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Full text of "Historical gazetteer and biographical memorial of Cattaraugus County, N.Y"

Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Allen County Public Library Genealogy Center 



http://www.archive.org/details/historicalgazettOOadam 



ALLEN COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY 



3 1833 01263 3936 



GENEALOGY 

974.701 

,C29a 



HISTO:UCAL GAZETTEii 



A 



] > . OGKAPHIC AL MEMORIAL 



CATTARAUGUS COIaTY.iN 



WITH MAP AND I i .LUSTRATIONS. 



Eurriii; hv vvilliam auams. 



SYKACUSK, N. Y. 

LYMAN, IIORTON A CO., LIMllEI), 

OCTOUER, I.So^. 



:ll . 123iC38 

^ ■ PREFACE. 



^ K yj HAS been said that " that country is happiest which furnishes fewest 
"^ OO -■- materials for history." If the duty nf the historian was limited to chron- 



V 



icling the devastations and dramatic prowess of s;iiguinary War this 
assertion would be self-evident. Hut the arts ai\d achic\ements of wliitc- 
7 win'^ed Peace, hovering over our varied industries, protecting the courageous 

"t^ and sturdy jjioneers in their Herculean labors of transforming the wild, 

dense forests into productive farms and thrifty villages, making Cattaraugus 
county the home of a prosperous, iiappy. and intelligent population of over 
si.\ty thousand people, are equally and eminently worthy of record. 

In this volume we have endeavored to i)rescnt a comprehensive outline 
history of the county from its earliest white settlement to the present time. 
I-"ollowing this are chapters devoted to the several towns, embracing their or- 
ganization, development, historical incidents, and' many biographical sketches 
of their representative pioneers and present citizens. It is wiih considerable 
pride that we present to our readers the following gala.\>- of able specialists, 
lEU whose united efforts, individual research, and personal (pialifications h.i\'e 
'^ materially aided u> and our corps ..f assistants in the production of' this work : 
^^ Frederick Larkin, M.D., Rev. J. W. Sanborn, Charles G. Locke, C.F.., Heals 
■f\ K. Litchfield, A. VV. Ferrin, A. I). Lake, M.I)., Col. E. A. Na.sh, Charles Z. Lin- 
;^j coin, i':sci., and others. In preparing the several town chapters we have been 
^ "reatlv assisted bv a number of local writers who.se authoritv and reliabilit\- are 
acktunvledged, and whose names appear in connection with their respecti\e 
work. To all these, to our numerous patrons, and to many frieiuls we e.\. 
7* tend our heartiest thanks for the valuable aid and encouragement they ha\e 
^, generously rendered us, and for the zeal and enthusiasm with which they have 
i^ seconded our efforts. 

if'^ In endeavoring to make this an interesting and valuable book \vc have 

-"^ spared neither time nor e.xpen.se. We have been more than ordinarily careful 
,""^ in its contpilation, and we place the volume in the hands of our patrons, — 
'^:\ without whose aid its publication would have been impossible,— hoping they 
lA will find little to criticise and much to approve and interest. 



W.i^ 



CONTENTS. 



CiiArri-: 

CllAI'TK 

Chattk 

CllAI'TK 
ClIAPTK 
CllAI'TK 
ClIATTE 
CllAI'TK 
CllAI'TK 
CllAI'TK 
CllAI'TK 
CllAI'TK 
.CllAI'TK 
CllAI'TK 
CllAI'TK 
CllAI'TK 
CllAI'TK 
CllAI'TE 
CliAPTE 

Chai'te: 

CHAI'TK 

■ CllAI'TK 

CllAI'TE 

CllAI'TE 



I. — Early Discoveries and Land Titles, 

II.— The Mound Builders, . . . - . 

III. — Discovery of the Iroquois, - - - . 

IV. — Indian Occupancy, and the Indians of Today, 

V. — Allegany Reservation. .Mission of the i'riends, 

VI. — Topogra[5hy of Cattaraugus County, 

VII. — Geology, Rock I'orniation, and Petroleum, 

VIII. — Organization of the County, 

IX. — Early Settlements and Internal Improvements, 

X. — Civil Lists, Education. Religion, etc., 

XI. — The Lumber Industry, .... 

XII. — The Agricultural Interests, . . . . 

XIII. — The Press of Cattaraugus County, - 

XIV. — The Medical Profession, . . . . 

XV. — The Military and the Various Wars, - 

XVI. — Roster of Soldiers and Sailors, 

XVII. — Bench and Bar of Cattaraugus County, - 

XVIII, — History of the Town of Allegany, 

XIX. — History of the Town of Ashford, 

XX. — History of the Town of Carrolton, - 

XXI. — History of the Town of Cold Spring, 

XXII. — History of the Town of Conewango, - 

XXIII. — History of the Town of Dayton, 

XXIV. — History of the Town of East Otto, 



I 

1 1 

24 

2Q 

47 
5- 
55 



SO 
106 
186 
209 

245 
416 

446 
462 
4.S4 
501 
523 
545 



vi Contents. 

ClIAPTKR XXV.— History of the Town of Elko, ----- 564 

ClIArTER XXVI.— History of the Town of Ellicottvillc. . . ^-q 

Chatter XXVH. — History of the Town of Farmersviiie, - - 603 

ClIAl'TER XXVni. — History of the Town of Frankh'nvillc, - - 622 

Chapter XXIX. — History of the Town of Freedom, - - . .673 

Chatter XXX. — History of the Town of Great \'alley, - - - 688 

Chapter XXXI. — History of the Town of Hinsdale, - - . . 701 

Chatter XXXII. — History of the Town of Humphrey, - - 723 

Chapter XXXIII.— History of the Town of Leon, - . . . ^43 

Chai'TER XXXIV.— History of the Town of Little Valley, - - 75S 

Chapter XXXV.— History of the Town of Machias, - - - . 787 

Chapter XXXVL— History of the Town of Mansfield, - - - 802 

Chapter XXXVII. —History of the Town of Xapoli, - - - S13 

Chapter XXXVIII. — History of the Town of Xew Albion, - - 823 

Chatter XXXIX.— History of the Town and City of Olean. . - 854 

Chatter XL. — History of the Town of Otto, . - - - ^23 

Chapter XLI. — History of the Town of Perrysbiirg, . - . . . 046 

Chapter XLII. — History of the Town of Persia. - . . . 562 

Chapter XLIII. — History of. the Town of Portville, - - . . 1000 

Chapter XLIV.— History of the Town of Randolph, - ^ . 1027 

Chapter XLV.— History of the Town of Red House, - . - . 1079 

Chapter XLVI. — History of the Town of Salamanca, - . . 1082 

Chapter XLVII. — Hi.story of the Town of South Valley, - - 1103 

Chapter XLVIIL— History of the Town of Yorkshire, . - - 11 14 

Chapier XLIX.— History of the Town of Ischua, - - - .- ir.25 

Chapter L. — History of the Town of Lyndon, - - . . 11 a2 

Chapter LI.— Appendix, '•- . . - 1 1 54 



HISTORICAL GAZETTEER 



BIOGRAPHICAL MEMORIAL 



Cattaraugus County 



CHATTER I. 

I■;.\R1.^■ DISCOVKKIKS AND LAND 1111, KS. 

IT IS very uncertain wlio were the first to visit America. N'arious authors 
of note have written on the subject, but their testimony is conflicting 
and unreliable; for instance, Cahnet, a distinguished author, brings for- 
ward the writings of Hornius, son of Theodosius the Great, who affirms that, 
" at or about the time of the commencement of the Christian era, voyages from 
Africa and Spain into the Atlantic ocean were both frequent and celebrated," 
and holds that, " there is strong probability that t'he Romans and Cartha- 
ginians, as early as the year 300 B. C, were well acquainted with the existence 
of this country," adding that there arc "tokens of the presence of the Greeks, 
Romans, Persians, and Carthaginians in many parts of the continent." These 
reports, however, only resolve themselves into mere conjecture. The first 
authentic record we have of voyages of discovery to America are in the Ice- 
landic accounts. From these we learn that in the year 1000 A. I)., Lief, son 
of Eric the Red, embarked from Greenland on a voyage of discovery and 
explored the eastern coast of North America as far south as Narragansett bay, 
in Rhode Island. Other discoverers and navigators followed this expedition, 
attempts at colonization were made, and the country explored, in some local- 
ities, quite a distance back from the coast ; but dissensions among the colonists 
and wars with the natives at length put an end to these rude attempts at 
civilization. Except a few vague records, and a " ntnc-stom-" found here and 
there throughout the te'rritory, marking a point of discover}-, or perhaps the 
grave of some unhappy Norseman, the history of these explorations is wrapt 



History of Cattaraugus County. 



in oblivion. Even the colonies in Greenland, established by Eric the Red in 
986 A. D., and from which the explorers came, were at length abandoned, and 
the site upon which they flourished became, for many years, forgotten. Finally, 
however, the fifteenth century was ushered in, marking an era of great changes 
in Europe. It put an end to the darkness of the middle ages; it witnessed 
the revival of learning and science and the birth of many useful arts, among 
which not the ieasjILwas printing; while the invention of the mariner's compass 
in the preceding century having enabled sailors to go out of sight of land 
with impunity, a thirst for e.xploring unknown seas was av\'akened ; long 
\oyages were undertaken and important discoveries made. 

It was during this age of mental activity and growing knowledge that 
Christopher Columbus undertook the most memorable enterprise that human 
genius ever planned, and which renders his name undying. On August 3, 
1492, a little before sunrise, he set sail from Spain for the discovery of the 
western world. A little before midnight, on the 13th of October, he des- 
cried a light on the island of San Salvador. From this moment properly 
dates the complete history of America. From this time forward its progress 
bears date from a definite period, and is not shrouded in darkness nor the mists 
of tradition. 

Two years after the disco\eries of Columbus became known in England, 
Henry VII. engaged John Cabot, a Venetian merchant, to sail in quest of 
discoveries in the west; and this navigator, in 1497, reached the coast of Lab- 
rador, which he named Prima I'ista. thus making, probably, the first visit of 
Europeans to the coast since the days of the Norseman. This voyage was 
succeeded by others under Sebastian Cabot, son of John, in 1498, and by 
Gasper Cortereal from Portugal, to whom the discovery of the St. Lawrence 
some authorities claim is due. This adventurer returned to Lisbon in the 
month of October of that year, laden with timber and slaves seized from among 
the natives of the coast he visited. On a second voyage he perished at sea. 

In 1504 the French first attempted a voyage to the new world; and in that 
year some Basque and Breton fishermen began to ply their vocation on the 
banks of Newfoundland and along its adjacent coasts. From these the islands 
of Cape Breton derived their name. In 1524 John de Verrazzani, a Floren- 
tine, in the service of Francis I. of France, sailed along the coast from Georgia 
to about latitude 41° north, and entered a harbor, which from his description 
is believed to have been New York bay. He remained there fifteen days and 
is believed to have been the finst European that landed on the soil of New 
York. He proceeded northerly as far as Labrador, and naming the territory 
New France, took possession for France so far as he could by his rights of 
discovery. April 20, 1534, Jacques Cartier, an able navigator of St. Malo, in 
the interests of the French nation, sailed with two ships of sixty tons each, and 
one hundred and twenty men, reaching New Foundland in May. After 
coasting along for some time, without knowing it was an island, he at length 



Early Discoveries and Land Titles. 



passed the Straits of Belle Isle and traversed the Gulf of St. Lawrence. Hav- 
ing spent part of the summer on these coasts, he sailed on the 25th of Julv, 
highly pleased with the hospitable reception he had received from the Indians, 
with whom he traded for furs and provisions. His report induced the French 
king to attempt a colony in the newly discovered regions; and in May, 1535, 
Cartier sailed with three small ships, with a numerous company of adventur- 
ers, and arrived on the coast of New Foundland much scat;^red and weakened 
by a disastrous storm of July 26th. Here they took in wood and water, and 
proceeded to explore the gulf, but were overtaken, August ist, by a storm 
which obliged them to seek a port, ".difficult of access, but with a safe 
anchorage near the mouth of the 'Great River.'" They left this harbor on 
the 7th, and on the loth caipe to a "gulf filled with numerous islands." Car- 
tier gave to this gulf the name of St. Lawrence, having discovered it on that 
saint's festal day. Proceeding on this voyage he explored both shores of the 
St. Lawrence ri\er. He moored his vessels where a little river flowed into a 
"goodly and pleasant sound," which stream he named St. Croix, near the 
Indian village of Stacona, the site of the present city of Quebec. Subse- 
quently,- October 2d, he ascended the river to a populous Indian village called 
Hochelaga, upon the site of which the city of Montreal now stands. In May 
Cartier returned to France, taking with him sexeral Indian chiefs, among 
whom v\as Donnacona, who had treated the French with the greatest kind- 
ness, and who died in a strange land, an exile from home and friends. 

During each succeeding year, for some time after, expeditions were sent 
out to the newly discovered river, but misfortune attended them all, and no 
efficient attempt at colonizing the country was made until 1608, when De 
Monts, a Calvinist, who had obtained from the king the freedom of religious 
faith for himself and followers in America, after many difficulties dispatched 
Champlain and Pontgrave, two experienced adventurers, to establish the fur 
trade and begin a settlement. Samuel Chainplain reached Quebec, where 
Cartier had spent the winter nearly three-quarters of a century before, on the 
3d of July. On the i8th of the following April, 1609, in company with 
two other Frenchmen and a number of natives, he started up the St. Lawrence, 
and after a time "turned southward up a tributary," and soon entered upon 
the lake which bears his name. He took possession of the territory in the 
name of the king of F" ranee, and that nation assumed still greater rights in the 
new territory. 

In 1609 Henry Hudson, an English navigator of note, offered his services 
to the Dutch East India Company of Holland (a wealthy corporation formed 
for trade and colonization), which were accepted; and with a suitable outfit he 
arrived on the eastern coast of this continent at or near what is now Portland, 
Maine, whence he sailed southward along the coast as far as Chesapeake bay; 
thence he sailed northward again, discovering Delaware bay, and on the 
3d of September anchored off Sandy Hook. He entered New York bay on 



History of Cattaraugus County. 



the 1 2th of the same month, and sailed up the Hudson river, which still per- 
petuates his name. He anchored just above where the city of Hudson now 
stands, and sent a boat with a detachment of his crew still farther up the river 
on a voyage of exploration. It is supposed from his description that this party 
ascended above where Albany is now situated. On the 23d of September, 
Hudson descended to the bay of New York, and set sail for home. 

Holland now claimed the territory by the right of discovery and explo- 
ration, and named it New Netherlands. The Dutch sent out trading vessels 
in 161 2. These were followed by others, and Manhattan Island was made 
the chief trading post. The States-General granted a charter to the mer- 
chants for exclusive jurisdiction over New Netherlands, which included all the 
territory between 40° and 43° north latitude. 

In 162 1 James I. granted to Fernando Gorges and his mercantile associates 
all lands between the 40th and 48th parallels of latitude, and from ocean to 
ocean. Claim was made of the Dutch for the territory, which was refused, 
and the subject of title was becoming an important question, as both had grants 
of the territory from the highest authority of their respective governments. 

In 1647 Peter Stuyvesant was appointed governor of New Amsterdam to 
succeed William Kieft, appointed to the position in 1638. To settle the 
controversy between the English and Dutch settlements arbitrators were 
appointed to adjust their respective claims. This tribunal assigned the eastern 
part of Long Island to the English, and a division line specified the boundary- 
between the Dutch New Netherlands and the English Connecticut colonies. 

In 1664 Charles II. of England, regardless of the claims of the Dutch, or 
any previous agreement, granted to his brother, duke of York and Albany 
(afterwards James II.), the whole country from the Connecticut to the Dela- 
ware river, which included the entire Dutch possessions. The duke's claim 
to the territory was to be enforced if refused, and rather than submit to the 
shedding of blood and the uncertainty of war Governor Stuyvesant surrendered 
the province September 3, 1664, when the possession of New Netherlands 
passed into the hands of the English, and the duke changed its name to New 
York, and that of Fort Orange to Albany. Peace was declared between the 
rival factions in 1674, leaving the English in full possession; but the duke of 
York, for his own protection, applied for and received from the crown a new 
patent. 

The rivalries and jealousies that had made France and England so long 
enemies in the old world were transplanted to the new continent. The ■ 
French made allies of the savages, and waged war against the English, and 
years of bloodshed followed. The first of these hostilities, which are now 
known as the old French and Indian wars, began with William's accession to 
the throne of England, in 1689, and was terminated in the peace of Ryswick, 
in 1697. Queen Anne's war came next, commencing in 1702, and terminating 
in the peace of Utrecht, in 1713. The third controversy was declared by 



Early Discoveries and Land Titles. 5 



George II., in 1744, and continued until the preliminaries of peace were signed 
at Aix-Ia-Cliapelle, in 1748. The final great conflict was declared by Great 
Britain, in 1756, and terminated in thecapture of Montreal, in 1760. when the 
whole of New France or Canada was surrendered to Great Britain. The 
province of New York remained an undisputed British possession, until "The 
Declaration of Independence" made her an independent State of the great 
confederacy of our glorious United States. 

*The Indians of the State of New York number about five thousand, and 
occupy lands to the estimated extent of 87,677 acres. With few exceptions 
these people are the direct descendants of the native Indians who once pos- 
sessed and controlled the soil of the entire State. As early as the beginning 
of the seventeenth century, at a time when the first Dutch explorers visited 
the new world, or at least very soon thereafter, these tribes, Senecas, Cayu- 
gas, Onondagas, Oneidas and Mohawks, were united in a league called by the 
whites, Iroquois, and by themselves He-do-no-saw-nee, and held sway over all 
the country between the Hudson and Genesee rivers. Their own name signi- 
fies "a people dwelling in a long house," of which the Mohawks held the 
eastern door, and the Senecas the western. The Onondagas kept the central 
fire as being the founders of the league, with the Oneidas on their eastern and 
the Cayugas on their western boundaries. The origin of these tribes is 
unknown to history. 

In the latter part of the seventeenth century, which uas the period of its 
greatest strength, the league numbered from thirteen to fifteen thousand souls. 
This people now number about fifteen thousand, of whom much the larger 
part reside within the Dominion of Canada. Their skill in war was only 
excelled by their aptitude for civil government. They lodged the civil 
authority of the league in fifty sachems, divided among the fi\'e tribes in 
unequal numbers, giving the Onondagas fourteen, the Mohawks nine, the 
Oneidas nine, the Cayugas ten, and the Senecas eight. Later on, another and 
inferior civil office grew up among them, that of chief, which gradually grew 
in importance, until it overshadowed the earlier title. No distinction appears 
now to e.xist between sachem and chief. The latter title .seems to be the only 
one in use now among the Indians, and they no longer use or understand 
the word sachem. The sachems, as well as the chiefs, were nominated and 
deposed by the people, but in all cases the action of the tribe was required to 
be confirmed by the general council. 

This brief and very general historical outline is deemed desirable as furnish- 
ing the facts for the better understanding of this interesting people to whom 
this State owes her northern boundary, and but for whose valor and steadfast 
friendship for our English forefathers the entire basin of the St. Lawrence 

*By the courtesy of Hon. J. S, Whipple the remainder of this article Is compiled from the interesting 
Report of the Special committee, appointed by the Assembly to investiijate the Indian Problem of 
the State of New York, of which Mr. Whipple was the chairman. 



History of Cattaraugus County. 



would now be a Canadian possession. The supremacy of the Iroquois in what 
was known as the "Ohio country " had a most important bearing upon the 
history of that great section. In 1684 the governor of Virginia made com- 
plaint to Thomas Dongan, colonial governor of New York, relating to some 
Iroquois attacks which had been instigated by the Jesuit French. The gov- 
ernor called a council of the league at Albany. Before the end of the council 
the sachems of the league requested the governor to affix the arms of the 
duke of York to their stockades and villages. This was done, and from that 
date forward England claimed the Iroquois as her subjects, and there is some 
evidence to show that the Indians accepted this view. In the final contest 
between France and England upon this continent for the possession of the 
"Ohio country," the French based their claim upon prior discovery and occu- 
pation, and from this standpoint their claim could not be successfully disputed. 
The English could produce no such evidence of title, and finally based their 
sole right to the disputed territory upon their Iroquois title, and stood upon 
this alone, urging that it was both their duty and privilege to guard the 
dominions of the Five Nations as their subjects, and saying in their memorial 
to the-French Council in 1755: "What the court of Great Britain asserts and 
insists upon, is this, that the five Iroquois nations acknowledged by France to 
be the subjects of Great Britain, are either originally or by conquest, the lawful 
proprietors of the territory of Ohio in question." We fairly owe it, then, to 
the league of the Iroquois to give credit, not only for their actual efforts on 
the field of battle, not only for their brave and successful defence of our north- 
eastern boundary against French assaults, but as well for having conquered 
and held for Anglo-Sa.xon civilization, the larger and fairer portion of our 
country beyond the Alleghanies. 

The Tuscaroras claim kinship with the Iroquois in language and blood. 
Here again their tradition shows that before the great Onondaga leader To-to- 
da-ho, led his warriors across the St. Lawrence and took possession of Central 
New York, a branch of the original family migrated westward to the Missis- 
sippi, and thence to North Carolina, where, according to their native historian, 
Elias Johnson, before the discovery of Columbus the Tuscaroras consisted of 
six towns, and they were a powerful nation, numbering over twelve hundred 
warriors. They lived principally upon the head waters of the Neuse and Tar 
rivers. About 1712 they became involved in quarrels with their white neigh- 
bors and the adjoining Indian tribes; battles took place in which they were 
defeated and many of their warriors slain, and many were sold as slaves. 
They made peace with the State and received a grant of lands in Bertie 
county, on the Roanoke river, to which the remnant of the tribe removed. 
Their troubles with their neighbors continued here, and finally, in 171 5, the 
larger portion of them removed to New York and formally united themselves 
with the confederacy of the Iroquois, and were assigned to lands between 
the Unadilla and Chenango rivers, and upon the territory of the Oneidas. 



Eaki.v Discoveries and Land Titles. ' 7 

From that time on the Iroquois became known as the Six Nations. With the 
exception of the Oneidas and a portion of the Tuscaroras, the Six Nations 
sided with England, during the Revolution, and were left at the close of the 
war unprovided for and unmentioned in the treaty of peace, and at the mercy 
of the exasperated Americans. 

At the close of the conte.st with the mother country, it appeared advisable 
for the new government to come to an understanding with the Indian tribes, 
with respect to their rights, the e.xtent and location of their lands, and with 
respect to the terms upon which they should be permitted to remain in the 
country. October 15, 1783, Congress, in a series of resolutions, defined the 
limit and scope of these negotiations, and appointed commissioners to conduct 
the same. In pursuance of .this action a general council was held with the 
Six Nations at Fort Stanwix, now Rome, at which LaFayette was present. 
Here the peace party under Cornplanter prevailed over Red Jacket and his 
followers, who were anxious to renew the war. Commissioners from the State 
of PennsyUania were present, as well as some from Virginia. The Mohawks 
were not represented. A treaty was negotiated and signed, October 22, 1784, 
between -commissioners plenipotentiary from the United States on the one 
part and the sachems and warriors of the Si.x Nations on the other, by which 
the United States gave "peace to the Senecas, Mohawks, Onondagas, and Cay- 
ugas," confirmed to the Oneidas and Tuscaroras the lands upon which they 
lived, limited the tribes to lands they occupied east and north of a line drawn 
from a point on Lake Ontario, four miles east of Niagara, to the mouth of 
Buffalo creek, on Lake Erie; thence south to the Pennsylvania line ; thence west 
and south along the line of PeimsyKania to the Ohi(j river; the Indians ceding 
all claims to land west of this line. The government again held a conference 
with the Six Nations at Canandaigua in 1794, by Timothy Pickering, "sole 
agent," at which "peace and friendship were again firmly established and 
declared to be perpetual between the United States and the Si.x Nations." 
It was here stipulated that the Oneidas, Cayugas and Onondagas should pos- 
sess the lands reserved to them in their several treaties with the State of New 
York, and that the said reservations should remain theirs until they shall 
choose to sell the same to the people of the United States, who have the right 
to purchase. A similar provision was inserted regarding the lands of the 
Senecas. 

Soon after the treaty of Fort Stanwix, in 1784, conflicting claims to a tract 
of land in the western part of this State arose between Massachusetts and 
New York, the former claiming title under a grant from King James I. to 
the Plymouth colony, and the latter under a grant from King Charles II. to 
the duke of York and Albany. The dispute was compromised by commis- 
sioners on the part of each state, four from Massachusetts and si.x from New 
York, namely: James Duane, Robert R. Livingston, Robert Yates, John 
Harring, Melancthon Smith and Egbert Benson, commissioners for New York, 



8 History of Cattaraugus County. 

and John Lowell, James Sullivan, Theophilus Parsons and Rufus King for 
Massachusetts, who met at Hartford, Connecticut, December i6, 1786. Mas- 
sachusetts ceded to New York the "government, sovereignty and jurisdiction" 
over the disputed territory, and New York ceded to Massachusetts the right 
of preemption of the soil of the native Indians, and all other estate except of 
sovereignty and jurisdiction to Massachusetts, its grantees and assigns forever. 
It was further stipulated in the compact between these two States, that no 
purchase of any of the lands in question should be made from the Indians with- 
out the presence and consent of an agent of Massachusetts. These lands 
comprised about 6,000,000 acres, bounded easterly by a line which ran from 
the southeast corner of Steuben county north along the west shore of Seneca 
lake and terminated in Sodus bay, on Lake Ontario, and embraced the pres- 
ent counties of Wayne and Schuyler, e.xcept their easterly tiers of towns, 
Monroe, Genesee, Yates, Ontario, Niagara, Livingston, Wyoming, Steuben, 
Allegany, Erie, Cattaraugus and Chautauqua. 

Oliver Phelps, of Connecticut, for himself and others, began negotiations 
with Massachusttts in 1787, looking toward a purchase of a portion of the 
lands contained in the grant of this "preemption right" from New York, and 
about the same time Nathaniel Gorham, of Boston, made an offer to the Mas- 
sachusetts Legislature of one shilling and six pence per acre for 1,000,000 
acres of those lands, to be paid for in "the public paper of the commonwealth." 
While this offer was not accepted, it had the effect to bring other competitors 
into the field, who, as fast as they appeared, were taken into the association, 
after the manner of the modern triist, until finally in April, 1788, these two 
gentlemen (Phelps and Gorham), acting for their company, purchased all the 
land comprised fn the cessation to Massachusetts, for S'>ooo,ooo, payable in 
three years in the public paper of the State, which was then greatly depre- 
ciated. Phelps at once began operations to extinguish the Indian title, and was 
met at the outset by another complication. What was in common parlance 
called the " Lessee Company," had been formed, and had procured two leases 
from the Indians, covering a large portion of the same territory bought by 
Phelps and his associates; and although Massachusetts promptly declared the 
leases void, and Governor Clinton commenced active warfare against them, 
holding councils in person with the Indians, warning them of the invalidity of 
the leases and taking evidence which established the fact that the leases had 
been procured by bribery and corrupt means, yet such was the influence of the 
lessees and their agents among the Indians and elsewhere, at one time threat- 
ening to form a new State from the disputed territory, at another stirring up 
enmity and dissatisfaction among the Indians, that finally the purchasers of 
the preemption right were obliged to compromise, and granted the lessees a 
certain interest in the property. On the 4th of July, 1788, Mr. Phelps opened 
negotiations at Buffa'lo creek, and the Indians sold for $5,000 and an annuity 
of $500 about 2,600,000 acres lying adjacent to the Massachusetts preemption 



Eari.v Discoveries and Land Titles. 



line. In the meantime the scrip, with which Phelps and his associates were to 
make payment to Massachusetts, had so appreciated in value, owing to the 
increased prospects of the State as a member of the United States, that they 
were unable to procure the same so as to meet their obligations, and suit was 
entered against them by Massachusetts. They were, however, able to effect 
a compromise, retaining the portion of their purchase as to which they had 
extinguished the Indian title and reconveying to Massachusetts all the residue. 
This arrangement was the more readily accomplished owing to the appearance 
of Robert Morris as an applicant to purchase these lands. On the I2th day 
of March, 1791, Massachusetts agreed to sell to Samuel Ogden, as agent for 
Robert Morris, all the lands before sold to Phelps and Gorham, excepting the 
portion retained by them, and on the iith day of May, 1791, this State con- 
veyed to Morris, for a consideration of $225,000 the whole of this land, by five 
separate deeds; the first, adjoining the Phelps purchase, comprising 500,000 
acres. In this conveyance Massachusetts reserved one-sixtieth of the whole 
tract to satisfy a claim of one John Butler who had entered into a contract for 
the purchase of the same from Phelps and Gorham prior to their surrender of 
the lands back to Massachusetts, which interest Morris afterward purchased 
from Butler, thereby acquiring the entire title. The first tract of 500,000 
acres was retained by Morris, and sold by him in different tracts, and was 
called the Morris reserve. 

The land comprised in the remaining four deeds, being 3,600,000 acres, was 
conveyed by as many separate conveyances, dated in their order, December 
4, 1792, February 27, 1793, July 20, 1793. and July 20, 1793, by Robert Morris 
to Herman Le Roy and others, as trustees for a party of Amsterdam capitalists, 
known as the Holland Land Company, of whom Wilhelm Willink was the 
largest owner, and Rutger Jan Schimmelpenninck bore the most conspicuous 
name. These conveyances were coupled with an agreement to extinguish the 
Indian titles, and Morris at once bent his energies to accomplish this result. 
Upon Thomas Morris, the son and able lieutenant of his father, fell the task of 
procuring the con.sent of the Indians to hold a treaty. He went into their 
country, followed their trails from the wigwam of one chief to that of another, 
and after much difficulty, and the use of all his persuasive arts, the Indians 
agreed to hold a conference, and designated Big Tree, now Geneseo, as the 
place where the same should be held. President Washington nominated Jere- 
miah Wadsworth as commissioner on the part of the United States, and the 
interested parties met together in August, 1797, and negotiations began, 
William Shepard representing Massachusetts. The council was held under a 
large tent, provided by Morris, where daily conferences took place. Red 
Jacket did the talking for the Indians, assisted by Cornplanter, Farmer's 
Brother and some others. The Indians resisted all ofTers; but finally con- 
sented to sell one towriship. At last Red Jacket "covered up the council 
fire," and declared the conference at an end. In an interview with F'armer's 



lo History of Cattaraugl's Couxiv. 

Brother on the following day, Morris said to him that Red Jacket had no right 
to cover up the council fire, as he alone who kindled it had a right to extin- 
guish it. To this Farmer's Brother assented, after some deliberation, and the 
council was continued. Morris understanding the Indian maxim, that the " lands 
belonged to the warriors, because they form the strength of the nation, and to 
the women, as the mothers of the warriors,"" held a conference with the chief 
women and the warriors, ignoring for the time the sachems and chiefs. 
His address to this unusual assembly deserves a passing notice. He informed 
them of the ofTers he had made the sachems, that "the money they would 
receive from their lands would lighten the burdens they then endured." He 
said to them, " Now you have to till the earth and provide by your labor food 
for yourselves and children; when these children are without clothing and 
shivering with cold, you alone are witnesses to their suffering; your sachems 
will always supply their own wants ; they feed on the game they kill, and sell 
the skins to buy themselves clothing ; therefore they are indifferent about selling 
their lands for money, enough e^'ery year to lessen your labor and enable you 
to procure for yourselves and children the food and clothing necessary for 
your comfort." He then said to them that he would give the women their 
share of the presents he had brought from Philadelphia to be distributed in 
case he bought the lands. Morris produced a powerful impression; negotia- 
tions were resumed, and on the 15th day of Septem.ber, 1797, the treaty was 
signed which transferred the control of nearly all the country which now com- 
prises western New York from the hands of the red men to their white neigh- 
bors. This treaty was of such absorbing consequence, and was such an 
excellent ilkistration of dealing between the two people, that these details 
relating to it, based principally upon facts found in " Turner"s History of the 
Phelps and Gorham' Purchase'" are deemed important. The Indians reserved 
from the operation of this treaty ten separate tracts of land embracing three 
hundred and thirty-seven square miles; the Allegany reservation in Cattarau- 
gus county, something over forty-two square miles; the Chautauqua reserva- 
tion, in Chautauqua and Erie counties, with forty-two square miles; the 
Buffalo Creek reservation in Erie county, one hundred and thirty square miles ; 
the Tonawanda reservation in Erie and Genesee counties, seventy-one square 
miles; the Squawky Hill reservation near Mount Morris, with two square 
miles ; the Caneadea reservation in Allegany county, with sixteen square miles ; 
Canawangus reservation, two square miles, on the Genesee river near Avon ; 
Little Beard's and Big Tree reservations, two miles square each, on the Gen- 
esee river opposite Geneseo, and the Gardeau reservation on the Genesee 
river below Mount Morris. Besides these reservations the Senecas continued 
to claim and use another, one mile square, divided by the line between the 
counties of Cattaraugus and Allegany and near the village of Cuba, upon 
which is situated a famous oil spring which had long been prized by the 
Senecas for its medicinal" qualities. 



Traces of the Mound Builders. 



By the conveyance executed by the Seneca nation to Robert Morris at 
the treaty of the Big Tree, in August. 1787, the Holland Land Company 
obtained a title in "fee simple," to all the lands conveyed to them by the four 
deeds before mentioned, which were e.xecuted by Robert Morris. 

This company through their efficient agent general, Mr. Theophilus Caz- 
enove, who resided in Philadelphia, had anticipated the perfection of title from 
the Indians, and in July, 1797, had employed Joseph Ellicott as chief surveyor 
to commence at once to lay out this immense tract into townships, and to sub- 
divide the townships into lots, as soon as the title was perfected. Mr. Ellicott 
began his service on this tract for this company in attendance at the treaty at 
Big Tree, which was continued without interruption for nearly a quarter of a 
century. He had acquired a, high reputation as a surveyor and civil engineer. 
In 1798 and 1799, he had completed the survey of the purchase into town- 
ships and begun the subdivision into lots, and the lands were in the market 
for settlement. 



CHAPTER II. 



'I'lii-; Mou.M) nun.DKKs. tkacks ix wkstkkx new vork. 

[Ry FitEUEiiiCK Larklv, M. D., MecnbiT of tlic .VirnTican A>»ociiition for the Advancement of Science.] 

A .SIM PEE heap of stones or of earth seems to have been the first mon- 
ument that suggested itself to man. In the old world thousands of 
such monuments are known to e.xist. The great antiquity of these 
works has staggered the greatest minds of Europe. By whom and when built, 
remains an impenetrable mystery. It is the opinion of modern archa;ologists, 
that the earthworks scattered over most parts of the old world, were built 
thousands of years before the historic period, and that to the builders of the 
splendid cities of Baalbcc and Palm\-ra, they were as much of an enigma as to 
the inhabitants of the nineteenth century-. But rude as these primitive memo- 
rials are, they have been little impaired by time, while majestic and imposing 
structures have fallen into shapeless ruins. "When covered with forests, and 
their surfaces interlaced with the roots of trees, or when protected by turf, the 
humble mound bids defiance to the elements which throw down the temple, 
and crumble the marble into dust." 

No part of the world presents to the archaeologist so many remarkable 
works as the western continent. We can trace the ancient inhabitants from 
the northern lakes through the Allegheny, Ohio and Mississippi valleys, to 
Mexico, Brazil, Peru, an'd the Pacific ocean. Every hill, mountain and valley 
discloses some rude instrument used by a people whose history is enveloped 



12 History of Cattaraugus County. 

in darkness. So numerous was this people in the Mississippi valley, that Mr. 
Breckenridge, after extensive explorations, says: "There are traces of a pop- 
ulation far beyond what this extensive and fertile portion of the continent is 
supposed to have possessed; greater, perhaps, than could be supported by the 
present white inhabitants, "even with the careful agriculture practiced in the 
most populous parts of Europe." 

It was formerly supposed that there was some alliance with those people 
and the Indian races of America, but that is very improbable. The skull of 
the Indian bears but little resemblance to that of the Mound Builder. The 
head of the Indian is low in the moral sentiments, has large firmness and 
small benevolence; in fact his head indicates the cruel ■savage that he is. The 
Mound Builder had a head-that will compare favorably with the most intel- 
lectual people now living. His head is well developed in the moral and intel- 
lectual regions, with large firmness, which cause him to move with energy, 
\\hether in peace or in war. 

When the copper mines of Lake Superior began to be explored, traces of 
ancient works were found in almost every section. In several places shafts 
had been sunk to the depth of thirty feet or more, and veins of native copper 
were traced for a great distance, in many places through solid rock. In one 
of the shafts was found a number of tools made of copper, which, at the time 
of discovery, were reported as being hardened at one end ; if such was the case, 
it was done with tin or with some other process unknown to us. From the 
shores of Lake Superior we can trace this people to Wisconsin, where we find 
some singular earth works, — six effigies of animals, six parallelograms, one 
circle, and one efligy of the human figure. These tumuli extend for the distance 
of half a mile along the trail. What the animals represent is difficult to deter- 
mine. Many at the present time suppose that the mastodon is one, and that 
he was a favorite animal and perhaps used as a beast of burden. That the 
mastodon was contemporary with the Mound Builders is now an undisputed 
fact. It is a wonder, and has been since the mounds have been discovered, 
how such immense works could have been built by human hands. To me it 
is not difficult to believe that those people tamed that monster of the forest 
and made him a willing slave to their superior intellectual power. If such was 
the case, we can imagine that tremendous teams have been driven to and fro 
in the vicinity of their great works, tearing up trees by the roots, or marching 
with their armies into the field of battle amidst showers of poisoned arrows. 
In western New York, particularly within the borders of the great valley of 
the Conewango river, evidence is abundant that ancient man and the great 
American elephant trod the soil together. Large molar teeth have been found 
at East Randolph, Leon, Conewango, Ellington and various places near the 
tributaries of the Conewango. 

From northern Wisconsin we can trace these ancient people through 
Michigan and Ohio to the southern shore of Lake Erie. Near the mouth of 



Traces of the Mound Builders. 13 

Cattaraugus creek, in western New York, commences a series of works which 
extend through the Conewango valley. In the town of Dayton are the 
remains of a sepulchral mound in a circular form, one hundred and twenty feet 
in circumference, with an elevation of ten feet. This tumulus when explored 
was found to contain several skeletons which were, no doubt, those of some 
distinguished warriors, whose acts of heroism might have been connected with 
the decline and fall of that powerful race of men. On either side of the valley 
a chain of fortifications can be traced for more than twenty miles, interspersed 
with numerous mausoleums constructed to cover the remains of their distin- 
guished dead. 

In the towns of Leon and Conewango a number of burial mounds have been 
explored. Among them is. one that contained eight skeletons which were 
buried in a sitting posture, in such a manner as to form a circle within the 
mound. In the center of this circle, surrounded by the mouldering skele- 
tons, stood a pestle artistically wrought from granite. This relic was 
placed in a perpendicular position and encircled with twenty-four flint 
arrows of large dimensions. This mound is now .nearly obliterated, and the 
ground whereon it once stood is cultivated by the white man. The fields in 
either direction disclose large quantities of relics designed for warlike pur- 
poses, which had been discharged, no doubt, during some terrible battle. 

On the Little Conewango, about two miles from its junction with the main 
stream, is located the village of Randolph. The groundoccupied by this beau- 
tiful village is a level plateau of land, which forms a part of the great valley of 
the Conewango. This ground, unknown centuries in the past, was densely 
populated by the Mound Builders. About forty \-ears ago a mound was 
thoroughly explored in about the center of the village, and in the midst of 
that ancient tomb three human skeletons were disinterred, which immediately 
crumbled to dust after being e.xposed to the air. In connection with them a 
large block of mica was disclosed, about twelve inches square, and of sufficient 
thickness to weigh several pounds. Mica was no doubt regarded a sacred 
relic, for it is nearly always found buried with their dead ; and it must also 
have possessed uncommon value, for it could not have been obtained in such 
blocks short of the mountains of North Carolina. On the ape.x of this mound. 
was a tree nearly four feet in diameter, whose roots penetrated to the midst 
of the tomb and disturbed the remains of those great warriors who had 
undoubtedly slumbered in the arms of death for more than a thousand years. 

It was the opinion of Dr. Cheney, with whom I have spent much time in 
exploring the mounds and ancient works in the vicinity of Randolph — and my' 
own coincides with his — that the ground now occupied by the village was once 
an ancient city; for when the white man came he was astonished to find 
within its borders and adjacent to it the remains of military fortifications, 
mounds, caches, hearth's, and various relics used for domestic and warlike 
purposes. In the summer of 1878, a Mr. Scudder, while plowing a piece of 



14 History of Cattaraugus County. 

ground, about forty rods from the railroad depot, discovered a nest of arrow 
heads under the remains of a large pine stump, and, by exploring, unearthed 
one hundred and sixty-seven. Subsequent to that time about fifty more have 
been found, together with blocks of mica, stone axes, etc. That these relics 
were buried before the growth of the tree is very apparent. The tree was one 
of the largest in the country. From as correct measurement as can be made, 
it was about eight feet in diameter and had fallen from age long before the 
axe of the white man was brought to bear upon the forest trees in Randolph. 

On Elm Creek near the village of East Randolph, is an embankment and 
trench of circular form two hundred 'and eighty feet in diameter. F"rom 
the appearance of a successive growth of t'imber it would indicate a remote 
date of construction. Wfthin and adjacent to this work numerous caches 
and hearths have been discovered, some of which contained the remains of 
charred corn. In the vicinity where the ground has been cultivated, hundreds 
of relics used by the ancient warriors have been found. 

Near the residence of J. E. Weeden, Esq., and about one mile from the 
village of Randolph, is a fortification that surrounds about three acres. The 
ditch was about eight feet deep, and numerous trees of great size were found 
growing upon the parapet and in the midst of the entrenchment. This work 
was well defined when first discovered in the wilderness, where it had lain in 
solitude for more than a thousand years, undisturbed only by the hurricane as 
it toyed with the monarchs of the forest. 

About forty years ago Dr. Apoleon Cheney, in a sur\-ey made of the village 
of Randolph, discovered the remains of a redoubt, sixty rods in length, that 
extended -across the village plateau, on either end of which is a small rivulet 
fed by living springs. On the north side of Jamestown street. Dr. T. A. C. 
Everet, while ditching his land and removing stumps, found blocks of mica 
and great quantities of relics, which had long been hidden in the ground from 
one to ten feet below the surface. About six rods from a pure and singular 
spring a number of hearths were disclosed, one of which contained several 
loads of stone which had been subjected to fire. Within a mile surrounding 
the village of Randolph, thousands of relics made for warlike and domestic 
purposes have been found. 

All of the towns in Cattaraugus and Erie counties are rich with relics left 
by the ancient people. On the north side of Cattaraugus creek, on lands of 
the Indian reservation, is standing at the present time, a group of mounds, 
which have never been disturbed, save by the action of the elements, and trees 
of the forest, which always attain an uncommon size when found among these 
tombs. 

The most extensive of these tumuli is on the terrace, which is elevated 
about fifteen feet abpve the stream. It is oblong in shape, fifty four feet in 
length by thirty-six in breadth and fifteen feet in height. Another tumulus, 
situated about seventy rods in a southerly direction, is circular in form and 



Traces of the Mound Builders. 15 

about one hundred and twenty feet in circumference and sixteen feet in 
height. Other works of less interest to the archaeologist are found in every 
direction. 

The Indians of this reservation have a superstition with regard to opening 
these receptacles of the dead. They say their fathers desired them to remain 
undisturbed, hence no one will be guilt}- of violating the sacred spot where 
the remains of some venerated chieftain is mouldering to dust. Not only in 
civilized, but in savage life, the desire to perpetuate the memory of the 
departed seems a powerful element indigenous to the nature of man. 

Although these mausoleums have stood since a score of great forests have 
lived and perished, let them rest, for they will feast the eye of the antiquarian 
thousands of years after our generation shall ha\'e passed away. 
" How sleep the brave who sink to rest, 
With all their country's wishes blest — 
While spring, with dewy fingers cold, 
Returns to deck the hallow'd mould." 

In Ellington, the town ne.xt west of Conewango, the relics and works con- 
structed by the ancient inhabitants are very numerous. On a hill, about a 
fourth of a mile from the village,' are the remains of a fortification which was 
no doubt constructed for defensive purposes. It occupies an eminence of 
more than a hundred feet above the waters of Clear creek, and commands a 
view of the circimijacent country for many miles. 

To the east, for several miles, is sjiread out the great valley of the Cone- 
wango, clothed with its nati\'c forests; to the westward is a broad ravine cut 
by the waters of a clear stream that rises among the hills which divide the 
valley of the Conewango from that of the Cassadaga. According to a survey 
made by Dr. Cheney, in 1868, this work is in the form of a parallelogram, and 
is si.x hundred feet in length by two hundred and ninety in width. The 
intrenchment, as it lay in the forest, was several feet deep. On the southern 
side was a wide gateway with an elevation on either side to guard the entrance. 
Within the intrenchment human bones have been discovered in large quanti- 
ties, and in such a stage of decay that they readily mingled with the soil. The 
land occupied by this fortification is noted for its great fertility, and marks the 
ground where once the tide of battle raged. This work presents more than 
ordinary interest to the antiquarian, on account of the great number of imple- 
ments of ancient warfare found in the vicinity. 

About a mile and a half up the valley of Clear creek, and near its junction 
with a mountain stream, are two other works, about sixty rods apart. One of 
these stands upon an eminence, seventy-five feet above the copious mountain 
stream. The vallum surrounds nearly two acres. It is in the form of a paral- 
lelogram, and when first examined, the parapet was three feet high. The 
location of this work was well selected for defence against the near approach 
of an enemv. 



i6 History of Cattaraugus County. 

Near the summit of a hill, about half a mile west of the narrows, in the 
town of Napoli, is a tumulus about one hundred and twenty feet in circum- 
ference. From its elevated position — more than six hundred feet above the 
valley of the Conewango — it commands an extensive view of the surrounding 
country' for several miles in either direction. This mound has never been 
thoroughly explored ; but a few years ago a small amount of soil was removed 
from near its base, which disclosed some relics, among which was a flint spear 
head more than six inches in length and wrought with remarkable skill. This 
mound, no doubt, contains the remains of some venerated dead who have 
slept for unknown centuries in the wild solitude. 

About eighty rods in a westerly direction from this tumulus is a rapid 
stream that winds its way, to the Allegheny river. , As we cross the river and 
pass up the Red House valley, on an eminence, about two hundred feet above 
the level of the stream, we find an ancient fortification from which can be seen 
the surrounding hills and the waters of the great river. This work is very 
extensive, being one hundred and sixty feet in circumference. The parapet is 
about three feet in height, and the ditch two feet in depth. Two rapid streams 
which- rise in the deep ravines nearly encircle the eminence upon which this 
work is located. Near the center of the enclosure is a copious spring, which 
was selected to supply the ancient warriors with water during a protracted siege. 

Several miles below the Red House creek, the remains of an ancient work 
can be traced. This is circular in form and about three hundred feet in diam- 
eter. Before it was disturbed the wall was four feet high and the ditch about 
six feet deep. Near the center of this enclosure various relics have been found, 
many of which point to a civilization much higher than of those located in the 
Conewango valley. 

In the year 1859, while exploring some tumuli in the vicinity of Red House 
valley, we found numerous singular and interesting relics, among which were 
spear heads, six inches in length, with double barbs composed of masses of 
native copper; also several blocks of mica, which were in about the same con- 
dition as when chiseled from the granite of the mountains. 

It was near this valley where was found one of the most interesting relics 
ever discovered among the works of the ancient inhabitants. It was a fiat 
piece of native copper, si.x inches in length by four in width, artistically 
wrought, with the form of an elephant represented in harness engraved upon 
it, and a sort of breast collar, with tugs on either side which extended past 
the hips. 

The great amount of copper implements and blocks of mica that have been 
found contradicts the theory of Mr. Squire, that the tumuli situated in western 
New York are not the work of the Mound Builders. I am satisfied, beyond 
a doubt, that the Indian races never mined for mica or copper, neither did 
they bury either of these articles with the remains of their distinguished dead. 
The Mound Builders, for a long period of time, made the great lakes a 



Traces of the Mound Builders. 17 



liighway of travel and transported the copper mined at Lake Superior to the 
northern borders of Lake Erie, thence by land to the Cassadaga lake and down 
the creek to which it gives rise, to its junction with the Conewango. The 
circumstance of the Conewango and Red House valleys being on and near the 
different routes to the southern rivers, may be the cause of the lavish distribu- 
tion of copper in those sections. 

Among the remarkable relics found in the vicinity of this last mentioned 
work, may be included an image chiseled from gray sandstone, which, for 
artistic design and elaborate workmanship, will compare favorably with mod- 
ern art. It is given life-size, and, no doubt, was designed to represent the form 
of head and face of the people then living. I have spent, with uncommon sat- 
isfaction, many hours in examining this wonderful specimen of ancient art. 
The head and features have a broad outline with high front. The brow is 
encircled with a plaiting of fanciful ringlets that cluster round the intellectual 
forehead. Rough and primitive as is the school of art to which this image 
belongs, it carries unquestionable marks of a much higher civilization than any 
of the Indian races that have been discovered. Several archaeologists who 
have examined this singular specimen, are of the opinion that it was an 
idol, one of the gods of their mythology, and worshipped in the mystical rites 
pertaining to their religion. As this ancient people worshipped the sun, it 
seems difficult to account for it on that hypothesis. But if it should prove to be 
an idol, we have a key to unlock one of the mysteries connected with a people 
once more numerous than the present population of America; a people, the 
sun of whose empire once rose beyond the northern lakes and extended south 
to uhcrc great ri\ers send down their turbid waters to meet the ocean's tides; 
and further still, to a land of flowers, where the golden fruits hung in tempt- 
ing clusters, unborn of human toil, and thence o'er ocean's isles, ere it is lost in 
the western wave. 

Notwithstanding every climate on the continent of America has once been 
densely populated by a numerous people, their footprints are fast fading away. 
The last vestige of these wonderful inhabitants will soon be lost in oblivion, 
which has already cast its shadow across the "Acropolis of ancient Athens and 
the Colosseum of imperial Rome." 

"The long haired Greeks 

To him upon the shores of the Hellespont, 

A mound shall heap ; that those in aftertimes 

Who sail along the darksome sea shall say 

This is the monument of one long since 

Borne to his grave, by mighty Hector slain." 

One of the most extensive sepulchral mounds bordering the Allegheny river, 

in the State of New York, formerly stood on the west side of the river, in the 

town of Cold Spring. This tumulus was located about five hundred feet from 

the river and some twenty feet above the highest flood. The location is 

3 



History of Cattaraugus County. 



grand and interesting. To the south and west is a broad level plain, embrac- 
ing nearly two thousand acres of the most fertile land to be found in Catta- 
raugus county. This great interval is flanked on either side by precipitous 
hills which are cut asunder in but three directions; once by the great river that 
flows to the south, to the north and west by a branch of the Conewango and 
the Cold Spring creek. 

For a description of this tumulus, as it appeared more than a hundred years 
ago, I am indebted to Gov. Blacksnake, the great chief of the Six Nations. 
According to his estimate it was about two hundred feet in circumference and 
twenty feet in height, and one of the largest trees he ever beheld was growing 
near its base, whose roots penetrated its side for fifty feet or more. When 
this mound was explored rnore than seventy years ago, it was found to contain 
a vast quantity of human bones. According to the recollection of the old 
chief and that of his son (then a very aged man), then living on the Indian 
reservation, " cart loads" of bones were discovered, many of which were in 
such a stage of decay that they crumbled to dust when exposed to the air. 
Great quantities of relics, such as gorgets, flint axes, arrow heads, and a great 
number of copper implements, artistically wrought from masses of native cop- 
per which was brought from the mines of Lake Superior, were found with the 
bones. 

This great tumulus is now leveled down and the place where it stood is a 
cultivated field. The earth of which it was composed is distributed over an 
acre of ground. So rich was this mound with decaying skeletons and relics of 
curious workmanship, that now, after more than seventy years have passed 
away, fragments of human bones, arrow heads and copper relics are found in 
large quantities at each successive plowing. In the spring of 1879, a 'few days 
after the ground had been plowed, in company with two boys we found fifteen 
arrow heads, a curious piece of copper and nearly a peck of fragments of 
human bones, all of which had been distributed in the soil during about fifty 
years of cultivation. 

That this mound was very ancient is apparent from the condition of the 
remains being found in such a stage of decay, and from the size of the trees 
found upon its summit, and adjacent to it. If the great tree referred to by 
the Indian chief was nearly ten feet in diameter, as he supposed it to have been, 
that alone would reach back in the past nearly a thousand \-ears, and it is not 
improbable that many generations of forests have grown and perished since 
that ancient tomb closed over scores of the dead. 

At one of my interviews with.Gov. Blacksnake, which lasted several hours, 
I derived much valuable informatiom. This great chief was a man in posses- 
sion of vast native talents. He was familiar with the location of every prom- 
inent mound and fortification in western New York, Pennsylvania and the 
valley of the Ohio. In fact he was one of the most intelligent archaeologists 
with whom I have come in contact. The subject under consideration was the 



Traces of the Mound Builders. 19 

antiquity of the works of these ancient people, and whether they were in any 
way connected with the native Indians of America. In answer to the ques- 
tion, "Is there any alliance between the Indians and Mound Builders?" he 
said: "We have no knowledge of these ancient people, only from the mounds 
and fortifications that are very numerous in every section of country with 
which I am acquainted. We have no reliable traditions in regard to them, 
though we have traditions reaching back for a long period of time." 

Question. " If a race of people as much developed in civilization as the 
Mound Builders appear to have been, by their works which they left behind, 
had lived in this country a thousand years ago, would not that fact have been 
transmitted to your generation?" 

Answer. " It is the custom with all Indian tribes to impart such informa- 
tion to their children, when v;ery young, and if those ancient people were con- 
temporary with the American Indians that fact would undoubtedly have 
passed through thousands of years." 

It was the opinion of this old chief that the Indian tribes originated in 
America, and came in some mysterious manner long after the Mound Builders 
had pa.ssed away. 

About two miles from the Allegheny, up Cold Spring creek, are t^t'o mounds, 
one of which has never been thoroughly explored. The other was leveled to 
the ground in the fall of 1879. This tumulus is on the farm of Wm. M. Brown, 
Esq., and was originally about ten feet in height, and one hundred feet in cir- 
cumference. At the time this mound was leveled, with the aid of Mr. Brown, 
we found a quantity of bone dust mingled with coal and ashes. This was a 
very interesting discovery, as it shows that ancient people practiced cremation 
to a certain extent at least. 

Opposite the village of Limestone in the town of CarroUton, in the valley 
of Tunaengwant creek is a circular fortification about one thousand feet in cir- 
cumference. Some ten rods to the north is Limestone creek, a mountain 
stream, that winds its way to the Tunaengwant. A large gateway with breast- 
works opened toward this stream. In the midst of this fortification once stood 
a number of pine trees of giant size whose heads towered far above the sur- 
rounding forest, several of which were about twelve feet in circumference. 
About forty years ago a cellar was dug within the boundaries of the fortifica- 
tion, and human bones were exhumed in great quantities, in such advanced 
state of decay that they offered but slight resistance to the shovel and pick. 
Several years ago, the man who dug the cellar informed me that the bones 
were several feet in thickness, as far at least as the cellar extended. 

The ground now occupied by the village of Olean was, no doubt, once 
densely populated. The line of the Genesee Valley canal at this place passed 
through a sepulchral mound that disclosed human bones in the last stage of 
decomposition. This tumulus was oval in form, about forty feet wide and 
sixty long and nearly ten feet high. 



History of Cattaraugus County. 



In the town of Hinsdale near the west bank of Olean creek, about five 
miles from Olean, a part situated on the lands of S. S. Peake and a part on 
the lands adjoining, of .Mr. Gould, are the remains of an ancient fort that sur- 
rounds about three acres. This work shows unmistakable evidence of great 
antiquity; for more than sixty years ago pine trees, nearly four feet in diam- 
eter, were growing within the entrenchment. In and around this fort large 
quantities of relics peculiar to those lost and wonderful people have been 
found. 

In the town of Persia, on Cattaraugus creek near Point Peters, situated on an 
elevated plateau, are the remains of an -ancient fort. When first discovered in 
the forest, the embankment stood in bold relief full three feet high. The con- 
tiguous country surrounding this tumulus, for several miles in exer)- direction, 
contained numerous and curious relics of this ancient and distinct race. The 
scenery at this point along Cattaraugus creek is rugged, bold, and grand. Mr. 
John S. Ackerly informed the editor of this work, that while cultivating his 
farm, he has found numerous arrow heads, stone a.xes, stone implements for 
skinning game, and a curiously wrought stone rasp. On his farm there are also 
several' deep pits, excavated long before the advent of the white man. In pos- 
session of Mr. Ackerly's neighbor is an image of a small bird, artistically carved 
in stone, which was found in the earth in the neighborhood. It is a fine spec- 
imen, but unlike any of the feathered songsters found in western New York 
at the present day. 

Space in this work will not permit us to extend the investigation of this 
lost but interesting race, to an\- great length, beyond the bounds of Cattarau- 
gus county. Suffice it to say their empire extended far to the west, and 
southwest across the continent. 

At Martin's F"erry, Ohio, nearly opposite the city of Wheeling, West Vir- 
ginia, is a more extensive work than I have before had occasion to mention. 
It is located on the second terrace which is about fifty feet abo\-e high water 
mark. This work is nearly square with two corners facing a hill to the westward 
rounded off. It is elevated some ten or twelve feet above the surrounding plateau 
and occupies about three acres. In fact it is a pile of earth artificially raised 
with gentle slopes on even.- side. This embankment, on the top, is as level as 
the floor of a house, and to all appearances has changed but little since its con- 
struction long ages ago. Near one of its corners, so as to be almost connected, 
is a mound much more extensive than any that have been discovered in the 
State of New York. In 1875, while spending several days in that locality, 
I made an estimate of about four handed feet for the circumference of this 
mound, and for height thirty feet. Many years ago the mound was partially 
opened, but from appearances the center has never been disclosed. I was 
informed by several parties residing here that human bones, copper implements 
and other relics were found. The Rev. J. P. Maclean is of the opinion that 
works of that character were devoted to some kind of amusement. If such is 



Traces of the Mound Builders. 



a fact, it would seem singular that they should build such stately tombs by its 
side. From its mode of construction, and its general characteristics, it is 
highly probable it was devoted to a far different purpose, a purpose in some 
way connected with religion. In every section of the country where the 
ancient works are found man\- of them show a religious significance. The 
religious element is so strong in the nature of man that it does and has always 
shown itself. Up the Ohio river, for several miles above Martin's Ferry, is a 
broad valley of alluvial land, which, to all appearance, was once extensively 
cultivated; done very probably by the people who built these mounds and 
fortifications. 

Twelve miles below the city of Wheeling on the West .Virginia side of the 
river, we reach the \illage oS Moundville, formerly known as Grave Creek, on 
account of the sepulchral mounds which it once contained. As the traveller 
arrives at this enchanting location of Nature's handiwork, his attention is at 
once draw n to a singular hill, symmetrical in form, which towers to the height 
of se\-enty feet. This imposing eminence is situated amidst a level plateau 
that contains more than a thousand acres, and is artificial, and is one of the 
largest sepulchral monuments constructed by human hands. This mammoth 
mound is located about half a mile from the (Dhio river and some forty feet 
above its banks. Its base is a true circle and about twenty rods in diameter. 
It is conical in form, and before the top was leveled off it stood eighty feet 
high. The time that has pas.sed away since this great work was built js 
shrouded in mystery; but it is not improbable that since its construction, 
Rome, Greece and Thebes have fallen and their go-^geous palaces, rotundas, 
obelisks and colosseums have gone down in a common sepulchre. 

In the year 1838, a Mr. Tomlinson, v\ho claimed a legal title over the Mound 
Builders by ad\'erse possession, e.xcavated a tunnel from its base to its center. 
The soil, composed in part of clay and being perfectly dry, showed no signs of 
caving in, so they readily reached the center, and to the astonishment of all 
concerned came to a vault or room twenty feet square, the bottom of which 
was covered with a dark material made from decayed timber, which had long 
been reduced to ashes by the destructive influence of time. After removing 
some of the debris and making a search, they discovered two human skeletons 
in almost a perfect state of preservation. One v\as that of a male and the 
other that of a female. They lay side by side in a horizontal position with 
their heads to the south, separated the distance of about ten or twelve inches. 
When deposited in that dark and silent vault, the arms of the corpses were 
laid carefully beside the bodies, where they had reposed for centuries before 
Columbus dreamt of a western continent. Four bracelets .made of copper 
artistically designed surrounded the wrists of the skeletons. In the spring of 
1841, I visited this mound and found it open for e.xhibition, by Mr. Tomlin- 
son, the owner and proprietor, a gentleman of education and very much an 
antiquarian, who had been to a very large e.xpense in preparing the place for 



22 HiSTuRV OF Cattaraugus County. 

the reception of visitors. He had caused the bones of the two skeletons to be 
wired and put in the most favorable position for exhibition. These two skel- 
etons were the best preserved of any that have ever been taken from any 
mound in this country and were calculated to open a new field of investigation. 
By the aid of them we can arrive more closely at the size of that ancient peo- 
ple, and as they were undoubtedly prominent personages we can form a ver}- 
reasonable opinion of their mental abilities. The two were apparently about 
the same age, perhaps about fifty years, indicating that they died in the hey- 
day of life. The male, judging by the skeleton, was a man about six feet in 
height, or perhaps a trifle more. The female was estimated to be five feet 
seven or eight inches in height, with bones which would denote a powerful 
frame. The intellectual aiid moral regions were exceedingly well developed. 
Benevolence and reverence were large, which would indicate the possession of 
a strong religious nature. The organ of juvenile love, was uncommonly large ; 
combativeness and destructiveness were only moderately developed. Such a 
head would indicate a person of strong moral feelings ; one that would love the 
right and despise acts of cruelty and oppression; would love the young with 
more than ordinary mother's love, and at the sight of a suffering child would be 
melted to compassion. If a mother she would devote her life to herchildren. The 
head of the king (if he was a king) was less developed in the moral qualities 
than that of this queen of the Mound Builders. The animal organs were rather 
large and the intellectual fairly developed. Such an organization would give 
considerable force of character, and if devoted to politics, would be no more 
likely to jump the track of honesty and virtue than many of our members of 
Congress, bank directors or present day political leaders. 

The skeletons and copper bracelets were not the only relics found in the 
vault in the midst of this great mound. More than three thousand beads of curi- 
ous and artistic workmanship, together with two hundred and fifty blocks of 
mica and large quantities of flint and copper implements were disclosed. But 
one of the most interesting relics ever found in any mound in this country 
was a block or fiat stone containing three lines of unknown characters engraved 
upon it. This stone lay near the skeletons, and it was thought by Messrs. 
Tomlinson and Schoocraft that it proved a written language, designed to be 
read by the inhabitants of the spirit world. So great was the interest taken 
in this stone and the characters engraved upon it that it was submitted to the 
learned professors of Europe, Rafu, of Copenhagen and M. Jomal, of Paris, 
who came to the conclusion that the stone contained twenty-two alphabetical 
characters which they were unable to interpret. 

It is stated in a paper written by Dr. Cheney in_ 1859, ^^hat the skeletons 
found in the mounds at Cassadaga were those of giants, and that one in par- 
ticular measured seven feet and five inches. I suppose he got that information 
from some who saw tliem at the time they were exhumed and who had their 
organs of marvelousness greatly exalted. That the Mound Builders were a 



Traces of the Mound Builders. 23 

little larger than the present type, is very probable; but that they were giants 
eight and ten feet high is all fabulous. I have seen many skeletons from 
mounds in different states, but have seen none that will much exceed the peo- 
ple now living. At the centennial, in one of the annex buildings, was a large 
amount of fragments of skeletons from the ancient tombs in West Virginia, 
Missouri, Ohio, and the Mississippi valley, and I saw none that would exceed 
the size of the Indian tribes of America. The subject under consideration has" 
quite enough of the marvelous about it to gratify almost any imagination with- 
out resorting to giants. 

The fact that the mastodon was contemporary with the Mound Builders is 
admitted by all antiquarians. It is my opinion that in all probability they 
tamed and used that powerful beast to haul heavy burdens. I am confirmed 
in this opinion by the fact that in his organization he possessed a mild dispo- 
sition, and that, like the African elephant, he could have been tamed when 
young and brought under subjection with as little trouble as is required for the 
o\ or horse. The inhabitants of Africa, who stand much lower in the scale of 
development than the ancient Mound Builders, use the elephant as a beast of 
burden. . This hypothesis is further strengthened by the finding of the copper 
relic before mentioned, in the town of Red House, on the .Allegheny river, with 
the form of the mastodon engraved upon it, represented in harness. 

When we look over the continent of America and find a race of people 
who once held empire over this broad domain, now slowly and surely passing 
away; and then into the midnight of the past, and find such unmistakable 
traces of a once numerous and powerful people now lost in oblivion ; and then 
again that wc, as a people, may be standing on the brink of ruin, with religious 
and political leaders lost to every principle of hoiKjr, and slowly undermining 
the glorious fabric of American greatness; who knows but in the distant 
future America with its colossal structures will be in ruins, when we consider 
the warlike spirit of man and the strange and dreadful con\ulsions of nature, 
that carry in their train vast and sudden destruction? I am aware that we, as 
a people, believe that we are crowned with everlasting safety, on account of 
our republican institutions, our liberty of speech, and our great range of relig- 
ious and political freedom. The ruined cities of the ancient world no doubt 
thought so once ; but "hearken to the voice of history."" Look at Babylon, 
once the praise of the whole earth. But " Babylon has fallen." 

How nations sink by darling schemes opprest. 
When vengeance listens to the fool's request, 
Fate wings with every wish the afflictive dart. 
Each gift of nature and each grace of art ; 
With fatal heat impetuous courage glows, 
With fatal sweetness elocution flows. 
Impeachment stops the speaker's powerful breath, 
And restless fire precipitates in death.. 



24 HisTtjRV OF Cattaraugus County. 



CHAPTER III. 

DISCOVERY OF THE IROQUOIS BY THE- FREN'CH. THEIR PRO\VES.S, SUBJU- 
GATIOX AND THEIR RELIGIOX. 

JACQUES CARTIER, a distinguished French explorer and navigator, in 
the service of France, in 1535, entered the great gulf of Canada, to vhich 
he gave the name of St. Lawrence, sailed through it and up the river of 
the same name which he called the "River of Hochelaga," and explored the 
country as far as the city of Montreal, ascended Mt. Royal, from which he was 
the first white man to gaze upon the magnificent prospect which continues to 
delight the tourist, and \\as the first to behold in the panorama stretched 
before him, a part of the territorj- of our Empire State. In i 540 Cartier again 
visited. Canada and made an aborti\'e attempt to found a colony. No further 
attempt was made to establish a settlement until 1608, when Samuel Cham- 
plain, a French nobleman, with others, founded a colony at Quebec. Cham- 
plain, restless for adventures, and equally anxious to make further discoveries 
in the new world, waited only for spring, and an opportunity, to enter upon 
a long cherished plan of explorations, with the high hope of finding a way to 
China. 

In the last part of the autumn he was visited by an ambitious young chief 
from the vicinity of Ottawa, (then unknown), who prevailed upon him to join 
him in the spring in an expedition against his enemies, the Iroquois, the 
Five Nations, composed of the Mohawks, Oneidas, Onondagas, Cayugas and 
Senecas, and of whom all the Indian tribes stood in mortal fear. 

On the 28th day of May, 1609, the expedition setoff, Champlain in a small 
shallop carr\'ing himself and ten others, armed with guns. They passed up the 
St. Lawrence, and entered the mouth of the Richelieu river. Here his ease- 
loving warriors encamped for two days, hunted, fished and feasted, and regaled 
their French allies with fresh fish, venison and wild fowl — and quarrelled, too. 
About three-fourths took to their canoes and paddled towards home. The 
remaining force consisted of si.xty warriors with twenty canoes. This expedi- 
tion pushed onward up the Richelieu,entered the beautiful lake which Cham- 
plain gave his name, and were then in the country of the Mohawk nation, who 
kept the eastern door of the Long House of the confederacy of the Five 
Nations. The party then traveled only by night. June 29th, they embarked 
at twilight from the west shore of the lake, near the site of Crown Point. They 
discovered a flotilla of Iroquois canoes about ten o'clock in the e\'ening; each 
recognized his mortal enemy, and their mingled war-whoops made " night hid- 



Subjugation of the Iroquois. 25 • 

eous." By common consent the battle was deferred until daylight, when the 
allies, confident of their success, marched with steadiness to the conflict. They 
opened their ranks, and Champlain and his two friends passed to the front 
with their carbines. The astonished Iroquois stared at the unwonted sight in 
amazement. The guns were leveled and discharged ; two of the chiefs fell 
dead. The brave Iroquois stood firm, and filled the air with their arrows ; but 
the fire-arms continued their deadly work ; their terrific reports quailed their 
stout hearts; they broke and ran, and the victory was won. Thus the French 
foolishly rushed into war with the mightiest and most powerful Indian con- 
federacy the world ever beheld. This act engendered a hatred of the French 
on the part of the Iroquois that descended to generations then unborn, and 
eventually led to the annihilation of many of the Canadian tribes and to the 
weakening of the Iroquois. 

They were generally on the war-path. They drove out and annihilated the 
powerful Neuter nation and the warlike Hurons. About 1655 they extended 
their victories over the immense territory reaching to the Father of Waters on 
the west; south to the Tennessee river, north to the St. Lawrence and east to 
the Hudson. 

In exterminating the Fries, the policy of the Iroquois seems to have been 
to remove a powerful rival rather than to acquire territory. Because the 
country of the Fries lay adjacent to the Senecas, it was given to that nation, 
and for many years after the e.xodus of their enemies it was only occupied by 
them as an occasional hunting ground and where deer, boars, and wolves held 
unmolested possession. 

This was the zenith of power of the Iroquois; and until the expedition of 
Marquis de Nouville, who w ith his army from Canada administered a just ret- 
ribution to the Senecas, in 1687, for ravages committed on French settlements 
on the Illinois river, the Iroquois were invulnerable to any fo/ce that came 
before them. Then a decisive battle was fought between the French and the 
Indians, in Ontario county, in which the victorious French struck terror to the 
hearts of the Senecas, and burned many flourishing Indian villages. The 
Indians through fear abandoned these villages in dismay, and retired further 
into the interior, and possibly as far as the territory of Cattaraugus county, so 
long left vacant by the Fries. 

The Iroquois were the allies of the Fnglish, and were instigated by them, 
who offered them a bounty for Yankee scalps during the war of the Revolu- 
tion, to constantly harrass the American settlements, and commit the most 
cruel and barbarous atrocities, among which was the massacre at Wyoming. 

During the winter of 1777-8 the Indians wintered at Niagara, and early in 
May assembled under their leaders at Seneca Castle in pursuance of the order 
of Col. Guy Johnson, and marched forth to do their murderous work. They 
spread death and destruction in the valley of the west branch of the Susquehanna 
river, at Cobleskill, at Cherry Valley, and Wyoming. They spared neither age 

4 



-26 History of Cattaraugus County. 

nor sex, and their fiendish atrocities were seldom equalled, and ne\er surpassed. 

Vigorous measures for subduing these savages, who had become fiends in 
their thirst for blood, were demanded by the entire nation. Accordingly 
Major General John Sullivan was entrusted with an expedition against the 
Iroquois. He entered their country, met them in several battles, and defeated 
them in every one, and as the most efficient means of their subjugation he 
resorted to that questionable war measure of burning over forty Indian 
villages, with 160,000 bushels of corn, destroyed their orchards, loaded with 
ripening fruit, and devastated their country all along his line of march. 

At the close of this expedition, that power was broken for ever, and the 
country passed from the possession and dominion of the Indians to the white 
man. 

This brave simple people, except when on the war-path, busied themselves 
with the vocations of peace, hunting, fishing, and in tilling the ground in their 
primitive way; and in worshiping the Great Spirit as taught them by their 
ancestors, for how many generations back they and we know not. 

They had the vices of barbaric life and they also had its virtues. That 
they were superstitious and are yet is admitted without a question; but they 
were never idolaters ; neither is the Indian stupid. He recognizes Ha-wen- 
ni-yu, the Great Spirit, and believes in a future life; He-no the Thunderer. 
Ga-oh, the spirit of the winds, a protecting spirit of fire, of water, of medicine, 
of all the trees and shrubs, and that each Indian has a protecting spirit 
appointed to take care of him by the Good Ruler. 

*The religious system of the Iroquois, notwithstanding it originated with 
the untutored savages, has the elements of great sublimity. It sees the Great 
Spirit not in a personality, but as a great and loving spirit, whose extended 
arms encircle the universe. The Indian believes that his God controls the motion 
of the stars, and that he watches their every interest with fatherly care ; and that 
he will escort their spirits to the charming hunting grounds beyond "the river 
of death," where beautiful birds make vocal the hills and valleys with their 
enchanting songs. They also believe that he has supplied the invisible world 
with innumerable deer, bears and all other animals useful for food; and has 
endowed the good Indian with ability to climb the rugged mountains and 
never tire; and to sport upon the shimmering lakes and sinuous ri\-ers that 
would never fail to supply them with fish. 

. For the countless blessings that the Great Spirit conferred upon them, they 
met at stated intervals to do him honor. Six annual festivals were held by 
the Iroquois. The New Year's feast and the White Dog dance, in the olden 
time lasted nine days, and was the greatest festival of the year. 

A week before the ceremony, two grotesquely dressed persons called at 
every house, with corn-pounders in their hands, with which they knocked on 

*For information of the religion and feasts observed by the Iroquois, the writer is indebted to 
the writings o( Dr. Larkin, and •'Our Life Among the Iroquois" bv Mrs. Harriet S. Oiswell. 



Religious Festivals oe the Iroquois. 27 

the floor to command silence, and then said these words: "Listen! hsten I 
listen I The ceremonies which Ha-wen-ni-yu commands are about to com- 
mence. Prepare your houses. Clear away the rubbish. Drive out all e\il 
animals. Should your friend be taken sick and die, we command you not to 
mourn nor allow your friends to mourn. Lay the body aside. When the cer- 
emonies are over we will mourn with you." These commands were actually 
obeyed. On the first day of the feast a white dog "without spot or blemish" 
was chosen and strangled, that no bones should be broken or blood shed. 
The body was painted with spots of red and decorated with feathers. Around 
the feet were wound strings of wampum and beads. The dog was then eleva- 
ted on top of a pole twenty feet high where he remained until the fifth day. 
Then they built an altar of wood upon which the body of the dog was laid 
and burned. As they did this the great thanksgiving address was made, and 
tobacco was constantl}- thrown upon the fire that the prayers might ascend 
in the clouds of smoke: "Hail, Ha-wen-ni-}-u I hail! Listen with open 
ears to the words of thy people. Continue to listen. Give us zeal and fidelity 
to celebrate the sacred ceremonies which thou hast gi\'en to us. We thank 
thee that we still li\'e. We thank our mother earth which sustains us. We 
thank the rivers for the fish. We thank the herbs and plants of the earth. 
We thank the bushes and trees for fruit. We thank the winds which have 
banished disease. We thank our grandfather He-no for rain. We thank the 
moon and stars which give us light when the sun has gone to rest. We thank 
the sun for the warmth and light by day. Keep us from evil ways that the 
sun may never hide his face from us for shame, and leave us in darkness. We 
thank Thee O mighty Ha-wen-ni-yu, our creator and our good ruler. Thou 
canst do no evil. Everything thou doest is for our happiness." 

During this feast there were social hours, and times for games. On one 
day all the people went into each others houses carrying wooden shovels, with 
which the ashes upon the hearth were. stirred and scattered, while invoking a 
blessing upon the household. 

They amused themselves at this time in guessing dreams, and with a great 
variety of games. The war-dance was also a part of this festival. They acted 
war. The war-song was sung which aroused all the fire of the young warriors 
and then the arrows flew thick and fast, the tomahawk was lifted, the dead and 
dying were upon the battlefield, the scalps were taken; and then could be 
heard the shout of victory and the dirge for the slain. This was made to be 
real by various devices of paint, false scalps, etc., and was very exciting; but 
a joyful time. 

" Keepers of the faith" are elected by the people whose duty it is to pre- 
pare and appoint the feast. 

At the maple festival in the olden times the leader made this speech: 
" Friends, the sun, the ruler of the day, is high in his path, and we must 
hasten to our duty. We are here to observe an ancient custom handed down 



History of Cattaraugus County. 



by our forefathers and given to them by the good ruler, Ha-\\cr-ni-yu. He 
requires us to give thanks for the blessings we recei\-e. We will be faithful to 
this command." 

Friends: "The maple is yielding its sweet waters. We join in thanksgiv- 
ing to the maple and also to Ha-wen-ni-yu, who made this tree for the good of 
the red man." 

Then came the prayer by the leader. Whene\"er the Great Spirit wa.s 
addressed, and then only, the\- burned incense by throwing tobacco on the fire. 
The following was the prayer for this occasion. "Ha-wen-ni-yu, listen now 
to our words. The smoke of our offering arises. Listen to our words as they 
arise in smoke. We thank thee for the sweet water of the maple. We thank 
thee for the return of the planting season. Let our corn and beans and 
squashes grow\ Ha-wen-ni-yu I Continue to listen for the smoke yet arises. 
Preserve us from pestilential diseases. Preserve our old men and protect our 
young. Ha-wen-ni-yu! Thou dost love th}- people and hate their enemies. 
Thou hast given us the panther's heart, the eagle's eye, the moose's foot, and 
the cunning of the fo.x; but to our enemies thou hast given the eye of the owl 
in the daylight, the foot of the turtle, the heart of woman, and the stupid brain 
of the bear in winter." 

The strawberry feast in ancient times consisted entirely of the wild fruit 
eaten with maple sugar. Before partaking the leader returned thanks for the 
people to the. Great Spirit. The green corn festival consisted of succotash, 
a soup of corn and beans; and Ha-wen-ni-yu was thanked for corn, beans and 
squashes. 

All of their festi\'als were opened by the meeting of the tribe in order that 
each one might repent of his past sins and resolve that in the future of his life 
he would avoid the snares and pitfalls into which he had fallen in the past. 
To make their promises binding one of their leading theologians would take 
in his hand a "string of white wampum" and facing the audience would con- 
fess his various infirmities and sins. The wampum was passed from one to 
the other, until every person in the audience had made confession. 

The belief in a presiding deity is indigenous to the soil of every clime. 
All nations ha\'e a God, but some, through ignorance of the laws that govern 
the universe, have converted him into a malignant spirit. The Indian idea 
of God is a sublime conception. He is their tender loving father Who watches 
the interests of his children with the care bestowed upon the infant reposing 
in its mother's arms; and, whilst he continually holds in his hands the scales 
of eternal justice, which he metes out to every son and daughter of the forest, 
he inflicts upon the wicked and those who have gone astray no sanguinary 
punishment, but holds out the hand of forgiveness to the worst of sinners, 
after they have been scourged with the whip of justice, tempered with mercy. 

Handsome Lake, a half brother of the famous chief Cornplanter, was born 
in 1735. ^nd had been a very dissipated man. He reformed after a long 



Early Indian Occupancv, Etc. ' 29 



illness, and after spending three days in the forest, where he claimed he was 
taught by the Great Spirit, he returned to his people as his prophet, with a 
message. He taught them temperance, restricted them to one cup of fire- 
water in the morning, one at noon and one at night. He insisted on a close 
observance of the marriage relation, and that death only should separate 
husband and wife. He taught them to give of their abundance to those who 
lacked substance, to care for orphans and adopt one if they had no children, 
and to welcome strangers to their homes, speak kind words to them, and always 
mention the good ruler, Ha-wen-ni-yu. He claimed to have been taken in a 
vision to the happy home: it was filled with Indians; the white people were 
all shut out. He claimed also to have visited the house of torment, where he 
saw many kettles of boiling, lead, into which people were plunged. He saw 
there a drunken Indian, and the evil spirit was in the act of pouring a cup of 
boiling lead down his throat, and he saw flames burst from his mouth as he 
screamed with agony. There were many who belie\'ed in the divine mission 
of Handsome Lake, and to this day many of the pagan portion of the Seneca 
nation are his disciples. 



CHAPTER IV. 



INDIAN OCCUPANCY OF C.VTTARAUGUS COUNTY. THE INDIANS AS THEY 
APPEAR ON THEIR RESERVATION T()-DAV. 

[By Kev. J. W. Sanborn, Manager State Inilian Exhibit at World's Fair.] 

THE GRADUAL encroachments of the whites upon Indian territory, 
and the march of a too often unscrupulous civilization, led to the 
defining of Indian boundaries by treaty stipulations. In 1784 a treaty 
was enacted on the site of what is now Rome, N. Y., (then Fort Stanwix), 
between the commissioners of the United States and the chiefs of the Six- 
Nations. By the terms of that treat}- the Iroquois were to be left in undis- 
turbed possession of the greater portion of what is now the State of New York, 
and had the right of possession guaranteed to them by the United States, of 
all territory west of a line called the "property line" running nearly parallel 
with, and less than eighty miles west of the Hudson river. Thus it appears 
that the early occupancy of what is now Cattaraugus county was co-equal in 
time with that of the entire State of New York. Cattaraugus county was 
organized March 11, 1808, and was taken from territory known as Genesee 
county.* Subsequent treaties narrowed down the territory of the Iroquois 

•Turner's Pioneer Period of Western New Yorlc. 



30 History of Cattaraugus Countv. 

until in 1845 ^^'^^ fi'''cl the Senecas removing fronn the BulTalo Creek reservation 
to the Cattaraugus reservation. 

As early as the year 1600 the Indians of western New York were visited 
by French missionaries who discovered that an extensive strip of territory 
lying between the domains of the Hurons and Iroquois (who were deadly ene- 
mies) was occupied by another tribe to which the French gave the name of 
the "Neuter nation," or as the Senecas called them "the Kah-kwas," or Eries. 
They appear to have "held their territory against both the Senecas and Hurons, 
and the remains of their forts and cemeteries are discoverable along the south 
shore of Lake Erie even to the Allegheny and Ohio rivers. There is hardly a 
town along the picturesque county of Cattaraugus that has not been the scene 
of some interestingevent in the Indian history. Its streams, well stocked with 
fish, its magnificent scenery, hardly surpassed by another county in the State 
of New York, its fertile soil, its dense forests once teeming with all sorts of 
game, made Cattaraugus county a veritable paradise to the red man. 

Of her memorable journey from Ohio to the Genesee country, Mary Jem- 
ison, the famous "white woman," whose line of march lay directly through 
Cattaraugus county, says: "From Conewango \\e came to a place called by 
the Indians Che-na-shun-ga-tan on the Allegheny river, at the mouth of what 
is now Cold Spring creek, in the town of Napoli, (now Cold Spring, Cattarau- 
gus county,) and from that to Dee-yu-no-weh, (Eddy-not-strong), i. e. Carroll- 
ton. Having rested ourselves two days at that place, we came to Caneadea." 

Olean was one of the favorite resorts of the Senecas and many are the tra- 
ditions which they relate of the w^onderful cures effected by the magic spring 
at Cuba. The liquid from the spring had marvelous curative properties and was 
called Seneca oil. It was from a petroleum spring containing other elements 
and its efiicacy was never called in question. 

Passing over interesting historical incidents of those early days, let us 
glance at the Senecas as rulers and statesmen, and of course this will bring us 
to the consideration of that matchless alliance known as the Iroquois confed- 
eration which has been characterized by one American statesman as " the 
most consummate piece of statesmanship ever devised by the wit of man." 

Weary of destructive attacks upon one another, the Iroquois established 
the confederacy for the better protection of themselves and for the securement 
of peace. The whole scheme is said to have originated in the brain of Hia- 
watha. While it is doubtless true that the beginnings of the system origin- 
ated with him, it is more than probable that the wisdom and experience of 
others added to its completeness from time to time. However, before Colum- 
bus discovered America, this confederation was in full operation and was 
bidding fair to establish a magnificent civilization in the heart of the wilder- 
ness. The conflicts between the English and French for the possession of 
this territory seriously interfered with the peace-dealing confederation, and in 
large measure broke it up. The best description of this league is that of Mr. 



Early Indian Occupancy, Etc. 31 

L. H. Morgan, who says: "The government of the Six Nations when they 
were in the zenith of their prosperity and power was an oHgarchy composed 
of a mixture of elective and hereditary power. The government was admin- 
istered by chiefs, each tribe having two, one of whom was hereditary, the 
other elective. His term of office was during good behavior. The elective 
sachem was a military chieftain, whose duty it was to attend to all military 
affairs of the tribe, and to lead the warriors to battle. Both were members of 
the general council of the confederacy, as well as of the national council, which 
met as often as necessity required, and settled all questions involving matters 
in which their own nation only had an interest : but the general council of the 
confederacy met once a year except in cases of emergency. In the settlement 
of difficulties the chiefs must iie of one mind. 

"At the institution of the league, fifty permanent sachemships were created 
with appropriate names, and in the sachems who held those titles was vested 
the supreme power of the confederacy. To secure order in the succession, and 
to determine the individuals entitled, the sachemships were made hereditary 
under limited and peculiar laws of descent. The sachems themselves were 
equal in rank and authority, and instead of holding separate territorial juris- 
diction, their powers were joint, and co-e.xtensive with the league. As a safe- 
guard against contention and fraud, such sachem was 'raised up,' and invested 
with his title by a council of all the sachems, with suitable forms and ceremo- 
nies. Until this ceremony of confirmation or investiture, no one could become 
a ruler. He received, when 'raised up' the name of the sachemship itself, as 
in the case of the titles of nobility, and so also did his successors from genera- 
tion to generation. The sachemships were distributed among the Five 
Nations; nine to the Mohawk, nine to the Oneida, fourteen to the Onondaga, 
ten to the Cayuga, and eight to the Seneca. The sachems united formed the 
council of the league, the ruling body in whom resided the e.xecutive, legis- 
lative, and judicial authority. It was an oligarchy, i. e., 'the rule of the few,' 
and, while' more system is observable in this than in the oligarchies of 
antiquity, it seems also better calculated in its framework to resist political 
changes. 

" Next to the sachems in position, stood the chiefs, an inferior class of 
rulers, the very existence of whose office was an anomaly in the oligarchy of 
the Iroquois. The office of chief was made elective, and the reward of merit, 
and without any power of descent, the title terminating with the individual. 
After their election they were 'raised up' by a council of the nation; but a 
ratification by the general council of the sachems was necessary to complete 
the investiture." 

Although these customs and forms of government have given place to 
more modern methods, it is still true that an Indian and his wife may not 
properly belong to the same clan. And this, from earliest days, has been a 
bar to political corruption, because all the children, being regarded as a part 



History of Cattaraugus County. 



of the woman's personal property, always belong to the clan of the mother, 
hence no chief can be succeeded in office by his own son. A \-acancy occur- 
ring, the eldest woman in the clan makes the nomination of the person to be 
' raised up ' to the chieftainship. 

On the 22d of October, 1868, the Seneca nation adopted a new constitu- 
tion, whereby the form of government was radically changed. This govern- 
ment has a legislative, executive, and judiciary department. The legislative 
power is vested in a council of sixteen members, called the councillors of the 
Seneca nation of Indians. Eight of these are elected annually for the Alle- 
gany reservation, and eight for the Cattaraugus reservation. The executive 
power is vested in a president, whose duty it is to execute faithfully all laws 
applicable to the nation. To him is given power to fill vacancies that may 
occur in the council either by death, resignation or impeachment of any 
of the members, until such vacancy shall be filled by election. The judiciary 
power is vested in a court known as the peacemakers, composed of si.x mem- 
bers, three of whom are from the Cattaraugus reservation, and three from the 
Allegany. They are elected annually for a term of three years. Two peace- 
makers have power to hold courts, differing from courts of justices of the 
peace, in that they have the further power to pro\^e wills, to settle estates of 
deceased persons, and to settle questions relating to real estate, and they are 
also empowered to grant divorces. But all their determinations and decisions 
are subject to appeal to the council, whose decisions are final. The council 
has power to make treaties subject to the approval of at least three-fourths of 
the legal voters, and the consent of three-fourths of the mothers of the nation. 
Besides the president there are a clerk and treasurer, and two marshals, one 
from each reservation. The president is elected every year, on the first Tues- 
day in May, and any male person in the tribe who is twenty-one years old or 
more is eligible to this position. The choice of a chief alternates between the 
Cattaraugus and Allegany reservations as the tribe is very nearly equally 
divided between the two reserves. The Seneca council convenes the first 
Tuesday in June, and continues its sessions until the business is transacted. 

The Cattaraugus reservation is partly in the county of the same name, but 
principally in Erie county north of the Cattaraugus creek. The Allegany res- 
ervation is wholly within Cattaraugus county and is forty miles long, by about 
one mile wide. Not far from one thousand Indians, principally Senecas, occupy 
■ this reservation. There are about fifteen hundred Indians on the Cattarau- 
gus reservation, and they, with the Indians of the Allegany reservation, con- 
stitute one nation, hence the division of officers between the two reservations. 
The population on both these reservations is increasing. The births exceeded 
the deaths by thirteen in 1891. Within the bounds of the Allegany reserva- 
tion there are 30,469 acres of land, not all fit for cultivation. The good tim- 
ber is gone for the rriost part, and many of the Indians- are compelled either 
to work for others for wages, or to till the soil, or both. 



Eaklv Indian Occupancy, Etc. 



Cattaraugus county is peopled by whites who are deeply interested in 
education, and a strong sentiment in its favor prevails. It is doubtful if any 
county in the State has better public schools, and this sentiment in favor of 
education has exerted its wholesome influence on the Indians, awakening 
among many of them a like interest. There are several State public schools 
on the reservations in Cattaraugus county, and in addition to these there is a 
prosperous industrial school at Quaker Bridge, sustained by the Society of 
Friends. This school accommodates about forty children of both sexes, and 
furnishes instruction to the boys in farming, and the girls in housework, in 
addition to a good course of study.* Other religious bodies exert no small 
influence on behalf of education throughout this county', among which should 
be mentioned the Baptists, Presbyterians and Methodists. 

Although the ancient customs of the aboriginal occupants of Cattaraugus 
county are fading away, still you may find among the older Indians a strict 
adherence to the usages of old. Nearly all of the things which we are about 
to describe are still in use, and a pictured reproduction of them will add inter- 
est to this chapter.t 

The _Saddlr. — The saddle of the aboriginal Cattaraugus county Indian 
excites a white man's curiosity, and with good reason, for it is a very ingen- 
iously constructed affair. It is distinctively Indian in all its characteristics. 
In its construction our red brothers select a good sized tree with a crotch of 
the right spread. They whittle down the wood, and fit it to the angle of the 
beast's back-bone. The pommel is shaped from the solid portion from which 
the spreading limbs of the tree project. Back of the pommel an opening 
e.xtends the whole length of the saddle. A piece of wood, sometimes a 
crotched stick, is whittled down and fitted over the sides of the saddle at the 
other end. The girth, crupper and stirrup-straps were originally of horse 
hair or buffalo hair, more latterly of thongs, and in modern times are of ordi- 
nary rope. The stirrups are made of hickory saplings split and bent in trian- 
gular shape. The sides of the saddle are eighteen inches long and si.x inches 
wide. The pommel is five inches high. 

T/ie Rattle. — There are two kinds of rattles made by the Cattaraugus 
Indians, the squash-shell rattle, and the turtle-shell. To make the squash 
rattle the Indians cut a hole in one end of a hard-shelled squash and remove 
the seeds and interior. Dried beans, kernels of corn and sometimes cherry- 
pits are put in, and the aperture is plugged. This rattle is too frail for violent 
pounding and so is used as an accompaniment to songs of lamentation for the 
dead. The turtle-shell rattle is a remarkable production. The turtle's legs, 
tail and body are carefully dissected, the skin is sewed up, after a goodly num- 
ber of cherry-pits have been put in, then the neck is stretched to its utmost 

♦This benevolent institution was established in 1798 by the Society of Friends in Philadelphia, 
and has been continually maintained —Ed. 

+ For illustrations see accompanying engravings. 



34 History of Cattaraugus County. 



length; hickory strips are placed upon the stretched neck to retain it in that 
shape for a handle. Thongs are wound tightly around the whole making a 
rigid handle. The eyes are dug out and a thong is passed through the sockets 
to serve as a loop by which to hang the rattle up. This rattle is used in war- 
dances and medicine-dances. 

The War-Club. — The Indians no longer have use for war-clubs, except as 
they gratify the white man's curiosity and brandish them to show how their 
fathers fought. The clubs were about two feet long, of iron-wood, with a 
knot at one end which they shaped like a ball. A bunch of feathers was tied 
at the end of the handle. 

Tlie Toinahmvk. — The tomahawk has from earliest times been the favorite 
weapon of the Indians. Before coming in contact with the French, toma- 
hawks were of stone, but afterwards more often of iron, steel or brass. The 
tomahawk of Red Jacket, represented in the accompanying sheet of engrav- 
ings, was surmounted by a bowl which served as a pipe, the handle forming 
the pipe-stem. The handle was inlaid with silver ornamentation. Chief 
Brant's pipe-tomahawk is also shown. 

The tomahawk and fire-brand have ever served as emblems of war. Bury- 
ing the tomahawk means peace ; lighting the torch and raising the tomahawk 
and throwing dust in the air, are the signals for immediate conflict. Happily, 
among the Cattaraugus Indians there are now no tomahawks, because the 
spirit is gone which resorts to such weapons, and peace pervades the breasts 
of chiefs and people. 

T/tc Head-Strap. — Basswood and slippery elm grow plentifully on the Indian 
reservation in Cattaraugus county. From the earliest times bark ropes have 
been made and used by the Senecas; woven or plaited into wide bands, they 
serve as head-straps for the support of burdens carried on the back. Head- 
straps are commonly used at the present day, but are constructed of yarn 
woven into a belt about fifteen feet long. The wide part of the belt is placed 
over the forehead, and the ends are tied to the burden to be carried on the 
back. 

T/ic Sap-tub. — One of the principal religious festivals of the Indian year is 
the "Adoration of the Maple." The sweet sap, after the cold winter has 
passed, is Nature's first e.Khibition of tenderness to the "Children of the 
Forest." The sap-tub is of bark. The rough bark is left on e.xcept where the 
ends and sides are turned up. The side of the bark next the tree forms the 
inside of the tub. The picture shows how the ends are gathered up and 
fastened. 

The Tray. — This is of bark, and is a useful utensil of household economy, 
being used as a mixing tray in the preparation of corn-bread. After the loaf is 
cooked, it is placed in a platter made of braided strands of corn husks. With 
the possible exception of a bark barrel, the bark tray is the most useful and 
most generally used of household articles. 



<A ,>4/ i> 'aL 'w ^> O 

Earlv Indian Occupancy, Etc. 



Gaiitcs. — The Indians are enthusiastic experts in playing certain games. 
The ring and rod represented in the engraving are used in the javeHn game. 
The ring is usually five or six inches in diameter. The rods are made of sap- 
lings sharpened and cut four to six feet in length. The Indians choose sides. 
One person steps out and rolls the ring midway between the contending 
parties. The Indians who are on the opposite side from the one who rolls the 
ring shoot their javelins, and if one of them hits the ring or sends his javelin 
through it, all on the other side at once throw their javelins at the ring, and if 
they fail, or as many of them as fail to hit the ring, or to send a javelin through 
it, they give up their javelins as forfeits to the other side, and they throw these 
captured javelins at the ring. As many of these last as hit the ring step out 
of the play, and cannot agaiji enter for that game. And the captured javelins 
which do not hit the ring are at once returned to their original owners. The 
winning side must now roll the ring, and the game continues until all the 
javelins on one side are forfeited. This is a summer game. 

One of the finest winter games, barring the betting which usually accom- 
panies it, is the game of snow-snake. I have often wondered that the whites 
do not take it up. A level place is selected, generally by the roadside, and a 
small log is dragged along in the snow, and thus a track is made in which to 
shoot the snakes. From hickory saplings shafts are cut, made to represent a 
snake. The head is elevated slightly, — as shown in the engraving, — and 
" loaded " with a few ounces of lead. The snakes are from six to eight feet 
long, and quite slender, but perfectly straight, and are polished with beeswa.x 
to facilitate their gliding over the smooth track prepared in the snow. At the 
small end of the snake is a slight notch to fit the finger. With this end resting 
on one finger, and firmly grasped with the other fingers and the thumb, the 
Indian steps back a few feet, makes a short, sharp run of — say twenty feet — 
and sends the snake along the glassy snow-track at a fearful velocity. Every 
man's snake bears his name or private mark, and sides are chosen, and a tally 
kept of the snakes which make the longest run. Each snake is credited with 
a certain number of points, and those which outstrip the others bring credit to 
the side to which they belong. ' Snow-snakes have been thrown twelve 
hundred feet in one of these slippery tracks. The game is exhilarating, 
exciting, and very healthful. 

In the use of bows and arrows the Indians of Cattaraugus county have 
ever been famous.. Arrow-heads of hornstone — sometimes called flint — have 
been found in vast quantities in all parts of the county, and they give us a hint 
of the past, and prove that this mode of bringing down game, and extermina- 
ting their enemies, has been employed from the earliest times by this historic 
people. One gets a good idea of the strength of an Indian by attempting to 
bend his bow. This is generally a very difficult thing to do. The average 
length of an Indian bow is four feet. The arrows are three feet long. At the 
bow-string end of the arrow a small twist of feathers is bound, causing the 



36 History of Cattaraugus County. 



arrow to whirl in its flight like a rifle-ball. With arrows pointed with stone 
heads, or even with wood whittled to a point, an Indian could easily kill large 
game. 

Indian boys have their games, varying according to the season of the year, 
just as the white boys have, but the standard sport among the former, take it 
year in and year out, is bow and arrow shooting. Knocking pennies off a post, 
and pocketing the pennies as a reward — whenever they can find anyone willing 
to put up the pennies — is a favorite sport. 

Corn-Pou)idcr. — The Cattaraugus Indian women still prefer to make their 
corn-meal in a corn-pounder, notwithstanding the fact that the grist-mills of 
the white man can be heard in the distance humming at their toil. And it is 
interesting to watch, on a slimmer day, Indian women pounding corn in the 
shade of their fruit trees, and sifting the poundings through queer looking 
baskets. The engraving gives an excellent idea of the corn-pounder as now 
used by the Cattaraugus county Indians. These pounders vary in size from 
two feet to thirty inches in height, and are from eighteen to twenty inches in 
diameter. The "upper," as it is called, is of hard wood, four feet long, slender 
at the center for convenience in handling. The opening is made in the end of 
the log of \\ood by red-hot coals, which the Indians pile up in a circle until the 
charred wood can be easily broken away and gouged in the shape of a mortar 
and made smooth. The dried corn is thoroughly pounded' by. dashing the 
" upper" up and down. The poundings are then put in a coarse-meshed bas- 
ket and shaken or sifted through, the coarser portion being made into hominy 
and the finer into bread and puddings. The Indians grow three kinds of corn, 
viz : sweet corn, red flint, and white flint, or " squaw " corn. The first is for 
succotash, the second for charring, and the third for bread and puddings. 

Indian Drum. — The drum is a favorite accompaniment to the Indian 
dances, more especially the war-dance, and with it the time is beaten. The 
drum is about one foot in height. A skin, tanned in smoke, is drawn over one 
end of the drum body, and a tightly fitting hoop wound with strips of thong 
is pressed down over the soft leather. Modern Indian drums are made by 
sawing a small paint keg in two, and stretching leather over the open end. 
Holes are made in the closed end " to let out the music " — as one Indian put it. 

Husk Bottles. — The engravings also show an article of Indian manufac- 
ture which is somewhat rare at the present day, nevertheless there are families 
which make use of husk-bottles for storing away salt, parched corn, etc. These 
bottles are made of woven strands of corn husks. Some of these are so tightly 
braided that by smearing them with clay prepared for the purpose, they will 
hold vinegar and other liquids. The wide mouths of the bottles in the 
engraving w'ill be observed by the reader; these bottles are for holding not 
only salt and parched corn, but also meal and a very nutritious preparation of 
powdered corn and maple sugar, a favorite article of food under long marches, 
or in severe physical labor. And the horse jockeys in the tribe refresh weary 




INDIAN MEDICINE MAN 



Early Ixdian Occupanxy, Etc. 37 



trotting horses, and revive them for another spurt on the track, by giving 
them water to drink in which a few handfuls of powdered corn and maple 
sugar have been mixed. There is certainly virtue in this preparation for man 
and beast. 

Pipis. — Xhe Indian furnished to the world tobacco and corn, but the whites 
taught them to chew. The Seneca Indian name for tobacco is 0-yeh-qua-a- 
weh. meaning "the only tobacco." They consider Indian tobacco the best 
grown, but are generally not unwilling to smoke any kind. Native tobacco is 
easily grown. If started from seed-planting one year, it will thereafter propa- 
gate itself. Aboriginal remains, wherever found, are accompanied with pipes. 

It may not be uninteresting to the reader to study Indian types as pre- 
sented in the child-group shown in the engraving. Here are twenty-seven 
children, and they are from the following tribes: Cornplanter, Seneca, Onon- 
daga. Cayuga, Oneida, Tuscarora, Stockbridge, and Mohawk. This group was 
taken on the Cattaraugus reservation, and the group comprises the infant 
department of the Thomas Orphan Asylum, and the picture was taken in the 
early part of the summer of 1890. 

Under ordinary circumstances it would be regarded as a mark of too great 
self esteem in a writer to insert his own portrait in an historical article like 
this, but hoping it may be excusable under present circumstances, I present 
myself to the reader in the garb of the medicine man. (See engraving.) 

Medicine Ma)i. — The false face of the medicine man is cut from a solid 
block of wood, and dyed with Indian red. On top are bags of tobacco, which 
is scattered in the fire as a part of the ceremony of the cure of the sick. In 
one hand is a turtle-shell rattle, and when ten or more Indians enter a sick 
room wearing as many masks, they certainly make an impression on the be- 
holder, and why should they not also impress the bad spirit which, according 
to them, locates itself in the diseased part I The theory is that by these 
incantations the bad spirit is frightened away, and the patient is left to get 
well. The carving of these faces is, in many instances, very skillfully done, 
and must call for a remarkable exercise of patience. 

In closing this chapter, I should say what must be plain to all, that I have 
not attempted to give an exhaustive relation of the aboriginal occupancy of 
Cattaraugus county, but have endeavored to present only a cursory glance at 
this people, who are remarkable for many things, and of whom it may be said 
that one of the most remarkable is the mystery of their origin. One thing we 
know, and there can be no difference of opinion about it, and that is, the Indian 
is a human being, created of God with susceptibilities, with capacity for 
improvement, and these are good and sufficient reasons why the stronger race, 
— stronger because more self-asserting — should throw no obstacles in the path- 
way of a better civilization for the red brothers, but rather promote positive 
progress, by demanding ?or the Indian the rights and privileges which we insist 
on for ourselves. . ' - 



38 History of Cattaraugus County. 



CHAPTER V. 

the ALLEGANY RESERVATION.* THE MISSION OF THE FRIENDS. 

THE Allegany reservation is in the county of Cattaraugus and lies along 
the Allegheny river for a distance of about thirty-five miles, the eastern 
terminus being near Vandalia, and the western at the boundary line 
between New York and Pennsylvania. It varies in width from one to two and a 
half miles, the reservation lines being run so as to take in, so far as practicable, 
all the bottom lands along the river. There are 30,469 acres in this reserva- 
tion, and according to the census taken in January-, 1892, there are residing 
within its borders nine hundred Senecas, -and seventy Onondagas. It is 
estimated that there are eleven thousand acres of tillable land, but not more 
than one-half of this is cultivated or in pasturage by the Indians. Considerable 
portions of it are covered with brush or second growth timber, the first growth 
having been cut ofT and sold. All valuable timber has been thus disposed of. 

The people on this reservation are not as a rule engaged extensively in 
agriculture. There are only a few farms of any considerable size, but there 
are quite a number of small farms with comfortable buildings. The people 
have but recently begun to develop their lands, having for many years 
supplied their actual necessities by selling timber, bark and ties. They have 
been making fair progress in farming for two or three years past, and material 
improvements can be seen in many quarters. 

The Allegany reservation is traversed by several important railroads. The 
Western New York & Pennsylvania railroad follows the south boundary of 
the same the entire length of the reservation. The New York. Pennsylvania 
& Ohio railroad runs along the north boundary for some tweh'e miles west- 
ward from Salamanca. The New York, Lake Erie & Western railroad runs 
along the north boundary eastward from Salamanca to the eastern boundary 
of the reservation, a distance of about thirteen miles. The Buffalo, Rochester 
& Pittsburg railroad runs eastward from Salamanca along the north boundary 
to Carrolton, a distance of about six miles; it then crosses the reservation to 
the south, running to Bradford, Pa., and the coal fields of McKean and 
Crawford counties in that State. The New York, Lake Erie & Western 
railroad also has a branch running southward from Carrolton into the same 
regions. 

When these railroads were built through the reservation, several stations 
were established, and around these stations towns grew up of greater or less 

* From the report of Agent A. W. Ferri.n to the United Status Indian Bureau. 



The Allegany Reservation. 39 

importance. The lands were leased from individual Indians, but the leases had 
no legal value, and a good deal of trouble grew out of that condition of affairs. 
In 1875, February 19th, Congress passed an act legalizing the leases for a 
period of five years and providing for a renewal of the leases at recurring 
intervals of tweh'e years, beginning in 1880. Under this act of Congress, a 
commission was appointed by the president to establish the boundaries of the 
several villages provided for in the act. This commission laid out and estab- 
lished villages at Vandalia, Carrolton, Great Valley, Salamanca, West 
Salamanca and Red House. The acres in the several villages are approxi- 
mately as follows: Vandalia, two hundred and forty acres; Carrolton, twenty- 
two hundred acres; Great Valley, two hundred and sixty acres; Salamanca, 
two thousand acres; West Salamanca, seven hundred and fifty acres; Red 
House fifteen acres. In 1890, the act of 1875 was so amended as to give 
authority for renewing the leases when they should expire in February, 1892, 
for a period not exceeding ninety-nine years. 

When the Seneca nation council met in February-, 1892, they declined to 
grant leases for so long a period, but after repeated conferences with 
committees representing the white leases, it was decided to make the leases 
for that time, which was done. The aggregate amount of rentals under the 
new arrangement has not been ascertained, but it is estimated that it will 
reach $8,000 or $'0,000, and perhaps more. These are paid to the treasurer 
of the Seneca nation, and the funds coming into the national treasury are 
disbursed upon orders issued by the president and clerk, authorized by vote 
of the council. Some dissatisfaction is e.vpressed by members of the Seneca 
nation that none of the funds coming into the national treasury from these 
rentals and other sources, are distributed among the families of the nation. 
It is alleged that the council is e.xtravagant in its expenditures, and that a 
proper accounting is not made by the officers ha\ing the funds in charge. It 
is probable that the foundation for these allegations is largely attributable to 
loose ways of doing business, and a failure to collect all the rents due the 
nation. A new set of books, with improved forms, has been recently 
procured, and it is hoped that a better showing may be made in the future. 

None of the villages established under the act of February 19, 1875, 
have attained any considerable size, e.xcept Salamanca. This being an 
important railroad center, there has grown up a city of about five thousand 
inhabitants, with all the adjuncts of a small business town. It has rtiany fine 
brick business blocks, a $35,000 brick school house, city water works, sewers, 
etc. An electric light plant is being put in, and is expected to be in operation 
in November of this year. Vandalia is a mere hamlet, but is the shipping 
point for considerable quantities of lumber, bark, etc. Carrolton has a 
population of three or four hundred. There are two or three hotels, several 
places of trade, a kindling wood factory, saw-mill, etc. 

At Great Valley, the village proper is off the reservation, and there are 



40 History ok Cattaraugus County. 



within the Hmits of the village established under the act of 1875, only a small 
population, a saw-mill and planing-mill, and a few more industries. West 
Salamanca has a population of about four hundred. It has the usual comple- 
ment of hotels and stores, and there is located here the Salamanca stock yards, 
one of the feeding points for live stock shipments from the west. 

At Red House there is simply a station on the New York, Pennsylvania 
& Ohio Railroad, and a hotel. When the Western New York & Pennsyl- 
vania was built on the south side of the river, the business of the place was 
mainly transferred to the station of that road, and a small village has grown 
up at that point. There are two or three hotels there, two or three stores, a 
blacksmith shop, etc. There are perhaps one hundred white people living in 
the hamlet. The}- are on the reservation without authority of law, but have 
leases from individual Indians. A bill was introduced by Congressman Hooker 
in the winter of 1891-92 to extend the boundaries of the village established 
under the act of 1S75. so as to take in this village, but it is strenuously 
opposed by the Indians, and is not likely to become a law. Much complaint 
is made of the sale of liquor to Indians by parties at Red House. The atten- 
tion of the prosecuting officer of Cattaraugus county has been repeatedly 
called to these complaints, and he has repeatedly promised to put an end to 
this illegal liquor selling, but up to this time it has not been done. The State 
law is ample to remove from the reservation all parties outside of the villages 
authorized by the act of 1875. It is possible that the failure of the Seneca 
nation council to permit the district attorney to remove the offending parties 
may account for his non-action. 

The descendants of the noted Seneca chief, Cornplanter, occupy a small 
reservation in Warren county, Pennsylvania, just over the State line. It 
lies on both sides of the Allegheny river, and is about two miles long and half 
a mile wide, and includes two small islands. There is nominally se\"en hun- 
dred and fifty acres in this reservation, but this includes the river bed and 
some worthless shoals. The reservation was donated to Chief Cornplanter by 
the State of Pennsylvania, March 16, 1796, for his valuable services to the 
white people. Cornplanter's descendants own the reservation in fee, and it is 
divided in severalty among them. The Cornplanter Indians are Senecas, and 
are enrolled on the Allegany reservation census, and vote on that reservation. 
There are ninety-eight Indians on this Cornplanter reservation. 

The Senecas own a small reservation located on the eastern boundary of 
Cattaraugus county, partly in this county and partly in Allegany county, 
known as the Oil Spring reservation. It has si.x hundred and forty acres, and 
the title is in the Seneca nation, unincumbered by any preemption right. The 
land is leased to whites. 

On the Allegany reser\ation there is a Presbyterian church at Jimerson- 
town, three miles wdst of Salamanca, with a membership of seventy-three per- 
sons. Rev. M. F. Trippe is the missionary in charge, but is unable to preach 



Mission ov the Friends. 41 

at this point only one Sunday in four. Rev. \Vm. Hull, of West Salamanca, 
who has been a missionary among the Indians more than fifty years, fills the 
pulpit the remaining Sundays. A Presbyterian church edifice is in construc- 
tion at Old Town under the supervision of Mr. Trippe, which will be ready 
for dedication in a few weeks. The church organization at this point has 
fortv-six members. The Baptists have a missionary station at Red House, 
with a church organization containing twenty members. Rev. Harvey 
Blinkey, a native preacher, has the spiritual oversight of this little band of 
worshipers. 

On the Cattaraugus and Allegany reservations there are sixteen Indian 
schools supported by the State of New York. The number of children of 
school age is seven hundred. Of that number four hundred and fifty attended 
school some portion of the year, with an average daily attendance .of two 
hundred and ten. The schools were taught the past year by sixteen teach- 
ers. The total expense for maintaining these schools was §5,096.56. 

The first settlement in the county by white people was made in May, 1798, 
under the auspices of the Society of. Friends, of Philadelphia. Their mission 
was one of benevolence and good-will. They banished themselves from 
civilized society, from friends and from home, to take up a life among the 
"untutored," with the only hope that they might make the life of the Indian 
like that of the white man. They were heartih' welcomed by the eminent 
chief, Cornplanter, who resided a few miles further down the Allegheny on his 
own reservation,. and by the other Seneca chiefs, who gave them lands to work 
at Genesinguhta, now known as Old Town, a deserted Indian village, from 
which most of the inhabitants had removed to Cornplanter's reservation. 
Here they found about one hundred and fifty acres of bottom lands had been 
partly cleared, and having negotiated with an Indian woman for her dwelling, 
they began their self-imposed duties of instructing the Indians in agriculture, 
in the mechanical arts, in clearing and fencing their fields, and in the enjoy- 
ment of civilized life. The Friends continued at this location, improved the 
farm, erected buildings, and taught the natives, u-itil i??03. They then 
thought it best for themselves and the Indians, whom th'iy desired to benefit, 
to own in fee simple a home of their own. Accordingly tney purchased si.x 
hundred ninety-two acres on Tunesassa creek of the Holland Land Company, 
who had put their large tract on the market about that time, and removed to 
it. Without any remuneration, they left for the use of the Indians one set of 
blacksmith tools, agricultural implements and all their improvements. In 1805 
the Friends had completed both a grist-mill and a saw-mill at their new 
location, where the grinding and sawing was done for the Indians without toll 
or fees of any kind. The Friends have also sent to this mission from time to 
time disinterested, self-denying. Christian women, who resided there for the 
purpose of promoting -the welfare of the Seneca nation,, by instructing them 
in the useful arts of civilized life. They taught them to spin, and a few of 
6 



42 History of Cattaraugus County. 



them learned to weave. They also instructed thern in cleanliness and good 
housekeeping. The Friends also made an early effort to assist the Indian 
youth in school education, but owing to the opposition of the pagan portion of 
the Indians, this enterprise met with little success, although Joseph Elkinton 
labored persistently for sixteen years to keep a school for their benefit ; 
sometimes with little opposition, and sometimes so violent that he was 
threatened with personal injury if he did not desist. Since they adopted their 
present system of taking the Indian youth into the family, the mission school 
has been fairly successful, as may be seen in the accompanying article 
contributed by James Henderson, the present superintendent of the mission. 
All the long years since May, 1798, the policy of the Friends, a course of 
disinterested friendship and open-handed benevolence, has never changed. 
Although they may not have accomplished all they desired, they may con- 
gratulate themselves and the Indians too, on the improved condition of the 
"Red Man." 

Superintendent Henderson contributes the following interesting account: 
The first settlement of Friends on the Allegany reservation was made near the 
Indian village called Genesinguhta, now known as Old Town, on the west bank 
of the Allegheny river, about fi\'e miles abo\'e the state line, in the latter part 
of May, 1798. 

Three young men, Joel Swayne, Halliday Jackson and Henry Simmons, 
the two former from Chester county, Pennsylvania, and the latter from Bucks 
county, Pennsylvania, assisted by John Pierce and Joshua Sharpless, also from 
the neighborhood of Philadelphia, selected the site and made preparations for 
a home. In a few weeks John Pierce and Joshua Sharpless returned home. 
The latter kept an account of this journey, which has been printed, in which 
he remarks upon taking leave of Cornplanter and other Indians at Buffalo, on 
the i6th of June: "We now took an affectionate farewell of the chief and of 
the Indians present, who parted with us with much respect, and I can truly 
say, the longer I have been among that people, the more near and united they 
have felt to me, and now on parting they feel like brethren with whom I have 
been intimately acquainted, and for whose welfare I feel ardent wishes." 

Henry Simmons returned home in 1799, and in that year Jacob Taylor and 
Jonathan Thomas, who had lived three years with the Oneida Indians, near 
Stockbridge, New York, went to the Allegany reservation. Halliday Jackson 
returned home in 1800. John Pennock, also from Chester county, Pennsylva- 
nia, spent a few months there in 1802, returning again in 1804. At this set- 
tlement the efforts of the Friends had been mainly confined to instructing 
them in agriculture, and in a more sober, industrious and comfortable way of 
living, and the use of mechanics' tools. 

In 1803, the comrnittee of Friends in Philadelphia who were engaged in 
carrying out the concern of the yearly meeting in the welfare of the Indians, 
believing- that advantages would result from removing their settlement to land 



Mission of the Friends. 43 



of their own, adjoining the reservation, after consulting with the Indians and 
obtaining their approbation, concluded upon a suitable location, a few miles 
further up the river. After some examination, the four Friends who had been 
appointed on this business, viz: Isaac Coates, Isaac Bonsall, Thomas Steward- 
son and John Shoemaker, Jr., as stated in their report, upon returning to Phil- 
adelphia: "On viewing a creek called Tunesassa, which falls into the Allegheny 
river on the east side about two miles above Genesinguhta, found sufficient 
water to work a saw-mill, and a convenient situation to build one, about half a 
mile from the Indian reservation, and navigable for canoes to and from the 
river at many seasons. The creek is bounded on the south by a mountain 
which it winds round the end of. On it are some fine white pine trees, near 
where the dam is proposed to.be erected ; it will require a dam fifty yards lono- 
and about twelve feet high to obtain a fall of ten feet. On the north side of. 
the creek is a body of good farming land, the bottoms abounding with white 
pine and other timber, among which are some sugar maples ; there is a low 
ridge on which there are many white oaks. Although the land is not gen- 
erally of the first quality, and to secure the water of the creek we must include 
a part of the mountain, yet we believe a very good farm may be made there, 
and the situation for our purpose is superior to any we met with, therefore 
we fi.ved on this place." 

The tract contained, according to the deed, about six hundred and ninety- 
two acres. Joel Swayne and Jonathan Thomas removed to it from Old Town 
in the early part of 1804, and shortly afterwards took steps to erect a saw and 
grist-mill on the property, which were in operation early in 1805. Jonathan 
Thomas returned from Tunesassa during the year 1805, after having been 
among the Indians for several years. 

The following Friends have resided at Tunesassa for a longer or shorter 
period, having the principal charge of the concern. A number of other F"riends 
have also been at the institution as teachers and care takers of the children, 
and helpers in the family during the past eighty years. 

Benjamin Cope and wife, Rachel Cope, went to the institution in May, 
1805; Jonathan Thomas, May 14, 1809; Jonathan Thomas and wife, Ann 
Thomas, September 12, 1816; Robert Clendenon and wife, Elizabeth Clende- 
non, May 30, 1812; Joseph Elkinton, September I3, 1816; Joseph Walton, 
and, wife, 'Abigail Walton, May 10, 1825; Robert Scotton,* May 8, 1822; 
Joseph Battey and wife, Rebecca Battey, October 26, I836; Ebenezer Worth,* 
May I, 1843; Solomon Lukens and wife, Susan Lukens, in October, 1849; 
John Wood and wife, Susannah L. Wood, November 23, 1852; Samuel Whit- 
son and wife, Rachel Whitson, November 6, 1854; Reuben Battin and wife, 
Eleanor Battin, May 21, 1858; Abel H. Blackburn and wife, Caroline Black- 
burn, in December, 1859; Abner Woolman* and daughter, Abigail Woolman, 
April 4, i860; George W. Mott and wife, Abigail Alott, in May, 1872; Aaron 

* Keturned to the Institute subsequently for a longer or shorter time. 



44 History of Cattaraugus County. 



P. Dewees and wife, Eunice Dewees, in October, 1873; George W. Mott and 
wife, Abigail B. Mott, in September, 1880; Aaron P. Dewees and wife, Eunice 
Dewees, in September 18S2; Aaron Dewees and wife, Miranda G. Dewees, 
April I, [886; James Henderson and wife, Eunice Henderson, and Rebecca 
\V. Bundy, in October 1S89. 

In 1S07 the committee remark: "It is supposed near one hundred new- 
houses have been built within a period of about three j-ears ; most of them are 
well put up of hewn logs: many of them two stories high- and covered with 
shingles; some have panel doors, and a great many have glass windows — and 
kept much cleaner than formerl}-. Their farms are enclosed under good fence, 
from seven to ten rails high; a much greater proportion of corn is planted this 
year than has been heretofore, and it generally looks well ; divers of them 
have raised wheat, oats, etc., and land is now clearing in many places to sow 
with wheat this fall. The\- have a number of horses and a good stock of cattle 
and swine, so that we belie\'e an evident change for the better has taken place, 
and may, with satisfaction on returning, note that in the course of our journey 
we have not seen one Indian the least intoxicated with liquor." 

In 1809 the Friends residing at Tunesassa mention that "a ver}- satisfac- 
tory progress has been made among the women and girls in learning to spin, 
several have purchased wheels and commenced spinning at their own houses." 
In 181 1 it is stated: "Out of one hundred and ten women residing on this 
reservation, upwards of fifty have come forward to learn to spin, twenty-five 
of whom are capable of making good yarn." 

In 1812, Joseph Harlan had a school among them, which was soon dropped, 
as the chiefs informed the Friends that they could not attend to sending their 
children. In 1813, the Indians are said to have raised and sold considerable 
quantities of grain to white people. A school was maintained at this time, 
though attended regularly by but few children. 

In 18 1 5, the committee state: "The residence of our Friends among the 
natives during the commotion occasioned by the war appears to have been 
especially useful, as is manifested by the speech of an old chief to the visiting- 
committee in the ninth month last, who expressed the great satisfaction they 
had that the Friends who lived beside them had remained so steady with 
them through their difficulties. That although the great guns had roared so 
loud as to shake the ground whereon they stood, yet they remained qviiet, 
which convinced them that our Friends must be under the protection of the 
Great Spirit. We feel thankful to them, said he, for staying by us; if they go 
away we shall be alarmed and fly also." 

In October, 1816, Joseph Elkinton opened a school for Indians, which was 
continued during the winter, fifteen to twenty young men and children gener- 
ally attending daily. This was continued for some years, but owing' to the 
opposition of those <\'ho adhered to their old customs, it was discontinued ii-i 
1 82 1. It was reopened in 1822. In 1817 there were se\'enty families on the 



Mission of the Friends. 



Allegany reservation. In 1823 a school was taught by one of the Friends in 
a house erected by the committee on land belonging to Friends, attended 
by a dailj' a\'erage of twenty children. A workshop was also erected 
near the school. In 1S31 the property at Tunesassa, including the saw and 
grist-mill, was rented to Ariel Wellman, Jr., and Lewis P. Thorp and Joseph 
Elkinton returned to Philadelphia. In 1835 one of the chiefs remarked "that 
they were two-thirds more comfortable than they were forty-five years ago." 

In the autumn of 1835 a hea\'y rainfall, continumg with but little inter- 
mission for three days, caused a great flood in the Allegheny river, b}- which the 
flats along it were inundated, and a number of the Indians were compelled to 
leave their homes and seek an asylum on higher ground. This was considered 
a greater flood than had occurred for thirty-two years. The loss of crops on 
the reservation was very great, and it was evident that unless some relief was 
speedily furnished, many of the Indians and a great part of the cattle must 
suffer, and perhaps perish from want. Two Friends visited them at this time 
and inspected their condition. These reported that there were on the reser- 
vation and at Cornplanter's, three hundred and thirty-seven adults and three 
hundred and fifty-three children, and the provisions saved from the flood were 
estimated at less than one-third of the whole, and that of the corn which was 
saved, a great part was so damaged as to be unfit fpr use. In this emergency 
the committee authorized the purchase of grain, etc., for immediate support 
and for seed; and eight hundred and ninety-five bushels of corn, forty tons of 
hay and one hundred and fourteen bushels of potatoes were procured for their 
use and distributed among them. In June, 1836, another unusual flood 
occurred, and Friends again assisted in relieving man_\- of the Indians from 
want. 

On the 26th of October, 1836, Joseph Kattey and his wife Rebecca arrived 
at Tunesassa, and w ith Robert Scotton, during the following winter, made 
arrangements for erecting a more comfortable house, to take the place of the 
log house, which had become much dilapidated. In the autumn of 1842 
another destructive flood occurred, and Friends again supplied the Indians 
with potatoes, oats and corn, which there is reason to believe were in some 
instances the means of preserving both them and their cattle from perishing. 

