord have 
been made by Stark county lawyers. In criminal matters the county 
is almost barren. The few ca})ital crimes committed are noticed as 
follows : Piney Arnold, once a resident of Stark county, murdered 
James M. Sweeney at Solana, Cal., in 1859, and was tried, convicted 
and sentenced in January, 1860. In November, 1865, one Archie 
Moore murdered one Lafferty in presence of a number of people, and 
then lied. C^aptain Brown, then sheriff, learned that a letter was 
mailed to him at Farmington, and, going thither, awaited Moore. The 
plan succeeded, and the murderer was taken to tiie Peoria jail. Joseph 
H. Wilbur, while returning from tlie postoffice at Lafayette to his 
home, on the evening of October 13, 1867, was assaulted and killed. 
David Anshutz was arrested on the charge. The trial took ])lace in 
November, 1868. Martin Shallenberger represented the })eople. Judge 
Howe the prisoner. He was found guilty, and the jury fixed the pun- 
ishment at twenty-one years in state's prison. Stewart Bowers mur- 
dered Paxton Perry, son of Anderson Perry, of Goshen township, at 



THE COUKTS AND BAR. 167 

the bank corner at Toulon, Jul\' 4. The case was tried at Toulon, l)e- 
fore Judge Cochran nnd jury. jVI;irtin Shallenl)ergei' and the hite AV. 
W. O'Brien defended Bowers, James IL Miller and Judge Puterbaugh 
])rosecnted. A verdict of "not guilty" was returned, as the charge of 
murder could not be maintained. It appeared on the trial that they 
often went into the timber to play Indian, shooting at one another, 
dodging the bullets behind trees. Bowers subsequently married 
Perry's sister, and is now a prosperous citizen at JSTebraska. The 
shooting of John Hopkins 1)}^ Benson S. Scott, at Duncan, occurred in 
July, IST'J. 

Peter lluber of West Jersey township was murdered by a tramp 
named Church, December 1, 1881. This Church was a resident of Tou- 
lon for over twenty years, wdiere it is said he married a very question- 
able character. The coroner's jur}^ — W. A. Hampton, A. Kamerer, 
S. M. Huffman, Xaam I]. Leigh, J. M. Wick and Francis Dugan — found 
that Andrew J. Church stabbed Huber, from which wound the latter 
died in eight or ten minutes. Robert H. Thompson and Wm. H. Bell 
arrested the murderer near Henry Godfrej^'s house, wdiile trying to 
escape. The trial took ])lace in April, 1882. J. E. Decker and A. P. 
Miller defended ; B. F. Thompson and J. IT. Miller prosecuted. He was 
found guilty, and sentenced to hard labor for life. Sylvester Makinson 
was sentenced to death, March 15, 1885, and executed May 11, for the 
murder of Mrs. M. E. Copeland. In April, 1886, William and Mrs. 
McCaul of Coal A'illage, were tried for the murder of the little Sturm 
child, but acquitted. Martin Shallenberger and James H. Miller 
defended, winning an acquittal. 

The law circle of the county, like the county, is small; but large in 
all those qualities wdiich bring honor to its membership, and tinge all 
dealings with honesty and ability. I^Towhere in this State or outside 
it does a higher sense of integrity obtain than within Stark county's 
limited legal circle. 



CHAPTEE IX. 




JOURNALISM AND LITEKATURE. 

[IE history of the press of the county presents an apt illus- 
tration of its progress. Periiaps in the wliole world of jour- 
nalism there cannot be found its equal in nianl}^ expression 
and sound reasoning — certainly not its superior. A great 
deal of courtesy is manifested in the offices, a "svestern 
friendliness exists among the journalists, and, above all, a 
desire to do justice to the people, by exposing what is 
wrong, and commending what is right, is a})parent. Tlie 
business of a newspaper is to give the neivs. This may be 
done in different ways; but journals agree upon one point 
— that their readers are entitled to adequate information 
respecting whatever notewoi'thy thing has happened. It is 
also the business of the press to review the 7i€ios, and herein 
consists the higher element of journalism. The charge, so jnstly brought 
against many of the sul)sidized papers of the great cities, and also against 
the little sheets of eastern towns for narro^v, anti-national reviews was 
never api)lical)le here. Many of the owners and editors of the Stark 
county journals have devoted the Ijest years of their lives to this dis- 
trict ; they have, so to speak, a stake in the country, and with it a 
reputation for ■|)robity and sound judgment which they have held 
during the building up of our institutions and I'efiected through their 
newspapers and books. 

The Prairie Advocate was issued January 4, 1856, by John G, 
Hewitt, editor; and John Smith, j)rinter and publisher. The sub- 
scribei's' list shows aljout 000 names. On the front page is the carriers' 
address to the patrons of the Prairie Advocate, on page 2, the saluta- 
tory, general news and a six-verse rhythmic acknowledgement of a 
Christmas donation visit, written by Kev. C. Brinkerhoff. Page 3 is 
given up to marriage notices and advertisements, so also is page 4, 
The local news seemed to be the least appreciated at that time, as it 
received very little notice. Charles Smith was the carrier boy. In 
establishing this journal. Judge Hewitt, a dentist here at that time, 
interested a number of his fellow citizens in the ]iroject, and, with a 
$300 bonus, he visited John Smith, of Pekin, and agreed with him to 
move the office to Toulon. The type was antique, indeed, and fit 
company for the p'^'ess — supposed to be the third printing press intro- 
duced into this state. Toward the middle of the year, Oliver "White, 
then a school teacher at Toulon, became a regular contributor, and 
])assed so much time in the office that he learned to work at the case. 
Moving to Henry county, he took a position on the Dial. John Smith 
meantiine, sold his interest to Hewitt and retired to farm life, leaving 

168 



JOURNAIJSM AND LITP:KATUKE. 169 

the latter to carry on the Advocate until earlj^^ in 1857, Avhen he sold 
the entire oufit to Rev. K. V. Dunn, avIio chaug'od the title to i\\eStarlx' 
County Xcws 

Tlie /Sta/'l- County News is the regular successor of the Pioneer 
Advocate^ as purchased 1)}" Mr. Dunn, in the spring of 1857, who gave 
it its ]n'esent title. After a few months he sold tlie office to Messrs. 
AV'hitakei" and Henderson, who placed Dr. S. S. Jvaysl)ier in charge as 
editor. At the close of 18(50 the publication sus):)ended, and the Neios 
office was a blank until the fall of 1861, when W. II. Butler took con- 
trol, and resuscitating it. called his new venture the Stark County 
Union. 

The Starh County Union was non-political, but decidedly Unionist. 
At that time no one waited for a local weekly ]iaj)er. Every one 
rushed for the daily journals ; even advertising was forgotten, so 
that, notwithstanding Mr. Butler's earnest effort and lil)eral outlay of 
money, the Union was forced to suspend. 

The Starh County News (revived) peered out from the debris of tlie 
old office in the spring of 1863, and under the new lights by which 
Dr. S. S. Kaysbier illuminated the now very small newspajier. The 
little news became a power in the land. In January 1861, Oliver 
AYhite joined Kaysbier in its publication, placed the name of Lincoln 
at the head of an enlarged pa])er for a second term, purchased sole 
ownershi}) in Julv and continued its publication until the fall of 1868, 
when he sold a half interest to Joseph Smethurst, and in the spring of 
1869 sokl the other half to Edwin Butler. Subsequently James A. 
Henderson purchased Smethurst's interest, and with Mr. Butler 
managed the paper until his death, Mrs. Henderson now holding her 
late husband's share, and acting- as local editor of the News. 

The Stark county Democrat was first issued July 19, 1860, the 
price being- stated at fifty cents for the campaign. Martin Shallen- 
l)erger was editor, with CI. A. Clifford, AY. H. Butler, Charles ]\[yers, 
Ben. AVilliams, J. II. Anthony, J. B. liassell, AY. D. Hicks and Thomas 
Ross, assistant editors. It advocated the election of the "Little 
Giant," or Stephen A. Douglas. The policy of the editor is portrayed 
in lines written June 1, I860, l)v '•'■' IVfelville " for the first issue, the last 
verse of which is thus given : 

"Curses fall on his name, bliglit forever his fame, who this glorious union would sever, 

Who would part the fair stars that our banner adorn, 

His ambition to feast on the wrecks of the storm, 
When Lil)erty's svm's set forever." 

In the issue of November 3, 1860, printed by C. Bassett, of Ive- 
wanee, 111., this notice appears: "BAY UB. AYe shall jiublish one 
more number of this ]^a})er, giving the full election returns throughout 
the United States, when the Democrat will be no longer ])ublishecr. 
AYe expect emry man who is in arrears will pay up now." The little 
sheet, thirteen by nineteen inches, recommending itself as the best 
advertising medium in the county, and having- one column of the 
same. The "largest dry goods merchants," B. Ar J. Nowlan, having 
recently purchased the entire stock of Thos. B. Starrett, indulge in a 
four-inch ad. Rockwell's saloon is also advertisetl. For politics, Lin- 



170 TIISTORY or STAKK COUNTY. 

coin is slurred and liis stories ridiculed, while Douglas is represented 
<as making rapid strides toward the ]?residency. Under the head of 
"Carrying Coals to Newcastle" are noted the meetings held by 
Republicans in Elmira. 

Some facts respecting the origin of the Stark county Deinocrat of 
1860 will not be out of phice. On July 6, 1860, a meeting of leading- 
democrats was held at Toulon to take ste})s toward the publication of 
a ]>arty journal. E. L. Emerv suljmitted a plan prepared by M. 
Shallenberger, })roviding for a stock subscription to carry the work on 
for a stated time. This stock was to be assessed just as required, but, 
sliould the paper become self-supporting, tlie amount of capital stock 
unpaid would be still collected and applied to the printing and distri- 
bution of Douglas literature. This plan was ado])ted and the gentle- 
nuMi named as editors were elected. P. Nowlan was elected fiscal 
agent and bookkeeper, and Benjamin Turner, distributing agent. The 
agents appointed to canvass the different towns were Benj. Turner, E. 
L. Emery, T. J. AVright, Wm. B. Armstrong and G. J. Taggart, 
Toulon; M. Blanchard and B. F. Thompson, Osceola; James Holgate 
and Dexter Wall, Penn; J. Mofht and H. Col well, Essex; John Morris 
and Benj. ['xmghn. Valley; Jesse Funk and J. Hepperly, Elmira; E. 
Mailvley and J. M. Parker, West Jersey; Jesse Atherton and T. W. 
Ross, Goshen. It was also agreed that the Toulon National Demo- 
cratic Association present a banner to tlie town furnishing the largest 
list of" subscribers. The ])roceedings were signed 1)y D. McCance, 
president, and F. A. Forman, secretary, of the Toulon National Demo- 
cratic Association. 

The relations between the Neios (Republican) and the Democrat in 
August, 1860, ma}" be judged of by the following paragraphs: 

"A HOLY THING. A whiskey barrel in a Democratic community 
where there are augers handy." — Stark county News. 

••The same old stereotyped charge which the editor (shade of departed 
Franklin, forgive us!) of the News likes to make. •People who live in 
glass houses should never throw stones." " — Stark county Democrat. 

"AN EMPTY ^.nilNG. A whisky barrel in a ball-room, wlien a 
Eepublican editor has had an opportunity to suck at the bung-hole.'" — 
Stark county Democrat. 

Stark C^ounty Democrat^ not that of 1860, was first issued August 2, 
1867, by Seth F^ Rockwell, from the office in the Culbertson budding, 
in Rockwell's row. M. Shallenberger was political editor. In the 
latter's salutatory address, it is stated that with the exception of the 
campaign journal of 1860, "it is the first time in the history of the 
county that any other than a Republican paper has been published." 
Indeed, it may lay claim to be the pioneer Democratic pulJication, 
since that of 1860 was only inspired and written here, but printed and 
published at Kewanee. This lirst number contains a criticism of the 
first chai)ter of the history of Stark county, printed in the News., sup- 
l)Osed to be written by the editor-in-chief. The Democrat was regu- 
larly issued up to December 25, 1867, when a notice appeared stating 
that its publication w^ould be suspended through the holidays. No. 20 



JOURNALISM AND LITEKATURE. 171 

appeared on Januaiy 8, 1808, and every week tliereafter to the close 
of October of that year. In November, 1808, paper had not arrived; 
there was a l>rief suspension, and the next issue was ])ubhshed under 
the name The Prairie Chief. On August 19, 1808, S. F. Rockwell is- 
sued his valedictory. The Prairie Chief, Avith M. Shallenberger and 
Ben. W. Seaton editors. Yol. II., No. 2, appeared November LS, 1808. 
The editors gave as a reason for the change of name: "'We think the 
heading of the paper looks better." In April, 1872, he sold the Chief 
to Henry M. Hall, who published regularly until January, 1870, (when 
he moved to loAva) under the title JSeai Era., a Democratic paper. 

The Kit Klux Bulletin was issued at Toulon, May 7, 1809. Its 
motto was, "Chide mildly the erring." Its editors were ''Grand Cv- 
clops," ''White Alligator" and "Rattling Skeleton;" or, as alleged, 
Thomas Shallenberger, Charles W. Wright and Albinus Nance, the 
latter afterwards governor of Nebraska. The following extract from 
the salutatory gives an idea of the principles of this journal: ''Our 
Pulletin is not a religious paper. Others may ])rate of the orthodox, 
the martyrs, and the clergy; of the peace and happiness of religion, 
and spiritual hap])iness ; but we ])refer to deal with the human crea- 
tures about us. We do not confine ourselves to any sect or creed ; we 
are on the side of reform, and our field of labor is as broad as the uni- 
verse. Toulon needs reorganizing, and we attempt to reorganize her. 
Let us ho])e that we may meet with better success than Artemus, when 
he attempted to reorganize Betsy Jane." The first page was maiidy 
devoted to a story called " The 'Lyon ' Hunt," a local subject. On the 
third page the (piestion is asked, "Why is our barber like Charlie 
Wright?" and answered, "Because he never wears out the knees of 
his breeches in secret prayer." On the fourth l)age the im])ortant 
question is asked, " Why is P. M Blair like a turkey gobbler?" and 
answered, "Because he cant swallow a billiard liall." Almost every 
one learned sometliing regarding himself from this little four ])age 
journal; but it was not a success, the editors grew tired, and like the 
clan after whom it \vas named, colla])sed. 

Ilolly Starl\ a tri-Aveekly newspaper, was issued l)y Olivei' White 
at Toulon, in 1870. The little journal was decidedly republican, aud 
carried the name of James CI. Blaine for President. 

Toulon seuii-weekly Ileraid., a four-page, twenty-four-column jour- 
nal followed MoUi/ Starl'. Yol. lY, No. 1, was issutnl July 2, i8S0, 
l)earing the editorial name of E. H. Phelps. This, too. was re])ublican, 
carrying a twin miniature picture of (4arfield and Arthur at the head 
of its local cohunus. In every issue of this paper a- desire to give the 
people news, and plenty of it, is manifested. Among the eccentricities 
of the types, the following notice from the Peoria Call, relating to the 
Jferald office, bi'ings foi'th one: "The Toulon Herah] has a poet, and 
the poet wrote a beaiitiful little poem all about 'a IViend with a heai't 
of gold,' and the Herald ])ri liters set it u]) a 'heart of Chicago,'' and 
when Plieli)s, the ])i';!ctical and mattar-of-fact editor of the IferaUL 
read the ])roof. he mildly wondercMl at th(> ])liysi()Iogical ]i<Hndiarity of 
the friend's heai't, l)iit didn't i|uestion the accuracy of the statement, 
and so it went through the paper, 'heart of Chicago;' and now the 



172 IIISTOKY OF STAEK COUNTY. 

poet threatens to put a head on the whole office, if they don't fix the 
thing u]) satisfactorily." It is said that this paper was moved to 
Wyoming in 1881, and published there under the name of Wyoming 
Herald. 

The Stark countv Senthrel closed its sixth volume, September 23, 
1886. The paper was first issued October 8, 1880. On April 30, 1881, 
the partnership between Thomas IT. Blair and Will E. Nixon was dis- 
solved, and that of W. E. Tsixon and J. K. Hall formed, which existed 
until ALay, 1882, when Mr. Hall became sole owner. On January 1, 
1884, Gus Ilulsizer purchased an interest in the paper. This copart- 
nership, existing between J. Knox Hall and Gus Ilulsizer, Avas dis- 
solved Fel)ruary 13, 1885, and the latter became sole owner and editor. 
The Sentinel is now one of the strongest prohibition journals in tlie 
state. It is well edited, full up of local news, and claims a very wide 
circulation in the western states, as well as in this county. The editor, 
in closing volume six, says: "AYe are thankful for the friends we 
have got, and are ready to hea]i coals of fire on the heads of our ene- 
mies; in fact, do anything honorable to keep our 'list' booming and 
bring delinquents to time, and we greatly fear when oui* spirit departs 
it "will seriously haunt the lives of some, unless they bring up their 
arrears soon. Amid clouds and sunshine, buoyant hopes and ])rospects 
figured out mountain high, we change to volume seven and thank our 
numerous readers for liberal support, kind words, and timely advice, 
and ho]^e by judicious management and fine maneuvering to retain all 
and <>-ather in manv more." 

The ti'i-weekly CaJl was issued by ]Sixon Bros, at Toulon, March 
20, 1883. It was changed to the semi-weeklv Call, but ceased puljli- 
cation August 16, 1883. 

The Post-Chronicle dates l)ack to 1872, when E. H. Phel]>s. now of 
Kansas Oity, was requested to found a newspaper at Wyoming. The 
first number was issued August 9, 1872, to eighty ])a_ying subscribers. 
Tlie name ado])ted \vas due to the fact that the Bradford Chronicle 
then held the field in the eastern townshijis, and the new ])aper was 
in fact a consolidation of the newspaper interests of AVyoming and 
Bradford. 

The AVyoming Post, a new name given to the pioneer journal of 
the town, made its appearance within a few months under Mr. Phel]«' 
charge, and continueil in charge until the sale of liis paper to Gil- 
christ. In October, 1878, Oraddock ilv: Yosburg issued their greetings 
as editors of the Post. This journal continued in existence until Feb- 
ruar}' 5, 1885, when it was consolidated with the Herald., under the 
name Post-lLrald. J. M. Xewton, of the last-named journal, holding 
a position in the office almost continuousl}' from 1872 to 1885. 

The Wyoming Ilerald was one of the journalistic enterprises of 
E. II. Phelps. Whether it was a continuation of the Toulon Herald or 
a se])ai-ate venture the writer will not say, Imt from the following para- 
gra])h, which a])i)eared in tlie Peoria rA^^/yv?«/, Noveiid)er ]2. is^d, it 
appears to be identical with the Toulon Herald, excei)t in name of 
office: "When Phelps of Xht^^yonxmg Hercdd sold out to Gilchrist, 
the paper he was then publishing — the Wyoming l\)st — he agreed 



JOUKNALISM AND LITERATUKE. 173 

not to pul)Tisll a paper in Stark county for five years. Eecently 
he removed his |)a})er from Toulon to Wyomino-, and thus game m 
(hrect conflict with Gilclirist's successor, Sandham. Tlio hitter has 
now asked for an injunction restraining- Phelps from publishing the 
Herald in AVyoming. The point is to be argued in this city next 
week." Agreeable to the above facts, B. F. Thompson, ])etitioner"'s 
attorney, and J. II. jMiller, defendant's attorney, went to Peoria to 
argue the case before Judge McCulloch." It is clear, however, that the 
Iierald survived this attack, for in April, 1SS2, Chandler & Sweeney 
]nirchased the office from E. H. Plielps, who left for Kansas Oitv. In 
February, 18S4, L. W. C-handler sold his interest to A. AV. llotchkiss; 
Sweeney also dis])Osed of his interest, and on January 1, 1885, the 
])ublicati()n of a tri- weekly newspaper ceased, the owners continuing a 
weekly journal, until its consolidation with the Post under the name 
Fost-JIerald. On February 5, 1885, the flrst number of the Posf- 
Herald was issued, with AY. P. Sandham and A. AY. llotchkiss, pul)- 
lishers. Jason M. Newton has been assistant editor from ])rior to this 
time to Januarv, 188(;, and editor since that time, thus leaving Mr. 
Sandham free to attend to his official duties as Superintendent of 
Schools. The Post-Herald is an excellent weekly ])aper. Sound judg- 
ment marks its progress; while in its local and editorial columns the 
enterprising spirit of the town of its publication is nnide manifest. 
A. W. llotchkiss, so long connected with this ])a])er, is publisher of the 
Wo^-Keeueij Trlhune^ in Kansas. 

The Dalhj Post Herald is a newsy sheet, issued from this office 
during the fairs of the Central Agricultural Society. In make-up and 
local news it vies with anv of the penuv dailies of our laro-e cities. 

The jSta/'k Count ij Bee was issued m 1870, at AVyoming, by M. M. 
Monteith. Professing independence in politics Avhile leaning toward 
republicanism, it could not exist very long, nor did it. 

The Bradford ('hr<))il<'Je dates l)ack to the spi'ing of 1872, l)ut 
there is no ])ositive information at Inind to warrant the statement that 
it was published tlien. In August of that year it was consolidated 
with the Post, at AVyoming, under tiie title Post-Chronicle. 

The Bradford Times was flrst issued December 25, 188(». Tlie salu- 
tatory was as follows: '' The cpiestion will })rol)ably arise in the minds 
of. many who receive this copy of the Tiiaes, AVhat is the use of anotlier 
])aper in Stark county? AVe answer l)y saying that the peo])le of Bi'ad- 
ford tliink tliey can support a ])ai)er. They also think that while it 
may be beneflcial to them in manv ways it can do them no ])ossible 
harm. This is all the excuse we have to offer, simply letting the |)a])er 
speak foi' itself. F. N. Prout, editor."' ■ Prof. AY. li. Sandhanrs naine 
appears as editor Sei)tember 21, 1881 The Times was not ])i'inted at 
Jh'adford. The l^radford Lndependeid was issued June 4, 1885, fi-om 
the flrst printing office ever established at Bradford, by (\ F. Ihimil- 
ton and J. C. Blaisdell, the latter continuing in pai'tnershii) until .June 
1, 188(1, when Air. Hamilton became sole owner. 

TJte Lafdijrtle Annex was issued l)y S. A. Miller in Octol)ei', 188o. 
In June, 1881 S. A. Aliller changed the name i.)ft\\e Annex io the Lafnij- 
ette Sentinel^ under which the paper was published to its close. 



174 HISTOKY OF STARK COUNTY. 



AUTHORS OF PUULISIIKD WORKS. 



IP we exce])t the liistorical contributions of George Clifford to tlie 
})ress. the readal^le little book of 1863, by Oliver AYhite, on the marine 
artillery, and the pamphlet on the progress of the R. I. & P. R. E., by 
P. M. Blair, in 1869, we must j^lace the historical work of Mrs. Shal- 
lenl^erger first, and her name among the first authors in the county. 

Stark ( 'ountu and Its Pioneers is the title of this work, issued from 
the press of the Prairie Chief -aX Caml)ridge, 111., in 1876, and dedica- 
ted to the ]iioneer families of the country. Apart entirel}'^ from the 
])raiKe wliich should be accorded to the writer or compiler of local 
history, this vokime should earn for its author both praise and thanks; 
for in it are found many items, which never could be obtained had she 
not made the effort prior to 1875. Again, the woi'k bears evidence of 
her desire to be exhaustive ; it is the result of two and a half years of 
literary work, and a testimonial for all time to her industrv and her 
a])preciation of what is due to the past, to the present and to the 
future. While the volume does not pretend to contain anything like 
the whole ]:)ioneer story of the county, it forms one of the most valu- 
able contrilmtions to local history which has come under the notice of 
the writer since 1871, when he entered on historical work. 

Pen sl'etches of service in the marine artiUery. In May. 1863 there 
was ])ublished at Toulon a little book by Oliver "White, under this 
title. His contributions to the press are generally well ])repared. 

Tlis History of tJie 112t]i Pegt. III. Vol. Inf. was completed Novem- 
ber 19, 1885, and issued from the press of the Starl' Countij News the 
same year. The ty])e, paj)er and binding reflect nmch credit on the 
book depai'tment of that office. Tiie work contains 480 ])ages of 
])riiite(l mattei", devoted solely to the 112th i-egiment. The author. 
Captain I>. F. Thompson, treats his subject exhaustively and well. 
So thoroughly has his task been performed old comrades of his regi- 
ment, after reading the book, sit doAvn content as they did when Lee 
surrendered, and say : — 'AVe have no more to learn-— it is all there." 

The historical addresses of the Hendersons, Miles A. Fuller, Millers, 
Martin Shallenberger and the historical reminiscences of AY. H. Adams 
and many others, credited with such stoi'ies in this work, have gone far 
to Vender the work of the historian light, aiul the benefits to their 
fellow citizens very material. Beliind all this there is a literary under- 
current prevailing in the county which is manifested in ])apers on 
s])ecial subjects, and in a few instances cai-ricd into ciiurch and other 
records. 

I cannot leave this subject without touching on the ])oets and 
])oetry of the cotmty. In a few instances their verses are introduced 
ill one or other of the various chapters: but beyond this, and it must 
be regretted, the character of this record-book will not })ermit their 
l)ublication. Many of the poets write under assumed names, such as, 
" Nina,'' while a few subscribe their full names — among whom are the 
Stewarts and StoufTers. From 185<'. to the ])resent time the county 
]U'ess has contained very choice poems fi'om local poets. 

The literary circles, too. have jiroduced some excellent essayists, 



SCHOOLS AND INSTITUTE. 



175 



but, like the poets, their labors must claim only a general notice. So, 
too, with the debating societies. Their logical contests cannot be re- 
counted ; but in each case the names of the essayists and debators are 
given in the history of the townshi])s. 

In music and })ainting, in law and medicine, the county will more 
than compare with any other 288 square miles of an equal population 
in the universe. 



CHAPTER X. 




SCHOOLS AND INSTITUTE. 

IvOM 1821 to 1869 Illinois received no less than $713,195.45 
from the ]n'oceeds of sales of school lands, together with 
S117,919 of the it^28,()0O,O()(> surplus divided by Congress in 
1836 among the states. The land grant for educational 
purj)oses comprised 985,066 acres for common schools and 
4<i,oso acres foi- universities. The report of the State 
Supei'intendent of Public Instruction for the year ending- 
June 30, 1883, was issued in April, 1881. It shows the 
\vhole number of persons under twenty-one years of age in 
the state to be 1,510,918, as compared with 1,529,318 in 
1882, and 1,500,255 in 1880. The number between the 
ages of six and twenty-one years is 1,016,936, as compared with 1,037,- 
567 in 1882. The increase under this head is 166,223 in the eleven 
years reported since 1872. There are now 1,096,540 persons in Illinois 
of school age, and the school enrollment is 743,343. Many changes 
have been made in the original school laws of the state, each one tend- 
ing to improve the system. The amendment ])roviding for the elec- 
tion of district school directors came into force in May, 1857. A few 
years ago the act regulating the meeting of teachers' institutes came 
into operation and has been attended with beneficial results. 

The first school district was No. 1, of Essex in 1833, where a school- 
house was built July 4, 1834. Adam Perry presided here three 
months, receiving $55.50 from Isaac P. Essex. " On July 8, 1835, Miss 
Sahrina Chatfield received sl3 for teaching here three "months. Miss 
Chatfield nuii-ried B. L. llilhard, and died in Clark county, Iowa, as 
related in the township history. From this small beginning the school 
system has grown iq) to its i)i'esent important place. The action of 
the county couiiuissioners in 1839, in a[)pointing trustees for the school 
lands of the several townshi])s, is referred to in the chapter on the 
organization of the county. In the history of the townships the schools 
ai-e treated as fully as records would pei-mit, so that in this chapter all 
relating sj)ecially to the tcnvnships is omitted. 

The school commissioners or county superintendents from 184(» to 
the jiresent time are named as follows : James Holgate, 1840; Chas. 
II. Miner, 1841-5 (died in Chicago about 1850); James P. Lewis,1845-9. 
H 



17() HISTORY OF STAKK COUNTY. 

(Lewis taiiglit school in the " Old Brick," which stood ^vhe^e Pierson 
Miller's house now is). Samuel G. Wright was elected in 1841) over 
Martin Shallenberger. He was reelected in 1851 over Thomas J. Hen- 
derson and G. A. Clifford ; reelected in 1853 over Lucius E. Miner. In 
1855 R. C. Dunn was elected; reelected in 1857; reelected in 1859. 
N. F. Atkins was chosen in 1861, reelected in 1863. but dying Ijefore 
expiration of term, his place was filled b}^ J. W. Agard. Following 
Mr. Agard were B. G. Hall, now in Iowa ; Alonzo Abbott, of Brad- 
ford, a member of the institute of 1886; Amelia L. Ilalsey, now a 
Chicago teacher, and W. R. Sandham, the pi'esent county superin- 
tendent and member of the State Board of Education. The dates of 
election, candidates for the offices, votes and party to which each can- 
didate belonged are all given in the political chapter. 

The principal school statistics for each half decade since the close 
of the war are given as follows: The order of figures is : Year, 1st 
column ; nundjer of districts, 2d ; number of school houses, 3d ; school 
not kept, 4th; number of pii])ils under 21 years, 5th; number attend- 
ing, 6th ; number of males, Ttli ; number of females, 8th ; number of 
graded schools, 0th ; number of male teachers, 10th ; number of female 
teachers, 11th ; total receipts for scliool purjioses. 12th column : 



1865 — 76 — 71 — 5 — 4798 — 3042 — 1550 — 1 492 — 1 - 


-24 — 115 — 17,494.39 


1870 — 69 — 74 — 1 — 5014—3138 — 1654 — 1484— 2- 


-38 — 105 — 38,222.49 


1875 — 79 — 84 6192 — 3520—1833 — 1687 — 17- 


-59 — 110 — 55,226.41 


1880 — 73 — 72 — 1 — 5500—2772 — 1453 — 1319— 6- 


-51 — 110 — 59,294.80 



in isco there were two pi'ivate schools attended by tliiity-hve 
pupils. In 1870 there were nine colored youths attending school 
here. 

The condition of the schools of the county in 18S6, ;is sh«Avn in 
Superintendent Sandliam's report to the l)e])artment of Public Instruc- 
tion, is as follows: Males under twenty-one years, 2425; females 
under twenty-one years, 2311; total under twenty-one yeai's, 4736. 
Males between six and twenty-one years, J 740; females between six 
and twenty-one years, 1711 ; total, 3460. jS^umber of school districts 
holding school for 110 davs or more, seventy; number of traded 
schools, six; ungraded, sixty-five; total number of schools, seventy- 
one; total numljer of ])upi]s enrolled, 2683, of which 450 males and 
454 females were enrolled in graded scliools. In these last-named 
schools there were eight male, and sixteen female, teachers emi)loyed 
during the year ending June 30, 188*1. In the ungraded schools were 
thirty-six male, and eighty-six female, teachers, or in all schools 146 
teachers. In the graded schools male teachers presided 574^ months, 
and female teachei's, 108J months. In the ungraded schools male 
teachers presided 151:^, and female teachers, 350, months in the aggre- 
gate. The number of brick schoolhouses is four, of frame houses, sixty- 
eight, o-ivino- u total of seventv-two buildinos. Seven districts have 
libraries, aggregating 233 volumes. There are two private schools, 
attended bv fortv male, and fortv-two female, puinls. i)resided over bv 
one female, and two male, teachers. The highest salary ])aid any male 
teacher per month was J^112.50, and paid any female s55 ])er month. 
The lowest in the case of males was .^27, and of females. ^25, per 



I 



S(UI0OL>S AND INSTITUTE. 177 

month. The amount earned by male teachers during tlie year was 
5^10,477.92, and by female teachers, $17,008.20. The amount of dis- 
trict tax-levy was 5^31, 100.03. The estimated value of school property 
was placed at §106,550; of school libraries, $740, and of school appa- 
ratus, $1205. The amount of bonded school debt in June, 1880, was 
$4350. There were four of school age in the county who could 
neither read nor write — one mute, one blind, and two mentalh' weak. 
The accounts of townsliip treasurers in re distributal)le funils, shows 
receipts, including balances in every township, amounting to $584,097, 
all of which was paid out except $223.13 on hand June 30, 1886. The 
account with school districts s lows total receipts from special district 
taxes of $32,228.72, })upils who paid tuition fees, $500.70, and other 
receipts, bringing the total revenue of districts for the 3^ear up to $61,- 
283.50. The whole amount paid teachers was $28,545.44. The total 
ex])enditure. reported by districts, was $30,084.86, leaving a balance 
of $23,008.64 on June 30, 1886. During the year a bequest of $18,- 
309.50 was made by Lewis Austin to the schools of Elmira. The 
amount ])aid school treasurers was $4,193.40, moneys invested, $18,- 
932.12. The names of treasurers for the year ending June, 1886, are 
Samuel AYrigley, Valley; A. G. Hammond, Essex; Joseph Swank, 
West Jersey; C. M. I>eecher, Goshen; Levi Silliman, Toulon; Brooks 
W. Crum, Penn ; H. J. Baldwin, Osceola ; and W. M. Fuller, Elmira. 
The foregoing, with the exhil)it of township fund, balance sheet, 
hoards of education, high schools, and general report of the county 
supei'intendent, constitute the whole report for the year ending June 
30, 1886. In his report to the Board of Supervisors he states that he 
had spent 124 days visiting schools; twenty days' institute work; 
twelve days on teachers' examination, and other official work, forty- 
six days. During the year 1885-86, had visited every school in the 
county three times, and five schools four times. In every township 
the efforts of the present superintendent to raise the school standard 
still higher are appreciated. The people know that his enthusiasm in 
school Avork alfects the teachers, is carried by them to the })upils, and 
thence to the homes of the people. His administration of the su})er- 
intendent's office has been attended with incalculable good. 

Tcdchers' Institute and Association. — In a letter addressed to Wil- 
liam Nowlan by Rev. S. G. Wright, replying to one asking for infor- 
mation in re the county institute, the following history is given: ''My 
recollection is that Rev. A. Lyman, of Geneseo, at my invitation, con- 
ducted the first county institute at my honse, just noi'th of Toulon. 
Rev. R. C. Dunn afterward told me it was the first institute hehl in 
Illinois. I have a minute book in my journal under date of March 19, 
1850: 'Last Friday I drew up a constitution for a teachers' associa- 
tion.' Also, under date A])ril 1, 1850: 'Last week attended Teachers' 
Institute.' Also, in May: 'attended institute in Lafayette. I find, 
also, in November, a notice of a teacliers' institute and essays of a 
high order read. I have a notice of having addressed the institute in 
October, 1852. I think we had at that time a countv institute with 
sul). or local institutes, as at Lafayette. Mr. Xowlan, continuing the 
subject, believes that the meeting of October, 1852, was the first 



178 HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY. 

public or regular meeting of the teachers. From this period until 
1859 meeting's Avere held, but the organization was little more than a 
social meeting clul>. In the summer of 1859 R. C Dunn and Oliver 
White were the only pei-sons avIio responded to a call for reorganizing 
the institute. A few evenings later the teachers of Toulon assembled 
at Mr. Dunn's house, where, with Mr. Dunn, were Rev. A. J. "Wright, 
Baptist; Rev. Matthews. Methodist, both of Lafayette; Rev. S. C. 
Humphrey, Christian church, Toulon; Rev. G. A. Leaver, of Wyom- 
ing. During this session one B. F. Taylor delivered his lecture. 
Among the readers were L. D. Gleeson. Miss Rogers. Dr. J. C. Cope- 
stake, Miss Maiy Berfield. W. W. Wright, C. J. Gill, or 'Jud' Gill. 
Gill Avon the prize, although Rev. G. A. Leaver announced publicly 
that he could not distinguish Jud's reading from a gymnastic exercise. 
This meeting adjourned to the .spring of 1860, but did not reassemble 
then. 

In the spring of 1867 B. G. Hall I'eceived a premium of s50 for 
getting a number of subscril)ers for the Teachers JournaJ. This he 
donated to the teachers' institute, to be applied in founding a library. 
Some money was added to this sum and. books were purchased. This 
led t(j the formation of the Stark County Teachei*s' Library Associa- 
sion, which ceased after a short time, and with its downfall the book 
collection disa|)[)eared. Then followed the teachers" institute as Ave 
noAv know it. haunted Avitli lectui'ers, school book agents and ambitious 
readers like Gill. 

The teachers who received certificates in 1861 were: Rebecca 
Trickle, William P. Barr, All)ert S. Johnston. John F. Rhodes. Levi 
Silliman. Charles Atherton. Eugenie Hull, Kate F. Johnston. Ellen 
Stanton, Ellen T. S])encer, Ann L. Himes, Eliza Drumm. Olive Smith, 
Martha M. Burnham, Rebecca Xicholas, Ella Bales, Jennie McCul- 
lough, Lucy Oziah. William Seely (local preaclien, Angelina Trickle, 
Miss Lynum. Eliza C. Smitli. Miss Sabra Wood, Ada AVillcox, Clara 
Pike, !Martlia Pratt. ]Martha Porter, Alice Fuller, Mary J. Lennon, 
Mary J. Pettit. Mrs. L. I). Purge, Mary Perry. Fanny Hicks. Harriet 
Rhodes. Ellen Kino-. ^Mai-v Gillette. ]\[arv B. Whitaker. Martha Sher- 
borne. Ellen Lynch. Jane Lyncli. Jc^shua Thorj). Olive Decker. Peter 
A. Ferbrache, Charles Th()m})Son, Alonzo P. Johnscm. Martin Johnson, 
Edwin Smith, Eugene M. Gallup, Eliza Marvin. John Watts, Henry H. 
Leonard, William Bell, Salathiel Fast, James Ferris. Robert Barr, 
James Holgate. Ezra Griffin. Lucia (Tregoiy. Albert.Crawfoi-d. Herl:)ert 
Bassett, John Kell, Harmon Phenix, Marv (Toodrich. Philip Tabor. 
Ben. Drake, D. V. Redding and William W. Miller. 

Among those to Avhom certificates Avere issued in 1862 were Samuel 
Purge, James M. Severens, W. A. Jones, Sanford Clark. James Rob- 
inson, George BroAvn, X. C. Blsho}). George Smitli, Martin Stitsel and 
Orra M. Allen, the onh' males anion"- sixtv-nine admitted. In 1863 
there do not apjiear to be any certificates or examinations held, and 
onh" eight in 1S6-I-. In \^^u) the following notice Avas published: 

•' A teacliers' institute Ava.s ealled to be held at Toulon, eoinineiieiiiii- 
April 20, 1865, and a good deal of pains taken to jjersuade teachers from 
abroad to attend, but it being the Aveek of the assassination of our Presi- 



SCHOOLS AND IXS'I ITUTK. 179 

(lent, the editor gave notice tluit tlie people could not prcpui-e for tlie insti- 
tute; it was therefore not held and no other one called. 

"J. W. Agari), 
''County Superintendent of Schools." 

The teachers to whom certificates were granted in ISO-i and 1865, 
and who niav be considered inend:)ers of the post-hellvm institutes, are 
named as follows: W. 11. Ulanchard, Francis Davis, (leorge Nicholas, 
Chai'les ]\Iyers, Allen V. Miller, Edwin Butler, llobert J. Dickinson, 
James H, TTurnbuU, George Bradley, Leona Blanchard, Jane Deys, El- 
vira Newton, Susan A. Beattv, Eni'ilv Tildon, Louisa L. Wilson, Eliza 
A. ISrcGlashan. Maria L. ruttei-, :\[artha O. Trickle, Nancy S. Bennett, 
Alice Bayniond, Harriet AVitter, Eliza Eckley, Mary B. Carter, Henri- 
etta J. Flint, Amelia A. Ilalsey, Harriet G. Grant, Kate A. Hablit, 
Mary J. Munson, Hannah Munson, Rosie Pratz, Jennie Bevier, Henri- 
etta Ividdle. Bebecca Fonts, ACi's. Townsend, Jane E. Shemerhorn, Mar}^ 
C. Lvon, Annie E. Dyei", Eliza Jane Moffitt, Juliet P. Judd, Mrs. Mary 
A. Bailey, Eliza J. Stockner, Amanda Mohan, Libbie A. Bryan, Emi- 
line Taylor, Louisa Whiffen, Emily Kellogg, Lecta Nicholas, Anna B. 
Kinmouth, Olivia A. Rhodes, Celesta Eastman, Jennie Dixon, Eliza A. 
Sticknev, Lucy A. Lil)by, Almira M. Snyder, Henrietta L. Snider, Susan 
P. Nash, ]\[ary O. Stevens, Miss Anthony, Josephine Dyer and Celestia 
Dyer. 

P'rom Novend^er, 1S()5 to December 7, 1S66, there were one less 
than l.")l teachers' certificates issued, many being rene-svals. Among 
the nundjer were Orlando Brace, a returned soldier, James E. Finley, 
Cyrus A. Anthony, Charles Butler, Charles R. Thom])son, all returned 
soldiers; Albert W. King, Josephine Dyer, of District No. 8, Penn, 
who ]iresided there for a number of years ; ^Mrs. Maria P., 
widow of N. F. Atkins; Robert Fell and Alfred Ilemmant, returned 
soldiers. In LS(;7 certificates were issued to Augustus Hulsizer and 
Edwin Butler, returned sohliers, and eighty-eight others. In 1808 
ninetv-nine certificates were issued, only twenty -nine to male ai)pli- 
cants. In 18()1>, 92 certificates were granted; 1870, 108; in 1871. 02; 
in 1872, 141 ; in 1873,90; in 1874, 140; in 1875, 111 ; in i876, 242; in 
1877, 160; in 1878, 103; in 1S70. 11.^ in 1880, 108; in 1881, 119; and 
in 18S2, 124 certificates were issued. Even now. four years after the 
last list was made, a large number of the ladies have married, or are 
scattered throughout tlie west — very few are engaged in the schools 
of Stark county. ' 

The Teachers' Normal Class was organized in the ''Old Brick" at 
Osceola, INIarch 23, 1868, bv B. G. Hall, with the following : Bartlett 
G. Hall, Dr. II. B.Upton, AVilliam C. Kay, Louisa A. Stone, Ellen 
Hall, Emeline Lvle, Marv Adams, Martha Rule, N. Clark, Rev. S. G. 
AVright, Edwin J. Smith,' Ed. P. Wright, Anna P. Oliver, Esther Hall, 
Bertha Parks, Anna Davis, Ellen Gurley, ]\[ary P. Wright and Florence 
J. Chandjerlain. 

The Stark County Teachers' Association \vas organized at Toulon, 
October 27, 1869. W. C. Dewey was elected president; Mrs. A. J. 
Dyer, vice-president; R. Fell, secretary, and Miss Henrietta Riddle, 



180 HISTORY OF STARK COFNTY. 

treasurer. F. M. Shallenberger, W. P. Wing. Misses A. J. Dyer. 
Louisa Taylor and L. Witter formed the executiYe committee. 

From this time down to the present day the teachers of Stark 
haYC been held together hy organization ; but of tlieir meetings, 
brief notices are only at hand. 

Paul Newton was president and Grace Jones secretar}' of the Stark 
County Teachers' Association in 1S80-1, and both are today prominent 
in the school circle of the county. 

The Teachere' Institute in 1882 comprised the following members : 
A. L. Halsey, H. M. White, M. Starrett. B. G. HaU, Amy I. E. Reed, 
ElYira Demuth, H. J. Bvatt, Sarah Berfield. Frank Akins, M. A. Plall, 
F. E. Saunders, A. B. "'Abbott, W. P. Sandham. H. J. Clark. P. J. 
Dickinson, F. S. Posseter. Mary Christy, E. II. Farley. Lizzie Meehan, 
Xeva Xewell, A. Keller, William Xowlan. James Kinney, Pobert Fell, 
Hattie J. Dator, S. A. Little, Henry Nowlan, F. C. Wilson, ]\Iary Hey- 
wood, E. E. Ackley, George Xowlan. E. B. Humphreys. M. H. Keyes, 
Paul Xewton, W. C. Henry, Joseph Chase, Al'l)t Snare, D. T. Osen- 
bauD-h, E. C. Posseter. Frank Pist. ]\[arv A. West. Anna Hevwood, 
James Chambers, Ella Turney, Grace Jones, Josie Tjaden, Kate Dris- 
coU, XeUie Jones. B. F. Jackson. Adna T. Smith. 

In 188^^ the Xormal Institute \Yas organized under the new statute. 

The Stark County Xormal Institute met at Wvoming. July 18, 
1886, with Superintendent Sandham presiding. He was assisted by 
Mr. A. B. Abbott, of Bradford, and Miss Grace Jones, of Wyoming. 
The list of members present, by townships, is as follows: West Jersey 
ToAvnship. — Lizzie L. Lyon. Minnie Bradley, Jennie Sweat, Madge 
Adams, Sarah Fulton, Caspar liana wait. Goshen Township. — Hattie 
Hendricks, Mary Maginis, Amy Byatt, Willie White, George W. 
Heskett, Mamie Byatt, Eva Beers, Xellie M. Jones. Frank John- 
son. Cora Galbraith. Will F. Johnson. Essex Townshi]). — Beatrice 
Kinkade, Lucretia D. Ogle, Ella B. Finley, Jennie A. Colwell, Ella 
E. Turney, Xettie E. AViley, Jenny Jordan, Cleora II. Quick, Kate 
A. Thomas, Alma Trimmer, Minnie Gehr, Eveline Lory, Henrietta 
Graves. Toulon Township. — Jennie Gharrett. Alice M. MaAvby, Elsie 
J. Mawliy, Anna C. Chase, Hattie White, Carrie White, Mary Fulton, 
Hattie Byatt, Anna Hevwood, Mary Hej^Avood, Lena Trouslot. Addie 
Keeling. Georgia Biles, Posa Swanson. Fred Fox. Frank Xowlan. 
Frank Smith, Xina E. Ilartz. Carrie Ilolgate, Hallie Sargent, Anna 
Copestake, Blanche WoUe, Ella Wolfe, Maud Brees, Alice Graham, 
Dora B. 'Pliter, Mamie Pliter, Laura Dickinson, Effie Adams, Sarah 
Kerney, Dell Lyon, Maggie Peny, Charles Foster, Frank Jones, W. F. 
Xicholson. Elmira Township. — Mary E. Prosser, Vena Johnston, 
Lottie Oliver, Maggie Ilaswell, Alice Green, Lucille Buswell, Alice 
Martin, Stella Sterling. Elmer E. Briggs. Valley Township. — Clara 
L. Joh, Allie Y. Cox, Florence Peterson, Mary Gill. Alice A. Selders, 
Mollv McManus. Cora Jarman. Georgia A. Parkei*. Melvin liJ. Patter- 
son. Penn Township. — Mary Colgan, Florence A. Proctor. Ella Wick- 
ham, Marie E. Dolan, Sallie Clark, Xellie Bunnell. Attie Martin. Paul 
Xewton, Percival G. Pennick. Osceola Townsliip. — Clyde Buswell. 
Effie Christy, Abby A. Damon, Lillie Phenix. Lizzie Howes, Marj^ 



KKF.lGIors AXI) SKMI-KKLKilors ASS( )01 A'1I( ).\S. 



181 



Sliarky, John M. Davles, Florence Kussell, llattie Bray, Jacob Wasson, 
Sara A. Little, Stella Sterling. Monica, Peoria county. — Ida Whit- 
ting'ton, Emma Mclvown. This list eml)races many names connected 
with fonnei' meetings, and almost covers the entire roll of teachers 
then in the county schools. 

The institute of 188<) is the fourth held under the administration of 
Professor Sandham, and the last of the four normal drills held under 
the new school law. 



CIIAPTEM XL 



KKLKaors AM) SEMI-KKI.Kaors ASSOCIATIONS. 





fl 



HE pioneer ^Methodist pi'eacher of Illinois, Jesse Walker, 
was Ixn-n in Viro'inia in 17^0, entered the ministry of the 
M. E. church in 1804; two years later came to Illinois, and 
in 1826 visited the Indian village near Plainfield. In 1827 
\\v was appointed superintendent of the Fox River mission ; 
in 1821> took eluu'ge of the Des Plaines mission, estahlislied 
numerous societies of tlie M. E. church throughout northern 
Illinois, and died at Plainfield in 1885. Fifteen years after, 
his l)ody was disint<M'red and reburied in the new cemetery, 
where a monument to his memory was erected by order of 
the Rock river conference, M. E. church. Under him Isaac B. 
Essex was ap]winted teacher of the Indian school at Peoria, 
and to him is credited one of the first sermons on Methodist 
doctrine in Stark connty. It is not at all certain that 
elders Silliman and Chenoweth ])reached here in 1829, con- 
tenting themselves with the physical aid given to Essex in 
establishing Jiis home. Rev. E. Heath of the St. Louis 
Methodist church, ju'eached here toward the close of 1834, 
and the following year came Rev. William C. Cummings of the Peoria 
mission, to lay the foundations of ]\Iethodism here. From 1829 to 
1835 the preachers named in the history of Essex township, visited the 
settlements in what is now Stark county. The I]aptist church of 
Fahrenheit, (T(jshen townshi]), Avas fouiuled in 1837 at the house of 
elder Miner. The luothei' of Presbyterian churches was established at 
Osceola, June 8, 1839, elder Davis presiding. The IVIorinons may be 
said to have recruited a church here in 1 84-< i-lfi, with John Miller, 
Isaac J3. Essex, Ii'a T. Dibble, Adam Perry, Robert and James 
McClenahan, Dr. Richards and Avife, Deacon Mott, Samuel Parrish, 
Mrs. Parrish, one son and three daughters, members ; but in 1811, the 
founder of Congregationalism here, S. (i. AYright, offered battle to the 
Mormon elders, and won a few of those members back. AVithin the 
last forty-six years, all the new Presbyterian societies, the Universalists, 
Christians or Canipl)elites, United Brethren and Catholics have built 
u]) chui'ches and large societies, which are all noticed in the township 
history. 



182 HISTORY OF STARK COUSTY. , 

Sunday School Union.— The Stark county Siinda}^ School Union, 
organized in 1867, held its first annual meeting- at James Ilolgate's 
grove that year. Davis Lowman was j^resident, witli AV. AV. "Wright 
secretary. The Stark county Sunday School Union Picnic Association 
was organized August, 1868, during the annual meeting of the Union. 
The Sunday School society held its annual meeting August 12, 1869, 
when D. Lowman was elected president. W. W. Wi-iglit. secretary, 
and Samuel Bnrge, treasurer. The vice-presidents were : J. M. Rogers, 
H. Griffin, Liberty Stone, Osceola; Eev. J. H. Montgomery. Elmira; 
Eev. AV. A. "Webster and H. "Willet, Toulon ; Rev. M. Hill and Isaac and 
Thomas, Essex ; Eev. T. S. Tail and Eeuben Swank. "West Jersey ; and 
Kev. Mr. Tiffany, G. Dillery, Goshen; Schermerliorn, Penn ; H. H. 
Oliver, Elmira ; and A. X. Peterson, Valley. 

In 1870 a formal meeting was held, of which no record can be 
found. The sixth annual meeting was held at Toulon, August 22, 1871. 
Avhen the following officers were elected : Davis Lowman, president ; 
IT. Y. Godfrey, E. G. HiD, Eeuben Swank, Eev. Montgomery of 
Elmira, Ilopkin Shivvers, Chas. Is ewell, James "Woods and Dr. T. "W. 
HaU, vice presidents; W. W. "Wright, secretary, Samuel Burge, treas- 
urer and ^. "W. Dewey, assistant secretary. The seventh annual meet- 
ing was held at the M. E. Church. Toulon, January 15, 187;>. E. H. 
Phelps was chosen assistant secretary vice X. W. Dewey, the other 
officers being reelected except the vice presidents for Toulon, Essex, 
"West Jersey and Osceola, of which the following were chosen res])ect- 
ively : xs^. W. De^vey, Eev. J. "W. Agard, J. Eaymond and E. P. 
Wright. Tlie eightli meeting was held September 1, 1874. Davis 
Lowman was elected president ; E. L. McCord, E. H. Pheli)s, W. W. 
Wright, Eobert Stonier, H. H. Oliver, C. A. Schemerhorn, E. P. 
A¥right and Henry Blood, vice presidents: X. W. Dewey, secretary 
and Saniuel Burge, treasurer. The ninth meeting, like the others, was 
held at Toulon, August 17, 1875. Tlie officers were nearly all reelected ; 
and so from 1876 to 1878 the greater number of old officers were con- 
tinued. In 1879 Eev. J. C. INlvers was elected president ; B. G. Hall, 
secretary; Eev. W. Walters, B.' G. Hall, A. L. Pott and E. II. Phelps, 
executive committee ; E. P. AV right. Eev. T. Springer and James Ful- 
ton, Penn, H. F. Blood, E. II. Miller and Wm. "\¥ilson, Essex, John 
Hawks, E. A. Burge. Geo. Eutherford, Aliss A. L. Halsey and A. D. 
Perrine, vice presidents. The annual meeting of 1880 was held at 
Castleton, September 1, when Rev. D. T. Wilson Avas elected president ; 
B. G. Hall, secretary and treasurer ; E. E. Tyson, D. S. Wrain and W. 
H. Barrett, executive committee. The vice presidents then chosen 
were AVatson Henry, L. P. Ilimes, E. B. Lyon, E. H. Aliller, Eev. 
James Henderson, II. F. Blood, Paul Xewton and Geo. Thompson. 
The meeting of June, 1881, was held at Bradford. Eev. Wm. Stur- 
geon was elected president; Dr. J. G. Boardman. Judge AV. AV. 
AVrioIit, Eevs. J. C. Alvers, L. F. Cullom and E. E. Tvson. executive 
committee, and B. G Hall, secretary. Airs. A. L. Halsey, Airs. C. AV . 
A^an Petten, Dr. E. O. Boardman. Dr. J. G. Boardman, A. P. Aluller, 
E. H. Smith and H. D. D. Alartin were among the vice presidents 
elected. The meeting of June, 1882, was held at the Baptist Church, 



RELIGIOUS AXD SKMI-RKLKJIOrS ASSOCIATIONS. 185 

Osceola. Dr. J. G. Boardman was olocted ])resident: Augustus IIul- 
sizer, W. 11. P>arrott, Ilevs. AV. If. Joi'dau and IngTaliaui and B. G. TTall, 
executive committee. Among the new vice presidents were M. Snai'e, 
II. J. Baldwin, Ghas. Grivits, L. P. Ilimes and Geo. Eutlierford. The 
fifteenth annual meeting was held in the Presbyterian Church, Elmira, 
in June, 1883. Dr. J. G. Boardman and B. G. Hall were reelected. 

A. P. Miller was added to the executive committee, and A. S. Thomp- 
son was chosen vice president for Gsceola, the othei' vice presidents 
being reelected. The sixteenth meeting Avas held at Toulon, June, 
188-1-, when T. C. Thomas was elected ])resident; Dr. J. G. Boardman, 
secretary, and these with AV. IF. Rarrett, J. AV. Stevens and Geo. 
Eutlierford, executive committee. The vice presidents were Revs. Y. 

B. Ingraham, W, H. Jordan and JVEessrs. T. F. Fate, Gus. llulsizer, W. 

C. Henry, A. C. Himes, Henry F. Blood and Joseph C'hase. In 1885 
Bev. ^y. IT. Jordan was elected president, and in June, 1886, the fol- 
lowing named officers were chosen: President, J. W. Stephens, vice 
])residents, A. S. Thompson, E. P. Boardman, W. Peagan, Morris 
Smith, Joseph Chase, Gus. Jlulsizer, W. C. Henry and E. G. Hill; 
executive committee, Osceola and Elmira, T. F. Fate; Penn and Valley, 
W. H. Jordon ; Toulon and Essex, 1). G. Stouff er ; AVest J ersey and 
(iroshen, J. F. Phodes; J. G. Boardman, secretary and treasurer." The 
seventeenth meeting was held in June, 1885, with Augustus Hulsizer, 
])residing. The officers elected were Rev. W. II. Jordan, president ; 
Dr. J. G. Boardman, secretary; J. W. Stephens, H. F. Blood, A. S. 
Thomson, Gus Hulsizer, executive committee; Robert Thoin])son, W. 
Reagan, Wm. Simpson, J, F. Rhodes, Joseph Chase, C. P. Wilson, W. 
C. Henry and Robert Armstrong, vice jiresidents. 

Cami^meefimj Asson'afion, as noticed in the history of Wvoming, 
may be said to (late back to 1840, when Elder Newton G. Berryman 
presided over a meeting held on or near the site of the present M. E. 
church at Wyoming. Revs. Euos Thompson and Wilson Pitner, as- 
sisted. The meeting at Fraker's Grove, near Lafayette, in 1842, over 
which A. E. Phelps presided, outdone the first camp completelv, 
while the third, held at Wyoming in 1843, surpassed its predecessors 
in number attending and sjuritual work performed. Rev. John Morey 
presided, with Rev. H. J. Humphry, assisting. Year after year the Meth- 
odists and others carried on such meetings until a regular campmeeting 
association was formed. This ba,nd of gospel workers claim a com- 
plete organization, with groves, tents, buildings, etc. The meeting of 
August 11, 188(), continued for several days. During the session good 
board can be obtained on the camp ground at the following prices : 
One day, i{>l ; tAvo or more days, 25c. per meal ; for the week, |4 ; on 
Sunday, transient, 50c per meal. 

BiNe faciei ij. — The Stark County Bible Society elected the fol- 
lowing officers for 1850-7: Norman Ihitler, president ; C. M.John- 
son, vice-president ; T. 11 Starrett, secretary ; Davis Lowman, treas- 
urer; Rev. R. C. Dunn and Rev. Mr. Ransom, executive committee; 
Samuel Halsted, Benjamin Packer, Hopkins Shivers, local agents; 
Mrs. N. Butler and Miss Sarah Armstrong-, collectors. The traveling: 
agent reported that onl}' thirteen families in the county Avere Avithout 



186 HISTORY OF STAKK COUNTY. 

J]ibles. This org-anizution ina^v 1)e said to have lost its occupation 
since the organization, of l^rancli or townshi]) Bible societies. 

Temperance League. — The Citizens"' Tempei'ance League was organ- 
ized :\[arch T). 1883, with ])resident, A. P. Millei-; vice-president. W. IT. 
]>arrett ; secretary, B. F. Thompson ; treasurer, P. P. Johnson ; execu- 
tive committee. Charles Girvits. AVest Jersey ; A. G. Ilammond, Xorth 
Essex ; Henry Blood, Yalley ; Paul Xewton, Penn : A. F. Stickney, 
East Toulon ; AYm. A. Dewey, West Toulon ; AYm. Kowlan, Goshen ; 
Kol)t. Armstrong, Elmira : E. P. Wright, Osceola : J. M. Jones. 
Lafayette; D. ]\[urchison, Toulon Village; 1>. G. Ilall, AVyoming Vil- 
lage, and H. J. Baldwin, Bradford. The Stark County Temperance 
T'nion. of whicli J. 11. Quinn was last president, preceded the Citizens' 
T'uiou. For tlie ])ast forty years tliis tem]iorance organization has 
been carried on under one form oi- another, and is as iustlv ao-o-ressive 
today as it Avas when the saloonkeeper and distiller and l)rewer placed 
the whisky shop within easy access of every citizen. How soon the 
question of regulating morals will l)e introduced into temperance work 
is uncertain. There are many crimes, not always l)red of strong drink, 
against society and the home, which call for prompt denunciation and 
punishment. 

Tr. C T. I\ — The Women's Christian Temperance Union dates 
back to May, 1884. In this month JNIi's. Smith, of Elmwood, district 
oi'ganizer. canvassed the C(ninty and formed three local societies, one 
at Wyoming, one at Toulon, and one at Lafayette. In February, 1885, 
a convention was held at Wvoming, when Miss jMcDowell org-anized a 
county society. In April, 188(), a liranch was estal>lished at Stark A'il- 
lage, and on the 18th of that month the second convention, in which 
the four societies were represented, was held at Toulon. Mrs. R. A. 
Turner has been president since organization, ]Mrs. Harriet ]M. Blaii- 
treasurer, and Mrs. C. P. McCorkle are the present olficers. 

JSLus'ical Sorletij. — On August 25, iSlio, the Stark County Musical 
Union elected A. J. AVright, president ; D. J. Walker, secretary and 
treasurer ; ]S^. J. Smitli, conductor ; O. Whitaker, John F. Ilhodes, S. 
M. F. Farrar, Theo. Xewell. P. V. Blanchard. and Miss Jennie Hay- 
wood, vice-presidents. F<n" many years this excellent society has not 
existed as a county organization, but in its place a hundred musical 
societies have grown up, so that no church and ver}" few homes are 
without their own musical circle. All such societies are referred to in 
the township and village histories, and this one, too, should find its 
place there, had it not something to do in founding many of our church 
choirs of the present time. 

The jNIasonic and Odd Fellow societies and Grand Army Posts are 
treated in the chapters devoted to local history. 



CITAPTEK XII. 




AGEICULTUKAL SOCIETIES. 



EGIISTNINGS of all iiiutual ])rotection and i^rogressiye or- 
ganizations date Ijack to the settlement of Elniira town- 
ship and neighborhood, when the pioneers banded them- 
selves together to ])rotect their claims nntil their lands 
could l>e ])urchased and entered under the laws. Following 
came the anti-horse-thief and anti-o-amblino- association, 
then the underground railroad conductors' association, and 
following a number of local agricultural organizations. In 
the fall of 1843 a meeting of famers was held in the old 
court house, which is now the Virginia House stable, to 
discuss means and ways for the organization of an agricul- 
tural society. Capt. Henry Butler delivered an address; 
Jonathan Miner presided, with Ilenr}" Butler secretaiy. W. 
11. Henderson was elected president ; Lawrence Dorrance, 
vice-president; J. Emery, II. IS.; Oliver Whitaker, secretary; Jonathan 
Hodgson, treasurer ; J. Holgate, Sylvanus Moore and Cyril Ward, ex- 
ecutive committee. On November 25, 1843, the constitution was signed 
bv the following named members: James Holgate, Syl. Moore, Samuel 
Camp, Dexter Wall, S. Strouss, Asher M Smith, Amza ]S^ewman, 
Joseph ]^ewton, L. C. Aveiy, Nehemiah Merritt. John A. Williams, 
Abner Camp, AVilliam F. Thomas, Henjy Butler, L. Dorrance. 

The Wyoming committee comprised Syl. Moore, William 
Thomas and James Holgate. The central committee was composed of 
Benjamin Turner, W. Miner and Cyril Ward. The Massillon commit- 
tee comprised Moses Boardman, Stephen Trickle and (leorge Eckley. 
The Lafayette precinct committee comprised Joseph Emery, Barney 
Jackson and Henry IMcClenahan. The Osceola committee comprised 
flames Moore, James Bus well and lleniw Sturms. The committee on 
constitution comprised Charles H. Miner, Henry Butler and Oliver 
Whitaker ; and the corres])onding committe. Captain Butler, M. G. 
P>race, B. M. Jackson, W. II. Henderson and Moses Boardman. For 
some years this association existed only in name. 

Stark County Agrictdtitral Society was organized Octobor 29, 1853 
and held its first fair at Toulon, September 20, 1 854. In 1868 the 
society purchased the fair grounds of twelve acres from the county for 
S720, and the same year [)urchac:ed three acres more for $330, Mi". 
Kowlan negotiating the purchases. The original members were : — 
Henry Butler, senior, John B. Atherton, AVilliam AV. Wright, sr. 
Hugh Rhodes, Benjamin Turner, Thomas J. Henderson, Jacob Janii- 

Tapp, Joseph Cox and 



son, B. F. Boughii, S. M. 



Curtis, Bushrod 
18^ 



ISS HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY. 

Williaiii Cluuiibei'liu. General TIkjhuls was ap})ointe<l President; 
C\aptain Bntler, Wni. AV. Wright, Jacob Jamison and David ]\[cCance 
were ap]iointed a committee on constitution. Tlie first election under 
the C(mstitutiontook place in Xovend)er 185o, wlien Hugh Khodes was 
ciiosen })]'esident, Martin Sha]lenl)erger and Jacob Jamison, vice- 
presidents, John R. Atherton, treasurer; David McCance, recorder; 
am] Captain l^utler correspondent. Tlie tirst fair was held in Septem- 
ber l.'^."')4, and annually since that time, witli the exception of 18(12. 
]\rrs. Sludlenberger in her reminiscences of that meeting savs : '' Some 
still remember that first fair in 1854, when the stock was quartered in 
Air. Wliitaker's yard, and exhibited on the pul>lic square, while the 
])roducts of the dairy, kitchen and loom were disposed of Avithin the 
old court house, the table containing a few fancy articles which a 
gentleman lifted up, one by one, that the}' might be seen by the 
assemblage.'" Many, if not all the members of the society of 18-13 
were interested in this fair. 

The presidents of the society prior to 1803 Avere : Hugh Rhodes, 
Jacob Jamison, Isaac Spencer, Charles Myers, W. AY. AVright and 
James Holgate. The old secretaries Avere David McCance, G. A. 
Clifford, OliA^er Whitaker and AV. II. Butler, with J. R. Atherton and 
Oliver AVhitaker treasurers. The names of jiresidents elected since 
18()o are given as follows : 1868, J. H. Quinn ; 18ti4, James M. Thomas ; 
1805, James H. Quinn ; 1806, Davis LoAvman ; 18<!7, AVilliam XoAvlan ; 
1868, Ohver AYhitaker ; 1869, Mark Blanchard: 1870, Joseph D. 
Rhodes; 1872, Mark Blanchard; 1873. II. H. Oliver; 1874, Henry 
Col well ; 1875, AVilliam Holgate; 1876, AViniield Scott; 1877, Dennis 
Mawbey ; 1878, Joseph D. Rhodes-; 1879, Samuel AA'rigley; 1880, 
Andrew OliA^er; 1881, James M. Rogers; 1882; Henry Col well; 
1884, Cvrus Bocock ; and 1885-7, Henrv Colwell. 

In 1863 Patrick Xowlan was elected secretary, served until 1872 
when AVilliam Lowman was chosen, and he gave place to H. M. Hall, 
in 1873. James ISTowlan AA^as elected in 1874, served until 1879, when 
B. J. Hall Avas elected secretary. \\\ 1880 (Inirles Alyers Avas chosen 
aufl he served until lb84, when James Xowlan, the present incuml)eut, 
was elected. The treasurers were O. AVliitaker, 1863; AAllliam Low- 
man, 1861-71; Geo. AV. Nichols, 1871 ; Samuel Burge, 1873-87. The 
corresponding secretaries since 1863 are named as follows: AVilliam 
XoAvlan, P. M. Blair, Charles Myers, II. AI. Hall, Benjamin C. Follett, 
1872, AA''illiam XoAvlan and James AI. Thomas, in 1875-7. 

The following were elected Avithout opposition at the close of the 
fair of 1886 ; Henry Cohvell, president ; Perry AVinnand C. AV. Brown, 
Aice presidents; AV. AV. Buswell, manager for Osceola and AVilson 
Trickle, manager for Essex. For secretary James Xowlan received 
23r> votes and R. J. Dickinson (Jl, ALanagers for Goshen, J. H. Quinn 
received 149 votes and Fred lihodes, 144. Alanager for Elmira, 
Thomas Oliver received 229 votes and H. II. Oliver 68. Edward Col- 
gan, A'alley ; E. B. Lyon, Toulon ; A. -1. .lolnison, AA'est Jersey; and 
Cyrus Bocock, Penn, were rei'lected. The field officers of the fair of 
1886Avere: Col. AVilliam Jackson, Alai'shal; Cora Moore and Frank 
Berfield, Assistant Alarshals ; OhA'er AA^hitaker, Judge of Election ; 



i 



AORICUI.TUKAL SOCIKTIES. 189 

Will JSTicliolson and Joseph IS^owlan, Clerks of Election ; and E. B. 
Lyon, Superintendent of Grounds. 

The question of removing the fair to AVvoming was mooted early 
in 1873, and in January, 1874, took a definite foi'm. The history of 
this movement is best related in the following official docnments : 

Wyoming, III.. January 2:i, J8T4. 

We, the citizens of Wyoming, pledge ourselves that we will haul the 
lumber from the fair grounds at Toulon, free of expense, to the Stark 
Co:ii!ty Agricultural Society, to Wyoming ; provided, the society locates 
thcii- grounds at the latter jDlace. ,Si(///ed, James Holgate, F. F. lirock- 
way, W. F. Thomas, Alfred Castle, Perry Stauclilf, Samuel Thomas, 
Isaac Thomas. 

Wyoming, III., Jamuiry 22, 1874. 

1 hereby guarantee the payment of 1800 for the purpose of fencing and 
improving the Stark County Agricultural Fair Grounds ; providing, the 
said grouiids be located within the corporate limits of Wyoming, to be paid 
by June next. Sigiied, Wiufield Scott. 

Tor LUX, January 24, 1874. 

We, the undersigned, do hereby tender the Stark County Agricultural 
Society live acres of grounds, adjoining their present grounds on the east, 
upon the following conditions : 1st. The fairs of said society shall he held 
on the pi'esent fair grounds and the grounds hereby tendered for ten years 
next ensuing. 2d. The said society will give the right of way for a road 
across the north side of the present fair grounds, od. AVe do further ten- 
der to said society a bona-fide subscription of 200 da3's labor to improve ami 
fence said fair grounds, upon the conditions al)ove sj^ecified. Signed, B. C. 
Follett, F. liacmeister, J. D. Rhodes. 

On January 24, 1874, the [))'()positions were discussed. AVni. ^o\\- 
lan's resolution to post])()ne consideration of the nuxtter until after the 
fair, was lost. AVni. Ilolgate -.noved that the Ayyoming proposal be 
accepted, to which -I. II. Anthony moved an amendment, pi'oviding 
for a vote on the two propositions l)y the agricultural board. This 
amendment was cari'ied, and the vote on the cpiestion taken with the 
following result : For tho ])roposition of Toulon, John II. Anthony, 
Samuel Bnrge, Henry M. llall. Davis Lownum, A. S. IMurchison, lleni-y 
II. Oliver, and James II. Quinn, 7; for the proposition of Wyoming, 
Henry Colwell, A. J. Finley, Wm. Ilolgate, AVm. Xowlan. James M. 
Itoii'ers and I. W. Searls, 0. Thus Wvoniin*'' lost — ami the old organi- 
zation of 1853 continues meeting on the ancient hunting grounds neai' 
Toulon. 

The AVool Growers' xVssociation of Stark County was pei'manently 
organized I)eceml)ei' 2, 1805, with J. II. (^uinn. president, and Wm. 
iS'owlan, secretary. 

Central A<jric>ilfin'<il SorJet//. — The tirst meeting at Wyoming to 
form a second agricultural society was held October 23, 187s. A. G. 
Hammond presided, with F. 15. AVall, secretary. A committee to 
solicit snbscri[)tions was then appointed, consisting of W. Scott, James 
Ilolgate, John AVrigley, Sam. AVrigley, Edward Colgan, A. J. Sheets, 
Monroe Cox, AVm. Pettit, Sylvester AV'ilkinson, E. J. Griffin and J. M. 
Thomas. For over two years the subject was discussed, but not until 



190 HISTORY OF STAKK COUNTY. 

1881 did ])lans for the establisLinent of fair grounds at AVyoming 
materialize. 

A meeting to consider the question of establishing a society with 
headquarters at W3^oming was held February 5, 1-881, on a call issued 
by Winfield Scott, 'W. II. Ilolgate, Samuel Wrigley and A. J. Sheets. 
This meeting was held with A. G. Ilauimond presiding, and T. I>. 
AYall, seci'etary. A constitution was reported, ado})ted and signed by 
Benjamin Bunnell. John Monier, John S])eers, James McKean, Geo. W. 
Scott, Winfield Scott. T. B. Wall, James M. Thomas, Sr., and Samuel 
Wrigley. The otticers then elected were Winfield Scott, president ; 
Samuel Wrigley, vice ])resident; T. ]]. Wall, secretary; J. M. Thomas, 
recording secretary; G. AY. Scott, treasurer. The society purchased 
from Mrs. ]\I. A. Markham a tract of 31»^ acres at $100 per acre, in 
April, 1881, and the work of bnilding and laying out grounds, entered 
upon. All was ready in July, and on September 0, 7, 8, and 1>, 1881, 
the first fair was held — preminms anujunting to .^^4,000 l)eing offered, 
the highest premium, s200, l)eing won by James McKean's 2:28i| 
trotters. The highest premium was s50 for short horns, won that year 
and since that time, with one exception, 1S81-, l)y AV. Scott Sz Son. In 
October, 1881, the election resulted as follows: AV. Scott, president; 
A. ^X. King, secretary; E. Davison, vice president; Wm. Ilolgate, 
treasurer; James McKean, II. B. Harris, Samuel AVrigley, Geo. AA^. 
Scott, directors. At the fair of 1882, two si 00 premiums were offered. 
The officers elected in 1882 wereAVm. Ilolgate, president; R. Davison, 
vice president ; T. B. AA^all, secretary ; J. M. Thomas, corresponding 
secretary ; A. AV^. King, treasurer ; AV. Scott, R. Davison, S. AVrigley, 
G. AA^. Scott and J. M. McKean, directors. The elections of 1883 re- 
sulted as follows : R. Davison, president ; Samuel AVrigley, vice presi- 
dent ; A. G. Hammond, recording secretary; J. AI. Thomas, corres- 
])onding secretary; Jacob Graves, treasurer; AV. C. Decker, John 
Monier, C. AV. Brown, Joseph Cox, directors. The officers for 1884 were 
AVinfield Scott, ]>resident ; John Moniei-, vice ]iresident ; C. P. Mc- 
Corkle, treasurer ; T. B. AVall, seci'etary ; D. S. Burroughs, A. AV. 
King, A. II. Mallory, Alichael Colgan, A. J. Sturms, directors. The 
officers of 1885-86 are AVinfield Scott, president ; John Monier, vice 
])resident ; C. P. AlcCorkle. treasurer: AV. A. Scott, corresponding 
and recording secretary, with John Monier, C. P. McCorkle, J. A. 
Kloek, Samuel AVrigley, AV. A. Scott, AVinfield Scott, T. J. Bocock, 
James McKean E. II. 'Mallory, directors. The society was iucorpo- 
i-ated in October, 1870. AVinfield Scott, AVm. Ilolgate, Samuel AVrig- 
ley and Andrew J. Sheets are named in the certificate, and the capital 
stock placed at it^lo,0O0. The roll of members comprises 231 names of 
stockholders owning 1,000 shares valued at $10 each, all paid up. 
The debts of the society in 1885 amounted to sl38, while against this, 
the grounds and buildings, counted among the finest in the State, 
stand to credit. This pi-operty is now declared free from taxation. 