The use of intoxicating drinks by the Indians and the sorrowful effects of 
it has long been a cause of much anxiety and trouble. The committee remark 
in 1848 that most of the white people who trespass on the reservation 
" consider it their interest to encourage the natives in the use of ardent spirits ; 
and regardless of the law which prohibits it, frequently keep the article to sell 
to them. Influenced by the temptation thus presented to him, and by the 
example and solicitation of wicked and designing men, the feeble resolutions 
of the Indian are soon overpowered, and he becomes the victim of this 
degrading habit." 

In 1852 it was concluded to take some children as boarders in the family. 



46 History of Cattaraugus Couxtv. 

and a school-house which had been built some years before, near the river, 
was moved into the yard adjoining the dwelling arid neatly fitted up, and a 
school was opened in it on the 23d of December, 1852, with fourteen children 
from the neighborhood and six girls from a greater distance admitted as board- 
ers. The number of day scholars soon increased to thirty-six. It was soon 
found necessary to enlarge the building, which was done in 1853, and accom- 
modations provided for a larger number of scholars in the family. It was soon 
found desirable to discontinue the day scholars, and for a number of years 
past all of the children attending the school have resided in and formed a part 
of the family. 

In 1863 there were fourteen girls and four boys thus receiving instruction; 
in 1873, twenty-four girls and five boys; in 1885, twenty-five girls and ten 
boys; in 1889, twenty-five girls and fifteen boys; in 1890, twenty-five girls and 
twenty boys; in 1870 a new tenant house was built; in 1878 a new barn was 
erected, twelve acres of land were cleared ; in 1882, the school-house having 
become too small for the increased number of pupils, it was removed and a 
two-story frame building, capable of seating forty children, erected on its site. 

In i'883 the saw and grist-mill, which had become quite dilapidated, was 
taken down, and some of the timber suitable for the purpose used in making 
an addition to the barn. In the nine years previous to 1884 seventy-five acres 
of land were cleared by Aaron P. Dewees, and put under cultivation, thus 
nearly doubling the area of the farm land, and other valuable improvements 
were made. 

On the night of February 24, 1886, the dwelling-house and school-house 
adjoining it were destroyed by fire, together with nearly all of their contents, 
yet all of the inmates escaped unhurt. During the summer of that year a new 
building was put up at a cost, including the necessary furniture, of about 
$12,500. This house is seventy-five feet in length from north to south, and 
fifty feet in width, two stories high with a basement and attic, warmed by a 
heater in the basement, and was ready for occupancy in the latter part of 
November, 1886, when the school was again opened with twenty-five girls and 
ten boys. A one-story frame building was added to the dwelling-house in 1S90 
for laundry purposes. 

The crops during 1891 "included ninety-two bushels of wheat- from twelve 
acres, two hundred and fifty-si.x bushels of oats from six and one-half acres, 
about one hundred and fifty bushels of shelled corn, and ninety-two bushels of 
buckwheat from eight acres, sixty loads of hay from thirty acres, one hundred 
and ninety bushels of potatoes from two acres, and five hundred bushels tur- 
nips and seventy-five bushels carrots from one and one-half acres. The work 
on the farm as well as the gathering of the crops has chiefly been done by the 
help of the boys, who in this way, and in the necessary care of the live stock, 
obtain many useful lessons in farming, and a training in habits of industr\'; 
while the girls in the performance of much of the work in the family, acquire valu- 



Physical Characteristics. 47 



able instruction in household duties, etc. The total amount of cleared land 
on the farm is about one hundred and ninety-six acres, of which sixty-five 
acres may be considered as under cultivation, and the balance of one hundred 
and thirty-one acres as pasture land, from about fifty acres of which the stumps 
have not yet been removed. The area of the tract, including the woodland, is 
about four hundred and sixty-four acres, some two hundred and twentv-five 
acres having been sold at different times within the last twenty years." 



CHAPTER VI. 
topoc;raphv of Cattaraugus county. 

[By Charles G. Locke, Civil Engineer.] 

IF IT were possible to produce a truthful and authentic history of the suc- 
cessive geological changes through which this country has passed, and the 
interesting incidents connected therewith could be fully described, what a 
volume both of interest and value it would be. No imaginary embellishments 
by ingenious writers would be necessary to give it a warm welcome in ever\- 
library. Yet without this complete knowledge of what has transpired in past 
ages, enough is known at the present day of the structure of the earth, its 
present physical conditions, its unchangeable law of cause and effect, to arri\e 
at reasonably accurate conclusions as to some facts of its past e.xistence. 
Although no branch of knowledge is more interesting than that which teaches 
the physical constitution of the world, no branch has been more neglected. 
If the reader expects that a scientific treatise on this subject is to follow, he 
will be doomed to disappointment. It would not only be inconsistent 
with the nature of this article, but would be another edition of geology, 
which had much better occupy a separate volume. The intention of the 
writer is to give a description of the physical characteristics of that part 
of the great State of New York known as Cattaraugus county, and in doing so 
he is fully aware that he is a follower and not a leader, as several descriptions 
have already been given, and were it not owing to the fact that his life thus 
far has been spent among its hills and valleys, not as one whose business 
confines him to one locality, but as one who has visited nearly every portion 
of the county, measuring thousands of its acres, ascertaining and examining 
many of its physical characteristics either in a professional capacity or out of 
personal desire to become better acquainted with its past history, he would 
not undertake so difficult a task. 

It is the desire of thfe writer to give facts as he understands them, and 
although a follower, as before stated, he must beg leave to differ with his 



History of Cattaraugu.s Countv. 



predecessors u-henever he feels that justice and duty to the subject demand it, 
saying, however, in honor to them, that he fuHy beheves their intentions were 
honest and their endeavors earnest, and if their descriptions were in any way 
misleading, they made them so only through a misunderstanding or miscon- 
ception of their subject. 

Cattaraugus county, lying in the southwestern part of the great State of 
New York, presents to one standing on an eminence a succession of hills and 
valleys. To the careless or thoughtless observer it might seem as if this 
uneven surface was moulded at creation's dawn, when the mighty upheavals of 
the eozoic time gradually grew less and the surface was solidified and became 
as it now exists. The student of science after a careful examination finds that 
this county is rich in all that goes to prove its. past life. He finds its present 
topography dates only back to the post-tertiar\- period, and that its present 
outline was entirely formed during that period, which is the latest in geologi- 
cal time. The different epochs may be traced by a careful examination of the 
contents of the sand pumps of the many oil wells which are being and have 
been drilled in the southern part of the county. In iS88 a well was drilled in 
the town of Little Valley, near what is locally known as Little Rock City, to 
a depth of twenty-seven hundred feet. At twenty-four hundred feet the drill 
encountered what had every appearance, as its fragments were drawn to the 
surface, of the well-known Trenton limestone, being gray in the upper beds 
and black in the lower. At different depths were found valuable specimens of 
brachiopods {spirifcr arciiosiis) and one fossil which appeared to be the liiigiila 
antiqua. It is needless to say these specimens are carefully preserved. This 
county is similar in topography to others known as the southern tier, and lying 
next to the State of Pennsylvania. Nearh- the entire surface of the county 
lies upon the upper members of the New York system of sedimentary rock and 
generally all the series above the Hamilton group and limestone series. It is 
really a vast system of watersheds, whose drainage is at different angles with 
the main streams. 

The Allegheny river is the largest of the main streams which flow through 
the county and drains the most territory'. It enters the county from Pennsyl- 
vania, crossing the south line at a point two miles west from the southeast 
corner and flows north and west to its extreme northern point, which is at 
the junction of Bucktooth creek. Here it takes a southwesterly course and 
leaves the county at a point five miles east from its southwest corner. The 
valley of the river is mostly occupied by the Allegany Indian reservation. 
The hills bordering this valley are- generally high and abrupt, and it is a ■singu- 
lar fact that the valleys of the tributaries of this river present the same feature 
of being bounded by hills almost as precipitous as those along the river itself, 
only that nearer the head waters of these tributaries the mountainous aspect 
becomes modified. This is especially noticeable in case of the Ischua creek, 
where in the town of Machias the hillsides bounding the vallev are no more 



Physical Characteristics. 



49 



than gentle slopes. The country lying along Great Valley creek retains a 
remarkable similarity in appearance to the river valley for a distance of more 
than seventeen miles from its junction with the river, and that of the Little 
Valley creek for about nine miles. The next stream in order of size is the 
Cattaraugus creek, which rises in Wyoming county, and as it flows westerly 
after entering this county it forms the natural boundary between this and Erie 
county. The larger tributaries of this stream pass through valleys whose 
environing hills, although somewhat irregular and broken, are by no means so 
high and abrupt as those bordering the Allegheny and its tributaries, if we 
except that portion of the affluent called the south branch, which passes 
through what is known as Skinner Hollow and on to the main stream. 

In respect to Cattaraugus creek a ver\- interesting chapter might be written, 
but space forbids. The pencil of the artist could best portray its various 
windings through its narrow valley, its boundary sharply defined by perpen- 
dicular cliffs, whose -walls were so well constructed by the artisan of nature. 
Some portions of its course along the northern border of the county are marked 
by alluvial flats, but these are exceptions. By far the larger portion of the 
distance traversed by the creek is noted for strikingly wild and picturesque 
scenery, more especially that portion bordering the creek between the towns of 
Otto in Cattaraugus and Collins in Erie county, where for several miles it flows 
through a gorge whose sides are from one hundred and fifty to three hundred 
feet in height and in places the edge at the top overhangs the sides at the 
bottom. 

The next stream we will notice is the Conewango creek, which term "Con- 
ewango" signifies in Indian phraseology-, " walking slowly." Where is the 
white man who could have given a name more appropriate, and where is the 
stream that walks more slowly for a distance of thirty miles? A part of this 
stream takes its rise in Chautauqua county and is augmented by tributaries 
flowing northerly from the interior of this county into Chautauqua, where 
after winding about in nearly ever}- direction the stream again enters Cattar- 
augus county, and after flowing in a remarkably serpentine course for about 
twenty-six miles it leaves the county at a point only five miles south from 
where it enters. There can be no doubt that the valley of this stream was 
once the bed of an ancient lake and even at the present time the annual over- 
flow of this stream gives to the valley a very lake-like appearance, as thous- 
ands of acres are submerged for a time. 

The valleys in the southern part of the county extend in a northerly and 
southerly direction, while those in the northern part are not confined to any 
particular compass points, being east and west as well as north and south, yet 
the final drainage is northerly in the northern part of the county. Extending 
across the county in an easterly and westerly direction is what is called the 
dividing ridge, which commences in Allegany county and extends westerly far 
into Chautauqua. This high table-land, lying in places at two thousand feet 
7 



HisToRV OF Cattaraugus C(iuxtv. 



above the sea, forms the di\ide between tlie waters flowing into the Cattar- 
augus creek on the north and into the Allegheny on the south. This ridge is 
not a clearly defined continuous extension, but is broken by numerous valleys 
through which flow spring brooks arid small creeks, and many whose waters 
flow northerly take their rise at points far to the south of others whose waters 
flow south from extreme northern points. There are locations along this 
divide where an ordinary sized dwelling might be built with the usual double 
roof, whose northern and southern slopes would shed the rain in such a manner 
that the water falling horn one side would reach the sea at a point more than 
four thousand miles distant from the place where the water which fell from 
the other side would reach it. This table-land was originally covered with a 
heavy growth of deciduous trees intermixed with hemlock and some pine, and 
this same description of the 'original forest would apply to the entire northern 
portion of the county, excepting that the pine was generally found along the 
low-lands. The southern part of the count}- was covered with forests of the 
choicest pine and hemlock, with a mixture of deciduous trees. Here we find 
the home of the white and red oak and chestnut, which apparently did not 
like to cross the dividing ridge, as \ery little of this timber is found in the 
northern part of the county. 

The soil is generally a loam and varies greatly in depth and strength in 
different localities. The hills in the northern part of the county are covered 
with a much darker colored soil than those in the southern part, and perhaps 
for certain cereals the dark soil might be better and more lasting; yet there 
are no better grazing lands in the county than some of the hills lying south of 
the dividing ridge. The soil in the valle)'s is mostly a gra\'elly loam, and with 
proper care is highly producti\-e, and everywhere in the county the land 
sloping toward the north and east is stronger and better for either grass or 
tillage than that facing the south and west, owing to the fact that the prevail- 
ing wind is from west to east and southwest to northeast, carrying leaves and 
fine particles of earth from the western slopes to the eastern and northern, 
thus creating a deeper soil. In winter the snows are blown from the western 
slopes and lodged on the eastern, thus protecting vegetation with its mantle 
of warmth, yet much good land may be found toward the south and west. 

One important physical feature of this county seems to have been ignored 
by the early settlers, and that was its elevation above the ocean. Perhaps it 
was not well understood by them. Their methods of farming would lead us to 
believe that they were ignorant of the fact, as they attempted to pursue the 
same system that was pursued in counties lying in the eastern and central 
portions of the State and more than one thousand feet lower in altitude. 
After vainly trying to make this a winter wheat country, many moved away, 
still clinging to the notion that the trouble was wholly in the soil. Those 
who remained soon learjied that this was a grass country, and adopted a course 
of farming such as nature had so plainly pointed out. 



Physical Characteristics. 51 

The average height of the hills is about two thousand feet above tide, and 
some of the highest points, strange to say, are not on the dividing ridge, but 
south of it. The highest land the writer has ever found in the county is in 
the town of Napoli, on a sub-division of that town known as lot four. The 
view from this point is fine beyond description, and will repav any one the 
work of climbing to the summit. The view is best looking north, west and 
east, as the southern view is somewhat obstructed by a near-b\- forest. From 
observations taken with a transit telescope brought to a level, there was no 
land in sight but what fell below the range of level, and a sight was taken so 
far that the distant highlands of Canada could be faintly discerned across the 
blue expanse of Lake Erie at a point a short distance west of Buffalo. This 
point must be fully twenty-six hundred feet above tide, according to deduc- 
tions made from the levels taken by the Erie railway survey, as much more 
reliability can be placed on this method than by barometric observations. 
There are hills in Great Valley of nearly as great an altitude, and in the 
northeastern part of Mansfield. The lowest point in the county is at the 
northwest corner of the town of Persia, where the Cattaraugus creek, flowinf^ 
northerly into Erie county, ceases to become the northern boundarv of Cattar- 
augus county. This point is about seven hundred and forty feet above the 
sea, and in spring foliage and vegetation are two weeks in advance of that on 
the high lands in the interior. 

As to whether a country possessing such features as above described would 
be preferable for the home of the tiller of the soil to the prairies of the far 
west, taking into account the extra expense of removing the forest and fitting 
the soil for the production of food supply, must be answered by those in occu- 
pancy, and even they are divided on this question. Many in possession of 
good farms here bewail their mistake that they tarried here when the treeless 
prairies with greater inducements invited them there and gave promise of 
greater rewards for less labor; but that is not a question which should take 
much time for discussion in an article like this. Owing to the fact that there 
are now thousands of homes built up in places where a few years ago stood 
the forest trees, and these homes are filled with an intelligent people who have 
by their energy and thrift built institutions of learning all over this land, it 
seems that already proof enough is before us to satisfy each and all that a 
country lying high above the sea and back from the seaports and lakeports of 
the mother State possesses certain powers, when properly developed, to make its 
people prosperous and happy by means created within its own borders and by 
its own people. 



History of Cattaraugus Countv. 



CHAPTER Vn. 



ROCK FOR.MATIOX. PETROLEUNr. 



AMONG men of science it has become the common if not the prevailing 
opinion, that in the beginning all the elements with which we meet 
were in an ethereal or gaseous state; that they were slowly condensed, • 
existing for ages as a heated fluid, by degrees becoming more consistent; that 
the whole earth was once a dense ball of fiery matter; that in the course of 
time it was rendered very compact, and at last became crusted over as the 
process of cooling gradually advanced, and that the interior is still in a molten 
condition. Thus, if the view suggested be correct, the entire planet in its 
earlier phases, as well as the larger part now beneath and within its solid crust, 
was a mass of molten fire, and is known to geologists as elementary or 
molten. Following this came another age, in which the molten mass began 
to cool, and a crust to form, called the igneous period. Contemporaneous with 
the beginning of the igneous period came another epoch. The crust thus 
formed would naturally become surrounded with an atmosphere heavily charged 
with minerals in a gaseous or vaporous condition. As the cooling advanced 
the etherealized matter would condense and seek a lower level, thus coating 
the earth with another rock. This is named the vaporous period. At last, 
however, another age was ushered in, one altogether different from those that 
had preceded it. The moist vapor which must of necessity have pervaded the 
atmosphere began to condense and settle, gathering into the hollows and crev- 
ices of the rocks, until nearly the whole surface of the earth was covered with 
water. This is called the aqueous period. As these waters began to recede, 
and the land began to appear, the long winter that intervened, while the sun 
was obscured by heavy clouds, would cover the earth with mighty ice-floes 
and glaciers, forming a drift or glacial period. 

A great difference also exists in the consolidation and structure of the 
rocks thus formed. The very newest consists of unconsolidated gravel, sand 
and clay, forming alluvium. A little farther down we come to the tertiary 
strata, where are some hardened rocks and others more or less soft. Next 
below the tertiary is found thick deposits, mostly consolidated, but showing a 
mechanical structure along with the crystalline arrangements of the ingredi- 
ents. These are called secondary and transition. Lowest of all are found 
rocks having a decided crystalline structure, looking as if the different min- 
erals of which they are'composed crowded hard upon one another. These rocks 
are called metamorphic, hypozoic, and azoic. 



Geology, Rock Formatiox and Petroleum. 



J. E. Hazard, of Randolph, kindly furnishes the following from the pen of 
Prof. Hall of Albany, New York State Geologist: "The rocks of Cattaraugus 
county are mostly of Chemung age (Upper Devonian). This formation 
constitutes the rocks of the lower portion everywhere in the county. In the 
southern townships, west of the Allegheny river, the highest hills are capped 
by the rocks of the sub-carboniferous age. East of the Allegheny river the 
greater elevation of the hills takes in the base of the coal measures. This 
base of the coal measures is the " Olean conglomerate" (zeral conglomerate) 
millstone grit, the true base of the productive coal measures, below which it 
is useless to look for coal. It is not probable that any coal measures are to 
be found abo\-e it, as no hills rise much higher. Everywhere in the countv, 
so far as I know, all of the rocks have a nearly south dip of thirty to forty 
feet in a mile, and are conformable. There are no elevations high enough 
west of the AUeghen)- ri\-er to catch the Olean conglomerate, but east of the 
river the higher elevations of the hills reach up to and a short distance above 
it, but not enough to catch the productive coal measures' shales. North of 
the river, the northern rise of the rocks carries the entire coal measures above 
the highest hill-tops; and they are capped by rocks of the sub-carboniferous 
age. Below this the Chemung age constitutes the entire rock system. 
Nowhere in the county, so far as I have examined, do the rocks show any 
disturbance or tilting. All of the hills and \alleys are made by erosion of the 
streams which ha\'e swept the missing materials down the main drainage 
streams. The rocks of Randolph and South V^allcy townships are almost 
exclusively of Chemung age; only a few of the highest hills are capped by the 
sub-carboniferous age. The rocks are sand-stones, conglomerates, flags and 
shales with some red bands. The red rock mined by the Elko Mining 
Company is one of these red bands, but its composition here is somewhat 
different from what I have observed in some other localities, where it is of 
coarser texture and more sandy and consequently unfit for paint." 

Kerosene oil, produced by the process of distilling petroleum, has con- 
stantly decreased in cost, and is now the illuminator of the people of nearly 
the whole earth. "It blazes in Polynesia and Cathay; in Burmah, Siam and 
Java the bronzed denizens toil and dream, smoke opium and swallow hasheesh, 
woo and win, love and hate, sicken and die under the rays of this wonderful 
product of our faithful caverns." , 

This wonderful illuminator has been stored away in nature's great maga- 
zine, the bowels of the earth, until the progress in our civilization required' it. 
The Indians of the Seneca nation discovered its existence on Oil Spring reser- 
vation before they ceded the territory of western New York to Robert Morris. 
This reservation is one mile square and lies on the line dividing Cattaraugus 
and Allegany counties, and near the village of Cuba. On this reservation is 
their famous oil spring, which they long prized for its medicinal qualities. The 
Indians gathered the petroleum by spreading a blanket over the surface of the 



54 History of Cattaraugus County. 

spring until it became saturated witii the oil, and then wrung it out and sold 
it as an efficacious medicine, which they properly named "Seneca Oil." 

Petroleum exists in- several localities in Cattaraugus county. The valley of 
Tunaengwant creek, in the town of Carrolton, lies on the northern border of 
the "Bradford oil belt." In 1864 Dr. James Nichols, Henry Renner and 
James Smith leased one thousand acres of land in the vicinity of Limestone 
and sank a well on the Baillett farm. They reached oil at a depth of five 
hundred and seventy feet, but not in paying quantities, probably because they 
did not bore deep enough. It only developed the fact that oil did exist, and, 
strange to say, the project was abandoned. In the fall of 1865 a well was 
sunk by the Hall Farm Petroleum Company, three-fourths of a mile west of 
the village before mentioned. This well, ten hundred and sixty feet deep, 
yielded oil part of one day at the estimated rate of two hundred barrels per 
day, but was ruined by accident before its capacity was fully known. The 
property of this company was purchased by Job Moses, a capitalist from New- 
York, the leading stockholder in the company, who purchased nine thousand 
acres in addition to the Hall tract of twelve hundred, and leased one thousand 
acres besides. 'He bored other wells, but his operations were unsuccessful 
financially. 

The successes of oil producers farther south impressed the people that 
these wells were north of the oil belt. In 1875 an oil company began opera- 
tions on the farm of Hiram Beardsley, on the west side of the creek, and near 
the State line, and another on the farm of William Beardsley, also near the 
State line. These wells when completed proved to be remunerative. New 
companies, or combinations, were formed by the impulse given by this success, 
and in a few months a forest of derricks covered the upper part of the valley 
in Carrolton. In the fall of 1878 there had been two hundred and fifty wells 
bored in the town. The Eureka and the Irvine F"arm Companies, each pro- 
ducing one hundred and fifty barrels per day, were the most prolific. These 
have gradually diminished in production to but a few barrels. Many of these 
wells are pumped daily, although the average yield probably does not exceed 
three or four barrels each. In the town of Allegany, a large number of 
producing oil wells have been drilled, which aggregated about twelve hundred 
barrels daily. The production is now pretty well exhausted. Wells have 
been drilled at Rock City, and on Whig street in Little Valley, where gas 
and a show of oil was found. Oil has also been found on Cattaraugus creek, 
at or near the little hamlet of Zoar. Several wells there produce large quan- 
tities of gas. Wells bored near Salamanca have produced gas only. 



Organization" of the County. 55 



CHAPTER VIII. 

(ORGANIZATION OF THE COUNTY, AND CHANGES IN CIYIL JURISDICTION. 

CATTARAUGUS county is situated in the southern tier of counties of 
the State of New York and with the exception of Chautauqua, is the 
most southwestern county of the State. It is bounded on the north 
b}' Erie and \\'\-oming counties, on the east by Allegany county, on the south 
by the State of Pennsylvania, and on the west b\- Chautauqua county. It 
contains an area of thirteen hundred and thirty-four square miles, and is two 
hundred and sixt\- miles from the State capital in nearly a western direction. 

Cattaraugus county was formed b\- an act of the Legislature of the State 
of New York, March 11, 1808, from territon,- taken from Genesee county, and 
e.xisted on paper only until 181 7. The territory of the county, by the act of 
its formation, was provisionally annexed to Niagara county, and was to remain 
a part of said county until there were within the borders of Cattaraugus county 
five hundred taxable inhabitants, qualified to vote for member of Assembly, 
and that thereafter the said territory should be organized as a separate county. 

Eor judicial purposes, and the convenience of such of the inhabitants in 
the eastern part of the new count}- as were obliged to "tend court," the east- 
ern half of Cattaraugus county was annexed to Allegany county, by an act fo 
the Legislature passed June 12, 1812. We quote the following portion of this 
act: "All of that portion of the said county of Cattaraugus lying and situated 
east of the east boundary line of the seventh range of townships of the Hol- 
land Company's lands in the said county of Cattaraugus, shall be annexed to, 
and is hereby considered as a part of, the county of Allegany, for all purposes 
whatsoever." 

The act of the Legislature dated March 11. 1808, forming this county, also 
erected its entire territory into a town which was named Olean. June 16, 
181 2, the Legislature confirmed the resolution of the voters of the town, passed 
at a special town meeting held for the purpose on May 16, preceding, dividing 
the town on a line between the third and fourth townships and creating the 
town of Ischua, which comprised that part on the north side of said line, 
Olean to remain and embrace the part south of the line. 

April 13, 1 8 14, the Legislature formed the town of Perry from the west part 
of the towns of Olean and Ischua, on the line between the sixth and seventh 
ranges of townships.* 

The county having acquired its requisite number of taxable inhabitants, 

♦This Is a part of the provisions of the same act that atinexed the eastern half of the county to Allegany. 



56 History of Cattarmu^us County. 

(five hundred), qualified to vote for members of the Assembly, the county was 
duly organized by " an act organizing the county of Cattaraugus," passed 
March 26, 18 17, which declared "That the freeholders and the inhabitants of 
Cattaraugus county shall have and enjoy the rights, powers and privileges 
which the freeholders and inhabitants of any other county in this State are 
by law entitled to have and enjoy." Since then Cattaraugus county has 
remained a separate '' body politic." 

A commission composed of Jonas Williams, Isaac Sutherland and Asa 
Ransom was appointed to locate a county seat, and they selected the site of 
the present village of Ellicottville, which was determined upon as the most 
eligible, and to mark the spot a large iron-wood post was there erected. 

The territory now em'braced in the limits of Cattaraugus county prior to 
its erection into a separate county, like most other uninhabited and new 
countries, has been subjected to numerous civil and municipal changes. In 
1683 the Colonial Assembly of New York erected the twelve original counties : 
Albany, Cornwall, Dukes, Dutchess, Kings, New York, Orange, Queens, 
Richmond, Suffolk, Ulster and Westchester. Under the so\-ereigns, William 
and Mary, in 169 1, these counties were reconstructed and Albany county 
included "the manor of Rensselsrswyck, Schenectada, and all the villages, 
neighborhoods and Christian plantations on the east side of the Hudson river 
from Roeloff Jansen's creek, and on the west side from Sawyer's creek to the 
outmost end of Saraghtoga." Later acts extended its boundaries so as to 
include all of New York to its northern and western limits. Tryon county 
was erected from Albany in 1772, and included all of the province west of the 
Delaware river, and a line draA\n northwardly through Schoharie, and along 
the eastern boundaries of Montgomery, Fulton and Hamilton, and continuing 
thence north to the line of Canada. In 1784 the name was changed to Mont- 
gomery in honor of the hero of the battle of Quebec. 

In 1788 White's Town was formed in the western part of Montgomery 
county, and was bounded " Easterly by a line running north and south to the 
north and south bounds of the State, and crossing the Mohawk river at the 
ford near and on the east side of the house of William Cunningham (in Genesee 
street, Utica), and which line is the western boundary of the towns of 
Herkimer, German Flats and Otsego; southerly by the State of Pennsyl- 
vania, and west and north by the bounds of the State." 

Cattaraugus county's territory underwent another change in 1789, when 
Ontario county was erected from the western part of Montgomery (and the 
western part of Whitestown), and contained all of Allegany, Cattaraugus, 
Chautauqua, Erie, Genesee, Livingston, Monroe, Niagara, Ontario, Orleans, 
Steuben, Wyoming, Yates and a part of Schuyler and Wayne. 

The town of Northampton in Ontario county was formed of all the 
territory of the Holland Purchase, the Morris Reserve and the Mill Seat Tract. 
March 30, 1802, Genesee county was formed from the town of Northampton. 



Settlements and Improvements. 57 



CHAPTER IX. 
early settlements and internal improvements. 

ADAM HOOPS, January 30, 1803, contracted with the Holland Land 
Company for about twenty thousand acres of land lying in townships 
No. 4 of the second and third ranges, No. i and No. 2 in the fourth 
range. No. i and No. 2 iq the fifth range, and No. 2 in the si.xth range. 
Major Hoops was a bachelor and had served in the Revolutionary war, and 
vyas influenced to make the purchase by his nephew, Adam Hoops, Jr., who 
had been employed as a surveyor by the Holland Land Company. As will 
be seen at a glance at the map of the county, that part of his purchase in the 
second range of townships lies in Allegany county, and all that part in 
Cattaraugus county, except township No. 4 in range three, lies mainly in the 
valley of the Allegheny river and includes the flourishing village of Olean. 

A settlement was commenced in 1804 at Olean Point by David Heuston, 
who was associated in the land purchase with Major Hoops and Robert 
Hoops, who was the agent of his brother, Adam Hoops. Mr. Heuston was 
accidentally killed in 1807, while engaged in jjetting out timber for spars. In 
consequence of his early death, Mr. Heuston did not become very much 
identified with the new settlement. Major Hoops was attracted to the loca- 
tion by reason, as he suppo.sed, that it was situated at the head of steamboat 
navigation on the Allegheny river, and was an important point in transit from 
the east to the undeveloped west and southwest, a supposition that was never 
realized to any extent. It is true that until the completion of the Erie canal 
emigrants in considerable numbers came to Olean in time of high water to 
take the easier and cheaper way to Cincinnati, en route to the Western 
Reserve in Ohio, by working their way as helpers on the numerous lumber 
rafts that descended the Allegheny, when its banks were filled with the 
melting snow and heavy spring rains. There were times, the writer is informed, 
when the population of Olean was temporarily more than doubled by 
emigrants who had arrived too soon for a "rise" in the river, and on one 
occasion at least two thousand were there, hoping for water to float them 
away. Then even the "Old Boat House" kept by mine host, Ebenezer Reed 
(who had a snug little family of only twenty-four children!), was not long 
enough to shelter them all. They were distributed around where they could 
find entertainment, and when every house was filled shanties were built of 
boards for temporary 'use. Much hardship and suffering was endured at these 
times, and pork sold for $50 per barrel and flour brought $25. 
8 



58 History of Cattaraugus County. 

In 1807 the Allegheny river was by authority of law made a public high- 
way, and that year Jedediah Strong, Bibbins Follett and Dr. Bradley ran the 
first raft from Olean Point dov\n the Allegheny to Pittsburg. This successful 
enterprise induced other lumbermen to try the new waterway and lumbering 
became for many years the leading business of the people of Cattaraugus 
county. This industry increased until 300,000,000 feet annually floated upon 
the face of the Allegheny to Pittsburg. Necessity compelled those engaged 
in this business to purchase supplies at Pittsburg, which were brought up the 
river in flat-boats. This laborious process of going against the current was so 
expensive that the cost of transportation of one hundred pounds of merchan- 
dize from Pittsburg to Olean was Si. 25, while from Olean down the river to 
Pittsburg it was done for twelve and one-half cents. 

The settlement made under the auspices of Adam Hoops and David Heus- 
ton at Olean did not increase rapidly, although their lands were offered for 
sale on very reasonable terms and at a moderate price, as were the lands of 
the Holland Land Company. The settlements at first were made within the 
belt of the pine lands with the exception of the McClure settlement, (the site 
of the village of Franklinville,) and perhaps because lumbering was the lead- 
ing business little attention was given to the herculean task of clearing away 
the hea\-y forest. The early settlers here as in other new countries were with- 
out means, and the offer of remunerative wages in the mills and lumber woods 
offered quicker pa\- than could be realized by the slow and laborious process 
of clearing and then waiting for a crop to grow. Besides, no bright young 
man thought himself accomplished until he had mastered the intricacies of 
ri\er na\-igation of rafts and was known as an e.xpert pilot. Another and seri- 
ous hindrance to the growth of the pioneer settlement was occasioned by the 
inability of Mr. Hoops to give titles in fee to his lands, which were encumbered 
by mortgages to the Holland Land Company. It is related by a preceding 
historian (Everts) that John King, of the King settlement, urged as a reason 
why the fertile bottom lands lying in the valley of the Allegheny river were 
so slowly settled, was the ready facilities that the river afforded for removal 
and getting away from the country ; that when the discouragementsinci- 
dent to a new country o\'ertook them they could step aboard of a flat-boat 
or raft and glide with the current away from the scene of their hardships, and 
begin again in some imaginary better country, only to be again disappointed. 
Those who had energy and courage, and came to stay, and possibly a few 
who were too poor to remove, had reason to congratulate themselves years 
later that they stayed and prospered. 

In 1814, ten years after the' settlement was made, the total population of 
the county was only 537. In 1820, 4,000; 1830, 16,724; 1840,28,872; 1850, 
38,950; 1860,43,886; 1870,43,909; 1 880, 53,806; and in 1890, 60,866. 

The pioneers who came and cleared up their farms, built school-houses, 
highways and bridges, had a hard time without a doubt. They were hampered 



Settlements axu Improvements. 59 

with poverty, had bad roads, or no roads at all, and no markets, nor but little 
to sell. About the only commodity that sold for money was black salts, 
manufactured by leaching the ashes from the burned timber and boiling the 
lye until it became a solid substance. The hunters deri\'ed an income for 
killing wolv-es, which were an annoyance to the settlers and a terror to domes- 
tic animals. A bounty of sixty dollars per head was paid for wolf scalps, and 
some of the lucky Nimrods of the early days drove a thriving business in 
hunting them. The forests then abounded in game; bears, deer, and land and 
water birds were here in profusion. The rivers and brooks were filled with 
speckled trout and other delicious fish. All of these have disappeared before 
the march of all-conquering civilization. 

As food, clothing and shelter are imperative necessities in civilized life, the 
first care after the settlements of the several towns of the county was the 
erection of grist-mills to reduce the farmers' grain to meal, saw-mills to cut 
lumber, and wool-carding and cloth-dressing mills to furnish clothing. The 
wool-carding and cloth-dressing establishments took the farmers' wool, 
prepared it for spinning, then received it from the hands of the busy house- 
wives, after they had woven it into flannel, and fulled, dyed and pressed it 
into completed " homespun." 

It is true, the early settlers had the hardships of pioneer life, but they were 
not without enjoyment. While they worked hard and lived plain, the 
demands of society were few. All were poor alike, and no caste existed. 
They. were often called together at "raisings and bees," when the entire neigh- 
borhood in a circuit of several miles, including both sexes, was all there. 
When the ladies of the day assembled at their quiltings they deemed it abso- 
lutely necessary to partake of their " toddy " at every roll of the quilt. All 
went well until after the third rolling, when their tongues were usually swifter 
than their needles, and they resolved the meeting into a committee of the 
whole for the good of the neighborhood. On one of these occasions a good 
old lady was so much interested in the meeting that she unconsciously departed 
for home with her bonnet hindside before. In those early days spirituous 
liquors were considered a necessity in every family. It was then used to keep 
out cold and to keep out heat. It was necessary at raisings, bees, quiltings, 
parties, weddings, neighborly visits, funerals, sheep washing, butchering, and 
to entertain the minister when he called to inquire of the spiritual welfare of 
his parishioners. 

If these early pioneers did not find their lands ready cleared, as do the 
pioneers on the western prairies, the first tree they cut was generally used 
towards building a snug log house, which they made warm and comfortable. 
W^hen they had their house completed, they had this advantage of the man on 
the prairie, that they owed no one for their humble domicile, and besides had 
made a small clearing'. They went slow, but had the satisfaction of seeing the 
forests disappear year by year, and their cleared land correspondingly increase. 



6o HisroRV OF Cattaraugus County. 

As soon as they had a few acres cleared the fertile virgin soil supplied their 
wants, and by a generous plan of the Holland Land Company, who gave them 
more than the current price for their surplus cattle, they were able to gain a 
clear title to their farms, although it generally required years of toil to support 
and raise their families and accomplish it. 

The navigation of the Allegheny river by rafts down the current, and by 
flat-boats both up and down, is the only use that has been made of this 
beautiful waterway as a bearer of burdens ; although one small steamer, on 
one occasion, ascended as far as Olean. 

The completion of the Erie canal in 1825, connecting Buffalo with New- 
York, opened to emigrants a new region embraced in the State of Michigan, 
and in Northern Ohio and Northern Indiana, by way of the canal and Lake 
Erie, and virtually closed the Allegheny river route for west-bound emigration. , 
This had the effect to shock the sensibilities and to dispel the illusion of all 
such as had so long considered that the route of the Allegheny river, west- 
ward, was superior to all others. The advocates of this river as a \-aluable 
waterway next bent their energies to connect it by a canal with the Erie at 
Rochester. The friends of the measure kept the project before the State 
Legislature until finally a petition of twenty-five hundred of the inhabitants 
of the city of New York, and resolutions passed by the American Institute 
and the common councils of New York and Brooklyn strongly recommending 
its construction, influenced the Legislature to order a survey of the route in 
1834 and the commencement of the Genesee Valley canal in 1836. It was 
finally completed in 1856. Again the inhabitants of Olean entertained high 
expectations of soon seeing their little village swell to the size of an imposing- 
inland city. The canal was completed to Olean in 1856. By the efforts and 
great influence of Hon. Samuel J. Mersereau, late of Portville, the canal was 
extended to the hamlet of Millgrove, and was there connected with the 
Allegheny river. The canal was continued until 1878, when it was closed and 
abandoned by the State. It never realized but a small fraction of what its 
friends expected of it, and never returned to the State but a small part of 
what it cost for repa'rs. 

April 24, 1832, the Legislature of the State of New York granted a charter 
to Samuel Swarthwout, Stephen Whitney and their associates, representing 
the New York and Erie Railroad Company, to construct a railroad from New 
York city through the southern tier of counties in this State, passing through 
Ovvego, in Tioga county, to Lake Erie. The preliminary surveys were com- 
menced in 1834, and finally fixed the western terminus at Dunkirk. In the 
spring of 1836 the only portion of the whole line which was located without 
a possible doubt was between the mouth of the Callicoon and Deposit. This 
section was then put under contract for construction. Such were the 
discouraging natural impediments to overcome that nearly all of the remain- 
ing line was changed (some of it several times) from the original survey. The 



Ui't:.\i-\G OF iiiH Ekiii Raii.ruau. 6i 



company was insolvent in 1842, and obliged to suspend payment, and its 
affairs went into the hands of assignees. The State, under certain conditions, 
had by an act passed April 25, 1838, granted the company a loan of $3,000,000. 
In 1845 the State released its lien upon the road for its three millions on 
condition that the company would complete the road by May i, 1851. The 
company was successful in obtaining the necessary funds, and the road was 
completed to Dunkirk early in April, 1851, and the directors made their first 
excursion over the division from Hornellsville to that city April 22. A 
correspondent of the New York B.vcning Post, who was one of the party, thus 
reported the incidents of the journey.: "At Cuba the con\'oy reached the 
untried and entirely new portion of the road. The distance thence to Dunkirk, 
on Lake Erie, is seventy-nine miles. As the train passed various sections of 
the road, the resident and superintending engineers and contractors joined 
the party. At Olean the rushing waters of the Allegheny met their view, 
covered with rafts floating on the great Father of Waters, and on its banks 
gathered in groups the wondering children of the forest. For several miles 
the road follows its banks through the Indian reservation, and the Indians, 
whose attention was arrested by the shrill whistle of the locomotive, as it 
thundered through their hitherto quiet domain, gazed with a sort of melan- 
choly interest. There were no expressions of surprise in their countenances 
at the rude disturbers of their peace, the precursor of their fate, the extermin- 
ator of their race — the genius of mechanism. Throughout the whole valley, 
called ' Little Valley,' the eye and attention are deeply interested, and the 
exclamation ' Look! Look!' was constant. 

"At Dayton, twenty miles more beyond, we came in \iew of Lake Erie, 
lying before us and extending as far as the eye can reach. As the party 
caught the first glimpse of the lake three hearty cheers broke from the 
directors, engineers, contractors and the entire company of guests." 

The final and triumphant celebration occurred on May 15, 185 1. The 
following notable guests passed over the entire line with the officers of the 
company and others: Millard Fillmore, president of the United States; 
Daniel Webster, secretary of state, and all the other members of the 
president's cabinet; Washington Hunt, governor of New York, and other 
State officers. The people turned out 01 masse along the entire length of 
road and greeted the party on..the train with bands of music and the booming 
of cannon, and made it a day of general rejoicing. 

Up to this time Cattaraugus county had no means of reaching the markets 
of the eastern cities, and what little surplus in agricultural products the 
farmers produced was nearly consumed by the cost of hauling it to Buffalo 
with their teams, which required four or five days to make the round trip 
under favorable circumstances. This railroad has proved to be the main 
artery of commerce foj the county, and has added millions to its valuation, 
and has infused life, activity and energy into every branch of business. 



62 History of Cattaraugus Countv. 

The New York & Erie railroad was constructed under its charter name, 
and soon after its completion it was changed to that of the Erie railroad, by 
which cognomen it was known until it again went into the hands of a receiver 
and passed to the present proprietors, with the name again changed to New 
York, Lake Erie & Western railroad ; but is more generally known under its 
old name, "The Erie." This road and the leading thoroughfare of this county 
enters the county at the northeast corner of the town of Hinsdale and follows 
down the valleys of Oil and Olean creeks to the village of Olean, thence down 
the valley of Allegheny river, through the towns of Allegheny, Carrolton and 
Great Valley to Salamanca. From the village of West Salamanca its line is 
through the town of Little Valley, across the extreme southwest corner of 
Mansfield, through New Albion, the south part of Persia, the northeast part of 
Dayton, where it makes a junction with the Buffalo & Southwestern Division, 
and leaves the count}- about mid-way on the west line of the town of 
Perrysburg. 

The successful completion of the Erie railroad seemed to inspire the people 
of the western part of this county and the inhabitants of Chautauqua county 
with enterprise and a spirit for improvement. A meeting was held in James- 
town on June 27, 185 1, to favor the project of constructing a railroad 
connecting with the Erie at the village of West Salamanca, and passing 
through Randolph and Jamestown to the city of Erie, Pa. Several meetings 
were held, which resulted in the organization of a company under the name 
of the Erie & New York City railroad. Funds were raised by subscription 
and by bonding the towns along the line, (jround was broken for its 
construction at Randolph, May 19, 1853. This worth}- enterprise dragged 
along for lack of funds, with the last dollar expended, until 1858, and the 
road not completed, when Sir Morton Peto, the head of an English company 
of capitalists, purchased the road and it became a part of the "Atlantic & 
Great Western Railwa}-," and was completed in 1861. In 1S64 its junction 
with the Erie road was extended from West Salamanca to Salamanca. It is 
now known by the name of the New York, Pennsylvania & Ohio. This 
railroad is leased by the New York, Lake Erie & Western, and forms a part of 
the Western Division of that company's grand system, commonly known as 
the " Nypano" Division of the Erie railroad. , 

The Buffalo & Pittsburg Railroad Company was organized for the purpose 
of connecting the city of Buffalo with the coal fields of Pennsylvania. It 
received its charter and the work of construction was commenced in 1852. 
Quite an amount of grading was done, but for want of means the project was 
abandoned. March 14, 1856, the Buffalo & Bradford railroad was chartered. 
On the 22d of March, 1859, ^^^ ^^^''^ railroads above named were consolidated 
with the name of Buffalo, Bradford & Pittsburg railroad, and were completed 
from Carrolton to Bradford, Pa., about 1865." 

Later this company, through the Eric managers, extended their road to 



Other Railroad Lines axd Changes. 



Buttsville, and the Erie continued the line to Johnsonsburgh, where it con- 
nects with the Pennsylvania railroad lines. The Buffalo & Pittsburg is leased 
by the Erie and the whole line from Salamanca to Johnsonsburgh, Pa., is 
known as the Bradford Division of the New York, Lake Erie & Western. 

The Buffalo & Southwestern railroad now forms a part of the Erie system. 
It was chartered in 1872, as the Buffalo & Jamestown railroad, and com- 
pleted in July, 1875. The road was sold at auction in September, 1877, on a 
judgment issued by the Supreme Court, to a committee representing the 
Farmers' Loan & Trust Company of Buffalo. The committee made one and 
the only bid, and the road was struck off to the company at its bid of one 
million dollars. The name was changed to the Buffalo & Southwestern Divis- 
ion of the Erie. The road enters the county at the village of Gowanda, in the 
town of Persia, crosses the extreme southeast corner of the town of Perrys- 
burg and travels diagonally across the town of Dayton to near the southwest 
corner, where it passes into Chautauqua county. In its course it again enters 
Cattaraugus county, in Conewango, and after traversing that town over five 
miles it again enters Chautauqua county and passes on to Jamestown. 

Besides the New York, Lake Erie & Western railroad and its branches, 
which in Cattaraugus county have a center in Salamanca, another important 
thoroughfare to this county is the Western New York & Pennsylvania rail- 
road, which has its center in the county at Olean. This road was chartered in 
1865, and completed about 1874. It connects Buffalo with Emporium, Pa., 
and connects with the Pennsylvania railroad system, and opens a way to the 
coal and iron districts and the great hemlock belt. The road was built largely 
with Buffalo capital, and opens a large portion of productive countr\- to the 
trade in Buffalo. The coal and lumber tonnage on this road is very large. 

The Rochester Division of the Western New York & Pennsylvania leaves 
the main track at the village of Hinsdale, and is built along the bed of the 
abandoned Genesee Valley canal, and terminates at Rochester. The Olean 
and Oil City Division of this road passes from Olean down the valley of the 
Allegheny river to Oil City. 

The Olean, Bradford & Warren, a narrow gauge railroad, was chartered in 
July, 1877, and completed February i, 1878. It gains an altitude of one 
thousand feet in a distance of five miles. This project originated in the mind 
of Hon. Charles S. Gary, who was its first president. The road is owned by 
the Western New York & Pennsylvania. 

The Rochester & State Line Railroad Company was organized in 1867, and 
was intended to connect Rochester with Salamanca, passing through the towns 
of Le Roy, Warsaw, Machias, and Ellicottville. In August, 1872, arrange- 
ments were made with the Cattaraugus Railway Company, and the road was 
completed from Machias to Salamanca, and was re-organized as the Rochester 
& Pittsburg. It again changed ownership and is now the Buffalo, Rochester 
& Pittsburg railroad. 



64 History of Cattaraugus County. 

The Buffalo Di\-ision of the Buffalo, Rochester & Pittsburg enters the 
county at the north line of Ashford, and passes through that town into 
Ellicottville, where it forms a junction with the Rochester Division at Ashford 
Junction. The Rochester Division enters the county from Rochester near 
the northeast corner of Freedom, crosses the track of the Western New York 
& Pennsylvania railroad at Machias Junction and unites with the Buffalo 
Division at Ashford Junction. From Ashford Junction the company runs 
regular trains to Punxsutawney, Pa., passing through Ellicottville, Great 
Valley, Salamanca, Carrolton, Limestone, in this county, and Bradford, Pa., to 
its terminus. On the return of passenger trains to Ashford Junction, trains 
are prepared simultaneously and start immediately for their respective desti- 
nations, Rochester and Buffalo. 

Lackawanna & Pittsburg is the present nam.e of the narrow gauge railroad 
that extends from Olean to Bolivar. It was chartered under the name of 
Lackawanna & Southwestern railroad. 



CHAPTER X. 



CIVIL LISTS. EDUCATIONAL. RLLIOIOX. CARE OE THE POOR. 

MEAHSERS HE Co.vORESS. — Timothy H. Porter, [S25-27; Staley K. 
Clarke, 1841-43; Asher Tyler, 1843-45 ; Frederick S. Martin, 1S51-53; 
Dr. Henry \'an Aernam, 1865-69 and 1879-81 ; Nelson L Norton, 
1875-77; William G. Laidlaw, 1890-92. 

State Sen.\T0RS. — The Senate of the State of New York consists of thirty- 
two members who are elected in November of every alternate odd numbered 
year, and hold their offices for two years from the first of January next suc- 
ceeding. The State is divided into thirty-two districts, each electing one sen- 
ator. The senators receive the annual salary of §1,500 and also one dollar for 
each ten miles traveled in going to or returning from the place of meeting 
once in each session. Ten dollars per da}- in addition is allowed when the 
Senate alone is convened in extraordinary session, or when acting as a court for 
the trial of impeachments. The lieutenant-go\'ernor is cx-officio president of 
the Senate, and has the casting vote therein. 

Cattaraugus and Chautauqua counties comprise the Thirty-Second District. 
Those who have represented it from Cattaraugus county are: Timothy H. 
Porter, one year in 1823, and 1828-31 (then the 8th District): Chauncey J. 
Fox, (filled vacancy) in 1835, was elected 1836-39 (8th District); Thomas J. 
Wheeler, 1846-47 (old 6th District); .Frederick S. Martin, 1848-49; Robert 



State Senators and Assemblymen. 65 

Owen, 1850-51; Roderick White, 1856 (died in office); John P. Darhng, 
1857 (filled vacancy), and served in 1858-59; Horace C. Young, 1862-63; 
Norman M. Allen, 1864-65; Allen D. Scott, 1870-71; Norman M. Allen, 
1872-73; Albert G.. Dow, 1874-75; Commodore P. Vedder, 1876-77 and 
1884-91 ; James T. Edwards, 1892-93. 

Members of Assembly. — The Assembly consists of one hundred and 
twenty-eight members, who are elected annually by districts. Each county 
is entitled to at least one mem.ber. Their compensation is $1,500 per annum 
and one dollar for each ten miles traveled in going to and returning from the 
place of meeting, once in each session. Should they be called upon to serve 
as managers of an impeachment, like the senators in such service, they are 
entitled to ten dollars per day additional. The Assembly chooses its officers 
at the opening of the session. 

From the formation of Cattaraugus county until 1822, Cattaraugus, Chau- 
tauqua and Niagara counties formed but one Assembly district, and was 
represented by a single representative until 1815, when the district was allowed 
two representatives. This continued until Cattaraugus county became a 
separate Assembly district, with but one assemblyman, until 1836, when 
under the new apportionment it was entitled to two representatives. In 1892 
it was again reduced to but one representative. 

In 1814-15 Joseph McClure represented the district composed of the three 
counties first named. Those named in the list following represented Cattar- 
augus county after it became a separate Assembly district: 

Stephen Crosby, 1823; Phineas Spencer, 1824; Daniel Flodges, 1825; 
James McGlashen, 1826; John A. Bryan, 1827; James McGlashen, 1S2S; 
Elavil Partridge, 1829; Stephen Crosby, 1830; Ru.sscll C. Mubbard, 1831; 
George A. S. Crooker, 1832, 1839-40; Chauncey J. Vox, 1833-34; Albert 
G. Burke, 1835; David Day, 1836; Tilly Gilbert and Phineas Spencer, 
1837; Nelson Green and Timothy H. Porter, 1838; George A. S. Crooker 
and Mollis Scott, 1839; Timothy H. Porter and G. A. S. Crooker, 1840; 
Alonzo Hawley and Chester Howe, 1841 ; Samuel Barrows and Lewis P. 
Thorp, 1842; Alonzo Hawley and Elijah A. Rice, 1843; James Burt and 
Marcus H. Johnson, 1844; Roderick White and Seth Field, 1845; Gideon 
Searle and E. A. Rice, 1846; Rufus Crowley and Joseph E. Weeden, 1847; 
James G. Johnson and Marcus H. Johnson, 1848; S. R. Crittenden and Horace 
C.Young, 1849; f". S. Martin and Horace C. Young, 1850; A. A. Gregory 
and William J. Nelson, 185 i ; S. S. Cole and Alexander Sheldon, 1852; Daniel 
Hicko.x and M. H. Baker, 1853; William H.Wood and James Kirkland, 1854; 
Alexander Storrs and James Kirkland, 1855; L. D. Cobb and Daniel Buck- 
lin, 185b; Alanson King and Rufus Crowley, 1857; Henry Van Aernam and 
William Buffington, Jr., 1858; Marsena Baker and William Buffington, Jr., 
1859; Ulysses P. Crane and James M. Smith, i860; Nelson I. Norton and 
Franklin Philbrick, 1861 ; Andrew L. Allen and Addison G. Rice, 1862; 

9 



66 History of Cattaraugus County. 

Andrew L. Allen and Albert G. Dow, 1863; Smith Parish and Albert G. Dow, 
1864; William P. Angel and E. Curtiss Topliff, 1865-; William McVey and E. 
Curtiss Topliff, 1866; Heman G. Button and W^illiam E. Hunt, 1S67; Jonas 
K. Button and E. Curtiss Topliff, 1868; William H. Stuart and C. V. B. Barse, 
1869; George N. West and Stephen C. Greene, 1870; Stephen C. Greene and 
Claudius Y. B. Barse, 1871 ; Commodore P. Vedder and Enoch Holdridge, 
1872; C. P. Vedder and John Manley, 1874; C. P. Vedder and Samuel Scud- 
der, 1875; Harrison Cheney and Edgar Shannon, 1876; Thomas J. King and 
Edgar Shannon, 1877; Thomas J. King and Simeon V. Pool, 1878: Wm. F. 
Wheeler and Simeon \". Pool, 1879; Charles P. Ingersoll and James Prender- 
gast, 1880; Zenas G. Bullock and J. Miller Congdon, 1881; Samuel H. Brad- 
ley and J. M. Congdon, 1882; Elisha M. Johnson and Elijah R. Schoonmaker, 
1883; Charles S. Gary and Elijah R. Schoonmaker, 1884; Frederick W. Kruse 
and Eugene A. Nash, 1885 and 1886; Frederick W. Kruse and Erastus S. 
Ingersoll, 1887 and 1S8S; Harrison Chcne\' and James S. \\"hipple, 1889; 
Burton B. Lewis and James S. Whipple, 1890; Burton B. Lewis and James S. 
Whipple, 1891 ; William E.Wheeler and Solon S. Laing, 1892: William E. 
Wheeler, only, 1893. 

County Jui;)(;ks. — L'ntil the change in the constitution of the State in 
1846 the presidhig officer of the county courts was styled "First Judge," and 
officiated by appointment. Since that date the office of count}- judge has 
been elective by the voters of the county. 

First Jjidgcs. — Elijah Miller, appointed March 13, 1817 (did not serve); 
Timothy. H. Porter, March 28, 1817; James Adkins, June i. 1S20; Alson 
Leavenworth, January 25, 1823; and Benjamin Chamberlain, February 15, 1833. 

County Judges, and li'Iicn elected. — Rensselaer Lamb,' June, 1847: Chester 
Howe, November, 1851; Nelson Cobb, November, 1855; Allen D. Scott, 
November, 1859, appointed, I'iee Cobb, removed from the county: William 
Woodbury, November, 1859; David H. Bofles, November, 1S63; Rensselaer 
Lamb, appointed January, t866; Samuel S. Spring, November, 1S70; William 
H. Henderson, appointed, vice Spring, deceased; Allen D. Scott, elected to 
fill vacancy, November, 1875. He was elected for a full term in November, 
1876, and succeeded by O. S. Vreeland, the present judge of the county. 

District Attorneys. — John A. Bryan, 1818; Timothy H. Porter, 18 19; 
Samuel S. Haight, 1822. The dates following are when the officers qualified: 
Timothy H. Porter, June 16, 1824; John A. Bryan, June 19,1827; Anson 
Gibbs, October 13, 1829; James Burt, October 10,1834; Daniel Reed Wheeler, 
February 5, 1841 ; William Pitt Angel, February 7, 1844; William H. 
Wood, December 23, 1850; Alexander Sheldon, November 29, 1853; W'illiam 
Pitt Angel, January 3, 1857; Samuel S. Spring, elected November, 1859; 
Merrill T. Jenkins, elected November. 1865; William G. Laidlaw, November, 
1871 ; Frank W. Stevens, November, 1878; George M. Rider, 1884; and James 
H. W'aring, present incumbent. 



Civil Officers of the County. 67 

Surrogates. — Jeremy Wooster, appointed March 28, 1817, and Febru- 
ary 12, 1821; Walter Wood, June i, 1820; Moses Beecher, April 16, 1830; 
Robert H. Shankland, February- 9, 1838, and 1847. The duties of this 
office by the amended constitution devolved on the judge of the county 
at the close of Mr. Shankland's term, until 1857, ^^hen the county had 
a population of more than 40,000, when Allen D. Scott was appointed to 
the office April 28, 1857, and was elected to the position in November, 
1861. His successors are Arunah Ward, elected in November, 1865 ; William 
Manley, November, i'869; James D. McVey, November, 1873; Hudson 
Ansley, October 14, 1879, succeeded by Alfred Spring, January i, 1880; 
Charles D. Davie, present incumbent. 

Sheriffs. — The sheriff^ for the county were appointed until 1822. Since 
then the office has been filled by election except in cases of vacancy occurring 
in unexpired terms. Israel Curtis, appointed March 28, 1817; Benjamin 
Chamberlain, February 17^ 1820, and February 12, 1821, and elected 1825; 
Jacob Downing, June i, 1820; Ebenezer Lockwood, 1822; Henry Saxton, 
1828; Henry Wooster, appointed, January 19, 1831, in place of Mr. Saxton, 
resigned; John Hurlburt, appointed in place of Mr. W^ooster, deceased; 
Samuel Barrows, 1831; Abram Searle, 1834-40; Richard Wright, 1837; 
George W\ White, 1843 : John Palmer, appointed in place of White, deceased ; 
Alonzo A. Gregory, 1846, 1852 and 1858; Addison Crowley, 1849 ^""^ '855 : 
Benjamin McLean, November, 1861; Richard Welch, November, 1864; Will- 
iam Cooper, Jr., November, 1867; William M. Brown, November, 1870 
William W. Henry, November, 1873; George L. Winters, November, 1876 
Gilbert L. Mosher, November, 1879; John Little, Jr., November, 1882 
Adclbert E. Darrow, November, 18S5; M. N. Pratt. November, 1888; William 
B. Hughes, November, 1891. 

COUN'TV Clerks. — The dates given are the time the clerks began the 
duties of the office. Sands Bbuton, May 28. 1817, and January i, 1823; 
Ebenezer Lockwood, July 21, 1820; Joseph McClure, March 3, 1821 ; John 
W. Staunton, January 2, 1826, January i, 1829, January i, 1832, and January 
i; 1835; Francis E. Bartlett, January i, 1838, January i, 1844, and January i, 
1847; George W. Gillett, January i, 1841; James G. Johnson, January i, 
1850; Enos H. Southvvick, January i, 1853; Thomas Morris, January i, 1856; 
Enos H. Southwick, January i, 1859; Thomas A. E. Lyman, January i, 1862; 
Samuel C. Springer, January i, 1865; Enos C. Brooks, January i, 1868; 
William W. Welch, January i, 1871 ; Eugene A. Nash, January i, 1874; 
Arthur H. Howe, January i, 1877; Warren J. Rich, 1880; Charles W. Terry, 
1883; Albert T. Fancher, 1886; Henry S. Merrill, 1889, re-elected November, 
1891. 

County Treasurers. — Sylvanus Russell, March 28, 1817, to 1821 ; Daniel 
Hodges, 1821; Staley' N. Clarke, 1824 to 1841 ; Marcus H. Johnson, 1841 ; 
Truman R. Colman, 1844; Daniel L Huntley, 1847; Charles P. Washburn, 



68 - History of Cattaraugus County. 



1848; John P. Darling, 1851; Stephen McCoy, 1854; J. King Skinner, 1857, 
1863 and 1S66; Dr. Lambert Whitney, i860; Alonzo Hawley, 1869, and 
appointed to fill vacancy February 22, 1878; Jarius Strong, 1876; Henry O. 
Wait, elected in Xovember, 1878, is the present incumbent, has held the posi- 
tion continuous!}.- to the present time (1893) and has just entered upon 
another term of three years. 

Superixtexdexts of Schooes. — By an act of the State Legislature 
passed April 17, 1S43, the office of superintendent was created, and the law 
then enacted made it the duty of the Boards of Supervisors to make appoint- 
ments of superintendents of common schools in their respective counties 
throughout the State. The office was held in the West District of this county 
by Elijah A. Rice of East Otto and Samuel Ewing of Randolph, and in the East 
District by Joseph H. Wright of Machias and Edward Taylor. This ofifice 
was abolished March 13, 1847, ^"d the supervision of the common schools was 
delegated to tow n superintendents until the office of school commissioner was 
formed by act of the Legislature, and the first election was held under its pro- 
visions in No\ember, 1859. Those who have fiUed the office successively in 
the First District of this county are Duncan R. Campbell, Lyman Packard, 
Thomas Edgarton, William G. Laidlaw, Frank A. Howell, Xcwton C. 
McCoon, Sanford B. McClure, J. H. Challis, G. W. Boyce, and S. N. Wheaton. 
Second District: S. N. Slosson, Norman M. Allen, George A. Gladden, John 
Archer, Jerome L. Higbee, Henry M. Seymour, Reuben J. Wallace, Joel J. 
Crandall, Henn,- A. Soule, and Clark D. Day. 

EdL'CATIOX. — Simultaneous with a neighborhood of half a dozen pioneer 
families appeared the primary school, taught in some abandoned log cabin, or 
in the living room of a public spirited family, who for the education of their 
children would generously open their door for that purpose. When the 
settlement had increased a school district was formed, and a log school-house 
was erected by calling together the entire neighborhood, which proceeded to 
build the structure by placing log upon log until the desired height was 
reached, and then roof it over with hand-made shingles. The seats and desks 
were not the modern patent easy luxuries, but slabs from the nearest saw- 
mill, pierced with holes with a two-inch auger, in which were inserted round 
wooden legs cut from the adjacent forest. The writing counter was a plain 
board placed against the wall of logs, at a proper height, with the inner edge 
inclined from a level towards the pupils. The bench was arranged in front of 
this counter, and when the youth wished to improve his "hand writing" by 
plying his gray goose-quill he turned around to his table by swinging his feet 
over his seat, and was generally started off by his teacher with the admonition 
to "take pains and write slow." The three R's usually comprised the curric- 
ulum, viz.: Reading, 'Riting and 'Rithmetic. These primitive log structures 
answered the double purpose of a school-house and a place of public worship. 
They have long since become a thing of the past, and the present well painted 



Education and Religion. 69 



and neat school edifice, with the stars and stripes floating over it, is one of the 
pleasant objects we see at intervals of two or three miles all over Cattaraugus 
county. 

The common school system of the State of New York was first placed 
under the supervision of a State superintendent in 1812, and Gideon Hawley 
was appointed to the position. . The sum of §50,000 was annually distributed 
to the-counties of the State, and the Boards of Supervisors were required to 
raise an equal amount. The school system has been amended and improved 
from time to time, until the doors of our common schools — the people's 
colleges — have been thrown wide open, and every son and daughter of school 
age in this State is invited freely to enter and receive a substantial education. 
The State appropriation of S50.000 in 18 12 has increased to the sum of 
S3'779-395-75 i" 1891. Cattaraugus count}-, on a valuation of $17,613,593, 
paid into the State treasury for the support of common schools $17,613.59 and 
received back from the State for the support of schools from the tax paid by 
the whole State on the basis of one mill on each dollar of valuation, or 
§51,588.32, and from the Common School Fund the further amount of 
83,841.37, or a total of $55,429.69. Besides this amount there was raised by 
ta.xation in the districts of the county, for school purposes, the sum of 
$108,382.24. The territory of the county is dix'ided into 284 school districts, 
which are under the supervision of two school commissioners, each havino- 
jurisdiction over a special commissioner district. Schools are maintained in 
all of these districts, taught by 421 teachers during the past school year. 
There are residing in the county 18,894 children between five and twenty-one 
years of age. The number of school-houses in the county is 297, of which 
si.xteen are fine brick edifices, 280 are framed buildings, and one is a log-house. 
These with the sites on which they stand are valued at $364,281. 

Relkjion. — It appears that the early pioneers of Cattaraugus county, as a 
whole, had neither the ability nor inclination to do anything towards the sup- 
port of Christian religion. They claimed that they had quite enough to do in 
keeping "the wolf of hunger" from their humble cabins by laboring seven 
days every week. It became a proverb, and was often quoted, that " the Sab- 
bath day did not extend westward beyond the Genesee ri\'er." Like other 
new countries the neighborhoods were so sparsely settled that for years it was 
impossible to gather the settlers into congregations of any considerable num- 
bers; and when Sunday came, if they did not labor, they made it a holiday. 

In looking over this religious dearth several religious associations sent mis- 
sionaries to preach the Word to them. Among these first to come was Rev. 
Robert Hubbard, a Presbyterian missionary located at Angelica, who pene- 
trated the wilderness in 18 10 as far west as the present town of Lyndon, and 
held service at the house of Seth Markham. He is described as a considerate, 
benevolent gentleman, who filled one side of his spacious saddle-bags with 
crackers and delicacies, which he distributed to the sick whom he found when 



History of Cattaraugus County. 



he made his pilgrimages to the lonely settlers. Rev. John Spencer, a Congre- 
gational missionary sent out in 1809 by the Co_nnecticut Missionary Society to 
the Holland Purchase, found his way to Cattaraugus county in 18 13. He was 
an acceptable missionary who died in Sheridan, Chautauqua county, in 1826, 
aged si.xty-eight years. He was familiarly and affectionately known far and 
near as " Father Spencer." About 18 14 Elder Nathan Peck, a Methodist 
missionary, held meetings at Yorkshire Corners, where he established, (as is 
believed) the first stated religious service in this county, excepting that of the 
Mission of the Friends, established at Tunesassa in 1798. The first building 
devoted exclusively to divine worship was erected in the town of Napoli 
about the year 1823. It was constructed of logs, and was situated about 
a mile southwest of the postoffice. In September, 1831, a new frame building 
was erected by the same society (Presbyterian) in Napoli Center, which was 
the first framed meeting-house in the county. The first organization of a 
Protestant Episcopal church was in Ellicottville in 1827. Their earliest rectors 
were Revs. Reuben H. Freeman and Alexander Frazer. Among the prom- 
inent early Baptist clergymen were Elders Beckwith, Eliab Gowing, and Eben- 
ezer V^ining. The Freewill Baptists were represented by Elder Judah Bab- 
cock in the town of Yorkshire as early as 181 7 and by Elder Richard M. Carey 
in 1820. This denomination held meetings in Perry in 18 16 and in Machias 
in 1818. Rev. Joseph Bartlett was the pioneer preacher of the Christian 
church in 1815. in the town of Otto. As early as 1835 there was a Universal- 
ist clergyman, Rev. J. Todd, stationed in Ellicottville, Rev. C. Morton, of the 
same sect, in Conewango, and Rev. S. A. Skeele in Farmersville. 

The Dutch Reformed church was organized in Farmersville as early as 
1835. Re\-. O. H. Gregory was then the of^ciating clergyman. The Roman 
Catholic church was planted in the county by Bishop Tiinon about 1845, '^'id 
as near as now ascertained the first church organization was that of St. 
Phillip Neri's church in Ellicottville on September 20, 1S48. 

Sketches of the graded schools and academies, and of the churches, are 
given separately in the respective towns where they are situated. 

The County Alms-House and Far.M.* — Those who from age, infirmity, 
or otherwise become unable to support themselves, and are so unfortunate as 
to be obliged to rely upon public charity for support, are cared for, in con- 
formity with the laws of the State, at the county alms-house. The buildings 
are ample, airy and comfortable and warmed with steam. The inmates are 
comfortably clothed and kindly cared for by the present keeper, Claude C. 
Trumbull, who is ably assisted by his wife. The board is good and whole- 
some. The inmates are expected to be cleanly and to observe sanitary rules. 
On the whole they are made welcome, and feel that the house is their home. 
The Cattaraugus County Aims-House and Insane Asylum is in the town 
of Machias, upon the westerly shore of Lime Lake, a clear, beautiful body of 

*Cy Aruuah Ward, Esq. 



Thf: Alms-House and Ixsaxe Asvlu.m. 71 

water about one and a half miles in length and one-half mile in width, navi- 
gable for steam and sail boats, and a great pleasure resort in summer. The 
county farm proper contains two hundred acres of fine level farming land, 
bordering upon the lake. The alms-house and insane asylum is located upon 
a slight elevation near the shore of the lake. The farm was purchased and 
the site located and established in 1833, and buildings erected and first 
occupied as an institution for the poor and insane in 1834, all under one 
management. The first keeper was Mr. Farley, of Conewango, and the first 
superintendents of the poor, having the construction and management of the 
building, were E. Harmon, Levi Peet, and Thomas J. W'heeler. The subse- 
quent keepers were Mr. Hill, Howard Peck, Moses Durfee, Nathan Hadley, 
L. G. Peck, Pardon T. Jewell, J. E. K. Button, William Follett, and Claude 
C. Trumbull, the present incumbent. The subsequent superintendents of the 
poor, ha\'ing the o\ersig]it and management of the county farm and poor 
department, are W. M. Farrar, John A. Kinnicut, Calvin Con\'ersc, John 
Palmer, H. G. Button, Nathan Follett, N. M. Allen, James M. Smith, C. T. 
Lowden, Jerome B. Jewell, Arunah Ward, Hiram Velsey, David Lang, John 
H. Groves, Mr. Merrill of Dayton, A. S. Lamper, S. C. Green, F-rank Strick- 
land, Fred Truby, and H. J. Trumbull, the present incumbent. The county 
physicians having had the charge of the medical department of the institution 
are Drs. Isaac Shaw, J. M. Copp, J. L. Eddy, Thomas J. King, and the 
present physician, Clarence King. 

Since the j'ear 1857, and up to 1S85, eight insane persons who had been 
adjudged lunatics, and sent from this count}' to the State Lunatic As\'Ium at 
Utica, were there treated the two \"ears allowed b}- the rules of that institu- 
tion for the recovery of patients, and were declared by the faculty to be 
incurable, were returned as incurable to the asj-lum at Machias. And after 
being properly treated there by the resident physician and humane keepers for 
a seasonable time, they recovered their reason and were discharged and 
returned to their homes and friends. 

The principal department, a fine stone building, was erected in 1868 at an 
expense of about §19,000. To this have been added other buildings, forming 
a complete system of apartrhents ample for the accommodation of at least 
one hundred and fifty inmates, including the insane. Attached to the 
institution is a well arranged steam laundry and bath-room. About the 5th 
of July, 1892, thirty-nine of the insane inmates were removed by the State 
authorities to the State Insane Asylum at Buffalo, at an increased expense to 
Cattaraugus county of at least three dollars per week for each of those thus 
removed. At the present time there are about ninety inmates supported in 
the institution. 



History of Cattaraugus County. 



CHAPTER XI. 

THE GREAT LUMBER INDUSTRY. 
[By Frederick Larkin, M. D.] 

WHEN the white man first began to explore the lands located in Cattar- 
augus county he was astonished at the vast amount of towering 
pines and hemlocks that dotted the hills with living green. Along 
the great tributaries of the Allegheny river the hillsides were resplendent with 
great monarchs that were ushered into life centuries before Columbus dreamed 
of a New World. Such a great amount of pine timber had a powerful attrac- 
tion for persons desirous of engaging in the manufacture of lumber — hence, in 
the early part of the present century the lumber business commenced, and has 
been continued for more than eighty years, and has added millions to the 
wealth and prosperity of Cattaraugus county. 

In the early days of the lumber interest there was a great drawback to a 
successful business in many parts of the county on account of finding a market, 
but the Allegheny river proved to be a thoroughfare that has floated upon its 
crystal waters hundreds of millions of the most valuable lumber that America 
has ever produced. 

The first saw-mills located in the county were run by water, and located on 
streams that pay tribute to the great river. The mills were mostly made to 
run with a single saw, about six or seven feet long, and were able to cut from 
three to four thousand feet in twenty-four hours. A great change has taken 
place since the advent of steam and circular saws. Many of these mills are 
capable of sawing from one to two hundred thousand feet of lumber a week. 

The town of Olean, located as it was on the Allegheny ri\-er, was the first 
section of Cattaraugus county that attracted the lumber interest. Here were 
magnificent forests of pine, man}- of which were from three to four feet in 
diameter, and reaching towards the heavens more than two hundred feet. In 
1804 Major Adam Hoops purchased of the Holland Land Company a tract of 
land comprising twenty thousand acres, on a portion of which the village of 
Olean is now located. At that time the eastern people, mostly from Connec- 
ticut, were settling on and near the banks of the Ohio ri\'er. Marietta, 
the first permanent settlement, was attracting a great number of enterprising 
emigrants to that new Eldorado. As the land route was over the mountain- 
ous part of Pennsylvania, the pilgrims selected the Allegheny river, whose 
waters would land them in safety upon any of the. fertile banks of the Ohio. 
The place of embarkation was Olean, which was soon alive with a busy throng 



Lumbering axd Rafting. y-^ 

building rude rafts to float them with speed and safety to their place of des- 
tination. 

Olean at that time had a wonderful boom, and demanded lumber in con- 
siderable quantities to build structures to accommodate the people that were 
watching the moving of the waters of the river. So great was the rush of 
people that six hundred could be counted frequently at one time. To supph- 
all these with facilities to float down the stream, there was a great demand for 
lumber, hence Major Hoops, with every facility within his reach, erected a 
saw-mill on Olean creek, which at first was designed to supply lumber for 
building up the village and those that were converting portions of the great 
wilderness into cultivated farms. At that time Pittsburg, located at the junc- 
tion of the Alonongahela a.nd the Allegheny, had become a prominent and 
growing town, and as the soil there was not adapted to the growth of pine 
timber that city called loudly upon the great pine forests located upon either 
side of the upper Allegheny river. During the months of winter the sound of 
the woodman's axe could be heard leveling the great pines that had defied 
the winds and storms of more than five hundred years. 

In 1807 Willis Thrall and William Shepard erected a saw-mill on the Olean 
creek, about three miles above its mouth. This mill was the first that 
manufactured lumber to be floated clown the river to find a market. After 
disposing of a portion to build boats to supply the numerous travelers waiting 
for a passage upon this great and picturesque thoroughfare, the remainder 
was formed into "rafts" and floated down to a southern market. The lumber 
platforms in the upper Allegheny were rafted sixteen feet scjuare and, for 
pine lumber, twenty courses deep. These platforms were coupled together 
to the number of ten, which would make a length of a hundred and sixty 
feet. Mad the river been straight, double that length could have been run 
with safety; but on account of its deviating or crooked course they would 
have been driven by the rushing waters against the winding and rocky shore. 

In those early days in this wilderness country the raftsmen encountered 
numerous difiiculties, the most prominent of which was the difficulty of 
obtaining ropes to land and hold the raft in some place of safety ; and they 
were frequently compelled to be exposed to the darkness of the night without 
being able to land the raft. These ten-platform rafts were generally run to 
Warren, where the Conewango tributary mingles its waters with those of the 
Allegheny. When the mouth of the Conewango was reached three of these 
ten platforms were coupled together, which, in raftsman language, comprises 
an Allegheny fleet. The rafts were usually supplied with a comfortable 
shanty, containing a good supply of provisions and apparatus for cooking the 
same. An Allegheny fleet required six oars with a stout and vigorous man to 
each. The pilot or captain must be a man familiar with the islands, bars and 
other obstructions liable to stop the raft or dash it in pieces. 

After the business of manufacturing and running lumber upon the waters 
10 



74 History of Cattaraugus Countv. 



of the Allegheny became firmly established, Judge Benjamin Chamberlain, 
James Green and others commenced operations on the Great Valley creek, 
where thev constructed saw-mills, and in a few years leveled down many of the 
monarchs of the prime\"al forest. This creek in the earlj- days afforded much 
more water than at the present time, surrounded as it was by a magnificent 
forest which obstructed to a large extent the evaporating rays of the summer 
sun. The gi^eat pine forest located on either side of the Great Valley creek, 
and affording millions of stately pines waiting for the saw, soon became one 
of the most prominent lumber sections in Cattaraugus county. The first saw- 
mill was built in the year i8i2 by James Green, and soon after was purchased 
by a Captain Howe, one of the early settlers on the Allegheny river. 

In t8i6 came Judge Benjamin Chamberlain, then a young man from 
Maine, and whose wealth consisted of a suit of clothes worth but a few 
dollars, a meager education, but indomitable energy and a native intellect 
which placed him in the front rank of the leading men in Cattaraugus county. 
He erected a saw-mill which manufactured a large amount of valuable pine 
lumber that was floated down the majestic river to the southern towns and 
cities. 

From 1812 to 1837 seven saw-mills were put in operation upon the Great 
Valley creek, and it was many years later before the labor of hundreds of men 
was able to conquer the towering pines. At the time the lumber business 
commenced on the crystal streams there was in some sections a great lack of 
provisions. A large share of the county was then a wilderness, but many- 
wants were supplied near at hand. The woods provided the lumbermen with 
venison and the streams, whose waters turned their wheels, supplied them 
with speckled trout. 

Among the important tributaries of the Alleghen\- was the Tunegawant, 
which was remarkable for the great amount of pine timber located in the valley 
and on the hillsides. In 1828 Stephen and Jesse Morrison erected a saw-mill 
near the Indian reservation line, where nothing but the best qualit\- of lumber 
was manufactured for the southern market. Since that time several mills have 
been built, from which more than twenty millions of feet of lumber ha\'e been 
floated southward. 

Following the river to the north line -of the State of Pennsyl\-ania the val- 
leys and hills on either side were rich with a splendid growth of pine. The 
Red House valley was about as remarkable for the great amount of pine tim- 
ber as that of the Great valley. About 1840 some fourteen thousand acres of 
the land was purchased by a company in the city of Boston, and has since 
been known as the Bay State Tract. This tract was worked for a number of 
years and many millions of their pine timber was floated upon the Allegheny 
and Ohio rivers to the city of Cincinnati, and various other towns and cities 
located on the Ohio. 'The first lumbering done in the Red House valley was 
adjacent to the river, as that afforded the only means to a permanent market. 



LUMBERIXG AND RAFTING. 



but since the advent of railroads the vast amount of pine, hemlock and hard- 
wood remaining on the tract has readily found a market. The valley of Creek's 
run has produced a large amount of pine lumber, much of which was run to 
a southern market " in the log." In South Valley much lumber has been man- 
ufactured. About 1865 some six thousand acres were sold by John Fenton 
for about $250,000. This valuable tract soon found its way into the hands of 
Hon. Reuben E. Fenton, who, in disposing of it, made the small sum of 
§20,000. 

On the various streams that contribute to enhance the waters of the river 
much lumber has been manufactured. In early days the valleys and hills bor- 
dering the tributary streams in South Valley were dotted with magnificent 
pines. As these streams formed the motive power, and as the process of man- 
ufacturing was much slower than that of the present time, lumbermen ran their 
mills both night and day as long as the streams provided them with water. 

Notwithstanding the great amount of pine timber that the county of Cattar- 
augus once contained it has nearly all been leveled and much of the land 
formerly covered with tall pines is now fenced with great stumps, and the 
land is divided into cultivated fields, pastures, and meadows, that give feed to 
numerous grazing herds of the best breed of cows that our country can pro- 
duce. Since the pine timber has become nearly obliterated lumbermen have 
resorted to the manufacture of hemlock, which abounds in great quantities in 
almost every town in the county. Interspersed with the great pine forests 
were numerous groves of hemlock which in many places were so dense as to 
obscure the sunlight. Hemlock, though not so valuable as pine, is in manv 
respects a \-aluablc timber. The bark has a ready sale for its astringent 
properties which make it valuable in tanning leather, and the lumber is the 
best that can be obtained for the frame-work of buildings. The towns at 
some distance from the river contained considerable pine lumber, but on 
account of the distance to haul it to the river it failed to be profitable to 
manufacture until railroads commenced to ship it to various markets. 

The only town in Cattaraugus county too far removed from the Allegheny 
river without a thoroughfare was Randolph, through a part of which flows the 
headwaters of the Conewango, one of the prominent tributaries of the great 
river. It has been said by the early lumbermen that where the villages of 
East and West Randolph are located once stood one of the most magnificent 
forests of pines that America could produce. The eminence where Chamber- 
lain Institute now stands was literally covered with a vast pine forest. A. G. 
Bush, one of the early settlers in the town of Randolph, in commenting on the 
appearance of the valley where the village of Randolph is now located, said 
to the writer: "In 1823, as I stood upon one of the Napoli hills which 
overlooks the Little Conewango valley, the great pine forest which presented 
itself to view was the most splendid scene I ever beheld." 

As saw-mills at that time had not been constructed much of the pine grow- 



76 History of Cattaraugus County. 



ing near the Conewango creek was cut into logs and floated down to mills in 
Chautauqua count}'. The land where Chamberlain Institute is located is com- 
posed of glacial drift, which contains elements well adapted to an exuberant 
growth of pine. Notwithstanding the great amount of pine timber once grow- 
ing where the village of Randolph now stands (which would seem almost 
inexhaustible) it has gone, and the site now contains one of the most beautiful 
villages in western New York. After mills were established in Conewango 
valley Abraham G. Bush and the Crowleys commenced the business of run- 
ning lumber down the Conewango. They usually ran two-platform rafts, 
which were almost invariably loaded with shaved pine shingles, the manufac- 
ture of which supplied scores of men a profitable business during the winter 
months. Many millions of pine lumber have been run on the waters of the 
Conewango, until it reached the Alleghen\', where it \\as coupled into great 
fleets destined for Pittsburg, Cincinnati, or the west. 

At the present time ( 1893) the facilities are such that the hardwood, which 
abounds in almost e\'ery town in Cattaraugus county, has found a market. 
Millions of feet are being shipped to Buffalo, Rochester, and Syracuse, and in 
fact to nearly all of the eastern cities. Beach, maple, oak, chestnut, cucumber, 
ash, and basswood are found in abundance. The lumbermen now are doing 
business on a different basis than those in earl}' days. The business was form- 
erly transacted with but a small amount of money. The leading men in the 
trade were generally merchants who were supplied with goods on long credit 
Avith the understanding that payment should be made when the lumber was 
sold. These goods stood in place of money. It was always understood by 
those engaged in the manufacture of lumber that their wants should be sup- 
plied at the store, and but little mone\- would be paid until returns came in 
after the lumber was sold. In these days of banks and railroads a great change 
has taken place. Lumbermen are expected to pa}- cash for e\"ery day's work 
and for all materials used in the business. If a person can show responsibility 
he has but little trouble in obtaining money. 



CHAPTER XII. 

THE AGRICULTURAL INTERESTS. 
[By Beals E. Litchfield.] 



AGRICULTURE was instituted by the Almighty. Genesis, 2 : 8 and 15 : 
" And the Lord God planted a garden eastward in Eden ; and there he 
put the man whom he had formed. And the Lord God took the man 
and put him into the garden of. Eden to dress it and to keep it." Thus Adam 
at once became a husbandman, and reared a famih- of farmers. Genesis, 4:2: 
"And Abel was a keeper of sheep, but Cain was a tiller of the ground." We 



The Ac;kicl"ltural Interests. ■ -jj 



also learn that Jabal, son of Cain, " was father of such as dwell in tents, and 
of such as have cattle." Thus agriculture was the first calling of the human 
race and divinely established. Hence it is inferior in dignity and importance 
to no other, and is the basis of all pursuits. While I admit that, without 
doubt, there are other callings or speculations from which, if successful, large 
fortunes are more speedily accumulated, yet the different branches of agricul- 
ture contain all the elements and conditions necessary to bring both pleasure 
and wealth to such as pursue their labors in an intelligent and scientific 
manner. In an early period it was thought that a half idiot, who could plow, 
sow, mow and reap, could be a successful farmer. But opinions, as \\'ell as 
agricultural implements, have changed, and in our day of progress it is 
admitted by intelligent farmers that a scientific education is very desirable if 
not positively necessary for the successful cultivation of the soil. The 
agriculturist should know enough of chemistry, one of the most useful 
sciences ever revealed to man by our kind Creator, to enable him to analyze 
the constituent elements of the soil that he cultivates, so that he may properly 
apply fertilizers; and he should also be able to scientifically direct and apply 
labor and any and every means to unlock nature's great store-house, and thus 
fill his barns with the rich fruitage of the soil, and his heart \\ith joy and 
gladness. 

In 1 83 1, fourteen years after the first white child was born in the town of 
Ellicottville, this part of the count}- was ahnost an unbroken wilderness. The 
^\•oods were well stocked \\ith deer and the streams with speckled trout, which 
furnished a good supply of delicious food to grace the crude tables of the 
pioneers. Bears were also quite numerous, and wolves could be heard almost 
e\ery evening in the year howling upon the hills. In some parts of the county 
lumbering was becoming quite an extensive business; but, as yet, agriculture 
throughout the county was in its infancy, or, perhaps I might more truly say, 
was at that time unborn. The pioneers were clearing the timber from their 
land, and to convert the timber into black-salts was almost the only means 
they had of obtaining mone\-. In my boyhood days, and when the snow was 
more than a foot deep upon the ground, I have known of men cutting, piling, 
and burning timber to obtain the ashes from which to make black-salts to buy 
bread. Upon those patches of land thus cleared were produced some of the 
cereals, such as wheat, rye, buckwheat, corn, and oats. Potatoes were also 
raised in abundance for home use. Occasionally a crude grist-mill had been 
erected, where farmers could get their grain ground. But the quality of flour 
there obtained would not, I think, please the fastidious people of the present 
generation; the millers had no machinery for separating the smut from the 
wheat, and both were therefore ground together, making the flour dark and 
coarse. 

In some portions of Cattaraugus county the soil by nature is well adapted 
to raising wheat; in other parts the soil or climate, or both, render this Indus- 



History of Cattaraugus County. 



try unprofitable. In Franklinville. Machias, Yorkshire, Freedom, Farmers- 
\-ille, and Randolph wheat is produced in small quantities, too small, in fact, 
to supply the home demand. An agricultural writer some forty-five years ago, 
according to a recent publication, said: "Cattaraugus is well adapted to the 
culture of cereal grain e.xcepting wheat, and nowhere else are grass, vegetables, 
and roots produced in greater abundance or of better quality. The system of 
wheat culture, too prevalent in this country, is a reproach to the farmer, and 
wars with the laws of reproduction. I submit if the fall wheat is not more 
generally sown the middle or last of October than the first of September. If 
the plant is destroyed by the spring frosts and heaving of the soil, if the 
farmer gathers chess and smut, if hi.- granary is empty, what wonder is it? He 
has sown to the whirlwind amid frost, rain, and sleet, and reaps the certain 
reward of his folly. Let the trial be made once and thoroughly of cultivating 
wheat in a wise manner, and the result will forever silence the assertion that 
'wheat cannot be raised in Cattaraugus.'" 

The pioneer emigrants from New England to western New York held the 
idea that wheat raising was the farmer's first and chief industry, and they were 
attracted hither by the high encomiums bestowed by Captain Williamson and 
others upon the Holland Purchase, only to find that Cattaraugus county did 
not fully meet their expectations in the production of their favorite crop. 
Many of them, therefore, moved to western prairies after various attempts to 
raise wheat in \\-hat they rather contemptuously termed "cold Cattaraugus." 
But they left behind a land of rich natural resources, whose agricultural inter- 
ests have been constantly developed and increased, until to-day it stands well 
among the farming districts of not only the Empire State but of the east. 
Under proper culti\'ation wheat au: be grown in every tow^n in the county, 
but with present prices and the fields of the great west still yielding abundant 
crops there are se\-eral other industries which the Cattaraugus farmer can 
pursue more profitably and certainl}-. 

While Cattaraugus county is not supposed to be well adapted to the pro- 
duction of Indian corn, yet good corn can be produced almost every year in 
some portions of the county. According to the agricultural "statistics found 
in the Cattaraugus County Director}- of 1874 there was produced in the 
county 197,657 bushels of corn. For sixt\' years I have watched the develop- 
ment and progress of''the different interests and industries of Cattaraugus 
county, and lo ! what a change has marked the passing years I The crude 
sickle and the cumbersome cradle have been consigned to the past, and the 
merry click of the mower and the self-binding harvester now move in noisy 
triumph where once the hardy pioneers toiled from sun to sun. Our sons no 
longer swing the hea\'3' implements of their grandfathers, but instead sit eight 
or ten hours a day on cushioned seats behind well-fed horses, doing the work 
that it required from' five to ten men to do in early days. Inventive genius 
has devised for the farmer labor-saving machinery for every part of his regular 



The Agricultural Interests. 79 



work. The old " bull plow " that merely stirred the ground was succeeded by 
the heavy cast-iron plow, which was a decided improvement. These have 
given place to the finely polished steel hand and sulky plows of to-day. 

The scythe and cradle of our pioneer fathers were used, perhaps, longer 
than any other farming implement of early times. The first mower made its 
appearance in Ellicottville about 1857. It was the property of the late Hon. 
Chauncey J. Fox, and I well remember seeing it in use on his farm. It was 
very clumsy, and was soon succeeded by others of better construction. With 
the aid of such machinery from manual toil, early and late, the farmer's life 
has become a lite of physical ease; but to cope with the times his brain must 
be educated and drilled in science and business to pursue successfully a calling 
designed by the Creator to be the most independent and exalted on earth. 

.A.S wheat could not be successfully grown, the early settlers generallj- 
turned their attention to the production of other cereals, which could be pro- 
duced profitably and in reasonable abundance. Oats and corn were the chief 
crops, and these, until the construction of the Erie railroad, found a market 
in the lumber camps of the southern part of the county and of Pennsylvania. 
From 1850 until the dairy interests developed these products were shipped to 
distant markets, but since then they have been consumed principally at home 
by the large dairies. Buckwheat during recent years has formed one of the 
staple products. Potatoes at first were raised solely for home use, but in 
abundance, ."^ince the completion of the railroads large quantities ha\-e found 
markets in Buffalo, Rochester, and eastern cities. Tlie soil seems peculiarl}- 
adajjted to the growth of large crops of fine quality. 

One of the earh- industries for those farmers w ho were fortunate enough 
to have maple orchards on their premises was sugarmaking, and while it appar- 
entl}- is as much or more of a manufacturing than a farming industry it ne\er- 
theless deser\L-s a notice here, for it often proved a convenient source of rev- 
enue. It was always in demand at the stores for either cash or "goods," and 
was one of the few means by which the farmer could raise a little money occa- 
sionally. Imlay, in his Topographical Description, says " that no cultivation is 
neces.sary; that no contingency, such as hurricanes or bad seasons, can disturb 
the process: that neither the heavy expense of mills, engines, machinery, or a 
system of planting is necessary at all to make the maple sugar. The process 
occupies si.x weeks, from the middle of February to the end of March, and the 
whole of the buildings and other articles necessary for carrying it on are to be 
obtained at so trifling an expense as to be within the reach of any person of 
common industry-, whose conduct in life can entitle him to the most moderate 
credit." Cattaraugus has produced maple sugar and syrup which in both qual- 
ity and quantit}- is unexcelled by any county in western New York. From 
the pioneer settlement until about 1870 the industry steadily increased in pro- 
portions; since then the product has graduall}- diminished, which fact is owing 
to many of the sugar orchards being converted into wood and timber. The 



So History of Cattaraugus County. 

following table of statistics shows concisely the growth and decrease of sugar- 
making in the county of Cattaraugus: 

YEAR. POUNDS SUGAR. GALS. SYRUP. 

1S55 416,300 2.459 

1865 5^2,193 8,121 

1875 441,021 7,022 

1885. No State census taken. 
The early settlers, having come from a country of orchards, quickly realized 
the necessity of fruit and hastened to plant fruit trees, choosing genei'ally the 
bottom lands for this purpose. Their choice usually proved unsatisfactory, 
for the trees were shorter-lived, less reliable and more liable to blast. Later, 
howe\-er, orchards were st;t on higher ground and these established the repu- 
tation of Cattaraugus as an apple producing county, making it compare quite 
favorably with other counties of the southern tier. Few grapes are grown 
except in the town of Perrysburg, a portion of which lies within the Chau- 
tauqua Grape Belt. The land there is almost wholly given up to the culture 
of the vine, and there are produced as fine a quality of grapes as are raised in 
any localit}' in New York State. Excellent pears are grown in limited quan- 
tities, and in early days, before the timber was cleared off, peach trees were 
occasionally seen in small numbers. Plums thrive and bear well, as do also 
cherries and berries of all kinds. The following shows the apple production 
of the county in the years named: 

YEAR. BUSH. APPLES. BARRELS CIDER. NO. OF TREES. 
1855 177,173 1.257 

1865 375-997 5,331 195,267 

1875 492,346 9,682 361,592 

1885. No State census taken. 
The larger portion of Cattaraugus county is better adapted to grazing than 
the growing of grain, fruit or vegetables, and it early became apparent to 
farmers that stock raising would become one of the principal industries. The 
climate, soil, and ele\'ation secure us against severe drouths, thus affording a 
reliable pasturage. The first efforts in this line were the raising of cattle and 
sheep-for market. As this cattle industry progressed some of the more enter- 
prising farmers began the systematic improvement of their stock, gradually 
converting their herds from the common breeds into the more favorite strains 
of Devons, Durhams, Ayrshires, etc. The first blooded animal brought into 
the county was a fine thoroughbred Durham bull, in 1828. Among the more 
prominent stock breeders who once made Cattaraugus county their home may 
be mentioned Staunton & Johnson, owners of the "Elk Farm" in Ellicott- 
ville, and Hudson Wait, of West Valley. Judge Ten Broeck was the most 
extensive cattle owner the county ever possessed. He had some six thousand 
acres in improved farms and often wintered from six hundred to eight hun- 
dred head of cattle. In' summers his stock usually numbered from twelve 
hundred to fifteen hundred. He gave no attention, however, to improved 



The Agricultural Interests. 8i 

breeds, and in this respect his ideas have often been copied, particularly by 
dairymen. 

The raising of young stock for market gradually increased as the farmers 
added to their improvements, and for a time became the leading branch of 
agriculture. For a time the sheep husbandry was not very successful, for the 
wolves made such slaughter among them that they were ne\"er safe at night, 
unless yarded with a fence that the wolves could not get through or over. It 
was not until the year 1843 that the wolves bade adieu to Cattaraugus count}-. 

From about that time the sheep husbandry increased quite rapidlv for 
twelve or fifteen years, when the dairy industrj- came to the front and has 
thus far held its advanced position. At the present day few sheep are raised, 
and those few are found only-in small flocks. In 1835 there were, according 
to reliable statistics, 39,509 sheep in the county; in 1845,68,609; in 1855, 
59,725; in 1865, 77,682; in 1875, 17,139. In 1865 there were 262,742 pounds 
of wool shorn; in 1875, 73,262 pounds. 

In 1830 the dairying industry was undeveloped, and for several years the 
small amount of butter and cheese manufactured was mostly traded in barter 
with the country merchant and used for home consumption. Even as late 
as 1846 I well remember taking in a wagon to Buffalo the product of six or 
eight cows and selling the cheese for 4'j cents and the butter for I2ij cents 
per pound. In fact, at that time, the dairying industry of Cattaraugus county 
was in embryo, waiting for light or knowledge from the east, or for the rail- 
road whistle proclaiming the grand truth that Cattaraugus was within shipping 
distance of the sea. And soon to supply the demand of Cattaraugus for cows 
Ohio, Indiana, Michigan, Canada, and Pennsylvania were kind enough to 
supply a portion necessary to meet the demand. Thus it was: the Erie 
railroad laid its track through the southern part of the county, and the dairy- 
ing industry was born. The Western New York & Pennsylvania railroad 
passes through some of the northern and eastern towns, and thus adds vigor 
and growth to the dairying interest. The Buffalo & Southwestern railroad 
traverses some of the western towns, which not only adds vigor and strength 
to the dairying industry, but also places those towns at the very door of the 
Buffalo market for all agricultural products. The Buffalo, Rochester & 
Pittsburg railroad traverses a central portion of the county, and it brings 
Buffalo, Rochester, Bradford and Pittsburg markets almost to our door; and 
under the stimulus of those markets the timber remaining upon the hills is 
rapidly disappearing, but instead of its being manufactured into black-salts, as 
it was sixty years ago, it is shipped to various manufacturing towns and 
converted into useful articles to supply the needs of mankind. It nets the 
owner many times the price it would bring if made into black-salts. In 1830 
there were but few cows in the county comparatively, but I have not the 
means of ascertaining the exact number. According to the agricultural 
statistics in 1865 there were 30,569. In 1870 there were 44,463, an increase 
II 



82 History of Cattaraugus Couxtv. 



during the five years of 13,894. During the same five years the sheep in the 
county decreased from 77,682 to 26,739. 

From 1870 to 1880 the dairying business increased in magnitude, and the 
number of cows were increased by many farmers changing their former mode 
of agriculture and stocking their farms with cows. Many new cheese factories 
and a few creameries were built, and the daiiying interest has since taken the 
lead of all other agricultural pursuits in Cattaraugus county. Until about 
1S67 each farmer manufactured the milk from his own coa\s at home, either 
into butter or cheese; but he now commenced the cheese factory system, and 
though some portion of cheese is yet manufactured at home the larger portion 
is the product of the factories. There are some creameries where butter is 
manufactured. But I think the bulk of the butter in this county is made as 
farm dairy. Although Cattaraugus county has a broken, uneven, and hilly 
surface, there is probably no county in the State better adapted to the dairying 
business than this. The hills and valleys are well supplied with pure soft 
water, and the soil will (if judiciously managed) produce an abundance of the 
choicest grasses. Hay, in connection with dairying, has become one of the 
important products of the farm. Not only are vast quantities consumed at 
home, but hundreds of tons are each 3-ear shipped to eastern markets. 

Before the advent of the railroads prices were low owing to the difficulty 
of reaching a market. The principal mode of trading for many years was by 
barter. Cheese was exchanged for flour, pound for pound. In the winter of 
1830-31 butter brought tweh'e and one-half cents a pound. From 1835 to 
1840 cheese sold for six or eight cents, while in 1846 it dropped to four and 
one-half cents. Butter was often as low as eight cents per pound, but in 1S51 
the best quality brought a shilling, which \\'as deemed a high price. 

The following statistics show the agricultural and dairying resources of 
Cattaraugus county. The latest State census at command is 1875: 



YEAR. 




BUTTER, LBS. 


CHEESE, LBS. 




XO. OF COWS. 


1855 
1865 
1875 




1,957,183 
2,308,923 


1,717,484 
■3.635.356 

FARMS, ACRES 




23.633 
34,408 

46.757 


l'EAR. dwl' 


'OS. 


VALUE. 


IMPRCiVED. UMMI'R'D 


VALUE. 


1855 7,515 
1865 8,685 
1875 9.713 


81,937.130 
2.759.904 
7.558,656 


266.431 432,620 
323,749 386,172 
360,681 363,155 


810,956,344 
14,247,927 
23,151,866 


YEAR. 




STOCK. 


IMI'LEMEXTS. 




TOXS OF HAY. 


1855 
1865 

1875 




$1,972,598 
2,683,220 
3,583.882 


8439,162 
558,302 
852,101 




62.546 

87,744 
137.493 



The farmers of Cattaraugus early recognized the necessity of annual 
agricultural exhibits, which ex'entually proved unusually beneficial in fostering 



The Agricultural Interests. 83 

and de\-eloping the pioneer efforts of the p.griculturist and encouraged him to 
greater activity and competition. On November 11, 1841, a small band of 
enthusiastic farmers and others met in the court-house in Ellicottville and 
organized the "Cattaraugus County Agricultural Society," with these officers: 
President, Hon. Peter Ten Broeck; vice-president, Elijah A. Rice; secretary, 
Daniel R. Wheeler; treasurer, Stephen S. Cole. These officers and a director 
elected from each town constituted the Board of Managers. This societv 
never owned its exhibition grounds. The annual fairs were first held in 
Ellicottville, the public square being used for the display of stock and the 
court-house for the exhibition of grain, fruit, vegetables, and articles of 
domestic manufacture. In 1852 the location was changed to Otto, the 
citizens of that place giving the society the free use of grounds for exhibition 
purposes. Samuel Har\-ey, of Mansfield, was president. In 1853 the fair 
was held in Randolph with Asahel Crowley, president. The next year it was 
again changed, this time to Little Valley, with Horace Howe, president, who 
tendered free of cost the ground for the exhibition of stock and farm imple- 
ments. The Congregational church was used for the display of articles 
contributed by the ladies, and Horace Greeley delivered an address. The old 
agricultural society held its last annual fair at the village of Little Valley in 
the year of 1855. 

January 28, 1856, the old society was re-organized under chapter 425 of 
the laws of 1855, and assumed for a time the name of "Cattaraugus Countv 
Agricultural and Horticultural Society." The meeting effecting this organi- 
zation was held at Howe's Hotel in Little Valley. Dr. Lyman Twomlev was 
chairman and John .Manley, secretary. April 5th ten acres of land were 
leased for ten years of the president, Horace Howe, for $10, with the privilege 
of buying the grounds within that period for $50 an acre, and in December, 
1865, the purchase was duly made. A large tent was bought and used for 
several years to display and shelter exhibits, and occasionally rented for 
other purposes. The premiums offered in 1856 consisted of forty diplomas, 
eighty-three volumes " Transactions New York State Agricultural Society," 
seventy-two volumes "'Transactions American Institute," two life member- 
ships, and S358.25 in cash. April 4, 1857, a corporate seal was adopted. This 
year a number of prominent men in the State became honorary members of 
the society, among them being Gov. Reuben E. Fcnton, of Chautauqua 
county. August 25-26, 1858, the first annual horse show was held, but did 
not prove as successful as expected. In 1859 the citizens of all the" border 
counties were invited to contest for premiums and become members. 
October ist of this year the corporate name was changed to the "Cattaraugus 
County Agricultural Society," which style it has since retained. 

In 1862 the ofificers deemed a change of location desirable and accordingly 
voted to hold the fair at Olean on grounds offered by the citizens there. The 
fair of 1863 was also held in that village. In 1864 the society returned to 



84 History of Cattaraugus County. 



Little Valley and remained two years. , The fair of 1866 was held in Olean, 
and from then until 1876 the annual exhibits were displayed on the society's 
grounds in Little Valley. In 1877 another change was thought desirable and 
the fairs of this year and of 1878 and 1879 "^Yere taken to Randolph and held 
on the Driving Park. Since 1880 they have been held in Little \'alley, on 
the society's grounds known as Beechdale Park, which was secured of John 
jNfanley in exchange for the old plat in 1875 under authority of a legisiati\'e 
act of April 22d of that j-ear. The grounds lie within the village limits, 
contain twenty acres, and possess suitable buildings, fences, etc., and a good 
half-mile track for racing purposes. The annual exhibitions have generally 
been successful and productive of much good to farmers throughout_ the 
county. Thousands of dollars have been distributed in purses and premiums 
from year to year. The s'ociety is a member of the National Trotting Asso- 
ciation. The Board of Managers consists of the four executive officers, who 
are elected annually, and six directors, elected for three years, two being 
elected at each annual meeting. This Board has power to decide all questions 
which may come before it. The acti\-e officers of the old societ}- were: 
Presidents, Hon. Peter Ten Broeck, Abraham Searle, Plon. C. J. Fox, Gen. 
Alexander Chambers, John S. Harvey, Samuel Harvey, and Asahel Crowley ; 
secretaries, Daniel R. Wheeler and John C. Peabody. Since the re-organiza- 
tion the officers have been as follows: 

Prcsidoits. — Horace Howe, 1856-57; J. Galusha Stanton, 1858; Nathaniel 
Walker, 1859-60; Samuel William Johnson, 1861-64; Isaac Reed, 1865-66: 
Chauncey A. Snow, 1867-69; John Manley, 1870-71; Enos C. Brooks, 1872; 
Halsey Safford, 1873; Horace S. Huntley, 1S74-76; Hezekiah O. Burt, 1877- 
78; William Stevens, 1879-80; John B. F. Champlin, 1881 ; Frank Larabee, 
1882; Ezekiel Kelley, 1883-84; Harlan D. Bryant, 1885; Myron L. Newton. 
1886-87; A. D. Bonsteel, 1888-90; Fred Clark, 1891 ; Cyrus R. Rhodes. 
1892-93. 

Vice-presidents. — Dr. Lyman Twomley, 1856; Lorenzo Stratton, 1857 
(resigned and Nathan Crosby elected) and 1859 ('^'^'''' Horace S. Huntley, 
resigned), 1860-63; Horace S. Huntley, 1858. 1873; Judson Sibley, 1864-65 
John Kennicott, 1866; Lorenzo D. Cobb, 1867; Isaac Reed, 1868; Halse\ 
Safford, 1869, 1875, 18S0; John C. Gardner, 1870-72; Hezekiah O. Burt, 1874 
William Stevens, 1876; Alonzo S. Lamper, 1877-78; Porter B. Canfield, 1879 
Erastus N. Lee, 1881; Ezekiel Kelley, 1882; Harlan D. Bryant, 1883-84 
Charles H. Davis, 1885; Smith Clark, 1886: C. A. Rhodes, 1887; O. H 
Smith, 1888; Fred Clark, 1889-90: C. R. Rhodes, 1891; M. B. Jones, 1892 
F. E. Champlin, 1893. 

Secretaries. — Henry Hoyt, 1856 and 1859 (resigned and John iManle}- 
elected to fill vacancies) ; John Manley, 1856-60; Horace S. Huntley, 1861- 
6g, 1880, 1884-85; Lambert G. Whitney, 1870; A. T. Palmer, 1871-73, 
1877-78; Charles H. Davis, 1874-75; M. N. Pratt, 1876; iM. Van Benson. 



The A(;ricli;ii'kal Interests. 8 = 



1879; Dell Tuttle, 1881-83; Samuel B. Densmore, 18S6; Samuel Dunham, 
1887-90; A. D. Bonsteel, 1891 ; Robert F. Winship, 1892-93. 

Treasurers. — S. T. iVIarsh, 1856 (did not qualify and Dr. Daniel Bucklin 
elected to fill vacancy") ; Dr. Daniel Bucklin, 1857-58; Eliphalet Culver, 1859 
(declined, and Horace S. Huntley elected); Horace S. Huntley, i860, 
1879; George M. Fitch, 1861-62; Claudius V. B. Barse, 1863-64; Fuller 
Bucklin, 1865; Erastus N. Lee, 1866-69, 1880; Enos C. Brooks. 1870-71; 
A. W. Ferrin, 1872; Harvey Tuthill, 1873; Stephen C. Green, 1874: B. B. 
Weber, 1875-76; CM. Hopkins, 1877-78, 1881 ; Mortimer N. Pratt, 1S82-85; 
Isaac Winship, 1886-87; Dr. S. Z. Fisher, 1888-92; S. L. Sweetland, 1893. 

The old, or first, Conewango Valley Fair Association was organized early in 
the 'sixties and a single e.xhibition held at East Randolph. Asahel Crowley, 
of Randolph, was president". The association was not successful, apparently, 
and it went down. It was re\i\'ed, however, in the spring of 18S0 under the 
same name, and has since held fairs every fall. The association leases about 
twenty acres of land midway between Randolph and East Randolph villages, 
upon which is a good half-mile track and convenient buildings, fences, etc. 
The officers for 1893 are C. D. Tuttle, president; Charles Merrill, vice-presi- 
dent; T. L. Ostrom, treasurer; L. D. Van Rensselaer, secretary. These with 
six directors constitute the Board of Managers. 

The I"ranklin\ille Agricultural and Driving Park Association was organ- 
ized March 18, 1882, and the first exhibit held on leased grounds from the 
26th to the 29th of the following September. A half-mile track was laid out 
and constructed, and earh- the next year the plat, consisting of twenty-one 
acres, was purchased for the permanent use of the association. Exhibits open 
to the world have been held in the fall of each year, proving very successful in 
every way. From §3,000 to $4,000 in premiums and purses are offered 
annually. The management is invested in si.x directors (elected for three 
years each) and the four executive officers (elected annuall\-|- These latter 
have been as follows : 

Presidents. — James H. P'erris, 18S2-84; Peter T. B. Button, 18S5-86; L. C. 
i'^iggs. 1887-90; P. T. B. Button, 1891 ; Robert Y. Woodworth, 1892-93. 

Vice-presidents. — -Robert F. Woodworth, 1882-91 ; S. E. McXall, 1892-93. 

Secretaries. — James H. Waring, 1882-83; George E. Spring, 1884-90; 
H. R. Curtis, 1891 ; P. T. B. Button, 1892-93. 

Treasurers.— VciGX T. B. Button, 1882-84; W. J. Ward, 1885-86; P. T. B. 
Button, 1887-90; A. P. Adams, 1891-92; S. A. Spring, 1893. 

The Gowanda Agricultural, Horticultural, and Mechanical Society was 
organized August 31, 1865, being the result of an industrial organization 
formed in 1855, representing adjacent towns in both Cattaraugus and Erie 
counties, and holding annual fairs for several years in Gowanda. The first 
officers were L. S. Jenks, president; Albert Gaensslen, vice-president; Frank 
A. Newell, secretary; William H. Stuart, treasurer. The societ\- purchased 



86 HisTuRV uF Cattaraugus C(jl'xtv. 

and fitted up twenty-five acres of land within the village corporation, and 
until 1875 held yearly exhibits. The property was disposed of about 18S5 
and the affairs of the association permanently wound up. 

Various attempts have been made from time to time to establish and 
maintain farmers' clubs in different parts of the county, but with a few 
exceptions these organizations enjoyed only a brief existence. One of the 
■ most active clubs while it li\'ed was the Farmers' and Mechanics' Club of 
Cattaraugus County, which was organized in January, 1874, with these 
ofificers : President, Frank Keeler, Otto: vice-president, William Stevens, 
Napoli ; secretary-, A. W. Ferrin, Salamanca; corresponding secretary, J. W. 
Sweetland, Little \"allcy; treasurer. A. H. Bedient, Little Valley. The 
object, as set forth in the B}'-Laws, was "the impro\'ement in the theory and 
practice of agriculture and the ad\'ancement of agricultural interests." The 
club went down afcer two or three years, but while it existed meetings were 
generall}- held each month. 

The Farmers' Agricultural Association of Cattaraugus County was organ- 
ized as the Northern Farmers' Agricultural Association on February 13, 1889, 
at West Valley, with Christian Ehman. president, and A. O. Tillinghast, 
secretary. Monthh- meetings Avere held in the different towns in the county 
and various modes of farming discussed. The State Department of Agricul- 
ture furnishes speakers occasionally. The present offtcers are O. H. Smith, 
Ellicottville, president; George W. Boyce, Elkdale, secretary and treasurer. 

The Ischua Valley Agricultural Society was incorporated July 7, 1857, 
with Hollis Scott, Nelson Nourse, Elihu M. Wasson, William O. Leland and 
Hiram Webster, of Hinsdale; Samuel Searl, of Franklinville; and Andrew J. 
Davis, of Ischua, as the first Board of Directors. The organization took in the 
towns of Hinsdale, Franklinville and Ischua, and leased suitable grounds 
about a half-mile north of Hinsdale \illage, where annual fairs 'were success- 
fully held for ten years, when they were discontinued and the affairs of the 
society wound up. 



CHAPTER XIII. 

THE PRESS OF CATTARAUGUS COUXTV. 
[By A. W. Fkrrin.] 

THE pioneer newspaper of Cattaraugus county was the Allcgaitv Mercury, 
which was started in the village of Hamilton (now Olean) in 1818 by 
Benjamin F. Smead. The early number of the Mercury which I have 
been privileged to inspect gave evidence of enterprise and ability on the part 
of this pioneer in Cattaraugus county journalism. It would now be hard to 
realize the difficulties he must have encountered in starting a paper in this 



The Newspapers and Their Editors. 87 

remote and sparsely settled region with its meager news and mail facilities. 
The same remark would apply to some extent, at least, to all the early news- 
paper experiments in the county. In 1S19 Franklin Coudrey became inter- 
ested in the paper and the name was changed to the Hamilton Recorder. After 
experiencing for two or three years the usual vicissitudes of such pioneer enter- 
prises the paper suspended publication. 

From the demise of the Recorder there was no newspaper in the county 
until 1826, when Richard Hill started a paper at EUicottville called the West- 
ern Courier. In 1827 the name was changed to the Cattaraugus Gazette and 
a year or two later it suspended publication. It was neutral in politics. Cyrus 
G. McKay, for many years a prominent citizen of Allegany, and who is still 
living at Port Allegany, Pa., was an employee in this office. 

Lodi ("now Gowanda) gave birth to the next newspaper enterprise in the 
county. The Z(?(// /^/();/i:Yr made its appearance about November, 1827. Lewis 
H. Edwards was the publisher, and the paper was anti-AIasonic in politics. 
Some time prior to January. 1829. G. N. Starr became the publisher and con- 
tinued as such as late certainly as February 29, 1834, although the name of 
the paper at that time was the Cattaraugus Freeman and Lodi Messem^er. 
I. R. Leonard of Gowanda has a copy of the Freeiiian and Messenger of that 
date, bearing Starr's name as publisher, which disproves the statement in 
Evarts's Histor\- of Cattaraugus County that Starr died in 1833 and the paper 
was then suspended. It is worthy of note that Moracc Greeley worked on 
the J/essenger for about six months in 1830 as a journeyman printer, and in 
his personal reminiscenscs the great editor says: '' I left Lodi no richer than I 
came." 

Edwin Hough became the publisher of the Freeman and Messenger on Jan- 
uary 3, 1839. This language in his salutator\-, " ha\-ing assumed the proprie- 
torship of the Freeman and Messenger." etc., would seem to indicate that the 
paper had been continued up to that time, or had not long been extinct. 
Hough made the paper Whig in politics, and continued as editor and proprie- 
tor until November, 1840, when Eliakim Hough became proprietor, Edwin 
Hough retaining the editorship. In January, 1844, the Houghs changed the 
name to the People's Advocate and Lodi Banner diwd in the following March 
curtailed the name to the Lodi Banner. In April, 1844, the paper was discon- 
tinued, the office and fi.xtures being remo\'ed to Springville, where Edwin 
Hough published for a time the Springville Express. He subsequently 
removed to Hornellsville, N. Y., where he established the Tribune. He was 
connected with that paper for many years and died there. 

The EUicottville Republican was started in May, 1833, by a stock company. 
The paper was neutral in politics, and Delos E. Sill was manager. In the fall 
of 1834 Sill retired from the management and was succeeded by Cyrus G. 
McKay, an employee in the office. In April, 1835, the establishment was 
purchased by R. H. Shankland. In 1836 the paper was enlarged and the name 



88 History of Cattaraugus County. 

changed to the Cattaraugus Republican, under which title it was published by 
Shankland until October, 1854, when he sold the office to Fred A. Saxton, who 
subsequently sold an interest to B. F. Morris. The paper was continued by 
Saxton & Morris until 1862. when, owing to the hard times incident to the 
war period, it ceased publication. The Rcpublicaii was Democratic in politics 
from its purchase by Shankland in 1835. Morris went to Warren, Pa., where 
he started the Ledger, and continued as its editor and publisher for some 
twenty-five years. 

In 1835 two brothers by the name of Cutler, both printers, came to Olean 
on their way westward via the Allegheny river. While waiting for passage 
down the river they resurrected an old press and issued a few numbers of a 
paper which bore the name of a former publication, the A/Iegany Mercury. 
From what I can learn this was not a serious effort to establish a paper, but 
merely the pastime of a couple of enterprising young men. 

In 1S36 a stock company, known as the Olean Land and Flydraulic 
Company, having headquarters in New York city, but owning a large tract of 
land in Olean, sent a press and materials to Olean to start a paper to boom 
their enterprise. They also sent as editor of the paper Rufus W. Griswold, 
who afterward gained much distinction in the literary world as editor of 
Graham's Magazine, editor of the International Magazine, and as the author 
of several standard works, among them " Poets and Poetry of America" and 
"Washington and the Generals of the Revolution." Gri.swold was a Baptist 
preacher, and a man of varied talents, but of somewhat eccentric character. 
The paper was called the Olean Advocate, and under Griswold's administration 
was an able and spicy sheet. The first number was issued in July, 1836. The 
Land and Hydraulic Company owned the paper for about a year, and then 
sold it to an Olean company, among whom were F. S. Martin, j. G. Johnson, 
T. H. Porter, and R. Welch. Martin and Johnson had a controlling interest 
in the company. Griswold retired from the editorship about this time, but 
Delos E. Sill, who had charge of the mechanical department, continued with 
it as business manager until 1840, when he went to Ellicott\iIle and started 
the Cattaraugus Whig. Carlos Woodcock, an Olean lawyer, was the editor 
for awhile after Griswold retired, but was soon succeeded by Dudley C. Bryan, 
another Olean lawyer. For a year or so, about this time, the name of 
Stephen Welch, who was then a young man and an apprentice in the office, 
appeared in the paper as publisher by the direction of the company owning 
it. A. M. Badger, an Olean jeweler, succeeded Bryan as editor and changed 
the name to the Olean Times. The Times was published until November, 
1840, when it suspended. The press and materials were stored in the second 
story of Martin's carriage shop, and were destroyed by fire in 1857. The 
Advocate and its successor, the Times, were Whig in politics. 

About 1837 a party of capitalists, among the most prominent of whom was 
Samuel P. Lyman, thought to build a city at Hinsdale. The company owned 



The Newspapers axd Their Editors. 89 

a large tract of land covering a good part of the valley about the village,, 
which they caused to bo surveyed, mapped and laid out into streets, parks, 
etc. In the interest of this scheme a paper was started by Joseph T. Lyman, 
which was called the Hinsdale Democrat. The paper did not continue long 
under the management of Lyman, but passed into the hands of Edward 
Hughes & Co., who continued its publication for about two years, when it 
ceased to exist. In politics the paper was Democratic. 

'Y\it People s Gazette, a Democratic paper, was started in Hinsdale in 1840 
by George C. Smith, and was published by him until 1S42, when he removed 
the establishment to Geneseo, Livingston county. 

The Freein'an and Messenger was started at Scott's Corners, in Hinsdale, in 
1843, by Edwin Fuller, in the interest of a visionary scheme known'as the 
"Manual Labor Institute." Its publication was continued for about two 
years. The press and materials passed into the possession of Allen C. Fuller, 
who issued in 1845 the Expositor, the particular mission of which seemed to 
be to expose the alleged rascalities of the first managers of the " Manual Labor 
Institute." The Expositor's life covered a period of only about six months. 

In the memorable presidential campaign of 1840 Delos E. Sill started the 
Cattaraugus Whig at Ellicottville, to advocate the election of Gen. William 
Henry Harrison and the principles of the Whig party. The ]Vhig received a 
good support, and grew to be one of the ablest and most successful country 
weeklies in western New York. R. L. Cary was associated with Sill in the 
paper from 1848 to 1854, the firm being Cary & Sill. When the Whig party 
dissolved the name of the paper was changed to the Cattaraugus Freeman, 
and ii[)on the formation of the Republican party it became the recognized 
exponent in the county of the principles of the new party. Mr. Sill continued 
in the control of the Freeman until stricken by an incurable malady, wjien it 
passed in 1864 into the hands of his son, C. D. Sill, and his brother-in-law, 
C. M. Beecher. In the winter of 1866 Beecher & Sill sold the press and office 
materials to J. T. Henry of the Olean Advertiser and the subscription list to 
the Olean Times, and the Freeman ceased to exist. 

Delos E. Sill was born in Cooperstown, N. Y. He was a printer by trade, 
and prior to coming to Cattaraugus county worked in Geauga, Ohio, and 
Buffalo, N. Y. He came to Ellicottville in 1833, and was manager of the 
Republican for a year or more. During this time he married Miss Harriet 
Beecher, a daughter of Moses Beecher, one of the leading men of the county 
at that time. In October, 1835, Mr. Sill started the Democrat at Aurora, 
N. Y. This was not a successful venture, and the paper was discontinued in 
February, 1836. When the Advocate was started at Olean in July, 1836, he was 
made its business manager. His career as founder and publisher of the 
Cattaraugus IV/iig and Cattaraugus Freeman is fully given above. Mr. Sill 
was an excellent business man and political manager. In the latter respect 
he probably excelled any man ever connected with the press of Cattaraugus 
12 



90 History of Cattaraucus Couxtv. 

county. He was a power in the politics of the count}- until stricken with the 
disease -which retired him from active life. He died in 1870, in the 59th year 
of his age. Under his management the' Freeman was the most prosperous 
paper published in the county during its existeiice, and gave him a fair com- 
petenc}' for the years of his retirement and for his fan-iily after he was gone. 
Mr. Sill was twice nominated as presidential elector, and in 1848 was appointed 
messenger of the electoral college of New- York. In 1861 he was appointed 
U. S. agent for the New York Indians, which position he held until ill health 
compelled his resignation. Mr. Sill was not an editorial writer, but employed 
men who could satisfactoril)- phrase his sentiments and ideas. C. M. Beecher, 
a brother-in-law, was with him for some years, and, as already stated, was 
associated with his son in the publication of the Freema)i after Mr. Sill became 
incapacitated. Mr. Beecher was a writer of much ability, and was a journalist 
at Wellsville and Elmira, N. Y., after leaving Ellicott\-ille in 1866. He was 
editor-in-chief of the Ehnwei Adi'er/iser when he died sonie years since. 
After the sale of the Freeniaii C. D. Sill was engaged with William Beecher, 
another uncle, in the publication of the Dunkirk Jpiiriieil for a year or two. 

The Randolph Herald WTif. started in March, 1842, and had an existence of 
about fi\-e }'ears. Its publishers were successiveh- William Mason, Lorenzo 
and Julius Marsh, Fletcher Russell and J. J. Strong. The latter was 
publisher for about two years, when he was con\erted to Mormonism and 
remo\-ed to Nauvoo, 111., and the paper was discontinued. 

About March, 1847, the Western Democrat was started at Lodi by A. A. 
Ladue. It was Democratic in politics. April 26, 1848. William Van Vechten 
succeeded to the management of the paper, but on the 17th of May following- 
he was succeeded by John W. Mason and Charles Aldrich. They passed the 
paper back to Van Vechten in June, 1848. In September. 1848, the name of 
the village was changed from Lodi to Gowanda, and the name of the paper 
was changed to the Gozcanda Democrat to conform to the name of the village. 
The paper soon after expired. J. C. Van Duzer issued the Goivanda Persia)/ 
on November 21, 1848. It was independent in politics and had only a brief 
existence. 

In October, 1850, H. ^I. Morgan began the publication at Gowanda of the 
Cattaraugns Chronicle. It was Democratic in politics. In June, 1852, the 
name was changed to the Fidependent Chronicle, \\'\\.\\ Re\-. L. S. Morgan as 
editor, H. M. Morgan continuing as publisher. In July, 1854, John M. 
Henry took an interest in the paper, the firm becoming Morgan & Henry. 
The name of the paper was changed to the Gowanda Chronicle, and it became 
the exponent of the principles of the Know-Nothing party. Mr. Henry's 
connection with the paper was of short duration, and upon his retirement 
H. M. Morgan continued as publisher until April, 1856, when he sold out to- 
John P. Grierson, of Buffalo, who made the paper Republican in politics. The 
first number under Grierson was issued, and the second was in press, when the 



The Newspapers and Tpieir Editors. 91 



disastrous fire which swept through Gowanda, April 30, 1S56, destroyed the 
entire establishment. 

The GoK'iriuia Pluvnix rose from the ashes of the Chronicle. Rev. Louis 
S. Morgan was the publisher, and the first number bore date August 15, 1856. 
The paper was published until iS;;, when the press and materials were sold 
and removed to Bradford, Pa., where they were used in the publication of the 
Bradford Miner. 

While publishing the Chrouiele the Morgans printed a hymn book and 
three or four books of the New Testament in the Seneca language. After 
leaving Gowanda H. M. Morgan published a paper for a time at Silver Creek, 
N. Y., and then removed to Chicago, where he died about 1864. Rev. L. S. 
Morgan, father of H. M. Morgan, died at Rutledgc a few years since, at an 
advanced age. 

The Neosopliie Gem was the name of a literary journal published in Ran- 
dolph from 184S to 1852 by A. M. Shattuck. 

In November, 1850, James T. Henry started the GoiveDida Whig. A few 
months later he removed the office to EUicottville, where he issued the Wliig 
and Union. He soon changed the name to \.\iQ. Anieriean ['nion,3.v\d continued 
as its publisher until 1855, when the establishment was sold to R. H. Shank- 
land. When first started the ['nion was "silver gray " Whig in politics, but 
when the W'hig party disintegrated it became an advocate of the principles of 
the American or " Know-Nothing" party. In 1856 it supported Fillmore and 
Donelson, the "Know-Nothing" candidates for the presidency and vice-presi- 
dency. A year or so later it became a Democratic sheet, and since that time 
it has been a steadfast advocate of Democratic principles. In 1862 the name 
was changed to the Cattaraugus L'nion, which title it still bears. About 1S69 
P. K. Shankland became associated with his father in the publication of the 
Union. In 1879 ^^ ^^^^ ^^^ paper and went to Jamestown, where he was inter- 
ested with E. A. Brooks of EUicottville in the publication of a new Demo- 
cratic journal. He is at present editor and publisher of t\\Q Jaincstozvn Satur- 
day Times. Upon the retirement of P. K. Shankland from the Union his elder 
brother, R. H. Shankland, Jr., became a member of the publishing firm. In 
May, 1 88 1, the Union was removed to the rapidly growing village of Salamanca, 
where it is still published by R. H. Shankland, Jr. 

Robert H. Shankland was actively engaged in the newspaper business in 
Cattaraugus county for more than forty years. He was born in Cooperstown, 
N. Y., October i, 181 3. He was a printer, learning his trade in Cooperstown, 
afterwards working in New York in the book printing establishment of the 
Harper Brothers and in the newspaper offices of the city. Horace Greeley 
was a compositor in some of these ofifices, and worked side by side with him. 
Mr. Shankland came to Cattaraugus county in 1835, and was connected with 
the newspapers of the county continuously from that date until his death, 
which occurred at his home in EUicottville, November i, 1889. He possessed 



92 History of Cattaraugus County. 

much native ability, was a man of kindly impulses and an honorable competi- 
tor. He was a prominent figure in the Democratic party of the county, and 
for many years was familiarly known as the oldest Democratic editor west of 
Cayuga Bridge. He was surrogate of Cattaraugus county for nine years, was 
supervisor of Ellicottville for two terms, was a presidential elector in 1844, 
and was U. S. agent for the New York Indians for two years under President 
Polk. 

The Cattaraugus SacJicni was started at Randolph in June, 185 1, by Charles 
Aldrich. It was a Democratic sheet of the "Free Soil" or anti-slavery type. 
The Sachem was published about one year, B. F. Morris being associated in its 
publication for the last six months. Aldrich then removed the office to Olean, 
where he issued the Olcatrjournal. For the first year the Joiirnal was neutral 
in politics ; it then hoisted the Democratic banner, but was strongly opposed 
to the extension of slavery into the territories. In 1856 Aldrich sold his inter- 
est in the y^«r«rt/ to James T. Henr\-, who changed the name to the Olean 
Advertiser and made it independent in politics. In 1857 Aldrich went to 
Iowa and started a Republican paper at Webster City, which he published until 
the autumn of 1862, when he enlisted and served in the Union army about two 
years as adjutant of the 32d Iowa Infantry. From 1866 to 1869 he published 
the Marsha/ltoivn Times, and since the latter date he has been connected with 
various Iowa newspapers, among them the W'atcr/oo Courier, the Dubuque 
Daily Times and the Council Bluffs Nonpareil. He is at the present writing 
curator of the Historical Collection in the Iowa State Library at Des Moines. 

During the stormy war period the Olean Advertiser favored the Demo- 
cratic party, and was one of the strongest papers of that faith in the county. 
In 1868 the Advertiser office was for the second time destroyed by fire, and 
Henry then removed to Jamestown and began the publication of a new Dem- 
ocratic paper called the Chautauqua County Press. 

James T. Henry was born in Cherry Valley, Otsego county, February 22, 
1823. In 1835 the^" family removed to Lodi, this county, and young Henry 
learned the printer's trade in the office of the Freeman and Messenger. He 
was a workman of more than ordinary skill and taste, and worked as journey- 
man printer until he began business for himself at Gowanda in 1850. From 
1850 to 1868 he was continuously connected with the press of Cattaraugus 
county as editor and publisher. He was an able and vigorous writer, and took 
an active part in the political controversies of the day. After leaving 
Cattaraugus county in 1868 he published the Chautauqua County Press at 
Jamestown for two years, and then went to Titusville, Pa., where he 
established the Courier. This he published successfully for three years, and 
. selling his interest he started the Titusville Sunday Nezvs, which was his last 
active work in the newspaper line. After selling the N'etvs he engaged for 
several years in the oil business. In addition to his regular editorial work Mr. 
Henry was the author of a valuable "History- of Petroleum " and a history of 



The Newspapers and Their Editors. 93 

the " Pioneers and Supervisors of Cattaraugus County." During his residence 
in Cattaraugus county he was for some years a member of the Board of 
Supervisors, president of the village of Olean, and at one time held a State 
appointment on the canals. He died at Titusville in 1878. His remains were 
interred at Olean. 

The Randolph Wldg was started by C. K. Judson and B. F. Morris in July, 
1853. Judson sold out to Morris, who changed the name to the Randolpli 
Reporter and made the paper Democratic. He continued its publication at 
Randolph until July, 1858, when he removed the office to Gowanda with the 
intention of trying his journalistic fortunes there. Before the first number 
was issued, however, he sold the office to VV. W. Henry and Frank G. Steb- 
bins, employees in the office, and under the firm name of Henry & Stebbins 
they issued in August, 1858, the Gozvanda Reporter. The paper was 
Democratic in politics. ' Mr. Stebbins withdrew from the firm in November, 
1S59, and went to Cuba, where he established the True Patriot, which he 
published for some twenty years, and nearly tip to the time of his death. 
Soon after the withdrawal of Stebbins, Henry sold a half interest in the 
Reporter to D. F. Moody, of Perrysburg, who soon afterward sold out to 
F. J. Fuller. The paper continued under the proprietorship of Henry & Fuller 
until September, i86i,-when Henry sold his interest to Charles E. Benton, an 
apprentice in the office, and enlisting in the 64th Regiment, New York 
Volunteers, went to the war. The paper was published by Fuller & Benton 
until 1864, when Benton went to Fredonia. In 1868 he purchased the 
Advertiser of that place, with which paper he was connected until his death, 
February 10, 1877. The Reporter was continued by Fuller for only a short 
time after Benton left it. 

In May, i860, some $1,200 was raised bj- subscription for the establishment 
of a Republican newspaper at Olean. Among the most prominent contribu- 
tors to the subscription fund were R. O. Smith, Samuel W. Bradley, Charles 
H. Thing, and John G. Mersereau. A contract was made with L. M. Gano, 
by which, in consideration of the §1,200, he was to publish a Republican paper 
in Olean for a term of five years. Upon the fulfillment of the contract the 
type, press, etc., purchased with the §1,200 was to become the property of 
Gano or his assigns. .The Olean Times was started by Gano under this 
contract in July, i860. Soon after, A. E. Fay became interested in the paper 
with Gano. In August, 1862, the office was destroyed by fire, but was 
replaced with another purchased with the insurance money. In the fall of 
1863 Gano sold his interest in the paper to Fay and went to Watkins, N. Y., 
where he engaged in the publication of the Express, with which paper he is 
still connected. 

In August, 1864, Fay sold out to George D. A. Bridgeman, who undertook 
to move the establishment to Penn Yan, N. Y. The Olean parties who made 
the contract with Gano in i860 forcibly prevented Bridgeman from removing 



94 HisTOKV OF Cattaraugus Countv. 

the materials, and a suit was brought by him in the Supreme Court to 
reco\'er tlieir value. The Olean parties sold the materials to C. F. Dickinson 
in Alarch, 1865, under a contract similar to that entered into with Gano in 
i860. The suit of Bridgeman against R. O. Smith and others was tried in 
the Supreme Court at Little Valley, June 15, 1868, before Justice George 
Barker. A verdict was rendered in favor of Bridgeman for §1,500, subject to 
the opinion of the Supreme Court at General Term. The General Term, 
however, rendered a decision in favor of the defendants. Mr. Dickinson was 
publisher of the Times from March, 1865, until his death, which occurred June 
10, 1871. His widow continued the business with Miles A. Davis as editor 
until January i, 1872, when she sold the establishment to George W. Dickin- 
son, her husband's brother, who was its publisher until December, 1881. In 
1879 the Times was made a daily, and the daily edition has since been 
regularly issued. Dickinson sold the Times in December, 1 881, to a stock 
company composed of Olean gentlemen, the company being known as The 
Times Publishing Company. After leaving Olean Dickinson went to Florida, 
where he published a paper at St. Augustine- for a time, and later returned to 
Carthage, N. Y. For some years he has been editor of the CartJiagc Tribune. 
When the Times was purchased by the stock company R. C. Hill merged 
with it the Press, which he had started in the spring of 1881, and he was made 
managing editor. The stock company's management was not successful or 
satisfactor\', and in April, 1883, the establishment was leased to E. L. Vincent 
and George N. Wood. Hill went to Buffalo, where he was successively on 
the editorial staffs of the Courier and the Cominereial, and was for two years 
editor of the Sunday Truth. Vincent was editor of the Times until June, 
1884, when he went to Binghamton and took an editorial posi-tion on the 
Daily Rcpubliean of that city. He subsequently had a similar position on the 
Journal of Hartford, Conn., and later owned for a time the Advocate at 
Waverly, N. Y. W^ood continued as business manager of the Times until 
September, 1884, when he purchased the establishment and was owner and 
publisher until September, 1887, when he died of typhoid fever. Mr. Wood 
devoted his time principally to the business management of the paper, and 
during the greater part of his administration Samuel H. Coon was local 
editor and Hon. D. H. Bolles wrote the editorial leaders. The paper was 
continued by Mrs. Wood with Coon as manager until December i, 1887, when 
it was sold to S. C. Green, B. B. Weber and A. W. Ferrin, the 'firm name 
being S. C. Green & Co. The establishment is still owned by these parties, 
but Mr. Green having retired from the active management in February, 1891, 
the firm is now Ferrin & Weber. Samuel H. Coon has been city editor of the 
Times since it passed into the hands of its present owners. From its 
establishment in i860 to the present time the Times has advocated the princi- 
ples of the Republican party. A weekly issue has been continued since the 
daily was started. 



The Newspapers axu Their Editors. 95 

Charles F. Dickinson, who was publisher of the Olcaii Turns from March, 
1865, to June, 1871, was born in Ontario county, December 14, 1829. He 
resided in Branchport, Yates county, until 1859, pursuing the vocation of a 
shoemaker. He then removed to Penn Yan and held a clerical position in the 
county clerk's office for three years. Leaving Penn Yan he purchased the 
Reporter at Angelica, Allegany county, which he published in connection with 
his brother, George W., until he purchased the Times in 1865. He then 
disposed of his interest in the Reporter to his brother and gave his attention 
to the Times during the remainder of his life. Mr. Dickinson was a man of 
retiring disposition, but had a warm heart and kindly nature, and was highly 
esteemed by those who knew him. His widow, Martha B., was a woman of 
unusual mental endowment, and was prominently engaged for many years in 
the temperance reform movement. While engaged in this work she married 
Hon.. John O'Donnell, State senator from Lewis county, and removed to 
Lowville, \\-here she has since resided. 

George N. Wood, publisher of the Times from September, 1884, ^^o Septem- 
ber, 1887, was born at Starkey, Yates county, November 1 1, 1859. When about 
ten years old his parents removed to Burlingame, Kan., where his youth and 
early manhood were spent. In 1876 he returned east and entered the employ 
of his uncle, George W. Dickinson, publisher of the Oleaii Times. He was in 
the office of the Times as book-keeper and business and editorial assistant most 
of the time from that date until his purchase of the Times in 1884. He was an 
enterprising and energetic young man and a very efificicnt business manager. 

In April, 1865, J. H. Melvin, of Springville, started the Gowarida Bulletin. 
It was independent in politics, but as the publisher once naively remarked to 
the writer, " It came out square-toed for the Union, and the week following its 
birth the southern Confederacy weakened and fell." The Bulletin lived but 
one year. Meh'in subsequently established the Spri)igville Local Nezvs, and 
has been and is now a contributor of humorous, poetical and narrative 
sketches to several of the Buffalo papers. 

The Randolph Register was founded by Southwick & Grierson in Septem- 
ber, 1865. When first started it was called the Rural City Budget, but the 
name did not strike the popular fancy, and it was soon changed to the Register. 
It was Republican in politics. Grierson had but a brief connection with the 
paper, .selling his interest to Austin L. Topliff. In i866Topliff purchased 
Southwick's interest and became sole proprietor. In the fall of 1867 the paper 
passed into the hands of William A. Shewman, who was in control until July, 
1869, when he sold out to Topliff, who again sold to Shewman in August, 
1872. Topliff went to Kansas, where he was connected with various news- 
paper enterprises. In the presidential campaign of 1872 the Register 
supported Horace Greeley for president, and was " Liberal Republican" in 
politics until February, 1874, when Shewman sold out to F. J. Lockwood and 
E. J. Smith, when it again became Republican. D. D. Lockwood purchased 



96 



History of Cattaraugus County. 



Smith's interest inNovember, 1875, the firm then becoming F. J. &: D. D. 
Lockwood. The Lockwood Brothers were publishers of the Ri-^is/cY until 
April 2, 1882, when they sold to George \V. Roberts and John Mishy. 
Roberts & Mishy were the publishers until November, 1882, when the interest 
of Mishy was purchased by Ben S. Dean. Roberts & Dean conducted the 
paper until May 30, 1885, when Dean sold his interest to Charles W. Terry 
and removed to Jamestown, where he founded the. JaiJicstoivn Morning Xcius. 
of which paper he is still the editor. About a year later Terry came into full 
control of the paper, which he retained until December, 1885, when he sold 
his entire" interest to Marc D. Johnson & Co. In May, 1890, this firm 
purchased the Couraiit of W. A. Shewman, and the name of the firm was 
changed to The Randolph Publishing Company. In January, 1892, Marc D. 
Johnson acquired all the stock in the company, and has since been sole pro- 
prietor.. The Courant was consolidated with the Register March 28, 1892. 
The Register hTisheevi. Republican since 1874, and is still of that political faith. 

The Weekly Pioneer was started in Franklinville in November, 1865, by 
H. A. Williams. A few months later A. M. Curtiss became interested in the 
paper, the firm name being Williams & Curtiss. Subsequently the name of 
the paper was changed to the Franklinville Pioneer, and in the latter part of 
1867 Curtiss sold out to Williams, who shortly after removed the office to 
Arcade, where he published a paper for a year or two. The Pioneer was 
independent in politics. 

In January, 1867, A. W. F"errin brought to EUicottville the press and 
materials of a defunct newspaper at Springville, and on February- 7, 1867, 
issued the first number of the Cattaraugus Republiean. The Republican 
supplied the need of a Republican paper at the county seat, which was 
seriously felt after the discontinuance of the Cattaraugus Freeman early in 
1866, and it very soon took the place of that old and popular newspaper as an 
exponent of Republican principles. In May, 1868, the county seat was 
removed to Little Valley and the Republiean accompanied it. January i, 
1873, B. B. Weber became an equal owner in the paper, the firm being Ferrin 
& Weber. In August, 1873, Ferrin & Weber opened a branch office in 
Salamanca and from that time on the Republican was dated at Salamanca and 
Little Valley. The business at Salamanca grew to such proportions that in 
October, 1875, the press and job department was transferred to that place, and 
subsequently all the work was done at the Salamanca office. In February, 
1876, Ferrin & Weber, became the publishers also of the Bradford Semi- 
Weekly Era. In October, 1877, the paper was made a daily. In May, 1878, 
Ferrin & Weber sold their interest in the Bradford paper to C. F. Persons, who 
had been local editor of the Era and had had a proprietary interest in it from 
the time it was made a daily. In September, 1880, the Republican office was 
destroyed in the great conflagration at Salamanca. In November following 
Hon. S. C. Green, of Little Valley, purchased a third interest in the paper, the 



The Newspapers and Their Editors. 97 

firm name being changed to Ferrin, Weber & Green. This partnership con- 
tinued to November, 1883, when Green sold his interest to Ferrin & Weber, 
who have been since and are still its publishers. The Republican has been a 
steadfast advocate of Republican doctrines from its first issfie. Since 
December i, 1887, Messrs. Green, Ferrin & Weber have been owners and 
publishers of the Olean Times. 

The Portville Mirror was started in the village of Portville early in 1867 
by B. D. Southwick. The paper was Republican in politics, and had an 
existence of about a year. Southwick removed the ofifice to Sherman, 
Chautauqua county, where he published a paper for a time, and from there he 
went to Mayville. and later to Belmont, N. Y., where he soon after died. The 
paper at Belmont was continued. for some years by his widow. 

The Goivanda Gazette was started by John S. Fidler in June, 1867. It 
was independent in politics with leanings toward Republicanism. The 
Gazette was published by Fidler for about ten years, when he sold out to John 
J. Horton and E. D. Deming, who issued the Gozi'anda Enterprise as an 
independent paper. For some two years under Fidler, beginning in 1869, 
W. B. Howland was editor of the Gazette. After leaving Gowanda in 1871 
Howland was for five years editor and publisher of the Advertiser at 
Kinderhook, N. V., for seven years editor and publisher of the Courier at 
Chatham, N. V., and for about five years editor, and publisher of the Tribune 
at Cambridge, Mass. While at Chatham he founded the Outing Magazine, of 
which he was editor. He was also in editorial charge for two years after 
Outing was consolidated with the Wheelman. Mr. Howland is at the present 
writing the publisher and general manager of the Christian Union of New 
York city. Deming retired from the Enterprise in Novembtr, 1880, and 
engaged in various journalistic enterprises. He is now connected with the 
Shoe and Leal her Rcviezv, published in Boston, Mass. • Horton continued as 
publisher of the Enterprise until January 28, 1887, when he sold to S. Clay 
Torrance and Merle D. Colby. During the years he owned the Enterprise, 
and subsequently, Horton was extensively engaged in show printing and 
devoted his time and energies to that part of the business. For several years 
the editorial work was principally done by Hon. W^illiam H. Stuart. In the 
summer of 1891 Horton moved his show printing establishment to Cleveland, 
Ohio. Torrance & Colby changed the name of the paper to Our Public Inter- 
ests, and made it a prohibition organ. April 5, 1888, they sold the paper to a 
stock company composed of Gowanda gentlemen, who changed the name to 
the Gowanda Herald and made it a Republicail paper with James Kavanaugh 
as editor. In December, 1890, Horton bought the stock of The Herald 
Publishing Company, and continued the publication of the paper with 
Kavanaugh as editor until February 6, 1891, when he sold it to George I. 
Lincoln, who in turn sold it to Charles D. Shults of the Cherry Creek Nezvs on 
April 10, 1891. The Herald is published by Shults, and is Republican. 

13 



98 History of Cattaraugus County. 

After selling out at Gowanda J. S. Fidler started a paper at Cattaraugus 
under the name of the Gazette^ which was published for a time, and was then 
removed to Salamanca, where it was issued in 1880 in the interests of the 
Greenback* party. It had a precarious e.xistence in Salamanca for a few 
months only, and was then removed to Scio, N. Y. 

The Tinvii Talk, a semi-monthly independent paper, was started by A. H. 
McClure at Allegany in August, 1874. In May, 1875, it was enlarged and the 
name changed to the Allegany Journal. In August, 1875, it was sold to J. J. 
Barker and changed to a weekly. Barker remained in control only about ten 
months, when the paper reverted to McClure, who was its publisher until 
January, 1S77, when a half interest was sold to A. Pfirsch. With the advent 
of the latter to the firm the -^0 //;-;/(?/ became Democratic in politics, but in June 
following it became an exponent of the principles of the Greenback part\-. 
In 1880 Pfirsch became sole proprietor, and continued its publisher until its 
suspension a few months later. After the suspension of x.\\cJoiiriiiil McClure 
published the Monthly Infidel for a short time. 

The Weekly Argus was established at Franklinville it September. 1875. b\- 
Francis M. Perley. It was neutral in politics and has so continued up to the 
present time. On April i, 1889, Perley transferred the paper to his son, 
Charles A., and removed to Waverly, Tioga county, where he purchased the 
Advocate, of which paper he is still the publisher. When the Argus changed 
hands in 1889 the name was changed to the Chronicle, which name it still 
bears. C. A. Perley is still its editor and publisher. 

With the extension of the oil de\'elopment down the Tuna \alley from 
Bradford the village of Limestone took on a wcw life and ambition, and 
among the results was the Tujia Valley Oil Xezcs, which made its appearance 
in 1876. Charles F. Topliff was the publisher, and in p(.ilitics it ta\ured the 
Greenback party. In September, 1878, the office was removed to Jamestown 
and used in the publication of the People's Press, a Greenback sheet that had 
but a brief e.xistence. 

The Limestone Times was the name of a weekly paper started in Ma}-, 

1878. It was owned by a stock company composed of Limestone citizens, 
and Robert Troup was the editor and manager. Troup was soon succeeded 
by J. Hill Thompson, and in No\-ember, 1878, the name was changed to the 
Limestone Telegraph. It had but a brief existence thereafter. 

The Limestone Reporter was published by Ferrin & Weber of Salamanca 
with Shep. L. Vibbard as local editor and manager, beginning in Februarj^-, 

1879, ^"d closing in September, 1880. The failure of the Limestone oil field 
to meet the expectations of the people and operators led to an abandonment 
of all newspaper enterprises in that village. 

The Boy's Argus was a small amateur paper started in East Randolph by 
O. M. Jeffords and A. H. Holt in September, 1873. In March, 1874, it was 
enlarged to eight pages and the name changed to the Empire Herald. In 



Thk Xi:\vsr'ArKRs and Thkir EnrroRs. 99 

September, 1875, Holt sold his interest to Jeffords, ^\ho afterwards discon- 
tinued the paper. 

The Pine I'allcy Xcus was started in 1876 by E. F. Beach. It was 
independent in politics, and was published by Beach until 1878, when he sold 
to Wheeler & Wilson. In 1879 W'ilson sold to Wheeler, and in 1881 Wheeler 
sold to Charles J. Shults. W^heeler is now on the editorial staff of the Buffalo 
Times. Shults published the Nctvs until November, 1885, \vhen he removed 
the office to Cherry Creek and consolidated it with the Cherry Creek Monitor, 
changing the name to the Cherry Creek Xeics. Shults is still the publisher of 
the Xe'iv.'s and also of the Goii.<aneia Herald. 

While the rag money fever was raging in the political field George W. 
Mason started a paper at Salamanca in 1877, ^vhich he called the County 
Record, devoted to the principles of the Greenback party. The Record never 
got much of a foothold, and expired shortly after the presidential election of 
1880. Mason went to Warsaw, N. Y., and started a monthly under the title 
of the Pioneers, which had a brief existence. 

The Olean Record was established by Henry J\I. McKenzie, the first issue 
appearing January 5, 1877. It supported the principles of the Greenback 
party. McKenzie continued as its publisher until November 22, 1879, \\hen 
he sold to W. W. Henry and Charles V. Persons. Mr. McKenzie came to 
Cattaraugus county from Michigan, and was in tlie employ at first of the 
Chemical Extract Company at Vandalia in a clerical capacity. Later he filled 
an editorial position on the Olean Times under George W. Dickinson, and 
subsequently started the Olean Record as above stated. McKenzie was a 
journalist of more than ordinary ability, and considering what he had to do 
with he made the Record di first-class paper. But little is known of McKenzie's 
antecedents. One of his intimate friends informs us that he had a brilliant 
war record, having enlisted as a private in a Michigan regiment and rising to 
a colonelcy. When he sold the Record at Olean he went to Leadville, Col., 
and took the editorship of a mining journal, but died within a year of a lung 
trouble. Henry & Persons changed the name of the paper to the Democrat, 
and the politics were made to conform to the name. In 1880 a daily was 
issued from mid-summer until after the presidential election. Henry retired 
from the firm in April, 1881. When the excitement attending the opening of 
the Allegany oil field was at its height in 1881 Persons started a morning 
paper called the Daily Herald, which was particularly devoted to oil matters. 
Pat. Boyle, subsequently manager of the Standard Oil Company's Newspaper 
Bureau, was interested for a time in this daily venture. When a daily paper 
was started at Richburg, Allegany county, about a year later. Persons merged 
the Daily Herald into a Sunday paper called the Sunday Herald. The 
Herald o^CQ \wa.s destroyed by fire in August, 1883. Persons then bought 
the Sunday Mirror office and consolidated the Mirror with the Herald. In 
June, 1885, the Sunday issue was discontinued and the daily revived. In 



loo History of Cattaraugus County. 

February, 1885, H. D. Sibley purchased an interest in the concern, but 
retired in July, 1886, and engaged for a time in journalistic work in Auburn, 
N. Y. In January, 1889, Persons went to New York as manager for the 
American Press Association, and a new firm was formed under the name of 
Persons, Sibley & Spaulding, the members of the firm being C. F. Persons, 
H. D. Sibley and Preston D. Spaulding. Persons retired from the firm Janu- 
ary I, 1891. Spaulding died May 28, 1892. In the July following Sibley 
purchased the interest of Spaulding, and is now sole proprietor. From the 
purchase of the Record by Henry & Persons in 1879 ^ weekly paper has been 
issued from the Herald office known as the Democrat, which has supported the 
principles of the Democratic party. 

Preston D. Spaulding was born in Deerfield, Warren county, Ohio, 
September 10, 1867, and had lived in Olean for about fourteen years. He 
learned the printer's trade in the office of the Olean Times and was with the 
Times until 1887. He then took a course in the Poughkeepsie Business 
College, and in February, 1889, became one of the publishers of the Herald. 
His death was caused by consumption, and he died at the home of a sister in 
Cleveland, Ohio, having just returned to that place from Colorado, whither 
he went in the previous January with the hope that the climate would effect 
a restoration of health. Mr. Spaulding v\'as a young man highly esteemed by 
a large circle of friends. 

The Mirror was a Sunday paper started in Olean in 1882 by C. F. 
Persons. It was soon after sold to Rev. J. J. Keyes, who changed it to the 
Saturday Evening Mirror. Ben S. Dean was associated with Keyes in the 
publication of the paper for a time. It was a non-partisan sheet with Repub- 
lican leanings, and its publication was continued until August, 1883, when the 
ofifice was purchased by C. F. Persons, to take the place of the Herald office, 
destroyed by fire. 

The Weekly Conrant was founded by W. A. Shewman and W. W. 
Canfield at Randolph in January, 1878. It was independent in politics until 
1884, when it came out in support of the Democratic party. In 1886 Canfield 
sold out to Shewman. He subsequently took a position on the Utiea 
Observer, and is now city editor of that paper. Shewman continued its 
publication until May, 1 890, when he sold to The Randolph Publishing 
Company. From that time until March 28, 1892, O. M. Jeffords was editor, 
and the paper was Democratic. On the latter date the paper was consoli- 
dated with the Register, under the nam./p of the Randolph Register and Weekly 
Courant. The consolidated paper is Republican. 

The Yorkshire Press was established at Yorkshire Center by Miss Abbie 
E. Hufstader in April, 1882. It was an advocate of prohibition principles and 
W. C. T. U. temperance work. In May, 1887, Miss Hufstader sold to W. F. 
Persons and went to Lockport, N. Y., where she started a prohibition paper. 
This venture was not a success and the paper was discontinued. Miss 



The Newspapers and Their Editors. ioi 

Hufstader still has a job printing office in Lockport, and is engaged in 
evangelistic temperance work. Upon its purchase by Persons the Press was 
made independent in politics, and so continues. Persons is at present 
publisher also of the Holland Review, Aj-eade Reeonl s.nd Sardinia Censor. 

In 1S82 H. L. Green started in Salamanca a monthly publication under the 
name of the Freethinkers' Magazine. It was dex'oted to the promulgation of 
free-thought principles and ideas. Since November, 1886, the publication 
office of the magazine has been in -Buffalo. 

In 1882 Robert B. Carr started an independent paper at Ellicottviiie under 
the name of the Xen's. It was conducted by him until December, 1885, when 
it passed into the hands of Hollis W. Hill. It was published by Hill until 
May, 1886, when it was leased by Brand Brothers, who made it a Democratic 
sheet and continued its publication until July. 1887. At that time it passed 
into the hands of Hon. C. P. Vedder, but was published by E. C. Brand as an 
independent sheet until May, 1S88, when Brand retired. It was then edited 
for a short time by Miss Greenman and later by W. L. Rasey. In 1889 
Arthur J. Salisbury became editor and publisher, and still retains that 
position. It is now Republican in politics. 

The Franklinville Star was started by J. A. Orr in July, 1883, as a 
prohibition organ. In July, 1885, Orr sold out to a stock company known as 
the Star Publishing Company. The paper was removed to Machias and the 
name changed to the Cattarangiis Star. The paper has been edited and 
managed for the Star Company by John C. Smith, and is still the organ of 
the prohibitionists of the county. 

The J^ost was established at Ellicottviiie in 1884 by James Mofifit & Son, 
the first number being dated November 24th. The paper is still issued by 
Moffit & Son and is Republican in politics. 

In October, 1884, an independent paper was started at Cattaraugus by 
J. D. Jones under the name of the Cattaraugus Gazette. In the following 
month George Straight purchased the paper and the name was changed to 
the Cattaraugus Times. The paper was published by Straight, assisted by his 
son Charles D., until 1885, when the latter became the sole proprietor. In 
1888 the name was changed to the Cattaraugus County Times, and in 1890 it 
was made a Republican paper. Charles D. Straight is still the editor and 
publisher. 

The Lively Times \vas the title of a monthly paper started in West Valley 
in May, 1886, by A. O. Tillinghast, an enterprising merchant in that village. 
It was independent in politics and was largely devoted to agricultural matters. 
It was published for four years and was then merged in the Post at 
Ellicottviiie. 

The Cattaraugus Journal was founded at Franklinville, August 23, 1888, 
by Levi T. Spring. It was Republican in politics until March, 1889, when 
Ward Morton purchased a half interest. It was then made independent. 



I02 History of Cattakaihius County. 

Spring died August 31, 1890, and from that time Morton has been editor and 
manager. He has been sole owner since April, 1891. In September, 1891, 
the name was 'changed to the Fraiikliiivillc Journal. Levi T. Spring was a 
son of the late Judge Samuel S. Spring. He was born in Franklinville, June 
28, 1855. He was educated at Ten Broeck Free Academy, and learned the 
trade of marble cutter. In 1876 he w^ent west, working at his trade in Kansas, 
Nebraska and Texas. In 1880 he returned to Arcade, N. Y., and in January, 
1882, married Myra Lyon, of Dalton, Livingston county. He was for "a time 
in partnership with his father-in-law, Plin B. Lyon, in a country store. He 
returned to Franklinville in 1884 and taught painting classes in that and 
neighboring villages for a year or two. In 1886 he opened a job printing 
office in Franklinville, and in 1888 he started the Journal as above noted. 
Mr. Spring was a bright and talented young man, and doubtless would have 
made his mark in the field of journalism had he lived. 

In April, 1889, M. D. Colby started an independent paper at Little Valley 
under the title of the County Scat Chronicle. In May R. K. Godding became 
an equal partner in the business, and about the middle of July the paper 
passed into the hands of Godding and George C. Wilson, who changed the 
name to the Capital. Wilson & Godding published the Capital for a few- 
weeks, when the firm dissolved and Godding became publisher. Subse- 
quently he turned .the concern over to Wilson, who ran the paper until March 
21, 1890, when it was discontinued. 

The Educator, a monthly journal devoted to the education of the young 
men and women of our country in the current events of the day, was started 
in Januar}-, 1889, by Prof. \\. H. Smith, A. B., principal of the Portville 
Union School. The publication of^ce was in Buffalo until December, 1892, 
when the printing was begun at Little Valley by W. H. Smith, a brother of 
the publisher. All the other work, including the setting of the type, is done 
at Portville. The matter in the Educator is all original, and the journal has 
attained a monthly circulation of 25,000 copies. 

In August, 1890, W. S. Norton and D. McMillen started a paper at Olean 
under the name of the Olcan Sunday Hatchet. It was independent in politics 
with strong Democratic proclivities. McMillen retired from the paper in 
September, 1890. Its publication was continued by Norton until March, 1891, 
when he discontinued it to accept a position on the reportorial staff of the 
Buffalo Courier. 

The latest newspaper within the county is the East Randolph Enterprise, 
which was started by W. A. Shewman, formerly connected with the Register 
and later with the Courant. The first number of the Enterprise was issued 
October 7, 1891. The paper is Democratic in politics. 

The preceding sketch is but a brief statement of facts with reference to 
the press of Cattaraugus county. If space permitted I would be glad to 
present some interesting personal experiences illustrating the vicissitudes of 



The Newspapers axd Their Editors. 



Cattaraugus county journalism, especially in the trying pioneer and war of the 
Rebellion periods. These vicissitudes are indicated in some degree by the 
frequent newspaper changes and suspensions, and in the change of names, 
which our brethren of the press in the early days seemed to have imagined 
would in some way propitiate the Goddess of Fortune and bring them success 
where there had been failure. Within the past twenty-fi\e years there has 
been a remarkable increase in the circulation of local papers. In 1867, when 
the writer came into the county, it had but seven newspapers. The most 
prosperous and widely circulated paper in the county up to that time — the 
Cattaraugus Fn-cjiiaii — reached a circulation of eleven hundred, and this was 
considered to be phenomenally large. The average circulation of the other 
papers was considerably less. Now there are fourteen \\'eekly newspapers and 
two dailies in the county. One of the weeklies has had a circulation for over 
twenty years of more than twenty-five hundred. Three or four others, at least, 
have a circulation exceeding that of the Freeman, and others approach it. It 
may well be said that this is a newspaper age, and it is unquestionabh- true 
that the great increase in newspaper circulation has had a marked influence in 
quickening and stimulating mental acti\'ity among the people. 

There has also been a \-er}' marked inipro\-ement in the publishing facili- 
ties in the county. The publication of a newspaper in the days before 
"patent insidcs"or stcreotyi)c news plates were thought of, and when the 
edition had to be pulled off on a hand-press at the rate of "a token" an hour, 
required an amount of physical labor that would appal the young journalists 
of the present day. Large circulations under those circumstances were not 
desirable, and when ail things are considered it must be admitted that our 
brethren of the press did exceedingly well in those early days. The first 
cylinder press in the county was put in the ofifice of the Cattaraugus Freeman 
about 1864. This press went to Olean into the Advertiser office in 1S66, and 
was destroyed by fire in 1868. The next cylinder press was put in the ofiice 
of the Cattaraugus Republican in 1870. For many years cylinder presses have 
been almost a necessit)-, and nearly e\ery office in the count}- is now well 
equipped in this respect. The jobbing departments of the offices have been 
improved in a corresponding degree. T am pleased to be able to say that the 
newspapers now in existence in the county compare very favorable with those 
of any rural county in the State. Most of them have passed through the 
experimental period and are upon a basis which warrants the conclusion that 
they are here to stay. 



Augustine W. Ferrin* was born in the town of Concord, ne'&r Springville, 
Erie county, March 9, 1843. His father was Adna P., youngest son of Eben- 
ezer Ferrin, a pioneer of Concord, who emigrated into that wilderness country 
from New Hampshire about 1816. His mother was Lucinda, daughter of 



■By Wm. Adams. 



I04 History of Cattaraugus County. 

William Sanders, a pioneer of Sardinia, N. Y., who came from Connecticut. 
A. W. Ferrin was born on the farm located and cleared by his paternal grand- 
father, but while he was a child his father removed to Yorkshire, this county, 
where the family resided until 185 1, when they returned to the homestead. 
The father died of typhoid fever in 1854, and left an invalid widow and four 
small children. Augustine, aged eleven, was the oldest child and the only son. 
Owing to these circumstances he had but meager opportunities for securing an 
education. A few years at a country district school and three or four terms 
in the Springville Academy comprised all his educational advantages. The 
pressing necessities of the family compelled him to become a "bread winner" 
at the age of fourteen years. When but thirteen he spent six months in the 
printing of^ce of Lucius C. Sanders, a maternal uncle, who published the 
American Citizen in the campaign of 1856, at Springville. The office was sold 
in December, 1856, and yoUng Ferrin went back to school for a year. In 
December, 1857, he entered the office of the Springville Herald diS an appren- 
tice, where he remained until August, 1861, when he enlisted in Co. F, i i6th 
N. Y. Vols., for service in the war of the Rebellion. In 1S59, during leisure 
hours, he published for several months an amateur paper called the Penny 
Weekly. His mother died in the winter of i860, leaving his sisters dependent 
upon him for support. The 1 i6th Regiment rendezvoused in Buffalo and left 
that city in September, 1862, for the front. At Baltimore it was ordered into 
a camp of instruction and remained a couple of months; it then joined Gen- 
eral Banks's expedition which fitted out at Fortress Monroe and proceeded-to 
New Orleans for operations in the Gulf Department. Young Ferrin was with 
his regiment through the Port Hudson and Donaldsonville campaigns, but 
upon its return to Baton Rouge in August, 1863, he was sent to the hospital for 
disability, from which he was honorably discharged in October following. He 
returned to Springville in December, 1863, and in Januan,- following took 
charge of the Springville Chroniele as editor and publisher. April i, 1865, he 
became the city editor of the Buffalo Express, but by reason of failing health 
he was obliged to resign that position in the following September. The 
remainder of 1865 and the year 1866 were spent in efforts to regain his health, 
which were measurably successful. In January, 1867, he purchased the 
Springville Hercild establishment and removed the press and materials to Elli- 
cottville, where he started the Cattaraugus Republiean, the first number 
appearing February 7, 1867. The Republiean W2is received with popular favor, 
and very soon had a substantial patronage and a large circulation. 

When the county seat was removed to Little Valley in May, 1868, the 
Republican office accompanied it. Mr. Ferrin's health broke down again 
in 1870, but with the exercise of great care he was able to attend to his 
editorial duties. January i, 1873, his brother-in-law, B. B. Weber, who had 
been an assistant in the office since January i, 1871, became equal partner in 
the business, and since then the two have been partners in this and other 




a.yr. h 



Augustine W. Ferrix. io; 



publishing enterprises, brfef mention of which are made in this chapter. 
Again, in 1879, ^^'^'^ health of Mr. Ferrin became seriously impaired, and he 
spent apart of the winter and the early summer of 1880 on the Pacific coast, 
with the hope of restoration, which was fortunately partially realized; but 
the strain put upon him in consequence of the destruction of the Republican 
office by fire in August, 1880, broke him down more effectually than ever. 
During the winter of 1880-81 he was completely incapacitated for work, and it 
was generally supposed he would not long survive. There came an improve- 
ment in the following summer, and in October, 1881, he engaged to do 
editorial work on the Buffalo Christian Advocate. This he was obliged to 
give up in March, 1882, and several months were spent in outdoor occupations 
to aid in a physical recovery. Health came back slowly, and in the v\-inter 
following he was able to resume some of his duties in the office of the Repub- 
lican. When Hon. S. C. Green retired from the firm on November i, 1883, 
iVIr. Ferrin was able to take full editorial direction of the paper as in former 
years, which he has continued to tiie present time. Mr. Weber has had charge 
of the business department since he became a partner. February 25, 1891, Mr. 
Ferrin was appointed United Stares agent for the New York Indians, which 
position he still ably fills. 

Mr. Ferrin began his business life hampered with poverty, and with but 
little physical power; but he has an able brain machine. By his great energy 
he very soon came to the front as an editor, and made the Republican the best 
family newspaper in the county and the reliable political organ of the 
Republican party. In fact his paper has few equals and no superiors in all 
the rural districts of western New York. As a politician he has been active, 
alert, and brave, but always honorable, and has generously used his great 
influence to help other men to high offices, but has never sought "place and 
position" for himself. Mr. Ferrin is liberal, public spirited, and enterprising, 
and in the fullest and most comprehensive meaning of the term a good citizen. 
His religious connections are with the Congregational church of Salamanca, 
of whose Sunday-school he is the superintendent, and has been most of the 
time since he came to the place in 1883. He also served as superintendent of 
the Sunday-school several years during his residence in Little Valley. 
September 24, 1868, he married Miss Anna E. Weber, daughter of Matthew- 
Weber, of Springville, who died February 14, 1872. January i, 1874, he 
married Miss Flavilla J. Van Hoesen, daughter of Matthias Van Hoesen, of 
Preble, Cortland county. A. W. Ferrin, Jr., their son, was born September 
1, 1875; Susie L., their daughter, was born September 18, 1878. 



14 



io6 History of Cattaraugus County. 



CHAPTER XIV. 

THE MEDICAL PROFESSION. 
[By A. D. Lake, M. D.] 

IN COMPILING a history of medicine in Cattaraugus county it is to be 
noted that only from a comparatively recent period has it been possible to 
obtain accurate data either as regards methods of practice and procedure 
or for biographical sketches of the earlier practitioners. It has been necessary 
in both instances to rely largely upon tradition. It is impossible to determine 
definitely the first physician to locate in the county. All the evidence at 
command points to the probability that it was John McClure, who not only 
practiced medicine but taught school at McClure Settlement in the town of 
Franklinville as early as 1806 or '07. Norman Smith followed his profession 
in Glean in 1S14. James Trowbridge, whom many of the present generation 
will remember, was an assistant surgeon in the War of 18 12, and came to 
EUicottville in 1816. He later practiced also in other towns. Alson Leaven- 
worth was another early practitioner who located in EUicottville in 1S18. His 
business for several years extended over the entire county as well as in 
adjoining counties and in Pennsylvania, covering more territory than any 
physician who has ever practiced within the limits of- Cattaraugus. His 
business was more largely devoted to surgery than any of his predecessors. 
Sands N. Crumb came into the town of Conewango as early as 1820, and a 
few years later removed to Gowanda. Andrew Mead, who added to his 
qualifications as a doctor considerable legal skill, and is remembered well for 
many peculiar characteristics, came to Olean in 1S20, while Charles McLouth 
located in Franklinville a year later. Augustus Crary came into the county 
soon after. At about the same time Levi Goldsborough settled in Otto. Dr. 
Goldsborough was a typical pioneer physician ; of splendid physique, of 
unsurpassed endurance, and always prepared for emergencies. Following 
these men in quick succession were Thomas J. Wheeler, Thomas J. Williams, 
Edwin Finn, Paul Clark, and others, all of whom have long since passed off 
the stage of activity. 

These pioneers in medicine found themselves in an almost unbroken 
wilderness. In many instances, in the urgency of the work they were called 
upon to perform, they were compelled to reach their patients, often at long 
distances away, through paths in the woods with no other guide save the trees 
"blazed" by the settler's axe. It is a well authenticated fact that in some 
cases they carried with them axes to "browse" their horses and "spot" trees 



Medicine and Surgery. 107 

that they might know their way back. When detained by storms or swollen 
streams they were forced to spend the night in the woods on improvised beds 
of hemlock boughs. Their only means of conveyance, when not forced to go 
on foot, was on horseback, with their saddlebags strapped on beside them. 
Their remedies, of fiecessity, were of the crudest character, often -consisting 
of indigenous roots, herbs and barks. The same condition existed as regards 
surgical appliances. The instruments used in operations were often obtained 
from the chest of the carpenter or manufactured for the occasion by the 
nearest blacksmith. 

Their distance from centers of medical knowledge, and their infrequent 
opportunities for consultation, compelled them to rely almost wholly upon 
their own resources. They \\ere, of necessity, self-dependent and conse- 
quently self-reliant. As the county became more thickly populated, and high- 
ways took the place of foot-paths and Indian trails, these in turn to be followed 
by railways, thus giving better opportunity for communication with distant 
points, the evolution which the rapid march of civilization ever shows was 
seen in more modern methods of practice. It may be truthfully said that 
the physicians of Cattaraugus county have always been in the front line of 
progress, and that at the present time, both in general and special practice, all 
of the more important medical and surgical work is done by physicians and 
surgeons residents of the county. 

During the late war the county contributed to the medical corps of the 
army, as surgeons and assistant surgeons, se\eral men who did noble work in 
the service, notable among them being Hon. Henry Van Aernam, surgeon of 
the 154th Regiment; Corydon C. Rugg, assistant surgeon of the same regi- 
ment: George \V. Barr, surgeon of the 64th Regiment; and Peter Wilson, who 
went out in the employ of the Sanitary Commission. 

There are now in active practice in the county ninety-si.x physicians, of 
which number seventy-two are registered as regular, seventeen as eclectic, and 
seven as homeopathic. 

There are three active medical societies deriving their membership in whole 
or in part from the practitioners of the county, viz.: The Cattaraugus County 
Medical Society, composed of regular physicians residents of the county; the 
Lake Erie Medical Society, which recei\es as members all legally qualified 
practitioners regardless of school; and the Homeopathic Medical Society of 
Western New York. 

By an act of the Legislature passed April 4, 1806, five or more physicians 
in a county or in adjoining counties could organize a medical society with 
power to grant licenses to practice medicine in the State. The Medical 
Society of the State of New York was legally organized in 1807 and possessed 
the right to grant diplomas. This society has maintained its organization to 
the present day. Its membership is made up of delegates from the county 
societies. 



loS History of Cattaraugus County. 



The first attempt to form a medical society in Cattaraugus county was in 
1824, but no organization was effected. It is quiteprobable that not enough 
resident physicians could be got together at that time to legally organize, for 
the entire population was not far from 8,000, and the practice of medicine, 
especially in a newly-settled country, was not confined to' such strict lines as 
it is in our generation. Hence the failure of those practitioners to launch suc- 
cessfully a medical society in the then wilds of "cold" Cattaraugus. 

The subject of organization, it seems, was riot revived until 1833, when 
T. P. Whipple, H. Davison, Augustus Crary, Thomas J.Williams, Elijah Har- 
mon, Lewis Riggs, Oliver Guernsey, Edwin Finn, and C. Ellsworth assembled 
and formally organized the Cattaraugus County Medical Society, but appar- 
ently left no record of officers elected that year. From what is learned through 
tradition the society held regular meetings until 1844, the last one being con- 
\'ened in January of that year at Daniel I. Huntley's in Ellicott\-ille. In 1842 
two years before, there were on its roll as members these names: Thomas 
J. Wheeler, Thomas J. Williams, Seth Field, J. P. Powers, Isaac Shaw, E\-erett 
Stickney. K. V. R. Lansingh, Alson Leavenworth, Paul Clark, J. B. Staunton, 
Abel Wilder, S. G. Ellis, Lambert Whitney, Andrew Mead, Charles McLouth, 
Samuel Wilcox, S. D. Buzzell, Elijah Dresser, Lewis Riggs, Elijah Harmon, 
J. S. Jones, Augustus Crary, and Levi Goldsborough. The officers, as far as 
can be ascertained, were: 

Presidents. — T. J. Wheeler, elected 1S34; Edwin Finn, 1836; Elijah Har- 
mon. 1837; T. J. Williams, 1844. 

I'icc-Prcsidcnts. — Lewis Riggs, elected 1834; Charles McLouth, 1837; 
David Bennie, 1844. 

Secretaries and Treasurers. — H. Da\'ison, elected 1834; T. J. Williams, 
1836; J. B. Staunton, 1844. 

Censors. — Elijah Harmon, T. P. Whipple, T. J. Williams, Lewis Riggs, 
and H. Davison, 1834; J. B. Staunton, T. J. Williams, Everett Stickney, Lam- 
bert Whitney, and T. J. Wheeler, 1844. 

The present Cattaraugus County Medical Society was organized in Irvine 
hall, EUicottviUe, on June 4, 1867, in conformity with the provisions of the 
statutes regarding the practice of medicine in the State of New York. A code 
of by-laws was discussed and adopted and one hundred copies ordered 
printed and distributed. Thus the regular county medical society was legally 
and successfully launched and has continued to the present time with 
considerable regularity, but with various degrees of professional interest. 
During the first few years the members evinced a good deal of enthusiasm in 
the discussions and papers, which covered a wide scope of medical literature. 
As the years passed interest waned until at one time (in 1886) it became a 
serious question whether to continue or disband. Fortunately this state of 
affairs aroused to new activity those who had come to use the name of the 
society more for outside show than for mutual benefit, and in the past half 
dozen years it has once more sprung into a new life and a larger sphere of use- 



Cattaraugus Couxtv Medical Societv. 109 

fulness. This has been caused partly by modern methods of practice and partly 
by competing in enthusiasm and prominence with neighboring medical 
societies. 

The charter members of the Cattaraugus County Medical Society (those 
who joined June 4, .1867) were Francis Findlay, Franklinville ; H. M. Gale, 
Salamanca; E.S.Stewart, T. J. Williams, and Horace Arnold, EUicottville ; 
■George St. John, Yorkshire Center; and H. L. Ensworth, Salamanca. 

Among the papers read at the various meetings may be mentioned the 
following: "Anaesthetics in Obstetrics," Dr. Woodruff; "Pathology, ^Etiology, 
and Treatment of Varicocele," Henry Van Aernam ; "Acute Rheumatic 
Fever," L. H. Kitchel; " Electricity in Medical Surgery " and "Scarlatina," 
H. D. Walker; "Puerperal Convulstons," Dr. Nichols; "Female Perinaeum," 

F. H. Bartlett ; "Neurasthenia," S. P. Jones; "Contagious Diseases," A. D. 
Lake; "The Microscope in Medical Diagnosis," H. D. Walker and L. L. Deck; 
"Some Points in Abdoment Surgery," H. D. H. Ingraham, of Buffalo; "Eye 
Symptoms in Disease," A. A. Hubbell; "Uric Acid Diathesis," William B. 
Johnston; "The Law and the Doctors in the State of New York," C. Z. Lin- 
-coln, Esq.; "A Higher Medical Education," Dr. Crandall; "Hereditary 
Chorea," Clarence King; " Puerperal Fever," William B. Johnston. 

The members of the society since the organization are as follows: 
1867, October 8, John L. Eddy, Zenas G. Bullock, Cornelius H. Bartlett, 
James Nichols, Melville C. FoUett, Charles A. Woodruff, Ale.xis E. Willard. 
C. W. Bond, Elijah Dresser. December 4, Ira J. Brownson, Thomas J, 
Wheeler. 1868, October 7, Lyman Twomley, Simeon V. Pool. December 
16, H. S. Smith. 1S70, June i, A. S. Bonsteel, Thomas J. King, A. B. 
Parsons, H. S. Bowen, A. D. Lake. 1873, jLine4, Phipps Lake. September 
JO, Hiram D. Walker, Henry Van Aernam, Edward Torrey, Luther H. 
Kitchel. 1874, June 3, C. O. Day, E. A. Chapman. September 2, Nelson 
.Saunders, AL C. Bissell, O. A. Tompkins, Ransom Terry, E. J. Burlingame. 
1875, June 2, Wallace Sibley, George Lattin. September 2, Harmon J. 
Ashley, Fred C. Beals, E. Burdick, E. IVL Cheney. 1878, June 19, A. A. 
Hubbell, S. .S. Bedicnt. 1879, Ji-ine 4, James L Williams. i88[, March 2, 
Frank H. Bartlett, E. J. Loughlin, S. J. Mudge, A. K. Corbin, W. H. Sage. 
J 883, December 5, E. W. Dutcher, B. M. Spencer, John P. Colgrove, Lyman 
L. Deck, William H. Dukeman, T. C. James, J. P. Powers. 1884, March 5, 
J. H. Sackrider, Edward Torrey, S. B. McClure, Lambert Whitney. June 4, 
S. P. Jones. September 3, R. F. Rowley, F. E. Tuttle, M. C. Hawley. 18S5, 
June 3, S. Z. Fisher. 1886, June 2, S. J. Spencer. 1887, December 7, Will- 
iam B. Johnston, C. AL Walrath, V. A. Ellsworth, F. P. Blair, H. D. Snover, 

G. B. Crandall, Clarence King, Robert R. Seyse. 1888, December 5, Alfred 
W. Smallman. 1889, September 4, E. M. Shaffner. 1892, December i, 
J. E. K. Morris, T. B. Loughlen, W. E. McDuffee, W. H. Vincent, E. B. 
Burdick, Joseph C. Clark, Ambrose E. Smith, W. Carl Dallanbaugh, J. D. 
Maloy, John L. Eddy. 

The officers have been as follows, being elected in June of each year: 
Presidents. — Francis Findlay, 1867; Elijah Dresser, 1868; T. J.Wheeler. 
1869; James Nichols, 1870; C. H. Bartlett, 1871 and 1877; no meeting, 1872; 



History of Cattaraugus Countv. 



Zenas G. Bullock, 1873-74; Henry Van Aernam, 1875 ; E.S.Stewart, 1876; 
A. D. Lake, 1878-79; no records, 1880-83; Wallace Sibley, 1884; John P. 
Colgrove, 1885-86; O. A. Tompkins, 18S7; no record, 1888; Lyman L. Deck, 
1889-90; no record, 1861 ; George Lattin, 1892. 

Vice-presidents. — H. M. Gale, 1867; T. J.Williams. 1868; James Nichols, 
1869; T. J. King, 1870; Lyman Twomley, 1871 ; no meeting, 1872; A. D. 
Lake, 1873; H. S. Smith, 1874; C. H. Bartlett, 1875 : S. V. Pool, 1876; C. O. 
Day, 1877; O. A. Tompkins, 1878; E. S. Stewart, 1S79; no records, 1880-83; 
George Lattin, 1884-85; Edward Torrey, 1886; S. J. Spencer, 1887 and 1889;- 
no record, 1888; Clarence King, 1890; no record, 1891; F. C. Beals, 1892. 

Secretaries and Treasurers. — E. S. Stewart, 1867-6S, 1873-75 ! H. S. Smith,. 
1869-71 ; no meeting, 1872. (Beginning with 1876 the offices were filled sepa- 
rately — S., secretary; T., treasurer.) H. S. Smith, S.. 1S76; E. S. Stewart, T., 
1876; A. D. Lake, S., 1877; Ira J. Browns'on, T., 1877-79; George Lattin, S., 
1878-79; no record, 1880-83; Edward Torrey, S., 18S4-85; B. M. Spencer, T., 
1884-85. (Since 1886 the two offices have been held by a single incumbent.) 
L. L. Deck, 1886-87; no record, 1888; M. C. Hawley, 1889-92. 

Censors, elected in the order named. — T.J. Williams, H. M. Gale, George 
St. John, James Nichols, A. E. Willard, C. W. Bond, S. V. Pool, E. S. 
Stewart, Charles A. Woodruff, Francis Findlay, H. S. Smith, Z. G. Bullock, 
L. H. Kitchel, Ransom Terry, A. D. Lake, Lyman Twomley, George Lattin, 
H. D. Walker, Henry Van Aernam, C. H. Bartlett. 0. A. Tompkins, H. J. 
Ashley, F. C. Beals, Wallace Sibley, F. H. Bartlett. S. B. McClure, S. P. 
Jones, Clarence King, C. O. Day, \V. B. Johnston, S. Z. Fisher, L. L. Deck, 
A. W. Smallman. 

Delegates to State Medical Society. — T. J. Wheeler and E. S. Stewart, 1867 
and 1869; C. H. Bartlett and Z. G. Bullock, 1868; lames Nichols and J. L. 
Eddy, 1873; J. L. Eddy and C. O. Dav, 1883; A. D.'Lake and C. H. Bartlett, 
1884; S. V. Pool and V. A. Ellsworth, 1887; S. Z. Fisher and L. L. Deck, 
1888; S. V. Pool, 1890; S. V. Pool and F. C. Beals, 1892. 

Delegates to the National Medical Association. — T. J. Wheeler, 1868; C. H. 
Bartlett, Henry Van Aernam, and A. D. Lake, 1878: C. H. Bartlett and A. D. 
Lake, 1881. 

The Lake Erie Medical Society, whose membership is derived from the 
legally qualified practitioners of a portion of Cattaraugus, Erie, and Chautau- 
qua counties, was organized at Angola, Erie county. May i, 1886. The 
following physicians have been its officers: 

Presidents. — J.G.Thompson, 1886; M. B. Shaw, 1887; Wm. Putnam, 1888 ; 
A. D. Lake, 1889; E. E. Davis, 1890; W. M. Ward, 1891 ; R. E. Moss, 1892. 

Vice-presidents.— M. B. Shaw, 1886; Wm. Putnam. 1887; A. D. Lake, 1888; 
E. E. Davis, 1889; W. M. Ward, 1890; W. J. French, 1891 ; J. Cherry, 1892. 

Secretaries.— \V. M. Ward, 1886-87; J. Cherr>-. 1888-89; R- E- Moss, 
1890-91 ; William Teft, 1892. 

The regular meetings of the society are held quarterly at Gowanda, 
Forestville, Angola, and North Collins. At its various sessions th'e following 
papers have been presented: "Our New Organization," W. M. W^ard ; 
"Adherent Prepuce," J. G. Thompson; "Mental Influence in Medicine," 
William Putnam; "Asphyxia," M. B. Shaw; "Gleanings in the History of 



Lake Erie Medical Society. 



Medicine," J. Cherry; "Dislocation of the Head of the Humerus," M. B. 
Shaw; "Diabetes," J. G. Thompson: "Duties of the Physician to his Patients 
and to the Community," L. R. Ra\'mond ; "Cold Baths as a IMeans of 
Reducing Temperature," J. Cherry; "The Diagnosis of Contracted or Granu- 
lar Kidney," A. D. Lake; "Treatment of Abortion," AL B. Shaw; "Disease 
of the Nasal Organs as a Contributing Cause of Consumption," R. E. Moss; 
"Infantile Convulsions," E. E. Davis; "Hemorrhoids," E. E.Davis; "Septic 
Infection During the Puerperal State," W. M. Ward; "Vomiting in 
Pregnancy," \V. J.French; "Diagnosis of Pneumonia," William Putnam; 
Annual Address by the President. A. D. Lake; "Gonorrhoea," W. J. French ; 
■"The Water Cure for Consumption," Dr. Ailing; "The Microscope and 
Stereopticon in Diagnosis," George Blackham ; " Reflex of the Eye and Ear," 
A. A. Hubbell; "Heredity and Contagiousness of Tuberculosis," George 
Lattin; "The Bacillus Tuberculosis," R. E. Moss; "Influence of Climatic 
Changes in Tuberculosis," W. M.Ward; " Symptomatology of Tuberculosis," 
A. D. Lake; "Local and General Treatment of Tuberculosis," William 
Putnam; "Pelvic Inflammation in Women," "Hysteria," A. D. Lake; "Con- 
cussion of the Brain and Fracture of the Skull," J. D. Zwetsch ; " Electricity 
and its Application to the Healing Art ;" C. C. Johnson and W. J. F"rench ; 
■" Amenorrhoea and Menorrhagia," J. G. Rugg; " Abcess of the Liver," Dr. 
Tarbox; "Causes and Treatment of Diarrhoea in Children," W. J. French; 
■"Tuberculous Disease and S\-pliili5 among the Indians on the Cattaraugus 
Reservation," A. D. Lake; "Treatment of Typhoid F"ever," R. E. Moss, 
■"Treatment of Diphtheria," W. M. Ward; "Treatment of the Breast in 
Puerperal Women after Still Birth," A. D. Lake; "Antiseptic Midwifery," 
M. D. Mann; "Treatment of Scarlet Fever," J. G. Thompson; "Sciatica," 
J. Cherry; "What is Mind and When is it Sound?" William M. Potter; 
"Diagnosis and Treatment of Cancer," C. C. Johnson; "Difference Between 
Typhlitis and Appendicles," Dr. Loop; "Dyspepsia," R. E. Moss; "Diabetes 
Mellitus," W. J. French; " Relationship and /Etiology of Dyspepsia, Diabetes, 
and Rheumatism," A. D. Lake; "Circumcision," N. G. Richmond; "Common 
Forms of Conjunctival Inflammation," F. H. Bartlett; "Railway Surgery," 
¥. C. Beals; "Gout," C. C. Johnson; "Urethritis: Its Treatment by Hot 
Water Irrigation," B. H. Dagget : "Puerperal Fever," E. E. Davis; "Asepsis 
and Antisepsis as Applied to the Lying in Chamber," W. M. Potter; "Asiatic 
Cholera and its Treatment," F. E. Tuttle; "Typhoid F"ever," A. D. Lake; 
""Valvular Lesions of the Heart and their Therapeutics," B. C. Johnson. 

The Cattaraugus county members of the Lake Erie Medical Society are 
A. D. Lake, William Putnam, R. E. Moss, C. C. Johnson, J. G. Rugg, J. D. 
Zwetsch, George Lattin, Horace Babcock, F. E. Tuttle, C. S. Cleland, William 
Teft, L. W. Tarbox (deceased), Guy B. Crandall, S. V. Pool, W. F. Gardner, . 
■S. B. McClure, F. C. Beals, Edward Torrey, F. H. Bartlett, S. J. Mudge, 
W. B. Johnston, A. W. Smallman. 



History of Cattaraugus County. 



The Chautauqua and Cattaraugus Counties Homeopathic Medical Society- 
was re-organized in 1866 from a similar society that had ceased to exist. This 
organization itself had but a brief existence, being disbanded some twelve 
years later. Most of its members resided and practiced in Chautauqua 
county. The physicians formerly members of this socjety belong, many of 
them, to a new organization called the Homeopathic Medical Society of 
Western New York, which was organized April 10, 1885. So far as can be 
ascertained the following is a list of the physicians residing in Cattaraugus 
county who are members of this last named society: J. D. Zwetsch, Gowanda; 
DeVere M. Hibbard, Olean ; A. H. Babcock, Randolph. 

The Eclectic Medical Society of the Thirty-second Senatorial District of 
the State of New York was organized at Dunkirk, September 25, 1865. It 
was composed mainly of Chautauqua county physicians. Regular meetings 
were held at various places each year until 1879, when the organization was 
allowed to go down. Among its members were many eclectic practitioners 
who possessed more than a local prominence, and chief among these may be 
mentioned Dr. C. C. Johnson, of Gowanda, who was foremost in everything 
looking to the advancement and well being of the society and was much of 
the time one of its officers. The Cattaraugus county members were Corydon 
C. Rugg, Corydon C. Johnson, N. F. Marble, Cyrus W. Babcock, Alfred 
Ayres, C. D.Thompson, A. A. Hubbell, V. A. Ellsworth. The following were 
the executive officers of the society: 

Prcsi</i-uts.—Vi. C. Taylor, 1865; N. F. Marsh, 1866; C. C. Rugg, 1867; 
James Fenner, 1868-69; C. C. Johnson, 1870; G. \V. Carpenter, 1871-72; 
A. P. Parsons, 1873-74; A. S. Davis, 1875-77; ^V. L. Wilbur, 1878; N. F. 
Marsh, 1879. 

Secretaries.— 1^1. M. Fenner, 1865; C. C. Johnson, 1866; N. F. Marsh, 
1867; A. P. Parsons, 1868-69; M. M. Fenner, 1870; A. P. Parsons, 1871-72; 
W. L. Wilbur, 1873-74; A. P. Parsons, 1875-77; C. C. Johnson, 1878-79. 

In the following pages something is said, it is believed, of every reputable 
physician, regardless of school, that ever practiced medicine and resided 
within the limits of Cattaraugus county — from the earliest settlement down 
to the present day. Of the pioneer practitioners the material has been 
gleaned mainly from tradition and occasionally from a lineal descendant, but 
the data of recent and present doctors were collected by personal visits. The 
whole represents over three hundred interviews, and is offered to the present 
and coming generations, particularly to members of the medical profession, as 
a w ork comparatively complete and accurate. It shows that over four hundred 
and twenty physicians have practiced their profession in this county since its 
first settlement. 

The editor desires to state that great credit is due Mr. W. Stanley Child 
for his indefatigable work in collecting and compiling the material in this 
chapter. Whatever merit it may possess is largely due to his earnest and 
painstaking labor. 



Medical Practitioxers in Allegany. 



ALLEGANY. 

Dr. Cleveland was the first physician to locate in Allegany. He came in 
183S. He was a good practitioner, and was interested in politics as well as 
in medicine. — See Olean. 

Dr. Lane came here in 1842, remained a short time, and went to Chautau- 
qua county. 

Hon. Henry Van Aernam. — See Franklin\'ille. 

James Parker became a physician here in 1854. He practiced a few years 
and removed to Cuba, Allegany county, where he died. His brother, W. B. 
Parker, came the same year and died here in 185S of typhoid fever. The two 
were associated in partnership and built up an excellent practice. 

Francis Findlay. — See Franklinville. 

Dr. Fritts came about 1856. He was here a year or so, but where he came 
from or where he went to can not be ascertained. 

A. P. Phillips, a brother of the celebrated singer, Philip Phillips, located in 
Allegany village in 1857 and two years later removed to Fredonia, Chautau- 
qua county, where he has attained a more than local reputation as a ph)-sician 
and surgeon. 

Adelbert McClary became a student in the office of John L. Eddy during 
the war and upon his graduation in New York city the two entered into 
partnershij), which continued two or three years, until 1866, when Dr. McClary 
went to Pennsyhania, and died reccntl)' in Coudersport. He was from 
Ando\er, Allegany county. 

.Andrew Mead. — See Olean, where he did the greater part of his medical 
practice. 

Hon. Zenas George Bullock deserves a prominent place not only among 
the leading physicians of Cattaraugus, but among her eminent citizens as well. 
He was born in Almond, Allegany county, December 5, 1841, a son of 
A. H. and Luva Ann (Georgej Bullock. Plis primary education was acquired 
in the district schools, supplemented by a course of study in the Rogersville 
Seminary in Steuben county, after which he entered the Medical Department 
of the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor, from which he was graduated 
March 24, 1867. The following May Dr. Bullock came to Allegany and suc- 
ceeded to the practice of John L. Eddy, who that year moved to Olean. He 
remained, a most successful practitioner, until the fall of 1881, when he went 
to New York city and took up several special courses in the College of Physi- 
cians and Surgeons. But in the prime of life and in the midst of this special 
preparation for a higher usefulness, on March 27, 1882, Dr. Bullock died in 
New York city, and was buried a few days later from the. residence of 
Dr. H. E. Orcutt, at Hornellsville. In 1864 Mr. Bullock enlisted in the i88th 
N. Y. Vols., was detailed commissary of the provost guard, and served until 
the close of the war. In 1876 he was supervisor of Allegany and in the fall of 
1879 ^^'^s elected a member of Assembly, serving honorably in each position 
i^ 



114 History of Cattaraugi's County. 

one term. He became a member of the County Medical Society on October 
8, 1867, president in 1873-74, censor, and delegate to the State Medical Society 
in 1868. Dr. Bullock married, in the spring of 1S69, Flora H., daughter of 
Dr. H. E. Orcutt. They had an adopted daughter. As a physician Dr. Bullock- 
was well read, scientific, and careful; as a citizen and neighbor he was candid, 
frank, and sincere; as a husband and father he was kind, loving, sympathetic, 
and devoted. He was a member of the Presbyterian church and honored that 
faith by his manly piety and simple belief. Asa W. Bullock, a brother of 
Zenas G., was graduated from the Cincinnati College of Medicine and Surgery 
in June, 1873, but has never practiced his profession. He came to Allegany 
in 1874 and has since kept a drug store. 

Charles Day Thompson, born in Vernon, Ohio, January 25, 1833, was gradu- 
ated from the Cincinnati Eclectic Aledical College, was licensed June 25, 1868, 
by the New York State Eclectic Medical Society, and began practice in John- 
son, Ohio. He moved thence to Ceres, Allegany county, thence to Oil City, 
Pa., in i86i,and finally came to Allegany, where he practiced three years, and 
returned to Oil City, where he died in April, 1891. Dr. Thompson was a 
charter member of the National Eclectic Medical Society and president of 
the State Eclectic Medical Society. His widow li\'es in Allegany village. 

John P. Colgrove. — See Salamanca. 

Sanford B. McClure, son of Hiram W. and Caroline (Burlingame) McClure, 
was born in I'ranklinville, September 30, 1835, attended Mt. Morris Academy, 
and began reading medicine with John L. Eddy at Allegany. His studies 
were interrupted, however, in 1861, when he enlisted in Co. I, 64th N. Y. Vols., 
as a private, and served thirteen months. In consequence of a severe wound 
received at the battle of White Oak Swamp Mr. McClure was in poor health 
for a number of years, but succeeded finally in acquiring a thorough knowl- 
edge of medicine and was graduated on June 2"], 1874, from the Cincinnati 
College of Medicine and Surgery. He at once entered upon his career in 
Allegany, which has since been his home. His first practice was in partner- 
ship with Zenas G. Bullock, which continued a year and a half. Dr. McClure 
has served three terms as supervisor, is the present incumbent of that office, 
has been school commissioner, and is a member of the County and Lake Erie 
Medical Societies, serving the former as censor. In June, 1864, he married 
Alice, daughter of Samuel Morgan, of Cuba, Allegany county. The great- 
grandfather of Dr. McClure was a surgeon in the Revolutionary war, and three 
of his grandsons and three great-grandsons were physicians. 

John L. Eddy. — See Olean. 

Francis P. Blair was born in Broome county, October 10, 1839. ^^ 
received his literary education at Whitney's Point and was graduated on 
February 2, 1877, from the Albany Medical College. He began practice in 
Barton, Tioga county, and in 1886 came to Allegany, where he has since 
followed a large business. Dr. Blair married. May 12, 1881, Miss Lydia C. 



Medical Practitiiwers ix Allegany. 



Newland. He became a member of tlie Cattaraugus County Medical Society 
in 1887. 

Edward Torrey has been a resident physician of Allegany since 1881. He 
was born in Maine, September 10, 1847, received his education at Westbrook 
Seminary in that State, graduated from the College of Physicians and 
Surgeons in New York city in March, 1869, and began practice in Hinsdale, 
coming thence to Allegany in 18S1. He joined the County Medical Society 
in 1873 and ser\'ed as its secretar\" in 1884-85. He married, first, Addie 
Sterling, of Wellsville, Allegany county, and second Mrs. Kittie (Kenyon) 
Church, daughter of P"reeman Ken\-on, of Allegany. 

E. W. Dutcher came from Broome county in 1879 or '80, built up a large 
practice in his five or si.x years' stay, and went to California and thence to 
Arizona. While here he ran for coroner, but was defeated. He graduated 
from the Albany Medical College, December 22, 1S70, and became a member 
of the Cattaraugus County Medical Society in 1883. 

Joshua Bascom, born in Chester, Mass., November 29, 1799, read medicine 
in Ohio, graduated from the Uni\'ersity of Pennsyhania, m Philadelphia, and 
began the practice of medicine in Smethport, Pa. He practiced later in 
Franklin, Pa., and in Ohio, and in i860 came to .Allegany. Shortly after- 
ward he remo\ed to Emporium, where he died December 11, 1863. 

Reuben R. Eggleston, a native of this State, studied medicine with Dr. 
l^utton, of Jamestown, with whom and where he began practicing medicine. 
He came to Allegany about 1853. In 1S62 he enlisted in the 154th New York 
Volunteers and was detailed for hospital duty, dying while in the service at 
Atlanta, Ga. Dr. Eggleston was a self-made eclectic physician, and during his 
short professional career here built up quite an extensive practice. I believe 
he had a license from the State Eclectic Medical Society. 

Ray A. Sweet, a graduate of the Medical Department of the University of 
Buffalo, February 25, 1880, and a nati\-e of Alfred, Allegany county, had a 
short professional career here. He went to Pennsylvania. 

T. C. James, a native of Wales, England, graduated March i, 1874, from 
the Bellevue Medical Hospital College, New York city, was several years in 
practice at Knapp's Creek, and established a good country business. Dr. James 
joined the Medical Society in 1883. He went to Bradford, Pa., where he is now 
located. 

E. J. Laughlin was also a physician at Knapp's Creek for a few years. H,e 
was born in Portage, N. Y., and was graduated February 19, 1879, f^rom the 
Medical Department of the University of New York city. He became a mem- 
ber of the County Medical Society in 1881. 

Daniel T. Millspaugh came to Knapp's Creek from Kendall, Pa., remained 
two or three years, and went to Patterson, N. J. He was "certificated" from 
New York county March 13, 1884. 

Lyman A. Burrows, a native of Waterford, Pa., was a graduate of the Cin- 



ii6 History of Cattaraugus County. 



cinnati Eclectic JNIedical Institute on June 7, 1887, and in the spring of 1889 
began a brief period of practice at Knapp's Creek. 

William FoUett, Jr., the present physician at Knapp's Creek, was born in 
JNIachias, March 17, 1871, and was graduated from the Medical Department of 
the University of Buffalo on May 3, 1892. 

Albert M. Cook began his professional work at Four Mile in 1882, coming 
from Jamestown, where he was born. February 21, 1882, he was graduated 
from the University of Buffalo. He had previously owned a drug store here, 
which was destroyed by fire. In 1884 he went to Youngstown, Ohio. 

Dr. Baum, from Syracuse, is said to have done a little medical work at 
Four Mile. He was principally engaged in oil speculation. 

ASHFORl). 

Probably the earliest medical practitioner in Ashford was William Wait, 
an old style root and herb doctor who came to West Valley in 1829 and died 
here, practicing more or less all his life. His old saddlebags are still in the pos- 
session of a grandson in West Valley. He was a strong old school Baptist 
and held several town offices. 

Clark Blakely, a botanical doctor, came to Ashford Hollow about 1843, 
practiced four or fi\'e years, and removed to Morton's Corners, Erie county, 
where he is now. His father uas with him -while here, but did little profes- 
sional work. 

Augustus Andrews, son of a physician and minister, located at Ashford 
village about 1848. He finally went to Missouri, came back during the war 
and remained a year, and then returned to Missouri. 

Alonzo Wiltse. — See Yorkshire. 

Abram B. Wilson was reared in Mansfield, was graduated from the Geneva 
Medical College, and came to Ashford village about 184.8, remaining until 
after the war. He was of New England parentage. His practice extended 
over a wide range of country, and both as a physician and a friend he was 
greatly respected. His knowledge of medicine was thorough and up to the 
times. He was never known to force a collection. Dr. Wilson was school 
superintendent and town supervisor, and otherwise prominent in local affairs. 
He lived also at East Otto and Springville, retaining, however, much of his 
practice here. He went to F"ranklinville, where he bought a farm, and finally 
to Michigan, where he died after his sight had partly failed. 

C. Johnson. — See Otto. 

Dr. Davis practiced in Ashford a few years before the war. He came from 
Nunda, whither he returned. He also practiced four or five years in 
Ellicottville. 

Alfred Ayres, eclectic, was born in Pine Grove, Pa., came to West Val- 
ley from Little Valley, and was quite a successful practitioner, especially in 
chronic diseases. He was licensed September 23, 1874, by the Eclectic Medi- 



Medical Practitioxers ix Ashford. 117 



cal Society of the 32d Senatorial District. Having accumulated some prop- 
erty he began speculating in oil, lost e\-erything, and died at his sister's in 
Little \'alley. Dr. Ayres was greatly respected both as a physician and a 
citizen. 

Willard Jones, a native of Ashford, began practice in West Valley in 1870, 
remaining about a year. He had attended lectures at Philadelphia. Young 
and unmarried. Dr. Jones went to Springville and thence to California, where 
he died. 

Seth Pickett was born near West Valley, and here he doubtless did his 
first practicing about 1844. He was an eclectic. Dr. Pickett removed to W^is- 
consin, where he and his son became skillful surgeons. 

C. O. Strong, a graduate of a western homeopathic college, came to West 
\'alley from Yorkshire and remained about two years. 

Wallace J. French graduated from the Medical Department of the Uni\-er- 
sity of Buffalo on February 26, 1884, and in April following located in West 
\'alley. He was born in Arcade, Wyoming county. He was here about a 
year and married a IMiss Robinson. Dr. French went to Chautauqua county, 
where he has developed into an eminent physician and surgeon. 

Dr. Clements, a German doctor. — See Randolph. 

Francis S. Comfort, another graduate (February 24, 1885) of the University 
of Buffalo and a Canadian by birth, began the practice of medicine in West 
\''alley in the fall of 1885, remaining only a short time. 

Willard H. Rogers acquired a large practice in West X'allc)- and vicinit}- 
during his five years' residence here. He was graduated from the Jefferson 
Medical College, Philadelphia, March 11, 1876, came to Sardinia, Erie county, 
and thence here, and in 1879 went to New York city, where he died recently. 
He was an active Republican and a genial, highly respected citizen and 
physician. 

Elbert L. l-'ish, since 1879 the practicing physician at West Valley, was 
born in Hume, Allegany county, September 18, 1853, and when two years of 
age moved with his parents to Centerville. Dr. P^ish's education, after the 
district schools, consisted of one year at Olean Academy and two years at 
Pike Seminary. At the age of si.xteen he began teaching school, which he 
continued two winters, and in 1875 was census enumerator. In 1873 he began 
the study of medicine with Dr. A. B. Stewart, of Hume, and completed a 
course of lectures at the Cincinnati Eclectic Medical Institute, commencing 
practice at Centerville. In 1879 '''^ removed to West Valley, which has since 
been his home. November 20, 1878, Dr. Fish married Mary Arabella, only 
daughter of Dr. A. B. Stewart, his preceptor, and niece of ex-Gov. Robert 
Stewart, of Missouri. They have three children — J. Blanchard, Glenn Russell, 
and Mildred Stewart. Politically Dr. Fish is a strong Democrat, but has never 
been an ofifice-seeker. He is a member of Springville Lodges, No. 351, 
F. & A. M., and No. 588, I. O. O. F., and a member and examining physician 



History of Cattaraugus County. 



of West Valley Tent, No. 35, K. O. T. M. Dr. Fish is highly respected and 
enjoys a large practice. 

Asher C. Porter was born in Danby, Rutland county, Vt., March 12, 1836. 
In 1840 his parents came to Cattaraugus county, locating in New Albion. In 
1865 young Porter began studying medicine in the office of C. W. Babcock, 
of Cattaraugus, and one year later entered as a medical student with Dr. 
Northrup, of Otto. In the winter of 1866-67 he attended the Philadelphia 
University. Returning to xA.shford he practiced medicine until 1869, when he 
again entered the Philadelphia University and was graduated from the Medi- 
cal Department in March, 1870. In the winter of 1873-74 Dr. Porter attended 
a course of lectures at Bellevue Medical College in New York city, and has 
since then steadily followed his profession at Ashford village. His wife (deceased) 
was Samantha, daughter of Ephraim Smith, of New Albion, and by her he had 
three children — Emma A. (Mrs. John Zeilman) and Ada (Mrs. George P. New- 
kirk), of EUicottville, and Alta M., at home. 

CARKOLTOX. 

James Nichols was the first resident physician in the town of Carrolton, 
locating in Limestone in 1856, but did not commence the regular practice of 
medicine until 1S64. He was born in Arcade, Wyoming county, July 23, 
1825, the eldest son of John and Sally Nichols, who came to Arcade in 1812. 
The family moved to Centerville, Allegany county, in 1837, and in 1844 young 
Nichols removed to Farinersville, where he taught the village school several 
terms. He began studying medicine with E. S. Stewart, and February 7, 
1864, was graduated from the Medical Department of the University of 
Buffalo. Owing to ill-health Dr. Nichols did not enter immediately on the active 
practice of his profession. He moved to Limestone in 1856 and engaged in 
the lumber business. He started, in 1871, the first drug store in that village; 
in 1876 the proprietorship was changed to Nichols & Paton, which continued 
until 1882, when Dr. Nichols removed to Bradford, Pa., where he is now 
located. He was twice elected supervisor from Farmersville and nine times 
from Carrolton. A war Democrat he was made a member of the Senatorial 
Committee and assisted in raising and organizing the 113th and 154th 
Regiments. For many years he was a member and several times president of 
the Board of Education of the Limestone Union Free School and was 
largely instrumental in effecting the organization of that and of the Limestone 
Academy. Dr. Nichols joined the County Medical Society in October, 1867, 
was its president in 1870, vice-president in 1869, one of its censors, and 
delegate to the State Medical Society in 1873. March i, 1852, he married 
Mary Jane Wade, and they have had four children — Henry- James (deceased), 
Jennie M., H. James, and John B. H. James Nichols, born September 16, 
1859, graduated from the University of Buffalo on February 21, 1882, and 
began the practice of his profession in the village of Limestone with his 



Medical Practitioners ix Carroi.tox. 119 

father, but remo\'ed with hhn to Bradford, where the two are still associated 
in partnership. 

Mortimer C. Bissell, son of Aaron and Delilah (PuUini Bissell, pioneers of 
Lyndon, was born in Lyndon, December 13, 1S36, and was educated in the 
district schools and at hard labor on the farm. He attended Rushford 
Academy and taught school, and after five years was graduated from that 
institution, after which he entered the University at Ann Arbor, Mich. With 
his friend, H. D. Walker, he decided upon a medical career and became a 
student in the Medical Department of the L'niversit}-. After a year's work 
he was again obliged to resort to teaching to replenish his purse. He finally 
entered the University of Buffalo and was graduated from the Medical 
Department February 20, 1870, and immediately came to Limestone and 
began practicing medicine in partnership with James Nichols, which continued 
until the latter removed to Bradford, Pa., when Dr. Bissell succeeded to the 
business of the firm and still retains it. Dr. Bissell has been president of the 
village three years and during the greater part of his residence there has been 
a member of the Board of Education. June 24, 186.S. he married Mary C. 
Dunn, of Lyndon, and they have had two children — one deceased and 
William Emerson, born May 28, 1877. 

Malcolm Wayne Smith was born in Angola, X. \'., h'ebruary 27, 1856, a 
son of E. P. Smith. Educated at the common schools and at the academy at 
Smethport, Pa., he early chose the medical profession as his life work and 
entered as a student the ofifice of Dr. S. D. Freeman, of Smethport, and later 
that of Dr. J. G. Thompson, of Angola, and was graduated February 26, 
1878, from the University of Buffalo. Dr. Smith entered that year upon his 
professional career in Limestone, where he has since enjo\'ed a large business. 
He is a member of the Lake Erie Medical Society and an honorary member of 
the McKean County (Pa.) Medical Society. He is a great reader, a thorough 
scholar, and a prominent citizen. He married, June 21, 1881, Maud R., 
daughter of Henrj- Renner, of Limestone. They ha\e had two daughters 
and a son. 

George P. Meecham. — See Randolph. 

Theodore S. Quick was born in New Haven, Conn., April 27, 1833, and 
graduated from the Eclectic Medical College of Pennsylvania in March, 1873, 
endorsed by the Eclectic Medical Society of Sullivan County, N. Y., July 14, 
1874. He began practice in Callicorn, Sullivan county, and in June, 1889, 
removed to Carrolton village, where he has since been located. Dr. Quick is 
a member of the Sullivan County Medical Society (which he was instrumental 
in organizing) and of the New York State Eclectic Medical Society. 

COLD SPRING. 

Alson Leavenworth, the first physician to locate in the town, came here 
about 1836. — See New Albion. 



History of Cattaraugus County. 



Of the early practitioners succeeding Dr. Leavenworth scarcely anything is 
known. It is only of those in the last quarter century that I am able to write. 

Dr. Butterworth was in Steamburgh about two years following 1875. He 
came from Kinzua, Pa., and it is believed he returned there. 

O. A. Tompkins and M. C. Hawley. — See Randolph. 

Dr. Crandall was located in Steamburgh about a year. He lived in Stock- 
ton and Lakewood, Chautauqua county, for a time. He went east. 

W. W. Daniels. — See Dayton. 

Dr. Miller was here from 1876 to 1879. He was a graduate of Buffalo and 
a very good physician. He went to Corydon, Pa., where he is now. 

Peter W. Mosblech, a german, kept a drug store and practiced medicine at 
Steamburgh in 1874, but how long he remained can not be ascertained. 

David Bemus. — See Randolph. 

Halsey D. Snover, born in Chemung, Chemung county, December 25, 
1856, was graduated from the .Medical Department of the Uni\'ersity of 
Buffalo on February 27, 1884, and in June of that year began the practice of 
his profession in Steamburgh, where he has since continued. He is a Mason, 
a K. O. T. M., and in 1887 became a member of the County Medical Society. 

CO.\E\VAXG(.). 

Sands Niles Crumb was not only the first physician in Conewango, but was 
one of the earliest in this part of Cattaraugus county. He moved into 
Rutledge as earl\- as 1S20 and about 1822 or '23 went to Gowanda (then 
Lodi). How long he remained there can not be determined. About 1830 he 
settled in Nashville, Chautauqua county, and while there did the first medical 
work in Perrysburg and Dayton. He went to Lockport, N. Y., about 1834, 
where he died on the street of heart disease August 9, 1839. ^^- Crumb was 
born July 18, 1793, and married, in 1825, Elizabeth Gray, a sister of Dr. Henry 
T. B. Gray, of Perrysburg. 

Dr. Cheney is said to ha\'e come to Rutledge very early — just after Dr. 
Crumb left. Plfforts to locate him definitely have proved futile. 

Thomas Jefferson Wheeler acquired more than local promiiience both as a 
physician and a citizen. He was born in Middlefield, Otsego county, No\'em- 
ber 16, 1803, recei\"ed a common school education, was graduated from the 
Cherry Valley Academ\", and studied medicine with that eminent doctor, 
Delos White, of Cherry Valley. He began and for si.x months practiced his 
chosen profession in Toronto, Canada, and came thence to Chautauqua 
county, practicing about a year each in Mina and Ellington. About 1826 he 
settled permanently in what was then Rutledge, where was ever afterward 
the pivotal scene of his enviable career. In 1833 or '34 Dr. Wheeler was 
appointed associate county judge, holding this position until the State consti- 
tution abolished the office in 1846. He was presidential elector from this 
district in 1836, was elected in 1845 State senator for the 6th District, and 



MKDKAL PkACTniDNKRS 1\ Da\"I(>.\. 12 1 

from its organization until liis death was president of the Randolph Bank. A 
Democr-^.t of the old school he was a staunch upholder of his party's principles, 
and in public and pri\ate life was alike honest, faithful, kind, and true. In his 
profession he took a front rank. He was well read, skillful, talented, and 
scientific. He was a member of the old County Medical Society, was elected 
its president in 1834, censor in 1844, became a member of the present society 
December 4, 1867, was made its president in 1869, delegate to the State 
Society in 1867 and 1869, and delegate to the National Medical Association in 
1868. He died in Conewango on February 8, 1875, leaving a widow and one 
daughter, the last representati\'es of the Wheeler family. His father was a 
physician and for a time resided u itli the son in Conewango, but did not 
practice medicine there. 

L. S. Morgan, a homeopathist, minister, geologist, came to Conewango, 
practiced and preached several years, and died there about 1886. He was a 
graduate of a Boston school. He was small in stature, but possessed a brilliant 
intellect. A pioneer in the science of geology he both wrote and lectured on 
this subject, acquiring an eminence of wide recognition. For one year 
(1856-57) he edited and published the Goz^ajida Pkanix. 

Fred C. Reals. — See Salamanca. 

Edgar Rood was graduated from the Medical Department of the Univer- 
sity of Buffalo on February 26, 1878, began the practice of medicine in 
Conewango, remained until 1885, acquired a large ride, and went to Cherry 
Creek, where he hailed from. He is now in W'estfield, Chautauqua county. 
For one year he was in partnership w ith Will F. Gardner. 

Will F. Gardner, son of George R. and Lurena F. (Crossfield) Gardner, 
was born in Conewango on September 20, 1853, graduated from the Chamber- 
lain Institute in 1877, graduated February 26, 1884, from the Medical 
Department of the University of Buffalo, antl began and still continues the 
practice of his profession in his native town. Dr. Gardner married, November 
25, 1886, Josephine F , daughter of Robert H. Curtiss, of Conewango. 



Samuel Redfield, the first physician in the town of Dayton, located on lot 
39 in 1 82 1 and followed his profession here until his death in 1836. He was 
an old style apothecary and did a large practice for those days. 

Dr. Sill followed his profession here for a brief period before the war, but 
did not obtain much business. He also practiced about three years in 
Perrysburg. He came from Franklinville. 

Corydon C. Johnson. — See Persia. 

Harrison Canfield began his medical career here, coming from Sherman, 
Chautauqua county. He went to Bradford, Pa., where he has attained a 
considerable reputation. He was here about a year. 

Moses P. Roberts was born in Tyre, Seneca county, August 28, 1820. He 
16 



History of Cattaraugus County. 



graduated from the Geneva Medical College June i, 1852, and began the 
practice of medicine the same year in Dayton, continuing until his death on 
August 2, 1886. August 22, 1852, Dr. Roberts married' Electa A., daughter 
of Avery and Lodema A. (Nash) Park, of Dayton, and had born to him two 
children, Alice V. and Altheus A. His widow survives him. It will be seen 
that his birth, marriage, and death occurred in August. Dr. Roberts owned 
and conducted a drug store from 1870 until near his decease. 

Dr. Shuey came from Sherman, Chautauqua county, and remained about 
a year, going thence to Bradford, Pa. A German and well read he did not 
seem to succeed \vell here. He married a sister of Harrison Canfield. 

James H. Fuller was born in Dayton, June 15, 1841. was graduated in 1867 
from the Medical Department of the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor, 
and practiced here, at Franklin, Ind., and at Indianapolis. He has given up 
medicine and is now following farming in Dayton. 

Chester Howard was born in Union, Broome county, June 25, 1847, ^nd 
Auo-ust I, 1864, enlisted in Co. E, 50th N. Y. Vols. In 1877 he entered the 
Medical Department of the University of Buffalo, graduating therefrom 
February 25, 1879. ^'^^ following April he began his professional career in 
Dayton village. 

Luther W. Tarbox, born in Arkwright, Chautauqua county, October 19, 
1849, was graduated from the University of Buffalo, February 21, 188 1, and 
followed the whole of his professional career in Pine \'alley, whither he had 
removed in 1879, his death occurring there on October 23, 1891. He was the 
first physician to locate at that village. His widow survives him. He was an 
industrious, hard-working man, acquired his education by sheer force and 
perseverance, and died in the prime of life. 

Dr. Kimball, for a short time a physician of the eclectic practice at 
Versailles, was likewise a brief time in this town at the hamlet known as 
Cottage. He was here somewhere about 1850. 

Dr. Tibbetts succeeded Dr. Brazil at Howard's Corners, but where either 
-came from or whither they went can not be determined. 

Charles S. Cleland, a native of Sinclairville, Chautauqua county, and a 
graduate (March 16, 1887) of the Baltimore University, practiced medicine a 
year or so at Pine Valley and went thence to Collins Center, Erie county, 
where he is now. 

William A. Putnam made a very brief professional stay at Pine Valley. 
He was born in Cassadaga, Chautauqua county, and received his diploma 
from the University of Buffalo on February 26, 1884. 

Raymond M. Evarts was at Pine Valley a year, beginning his career, and 
moved to Irving, Erie county, where he has since been located. A native of 
Leon he was graduated from Howard University, Washington, D. C, March 
2, 1882, and endorsed by the faculty of the University of Buffalo. 

Henry W. Dye, born in Madison county, secured a license August 12, 



Medicai. Practitioners ix East Otto. 



1874, from the Eclectic Medical Society, and practiced first at Dayton village 
and latter and longer at Markham's, going finally to West Salamanca, where 
he died. He was a widower while here, and left at his death a family of 
smart children. 

William Teft was born in South Dansville, Steuben county, March 19, 
1858. He was graduated from the Medical Department of the Universitv of 
Buffalo on March 25, 1890, and began practice in January-, 1891, in X'ersailles, 
removing, however, the next November to Pine X'allev, where he now is. In 
February, 1892, Dr. Teft was elected secretary of the Lake Erie Medical 
Society. 

William W. Daniels was graduated from the American Medical College, 
St. Louis, January 23, 1878, and practiced at Pine Valley a few months. 

EAST OTTO. 

Dr. Ball, an old school doctor, is said to have been the first medical practi- 
tioner in East Otto. As no data can be produced to substantiate this 
statement it must be accepted as doubtful. 

Dr. Mason succeeded Dr. Ball, going thence in 1834 to Michigan, where 
he became a minister of the Gospel. He was well read and a good doctor. 

Dr. Barnes then came in from Massachusetts, followed his profession for a 
year, and removed to Lockport. He was a graduate of a Pittsfield, Mass., 
school and possessed a bright intellect. 

Levi BuUis came here in 1825, or earlier, and settled three miles southwest 
of the village. He was born in X'erniont in 1797, lived in Cooperstown and 
Hamburg, N. Y., and was educated as a physician of the old school. His 
wife Sally died February 13, 1877, aged 82 years. He lived until June 15, 
1 88 1. He was well read in medicine and considered by all a good physician. 

Elijah Dresser, son of Elijah, was born in Paris, Oneida county, September 
15, 1 8 10. He was educated in the Geneseo Academy and the Fairfield 
Medical College, graduating from the latter institution in the spring of 1834, 
and the same year came to East Otto, which has since been his home and the 
central field of his medical career. He was supervisor of his town in 1859, 
the first commissioner of common schools for East Otto in 1855, a member of 
the old County Medical Society, postmaster under President Taylor's 
administration, census marshal in 1855 and [865, town clerk, and town 
superintendent of schools. He became a member of the new County Medical 
Society on October 8, 1867, and its president in 1868. July 31, 1841. Dr. 
Dresser married Harriet M., daughter of John Prescott, of East Otto. Dr. 
Dresser has practically retired from professional life and enjoys the fruits of 
his labors in the quietude of a pleasant home. 

¥. W. Hawkins was "a physician and surgeon" in East Otto in 1874. 
Where he came from, where he went to, his length of stay, his a/j/ia mater 
can not be ascertained. 



124 History of Cattaraugus County. 

Elmer D. Williams, son of Solomon, is a native of Mansfield, being born 
there on August 23, 1859. ^e was graduated from the Chamberlain Institute, 
Randolph, in 1882, taught school, was graduated from the Medical Depart- 
ment of the University of Buffalo on February 22, 1886, and at once began 
his practice in Arcade, Wyoming county. In 1887 he went to Wichita, Kan., 
but returned the next year, locating in East Otto, his present home. Dr. 
Williams married, August 18, 1892, Milia, daughter of William Hammond, of 
this town. 

A. B. Wilson.— See Ashford. 

V. A. Ellsworth was born in Milford, Otsego county, was graduated from 
the Buffalo Medical College on February 23, 1876, and has since practiced his 
profession in East Otto, whither he had come in 1869. He joined the County 
Medical Society in 1887 and the same year was elected a delegate to the 
State Society. 

W. A. Crandall. — See Salamanca. 

EI.I.ICOTTYILI.E. 

James Trowbridge, the first medical practitioner in Ellicottville, came here 
with his wife in the fall of 1816, remained sI.n; months, and removed to Great 
Valley and finally to Hinsdale. — See Hinsdale. 

Alson Leavenworth came here in September, 18 18, located on lot 57, 
built a log house, and afterward erected a hotel. — See New Albion. 

Dr. Ward removed to this town from Hornellsville in 1827. He became 
quite popular and was regarded as a good physician, but somehow could not 
get a firm foothold. He remained about two years. 

Thomas J. Williams was born April 29, 1806. He was graduated from the 
Geneva Medical College, began his life work in Ellicottville in 1829, and died 
here December 7, 1877. He married Abigail P., daughter of Judge Israel 
Day, who survived him until May 20, 1890. Dr. Williams possessed rare traits 
of manly character, which won for him hosts of friends. As a physician he 
was careful, skillful, and successful ; as a citizen, neighbor, friend, he evinced 
those characteristics that go to make up a true gentleman. He was interested 
in politics, but never sought office. A member and a liberal supporter of the 
Presbyterian church he was an unassuming Christian, generous and forgiving 
to all, and with his purse and time assisted in every good movement, especi- 
ally in the erection of the present church edifice in the village. Dr. Williams 
was a charter member of both the old and the present County Medical 
Society, and of the old organization he was president in 1844, secretary and 
treasurer in 1836, and censor in 1834 and 1844. Of the new society he was 
vice-president in 1868 and for some time one of its censors. 

James I. Williams, son of Thomas J., was born in Ellicottville, July 31, 
1845, received his degree of M. D. from the College of Medicine and Surgery, 
Cincinnati, February 14, 1876, became assistant to the noted specialist. Dr. 



MeDICAI. PRACTITmXERS IX El.LICOTTVILLE. 1 25 



Up de Graff, of Elniira, and settled in New Haven, Conn., where he acquired 
considerable success in the treatment of diseases of the eye and ear. Owing 
to his father's declining health he relinquished his practice and returned to 
Ellicottville, where he took up and continued until his death the large 
business established by the elder Williams. Dr. Williams, Jr., possessed a 
well stored mind, an excellent judgment, and a frank and generous nature. 
He died in the prime of life on February 25, 1884, unmarried. He joined the 
County Medical Society in 1879. 

E. M. Shaffner. — See Great Valley. 

Jonathan Brewster Staunton, son of John W., of English ancestry, was 
born in Massachusetts, November 12, 1813. He early registered as a medical 
student with T. J. Williams in Ellicottville and was two years in a doctor's 
office in Geneva, and received a license from the Cattaraugus County Medical 
Society on December 29, 1837. Dr. Staunton followed his profession wholly 
in Ellicottville. He had an almost intuitive knowledge in the diagnoses of 
diseases and rose rapidly to a front rank in medical jurisprudence. He was 
often called in consultation. He died February 11, 1875. He married, first, 
in 1835, Sarah Wilbur, who died tv\o years afterward, and in 1839 he married 
her sister, Susan, who survives him. Dr. Staunton was a member, secretary, 
treasurer, and censor of the old County Medical Society. 

Joseph M. Staunton, a brother of Jonathan B., grew to manhood here, 
practiced awhile his profession here, and removed to West Virginia in i860. 

J. Galusha Staunton, another brother of Jonathan B., also did some medi- 
cal work in Ellicott\-ille. 

Augustus Crary was a man of marked character and great self-reliance. A 
son of William Crarj-, he was born in Wallingford, Vt., in 1788 and in 1809 
moved with his parents to Tompkins county, where he studied medicine with 
Dr. Hanchett, of Groton. Here he began practice. Removing in 1827 to 
Yorkshire Corners he thence came in 1831 to Ellicottville, and shortly before 
his death, which occurred January 28, 1868, he went to live with his daughter, 
Mrs. Virgil Reed, in Humphrey, where he died. His wife was Priscilla 
Hale, by whom he had six children. A daughter, first the wife and widow of 
Dr. Calvin Chickering and later and now the same of Dr. Virgil Reed, both 
of Humphrey, survives them all. While in Yorkshire Dr. Crary built and 
operated a grist-mill and began the erection of a stone house. This latter he 
never completed. In some way he became financially entangled and upon his 
removal to Ellicottville was placed on the "limits of the town for debt," 
being allowed to practice outside these limits only on Sundays. He placed 
but little belief in books, but said: "God Almighty made me a doctor." He 
was a charter member of the old Medical Society. Tall and dignified, 
possessing excellent judgment, he made many friends and covered in his 
practice a wide territory. A leading feature of his success as an old school 
physician was his skillful use of opium. 



126 HrsTORV OF Cattaraugus Countv. 

Clark Crary, son of Augustus, studied medicine with his father and 
practiced in Ellicottville until his death. For one year (1S43) he was in 
partnership with E. S. Stewart. He rode extensively and was very popular. 
He never married. 

Dr. Squires practiced medicine in Ellicott\'ille over fifty years ago, but for 
how long I can not say. He died here. 

Horace B. Miller came here from Genesee count}-, remained a couple of 
years, and went to Buffalo, where he died. He had previously practiced in 
Great Valley and Franklinville. His medical education was acquired at 
Castleton, V't., where he graduated, and at Buffalo and Philadelphia, where he 
took lectures. 

Dr. Pruyn. — See Farmersville. 

William B. Hartman moved here from Pennsylvania, whither he returned 
after a brief stay. He studied medicine in Philadelphia. While here his wife 
died and he married again, a Mrs. Rogers. He made considerable pretensions 
to surgery. 

Burton M. Spencer, brother of Stephen J., was for a few years an eminent 
practitioner in Ellicottville. He was born in China, Wyoming county, was 
graduated, March, 6, 1880, from the Medical Department of the University of 
Maryland, and began his professional career here soon afterward. He went 
finally to Hornellsville and established a sanitarium, which proved unsuccess- 
ful, and he soon came to Farmersville, where he died recently of consumption. 

Dr. Davis. — See Ashford. 

Harlan S. Smith, a native of Mansfield, received his diploma March 2, 
1867, from the Georgetown College, Washington, D. C, and from then until 
1880 followed his profession in Ellicottville, going then to Kalamazoo and 
later to Schoolcraft, Mich., where he now resides. He held a position in 
the Treasury Department in Washington during the war. He was well read 
and popular. Dr. Smith joined the County Medical Society in 1868, was 
elected vice-president in 1874, secretary and treasurer in 1869, 1870, and 1871, 
and secretary in 1876. 

Elihu S. Stewart, of Scotch-Irish descent, was born in Jefferson county in 
1814. His father, Elihu, was born in Coleraine, Mass., whither his father had 
immigrated in early days from the north of Ireland. Capt. Leonard Proctor, 
Dr. Stewart's mother's grandfather, was also the grandfather of Secretary of 
War Proctor and a captain in the Revolution. Dr. Stewart's parents came to 
Cattaraugus county in 1831. He attended Denmark Academy and at sixteen 
or seventeen began teaching district schools winters. He took up the study 
of medicine in the office of Dr. Powers, and January 30, 1837, was graduated 
from the College of Physicians and Surgeons at Fairfield. His practice began 
at Sugar Grove, Pa., but in 1842 he removed to Farmersville, where he 
remained for eighteen years. In i860 he located in Ellicottville, which has 
since been his home. He married, in 1839, Mary A. Blodgett, and they have 



Medical PKACTiTroxKRs ix Ellicottville. 127 

had four children. Dr. Stewart was a charter member of the new County 
Medical Society, was elected its president in 1876, vice-president in 1879, sec- 
retary and treasurer in 1867-68 and 1873-75, treasurer in 1876, its censor a 
number of years, and delegate to the State Medical Society in 1867 and 1869. 
He has been a member of the Board of Pension Examiners, surgeon for the 
Buffalo, Rochester & Pittsburg railroad, and president of the Bank of Ellicott- 
ville since its organization in 1878. A Republican in politics Dr. Stewart 
was a delegate to the State convention in Syracuse that favored Greeley for 
president, and for many years he has served on the Board of Education. He 
has always been public spirited, zealous in the interests of the community, 
and highly respected for his many excellent qualities. He still retains an 
office practice and is called far and near in consultation. 

Virgil Reed. — See Humphrey. 

Horace S. Arnold, son of Samuel P., was born in 1826 and came with his 
parents to Plllicott\'ille \'ery early. He studied medicine with J. B. Staunton, 
was graduated as an M. D., and began and practiced here until his death 
February 8, 1869. As a physician he was careful and judicious and acquired 
a large business. He was a prominent figure in local enterprises. Dr. Arnold 
was a charter member of the new County Medical Society. 

George Lattin. — See New Albion. 

William B. Johnston, born in Ellicottville, Jul\- 14, 1856, rccci\ed his 
literary education in the village Union Free School and his medical education 
with H. S. Smith and at the Medical Department of the Universitvof Buffalo, 
graduating as M. D. therefrom on P'ebruary 21, 1881. To complete these 
studies he taught several winter terms of district school. From his graduation 
until June, 1881, Dr. Johnston practiced his profession in Ellicottville. He 
then moved to Ishpeming, Mich., where he had a good private and htispital 
practice for four years, when he went to Bessimer, Mich., and followed his 
calling two years. In September, 1887, he returned to Ellicottville and took 
a post-graduate course at the New York Post-Graduate School and Hospital. 
Since then Dr. Johnston has continued the practice of medicine in his native 
village, being interested also in a drug store in partnership with R. E. Ward. 
In July, 1882, he married Katherine L., daughter of Hon. Arunah Ward, of 
Ellicottville. They have had one daughter. Dr. Johnston joined the County 
Medical Society in 1887 and is one of its censors. He is a member of the 
Salamanca Board of Pension Examiners. 

Charles M. Walrath, son of Walter and Mary A. Walrath, was born in 
Humphrey, December 5, 1856, and reared in Great Valley, where his parents 
settled when he was an infant. He attended the Ellicottville Union Free 
School and Ten Broeck Academy at Franklinville, taught school a number of 
terms, was principal of the Franklinville Union Free School one year, began 
the study of medicine with Hiram D. Walker in 1881, and in September, 1882, 
entered the Medical Department of the University of Buffalo, graduating 



128 History of Cattaraugus County. 



therefrom February 22, i8S5,and immediately settling in practice in that city, 
supplementing, meantime, his medical education by another course of lectures 
that year. In the spring of 1886 he removed to EUicottville, which has since 
been the home of his professional and private life. He has a fine library, is a 
close student, and is interested specially in educational matters. He has 
served on the Boards of Education and village trustees. He became a member 
of the Cattaraugus County Medical Society in 1887. 

Fred C. Beals. — See Salamanca. 

Stephen J. Spencer, a native of Arcade, Wyoming county, was born Janu- 
ary I, i860, attended Ten Broeck Academy, studied medicine with his brother, 
Burton M., in EUicottville, and was graduated from the Medical Department 
of the University of Buffalo on February 24, 1885. He commenced practicing 
his profession in EUicottville, continuing until 1891, when he removed. June 
30, 1886, he married Clara M., daughter of D. L. Wilson, of Erie county. Dr. 
Spencer was made a member of the County Society in 1886 and its vice- 
president in 1887 and 1889. 

Alfred W. Smallman was born in New Haven, Conn., May 23, 1861, and at 
the age of four years came with his parents to EUicottville. Receiving an 
academic education in the village Union School and in Chamberlain Institute 
he began the study of medicine with John P. Colgrove in Salamanca and was 
graduated from the University of Buffalo on February 28, 1888. He at once 
located in practice in EUicottville. Dr. Smallman is self-educated. He 
earned his first money setting type on a local newspaper and taught thirteen 
terms of school to carry him through college. He joined the County Medical 
Society in 1888 and is one of its present censors. 

FAK.MERSYILLE. 

Dyer Coudrey was doubtless the first physician in Farmersville, locating 
here about 1825. In 1835 he went to Freedom, where he practiced with his 
brother James until 1840, when he returned and died here about three years 
afterward. 

Joel Joy, a Thompsonian doctor, followed medicine here from 1832 to 
1838, becoming well known and establishing quite a business. He was a good 
story teller. He went to Michigan and died there. 

Spencer Crary, a nephew of Augustus Crary, began practicing medicine in 
Farmersville as early as 1835. He took lectures at the Fairfield Medical 
College and got a license from the Herkimer County Medical Society. His 
knowledge of medicine and his natural professional ability he seemed to 
inherit from his uncle, and his 'excellent qualities secured him a good practice. 
He finally moved west and died there. 

Hiram Bond, energetic and successful, came to Farmersville from Pike. 
He retired from practice about 1S42 and eventually died in Fon du Lac, Wis. 

E. S. Stewart came here in 1842. — See EUicottville. 



Medical Practitioners ix Franklinville. 129 



Dr. Gilmore succeeded Spencer Crary. He also took lectures at Fairfield. 
Owing to the fact that he was once engaged in making calculations for 
almanacs he was familiar known as the " almanac maker." He went from here 
to Warsaw, N. Y. 

Clinton W. Bond, son of Hiram, located in this town about 1862, practiced 
three or four years, and moved to Wisconsin, and died in Illinois. In October, 
1867, he joined the County Medical Society and became one of its censors. 
He had good ability and was quite popular. 

Dr. Pruyn practiced two years in EUicottville and in i860 moved into 
Farmersville, where he likewise practiced two years, removing thence to Her- 
kimer county, where he died. Before all this, howe\-er, he had practiced a 
short time in Mansfield. 

Dwight G. Hubbard was a medical practitioner here a few years succeeding 
Clinton W. Bond's brief stay, and became popular. He was a graduate of 
the University of Buffalo. He came from Wethersfield, Wyoming county, 
went to Pennsylvania, and is now in Buffalo. 

Robert R. Seyse graduated from the Medical Department of the Univer- 
sity of Buffalo in 1886 and immediately began his professional career in 
Farmersville. He joined the County Medical Society in 1887. He finally 
removed to Bliss, W'yoming county, where lu: died. 

W. E. McDuffie.— See Olcan. ' 

Dr. Dutton, a graduate of the Uni\ersity of Buffalo, followed medicine 
here awhile and went finally to W'yoming county. 

Brayton N. Strong was born in Machias, May 20, 1865, was graduated 
from the University of Buffalo, Medical Depirtment, on March i, 1SS7, and 
commenced the practice of medicine in this town, clying here in 1891. 

Cassar Smith, the present physician, was born in Pike, Wyoming county, 
October 3, 1867, and was graduated from the University of Buffalo, March 
24, 1891. He located here in December, 1S92. 

I RANK LI. \V I LI. E. 

John McCkire has the distinction of having been the first medical practi- 
tioner to locate in Cattaraugus county and likewise the first physician in the 
town of Franklinville. He was also the first school teacher in the locality, 
and while here combined the two callings. He was doubtless a relative of the 
McClure family who first settled the town as early as 1804, for they all came • 
from Massachusetts, the doctor, however, in i8o5 or 1807. He was elected 
one of the first three assessors in the county in 1809, then the town of Olean. 
Possessed of more than ordinary intellectual ability he built up an excellent 
reputation. He erected the first framed house in the town, the frame of 
which is still standing, and the locality was for a long time known as McClure 
settlement. A brother was an officer in the War of 1812. Dr. McClure never 
married. He died here in 181 1, the first death in the town. 

17 



130 History of Cattaraugus County. 



H. Davidson was an early physician here, for he is on record as a charter 
member and one of the first secretaries, treasurers, and censors of the old 
County Medical Society. It is said that he also practiced a year or two in 
Ellicottville after leaving this town. 

James Trowbridge came here from Ellicottville in 1817. — See Hinsdale. 

Charles McLouth, born March 24, 1798, in Cheshire, Mass., was reared on 
a farm, attended school winters and worked summers, and read medicine with 
Dr. Smith, of Clyde, N. Y. He was licensed by the Seneca County Medical 
Society August 20, 1819, and began practice in Aurora, Erie county, where he 
remained two years, coming thence, in 1821, to Franklinville, where he practiced 
until his death July 26, 1870. He was a member of the old County Medical 
Society and its vice-president in 1837. He was ever foremost in educational 
matters and served both as county school commissioner and town superin- 
tendent of schools. Dr. McLouth was a man wonderfully endowed by nature. 
Possessing a robust constitution and a fine intellect he used both to good 
advantage, and was highly respected as a physician, a citizen, and a friend. 
He was brusque in manner and careless in dress, but prompt in decision and 
of unquestioned ability. He married twice and reared four children. 

Charles D. McLouth. son of Charles, was born here, and August 12, 1874, 
was licensed by the Board of Censors of the Eclectic Medical Society of the 
32d Senatorial District. His life has been spent in Franklinville. 

A. B. Wilson.— See Ashford. 

Isaac B. Emerson, dentist, physician, surgeon, a student of medicine in 
Kentucky and a graduate of the Medical Department of Yale College, 
followed his profession here from about 1835 to 1844, when he went to St. 
Lawrence county. 

Lewis Riggs was one of the prominent early physicians who made Cattar- 
augus county their home. Born in Litchfield county, Conn., January 23, 
1808, he early went to Homer, Cortland county, and began reading medicine 
in the office of his uncle and namesake, Dr. Lewis Riggs. He went thence to 
Yale College and was graduated from the Medical Department of that institu- 
tion about 1830. He came immediately to Franklinville, where he practiced 
and lived until his death December 17, 1862. He bought a farm and soon 
became an extensive dealer in real estate, owning when he died over fifteen 
hundred acres in this vicinity. Dr. Riggs was a charter member of the old 
County Medical Society, its first vice-president, and its censor in 1834. He 
is well remembered still as a splendid physician. It was as a farmer that he 
enjoyed life most, and in this direction he was considered an expert. His 
widow survives him on the homestead. 

Horace B. Miller. — See Ellicottville. 

C. H. Newton came to Franklinville about 1841, remained two or three 
years, and removed to Ohio. 

C. Ellsworth, later of pill fame, was the first to locate as a medical practi- 



Medical Practitioners in Franklinville. 131 



tioner in the village of Cadiz. He came there in 1S34, practiced a year or 
two, and went to Corry, Pa., where he died, and where he manufactured large 
quantities of pills and other medicines. He was a charter member of the old 
County Medical Society. 

Hon. Henry Van Aernam, M. D.'- — Of the many eminent men who passed 
their boyhood in Cattaraugus county not one has made so marked an impress 
upon its people as Dr. Henry Van Aernam. Born in Marcellus, Onondaga 
county, N. Y., March 11, 1819, he came to the present town of Mansfield with 
his father, Jacob B. Van Aernam, in the spring of 1822. His early life was 
that of the other pioneers of the county. A log school-house education, a 
close study of a very few standard books supplemented by a term or two as a 
district school teacher, made the rutted road to success in that period of self- 
denial and hardship. In the spring of 1834 Van Aernam, at fifteen, was a 
clerk in the store of William Elliott, and the August of the succeeding year 
found the youth in Virginia in the employ of William L. Perce & Co., who 
were engaged in the construction of the James River & Kanawha canal. 
He was the paymaster and confidential clerk of this company for two years. 
Returning home he attended school in Springville Academy from 1837 to 1841, 
and his academic course was barely ended when he began the study of medi- 
cine with Dr. Levi Goldsborough, of Waverly (now Otto). He attended 
the Geneva Medical College in the winter of 1S42-43, but received his diploma 
from Willoughby College, Ohio, in 1845. After his graduation he began the 
practice of his profession in the present village of Allegany, remaining there 
until the spring of 1848, when he removed to Franklinville, where he has since 
continuously resided. On the 30th day of November, 1845, 'ic married Amy 
M. Etheridge, and their wedded life of nearly forty-eight years has been 
marked by constant devotion. 

Dr. Van Aernam early acquired prominence in the practice of his profes- 
sion. Of excellent judgment, accurate in his diagnosis of a disease, with an 
intuitive insight into the mental characteristics of his patient, sympathetic in 
temperament and yet vigorous in his treatment, and with a willingness to ride 
with his pillbags to the hut of the poor as well as to the residence of the rich, 
were qualities that alike established his reputation as a skillful practitioner 
and endeared him to the people of eastern Cattaraugus. No physician ever 
retained for forty-five years the undiminished confidence of his neighbors in 
his medical skill to a greater extent than has Dr. Van Aernam. His decision 
on the pathology of a disease has been the dernier resort in difficult cases in 
the vicinity of Franklinville for more than a generation. And to-day, 
although crippled by disease and debarred on that account from active 
practice, his ripe judgment is still deferred to as the ultimate authority. 

Dr. Van Aernam early turned his attention to politics. He was a charter 
member of the Republican party with most decided leanings toward 

»By Hod. Alfred Spring. 



HisT(jRY OF Cattaraugus County. 



abolitionism. He had a most intense hatred of slavery and he rarely could 
brook a compromise. Local politics were then dictated by a coterie of poli- 
ticians residing in Ellicottville, and his first reputation as a practical organizer 
was acquired in his successful endeavor to disrupt this political machine. 
Many an aspirant for political honors can tearfully certify that the doctor's 
ability as a convention organizer did not end in the 'fifties. In the fall of 1857 
he was elected to the Legislature from the First Assembly District of the 
county. When the rebels of the south sought to dismember the Union Dr. 
Van Aernam was energetic and unequivocal in his fidelity to the Republic. 
August 20, 1862, he was mustered into the State militia service as surgeon 
of the 154th Regiment, New York State Volunteers, and on the 26th of the 
following month into the L^nited States service with the rank of major. On 
the 5th of October, 1862, he was assigned to duty as surgeon-in-chief of the 
Second Brigade, Second Division, of the Eleventh Army Corps, and on the 
28th day of December, 1863, surgeon-in-chief of the Division, and in April of 
the following year surgeon-in-chief of the Second Brigade, Second Division, 
of the Twentieth Army Corps, and was discharged at Atlanta, Ga., by 
reason of disabilities, November 7, 1864. This military life of Dr. Van 
Aernam, though compressed in a sentence, signifies much to the army with 
which he ser\-ed. He came of fighting stock, for the two preceding genera- 
tions of Van Aernams had shown their valor in their country's service — 
the one with the Continentals of '76 and the other in the second war 
with England. So the third in the descending line was not a theoretical 
surgeon, but was on the operating staff and became famous among famous 
experts with the knife. He gained the ardent affection of his comrades, and 
the few survivors of the 154th Regiment to-day have great respect and 
veneration for their old surgeon. If they are afflicted with hero-worship for 
him there is much in his conduct to warrant the devotion. In the fall of 1864, 
and while he was still with Sherman at Atlanta, he was elected to the Thirty- 
ninth Congress from his home district and was re-elected to the succeeding 
Congress. No legislative body ever surpassed in ability these two Congresses. 
Stevens, Shellabarger, Bingham, Butler, Conkling, Davis, Blaine, Garfield and 
Boutwell were then in the prime of their stalwart manhood. They were con- 
fronted with problems the like of which were never presented for solution. Four 
millions of people whose intellects had been dimmed and ambitions repressed 
by continued bondage were to be exalted to citizenship. Their destiny was 
to be worked out in the south by the side of their former masters. Rampant 
hostility to the north and to the civil rights of the black men must be 
crushed out. 

These were among the stupendous issues to be crystallized into legislative 
enactment. Dr. Van Aernam was soon in touch with the most eminent of 
this galaxy of statesmen. He was the intimate friend and medical adviser of 
the great war secretary, Stanton, a daily table companion of 'Henry Wilson 



Mkdk'ai. ■ Pkac rrri(_iNF.;-;s ix Im<anklinvii.le. 133 

and John A. Bingham. An ardent radical he beHeved that civil rights to the 
colored people should be a reality, not a myth. That to reconstruct the south 
those who had engaged in rebellion m.ust give unquestioning allegiance to the 
Union, and that mal-treatment of the former slaves should be followed by 
vigorous punishment. Dr. \^an Aernam earnestly believed the attempt of the 
chivalrous southerners to disrupt the Union was treason, and before they were 
re-instated into the full privileges of citizenship they should give ample proof 
of repentance, and his whole bent during this period of his congressional life 
was to render effective this policy. After the inauguration of General Grant 
in 1869 Dr. Van Aernam was appointed commissioner of pensions — a posi- 
tion he held for upwards of two years. The affairs of the department needed 
systematizing and his previous ser\ice in Congress on the Committee of In\'alid 
Pensions specially fitted him for this duty. Prior to his incumbency the 
pensioners were paid semi-annually and each pensioner was obliged to pay the 
expense of making and executing his vouchers and of collecting the pension. 
Under the legislation originated and pushed through by the commissioner the 
present mode was engrafted on the statute. 

After lea\'ing the Pension Department Dr. \'an Aernam returned to Frank- 
iinville and sedulously practiced his ]Tr<_ifession. The faculty of money sa\ing 
was never well developed in him and he followed his calling to earn a li\-eli- 
hood, although he had an abiding faith, which was almost eccentric in its 
sensitiveness, in the nobility of his profession and an affectionate regard for 
his fellow-workers in it. In the fall of 1878 he was again elected to Congress 
and re-elected in 1880. In the latter Congress he was chairman of the Com- 
mittee on Education and Labor, and the economic agitation made his position 
important and arduous. The hearings to the representatives of all classes per- 
taining to the labor question were frequent and Dr. Van Aernam applied him- 
self closely to a study of the problems growing out of the antagonism of organ- 
ized labor and corporate capital. Returning home after his public service he 
again resumed the practice of his profession and continued in it until he was 
stricken with paralysis in 1889, and has since been an invalid. His house is a 
Mecca for the survivors of the war of Cattaraugus and Chautauqua, and especi- 
ally of his old regiment, and also of the politicians of the two counties. He 
is ever alert to aid the soldier in securing a pension, for he has no sympathy 
with the clamor now so fashionable against pensions, and he retains a deep 
interest in the welfare of the party with which he has so long been identified. 
Upon the death of Jonas K. Button in 1884 Dr. Van Aernam was appointed 
a trustee of Ten Broeck Free Academy in the village of Franklinville, the loca- 
tion and endowment of which were accomplished largely through his influence 
with its founder. 

Dr. Van Aernam has always been zealously in favor of public improve- 
ments, and in all local matters has e.xercised a dominating influence for the 
elevation of the people of the community. He has two children: Mrs. James 



134 History of Cattaraugus County. 

D. jMcVey, who resides with him, and Charles D. Van Aernam, \\ho is engaged 
in the practice of law in Franklinville. 

William M. Smith, a native and a medical graduate of New York citv, 
came here before 1840, established a splendid practice, and removed to Rush- 
ford, Allegany county, where he died. 

Nathan B. Reed made his advent here in about 1844, read medicine with 
Charles McLouth, studied awhile at Willoughby Medical College in Ohio, and 
finally graduated from the Medical College at Geneva. He located here to 
follow his profession, but died in 1849 '^i young manhood. He married Emily 
Ferrington, of Farmersville 

Francis Findlay, son of Stephen and .Sarah (Chapman) Findlay, early 
settlers of Freedom, was born there July 27, 1834, was reared on the farm, and 
in 1856 was graduated from the Rushford Academy in Allegany county. 
Teaching school and reading medicine was his employment until the winter of 
1856-57, when he took a course of medical lectures at the University of 
Buffalo and graduated therefrom February 21, i860. His practice began in 
Allegany as a partner of John L. Eddy. One year later he went to Bradford 
and four years afterward came to Franklinville, his present home. Dr. Find- 
lay, aside from being a pension examiner, has never sought nor held office. 
He was a charter member and the first president of the present County 
Medical Society, and one of its censors. His only son, Morgan C, is professor 
of physics in Park College, Parkville, Mo. 

Hiram D. Walker was born in Farmersville on the 12th of October, 1839, 
a son of Gideon D. and Sophia (Lawrence) Walker, pioneers. At seventeen 
young Walker entered the Rushford Academy and in 1861 registered as a 
student in a select course in the Michigan University at Ann Arbor. The 
following year he entered the Medical Department of that institution and in 
1863 was a medical student in the University of Buffalo, from which he was 
graduated February 23, 1864. The following March he located permanently 
in Franklinville. Dr. Walker has been coroner three terms, many years local 
health officer, and is now surgeon to the Western New York & Pennsylvania 
railroad. He is a member of the Buffalo Microscopical Club and of the 
County Medical Society, joining the latter in 1873 and becoming soon after 
one of its censors. For several months in 1885 he was in the Bureau of Animal 
Industry at Washington; in 1883 he made quite in important scientific 
discovery in relation to the disease and prevention of gapes in fowls. 

Gershom R. Staunton, a cousin of the Ellicottville family of this name, 
and a botanical doctor, came to Cadiz in the 'forties. His wife was an aunt 
of Dr. S. B. McClure, of Allegany. He had considerable ability, had a good 
practice and became popular, and finally went to Iowa, where he died. 

H. W. Dye.— See Dayton. 

W. J. C. Crandall, the seventh son of a seventh son, came to Franklinville 
from Allegany county in 1846 or '47 and remained until about 1852. At first 



Medical Practitioners in Freedom. 135 

he lived in Cadiz. He had taken lectures at the Eclectic College in Cincin- 
nati. He was a clever, harmless fellow, strong and athletic, and quite a 
wrestler. He went to Erie county. 

S. W. Green, once a preacher and afterward a doctor, and a somewhat 
wandering physician, was located here a short time and went thence to 
Pennsylvania. 

John W. Kales was born in Chemung county, October 16, 1850, was 
educated at Whitney Point Union School and Cortland Academy, graduated 
from the State Normal School at Cortland in 1873, was one year in the 
literary department of Syracuse University, the same time in the Detroit 
Medical College, and was graduated from the Long Island Medical College 
Hospital on June 24, 1879. He began practice that year in Union Springs 
and in 1884 removed to FranklinviUe, where he has since been located. Dr. 
Kales has evinced an inclination and considerable skill as an inventor, among 
his inventions being a surgical table and sofa combined and an automatic 
interlocking switch for railroads. 