CHArXEK XIII. 




rilVSICIAlNS OF THE corxTV. 

[IE first resident physician of Stark county was Dr. Eliplia- 
let Ellsworth, who })ractice(l here before the Black Hawk 
war, and made a permanent settlement here in 1834. In 
1835 a Dr. Pratt settled in Elinira township, and in 1837 
came Dr. Thomas Hall, a man identified closely with the 
county up to the period of his death. He was followed by 
Dr. William Chandjerlain, in 1810. When dysentery and 
typhoid prevailed here they traveled on horseback for nine 
weeks, making eighty miles one day and fifty-six the next. 
Six years later he and Dr. Chamberlain attended 1,500 patients and 
dispensed eighty ounces of quinine or Peruvian bark. Dr. E. R. lioard- 
nian, Dr. Bacmeister, Dr. Curtiss, Dr. King, and others, to whom full 
references are made in the township histories, must be classed as pioneer 
physicians. Many of the physicians who have practiced in this county 
are named in tlie following review: In May, 1881, Dr. Baldwin sold 
his office, lot and practice at Toulon to Dr. Pratt, of Galva. Charles 
W. Wi'ight, a medical student, died at Toulon, March 9, 1884. On June 
'28, 1883, Dr. L. L. Long moved to Toulon from Orion. Dr. Gilman, 
dentist, settled at Wyoming in July, 18T<». Dr. Thomas Motter, Avho 
was found dead in his office at AVx'oniing, January (5, 1885 ; })racticed 
in that town for twelve yeai's. Dr. J. (1. (Ireene died in August, 1879. 
He Avas an old resident of Wyoming. Dr. A. Swen moved to Canton, 
]\IcPhe]'S(m county, Kansas, from AVvoming in March, 188G. Dr. Gar- 
field, who practiced at Toulon from l.sll to 1818, then residing in a 
log cabin o})posite Benj. Turner's house, moved to LaSalle, 111. Dr. 
Curtiss, referred to in a former page, was one of the earl}^ phj^sicians 
here. In 1865 S. S. Kaysbiei' l)egan the practice of medicine here. 
He is no\v in ]\ansas. Dr. AV. J. Adams, dentist of Toulon, was })ro- 
hibited from using rulJjer dental plates in Se])tember, 1800. Dr. 
Kitchen, a dentist, was here in 1869. Dr. Dunn, l)i'()ther of Bev. li . C. 
Dunn, who served in the ]12th Illinois lufantrv, di^Hl at ('hicago. 
Cook county, in March, 1869. Dr. Waltei- T. Hail o])ened his officeat 
Toulon in March, 1869, moved to Bi'adford in October of that yeai", but 
subsecpiently returned to Toulon. Dentist Hoover was at Toulon in 
1880. Dr. Clark Demuth, of Plymouth, Mich., ]n"acticed at Toulon 
])rior to 1S81. Dr. J. C. Copestake, of AVyoming, pi-acticed at AVest 
Jersey, and here also were the following named ])liysicians : West, 
liarnett, Upshaw, Perry, AV. A. IIam[)ton, Claybaugh, 11. AV. King, 
AV. S. McClenahan. I)r. Eam])er pi-acticed some years at Bradford. 
In 1870 his son was ap[)ointed receiver for AVashington Territory. Dr. 
Swazey, the organizer of the first base ball club in the county, was at 

191 



H»2 HISTORY OF STARK COUXTY, 

Toulon about 1S»>G. In the fall of ISHO one Dr. Ilayden. of "Wyominu-. 
was taken to the tinil)er by the people and there siiaved, tarred, 
feathered and pelted with rotten eggs. His alleged assault on the 
daughter of the pastor of the M. E. Church there was the cause of this 
])oi)ular punishment. li. O. Philli})s. of Cal.. practiced at Lafayette up to 
the time of his emigration to the Pacific slope. Dr. D. F. Chamberlain, 
a member of the first company sent from Stark Co. to the war, is now 
proprietor of a hotel at Eagle Rock. Idaho. Dr. Joseph S. Kohn died 
at Dorrance, Stark Co., March '29. 1SS~>. He Avas born in Union Co., 
Pa . in 1S09. l)ut for years practiced in Stark and Bureau Counties. 
Dr Chas. E. Jordan, formerly principal of the Castletou school, is now 
a dentist at Red Cloud. Xeb. Dr. Pinney, of Kewanee, an old settler 
of the county, who visited Texas, served in the rebel army, returned in 
A]iril. 1SS3. is now in Texas. His wife is a sister of Mrs. G. Laurence's 
mother. Dr. Gilman G. Shaw, a <;i'aduate of the Eclectic CoUeo-e of 
Pennsvlvania, settled in Loml)ardville about 1876. Dr. Emigh. of 
Ih-adford. left for Red Cloud, Xeb., 1SS3. Dr. A. V. For^ay located 
at Bradford in February, ISSO. Mrs. Dr. Henrietta Iv. Morris, formerly 
of ]3radford, was elected vice-president of the State Eclectic Medical 
Association in May, 1SS6. Dr. Annie L. Green removed from Bradford 
to Princeton in August. 1870. Dr. James Culbertson studied medicine, 
but has not ]iracticed here. Dr. Azra Lee, a surgeon in the war of 1812, 
connected with the village of Duncan, died in August, ls7»;. Dr. L. T. 
Sprague settled at Lafayette in the fall of 1881, and opened a drug- 
store there. Dr. Thomas, a physician of Duncan in 1881. Dr. Daniel 
Tyrrell is an old settler here, but long since retired from active profes- 
sional work. Dr. S. T. C. Washburn died at Bradford in 1862, aged 
4o years. Dr. Young was also here that year and here his wife died. 
The official list of physicians registered in Stark county since 1877 
includes the following names: T. Bacmeister, Germanv, December 
4, 1877: 11. :\L Hall, now of Kansas: ^y. T. Hall. U. S.. December 19, 
l'^77; L. L. Long. Pennsylvania. April 5. 1>^4; A. AV. Peterson, Ger- 
many, December 31, 1877. all registered at Toulon. The physicians 
registered at AVyoming since 1877 are named as follows: J. C. Cope- 
stake, England, Felnniary 1, 1878; Harvey X. Fox. Ohio, January 9, 
1880 ; D. "W. Magee, Pennsylvania. December 20, 1881 ; X. B. MoVse, 
L". S., February •>, 1878. In the other villages throughout the county 
are found the following named registered physicians (all natives of 
the Union, with the exceptions of J. Fieldhouse, of Camp Grove, a 
native of Enij-landi: E. O. Boardman. Osceola: E. R. Boardman. 
Elmira; James G. Boardman, Bradford: AV. AV. Clayljaugh. AVest 
Jersey: John R. Crawford. Lafayette; O. ( . Dai-ling, Bradford: S. A. 
Davison, Bradford: J. Seth Farrell, Duncan: J. Fieldhouse, Camp 
Grove: J. R. Ilolu'ate. Castleton : AV. S. McClenahan. AVest Jersev : 
John B. Mc Dee. Camp Grove: S. T. AV. Potter, AVada Petra : G. G. 
Shaw, Lombardville; Loyal T. Sprague. Dr. Xicholls, Lafayette. Many 
of the above named physicians are members of the Military Tract 
^ledica] Societv. and a few of them are eminent in scientific cii'cles. 



CHAPTEE XIY. 



KAILROADS. 





HE AVestern Air Line Eailroad, or a road over the route 
siil)seqiiently surveyed under this name, was mentioned as 
early as 1850; but not until 1853 did the idea take practical 
shape. In that year the Western Air Line Eailroad Com- 
' pany appealed to the county for aid, and this appeal was 
liberally responded to, as shown in the following abstract 
from a supreme court judgment. The case of Olaf John- 
son i'. Stark county was tried before the State supreme 
court in April, I860. From the facts, as understood bv the 
court, the following are given : On August 13, 1853, 534 
votes were cast in favor of aiding the Western Air Line 
Eailroad, while 141 votes were recorded against. In 1855, 
six per cent bonds were issued for $1,000 each, signed by 
W. AV. AVel)ster, chairman of the supervisors' board, and 
Miles A. Fuller, clerk, for which the}' received $50,000 
stock in return. In the evidence of Johnson it is said that 
the Swedish, or Bishop Hill colony, graded sixteen miles 
of the road from Wyoming to Galva. It a])peared fur- 
ther that AYel)ster, at the election of railroad officers held at Lacon in 
1856. cast the vote to which Stark county was entitled, and that in 
1857 Isaac Thomas cast a representative vote. The judgment of the 
circuit court was reversed, and Stark county was ordered to pay both 
the principal and interest. 

In September, 1855 the ceremony of breaking ground was per- 
formed. A dinner was spread on the public square at Toulon, and 
the $50,000 donation to the enterprise promised a twent3^-fold return. 
Work on this division of the W. A. L. railroad prior to May, 1856, rep- 
resented 08.400 yards of excavation and embankment, and during that 
month 21,000 yards were completed. W. 11. Greenwood was engineer. 
At this time the road was graded from the south side of O. Whitaker's 
field to C. L. Eastman's farm. Then the shock came. The embank- 
ment was there, but beyond this there were no signs of completir.t;' 
the work. Intei'est coupons Avere ])resented and payment refused. 
On September 15, 1858, one Olaf Johnson sued the county for the 
amount of interest due on such bonds; but a judgment by the circuit 
court dismissed the suit; which Avas renewed, as stated, by the 
supreme court : and in March, 1862, the same victorious Olaf Johnson 
])resented foi" ]xiyment sixty-five coupons; Claudius Jones, forty -one 
coupons; O. Whitaker, two coupons, and T. F. Hurd, five coupons — 
all of which the sujx'i'visors ordered to be paid. 

On -luly (), 1865, Wm. Lowman, of Toulon, Avas elected treasurer, 

12 193 



194 IlTSTOnY OF STAKK COrXTV. 

and AVin. F. Thomas, of Wyoming, a director of the new board of tlie 
America! Central R. E. Those men knowing that $7()(»,000 worth of 
Avork was done, and 80 miles of road-l)ed made ready for the rails, 
determined not to consent to the al)anchjnment of tlie enter])rise: but 
their efforts were not attended with success, the county lost S5U,<>(io 
and a fountain of patience equal to as much more. 

The Peoria A: Rock Islantl Ji. R. Go. was cliartered March 7, 1807. 
The first railroad meeting lield at Toulon was that of Aug. 26, 1867, 
i/i re the Peoria and Rock Island R. R. jU'oject. Chas. Myers presided 
with Oliver White secretary. M. Shallenberger, A. B. Gould and O. 
E. Page, of Cambridge, were the princijjal speakers. Resolutions were 
adopted endorsing the scheme, and a committee com])rising ^F. Shallen- 
berger, Oliver Whitaker, P. ^[. Blair. Davis Lownum and Benjamin 
Turner was a])pointed to further the project. On Xov. 9, a second 
meeting was held, presided over by G. M. S. Lyon, with J. M. Brown, 
secretary. Resolutions were a(lo])ted pledging the township to sub- 
scribe 8-">0,0U(i, and a})pointing Miles A. Fuller, Davis Lowman and 
]\Iartin Shallenberger a committee to take charge of raising this sub- 
scription. On Xov. 12, 18ti7, directors were elected, and on the same 
day W. R. Hamilton was chosen president and Patrick M. Blair, vice- 
})resident. A year or two later one of the local papers, noticing this 
election, stated : "'It is thi'ough Mr. Blair's effort, to a great extent, 
that the work has been pushed forwai'd so si)eedily in this county." 
On Xov. 22, 1867, citizens of Toulon, Penn. Essex, and valley town- 
sliips assembled at Wvoming to consider the (jnestion of granting a 
bonus to the P. cV: 111. R. R. II. A. Hoist i)resided, with J. G. Cope- 
stake, secretary. A committee com])i'ising A. G. Hammond and C. H. 
Butler, of Essex ; John Wrigley and Isaac Tiiomas, of Toulon ; Chas. 
Holoate and Georoe Xicholas. of Penn ; and Elisha Dixon and Thomas 
Crone, of Valley, was ap])ointed to draft resolutions. Their re})ort 
Avas adoj)ted, and each townshi]) pledged to subscribe s.")0.OOO. A sec- 
ond committee to confer with the tlirectors was appointed. Isaac 
Thomas, WinHeld Scott. S. K. Gonover and James M. Rogers Avere the 
members. The voting on this question Jan. 27, 1868. resulted as fol- 
lows : Toulon, for 281, contra 155, majority 129; Goshen, for 120, con- 
tra 116, majority 4; Essex, for 115. contra I2it. majority 5; Valley 
voted s30,<»i»(». The freeholders were wary this time, and surrounded 
their bonds with sucli conditions that default on the part of the com- 
])any was out of the question. In Dec, 1867. the surveyors arrived 
at Touh)n. having- run the line from Princeville to Toulon via Wvom- 
ing. In July, 18t)8. the road was permanently located on this route 
(in })reference to the route via Brimfield). striking the old grade of the 
America Central at Wyoming, and following that to Toulon. In Aug- 
ust, 1869, the AA^ork of repairing the grade of the " American Central," 
or \Y. a. L. R. R., was entered upon just we^^t of Toulon, the consider- 
ation to the old defaultin"" comiianv beinu: about S27.000. The road 
was so far completeil by 1>( 1 that in June of that year a construction 
train steamed into Toulon, the event being celebrated l)y a dinner 
spread in Judge Ogles grove. On Juh' 8, 1871, the first regulai- trnin 
passed over the road. 



RAILROADS. 195 

i 

In October, 1SH9, the Peoria & Kock Island Kailroad Co. was con- 
solidated with the Hock Island & Pacific Railroad, thus uniting the 
Coal A^alley Railroad and completing one of the best short lines in the 
state. During the quarter century of its existence, several accidents 
on this road have been recorded, the death of vouno: Fuller near the 
depot being one of the saddest. On January 10, 18S1, a coach attached 
to the freight went over the embankment on the Rock Island & 
Peoria near Indian creek. Conductor Samuel Grant was killed. The 
thermometer stood 2S'^ l)elow zero, so that the survivors were ahnost 
frozen when rescued. In January, 1882, William Allen, a well-known 
cattle-dealer, was killed by a train while crossing the Rock Island & 
Peoria ti'ack near Robt. Mitcheirs house. The Rock Island & Peoria 
is assessed $198,755 for its 19 miles and 169 feet of main track, 1 mile 
and 2,120 feet of side track ; buildings valued at $1,500 and rolling- 
stock at $11,055 within Stark county. 

The Rushville Branch of the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy rail- 
I'oad brings one back to 1855, when the Jacksonville & Savannah rail- 
]-oad project was agitated and the Peoria & Hannibal railroad project 
became ])retentious. In 1861, James II. Stipp and Judge Henry L. 
Bryant, the central figures of the two corporations, gave a perpetual 
lease of the two roads to James F. Joy and E. B. Ward, agents of the 
( liicago, Burlington & Quincy, the conditions being that the roads 
woidd be completed and operated regularly by the greater corpora- 
tion. In 1862 the road was completed to Canton, May 2, and to Lew- 
ist(m in June, 1862, and to Rushville in 1869, and early the same year 
the question of subsidy was mooted in Valley, Essex, Penn and Osce- 
ola townships, as related in the several chapters devoted to those 
The branch was then known as the Peoria, Dixon & Hannibal rail- 
road. Being very liberally subsidized, the builders completed the 
11^ miles — Buda to Elmwood — in 100 days, and thus defeated the 
efforts of the Rock Island & Peoria people to claim the pioneer rail- 
road of the county. Dr. Alfred Castle, an old resident of Wyoming, 
was one of the leading spirits in pushing forward this enterprise ; and it 
is related that for a time the new road was o-enerallv called " The Castle 
Flax-road,'' the soljriquet of the doctor being " Old Flax." Through 
his influence the depot was ])laced in the new town, a distance from 
the business center, round which North Wyoming has since grown up. 

The Chicago, Burlington & Quincy railroad is assessed $192,611 
tor its 20 miles and 1,892 feet of main'track, 1 mile and 1,621 feet of 
side track, together with buildings valued at $2,721, and rolling-stock 
at $27,668, all within Stark county. 

The Havana, Toulon it Fulton City Railroad Co. ^vas projected in 
1869 and subscriptions asked for. 

In ISSO it was reported tliat a branch of the Hannibal & St. Joe 
railroad was to be built from Quincy to Chicago via Wyoming. At 
this time, also, the Peoria tfe Northwestern railroad project came up, 
])r()vi(ling for a route via Wyoming and Toulon to Dubuque. 

In July, 1881, articles of incorporation were filed at Toulon l.>y tlje 
Indiana, Illinois & Iowa Railroad Co. It promised a third railroad to 
Stark county, l)ut the scheme did not materialize. A meeting to 



IW 



HISToltY OF STAKK COUNTY. 



foster the building of this road was held at the county seat in March, 
1882. John M. Bro\vn presided, with A. P. Miller. secretar\^ Smith, 
of Keithsburg, gave the history of the enterprise, and a committee was 
appointed to solicit subscriptions to the capital stock. E, A. Burge, 
J. H. Miller. Wm. Xowian. AY. H. Winans. James II. Quinn, Major 
Merriman, Harrison Miner. John O'Xeil and Samuel Burge were 
appointed ; but the time was inopi)ortune, and so the project is allowed 
to sleep. 

The Atchison. Santa Fe it Chicago liailroad r'omi)any, a south- 
western peo])le are now seeking direct communication with Chicago. 
Surveyers have been through this country, and the probability is that 
within a short time Stark county will have a main line instead of the 
Ijranches which afflict her with their variable time-tables and total ab- 
sence of a desire to connect their trains for the convenience of the 
])ublic. 

The Great Southern & Canadian I^nderground Eailroad, noticed in 
the old settler's chapter, has long since passed away. The division of 
Stark witnessed many a ^veary slave pass foi'ward on the road to 
Canada and freedom- — a criminal in his own land. 



CHAPTER XY. 




:\[ILITAKY lllSToKI'. 

IE beuinninos of Hlinois Territorv were nuide in war. 
Hamilton, the British scalp-buyer, his ti*oo])s and Indian 
allies, were subjected to all those in glorious di^feats recordi^d 
in British as well as American histoiy. In 1832, Black 
Hawk's Indians renewed the wai-. but Avere subjected and 
j)lante(l beyond the Yfississi])])!. In May, 184(*). 8,870 citi- 
zens of Hlinois answered the call for ti'oo])S to serve in the 
war against Mexico. Of this number, 3,720 were accepted, 
formino' the first six reoiments of Hlinois militia. The vol- 
unteers won signal honors at Passo de Ovegas. August lo. 
1847 ; National Pidge, August 12 ; Cerro Gordo, August l'> : Las Ani- 
mas, August 19 ; the siege of l^uebla, Sei)tember 1~) to October 12; 
Atlixico, October 19; Thiscala, Novemljer 10 ; Matamoras and Pass- 
Galajara, November 23 and 24 : Gueri'ila IJanch. December 5 ; Na])al- 
oncan, December 10, 1847; at St. Martins. February 17. ls48 ; Cholula. 
March 26; Matacordera, Feln'uary 19; Se(jualtej)lan. February V\ 
this division did magnificent service. The aff'aii's of \'era Cruz. Chur- 
ulnisco. Che})ulte])ec and Mexico City will forevei' be identified with 
the names of the tro(^})s of Illinois, and hei- citizen-general, James 
Shields. This war cost ^<)(;.000,(»<i(i, and defended for the Union the 
Lone Star State. 



MILITAKV IIISTOKY. 197 

Tlie war of 1861-05 cost the United States al)Out $4,000,000,000, 
and was the direct cause of the loss of about 1,000,000 of men to the 
whole counti'v. The manner in wliich Illinois responded to the call of 
the President, April 14, 18(51, is told in the following simple record. 
The record of volunteer troops organized within the state, and sent to 
the field, commencing April, 1801, and ending December, 31, 1865, 
with number of regiment, name of original commanding officer, date 
of organization and muster into United States service, place of muster, 
and the aggregate strength of each (organization, have been ])repared 
with great care, and forms in itself a concise record of Illinois in the 
war for the Union. It is said that only one organized company was 
given by " the North '' to the armies f)f the Confederacy. That com- 
pany was raised in southern Illinois b}^ Captain Thorndyke Brooks. 
He had ninety splendid fellows to share with him his bold enterprise. 

A reca]Mtulation of the rosters shows : Infantry, 185,041 ; Cavalry, 
32,082 ; Artillery, 7,277; or a grand total of 225,300. 

The actual number of enlistments in Illinois from 1861 to 1865 was 
259,147, which includes reenlistments in veteran reserve corps, and ordi- 
nary reenlistments. This number, however, does not include 20,000 or 30,- 
000 citizens of Illinois, found in various branches of the army and 
navv and in the volunteer regiments of other states. The conduct of 
the troops, from the day they took j)ossession of Cairo to the close of 
the war, was one magnificent testimony to the worth of citizen soldiery. 

Tli(^ War of the Revolution and that of 1812 are connected with 
the history of the county onh^ so far as the names of a few actual par- 
ticipants, and of the sons of revolutionary soldiers are connected with 
the settlement of the county. Among the old soldiei-s of 1812, present 
at a meeting held at Toulon, November 24, 186(», were Sylvester 
Sweet, William Winter, Louis Lasure. Dunn, Jackson. George Rose, 
Jacob -lainison and fe\\i others whose names are found in the townsliip 
histories. This meeting was called just six months after the Scotch 
or new Americans of Elinira townshij) had organized a company for 
defense. The writer's research at Hennepin did not bring to light the 
name of more than one pioneer of Stark county, Thomas Essex, con- 
nected with the Rlack Hawk squal)ble. There is no doubt, however, 
that many of the men whose names are connected with the history of 
Stark fift^^-five years ago, notably those mentioned as jurors in 1831, 
were readv to defend their territoi'y. 

During the Black Hawk War it is related that one of the early 
German settlers of Spoon river precinct remained at home to protect 
his sick wife, after his neighbors had fled. Excitement, however, 
overcame love and duty, and he addressed the invalid thus: " Ivatrina 
Ave vas all scallupped by the Injines, ov I don't go away so quick as 
never vas. I get on my pony and go under der fort. 'You don't be 
afraid. Dey not hurt you." Saj^ing this the chivalric settler set off, 
but the wife, driven to desperation, l)ridled another horse, and reached 
the fort before her lord. 

A reference to the history of the townships and pages devoted to 
biography discloses the fact that a few citizens of Stark served in the 
Mexican War. 



198 HISTORY OF STARK COUXTV. 

The first war meeting was held at Toulon, April 15. IsBl. The 
report of this meeting as published in the Chicago Trihvue is as fol- 
lows: "Elihu X. Powell was called to the chair, and James A. Hen- 
derson was appointed Secretary, — Judge Powell on taking the chair, 
briefly stated that the object of the meeting was to consider the pres- 
ent state of the country — to renew our deyotion to the glorious insti- 
tution, and to pledge our lives in the maintenance and defence of the 
government and the constitution, and the union as it is. — Honorable 
J. H. Howe, G. A. Clifford, Dr. AVm. . Chamberlain, Thomas J. Hen- 
derson, Levi ISi^orth, and Alex. McCoy were successively called upon 
and responded. Resolutions were adopted, one of which reads as fol- 
lows: ''That in the present crisis of our country, we will ignore all 
mere party considerations, and uphold tlie administration in enforcing 
the laws north and south, and in putting down rebellion wherever it 
may arise. And to that end we invoke the entire power of the govern- 
ment, and we hereby adopt as our motto those memoralJe words 
uttered long since on a similar occasion by a patriot now in liis grave. 
"Liberty and Union now and forever, one and inseparable." 

The first officers of the Home Guards were : Jacob Jamieson, capt.; 
T. J. Henderson, first lieut.; H. M. Hall, second lieut.: George Green, 
third lieut.; O. "Whitaker, orderly. Oliver Whitaker presided at this 
organization ]\Iav IS. 1S61. The Stark countv volunteers organized 
May 19, 1861. with David Dewolf, capt.; S. S. Ka3'sbier, first lieut.; 
Hugh B. Creighton, second lieut.; J. H. Chaddock, first sergt.: Joel 
Dixon, second sergt.; Harry Pierce, third sergt.; Charles E. Shinn, 
fourth sergt.; William Dixon, first corpl.; liichard Alderman, second 
corpl.; Jefferson Ellis, third corpl.. and A. P. Finley, fourth corpl. 
On June 22, 1861, a meeting was held at Osceola village to provide 
for expenses incurred in fitting out the "Elmira Pifles." Like all such 
meetings in this township, this was a success. 

In July, 1861, Dr. Thomas Hall and Davis Lowman were appointed 
a committee to publish in the Stark county Nev;s directions for pre- 
paring bandages and lint. The following ladies were appointed a com- 
mittee for procuring bandages and lint : Elmira — Mrs. E. C. Spencer, 
Miss C. Brace, Mrs. Oliver Smith. Osceola — Mrs. Mark Blanchard, 
Mrs. R. Chamberlain, Mi-s. S. M. Hill. Vallev — Mrs. J. M. PtOgers! 
Mi-s. C. A. Fox. Mrs. P. Blood. Toulon— Mi-s.'^O. Whitaker, Mrs. Dr. 
Chamberlain. ]\rrs. P. M. Blair. Goshen — Mrs. Jacob Jamison, Mrs. 
J. AV. Rogers, Mrs. T. F. Hurd. West Jersey— Mrs. C. M. S. Lvons, 
Mrs. James Hulsizer, Mrs. fL H. Anthon}'. Essex — Mrs. J. Dennis, 
Mrs. TTm. F. Thomas, Mrs. Henry Holsf. Penn — Mrs. Virgil Pike, 
Mrs. John Snare. 

The Soldiers' Relief Circle of Toulon organized November 12, 1861, 
with Mrs. O. Whitaker, president ; Mrs. O. Gardner, vice-president ; 
Mrs. C. Eastman, treasurer; Miss E. Marvin, secretary; Mrs. P. M. 
Blair, Mrs. S. S. Kavsbier, Mrs. M. A. Fuller and Miss R. White, com- 
mittee on supplies. Mrs. J. Shinn was appointed treasurer in March, 
1862, up to which time $42 were collected. The supervisors on June 
10, 1861, adopted resolutions for the appointment of a committee to 
disburse military and relief funds, and tiiat such funds be raised by 



NfTT.ITAKV iriSTOEV, 190 

special tax of twenty cents per $100. The uses s})ecilie(l were, first, 
for the support of soldiers' families, and secondly, for equipping and 
uniforming Stark county soldiers. The first report of the committee 
was made in 1802. The appeal of the Home Guards, which led to this 
legislation, was signed by G. A. Clifford, chairman, Jacob Jamison, T. 
J. Henderson, Oliver Whitaker, Charles Myers and Amos P. Gill, a 
committee ap})ointed by the guards. The Military Disbursing Com- 
mittee of Stark county, appointed in June, 1861, comprised David 
McCance, Davis Lowman and Oliver Whitaker. They disbursed $635 
to Capt. Stuart's Elmira Ilifles of 105 men ; $456 to Capt. Dickenson's 
Lafayette Ilifles of 76 men, and $4u2 to Capt. Jamieson's Stark County 
Ilifles of 77 men. To soldiers' families in Toulon township, $76.62 were 
given; in Goshen, $106.87; in Valley, $12; in Tenn, $20.71; in 
Osceola, $9, and in Elmira, ^S(^, or, $311.98 to soldiers' families and 
$1,548 to volunteers from June to December 2, 186)1. 

In February, 186)2, what ])urported to be a complete list of Stark 
county soldiers who had died up to that date, was pul)lished, viz., Rob- 
ert Cliarles Reed, WiJliam Y. Perry, William Nicholson, Wallace 
Hughes, John A. Perry, all of Company B, Thirty-seventh Infantry; 
George Comstock, Nineteenth Infantry ; George W. Ellis, C. W. 
Drummond, John Cox (Peoria Artillery), Companv K, Forty-seventh 
Infantry ; William II. Packer and Murray Ilotcldviss, Thirty-third 
Infantry ; James S. Taylor, Company B, Forty-second Infantry ; James 
T. Marshall, Company D, Forty-seventh Infantry, and Perry Kent, 
Comi^anv P>. Forty-seventh Infantry. Svlvester F. Otman was 
ap})ointed l)y the relief committee of W3^oming, in March, 1862, to 
visit the Forty-seventh Infantry in the field. The relief committee of 
Elmira selected T. J. Henderson to visit the Elmira company in the 
held, in Marcli, 18<i2. Dr. Pierce, representing tlie Toulon Aid Society, 
visited the troops in the held in INlarch, 1862. 

The officers of the AVyoming Soldiers Relief Society in April, 1862, 
were Mrs. M. A. Hoist, president; Mrs. A. G. Hammond, secretar}^ ; 
Miss Lucy Butlei*, treasurer. The committee on collections com]n"ised 
Madams Isaac Thomas, B F. Fostei", ^V. B. Armstrong, P. Pettit, 
Mary Butler, J. AVrigley, J. B. Lashels and J. Matthews. S. F. Otjnan 
is mentioned as an aid of the ladies committee. On June 5, 1863, a 
meeting was held in the Presbyterian church, Elmira, with a view of 
helping along the objects of the Soldiers' Ai<l Society. $151 in cash, 
a firkin of butter, five barrels of potatoes, together with other supplies 
were subscribed. In Osceola village $90 was subscribed, making $235 
for the township under this call. On July 8, 1863, the fall of Yicks- 
l)urg was celebrated throughout the county. A company called the 
" Blood V Marines" brought out the mui and fired a salute. Some 
days before this, after the battle of Gett^^sburg, the Union flag was 
hoisted on the court house. The Women's Loyal League of Penn 
township, was organized July 27, 1863, with forty members. Mrs. J. 
M. Ricker presided, with Mrs. S. S. Sock well secretary. In August 
1862, Provost-Marshal White visited Bradford to arrest two young men 
named Terwilliger, on the charge of desertion. The father tried to 
aid in the escape of the boys. White learned the game and cautioned 



200 HISTORY OF STARK COUNT V. 

the old gentleman against repeating it, and told him that should he 
not place the young men in custody within two days, himself would 
be arrested. The delivery was not made and the marshal revisited 
Bradford and asked the old gentleman to come along under arrest, but 
he responded that he should not go unless he went dead. "As you 
prefer about that," said the marshal, " but I think you better go alive." 
The old man then attacked him with the hay fork, l>ut White pushed 
the weapon aside and hit the prisoner on the head with a heavy cane, 
cutting a deep wound. Terwilliger surrendered, was taken to Dr. 
Little's and patched up, but was not imprisoned at that time. 

Lieut. C. W. Brown, of the Onedumdred-and-twelfth Illinois In- 
fantry, with Sergeants William Dojde, John Lane and Henry Graves, 
opened a recruiting station in the Ilolst building, at Wyoming, in Jan- 
uary, 18G4. Oliver White, recruiting agent for Stark county, made a 
call on the county to furnish its quota in February, 1864. His address 
contains the following paragraph : " Fathers and mothers encourage 
vour sons to rally once more around the old flag, and the day is ours 
"almost without a struggle, for the Ijlind giant of rebellion already reels 
and falters. The work of finishing his troubled existence will be sharp 
and short. The enormous government bounties — $802 for neAV recruits 
and $402 for veterans — are still offered. * * ^^ -jf ^^ Board 
and transportation furnished to recruits for any Illinois regiment in 
the field." Jacob Galley, of Toulon, was killed at Franklin, Tenn.. in 
1864, while holding the flag. His body was brought here and interred. 
Springer Galley was w(^unded there, and Wright Oziali was re])orte(l 
wounded. 

The number of men to be drafted in the county in August, 1864, 
was 154, divided as follows : Toulon and Essex, 34 ; Elmira and Osce- 
ola, 36 ; Yalley and Penn, 53 ; Goshen and West Jersey, 31. J. W. 
Hewitt was president and T. Bacmeister secretar\' of the Toulon and 
Essex Draft Association in 1864. 

The county central aid committee received in Septeml)er, 1864, $146 
from Osceola and $19 from Elmira. The Osceola subscription com- 
prised $47 through Mrs. Riley Chamberlain, $78.85 thi'ough the Brad- 
ford soldiers' aid society, $14.75 from individuals at Bradford, and $6 
from Lodge 131, I. O. G. T. Alfred Foster, Mrs. Riley Chamberlain 
and Mrs. Dr. Little formed the committee in Osceola. At this time 
W. II. Butler raised $27 in Essex. 

On August 24, 1864, Rev. R. C. Dunn delivered his celebrated 
funeral discourse in the Methodist church at Toulon. After noticing 
the organization of the One-hundred and-twelfth Regiment he says: 
" Of these have l)een killed : W. W. Wright, its Ca]itain : W. P. Finley, 
its second Lieutenant; William C. Bell, Aaron liidle, John Kendall, 
Olaus Fors, Elmore Barnhill, J. II. Lane, A. G. Pike, R. M. Dewev, G. 
W. Rhodes, John W. Whitten, and Henry C. Hall — 14. Died of dis- 
ease: R. C. Westfall, J. L. Adams. William Creighton, George Miller, 
J. D. Madden, John F. jS'egus, G. AV. <Jziah — 7. Homer Leeke, re- 
cruit, died on his way to the regiment. Thomas F, White was drowned 
in Clinch river. Two have been discharged on account of wounds, X. 
Crabtree and J. F. Rhodes. Four are prisoners, Edwin Butler, Z. II. 




BLACK HAWK — CEIIEP OF THE SACS. 



LIBRARY 
UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS 

|tpr;nr.!i\ 



:MriJTARV nisTORV. 203 

Xew'ton, -l()se])li Iloppoek aiul J. TT. Biii'wiek. Five liavo l)Gen dis- 
charged on account of disease. A large nunil>ei' have been wounded. 
* * "■ * * On the sixth of the present month an order was 
given to charge a part of the enemy's works before Atlanta. The ill 
advised attem])t had to be abandoned; and tliere fell on that da}' five 
n(jble men, James Essex, John II. J.ane, Andrew G. Pike, George W. 
Ilhodes, and Ilobert Dewey. They were lovely and pleasant in their 
lives, and in their death they were not divided. (3n the following day 
John W. AVhitten was killed. These deaths have called this large as- 
semblage together today.'' The last named was the son of Theodore 
Whitten, of West Jersey; James Essex was the son of Joseph Essex, 
of Penn township; Joseph Lane was born in Scmierset county, New 
Jersey, July 27, 1831); Andrew G. Pike, born in Pennsylvania, in Jan- 
nary, 1S36. came to this county with his parents the following winter; 
George W. Rhodes, like Sergeant Pike, was an only son, born to Mi's. 
X. ^y. Rhodes at Nauvoo, 111., November 6, 1 S4 3 ;' Robert M. De^vey 
was born at Ganaan, New Hampshire, May 31, 1836. came with his 
father to Illinois in 1850, and settled here in 1851. 

The following re])ort Avasmade to the supervisors' board in Septem- 
ber, 1864, by Miles A. Fuller: The undersigned, having at the solicita- 
tion of persons interested therein, visited S[)ringfield for the purpose 
of ascertaining the quota of Stark County in the coming draft, and 
also to ascertain whether any mistakes have been made in the credits 
for men from this count}^ who have volunteered into the military ser- 
vice of the United States, would make the following report : 

"The whole number of men required to till all calls to the present 
time is 904 ; whole number of credits uj) to October 1st, 18<;3, was (iS!) ; 
from October 1st, 1863, to September, 1864, is 121; and total credits, 
810; total deficit of county, 154. Of this number there is due from the 
several sul)-districts of this county as follows: Sub-district 72, Essex 
and Toulon, 34; 13, Elmira and Osceola, 36; 74, \'alley and Penn, 53; 
and 75, Goshen and West Jersey, 31. 

" The undersigned would further report the credits allowed u]) to 
October 1st, 1863, are distributed among the different regiments of this 
state, as follows, to wit: 12tli Regiment Illinois Infantrv, 1 ; 16th, 1 ; 
17th, 2 ; 19th, 107 ; 33d, 19 ; 37th, 58 ; 38th, 1 ; 46th, 6 ; 47th, 81 ; 51st, 
10; 56tli. 2; 57th. 5; 64th. 1; 65th, 39; 67th, 1; 83d, 1; 86tli, 22 ; 
93d, 9: 112th. 268; 124tli. 4; 127th, 5; Fusileers, 1; 3d, (\avalrv, 6; 
9th, 16; 11th, 2; 13th, 1; 14th, 2 ; 1st Artillery, 4; 2d, 9 ; Missouri 
regiments. 5 — 685. Credits allowed from October 1st, 1863, to July 
1st, 1864, one hundred and twenty-one men. I was unable in my brief 
stay to ascertain in what regiments these last named have enlisted. 

"■About one hundred men (estimated) residents of this county, have 
enlistetl in different regiments and have been credited to other counties. 
This has resulted from several causes : Sometimes from carelessness on 
the ]mrt of the men enlisting in not giving their residence, and perhaps 
on the part of recruiting officers, who were desirous to ofitain credits 
for their own counties, and sometimes from misrepresentation on the 
part of the men enlisting in order to obtain the local bounties offered 
by other counties. I was informed by Adjutant General Fuller that 



204 riis-roiiv ok stakk cotTNTV. 

ill every case the men were cretlited to tlie counties where tliey actiuillv 
resided at the time of their enlistment whenever tliat could he ascer- 
tained ; and from such examinations as I Avas aJ)le to make while there, 
I am satisfied that his statement is correct, and that no pains have l)een 
s})ared by him to do justice to every county, 

" For instance, I was acquainted Avith several men in tlie 72d and 55th 
regiments in which we have no credits, and on an examination of the 
mustei'-rolls of said regiments I found Robert Holmes, Scepter Hard- 
ing, Darsie Heath, Jacob (Galley and Jasper Morris reported from Chi- 
cago, and Miles Aver}- from Cook county, and Lester Coggswell, Joseph 
C Hinei' and Cleorge W. Eckley from Bushnell, McDonough county, 
and George Wittei", without any residence given. So of other regi- 
ments. Our men have enlisted and are credited to other counties in 
consecjuence of tlie errors of the muster roll. 

" My thanks are due to General Fuller, and to lion. Xewton Bate- 
man of the Provost Marshal's office, who extended to me every cour- 
tesy and gave me all the assistance in their power. 

" I would recommend to the Iward that some time during; the comino' 
winter, when the present press of business at the Adjutant General's 
office shall be past, that an agent be sent to examine the records and 
get the names of all persons who have enlisted from this county. - "- ■•'" 
Let a roll of honor be kept. 

" All of which is respectfully submitted. Miles A. Fuller." 

In March, 1S(;5,P. A: J.Nowlan, onbehalf of the Ladies' Aid Society 
of Toulon, mailed to Thos. B. Bryan at Chicago the sum of $52 as a 
donation to the Soldier's Home from the supper and sociable committee. 
The serai-annual report of Mrs. S. A. Dunn, treasurer of the Toulon Sol- 
diers' Aid Society, made March 16, 1805, shows that on Sept. 19, she re- 
ceived from former treasurer, $27.22; (m Oct. 10, $34.50 pr(jcee(ls of 
concert; Oct. IS, $331.05, })roceeds of fair; Dec. 1, moneys collected by 
Mrs. Copperthwaite, $4.55, and fines and memberships, $1.17, total, 
$398.29, of which $291.07 was disposed of. 

In March, 1865, the quota called for Avas 239. Osceola was unfilled 
for 15, its (juota ; A'alley for 33, its quota ; and Penn for 5, or 5-26 of 
its quota. Elmira owed 9 out of 36, Toulon was filled and the other 
towns owed 1 recruit each. 

On April 3, 1865, the 112th Ptegiment assembled at Baleigh, N. C. 
and adopted six resolutions expressive of sympathy with the Union, and 
Mr. Lincoln's family. These were signed by E. S. Bond, Lieut. -Col., 
and B. F. Thompson, secretar}^ 

In May, 18<!5, the following named drafted men from Stark county 
were reported among the deserters : Charles Hampson, John AVren, 
Harvey Hadding, Ben. Howes, Wm. Jiarnhill, David H. McLaury, 
Amos Cornish, Pobert Evans, Thomas Shockmey, Patrick Tobin, Ed- 
mund Martin and Henry Fitzpatrick. The two men drafted and held 
to service, who sultsequently deserted, were David Fry and Chester W. 
Woodward. 

In August 1865, P. M. Blair, circuit clerk, opened a record of soldieTS 
for the county. 

On December, 1865, a committee of soldiers, conqirising P. M. Blair, 



MILITAKV HISTORV. 205 

,I.(t. Arnisti'oiig and W. W. AVrii^iit, called a mertini;' to oi'ii'aiiizc the 
Soldiers' Monmiient Society; 

The Stark County Soldiers' Monument Association was organized 
at Toulon, October 31, 1807, with the following members: J. (\ 
Cojiestake, R. J. Dickenson, II. Fell, Andi-ew Galbi'aitli, S. K. (\mover, 
Marshall AVinn, M. D. J>loomer, I. (Unnamon, I), .lackson, T. Murray, 
W. Jackson, J. M. Brown, ,1. Kerns, P. M. I'lair, (i. Ilulsizer, W. 
Lownian, J. Ilolgate, J. Turnbull, M. I'lanchard, (\ Stuart, !>. V. 
Thonijison, ('. W. Brown, C. A. Fox and Lewis Berry. The articles 
were countersigned by J. 0. Co})estake, V. D. of Stark G. A. R., and 
J. M. Browni, A. A. A. G. In 1885 an association was organized in 
this district to erect a monument to Grant at S))ringfield. James II. 
Miller represented Stark county. 

On May 25, 1865, the first meeting was held to I'ejoice u])on the 
return of peace. Meetings were held weekly until the great celebra- 
tion of July 4, 1865, which closed the festive season. The officers in 
charge were: M. A. Fuller, president; B. jVF. Blair, secretary; E. 
Ransom, R. C. Dunn, Oliver Whitaker, William Bowman, Jas. A. 
Henderson, executive committee;- Wm. Bowman, A. J. Wright, Wai'- 
ren AVilliams, Y. B. Thornton, C. M. S. Byon, on grounds; N. B. 
Cross, N. Bangford, Wells White, on Hags; T). J. Walkei-, B. G. Hall, 
N. J. Smith, on music; Jas. A. Henderson, Henry Butler, H. M. Hall, 
R. C. Dunn, A. G. Hammond, Mrs. S. A. Chamberlain, Mrs. fl. A. 
Fuller, IVfrs. Jas. A. Henderson, Mrs. E. IB Shallenberger, Miss E. S. 
Tilden, on toasts; Oliver White, Capt. J. M. Brown, Samuel Burge, 
Chas. R. Berrv, Benj. Follett, Misses M. L. Mercer, Stelhi I). Rhodes, 
Dell Whitaker, E. S Tilden, Fidie CUirtis, on decorations; Wells White, 
Bewis Williams, II. M. Hall, Oliver White, Wm. O. Johnson, on fire 
works ; A. J. Whitaker, Ruben Rounds, W. T. Hall, on arms and amu- 
nition, and (lias. R. Beriy, A. J. Whitaker, Jas. Nowlan. a committee 
to arrange with young ladies to represent the states. 

RKGIMENTAL SKETCHES AND ROSTERS. 

Seventh Infantry was mustered in at C^amp Yates. April 25, 1861, 
served at Alton, St. Louis, Cairo and Mound City, during its three 
months. The command was reorganized July 25, 1861, entered on ser- 
vice in Missouri, and thence with the Twenty-eighth Regiment and 
McAllistei-s's Battery to Fort Holt, Ky. In 1862 ])articipated in the 
affair at F'ort Donelson, Bittsburgh Banding, Shiloh, (^orinth, and 
other battles in Missouri. In A])ril, 1863, the command marched 
under General Dodge, through luka to South Florence, where the 
Kinth Illinois Mounted Infantry reinforced it. In May and June, 
served in Tennessee, and continued weekly meetings with the rel)els 
until the close of the war. The Seventh veteranized December 22, 
1863,, and was mustered out -Bdy !>, 1865, at Bouisville, Ivy. In C^om- 
])any I) of this command were the following named officers and pri- 
vates, all enlisting in 1865 : 

Captain — Hugh J. Cosgrove. F'irst Bieutenant — George H. 
Martin. Sergeants — Andrew Nelson ; Isaiah V. F)ates. C-orporals — 
Alexander Ileadley; Henry Stauffer. Bi'ivates — Enlisted F'ebruary 



200 HISTORY OF STAKK ('OUNTY. 

18()5 — Jacol) Jjogai'd, Oliver Boo-g-s, Patrick Philben (deserted), Henry 
IT. Witcher, "William Zumwalt, AA^illis Burgess, Ilenrv JI. Ballentine, 
Silas Chnp])el. Tlios. Dawson, John J)a\vson, Ilenrv Duckwoi-tli, John 
L. Fonlk, Wni. AV. Isenherg-, flames L. Jarman, Geoi'ge II. Martin. 
John Otto, Franklin Pratt, John Pouse, Ilenrv Ponse, Mason Stauffer, 
William Shipley, p]dward II. Trickle, Thomas II. C^rowe, John Garvin, 
John iAFartin, (died at Lonisville, June 21, ISno), Timothy Patcliff, 
Stephen Timmons. Jotham K. Taylor (pi-omoted), David White. Ben- 
jamin Witter, and Jasper Graves. 

Eleventh Infantry was organized at Springfield, and mustered in 
April 30, lS6f, for three months. /)n July 30, the command was 
mustered out, but reenlisted for three years. Many severe ixittles 
mark the historv of the Eleventh, down to the attack on Fort Donel- 
son, in Febi'uarv, 18<)2, loosing heavily there. At Shiloh, Oorinth, and 
on other well-fought fields the command was present until January, 
1803, when tlie Northern Mississippi canijiaign was entered on. In 
February, 18H3, the i-egiment was assigned to the Seventeenth Army 
Corps, and in April, 589 men of the OneJiundred-and-ninth Pegiment 
was merged into the Eleventh, and proceeded to take part in the siege 
of Yickslnirg. From the fall of A^icksburg to the muster out at Ba- 
ton Pouge, Ala., July 14, 1865, the command was in active service. 
Among the members was Henry S})eers. Company C,'d recruit of 1865, 
transferred to 46th Infantry. 

Twelfth Infantry (3 years) was mustered in August 1, 1801, served 
at Cairo, 111., Bird's Point, Mo., and Paducah and Smithland, Ky., up 
to February, 1802, when the command moved on Fort Henry. At 
Donelson 16 men wei'e killed and 58 wounded. At Pittsburo-h 
Landing 1<>9 were killed and wounded. At Corinth, IT killed and 8<> 
wounded, and so on to the end at Ahitoona Pass, whei'e 57 were killed 
or wounded. The command shared in Sherman's march to the sea, 
and returning was mustered out at Louisville, Ky., July 10, 1865, 
Thomas Carroll of Pi'ovidence, enlisted in Company H, in 1861, was 
wounch^l and discharii'ed in Aumist, 1802. 

Fourteenth Infantry was mustered in, ]\[ay 25, 1801, at Jackson- 
ville, 111.; served in ]\Iissouri until the 1)eginning of winter, camped at 
Otterville until February, 1802, when it moved to Fort Donelson. Its 
first l)attle was A])ril and 7, round Shiloh. where it lost half its 
strength. After the evacuation of Corinth, the command proceeded 
to Tennessee. In 1803 and 1804, it participated in many battles, no- 
tably Yicksburg, and served with great distinction until mustered out 
at Fort Leavenworth, September 10, 18<)5. In the reorganized com- 
mand, Com]iany C, were the folloAving named recruits of Februarv, 
1805 : ' ■ " 

Michael Casey, Thomas Doyle (deserted), James Maloney (de- 
serted), Frank AVilliamson. In Com])any E, were Thomas J. Marshall 
(deserted), John Norris (deserted). In Comjmny G, were Livingston 
Sharrach. In Company H, Avas Corporal Samuel a Patten. 

Sixteenth Infantry was mustered in at Quincy, 111., May 24, 1801, 
served in Missouri until April 7, 1802, when with the Tenth Illinois In- 
fantr}', the command ])ursued the rebels across the Mississippi, and cap- 



MILITARY HISTORY. 207 

tiired 5,000 men with arms, etc., at Tiptonviile, Tenii. It was present 
at Corinth, and in active service until July S, 1805, when mustered out 
at Louisville. In Company A, was George W. Leighton, Penn, re- 
cruited February, 1861; in CV^mpany G, Lemuel G. INIarsh, Penn ; Reu- 
l)en Crook, enlisted May, 18()1, veteranized in Company A. 

Seventeenth Infantry, mustered in at Peoria, in May, 1801. w^ith 
1,259, served in Missouri until ordered to Fort Donelson in February, 
1862, participated in that battle with heavy loss, also at Shiloh, with 
heavier loss, next at C(jrinth, then at luka, Ilatchie, and in December, 
1862, at Holly Springs. In 1863 shared in the siege of Vicksburg, and 
remained in that neighborhood until may, 1864, when on expiration of 
service, that command was discharged. The few reeidisted veterans of 
the Seventeenth entered the Eight Infantry, and served with that com- 
mand until A])ril, 18()6. In Company D were Thomas B. Bonar and 
David W. Snyder, of Lafayette, enlisted May, 1861. 

P^ieliteenth Infantrv was mustei'ed in at Aniui, 111. Mav 28, 1861; 
served in Missoui'i and I'oimd (^airo, until ordered to Fort Jefferson in 
Januarv, 18()2. At Fort Donelson the command lost 50 killed and 
150 wounded; at Shiloh 1(» killed and 65 wounded. In A))ril, 1865, the 
regiment comprised Companies P and (\ veterans; Company A, three 
years' recruits and seven companies of one year men. From December, 
1868, to the close the comnumd may be said to have been engaged in 
Arkansas, where it was mustered out at Little Pock, I)ecend)er Ki, 
1865. The Stark county representation in Company F were Charles 
McGlaughlin and John Madden, of Essex, enlisted and deserted March 
1865; John P. Smith; George W. Powei'S, of Lafayette, enhsted 
in 1865. 

Nineteenth Infantry was oi-ganized in istil undei' C*ol. John B. 
Turchin. and mustered in June, 1861, 1,095 strong. In Cojiipanies B, 
(^ and I) of this command Stark county was well I'epresented. Com- 
[)any B. or the "Palmira Pities." was the iirst com])any to leave this 
county for the field, and, with the comnumd. sei'ved to the close of the 
war. The regimental colors ai'e inscribed with the names of almost all 
the well-f(jught fields, the history of which tell of a I^nion preserved. 
The record of Stark county soldiet's in the Nineteenth Regiment is as 
follows : 

Com})any B, ''Elmira Pities,'" Captains — Chas. Stuart, enlisted 
July 30, 1861. resigned Julv 15. 1862. Alexander ]\[urchison, jr., pro- 
moted July 15, 1862. First Lieutenants — Stephen ^X. Hill, July 30, 
1861, resigned Novembei' 29, 1861. Alexander ]\Iurchison, jr., Xovem- 
l)er 3U, 1861, AVilliam Jackson, July 15, 1862. Second Lieutenants — 
Alex. ]\Lirchison. jr., Julv 3(t. 1861. Wm. Jackson, Novend)er 30, 
18(;i. John II. Hunter, July 15, 1862. Died January 9. 1863. John 
T. Thornton, commissioned Januarv 9, 1863. 

The non-commissioned and privates in this comjtany, wei'e, Fii'st 
Sei'geant — Dr. John S. Pashley, June, 1861. Sergeants — William 
Jackson. June IT, 1861. James (t. Boardnum. June 17. 1861. James 
Montooth. June 17, 1861. discharged for disability. March 13. 18<;2. 

(/orporals — James Jackson, June, 1861. Killed near Dalton, Ga.. 
February, 23, 186-1. Charles H. Brace, June, 1861, dischai'ged for dis- 



2(>8 JlISTOin- UF STARK COUNTY. 

ability. Tiol)ert A. Turnbull, June, 1861. Josej)li Blanchard, June, 
ISOl, reduced. John G. Lamper, June, 1861; discharged for disability. 
Thomas Kobinson, June, 1861; discharged February, 1863; wounded. 
John T. Thornton, June, 1861, George B. Hutchinson, June, 1861, 
discharged Noveniher, 1861, for disability. 

Musicians — Isaiah V. Bates and Isaac ^Nf. Spencer, June, 1861. 
AVagoner — John Douglas, enlisted June, 1862. 

Privates — Enlisted June, 1861— James Atherton, John Q. Adams, 
David W. Aldrich (discharged), David Allen, Frederick P. Bloom, John 
Burke (discharged), Charles Blackwell (wounded; died at Chattanooga, 
October 14, I860), Henry Burrows (died at Louisville, April 9, 1862), Lem- 
uel D. BuUis (discharge'd March, 1863), Walter Clark (transferred to Vet- 
eran Reserve Corps), James Cinnamon, Julius A. Case, WilHam A. Cade, 
DeForest Chamberlain, Leonard C. Drawyer, Henry Drury, Cliester P. 
Harsh (corporal, died at Murfreesboro, April 11, 1863, William Ingles 
(died at Nashville, October 31, 1862.), Edward M. Jordan (sergeant, died 
at Chattanooga. October 5. 1803), John L. Kennedy, Robert T. Scott, 
Thomas Turnbull (discharged for wounds), Henry 15. VVortli, John Black- 
burn (discharged for disability; died in Henry County in 1882), George 
Dugan (dischaged for wounds). Philip S. Galley (transferred to Veteran 
Reserve Corps, January 25, 1864), S])ringer Galley, William Johnson, Wm. 
H. Newcomer (ilischai-ged for disability), George H. Stone, Isaac Ban- 
nister (discharged for disability), Henry F. Davison (discharged), Aaron 
T. Courier (discharged for disability). Owen Carlin (died at Xashville, 
October 31, 1862), Francis Crowden, George Crowden (discharged for disa- 
bility), Jason G. Duncan (discharged for disability), Wm. Douglas, Edward 
F^rvin (wounded at Dalton, Ga., February. 1864), Adam G. Fell (dis- 
cliarged to rer-nlist ), AVilbam If. Flemming (discliarged for disability), 
Charles Greentiehl (wounded and discliarged), lieuben Gardiner (dis- 
charged, disability), Wesley Hall, James Huckins, Alfred S. Hurment 
(disability), Ernold Kem})ion, Isaac Ivenv'on (killed at Stone River), 
Alonzo Luce, Charles X. Leeson (killed at Stone TJivei". December 31, 
1862), J(Jin ^r Lamper, James Mci-ril, Samuel Montootli, Josepli C. 
]\Ieigs, Daniel J. Moon, Comfort Morgan, Columbus Morgan (died at 
Murfreesboro, January 7, 1863 ; wounds), Cornelius Morgan (died at 
Pilot Knol), Missoui'i^ (Septeml)ei' 15, 1861), George Miller, John Mc- 
Sherry, William X. Nelson, Joseph N. Park, George X. Ryerson 
(killed at Stone Kiver, January 2, 186>3), George P. Richer, George T. 
Shai-rer (wounded at Stone River, December 31, 1862), Henry C. ShuU 
(disclmrged July 8, 1862), John (). S])aulding. Elijah X. Terwilliger 
(Company D), Albert Tei'williger (Com])any D), Amos Vinson (V. R. 
C), Lewis Williams, John Webber, Edwiii D. Way (discharged for 
disability, July. 1862). James O. Imes (killed at Stone River, Decem- 
l)er 31, 1862).' The recruits of 1S61 ami 1862 were: Urban Coon, 
Lewis Corsan (discharged for disability, Se])tember, 1861), Asa Clark 
(discharged to rei-idist), Geoi'ge Comstock (died at Louisville, October 
29, 1861), Leonard I). Henderson, Willard Jordan (killed at Chicka- 
mauga, Sei)tember 2<i. 1863). Madison Linsley (missing), Joseph M. 
Leacox (V. U. ('.). John rNrcConchie. James G. Tui'ubuU (transferred 
11. Q. 14th A. ('.). Adi-ian Coon (deserted). Frank Horrigan (killed at 
Pulaski, Tenn., Mav 2, 1862), AViUiam Imes (killed at Reynold's Sta- 



IVtII.ITAUV HISTORY. 209 

tioii, August 27, 1802), rlohn lines, Martin Tnies (in-onioted), liobert 
Fell (discharged to reenlist), Thomas W. Oziah (ti'ansferred to 11. Q. 
l-tth A. C), Fred H. Whitaker, David Jackson (transferred to H. Q. 
Uth A. C). 

Company C recruits were: James Atherton (discharged for disa- 
bility), Wesley Hall (veteranized), John McSherry, June, ISOl ; and 
Company D recruits : Elijah ^V. Terwilliger and Albert Terwilliger, 
enlisted in June, 1861 (deserted). 

The organization of the Nineteenth Illinois Veteran Volunteer 
association took place August 22, 1870, near Aurora. Col. llatfen was 
elected president ; Lieut. -Col. William Jackson and Thomas Lawler, 
vice-i)residents ; James Stewart, secretary, and Jolm Stephens, treas- 
urer. From 1880 to the })resent, reunions of this association have been 
held. Company B, Nineteenth Illinois Infantry Veteran club, hehl its 
annual reunion, October 11, 1883. Dr. James G. Boardman was 
elected president; Charles Stuart, of Osceola, vice-president; Lieut. 
William Jackson, of Elniira. secretary and treasurer. Ca])t. C. Stuart 
and I. M. Spencer, of Osceola; Capt. A. Murchison and Thomas llob- 
inson, of Kewanee, and James Montooth, of Modena, ^vere elected 
members of executive committee. Like the regimental association, 
tliat of Com])any B is perfect in organization, as its meetings are 
always numbered among the most pleasant, happy military gatherings. 

Twentieth Infantry, organized at Joliet, was mustered in June 13, 
1861 ; had first engagement M^th Jeff. Thompson's rebels, October 
20th, near Fredericktown. In Januai'y, 1862, the command accom- 
panied Grant through Kentucky; in February engaged at Fort Doneh 
son; in April, at Shiloli ; at Britton's Lane, on September 1st, and so 
on, through Jackson, Molly S[)rings, Tallahatchie, to the muster out at 
Chicago, Jul^' 19, 1865. The substitutes and drafted men from Stark 
county, in this command, were, in Comj^any B — William Border, 
Zelotas Kendall, of Goshen, enlisted September 30, 1S61:. Company 
D— William Keeper (drafted), Calvin A^ulgamot (drafted), September, 
1864. Company E — James Farrell, January, 1865; Philip Graves, 
Edward Quish, October. 1864; Finley C. McClelian, Ilerman Shrader, 
\'alley, Sei)tember, 1864. Company F — Thomas Graves, September, 
1864. Company I— Michael Flinii, January, 1865; William H. Little 
(drafted). West Jerse}^ September, 1864. 

Twentv-fourth Infantrv was mustered in at Cliicai-'o, Julv 8, 1861; 
served m Illinois, Missouri and Ohio until moved to Kentucky in Sep- 
tember. In Kentucky and Tennessee tlie command was fortunate in 
striking terror into rebel hearts. From Api'il. 1862, to muster out in 
-luly, 1865, the regiment ]>artici|)ated in several engagements, losing, 
near Perryville, on Oct(jbei' s, 1862, llo in killed, wounded and miss- 
ing. Jerome B. Thomas, of Wyoming, enlisted at Kewanee, and com- 
missioned first-assistant sui-geon, March 3, 1862. 

Twenty-eighth Infantry was organized at Cainj) Butler in August, 
I8(;i; sei'ved at Fort Holt, Ky., until January, 1S62; in February 
participated in the ca})tui'e of Forts Henry and Ileiman; at Pittsburg 
Landing in March; at Peach Orchard in April; at Corinth in May; 
lost ninety-seven killed at Matamora in October, 1862; at X'icksbu'rg 



210 HISTORY OF STAKK COU>."rV. 

in June and Jiilv. 1S03; lost seventv-three killed at Jackson in July. 
1863 ;> reenlisted as a veteran I'egiment. January 4th; consolidated into 
four companies, October lo. isoi; lost fourteen killed at Spanish Fort, 
Feljruary 27, 18H5. Companies G. H. I. and K. from Cam]) Butler, 
joined the command in April, 1865; in July moved to Texas, and 
served there until peace was restored. In this command the following 
named Stark county soldiers served : In Company E — James C. Hall 
and John Waldron enlisted February, 1864. botli from Penn. Coni- 
])any F — Edress M. Conklin. October. 1864, (substitute). Company 
K — James M. Paden, Toulon. September. 1861 ; George A. Arm- 
strong. Elmira. and Jeremiah Ferguson. Goshen, enlisted March. 1865. 
Thii'ty-third Infantry was mustered in at Camp Butler in August, 
1861,1660 strong. The command served in Missouri and Arkansas 
until the spring of 1863, Company A checking a charge of 2o00 Texan 
Rangers at Cotton Plank. On moving to Louisiana, it participated in 
the Ijattles of Fort Gil)Son. Champion Hills, Black liiver bridge; siege 
of Jackson and Yicksburg; moved to New Orleans in August with 
Thirteenth Corps: in October joined the Bayou Teclie campaign; 
afterward aided in the capture of Foi't Es])eranza : moved thence to 
Fort Lavaca. The command veteranized March 14. 1864; returned 
on furlough to Bloomington: reorganized at Camp Butler in April, 

1864, and in May proceeded to Brashear, La. ; the non-veterans re- 
turned via Xew York city, in Septend^er, with prisoners, leaving tlie 
veterans to share the glory of closing the camj^aign. From March 
until A]iril, 1865, this command was Ijefore Mobile; then moved to 
Montgomery; thence to Yickslnirg, and mustered out November 24, 

1865. In Conijiany B of this regiment were the following named 
soldiers from this county: Captains — C. Judson Gill. January 23, 
1863, resigned September 23, 1863; Nelson G. Gill, September 23, 
1863. First lieutenants — C. Judson Gill. September, 1861; Nelson 
(4. Gill. January. 1863. Second lieutenants — Nelson G. Gill. Sep- 
tember. 1862; Newton (4. B. Brown. August, 1865, veteranized and 
jH'omoted to fii-st lieutenant. First sergeant — Nelson G. Gill, August, 
1861. Corporal — AValter T. Hall, August, 1861, promoted. Privates, 
who enlisted August 20, 1861, were Jessie Armstrong, AYilliam Biggs 
(veteranized), George Dewey. George Fezler. Charles Green (trans- 
ferred to band). Murray Ilotchkiss (died at St. Louis. December 2(J, 
1831), Edward H. Ingraham (veteranized), Charles S. Johnson (died at 
Ir(jnton. Mo., February (i, 18t)3), George Lowman (transferred to 
band). AYilliam J. P. Mayo (veteranized). Andrew McKee (died at 
Pocaliontas. Ark.. ]\Iay 3. 1862). Charles Shinn (veteranized), Lewis 
Thomas (discharged for disability. December. 1862). Newton G. B. 
Prown (veteranized). Daniel Donovan (veteranized), and Harrison W. 
Ellis. The recruits of 1864-5 wei-e Calvin Butler, Otis T. Dyer. Levi 
T. Ellis. AYalter A. Fell (see One-hundred-and-twenty-fourth Illinois). 
Hugh Y. (Todfrey, Alvin Galley (see OneJiundred-and-twenty-fourth 
Illinois), Charles "C. Hotciikiss. Tliomas AY. Kule (see One-hundred-and- 
twenty-foui'th Illinois), Sanford StroAvbridge (supposed died April 10. 
186).'>. of wounds) John II. Stickney. Andrew Turnlndl. Jn the regi- 
mental Ijaiul were Charles Green and George A. Lowman, of Toulon; 



MILITARY HISTORY. 211 

and ill Company" K — John Peterson (veteranized), Adam Rush (dis- 
charged for disability) ; both enhsted in December, 1861. 

Thirty-fourth Infantry organized in 1S61 ; mustered out in 1864, 
and veteranized. Hekl two representatives from Stark county — James 
Hall and John Waldron, of Penn townshi]^. 

Thirty-seventh Infantry was organized at Chicago in September, 

1861, with ten companies of infantry and two of cavalry. In Janu- 
ary, 1862, the command was present at Pea Ridge; in September, at 
Newtonia; in October, at Fayetteville ; subsequently relieved General 
Blunt, and camped at Prairie Grove, Ark., after tramping 2,250 miles. 
The command was mustered out in' May, 1866. This command held 
a, number of Goshenites, who enlisted August 19, 1861. In Company 
B, of this regiment, the following named soldiers served : Captain — 
Charles V. Dickinson, August 19, 1861. First-lieutenant — Cassimir P. 
Jackson, August 19, 1861, resigned July 9, 1862; Francis A. Jones, 
July 9, 1862 ; Luman P. Himes, veteranized and promoted first-lieuten- 
ant. Second-lieutenant — Francis A. Jones; David L. Ash, July 9, 

1862. Sergeants — David L. Ash; William N. Perry, died at St. Louis, 
Deceml)er 1, 1861 ; Fayette Lacey, promoted sergeant-major, reduced 
August 19, 1865. Corporals — Oliver S. Risdon, sergeant, transferred 
to cor])s d'Af., September 27, 1863; Thomas J. McDaniel, sergeant, 
died at Cassville, Mo., June 9, 1862; Luman P. Himes, veteranized ; 
Chilion B. Redtield, died at C^assville, Mo., June 9,1862; Joshua S. 
Dudley; James S. Lundy; John A. Perry, died at Otterville, Mo., 
January 13, 1862; AVilliam Nicholson, died at St. Louis, November 26, 
1861. Musician — George Ransom. 

The private soldiers were — enlisted in August, 1861 — John Ander- 
son, veteranized ; Aaron S. Anshutz, Andrew Anderson (discharged 
for wounds); William W. Atkins, David Anshutz (veteranized); Alva 
W. Brown, AVilliam H. Barney, veteranized; William W. Biyan 
(killed at Prairie Grove, Ark., December 7, 1862); Joseph Barlow 
(died at New Orleans, May 6, 18()4) ; Emery S. Buffum, John W. 
])uffum, -John duirleson, Lucius Church (discharged February 11-, 
1862); William H. Craig, AVilh am T. Dickinson, Eldrige B. Driscoll, 
died at New Orleans, September 5, 1863; Michael M. Emery, John A. 
Edd}', IVLartin Fitch, Nelson Grant, Matthew T. Godfrey, died at 
Brownsville, Texas; CUiarles F. Himes, veteranized; N. G. Hilliard, 
George II. Ilurd, W. II. Hurd, Norman Ives (discharged for wounds) ; 
INIoses S. Jones, veteranized, and discharged for disability; George W. 
Ivirby (veteranized); Daniel Kieni, Julius Kelsey, Anthony Ivennard 
(veteranized); Alvin Kiem, Dennis Lee (discharged for wounds); 
Thomas R. Lake, veteranized ; James E. Lee (killed at Pea Ridge, 
Ark., MarcJ] 7, 18f)2) ; Samuel Lemoine, Daniel Lundy, Chauncey R. 
Miner, Benjamin H. Morgan, died at S])ringileld, Mo., November 26, 
1862; Ira Newton, veteranized; AVilliam J. Noran, David Nowlan, 
AVilliam M. Pilgrim, Edward Perkins, Robert C. Reed, died at Otter- 
ville, Mo., October 23, 1861; John Reed, (Tcorge AV. Rouse (First 
Fnited States Artillery); John Sackrisson, Henry Sipe, Henry W. 
AV'^ilbur, Martin AVilcox, veteranized ; Henry B. Dexter, veteranized ; 
Luther Fitch, Thomas Hughes, (Himmings Force, Hartford J. Rowe, 



212 HISTORY OF STAKK COL'XTV. 

Samuel AV. Young (veteranized). The recruits were Joseph II. Xew- 
ton. February 6. 18*)5. and David AV. Snyder, April :24. 1804. 

Thirty-eighth Infantry organized at Camp Butler in Se])tember, 
1861, ordered t(^ ^Missouri that month. engage(l Jeff. Thompson's rebels 
at Fredericktown, and in March, 1862, was assigned to the division of 
S. E. Missouri. The historv of this command is one of heavv marchino- 
and small l)attles u]) to Decemljer. 1862. when it participated in the 
l)attle of Stone liiver. losing 34 killed, lUU wounded and 34 missing. 
After this affair the regiment appears to be everywhere, engaged- in 
evervthint)-, until mustered out at Yictoria, Tex. The Stark countv 
men in this command were: In Company E.. enlisted August. 1861, 
John M. Cole, Thos. C. Davis (taken ]n'isoneri. Peter Lane, discharged 
for disability. 

Fortieth Infantry, mustered in August 10, 1861, at Salem. 1.-277 
strong, claimed the following named Stark county soldiers: Company 
G., Hugh D. Iveffer. enlisted at McLeansboro. July. 1S61 : ])romoted 
captain April, 18'i."'). In Companv I).. John Timmons. recruited March. 
1865. (See 93d Illinois.) 

Forty-lirst Infantry, oi-ganized at Decatur in August. 1861. served 
in Missouri and Kentucky up to February. 1862. ])artici]iated in the 
three-days" siege of Fort Donelson. was at Fittsljurg Landing in March, 
at Shiloh in April, and at Corinth in May. 1^62. At Jackson the com- 
mand lost 40 killed and 122 wounded, in July, isi;:-;: went into winter 
(|uarters at Big Black river, where it remained until cons(Jidation with 
the Fifty-tirst Kegiment. Stark county was represented as follows: 
Company D., James D. Anderson, enlisted July, 1861; transferred to 
A^eteran Battalion. Comjxiny A., as corporal. January. 18<;4. 

Forty-second Infantry, mustered in at Chicago SejUember IT. 18()1. 
with l.>^24 men. moved at once to St. Louis, and sei-ved in Alissonri and 
Kansas, until A]3i*il. ls(;2: sul)sequently served betoi-e Corinth, at Farm- 
ington. Stone river, in the Tullahoma campaign, at Chickamauga. and 
Mission Bidge. The command veteranized January 1. 1864. engaged 
in the Atlanta campaign, at Rf)ckv Face Ridge. Resaca. Adairville, 
New Hope Church. Bine Mountain. Kenesaw Mountain, Beach Tree 
Creek, Atlanta. Jonesboro, and Lovejoy Station ; halting at Atlanta, 
September 8. tlience to Xew Orleans, where the command was dis- 
charged January lo. 1S66>. In Company B. was: Henry Boyle. Se]i- 
tember 29, 1864; in Comjiany D.. John AA". Shoemaker, kdled at Mai-i- 
etta, Ga., June 15. 1864, Frank Horn, James Hall and Robert Miller; 
in Company F., Amos Hodges, Samuel B. Ilankins, Cyrenus Dewey, 
Case I). Dul)ois, September 3i>. 1864: in Com])any K.. Silas Avery, 
^lordecai Bevier. Jose[)h (4. Fowler (died December 21. 18»;4. wounds). 
Springer Galley (substitute). Thomas AV. Oziah (substitute), all enlisted 
in September. 1864. 

Foi'tv-seventh Infantrv was organized at Beoi'ia. Auo-ust 16, 1861. 
It proceeded to Benton Bari-acks. September 23; ^lay 1». 1862. was en- 
uau-ed at Farminoton. ]\Iiss.; was enuaoed Alav 2s. near Corinth, ar.d 
at that city. October 3 and 4. where they lost theii' l)i;ive Colonel AV. 
A. Thrush, while leading a charge. The regiment lost in this engage- 
ment 3* I killed and over lo'j wounded. AFay 14. isr)3, was engaged at 



MILITARY HISTORY. 213 

Jackson, Miss.; took part in tiie cliarge on the enemy's works at Yicks- 
biirg, May 22, losing 12 Killed and a large number wounded ; was at 
the battle of Pleasant Hill, La., April 9, 1804; returned to Vicksburg 
May 22, with General Smith's command, after a campaign of nearly 
three months, in which thev suffered almost nnheard-of fatio-ue and 
]irivations, many men dying from hardships. The Forty-seventh met 
and defeated General Marmaduke near Lake Chicat, in which they lost 
II killed and a number wounded. It was mustered out January, 18<)6, 
at Selraa, Alabama. In Company A, wei'e, Second-Lieutenant, Charles 
S. r>lood, June 17, 1863 (promoted from sergeant). Privates, Benjamin 
Anient, Benjamin F. Ellis (veteranized, transferred to Company C), 
Forty-seventh consolidated, enlisted August 16, 18()1. In Company I) 
were, privates, enlisted August, 1861, Nathaniel Childs, (died in Stark 
county, Illinois, February 10, 1864), William Crow, Perry Kent (died 
at Jefferson City, Missouri, Xoveml)er 16,1861), John McKinnon, Wm.W. 
Stewart, Albert G. Conley, Alva W. Sturdevant (discharged for disabil- 
ity), Robert Davidson (promoted,) Wm. R. Kiger (discharged for disabil- 
ity), Robert S. Martin, Allen II. Spellman (died at Young's Point, La., 
July y, 1863), Abraham Vandusen (died at St. Louis, October 25, 1861), 
James Richart (deserted.) In Company H, was: Privates, James Drum- 
mond, (enlisted September 1, 1861), and in Company K, Captains, Jacob 
Jamison, August, 186.1 (i-esigned March 26, 1862), David DeWolf, 
]\[arch, 1862, John M. Brown, September, 1862. First-Lieutenants, 
David DeWolf, August, 1861, James A. Henderson (not mustered, re- 
signed as Second-Lieutenant, June 16, 1862), John M. Brown, June, 
1862), William H. Denchtield, October, 1862. Second Lieutenants, 
Wm. II. Denchtiehl, March, 1861 (])romoted), John Hawks, October, 
1862 (resigned April, 1864). First-Sergeants, J. M. Brown, September, 
1861, Elisha Dixon, September, 1861. Sergeants, Philip A. Temple- 
ton, (discharged for disability), William 11. Denchfield, Charles Butler, 
Elisha Dixon (promoted. Se])tember, 18(51). Corporals*, Adam Tor- 
rance (killed at A'icksburg May 22, 1863), Charles D. Paul (died at 
Rienzi, Mississippi, August, 1862), Joseph W. Jamison (died at Toulon, 
March 29, 1862), Henry Dixon, (Sergeant, discharged for wounds), D. 
W. Davis, Henry Hixon (veteranized), Charles Edmunds. Wagoner, 
John H. Waller (discharged), all dating appointments to Sept., 1861. 
The privates enlisted in September, 1862, were, James Alderman, (dis- 
charged), Hiram Boardman, killed at luka. Miss., September 19, 1862 ; 
Allen r^iiatfee. Miles (Jolwell (promoted), Ross Colwell, John G. White 
(discharged for disability), Henry Allen (promoted), John Barler, Joel 
Dixon, William Dixon, Carson W. Drummond (died at Jefferson City, 
Mo., January <>, 1862), AVilliam Dailey, Jasper Doleson, Samuel Eby 
(died in Stark county, Illinois, September 11, 1863), Geo. W. Ellis (died 
at Jefferson City, Mo., Novend)er 28, 18(!1,), Andrew Eutzler, Jacob 
Hutchinson (died at St. Louis, October 27, 1862), Daniel Howard (ser- 
geant, died at Memphis, June 25, 1862 ; wounds), Sylvester Sylcott(vet- 
ei'anized), Edward Sommers (discharged for wounds), Barton Thurston, 
IJenj. Ijiackl)urn, Thomas Cross (desei'ted), George A. Clifford, and 
Amos Cornish, discharged for disability ; Oliver Crowder, William 



214 HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY, 

Cross (discharged as corporal, March 11, 1863, to enlist in Mississippi 
Marine Brigade), Robert Garner (discharged for Avounds) James W. Jar- 
nagin (died at Alexandria, La., May 31, 1864), James Kinkade (veteran- 
ized), George II. Martin. David Oziah (veteranized). Jesse AVest (died 
at Jefferson City, Mo., FebruarA^^l, 1862), AVillson Boggs (veteranized), 
Charles Goodrich (veteranized), Penn. Lewis Egbert, Theodore W. Mc- 
Daniel (discharged for disalnlity). Joseph Witter, Daniel Fast (died at 
St. Louis, July 12, 1862), John Hum, Daniel ]\[cCrady, Valley, .lames 
T. Marshall (died at Jefferson City. Mo.. October 27. 1861),' Bradford 
The recruits wei-e, Secratus Drummond, August, 1864, [see Co. B.,47th 
consolidated], John D. Eby, December 7, 1861 (discharged for wounds), 
George Hachtel (see Co. B. 47 consolidated). Oscar G. Ilixon, Fel)ruary 
11, 1864 (see Co. B. 47 consolidated)' Charles 8. Ilitclicock, October 21, 
1861 (discharged ; John Hawks, December 7, 1861 (promoted to ser- 
geant and 2d lieutenant), William Jamison (died at Milliken's Bend, July 
19, 1863), Robert Lambert. Deceml)er 7, 186)1 (left in the field with vet- 
erans); Thomas Xichols. October 21, 1861 (dis. for dis.), Robert P\'les, 
December 7 (left in the held with veterans), George F. Pyles, Decem- 
ber 7. 1861 (dis. for dis.), John E. Thrall, December 7,1861 (discharged 
for wounds), Rol)ert L. Wright, Decend^er 7, 1861 (deserted). 

Forty-seventh Consolidated Infantry claimed a Stark county rejn'e- 
sentation in Company A as follows: Recruits — Richard LA^nch. 
[N^ovember 18, 1863, and James B. Riley, March 31, 1865, from'^One- 
hundred-and-eighth Illinois. In Company B were : Captain — Ilenrv 
Weiar, Octc^ber 11. 1864; First-Lieutenant— W. Boggs, October 11, 
1864; Corporals — Ilenrv Weiar. Oct olier 22,1864; promoted to cap- 
tain. The ])rivates who enlisted in February, 1864, were : Wilson 
Boggs, Charles Goodricli. George W. Waldon, J. Bates, Secratus 
Drummond, Sylvester Sylcott, Jacob Weiar, Michael Weiar, George 
Hachtel, James Kiidcade, David Oziah, Oscar (L Ilixou and Henry 
Hixon. In Company C were: Cor})oral. — Benjamin F. Ellis, Feb- 
I'uary 22, 1864, who was made prisonei'. In Com))any E were; Ser- 
geant — Philip C. Scott; Corporal — Bernard Hogan, appointed in 
February, 1865; and the privates who enlisted in February, 18<)5, 
were: Charles Byrne, Thomas Bryne, John Keely, William Conklin, 
Charles Hall, James Farrell, Robert Keusler, all of whom were rejiorted 
to have deserted. In Company H were : privates, who enlisted Mai'ch. 
1865. George Edwards (dishonoraUy discharged!, John Hartley 
(deserted), Daniel Ilogaii (deserted), Chark^s Ardh'ide (deserted), Will- 
iam Welch (deserted). In Com])any I were : Privates, who enlisted 
March, 1865, John Burns. Aljram Loudenbui'gh, Theodore VanD^'ke, 
Daniel Ballar<l. In C()m])any K were: Sergeant. — Albei-t Pajieneau. 
enlisted March 6, 1865; died at Demopolis, Ala., July 5, 18(55; Cor- 
porals — Alexander Davis, Alexander Sanies, (ieorge W. Sailer; Wag- 
oner — Robert Lambert; Privates — David Biddleman. died at Dem- 
opolis, Ala., Jun(^ 15, 1865, Thomas J. Fuller. Ste])hen II. Jackson, 
Enoch Fol)le, Simon Watson, Ilasleb W. Wilson, Thomas Fryman, 
Samuel A. Glassford, Samuel S. (ylassfoi'd (died at Selma, Ala., August 
15, 1865), Robert Sames, John W. Morrison, enlisted in March, 18«)5, 



MirJTARV niSTORY. 215 

with unjissigned recruits — Joseph A. O'Uonnel, December 2, 1864 
(rejected by Board). 

Forty-ninth Infantry was organized at Cam]) Butler, December 81, 
18(11, ordered to Caii-o' 111., in Febi-uary, 18P.2, lost, 14 killed and 37 
wounded at Donelson ; lost, 17 killed and 99 wounded at Shiloh ; par- 
ticijxited in the siege of Corinth, joined the expedition against Little 
Tlock, and in January, 1864, three-fourths of the command re-enlisted. 
In March, 1864, participated in the capture of Fort DeRnssey, Ala.; 
ordered to Illinois for veteran furlough, June 24, while the detadiment 
of non-veterans remained, and under Captain John A. Logan, partici- 
pated in the affair of Tupelo, July 14 and 15, 1864. Several magnifi- 
cent movements are credited to this command. In December, 1864, 
the non-veterans were mustered out at Paducah, Ky., and the veterans 
Septeml)er 9, 1865, at the same place. The soldiei's from this county 
were: Company I), Jolin L. Lee, Lafayette, recruited April, 1865. 
Company K, William C. Grant, Elmii-a, recruited March, 1865. 

Fiftieth Infantry organized at (^)uincy, August, 1861, held a repres- 
entative of IVnti township, in the })ersoii of John Eyan. 

Fifty-first Infantry was organized December 24, 1861 ; Februar}^ 
14, 1862, ordered to Cairo, 111; April 7 moved against Island No. 10 ; 
on the 6tl] pursued the enemy, com])elliug the surrender of Gen. Mack- 
all ; on the 11th endjarked and moved down the Mississippi to 
Osceola, Ark., ami disembarked on the 22d ; in the battles of Farming- 
ton, siege of Corinth, Nashville, Stone River, Chickamauga, Rocky 
Face Ridge, Kenesaw IVIountain and many others ; they were in the 
thickest of the light, nearly one-half of the number engaged being- 
killed or wounded, at Chickamauga; also sustained severe loss at Kene- 
saw Mountain. The regiment was heavily engaged in the battle of 
of Nashville, Decem])er 1, where 150 men were killed, wounded and 
missing. The Fifty-first was mustered out at Camp Irwin, Tex., Sep- 
tember 25, 1865. In Com])any II were the ]H'ivates who enlisted in 
January, 1862 : Hugh Donnelly, Elison Eli (veteranized, promoted), 
Erick From (veteranized, pi'omoted), James Kinneman, James Kennedy, 
Jose])h Pew (discharged), Solomon R. Shockley, David Simmerma'n, 
Paul Ward (veteranized, prisoner of war), Thomas lines (veteranized), 
Anthony Sturm (veteranized, })romoted), Cyrus Jacobs (veteranized, 
promoted), Chai'les W. Newton (promoted) ; and in Com])any K, 
privates: Cyi'us A.Anthony, enlisted November 15, 1861, (veteran- 
ized, promoted cpuirtermaster sergeant, then first lieutenant of Com- 
])any G ; next adjutant and then ca})tain of Company B, vide family 
history in West Jersey township. 

Fifty -third Infantry, oi'ganized at Ottawa; moved to Savannah, 
Tenn., in March, 1862, and present at Shiloh on April 7. On January 
4, 1865, 222 men and officers of the Forty-lirst were consolidated with 
the Fifty-third, and served until muster-out July 22, 1865. In Com- 
pany A were: Francis Bradley, December, 1864 (sul)stitute, never 
joined the company). Company C, James W. Albro, October, 1864 
(never joined company) James Lee, December, 1864, (never joined com- 
pany). In Company E, William Osiah, December, 1864 (substitute.) 

Fifty-fifth Infantry mustered in October, 31, 1861, at Camp Doug- 



216 HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY. 

lass with 1,287 men, moved to Kentucky in January 1862, joined the 
expedition against Corinth in March, lost 1> officers and 102 men killed 
and 161 Avounded and prisoners lost also at Russell's house, entei-ed 
Corinth May 30, moved to Arkansas Post that winter where three 
men were wounded in January, 1863. At Yicksburg and Jackson the 
reg-iment did excellent service, again at North Chickamauga Creek, 
Knoxville, Kenesaw Mountain, where its losses were heavy, at Atlantic 
and Jonesboro it made an enviable reputation. The command partici- 
pated in the grand review at Washington, D. C, and received honora- 
ble discharge. In Company G. of this command were privates, enlisted 
October, 1861 — L. S. Coggswell, veteranized, promoted ; George W. 
Eckley, died at Camp Sherman, IVIiss., August 8, 1863 ; James A. Eck- 
ley, Joseph C. Iliner, veteranized, promoted ; George E. Witter, vetera- 
nized, promoted. 

Fifty-sixth Infantry was mustered in at Shawneetown, February 27, 

1862, with 1,180 men. The Stark county men in the command were: 
Edward Keffer, enlisted at McLeansboro, February, 1862, and commis- 
sioned Second lieutenent, promoted captain, October, 1862, killed by 
fall of a tree, December, 1863, in Ala. Osmand C. Griswold, enlisted 
at McLeansboro, as sergeant, No^^ember, 1861, promoted Second-lieu- 
tenant, October, 1862, resigned. May, 1864. 

Fifty-seventh Infantry organized at Chicago, in December 1861, 
moved to Cairo in February, 1862, engaged in the siege of Fort 
Donelson, February, 13, 11 and 15; in the Battle of Shilph, April 6 and 
7 ; in the siege of Corinth in May, and the battle of Corinth, October 
3 and 4, 1862. The regiment was engaged in guard and garrison dutv 
until mustered out at Louisville, Ky., July 7, 1865. The Stark County 
soldiers who enhsted September, 1861. Thomas J. Blake, veteranized, 
James Ivelley, veteranized ; Joseph Manning, killed at Shiloh, April 6, 
1862 in Company F; Thomas C. I^ichols and James Nichols, dis- 
charged, in Company K ; and William P. Clifford, who deserted in 
June, 1862, from Company H. 

Fifty-eighth Infantry recruited at Chicago in February. 1862, went 
at once into service at Fort Donelson, and suffered all the trials to 
which new troops were ever exposed. The Stark County soldiers were 
Company D., PudoljJi Shippman, promoted, discharged for disability. 
Company E., Isaac Dudley, Edward Deffleg, deserted, March, 18(i5. 
Company I., Franklin Maxcy, coi'poral and James C. Maxcy, ]\Iarch, 
1865. TJnassigned, John Ryan, Februar3% 1865. 

Sixty-fourth Infantry, mustered in at Cliicago, December 16, 1861, 
was assigned to Pope's army March 1, at New Madrid, and on the 12tli 
made a night attack on the enemy, and participated in the battle of 
the 13th; Stephen Babb, a recruit of Fel)ruary, 1862, served in this 
command. 

Sixty-fifth Infantry, or the " Scotch Regiment," was organized at 
Chicago, and mustered in May 1, 1862. It was ordered to Virginia 
and brigaded with the One Hundred and Twentv-tifth New York 
Infantry and Battery M, Second Artillery. Col. Miles captured at 
Harper's Ferry, paroled next day, returned to Chicago, and in April, 

1863, after exchange, w^as assigned to the armv of Eastern Kentuckv. 



MILITAin- IlIs'l'ORV. 217 

In Marcli, ISOi, the coiiniuiml vetemnizecl, received i'urlougli, rejoined 
Gen. Sherman's army, and on -June 15, engaged the enemy between 
Kenesaw and Lost IVEountain, and continued in active service until 
mustered out July 1.''). ISH,"). The soldiers fronv Stark County are as 
follows : 

Company A — Enlisted March, 1S()2 : James K. Allen (veteranized 
in Company II), Joseph Bogard, Ezekiel Bogard (veteranized in Company' 
II), Asa Greenfield. Robert H. Hitchcock (veteranized in Company 11). 
Bethuel Greenfiehl (veteranized in Company II), Sylvester Greenfiehl 
(veternized in Company H). Compau}^ D — Finley McLellan (de- 
serted), William W. Updike, Daniel P. White (veteranized in Company 
II). Conii)any G — Cori)oral: John Bicher, March, 18P)2, X. B. C*;, 
Septemf)er ;](), 1S<;4. . Privates — Enhsted April, 18(!2 : William PI. 
Ausman (nmsician), James F. Ausman, Joseph Bicher (veteranized in 
Com])any B, consolidated), George Maxlield (discharged for disability). 
Company L — Fii'st-Lieutenant : George H. Brown, June 2H, 1864, 
(not mustered). Sergeant — George II. Brown, February 12, 1862, 
promoted to second-lieutenant. Corj)oral — James K. Oziali, February 
12, 1862. Privates — Enlisted March, 1862: Stephen S. Bnrnham 
(deserted), Bobert Hennessy (discharged for disability), Fred. K. Ket- 
zenberger (discharged foi' disal)ility\ Isaac Bannister (X. B. C, A])ril 
1, 1865), Chauncey Gardner, Usi-o Iluckins (veteranized), Ilenr}' C. 
Hall (discharged for disability), Francis M. Steves, AV. W. Weaver 
(died in Georgia, June 15,1864; wounds), Alfred Cornish (deserted), 
Arthur B. Olds (discharged for disability), William Shirts (discharged 
for disability), James J)alrymj)le, Freeman B. Davison (veteranized), 
Harmon Ilochstrasser, James C. Powell Samuel (\ Sharrer (discharged 
for disal)ility), Bobert W. Wood (deserted), Alexander C. Lord. Be- 
cruits — Enlisted August. 1862: I)enjamin Blackburn (deserted), John 
AYhitcher, George W. Pate (deserted), Harvey L. AVay (discharged). 
Fnassigned recruit — Peter Xelson, ]\[ay, 1864. 

In the Sixty-fifth Consolidated Infantry were the following named : 
Sergeant — David L. .Jones. Corporal — Jose])h W. Bicher. Private 
— Enlisted March, 186)5: David Woodard, in Company B. First- 
Lieutenant — Elmer Sage, June 2!», 1865. Cor])orals — Frank L. Yale, 
March 28, 1864; Luther Graham, November 21, 1863. The private 
soldiers were : William A. Brown, ^Sfartin Hickman, William J. Ham- 
ilton, Morris C. Lampson, 1868; Jacob W. McDaniel, 1864; Thomas 
Patterson, George W. Pate, 1862; (4eorge A. Brown, 1863; Melvin 
Gage, 1684; Ira F. Ilayden, 1863; Zach. T. Brown, 1865; James L. 
Fox, 1865; Adam Bush, George Bush, James M. Tacket, Elisha E. 
Tayh)r, Anson Tanner, Stephen Talbot, Andrew Jackson, William 
J. Tamper, Solomon Leighton, Isaac Luce, 1864; John Lee, 1863; 
Ijaily C. Ogden, 1861, in Company F. Privates — James K. Allen, 
Jose])h Bogard, Bobert II. Flitchcock, Bethuel Greenfield, Daniel 
P. White, in Com])any II. First-Lieutenant — George II. BroAvn, in 
Company I, and Privates Freeman B. Davison, Ozro C. Huckins, in 
Company K. 

Sixty-Sixth Infantry, known as "Birge's Sharpshooters" and 
" Western Sharpshooters,'' was mustered in as Fourteenth Missouri In- 



218 HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY. 

fantry, December 12, 1861, served in Missouri until moved to Cairo in 
February, 1862, participated in tlie affairs at Fort Ilenry, Fort Donel- 
son, Sbiioh, Corintb, and lesser battles, until Kovember 20, when the 
command was transferred to Illinois, and received the number ()C). 
From this time to muster out at Louisville, ivy., Jul}' 7, 1865, it was 
actively engaoed. In this command were, of Company F, Charles 
Atherton, October, 1864 (transferred to invalid corps); Andi'ew Hamil- 
ton, recruited February, 1864. Unassigned — Daniel Holmes, recruited 
February, 1864. 

Sixty-ninth Infantry was mustered in at Camp Douglas, June 
14, 1862, with 912 men. lu Company D of this command were the 
following named Stark county soldiers: Corporals — Enlisted June 
1862 — Jedediah Luce, George W. Smith, jMatthew Eounds, James 
Adams; privates — Moses M, Adams, Robert Boyd, William II. David- 
son, William Foster, Ransom D. Foster, WilsoQ Rounds, Lorenzo 
K. AViley, Edward Brown, William Bowden, Lucius Church, Alger- 
non Fitch, Michael Gillespie, Wm. Hamilton, Benjamin F. Lewis, 
Henry B. Lewis, George W, McDaniels, Edwin B. Pomeroy, Edward 
Perrv, John W. Rounds, Jasper Smith, Wm. F. Wheeler, Theron 
Waller, Michael Hum, David Himes, Isaac M. AVitter, Frederick 
Russell (deserted). The recruits of 1862 Avere: George Pate (deserted). 

Sev'ent3'-second Infantry was organized at Chicago, as the First 
Regiment of the Chicago Board of Trade. Its first bills were put out 
for one company, caUing itself the ''Hancock Guards," on July 23, 
1862, and one month afterward tlie regiment mustered into service, 
started for Cairo, arriving on the 24t]i. Their strength at that time 
was 37 officers and 93(> men. T^ie Seventy-second partici]iated in many 
engagements during their three years' service in the field. At the bat- 
tle of Franklin, Tenn., the Seventy-second lost 9 officers and 152 men, 
who Avere either killed or severely Avounded. In C^ompany A, Avere : 
]\[iles Avery (deserted), Jacob Galley (promoted, was prisoner), Scepta 
T. Harding (killed at Vicksburg, May 22, 1863), James I). Heath (pro- 
moted), Robert Holmes. 

Eighty-third Infantry mustered in August 21, 1862, at Monmouth, 
111., contained W. H. Harris, who was discharged for disability, and 
George W. Dunbar, jr., of Company E. 

Eighty-sixth Infantry Avas organized at Peoria, and mustered in 
August 27, 1862, 993 strong ; moved at once to Louisville, and served 
at Chickamauga during the three days' fight in September, pursued 
the rebels from Missionary Ridge to Ringgold on September 26th, 
served at Perryville ()ctol)er 8th ; engaged at Buzzard's Roost May 
9, 10, 11 ; at Resaca in the U\o days' fight ; at Rome on May 17; at 
Dallas from May 27 to June 5 ; at Kenesaw Mountain from June 11 
to 27, losing 110 killed and wounded. On the banks of the Chatta- 
hooehie on the 18th, and at Peach Tree Creek on the 19th, and near 
Atlanta on 20, 21 and 22, the regiment did good service, Avas engaged 
in the siege of Atlanta until joining in the " march to the sea" Novem- 
ber 16, arrived at Savannah December 21, and after the defeat of 
Johnson proceeded to Washington, D. C, Avhere it was mustered out, 
June 6, 1865. The command lost 346 men, died, killed and wounded, 



:\[IIJTARY HISTORY. 221 

marched ;5,5U0 miles, and ti'aveled l)y rail 2,000 miles. In C^cmpaiiy E, 
were: Captain, George A. Smith, Jul}^ 15, 1804; First-Lieiiteiiant, 
George A. Smith, June 15, 1863; Second-Lieutenants, George A. 
Smitli, June 11, 1863 ; Ilenrv Foreman, June 12, 1865 (not mustei'ed); 
Sergeants, George A. Smith, August 13, 1862. Privates, enlisted 
August, 1862, Wm. Cooper (died at Nashville, Tennessee, January 13, 
176)3), Joseph Carter, Wm. Dawson (discharged), Harvey Foreman 
(proiioted), Alonzo Goodale (disciiarged), John A. Job (promoted), 
Andrew Nehlig (died of wounds, March 20, 1865), Wm. F. Speei's (pro- 
moted), James S. Schank (died at Nashville, February 22, 1863), Louis 
Woodward, Eli Wilson (discharged), Benton Carrington (discharged 
for wounds), Thomas Reader, James W. Ileagan (discharged), Tighl- 
man S. Ragan, Jacob Schleigh. The recruits, enlisted Fel)ruary, 186-t, 
James C. Kail (transferred to Company Fl, Thirty-fourth), John II. 
Waldron (transferred to Company E., Thirty -fourth), and in Company 
H., Musician, Cyrus A. Fox, August 7, 1862 ; Privates, Alexander R. 
He])])erly, August 6, 1862 (promoted) ; Recruits. John Jenkeson (died 
of wounds, March 20, 1865). 

Nineteenth Infantry, or Irish Legion, was organized in the summer 
and mustered in in October, 1862. Its prompt organization was 
mainly due to Yery Rev. Dr. I). Dunne, and Timothy O'Meard, the 
lirst Colonel. The services of this command were as extensive as they 
were brilliant, losing 300 men and retui-ning with only 221 men, of 
whom 41 Avere crippled. The badge of the command was '' 4o rounds 
of cartridge." It is said that two or more Stark county men served in 
this command. 

Ninety-third Infantry organized at Chicago in September, 1862 ; 
ordered to Memphis in November, served in the northern Mississippi 
campaign, and in March, 1863, served in the ^'azoo Pass expedition. 
On May 14 was the first engaged at Jackson, losing 3 killed and 4 
wounded. On Black River the command lost 37 men and (> officers 
killed, and 107 wounded. A'icksburg, Mission Ridge, the Alabama 
campaign, Resaca, Alatoona, the CJarolina's campaign, and a hundred 
smaller affairs, tell the history of the Ninety-third. It was mustered 
out June 23, 1865, after 6,087 miles of travel and a casualty list of 478 
men. The soldiers of Stark in the Ninety-third were : Colonel, Nich- 
olas C. Buswell, November 25, 1863 (not mustered), Lieutenant-Colonel, 
Nicholas C. Buswell, October 13, 1862 (promoted); Privates, enlisted in 
August, 1862, Thomas Goodwin (died at Rome, Ga., October 25, 1864, 
wounds), George Gardner (killed at Yicksburg, May 22, 1863), Wil- 
liam C. Hall (died at Memphis, Januai'v 17, 1863), Edgar Hall ((lied at 
Memphis, March 5, 1863), John Hellenei- (died at Vickslnirg, Septem- 
ber 9, 1863), Matthew Landon (promoted), Seth E. Stoughton, Fred 
Sclaghter, Nathan Thorn (^promoted), IVforgan L. Weaver (died at home, 
November 21, 1863). 

One-hundred-and-sixth Infantry organized at Lincoln, 111., in Au- 
gust, 1862, moved to Columbus, Ivy., in November, thence to Jackson. 
Tenn., and served until musterecl out at Pine Bluff, Ark., July 12, 
1865. Serving in the One-hundred-and-sixth were in Company G, 
I>enjamin Williams, commissioned captain Septembei', 1862, died in 



2t^2 ' IIIST()i;V OF STAKK roT'NTV. 

service. Coiiipany II, James W. Berrv, enlisted as corporal August, 
18B2, promoted to First Lieutenant. 

One-lnmdred-and eighth Infantry organized at Camp Peoria, 
August 27, 18(i2, left for Kentucky Oetoher (>, and went into active 
service. In December, 1862, the command moved toward \^icksburg, 
meeting the enemy at Chickasaw Bayou, for the first time, losing four 
men killed. In the investment of Arkansas Post, January 10, 1863, 
the One-hundred-and-eighth bore a brilliant part, losing thirteen men 
wounded. The command was mustered out August 5, 1865. In this 
regiment were in Company C, Richard Lynch, recruited November, 
1863, (see Forty-seventh Illinois.) Comjiany T), James Rilev, recruited 
]\Iarch, 1865, (see F'orty-seventh Illinois.) 

One-hundred-and-twelfth Infantry may be said to date its organ- 
ization back to August 8, 1862, Avhen the commissioned officers of the 
three Stark county com})anies and seven Henry county comjmnies of 
militia met at Clalva. The command was then known as the '' Ilenrv 
County liegiment," the number " One-hundred-and-twelfth'' being 
assigned on acceptance by the State. The regiment was mustered 
in at Peoria, September 20 and 22, 1862, 903 strong. This number 
was increased to 940 by October 8, when the commcmd left e?i route 
to C'incinnati, where.Iohn F. Meyers, of Com])any F, died. From this 
time to IVIarch 31, 1S()3, no less than thirty-two members were rejwrted 
dead. On Fel)ruarv 23, 1863, twenty-five men under (^apt. Dow, were 
captured by 250 men of Morgan's command, and, after being robl)ed, 
were paroled, and were not exchanged until September, 1863. At 
Winchester, Mt. Sterling, Paris and Boonsboro, in March, 1863, the 
command gave evidence of Avhat stuff it was composed. Service round 
Danville, Capt. Otman's escape on the Kentucky river, the mounting 
of the command, and a few minor meetings with rebel outposts char- 
acterized the command in April. Monticello, Knoxville, Lemoir, and 
AValburg, Somerset, the organization of a musician's corps, the affair at 
Clinch Kut, and the destination of I'ailroad stations mark the progress 
of the One-hundred-and-twelfth in Kentucky and Tennesee u]) to July, 
1863. In July the attempt to save the wagon train at Crab Orchard; 
the capture of rebels at Harrodsburg by Capt. Otman and Milchrist's 
command, the fight at Richmond and pursuit formed the most notable 
events. The march over the Cumberland ]\[ountains, the ca])ture at 
Post Oak Springs ; the entry into Athens, and estal)lishment of a Union 
newspaper there mark the cann)aign of the One-hundred-and-twelfth 
in August. In September the i'el)els sur])rised the town, capturing a 
numl)er of Stark county men, and killing Capt. Dickenson. At Cal- 
houn, Cleveland and along the Iliawassee river, the command was 
ever on dut}' during a part of this month ; many members luiving seri- 
ous adventures and hair-breadth escapes. In the fall of 1863 the bat- 
tles round Loudon, Lenoir and Philadelphia were partici])ated in, and 
in ]S[ovend)er the seige of Knoxville, battle of Campbell's Staticm ; the 
affair at Ft. Saunders brought additional honors to the command. 
The pursuit of Longstreet, and a never ending round of skirmishing 
characterized the campaign of December. The affairs of Flat Creek 
and Kelly's Foi'd in Januar}^, 1864 entailed serious losses in the One- 



MILITAKY HISTORY. 22?) 

hundred-and-twelfth. In April the I'egiment was dismounted, and 
took its place among the troops ordered to ])articipate in the Georgia 
campaign. P'roni Ma.y 8, 18(54, this comman i did l)rilhant service 
under Sherman, and its history is in fact that of the most aggressive 
reo"iment under Shei'man. P'rom tlie (hiv the command left Peoria in 
1862, to muster out. June 20, 1865, its services to the Tnion were held 
as models for all other regiments. On its flag is the inscription : 
"Kentucky," " Monticello,'' "East Tennessee," '' Campbell's Sta'tion," 
"Knoxville," ''Bean's Station," " Dandridge," "Atlanta," ''Kesaca," 
"Kenesaw," '' Utoy Creek," "Nashville," "CV>lumbia," "Franklin." 
"Wilmington," "Fort Anderson." In the history of this command, 
written l)y Capt. B. F. Thompson, the whole story of the organization 
and services of the One-hundred-and-twelfth is related. In the fol- 
lowino' roster and record, summarized from this woi'k, is the minutia^ 
of its history. 

Field and Staff. — General Thomas J. Henderson, enrolled August 11, 
1862, and elected captain of Company F. Upon organization of the regi- 
ment unauimouslv elected colonel by vote of the commissioned officers and 
of the enlisted men. Mustered in as colonel of the regiment September 
22, 1862. — Severely wounded in the battle of Resaca, Ga., May, 14, 1864. 
and absent by reason of wounds until July 28. 1864. Commanded Second 
Brigade, Second Division, Cavalry Cor2)s. Ai-my of tlie Ohio, from January 
15 to April 8, 1864. Commanded Third Brigade, Third Division, Twenty- 
third Corps, Army of the Ohio, from August 12, 1864, until mustered out. 
Eecommended for promotion to l)rigadier general by Major General Scbo- 
field, commanding the Army of the Ohio, and by Major General Cox, com- 
manding the Twenty-third Army Corps, for gallant and meritorious service 
in the Georgia and Tennessee campaigns, and especially at the battle of 
Franklin, Tenn., Xovember 'M), 1864. Appointed brigadier general, by 
Brevet, by President Lincoln, January 6, 1865. to rank from November 30, 

1864. Residence at Princeton. Luther S. Milliken — Mustered in Sep- 
tend^er 15. 1862. as first assistant surgeon, with rank of captain. Pro- 
moted to surgeon, witli rank of major, March 22, 1863. Brigade surgeon 
a considerable portion of the last year of the war. Resided ever since the 
war at Franklinton, N. C. 

Company B. was enrolled at Ib-adford, and organized August 12, 1862. 
The date of all enlistments not otherwise stated, and date of muster into 
the United States service, September 20, 1862. Of those present and mus- 
tered out witli the company, June 20, 1865, the following record is made: 
Captain Bradford F. Thompson, mustered in as first sergeant. Promoted 
to second lieutenant April 10, to rank from March 31, 1863. Promoted 
first lieutenant January 17, 1864, to rank from September 18, 1863. Ap- 
pointed adjutant of the regiment March 7, 1864, to rank from November 
25, 1863. Promoted to captain May 9, to rank from April 25, 1865. 
Slightly wounded in action at Resaca, Ga., May 14, 1864, and in the battle 
of Franklin, Tenn., November 30. 1864. First Lieutenant William H. 
Doyle, mustered in as sergeant. Promoted to first lieutenant, Se})tendjer 
30, 1864, to rank from November 25, 1863. Commanded the company as 
sei'geant and lieutenant from August 6, 1864, to May 0. 1865; now of 
Rico, Colorado. First Sergeant Charles B. Foster, mustered in as ser- 
geant; promoted Ai)ril 10, 1863; commissioned second lieutenant June 15, 

1865, but not mustered. Sergeants: Willard B. Foster, mustered in as 



'224r IIISTOKY OF STARK COUXTY. 

sergeant, i-egimental " Ambulauce Sergeant "' from .June 1864, until mus- 
tered out; now of Rice county, Kansas: Augustus 8. Thompson, mustered 
in as corporal: promoted to sergeant August 31, 1864: regimental ''Ord- 
nance Sergeant "" from Xovembei 1864, until mustered out; George W. 
Reed, mustered in as corporal: promoted to sergeant August 31, 1864: cap- 
tured at Lancaster. Ky.. July 2S, 1863 — made his escajie the same flay. 
John R. Jones, promoted to Sergeant October 1, 1864; slightly wounded by 
splinters from "head-log"" struck by solid shot. May 27, 1864, and in 
action at Utoy^ Creek, near Atlanta, Ga.. August 6, 1864. Corporals: 
John Olenbtirg, promoted June 18. 1863: wounded in action at Kelly's 
Ford, on the French Broad River, East Tennesee. January 28, 1864, now 
of Zeari]ig, Story county, Iowa. James A. Long, mustered in as private, 
promoted August 31. 1864. Levi White Jones. October 7, 1862: sick when 
comjDany mustered in: promoted September 15. 1864: mustered out with 
company by order of Major General Schofield, now of Glasco, Cloud 
county. Kan. John D. Keagle. ])romoted October 1, 1864; accidentally 
shot in knee, by Company H man. at Milledgeville, Ky. . April. 1863; acci- 
dentally wounded at Mossy Creek, East Tennessee. January 1, 1864. F. 
Louis Heinke, promoted March 15, 1865 ; wounded in action at Cleveland. 
Tenn., Septeml)er 18. 1863. now of Spokane Falls. AVashington territory. 
Charles X. Crook, j^i'omoted Maix-h 15, 1865: captured at Cleveland, Tenn.. 
September 18, 1863: exchanged November 26, 1864. Rejoined company in 
the spring of 1865, now of Goodrich, Kan. Musician Henry S. Hayden 
Avas member of the Regimental liand from its organization until mustered 
out, now of Creighton, Xeb. Wagoner John ]\[cLaughlin: teamster during 
his whole term of service ; accidentallv killed, moviuir a l)uildiii^. at Brad- 
ford, December 20. 1871. 

The private troops mustered out were: William II. Conibear. now of 
]\Iorton. 111. Thomas E. Delany, now of Zearing, la. William D. Free- 
man, captured at Cleveland, Tenn., Se])tember 18, 1863: escaped from An- 
dersonville May 24, 1864: entered the lines of Sherman's army on the Eto- 
wah river, Ga., June 13. 1864: received furlough, after which rejoined 
company: now of Eureka, Kan. Samuel B. Francis. Joseph Fleming, 
slightly wounded at Knoxville. Tenn.. Xovember 18. 1863, now of this 
county. James A. Goodrich, injured in head l)y concussion of exploding 
shell, at Resaca, Ga., 3Iay 14. 1864: resides at Goodrich. Kan. Xewton J. 
Green, mustered in as Corpoial: was captured at Cleveland, Tenn., Sep- 
tember 18, 1863: exchanged March 21. 1864: rejoined company on Pine 
Mountain, Ga., June 16, 1864: resides at Linn Creek. Mo. AVilliam Han- 
ley, absent on furlough: rejoined and discharged with company at Chicago, 
July 6, 1865: now of Scran ton. la. Charles H. Hanley resides at Omaha. 
Xeb, John Hall, of Bradford, 111. Xicholas Hill, mustered in as Corpo- 
ral: reduced June 2, 1864; captured near Winchester. Ky., February 23, 
1863; paroled next day: exchanged September 10; rejoined comjiany at 
Bean's Station, E. Tenn.. December 14. 1863. George Jennings resides at 
Cherokee, Kan. Francis J. Liggett, captured at Cleveland. Tenn., Seja- 
tember 18. 1863: confined on Belle Isle, Va., until March 10, 1864, then 
transferred to Andersonville: escaped from Andersonville May 24, 1864; 
entered lines of Sherman's army on the Etowah river, Ga., June 13, 1864; 
received thirty days' furlough, then rejoined company, John C. Leighton, 
injured in head by concussion of exploding shell, at Resaca, Ga., May 14, 
1864, now of Gilman. 111. Charles Leighton. captured at Cleveland. Tenn,, 
September 18. 1863; exchanged March 21, and rejoined company June IG, 



MILITARY HISTORY. 225 

1804; died iieui- Modena. in May, 1870. William C Lopeaiaii, enlisted 
August 21, 18G2; slightly wounded in action at Flat Creek, in E. Tenn., 
January 26, 18G4; now of Henry, 111. Orman M, Miller, captured at 
Cleveland, Tenn., September 18, 18G3; exchanged March 21, and rejoined 
company June 16, 1864: now of Iloopeston, 111. Lewis Osborn, captured 
at Cleveland. Tenn., September 18, 1863; exchanged March '21, and re- 
joined com])any June 16, 1864. Irvin Oxljerger, sliglitly wounded by shell 
at Calhoun, Tenn., S.eptember 26, 1863. Jacob II. Pirkey enlisted' when 
only 15 years of age; under 18 when discharged; now of Elliott, 111. Ira 
Porter died in Stark county April 21, 1873. Ephraim N. Pardee enlisted 
August 21. 1862; mustered in as Cori)oral, detailed in Law's battery, and 
reduced to make room for another Corporal; now of Galva, 111. Samuel 
Redding, captured at Cleveland, Tenn., September 18, 1863: exchanged 
March 21, 1864: rejoined eom[»any on Pine Mountain, Ga.. June 14, 1864; 
now of Goodrich, Kan. Alva W. Sturtevant. severely wounded by rebel 
sharpshooters near Atlanta. Ga., August 9. 1864, resides at Dexter, la. 
John Sturm, now of Oak Dale, Mo. Charles R. Thompson, slightl} 
wounded in action at Utoy Creek, Ga., August (i, 1864. Joseph Taylor. 
John Wallace, captured at Cleveland, Tenn., September 18, 1863; ex- 
changed May 1, 1864; rejoined company June 16, 1864; slightly wounded 
in action at Utoy Creek, Ga. , August 6, 1864; now of Coon Rapids, la. 

There were al)sent at muster-out Corporals; Edward 'i\ Riley— captured 
at Cleveland, Tennessee, September 18, 1863, exchanged at Wilmington, 
North Carolina, March 1, 1865, absent sick, discharged at S])ringfield, Illi- 
nois, Sei^tember 26, 1865. resides at Byron, Xel)raska: Hiram P. Mallory — 
mustered in as i)rivate, ijromoted April 10, 1863, captui'ed at C'leveland, 
Tennessee, September 18, 1863, exchanged at Wilmington, North Carolina, 
March 1, 1865, al)sent sick, discharged July 1, 1865. now of Buda. Illinois. 

Privates; John II. Baldwin — enlisted and mustered in July!), 1863, 
at Camp Nelson, Kentucky, for three years, absent sick in hospital since 
October, 1863, on muster-out roll ; Ira F. Hayden — enlisted February 29, 
mustered in March 1, 1864, for three years, captured at Columbia, Ten- 
nessee, November 30, 1864, ])aroled April 15, 1865, and entered L^niou 
lines at Black River, discharged at Springfield, Illinois, July 1, 1865, and 
rejoined company at Lasalle, Illinois, in the night of July 6, 1865, on rail- 
way train coming home; Hoi'ace Morrison — captured at Cleveland, Ten- 
nessee, September 18, 1863, paroled and exchanged March 21, 1864, never 
rejoined company. 

The troops previously discharged wore : Cai)tains; James B. Doyle — 
enrolled August 12. and mustered in as captain September 20. 1862, resigned 
at Lexington, Kentucky, ]\Iarc]i ;U, 1863 ; John Gudgel — enrolled August 
12, and mustered in as second lieutenant, Sei)teml)er 20, 1862, promoted 
to first lieutenant A])ril 10, to rank from March 31, 1863, promoted to cap- 
tain January 17, 1864, to rank from September 18, 1863, wounded in action 
at Utoy Creek, August 6, 1864, discharged by reason of wounds March 27, 
1865, died at Red Wing. Minnesota. July 27, 1876. widow's residence at 
Tiskilwa, Illinois. 

The privates discharged before muster-out were : (ieoi'ge Barber — acci- 
dentally shot off right fore-finger while on guard at Lexington, Kentucky, 
discharged there March, 1863 : Uriah Dunn — discharged at Cam]) Denni- 
son, Ohio, June, 1863, disability, now of Quincy, Iowa; Isaac N, Dalrym- 
ple — wounded and captured at Cleveland, Tennessee, September 18, 1863, 
exchanged March 1, 1865, dischai-ged at Camp Chase, May 31, 186'), now 



22^ HISTOKV OF STARK COUNTY. 

of Simpson, Kansas; Morris Fowler — tliseliarged at Camp Xelson, Ken- 
tncky. October 11. 180-4, disability: Enoch W. Foster— discharged at Evans- 
ville, Indiana. May 1, 1865. now of Brinitield. Illinois; John P. Freeman — 
captured at Cleveland, Tennessee, September 18, 1863, exchanged March 1, 
1865, discharged at S})ringtield, Illinois. May 25, 1865, discharged at 
Springfield, Illinois, ]\Iay 25, 1865; Washington (larside — captured at Cleve- 
land, Tennesse, September 18, 1863, exchanged March 21, 1864, rejoined 
company near Pine ]\Iountain, Georgia, June 12, 1864, discharged at hos- 
])ital in Newark, New Jersey, June 14, 1865, died at Bloomington. Illinois, 
August 16, 1866; Hiram P. (Jeer — discharged at Lexington, Kentucky, 
February 10, 1863, now of liockwell, Iowa ; Stephen Cudgel — discharged 
at Lexington, Kentucky. April, 1863, reported dead ; James Hare — dis- 
charged at Lexington. Kentucky, March, 1863, now of Ten Mile, Colorado; 
Edwin Holmes — wounded and ca})tured at Cleveland, Tennessee, September 
18, 1863, exchanged November 27, 1864, discharged at Springfield, Illinois, 
June 17, 1865 ; William H. Johnson — captured at Cleveland, Tennessee, 
Septend^er 18, 1863, exchanged at Wilmington, North Carolina, March 1, 
1865, discharged at Little York, Pennsylvania, June 14, 1865, now of A'al- 
ley Brook, Kansas ; Daniel Kane — captured at Calhoun, Tennessee, Sep- 
tember 2(i, 1863, paroled prisoner of war at Benton l^arracks, St. Louis, 
Missouri. I'eported in Adjutant (leneral's reports discharged June 19, 1865. 
Henry McKibbons — discharged at Lexington. Kentucky, January. 1863, 
died at Denver. Colorado, February 22. 1882; James Partridge — discharged 
at Quincy, Illinois. July. 1864, now dead ; Henry Shimp — discharged at 
Lexington, Kentucky, January, 1863; Clark M. Sturtevant — discharged at 
Mt. Sterling, Kentucky, March, 1864, now of Houghton, Washington Ter- 
I'itoiT: Nathan 1). Steward — discharged at Quincy, Illinois. February 8, 
1865; Dennis S[)elman — captured at Cleveland, Tennessee, September 18, 
1863, exchanged March 21, 1864, discharged at general hospital, Benton 
iiarracks, St. Ijouis, Missouri. May 30, 1865, now of Henry. Illinois; Henry 
Stacy — captured at Cleveland, Tennessee. September 18, 1863, escaped 
from Andersonville. May 24, 1864, was taken sick and recaptured, again 
escaped and was recaptured and attached to a sixty-pound ball and chain 
Tintil exchanged, March 1, 1865. discharged at S])ringiie](l. Illinois, May 
26, 1865, now of Lucas, Iowa. 

The soldiers transferred to the veteran reserve corps, were ; Andrew J. 
Brode, severely wounded at Knoxville. Tenn., Nov. 18, 1863 ; transferred 
to V. R. C, March 30, 1864. by reason of wounds, and employed as muster- 
ing clerk ; discharged at Louisville. Ky., Aug. 25. 1865 ; resides at Buda, 
HI. Peter Imes, cut off a toe splitting wood, at Lexington, Ky., Nov. 18, 
1862, and accidently shot himself through wrist at same place, Jan. 15, 1863, 
and was transferred to V. li. C.;(lied near Bradford. Eber S. Osborn, 
transferred in 1864; now of Montpelier, Ind. George W. Scott, transferred 
in 1S64 ; died aftei' the war. and Isaac Sturm, transferred in 1864. 

'['he ti'oops who were killed or died in the service, were; Captain Jona- 
than {'. Dickerson ; enrolled Aug. 13. and mustered out Sept. 20, 1802, 
as first lieutenant ; i)romoted to captain April 10, to rank from March 31, 
1863 : commissioned, borne on the rolls and performed the duties of captain 
but was not mustei'ed as such ; killed in action at Cleveland, Tenn.. Sept. 
18, 1863 ; l)uried in the Cleveland Cemetery, and a suitable monument erec- 
tep to his memory by his wi<low. See Braford Post, G. A. K. 

Sergeants — John II. Bunnell, mustered in as sergeant ; wounded neai' 
Dallas, (Ja., May 31, 1864; left leg amputated at Cumberland Hospital, 



MIMTARY HISTOKY. 227 

Nashville, July 27, 1804 : died of wounds Aug. 12, 1864; remains interred 
in the Snare Cemetery, March 8, 18G5. Eli C. Jones, mustered in as cor- 
jioral ; promoted April 10. 1863: was color-guard in the E. Tenn., cam- 
paign, and color-bearer from April 6, to May 6. 1864 ; wounded in action 
at Utoy Creek near Atlanta, Ga., Aug. 6, 1864 ; died of wounds at Mari- 
etta, Ga., Aug. 19, 1864; remains interred at Kewanee, in 1865. 

Corporals Abram Deyo, captured at Cleveland, Tenn., .Sept. 18, 1863. 
died in Andersonville Prison, Ga., July 18. 1864, grave 41 72. Orlin 
Bevier, mustered in as private ; promoted April 10, 1863 ; captured at 
Clevelaiul, Tenn.. Sept. 18. 1863: died in Andersonville Prison, Ga., July 
22, 1864, grave 6519. 

Privates — Robert Alexander, wounded at Flat Creek Gap, E. 'I'eiin., Jan. 
26, 1864; died of Avounds at Knoxville, Tenn., May 16, 1864; buried at 
Knoxville, in grave 782. Charles If. Barber, wounded at Utoy Creek, Ga., 
Sept. 6, 1864; died of wound at Marietta, Ga., Sept. 15, 1864; buried at 
Marietta, in grave 8113, sec. G. Spencer Elston, died of disease at Lexing- 
ton. Ky.. Dec. 9. 1862 ; buried in grave 160. George Ludlnm. raptured at 
Cleveland. Tenn.. Se])t. 18, 1863: exchanged Dec. 18. and died Dec. 26, 
1864, at Annapolis, Md. Elias Miller, killed at Franklin. Tenn.. Xov. 30, 
1864. Joseph B. Phillips, mustered in Feb. 29, 1864, for three years ; died 
of disease at Chattanooga, Tenn., July 22, 1864 ; l)uried at Chattanooga, in 
grave 11,320, sect. Fl Jeremiah Sargent, died of disease at Lexington, 
Ky., Jan. 17, 1863 ; buried there in gi-ave 251. Cyrus Sturm, captured at 
Cleveland, Tenn.. Sei)t. 18, 1863 : excbanged and i-ejoined company June 
16, 1864; wounded in action at Utoy Creek, Ga. , Aug. 6, 18(i4; died of 
wounds at Xashville. Tenn., Feb. 10, 1865. William" P. Wilson, died of 
disease at Lexington. Ky., Dee. 9, 1862 ; buried in grave 162. 

Privates wbo deserted were: F]phraim Glidden, deserted at Lexington, 
Ky., January 18, 1863, and moved to Canada. George M. Stone, detailed 
for service m Law's Batterv, and deserted at Lexington, Kv., F'ebruarv, 
1863. ■ " . . 

The recruits transferred to the Sixty-hfth Regiment Illinois \'olunteer 
Infantry (consolidated) June 20, 1865, and mustered out at Greensboro, 
N. C, July 13, 1865, were George A. Bi'own. enlisted July 9, mustered in 
in July 23, 1863. for three years: captured at Clevelaiul, Tenn., September 
18, 1863; exchanged April 16. and rejoined com2>uny on Pine Mt., Ga., 
June 16, 1864; reported "'absent sick "' at muster-out of Sixty-lifth Illinois. ; 
now of Xorth Lewisljurg, 0. ]\[ichael Dardis, enlisted and mustered in 
January 24, 1865. ^lelvin Gage, enlisted February 29, mustered in March 

I, 1864, for three years: slightly wounded in action at Utoy Creek, Ga., 
August 6, 1864. William J. Lamper, enlisted March 28. mustered in May 
24, 1864; resides at Laramie Clity. Wy. T. John Lee, enlisted March 11, 
mustered in March 13, 1865, for one yeai': reitorted '• absent sick" at 
muster-out of Sixty-fifth Illinois. Solomon Leighton, enlisted and 
mustered in March 13, 1865. for one year: now of Carbon. Iowa. Isaac 
Luce, enlisted and mustered in March 13. 1865, for one year. 

Company D. — Sergt. Sanford L. Ives, enlisted Julv2"i 1862, accidentally 
wounded in June, 1863: transferred to A\ R. C. January 1. 1864; dis- 
charged for disability at Rock Island. November 1. 1864". Whittield D. 
Matthews, served from August 11. 1862; was discharged at Vork. Pa., July 

II, 1865; is now a resident of Elmwood. Privates: Lemuel F. Mathews, 
enlisted August 12, 1862, was wounded at Hesacain May. 1864. discharged for 
wounds August 20, 1864. Hiram Kewton, of Goshen, enlisted in 1862; 



-228 HISTORY OF STAKK COUNTY. 

wounded in Oeorgia, June 3, 1864. Stephen Talbott, enlisted in April, 
1804; transferred to Sixty-fifth Regiment; sick at muster-out; now resides 
at Cambridge, III. 

Company E was enrolled at Wyoming and organized August 12, 1862. 
The date of all enlistments, not otherwise stated, and date of muster into 
the United States service was September 20, 1862. There were mustered 
out with the company, June 20, 1865. the following-named officers and 
men; Captain Sylvester F. Otman, enrolled August 11, and mustered in 
September 20, 1862, as captain; commanded the regiment on the march 
from Kiioxville, Tenn., to Mt. Sterling, Ky., in February, 1864, and also 
commanded after Lieut. Colonel Bond was wounded in the battle of Frank- 
lin, Tenn., and in the tvv"o days' battle of Nashville, and until January 14, 
1865; was Acting Assistant Inspector General of 3d Brigade, 3d Division, 
23d Corps, Army of the Ohio, on Gen. Henderson's staff, from January 30, 
1865, until mustered out. First Lieut. Cranmer W. Brown, mustered in 
September 20, 1862, as First Lieutenant^ Acting Adjutant of the regiment 
from Nov. 24, 1863, to March 7, 1864; Avas offered the adjutancy jjerma- 
nently, but declined it; commanded the company from November 30, 1864, 
until mustered out. First Sergeant Henry Graves, mustered in as sergeant, 
[)romoted April 1, 1863^ commissioned second lieutenant June 15, 1865, 
but not mustered; was wounded near Philadelphia, E. Tenn., October 26, 
1863, and again at Utoy creek, August 6, 1864; now of Oakland, la. 

Sergeants: Peter M. Swords, mustered in as corporal, promoted April 1, 
1863; died in April, 1867. James D. Bloomer, mustered in as private; pro- 
moted to corporal November 10, 1863; to sergeant April 1. 1864; now of 
Hebron, Neb. Michael Hire, promoted to corporal October 31, ]862; to 
sergeant November 10, 1864; now of Baraboo, Wis. 

Corporals — Douglas M. Crone, promoted April 1, 1863; now of 
Wyoming. Cyrus C. Snare, enlisted August 14, 1862; promoted Ajiril 1, 
1864; wounded in action at Resaca, Ga., May 14, 1864; now of Delavan, 
Minn. Sidney D. Butler, promoted November 19, 1864; wounded at 
Resaca, Ga. . May 14, 1864, and again at Utoy Creek, August 6, 1864; now 
of Essex, J a. John Oldaker, promoted December 25, 1864; wounded at 
Knoxville. 'J'enn.. N^oveniber ]T, 1863; was seven months in hospital; re- 
sides in Cherokee Co., la. Andrew .1. Fautz, promoted; captured at Park's 
Ferry, on the Holston River, East Tennessee, November 16, 1863; exchanged 
and rejoined company in the summer of 1864. Ananias Timmons, pro- 
moted. David S. Miller, promoted; is reported deceased. Charles H. 
Hall, enlisted August 14. 1862; promoted corporal. 

The private troops mustered out were; Timothy Bailey, mustered in as 
corporal; reduced October 31, 1862, at his own request; now of Bay Center, 
W. Ter. Gershom A. Bunnell, now of Osceola, la. James E. Jiush, re- 
sides at Ikatrice, Neb. Elijah Cox, enlisted August 20, 1862; now of 
Odell. \eb. Al)salom J. Cooper, enlisted August 13, 1862, now of ^laroa. 
111. John Dawson, now of Stark Station. Newton Dolison. now of Milo. 
la. Wallace W. Emanuel, enlisted August 21. 1862, now of Crawfords- 
ville. Lid. Eugene Hunt, now of Kewanee. William Holgate, enlisted 
August 13. 1862; captured at Park's Ferry, on the Holston River, East 
Tennessee, November 16, 1862; exchanged at City Point. Xn.. April 15, 
1864 ; rejoined the company near Atlanta. Ga., July 28, 1864 ; was 
wounded in action at Utoy Creek. Ga., August 6, 1864 ; absent by 
reason of wounds until December 1, 1864, when rejoined company at 
Nashville, Tenn. Curwin A. McCoy. Jonas Stronburg, enlisted August 



MILITARY HISTORY. 229 

13, 18G2; wounded at Utoy Creek, Ga., August G, 1804. Henry Soper, 
enlisted August 13, 1862; died -September 9, 1878. Philip M. Trapp, en- 
listed August 14, 1863; now of Palmyra, ISTeb. Josiali P. Umbaugli, of 
Ottumwa, la., and Ancil H. Woodcock, of Wyoming. 

The following were absent at mnster out: Jonathan Graves, captured at 
Park's Ferry, East Tennesse, November 16, 1863, escaj^ed from rebel 
prison at Florence, S. C, in February, 1865, and entered the Union 
lines at Newbern, N. C. ; discharged at Chicago, 111,, July 10, 1865; resides 
at Quitman, Mo. Stephen W. Green, captured at Park's Ferry, East 
Teniicssi'e, Kovember 16, 1863; exchanged in February, 1865; discharged 
at Spriuglield, 111., July 7, 1865; now of Panora, la. David Kerns, cap- 
tiii-ed at Park's Ferry, East Tennessee, November 16, 1863; exchanged at 
Aiken's Landing, Va., in February 1865; discharged at Springfield, 111., 
July 7. 1S65; now of Plainville, Kan. Calvin B. Lashells, enlisted August 
22, 1862; on detached service in General Hospital at Lexington, Ky. ; now 
of Biggs, California. William J. Morgan, enlisted August 13, 1862; re- 
ported "absent sick." William II. Morgan, enlisted August 13, 1862; 
captured at Park's Ferry, East Tennessee, November 16, 1863; exchanged 
March 1, 1865; discharged at Springfield, 111., July 1, 1885. George W, 
Nicholas, captured at Park's Ferry, East Tennessee, November 16, 1863; 
escaped near Wilmington, N. C, February 22, 1865; discharged at Spring- 
field 111., July 1, 1865; now of Quitman, Mo. Joseph Sparks, enlisted 
August 13, 1862; wounded in action at Kelly's Ford, on the French Broad 
River, East Tennessee, January 28, 1864, and again at Utoy Creek, Ga., 
August 6, 1864; discharged at Quincy, 111., June 22, 1865; died in Har- 
rison connty. Mo. 

The troops previously discharged were: First Sergeant Henry J. Ot- 
man; discharged at Lexington, Ky, April 1, 1863, by reason of disability; 
killed by his team running away at Toulon, in January, 1867. Sergeants — 
John E. Gharrett, enlisted August 13, 1862, wounded at Knoxville, Tenn., 
November 18, 1863; discharged in March 1864, to accept commission as 
Captain in First Regt. U. S. Heavy Artillery, now of Missoula, Mon. Ter. : 
John B. Pettit, mustered in as corporal; promoted April 1, 1863; dis- 
charged at Springfield, 111., February 17, 1865; now of Blair, Neb.; Carey 
G. Colburn, mustered in as corporal, promoted August, 1863; captured at 
Athens, Tenn., September 27, '1863; exchanged March 1, 1865; discharged at 
Springfield, 111., May 21, 1865. 

Corporals — James B. Blackmore; discharged at Knoxville, Tenn., May 
17, 1865; now of Spring Hill, Kan. David Fast, discharged at Spring- 
field, 111., October 29, 1864; now of Irwin, Mo., and AVagoner John D. 
Martin, discharged at Springfield, 111., May 29, 1865; now of Page Center, 
Iowa. 

The private troops absent at mnster out were : Michael Alderman, dis- 
charged at Lexington, Ky., January 15, 1863; now of Duncan. Alfred 
B. Armstrong, enlisted August 22, 1862; discharged at Lexington, Ky., 
January 21, 1863. Jerry H. Bailey, captured at Danville, Ky., while sick 
in hospital, March 23, 1863; paroled, and afterward exchanged; wounded 
at Resaca, Ga., May 14, 1864; discharged at St. Louis, Mo., January 4, 
1865. William T. Carter, discharged at David's Island, N.Y., May* 31, 
1865; now of Rome, 111. William Colwell, discharged at Lexington, Ky,, 
April 18, 1863; died one week after his return home. William A. Ellis, 
discharged at Lexington, Ky., January 23, 1863; now of Odell, Neb. 
Shepard Green, discharged at Camp Butler, 111., May 12, 1865; now of 

14 



2oU IIISTOKY OF STARK COUNTY. 

Orient, Iowa. John Harvey, discharged at Camp Nelson, Ky.. September 
19, 1864. Charles W. Hart, enlisted August 15, 1862; captured at Park's 
Ferry, East Tenn., November 16, 1863; exchanged March 1, 1865; dis- 
charged at Springfield, III., June o. 1865. Kilev Maranville, wounded at 
Mud Creek, Ga., June 17, 1864; discharged May 30, 1865. John McCoy, 
discharged at Camp Xelson, Ky., Ajjril 22, 1864. S^dvester H. Stofer, 
wounded at Harrodsburg, Ky., July 20, 1863; discharged at Camp Xelson, 
Ky., November, 18<)3. Thaddeus S. Tliurston, wounded at Eesaca, Ga., 
May 14, 1864; discharged at Quincy, 111., December 16, 1864; died in 
Harrison county. Mo. 

The troops transferred from this company were: Second-Lieutenant 
Elmer A. Sage, enrolled August 12, 1862, and mustered in as second-lieu- 
tenant; absent from regiment from June, 1864 to May, 1865; transferred 
to Company F, Sixty-fifth Regiment, Illinois Volunteer Infantry (con- 
solidated). June 20, 1865, and promoted first-lieutenant; mustered out at 
Greensboro, X. C, July 13, 1865. Joel Cox, transferred to V. R. C. ; died 
in Cass county. Neb., since the war. David Dawson, transferred to V. R. C, 
September 11, 1863: discharged in June, 1865; died at Davton, Iowa, 
October 9, 1884. 

The troops who were killed or died in the service are named as follows: 
Sergeants — Solomon Dixon, captured at Park's Ferry, E. Tenn., Novem- 
ber 16, 1863; died in rebel prison at Richmond, Va., March 1, 1864. 
Charles B. Hitchcock, killed in action at Utoy Creek, Ga. ; August 6, 1864; 
remains removed to Marietta, Ga. : grave 5,307, in section F. 

Corporals — William G. Wilkinson, died at Lexington, Ky. , November 
8, 1862; remains sent home for burial by the company. William W. 
McMillen, captured at Athens, Tenn., September 27, 1863; died in rebel 
prison at Andersonville, Ga., May 24, 1864. No. of grave 1,337. 

The privates were: David Barrett, died at Lexington, Ky., February 7, 
1863; buried in Lexington cemetery; grave 239. William B. Barr, cap- 
tured at Park's Ferry, E. Tenn., November 16. 1863; died in rebel prison 
at Andersonville, April 13, 1864; grave 526. John Cole, captijred at Park's 
Ferry, E. Tenn., November 16, 1863; died in rebel prison at Andersonville, 
April 2, 1864; grave 300. Thomas Colwcll, died at Lexington, Ky., of 
typhoid pneumonia, January 9, 1863; buried in Lexington cemetery: grave 
204. C'harles B. Davis, captured at Park's Ferry, E. Tenn., November 16, 
1863; died in rebel prison at Andersonville, September 12, 1864; grave 
8,553. James Elston, enlisted August 13, 1862: captured at Park's Ferry, 
E. Tenn., November 16, 1863; died in Andersonville prison, June 21, 
1864; grave 2,249. Whitfield Evans, captured in Kentucky in the snm- 
mer of 1863, and paroled; parole not recognized, and returned to 
his company for duty, recaptured at Athens. Tenn., September 27, 1863, 
and fearing he might be accused of baving violated bis former parole, 
gave the name of " John Robinson," and was known by the rebels by that 
name, died in rebel prison at Danville, Va., March 21, 1864, and his death re- 
corded as that of John Robinson, Imried at Danville, grave 646. Noah Fautz, 
.captured at Park's Ferry, E. Tenn., November 16, 1863; Adjutant General re- 
ports him as having died in rebel prison at Andersonville, April 18, 1864; 
the Superintendent of National Cemetery at Andersonville reports that he 
cannot find this name on j^rison records; he reports '•' Thomas Jones of 
Company E, ono-hnndred-and-twelfth Illinois — died April 20. 1864. No. 
of gi'ave 644:"' ;is there was no " Thomas Jones "' in the regiment it may 
be that Fautz assumed the luime of Jones when captured, and that No. 644 



MILITARY HISTORY. 231 

is liis grave. Madiras Hoover, died at Lexiugton. Ky., April, 1863; buried 
iu Lexington cemetery, grave 382. William Herridge, enlisted August 19, 
1862; mortally wounded by explosion of gunpowder at Lebanon, Ky., July 
9, 1863; died July 15, 1863, and buried at Lebanon; grave 175. George 0. 
Marlatt, enlisted August 11. 1862; captured at Park's Ferry, E. Tenn., 
November 16, 1863; reported as having died in rebel prison at Eiclimond, 
February 18, 1864; but the superintendent of the national cemetery at 
Richmond reports that he can not find this name on the prison records. 
Simon Ray, enlisted August 20, 1862, captured at Park's Ferry, E. Ten- 
nessee. Xovember 16, 1863; died in rebel prison at Richmond, Va., April 
12, 1861. James Ray, captured at Park's Ferry, E. Tennessee, November 
16. 1863; died in rebel prison at Richmond, Va., March 11, 1864. 
A\illiam Ray, captured at Park's Ferry, E. Tenn., Nov. 16, 1863; 
exchanged and died a few days after in hospital at Baltimore, Md., 
June 30, 1864. John W. Ratcliffe, died of typhoid fever at Lexing- 
ton. Ky., January 7, 1863; buried in Lexington cemetery; grave 203. 
William E. L. Smith, died at Lexington, Ky., November 22, 1862; buried 
in Lexington cemetery; grave 114; Michael Springer, captured at Park's 
Ferry, E. Tenn., November 16, 1863; died in Andersonville prison, June 
6, 1864; grave 1,667. John D. Swaim, enlisted August 14, 1862; cap- 
tured at Park's Ferry, E. Tenn., November 16, 1863; died in prison at 
Richmond, Va., March 7, 1864. Francis M. Sollars, mustered in March 
31, 1864, for three years; died at Springfield, 111., June, 18, 1864. David 
P. Wandling, shot through hips at Knoxville, Tenn., November 17, 1863, 
died next day; remains removed to Knoxville, February 1, 1864; grave 
451. Russell White, died at Lexington, Ky., December 7, 1862; buried in 
Lexington cemetery; grave 166. 

The deserters were Musician William Cassett, enlisted August 15, 1862; 
deserted at Danville, Ky., July 15, 1863. Private Henry Greenewald; de- 
serted while on detached duty in government blacksmith shop at Lex- 
ington, Ky., in May 1863. Frank Pross and Lewis Hiback, deserted at 
Danville, Ky., duly 15, 1863. 

The recruits transferred to Comany F, Sixty-fifth Regiment, Illinois 
Volunteer Infantry (consolidated), June 20, 1865, and mustered ont at 
G-reensboro, N. C, July 13, 1865, were William W. Copley, mustered in 
January 24, 1865; reported "■ absent sick " at muster-out of Sixty-fifth, now 
of Walnut, Iowa. Daniel Colbran, mustered in January 24, 1865, now of 
Aledo, 111. Gordon H. Edgerton, mustered in Januar}' 24, 1865; reported 
" absent sick "at muster-out of Sixty-fifth, now of Ayr, Neb. James L. Fox, 
mustered in March 21, 1864. Morris C. Lampson, mustered in December 
24, 1863; wounded at Flat Creek, in E. Tenn., January 26, 1864; reported 
" absent" at muster-out of Sixty-fifth, disajipeared from his home at Wyom- 
ing, 111., several years ago, and not since heard from. iVdam Rusli, George 
Rush, and Jacob Stoves, mustered in March 21, 1864. James M. Taskett, 
mustered in April 28, 1864, now of Pnlaska, la. Anson Tanner, mustered 
in April, 25, 1864; was frozen to death in 1871. 

Company F was enrolled at Toulon in August, 1862, and organized 
August 15, 1862. The date of all enlistments not otherwise stated is 
August, 15, 1862, and date of muster into the United States service, Sep- 
tember 20, 1862. Of those present and mustered out with the company, 
June 20, 1865, the following is the record: Captain James G. Armstrong, 
enlisted August 22. and mustered in September 20, 1862, as first sergeant; 
promoted to second-lieutenant March 10, to rank from March 5, 1863; to 



2o2 HISTORY OF STAOiK COUNTY. 

first-lieu I eiiaiit August 5, to rank from June 10, 18G3, and to captain Sep- 
tember 14, to rank from June 24, 1864; A. A. Q. M. of Second Brigade 
First Division Cavalry Corps, Army of Ohio, from March 5 to April 8, 1864. 
He and two of his sons were killed by lightning in Greene county, Iowa, 
August 31, 1881. First-Lieutenant Bushrod Tapp, enlisted August 11, 
1862, and mustered in as sergeant; promoted to first-sergeant April 1, 1864, 
and to first-lieutenant December 10, to rank from June 24, 1864: wounded 
at Bean's Station, E. Tenn.. December 16, 1863. and at Kelly's Ford, on 
the French Broad river, E. Tenn., January 28, 1864. First-Sergeant 
Henry B. Perry, enlisted August 22, 1862, and was mustered in as corpo- 
ral: promoted to sergeant March 10, 1863. and to first-sergeant January 1, 
1865: commissioned second-lieutenant June 15, 1865, but not mustered. 

Sergeant Andrew Harty, mustered in as private, 2>i"omoted to corporal 
August 5, 1863, and to sergeant September 1, 1864; wounded near Phila- 
delphia. Tenn., October 26, 1863. James E. Gelvin, enlisted August 14, 
1862, and mustered in as private; promoted to corjioral February 2l'>, 1864, 
and to sergeant September 1, 1864; wounded at Knoxville, Tenn.. Xovem- 
ber 18, 1863. William P. Ballentine, enlisted Aiigust 14, 1862, promoted 
corporal April 1, 1864. and sergeant January 1, 1865; was injured on the 
road home after muster-out — standing on a car as the train passed under a 
low bridge, his head struck the bridge — near York, Ppnn.; was left in 
hospital at Harrisburg. but recovered and returned home, now of Kansas. 
William H. El v. promoted to sergeant September 1. 1864: now of Webster 
City, la. "^ ' 

Corporals — Levi Silliman. enlisted August 13, 1862: wounded at 
Resaca. Ga., Mav 14. 1864. Milton Trickle, enlisted Ausfust 14. 1802; 
now of Atkinson. 111. James E. Finley, promoted February 26, 18 64; 
wounded near Atlanta, Ga., July 21, 1864; now of Perry, la. George G. 
Stone, promoted September 1. 1864; wounded at Knoxville, Tenn., Xo- 
vember 18, 1863, and again at Resaca, Ga., May 14, 1864; now of Plain- 
view, Neb. James Hughes, promoted September 1, 1864; now of Spear- 
ville, Kan. Andrew Kamerer, promoted Sejitember 1, 1864: captured on 
the Sattnders raid at Knoxville, Tenn., June 20, 1863; paroled at Rich- 
mond, Ya., July 11; exchanged September 10, and rejoined the company 
at Bean's Station, E. Tenn., December 14, 1863. Samuel M. Adams, en- 
listed August 14, 1802: promoted January 1, 1865. Jacob Yulgamott, en- 
listed August 19, 1862; promoted June 1, 1865; now of Denver. Col. 

The private trooj)S mustered out were : Henry C. Ackley, caj)tured 
near Winchester, Ky. . February 23, 1803: paroled February 24: exchanged 
September 10, and rejoined the company at Bean's Station, E. Tenn., De- 
cember 14, 1863; now of Gilman. la. Alfred C. Ballentine, enlisted 
August 22, 1862: wounded at Knoxville. Tenn., November 18, 1863; now 
of Eugene, Ta. George Boyd, enlisted August 13, 1862: resides at Grafton, 
Xeb. Edwin Butler, enlisted August 11. 1862: mustei*ed in as sergeant: 
prompted to first-sergeant August 5, 1863 ; detailed to work on the 
•'Athens Union Post," Tenn., and when the Union troops retreated 
was captured, on the night of September 26, 1863 ; reduced to the 
ranks Ajiril 1, 1864, while a ^^I'isoner of war, without cause or excuse, ex- 
cept to create a vacanc}' for the appointment of another first sergeant. 
Samuel M. Eldridge, enlisted August 11, 1862; detailed as postmaster Oc- 
tober 3, 1862, and served as postmaster of the regiment or brigade uiitil 
mustered out; resides at Galva. la. John D. Essex, now of Yalparaiso. 
Xeb. Milton Headley, enlisted August 13, 1862. James P. Headley, en- 



MILITARY HISTORY. 233 

listed August 14, 1863; detailed as musician, and was a membei- of the 
regimental band from its organization until mustered out. AVilliam 
Himes, enlisted Angust 14, 1862; wounded at Utoy creek, Ga., August 6, 
1864; resides at Lewis, la. Austin 0. Himes, enlisted August 14, 1862. 
Peter C. Johnson, enlisted in Compan}' F, bnt mnstered in as of Comjjany 
H; transferred back to Company F, November 1, 1862; now of Hinsdale, 
111. George W. Johnson, wounded at Utoy creek, Ga., August 6, 1864. 
Timothy Kenely, enlisted August 12, 1862; reported dead. Eoyal Laff- 
erty, now of Emporia, Kan. Job C. Mahaffey, enlisted August 14, 1862; 
wounded at Kelly's Ford, E. Teiin., January 28, 1864; now of Henderson, 
111. Robert Makings, enlisted Angnst 21, 1862; died at West Jersey, De- 
cember 15, 1873. Theodore McDaniel, enlisted August 22, 1862. Charles 
McComsey, enlisted August 11, 1862, in Company F, but mustered in as 
of Company H; transferred back to Company F, November 1, 1862. 
Iliram G. Parrish, enlisted August 22, 1862; on detached duty as teamster 
in Twenty-third Corps train from February 1, 1864, until mustered out; 
now of Aftou, la. Jacob Stauffer, enlisted August 14, 1862; now of East 
Lynne, Mo. Frank A. Stone, enlisted August 11, 1862, in Company F, 
but mustered in as of Comj)any H; transferred to Company F, November 
1. 1862; resides at Westboro, Mass. Eiohraira W. Smith, on detached ser- 
vice in division commissary department; enemy attacked herd of cattle in 
his charge, at Thompson's Stiition, Tenn., November 30, 1864, killed his 
horse, and captured fifty head of cattle. Ira Scranton, on detached service, 
as teamster in Twenty-third Corps train, from Sej^tember 19, 1864, until 
mustered out. Presley Tyrrell, enlisted August 22, 1862. Benjamin W. 
Todd, enlisted August 22, 1862; now of Ida Grove, la. William Vulga- 
mott, now of Burlington Junction, Mo. David Webster, enlisted August 
14, 1862. 