Elihu Cruttenden is credited with being the first physician in Freedom, 
coming here with Hurlbut Cruttenden and locating on Clear Creek about 1820. 
The doctor built on this stream, in 1822, the first grist-mill in town. 

Warren Coudrey, the records have it, was located in the town of PVeedom, 
"in the Fish Lake Settlement," as early as 1821. He was the first postmaster 
and in 1828 built the first brick house. 

James Coudrey came in about 1835. He remained until 1840, when he 
went west and joined the Mormons. 

Dyer Coudrey practiced in partnership with his brother James. — See 
Farmersville. 

Dr. Powers was another early physician in this section. He married a 
sister of C. C. Mason and finally went to Pennsylvania. 

D. L. Barrows is quoted as being one of the early physicians of the county 
as well as of Freedom, but aside from this I have not succeeded in establish- 
ing any reliable data. 

Dwight Chase located in Sandusky about 1846, coming here from Cohocton. 
He became a surgeon in the army during the Rebellion. Returning here 
after the war he soon removed to Iowa. He was considered a most competent 
physician and surgeon and established a large country practice. 

J. Warren Sawyer commenced his medical studies with Dwight Chase and 
succeeded to the latter's practice. His father, Col. Earl Sawyer, was an early 
settler (181 1), built the first frame house in town, was the first town clerk, 
and did several other "first things." Dr. Sawyer was an able financier and 
endeavored to become a politician. He went south and finally to Indianapo- 
lis, Ind., where he is now living. 



136 



History of Cattaraugus Couxty. 



C. C. Mason, a student of Dr. Colgrove, of Sardinia, attended lectures in 
New York city and in Buffalo, and was located here a short time. Towards 
the latter part of the war he received an appointment as surgeon in a colored 
regiment. He finally went to Rushford, Allegany county, and died there in 
1892. Dr. Mason was well read and an active member of the Baptist church. 

E. J. Burlingame came here from Pennsylvania and removed after a num- 
ber of years to Buffalo, where he still lives. He was made a member of the 
County Medical Society in 1874. He was once a preacher of the Christian 
denomination. 

E. W. Earle, homeopathist, made his appearance in Sandusky about 1873 
to begin his medical career, practiced some eight years, removed to Arcade, 
Wyoming county, and thence to Rochester, where he has sprung into 
prominence in his profession. He was a student of Baxter Sovereign, of 
Yorkshire. 

B. B. Grover came from Wyoming county, remained a year or two", and 
went to Grimes, Iowa, of which place he has been postmaster. 

Edward C. Barker hung out his shingle in Sandusky in 1884. He was a 
graduate (June i, 1880) of the Eclectic Medical College of Cincinnati and a 
native of Onondaga county, coming here, howe\er, from Wyoming county. 
He went to Union City, Pa. He was "a regular Yankee for asking questions." 

Arthur H. Wright.— See Yorkshire. 

William Arthur Hubbard was born in Center\ille, Allegany county, was 
graduated as an M. D. from the University of Buffalo on March 18, 1887, and 
immediately located in Sandusky. His stay was short, but creditable. 

H. J. Ashley.— See Machias. 

William Stanton, born in Portage, Livingston county, April 5, 1867, 
received his medical diploma from the University of Buffalo, and located in 
Sandusky in the spring of 1891. He left in July. 1892. 

W. H. Leonard will be remembered more for his money making than for 
his professional career. He was a graduate of the Cincinnati Eclectic College, 
came here from Onondaga county, and finally drifted around to Syracuse. 

GREAT VALLEY. 

James Trowbridge was the first physician to locate in this town. He was 
poor and visited his patients on foot. He located at Kill Buck and went 
finally to Hinsdale. — See Hinsdale. 

A. S. Bonesteel was a native of this town. After practicing his profession 
here a few years he went to Corry, Pa., where he died. He also practiced in 
West Salamanca. He joined the County Medical Society in 1870. While 
here he married. 

Dr. Clements, a German doctor, died here. — See Randolph. 

Nathan F. Marble first located in Chapplesburg in Humphrey, and came 
to Peth in this town, where he died recently. He was licensed August 2, 



Medical Practitioners in Hinsdale. 137 

1874, by the censors of the State Eclectic Medical Society. Dr. Marble was 
a native of Madison county. 

Eugene Crary, son of Augustus Crary, of EUicottville, studied medicine 
with his father and started on his career at Great Valley Center. After a few 
years he removed to Ohio. 

Hale Crary, also a son of Augustus, studied medicine too with his father 
and did some medical work, living in Great Valley, where he died. 

Horace B. Miller.— See EUicottville. 

Edward M. Shaffner was born in Ashford, June 5, 1854, was educated at 
Springville, and began the study of medicine with Dr. Jackson, of that place. 
After one year spent in the Medical Department of the University of Michi- 
gan at Ann Arbor he entered the same department in the University of 
Buffalo and was graduated therefrom February 26, 1884. From then until 
January, 1886, he practiced first in EUicottville and afterward in Humphrey, 
and since then has been located at Great Valley. He married Ella, daughter 
of Elam Chandler, of Ashford, and they have one daughter, Ethel I. Dr. 
Shaffner joined the Medical Society in 1889. 

HINSDALE. 

James Trowbridge was the first resident physician in Hinsdale. Moving 
about as he did he had the honor also of being the first practitioner in Great 
Valley and EUicottville. He had been an assistant surgeon in the army and 
was poor and somewhat broken down from early excesses. With his wife he 
came to EUicottville in 1816, boarded with a Mr. Leonard six months, and 
removed to Great Valley. Soon afterward he came to Hinsdale, where he 
remained until 1844, when he went to Ohio and died. It is claimed that he 
also practiced medicine for a time in Franklinville. He was considered a good 
physician and generally did an extensive business. 

Edward Torrey. — See Allegany. 

Paul Clark came here in 1836 from Friendship, Allegany county, and did 
a large practice until his health failed, when he sold to Dr. Brownson and 
returned. He shortly afterward died in Nile of consumption. He was a 
careful, quiet, judicious physician and highly respected. He was pre-emi- 
nently a family doctor. Dr. Clark was a member of the old County Medical 
Society. 

Ira J. Brownson succeeded Paul Clark in January, 1853. ^^ ^Iso came 
from Friendship, with a license from the censors of the Allegany County 
Medical Society, and resided here until his death December 18, 1889, practic- 
ing up to two or three years previous. The Cattaraugus County Medical 
Society, of which he became a member December 4, 1867, granted him a 
license September 2, 1874. In 1877-79 he was its treasurer. He was a Dem- 
ocrat in politics and in every position in life was greatly respected. During 
his professional career here he had several partners. 
18 



138 



History of Cattaraugus County. 



John Palmer, a native of Allegany, began his career here. He was 
assistant surgeon in the 85th X. Y. Regt. during the war. He went to Corry, 
Pa., and died there. 

George Palmer, a nephew of John Palmer, read medicine with his uncle 
and with Paul Clark, and practiced here a short time. 

Bradley Goodyear came to Hinsdale from Groton, Tompkins county, 
remained a few years, and went to Buffalo, where his sons are prominent coal 
dealers. 

Alexis E. Willard, a son of the well known Dr. A. E. Willard. of P^riend- 
ship, began his professional life hereabout 1868, remaining some six years. 
He was a graduate of the University of Buffalo and a partner of Ira J. 
Brownson. He joined the Cattaraugus County Medical Society in October, 
1867, and was elected one of the censors. He returned to Friendship, where 
as well as here he built up an enviable reputation. 

R. A. Drake became associated with Dr. Brownson somewhere about 1865. 
He was both a doctor and a minister, and while here it is stated he was pastor 
of the M. E. church. In the ordinary vernacular he was a "character." 

Dr. Pruyn. — See Farmersville. 

John Norton practiced here awhile with Ira J. Brownson. He came from 
Belmont, Allegany count}-, and returned there, dying there finally of 
consumption. 

Dr. Hinman emigrated here from the central part of the State. He was 
for a time in partnership with Paul Clark, but afterward alone. He married a 
wife here, and finally went to California. 

H. D. Hillman practiced in Hinsdale for a number of years preceding 1883, 
when he went into other business and is now a farmer in town. He came 
from Cuba, Allegany county. 

Dr. Harvey followed medicine two or three years with Paul Clark. Aside 
from this nothing can be learned of him. 

Dr. Kennedy was in practice here about 1855. He was in town only a 
short time and died. 

Dr. Dana was an old physician in Friendship, Allegany county. He went 
into partnership with Ira J. Brownson, continued a brief period, returned, and 
died there. His big Newfoundland dog was one of his closest friends. 

Hallett Fay came here from Hornellsville, whither he returned in less than 
a year. 

Dr. Suydenham, whom many will remember, located and practiced in 
Hinsdale about 1878. He went to Dunkirk. 

Adelbert W. Truman was born in Richburg, Allegany county, was reared 
at Alfred Center, where he began the study of medicine with his father, 
William M.; and was graduated in 1870 from the University of Philadelphia 
(eclectic). In 1871 he came to Hinsdale with his father, the two practicing in 
partnership for six months, when the father returned to Allegany county. 



Medical Practitioxers rx Humphrey. 139 



October 22, 1872, A. W. married Augusta, daughter of A. D. Salisbury, of 
Hinsdale. In 1873 Dr. Truman removed to Alfred Center and subsequently 
to De Ruyter. X. Y., where he now resides. 

Appleton K. Corbin, a native of Waverly, Tioga county, and a graduate 
on February' 28, 1879, o^ the College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York 
city, began his medical business in Hinsdale, married here a daughter of 
Alfred C. Torrey, and was associated with Dr. Brownson for a time. He 
became a member of the County Medical Society in 1S81. In the fall of 1881 
he went to Clearmont, Pa., thence to Wilcox, Pa., and finally to Bradford, 
where he is now. 

William H. Vincent, son of Hiram and Wealthy (Blakely) Vincent, was 
born in Persia, this county, April 3, 1854. His father was a soldier in the 
Civil war and died in Andersonville prison. The son spent his early years in 
caring for his widowed mother and her other five children, and finally 
succeeded in beginning a course of study at Friendship Academy, teaching 
school and studying alternately until he was graduated in June, 1877. Soon 
afterward he entered the University of Buffalo and was graduated as an M. D. 
February 21, 1881. Dr. Vincent began practice that year in partnership with 
Ira J. Brownson, his old preceptor, whose entire business he succeeded to 
upon the death of the elder doctor in December, 1889. A Republican in 
politics Dr. X'incent was chosen supervisor four times — from 1883 to 1886, — was 
one of the organizers of the Hinsdale Union Free School, and elected contin- 
uously a member of the Board of Education. He joined the County Medical 
Society in 1S92. (October 17, 1883, Dr. Vincent married Ada M., daughter of 
Henry Flint, of Friendship. They have one daughter, Genevieve, born Jan- 
uary 28, 1888. 

HUMPHREY. 

Calvin Chickering was one of the earliest if not the earliest to settle as a 
physician in Humphrey. He was born in Amherst, N. H., was educated at 
Dartmouth College, and received a license to practice from the Cattaraugus 
County Medical Society. Beginning practice at Yorkshire Corners in 1829 he 
moved in 1831 to Ohio, but in 1836 returned to Cattaraugus county and 
settled for life in Humphrey, where he died in 1856. He combined the calling 
of a farmer with the professional work of a doctor, and succeeded in both occu- 
pations. He married Caroline, a daughter of Augustus Crary. 

Virgilium Reed, a native of Connecticut, studied medicine with Dr. 
Powers, of Spencerport, Monroe county, was graduated from the Geneva 
Medical College in 1854, and in 1857 came toEllicottville and entered into 
practice with Clark Crary. In December of that year, however, he moved to 
Humphrey, where in 1858 he married the widow of Calvin Chickering, who 
survives him. Dr. Reed died in 1866. He had an extensive ride and was 
much respected. 



i4o History of Cattaraugus County. 

James M. Andrews was born in New York city, March lo, 1837. He began 
studying medicine in Rochester in i860, was graduated from the Medical 
Department of the University of Buffalo in February, 1867, and began his 
professional life in Rochester, where he was sanitary inspector for four years. 
In 1875 he came to Humphrey, practiced here until his health failed in 1888, 
when he retired wholly from medical work and removed to Franklinville, 
where he now resides. In April, 1861, he enlisted in Co. E, 27th N. Y. Vols., 
in 1864 was appointed assistant to Surgeon Barnes, and in July, 1865, was 
honorably discharged. Dr. Andrews was justice of the peace four years in 
Humphrey and census enumerator in 1892 in Franklinville. 

ISCHUA. 

Dr. Ritchie was probably the first doctor to settle in this town, but when 
he came can not be determined. He moved here from Steuben county, 
whither he returned in 1842. He was not a regular practitioner. 

Albert A. Simons spent the most of his life in Ischua. Born in Chaplin, 
Conn., February 2, 18 19, he entered as a medical student the office of Rich- 
ard Charles, of Angelica, Allegany county, read next with his uncle, Paul 
Simons, of Bridgeport, Conn., studied a short time at the Medical Department 
of Yale College, and began practice in 1841 in Cuba, but two months later 
removed to Ischua. In 1862 he enlisted in Co. C, 154th N. Y. Vols. Dr. 
Simons received a license from the Eclectic Medical Society of the 32d Sena- 
torial District on September 23, 1874. He had two sons who are physicians — 
one in Chautauqua county, the other in West Virginia. Dr. Simons retired 
from active practice some years ago and died March 31, 1893, his remains 
being buried at Scott's Corners. He married, in April, 1842, Marilla S., 
daughter of Benjamin Townsend, of Ischua, who survives him. 

Dr. Frank, a Pole, came hereabout 1850 from his native country, remained 
four years or so, and went to Buffalo and thence west. 

Ransom Terry, son of Elisha and Amy (Hawley) Terry, was born in 
Franklinville, April 14, 1838, studied medicine with A. A. Simons, of Ischua, 
and his uncle, M. Terry, of Painted Post, Steuben county, was graduated 
February 24, 1874, from the Medical Department of the University of Buffalo, 
and began the practice of his profession in Ischua, where he still continues. 
Dr. Terry was supervisor of his town in 1878, health officer from the organiza- 
tion of the board, and member of the Olean Board of Pension Examiners 
since October, 1892. In 1874 he became a member of the County Medical 
Society and afterward one of its censors. He married, January 25, 1877, 
Ellen G., daughter of Wellington Morris, of Franklinville. 

LEON. 
Samuel Daniels, a Thompsonian doctor from Vermont, was the first 
resident to practicemedicine in Leon, but he did not make a business of it. 
He died here about 1855. 



Medical Practitioners in Leon. 141 

Joseph Wilson, the first regular practitioner, located here in 1834 and had 
an extensive ride for several years. 

Everett Stickney was born in Reading, Vt., and received a medical license 
February 28, 1834, from the Herkimer County Medical Society. He settled 
in Leon in 1835, coming here from Erie county, and remained until his death 
on August 12, 1891. He partially relinquished his practice in 1869, when 
A. A. Hubbell took up his career. Dr. Stickney married, first, Lucy Green, 
of Erie county, and second, Emeline Wells, who survives him. He became a 
member of the old Medical Society and was one of its Board of Censors. He 
was widely known and quite popular, acquired a host of friends, and left an 
indelible impression upon the whole community. 

Fred C. Beals. — See Salamanca. 

A. A. Hubbell was born on a farm in Conewango, May i, 1842, son of 
Schuyler Philip Hubbell and Hepzibah Farnsworth. His education was 
acquired at the district schools and Randolph Academy, interspersed with 
school teaching as a means of support, and in the summer of 1865 he 
registered as a medical student with G. J. Ackley, of Cattaraugus. Dr. Ackley 
died soon afterward and young Hubbell resumed his studies with Lyman 
Twomley, of Little Valley. He was obliged to practice economy, and to 
better do this he decided to enter the Eclectic Medical College of Pennsyl- 
vania, ini867, from which he was graduated January 4, 1869. February ist, 
following. Dr. Hubbell began the practice of his chosen profession in Leon, 
but in a few years became dissatisfied with the reputation of his eclectic alma 
viattr. He finally entered the Medical Department of the University of 
Buffalo and was graduated as an M. D. on February 23, 1876. F"or his 
graduation thesis he received one of the Fillmore cash prizes. He has 
frequently contributed valuable scientific papers to societies and periodicals. 
About 1880 Dr. Hubbell resolved to make a specialty of diseases of the eye 
and ear and removed to Buffalo, where he now resides, and where he fills the 
position of professor of diseases of the eye and ear in the Medical Department 
of Niagara University. He was elected a member of the Cattaraugus County 
Medical Society in 1878 and is a fellow of the New York State Medical 
Association. June 27, 1873, Dr. Hubbell married Evangeline, daughter of 
Capt. William Fancher. 

Dr. Cornwell did some professional work here about the year 1830. Noth- 
ing further can be learned of him. 

John E. Caneen, son of Frank, was born in Leon, August 20, 1855, and 
February 27, 1883, received his diploma from the University of Buffalo. He 
did his first medical work here from then until 1884, when he went to Chau- 
tauqua county and is now in Ripley. 

A doctor named Eddy followed medicine in Leon a couple of years, but 
did not accomplish much business. 

Fred E. Tuttle, son of Edmond D., was born March 30, 1857. His grand- 



142 



History of Cattaraugus County. 



father, Stephen Tuttle, was a soldier in the War of 1812 and a contractor on 
the Champlain canaL Fred E. Tuttle received his literary education at the 
State Normal School in Fredonia, began the study of medicine in the ofifice of 
Robert E. Gifford, of Cassadaga, Chautauqua county, was graduated February 
25, 1880, from the Medical University of Buffalo, and commenced his 
professional career in this town. He is a member of the Lake Erie and 
Cattaraugus County Medical Societies, joining the latter in 1884. He married 
Lillian M. Fisher, of Villenova, Chautauqua county, by whom he has had one 
daughter, Bertha L. 



LITTLE VALLEY. 

A. B. Wilder, tradition says, was the first settled physician in town. A 
native of Vermont he inherited strong New England characteristics. He was 
an old style apothecary, scholarly, and successful at first. Dr. Wilder was a 
member of the old County Medical Society. He was unmarried. He died at 
Little Valley before the war. 

Alfred Ayres is said to have kept a store here prior to 1830. It is quite 
probable that he is the same Alfred Ayres who is recorded as being one of the 
first doctors in Ashford. — See Ashford. 

Alson Leavenworth had the first brick house in town. It was valued in 
1837 at S500. — See New Albion. 

Stillman Chase, an eclectic doctor from New England, settled quite early 
at the Center and kept hotel as well as followed medicine. He was also a 
farmer, and died here about 1856. 

Dr. Irish located at an early day on what is now the Willis farm and 
practiced medicine a few years. He w as considered a good doctor for those days. 

Dr. French came to Little Valley Center from New England as a cotem- 
porary and partner of Dr. Miner. He soon went west. 

John H. Miner was from Madison, X. V., and returned there. With Dr. 
French he established an excellent practice for those times — from 1835 to 
1840. He was well educated. 

Wellington M. Cheney was born in Yorkshire and came hither about 
1873, remaining two or three years, and going thence to Washington, D. C, 
then to the Pennsylvania coal regions, and finally to Dansville, N. Y., where 
he is interested in the production of patent medicines. While here he was 
coroner a term. 

Daniel Bucklin, son of Amos, was born in Wallingford, Vt., September 16, 
181 1, studied medicine in physicians' offices there and in Mansfield, Ohio, and 
about 1839 came to Salamanca, where he started in life as a doctor. In 1840, 
however, he moved to the town of Little Valley, where, in 1842, he married 
Cynthia, daughter of Abner Chase, who survives him, his death occurring July 
23, 1 88 1, at Little Valley village, whither they had come to live in 1856. He 
was licensed September 2, 1874, by the allopathic .school. Dr. Bucklin for 



Medical Practitioners in Little Valley. 143 

a number of years owned a general store in partnership with his brother-in- 
law, Charles McG. Chase. He was supervisor in 1864, assemblyman in 18^6, 
and held several minor offices. He possessed a strong and robust constitution, 
which carried him through a long and successful medical career, but at last his 
health gave way under the incessant strain forced upon it, and he was obliged 
to give up much of his business. 

E. E. Davis, an eclectic, a nephew of Stillman Chase, was here from 1873 
to 1876. He came from and returned to Forestville, Chautauqua county, 
where his father lived. He secured a good practice during his brief stay. 

J. P. Powers began a five years' practice about 1857, but soon got into 
other business, owning a steam grist-mill with Daniel Biicklin at one time. 
He went west. He was a member of the old County Medical Society. 

Dr. Grout married a sister of the wife of Dr. Miner. He did not succeed 
very well as a physician in Little Valley and finally removed to Pennsylvania. 

Henry Van Aernam. — See Franklinville. 

Dr. Carpenter, a Quaker and a queer old gentleman, well posted on both 
medical and general topics, odd even to eccentricity, but a great favorite 
withal, practiced his school of medicine here a few years and went to James- 
town, where he died. He had considerable ability as a doctor and treated 
successfully a number of cases of a chronic nature. 

D. P. Baker had a large business here at one time as a homeopathic 
physician. He came from East Greenwich, R. L, and returned there, practic- 
ing there since. 

F"rank C. Davie was born in Bolivar, Allegany county, in 1856, was 
graduated June 22, 1876, from the Long Island Medical College Hospital, and 
began practice in Little Valley. He had previously studied and graduated in 
medicine at the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor. After a brief stay 
here Dr. Davie went to Le Roy, Minn., and one year later returned to this 
State to Angelica, Allegany county, where he is now. He is a brother of 
C. D. Davie, the present surrogate. 

Dr. Satterlee followed medicine here about 1871 for a year or two, but 
scarcely anyone seems to remember him. 

Jacob D. Woodruff, a native of W'estfield, N. J., and a medical graduate 
on February 21, 1882, of the L'niversity of Buffalo, registered as a resident 
physician on February 28th of the same year. He is also one of the forgotten 
ones, and probably did little business. 

Seaver Z. Fisher, grandson of a captain of the War of 1812, was born in 
Bradford, Pa., January 14, 1845. His father being first a lumberman and 
then a farmer the son early became accustomed to hard work. His education 
he obtained in the State Normal School at Edenboro, Pa. March 4, 1864, he 
enlisted in Co. L 78th N. Y. Vols., and participated in the battles of Resseca, 
New Hope Church, Pine Hill, and Mud Creek, receiving at the latter a severe 
wound. He was discharged in July, 1865. He finally took lectures at the 



144 



History of Cattaraugus County. 



■.^ 



University of Buffalo and was graduated as an M. D. from the Miami Medical 
College, Cincinnati, in March, 1878. From then until 1892 he practiced his 
profession in Little Valley. September 21, 1876, he married Lillie E., 
daughter of the late Ira Wood, of Little Valley, and they have had three 
daughters. Dr. Fisher joined the County Medical Society in 1885, became 
one of its censors, and in 1888 was elected delegate to the State Society. He 
was president of the Board of Education, health officer, county coroner, and 
five years treasurer of the Cattaraugus County Agricultural Society. 

Samuel Learned. — See Salamanca. 

George Albert Jameson was born in Ontario, Can., January 11, 1850, was 
educated in high schools and Albert College in Canada, was graduated in 
medicine from the University of Vermont, and began practice in Chateaugay, 
N. Y. In the fall of 1891 he came to Little Valley. Previous to his medical 
studies Dr. Jameson was for about fifteen years a Presbyterian minister. 

Lyman Twomley was born in Lancaster, N. H., and came while yet a 
young man to the town of Machias. August 16, 1832, he became a clerk in 
the store of Holmes & Washburn at $7 a month. In 1834 he married Urania 
M. Holmes, and in 1836 formed a partnership with Stephen Holmes at 
Machias. He very early formed the design to study medicine, but his plans 
were not easy of fulfillment. Nevertheless he began his studies and continued 
them as best he could, continuing, however, his mercantile pursuits. After a 
time he attended lectures at the Medical College of New York, graduating 
from that institution in June, 1851. He continued lectures after his gradua- 
tion. While in Machias he was a very active man. He carried on a general 
country store. He was a justice of the peace, taking the oath of ofifice the 
first time February 27, 1845, ^^'^ again January 10, 1849, ^"^ his papers show 
that he did a large business. He also held the ofifice of postmaster a long 
time, and was supervisor from Machias for four years (1841-44). He was 
also school inspector during a portion of the time. His business in Machias 
was continued until the spring of 1852. His books show the last entry for 
goods sold on the 13th of March, and on the 17th he notes his arrival at 
Little Valley. The first item for medical services was on March 19, 1852, 
and from that time until within the last year of his life he had a large practice, 
and ranked as one of the leading physicians of the county. He was supervisor 
of Little Valley in 1859 ^"^ again in 1868. He took an active interest in the 
removal of the county seat to Little Valley, devoting considerable time and 
money to the project. He joined the County Medical Society in 1868, 
becoming its vice-president in 1871, and was one of its censors. Dr. Twomley 
possessed literary ability of a high order, and wrote many poems, plays, and 
papers upon public, national, and social questions. He was to the last a 
thorough student of his profession, keeping abreast of the best thought and 
the latest discoveries in medical science. He was an indefatigable worker, 
and he carried with him wherever he went a confidence that was truly remark- 



^ 



Medical Practitioxers in Machias. 145 



able. He was also very kind hearted and benevolent, ministering to. rich and 
poor alike. His smile in the sick room was a benediction and his unfailing 
humor was an invaluable aid to his medicines. He died at his summer home 
at Chautauqua, N. Y., August 13, 1886, leaving a widow, since deceased, and 
an adopted daughter, Minnie D. Twomley. 

Seba S. Bedient, a native of Mansfield, was born August 27, 1855. His 
father, Amos H., was an early settler of that town, but died in Little Valley, 
March 4, 1889, aged seventy-four. Receiving an academic education he began 
the study of medicine with Lyman Twomley, graduating from the Medical 
Department of the Uni\'ersity of Buffalo on February 27, 1878. He at once 
commenced his chosen profession in Little Valley. Dr. Bedient was the first 
physician in Cattaraugus county to register his name, etc., in the county 
clerk's office under the act of May 29, 1880. He registered August 4, 1880. 
He was made a member of the Medical Society in 1878. He married Kate 
Lamb, of Marilla, Erie county, and they have two daughters. 

J. W. Mower, born in Schuyler, Herkimer county, December 9, 1824, 
attended Whitestown Seminary, and was graduated from the Albany iVledical 
College on January 27, 1852, and from the New York Homeopathic Medical 
College on March 3, 1864. From 1852 until 1878 he was in practice in his 
nati\-e town; he then removed to Buffalo and in 1886 to Little Valley. 

F. Granville Barnes was born in Paris, France, September 5, 1854. He 
studied medicine and was graduated February 21, 1875, from the Hahnemann 
Medical College, Chicago. He followed hospital practice until 1885, when he 
went to Syracuse as a physician and surgeon, and in the fall of 1892 removed 
to this town, where he is establishing a good business. 

LVNDOX. 

Dr. Hotchkiss is given by an old writer as being "the first physician" in 
the town of Lyndon. No one seems to remember him, however. 

M. C. Bissell. — See Carrolton. 

Hattie B. Stevenson, although registered as from Franklinville, lived and 
practiced in Lyndon a short time. She was born in Farmersville, attended 
Ten Broeck Academy, and was graduated I'ebruary 21, 1881, from the 
Eclectic Medical College of New York city. She soon went to Buffalo. 

Augustus Hayden settled in the edge of Lyndon in 1824 or '25. He died 
in 1835. 

IIACHIAS. 

Dr. Barber was the first physician to locate in Machias. Coming here 
about 1830 he remained two or three years, and was an unmarried man some 
forty years of age. Whence he came or whither he went can not be 
determined. 

Dr. Kneeland, also unmarried, but young, succeeded Dr. Barber, after a 
brief interval, in 1833, and was succeeded himself by Isaac Shaw, 
19 



146 



History of Cattaraugus County. 



Isaac Shaw located here in 1835, coming from Cayuga county. He was 
some years inspector of schools and made some radical changes in the school 
system, and a marked improvement in its efficiency was manifest. About 
1844 he sold out to Dr. Copp. Dr. Shaw was a member of the old County 
Medical Society. 

John L. Eddy was in partnership with Dr. Copp a short time. — See Olean. 

J. M. Copp came to Machias from New Hampshire about 1844 and prac- 
ticed his profession here ten years. His first wife died here and at her 
request her remains were sent back to New Hampshire for interment; his 
second wife also died in Machias and was buried here. For a time he was 
in partnership with John L. Eddy. In 1854 Dr. Copp removed to Waterford, 
Pa., and later to Portville, and finally to the west. He was a good singer and 
prominently identified with the advancement of education. It is said that he 
was also a practitioner for brief periods in Franklinville and in Rushford, 
Allegany county. 

Thomas J. King, A. M. and M. D., was born at East Hampton, L. I., 
June 4, 1825, and died in Machias, November 5, 1889, being the only child 
of Col. Samuel T. and Martha (Leek) King. Attending the public schools 
and Clinton Academy at Bridge Hampton, L. I., of which he afterward 
became principal, he entered in 1844 Williams College, graduating therefrom 
as Master of Arts in 1848. After teaching school for a time he began the 
study of medicine with Abraham Van Scoy, of East Hampton, and in 1885 was 
graduated as an M. D. from the Albany Medical College. In the summer of 
1856 he settled permanently in Machias and resided and practiced there until 
his death. From 1875 until January, 1887, Dr. King had as a partner H. J. 
Ashley, and from then until he died his son was his medical associate and 
since then has assumed his practice. In i860 Dr. King married Mary Eliza- 
beth, daughter of the late Wiggin M. Farrar, by whom he had two sons. Dr. 
Clarence and Harold S. Mrs. King died about three years after their 
marriage. In 1876 he was chosen member of Assembly and the following 
year reelected. In the House he was made chairman of the Committee on 
Public Health and a member of the Committee on Apportionment. Dr. King 
became a member of the County Medical Society in 1870 and was the same 
year elected its vice-president. He had been pension examiner for many years, 
and at the time of his death was attending physician to the Cattaraugus 
County Aims-House and Insane Asylum and local surgeon for the Buffalo, 
Rochester & Pittsburg railroad. A neighboring physician has said: "Dr. 
King was as a father to us younger physicians, and as a consultant I regarded 
him a model. * * * He explained our difficult cases to us so as to make 
them plain and corrected our mistakes in a way that half convinced us, as well 
as the patient, that we had not committed an error." A medical journal 
says: " Dr. King was regarded as a ripe scholar, was active in many philan- 
thropic works, and very popular in the village where he had so long resided. 






Medical Practitioners in Machias. 147 

Without being a contributor to medical literature he wielded an extensive 
influence among his brethren by reason of his clinical knowledge, his philo- 
sophical turn of mind, and his power of diagnosis. His leanings were toward 
medicine, pure and simple, although his surgical operations were numerous." 

Clarence King, son of Thomas. J. and Mary E. (Farrar) King, was born in 
Machias, June 6, 1861, received his education at Chamberlain Institute and 
Ten Broeck Academy, for one year was a private pupil of Rev. J. L. Davis, 
now a professor in the Methodist school at Lima, N. Y., and finally began the 
study of medicine under his father, entering afterward and graduating 
February 24, 1885, from the Medical Department of the University of Buffalo. 
His thesis, entitled " Hereditary Chorea," received honorable mention by the 
college faculty and was published in the Xetc York Medical Journal. Dr. 
King has written and published a number of papers valuable to medical 
science, and all of them are considerably quoted as authority. In 1891 he 
took a post-graduate course at the New York Polyclinic Medical College. 
The practice of his profession he began in Machias immediately upon his 
graduation at Buffalo, and in January, 1887, he formed a partnership with his 
father, which was only terminated by the death of the senior partner in 
November, i88g, since -which time Clarence King has continued alone. He 
succeeded his father as physician to the County Aims-House and Insane 
Asylum and local surgeon to the Buffalo, Rochester & Pittsburg railroad. 
With his brother-in-law he also conducts a drug and grocery store in the 
village. Dr. King is a member of the National Association of Railway Sur- 
geons and in 1887 joined the County Medical Society, was elected its' 
vice-president in 1890, and has*been one of its censors. May 13, 1885, he 
married Altie S. Jackson, eldest daughter of Rev. M. D. Jackson, a Methodist 
clergyman then of Centerville, Allegany county. They have had two sons 
and a daughter. 

Harmon J. Ashley, a son of Dennison and Lucinda (Gillett) i^shley, was 
born in Freedom on July 29, 1849, ^'^"^^ graduated as an M. D. from the 
University of Buffalo in February, 1875, and that spring began his career 
as a physician in partnership with Thomas J. King. This continued until 
January i, 1887, since which time Dr. Ashley has practiced alone. In the 
winter of 1886-87 Dr. Ashley took a special course in the treatment of 
diseases of women and children in the New York Polyclinic" Medical College. 
In 1875 he joined the County Medical Society and has been a censor. 

Madam Le-o-net-to, an Indian doctress, bought a house in Machias in 1891 
and has since made this her central headquarters, from which she makes tours 
through adjoining counties. 

The following persons have gone forth from Machias as legally equipped 
physicians and are not mentioned in other towns in Cattaraugus county: 
Fletcher FoUett, 1864, Bradford, Pa.; Jesse O. Randall, 1882, Silver Springs, 
N. Y.; Edwin M. Baker, 1883, Clyde, O. 



148 History of Cattaraugus Countv. 



XAPOLI. 

Phineas F. Noble, the first doctor to locate in this town, and a school 
teacher as well, came hither from Ontario county in 1820, and afterward 
moved to Iowa, but subsequently returned to Ontario county, where he died. 
He was a military captain and the first militia officer in Napoli. He settled 
on lot 34, and his was the first marriage to occur among the pioneer settlers, 
but he went outside the town to find a proper officer to perform the ceremony. 
His wife was Statira Canfield. 

Elijah Harmon was the first of two noted physicians to settle in Napoli. 
The second child of Rev. Elias Harmon, he was born in the town of Marcellus, 
N. Y., in 1805, and studied medicine first with Dr. Hoyt, of Aurora, and 
afterward with Dr. Hammond, of the city of Buffalo, from which city he 
"was graduated under Dr. Hamilton about 1830." About the year 1832 he 
located here and for some years was associated in practice with his brother-in- 
law, Samuel S. Wilcox, who came to Napoli in 1 841. Dr. Harmon had an 
e.xtensive business, often extending a distance of fifty miles. He was a man 
highly respected, strictly moral in character, honest and upright in all his 
dealings. For his first wife he married Mary B., only daughter of Rev. \V. J. 
Wilcox, then pastor of the Napoli Presbyterian church. They had three 
children — Lysander Elias, born 1834, died 1835; Mary Jane (Mrs. Austin 
Harvey, of Little Valley), born May 9, 1842; and Martha L. (Mrs. C. B. 
Fairchild, of New York city), born October i, 1844. His second marriage, to 
Saloma Wood, of Lowell, Mass., bore no issue. Dr. Harmon was a charter 
member of the old County Medical Society, its president in 1837, audits 
censor in 1834, and died in West Randolph in the spring of 1859. One of the 
tcnderest traits in human nature was manifest in Dr. Harmon when his first 
wife died, leaving his youngest child a motherless babe two months old. To 
her he gave until his death a mother's tender care and a father's fond affection. 

Samuel S. Wilcox was the second of two noted medical practitioners to 
make Napoli almost their life-long home. Born June 28, 1817, in Otisco, 
Onondaga county, a son of Rev. William J. Wilco.x, one of the very earliest 
ministers in Cattaraugus county and the leading spirit in the organization of 
many of the first Presbyterian and Congregational churches in different towns, 
he began his medical studies in the Geneva Medical College, from which he 
received the degree of M. D., and his practice was commenced with Br. 
Powers, of Spencerport, Monroe county, who for a brief period was his pre- 
ceptor. January 27, 1841, he married Mary J. Bell, of Sodus, N. Y., and the 
following May located in Napoli. He had been here, however, in 1826, with 
his father, William J., who died in this town July 14, 1842, aged sixty years. 
From 1841 to 1849 he was in partnership with his brother-in-law, Elijah 
Harmon. Dr. Wilcox died here May 28, 1872. A few years before his death 
he retired from active practice. Richard D., his son, was a physician in 
Salamanca (see Salamanca). As a doctor and a gentleman Dr. Wilcox was 



Medical Practitioners in New Albion. 149 

greatly respected. He acquired a wide practice and a host of friends, and 
was an honored member of the old County Medical Society. 

Dr. Blodgett came into town about 1827. — See Randolph. 

William C. Peaslee was a physician here in 1878, but how long before or 
how long after is not definitely known. It is certain he left prior to iSSo for 
Colorado for his health. While here he married Lena, daughter of John 
Damon. 

Dr. Barnes, it is said, was first a preacher and then a doctor and combined 
the two professions during a short stay in Napoli. 

NEW ALBION. 

Dr. Brown is given the credit by former writers of being the pioneer phy- 
sician in New Albion, and as nothing definite can be learned of him at this late 
day we will leave his name and record to the tender mercies of tradition. 

William F. Underwood had quite a lengthy career here. He was an eclec- 
tic, popular; but ostentatious, yet he built up a very good practice, and went to 
Hornsllsville soon after the war. 

Thcron L. Ailing was born in Canaan, Conn., in 1800, studied medicine at 
Fairfield Medical College, began his profession at Harmony, Chautauqua 
county, and came to New Albion in June, 1839. Remaining until 1853, he re- 
turned to Chautauqua county, where he died Februar).- 20, 1875. 

Gustavus J. Ackley was a physician in Cattaraugus during the closing 
years of the war. He died there in the winter of 1865-66. He was a medical 
student of Thomas J. Wheeler and a practitioner in Ellington, Chautauqua 
county, whence he came to this town, being a graduate of the University of 
Buffalo. 

Dr. Devoe came to Cattaraugus village from the west and followed medi- 
cine here several years — a good physician, popular, well read, and scientific. 
A son practiced his profession in Buffalo and later in Seattle. 

Albert D. Lake. — See Persia. 

Alson Leavenworth,* although he did not follow the practice of medicine 
after settling in New Albion, he nevertheless should go on record as a resident 
here, for here he ended his life, in itself a remarkable career. A physician in 
many towns in the county, a surgeon of recognized ability, a shrewd business 
man as well as a doctor, he became widely known and left to posterity a name 
that will live for generations to come. He was born in Woodbury, Conn., Oc- 
tober 12, 1788, and acquired his preliminary education at the common schools 
and at farm work. Upon attaining his majority he commenced the study of 
medicine with local practitioners and in May, 181 1, having passed the allo- 
pathic examination, was licensed to practice medicine and surgery in his na- 
tive State. October 17th of that year he married Sally Canfield, of Wood- 
bury. In the autumn of 1812 Dr. Leavenworth \vent to Philadelphia and 

♦Condensed from a biography written by Hon. John Manley. 



150 History of Cattaraugus Countv. 



entered the University of Pennsylvania as a medical student. That institution '^2^ 
was then in charge of that famous surgeon, Benjamin Rush, also a signer of ■ 
the Declaration of Independence. Graduating in the spring of 1813 Dr. Leav- 
enworth returned to Connecticut, resumed his practice, and soon after was ap- "M 
pointed surgeon in the State militia and ordered to the service of the United ~$r 
States in the War of 18 12-15. ^ dispute arose between the government offi- -i^-, 
cers and the officers of the army as to which should have the power of appoint- M;, 
ment, which resulted in Dr. Leavenworth not seeing active service under his '"^^ 
commission. In the spring of 1818 he started with his family for western ? 
New York and on September 25th reached the village of EUicottville, where ' ;%^ 
he took up the practice of his profession as the first physician in that town. ''^^ 
His ride e.xtended from Corydon and Kinzua, Pa., to Collins, Erie county, iH' 
among the Indians as well as the whites. Dr. Leavenworth rode horseback W?^ 
and carried an axe to cut browse for his horse and to "spot trees" to find his "^' 
way back. Frequently he was obliged to sleep in the woods on hemlock boughs 'S| 
and remain away from home several days at a time. Being often called upon 'vf 
to perform difificult cases of surgery, a noteworthy event may be appropriately W 
recorded here. An Indian had suffered several years with a lame knee that ^' 
finally became so dangerous as to threaten his life. The Quakers residing at - -V' 
the Quaker Mission on the Allegheny river applied to Dr. Leavenworth for ,£' 
advice and he decided that amputation was necessan,-. Accordingly the doc- 'i^ 
tor made (from necessity) his surgical instruments from a carpenter's chest of "^ 
tools. John Green and another resident of Great Valley were selected as assist- ^a 
ants, and as the doctor began his work the latter assistant fainted. Green -l^*^ 
made a brisk application of sole leather upon his nether person, and he |^ 
speedily revived and left, and the doctor, assisted by Green, successfully ac- -i^;' 
complished the painful task. The Indian fully regained his health and lived .'^• 
to a good old age. In 1831 Dr. Leavenworth removed to Little Valley, and ^^ 
about 1836 to Cold Spring, where he became largely interested in timber land. ■ ^j^ 
He subsequently lived for several years in Randolph, and about 1851 came to i^ 
Cattaraugus in New Albion, where he erected the first brick house in the town, ijg. 
and where he died. January 25, 1823, he was appointed first judge of the ,| 
County Court, which office he held until Februar}- 15, 1833, and in 1840 was '<1|' 
appointed loan commissioner. He was commissioner to superintend the erec- -r^,^ 
tion of the county buildings at EUicottville, commissioner to lay out public '^ 
roads on the Indian reservation, and was supervisor from Cold Spring from % 
1 843 to 1846 and from New Albion in 1853 and 1854. He was also instrumental 'fy 
in procuring from the Holland Land Company an entire surrender of theaccu- '? 
mulated interest on land contracts held by them against the early settlers, and f-" 
was, besides, one of the original projectors of and a liberal contributor to the .^i. 
Randolph Academy (now the Chamberlain Institute), and was a member of -^ 
the old County Medical Society. In all these positions he served with re- . ; 
markable ability, evincing a well trained mind and a keen penetration. He 



Medical Practitioners in New Albion. 151 

was an eminent physician, a skillful surgeon, a shrewd business man, a public 
spirited citizen, a good politician, a staunch friend, and a liberal benefactor. 

Cyrus \V. Babcock, a native of Persia, this county, graduated February 21, 
1866, from the Philadelphia University, of Philadelphia, Pa., an eclectic school, 
and in the 'seventies located in practice in Cattaraugus village. He became 
quite popular during his few years' stay, and mo\ed to Buffalo soon after 1880, 
where he still resides. 

George Lattin, one of the present physicians in Cattaraugus, is a son of Li- 
nus and Julia (Root) Lattin, and was born in Mansfield, August 17, 1847. Li- 
nus Lattin settled in that town in 1831 and died there aged eighty-two years. 
The son attended Griffith Institute, Springville, and Carleton College, North- 
field, Minn., taught school, and was graduated in medicine on March i, 1875, 
from the Bellevue Hospital Medical College, New York city. Practicing then 
a year in EUicottville he came thence to Cattaraugus. As a Republican in 
politics he served as supervisor in 1886 and 1887 and became a member of the 
County Medical Society in 1875. Of this he was vice-president two years 
(1884 and 1885), secretary in 1878 and 1879, ^^'^^ o"^" of '^^^ censors, and in 1892 
was elected its president. Li Februar\-, 1874, he married Grace, daughter of 
Charles Harvey, an early settler of Mansfield. They have three children — 
Alice, born in 1876, and Berton and Benton (twins 1, born August 5, 1885. 

Edwin H. Millington was born in New York cit}', January 3, 1846, where 
his father was for many years engaged in mercantile business. VV. F., his only 
brother, is engaged as a physician in Brooklyn. Edw in H. began the study of 
medicine in New York in the office of Prof. R. S. Newton, taking in the mean- 
time a course of lectures at the Eclectic Medical College of New York city, 
from which he was graduated February 15, 1867. He was then appointed phy- 
sician in one of the dispensaries and finally resigned to remove to Saratoga. 
P'rom June, 1872, to April, 1881, Dr. Millington was located at Hancock, Del- 
aware county, where in May, 1874, he married Miss Lou Hall. Since 1881 he 
has resided and practiced his profession at Cattaraugus. In 1886 he was for 
several weeks engaged in hospital practice in New York city. 

Chauncey M. Jones was born near Ithaca in 1829, was graduated from the 
Medical Department of the University of Buffalo, February i, 1882, located in 
practice at Cattaraugus soon afterward, and died here. He married Sophia P., 
daughter of James Buffington, of Mansfield. 

Sophia P. Jones, wife and widow of Chauncey M., was born in Mansfield 
in 1832, and was graduated from the University of Buffalo on February 27, 
1887. She began practice in Cattaraugus and established here a sanitarium, 
which was continued two or three years. She then moved to West Sala- 
manca, where she followed medicine with her son Wirt W. from his gradua- 
tion until the fall of 1892, when both moved to Greenville, Mich. She became 
a member of the County Medical Society in 1884. 

O. J. Stafford was here less than a year about 1886. On P'ebruary 20, 1878, 



152 History of Cattaraugus County. 

he graduated from the University of Buffalo. He came from and returned to 
Canajoharie, N. Y., where he was born. 

Henry M. Schall was here a few months, first with E. H. Milhngton and 
then alone. He graduated from the Jefferson Medical College, Philadelphia, 
April 5, 1887, and likewise went to Rochester. 

Dr. Angus came into this town from the west, was in partnership a short 
time with E. H. Millington, and went south. He was young, bright, and 
promising. 

Lyman T. Wade, a native of Wisconsin, being born there February 14, 1867, 
was a graduate on March 20, 1888, of the Bennett Medical College, Chicago, 
came from that city here, and practiced first with E. H. Millington and later 
alone. In 1891 he removed to Rochester, where he has become a specialist. 



Norman Smith was the first physician to locate in Olean, coming hence 
from Pittsburg, Pa., about 1814. Born near Hartford, Conn., December 25, 
1788, he married, January 7, 1808, Abigail Sanders, of Litchfield, Conn., where 
he pursued his medical studies, and where he received his diploma or license 
as a physician and surgeon on July i, 181 1. Soon afterward he removed to 
Pittsburg, Pa., and thence to Olean, and in August, 1828, went to Elmira, 
where he died March 7, 1874. While in Olean Dr. Smith was made surgeon 
of a local militia regiment. He was also a dentist, and was the first and for 
some time the only one in this part of the country. Dr. Smith was a devout 
Presbyterian, and a man of sterling qualities, being also a noted fisherman. 
His first wife died in 1839 ^""^ he married, second, Mrs. Mary Ann Tompkins, 
\vho died in 1846. His two wives were sisters. His old clock, which he 
cared for a long number of years, and which stood in his room, stopped at the 
exact moment when he breathed his last. 

Alanson C. Bennett, who located in Olean in 1816, was a good doctor and 
a man of fine appearance. With three other men he was drowned in 1S20 in 
the Allegheny river while on their way to Ellicottville to attend court. Their 
boat upset. 

Dr. Eastman, as far as tradition goes, might also be said to have been one 
of the first medical practitioners in Olean, coming in 1818 or before, but aside 
from this fact no definite knowledge has been gleaned of him. 

Dr. Rue was doubtless the first Thompsonian doctor here, but when he 
came, except that he "came early," can not be determined. It is quite 
probable that he was here about 1820. 

Andrew Mead was a man of considerable note. He was from Stamford, 
Conn., locating in Olean as a physician in 1820. He was a graduate of a 
medical college in New York city. He followed medicine steadily until about 
1833. March 28, 1831, he became associate judge of the County Court and 
about the year 1840 was appointed examiner and master in chancery. After 



Medical Practitioners in Olean. 



this date Dr. Mead did little medical business. His library and practice 
finally passed into the hands of Lambert Whitney, who was at one time his 
student. His health failed or partially failed him, and it was principally on 
this account that he ga\'e up his extensive ride and confined his practice to the 
village of Olean. Becoming a noted politician he was much of his life in 
office, living in his own as well as holding one. In 1845 '^t; moved to Alle- 
gany, where he was brutally murdered by Theodore Nichlas, a German, on 
December 18, 1869, aged nearly eighty years. Dr. Mead was amemberof the 
old County Medical Society, was many years acting magistrate in Olean, and 
held many other positions of trust. He was a bachelor. Eccentric and 
talented, well read, a man of deep penetration, he was widely known and 
respected; he possessed a quick judgment and was decided and confident in 
his opinions. James G. Johnson, in his "Pioneer History of Olean," says of 
Dr. Mead: "As a physician who had received a thorough medical education, 
and had \'oluntarily supplemented it by two years' attendance in the princi- 
pal hospitals of New York city, he was quick, skillful, penetrating, and dis- 
criminating, and in the early days of his practice was pre-eminently successful, 
and enjoyed to a more than usual degree the entire confidence of this commu- 
nity and a large section of country round about. Vet as time passed he alien- 
ated all his early friends by his intolerance, quarrelsomeness, and vindictive- 
ness. He was an unreasonably warm friend and a bitter, relentless enemy. 
In contradistinction with the above I may mention that he contributed prin- 
cipally if not entirely to the education of two promising young men at Ham- 
ilton College for the ministry of the Baptist church, of which he was a mem- 
ber, and he did many other things equally benevolent and creditable to his 
goodness of heart." A further sketch of Dr. Mead may be found in Mr. Lin- 
coln's chapter on the Bench and Bar. 

Edwin Finn, son of Menzo White Finn, came from Cortland county to 
Olean in 1829. He had attended medical lectures at Fairfield, received a 
license from a medical society, and died here in April, 1843. Dr. Finn was 
not a brilliant man, but he was ambitious and industrious; his practice 
extended into adjacent towns. He was a charter member of the old County 
Medical Society and was elected its president in 1836. 

Lambert Whitney, born in St. Johnsbury, Vt., October 10, 1812, received 
a common school education in his native town, removed in his youth with his 
parents to New Hampshire, and there commenced the study of medicine. In 
June, 1833, he came to Olean, being fourteen days making the journey by 
stage and the Erie canal. Arrived in Olean he resumed his medical studies 
in the office of Edwin Finn, finishing, however, with Andrew Mead, whose 
business and library he eventually acquired. After a course of lectures at 
Fairfield Medical College he was granted a diploma by the Medical Society 
of the State of New York in January, 1837, and at once settled in active 
practice in Olean. In 1837 h^ joined the old Medical Society of Cattaraugus 
20 



154 History of Cattaraugus County. 

county and was later elected a censor. In 1884 he was made an honorary 
member of the present County Medical Society. In the early years of his 
practice Dr. Whitney rode horseback over a large territory. He says: "I 
did everything that a doctor then had to do." In 1834, while yet a medical 
student, young Whitney was appointed deputy sheriff for one term and in 
1838 was elected justice of the peace, serving as a magistrate twelve years. 
He was a member of the first Board of Trustees of the village of Olean, was 
supervisor from this town in 1853 and 1S54, and in i860 was elected county 
treasurer for three years. He has also served as coroner and village health 
officer. In politics he is a Republican and in religion a Baptist, and for more 
than half a century has been a worthy member of that church. Dr. Whitney 
is highly respected as a physician, a public officer, and a private citizen. He 
enjoys a quiet home amid life-long friends and scenes, reaping the reward of 
ah industrious, well-spent life. In May. 1834, Dr. Whitney married Sally 
Senter, who bore him six children. Two sons live in Olean, viz.: Lam- 
bert S. and Russell M. : a third, James 0., resides in San Francisco, Cal. 
Mrs. Whitney died April 15, 1891, aged seventy-five years. 
Lyman Packard. — See Yorkshire. 

Dr. Marshall came here in the winter of 1836-37 from Connecticut, 
remained a year, and went west. 

Dr. Cleveland made his appearance in Olean quite early, and was in part- 
nership with Edwin Finn for a time. He was also in Allegany, where he had 
a store on the river. 

Dr. Bigelow is given the credit of being the first horneopathist in this town. 
He married here, and professionalU- was \"ery successful. After several years 
he removed to near New York cit\'. 
David Bcnnie. — See Port\'ille. 

William S. Babbitt, the son of a l'resb\'terian minister, a brother of the in- 
ventor and manufacturer of the Babbitt steel pen, and a graduate of a New 
York medical college, pursued his profession in Olean eight or ten years, dur- 
ing which time his wife died. He was a student here of David Bennie. Care- 
ful, steady, and well educated, he acquired the reputation of being a skillful 
surgeon, and finally went to Lockport, where he died, his remains being 
brought back for interment by the side of his wife. 

Charles S. Hurlbut, a native of this State, was a student of Dr. Babbitt 
and, after his graduation, a practitioner here some ten years, going finally to 
Pennsylvania, where he lately died. He married Eveline Barker, of Olean. 
Dr. Hurlbut was a good silrgeon and a good scholar. 
J. L. C. Cronyn. — See Portville. 

Charles Austin Woodruff, born in Farmersville, February 7, 1840, was a sol- 
dier and was wounded in the Rebellion, and in 1866 entered Bellevue Hospital 
Medical College, graduating March i, 1867. He also received certificates in 
auscultation and percu.ssion from Dr. Austin Hint, from Dr. Alexander B. Mott, 



Medical Practitioxers in Oleax. 15^ 

professor of surgery at Bellevue, and from Dr. R. Ogden Doremus, professor 
of chemistry and toxicology in the same institution. Dr. Woodruff, on return- 
ing to Olean, succeeded to the practice of his old preceptor, Charles S. Hurl- 
but, and died here honored and respected. He joined the Medical Society Oc- 
tober 8, 1867, and became one of its censors. His wife was Eliza M. Charles, 
daughter of Joh'.i and niece of Richard Charles, M. D., of Angelica, Allegany 
county. 

John L. Eddy, son of Dea. John C. and Samantha P. (Frost) Eddy, born in 
M't. Holly, Vt., November 27, 1829, graduated from Ludlow (Vt.) Academy, 
taught common schools seven winters, and when twenty-one began the study of 
medicine in the office of F". M. Bliss, of Poultney, Vt., and finished with Prof. 
Middleton Goldsmith, of Castleton, Vt. In June, 1854, he was graduated from 
the Castleton Medical College, having previously attended a course of lectures 
at the Pittsfield (Mass.) Medical College. In August, 1854, Dr. Eddy settled 
in Machias and practiced until June, 1857, when he moved to Allegany, where 
he continued until July, 1867, when he located and has since continued in 
Olean, having had as a partner' since August, 1878, his son-in-law and former 
student, Selderi J. Mudge. While in Machias Dr. Eddy was in partnership with 
J. M. Copp. He has been pension examiner since 1864. August 8, 1867, he 
joined the new County Medical Society and was elected a delegate to the State 
Medical Society in 1873 and 1884. Dr. Eddy has been a member of the vil- 
lage Board of Trustees, president of the corporation, and a member of the 
Board of Education. He became a Republican at the organization of that 
party and has ever since staunchly adherred to its principles, but has never 
been a politician or an office-seeker. November i, 1855, he was married to 
Elvire L., daughter of William Loomis, of Machias. They have had five chil- 
dren, of whom a son and daughter survive — Loren L. and Nellie S. (Mrs. Sel- 
den J. Mudge). Dr. Eddy is one of the best physicians and surgeons in west- 
ern New York. 

Selden J. Mudge, son of Rev. W. Mudge, a Baptist clergyman, was born in 
Tonawanda, N. Y., May 24, 1851, was educated at the Collegiate Institute of 
Nunda, Livingston county, and in 1871 followed civil engineering. He began 
his medical studies in the ofiice of John L. Eddy in Olean in 1873 and finished 
at the Medical Department of the University of Buffalo, receiving his degree 
of Doctor of Medicine in February, 1877. In September following he located 
in Bradford, Pa., and in August, 1878, removed to Olean and became and has 
since remained a partner of his old preceptor, John L. Eddy. He joined the 
County Medical Society in 1881. Dr. Mudge is conceded to be a skillful sur- 
geon, having performed successfully many difficult operations. He married a 
daughter of Dr. Eddy. 

Melville C. Follett was born in Machias, September 29, 1838, a son of Na- 
than and Clarissa (Potter) Follett, attended the common schools, academies, 
and Oberlin College (Ohio), and commenced his medical education with 



156 History of Cattaraugus County. 



Thomas J. King. Six months afterward he was appointed house physician 
for the Erie County Aims-House, which position he held for over two years. 
In the meantime he had entered the Medical Department of the University of 
Buffalo, from which he was graduated in February, 1865. Prior to his gradu- 
tion Dr. Follett had been for six months a medical student of Prof. Thomas F. 
Rochester. He commenced practice in Rouseville, Pa., and in September, 

1866, settled permanently in Olean, where he has acquired the reputation of 
being an eminent practitioner. He joined the County Medical Society Octo- 
ber 8, 1867. He married, May 31, 1865, Mary A. Smith, of Kenosha, Wis. 

W. Carl Dallanbaugh, a native of Niagara county, was born June 18, 1849, 
and was graduated from the Eclectic Medical Institute, Cincinnati, June 7, 
1881, endorsed by the U. S. Medical College, New York city, June 11, 1881. 
He came to Olean, however, in 1878, and in 1880 married Ella E. Van Slyke, of 
Niagara county. He joined the County Medical Society in 1892. 

Cornelius H. Bartlett is a son of Nathaniel and Sarah (Waters) Bartlett. 
Born in Pine Plains, Dutchess county. May 10, 1825, he was educated in the 
district schools and in Groton and Cortland Academies. After graduating at 
the latter institution he taught school some five or six years, and while so 
engaged began studying medicine with Ashbel Patterson, of Homer, and later 
with Caleb Green, of the same place. He attended the University of Buffalo 
one year as a medical student and July 3, 1849, ^^^s graduated as an M. D. 
from the Geneva Medical College. The same year Dr. Bartlett commenced 
his professional career at Summer Hill, Cayuga county, and in 1853 removed 
to Portville as David Bennie's successor, remaining there until 1876, when he 
came to Olean, going into partnership both in practice and in a drug store 
with Melville C. Follett. Dr. Bartlett married, in June, 1850, Sylphia C, 
daughter of Dr. Bennie, of Portville. Their children are Mary D. ; Kate E. 
(Mrs. George E. Ramsey), of Olean; and Frank H., of Olean. Since 1870 
Dr. Bartlett has been curator of the Medical Department of the University of 
Buffalo. He became a member of the County Medical Society on October 8, 

1867, was elected its president in 1871 and 1877, its vice-president in 1875, a 
member of its Board of Censors, delegate to the State Medical Society in 
1868 and 1884, and representative to the National Medical Association in 
1878 and i88i. Dr. Bartlett is eminently qualified for these numerous posi- 
tions, and in one and all has evinced sound medical knowledge and excellent 
judgment, and is frequently called in consultation. His once extensive 
country practice he has relinquished on account of approaching old age. 

Frank H. Bartlett, son of Cornelius H. and Sylphia C. (Bennie) Bartlett, 
was born in Portville, April 9, 1856. On February 25, 1879, he was graduated 
from the Medical Department of the University of Buffalo and soon afterward 
took a special course at the College of Physicians and Surgeons in New York 
city. He immediately began the practice of medicine in Olean, continuing 
until the winter of 1886, when he took a course on the eye, ear, and throat at 






Medical Practitioners in Olean. ' 157 

the Post-Graduate Medical School of New York. Since then he has given his 
attention mainly to the treatment of these organs. In 18S1 he joined the 
Cattaraugus County Medical Society and was elected to its Board of Censors. 

Wilfred Havland Sage, born in Angelica, Allegany county, November 19, 
1853, attended Ten Broeck Academy, began the study of medicine with 
Melville C. Follett in December, 1874, and was graduated February 25, 1879, 
from the Medical Department of the University of Buffalo. On the ist of 
March of that year Dr. Sage formed a partnership with his old preceptor. Dr. 
Follett, which continued until 1881, since which time he has been alone. He 
was secretary of the Board of Health for three years and held also the 
position of registrar of vital statistics. In 1886 he was appointed chemist of 
the State Dairy Department for western New York, filling the office with 
eminent ability until 1891, when he resigned on account of ill health. He 
was then in California a year, and spent the college year in the Chemical 
Department of the Leland Stanford, Jr., University. In 1886 he passed con- 
siderable time in the Chemical Department of the University of Buffalo and 
in New York cit}^ under Dr. Martin, of the Board of Health, taking up the 
study of fats and oils. Dr. Sage has made chemistry a specialty, though he 
continues to practice medicine to a considerable extent, treating principally 
acute diseases and diseases of children. November 29, 1880, he married 
Jennie, daughter of Peter Loughlen, of Hinsdale, and a sister of Dr. T. B. 
Loughlen, of Olean. Dr. Sage was elected a member of the County Medical 
Society in 1881. 

De Vere M. Hibbard was born in Brookfield, Madison county, July 31, 
1848. Attending Friendship Academy he entered the Cleveland Homeo- 
pathic Hospital College, graduated therefrom February 12, 1878, and the 
following September began his career as a physician in Olean. February 16, 
1880, he married Mary E. Thomas, of Buffalo. They have one daughter, 
Marie. 

John C. Richards was born in Philadelphia, Pa., May 4, 1842, was gradu- 
ated March 10, 1865, from the Jefferson Medical College of that city, and 
in 1870 married Carrie Van Syckle, of Milford, N. J. Dr. Richards was 
acting assistant surgeon in the Rebellion, began practice in 1866 in Lock 
Haven, Pa., and in 1882 came to Olean, where he was a physician until his 
death, which occurred in 1892. He was county coroner, secretary of the U. S. 
Board of Pension Surgeons, and supreme medical examiner of the E. A. U. 

James V. D. Coon, druggist and physician, was born in Nunda, Livingston 
county, September 14, 1834, attended district school and Nunda Academy, 
read medicine with C. L. Harding, of his native village, and graduated Feb- 
ruary 5, 1856, from the Eclectic Medical Institute, Cincinnati. His practice 
was commenced the same year in Tuscarora, Livingston county, and the 
following year he moved to Nunda and formed a partnership with his preceptor. 
This was dissolved in i860 and Dr. Coon went to Nile, Allegany county, but 



15^ 



History of Cattaraugus CountV. 



two years later returned to Nunda, where he purchased a drug store. 
Coming to Olean in 1877 he bought his present drug store, and has never 
been in active practice here, but is often called in consultation. Dr. Coon 
married, January 13, 1858, Polly A. Robinson, of West Sparta, Livingston 
county, and their children are Harriet M. (Mrs. Joseph C. Clark), of Olean; 
Carrie D. (Mrs. C. S. Phelps), of Gowanda; and William R. and Faith J., 
of Olean. 

Charles O. Chester practiced medicine in Olean about a year, being here 
in 1880. He was born in Buffalo, graduated at the Medical Department of 
the university of that city February 23, 1876, came to this place from there, 
and eventually returned. 

J. J. Powers remained here some seven or eight years. He was a graduate 
of the Baltimore College of Physicians and Surgeons, receiving his diploma 
March i, 1881, and commenced practice in Olean the same year, coming hence 
from Allegany county. His health failed, causing his removal to Denver, 
where he is now. He was a native of Hinsdale and a member in 1883 of the 
County Medical Society. 

Warren F. Series came to Olean in 1885, practiced a few years, and went 
to Wichita, Kan., where he is now engaged in his profession. Graduating 
from the University of the City of New York on March 3, 1883, he began 
business in Hornellsville, whence he moved to this place. 

W. H. Dukeman, a Pennsylvanian by birth, graduated from the University 
of the City of New York, February 19, 1880, came to Olean in 1885, and 
moved about five years later to California. He came here from Hornellsville 
and proved a good physician. Dr. Dukeman became a member of the County 
Medical Society in 1883. 

Luther H. Kitchel, young, talented, finely educated, and bright, a general 
favorite everywhere, came from Buffalo about 1873, remained a few years, and 
returned. He was a graduate of the Medical Department of the University 
of Buffalo, and soon after his advent here joined the County Medical Society 
and became a member of the Board of Censors. 

Francis E. Watts, born in Euclid, Ohio, July 25, 1858, graduated from 
Alfred University in Allegany county as Ph. B. in 1880, was one year in the 
Medical Department of the University of Ann Arbor, and graduated as M. D. 
from the Hahnemann Medical College, Chicago, February 20, 1883. He 
immediately located in Olean, leaving here in 1886 for Port Allegany, Pa., but 
returned in 1892. He was a member of the Chautauqua and Cattaraugus 
Homeopathic Medical Society and has been health officer of Olean village. 
In October, 1879, he married Aria Bickford, a niece of William H. Vanderbilt. 

Alexander M. Kinkaid was born in Butler, Pa., was graduated February 26, 
1880, from the Hahnemann Medical College, Chicago, came the same year from 
Kankakee, 111., remained a couple of years, and moved west and engaged in 
manufacturing. He married his wife while here. 



Medical Practitioners in Olean. 159 

Eugene B. Burdick was born in Wirt, Allegany county, August 30, 1856, 
graduated at the Friendship Academy, June 17, 1880, received his degree of 
M.D. from the Medical Department of the University of the City of New A'^ork, 
March 8, 1886, and began practice at Whitesville, Allegany county. In July, 
1887, Dr. Burdick removed to Olean. Prior to his graduation in medicine he 
was four years a teacher of common and six years principal of union graded 
schools. In 1 891 he was elected coroner for three years. He is a member of 
the Olean City, the Allegany County, and the Cattaraugus County Medical, 
Societies, and a 33d degree Mason. Dr. Burdick makes diseases of children 
and heart and lungs a specialty. 

William E. McDufifie and his father Angus were both born in the town of 
Otto, where Robert McDuffie, father of Angus, located in 1822. William E. 
was born July 23, 1859, completed his education at Ann Arbor in 1880, and 
for five years following was engaged in the drj' goods trade. F~ebruary 28, 1888, 
he was graduated as a physician and surgeon from the University of Buffalo, 
began practice at Earmersville, and in March, 1890, removed to Olean. Au- 
gust 12, 1885, he married Dell Losee, a native of Otto and a daughter of Sul- 
livan Lo.see, a soldier in the Rebellion who fell in battle at Fair Oaks. Dr. 
McDuffie joined the County Medical Society in 1892, and now holds the posi- 
tion of chemist of the State Dairy Department of western New York. 

Ambrose E. Smith, a native of New Troy, Mich., was born August 23, 1857, 
and at the age of nineteen began teaching school. In 1 881 he was graduated 
as a B. S. from the Michigan State Agricultural College, spent the ne.xt two 
years as a commercial traveler, and February- 17, 1885, was graduated as an 
M. D. from Rush Medical College, Chicago, and endorsed July i6th by the 
University of Buffalo. He commenced practice at Belmont, Allegany county", 
and in 1888 came to Olean as the successor of J. J. Powers. Dr. Smith joined 
the Cattaraugus County Medical Society in 1892. He married Altie Emer- 
son, of Belmont, in December, 1884. 

Thomas B. Loughlen, son of Peter and Mary Loughlen, was born in Hins- 
dale, April 13, 1868, graduated from the Olean High School in June, 1886, and 
began his medical studies with William H. Sage, receiving his diploma from 
the University of Buffalo on March 25, 1890. He began practicing that spring 
in Olean and became a member of the County Medical Society in 1892. 

John D. Maloy, a native of Ireland, was born in 1844, was graduated 
February 23, 1875, from the University of Buffalo, began practice in Olean in 
1 89 1, and belongs to the County Medical Society. 

Joseph C. Clark was born in Chester, Orange county, December 12, 1858, 
his parents being J. G. and Mary E. (Carpenter) Clark. He graduated from 
the Chester Academy, in 1877 became a medical student in the office of his 
uncle. Dr. S. G. Carpenter, and shortly afterward took up telegraphing in New 
York city. He was graduated March 6, 1885, from the Medical Department 
of the University of the City of New York, and immediately entered the Sur- 



i6o 



History of Cattaraugus County. 



gical Department of Bellevue Hospital, where he remained eighteen months. 
After practicing as a physician and surgeon in New York city two years he 
came to Olean in the spring of 1891. Dr. Clark joined the Medical Society 
in 1892. He married a daughter of Dr. Coon. 

John F. Steyner, son of John J., of Olean, was born here July 30, 1859, 
studied medicine with De Vere M. Hibbard, graduated February 24, 1884, 
from the Hahnemann Medical College, Chicago, and began practice that year 
in Olean. He was appointed a member of the Board of Pension Examiners. 
In 1889 Dr. Steyner removed to Pittsburg, Pa., where he now makes a 
specialty of diseases of the rectum. 

Mary R. Evans was a graduate of the Electro Therapeutic Institute, 
Toronto, Can., receiving her degree September 4, 1876. She is registered 
from Olean, October 11, 1880, but how long she remained can not be deter- 
mined. She was born in Rushford, Allegany county. 

Mrs. Emma B. Steyner was born in Monroe county and was graduated 
from the Hahnemann Medical College, Chicago, February 24, 1884. She 
commenced practice in 1886 in Olean and two years later located in 
Rochester, where she makes a specialty of diseases of the rectum. 

M. A. Sanford, who claims the double title of A. B. and M. D., says he is 
a " traveling tramp." He graduated from the Albany Medical College, 
December 23, 1861, was in practice a short time in Ellicottville, and came 
here in 1881. 

Erwin M. Cass was born in Afton, Chenango county, February 9, 1853, 
was graduated from the Medical Department of the University of Buffalo on 
February 26, 1884, and in July, 1891, registered in the county clerk's office as 
a physician in Olean. 

Thomas L. Barnes was graduated from the Eclectic Medical College of 
New York city March 25, 1886, and at once started to practice in Olean. He 
probably got no footing, for he is scarcely remembered. 

James W. Peebles, a graduate of the American Eclectic College of Cincin- 
nati on October 13, 1869, came to Olean in January, 1887, but doubtless soon 
removed. 

G. Reve is registered as practicing in Olean in May, 1882; he was graduated 
December 23, 1862, from the Albany Medical Cellege. Very little seems to 
be known of him. 

Francis E. Comstock was another brief resident physician in Olean. Born 
in Andover, Allegany county, he graduated from the University of the City of 
New York, March 13, 1883, and at once came here. 

Dr. Meecham, it is said, came here before 1876. He soon removed to 
Warsaw, N. Y. 

James C. Earle graduated March i, 1887, from the Medical Department of 
the University of Buffalo, and in 1889 located in Olean, coming here from 
Allegany county, whither he returned two years later. 



Medical Practitioners in Otto. i6i 

John P. Boothe has recently come here to retire from active practice. He 
was licensed January 5, 1875, by the 32d Senatorial District Eclectic Medical 
Society, and for some time has followed his profession in Ceres, Allegany 
county. He is a Canadian by birth. 

Dr. Reno was with Marshall J. Lincoln for a time. He went to Pennsyl- 
vania and finally to New York city, where he holds a responsible medical 
position. 

D. M. Hillihan was a homeopathist in Olean in 1877, but how long he 
^remained, whence he came, and whither he removed is not known. 

Jacob Eugenio Kincaid Morris was born in Eldred, Pa., November 23, 
1856, the son of Rev. Samuel D. and Elizabeth C. Morris. He received an 
academic education and in 1879 ^^^^ graduated as an M. D. from the Univer- 
sity of Buffalo, commencing practice at once in Eldred, Pa., and moving 
thence to Olean in i886. In 1884 and again in 1891 Dr. Morris took courses 
at the Post-Graduate School of New York city; for six years he has been a 
member of the Board of Education of Olean, and in December, 1892, he 
joined the County Medical Society. July 2, 1881, he married Sarah Gilling- 
ham, of Olean. 

J. K. Tretton was a short time physician in Olean, who succeeded in 
establishing a good reputation and a lucrative practice. 



Edwin Putney, the first physician to come into the town of Otto, came 
there in the fall of 1823, boarded that winter with one of the settlers and prac- 
ticed his profession in the neighborhood, and moved to Erie county in the 
spring. 

Levi Goldsborough was a son of Thomas and Rebecca (States) Goldsbor- 
ough and was born near Dover, Delaware county, N. Y., February 15, 1806. 
His early education was acquired at the common schools in the vicinity of 
his birthplace, and at home where he employed the little leisure he could 
obtairi from the severe labors of the farm entirely in studying and reading the 
few books his parents' limited means afforded him. This work was done 
mainly at night, with no other light than that derived from the old fireplace, 
before which young Goldsborough lay upon the floor with his book in his 
hands. It is impossible to obtain accurate information as to the extent of his 
medical education prior to the beginning of practice. Even the name of his 
preceptor has passed into oblivion. It is learned, however, that he attended 
lectures at and possibly graduated from Fairfield Medical College and' was a 
member of the Herkimer County Medical Society. In 1830 he located in 
Otto, where he began the practice of medicine, and some years afterward joined 
the old Cattaraugus County Medical Society. He was married in 1829 to 
Almira Prentice, who died April 25, 1846, leaving three children — Charles 
Goldsborough, now of Fort Collins, Col., Mrs. James Porter, now of Marshall, 
21 



i62 History of Cattaraugus County. 

Wis., and Mrs. John Becker, now of Collins, Erie county. September 13, 
1846, he married for his second wife Maria Cheney, who with two children by 
her — -Mrs. Maryette Marsh (since deceased) and Mrs. Ell G. Burger, of Cattarau- 
gus — survive him. Dr. Goldsborough's death occurred in Otto, February 17, 
1886. He was of marked personality. Coming into the county early, by his 
pronounced skill and thorough attention to his patients he speedily acquired 
the confidence and esteem of all the people over a large extent of country. 
Through three generations his welcome appearance in every household was a 
herald of hope in sickness and distress. His cheerful countenance and 
pleasant stories were often an inspiration to the weary settler. He was a 
sturdy, vigorous man, a philosopher who received his knowledge and developed 
his mind more from a study of men and all natural things than from the 
literary acquirements which were denied him. Still from the few books he 
possessed he carefully gleaned more knowledge than many men succeed in 
obtaining from large libraries. His acquaintance with current literature was 
varied and extensive. His conversation was brilliant, fluent, full of eccentric 
expressions, and so characteristic that his witticisms were often quoted and 
helped to form a fund of anecdote that is still e.xtant. He was bluff and 
brusque with his patients, but withal sympathetic and kind hearted. In 
politics he was first a Whig and later an uncompromising Republican, but 
never sought office, and being once elected supervisor he promptly resigned, 
the duties of that position interfering with his professional work. Through 
his well-trained judgment and his minute observation of symptoms and signs 
he became unusually accurate in diagnosis and prognosis. Consequently his 
assistance was often asked in consultation, and many of the then younger 
practitioners still bear in grateful remembrance his kindness in advice and the 
valuable hints in treatment which he gave them. He was preceptor of Hon. 
Henry Van Aernam, whose biography appears in this chapter. During the 
war, by his influence and means, he assisted largely in the local organization 
of troops, and whenever called upon to treat a soldier's family no charge was 
ever made. 

Phipps Lake was born in Windom, Herkimer county, July 19, 1818. He 
was a son of David Lake, Esq. His father moved from Windom to 
Hamburg, Erie county, when Phipps was about three years of age. He 
received his education in the district school of this place and learned the trade 
of a shoemaker, which he followed until his marriage with Rebecca Jaques in 
1 841. He then commenced the study of medicine with Dr. Davis, of Eden 
Center, N. Y., supporting himself and family by working at his trade. He 
graduated, receiving the degree of Doctor of Medicine from an eclectic school 
in Cincinnati, Ohio, in 1848, and began the practice of his chosen profession 
in Gowanda the following year. In 1855 he changed his residence to Otto. 
After remaining at this place for four years he removed to North Evans, 
returning in i860 to Otto, which town remained his home until his death. 



Medical Practitioners in Otto. 163 

Although a graduate of an eclectic school he never followed any exclusive 
system of practice, and in 1873 he joined the Cattaraugus County Medical 
Society. In 1861 he enlisted in the 64th N. Y. Vols., of which regiment he had 
previously been surgeon, having vacated the position by his removal from the 
regimental district. While the regiment was in barracks at Elmira he was 
appointed sergeant-major, and in a few days was commissioned as first lieuten- 
ant of Co. D, being promoted captain when the regiment reached Washington. 
His health became seriously impaired after about one year in the service and 
he was compelled to resigii. After his return he was appointed medical 
examiner of recruits, which position he filled for two years, and after the com- 
pletion of his 'army service he resumed the practice of medicine, but the 
affection of the heart, originating during his army life, had slowly grown 
worse, and it became impossible for him to endure the labor and fatigue of a 
country practice. After his retirement from the active work of his profession 
he was elected justice of the peace of the town of Otto, which position he 
filled for twelve years. His disease gradually increased in severity and he 
died, after many months of suffering. May 23, 1887. His wife and two sons, 
Dr. Albert D., of Gowanda, and Frank P., of Otto, and three daughters, Mrs. 
William Cox, of Cattaraugus, Mrs. Herman Carter, of Mauston, Wis., and 
Mrs. Silas Long, of Hornellsville, survived him. Mrs. Lake died at Hornells- 
ville, October 23, 1 891. Dr. Lake was a popular physician, enjoying the 
confidence of the community and the respect of his medical associates. He 
was a man of large intellectual development. In the diagnosis of disease his 
intuition and judgment were seldom at fault, and in his active professional life 
he was known as a skillful and successful practitioner. He was an enthusi- 
astic Mason and was a past master of Clinton F. Paige Lodge, F. & A. M. 

Dr. Irish emigrated here from Hamburg, Erie county, about 1842, fol- 
lowed the botanic school, was quiet and pleasant, and remained until 1850 or 
thereabouts. 

Elisha Johnson was born November 8, 1793, and died here July 27, 1870. 
He was a merchant in Ellicottville and went thence to Ashford, where he 
studied medicine and secured a license from some medical society, when he 
came here and lived until his death, following his profession up to about i860. 

Bradley H. Northrop came from Wyoming county in 1862. In 1870 he 
removed to Gainesville, N. Y. He was thoroughly well read, popular, and 
established a good practice. 

B. F. Eggleston, a graduate of the Medical University of Buffalo, receiving 
his diploma therefrom February 21, 1882, came to Otto the following April, 
but left within a year. He was born in Kendall, Orleans county. 

Hon. Simeon V. Pool was born in Springville, Erie county, March 14, 1837. 
He is the eldest son of Dr. E. C. Pool, for forty years a successful medical 
practitioner, and who while yet a lad came with his own father at an early day 
to western New York. Simeon V. Pool received his literary education in 






164 



les in 
and i 
he ei 



i: -f ! 



History of; Cattaraugus ;County. 



Springville Academy an 
the U;iivefsity of 



,d at about the age of twenty began his medical stud- 
Buffalo', takjhg fwo-preHminary and one fiill .course, 
Ucrspcrsing; thcge by teach'^ing school, prior to 1862. September 26, .1862, . 
isted at Jamestown and becaijie 'first lieutenant of Co.B, 154th N.Y.'; 
Vol. inf., participating at Chancellor^ville-, previous, to which he had been, pro-- 
motea captain, -At the pext engage!|Tient'(Gettysburg), on July 1, 1^63, he was 
captured and :Confined ijiine months in Libby prison, three months at. Macon, 
Gn., six weeks at Charleliton, S. C, fi'Ve months at Columbus, S. C.-, and finally 
at C larlottc, -N. C, jXvht re,; after twenty months in all, 'he; escaped on -Febru- 
:\ry i\j, 1865, ehteringtht: Federallines one month. jlater at French Broad River. 
A cqncise account of D •. .Pool's army career appears in the. IVIilitary Roster. 
Retiirning home after l:is discharge^ pom the service he resumed tljc study of 
medicine and i\vas| graduated Februairjy 23, 1866, from, the Medical Department 
of tl,ie Uniyei'sity of Bi ffalo.' JHeidonjimenced his practice in Colden, Erie 
couAtv, and in 1867 settled <\permand:'ntlv in Otto. In 1 872 he took a course 
of Ibctu'res at the Jefferson Medidal College, Philadelphia. Dr. Pool' ranks 
high in the medical profession. IniJ-i civil capacity he is aJso highly esteemed. 
Hc;was for threC {years town .superyiisoi' and ,in 1878 and 1879 represented the 
Second Assembly Distrjct of Cattahiugits in- the State Legislature. He joined 



the! County} Medical 
been a mcm'bcr ofj its 
Mcdicar Society 'in 1 
M., 



Pe 



Society _in 1868,. becarne its vice-president in 1876, has 
Board of CehsQrs,;und was elected a delegate to the State [ 
SSJ/, 1S90, and 1892. ; Dr. Pool ntarried, im 1865, Esther 
daughter of 'Constant B. AllehJ.of'C3tto, by wliorh he has two children: 
Anna It. (Mrs. Mark F. pensley), of Buffalo, and C. Bret, a graduate of the Bal- 
timore jCollege of'Physijcians and Suirgeons; and of the Medic:«l Department of 
the| University of Buffalo. ; ■ i ■ ,| i ' ' ,■-.'; 

' I ; j ' 1 : ' PERjRVSBijRG. '-. '-■... ' , , ■ : 

Henrv Ti Rj Gray, ilic first resident physician in the town and village of ' 

rysburg, was :born in Lansingburg, N-, Y., in December, iBoi, and died in 
Pe|"rysburg, :Decembcr 23,! 1874. | His p:|rents were Sturges Gray and Eliza- 
beth Wood,|:natives of Boston and JNew York city, respectively. He married ,: 
Mary, daughter jof Sajnuel and Hannah .Parkman, of Perrysburg, who .died ' 
he "e in i S90,laged seventy-eight years'.- Dr/Gray was graduated^ from the New . ' 
York Medical institute in 1S28 and came to Perrysburg in 1S30, living apd ; 
practicing h(ire until hi,s death, -i^son, Henry B.', has b'eenstation agent here '; 
for thirtv-{iv<s years. I .i. ■ : : " ■ . ' " .... '• ' |. 

Albert p. Lake.— ^See Persia, .j .j 

Dr. Mi'x i practiced at this, place [some two lyears and finally.moved to the ' 
oil regions; | I > , I j : ; « : , ■ | 

John David Davis Kvas; born in'-Cassadaga, Chautauqua, countv, was sfradu- ,: 
atjed February 23, 1886, from the jMedical D.epartment of the. University of !, 
Buffalo, and came to Versailles as a physician inthe fall of 1887. ■ When'the' ■ 



Medical Pracxitioners in PerSiA:-'. 165 



smalUpbx ;brokeout|among- the Indiaiis onithe reservation. Dr. Davis volun- 
teered and was auth6rized by the State Board of Healthas official vaccinator 
arid physiciian to the; Indians, and- in this work he ?pent three months among 
them. jHe finally removed to. VVestfield, Ghautaiiqua county, where' he still 
resides. ... '■ ' . , \y'':''\' ■ ^ " 

, ■ E00J3 T. Lazell, wiio was born in Stocktoh, Chau'tauquacounty, was gradu- 
ated from thcj-Bellevue Hospital Medical College, New York, February 12, 
1866, jlocated in Versailles for the practice of his profession' somejwhere about 
1875, :kn4 died'therc ^ome-five years later. . ' . ,1 - 

Dr. Sill. — See Dayton..' ^ 1 '' •'.■•'■ . 

Dr. Hazeltirie practiced medicine at! Versailles a short, time, an(!l moved 
thenCe tio Jamestown. ^ ■!,,.■ 

Dr. Beals foUdwep his profession several years in the| village of Versailles 
and filially became ajmanufacturer of botanic medK^ines there. 

Guy J^. CrandalL-L-See Randolph. , i =: ; ' ' 

Pe'tcil iVVilson was| a full blooded Cayuga Indian who received an e.xcellcnti 
preliminary education, was graduated from Bellcvuc Hospital Medical College,' 
New York city, and 'began practice in. Versailles in this town about 1850. ;H:e 
was a man of large intellectual development, a ftrst-classi^ physician, and his 
reputation as a surgeon extended over a wide' terr tory. J In fact he performed 
all of thje'i more: important surgical operations which were -required in hi's- 
vicinity. [ puring the war he was sent south by tne Sanitary Commission, and 
rendered jvjery efficient service, having a record both on the fiel^d and.in thie 
liospital of! being one of the best operators in the army corps to which he was 
attached.', [ On his' return he resumed the practice ofl his , profession at 
Versailles, i still maintaining the excellent reputation wh'ich he had 'gained. 
There he i suffered the great misfortune of the loss of; his wife, who was an 
estimable' white woman. He married for his second wife an Indian womah. 
and spent tJhe rest of this life on the adjoining reservation!,' where he diied in 
1872. 'To his splendid qualificfations as a physician and surgeon Dr. Wilson 
added ' a lai-ge amount 'of Indian eloquence. His reputation as an orator 
extended tliroughout the State. " At the opening of the EJrie railway he was 
appointed! tb respond to an address JDy Daniel Webster-atlDunkirk, in- which 
the doctor used this^ expression: " When the white man fcornes .through-, the 
woods .with 'his iron- horse, drawing: his train loaded iiown-with people, the 
very trees; bend in obeisance to his pow^n" •■ , . !■. -.■.,/ .° ' ' ". ■' 

■, i :i ■'[!''! ' • PERSIA. ■ . • ! :'•':- "-,: '' ' ' ' 

■ Sands Niles''Crurrib ;is given the. honor of-be.ing the ^fii-stl resident physician', 

in thisjtownl cbmihg; here about, 1822 and living in iLbdi (now' Gowanda).— ;, 

SeeCdnewahgo. r ' ■ '.:■■■■: {-■'.' ''■■■:;' : ' I 

T. P. Whipple was a student 'o'f Dr. Crumb and followed him in jiractice.'. 

He was a'n- interesting man, kind, hearted, and, during; his stay became highly 



i66 History of Cattaraugus County. ' ^ 

respected. Selling his practice to his partner, Seth Field, Dr. Whipple moved "^ 

in 1834 to hear Buffalo and thence to Elgin, 111., where he died. He was a 
charter member and one of the first censors of the old County Medical JT 

Society. "^ 

Dr. Benjamin came here soon after Sands N. Crumb removed, but how ^ 

long he remained, where he -came from, or whence and when he left can not j^ 

be determined. 

Dr. jVIerrick was a medical practitioner in what is now Gowanda prior to si' 

1833. His first wife died here, and he finally moved to Canada, where he ■% 

married a wealthy widow. t^ 

Seth Field was born in Leverett, Mass., March 20, 1797. He was educated f'' 

at Amherst Academy and Dartmouth College, graduating from the Medical ^ 

Department of the latter institution the first in his. class. Beginning practice ^ 

in Barre, Vt., Dr. Field came in 1833 to Gowanda, where he followed his "^ 

profession until his death August 11, 1855. Upon his arrival he became a ^1 

partner of T. P. Whipple, which was terminated at the end of a year by the S 

latter removing. Dr. Field was elected a member of Assembly in 1845 ^^id ^ 

served his constituents faithfully and well. He was chosen supervisor in '^ 

1843, 3-nd was a member of the old County Medical Society. In politics he ■0 

was an old line Whig. May 14, 1833, he married Eliza R., daughter of Joab -^ 

Kimball, of Peacham, Vt., who survives him at the age of over ninety years. M" 

She is remarkably bright and active. Dr. Field was eccentric, but a good 
practitioner, and possessed a fund of general information. During the latter 
part of his life he owned and ran a drug store in Gowanda. 

Dr. Merritt made his appearance in what was then Lodi soon after Dr. 
Field arrived. He was also a Methodist minister, was poorly read, and soon 
moved away. 

Dr. Fritts came here quite early, practiced a few years, went west and 
contracted the ague, returned to Gowanda, and went thence to Versailles, 
removing finally to Collins, Erie county, where he died. 

Stephen B. Green was another early old-school physician in Gowanda, 
coming before Dr. Field, practicing a few years, and removing about 1835 to 
near Buffalo, where he died. 

Dr. Davison followed here the Thompsonian method of prescribing before 
and after 1833, but was more of a business man than a doctor. He went to 
New York city and died there. 

Samuel G. Ellis, son of Barzilla Ellis, was born in old Plymouth, Mass., 
July 17, 181 1. At the age of four years he came with his parents to Chau- 
tauqua county, locating near Forestville, where he was reared on a farm and 
educated at Fredonia Academy. He read medicine and surgery with Amos 
R. Avery, of Forestville, and was graduated from the College of Physicians 
and Surgeons in New York. Locating in practice in Fairfield, Herkimer 
county, he removed thence in 1838 to Gowanda (then Lodij, where he resided 



Medical Practitioners ix Persia. 167 

until 1856, when he went to Lima, Livingston county. There he Hved and 
practiced until February, 1881, when his wife died and he removed to 
Syracuse to educate his grandchildren, and still resides there. Dr. Ellis 
married Natalia H. Waterman, of Forestville. He was appointed by the 
Legislature to superintend the erection of the Thomas Orphan Asylum on 
the Cattaraugus reservation and remained the president, of its Board of 
Trustees until he resigned to remove to Lima. He was elected a trustee of 
Genesee College and served eleven years as Regents examiner. He was a 
member of the old Cattaraugus County Medical Society, is a member of the 
State, the Central New York, the Onondaga County, and the Syracuse City 
Medical Societies, and has been a member and a delegate to the National 
Medical Association. Dr. Ellis has done an immense amount of hard work 
in the medical profession and holds a, high place in the science of its practice. 

Horace Babcock is a son of John C. Babcock, one of the early settlers of 
the town of Persia. He was born here in a log cabin April 12, 1825, was edu- 
cated in the common and select schools of the day, studied medicme with Dr. 
S. G. Ellis, was graduated in February, 185 1, from the Medical Department of 
the University of Buffalo, and at once began the practice of his profession in 
Gowanda. In 1856 he removed to Weyauwega, Wis., where he remained until 
1867, when he returned to Gowanda and has since resided and practiced here. 
In 1863 Dr. Babcock became a surgeon in the Union army, but was obliged to 
resign about a year later on account of ill health. He was medical examiner 
of drafted men for Waupacca county. Wis., during the first of the war and 
later served there as pension examiner. While in Wisconsin he bought and 
for twenty-seven years continuously rode a black horse, which he brought 
around the lakes when he returned to Gowanda. May 14, 1856, Dr. Babcock 
married Mary, daughter of James and Lucinda (Wheeler) Locke, of Persia. 
They have had three children — Blanche (Mrs. W. R. Smallwood) and (Katha- 
rine (Mrs. W. W^. Chaffe), of Gowanda, and Louis L., managing clerk for Rog- 
ers, Locke & Milburn, of Buffalo. 

Corydon C. Rugg was descended from Revolutionary stock. His grand- 
father was a soldier in that war and his father, Jonathan G., was a soldier in 
the War of 18 12, where he distinguished himself at Sackett's Harbor. Jona- 
than G. Rugg was born near Lake George in 1795 and died May 12, 1877. 
Corydon C. Rugg, born in Perrysburg, May 13, 1822, passed his youth on the 
farm and in attending the district school, supplementing his rudimentary edu- 
cation by nearly two years' work at Fredonia Academy and teaching school 
three winter terms. At the age of twenty he commenced the study of medi- 
cine in the office of Cyrus Thompson, of Syracuse, a son of Samuel Thomp- 
son, founder of the Thompsonian system of medicine. In 1844 he was ap- 
pointed colonel of the i68th Regiment Infantrv*, 54th Brigade, 26th Division, 
of New York State militia. At the breaking out of the Civil war he was cap- 
tain of Co. A, 64th N. Y. Regiment, which was organized in 1853 as the New 



History of Cattaraugus County. 



York militia. In 1847 he married Fidelia Goodell, by whom he had six chil- 
dren: Adella D., Loella V., Corydon A., Estella F., Clayton A., and Minnie M. 
In 1848 he was graduated from a medical college in Cincinnati and located in 
practice in Meadville, Pa., removing one year later to Gowanda, where he fol- 
lowed his profession until the war of the Rebellion, when, on the organization 
of the 154th Regiment, he volunteered as a private and on November 3, 1862, 
was appointefl by Governor Morgan its assistant surgeon. In this position Dr. 
Rugg was exposed to great danger, but always performed his duties bravely 
and faithfully, and acquired the unqualified esteem and respect of all — soldier 
and superior officer alike. Failing health compelled him to resign on January 
3, 1864, and return to Gowanda, where he resumed his practice, which he con- 
tinued till February, 1874, when he removed to Rutland, Vt. Four years later 
Dr. Rugg removed to Jamestown, where he continued practice until a short 
time previous to his death, which occurred there January 14, 1891. Dr. Rugg 
was endowed by nature with a splendid physique. He was charitable and gen- 
erous to a fault, and his industry and self-sacrifice were remarkable. 

Corydon C. Johnson was born in Dayton on July 7, 1833. His parents, 
Gile and Philena (Salisbury) Johnson, were pioneer settlers of that town, 
coming hence from Fairfield, Herkimer county. After attending Fairfield 
Academy and Chamberlain Institute he entered the Eclectic Medical 
Institute, Cincinnati, and was graduated from the Eclectic Medical College, 
Philadelphia, January 28, 1864. He began his professional career the same 
year in Gowanda, continuing it uninterruptedly to the present time. Septem- 
ber 20, i860, he married Grace M. Randall, a native of Brookfield, Madison 
county, and to them have been born four children: Burnell R., January 11, 
1862, a medical graduate of the University of Buffalo and now a practitioner 
in Gowanda; Fred E., April 18, 1865, since 1886 cashier of the Bank of 
Cattaraugus; Grace P., a graduate of the Gowanda Academy, now preceptress 
of the Cattaraugus High School; and Burt C, a graduate in 1890 of the 
Medical Department of the University of Buffalo, for one year house physi- 
cian and surgeon of the General Hospital, and now .a' practicing physician 
in Buffalo. Dr. Johnson is a member of the Lake Erie Medical Society, the 
Northwestern Eclectic Medical Society of the State of New York, and the 
New York State Eclectic Medical Society. He has been for fifteen years 
president of the Board of Education, and in other capacities has interested 
himself in the betterment of "his town and county. He is a representative 
citizen, a firm friend, and an excellent physician. 
Phipps Lake. — See Otto. 
George \V. Barr came from Evans, Erie county, with his father some time 
before the war. He was a graduate of the Medical Department of the Uni- 
versity of Buffalo. Upon the organization of the 64th Regiment as State 
militia in 1853 Dr. Barr was made its regimental surgeon; in this same regi- 
ment he enlisted as surgeon November 20, 1861, and did honorable service in 



Medical Practitioners in Persia. 



the late Rebellion. He was a staunch Republican, a cultured gentleman, 
and a bright physician, and finally removed to Titusville, Pa., where he is now 
located. 

George C. De Lameter came here from Fredonia, Chautauqua county, iii 
1845. He evinced about as vacillating a character as can be found among 
humanity. A tailor by trade, a doctor from choice, he lived a life of constant 
activity, acquiring one of those reputations for oddity that are almost 
imperishable Dr. De Lameter was not a graduate. Nevertheless he was 
thoroughly versed in the genuine botanic school of medicine, and in its 
practice acquired a large ride and a good reputation. In religion he was first 
a Methodist, then a spiritualist, and subsequently a Methodist again, and died 
in this belief in Gowanda, August 6, 1876. During the war, when excitement 
ran high in the village and enlistments were going on, he played a snare-drum 
to arouse patriotism. Taken all in all Dr. De Lameter was a curious man, 
but possessed many noble qualities which endeared him to a wide circle of 
friends. 

J. G. Rugg, son of Jonathan G. and Ann M. (Tousey) Rugg and brother 
of Corydon C. Rugg, was born in Perrysburg in 1838. Receiving an academic 
education he began to read medicine with his brother, and on May 11, 1875, 
was graduated from the Cincinnati Eclectic Medical College. He began 
practice in Gowanda that year. March 18, 1863, he married Mandane Muzzy, 
of Dayton, who died August 28, 1891. 

Ransom E. Moss is a son of Ransom W. and Eliza J. Moss, and was born 
in Collins, Erie county, October 14, 1854. In 1875 he began his medical 
studies with Dr. J. H. Shugert, of Gowanda (Erie side), and in 1877 entered 
the Medical Department of the University of BulTalo, graduating therefrom 
February 28, 1880, and locating in Gowanda the following month for the 
practice of his chosen calling. June 2, 1880, he married De Etta, daughter of 
James Cole, of Gowanda. Dr. Moss was for two years secretary and treasurer 
of the Lake Erie Medical Society and since March, 1892, has been its 
president. He has served four years as health officer of the village of 
Gowanda and in December, 1890, being a K. O. T. M., was elected great 
commander for the State of New York, which ofifice he held about two years, 
when he resigned. 

John D. Zwetsch, a native of Sheldon, Wyoming county, was born April 
30, 1858, moved with his parents in 1867 to Corning, and one year afterward 
to Buffalo, where he attended private school. The family finally removed to 
Akron, Erie county, and when nineteen years of age John D. began teaching 
school. In August, 1878, he took up the study of medicine with the late F. S. 
Bosworth, of Akron, and a year later with H. C. Frost, of Buffalo, remaining 
with the latter until he completed his course in the Cleveland Homeopathic 
Medical College, from which he received his diploma March 8, 1882. He 
then came to Gowanda, where he has since followed his profession. Dr. 
22 



I70 History of Cattaraugus County. 

Zwetsch has been surgeon to the Buffalo & Southwestern railroad several 
years, is a member of the New York State and the Western New York Home- 
opathic Societies, the National Association of Railway Surgeons, the New 
York State Association of Railway Surgeons, and the. Association of Erie 
Railway Surgeons, and in May, 1893, was appointed attending physician to the 
Thomas Orphan Asylum. November 19, 1885, he married Kate Schwink, of 
Gowanda. 

Albert D. Lake was born in North Collins, Erie county, February 22, 1846. 
His father was Dr. Phipps Lake, a long-time physician in the northwestern 
part of Cattaraugus county, and a sketch of whom appears in this chapter in 
the town of Otto. Receiving a good English education at Springville 
Academy Albert D. entered the Medical Department of the University of 
Michigan at Ann Arbor, where he pursued the study of medicine for two 
years (1866-67). He then registered as a student at the Cleveland Medical 
College and received from that institution his degree of M. D. March 4, 1868. 
For a period of two and a half years succeeding his graduation Dr. Lake 
practiced his profession in the village and town of New Albion, and in 1871 
located in Perrysburg, where he remained as a physician until 1891, when he 
removed to Gowanda, where he has since followed his chosen calling. Dr. 
Lake served as supervisor of Perrysburg for three terms (1885, '86, and '87) was 
for fifteen years physician to the New York State Indian Agency and 
Thomas Asylum for Orphan and Destitute Indian Children on the Cattaraugus 
reservation. Fellow of the New York State Medical Association since August 
28 1888, and in June, 1891, was appointed chairman of the Board of Pension 
Examiners at Salamanca, a position he still holds. He joined the Cattarau- 
gus County Medical Society in 1870, was for some time amember'of its Board 
of Censors, was chosen its secretary in 1877, was elected president in 187S and 
1879, delegate to the State Medical Society in 1884, and representative to the 
National Medical Association in 1878 and 1881. He was also a charter mem- 
ber and for one year president of the Lake Erie Medical Society and is one of 
the present Board of Examiners for the Medical Department of Niagara 
University, Buffalo. May 15, 1867, he married Eliza M., daughter of Ralph 
Dewey, of Otto. They have one daughter, Nellie J. 

PORTVILLE. 

Dr. Willard, it is quite safe to say, was the first resident physician in this 
town. He came from Friendship, Allegany county, not far from 1840, and 
established a successful practice ; how long he remained or whither he removed 
it has been impossible to ascertain. 

David Bennie, a Scotchman by birth and parentage, was born June 13, 
1794, came while yet a boy to America with his father, studied medicine in Au- 
burn, and began his professional career in Cayuga county. He also practiced 
in Tompkins and Cortland counties, and removed to Olean in 1840, where he 



Medical Practitioners in Portvii.le. 171 

followed medicine until 1848; when he moved to Portville. Here he practiced 
till his death September ii, 1873. Possessing many sterling qualities he was 
widely known and highly respected. His daughter married Dr. Cornelius H. 
Bartlett. Dr. Bennie was a member and in 1844 vice-president of the old 
County Medical Society. 

Dr. Rouse was an early physician in Portville. Aside from this fact his ca- 
reer seems to have been quietly consigned to oblivion. 

Cornelius H. Bartlett. — See Olean. 

Thomas S. Jackson was born in Oneida county, September 14, 1820, re- 
ceived his medical education'at Castleton, Vt., and located in Portville in 1850, 
being licensed July 8, 1874, by the censors of the Steuben County Medical So- 
ciety. He died here October 29, 1882. 

Charles P. Jackson, son of Dr. Thomas S., was born in this town December 
21, 1854, was graduated from the University of Pennsylvania (Medical Depart- 
ment), March 14, 1879, and began practicing medicine in Portville. He is now 
a physician in Hampton, N. H., going there after his father's death. 

Wallace Sibley was reared in Cuba, Allegany county, began his career as 
a doctor in Ischua, wefit thence to Eldred, Pa., and came from there to this 
place, removing finally to Rochester. He graduated from the University of 
Buffalo on February- 27, 1875, and became a member of the Cattaraugus County 
Medical Society the same year. 

E. Burdick came to Portville in 1876 as C. H. Bartlett's successor. He was 
born in Little Genesee, Allegany county, was educated at Alfred, studied med- 
icine with Dr. Crandall, of Andover, graduated, and began practice in Mich- 
igan, whither he came from and returned after a year or two. He was an adept 
in athletic sports. Dr. Burdick became a member of the County Medical 
Society in 1875. 

R. H. Goodrich came into town in 1882 from Rhode Island. He was grad- 
uated from the University of Vermont on June 27, 1876, and went first, after a 
brief stay, to Turtle Point, Pa., and finally west. 

J. L. C. Cronyn, a native of Fort Erie, Can., and a son of Dr. Cronyn, of 
Buffalo, received his medical diploma February 23, 1876, from the University 
of Buffalo, and came first to Olean and then to Portville, but remained in 
neither place long. He married here and finally returned to Buffalo. 

John C. Young came here from Little Genesee, Allegany county, where he 
was born, and began his medical studies in the office of C. H. Bartlett in 1867. 
In 1871 he was graduated from the Medical Department of the University of 
Buffalo, and then became a partner with his old preceptor for two years, re- 
moving at the end of that time to Cuba, Allegany county, where he still resides. 
In 1892 he was graduated from the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons, 
London, England. Dr. Young is emphatically a self-made man. 

R. F. Rowley, born in Freetown, Cortland county, April 24, 1858, removed 
to Cuba, Allegany county, in 1865, studied medicine with John C. Young, was 



172 History of Cattaraugus Coui^jty. 

graduated February 26, 1884, from the University of Buffalo, and began his 
career in Salamanca in May, but removed to Portville in September, both in 
the same year, and has practiced here since. In 1884 Dr. Rowley joined the 
County Medical Society. 

George W. Winterstine, son of Henry and Lydia(Ebner) Winterstine, was 
born in Montour county, Pa., March 22, 1852. At the age of fourteen his 
father died and at the age of twenty-two he entered a dry goods store. One 
year later he began his medical studies with Dr. C. M. Martin, of Sunbury, Pa., 
and March 12, 1878, was graduated from the Jefferson Medical College of Phil- 
adelphia. He practiced first at Paxinos and afterward at Hickorj- Corners, Pa., 
and in April, 1884, came to Portville. In March, 1875, he married Hannah E. 
Root, of Danville, Pa. They have three daughters. 

M. J. McCarey was born in McKean county, Pa., May 25, 1861, was 
educated and graduated in 1885 from the State Normal School in Tioga 
county, Pa., was graduated in 1886 from the Northern Indiana Normal School, 
and received his diploma of M. D. from the medical college at Columbus, 
Ohio, March 4, 1890. Soon afterward he settled in Portville. 

RANDOLPH. 

Benjamin Blodgett, as near as can be ascertained, was the first physician 
to take up his residence and business in Randolph. He came to Napoli in 
1827 and to East Randolph village in 1829, dying in the latter place in 1832-* 
his widow -married John Converse. Dr. Blodgett was a good practitioner for 
those days and covered a wide territory in his ride. 

Oliver Guernsey was the first disciple of medicine in Randolph village. 
His father, Oliver, Sr., was an eminent physician and surgeon in Mt. Holly, 
Rutland county, Vt., where the son was born January 6, 1804. Oliver, Jr., 
studied medicine with his father and an elder brother, was graduated from the 
Castleton (Vt.) Medical College, and began the practice of his profession in 
Pierrepont, St. Lawrence county, where he remained until the spring of 1831, 
when he settled permanently in Randolph and died here July 3, 1864. 
October 26, 1827, he married Sally Crowley, who was born in Mt. Holly, Vt., 
May 23, 1806, and who still survives. They had twelve children, of whom 
five are living. Dr. Guernsey practiced over several towns, among both 
Indians and whites, and was highly respected everywhere. He was. very 
public spirited in religious and educational affairs, was one of the original 
incorporators of Raridolph Academy, and was a charter member of the old 
Cattaraugus County Medical Society. His father came here in 1836 and died 
the following year. 

Alson Leavenworth. — See New Albion. 

K. V. R. Lansingh was born at Albany in 1794, attended medical lectures 
and was graduated at Philadelphia, and began the practice of medicine in 
Amber, Onondaga county. Moving thence to Dansville and afterward to 



I 



Medical Practitioners in Randolph. 173 

Penn Yan he came to Randolph in 1834 and followed his profession here until 
near 1850, when he returned to Albany, where he died about 1877. Dr. Lan- 
singh was a partner for a few years of William Giles. He was a distinguished 
physician and a popular citizen, and was a member of the. old County Medical 
Society. 

Luther P. Cowles, a physician of the homeopathic school, came to 
Randolph in 1835, but a few years later removed to Chautauqua county. His 
brother, Rev. Sylvester Cowles, formed the first Congregational church of 
Randolph, the meeting effecting the organization being held in the doctor's 
house. 

William Giles located in Randolph village in 1841, and for many years 
followed the medical profession, first with K. V. R. Lansingh and afterward 
alone, combining it also with business enterprises. With two brothers, Lyman 
and Benjamin, he conducted a dry goods store at East Randolph. He was 
born in Oneida county and died in this town about 1870, marrying late in 
life a daughter of Mr. Eggert, of Randolph, who still survi/es him at Lake- 
wood, Chautauqua county. Dr. Giles had considerable swamp land near the 
west village and with two brothers owned a lumber interest in Napoli. He 
was an honest man and a skeptic in religion. 

A. H. Davis made quite a stir here for four or five years. He came in 
1845 ^"d moved to Madison, Wis., where he has accumulated a competency. 
-He was an eclectic, and was interested in a saw-mill near Falconer, Chautau- 
qua county. On the organization of the Eclectic Medical College of 
Randolph Dr. Davis was elected to the chair of materia medica and pharmacy. 

Isaac Hill made his appearance here about the same year and continued 
until his death in i860. A physician of the old school, energetic, and some- 
what popular, though inclined to jealousy, Dr. Hill built up a large and 
successful practice, and was something of a politician as well. His widow 
married a Mr. York and went to Corry, Pa., and finally to Jamestown. 

E. G. Cook settled in Randolph as a physician a little prior to 1850. 
After a two years' stay he went to Fredonia, thence to Buffalo, and is now in 
New York. He was a homeopathist and was well liked. 

Amos Paul Jones, son of Judge Alfred Jones, of Monroe county, was born 
in Rush, N. Y., April 22, 18 16, and was graduated from the Albany Medical 
College in January, 1840. After practicing a few years in his native county 
Dr. Jones returned to Albany and took a post-graduate course, and in 1847 
settled as a permanent resident of Randolph, where he died April 3, 1880. In 
1841 he married Emeline S. Hurlbut, of Avon, Livingston county, who died 
four years later, and on January i, 185 1, he married, second, Mary A., 
daughter of Jonathan and Eunice (Wood) Hunstead, of Fredonia, N. Y., who 
survives him. Dr. Jones was a well read, scientific physician, a skillful surgeon, 
a specialist in diseases of the eye, and a good counselor. He was an e.xcellent 
citizen, a close friend, and a kind neighbor. 



174 



History of Cattaraugus County. 



D. S. Van Rensselaer was born near Albany in 1797 and at an early age 
entered the mercantile trade in the employ of a relative in Amber, Onondaga 
county. He married and followed that business in Amber some years and in 
1833 removed to Penn Yan, Yates county. In October, 1835, he settled in 
Randolph, where he was engaged for a short time in mercantile business, 
which he finally sold to Swan & Scudder. He then followed farming and mer- 
chandizing until about 1853. In the early part of his life Dr. Van Rensselaer 
was associated much with his brother-in-law, K. V. R. Lansingh, and had 
imbibed a taste and some useful knowledge of the medical profession. He pre- 
pared himself for college lectures and in 1852 was graduated from the Cleve- 
land Homeopathic Medical College, beginning his professional labors that 
year in Randolph, where he continued them until old age warned him to cease. 
He died here in December, 1880. Dr. Van Rensselaer was for many years an 
active member of the M. E. church, organized the first Sabbath school in Ran- 
dolph, and was its superintendent for some time. In politics he was an old 
school Democrat, but on the agitation of the slavery question promptly sided 
with the Free Soil party, and later became a pronounced Republican. He 
early became a Mason, was a Knight Templar at the time of the Morgan 
e.xcitement, and in 1862 received the 33d degree. His father was a charter 
member of the first Masonic lodge established in Albany, while his brother 
William H. attained to the highest position and honors known to the craft in 
this country. His mother died in Randolph village at the great age of nearly 
one hundred and two years. Dr. Van Rensselaer was descended from the Van 
Rensselaers who settled in and about Albany in 165 1. He was the fifth in de- 
scent from Jeremias, who was the first of the name to permanently locate in 
America, and from whom all of the name in this country descended. His 
father, Henry K., was before the Revolution a soldier in the Colonial service, 
holding a major's commission under King George III. At the outbreak of 
hostilities he sided with the patriots and was severely wounded early in the 
war, carrying the bullet in his body until his death. The family in some of 
its branches has been represented in civil affairs and in every war in the coun- 
try since 1660. 

Nelson Saunders is the son of Harvey and Sarah (Hanford) Saunders, who 
settled in Farmersville in 1831. Harvey Saunders died about 1871 ; his widow 
survives and lives in Randolph. Three of their sons became physicians — John, 
who graduated from the New York College of Physicians and Surgeons, set- 
tled and for over forty years practiced in Belfast, Allegany county, and died 
there; Charles VV., who was graduated at the Medical University of New 
York city in i860, became a partner with his brother and afterward practiced 
alone in Belfast, and died there recently; and Nelson. Nelson Saunders was 
born in Norwalk, Conn., December 2, 1823, received an academic education, 
and was graduated in medicine from the University of Buffalo in February, 
1849. ^^ took up his profession and has since continued in Randolph, hav- 



Medical Practitioners in Randolph. 175 

ing enjoyed a large ride and a high reputation both as a practitioner and a 
consultant. For over twenty years he has been local surgeon to the New 
York, Pennsylvania & Ohio railroad, and for some time one of the directors 
of the Randolph Bank. He joined the County Medical Society in 1874. 

Elijah Harmon.— See Napoli. 

Samuel Foote became a resident about 1842 as a physician of the old 
school. He rem.oved some three years later to Waterboro, N. Y., and finally 
to Cincinnati, where he became a homeopathist. He eventually came to 
Jamestown, where he died suddenly while sitting in his chair in his office. Dr. 
Foote was particularly and specially a surgeon, in which science he became 
considerably celebrated. He was a rough, blunt man, but made many friends. 

Charles J. Kenworthy, a native of Philadelphia, was a graduate of the Jeffer- 
son Medical College of that city, and upon his settlement in Randolph about 
1847 he became a partner of A. H. Davis, which relationship was soon dis- 
solved. Before coming here Dr. Kenworthy had become an eclectic, and 
upon the formation of the Randolph Eclectic Medical College he was ap- 
pointed to the professorship of surgery. He had also delivered lectures at a 
medical college in Petersburg, Va., and after leaving here he became professor 
of surgerj- in an eclectic college in Syracuse. He went to New York city and 
finally to Australia, but returned to America and married. He was well read 
and quite a writer, and it is said of him that he was more of a medical scientist 
than a practitioner. 

Frederick Larkin came to Randolph in 1841. The son of Edmund Larkin, 
an early and a prominent physician of Thompson, Conn., he was born there 
February 12, 1814, and studied medicine with his father. When the Ran- 
dolph Eclectic Medical College was organized Dr. Larkin was given the chair 
of physiology, and when this institution was merged into the Central New 
York Eclectic Medical College at Syracuse he had conferred upon him the 
honorary degree of M. D. A more extended sketch of Dr. Larkin will be 
found in the history of Randolph. He has never practiced medicine. 

A. B. Parsons was born in Fairfield, Vt., took lectures in New York city, 
and came to East Randolph in 1851. His wife was Marietta, daughter of 
William Hurd, of Bridport, Vt., and sister of J. C. Hurd, a druggist of East 
Randolph. Dr. Parsons went to Springfield, Mass., after more than twenty 
years' practice here, and shortly afterward removed to Jamestown. He died 
in 1874 in Atlanta, Ga., while on a trip for his health, leaving a widow and two 
daughters. He was a strong Democrat, a true Episcopalian, and a generous 
hearted citizen. For some time he was local surgeon for the New York, 
Pennsylvania & Ohio railroad, and in all his professional life he distinguished 
himself by a thorough and scientific knowledge, close application, and sound 
judgment. In fact he ranked as one of the best physicians and surgeons in 
Cattaraugus county. Dr. Parsons in 1870 joined the County Medical Society. 
Henry Neville and his wife, Mrs. A. S. J. Neville, net' Ahhie S. Jones, daugh- 



176 



History of Cattaraugus County. 



ter of Perry Jones, of Randolph, commenced a homeopathic practice here in 
1872 and three or fouf years afterward went west and finally to Jamestown, 
where Mrs. Neville died. She was bright, well educated, and after leaving 
here acquired a large practice. He still lives in Jamestown, where he has 
married again. 

Arthur H. Southwick was a physician in East Randolph a number of years 
ago. His father was a druggist. He was a graduate of Ann Arbor. After a 
two years' stay he went to Pennsylvania and practiced in Corydon, Warren, 
and Bradford, and finally removed to Syracuse. 

O. S. Martin. — See Salamanca. 

A. A. Whipple was in Randolph for two years from about 1877, secured a 
large practice and a good reputation in the homeopathic school, which he fol- 
lowed, and removed thence to Cuba, Allegany county, where he went into 
partnership with his father-in-law. He finally located in Quincy, 111., where 
he devotes much of his time to the practice of surgery. 

David Ward, author, druggist, and physician, located at East Randolph 
not far from 1850. Here he conducted a drug store and practiced medicine 
some si.x or eight years, devoting most of his time, however, to his mercantile 
business. He wrote several works on medicine. 

George W. Whittaker was born in Windsor, Vt., came to East Randolph 
about 1849, and followed the botanical system of medicine in connection with 
mercantile trade for several years. He removed finally to New Rochelle and 
thence to Andover, N. Y., where he practiced and had a drug store. Late in 
life he returned to East Randolph and opened a small office and drug store, 
and here he died in 1883. Dr. Whittaker was somewhat of a medical writer 
and published a volume entitled "The Sick Man's Friend." 

David Bemus, related to the Bemuses of Jamestown, followed his profes- 
sion here a couple of years and moved to Steamburgh. After residing there a 
year he left on account of ill health and finally died in Bradford, Pa. 

Hector S. Bowen, a native of Conewango, a student of A. B. Parsons, and 
a graduate of one of the medical schools in New York city, formed a partner- 
ship with his preceptor, but was only permitted to follow his chosen calling 
for'a brief period. The germs of consumption developed in his young body 
so thoroughly that a trip south produced no benefit, and he died here in the 
flower of youth. Dr. Bowen, in 1870, joined the County Medical Society. 
He had a bright and promising future. 

Dr. Clements, a German, practiced his root and herb system first in Ash- 
ford a year, whence he came to Randolph, and finally removed several years 
later to Great Valley, where he died. He never mastered the English lan- 
guage enough to make himself understood. He was termed a "good doctor" 
and had many followers. 

Parthenia Williams, familiarly known as " Dr. Parthenia," began her pro- 
fession in East Randolph at a time when women were just entering the field of 



Medical Practitioners ix Randolph. 177 

medicine and people were prejudiced because of her sex. She acquitted her- 
self quite creditably, but did not succeed in establishing a large practice. 

Mrs. M. L. Maxon, a hydropathic doctor, practiced her calling here 
for a short time about 1874, but did not seem to gather many supporters 
of that mode of treatment into her "professional" net. 

Dr. Kahle practiced medicine in Randolph a few months, and leaving here 
went to Kennedy, where he was both successful and popular. He finally 
removed to Lima, O. 

Orrin A. Tompkins, son of Amos D. and Emily (Hale) Tompkins, was 
born in Ellery, Chautauqua county, February 2, 1841. After teaching school 
a few terms he entered the office of George S. Harrison, of Sinclairville, as a 
medical student and on February 27, 1865, was graduated as an M. D. from 
the University of Buffalo. He settled the same spring in Randolph, where 
he has since practiced his profession with the exception of a three years' 
residence in Steamburgh. From 1872 to 1884 he lived in East Randolph; 
since then he has resided in the west village. Dr. Tompkins is a member of 
the New York State Medical Association and the Cattaraugus County Medical 
Society, joining the latter in 1874, and being elected president in 1887, vice- 
president in 1878, and one of its censors. In 1865 he was appointed pension 
examiner, which position he held ten years. He married, in 1868, Frances P. 
Marsh, by whom he has one son. 

Emory M. Cheney was a graduate of the University of Buffalo, receiving 
his diploma of M. D. February 25, 1873. He was born in Poland Center, 
Chautauqua county, coming hence to this town about 1880. Seven or eight 
years later he went to Kennedy, where he had become interested in farming 
and lumbering to the abandonment of his profession. Dr. Cheney became a 
member of the County Medical Society in 1875. 

Archibald H. Babcock is a son of Erastus and Doroleski (Perkins) 
Babcock, and was born in Scio, Allegany county, November 3, 1853. Receiv- 
ing a common school education, supplemented by three years at the Union 
School in Jamestown, where he began the study of medicine in the olifice of 
C. Orms & Son, young Babcock finally entered the Homeopathic Medical 
Department of the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor, from which 
institution he received his degree of M. D. in March, 1879, ^""^ ''^ June of 
that year located permanently in Randolph. October 7, 1882, he married 
Emma L. Parmenter, of Cambridgeport, Mass., a niece of Mrs. J. T. Edwards. 
John H. Sackrider, son of David and Julia (Maybee) Sackrider, was born in 
Geauga, Ohio, in 1847, ^"<^ 's descended from a prominent Dutch family of 
the name who settled early in the Mohawk valley in this State. His paternal 
grandfather was a soldier in the Revolution and his maternal grandfather 
was in the War of 1812. In 1852 his parents settled on a farm in Napoli, in 
whose common schools he was educated, finishing, however, his literary 
studies in Randolph Academy. He also taught twenty-nine terms of district 

23 



178 . History of Cattaraugus County. 

and graded schools. February 26, 1878, he was graduated as a physician and 
surgeon from the University of Buffalo and immediately began his profes- 
sional career in East Randolph in partnership with Orrin A. Tompkins. Six 
years later the firm was dissolved and Dr. Sackrider assumed the entire 
practice, and since then he has continued alone. In 1878 he married Hattie 
F., daughter of James Senter, of Olean, who has borne him one son. Dr. 
Sackrider joined the County Medical Society in 1884. 

Myron C. Hawley was born in Brant, Erie county, November 7, 1856; his 
parents were Alonzo ]\I. and Lucy W. (Clough) Hawley, farmers. He was 
educated at Angola Academy, was graduated from the Medical Department 
of the University of Buffalo on February 21, 1881, and began practice at once 
in Steamburgh. In the spring of 1884 he removed to East Randolph. In July, 
1878, Dr. Hawley married Kittie A. Beals, of East Randolph, by whom he has 
two sons. He was made a member of the County Medical Society in 1884 
and since 1889 has served as its secretary. 

Guy B. Crandall is a graduate of the University of Buffalo, receiving his 
medical diploma from there March i, 1887. He is a son of Etsel and-Mariette 
(Conklin) Crandall and was born in Little Valley, July 24, 1858. He attended 
Ten Broeck Academy, was graduated in 1882 at the Chamberlain Institute, 
and afterward took a course of both Greek and Latin at Chautauqua. Dr. 
Crandall began the practice of his profession in Perrysburg in copartnership 
with Dr. Lake, but a few months later removed to Randolph, where he 
became the attending physician of the Western New York Home for Home- 
less and Dependent Children. In September, 1883, he married Addie Thorp, 
of East Randolph. They have one son. Dr. Crandall became a member of 
the County Medical Society in 1887. He has recently relinquished -his 
practice and become a commercial traveler, but still resides in Randolph. 

Elton S. Rich was located at East Randolph about a year. He was born 
in New Albion, received his diploma from the University of the City of New 
York on March 6, 1886, and the ne.xt July began practice here. He removed 
to Kennedy, Chautauqua county, where he now is. 

Robert A. Carson, a native of Sacramento, Cal., was graduated March 20, 
1877, from the Chicago Medical College, and commenced his profession in 
Randolph. His brief practice here marked a brilliant man and a thorough 
scholar. 

Andre L. Cowles received his diploma from the Columbus (Ohio) Medical 
College on February 27, 1878, located ' at once in Randolph village, and 
followed his profession until about 1882, when he removed to Pennsylvania. 
He was born in Harmony, Chautauqua county, and was a well read physician. 

Edward Wallace Lee was born in Perrysburg, O., July 21, 1859, came to 
Randolph with his parents in 1866, was graduated in medicine from the 
University of Michigan at Ann Arbor and the College of Physicians and 
Surgeons in New York city, and began practice here in 1882, removing two 



Medical Practit[(3xkrs in SAI,A^rA^■CA. 



years afterward to Omaha, Neb., where he has acquired a reputation and a 
business not often accorded so young a man. Indeed his success there has 
been ahnost phenomenal. Prior to these studies Dr. Lee was a cadet at the 
West Granville ( X. Y.) Military Institute, from which he was graduated in 
1.S78. He married a daughter of A. Wentworth, of Randolph. 

George P. Meecham was born in Kingston, Ontario, Can., May i, i860, 
was graduated from Queens Uni\"ersit}', April 28, 1891, and commenced as a 
physician in Limestone the following June. He came to Randolph a year 
later as Guy B. Crandall's successor. 

Edward C. Lyman, born in New York city December 24, 1869, came to 
Randolph with his parents in 1875, was for three years a cadet at the military 
school at Sing Sing, was graduated in medicine from the University of Michi- 
gan in June, 1892, took a post-graduate course and received a diploma 
November 29, 1892, from the College of Physicians and Surgeons of New 
York cit\-, and has commenced his profession in Randolph village. 

SAI.AMAN'CA. 

Daniel Pucklin was doubtless the first resident medical practitioner in 
Salamanca. He came in 1839 '^'^'-1 i'emo\'ed to Little Yalley in 1840. — See 
Little \'alle\-. 

H. M. Gale, it is learned from good authorit}-, was the first i.ii;rmanent 
resident physician in Salamanca. He located at the west village, where he 
practiced his profession many years with e.Kcellent success, leaving about 1870. 
Dr. Gale was a charter member, the first vice-president, and one of the first 
censors of the County Medical Society, and in both civil and professional life 
was highly respected. 

E. A. Chapman, a regular graduate, came to Salamanca as a clerk for the 
Erie railroiid. His wile died and he took up the practice of his profession, 
but sh(jrt[\' afterward removed. He was here in all some four or five years, 
and joined the Count}- .Medical Society in 1874. 