The members absent at muster out were James McSherry, enlisted 
August 19, 1862; captured at Columbia, Tenn., November 30, 1864; pa- 
roled April 15, 1865; discharged at St. Louis, Mo., June 20, 1865. Zarah 
H. Newton, captured, while driving ambulance, near Pine Mountain, Ga., 
June 6, 1864; paroled prisoner of war at St. Louis, Mo.; not exchanged; 
discharged at St. Louis, July 15, 1865; now of Yolo, Cal. Jesse B. Taylor, 
enlisted Angust 22, 1862, in Conqjany F, but mnstered in as of Company 
H; transferred to Company F, November 1, 1862; captured at Columbia, 
Tenn., November 30, 1864; paroled April 15, 1865; not exchanged; dis- 
charged at St. Louis, Mo., June 20, 1865. 

The troops previously discharged were First-lieutenant Jackson Lor- 
ance, enrolled August 11, and mustered in Septeuiber 20, 1862, as first- 
lieutenant; resigned at Lexington, Ky., March 5, 1863; resides at Burling- 
ton Junction, Mo. Second-lieutenant George C. Maxfield, mustered in as 
sergeant; promoted first-sergeant March 10, 1863, and to second-lieutenant 
August 5th, to rank from June 16, 1863; wounded at Knoxville, Tenn., 
November 18, 1863; resigned at Decatur, Ga., September 11, 1864; resides 
at Fairmont, Neb. 

Sergeant John F. Rhodes, enlisted August 13, 1862, and mustered in as 
corporal; promoted February 26, 1864; wounded in action at Resaca, Ga,, 
May 14, 1864; discharged at Chicago, 111., July 28, 1804. 

CorjJorals William Rounds, enlisted August 14, 1862; discharged at 
Camp Nelson, Ky., May 18, 1864; died here in 1873. David Tinlin, en- 
listed August 22, 1862; promoted March 10, 1863; discharged at Lexington, 
Ky., May 24, 1865. 



234 HISTORY OF StARK COITNTY. 

Privates — William H. Barton, enlisted August 14, 1862; wounded at 
Resaca, Ga., May 14, 1864; discharged at Quincy,.]ll., February 24, 1865; 
now of Walkerville, la. William Boyd, enlisted August 14, 1862; discliaiged 
at Beaufort, N. C; May 29, 1865; died at Toulon, May 7, 1875. Nathaniel 
Crabtree, wounded at Knoxville, Tenn., November 18, 1863; left leg amj^u- 
tated; discharged at Chicago, July 23, 1864. James N. Davison, discharged 
at Lexington, Ky,, January 12, 1863, now of Corydon, la. Henry Garner, 
enlisted August 14, 1862; discharged at Lexington, Ky., January 12, 1863; 
now of Unionville, Mo. George Graen, enlisted August 11, 1862; absent, 
sick, from December 12, 1864; discharged at Chester, Pa., June 2, 1865. 
A\'illiam H. Harris, absent, sick at Camp Nelson, Ky., from April 17, 1864; 
discharged May 20, 1865; married and remained in Kentucky; now of Mil- 
ledgeville, Ky. Josiah Miner, enlisted August 19, 1862; on detached ser- 
vice from July 28, 1864: was discharged June 12, 1865. William B. Price, 
discharged at Lexington, Ky., January 13, 1863; resides at Spirit Lake, la. 
Thomas Proctor, enlisted August 11, 1862; discharged at Camp Nelson, 
Kentucky, Sei^tember 20, 1864; died at Davenport, la. Robert (4. Stowe, 
enlisted- August 11, 1862; discharged at Cincinnati, 0., November, 1862; 
now of Shenandoah, la. William A. Stowe, enlisted August 11, 1862; 
wounded at Utoy Creek, Ga., August 6, 1864; discharged at St. Louis, Mo., 
April 9, 1865; died at Beaver City, Neb., May 1, 1864. William T. Shore, 
mustered in June 6, 1863; discharged at Knoxville, Tenn., May 13, 1865; 
now of Tarkio, la. Henry S. Stone, enlisted August 22, 1862, in Comjjany 
F., but mustered in as of Compaiiy H.; transferred to Company F. Novem- 
ber 1, 1862; wounded at Franklin, Tenn., November 30, 1864; right arm 
amjDutated; discharged at Chicago, HI., March 5, 1865; now of Republic 
Cit}^, -Kan. Carlos B. Thorpe, enlisted August 11, 1862, in Company F., 
mustered in as of Company H. : transferred to Company F. November 1, 1862; 
discharged at Lexington, Ky., March, 1863; died at Perry, la., Ajiril 3, 
1885. Curtis Wright, enlisted August 13, 1862; on detached service in 
commissar}' department, at Knoxville, Tenn., from Ma}' 11, 1864; dis- 
charged at Knoxville, June 17, 1865; resides at Connersville, Ind. Olof 
N. Youngquist, enlisted in Company F.. but mustered in as of Company 
H.; transferred to Company F. November 1, 1862; discharged in hospital, 
at Quincy, HI., May 5, 1865. 

'J'he men transferred to veteran reserve corps were : Darius Demuth, 
enlisted August 12, 1862; transferred at Camp Nelson, Ky., August 30, 
1863; discharged at Madison, Wis., July 5, 1865. George Ely, enlisted 
August 11, 1862; transferred September 11, 1863; discharged at Madison, 
Wis., July 5, 1865; now of Webster City, la. Havilah B. Johnson, enlisted 
August 11. 1862; transferred April 30, 1864; discharged at Lexington, Ky., 
May 17, 1865; died at Peoria, 111., October 26, 1881: buried at Toulon. 
Jesse Likens, transferred September 11, 1863; discharged at Camp Nelson, 
Kentucky, November 17, 1864; now of Rolla, Mo. George Rockwell, en- 
listed August 20, 1862: absent, sick at Knoxville, Tenn., since May 7, 1864, 
and transferred; discharged at Knoxville, July 12, 1865: killed in Nebraska 
since the war. 

The record of men who were killed or died in the service is as follows: 
Captain William W. Wright, enrolled August 13, 1862, was elected First 
Lieutenant of Company F; when Captain Henderson was elected Colonel 
of the regiment, he was elected and mustered in September 20, 1862, as 
Captain; was wounded in the battle of Resaca, Ga., May 14, 1864. right 
arm amputated at the shoulder, and died of wounds at Nashville, Tenn., 



itir.lTARV HistOKV, 2r)5 

June 24, 1804; his remains were brought liome and interred in the cemetery 
ai Touk)n, and in liis honor the Post tliere is named. 

First Lieutenant Kobert E. Westfall enrolled August 15, and mustered 
in September 20, 1862, as Second Lieutenant; promoted March 10, to rank 
from March 5, 18G3; died at Somerset, Ky., Jnne IG, 18G3 — the first death 
of a commissioned officer in the regiment; his remains bronght home and 
interred in tlie cemetery at Wyoming. 

Sergeants — William P. Finley, killed at Knoxville, Tenn., November 
18, 1863; left on the field and bnried by the enemy. John IL Lane, en- 
listed Angnst 11, and mustered in as Corporal October 7, 1862 — sick when 
company mnstered in; promoted Angnst 5, 1863; killed at Utoy creek, Ga., 
August 6, 1864; remains interred at Marietta, Ga., grave 5,317, in section 
F. Andrew G. Pike mnstered in as Corporal; promoted April 1, 1864; 
killed in action at Utoy creek, Ga., Augnst 6, 1864; remains interred at 
Marietta, Ga., grave 5,318, in section F. 

Corporals — William C. Bell enlisted August 11, 1862; killed at Knox- 
ville, Tenn., November 18, 1863; buried at Knoxville, grave 450. Eobert 
M. Dewey enlisted August 22, 1862; promoted January 1, 1864; killed at 
Utoy creek, Ga., August 6, 1864; remains interred at Marietta, Ga., grave 
5,304, in section F. 

The record of casualties among private troops is as follows: John L. 
Adams enlisted August 14, 1862; died of typhoid fever at Lexington, Ky., 
December 17, 1862; remains bnried at Toulon. Elmore Barnhill, wounded 
at Knoxville, Tenn., November 18, 1863 — right arm amputated; died of 
wound at Knoxville, January 2, 1864; buried at Knoxville, grave 354. 
A\'illiam M. Creighton enlisted August 22, 1862; died of heart disease at 
Lexington, Ky., February 14, 1863; bnried in the Lexington cemetery, 
grave 277. John W. Curfman enlisted August 22, 1862; wounded at Knox- 
ville, Tenn., November 18, 1863; mortally wounded and left on the Held at 
Franklin, Tenn., November 30, 1864; died of wounds in rebel hospital at 
Franklin December 10, 1864. James Essex, wounded at Knoxville, Tenn,, 
November 18, 1863; mortally wounded at Utoy creek, Ga., August 6, 1864; 
died in field hospital August 7, 1864; remains interred at Marietta, Ga., 
grave 5,306, section F. AVilliam T. Essex enlisted August 14, 1862; 
wounded at Resaca, Ga., May 14, 1864; died of wounds at Sjiringfield, 111., 
September 18, 1864; buried at Camp Butler, grave 534. Glaus Forss en- 
listed August 11, 1862; mortally wounded at Knoxville, Tenn,, November 

18, 1863, and left on the field; died in the hands of the enemy November 

19, 1863. Henry C. Hall enlisted and mustered in Febi'uary 1, 1864, for 
three years; wounded at Eesaca, Ga. , May 14, 1864; died of wounds in hos- 
23ital at Chattanooga, Tenn., May 24, 1864; buried at Chattanooga, grave 
12,294, in section D. Joseph Hoppock enlisted August 22, 1862; captured 
at Bean's Station, E. Tenn., December 14, 1863; died at Andersonville, Ga., 
July 15, 1864, grave 3,255. John Kendall enlisted Aug. 13, 1862; killed at 
Knoxville, Tenn., November 18, 1863, buried by the enemy, remains re- 
covered and interred in the National Cemetery at Knoxville, as *'John 
Kimball " of Company E, One Hundred and Twelfth Illinois. Number 
of grave 442. Omer Leek, enlisted February 14, 1863, was ordered on 
duty at Lexington, by jjrovost marshal, and died there of measles, April 2, 
1863, buried in Lexington Cemetery, grave 341. George Miller, enlisted 
August 13, 1862, died of typhoid fever at Lexington, Ky.*, November 26, 
1862, buried in Lexington Cemetery ; grave 120. Jeremiah D. Madden, en- 
listed August 22, 1862, died at Kiioxville^, Tenn., March 4,1864, buried at 



230 BISTOUY OF STARK COUNTY. 

Kiioxville ; grave 491. Isaac Messeiiger, enlisted August 11, 1862, wounded 
at Uto}^ Creek, Ga., August G, 18G4:, died of wounds at Marietta, Ga. ; 
September 2, 1864, buried there; grave 1,016 Sect.G. John F. Negus, died 
in hospital at Cincinnati, Ohio, October 17, 1862 — the first death in the 
regiment. George W. Oziah — died in Lexington, Ky.;, March 14, 1863, 
biu'ied in Lexington Cemetery ; grave 231. George W. Ehodes, enlisted 
August 13, 1862, captured near Winchester, Ky., February 23, 1863, jm- 
roled Februar}' 24, and sent to Parole Camp at St. Louis, Mo., exchanged 
September 10, and rejoined company at Bean's Station, E. Tenn., Decem- 
ber 14, 1863, killed at Utoy Creek, August 6, 18G4, remains interred at 
Marietta, Ga.; grave 5,305, in Section F. Aaron Eidle, enlisted in Com- 
pany F, mustered in as of Company H, transferred to Company F, No- 
vember 1, 1862, wounded and missing in action at Knoxville, Tenn., No- 
vember 18, 1863, died in the hands of the enemy. Thomas T. White, en- 
listed August 14, 1862, drowned crossing Clinch river, on the Saunders 
Eaid in East Tennessee, June 18, 1863. John W. Whitten, enlisted 
August 22, 1862, mortally wounded near Atlanta, Ga., August T, and died 
in Field Hospital, August 9, 1864, remains interred at Marietta, Ga. ; grave 
9,852, Section J. 

The deserters were: Daniel Haselton, enlisted August 21, 1862, went 
to New Jersey — his native State — from Milledgeville. Ky., April 19, 1863, 
on a thirty days' furlough, and never returned. Milton Stej^hens, deserted 
in the face of the enemv, with his arms and accoutrements, at Eesaca, Ga., 
May 14, 1864. 

Other records of private troops are thus given. — Recruits, transferred 
to Company F, Sixty-fifth Illinois Volunteers (consolidated), June 20, 
1865, and mustered out at Greensboro, N. C, July 13, 1865 : Joseph H. 
Burwick, enlisted November 17, mustered in November 27, 1863. Zach- 
ariah T. Brown, enlisted and mustered in January 17, 1865, for one year, 
now of Peoria, 111. Luther Graham, enlisted November 21, mustered in No- 
vember 27, 1863. William J. Hamilton, enlisted February 10, mustered 
in June 6, 1863, absent, sick at Washington, D. C, discharged at Mower 
LT. S. Hospital July 1, 1865. Martin Hickman, enlisted April 1, mustered 
in June 6, 1863. Jacob W. McDaniel, enlisted March 28, mustered in 
April 28, 1864. Thomas Patterson, enlisted and mustered in December 2, 
1863. George W. Pate, enlisted and mustered in December 4, 1863, Mc- 
Cook, Eed Willow County, Neb. Elisha E. Taylor, enlisted and mustered 
in March 23, 1864, injured in side unloading rations from railroad car at 
Greensboro, N. C, June 18, 1864, of Camden. Minn. 

The recai^itulation of roster and record of this company presents the 
following figures : Mustered out with the company, 42; absent, 3; previously 
discharged, 22; transferred to the Veteran Eeserve Corps, 5; killed and died 
in the service, 27; deserted, 2; recruits transferred to the Sixty-fifth Illi- 
nois, 9; or a total of 110. 

In Compan}^ G of the One Hundred and Twelfth were : Sergeant 
Edward P. Wright, enlisted August 12, 1862; wounded at Xashville, 
Tenn., in December, 1864; now a resident of Ringgold county, Iowa. 
Sergeant Ira G. Foster served from August 14, 1862, to muster-out, 
dating his promotion from Februar}^ 1863. Joseph Berry, absent 
sick at muster-out, was detailed as bugler at Camp Nelson in 1863. 
Charles Keyser served from August, 1862; transferred October 15, 
1863 ; now of Webster county, Iowa. George Milbourn and Myron 



MILITAttY lllsToliY. 239 

Waters were members of this command. Louis E. Morton, of Galva, 
was discharged at Lexington in April, 1865. John A. Tarble served 
a full term ; now resides in Polk county, Neb. William A. Brown 
enlisted in 1863, and served to the close of the war. Andrew Jackson, 
of Lafayette, enlisted in 1864, served to the close of the war. Frank 
A. Yale, enlisted in IStiJ; transferred to Sixty -fifth Regiment ; now of 
Barton county. Mo. 

In Company LI : John Bevier, who died at Camp Butler in Novem- 
ber, 1804; was a recruit of 1864; Ciba A. Dunlap, of Bradford, Noah 
Iliddlebaugh and John C. Gingrich, of Essex, were drafted in 1864. 
, Jonas Johnson, a recruit, was not accepted, and Yolney Arnold was 
unassigned. A few members of Company F belonged oi'iginally to 
Company H. 

The One-hundred and-twelfth Regiment Association dates its or- 
ganization back to 1866. The reunions of the One-hundred-and-twelfth 
have been as follows: Banquet, Galva, November IT, 186)5; 1866, 
Geneseo, September 20; 1867, Galva, September 20; 1868, Cambridge, 
September 22 ; 1869, Geneseo, September 21. ; 1870, Galva, September 
20; 1871, Cambridge, September 20 ; 1872, Geneseo, September 20 ; 
1873, Galva, September 20; 1874, Wyoming, November 18; 1875, 
Cambridge, September 22 ; 1876, Geneseo, September 22 ; 1877, Toulon, 
September 20; 1878, Annawan, September 20; 1879, Galva, Septem- 
ber 22; 1880, Bradford, September 22; 1681, Cambridge, August 18; 
1882, Geneseo, August 18; 1883, Toulon, August 16-17; 1884, Galva, 
August 28; 1885, Orion, August 27; 1886, Wyoming, August 24. The 
officers of 1885 were Gen. Thomas J. Henderson, Princeton, 111., ])resi- 
dent; Sergt. John L. Jennings, Cambridge, 111., vice-president; J5. F. 
Thompson, secretary ; Capt. S. F. Otman, William Ilolgate and Lieut. 
Bushrod Tai)p, executive committee. The president, vice-president 
and secretary were reelected in 1886, and also the following executive 
committee: J. E. Avers, Thomas F. Davenport, and William K. 
Wight, of Cambridge. The following roll of deceased comrades for 
the past year , was read : Joseph C. Johnson, hospital steward, at 
Mason City, 111 , September 26, 1885. Lewis W. Smith, Company A, 
at De Soto, Dallas county, Iowa, October 6, 1885. James B. Brown, 
Company D, at Burns, Henry county. 111., October 28, 1885. William 
J. Lamper, Company B, at Laramie City, Wyoming Ter., in 1885. 
Capt. George W. Sroufe, Company II, at Earned, Pawnee county. Ran., 
March 2(», 1886. Wallace W. Emanuel, Company E, at Lafayette, Ind., 
July 29, 1886. Ilenr}" Slick, Company A, in Pennsylvania, May 17, 
1886. Wilber F. Broughton, Company I, at Geneseo, July 13, 1886. 

One-hundred-and-thirteenth Infantry, organized near Camp Doug- 
lass in 1862; moved to Memphis, Tenn., in November, and joined in the 
Tallahatchie expedition, Yicksburg, Arkansas Post, Black's Ba)'ou, 
Corinth, Memphis, are all inscribed on the banner of the One-hundred- 
and-thirteenth. It was mustered out June 20, 1865. In Coinpany K 
Milton A. Coffinberry, of Bradford (recruited in November, 1863), 
served. 

One hundred-and-fourteenth Infantry was organized in July and 
August, 1862, and in November moved to Tennessee. On the 26th it 



240 MISToftY OP* StAftl^ cotlNtY, 

entered on the Tallahatchie campaign; was yarionsly engaged until 
May, 1803, when it was present at Yicksburg, Jackson, and Brandon, 
Miss. Up to the day of its muster out, August 3, 1865, the command 
rendered excellent service. In October, 1 804, John C. Copestake was 
commissioned first assistant surgeon. 

One-hundred-and-twenty-f ourth Infantry, organized at Camp Butler ; 
moved to Tennessee October 6, 1862 ; drove the rebels across the Talla- 
hatchie in November, and held the Yacona river;" on April 23, 1863, 
ap])roached A^icksburg, and this with Thompson's Hill, Eaymond, 
Jackson, Champion Hills, Brownsville, Meridian, ('hunky Station, 
Benton, Jackson, Cross Roads, Spanish Fort, tell the story of this com- 
mand to its muster out at Chicago, August, 1865. The soldiers from 
Stark county in Company A were : Corporals — Asa Bunton, August, 
1862 ; promoted. Privates enlisted August, 1862- — Daniel S. Adams, 
Frank Hudson, promoted; Levi Leek, Invalid Corps; Fred. M. Lea- 
croft, Asa Smith, promoted, died at Fort Gaines, April 19, 1865. 
Compan}?^ F: Sergeants — George S. Green, August, 1862. Cor- 
porals — Samuel M. Likes, August, 1862; died at Vieksburg Septeml^er, 
1864. Privates — Xathaniel Cooper, died May, 1863, of wounds; 
Alexander Wicr, died at Memphis, September, 1863; Sylvester Sweet. 
Kecruits — Walter A. Fell, Thirtv-third ; Thomas Murray, February, 
1864; Thomas W. Rule, Thirty-third; Andrew Turnbull, thirty-third ; 
Alvin Galley, Thirty-third. 

One-hundred-and-twenty-sixth Infantry organized at Alton in Se])- 
tember, 18f)2, moved to Bolivar, Tenn., in November, and took a full 
))art in the Tennessee campaign. In March, 1863. the command par- 
ticipated in the capture of J^ittle Rock, of Clarendon, Ark., besides 
partici})ating in the siege of A^icksburg. It was mustered out at Pine 
Blutf, in Julv, 1865. One-hundred-and-twenty-seventh Infantry was 
mustered in on September 5, 1862, at Camp Douglas, 957 strong. In 
the ranks were, Abram Bevier (deserted), Robert J. Dickinson (dis- 
charged), William H. Giwitts (V. R. C, January, 1865), Uriah Giwitts 
(deserted), George Kinter (deserted), all of Company I^. One-hundred- 
and-thirty-second Infantry, organized at Camp Fry, Chicago, was mus- 
tered in June 1, 1864, moved to Kentucky on the 6th, and was on duty 
there until muster out, October IT, 1864. In this command were C. 
Hotchkiss, of Toulon, and Barney M. Jackson, of Lafayette, who were 
mustered in in 1864. 

One-hundred-and-thirty -ninth Infantry was mustered in at Peoria, 
June 1, 1864, with 878 men, for three months service. Among the 
troops were the following named residents of this county : Company 
A, Cor})oral, Otis P. Dyer, May, 1864. Company E, Corporal James 
Swank, May, 1864. Company II, Second-Lieutenant, Ansel J. Wright, 
June, 1864, Sergeants, enlisted May, 1864, Gorham P. Blood, George 
Dugan, Cor])orals, enlisted May, 1861, O. P. (!rowell, jST. W. Dewey, 
W. O. Johnson; Musician, S. Y. R. Bates, May, 1864 (promoted })rin- 
cipal musician), Privates, Samuel Purge, Wm. J. Barrett, Thomas W. 
Cade, George W. Dewey, Joseph Flansburg, Adam Gardiner, D. C. 
Lyon, Orin Maxfield, jr., Elisha Mosher, WiUiam H. Newcomer, Har- 
rison Newton, Joseph 11. Newton, Ruben Rounds, Harvey J. Reming- 



MILITARY HISTORV. 241 

ton, John S. Roof, Cliarles D. Shavi-er (discharged to re-enlist), Theo- 
dore Vandyke, AVni. W. AVright, Andrew J. Whitaiver, JJenjamin J. 
Whitcher, Benjamin AYitter, Isaac M. Witter, George Potter. The re- 
cruits, enlisted May, 1864, were Abram H. Louden burgh (from Com- 
])any I), Wm. Searl (from C'om])any I). 

One-hundred-and-1'orty-elghth Infantry was organized at Camp But- 
ler, February 26, 1865, for the term of one year. Februarj^ 22, pro- 
ceeded to Nashville, Tenn., in JVLarch, moved to Tullahoma, and in June 
five companies were ordered to Deckerd, one company was stationed at 
McMinnville, and the other four companies guarding the Nashville and 
Chattanooga railroad from Lombardv to Anderson Station, AVrived 
at Spring-held September 9, ] 865; where it received its final discharge. 
The troo]is from Stark county were in Company I, Sergeant, Moses B. 
Robinson, February, 1865, Corporal, Edwin B. Pomeroy, Privates, 
AYm. D, Cunditf (promoted), Charles Hester, Luman Himes. 

One-hundred-and-fifty-first Infantr}^ was organized at Quincy, 111., 
and made up from various parts of the state, recruited under the call 
of December lit, 1864. The regiment was ordered to Springlield, 111., 
where, Fel)ruary 25, 1865, the field and staff officers were mustered in 
and the regiment moved to Nashville, Tenn., thence to Dalton, Ga. 
April 23, Col. Woodall was ordered to proceed, under flag of truce, to 
Macon, Ga., to carry terms of surrender to the rel)el Gen. Warford ; 
JVfay 2, was ordered to Kingston, Ga., arriving on the 12th, after a 
toilsome march. Here, on May 13, 14 and 15, 1865, the regiment 
received the surrender of Gen. Warford, Avith 1(),40(» ])risoners. The 
One-hundred-and-hfty-first was nuistered out at Columbus, Ga., Janu- 
ary 24, 1866, and moved to Springfield, 111., where it received final dis- 
charge, February 8, 1866. The Stark county men in the command 
were: Sergeant-Major — Fayette Lacey; private, Lafayette Schamp, 
February, 1865, in Company A. Privates, enlisted February, 1865 — 
AY. 11. Boyer, Allen Gingrich (died at Nashville, March, 1865), C. AY. 
Phenix (promoted), in Company B; and in Company I: Captain — 
Casimer P. Jackson. First Lieutenants- — James Mon tooth (resigned, 
June, 1865), Andrew Galbraith, July, 1865. Second Lieutenants — 
Andrew Galbraith, February, 1865, George Fezler, July, 1865, not 
mustered. First Sergeant- — Fayette Lacy (promoted Sergeant-Major), 
Sergeants — Geo. Dugan (promoted), Geo. R. Fezler (promoted Second 
Lieutenant), Geo, AY. McDaniels (promoted) and Samuel Keys. Cor- 
porals, enlisted Februar}^ 1865 — Rufus S. Jones (promoted), Samuel 
L)ixon (died at Michigan City, Ind., May, 1865. Thonuis Homer, James 
F. Thompson, John S. Roof, Herod Murnan. Musicians, enlisted Feb- 
ruary, 1865 — Thomas S. Craig and Chas. W. Orr. AA^agoner — Jona- 
than Rounds, February, 1865. Privates — Atkinson Coe, Austin L)e- 
AA'^olf, Joseph Dixon, AndreAV Galbraith, Edward A. Johnson, Samuel 
K. Lowman, John H. Moncrief (died at Dalton, Ga., March, 1865), 
Bethuel Pierson, Seth F. and Daniel Rockwell, Henry W. Thomas, 
David Woodard, David Cruml), Geo. AY. Gilson (killecl at Bushnell, 
111., 1865, in attempt to jump bounty), Orson Grant, Leonidas Jones, 
Elias B. Lewis (deserted), Ira, I. McConnell, Samuel Alasters (pro- 
moted), Ed. A, Perry, Cassimer Jackson, James Montooth (promoted). 



i^42 insTokv of stakic coi-ntv*. 

One-himdred-aiid-fiftj^-liftli Infantry, organized at Camp Bntler, 
was mustered in February 28, 1865, for one year, with 904 men and 
officers. The command moved to Tennessee in March, and in June 
was divided into squads for protection of Xashville & Chattanooga 
raih'oad, occu])ying the block-houses from Nashville to Duck river, a 
distance of fifty miles. It w^as mustered out September 4, 1865. 
Stark county was represented l)y Wm. Cross, Oliver P. White, Patrick 
McGuire, Edward O'Brien (drowned in Stone river, Januar}-, 1865), all 
enlisted in February, 1865, m Company I. 

Miscellaneous infantry commands claimed Stark county men as 
follows: One-liundred-and-twenty-first Xew York, Company A — Peter 
Nicholson. Twenty -first Ohio — Patrick Flynn and John IT. Ilarkins. 
Seventh Missouri Volunteer Infantry, Company I, enlisted at St. 
Louis, Mo., June, 1861, mustered out June, 1864 — Sergeants: Robert 
Robb and Isaac Harris. Privates: James Shivvers and Thomas Per- 
ry. Tenth Missouri Volunteer Infantry, Company C — A. N. Harris. 
Second U. S. A^eteran Volunteers, Company A — Alvah M. Brown, 
enlisted Fel)ruary, 1865. Fourtli IT, S. Veteran A'olunteers, Company 
B — Geo. Carter, enlisted February, 1865. First U, S. Ami}' Corps, 
Company 5- — Thomas Higgins, enlisted Mai'ch, 1865. First II. S. 
Pegular Infantr}" — Adam Fell (died at Annapolis, Md.), liobert Fell 
and Asa Clark. Sixteenth U. S. Regular Infantr}' — Reuben Shock- 
ley, James Schemerhorn, Creighton Swain, James McGee. In the 
Thirtieth Illinois Volunteer Infantry was Thomas Gemmell,who enlisted 
in Mercer countv in 1861, veteranized in 1863, and served to the close 
of the war. 

CAVALRY. 

(Javalry regiments held only a small number of troops from this 
countv. Of the seventeen regiments sent forward from Illinois, onlv 
the Third, Ninth, Eleventh, Twelfth and Fourteenth claimed repre- 
sentatives of Stark. In the following sketch the beginnings of each 
of those seventeen commands are noted : First — Colonel Thomas A. 
Marshall, mustered in June 1861, at Bloomington, with 1,206 men; 
Second — Colonel Silas Noble, mustered in August 24, 1861, at 
Camp Butler, Avith 1,861 men; Third — Colonel Eugene A. Carr, 
mustered in September 21, 1861, at Camp Butler, with 2,183 men ; 
Fourth — Colonel T. Lyle Dickey, mustered in September 30, 1861, 
at Ottawa, with 1,656 men; Fifth — Colonel John J. Updegraff, 
mustered in December, 1861, at Cam}) Butler, with 1,169 men ; 
Sixth — Colonel Thomas H. Cavanaugh, mustered in November, 1861, 
January, 1862, at Camp Butler, with 2,248 men; Seventh — Colonel 
"William Pitt Kellogg, nmstered in, August, 1861, at Camp Butler, 
with 2,282 men; Eighth — Colonel John F. Farnsworth, mustered 
in September 18, 1861, at St, Charles, with 2,412 men; Ninth — 
Colonel Albert G. Brackett, mustered in October 26, 1861, at Camp 
Douglas, with 2,169 men; Tenth — Colonel James A. Barrett, mus- 
tered in November 25, 1861, at Camp Butler, with 1,934 men; 
Eleventh ^ — Colonel Robert G. Ingersoll, mustered in December 20, 
1861, at Peoria, with 2,362 men; Twelfth — Colonel Arno Voss, mus- 
tered in December, 1861, February, 1862, at Camp Butler, with 2,174 



MILITARY HISTORY. 243 

men; Tliirteeiith — Colonel Joseph W. Bell, mustered in Decem])er, 
1861, February, 1802, at Camp Douglas, with 1,759 men; Fourteenth 
— Colonel Horace Capron, mustered in January 7, 1863, at Peoria, 
with 1565 men; Fifteenth — Colonel Warren Stewart, mustered in 
December 25, 1863, at Camp Butler, with 1,473 men; Sixteenth — 
Colonel Christian Thielman, mustered in January and A])ril, 1863, at 
Camp Butler, with 1,462 men; Seventeenth — Colonel John L. Bev- 
eridge, mustered in January 28, 1864, at St. Charles, with 1,247 men. 

In Company A. of the Third Cavalry were privates James H. 
Chaddock, (promoted), Samuel A. Highlands, (deserted), John W. 
Highlands, (promoted, died at Memphis), who enlisted in August, 
1861, and recruits who enlisted in February, 1864, — Sanmel H. Aten, 
(Company C, third consolidated cavalry), William P. Burns, (Company 
C., thinr consolidated cavalry), Harrison Burkhart, Robert Gai'ner, 
Company C, third consolidated cavalry), John Green, (Company C, 
third consolidated cavalry), John King, (died at Port Hudson, Louis- 
iana), June, 1865, Theodore W. McDaniel, George F. Pyle, (Company 
C, third consolidated cavalry), ,lohn Simmerman, (Company C, third 
consolidated cavalry), Heniy Simmerman, (Company C., third consoli- 
dated cavalry). West Jersey ; George Boardman, (discliarged for disa- 
bility), Hugh E. Creighton, (discharged for promotion), Albert P. 
Finley, all of Stark county. 

In Company C, third consolidated cavalry, were })rivates Samuel 
Aten, William' Burns, Robert A. Garner, J. Green, (deserted), Theo- 
dore W. McDaniel, George F. Pyle, (deserted), Henry Simmerman, 
John Simmerman, West Jersey ; and in Com])any K., Andrew J. 
Walker, Elmira, March, 1865. 

In the Fourth Illinois A^olunteer Cavalry were : Company I)., 
William Douglas, Essex, January. 1861, (see twelfth cavalry). Com- 
pany A., Joseph E. McKinstrey, corjioral, (see twelfth cavalry). Com- 
pany K.. William Crooks, Essex, recruited October 1862, promoted ser- 
geant-major. 

In the Seventh Cavalry were unassigned recruits who enlisted from 
Penn township in March, 1865, viz.: Charles Butcher, (died at Camp 
Butler), and AVilliam Butcher. 

In C'om})any H., Ninth Cavalry, were the recruits who enlisted in 
January, 1864 --Thomas Flanagan, Christopher Flanagan, John 
Stokes, John C. Shaw, Patrick Smith, Toulon. Henry Lewis, (died a 
prisoner at Charleston, S. C), Samuel R. Lewis, (deserted), Lafayette, 
and in Company K., Captain J. O. H. Spinney, Bradford, May 1865, 
veteranized ; first lientenant, J. O. H. Spinney, Bradford, vSeptember, 
1864, promoted ; sergeants, enlisted September, 1861, John Jamison, 
Ih-adford; veteranized and deserted; Francis M. Lamper, Osceola, dis- 
charged. Privates — Enlisted October, 1861 — Fowler Biyant, E. W. 
Curtis, (veteranized), Frank U. Doyle, (discharged), Thomas A. Fos- 
ter, Wesley F. Foster (veteranized and promoted), John S. Ilayden, 
(veteranized and promoted), Christo})her Handley, Wm. S. Luce, Isaac 
Moon, James M. Stanley, (veteranized and promoted), J. O. II. Spin- 
ney, (veteranized), James Sherlock' (veteranized), Bi'adfoi'd ; Fi-ancis 
Griswold, (promoted, tUed at Memphis, July, 1862), Herman D. 



2-1-1: HISTORY OF STARK COL'NTV. 

Sturm. Osceola ; William F. Wheeler, of Lafayette, the only sou of 
Avidow C, M. Wlieeler, died in hospital at Decatur, Ala., August 21, 
1865. Eecruits — Henry ]\IcKibbon, (promoted). March 28. 18u4, 
Bradford. Unassio-ned recruits — Martin Shav. Penu. March 31. 1865. 

In the Eleventh Cavalry. Com])any C, were Andrew Caldwell, 
Slackwater. (recruited December. 1863, deserted Jul\\ 1864), Company 
M., Wm. A. Glaze, West Jersey (recruited March, 1863) ; Unassigned, 
Baxter M. Mahany. Toulon (recruited February, 1865, died at Camp 
Butler.) 

In the Twelfth Cavalry were Joseph Johnson, Toulon. Noveml)er, 
1864, William Douglas. Essex (also Fourth Cavalry), Joseph E. McKin- 
stry, corporal (also Fourth Cavalry). 

In the Fourteenth Cavalry. Company A., were, Dewitt C. Beece, 
West Jersey, November. 1862, and Company M.. Isaac Dennis. West 
Jersey. October, 1866 (discharged for disability). 

In the First New Yoi'k A'eteran Cavalry T. A. LaCosta, now of 
Toulon, served for twenty months. He was also in the United States 
naval service. 

In the Eleventh Missouri Volunteer Cavahy, Company K., was A. 
X. Harris. Goshen, enlisted as Second-Lieutenant and promoted to 
Captain; S. Drummond. son of Benj. Drummond, a volunteer of 18t)l- 
5. enlisted in the United States armv the latter vear and was servin"- 
with the Seventh United States Cavalry in 1880. 

LIGHT ARTILLERY. 

Company A. Captain C. M. Williard. mustered in at Chicago, with 
168 men ; Company B, Captain Ezra Taylor, mustered in at Chicago, 
with 204 men ; Company C, Captain C. Haughtauling. mustered in 
October 31. 1861, at Ottawa, with 175 men; Company I), Captain Ed- 
ward McAllister, mustered in January 14,1862, at Plaintield, with 141 
men: Company E, Captain A. C. Waterhouse, mustered in December 
IV), 1861. at Chicago, with 148 men; Company F, Captain John T. 
Clieuey, mustered in February 25. 1862, at Camp Butler, with 15'.> 
men; Compaii}" G, Captain Artliur O'Leary, mustered in February 28, 
1862, at Cairo, with 113 men; Company H, Captain Alex. Silversparr. 
mustered in February 20, 1862, at Chicago, with 147 men; Company I, 
Captain Edward Bouton. mustered in February 15, 1863. at Chicago, 
with 16'J men; Company K. Captain A. Franklin, mustered in January 
9. 1862. at Shawneetown. with 96 men; Company L, Captain John 
Rourke, mustered in February 22. 1862, at Chicago, with 153 men; 
Com])any ^I. Captain John B. Miller, mustered in August 12. 1862, at 
Chicago, with 154 men; Field and Staff. 7 men: Recruits, 883 men. In 
Battery D, Lewis W. Jones, of Wyoming, was Corporal. 

The Second Light Artillery was made up as follows: Company A. 
Captain Peter Davidson, mustered in August 17, 1861, at Peoria, with 
116 men: Company B., Ca]>tain Riley Madison, mustered in June 20, 
1S61, at S]nTngtield. with 127 men; Company C, Captain Caleb Hop- 
kins, mustered in August 5, 1861, at Cairo, with 154 men ; Company D. 
Jasper ]\[. Dresser, mustered in December 17, 1861. at Cairo, with 117 
men ; Company E. Captain Adolph Schwartz, mustered in Februar}- 6. 



MILITARY HISTORY. 245 

1862, atCairo, witli loi men ; Company F, Captain John W. Powell, mus- 
tered in December 11, 1861, at Cape Gira.rdeau. Mo., with 190 men ; Com- 
pany G, Captain Charles J. Stolbrand, mustered in December 31, 1861, 
at Camp Butler, with 1()8 men ; Com])any II. Captain Andrew Stein- 
beck, mustered in December 31, 1861, at Camp Butler, with 115 men ; 
Company I, Captain Charles W. Keith, mustered in December 31, 1861, 
at Camp Butler, with 107 men ; Company K, Ca])tain I]enjamin F. 
Eogers, mustered in December 31, 1861, at Camp Butler, with lOSmen ; 
Company L, Captain William H. Bolton, mustered in February, 28, 
1862, at Chicago, with 115 men; Company M, Ca])tain John C. Phil- 
lips, mustered m June 6, 1862, at Chicago, with 100 men ;field and staff, 
10 men ; recruits, 1,171 men. 

In Company A, were the following named Stark county soldiers — 
Cor]x>ral, Harvey Pierce, Wyoming, May, 1861; veteranized and ])ro- 
moted. Privates, enlisted July, 1861 : Clemens R; Defendener (died at 
New Orleans, February, 1864), Thomas J. Ellis (veteranized), Wyom- 
ing. Enlisted September, 1862: Alva W. Brown, Lafayette, John Cox 
(dfed in Syracuse, Decend)er, 1865), N. II. Hull, Chas. Thomas, Wyom- 
ing; Samuel Eagan, Emanuel Kissel, West Jersey; David N. Hiffner, 
Charles N. Hull, Csceola ; Wm. Beers, Calvin liockwell, Hugh Stock- 
ner, Marshall and Warren Winn. Lorenzo K. Wiley, Toulon ; Morris 
Ayres (died in service), Joseph (i. Bloomer (died in service), Albert 
Eagan, John Hull, John R. Stratton. In tbe Peoria Batteiy, S. W. 
Carney enlisted in May, 1861. 

The Inde])endent Batteries were: Board of Trade, Captain James 
S. Stokes, mustered in July 31, 1862, at Chicago, with 258 men ; Spring- 
lield. Captain Thomas F. Vaughn, mustered in August 21, 1862, at 
Camp Butler, with 109 men ; Mercantile. Captain Charles G. (^ooley, 
mustered in August 29, 1862. at Chicago, with 27<> men; Elgin, Cap- 
tain George W. Benwick, mustered in Novendjei" 15. 1862, at Elgin, 
with 242 men ; Coggswell's, Ca})tain William Coggswell, mustered in 
September 23, 1861. at Camp Douglas, with 221 men ; Ilenshaw's, Cap- 
tain Ed. C. Henshaw, mustered in October 15, 1862, at Ottawa, with 
196 men; Bridges', Captain Lyman Bridges, mustered in January 6, 
1862, at Chicago, with 252 men; Colvin's, Captain John 11. Colvm, 
mustered in October 10, 1863, at Chicago, with 96 men ; Busteed's, Chi- 
cago, with 127 men. 

In the Marine Artillery were, John James Cam})l)ell, died in ser- 
vice, Samuel Dyer, died at Roanoke, Andrew (Talbraith, sheriff; John 
Hotchkiss, Charles IMaxfield, Henry Marchant, Jephta Mosher, Carle- 
ton Rhodes, died at Xewbern, N. C, Warren Winn. Oliver White, Isaac 
Whitaker, Marshall AVinn, of Wyoming. Dennis Clark. Jas. W. Dexter, 
Marian Godfrev, James Hall, John Labari', John H. Parks. Andrew 
Galbraith served in the IST. Y. Marine Ai'tillerv from August, 1862, 
until February, 1863, when he enlisted in the V. S. navv, and served 
until 1864. 

In the 1st U. S. Ai'tillery were. (Tcorge Rouse, Goshen, and in tlie 
Mississippi Marine Brigade, William Cross, of Toulon. 

In other commands were Josejih Jamison, a, l)i)y of eighteen sum- 
mers, served in the war with his father, died at Jefferson City. J\lo., 



24fi HISTORY OF STAEK COUNTY. 

March 29, 18f)2, and John A. Perrv, a voimg soldier, died Januarv 15, 
18<32, at Otterville, Mo. 

In the histories of the several Grand Army Posts many records are 
given, some of them being of soldiers who resided here or are now res- 
idents, who were not listed with Stark countv men during the war. 

The Fourth Regiment, I. X. G., was organized at Peoria, Februaiy 
2. 1ST6. During that winter an act was passed to organize and govern 
the militia of the State, which went into force July 1, 1877. Captain 
John Huff was elected Colonel. Captain W. Whiting, of the Altona Rifle 
Company, Lieutenant-Colonel ; and Captain A. T. Johnson, Major. 
Owmo- to the legislature refusing to confirm Colonel Huff, Whitino' 
was appointed Colonel. In 1877 some disagreement over the time and 
form of elections marked the histor}^ of tlie regiment ; but this disa- 
greement, if such it were, resulted in the election of Col. AVhiting, Ma- 
jor: Wm. Jackson, of Elniira, Lieutenant-Colonel, and Captain O. L. 
Higgins. Major. In July. 1877, Peoria's three com]ianies, with others 
in tliat district, were detatched from the Fourth Reoiment and oro^an- 
ized as the Seventh Regiment, I. X. G.. ]\I()line's two companies and a 
new company at Princeton, were incorporated with the Fourth I. X. G., 
and a rer-nlistment ordered. This was affected, but the muster-in was 
postponed. On July 22, 1877, the "great strike" assumed huge pro- 
portions, the Fourth Regiment received orders to be in readiness, and 
within four hours all the com])anies were read}^ for dut\^ At 5 p.m., 
on July 27. orders were received to proceed at once to Alton Junction, 
and at midnight companies A, C, and H were at Galva. Company G, 
of Toulon, arrived there a little later, and Company F, from Kewanee, 
shortly after. Early next morning Company I joined them at 
Wvoming r/t route to East St. Louis. Three davs later the reo^iment 
was ordered to Galeslmrg. The Lieutenant-Colonel of that day is now 
commander of the regiment. 

Stark county has ninety-tlii'ee persons on the pension roll, of which 
seventy-two are invalids, eight are widows, ten dependents, three wid- 
ows that are survivors of the war of 1812. The monthly pay of these 
amounts to s8Sl:.25. 

This chapter must be considered only an index to the greater mili- 
tary history contained in the pages devoted to biograph v and in some 
instances to township history. Yet it is a great record — one of which 
any peo])le may feel })roud, and one that will be re-read and re-read and 
analyzed, when all other memorials, of the soldiers of Stark County 
are forgotten. 



CHAPTER XVL 




TOCTLON TOWNSHIP. 



HIS division of the county is one of well cultivated farms, 
pleasant homes and thriving business centers. Within its 
borders are the towns of Toulon and Wyoming and the 
village of Modena. Spoon river and tributaries course 
through, the R. I. & P. R. R. runs through its southern 
sections, while good roads make all sides of every section 
accessible. Thrifty hedge-rows of Osage orange line these 
roads aud mark the boundaries of the large fields into 
which the township is subdivided. Many of the farm homes 
are elegant, and all comfortable. The population of Toulon 
township in 1880, exclusive of the towns, was 1,038, of Toulon 
village, 967, of a part of Wyoming 652, and of Modena 75. 
In area it is an original congressional township. From 
Capt. Hawk's tabulated schedule of Toulon township for 1885 
we learn that there were 7,246 acres of corn planted in said township, 
and 222,900 bushels harvested; 3,774 acres of oats, 151,220 bushels 
harvested; total gross weight of fat cattle sold, 531,500 lbs.; gross 
weight sheep sold, 30,820 ; gross weight hogs sold, 1,428,045 ; number 
feet' tile drain laid, 30,010. Throughout its entire area it is underlaid 
with coal, in some places exposing the veins. 

The shafts on section 14, Toulon are worked by Fred Charleston, 
Peter Herberger, William Newton, Henry Newton, and John Cuni- 
mings, one each. The oldest bank is that operated by William New- 
ton, now mined for over twenty years. It was formerly known as 
the " Coe Bank." There are about fifteen men employed, earning 
about $1.50 per day. A number of horsebacks exist here, some clay 
veins are four or five feet thick, the coal vein averages four feet. At 
Modena coal mining is carried on extensively, and the opening of new 
shafts still continues. 

The fisherman may still pursue his calling here with pleasure, if 
not with profit, for civilization has not yet succeeded in driving out 
all the inhabitants of the rivers. 

The wolf-hunter, too, may hunt with profit ; for in April, 1884, 
Henr}^ Hamilton and others captured a wolf near Indian Creek, and 
subsequentl}' he with his brother Edward and Jacksoft Lorance found 
a nest of seven cubs. The bounty was $17.50. 

The original entries of the lands in this townsliip form a very im- 
portant part in this history ; for to them we must look for the first 
faint gleams of civilization on the wilderness of 1817. The name, lo- 
cation, and date of each entry are given first, and name of present 
owner last : 



15 



247 



248 HISTOKY OF STAKK COUNTY. 

John T. Phenix, e. bf. u. e. qr. sec. 1; Sept. I, 1839. James Montootli. 

James Bailey, w hf. lot 1, w. hf. lot 2, sec. 1; Nov. 14, 1851. Humphrey Avery; Thos. 
and Jacob Fleming, lot 1 ; Humphrey Avery, lot 2. 

W. K. Fuller, n. e. cj[r. of n. w. qr.,.see. 1; Oct. 8, 1839. B. G. Row ell, n. e. qr. of n. w. qr. 

John T. Phenix, s. e. qr. of n. w. qr., sec. 1; Oct. 25, 1853. Wm. Jackson, 9, T. and J. 
Fleming, 36 acres. 

W. K. Fuller, w. hf . of n. w. qr. , sec. 1 ; Sept. 28, 1339. Samuel Malone, 22, Humphrey 
Avery, 37. 

Jonathan Matthews, s. w. qr., sec. 1; Xov. 29, 1817. John Scott, 54; James Irvin, 80; 
James Snare, 25. 

Samuel P. Tufts, s. e. qr. , sec. 1 ; Nov. 29, 1817. H. B. Dorrance, 100, and a number of 
small lot owners. 

Erastus Brown, n. e. fr. sec. 2; June 27, 1851 Silas Norris, 135 acres. 

David Park, e. hf. n. w. qr. sec. 2; Oct. 8, 1839. E. Geoi'ge; e. 54 acres. 

Samuel 3IcAuglm, w. hf. lot 1, w, hf. lot 2, sec 2; Sept. 19, 1848. Eli Mix, w. 84 acres. 

Michael Cunningham, s. w. qr., sec. 2; Oct. 6, 1817. E. George, O. B. Blanchard, J. H. 
Vernon, R. Patterson, Gideon Murray. 

N. Chadwick, s. e. qr., sec. 2; Mar. 10, 1818. Julia Harding, T. Watts, J. H. Vernon, 
and Hurlburt Harding. 

Chauncey D. Fuller, n. e. qr. sec. 3; Sept. 28, 1839. William Sturm. 

Phineas Austin, n. fr. hf. n. w. fr. qr. sec. 3; Oct. 2, 1851. Theodore Vand^'ke, 44 
acres. 

James M. Jackson, w. hf. lot 1, sec. 3; Sept. 20, 1848. T. and C. Vandj^ke, 10 acres. 

Heiisebah Fuller, s. e. part, sec. 3: ^lay 16, 1840. Wilmot Newton, s. 80 acres. 

William Dunlap, s. w. qr., sec. 3; Nov. 15, 1817. Wilmot Newton, s. w. qr. 

Charles Gist, s. e. qr., sec. 3; Nov. 15, 1817. T. and C. Vandyke, n. 80, Adam 
Holmes, s. 80. 

Allen Bagley, e. hf. lot 1, e. hf. lot 2, n. e. qr. sec. 4; Dec. 4, 1851. William Mur- 
ra}'. e. 80. 

Brady Fowler, w. hf. lot 2, w. hf. lot 1, n. e. qr. lot 2, n. w. fr. qr. and e. hf. lot 1, 
sec. 4; Nov. 20 1848. Bradv Fowler, w. 80. 

Robert A. Craiij-, w. hf . lot 1 , f r. n. w. f r. qr. , sec. 4 ; Sept. 23, 1852. Brady Fowler, n. w. 
140. 

Joseph Banks, s. w, qr., sec. 4; Dec. 15, 181T. John Fowler, s. w. 160. 

Erastus Backus, s. e. qr., sec. 4; Nov. 29, 1817. Brady Fowler, s. e. 160. 

Robert Grieve, n. e. qr. sec. 5; Sept. 14, 1849. Robert Grieve, n. e. qr 

John L. Clark, n. w. qr. sec. 5; July 16, 1850. Robert Grieve, u. w. qr. 

S. Hutchinson, s. w. qr. sec. 5; Feb. 10, 1818. G. L. Goodale, e. hf., G. Ruther- 
ford, w. hf . 

Jes.se Seeley, s. e. qr. sec. 5; Feb. 10, 1818. John Fowler, e. hf, G. L. Goodale, w. hf. 
David Park, n. w. qr. n. e. qr. and s. w. qr. sec. 6; Oct. 8, 1839. Abel Armstrong, n. e. 
149, G Armstrong, s. w. 150, A. Armstrong, n. 105, and R. Armstrong, s. 40 of n. w. 

Jacob Rheam, s.-e. qr. .sec. 6; May 5, 1818. George Rutherford, s. e. 160. 

William AViley, u. e. qr., sec. 7; Sep. 17, 1818. Geo. Rutherford, n. 80; R. Mc- 
Keighau, s. 80, e. qr. 

"David Park, n. w. qr. and s. w. (jr., .sec. 7; Oct. 8, 18S9. Wm. Beatty, n. w. 150; 
N. G. Smith and C. Bei-field, s. w. qr. 

Hiram Stevens, s. e. qr., sec. 7; Sep. 17, 1818. R. H. McKeighan, e. 80, and Robt. 
McKeighan, w. 80. 

Washington Duke, u. e. qr., sec. 8; Aug. 29, 1818. jVIartin Rist, n. e. qr. 

Elijah Coats, n. w. qr., sec. 8; August 29, 1818. Anna D. Richardson, n. w. (p-. 

Samuel McCahan, s. w. cp-., .sec. 8; July 13, 1818. Duncan McKenzie, s. w. (jr. 

Ira Ellmore, s. e. qr., sec. 8; July 13, 1818, John C. McKenzie, s. e. cjr. 

Silas McCullough, n. e. qr., sec. 9; Jan. 20, 1818. Robert Grieve, n. 80; B. Barton, 
s. 80. 

Robert Morton, n. w. qr., sec. 9; Jan. 20, 1818. Martin Rist, n. w. qr. 

Amos J. Eagleson, s. w. (]r., sec. 9: Oct. 6, 1817. W. P. Caverlv, e. 80 and s. w. 
40; M. Rist, n. w. 40. 

Daniel Dudley, s. e. qr., .sec. 9; Oct. 6, 1817. B. Barton, n. 80; J. H. Brown, s. 80. 

Bela Hall, n. e. qr., .sec. 10; Jan 24, 1818. George E. Holmes, u. 320 acres. 

Ira Remington, n. w. qr., sec. 10; Jan. 24, 1818. 

Jo.seph Porter, s. w. qr., sec. 10; Dec. 22, 1818. Silas Barton, e. hf . ; J. JVI. Barton, 
w. lif. 

Hester Faust, s. e. (p-., .sec. 10; Dec. 22, ISIS. ('. 31. S. Lyon. 

James Thomas, n. e. qr. . sec. 11; Oct. 6, 1817. Hugh Maguire, s. \v. 40 ot n. e. (jr., 
and lots belonging to twelve others. 



TOULON TOWNSHIP. 249 

Benj. H. Tozer, n. w. qr., sec. 11; Oct. 6, 1817. Gideon Murray, 160. 

Isaac Dyer, s. w. qr., sec. 11; Aug. 31, 1818. O. M. S. Lyon, 160. 

Benj. Pratt, s. e. qr., sec. 11; Aug. 31, 1818. Foster Coulson, 160. 

Abraham Bowman, n. e. qr., sec. 12; March 12, 1818. John Snare, e. 104; James 
Snare, e. 16, and small lots; John Caley, w. 38 qr. 

Samuel Grimes, n. w. qr., sec. 12; March 12, 1818. J. W. Medearis, 57; John 
Caley, 40; John Snare, 38 qr. ; N. Snare, 24;*4^' in n. w. qr. 

Luke Blackshire, s. w. and s. e. qr., sec. 12; Nov. 6, 1817. Nathan Snare, w. 120; 
John Snare, e. 40, s. w. qr. ; John Snare, s. e. 160. 

Isaac Patch, n. e. qr., sec. 13; July 1, 1818. J. W. Fleming, s. w. 40 and n. e. 40; 
F. Coulson, n. w. 40 of n. e. qr. 

David Falwell, n. w. qr., sec. 13; July 1, 1818. Foster Coulson, 80; Clara E. Flem- 
ini;-, 40; Foster Coulson, 80; J. W. Fleming, 40 in n. w. qr. 

(}e )rie W. Russell, s. w. qr., sec. 13; Jan. 7, 1818. Martin White, 80; Geo. White, 
50; ('. While, 30, s. w. qr. 

Jesse Onnsby, s. e. qr., sec. 13; Jan. 7, 1818. R. E. Bunnell, s. e. qr. 

D. R. Whiteley, n. e. qr., sec. 14; Oct. 22, 1817. I. Watt, 38; F. Coulson, 80; W. 
H. CLufniau, 21; Hiram D. Thurston, 19; H. Newton, 2, n. e. qr. 

John Pike, n. w. qr., sec. 14; Oct. 22, 1817. Geo. Harvev, n. 80; Mary Renwick, 
s. 80. 

R. D. Thompson, s. w. qr., sec. 14; Nov. 21, 1817. J. A. Ballantine, u. 80; J. D. 
Ballantine, s. 79. 

John Dawson, s. e. qr., sec. 14; Nov. 21, 1817. F. Ballantine, one acre on s. w. qr. 

Samuel Null, n. e. qr., sec. 15; Nov. 24, 1817. H. Dixon, 40; J. D. Ballantine, 86; 
Wm. Daley, 40, s. e. qr., sec. 14. 

Abram Rader, n. w. qr., sec. 15; Nov. 24, 1817. Elisha Bass, 118; M. A. Bass, 80; 
P. H. Hawkins, 120; Brace and Burge, 80; Mary E. Bell, 80; John O'Neil, 40; W. B. 
Ballantine, 4*0; J. D. Ballantine, 40; F. Ballantine, 40. 

John R. Turner, s. w. qr. , sec. 15; Nov. 29, 1817. 

Thomas Thompson, s. e. qr., sec. 15; Nov. 29, 1817. 

Oliver Whitaker, lot 1, Thomas Seeley, lot 2, Samuel M. Eldredge, lot 7, H. W. 
Newland, lot 8— n. e. qr. sec. 16; Oct. 27, 1851. J. H. Brown, 20; T. Hogg, 40; W. H. 
Newcomer, 80; R. Hogg, 20, n. e. qr. 

Moses Snodgrass, lot 3; Samuel M. Eldredge, lot 4 and 5; Moses Snodgrass, lot 6 
— n. w. qr. sec. 16; Oct. 27, 1851. Wm. P. Caverly, n. w. 160. 

Samuel M. Eldredge, lot 11; Samuel Beatty,"lot 12; Samuel M. Eldredge, lot 13; 
James T. Snodgrass, lot 14— s. w. qr. sec. 16; Oct. 27, 1851. Wm. P. Caverly, s. w. 160. 

Oliver Whitaker, lot 9; Samuel M. Eldredge, lot 10; James T. Snodgrass, lot 15; 
R. H. Jacobs, and D. P. Winter, lot 16— s. e. qr. sec. 16; Robson Hogg, 40; W. H. New- 
comer, 40; Frank Rest, 80, s. e. qr. 

Valentine Matthews, u. e. qr. sec. 17; Dec. 16, 1817. F. P. Barnes, 140; W. W. 
Wright, 20. 

William Davidson, n. w. qr. sec. 17; Dec. 16, 1817. W. W. Wright, e. 80; Syl. M. 
Keiglian, w. 80. 

John Yearns, s. w. qr. sec. 17; Sept. 11, 1818. J. C, Moore, s. w. 160. 

James Bulley, s. e. qr. sec. 17; Sept. 11, 1818. M. A. Hall, 40; B. G. Hall, 40; 
John Lyall, 80. 

William Young, n. e. qr. sec. 18; March 31, 1818. Duncan McKenzie. 

Adam Perry, e. hf. and w. hf n. w. qr. sec. 18; Sept 28, 1839. Lewis Williams, 
e. 76; R. H. McKeighan, w. 76. 

Joseph Perry, e. hf. and w. hf. s. w. qr. sec. 18; Sept. 28, 1839. Henry B. Perrv, 
s. w. 160. 

.John Wallace, s. e. qr. sec. 18; March 13, 1818. H. R. Pierce, Est, s. e. 160. 

William Bennett, n. e. qr. sec. 19; Jan. 24, 1818. J. M. Stickney, e. 80, s. 13, 5 
acre lots. 

John Culbertson, n. w. qr. sec. 19; Sept. 28, 1839. Pleasant Follet, 140. Trustees. 

John Miller, s. w. qr. sec. 19; Sept. 6, 1839. Depot grounds and Toulon lots. 

Gideon W. Moody, s. e. qr. sec. 19; Jan. 24,1818. Jerry Lyon, 44; O. Whittaker, 
50; J. A. Codey, 21. 

Wm. Vandermon, n. e. qr. sec. 20; Dec. 5, 1817. Kate Grer, 80; Daniel Tyrrell, 
w. 80. 

Lydia Barritt, n. w. qr. sec. 20; Dec. 5, 1817. E. B. Lyon, 40; Mary M. Merri- 
man, 120. 

E. D. Strickland, s. w. qr. sec 20; .Tuly 18, 1818. Charles P. Dewey, s. w. 160. 
Robert Vallally, s. e. qr. sec. 20; July 18, 1818. John Whittaker, jr.; s. e. 160. 
Robert Fry, n. e. qr. sec. 21; Oct. 6, 1817. Eh Packer, e. 80; M. A. Packer, w. 80. 



250 HISTORY OF STAKK COUNTY. 

Moses ]\rcChiy, n. w. qr. sec. 21; Oct. 6, 1817. David Nicliolsou, n. w. 160. 

Jeptlia Cloud, s. w. qr. sec. 21; Juue 5, 1818 Benjamin Packer, s. w. 160. 

Robert Miner, s. e. qr. sec. 21; .June 5, 1818. .J. W. Ballantine, e. 80; Ezra Packer, 
w. 80. 

Nicholas Cook, n. w. and n. e., sec. 22; Nov. 24, 1817. O. J. Bass, 4J^; John O'Neil, 
201^; Peter O'Neil, 55; F. Mawbe}% 80, n. e. qr. 

Allen B. Strong, s. w., sec. 22: Dec. 24, 1817. F. Mawbe3% e. 80; Catherine Brady, 
n. w. 40; Melvina Nowlau, s. w. 40 in n. w. qr. ; CUi':irlos Rhodes, s. w. 160. 

.John Wells, s. e., sec. 22; Dec. 24, 1817. John Drinnin, e. 80; I. Hochstrasser, w. 80. 

Reuben Boles, n. e., sec. 23; March 16, 1818. O'Neil & Buru.s, u. e. qr. 

.John P. Howard, e. hf., n. w. qr., sec. 28; Oct. 14, 1839. Daniel New, c. 80, 
u. w. qr. 

W. L. Howard, s. w. qr., sec. 23; Feb. 19, 1850. John O'Neil, 20; F. IMawbey, 58. 

Horace I^each, n. w. qr., sec. 23; Feb. 26, 1652. Peter O'Neil, 2 of w. hf., n. w. qr. 

W. B. Mclveunan, s. w. qr., sec. 23; ]\Iarch 3, 1818. .Jacob Herberger, s. w. qr. 

R. Hill, s. e. qr., sec. 23; March 3, 1818. John Drinnin, n. 80; Peter Pauli, s. 79. 

Silas M. Moore, u. e. qr., sec. 24; March 9, 1818. R. E. Bunnell, n. e. 160 and e. 
80 of n. w. qr. 

Al)el H. Coleman, n. w. qr., sec. 24; March 9, 1818. Small lots. 

Isaac Parcelles, s. w\ qr. , sec. 24; March 5, 1818. R. E. Bunnell, e. 80; S. Snare, 
40; Peter Pauli, 30, and J. Bever, 10 s. w. c^r. 

Joseph ,Joy, s. e. qr., sec. 25; March 7, 1818. "Winfield Scott. 

.John Thompson, n. e. qr., sec. 25. Dec. 4, 1817. Wesley Iving, e. hf. ; P. E. 
Pratt, w. hf. , n. e. qr. 

Asaph Witherill, n. w. qr., sec. 25; Dec. 4, 1817. li. Howarth, 70 acres and small 
lots. 

William Ivarns, s. w. qr., sec. 25; Nov. 23, 1818. J. W. Bond, e. 79; W. A. Haven, 
28 and lots in s. w. qr. 

Benjamin Harvey, s. e. qr., .sec. 25; Nov. 23, 1818. Peter E. Pratt, s. e., 147 acres. 

Thomas Rogers, n. e. qr. , sec. 26; March 2, 1818. I. Hoch.strasser, Stephenson 
S. W^atson, D. New, William Watson, Peter Pauli, n. e. qr. 

George Metzinger, n. w. qr. , sec. 26; March 2, 1818. D. New, H. Hoclistras.ser, 
W. Drinnin, .J. Drinnin, n. w. qr. Small lots on s. w. qr. 

Joseph Wildey, s. e. and s. w. qr., .sec. 26; Nov. 29, 1817. Small lots on s. e. qr. 

Polly Tucker, heir, n. e. q., sec. 27; Dec. 16, 1817. George Hartley, w. 80 and 
small lots. 

Job Parkhead, heir, n. w. qr., .sec. 27; Dec. 16, 1817. George Hartlej', e. 80; 
Charles Packer, w. 80. 

Timothy Cook, s. w. qr., sec. 27; Jan 1, 1818. Stephen W. Eastman, s. w. 160. 

.Joseph S. Gorman, s. e. qr., sec. 27; Jan. 1, 1818. S. W. Eastman, s. 60, and 
small lots. 

Jacob Slantler, n. e. qr., sec. 28: Oct. 6, 1817. C. Packer, e. 80; Ezra Packer, w. 
78; M. Winn, 2. 

Phineas Spilman, n. w. qr., sec. 28; Oct. 6, 1817. Benjamin Packer, n. w 154. 

Samuel Griffith, s. w. qr., .sec. 28; Nov. 29, 1817. Charles Hartley, s. w. 160. 

Ebenezer Gilkey, s. e. qr., sec. 28; Nov. 29, 1817. S. W. and J. E. Eastman, s. e. 
160. 

William Hj^le, n. e. qr., sec. 39; Oct. 6, 1817. .John Whitaker, u. e. 160. 

Asa Hill, u. w. qr., sec. 29; Oct. 6, 1817. David Guvre, n. w. 160. 

.James Trumble, s. w. qr., sec. 29; April 3, 1818. C. Hartley, e. 80; J. B. Cooley, 
w. 80. 

Henry Roberts, s. w. qr., sec. 29; (cancelled). June 21, 1852. 

Stephen Wheeler, s. e. qr., sec. 29; April 3, 1818. F.R.Greenwood, n. 80; B. 
Turner, s. 80. 

Phillip Lawless, n. e. qr. .sec. 30; Feb. 11, 1818. John Berlield,120; B. Turner, 
w. 40. 

Lewis Perry, n. vv. qr. sec. 30; Sept. 6, 1839. Benjamin Turner, sec. 38 in s. w. (p\ 

Adam Perry, s. w, qr. sec. 30; .June 24, 1839. S. w. qr. in small lots. 

Adam McCaslen. s. e. qr. sec. 30; Nov. 10, 1818. T. H. Ma.xtield, s. e. 160. 

Peter Wolf, n. e. qr. sec. 31; Oct. 6, 1817. W. M. Mason, w. 134; J. Black, s. 12. 

Wm. H. Henderson, n. w. qr. sec. 31; June 24, 1S39. Benj. Turner, 82 acres in 
.small lots. 

Wm. Mnlioiiey, s. w. qr. .sec. 31; .July 4. 1839. Oliver Mahonej', s. w. 151. 

Sipiire Williams, s. e. qr. .sec. 31; Oct, 6, 1817. Jolin R Atherlon, 30 and sinull lots. 

David Hambleton, u. e. qr. sec. 32; Feb. 2, 1818. A. Wilkinson, e. 80; C. llartlev, 
w. 80. 



Tol'LON TOWXSIIII'. 251 

Thomas Waiidall, n. w. qr. sec. 83; Feb. 3, 1818. John IJIack, e. 153; W. M. 
Mason, w. 7. 

James Baldwin, s. \v. qr. sec. 32; Oct. G, 1817. James Biggs, n. 80 and small lots. 

Isaac Higgins. s. e. qr. sec. 32; Oct. 6, 1817. Charles Hartlcj-, s. e. 160. 

Joseph Cram, father, etc., n. e. qr. sec. 33; Dec. 4, 1817. Newton Wilkinson, 
n. e. 160. 

Henry Bailey, u. w. cjr. sec. 33; Dec. 4, 1817. Alonzo Wilkinson, n. w. 160. 

John Cross, jr., s. w. qr. sec. 33; March 18, 1818. Owen Thomas, s. w. 160. 

James Chancey, s. e. qr. sec. 33; March 18, 1818. M. Guyre, n. 80; T. Hagartv, 
s. 80. ' 

William Oaks, n. e. qr. sec. 34; March 11, 1818. James Hartley, n. e. 136, and John 
Carico, 283^. 

John Short, n. w. qr. sec. 34; March 11, 1818. Newton Wilkinson, n. w. 160. 

Jeremiah Davis, s. w. qr. sec. 34; Aug. 17, 1818. C. G. Humphrey, 30; M. Guyre, 
90; D. Guyre, 40. 

Richard Nixon, s. e. qr. sec. 34; June 3, 1818. David Gviyre, s. e. 160. 

Luke G. Hasley, n. e. qr. sec. 35; March 9. 1818. John Francis, 1161^; H. Duck- 
worth, 120; Alfred Duckworth, 76. 

Benj. Hughes, n. w. qr. sec. 35; March 9, 1818. 

Johii Bussell, s. w. qr. sec. 35; Dec. 1, 1817. Julius Barnes, 62}^, and Wyoming 
town lots. 

Henry Murphy, s. c. qr. sec. 35; Dec. 1, 1817. Mary Thomas, 523^; J. C. Copestake, 
51, s. 2M. 

Thomas W. Way, n. e. qr. sec. 36; Dec. 23, 1818. James Harwood, 1373^; J. Ker- 
naghan, 61-^. 

" John Hageman, u. w. qr. sec. 36; Dec. 24, 1818. Alfred Castle, 56, and town lots 
in W^yoming. 

Patrick Short, s. w. qr. sec. 36; Dec. 16, 1817. Town lots. 

John Lynes, s. e. qr. sec. 36; Dec. 16, 1817. Towm lots. 

Politically the township is decidedly Eepublican, the vote for 
county clerk in 1886 being — Walker, Republican, 33-i; ISTowlan, Dem- 
ocrat, 202 ; Callison, Prohil)itionist, 37. 

The supervisors of the townshi]^, other than the first who is men- 
tioned in the organic chapter, are named as follows : 1854, John Ber- 
field, with A. Moncrief, clerk; 1855, Amos P. Gill; 1856-9, John 
Perfield; 1859, Geo. A¥. Dewey; 1860-2, Davis Lowman; 1862, John 
Murnan; 1803, Brady Fowler ; 1864, Isaac Thomas; 1865-8, George 
W. Dewey; 1868, C. M. S. Lyon; 1869, Brady Fowler; 1870, C. M. S. 
Lyon; 1871-3, James Fraser; 1873-5, Jonathan Fowler; 1875-9, 
James Nowlan; 1879-81, Wm. P. Caverly ; 1881, John Fowler; 1882, 
W. P. Caverlv; 1883, John Fowler; 1884, W. P. Caverly; 1885, John 
"W. Smith ; 1886, John W. Smith. 

The justices of the peace elected since 1853 were: 1853, John 
Miller, C. B. Donaldson, Benj. C. Leonard and A. Moncrief; 1856, 
Alex. Hochstrasser and D. McCance; 1857, Chauncey D. Fuller and 
David McCance; i860, A. Y. Fuller; 1861, D. McCance and Ben. F. 
Fuller; 1865, C. M. S. Lyon and C. D. Fuller 1867, D. Clayton Young; 
1868, Isaac Thomas; 1889, Isaac Thomas and D. K. Hutchinson; 1870, 
James H. Miller; 1873, O. H. Stone and John Berfield (Oliver White, 
November); 1874, Branson Lowman; 1875, James II. Miller; 1877, 
Orren H. Stone and Allen P. Miller; 1878, Thomas B. Wall; 1881, 
Egbert H. Smith; 1883, Isaac Thomas (August); 1885, George Van 
Osdell and Isaac Tliomas. 