M. M. McDonell followed medicine at West Salamanca for a few years 
prior to 1870. Little is known about him, howe\-er. 

A. S. Bonesteel. — See Great Valley. 

James Wright, an eclectic, came to West Salamanca from Missouri, 
whither he finally returned. He did little professional business, but confined 
his attention mainly to a drug store. He removed about 1876. 

Henry W. Dye. — See Dayton. 

W. W. Drake, another eclectic physician in West Salamanca, was reared at 
what is called Drake run in that town, his father being Warren Drake, from 
whom the locality was named. Dr. Drake, I think, began his practice here, 
but removed shortly to the west. 

Dr. Fisher practiced the eclectic system of medicine at West Salamanca a 
brief period. 



i8o History of Cattaraugus County. 



Dr. Westbrook was at one time located in practice liere, but aside from 
this little is known of him. 

Dr. Kimberley also followed medicine at the village of West Salamanca a 
short time. 

Henry Learned did some medical business and ran a saw-mill for a time. 
He finally went to Florida, where he is growing oranges, 

Julian G. Smith, son of T. L. and Catherine ( Nelmes) Smith, was born on 
the island of Bermuda, January 17, 1845. When eleven years of age his 
parents sent him to Clinton, N. Y., to attend Dwight's High School ; he 
afterward completed a scientific course at Bisbee's school in Poughkeepsie, 
and returning to Bermuda remained there until 1867, when he began a 
medical course in the University of Pennsylvania, where he graduated March 
I, 1870. Dr. Smith commenced the practice of his profession in Plainfield, 
N. Y., but one month later, on August i, 1870, came to Salamanca, where 
he has since pursued his chosen calling, being now the longest resident ph}-si- 
cian in the village, of \\hich he has served as trustee. In 1873 he married 
Sarah C, daughter of De Lancy King, and they ha\'e had seven children, si.\ 
of whom are living. 

John P. Colgrove is a son of Francis and Amanda (Pitts) Colgro\'e, of 
Hornells\'ille, where he was born April 19, 1833. Reared a farmer and edu- 
cated in the common schools and Alfred Uni\'ersity he early chose the 
medical profession as his life-long \'Ocation, and combined his primary studies 
in medicine with teaching school. He was a medical student under his uncle. 
Dr. James Pitts, and for one year ( 1860-61 ) pursued his studies at the College 
of Medicine and Surgery, Cincinnati, immediately afterward passing the State 
e.xamination which entitled him to practice in Ohio. F"ron.i then until 
November, 1862, he followed his profession with another uncle, Dr. John C. 
Pitts, of Rushford, Allegany county, and at the solicitation of John L. Eddy 
assumed the latter's practice in Allegany. There he remained until 1S66, 
when he removed to Clearwater, Minn., where he practiced until 1870, and 
where he married his wife, Salina Parker, a native of Allegany. Returning to 
Allegany Dr. Colgrove resumed his practice there and continued until the fall 
of 1874, when he took lectures at the Medical Department of the University of 
Buffalo, graduating therefrom February 23, 1875. He then located in Sala- 
manca. Dr. Colgrove is a member of the Salamanca Board of Pension Exam- 
iners, was for several years local surgeon to the New York, Pennsylvania & 
Ohio railroad, -and was one of the founders and continuously a director of the 
First National Bank of Salamanca. He joined the Medical Society in 18S3 
and in 1885 and 1S86 was its president. He also has a drug store. 

Salina Parker Colgrove, born in Allegany, May 27, 1850, is a daughter of 
J. W. Parker, Esq. Receiving her education in the local district schools and 
in Olean Academy, from which she was graduated in 1866, she followed 
teaching for two years and for the same period pursued a course of normal 



Medical Practitioners in Salamanca. i8i 



studies at the University of Michigan. In 1870 she was married to John P. 
CoIgro\^e, then practicing medicine in Clearwater, Minn., but who returned to 
Allegany with his bride that year, following his profession there until 187^, 
when the couple moved to Salamanca, where they settled permanently. Mrs. 
Colgrove was graduated as an M. D. from the University of Buffalo on Feb- 
ruary 28, 1888, and the following year from the Department of Pharmacv of 
the same institution. She is a charter member and was elected the first 
president of the Buffalo Medical Club, is a member of the Educational and 
Industrial Union of the City of Buffalo, and an honorary member of the 
Buffalo Medical Society. 

Charles Oliver Day, son of Chauncey and Almedia (Oliver) Day, was born 
in South Dansville, N. Y., April 13, 1846, was graduated in June, 1867, from 
the Rogersville Union Seminary and Collegiate Institute, received his degree 
of M. D. from Bellevue Hospital Medical College, New York, March i. 1870. 
and began practice in Cohocton, Steuben county, in partnership with Dr. 
L. B. Healy and continued it with Dr. J. L. Acomb in Tidionte, Pa., two 
years in each place. In 1874 he came to Salamanca, becoming a member of 
its first Board of Village Trustees, and remained until his death November 18, 
i8gi. Dr. Day was an excellent surgeon, and for many years bore that offi- 
cial relation to the Erie and the Western New York & Pennsylvania railroads. 
He became a member of the County Medical Society in 1874, was its \ice- 
prcsident in 1877, ^^''^■'^ o'^c of the censors, and in 1883 ^^''^^ ^ delegate to the 
State Medical Society. November 12, 1873, he married Lucy S. Healv. who 
bore him three children, and who survives him. 

Fred C. Beals was born in Gowanda, April 18, 1852. His parents were Sam- 
uel P. and Sarah E. (Holcomb) Beals. He attended Chamberlain Institute, 
was graduated as a physician and surgeon on February 23, 1875, from the Uni- 
versity of Buffalo, and that spring hung out his shingle as a practitioner in 
Conewango. In December, 1S78, he removed to EUicottville, and in April, 
1880, came to Salamanca. He is local surgeon for the Western New York & 
Pennsylvania, Erie, and Buffalo, Rochester & Pittsburg railroads. In 1875 
he was made a member of the County Medical Society, has been one of its 
censors, and became its vice-president in 1892. Dr. Beals married, in 1875, 
Lucy I. Bcardsley, of East Randolph. They have one son. 

W. A. Crandall, a nati\e of Mansfield and on F"ebruary 17, 1883, ^ gradu- 
ate of the Hahnemann Medical College, Chicago, began his chosen calling in 
East Otto that year, moved thence to Michigan, returned and 'practiced two 
years in Salamanca, and finally located again in Michigan, where he now re- 
sides. He is the inventor and patentee of a rubber obstetrical pan. 

Samuel Learned, father of Henry, died in this town, yet he performed most 
of his professional work while living in Elkdale in the town of Little \'alley, 
where he practiced four or five years. 

Charles S. Boyce, son of Charles S., was born in Westfield, Chautauqua 



i82 History of Cattaraugus County. 



county, December 24, 1855, was graduated from the Jefferson Medical College, 
Philadelphia, March 11, 1877, and began his practice in Fredonia, N. Y. He 
removed thence to East Aurora, Erie county, and in 1881 came to Salamanca. 
October t^o, 1878, he married Elba Ralyea, of Pennsylvania. 

Two doctors by the name of Baker, one a regular, the other an eclectic, 
but not related, followed their professions here a year each in i876or 'jy. 

H. L. Ellsworth, a nati\e of Independence, Allegany county, was licensed 
by the Cattaraugus County Medical Society, June 4, 1S67, thus becoming its 
first licentiate and a charter member, and is said to have been one of the first 
practitioners in West Salamanca. He still resides in town incapacitated for 
practice. 

Richard Dewees Wilcox, son of Dr. Samuel S. Wilcox, of Napoli, was born 
there February 6, 1842. He studied medicine under his father and in 1863 
enlisted in the army, being detailed as hospital steward. Returning home he 
engaged in mercantile business in Jamestown, and June 11, 1867, he married 
Fannie D. McCoy, of EUicottville, who survives him. He was theii one year 
a medical student in the University of Buffalo, and was graduated in March, 
1871, from the College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York city. From 
then until 1880 he practiced his profession in Corry, Pa., but in that year came 
to Salamanca, where he resided until his death January 5, 1892. I*"or two 
years he served as county coroner and for some time was a prominent Odd 
Fellow. He was also a trustee of the Congregational church; his brother S. 
Darwin was a professor in Hamilton College and died March 31, 1874. 

Charles M. Hamilton, born in Harpersfield, N. Y., August 30, 1856, began 
his medical studies in the Albany Medical College, and was graduated from 
the Medical Department of the University of Vermont on June 26, 1877. He 
practiced in Gladwin, Mich., and Seapo. Kan., and in 1881 came to West Sal- 
amanca, moving thence in 1883 to Salamanca village. Since coming to this 
town Dr. Hamilton has been wholly engaged in the drug business. 

Mrs. E. H. Stevenson, a graduate in 1878 of the Hahnemann Medical 
College, Chicago, came to Salamanca in iSS2,and remained only a short time. 

W. R. Sitler came here also in 1S82. and was a graduate of the Medical 
Department of the University of Pennsyh'ania, receiving his diploma March 
12, 1875. He v\-as local surgeon for the New York, Pennsylvania & Ohio rail- 
road and removed after about eight \-ears" practice to Binghamton. 

R. F. Rowley. — See Portville. 

Lyman Lewis Deck, son of Abram and Helen (Moore) Deck, was born in 
Stark, N. Y., June 10, 1850. He was.graduated from the Medical Department 
of the University of Michigan, March 27, 1878, began the practice of medicine 
in Ripley, Chautauqua county, continued it in Duke's Center, Pa., and in 1882 
came to Salamanca, where he has given his attention quite largely to the use 
of the microscope in diagnosis and has also made a specialty of .diseases of 
the eye. He is a member of the Chautauqua and the Cattaraugus Counties 



Medical Practitioners in Salamanca. 183 



Medical Societies; of the latter he was president in 1889 and '90, secretary 
and treasurer in 1886 and 'Sj. and one of its present censors. 

Weldon Dickson is a son of Re\-. Alfred and Eveline B. Dickson, and was 
born in Harmony, Chautauqua count}-, February 7, 1857. He was graduated 
from Allegany College, Meadvillc, Pa., in 1882, began the study of medicine 
with Laban Hazeltine, of Jamestown, recei\'ed his degree of IM. D. from the 
Baltimore College of Physicians and Surgeons in 1886, and began practice the 
same year in Jamestown. In 1889 he removed to Cuba, Allegany county, and 
in August, 1891, located in Salamanca. On January 2, 1889, Dr. Dickson mar- 
ried Anna, daughter of Charles Hevenor, by whom he has one son. 

\V. C. Peaslee. — See Xapoli. 

Abner P. Reehcr was born in Mercer county. Pa., in 1855, was educated in 
the High School in Clarks\'i!le in his native county, became a medical student 
in the office of Dr. G. T. Monroe, of Mercer, Pa., and was graduated P'ebruary 
28, 1883, from the Homeopathic Hospital College, Cleveland, O. After prac- 
ticing one year in Massilon. ()., and three years in Johnstown, Pa., Dr. Reeher 
came to Salamanca in 1S87. wlierc he has since followed his profession. 

Frank C. Davie. — See Little \'alley. 

Garret V. W. Co.x, a nati\-e of Sparta, Li\-ingston count}-, was born in 1852, 
was graduated in 1875 from the Cincinnati Eclectic Medical College, and be- 
■gan practice as a physician in Portage, N. Y. In 1877 he removed to Bradford, 
Pa., where he was in copartnership with C. E. Sa}des until 1882, when he took 
a post-gradLiate course at Belle\-ue Hospital Medical College, New York city, 
and states that he was graduated therefrom in the fall of that }-ear. He set- 
tled in [jractice in Red Huuseand in iSgoremoxed to West Salamanca, where 
he is still in acti\'e business. 

T. L. De Xike was born in Chautauqua county and rccei\-ed his medical 
diploma from the Uni\-ersit}- of Buffalo on Fcbruar\- 26, 1865. He located in 
Salamanca in 1885 and has since devoted his attention almost wholly to a 
drug store. 

VV. F. Seaman was graduated from the New York City Eclectic Medical 
College on March 4, 1882, and registered as from Salamanca on May 25, 1886. 

La Rue R. Colgro\'e, a graduate of the Medical Department of the L^ni- 
\-ersity of Buffalo on April 30. 1887, began his practice with his uncle, John P. 
Colgrove, but soon removed. 

Jeremiah K. Bowers was born in Reading, Pa., March 17, 1840. He was 
graduated from the " Philadelphia American Uni\-ersity " on December 22, 
1873, and located in Salamanca in the summer of 1889. 

Mrs. Sophia P. Jones. — See New Albion. 

Philip H. Bourne is a native of Leavenworth, Kan., being born 'there April 
5, 1869. He was graduated from the Medical Department of the University 
of Michigan at Ann Arbor. June 26, 1891, and came to Salamanca in 1892. 

Wirt W. Jones, son of Dr. Chauncey M. and Dr. Sophia P. Jones, of Cat- 



1 84 History of Cattaraugus County. 

taraugus, was born there in May, 1867, was graduated- May 3, 1892, from the 
Medical Department of the University of Buffalo, and commenced the prac- 
tice of medicine in West Salamanca, but removed within a few months with 
his widowed mother to Greenville, Mich. For sketches of his father and 
mother see New Albion. 

Theodore L. Hazard was born in Napoli, was graduated June 28, 1883, 
from the Homeopathic College of the University of Michigan, and began prac- 
tice as a physician in partnership with Dr. O. S. Martin in Salamanca. He 
moved after a brief stay to Iowa. 

O. S. Martin, homeopathist, practiced in Randolph a few years and moved 
to Jamestown, where he came from. For a time he itinerated between there ," 

and Salamanca. 

YORKSHIRE. 

Dr. Patterson has the distinction of being the first resident physician in 
Yorkshire. The early settlers here were attended by Dr. Colgrove, of Sar- 
dinia, Erie county. Where Dr. Patterson hailed from or what became of him , .j 
can not be ascertained. 

Augustus Crary erected in 1884 a grist-mill and a storehouse at Yorkshire 
Corners, but it is not probable that he resided here and engaged in practicing 
medicine. — See EUicottville. 

Ambrose Thomas came to the Center from Niagara Falls about 1832. He 
was an old school physician of e.xcellent attainments and became very popular. 
.After a four years' stay he returned to Niagara Falls. 

John Thomas, a brother of Ambrose, moved into town about 1835 and 
also remained some four years. He did not acquire an e.xtended practice. 

Calvin Chickering. — See Humphrey. 

William Langmaid used roots and herbs in his quite general practice at an 
early day and did for those times a good business. He died here. 

Dr. Powers was another early physician in Yorkshire who located at the « 

Corners and moved thence to Wyoming county. 

Dr. Ives, a student and a brother-in-law of Dr. Colgrove, of Sardinia, 
settled at Yorkshire Corners quite earl}-, and practiced only a few years. 

Henry Sheppard, another student of Dr. Colgrove, had a large and success- 
ful business here as a physician at one time. He was popular and greatly 
esteemed, and finally went west. f 

John Cheeseman did some professional work in town prior to 1875. A 
son of his is also a physician. Dr. Cheeseman finally died in Eldred, Pa. 

Dr. McCarthy practiced at the Corners a short time and died there. His 
widow has married again. 

L. A. Cornvvell succeeded Dr. Sheppard at Yorkshire Corners and followed 
his profession there during the war. He was skillful, shrewd, and successful, 1 

and moved to Alden, Erie county, of which county he was a native. > 



Medical Practitioners in Yorkshire. 185 



Benjamin Hunt, a homeopathic doctor and a Universalist preacher, 
followed medicine some at the Center prior to 1870. He removed to Erie 
county, where he died ; he is said to have been a sound reasoner, and was 
decisive, stubborn, and skillful. 

Lyman Packard, a native of Yorkshire, began his professional career in 
Olean and thence came here, remaining some ten or twelve years — probably 
through the seventies. He was a regular graduate, a scholar, well read, even 
scientific, but was not successful, and finally went to Michigan. 

George St. John was engaged in practicing medicine at the Center a few 
years before 1865. He was a charter member and one of the first censors of 
the present County Medical Society. Aside from this little is known of him. 

Isaac K. Richardson, a native of Windham county, Vt., a Universalist 
preacher too, came here in 1S84. He received a diploma from the Eclectic 
Medical Society of the Southern Tier dated May 5, 1875. He had a drug 
store at the Center, and left in 1892 for Corfu, Genesee county, where he has 
discontinued the practice of medicine. 

Alonzo Wiltse was born in Saratoga county, February 22, 1814, began 
stud}'ing medicine with John Allen, an old school doctor, and finally took up 
the botanical system of practice. He removed to East Ashford in 1847 ^"d 
commenced his profession there as the first physician in the village. He also 
had a farm there which he carried on. In February, 1 871, he came to York- 
shire Center, where he still resides. Dr. Wiltse was licensed August 12, 1874, 
by the Eclectic Medical Society of the 32d Senatorial District, and has held 
a number of town offices and has been coroner two terms. 

Frederick Krehbiel, born in Clarence, Erie county, October 4, 1843, 
attended Williamsville Academy, and was graduated in medicine from the 
University of Buffalo on February 23, 1875. He had previously read medicine 
with his brother in New Haven, O., and with J. F. Miner, of Buffalo. Dr. 
Krehbiel began his career at Yorkshire Center in 1875. His brother, a gradu- 
ate also of Buffalo, was formerly a prominent practitioner in Cleveland, O. 

Baxter Sovereign, son of Maurice and Hannah Sovereign, was born in 
Aimer, Middlesex county, Ontario, Can., attended Ann Arbor University one 
year (1867), and in 1869 was graduated from the Cleveland Homeopathic 
Hospital College. He practiced one year each in Canada, in Washington, 
D. C, and in Pasadena, Cal., and then located in Yorkshire. Dr. Sovereign 
married, in 1877, Lula Thomas. 

Arthur H. Wright, a native of Canton, St. Lawrence county, was born 
December 30, 1836. He was educated at Newbury (Vt.) Seminary and at 
Castleton, Vt., and in August, 1862, enlisted in Co. I, 3d Vt. Vols., being 
detailed as hospital steward. After practicing in Vermont and in Livingston 
county, N. Y., he came to Sandusky in 1886 and thence in 1891 to Yorkshire 
Corners. He is a member of the Erie County Medical Society and of the 
Eclectic Medical Society of the State of New York. 
24 



1 86 History of Cattakaucus Ctjuxi'v. 



CHAPTER XV. 

THE MILITARY: THE OLD STATE MILITIA. THE COUNTY IN THE VARIOUS 
WARS. THE DUTCH HILL EXCITEMENT. 

[By Col. E. A. Xash.] 

TO COLLATE material for a complete military history of any county is 
a herculean if not an impossible task. Accurate data covering the 
principal wars can be obtained from documentary sources, but much 
information of individuals and a full account of the old State militia prior to 
1853 '^re almost wholly buried in oblivion or storied in the uncertain realms of 
tradition. In fact, what appears in the following pages down to the war of 
the Rebellion has been gleaned mainly from personal interviews, supplemented 
now and then by a reference to an old paper or commission to substantiate a 
statement. The account of the State militia, incomplete as it necessarily is, 
will be interesting and valuable from the fact that comparati\-ely few are 
living who were once active in its general trainings or musters; that scarcely 
any one of the present generation has the least idea of how our fathers 
annually trained in the manuel of arms and in the arts of mimic war; and, 
finally, that it is the first attempt in Cattaraugus county to collect and pre- 
serve a record of the events of those times and occasions when youth and 
age assembled regularly for fun and drill. 

It is eminently desirable at this period of our county's history to system- 
atically arrange and record its whole military data in a manner to which it is 
properly entitled, and in this article space is devoted to the various subjects 
as nearly as possible in chronological order. The plan was arranged by 
W. Stanley Child and myself. Mr. Child has faithfully and ably assisted in 
gathering the material and in preparing it for the press. 

An earnest effort was made to secure the names and brief data of the Rev- 
olutionary veterans and soldiers of the War of 1812-15 who settled atone 
time or another in this county, but how futile has been this task is glaringly 
shown by the appended lists. In the absence of records it has been necessary 
to rely largely upon tradition. The veterans credited to Leon, however, 
were obtained by the assistance of E. C. Durfee, Esq., whose knowledge is 
derived from the fact of his having procured bounty lands or a pension for 
almost every soldier or his widow who ever lived much time in the town. In 
1840 there were "sixty-two persons residents of the county who were pension- 
ers for Revolutionary or other military services." 

Nearly all of these brave veterans were pioneer settlers in the various 



Resident Veterans of Two Wars. 



187 



towns; a few subsequently moved westward or to other portions of the State. 
The majority of those who immigrated to Cattaraugus county died within its 
borders and sweetly sleep on its sunny hillsides or in its green valleys, revered 
in memory and sacredly remembered each glorious Memorial Day. Their 
heroic deeds are immortalized on the pages of national history, but much of 
their individual action is buried in the misty past. I-n the following lists, 
incomplete as they are, appear the names of all whom it has been possible to 
secure : 

SOLDIERS' OF THE REVOLUTIONARY WAR. 



A(l3e, Ciileb, difd in Napoli in .lanuai-y, 18-1!>: Napoli. 

Beekiiian, KveUcrick, died in Freedoiu a^ed 109 ; his 
witV iil^o died tliore ajfcd IDS ; Kieedoin. 

Biyliii', NiciroUiJ, SL-rvcd undui- Oi-nenil Hcrliimer at 
Oii'-liany. iiension penUinsf at lime of death, 
dic-d ls4iiund buried in Napoli; Leon. 

niaelyiuaii, Zaehariah, settler ISij, died here; Farm- 
ersville. 

Houtwell, John, early settler, died September 12, 
1S<47, aL'ed eishty-tivp; Otto. 

Brooks, Cornelius, taken prisoner at battle of Lonji 
Island, died in Glean in IS.'.t; Glean. 

Burt, Edward, pensioner; Machias. 

Cliaiuberlain, Benjamin, father of Judjje and Gen. 
C. T. Chamberlain, enlisted as " Benjamin Cham- 
bers"; was at Lexinjjton, Yorktown, Bunker 
Hill, Stillwater, Valley Korije, and others; was 
also at Quebec, where he was eaptured and con- 
fined in irons; died in Great Valley, February 4, 
IN47, ased nearly ninety-two; Randolph and 
Great Valley. 

Champlin, , widow pensioner; Freedom. 

Coleman, Bennett, born in Ireland, August 1, 175f, 
came to this country in Lord Howe's army, but 
deserted at the battle of White Plainsand imme- 
diately enlisted in the Anjericau army as " Ben- 
jamin Cole," serving' until the close of the war; 
He died in llumplnev, Jan. 2, fSW; Humphrey. 

Coston, Bishop, pensioner ; Y'orkshire. 

Crook, Charles; Cold Spring'. 

Davis, Joseph, died in .New Albion in the 'forties, 
ujied over eiy:hty ; New .Albion. 

Day, Anthony, enlisted at Danbury, M;i£3., pension- 
er, died 1S12; Leon. 

Farrar, John, member of Boston tea party, pen- 
sioner; Machias. 

Fay, .Moses, Sr., pensioner; Hinsdale. 

Frank, Henry, Sr., scout, died in Ashford; A.'ihford. 

Franklin, .lames, enlisted from (,'helsea, N. H., under 
(.'olonel Warner, wasat the battle of Benriinatnn, 
jiensioner, built the tirst house in Leon, died in 
Leon l.'<:i4; I.eou. 

Freeman, Elisha, enlisted from Parato;,'a county, 
N. v., was in campaign a^rainst Bur^oyne arid 
afterward in Wasliiiifrton's army, pensioner, died 
before lB:illancl buiieil in ^apoli; Leon. 

Fuller, — , widow pensioner; Freedom. 

Gould, William, peiisiuner; Yorkshire. 

Gowin^, Jonathan, pensioner; Hinsdale. 

Grant, Thomas; East (Jtto. 

Hitchcock, (Kis; Uandolph. 



Hoaitl, Samuel, removed to Chautauqua county; 
Conewango. 

HoUister, Josiah K., pensioner, died in Mansfield; 
.Mam-field. 

Hoops, .idam. major on Washiuffton's staff, pen- 
sioner, died in Pennsylvania in 1S45; Glean. 

Howe, Zaazaniah, died in Gowanda in 1838; Pei'sia. 

Hufstrader, Jolin H. ; Ashford. 

Lane, Matthias, early settler, pensioner, died 185U ; 
Farmersville. 

Larabee, Eleazer, died January, 1^:37, aged eighty- 
seven ; East otto. 

Lndden. Euos, pensioner; Hin.sdale. 

Morev, Samuel, died 187i; Otto. 

Mosher, John, 

Murrav, Elihu, captain, see also War of 1812-15; 
Hinsdale. 

Xichols, .John, pensioner; Freedom. 

Norton, Zera, pensioner; Freedom. 

Noyes, Dudley, enlisted from Dedham, Mass., was at 
b.attle of Bunker Hill, pensioner, came to Leon 
in le2.8, died in Leon 18:5:3 ; Leon. 

Odell, lUehard, pensioner; iMachias. 

Parish, Jeremiah, early settler, pensioner; Farmers- 
ville. 

Parish. Nehemiah; Farmersville. 

Parish, Sliubael, early settler, pensioner; Farmers- 
ville. 

Parkeoson, Sylvanus, early settler, removed to 
Collins, Erie county, whore he died ; Otto. 

Plumb. Elisha, pensioner; Yorkshire. 

Piatt. .Jonathan, died here; Napoli. 

Quackenbush, John H., captured by the Indians, 
taken to Niauara, and ran the irauntlet; Ash- 
ford. 

Randall, Elisha, pensioner; Yorkshire. 

Redfield, Samuel, Dr., enlisted from Old Guilford, 
Conn., came here 1821, died 18:jO; Dayton. 

Uickard, Abner, pensioner; Yorkshire. 

.<eudder, Ezekiel, died in Randolph; Randolph. 

Smith, Oliver, pensioner, buried at Eddyville 
Manstield. 

Squires, -\mbrose, pensioner, died in Leon; Leon. 

Taylor, Gad, pensioner ; Machias. 

Warner, Moses, Sr., born in Vt., came here 180C; 
Franklinville. 

Whitcomb, Samuel, served at New London, Conn., 
was there when that city was burned by the 
British under Arnold, died in Leon 184U; Leon. 

Wintei-s, Jacob, pensioner; Yorkshire. 

Woodworth, Jos., died in Conewango in 1844 ; Napoli. 



SOLDIERS OF THE WAR OF 1812-15. 



Ames, David, served a short time ; Little Valley. 
Austin, Benjamin, came from Washington county 

1821), died April 14, 18.52, aged 87 ; Otto. 
Austin, William, settler 1827, died here 18.«, aged 89; 

Farmersville. 
Badger, Frederick L,, pensioner, died in Allegany; 

Allegany. 
Bargy, Jacob P., was at Sackett's Harbor; Ashford. 
Bargy, Joseph H.; Ashford. 
Barton, Grosvenor, received bounty land ; Coue- 

wango. 
Be-aeh, Henry, died 1847, aged nS ; East Otto. ■ 
Beardsley, Wheeler, li\ed manj- years in Napoli, 

died in Little Valley, December 25, 1872, buried 

in Napoli; Napoli and Little Valley. 



Bennett, Daniel, sergt. in Capt. Elias Streeter's com- 
pany from Monroe Co., wasat burning of Buffalo, 
given bounty land, died in Leon ; Leon. 

Berry, Alonzo, served tour months ; Humphrey. 

Beverly, James, settled about 1821), died here; Otto. 

Bigler, John, enlLsted in Capt. Elias Streeter's com- 
pany from Monroe Co., was at burning of Buf- 
falo, removed to Ohio; Leon. 

Bigler, Philip, enlisted in Capt, Elias Streeter's com- 
pany from Monroe Co., was at burning of Buffalo, 
widow given bounty land, removed to Pa.; Leon. 

Blodzett, Xury, enlisted from Tompkins Co., ser- 
geant in Capts. John Ellis's and Samuel Jones's 
companies in 18i:5, served in Canada si.\ mouths, 
given bounty land; Leon. 



i88 



History of Cattaraugus County. 



Boon, Jonathan, died 1S37, aged 70 ; Otto. 

Botsford, Daniel, born 1782, came from Conn. 1825, 
died in 1376, a»ed 91 ; Otto. 

Brace, Calvin, died in Iowa; Maohias. 

Brace, Norman, died in Erie county ; Machias. 

Brokaw, Isaac, officer, widow pensioner; South Val- 
ley. 

Brown, Hosea, pensioner, moved to Oregon; Mans- 
field. 

Brown, John, early settler ; Yorkshire. 

Bull, William, born 1771, died Nov. 12, 1863, aged 82 ; 
Otto. 

Burchard, Joseph, six weeks in service, participated 
in capture of St John's; East Otto. 

Burling-ham, Palmer, died here ; Machias. 

Bush, Samuel, died here; Machias. 

Butler, Harvey, given bounty land; Leon. 

Butler, Hervev, born 1791, came from Otsego Co. 
1820, died 18S1 ; Otto. 

Button, Charles, was at Plattsburgh, died here ; Ma- 
chias. 

Carpenter, Eiias. received bounty land ; Conewango. 

Carpenter, Stephen, enlisted in Capt. Atwell's com- 
pany from Onondaga Co., served at Sackett's 
Harbor, given bounty land, removed to Ohio ; 
Leon. 

Carver, Sylvester, died here ; Machias. 

Chase. Robert, died in Humphrey ; Humphrey. 

Cheney, William, removed ; Cold Spring. 

Comter, Jonathan, enlisted from Otsego Co.; Mans- 
field. 

Corwin, Jesse, born in N. J. in 1780 ; East Otto. 

Crosby, Stephen, died in Mansfield, Aug. 30, 1869; 
Little Valley and Mansfield. 

Crowell, Seth, early settler; Otto. 

Culver, Noah ; Little Valley. 

Dako, Edmund, served through the war, was at 
Lundy's Lane, Queenstown, and Fort Eric, came 
from Monroe Co. 18:i2 ; Little Valley and Otto. 

Darling, John, received bounty land ; Conewango. 

Darling, Thom.is, received bounty land ; Conewango. 

Davison, Abial, given bounty land ; Leon. 

Day, Ebenezer, enlisted in Capt. Amasa Wilco.x's 
company in 1813, was at Sackett's Harbor three 
months, given bounty land ; Leon. 

Dean, Lyman, sergeant in Capts. Davis's and Hard- 
ing's company under Colonel Van Rensselaer, 
served six mouths in Canada, given bounty land ; 
Leon. 

Delap, George, at Sackett's Harbor, died in Wiscon- 
sin ; Mansfield. 

Durfee, Abner, enlisted in Capt. Isaac Brown's com- 
pany at Albany, served at Sackett's Harbor four 
months, given bounty land ; Leon. 

Durfee, Robert, enlisted in Porter's volunteers at 
Buttalo, crossed into Canada, was a sliort time in 
service; Leon. 

Durfee, Zephaniah C, enlisted in Capt. MoMahon's 
company from Chaiitau(iua Co., served three 
months, was at burning of Buffalo, given bounty 
land ; Leon. 

Earl, Silas, died here June 26, 1803 ; Napoli. 

Everts, John, enlisted in Capt. Ellas Streeter's com- 
pany from Monroe Co., was at burning of Buf- 
falo, given bounty land, died in Leon ; Leon. 

Ewens, Asa, served three months in Capt. Smith's 
company from Onondaga Co., widow given 
bounty; Leon. 

Fairbank, Joshua, service could not be proven ; 
Leon. 

Farrar, Wiggin M., pensioner; Machias. 

Francis, Edwin, given bounty land ; Leon. 

Frank, Andrew ; Ashford. 

Franklin, Andrus, enlisted in Capt. Richard Han- 
som's company, served at Buffalo ; Leon. 

Franklin, Asa, enlisted at Rochester in Capt. Peter's 
and Stone's cavalry in 1811, served nine months, 
given bounty land ; Leon. 

Franklin, Eber, served in Capt. Kelsey's and Capt. 
Ellas Streeter's companies four months, from 
Monroe Co., given bounty land ; Leon. 

Franklin, Henry, enlisted in Capt. Elias Streeter's 
company from Monroe Co., was at burning of 
Buffalo, died in 1852 : Leon. 

Franklin, James, J r., enlisted in Capt. Elias Streeter's 
company from Monroe Co., was at burning of 
Buffalo, widow given bounty land, died in Leon ; 
Leon. 



Trantz, Peter ; Hinsdale. 

Frisbee, George, received bounty land ; Conewango 

Fuller, , moved west; Otto. 

Harmon, Simeon, enlisted in Capt. Elias Streeter's 
company from Monroe Co., was at burning of 
Buttalo, widow given bounty land, died in Leon • 
Leon. ' 

Hibbard. Arunah, colonel, wounded in arm at Lun- 
dy's Lane ; Yorkshire. 

Hill, John ; Conewango. 

Hill, Valpntine ; Conewango. 

Hitchcock. Manna, musician, removed ; Otto. 

Hizur, John, enlisted in Capt. John R. Cherrytree's 
company, served three months at Brooklyn, 
given bouniy land ; Leon. 

Holbrook, Sheldon, wounded at Bridgewater, died 
here; Machias. 

Hollister, Josiah R., Jr., died in Mansfield ; Mansfield. 

Holmes, Eber; Freedom. 

Hubbart, Levi B,. enlisted Sept., 1811, at Remsen, 
N. Y., in Capt. Sheldon's company, served 10 days 
at SacKett's Harbor, given bounty land ; Leon. 

Hall, William, served a few days in Capt. John Moss's 
N. Y. company ; Dayton. 

Huntington, John, died m Conewango, March 23, 
1800; Conewango. 

Hurlburt, Caleb, died here aged 95 ; Great Valley. 

Ingraham, Humphrey W.,died Sept. 1.3, 1870, aged 72 ; 
Otto. 

Johnson, Daniel, enlisted in Capt. Elias Streeter's 
com|)any from Monroe Co., was at burning of 
Buffalo, died in Leon ; Leon. 

Johnson, John, given bounty land ; Leon. 

Kiearstead, John N. C, enlisted in Capt. Conrad Van 
Gosbeck's company in 1813, served three months 
near Brooklj'n, given bounty land ; Leon. 

Knight, Gorton, served to close, settler 1827; Free- 
dom. 

Lamb, .Tames, early settler in Otto, died in Mans- 
field ; Otto and Mansfield. 

Larkins, Nathan, served under General Wool, died 
1860, aged 67 ; East Otto. 

Lewis. Laban, settler 18.32, died 1861 ; Freedom. 

Lingenfelter, Baltus, died here : Machias. 

Low, Abraham, ensign in Capt. Elias Streeter's com- 
pany from Monroe Co., was at burning of Buttalo, 
given bounty land ; Leon. 

Low, Ten Eyck, was at Queenstown Heights, died 
hero; Franklinville. 

Luce, Robert, received bounty land ; Conewango. 

McKay, Silas, died in Mansfield in 1813 ; Mansfield. 

Miller, William, musician, removed ; Otto. 

Moon, Jonathan, early settler ; Otto. 

Moran, John ; Conewango. 

Morris, John, died Oct. 1, 1&)2, aged nearly 79 ; Otto. 

Murray, Elihu, captain, see also Revolutionary war, 
died in Chenango Co., N. Y.; Hinsdale. 

Newcorab, Thomas, early settler ; Dayton. 

Nichols, Caleb, service could not be proven ; Leon. 

Nichols, Stephen, service could not be proven ; 
Leon. 

Older, Jerry, stationed at New York city, died in 
Iowa 1871 ; Farmersville. 

Orno, Stephen, was at Bridgewater, died here ; Ma- 
chias. 

Orr. Phineas, sergeant under Colonel Riddle, in one 
or more battles in Canada, present at the burn- 
ing of Buffalo, died 1870, aged 81; East Otto. 

Osterstuck, John ; Hinsdale. 

Owen, Robert, received bountj- land ; Conewango. 

Paddock, Benjamin H., served in 1811 and 1815 in the 
navy on Lake Ontario under Commodore Chauu- 
cey, given bounty land ; Leon. 

Pennock, Joseph ; Conewango. 

Pope, Elnathan ; Conewango. 

Post, Grove, served from Trenton, N. Y., on north- 
ern frontier, pensioner, died at Washington in 
1868; Farmersville. 

Reynolds, John ; Franklinville. 

Rivenburgh, Peter, early settler, removed to Oramel, 
N. Y., and died there 187.5, pensioner; Farmei-s- 
ville. 

Roberts, Ebenezer, under Captains Lilly and Camp- 
bell, received bounty land ; Dayton. 

Root, Ira, came from Otsego county 1832, died in 
Otto in 1876, aged eighty-five; Otto. 

Ross, David, service could not be proven ; Leon. 

Ross, Reuben, given bounty land ; Leon. 



Veterans of Other Struggles. 



Koss. Jesse, enlisted in I8U from Pennsylvania in 
Captain Frederick Bailey's company, served one 
month, Bi%-en bounty land ; Leon. 

Russell, Benedict, enlisted in L'apt. Willium Pen- 
nock's company from Monroe county, was at 
burning of Buffalo, jriven bounty land ; Leon. 

Satterlee, Joseph, died December 1.5, 1863, aged 
seventy-four, buried in Otto; East Otto. 

Scott, Edward ; Franklinville. 

Searl, Isaac; Franklinville. 

Searl, Jeriah ; Franklinville. 

Bherman, John, served in Mass. Heavy Artillery, 
given bounty land ; Leon. 

Sickles, John, enlisted in Capt. Ellas Streeter's com- 
rany from Monroe Co., was at burnini? of 
Ruttalo, given bounty land, died in Leon; Leon. 

Smith, Alvah ; Leon. 

Smith, Amasa ; Mansfield. 

Smith, Gideon, service could not be proven ; Leon. 

Snow, Nathan, captain; Conewango. 

Spaulding, Jeremiah, died 18.36, aged G.t ; East Otto. 

Streeter, Hazeltine, enlisted in Captain Elias Street- 
er's company from Monroe county, was at burn- 
ing of Buffalo; Leon. 

Stryker, John I., died here 1873; South Valley. 

Sweet, Ephraira, served three years, enlisted in 
( 'apt. .McChesnej 's Co., given bounty land ; Leon. 

Sykes, Levi, enlisted in Capt. Elitis Stieeter's com- 
pany from .Monroe county, was at burning of 
Buffalo, died 18:311; Leon. 

Tarbell. James, volunteered from Vermont, came 
here 18-'."), pensioner, died 1871); Farmersvillc. 

Trowbridge, [jr. .lames, assistant surgeon, see Med. 

Valentine, Stephen, settler 1839, died about 1858; 
Farmei'sville. 



Van Aernam, Jacob B. ; Mansfield. 

Ward, Elisha, enlisted in Berkshire Co.. Mass., sta- 
tioned at Boston and Cambridge, died in 1861, 
aged seventy-seven ; East Otto. 

Waring. William, was present at the surrender of 
Hull at Detroit, died in Lima, N. Y., 1835; Far- 
raersville. 

Warner, Moses, Jr. ; Franklinville. 

Washburn, Howland, Jr.; Franklinville. 

Wasson, Thornton, captain ; Hinsdale. 

Wheeler, David, born in Conway, Mass., served si.t 
months, died here; Humphrey. 

Wilco.x, Alanson ; Dayton. 

Willoughby. Ebenezer, musician, settled here about 
1819, came from Washington Co. ; Great Valley. 

Willoughby, Reuben, musician (?), came from Wash- 
ington Co. 1819; Great Valley. 

Winchester, Elhanan, enlisted from Marcellus, N. Y., 
musician, was at Sackett's Harbor and others; 
East Otto. 

Winship, Benjamin, given bounty land ; Little 
Valley. 

Wi.von, Seth ; Carrolton. 

Wood, Emery, prisoner twice; Hinsdale. 

Wood, Wheelock; Hinsdale. 

Woodford. Samuel, captain at Lundy's Lane and 
Kingston, served under Gen. \V. H. Harrison, 
died in East Randolph January ID, 18.57 ; EUicott- 
ville, Napoli, and Randolph. 

Woodward, Ayres, enlisted from Vermont in Capt. 
Briggs's company. ser\ ed three months at Bur- 
lington, given bounty land; Leon. 

Wright, .Miniluiiii, nnisii-ian, came from Washington 
l.'o. IsHi; Giviit \'iilley. 

Yates, Emery; llin.sdale. 



Nearly all the agents who procured boimt}- lands for veteran soldiers or 
their widows under the congressional acts of 1850 and 1855 are now dead, 
and it is to be regretted that their descendants ha\'e forgotten the material 
facts in connection with their heroic service. In the War of 1812-15 l^lic 
count}' evidently contributed generously, considering the population (about 
five huiidredj, but no organizations were recruited here, the volunteers join- 
ing companies and regiments in counties north and northeast. 

The participants in the~ Mexican war (1846) who either enlisted from 
Cattaraugus county or became residents afterward were few, and efforts to 
secure the names of all such soldiers ha\'e resulted in the following list: 



SCH.lilERS OF THE MEXICAN WAR. 



Ames, Milo, wounded in hip. enlisted from and 
returned to Little Valley ; Little Valley. 

Bush, Jacob; Machiius. 

Bush, Peter; Machias. 

Fancher, William, enlisted in regular array at 
Albany, July 1.3, 1841, honorably discharged in 
July, 1846, lis 1st sergeant Co. F, 'Zd U. S. Inf., was 
at the capitulation of the City of Me.tico ; was 
also~iQ Florida war; was recruiting officer for 
I.'. S. army after Mexican war; re-enlisted in 
naval service, served four years, promoted 1st 
lieut., discharged 1850; died in Leon on May 24, 
186«, from fever contracted in the Civil war, in 
which he served as captain ; Leon. 

Farley. Peter, lost an arm in service, given bounty 
land ; Leon. 



Howard, George M., enlisted in 10th N. Y. Vols., 
served si.x months; was also in the Rebellion; 
Persia. 

Kelly, Bradford ; E:ist Otto. 

Long, Samuel, also in 1.54th Rcgt. in Rebellion, died 
in Soldiers' Home in Bath; Otto. 

Rowley, Emmett; Machias. 

Walker, Chauncey; Mansfield. 

Winship, Oscar F., first cad t to IT. S. Military 
Academy from Cattaraugus county, entering in 
18;j6; 1st lieut. in regular army; brevetted capt. 
for meritorious conduct at Palo Alto and Res- 
aca, made asst. adjt.-gen. July, 1846, promoted 
major December, 1847, served much on the Gen- 
eral Staff of the army, died December 13, 1855 ; 
Persia. 



In the first Seminole Indian war (1817-18) a Mr. Day enlisted under Gen- 
eral Jackson as a musician, and after the war accompanied the latter to his 
home in Tennessee, where he resided until Jackson became president, when 
he was appointed collector of customs at Dunkirk. Mr. Day finally settled in 
New Albion and died there. In the last Seminole war (1856-58) Jeremiah S. 
Harrington, of Leon, participated and was severely wounded. Whether or 



igo History of Cattaraugus Couxtv. 



not any other citizens of Cattaraugus county saw service in these or similar 
struggles can not be determined. 

It is a recognized fact that all who fought in these several wars, and either 
volunteered from or afterward resided in this county, served nobly, faithfully, 
and creditably, and deserve a prominent place in all history. Their descend- 
ants and the present inhabitants may well feel proud of the honorable record 
so justly accredited to those brave men. In the more recent events of the 
great Rebellion let us not forget their heroic deeds and individual worth. 

Time often obliterates unrecorded conditions and incidents. A generation 
passes away and they become amusing anecdotes of a former period. An- 
other generation steps upon the stage of activity and finds them buried in 
tradition or oblivion, from which it becomes the arduous task of the historian 
to resurrect and preserve. An excellent example of this human characteristic 
is the old State militia, of which scarcely a remnant of history has hitherto 
been recorded. Its organization and variegated equipment, its annual train- 
ings or drills, its crude maneuvres, its power and decline — all are little more 
than historied in vague remembrance by a few old men still living who thus 
prepared themselves in peace to defend their country should occasion 
demand. 

The long struggle for American Independence; the close proximity of the 
sparsely settled districts to the Indian country; the absence of a national 
navy and regular army; and the impending disputes between the colonies and 
other nations \'ery early created a general desire for armed security. In fact 
it was not onh- a desire but a necessity. To effectually and inexpensivt^ly 
protect and maintain the dignity of the young republic soon became a sub- 
ject of legislation, and on May 8, 1792, Congress passed an act authorizing 
the systematic and uniform organization of local military companies, regi- 
ments, and brigades throughout the United States. On April 23, 1823, the 
New York State Legislature for the first time availed itself of the authority 
reserved to the several States by enacting a law to organize, officer, and drill 
all persons liable to military duty in conformity with the -old congressional 
act. This law was practically a re-enactment of the act of Congress of 1792, 
adding, howe\'er, a few minor provisions in detail. 

The popularity and effectiveness of the militia was attested by the speedi- 
ness with which a good sized army was raised and marched to the front at the 
outbreak of the War of 1812-15. After that struggle ended the necessity of 
armed organizations, properly drilled and accoutred, was more evident than 
ever, and public interest in their maintenance increased proportionately. 
Hence the enactment of the law in 1823 by the State Legislature as 
previously mentioned. Punctual attendance at the annual trainings was 
considered a privilege and a duty; an election to any official position, even to 
a non-commissioned rank, was given and received as an honor. Indeed all 
military offices were generally sought after — not for the remuneration they 



Militia Organizations and Trainings. 191 

gave, for only the brigade inspector received pay for his services, but rather 
for -the respect and fame they brought the incumbent. 

The mihtia laws down to about 1850 required the enrollment of every able- 
bodied white male citizen between the ages of eighteen and forty-five, except 
national and State officers, preachers, teachers, students, and Quakers. The 
latter, however, were required to pay each year a commutation of §4. Each 
man was obliged to arm and equip himself at his own expense with a musket, 
bayonet, belt, two spare flints, knapsack, cartridge box, and ammunition, all of 
which were exempt from seizure for debt or taxes. Commissioned officers 
were uniformed and accoutred consistent with their rank. Officers' drills 
were held once a year, in August, at convenient points, and lasted three days, 
on at least the first of which the brigade inspector superintended the ma- 
neuvres. On the first Monday in September the company trainings took 
place in their respective beats, and on an appointed day between then and 
October 15th occurred the annual regimental muster or " general trainin'." 
This was for many years the day of days; it was anticipated by young and 
old as an occasion for fun and frolic; even the Glorious Fourth scarcely sur- 
passed it. E\'erybody was there — men, women, and children. Every boy who 
could raise ten cents was on the ground soon after sunrise, even if he had to 
walk a distance of fifteen miles. He wai considered "rich" if he possessed 
twenty-five cents with which to buy refreshments; occasionally one of them 
"had n't a red penny." Some carried their dinners in their spacious pockets, 
but generally their pennies were exchanged for great chunks of old-fashioned 
gingerbread, new cider, and apple pie, and sometimes a piece of watermellon. 
The tavern near by dispensed hard drinks to those who indulged in the cup, 
and also furnished the customary officers' dinner, never complete without a 
roast-pig and rice-pudding. 

The parade ground was carefully reser\'ed for military maneuvres. Tress- 
passers were liable to arrest. Fines and penalties were imposed by court- 
martial according to the nature of the offense and the rank of the offender. 
Non-appearance at the general musters and lack of personal equipment were 
punishable by money fines ; disobedience and insubordination by both money 
fines and penalties. Cooper's & Macomb's, Steuben's, and Hardy's tactics 
were used. 

Until the new code went into effect the militia was composed of two ele- 
ments, — uniformed and ununiformed, the latter being the "militia" proper, — 
formed into divisions, brigades, regiments, battalions, and companies. A 
town, known as a "beat," produced a single company of ununiformed soldiery, 
which was somewhat derisively dubbed "floodwood," "flood-trash," or drift- 
wood" because of their motley appearance. Besides these there were an in- 
definite number of "independent" uniformed companies, but each brigade 
was obliged to have at least one artillery- and one cavalry company and e\-ery 
battalion one company of grenadiers, light infantry, or riflemen, — all in uni- 



192 History of Cattaraugus County. 

forms which varied in color, material, etc, according to the prevailing fancy 
and wealth of the organization. These independent companies were com- 
posed of volunteers, principally from the ranks of the militia, and furnished 
at their own expense their uniforms, accoutrements, horses (cavalry"), etc. 

The first tangible evidence of a movement in Cattaraugus county to form 
her pioneer settlers into armed and drilled soldiery, under the statutes, was in 
the summer of 1818, when the 173d Regiment was regularly organized, and 
the first militia officer to subscribe to the constitutional oath was Isaac Law- 
ton, ensign, on June 19th. Just how much territory this regiment covered 
can not be ascertained, but in all probability it comprised at least the eastern 
half and perhaps the whole of the county of Cattaraugus. 

The 198th Regiment, 25th Division, was evidently organized in 1821, and 
during that summer this and the 173d had each an active existence here, the 
former taking in the west half and the latter the east half of the county. In 
1822, however, it would appear from the registry book in the county clerk's 
office that the 173d Regiment was either disbanded or its numerical designa- 
tion changed. From that year until 1S40 it is impossible to obtain much doc- 
umentary- data of the State militia in this county. Under the amended 
constitution of 1822 military officers were not compelled to subscribe to the 
constitutional oath as they had theretofore. In 1840 the law was re-enacted, 
but the militia had fallen into such disrepute as a body of armed resistance 
that few names appear upon the book. 

Following is a list of the officers of the 173d, the 12th, and the 198th Mili- 
tia Regiments, from 1818 to 1822, with the dates of the subscription to the 
oath as they appear in the previously mentioned book kept in the county 
clerk's office : 

The 173d Reaimcnt J)i/an(ry.— Lieutenant-Colonel.s September i, 1821 ; Henry T. Lighten, Sept. i. 1821. 

(commandantsi: Solomon Curtis, Aug. 1, 1818; Peter Qiiartermiistei-s: Griswold E. Warren, Aug. 24, 

Ten liroeck. July 12, 1821. I8I9; James McGlashan, Sept. 19, 1820 (battalion): 

Majors: Timothy Butler, Aug-. 13, 1818; Royal TeBft, Kobfert Hinds, Sept. 4, 1821. 

Au^^ 1, 18211; Peter Ten Broeck, Aug. .5, 1820; Samuel Surgeon : Dr. James Trowbridg-e, July .31, 1818. 

McClure, Julvl2, 1831. Paymasters: Samuel G. Sutton, July 10, 1818 ; Levi 

Adjutants:" Peter Ten Broeck, Aup:. 28, 1818 ; Daniel Peet, Aug. 24, 1819; Richard Tozer, July 14, 1831. 

"!^^??'in^-"=Kov7TVfft'TXf8^lHf8*''Ho!r^^ ^'"^ ''-"' R<^aiment C«rarry.-Captain, James Ad- 

/R-«l?iiS?" V,^l in^«io. «„^;;„i w;.riMl» A,;,^ 2? kins, Julyir, 1819; first lieutenant, Wyllys Thrall, 

Sq n2n-;i^-n"Vh;^i^i .if?n IL^ y iIIq-^ f;,i' J"'? l'- •«!« = comet, Benjamin Seeiy, July 17, 1819; 

1819; Benjamin Chamberlain, Aug-. 24, 1819; Jere- opfnnd Hpiiton-mf \i\ohirc\ Tnvpr An.V -'4 isiq 

miah Pratt. Sept. 14, 1819; Jonathan Dodge, July 21, second lieutenant, Kichard io/.ei, Aug. .4, I8I.1. 

1820; Moses Chamberlain, Aug. 12, 1820; Isaac Law- The lOSth Regiment /»/o»fn/.— Colonel: Benjamin 

ton, June .30. 18^1; Solomon Curtis. Jr., July 12, Waterman, ,luly 5, 1822. 

1821; Levi Peet, July 12. 1821 ; Harvey Parker, Aug. Lieutenant-Colonels: Benjamin Waterman, July 6, 

25, 1821 ; Gris-svold E. Warren, Sept. 4, 1821. 1821 ; James McGlashan, July 5, 1822. 

Lieutenants: Moses Chamberlain, July 18, 1818; Majors: James McGlashan, July 13, 1831; John T. 

Samuel McClure, Aug. 1, 1818; Jeremiah Pratt, Jr., King, Aug. 24, 1833. 

Aug. 14. 1818; John T. King, Sept. 1.5, 1818; Walter Captains: Dr. Phineas F. Noble, June 10, 1821; 

Wood (Riflemen), Aug 10,1819; Isaac Lawton, Aug. Euoch Close, Jr., June 30, 1831; Bela H. Kedfleld, 

24. 1819 ; Harvey Woodworth, Aug. 24, 1819 ; Harvey July 5, 1831 ; Simon Waterman, July 6, 1821 ; John T. 

Parker, Aug. 21. 1820; Amos Ingalls, Sept. 11, 1830; King, Aug. 30, 1831 ; John Fairbank, Aug. 31, 1831; 

David Farnum, June 36, 1831; Manly McClure, July William Blasdell, April 3;j, 1830. 

13. 1831; Robert P. Blackmer, July 13, 1821. Lieutenants: Heman Waterman, June 9, 1831; 

Ensigns: Isaac Lawton, June 39, 1818; Nathan Bum- John Frarv, Jr., June 13, 1831; William Blasdell, 

pus, Aug. 14. 1818; Harvey Woodworth, Aug. 29, 1818; June 16, 1831 ; Ebenezer Edwards (?), July 18, 1821; 

W. I. Wood (Riflemen), Aug. 10, 1819; Amos Ingalls, Abner W. Wise, Aug. 31, 1831; Guilson Morgan, 

Aug 24, 1819; David Farnum, Aug. 34, 1819; William Sept. 1,1821. 

Blasdell, Aug. 27, 1819; Simon Waterman, Sept. 15, Ensigns: Harvey Parmelee, June 13, 1821; Edwin 

1819; Spencer Pitcher, Aug. 18,1830; Robert Hinds, Farnsworth, July 6, 1831; Rowland Thurston, July 

Aug. 29, 1821); Robert P. Blackmer,. Sept. 9, 1820; 18,1821; Peter Cook, July 6, 1822. 

Henry Gross, June 18, 1821; James Greene, June 26, Paymiister: Simeon Seward, June 30, 1821. 

1821 ; Samuel Barrows, Sept. 4, 1821 ; Wheelock Wood, Quartermaster : Robert P. McGlashan, Aug. 1, 1821. 



Militia Organizations and Officers. 193 

The first general muster of the 198th took place at Fish hill, two miles 
west of Ellicottville, in Mansfield, near Nathaniel Fish's tavern, where the 
annual re\-iews were held until 1827, when James McGlashan was promoted 
colonel in place of Benjamin Waterman, resigned, and the militia trained that 
year at Rutledge, Colonel McGlashan's home, but in 1828 drilled again on its 
old grounds. The 198th was then divided and a regiment formed in the terri- 
tory comprising what is now the towns of New Albion, Napoli, Cold Spring, 
Elko, South Valley, Randolph, Conewango, and Leon, with James McGJashan 
colonel, and for many years the general trainings occurred at Rutledge. Col- 
onel McGlashan was made brigadier-general of the 54th Brigade, 26th Division, 
about 1830 and at his death, about 1840, was a major-general. His brother 
Charles succeeded him as colonel ; subsequently Solomon G. Wright, Eben- 

ezer Seely, Williams, Lyman Town, George Shannon, and perhaps one 

or two others, it is said, held the position. Colonel Shannon is now living in 
Napoli. 

In the year 1830 Cattaraugus county was included in the new or re-organ- 
ized militia district comprising the 54th Brigade, 26th Division, which also 
took in China, Java, and Wethersfield in Wyoming county and Collins and 
Concord in Erie county. The brigade was composed of seven regiments, 
whose annual rendezvous were as follows: (i)The 198th at Gowanda, Col. 
Jehicl Hill; (2) at Rutledge; (3) at Ellicottville, Col. Daniel I. Huntley; 
(4) at Olean or Hinsdale, Colonel Layton (?) ; (5) at PVanklinvillc; (6) at 
Yorkshire, Colonel Pingrey {}); and (7) at Springvillc, Colonel Cook. James 
McGLishan was brigadier-geneial ; his brother Peter was inspector and the 
only paid officer in the organization. Peter McGlashan received §5 per day 
and his salary aggregated about $75 annually. Col. Jehiel Hill, of Zoar, 
upon General McGlashan's promotion to the position of major-general in 
1838, was made brigadier-general, and in 1840 became major-general, being 
succeeded as brigadier-general by Col. Daniel L Huntley. General Hill's 
staff consisted of Byron Cochran, of SpringviUe, and Thomas J. Parker, of 
Gowanda, aids; Dr. Levi Goldsborough, surgeon; and John P. Darling, of 
New Albion, and Enos Austin, of Otto. Thomas J. Parker enlisted Septem- 
ber 12, 1833, in a uniformed company of riflemen, under Howel W. Parker, 
captain, attached to the 198th Regiment. Colonel Hill's successors in 
command of the 198th were Col. Sylvenus Cook, Col. Joseph H. Plumb, 
Col. George S. Hickox, and Col Titus Roberts. Among the independent 
uniformed companies attached to this regiment were the East Otto Rifles, 
Captains Charles F. Mallory, William Bonesteel, Hammond, Eli D. Cox, and 
Hugh Orr; the Otto Riflemen; and the Collins Rifle Company. Capt. Jasper 
Waterman also had a company of artillery and Capt. Amasa L. Chaffee a 
company of riflemen. 

It would seem that a general re-organization of militia districts was made 
about 1830, particularly in Cattaraugus county. Apparently there were six, viz,; 
25 



194 History of Cattaraugus Couxtv. 

Rutledge District. — All the towns south of the north boundary lines of 
Leon and New Albion, as previously mentioned. 

Goivaiida or Zoar District. — Perrysburg, Dayton, Persia, Otto, and East 
Otto, and Collins and Concord in Erie county. 

Olean District. — Ischua, Hinsdale, Portville, Olean, and Allegany. 

Ellicottvil/c District. — Ellicottville, Great Valley, Humphrey, Carrolton, 
Red House, Salamanca, Little Valley, and Mansfield. 

Franklinville District. — Franklinville, Lyndon, Farmersville, and Machias. 
Yorkshire District. — Ashford, Yorkshire, and Freedom. 

Springville District. — Attached to the 54th Brigade. Some of the towns in 
Wyoming county. 

Prior to this re-organization the eastern half of the county was embraced 
within the 226th Regimental District of New York State Militia, the general 
trainings being held at Franklinville as early as 1822, with Joseph McClure 
colonel. Emory Wood was lieutenant-colonel and Solomon Curtis, major. 
Wood succeeded Colonel McClure about 1825. The opposition element mani- 
fested itself strongly and arrogantly. Julius C. Underwood placed himself at 
the head of what was facetiously dubbed a "barefoot" company of " opposi- 
tionists " and industriously ridiculed and mocked the mi'.itia and defied the 
courts-martial. 

In the new Olean district general musters were held first at Hinsdale and 
then at Olean, and at first were in command of Col. PVedcrick L. Martin, whose 
successor was Colonel Gross. It was under the latter that the last review in the 
district took place, in 1846, in Olean. The spectators became so bold in mock- 
ing and deriding the militia, especially the ununiformed companies, and in 
guying Colonel Gross, who had made himself somewhat unpopular, that a 
clash occurred and the review broke up into a small sized mob. 

Among the uniformed companies attached to the regiment in the Olean 
district were the Hinsdale Rifles of about 100 men, organized in 1833, under 
Capt. Neri Wilson, whose successors were Captains Daniel Hickox and Abra- 
ham Miller, the latter holding the position from 1837 to 1845, when it dis- 
banded; the Five Mile Rifles from the town of Allegany, organized in 1834 
or 1835, under Captain Clark and commanded subsequently by Captain Ken- 
yon; and an artillery company organized and commanded by Captain Gross, 
but disbanded upon his promotion to colonel. William G. Todd, of Hinsdale, 
was also a local militia captain. George P. Bascom, of Allegany, was at one 
time lieutenant-colonel. 

Of the Ellicottville and Yorkshire districts nothing definite can be given. 
In the former Daniel I. Huntley was an early and a prominent officer, and 
finally became brigadier-general. 

The Franklinville district is almost equally destitute of reliable data. 
Marvin Older, a local captain, still living, states that the last general muster 
was held there about 1837. Solomon Curtis, Jr., was colonel and Pardon T- 



Decline of the Old Militl\. 195 

Jewell was lieutenant-colonel. As near as can be ascertained the district had 
two independent companies commanded respectively by Captains Jerome B. 
Jewell and Marvin Older. 

Perhaps some further light may be thrown upon the early militia organi- 
zations in Cattaraugus counties by the appended list of officers who, accord- 
ing to law, subscribed to the constitutional oath at the county clerk's office 
between 1840 and 1845. At any rate it shows the existence (probably in the 
EUicottville district) of a regiment designated the 238th, officered during that 
period as follows : 

The -iSSth Reaimcnt Tnfanlni. -Colonels: W. W. Lieutenants : Dwiybt CoreU, August 4, 18-10; Les- 

Willnughby, 5[!iy26, 1S43; Geo. W. Moore, June 24. '44. ter Granser, September iH. 1S4*); H. Hale Crary, April 

IJcuriMiant-colonels: Alonzo A. Greg-ory. August IT, 1841; T. Mattocks, August -'15.1841 ; W. E. Fellows, 

2(1. 1.S41; George W. Moore, May 24, 1843; William August 26, 1841; Chauneey Butterfii-ld, August 24, 

Cniss, .July 3, 1844. 1842; Draper Jackson, August 24, 1S42; W. H. Niles, 

Captains: Nathan f'rosbv. May 26, 1840; George Julv 25,'1845. 

W. .\loorc, .luly 28, 184(); U. K. Willoughbv, AprilSi), Ensigns: Seth Wheeler, Mav 26, 1840; Edward 

1841; Edwiu u. Locke, August 26, 1841; William Low, July 28, 1840; Dexter G. Williams (artillery). 

Cross, August 26, 1841; .lame's L. Smith. August 24, June 12, 1841; HomerChase, August24, 1842; Stephen 

1842; Archibald S. Clarke, August 26, 184:!; Luke B. Smith, .\ugust 24, 1842: Archibald C. Crary, October 

Lattin. September 11, 1844. 18, 1843. 

From the same source is obtained the following names of the 54th Brigade 
officers with their respecti\-e dates of muster: •Brigadier-general, Daniel I. 
Huntley, July 16, 1840; aid-de-camp, Addison G. Rice, September 27, 1843. 
Brigade in.spector, Solomon Cummings, August 24, 1844. Adjutants, Nelson 
P. Willson, August 27, 1841, and P. R. Skinner, June 27. 1844. Paymaster, N. 
Searle, July 13, 1844. Major, M. L. Brewster, June 24, 1844. Quartermaster, 
J. H. Mudgett, August 24, 1842. 

According to the report of Adjutant-General Le\i Hubbell in 1835 there 
were in the State 39 divisions, 80 brigades, 361 regiments, 2,687 companies, 
and a total of 192,083 persons enrolled for military duty. Of these, Cattarau- 
gus county had a total rank and file of 2,423; in 1845 the census gives 2,650. 

Like many another compulsory duty to which man is forced by law to bow 
the annual muster finally became an onerous burden. The peaceful condition 
of the country diverted men's minds into channels of industry, and these 
mimic preparations for national defease appeared unnecessary if not ridicu- 
lous. The "spirit of '76" had bowed in obedience to peace and prosperity. 
The almost utter uselessness of these crude military organizations on a real 
battlefield caused considerable discussion. From bodies of proud soldiers 
they deteriorated to scarcely more than crowds of ungovernable humanity. 
Their fall into disrepute was gradual; their decline and ultimate demise was 
rapid and final. From the close of the Revolutionary war to 1830 or '35 the 
old militia system fulfiUeci its purpose with comparative dignity and generally 
commanded universal respect. With the beginning of that decade appeared 
the first signs of a feeling of popular revolt, which steadily intensified until it 
developed into open defiance. Between 1837 and 1846 the various regimental 
districts and organizations were not disbanded, but one by one abandoned. 
The latter year saw the last general training in this county under the old 
compulsory law. 



196 • History of Cattaraugus County. 



Various acts were promulgated from time to time, but in vain. In 1846 
the laws empowering civil officers to arrest and imprison military delinquents 
were repealed. In 1S49 ^^^ former acts were annulled and a new one enacted 
authorizing a commutation of seventy-five cents in lieu of active service, and 
some of the commissioned officers were entitled to pay out of the fund thus 
created. Notwithstanding the several concessions and the numerous induce- 
ments thus granted by the Legislature the old State militia in Cattaraugus 
county could not be re\'i\'ed. Its maneuvres and evolutions', its days of 
festivity and drill, its popularity, decline, and fall — all are storied in remem- 
brance and tradition. 

In closing a histor\- of the old militia it is pertinent to add a brief sketch 
of that bloodless victory — the Dutch Hill war: the first and last agrarian 
collision occurring within the limits of Cattaraugus county. To intelligently 
recount the incidents of the memorable Sabbath of January 26, 1845, ^"d of 
the few days just before and after, it is necessary to revert briefly to a previous 
chapter, for on that hang th^ links in the chain of connecting events. 

The extreme liberal treatment accorded the early settlers by the Holland 
Land Company produced improvidence and carelessness in those who, under 
more exacting creditors, would have been compelled to become thrifty and 
independent. The Dexereux Land Company, successor to the Holland 
Compan\', was almost equally as lenient and thus unwittingly fanned the 
embers of agrarianism. which flamed into manifest disaffection in a few of the 
eastern towns of the county in the period immediately preceding and includ- 
ing the year 1844. Hinsdale seemed to be foremost in the open manifestation 
of this unreasoning agrarian spirit, and the historic eminence between that 
town and Ischua, known as Dutch hill, shortly became the theater of a 
disturbance which took its name from the locality. 

Jacob and George Learn, brothers, settled on Dutch hill in 1823, upon a 
tract of over three hundred acres of land, which they had bought of the Hol- 
land Land Company for $2 per acre, and for which they took a single contract. 
They paid a nominal sum down and obtained credit for the balance for ten 
years, but in this agreement they defaulted, and July 29, 1837, secured from 
the Devereux Land Company (the new owners) two new contracts, running 
six years, for which the\- paid $50 each. A few years later the lands of the 
Devereu.x Company were divided among the several proprietors, and the 
contract of Jacob Learn fell to Gould Hoyt and that of George Learn to 
Russell H. Xevins. Shortly after the expiration of the contracts the brothers 
were called upon by the agents of Hoyt and Nevins and asked for a settle- 
ment, or at least partial payments on their lands, but were "met by pretended 
doubts of the company's title, refusal to pay, and open defiance." In the 
hope that the Learns would reconsider their decision and fulfill their agree- 
inents the proprietors refrained from further action until March, 1844, when 
the}' reluctantly commenced suits of ejectment. 



The Dutch Hill War. 



197 



The writs were placed in the hands of Sheriff George W. White for exe- 
cution and on June 12th he proceeded to Dutch hill to serve them. He was 
directed, however, to give the Learns the privilege' of coming to the land office 
and enter into new contracts, but this alternative he found unavailing and 
immediatel}- begun the fulfillment of his duty. The Cattaraugus Republican 
of that time says: "The sheriff, who had only six or seven unarmed persons 
as assistants in removing the furniture from the house, was surrounded by a 
mob, numbering from 100 to 150 men, many of them armed and disguised as 
Indians. The rioters commanded the sheriff to leave the premises, but he 
resolutely perse\ered in the performance of his duty until his person was vio- 
lenth" assaulted and seriously injured. Poinding the contest hopeless against 
such overpowering force he was compelled to lea\-e the premises in the pos- 
session of the mob." 

This collision caused great excitement, particularly in the eastern part of 
the county, and a few days afterward a public meeting of the malcontents was 
held in Hinsdale, at which the landowners were bitterly denounced, their titles 
discredited, and resistance to their claims recommended. This was followed 
by similar gatherings and proceedings in adjoining towns. "Associations 
were formed for the avowed purpose of resisting the execution of the laws," 
particularly " in certain cases." Threats were made that in case the officers 
should arrest and imprison any one caught taking timber from the company's 
lands the jail and land offices would be destroyed. The feeling prevailed, 
though seemingly without just cause, that the Holland Land Company and 
its successors could give no valid title to the lands in that section and was 
therefore simply robbing the settlers of their hard earnings. Events were 
rapidly developing, however, which brought the insurgents to their senses. 

Soon after the collision between the sheriff and the mob at Dutch hill 
eleven of the rioters were indicted and bench-warrants issued for their arrest, 
but their execution was postponed, which ultimately created a suspicion of 
timidity on the part of the authorities and a feeling of boldness and defiance 
on the part of the malcontents. On January 20, 1845, Sheriff White and First 
Judge Benjamin Chamberlain went to Hinsdale and endeavored to persuade 
the indicted persons to submit quietly to arrest, but they refused, and the 
sheriff commanded Uiem to follow him to the village, where the judge was 
prepared to accept bail. This they also refused to do, and the officers finally 
returned to Ellicottville. The following Friday night, January 24th, William 
Gallagher, Henry Sikjth, and Alexander Chambers were deputed to make the 
desired arrests, and their work can best be told in a quotation from a news- 
paper printed at the time: 

"The next morning they found the rebels ready on Dutch hill to receive 
them, but in separate squads, as guards to the several indicted persons. They 
attacked one squad of eight men, and had a parley, struggle, and fight of 
about half an hour, when, finding themselves likely to be overpowered, they 



History of Cattaraugus County. 



drew their pistols, scattered the enemy, and secured their prisoners. The 
'Indian' alarm signal was soon given, and the arresting party had not 
proceeded far before they found their road filled with men to oppose their 
progress and rescue the prisoners; but the speed of their horses and the 
determination of the party, seconded by their display of arms, broke the 
ranks of the enemy." 

The party returned to EUicottville about one o'clock Sunday morning 
with Thomas McWilliams in custody. Meanwhile Sheriff White had been 
active in preparing for the security of the prisoners and the safety of the 
village (the county seat). He promptly ordered out the militia from all parts 
of the county and even called on Colonel Cook, of Springville, Erie county, 
who responded with a body of over fifty armed men. On Saturday and Sun- 
day a formidable force collected in EUicottville, "armed and panoplied with 
the majesty of the law, standing guard to the temple of justice and in its very 
shadow, and the ermine itself, in the person of Judge Benjamin Chamberlain, 
was present in the midst of the embattled host." The Republican a few days 
later said: "Sentinels were stationed on the various roads leading to the 
village, three pieces of cannon were ranged in front of the court house, and 
every necessary preparation for the warm reception of the threatening invaders 
was duly attended to by the sheriff." 

By Sunday evening the forces at EUicottville numbered about eleven 
hundred men. The situation presented all the appearances of a coming 
battle. Gen. Daniel I. Huntley was in charge as the commanding officer. 
Rumors of all kinds were freely circulated, one being that the Allegany 
Indians had joined the Dutch hill people as allies. All day Sunday, cold and 
bleak, the expected attack was eagerly watched for, but not even a scout nor 
a skirmisher made his appearance. Visitors were plentiful. " Many of the 
insurgents and their sympathizers visited the village for the purpose of obser- 
vation, to a\'ail themselves of the first opportunity to make demonstrations of 
hostility." Fortunately a large number of smoked mutton-hams had been 
stored in EUicottville awaiting shipment, and these were appropriated for 
the use of the soldiers. Without them there would have been a famine. 

On Sunday evening it was decided to take the aggressive, and an expe- 
ditionary corps of some three hundred men was detailed for active service. 
These were loaded into about fifty sleighs and at lo P. M. began the 
transportation to their destination, twenty miles away, where they arrived 
about daylight on Monday morning. Chambers, Gallagher, and Smith led 
the column; the sheriff accompanied the main body, behind which came the 
reserves. Chambers's party, anxious for distinction, pushed ahead, and 
" arrested three of the men, but while securing his prisoners, one of whom 
made a hard fight, the sheriff came up with his guard, one of whom fired a 
gun by accident or design. This alarmed the country, and the rest of the 
• men sought for ran away and could not be found." 



The Dutch Hill War. 



199 



Notwithstanding the differing accounts given of the occurrences at Dutch 
hill it is certain the troops encountered no armed resistance. The premises 
of the Learns were quietly surrendered to the land agents, who generously 
permitted the occupants to remain; both Jacob and George Learn signed an 
agreement to take new contracts from the proprietors within ten days. The 
return movement was then begun, and after a weary march the victorious 
corps re-entered Ellicottville. But a new calamity was in store for them. 
They were tired, cold, and hungry. First of all they wanted something to 
eat, but to their dismay and disgust it was learned that the last mutton-ham 
had been devoured by the garrison left in charge of the village. A few hours 
later the forces were relieved and quietly dispersed to their several homes. 
On Tuesday all the remaining indicted men surrendered themselves and gave 
bail for their appearance at the June term of court. Thus ended the Dutch 
Hill war, one of the most memorable incidents that ever occurred in Cattar- 
augus county. 

The excitement caused by these events had scarcely subsided when bitter 
recriminations were heard from the fallen forces of the foe. Dutch hill sym- 
pathizers accused the authorities of upholding the land agents and compell- 
ing tenants to sign contracts at the point of the ba}-onct. They criticised the 
necessity of calling out the militia, mainly because of the paltry expense (some 
S700) it incurred. An effort was made to have the Legislature authorize the 



NOTK.— Like other events of some renown tlie story of tlie Dutch Hill win- was ciuicUly imnioit:il- 
i/cil in poetic verse. The following clever narrative was written by the Hon. Geor^'e A. S. Crocker, iil 
Couewungo, and published in the VaUaraiuju^ II }iitj of Juniiaiy 1, \SW : 



I.o ; in the morn, departed year. 
The signs of woe and war appear. 
Fair freedom's Hag to shield us uU 
Hangs floating from the court-house wall, 
And ioud on cchoini; breezes borne 
Comes clarion shrill of bugle horn. 
Tall soldiei-s arm'd with cannon come. 
And musket, fife, and kettle-drum. 
Dan Huntley's bled and brave brigade. 
On village green, in arms parade. 
Brave Cook leads on the Springviile choir. 
With steady step and eye of tire; 
Ueady to wield a battering ram. 
Or to devour a mutton-ham; 
He seeks fur glory's brightest wreath, 
Or honor's bed— a soldier's death. 
And yonder comes a noble wight- 
New Albion's gallant Colonel Wright. 
His visage, pale, no dangers swerve. 
His sword is grasped with iron nerve; 
His plumes pend gaily to the breeze; 
He calmly looks on scenes like these. 
Undaunted he; his veteran skill 
Has faced the fires of Bunker Hill ' • 
The Persian troops young Hlckox leads; 
His bosom friend by martial deeds. 
The soldier's glorious wreath he '11 win 
If war and carnage once begin. 

But why, ah ! why, this fierce array'/ 
Why float aloft war's pennons gay? 
The sheriff has a writ to serve 
On one George Learn— a man of nerve- 
Besides, the Indians on Dutch hill 
'T is said each nook and corner fill ; 
And armed with war club and with knife. 
They threaten each white man's life; 
To steep our streets with humau blood. 



And burn the house of man and Clod. 
O wonder not that threats like these 
JIade White's warm blood to icebergs freeze. 

Ben Chamberlain, the daring soul. 

Before whose vision sijectres roll 

Of .slaughtered hosts and burning fiamc. 

To White's relief that insrant came. 

His " honest face," so deeply red. 

Had lost its crimson hue 't is said; 

Others maintain 't was but the light 

Kctiected from the face of " White." 

Ben's order called these braves 

To save the town and find their gra\ ''S. 

Alas 1 why was it ever said 

The soldier's grave was honor's bed ! 

To me, this seems a butcher's trade— 

Their brightest glory but a shade. 

Rest, soldier, rest 1 tomorrow's morn 
The fife and drum and bugle horn. 
At early dawn, alarm shiill sound. 
To call thee on to glory's ground. 
The mutton-ham and bread are shared; 
The soldiers' bed on floors prepared; 
The guards are set at daylight's close; 
The wearied troops in sleep repose. 
But daring Ben, his bosom fired 
With love of glory, last retired. 
'T is strange we ne'er before could find 
The glories of his mighty mind; 
But they burst at once to light; 
And here we found thy genius. White. 

How strange that slander seeks its food 
By railing at t he great and good I 
And that the mean, ignoble, vile. 
Escape its lashes all the while 1 



History of Cattaraugus County. 



payment out of the State treasury, but this could not be done. Instead an 
act was passed empowering the comptroller to loan the necessary sum on the 
credit of the county. Had there been bloodshed not a dissenting voice would 
have been raised against Sheriff White and other officers. In some respects 
the "war" appeared ludicrous and ever since its occurrence it has received 
unrelenting ridicule. Those now living who participated in its unopposed 
victory express the belief that the magnitude of the power invoked was greatly 
disproportionate to the danger which threatened. In the Cattaraugus Rcpub- 
lican of April 28, 1845, "^^"^^ published an editorial on the subject which doubt- 
less accurately reflects the better element of public opinion of that period. 
Part of it reads as follows: 

" Sheriff White from the first outbreak acted with judgment and discretion. 
True, he was unwilling to push headlong into a strife with men who were 
determined to resist the law without proper time for reflection on their part 
and sufficient means in his hands to enable him to carry out what he under- 
took. It is well known, in this community at least, that the course he pursued 
after the disturbance of last June was at the instance and advice of the cir- 
cuit judge: all of our leading men, and even the land agents themselves, fell 
in with the proposition that the matter should be delayed in order that the 
misguided should ha\'e time for reflection and with the hope that the excite- 
ment would subside. The ordering out of a strong force was sanctioned and 



'T is said, by some, tliat ni^ht iu sleep 
The judjje w;is walied from slumher deep; 
A stnintre click, click, struck his eai-; 
Api'iilled, lie deemed an Indiaii near. 
He listened, thoufjlit the devil in 't— 
The Indian seemed to peck his Hint. 
He sei ed the tongs, and struck -tlie shock 
To atoms broke— a wooden clock 1 
lint his great soul herself once more. 
Ho soon snored calmly as before. 

Kest, soldiers, rest! on villag-c square 
The deep-mouthed cannon planted there. 
In rows along, each sulphury mouth 
Is planted from the court-house, south. 
See near a gun bold Travis stand; 
He holds a lighted match iu hand. 
Now towards the captain of the gun 
Judge rhamberlaiii walks boldly on; 
(Though here and there a rascal sees 
A sortof trembling in his knees:' 
The judge to Travis gives coaiiiiand: 
'■ Captain, the Dutch Hill Indian baud. 
With Scalping knives, will soon be here; 
We tight for all to freemen dear. 
From yonder south the rogues must come; 
Let uot your caunou's mouth be dumb. 
If they approach— their errand dire— 
As ■ First Judge ' I command you Fire !" 

'T is morn; the troops in sleighs are stowed, 
To start upon the Dutch hill road. 
Bold White the chief command assumes; 
Xo sword he wore or waving plumes, 
liy which the Indians of Dutch hill 
Could tell who was the chief to kill. 
Aioug, the war-worn troops advance; 
Pass safe the house of Peter Frantz; 
An old log barn next met their view. 
That trembling passed in safety, too. 
And clearing, ne.\t, the ruad's last turn. 
They reach the house of Mister Learn. 
High on the breeze their pennon streamed; 



Their muskets in the sunlight gleamed. 
'J hey formed 'n front a hollow square. 
White safely siands ui center there. 
When, lo 1 Learn's door is open thrown, 
A youthful maiden stands alonel 
Of laughing eye and manner bland. 
She bore a flag of truce in band. 
She waved lier Hag; " her. sire," she said, 
" Was sick and could not leave his bed. 
If the.v would to their homes lepair 
The old man soon would meet them there.' 
She turned her eye on Archy Clark, 
A dashing, gay, and youthful spark. 
And said, "I 'd like, my gallant soul. 
Your bearskin cap for yonder pole." 
The maiden, blushing, bowed, retired. 
But Sheriff White did as desired. 
Like King of France in days of yore. 
Shed not a drop of human gore; 
But he and his two thousand men 
Marched up Dutch hill and down again. 

The war is o'er. Xo more each morn 

Is beard the blast of bugle horn. 

Our dwellings safe from sack and fire. 

The Lord's to boot— what more desire?— 

Kejoice in safety; now our wives 

And babes may pass their tranquil lives. 

To give due praise let us begin. 

Let us avoid that damning sin 

Of all the sins republics know: 

Ingratitude-the worst below. 

Lord bless, with slumbers sweet and light, 

Judge Chamberlain and Sheriff White. 

'T was their wise counsel saved us all 

From sack and Hame and murderer's pall. 

Long in the hollow of the hand 

Preserve them. Lord, to bless the land. 

And when thej- die (e'en great men must, 

By nature's laws, return to dust) 

We '11 sacrifice two fatted rams 

To deck their graves with muttoa-ham^ ! 



The Re-orc;axized Militia. 



approved by all reflecting minds, and, as the result has proved, was not with- 
out its good. Human life has been preserved and the law enforced. '" * * 
All have acted nobly and manfully, and we rejoice in the assurance afforded 
by this demonstration of security under protection of law. We have no 
doubts that process can not now be executed in any portion of the county." 

In outlining a sketch of the re-organized militia it must be remembered that 
for a period of seven years succeeding 1845 ^^nly a few feeble attempts were 
made in Cattaraugus county to revive the worn-out system. About 1852 all 
strictly compulsory militarj-- laws of the State were repealed and a new act 
promulgated, which authorized the enrollment of all able-bodied white male 
citizens between the ages of eighteen and forty-five, with the customary ex- 
emptions. A commutation fee of fifty cents, however, was provided in lieu of 
enlistment, which made the duty practically voluntary. None but uniformed 
companies were mustered, and all arms and equipments were furnished by the 
State. Annual regimental parades or brigade encampments were required, 
at which non-commissioned officers, musicians, and privates received §1.25 
and commissioned officers from Si. 25 to §5. 00 per day. Cavalrymen and 
mounted officers also recei\'ed S'-OO a day for horses, which they furnished. 
The fund deri\'ed from the commutations was applied to these salaries. 

When the subject of forcing the commutation fees came before the Board 
of Supervisors in 1854 that body promptly rejected it. They staunchly re- 
fused to carry out the provisions of the law, which plainly set forth their duties 
and obligations. A suit was finally brought against them in the Supreme 
Court, and on September i, 1855, at Lockport, Justice Bowen handed down a 
decision which con\-ened an extra session of the board and ordered them to 
le\y the collection, which was promptly and satisfactorily done. 

The first and only militia organization in Cattaraugus county prior to the 
Rebellion and under the re-organized system was the 64th Regiment of the 
30th Brigade, 8th Division, Col. Thomas J. Parker. Colonel Parker was com- 
missioned December 16, 1852, and recruited and mustered the regiment at 
Gowanda m August, 1853. The lieutenant-colonel, Daniel G. Bingham, and 
the major, Enos C. Brooks, were commissioned in July preceding. The adju- 
tant-general's report says that the 64th was composed in 1857 as follows: 

Co. A, thirty-eisfht men. infantry, t'apl. Levi W. cruited in Otto, East Otto, and Mansfield. 
Strope, succeeded by Capt. Corydon C. lUjisit, who Co. D, thirty-five men, Capt. William B. Battin, 

wiis commissioned September 12. 1857; lieutenants, commissioned September 22, 1857; lieutenants, John 

Marvin F. Crandall and Henry W. Johnson; re- N. Semen and F. Phillips, 
cruited in Persia. Co. E, thirty -seven men, infantry, Capt. Joseph 

Co. B. thirty-seven men, infantry, Capt. Timothy. L. Savaffe, commissioned April 22, 18.54 (succeeded 

A. C. Everett, commissioned November 21. 18.56; lieu- August 24, 1&58, by Capt. Belknap); lieutenants, John 

tenants, Henry L. Jones and David F. M'ijfgins; re- K. Comstock and Samuel R. Homer, 
iruitedin Kandolph. Co. K, thirty-seven men, artillery, Capt. Samuel 

Co. C. forty-three men, infantrj-, Capt. Julius B. W. Johnson, commissioned February 19, 18.55; lieu- 

, Maltbie, commissioned September 10, 1853; lieuten- tenants, George W. Baillet, Stephen B. Seward, and 

ants, Alanson L. Dudley and Jacob Slingerland; re-- Constant S. Trevitt ; recruited in Eliicottville. 

The 64th Regimental District at its organization comprised Cattaraugus 
county and the towns of China, Java, and Wethersfield in Wyoming county. 
The 63d covered the territory of Allegany county and the towns of Eagle, Pike, 

26 



History of Cattaraugus County. 



and Genesee Falls also in Wyoming county. On August 15, 1857, these two 
districts were consolidated and re-organized, leaving the 64th Regiment com- 
posed of the counties of Cattaraugus and Allegany and attaching the towns 
in Wyoming county to the 6ist. The 30th Brigade was composed solely of 
the 64th Regiment and likewise comprised the counties of Allegany and Cat- 
taraugus. The following Allegany county companies were attached to the 
64th upon the consolidation, and in 1 861 were composed as follows: 

Co. F, flfty-two men, infantry, Capt. James R. Co. H, thirty-eight men, infantry, Capt. Daniel n. 

Weston, commissioned August 2.5, 18.i8 ; lieutenants, Gardiner, commissioned November 1, 1858; lieuten- 

Samuel F. Blood and Samuel S. Stiles. ant, .James S. Green. 

Co. G, thirty-six men, infantry, Capt. Jared H. Co. L, forty si.x men, riflemen, Capt. Luke G. 

Parmelee, commissioned September 4, 1660; lieuten- Harmon, commissioned August 30, 1860; lieutenants, 

ants, Joshua S. Pettinger and Charles G. Andrews. Robert H. Kenwick and John K. McConnell. 

Encampments and parades were held as far as can be ascertained at these 
places: Little Valley, June 4-6, and Gowanda, August 23-25, 1855; Olean, 
June 16-18, and Ellicottville, September 14-17, 1856; Cuba, September 28- 
30, 1857; Gowanda, June 22-24, 1858; and Angelica, August 22-27, '859. 
Other parades were held at Randolph, Otto, and Allegany. Calvin T. Cham- 
berlain was brigadier-general with rank from July 15, 185 1. At the breaking 
out of the Civil war the regiment had a total of four hundred and forty-seven 
officers and men. Many of those whose terms of service had e.xpired 
re-enlisted in the re-organized 64th or volunteered elsewhere. It was not 
until February 18, 1867, that the 64th Militia Regimental organization was 
officially disbanded. 

All through the great Rebellion the fires of patriotism burned brilliantly 
in every town in Cattaraugus county. From the startling gun of Sumter 
to the final surrender of Lee her noble sons went gallantly forward in large 
numbers to fight the Nation's cause. Bearded sire and zealous youth 
marched side by side from our woody hills and fertile valleys to the fierce 
battlefields of the slave-cursed south. Their deeds are deeds of heroism and 
renown, treasured in memory and in history, storied in poetry and in prose, 
and recorded in imperishable characters in the archives of freedom. With 
them went the hearts and hopes of fathers, mothers, sisters, sweethearts, who, 
left behind to guard homes and property, generously contributed both time 
and money in providing comforts for the brave soldiers and sailors at the 
front and in the hospital. 

But still another and a sadder tribute remains to be written of those whose 
memories gently linger as sweet fragrance on the annals of time. I refer to 
the dead — to many true sons of Cattaraugus whose lives e.xpired on their 
country's altar. In the terrific battles of the Rebellion, in the awful prison- 
pens of the south, in the hospitals of the Nation, they suffered and died. They 
unflinchingly faced the cannon and the bayonet and were mowed down in the 
fierce carnage of conflict. Some of their remains were returned to their 
loved ones and rest in peace in the green cemeteries near their homes. Others 
were buried where they fell and slumber in unmarked graves in the soil ■ dyed 



The War of the Rebellion. 



with their Hfe's blood. Over all alike waves the stars and stripes in the 
breezes of a free nation. On Memorial Day of each year their graves are 
strewn with flowers b}' loving, living friends, who are touchingly reminded of 
their heroic valor in patriotic speeches and martial music. All glor}- to the 
dead! All honor to the survivors! May generous tribute ever be accorded 
the country's heroes. 

Altogether, Cattaraugus county contributed not far from 3,500 men to the 
Union armies, who served in no less than one hundred and eighty different 
organizations. This may seem incredible, but it is a fact nevertheless. Be- 
sides these, nearly one hundred men were in the navy, several of whom were 
on board the Kearsargc, which sunk the privateer Alabama, and all of whom 
served with credit to themselves and to the county. 

The 37TH N. Y. Vol. Inf. — The 37th Regiment was organized in New 
York city in May, 1861, to ser\e for two years; colonel, John H. McCunn, 
resigned September 25, 1861, and succeeded on September 28th b\- Samuel 
B. Hayman, who was mustered out with the regiment June 22, 1863. It con- 
tained two Cattaraugus companies, viz.: Co. H, "Chamberlain Guards," Capt. 
Luke G. Harmon, and Co. I, "Cattaraugus Guards," Capt. William T. Clarke. 
Both of these companies were largely composed of former members of the 
64th N. Y. Militia, and were recruited simultaneously at Ellicottville and Al- 
legany. They left for Elmira May 20th and on the 25th were transported to 
New York city, where they were mustered into the United States service with 
the 37th Regiment for two years on June 7, 1861. On the 23d the regiment 
was moved to Washington, where it went into camp. Soon afterward the two 
Cattaraugus county companies were detailed for special service, and April 15, 
1862, rejoined their regiment. The 37th participated in the engagements of 
Bull Run, Bailey's Cross Roads, Peninsula Campaign, Williamsburg, Seven 
Pines (or F"air Oaks), Charles City Cross Roads, Seven Days' Fight, White 
Oak Swamp, Malvern Hill, Second Bull Run, Chantilly, Fredericksburg, Chan- 
cellorsville, and second P'redericksburg. It was mustered out at New York 
city by reason of expiration of term of service June 22, 1863. Veterans re- 
enlisted in the 40th N. Y. Inf. The two Cattaraugus count}- companies 
returned home. The 37th lost in killed and died from wounds and disease a 
total of 1 12 men. 

The 64TH N. Y. Vol. Inf. — This regiment was organized as the 64th New 
York State Militia in 1853 and re-organized as a volunteer command at Elmira 
in the autumn of 1861. At the breaking out of the Rebellion it was composed 
as follows: Colonel, Thomas J. Parker, Gowanda ; lieutenant-colonel, Daniel G. 
Bingham, Ellicottville ; major, Enos C. Brooks, Olean ; Co. A, twenty-eight 
men, Capt. Coiydon C. Rugg; Co. B, forty men, Capt. T. A. C. Everett; Co. 
C, forty-two men, Capt. Julius B. Maltbie; Co. D, forty-four men, Capt. Will- 
iam B. Battin ; Co. E, forty men, Capt. John S. Belknap; Co. F, fifty-two 
men, Capt. James R. Weston; Co. G, thirty-six men, Capt. Jared A. Parmelee; 



204 History of Cattaraugus Countv. 



Co. H, thirty-eight men, Capt. Daniel D. Gardiner; Co. K, fifty men (artillery), 
Capt. Samuel \V. Johnson; Co. L, forty-six men (rifles), Capt. Luke G. Har- 
mon; band staff, etc., twenty-eight men; total of regiment, 447 men. 

Companies F, G, H, and L were Allegany county commands. In the re- 
organized 64th Regiment Cattaraugus county was represented by six compa- 
nies, viz.: Co. A, Capt. Rufus W'ashburne, eighty-two officers and men; Co. B, 
Capt. Timothy A. C. Everett, eighty-three; Co. C, Capt. Julius B. Maltbie, 
eighty-four; Co. F, Capt. William B. Battin, eighty-three; Co. I, Capt. Robert 
H. Renwick, eighty-two ; and Co. K, Capt. William Fancher, eighty-three. The 
other companies were Co. D. Capt. Phipps Lake, and Co. G, Capt. Joshua 
S. Pettinger, eighty-three men each, from Allegany county; Co. H, Capt. Sam- 
uel Barstow, seventy-five men. from Tioga county ; and Co. E, Capt. William 
Glenny, eighty-four men, from Tompkins county. The regiment contained a 
total of 848 men. It was mustered into service from September 7 to Decem- 
ber 10, 1861, for three years, with the same field officers as previously given, 
and arrived in Washington on December 1 1, 1861, going into camp near the cap- 
itol. It was one of the fighting regiments of the war. " It commenced active 
service in Virginia, January 2, 1862, performing picket duty, with an occasional 
reconnaissance, until April 5th. when it sailed for the Peninsula with General 
McClellan's army. It served there in Richardson's Division — afterwards Han- 
cock's — remaining in that di\"ision ( 1st Division A. C.) until the end of the war. 
The 64th, under Colonel Bingham, distinguished itself at Chancellorsville, 
where, in company with four other regiments, it held successfully an advanced 
skirmish line against the persistent attack of a large force of the enemy." * 
The colonels in command of the 64th, with the date of rank, were Thomas J. 
Parker, November 13, 1861 ; Daniel G. Bingham, July 12, 1862; Leman W. 
Bradley, July 4, 1864; William Glenny, October 4, 1864. 

The regiment participated in the following engagements, the figures after 
each indicating the numberd 1 killed and (2) wounded and missing: Fair Oaks, 
30, 143; Seven Days' Fight, 2. 36; Antietam, 8,42; Fredericksburg, 4,68; 
Chancellorsville, 15, 29; Gettysburg. 15, 83; Auburn, Va., 5, 12; Bristoe Sta- 
tion, \^a., I, 24; Mine Run, 1. 2: Wilderness, o, 8; Po River, 2, 14; Spotsyl- 
vania, 10,49; North Anna, O. 2: Tolopotomoy,o, 2 ; Cold Harbor, 2, 10; siege 
of Petersburg, 7, 28 ; Weldon Railroad, o, 30; Deep Bottom, 1,3; Ream's Sta- 
tion, o, 12; Hatcher's Run, 4, 13; White Oak Road, 3, 14; Sutherland Sta- 
tion, 2, 5 : Farmville, 5,11. The 64th was present also at Yorktown, Gaines's 
Mill, Snicker's Cap, Savage Station, Peach Orchard, White Oak Swamp, Glen- 
dale, Malvern Hill, Second Bull Run, Strawberry Plains, Sailor's Creek, and 
Appomatto.v. The total loss in killed, wounded, captured, and missing aggre- 
gated 757 men, of whom 18 officers anc^,274 volunteers died on the field of 
battle, of disease and accidents, or in Confederate prisons. The original mem- 
bers were mustered out at the expiration of their term of service, and veterans 

* WilliiiiQ A. Fo.x's " llegimeotiil Losses in tin." .Vmcfioiiii Civil War," 18S8. 



The War of the Rehhlliox. 205 



and recruits continued the regimental organization until the close of the war, 
being themselves mustered out July 14, 1865. 

The 154TH X. V. \'o\.. Ixf. — This was almost distinctively a Cattaraugus 
county organization. It was recruited in 1862 and mustered into the United 
States service at Jamestown, for three years, September 24-26, 1862, with the 
following field, staff, and company officers: Colonel, Patrick H. Jones; lieu- 
tenant-colonel, Henry C. Loomis; major, Samuel G. Love; surgeon, Henry 
Van Aernam ; chaplain, Henry D. l.owring; adjutant, Samuel C. Noyes, Jr.; 
quartermaster, Edward Porter; Co. A, Capt. B. Leonard Saxton ; Co. B, 
Capt. Daniel B.Allen; Co. C, Capt. Lewis D. Warner; Co. D, Capt. Harrison 
Cheney; Co. E, Capt. Joseph B. Fay; Co. F, Capt. Thomas Donnelly; Co. G, 
Capt. M. B. Cheney; Co. H, Capt. John F. Nelson; Co. I, Capt. Edward S. 
Mills; Co. K, Capt. Henry Hugaboom. Co. E was recruited. wholly in Chau- 
tauqua county, as was also a portion of Co. F. The remainder were composed 
entirely of Cattaraugus county men. 

Col. Addison G. Rice had command, however, during its organization and 
until the regiment reached the front, when Col. Patrick H. Jones relieved him. 
Colonel Jones had been major in the 37th a'nd received his commission Octo- 
ber 8, 1862. The 154th left Jamestown on S_'ptembjr 2S, 1862, received their 
arms and equipments at Elmira, and reached Washington on the 1st of 
C~)ctober. The regiment was immediateh- assigned to the P'irst Brigade, 
Second Division. Eleventh Army Corps, under General Sigel, and participated 
in the following battles and skirmishes: Haymarket, Chancellorsville, Gettvs- 
burg, Wauhatchie, Lookout Valley, Missionary Ridge, Buzzard's Roost, 
Rocky Face Ridge or Resaca, New Hope Church, Pine Knob, Peach Tree 
Creek, capture of Atlanta, and Sherman's march to the sea. The 154th Reg- 
iment was mustered out of service June 11, 1S65, at Bladensburg, and 
reached home the latter part of the month. The greatest loss the 154th 
sustained in a single battle was at -Rocky I-"ace Ridge, May 8, 1864, when 
fourteen were killed and forty-two wounded. The total number of deaths on 
the battlefield, in prison, and of disease was 278, of which ninety occurred in 
Confederate prisons. 

The 44Tit X. Y. Vol. Ixf. c'The People's Ellsworth Reih- 
>[EXT"). — This command was organized at Albany and mustered into the 
service of the United States on September 24, 1861, for three years or during 
the war. It was named in honor of Col. Elmer E. Ellsworth, one of the first 
heroes to fall in the war of the Rebellion. It was composed of volunteers 
from nearly every town and ward in the State, and contained a superior class of 
young men, all being under thirty years of age. The regiment left Albany on 
October 21st by boat, and from New York proceeded by rail, reaching Wash- 
ington on the 22th. The principal engagements in which it participated were 
Yorktown, Hanover Court House, Gaines's Mill, White Oak Swamp, Malvern 
Hill, Second Bull Run, Antietam, Shepherdstown Ford, Fredericksburg, Chan- 



2o6 History of Cattaraugus County. 



cellorsville, Aldie, Gettysburg, Jones's Cross Roads, Rappahannock Station, 
Mine Run, Wilderness, Laurel Hill, Spotsylvania, North Anna, Bethesda 
Church, Cold Harbor, Weldon Railroad, and Petersburg. Its colonels were 
Stephen W. Stryker, September 24, 1861, resigned July 4, 1862; James C. 
Rice, July 4, 1862, promoted brigadier-general August 17, 1863; Freeman 
Conner, August 27, 1863 (not mustered as colonel). The 44th was mustered 
out of service October 11, 1864. The veterans and recruits were transferred 
to the 140th and 146th N. Y. Vols. The regiment went into, service with 
(rank and file) 1,061 men. It received 304 recruits, had 182 killed, lost loi 
by disease, lost 603 by wounds, and had 141 promoted from its ranks. 

The 85TH N. Y. Vol. Inf. — The 85th Regiment, like the 37th, 
contained two Cattaraugus companies, the others being from Allegany and 
Ontario counties. It was organized at Elmira and mustered into the service 
December 3-13, 1861, with Col. Uriah Davis, Lieut.-Col. Jonathan S. Belknap, 
and Maj. J. A. Williams. It participated in the battles of Fair Oaks, Savage 
Station, Franklin (Va.), Kingston, Whitehall, and Goldsboro. Its total loss 
aggregated three hundred and sixty-one men, of whom thirty-five were killed 
and died of wounds and two hundred and twenty-two met death in Confed- 
erate prisons, the regiment having been captured at Plymouth, N. C, April 
20, 1864. The original members, not veterans, were mustered out at the 
expiration of their three years' term of service, and the veterans and recruits 
themselves mustered out July 27, 1865. 

The 105TH N. Y. Vol. Inf. — The 105th Regiment contained parts of 
two companies (C and D) from Cattaraugus county, and was mustered into 
the service of the United States for three years in March, 1862, at Le Roy, 
Lyons, and Rochester. It was mustered out at the close of the war. 

THE9TH N. Y. Cavalry. — This regiment was organized at Albany and 
mustered into the service of the United States from September 9 to Novem- 
ber 19, 1861, for three years, under field officers: Colonel, John Beardsley; 
lieutenant-colonel, William B. Hyde; and majors, William Sackett, Charles 
McL. Kno.x, and George S. Nichols. It contained two companies from 
Cattaraugus county — under Capt. Benjamin F. Chamberlain and Capt. Emery 
A. Anderson (afterward major). The regiment left for Washington on No- 
vember 26th and is credited with participating in the following engagements : 
Cedar Mountain, Brandy Station (where it lost four killed and twenty-five 
wounded and missing), Aldie, Upperville, Gainesville, Second Bull Run, 
Chantilly, Antietam, Gettysburg, Kelly's Ford, Rappahannock Station, Sul- 
phur Springs, Opequon, Trevilian Station (where four were killed and forty-six 
wounded and missing), the Wilderness, Cold Harbor, Mechanicsville, Deep 
Bottom, Winchester, Fisher's Hill, Germantqwn, Haymarket, Berryville, 
Middleburg, Spotted Tavern, Goose Creek, Boonesboro, Funkstown, Falling 
Waters, Stevensburg, Culpepper, Bealton, Cedar Creek, Petersburg, and Rich- 
mond. The total deaths numbered two hundred and twenty-three, of whom 



The War of the Rebellion. 207 

ninety were killed and died of wounds. On the expiration of their term of 
service the original members, not veterans, were mustered out. The 4th 
N. Y. Cavalry was transferred to the 9th as Companies B, E, and L, and the 
whole, veterans and recruits, mustered out of service Jul_\- 17, 1865. 

The 5TH N. Y. Cavalry ("Fn<ST Ira Harris Guard"). — This organ 
ization was mustered into the United States service for three years in New 
York city from August 15 to October 31, 1861. It contained two Cattarau- 
gus companies, the others being recruited from New York, Kings, Allegany, 
Wyoming, Tioga, Essex, and Greene counties. It was in the engagements of 
Big Bethel, Yorktown, Hanover Court House, Mechanicsville, Gaines's Mill, 
Peach Orchard, Savage Station, \\4iite Oak Swamp, Glendale, Malvern Hill, 
Gainesville, Second Bull Run, Antietam, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, and 
the Wilderness. The total death losses of the regiment numbered three hun- 
dred and twenty-six, of whom ninety-nine died in southern prisons. 

The 1 5111 N. Y. Canalrv. — This regiment was organized for three years, 
at Syracuse, and was composed of companies raised in the counties of Cattar- 
augus, Chautauqua, Erie, Genesee, Oneida, Onondaga, Ontario, Orange, and 
Tompkins. It was mustered into service August 8, 1863, to January 14, 1864, 
and on June 17. 1865, consolidated with the 6th N. Y. Cavalry under the des- 
ignation 2d N. Y. Provisional Cavalry. It lost altogether one hundred and 
sixty-eight men. 

The I3'1'H N. Y. Heavy Artillery. — This was organized at New York 
and contained a number of recruits from this county. It was mustered in 
October 15, 1861, for three years. Original members, not veterans, mustered 
out at expiration of service, and veterans and recruits retained until July 28, 
1865. It participated in the battles of Cross Keys, Waterloo Bridge, Second 
Bull Run, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, Mission Ridge, Chattanooga, Atlanta, 
and Cedar Creek. The regiment lost in killed, disease, and prison one hun- 
dred and twenty-nine men. 

The 14TI1 N. Y. Heavy Artillery. — The 14th H. A. was formed at 
Rochester and mustered into the service of the United States from August 
29 to December 17, 1863, for three years. The companies of which it was 
composed were raised in the counties of Cattaraugus, Jefferson, Lewis, Liv- 
ingston, Monroe, Oneida, St. Lawrence, and Steuben. It was engaged in the 
battles of Spotsylvania, Petersburg, Weldon Railroad, Poplar Spring Church, 
Cold Harbor, and Hatcher's Run. The regiment was mustered out of service 
August 26, 1865. Its total loss was nine men. 

In a work of this. character — confined strictly as it is to a history of Cattar- 
augus county — it is impossible in the limited space to present a detailed nar- 
rative of each organization or of individuals. The prompt and patriotic action 
of our people in the various wars, the veterans we have been proud to claim 
as citizens from time to time, and the energetic part the inhabitants of the 
county have always taken in complying with the military requirements of the 



2oS History of Cattaraugus County. 



State and Nation have been fairly well outlined. For various reasons it has 
been deemed advisable to limit the sketches of the several Cattaraugus count}- 
regiments in the Rebellion to brief facts. In the roster comprising the fol- 
lowing chapter appears a more detailed account of the soldiers and sailors 
who served from this county in that sanguinary struggle. 

Nearly a score of years and ten have glided by since the closing days of 
that fierce conflict. Age is steadily creeping upon the surviving veter- 
ans, who one by one are rapidly joining their comrades on the -other shore. 
Ever since the close of the Rebellion it has been customary for the soldiers 
and sailors to hold occasional or periodical reunions, and those occurring 
in this county have been well attended and profitable. From time to time 
grand army posts have been organized in the various villages, but a number 
have gone down in recent years mainly because of the death-depleted ranks 
of their members. The posts existing at the present day are noticed in their 
respective towns. 

Cattaraugus county has sent ten cadets in all to the United States Military- 
Academy at West Point, the first one entering in 1836. Of this number 
four have graduated. Allegany county has given seven and Chautauqua 
nine. The cadets entering from this county, with the dates of their admission, 
are as follows: Oscar F. Winship, Persia, 1836; Staley N. Clarke, Jr., Ellicott- 
ville, 1846; Alexander Chambers, Ellicottville, 1849; Henry Martin, Olean, 
1853; Luke G. Harmon, Ellicottville, 1854; William S. Stanton, Randolph, 
1861; Hiram M. Chittenden, Yorkshire, 1880; Wm. S. Card, East Randolph, 
1884; Norman S. Thrasher, Dayton, 1889; Edward P. O'Hern, Olean, 1890. 

The 43d Separate Company. N. G. S. N. Y., Olean, is the only military 
organization in the county at the present time. It was recruited and mus- 
tered into the service of the State of New York at Olean on March 17, 1887, 
by Adjutant-General Josiah Porter and Assistant Inspector-General Thomas 
H. McGrath, with fifty-two enlisted men and four officers, the latter being 
Capt. C. G. Thyng, First Lieut. H. F. Lee, Second Lieut. W^ H. Corringer, 
and Assistant Surgeon Selden J. Mudge (ranking as first lieutenant). Lieu- 
tenants Lee and Corringer have since resigned and R. M. Whitney and R. H. 
Franchot were elected to their respective places. The present strength of . 
the company is ninety-three. The company has quarters in the State armon,-, 
which was completed in 1890 and occupied in January, 1891. For the 
construction of thi armory an appropriation of $25,000 was received from the 
State and $8,700 from the county, the latter being appropriated for the site, 
which, when purchased, included a neatly constructed brick building. This 
was fitted up as the administration department and a spacious drill room 
subsequently attached. The total amount received from appropriations, 
active and honorary members, and subscriptions, and expended on the prem- 
ises, aggregates $46,700. 



ROSTKK OF SOLMIERS AXlJ SaILoRS. 



209 



CHAPTER XVI. 

ROSTER OF CATTARAUGUS COUNTY SOLDIERS AND SAILORS IN THE WAR 
OF THE REBELLION. 



ALLEGANY. 

Allen, Elmore, Co. K, STth Inf.; enl. June 3, 1864. 
Allen, '. ieorffe, ISth Wisconsin Inf. 
Allen. Henry. Co. A, tetli Inf.; enl. Ausr. 2.S. 1S61. 
Altenburjr, Henrj", corp. Co. H., Wth luf.; enl. Sept., 

1861. 
Altenhurjf, Jlorris. Co. H. 64th Inf.: enl. Sept., ISBl: 

killed at Chaneellursville, May 2, l^tti. 
Anderson, John, Co. A, 18»th Inf.: enl. Sept. 11, 1864. 
Andoi-son, \Vm., Co .\, ISSth Inf.; enl. Sept. 5, 1S64. 
Ascha, William, Co. F, I'.Uth Inf.; enl. March :??, 1S6.5; 

disch. May 3, Isij. 
Austin, George, Co. H, .37tli Inf.; enl. Oct. 10, ISiJl; 

di'^ch. March 7, iNi-', for disability. 
Bacon, James, Co. I, l.>ith Inf.; enl. Sept. 5, 1862. 
nad'Tcr. William. Oi. I, B4th Inf.; enl. Au^-. -'6, 1862; 

disch. July IT, 186:!, tor disability, 
liarber, Eliab, Co. F, «th Inf.; enl. Sept., 1861. 
Barnes, Albert H., Co. I, Wth Inf.; enl. AUi,'. 24, 1861; 

dftailed on jjunhoat S7. Luiii.-; died at Fort 

Pillow, May i),'l.^i-'. 
Barnes, Orrin, Co. 1, 64th Inf.; enl. Sept. i, 1861. 
Barry, .lohn. Jr., Ijih Cay.; enl. Auf.'. l.i, IsiU: disch. 

June 24, 180.0. 
Barry, Bobsrt, Co. G, 1.54th Inf.; enl. Ail's. 6, 1862. 
Bascora, Charles, .5th illiio llet.'t. 
Bascom, George II., corp. Co. I, 64th Inf.; enl. Sept. 

!l, 1801. 
Ba.\ter, James, Co. I, 15lth Inf.; enl. Sept. .5, 1802; 

prisoner; di^i'h. June 2n, 18(ri. 
Beals, Daniel. Co. C, l.>lth Inf.; em. Aujr. 6, 1862. 
lichan, IMward, Co. G, l.ilth Inf.; enl. Seiit. 25, 1862. 
BicUniire, August, Co. F, lUth Cay.; enl. Sept. 10, 

■ l-^oi; disch. June 7. 1805. 
Bishop, Charles, Co. I, 04th Inf.; enl. .-VU!,'. 28, 1861; 

wasconllned fmir and one-half months in Itich- 

mimd and thirteen months in Andursonvillo 

prisons; disch. 
Bishop, George, Co. C, I.54th Inf.; enl. Aug. 0, 1802; 

killed at Uocky Face lUdge, .May >. 1S64. 
Bishop, Lewis, Co. H. aTth Inf.; enl. May 17,1861; 

prisoner at Fair Oaks; disch. 
Bishop, Lewis. Co. C, 1.54th Inf.: enl. .iug. 6, 1862; 

killed at Gettysburg. 
Blackmore, Albin, Co. I. 64th Inf.; enl. Aug. 2.5, 1861. 
Blackraore, Nelson. Co. H, 71st Inf.: enl. May 29, 1861; 

three years. 
Blaiscr, John, Co. H.:i7th Inf.; enl. May 16. 1.861. 
Blaiser, John, Co. C, 15Uh inf.; enl. July 26, 1862; 

disch. June 2.5. 1865. 
Bockoyen. William C, enl. Aug. In. 1861; pro. 1st 

lieut. Sept 20, 1.^2; disi-h. Sept. '.'. 1564. 
Borden, John H., napt., 83d Pa. Regt. 
Bouchmire, Conrad. Co. K, 64th Inf.; enl. Nov. 11, 

1861. 
Bryant, R. O., Co. H, 37th Inf.; enl. May 17, 1861; 

killed at Gettysburg, July 2, 18*3. 
Burdick, Albertus. Co. I, 64th Inf.; enl. Aug. 2.5, 1861; 

died July 22, 1862. 
Burns, Joseph. Co. A. 85th Inf.; enl. Aug. 28, 1861; 

re-enl. Jan. 1, 16tU; disch. July 15. 186.5. 
Cain, Patrick, Co. I. 64th Inf.; enl. Aug. 28, 1.861. 
Canfleld, Charles, 13th Cav.; enl. Aug. 1.5, 1864; disch. 

June 24, 186.5. 
Carrington, Edwin L., Co. K. 37th Inf.; enl. June 3, 

1861; -wounded at Fair Oaks. 
Carrington, Leroy, Co. I, tJ4th Inf.; enl. Aug. 28, 1861; 

detailed on gunbyat Dc Kalh. 



Carrington, Nathaniel, Co. I, 64th Inf.; enl. Au^'. 25, 

18B1; leg broken at Antietam. 
Clark, Charles, Co. 1, 64th Inf.; enl. Sept. 1, 1861. 
Clark, Henry, Co. A, 85th Int.; enl. Aug. 28, 1861. 
Coleman, Emmet, Co. 1, 64th Inf.; enl. Aug. 28, 1861. 
Corcuran, Richard, Co. C, lo4th Int.; enl. Aug. 6, 1862. 
Cortliell, Lewis S., Co. C, 1.54th Inf ; enl. July 26, 1862; 

disch. March 3, 1863, for disability. 
Crocker, Abel B., Co. I, 64th Inf.; eul. Aug. 25, 1861; 

wounded at Antietam; left leg amputated; 

disch. Dec. 6, 1862. 
Densinger, Frederick, Co. B, 100th Inf.; enl. Aug. 22, 

1863. 
Dillon, .Michael, (.'0. G, 154th Inf.; enl. Sept. 10, P62. 
Dolan, Chjs. H., Co. C, 117th Inf.; enl. Aug. 22, 1862. 
Donough, -Michael, Co. I, H4th Inf.; enl. March, 1862; 

wounded at Fair Oaks. 
Drayton, Washington, Co. C, 154th Inf.; enl. Sept. 1, 

1862. 
Drayton, Wm., Jr., Co. [, 1.54th Inf.; enl. Aug. 28, 1862. 
Dye, Elam S., Co. E, 5th Cav ; eul. Aug. 28, 1861; mor- 
tally \youiidcd at llauovcr. Pa. 
Dye, William P., 1st. sergt. Co. E, .5th Cav.; enl. 

Aug. 2.S, 1801; pro. capt. Feb. 7, 1863. 
Earl, William, enl. Co. K, 85th Inf. 
Eggleston, Charles, Co. H, 37th Inf.; enl. May 17, 

IHiJl; disch. .Iunc2.5. Isiy. 
Eggleston, Reuben H., (.'o. C, 1.54th luf.; enl. July20, 

1862; died in Atlanta, Ga., Sept. 2!), 1864. 
Emhiser, Edward, Co. I, 64th Inf.; eul. Aug. 2.5, 1861. 
Enman, Philip, eul. Co. K, 85tli Inf. 
Fee, 0"en, corp. Co. H, 64th Inf.; enl. Aug. 28, 1861; 

killed in battle of Fair Oaks. 
Fitzpatrick, John, Co. I, 64th Inf.; onl. Aug. 28, 1861. 
Forness, Joseph, Jr., Co. A, 188th Inf.; enl. Sept. 5, 

1861; ilisch. May 31, 1.86.5. 
Fin-uess, .Michael, enl. Co. A, 105th Inf. 
Fo.^t.-r. Byron, (.'0. Il,:)Ttli Inf.; enl. Oct. 10, 1861. 
Frank, Daniel, Co. 1, 64[h Inf.; enl. Aug. 25, 1801. 
Frank, Syhestcr, (,'0. I, 04th Inf.; eul. Aug. 2.5, 1861. 
Freelaud, James A., Co. E, lOUtli Inf.; enl. Aug. 22, 

1803; wounded at Drury Bluffs, May 1.5, 1864; disch. 

July 16, 1865. 
Fiey, John, Co. A, 188th Inf.; enl. Sept. .5, 1864; disch. 

June 1, 180.5. 
FuUei-, Allen, Co. I, 64tli luf.; enl. Aug. 28,1801; disch. 

for disability; died .Nov. 21, 1803. 
Fuller, Charles, Co. A, 188th Inf.; enh Sept. 6, 1864; 

disch. June 16, 1865. 
Fuller, Evi, Co. I, 64th Inf.; enl. Aug. 2.5, 1861. 
Fuller, Lataj'ette, Co. I, 64th Inf.; enl. Aug. 2.5, 1861. 
Fuller, Perry \V.. enl. July 1, 1864. 
Furnace, John, 26th Pa. (.Mills' Bat.); enl. Aug. 8, 1861; 

disch Oct. 18<J3. 
Geiger, Jacob, Co. A, 188th Inf.; enl. Sept. 6, 1864; 

disch. June 16, 186.5. 
Gibbs, William K , Co. A, 188th Inf.; enl. Sept. .5, 

1864; disch. June 16, 1805. 
Gillett, Charles M., Co. B,97th Inf.; enl. 1864. 
Gillett, Melviu, 18;3d Inf.; enl. Sept. 6, 1864; detailed 

lor duty in hospital. 
Gooden, Joseph, Co. I, 04th Inf.; enl. Aug. 28, 1861. 
Gooden, Nelson, Co. B, 97th Inf.; enl. June 14, 1884; 

disch. July 18. 186.5. 
Green, William C, Co. I. 64th Inf.; enl. Sept. 1, 1861; 

disch. Sept. 9, 1864. 
Grinard, Robert, Co. C, 1.54th Inf.; enl. Aug. 5, 1862. 
Grossman, Godfrey, Co. H, 37th Inf.; enl. May 17, 1861. 
Guschusky, August, Co. H, 37th Inf.; eid. Oct. 10, 1861. 



History of Cattaraugus County. 



Hag-gerty, Milton M., Co. I, 64th Inf.; enl. Aug. 28, 

1861. 
Hall, Benjamin, Co. I, 64th Inf.; enl. Aug. 26, 1861. 
Hall, Danforth, Co. I, liWth Inf.; enl. Sept. 3, 1862. 
Hall, Martin, Co. C, 154th Inf.; enl. July 2.5, 1862. 
Hallei- .John, Co. H, 3Tth Inf.; enl. Oct. 10, 1861. 
Hand, George, Co. I, 64th Inf.; enl. Aug. 26, 1861; 

wounded by accident and disch. 
Hanglister, Frederick, Co. I, 64th Inf.; enl. Aug. 28, 

1861. 
Harmon, Luke G., capt. Co. H, .3Tth Inf.; enl. May 

17, 1861. 
Harting, Joseph, Co. K, 64th Inf.; enl. Nov. 11. 1801; 

wounded at Antietam and Gettysburg ; disch. 

Nov. 18, 1864. 
Hitchcock, Jos., Co. C, 154th Inf.; enl. July 20, 1862. 
Howard, Philo A., Co. I, 64th Inf.; enl. Aug. 24, 1861. 
Howard, Schuyler, Co. 1. 64th Inf.; enl. A\ig. 2.5, 1861. 
Huganir, D. M., Co. I, 64th Inf.; enl. Aug, 28, 1861. 
Huganir, Nicholas, Co. I, 64th Inf.; enl. Aug. 26, 1862. 
Hughes, George, Co. A, 188th Inf.; enl. Sept. 5, ISIU ; 

disch. June 16, 1865. 
Hull, Andrew, Sickles's Brigade. 
Hyde, Henry, enl. Aug. 22. 186.3. 
Jennings, William, Co. I, 64th Inf.; enl. Aug. 28, 1861 ; 

wounded at Fair Oaks and Gettysburg; died Feb. 

3, 1863. 
Jewell, C. C, Co. C, 1.54th Inf.; enl. July 26, 1862. 
Johnson, Gardner, Co. I, 64th Inf.; enl. Aug. 28, 1861. 
Johnson, George ^y., Co. I, 6-lrh Inf.; enl. Aug. 28, 

1861; died in Allegany, of fever, July 2, 1862. 
Johnson, Henry, Co. A, 188th Inf.; enl. Sept. .5, 1864; 

died in Campbell hosp., Washington, May 21, 186.5. 
Johnson, JamesG., 2d lieut. Co. B, 64th Inf.; enl. Aug. 

17, 1861, three years. 
Johnson, William, Co. I, tilth Inf.; enl. Aug. 28, 1861. 
Johnson, Wra. H. , Co. H. 37th Inf.; enl. May 17, 1861. 
Jones, Alanson, Co. A, 188th Int.; enl. Sept. 5, 1864. 
Kane, Pattick, Co. I, 64th Int.; enl. Aug. 28, 1861. 
Keim, Morris, Co. 1, 154th Inf.; enl. Sept. .5, 1862. 
Kinyon, Sanford, Co. I, 154th Int.; killed at Kocky 

Face Kidge, May 8, 1864. 
Kline, Joseph, Co. A. 188th Inf.; enl. Sept. 8, 1864. 
Lahr, George. Co. H, 37th Inf.; enl. Oi;t. 10, 1861; disch. 

Oct. 29, 1862, for disability. 
Lamb, George W., Co. E, 5th Cav.; enl. Aug. 28, 1861. 
Langer, Joseph, Co. E, I94thlnf.; enl. March 27, 18G5; 

disch. May 3, 186.5. 
Lawrence, Horace, 194th Inf.; enl. March 27, 1865 ; 

disch. May 3, 1865. 
Layton, George, 13th Cav.; en!. Aug. 14, 1864; disch. 

June 24, 1865. 
Layton, George, Co. H, 37th Inf.; enl. May 17, 1861; 

disch. June 22, 186:1 
Low, George W., Co. I, 64th Inf.; enl. May. 17, 1861; 

pris. Aug. 25, 1864; died at Salisbury Oct 2.5, 1864. 
Low, John, Co. H, 37th Inf.; enl. May 17, 1861. 
Lyon, John, Co. H, 37th Inf.; enl. May 17, 1861. 
Lyon, Peter. 13th Cav.; enl. Aug. 15, 1864; disch. June 

24, 1865. 
Lyon, Kowlaud. Co. L 6Uh Inf.; enl. Aug. 28, 1861. 
Manning, Thomas, Co. I, 64th Inf.; enl. Aug. 28, 1861. 
Marks, Milton W., 9th Cav.; enl. Aug. 29, 1862. 
Marks, Thomas, Co. I, 64th Inf.; enl. Aug, 28, 1861. 
Marsh, Daniel, Co. E, 5th Cav.; enl. Aug. 28, 1861. 
Marsh, William, Co. K, 64th Inf.; enl, Aug. 28, 1861. 
Mason, Charles H., Co. 1, 64th Inf.; enl. Aug. 28, 1861. 
May, Francis, Co. I, 64th Inf.; enl. Aug. 28, 1861. 
May, Lyman, Co. H. 37th Inf.; enl. May 17, 1861. 
Mayer, Solomon, Co. A, 188th Inf.; enl. Sept. 5, 1864. 
McClure, Sanford B., Co. I, 64th Inf.; enl. Aug. 28, 

1861; disch. Sept. 27, 1862, for disability. 
McConnell, John R., capt. Co. H, •37th Inf.; enl. May 

17, 1861. 
McCoy, Richard, Co. I, 64th Inf.; enl. Aug. 28, 1861; 

wounded in left leg; disch. Nov. 27, 1862. 
Mclvar. Patrick, Co. H, 37th Inf.; enl. May 17, 1861; 

disch. June 22, 1863. 
McKay, Charles W.. sergt. Co. C, 154th Inf.; enl. July 

26, 1862; disch. July, 1865. 
Mehan, Patrick, Co. I, 64th Inf.; enl. Aug 28, 1861.' 
Merryman, F. Co. K, 64th Inf.; enl. Aug. 28, 1861. 
Miller, Lewis, Co. H, 37th Inf.; enl. May 17, 1861; 

disch. June 2.5, 1863. 
Mills, E. S., Co. 1, 154th Inf.; enl. Sept. 1, 1862. 
Mills, Robert B., Co. H, 37th Inf.; enl. May 17, 1861. 
Morgan, Menzo S., Co. H, 37th Int.; enl. .May 17, 1861; 

disch. June 23, 1863. 