Schools.- — Toulon township school records are extant. From them it 
appears that Adam Perry took the school census of Toulon township in 
L)ecember 1843, and reported 141 children. On December 11 the fol- 



252 HISTORY OF STAKK COUNTY. 

lo\ving named petitioned for an election on the question of organizing 
the township for school work : "VV. H. Henderson, Jos. K. Lane, Jos. D. 
Lane, Ira T. Dibble, Timothy Hollister, John Winter, Jonathan 
Anthony, Lewis Perry, Langley Hall and John Miller. In response to 
this petition the trustees of school lands — Elisha Gill, Oren Maxfield 
and John W. Henderson — ordered an election for December 30, 181:3, 
on this question, and also for five trustees. On that day the question 
was decided affirmatively, and Thomas Hall, Oren Maxfield, Wm. H. 
Henderson, Elisha Gill and Caleb P. Flint were elected trustees, and 
Adam Perry, treasurer. John W. Henderson was examined for teacher, 
January 1, 1844, and was given a certificate. On Jai'iuary r», Dr. Hall, 
John Miller and Lewis Perry were elected school directors, and on 
April 9, 1845, those directors ordered a meeting to vote on the question 
of levying a tax of fifteen cents on the one hundred dollars. Oliver 
Whitaker was secretary, and the question was carried. In October, 
1845, the number of school children was 209. In January, 1840, Geo. 
Buchanan, Stephen W. Eastman and W. W. Drummond were elected 
trustees, and Oliver Whitaker, J. W. Henderson and W. J. Phelps were 
elected directors, A school meeting was held at Toulon, May 2, 1846, 
to vote for or against a tax for school purposes. Ira Ward, senior, pre- 
sided, with Wheeler B. Sweet, secretarv. The vote resulted in seven- 
teen content, none dissenting, when W. W. Drummond proposed that 
" a tax of fifteen per cent on the one hundred dollars valuation be now 
levied on all real and personal property in the Toulon school district, 
expressly for the completon of school house, now under contract by 
the school directors of said district to Ira Ward junior." This propo- 
sition Avas adopted. The votes recorded for this tax numbered seven- 
teen, as follows: Stephen AV. Eastman, Wm. W. Drummond, Wm. J. 
Phelps, Oliver Whitaker, Joseph Essex, Samuel Beatt}', George Buck- 
hannon, John W. Henderson, Charles M. Johnston, George Worley, 
Benj. Turner, Thos. M. Lacon, Ira Ward, senior, Wheeler B. Sweet, 
Thomas Hall, Lucas E. Miner, IST. Maxfield. In January, 1840, the 
"Union District" was set off on petition of C. P. Flint and others. 
This commenced at the southwest corner of the township, north one 
and one-half miles, east two miles, south one and one-half miles, and 
thence west to beginning; the l)alance of the township being known as 
Toulon district. In April, 1840, Ira Ward, junior, received $90 on his 
contract for building school house at Toulon. In June, 1847, $100 
was paid to him. In July, 1847, the trustees of township 13, north, 
5, east. H. J. Rhodes, G. W. Jackson and Harry Ha>'s, agreed to 
cede a part of their district to the Toulon district, and also a part of 
township 12, range 7, was ceded. Oliver AVhitaker served as treasurer 
from January, 1846, to April, 1848, when ]\Iartin Shallenberger was 
elected. At that time the ti'ustees were John Miller, Joseph Perry and 
Thomas Winn. In Octoljer, 1848, on petition of Madison Winn, a new 
district, known as the "'Middle district" was formed. This ran from 
the southwest corner of section 35 to the northwest corner of section 
21, east to 24, south to the southeast corner of section 24, thence 
west to southwest corner of section 24, south one and one-half mile, 
east two miles, south one-half mile, thence west to beginning. Luman 



TOULON TOWISiSIIIP. 25o 

Thurston, then the only resident on section 2(), asked to liave it attuclied 
to the Middle district, which was done in July, 1849. In 1850 John 
Berfield, Charles F. White and Cyril Ward were elected trustees. In 
Fe]:)ruary, 1850, on petition of Alfred Castle, the southeastern part of 
Middle district was attached to W3'^oming district. In April, 1851, 
Jack Creek district was established on petition of Brady Fowler and 
others. Cyril Ward was trustee at this time. In 1852 the districts 
named and Wyoming and Holgates were in existence. In 1853 the 
Pratt's district was laid out. Benjamin Turner and John Berfield, 
trustees, with Martin Shallenberger secretar}^ and treasurer, served 
regularly from 1851 to 18G1, the secretary's term going back to 1817. 
In 185G Miss A. J. Dyer presided over thirty-five pnpils at the Winn 
school for $3 per week. In 1858 Oliver Whitaker and Thos. J. AVright, 
directors of District No. 1, order |25 to be paid to Henderson and 
Whitaker in part })ayment for lot 2, block 1, in their addition, pur- 
chased for building a school house, and that the sum be paid out of 
the special tax of 1857 for liuilding school houses and purchasing sites 
therefor. In 1859 Oliver Whitaker, Carson Berfield and Wm. Low- 
man were elected directors at a meeting over \vhich li. Dunn presided, 
with C. Myers, secretary. There were twelve candidates in the field. 
I. C. lieed was elected a director in 1861. There were eight school 
districts, numbered in March, 1862, for the first time. J. Thorp, who 
was a visitor here in June, 1886, was principal of high school, or No. 
1, at $50 per month; Miss M. Perry presided over the grammar 
grade ; Miss E. E. King taught in the " brick school " with Miss E. 
Marvin and Miss M. E. Beatty ; Miss O. A. Decker presided over 
" Soap Hall school" and Miss M. B. Whitaker over the "Fair Ground 
school.'' N. F. Atkins tanght in District No. 4 ; Miss M. J. Lacock in 
No.'5; Miss A J. Dyer in No. 7; H. H. Leonard presided over LTnion 
school, or No. 8; E.' M. Gallup taught in No. 9; Miss M. J. Ewalt in 
No. 10, or Modena, and su.bseqnently, G. H. Brown. Nos. 2, 3 and 11 
were not in this township, and a few schools were closed. In 1863 
Patrick Nowlan received twenty -four out of foi'ty-one votes for director 
of village schools , and on the question of extending school to ten 
months, thii'ty-six affirmative votes ^vere recorded. 

The trustees of Toulon township schools since 1861 are named as 
follows: 1861-2, Benjamin Turner, Isaac Thomas, Miles A. Fuller; 
1863-7, George W. Dewey, O. Whitaker, Isaac Thomas; 1867-9, 
George W. Dewey, C. M. S. Lyon, Isaac Thomas; 1869, George W. 
Dewey, C. M. S. L3"on, James Fraser; 1870, George W. Dewey, Davis 
Lowman, James Fraser; 1871, George W. Dewey, Dennis Mawbey, 
James Fraser; 1872-1, Dennis Mawbev, John Francis, Davis Lowman; 
1874-6, C. M. S. Lyon, John Francis," Davis Lowman; 1876, C. M. S. 
Lyon, John Francis, Elisha Mosher ; 1877-80, Davis Lowman, Elisha 
Mosher, John Francis; 1880-2, Kol)ert P. Holmes, Thomas Gemmell, 
John Francis ; 1882-4, Newton J. Smith, Thomas Gemmell, Benjamin 
Packer; 1884, Newton J. Smith, A. F. Stickney, Benjamin Packer; 
1885-7, Kobert McKeighan, A. F. Stickney, Newton J. Smith. 

The treasurers have been: 1861, Job Shinn ; 1863-5, Patrick Now- 
lan; 1865, II. C. Dunn; 1867, Eobert Till and J. G. Armstrong; 1870, 



25-1: HISTORY OF STAKIC COUXTY. 

J. G. Armstrong; 18T1-5, Patrick iS'owlan ; 1875, H. M. Hall; 1876- 
85, Samuel Burge ; and 1885-7, Levi Silliman. 

In 1886 there were 522 males and 565 females under 21 years ; two 
graded and seven ungraded schools, attended by 562 pupils and pre- 
sided over l)y five male and sixteen female teachers, the former earnino' 
S2,144.86, and the latter 84,132.18; district tax, 87,145; bonded debf, 
$1,350; total receipts, 815,251.01; total expenditures, 810,307.54. 

Pioneers and Old Settlers. — The following is a list of persons who 
were in Stark county tlie day of its oi'ganization, and who resided in 
Toulon townshiji in the spring of 1866 : Mrs. Oliver Whitaker, Mrs. H. 
White, Mrs. P. M. Blair, Mrs. M. Shall enljerger, Mrs. Hall, Mrs. Kays- 
bier, Mrs. Martin. Mrs. Jones, Mrs. J. Perry, Mary J. Perry, Mrs. 
Warren Wilhams. Mrs. T. AVinn, Mrs. S. Parrish, Mrs. C. Bertield. Mrs. 
J. Berfield, Mrs. William Ogle, Mrs. James Culbertson, Mrs. Broad- 
head, Mi's. T. J. Henderson, Mrs. Wallace Mason, Mrs. M. Williams, 
Mrs. Guire, Mrs. David Fast. Mrs. A. Christy, Mrs. A. Y. Fuller, Mrs. 
Susan Dunn, old Mrs. Greenfield (87 years old), Mrs. David Winter, 
Mrs. Mahala Bezett, Mrs. C. Greenfield, Mrs. William Thomas, Mrs. J. 
C. Keed, Miss Polly Crandall, Mrs. Brad}^ Fowler, Jane B. Martin and 
Mrs. Marv Gurlev. Mr. C. L. Eastman, the enumerator, adds : " The 
oldest woman is Old Ladv Greenfield, 87 years. ^ * * Youno-est 
woman not ascertained. It would make them older than the}" care to 
acknowledge." The pioneer men residing here in 1866 are named 
thus : O. Whitaker, Dr. T. Hall, T. W. Hall, H. M. Hall, Isaac Whita- 
ker, O. White, Wells White, Joseph Perry. Henry Perry, Matterson 
Winn, Thomas Winn, Warren Winn, Squire Parrish, Carson Berfield, 
John Berfield, Elisha Greenfield, John Fmdle}', AA^illiam Mahony, Ben- 
jamin Turner, AYilliam Ogle, E. S. Broadhead, C. L. Eastman,"^ S. W. 
Eastman, T. J. Henderson, E. C. Dunn, M. A Fuller. Chancey D. 
Fuller, W. K. Fuller, A. Y. Fuller, Stephen D. Breese, Charley Green- 
field, William Thomas (Wyoming), J, C. Eeed, Eoyal Arnold, Brady 
Fowler, Kirk Fowler, C. M. S. Lyon, X. Butler, John Fowler and J. 
W. Fowler. Mr. Eastnmn adds: " The oldest man on the list is Joseph 
Perr}", '(^'o\ years ; and the youngest man, Ike Whitaker.'' In other 
pages brief mention is made of several old settlers and others, whose 
names maj" not appear either in the pioneer chapter or in the pages 
devoted to biography. All of them have been connected with the 
township's history. 

The Toulon cemetery gives a plain history of many of the pioneers 
and old settlers of this neighborhood, and for this reason, as well as to 
include some names, which might be otherwise omitted, the following 
list and date of death are given : 

Susan M. Eastman, 1850: Eliza Ann Flint, 1851: Caleb P. Flint. 18C3; 
Oliver Gardiner, 18G7: Mrs.' Jane Whitaker, 1852; E. S. Brodhead, 1873; 
W. W. Wright, 1864; wounded at Eesaca, ]V[ay 14^ died at Xashville. 
Ehoda Silliniau. 1841; Henrietta Silliman. 1846: Eliza Ives, 1853; Hannah 
Ives, 18G5: Elisha Gill, 1864; Abigail Gill, 1875; Jefferson Winn, 1863; 
John Dack, 18T2; Dr. W. Chamberlain, 188,2; James Wright, 18G5: Jona- 
than Miner 1844; John Drinnin, 1881; Eliza Pollock, 1874; Johii Pollock, 
1805; Eebecca Pollock, 1841; Jane Bradley, 1855; Ann Bradley, 1881; 



i 









■3C^_^.,- 





Jn^ 



llbKARY 
UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOl 
URBANA 



TOULON TOWNSHIP. 257 

John (hilbertsoii, ISCO; Lodowick Follet, 1879; 'Thomas Hall, 187(5; liis 
monument was erected by old settlers. Gloriana Asli^, 1855; Dennis 
Mawbey, 1879; Elizabetli Turner, 1856; Eliza McWilliams, 1874; John 
McWiliiams, 1853; Louisa Winter, 1853; Thomas I. Elliott, 1852; Jane 
Elliott, 1847; Martha Mason, 1857; .Swilt Perry, 1856; Mary Perry, 1842; 
Mary Henderson, 1847; John Perry, 1840; James S. Taylor, soldier; 18G1. 
Mary Shivvers, 1875; Andrew Dewey, 1854; Sarah Dewey, 1861; Henri- 
etta Smith, 1861; Rev. Allen C. Miller, 1874; Squire Parrish, 1876; 
Joseph Rhodes, 1880: Robert Moore, 1881: Charlotte Grose, 1879; Lotan 
Dexter, 1873; Henry B. Dexter, 37th I. V. 1.; 1873. Mahala Young, 
1883; Wm.A. Patterson, 1872; James M. Hotchkiss, soldier, 1861. John 
M. Monis, soldier; 1866. William Mahony, 1875; John Atherton, 1885; 
Mary (Newell) Dewey, 1867; Elizabeth Goodsell, 1858; Isabella White, 
1864; William Rounds, 1873; Angeline Riddle, 1857; Stacy Oopperthwaite, 
1863; Ann B. Tezler, Maria Moore, 1875; Orrilla Rice, 1865; Chloe W. 
Maxfield, 1872; Benjamin Williams, soldier; 1864. Avery Rice, 1875; Julia 
A. Bates. 1874; Marv A. Dyer, 1875; Elizabeth AVilliams, 1868; Paulina 
A. Jackson. 1875; Elizabeth Wright, 1869; Catharine Spillnian, 1864; 
William Williams, 1885; John L. Adams, soldier; 1862. Jonathan New- 
myre, 1857; Matilda Galley, 1857; Catharine Lowman, 1876. 

Modena Village. — The town of Modena was platted by Carson Ber- 
field for Williston K. Fuller and Miles A. Fuller in March, 1853, and 
recorded in Juh% 1856. The location is sec. 1, T. 13, N., E. 6, E. The 
streets named were Main and Second running North and South, and 
Locust and Chestnut East and West. Among the purchases of lots at 
Modena before the war were the following named : Bethuel Greenfield, 
I860; W. K. and M. A. Fuller, 1856 ; William T. Leeson, A. W. Avery, 
James K. Oziah, 18G1; B. F. Fuller, 1856; M. Y. Smith, 1860; Samuel 
C. Sharer, 1856; C. A. Dean, 1859; Charles Greenfield, 1861; S. D. 
Brees, 1859; Dexter Wall, 1859; A. Y. Fuller, 1859; Trustees of Bap- 
tist church, 1856; Robert E. W^estfall, 1858. 

The location is within the bend of Spoon river on the south east one- 
fourth of section 1, certainly one of the most picturesque places in the 
whole county. Across the river, and connected with Modena by the 
iron bridge is the hamlet called Waldron or Wallden. Within the vil- 
lage and surrounding it are the coal mines, which, while detracting 
from the pastoral beauty of .location, add to the wealth of the district. 

The business circle of Modena comprises A. Y. Fuller, general mer- 
chant ; J. B. Lukens, flouring-mill, and B. A. Newton, grocer. John 
Scott's coal shaft at Modena is forty-five feet, with several levels or 
entries. This was sunk in 1884. There are seven men in the levels. 
Llorse-power is used in hoisting. The product is from 400 to 500 per 
day. North of the shaft, on the road is the air-shaft. Across the 
road from Scott's shaft is the Talbot shaft, with air-shaft and pumj) 
south some distance. This is an old shaft, forty-nine feet deep, with 
levels. This gives employment to five men. 

The pensioners residing at Modena in 1883 were Austin Jeffers and 
Eobert Freeland, $2 each; Edward P. Wright, $4; A. IL Louden- 
burgh, $6, and James Montooth. !^18. 

So much has been written in the general history and in the pages 
devoted to the old settlers of Modena that the writer withdrew from 



258 ttmTORY of STARK COtJNTY. 

this part of tlie cha])ter several paragraphs, tlie pith of which appears 
ill the pages devoted to biograph3\ 

The Stark Predestinarian Baptist Society dates back to August 15, 
1853, when a number of members of the okl Sandy Creek Association, 
residing here and in Henry county, expressed a desire to be constituted 
a new cliurch under the name Spoon Eiver Predestinarian Baptist 
Association. Eklers Pobert F. Haynes, James B. Clienoweth and 
Clement Wirt, with Deacons Isaac Babbitt and Eliel Long, were at 
this meeting, with J. B. Chenoweth, clerk, and Wm. J. Fillingham was 
ordained. The twelve articles of faith were adopted, and the consti- 
tution signed by ArchilDald, Charles, Martha and Eleanor Vandike, 
Catherine Bolt, Zarah. Benjamin and Jane Newton, Robert and Phoebe 
Sharer, Wm. J. Fillingham, David Potter and George Beall. Tlie 
new society applied for admittance into the Sandy Creek Association, 
and the delegates, W. J. Fillingham, D. Potter and Zarah Newton 
took their seats as members thereof. On October 1, 1858, Archibald 
Yandike'and David Potter were chosen deacons, and Zarah Newton, 
clerk. John Case, Elizabeth Case and Joseph Newton were admitted 
members. This meeting was held in tlie Franklin school house. In 
1856 Edward Why brow, J. 11. Atherton and wife were received. In 
October, 1857, the name Spoon River Church of Christ, or Old School 
Baptist Church occurs on the records. Mr. Booher and wife, of 
Galva, and Mrs. Winchell were admitted members. In 1856 C. Van- 
dike was clerk. In 1858 Rebecca Boggs and William Davis were 
received. On October 1, 1856, the new meeting house at Modena was 
opened, and meetings held therein. In 1859 Margaret H. Taylor, 
Catherine Cox, Nancy Funderburg, Eli and Hester Batten, Sarah 
Hilliard, Isaac and Hannah Mehew joined the cliurch. In 1860 
Catherine Lane, LenaWinchell, Rebecca Thompson and Eliza Chenoweth 
became members. In 1863 Peter Rinard and wife, Levi AYinchell, 
Hiram Bogart and wife, joined; in 1864 Isaac and Rachel Thurston, 
John W. Riner, Rachel Riner and Maria Dunham became members ; 
in 1866 (Jrin Thompson, a soldier of Nebraska, and Sarah Smith were 
received; in 1868 Delphine Newton joined, in 1870 Lewis Brasel and 
wife Mary, in 1871 Zelphe Collins and Oliver Stimson. 

Elder Chenoweth presided for the last time in August, 1866. Rev. 
Salle presided in 1867, and William A. Thompson presided as moderator 
from February, 1868, to July, 1870. Elder Dillon presided in August, 
1870, Orin Thompson from November, 1870, to July, 1877, when the 
record closes, Charles Yandike serving as clerk all these years. The 
present members are Catherine Bolt, Eleanor Yandike, Margaret 
Atherton, Catherine Cox, Rebecca Thompson, Eliza Chenoweth, Oliver 
Stimson, Hiram and Elizabeth Bogart, Archibald Yandike, Delphine 
Newton, Zelphe Collins, Charles Yandike. 

About 1880 the "Mound Church," or the Cumberland Presbyterian, 
was purchased by James M. Jackson, and since that time the Baptists 
Avorship there. In 1879 the church at Modena was sold. There Rev. 
J. B. Chenoweth preached from 1853 to 1866, when he was succeeded 
by Orin Thompson. On his death Smith Ketchum, the present 
preacher, took charge. 



TotJLoK TOWNSHIP. 259 

In September, 1886, J. Y. Lonnon, of Milo, raised ;i barn, the 
|)rinci])al part of the frame of which is composed of the frame of the 
old mill that was built at Modena man}^ years ag'o, and was called 
Fullers mill. The fi'ame is hard wood, and makes a very substantial 
building. 

MouUon — was platted in August, 1836, for Kobert Schuyler, Russell 
II. Nevius, Wm. Couch, Abijah Fischer and David Lee. The location 
was four miles southeast of Toulon, on what is now the Solomon Wil 
kinson farm, as laid out in May of that year. The fact of a store 
being kept there by George and William Sammis was the incentive 
toAvard establishing a town here. About 1810 Eugenius Frum ei'ected 
the frame of a house there, which was purchased by Benj. Turner, 
moved to Toulon, and stood there until June, 1886, when it was 
demolished. At one time this little hamlet entertained great hopes of 
being the seat of justice for the new couuty on account on its geo- 
graphical position, but Miller's Point won the honor, and old ]\[oulton, 
with her traders and aspirations, passed out of existence. 

Societies. — Almost the entire list of mutual benevolent associations 
find a place in the history of the villages of Toulon and "Wj^oming. 
Tw^o, however, are so closely identified with the township that refer- 
ence to them is made here. The Farmers' Club of Toulon township, 
was organized in February, 1873. Signing the Constitution was next 
accomplished when twenty members \vere enrolled, as follows : N. 
W. Dewey, James Fraser, Eugene B. Lyon, Richard Tapp. B. G. ILill, 
David Guyre, Charles, Hartley, Benj. Turner, Robert McKeighan, T. 
H. Maxfield, Benj. Packer, Jr., William Hughes, John Black, Don C. 
Lj^on, George W. Dewey, Eli Benham, Fred R. Greenwood, Oliver 
Thomas, John T. Gardner, D. Lowman. The committee on perma- 
nent oi'ganizatioU reported the following, which, on motion, was ac- 
cepted and adopted in full : President, D. Lowman ; vice presidents, 
Geo. W. Dewey, Benj. Turner; secretary, B. G. Hall; treasurer, Benj. 
Packer. The Stark County Farmers' Association may be said to date 
back to Jul}', 1873. The introduction of politics in September of that 
year, which action was entirely op})osed to the rules of the grange, 
may be said to have destroyed this powerful organization. 

In subsequent pages devoted to family and pioneer history, a 
sic etch of almost every one prominently connected \vith this township 
or any of its towns, is given. 

TOWN OF TOULON. 

Toulon is the center of new associations. It borrows no propelling 
power from venerated antiquarian ism, since the spot where it stands 
was but yesterday wa^apt in solitary grandeur. Some western settle- 
ments are filled up with bankrupts who have fled from eastern credi 
tors, anxious only to ol)tain peace of mind and bread enough to eat; 
they are decayed and tem})est-tossed vessels, stripped of sjjars and rig- 
ging, but Toulon, however, always claimed large exemption from these. 
Its first settlers were iron-souled and true-hearted men. They came 
determined to plow their way through the wilderness and nuike unto 
themselves pleasant homes — and they succeeded. They had a mis- 



260 HISTORY OP STARK COtJNTY. 

sion. and tbev iioLlv perforaied it. Thev did their work roiio-hlv. vet 
tliey did it for all time. There is a sort of romance in their historv 
that fascinates : there is a kind of rnstic simplicity connected witli 
them that is trnlv poetic. Behind them were the homes they had left. 
the waterfalls that danced to their childish mnsic. and the hills that 
echoed back their playfnl shonts. Before them was the wilderness, 
dark and oloomv, standino- in all its solemnity. Look from the little 
village of the past to the city of the present and see what a contrast it 
presents. It is set off with substantial dwellings, cultivated gardens 
and shaded streets. True to the progressive spirit of the age. its peo- 
ple have devoted themselves to the decoration of their homes. There 
are dry goods and millinery stores, grocery stores, clothing stores, 
hotels, drug stores, physicians, lawyers, hardware and tinning estab- 
lishments, a woolen factory, carriage factory, printing houses, harness 
makers, wagon shops, lumber merchants, cabinet-makers, stonemasons 
and painters. There is a l)ank, school houses and five churches, a 
number of benevolent and literary societies, and not one saloon. Only 
a little over half a century ago the Indians of AValnut Grove, driven 
out by the patentees of their land, sought refuge in the groves round 
the present town and along Indian Creek in its vicinity. The name 
is taken from Toulon in Tennessee, which was suggested by Col. Hen- 
derson, and adopted. The population in 1880 was 967, but now esti- 
mated at about 1,100. 

Prior, however, to this present name being applied, it was known 
to the pioneers as "Miller's Point." Harmon and Conrad Leek, who 
came to Indian creek in 1832 and who sold their lands south of Toulon 
to Col. Henderson in 1836, were undoubtedly the first white settlers in 
the neighborhood. Samuel Merrill came some time after Harmon 
Leek moved to Hennepin, and settled close by. In 1834 Minott Silli- 
man moved to the neighborhood and resided here until 1836, when he 
opened the "Culbertson farm," just north. In the cabin which Miner 
erected there in 1833, be and Ephraim Barnett kept house in -July, 
1^36. when the Henderson family moved on the Leek claim, a short 
distance south. In 1832. Harris TT. Miner erected a cabin not far 
from the Toulon depot; and it is further claimed for him and this sec- 
tion that here the beginnings of cultivation of lands in this township 
were made, although Minott Silliman. who came in 1843, does not 
state positively that any evidences of such improvement were observed 
by him. John Miller and Charlotte, his wife, of whom mention is 
made in the organic and other chapters, the original owners of Toulon, 
were the tirst permanent residents, and the onh' ones when the county 
was organized. In October. 1841. Benjamin Turner, his wife and her 
parents, the McAVilliams'. moved into the countv seat and erected the 

J. V 

fii'st Iniilding to which the name " house " could be appropriately ap- 
plied. Minott Silliman. the original owner of the land, built a cabin 
here as early as March 25, 1835, which, together with the land he sold 
to John Miller, who occupied both at the time the town was located, 
and deeded to the countv the orioinal site on the condition it should be 
made the '' shire town " or countv seat. At this time the location was 
caUed - Millers Point." 



TOULON TOWNSHIP. 261 

Toulon was surveyed by Carson Berfield in August, 1841, on a part 
of the southwest one-quarter of Section 19, Township 13, Range 6. 
The streets named thereon are Miller, Franklin, Washington and Hen- 
derson running one way, and Vine, Main and Jefferson tiie other, with 
twentv-feet alleys between the first named streets, titled Plum, Cherry 
and Grape alle\^s. The plat was acknowledged by Jonathan Hodg- 
son and Wm. Ogle, commissioners, before John Miller, Probate Justice 
of the Peace, and recorded by Benjamin Turner, deputy Recorder. At 
til is time the evidences of the cornfields of the Indians were very 
])lain, their fields ha^^ng extended along the plateau where is now the 
residence of Samuel Purge, south to the Rhodes farm and north to the 
C'ldbertson farm. Even in 1847 ou the Shallenberger homestead evi- 
dences of corn-fields and Indian burial-grounds still existed. 

The sale of lots in the original town of Toulon, took place Septem- 
ber 14 aud 15, 1841. To point out definitely the first owners of the 
lots then sold tlie foUowiug list of the 122 purchases is given. The 
highest price paid was $8(> for lot 10, block (y, the lowest price, $5 for 
lot 2, block 9, and ^5 for lot 1, block 1. The plirchasers are named as 
follows : Harris Miner, lots 9 and 10 ; E. Greenfield, lot 8 ; Calvin 
Powell, lot 5 ; O. AVhitaker, lots 4 and 1 ; John ^Y. Henderson, lots 2 and 
38«;, block 16 ; Wm. Cue. lots 1, 4, 5, 8 and 9 ; Wm. liowen, lot 2. Austin 
Grant, lots 3, 6 and 7 block 15 ; Z. Cooley, lot 1 ; Orrin ]\[axfield, lot 2 ; 
L. S. Dorrance, lot 5 ; W. Bo wen, lot 8 ; Jonathan Hodgson, lot 9 ; R. F. 
Washburn, lot 3, block 14; Jonathan Hodgson, lot 1 ; John W. Hender- 
son, lot 2 ; John Prior, lot 3 ; Harris Miner, lot 9. block 13 ; Wm. Cue, 
lot 10; Philip Miller, lot 9 ; Abel Mott, lot 8 ; J. II. Stipp, lot 5; Eugenius 
Frum, lot 4; Benjamin Turner, lot 1; John McWilliams, lots 2 and 3; Cyril 
Ward, lots 6 and 7, block 12. John Miller, lot 1 ; Henry Breese, lot 
4 ; Alex. Bothwell, lot 5 ; John Smith, jr., lot 8 ; J. K. McClenahan, 
lot 9 ; Robert McClenahan, lot 7; S. iJwire, lot 6; Smith Fry, lots 3 
and 2, block 10. John Miller, lot 2 ; Dr. Kinkaid, lots 3, 6, T ; Thomas 
Colwell, lot 10 ; G. B. Gillett, lot 9 ; jS^elson Grant, lot 8 ; David Essex, 
lots 5, 4 and 1, block 9. Ts. Chamberlain, lot 10; D. Winter, lot 9 ; 
John McWilliams, lot 5 ; Edlej^ Bi'own, lots 4 and 1 ; S. Shaw, lots 4 
and 6 ; Calvin Eastman, lot 2 , I. D. Lane, lot 8, block 8. Martin 
Mason, lot K • ; J. A. Parker, lot 9 ; Harris Miner, lots 5 and 8 ; Jon- 
athan Hodgson, lots 6 and 3 ; B. M. Jackson, lots 1 and 7 ; Jarvill W. 
Chaffee, lot 2, block 7. Stephen Trickle, lots 10, 7, 6 and 3 ; T. F. 
Ilurd, let 9 ; J. Hodgson, lot 2 ; Harris Miner, lots 1 and 4 ; AV, Car- 
ter, lot 5 : D. Winters, lot 8, block 6. Eugenius Frum, lot 9 ; Adam 
Perry, lots 10 ^and 7; H. Brees, lot 3; M. Silliman, lot 2; I. Ward, lot 
1 ; li. Winters, lot 4 ; T. J. Henderson, lot 5 ; II. Miner, lot 8, block 5. 
John Prior, lot 2 ; Walter Richmond, lot 8 ; Ira Ward, Jr., lot 9 ; 
block 4. J. K. Lane, lot 10 ; Robert Mitchell, lots 3, 2. and 9 ; Harris 
Miner, lots 4 and 5; Pliilii) Miller, lot 8; block 3. Harris jVIiner, lot 
4, 5, 10 and 7; J^ero AV. Monnts, lot 1; J. Hodgson, lot 8, Virgil 
Pike, lot 6; W. Stowe, lot 3; James Johnson, lot 2; block 2. Elijah 
Greenfield, lot 7; Calvin Powell, lot <>; H. Miner, lot 2; Calvin East- 
man, lot 10 ; Cyril Ward, h^ts 9, S, 5. 4 and 1 ; l)lock 1. 

The sale of lots under special authority, legislative eiuictnient. 



262 HISTOKY OF STARK COUNTY. 

which took place April 2, 18-i9, resulted as folio \ys :. Calvin L. Eastman, 
lots 2 and T ; block 1. Geo. W. Fuller, lot 9 : block 2. John W. Hen- 
derson, lot ; David P. Winter, lot 6 ; Elijah ]yrcClenahau, Jr., lot T : 
block 3. Jolm W. Henderson, lots 1, 3 and 5 ; Andrew Dray, lots 7 
and 10, block 4. Simon S. Heller, lot 1, block 5. Bushrod Ta])]). lot 
1 and 3 ; block 8. Isaac C. Eeed, lot 10, block 12. John A. Williams, 
lot 4 ; Daniel D. DriscoU, lot 5 ; Geo. A. Worley. lot 1 ; T. J. Hender- 
son, lots land 10 ; block 13. John W. Henderson, lot 4 ; John Emerv. 
lots 1 and 7 ; Thomas Hall, lot 10; block 14. Jacob Holgate, lots 1 
and 4 : Minott SiUiman, lots 5, 8 and 9 ; Thomas Hill, lot 10 ; block 
15. The prices ranged from $6.50 for lot 6, block 8 ; to $60 for lot 6, 
block 5. Mrs. Shallenberger, referring to the first sale sa3"s : "'The old 
home of Mr. Turner, north of Dr. Cham])erlain's drug store, and west 
of the square, was originally purchased for $45.00, while lot 1, in block 
14, (the site of the First Baptist Church) considered to be very choice, 
was bought by a Knox county man, Z. Cooley, for $70.75. Mr. Theo- 
dore F. Ilurd, has the honor of investino- the largest sum in anv one 
lot at the first sales, he having paid $75, for lot 6, in block 9.'' 

Henderson & Whitaker's addition to Toulon was surveyed by Wm. 
H. Greenwood and Svlvester F. Otman, in August 1856. This tract ex- 
tended South from tlie alley Xorth of Clinton street to the Xorth line 
of Thomas street, and from the East line of the original town to the 
line of Union street, of course exclusive of the proposed W. A. L. H. 
R. and depot grounds. 

Culbertson's Eastern addition to Toulon, extending East from Union 
street, was sui'veyed by S. F. Otman in December, 1885, and ac- 
kowledged by Jolm Culbertson. 

The Toulon Cemetery Extension, surveyed by H. H. Oliver, for 
Oliver Whitaker, A]n'\l 20, 1885 ; the survey beginning at the north- 
eastern corner of original cemetery. 

The estabhshment of the countv seat under a village government 
dates back to October, 1857. when, of the thirtv-six voters within the 
original town, and Henderson, Wliitaker & Culbertson's additions 
thirty-two voted in favor of local government. The trustees tlien 
elected wereE. L. Emer\', president ; Oliver Wlntaker, Miles A. Fuller, 
William Lowman, and Isaac C. Reed, trustees. Of all work done 
under this organization, the newspaper contains little, while no official 
record can be found. The ]3eople appealed to the legislature for relief 
in the form of regulating the form of government, and in response was 
passed the charter of February 11, 1859, defining powers and duties 
of the trustees of Toulon. During the eight, succeeding years under 
the new organization, trustees met at intervals, approved a few ordi- 
nances for side-walks and government; but not until the winter of 
1867-8 did thev venture to agree to any proposition entailing much 
expense to, or providing for much comfort for the citizens. During 
that winter they authorized the building of 300 per cent more side- 
walks than all their predecessors did combined. On April 6, 1868, the 
tirst temperance village board of Toulon was elected, and it does not 
seem at all strange, that since 1868. the records, good, bad or indif- 
fent, are in existence. This, at least, temperance has affected. The fact 



TOULON TOWNSHIP. 263 

of tlie old I'ecords being missing is its own commentaiy on the old oflfi- 
cials, many of whom, however, were as substantial and sober as any 
who ever succeeded them. 

In the fall of 18C>5 tlie old improvement era of Toulon returned. 

A. J. Wright, C. M. Johnson, C. Thorp, Alf. Geirhart, Carson Berfield, 
George Green, Captain Armstrong, Wells White and others improved 
their homes or built new ones, and following up their example the 
council considered measures for improvement of the streets, but did 
not approve of them until three years after. 

The question of subscribing $10,000 to aid the Peoria and Rock 
Island Railroad was submitted to the citizens of the ''Town of Toulon," 
June -i, 1868, when 108 voted for and 10 against. Gill, Nixon and II. 

B. Johnson were judges, and J. M Brown and I). Tinlin clerks. 

The trustees of the village, elected in 1868, and four succeeding 
years, are named as follows : 

C. M. S. Lyon, Davis Lowman, A. P. Gill, David Tinlin, H. Y. Godfrey, 1868. 

Hny:li Y. Godfrey, Andrew Galbraith, James Gillan, C. W. Patterson, R. J. Dicken- 
son, 1869, 

C. M. S. Lyon, Patrick Nowlan, Branson Lowman, James Gillan, C. W. Patterson, 
1870, 

Josepli D. Rhodes, Patrick Nowlan, Denis Mawbey, Daniel Gin.E;rich, Stephen Lloyd, 
1871. 

James Nolan, Benjamin C. Follett, John Morrison, Denis Mawbe\', A. Galbraitli, 
1873. 

In 1868, A. P. Gill was treasurer and David Tinlin clerk; Gill con- 
tinued in 1869, witii R. J. Dickinson clerk. Patrick Nowlan served 
as treasurer and clerk from April, 1870, until 1872, when he was suc- 
ceeded in the dual office by Benjamin C. Follett. In 1870, Daniel Mc- 
Cance was appointed police magistrate; succeeded in 1872 by Seth 
Johnson. In the latter )'ear Martin Shallenljerger was appointed city 
attorney. 

A petition was presented to the trustees of the town of Toulon, 
July 21, 1873, asking that tiie (piestion of village organization be 
placed before the people. The signers were : James M. Lownum, 
T. M. Shallenberger, Edwin Butler, Elmer Bates, W. O. Johnson, 
Fraidv Marsh, M. Shallenberger, W. S. Merriman, Seth Johnson, Elias 
Lyon, Davad Hewitt. D. S. Hewitt, James Culbertson, G. W. Nicholas, 

C. I). Ward, Alex. Ileadley, E. A. Burge, II. B. Jolmson, B. Pierson, 
J. W. Morrison, S. J. Connelly, George Nowlan, Henry Jones, James 
Kerns, P. M. Blair, John Devers, Samuel Grimsliaw, J. W. Plummer, 
H. Geisenheyner, James H. Miller, D. J. Walker, C. E. Harrington, 
George Graen, Baton Lyon and C. J. Robins. An election was oi-dered 
for August 26, 1873, winch resulted : ."iS for and 30 against. The Town 
Board then declared the village to be oro'anized as the '' Villao-e of 
Toulon." ^ n 

The trustees of the village, 1873-86, are named as follows : 

Dennis Mawbey, Benjamin C. Follett, Warner Williams, H. Stauffer, James Now- 
lan, 1878. 

Patrick Nowlan, Samuel Burge, W. S. Merriman, 1). J. Walker, C. E. Stone, S. M. 
Adams, 1874. 

Patrick Nowlan, James Nowlan, Warner Williams, W. Ileadley, J. D. Rhodes, C. 
E. Stone, 1875. 



264 HISTORY OF STAKK COUNTY. 

Joseph D. Rhodes, D. J. Walkei", H. Stauffer, W. Williams. W. Headley, James 
Nowlau, 1876. 

J. M. Browu, C. M. S. Lvon, O. Brace, Patrick Nowlan, Cora U. Pierce, Y. B. 
Thornton, 1877. 

Patrick Nowlan, D. J Walker, C E. Stone, B. F. Thompson, Anton Sandquist, 
D. S. Hewitt. 1878. 

J. M. Brown, J. D. Rhodes, D. J. Walker, E. B. Bass, A. P. Miller, Samuel J. 
Connelly, 1879. 

W. S. Merriman, W. Williams, S. J. Connelly, J. M. Brown, H. Shivvers, K. Mat- 
thews, 1880. 

W. E. Merriman, T. Bacmeister, S. J. Connelly, J. M. Flint, D. :\Iurchison, K. 
Matthews, 1881. 

T. Bacmeister, Samuel Burge, H. M. Hall, S. J. Connelly, 1882. 

Samuel Burge, T. Bacmeister, J. M. Brown, J. B. Coolej^ 1883. 

Samuel Burge, James P. Headley, Frank W. Lyon, 1884. 

J. M. Browii, T. Bacmeister. J. B. Cooley, J. 31. Lowraan, 1885. 

Sanuiel Burge, J. M. Lowman, J. P. Headley, 1886. 

The first named in each line served as president of the council, 
but 1). S. Hewitt \vas acting president at many meetings in 1878. 

The treasurers since 18T3 are thus named: B. C. Follett, 1873; 
James IT. Miller, 1874: George Xowlan, 1875-76; C. E. Stone, 1877; 
J. M. Brown, 1878; E. Mosher, 1870-80; H. G. Mosher, 1881-86. 

The clerks of the village are named as follows: B. C. Follett, 1873; 
11. M. Hall, 1874-75; J. M. Lowman, 1876-81; G. C. Tan Osdell, 
1882-83 ; George Kowlan, 1884-86. 

The ])olice magistrates Avere: 1875. Thomas M. Shallenberger ; 1876, 
Frank W. Fuller: 1877. Elisha Mosher. who died in March. 1881 ; 1882, 
H. W. Xewland, and 1886, Charles A. Stauffer. 

The attornevs elected are named as follows; 1874, Miles A. Fuller; 
1876, Martin Shallenberger; 1879, Miles A. Fidler; 1880, B. F. Thomp- 
son; 1883, James H. Miller; 1886, M. A. Fuller. 

In 1883, Gustave A. Lind was appointed fire superintendent, Edwin 
Butler engineer and surveyor, and James H. Miller superintendent of 
cemeterv. 

Benjamin Turnei* was ap])ointed ])ostmaster at Toulon in 1841 ; 
continued in 1845 under the Polk administration ; continued in 1849 
under Zacliary Taylor's commission ; in 1850, under Fillmore's admin- 
istration, and under that of Franklin Pierce, 1853-57; under Bu- 
chanan, until succeeded by Oliver "Whitaker, and lastly, under Andrew 
Johnson. The name of Mr. Catterlin, of Catterlin tk: Pierce, appears 
as postmaster in 1850-52, succeeding John Smith. On February 10, 
1863, Oliver AVhitaker was appointed postmaster, and held the office 
until October, 186^), when he was succeeded by Benjamin Turner. In 
1869, Oliver AVhite. now of Peoi'ia, was appointed, vice Benjamin 
Turner. 

In January, 1882, the office was raised to a second class, with 
salary of $l,00o. In July, 1883, G. A. Thomas resigned as post- 
mastei-. wlien Frank AV. Lyons was appointed. The rank of the office 
was rechiced, aiul up to July 1, 1886, was ranked at fourtli rate, but 
was raised to a presidential office that day. On April 9, 1885, J. 
Knox Hall was commissioned postmaster. On April 26, 1883, a tele- 
])hone was placed in the office, connecting Toulon with Wyoming and 
other towns. 



TOULON TOWNSHIP. 265 

It is stated that during Taylor's administration, one John Smith, 
of the firm of Smith & Dunn, was appointed postmaster. The new 
officer did not appear to suit all people, so that, through the influence 
of Benjamin Turner, Martin Shallenberger and Abram Lincoln, Joseph 
Catterlin was appointed in his place. This Catterlin is said to have 
been a centennarian when he died at Kewanee. 

The old building on the west side of the square, which sheltered 
the Sentinel office from the south wind, with the lot on which it stood, 
was purchased in June, 1886, from the Geisenheyner estate, by Hop- 
kins Shivvers for $150. The editor of the Sentinel gives the following 
history of it: "The frame Avas built in the year of 1843 by Eugenius 
Frum, at a point about four miles southeast of here, on the Solomon 
Wilkinson farm, called Moulton, the contemplated county-seat, but 
Toulon, being an aspirant, gained the point, when the frame was 
moved on its present site, and shortly afterward was bought and 
finished up by Benjamin Turner, and stocked up with goods by Mr. 
Culbertson, who, for three months, carried on the mercantile business, 
when Mr. Turner sold it to Samuel Beatty, who brought on a stock of 
goods and continued the business until ahout 1849, wdien Catterlin & 
Pierce became proprietors, and built an addition on the west side, 
where they lived. They also engaged in merchandising, and about 
1850 Father Catterlin was appointed postmaster, and for about two 
years the postoffice was here. A few 3^ears later, it was purchased by 
Herman Geisenhejmer, who converted it into a tin shop and hardware 
store, and occupied it for a number of years, when it was abandoned 
for more commodious quarters. For some time Hiram "Willett occu- 
pied it for a hardware store, after which it was used for a store-room, 
but for the last ten years it has been without an occupant, and counted 
an 'eye-sore' to the place, and gradually going down, but the hard 
wood of which it was constructed yielded slowly to the elements tend- 
ing to ruin and decay. During the campaign of 1884, an attempt was 
made to utilize it for a bonfire, when the west end was torn down and 
the proceedings stopped. On July 2, 1886, the underpinning was 
knocked out and a slight push brought it crashing to the ground. Mr. 
Shivvers says the first class-meeting he attended in this country was 
in this building." In November, 1886, the council considered the 
question of purchasing this and adjoining lots for a park; but the 
question was negatived, and at once the old cheese factory was moved 
thereon for Veterinary -surgeon Edwards, to be used as a horse in- 
firmary. 

In 1857, Dewey & N"owlan, Stone & Shook, and John Culbertson 
were the principal dealers. The hitter's store stood where the Method- 
ist parsonage now is. Herman Geisenheyner's hardware was in the 
old house just torn down, while Miss C. Donavan carried on the mill- 
inery business. In 1858, this lady moved her stock to the east side of 
the square. W. M. Miner was county agent for Gibb's patent sewing- 
machine. Smith & Dunn were old-time dry goods merchants, carrying 
on trade in the house now occupied as a millinery by the Misses Wol- 
gamood, which in early years stood where Starrett Bros, dry goods 
house now is. 
16 



2ti6 



HISTORY OF STARK COU^"^Y. 



AYliile referring to the old traders of Toulon, it is well to give the 
following abstract of Herman Geisenheyners day-book for part of 
January, 1856. The orthography is Geisenheyner's own : 



Jan. 1. H. Rotlis, paid hy cash $10 

" Boath of Emery, groceries. 1 65 

" " By cash to-day! 44 15 

" 2. Wm. Adkins, mending coal 

hod , . . 15 

" " ]\I. Xolou, mending 1 sifter. 50 
" Boath of Howard, 25 bushels 

coal 

" " Emrv paid hv cash 5 00 

" " Briukerhoff , "l coal hod and 

tea-pot 1 5C 

" Baptist church, 1 coal hod. 1 50 

" " By cash todaj^ 5 15 

8 Couwerthwete, balance on a 

coal cookiusi" stove 20 00 

" " Arnold, paid bv cash 29 33 

" " Paid by cash to Loven Wood, 12 00 
" 4 David LoAvman, mending a 

milk strainer 15 

" Send by mail to Vincent 

Howard & Co., Chicago. 100 00 
" " Bv cash to Thomas White. . 50 00 
" " By cash today 6 20 



Jan. 5 John Beerfeeld, balance to a 

coal cooking stove 10 00 

" District school house, 1 large 

coal stove, "Salamander" 16 00 
" " Theodor Trimmer, paid by 

cash 5 00 

" " W. Lowman, paid bv cash.. 15 60 
" " Theodor Trimmer,l coal hod 1 00 
" " Boath of Emery, tea and 

candles 60 

" " I. Pix, paid in cash 7 00 

" " Dacorate pen man, 1 coal 

stove 7 50 

" " Dr. Hall, 'stove-pipe 3 50 

" " By cash today 40 10 

" 7. Bv cash, from the Baptist 

■church 46 00 

" Dr. Chamberliu, mending.. 18 
" " J. G. HeA\itt, join pipe and 

elbow and household. ... 4 67 
" 0. Collins paid by settlement. 4 90 
'• 11. Fifty bushel of coal from 

Howard 



Aniono; his other customers durinij: this month were George Jame- 
son. William Sweet, Samuel Thomas, Lasher or Larker, the coal miner 
at Wyoming. S. Shaw, Jose[)li Eeidd, — . Annis, — . Biers, Elias Eoof. 
Jackson Lorenz. Oliver Whitaker, Martin Shallenberger. — . Shurz, 
John Culbertson. and Starrett. The old store-keeper is said to have 
known exactly what his own entries meant, even if others could not 
understand them. 

The John Miller cabin stood close by. or on the spot where Legg 
built his residence, now the home of Dr. Bacmeister. This cabin was 
moved near the present office of the Neivs, where Xorman Butler had 
his blacksmith shop, was occupied by Charles Johnson in 1847, and 
subserpiently converted into a coal house by Xorman Butler. 

The first hotel was conducted by Benjamin Turner in a house moved 
to the northwest corner of the square, the same in Avhich Augur, 
Shurtz, Bradlev and others, used as a store in later vears. Mr. Tur- 
ner kept a dry goods store in the front part of his hotel. 

Alexander Abel kept a tavern on the site of the A^irginia House. 
It was one of the real-old- time taverns. Here also Charles White kept 
a grocery, the same who for some vears carried on that business in a 
house which stood where P. M. Blair's residence now is. 

B. A. Hall, conducted a tavern and hotel in the brick house on 
Main street, now the residence of James Xowlan. William Rose also 
carried on the same business here. The house was built by John 
Ivarr, now of Missouri. 

The \'irL)-inia house was established bv the 



late Mr. Cool 



ooiev 



m 



1849, on the site of Abel's Tavern. Many additions were made to this 



TOULON TOWNSHIP. 267 

house, and up to 1S73, it was the leading- hotel of the county, and is 
still a well conducted house. 

The Follett House was erected in 1873, by Mr. Stockner, and was 
known as the Stockner House until 1882. when the property was pur- 
chased by B. C. Follett, the house remodeled, and tlie name of the 
new owner conferred on it. For some 3^ears a large saloon business 
was carried on in the basement of this house, l)ut on the new proprie- 
tor taking possession, this department was closed up and converted 
into a store-room. The house enjoys a large trade, both on account of 
its position and the popularity of the ju'oprietor. 

As early as 1832, milling facilities, though of a very primitive char- 
acter, were brought within easy distance of the few settlers then in the 
county. Nme years later the second dwelling was established on the 
site of Toulon, so that thei'e did not exist a demand for a manufactur- 
ino- concern here then, nor indeed for some years later. In 1849, Jeff- 
rev Cooley opened the first modern hotel, doing away at once with the 
old-time tavern. (In 1859 the name " Virginia House," was conferred 
on this hotel.) Stores were then carried on here, one or two being 
pioneer concerns ; the blacksmith and wagon shop was also here. In 
Januar}^ 18.56, an extensive wagon factory was started by H. White 
& Co. In December, 1863, John Culbertson completed his steam mill 
under the supervision of Elder Wright. The Rice carding mill was 
put up in the summer of 1865. 

Dewe}' & Lowman, merchants and bankers added a story to their 
buildinof in the fall of 1865. C. E. Harrington erected a two-storv 
store, P. c'c J. Nowlan erected a large business house on the site of 
their old store, and C. J. Robins built a cottage, east of the depot 
ground. Seth Rockwell, and T. Thornton also built this year. 

A meeting to consider ways and means for establishing a woolen 
factory at Toulon was held February 10, 1866. James Woods pre- 
sided, with Wm. jS^owlan, secretary. Andrew Oliver, J. H. Quinn 
and I. L. JSTewman reported favorably on promises of subscriptions. 

On August 3, 1867, a well written notice of the enterprise of Cul- 
bertson, Scofield ct Baldwin appeared in the Stark county Democrat. 
At that time their new woolen mills were in operation. 

A cheese manufacturing company was organized December 22, 
1874, with a capital of $5,000. The manufacture of cheese was com- 
menced May 10, 1875, and closed for the winter, October 23 of the 
same year. During this first season there were 420,616 pounds of 
milk purchased, from which 41,800 pounds of cheese were manufac- 
tured, at a cost of $4,850.74 for milk and labor. The cost of buildings 
and machinery was $3,500. 

On January 15, 1885, this old cheese factor}^ at Toulon was opened 
as a skating rink by Knocke Bros. In November, 1886, it was moved 
to the west side of the public square. 

The beginning of the banking business of Toulon may be credited 
to flohn Culbertson, who, in connection with his extensive business, 
carried on a real estate and loan office in such a manner as to extend 
to his neighbors and customers many facilities. Samuel M. Dewey, 
also one of the leading merchants, was equally accommotlating, so 



o 



2fiS HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY. 

that prior to the estabhshraent of a regular system of banking, money 
could be purchased at the ruling rate of interest. The bank of Toulon 
or Small 6z Walley's bank. Avas established in 1860. Benjamin Lom- 
bard was the actual oAvner. Georgia and Carolina bonds formed the 
security for their issue of bills so that in closino- here only the holders 
of such bills lost to the extent of 2.5 per cent. In the spring of 1865 
Messrs. Dewej'^ (fe Lowman offered United States notes of the $230,- 
000,000 7-30 loan for sale. In December, 1865, Messrs. Dewey & 
LoAvman established a banking house. Mr. Dewey died in the fall of 
1866, and the banking and mercantile departments were carried on 
under the title of Burge & Dewev until 18j9. when Samuel Burore 
purchased the interests of the Dewey estate, and in the spring of 1870 
gave his attention exclusively to l>anking. In 1879 Charles P. Dewey 
was admitted into partnership, the firm title now being " Burge & 
Dewey." For some years D. J. Walker held the position of cashier, 
George Xowlan succeeding him. For over twenty-one years this 
house has held its position among the most solid banking houses in the 
State. 

The opening of the R. I. & P. P. P. was celebrated in a peculiarly 
happy manner by Charles Myers, who shipped the firet load of grain 
from Toulon. April 1. 1871, to John A. Maxfield. He erected a large 
elevator in 1872, and later erected the residence now owned by P. P. 
Johnson, had his office under a cotton wood tree, which stood near the 
depot, and carried his books in his vest jxjcket. A second grain ware- 
house has been added and the modern methods and extensive business 
of Levi Silliman have taken their place. Patrick Xowlan was super- 
ceded as station agent Ijy King Matthews of Rock Island in Septem- 
ber, 1878. King Matthews commenced railroading on a P. I. <fe. St. 
L. construction train in 1870, served as freight conductor there, and m 
1878 was appointed agent at Toulon, where he served until July. 1882, 
when he moved to Fulton county, 111. On May 1, 1881, Station Agent 
Rockwell resigned his position and was succeeded by Presley Greena- 
walt. Mr. Stickney, the present agent, is a son of Elder Stickney, an 
old settler of the county. The office ranks among the first on the 
road, and is among the first in the matter of its administration. 

The leading business houses of Toulon comprise the banking house 
of Burge & Dewey, Charles M. Swank, George S. Lawrence, Charles 
Price, Starrett Bros., L. Watson A: Son, Christy 6z Rist. ^V. S. Merri- 
man, Pierce Bros., Davis tfe Fell, merchants ; Levi Silliman, grain and 
lumber merchant ; L. & R. Wolgamood, Mi's. Sweeden, and A. X. 
Prout. millinei's ; Carl Lehman, G. S. Lawrence, H. Stanley. W. White 
ct Co.. carriage and wagon factories ; Carlin <\: Sickles, cigar manufac- 
turers ; J. Edwards, veterinary surgeon : Stephen Deaver, woolen 
mills; Xorman E. Pomeroy, Joseph Walt her, A. Sundquist. furniture 
dealers ; J. Walther, cabinet maker ; John D Pierson, James Price, 
Robert Price, harness makers ; S. J. Connelly, W. A. Xewton. 
meat market; James P. Headley. l)rick manufacturer; D. S. Hewitt, 
jeweler; P. P. Johnson, nurseryman; George Martin, fruit grower 
and ice dealer : William Mason, sorghum manufacturer and 
apiarist ; C. W. Teeter and W. C. Wall, druggists ; A. F. Stickney, 



TOULOM TOWNSHIP. 2H9 

railroad, telegraph and express agent ; William Verfuss, bakery and 
restaurant ; Edwin Butler and Gus Hulsizer, newspaper and job 
offices ; Oliver Whitaker, insurance and pension agent ; G. C. Van 
Osdell, photographer, news agent, and justice of the peace ; B. C. 
Follett, ])roprietor of Follett House ; Cooley & Sexsmith, Virginia 
House ; William S. Templeton, house-mover ; Frank Hook and Bruce 
& Sellon, livery ; W. W. Williams & Son, Eobins, Colburn & Son, and 
D. Beers, carpenters ; Peter Custer, Richard Hoadley, C. Bradley, Carl 
Lehman, AV. AVhite, blacksmiths. 

3Iethodist Church.— The beginnings of the church are referred to 
in the history of Wyoming. In 1841 a class was formed just south of 
Toulon, with Caleb B. Flint, leader. In 1842, John Prior's log cabin 
was the headquarters. Four years later a class was formed at Toulon 
and a quarterly meeting held at Samuel Beatty's house, with A. E. 
Phelps, presidpig ; John G. Whitcomb, P. C; George C. Holmes, 
Ct. P.; W. C. Cummings, assistant; John Cummings, Jonathan 
Hodgson, P. J. Anshutz, C. Bostwick and Jonas J. Iledstrom, L. P.; 
David Essex, Wesley Blake and A. Oziah, exhorters ; Isaac Thomas, 
William Hall, Samuel Halstead, J. Hazen, I. Berry, W. M. Pratt, J. 
H. Wilbur, and C. Yocum, leaders and stewards. This class won many 
additions during the following five years, from 1851-52 we find it 
mentioned as Joseph Catterlin's class, with place of meeting at Samuel 
Beattj^'s house. Among the members were the leader and his wife, 
Caleb B. Flint, Joseph Essex, Andrew Sw^arts, Charles M. Johnson, 
Samuel Beatty, John II. Smith, Joseph P. Piddle, J. C. Cowperthwaite, 
and their wives. Others belonging at that time were : Ruth White, 
Mary Shull, Martha Pierce, Rachel and Eliza Catterlin, Rebecca 
Ring, Eliza, Eveline and Sarali Armstrong, Sarah A. Shockley, Jane 
Flint, Jane Whitaker, Susan Jones, Mar}^ J. and Lydia Lazenby, Rachel 
Cox, Peter Wilson, Morrow P. Armstrong, Davis Lowman, Ignatius 
Beaver and Joseph L. Flint. Hopkins Shivvers was subsequently a 
member of this class, joining in 1853. 

The subject of church building was discussed June 2, 1853, Rev. C. 
Lazenbee, presiding, with S. Beatty, secretary. Joseph Catterlin, 
Joseph H. Riddle, Charles N. Johnson, Bushrod Tapp and Samuel 
Beatty were chosen trustees, and empowered to build a church, and 
later, W. F. Thomas and T. J. Wright were appointed a building com- 
mittee. Within a year a frame building was erected at a cost of ^2,000, 
which continued in use down to December 6, 1885, when the last ser- 
vices were held therein. The following record of pastors is taken from 
Mr. HulsizeFs history of 1885 : " Following Rev. Lazenbee was Rev. 
Murcli, then E. Ransom, in 185G, with A. J. Jones, assistant; A. Hep- 
perly, in 1858 ; J. Mathews, with C. AY. Pollard, assistant, in 1859 ; 
W. J. Smith, with D. S. Main, assistant, 1860-61 ; A. C. Price, 1862- 
63 ; D. M. Hill, 1864-65. During the last year of Rev. Hill's work, 
now about eleven years since the church was built, it was found 
necessary to repair it, and five hundred dollars w^ere expended in fix- 
ing it up. W. J. Beck was the pastor in 1866 ; B. C. Dennis, in 1867 ; 
G. W. Gue, in 1868-69-70 ; W. J. Beck, in 1871 ; A. Bower, in 1872- 
73; B. Kauffman, in 1874; W. Watson, in 1875-76. During the last 



270 HISTORY OF STlEK COUNTY. 

year's work of Rev. Watson, it \vas again thought to be needful that 
the church be repaired, and in accordance therewith, five hundred dol- 
lai*s were again expended in fixing it up. W. B. Caruthers was the 
pastor in 1877: I). T. Wilson. 1878-79; D. G. Stouffer, 1880-81-82; 
T. J. Wood, 1883 ; W. W. Carr, October 1. 1884 : moved to Cambridge. 
October 26, 1886. 

On 3Ir. Carr coming here he failed not to state that the old church 
was ver}^ much behind the times, and at once took steps toward build- 
ing a new one. In ]\Iay, 1885, lie reported a subscription of about 
$4,000 ready, when the board of trustees, consisting of H. Shivvers, 
W. B. Xelson, J. DeMuth, Dr. T. Bacmeister, Martin Rist, O. Brace, 
D. Tinlin, J. B. Cooley, and W. A. Xewton. were duly authorized to 
procure a lot on the corner of Main and Henderson streets, and proceed 
to erect thereon, of brick, a new Methodist Episcopal church, the entire 
cost not to exceed 85,500. A building committee, consisting of Rev. 
W. W. Carr, Dr. T. Bacmeister, D. Tinlin and O. Brace, was appointed, 
and the work entered into at once. About Juh^ 15, the contract was 
let to T. M. Mercer, of Astoria, and on Juh' 27, 1885, the first brick 
was placed. The corner-stone was placed August 6, 1885, which, how- 
ever, was removed in September, to give place to a more substantial 
one. On the first occasion a subscription was taken up for the pur- 
chase of a bell. Mi's. Jennie E. Stouffer contributed seven verses to 
aid this cause, one of which reads : 

I'm a fine church bell with a silvery tongue, 
And high in the belfry I want to be hung, 

Of the new M. E. church in Toulon. 
I'm here at the foundry awaiting your call, 
Will come in a hurry and hope to suit all 

The good people who live in Toulon. 

The bell was first tolled here, October 29, 1885, and before the 
close of the vear the last services were held in the old house of 1853. 

The secretaries of conference since 1867, are named as follows : 
Davis Lowman, 1867; G. L. Smith, 1868; Davis Lowman, 1868-7U; J. 
G. Armstrong. 1870; Davis Lowman. 1871 : B. G. Hall, 1872 ; D. Low- 
man, 1873 ; B. G. Hall, 1877 ; J. C. Cowperthwaite, 1878 ; B. G. Hall, 
1879; D. S. Wilson, 1880; D. R. Tinlin, 1880, and GusHulsizer, 1881- 
86. In 1867 Toulon charge embraced Starwano and Rising Sun. 

Conqregationa.l Church. — The beginnings of this church enter very 
full}' into the personal history of Rev. S. G. Wright. He was born in 
Hanover, IST. J., in 1809, settled with his wife in Fulton county in 1832, 
where he eno-awd in ao-riculture for a time, and then attended Lane 
Seminary. In 1841, the Home Missionary Society commissioned him 
to labor in Stark coimty. and he took up his residence at Xiggers' Point, 
also known as the Webster Settlement, in West Jersey township. He 
preached at Lafayette, Wyoming. Osceola, Wall's School House, Moul- 
ton, at Hugh Rhodes' and Xicholson's houses, at Walnut Creek. Vic- 
toria, Henderson and Wethersfield. In January. 1842, he preached at 
Toulon, within the court house, just then completed, and with one ex- 
ception, held services every month thereafter for some time. The Mor- 
mons worked hard against him, calling him an ''abolitionist,"' and •• nig 



o 



TOULON TOWNSHIP. 271 

ger stealer." He outlived this opposition, and on November 29, 1846, 
he and Eev. L. H. Parker organized the first orthodox Congregational 
church of Toulon. He was identified with this society until December, 
1854. Writing from Brookville, Kan., December 7, 1882, to his friends 
at Toulon, he says: * * * * Thirtj^-three years ago this month, the 
writer went round Toulon with a subscription paper to collect funds 
for building the house in which you have so long worshipped. On Jan- 
uar}^ 14, 1850, he went to AVethersfield, to view the new clnirch there. 
On July 4 he went to Henr}^ count}" to learn could lumber be got there, 
and five days later he went thither with Joseph Perry to conclude the 
purchase of lumber. On the 18th he borrowed $700 from a Fulton 
county man, and a few days later, with James M. Flint, selected the 
lumber and held himself responsible for |130.65. During September 
he drummed u}) hands to quarry and haul rock, and also teams to haul 
lumber from Henry. He, with Joseph Perry, worked several days in 
the quarry, and in loading and teaming. In May, 1851, he procured 
glass, in June, a lightning rod, and in September, hauled sand for plas- 
tering. On September 21, 1851 (the Universalists occu]ned the court 
house), he extemporized seats and worshipped in the church for the first 
time. On February 8, the first sermon was preached in it. Jonathan 
Blanchard. I). D., dedicated the house A])ril 17, 1852. 

In the following summary of the well-kept records of tins church, 
few, if any, names connected with it, escape mention : On November 
29, 1846, a meeting of Congregationalists w^as held at Toulon, Rev. L. 
H. Parker and S. G. Wright attending. At this meeting a society was 
organized under the title " First Orthodox Congregational Church of 
Toulon,'' with the following named members : Jonathan and Hannah 
Rhodes, Hugh and Jidia lihodes, all by letter from the Presbyterian 
church at Lafayette ; Mrs. Fliza Rhodes, from the Wesle^'an church of 
Knox county ; Giles C. Dana, by letter from M. E. church, and Mary 
A. Dana, from the Main street church, Peoria ; Sophronia E. Rhodes 
and Franklin Rhodes. In March, 1847, there were admitted, Mrs. Ma- 
tilda Hall, Miss Eliza Jane Hall, Orrin and Sarah Rhodes, Robert and 
Sarah Nicholson, John and Mary Pollock, from the Presbyterian church 
at Lafayette, and Mrs. Jane Rradley, from the Presbyterian clmrch in 
Ireland!^ In May, 1847, Hugh Rhodes was delegate to the Central Asso- 
ciation, and Jonathan Rhodes was delegate in the fall of that year. In 
April. 1848, George and Ann Bradley, from the Presbyterian church in 
Ireland, were received, and Mrs. Eliza Jane Flint from the church at 
Knoxville. In June, 1818, Samuel G. and Minerva Wright, Edward P. 
Wright and Susan Durand were received from the Spoon River Presby- 
terian Church. At this time Hugh Rhodes, Joseph K. Newton and Giles 
C. Dana were elected deacons and S. G. Wright clerk. In July Mrs. C. 
M. S. Lyon (S. E. Rhodes) joined the Spoon River church. In*^1847 Mr. 
Wright was chosen pastor, Hugh Rhodes and Giles C. Dana deacons and 
Hugh Rhodes clerk. In July. 1849. Chas. Flint was added to the board 
of deacons, and the same month Hannah Rhodes died. The trustees 
elected in September were Norman Butler, Joseph Perry and James 
M. Flint. Eliza Jane Flint died October 12, 1851. On November 1 
W. W. and Ann Matilda Wi'ight were received from the church of 



272 HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY. 

Canton. About this time services were held in the Temperance hall 
(which was destroyed in the fire of 1877), after its removal to the pub- 
lic square. In March, 1852, the meeting house was completed. In 
May, Kehemiah Wyckoff, wife and son were received from the Spoon 
River church. In fact, at every meeting there were candidates for ad- 
mission from foreign and local churches. In 1852 William AVilberforce 
Wright was added to the board of deacons. In the fall of 1853 several 
persons were received, while one at least, retired on the principle that 
she was not a Pedo Baptist. In December Joseph Perr}^, JSTorman 
Butler and James M. Flint were elected trustees and W. W. Wright 
clerk. Rev. Wright was asked to take half time from his church at 
Lafayette in the interest of the Toulon church. In January, 1854, S. 
M. Dewey was clerk of the church, succeeding Rev. S. G. Wright. In 
June a resolution against countenancing the users of intoxicants in 
public or private, and in September the celebrated anti-slavery resolu- 
tions were adopted. In December the question of Rev. S. G. Wright's 
resignation and the calling of Rev. R. C. Dunn was before the church. 
In January, 1855, Mr. Dunn was called to preach here. Mr. Wright 
was never installed, but he was considered pastor since its organization. 
In February the trustees were reelected, and Joseph Blanchard and 
George W. Dewey added to the board of deacons. In December, 
1855, Norman Butler, W. W. Wright and E. B. Starrett were elected 
trustees. At this time there were eighty-seven members enrolled. On 
January 1-1, 1857, Rev. R. C. Dunn was installed pastor. In the 
spring of 1858 many members were received, Messrs. Wright and Dunn 
holding the services. In 1859 the trustees and clerk were reelected. 
In 1860 Joseph D. Rhodes took Mr. Starrett's place on the board, the 
other trustees and clerks being continued in 1861 and 1862. In 1863 
George W. Dewey, S. M. Dewey and J. D. Rhodes were elected trus- 
tees, and Joseph Blanchard and W. W. Wright deacons. In 1864, 
when Rev. R. C. Dunn was elected representative in the State Legisla- 
ture, leave of absence was granted and his salary continued. In 1865 
Nelson Prout was chosen first-sexton of the church, the trustees were 
re-elected in 1866, and Joseph Perry and Joseph Blanchard chosen 
deacons and W. W. Wright delegate to Central West Association. S. 
M. Dewey, clerk from 1854, died August 31, 1866. On October 5, 
1867, Rev. R. L. McCord, Mrs. Helen McCord and Miss Belle Pierce 
were received, and in December D. Nicholson, George W. Dewey and 
J. D. Rhodes were elected trustees. 

The minutes were signed bv Samuel Purge as clerk for the first 
time August 3, 1866. In May, 1868, W. W. Wright was elected dele- 
gate to the convention ; in December, the trustees were reelected, and 
Geo. W. Dewey and Hugh Rhodes chosen deacons. In 1869, Joseph 
Perry was chosen deacon, the trustees reelected, and W. W. Wright 
secretary and treasurer mce Samuel Purge. In 1870, W. W. Wright, 
James M. Flint and Newton J. Smitli were elected trustees. In 1871, 
Samuel Burge was chosen clerk vice W. W. Wright. The membership 
Avas 158, or twelve over the corresponding period of 1870. In 1872, 
Joseph Blanchard was chosen delegate, Geo. W. Dewey and Hugh 
Rhodes deacons, with Samuel Burge treasurer and secretary. In 1873, 








^^^^^^^^^ix^ /^^^i^e^^^^ 



LIBRARY 
UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOI 



TOULON ToWNSMlfJ. 275 

Geo. W. Bewey was chosen delegate, Norman Butler deacon, once 
Jose])!! Ferry; while in 1874, G. W. Dewey was state delegate, and K. 
J. Smith district delegate. In 1875, Plugh Eliodes and Norman Butler 
were elected deacons; in 1876, James M. Flint took the place of Joseph 
Blanchard on the deacons' board ; and in March of tliis 3^ear, Allen F. 
Miller made the first entry as clerk of the church, Samuel Bui'ge was 
elected treasurer and Messrs. Flint and Dewey deacons. In June, 
1877, Willis C. Dewey was ordained as a foreign missionary, and 
deacons Butler and Perry were reelected. In 1878, Samuel Burge was 
elected state delegate. On August 3, Fev. J. C. Myers preached his 
first sermon here ; in October, Geo. W. Dewey was elected delegate to 
Cen. W. Association, and deacons Flint and Dewey were reelected 
deacons. In 1879 and 1880, Deacon Flint was chosen delegate and the 
deacons of 1878 reelected. In 1881, A. P. Miller was elected treasurer 
and reelected clerk. In 1881, E. A. Burge, Xorman I'utler, and D. 
Murchison, were chosen deacons. In July, FS82, James H. Miller and 
R. J. Dickinson were appointed to committees to inquire into the cost 
of building a new church or repairing the old one. Their report in 
favor of a new building was a])proved. On July 22, A. P. Miller re- 
ported favorably on the subject of raising funds, and the trustees with 
James M. Flint, L. W. Williams, A. P. Miller and Geo. W. Dewey, 
were appointed a building committee. 

On August 8, t\vent3-one votes were cast for building on the site 
of the old church and five in favor of a new site. The building com- 
mittee was instructed to dispose of the old church ; Geo. W. Dewey 
was elected delegate to the C. W. Association. On October 15, the old 
church was sold to Chas. S. Payne for $175, and on the 15th the last 
services were held therein, when it was moved to Wyoming. In 
December, 1882, John F. Rhodes, Chas. P. Dewey and D. J. Walker, 
the trustees, were continued in office, and E. B. Starrett, James Nichol- 
son and Willis C. Dewey, continued on the finance committee. 

On May 23, 1883, letters of dismission and recommendation were 
granted to Pev. J. C. Myers and wife. In July, Pev. S. W. Dickinson 
Avas called, but declined. In September, Pev. W. P. Butcher, and in 
November, Pev. Samuel J. Rogers were called, the latter accepted. 

The first services in the new church, were those attending the 
funeral of Mrs. Norman Butler, conducted by Rev. D. J. Stouffer, of 
the M. E. Church. 

Rev. W. Rogers held the first regular service November 18, 1883, 
and preached his first sermon here that da}^ 

In December, 1883, D. Murchison, W. W. Wright and Norman 
Butler, were elected deacons. On January 3, 1884, the new church 
was dedicated by the new pastor, A. P. Miller, rendering the account 
of the building committee, showing $5,352.61 paid out and $4,121.65 
received, leaving a l)alance of $1,230. 90 due. In May, Geo. W. Dewey 
was appointed delegate, and in December, E. B. Starrett, C. P. Dewey 
and James Nicholson were chosen trustees. In 1885, James M. Flint 
was delegate, the trustees were reelected, and also tlie deacons of 1883. 
W. W. Wright and Willis C. Dewey were chosen delegates in 1880, 



276 HISTORY OF STAEK COUNTY. 

On May 22, Eev. Samuel J. Eogers resigned, and on the 23d, a call 
was extended to Eev. J. H. Dixon, which was accepted. 

The number received into the church since its organization is 443, 
the gi'eat majority of whom have died or removed. 

The choir of the Congregational church requires some mention. In 
earlier years Mr. Baldwin, Hugh Drummond, John Fuller, Carrie 
Gardner and Hannah Whitaker were the ]5rincipal singers. In the old 
church, now the Opera House of W^^oming, Baldwin led the music 
until succeeded by Donaldson. In 1857 old time custom disappeared 
and a new choir was organized, with E. P. Wright leader and flutist ; 
Eliza and Minnie AV right, Harriet, Kebecca and Robert Dewey, Mary, 
Elizabeth and H. B. Perry, and Abbie Gardner vocalists. In later 
years new names appear, such as Mary Curtis, Carrie Burge. Harriet. 
Achsah and John F. Ehodes. Miss Bixln^, C. M. Wood. Wright Dewe}', 
Caroline, Jane and Mary Beers : Benjamin Williams, Anna Prout, 
BeUe Pierce, Hattie Phelps. Mary and Delphine Whitaker, and Samuel 
Burge, George A. Clifford. Benjamin Williams and James A. Hender- 
son were sometimes present as vocalists. A parlor organ was subse- 
quentlv purchased from S. G. Wright for §35, at which Miss Ehza 
"Wright presided. She was succeeded by Miss Hattie Phelps, and she 
by Miss Harriet Dewey. H. B. Perry succeeded Mr. Wright as leader. 
Seven members served in the army, one of whom was killed — Robert 
Dewey. After the wai' K. J. Smith was leader. One by one the old 
members left, and now the old organization holds a majority of new 
meml)ers, among whom were Tillie and Pauline Shalleidjerger, Lou 
Flint, Mrs. Lawrence, D. J. Walker. Mar}" and Ida Mosher, Mrs. Ida 
Sweedeen. R. J. Dickinson, Edith Dickinson, Bird Thornton, Clyde 
Lyon, W^illiam Dewe}', Adna Smith and others. Mrs. AUie Burge, 
Mrs. Mary Wright, Lou Flint and Carrie Burge jDresided at the organ 
in the order of their names. 

Bcqjtist Church. — The first meeting to organize was held Ma}' 13, 
1848, at the house of S. W. Eastman. Elisha Gill presided, with W. 
M. [Miner clerk. The following named persons signed the articles: 
Elder Elisha Gill. Elder J. M. Stickney, Ozias Winter. Harry T. Ives, 
Abigail Gill. Cynthia K. Stickney, Helen Winter, Hannah Parrish, 
Susan M. Eastman, Mrs. H. T. Ives and Mrs. Sarah Chamberlain. In 
January, 1847. Elder Stickney arrived here from Rochester, Wis., and 
preached at Fahrenheit (then the name of the Miner settlement, north- 
west one and one-half miles of Minott Silliman's residence), in widow 
Miner's house. Among the members of the Fahrenheit church were 

Hays, Wm. and Mrs. Miner, Charles H. Miner and wife, Selden 

Miner and wife. Mrs. Parrish, Elisha Gill and wife. J. M. Stickney and 
wife, and Susan M. Eastman. This Fahrenheit church was the first 
Baptist society in the county, subsequently moved to Lafayette, and 
some joined this church at Toulon. In June. 1848, Elders Gill, Stick- 
nev and H. T. Ives were chosen deleofates to the Illinois River Associa- 
tion. Elder Stickney was clerk, succeeded by W. T. Bly in June, 1848. 
Rev. C. E. Tinker and Elder Gardner presided here at the council 
of recognition in this month. In July Ozias Winter was appointed 
clerk. Mrs. Catlierine Buchanan joined the church in 1848, also Geo. 



TOULON T0WN8ItlP. 2TY 

W. Buchanan and Martha, 'Mercliant were baptized, and Lucretia- 
liouse, Thos. Cxodlrey and wife, Hugh Y. Godl're^^ Armina and Eliza- 
beth Godfrey were received by letter. In 18^9 Mary Winn was 
received. In 1850 Elder Gross, who succeeded Mr. Stickney, in 
August, 1851, came here and preached at intervals. The Colburns, 
Gardners, Whiffens, Parmelia Barton, Belshers, Baldwins, and Nelsons 
were received in 1850-1. During the revival of November, 1851, John 
and Pleasant Culbertson, W. B. Sweet, and a number of others were 
received, Kev. Barry assisting. ITp to this time meetings were gener- 
ally held at the court house, until January 29, 1851, when the C(mi- 
pleted church held services at the time and place announced for Bap- 
tist services. In 1852, Benj. and Hannah Packer were received, also 
Catherine Whitaker. In July, 1852, S. W. Eastman and L. E. Miner 
were elected deacons. In October the first meeting to discuss the 
question of building a meeting house was held, and the pastor asked to 
confer with J. C. Van Osdell, architect, of Chicago, regarding ])lans, 
etc. Eastman, Sweet and Jones were appointed a committee on sul)- 
scription in town, and H. T. Ives, Benj. Packer and Ephriam Colburn 
in the country. In December, 1852, Culbertson, Ives and Eastman 
were appointed to select a site, and the same month Wheeler B. Sweet, 
Oliver Whitaker, Wm. Ogle, H. T. Ives and Jolm (Julbertson were 
elected trustees. In March, 1853, a plan of building, pre]>ared by the 
trustees, w^as adopted. In April, 1854, John Berfield succeeded O. 
Gardner as clerk, and for some time meetings were held at the house 
of Robert Robb. In 1855 Elder Gross resigned. The church was 
dedicated in April, 1855. In July that year Rev. C. Brinkerhoff came 
and served here until January, 1858. In August, 1858, Elder Myron 
H. Negus was called — about a year after the appointment of Robert 
Robb as clerk. On July 10, 1859, Rev. Wm. Leggett was called. In 
July, 1861, E. M. Gallup was chosen clerk, and in November, 1861, 
Rev. A. J. Wright was pastor. During Mr. Leggett's pastorate a 
revival was held here, in which Rev. Louis Raymond, now of Chicago, 
assisted. In November, 1863, John H. Stickney was elected clerk, 
lie was succeeded in December, 1861, by Robert Robb. Elder E. P. 
Barker was called in March, 1866. In February, 1867, J. H. Stickne}^ 
was reelected clerk. Elder Estee succeeded Mr. Barker, and after six 
months Elder Dodge came as supply. In 1868 H. Willett was ap- 
pointed clerk. About this time Elder Thomas Bodle}^ preached here. 
On February 29, 1868, a resolution (dealing with the dilliculties in the 
church), called for the ti'ansfer of all property and the trustees, to be 
held for a new organization. Early in the summer of 1863 Rev. S. A. 
Estee returned and preached here. On July 8, 1868, a number of the 
few remaining members of the first church assembled, with S. A. Estee 
moderator and acting clerk. Seven resolutions, of a conciliator}^ char- 
acter, were adopted, dealing with the case of Reverends Estee and 
Barker. In August, 1868, Rev. S. Brimhall was called, and on Janu- 
ary 1, 18Y0, he was elected trustee, vice John Culbertson, deceased. 
On .April 8, 1871. Elder Stickney was recalled as pastor and clerk, and 
served until September, 1873. 

In May 1875, Elder L. D. Gowen's name appears for the first time. 



2^8 ttlSToRY 01<' STARK COtfNTY. 

He was here also in 18T<) until succeeded by Elder J. C. Hart, who was 
here when this old church consolidated with branch or new church, 
which had its meeting-house on Main street. 

The members who signed the constitution of the consolidated 
churches in September, 1877, are named as follows: Abrani Bowers 
and wife, Mrs. Martha Berfield, Mrs. Harriet Blair, Andrew Baldwin, 
Julia Baldwin, Sarah Berfield, Eliza Beers, Albert Bowers and wife, 
S. B. Barton, Mrs. Polly Crandle, Mrs. Mary Crumb, Miss Charlotte 
Cross, Mrs. Emma Cooley, Margaret Conover, Mrs. Celestine Dack, S. 
W. Eastman, Mrs. Martha Eastman, H. Y. and Henry S. and Miss E. 
and Miss Isabelle Godfrey, Maggie Greer, Mrs. A. Gill, Flora Gill, 
Clarence Guire, John E. and L. D. and Mrs. A. M. Gowin ; Luther, 
Abba, Avery and Kate Geer ; Ellen, Frances, Lucy and Mrs. Hickson, 
Mrs. A. House, J. C. Llart and wife, Llarriet Hall, Minerva Lyon, Car- 
oline Lyon, Jenny Lyon and Modella Lyon, S. W. and Sarah Mering, 
Nancy Mote, Martha Perry, Mrs. Louisa Phillips, Benjamin, jr., Mrs. 
Hannah Mortimer, Charles and Miss C. Packer, Bethuel, Mrs. Kegina 
and Mrs. Caroline Pierson, Mrs. C. Pliter, Mrs. L. Rennick, Mrs. J. 
Eankin, John Biggs, Miss N. Remington, and Mary Robb, Mrs. Sim- 
merman, Mary Sarah Shockley, Mrs. Lettie Silliman and Sarah Silli- 
man, John H. Stickney, Mrs. C. K. Stickne}^, Mrs. Esther A. Smith, 
Mrs. Ester Twiss, Mary Twiss, Mrs. E. J. Treat, Owen Thomas and 
Mrs. Sarah Thomas, G. C. Van Osdell, Mrs. C. A. Van Osdell, Mary 
Willett, Nancy White, Elisabeth White, Joseph Weed, N. F. Wy- 
nans. Sarah Wynans, Miss Laura Wise, Frank Williams and wife, 
Jacob Wagner and wife, Mrs. John O. Weed, Sarah Weed, Mrs. 
Charlotte Woods, Mrs. Kancy E. Walling, Rose Whitwell, Mary 
Winn. 

On September 21, 1877, a meeting was held to consider the ques- 
tion of consolidating the two Baptist churches of Toulon, under the 
title, " The Baptist Church of Toulon." Squire Xan Osdell presided 
H. Y. Godfrey, clerk. The question was decided affirmatively, and B. 
Packer, S. W. Eastman, X. F. Wynans, Owen Thomas and H. Y. 
Godfrey were elected trustees. In October Benjamin Packer was 
chosen treasurer, solicitor and collector ; John O. Weed, sexton, and 
Messrs. B. Packer, Geer, Eastman and Williamson, deacons. At this 
meeting a resolution to sell the frame church on Main street, and hold 
the brick house for worship was carried. In November, 1877, Rev. 
A. C. Keen was called as pastor at an annual salary of $700. In 
December, James M. Stickney, Benjamin Packer and N. F. Wynans 
were ap]:)ointed delegates to the conference at Farmington. In this 
month also the trustees purchased the Otis Dyer property for a par- 
sonage. In April, 1878, the Main street church was sold for $1700, 
one-half cash and balance standing out at ten per cent. In 1878 the 
ladies of this church supplied dinner at the Stark county fair grounds, 
realizing $303.13 less $152 expenses. Dr. A, E. Baldwin became a 
member. In June, 1879, Rev. B. F. Colwell was called as pastor. In 
January, 1880, Mortimer Packer was chosen collector, vice B. Packer. 

In October, 1880, Rev. B. F. Colwell resigned. In February, 1881. 
J. M. Stickney filled the pulpit, and during this month H. Y. Godfrey 



TOULON TOWNSHIP. 279 

was chosen solicitor and collector. Dr. TI. L. Pratt's name appears on 
the minutes about this time. In October, 1881, Kev. E. C. Cady, ac- 
cepted a call as pastor and commenced to labor here November 1, 
that year. In Se])tember, 1882, M. A. Packer succeeded PL Y. God- 
frey "as church clerk. In 1884 Andrew F. Stickney and wife were 
admitted to membership by letter from Wyoming. In October, 1884, 
Rev. Mr. Cady resigned ; Elder Stickney was puljut supply for three 
and one-half months. In June, 1885, -Rev. E. W. Hicks accepted a 
call, and in January, 1886, E. B. Packer was elected clerk. Almost 
from the beginning of the church in this county to the present time 
Elder Stickney has proven himself loyal to his faith by Avork and 
example. Only a few years ago he donated $2,500 toward the sup- 
port of his church in this county. Tliere have been 183 admissions 
by letter an{l otherwise since the re-organization of the Baptist society 
in 1877. Between the secession and consolidation the Sunday school 
was maintained by Mrs. S. K. Stickney, who was also clerk in 1876 
and 1877, or before consolidation. Indeed to her is due in greater 
measure the present happy condition of the society. 

The Second Baptist Chnrch may be said to have been oi-ganized 
March 4, 1868, and to have continued in existence until Se])tember, 
1877. From 1858 to 1868 the question of title to church property led 
to disagreements, and ultimately to the formation of the Second 
society. In March, 1868, a new society was organized, and a house of 
worship erected the same year at a cost of $2,372. Elders W. A. 
Welsher, Gowan, Negus, Hart and Van Osdell were the leading- 
preachers. Among the leading members were Stephen W., Mrs. M., 
Miss Eliza and Miss Celestia Eastman, A. F. Stickney, Luther Geer, 
H. Y. Godfrey, Benjamin Packer and wife, Abram, Mrs. C. and Miss 
Lettie and Miss Martha Bowers, Mrs, C. Lyon and Miss M. Henry, 
Otis Dyer, L. Clark, Julius Ives and Hiram Willett, the latter h)sing 
fellowship in 1870 because he "could no longer conscientiously main- 
tain and indorse the articles of faith as interpreted by the church." 
The consolidation of the old and new churches in 1877 healed up all 
contentions, and the l)uilding and lots wei'e sold to the Catholic con- 
gregation. 

The Christian Church was organized in the old court house, July 15, 
1841), with the following named members ; Elijah McClenahan, Sarah 
McClenahan, Edward Wilson, Martha J. Wilson, James Bates, Henry 
Sweet, David McCance and Mary J. McCance. In 1855 the present 
house of worship, on Washington street, just north of the opera house, 
was erected, and with the lot, cost about $5,000. This is a i)lain brick 
structure, old English in style, well furnished, and in all respects 
well adapted to its uses. The names of pastors from beingning are : 
Edward Wilson, M. P. King, A. G. Lucas, Charles Berry, S. C. 
Humphrey, A. P. Aten, James Darsee J. V. Beekman, Wm. Lloyd, L. 
B. Ames, Geo. K. Berry and J. P. Davis. In the summer of 1886 the 
church was \vithout a regular pastor, but services were dul}' held. 
The secretaries or clerks of the church in order of election, were : E. 
K. Wilson, David McCance and W. G. Bradley. S. E. Callison, is the 
pi'esent clerk. The property of the society is valued at $4,50() and the 



280 HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY. 

number of members placed at sixty-five. Prior to tlie opening of their 
house of worship, the Court House was extensive!}^ used by this church. 

The Catliolic Church of Toulon, though modern in the o'wnership 
of church building, dates back to 1840 for its beginning in the imme- 
diate neighl)orhood, for then the ]^owlans and Drinnins settled here 
and the services of the church were held occasionally at their houses. 
Prior to 1867 mass was said at very irregular intervals in jirivate 
houses. Among these were Michael Xowlan's. Barnev FraiTs, Jacob 
Emery's, (whose wife was a Catholic) Owen Denny's, and perhaps 
some others in Stark county, and Patrick Cavanagh's at Wethersfield, 
and later in Davis and Rhodes' Hall, Mrs. Wolgamood's house and 
James Nowlan's house. Tlie priests who attended here Avere first from 
Peoria; afterward Lacon. From Peoria tlie first was Fr. Rowe, then 
Fr. DreAV, then Fr. Ranaldi. From Lacon, Fr. Lynch. Fr. Powers, 
Fr. Delahunty, Fr. Kilkenny. Those who attended mass here in the 
earlv davs were mostly families named above. 

The names of principal heatls of families now belonging are William 
P. Caverly, John O'Xeill. Michael N. Denny. John Brady, Daniel Wol- 
gamood, Michael Flynn, James Graham, John Hagert}^ Ellen S. Now- 
la,n, Joseph Xortmann, Peter O'Neill, Petei* Pauli, Jacob Herberger, 
Mary Peters, Patrick Smith, James Burns, Peter O. Olsen, James 
Brady, Henr}' Nowlan, Mary ]S"eal, Thomas Carlin, William Nowlan, 
John Kirley. From 1867 the priests Avho attended Toulon were : 
from Kewanee, two Fathers Ryan ; from Princeville, Father John 
Moore, 1877; from Wataga, Fathers Ryan, P. A. ]\rcCTair and M. F. 
Fallihee; from Bradford, Father Moynihan; from Brimlleld, Fathers 
Flynn, Ryan and Moore ; from Bradford, Father Delbarre ; from 
Kewanee, Fathers McCartney. Devaney. and at present. Father Burke. 
On December 3r», 1877 Rev. John Moore held services in the Second 
Baptist Church, which was purchased from the Baptists, March 1, 
1878. The congregation owns the building and lots and is, in fact, 
clear of every indebtedness. 

Universalist Church. — Rev. R. M. Bartlett held services in th6 
Masonic and Odd-Fellows Hall at Toulon in the winter of 1860 and 
1861. Prior to this time ministers of the denomination held services 
here and continued so to do at intervals until 1873. 

SahhatJi -Schools date back to the l)6ginning of the Congrega- 
tionalist church here, but not as a regularly organized body. Samuel 
Burge, in his reminiscences states that his recollections make the 
summer of 1854 the initial point, for at that time he attended a Union 
Methodist-Congregational school in the church of the last-named 
society — "a house surrounded by a- dense hazel thicjvet, and underneath 
the building, which rested on piers, the town-hogs sought shade from 
the sun." The Union Question Booh was then used. The Bible-class 
selected their own lessons independent of the rest of the school. The 
Congregational and Methodist Union separated on the completion of 
the hitter's church, and the former's school was organized, with Isiv. 
Wright superintendent, who served until 1861, when he entered the 
army. He fell in the LTnion cause ; S. M. Dewey succeeded, serving 
until his death in 1866, except for one year. Judge Wright presided 



TOULON TOWNSHIP. 281 

from 186G to 1868 and in 1870. Samuel Burge served from 1868 to 18T9, 
except in 1870, Rev. E. L. McCord teaching- the Bible-class. In 1880 
J. F. Rhodes was superintendent, then E. A. Burge and again John F. 
Rhodes. In the case of the Baptist church the existence of the Sun- 
day-school during the troubles in that churcli is due in great part to 
Mrs. J. M. Stickney. 

Schools of Totilon. — The school history of the township embraces 
almost the entire history of this district up to 1861. In 184o a com- 
mon school was presided over b}" Miss Elizabeth Buswell, wliile a select 
school was taught by Miss Susan, daughter of Eldei- Gill, both held in 
the old court house. Miss Booth also taught in a house west of OHver 
Wliitaker's late residence then belonging to Ro3'al Arnold, while the 
pioneer lawyer, W. W. Drummond, conducted a school in his own 
house. The first school-house was the " Old Brick," erected by order 
of the commissioners, and tlie first teacher, T. J. Henderson. In 181:9 
Miss Booth conducted the summer school in the building, while Miss 
Bayce presi led over a private school in the old Masonic Hall, near 
the Methodist churcli. 

In the former cha})ter reference is made to the seminary. In 
March, 1850, the commissioners passed the following resolution : 
''This day came Samuel G. Wright, Samuel Beatty and Oliver AVhit- 
aker, a committee ai)})ointed in December, 1849, in relation to the 
building of a female seminary, and ])resented their report, together 
with a plan of said seminary, \vliich report was accepted. Where- 
upon it is ordered that the committee proceed to receive sub- 
scri])tions toward building said seminary. And it is further considered, 
that whereas the funds now on hand, arising from sale of lots in Tou- 
lon ($630) are insufficient to l)uild a female seminary without the aid 
of individual suljscriptions, and whereas there is an unwilHngness on 
tlie part of the people to subscribe toward the erection of said semi- 
nary, witliout it can be used for the education of males as well as 
females, it is ordered that said committee proceed to build, said semi- 
nary according to the plan presented by them, for the accommodation 
of lioth males and females." This building was completed, aiid N. F. 
Atkins and Mrs. Atkins taught there, with the permission of the com- 
missioners. 

In December, 1856, Dista'ict school No. 1, at Toulon Avas taught by 
C'harles Myers, who received $30 per month for instructing seventy- 
eight pu[)ils. Miss E. J. Creighton was assistant. At this time the 
senior boys and girls attended the seminary. During the previous 
summer, Oliver White and Miss Hubl)ard were the teachers. Union 
District school was presided over in February, 1856, by J. E. Hickok, 
who receiv^ed $20 per month and board. There were fifty-six puj)ils 
enrolled, but only eighteen present. There was no chair to be seen 
here at this time. In 1857 a writing school was conducted at Toulon 
by II. L. Bailey. On May, 20th, that year, sjieciniens of his ]iupils"' 
work were submitted to a committee com})rising Thomas Hall, Charles 
Myers and Nelson F. Atkins, who indorsed his method of instruction 
and testified to marked im})rovenient in the wi'itiiig of the })npils, par- 
ticularly that of Isabella Pierce. 



282 HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY. 

In the fall of 1858 the school house on Soap Hill and that west of 
the fair grounds, were completed. Wm. Campbell became ]irincipal 
of Toulon seminary in September, 1858. In March, 1859, Isaac C. 
Reed and Oliver Whitaker, school directors, announced that Mr. Car- 
penter's school, or District No. 1, would embrace all Toulon, south of 
Main and west of Olive, and also the senior male pupils of the whole 
town. It was also announced that Mrs. Burg-e would commence scliool 
in the seminary, March 16th, taking in all between Main and Thomas 
streets, except the senior male pupils. Miss Mary Perry opened a 
select school here in June, 1860. Prior to that she was teacher of 
what was known as the " Fair-ground " school. 

In October, 1861 Oliver Whitaker and Branson Lowman resigned 
as school directors, when Davis Lowman and Warham Mordoif were 
elected. They, with J. C. Reed, formed the board. In March 1862, 
Joshua Thorp proposed to teach the high school for $30 per month, on 
condition that he be authorized to em]:)loy a female assistant. Ellen 
King was engaged as teacher in the brick schoolhouse and Mary AYhita- 
ker in the Fair-ground school. Mr. Thorp presided over the seminary 
from Octol)er, 1S61 to February 1862, with Mar}' Perry assistant. 
Olive Decker taught at Soap Hill, Elizabeth Marvin and Mary Beatty 
assistants in the brick school. During the war it appears there were 
no records kept beyond the ordinary cash book. The schools, however, 
were regularly carried on, several teachers' names aj)pearing. In April 
1886, Patrick Nowlan was appointed clerk of board, vice Oliver 
White, resigned, and subsequently elected for three years. S. M. 
Dewey took Amos P. Gill's place, and on September 1866, David 
Tinlin was chosen, vice S. M. Dewey, deceased. B. Gr. Hall was princi- 
])al of the seminary from April 1866 ; Mrs. P. O. Hall in the grammar 
department. Miss S. A. Beatty in brick school. Miss C. Robinson in Fair- 
ground school. Miss E. S. Til'den at Soap Hill. In August 1867, forty- 
seven votes were recorded for and fifteen against the purchase of the 
seminary from the county. Calvin Eastman was elected a director in 
August, 1868, John Berfield in April, 1869, Benjamin Turner in 1870. In 
September, 187<>, Robert Blackwell, principal; with Charles Myers, 
Anna G. Murphy, Sarah Berfield, Fanny Young, Ruth Thomas presided 
in the schools of Toulon. Stephen Lloyd, director in 1871, and James 
M. Brown in 1872. In April of this year it was resolved to erect a 
new school-building, and on August 10 an election was held to consider 
the question of building a $15,000 house. In July Frank Matthews 
was chosen principal. The question of building was decided by sixty- 
five votes for, nine contra. The school census of the district taken in 
l!s72 showed the population to be 1,010. In February 1875, the new 
school-building was completed and opened. Frank Matthews, Manning 
Hall, Sarah Berfield, Pauline Shallenberger and Kate Kefi'er were the 
teachers. 

In 1878 Benjamin Turner was a director and clerk. In 1879, David 
J. Walker was elected director and clerk vice Benjamin Turner ; in 
1880, Caleb M.S. Lyon; in 1881, Theodore Bacmeister; in 1882, Allen 
P. Miller; in 1888, Gus. Ilulsizer was chosen director, Allen P. Miller 
being clerk in 1883, 1881 and 1885. In 1885 Gus. Hulsizer was chosen 



o 



TOULON TOWNSHIP. 283 

clerk. Warren Williams was elected director in 1884 ; Jeremiah Lyon, 
and James iSTowljin, in 1885, and James Xowlan director and clerk, m 
1886. The records point out the name of Samuel Burge as treasurer 
from 1880 to the present time. In July, 1881, Frank S. Rosseter was 
engaged as principal of the schools at $1,000 per year of eight or nine 
months, witli Miss Amy Reed, assistant. R. J. Dickenson, Sarah Ber- 
field, Mar}^ Christy and Marian Starrett were also employed — the first 
named in the grammar school. In February, 1883, Mr. Rosseter re- 
signed, and in March Edgar P. Hawes took charge, but moved to 
Arkansas shortly after. In May, 1883, Edmund C. Barto was appoint- 
ed ])rinci])al at $900 per annum. Prof. E. C. Barto resigned May 8, 
1881. when Miss Amy Reed was appointed to fill his term. At this 
time Amy Reed, Alice Cowles, Mar}^ Christy. Mirriam Starrett, Adna 
T. Smith, with Mr. Barto, formed the teaching staff. In 1881: Hamil- 
ton Rennick and Cora Keffer were added to the stafi". The enrollment 
was 220. At this time, also, the academical board, with John F. 
Rhodes, Orlando Brace, Samuel Burge, H. Miner and T. Bacmeister 
operated with the district board. 

In May, 1884, J. W. Stephens was engaged as principal at $1,000 
per annum; Miss M. Y. Neale, teacher in "Xew Grade," Mrs. Hel- 
en Middlekauf assisted in High School, and Miss M. A. Lyon, vice Miss 
Starrett, resigned. In May, 1885, a petition of 50 citizens w^as pre- 
sented, asking that J. W. Stephens be retained as principal. There is 
no further record relating to changes at this time, w4th the exception 
of Mr. Broomall's name appearing as principal in a record of meeting 
held August 6, 1885, although his appointment dates from June 3, 
1885. The names of Hattie Byatt and Dora Plighter appear as teach- 
ers under date October, 1885. H. W. Newland has served the district 
as school janitor almost from the date of the establishment of this 
office. In 1885 the directors were, Warren Williams, Jeremiah 
Lyon and James Nowlan. The corps of teachers was made up as 
follows: High School, J. H. Broomall, principal, Miss Amy Reed, as- 
sistant ; second grammar department, J. H. Rennick ; first grammar 
department, Miss Maidell Lyon ; intermediate department. Miss Hattie 
Byatt ; second primary department, Miss Dora Pliter, and first primary 
department, Miss Mary Christy. 

The statistics of Toulon High School for year ending June, 188<), 
show 25 male and 12 female pupils, of whom 18 male and 20 female 
pupils were in their first je-AY ; 5 males and 10 females in their second 
year, and 2 males and 12 females in their third year of studies. The 
highest monthly salary paid was $112.50. The classes formed in Sep- 
tember, 1880, are, Rhetoric, 12 scholars; Grammar, 10; Arithmetic, 
38; Geograpl\y, 1(5; Physical Geography, 16; U. S. History, 18; Al- 
gebra, 5 ; Natural Philosophy, 17 ; Botany, 3 ; First Lesson in Latin, 2 ; 
Ca?sar, 3 ; sandwiched with Reading, Writing and Spelling. Geom- 
etry, of which there 6 scholars ; Physiology, 8 ; Bookkeeping, 8 ; His- 
tory and Zoology, will be taken up and finishetl during the year. 

The Toulon xVcademy was opened October 12, 1883, with J. W. 
Ste]J]ens, of Eldora, la., principal. Rev. D. G. Stouffer, drawing mas- 
ter, Miss May Cad}^, music, and Gus Hulsizer, penmanship. This 
17 



284 HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY. 

school \Vcis designed to offer a course of study, which \vas not provided 
for in the curriculum of the Hio-h School at that time. Among the 
original supporters of this academy were, J. F. Rhodes, Sarah A. Cham- 
berlain, J. A. Henderson, B. F. Thompson, B. C. Follett, Harrison 
Miner, Andrew Oliver, Callison & Newton, C. M. Swank, R. H. Mc- 
Keighan, T. Bacmeister, "Wells White, A. P. Miller, W. T. Hall, Chas. 
P. Dewey, D. S. Hewitt, G. W. Dewey, sr., S. J. Connelly, W. W. 
Wriglit, D. J. Davis, Gus Hulsizer, S. K. Conover, Miles A. Fuller, R. 
J. Dickenson, Starrett Bros., John H. Ogle, S. M. Adams, Sauiuel 
Burge, Orlando Brace, J. M. Brown, Robert Armstrong, Geo. Arm- 
strong, James H. Miller, Abel Armstrong and J. H. Quinn. The acad- 
emy meets the expectations of its originators, and continues to afford 
facilities for acquiring a good knowledge of the arts and sciences, — a 
practical, commercial or literary education. The following is the acad- 
emical board of trustees elected in August, 1886: Dr. Bacmeister, Sam- 
uel Burge, J. F. Rhodes, Robert Armstrong and E. B. Starrett. 

/Secret Societies. — Toulon lodge, No. 03, A. F. and A. M., was 
chartered October 10, 1850, with AV. W. Drummond, William Rose, 
Orin Maxfield, Ellison Annis, Henry Butler, W^illiam A. Reed an(l 
Samuel Thomas, with the three first named W. M., S. W., and J. W., 
respectively. Among the old members the name of Benjamin Turner 
must be mentioned. In Noveml)er, 1850, the first cliarter election was 
lield, when the following-named officers were chosen : William F. 
Thomas, treasurer; T. J. Henderson, secretary; William A. Reed, 
S. D. ; General Samuel Thomas, J. D. ; Simon S. Heller, S. S. ; Thomas 
J. Wright, J. S. ; C. F. White, Tyler. The masters of the lodge, suc- 
ceeiling W. W. Drummond in the order of service, were William B. 
Smith, Alexander Moncrief, Thomas J. Henderson, James A. Hender- 
son. Elisha Greenfield, George Bradley, Martin Shallenberger, George 
A. Lowman, and Levi Silliman. Since the destruction of the masonic 
hall, cliarter and records, May 17, 1877, the following masters have 
been elected: E. Greenfield, 1877; Levi Silliman, 1878; B. F. Thoni])- 
son, 1879-81; E. Greenfield, 1881; B. F. Thompson, 1882; Levi Silli- 
man, 1883-8(5; and J. Knox Hall, 1886-88. The seci'etaries during 
the time have been D. Tinlin, 1877; Charles Mvers, 1878-80; I. N. 
Wade, 1880; B. F. Thompson, 1881; P. M. Blair, 1882; Llenry M. 
Hall 1883-85 ; Robert Fell, 1887. The other officers for 1887 are Col- 
burn J. Robins, S. W. ; W. F. Young, vice John W. Morrison, J. W. ; 
Jolm A. Slocum, treasurer; Levi Silliman, S. D. ; Knox Keffer, J. D. ; 
1). M. Hill, C. ; Henry A. Brainard, Tyler; Col. William Jackson, 
S. Steward, John A. Maxfield, J. Steward. 

The record of members gives the fohowing names : James G. 
Armstrong, W. B. Armstrong, Milton M. Adams, George Bradley, 
W. G. Bradley, Daniel M. Beers, Theo. Bacmeister, John Black, Mel- 
ville A. Bass, P. M. Blair, H. A. Brainard, William Chamberlain, 
James Culberts(jn, James Cinnamon, William Ciniiamon, D. J. Davis, 
James W. Dexter, D. Fast, Jr., Alex. Y. Fuller, Chancey D. Fuller, 
Robei't Fell, Oliver Frame, Herman Geisenheyner, David Guyre, 
Elisha (ii-eenfield, George Green, B. G. Hall, Henry M. Hall, Henry 
(). Jackson, Ilavilah B. Johnson, AYilliam Lowman, George A. Low- 



TOULON TOWNSHIP. 285 

man, James Tv. P. Lowman, 0. M. S. Lyon, Elias Lyon, George S. 
Lawrence, Gus. A. Lmdbloom, Charles McComsey, James Montooth, 
John A. Maxfield, Charles Myers, John Moore, I. L. Kewraan, W. B. 
N^elson, William Ogle, M. Shallenberger, John H. Ogle, Colburn J, 
Kobins, T. M. Shallenberger, Wheeler B. Sweet, Levi Silliman, Benja- 
min Tnrner, Bnshrod Tapp, Samuel Thomas, David Tinlin, James M. 
Tate, Thomas S. Wright, George H. White, Benjamin AVhitwell, Jacob 
Walther, John A. Colthar, W. F. Johnson, R. J. Curtiss, W. P. 
Gnlick, Charles Thorpe, Thorpe Dwight, George C. Maxfield, Jesse 
Likens, Charles L. Lame, Charles Atherton, John Hepperly, John 
W<^l)b('r, W. A. Reed, James Kerns, Jolm C. Eckle}^, Robert A. Turn- 
hull. Dana H. Maxfield, William IS'. Brown, Simeon Hall, John H. 
Funk, A. W. Atwood, John N. Davis, John H. Funk, S. P. Jackson, 
A. C. Bradley, S. J. Connelly. 

Eastern Star Chapter, No. 10, was chartered October 2, 1877, with 
the following members: Sisters — E. L. Lowman, Diantha Green, Lucy 
Green, Anne Bradlev, R. S. Turner, Sarah Turner, A. R.'Curtiss, Anne 
Thomas, Martha Myers, S. M. Keffer, S. E. Fraser, S. M. Robins, Sarah 
Guyre, Florence Guyre, A. E. Lawrence, Minerva Lyon, Cynthia Rose, 
L. "Guyre, Effie Lyon, L. A. Mercer, Kate Keffer, Ada Johnson, A. 
Luke'ns, Flora Cinnamon, M. R. Bradley, Clara Guyre, Jane Maxfield, 
M. Montieth, L. Fast. Brothers — William Lowman. John Green, J. 
K. P. Lowman, G. S. Lawrence, George Bradley, Benjamin Turner, R. 
J. Curtiss, Samuel Thomas, S. A. Lowman, Charles Myers, George 
Green, James Fraser, John Black, David Guyre, C. Robins, Elias Lyon, 
W. F. Johnson, Levi Silliman, J. A. Maxfield, James Cinnamon and 
James Montooth. The organization, chartered February 17, 1871, the 
reco]'ds of which were destroyed in the fire of 1877, claimed the 
greater number of this membership. 

Stark Lodge, No. 96, I. O. O. F., was organized November 8, 1851, 
under charter of October 17, 1851, with Amos P. Gill, Oliver Whita- 
ker, Thomas J. Wright, Alexander Moncrief and William Clark mem- 
bers, with A. Moncrief, Y. G., and Oliver Whitaker, R. S. From 1802 to 
April, 1866, the lodge was suspended. The record of membership is as fol- 
lows : Alexander Moncrieff, Amos P. Gill, d., Oliver Whitaker, Thomas 
J. Wright, all P. G.'s ; William Clark, Benjamin Turner, C. R. Mor- 
ton, W. B. Sweet, S., J. W. Henderson, C. L. Eastman, S., W. F. 
Thomas, d., George A. Clifford, S., d., Peter Fast, d., M. P. Armstrong, 
Thomas J. Henderson, P. G., William Chamberlain, d., P. G., for j^ears 
treasurer of the lodge, William Lowman, P. G., J. A. Cooley, Cyril 
Ward, T. W. Newland, John A. Williams, P. L. N. Duston, Samuel M. 
Dewey, W. H. Shugart, P. G., Abram Smith, Josiah Fast, Edgar Cod- 
ding, Samuel S. Kaysbeir, P. G., Robert F. Henry, Robert Winter, N. 
Schumick, W. B. Armstrong, Daniel M. Beers, Cyrus Sweet, P. G., 
Clinton Fuller, John J. Boyd, J. A. Pratt, John Garrett, Jr., T. D. 
Fitch, Charles G. Beamont, Ralph E. Tenney, G. N. Palmer, David 
Whiffen, Edward Keffer, d., P. G., Allien 'M. Pinney, E. Pinney, 
Stephen N. Fezzler, W. A. Sweet, P. G., Allen Cross, Robert Robb. P. 
G., Adonijah Tavlor, James Culbertson, R. G. William, Wm. I. Shirts, 
P. G., A. M. Black, ( ). W. Negus, Syl. McKenzie, Nelson Prout, John 



286 HISTORY OF STARK COUNIT. 

Slociuii, P. G., Stacy Coppertliwaite, P. G., Jos. Robb, John Black, S., 
Jos. Shallenberger, W. R. Legg, P. G., Wm. Harper, C. F. Jackson, H. 
A. Holts, John Hawks, Isaac N. Kidd, I\^. M. Whiff en, C. W. Brown, H. 
W. Kewland, Benj. F. Fuller, Jas. A. Xewland, S., Baton Byon, P. G., 
O. C. Griswold, H. B. Wells, Clark Newcomer, Addison Edwards, 
Martin Kern, John Jackson, Carlos B. Thorpe, F. D. Hotchkiss, 
Nathan Langford, John J. Pollok, S.; Zach. Sliugart; Fred. Russell, 
Charles Rhodes, Hugh Stockner, Thomas D. Swan. Elias Stockner. 
Robert AYoods, Charles McCumsey, James H. Quinn, James Gillen. 
Stephen D. Breese, Allen C. Copperthwaite, William Baldwin, John 
Evans, Cyrus N. Schofield, Jolm W. Morrison, William C. New- 
mire. Henrv Staufer, Harrod Murnan, Alilton Headlev, B. C. Dennis, 
Benjamin G. Yule, Robert Holmes, Henry Jones, Thomas Downey, 
William C. Burdett, Warren Williams. Yal. B. Thornton, P. G.; Samuel 
J. Connelly, Josiah Higgins, Abner J. Sturm, William Holgate, 
AV. A. Welchei', William S. Templeton, V. G.; Peter Lane, David 
Crum, M. IVIilton Adams, Julius Ives, Patrick H. Woods, Lewis W. 
Williams, John G. Robertson, Richard Iloadiey, Jerrv J). Woods, Jos. 
Smethurst, F. B. Little A. D. Brodhead, C. D. Ward, Samuel M. 
Adams, S.; William Headley. Cyrus Bocock, Alexander R. Hepperl3% 
Ste])hen W. Maring, John M. Brown, Benjamin C. Follett. Amos 
G. Goodheart, C. E. Harrington, John C. Lawrence, James Kernes, 
D. S. Hewitt, P. G.; M. W. Benjamin, A. Christie, Robert J. Dickinson, 
William Sourk, Stephen Deaver, Charles E. Stone, Daniel Wol- 
gamood, Russell Carr, P. G.; Alva Higgins, Thomas J. Likens, Charles 
R. Carr, Lloyd Crawford, Anton Sundquist, George ]\IcKeighan. W. W. 
Rhodes, S.; S. A. Millei", John E. Smith, R. O. Phillips. Alex. Headley, 
John W. Cisney, George F. Wise, Almeron X. Harris, Geo. R. Sisna, 
W. H. Brown, M. A. Dougherty, Stewart Moore, Oliver White, Charles 
A.Norholm, William F. Thatcher, Andrew Galbi-aith, Hugh Gal- 
braith, Nelson J. Olson, Perry J. Nelson, Dennis Lee, Benjamin 
Whitwell, Henry M. Hall, Leroy F. Morrison (Idaho), George E. Carr, 
Gustave E. Peterson, W. S. Carver, S.; Benjamin J. Perry, W. Anson 
McCance, William. F. Templeton, John F. Barton, Caspar J. Maxlield, 
William R. Bennett, W. A. Fell, David J. Walker, P. G.; Robert, C. 
Wright, James M. Lowraan, Fred. A. Jackson, William H. Sturm, 
James Sturm, J. P. Headley, Matthew McKeeghen, Chancy R. Miner, 
Charles H. Christie, George A. Thomas, S ; A. Baldwin, S.; John 
Hook, Orlando Bi'uce, Joseph H. Drinnin, Howard Stanley, P. G.; 
Laton D. Maxlield, George Starritt, Elisha H. Phelps, R, B. Rhodes, 
Kenslev Matthew, Frank S Rosseter, John W. White, George 
W. Moffat. David M. Flora, John Stires, W. H. Stii-es, Winfield AV. 
Fuller, C. F. Jackson, C. S. Bristol, Eli Emerv, G. H. Beaumond, 
Simeon E. Callison, Dr. H. L. Pratt, V. B. Ingram, T. H. Maxfield, 
I\ G.; C. A. Johnson, Gus. Hulsizer, J. C. Perry, F. B. Ilallock, F. AV. 
AVaddell. George C. A'^an Osdell, Eugene Rose, D. G. Stouffei-, 
Bethuel Pierson, S.; J. F. AVaddell, F. AV. Lyon, George E. Downend, 
Thomas H. Carlin, S.; John AY. Scott, AYilliam F. Newland, Nathan 
I). Alaxfield. AY. A. Xewton, Martin B. Downend. James II. Rennick, 
AVilliam AV. Vox. Xoi-nian E. Pomurov. Alex. J. Forbes. John P. 



TOtJLON TOWNSHIP. ^87 

Williams, Dr. Lemuel L. Long. W. T. Lloyd, Charles W. Kellogg, 
John Ilanna, Frank J. Marlatt, Charles INfyers (Peoria), John A. 
Williams, Wallace W. Carr, W. H. Sexsmith, Edward Sellon, William 
H. Bartram. The actual active membership is 76. 

Rebekah Degree, Star Lodge, No. 110, was instituted February 16, 
1882, bv Grand Secretary N. C. IS^ason, of Peoria, as G. M.; U. H. 
Brown,^P. G., of Lafayette, as D. G. M.; P. G. Cruchfield, of Wood- 
hull, G. Sec; P. G. Franks, of Peoria, G. Treas.; P. G. Greibell, of 
Peoria, G. Sent. After the lodge was instituted the following officers 
were elected and installed : D. S. Hewitt, ]S^. G.; Mrs. V. 13. Thorn- 
ton, V. G.; J. M. Brown, Sec; Mrs. Stanley, Fin. Sec; Mrs. D. 
Chamberlain, Treas. 

Temperance ^Yorl\ — The Washingtonian Temperance Society was 
organized in 1845, and for a few years did ver}^ effective work. 

The Sons of Temperance was chartered in Februar}^ 1848, with the 
following members : John W. Henderson, Martin Shallenberger, Benj. 
Turner, Patrick ]\[. Blair, Thomas J. Henderson, Ira Ward, sr., Wheeler 
B. Sweet, Oliver Whitaker, W. W. Drummond, Simon S. Heller, John 
A. Williams, L'a Ward, jr., and Sani'l G. Butler. In 1848-9, this asso- 
ciation erected a hall, which was subsequently owned by the Masonic 
l)0(ly, just north of the old M. E. Church. The public good effected by 
this organization is incalculable. Through association drunkards were 
reclaimed; moral lepers cured; but an ultra element grew up w^ithin 
it, introduced politics, destroyed its usefulness, and ultimately killed 
the lodge itself. 

Arthur Lodge, No. 454, I. O. G. T., was chartered in October, 1863, 
with the following named meml)ers: Amos P. Gill, Patrick Nowlan, 
Mary P. Nowlan, Delphine Whitaker, Mary E. Beatty, Mrs. M. A. 
Myers, Mrs. E. S. Fuller, Charles Myers, Samuel Burge, John D. 
Walker, S. S. Kaysbier, Wm. Lowman,'M. A. Fuller and A. C. Price. 

Division No. 3 Sons of Temperance, was organized March 17, 1875, 
with Levi Silliman presiding. Oliver Whitaker, Oliver White, Mrs. 
Mary Merriman, Frank Eastman, IL Y. Godfrey, Orlando Brace, R. 
H. Price, Manning Hall, and other members of the former Good 
Templars lodge, belonging. 

The I. O. G. T. organized a lodge at Toulon in February, 1880, with 
42 members. The officers in order of rank were: A. P. Miller, Robert 
Fell, Miss Effie Lyon, Elder Berry, F. S. Rosseter, Mrs. A. P. Miller, 
King Matthews and R. H. Price. 

Women's Christian Temperance LTnion is noticed further on. 

Earnest Lodge, No. 191, 1. O. G. T., was organized at the Methodist 
Church, Toulon, March 4, 18b6. J. M. French i)resided, with Gus. 
Hulsizer. secretar}^ The permanent officers elected, were A. F. Stick- 
ney, W. C. T. ; Mrs. Marv Lake, W. \. T.; P. P. Johnson, W. T.; 
Gus. Hulsizer, W. S. ; Robert Fell, W. F. S. ; Chas. Eicholz, W. M. ; 
Rev. W. W. Carr, W. P. W. C. T. ; C. W. Hall, A¥. L. S. ; I. N. Wit- 
ter, W. C. ; Miss May Smith, W. I. G. ; Will Newton, W. O. S. The 
name of the lodge was suggested by C. W. Hall. The signers of the 
petition for a charter were: Eva Turner, Sarah Bennett, M. L, 
McClenahan, Cora Ileadley, David Johnson, S. R. Blackner, Cora 



288 HISTORY OF STARK COUKTY. 

Edwards, L. Ed\Yards, Alice Edwards, Austin and Wni. Eyck, Peter F. 
Bradv, E. Fell, Mrs. Lake, Ed. IS^ewland, Samuel Johnson, Oscar 
Hendley, C. D. Ward, Ella Bennett, Clias. W. Eicholz. Wm. Hogle, 
Wells White, G. Cratford, P. P. Johnson, Bertie Hall, C. B. and 
Harry Hall, Mrs. A. Hall, H. Foglesong, Andrew Whitaker, A. L. and 
P. A. Johnson, J. W. Plumber, J. H. and C. W. Hall, John East- 
man, A. F. Stickne}", Mrs. L. A. Brainard, Bell Adams, Mabel Fell, 
W. A. Newton, Gus. Hulsizer, Isaac M. and Etta Witter, Minnie 
Blust, W. W. Carr, A. Christy, Ma}" Smith and Anina McConisey. 
Man}'' of all who signed the petition did not become members, but in 
March, 1886, others were admitted, among whom were Emma and 
Plessie Follett, Percy Pennick, John Geer, S. J. Sharp, Geo. Walker, 
Geo. Grim and Fanny Thorp. 

W. W. Wright Fost — ^o. 327, G. A. E., was chartered August 20, 
1883. The original members are the first twenty-five on record, name, 
native state, date of enlistment, rank, company and regiment, and 
term of service being given : 

John M. Brown, Va., Oct. 1, 1^61, Sergt., Co. K, 47 111. Inf., 3 vrs., promoted Capt. 

Orlando Brace, 111.. Sept. 10, 1862, private, Co. A, 124 111. Inf.', ^iV yrs., promoted 
corporal, wounded at Spanish Fort. 

George H. Martin, N. Y., Oct. 1, 1861, private, Co. K, 47 111. Inf., until Julv, 1865. 

George H. Martin, N. Y., Oct. 1, 1861, l.st Lieut., Co. B, 7 111. Inf., to close of war. 

.James Price, Kv., Aug. 21, 1862, private, Co. E, 88 111. Inf., 10 mos. , dis. for dis. 

Rohert H. Price, 111., Aug. 21, 1862, private, Co. E, 83 111. Inf., 2 vrs. and 10 mo.s. 

Robert J. Dickinson, N. Y., Sept. 5, 1862, private, Co. B, 127 111. Inf., 12i^ mos., 
wounded. 

William W. Wright, 111., June 1, 1864,, private, Co. H, 139 111. Inf., 5 mos.. clo.se 
of term. 

Andrew Galbraith, Pa., Aug. 18, 1862, marine artillery, disbanded. 

Andrew Galbraith. Pa., Aug. 18, 1862, U. S. navv, term expired. 

Andrew Galbraith, Pa., Feb. 24, 1865, 2d Lieut., Co. I, 151 111. Inf., 11 mos. 

Samuel M. Adam.s, O., Sept. 20, 1862, private, Co. F, 112 111. Inf . 2% yrs. 

Edwin Butler, 111., Sept. 20, 1862, .sergeant, Co. F, 112 III. Inf., 2% yrs. 

Austin C. Himes, Pa., Sept. 20, 1862,^private, Co. F, 112 111. Inf., 2^ yrs. 

John F. Rhodes, 111., Sept. 20, 1862, corporal, Co. F, 112 111. Inf., 1 yr. and 10 mos., 
wounded. 

David Tinlin, Can., Sept. 20, 1862, private, Co. F, 112 111. Inf., 2 yrs. and 8 mos., 
dis. for dis. 

Jesse Likens, Pa., Aug. 15, 1862, private, Co. F, 112 111. Inf., transferred. 

Je-sse Likens, Pa., Nov. 17, 1864, private, Co. K. 2d Y. R. C, 2li yrs., dis. for dis. 

Bradford F. Thompson, Me., Sept. 20, 1862, 1st Sergt., Co. B, 112 111. Inf., 2% yrs., 
captured. 

]\Iatthew H. Rounds, X. Y., Sept. 30. 1864, private, Co. B, 20 111. Inf., 9 mos. 

Gus. Hulsizer, N. J., Mav 31, 1864, private, Co. H, 134 111. Inf.. 5 mos. 

Gus. Hulsizer, N. J., Feb. 27, 1865, private, Co. A, 32 111. Inf., 9 mos. 

Charles E. Shinn, 111., Sept. 2, 1861. private, Co. B, 33 111. Inf., 4 vrs. and 2 mos. 

Thomas Gemmell. 111.. Aug. 29. 1861, private, Co. A, 30 111. Inf., 3 yrs. 11 mos. 

Bethuel Pierson. Pa., Fel). 7, 1865, private, Co. I, 151 111. Inf., 111.; mos. 

W. F. Xewland, Ind., Auff. 1863, private, Co. F, 79 Ind. Inf., 6 mos., dis. for dis. 

Daniel S. Hewitt, Pa., Feb. 26, 1864, private, Co. C, 1st Batt. M. M. 

James A. Henderson, Tenn., Feb. 1, 1865, private, Co. F, marine Art., 11 mos. 

William Hughes, IMich., Aug. 1862, private, Co. I, 18 Mich. Inf. 

William Hughes, Mich., Xov. 1863, private, Co. D, 11 Mich. Cav. 

Henrv B. Perry, W. Ya., Sept. 20, 1862, corporal. Co. F, 112 111. Inf., 2% yrs. 

Ambler T. Massac, 111., Aug. 20, 1864, private, Co. B, 29 111. Inf., 14i^ mos. 

Wm. H. Tavlor, 111., May 1, 1861, private, Co. G, 8 Mo. Cav., SIJ^ mos. 

Chas. E. Hill, Va., Nov. 11, 1863, private, Co. I, 11 U. S. Col. Art., 23)^ mos. 

James P. Headlv. 111., Aug. 12, 1862, Co. F, 112 111. Inf., 34 months. 

David G. Stouffer, Pa., Aus. 8, 1862, Co. B, 127 Penn. Inf., 9 months. 



'I'OULON TOWNSTITP, 2.^1> 

Darius Demuut, N. J., Aug. 12, 1862, Co. F, 112 111 Inf., 35 mdullis. 

Darius Demunt, N. J., Aug. 30, 1863, V. R. Cav., 35 montlis. 

Willis Pit'i-sun, N. J., April, 1861, Co. C, 4 N. Y. lul, 39 mouths 

Willis Piersou, N. J.. July, 1861, Co. C, 8 N. J. Inf.. 39 months. 

Samuel Burge, N. H., June 1, 1864, Co. H, 139 111. Vol., 5 months. 

Presly Tirrill, 111.. Aug. 12, 1862, Co. F. 113 111. Vol., 34 months. 

Joseph Fleming, N. Y., Aug. 12, 1862, Co. B, 112 111. Vol., 34 months. 

Louis C. Egbert, N. J., Sept. 17, 1861, Co. K, 47 111. Vol., 43 months. 

Louis C. Egbert, X. J., March 13, 1865, Co. E, 11 111. Cav., 43 months. 

Andrew Kamerer, N. Y., Aug, 12, 1862, Co. F, 112 111. Inf., 34 months. 

Wm. H. Little, N. J., Sept. 30, 1864, Co. I, 20 111. Vol., 3)/ months. 

Chas. W. Price, 1st Lieut., 111., June 30, 1862, Co. E, 71 IlL Vol., 45i<^ months. 

Chas. W. Price, 111., Feb. 29, 1864, Co. A, 77 111. Vol., 45i.< months. " 

Chas. W. Price, 111., July 25, 1864, Co. I, 117 111. Vol., 45i.^ months. 

Bartlett N. Fox, O., Oct. 15, 1861, Co. A, 2 Col. Inf., 36 months. 

William Newton, Eng., July 3, 1861, Co. B, 35 111. Vol., 53 months. 

William Newton, Eng., Dec. 3, 1862, Co. C, 4 U. S. Cav., 53 months. 

David Webster. 111., Aug. 14, 1862, Co. F, 112 111. Inf., 34 months. 

Joseph B. Witter, O., Sept. 17, 1861, Co. K, 47 111. Inf., 37 months. 

George P. Richer, O., June 12, 1861, Co. B, 19 111. Inf., 49 months. 

George P. Richer, O., Oct. 8, 1864, Co. K, 42 111. Inf., 49 months. 

W. H. Scott, 111., May 14, 1864, Co. G, 132 111. Inf., 5 months. 

Robert Pyle, O., Dec. 7, 1861, Co. K, 47 111. Inf., 36 months. 

Melville A. Bass, N. Y., Aug. 19, 1862, Co. D, 4 N. Y. H. Art., 14 months. 

Thomas Flanagan, N. Y., Jan. 25, 1864, Co. H, 9 111. Cav., 21 months. 

W^m. D. James, Pa., Aug. 17, 1861, Co. C, 10 111. Inf., 25 months. 

W^m. D. James, Pa., Feb. 23, 1864, Co. C, 10 111. Inf., 25 mouths. 

John W. Morrison, Va., ]VIarch 7, 1865, Co. K, 47 111. Inf., 103^ months. 

James Gelvin, vide Essex Tp. history. 

The pensioners residing at Toulon in November, 1883, were Saman- 
tlia Ketfer, receiving $20 per month ; Sylvester Sweet, $8 ; Jesse 
Likens, $4 ; John Clark, $6 ; Matthew H. Eounds, $4 ; John Black- 
burn, $24; Chas. E. Shinn, $8; E. J. Dickenson, |18; Orlando Brace, 
$18 ; J. F. Bhodes, $2.67; and James A. Henderson, $15. The latter 
now deceased. 

The first commander was John M. Brown, 1883-84, \vith Bradford 

F. Thompson, Adjutant. David Tinlin was elected commander for 
1885, with John M. Brown, adjutant. Andrew Galbi-aith was elected 
commander in 1880, with David Tinlin adjutant. The officers of 1887 
are, O. Brace, commander; I). S. Hewitt, S. Y.; L. C. Egbert, J. V.; 
Robert Pvle, S.; J. F. Rhodes, C; J. M. Brown, Q. M. T.; R. H. Price, 
O. of D.; C. E. Shinn, O. of G.; B. F. Thompson, D. to S. E. 

The soldiers who died in the service are named as follows: 
Captain W. W. Wright, Olanss Forss and John L. Adams, 112th 111. 
vol. ; Capt. Benj. Williams, Cb. G, 106th Regt. ; John S. Taylor, Co. 

G, 42d Regt. ; Joseph W. Jamison, Co. K, 47th Re^t. ; Geo. K. Prath- 
er and Philip O. Faber, 0th 111. Cav.; John A. and Wm. N. Perry, Co. 
P., 37th IlL Inf.; Murry Hotchkiss, 130th Ind. Inf. The names of sol- 
diers buried here, who died since the close of the war are, Wm. Rounds 
and H. B. Johnson, Co. F, 112th 111. Inf.; Flenry B. Dexter, Co. B, 37th 
111. Inf.; Alex. Headley, Co. B, 7th 111. Inf.; Elisha Mosher, Co. H, 
139th 111. Inf.; Henrv W. Thomas, Co. I, 151st Inf.; Wm. O. Johnson, 
Co. H, 139th Regt.; St. James A. Henderson, Co.K. 47th 111. Inft.,and 
Nathaniel W. Dewey, Co. H, 139th III. Inf. Sylvester Sweet, of the 
war of 1812, and Wm, Dunn, of the Mexican war, are also buried 
here in the Toulon cemeterv. 



290 MISTORY OF STARK COUNTY. 

In the Khocles burying ground lie the remains of Carthn Rhodes of 
the U. S. Marine Corps. 

Co. G, HI. X. G. was organized at Toulon in 1877. 

Literary^ Debating and Mutual Societies. — The Lotus Club dates 
back to April, 1874, when it was organized at the house of Martin 
Shallenberger. Its object, says Miss E, L. Mclveighan, " was the mu- 
tual improvement cf its members, who were limited to twelve, but 
afterward extended to sixteen. The girls who signed the constitution 
and still retain then* membershiiD, though the most of them have 
changed their names, are: Ada Fuller, Tillie and Pauline Shallenber- 
ger, now Mrs. Reagan ; Sarah Eastman, Sarah Silliman, Bell Godfrev, 
Kate Ketfer, Kate Adams, Sophia Wright, Louisa Culbertson. who died 
seven years ago, Mary Davis, Ella Lowman, Jodie Jones, Mary Lyon, 
Nellie McKeighan and Effle Lyon. Meetings Avere regularly held for 
some time, but gradually lessened in number and interest until the club 
only existed in name. In September, 1884, during a visit of Mrs. Mary 
(Lyon) Hart, nine of the original members assembled and reoi'ganized. 
At a reunion of the Lotus Club held in August, 1885, at the house of 
Miss Sarah Eastman, there were eight of the original club present. 
These were Mrs. EfHe McKeighan, Mrs. Nellie Silliman, Mrs. Ada Ful- 
ler, Mrs. Tilhe Higgins, Mrs. Sophia AVright, Miss Sarah Silliman, 
Mrs. Belle Newland and Mrs. Sarah Eastman. The last named was 
elected president ; Mrs. Higgins, vice-president ; Mrs. McKeighan. 
secretary, and Miss Silliman, Treasurer. In September, 1886, the last 
meeting was held at the home of Mrs. Effie L. McKeighan, at Toulon. 

The Woman's Club of Toulon, successor to the Reading Circle, 
Dorcas Society, and other old-time literary associations, may be 
said to have been organized November 2, 1878. Mrs. Walker 
was chosen president. The original members were : Mrs. Benj. 
Turner, Mrs. Stella Walker, Mrs. Lois Baldwin. Mrs. H. M. 
Blair, Mrs. Thornton, Mrs. Carrie Rhodes, Mrs. Emily Hall, at 
whose house the first meeting was held, Mrs. E. H. Shallen- 
berger, who drafted the constitution, Miss Sarah Turner and Miss 
Sarah Berfield. Miss ^lartha Berlield was chosen an honorary 
member. The second meeting was held at Mrs. Turner's, and cele- 
brated its first anniversary at the Opera House. The second anniver- 
sary was observed at the Toulon House. Mrs. C. R. Rhodes was 
elected president in 1879-80, and Miss Lois Baldwin secretary. In 
1880-1, Mrs. W. B. Nelson, president, and Miss Martha Berfield secre- 
tary, Mrs. E. H. Shallenberger president and Miss Sarah A. Turner 
secretary, Mrs. R. A. Turner president and Mrs. Davis secretary ; 
1881-2, Mrs. Stella D. Walker president and Mrs. Harriet M. Blair 
secretary ; 1882, Mrs. Eliza Lyon president and Mrs. Anna K. Wright 
secretary ; Mrs. C. R. Rhodes president, Mrs. Lucy P. Smith president 
and Miss May Cady secretary ; 1883, Mrs. Kate Geer president and 
Mi^. Eliza Davis secretary, also Mrs. A. Johnson secretary ; Mrs. ^Mary 
Wright president, Mrs. Emily Hall secretary, Mrs. Davis president 
and Mrs. Mary Wright secretary. In 1884, Miss Nellie Wright jjresi 
dent. Miss Sarah Eastman secretary ; Mrs. R. A. Turner secretary and 
Mrs. Kate Geer secretary ; Miss Sarah Berfield president and Miss 



TOULON 'rcwNf^itii*, i>91 

Cora B. Swank secretary ; 1885, Mrs. Stella I). Walker president and 
Mrs. Harriett M. Blair seci'etary ; Mrs. Geer president, Mrs. C. 11. 
Rhodes president and Mrs. Ruth A. Price secretary ; 1886, Mrs. Yan 
Osdell president and Dell A. Lyon secretary ; Mrs. N. J. Smith, Mrs. 
Emily Hall, Miss Cassie Dewey and Miss Sarah Berfield. 

The Woman's Christian Temperance Union was organized May 29, 
188 . The delegates to the W. C. T. U. convention at Peoria in Octo- 
ber, 1884, were Mrs. R. A. Turner, Mrs. S. A. Chamberlain and Mrs. 
R. A. Price, represented in convention by Mrs. R. A. Turner. In June, 
1885, the representatives at the Canton convention were Mrs. R. A, 
Turner, Mrs. F. A. Godfrey and Mrs. S. D. Walker. In 1886 all the 
members represented this society at Toulon. The Farmington convention 
of the summer of 1886 claimed as representatives Mrs. A. W. Hicks, Mrs. 
S. A. Chamberlain and Mrs. R. A. Turner. The names of present mem- 
bers are as follows: Madams R. A. Henderson, R. A. Turner, S. D. 
Walker, R. A. Price, L. Purge, C. J. Pliter, C. R. Rhodes, C. K. Stick- 
ney, F. Godfrey, M. McClenahan, Mrs. Stevens, Mary Wright, Miss 
Sarah Turner, E. S. Lyon, Jennie Foster, Miss T. Dewey, Mrs. D. W. 
Dew^ey, Mrs. S. A. Chamberlain, Mrs. A. W. Hicks, IVIrs. Brooks, Mrs. 
Flint and Mrs. John Smith. Mrs. R. A. Turner has presided since 
organization with Mrs. S. I). Walker corresponding secretar}^, Mrs. R. 
H. Price recording secretarv and Mrs. II. M. Blair treasurer. 

The Y. M. C. A. of Toiilon was organized March 23, 1885, with the 
following named members : William A. Dewey, C. N. Christy, Elmer 
Packer, E. B. Starrett, W N. Starrett, F. W. Rhodes, Charles B. Hall, 
A. T. Smith, O. C. Starrett, J. M. Stanley, Frank Smith, F. B. Nichol- 
son, C. A. Foster, James B. Mason, George Downend, C. W. Eicholz, 
Frank Rist, W. F. Nicholson and J. W. Stephens. Charles H. Christy 
was first president, succeeded in 1886 by the iirst secretary, W. F. 
Nicholson, and he as secretar}" by W. H. Starrett. The membersliip is 
twenty-eiglit. The rooms of the association are well furnished and 
provided with a very liberal sujiply of books, pamphlets, magazines and 
newspapers. Prior to its organization. nu\ny of the members l)elonged 
to the " Young Peoples' Christian Association." The records of the tirst 
Y. M. C. A. cannot be found, though Judge Wright, one of its most 
energetic members, made a search for them. 

The Toulon Literary Society was organized in 1858. T. A. Forman, 
D. Lownum, Dr. Copestake, Martin Shallenberger, G. A. Clifford, T. 
J. Henderson, P. M. Blair, O. White, H. M. Hall, M. A. Fuller, J. A. 
Henderson, called the meeting to organize December 2, 1858. 

The Philozata Society was a permanent organization at Toulon in 
1867. 

The Reading Circle of 1867 was presided over generally b}' Oliver 
White, with John F. Rhodes, secretary. Among the essayists Avere 
the men named, Miss Kate Whitaker, Mrs. M. Shallenberger, Miss 
Heath, William Thompson, Miss Tilly Beatt}", and others. Mrs. 
Turner, Miss Tilly Shallenbei'ger and others, generally entertained 
their associate members with select music. 

The old Couit House Delating Society, or Toulon Private Deba- 
ting Club, the constitution of whicli was the basis of the constitution 



9,9-2 m&mkV OP STAftK COtT^fTY. 

of the present debating societ}', as di'afted bv W. W. Wright, was one 
of the leading literary clubs of the county. The first meeting re- 
corded was held January 29, ISfJl. with I)r. Chamberlain presiding. 
The question was : " Has any State the right to withdraw from the 
Union.'- J. A. Henderson, P. M. Blair, O. F. Dorrance, and F. Rhodes, 
affirmed, while D. Lowman, M. A. Fullei', Kathaniel Wi'ight and Mr. 
Walley, a banker here in the days of "stumped-tailed currency," 
taking the opposite side. Among members taking part in sub- 
sequent debates, were Eev. Wdliam Leggett, W. W. Wright, 
Capt. Benj. Williams, E. L. Emerv. D. J. Walker. J. W. Hewitt, 
Rev. Xeff, G. A. Clifford, C. L. Eastman, X. M. Bonham, B. G. 
HaU. The last meeting on record took place Xovember 28, 1865, 
when the resolution that Jeff Davis should be executed, was carried. 
M. A. Fuller was secretai-y of this society from its organization to this 
date. Rhodes, Chaml)erlain, Walker, Blair, J. A. Henderson, Wright 
and D. Lowman, sei-ved as presidents, with others. 

The Toulon Debating Society was organized February 5, 1872, with 
the following named members : James H. Miller, G. 'N". Nicholas, R. 
Creighton Wright, George A. Lowman, W. W. Wright, Samuel Burge. 
C. H. Burge. D. J. Walker, John F. Rhodes, H. L. Harrington, J. K^ 
P. Lowman, Edward A. Burge, E. B. Lyon, Frank Matthews, Frank 
Fuller, Levi Silliman, William Dunn, and T. M. Shallenberger. W. W. 
AA^right was elected president, and James H. Miller, secretary. Willis 
Dewey, Frank, Prout, Oliver White and M. A. Daughei'ty, were ad- 
mitted before the close of 1873. The initiation fee was .$15. In 1880 
the society was incorporated under the name " Toulon Debating Soci- 
ety." The constitution of 1872 was drafted by Messrs. Mathews, E. 

A. Burge and James H. Miller. The by-laws were reported by John 
F. Rhodes and Thomas Shallenberger. The question—" That success 
is the best criterion of character." was the first discussed and decided 
for the affirmative. Among the names on record as presidents are the 
following : W. W. Wright. G. W. Nicholas, John F. Rhodes, G. A. 
Lowman, C. H. Burge, D. J. Walker, F. Fuller, R. C. Wright, E. B. Lyon, 
Levi Silliman, J. K. P. Lowman. G. M. Miller, Geo. McKeighan, 
William Dunn, Frank Matthews, E. A. Burge, Frank Prout, M. A. 
Daugherty, F. Lyon, Edward Starrett, A. LL Price, Wm. Hughes, E. 

B. Lyon, Thomas Treat, James H. Millei-, R. J. Dickenson, I. N. Wade, 
princi})al of the high school in 1878, and Dr. Baldwin. J. H. Miller 
was secretary up to March, 1876. From April following to February 
1877, A. P. Miller, E. B. Starrett, and G. A. Thomas served at inter- 
vals, when J. H. Miller was reelected secretaiy. Since 1878, A. P. 
Miller has filled the position of secretary. In May, 1873, Dr. R. B. 
Bement lectured before the societ}'. In February, 1875, John G. Saxe 
was here. On December 9, of this year a present of an office chair was 
made to the secretary, Mr. Miller, in recognition of his services to the 
society. Prof. Parsons lectured here on January 6, 1876, and Mrs. Abby 
Sage Richardson in November, 1877. In 1878 the "Blind preacher of 
Congress" lectured here. Schuyler Colfax, Fred. Douglass, Henry 
Ward Beecher, Laura L)aint3\ J. C. Burroughs, "Eli Perkins," "Josh 
Billings," Wendell Phillips, were here in 1878, General Kilpatrick, 



Ann Eliza Young and Tlieo. Tilton In 1880, and in Febrnary of this 
year an anniversary banquet was given, (^no less than 180 persons par- 
ticipating) at the Town Hall, J. F. Ehodes presided. A. P. Miller 
presided over the ninth anniversary, and James H. Miller over the 
tenth anniversary meeting of its organization. Evei-y winter this 
society has introduced to the people some able lecturers or artists, and 
in this year, beginning in October, 1886, and ending in February, 
1887, such well-known names as Laura Dainty, General Lew. "Wallace, 
Chaplain J. P. Eoe, Dr. James Hedley are on the program, with the 
Nashville students and entertainments by local talent. 

Miscellaneous. — The mnsic school of Miss Ahce M. Lowman was 
opened at Toulon, in November, 1867. 

The Toulon sax-horn band was re-organized in February, 1868. An 
organization of this character existed prior to the war. 

The first regular meeting of the Toulon Benevolent Society was 
held in May, 1870. Mrs. Whitaker was president \Yith M. L. White, 
secretary. 

The Marble Club or Shoe Fly Club, was organized at Toulon, 
in May, 1880. 

The '' P)uds of Promise," a social organization, organized in Novem- 
ber, 1872, continued to exist until November, 1883, when its last supper 
was given. It comprised the greater number of the younger citizens 
of Toulon. 

The Musical Institute w^as organized at Toulon, October 4, 1876, 
with Samuel Purge, president ; Wdliam Dewey, secretary ; and Messrs. 
Howard, Gaston, Theo. Whitlock, William Dewey, Wesley Rist, Lou 
and Lottie Brace, Mary and Ella Christy, Pauline Shallenberger, Ada 
Nowlan and Katie Newcomer, a committee on scholarships. 

The Chautauqua Literarj" and Scientific Circle of Toulon, dates to 
1879, when four members, one being a member of the first graduating 
chass, signed the constitution. 

Old base ball club is said to date back to 1866, when a Dr. Swazey 
referred to the game and assisted in the organization of the first club. 
Among the members were W. W. Wright, secretary ; J. M. Brown, 
Harlan Pierce, W. G. Bradley, now in Nebraska, B. G. Hall, now in 
Iowa, George Stone, Neponsett, Bureau connt}^. 111., Henry Harring- 
ton, now a physician at Monmouth, 111., George W. Dewey or 
" Yankee George," now in Guthrie county, Iowa, A. T. Iliggins, 
Robert Fell, of Davis & Fell, W. T. Hall, now a pliysician of Tonlon. 
I). J. Walker was a member of the club. Kewanee, Galva, Princeville, 
Lafayette, Altona and Bradfoi'd clubs were generally beaten in con- 
tests! The base ball circle of the present time com|)rises such players 
as C. Hall and Ed. O'Donnell, and the sons of many of those who 
participated in the games of the old club. Speaking of C. W. Hall, 
who is a student of Rush Medical College, Chicago, a re})ort ^vas cur- 
rent in December, 1886, that the New York City Metropolitan base 
ball club, members of the American Association, have engaged his 
services for the coming season — six months — at $1,700, expenses 
paid. 



204 HISTOKY OF STAEK COtlA^TV, 

" The nine worthies." 

" Pardon me, if I speak like a eaptain." 

" Will make him fly an ordinary pitch." 

" No doubt but that he hath got a quiet catch." 

" I'll have an action of batterj- against him.'' 

" Ma.sking the business from the common eye." 

TOWK or AVTOMIXG. 

Wyoming is made up of all kinds of materials, and its society is 
exceedingly miscellaneous. There is the inquisitive Yankee, pushing- 
forward his new inventions ; the industrious Pennsylvanian, amassing 
wealth l)v the aid of his iron sinews ; the shrewd Irishman, lookino- as 
cheerful as the blue smoke that curls up from his pleasant home; the 
deliberate Englishman, boasting the superiority of his country and his 
laws; the canny Scotchman, making his acres blossom like the rose; 
and the rudd3^-looking German, singing his songs of " Faderland " and 
hoarding up every little ''shiner" that gets between his fingers. Each 
brought along with him his early habits and associations ; his own 
views of business, laws and religion ; and, as a natural consequence, 
when brought together on public questions, were apt to boil up like a 
mixture of salt and soda, l)ut the spirit of the country and circum- 
stances boiled them down into one people. 

There are in the towni no church steeples with bells in, that tolled our 
great-grandfathers to the toml) ; no long lines of graves, in which are 
buried the virtues of those ancestors only known from tradition ; 
there is no gray -haired pastor, rising up like a sacred statue in the 
memory : no aged deacon, with his head resting on the side of the pew 
and enjoying a brief sleep as the preacher sermonizes ; no old sexton, 
lim])ing away to the hurrying ground with his spade upon his shoulder, 
f(jr the purpose of making an unceremonious rattle among the dry 
bones. Yet the city has a past upon which the historian can dwell. 
Nature's mighty cathedral still stands around and above with its lofty 
dome of sun, moon and stars ; but its pillars are not overgrown with the 
moss of centuries. The great high priests that worshiped at the altars 
and burnt incense to the great Spirit — where are they? The temple 
still stands, but the worshipers are gone. Here and there, we meet 
with melancholy souveniers of some tribe that wandered here in early 
years ; l>ut the mass lie buried under the mounds with their Aveapons of 
war crumbling to dust, and their historv buried alono- with them. 

Unlike the county-seat the histor}" of this town is linked with the 
personal history of many of the pioneers of Essex, Penn and Valley 
townships as well as of Toulon township, in which it is situate. For 
this reason, the histories of these townships must be read in connection 
with this chapter to obtain the fidl knowledge of the character and 
manner of its settlers and of its settlement and progress. Many new 
names are also identified with the old village of Spoon Eiver — names 
brought from all parts of the Union, from the Canadas and from 
Europe. 

It is the oldest village in the county, being laid out by B. M. Hayes, 
survevor of Putnam countv, for Gen. Samuel Thomas, in March, 1S3«), 
and the plat acknowledged in Mav of that vear. The area of the 



TOULON TOWNSHIP. 205 

original town, or from William street on the north to Agard street on 
the sonth is Y9 27-33 rods, and from First to Seventh or East street 
156i rods, with streets, 82|^ feet wide, alley 16^ feet, lots 156| feet 
lono- ranging from 52^ to 66 feet wide. Smith and Main streets formed 
the centre of the town with the public square between Fourth and 
Fifth and Smith and Mam streets. 

Two years later very little in the way of improvement was affected. 
In Mrs. Shallenbero-er's " Stark County*^ and its Pioneers " it is stated 
that "the Lacon Ilerald in 1838 spoke' of as having upon its site "one 
second-hand log smoke house " which served the double purpose of 
store and postoffice. Nevertheless its name appears upon several maps 
of that time, and it was a prominent candidate for the county seat. It 
is said that some speculators interested in the sale of lots had circulars 
struck off and cii'culated in the eastern states in which this town was 
represented in 1837, at the head of navigation on Spoon river, with 
fine warehouses towering aloft and boats lying at the wharf which 
negroes were loading and unloading, giving the appearance of a bus\' 
commercial mart. This nuiy be but a story, still it serves to illustrate 
the speculating mania of those days : which disease has not yet ceased 
to atfiict mankind, but only traveled a few degrees farther west. A 
gentleman who had been somewhat victimized by such false reports in 
1838, revenged himself by perpetrating the following rhymes : 



o 

Osceola's but a nauiL', a staked out town at best, 
Which, like the Indian warrior's fame, has sunk to endless rest 
Wyoming's still an emptier sound, with scarce a wooden peg, 
Save that my old friend Barrett has, to serve him as a leg ! " 



The early lot purchasers at Wyoming are named in the following- 
list : Giles C. Dana, 1842 ; M. B. YanPetten, 1860 ; Robert Barrett, a 
one-legged shoemaker, 1843; Casper Katzenberger, 1 854 ; James P. 
Greenough, 1858; Wm. Kearns, 1854; Samuel AYriglev. 1856; John 
Wrigley, 1851; \N . O. Shaw, 1857; Pollv Thurston,*^ 1850; D. C. 
Green,- 1858 ; Patrick Murphv. 1861 ; John AVhite, 1860 ; Alfred F. 
LaShells, 1857; J. P. LaShells, 18i9: T. D. Guthrie, 1852 ; Greenwalt 
& Dixon, 1856; C. AV. Brown, 1860; School Trustees, lots 10 and 11, 
in block 10, November, 1850, March, 1851; John Colgan, 1856; 
St. Luke's Protestant Episcopal Societv, lot 8, block 10, Thomas ad- 
dition, 1857; H. A. Hoist, 1852; S. F"^ Otman, 1855; W. F. Cristy, 
Robert K. Woods, A. G. Hammond, 1857 ; Bassett & Pierce, 1861 ; 
Francis A. Milliken, 1855 ; D. P. I5eers and wife, 1856; Edwin Hutch- 
ison, 1852; Trustees Methodist Episcopal church, lot 4, B. C. Thomas 
addition, 1857; Rufus Woodcock, 1852; Joel Cox, 1855; T. F. Hurd, 
1843; W. G. Thompson, 1848; Maiy G. Brooks. 1856; Isaac Young. 
1857; James Martin, 1858. Wrigiey's addition to Wyoming, lots 1 to 
11, each containing from f acre to \\ acre, was surveyed by S. F. 
Otman, and acknowledged by John Wrigley, June 17, 1857. This 
tract Hes southeast of the Wvoming & Galena i'oa<l. 