Moriarity, Michael, Co. G. 154th Inf.; enl. Sept. 3, 1862. 
.Morris, Christopher, Co. ,G, 52d Inf.; enl. Aug. 29, 

1864; discharged. 
Mor.is, John T., Co. I, 64th Inf.; enl. Aug. 28, 1861; 

disch. .June 5, 1863. 
iloscripr, John, Co. I, 64th Inf.; enl. Aug. 28, 1861. 
Mullison, John, Co. I, 64th Int.; enl. Aug. 28, 1861. 
Nolta, Joseph, Co. I, 64th Inf.; enl. Aug. 28, 1861; 

wounded; re-enl. Feb. 28, 1864. 
Noonan, Edward, Co. A, 183th Inf.; enl. Sept. 16,1864; 

disch. June 16, 1865. 
Nooning, Martin, Co. I, 64th Inf.; enl. Aug. 25, 1861. 
Norwood, Deloss M., Co. I, 64th Inf.; enl. Aug. 8, '61. 
Norwood, Eugene F.,Co. D, 85th Inf.; enl. July 19, '62. 
Norwoo.l, George, Co. F, 147th Inf.; enl. Aug. 2'2, 

1863; wounded at Weldon Railroad; disch. June 

9, 1865. 
O'Brien, Michael, 149th Inf. 

O'Brien, Patrick, Sickels's Brigade; enl. Aug., 1861. 
O'Hara, Michael, Co. I, 64th Int.; enl. Aug. 28, 1861. 
O'Hern, Jerry, Co. G, 154th Inf.: enl. Sept. 3, 1862. 
Onan, Warren, Co. C, 1.54th Inf.; enl. Aug. 19, 1862; 

pro. 1st lieut. Feb. 20, 186.5. 
osterstook, John, Co. G, 154th Inf.; enl. Sept. 3, 1862. 
i'alen, Theodore, Co. I, 64th Inf.; enl. Aug. 28,1861; 

pro. capt. Sept. 16, 1863; resigntd Dec. 21, 1863. 
Parks, Elisaph, enl. Aug. 5, 1862. 
Partridge, James, Co. C, 154th Inf.; enl. July 26, 1862. 
Perry, Luther 0., Co. I, 64th Inf.; enl. Aug. 28, 1861. 
Phelps, Dudley, Co. C, 1.54th Inf.; enl. Aug. 6, 1862. 
Platner, Henry, Co. I, 15tth Inf.; enl. Sept. 5, 1862. 
I'latner, Thomas, Co. I, 64th Inf.; enl. Aug. 21,1861. 
Polau'l. James, Co. G, 1.54th Inf.; enl. Sept. 3, 1862. 
Pratt, Eldridge, Co. I, 64th Inf.; enl. Aug 28, 1861. 
Pratt, Newton, Co. H, 37th Inf.; enl. May 17, 1861. 
Prentiss, Myron, Co. H, 37th Inf.; enl. May 17, 1861. 
Reed, William, Co. I, 64th Int.; enl. Aug. 25, 1861. 
Rcgen, Thomas, Co. G, 1.54th Inf.; enl. Aug. 16, 1862, 

three years. 
Reitz, Conrad, Co. G, 154th Inf.; enl. Sept. 3, 1862; 

wounded and prisoner May 2, 1863; disch. July 7, 

1865. 
Renwick, Ale.v., U Indiana Regiment. 
Renwick, James H., Co. I, 64th Inf.; enl. Aug. 28, 

1801; died at home July 30, 1863. 
Renwick, Kobert H., capt. Co. I, 64th Inf.; enl. Aug. 

28, 1861. 
Renwick, Victor D., Co. I, 64th Inf.; enl. Aug. 28, 1801. 
Reynolds, Harmon W., Co. 1, 64th Inf.; enl. Aug. 17, 

1861. 
Rice, A. L., Co. C, 154th Inf.; enl. July 26, 1862. 
Roberts, Zenas, Co. C, 1.54th Inf.; enl. Aug. 6, 1862. 
Roe, Samuel E., Co. A, 188th Inf.; enl. Sept. 11, 1862. 
Rogers, William (no record). 
Rotchky, Godfrey, Co. D,61st Inf.; enl. July 14, 1864; 

disch. JulvU, 1865. 
Rounds, F. M., Co. C, 154th Inf.; enl. July 26, 1862. 
Rounds, Orton, Co. C, l.>tth Inf.; enl. July 26, 1862. 
Rowe, Samuel E., Co. H, 37th Inf.; enl. May 17, 1861. 
Rowell, Daniel, Co. H, 37th Inf.; enl. May 17, 1861. 
Rowen, Malachi, Co. H, 37th Inf.; enl. May 17, 1861. 
Rowen, Patrick, Co. 1, 64th Inf.; enl. Aug. 28, 1861. 
Rvan, Christian, Co. B, 49th Inf.; enl. June 4, 1864; 

killed in battle of Cedar Creek, Oct. 19, 1864. 
Ryant, Abram, Co. C, 1.54th Inf.; enl. July 26, 1862. 
Shehan, Jerry, Co. G, 154th Inf.; enl. Sept. 3, 1862. 
Sheldon, George L., Co. I, 64th Inf.; enl. Ausr. 28, 

1861; wounded at Fair Oaks June 1, 1862; disch. 

Sept. y, 1864. 
Shuler, Nicholas, Co. A, 188th Inf.; enl. Sept. 9, 1864; 

disch. June 16, 1865. 
Shuster, Stephen, Co. G, 154th Inf.; enl. Sept. 5, 1862; 

disch. Dec. 29, 1862, for disability. 
Smith, George S., Co. 1, 64th Int.; enl. Aug. 28, 1861; 

died July 27, 1863, from wounds received at Get- 
tysburg. 
Smith, Henry, Co. 1, 64th Inf.; enl. Aug. 28, 1861. 
Smith, James, sergt. Co. I, 04th Inf.; enl. Aug. 21, 

1861; died in the service Nov. 20, isfj.3, of fever. 
Smith, John, Co. I. 64th Inf.; enl. Aug. 26, 1861. 
Smith, John, enl. Aug. 28, 1863. 
Smith, John, Jr., Co, I, 64th Inf.; enl. Aug. 26, 1861. 
Snyder, Conrad, Co. H,37th. Inf.; enl. May 17. 1801. 
Soule, Charles, lieut. Co. H, 64th Inf.; enl. Sept. 1861. 
Spicer, Horan O., Co. H, 37th Inf.; enl. Oct. 10, 1861; 

disch. June 28, 1862. 
Spraker, William, Jr.,sergt. Co. 1, 64th Inf.; enl. Aug. 

21, 1861; lost leg at Gettysburg, disch. May 3, 1664 



Roster of Soldiers and Sailors. 



Stafford, Joseph, Co. H. 37th Inf.; enl. May 17, 186L 
Starks, Saul, Co. I, 154th Inf.; enl. Sept. 3, 18B2. 
Stiles. Giorge, Co. K, 64th Inf.: enl. Oct. 10, 1801.; 

disch. Out. -'9, 1803. 
Stiles, Georire, Co. .V, lS8th Inf.; enl. Sept. 5,1804. 
Stratton, George, Co. A, ISSth Inf.; enl. Sept. 5, 1804; 

disch, June 3, 1865. 
Strohuber, Georjfe, Co. A, lS8th Inf.; enl. .Sept. 6, 

1804; wounded in both legs at Hatcher's Kuu, 

Oct. 27, 1864, left leg amput.; disch. May 20, 1S05. 
Sweeten, Marshall, Co. H, 04th Inf.; enl. July 14, 1804; 

prisoner at Ueam's Station; disch. June 3, 1865 
Sweeten, Wallace, Co. H, 37th Inf.; enl. May 17, 1801. 
Thompson, Albeit, 147th Inf.; enl. Aug. 22, 1863. 
Thurbur, Hiram, Co. I, 64th Inf.; enl. Sept. 20, 1862; 

disch. April 16, 1864, for disability. 
Thurbur, Ira S., Co. I, 64th Inf.; enl. Aug. 28, 1861. 
Tide, Thoma-s, enl. 1864. 
Tirney, Christian (no record). 
Towsey, Charles, Co. I, 04th Inf.; enl. Aug. 25, 1801; 

detailed on gunboat Sf. Limis: disch. Sept. 3, 1862. 
Towsey, (leorge, Co. H, 37th Inf.; enl. May 17, 1801; 

killeil at Chancelloi'svillu. 
Trowbridge, Wm., Co. H, 37th Inf.; enl. Oct. 10, 1861. 
Truesdell, Joel, Mth Cav.; enl. Aug. 29, 1802; wounded 

at ChariceUorsville; disch. Jan. 23, 18t>4. 
Van Antwerp, I., Co. I, Otth Inf.; enl. Sept. 10, 1801. 
Ward, Hibbard, Co. H.Oth Cav.; enl. July, 1801; killed 

at Murfrecsboro, Tenn., Aug. 3, 1802. 
Ward, John D., Co. I, 04th Inf.; enl. Aug. 28, 1801; 

disch. Sept. 9, 1864. 
Waters, David. Co. I, l.Mth Inf.; enl. Sept. .3, 1862. 
Waters, Frank, Co. H, 37th Inf.; enl. .May 17,1801, 
Waters, George, Co. A, 8.5th Inf.; enlisted Aug. 28, 

1801; wounded Dec. 14, 1803; re-enl. Jan. 1, 1804; 

disch. July 15, 1865. 
Way, Robert, enl. July 8, 1804. 
Welch, Delancy, Co. C, 154th Inf.; enl. Aug. 9, 1862; 

prisoner; died in Richmond, \'a., in Feb., 1864. 
Welch, Stephen, Co. C, 154th Inf.; enl. .-Vug. H, 1802; 

pro. 1st lieut. June 8, 1804; taken prisoner. 
Weptner, John, Co. I, 64th Inf.; enl. Aug. 28, 1861. 
Wheeler, Devilo, Co. I, 154th Inf.; enl. Sept. 11, 1802; 

pi-JsiHier; died in or near Itichinoud. 
Wlicclcr. Silas, Co. I, 64th Inf.; enl. Aug. 25, 1801. 
Wheeler, Wm. W., Co. A, lS8th Inf.; enl. Sept. 11,1864; 

wounded at Hatcher's Run; disch. May 31, 1865. 
Whitlock, Wm., Co. A, 188th Inf.; enl. Sept. 6, lS)i4; 

killed in battle of Hatcher's Run, Feb. 0, 186.5. 
Wilbur, Charles R.. Co. I, 154th Inf.; enl. Sept. 3, 1802; 

died in rebel prison. 
Wilbur, Oscar, Co. G, 154th Inf.; enl. Sept. 3, 1862; 

died from wounds received at Chaucellorsville. 
Wilbur, Wallace (no record). 
Williams. Nathan, Sickles's Brigade. 
Wilson, John E., Co. 1.04th Inf.; enl. Aug. 25, 1801; 

died in hosp. at Washington, D. C, April Id, 1802. 
Winsor, Ezer. Co. I, 64th Inf.; enl. Aug. 2.5, 18<J1. 
Winton, William, Co. I, 04th Int.; enl. Aug. 20, 1801. 
Wolil, Joseph, Co. I, 04th Inf.; enl. Sept. 20, 1802. 
Worden, George I!., Co. I, 04th Inf.; enl. Aug. 25, 

1801; disch. Jan. 12, 180;j. 
Worden, James, Co. C, lli5th Inf.; enl. March 4, 1802. 

disch. for disability June 2.), 1862. 
Wright, Horatio D., ( o. I, 64th Inf.; enl. Aug. 28, 

1801; prisoner; discharged. 
Wright, Robert, Co. A, 18Sth Inf.; enl. Sept 6, 1804; 

disch. July 5, 1803. 

ASHFORD. 

Achenbach, M., Co. A, 187th Inf.; enl. Sept. 28, I8(K. 
IJabcock, Maynard, Co. K, 65th Inf.; must. March 17, 

1865, one year. 
Backtalf, Francis, Co. H, 0.5th Inf.; must. March 17, 

1865, one year. 
Ballou, Charles F., Co. I, 44th Inf.; must. Sept. 17, 

LStil, three years; pro. Corp.; wounded at Gettys- 
burg July 2, 1.8ra. 
Ballou, Heriiert E., corp. Co. A, lOOth Inf.; must. 

Oct. 10, 1801, three years. 
Bargy, Michael, Co. G, 154tl> Inf.; must. Sept. 15, 

1865, one year. 
Beardsley, Salmon W., 1st sergt. Co. G, 154th Inf.; 

enl. Aug. 11. 1862, three years. 
Beebe, Charles H., Co. A, :i6th Inf.; must. Sept. .5, 

1861, two years; re-enl. as corp. Aug. 28, 1863; pro. 

to sergt. 



Bemus, Charles B., Co. B, 140th Inf.; must. Aug. 22, 

1863, three years; died in Lincoln hospital Nov. 26, 
18a3. 

Bernhoft, Fred C, Co. K, ICath Inf.; must. Feb. 3, 

1802, three years. 
Bernhoft, H., Co. K, 9th Cav.; died in Arhngton. 
Bigelow, Arnold M., 93d Int.; mustered Maix-h 17, 

1665, one year. 
Bihl, Caspar, Co. A, 187th Inf.; enl. Sept. :i'i. W4 ,, 
Bishop, Cieorge, Co. A, lOOth Inf.; must. Oct. in, 1801, 

three years. 
Block, Charles, Co. K, e5i;h Inf.; must. March 17,180,5, 

one year. 
Block, John, Co. E, 10th Inf.; must. April, ItO-j. three 

years. 
Block, William, Co. I, 44th Inf.; must. Oct. 2, 1861, 

three years. 
Bond, Daniel, Co. F, 116th Int.; must. Sept. .3, 1802, 

three years; pro. Corp.; wounded in thish June 

25, 1805. 
Bowles, Hammond E., Co. H,98th Inf.; must. April 0, 

1865, one year. 
Brooks, Michael, Co. C, lOlJth Inf.; must. March 9, 

1804, three years; wounded in battle of .Tames 

River. 

Cheeseman, , Co. A, 44th Inf. 

Clark, George (no record). 

Clark, George W., Co. G, 1.54th Inf.; must. Sept. 1, 

181)5, one year. 
Clark, Salmon J., Co. D, 1.54th Inf.; enl. Aug. 14. 1861, 

three years. 
Clark, Warner F., Co. G, 1.54th Inf.; enl. Auir. 13, 1862, 

three years. 
Comstock, Lewis H., Co. K, 10.5th Inf.; must. Jan. 12, 

1802, three years. 

Cook, NichoUis, Co. G, 1.54th Inf.; enl. Aug. 13. 1862, 

three years ; wounded in jaw at Pine RiJse. 
Cradden, Augustus, Co. D, 1.54th Inf.; must. July 16, 

1864, three years. 

Crosby, Willard, Co. D, 154th Inf.; must. Sept. 22, 1805, 

one year; died at Beaufort, S. C. 
Day, Henry, Co. A, 100th Int.; must. April 1, 1802, 

three years. 
Day, Job, Co. K, 105th Inf.; must. Dec. 21, hoi. three 

years; died in service .Jan. 10, 1862. 
Day, Marcus D., Co. K, 105th Inf.; must. Dec. 21, 1801, 

three years. 
Deilz, Frederick (no record). 
Deitz, John (no record). 
Derby, Solomon, Co. A, 100th Inf.; must. Julv 12, 1802, 

three years. 
Dutcher, H. (no record). 
Dutcher, John, Co. B, 1.54th Inf.; must. Aug. 17, 1^*62, 

three years. 
Ehman, C, 9th Cav. 
Ehman, Jerry, 9th Cav. 

Eno, K. Conrad, Co. G., lK7th Int.; enl. Sept 29, 1804. 
Entridge, George, Co. K, 193d Inf.; must. April 1, 

1803, two years. 

Fisk, Nelson H., Co G, 1.54th Inf.; enl. Aug. 19, 1W2, 

three years. 
Fo.x, Ambrose H., Co. B, 9th Cav.; must. Sept. 2:i, 

1801, three years. 

Frank, David A., corp. Co. G, 1.54th Inf.: enl. Aug. 11, 

1862, three years. 
Frank, Franklin (no record). 

Frank, Hiram P., Co. B, 64th Inf.; must. Aug. 12, 

1865, three years. 

Frank, Robert, Co. H, 64th Inf.; must. March 30, 

1.865, one year. 
Fuller, C, 9th Cav. 
Gamp, Jacob, Co. F, 116th Inf.; must. Aug. 9, 1862, 

three years. 
Garwick, Gerhard, Co. H, 6.5th Inf.; must. March 31, 

1865, one year. 
Gerrecke, Robt., Co. A, 187th Inf.; enl. Sept 29, 1804. 
Goodbread, Jacob, Co. B, 197th Inf.; must. Sept. 29, 

1863, three years; taken prisoner at Wilderness, 
May .5, 1863; died at Andersonville. Oct.. l.'*4. 

Goodemote, Abraham. Co. D, 154th Inf.: must. Sept. 

8, 1862, three years. 
Goodemote, Wilham, Co. A, 188th Int.; must. Sept. 6, 

186.5, one year, 
Gould, John, Co. B, 10.5th Inf.; enl. after muster of 

regt. 
Groat, Esley, corp. Co. G, 1.54th Inf.; must. Sept. 25, 

1802, three years. 
Groat, Jeremiah, navy. 



History of Cattaraugus County. 



Groat, John, Co. G, 154tli Inf.; must. Sept. 16. l>6i. 

one year. 
Groat, Uriah D., Co. L, 13th K. A.; must, riept.ll. I'*!. 

one j'ear. 
Hadley, Warner J., Co. D, 15-lth Inf.; must. Sept. M. 

l;?62, three yeai-s; taken prisoner at Gettysburg: 

died at Kichmond, Jan. lU, lSti4. 
Haller, Charles, Co. A, lS7th Inf.; enl. Sept. X. 1~<>1. 
Hammond, Franklin G., Co. H, 37th Inf.; must. .May 

IT. 1861, three years; wounded at Malvern Hill. 
Hammond, Orange, Co. H, 3Ttti Inf.; must. June. 

isui. two yeai-s; re-enl. Co. D, l.Wtli Inf. 
Hattan, Lewis, Co. D, l.>!th Inf.; must. Oet. 1, iHi-i. 

one year. 
Haynes, Jiimes, Co. D, 1.54th Inf.; enl. Aug. 9. Ist'. 

three ycai-s. 
Hess, Elias H., Co. H, 6.5th Inf.; must. April -5. l-«. 

cue 5-ear. 
Hess, George W., corp. Co. G, 154th Inf.; must. Aui.'. 

15, 1861, three years. 
Hess, Horace H. (no record). 
Hinkley, Bradley, Co. B. 9tli Cav.: must. Oct. L\i. 1-*1. 

three j'ears; died at Audei-sonville prison .March 

9. 1864. 

Hitcticocli, Lucius, Co. D, 1.54tb Inf. 

Howard, L. M., Co. C, 1.87th Inf.; enl. Sept. ;ii. InU. 

Hufstater, Harrison (no record). 

Hufstater. Henry H., Co. H, lOUth Inf.; must. May !. 

1861, three years. 

Hunt, James B., Co. C, ISTth Inf.; enl. Sept. 30. 1SJ4. 
Johnson, John. H., Co . H, 1.54th Inf.; must. Sept. 1-'. 

186:3, one year. 
Johnson, Lorenzo, Co. F, 116th Inf.; must, Sep:. 3. 

1862, three years. 

Johnson, Marion, Co. F, 116th Inf.: must. Sept. 3. lyC. 

three years; wounded in battle of Wmchester. 

Sept. 19, 1864. 
King, Edgar O., Co. B, 9th lav.; must. Oct. 11. ISJl. 

three yeai-s. 
King, Edward, 146th Inf. 
Kost, George H., Co. A, 188th Int.; must. Sept. If.. 

186.5, one year. 
Lansmade, Watlau F., Co. D, 154th Int.; must. Sept. 

15, 1865, one year. 
Lawton, Addison, Co. D, 154th Inf.; must. Oct. 1. 

1865, one year. 
Lawton, Joseph, Co. K, lOStli Inf. 
McClure, George W., Co. K, 65th Inf.; must. March 

16, 1865, one year. 
Milholland, William, Co. G, 154th Inf.; enl. Aujf. -'. 

186:i, three yeaiTS. 
Moore, Jacob, Co. K, 65th Inf.; must. March 17. 1M». 

one year. 
Murphy, L. P., Co. A, lS7th Inf.; enl. Sept. '-T. Is54. 
Myers, Edmund, Co. D, 1.54th Inf.; enl. Au;;. 9. l-«;. 

three yeais; died in Andei-sonviUe prison July 

1, 1864. 
Myers, Eli C, Co. D, 1.54th Inf.; must. Sept. SIX 1>65. 

one year. 
Nye, Cornelius, Co. G, l.'>ith Inf.; eul. Aug. 7. IHI.'. 

three years. 
Ostrander, A. J., must. Sept. 22, 186:3, tbree years. 
Peabody, George W., Co. U, 1.54tli Inf.; must. Sept. 

9. 1865, one j'ear. 

Peer, Stephen, Co. D, ISTth Inf.; enl. Sept. 2-. 1-<V4. 
Proper, George W., Co. D, 1.54th Inf.; must. sept. 9. 

1865, one jear. 
Quackenbusn, Daniel, corp. Co. A. 9th Cav.; must. 

Jan. 9, 1864, three years. 
Quackenbush, John, Jr.. Co. H, 9Sth Inf.; must. April 

6, 1865, oue i ear. 
Uamsdell, oli\cr, Co. A, l:<7th Inf.; enl. Sept. ou, 18i;4. 
Kice, Abel, navy; died In Philadelphia. 
Kowlaud, Bradford, Co. G, 154 Inf.; must. Sept. 2.5. 

1862, three years. 
Schroeder, Chas., Co. C, 187th Int.; enl. Se!)t. 26, 18i;4. 
Shall ren, Uavid, Co. A, 44th iiit.; muse. Oct. 12. 18ij2. 

three years; killed at Malvern Hill, July, ISii. 
Shattuer, Frederick, Co. G, 72d Inf.; must. July 17. 

1862, three years; wounded at North Anna Kiver. 
Shattner, Frederick, Co. H, 1.3LU H. A.; must. sept. 2. 

1864, one year. 
Shattner, James K., Co. K, 105th Inf.; enl. Jan. -"l. 

1862; pro. 2d Sergt. Co. H, 94th Uegt.; must. 

Mch. 1, 186:3, three years; wounded at Gettysbnrir. 
Shattner, Philip L., Co. G, 72d Int.; must. July IT, 

1862, three years. 
Sherman, Charles W., Co. F, 116th Inf.; must. Aug. 



9, 1S61, three years; wounded in arm and hip in 

May, 1862. 
Sherman, Ebenezer C, Co. D, 154th Inf.; must. Sept. 

9, 1865, one year. 
Shields, George, Co. D, 154th Inf.; must. Aug. ij. 

1862, three years; died at Belle Isle, Jan., L8t).3. 
Shoemaker, Henry, corp. Co. F, 116th Inf.; must. 

Aug. 9, 1862, three years. 
Simons, William, Co. I, 37th Inf.; must. May 10. 1861. 

two years. 
Smith. Andrew M.. corp. Co. F. 116th Inf.; must. 

Sept. 3, 1862, three yeai-s; Killed at Donald.sonville 

July 1:3, 186:3. 
Smith, Elsbra I., corp. Co. K, 10.5th Inf.; enl. Feb. -1, 

1862, three years. 
Smith, Francis M., Co. F, 116 Inf.; must. Sept. 3, lStj2, 

three years; died of fever in New Orleans, April 

1, 186:3. 
Smith, John L., Co. A, 13th H. A.; must. Sept. 12, 

1864, one year. 

Smith, Peter W., Co. F, 5th Inf.; must. Sept. 20, 1S61. 

three years. 
Snyder, John, Co. D, 154th Int.; died in Savannah, Ga. 
Stocking, Spencer, Co. D, 154th Inf.; must. Sept. 9, 

ISiw, one year. 
Thomas, Hiram B., Co. I, :37th Inf.; must. Oct. 5. 

1861, two years. 

Turner, Jerome J., Co. D, 154th Inf.; enl. Aug. 14, 

18(i2, three yfars; wounded In right shoulder. 
Yedder, Jacob M., Co. G, 154th Int.; must. Sept. 12. 

1865, one year. 

Wait, A. J., Co. E, 175rh Inf. 

Wait, Lovinas B., Co. E, 157th Inf.; must. Oct. 1, I86.3, 

three years; died of fever while in the service. 
Walters, John W., Co. K, 6th Inf.; must. Sept. 11. 

186-3, three yeai-s. 
Walters, Luman B., Co. A, 36th luf.; must. March 1, 

three years; pro. corp. 
Wasson, Nathan, Co. K, 105th Inf.; enl. Jan. 4, 1862. 

three } ears. 
Weast. Amos B.. Co. D, 1.54th Inf.; must. Sept. 25, 

1862, three years; pro. corp. Jlay 8, lmH; serst. 
.\pril 1, 186.5. 

Weast, Clark E., Co. D. 151th Inf.; must. Feb. 24, 1.8<!5, 

one year. 
Weast. Frederick, sergt. Co. D, 1.54th Inf.; enl. Aug. 

8, 18(j2, three years; re-enl. Sept. 1.5, 1865. one year. 
Weber, James B., Co. F, 116th Inf.; must. Sept. 3, 

1.8<i2, three yeai's. 
Weber, Jacob J., Co. F, 21st Inf.; must. May 2i_), 1861, 

two yeai-s. 
Wedderman, Fred, Co. F, 96th Inf.; must. April 1. 

18ii5, one year. 
Willis, Thomas, corp. Co. H, 154th Inf.; enl. Aug. 10, 

18ti2, three years. 
Wilson, Orrin, i:i7th Inf.; killed while in the service. 
Wiltse, Emerson M., corp. Co. D, 1.54th Inf.; must. 

Aug. 8, 1.862, three years. 

CAKROLTON. 

.\very, Isaac N., Co. I, 56th Inf.; enl. Sept. 8. 1864; 

disch. Aug. 2, 1865. 
Bailey, David L., Co. A, 154th Inf.; enl. Sept. 1, 1862; 

disch. Jan. 27, 186:3. 
Baillett, Eugene, sergt. Co. A, 154th Inf.; enl. July 

24, 1862; taken prisoner Julv 1, 1^>1; died in hospi- 
tal at Kichmond, Feb. 15, 1864. 
Baker, George W., corp. Co. A, l.>tth Inf.; enl. Aug. 

12, 1862; disch. June 2:3, 1865. 
Barton, Horace C, Co. E, 146th Int.; enl. 1.86:3; died 

Dec. 24, 1863. 
Bates, Charles W., Co. K, 65th Inf.; enl. April 5, 186:3; 

disch. July 29, 1865. 
Beers, John B., Co. E, 72d Inf.; enl. May 17. 1S61; 

disch. Dec. 1:3, 1862; re-enlisted Aug. 22, 186:3, Co. 

E, 146th Inf.; wounded at Weldon Kailroad, Sept. 

16, 1864; pro. corp. Sept. 20, 1864; disch. March 23, 

186-5. 
Brown, George W., Co. A, 100th Inf.; enL Aug. 12, 

1863; wounded at Drury's Blutts, Va.; disch. June 

19, 18<>5. 
Brown, Spaulding K., Co. A, 154th Inf.; enl. Aug. 11, 

1862; disch. June 2:3, 1865. 
Cowen, Daviil A., Co. C,96th Inf.; enl. March IS, IS65; 

disch. April 4, 1866. 
Fleck, Joseph, Co. E, 72d Inf.; enl. May 28, 1861; disch. 

June 28, 1864. 



Roster of Soldiers and Sailors. 



213 



Hunt, James B., Co. E, T-M Inf.; enl. May 21, 1*1; died 

Juue M, l.-i«>4. 
Hutchinson, Daniel A., nnvv; on board the BriU- 

iaiil; enl. Sept. B, 1J''4; disch. Aus. 1. 18B,5. 
Kellogg-, Edgar, Co. D,5-th Pa.Inf.: enl. Oct. Sri.lSSl; 

pro. Corp.; re-eul. Jiin. 1, ia8, in Co. D, ItU U. S. 

Lt. Art. 
KellOH:^, Georjje \V., Co. K, S2d 111. Inf.: enl. Aut'. 29, 

Ifriii. 
Leonard. Joseph, serjrt. Co. A, 154th inf.; enl. Auy. 

1-', lsii2: disch. Deo. 24. 1^^. 
Leonard, Samuel J., navv; on hoard the DiiUiaiit; 

enl. Sept. li, lsiJ4; dtR-li. Aug-. 1. 1SU5. 
McKinnev, John J., navv; on l.oiird the Diilliant; 

enl. Sept. 6, 18i>l; disch. Au]f. 1, I'-'ii'i. 
Pinkerton, Samuel, Co. A, l.S'^th Inf.; enl. Sept. 0, 

1W4: disch. June 1. l-^'w"). 
Pinkei-tun, Ziba, Co. A. VAi\\ Inf.; enl. July2S, 1,S12; 

disch. June 24, isiij. 
Schotlner, Sebastian. Co. I. 71st Cav.; enl. May 2ti, 

li-til; disch. Nov. 21. I~ij2. 
Scott. Bradner, navy: on board the BiilUa}it: enl. 

Sept. H, isui; disch. Aul'. 1, 18U3. 
Spotlor.t, John. Co. (i. .52d Inf.: enl. Aug-. 23, li^i. 
Sweet. James K., Co. A. I.">4th Inf.; enl. July 2i), 1SB2; 

disch. JIai-cli 4, 1h3. 
Whipiilc. (ieortre D.. navy; on board the Biilliaut; 

enl. Sept. ti, l.s-i4. 
Windon. (icorfre W.. ( u. A, With Inf.; eul. March 13, 

IWio; disch. Oct. 24. IvVi. 
Wolcott. Otis C.. Co A. l.">4th Inf.; enl. July 2S, lsi£3; 

pro. Corp. May, iNii; disch. June 23, IflK. 
Woodworth, Joseph .M.. Co, A, 1.34th Inf.; enl. July 

211, \xiS; disch. June2:i. ISio. 
Woodworth, Wra.. re;-''tl wa^'on mas. Co. A, 154th; 

Inf.; enl. An^'. 12, I-^Ii: disch. June 23, 1SU5. 
Zcluir. .\lon7.0, Co. A. 154th Inf.: unl. Sept. 1, lWi2: 

disch. June 23. ls<j.5. 
Zehiir. Willard, Co. I. .3Bih Inf.; enl. Sept. 7. lS)i4; 

disch. Oct. 17, lNi5. 

COLD SPlUN(i. 

Arancc, Daniel, nth Cav. 

Backus, Wm. A., musician Co. C, i:jth IL A.; eul. 

Au;;. 24, !«■:). three vears. 
Berry. Frank, Mth Inf. 

Bi.vby, W. (no record'; was IS months in service. 
Blood, .Vndrew D. Co. A. 1.34th Inf.; enl. July 25, lsii2, 

three yeais; pro. 1st serirt. 
Brown, (.'harles \V., corp. Co. D, lU'Jtli Inf.; enl. July 

2», 1S(K, three years: wounded Dec. 28, ]H(i4. 
Brown, (ieo. 1'., Co. A. l">4th Inf.; enl. J uly 24, 18ii2, 

three years; woun'k-'l and p.-isoner; pro. Corp. 
Brown. Hiram L., I'o. <:. IM\ H. A.; enl. Au;?. 24, 18ii;), 

three vears. 
Bryant, Howard L.,Co. F. 194th Inf.; enl. Apr. 8, 18U5, 

one year. 
Buck, Alfred, Co. B. 64th Inf.; enl. Sept. 1.3, 1801, three 

years; died in service. 
Buck, Araasa. Co. B. 'Uzh Inf.; enl. Sept. 15, IStil; 

trans, to Vet. Ues. Corps. 
Buck, Eugene, Co. F.. IWth Inf.; enl. April 10, 18IJ.3. 
Buck, William H., Co. A. I.34th Inf.; enl. Aug. 12, W12, 

thi-ee years; in-isoner. 
easier, Alonzo A., .3d sergt. Co. A, 154th Inf.; enl. 

July 25, IS*;:.'; pro. lieut.; nrisoner. 
easier, Benjamiu (;.. 1st. lieiit. Co. A, 154th Inf.: enl. 

Aug. 8, 18ii2, tlirce years; pro. cupt.; wounded; 

prisoner. 
Campbell, John D.. Co. A, 1.34th Inf.; enl. July 28, 

18ci2, three years. 
Campbell, Wm. H. H.. corp. Co. A, 134th Inf.; enl. July 

25, lst)2; prisoner; pro. 1st. sergt. 
Chase, Wallace W., Co. A. 1.34th Inf.; eul. July 29,1802; 

died in service. 
Clancy, David, Co. F. tuth Inf.; enl. Aug, 27, 1861, 

three years; wounded. 
Cowles, A.sa, served in 12th X. Y. Vols. 
Crook, Albert, served in 13th H. A. 
Crook, Byron. Co A. 1.34th Inf.; enl. July 24, 1802, 

three years. 
Curtis, Andrew, Co. B. 1.34th Inf.; enl. July 20, 1802, 

three years. 
Curtis, George, Co. G. 14th H. A.; enl. Nov. 11, 1^(3, 

three years. 
Curtis, Lorenzo, Co. G. 14th H. A.; enl. Nov. 11, 18(>3, 

three years. 



. Sept. 0, 18G4; 



Curtis, Stephen H., Co. B, e4th Inf.; enl. Sept 10, 

1801, three years. 
Davenport, Cyrus G., Co. E, 9th Cav.; enl. Oct. 1, 1801, 

three years; pro. sergt. 
Dean, Lyman, corp. Co. B, 04th Inf.; enl. Aug. 17, 

1801; orderly sergt.; wounded. 
Dow, Lyman, Co. E, 9th Cav.; enl. Oct. 1, 18<jl, three 

years; died in service. 
Dow, Orville, Co. E, 9th Cav.; enl. Oct. 21, 1801. three 

yeai-s 
Dui-phy, Feli.v, Co. F, fi4th Inf.; enl. Aug. 24, 1804, 

three years: killed .it battle of Fair Oaks. 
Eanon, John. 125th Inf. 
Egglcston, William L., corp. Co. F, 04th luf.; enl. 

Aug. 28, 1801; wounded, taken prisoner, disch.; 

re-enl. as private in 9th Cav., Aug. 2.3, 1804, one 

year. 
Fay, A»y, 9th Cav.; enl. Sept., I,8il2; wounded and 

taken prisoner. 
Fenton, Charles, 64th Inf. 
F'urraan, Charles M., musician Co. F, 04th Inf.; enl. 

Aug. 9), isiil, three years. 
Galbraith, William, Co. H, 1.54th Inf.; enl. Sept. 1, 

1802; pro. Corp.; disch. 
Gates. (Jcorge W., 11th Mich. Cav.; pro. 1st lieut. and 

trans, to command of I". S. C. T. 
riear, Webster (no record*. 
Hacket, John, Co. B, 13th H. A.; enl. Aug. s, 186;i, 

three years. 
Hacket, Perry, Cj. A, Tilth Inf.; enl. July 2S, 1802; 

three years. 
Hall, Erastus. music an Co. F, lUth Inf.; enl. Dee., 

I'Ol: disch. at e.vpiration of term. 
Ilai-kncss, Tiuman, 04th Inf.; died in Belle Isle 

itrison. 
Ilcy wood,. lames. 13th H.A.; enl. Sept. 1,1864, oneyear. 
Hcywouil, Phmcas, sergt. 04tli Inf.; en . May 25, 

l':iil:dicd .Match 20. l>-'04. 
Heyvvodd. Sanuiel S., 04th Inf.; enl. Aug. 10, 1802; 

killed in battle .May 0, l.'^Ol. 
Hopkins, William, Co. K, 1st N. Y. Mtd. Kitles; enl. 

Aug. :)(), 1^02, thi-ee years: reported missing. 
Hotclikiss, Hai niou, 9th N. Y. (.'av. ; eul. Sept. 0, 

disch. with company. 
.Tellorils, Lyman, sergt. ii4th Inf.; enl. Oct. 9. 1861; 

prisoner; escaped from Belle Isle. 
Kennnn, Lucius J., Co. D, 179th Inf.; enl. March 30, 

1H04, thrc'e years. 
Kilhurn, Alviti, Co. 1), 179;h Inf.; enl. March 31, 1804, 

three years. 
Kilbuin, Cicero, Co. B, 04th Inf.; enl. Aug. 17, 1.861; 

died in ser\'ice. 
Langhorn, Hichaid, 12th Inf.; wounded. 
Langliorn, William, 12th luf.; enl. Dec. 1, 1861. 
Lyon, .ManleyS., 9th Cav.; eul. Sept., 1864; disch. at 

e.vpiraticjn of term. 
Marsh, Cassius M., Co. F, 19itli Inf.; enl. April 8, 1805, 

one year. 
Marsh, Duane, Co. A, 1.34fh Inf.; onl. July 24, 1862; 

prisoner; died at Annapolis, .Md., Aug. 2:3, 1863. 
May, Johnson, 9th Cav.: eul Sept., 1X04, one year. 
May, Sylvester, sergt. 18,'<th Inf.; enl. Sept. :3. 1864; 

disch. with compauy. 
McDonald, Martin, Co. F, 194th Inf.; enl. April 14, 

l.xio, one year. 
Morrison, Miles, 37th Inf.; enl. 1801. 
Morton, (.'harles, 9th Cav. 

Morton, Orville, 72d Inf. (Ud Excelsior, Sickles's Bri- 
gade); wounded. 
Myers, Albert, Co. E, 9th Cav.; enl. Oct. 23, 1801, three 

years. 
Niles, Lucius J., Co. G, 14th H. A.; eul. Oct. 24, 1863; 

died xi-pril lu, 1804. 
Preston, John (no record). 
Preston, Samuel E., Co. F, 04th Inf.; enl. Aug. 20, 

1801; wounded. 
Price, Dorr, Co. A, 154th Inf.; enl. Aug. 13, l.s02. three 

years; pro. corp: disch. at expiration of term; re- 
enl. Co. F, 194th Inf., April 4, Wi5. 
Price, Joseph, Co. A, I.34tli Inf.; enl. Aug. 13, 1802; 

wounded and taken prisoner at Chaneellorsville. 
Riindolph, James A., corp. Co. A, 1.34th Inf.; enl. 

Aug. 5, 1802; wounded, and died at NasuvUle, 

Sept. 19, 1804. 
Randolph, John H., Co. B, 04th Inf.; wounded; pro. 

1st sergt.; disch. at e.xpiratiou of term. 
Kay, Stephen, Co. C, 13th H. A.; enl. Sept. 4, 1863, 

three years. 



214 



History of Cattaraugus County. 



Bhodhouse, Alva, Co. D. ITflth Inf.; enl. March 28, 

ISJi-J; wouaded. 
Rogers, Lemuel A., Co. F, 64th Inf.; enl. Nov. 1, 1861; 

i-e-enl.; wounded; pro. sergt.; must, out with 

regt. 
Ross, Zenas, 0th Cav. 
Stephens, William C, oOth Eag,; enl. Sept. 5, 1864, 

one year. 
Terry, Alauson T., 9th Cav.; enl. Sept., 1864; disch. 

tor disability. 
Terry, Charles W.,9th Cav.; enl. Sept. 10, 1864. 
Updike, Lewis S., Co. C, ITOth Inf.; enl. March 29, 

1SB4, three years. 
Van Scouter, Cornelius, 72d Inf. (E.^ccelsior Brigade). 
Van Scouter, Thaddeus, 9th Cav.; died in service. 
Walker, Francis, Co. F, 194th Inf.; enl. March 4, 186-5, 

Washburn, Giles, 1st sergt. 72d Inf.; enl. June 6. 

IHOI; disch. June 6, 1864. 
Welmon, George, 1st sergt. 64th Inf.; enl. Sept. 16. 

1861; wounded and disch. 
Wetmore, Eugene, 64th Inf.; wounded. 
Whitmore, Allison, Co. G, 14th H. A.; enl. Oct. 22, 

1863; pro. Corp. 
Wood, John, Co. A, 154th Inf.; enl. July 24, 1862; died 

of wounds. 
Wuodruff, Henry, sergt. Co. E, 9th Cav.; enl. Sept. 

25, 1861; prisoner Ave months; disch. Sept. 25, 1864. 

CONEWANGO. 

Abbey, Orange J., Co. A, 154th Inf.; enl. Sept. 3, 1862, 

three years. 
Abbott, Samuel D.; regt. not given. 
AcUley, Gustavus J., Co. K, 1.54th Inf.; enl. Sept. 24. 

1862; disch. Dec. 7, 1864. 
Battles, Commodore, corp. Co. D, 64th Inf.; enl. 

Sept. 10, 1S61; disch. Sept., 1864. 
Benson, Charles A., Co. B, 9th Cav.; enl. Sept. 23, 

1S61, three years. 
Benson, James Garrett, Co. E, 9th Cav.; enl. Aug. 

26, 1862; disch. June 30, 18«J5. 
Bentley, Emory, Co. B, 112th Inf.; enl. Aug. 11, 

1862; disch. Juno 13, 1865. 
Bentley, Henry, Co. C, 9th Cav.; enl. Oct. 2.5, 1861; 

disuh. Dec. 19, 1863; re-enl. Dec. 19, 186:5; pro. 

corp. June 1, 186.5; disch. July 17, 18<J5. 
Bentley, Jerome, Co. B, ll2th Inf.; enl. Aug. 11, 18<)2, 

three years. 
Bigelow, Henry, Co. B, Wth Inf.; enl. Aug. li, 1861; 

disch. Sept. 7, 1864. 
Boon. Cyrenus, Co. G, 13th Art.; enl. Aug. 31, 1864. 

one year; disch. June 21, 1865. 
Booth. Daniel, 9th Cav.; must. Sept. 6, 1864, one year. 
Brown, H. C, enl. spring of 1865; regiment not 

given. 
Booth, Howard, Co. C, 13th Art.; enl. Sept. 2, 18W; 

disch. June 31, 1863. 
Booth, Orlando, Co. F, 9th Cav.; enl. Sept. 6, 1864, 

one year. . . 

Brennen, Edwin William, Co. E, 13th Art.; enl. Aug. 

7 1862; pro. Corp. June 1, 18(3; sergt. Dec. 6, 186:3: 

2d lieut. JIarch 18, 1865; disch. J uly 10, 1865. 
Buffington, Kred'ck E., 112th Inf.; enl. March 25, 1864. 
Burgess, Edmond, lt5th Regt.; enl. 186:); taken pris- 
oner at battle of Wilderness, and died at Ander- 

sonville. 
Bush, Milton H., Co. K, 154th Inf.; enl. Sept. 1, 1862, 

three years; died at Nashville, Teun., from 

Carpenter,' James M., Co. K, 1.54th Inf.; enl. Sept. 2, 

1862, three years; died at Chattanooga, Tenn., 

July 21, 1864, of disease. 
Coats, Richard, Co. I, 49th Inf.; enl. Aug. 20, 1861, 

threes-ears; disuh. Jan. 6, 1863, for disability. 
Coats, Thomas, Co. E, 9th Cav.; enl. 1862; died in 

Virginia. 
Cockran, Samuel W., Co. B, 64th Inf.; enl, Sept. 20, 

1861; re-enl. March 24, 1864. 
Congdon, George W., Co. A, 154th Inf.; enl. July 22, 

1862, three years; disch. Jan. 16, 186:3, on account 

of disease. 
Conroe, James M., Co. I, 49th Inf.; enl. Aug. 8, 18G1, 

three years. 
Cook, Elliott L., Co. H, 179th Inf.; enl. June 16, 1864. 
Cook, Hiram, Co. K, 9th Cav.; enl. Sept. 11, 1861, three 

years. 
Cooper, Ellas, 64th Inf.; enl Aug., 18<j2. 



Cunningham, Benjamin, Co. B, 64th Inf.; enl. Sept 
10, 1861; disch. June 8, 1864. 

Cunningham, Henry, Co. K, 1.54th Inf.; enl. Sept. 1, 
1862, three years; disch. J une 23, 1865. 

Darling, Charles, Co. H, 1.54th Inf.; enl. Sept. 4, ise2 

Darling, Deloss, Co. K, 154th Inf.; enl. Sept. 2, 1862, 
three years; died in hospital at Annapolis, Md.| 
Jan. 16, 186.5, of disease contracted in service. 

Day, Harland Blake, C". K, 1.54th Inf.; enl. Aug. 30, 
1862; disch. June 23, 186.5. 

Ellsworth, Stiles B., Co. K, 1.5tth Inf.; enl. Sept. 2, 
1862, three years; pro. 1st sergt. Sept. 16, 1862; 1st 
lieut. May 2:3. 1864; lesigned and disch. on account 
of wounds received in battle Aug. 12, 1864i 

Everhard, John, Co. I, 49th Inf.; enl. Aug. 20, 1861. 

Fairbanks, Dantoith, Co. A, 154th Inf.; enl. Aug. ,5, 
1862, three years; taken prisoner July 1, 1863; in- 
carcerated in Libby and Andersonville; disch. 
June 20, 186.5. 

Ferman, Amos, enl. April 4, 18134; regt. not known. 

Ferman, Elisha, Co. C, 112th Inf.; enl. Aug. 8, 1862, 
three years. 

Francis, Frederick, corp. Co. H, 154th Inf.; enl. July 
28, 1863, three years. 

Franklin, Audrus, Co. M, 13th Art.; enl. Aug. 31, 
1864; disch. July 7, 186.5. 

French, Horace, sergt. Co. F, 64th Inf.; enl. Sept. 20, 

1861, three years; wounded at Gettysburg, July 
2, 186:3; disch. Jan 28, 1864. 

Frisbie, Geo. Morrell. Co. C, 1.3th Art.; enl. Sept. 6, 

1864; disch. June 20, 1865. 
Furman, Charles M., musician Co. F, 64th Inf.; enl. 

Au!i. 30, 1861, three years. 
Furman, Gale, musician Co. H, 1.54th Inf.; enl. July 

29, 18(!2, three years. 
GalBn, Richard, enl. 1865; regt. not known. 
Gardner, Charles, Co. C, 13th Art.; enl. Sept. 2, 1864; 

disch. June 21, 1865. 
Gardner, Daniel H., Co. K, 154th Inf.; enl. Sept. 6, 

1862, three years; died May 5, 186:3, at Guinea Sta- 
tion, Va., of wounds received at Chancellors- 
ville. May 2, 186:3. 

Gardner, Edwin L. (no record found). 

Grover, Deles. Co. K, 64th Inf.; enl. Aug., 1861, three 

vears; disch. after one year's service; re-enl. in 

Co. A, 13th Art., Aug. 31, 1864; disch. June, 186.5. 
Grover, Gustavus, Co. K, 64th Inf.; enl. Oct., 1861, 

three years; wounded in battle of Fair Oaks; 

disch. Alav, 186.3. 
Grover, William, Co. C, 13th Art.; enl. Aug. 29, 1864; 

disch. June 21, 1865. 
Halker, Frederic C, Co. B, 64th Inf.; enl. Aug. 17, 

1861. three years; disch. Dec-. 1, 1862, for disability. 
Hall, Horace, 9th Cav.; enl. 1862. 
Hall, Leonard Franklin, Co. E, 9th Cav.; enl. Oct. 1, 

1861; disch. Oct. 27, 1864. 
Hall, Philander, Co. I, 9th Cav.; enl. Sept. 7, 1864; 

disch. July, 1865. 
Hamilton, Henry, Co. B, 64th Inf.; enl. Aug. 17, 1861, 

three years; wounded in right arm at the battle 

of Chancellorsville; disch. Aug. 28. 1863. 
Hammond, William R., Co. K, 49th Inf.; enl. Aug. 18, 

1862; disch. Oct. 15, 18(j4. 
Helms, Gaylord, Co. D, 179th Inf.; enl. March 31, 1864; 

disch. June 7. 1865. 
Hillegon, Rudolph, 64th Inf.; enl. 1862; killed at the 

battle of Antietam, Sept. 17, 1862. 
Hills, William G., Co. E, 9th Cav.; enl. Sept., 1S61; 

disch. Nov. 27, 1864. 
Hopkins, Daniel, enl. June 23, IStU. ■ 
Huntington, Charles D., Co. E, 9th Cav.; enl. Oct. 1, 

1861; disch. Nov. 2, 1864. 
Huntington, Monroe H., Co. E, 9th Cav.; enl. Oct. 1, 

18(31, three years. 
Johnson, Leander D., Co. K, 154th Inf.; enl. Aug. 28, 

1862; disch. June 23, 18(j,5. 
Reach, Charles, .57th Inf. 
Reach, Ira L., Co. A, 154th Inf.; enl. July 28, 1862, 

three years. 
Reach, Nathan, Co. I, 154th Inf.; enl. Sept. 6, 1862, 

three years. 
Rilburn, Alvin, Co. D, 179th Inf.; enl. March 31, 1864, 

three years. 
Rilburn, Cicero, Co. B, 64th Inf.; enl. Aug. 17, 1861, 

three years. 
Rlock, Charles L., 64th Inf.; enl. 1861. 
Loop, Moses W., Co. A, 13th Art.; enl. .\ug. 2(3, 1864; 

disch. June 20, 1865. 



Roster of Soldiers axd Sailors. 



^'5 



Jfarsh, Hollis, Co. E, flth Cav.; enl. Oct. 1, 1861, three 

years. 
Mason, George J., Co. K, 15-tth Inf.; enl. Sept. 2, 

lS<i2; pro. 1st sergt. Aug. 20, 18&4; disch. Juae2;?, 

18ti5. 
Mason. William T., Co. B, Wth Inf.; enl. Aug. 17, 

1861; disch. June d, 18IJ3, for wounds received at 

Fredericksburg, Dec. 13, 1862; re-enl. Aug. 30, 

1864; disch. June 11, 186.5. 
McCann, J. D. mo record). 

Menker. Henry A., Co. B, 6+thInf.; enl. Aug. 17, 1861. 
Metcaif, Labrun, Co. E, 9th Cav.; enl. Oct. 8, 1861; 

disch. Oct. 27, 1804. 
Miller, Henry, Co. G, 179th Inf.; enl. March 26, 1864, 

three years. 
Millman, James, Co. C, 13th Art.; enl. Aug. 29, 1864; 

disch. June 21, 186.5. 
Monroe, W. H., enl. spring of 186.5. 
Morgan, Wicklitf, (Hth Inf. 
Myers. Adi, Co. A, 13th Art.; enl. Aug. 31, 18W; disch. 

June 21, 1865. 
Jlyers, Eugene, Co. A, 1.54th Inf.; enl. Aug. 5, 1862, 

three years; wounded in battle of Chancellors- 

ville. May 2, IstB; died in consequence of wound 

and amputation of leg at Brooks Station, Va. 
Myers, George W., Co. B, B4th Inf.; enl. Sept., 1861, 

three years; killed in battle of Fair Oaks, .June 1, 

18IJ2. 
Myers, Gerret S., Co. B, 64th Inf.; enl. Aug., 1861, 

three years; disch. May 14, 1862. 
Myers, John M., Co. C, 112th Inf.; enl. Aug. 27, 1862, 

three years. 
Newcomb, Daniel, enl. Aug. 30, 1864. 
O'Neil, John, 64th Inf.; enl. Feb. 5, 1864. 
Ostrum, Bush, enl. l.'<61; regt. not given. 
Otis, Harrison G., Co. D, 9th Cav.; enl. Aug. 26, 1862; 

disch. June 5, 18ti.5. 
Owen, Lemuel, Co. B, 64th Inf.; enl. Aug. 19, 1861; 

disch. Aug. 17, 1864. 
Patterson, llobert M., 9th Cav.; enl. Aug., 1862. 
I'enhallow, Dorua D., Co. U, 112th Inf.; enl. July 29, 

1n;2, three years. 
Penhallow, Henry, Co. B, 112th Inf.; enl. Aug. 11, 

1862, three years. 
Perry, Albert, Co. D, 179th Inf.; enl. March 31, 1864, 

three years. 
Phillips, Sylvanus L., Co. D., 179th Inf.; enl. April 13, 

lHi4. 
Pinner, Samuel, Co. K, 64th Inf.; enl. Oct. 1, 1861; 

wounded at Fair Oaks; died at Frederick City, 

Md., in Dec, 18ii2. 
Price, Merrick, Co. K, 1.54th Inf.; enl. Aug. 29, 1862, 

three years; disch. Dec. 7, 1862. 
Ilisley (or Kulcy), Henry, Co. B, 64th Inf.; enl. Sept. 

7, 1>«>1. three years. 
Koberts, Wallace, Co. D, 179th Inf.; enl. Feb. 27, 1864. 
Kobinson, Remington, Co. B, 64th Inf.; enl. Aug. 

3, I8tU, three years; disch. June 29, 1865. 
Boss, Edwin, Corp. Co. K, IMth Inf.; enl. Aug. 29, 

l.«62, three years; wounded at Chuncellorsville, 

Jlay 2, IHki; died at Beaufort, N. C, in Feb., 186.5, 

of disease. 
Saunders, He/.ekiah, Co. A, 13th Art.; enl. Aug. 30, 

18W4, one year. 
Saundeis, Philo W., Co. H, 64th Inf.; enl. Sept. 14, 

1861, 3 years; died Jan. 22, 186.5, at Salisbury, N. C. 
Seager, Edward L., Co. A, 154th Inf.; enl. Aug. 5, 

1862; disch. June 11, 186.5. 
Seager, George, Co. E, 9th Cav.; enl. Oct. 6, 1861; 

disch. April 14, 1862. 
Snow, Orre, Co. E, 9th Cav.; enl. Oct. 8, 1861, three 

years; pro. Corp.; disch. in May, 1862. 
Spaulding, Albert M., 64th Inf. 

Spencer, Jas. O., Co. D, 179th Inf.; enl. March 24, 1804. 
Starks, Charles, enl. in spring of 1865. 
Stephens, David H., Co. A, 154th Inf.; enl. Aug. 5, 

1862, three years; disoh. Dec. 13, 1862. 

Stone, Edwin, Co. E, 13th Art.; enl. Sept, 2, 1864; 
disch. June 21, 1805. 

Stone, Martin, 112th Inf.; enl. 1864. 

Sweet, Langford, Co. B, 64th Inf.; enl. Aug. 17, 1861, 
three years; served 16 months; disch. for disa- 
bility; re-enl. Co. C, 13th Art., Aug. 13, 1864, one 
year; diseh. 

Truk, William, Co. D, 179th Inf.; enl. Feb. 20, 1864. 

Van Namee, Charles, 37th Inf.; enl. 1861. 

Ward, Osman, Co. A, Ibth Art.; enl. Aug. 31, 1804; 
disch. June 21, 1865. 



Washburn, Jackson A., 37th Inf.; enl. 1861. 

Wescott, Anthony, enl. Dec. 22, 1864. three vears; 
died at Conewango Jan. 21, 18(o, of disease con- 
tracted in service. 

West, Charles, 112th Inf.; enl. 1864. 

White, James M., 112th Inf.; enl. 1,'*62. 

Wilco.v, D. (no record found). 

Wilkins, Franklin. Co. D. 179th Inf.; enl. Feb. 13. 1864. 

Williams. Jackson, corp. Co. K, 9th Cav.: enl. Sept. 
11, 1861, three years. 

Woodford, Solomon, Co. E, 9th Cav.; enl. Aug. 26, 
1862, three years; pro. Corp.; disch. Mav 28, 1S6.5. 

Worden, Edward Clinton, Co. B, 1.54tb'lnf.; enl. 
Aug. 4, 1864, three years; wounded at Gettvsburg 
July 1, 1863; died at Cuyier hospital Feb. 27, 1865. 

Yarrington, Aury, Co. L, 13th Art.; enl. Aug. 28, 
1864, one year; trans, to navy; died in hospital 
near Point of Rocks. 

DAVTON. 

Bacon, Eseck P., Co. B. 1.54th Inf.; enl. July 21. lwi2; 

died in Andersonville prison May 5. l-ii4. 
Badger, John W., 1st sergt. Co. K, 154th Inf.; enl. 

Aug. m, 1802; pro. 2d lieut.; died in service June 

4, 186:1. 
Bailey, George, Co. K, l.Mth Inf.; enl. Aua-. 30, 1S)2; 

disch. July, 1865. 
Blair, Charles H., Co. H. 44th Inf.; enl. Sept. 1.5. ls6l: 

pro. Corp.; disch. at expiration of term. 
Blair, William W., Co. K, 154th Int.; enl.8ept. li. 1S62; 

pro. Corp.; disch. for disability. 
■Brown, Charles F., Co. H, t-tth Inf., three years. 
Coon, Sylvester, 111th Inf.; enl. Sept.. 1n>4; disch. 

Sept., 1865. 
Darbey, Albert, 1st lieut. Co. A, 64th Inf.: enl. Sept. 

7, 1861, three years: disch. Oct., ls(v4. 
Darbey, Henry H., (;o. A, 64th Inf.: enl. Sept. 20, 

1861; killed at .Malvern Hill. 
Darbey, Horace X., Co. K, IMtli Inf.; enl. .\iig. .30, 

1862; disch. Aug., 1^65. 
Darbey, John H., Co. H, 44th Inf. 
Gregg, Adgate F., Co. H, 44th Inf.; enl. Oct. 2, Isol; 

pro. corn.; disch. in 1M)5. 
Hagaden, Henry, Co. R. ir>4th Inf.; enl. July 2s. ls(i2. 

three years. 
Hall, Charles W., corp. Co. B, ir^tth Inf.: enl. Aug. 

24, IstE; disch. Sept., 1.S6.5. 
Hammond, David, Co. I, 187th Inf.: enl. Sept. 22, 

1864. one year. 
Haupt, Charles, Co. K, 1.54th Inf.: enl. Sept. 1. I'<ii2, 

three years. 
Hooker, Hull, Co. H, 44th Inf.; enl. .■v.-pt. 15. |S6|- 

killed in Seven Days' battle. 
Hooker, Leroy J., Co. H, 44th Inf.; enl. net. 2. l.-iiil; 

disch. in 1H62 for disability. 
Howlett, Horace H., Co. K, 1.54th Inf.: enl. .Vu--. :J0, 

1862; disch. Aug., lSi.5. 
Hubbard, (ieorge. Co. K, 1.54th Inf.: enl. .\ug. :iO, 

18*2, three years. 
Hubbard, Philander W.,2d lieut. Co. K. 1.54tli Inf.; 

enl. Sept. 16, 1862; disch. June, INJJ. for disability. 
Hulett, Marcus, Co. K, ir>4th Inf.; enl. .Vug. 27. 1N62; 

disch. in 186.5. 



Hull, Samuel, Co. H, 112th Inf.: enl. Aug. 27, 1862; 

killed at Petersburg. March :ii, l.'^U. 
Hunt, Leonard L., (.'o. B, l.54th Inf.: enl. July 28, 

1862; disch. Sept., Istti. 
Inmanu, Burt, Co. H,44th Inf.; enl. Sept. 1-5, 1861; 

pro. Corp.; disch. in 1864. 
Inmann, Harvey, Co. K, 1.54th Inf.; enl. Aug. :jO, 1862, 

three years. 
Johnson, Calvin S., Co. K, 1.54th Inf.; enl. Aug. 30, 

1862; disch. June 27, 18(J4, of disease. 
Johnson, Erwin E., Co. H, 44th Inf.; enl. Sept. 1.5, 1861; 

pro. Corp.; disch. at expiration of term. 
Johnson, Gile N., sergt. Co, B, 154th Inf.; enl, July 

28, 1862; disch. in May, 1864, for wounds. 
Jolls, Jerome, Co. A, 64th Inf.; enl. Oct. 9, 1861; 

served 14 months. 



Lafferty, Wiley, 64th Inf.; enl. Dec. 11, 1861; disch. 

Feb., 1863. 
Luce, Israel, Co. H, 44th Inf.; enl. Sept. 15. 1861; disch. 

at expiration of term. 



2l6 



History of Cattaral'gus County. 



Markham, Aaron, 44th Inf.; enl. Jan., 1S62: killed at 

Petersburg, June 19, IStU. 
Markham, James, Co. H, 4ithlnf.; three .vears. 
Markham, Sylvanus A., Co. H, 44th Inf.; enl. Sept. 15, 

IStil; disch ; re-enl. in Sharpshooters. 
Markham, Philo, corp. Co. U, 1.54th Inf.; enl. July 3S, 

1862; disch. Oct., l.'-'Uo. 
Mathewson, David, Co. B, 1.54th Inf.: enl. July -S, 

1862; disch. in Feb., 18ti5. 
Mayer, John, Co. H. 44th Inf.; enl. Sept. 15, 18til; 

killed at Fredericksbursj. 
Merrill, Alva C, Co. K, 1.54th Inf.; enl. July 27, 1.502; 

killed at Chancelloi-sville, Jlay 2, 1-*!. 
Merrill, Oarzilla, Co. K, 1.54th Inf.; enl. Aug. 30. 1SI32; 

killed in battle of Cbaucellorsville. May 3,186:3. 
Merrill, Wilbur H., Co. H, 44th Inf.; enl. Sept. 6, 1861; 

pro. sergt.; disch. ate.xpiration of term. 
Nash, Clayton S., i:3th Wis. Vols.; enl. May, 1802; ten 

months in Cawhawber, Ala , prison. 
Nash, Clinton D., Co. K, yth Cav.; enl. Sept. 11, 1861; 

died at Yorktown, April, 1862. 
Nash, E. Hart, Co. A, 64th Vols.; enl. Oct.. 1862. 
Nash, Eugene A, Co. H, 44th Inf.; enl. Aug. 8, 1861; 

2dlieut. Co. H; adiutant; capt. Co. I), July 11, 1862; 

lieut-col. IT. S. C. T.; must, out Oct. 11, 1864. 
Newcomb, George W., Co. K, 1.54th Inf.: enl. Aug. :30, 

1862; starved to death in Libby prison. 
Oaks, John, Co. K, 112th Inf.; enl. Aug. 2S, VM2: 

wounded at Cold Harbor and Fort Fisher; disch. 

June, 1865. 
Oaks, William K., 90th Inf.; enl. Aug., 1864; disch. in 

i\lay, 1865. 
Parks, Anson N., Co. B, 1.54th Inf.; enl. Aug. 11, 1862; 

died at Chattanooga. 
Prosser, Emmctt .M., Co. A. U4th Inf.; enl. Sept. 20, 

1861: disch. in 18ti4. 
Randall, Harvey, Co. K, 1.54th Inf.; enl. Aug. 130, 1862; 

died ill service. 
Randall, Henry, Co. B, 154th Inf.; enl. July 26, 186;; 

disch. Aug., 186.5. 
Real, George, Co. B, 1.54th Inf.; enl. .\ug. 2, 1,862; disch. 

in 186:5 tor wounds. 
Robinson, Horace, Co. K, 154th Inf.; enl. Sept. 6, 1862; 

disch. at e.icoiration of term. 
Rice, Henry T., Co. H,'44th Inf.; enl. Sept. 15, 1861; 

disch. in 1862 for wounds. 
Schneider, George, Co. K, 1.54th Inf.; enl. Aug. :!0, 

1862; disch. in March, 1864. 
Seeker, William H., Co. K, 154th Inf.; enl. Aug. :50, 

1.862; died in service Oct. 14, 1S6;5. 
Shults, EdwHrd, Co. K. 154th Inf.; enl. Aug. :30, 1SB2, 

three years. 
Shults, Julius C, sergt. :37th Inf.; enl. May 9, 1861; 

wounded three times; disch. June 22, 186:5. 
Stone, John S., Co. B, 1.54th Inf.; enl. July 21. 1862; 

killed in battle of Chancelloisville. May :3, 1.86:5. 
Strickland, Chester, corp. Co. K, 1.54th Inf.; enl. Aug., 

18li2; disch. in Sept., 186:5, 
Stewart, Ira B., Co. A, 64th Inf.; enl. Sept. 20, 1861; 

disch. in 1.804. 
Ulmer, Jacob, Co. K, 154th Inf.; enl. Aug. 30, 1862; 

disch. Oct., Wa. 
Vosburgh, Emory K., corp. Co. B, 1.54th Inf.; eul. 

July 28, 1862; died Jan. 26, 180:5, of disease. 
Wells, John L., Co. A, B4th Inf.; enl. Oct. 5, 1861; died 

June 22, 1802, of wounds. 
Wheelock, Theodore, Co. K, 1.54th Inf.; enl. Aug. 30, 

1862; disch. in 186.5. 
Wickham. Cullen, 112lhlnf.; enl. Aug.. 1862; disch. in 

1865. 
Wiaand, Frederick, Co. K, 154th Inf.; eul. Aug. 30, 

1862; discli. in 186:5. 
Wilson, Thomas, 115th Inf.; enl. Jan. 4,1804; disch. in 

July, 1805. 
Wolf, William, Co. K, 154th Inf.; eul. Aug. 30, 1862; 

disch. in 1.865. 

EAST OTTO. 

Andrews, Edson A., must. 1804, one year; died at 

Danville prison Jan. 11, 1805. 
Andrews, George W., bugler Co. F, 9th Cav.; must. 

Oct. 3, 1801, three years. 
Andrews, Jerome A.. 1st sergt. Co. I. 37th Inf.: must. 

May 20, 1861, two years; wounded at Chancellors- 

ville; re-enl. in lH4lh Inf. in 1805; pro. Istlieuf. 
Bacon, William S., Co. G, 1.54th Inf.; must. May 25. 

1801, three years. 



Ballon. James M., Co. L, 2d Mtd. Rifles; enl. Jan. 23, 

18(U, three vears. 
Barlow. Frederick, Co. B, 154th Inf.; enl. Aug. .5, 1862, 

three veai-s. 
Barnhart, Henry, Co. B, 9th N. Y. Regt.; died on 

board vessel on the way to Annapolis. 
Bartholomew-, Almon, Co. B, 9ch Cav.; must. Oct. 3, 

ISil, three years. 
Bartholomew, Leman, sergt. Co. A, ;50th 111.; must. 

Aug. 5, 1861, three years; re-enl. Jan. 1, 1864, same 

regt. and company; pro. sergt. 
Bates, Frank, Co. D, 9th Cav.; must. Sept.2, 1864, one 

vear. 
Beach, Robert C, Co. B, 9th Cav.; must. Oct. 2:3, IS.'Jl, 

ihree years. 
Beach. William A., 154th Inf.; must. Sept. 9, 18f4, one 

year. 
Beetle. Edwin F., sergt. Co. B, 9th Cav.; must. Oct. 2, 

1862. three years; re-enl. as sergt. Co. D, same 

regt., Sept. 2, 1864. 
Blowei-s. Truman D., Co. G, 154th Inf.; must. Sept. 2, 

18<i2. three years. 
Bowen. Ellas, Jr., Co. G, 1.54th Inf.; must. Sept. 24. 

1.802. three years. 
Bradley, Charles, Co. G, 1.54th Inf.; enl. Sept. 1, 1862. 

three years; died at Annapolis, Sept. 28, 180:3. 
Bradley. Warren. Co. G, 1.54th Inf.; enl. Sept. 1, 1802. 

three vears; died at Fredericksburg, Va., Jan. 1. 

l.'^y. 
Buchanan. James, Co. H, 1.54th Inf.; enl. Sept. 7, 1804. 

one year. 
Cadv. John, 1.54th Inf.; must. Sept. 9. 1.864. one jear; 

died at Evansville, Ind., Feb. 21, 186.5. 
Cady. Levi. Co. C, 04th .Inf.; must. Oct. 1.5, 1.861, three 

veai s; died of fever at Shipping Point, Va., April 

20. 1<02. 
Colvin. Mark, Co. D, 9th Cav.; must. Sept. 2, 1864, one 

year. 
Co.<. .Nelson, corp. Co. C, G4th Inf.; must. Sept. 24. 

1>'61. three years. 
Co.v, Sylvester E., Co. C, 64th Inf.; must. Oct. 14, 1861, 

three years. 
Ditcher. John, Co. B, 1.54th Inf.; must. Sept. 25, 1862, 

thrte years. 
Dresser. Harlan C, Co. B, 9th Cav.; must. Oct. 2:3. 

I'^il. thn e j'eais. 
Dunbar. William H., Co. D. 9th Cav.; must. Sept. 9. 

IN>4. one year. 
Dutcher, Fayette, Co. B. 1.54th Inf.; must. Sept. 20, 

l'^i2. three years; killed at Fairfa.v Court House. 
Edmonds. Austin, Co. C, 64th Inf.; must. Sept.. 1861, 

three years; died in Salistiury prison. 
Gallagher. Andrew, Co. C, 64th Inf.; must. Sept. 16. 

1861, three years; wounded in head at Freder- 
icksburg. 

Cioodricb, Alonzo, Co. I, :57th Inf.; must. May 20. 
ISU. two years; wounded at Chancelloi-sville, 
.Mav 4. 18li:5; re-enl. as sergt. Co. F, 194th Regt.. in 
Felj.. 18»i5. 

Goodrich. Franklin L., Co. B, 154th Inf.; must. Sept. 
25. 1Sj2, three years; taken prisoner at Gettys- 
burg in July, 180:5, and died of starvation in An- 
dersonville, July 8, 18M. 

Goodrich, Orestes H., Co. B, 9th Cav.; must. Oct. 23, 

1801. three years. 

Goss. Warren, Co. B, 9th Cav.; must. Oct. 3, 1801, 
three years; pro. ord. sergt.; re-enl. Jan., 1864, 
same regt. and co.; killed at Chantilly, 1804. 

firinols. Harvey, Co. B, 9th Cav.; must. Sept. 3, 1801, 
three years. 

Hammond, Samuel F. (no record found). 

Harman, SetU M., Co. C, 04th Inf.; must. Oct. 1.5, 
1-801, three years; pro. sergt. Sept. 15, 1802; re-enl. 
18i>5. three years; wounded in battle of Wilder- 
ness. May 10, 1804. 

Harrison, Jesse S., Co. D, 9th Cav.; must. Sept. 9. 
1804, one year. 

Hauck. Jeremiah, Co. G, 154th Inf.; must. Sept. 26, 

1802. ihree years. 

Hawkins, John, Jr., Co. B, 9th Cav.; must. Oct. 2, 

1862, three years; re-enl. Co. D, same regt., Sept. 
2, 1804. 

Hawkins. William, Co. B, 1.54th Inf.; must. Sept. 24, 
1862. three years; taken prisoner at Gettysburg, 
July 2. 1.80:5; contlned at Belle Isle and Savannah 
seven months, at Andersonville nine months, 
CampMillen one month; e.Ychanged Nov. 19, 1864. 

Hicks, Clark, Co. D, 0th Cav.; must. Sept. 2, 1804. 



Roster ov Soldiers and Sailors. 



217 



Hinman, Truman, Co. B, 1.54th Inf.; must. Sept. 9. 

I81U, three years. 
Huffstater, Francis, Co. B, l.>tthlnf.; must. Sept. ii, 

IsiG, three years. 
Hull, Francis H., Co. B, 9th Cav.; mu.st. Oct. 23, IStil. 

three years. 
Jackson, John, drum-major Co. I, 37th Inf.; must. 

Jlay 20, l.S(jl, two years. 
Kelly, Poltus, Co. B, l">lth Inf.; must. Sept. 24, 1*2. 

three years. 
Klump, Georife, Co. I, 37th Inf.; must. May 20. Isil. 

two yen rs. 
Langhaus, John, corp. Co. H, 154th Inf.; must. Sept. 

9, ISW, three years. 
Larabee, Cyrus, 4!)th Inf.; enl. Sept. G, IStil, three 

years; died at Philadelphia, Julv I'.l, 1802. 
Larkin, Orville L., Co. G, 154tli Inf.; must. Sept. 2. 

18t>4, one year. 
Lincoln, William H., 2d lieut. Co. B, 1.54th luf.; enl. 

Aug. .s, 18*12, three years; re-eul. as private in lOth 

Cav., Oct., urn. 
Lines, Stephen H., Co. D, 72d Inf.; must. June 20. 

l."*)!!, three yeai-s. 
Morcy, U'illiam, corp. Co. I, 37th Inf.; must. May '!». 

1»U1, two yeai's; died at .\nnapolis. May 16, liM2. 
Morrow, Lafayette, Co. I, 37tli Inf.; must. May 20. 

18B1, two yeai's; killed at Williamsburg-, Va., -May 

5, lK(i2. 
Myei's, William E., Co. A, ilth Cav.; must. Sept. '.1. 

imn, one year. 
Orr, Amherst L., corp. Co. B, !)th Cav.; must. iict. 

—J, 18111, three years. 
Orr, CJeorge F., Co. .V, !<th Cav.; must. Sept. !i, InU. 

one year. 
Orr, John W., Co. C, Mth Inf.; must. Oct. 1.5, ISJl. 

three years; killed whil<! on picket dutj' at An- 

tietam, Sept. 18, 1S(,2. 
Oyer, Major A., Co. G, 1.54th Inf.; must. Sept. 2H. 

ls(;2, three years. 
Perkins, JIarsball A., Co. B, 1.54tli Inf.; must. Auif. 

x, 181)2, three years; pro. 2d ser^t.; died at Jetfer- 

sonville, Ind. 
Perkins, William H., Co. I!, 1.54tli Inf.; must. Sept. '■>. 

18iH, one year. 
Pratt, Charles E., Co. A, nth Cav.; must. Oct. 2, ISH. 

one .year. 
Pratt, Jackson M., Co. B, 9th Cav.; must. Oct. 3, 1861, 

three years; died of fever at Yorktown, Va., .Mav 

1, 1862. 
Pratt, .Martin M, Co. B, 1.54th Inf.; must. Sept. 24. 

1862, three years. 
Satterlee, Oel U., Co. K,9th Cav.; must. Sept. 2, ISjjt. 

one year; appointed co. blacksmith Jan. 1, 186.5. 
Satterlee, Zena, Co. A, 9th Cav.; must. Sept. 2. ls<u, 

one y(!ur; died at Harper's Ferry, Feb. 26, 186.5. 
Schiippenhauer, John. Co. C, 13th H. A.; eul. Aujj. 

24, 186:J, three years. 
Scott, .Marshall E., Co. B, 9tli Cav.; must. Oct. 23, 

1861, three years. 

Secoiiib, Henry, Co. G, 1.54th Inf.; must. Sept. 24, 

1862, three years. 

Slocum, J. Newton, Co. C, 64th Inf.; must. Sept. 23, 

1861, three years. 
Slocum, Nathan J., Co. C, 64th Inf.; must. Sept. 2:1, 

1861, three years. 
Smith, Francis, Co. A. 9th Cuv.; must. Sept. 9, 1864, 

one year. 
Spaulding, Henry M., Co. C, 64th Inf.; must. Oct. 14, 

18»jl, three years. 
Tardea, John, Co. I, 64th Inf.; killed al Spotsylva- 
nia Court House. 
Thurber, Joel, Co. B, 154th Inf.; must. Sept. 9, 1864, 

one year. 
Tracy, Hiram, Co. C, 64th Inf.; must. Oct. 15, 1861, 

three years; wounded at Spotsylvania Court 

House, May 12, 1864. 
Tracy, Sylvester, Co. E, 72d Int.; must. June 20, 1S61, 

three years; wounded May 5, 1864, at Spotsylva- 
nia Court House. 
Urelff. Henry, Co. B, 1.54th Inf.; must. Sept. 24, 1862, 

three years; pro. Corp.; died of disease contracted 

in service. 
Vannatta, Elias, Co. C, 64th Inf.; must. Oct. 15, 1861, 

three years; died of wounds at Fair Oaks, June 1, 

1862. 
Vannatta, William, Co. C, 64th Inf.; must. Oct. 15, 

1861, three yeai^s; prisoner June, 1864, to April, 

186.5. 

28 



Wickham, Levant, Co H, 9th Cav.; must. Sept. 9, 

1884, one year. 
Wickham, Thomas, Co. D, 9th Cav.; must. Sept. 9, 

1864, one year. 
Wickham, William T., Co. I, 37th Inf.; must. May 20, 

1861, three years; pro. corp.; killed at Chancel- 
lorsville. 

Wilson, Garrett, corp. Co. B, 1.54th Inf.; must. Sept. 

21), 1862, three years. 
Wilson, Perry, Co. L, 2d N. Y. Mtd. Kitles; enl. Nov., 

ISa. three years; shot throujrh the head in front 

of Petersbui-H-. July 31, 1864. 
Win;:, .Vsa S., Co. G, 1.54th Inf.; enl. Sept. 1, 1862, 

three years. 
Woodruff, Albert, Co. B, 9th Cav.; must. Oct. 3, 1861, 

three years; severely wounded in left let; in bat- 
tle of Wilderness. 
Woodruff, Joel W., Co. G, 1.54th Inf.; must. Sept. 9, 

1864, one year; died at Goldsborouyh, March, 186.5. 
Worden, Asa, Co. C, 9th Cav.; must. Sept. 0, 1864, one 

year. 

ELLICOTTVILLE. 

Abers, Garret, Co. I, 37th Inf. 
Aeman, Fred, Co. E, 5th <_'av. 
Aeman, John, Co. E, 5th Cav. 
.\llen, Uaniel B., capt. Co. B, 1.54th Inf.; enl. Aug-. 16, 

1862, three ycais; pro. major; lieut. -col. 
Andrews, Jerome A., Co. I, 37th Inf.; enl. May 9, 1861, 

two \ears. 
Baillet, Geor;re W., 1st lieut. Co. I, 37ili Inf.; enl. 

-5Iay 9, 1861, two years. 
Bailey, Harry L., musician Co. I, 37th Inf.; enl. May 

9, 1861, two yeai-s. 
Batt, William, Co. I, 37th Inf.; wounded at Williams- 

bui-^'. 
Bentley, Byron H., Co. I, 37th Inf.; enl. .May 9, 1861, 

two years; taken prisoner at Richmond. 
Bing-hum, Daniel (1., lieut.-col. 64th Inf.; pro. to 

col.; must, in Nov. 1.5, 1861, for three years or 

during' war. 
Bird, .VIe.vander, corp. Co. G, 1.54th Inf.; pro. 1st 

lieut; must. Sept. 24, 1862, three years. 
Bird, James W., seijft. Co. d, 1.54th Inf.; must. Sept. 

24, 1S<J2, three years. 
Bird, William, Jr., ord.-scryt. Co. 1, 37th Inf.: enl. 

Jlay 9, 1861, two years; pro. lieut.; rc-enl. 179th 

Int.; pro. capt. 
Bishop, Georac, Co. I, 37tli Inf.; killed. 
Bli^'htuu, Henry, Co. G, 1.54th inf.; must. Sept. 24, 

1862, three years. 
Bolies, H. E., Pa. re;,^. 
Bryant, Hamilton T., corp. Co. I, 37th Inf.; enl. May 

9, 1861, two years. 
Bryant, Levi D., Co. G, l.>tth Inf.; must. Oct., 1804. 
Burlin^'ame, Victor U., Co. A, 154tli Inf.; must. Sept. 

24, i»62, three years. 
Calkins, James, Co. B, 154th Inf.; enl. Any. 8, 1862, 

three years. 
Clark, William T., capt. Co. I, 37th Inf.; enl. May 9, 

1801, two years. 
Cochrane, Au^'ustus, Co. G, 154th Inf. 
Coit. Gordon, Co. I, 37th Inf.; enl. May 9, 1861, two 

years; re-enl. in 2d Mtd. Kitles. 
Conklin, Benjamin H., Co. I, 37th Inf.; enl. May 9, 

1861, two years. 

Cooley, Charles H., Co. G, 154th Inf.; must. Sept. 24, 

1862, three years. 

Cooley, Ebenezer M., Co. G, 1.54th Inf.; must. Sept. 

34, 1862, three years. 
Cotter, Andrew, 37th Inf.; killed in action. 
Crosby, Alauson, 2d lieut. Co. A, 154th Int.; must. 

Sept. 26, 1862, three years; pro. 1st lieut.; capt.; 

died between Atlanta and Chickamauga of 

wounds. 
Devine, Owen, Co. I, 37th Inf.; enl. May 9, 1861, two 

years. 
Dolph D. W., Co. G, 154th Inf.; must. Sept. 24, 1862, 

three years. 
Earle, William H., corp. Co. I, 37th Inf.; enl. May 9, 

1861, two years. 
Ehman, Christian, Co. E, 5th Cav.; enl. Aug. 30, 1861, 

three years. 
Ehman, Fred J., Jr., Co. E, 5th Cav.; enl. Aug. 30, 1861, 

three years. 
Fedi.ic, George (no record). 
Firman, , 100th Kegt. 



!l8 



History of Cattaraugus County. 



Fish, Nelson H., Co. G, 154th Inf.; must. Sept. 24, 1S62, 

three yeare. 
Fisk, Nelson H., Co. G, 154th Inf.; enl. Aug. 19, 1S62, 

three years. 
Goodspeed, George, corp. Co. G, 154th Inf.; must. 

Sept. 24, 1862, three years. 
Gregory, George M., Co. I, 37th Inf.; enl. May 9, IStil, 

two years; killed, 
Groat, Esley, Co. G, 154th Inf.; must Sept. 24, 1S02, 

three veara. 
Groat, John, Co. G, 154th Inf.; must. Sept. 24, 1S62, 

three years. 
Hall, Walter, 37th Inf.; pro. to lieut.; re-enl. in 5tb 

Cav.; pro. to col. 
Hames, Theodore C, wagoner Co. A, 154th Int.; 

must. Sept. 24, IStti, three yeai-s. 
Harmon, Clarence, 1st. lieut. Co. H, 37th Inf. 
Harmon, Luke G., capt. Co. H, 37th Inf.; enl. May 

IB, 1861, two years. 
Harrington. Edwin T„ Co. F, 154th Inf. 
Harrington, H. B., Co. F, 151th Inf.; must. July, 1862. 
Harvey, George \V., Co. G, 14th Art.: enl. Oct. 28, 

1863. 
Hicks, Frankhn, Co. G, 154th Inf.; must. Sept. 24, 

1862, three years. 
Hopkins, Alonzo, Co. I, 37th Inf. 
Hopkins, George G., Co. Cr, 154th Inf.; must.. Sept. 

24, 1862, three yeiirs. 
Huntley, Henry, 37th Inf.; killed at Williamsburg. 
Huntley, Silas S., sergt. Co. I, 37th Inf.; enl. May 9, 

1861, two j'ears; pro. 1st lieut. 

Jackson, John, musician Co. I, 37th Inf.; enl. May 

9, 1861, two yeai-s; re-enl. Co. D, 179th Int., Marcn 

11, 18tit. 
Johnson, Bvrou, ord.-sergt. Co. I, 37th Inf.; pro. 

1st sergt. Co. A, l.Mth Inf., July 21, 1862; pro. 

2d lieut., assigned to Co. B; trans, to Co. I, July, 

1863; pro. capt. Co. F, Oct., 1864. 
Johnson, William H., musician Co. A, 154th Inf.; 

must. Sept. 24, 18tj2, three years. 
Jones, Patrick H., Co. H, 37th Inf.; enl. May 16, 1861; 

pro. 2d lieut.; adjt.; major; col. 154th Inf.; brig.- 

general. 
Kingsley, N. A., Co. G, 154th Inf.; must. Sept. 24, 1862, 

three years. 
Kingsiey, T. N., Co. G, 154th Inf.; must. Sept. 24, 1862, 

three years. 
Kingsiey, Warren, corp. Co. G, 154th Inf.; must. Sept. 

24, 18(;2, three yeai-s; killed at Chancellorsville. 
Klumpp, W. W., Co. 1,37th Inf.; enl. May 9, 1861, two 

years. 
Lamb, Moses B., Co. G, 154th Inf.; must. Sept. 24, 

ls<i2, three years. 
Lewis, Sidney M., Co. C, 13th H. A.; enl. Aug. 7, 1863, 

three years. 
Longhaus, John, Co. G, 1.54th Inf. 
Low, Henry A., Co. I, 37th Inf.; enl. May 9, 1861; re- 
enl. Co. F, 9th Cav. 
Matteson, Charles H., hospital steward, 154th Inf.; 

must. Sept. 26, 18<i2, three years. 
Maybe, A. (colored), 20th Conn. Inf. 
McCadden, Kichard J., sergt. Co. G, 154th Inf.; must. 

Sept. 24, l.*2, three years. 
Mclnery, John, 179th Inf.; (not on original muster- 

in-rolls). 
Miekle, Benjamin, Co. G, 154th Inf.; must. Sept. 24, 

1862, three years. 

Morris, Ebenezer H., Co. I, 37th Inf.; enl. May 9, 1861. 
Morris, James, Co. I, 37th Inf.; enl. May 9, 18U1, two 

years. 
Mulholland, WiUiam, Co. G, 154th Inf.: must. Sept. 

24, 1862, three years. 
Nelson, John, Co. 1, 13th H. A. 
Noyes, Samuel C, Jr., adj. 154th Inf.; must. Sept. 26, 

18«J2, three years; killed at Chancellorsville, May 

3, 186:j. 
Nye, Cornelias, Co. G, 154th Inf.; must. Sept. 24, 1862, 

three years. 
Oakes, Hiram. Co. I, .37th Inf. 
Oyer, Clark, sergt. Co. G, 1.54th Inf.; must. Sept. 24, 

1862, three years. 
Pettit, Amos, sutler Co. G, 1.54th Inf. 
Pettit, George W., Co. G, 154th Inf. 
Pettit, Joshua K., corp. Co. A, 154th Inf.; must. Sept. 

24, 1862, three years. 
Potter, Charles B., sergt. Co. I, 37th Inf.; re-enl. as 

1st. Ueut. Co. F, 194ih Int.; pro, to capt. same co. 

and regt. 



Prine, Israel D., Co. 1, 37th Inf.; enl. May H, 1861, two 

years; (missing). 
Pryor, Peter (no record). 
Kazey, Lorenzo L., corp. Co. E, 5th Cav.; enl. Aug. 26, 

1861, three years. 

Keed, I)e Forest, Co. G, 154th Inf.; must. Oct., 1864, 

three j-ears. 
Rice, Addison G., col. 154th Inf.; must, in Sept. 26, 

1862, resigned as soon as regt. reached Washing- 
ton. 

Kider, G. M., 179th Inf. (not on original muster-in- 

roUs). 
Boot, Marvin J., Co. G, lo4th Inf.; must. Sept. 24, 1862, 

three years. 
Rowland, Bradley, Co. G, 1,54th Inf.; enl. July 28, 1862, 

three years. 
Rowland, Hiram (no record). 
Sa.\ton, B. Leonard, capt. Co. A, 1.54th Inf.; must. 

Sept. 26, 1862, three years; re-enl. in 179th Regt. as 

1st. lie\it.; killed in front of Petersburg. 
Shankland, Uobert H., Jr., qrm., 5th. Cav. 
Sheffield, Henry (colored). 
Sheffield, J. M. (colored), Co. F, 4.3d Pa. Inf. 
Sheffield, Wesley (colored). 
Shelnor, Sanford, Co. G, 1.54th Inf. 
Shultz. Charles. Co. I, 37th Inf.; enl. May 9, 1861. 
Shultz, Julius C, sergt. Co. I, 37th Inf.; enl. May 9, 

1861, two years. 

Snow, Freeman, Co. I, 37th Inf.: enl. May 9, 1861, two 
years; wounded and taken prisoner. 

Stevens, Perry, Co. 1, 37th Inf.; enl. May 9, 1861, two 
years. 

Stuart, J. Hadley, hospital steward Co. 1, 37th Inf.; 
enl. May 9, 1861, two years; died of fever at For- 
tress Monroe. 

Towsley, George H.. Co. H, 37th Inf.; killed at Chan- 
cellorsville, May 3, 1863. 

Trivett, ComtantS., 2d lieut. Co. I, 37th Inf.; enl. May 
9, 1861, two years. 

Turner, Jerome, Co. G, 154th Inf. 

Turner, Philo C, Co. I, 37th Inf.; enl. May 9, 1861; 
killed in action. 

Vallelly, James L., sergt. Co. C, 164th Inf.; enl. Aug. 
28, 1862, three years. 

Vaughan, Abraham, Co. A, 188th Regt.; died in hos- 
pital at Washington, of a lever, Aug. 19, 1864. 

Vedder, Commodore P., 1st lieut. Co. G, 154th Inf.; 
must. Sept. 26, 1862, three years. 

Vinton, Wm. F., Co. A, 154th Inf.; must. Sept. 24, 

1862, three years. 

Wickham, Wm., Co. I, 37th Inf.; enl. May 9, 1861, two 

years. 
Williams, George P., Co. I, 37th Inf.; enl. May 9, 

1861, two years. 
Wilson, Wm., Co. G, 154th Inf.: must. Sept. 24, 1862. 
Wood, David H., Jr., Co. I, 37th Inf.; enl. May 9, 

1861, two years. 
Woodard, Samuel, corp. Co. I, 37th Inf.; enl. May 9, 

1861, two years. 
Wort, De Witt C, 179th Inf. (not on original rauster- 

in-rolls). 

FARMERSVILLE. 

Adams, Albert, Co. D, 64th Inf.; enl. 1861.; disch. at 

expiration of term. 
Adams, David, Co. D, 64th Inf.; enl. 1861: died of 

disease in 1862. 
Adams, Edward, Co. D, 81st Inf.; enl. 1865. 
Alexander, Bradley, Co. E, 5th Cav.; enl. 1861; 

wounded; re-enl.; taken prisoner. 
Alexander, Nelson, Co. D, 64th Inf.; enl. 1862; wound- 
ed at Fredericksburg; disch. 
Austin, Daniel, sergt. Co. K, 94th Inf.; enl. 1862; 

wounded; disch. 
Austin, Xina, navy; landsman. Undine; enl. 1864; 

died in Mound City, 111., Jan. 11, 186.5. 
Bannister, Adam C, navy; seaman. Flambeau; enl. 

1861; disch. June, 1862. 
Bard, Samuel, Co. D, 154th Inf.; enl. 1862; disch. 1863, 

for disability. 
Blackman, James A., Co. D, 13th H. A.; enL 1863; 

disch at close of war. 
Brown, A. A., Co. D, 154th Inf.; enl. 1862; disch. at 

close of war. 
Brown, George R., Co. D, 81st Inf.: enl. 1865; disch. 

at close of war. 



Roster of Soldiers and Sailors. 



219 



Bullock, Horace W., Co. C, 13th H. A.; enl. 18G3; 

disch. at close of war. 
Bush. .John, sergt. Co. D, L^ith Int.; enl. l.%2; 

wounded at Gettysburg: disch. at close of war. 
Bush, l{oht., Co. 1, 71st Inf.; enl. 1801; taken prisoner; 

exchanged; disch. at expiration of term. 
Byiugton, Norton, Co. E, .5th Cav.; enl. 1861; re-enl.; 

wounded; disch at close of war. 
Cady, George, Co. D, 8l3t Inf.; enl. 1S0.J; disch. at 

close of war. 
Caprwin, George H., sergt. Co. K, 10.5th Inf.; enl. 1862; 

disch. after ten months' service. 
Carpenter, Adelbert, sergt. Co. D, 0-tth Inf.; enl. 1S61; 

wounded May, 1861; disch. Nov., 1864. 
Carpenter, Leonard, navy; landsman. Undine; onl. 

mU; disch. June, 1865. 
Carpenter, Levi, Co. D, 61th Inf.; enl. 1861; killed at 

Gettysliurg. 
Cleveland, Freeman, Co. D, 61th Inf.; enl. 1862; diseh. 

at closi! of war. 
Coly. David, Co. D, 61tb Inf.; enl. 1862; wounded at 

Fredericksburg; died. 
Conrad, Henry A , Co. D, 16l.st Inf.; enl. 1864; wound- 
ed; Misch. at close of war. 
Conrad, Henry C, Co. D, 161st Inf.; enl. 1864; wound- 
ed; died Sept. 5, 1864. 
Conrad, Justin M., Co. D, 64th Inf.; enl. 1862; disch. 

at close of war. 
Day, Daniel, Co. D, 64th InL; enl. 1861; wounded 

Ave times in battle of Fair Oak.«. 
Day. \Vm., Co. D, 64th Inf.; enl. 1863; disch. Jan., 1864. 
Dennison, W'm. A., Co. D, 1.54th Inf.; enl. 1862. 
Durkee, Alson, Co. B, 2:jd Inf.; enl. 186U disch. at 

exuiration of term. 
Eckert, Jerman A., Co. D, 64th Inf.; enl. 1863; disch. 

after six months' service. 
Evans, William, Co. I, 71st Inf.; enl. 1.861; disch. at 

expiration of term. 
Frasier, Spencer M., Co. D, 64th Int.; enl. 1863; 

wounded at Chancellorsville; died of disease 

Feb. 28, 1864. 
Frasier, Wallace, sergt. Co. D, 64th Inf.; disch. at 

close of war. 
Giles, James T., Co. B, 2d Mtd. RiHcs; enl. 186:!; disch. 

at close of war. 
Hayford, .Mortimer D., Co. D, 64th Inf.; enl. 1861; 

killed in battle of Fair Oaks. 
Hayford, Wallace \V.. sergt. Co. D, 64th Inf.; enl. 

1S62; disch. at close of war. 
Henry, William, navy; landsman, I'aic Paiv; enl. 

18<)4; disch. June, 1865. 
Herrick, Edward, Co. U, 2d Mtd. Rilles; eul. 186.3; 

disch. at close of war. 
Holmes, C. VV., navy; landsman, Hiuilnta; enl. 1864; 

disch. June, 186.5. 
Hoopi.r, Jolin, corp. Co. F, 5th Cav.; enl. 1861; disch. 

at expiration of term. 
Howard, Francis, Co. D, 64th Inf.; enl. 1862; killed at 

Gettysburg. 
Howard, Thomas, navy; landsman, Uinliiic; enl. 1864; 

disch. at close of war. 
Hudson, Charles, Co. D, 64th Inf.; eul. 1861; died of 

disease April 4, 1862. 
Hudson, Geo., Co D, 64th Int.; enl. 1861; disch. 1863. 
Hunt, Nathaniel T., Co. D. 64th Int.; enl. 1861; 

wounded June 17. 1864; disch. Dec, 1864. 
Kingsbury, James H., sergt. Co. D, U4th Inf.; enl. 

1861; disch. June, 1864. 
Kingsbury, Otis, Co. B, 2:id Int.; enl. May 16, 1861, 

two years; re-enl. 1st sergt. Co. L), 13th H. A., 

June 11, 186:J, three years; pro. 2d lieut.;. must. 

out at close of war. 
Kin.'sbury, Percival, Co. D, 64th Inf.; enl. 1861; disch. 

1862; re-enl. in 13th H. A.; disch. at close of war. 
Knight, Alfred E., Co. K, 105th Int.; enl. 1862; in An- 

dcrsonville prison; died at Annapolis, Md., April 

6, 1865. 
Leon, Patrick, Co. D, 64th Inf.; enl. 1861; wounded at 

Fiiir Oaks; died of wounds at Philadelphia. 
Lewis, Guy C, sergt. Co. D, 64th Inf.; eul. 1861; trans. 

to V. K. C; disch.; re-enl. 
Lewis, Kalph, Co. D, U4tli Inf.; eul. 1861: disch; re-enl. 
Lewis, Stillman E., Co. M,13th H. A.; enl. 1864; disch. 

at e.xpliJition of terra. 
Little, Adelbert W., Co. K, 94th Inf.; enl. 1864; 

wounded at Hatcher's Hun. 
Little, Frederick M., sergt. Co. I, 71st Inf.; enl. 1861; 
disch. at close of term. 



Little, Henry, Co. K, 105th Inf.; enl. 1SG2; disch at 

close of war. 
Little, Waller N., wagoner Co. K, 105th Inf.; enl. 1862; 

disch. at close of war. 
Manwaring, Civilian, corp. Co. D, 1.54th Inf.; enl. 1862; 

disch. for disability 186:3. 
Martin, Hiram A., Co. D, 154th Inf.; enl. 1862; disch. 

at close of war. 
Meade. Joe, Co. D, 64th Inf.; enl. 1861; disch. at expi- 
ration of term. 
Merrill, Emmet W., Co. B, 23d Inf.; enl. 1861; disch. 

at e-vpiration of term. 
Merrill, Henry S., Co. B, 23d Inf.; enl. 1861; disch at 

e.xpiration of term. 
Merrill, John B., Co. D, 64th Inf.; eni. 1861; killed at 

Fair Oaks. 
Nichols, John, sergt. Co. D, 64th lut.; enl. 1861; disch. 

at e.xpiration ot term. 
Nicholus, Ormus, Co. B, 2d Mtd. Rifles; enl. 1.863; 

killed while on picket duty June 2, 1864. 
Osborn, Franklin, sergt. Co. D, 64th Int.; enl. 1861; 

wounded at Chancellorsville; disch. at e.xpira- 
tion of term. 
Parrish, Zabad, Co. D, 64th Int.; enl. 1862; disch. after 

six months' service. 
Patterson, Henry L., Co. D, 1.54th Inf.; enl. 1862; died 

of disease Jan. 9, 1803. 
Patterson, Nathaniel, Co. D, 1.54th Inf.; eul. 1862; 

disch. at close of war. 
Peet, Abram A., 2d lieut. Co. D, 64th Inf.; enl. 1862; 

pro. Nov., 1864; disch at close of war. 
Peet, Silas (no record). 
Persons, Daniel D., navy; landsman, Pcxii' Pair; enl. 

1.8(>4; disch. June, 186.5. 
Potter, Augustus, enl. 1865; disch. at close of war. 
Potter, Stanley N., sergt. Co. K, 1st Mtd. Rifles; eul. 

18*52; re-enl. 1864; disch. atcloseof war. 
Pratt, Adelbert A., Co. H, 93d Int.; enl. 1865; disch. 

at close ot war. 
Pratt, Truman C. (no record). 
Ray. James, Co. D, 64th Inf.; enl. 1862; wounJed at 

Gettysburg; died Aug. 6, 1863. 
Rhodes, William M , Co. D, 64th Inf.; enl. 1.861; died 

ot disease at Vorktowu, Va. 
Robbins, Albert W., corp. Co. A, .85th Inf.; enl. 1861; 

re-enl.; disch. at close, of war. 
Robbins, Egbert W., Co. B, 2d Mtd. Rifles; enl. 186.3; 

killed while on picket duty Aug. i:!, 1864. 
Robbins, Milton H., sergt. Co. D, 64th Int.; enl. 1862; 

wounded at Fredericksburg; killed before 

Petersburg, Va., 1864. 
Sessions. Albert, navy; landsman. Undine; enl. 1864; 

died in Clarksville, Tenn. 
Sessions, Luther M., Co. D, 2d H. A.; enl. 1864; died ot 

disease at Elmira, 1864. 
Stevenson, Loreii W., (lo. D,64th Inf.; enl. 1.861; died 

of disease Aug. 8, 1863. 
Tyler, Franklin, Co. B, 2d Mtd. RiUes; enl. 186:3; 

disch. at close of war. 
Valentine, Foster, navy; landsman. Undine; enl. 1864; 

disch. July, 1865. 
Wade, Henry, 1st. sergt. Co. D, 9th Cav.: enl. 1863; 

wounded at Winchester; disch. April, 186.5. 
Watkius, Loroy C, Co. D, 64th Int.; enl. 1.^61; 

wounded; disch. 
Watkins, Romanzo, Co. B, 2d Mtd. Ritles; enl. 1804; 

disch. at close of war. 
Wheeler, Thaddeus, navy; landsman, Paw Paw; enl. 

1.8(M; disch. June, 186.1 
Wickwire, Hiram L., 13th H. A ; died of disease Feb. 

10, 1865. 
Woithington, Giles M., sergt. Co. B, 2a Mtd. Ritles; 

enl. 186:!; disch. at close of war. 
Worthington, Henry, Co. D, 64th Inf.; enl. 1861; 

wounded at Fair Oaks; disch. 
Worthington, Jacob, navy; landsman, Paio Paw; enl. 

1S64; disch. June, 180.5. 
Worthington, Sylvester, navy; landsman, Undine; 

eul. 1864; shipwrecked: wounded; taken prisoner; 

rescued by Union soldiers. 
Wright, Orrin, Co. H, Wid Int.; enl. 1865; disch. 

FRAN KLIN VILLE. 

Adams, David, Co. I, 6th Cav.; must. Nov. 1, 1861, 
three years; died ot disea.se contracted in service. 

Adams, George W.; navy; must. Sept., 1864, one year; 
died of disease contracted in service. 



History of Cattaraugus County. 



Bard, Robert, Co. I, 6th Cav.; must. Nov., 1S61, three 

years. 
Bard, Samuel P., musician Co. D, 154th Inf.; must. 

1862, three years. 

Benedict, Wm. H., l.ith Cav.; must. Feb., 1864, three 

years; died of disease March, 1864. 
Bond, .Marshall O., 1st lieut. Co. D, 154th Inf.; must. 

1863, three years; resigned in >larch, 1863. 
Bowen, Azine F., 105th Inf.; must. 1S61, three years. 
Bowen, Judson, loth Cav.; must. Feb., 1864, three 

years. 
Brigg-s. Gilbert, 2d Inf.; must. June, 1861, two j'enrs. 
Rurlingarae, Addison G., 64th Inf.; must. June, 1861, 

three years; pro. sergt.; wounded at Williams- 
burg, Va 
Burrows, Jasper, loth Cav.; must. Feb., 1864, three 

years. 
Carey, Howard, 15th Cav.; must. Feb., 1864, three 

years; wounded near New Creek, Va. 
Chirk, Henry, Co. D, lo4th Inf.; must. Aug., 1863, 

tnree years; trans, to Invalid Corps. 
Cline, Elisha, Jr., Co. K, 85th Inf.; must. June, 1861, 

three years. 
Copeland, James,' Co. D, 1.54th Inf.; must. Au^-., 1862, 

three years. 
Corthill, Barzilla, 154th Inf.; must. Aug., 1883, three 

years. 
Currie, John, 71st Inf.; must. June, 1861, three years. 
Curtiss, Azor, 89th Inf.; must. June, 1861. three 

years; wounded and taken prisoner at Sharps- 
burg. Sept., 1863; paroled on the field; disch. on 

account of wounds; re-enl. Sept., 1864, in 188th 

Inf.; pro. to lieut. 
Curtis, James, Co. I, 7th Inf.; must. June, 1861, three 

yeai-s; re-enl. in 188th Inf.; pro. to capt.; wound- 
ed at Dutch Gap, and was present at surrender of 

Gen. Lee. 
Day, JIarvin G., Co. D, 154th Inf.; must. Aug., 1862, 

three years. 
Day, Orlando F., 21st Inf.; mu^t. June, 1861, two 

years; died at Alexandria, Aug., 1864, from 

wounds. 
Dickinson, Solomon, Co. I, 6th Cav.; must. Nov. 1. 

1861, three years; served two years; re-enl. as 

veteran. 
Diltz, Gilbert, Co. D, 15Uh Inf.; must. Aug., 1862, 

three yeai-s; pro. to sergt.; killed in battle of 

Rocky Face Ridge, Ga. 
Dolph, Wesley, 154th Inf.; must. Aug., 1863, three 

years; died at Annapolis from disease contracted 

in Libby prison. 
Drewry, Ebenezer, 105th Inf.; must. Oct., 1861, three 

years. ^ 

Dwyer, Joseph, 154th Inf.; must. Aug., 1863, three* 

years. 
Elmer, .Vustin W., navy; must. Sept.. 1864, one year; 

died of disease contracted in service. 
Farrall, Michael, 64th Inf.; must. June, 1861, three 

years. 
Fay, Warren R., Co. L. 15th Cav.; must. Feb., 1864, 

three years; trans, to Invalid Corps and died in 

Washington, Sept., 1865. 
F'ish, William, Co. I, 6th Cav.; must. Nov. 1, 1861, 

three years; served two yeai-s; re-enl. as veteran. 
Fitch, Charles, 64th Inf.; must. June, 1861, three 

years; served one jear and died of disease con- 
tracted in service. 
Fitch, John O., 1.54th Inf.; must. Aug., 1863, three 

years. 
Frazer, James, Jr., navy; must. Aug., 1864, one year. 
I[a!e, Hinun, Co. K, 85tli Inf.; must. June, 1861, three 

yeur.s. 
Hall, William, Co. D, 1.54th Inf.; must. Aug., 1863, 

three years; trans, to Invalid Corps. 
Harvey, Lyman, Co. I, 6th Cav.; must. No%'. 1, 1861, 

thrieyeai-s; died at Ale.\andria, Va., Aug., 1863, 

of disease. 
Hatfield, Wm., 188th Inf.; must. .\ug., 1864, one year. 
Hayden, Augustin F., Co. I, 6th Cav.; must. Nov. I, 

1861, three years; pro. to capt., and trans, to Gen. 

Pleasiinton's staff as A. A. A. G.; thence to Gen. 

Sheridan's staff with rank of major. 
Hill, Henry, 154th Int.; must. Aug., 1863, three years; 

pro. to color-sergt. 
Hill, HoUis W., Co. Iv, 85th Inf.; must. June, 1861, 

three years; wounded at Fair t)aks. Va. 
Hogg, Wm., navy; gunboat, I\iw I'aw: must. Sept., 

1864, one j'car. 



Hotchkiss, Orange, 1.54th Inf.; must. Aug., 1862, 

thr- e years. 
Hotchkiss, Stepheu, 154th Inf.; must. Aug., 1862, 

three years. 
Howard, Wallace, Co. H, 14th Cav.; must. Nov., 1863, 

three years. 
Howard, Webster, Co. D, 15th Cav.; must. Feb., 1864, 

three years. 
Jones, Henry, 154th Inf. (not on original muster-in 

rolls of regt.) 
Jones, Oliver, 154th Inf. (not on original muster-in 

rolls of regt.). 
Jones, Thomas, 1.54th Inf. (not on original muster-in ' 

rolls of regt ). 
Kerr, Richard W., ISSth Inf.; must. Aug., 1864, one 

year. 
Laidlaw, Wm. G., navy; gunboat Tawa: must. Sept., 

1861, one year. 
Latham. Russel, navy: gunboat Taiva; must. Sept. 

1864, one year; died in hospital at Clarksvitle 

Tenn., Dec. 33, 1864. 
Lawrence, Dalliis, &4th Inf.; must. June, 1861, three 

years; re-eul. Jan.. 1864. in 15th N. Y. Cav. 
Lawrence, Joseph, Jr., 64th Inf.; must. June, 1861, 

three years. 
Lawrence, William, Co. I, 6th Cav.; must. Nov. 1. 

1861, three years; died in service at York, Pa , 

Dec. 26, 1861. 
Lean, Timothy, Co. I, 6th Cav.; must. Nov. 1, 1861, 

three years; re-enl. as veteran. 
Little, James, Co. I. 6th Cav.; must. Nov. 1, 1861, 

three years; served two years; re.enl. as veteran; 

pro. to com. -sergt. 
Lowe, Judson, sergt. Co. B, 0th Cav.; must. Oct. 1, 

1861, three years: pro. to 3d lieut. Dec, 1863; died 

in Seminary Hospital, Washington, I>. C, Nov. 

19, 186;3, from wounds received at Brandy Station. 
Marsh, Staley, Co. I. 71st Inf.; must. June, 1861. three 

years. 
McAtleo, John, Co. I, 6th Cav.; must. Nov. 1, 1861, 

three years; killed in battle and buried on the 

field. 
McClure, Fayette, lieut. Sign.il Corps; must. 1861. 
McClure, Freeman, corp. Co. I, 6th Cav.; must. Nov. 

1, 1S91, three years; disch. after one year by icason 

of injuries received. 
McClure, .lohn, Co. 1, 6th Cav.; must. Nov. 1, 1861, 

three years; transferred to the command of Gen. 

Sheridan and mortally wounded at Winchester. 
McClure, John H., 1.54th Inf.; must. Aug., 1863, three 

years; pro. to sergt. 
McClure, Leonard 1).. 2l3t Inf.; must. June, 1861, two 

years; re-enl. in 15th N'. Y. Cav. 
McMahon, Patrick, Co. I, 6th Cav.; must. Nov. 1, 

1861, three years: died in Aug., 1863, of disease 

contracted in service. 
McNall, Thomas E., Co. L6th Cav.; must. Nov. 1, 1661, 

three years; pro. to sergt.; killed at Brandy Sta- 
tion in Oct., 186:1. 
McStay, James, 154th Inf.; must. Aug., 1862. three 

years. 
Miller, John, 1.54th Inf.: must. Aug., 1862, three years. 
Morgan, James, Co. K, ivith Inf.; must. June, 1861, 

three yea r^. 
JIorrisoM, Alfred. 64th Inf.; must. June, 1861, three 

years. 
Nichols, James, navy: must. Sept., 1864, one jear. 
Noyes, Emory, 154th Inf.; must. Aug., 1863, three 

years; killed at Chaiicellorsville, May 3, 186;J. 
Oakes, Eli L. mo record). 

Oakes, Elijah, 188th Inf.; must. A.ug., 1864, one year. 
Older, James M., 3d Inf.; must. June, 1861, two years. 
Older, JIarvin, sergt. Co. I, 6th N. Y. Cav.; must. 

Nov. 1, 18til, three years; com. -sergt. .Jan., 1863; 

wounded at Chancellorsville; taken prisoner and 

sent to Libby prison; e.xchanged and rejoined 

regt. June, 1863; detacntni from regt. Aug. i, 1863, 

by order of Secretary of War, and detailed as 

clerk in Ord. Dept.. Cav. Bureau. 
Older, Robert !•;., 71st Inf., Sickels' Brigade; must. 

Jan., 1861, three years; killed in battle June 18, 

1864. 
Older, William M., Co. L, 15ch Cav.; must. Feb. 9, 

1864, three years; wounded and captured by Mos- 

by at Front Ko.val, .\Iay2K, 1864; sent tn Ander- 
sonville, Ga., and died of starvation Aug. 8, 18<W. 
Patterson, William, 15th Cav.; must. Feb., 1864, ihiee 
years. 



Roster of Soldiers axd Sailors. 



Perry, James. Tlst Inf.; must. .Tune, 18G], three years. 
Phillips, David. Co. I. 6th Cav.; must. Nov. 1, 1)<U1, 

three vears: killed near White House iu Va., 

June, 1WW. 
Phillips. William W., sergt. Co. I, 6th Cav.; must. 

Nov., ISU. three years; pro. lieut. Dec., 18C3; mor- 
tally -svounded at Beverly's Ford in June, 1S6;3, 

and died at Seminary Hospital. 
Plumb, .M., 1.54th Inf.; must. Auy.. 15G2, three years; 

died of disease contracted in service. 
Poll man, Harrison, 1.5th Cav.; must. Feb., 1SC4, three 

years. 
Preston, Edward, 5th Cav.; must. Nov., l.''6I, three 

vears. 
Prin;,'Ie, William, Co. C, 104th Inf.; must. Oct., 1,-^ni, 

three years: wounded at Co'.d Harbor and left on 

tlie Held. 
Putnam. Joseph M. C, ISSth Inf.; must. Ausr., l'«4, 

one year. 
Keyiiolds, liiiel, navy; must. Sept., ISiU, one year; 

died of disease contracted in service. 
Ko;;ers, Mai-shall, Co. D. KHtli Inf.; nuist. Oct. 9, isiil, 

three years: p'O. to 1st lieut. Nov. s, if^iB. and to 

capt. Co. D. -May 2.5, Ifiti; wounded at South 

Mountain, Sept. 14, lsi>2: captured at Wcldon 

Uailroad and sent to Libby prison; e.xchd. and 

joined rc-'t. Feb.. Wii-'>. 
SaiMiders, Iien.iamin F., sergt. Co. I, Gth Cav.; must. 

Nov. 1, ixsi, three yeai-s: pro. lieut.; died from 

wounds received near Staunton while in pursuit 

of (;en. Early. 
Saundei-s. James. Co. I, lith Cav.; must. Nov. 1, ISUI, 

three years: re-cril. as veteran. 
Scott, John, Co. 1, lith Cav.; must. Sept., 18(14, one 

year. 
Searl. Coville, ir>4th Inf.; must. Aujj., IsiC, three 

years; trans, to L'. S. Battery. 
Searl, Dalston.64th Inf.; must. Jiuic.lsill. three years. 
Seaii, Hantord, serjft. Co. (.', Hi5th Int.; must. June, 

iNi'd, two years: died in hospital from wounds, 
.■^earl, Walter, navy; must. Sept., I8ij4, one year; 

served on jruoboat Tain! an<l the I'iiichnniti. 
SInunan, Ernest, Co. I, tith Cav.; must. Sept., l.-<i;4; 

pro. to com. serift. 
Simonds, Justin, j three years; died in the 

service. 
Smith, Ephraim, Co. I, ijth Cav.; must. Nov. 1, isfll, 

three years; killed at Brandy Station in Oct., l.~«i:i. 
Smith, Horace, Co. D, !-54th Inf.; must. Autr., isti-*, 

tlu-ce years; prisoner in Libby prison: rejoined 

rejjt. Feb.. 1^14; pro. to lieut. 
S(iuircs, Franklin, 15th Cav.; must. Feb., 18ii4, three 

years. 
Stiles, Darius. Co. I, 0th Cav.; must. Nov. 1, ISGI, 

three years (rcfe't'l blacksmith); re-enl. as veteran. 
Stimson, Franklin, loth Cav.: must. Feb., 1SG4, three 

years. 
Stimson, George. Co. K, Soth Inf.; must. June, 1801, 

three years; died at home while on a furlough 

Aug., l^<^;i. 
Stimson, Hiram. 1.54th Int.; must. Aug., l.'iO^, three 

years. 
Stow, William, Co. I, 6th Cav.; must. Nov. 1, 18C1, 

three years; re-eni. as veteran. 
Thompson, Frank, Co. I, 6th Cav.; must. Nov. 1, 1861, 

three years. 
Van Aernam, Henry, surg. 1.54th Inf. Sept. 2.5, 1862; 

pro. brigade surg.; med. director 2d Div. ,11th 

A. C, ISo:), afterwai'd the 2ijth A. C, on operating 

statf; resigned Nov., 1.8G4. 
Vosburg, William, Co. D, 15th Cav.; must. Feb., 18G4, 

three years. 
Weeks, Barzilla, navy; must. Sept., 1.8('i4, one year. 
Wheeler, John, 1.54th Inf.; must. Aug., 1862, three 

years. 
White, James, 15th Cav.: must, Feb., 18G4, three 

years; died of starvation in Andei-sonville prison 

in Aug.. IWU. 
Whitney, John, Co. I, 6th Cav.; must. Nov. 1, 18til, 

three years; pro. to sergt.; disch. for injuries re- 
ceived in .service. 
Williams, Charles P., navy; must. Aug'., 1.8G4, one 

year. 
Williams, Clinton, 188th Inf.; must. Aug., 1864, one 

year. 
Wing, Charles, navy; must. Sept., 1804, one year. 
Wing, William. 1.5tli Cav.; must. Feb., 18C4, three 

years. 



Winrich, Benjamin, 64th Inf.; must. June, 1861, three 

yea rs. 
Winton, William, Jr., 64th Inf.; must. June, ISUl, 

three years; wounded at Fair Oaks and died in 

hospital. 

FREEDOM. 

Althof, Albert, Co. K, Kloth Inf.; enl. Jan. 7, 1S02, 

three years; disch. at close of war. 
Arnold, Ambrose F., sergt. Co. D, l-54th Inf.; enl. 

Aug. 4, 1862, three years; killed at Buzzard's Hoost, 

Cia., .May 8, 1864. 
Austin, William, Co. G, 13th Art.; disch. at close of 

war. 
Baldwin, Adelbert A., Co. C, 13th Art.; disch. at close 

of war. 
Baldwin, Lysander W., Co. C, 13th Art.; disch. at 

close of war. 
Brown, Merrit, Co. B, 2d Mtd. Rifies; disch. at close 

of war. 
Brown, Seymour S., corp. Co, E, i)th Cav.: disch. at 

close of war. 
Burden, Alauson (no record). 
Burgess, Eugene (no record). 
Charles, William, Co. F, 1.54th Inf.; enl. Aug 26, 18G2, 

three years. 
Cheesraau. Morris, Co. C, OOth Inf.; disch. at close of 

wa r. 
Cheney, George, Co. C, 96th Inf.; disch. at close of 

war. 
Cheney, Harrison, capt. Co. D, 1.54th Inf.; enl. Sept. 

:i, 1862; pro. raaj.; lieut.-col.: disch. at close of 

war. 
Chittenden, Wm., Co. D, 154th Inf.; enl. Aug. 5, 1862, 

three years. 
Coleman, Richard (no record). 
Cook, Joseph, Co. C, 13th Art.; enl. Aug. 22,1863, 

three yiai-s: disch. iit close of war. 
Crandall, Charles M., Co. C, 13th Art.; disch. at close 

of war. 
Crandall, Oscar .M.. Co. C, 13th Art.; enl. Aug. 24, 

186:!, three years; disch. at close of war. 
CrandMll, William P., Co. D, 1.54th Inf.; enl. July 25, 

1802, three years; disch. at close of war. 
Cnine, Ovid N. (no record). 
Crawford, Joseph R., (.'o. K, 1.54th Inf.; twice severely 

wounded. 
Crawford, Robert O., 1st sergt. Co. D, ITOth Inf.; enl. 

Jan. 2, 181)4, three years; disch. at close of war. 
Crawford, William O., corp. Co. D, 179th Inf.; enl. 

Jan. 2, 1864, three years; disch. at close of war. 
Crowell, Joseph R., Co. D, 154th Inf.; enl. Aug. 8, 

1.862, three years. 
Dailey, John (no record). 
Daley, Almond, Co. D, 154th Inf.; enl. Aug. 14, 1862, 

three years. 
Davis, John J., Co. D, 9th Cav.; disch. at close of war. 
Davis, William M., Co. F, 154th Inf.; enl. Aug. 26, 

1862, three years; disch. at close of war. 
Day, Ellis W., corp. Co. D, 154th Inf.; enl. Aug. 4, 

1862, three years; disch. in 1804 for disability. 
Deyoe, Henry, Co. C, 90th Inf.; disch. at close of war. 
Emth, Robert (no record). 
Felcb, John, Co. F, 154th Inf. 
Felch, John, Co. D, 1.54th Inf.; enl. Aug, 4, 1802, three 

years. 
Fo.x, De Witt C. (no record). 
Fo.\, William H., Co. E, 1st Dragoons. 
Froth, John (no record). 
George, John (no record). 
Gorman, Jeremiah (no reco/d). 
Gould, Lyman (no record). 
Guild, Eugene B., Co. I, 18th Cav.; enl. Sept. 1.5, 180:3, 

three years: disch in 1804. 
Haskell, George W., Co. C, 13th Art.; disch. at close 

of war. 
Hassett, Patrick (no record). 
Himmengarden, Philip, Co. 1, 110th Inf.; wounded at 

Port Hudson; disch. at close of war. 
Holmes, Eber B., Co. D, 154th Inf.; enl. Aug. 4, 1862, 

three years; disch. at close of war. 
Hudson, Miner, Co. F,90th Inf.; disch. at close of war. 
Humphrey, Harrison D., Co. F, 85th Inf.; enl. Aug. 

20, 1861; pro. corp.; disch. 1864; re-enl.; captured; 

died of starvation in rebel prison. 
Hyde, Heman T., Co. D, 64th Inf.; enl. Sept. 24, 1861, 

three years; killed at Chancellorsville, May 3, 1SC3, 



't22 



History of Cattaraugus County. 



James, 'William P., Co. F, l.>ith Tnf.; disch. at close of 

war. 
Johnson, James (no record). 
Johnsou, Julm A. (no record). 
Jones, John B., Co. F, .ith Cav.: enl. Sept. 2, ISfil; pro. 

1st sergt.; re-enl.; disch. at close of war. 
Jones, Lewis L., Co. F, 154th Inf.; enl. Aug. 2G, 1SC2, 

three years. 
Jones, Thomas, Co. A, 9th CaF.; disch. at close of war. 
Jones, Thomas T., Co. F, 154th Inf.; enl. Aug. 2U, 
1SU2, three years; wounded at Chancellnrsvillo; 
disch. at close of war. 
Jones, William E., Co. F, l.>ith Inf.: enl. Aug. 2t!, 
18ti'; captured at Gettysburg and confined in An- 
dersonville; exchanged; pro. Corp.; disch at close 
of war. 
Lewis, Alfred H., 4th sergt. Co. D, 64th Inf.; enl. 
Dec. 5. 1«1, three years; pro. sergt.; 2d lieut.; 1st 
liput.; capt.; killed at Gettysburg. 
Lewis, Richard, Co. F, 15tth Inf.; disch. at close of 

war. 
McGovern, Patrick (no record). 
McKerow, Tliomas (no record). 
Mcarns, Andrew, Jr., Co. F, 1.54th Inf.; disch. at close 

of war. 
Mearns, John, Co. D, 154th Inf.; enl. Aug. 4, 1SC2, 
three years; died June 0, lSt>J, of wounds rec'd 
Mav 2, \f*ii. 
Moore, Sidney. Co. D, 1.54th Inf.; enl. July 2.5, 1SC2, 
three years; prisoner at Dug Gap, Ga.; escaped 
from Andersonville, and rejoined army near 
Atlanta. 
Morey, Charles, Co. D, 64th Inf. 
Morey, Henry (no record) 
Morey, William, Co. E, 5th Cav. 
Morgan, Benjamin D., Co. F, 1.54th Inf.; enl. Aug. 26, 

l.Si2, three ycius. 
Morris, John, Co. D, 151th Inf.; enl. Aug. 4, lS(i2, 

three yeni's. 
Northrup, Hiram, musician Co. D, 1.54th Int.; enl. 

Julv s, isii2, three years. 

Norton, A. M., (Jo. G, Hist Inf.: disch, at close of war. 

Norton. Samuel S., Co. F, 5th Cav.; enl. Sept. 20, istil, 

three years; pro. 1st sergt.; di=cii.atclo3eo( term; 

Osborn, Calvin W., Co. F, 5th Cav.; enl Sept. 7, 1661; 

pro. Corp.: wounded twice; disch. IStM. 
Pinney, Chauncey, Co. D, 154th Inf.; enl. Aug. 4, ISK, 

three yeai's. 
Pinney, Curtis, Co. D, 1.54th Inf.; enl. July 25, 1SU2, 

three years. 
Pinney, Henry A., Co. F, 5tli Cav.; enl. Sept. 12, 1861, 

three years. 
Plucher, John E. (no record). 

Kich, Lafayette, Co. D, 154th Inf.; enl. Aug. 4^1862, 
three yeai-s; killed at ChancellorsviUe, May 2, 
1»B. 
Roberts, Robert, Co. A, nth Cav.; disch at close of 

war. 
Robinson, John (no record). 
Ryan, Andrew I. (no record). 
Ryerson, Smith (no record). 
Seaman, Eiul (no record). 

Shellis, E. M., Co. G, 13th Art.; disch at close nf war. 
Shcllis, Elbert, Co. I), 1.54th Inf.; enl. Aug. 14, 1862, 
three years; disch. 186:!; re-enl. in i:!th H. A; disch. 
at close u£ war. 
Singale, Frank, disch. at close of war. 
Bkeels, Herbert, Co. G, 13th Art.; disch. at close of 

war. 
Sparks, Thomas S., Co. D, 2d Mtd. Rifles; wounded; 

disch. at close of war. 
Sumner, Monroe (no record). 
Van Duzer, George, 2d Mtd. Rifles; disch. at close 

of war. 
Walker, Jefferson (no record). 
Waterman, George A., Co. G, 13th Art.; disch. at close 

of war. 
Williams, Charles, ord.-sergt. Co. F, lD4th Int.; disch. 

at close of war. 
Williams, David, Co. E, 2d Art.; disch. 
Williams, David J., Co. F, 1.54th Inf.; enl. Aug. 26, 
1862, three years; wounded at Fredericksburg; 
disch. at close of war. 
Williams. George P., Co. A, 0th Cav.; disch. at close 

of war. 
Williams, Isaac T., Co. G, i:!6th Inf.; enl. Aug. 8, 1862, 
three yeais; prisoner at Gettysburg; paroled; 
died at Annapoiis. 