The additions bv W. F. Thomas, 1870; J. G. Greene, 1870; (t. C. 
Dana, 1870; Scott It Wrigley, 1872; and Castle, 1S7(>, with Dana's 
first addition, Thomas' first addition, and Castle's addition of 1876, 
make up the present tow^n. 



296 HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY. 

The early purchasers of town lots in Green's addition to Wyoming- 
were : Harvey N. Fox, 1869 ; B. F. Boiighn, Gecrge W. Selders, Mar- 
garet Turner, 1870; IS'ewton Bouglin, Thomas N. Benedict, 1871; 
Jonatlian Sims, 1873 ; David Fast and Son, 1874 to 1875, and others 
since that time. 

In Dana's addition the lot buyers were : John Hawkes, 1860 ; M. 
A. Coles, J. R. Wilson, 1865 ; Geo. A. Seaver, 1863 ; Benjamin F. Boughn, 
J. M. and H. :\r. Rogers, 1868 ; Thomas W. Bloomer, 1869 ; James 
Hulsizer, Kerns and Cox, 1870; S. K. Conover, 1872; Laura Fox, E. O. 
Swift, 1873 ; F. F. Brockwa}'', A. J. Sheets, Greenwalts, Gates, 
Mahanys, Purintons, Kings, Truax, Paynes, Aumicks and others pur- 
chased subsequently. In 1873 the Central Hall Company of Wyoming 
secured a part of Block 1, and in June, 1880, the village purchased a 
part of the same block. In Nov., 1865. St. Luke's Protestant Episcopal 
Society secured a part of Block 6. The first purchasers in Scott and 
Wrigley's came in 1872, the Jordans on Block 2. In 1870 W. H. But- 
ler, A. II. Huntington, Peter Lane purchased on Block 1, Castle's ad- 
dition to AVyoming; O. G. Smith, Block 2; Aaron Merker, Block 3; 
Alfred Wolfe, Block 5; Mary M. Fuller, Perry H. Smith and Martin 
S. Stoner, Block 6 , Joseph F. Noone, Block 7. In 1871 some of the 
other blocks of this subdivision wei'e entered. 

The town owes its establishment and name to Gen. Samuel Thomas, 
l)orn in Connecticut, but a settler of the Wyoming Yalley, Pa., from 
1807 to Aug-., 1834, when he set out with his family and William Godlev 
for Spoon river, and settled here in October, 1834. Less than two years 
elapsed befoi*e he had the town surveyed under the title, " Town of 
Wvominii'." At this time the Essex settlement southwest and the 
Seeley settlement northeast, and Grant's hut on the Holgate Farm, 
may be said to be the only spots on the wilderness of Upper Sjioon 
river where civilization was to be f<mnd; but the Indians had their 
corn lields near the mouth of Cam})iug Run; on Indian Creek and 
round Walnut Grove. At Bulbona Grove was the French trader, while 
at Boyd's Grove and Wyanet the beginnings of settlement were made. 
The names of Miner, Parker, Bradford, Sturm. Smith, and all those 
mentioned in the organic and political chapters were scattered round, 
but still the pioneer home of the Thomas family in Illinois must be 
considered in the wilderness. 

In early 3'ears, the horse-thief gang visited this part of the county, 
and some members resided here. The adjuster, described by C. S. 
Payne as a green-eyed, spectacled gentleman of very solemn demeanor, 
was accustomed to pass u}> Spoon river once or twice a year to adjust 
or equalize the proceeds of horse sales for the horse-thief gang. There 
are a few today in the county who well remember this adjuster and 
those horse-thieves. 

Now the additions to population and enterprise created new aspira- 
tions. Nothing less than separate government would suit the big ideas 
of the httle hamlet, and a petition to this effect was signed in 1865, its 
})rayer granted, and ''The Town of Wyoming" was in fact a town. 
The records of the village are not in good shai)e, l)ut fi'om them the 
following list of village officers is made out: 



TOULON TOWNSHIP. 297 

1872 — A. G. Hammond, C. C(^llier, A. J. Conover, P. H. Smith 
and Otis T. Dyer, trustees ; Perry H. Smith was chosen president, and 
C. Colher, clerk, 1873 — Charles S. Payne, president ; W.H.Butler, 
A. J. Stone, H. F. Turner, John W. Agard and John Ellis, trustees; 
C. Collier was chosen clerk. 1871: — ^S. F. Otman, president; H. J. 
Baldwin, clerk ; J. E. Decker, attorney ; T. W. Bloomer, Alfred Wolfe, 
H. F. Turner, C. P. McCorkle and John Ellis, trustees. 1875 — G. W. 
Scott, C. P. McCorkle, A. D. Wolfe, trustees ; J. E. Decker, attorney ; 
W. H. Butler, clerk ; Isaac Thomas, police magistrate ; and Capt. 
Otman, president. 1876 — S. F. Otman, A. J. Stone, J. A. Klock, T. 
W. Bloomer, Adam Ljon and Peter Lane, trustees ; W. H. Butler was 
elected clerk, and S. F. Otman, mayor. 

In 1873 the vote for village organization under the general hiw was 
77 against 7. A petition was presented to the circuit court in 1876, 
asking that the south oneJialf of Sections 1 and 2, Essex, be detatclied 
from AVyoming. The trustees of Wyoming, in October, 1878, were, 
Agard S. Stark. Jordon Hamilton and O. T. Dyer, the latter re- 
placing W. J. Bond. T. B. Wall was clerk. In' 1879 the trustees 
were : C. F. Hamilton, J. E. King, E. Clark, J. W. Smith, and I. II. 
Cowen ; clerk, T. B. Wall, and police magistrate, Isaac Thomas. Tlie 
trustees elected in 1880 were: John A. Klock, John AV. Smith, Chas. 
I). Castle, Andrew F. Stickney, Chas. F. Hamilton and John Jordon. 
Thomas B. AVall was elected clerk ; C. F. Hamilton was chosen presi- 
dent. The trustees elected in 1881 were: C. F, Hamilton, president; 
C. D. Castle, A. D. Wolfe, J. W. Smith. J. John, and C. P. McCorkle. 
H. A. Hammond was elected clerk. 

The Wyoming election of 1882 was hotlj contested, J. B. Kobinson, 
of the People's party, receiving 130 votes ; J. A. Klock and E. Clark, 
antiJicense, 122, and Elisha Clark, People's party, 127 — the three 
members elect. CUiarles Sargent received the total vote, 250, for vil- 
lage clerk. By order of the board the certihcate of stock, :I^10,ooO, 
which Wvoming held in the Dixon, Peoria & Hannibal Railroad, was 
sold in 1882 to A. H. Castle, of Chicago, for ^500. This is a sad 
eulogy on the morals of railroad companies. In 1883 C. P. McCorkle 
and Dr. J, C. Copestake were elected trustees, Charles Sargent, clerk, 
and James M. Rogers, police magistrate. The trustees elected in 1884 
were J. A. Klock, Allen M. Pierce and W. A. Truax ; Charles Sargent, 
clerk. A. M. Pierce was chosen president and Frank Thomas attorney. 
The trustees of 1885 was, John AV. Smith, llenr}- Duckworth and F. 
A. Sweetland ; S. K. C/onover was electetl clerk, succeeded bv F. P. 
Hill 

The Wyoming election of 1886 resulted in the choice of E. S. 
Teeter, AA"^. A. Truax and Peter Sanner, license men, over Dr. J. C. 
Copestake, J. E. King and ]\Iiller Patterson, anti-license men. J. AV. 
Smith was elected president; L. F. Hill, clerk; H. A. Hammond, treas- 
urer and Frank Thomas, attorney. The clerk's position was filled by 
S. K. Conover. The expenditures of the village, shown by appropria- 
tion of August, 1886, aggregate tlie sum of :$3,(»00, to be levied, as- 
sessed and collected. 

Schools. — The history of the schools of AVyoming begins in that of 



298 HISTOEY OF STARK COUNTY. 

Toulon and Essex townships, and to these sketclies the reader is 
referred. The school records in existence comprise a number of books, 
some well kept, some very poor in data and facts. From them, how- 
ever, the following- memoranda is taken: In May, 1857, the district 
composed of sections 1 and 2 and part of 3. Township 12, range 6, and 
sections 35, 36 and part of 23, Township 13, range 6, was presided over 
b\^ J. B. Brown, H. A. Hoist, S. F. Otman, Isaac Thomas, Wm. B. 
/Armstrong. Dr. Milliken, Perry Stancliff, Isaac X. Tidd, directors or 
parties in interest. At this time the question of additional school 
room was considered ; and on June 13 decided affirmatively. It was 
ordered to levy a tax for keeping the summer school in operation, and 
also to establish a graded school. On June 22, a vote on raising $3,000 
was voted against — 20 to 17; so that the district had to be satisfied 
with some repairs to the old building. Miss Harriett Milliken was 
teacher at this time; but in the fall of 1857 Enoch K. Evans was 
engaged to teach the winter school. In 1858 J. G. Greene and Isaac 
Thomas, clerk, are named as directors. Mrs. M. A. C^heney was teacher, 
at 83(1 per month until May, when Miss Mary W. Thomas took her 
place. In the winter W. II. Greenwood was engaged. Early in 1859 
the district was divided, and H. A. Hoist, Perry Stancliff and Dr. J. 
G. Greene chosen directors of "Wvomino- district. In ^[ry Miss Marv 
Hayden was appointed teacher, at §20 per month ; and so well did she 
conduct this scliool, she was reengaged in July. At that time there 
was no summer vacation. In September, 1859, Dr. Wm. Hayden, W. 
H. Butler and John B. Pettit were elected directors, and the first 
named served as clerk. In April, 1860, Miss Minerva Woodrnff was 
engaged as teacher at §25, to succeed Augnstus Hammond, who tauo-ht 
here during the five previous months. Mrs. Hammond assisted him 
voluntarily, and to her the directors granted $20. Isaac Thomas suc- 
ceeded J. J]. Pettit as director. Playden left the village in 1860, but 
his successor was not elected that vear. Augustus Hammond ^vas 
reengaged to teach the winter school at $35 per month. In May, 
1861, Miss Marv Pettit was eng-ao-ed to teach the summer school. In 
Augnst W. II. Butler and J. M. Thomas were elected directors, and 
Charles Myers engaged as teacher at $30 per month. James M. 
Thomas was elected director in August, 1861, vice Dr. Hayden. Isaac 
Thomas was elected in 1860 and Wm. H. Butler in 1861 ; reelected in 
1863 with J. G. Greene. In 1863 Isaac Thomas resigned. W. II. 
Butler was chosen clerk, and in 1868 Perry Stancliff was a})pointed 
clerk. In 1869 the school tax was increased from sixty cents to $1.50 
per $100 valuation. In 1864 J. P. Lashells was elected, and in 1865, 
Samuel Butler, to serve until August, 1868. In 1868-9 Perry Stan- 
cliff, J. (t. Greene and John C. Copestake were the directors. In 1871 
the names of Wm. Schroeder, builder; Beal & Gray, brick manufac- 
turers ; (3ttman & King, quarrymen, and J. G. Briggs, lime Ijurners, 
occur in connection with building the school house. The name of 
Samuel Thomas is in connection with the sale of school lot. In 1869 
S. K. Conover was elected as director, and subsequently appointed 
cler'k. In 1870 Pei-ry Stancliff was re-elected director, the meeting 
being held in the brick school house, for District of Township 12, 



TOULON TOWNSHIP. 299 

range 6, and District ISTo. 8 of Township 13, range 6. In September, 
1870, the first movement was made toward erecting a large school 
building. At that time it was resolved to raise one ]3er cent for a 
sinking fund, to borro\v $5,000, and to dispose of the old brick house. 
In April, 1871 J. C. Copestake was elected director, and in May a 
vote of the two districts was taken in re new school house, when it was 
decided to build on the old site. In July a vote of 27 to 1 agreed 
to increase indebtedness of the two districts to five per cent of the " 
assessed valuation. 

In 1861 Miss Mary Pettit taught three months, and in 18G2-3 
Charles Myers presided for five months. Mrs. S. A. Beatty and D. H. 
Allen were teachers here in 1863 ; Greorge A. Seaver and Anna E. 
McGlashan in 1861-5. In 1866 she and Miss Cheery were here, the 
former continuing in 1867 with Miss Ardehne Jarneau. In 1869 Miss 
Kate McGlashan assisted in the schools here, and the names of C. O. 
Lambert, Miss R. A. Courtright, Miss Abbie Ilulsizer, and Miss Belle 
Brown appear as teachers. In 1870-71 Miss Evans, J. Sohnand E. G. 
Wynkoop were teachers. In 1872 the names of William Nowlan, Miss 
H.' Stone, Miss M. E. Stone, Miss Mattie Stone, Alonzo Kicholls and 
Miss Fletcher appear as teachers in the new school building, with 
Simeon Ellis janitor. In 1873 the names of Wm, Nowlan, Miss Fannie 
Thomas, Annie M. Rule, Rebecca Butler, W. R. Sandham, appear as 
teachers ; Peter Pettit was janitor. During Charles Myers term there 
were nineteen boys and fifteen girls admitted to school, who, with the 
thirteen boys and sixteen girls at beginning of term, in N"ovember, 
1861, made up sixty-three pupils. 

On July 1, 1871, Newton Matthews, of Peoria county, bought $3,- 
500 of district bonds for $3,150, due July 1, 1876, and $2,000 on July 
1,1881. Levi Silliman also purchased $f,000 worth of bonds for $900, 
due July 27, 1877. In 1872 S. K. Conover, clerk and director since 
1869, was reelected. On his resignation in 1873, Perry Stanclifi" and 
T. W. Bloomer were elected directors and John C. Copestake, a mem- 
ber of the board, was appointed clerk. In 1871 George W. Scott was 
elected director. In Se])tember, 1874, the "Wyoming south side schools 
opened, with Prof. Sandham in charge of high school ; W. W. Ham- 
mond, grammar; Rebecca Butler, intermediate; Nellie Walker, pri- 
mary ; 1('4 names were enrolled. 

in 1878 James M. Rogers was elected a director; in 1879 Thomas 
W. Bloomer; in 1880, G. W. Scott, reelected (former clerk, was elec- 
ted president of the board). In 1881, James M. Rogers (also appointed 
clerk). In May, 1879, a school term of eight months was adopted ; 
$700 made the'salary of princi])al, and $10 per month the pay of other 
teachers. In January, 1877, the south Wyoming school house was 
destroyed by fire, but the damage was secured under insurance policies 
of $7,000. In July, 1878, W. R. Sandham was princijial ; Miss Carrie 
Butler, teacher in grammar school ; Rebecca G. Butler, intermediate 
classes ; and E. E. Stevenson, primary classes. L. Hill was chosen jan- 
itor. The principal received $90 per month, each teacher $12.50, and 
the janitor $25. In 1879 Mrs. C. W. YanPetten was appointed 
teacher, vice Mrs. R. G. Butler, resigned. A. B. Hill was appointed 
18 



300 HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY. 

principal; Mrs. YanPetten, H. Y. Morrison, and E. E. Stevenson, 
teachers, and S. F. Hill, janitor. In 1S80 Miss M. E. Beers took Miss 
Stevenson's place, being tlie only change on the staff prior to Jnne. 

In June, 1880, B. G. Hall was appointed principal, and in Septem- 
ber Miss Alice Kellar was appointed teacher. In 1 881 B. G. Hall was 
reengaged as ])rincipal, and Miss Louisa Down emploj^ed as teacher. 
In April, 1881, it was resolved to borrow SI, 000 from Wyoming vil- 
lage to meet bond maturing. In 1882 A. W. King was elected direc- 
tor, George W. Scott still serving as clerk. In 1883 Mr, Scott was 
reelected. In 1882 Wm. Boggs was appointed janitor ; B. G. Hall 
reengaged as principal ; Miss Anna Keller, Miss Alice Keller and Miss 
Louisa Down, teachers. In April, 1883, Miss Grace Jones and Miss 
L. H. Searle took the places of Susan Down and Anna Kellar. Miss 
Alice Kellar was retained with them, and B. G. Hall, principal. John 
Ilnlsizer was employed as janitor. The teaching staff of 1883 were 
reC'ngaged. An offer to Edward Bangs of $1,000 per year as principal 
was declined, when Mr. P. K. Cross was engaged at |900 for term of 
eight months and twenty-two days. In October, 1881, the na-mes of 
Miss Grace M. Jones, Ella M. Hall and H. L. Tucker appear on the 
roll of teachers, and that of George Osborn as janitor. In January, 
1884, the first record of punishments is made — the ordinar}^ boyish 
freaks justifying such ])unishments. During this year Mr. Scott was 
elected president and A. W. King was chosen to fill his place as 
secretary. 

In 1881 a steam heater was introduced into the schools at a cost of 
$975. In 1885 the same principal and staff served the schools, the 
principal receiving $1,000 per annum. In March, 1886, Miss Clara 
Cook was appointed assistant teacher, with the former staff. In 1881 
Henry I^. Fox was elected director ; in 1885, Albert W. King reelec- 
ted, and in 1886 George W. Scott reelected, John E. Decker receiving 
only 47 votes out of 171 polled. The vote on levying special tax was 
107 for, 62 contra. 

In April, 1886, the question of building an addition to and improv- 
ing the south side school building was decided affirmatively, and a loan 
of $3,000 in $500 bonds was authorized. These bonds were sold to 
Church Sturtevant, of Bradford, at par, on his bid of 5^ annual 
interest. In June the contracts were sold, in August a tax levy of 
$3,500 for 1886 was ordered, and in September the schools opened, 
completed according to contract. 

No enterprise of Wyoming has made more rapid strides in progress 
than its schools. The town has always been fortunate ui electing school 
trustees who ever looked well to the interests and education of the ris- 
ing population, and spared no trouble to provide all the facilities for good, 
thriving schools that the demands should warrant. Since the two 
school buildings were erected, Wyoming's population has doubled, and 
the schools are among the enterprises which have kept pace with this 
growth. W. K. Sandham, to whom the school interest owes so much, 
was appointed a member of the state board of education in May, 1885. 

CVturches. — The Methodist Churcli of Wyoming was organized at 
the house of Gen, Thomas, by Kev. William "^C. Cummings, in the fall 



TOULON TOWNSHIP. 301 

of 1836 ; but the members of this class belonged to Adam Perry's 
class, organized early that year in the Essex settlement. The senior 
members were the Thomas family, Agards, Holgates, Greorge Sparr, 
Ann Carney, Adam Day, Mrs. Adam Perry and Eliza Essex. Pev. 
Jesse Heath, father of the pioneer mercliant, preached here shortl}^ 
after, followed by Zadoc Hall, and Leander Walker, Newton G. Berr}?^- 
man, Enos Thomson, Wilson Pitner, A. E. Phelps, John Morey, H. J. 
Humphrey, John Hodgson, John Sinclair, A. Worhiscroft, or Wollis- 
croft, and other preachers and presiding elders well known on the cir- 
cuit. The first authentic record is that of the class of 1847, under 
Isaac Thomas, with place of meeting at the Wyoming school-house. 
The meml)ers were Isaac, Samuel and James Thomas, with their wives, 
Lydia A., Marcia and Ellen Thomas ; Ellen Greenough, Polly and 
Mary A. Thurston, James M. Rogers, Harriet Pogers, David Wiffings, 
James Lashelle and wife, William G. Welch and wife, Sam Farding, 
Julia A. Welch, Clarinda Bishop, Ezra Wooden, Bethena and Lydia 
Wooden, Thomas and Eliza Essex, Emily Aumick, Lucy T. Dennis, 
John and Frances Bateman, John B. and Eliza Brown. (Thomas Essex 
died in 1853.) Eddy Brown, Maria, Samuel and Joseph Cummings, 
]Sr. P. Doolittle and David Cooper. In 1848 John Sinclair was pre- 
siding elder, A. Wolliscroft preacher and Isaac Thomas class-leader. 
In 1844 services were held in the Smith store. In 1837 Gen. Thomas 
donated 1^ acres for a methodist parsonage, the same on which George 
Sparr erected the parsonage in 1838. In 1856 he donated the site for 
an M. E. Cliurch, which was l^egun and completed that 3^ear. In 1852 
Rev. A. E. Plielps was presiding elder, C. Lazenby preacher, W. Thomas 
assistant and Isaac Thomas class-leader. The class was the same as in 
1847, with the exce|)tion of the Essex family transferred, and the addi- 
tion of Elizabeth Williams, Catherine Johnson and Ann Bearley. In 
1854 a few new names were added, making u]) a class of twenty-eight 
members. In March, 1858, Betsey Wrigle}^, Eliza Donaldson, John B. 
Pettit, Dewitt Hunt and wife, C.'W. Brown and wife, Isaac Tidd and 
wife, H. Greenough, James Greenough and wife, John Knott, James 
Martin and wife, Edmund Wrigley, Joseph Balsley and Avife, David 
Maine and wife, Joseph Mi lor and wife, and others, were admitted. 

In December, 1858, Elder Morey, Rev. W. G. Smith preacher, J. 
J. Fleharty, assistant preacher, were present at conference. W. Wal- 
dron, J. Stedham and J. Bateman were stewards. William Hall was 
recording steward. At this time the societies at Rogers' Grov^e, Pleas- 
ant Ridge, Walls, Seeley's Point, Osceola, Center School-House, Mound, 
Elmira and Bradford belonged to this Peoria conference. In Feb- 
ruary, 1859, the same elders and preachers, with W. II. Jones, L. D., 
E. B. Rogers and J. T. Conner, exhorters; A. Whitman, W. Hall, J. 
Bateman, J. Stedham, W. Fuller, W. Waklron, stewards; W. G. Reed, 
J. J. Garman, Isaac Thomas and T. M. Clark, leaders, and Thomas 
Banister, Sunday-school superintendent, were present. E. B. Rogers, 
T. A. Whitman, J. B. Brown, W. G. Reed, James and Isaac Thomas, 
William Hall, W. Fuller and Wesley King were appointed trustees for 
five years. At this time E. B. Rogers was licensed to preach. In 
June, 1859, the names of P. Sturms, L.L. D., James Wood and John 



302 HISTORY OF STAEK COUNTY. 

Drawyer exliorters, J. Seeley steward, jSTat. Richards and James 
Tanquary leaders, Thomas Heywood, Sunday-school superintendent, 
appear among other members of the conference. In August, 1859, the 
names of James Miller exhorter, Elijah Ferris and John Farmer lead- 
ers and Stephen Hill, Sunda\" school superintendent, appear, with 
others above-named, at the conference then held. At this meeting the 
committee from the Elmira society reported their church at that point, 
built after the style of the Osceola church, almost completed. 

In October, 1859, liev. J. J. Gue succeeded Mr. Fleharty as assist- 
ant to Rev. J. W. J. Smith, Elder Morey still presided and the per- 
sonel of the conference remained generally the same. On January 1, 
1860, the report of membership credits the following numbers to each 
societ}'^ : Wyoming, GO, quota of funds, $234 ; Roger's Grove, 4 miles 
southeast, 32, quota, $75 ; Seeley's Point, 33, quota, $85 ; Pleasant 
Ridge, 24, quota, $45 ; Centre, 13, quota, $40 ; Bradford, T, quota, $25 ; 
Osceola, 29, quota, 125; Elmira. 45, $135 or a total membership in 
circuit of 243 and total contribution of $760. The conference of Jan- 
uary, 1860, was constituted as in August, 1859. In July, 1860, this 
part of the district was known as Wyoming Circuit of Toulon district. 
Central Illinois Conference. H. C. Greenough's name appears as ex- 
horter with Revs. Morey, Smith, Gue and Ferris. In Sunday-school 
matters there were 111 officers and teachers, 9 bible classes, 405 schol- 
ars, 1,131 volumes, and 72 scholars in infant classes. In October, 1860, 
John Chandler was presiding elder, Jacob Matthews, preacher in 
charge, J. G. Lamper, local preacher, S. Hill, Chas. Brace, Jas. L. 
Ferris and Jas. W. Woods exhorters. In 1861 the preachers of the 
circuit were the same as in October, 1860. In July, 1861, J. B. Brown, 
Wesley King, John Bateman, Art emus Whitman, J. B. Kent, Wm. 
Hall, W. M. Fuller, Israel Seele}^ and Daniel Drawyer were elected 
stewards. 

In May, 1862, William Hall gave place to Isaac Thomas as clerk of 
the conference. Rev. Hamilton was appointed assistant to Rev. 
Matthews on the circuit and the same stewards were reelected. In 
November, 1862, Rev. W. J. Stuljbles was preacher in charge, with J. 
W. Woods exhorter. At this time the purchase of a parsonage at El- 
mira was placed in the hands of the preacher, W. M. Fuller, S. Hill, 
L. Bailey, and J. M. Clark. This house was sold in 1865. In April, 
1863, resolutions on the death of Wm. Hall, an early friend of Metho- 
dism, were placed on record. In July Lewis Bailey was junior 
preacher. In October, 1863, Rev. Adam Plepperly came as preacher 
in charge. Here he showed some signs of insanity, which grew at 
other stations and led him ultimately to the asylum. W. M. Fuller 
was clerk of conference, John Chandler being still presiding elder. In 
July, 1864, Isaac Thomas was reappointed clerk. In October, 1864, 
Elder Sammons presided. In April, 1865, the trustees of the church at 
Pleasant Ridge paid out on their church building $13.22, John Childs 
being treasurer. Among the trustees elected iu 1865 were Isaac Thomas, 
Geo. Strong, Shepherd AVestfall, Walter Fuller, Geo. Shaw, Daniel 
Drawj^er, and A. Whitman. In January, 1866 W. Shafer was preacher 
in charge. A. H. Hepperly and J. W. Agard were also here as superan- 



TOULON TOWNSHIP. 303 

nuates. Missions known as Holmes, Ebeys and Franklin belonged to this 
circuit about this time. In 1867 Rev. J. Cavett Avas j^reacher. Kev. D. M. 
Hill came the same year, the same who gave the blessing at old settlers 
meeting in 1886 at Toulon. In October, 1867, J. W. Agard, "Wesley King 
and I. Thomas were chosen trustees, the latter being then clerk. 
Revs. E. Roof and Estees i)reached here then. In 1868 Wm, Under- 
wood was presiding elder, and Rev. Torry, L. P. In 1869 Rev. A. B. 
Morgan took charge of the circuit. In 1870 Pleasant Green was de- 
tached, and in November of this year, M. P. Armstrong was preacher 
in charge. In 1871 came Rev. Carpenter, and in 1872, J. W. Agard 
was in charge of the circuit. In 1873 Elder C. Springer presided with 
"Wm. Wooley, preacher in charge, Isaac Thomas being still clerk. In 
ISTovember, 1873, Rev. Stouffer took charge. In 1874 E. C. "Way man 
came. In 1876 M. E. Beal, R. S., signs the records after Isaac 
Thomas. In November the name of W. H. Hunter appears as presid- 
ing elder and L. Janes as pastor, and B. H. Ober, now of Galva, secre- 
tary. In 1877, J. J. Fleharty was pastor, and early in 1878 Isaac 
Thomas was reappointed clerk. The following year, 1879, T. L. Falk- 
ner was pastor, and in 1881 came Rev. L. F. Cullom. During these years 
of progress I. M. Rogers, W. King, I. Thomas, Hall, Mallor, Edwards 
and otliers were stewards, and H. I. Brown, presiding elder. Presiding 
Elder Forsj^the and Rev. Seadore are named in November, 1881, with 
Ezra and Wesley King, E. J. Edwards, I. Thomas, Wm. Holgate, 
Benj. Bunnell, Chas. Sargent and B. G. Hall, trustees. In December, 
1882, Rev. A. L. Morse became pastor. In 1883 Elder M. Y. B. 
White presided with Rev. R. B. Seaman, pastor. Mr. Seaman was 
succeeded in 1884 by Rev. A. R. Jones, and he in November, 1885, by 
Rev. D. G. Stouffer the present pastor. The trustees are AVesley 
King, E. J. Edwards, J. M. Rogers, Isaac Thomas, Jacob Smith, 
Thomas Beall, E. J. King and Benj. Bunnell. Messrs. Edwards, 
Thomas and Smith of the trustees are now stewards with Madames 
Colburn, Smith and Patterson. In January, 1882, the Methodist 
Episcopal Society bought the Drinnin lot on North Main street, and 
erected the new church thereon that year. The old building was sold 
to C. S. Payne in May, 1882. 

St. Luke's Protestant Episcopal church may be said to have been 
founded here in 1848 by Rev. Richard Radley at the house of Henry 
Butler. Mr. Radley held monthly services here until March 1851, 
Avhen he moved to New York, his position here being taken by Rev. 
Philander Chase, who held services in the school house. On September 
2, 1855, the society was organized with the following named members : 
Henry A. Hoist, Henry Butler, Charles S. Payne, L. S. Milliken, T. B. 
Whiffen and W. B. McDonald. On October 18 the parish was admitted 
into the diocese. The wardens were Henry Butler and Henry A. 
Hoist, in 1855; with Charles S. Payne, Thomas B. Whiffen and A. B. 
Butler, vestrymen. Of those, A. B. Butler, now of New York Post for 
about twelve years, and Charles S. Payne are living. In December, 1856, 
Peter Pettit off ered to do the carpenter work on the church and school- 
house for $385. Dr. McMillen was elected vestryman, vice C. S.Payne, 
resigned. In July 1857, II. A. Hoist and Henry Butler were ward'ens, 



304 HISTORY OF STAKK COUNTY. 

and J. H. Hopkins and R. Trasker elected vestrymen. In Jnl}^ 1857, J. 
Hopkins, A. E. Butler and H. A. Hoist were ap])ointed a building- com- 
mittee. Up to this time services were held in the old brick schoolhouse, 
but changed to the old Methodist church (then new) on invitation. 
Their own church, begun in May 1857, ^va.s dedicated in Februarj^ 28, 
1858, at a total cost of $1,020, of which Chicago contributed $271 and 
eastern people $172 A. B. Butler hauled the first load of building 
material. 

Among tlie families belonging to this church in August, 1877, were 
Dr. J. G. Greene,L. 1). Ellsworth, Mrs. E. McLaughlin Brimfield; Ann E. 
King, Miss M. A. Allen, A. Root, of Blue Ridge; H. Byatt, William 
Thomas, Lucy Butler, Belle Kearns, Jerrems family in Nebraska; O. 
H. Stone, California ; W. J. Bond, Mrs. Amelia Hall, Bradford ; Dr. 
W. Cook, Edward Cook, the Ilochstrassers, Harrison Cqoper, Brad- 
ford ; the Chase family, Heber Chase, Wada Petra; C. H. Yoorhees, 
Princeville ; Charles Me\^ers, of Toulon, now of California ; Mrs. Keffer, 
Toulon; G. Porter, Wada Petra; the Malone family, of Penn town- 
ship (withdrawn) ; George White, of Toulon ; Mr. F. Renneck, of 
Toulon ; Richard Parker, of Stark ; Charles Wright, Toulon ; T. B. 
Wall, Modena ; John Hardy, E. H. Laymiller, C. S. Payne, W. Scott, 

Prentiss, of Wyoming district; Lyons and Simples, of Toulon; 

Robert Hunter, Osceola ; Robinsons, Heberlings and Hamilton Hock- 
strasser. The families named above formed fifty-seven members of this 
church in 1877. 

There is no record of the church from 1858 to March, 18G0. In 
this year the Drummond house was leased at $215 per annum, for rec- 
tor's house, and in October, 1869, Rev. T. N. Benedict was called, 
Messrs. Hoist, Greene, W. H. Butler, C, S. Pavne'and D. C. Kelloo-o- 
forming the board. 

Rev. F. II. Potts remained until Dr. Lloyd, now in Iowa, came and 
he was succeeded by Rev. T. H. Eddy, who, after three years service 
moved to Keokuk, Iowa. Rev. George Moore, who came early in 1883, 
left in 1881 and thei'e were no services held until August, 188(!, when 
Rev. John Hoist, a son of Henry A. Hoist, was appointed rector. Among 
the members of this society in later days were Dr. Cook, Dr. Castle, 
Charles D. Castle, W. J. Bond, here ; Ilenr}^ P>utler, deceased ; O, 
II. Stone, now in California ; L. D. Ellsworth, in Nebraska; Dr. J. G. 
Greene, deceased ; John Wrigley, Mrs. William F. Thomas, nee Mary 
Butler, Mrs. Amelia Bond, Mrs. Laymiller, Mrs. Hochstrasser, Mrs. 
Charles S. Payne, Henry A. Hoist, deceased. 

In Se])tember, 1871, the board accepted Dr.. Castle's proposition to 
donate a lot opposite the residence of O. II. Stone; although William 
Tliomas offered two lots and $1,000, provided the church would be 
moved to the present location of the Congregational church. In 1872 
the building was removed to its present site. 

The Catholic Church of AVyoming, the building of which Avas begun 
in October, 1880, on grounds donated by Dr. Castle, was dedicated by 
Bishop Spalding, July 27, 1881. The subscription of the Protestant 
element of Wyoming very near equaled that given by the members. 
Tlie building was erected by James Murray for the committee, which 



TOtTLON TOWNSHIP. 805 

comprised John Seibold, Michael Colgan and John Colgan. It is 
32x04 feet, 20 feet to ceiling-, and seats 350 persons. Its cost was over 
$3,000. Father Moynihan began the work and completed it. The old 
members of the Catholic Church are named as follows : Michael, John, 
Edward and Thomas Colgan, of Penn, Yalley and Essex townships; 
Edward Weston and Michael Rj^an, of A^alley ; John Siebold, of 
"Wyoming ; James Colgan, of Yalley ; Andrew Cain, Toulon ; Patrick 
Cain, Essex ; Wm. Marlatt, Dominick Harty, Penn ; Peter Pauli, 
Toulon ; Edward Garman (deceased), Valley ; John Moloney, Essex ; 
the Frails, and a few others, who belong to the older Church at Camp 
Grove, or at Toulon. The Catholics of this district were visited by 
missionary priests from Lacon and Peoria prior to the building of the 
church, who held services in various homes. Since 1881 the church 
has been attended by Fathers Moynihan, Cullen and Rev. Delbarre, 
now stationed at Bradford. The congregation at present exceeds in 
number 200. 

The Baptist Church of Clirist, of Wyoming, ma}^ be said to have 
been organized in August 1807, when Elder Dodge, of Toulon, pre- 
sided here with A. J. Wright, of Saxon, clerk, and J. M. Stickney, 
reader of the articles of covenant. A number of ministers were pres- 
ent, among them J. W. Agard. The original members were James M. 
Stickney, Eplirairn M. Ilolton, Eliza M. Ilolton, Margaret A. Conover, 
Sai'ali Wilson, Francis Wallcer, Mary Butler, Louisa S. Hearse, Jose- 
phine A. Ilolton, Martha E. Wilson, Rachel Long, Adelaide Cole, Lucy 
Timmons and Rachel Davis. Of the above only Mrs. Cole and Mrs. 
Wilson now l)elong to tlie church here. The present membersliip is 
42. The whole number received since 1807 was 170. Marshall Winn, 
the present clerk, beame a member in 1809. Elder Dodge was chap- 
lain of the Ellsworth Zouaves, and commanded after the death of 
Colonel Ellsworth. The present clerk also served in two or more 
Union commands. The pastors since his time are named as follows : 
J. M. Stickney, Samuel Brimhall, Thomas Reese, George C. Van 
Osdell, Adison B. Tomlinson, AVilham Sturm and A. C. Edwards. The 
clerks were Ephriam Ilolton, Wm. S. Wilson, Marshall Winn, Edward 
Gimlett, Charles R. Wilson and J. B. Hammatt. 

The Congregational Church of Cln'ist, of Wyoming, was organized 
April 3, 1873, with fourteen members. First services were conckicted 
by Rev. A. A. Stevens, of Peoria, the following Sunday. Rev. W. 
"Walters served this church from 1873 to August 23, 1883. when he 
resigned to take charge of the church at Lacon. Lie is now at Has- 
tings, Neb. Rev. John Mitchell succeeded Rev. W. Walters, March 9, 
1884. On February 18, 1873, a meeting was called to consider the 
question of founding a Congregational society here. This meeting was 
held at Dr. Copestake's house, John Hawks presiding, with J. F. Rock- 
hold, secretary. The question was decided affirmatively, and on April 
3, the following named members signed articles of association : John 
Rockhold, Prudence Rockhold, John C. Copestake, Sarah C. Co]:>estake, 
John Hawks, Augusta Llawks, Henry F. Turner, Charlotte Turner, 
James Buckle}^, Susannah Buckley, Ann Wrigley, Mary C. Scott, 
William Walters, Mary Ann Walters. The organization was received 



306 HISTORY OF STAEK COUNTY, 

into the general body of the church, August 2Y, 1873, when the first 
council was held. The next proposition was to erect a house of wor- 
ship. The Congregational Union granted §500 in 1874, and in August 
of that year the following solicitors were appointed : J. C. Copestake, 
H. Turner, John Walters, ]\[rs. G. W. Scott, Mrs. T. Stephenson, Mrs. 
A. Lyon, Mrs, Bailie, Mrs, Hawks and Will Hammond. 

The building committee, composed of Eev. AValters, John Hawks, 
and Henry F. Turner, was appointed July 15, 1871:. This body re- 
ported in August, 1871, that W, F. Thomas offered one lot on Main 
street for 8100, and donated a similar lot. This report was adopted, 
and the deed of the property given to J. C. Copestake, Jolin Wrigley, 
H. F. Turner, John Hawks and George Kerns, trustees. The dedica- 
tion took place May 4, 1875. Up to this time the societ}" worshipped 
in the Baptist church, Rev. William Walters filling the ])ulpit for botii 
congregations. The building stands on a lot donated by AV. F. Thomas, 
opposite the house of John Ellis. John Hawks was the architect. 
Smith tfc Wolfe were the carpenters, W. H. Gray builder of foundation, 
E.. R. Worley, of Toulon, plasterer, Haines & Bruce painters, Payne & 
Turner supplied the seats. The entire cost of the building was $3,583 ; 
all paid except 8500 at date of dedication. The deacons in 1873 are 
named as follows : J. Hawks, H. F. Turner, Joseph Mellor, J. Buckley, 
Prescott Blood, George Kerns, Mr. Corder and Mr. Wygant. The 
trustees in 1871r-5 were: Dr. Copestake, John Hawks, John Wrigley, 
H. F. Turner and George Kerns. In 1875, the latter was electecl ; in 
1876, John Hawks; 1877, E. H. Phelps; 1878, Henry Duckworth and 
Adam L3^ons; 1879, Prescott Blood; 1881, John Hawks and A. W. 
King; 1882, J. W. Walters, J. C, Copestake and George Kei-ns; 1883, 
Dr. Copestake; 1884, Mrs. John Wrigley; 1?585, Mrs. George Kerns; 
1886, Roval H. Miller and John Hawks. The clerks have been : John 
F. Rockhold, 1873; John W. Wahers, 1873; James Hunter, 1874: 
WiUiam W. Hammond, 1875; Miss Ahce B. AYrigley, 1876; John W. 
Walters, 1877-81 ; Miss Laura M. Jordan, 1882-6 ; Mrs. Addie Colwell, 
1886. John W. Walter has been the financial secretarv since 1884, 
the first time the office was founded. The treasurers have been : J. C, 
Copestake, J, Hawks, Mrs. C. B, Hammond and James Buckley, the 
present treasurer. 

The Sunday-School is contemporary with the church, John Hawks 
was first superintendent, succeeded by E. H, Smith some six years ago, 
and he bv Roval H, Miller, 

The first baptisms were: Francis Xewlan, Laura M, Edwards, Will 
Hammond, 1874. Since 1876 the rite of baptism has Ijeen solemnized 
in 46 cases. The total number of admissions to membership, since 
1873, is 196. The present membership is 106. Of the original mem- 
bers there are now connected with the church 6. Mrs, Buckley is 
dead and the others removed. 

The United Brethren Societv, which mav be said to have existed here 
from 1872 to 1882, claimed no less than 54 members in 1875, among 
wliom where : Samuel and Lorina Farden, Samuel Bishop, Malinda 
O'Yanda, Mary (now Mrs. White; and Martha (now Mrs. Winfield) 
Beaver, Samuel and Lucretia Redding, Gasper Bogard, and Rebecca 



TOtTLoN TOWNSHIP. 307 

Bogard, Jesse and Cynthia Redding, Lillie (now Mrs. Polly) and Olive 
Redding, Henry Curfman and wife, Edwin Baldwin and wife. Rev. 
J. S. Smith attended here for the last time October 28, 1882, but a 
traveling preacher held services here afterward on one occasion. The 
United Brethren church building is now the residence of Thomas 
Dugdale; sold in 1884 to John Francis. It used to stand south of the 
north side schoolhouse, and was used as a schoolhouse up to 1875. 

Secret, Benevolent and Literary Societies. — Wyoming Lodge, 4Y9, 
A. F. & A. M., was organized February 28, 1886, and chartered 
October 3, the same year, with J. W. Agard, W. M.; George W. Scott, 
S. W.; Henry M. Rogers, J. W.; John Wrigley, treasurer; H. A. 
Hoist, secretary; S. K. Conover, S. D.; T. W. Bloomer, J. D.; and J. 
H. Cox, T. These, with Simon Cox and Isaac Thomas were the 
original members. Mr. Agard was master from this time to 1872, 
when he was succeeded by T. W. Bloomer, who served until 1881, when 
A. W. King was elected. In 1883, James M. Rogers was elected 
master, and in 1884, T. W. Bloomer was reelected. He represented 
Wj^oming at the meeting of the Grand Lodge in 188G, at Chicago. 
The secretaries were: 1867, Henry A. Hoist; 1868, W. H. Butler; 
1869, Isaac Thomas; 1871, H. A. Hoist; 1873, E. H. Phelps; 1874, C. 
Collier; 1876, W. H. Butler; 1877, E. H Phelps; 1878, C. F. Hamil- 
ton; 1879, J.C. Bloomer; 1880-5, C. F. Hamilton ; 1885, P. K. Cross; 
1886, S. K. Conover. 

The members of the Blue Lodge on roster in 1886, are Thomas W. 
Bloomer, J. C. Bloomer, T. J. Bocock, S. K. Conover, J. H. Cox, Simon 
Cox, J. C. Copestake, Foster Coulson, J. M. Cox, Myron Cox, Charles 
Childs, P. K. Cross, H. Duckworth, W. T. Ditman, F. E. Davis, Frank 
Davis, C. S.; William and George Eagelston, H. N. Fox, G. M. Fuller, 
Orange Fuller, William Ilolgate, Dr. James Ilolgate, jr., C. F. 
Hamilton, Charles Hanipson, Richard Hight, A. G. Hammond, 
II. A. Hammond, James G. Hunter, J. B. Ilammatt, L. M. 
Graves, John Jordan, W. LI. Jordon, Albert W. King, J. M. Menden- 
hall, M. F. Meeker, C. McCorkle, George Moore, B. A. Newton, S. F. 
Otman, J. M. Rogers, J. T. Rogers, J. B. Robinson, G. W. Scott, Perrv 
11. Smith, A. Snidiker, Winfield Scott, E. O. Swift, F. A. Sweetland, 
I. Thomas, Frank Thomas, John Wrigley, Samuel Wrigley, E. C. Way- 
man, J. K, Weller, J. E. Woods, V. A. Welton, and Geo. W. Nicholas. 

Tlie first hall was over Llolst's drug store, the next in the Thomas 
building, the third over tlie '' Boston Store," the fourth in the '' Agard," 
or " Masonic Hall," and the present over Hammond & Walters' store, 
dedicated January 3, 1882. 

Wyoming Chapter Royal Arch Masons, No. 133, had an organ- 
ization in 1866, but no charter up to October 9, 1868. The officers in 
1866 were: J. W. Agard, 11. P.; G. W\ Scott, E. S.; J. M, Rogers, 
P. S.; Alvin Abbott, M. 1 Y.; S. A. Davis, M. 2 V.; C. Kerr, M. 3 V.; 
William Lowman, E. K.; Charles Weston, C. H.; M. S. Curtiss, R. A. C; 
Henry M. Rogers. J. H. Box, William Eagelston, John Ellis, Samuel 
Wrigley, and T. W. Bloomer were charter members. J. W. Agard 
served as II. P. up to 1875. T. W. Bloomer served from 1875 to 1886. 
John Wrigley served as secretary to 1870, and as treasurer from 1870 



308 HISTORY OF STAPvK COITNTY. 

to present. J. C. Copestake, secretarv in 1870; Henrv A. Hoist, 1871 
to 1874; C. Collier. 1871; S. Miner, i875 to 1880 ; A. AV. King, 1880 
to 1886; and S. K. Conover, 1886. Other members not noted in Bine 
Lodge are: S. G. Hatch, AV. F. Speer, W. Peterson, H.J. Cosgrove, E. 
H. Dej's, George D. Eagelston, W. P. Dator, A. Y. Fuller, J. A. Klock, 
D. G. Hurd, J. W. Morrison, Eev. George Moore, J. K. Hall, Wdliam 
Lowman, Charles Sargent. James Montooth, W. J. Washburn, Hiram 
Phenix. Harlan Hopkins, William M. Pilgrim, and W. "Williams. 

Wyoming Family, Eastern Star, jS^o. 134, was organized Ma}^ 29, 
1862, "^with J. W. Agard, Martha Agard, George W. Scott, Mary C. 
Scott, H. A. Hoist, S. K. Conover, Margaret Conover, John AVrigley, 
Ann Wrigley, James M. Rogers. Harriet Rogers and Eebecca Butler 
members. This organization continued in work nine years. 

Wyoming Chapter, ISTo. 52, Eastern Star, was organized out of 
Wyoming Family February IS, 1871, and must be considered a con- 
tinuation of the old lodge under a new name. The officers for 1886 are : 
Mrs. C. P. McCorkle, W. M.; A. W. King, AV. P.; Mrs. Dr. Sweetland, 
A. M.: Mrs. A. W. King, C.; Mrs. A. Thomas, A. C; Miss Fanny 
Rockfellow, Secretary ; Miss Laura Jordan, Treasurer. 

Wyoming Lodge Xo. 244, I. O. O. F., was organized October 15, 
1857, with the following charter meml)ers: Henry x\. Hoist, W. B. 
Armstrong. John Hawks, C. AV. Brown, U. M. Whiifen and Isaac N. 
Tidd. In October, 1863, they surrendered theii' charter, but the lodge 
was reinstated bv the following named members: Henry A. Hoist, 
Thomas W. Bhjomer, John Hawks, Charles S. Payne, John C. Wright 
and C. AV. Brown, Felnniary 6. Ib71. The list of members of AVvoming 
I. O. O. F. Lodge in 1886 is as follows: G. AY. Scott, W. A.^Boyer, 
James E. Rogers, Hiram AVeller, AY. W. Jarman, Jesse L, Aloffitt, Denis 
Guvre. James Bucklev, AY. Lvons, Henrv Newton, T. C. Dunlap. D. AL 
Crone, C. A. and R. T. Trapliagan, J. Kernaghan, D. C. Greene, S. R. 
Graves, G. E. Bonnell, AI. II. Teets, E. D. H. Couch. AA^ H. Jordan. 
AY. A. Truax, F. C. Wilson, D. M. Stancliff, M. T. Routzahn, O. ¥. 
Jacobs, Josepli W. Conger, John Scott. Charles H. Aloore, X. B. Alorse, 
AI. D.. AY. II. Proctor, G. S. Rakestraw, AY J. Legg, A. AY. Hotchkiss, 
A. Simmons and C. F. Hamilton. 

The P. G's. are: 1858, W. B. Armstrong; '58. John JIawks; '59, 
Henry A. Hoist; '59, C. W. Brown; "60, J. M. Brown; '60, J. B. 
Thomas; '61, John C. Wright: '71, H. A. Hoist, John Hawks; '72, 
Peter Lane, C. F. Hamilton : '75, John D. D. Phihps, J. D. D. Philips; 
'74, F. AI. Earhart, Charles S. Pavne; '75, C. Collier, H. F. Turner ; '76, 
C. F. Hannlton, H. J. Cosgrove ;" '77, E. Clark, J. L. Aloffitt ; '78, Wm. 
Lvon, AVm. Lvon ; 79, W. II. Grey, C. F. Hamilton : '80, T. B. Wall, 
T. B. AA\nll: "81, J. G. Robertson; '82, S. AL Stanchff ; 'S3. J. S. AYins- 
ley, H. C. Aldrich ; '84, E. S. Teeter, J. X. Conger; '85, J. X. 
Conger, J. X. Conger; '86, L. A. Trimmer. C. F, Hamilton, now 
of Bradford, served as secretaey from 1878 to 1884, when J. X. Conger 
was elected. In 1886 the annual office term was adopted. In January", 
1882, the Lodg-e at Wvoming held their first meetino; in the new haU 
over the Post- Herald. 

W3'oming Encampment, Xo. 174, was instituted March 24, 1876, bj^ 



TOtTLON TOWNSHIP. 309 

P. C, P. ]Sr. C. ]M"ason, with tlie members J. M. Brown, C. F. Hamilton, 
J. M. Cox, T. B. Wall, D. S. Hewitt, H. J. Cosgrove, J. D. Woods, I. 
P. Carpenter, J. L. Moflfitt, Dennis Gnyre and John Hawks. This 
has been transfei-red to Galva. C. F. Hamilton, of W^^oming Lodge, 
I. O. O. F., has been Depnty to the Grand Lodge since 1874. He was 
the first Patriarch of the Encampment and Depnty of the Grand 
Encampment one term preceding Capt. Brown in that office, wlio has 
since been re])resentative. 

De Wolf Post, No. 371, Wyoming, dates back to 1867-S, when 
Colonel Ford, State Adjutant of the G. A. R., met Dr. J. C. Copestake 
at Lacon, and again at Toulon, mustering- him in to tlie Grancl Army 
of the Republic at the latter tow^n, with power to organize posts 
throughout the county. On his return he brought the subject before 
some military men at a meeting in tlie old Boston Hall, who signed 
articles of association and were mustered. Dr. Copestake was elected 
first commander, succeeded by Capt. S. F. Otman, and he by Lieut. S. 
K. (Jonover, who commanded when the old Post disbanded, in 1868 or 
1869. During its existence no less than thirty members were received, 
among whom were : William Llolgate, Sylvester F. Otman, S. K. Con- 
over, Henry Otman, J. C. Copestake, Marshall Winn, George Murna, 
John Oldacker. P)arton Fox, Ancel H. Woodcock, Wallace W. Eman- 
uel, Nelson Bell, John Pettit, Richard Frazier and Rufus Woodcock, a 
soldier of 1812. This old Post rendered material services to those 
widows, orphans or soldiers whom the pension office could not reach 
at that time. Henry Otman, a member, was buried with military 
honors, a Post was organized at Toulon and one at Elmira through its 
example, and much good accomplished ; but the introduction of poli- 
tics killed this Post, as it did formerly other beneficial associations 
here. 

In November, 1883, an effort was made to organize a Post undec 
the new laws of the G. A. R. A charter was ap})lied for and granted 
Noveiuber 26. This effort succeeded, and on December 6, 1883, An- 
drew Galbraith, of Post 327, Toulon, assisted by brothei's from Elm- 
wood and Brimfield, mustered in nineteen members into Post 371, with 
Harvey Forman, C. ; John Hawks, S. V. C. ; Jacob Graves, J. V. C. ; 
C. J. Colburn, S. ; Peter Lane, Q. M. ; H. K. Hochstrasser, O. of D. ; 
Thomas Nicliolas, Chaplain ; David Kerns, O. of G. ; C. F. Hamilton, 
Adjutant ; M. M. Sparr, Sergeant Major ; William Sewards, Q. M. S. 
The officers were then installed by Dept. Com. Samuel A. Harper. At 
a subsequent meeting the names of Lient. W. Denchfield and Captain 
DeWolf were proposed to select a name from, for the Post ; and on a 
vote the latter name was carried, the authority l)eing his record as 
given in the military chapter and in the biography of Toulon town- 
ship. In 1884 C. F. Hamilton was elected Commander ; A. Simmons, 
Q. M. ; D. B. Kellogg, O. of G. ; and Marshall Winn, Adjutant. In 
1885, J. C. Copestake was chosen Commander ; Marshall Winn, Adju- 
tant ; C. F. Hamilton and C. G. Colburn, S. V. and J. V. respectively ; 
A. M. Pierce, Surgeon; H. LI. Hochstrasser, O. of D. ; A. Timmons, 
Q. M. ; John Hawks, Chaplain ; Ancel H. Hanchett, O. of G. ; Leroy 
Mash, S. M. ; and John Jordan, Q. M. S. In 1886, Marshall Winn was 



310 HISTORY OF STAUK COtTNTY. 

elected Commander ; A. B. Armstrong and C. G. Colburn, S. Y. C. and 
J. Y. C. ; J. C. Copestake, Surgeon ; Leroy Mash, O. of D. ; J. Hawks, 
C. ; John Jordan, Q. M. ; Thomas Dngdale, O. of Gr ; H. H. Hoch- 
strasser, Adj. ; E. J. Kellogg, S. M. ; and M. M. Sparr, Q. M. S. 

The names of the membei's who signed application for charter are 
as follows: S. F. Otraan, Ananias Timmons, C. G. Colburn, David 
Kerns, Peter Lane, Joseph Peve, John G. White, Charles P. McCorkle, 
William Dixon, Allen M. Pierce, Harvey Foreman, John C. Copestake, 
John Jordan, Ancel H. Hanchett, John Hawks, Matthew M. Sparr, 
Franklin Pratt, Dennis D. Kellogg, Thomas Dugdale, William Sew- 
Sewards, Thomas Nicholas, Harmon H. Hochstrasser, Alfred B, Arm- 
strong, Charles F. Hamilton, Jacob Graves, William E. Thomas, Will- 
iam Holgate and James Ditman, Commander Marshall Winn, to 
whom the writer is indebted for the above names, dates and incidents, 
says : " As we close our chapter on DeWolf Post we realize the fact 
that she is now in the ver}^ zenith of her strength, and that these gray 
haired veterans are nearing the sunset of life's journey, and one by 
ones will, in obedience to orders from their Supreme Commander, cross 
over the river, and pitch their tents in the silent camping ground of 
our heroic dead." 

The Fourth of 1863 was one one of the gala da3^s in the history of 
Wyoming. Capt. H. Butler presided, with Capt. W. B. Armstrong 
marshal. The assistant marshals were : A. G. Hammond, J. G. Mc- 
Graw, W. F. Thomas, J. M. Eoger and Henry Otman. The executive 
committee comprised Isaac Thomas, Dr. A. M. Pierce, G. M. Fox and 
H. A. Hoist and Dr. J, G. Greene. The ladies raised $150 for the re- 
lief of soldiers on that day. The following named soldiers were at 
rest in Wyoming cemetery in May, 1879 : Capt. David DeWolf, Lieut. 
William H. Denchfield, Lemuel Dixon, Forty-seventh Illinois Infantry ; 
Samuel Dixon, Fifty-first Illinois Infantry ; Henry J. Otman, William 
Wilkinson, One-hundred-and-twelfth lUmois Infantry; Harr}^ Price, 
Peoria Battery ; Joseph Diggle, Eighth Missouri Infantr}^ ; John 
Brandon, war of 1812 and of the Black Hawk war. The pensioners 
residing in Wyoming in 1883 were : Belinda Bessett, Hannah Dixon, 
Mary A. Cole, Annie Curfman, Charles P. McCorkle, Morris C. Lamp- 
son, Dennis Kellogg, John G. White, George Newton, John Harvey 
and Eliza Brown, $8 each ; Michael Alderman, Carey Colburn, Asabeil 
Wilmot, §4 each ; AYilliam Holgate, $2 ; Thomas C. Dunlap, $6 ; Alvah 
Sturtevant, $5 ; and John Hawks, $24 per month. 

Miscellaneous Societies. — In March, 1862, the Wyoming Sons of 
Temperance organized, succeeding the old temperance association, and 
preceding a few others organized between 1866 and 1880. 

The Wyoming Temperance L^nion was organized in JVIarch, 1882, 
Avith A. G. Hammond, P.; Mrs. W. Sturgeon, Y. P.; A. F. Stickney, 
secretary and statistician, and Isaac Thomas, treasurer. 

The Wyoming Band of Hope (temperance) claimed for its execu- 
tive board in 1882 the following members : W, H. Barrett, A. F. 
Stickney, Mrs. Mary Sturgeon, W. H. Barrett, J. Hawks, Mrs. E. H. 
Smith, J. C. Copestake, Mrs, Martha Colby, Mrs. Jacob Smith and 
Mrs. S. E. Sedore. 



TOULON TOWNSHIP. 311 

The T. O. G. T, Lodge of Wyoming, was organized April 9, 1885. 
The officers in order of senority elected were : W. H. Barrett, J. K. 
Conger, Grace Jones, Isaac Thomas, H. A. Hammond, Algina Har- 
wood, C. K. Wilson, Mrs. E. C. Breese, P. K. Cross, Mrs. H. A. Ham- 
mond, Mrs. Kellie Clark, Marsh Winn, Isaac Thomas, Mrs. P. K. Cross, 
Blanche Wolf, Mrs. M. Fox, A. G. Hammond and Robert Jordan. 

The organization of the Woman's Christian Temperance Union 
here is noted in the general history. In October, 1886, Mrs. Castle 
and Mrs. McCl3mient represented tliis society in State Convention at 
Moline. 

The Wyoming Debating Society was organized in November, 1878, 
witliAV. R. Sandham, president: H. A. Hammond, vice president; J. 
W. A¥alters, secretar}^ and A. W. King, treasurer. Among the mem- 
bers who took part in the first debate, November 25, 1878, were J. E. 
Decker, W. Wilson, C. R. Wilson, G. W. Scott, A. N. Walters, W. 
H. Pettet, J. E. King, J. Woods, S. Stark and J. C. Copestake. 

The W3"oming Band was organized in 1879, with J. II. Bray, 
master. 

The Art Loan exposition held at Wyoming in February, 1880, was 
a great success. 

The great shooting tournament, under the auspices of the W^^oming 
Club, took place June 18, 1880. J. C. Lyons won the gold medal. 

The Wyoming lecture clulj was organized in October, 1881, with 
J. C. Decker, A. F. Sticknev, E. H. Phelps, A. F. Bloomer, T. B. Wall, 
J. E. Decker, B. G. Hall, C. P. McCorkle, and A. W. King, original 
members 

On April 8, 1883, an auxiliary Women's Foreign Missionary soci- 
ety was organized at Wyoming with the following named members : 
W. Adams, I. Thomas, Anna Sharp, Sarah Wall, P. (). Hall, M. Pierce, 
M. A. Colburn, M. A. Ward, Robinson, E. O. Swift, I. Smith, Robert- 
son, Drummond, E. M. Edwards, A. L. Morse, R. Miller, Alice Miller, 
E. King, W. King ; Misses Alva King, Kittie Thomas, J. Conover, 
Grace Jones, O. Harwood, A. L. Morse and B. G. Hall. 

Wyoming camp-meeting association is modern in organization but 
old in practice. In 1810 the first meeting was held, almost on the pres- 
ent camp grounds, with N. G. Benyman, Enos Thomson, and Wilson 
Pitner, leaders. Two years later a similar meeting was held near La- 
fayette, and during Mr. Morey's time as presiding elder, a third meet- 
ing was held there. Every year since Mr. Morey's time a camp meet- 
ing or local revival meeting has been held successfully ; but in later 
vears the camp at Wyoming has robbed the ordinary church revival of 
so much romance and religion, that it became a permanent nstitution. 
James M. Rogers, B. G. Hall and E. J. Edwards, a committee on 
building for the W^^oraing camp meeting association in 1883, ordered 
the old boarding-house to be removed and a new building erected. 
No tobacco is sold upon the ground. Swearing is discouraged. The 
crowd is composed of the average sort of church-going people, inter- 
spersed with a company of pleasure seekers of more worldly stripe but 
of some social position. Upon these '' worldly " folk, who stay long- 
enough for the Methodist brethren to " place," every redeeming power 



312 HISTOEY OF STAEK COUNTY. 

is brought to bear, A large out-door auditorium is used whenever the 
weather ])ermits, and there are chapels for stormy days, rooms for 
boarders, always a good dinner, and permission for all visitors to pitch 
their tents, cook, eat, pray and sleep. The lectures and religious dis- 
courses are practical appeals. 

A lodge of Modern Woodmen of America, a new benevolent and 
benefit society, was organized July 29, 1886, with about a score of 
charter members. The following were elected and installed as officers 
for the iiisuing half-year: E. A. Trimmer, V. C; A. W. King, W. A.; 
J. E. Decker, E. B.; 'J. M. Thomas, jr.. Clerk ; W. E. Nixon, Escort ; 
D. S. Burroughs, Sentrj^ ; J. H. Garside, AYatchman ; C. D. Castle, A. 
^¥. Ilotchkiss. and D. S. Burroughs, Managers ; Dr. H. IS^. Fox, M. E. 

The circulating librar}- located at E. D. Hewitt's, which opened 
September 25, 1886, is established upon the most commendable plan, 
and the reading people of Wyoming are fortunate in secmMngso large 
a collection of books l)y standard authors. This library was opened 
witli 80 members at ^1.50 each membership, and every two new sub- 
scril)ers or members at the membership price $1.50 will buy three 
books ; that is each sul)scril)er's membership price buys a book and a 
half. There are now some 120 volumes in the library' and all are the 
pro|)erty of the members. 

The Po8t Ojfice is an old institution at W3^oming. Mrs. Shallen- 
berger states that "in 1834 General Thomas came to Wyoming, bring- 
ing with him a large family of sons antl daughters and sons-in-law, be- 
sides several other men, among them AVilliam Godley who accom- 
panied him in some capacity. All at once AVyoming began to assume 
importance, and aspired to the post office. The Osceola settlers too, 
favored the change, always choosing to cast their lot with Wyoming. 
Accordingly a petition was gotten up, and William Godley was the 
fortunate appointee of government. Mr. Holgate accompanied Mr. 
Godley to Essex's to receive possession of the books and papers, mail 
matter and appurtenances of the office generally, and to convey them 
to Wyoming, lie soon noticed indications of a coming storm in the 
countenance and conduct of Mrs. Essex. She was washing when they 
entered, and for a while continued her occupation with a vim that as- 
tonished her visitors, rubbing and scrubbing almost furiously, then she 
deliberately turned from her tub, wiped her arms and hands, sat 
down, and gave them her opinion of men who would steal a post 
office, in terms which those gentlemen could never forget. The office 
has been generally well filled down to the present lime. On August 
1, 1870, it was created a money order office and in recognition of its 
growing im])ortance a sidewalk was at once l)uilt from Castle's addi- 
tion to this office. For 3^ears the late John B. Brown had charge of 
this office. In 1884 C. G. Colburn was appointed master here, but 
was succeeded b}^ J. M. Thomas in 1885,, the present courteous and 
able incumbent. 

The Wyoming Cemetery Association was formed May 8, 1871, 
when the following named organized under that title : J. AV. Agard, 
S. K. Conover, J. B. Pettit, A. J. Conover, E. S. Conover, Isaac 
Thomas, J. B. Brown, John Hawks and H. A. Hoist. Messrs. Agard 



TOULON TOWNSHIP. 313 

and Thomas were elected president and clerk respectively, and S. K. 
Conover, A. J. Conover and J. B. Pettit, directors. They were in fact 
the successors of the old cemeter}^ trustees — a body in name only, and 
being so, agreed to purchase the land between the okl cemetery and 
First street, S. K. Conover being a committee to negotiate such pur- 
chase with Gen. Thomas. Messrs. Agard, Pettit and A. J. Conover 
were to plat the grounds and build a fence. The tract was purchased 
for $100, and sold at from S^l to $15 per lot ; E. S. Conover was lirst 
superintendent. In 1872 J. C. Copestake, J. Hawks and S. K. Conover 
were elected directors; in 1S73 A. G. Hammond, G. A¥. Scott and 
Samuel Pierce were chosen directors, the president and secretary hold- 
ing over; in 187-1 E. S. Conover replaced S. Pierce, and C. Collier was 
appointed collector of an improvement fund. Tliis board continued 
until 1877, when the president, secretary with Robert Jordan, John 
Wrigley and S. F. Otman were chosen, and the latter elected presi- 
dent. In 1880 Rev. Wm. Walters, John Wrigley, S. F. Ottman, A. G. 
Hammond, F. Thomas and J. C. Copestake formed the board, with Capt. 
Otman, president, and Isaac Thomas secretary and treasurer. In 1882 
A. G. Hammond was chosen ])resident; in 1883 tlie same officers 
served and continued in office down to the present time. James 
Bucldey, the first regular sexton, is now filling that position. Isaac 
Thomas, who for years has been secretar}^ of the association, permit- 
ted J. G. Greene to make the followino' entrv in the old school recortl, 
which is also the cemetery record, April 23, 18.58. It is witnessed by 
H. A. Hoist and reguhirly signed l)y Greene: "I hereby agree to 
give Isaac Thomas $5 a year for abstaining from the use of tobacco 
from this date." The present cemetery at Wyoming may be said to 
be opened by tlie burial of Artemus Lake, brother of Mrs. Barley and 
Mrs. Sewell Smith, next AVm. Godfrey, and next Ann Carney Hodges. 
The land was donated by Gen. Thomas to trustees for public use on 
condition that it would be fenced and kept in order. 

Wyoming cemetery contains tlie remains of many ])ioneers of the 
vihage and of the district. The list tells what old Father Time has 
done. AVilliam C. Thomas, 1810; Nancy (A. McDonald) Crone, '80; 
James Woods, '78; Charles M. Teeter, '83; Jane Ingram, '78; Lizzie 
S. Edwards, '80; Anna Frantz, '81 ; Thomas H. Jackson, '58; Anna 
Dixon, '86; Sarah Dawson, '67; Charles Brunger, '73; Henry A. 
Hoist, '75; Sally A. Hoist, '68; Mattie Kerns, '77; Mary A. Dew- 
hurst, '80; Sarah Walters, '72; William Kerns, '73; Elizabeth Browm, 
'81; John B. Brown, '80; Zeuriah Greenwood, '64; Rachel Dixon, '60 ; 
Simon Dixon, '60; Samuel Pierce, '79; Emma Otman, '64; William 
Denchlield, '57; William II. Denchfield, '65 ; Dan. M. Beers, '16; Ezra 
Wooden, '57; Henry M. Rogers, '78; James Gibson, '60; l^etsy E. 
Wrigley, '64; David Rouse, '69; James H. Bloomer, '62; M. W. Mc- 
]\Iullen, '54; Polly Thurston, '63; Hart well Thurston, '45; Mary 
Butler, '78; Rebecca Butler, '65; H. Augusta Butler, '65; Capt. H. 
Butler, '64; Lydia S. Whitnev, '83; Ward B. Dana, '73; Anna Curf- 
man, '81; Hannah B. Cox, '85; S. Keeling, '84; Mary E. Cox, '81; 
Clara M. Davis, 's3; SoL Wilkinson, '85; Mary A. Lefflers, '82; Capt. 
A. E. Ewer, '79; George Marlatt, '68; Barbara E. Smith, '82; B. W. 



14 HISTOKY OF STARK COUNTY. 



Whitclier, "75; Joel Stewart, '66; Uzziel Meachum, '67; Margaret 
Johnson, '68; James R. Wilson, '66; Eliza A. McKean, '66; Susanna 
Buckley, '85 ; L. L. Hancbett, '65 ; Eobert B. Marlatt, '59 ; Edmund 
Wriglev, '72; Joseph Digg'le, '64; Emma E. Pilgrim, '84; Thomas 
Hey wood, '68; Samuel E. White, '66; Isabella McCormick, '68; John 
Brandon, '64; Samuel Dixon (One-hundred-and-fifty-first Illinois In- 
fantry), '65; James Hartley, '71; William Wilkinson, '64; Emily 
Nicholas, '65; George Nicholas, '02; John Dixon, '73; Rosanna 
Dixon, '85; Lvdia L. Coombs, '60; Thomas B. Whiffler, '80; Lydia 
Webster, '70;' Peter Pettit, '75; Delana B. Pettit, '67; Henrv J. 
Otman, '67; J. W. Agard, '81; AVilham F. Thomas, '75; Marcia 
Thomas, '65; Ruth Ann Dana, '56; Xancy M. White, '78; E. S. Con- 
over, '77; Sally A. Hochstrasser, '83; Henry Shroh, '84; Robert E. 
Westfall, '63 ; James A. Harwood, '77 ; C. W. Wright, '75; Margaret 
Ditmon, '77; Jane Ingram, '78. 

The C. S. Payne monument, erected by the owner, is an elegant 
work of art. Mr. Payne has undoubtedly outwitted death, and gives 
promise of battling with Old Time for years to come. John Brandon, 
a soldier of 1812, and of the Black Hawk war, is buried liere, but the 
headstone lies broken. The o-rounds contain manv excellent monu- 
mental pieces. 

In tlie foregoing list the year of death is given and with few ex- 
ceptions onl}^ the aged old residents mentioned. 

Traders. — In May, 1869, F. J. L. sent to the Prairie Chief for 
publication thirty-one quartettes — a long mathematical poem on 
Wyoming. Messrs. Payne, King, Ottman, Kellogg, Brown, Winn, 
Hoist, Bouglin, Bunn, Bonner, Dennis, Bloomer, Doctors Green, Fox, 
Copestake and Castle ; Conover at the mills, all find mention in this 
poem in connection with their business and their enterprising town. 

The removal of the Bond store to Coal village in August, 1878, 
where about fifty men were at work on the big shaft, gave AVyoming 
the appearance of being divided up into three distinct })arts, the origi- 
nal town, tlie Castle addition, and Coal village. 

When W. J. Bond came in 1872 to take charge of the Lathrop Co.'s 
store, there were 100 men working on the shafts, the company then 
furnishing the C, B. & Q. R. R., and local consumption. The works 
were burned April 28, 1880 — the mule used in the mine escaping ^vith 
little injurv. A¥m. Taylor and Joseph Swanson are said to be the first 
regular miners, John McCarthy was their contemporary, also John and 
Anthony Robinson. After the founding of the Lathrop Co.'s works 
the men named continued to supply local trade, Taylor being engaged 
actively up to a few years ago, Swanson still in harness. McCarthy is 
also here, so also are the Robinson's. Thomas Stevenson, who worked 
for the Lathi-op Co. up to about 1878, now operates his own mine. In 
1882 James Higby oj^ened a bank on Mr. Bond's farm. In Coal Hol- 
low are a number of small operators, while along the C, B. & Q. 
shafts are worlced economically. 

The interests of the Latlirop Coal Co. here have ceased — their 
leases having passed into other hands. About 1878-79 the weigh- 
master, Richard Kent, stepped on the cage, which descended rapidly, 



TOULON TOWNSHIP. 315 

almost causing his death. A few minor accidents mark the progress 
of the coal industry. 

For the purpose of making a record of the new buiklings erected in 
Wyoming during the ten years ending in 1882, a bst of the same with 
the names of the occupants in 1882 is presented.* Where the occu- 
pant does not own the building the name of the owner is also given. 

House occupied by B. C. Boice, house occupied by Dr. F. A. Sweet- 
land, house occupied by H. L. Weller, house occupied by Jacob Smith, 
house occupied by Mrs. Carpenter, house occupied by Robert Jordan, 
house owned by Robert Jordan and occupied by James Hendricks, 
house occupied by C. H. Rogers, house occupied by Charles Geesey, 
house occupied by William Ditman, house owned by Mrs. McClaugh- 
lan and occupied by Marvin Colwell and George Lyons, house occupied 
by J. M. Rogers, house owned b}^ Mrs. M. Ditman and occupied by M. 
F. Meeker, house occupied by J. B. Robinson, house owned by George 
Selders and occupied b}^ E. O. Swift, house occupied by Miles Stancliff, 
house occupied b}^ H. F. Turner, house occupied by George Kerns, 
house occupied by Thomas Fox, house occupied by C. W. Teeter, house 
owned by King Brothers and occupied by John Hansel, house occupied 
by John Hanes, house occupied b}^ William Eagelston, house owned 
by W. Eagelston and occupied b}^ S. H. Smith, house occupied by Mrs. 
Selders, house occupied by Ripley Watts, house occupied by Ansil 
Hanchett, house occupied by Charles Eagelston, house occupied by E. 
H. Smith, house occupied by Jolm Seibold, house owned by Mrs, Hill 
and occupied by L. F. Hill, house occupied by James Duff, house oc- 
cu|)ied by W. A. Eddy, house occupied by William Greenfield, house 
owned by James Muse and occupied by Ed. Chapman, house occupied 
by John Karnaghan, house occupied by John Curtiss, house occupied 
bv B. Newlin, house occupied by l^ewton Bess, house occupied by 
John Noret, house owned by J. Noret and occupied by James 
Strong, house occupied by John Heperly, house occupied by D. Barth, 
house occupied by Peter Herberger, house owned by Mr. Wales and 
occupied by W. O. Hudson, house occupied by Mrs. J. Wall, house 
occupied by Dexter Wall, house occupied by H. B. Harris, house occu- 
pied by Mrs. Ewers, house occupied by L. E. Wood, house occupied by 
Mrs. Nicholas, house occupied by Elias Teeter, house owmed by Mrs. 
S. M. Wright and occupied by Will Huffman, house occupied by J. A. 
Klock, house occupied by Adam Lyons, four houses owned b}^ A. J. 
Stone, occupied by James Fulton, C. Priester, S. G. Brees and Samuel 
Emery ; house and office owned by Dyer Sisters and occupied b}^ 
Frank Thomas, house occupied by C. M. Teeter, house occupied by 
Rev. W. Sturgeon, house occupied by D. S. Burroughs, house owned 
by Thomas Beall and occupied by W. Holgate, house occupied by W. 
Miller, house occupied by A. W. King, house occupied by J. M. 
Thomas, house occupied by S. F. Otman, house occupied by A. F. 
Stickney, house occupied by J. 'N. Conger, house occupied by Greger 
Herl)erger, house (rebuilt) owned by C. C. Payne and occupied by O. 
B. Merrick, house occupied by Henry Duckworth, house occupied by 
John Jones, house occupied by M. Winn, house owned by J. W. King 

* From Post-Herald. 
19 



316 HISTORY OF STAEK COUNTY. 

and, occupied by David Hull, house occupied by M. Sparr, house occu- 
pied by il. L. Bingham, house occupied by Simon Cox, house occupied 
by E. Keeling, house occupied by David Jones, house occupied l)y Dr. 
Magee, house occuiued by M. Alderman, house occupied by M. Teets, 
house occupied by Dr. Fox, house owned by Thomas Johnson and 
occupied by W. R. Sandham, house occupied by C. P. McCorkle, house 
occupied by H. A. Hammond, bank Imilding occupied by Farmers, 
Bank, store owned by W. J. Bond and occupied by H. B. Harris & Co., 
store occupied by Lyons Bros., store owned l)y the Farmers' Bank and 
occupied by W. C. Wall, store owned by Thomas Beall and occupied 
by D. Barth for restaurant, store and dwelling occupied by Hopkins 
Sisters, shop occupied by E. H. Laymiller, store occupied by John 
Seibold, photograph gallery occupied by Charles L. Davis, barl)er shop 
and dwelling occupied by T. J. Cross, store occupied by F. E. Davis, 
store occupied by Hammond & Walters, store occupied by King Bros., 
store occupied by Miss A. E. Bicker, store and dwelling occu])ied l)y 
Peter Lane, store and hall occupied b}^ E. O. Swift and Central Hall 
Company, office and hall occupied b}^ the Wyoming Post and Odd 
Fellows, bank building occupied by Scott »fc Wrigley, isorth Side school 
house. Catholic church, Cono-reo-ational church, office and other build- 
mgs on Otman & Jordan's lumber 3'ard. office occupied by Charles 
Sargent, chicken dressing house occupied by D. S. Burroughs, office 
o^ATied by Scott & Wrigley and occupied by J. Mc^Iillen, several build- 
ings on the fairgrounds of the Central Agricultural Society. 

During the ten years the Episcopal church was re-built. United 
Brethren church moved to its present location and remodeled, and the 
South Side school rebuilt. 

The following buildings have been moved into town from outside 
the corporation during the ten years : House occupied by I. H. Cowen, 
house owned bv W. J. Bond and occupied bv F. C. Wilson, store and 
dwelling owned by W. J. Bond and occupied by W. T. Wood, mill oc- 
cupied by C. Priester & Co., elevator occupied by Charles Sargent. 
There have been several sho]is and offices put up during the ten years. 

The Yapp log-house, which in 1850 stood on the S. W. corner of 
Beers lot, and which was sold to Beers by John Wrigley in 1855, and 
moved in rear of his stable was torn down in April. 1882, by Harry 
Hammond, wlio purchased the Beers' liomestead. The old Methodist 
building of Wvomino- and the old Conoregational building of Toulon 
were moved by C. S. Payne and transformed into an opera house. 

In Xovembei?, 1860, the Wyoming Banking Company filed articles 
of incorporation in the clerk's office, jJacing the caj)ital stock at 
8500,000. The Exchange Bank of Wyoming was opened in October, 
1869, at Wyoming, in Eockhold's building, by Anson Miner. Otis 
Dyer was appointed cashier of this bank in November, 1869. The 
Farmers' Bank lield an important place for some time. The Wyoming- 
Building and Loan Association was incorporated in August, 1882, on 
the petition of John Wrigley, S. F. Otman, W R. Sandham, C. P. 
McCorkle, Wm. Holgate, John A. Klock and Wm. II. Barrett. 

The First Xational Banking Compan}'' of Wyoming, successors of 
the Farmers' Bank, elected their first board of directors in October, 



TOULON TOWNSHIP. 317 

1882, viz.: James Holgate, President; John A. Klock, Cyrus Bocock, 
W. JP. Bus well, Wm. Holgate, Lev^i Silliman, Vice-President s, and 
Andrew F. Stickney, cashier. The other stockholders were S. W. East- 
man, E. S. Teeter, Isaac Thomas, A. Bailey, J. Smith, E. M. Bocock, 
C. W. Teeter, Brj^an Eielh", John Delzer, Peter Lane, John Snare, H. 
Brown, A. F. Bloomer and Abram Phenix. - The bank was opened 
March 15, 1883, and continued as a National bank until January 1-4, 
1885, when the company went into voluntary liquidation. 

The banking house of Scott & Wrig-ley dates back to 1870. It is 
the predecessor and successor of the National Bank. With its capital 
of $100,000, and the men who control and manage this capital, the 
house justly claims as high, if not a higher position in the estimation 
of tlie people as it would if working under a national charter. 

The leading business circle at "Wyoming comprises Joseph Ander- 
son, John A. Klock, grain merchants; C. H. Bogue, H. T. Prentiss and 
Otman & Jordan, lumber; C. S. Payne, grist and planing mill; Scott 
& Wrigley, bankers; Hammond & Walters, King Bros., P. H. Miller 
& Co., Chas. S. Payne, merchants ; Winfield Scott, meat market and 
stock dealer; Chas. Hill, John Seebold, C. P. Wilson, meat market ; J. 
W. Smith, dealers in dry goods and groceries ; J. M. Cox & Co., F. E. 
Davis, Teeter & Co., Wm. C. Wall, druggists; Patrick Sullivan, Pat- 
terson Bros., E. A. Trimmer, hardAvare and farm implements; 
Viola Flouring Mills, Smith & Miller, Samuel G. Breese, fur- 
niture; Mrs. G-. Tyrrell, Mrs. Ella McCorkle, Misses Hopkins, mil- 
liners ; Mrs. J. Morgan, dressmaker ; Damon & Co., wind-mills and 
Avagon boards ; John Steer, Hour and feed ; William H. Gray, 
William Holgate, Edward Keeling, Iligby & Damon, brick and tile 
manufacturers; W. A. Truax and Fuller & Co., livery stables; Peter 
Sanner, hotel ; F. K. Fuller, restaurant ; J. B. Robinson, carriage 
manufacturer; Jacob Smith, Geo. W. Davis, James Burns, and E. II. 
Lawmiller, boots and shoes ; Teets & Davis, granite and marble works ; 
Joseph Noret, sorghum works ; Charles L. Davis, photographer ; W. R. 
Sandliam, newspaper and printing office; C. P. McCorkle, Marsh 
Winn, E. J. Kellogg, harness manufacturers ; Geesey & Meeker, build- 
ers ; Edgar D. Hewitt, jeweler ; Leon Fuiks, clothing ; W. H. Boyer, 
bakery and restaurant. 

The merchants who have acquiesced in the early-closing movement 
from October to March are : Hammond & Walters, King Bros., Chas. 
S. Payne, E. H. Miller & Co., Jacob Smith, Patterson Bros., J. W, 
Smith, Hunter & Hartz, E. A. Trimmer. 

The great milling business of Spoon river dates away back to the 
years credited in the general history. Samuel G. Breese, of Wyoming, 
has one of the buhrs of the Dorance & Breese corn-cracking mill of fifty 
years ago. B. F. Fuller, C. D. Fuller and Miles A. Fuller were among 
the many old settlers who worked hard on this primitive grist mill, 
nor was it unknown to many of those men, a few of whom are still 
here, who built up Wyoming to its present prosperous state. Such 
milling enterprise as now obtains here was then unthought of, and he 
of forty 3^ ears ago, who would agree with Charles S. Payne, that his 
big industrial ideas .would ever find a field here, would be counted as 



318 BIOGKAPHT AND REMINISCENCES 

one of the old-time crazy men. He has accomplished even more than 
he 23romised in the long ago, and brought up in the very heart of the 
town two manufacturing industries of great importance. These have 
been planned and equipped by himself, and much of the actual work 
of building, fitting and placing new machinery was performed by him. 
His flouring and feed mills, as well as planing mill have all been 
brought iuto existence by him and form to-day a part and parcel of 
Wyoming's progress. 

The Viola Flouring Mills in North "W3^oming, operated by Charles 
C. Priester, were remodeled in 1886 and the roller process introduced. 
In the neighborhood is the old, old mill, known for years as Cox's 
Mill; older one's still have been swept away, while S. K. Conover's 
was destroyed by fire. 

Payne's Opera House, Wyoming, was opened Januaiy 1, 1885, by 
the Peoria Parlor Party. In October, 1882, the old congregational 
building at Toulon was purchased by Charles S. Payne and moved to 
W3Tjming. The price paid was 81 "5. Subsequently he purchased the 
old Methodist building, and out of the two derelicts of religion he 
formed a temple and dedicated it to music and the drama. 'The ex- 
terior of this dual edifice is as unique as the idea which brought them 
together. The interior is witliout doubt worthy of the originator. 
The frescoing, scenery, arrangement of seats and ante-rooms were all 
carried out after Mr. Payne's plans, and all reflect his good taste. 

In September. 1870, the American House was opened by Greenwalt 
& Culbertson, and the name changed from the Wyoming House. This 
house was burned in A})ril, 1876, wliile tenanted hy Mr. Linscott and 
family. The hotel was the propert}^ of C. S. Payne. The " Tremont," 
formerly known as the " Castle House," was opened by G. B. Fern, in 
April, 1882. The Truax House, or Clifton, one of the leading hotels of 
the district, is now (September 20, 1886,) conducted by Peter Sanner. 
W. A. Truax sold this house to John Slater, of Duncan, in September, 
1886, of whom Mr. Sanner is lessee. The house is all that is claimed 
for it, the leading hotel of W^^oming, and one of the best conducted in 
the whole district. 

The Payne building at Wyoming, in which McCully carried on the 
grocery business, was burned April 6, 1868. McCully lost his stock, 
$200 in cash, and barely escaped himself. Wilson Bros.' sorghum 
works were burned in Se])tember, 1879. In 1876 the American House 
was destroyed by fire. The Castle Block at Wyoming was destroyed 
by fire March 11, 1885. This building was owned by Teeter & Co., 
druggists, G. B. Fern, A. H. Castle, and the Dr. Green estate. Pat- 
terson Bros, carried on business in this building, but were not among 
its owners. The destruction of Jarnaghan's tile works, owned bj' Wm. 
Holgate, took place in 1886. The destruction of the Conover mills, 
about eight years ago, entailed heavy loss on the owner. These fires, 
with a half dozen of smaller ones, make up the list of cc>nflagrations here. 



BIOGRAPHY AND REMINISCENCES. 



From what has already been written on Toulon township and her 
towns and villages one would think that the sketch was complete. 



OF TOULOK TOWISISHIP. 319 

This, however, is not the case ; for in the unwritten, unrecorded history 
of the men who made the township is found the minutise and the most 
interesting parts of her history. These sketches are arranged alpha- 
betically. 

John W. Agard was born in Odessa, Schuyler county, New York. 
He was educated at Cazenovia, New York. March 1, 1834, he and 
Martha P., a daughter of General Thomas, were married at Kingston, 
Luzerne county, Pa. In 1836 he resolved to make his home in Illinois. 
He arrived in Wyoming September 25 of that year, and though he 
lived in other places since he always looked upon Wyoming as his 
home. From 1836 until 1845 he followed farming as a business, occa- 
sionally working as a carpenter, In 1845 he applied to the M. E. 
Pock River Conference for a preacher's license. He took an active 
part in the work of the conference, and was for several years one of 
the leading presiding elders. He returned to Wyoming, there to 
devote himself more fully to the care of his sick wife, completing this 
duty with her death September 21, 1870. Mr. Agard then considered 
it his duty to give his time and attention to the care of his wife's 
father, the aged General Thomas. A few months after General Thomas' 
death, which occurred July 7, 1879, Mr. Agard removed to Chicago, 
where he resided until his death, October 11, 1881. 

John R. Atlierton,, born in Kentucky, in 1 802, moved with parents 
to Ohio in 1803, married Jane Armstrong in 1825, moved to a point 
near Nauvoo in 1835, and to Stark county in 1844, where he settled 
on what is now the James Biggs farm ; died January 31, 1885. 

Jvlius Barnes, son of Martin and Ruth (Dart) Barnes, was born at 
Florence, Oneida county, New York, August 27, 1826. His parents 
were natives of Connecticut, who, with their family, moved into York 
state. Their children numbered six sons and four daughters, all of 
whom, with the exception of two sons and one daughter, grew to man- 
hood and womanhood — one son and one daughtor dying in late years. 
In 1836 the entire family moved to Elmwood township, Peoria county, 
coming tlie whole distance by wagon, and occupying six weeks in 
making the trip. Julius received his education at Elmwood, and was 
there engaged in agriculture and stock-raising until 1853, when he set- 
tled in Valley township and improved a farm of 160 acres there, since 
extended to 400 acres. For thirty years he resided on this farm ; was 
school director of his district for fourteen years consecutively, and 
served in several township offices, always taking a pride in the progress 
of the community. In 1853 he married Miss Sarah, daughter of Arni 
and Susan (Bosworth) Kellogg, who came from Clinton county, N. Y., 
to Stark county in 1836. Mrs. Barnes, however, was born in Vermont. 
Their children are Martin J., a farmer of Davis county, la.; Mrs. Mary 
A. Tilton, of Bement, Neb.; Rufus A., of Davis county, la.; Franklin 
A., farmer on old homestead ; Alvin S., of Otoe county. Neb.; Edson 
S., who died in his fifth year ; Frederick H. and Emma L. Mr. and 
Mrs. Barnes, originally Methodists, but of old Presbyterian families, 
are members of the Congregational church. He was a member of the 
Stark County Agricultural Society, but since the organization of the 
Central Agricultural Society has given it full support. He devoted 



320 BIOGEAPHT AND REMINISCENCES 

much attention to tine stock growing up to 18S3. when he moved into 
AYyoming, where he has a pleasant residence and a farm of 7< » acres of 
well located and fertile land. 

Jonas Ballentine^ born in X. Carolina, April 3, 1815, married Miss 
M. R. Edwards in 1841, settled in Stark county in September of that 
year, died near Monica, Peoria county, in his H3d year. 

Mt8. Eunice {Ferguson) JBass^ born in Northampton, X. Y., in 1820, 
married E. B. Bass there in 1810, came with her husband to Blinois in 
1854, settled five miles northeast of Toulon, and resided there until 
1878, when she moved into the village, where she died August 10, 1885. 

Thomas A. Beall, S/\. born in Dubois county, Ind., March 11, 1823, 
is the son of Asa and Mary (Co^de) Beall, natives of Kentucky. The 
former of Favette countv and the latter of Bullitt countv. The 
father was a millwright and helped Iniild the first grist mill at Cincin- 
nati, O. He died in Peoria county in June, 1873, aged eighty-four 
years, his wife preceded him in 1872, leaving three sons and two 
daughters. Asa Beall was a son of Thomas Beall, an old settler of 
Kentucky. Asa Beall removed with his family to Illinois in 1832 and 
located where is now ^[ossville, Peoria county, but removed to Kicka- 
poo, where he resided for many years. His children are: Thomas, 
Harriet, wife of James Pogers; William, a farmer of Valley township ; 
Francis, a resident of Peoria, and Josephine, wife of William Law- 
rence, of Peoria county. 

T/io/nas Beall was educated in Peoria county and there married 
Miss Ophelia, daughter of David and Poxanna (Minter) Bush, of 
Pennsylvania and Kentucky, respectiveh% and pioneers of Peoria 
county. At thirty years of age he left there and ]iurchased a property 
in Valley township, section 2, known since as the Beall farm Of his 
five sons and six daughters, Marion is a farmer in Harlan county, Neb.; 
Fred'k, an attorney-at-law, of Alma, Harlan county. Neb. ; Asa, a min- 
ister of the Methodist church (Peoria conference) : Hattie, the wife of 
David McLeish, a minister of the Methodist church, at Eoseville, 111.; 
Thomas Allen, at Hedding College, pursuing a literary and classical 
course; Mary, at Squire Pogers; John is a clever musical genius; 
Susie, Etfie, Minnie and Ada residing liere. He is a supporter of 
the Methodist church, while Mrs. Beall and many of the children are 
members of that church. 

John Berjield, son of Benjamin and Martha (Sloan) Berfield. was 
born in Summer HiU townshi]x Crawford county, Pa., April 24, 1814. 
His father was born in Cleartield countv, Pa., and his orandfather at 
London, Eng., who came to our shores as a Bi'itish soldier during the 
Franco-Indian War, settled in ]\Iahoning county, and afterwards 
embraced the cause of the Revolution ; lived to see the country rid of 
t3'ranny, and a family of five sons and two daughters growing up m a 
free state. His wife was a Miss Hall, who, like the old soldier, ended 
her days on the old farm beside the Susquehanna. Mr. John Berfield's 
father served in the War of 1812; settled in Crawford county. Pa., 
where he raised a family of four sons and five daughters. In 1834 he 
moved to Peoria county. 111., and in 1836 took up land in West Jersey 
township, where he and his wife died in 1840, and were biu'ied in the 



OF TOTJLON TOWNSHIP. 321 

McClenaghan cemeteiy. His wife was a daughter of John SJoan, of 
Crawford county. Of his family, Ehzabeth, wife of JSTatlian Stockton, 
of Peoria county, is dead; Maria, wife of Jacob Kightlinger, of Yates 
city is dead. The former was the mother of two sons and three daugh- 
ters, and the latter of eleven children, seven of whom are living. 
Sarah, wife of Mr. Ball, of Dakota, is dead ; Carson and John, of Stark 
county; George, who died in 1845; Martha, wife of Joseph jST. Bene- 
dict, of Moline, deceased, leaving three children — Wheatle}^ B., a farmer, 
near Hokah, Minn., and Mary Anne, wife of Miner Hedges, of Den- 
ver, Col., deceased. John Berheld received a fair education in his 
native county, learned the carpenters trade there, and on coming to 
Knox county, now a part of Stark, purchased and improved a farm in 
what is now West Jersey township, and ever since has been identified 
with the county's progress. He married here Emily, daughter of 
Squire Thomas Colwell and a native of Boss county, Ohio. They are 
the parents of two sons and two daughters, who are also the heads of 
families. Mr. Berfield has served as justice of the peace for West 
Jerse}^ supervisor of Toulon, whither he moved in 1852; has been 
township treasurer of schools and member of school board, as related 
in the histories of these townships. Mr. and Mrs. Berfield at one time 
were members of the Baptist church, and are numbered among the 
most useful citizens and honored pioneers of the count}^ 

Patrick M. Blair, son of William Preston and Hannah (Craig) 
Blair, was born at Frankfort, Ky., April 10, 1829. His father was 
also born at Frankfort, son of James Blair, a native of Richmond, Va., 
— attorney general of Kentuck}^, and grandson of John Blair, also a 
native of Yirginia — a name known in the judicial histor}^ of Virginia. 
James Blair served with distinction in the Eevolution, and William P. 
Blair in the War of 1812 as captain in the U. S. army. After the war he 
was in command of the first regular garrison at Ft. Clark (now Peoria) ; 
subsequently in command at Rock Island, Council Bluffs and Ft. 
Smith, Ark!, where he married Miss Craig, daughter of one of the first 
settlers of Arkansas. Patrick M. Blair was educated at St. Louis Uni- 
versit}?^, studied law in the office of his cousin, Montgomery Blair, and 
was admitted to the Illinois Bar at Ottawa in 1850. In 1816 he visited 
Toulon ; returned to St. Louis in 1818, and took up his residence at 
Toulon in 1851. He was married November 5, 1851, to Miss Harriet 
M. daughter of Dr. Hall, born in Derbyshire, Eng., July 20, 1832. In 
1854 he and John Berfield established the first lumber yard at Toulon, 
where his present residence now stands. In 1858 he and G. A. Clifford 
opened ^ law office. Before the war this partnership was dissolved, 
and one with Judge James Hewitt formed. In 1860 he was elected 
circuit clerk, which position he held eight years, the vote being in 
1868 for Mr. Blair 112S, a majority of 570, the largest majority 
given at this election. In 186T he assisted in organizing tlie R. I. & 
P. R. R. Co. ; was one of the incorporators, and in 1869 was elected 
first vice president, serving until succeeded, b}^ Captain S. F. Otman. 
In 1886 he was appointed master in chancery, as successor to Allen 
P. Miller. Of the four children born to Mr. and Mrs. Blair none are 
living. WiUiam P., born December 19, 1854, died December 25, 



322 BIOGEAPHT AISTD EEMIXISCENCES 

that year; Frances L., born January 20, 1856, died April 23, 1873; 
Thomas H., one of the founders of the Sentinel, born Julv 30. 1858, 
died August 28, 1881, and AValter H., born m 1862, died December 26, 
1884. 

Mrs. EJva M. {WrigJif) Black, born near Toulon in 1858, married 
Samuel G. Black in 1876, died October 30, 1885. 

Herbert Blal-ely, born in Tennessee in 1807, moved to Knox county. 
lU., in 1853, to Toulon in 1883, died here December 25, 1881. 

TJiomas TT. Bloomer, born in Fayette county, Ohio, January 15, 
1833, is the son of Jesse and Matilda (MacDonald) Bloomer, the for- 
mer a native of Ohio and son of "W^m. Bloomer, a farmer who settled 
in Favette county on movino- from Alabama. Jesse Bloomer was a 
farmer in Favette county Ohio when he died. Thomas W. received a 
fair education there, and there learned the blacksmith's trade at 
"Washington, Ohio. In 1855 he came to Stark county with his uncle 
Squire 5lacMillen. Here he established business for hunself and has 
since been identified with "Wvomiuo:. He was married in Favette 
county. Ohio to Miss Mary J. Kimble, daughter of IS^athan Kimljle, a 
merchant of "Washington. The}^ have one son and one daughter. Jesse 
C, a real estate dealer, and Ida A., the wife of George H. Lyons of 
"Wyoming, a traveling salesman. A reference to the history of "Wv- 
oming will pomt out Mr. Bloomer's connection with the city council, 
school board, masonic circles, while in the general history many refer- 
ences are made to him. He is one of the original members of the 
Central Agricultural Societ}". 

Andreio F. Bloomer, formerly of "Wyoming, moved to York, Keb. 

IF;/?. Boggs. who settled at AVvoming veal's ago, died in January, 
1886. ' \ ' 

Major Bohanon, of Trivoli, 111., father of Mrs. J. D. Pierson, of 
Toulon, died in September, 1881. in liis S5th year. He came from 
Syracuse, K. Y., to Peoria county in 1835. 

William J. Bond, a native of Maine, was born in Lincoln county, 
township of Jefferson, January 25, 1827. His father was William Ful- 
lerton Bond, a farmer, and son of Henry Bond, a farmer, originally a 
brick-mason, a native of "Winchester, Mass. "William J. was one of 
three sons and three daughters of TVilliam F. and Hannah (Jackson) 
Bond, the latter daughter of Joseph Jackson, who served in the Kevo- 
lution. He spent boyhood in his native county. At the age of seven- 
teen years he engaged as clerk in a mercantile house, and after a few 
years became a partner in a general store at Jefferson. In 1850 he 
went to Bockland, Me., and was engaged in mercantile woi'k until 
comino- west in 1868. During: his stay at Kockland he served in the 
council of that city six years, was clerk of the city three 3'ears, and 
member of the board of assessors of Eockland for eight years. In 
1868, sold out his interest, came west, and after spending four years in 
Missouri in traveling trade, he was sent here in 1872 to take charge of his 
coal mining compan^-'s interests. Those interests he subsequently pur- 
chased, and was promiuenth" connected with business here until 1881. 
U]wn the organization of the Central Agricultural Society he became 
a ;>tockhokler. He was married in Missouri to Miss Amelia Gvegory. 



LIBRARY 

UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS 

r 



OF TOULON TOWNSHIP. 325 

A reference to the official history of the village of Wyoming, of the 
Protestant Episcopal church, of tlie Masonic circle and commercial in- 
terests will point out very definitelv the part he has taken in the 
progress of this town. 

Orlando Brace, son of Myrtle G. and Phoebe (Munson) Brace, was 
born in Elmira township, this county, August 8, 1838. His father, a 
native of Xew York state, was reared and educated in Luzerne countv, 
Penn. His mother Avas also a native of that countv. In 1836 Myrtle 
G. Brace, his wnfe and two children caine to Osceola Grove, making 
the trip overland. Of their eleven children, three sons and six daugh- 
ters survive. Tlie pioneers were laid to rest in Elmira cemeterv, the 
father dying in 180(i, the mother in 1873. Orlando Brace spent his 
boyhood on the farm, again farmed his own lands in Henry county, 
and was so engaged when the civil war broke out. In 1862 he en- 
tered Company A. One hundred and twenty-fourth Illinois infantry, 
and followed the fortunes of that command until April 1, 1865, when 
he received a wound in the right shoulder joint at Spanish Fort, Ala. 
Su])sequently he spent three months in the hospital at New Orleans, 
and in October of that jquy w^as honorably discharged at Springfield, 
111. In 1867 he resumed farming, but owing to the failure of his 
health had to discontinue agriculture. In 1873 he was elected treas- 
urer of Stark county, which position he held for five consecutive terms, 
and doubtless would be elected and reelected had not the legislature 
adopted a law fixing the tenure of that oifice. During all these vears 
not one cent has been incorrectly entered or unaccounted for, pre- 
cision marking all his dealings with the office. In December, 1886, he 
was elected commander of the G. A. R. post at Toulon. He married 
Miss Lucy A. Hudson, of Elmira township, whose parents, Daniel and 
i\[ary Hudson, settled tlier'e about 1854, moving that year from Wash- 
ington county, Ohio. They are the parents of seven children, namely: 
Lottie, now Mrs. William Nixon, of W3^oming ; Luella, now Mrs. F. S. 
Rosseter, of Chicago; Frank, Florence, Harry, George and Edith. A 
reference to the military, political and pioneer chapters of the general 
histor3\ to the chapters on Elmira township, and to that on the town 
of Toulon, will point out definitely the various positions held by Mr. 
Brace. 

2[rs. Khzle F. Brace, daughter of Caleli P. and Diana Flint, born 
in Corning, N. Y., in 1839, came to Toulon in 1840, died at Winona. 
111., February 25, 1878. 

Henry C. Bradley, son of George and Ann (Campbell) Bradley, 
w^as born in Goshen township, Fe])i'nary 7, 1849. His parents were 
old residents of Stark countv, comino- here from New York Citv. Of 
their five sons and four daughters, Bessy died in infancy ; William G. 
is a farmer of Nicholls county, Neb.; Sarah J, is the wife of Jacob 
Goliey, of Nicholls county. Neb.; Henry C. resides at Toulon ; Andrew 
C. and Mary, the wife of Robert Nicholson, reside in Goshen; 
Frank B. is a farmer of Nicholls county, Neb.; Annie is the wife 
of Cory Moore of Toulon townshi}), and Ora A. is the wife of James 
Lamb, of Fillmore countv, Neb. Henrv C. received a common school 
education in his native township, and learned the blacksmith's trade 



326 WOGRAPHT A^T) REMINISCENCES 

at Toulon. At the age of 21 years entered farm life for himself, and 
continued agriculture until 1881, when he sold his farm, moved into 
Toulon, and commenced the blacksmith's trade. His wife, Miss Alice 
A. Edwards, is a daughter of Lewis Edwards, formerly of Essex town- 
ship, now of Antelope county. Neb., residing near Keeley village. 
Mr. and Mrs. Bradley are tlie parents of four children, namely: Fan- 
nie, Jessie, Addie and Bertha. Both are members of the Christian 
Church, and he is a member of the County Agricultural Society. 
George Bradle}^, the pioneer of the family in this county, is now a res- 
ident of Thayer county, Neb. His wife died here July 9, 1881. Geo. 
Bradle}^ was born in Tyrone county, Ireland, in 1820, came to New 
York in 1839. His wife, Ann Campbell, was born in same county in 
1822, and came to New York in 1841, was married in 1844 and 
started for Toulon the same spring. 

Sarjiuel G. Bpeese, son of Henry and Sarah (Johnson) Breese, Avas 
born December 25, 1836. His father was born in Luzerne county, 
Wyoming Valley, Pa., December 21, 1797, died October 21, 1875. He 
was one of nine children of Samuel and Llannah (Pierson) Breese of 
Somerset county. New Jerse}', and grandson of John and Dorothy 
(Riggs) Breese of Basking Ridge, N. J., the same John who was a soldier 
of the Eevolution. Henrv Breese, father of Samuel G. came here 
from Luzerne couuty, Pa., in 1835, with three sons and two daughters, 
namely : Stephen JD., Milton, Johnston, Ellen and Anw, while here 
the subject of this sketch Avas born. He, with Stephen and Amy, 
now Mrs. A. Y. Fuller, are the only survivors here, of this large and 
prominent family. Milton resides at Neponset, Johnson, at Kewanee, 
and Ellen is the wife of Samuel Besett, residing near Chenoa, 111. 
Samuel G. grew to manhood here, at 18 years he engaged in his 
father's business at Neponset, 111.; visited Omaha, Neb., returned in 
1864 to Prairie city, and was engaged in mercantile work until 1870, 
when he moved near Castleton, where he was engaged in farming up 
to 1882, when he took charge of his present business at Wyoming, 
still holding his farm in Penn township. He was married December 
24, 1865, at Prairie city to Miss Elvira C, daughter of Moses and 
Martha A. (Yocum) Craig, of Virginia and Kentucky respectively. 
They are the parents of Maude, Henry C. and Mattie. Mr. Breese 
supports all religious denominations, but is not a member of any 
church. Throughout the township history and in man}^ pages of the 
general histoiy, this famil}^ is referred to. Mr. Breese was born in a 
small log cabin, and at time of birth, had four teeth, two above and 
two below, a rather striinge or unusual thing, but necessit}- is always 
the mother of invention, and the teeth must have been provided, so as 
he could become self-sustaining very A^oung, and learn to live on nuts 
and acorns, etc., as at that time most pioneers had very little of the 
luxuries to eat. His elder brothers used to heat clapboards by the lire 
place and carry them out to the wood pile to stand on barefooted 
while the}" chopped wood. Such are a few incidents peculiar to life 
here over half a century ag-o. 

niJItam Brouyn, a mason since 1812, died near Toulon in Decem- 
ber, 1874, aged ^Q years. 



OF TOtTLON TOWNSHIP. 327 

John B. Broion, born inVirginia in 1806, settled near Kickapoo, 111., 
in 1837; came to Wyoming in 1853, was postmaster here from 1800, 
which position he filled until his death, May 23, 1880. ( Vide chai^ter 
on Penn Toianship.) 

Captain John Marshall Broion, son of John Benton and Elizabeth 
Ann (Jofmson) Brown, was born in Hampshire count}', Va., August 10, 
1837. His father settled in that state and foliowed the millwright's 
trade in his youth ; while his mother's people — the Johnsons — resided 
there for over a century. In the summer of 1837, the family (parents 
and three sons) moved west to a ])oint near Kickapoo, Peoria county, 
111. In 1853, the father settled in Wyoming, engaged in mercantile 
work and was one of the town's most energetic and public-spirited 
citizens up to his death in 1880. He was postmaster there for nearly 
twenty 3^ears. At the beginning of the Civil War, John M. Brown 
was engaged on the farm in Valley township. In August of that year 
he enlisted in Company K, Forty-seventh Illinois Infantry, and was 
at once appointed orderly sergeant of the comjiany. Eai'ly in 1862, he 
was premoted first lieutenant. Follo\ving the battle of Corinth he was 
commissioned captain antl held that position until honorably dis- 
charged, October 10, 1861. In JSTovember, 1864, he was elected sheriff 
by 555 majority over the popular democratic nominee, James Now Ian. 
In 1868, he defeated William Lownian for circuit clerk by 534 majority, 
and reelected each term since that time. In 1850, he married Miss 
Margaret K., fourth daughter of John and Margaret (Robinson) Hawks. 
Of their three children, Ella M. is now the wife of Herbert D. ISTott, 
of Galva; Maud E. resides with parents, and Lew M. Brown is a very 
courteous and competent assistant in the circuit cleric's office. A refer- 
ence to the history of the G. A. li. post at Toulon, that of the I. O. O. F. 
lodge, and of the Encampment will show the part he has talcen in these 
important organizations. As an officer of the county his record is 
without rejiroach, as a soldier he won his laurels and wears them, 
while as a citizen he has shared in the labors of adding a pleasant 
home to Toulon, and has become interested in a farm in the county. 
( Vide history of Penn Townshij).) 

" Grandjxi''' Buchanan, who died at Olympia, W. T., Septembgr 27, 
1881, once resided on the land now known as the county Poor Farm. 
He was born in 1801, married in 1822, and crossed the plains in 1853, 
with his family. 

Samuel Burge, son of Pev. Benjamin and Lucretia (Dewey) Burge, 
was born at Enfield, Grafton county, N. H., October 21, 1811. In 
1856 Mr. Barge, his mother and sister, moved from Lewiston, Fulton 
county, to Stark county. The family having settled in Fulton county 
in 1853, four years after the death of Rev. Mr. Burge. This move was 
made on the suggestion of the late Samuel M. Dewey, a resident of 
Stark in 1819, who counseled his sister to bring her famil}' among a 
)eople whom he esteemed, and among whom himself was one of the 
eading citizens. On arriving here Mr. Burge entered his uncle's store 
and filled the position of clerk for ten years, until 1866, when he ac- 
cjuii-ed a one-fourth interest in the house of Dewey, Lowman ^ Co. 
In the fall of that year Mr. Dewey died, but, by the terms of the will, 



328 BIOGRAPHY AKB KEinNlSCENCES 

the business was to be continued under the title of Dewey & Burge, 
and with the mercantile department the banking house, established in 
1865, was included. Of all this Mr. Burge took the management Jan- 
uar}^ 1, 18G7. Early in 1869 he purchased the interests of the Dewey 
estate, and in the sju'ing of 187U disposed of the mercantile depart- 
ment, so that he could give exclusive attention to the banking business. 
In 1879 Charles P. Dewev. son of the late Samuel Dewev, was ad- 
mitted into partnership, and the firm name of Burge & Dewey 
adopted. On September 1, 1870, Mr. Burge was married to Miss Alice, 
daughter of AVilliam Lowman. To them four children were born, 
Annie M., Samuel D., Esther L. and Jessie, the latter now lying in the 
familr lot in Toulon cemeterv. Mrs. Buroe is a graduate of the Bock- 
ford Female Seminary, and, as evidenced by references in this work to 
local literary and musical societies, holds a first place among the 
alumni of thit seminary. In the history of the schools of Toulon 
township, of the Congregational church of Toulon, of the munici- 
])ality, of the soldiers of the count}' and of the AV. W. Wright Post, 
G. A. R., the part taken by Mr. Burge in affairs of public interest is 
clearly porti'ayed. To him is credited the introduction of modern 
residence building into Toulon, and above all a desire to share in build- 
ing up higher the industrial and social interests of the town, which he 
calls his home for over thirty years. 

Rev. Benjamin Burge^ named in the foregoing sketch, vras born at 
Francistown, X. H. For years he was an esteemed pastor of the Con- 
gregational church, until his death in 1848. His widow, Mrs. Lucretia 
(Dewey) Burge, was a daughter of Andrew Dewey, a farmer of Han- 
over, X. H., who died on the farm in Goshen township, in 1857. 
Shortly after the death of her husband, Mrs. Burge and family moved 
to Nashua, X. II., where she resided until coming to Lewiston, 111., in 
1853. The name and family are well known in the pioneer history of 
Xew Hampshire, particularly in the Hollis neighborhood, where the 
old residence of the Buro-es has a historv antedatino- 1740. 

I). S. Burroughs., son of Lorin and Meribah (Boardmanj Burroughs, 
w^as born at Xapoli, Cattaraugus county, X. Y., Feb. 7, 1843. His father 
was a son of Porter Burroughs, and mother a daughter of Bichard 
Boardnum, prominent agriculturalists of Onondaga Co., X. Y. In 1867 
Lorin Burroughs and family migrated to Prophetstown, where the father 
died Sept. 5, 1867, leaving five sons and three daughters living. Geo. 
W. is supposed to have been killed at Chancellorsville, under Hooker; 
Orlando, the eldest, is a farmer; Lewis P., died at Xapoli, X. Y.; Ira, 
like Orlando, resides in Sarp}' county, Xeb.: Daniel L. is a citizen of 
Whiteside county. 111.; Wallace M. is in insurance business at Omaha, 
Xeb.; Lavina is the widow of O. Fischer, Whiteside county ; Salina is 
the wife of John M. Richards, of Whiteside countv ; and Marinda V. 
IS unmarried. D. S. Burroughs is the sixth son of seven boys. Lie 
spent his boyhood at X^apoli, and obtained his education in Cattaraugus 
county. After coming to Illinois he traveled extensively through the 
west, was engaged in the creamery business in Whiteside county until 
1884, but started in business in this place Xovember 10, 1875, the date 
of his commission house at Wyoming. His wife, whom he married at 



OF TOULON TOWNSHIP. 329 

Council Bluffs, la., was born at Cold Springs, Cattaraugus county, K. 
Y. They are the parents of one daughter, Carrie. Mr. Burroughs is 
a member of the masonic society, a strong advocate of temperance 
principles, and a supporter of all beneficial enterprises. 

Captain Henry Butler\ son of Justus Butler, the famous hotel- 
keeper of New Haven, Conn., was born in tliat city about 1793. 
Wlien he was of age he mai'i-ied Miss Tlebecca Green, grand (hiughter 
of Samuel Green, the "Camljridge, Mass., printer." Captain Butler, 
depending on the accounts of tlie West rendered by one lk)gardus, a 
pioneer lawyer of Peoria, and Elias K. Kane, one of the first constitu- 
tion makers of Illinois, left New York in June, 1835, traveled by boat 
to Chicago, and arrived at Wyoming in the fall. He was followed by 
his wife, three sons and five daugliters, who took up their residence in 
the double log-house whicii the captain had built and ])repared for 
them. In later years the brick residence was erected, and here the 
founder of the family in Illinois died, August 2, ISC)!:, his wife follow- 
ing him to rest, November 30, 1865. In this county two of their 
children were born. Lucy, George, Samuel, Henry, Rebecca, Mary, 
Charles, Abb}^ Elizabeth, 'All)ert, Virginia and Henrietta then made 
up the famil_y circle. In 1839, William F. Thomas married Mary But- 
ler, and the same day Ira Ward, Jr., married Elizabeth. In January, 
1840, Oaks Turner, of Hennepin, married Rebecca G., Elizabeth mar- 
ried John W. Henderson, Henrietta married Thomas J. Henderson, 
and soon through the list. George and Charles never settled here; 
the former held a leading position in A. T. Stewart's house. New York 
city, for years; the latter is a lawyer of that city. Virginia, who in 
her youth was deprived of hearing, was educated by the Gallaudets; 
Abby died while 3^et an infant. 

Edwin Butler, })ublislier and editor of the Stark County Neivs, was 
born at Kewanee, Henry county, 111., January 9, 1841. Moving to 
Milan, 111., he remained there until 1849, when he came to Toulon. 
Here he attended some of the many private scliools then existing at 
the county seat, was a pupil at the seminary, and completed a four 
3'ear's classical course at Knox college in June. 1801. During the next 
winter he taught the "Dutch Island" school in Essex township. On 
August 11, 1862, he enlisted in Company F, One-hundred-and-twelfth 
Illinois Volunteer Infantry, was appointed second sergeant, promoted 
orderly, and served three years. In September, 1863, he was de- 
tailed to assist in printing the Athens Union, Post in the office of 
the suppressed Athens I^ost. On the 17th the first number appeared, 
and contained a well-written salutatory, from which the following 
extract is made : " Our first issue of the Athens Union Post will 
present quite a diffei'ent appearance to what it did, when Union was 
not attached to its title. . . . The former editor, Mr. Ivins, prob- 
ably not thinking that we would want to issue the paper in his 
absence, took witli him nearly all the material necessary to give it a 
genteel appearance." The motto of the new paper was " Our country, 
may she ever be right; but our country right or wrong." Mr. Butler 
worked faithfully on the Post until the sudden evacuation of Athens, 
when he was captured in the office. AVhile ^vith the rebels, he tasted 



330 biograi'hy and reminiscences 

the sweets of prison life at Atlanta, Danville, Richmond ; from March 
to September, 1864, in their notorious hotel at Anderson ville ; next at 
Charleston, and then at Florence, S. C. In December, 1864, he con- 
trived to make his way to Charleston with the sick and wounded, who 
were there exclianged. Once witliin the union lines, he made the first 
hearty meal since his captivity, put on a new dress, returned to Toulon 
for thirty days, and in one week increased fourteen ]3ounds in weight. 
In April, 1865, he rejoined his command at Greensboro, N. C, and 
served until July. lieturning, lie worked on a farm, was elected 
county surveyor in November, a position he has since filled with the 
exception of two years. In Ma}^ 1869, he purchased Oliver White's 
interest in the News with Joseph Smethurst; early in 1870, purchased 
the hitter's interest, but in June, 1882, sold a half interest to James A. 
Henderson, who, dying in the fall of 1883, left the partnership to his 
widow. Mr. Ijotler was married in March, 1883, to ]\Irs. Maggie 
Porter, daughter of James S. Templeton, one of the early settlers of 
Toulon, who returned to his home near Pittsburgh, Penn. In 1872, 
he with Enoch Emery were delegates to the Republican National con- 
vention. ( Vide miluary and local history.) 

O. C. CanqjheU., born in Connecticut in 181Y; moved to Stark 
countv in 1865; resided at Wvoming a number of years; died at Chi- 
cago, May 1, 1880. 

Alfred Castle, M. i>., son of Samuel and Phoebe (Parraalee) Castle, 
was born at Sullivan, Madison county, N. Y., September 22, 1806. Plis 
father was a native of Berkshire county, Mass., and a cousin of Ethan 
Allen, and a descendant of the Irish family of Castles who settled in 
Connecticut among its pioneers. His mother was of Belgian lineage. 
Dr. Castle studied the languages under Dr. Sillsbee, of Cazenovia, N. 
Y., and medicine at Brockport and Pittsford, in Monroe county, mean- 
time attending lectures at Berk's College, Pittsfield, Mass., at Jefferson 
College, Philadelphia, and at Vermont College, Woodstock. He was a 
resident graduate of Harvard College, and also at Massachusetts Hos- 
pital, Boston. He practiced two j^ears at Brock)iort before obtaining 
his degree of M. D. in 1834, at the Berkshire school. During the two 
succeeding years he practiced in Monroe count}^ On May 19, 1835, 
he married Miss Maria P., daughter of Col. Daniel Dana, of the IJ. S. 
ariu}^, who commanded the Vermont volunteers during the war of 
1812-14. In 1836 he set out for Peoria, 111., on a one-horse buggy, 
leaving his bride to follow. He resided there five or six years, returned 
reduced in health to Vermont, but in 1842 he revisited Peoria, to find 
that, where onl}^ one house stood in 1836 (six miles west of Peoria), 
between Peoria and Wyoming, many were now built and bnilding. 
In 1843 he settled at Wyoming. Dr. and Mrs. Castle were the parents 
of five children, two of whom died in infancy. He was the active 
agent in building the B. & R. R. R., of which his son Alfred was 
president. The doctor only retired from jiractice a few years 
ago. During his forty years of duty in this county he merited and 
obtained many tokens of popular esteem. A reference to the chapters 
of the general history and to the sketch of Wyoming ^vill point out 
the various parts Dr. Castle has taken in that drama of real life which 



OF TOULON TOWNSHIP. 331 

has been on the stage of Stark County particiihirly since its organiza- 
tion, only a few years before his settlement here. 

Be)j. W. W. Garr, native of Vermont, born in Addison county, at 
Middlel)ury, July 23, 1850, is the son of William and Harriet E. 
(Rogers) Carr, both active members of the Methodist church. William 
Carr's father, also William, was a native of Rhode Island — of old 
Episcopalian circles there. W. W. Carr spent his boyhood at Middle- 
bury, obtained a gc^od common school educatiou, aud took a prepara- 
tory course at the Middlebury High School, and at Brandon, Vt. lie 
also taught school duriug this time, and labored for himself since the 
age of twenty-oue. At the age of twenty-three he came west and 
entered the Noi'thwestern University, at Evanston, graduated in the 
class of 1877 with an honoraljle record, taking some prizes. During 
the last two years of the college course he preached at Brighton Pai'k, 
and upon graduating joined the Illinois conference, and was stationed 
at Yates City. He held this charge one year, then went to Trivoli, 
Peoria county, where he remained two years, signalizing his work 
by a hirge revival. At Ipava, Fult<ni county, he remained three years 
There he removed a considerable church debt, repaired the old build- 
ing, and built a new parsonage. A church was built in his circuit dur- 
ing this time. Movino' to Bland insville, McDonouo'h countv, he held 
remarkable revival services, and during his one-year term repaired the 
church there. In 1884 he was appointed to the Toulon charge, and in 
1886 to that of Kewanee. He married at his old Yermont home Miss 
Mattie L. Piper, daughter of David Piper, of Middlebur}^ an old 
family of that town. To them three sons and one daughter were born 
- — ^Ruby Pearl, Harlow Piper, George W., and Sidney McCord. Rev. 
Mr. Carr s relation to Stark county is best told in the history of the 
Methodist church and of the Masonic, Old- Fellow and Good Templar 
circles of Toulon. 

Thomas H. Carlin., senior member of the firm of Carlin & Sickles, 
is one of the enterprising and progressive business men of Stark c(junty, 
and takes the ci'e(bt of pioneer work here in his industry. He was 
born in Canal Dover, Tuscarawas county, O., March 9, i858, the son 
of Matthew Carlin and Jane Rockford, both natives of Ireland, who 
came from near Drogheda, Louth county, to our shores to make a 
home for themselves. The}'' settled in Tuscarawas county, where two 
sons and five daughters came to them and grew to manhood and 
womanhood, all worthy citizens and industrious people. The subject 
of our sketch completed a good common school education and began 
the trade of cigar-making at Canal Dover. He subsequentlv did jour- 
neyman work at his trade through the country, finally locating here 
in March, 1882, where he soon after embarked in business, which he 
has very successfully carried on since. He feels the fnll force of his 
citizenship in Toulon, and in the early part of the present year married 
Miss Lydia, the estimable daughter of Daniel and Ann (Maguire) 
A¥olgamood, worthy peo[)le of Toulon. Mr. Carlin atti-ibutes his suc- 
cess in life to a careful and pains-taking principle in the manufacture 
of his goods, and the rapidly growing trade of the firm attests this 
fact. Socially, he is a genial gentleman and a substantial friend. He 



332 BIOGRAPHY AND REMINISCENCES 

is a worthy member of the I. O. O. F. society,' and is (with all 
his active business duties) a close student of this progressive age, and 
is found clever in other arts besides his trade. 

William Chamherlain^ M. J)., died Xovember 2, 1882, in iiis 6-ith 
year. He came to Stark county in 1847, and practiced here contin- 
uously up to the ])eriod of his death. F. S. Rossiter represented the 
I. O. O. F., and B. F. Thom]ison the Masonic society at the funeral. 

Jtilius Field Chajjin^ born in ISTew York in 1801, died in Marcli, 
1884, aged 82 years He put the first coat of paint on the Baptist 
church spire at Toulon prior to his removal to LaSalle. 

J/y'.y. Mary {Fanshaw) Ghapin^ sister of Daniel Fanshaw, one of the 
pioneer printers of Xew York city, died at LaSalle, Ills., December 15, 
1883, aged 81 years. She came to Toulon in early days, moved to 
LaSalle in 1853, wliere she resided thirty years. 

Joseph. Catterlin., born in Virginia in 1789, moved to Ohio, married 
Eleanor Knox, who died at Kewunee in 1873 ; died himself at Albion, 
Kan., May 22, 188G. He was postmaster at Toulon during Fillmore's 
administration, and one of tlie old merchants. 

John S. Cleveland died in Wyoming October 4, 1880. He was 
father of three children, two of tliem are still living, and one of them, 
Mrs. John W. Cox, resides at Wyoming. His wife died in this place a 
little over one year ago. The deceased was born at Cliillicothe, Peoria 
county. Ills., and died in his 57th year. His home was formerly in 
I^s^eponset, from which place he moved to Wyoming several 3'ears 
since. He served three years in the \var of the Rebellion, as a member 
of the Fourteenth Illinois Cavalry. Lie was the inventor of a sulky 
revolving harrow, on wliich he received letters patent in 1883. 

Jeffrey A. Cooley, born in Grayson county (now Carroll county), 
Virginia, on July 4, 1825, where he livetl for seventeen \^ears, came to 
Toulon ISTovember 18, 1842, and lived for fortv-four vears here. The 
first seven years he was in the employ of John Culbertson, assistmg 
him in farm work. On February 7, 18^0, he was united in marriage to 
Mrs. Louisa Culbertson, by Eev. S. G. Wright. They had three chil- 
dren, all of whom died early. Only his wife survives him. Immedi- 
ately after marriage in 1849, he built a hotel on the site of the present 
house which was the first regular public hotel in the place ; and up to 
his death, September 22, 1886, he was proj)rietor of what is known as. 
the Virginia House He bequeathed to his wife the hotel and fix 
tures, lot and barn thereon, and to Kate Maxfield, daughter of Mrs" 
Xellie Maxfield, all his personal property and twenty two acres of land 
lying just east of town. 

Fresly Colwell, an old settler of Stark county, died at Burlington 
Junction, Mo., June, 1, 1883, 

Mrs. David Cooper^ now Mrs. Funis of Wyoming, a sister of Isaac 
B. Essex, came in the fall of 1829. 

Mrs. Mary Co,i\ of W^^oming, daughter of James and Maria Graves, 
died June 24, 1881. 

Qlara [De Wolf) Cox Avas born in Clark county, Ohio, March 23, 
1848, and at the age of four years came with her parents to Stark 
county, where she resided up to her death, jS^ovember 4, 1 886. In the 



OF TOULON" TOWNSHIP. 333 

year 186Y, she was united in marriage to Walter Cox which union was 
blest by six children. 

Jere M. Cox^ druggist and pharmacist, was born in Ross county, 
Ohio, May 11, 1850. His parents, Jesse and Abigail (Waldron) Cox, the 
former a native of Ohio, the latter of Xorth Carolina, with their fam- 
ily moved to Illinois in 1852, and here Mr. J. M. Cox received his early 
education completing such at Lombard university, Galesburg. At the 
age of 23 3^ears, he engaged in mercantile life, and has since been one 
of the successful business men of the count3^ He married Miss 
Emma J., daughter of the late J. H. BatcheJder of Englewood, and to 
them three children were born : Harry C, Fannie G. and Nellie — the 
second now deceased. A reference to the Masonic and Odd Fellow's 
history of Wyoming, will point out definitely the position of Mr. Cox 
in these societies. He is a member of the Illinois Pharmaceutical so- 
ciety and of the State Board of Pharmacy. 

Aunt Polly CrandaU, the old maid of Toulon and " aunt to the 
whole town," moved to Barton county. Mo., in 1882, and died there 
the same year. 

Miss Eliza J. Creighton^ who was a well-known teacher of Stark 
county, in the fifties, died at Morris, 111., September 21, 1864. 

Prof. P. K. Cross, a native of Illinois, comes from a worthy pioneer 
family of Winnebago county. He was born in tliat county April 18, 
1856. His father, A. B. Cross, a descendant of Scotch ])ioneers, of 
New York state, has always been known to the people of Winnebago 
county for his sturdy support of upright principles and progressive 
measures. The subject of our sketch, when a lad, obtained a good 
training in the elementary studies of the common schools of the dis- 
trict in wliich he lived, and at the age of sixteen he entered college at 
Beloit, Wis. There he applied himself to a regular collegiate course 
of study, and began fitting himself as an educator. At nineteen he 
began teaching as a prvjfession, as also for the purpose of earning 
money to complete a thorough and systematic training, which he did 
subsequently by s})ending about two years in the Illinois State Normal 
School, when he resumed teaching. His success has been favorably 
marked, and he is now found a leader in the profession. He passed 
some five years at Somonauk, 111., where he raised the public schools 
from a chaotic condition to that of a thoroughly graded system, and 
had the ])leasure of not only being complimented with a salary nearly 
double of what he began with, but of graduating two large classes ink 
thorough English literary course. Finishing his work there he ac- 
cepted his present position in 1883, where he has been successfully con- 
nected since, as the records of Wyoming's school shows. In politics 
he is a pronounced republican, of strong temperance proclivities, prin- 
ciples es])oused not only through his own observations, but inherent, 
as his father Avas prominent among the many early abolition and tem- 
perance workers of Winnebago county in promulgating those views. 
Prof. Cross was ha})pily married in Somonauk, 111., to Miss Emma L. 
Hess, a lady of clever literary and musical attainments, and a fitting- 
helpmeet to him in his professional labors. He is a member of the 
Masonic order. In person he is tall and of commanding presence, of a 
30 



334 BIOGRAPHY AND KEMINISCENCES 

frank and generous nature, but of a disposition to reason deeply and 
conscientioush^ on all matters, and when resolv^ed, to stand manfully 
to his opinions. Since coming to Wyoming he has won the admira- 
tion of all good lovers of its school interests. 

John Calbertson, son ^f William and Elizabeth Culbertson, was 
born in Pennsjdvania, December 19, 1800. His earlier years were 
passed in a manner common to bo3^s at the beginning of this centurj'^ ; 
but as his years increased he maDifested his desire for independence, 
and resolved to learn the saddler's and harness trade. This resolve he 
carried out, and for years he followed the trade with the same close at- 
tention which marked his later life in commercial circles. In 1841 he 
settled in this count}^ and engaged in mercantile trade. His strict at- 
tention to business and square dealing, insured the success of his new 
venture, so that in a short time he commanded a ver}^ heavy trade 
around Toulon, and indeed throughout this section of the countr}^ He 
established a flouring mill and woolen factor}^ here, which ^vas operated 
under his own supervision, and gave employment to a number of per- 
sons, some of whom were skilled woi-kmen. His investments in real- 
estate round Toulon were verv extensive, and at one time it was said 
he intended to purchase the whole township and adjoining one of Go- 
shen. In religious affairs both he and Mrs. Culbertson were Baptists, 
and in the history of that church their connection with it is shown — 
he having built the present house and presented it to the societ}^ On 
February 17, 1822, he married Miss Pleasant Bateman. Thev were 
the parents of four children — Louisa, who married Lucius Miner; Will- 
iam and John, deceased ; and James, a physician of Toulon. Mr. Cul- 
bertson died June 5, 1869, just at the time when he planned the expen- 
diture of some of his great wealth on imjiroving the town in ^vhich he 
accumulated it. 

Bev. T. J. Cullen, while en route from 'Wyoming to Bradford, was 
attacked by heart disease, and falling from his buggy was insta,ntly 
killed, Ma}^ 13, 1883. He was missionary priest in this county during 
the absence of Father Moynihan. 

Dr. Ourtiss died at Cleveland, Oliio, June 21, 1883, aged sixty-seven 
years. Years ago he practiced medicine at Toulon. 

L. P. Damon, son of James G. and Martha J. (Clark) Damon, was 
born at Medford, Mass., October 1, 1848. His father was a native of 
that state, and mother of Maine; on both sides being the families of 
mechanics. In 1858, the family moved to Stark count^^ L. P. learned 
the machinists' trade at Kewanee, also learned the mason's trade, and 
followed this trade in Cass and Union counties, Iowa, for al)out ten 
years, returning to Wyoming in 1879. Here he was engaged in mason 
Avork, windmill manufacturing, and machine business. More recently 
he established his blacksmith and machine shop here, and now has 
completed preparations for manufacturing a "shoveling board" and 
end gate for wagons, which he invented and improvetl. The manu- 
facture of these inventions he is now pushing forward. In 1869, he was 
married in Stark county to Miss Ella M., daughter of George Gushing. 
They are the parents of one son and two daughters — George G., 
ISTellie E. and Jessie A. In religious matters he is entirely Christian, 



OF TOULON TOWNSHIP. 335 

yet liberal to a degree and yields hearty moral support to all 
churches. 

Samuel If ills Dewey ^ son of Andrew and Harriet (Pinneo) Dewey, 
was born December 21, 1823, at Hanover, N. H. His father, who was 
a carpenter, carried on a small farm here in connection with his trade, 
and on this farm the snl^ject of this sketch worked in his boyhood, at 
the same time attending the district school. In 1836 or 1837, the 
family moved to Canaan, N. H., where Andrew purchased a farm and 
established a saw and shingle mill. With the exception of about one 
year passed at school in Hanover, Samuel M. assisted his father both 
on the farm and in the mill. In 1814, he visited Boston and held the 
position of book-keeper in the drug store of Carruth, Whittiei- & Co., 
until the character of the work and the cold sea breeze brought on a 
severe sickness. On his recovery he looked westward, and in the fall 
of 1848, moved to Canton, 111., where he was clerk for Mr. Graham, 
and subsequently clerk and partner in the house of Stipp & Bass. 
Close attention to business there threatened another attack of sickness, 
which urged him to move to Toulon in 1852. Here he was clerk in 
John Culbertson's house for a short time, when, in partnership with 
the late Davis Lownian, he established the firm of Dewey & Lowman. 
In 1865, he established a banking house at Toulon, which is still carried 
on by his nephew, Samuel Burge and his son, C. P. Dewey. In the 
course of his business life here he had for partners — Davis Lownian, 
Patrick Nowlan, William Lowman and Samuel Burge. Mr. Dewey 
was married in May, 1853, to Miss Cornelia, daughter of Myron and 
Adaline (liice) Phelps, of Lewiston, 111. This old settler was born in 
Ontario county, N. Y., March 17, 1803, settled near Springfield in 
1824, and carried on an extensive trade in furs and peltries with the 
Indians and early settlers of Illinois, Iowa and Cedar Valley. Mrs. 
Myron Phelps died March 24, 1851 ; but in April, 1855, this pioneer 
married Miss Mary Proctor, of Kawley, Mass. He died at Lewiston, 
August 15, 1878. His daughter, who married Samuel M. Dewey, died 
at Toulon, January 2, 1862, leaving tw^o sons, Charles Phelps and 
Harry Pinneo Dewey. In June, 1863, Mr. Dewey married Miss Sarah 
M. Hale, of Rowley, Mass. ' In 1853, he united with the Congregational 
church, and at the time of his death, August 31, 1866, was clerk and 
trustee of that church and su])erintendent of the Sabbatli school. A 
reference to the official, social, religious and business life of Toulon 
village, will point out more definitely the several parts taken by him 
during his life here, and further, will show what his children and old 
associates have done and are doing to advance all the interests of this 
section. Quoting from Rev. R. C. Dunn's funeral sermon, delivered in 
1866, this brief sketch of a useful citizen closes: "His loss to the 
church as well as to the community will be a severe one. It Avas 
especially in private life — in his owm family — that his shining qual- 
ities were seen. Those that met him only in business little knew his 
sterling worth. ***** y^Q cannot enter the privacy of his 
home life ; Ijut those that enjoyed his ever-ready hospitality can form 
some idea of what he was." 

Stephen Beaver, son of Stephen and Sarah (Bouchman-Stephens) 



336 BIOGKAPHY AND REMINISCENCES 

Deaver, was born in Baltimore county, Md., November 20, 1828. His 
father was a native of Maryland and a blacksmith ; his mother, of 
Washhigton, D. C. Stephen, Jr., learned the woolen business in his 
native count}^, and about 1843 moved to Philadelphia, Pa., where he 
was engaged in that trade for fifteen years, meanwhile resided at 
Bonaparte, la., for two years. About 1858 he moved to Wilmington, 
Del., and in 1859 to Northeast, Md., where he married Miss Hattie 
Carter, of Brandy wine, Del. Returning to Wilmington, in 1862, he 
lived there until 1868, when he came to Monmouth, Bl. In 1869 he 
came to Toulon, Stai'k county, and embarked in the manufacture of 
woolen goods, with his brother-in-law, James Frill. In 1871, Mr. 
Deaver acquired a sole interest in the mills and business, conducting 
them successfully down to the present time. Mr. and Mrs. Deaver are 
members of the Methodist Episcopal church, the former since 1866, the 
latter from her girlhood. He has also served the society as steward 
and class-leader ; is a member of the Stark County Agi'icultural Society 
and of the Toulon Lodge of Odd Fellows. Flis son, William Ellsworth 
Deaver, is a young man of much promise. 

Miss Kezia Dexter^ nee Mrs. Young, was born in Maine, in 1799 ; 
married Stephen Young in 1823; moved to Iowa in 1854, and to Tou- 
lon in 1858. Mr. Young died in 1875; herself on February 3, 1886. 

Bohert J. Dickensoyi^ son of William Townsend and Rebecca (AYellerj 
Dickenson, was born at Woodburne, Sullivan county, JST. Y., September 
3, 1836. His parents were natives of Duchess county, IST. Y., and Yer- 
mont, respectively. In 1855, they moved to this county, where Robert 
J. Dickenson com])leted his knowledge of the building trade, with his 
father and has been vei*}^ prominently connected with this trade down 
to the present time. In 1857 he married Miss Laurette M., daughter 
of James Chapman, of Steuljen county, N. Y. Tlieir children are: 
James B., a builder, of Toulon; Harvey E., paper-hanger, frescoer and 
decorator; Laura A. and John W. Upon the beginning of the Rebel- 
lion Mr. Dickenson was residing at Lafayette. On August 14, 1862, he 
enlisted in Company B., One-hundred and-twentv-seventh Illinois Infan- 
try, and followed the fortunes of that command until, at the siege of 
Vicksburg, he lost his arm by a minnie bullet; was sent to hospital 
and received honorable discharge September 24, 1863. On regaining 
health he engaged in teaching school, meantime giving attention to 
the arts of drafting and building. Many of the new business blocks at 
Toulon, Samuel Barge's palatial residence, the Congregational church, 
the County Agricultural Society's buildings, the residence df A. F. 
Stickney, S. M. Adams and A. H. Galbraith, with those of the Arm- 
strongs, Lehmans and H. H. Oliver, bear testimony to the character of 
his studies in this direction. Mr. Dickenson is a member of the W. W. 
Wright Post, G. A. R., of the I. O. O. F. and of the Stark County Agri- 
cultural Society. He is a strong temperance advocate, and for years 
has been identified -with the literar}^, musical and social progress of 
Toulon. 

Mrs. Dorcas., wife of the late B. S. Foster, died at Little River, Kan., 
Aprd 28, 1883, aged seventy-four years. She came from Maine to 
Illinois thirty-five years prior to 1883. 



OF TOULON TOWNSHIP. 337 

Henry Bradford Dorrance, deceased, was the son of Lemuel Smith 
and Mahala (Fuller) Dorrance. He was born in what is now Penn 
township, August 30, 1836. Lemuel was descended from one of the 
old Dutch families of Penns3"lvania, while his wife, daugliter of Orange 
and Ilepsey (Munroe) Fullei', was born in York state, the ancestors of 
her father being some of the " Mayflower " immigrants, as related in 
the history of the Fuller family in this chapter. Henry B. was edu- 
cated in the schools here and at Galesburg. On August 1, 1858, he 
married Miss Mary E., daughter of John R. and Lucretia (Hallaw- 
baugh) Powell. Her father was a native of New Jersey, where his 
Welsh ancestors settled, and her mother of Pennsylvania, where her 
German ancestors made a home. Mar}^^ (Powell) Dorrance was born 
July 4, 1842, at Milwaukee, Wis., but was brought to this county 
when a child, and here was educated. In 1858, with her husband, she 
took up her residence on his fifty-acre farm in Penn township, and 
moved with him to Toulon township, where he purchased one hundred 
acres. Their children are, Efhe L., wife of E. P. Engle, Cowly county, 
Kan., and Lemuel S. attending school at Brooklyn, Iowa.* Mr. Dor- 
rance was a farmer during his whole life. In politics he Avas decidedly 
republican, in school matters ever interested and in business upright. 
His death occurred in March, 1885. 

Jolin Drinnin, born in Ireland in 1812, came to Canada in 1832, 
to the United States in 1834; was a contractor on the Erie railroad; 
married Miss Acker at Buffalo, N. Y., in 1840; moved to Toulon town- 
ship in 1844, where he died September 16, 1881. Father Moynihan 
conducted the service of the dead. Joseph Drinnin, a Stark county 
man, was elected sheriff of Platte county, Neb., in 1885. 

Luther DriscoU, whose name is identified with the early history of 
Stark, was born in Connecticut, ]\[ay 14, 1791, died April 5, 1858. His 
wife was Mary Neal, born in Pennsylvania, December 28, 1809, died 
July 30, 1876. Their son, G. C. Driscoll, resides near Lafayette. 

Mrs. Mary Etta Dmjan^ one of the very old settlers, died May 10, 
1881, aged sixty-five years. 

William Dunn, a soldier of the war of 1812, died January 23, 1863, 
aged eighty-seven years, at the house of his son-in-law, Seth Johnson, 
at Toulon. He was a native of York state. 

Rev. It. C. Dunoi, born in Georgia, like his brother Augustus, was 
in his vouth a school teacher in Georma. On movino- to Ohio with 
the family in 183], he studied at Cincinnati, and on coming to this 
county in 1836, left nothing undone to acquire practical knowledge. 
In 1 840 he attended the Galesburg Academy, working for his board 
and tuition; in 1843 he entered college there, and in 1847 was one of 
three who graduated with the second class graduated from Knox Col- 
lege. In 1850 he received the diploma of Master of Arts, having mean- 
time traveled and taught school in several ]3laces. On October 31, 
1850, he married Miss Sarah A. Marvin, then cast aside his law studies, 
and in November, 1850, entered the Union Theological Seminary, of 
New York, studied there for three years, preached for one year in 
Western New York, then came to Peoria, where he filled the pulpit of 
the Congregational church for three months, and in January, 1855, 



338 BIOGEAPHT AND REMINISCENCES 

succeeded Rev. S. G. Wright, as minister at Toulon, as related in the 
history of the Congregational church there. In 1867 he was called to 
Oneida. Knox county, and there died May, 24, 1868, and in 1869 his 
remains were moved to Toulon. In the history of Toulon, the school 
chapter and political chapter, full references are made to this distin- 
guished pioneer. 

Otis T. Dyer and family left Wvoming for San Francisco in Julv, 
1880. 

William 21. Eagelston, born at Albany, IS". Y., April 15, 1819, is 
the son of John T. and Maiy (Charles) Eagelston. Father was a native 
of Philadelphia, and son of James Eagelston. a seafaring man and 
captain in the United States Mercantile Marine, who served with dis- 
tinction in the war of 1812, and died of his wounds in Bellevue Hospi- 
tal, New York. He was one of seven brothers, who came to America 
from Yorkshire, England, but little of whom is known. John T. 
was a rope and sail maker by trade, and the only child of Captain 
James Eagleston. He married at Albanv, !X. Y.. Miss Marv Charles, 
a native of Oxfordshire, England, b}' whom he had three sons and 
three daughters, all of whom became the heads of families, namely : 
William M.: James, a farmer of Texas, who settled there before the 
war; Thomas is a farmer of Penn township; Maria is widow of Pier- 
son Shepherd, of Peoria county ; Elizabeth, wife of Joseph Soper, of 
Kansas, and Ellen, widow of the late Mr. Eibby, of Illinois. AVilliam 
M. spent his boyhood at Albany, and came with his parents to Illinois 
in 1833, who settled at what is now Kickapoo town, Peoria count}', 
111., where William grew to manhood and married Miss Emiline 
Fargo, a native of Ashtabula county, O., whose parents, Thomas and 
Mabel (Bidwell) Fargo, removed to Peoria county. 111., in 1835. They 
have five sons and four daughters — Harriet Ann. deceased wife of 
Allen Ticknor, of Iowa, she died in Penn township, leaving one son 
now deceased ; John is a farmer of Penn township, and parent of one 
son and one daughter ; William is a farmer of Osceola townshiji and 
has three sons and two daughters ; George D. is a farmer of Penn 
township, has four sons ; Charles, a farmer of Penn, has two daughters ; 
Jennie, wife of J. C. Bloomer, real estate and mone}^ dealer of Kansas 
CitN^; Fannie, wife of S. H. Smith, a merchant of Ottawa, Kan.; 
James, a farmer, and Abbie. Upon coming to this county in 1852, 
Mr. Eagelston took up land in Peiin, purchased 160 acres which he 
improved and meantime added property aggregating 610 acres of 
choice land, improving during his time the making of four large and 
well improved farms. In 1873 he removed to Wyoming. Has served 
on the school board of the township, and has taken a full ])art in all 
matters relating to public well-being. He has given considerable at- 
tention to stock-growing and horse-breeding as Avell as agriculture. 
Thomas Fargo was born in Saundersfield. Mass., and of a long line of 
ancestry of that state. His mother was born in Lichfield. Conn. 
Thomas Fargo was a soldier in the war of 1812. Mr. Eagelston is a 
member of the Masonic order with three of his sons. He is a member 
of the Eoval Arch, while Mrs Eagelston is a member of Eastern Star 
Lodge, with two of her daughters, Jeimie and Abbie. 



OF TOULON TOWNSHIP. 339 

Calvin Livermore Eastman, son of Stephen and Sarah (Emmons) 
Eastman, was born at Bridgewater, N. H., January 21, 1814, of which 
state his parents and grandparents were natives. Stephen was the 
son of Thomas Eastman, jr., who was a soldier in the War of Inde- 
pendence, and was engaged in the battles of Bunker Hill, Monmouth, 
Stillwater (where he was severely wounded) and Saratoga. Stephen's 
family consisted of five sons and two daughters, of whom only three 
sons are now living — Calvin L. and Stephen W., Avho reside at Toulon, 
III, and Luther D., who resides at Bloomington, 111. The daughters 
married, and both died on the old homestead in Bridgewater. The 
mother of these children died on the old homestead, in December, 
1821, and the family was then broken up and the children separated. 
Calvin L., then about eleven years of age, was bound to a paper 
maker at ITolderness, now Ashland, N. H., where he remained three 
and one-half years, and then retui-ned to his home, and remained until 
the spring of 1830, when he went to Ply mouth, IST. TL, and apprenticed 
himself to a blacksmitli at $30 a year. He left Plymouth late in the 
fall of 1834, and went to Newton, Mass., where he readily found em- 
ployment at his trade of blacksmith, at $15 per month. He remained 
at Newton until April, 1838, working at his trade, attending school 
there and at New Hampton, N. H., and teaching school. On the 13th 
of April, 1838, he left Boston for the west, and arrived at Hennepin, 
111., about the 1st of May. From Hennepin he came, by the w^y of 
Indiantown (now Tiskilwa) and Providence, to what is now Stark 
county, and located near Cox's Mill, on Indian Creek, where he estab- 
lished a blacksmith shop about the 1st of August, 1838. Here he was 
joined by his brother Stephen W., late in December of the same 3^ear, 
and they worked together at blacksmithing until the following spring, 
wlien they erected a shop in the then village of Moulton, where they 
continued' the business until the spring of 1843, when they dissolved 
partnership, and Calvin L. moved the shop upon an adjoining quarter 
section of land (N. W. 10), which he had purchased, and there con- 
tinued to work