Williams, Robert G. (no record*. 

Williams, Samuel, Co. F, 154th Inf.; prisoner at Get- 

tj'sburg; p.iroled; died at home on a furlough. 
Williams, Simeon, Co. G, T8th Inf.; enl. Nov. 25, 1862, 

three years; disch. 1S63, for disability. 
Williams, Wm., Co. F, 1.54th Inf.; enl. Aug. 26, 1862, 

three years. 
Wood, David H., Jr., Co. I, 3Tth Inf.; enl. May 9, 1861, 

two year^; killed at Fair Oaks, June 3, 186.3. 
Wood, Lawrence M., Co. I, 96th Inf.; disch. at close of 

war. 
Wood, Monroe, Co. C, 13th Art.: disch. at close of war. 
Wood, Thoraits J., Co. I, 37th Inf.; enl. May 9, 1861, 

two years; disch. for disability 1862. 
Wyman, Watson, musician Co. G, 78th Inf.; enl. Nov. 

25, 1862, three years; disch. 1864. 

GREAT VALLEY. 

Akers, George W., Co. 1, 1.54th Inf.; enl. Sept. 1, 1862; 

disch. at close of war. 
Akers, Isaac D., Co. A, 154th Inf.; enl. Aug. 3, 1862; 

died in Libby prison Sept., 186:3. 
Akers, John D., Co. A, IS'.lth Inf.; enl. Sept. 1, 18(U; 

died of disease at Park Station, Va., Nov., 1864. 
Akers, William A., Co. A, 1.54th Inf.; enl. July 21, 

1862; disch. at close of war. 
Ale.\ander, Franklin W., 96th Inf.; enl. April 6, 1865. 
Alexander, William, enl. Aug. 21. 1.8ts3. 
Railey, Stewart, Co. I, 154th Inf.; enl. Aug. 23, 1862; 

served till close of war. 
Battles, John; enl. Sept. 21, 1S64._ 
Benton, James A., enl. Sept. 28, 1864. 
Bogenschuetz, Anthony, Co. D, 187th Inf.; enl. Oct. 1, 

1.864. 
Booth, Dan. F., enl. Aug. 21, 1863. 
Booth, Edward, Co. C, 105th Inf.; enl. Feb. 2, 1862. 
Booth, Thomas, 6.5th Inf.; enl. Oct. 4, 1864. 
Booth, Thomas, Co. E, 187th Inf.; enl. Oct. 4, 1864; 

disch. at close of war. 
Booth, Wm., Co. C, 105th Inf.; enl. Feb. 7, 1862, three 

Bosz, Jacob, Co. D, lS7th Inf.; enl. Sept. 29, mn. 
Bryant, Colby M., Co. A, l-54th Inf.; enl. July 21, 1862. 
Bryant, Edward P., 37th Inf.; enl. Sept., 1861; wound- 
ed; disch. at close of war. 
Bryant, Orris W.. 9th Cav.; enl. Sept. 26, 1864; disch. 

at close of war. 
BuUard, Elijah H., 76th Inf.; enl. Aug. 21, 186:$; 

wounded. 
Burlingame, Victor R., Co. A, l-54th Inf.; enl. July 

21, 1862. 
Chamberlain, Calvin T., Co. H. 154th Inf.; enl. Aug. 

2'.l, 1862; died in Andei-sonville prison Aug., 1864. 
Chamberlain, John T., Co. C, lUoth Inf.; enl. March 

4, 1862, three years. 
Chamberlain, Philip S., Co. A, 154th Inf.; enl. July 

21, 1862; died in Libby prison Oct., 186.3. 
Chamberlain, Simon, enl. Sept. 20, 1864. 
Church, Charles W., 2d sergt. Co. A, 1.54th Inf.; enl. 

July 21, 1862. 
Clark, Henry S.. Co. A, 154th Inf.; enl. Aug. 11, 1862; 

disch. at close of war. 
Clemmons, John, Co. H, 37th Inf.; enl. May 7, 1861; 

disch. Aug., 1862, on account of sickness. 
Clemmons, Louis A., Co. 1, o7th Inf.; enl. May 7, 

1861; served full term. 
Cochran, Augustus G. E., 65th Int.; enl. Oct. 6, 1864. 
Collins, Richard, enl. Sept. 7, 1864. 
Conklin, Taylor, Co. G, 14th H. A.: enl. Nov. 4, 1863; 

prisoner; died in Union hospital Dec, 1864. 
Cook, Roswell, Co. H, 1.5tth Inf.; enl. Aug. 14, 1862; 

served till close of war. 
Corbet, John, Co. C, 64th Inf.; enl. Nov. 29, 1861; died 

in rebel prison. 
CuUen, John, enl. Sept. 29, 1864. , 

Cummings, John P.: enl. Aug. 21, 1863. 
Davis, Abram, Co. C, lft5th Inf.; enl. Jan., 1862; died 

in hospital at Le Roy, N. Y., Jlarch, 1862, of 

measles. 
Davis. Peter, Co. C, 105th Inf.; enl. Jan., 1862; died 

in Salisbury prison Jan.. 186.5. 
Davis, Wm. H., Co. C, lUoth Inf.; enl. March 6, 1862; 

wounded; re-enl. 1864; served till close of war. 
Day, Willard E., Co. C, 105th Inf.; enl. Jan. 7. 1862; 

killed near Atlanta. Ga., June, 1864. 
Dolph, Joseph, Jr., Co. E, 5th Cav.; enl. Aug. 30, 

1861, three years. 



Roster of Soldiers and Sailors. 



Dunn. Daniel, enl. Auij. 21, ISliS. 

Duttweiler, FreJerick, Co. A, ISTth Inf.; enl. Sept. 

3), l-<iU. 
Eder, Joseph, 1-iith Inf.; enl. Sept., IStiS; trans, to 

iron-clad, Dc Kalb; wounded; disch. on ac^couut 

of wounds. 
Elder, John, Co. A, WTth Inf.; enl. Sept. 30, 18B4. 
English, John, navy; enl. Oct. 7, ISW. 
Fay, Adrian, Co. C, lU.5th Inf.; enl. Jan. 3, 1S63; re-enl. 

Jan., l^<«i. 
Fay, Alcander, Co. C, 10.5th Inf.; enl. Jan. 9, 1862; 

disch. soon after enlistment. 
Fay, Montrose M., "Jth Cav.; enl. Jan. 15, LSBi; disch. 

at close of war. 
Fellows, Stephen F., enl. Au^'. 21, lsi>3; disch. for 

disability. 
Flint, Orville, UTth Inf.; enl. Aus. 21, IJ^iS; disch. 

Dec, 1803. 
Folts, Daniel H., 37th Inf.; enl. June, isijl; disch. at 

close of war. 
Foster. Clark C, Co. I, 37th Inf.; enl. May 9, IsOl; 

wounded. 
Foster, Edward W., 37th Inf.; enl. Oct. 1, 1801; disch. 

March, 1803, on account of sickness. 
Foster, Joseph N., sergt. 9th Cav.; unl. Nov. 19, 1801; 

disch. at close of war. 
French, Erastus D., Jr., Co. I, 6th Cav.; enl. Oct. 22, 

I'Jil; disch. on account of sickness. 
French, Henry, enl. Auj,'. 22, lS(i;j; served till close of 

war. 
Gardner, Granville D., Co. A, l.Mth Inf.; enl. Aug. 

11, 1862: prisoner at Gettjsburg; died in Libby 

prison Jan., 18tU. 
Gordon, Kansom, :Jd Art.; enl. May, 1801. 
Hall. W'm. W'.. Co. E, 13th H. A.; enl. Aug. Li, 1804. 
Halleck, Eilward G., Co. I, 71st Inf. (2d Kegt.Sickels's 

lirigadei; enl. June 1, isiil, three years. 
Halladay, Solomon, Co. K, 8.")tti Int.; enl. Sept 17, 

IMil; died in Andcrsonvillc prisou Aug., 1801. 
Hanson, Kichard U., 37tli Inf.; enl. Dec, 1801. 
Harris, Thomas, enl. Aug. 21, IsiB. 
Harvey, George W., Jr., :j7th Inf.; enl. May, 18i;i; 

re-enl.; prisoner at Petersburg; exchanged near 

clo.se of war. 
Hehrlcin, John, Co. E, 187th Inf.; enl. Oct. 7,I.8tH. 
Heinold, John G., Co. G, 187th Inf.; enl. Oct. 7, 1804. 
Henry, Alexander (no record). 
Ho-.', Samuel, C'o. H,l.i4th Inf.; enl. Aug. in, 1802. 
Howard, O. C, capt. '.Ith Kegt. Sickles's Brigade; enl. 

June, 181)1; died in service Oct., istil. 
Hull. Hiram, Co. I, 37tli Inf.; enl. Sept. 11, 1801; served 

till close of war. 
Hurlburt, George, 37th Inf.; enl. Jan., 180:3; re-ejil.; 

.■■erved till close of war. 
Hurlburt, Wm., Co. I, 37th Inf.; enl. .May !l, 1801; 

re-enl. in navy 1804. 
Hyatt, Charles, I'a. liucktail Uegt.; enl. March, is<i4; 

served till close of war. 
Hyatt, James, Co. G, 14th H. A.; enl. Nov. 10, 180:3; 

served till close of war. 
Jackson, Andrew, Co. E, .5th Cav.; enl. Aug. 30, 1802, 

three years. 
JohiLson, Henry, enl. July 15, 1804. 
Johnson, James I!., Co. E, :3d Kegt. E.vcelsior Bri- 
gade (72d Inf.); enl. May, 1801; re-enl. 
Kelly, fleo. H., Co. I, Otli Cav.; enl. Oct. 22, 1801; 

served till close of war. 
Kelsey, Stephen It., .5th U. S. Art.; enl. May 30, 1862; 

disch. at close of war. 
Killinger, John, Co. I, 1.54th Inf.; enl. Aug., 1802; 

disch. at close of war. 
Kingsley, Nelson A., Co. G, 154th Inf.; enl. Aug. it, 

1^02.; re-enl.; served lill close of war. 
Koch. Philip, Co. E, 187th Int.; enl. Oct. 7, 1804. 
Lamb, .Moses 13., Co. G, 154th Inf.; eul. Aug. 9, 18ii2; 

.served till close of war. 
Landis, Wm., enl. Sept. 22, 1804. 
Lang, Frederick, enl. Aug. 21, 1803. 
Lemon, Jerry; 37th Inf.; enl. Aug., 1861; died at Har- 
rison Landing, Va., in 1802. 
Lemon, Oscar, Co. H, 1.54th Inf.; enl. Aug. 29, 1802; 

disch. at close of war. 
Lininger, Charles, 05th Inf.: enL Oct. 4, 1804. 
MaloDcy, Michael, Co. E, 5th Cav.; enl. Aug. 30, 1801, 

three years. 
Maloney, Thomas, 154th Inf.; enl. Aug., 1802; re-enl.; 

served till close of war. 
Maloy, James, navy; enl. Oct. 3, 1804. 



Markham, Isaac P., Co. C, 105th Inf.; enl. Doc, 1861; 

disch. for sickness. 
MarKham, John, Co. C, lUSih Inf.; enl. Feb., 1802; 

accidentally wounded; disch. in consequence. 
Markham, Wm. H., 12th Iowa Vols.; re-enl. 
Mainey, Jliehael, Co. D, 187th Inf.; enl. Sept. 30, 1804. 
Mai-sh, Daniel W., Co. E, 5th Cav.; enl. Aug. 30, 1801, 

three years. 
Marvin, Abner C, Co. C, 105th Inf.; enl. Jan. 10, 1S02. 
Marvin, Ferdino A., Co. C, lOStli Inf.; enl. Jan. 10, lt02. 
McCarty, Frank, Co. E, 187th Inf.; enl. Oct. 7, ltB4. 
McClure, Sydney, Co. C, 105th Inf.; enl. Feb., 1802. 
McClure, Wm., Co. I, 71st Inf.; eul. June 2, 1801; died 

at Fair Oaks, July, 1803, ot disease. 
McDave, John, enl. July 1, 1804. 
Mclntyre, Sheldon P., :;d N. Y. Kities; enl. Jan., 1803; 

disch. at close of war. 
McMahon, Patrick, enl.xVug. 21, 1803. 
Merkt, Charles, Co^ G, 14th H. A.; enl. Oct. 12, 180:3; 

disch. at close of war. 
Merkt, Joseph, Co. A. 1.54th Inf.; enl. July, 1802; 

disch. at close of war. 
Jfessenger, Peter, Co. A, 154th Inf.; enl. Aug. 12, 1802; 

pro. 2dsergt.; prisoner at Gettysburg. 
Miles, Itichard, enl. July 6, 1S04. 
.Moo.i-, Komanzo, Co. A, 1.54th Inf.; eul. Aug. 11, 

l.sti2; died in Itingfield, Teun., May, 1804, ot 

\vounds. 
.Moure, Thomas J., Co. I, 154th Inf.; enl. Aug. 23, 

1802; prisimer; served till close of war. 
Mudgett, Alc.v. F., I47th Inf.; eul. Aug. 21, 1803; disch. 

at clo^e of war. 
Nelson, James, .Jr., siith 111. Kegt.; enl. Aug., 1802. 
Nelson, John I'., ciii.t. Co. H, 154lh Inf.; eul. July 20, 

1802; re.-igiied .Niaich 10. ISKl. 
O'lSrien, Jolm, enl. June 2:!, 1804. 
Peck, Harvey S., Co. A, 154th Inf.; enl. , July 23, 1802; 

served tiil close of war. 
Peck, Solomon, Ccj. H, :37tli Inf.; eul. May 10, IsOl; 

served till close of wai . 
Pellott, John B., Co. D, 187th Inf.; enl. Oct. 6, 18m. 
Pembertou, Boyd II., 140tli Inf.; enl. Oct., 1801; served 

till close of war. 
Pembertou, Henry V., 1st lieut. Co. H, 37th Inf.; enl. 

Sept. 14, 1801; pro. major; prisoner at Petersburg; 

di?ch. 180.5. 
Pembertou, William W., regt. cora.-sergt. 1.54tl) Inf.; 

enl. Sept. 20, 1802; disch. at close of war. 
Perry, Charles H., navy; enl. Sept. 30, 1804. 
Pierce, Sidney D., Co. I, 154th Inf.; enl. Aug. 30, 1802; 

served till close of war. 
Potter, Charles, scrgt. Co. I, 37th Inf.; enl. June?, 

1801; disch. at close ot war. 
Powers, Edwin, 37th Inf.; enl. Sept., 1801; served full 

time. 
Ueed, Daniel K., Co. G, 154th Int.; enl. Aug. 10, 1802; 

trans, to 9th V. K. C. 
Keed, John \V., corp. Co. C, 105th Inf.; enl. Jan. 6, 

1802, three yeais. 
Rice, A. L., Co. C, 154th Inf.; enl. Aug. 13, 1803 
Koberts, Daniel B., 05th Int.; eul. April ,5, 180.5. 
Human, Peter T., enl. Aug. 21, 1803. 
Kust, Louis S., Co. 0, lUoth Inf.; enl. Jan., 1.-02; 

wounded at Bull Hun, Aug., 1802; died next day. 
Schlehr, John W., 05th Inf.; enl. Oct. 0, 1804. 
Shea, Michael, lOOth Inf.; enl. Oct. 29, 1802; lost a leg 

in service. 
Shurley, Samuel, :37th Int.; enl. May 7, 1801. 
Sickers, Charles, enl. Sept. 20, 1801. 
Simmons, Samuel, Co. H, 154th Inf.; enl. Aug. 2.5, 

1802; prisoner at Gettysburg; died in Libby prison 

Jan., 1804. 
Sisson, Henry, Co. 1, 1.54th Inf.; enl. Aug. 23, 1802. 
Smith, Charles, Co. A, 187th Int.; enl. Sept 30, 18(j4. 
Starks, Saul, Co. I, 151th Int.; enl. Aug. 28, 1802; 

disch. Jan., 1803, tor sickness. 
Sullivan, Lawrence, eul. 180:3. 
Tonseau, Peter, enl. Aug. 21, 1803. 
Travis, D. \V., Co. C, 1.54th Int.; enl. Aug. 13, 1863. 
Vreeland, Frederick, co. I, 154th Int.; eul. Sept. 6, 

1802. 
Walrath, Walter, Co. A, 154th Inf.; enl. Aug. 11, 1802; 

disch. at close of war. 
Ward, Namaan, Co. I, 37th Inf.; enl. May 9, 1861; 

served full time. 
Warner, John, navy; enl. Oct. 7, 1804. 
Whitney, Chas. E., Co. I, 154th lut.; eul. Aug. 2:3, 1802. 
Wilson, James, eul. Aug. 31, 1803. 



224 



History of Cattaraugus County. 



Wooiruff, John H., Co. E, 5th Cnv.; col. Aug-. 28, 1E61, 
three years; re-enl. 

HINSDALE. 

Allen, Edward D., Co. K, 8.5th Inf.: enl. 18(11; taken 

prisoner at Plj'mouth, N. C; disch. at close of 

war. 
Allen, Timothy A., q.-m. Co. 1, 1.54th Inf.; enl. 18«2, 

three years. 
Austin, Charles, Co. I, 154th Inf.; enl. 1863; disch. at 

close of war, 
Banfleld, George H., navy; marine, Brrirjhhjn; enl. 

lS<i4, four years; disch. June, lSfi.5. 
Bennett, AVallace M., sergt. Co. A, 13«th Inf.; enl. 

1863; disch. at close of war. 
Bessecker, Zeno, Co. 1, 154th Inf.; enl. Sept. 1, lSli3, 

three yenrs. 
Bidwell, Jonathan, Co. K, 65th Inf.; enl. 18U5; disch. 

at close of war. 
Brown, C. Jerome, Co. K, Oath Tuf.; enl. ISto, one 

year; died July 26, 1865. 
Brown, Edmund O., 1st Ind. Bat.; eul. 1864, three 

years; disch. at close of war. 
Brown, Francis B., Co. A, 136th Inf.; enl. 1863, three 

years; disch. at close of war. 
Brown. Franklin, Co. A, 13i>th Inf.; enl. 1863; disch. 

at close of war. 
Brown, Myron N., Co. K, 65th Inf.; enl. 1865, one 

year; disch. at close of war. 
Bullard, Edwin G., Co. G, 1st Vet. Cav.; enl. 1^(6:1; 

disch. at close of war. 
Burlingame, Julius, 65th Inf.; disch. at close of war. 
Burton, Franklin M., 1st. Ind. But. 
Burton, George, Co. K, 85th Inf.; enl. ISil, three 

years; prisoner; died in Andersonville, Aug. 36, 

18i>4. 
Burton, Wra. W., corp. Co. T>, 15th H. A.; enl. ls(«, 

three years; disch. at close of war. 
Bush, Lorenzo F., Co. I, 154th Inf.; enl. 1863, three 

years: disch. at close of war. 
Cartw light, Peter, Co. K,s5th Inf. 
Chapin, Herbert F., navy; maiine, Ciimiv; enl. 186.', 

four years; captured liy the Alahanut. 
Chapin, Nelson, eapt. Co. K, 85th Inf.; must, in Dec. 

;i, 1861, three years; killed while in command of 

Fort Wesscis, N. C, April' 18, IMU. 
Clark, Horace T., scrgt. Co. G, 154th Inf.; enl. 1863; 

wounded; disch. at close of war. 
Cole, Charle.s \V., Co. C, 154th Inf.; enl. 1863, three 

yeara; prisoner at Gettysburg; disch. at close of 

war. 
Collins, Michael, Co. F, 85th Inf.; enl. 1861; prisoner; 

disch. at close of war. 
Corttrell William H., Co. I, 6th Cav.; enl. Oct. 36, 

1861, three j'ears. 
Degeir, James, corp. Co. I, 1.54th Inf ; eul. Sept. 5, 

1863, three years. 
Dodge, Almon B., Co. C, 154th Inf.; enl. Aug. 6, 1863, 

three years. 
Drake, Osaph, Co. 1, 1.54th Inf.; enl. 1862, three years; 

disch. at close of war. 
Eberlyne, George, Co. I, 6th Cav.; enl. Oct. 22, 1861, 

three years. 
Evans, Aaron H., 1st Ind. Bat.; enl. 18t)4. three years; 

disch. at close of war. 
Evans. Lorenzo D., Co. K, 85th Inf ; enl. ISiil, three 

yeai-s; prisoner; disch. in IXKi. 
Evans, Orange, Co. K, 8.5th Inf.: enl. 1861, three 

years; disch. for disability 1863. 
Evans, Samuel C, 1st Ind. Bat. 

Fay, Alonzo, Co. I, 154th Inf.; enl. lN6i, three years. 
Fay, Walter M., Co. K, 85th Inf.; enl. 1861, three 

years; died at Portsmouth Grove, K. I. 
Gardner, John (no record). 
Gates, Theodore H., Co. K, 27th Inf.; enl. 1861, two 

years; wounded and prisoner at 1st Bull Hun; 

e.Ychanged 1863; disch. ]8(a. 
Gates, Warren, Co. H, 71st Int.; enl. 1861, two years; 

died in Andereonville prison. 
Gile, Merrit A., navy. 

Goodell, Horace, Co. A, 85th Inf.; enl. Sept. .5, 1861 
Gould, Wm. W., corp. Co. I, l.>ith Inf.; enl. Sept. 1, 

18t;3, three years; died of disease Jan. 23, 1864. 
Graham, Jason, enl. 186:3; disch. at close of war. 
Green, Henry F., navy. 
Green, Jesse K., serge. Co. I, 1.54th Inf.; enl. 1863; 

disch. at close of war. 



Green. Martin, navy. 

Giimes, Franklin, Co. H. 1.5th Eng.; enl. 1864; disch. 

at close of war. 
Grimes, Wm. H., Co. 1. 154th Inf.; enl. 1862; disch. at 

close of war. 
Guild, .\lmon L., sergt. Co. C, 154th Inf.; enl. Aug. 6, 

1863, three years. 
Hamilton, E. H., Co. A, ISiith Inf. 
Haney, Wm. J., corp. Co. K, 85th Inf.; enl. 1861, 

three years; prisoner; disch. at close of war. 
Hartican, John (no record'. 
Harwell. Henry. Co. K,S5th Inf. 
Hewitt, Henry, Co. K, S5th Inf.; enl. 1861, three years; 

prisoner. 
Huganer, Alfred, sergt. Co. K, 85th Int.; enl. 1861; 

died in Andersonville prison Sept. 5, 1864. 
Ingorsoll. Hirara M., navy: 'andsman, tT/iifiiif; enl. 

1^64; died in hospital in Xew York, Sept., 1865. 
Iseraan, George, Co. I, IMth Inf.; enl. lS(i3, three 

years; disch. 1863; drafted; diseh. 1865. 
Johnson. Francis E., navy. 
Jones, Allen, navy. 

Kamerv. Kuf us, (iSth Inf.: disch. at close of war. 
Kemary, John N., Co. F, 2:th Inf.; enl. May 31, 1861, 
Knapp, John C, corp. Co. K, S5th Inf.; enl. 18()1, three 

year.<; re-enl.; disch. at close of war. 
Lacey, Wallace L.. Co. K. S5th Inf.; enl. 1861, three 

yeai-s; piison^r; died in.Xndersonville. 
Lafevre. John H., Co. K. 6th Cav.; onl. 1861, three 

years; re-enl.; disch. at close of war. 
Lewis, Hiram, navy; landsman, iliiuiid Citu; enl. 1864; 

disch. at close of war. 
Lewis, William, Co. I, 1.5*th Inf.; enl. 1863, three 

yeai-s; disch. at close of war. 
Liiipet, .Matthew, corp. Co. I, 154th Inf.; enl. 1863; 

disch. at close of war. 
Lockwood, James M., navy. 
Longciire, Hamilton, Co. 1. 15tth Inf.; enl. 1863, three 

years; prisoner at Gettvsburg; died in Kichmond, 

Va., 1863. 
Ludington, Harvey, Co. D. IT'.ilhlnf.; enl. 1863, three 

years; disch. at close of war. 
Ludington, Sylvester M., Co. K, 85th Inf.; enl. 1861, 

three years; died at home Aug.,18<)3. 
Lupper, Milo, Co. G, 1.54th Inf.; enl. 186.3; wounded 

and prisoner at Chancclloi'sville; diseh. at close 

of war. 
MeHill, William, 50th Inf. 
Mclvee, Edwin, navy; marine, BiixMyn; enl. 1862, 

four years; disch. Au--.. lNi4. 
McManemay, Hugh, Co. E:,'.i3d luf,; enl. Nov.29, 1S61, 

three years. 
MeVey, Archibald, navv: landsman, MniiUjnmcni. 
Miller. Frederick H.. Co. C, 154th Inf.; enl. Aug. 6, 

1863. three years. 
Miller, Lemartine, navy. 
Morris, Ararai, Co. K. s.5th Inf.; enl. 1861, three years; 

disch. for disability Ixii. 
Morris, Wellington, Co. K. 85th Int.; enl. 1861, three 

years; disch. for disability l.'<63. 
Morton, Daniel, Co. G, l-Mth Inf.; enl. 1863, three 

years; died in hospital Ifi'ii. 
Moyer, Solomon H., corp. Co. A, 188th Inf.; enl. 1864, 

one year; disch. at clos«? of war. 
Murray, Thomas, navy; marine, ByoitliJifn. 
Newlahd, Andrew, 15th Eng.: enl. 1864, one year; 

disch. at close of wa.-. 
Newland, James, 15th Eng.; enl. 1864, one year; disch. 

at close of war. 
Newland, Thomas, navy; landsman. Paw Paw; enl. 

1864; disch. Sept., 18(i5. 
Norris, Joseph P. (eoloredi. Co. K, 33d Cav.; enl. Jan. 

13, 1864, tnree years. 
O'Hurlin, John (no record'. 
Osterstock, Emory, Co. G. LSith Inf.; enl. 1863; disch. 

at close of war. 
Osterstock, William, Co. 1. 1.54th Inf.; enl. 1863, three 

years; taken prisoner at Gettysburg and died in 

Andersonville in May. ISU. 
Packard, Loren F., Co. E, 5th Cav.; eul. 1861, three 

years; re-enl.; disch. at close of war. 
Pardey, Erastus W., ser^. Co. K, 85th Inf.; enl. 

1861, three years: died in Andersonville prison. 
Parker, Chauncey, Co. K. 8.5th Inf.; enl. 18(jl, three 

years: died in Andersonville prison Sept. 18, IStU. 
Parker, Leroy, sergt. Co. K. S.5thlnf.; enl. 1861; disch. 

1863, re-enl. same regt. 1864; disch. for wounds 

June 5, 1865. 



Roster of Soldiers axd Sailors. 



Paug-h, John, Co. I, lolth Inf.; enl. 1S62, three years; 

killed at Gettysburg, July, 18i>". 
Peake, Spencer, :i<i lieut. Co. K, »5th Inf.; enl. ISiil, 

three vears; prisoner; exchanged; disch. Jlarch 

2, l.SU-j. 
Peck, Mahlou C, Co. E, 8oth Inf.; enl. 1801, three 

year.-; disch. April, U62. 
Pettitt, Stephen D., navy; enl. IStii, one year; re- 
jected. 
Plielps, Harlan, Co. A, Ulst Inf.; enl. Aug. ;.'•.', iwa, 

three years. 
Piphei-, Chauncey, Co. G, 154th Inf.; enl. 1^02; disch. 

at close of war. 
Pipher, Francis, corp. Co. (}, l.jith Inf.; enl. 18ti3, 

three j'eais; disch. for disaliility lbU3. 
Pipher, Peter, Co. K, 8.5th Inf.; enl. Itiil, three years; 

disch. for wounds rec'U at Antietam; re-enl. same 

regt. and killed in battle near Kingston, X. C. 
Popple, Orville, 1st Ind. Bat.; enl. 18iH, one year; died 

of disease 18U4. 
Preston, Koswell, Co. I, 1.54th Inf.; enl. WG, three 

years; died in prison at Kiehmond, ^'a. 
|,luack^•nhu^h, Delevan. Corp. Co. K, 85tti Inf.; enl. 

IsiU, three years; prisoner; disch. at close of war. 
Heynolds, Cedrick. navy; landsman, Pan- I'mr; enl. 

ISW; disch. Sept., l.sii.5. 
Reynolds, Harmon D., Co. G, 1.54th Inf.; enl. 1863, 

three yi'urs; disch.; re-eul. 
Ki'yn(ilds. James (no record). 
Reynolds, Sardis, Co. K, Ij5th Inf.; enl. lSii.5, one year; 

disch. at close of war. 
Kickert. (leorge VV. (no record). 
Roen, -Martin, 8.5th Inf. 
Ryan. Jnhn, Co. F. 8.5th Inf.; enl. isill; prisoner; 

disch. at close of war. 
Salisburv. (lalius .M., M Pa. Cav. 
.<ci)tt. Mollis, Co. I, 1:54th Inf.; enl. 18li'.', three years; 

disch. at close of war. 
Searle, Gideon, Jr., Co. K, 85th Inf.; enl. Sept. 17, l.'ilil, 

three years. 
Shafer, Jerome C, Co. C, 1.54tli Inf.; enl. Aug. li, 18ii3, 

three years. 
Sherlock, Uily, Co. K, .s5th Inf.; enl. Sept. 38, 18(13, 

three years. 
Sherman. .\. H., Co. C, 1.54th Inf.; enl. Aug. li, Wa, 

three years. 
Sherman, Whitman, Co. I, ].54tli inf. 
Sherwin, Joseph B., navy; landsman, i'lulinc; enl. 

I.s()4; kill.-d in battle Oct. :«!. 1804. 
Sherlock, Henry, Co. (!, 1.54th Inf.; enl. Aug. 8, ls(i3, 

three years. 
Snyder, Lugenc G., Co. B, 3:kl Inf.; enl. May HI, 18ijl, 

two years. 
Streeter, Daniel, Co. B, 3:jd Inf.-; enl. .May Hi, IWil, 

two years. 
Thomp~im, .Uhertino record). 
ThMmpsim, Charles, Co. K, s.5th Inf.; enl. Sept. IT, 

l.'^i;3. tlirce years; killed in battle. 
Thuuipsuti, Samuel, corp. Co. H, 71st Inf.; enl. 1801, 

three years; killed at Gettysburg, Jidy '.i, P^O:!. 
Tracj-. lOdwin R., Co. G, 1.54th Inf.; enl. Aug. i), 1803, 

three veai-3. 
Updike, Abram S., Co. K, .^5th Inf.; enl. Sept. 17, 1801, 

three years; disph. Sept., 1803. 
Venus, Martin U. B., Co. A, llHithlnt.; enl. Aug. 7, 

1803, three years. 
Waite, Stephen, Co. B, 3:sd Inf.; enl. 1801, two years; 

disch. in 1801 for disability. 
Walker, Lyman H., Co. K, lyoth Inf.; enl. 1803, three 

years; disch. at close of war. 
Warren, Isaac, navy; landsman, Undine; enl. 1804; 

disch. at close of war. 
Washburn, George, Co. A, 130th Inf.; enl. 1803; disch. 

at close of war. 
Washburn, Isaiah S., Co. C, 1.54th Int.; enl. 1*3, three 

years; died of disease Dec. 11, 180;i. 
Washburn, James W., Co. C, 1.54th Inf.; enl. 1803, 

three years; died at lielle Isle prison Dec., I.sti3. 
Whitacre, Lyman, Co. 1, 1.54th Inf. 
White, George L. (no record). 
Wilbur, Darius, Co. I, lo4th Inf.; enl. 1803, three 

years; disch. lor disability 1863. - 
Wilbur, Milo L., Co. G, 1.54th Inf.; enl. Aug. 9, 1863. 
Wilbur, Oscar F., Co. G, 154th Inf.; enl. Aug. 11, 1803. 
Wiley, Charles V., 48th Mass. Inf. 
Willover, John A., Co. G, 1.54th Inf.; enl. 1862, three 

years; prisoner at Gettysburg; exchanged after 

nine months; disch. at close of war. 



Willover, Martin V. B.. Co. K, Soth Inf.; enl. Sept. 

17, 1861, three j'ears; taken prisoner in 1864; died 

of starvation at Florence, S. C, Oct. a, 1864. 
Willover, Wm. A.. C .. I. 1.54th Inf.; enl. 1803, three 

years; wounded: disch. at close of war. 
Wilter, Geo. H., Co. K, 85th Inf.; enl. 1861, three 

years; prisoner: died in .iudersonville. 
Wilter, James F., Co. K. N5tU Inf.; enl. 1861, three 

years; prisoner; died at Florence, S. C. 
Wood, Edward, sergt. Co. I, 154th Inf.; enl. 1803; 

disch. at close of wai . 
Woodard, Jacob J.. Co. E, .5th Cav.; enl. Aug. 19, 

1801, three vears. 
Woodard, Uobt. J., Co. C. l->tth Inf.; enl. Aug. 6. 1863, 

three years. 

HCMPHREV. 

Bacon, James, Co. I. 1.54th Inf.; enl. Sept. 3, 1862, 

three years. 
Barber, Eliab, Co. H, 37th Inf.; enl. Mtiy 16, 1861, two 

years. 
Ba.\ter, Henry. Co. I. 1.54th Inf.; enl. Sept. 3, 1803. 

three jears. 
Ba.\ter, Perry, Co. I. 1.54th Inf.; enl. Sept. 3, 1863, 

three years. 
Benjamin. George W., Co. I, l-54lh Inf.; enl. Sept. 5, 

1863, three years. 
Bowen, Ellas, Jr., Co. G, l.>4th Inf.; enl. Aug. 30, 1802, 

three yeiu-s. 
Bozard, Ashljel L-, Co. C, l-54th Inf.; enl. Aug. 0, 1803, 

three veal's. 
Canadv. .Mvron. inth N. V. Bat. 
Chapman. Wm. A.. Co. C, luith Inf.; enl. Jan. 14, 

1803, three years. 
Childs, Cephas, Co. C, lik5th Inf.: enl. Jan. 15, 1862, 

three vears. 
Cole, Marvin S.. sergt. Co. H, ;J7th Inf.; enl. May 10, 

1861: two years- 
Colvin. tliarles, Co. A. l>8th Inf.; enl. Sept. .5, 1864, 

one vear. 
Colvin, Mark, 9th Cav. 
Colvin, Seth, Co. C, IsTth Inf.: enl. Oct. 3, l.sot, one 

year. 
Colvin. Royal, l:)th Ca\-. 
Crary, Lerai H..S5th Inf. 
Dick, Philip, Cu. A. 1^7ch Int.; enl. Oct. 4, l.soi, one 

year. 
Drake, Daniel, died in service 1804. 
Foster. Edwin. Co. H.oTth Int. 
French, Henry ino rccordi. 
Gardner. Horatio. (;'o. H, 1.54tli Inf.; enl. .-Vug. 29, 

1803. three veai-s. 
Hill, Edward, Co. H,:r7th Inf.; enl. May 10, 1861, two 

years. 
King Edward, tiler Co. I. 1.54th Inf.; enl. Sept. :>, 

1803, three years. 

Lockie. James H., Co. G, 154th Inf.; eid. Aug. 11, 

1>^03. three vears. 
Marsh. Staley .V.. Co. 1. 71st Inf. (3d Uegt. E.'ccelsior 

Brigade): enl. .Mav3^. ISOl. three years. 
Miller. Wilkes J., Co. A. 154th Int.; enl. July 36, 1802, 

three years. 
Moilit, Aaron, Co. C. l-5tth Inf.; enl. Aug. 6, 1803, 

three years. 
Mofflt, James. Co. I. l-:th Int.; enl. Sept. 23, 1864, 

one year. 
Mossman, Matthias. Co. .V, 188th Inf.; enl. Sept. 8, 

1804, one year. 

Newell, Harrison H.. Co. A, IsSth Inf.; enl. Sept. 19, 

1804, three vears. 
O'Brien, Matthew. Co C. lU.5th Inf.; enl. Feb. 2.5, 1862, 

three years. 
Pierce, Jasper, 1.54th Inf. 
Putnam, Joseph (no record). 
Keed, Daniel. liMth Inf. 
Reed. John W., Co. C, 105th Inf.; enl. Jan. 6, 1802, 

three years. 
Reed, Wm., Co. I, (Mth Inf.; enl. Sept. 16, 1861, three 

years. 
Rieley, Michael, Co. C. 105th Inf.; enl. Feb. 15, 1802, 

three years. 
Reynolds, Wm. H.. corp. Co. A, l.Wth Inf.; enl. July 

31, 1863, three years. 
Schair, George, Co. A. 187th Inf.; enl. Oct. 4, 1804, one 

year. 
Shepard, Thomas \., corp. Co. A, 1.54th Inf.; enl. July 

36, 1803, three years. 



History of Cattaraugus County, 



Sill, Alonzo D., Co. C, IMth Inf.; enl. July 31, 1S62, 

three years. 
Skeels, Hiram, Co. C, 10.5th Inf.; enl. Jan. U, 1S62, 

three years. 
Slocum, AlviQ M., Co. F, 1st Cav. 
Southern, Geo. P., Co. A, 154th Inf.: enl. July 2t., 

1863, three years. 
Southwick, Barnet, Co. C, 105th Inf.; enl. Jan. U, 

1862, three years. 
Southwick, Da%-id J., Co. C, 105th Inf.; enl. Jan. 1.5, 

1862, three years. 
Southwick, Nelson. Co. C, 10.5th Inf.; enl. Jan. 4, 1862, 

three years. 
Stone, Benj. F., Co. I, 14Tth Inf. 
Thomas, Shepperd N., corp. Co. A. 154th Inf.; enl. 

July 26, 1862, three years. 
Tracy, Edward F., Co. G, 1.54th Inf.; enl. Aug. 9, 1862, 

three years. 
Walch, Michael, Co. 1, 154th Inf.; enl. Aug. 39, 1862, 

three years. 
Washburn, William, Co. C, 105th Inf.; enl. Feb. j, 

1862, three years. 
Wheeler, Erastus, Co. C, 105th Inf.; enl. Jan. 14, 1862, 

three years. 
Wheeler, Seth, corp. Co. C, 105th Inf.; enl. Jan. 3, 

1862, three years. 
Wheeler, Silas, Co. I, 64th Inf.; enl. Sept. 24, 1861, 

three years. 
Wicks, Geo. C, Co. A, 154th Inf.; enl. Aug. 12, 1862, 

three yea'S. 
Wilber, Charles R., Co. I, 154th Inf.; enl. Sept. 2, 

1862, three years. 
Wilber, Oscar F., Co. G, 154th Inf.;. enl. Aug. 11, 1862, 

three years. 
Winters, Alphonzo, 1.54th Inf. 
Winters, Gei. L., sergr. Co. C, 1.54th Inf.; enl. Aug. 

6, 1862, three years. 
Woodard, Kobt. J., Co. C, 1.54th Inf.; enl. Aug. 6, 

1862, three years. 
Woodruff, Frank (no record). 
Woodruff, John B., Co. E, 5th Cav.; enl. Aug. 28, 1861, 

three years. 
Worden, Geo. B., Co. I. 64th Inf.; enl. Sept. 24, 1861, 

three years. 
Wright. James, Co. I, 6th Cav.; enl. Oct. 22, 1861, 

three years. 
Ziegler, Adam, Co. E, 18Tth Inf.; enl. Oct. 5, 1864, one 

year. 

ISCHCA. 

Barber, Eliab, Co. K, 37th Inf.; must. March 17, 1861, 

two years. 
Earned, Wm. W., Co. K, 85th Inf.; must. Oct. 4, 1861, 

three years; pro. corp.; re-enl. V. S. C; died in 

Andersonyille prison July 2:i, 1864. 
Beebe, Lyman H, Co. D, 13th H. A.; must. Sept. 9, 

1864, one year. 
Bristol, Richard T., Co. K, 8.5th Inf.; must. Oct. 24, 

1861, three years; detached to N. Y. L. A.; died in 

October, 1864. 
Brown, James, Co. E, 90th Bat. N. Y. Y.; must. Sept. 

13, 18&4, one year. 
Burlingame, Eugene, Co. B, 147th Inf.; must. Sept. 

10, 1863, three years: died July 2, 1864, of wounds 

received in battle of U ilderness. 
earner, Martin, Co. D, 15th Art.; must. Sept. 5, 1864, 

one year. 
Caswell, Charles J., Co. D, 6th Cav.; must. Nov. 1, 

1861, three years. 
Chadwick, Hosea N., Co. K, 85th Inf.; must. Sept. 27, 

1861, three years; pro. corp.; trans, to navy Feb. 

22,1862. 
Chadwick, Ransom A., musician; must. Sept. 27, 

1861, three years; re-enl. Y. 1. C. Jan. 1, 1864; pris- 
oner at Plymouth, N. C. 
Cline, Bela C, Co. K, 85th Inf.; must. Sept- 27, 1861, 

three years; re-enl. Jan. 1, 1864; died in Anderson- 

ville prison Aug. 21, 1864. 
Densmore, Eleazer, Co. H, 85th Inf.; must. Sept. 27, 

1861, three years; corp.; sergt. Jan. 24. 1863; died 

in Andersonville prison Aug. 3t), 1864. 
Drake, Charles, Co. B, 146th Inf.; must. Sept. 28, 1863, 

three years; taken prisoner at battle of Wilder- 
ness and escaped. 
Ellithorp, Lyman, Co. D, 10.5th Inf.; three years; 

wounded. 
Gere, Aaron, Co. G, 13th H. A.; must. Sept. 10, 1864. 



Gort, Daniel W., Co. A. 85th Inf.; must. Sept. 5, 1864, 

one year. 
Guild, Charles L.. sergt. Co. C, 154th Inf.; must. Sept. 
24, 1862, three years; taken prisoner at Gettys- 
burg, July 1, 1863; sent to Belle Isle, and removed 

to Andersonville: died .Aug. 4, ls64. 
Guild, Edmund C, Co. H, 2d Inf.; must. June, 1864, 

three years. 
Guild. Willis M., Co. C, 1.54th Inf.; must. Sept. 24, 1862, 

three years; killed at Chancellorsville, May 1,1863. 
Harvey, Russell, 9th Cav.; must. Sept. 21, 1864, one 

year. 
Ingrahara, Geo. S., Co. A, 136th Inf.; enl. Aug. 13, 

1862, three years; pro. corp. 
Jones, Thomas J., Co. G, 2d Cav.; must. Jan. 4, 1864, 

three years. 
Kno.v, Wm., Co. C, 2d Cav.; must. Jan. 4, 1864, thiee 

years. 
Lafton, James H., Co. G, 2d Cav. (V); must. Jan. 4, 

1864, three years. 
Learn, John C, Co. A, lS8th Inf.; must. Sept. 19, 1864, 

one year. 
Learn. Joseph L., Co. G, 1st Cav.; must. Aug. 28, 1863. 

three years. 
Learn. Morris, Co. A, 18Sth Inf.; must. Sept. 19, 1864, 

one year. 
Learn, Thomas, Co. K, 85th Inf.; must. Sept. 27, 1861, 

three years; lost an arm in the battle of Fair 

Oaks, May 31, 1862. 
Leonard. James W., Co. K, 85th Inf.; must. Sept. 27, 

1S61, three years; pro. Corp.; prisonerat Plymouth, 

A pril 20, 1864, and supposed to have died in An- 
dersonville. 
Linderman, Alonzo, Co. C, 154th Inf.; must. Sept.24, 

1862, three years. 
Lockwood, David, Co. K, 22d Cav.; must. Feb. 6, 1864, 

three years. 
Lockwood, Henry, Co. H, 21st Inf.; must. March 18, 

1862, three years; killed at Gaines"s Mills. 
Mallorv, Edwin W., Co. K, 8.5th Inf.; must. Sept. 24, 

1861, three years; died in hospital at Washington, 
May 26, 1862. 

Mallory. Ferris J., Co. H, 13th H. A.; must. Jan. 19, 

1864, three years. 
McCormick, George (no record). 
Miller, Frederick, Co. C, 154th Inf.; must. Sept. 24. 

1862, three years. 

Morgan, Geo. T., Co. C. 1.54th Inf.; must. Sept. 24, 
1862, three years; wounded near Dalton Hill, May 
20,1864. 

Moyer, Joseph, Co. 1, 1.54th Inf.; must. Sept. 26, 1864, 
one year; died in service March 4. 1865. 

Newton, Cyrus W., Co. K, 85th Inf.; must. Oct. 25, 

1861, three years; pro. corp.; died in Anders ju- 
ville prison Aug. 9, 1864. 

Osgood, Edwin R., Co. C, 154th Inf.; must. Sept. 24, 
1864, three years; pro. corp.; prisoner July 1, 1863; 
died in hospital at Richmond, Dec. 9, 1883. 

Osgood, Stephen, Co. C, 154th Inf.; must. Sept. 24, 

1862, three years; wounded at ChancellorsviUe; 
trans, to V. R. C, Sept. 1, 1863. 

Osgood, William W., Co. C, 1.54th Int.; must. Sept. 24, 

1862, three years; pro. corp. 
Parker, Leroy, Co. K, 85th Inf.; must. Sept. 17, 1861; 

wounded -March 8, 1865. 
Pearl, Levi L., Co. D, 6th Cav.; must. Nov. 1, 1861; 

served three years; re-enl. for three years; killed 

at Kockv Point. 
Presho. James H., Co. K, 85th Inf.; must. Oct. 25, 

1861, three years; died in front of Yorktown, 
April ;30, 1862. 

Robinson, Mortimer H., Co. H, 90th Inf.; must. Sept. 

17, 1864, one year. 
Rockwell, Eli, Co. L, 6th Art.; must. Feb. 19, 1864, 

one year. 
Rowen, Martin W., Co. E, 90th Inf.; must. Sept. 17 

1864, one year. 
Shafer, Addison, Co. C, 154th Inf.; must. Sept. 24, 

1862, three years. 

Shafer, Jacob, Co. C, 154th Inf.; must. Sept. 24, 1862, 
three years; wounded at Gettysburg and Look- 
out Mountain. 

Shafer, Jerome, Co. C, 154th Inf.; must. Sept. 24, 1862, 
three years; taken prisoner and died in Rich- 
mond, Dec. 8, 1863. 

Sheldon, James L., Co. K, 85th Inf.; must. Oct. 25, 
1861, three years; pro. sergt.; killed at Plymouth, 
N. C, April 18, 1864.. 



Roster of Soldiers axd Sailors. 



237 



Shipman. Joseph, l:3th H. A.; must. Feb. 15, 1864, 

three vears. 
Simons. Albert A., Co. C, 15tth Inf.; must. Sept. 24, 

1S6:.', three roars. 
Terr}-, liansom. Co. (% l.>lth Inf.; must. Sept. 4, 18(K, 

three years; wounded at Gettysburg-, Jul}- 1, If^iB. 
Thornton, Lyman, Co. C, 1.54th Inf.; must. Sept. 24, 

IsiK. three veai-s. 
Utter, Georye; Co. D, 13th H. A.; must. Sept. 5, lStt4, 

one vear. 
Wagner. Chas. H.. Co. D, 13th H. A.; must. Jan. 4, 

IStH, three years. 
Wells. James, Co. H. 85th Inf.; must. Sept. 25, 1801, 

three years; pro. 2d serg-t.; re-eal. Jan., 1864; died 

a prisoner in Florence, Nov. 14, lb64. 
Wilber. Chauncey B , Co. D, 13th H. A.; must. Aug. 

4, 18*>?. three years. 
Wilber, Ttiomas C, Co. D, 13th H. A.; must. Sept. 9, 

18W. one year. 
Wood, Conly .M.. Corp. Co. D, 13th H. A.; must. July 

2i). INIJ. three vears. 
Wood. William H., Co. D, 13th H. A.; must. Jan. 28, 

IMU, three years; died in hospital at Elmira, 

-March 15. ISH. 

LEO.V. 

Alverson, Xathan F.. Co. I, 4nth Inf.; inl. Sept. 8, 
Istil; pro. eorp. Dec, ISCl; died in hospital at Da- 
vid's Islands, June 1, 18<i2. 

Babuock, Alfred D., Co. U, l.Mth Inf.; enl. Aug. 1, 
istli; disch. Sept. 25, lH«:i. 

Barloir, KusseU L., Co. K,l.Mth Inf.; enl. Sept. 2, 1802; 
trans, to Invalid Kes. Corps; disch. Sept. 6, 18li.5. 

Battles. Benjamin C, Co. C, 13th Inf.; enl. Sept. 22, 
I'^M; disch. .lunc 2ii. |S(m. 

Bennett. William D.. Co. K, l.Vtth Inf.; enl. Aug. 1, 
iNil: disch. June V.\ lsil."i. 

Bowci>. Joseph. Co. K, Wth Inf.; enl. Oct. 2, lS»il; 
died in hospital from wounds received at Fair 
Oaks. June 1, l-«2. 

Bullock. Harlan L.. Co. F, lil4tli Inf.; enl. April U, 
Wk'i; stationed at Elmira, and disch. at close ot 

liuUock. William J.. Co. H, 3rth Inf.; enl. May 2il, 

1-^il: died in hospital at Newport, Va., Sept. 2, 1802. 
Butcher, Andrew K., Co. C, 13th Inf.; enl. Sept. 2, 

IMU; Served till close of war. 
Butler. Ezekiel, Co. K, I.>Ith Inf.; enl. Sept. .->, 18t;4; 

disch. July 12. Lstt"). 
<amp. .\sa E., scrgt. Co. H, 37th Inf.; enl. May 2i), 

iNil; disch. .May 1.'), isisi; re-enl. in Uattery C, Wth 

H. A.: served till close of the war. 
Camp, Joel. Co. K, Mth Inf.; enl. Oct. 22, 18<J1; disch. 

March 22. Isii2. for disability. 
Camp, William. Co. F, W4tli Inf.; enl. April 11, Wii; 

stationed at Elmira; disch. at close of war. 
Campbell. Abel C , Co. F, l!l4th Inf.; enl. April 11, 

ls<i"); disch. Ma\ following. 
Carle. Jerome, Co. K, Wth Int.; enl. Oct. 2, 1861; disch. 

Nov. :>. l!V± 
Casten. William M., 1st sergt. Co. B, 154th Inf.; enl. 

.Vug. 15, lsii2; pro. 1st lieut.; disch. at close ot war. 
(liild-. John M.,Co. B, I.54th Inf.; enl. Aug. 2, 1862; 

wounded at Chancelloisville; disch. June 22, Win. 
Clark. Edward W., drum-major Co. K, 64th Inf.; enl. 

Oct. 2. Istjl; disch. Sept., l.'<64; regimental drum- 
major. 
Cooper. Nathaniel F., 2d lieut. Co. K, 64th Inf.; enl. 

Sept.2i), isiil; pro. 1st. lieut. May 14, 1862; wounded 

at Fair Oaks; disch. Nov. 1.5, 18(32. 
Crowfoot. Warren, Co. L, 13th H. A.; enl. Sept. 2, 1864. 
Darling. .Marcellus W., Co. K, iri4th Inf.; enl. Sept. 6, 

Wii: pro. sergt. May 21, 18iJ2; disch. June 23, 1865. 
Davidson, Abiel, Jr., Co. K, 64th Inf.; enl. Oct. 28, 

1.:<)1; nurse in hospital; disch. Feb. 14, 18lv3. 
Dean, James, Co. F, ia4th Int.; enl. April 11, 186.5, one 

year. 
Dean, Mervin, Batfry C, Wth H. A.; enl. Sept. 2, 

1864: disch. June 2.5, 186.5. 
Dye, Alfred VV., Co. K, tuth Inf.; enl. Oct. 2, 1861; died 

July 17, IHi;!, from wounds rec'd at Gettysburg. 
Dye. Charles H., I'o. H, KJUth Inf.; enl. Sept. 15, 1861; 

prisoner; died from wounds and exposure Jan. 

17, 18S3. 
Dye, George W., Co. K, flth Inf.; enl. Sept. 2, 1.864; 

disch. June 1, 186.5. 



Earl, Charles L., Co. A, 11th Conn. Inf.; enl. Aug. S, 

1861; re-enl. July 10, 1864, in Co. L, 10th N. Y. Cav.; 

disch. at close of war. 
Eldridge. Andrew J., sergt. Co. K, 64th Inf.; enl. Sept. 

14, 1861; disch. Feb. 11. 1.86:3. 
Fancher, William, capt. Co. K. 64th Inf.; enl. Sept. 14, 

1861; died May 24, lS(i2. 
Francis, George, sergt. Co. K, 64th Inf.; enl. Sept. 14, 

1861; wounded at Fair Oaks; disch. Nov. 15, 1862. 
Franklin, Andrew J., Co. K, 64th Inf.; enl. Sept. 14, 

1861; disch. June, 1.862, for disability. 
Franklin. James, Battery C, 13th H. A.; enl. Aug. 17, 

18i>4; disch. June 27, IStK. 
Franklin, William S., Co. K 64th Inf.; enl. Nov. 25, 

isul; wounded at Fair Oaks, right leg amputated; 

died soon after. 
Gould, James W., Co. K, 64th Inf.; enl. Sept. 14, 1S61; 

died in hospital at Newport News, Oct. 26, 1862. 
Green, Benjamin F., Co. F, IWth Inf.; enl. April 11, 

1S64; disch. June following. 
Green, John C, Co. K, 1.54th Inf.; enl. Sept. 5, 1864; 

disch. July 12, 186.5. 
Halker, Frederick C, Co. B, 6tth Inf.; enl. Aug. 17, 

l.><61; disch. Dec. 1, 1862. 
Hallenbeck, Lemuel H., Co. C, 13th H. A.; enl. Aug. 

17, 1864; disch. June 27, l.s». 
Hallenbeck, Matthias, Co. C, 13th H. A.; enl. Sept. 5, 

1864; disch. June 26, 1865. 
Harmon. George W., Co. D. 76th Inf.; enl. Oct. 2, 1863; 

taken prisoner Oct. 1, IStVl, and confined in Salis- 
bury until March 1, 18a5. 
Herrick, Daniel C, Co. C. 13th H. A.; enl. Sept. 2, 

1.H64; disch. June 26, ISa5. 
Herrick, John D., Co. F, 194th Inf.; enl. April 11, 

1865; disch. June 27, 186.5. 
Hodges, John K., Co. K, 64th Inf.; enl. Oct. 1.5, 1861; 

prisoner; disch. Oct. 9, 1862. 
Hogan. Koger, Co. K, 64th Inf.; enl. Nov. 4, 1861; 

killed at Antietam. 
Holmes, Harvey H.. Co. K, 64th Inf.; enl. Oct. 28, 

1861; disch. Oct. 2!!, ISW. 
Hubbard, Levi B., Co. K, 64th Inf.; enl. Oct. 15, 1861; 

died at Harper's Ferry of disease. 
H ubbard, Solon E., Co. B, 64th Inf.; enl. Sept. 20, 1861, 

disch. in June, 1862. 
Hunt, Horatio N., lieut. Co. K, 64th Inf.; enl. Sept. 

1.5, 1861; pro. capt. May 24, 1862; disch. Oct. 4, 1864. 
Hurd, David H., corp. Co. H, 37th Inf.; enl. May 20, 

18»)1; disch. Oct. 26, 1862; re-enl. in Bat. C, 13tli 

H. A.; disch. Sept. .'J, 1865. 
Ingersoll, Francis D., corp. Co. K, 04th Inf.; enl. Oct. 

2, 1861; wounded at Fair Oaks; died at Crany Is- 
land, Sept. 9, 1863. 
Ingrahara, Charles M., Co. K, 64th Inf.; enl. Oct. 15, 

1861; wounded at Gettysburg; disch. Dec. 16, 18ti4. 
Ingraham, Gilbert C., Co. K, 64th Inf.; enl. Oct. 13, 

1861; disch. Jan. 16, 1865; re-enl. in Co. G, 6th Inf.; 

served one year. 
Ingraham, Henry A., Co. K, 64th Inf.; enl. Nov. 13, 

1861; died in hospital at Alexandria, Feb. 11, 1662. 
Ingraham, Simeon M., Co. K, 6ith Inf.; enl. Sept. 17, 

1861; pro. 1st sergt. Jan. 21, 186:3; wounded at Get- 
tysburg and Spotsylvania; disch. Oct., 1864. 
Jackson, KusseU C, Co. K, tHth Inf.; enl. Sept. 14, 

1861; disch. in Feb., 186:3. 
Jones, David S., Co. K., 154th Int.; enl. Aug. 29, 1862; 

pro. corp. 1864; wounded at Gettysburg and in 

Sherman's campaign; disch. June 28, 1865. 
Kelly, De Witt C, Co. B, 64th Inf.; enl. Sept. 2.5, 1.H61; 

disch. Sept. 28, 1864 
Kelly, Eber, Co. A, 9th Cav.; enl. Sept. 2, 1864; disch. 

June 1, 1865. 
Kelsey, Orsemus, Co. K, 61th Inf.; enl. Oct. 7, 1801; 

trans, to Invalid Corps: served to close of war. 
Kierstead, Wm. K., sergt, Co. K, 64th Inf.; enl. Oct; 

2, 1801; conttned in Libby and Salisbury prisons, 
died April 15, 186.5, of disease. 
Killburn, Benjamin, Co. B, 1.54th Inf.; enl. Aug. 12, 

1802; disch. Jan. 3, 180.5. 
Killburn, Cicero C, Co. B, 64th Int.; enl. Sept. 25, 

1861; died in hospital at Elmira, Nov. 8, 1801. 
Kyser, Amos S., corp. Co. K, 154th Inf.; enl. Sept. 2.5, 

1862; disch. June 16, 1865. 
Kyser, Nicholas S., Co. V. Ifl4th Inf.; enl. April 11, 

1805; disch. May 6, following. 
Low, Manfred, Co. F, 194th Inf.; enl. April 11, 1865. 
.McCoon, Chauncey, Co. B, 64th Inf.; enl. Sept. 13, 
1861; disch. June 1, 1864. 



228 



History of Cattaraugus County. 



Meloph, Hermon, Co. K. 64th Inf.; enl. Oct. 7, 1S61: 

died in Baltiraore, Oct. U, 1802. 
Millman. Jolin H., Co. K, B4th Inf.; enl. Sept. 1.5, ISiJl; 

wounded at Gaine.s'3 Mills; discb. July 25, 1SH2. 
Moore, Harlow E., Co. K, 64th Inf.; enl. Oct. 7, ISil; 

wounded at Fredericksburg; killed at Chanccl- 

loi-sville. Mar 3, 18G.S. 
Morgan, Newell C, Co. B, 64tli Inf.; enl. Sept. 14, 

1861; trans, to V. R. C; disch. July 4, 1S64. 
Mosher, Baronet B., Co. B, 64th Inf.; enl. Sept. 26, 

1861; disch. Sept. 28, 1864. 
Mosher, Francis M., Co. K, 64th Inf.; enl. Oct. 7, 1.861; 

pro. Corp. Au^'. 1, 1862, and sergt. Dec. 15, 1862; 

disch. Oct. 15, 1864. 
Myei-s, Garret S., Co. B, 64th Inf.; enl. Sept. 13, 1861; 

disch. June 20, 1862. 
Nickerson, Harris, Co. H,37th Inf.; enl. May 20, 1861; 

wounded at Charles City; disch. June 24, 1863. 
Nortbrup, Charles, Co. K, 64th Inf.; enl. Sept. 21, 

1861; died in Elmira. 
Parks. Andrew G., Co. B, l.S4th Inf.; enl, Aug. 11, 

1862; pro. 1st sergt. Dec. 1, 1864: prisoner at Golds- 
borough, N. C, March 2.5. 1865; disch. June 17, 1865. 
Pember, Deloss E., Co. K, 64th Inf.; enl. Sept. 14, 1861; 

wounded at Fair Oaks and disch. soon after. 
Plopper, John C, Co. B, 64th Inf.; enl. Sept. 16, 1861; 

wounded and prisoner; disch. Feb. 27, 186:3. 
Plunkett, Thomas. Co. K. l-54th Inf.; enl. Sept. 6, 1862; 

disch. March 24, 186:3, for disability. 
Eichmier, John, Co. H, 13th H. A.; enl. Sept. 4, 1864; 

served on gunboat Bxan.tklc: disch. June 13, l.«6.5. 
Kobinson, Horace, Co. K, 1.54th Inf.; enl. Sept. 6, 1862; 

pro. Corp.; disch. June 23. 1865. 
Kobinson, Wra. R., Co. K, 64th Inf.; enl. Sept. 16, 

1861; disch. Sept., 18t;4. 
Ross, Reuben, Co. B. 64th Inf.; enl. Sept. 25, 1861; 

died at Fortress Monroe, April 17, 1862. 
Sattord, James M., corp. Co. K, 64th Inf.; enl. Sept. 

14, 1861; died at Fortress .Monroe, April 16, 1862. 
Sanders, Nelson T., Co. K, 64th Inf.; enl. Sept. 14, 

1801; served three yeai'S as regimental commis- 
sary, and was discharged at the close of his term 

of service. 
Shannon, Edgar, Co. B, 1.54th Inf.; enl. Aug. 1, 1802; 

pro. 1st serg. March, 18t>4; 1st. lieut. April 5, 1864; 

quartermaster; discli. June 23, 186.5. 
Shannon, .Marshall H., Co. K, 1.54th Inf.; enl. Sept. 6. 

1862; pro. 1st. sergt. .Tan. 18, 181V4; wounded Jan. 16, 

1864; trans, to V^ K. C. Dec. 20, 1804; disuh. July 5, 

18ti5. 
Shannon, Truman S., Co. K, ].54th Inf.; enl. Sept. 0, 

1862; pro. corp. in tiret buttle of Fredericksburg; 

killed at Chancellorsville. 
Shelmadine, Barut D., Co. K. 154th Inf.; enl. Sept. 6, 

1862; killed at Chancellorsville. 
Sherman, Joseph B., Co. A. 64th Inf.; enl. Sept. 17, 

1801; wounded at Fredericksburg; disch. Oct., 1804. 
Smith, Amos S., Co. B, 04th. Inf.; enl. Aug. 16, 1861; 

disch. Feb. 2.5, 186.3; re-enl. April 11, 1805; stationed 

in Elmira. 
Smith, Henry, Co. B, 64th Inf.; enl. Sept. 25, 1861; 

disch. Feb. 14, 186:5. 
Smith, Isaac W., Co. K, 1.54th Inf.; enl. Sept. 6, 1802; 

pro. corp. Oct. 2:5, 180:3; disch. June 14, 186.5. 
Smith, Wiliard D., Co. H, :37th Inf.; enl. May 20, 1861; 

disch. Sept. 13, 1861. 
Stickney, Theodore E., Co. K, 04th Inf.; enl. Sept. 14, 

1801; disch. Aug. 22, 1862. 
Sutton, Patrick, Co. H, :37th Inf.; enl. June 15, 1861; 

disch. Aug. 15. 18&'; re-enl. Co. F, 194th Inf.. and 

stationed in Elniini until the close of the war. 
Town, Rufus P., Co. K, 154th Inf.; enl. Aug. 6, 186:!; 

disch. June 16, 1805. 
Trumbull, Henry, Co. K,64th Inf.; enl. Sept. 15, 1801; 

disch. Jan. 1.5, 180:3. 
Wait, John C, Co. B, 64th Inf.; enl. Sept. 2.5, 1861; 

disch. Sept. 28, 1804. 
■\Vellman, George W., sergt. Co. K, 64th Inf.; enl. 

Sept. 16, 1861; severely wounded at Fair Oaks; 

disch. in Sept.. 1862. 
Wells, Albert N.. corp. Co. K. 04th Inf.; enl. Sept. 14, 

1861; died at Fairfa.x Station, April 22, 1862. 
Wells, Mandeville, Co. H, 3nh Inf.; enl. May 14, 1801. 
Wilcox, Martin V. B., Co. K, &4th Inf.; enl. bept. 2!), 

1861; disch. Oct. 15, 1864. 
Willson, Lester (no record). 
Willson, Myron L., Co. H, 9th Cav.; enl. Sept. 2, 1864; 

disch. June 27, 186.5. 



Wood, Bradford H., Co. K, 64th Inf.: enl. Dec. 9, 1861- 

disch. March, 1862; re-enl. Co. K. 1.54th Inf., Aug! 

1, 1802; severely wounded at Chancellorsville; 

remained in service until Juno 1. 1865. 
Wood, Daniel T., sergt. Co. K, 64th Inf.; enl. Sept. 14, 

1861; ri<rht arm shattered at Gettvsburg; disch 

Dec. 2i; ISia. 
Wood, Joseph F., corp. Co. K, 64th Inf.: enl. Sept. 14, 

1861; served three years. 
Zibbells, Jefferson, Co. F, 64th Inf.: enl. Sept. 1.5, 1861; 

severely woiuided at Gett.\sburg and trans, to 

Invalid Res. Corps; served three yeai'S. 

LITTLE VALLEY. 

Anderson. Emory A., capt. Co. B, 9th Cav.; enl. Sept. 

23, 1861; pro. major. 
Austin, Horace, Co. F, 64th Inf.: enl. Aug., 1801; 

died at Mount Pleasant ho.spital. 
Beckwith. James M.. Co. B, 9th Cav.; enl. Oct. 1. 1801. 
Bisbee, Alvan, Co. A. 1.54th Inf.; enl. July 2.5. 1862. 
Borden, Herman D.. :3d Iowa Cav. 
Borden, Peter J.. 111th Inf.; enl. Sept. 4.1864. 
Brainard. Cyrus W.,64th Inf.; enl. Sept. 9, iwi. 
Button. John, Co. B, 9th Cav.; enl. Sept. 29, 1S61. 
Calkins, Patrick. Co. D, 67th Ohio Inf.: enl. Dee. 9, 

1861; re-enl. at the end of three years. 
Cna,«e, Abner W., Co. D. 2lst Inf.: enl. April., 1861: 

died at Ale.vandria, -\pril 21. l.'^)2. 
Chase, Hiram, corp. Co. B, 9th Cav.: enl. Sept. 23, 

l.~<01; died at Springfield. Aug.. 1862. 
Childs, Joel L., Co. B, 9th Cav.; enl. Sept. 27, 1861. 
Conklin, Benjamin. Co. I. 37th Inf.: enl. May 9, 1861; 

wounded in both thighs. 
Cory, Hiram, Co. L, 1.5th Cav.; enl. Nov. 18, 1862. 
Crundall, William, Co. B, 9th Cav.: enl. Sept. 23,1861. 
Crosby, Nathan C, 1st lieut. Co. B. 9th Cav.; enl. 

Sept. 2:5, 1801. 
Cullen, John, Co. H, 1.54th Inf.; enl. Julv. 1862; died 

Nov. 20. 186:3. 
Cullen, Joseph, Co. B. 154th Inf.; enl. Sept. 3, 1862. 
Culleii, Samuel, Co. B. 13th H. A.; enl. Aug. 19, 1863. 
Davis, F. Lei-oy, Co. E, 5th Cav.: enl. Aug. 26, 1801. 
Ellis, Albert. Co. B. 9th Cav.: enl. Sept.2;j, 1801. 
Ellis. Henry, Co. H. 1.54th Inf.: enl. Aug. 1.5, 1862; died 

at Chancellorsville. Mav :3, 18o:3. 
Farnace, .\sa H.. <;'o. B. 9th Cav.; enl. Sept. 2:3, 1861. 
Fields, Charles, Co. B, 1.54th Inf.; enl. Sept. 3, 1862; 

pro. Corp. 
Foster, Mclvin, Co. B, 1.5tth Inf.; enl. Sept. 19. 1864. 
Fuller, Benjamin C, Co. I, :37th Inf.: enl. May 9, 1864. 
Fuller, Henry V., Co. F, 64th Inf.: enl. Aug., 1861; 

pro. sergt.; 1st lieut.; capt.; killed at Gettysburg. 
Gallagher. James, Co. E, 1.54tn Inf.: enl. Sept. 29, 1862; 

pro. 1st. sergt. Dec. 1862; 1st lieut. Sept., 1864: 

capt. Nov., 1804. 
Gates, Levi, (.'0. 1, 187th Int.: enl. Sept. 16, 1804; died 

May 2:5, 1805. 
Godding, Carlos, Co. C. 64th Inf.: enl. Sept., 1861; pro. 

Corp. 
Godding, William W.. Co. B, 9th Cav.: enl. Octl, 1861. 
Hale, .Tames, Co. H, 1.51th Inf.; enl. Aug.. 1802. 
Hale, William D., Co. H. 1.54th Inf.; enf. Aug. 11, 1863; 

died in .Tamestown, N. Y., .\ug. 29, 1SJ2. ' 
Hildroth, Edward A., Co. B. 1.54th Inf.: enl. Aug. 14, 

1802: trans, to ISth Pa. Cav. 
Hildreth, Oliver B., Co. F, 64th Inf.; enl. Sept. 23, 

1.861; pro. Corp.; sergt.; re-enl. Jan.. 1861, as sergt. - 

major: pro. 2d lieut.; 1st lieut.; quartermaster; 

capt.; brevet major. 
Houghton, Nelson, 9th Cav.; enl. Jan. 22, 186:3; died in 

Philadelphia. 
Ingalls, Orlin, 2d Cav.; enl. March Sn. 186.5. 
Keith, Albert, Co. F, 64th Inf.; enL Nov. 27, 1861. 
Keith. Horace, Co. F, 64tb Inf.; enl. Aug., 1861; re- 
enl.; died in the service. 
Kenyon, Ellas W., Co. A, 1.54th Inf.: enl. .\ug. , 1862; 

lost an eye in battle. 
Kenyon, Hiram L., Co. E, 10th Cav.: enl. Oct., 1861. 
Kenyon, Lorenzo A., 13th H. A.: enl. Aug. 22, 1864; 

died in Norfolk, Va., Nov. 3, 1864. 
Kilbourn, George. 166th Inf.; enl. March, 1S&5. 
King, Joshua, farrier Co. E, 5th Cav.: enl. Aug. 23, 

1861. 
Lewis, Harmon, Co. B, 9th Cav.; enl. Oct. 5. 1861. 
Lewis, Thomas J., Co. B, 9th Cav.; enl. Sept. 30. 1861. 
Loomis, Clark, Co. A, 18Sth Inf.; enl. Aug. 31, 1864. 



Roster of Soldiers and Sailors. 



229 



Loop, David P., Co. B, 9th Cav.; enl. Oct. 3, 1861; 

killed at Shepardstown, 1B64. 
Loop, Georjre U., Co. B, 9tb Ciiv.; enl. Oct. .S, ISBl; 

killed at Stevensbiirt'-, Va., Oct. 11. \xia. 
L'lce, Augustus, 13th H. A.: enl. Autr. 24. l.*i. 
Mark ham, Isaac P., Co. B. 9th C;\y.\ enl. Sept. ^':3, ISU. 
Markham, William J., Co. B, 9tli Cav.; enl. Sept. S5, 

ISil: pro.' Corp.; 1st ser^-t.; 2(1 lieiit. 
Martindale, Warren B., Co. B, 9th Cav.; enl. Sept. 30, 

IStil; died in service April S. l.'^iC 
Mattindale, William S., 3Tth Inf.; enl. Ort. 8, 1861: 

killed at Williamsburg, Va.. April il. isii:;. 
McGowan, .Tohn W., Co. B,9th Cav.; enl. Oct. 27, 1H61; 

died Feb. 2.S, 1S62. 
McGuire, Michael, Co. B, 9th Cav.; enl. Sept. 30. 1861: 

pro. Corp.; serg:t. 
McVa.v, William H., 1st lieut. 6th Kegt. U. S. A.; enl. 

.\Uif., l-«62; died at Fortress Monroe, Nov. 9. 1S61. 
Meakcr. Nelson, Co. F, 89th Inf.; enl. Nov. 8, 1861; 

disch. for disability. 
Jfetsker, Fred'ck, Co. A, 188th Inf.; enl. Sept. 3, 1S61. 
Monroe, Henry W., Co. E, 5th Cav.; enl. Aug. 26, 1862; 

re-enl. in 186.i. 
Jinnroe, Samuel, Co. A. l.ilth Inf.; enl. Aug. 4, 1864. 
Mosher, Henry W., (i4th Inf.; enl. Sept. 9, ].'<64. 
Newton. Truman, Co. B, 9th Cav.; enl. Oct. 8, 18111. 
Orr, C. P., Corp. Co. H, 9th Cav.; enl. Sept. 2:3, 1801. 
Parker. Chauney A., Co. B, 9th Cav.; enl. Sept. ai. 

1H61: pro. adjut. 
Peabody, Martin L., corp. 8:!d Ohio Inf.; enl. Aug. 22, 

1862; dit'd in the ser\'ice. • 
Perry. (;harles K. A., l.ilth Inf.; enl. July 21. l.sti:; 

died at Chancelli.rsvillc, Mav2, lS(i:i. 
Price, T.. Co. [,44th Inf. 

Ru>sell, Almiin P., Crj. H, 9th Cav.; enl. Sept. 30. isiil. 
Snider. Francis K., .>8th [II. inf.: enl. Aug. 12, lsii3. 
Spraiige, L\itber A., lient. 1:0. B. 9th Cav.; enl. Oct. 

27, 1861; pro. to 1st lieuf. Mav, WW. 
Starks, ,lohn W.. :i7th Inf.: eid. Oct. 1, 1861. 
Stevens, .ludson, lUth Inf.; enl. Aug. 2ii, IS64. 
Stevens. Silas, Co. K, 64th Inf.; eid. Aug. 26, 1861; 

wounded at Fair Oaks. 
Sweatland,, Emery, hospital steward Co. B, l.ilth 

Inf.; enl. .\ug. 11, 1,SB2. 
Sweatland, Wesley J., Co. B. l.'uth Inf.; enl. Se|)t. 

21, l.s<i2. 
Thompson, Hiram S., (irm.-sergt. Co. II, 9th Cav.; 

enl. Oct. .3, 18*11. 
Thompson, Joseph F., Co. B, 9th Ca\ .; eid. Sept. 28. 

Ti.sdale, Edward A.. Co. B, 9th <^av.; enl. Oct. 8, isill. 
Town, George, scrgt. (jo. B, 9th Cav.; enl. Sept. 2:i, 

1861; disch. for disatnlity. 
Walker, K. .\f.. Co. It, Kith II. A.; enl. Aug. ], 1SI13. 
Wheat. Jonathan. lUth Inf.; eid. Feb. 27, [S(14. 
Willis Thomas, sergt. Co. H, l-Mth Inf.; enl. Aug., 

1S12; died at Atlanta. Ga. 
Wirnie. Thomas. I'.ith II. Art.; enl. Sept., iwa 
Wocidworth, Charles, corp. Co. C, 13th H. Art.; enl. 

July 27, 18ia 
Woodworth, Thomas, corp. Co. C, Kith H. A; enl. 

Auif. 17, 1863; died Feb. 5, 18U.x 

LYNDON. 

Adams, Ozias F., Co. D. l.>4th Inf.; must. Oct. :J0, lsi_i2, 

three years. 
Beebe, Jeptha, Co. D. liUtli Inf.; must. Sept. :iO. l>i<;2. 

three years; killed at Chancel lorsviUe, .May 3, l.Hiii. 
Bertels, Henry S., Co. C, ir>4th Inf.; must. 'Oct. ;ilj. 

ISU, three years. 
Campbell, Jes.se D., Co. D, 154th Inf.: must. Oct. 30, 

1864. three years; accidentally killed Dec. 7, 1.S61. 
Chase, James F., Co. D, l.i4th Inf.; must. Oct. .30, 1862; 

died July 30, 1863, from wounds received at Get- 
tysburg. 
Clement, Ouane, Co. D, 154th Inf.; must. Sept., 1.S62, 

three year-s. 
Emory, Burdett, Co. G, 13th H. A.; must. Sept. 10, 

1863, one year. 
Emory, Isaa(^ Co. D, 154th Inf.; must. Aug. 12, [1-62, 

three years. 
Gere, Osman B., Co. D, 64th Inf.; must. Sept. 24, 1861, 

three years; died in service May 2, 186;J. 
Goss, John, Co. I, Bth Cav.,- must. Nov. 1, 1861, three 

years; re-enl. Dec. 16, 18fl3. 
Hayden, Edward L., Co. I, 6th Cav.; must. Oct. 30, 

1861, three years. 



Herrick, Matthew, Co. E, .5th Cav.; must. Aug. 30, 

1861, three years: pro. corp.: 2d lieut. Dec. 15, 18t>4. 
Hogg, Adam. must. Sept. 3. 1864, one year. 

Hogg, Ben.1. F., corp. Co. C, 104th Inf.; enl. Oct. 9, 

1862, three vears; wounded at Gettysburg. 
Hogg, Geo. W., Co. C. 104th Inf.; enl. Oct. 9, 18C2. 
Hogg. John R., Co. D. l.>4th Inf.; must. Aug. 12, 18G2, 

three years: prisoner at Gettysburg; sent to 

Belle Isle. Andersonville, and McMillen. 
Hogg. Thomas P.. eul. Jime 5. 1864, one year, 
Johnson, Wm.. served on board Tara, Sineaiite, ("n- 

rondelct. and Bhul- Hau-k. 
Johnston, Jamos, Co. D, 1.54th Inf.; must. Aug. 12, 

1862, three years; wounded; died of smallpo.v Dec. 

.30, 1864. 
Laten, Samuel, Co. 1, 2dRegt.; must. Jan., 1861, three 

years. 
Laten, Wm., Co. I, 2d Regt.; must. Jan., 1861, three 

years. 
Lockwood, Geo.. Co. K. 22d Cav.; must. Nov., 1863. 
McFarland, James, Co. D, 1.54th Inf.; must. Sept. 24, 

1862, three years; prisoner; wounded at Kenesaw 

Mountain. 
MellvillP, Daniel C. 64th Inf.; must. Sept. 10, 1,864, 

one year. 
Melrose, James, must. Sept. 3, 1864, one yeai-. 
Mervale. Halliday. Co. K, 22d Ca\-.; must. Nov., 18il3; 

captured by guerrillas and never heard from. 
Mitchell. John. 1st lieut. Co. I), 154th Int.; must Aug. 

12, 1S6J, three years; taken prisoner at Gettys- 
burg anil escaped. 
Otto, Howard. Co. K, 22d Cav.; must. Nov., 1S(J3, tsvo 

Patterson. Darius, Co. I, 85th Inf.; must. Nov. 26. 

isill. three viai-s. 
Portt-r. .Inhn C. Co. E, 6th Cav.; must. Sept. 10, 1S64, 

one \ ear. 
Pratt, IMwar.I F.. Co. I, fith Cav.; must. Nov. 15, 1861, 

three years: killed in battle Sejit. 4, 1S64. 
Rider, Henry D.. Co. [, 27th luf.; must. June, 1861, 

two years: died July 22, 1861. 
Rider. Wm. B.. Co. I. 27th Inf.; must. July :!, IMll, 

two yea'S. 
Scott, James, served onboard Umli m- and Hiiiitiiss; 

eul. Sept. 3, 1864. on"- jear. 
Stone, Edmund. Jr., Co. D. 64th Inf.; must. Oct. 18, 

l.'^62. three years: pro. ciu-p.; killed July 2, l.-<ii:i. 
Stone, .lames .M., (o. (', 67ih Inf.; must. May 14, 1861, 

three \ ears: re-enl. Dec. 2.S, 186:!. 
Taylor, lieiijamm F.. Co. [, 6th Cav.; must. Nov., 

1861. three yeai>: killed in battle Oct. 11, In;:.. 
Taylor, Henry H.. Co. 1,0th Cav.; must. Nov., 1861, 

three years; died of disease Sept. :30, 1862. 
Thompson. Addison S., Co. E, .5th Cav.; must. Aug. 

29, Isiii, throe years: prisoner; paroled; re-enl. 

Dee. 26. iwuj: pro. 2il lieut. 
Vaughan. .iii;;u-tus W., Co. D, 64th Inf.; must. May, 

l>61. tliic-e yeai-s: died in service. 
Vaiighuii. Wallace. CO. F, 90th Inf.: must. Oct. 18, 

l.-^.U, one vear. 
Winehell. David. Co. G, 13tli [I. .\.; must. Sept. 10, 

l^iJi, one year. 



MACHIAS. 

Abers, Gerrett. 37th Inf.; enl. Nov. 2.5, 1.H61: disch. 

Sept., isfil. 
-■\dams, James, musician 21st Ohio Inf.; enl. Sept., 

1861: disch. Sept., 1862. 
Allen, Edward A., Co. D, 105th Inf.; enl. Dec, 1K61; 

disch. June. 18<>5. 
Allen, Edwin A., Co. D, 105th Inf.; enl. Dec. 6, 1861; 

re-enl. as sergt. 94th Inf., Feb.. l.'<64. 
Allen, George, lo. D, 105th Inf.; enl. Dec., 1861; died 

of wounds I let. 7. 1862. 
Ames, Nelson, 21th Inf.; served nineteen months. 
Andrews, B. F. H., Co. D, 1.54th Int.; enl. July II, 

1862, three years; died in Libhy prison. 
Andrews, H. E., Co. D, 15tth Inf.; enl. July 11, l,so2, 

three ynars. 
Baker. F. .Marion, Co. G, 14th H. A.; enl. Nov. 10, 

186:1, three years. 
Barns, Alanson, corp. Co. C, 104th Inf.; enl. Oct. 9, 

1.S61; re-enl. Feb., 1804. 
Bliton, Nelson F., 1.54th Inf.; enl. Aug. 8, 1862, three 

years. 



230 



History of Cattaraugus County. 



Bliton, Thomas N., Co. D, 15ith Inf.; enl. Aug. 8, 1862, 

three years. 
Brandart. Frederick, Co. D, 105th Inf.: enl. Dec. 6, 

1H61, three years. 
Brown, Albert, Co. G, Uth H. A.; en). Nov. 12, 1863, 

three years. 
Brown, C. R., Co. D, 1.54th Inf.; enl. Aug. 14, 1862, 

three years. 
Brown, Charles, 154th Inf.; enl. Aug., 1862, three 

years. 
Brown, Frederick, Co. A, 188th Inf.; enl. Sept. 3, 

lSt>4, one year. 
Bush. John, corp. Co. D, 1.54th Inf.; enl. Aug. 6, 1862, 

three rea'S. 
Butler, Alvin G., Co. A, 188th Inf.; enl. Sept. 3, 1864, 

one year. 
Button, Kingsley, 72d Inf.; enl. June, 1861, three 

years. 
Button, Milford F., Co. G, Uth H. A ; enl. Nov. 10, 

1863, three years. 
Carver, Carthalo, 4th Mich. Cav.; enl. 1863, three 

years. 
Chase, Chas. M., Co. I, 1.54th Inf.; enl. Aug. 30, 1SG2, 

three years. 
Cheney, David H., Co. G, 104th Inf.; enl. Nov. 18, 

1861; disch. for disability Aug., 1862. 
Cheney, Galen, Co. C, 104th Inf.; enl. Oct. 21. 1861; 

re-enl. as musician in 2d N. Y. Regt. Jlaj' IB, 1864. 
Corwin, James H., Co. D, lOoth Inf.; enl. Feb. 4, 1862, 

three years. 
Curtis, Wra. L., Co. A, 188ch Inf.; enl. Sept. 9, 1864, 

one year. 
Dean, C. P., enl. April 14. 1864, two years. 
Dillingham, Abijah S., Co. D. Ili5th Inf.; enl. Feb. 1, 

1862; died at Annapolis, Feb. 2, 1864. 
Dillingham, Ale.xander K.,Co.D, 1.54th Inf.; enl. Aug. 

6, 1862, three years. 
Dillingham, Benj., Co. F, 1.5tth Inf.; enl. Sept. 2, 1802, 

three years. 
Eder, Michael, Co. A.lSSth Inf.; enl. Sept. 3, 1864, one 

year. 
Ellithorp. Lyman, Co. D, 105th Inf.; enl. March 26, 

1862, three years. 
Evans, Daniel, Co. A, 18Sth Inf.; enl. Sept. 3, 1864, 

one year. 
Farran, Martin V., Co. C, 104th Inf.; enl. Nov. 19, 

1861, three years. 

Farran, Melville. 72d Inf.; enl. Juno, 1861, three years. 
Fish, Harry, Co. D, 105th Int.; enl. Jan. 20, 1861, three 

years; died of \Bounds in Maryland, Oct. 1, 1862. 
Freeman, Easterly, Co. 1, 1.54th Inf.; enl. Sept. 2, 1862, 

three years. 
Gould, Amos W., Co. K, 105th Inf.; enl. Jan. 15, 1862, 

three years. 
Gould, Elias, Co. K, 10.5th Inf.: enl. March 1.5, 1862, 

three years; re-enl. Co. A, 188th Inf., Sept. 3, 1864. 
Gould, John, Co. A, 188th Int.; enl. Sept. 3, IStU, one 

ytar. 
Gould, Lyman (no record). 
Gould, Wm., Co. A, 188th Inf.; enl. Sept. 9, 1864, one 

year. 
Hall, Harvey H., Co. H, 44th Inf.; enl. Sept. 24, 1861; 

disch. Sept. 24, IMH. 
Hall, Wyman, Co. H, 44th Inf. 
Hamilton, Alson, Co. C, 104th Inf.; enl. Oct. 14, 1861, 

three years; re-enl. March, ISW. 
Hamilton, John, corp. Co. D, 105th Inf.; enl. Nov. 

29, 1861, three years. 
Hawkins, Duty, corp. Co. D, 105th Int.; enl. Oct. 30, 

18U1, three years. 
Hawkins. Oscar F., 1st sergt. Co. D, 105th Inf.; enl. 

Oct. 311, 1861, three years. 
Hilsen, Andrew, Co. A. 188th Inf.; enl. Sept. 3, 1864, 

one year. 
Hitchcock, Lucius, 1.54th Inf.; enl. Sept., 1864, one 

year. 
Hyatt, James, Co. G, Uth Art.; enl. Nov. 16, 186:!, 

three years, 
.lohnson, Andrew L., sergt. Co. D, 10.5th Inf.; enl. 

Dec. 9, 1861, three years: disch. at e.\p. of term. 
Johnson, John B., Co. M, 2d .Mtd. Kitles; enl. Jan. 15, 

1864; died at Petersburg, July 7, 1864. 
Johnson, Wallace H., Co. A, 136th Inf.; enl. Aug. 2.5, 

1862, three years. 

Jones, Morgan, 2d Art.; enl. Feb., 1864. 

Joslin, Alanson, wagoner Co. C, 104th Inf.; enl. Oct. 

21, 1861; transferred. 
Joslin, Francis S., Co. D, 105ih Inf.; enl. Nov. 20,1861. 



Joslin, Geo., 44th Inf.; enl. Sept., 1862; killed at Spot- 
sylvania, May 8, 1804. 
Keller, A. Martin, corp. Co. D, 1.54th Inf.; enl. Aug. 6, 

1862, three years; pro. sergt. 
Kennedy, John, Co. A, 188th Inf.; enl. Sept. 3, 1864 

one year. " 

Lamb, Moses B.. Co. O, l.>4th Inf.; enl. Aug. 9, 1862 

three years. 
Lind, James, 2d N. T. Mtd. Rifles: enl. Jan., 1864. 
Lingenfelter, James, Co. I, 154th Inf.; enl. Sept. 2, 

1862, three years. 
Little, Henry, 105th Inf.; enl. March, 1862. 
Locke, H. E., musician Co. D, 154th Inf.; enl. July 30, 

1862, three .yea'S. 
Lowell, Merritt, Co. A, 188th Inf.; enl. Sept. 3, 1864; 

disch. June. 186.5. 
Lynde, Chas. S., Co. D, 105th Inf.; enl. Dec. .5, 1861, 

three years; re enl. 2d Mtd. Kities, Jan. 30, 1864. 
Lynde, Spencer, Co. A, 188th Inf.; enl. Sept. 3, 1864, 

one year. 
Jfartin, Hiram, Co. D, 1.54ih Inf.; enl. Aug. 1.5, 1862,. 

three years. 
McCracken John, Co. D, 105th Inf.; enl. Jan. 15, 1862; 

disch. Oct., 1864. 
Mosman, Matthias, Co. A, 188th Inf.; enl. Sept. 3, 1864, 

one year. 
Munson, Willis, Co. D, 105th Inf.; enl. Feb. 1, 1862, 

three years. 
Myers, John L., Co. D, 154th Inf.; enl. Aug. 9, 1862, 

three years. 
Newton, Geo. H., Co. K, 10.5th Inf.; enl. Nov. 15,18(31; 

died of wounds Oct. 15, 1862. 
Newton, Henry, corp. Co. K, 105th Inf.; enl. Nov. 17, 

1861; died in hospital Nov. 9. 1862. 
Owen, David J., corp. Co. E, lS7tli Inf.; enl. Sept. 26, 

1864, one year. 
Patterson, Chas.. Co. A, 188th Inf.; enl. Sept. 3, 1864, 

one year. 
Patterson, H. L., Co. D, 154th Inf.; enl. Aug. 11, 1862, 

three years. 
Patterson, Nathaniel, Co. D, 154th Inf.; enl. Aug. 7, 

1862, three years. 
Peck, John, corp. Co. D, 105th Inf.; enl. Oct. 3, 1861; 

disch. Jan., 186-5. 
Phillips, Delos, Co. D, 154th Inf.; enl. Aug. 5, 1865; 

disch. May, 1864. 
Phillips, Dudley, Co. D, 154th Inf.; enl. Aug. 11, 1862, 

three years. 
Phillips. George, Co. I, 1.54th Inf.; enl. Aug. 27, 1862, 

three years. 
Phillips, Norris, Co. A, 188th Inf.; enl. Sept.'S, 1864. 
Kay, .loseph, Co. A, 188th Inf.; enl. Sept. 3, 1864, one 

year. 
Hfied. Alpheus N., Co. G, Uth H. A.; enl. Nov. 9. 1863, 

three years, 
Hosenburger, Frederick, Co. K, 105th Inf.; enl. Nov. 

19, 1862; killed at Bull Run, Aug. 30, 1863. 
Shaw, Daniel, Co. D, 10.5th Inf.; enl. Oct. 30, 1861; 

wounded; disch. Oct., 186.3. 
Shultz, John, Co. D, 105th Inf.; enl. Dec. 3, 1861; died 

of wounds Oct. 26, 1863. 
Snyder, Edgar, Co. D, 105th Inf.; enl. Jan. 22, 1862, 

three years. 
Starks, John D.. corp. Co. A, 100th Inf.: enl. Oct. 29, 

1861; died in Anderson ville prison Sept. 18, 1864. 
Starks, Nathaniel, Co. D, 105th Inf.; enl. Dec. 10, 1861; 

died at Annapolis, Md., April 2, 186.5. 
Stephens, Cora L., 1st sergt. Co. D, 154th Inf.; enl. 

Aug. 6. 1862; pro. 1st lieut. 
Slevens, Andrew, Co. A, 18Sth Inf.; enl. Sept. 3, 1864, 

one year. 
Stoneman, George A., Co. D, 105th Inf.; enl. Dec. 20, 

1861; transferred. 
Sutton, Charles G., Co. D, 154th Inf.; enl. Aug. 6, 

1862, three years. 
Thompson, Osro, Co. A, 188th Inf.; enl. Sept. 9, 1864, 

one year; disch. with company. 
Travis, Byron, Co. D, 105th Int.; enl. Jan. 22, 1862, 

thrpe years. 
Van Slike, James E., Co. I. 116th Inf.; enl. Aug. 9, 

1862; died of disease at New Orleans, April 8. 1S(>3. 
Vanderwater, Jacob, Co. D, 105th Inf.; enl. Feb. 1, 

1862,; killed at Bull Run, Aug. 30, 186:3. 
Velzey, George, Co. D, 105th Int.; enl. Dec. 20, 1861, 

three years; wounded at Gettysliurg; re-enl. Co. 

A, ISSth Inf., Sept. 3, 1864. 
Velzey, Milton, Co. C, 104th Inf.; enl. Oct. 31, 1861, 

three years. 



Roster of Soldiers and Sailors. 



Velzey, Oliver, Co. A, ISiith Inf.; enl. Sept. 3, 1864, one 

year. 
'.Varreo, Delano, Co. A, ISSth Inf.; enl. Sept. 3, 1364; 

discli. June. lSt;.5. 
Weed. Martin E., 1st corp. Co. D, 105th Inf.; enl. Nov. 

1, ISOI, three years. 
Whitcorab. Newell, Co. A, lS*th Inf.: enl. Sept. 6, 

IBiU; killed at Petersburg, April 5, ISffi. 

MANSFIELD. 

Ames, Jonathan M., enl. April. lfJ>5. 

liabcock, Enoch H. (no record); enl. in Steuben Co. 

Uailey, Georjre \V., Co. G, l.Mth Inf.; enl. Aujr.. 1802; 

died in Andei'sonville prison Aug., 18G4. 
Hall, Ezra D., Co. B, 151th Inf.: enl. Aug., 1S62, three 

years. 
Ball, Georg-e M.. sergt. Co. B, 1.51th Inf.; enl. Aug., 

1862; prisoner at Gettysburg, and confined in 

Belle Isle 40 days. 
Ball, Lucius D., musician Co. B. 151th Inf.; enl. Aug., 

liallard'. Willard, Co. I, 3:th Inf.: enl. May, isijl. 

Barnes, George W., enl. Sept., 1>»>4. 

Bartlett, De.xter, Co. 1, 37th Inf.; enl. May, 1.SU1; died 

in hospital in 18t)2. 
Bartlett, Nelson M., Co. B, 1.51th Inf.; enl. Aug., 1862; 

re-enl. 
Barto, Jesse, Co. B, 8th Cav.; enl. Oct., l.'^l: disch. 
Beckworth, James M., Co. B. nth Cav.; enl. Nov., 1861; 

disch. 
Black, Charles S , Ind. Co.'Fa. Inf.; enl. Aug., 1862. 
Bornhoff, Henry H., Co. B, 9th Cav.; enl. Nov., 18B1. 
iiowen, Francis M., Co. I, 151th Inf.; enl. Sept., 1802; 

wounded; disch. .lune 11, IStfi. 
Bowen, Moses, Jr., Co. B. 1.54th Inf.; enl. Aug., 1802. 
Boyington, Fred H., enl. March. 1804. 
Brown, Heman G.. Co. I, .37th Inf.; enl. May, 1801. 
Buckley, H., enl. March, liM'A. 
Bullinger, Frederick, enl. April. 180.5. 
Burroughs, William K., lieut. Co. C. 04th Inf.; enl. 

Sept., IWl: disch. July, l.si2. 
Butcher, Frederick, enl. March. I8M. 
Butler, Oscar, Co. B, 1.54th Inf.: enl. Aug., 1802; pris- 
oner; died in Belle Isle in I'^'S. 
Calkins, James, Co. B, 1.51th Inf.; enl. Aug., 1S02, 

throe years. 
Callahan, Thomas, enl. Sept., Is^. 
Charlesworth, Aaron, Co. I, ;J7th Inf.; enl. Jlay, 1801; 

prisoner. 
Chase, Jame.=, Co. F, UHth Inf.; enl. April, 180.5. 
Chase, John J., enl. Oct.. 18(H. 
Cochrane, Wilbur, is'^tli Inf.; enl. Sept., 18<U. 
Conklin, Morrill J., Co. A. IS^th Int.; enl. Sept. .5, 1804. 
Co."C, Mervin, Otii Cav.; enl. Sept., 1804. 
Curtis.s, .M. F.. enl, March, IsH. 
Davis, George, Co. C. fUih Inf.: enl. Sept., 18);i; died 

in Elmira, P^H. 
Davis, Kobert. Co. B, nth Cav.: enl. Oct., 1,'«1; disch.: 

ri--enl. Co. B, 1.54th Inf.. Julv, 1.<B2; disch. Jan. .180:5. 
De Costa, Alfred, Co. F, With Inf.: enl. April, 186.5. 
Demming, Chester, sergt. Co. B. 1.54th Inf.; enl. Aug., 

180:J; wounded; prisoner. 
Edmonds, Austin, Co. C, 04th Int.; enl. Sept., 1801. 
Fay, James S., musician Co. K, ploth Inf.; enl. Feb. 1, 

1802. 
Finch, Hugh. 188th Inf.; enl. Sept., 1801. 
Gardner, A. S., enl. March, 1864. 
Gardner, S. F., enl. March, H^A. 
Godding, William, Co. B, nth Cav.; enl. Nov., 1861; 

disch. 
Gogal, Christian (no record i. 
Green, Otheniel, Jr., < 'o. G, 1.54th Inf.; enl. Aug., 1802; 

died in Andersonville prison Aug., 1804. 
Greene, Henry, enl. Oct., 18<>4. 
Hardy, Ale.\ander, Co. C, Wth Inf.; enl. Sept., 1861. 
Harvey, Isaac, (2d), sergt. Co. C, 64th Inf.; enl. Sept., 

1801; disch. July, 18)C 
Hamilton, Benjamin, enl. Sept., \(M. 
Heath, Bart, Co. F, 61th Inf.; enl. Sept., 1861. 
Huntley, Henry S.. Co. I. 37th Inf.; enl. May, 1801: 

wounded at Williamsburg, and died in hospital 

after having leg amputated. 
Huntley, SilasS., lieut. Co. 1. 37th Inf.; enl. May, 1801. 
James, Martin A., O. F, inith Inf.; enl. April, 180.5. 
Johnson, Albion T., Co. B, 15tthlnf.; enl. Aug., 1862, 

three years. 
Johnson, Alexander, enl. Sept., 1864. 



Johnson, Fred, enl. Sept., 1864. 
Johnson, John, enl. Sept., 1864. 
Johnson, Stephen T., Co. A, 188th Inf.; enl. Sept. 5, 

1864. 
Johnston, Edward, Co. F, nth Cav.; enl. Sept., 1861; 

wounded: disch. 
Johnston, Newell, Co. F, 9th Cav.; enl. Sept., 1861; 

disch. 
Jones, Hiram, enl. Oct., 1801. 
Keen, Henry, Co. B, 9th Cav.; enl. Oct., 1861. 
Kelly, Warren J., Co. A, 154th Inf.; enl. Aug. 4, 1862, 

three years. 
Lang. William, Jr., 1.5tth Inf.; enl. Sept., 1864. 
Lathrop. John S., enl. March, 1801. 
Lattin. Alvin, Co. F, 9th Cav.; enl. Oct. 10, 1861; re- 
enl. Feb. 16, 1801: pro. 1st. lieut. Dec. 28, 1864. 
Lattin, Charles, (^o. I, 37th Inf.; enl. May, 1861; re- 
enl. as sergt. Feb. 16, 1804. 
Lattin, Edgar, Co. B, 154th Inf.; enl. Aug., 18i>!; re- 
enl. Feb., 1864, in 179th Inf.; lost right arm at mine 

explosion, Petersburg. 
Lewis, Herman, Co. B. 9th Cav.; enl. Oct., 1861. 
Lewis, Jefferson, Co. B, 9th Cav.; enl. Oct., 1861. 
Lvon, Urban, enl. March, 1864. 

Manley, John A., capt. Co. F, 64th Inf.; enl. Sept., 1801. 
Mason, Albert W., Co. A, 18Hth Inf.; enl. Sei>t. 5, 1804. 
McDonald, Duncan, enl. Sept., 1804. 
McDonald, Martin, Co. F, 194th Inf.; enl. April, 1805. 
McFarland, Robert (no record). 
McKay, Oscar, Co. C, 64th Inf.; enl. Sept., 1861; disch. 

Feb., 1,803. 
McKay. Thomas H., Co. B, 154th Inf.; enl. Aug., 1862, 

three years. 
Milks, Jonathan B., Co. A, 188th Inf.; enl. Sept. 5. 1864. 
Morris, John, enl. Oct.. 1864. 
Murray, Francis P. (no record). 
Myers, Henry, enl. April. 186.5. 
Newton, Freeman, C^o. B, 9th Cav.; enl. Oct., 1861; 

disch. 
Olsen, John (no record). 
I istrander, Henry, enl. Oct., 1864. 
Perry, Abner, Co. B, 9th Cav.: enl. Sept., 1861; disch. 
Perry, Charles R., Co. A, 1.54th Inf.; enl. Sept., 1862; 

wounded at Chancellorsville and died on the field. 
Perry, Leander, Co. I, :!7th Inf.; enl. May, 1861. 
Prince, Henry (no record). 
Rogei-s, Jason, Co. C, 64th Inf.; enl. Sept., 1861; disch. 

July, 1802. 
Ryan, John, Co. F, 85th Inf.; enl. Sept., 1861; re-enl. 

Jan. 1, 1804. 
Scott, John, enl. Sept., 1804. 
Smith, Addison M., Co. K, 14th H. A.; enl. Aug. 21, 

186:1; trans, to steamer Rcnn, Feb., 1864. 
Smith, D. C, enl. March, 1864. 
Smith, Francis A., 18Sth Inf.; enl. Sept., 1864. 
Smith, Sylvester C, ser^t. Co. H, 9th Cav.; enl. Oct., 

1.801, 
Snowdon, John, enl. Oct., 1804. 
Sprague, Luther, Jr., lieut. Co. B, 9th Cav.: enl. Nov., 

1861. 
Stafford, Frank, Co. C, 64th Inf.; enl. Sept., 1861; died 

in hospital of disease. 
Stewbach, August, enl. Sept., 1804. 
Stoorcs, George H.. enl. Oct., 18(U. 
Sykes, Charles H.,9ihCav.: enl. Sept., 1804; wounded 

in foot. 
Van Aernam, Francis, 9th Cav.; enl. Sept., 1864. 
Washington, William, enl. Sept., 1864. 
Watkins, Henry (no record). 
Wheeler, David A. (no record). 

Whitcomb, Newell, Co. A, l«8th Inf.; enl. Sept. .5, 1864. 
Wilber, Joshua, Co. C, 13Lh Cav.; enl. 1864. 
Wood, Ira, Co. A, 154th Inf.; enl. Sept., 1862; disch. 

Feb., 186:j, for disability. 
Yetter, John, Co. H, lo4th Inf.; enl. Aug., 1802, thiee 

years. 

NAPOLI. 

Adams, Otis, 1st sergt. Co. H, 154th Inf.; enl. Aug. 10, 

1862; disch. Feb., 180:i. 
Allen, Thomas W., 13th H. A.; enl. Aug. 15, 1864, one 

year. 
Arms, Nelson E., Co. B, 64th Int.; enl. Sept. 20, 1801, 

three years; disch. April, 1803, for wounds. 
Arnold, Joseph, 9th Cav.; enl. Feb. 9, 1804; wounded. 
Ballard, Frank R., 9th Cav.; enl. Nov. T, 1802; disch. 

Aug., 1803. 



-0- 



HisTORv OF Cattaraugus County. 



Barber, Solomon, Oth Cav.; enl. Aug-. 26, 1862; disch. 

Nov., 18«2. 
Boardman, Alphonzo J., Co. B, 04tli Inf.; enl. .\ug. 

IT, 1861; disch. Oct., ISO-'. 
Boardman, Henry, 1st serjft. Co. B. liith Inf.; enl. 

Sept. 1."), 1861; re-enl. in 1864, 14th Mass. Vets. 
Boardman, James M., Co. B, 64th Inf.; enl. Aug-. 17, 

1861; disch. Dec, 186:2; re-enl. Aug-., 1863, in 14Tth 

Inf.; disch. May, 1865; prisoner ten mouths. 
Boardman, Timothy S., ord.-sergt. Co. F, 64th Inf.; 

enl. AuK. oil, 1861; died at Annapolis, Md., March 

28, 1865, of wounds. 
Boorn, Charles X., corp. Co. I, 49th Inf.; enl. Aug. 

18, 1861; died Nov. 1.5, 18iJ4, of wounds. 
Booth, Daniel, 9th Cav.; enl. Sept. 1, 1864, one year. 
Booth, Ho-ward A., Kith H. A.; enl. Sept. 2. \SH. one 

year. 
Booth, (Jrlan S.. 9th Cav.; enl. Sept. 1, 1864, one year. 
Brooks, \Vm., l:ith Art.; enl. Sept. 5, 1864, one year; 

trans, to steamer Foato . 
Brown, Chas. D., corp. Co. B, Wth Inf.; enl. Sept. l.i. 

1861, three yeai-s. 
Brown, J. Quincv, sergt. Co. E. 9th Cav.; enl. Oct. 9, 

1861; pro. cap't.; died July 17, 1864, of wounds. 
Bumlage, Rowland, 91 h Cav.; enl. Aug. 29, 1862; disch. 

May, 1864. for wounds." 
Burroughs, Geo. Washington. Co. B, 1.54th Inf.; enl. 

Aug. 8. 1.862; ue\-er returned. 
Burt, Lyman S., Co. F, 6ith Inf.; enl. Oct. 1. L-61; 

died May 17. 1.8ii2, of disease. 
Bushnell, Martin D., corp. Co. H. 1.54th Inf.; enl. Sept. 

26, 1862, three years; wounded in foot. 
Cafej-, Geo. W., Co. C, 13th H. A.; enl. Aug. IT, Ha, 

three years. 
( ary, Sewell H., Co. F, 64th Inf.; enl. Sept. 27, 18<il; 

died Feb. 11, 1862, of disease. 
Chafer, Edward E., sergt. 9lh Cav.; enl. 1S61;-\vouik1- 

ed; served to end of term. 
Champlin, Delos M.,2d lieut. Co. H, 154th luf.; enl. 

Sept. 12, 1862. 
Crawford, Franklin, 9th Cav.; enl. Sept., 1864, one 

jear. 
Damon, Lyman E., 9th Cav.; enl. Aug. 29, 18i)2: disch. 

Dec. 186;j for disability. 
Davis, Jefferson \V., corp. Co. F, 64th Inf.; enl. Aug. 

22, 1861. 
Disbro, Alonzo, 64th Inf. 

Earl, Harvey, Co. H, 154th Inf.; enl. Aug. 11. 1862. 
Earl, Norman, 64th Inf.; enl. Aug. 29, 1^62; disch. 

May, 1863, for disability. 
Earl, Spencer V., Co. B, 64th Inf.; enl. Aug. 17. 1861; 

died Oct. 21, 1S62, of disease. 
Elwell, Michael T., corp. Co. K, yth Cav.; enl. Oct. 7, 

1861; died Nov. 26, 1864, of disease. 
Fay, Ary, 9tli Cav.; enl. Aug., 1862, three years; 

wounded. 
Finnin, Thomas H., Co. B, 13th H. A.; enl. Aug. 19, 

18Ki, three vears. 
Fisher, Harmon I., Co. H, 1.54th Inf.; enl. Aug. 1.5, 

1862; disch. Aug.. I,'i6:5, for wounds. 
Geary, William H. II., Co. B, Wth Inf.; enl. Sept. lU, 

1861; re-enl. Feb., 186:J. 
Gere, Webster, corp. Co. D, 179th Inf.; enl. Feb. 29, 

1.864; disch. June, 186.5, for wounds. 
Gowin, Leroy, 9th Cav.; enl. Sept. 13, 1862, three 

years; prisoner eight months. 
Gray, Geo. K., Co. A, 154th Inf.; enl. July 21, 1862, 

three years. 
Gray, Nathan, 13th H. A.; enl. Aug., 1864, one year. 
Hall, Marcus, corp. 9th Cav.; enl. Aug. 31. lMi2; 

disch. July, 1864, for disability. 
Hazard, Daniel, 1st sergt. 64th Inf.; enl. Sept. 7, 1861; 

disch. April, 1864. 
Hickey, John, Co. B, 64th Inf.; enl. Sept. 15, 1861. 
Hoard, Nathaniel, corp. Co. E, 9th Cav.; enl. Oct. 9, 

1861; died Sept., It62, of wounds. 
Hopkins, Daniel, 9th Cav.; enl. -Sept. 3, 1864; disch. 

June, 1865. 
Kelsey, Elon E., Co. B, 64th Inf.; enl. Aug. 17, 1.861; 

disch. March 18, 1864, for wounds. 
Kelsey, Enos M.. Jr., Co. F, 64th Inf.; enl. Aug. 21, 

1861; re-enl. Feb., 1864; twice wouadel. 
Kelsey, Wm. H., Co. B, 64th Inf.; enl. Aug. 17, 1861; 

re-enl. Kith H. A., Aug. lU, 186:J. 
Kenyon, Ellas U., Co. A, 154th Inf.; enl. Aug. 6, 1862. 
Kirsch, Michael B., Co.B, 64th Inf.; enl. Aug. 17, 

1861; died at Fair Oaks. 
Lowing, H. D. Kev., chaplain 1.54th Inf. 



Merchant, Joseph M., Co. I, 49th Inf.; enl. Sept. 6, 

IS61; died Nov. IS, 186.3, of disease. 
Morrell Bvron, sergt. Co. B, 64th Inf.; enl. Aug. 17, 

1^61; disch. Oct., 1862, for dii-ability. 
Myers. BoTd D., corp. Co. A, 1.54th Inf.; enl. Julv 2<.i, 

1S62. 
Monroe, Samuel. Co. A, 1.54th Inf.; enl. Aug. 4, 1.861. 
Newcomb. Daniel, 24th Cav.; enl. Aug. 29. 1864, one 

year; in Salisbury prison nine months. 
Newcomb, Truman L., Co. —,9th Cav.; enl. Jan. 2(1. 

1864, three years. 
Palmer, Russell W., Co. B, 154th Inf.; enl. Aug. 1.5, 

1862; disch. March, 1863. 
Peaslee, Willian T., corp. Co. B, 64th Inf.; enl. Oct. 1.5, 

1861; pro. sergt.; diseh. at ex p. of term. 
Periy. Abner L., Co. A, 1.54th Inf.: enl. Sept. 26, 1862. 

three veais. 
Porter. T. Jeffci-son, Co. A, 1.54th Inf.; enl. Aug. 6, 

1862. 
Pratt, Calvin B., corp.64th Int.; enl. Sept. 23, 1S62, 

three years. 
Pratt. Thomas, corp. Co. F, 64th Inf.; enl. Aug. 20, 

1861: died Jan. 3, 1863, of wounds. 
Prescott. Harrison. Co. H, 37th Inf.; enl. May 16, 

1861; disch. Mav, 1863. 
Preston. Samuel E.. Co. F, 64th Inf.; enl. Aug. 20, 

1861. 
Price, Merrick, Co. K, 154th Inf.; enl. Aug. ;S0, 1862; 

disch. Dec., 1.^62. 
Rhodes, Otis D., Co. B, 1.54th Inf.; enl. Aug. 4, 1862, 

three vears. 
Ross, Welcome F., Co. B, 1.54th Inf.; enl. Aug. 14, 1862; 

disch. June, 1^6:5. 
Russell, Pai-sun C. 9th Cav.; enl. Nov. 2, 1862; disch. 

Aug., l.-<:!. 
Rycroft, Wm.. 9th Cav.; enl. Sept. 28, 1864; disch. 

.Mav. is.ri. 
Salmon. Wm., Co. C, 13th H. A.; enl. Aug. 24, 186:5; died 

Jan. 5. lNi5, of disease. 
Shannon. Frank (1., buglerCo. B, 64th Inf.; enl. Aug. 

17. I.8<il: died .\pril 17, 1862, of disease. 
Sliaiinon. Wm. H., chief bugler .52d Inf.; enl. July 9, 

l.'-'iil; disch. Jan., 18|-;i, fen- disability. 
Smalley. Is.iac. 9th Cav.; enl. Aug. 29, 1862; killed 

at Bi-anlv Station. .\ug. 1, 186:!. 
Smalley. Lcunaid C, 9th Cav.; enl. Aug. 29, 1861; 

rc-en!. in navv, on the .7o/ni Ailains, April, 1864. 
Smith, David P., corp. Co. E, 9th Cav.; enl. Oct. 7, 

1861: dijch. Nov., 1864, for wounds. 
Smith, Zalmon, 9th Cav.; enl. Aug. 26, 1.862; disch. 

.May, Hio. 
Stevens, William, 9th Cav.; never returned. 
Stoddard, (iilcs, Co. C, Kith H. A.; enl. Aug. 22, 1863, 

three veais. 
Stone, Welcome G., Co. F, 194th Inf.; enl. April 3, 1865; 

disch. .Mav, l,-<«5. 
Underw(io<l. Daniel P., Co. E, 9th Cav.; enl. Oct. 7, 

1861: disch. Nov., 1.865. 
Underwood. William G.. sergt. 9th Cav.; enl. Aug. 

29. l,^.': disch. Aug., 186:5. 
Vincent. Flovd R.. Co. F, 194th Inf.; enl. April 8, 

K^iw; dL-ch. May 6, 1.SJ3. 
Wadkins, John, 64th Inf.; enl. Aug. 27, 1862, three 

years; twice prisoner and not since heard from. 
Wait. Alexander, 9th Cav.; enl. Nov. 3, 186:3; disch. 

Ma^•, 1.-64. 
Wait, George H., Co. F, 64th Inf.; enl; Oct. 14, 1861; 

disch. at e.xp. of term. 
Wait, James. Co. F, 64th Inf.; enl. Aug. 19. IWl. 
Wait, Noah, 9th Cav. 
Wait, (Ji-rin B., Co. F, 64th Inf.; enl. Sept. 9, 1861; 

disch. Nov.. 1864, for wounds. 
Wait, Thomas, 64th Inf.; enl. Sept. 23, 1862; disch. 

A ug.. l.'-tj3, for wounds. 
Wait, Warden B., sergt. Co. B, 64th Inf.; enl. Aug. 

17, 1861. 
Wair, Warren. Co. C, 64th Inf.; enl. Oct. 1.5, 1861; pro. 

capt.; wounded; disch. at e.\p. of term. 
Waterman. George C, sergt. Co. H, 1.54th Inf.; enl. 

Aug. 1.5. 1.S6.'. 
Weedei), Willia:n P., Co. F, 64th Inf.; enl. Aug. 19. 

18';i; died Feb. 4, 1862, of disease. 
Whitinore, Fi-nax. H.. Co. F. 191th Inf.; enl. April :3, 

1.8<i5; disch. May, l.'<65. 
Wilco.v, Hi ron W., Co. F, 64rh Inf.; enl. Sept. 7, 1861, 

three years. 
Wilco.v, D. R., hospital steward regular army; enl. 

Sept. 1, lSt)4, three years. 



Roster of Soldiers and Sailors. 



Wood worth, Matthew, Co. H, 1.54th Inf.; enl. Aug. 

15, 1S(J2. 
Wyman, Francis M., Co. H, l.T4th Inf.; enl. AllL^ 1.5, 

ISiK; died May IS, ISSi, of disease. 

NEW ALBION. 

Allen, Charles ¥., Co. B, l.i-lth Inf.; enl. Julv :."■.', 

lgB2; died in prison Oct. 5, IStU. 
Alverson. Anson E., corp. Co. A, t)4th Inf.; enl. 

Sept. 7, 1S61; pro. 3d sergt.; served 17 months. 
Andrews, Adsnn A., serg-t. Co. D, 17(lth Int.; enl. 

March 9, 1SB4; died in prison Jan. 10, l.sui. 
Andrews, Jerome A., Co. I, 37th Inf.; enl. April, 

1861; pro. sergt; discharged; re-enl. in Co. F, 

194th Inf., as 1st lieut. 
Austin. Monroe, l.S4th Inf.; enl, March II, 186.5, three 

years; re-enl. 
Babb, Horatio, qrm. 64th Inf.; enl. Dec. 10, 1S61; re- 
signed April 10, is(i2. 
Babcock, Myron, 10th Cav.; enl. Sept. 18, 1861. 
Baldwin, Joseph H., 17Uth Inf.; enl. Sept. 6, 11*2; pro. 

lieut. 
Beardsley, Salmon W., Istsergt. Co. G, 154th Inf.; enl. 

Aug. 11, 1S62; pro. -'d lieut.; served 19 months. 
Boardman, Francis D., Co. B, 9th Cav.; enl. Sept. 

23, 18B1; disuh. in seven months on account of 

illness. 
Boardman, Isaac H., 13th H. A.; enl. Sept. 2, 1S64, 

one year. 
Briggs, Arland, 100th Inf.; enl. Sept. a6, 186:3, three 

} ears. 
Brooks, James A., Co. F, Utth Inf.; enl. Aug. 28, 1861; 

killed in bnttle June 1, 1862. 
Buftington, Fred, 112tli Inf.; enl. March 25, 1864: 

disch. May, 1865; lost use of one leg. 
Butler, Newell, Co. K, 1.54th Inf.; enl. July 31, 1662, 

three jears. 
Carter, Bryan M., Co. B, 1.54th Inf.; enl. July 25, 

1H62, three years; pro. sergt. 
Carter, Herman, Co. C, 64th Inf.; enl. Nov. 25, 1861, 

three years. 
Charlesworth. Joseph, sergt. Co. C, Wth Inf.; enl. 

Seiit. 24, l-iOl, three years. 
Clark, Edward J.. Co II, :!7th Int.; enl. Oct. 10, 1861; 

re-enl. Sept. 9, 1864; wounded. 
Clark, Wm. C, Co. H, 37th Inf.; enl. Jfav 16, 1S61; 

re-enl. July 20, 1862, in 154th Inf.; pro. 1st lieut. 

June 9, 1864; capt. April 20, 1865. 
Clock. Charles G., Co. F. 64th Inf.; enl. Aug. 2!), 

1861, three years; pro. sergt.; re-enl. 
Cole, Asa, 13th H. A.; enl. Sept. 1.5. 18<j4, one year. 
Cross, Hawley, navj ; enl. Sept. 3, 1H64, two ycai-s. 
Cummings, Charles F., Co. C, 64th Inf.; enl. Sept. 16, 

1861; killed in battle May, 1864. 
Cummings, Judson, 1.54th Inf.; enl. Sept. 17, 1864; 

served nine mouths. 
Darby, Albert, 1st lieut. Co. A, 64th Inf.; enl. Sept. 7, 

Itol; wounded twice; pro. capt.; served twenty- 
two and one-half months. 
Davis, Charles G., Co. F. 194th Int.; enl. March 17, 

186.5, three years; disch. in two months. 
Dawbon, Ale.\., UthCav.;enl. Sept. 9, 1K64, one year; 

pro. Corp. 
Dimling, John P., l:Jth H. A.; enl. Sept. 2, 1864, one 

year. 
Drew, Francis, 179th Inf.; enl. March 24, 18ij4, three 

years. 
Ford, John W., Co. C, 64th Inf.; enl. Oct. 29, 18*11; 

disch. Sept. 7, 1864; re-enl. 
Fuller, Wm., Co. C, 64th Int.; enl. Sept. 16, 1861; 

killed in battle .-^ept. 18, 1862. 
Gibbs, JohnH., 149th Inf.; enl. Apiil, 1865; disch. in 

one month. 
Green, Heman (no record). 
Hall, Adelbert, Co.D, 179th Inf.; enl. March 15, 1864, 

three years. 
Hickey, John, Co. B, 64th Inf.; enl. Oct. 14, 1861; 

wounded twice. 
Higbee, Franklin, Co. B, 64th Inf.; enl. Aug. I", 1861,- 

three years. 
Higbee, Jefferson, Co. F, 194th Inf.; enl. March 27, 

1865; disch. in one month. 
Higbee, Justus, 64th Inf.; enl. Aug., 1861; re-enl. Co. 

F, 194th Inf., April 27. 186.5. 
Higbee, Lorenzo, Co. C, Wth Inf.; enl. Sept. 3, 1861; 

died in service April 9, 1861. 
Hill, Jerome, Co. F, 64th Inf.; enl. Oct. 14, 1861. 

30 



Horth, Hadley S., Co. H, 72d Inf.; enl. Oct. 17, 1861, 

three years; re-enl. Dec. IS, 1863. 
Horth. Millard F., Co. D, 179th Inf.; enl. March 21, 

1.-^; died Sept. 4, 1864, of wounds. 
Howe, Halph, 72 Inf. (3d Eegt. Sickles' Brigade); 

enl. Sept., 1S62; pro. Corp.; lost right leg by 

wound; served 2 yrs. 6 months. 
Hunton, John,Co. C, 13th H. A.; enl.Aug. 18, 186:3; died 

Nov. 12, 1864, of disease contracted in service. 
Ingals, Charles, Co. D, 179th Inf.; enl. March 29, 1864, 

three vears. 
Ingals, David, Co. C,B4th Inf.; enl. Sept. 16,1861; died 

June 31.1. 18IJ2, of wounds. 
Ingals. James, 90th Inf.; enl. Sept. 10, 1864, one year. 
Ingraham, Adelbert, 64th Inf.; enl. Oct. 14, 1861; died 

Feb. 1. 1S62, of disease contracted in service. 
Ingraham, Charles M., Co. H, 64th Inf.; enl. Oct. 29, 

1S61, three years. 
Ingraham, GUbert C, Co. H, 64th Inf.; enl. Oct. 14, 

IS61. three years; re-enl. 
Kelley. Nelson, wagoner Co. F, 64th Inf.; enl. Oct. 1, 

1861; died in prison April, 1862. 
Kelley, Warren I., Co. A, 154th Inf.; enl. Aug. 4, 1862, 

ttiree yeai"s; pro. corp. 
Kenyon, .Monroe, 52d Inf.; enl. Aug. 21, 1864; served 

ten months. 
Kenyon. Wm. H., (?o. B, 9th Cav.; enl. Sept. 8, 1861, 

three years; re-enl. Feb. IB, 1864. 
Kenyon. Winfleld Scott, corp. Co. B, 154th Inf.; enl. 

July 26, 1>62; wounded; served three years. 
Lackeritine, John, 1.54th Inf.; enl. Sept. 7, 1864, one 

year. 
Lane. Alfred, Co. B, 64th Inf.; enl. Sept. 2.5, 1861; 

killed in battle July 2, 18tj;i. 
Lane, D. Webster, 25th Ills. Inf.; enl. June 4,1861; 

served three years three months. 
Lane. Henry C. (no record). 
Lane. Quincy, .52d Inf.; enl. Aug. 30, 1864; disch. in 

nine months. 
Langley, John, Co. B, llth H. A.: enl. July 27, 1863, 

three vears; pro. corp. 
Little, Eugene, Co. E, 9th Cav.; enl. Oct. 9, 1861; pro. 

orderlv-sergt. 
Locke, John M., Co. C, 21st Inf.; enl. May 12, 1861; 

pro. military tel. corps.; served IS months. 
Luce, Henry, Co. B, 1.54th Inf.; enl. Aug. 8, 1862, three 

years. 
Luce. Hiram, Co. C, 64th Inf.; enl. Oct. 18, 1861; died 

April 2i). 1862, of disease contracted in service. 
Mackcy, Oscar, 37th Inf.; enl. May 20, 1861; served 

live months. 
McClear. John, Co. H, 1.54th Inf.; enl. Aug. 15, 1862; 

died June 18, 1864, of disease contracted in service. 
McCoon, Chauncey, Co. B, B4th Inf.; eol. Sept. 7, 1861, 

three vears; pro. lieut.; re-enl. 
Jlclntyre, Amos, 154th Int.; enl. Sept. 19, 1864, one 

year. 
Mclntyre. Orson, Co. A, 64th Inf.; enl. Oct. 5, 1801, 

three >ears. 
-Mosher. Dewitt C, Co. F, tUth Inf.; enl. Oct. 1, 1861; 

died after leaving service Oct. :30, 1862. 
Nichols. John B., 17th Inf.; enl. Dec. 18, 1863; five 

years in regular army. 
Nye. Samuel, 9th Cav.; enl. Aug. 15, 1862; died Sept. 

19, liHH. of disease contracted in service. 
Payne. Lorenzo H., corp. Co. F, 64th Inf.; enl. Sept. 

10. ISta; disch. at expiration of term; kept in 

rebel prison six months after expiration of term; 

wounded in leg. 
Payne. Nelson F., Co. D, 179th Inf.; enl. March 15, 

1864; wounded; served ten months. 
Pflueger. Wm.. Co. B, 1.54th Inf.; wounded; enl. July 

8, 1862. three years. 
PhilUps, Andrew J., Co. K, 44th Inf. 
Phillips, Sylvanus L., Co. D, 179th Inf.; enL April 12, 

1864; died in prison Aug. 24, 1864. 
Powell. De Lafayette, 13th H. A.; enl. Sept. 2, 1864; 

died Sept. 28, 1864, of disease contracted in service. 
Prime, Abram C, Co. C, 13th H. A.; enl. Sept. 5, 1863, 

three years. 
Kith. Bela. Co. A, 64th Inf.; enl. Oct. 30, 1861; died 

Sept. 22, 1862, of disease. 
Rich. Frank, lB5th Inf.; enl. Sept., 1864; disch. March, 

l!^i5. 

Rich, Justus. Co. B, 154th Inf.; enl. Sept. 5, 1862, 

three vears. 
Ross, Wm.,Jr., Co. B, 154th Inf.; enl. Aug. 4,1862, three 

years; wounded. 



234 



History of Cattaraugus County, 



KusseU, Ephraim, Co. F, 64th Inf.; enl. Sept. 10, 1861; 

pro. Corp.; wounded twice. 
Ryder, Darwin, nav}-; enl. Sept, 2, 1S64, two jears. 
Ryder, James H.. Co. B, l»4th Inf.; enl. Aug. 29, 1S62. 

three years; pro. -tth sergt. 
Sabine, Darid S.. Co. H. ISdth Inf.; enl. Aug. 13, 1SB2; 

died Sept. ■-+. 1S62, of disease. 
Sackett, Anson, 9th Cav.; enl. Sept. 7, 1864; served 9 

months. 
Salmon, John. Co. K, 1.54th Inf.; enl. Sept. 3,' 1S63; 

wounded; served two years nine months. 
Sherman, Albert L., 6.ith Inf.; enl. Oct. 13, 1864, one 

year. 
Sigman, .Martin P., Co. C, 64th Inf.; enl. Oct. 29, 1861; 

pro. sergt. 
Smith, Doras. Co. D, 179th Inf.; enl. March 24, 1864, 

three years. 
Smith, Willard D., corp. Co. E, 100th Inf.; enl. Dec. 

9, 1861; pro. sergt.; wounded. 
Spink, Joseph F., Co. B, 9th Cav.; enl. Sept. 21, 1861; 

pro. Corp.; wounded; disch. in two and a half 

years. 
Squire, Edgar A., 83d Pa. Regt.; enl. May 1, 1862. 
Stone, Adam, Co. I, 37th Inf.; enl. May 9, 1861, two 

vears; wounded. 
Tanner, Silas J., Co. D, 179th Inf.; enl. March 2.5, 1864; 

served 14 months. 
Tingue, Albert H., Co. H, 179th Inf.; enl. March 21, 

1864, three vears; pro. sergt. 
Tingue, Geo. B., Co. B, 1.54th Inf.; enl. Aug. 8, 18t52 
Vickery, Edgar R., Co. I, 49th Inf.; enl. Sept. 3, 1861; 

served one vear si.t months; disch. for disability. 
Wade, Wm. Dudley, Co. C, 64th Inf.; enl. Sept. 16, 

1861; served 17 months. 
Wallace, Geo. W.. ord.-sergt. 13th H. A.; enl. Sept. 2, 

1864, one year. 
Wells, Anson, 6.5ih Inf.; enl. Oct. 12, 1864, one year. 
Wheeler, David. 47th Inf.; enl. Sept. 16, 1863; died in 

service. 
Whitcomb, Burt, 64th Inf.; enl. Aug., 1861; wounded; 

served 18 months. 
Whitcomb, Florentine, 179th Int.; enl. March 1, 1865; 

disch. in three months. 
Whitcomb, Francis J., Co. F, 37th Inf.; enl. May 16, 

1861, two vears: re-enl. Oct. lu, 1864, in 14th H. A. 
Whitcomb, Wesley E., Co. H, 64th Inf.; enl. Aug. 10, 

1861. three years. 
Wiley, John, 13th H. A.; enl. Aug. 27, 1863; died June 

21, 1865, of disease contracted iu service. 
Williams, Geo. P., Co. I, 37th Inf.; enl. May 9, 1861, 

two years. 
Wood, J. Franklin, sergt. Co. F, 64th Inf.; enl. Sept. 

10, 1861. 

OLEAN. 

Abbott, Delos, 9th Mich. Cav.; enl. Aug. 17, 1864, one 

year. 
Barnes, Spencer M., Co. A, 85th Inf.; enl. Aug. 10, 

1861, three yeai-s; re-enl. Sept., 1864. 
Barnes, Wallace inn record). 

Barron, Geo. W., corp. Co. 1, 154th Inf.; enl. Aug. 30, 

1862, three years; must, out at e.\p. of term. 
Belknap, Jonathan S., lieut.-col. 85th Inf.; enl. Aug., 

1861; pro. col.; disch. July, 186:j. 
Blossom, Benj. W., farrier Co. G, 1st Vet. Cav.; enl. 

Julv 10, 186.3, three years. 
Boots, John A., Co. A, 85th Inf.: enl. Oct. 10, 1861; 

disch. July, 1S*J5. for wounds. 
Borst, Julius R., corp. 54th Int.; enl. Dec, 1863, three 

years. 
Boughton, Joel M., corp. Co. C, 154th Inf.; enl. Aug. 

6, 1863, three years; died in the service. 
Bradley, S. Henry, 9th N. Y. Cav.; enl. Feb.,1864; pro. 

1st lieut. 
Brooks, Enos C, major 64th Inf.; enl. Aug., 1861; 

pro. colonel.; disch. May, 1864; shot through left 

shoulder. 
Brown, Edw., 1.54th Inf.; enl. Aug. 31, 1862, three 

years. 
Brown, Frank C, corp. Co. D, 9th Cav.; enf. Sept., 

1861, three years; pro. capt.; re-enl. 9th N. Y. \ et. 

Cav. 
Brown, Patsy, in navy; enl. Aug. 10, 1864; killed Deo. 

12, 1864, at Bndgeport, Ala. 
Brown, Samuel A., sergt. Co. A, 8oth Inf.; enl. Oct. 

18,1861; pro. 2d lieut.; disch. Oct., 1862, for disa- 

biUty. 



Butler, Alfred W., .5th Mass. Cav.; enl. Dec, 1863; 

disch. Oct., 1864, for disability. 
Cameron, Wm. S., ord.-sergt. Co. H, L54th Inf.; enl. 

Aug. 4, 1862, three years; pro. 2d lieut. 
Chadwick, Ransom A., drummer Co. K, 8.5th Inf.; 

enl. Sept. 28, 1861; disch. June, 186.5, for disability. 
Chase, Augustus, 81st Int.; enl. April 18, 1865, one year. 
Cole, Ebenezer, Co. A, 85th Inf.; enl. Sept. 4, 1861; re- 
enl. Aug., 1864. 
Cole, Elias, 85th Inf.; enl. Aug., 1864, one year. 
Cooper, Andrew, Co. G, 154th Inf.; enl. Aug. 18, 1862, 

three years. 
Cooper, Harvey A., Co. A, 85th Inf.; enl. Sept. 4, 

18<>1, three years; pro. corp.; re-enl. 4th U. S. 

Lt. Art. 
Cross, Charles G., 81st Inf.; enl. April, 1865, one year. 
Creamer, Alfred W., 2d lieut. Co. E, 5th Cav.; enl. 

Aug. 27, 1861, three years. 
Cronk, Luther, sergt. Co. G, 1st Vet. Cav.; enl. July 

26, 1803; died of disease March 28, 1865. 
Davis, Eugene M., ord.-sergt. Co. C, 27th Inf.; enl. 

April 19. 1861; pro. sergt.; major; re-enl. 1st M. Y. 

Vet. Cav. 
Davis, Henry V., Co. D, 9th Cav.; enl. Oct. 30, 1861, 

three years; pro. capt.: disch. 1864. 
Donegan, James, Co. I, 1.54th Int.; enl; Aug. 31, 1862; 

died a prisoner at Richmond, Va., Sept. 1, 1863. 
Earl, C. A., corp. "Minn. Mounted Rangers"; enl. 

Oct., 1862, one year; re-enl. in 2d Minn. Cav. as 

2d sergt. 
Fay, Alonzo, Co. I, 154th Inf.; enl. Aug., 1862: disch. 

June, 1863. 
Franklin, Benjamin, capt. (no record.) 
Freeman, William A., 1st sergt. Co. I, 1.54th Inf.; 

enl. Aug. 30, 1862, three years; trans, to Invalid 

Corps. 
Gifford, W. L., "Kane Rides"; enl. June, 1861: pro. 

capt.; disch. March, 1862, for disability. 
Godfrey, Eiisaph D., Co. C, 154th Inf.: enl. July 26, 

1862, three years; trans, to War Department. 
Goodrich, Edwin, Co. D, 9th Cav.; enl. Nov. 9, 1861, 

three years; pro. capt. 
Greek, George W., Co. C, 15tth Inf.; enl. July 26, 

1862, three years. 
Hannegan, James, Co. I, 1.54th- Int.; enl. Aug. 30, 

1862, three years. 
Hannegan, Lewis, 6th Cav.; enl. Aug., 1861, three 

years; re-enl. 1864. 
Hicks, Stephen A., Co. A, 136th Inf.; enl. Aug. 11, 

1862, three years. 
Hill, George, 20th LT. S. Inf.; enl. Sept. 14, 1864; pro. 

drum-major. 
Hooper, Hollis, 8oth Inf.;enl. Nov., 1861; died July 9, 

1862, of disease. 
Hotchkiss, Arthur, Ist lieut. Co. C, 154th Inf.; enl. 

Aug. 19, 1862: pro. capt.; trans, to 97th Inf. 
Hotchkiss, Ephraim H., corp. Co. C, 154th Inf.; enl. 

Aug. 6, 1862; died as prisoner of war. 
Hough, Samuel, 102d D. S. Inf.; enl. Dec, 1863, three 

years. 
Huffman, Henry W., Co. A, 18Sth Inf.; enl. Aug. 15, 

1864, one year. 
Johnson, Henry, 5th Mass. Regt.; enl. Dec. 24, 1863, 

three years. 
Jones, Daniel, 81st Inf.; eul. April 18, 1865, one year. 
Jourdan, George W., Co. A, 8oth Inf.; enl. Nov. 3, 

18<jl; in service seventeen months; disch. for dis- 
ability. 
Keith, Horace, Co. G, 1st Vet. Cav.; enl. July 22, 1863, 

three years. 
King, Charles, 1st lieut. Co. A, 85th Inf.; enl. July, 

1861, three years; pro. capt.; re-enl. 
King, James, Co. A, 2ith Inf.; enl. May 21, 1861; pro. 

2d lieut.; disch. May, 186.5. 
King, Reuben V., capt. Co. A, 85th Inf.; must, in Dec. 

2, 1861, three years. 
Kirkmire, Frank, 85th N. T. Inf.; enl. Oct. 16, 1861, 

one year. 
Lawrence, George, 142d Inf.; enl. Aug. 22, 1863, three 

years. 
Lawrence, Russell, Co. C, 154th Inf.; enl. Aug. 23, 1863, 

three years. 
iMagee, Lafayette, 147th Inf.; enl. Oct. 6, 1863; disch. 

June, 1864, for disability. 
Mahar, James, &5th Inf.; enl. Jan. 1, l&H, three years. 
JIandeville, J. Bradley, 141st Inf.; enl. Oct. IS, 1864. 
Marcin, Henry, Co. I, 154th Inf.; enl. Aug. 30, 1862; 

pro. capt.; disch. Aug., 1864. 



Roster of Soldiers and Sailors. 



Mason, Thomas, corp. Co. 1, 15tth Inf.; enl. Aug. 27, 

1862; disch. March, 186-5, for wounds. 
McAroy, B. F., lieut. (no record). 
i[cAv"oy, Joe (no record). 

McDonoush, Richard, enl. Au"., 1S61, three yeare. 
Melvor, Thomas, lUth Inf.; enl. Feb., 1S6.5, one year. 
McMahon, John, (regt. not given); enl. Oct., 1S64. 
McMillen, Marcus, musician 5»th Pa. Vols.; enl. Oct. 

15, 1862; disch. Sept., 1863. 
Miller, Charles, 41st N. Y. Inf.; enl. Oct., 1861; disch. 

Dec, 1861, for wounds. 
Miller, Hiram C, capt. Co. C, 8.5th Inf.; enl. Sept. 2, 

1861; disch. Jan., 186:3, for disability, 
^roore, John W., Co. A, 8oth Inf.; enl. Aug. 8, 1861; 

died in prison May, 1862. 
Morton, Alexander, Jr., Co. C, 15ith Inf.; enl. July 

26, 1862, three years. 
Morton, Andrew, 2d lieut. 17th Wis. Regt.; enl. 1864, 

one year. 
Morton, James, 85th Inf.; enl. Feb., 1863, three years; 

captured at Plymouth, N. C, and prisoner at 

Andersonville. 
Mosher. George, corp. Co. 1, 1.54th Inf.; enl. Aug. .30, 

1862, three years. 
Munger, Jerome, enl. Aug. 2, 1862; disch. Feb., 1863. 
Murray, Thomas, Co. F, 164th Inf.; enl. Aug. IS, 1862; 

disch. June, 1865. 
Noonan, Martin, Co. H. 64th Inf.; enl. Sept., 1861; pro. 

Corp.; killed at battle of Fredericksburg, May 13, 

1864. 
Xorris, Andrew L., Cav.; enl. Sept., 1864, one year. 
Norris, George W., Cav.; enl. Sept., 1864; disch. for 

disability. 
Peterson, Americus, 31st Inf.; enl. Dec. 24, 1863, three 

years. 
Peterson, Solomon, .5th. Mass. Eegt.; enl. Dec. 24, 1863, 

three years. 
Pierce, A. Lacey, Co. C, 1.54th Inf.; enl. Aug. 6, 1862; 

disch. April, 186.5. 
Porter, Edward, quartermaster 1.54th Inf.; enl. Sept., 

1862; disch. March, 18G5; captured at Gettysburg; 

prisoner 20 months. 
Kamsey, Sylvester. 9th Cav.; enl. 1861; disch. 1864. 
Ramsey, W. H.. 9th Cav.; enl. Sept. 16. 1862; pro. 2d 

lieut. 
Randall, Addison, navy; on ISriinldun: enl. March, 

1864. two years; must, out at e.vpiration of term. 
Randall, George H., Co. A, 85th Inf.; enl. Oct. 12, 1861; 

disch. Nov., 18tW. 
Randall, Simon, 61st Inf.; enl. March, 1865; must, out 

at e.xpiration of term. 
Renwick, Robert H., capt. Co. I, 64th N. Y. Inf.; enl. 

Aug. 21, 1K61; disch. June, 1862, for disability 

and wounds. 
Renwick, Victor D., corp. Co. I, 64th Inf.; enl. Aug. 

27, 1861; pro. capt.; disch. Feb., 186.5, for disability. 
Reynolds. Thaddeus, ord.-sergt. 1.54th Inf.; enl. Aug. 

:iU, 18»J2; died July 12, 1863, of wounds received at 

Gettysburg. 
Rounds, Orton, Co. C, 154th Inf.; enl. July 26, 1802, 

three years. 
Schermerhorn, Charles A., enl. Feb., 186.5, three years. 
Schneider, Conrad, 32d Inf.; enl. for two years, and 

rc-enl. March, 18IJ.5. 
Setchell, Leroy D., sergt. Co. G. 1st Vet. Cav.; enl. 

July 17, 1863, three years. 
Shater, Addison, Co. C, IMth Inf.; enl. July 26, 18fc', 

three years. 
Sherwood, Myron B., 12th Cav.; enl. Aug. 1.5, 1864; 

disch. May, 18<J5. 
Smith, Charles, Co. A, 188th Inf.; enl. Aug. 15, 1864, 

one year. 
Smith, John C, Co. A, 85th Inf.; enl. Aug. 8, 1801, 

three years. 
Smith, Myron, Jr., 85th Inf.; enl. Aug. 30,1801; killed 

April 20, 1864, at Plymouth, N. C. 
Smith, Stephen, Co. K, 85th Inf.; enl. Sept. 28, 1861; 

disch. Oct., 1862 for disability. 
Spink, Benjamin, Co. 1, 154th Inf.; enl. Aug. .30, 1802; 

killed at Chancellorsville. 
Spothalt, Fred \Vm., Co. A, 85th Inf.; enl. Sept. 11, 

IMil, three years; re-enl. 
Stark, Saul, 85th Inf.; enl. 1864, one year. 
Stark, Stephen, Co. A, 85th Inf.; enl. Aug. 12, 1861, 
Swartz, John, drum-major .5th Mass. Cav.; enl. Jan., 

1804, three years. 
Swartz, V7m., Co. 1, 154th Inf.; enl. Aug. 15, 1862; died 

in hospital at Washington, D. C, Dec. 15, 1862. 



Sweitzer, F., musician 9th Cav.; enl. April 1, 1864' 

three years. 
Tallman, Benj. H., Co. M, 24th Cav.; enl. Jan. 22, 1864; 

died in service. 
Tenter, A., 85th Inf.; enl. June, 1861; re-enl. June, 

1864. 
Tenter, William. 85th Inf.; enl. Aug.. 1864, one vear. 
Thurber, Chas. F., 93d Pa. Inf.; enl. Dec. 1, 1864, one 

year. 
Town, Oscar, 100th Inf.; enl. Aug., 1802: died in prison 

at Charleston, S. C, Aug. 9, 1863. 
Townsend, Henry M., sergt. Co. A, a5th Inf.; enl. 

Aug. 8, 1801; died Feb. 11, 186.5, at Rorence, S. C, 

while a prisoner of war. 
Wands, Alfred L., 8oth Inf.; enl. Sept. 6, 1804, one 

year; must, out at exp, of term. 
Wands, James B. W., on U. S. gunboat Montgnmenj: 

enl. Aug. i:3, 1802; disch. June, 1863. 
Way, Robert (no record). 
Whitney, Russell M., 2d lieut. Co. A, 85th Inf.; enl. 

Aug. 18, 1861; pro. 1st lieut.; resigned. 
Wight, Samuel J., Co. C, 85th Inf.; enl. Sept. 2, 1861; 

re-enl. as sergt. Jan. 14, 1864; disch. Oct., 1805. 
Wight, Wm. H., &5th Inf.; enl. Sept. 2, 1861; disch. 

for disability June, 186:i. 
Wood, Geo., Co. G, 1.54th Inf.; enl. Aug. 14, 1S62, three 

yeai-s; trans, to Vet. Res. Corps. 
Woodward, Lansing, enl. Sept., 1804; disch. June, 1865. 
Wright, Erastus, Co. C, 154tfa Inf.; enl. Aug. 6, 1862; 

disch. April, 1805, for wounds. 
Wright. Luther, Co. C, 154th Inf.; enl. Aug. 6, 1862; 

died in service. 
Zimmer, Carl, Co. C, 1.54th Inf.; enl. Aug. 6, 1862, three 

yeais. 
Zimmerman, Jacob, 81st Inf.; enl. March, 1865, one 

year. 

OTTO. 

Allen, Dan B., capt. Co. B, 154th Inf.; enl. Aug. 10, 

1802, three years; pro. to lieut.-col. 
Austin, Phineas, Co. H, 04th Inf.; must. Sept. 16, 1801, 

three years; died from wound received at Spot- 
sylvania, May 12, 1.S04. 
Rabcock, Myron, Co. C, 04th Inf. 
liartlett, Judson C, Co. C, 04th Inf.; enl. Sept. 10, 

1801, three years. 
Blotman (or Blotner), Michael, Co. C, 64th Inf.; must. 

Sept. 19, 1801, three years; re-enl. in navy on gun- 
boat S(. Lnnlv. died of fever. 
Brooks, (Jrrin, 9th Cav. 
Brown, Ephraim E., Co. C, Mth Inf.; enl. Dec. 6,1861, 

three years. 
Charlesworth, Aaron. Co. I, 37th Inf.; enl. May 9, 

1861, two years. 
Charlesworth, Joseph, sergt. Co. C, 64th Inf.; enl. 

Sept. 16, \x&, three years. 
Clark, James M., Co. C, 04th Inf.; enl. Sept. 16, 1801, 

three years; died of fever at Fortress Monroe. 
Cox, Horatio Nelson, corp. Co. C, t>4th Inf.; enl. Sept 

16, iwi, three years. 
Crane, Geo. O., musician Co. C, 64th Inf.; enl. Oct. 

13, \m\; died in Elmira. 
Crane, J. Collins, Co. C, 64th Inf.; enl. Oct. 1, 1861, 

three years. 
Cross, Silas B., 9th Cav. 
Elder, Joseph, Co. C, 64th Int.; enL Sept. 10, 1861, 

three years; re-enl. in navy on gunboat St. Louis; 

wounded in leg by a shell. 
Fenton, Daniel. 72d Inf. 
Foster, Norman O., Co. C, 04th Inf.; enl. Sept, 16, 1861, 

three years; shot in the head at Antietam. 
French, Eugene, 194th Inf.; enl. April 13, 1804, one 

year. 
Fuller, William, Co. C, 64th Inf.; enl. Sept. 16, 1S61, 

three years; killed at the battle of Antietam. 
Green, Ephraim C, sergt. Co. C, 04th Inf.; enl. Sept. 

16, 1861; three years; killed at Antietam. 
Hatfield, Nicholas, Co. C, 64th Inf.; enl. Sept. 16, 

1861, three years. 
IngersoU (or Ingols), David, Co. C, 64th Inf.; enl. 

Sept. 16, 1861, three years; died from wounds re- 
ceived at Fair Oaks. 
Xngraham, Simon M., Co. H, 64th Inf.; enl. Oct. 7, 

1861, three years. 
Kelly, Battus R., Co. B, 151th Inf.; enl. Aug. 3, 1862. 
Ladd, Auldin, Co. F, 194th Inf; enl. April 1, 1864, one 

year, 



236 



History of Cattaraugus County. 



Loomis, Henry C, Ist lieut. Co. C, 6-tth Inf; enl. Sept. 

IB, 1861, three years; re-enl. 154th Inf. as lieut.- 

col.; disch. May 19, 1805, to receive promotion 

as brig-.-gen.; wounded. 
Loomis, Nelson, Co. I, 37th Inf.; enl. May 9, 1861, two 

years; pro. corp. 
Losee, Sullivan B., color-sergt. Co. C, 64th Inf.; enl. 

Sept. 16, 1S61, three years; killed in battle. 
Losee, Abraham, wagoner Co. C, 61th Inf.; enl. Oct. 

1, 1861, three years; died on tioating hospital 

UtateoT Maine, after the Seven Days' lisht. 
Maltby, Julius B., capt. Co. C, 61th Inf.; enl. Sept. 

16, 1861, three years. 
Mason, Arnold P., musician Co. C, 61th Inf.; enl. 

Sept. 16, 1861, three years. 
McMann, John, Co. H, 3Tth Inf.; must. June 7, 1861, 

two years; killed in Seven Days' flght June29, 1862. 
Morris, Edgar F., 1st lieut. Co. I, 181th Inf.; enl. 

Sept. 5, 1861, one year. 
Morris, Emory, corp. Co. C, 61th Inf.; enl. Sept. 16, 

1861, three years. 
Morse Charles O., Co. B, 151th Inf.; enl. July 25, 1862, 

three years. 
Muhlfelt, Joseph, Co. C, 61th Inf.; enl. Sept 16, 1861, 

three years; killed at Fair Oaks, June 2, 1862. 
Newman, John T., Corp. Co. C, 61th Inf.; enl. Sept. 

16, 1861, three yeai-s. 
O'Brien, Charles A., Co. H, 37th Inf.; enl. May 16, 

1861, two years; wounded; prisoner; re-enl. in 
Co. G, nth H. A., Oct. 17, lS63;must. assergt.; pro. 
2d lieut.; brevet 1st lieut.; 1st lieut. 

Palmer, Thomas B., Co. C, 61th Inf.; died June 2, 

1862, of wound in hip received at battle of Fair 

Pattison,' Washington J., Co. F, 191th Inf.; enl. April 
1, 1861; one year. 

Philip, Herman, 181th Inf. 

Place, Thomas S., Co. C, 61th Inf.; enl. Sept. 16, 1861. 

Pool, Simeon V., 1st lieut. Co. B, 1.54th Inf.; enl. 
Aug-. 16, 1802; must. Sept. 26, 1862, at Jamestown; 
pro. capt.; taken prisoner at Gettysburg, July 1, 
186.3; was in Libby prison 9 months, Macon, Ga., 
3 months, Cliarleston, S. C, 6 weeks, Columbus, 
S. C, 5 months, and at Charlotte, N. C, whence, 
after beins conttned in all 2U month.s, he escaped 
Feb. 17, 1865, and a few months later was honor- 
ably disch. 

Rogers, Stephen H., corp. Co. C, 64th Inf.; enl. Sept. 
16, 1861, three years; pro. sergt.; wounded at first 
battle of Petersburg. 

Sanders, John, Co. C, 61th Inf.; enl. Sept. 16, 1861, 
three years; wounded in thigh at battle of An- 
tietam. 

Sent, Daniel, Co. G, 13th H. A.; enl. 1804, one year. 

Sherman, David, Jr., Co. B, 154th Inf.; enl. Aug. 2, 
1862, three years. 

Sherman, Edson, Co. C, 61th Inf. 

Sherman, George, Co. C, 64th Inf.: enl. Sept. 16, 1801, 
three years; re-enl. in navy on gunboat St. Lenin. 

Shippey, Aaron P., Co. G, 13th H. A.; enl. 1864, one 
year. 

Shippey, Augustus A., sergt. Co. B, 1.54th Inf.; enl. 
July 30, 1862, three years; pro. to col. -sergt.; shot 
through the head at Kocky Face Kidge, Ga. 

Shippey, Eugene, Co. D, 85th Inf.; must, in Sept. 25, 

1861, three years. 

Shippey, Leroy, Co. C, 64th Inf.; enl. Sept 16, 1861, 

three years; twice wounded. 
Shippey, Stanley, Co. H, 14th H. A.; enl. Oct. 17, 

1803, three years. 
Smead, George, Co. C, 64th Inf.; must Sept. 16, 1801, 

three years; pro. corp.; lost right arm in the 

battle of Fair Oaks. 
Smith, Powel, Co. C, 64th Inf.; enl. Sept. 10, 1861, 

three years; died from wounds received at lair 

Oaks. 
Soule, Stephen P., Co. C, 64th Inf.; enl. Oct. 1, 1861, 

three years; died of fever at Fortress Monroe. 
Welman, Arial H., Co. B, 154th Inf.; enl. July 19, 

1862, three years; pro. 2d lieut. colored regt. 
Welman, John F., segt. Co. B, 154th Inf.; enl. July 

18, 1802, three yeai-s; pro. 1st lieut. 
"VVemple, Nelson, Co. C, 04th Inf.; enl. Sept. 16, 1861, 

three years; pro. sergt.; died at Philadelphia, 

July 30, 1802, from wounds received in the buttle 

of l<'air Oaks. 
Wemple, William H., Co. C, 04th Int.; enl. Sept 16, 

1861, three years; pro. sergt. 



Wenzel, John P., Co. B. l->4th Inf.; enl. July 30, 1862 

three years. 
Whitmire, John N.. Co. C, 64th Inf.; enl. Sept. 20, 

1801, three years; did at Elmira. 
Whitmire, Nicholas J.. Co. C, 61th Inf.; enl. Sept. 16, 

1861, three years. 
Wickham, Thomas, Co. C, 64th Inf.; must. Sept. 16, 

1861, three years. 
Wilbur, Joshua, 10th Cav. 
Wilson, L. Arthur, Co. C, 61th Inf.; enl. Sept. 16, 1861, 

three j'ears; killed at battle of Fair Oaks, June 

3, 1862. 
Wood, Alonzo, 9th Cav. 
Wyant, Alanson, musician Co. B, 154th Inf.; enl. July 

19, 1862, three years: taken prisoner at Gettys- 
burg and not since heard from. 
Wyant, Stephen, Co. B, 1.54th Inf.; enl. Aug. 8, 1802, 

three years. 

PERRTSBURG. 

Anthony, John, Co. K, 151th Inf.; enl. Sept., 1862, 

three years. 
Beals, Bishop A., Co. A. 64th Inf.; enl. Oct. 9, 1861; 

disch. Sept., 1862, tor wounds. 
Belts, Dudley, Co. K, 1.54th Inf.; enl. Aug. 22, 1862, 

three years. 
Blaisdel, Heman, Co. H, 44th Inf.; pro. corp. 
Briggs, Warrtn, musician lUth Pa. Inf.; enl. Nov., 



1861; disch. Aug., lt*C for disability, 
ints, Silas W., musicii 
21, 18<)2, three years. 



Bunts, Silas W., musician Co. B, 1.54th 



inf.; 



enl. July 



Campbell, Frank, Jst sergt. Co. H, 44th Inf.; enl. Aug. 

8, 1861; disch. Nov.. 1864. 
Campbell, Wm., Co. H. 44th Inf. 
Case, Wm. A., Co. C, 112ch Inf.; enl. Aug. 6, 1862, 

three years. 
Chapman, Eugene, Co. K, 1.54th Inf.; enl. Aug. 26, 

1862, three years. 
Chapman, Wm. F., lit lieut. Co. K, 1.54th Inf.; enl. 

Sept. 16, 1862, three vears. 
Clark, Augustus B., Co. H. 44th Inf.; enl. Sept. 24, 

1801; oisch. Oct., IfttJ. for disability. 
Darling, Leonard, corp. Co. H, 44th Inf.; enl. Sept. 

1.5, L'iOl; pro. sergt.; killed at 2d Bull Run. 
Dawley, Job B., Co. K. 154th Inf.; enl. Aug. 26, 1862; 

killed in action March 26. 1805. 
Dawley, John M., corp. Co. K, 151th Inf.; enl. Aug. 

17, 1862, three years. 
Dawley, Russell B., Co. K, 154th Inf.; enl. Aug. 30, 

1802, three years. 

Eells, Edwin R., corp. Co. H, 44th Inf.; enl. Sept. 17, 

1861; disch. Oct., 1804. 
Farnsworth, Henry, Co. C, 13th H. A.; enl. Aug. 20, 

1803, three years. 

Farnsworth, Herbert E.. musician Co. D, 10th Cav.; 

enl. Sept., 1801; re-enl. Jan., 1804. 
Gould, Henry C, Co. K. 1.54th Inf.; enl. Aug. 30, 1802, 

three years. 
Gregg, Henry B., sergt. 72d Inf.: enl. June 20, 1861; 

disch. Aug., 1864. 
Grow, John, Jr., Co. K. 154th Inf.; enl. Aug. 30, 1863, 

three years. 
Hall, Samuel R., Co. A. 64th Inf.; enl. Sept. 7, 1861; 

disch. April, 1.86.'), for disability. 
Hart, James L., 2d N. Y. Mtd. Rifles; enl. Jan. 26, 

1864, three years. 
Herberuer, Adam, Co. K, 154th Inf.; enl. Aug. 2.5, 

1862; killed at ChancoilorsvlUe, May 2, 186:3. 
Hines, Gideon, Co. E, 16th Cav.; enl. July 4, 1863, three 

years. 
Hoogaboom, Edwin, sergt. 10th Cav.; enl. Oct. 14, 

1801; re-enl. Feb., 1863: wounded at Richmond. 
Hoogaboom, Wellington C, Co. A, 64th Int.; enl. Oct. 

5, 1801; pro. com. -sergt.; disch. at exp. of term. 
Hooker, Corydon, 72d Inf.; enL June 20, 1861; disch. 

May, 1862. 
Hooker, Hull, Co. H, 44th Inf.; enl. Sept. 15, 1801; 

killed at Malvern Hill. June 27, 1862. 
Hooker, Leroy J., Co. H. 44th Inf.; enl. Sept. 27, 1801; 

disch. May, 1802, for disability. 
Hugaboom, Henry, capt. Co. K, 1.54th Inf.; enl. Sept. 

16, 1862; disch. March, IsWJ, for disability. 
Hugaboom, John B., Co. K, 154th Inf.; enl. Aug. 26, 

1862, three years. 
Hugaboom, Norman H., corp. Co. K, 1.54th Inf.: enl. 

Aug. 9, 1862, three years. 
Hull, Wm. J., Co. K, 154th Inf.; enl. Aug. 30, 1802. 



Roster of Soldiers axd Sailors. 



237 



Huj-a, Lestur N., Co. H, 4-Hh Inf. 

Johnson, W. W., Co. H, ■Wth Inf.; pro. 2d sergt. 

Kirkland. Myron, Co. K, l.>tth Inf.; enl. Aug. 30, 1862, 

three years. 
Losee, Albert, Co. K, 112th Inf.; enl. Aug. 25, 1862; 

died Oct. 25, 1S62, of disease. 
Manhart, Truman, Co. K, 154th Inf.; enl. Sept. 0, 

1862. three years. 
Mattoon, Charles H., Co. A, 64th Inf.; enl. Sept. 7, 

1801; re-enl.in Co. B. Minn. Cav., Feb-, 1SU3. 
Mattoon,, lohn W., Co. A, Mth Inf.; enl. Oct. 30, 1861; 

disch. April, 1863, for wounds. 
Meganda, Wm. M., Co. A, 64th Inf.; enl. Sept. 7, 1861; 

disch. at e.xp. of term. 
Merrill, Wilber H., Co. H, 44th Inf.; enl. Sept. 19, 

1861; pro. sergt.; disch. Oct., 1864. 
Moody, David F.,corp. Co. H,44th Inf.: enl. Sept. 15. 

1861; disch. Feb., 1862, for wounds. 
Morrison, Thomas H., Co. K, 1.54th Inf.; enl. Aug. 30, 

1862, three years. 
Morrison, Wm., 1.54th Inf.; enl. Aug. 1, 1862, three 

years. 
North, James, Co. K, 154th Inf.: enl. Aug. 28, 1862, 

three years. 
Parker, Ezra A., 1st lieut. 154th Inf.; enl. Sept. 10, 

lSti2; died at Harper's Ferry, Nov. 23, 1862, of 

disease. 
Parker, George F., Co. D, 72d Inf.; enl. May 3, 1861; 

pro. 1st sergt.; re-enl. Oct. 7, 186:i, in lS7th Inf. 
Parker, George F., 64th Inf.: enl. Dec. 17, 1861; died 

at Philadelphia, Feb. 18, 1862, of disease. 
Parsons, George \V., 8th U. S. Inf.; enl. Feb. 5, 1862; 

disch. Feb., 186-5, for wounds. 
Perkins, Pizarro, Co. E, 72d Inf.; enl. May 28, 1861; 

trans, to 120th Inf., Dec. 25. l.><<>i. 
Ranney, Franklin E., corp. 10th Iowa Inf.; enl. Sept. 

1, 1862; disch. Sept., 18(>.5. 
Bobbins, Allen L., Co. K, 154th Inf.; enl. Aug. 26, 

18<i2, three years. 
Rolf, Adelbert, Co. K, l.'i4th Inf.; enl. Aug. 24. 1862, 

three years. 
Rugg, Charles A., Co. K, !)th Cav.; enl. Sept. 11, 1861; 

disch. March, 1862, for disability. 
Sandei-s, George \V., Co. H, 44th Inf. 
Sheldon, Lewis C, Co. A, (Hth Inf.; enl. Sept. 7, 1861; 

died Feb. 13, 1862, of disease. 
Sickler, Philander B., Co. K, 154th Inf.; enl. Aug. 26, 

1862, three years. 
Smith, John Adam, Co. K, 1.54th Inf.; enl. Aug. 30, 

1862; disch. May, 1865; pro. Corp.; pris. more than 

20 months. 
Smith, Willis, Co. K, 1.54th Inf.; enl. Aug. 30, 1861; 

died at Chattanooga, June 11, I81U, of disease. 
Stafford, Jnsiah, 154th Inf.; enl. Aug., 18(J2; disch. 

Aug., 18ISJ, for wounds. 
Stanton, Charles A„ Co. A, 116th Inf.; enl. Aug. 12, 

18<i2; died in 1864 of disease. 
Taylor, Lorenzo, drum-major 64th Inf.; enl. Aug. 

18, 18(>4: disch. June, 186.5, tor wounds. 
Vandenburgh, Taylor, Co. K, 154th Inf.; enl. Aug. 

2!), l.'«;2, three years. 
Van Vlack, George W., Co. A, 64th Inf.; enl. Oct. 5, 

18<il; pro. ord.-sergt.; disch. Dec, 1864, for wounds. 
Van Vlack, Henry G., corp. Co. A, 64th Inf.; enl. 

Oct. 7, Iwjl; killed in battle of Antietara while 

carrying the "colors." 
Van Vleet, Theodore, 81st Inf.; enl. April, 1865, one 

year. 
Watera, Charles B., Co. A, 64th Inf.; enl. Sept. 7, 

1861; died at Ale.xandria, Va., Feb. 11, 1862, of 

disease. 
Waters, John W., sergt. Co. K, 154th Inf.; enl. Aug. 

26, 18*32, three years. 
White, Franklin, 90th Bat.; enl. Sept. 10, 1864; disch. 

May, 18t». 
"Whitney, Frank, Co. K, 154th Inf.; enL Aug. 23, 

18tj2, three years. 
Wilber, Charles C, Co. E,72dInL; enl. May 28,1861, 

three years. 
Wilber, Samuel K., 154th Inf. ; enl. Sept., 1862, three 

years. 
Wilkinson, Benjamin G., sergt. Co. K, 1.54th Inf.; enl. 

Aug. :jO, 1862, three years. 
Williams, Joll, Co. K, 154th Inf.; enl. Aug. 27, 18<i2, 

three years. 
Winney, Jacob, Co. K, 154th Inf.; enl. Aug. 26, 1862, 

three years. 
Wood, David K., Co. H, 44th InL 



PERSIA. 

Austin. Irwin E., Co. B, lOOth Inf.; enl. Jan. 1, 1862, 

three years. 
Averill, Jerome, corp. Co. K, 154th Inf.; enl. Aug. 12, 

lS<t->: disch. March, 1863. 
Bacon. Esack P., Co. B, 154th Inf.; enl. July 21, 1862, 

three vears. 
Barr. George W., surg. 64th InL; enl. Nov. 20, 1861. 
Brown. Edwin, corp. 100th Inf.; enl. Oct. 11, 1861; 

died of wounds Jlay 2!), 1862. 
Chaffee, Adelbert, sergt. 154th InL; enl. Sept., 1862, 

three years. 
Congdon. George B., Co. B, 154th InL; enl. Ausr. 14, 

1^J2. three years. 
Darby. Henry A., Co. A, 64th Inf.; enL Sept. 7, 1861; 

pro. eapt.; killed in battle April 8, 1865. 
Foley. Patrick, Co. A, 64th InL; enl. Sept. 20, 1861; 

disch. for disability; re-enl. sergt. 154lh Inf. in 

Sept.. IS)2. 
Gardner. Clayton A., 64th InL; enl. Sept. 2:3, 1862; 

killed at Gettysburg. 
Giering. Matthias, 97th InL; enl. Aug., 1863, three 

years. 
Hall. Charles C, Co. A, 6tth InL; enl. Sept. 7, 1861; 

discharged Nov., 1862, for disability. 
Hall. Willis G. C, corp. Co. A, 64th InL; enL SepL 7, 

1^1: died of wounds Dec. 28, 1862. 
Henry. James E., Co. A, 64th Inf.; enl. Sept. 7, 1861; 

died at Vorktowii, May 4, 1862. 
Henry, Wilbur W., corp. Co. A, 64th Inf.; enl. Oct. 7, 

1~61: pro. 1st lieut.( discharged Jlay, 1863. 
Howani. George M., 18th Iowa Inf.; enl. April 13, 

IxC; disch. Aug., 1862, for wounds; served also 6 

months in Mexican war in 10th N. Y. Vols. 
Locke. James E., Co. B, 154th Inf.; enl. July 31, 1862, 

three years. 
Matthews, Henry, 90th InL; enl. Sept 13, 1864, one 

year. 
Matthewson, James M., sergt. Co. K, 154th Int.; enl. 

Aug. 31, 18U2, three years. 
Parker. Thomas J., col. 64th InL; enL Sept. 16, 1801; 

disch. Oct., 1862. 
Place, Thomas S., Co. C,64th Inf.; enl. Sept. 16, 1861, 

three years. 
Hector. Franklin, Co. B, 154th Inf.; enl. Aug. 15, 

1-HJ2. three years. 
Rich. Joshua, Co. B, 154th InL; enl, Sept. 6, 1863, 

three years. 
Roller. William W., sergt. Co. A, 64th Inf.; enl. Sept. 

16. If61; pro. capt.; disch. Jan., 186.5, lor wounds. 
Rugg. Corydon C, enl. 1.54th Inf.; pro. usst. surg. 

Nov. 3, lH«i2; resigned Jan. 3, 1804. 
Russell, Ransom, Co. B, 154th Inf.; enl. Aug. 12, 1862; 

thrte vears. 
Shelmadine, Bornt B., Co. K, 151th InL; enl. Sept. 

6, iMi.'; killed at CliancellorsviUe. 
Staats, Thomas, Jr., Co. A, 64th Inf.; enl. Sept. 18, 

1-61: pro. Corp.; died in .Salisbury prison Jan. IS, 

Ix'A. 
Staats. William H., corp. Co. C, 79th InL; enl. May 

23. lSt;i; disch. June, 1864. 
Stone, John S., Co. B, 154th InL; enl. July 21, 1862, 

three years. 
Stone, Peter, Co. K, 151th InL; enl. Aug. 30, 1862, 

three years. 
Torrance, Stiles C, 10.3d Ohio InL; enl. Aug., 1862, 

three years. 
Torrence, George S., Co. E, 72d Inf.; enl. Mav 28, 

1861; disch. July, 186:), for wounds. 
Vincent, Hiram, Co. K, 154th Inf.; enl. Aug. .31, 1862; 

pro. sergt.; died in prison at Richmond, Va. , Feb. 

5. L-W. 
Waller. Daniel, 1st N. Y. D. G.; enl. Feb. 24, 1864: 

died of disease March 17, 1865. 
White. Orlando, Co. K, 15tth InL; enl. Aug. 11, 1862, 

three years. 
Wdber, Charles C, Co. E, 72d InL; enl. May 28, 1861, 

three years; disch. June, 1864. 
Wilkins. Franklin, Co. B, 154th InL; enl. Aug. 14, 

1862, three years. 
Wilkinson, Benjamin G., sergt. Co. K, 15tth InL; 

enl. Aug. :aO, 18t)2; trans, to 6th Vet. Res. band. 
Wright, Abraham, Co. B, 154th Inf.; enl. Aug 18, 

1S62, three years. 



238 



History of Cattaraugus County. 



POBTVILLE. 

Adams, Fraocis C, Co. K, 85th Inf.; enl. April 7, 1862; 

died iu Andersonville prison Aug. 23, 1864. 
Ames, AlviQ .M.. Co. I, lS9th Inf.; enl. Feb. 2, 1864; 

disch. from .51st Inf. July 25, 1865. 
Baker, Edjrar. Co. E, 85th Inf.; enl. Feb. 12, 1864; died 

in Andersonville prison Aug. 22, 1864. 
Baker, Lyman. Co. I, 85th Inf.; enl. Aug. 29, 1864; 

disch. Julv 1.5. 186.5. 
Barber, B. A.. Co. I, 81st Inf.; enl. March 22, 1865. 
Barnes, Artemus R., Co. C, 1.54th Inf.; enl. July 26, 

1862; pro. sergt. Co. D, June 21, 18613. 
Barnes, George W., Co. A,o2d Inf.; enl. Aug. 13, 1864; 

disch. Aug. 16, 1865. 
Barnes, Spencer M., Co. A. 85th Inf.; enl. Aug. 12, 

1861; disch. April 16, 186:3; re-enl. same company 

and regiment Sept. 19, 1864; discharged July 14, 

18a5. - 
Barnes, Wm. W., Co. D, 94th Inf.; disch. Mav 14, 186.5. 
Barse, William. Co. I, 81st Inf.; enl. March 22, 1865; 

disch. Aug. 31, 1865; died Sept. 15, 180.5, of disease 

contracted in service. 
Bennie, Marcus B.. Co. C, 76th Inf.; enl. Dec. 3, 1861; 

pro. sergt. June, 1862. 
Blakeslee, Aaron. Co. B, 14S'th Inf.; enl. Aug. 22, 1863; 

disch. Aug. 3, 4%5, from 3d Vet. Res. Corps. 
Bostwick, C. H.. Co. I, 136th Inf.; enl. Aug. 18, 1S62; 

disch. Dec. 1862. 
Burch, Anson W., navy; enl. Aug., 1864; disch. March 

4,1865. 
Burdick, Addison O., Co. A, 85th Inf.; disch. June 

27, 18&). 
Burdick, Daniel C, Co. A, 85th Inf.; enl. Aug. 14, 

1862; pro. corp.; disch. Dec. 31, 186;3. 
Burdick, Joel A., Co. A, 85th Inf.; enl. Aug. 7, 1861; 

pro. Corp.: disch. Dec. 31, 1863; re-enl. Jan. i, 1864; 

taken prisoner at Plymouth, N. C, April 20, 1864; 

paroled Dee. 10, 1864; disch. Jan. 7, 1865. 
Burdick, .Matthew K., Co. A, 85th Inf.; enl. July, 

1861; diseh. Dec. 31, 1863; re-enl. same regiment 

and company Jan. 1, 1864; disch. June 27, 1865. 
Button, Commodore P., Co. I, 15th N. Y. Eng.; enl. 

Sept. 1, 1864: disch. Sept. 17, 1865. 
Carr, Lyman E.. Co. C, 85th Inf.; enl. Aug. 31, 1864; 

disch. Julv 31, 186.5. 
Carter, Charles L., Co. B, 189th Inf.; enl. Sept. 2, 1864; 

disch. Mav :30, 1865. 
Cleveland, Wilson, Ist N. Y. Ind. Bat.; enL Aug. 20, 

1864; disoh. June 27, 1865. 
Cole, Jay, Co. C. 179th Inf.; enl. Aug. 3, 1864; disch. 

June 30, 186.5. 
Crandall, WiUiam L., Co. A, 8oth Inf.; enl. Sept. 2, 

1864; disch. June 27, 1865. 
Crowley, Timothy, Co. 1, 15th N. Y. Eng.; enl. Aug. 

29, 18M; disch. June 13, 1865. 
Dennis, George T., Co. I, 85Ch Inf.; enl. Sept. 25, 1861; 

disch. July 18, 1865. 
Dickenson, Deuison R., Co. E, 5th Cav.; enl. Aug. 20, 

1861; died at Annapolis, Md., of disease Jan. 1, 

1863. 
Dickenson, Foster, Co. E, 5th Cav.; enl. Aug. 28, 

1861; pro. sergt. July 1, 1863; 2d lieut. May 21, 1864; 

Ist lieut. Nov. 14, 1864; capt. June 12, 1865; disch. 

June 19, 1><>5. 
Dickenson, Hebron E., musician 28th Inf.; enl. Sept. 

12, 1861; disch. Sept. 2, 1862. 
Dominy, Lyman. Co. D, 85th Inf.; enl. Aug. 31, 1861; 

disch. liec. 31, 1863; re-enl. same company and 

regiment Jan. 1, 1864; died In Andersonville 

prison Sept. 7, 1864. 
Durfy, George J., Co. E, 85th Inf.; enl. Aug. 2il, 18tU; 

disch. Aug. 15, 1865. 
Evans, Evander, Co. C, 154th Inf.; enl. Aug. 6, 1862; 

died in hospital at Alexandria, of disease, Oct. 17, 

1862. 
Evans, John A., Co. A, 81st Inf.; enl. March 22, 1865; 

pro. Corp.; disch. Sept. 17, 1885. 
Evans, Mosby O., 1st JM. Y. Ind. Bat.; enl. Sept. 2, 

1804; disch. June 26, 1865. 
Fairbanks, Alanson, Co. A, 8.5th Inf.; enl. Aug. 1, 

18(J1; disch. Dec. 31, 186:3; re-enl. same company 

and regiment Jan. 1, 1864; pro, sergt. March 1, 

1865; 2d lieut. April 22, 1865; disch. June 27, 1865. 
Fales, Newman P., Co. I, 154th Inf.; enl. Aug. 26, 

1802; died in prison at Kichmond, March 22, 1804. 
Fales, Zodac H.. Co. I, I54th Inf.; enl. Aug. 26, 1862; 

pro. Corp. May, 1864; disch. June 17, 1805. 



Godfrey, 'William B., 1st sergt. Co. C, 154th Inf.; enl 

July 26, 1862; pro. 1st lieut, March 16, 1863; disch. 

Aug. 11, 1863, for sickness. 
Grierson, John, Co. D, 8.5th Inf.; enl. Sept. 2, 1861- 

re-enl. iu Co. H, 14th Art., Dec. 8, 1863; pro. sergt! 

June 24, 1864; 2d lieut. July 13, 1864; prisoner at 

Petersburg, Va., July 30, 1864; diseh. March 2.5, 1865. 
Griffin, Henrv, Co. A, 85th Inf.; enl. Nov. 20, 1861: 

disch. Dec. 3, 1864. 
Griffin, Patrick, Co. I, 154th Inf.; enl Aug. 28, 1862; 

killed near Nashville, Tenn. 
Hadley. Adolphus, Co. D, 111th Inf.; enl. Aug. 28, 

18ii4; disch. J une 4, 186.5. 
Halbert. Albert B., Co. D, 85th Inf.; enl. Aug. 2.5, 

1801; disch. Dec. 31, 1863; re-enl. in same company 

and regiment Jan. 1, 1864; died in Andersonville 

prison Oct. 16, 1864. 
Hamilton, Adolphus D., Co. A, 85th Inf.; enl. Aug. 15, 

1862; disch. for disability. 
Hamilton, Oscar W., Co. A, 8.5th Inf.; enl. Aug. 29, 

1802; disch. July 14, 1865. 
Harrison, James, Co. M, 111th Art.; enl. Jan. 17, 1864; 

disch. May 15, 18ti5. 
Hornbeck, Thomas, Co. M, llth Art.; enl. Dec. 25, 

1804; died in service. 
Irish, George H., Co. C, S5th Inf.; enl. Sept. 20, 1861; 

disch. Dee. :j1, 1803; re-enl. in same company and 

regiment Jan. 1, 1864; died in Andersonville pris- 
on Aug. 2, 1864. 
Johnson, Timothy B., Co. D. 85th Inf.; enl. Sept. 7, 

1861; disch. on account ot sickness March 3, 1862; 

re-enl. in Co. A, same regiment, Aug. 31, 1864; 

disch. from hospital June 21, 186.5. 
Jones, H. W., Co. A, 85th Inf.; enl. Aug. 14, 1802; pro. 

corp. 
King, Reuben V., capt. Co. A, 85th Inf.; enl. Aug. 24, 

1861; pro. major March 14, 1862; res'n'd Maj' 2, 1863. 
Lackey, Isaac M., Co. A, 85th Inf.; enl. Aug. 30, 1862; 

disch. June 27, 1865. 
Lackey, Walter H., Co. C, 85th Inf.; enl. Aug. 20, 1862; 

dish. June 10, 1865. 
Langdon, Albert M., Co. D, 85th Int.; enl. Nov. 1, 

1861; disch. Dec. 31, 1803; re-enl. in same company 

and regiment Jan. 1, 1804; taken prisoner April 

20, 1864; died in Andersonville, Ga., Sept. 7, 1805. 
Langworthy. John, Co. A, 85th Inf.; enl. Sept. 2, 1864; 

disch. J une 27, 186.5. 
Larrabee, Nelson B., Co. C, 76th Inf.; enl. Dec. 3, 1861, 

three years. 
Lewis, Israel T., Co. D, 85th Inf.; enl. Aug. 31, 1864; 

disch. July 15, 180.5. 
Love, Charles, 1st N. Y. Ind. Bat.; enl. Sept. 2, 1864; 

disch. June 26, 1865. 
Maine, Dewey S., Co. A, 85th Inf.; enl. Aug. 14, 1862; 

disch. Aug. 31, 180.5. 
Maine, James S., Co. I, 81st Inf.; enl. March 22, 186.5. 
Maine, William O., Co. A, &5th Inf.; enl. Aug, 14, 1864; 

taken prisoner at Plymouth, N. C, April 20, 1864; 

died in Andersonville, Ga., Oct. 31, 1804. 
Mason, Philip, Co. I, 154th Inf.; enl. Aug. 29, 1862; 

disch. June 11, 1865. 
Ma.fon, Phineas V., Co. A, 85th Inf.; enl. Sept. 2, 1864; 

disch. June 27, 1865. 
Maxou, Sanford L., Co. A, 85th Inf.; enl. Sept. 16, 

1864. 
Mcintosh, Charles A., Co. C, 154th Inf.; enl. Aug. 22, 

1802; pro. sergt. July 1, 1803; taken prisoner; aisoh. 

June 17, 1865. 
Middaugh, Randall, Co. E, 81st Inf.; enl. March 22, 

1.805; disch. Sept. 17, 1865. 
Miller, Albert, Co. A, 85th Inf.; enl. Sept. 20, 1801; 

disch. Sept. 20, 1864. 
Oakley, George W., Co. F, 90th Inf. ; enl. Sept. 2, 1864; 

disch. May 30, 1865. 
Oakley, Zachariah D., Co. A, 90th Inf.; enl. Sept. 9, 

18(34; disch. June 3, 1865. 
Parish, Horace, Co. A, 85th Inf.; enl. Sept. 12, 1861; 

disch. Dec. 31, 186:3; re-enl. same company and 

regiment Jan. 1, 1864; pro. sergt. Jan. 5, 1864; disch. 

June 27, 1805. 
Parish, Marvin, 1st N. Y. Ind. Bat.; enl. Sept. 2, 1864; 

wounded at Cedar Creek, put in ambulance, and 

has not been heard from since. 
Parish, Melvin, Co. A, 85th Inf.; enl. Sept. 2, 1864; 

disch. July 8, 1865. 
Pelton, A. N., Co. C, irAtix Inf.; enl. Aug. 22, 1802; 

taken prisoner at Gettysburg: died at Ander- 
sonville, July 1, 1804. 



Roster of Soldiers and Sailors. 



239 



Percival, Joshua G., Co. A, 81st Inf.; enl. Mch. 22, 18B.5. 
Popple, Jason, Co. A, ISoth Inf.: enl. Aug. 1, 1861; 

discb. Dec. 31, IStiS; re-enl. same company and 

regiment Jan. 1, 18«>i: disch. Jan. 27, ISO."). 
Potter. William H., Co. A, Soth Inf.; enl. Aug. 1, 

1S6]; disch. Dec. 31, 1863: re-enl. in same company 

and regiment Jan. 1, 18<>1: taken prisoner April 

20, 18M; died in Andersonville, Ga. 
Prince, Lorenzo, Co. H, ICOth Inf.; enl. Feb. B, 1864; 

disch. Sept. l.i. 1665. 
Keynolds, Benjamin. Co. C, 154th Inf.; enl. Aug. 9, 

1862; disch. Aug. 20, 1865. 
Reynolds, Charles. Co. C, 154th Inf.; enl. Aug. 9, 1862; 

disch. May 1, 186:3. 
Reynolds, John L., Co. C. 1.54th Inf.; enl. Aug. 9, 1862; 

disch. from hospital Dec. 11, 186:3. 
Richardson, Rodney. Co. B, 15th Cav. ;enl. Sept. 5, 

1864; disch. June 12, 1865. 
Roberts, Lyman A., Co. D, 85th Inf.; enl. Oct. 2.5, 

1861; disch. Dec. 17, 1862, for disability. 
Robinson, Peter, Co. H, Slst Inf.; enl. Sept. 1, 1864; 

disch. Sept. 17, 1865. 
Sawtell, Henry P., Co. D, S.5th Inf.; enl. Aug. 31, 1S64; 

disch. July 15. 1.86.5. 
Sawyer, John, Co. D, 85th -Inf.; enl. Sept. 7, 1861; 

disch.; re-enl. same company and regiment; 

disch. July 15, 1865. 
Scott, Jason L., Co. H, 37th Inf.; eni. May 17, 1861; 

pro. sergt. Jan. 7, 1862; disch. 18<i2; re-enl. private 

Co. K, 85th Inf.. April 15. 1862; pro. to 1st sergt. 

May 1,1862; taken prisoner at Plymouth, N.C., 

-Vpnl 211, 18<U; died in Andersonville, Aug. 5, I8IU. 
Scott, Martin V. IJ., Co. A, 85th Inf.; enl. Sept. 20, 

1861; disch. Dec. 31, l.^S: re-enl. in same company 

and regiment Jan. 1, 1864; pro. corp.; disch. June 

27, 1865. 
Scott, Truman A., 1st X. Y. Ind. Bat.; enl. Sept. 1, 

1864; disch. June 23. 1n;5. 
Scott, Warren, Co. A, 85th Inf.; enl. Sept. 21, 1861; 

disch. Dec. 31. 18iw; rc-eiil same company and reg- 
iment June 1, 1^64: pro. sergt. March 1,1865; disch. 

June 17, l.'^M. 
Scutt, Addison L.. 1st sergt. Co. C, 154th Inf.; enl. 

Aug. 30, 1862; disch. June 22, 186.5. 
Seaver, Charles, Co. A. :>4th Inf.; enl. June 15,1861; 

disch. July 2. 1>6:5; re-enl. Co. .\, 85th Inf., Sept. 

10, 1864; pro. corp.; disch. May 22, 1865. 
Simmons, William H., Co. F, 81st Inf.; enl. March 22, 

18<i5; disch. .Vug. 31. IsiV 
Smith, .Martin A., Co. A, 85th Inf.; enl. Sept. 2, 1804; 

disch. June 27, I8<i5. 
Smith, Myron, Co. A, .Mith X.Y. Eng.; enl. Aug. 29, WA\ 

trans, to Co. IS, 1.5th X. V. Eng.; disch. .lune 13, 

1865. 
Smith, Stephen, Co. K. X5th Inf.; enl. Sept. 27, 1861; 

disch. Oct. 14. 1862, for disability. 
Smith, Willard .M., navy: enl. Aug. 17, 1864, on Van- 

ilerhiLt: trans, to the Bniithlun in l.><65. 
Southworth, AuL'Ustus H., 1st lieut. Co. D, 85th Inf.; 

enl. Sept. 17, 1-<J1: resigned March 25, 1862; re-enl. 

in Co. A, same regiment, .\ug. 31, 1864; disch. .July 

15, 1HI». 

Southworth, Byron De F., 50th N. Y. Eng.; enl. 

Sept. 3, I81U; disch. June 11, 1865. 
Southworth, Charles, Co. C, 27th Inf.; enl. July .5, 

ISBl; disch. May 31, 1>6:J; re-enl. sergt. Co. F, 1st 

Vet.Cav., July 14, 186:3. 
Speese, Andrew J., Co. A, 85th Inf.; enl. Aug. 31, 1864; 

disch. July 16, 1865. 
Stone, Addison, Co. I, 154th Inf.; enl. Aug. 30, 1862; 

pro. corp. at Gettjsburg, July, 1863; disch. May 

22, 186.5. 
Swartz, George E., Co. L, 1st. Vet. Cav.; enl. Aug. 17, 

1863; disch. J uly 20, 1865. 
Swartz, Nelson L., Co. F, IJOth Cav.; enl. Sept. 9,1864; 

disch. July 20. l^«.). 
Traver, William, Co. A, 34th Inf.; enl. June 1.5, 1801; 

wounded at Antietam; disch. July 2, 1863; re-enl. 

Co. A, 85th Inf., Feb., 1864; disch. July 15, mio. 
Vanvalkenburg. Francis H., Co. A, 85th Inf.; enl. 

Aug. 31, 1864; disch. July 15, 1865. 
Wakefield, .Marion, Co. K, 100th Inf.; enl. Aug. 22, 

1863; died Nov. 6, 1864, of disease contracted in 

service. 
Wales, Jared, 1st sergt. Co. D, 85th Inf.; enl. Sept. 15, 

1861; disch. Dec. 31, 186:3; re-enl. as sergt. same 

regt. Jan. 1, 18*>4; taken prisouer at Plymouth, 

N. C; died in Andei-sonville, June 24, 1864. 



Warner, Lewis D., capt. Co. C, 1.54th Inf.; enl. Aug. 

19,1862; pro. major July 1, 186:5; lieut.-col. Jan. 

19, 1864; col. Feb. 20, 1865; disch. June 11, 1865. 
Way, Robt. B., Co. C, 27th Cav.; enl. July 5, 1861; 

wounded at Gaines's Mills; pro. sergi.; disch. 

.May :31, 1863; r.--enl. as private Co. F, 1st Vet. Cav., 

July 8, 1864; disch. July 31, 1865. 
Wheeler, Samuel J., Co. C, 154th Inf.; enl. July 26. 

1862; disch. 
Wicker, Edmund A., Co. A, 85th Inf.; enl. Nov. 20, 

1861; died Dec. 17, 186:3, of wounds. 
Witherel, Daniel W., Co. F, 27th Cav.; enl. July 5, 

1861; wounded at Gaines's Mills; disch. May 31, 

1863. 
Witherel, Wm. E., Co. 1, 154th Inf.; enl. Aug. 30, 1862; 

disch. June 11, 1865. 
Wright, Daniel M., Co. C, 1.54th Inf.; enl. July 26, 

1862; pro. Corp. May 1, 1804; disch. July 1.5, 18B5. 

RANDOLPH. 

Arnold, Joseph, 9th Cav.; enl. Jan. 12, 1864, three 

years. 
Arnold, Wm., 13th H. A.; enl, Aug. 27, 1864. 
Barber, Lewis, 14th H. A.; enl. Dec. 24, 1863. 
Beardsley, Charles A., Co. E, 5th Cav.; enl. Aug. 27, 

1«1. 
Beckwith, Stephen H., sergt. Co. H, 37th Cav.; enl. 

May 1, 1861; must, out June 23, 1863. 
Bement, Philetus S., musician Co. B, 64th Inf.; enl. 

Aug. 17, 1861; must, out Sept. 6, 1864. 
Benson, Charles A., corp. Co. B, 9th Cav.; enl Oct. 11, 

1861. 
Berry, Joel S., Co. B, 64th Inf.; enl. Aug. 17, 1861, 

three years; trans, to Co. G, 1st N. Y. Art., Oct. 

14, 1863: re-enl. Dec. 31, 186:3; wounded at Spotsyl- 
vania, -May 12, 1864; pro. corp. Nov., 1864; must. 

out June 20, 1865. 
Boyington. Uenj., Co. E, 7th Inf.; enl. Aug. 1, 1861; 

re-enl. Feb. 19, 1804, in 13th H. A.; must, out Aug., 

1865. 
Bnidshaw, Clinton, Co. H, 71st Inf.; enl. July 8, 1861, 

three years. 
Bradshaw, Wm., Co. E, 9th Cav.; enl. Oct. 1, 1861; 

pro. to sergt. Oct. 7. 1.861; 1st sergt. June 21, 186:5. 
Brown, Charles F., Co. C, 13th H. A.; enl. Aug. IS, I8i;4. 
Brown, Isaac, Co. G, 9th Cav.; enl. Aug. 23, 1864. 
Brown, Lineas J., Co. H. 194th Inf.; enl. JIarch 2'2, 

186.5; disch. May, 186.5. 
Bruce, Myron, Co. B, 64th Inf.; enl. Aug. 17, 1861; 

must, out Sept. 10, 1864. 
Bryant, Samuel, Co. H, 1.54th Inf.; enl. Aug. 29, 1862. 
Bump, Orwin W., Co. E, 13tli H. A.; enl. Aug. 25, 18(>4. 
Busch, Walter, 5th N. Y. Cav. 
Carr, Daniel L., Co. I, 9th Cav.; enl. Sept. 3, 1804; 

disch. June 8, 18t>5. 
Carr, Levi L., Co. B, 64th Inf.; enl. Aug. 17, 1801; 

prisoner at Petersburg; re-enl.; disch. June, 1865. 
Chamberlain, Benj. F., capt. Co. E, 9th Cav.; enl. Oct. 

1, 1861: resigned June 2:3, 1802. 
Cheney, Matthew B.,lst sergt. Co. D, 112th Inf.; enl. 

July 2!), 1862; pro. capt. 
Cochran, .Samuel W., Co. B, 64th Inf.; enl. Sept. 10, 

18131; disch. for disability Jan. 26, 1802. 
Congleton, Luther, Co. C, 13th H. A.; enl. Aug. 19, 

1864. 
Crooks, Albert, Co. A, 13th H. A.; enl. Aug. 22, 1864. 
Crosby, Alanson, 2d lieut. Co. A, 154th Inf.; enl. Aug. 

8, 1862; pro. adjt.; killed before Atlania. 
Cross, Wm., Co. G, 9th Cav.; enl. Sept. 0, 1864. 
Crowley, M. J., Co. B, 64th Int.; enl. Aug. 17, 1861; 

disch. for disability July 17, 1802. 
Crowley, Rodney K., C). B, B4th Inf.; enl. Aug. 17, 

18B1; pro. qrra.-sergt. Nov. 13, 1801; 2a lieut. Jan. 

10, 1862; 1st lieut. and qrm. Feb. 28, 1862; capt. 

July 12, 186:5; resigned Nov. 6, 1863, on account of 

wounds received at Gettysburg. 
Daniels, James, Co. £, 13th H. A.; enl. Aug. 27, 1864. 
Dean, Lyman, Co. B, 04th Inf.; enl. Aug. 7, 1861; pro. 

Corp.; served three years. 
Decker, Prentice, Co. B, 9th Cav.; enl. Aug. 30, 1862; 

trans, to navy April 26, 1864. 
Dejanes, Francis, Co. H, 154th Inf.; enl. Aug. 29, 1862. 
Deland, Kuf us, Co. E, 9th Cav.; enl. Oct. 1, 1861; pro. 

Corp. Oct. 7, 1861; sergt. June, 1862; must, out 

Oct. 28, 1864. 
Devine, Franklin J., 49th Inf.; enl. Aug. 1, 1861; 

trans, to 21st Inf.; wounded at Wilderness. 



240 



History of Cattaraugus County, 



Dewej-, Jairus B., Co. C, 13th H. A.; enl. Aug. 26, 1S64. 
Dixson, Henry L., Co. E, 9th Cav.: enl. Oct. 1, 1861; 

killed by accideni while on picket duty July 29, 

1863. 
Dow, Albert G., Jr., Co. B, 6ith Inf.; enl. Feb. 15, 

1865. 
Dow, Franklin, Co. E, 9th Cav.; enl. Oct. 1, 1861; pro. 

qrm.-sergt.; disch. in March, 1862. 
Draper, Elmore, Co. B. 64th Inf.; enl. Aug. 17, 1861; 

appointed regular wagon master; disch. for dis- 
ability Oct. 11, 1862. 
Draper, John W., Co. H, Hst Inf.: enl. July 8, 1861; 

died at Washington, Sept. 10, 1S64. 
Duffie, I'atrick, Co. B, 64th Inf.; enl. Sept. 10, 1861. 
Everett, Timothy A. C, capt. Co. B, 64th Inf.; enl. 

Aug. 17, 1861; resigned Jan. 16. 1862. 
Fay, Dallas, Co. G, 13th H. A.; enl. Aug. 26, 1864. 
Finley, Edmund J., 154th Inf.; enl. Aug. 8, 1862. 
Fosket, Hezekiah, Co. E, 9th Cav.; enl. Oct. 1, 1861; 

must, out Oct. 28, 1.864. 
Franklin, Andrew, Co. B, Wth Inf.; enl. Aug. 17, 1,861; 

wounded at Gettysburg, July 2, 1863; disch. for 

disability April 30, 1864. 
Frederick, Horace S., Co. D, 13th H. A.; enl. Feb. 10, 

1864. 
French, Geo. W., 1st lieut. Co. F, 64th Inf.; enl. Aug. 

15, 1861. three years. 
French, Horace H., Co. F, 64th Inf.; enl. Sept. 20, 

1861; pro. 1st sergt.; wounded at Gettysburg; 

right arm amputated. 
Furman, Charles M., musician Co. F, 64th Int.; enl. 

Aug. 30, 1861, three years. 
Galbraith, Thomas H., Co. B, 64th Inf.; enl. Aug. 17, 

1861; disch. fordisability. 
Gates, Adelbert, Co. E, 13th H. A.; enl. Feb. 23, 1864, 

three years. 
Geary, William H., Co. B, 64th Inf.; enl. Sept. Hi, 

1861, three years, 
Goldwaith, Jesse, enl. Aug. 22, 1863; regt. not known. 
Goodrich, Aaron, Co. E, 9th Cav.; enl. Oct. 1, 1861; 

disch. March, 1862. 
Goodrich, Isaac, Co. E, 9th Cav.;enl. Oct. 1. 1861; disch .; 

re-enl. Aug. 11, 186.3, in 13tli H. A. 
Goodrich, Sanford J., Co. E, 9th Cav.; enl. Aug. 2.5, 

1862; wounded in right leg; taken prisoner; 

paroled; e.Kchanged; must, out 186.5. 
Gorsline, Gilbert O., corp. Co. D, 35th Inf.; enl. Aug. 

1, 1861; trans, to 13th H. A.; bugler; must. out. 
Gould, Daniel M., 102d Inf.; enl. Oct. 15, 1861. 
Gould. G. F., Co. G, 13th H. A.; enl. March 20, 1.864. 
Grannis, Lewis H., Co. A, 112th Inf.; enl. Feb. 1, 1864. 
Grant, Kufus, enl. Aug. 22, 1863; regt. not known. 
Gray, Orange, Co. H, 1.54th Inf.; enl. Aug. 29, 1862, 

three years. 
Green, William P., Co. F, 61th Inf.: enl. Dec. 7, 1861, 

three years. 
Gurnsey, Delos W., Co. H, 44th Inf. 
Hanius, M. G., Co. B, 6ith Inf.: enl. Aug. 17, 1861; 

disch. for disa.iility Jan. 26, 1862. 
Harris, Charles, 37th Inf. 
Hedman, Charles F., Co. B. 64th Int.; enl. Sept, 1.5. 

1861; pro. to corp. Oct. 1.5, 1861: ord.-sergt. of l«t 

Div. 2d Corps, of Army of Potomac, June 2, 186:1. 
Helms, A. H.. Co. G, 9th Cav.; enl. Aug. 23. 1,864. 
Helms, Charles H., Co. E, 9th Cav.; enl. Oct. 1, 1861; 

wounded June 21. 1864. 
Henly, Eleazer C, Co. G, 9th Cav., enl. Aug. 2:j, 1864. 
Hibbard, Frederick M., Co. H, 71st Inf.; enl. July 18, 

1861; disch. for disability. 
Hibbard, Oliver D., chaplain 64th Inf.; enl. Dec. 10, 

1861; must, out Dec. 10, 1864. 
Hollenbock, C. H., Co. B, 64th Inf.; enl. Aug. 17, 1861; 

must, out Sept. 6, 1861. 
Jeffords, Lyman P., Co. F, B4th Inf.; enl. Oct. 1, 1,861, 

three years. 
Johnson, James G., 2d lieut. Co. B. 6tth Inf.; enl. Aug. 

17, 1861; pro. Ist lieut. Jan. 26, 1862 ; resigned Oct. 

3, 1862. 
Jones, Frank C, Co. B, 64th Inf.; enl. Aug. 17, 1861; 

pro. regt. color-bearer Sept. 10, 1861; 1st sergt. 

June 18, 1863; re-enl. Frb. 25, 1864; 2d lieut. April 

12, 1864; capt. Nov. 26, 1864; wounded at Spotsyl- 
vania; resigned May 8, 1865. 
Jones, Harvey L., 1st lieut. Co. B, 64th Int.; enl. Aug. 

17, 1861; pro. capt. Jan. 16, 1862; resigned and disch. 

Jan. 10, 186:1. 
Keach, Charles. Co. B, 37th Inf.; enl. May 16, 1861; 

disch. July, 1863. 



Keach, Ira L., Co. A, 1.54th Inf.; enl. July 28, l.'<62. 
Keach, Nathan, Co. I, 1.54th Inf.; enl. Sept. 6, 1862- 

disch. for disability Feb., 1.86.3. 
Klock, Charles G., Co. F, 64th Inf.; enl. Aug. 29, 

1861, three years. 
Knight, Edgar Olin, 97th Inf.; enl. Aug. 21. 186:3; 

wounded in battle of Wilderness; right leg am- 
putated; disch. July 2, 186.5. 
Law, Patrick, Co. E, 9th Cav.; enl. Oct. 1, 1861; disch 

March, 1862. 
Litchfield, Harvey D., Co. B, 64th Inf.; enl. Aug. 

17, 1861; in Andersonville prison eleven months; 

must, out June 21, 18t>5. 
Litchfield, Hiram, Co. B, 72d Inf.; enl. May 28, 1,861, 

three years. 
Litchfield, Leroy, Co. H, 154th Inf.; enl. Aug. 11, 1862, 

three year^. 
Lyman, Joel H., Co. E, 9th Cav.; enl. Oct. 9, 1861; 

pro. qrm.-sergt. March, 1862; trans, to Co. B, 

March, 186:3. 
Marsh, Albert, Co. B, 64th Inf.; enl. Aug. 17, 1861; 

pro. corp. Oct. 1.5, 1,861; sergt. April 15, 1864; 

wounded at Spotsylvania, right leg amputated; 

must, out as 2d lieut. 
Marsh, Hollis, Co. E, 9th Cav.; enl. Oct. 7, 1861; disch. 

March, 1862. 
McClease, D., Co. H, 37th Inf.; enl. May 4, 1861; must. 

out Oct. 1, 1864. 
McLaughlin, Johu, Co. F, 64th Inf.; enl. Dec. 6, 1861, 

three years. 
Mighells, Florentine C, Co. B, 64th Inf.; enl. Aug. 17, 

I'61; wounded at Antietam, Sept. 9, 1862; disch. 

April 1, 186:3. 
Miller, Jeflei-sou. Co. E, 13th H. A.; enl. Aug. 22,1864. 
Miller, Morton W,, Co. E, 9th Cav.; enl. Oct. 1, 1861; 

pro. to Corp. March, 1864; must, out Oct. 15, 1864. 
Morey, Benjamin, 1.54th Int.; enl. Sept. 13, 1864. 
Morey, Philip, Co. H, 1.54th Int.; enl. Aug. 29, 1862, 

three years. 
Morgan, Henry A., Co. B, 64th Inf.; enl. Aug. 17, 

1.861; sent to hospital at Philadelphia; re-enl. Feb. 

12, 186:3, in 14th N. Y. Cav. 
Nichols, Sylvester S., Co. B, 64th Inf.; enl. Aug. 17, 

1861; discharged tor disability March 3, 1S62; re- 
enl. Aug., 1862, 13th H. A.; died at Norfolk, Va., 

Nov. 26, 186t. 
Nutting, Hulbert, Co. E, 9th Cav.; enl. Oct. 1, 1861; 

must, out Oct. 1, 18<i4. 
Parks, Clifton M., Co. C, 13th H. A.; enl. Aug. 25, 1864. 
Parks, Edmunds R., Co. G, 13th H. A.; enl. Feb. 29, 

1864. 
Phelps, Timothy E., Co. E, 13th H. A.; enl. Aug. 27, 

1864. 
Piorce, Addison, Co. B, 64th Regt.; enl. Aug. 17; 

1861; pro. sergt. Sept. 11, 1862; 2d lieut. ISO v. 6, 

1863; 1st lieut. and qrm. June 23, 1864. 
Pitcher, George E., Co. B, 64th Kegt.; enl. Aug. 17, 

1861; died of typhoid fever, at Fortress Monroe, 

April 29. 1862. 
Plopper, Leroy, Co. E, 13th H. A.; enl. Aug. 25, 1864. 
Price, Alfred B., 1.54th Inf.: enl. Sept. 26, 1862. 
Price, Anson D., Co. A, 154th Inf.; enl. Aug. 8, 1862, 

three years. 
Heed, Alfred, Co. B, 164th Inf.; enl. Aug. 17, 1861, 

three years. 
Reed, Asa J., 64th luf.; enl. Feb. 6. 18»>5. 
Reed, Austin T., Co. M, 13th H. A.; enl. Aug. 24, 1864. 
Reeves, Daniel F., Co. I, 9th Cav.; enl. S-pt. :3, 1864. 
Riesd ilph, Charles W., Co. B, 64th Kegt.; enl. Aug. 

17, 1861; pro. corp. Sept. 1, 186:3; wounded at Fred- 
ericksburg, Dec. 13, 1862, and at the Wilderuess, 

May 7, 1864. 
Rogers, Gilbert, Co. H, 1.54th Kegt.; enl. Sept. 3, 1862. 
Rogers, Jerome, 71st Inf. 
Sabins, Johnson, Co. H, 37th Inf.; enl. May 1, 1861; 

must, out June 2:5, 1863. 
Sadler, Benjamin, Co. H. 71st Int.; enl. July 8, 1861. 
Sample, Eugene, Co. H, 1.54th Int.; enl. Sept. 6, 1862; 

taken prisoner at Gettysburg, July 1, 1863, not 

since heard from. 
Scudder, Ambroses., Co. F, 64th Inf.; enl. Dec. 8, 

1861, three years. 
Seekins, Cyrel, Co. H, 1.54th Inf.; enl. Sept. 10, 1863; 

re-enl. Co. A, 188th Inf.; disch. AprU, 1865. 
Sheldon, Clark E., Co. F, 64th Int.; enl. Sept. 15, 1861; 

re-enl. Co. E. 13th H. A., Aug. 25. 1864. 
Sheldon, Oscar W., enl. Feb. 2.5, 1865; regt. not given 
Sheldon, Osman, Co. E, 13th H. A.: enl. Aug. 25, 1864| 



Roster of Soldiers axu Sau.ors. 



241 



Siples, Nelson. Co. H, STtli luf.; enl. May 1, 1S61; musr. 

out June 23. 1S>J. 
Spencer. James C, Co. H, 37th Inf.; enl. Mayl.lsGl; 

must, out JuneSi, 1-Uo. 
Stanley, Lutlitr, eorp. Co. A, l.Mth Inf.: enl. Aug-., 

isai; disi-li. for disability Nov., l.'iKi. 
Stilhvell, Joliu H., Co. B. Wth Inf.; enl. Nov. 2.5, l.Wl. 
Stillwell, Oua.V.. Co. li. B4th luf.; enl. Aug-. 17, IStil; 

wounded; re. enl. Keb. 25, 1.SB4; pro. to 1st iieut. 

July 1, ISW: wounded at Mills' Farm, April 1, It^Hi; 

died .ipril 4. ISim, and buried on the field. 
Stone. WilliHm. Co. C, loth H. A.; enl. Aufr. 23, 1804. 
'J'aylor, Friinaii. Co. E, ath Cav.; enl. Oct. 1, 1861; died 

in hospital at Washington, .June, 1802. 
Thurston, Columbus. Co. B. «4th Inf.; enl. Sept. 1.5, 

1861; trans, to Invalid Corp*, July 2:i, 1S6;J. 
Tliui ston, Geo. W., Co. A, lS8th Inf.; enl Sept. 3, 1804. 
Thurston, Samuel, Co. K, 112th Inf.; enl. April :3U, 

1862. 
Tor.ance. Joel B.. Co. H, l.>4th Inf.; enl. Sept. 6, 1802. 
Torrance, Michael, !4th H. A.; enl. Dec. 11, 1863. 
Vanama, Charles, Co. H, 37th Inf.; enl. Jlay 1, 1801; 

diseh. Sept. 8. 1801: re-enl. Co. G, 9th Cav., Aug. 

2:3, 1804; must, out June 5, 186.5. 
Vansuoter, Sheldon, Co. K. 9th Cav.; enl. Oct. 1, ISOl; 

died in hospital at Washington of disease. 
Wait, llorai e (J.. Co. C. 13th H. A.; enl. Aug. 2.5, 1804. 
Walsh, T. I,., Co. U. 04th Inf.; enl. Aug. 17, 1801; 

wounded at Gettvsburg, July2, 18<i3; pro. corp. 

July 1, InU: must, out Sept. 0, 1804. 
Washburn, (iilts. Wth Inf. 
Watkius, V,i;,. w .. Co. U. 04ih Inf.; enl. Aut'. 17, 1801; 

pro. 1st sert't.; 2d Iieut.; 1st liout. in 1862. 
Wentworth, Harmon E., Co. II. 37th Inf.; enl. May 

1, 1»)1; pro. 1st Iieut. .M:iy 15, 18I..5; brevet capt. 

May 15, l.«65; nine months in Libby. Macon, and 

other prisons; fii-st must, out June 2:3, 1803; re- 
enl. Oct. l:j, KN3, Co. H, 14th II. A ; disch. Sept. 

12, 1,865. 
Whitman, Allison. Co. G, 14th H. A.; enl. Oct. 22, 18lVi. 
Wiggins, David T., Co. U, 64tli Inf.; enl. Aug. 17, 

1801; pro. Isr sergt. Oct. 3. ISKi; 1st Iieut.; killed 

at Spotsylvania. .May 12, 1804, and buried on the 

Held. 
WiUard, F.ben. Co. B. Olth Inf.; enl. Sept. 10, 1801; 

wounded at Gettysburg; must, out Sept. 2U, 18114. 
WiUard, (I. H.. Co. B, lUth Inf.; enl. Aug. 17, 1801; 

pro. to 2d sergt. (K-t. 15.1801; 1st sergt. Feb. 10, 

1862; 2d Iieut. Oct. 3, 1802; 1st Iieut. June 18, 1863; 

capt. Nov. 0, wa. 
Willes, Kufus T., Co. E, 13th H. \.: enl. Aug. 2.5, 1801. 
Williams, Favette H., Co. G, 9th Cav.; enl. Aug. 25, 

I8(U. 
Williams, Geo., Co. H. 154th Inf.; enl. Aug. 27, 1862. 
Williams, James, 112th Inf.; enl. Dec, 18ij3. 
Wiiisor, Warner .1., Co. IS, 01th Inf.; enl. Aug. 17, 

1801; died July 2. Isi2. of wounds received at Mal- 
vern Hill, auu buried 011 the field. 
W(jo.lin, David, Co. G. 9th Cav.; enl. Aug. 2:!, 1804. 
Woolcot, Charles H., Co. H,37th Inf.; enl. May 1, 1861. 
Wright, Lyman J.. Co. li, 04th Inf.; enl. Aug. 17, 1801; 

pro. Corp. Feb. 0, 1862; killed at Fredericksburg, 

Dec. 13. INU!. 
Zibblo, Thomas J., Co. F, 04th Inf.; enl. Oct. 9, 1861, 

three years. 

SALAMANCA. 

Those marked with a star {*) were Indians. 

Allen, Ellas, 2d C. S. Col. Eegt.; enl. April 7, 1805. 
Allen, Thos. W., Co. C, 13th H. A.; enl. Aug. 1.5, 1804. 
Ames, Henry W., Co. C, 13th H. A.; enl. Aug. 15, 1804. 
Atwatcr, Kobt., 1st Army Corps; enl. Marcn 21, 1805. 
Backus, William. Co. C, 13th H. A.; enl. Aug. 24, 1863, 

I hree years. 
Barber, Benjamin, Co. I, 1.54th Inf.; enl. Aug., 1862. 
Barbei, Henry, Co. A, 1.54th Inf.; enl. Aug., 1862; 

pro. 1st Iieut. 
Barber, Levant F., Co. 1, 1.54th Inf.; enl. Aug., 1802; 

died in service. 
Barry, John, Co. C, 13th H. A.; enl. Aug. 1.5, 1864. 
Bigkettle, James*, Co. C, 13th H. A.; enl. Aug. 1.5, 

186;3, three years; died in service or was killed in 

battle. 
Bigler, Wm. J., Co. A, 1.54th Inf.; enl. July 24, 1862. 
Blackchief, Simon*, 188th Pa. Vols.; enl. 180L 
Bliss, Asher, Jr., Co. I, 1.54th Inf.; enl. Aug., 1862. 
Bottum, Jacob, Wlh Cav.; enl. Sept. 17, 1804. 

31 



Boughton, George H., Co. B, 13th H. A.; enl. Aug. 

17, 1803, three years. 
Breen, Patrick, enl. Feb. 22, 186.5. 
Brown, Hiram L., Co. C, 13th H. A.: enl. Aug. 24, 

1863, threi- years. 
Brown, William, Jr., sergt. Co. H, 1.54th Inf.; enl. 

Aug. i;3, 1862. 
Bucktooth, Ira*, 51st Pa. Inf ; enl. 1801; killed in 

service. 
Bullock, Horace, Co. C, 13th H. A.; enl. Aug. 24, 1803, 

three years. 
Burk, William C, wagoner Co. G, 154th Inf.; enl. 

Aug. 27, 1862. 
Burns, Andrew, Co. C, 13th H. A.; enl. Julv 27, 1863, 

three years. 
Cables, Samuel B., Co. B, 13th H. A.; enl. Aug. 3, 1863, 

three years; disch. from hospital before term of 

service e.xpired. 
Camp, Asa E., 37th Inf.; enl. Aug. 2.5, ISOl; re-enl. as 

sergt. Co. C, 13th H. A., Aug. 2.5, 1803, three years. 
Canfield, Charles, Co.-C, 13th H. A.; enl. Aug. la, 1804. 
Clark, George, enl. Feb. 21, 1*5. 
Clark, Kiley. Co. C, 13th H. A.; enl. Aug. 24, 180:3, 

three yeai-s. 
demons, John, 9th Cav.; enl. Sept. 17, 1804. 
Cone, William, Co. 1, 1.54th Inf.; enl. Aug., 1802. 
Comstock. Lewis H., Co. C, 13th H. A.; eul. Aug. 24, 

18<i3, three years. 
Counery, William, Co. C, 13th H. A.; eul. Aug. 21, 

186:3, three years. 
Cook, Arthur, Co. C, 13th H. A.; enl. Aug. 15, 1864. 
CuUeu, Samuel, Co. Li, 13th H. A.; enl. Aug. 17, 186:3, 

three years. 
Dauforth, George, enl. Aug. 22,1803. 
De Puy, Charles V., Co. 1, 154th Inf.; enl. Aug. 24, 

1802. 
Didcock, Henry D., Co. I, 187th Inf.; enl. Sept. 20, 

1804, one year. 
Dingraan, Robert, Co. C, 13th H. A.; enl. Aug. 15, 1864. 
Dollard, John, Co. C, 13th H. A.; enl. .\ug. 10, 1803, 

three years. 
Dunbar, Sylvester, Co. I, 1.54th Inf.; enl. Sept. 3, 1802. 
Eastman, Albert, enl. Oct. 7, 180:3. 
Eastman, Hiram, Co. C, 13th H. A.; enl. Aug. 10, 1804. 
Ellis, Cassius M., Co. K, 04th Inf.; enl. 1861; taken 

prisoner and escaped; was thirty days iu swamps. 
Everett, Henry, Co. C, 13th H. A.; enl. Aug. 24, 1803, 

three years. 
Tatley, Cornelius B., bugler Co. B, 13th H. A.; eul. 

Aug. 3, 186:3, three yeai's. 
Fellows, Alonzo, Co. (.', 13th H. A.; enl. Aug. 21, 180:1, 

three years; pro. Corp.; sergt. 
Fellows, John, Co. B, 13th H. A.; enl. Aug. 1, 1863, 

three years; pro. corp.; sergt. 
Fellows, Willard E., corp. (;o. I, 71st Inf.; enl. 1801; 

disch. before terra expired. 
Firman, Thomas, Co. B, 13th H. A.; enl. Aug :3, 1803, 

three years. 
France, Cyrus, Co. C, 13th H. A.; enl. Aug. 10, 1864. 
French, Eugene. Co. I-", 194th Int.; enl. April II, 1865. 
Frink, James D., Co. 1, 154th Inf.; enl. Sept. 3, 1863. 
Gilbert, John, eul. Dec. 8, 1804. 
Goodman, Jefferson, Co. A, 154th Inf.; enl. July 24, 

1862; died in service. 
Gordon, Bennett,* Co. 1, 104th Inf.; enl. 1861. 
Goring, William, 1st Army Corps; eul. March 27, 1865. 
Gray, Nathan W., Co. C, 13tli H. A.; enl. Aug. 16, 1804. 
Gray, Norman H., Co. A, 154th Inf.; enl. July 22, 1802; 

wounded at Chancellorsville; pro. sergt. 
Gray, Walter, Co. H, 154th Inf.; enl. Aug. 23, 1802; 

died In service. 
Hagar, Legrand D., Co. C, 13th H. A.; enl. Aug. 1, 

1803, three yeai-s. 
Hall, William H., Co. C,13th H. A.; enl. Aug. 16, 1804. 
Ham. Charles, Co. C, 13th H. A.; enl. Aug. 3(1, 1804. 
Hamner, Edgar E., Co. B, 13th H. A.; enl. Aug. 1, 

186.3, three years. 
Harkness, Truman, Co. H, 154th Inf.; enl. Aug. 30, 

1802; died or was killed in service. 
Hart, Matthew, Co. 1, 1.54th Inf.; enl. Sept. 3, 1862; 

afterwards represented by Benjamin Lee. 
Helmick, Darwin, Co. C, 13th H. A.; enl. Aug. 19, 

186:3, three years; died in hospital at Norfolk, Va. 
Helmick, Jasper, Co. C, 13th H. A.; enl. Aug. 19, 1863, 

three years. 
Henderson, John, enl. 1861; died in hospital. 
Hoag, William C, Co. B, 9th Cav.; enl. Oct. .5, 1861; 

disch. before term expired, 



242 



History of Cattaraugus County. 



Hoyt, Bdwin, Co. C, 13th H. A.; enl. Aug. 9, 1861. 
Hunington, M. H., Co. B, 13th H. A.; enl. Aug. 3, 

l)<a3; pro. ord.-sergt.; 2d lieut.; capt. 
Hunton, John, Co.C,13th H. A.; enl.Aug.18, 186.3, three 

years; died while home on a fui lough of disease 

contracted in the service. 
Hurd, David H., 37th Int.; enl. Sept., 1861; re-enl. 

Co. C, 13th H. A., Aug. \io, 1S63, three years; pro. 

Corp. 
Hyde, Franklin A., Co. C, 13th H. A.; enl. Aug. 22, 

ISKS, three years. 
Jimeson, Chauncey, enl. 1861; killed while acting as 

scout. 
Jimeson, Cyrus,* navy; enl. 1861. 
Jimeson, Jacob T.,* Co. B, 13th H. A.; enl. Aug. 3, 

186:3, three years; died in hospital at Portsmouth, 

Va. 
Jimeson, Moses,* 157th Inf.; enl. 1862. 
Jimeson, Kobert,*enl. 18U1; killed at Petersburg. 
Jimeson, Thompson,* enl. 1861; disch. 
Johnson, William, 1st. D. S. Art.; enl. April 1, 1865. 
Jones, Bela, Ifttth Inf.; enl. 1861; disch. before expira-' 

tion of term. 
Jones, Charles, enl. Aug. 22, 18K5. 
Kelley, Thomas, 1st Army Corps; enl. March 22, 1865. 
Kelsey, William H., Co. B, 13th H. A.; enl. Aug. 6, 

18fe, three years. 
Kennedy, Robert, 1st Army Corps; enl. March 25, 1865. 
King, Wooster,* Co. K, 57th Pa. Inf.; enl.Xov.7,1861; 

wounded and disch. for disability; re-enl. Co. B, 

I3th H. A., July 31, 1863; disch. before e.xpiration 

of term. 
Langley, John, Co. B, 13th H. A.; enl. Aug. 6, 1863, 

three years; pro. Corp.; sergt. 
Lavton, George, Co. C, 13th H. A.; enl. Aug. 15, 1864. 
Lent, David, Co. C, 13th H. A.; enl. Aug. 23, 1863, 

three years. 
Lewis, John, enl. Jan. 21, 1865. 
Lindguest, James, Co. C, 13th H. A.; enl. Aug. 17, 1863, 

three years. 
Lindgue-t, John F., Co. C, 13th H. A.; enl. Aug. 17, 

1863, three years. 
Long, Samuel, Co. H, lolth Inf.; enl. Aug. 4, 1862. 
Lyons, Peter, Co. C, 13th H. A.; enl. Aug. 1.5, 1864. 
Mack. John, 1st I'. S. Art.; enl. March 25, 1865. 
Maloney, James, enl. Aug. 22, 186.3. 
Mathews, Bernard, Co. B, 13th H. A.; enl. Aug. IS, 

1863, three years. 
McEvoy, William, corp. Co. B, 13th II. A.; enl. Aug. 

:30, 1863, three years. 
McMahon, Patrick, 37th or 64th Inf.; enl. 1861.; (not 

on muster-in rolls). 
Meade, Horace W., Co. H, 37th Inf.; enl. Sept,1861; re- 
enl. Co. I, 13th H. A., Aug. 24, 186:3. 
Messenger, Peter, Co. A, lo4th Inf.; enl. Aug. 12, 1862. 
Miller, Wilkes J., Co. A, 154th Inf.; enl. July 26, 1862. 
Moore, John, enl. Jan. 12, 1865. 
Moore, Levi, Co. B, 13th H. A.; enl. July 31, 1863, three 

years; pro. Corp.; sorgt. 
Morgan, Charles P., enl. Aug. 22, 1863. 
Morris, Stephen, Co. H, 1.54th Inf.; enl. Sept. 4, 1862. 
Murphy, George, enl. Jan. 27, 1865. 
Murphy, James, Co. C, i:3th H. A.; enl. Aug. 29, 1864. 
Myer, Anthony, Co. H, 194th Inf.; enl. April 7, 1865, 

one year. 
Nelson, John, Jr., Co. C, 13th H. A.; enl. Aug. 25, 1863, 

three years. 
Nelson, Kichard, Co. C, 13th H. A.; enl. Sept. 11, 1863. 
Nelson, William J., Co. C, 13th H. A.; enl. Aug. 24, 

1863, three years. 
Nichols, Richmond, Co. C, 13th H. A.; enl. Aug. 24, 

1863, three years. 
Nichols, Sylvester, Co. B, 13th H. A.; enl. Aug. 8, 

1863, three years; died in service. 
Norton, Alonzo, Co. A, 154th Inf.; enl. July 28, 1862; 

died in service. 
Nyhart, Peter, Co. C, 13th H. A.; enl. Aug. 21, 1863, 

three years. 
O'Day, Patrick, Co. 1, 37th Inf.; enl. 1861; killed in 

the service. 
Padgett, Anson, Co. C, 13th H. A.; enl. Aug. 17, 1863, 

three years. 
Patterson, Samuel *, navy; enl. 1861; starved to death 

in Belle Isle. 
Pattyson, Minard, 9th Cav.; enl. Sept. 13, 1864; died 

at home from disease contracted in serrice. 
Payne, Squires., Co. B, 64th Inf.; enl. Sepc. 28, 1861, 

three years. 



Payne, William H., mustered and afterward rejected. 
Pease, Franklin S., corp. Co. F, 64ih Inf.; enl. Sept. 

10, 1861, three years; wounded; pro. lieut. 
Pierce, Lewis, Co. I, 104th Inf.; enl. 1861. 
Pierce. Wilson *, enl. 1861; disch. 

Plummer, Cornelius,* Co. I, 104th Int.; enl. 1861; 

killed in battle. 
Potter, G. Fred, . apt. Co. C, 13th H. \.; must. Sept. 

11, 1863, three years; pro. brevet mijor. 
Powers, Edward, Co. C, 13th H. A.; enl. Sept. U, 1863. 
Prime, Abram C, Co. C, 13th H. A.; enl. Sept. 1.5, 

1863, three years. 
Putnam, Orville, Co. C, 13th H. A.; enl. Aug. 9, 1S64; 

died in service. 
Redeye, Martin*, Co. C, 13th H. A.; eul. July 31, 1863, 

three years. 
Riley, Fariell, 1st Army Corps; enl. March 28, 1865. 
Robinson, George W., Co. I, 1.54th Inf.; enl. Sept. 3, 

1862. 
Robinson, Josiah, Co. C, 13th H. A.; enl. Aug. 24, 

1863, three years; died while home on a furlough. 
Root, Elias, Co. F, 194th Inf.; enl. March 22, 1865, 

one year. 
Ross, Thomas, 21st Ind. Co. N. Y. Vols.; enl. April 

7, 1865. 
Salmon, William, Co. C, 13th H. A.; enl. Aug. 24, 

18(3, three years; died at home before e.vpiration 

of term, from disease contracted in service. 
Sample, Emmett, Co. B, 13th H. A.; enl. Aug. 11, 1863, 

three yeai-s. 
Scroggs, Thomas*, Co. B, 13th H. A.; enl. Aug. 16, 

1863, three years; disch. before expiration of 

term. 
Sears, Alfred, Co. C, 13lh H. A.; enl. Aug. 21, 1863, 

three years; died in hospital at Portsmouth, Va. 
Sedgwick, Theodore, 1st Army Corps.; enl. March 

24, 1865. 
Selen, William H., Co. H, 1.54th Inf.; enl. Aug. 29, 1862. 
Shea, Michael, :37th or 6tth Inf.; enl. 1861; lost leg in 

service: (not on muster-in lOlls). 
Sheffield, Albert, Co. I, 44th Inf. 
Sherman. David, Co. C, 13th H. A.; enl. Aug. 22, 1863, 

three vears. 
Shirley, Samuel C, Co. H, :37th Inf.; enl. 1861; disch. 

at expiration of term; re-enl. 9th Cav. Sept. 

17, 1864. 
Shongo, Thomas *, enl. 1861; disch. 
Slater, James, Co. C, 13th H. A.; enl. Aug. 9, 1864. 
Smith, George, 1st Army Con s; enl. March 28, 186.5. 
Smith, George H., Co. H, 37tii Int.; enl. 1861; pro. 

Corp.; disch. at expiracion of term; re.-enl. pri- 
vate Co. C, 13th H. A., Aug. 16, 1864; pro. corp. 
Smith, John, enl. 1861. 
Smith, Orrin, Co. C, 13th H. A.; enl. Aug. 21, 1863; 

pro. Corp.; sergt. 
Smith, Spencer, Co. C, 13th H. A.; enl. Aug. 16, 1864. 
Stebbins, Francis B., 9th Cav.; enl. Sept. 20, 1864. 
Stebbins, John W., 9th Cav.; enl. Sept. 20, 1864. 
Stevens, Silas, Co. C, 13th H. A.; enl. Aug. 16, 1864. 
Stimpson, Orrin, Co. C, i:3th H. A.; enl. Aug. 27, 1864. 
Stoddard, Giles, Co. C, 13th H. A.; enl. Aug. 22, 1863, 

, three years. 
Stoddard, Riley, Co. C, 13th H. A.; enl. Aug. 22, 1863, 

three years; pro. corp. 
Strickland, Francis, sergt. Co. I, 1.54th Inf.; enl. Sept. 

3, 1862; lost an arm in the battle of Gettysburg 

and was discharged. 
Sweet, Langtord, Co. C, 13th H. A.; enl. Aug. 17, 186:3. 

three j'ears. 
Thomas, Abner, Co. 1, 1.54th Int.; enl. Sept. 3, 1862. 
Thompson, Joseph, 21st Ind. Co. N. Y. Vols.; enl. 

April 7, 186.5. 
Titus, Dennis C* Co. C, 13th H. A.; enl. Aug. 5, 1.863, 

three years; disch. before exp. of term. 
Traver, Cyrus, Co. C, 13th H. A.; enl. Aug. 16, 1864. 
Trousdale, Calvin, Co. C, 13th H. A.; enl. Aug. 9, 1864. 
Uncles, Frederick,* Co. C, 13th H. A.; enl. Aug. 22, 

1863, three years. 
Vincent, Freeman W., Co. F, 194th Inf.; enl. April 

11, 1865, three years. 
Walker, Richard N., Co. B, 13th H. A.; enl. Aug. 11, 

1863, three years. 
Waters, John W., Co. C, 13th H. A.; enl. Aug. 19, 1863, 

three years. 
Webster, Edwin, Co. C, 13th H. A.; enl. Aug. 16, 1864; 

died m hospital at Portsmouth, Va. 
Wells, Wm. H., 1st Army Corps.; enl. March 27, 1865. 
West, George, 10th H. A.; eul. April 10, 1865. 



Roster of Soldiers and Sailors. 



Whaley, Charles, Co. C, 13th H. A.: enl. Aug. 25, 18C3. 
Whallen, Patrick, Co. C, 13th H. A.; enl. Au^'. 15, 186i. 
Whip'le, Hrnry F., Co. H, ISith Inf.; enl. Aug. 30, 

ltU2; (lifd wliile a prisoner at Belle Isle, Va. 
Whitney, .Si;ott D., cr.l. Oct. 28, 1803. 
Wiley, .loliii, Co. B, 13th H. A.; enl. Aug. 17, 1S(>3, 

three years: disc", before exp. of term. 
WilUa-ns, .lames H., Co. H, 154th Inf.; enl. Aug.,1.^62. 
Williams, Li-vi'l"., enl. 1S61; killed in battle. 
Willson, .Inhn. Isf Army Corps; enl. March 23, 1S65. 
Wiser. .Marcus i... atli Cav.; enl. Sept. 9, 1864. 
Woodford, Samuel D., Co. 1,1.54th Inf.; enl. Sept. 3, 

l.'-'62; prisoner at Salisbury, N. C; escaped and 

was thirty day.« in swamps; was assisted and got 

home bv help of negroes. 
Woodworth, Charles, Co. C, 13th H. A.; enl. July 17, 

IStSi, three vears; pro. corp.; sergt. 
Woodworth, Thomas, Co. C, 13th H. A.; enl. Aug. 17, 

ly(>J, three years; pro. sergt.: reduced to the 

ranks; died in hospital at Portsmouth, Va. 

SOUTH VALLEY. 

.Vkin, riijiih, 1st Pa. Ritle Corps; enl. Sept. 28, ISfil; 

disch. for wounds Aug. 22, 1862; re-enl. Co. A, 

188th Inf., .\ug. 12, 18ti4; disch. June 1, 186.5. 
-Vldiich, Leroy, Co. A, li-Sth Inf.; enl. Sept. 3, 1864; 

killed at Hatcher's Kun, Oct. 27, 1864. 
Armstron„^ Nathaniel (Indian), Co. B, 13th H. A.; 

enl. Aug.. 18t;2. 
.\rnol i, Andrew T., Co. A. 112th Inf.; enl. July 2n, 

1W2; disch. June III, 186.5. 
Atkins, William P.. Co. A, ISlSth Inf.; enl. Sept. 4, 

liliss, Asher, Co. 1, 154th Inf ; enl. Sept. 3, 1862. 
Bliss, David, G., Co. F, IstH. A.; enl.Sept. 7, 18(U. 
liliss, Samuel .M., Co. M, 1st H. A.; enl. Sept. 7, 1864. 
Brown, Tnomas, 112th Inf.; enl. Feb. 22, 1864. 
Bucktooth. Ira (Indian), 51st Pa. Inf.; enl. Nov., 

1861; killed in service. 
Burch, Edward C, 112th Inf.; enl. March, 186:!. 
Cooper, David, Co. B, 64th Inf.; enl. Aug. 17, 1861; 

wounded at Fair Oaks; died in hospital in New 

York city. 
Covell. Charles M., Co. I, ftth Cav.; enl. Sept. 3, 1864. 
Covell. Eilmuiid K., Co. A, 188th Inf.; enl. Sept. :i, 

18(H; pni.sergt. Sept. 20, 1SC4; disch. June, 18i». 
Covell, Harrison, corp. Co. H, 154th Inf.; enl. Aug. 

1(). 1862, three years. 
Covell, .''eth, Co. H, 1.54th Inf.; enl. Aug. 13, 18132. 
Covell. Sylvester, enl. July 1, 1864. 
Crick, Franklin J., Co. A, 1.54th Inf.; enl. Aug. 17, 

1862, three years. 
Crofort, Hiram P., Co. F, 9th Cav.; enl. Sept. 3, ISiVt. 
Eyman, John, Co. U, 179th Int.; enl. Feb. 27, 1864. 
Fargo, Daniel C., Co. E, 9th Cav.; enl. Oct. 7, 1861; 

disch. May 20, 1862. 
Fargo, Samuel P., Co. F. 64th Inf.; enl. Sept. 1.5. 1861; 

confined in Libhy and Andersonville prisons; 

paioledat Vicksburg, April 1, 1865; disch. June, 

lMi5. 

Ford. William, enl. March 20, 1.865. 

Freeman, Isaac, U. S. Navy; enl. Sept. 3, 1864. 

Frew, Josiah, Co. A, 18«th Inf.; eul. Sept. 3, 1864; 

disch. June 1, 1865. 
Hall, Albert E., Co. C, 1.54th Inf.; enl. July 26, 1,862. 
Harkins, Henry W., enl. Sept. .5, 1864. 
Hill, George B., Co. A, 76th Inf.; enl. Oct. 15, 1861. 

three years. 
Hotchkiss, George W., Co. A, 1.5th Inf.; enl. July 20, 

1862. 
Hotchkiss, Harmon. 9th Cav. 
Jaquay, Fernando C, Co. A, 154th Inf.; enl. Aug. 8, 

1862, three years. 
Keith, Hiram, Co. H, 154th Inf.; enl. Aug. 12, 1862; 

disch. June 30, 1865. 
Kinniston, Samuel, Co. H, 112th Inf.; enl. Aug. 30, 

1864; killed at Fort Fisher. 
Kinniston, William, Co. H, 112th Inf.; enl. Aug. 30, 

1864. 
Lake, Alexander, Co. A, 154th Inf.; enl. July 30, 1863, 

three years. 
Lyon, Franklin, 188th Inf.; enl. Oct 12, 1864. 
Martin, Chapin, 112th Inf.; em. Feb. 17, 1864. 
Mason, Lorenzo, Co. C, 9th Cav.; enl. Sept. 10, 1862. 
McDonald, Alexander, Co. A, i.54th Inf.; enl. July 

29, 1862; in Libby prison; removed to hospital, 

where he died. 



McLaughlin, John, Co. F, 64th Inf.; enl. Dec. 6, 1861. 
Mendell, Asa, Co. I, 9th Cav.: enl. Sept. 5, 1861; killed 

at Dinwiddle Court House. 
Moore. David, Co. H, 1.54th Inf.; enl. Aug. 28, 1862; 

killed at Chancellorsville. 
Moore, Dwight, Co. H, 1.54th Inf.; enl. Aug. 12. 1862; 

prisoner at Gettysburg, was in hospital at Rich- 
mond, and since not heard from. 
Moore, Wilbur V., Co. H, 1.54th Inf.; enl. Aug. 12, 1862; 

died in service of disea.^e. 
Moore, William W., Co. F, 64th Inf.; enl. Aug. 17, 

1861; wounded at Gettysburir: disch. Sept. 10, 1864. 
Morrill, Franklin S., Co. A. 1.54th Inf.; enl. July 30, 

1862; wounded at Chancellorsville and died in 

hospital Mav 21, 18^3. 
Morrison, Henry W., Co. A, l>Sth Inf.: enl. Sept. 3, 

1864; pro. sergt. Sept. 20, 1>64: disch. June 1, 186.5. 
Morro«-, John, Co. A, 188th Int.: enl. Sept., 1864; killed 

at Hatcher's Kun, Oct. 27. IsiU. 
Norman, George, Co. E, Ifflth Inf.: enl. Oct. 10, 1863; 

died in Jarvis hospital Julv 14, 1864. 
Norton, Lyman, Co. B, 13th H. A.; enl. Dec., 18113; 

died in V. S. hospital Julv 4. 186.5. 
Norton, Zacheus, Co. E, 112th Inf.; enl. Aug., 1862. 
Owens, William J., Co. D, 179th Inf.; enl. Feb. 26, 

1864, three years. 
Pierce, Willet (Indian), .57th Pa. Inf.; enl. Nov., 1861. 
Reeves, Daniel F., Co. I, 9th Cav.; enl. Sept. 7, 18(4. 
Reeves, George W., Co. 1, 9th Cav.; enl. Sept. 7, 1864. 
Rice, Kdmund R., Co. A, 154th Inf.: enl. July :30, 1862; 

died in hospital Dec. 24, l"»i.'. 
Robbins, Deloss, Co. A, 112th Inf.: enl. Aug. 10, 1864; 

wounded; disch. June 19. 1-A5. 
Smith, John. enl. Aug. 22, IsiS. 
Spencer, B. (Indian), 104th Inf.; enl. March, 1865. 
Stone, Martin V., Co. A, 112th Inf.; enl. Aug. 2:!, 

1864; disch. June 13, 186.5. 
Terney, Levi E., Inf.; enl. Feb. 17, 1864. 
Thompson, Ebenezer (Indiani, 88th Pa. Inf.; enl. 

Sept., IStU. 
Vanderwerk, John W., 112th Inf.; enl. Feb. 20, 1864. 
Whelpley, Hiram, Co. I, flth Cav.; enl. Sept. 1, 1864. 
Whittord, George H., 112th Inf.: enl. Jan. 20, istil. 
Wilco.x, Rodney H., Co. C, 9th Cav.; enl. Aug. 11, 

1864; disch. 186.5. 
Wilco.v, Stephen P., Co. A, l^~th Inf.; enl. Sept. 3, 

1864; killed at Hatcher's Run, Oct. 27, 1864. 
Wooden, Merritt, 112th Inf.: enl. Feb. 2:i, 1864. 
Wri^'ht, Alonzo, Co. D, 179th Inf.; enl. March 8, 1864; 

disch. June 22, 186.5. 
Wright, Calvin, Co. A, 1.54th Inf.; eni. July 29, 1862; 

served three years. 
Wright, Landers, Co. A, 1.54th Inf.: enl. July 24, 1862; 

killed at Chancellorsville. 
Wyraan, William (no record*. 

YORKSHIRE. 

Adam.s, Henry, Co. K, 1.54th Inf.: enl. Dec. 10, 1861, 

three years; wounded and prisoner at CJettys- 

burg: disch. at close of war. 
Bailey, George W., Co. D, l-Mth Inf.; enl. Aug. 5, 

1862; disch. Jan. 7, 186:1, for disability. 
Bassett, George, corp. Co. D, 1.54th Inf : enl. Aug. 5, 

1862, three years; prisoner at Gettysburg; disch. 

at close of war. 
Beach, William F., Co. D, 1.5tth Inf.; enl. Aug. 6, 

1862, three years; disch. at close of war. 
Bentley, Benjamin F., Co. D, I.54th Inf.; enl. July 31, 

1862. three years; wounded June, 1864; disch. at 

close of war. 
Bookman, Charles, Co. D, 1.5tth Inf.; enl. Aug. 10, 

1862, three years; wounded and prisoner at Get- 
tysburg; escaped. 
Bowen, Squire D., Co. C, 1st Dragoons; disch. at 

close of war. 
Brand, Dennis E., Co. D, 154th Inf.; enl. July 1.5, 1862, 

three years: prisoner in ISB; killed in Georgia, 

June 16, 1864. 
Brown, Jeff. O. N., Co. K,2d Mtd. Rifles; enl. Jan. 5, 

1864, three years; died Oct. 22, 18ti4. 
Brown, Nathaniel S., Co. D. 1.54th Inf.; enl. July 5, 

1862, three years; woundeJ at Chancellorsville. 
Bull. Eason, Co. D, 154th Inf.; enl. July 31, 1862, 

three years; died at Brooks's Station, Va., Feb. 9, 

1863. 
Bull, Ezra, Co. A, 188th Inf.: enl. Sept. 3, 1864, one 

year; disch. at close of war. 



244 



History of Cattarauous County. 



Bump, George R., Co. H, iith Inf.; enl. S<"pr. 15, 1S61, 
three years; wounded at Malveru Hill. 

Burdick, Milion 1'., waironer Co. D, l>Hli Inf.; enl. 
July 5, 18U2, three year.s. 

Champlin, James, Co. A, 44th Inf. 

Chandler, Ale.x. B., Co. D, ITllth Inf.: enl. Jan. ±2, 
1864, three years. 

Chittenden. Hiram M., Co. G, 7Sth Inf.: enl. Dec. 3, 

1801, three years. 

Chittenden, William F., Co. D, l.")4th Inf.: enl. Au^f. 

5, 1862, three years; disch. May, 186:3. for disability. 
Churchill, Eugene, Co. C, 9th Cav.: disch. at close 

of war. 
Cleveland. George, Co. A. ISSth Inf.; oul. Sept. 6, 

1864, one year; died at home in 186-5 oi ilisease. 
Comstock, Lewis H., Co. K, KISth Inf.: enl. Jan. 1.5, 

1802, three years. 

Cook, Alonzo H., Co. K, 10.5th Inf.; enl. Dec. 31. 1862; 

wounded and prisoner. 
Crook, Warren W., Co. H, 44th Inf.: onl. Sept. 15, 

1861, three years; killed at Hanover Court 

House. 
Curtis, William L., Co. A, 18«th Inf.: enl. Sept. 3, 

1804, one year; died In Ale.xandria, Va.. in 180.5, of 

disease. 
Day, Marcus D., Co. K, llioth Inf.; enl. Jan. 2.5, 1S62, 

three years. 
Dimix, James, Co. C, 9th Cav. 
Doty, lia A., Co. K, 105th Inf.; enl. Jan. IS, 1802, 

three years. 
Dowd, James C, Co. K, 10.5th Inf.; enl. Jan. 11, 1802; 

wounded at Gettysburg- in 181*!; prisoner in 1804; 

died in Virginia, 1804. 
Feigles, Clark, corp. Co. K, 10.5th Inf.: enl. Dec. 10, 

1861, three years. 
Ferrin, Nathan H., Co. K, 105th Inf.: enl. Dec. 0, 

1801; disch. July, 1862, for disability. 
Freeman, Franklui E., Co. I, 71st Inf.: enl. .May 13, 

1861, three years; prisoner at Mah ern Hill; disch. 

for disability. 
Freeman, Loyal C, Co. D, 154th Inf.: enl. Aujr. 0, 

1863, thre- years; Qisi h. Jan., 180:3, for disability. 
Fuller, Orlando P., coip. Co. K, lUoth Inf.; enl. Dec. 

15, 1801: taken prisoner twice; disch. at close of 

war. 
Gale. Henry, sergt. Co. G, 78th Inf.: enl. Nov. 27, 

1801, three years; disch. at e.\p. of term. 
Gibson, Edward G., Co. A, 100th Inf.: enl. Sept. 2:i, 

1801, three years; disch. ate.\ti. of term. 
Gill, Carlton L., Co. H, ilOth Inf.; kil'.eti at Cedar 

Cicek, Oct. 18. 1804. 
Goodemote, William, Co. A, ISSth Inf.: enl. Sept. 6, 

1804, one year. 
Gould, David, Jr., 1st. lieut. Co. K, l(6th Inf.; enl. 

Dec. 12, 1861; disch. for disability July 11, 18ti.'. 
Gould, Nathan E., Co. B,2d Mtd. Uitles: wounded at 

Petersburg. 
Hakes, Ira J., Co. A, 188th inf.; enl. Sept. 1. l-tU, one 

year; disch. at close of war. 
Hall. Abel W'., Co. H, 44th Inf.; enl. Sept. 15, 1861, 

three years; disch. 1802 tor disability. 
Hall, Alfred O., Co. G, 78th Inf.; enl. Nov. 27, 1861, 

three years. 
Hall, Harvey C, Co. H, ■14th Inf.; enl. Sept. 1.5. 1801, 

three years; wounded at Wilderness: hon. disch. 
Hall, Lucius, corp. Co. G, 78lh Inf.; enl. Nov. 27, 1861, 

three years; disch. 18IJ2 for disability. 
Hancock, Koyal F. (no record). 
Hawkins, Rodney E., Co. A, 1.88th Inf.: enl. Sept. 9, 

1864, one year; wounded at Chancellursville. 
Hayo-, James M., Co. A, 76th Inf.; wounded in battle 

of Wilderness. 
Hayes. Hoberi !(., Co. K, 10.5th Inf.; wounded and 

piisoner at Gettysburg. 
Hayes. Wm. E., Co. K, 10.5th Inf.; enl. Feb. 17, 1862; 

disch. 1863 tor disability. 
Hermance, John L., Co. A, 188th Inf.: enl. Sept. 9, 

1864, one year. 
Herrick, Harden P., Co. A, 1.88th Inf.; enl. Sept. 6, 

1864, one year. 
Hover, Jonathan. Co. A, 188th Inf.; enl. Sept. 1, 1804, 

one year. 
Howell, Lafayette, Co. G, 78th Inf.; enl. Nov. 26, 1861, 

three years. 
Howell, Uriah F., Co. K, 105th Inf.: enl. Dec. 10, 1801, 

three years. 
Jasseph, bimeon, Co. K, 10.5th Inf.: enl. Feb. 21, 1862, 

three years. 



Kast, Geo. H., Co. A, ISStb Inf.; enl. Sept. .5, 1864, one 

year; wounded at Hatcher's Kun. 
Keller, Martin A., corp. Co. D, 154th Inf.; enl. Aug. 

6, 1862, three years; pro. 2d lieut.; wounded and 

prisoner ai Gettysburg. 
Kelly, Daniel, Co. G, 7»th Inf.; enl. Nov. 28, 1861. 

three years 
King, Chas. E., Co. D, 1.54th Inf.; enl. Julv 31, 1862, 

three years; wounded at Rocky Face Ridge and 

Dalton, Ga. 
King, Reuben, Co. A, ISSth Inf.; on]. Sept. 6, 1864. one 

year; Killed in batili; near City I'oint, 1864. 
King, Van Rensselaer, Co. D, 120th Int.; wounded at 

Hatcher's Run, Oct.-27, 1804. 
Langmade, Andrew J., sergt. Co. K. 10.5th Inf.; enl. 

Dec. 12, 1861; prisoner at Gettysburg; disch. at 

close of war. 
Langmaid, Alonzo, Co. I, 1.54th Inf.; enl. Aug. 26, 1862, 

three years. 
Liiidsley, HMlsey, Co. G. 78th Inf.; enl. Nov. 27, 1861, 

three years. 
Lowe, Allen, Co. D, 1.54th Inf.; enl. July 31, 1862. 

three years 
McCutcheon, James, Co. A, 44th Inf. 
McKnight, Wm., Co. K, I05ih Inf.; enl. Feb. 12, 1862; 

disch. 1863 for disability. 
Montgomery, John, Co. A, 188th Inf.; enl. Sept. 5, 

1864, 'ne year; disch. at close of term. 
Jtorrow, John, Co. A, 188th Inf.; enl. Sept. 5, 1864, 

one year. 
Jlorse, Leander, corp. Co. K, 105th Inf. ; enl. Dec. 6, 

1861; wounded at Gettysburg; discb. at close of 

war. 
Myers, Albert E , Co. G, 78th Inf.; enl. Nov. 27, 1861, 

three 3eai-s. 
Newton, William M., sergt. Co. K, 105th Int.; enl. 

Dec. 10, 1801; disch. 180;j for disaoiliiv. 
O'Neil, John W., Co. K, 10.5th Int.; enl. Feb. 13, 1862, 

three years. 
Ferryman, jVsaph, Co. K, 97th Inf. 
Perryman, Collins, 4tli Art.; disch. at close of war. 
Ferryman, Dennison, corp. Co. G, 78th Inf.; enl. L)ec., 

1801, three years; disch. for disability. 
Perryman, Gideon, Co. K, 105th Inf.; died of disease 

Aug., 1863. 
Perrymun, Greene, Co. K, 105th Inf.; enl. Feb. 22, 

1862; prisoner in 1802; wounded in 1864; disch. at 

e.vpiration of term. 
Persons, Frank, Co. H, 44th Inf.; enl. Sept. 15, 1861, 

three years; irisoner at Gaines's Mills. 
Phelps, James H., musician Co. K, 105th Inf.; enl. 

Jan. 14, 1802, three years. 
Phillips, Henjamin F., Co. D, 1.54th Inf.; disch. at close 

of war. 
Phillips, Deloss, Co. D, 154th Inf.; enl. Aug. .5, 1862, 

three year.<; disch. Feb., 18<i:j, for disability. 
Phillips, Loren, Co. D, 154th Inf.; enl. July 31, 1862, 

thiee years; prisoner; disch. at close of war. 
Phinney, Henry P., Co. A. 188th Inf.; enl. Sept. 3, 

1864, one jear. 
Pomeroy, Moses H., Co. K, 105th Inf.; enl. Dee. 12, 

1.861; disch. for disability in 1862. 
Pomeroy, William C, Co. C, 13th Art.; enl. Aug. 22, 

1803, three years; disch. at close of war. 

Poor, Stephen B., Co. A, 188th Iiif ; enl. Sept. 6, 1.^64, 

one year; disch. at close of war. 
Quint, William, Co. D. 154th Inf.; enl. Aug. 10, 1862, 

three years; disch. Feb., 1803, for disability. 
Reed, Wample H., Co. G, 78th Inf.; enl. Feb. 9, 1862, 

three years. 
Reed, Wesley, Co. K, 10.5th Inf.; enl. Feb. 25, 1862, 

three years. 
Reynolds, Ross, Co. H, 44th Inf. 
Rickards, Israel, Co. D, 154th Inf.; enl. Aug. 1.5, 1862, 

three years; wounded at Rocky Face Ridge, Ga. 
Robinson, Thaddeus, Co. A, lS8th Inf.; enl. Sept. 3, 

1804, one year. 

Rose, John H., Co. I, 71st Inf.; enl. May 13, 1861, three 

years; prisoner; disch. at e.vpiration of term. 
Sample, Nelson, 2d lieu'. Co. A, ISSth Inf.; enl. Aug. 

30, 1864, one year. 
Serline, Charles, Co. A, ISSth Inf.; enl. Sept. 6, 1864, 

one year; disch. at close of war. 
Shaw, Lysander, Co. A, ISSth Int.; enl. Sept. 14, 1864, 

one year. 
Shepard, William M., Co. K, 105th Inf.; enl. Dec. 16. 

1861, three years; wounded. 
Sherman, Geo. H., Co. G, 78th Inf.; enl. Feb. 4, 1.86::. 



The Bench and Bar. 



H5 



Shultz, Stephen T)., Co. K, 10.5th Inf.; enl. Jan. 4 iNji. 

Silliman, Frederick, Co. H, 4ith Inf. 

Sippi, Joseph, Co. K, ia>th Inf.: 6nl. Dec. 10, 1-^1: 

killed in battle. 
Smith, Tyler, Co. K, 10.5th Inf.; enl. Feb. 25, 1-~(H: 

disch. for disabilitv. 
Smith, Webster, Co. K, 10.)th Inf.; enl. Feb. 25, lj<t\ 

three years. 
Smith, William, Co. K, 10.5th Inf.; enl. Deo. 16, iMil. 

three years. 
Snyder, Dennis, Co. D. 154th Inf.; enl. Aug. 5, 1^:, 

three years; killed at Gettj-sburg, July 1. |n>5. 
Spring-, Vernou L., Co. H, 44th Inf.; enl. Sept. 15. l?ol. 

three years; disch. for disability; died iit home. 
Stacy, William H., corp. Co. K. lOOth Inf.; enl. Oct. :;. 

ltB2, three years; wounde<i at Fort Wagner. 
Stoddard, Thomas, Co. K, lOStU Inf.; enl. Jan. 1-. 

ISti-, three years. 
Straiirht, Stephen J., Co. G. TSth Inf.; enl XoA-. 27. 

1><;1. three years. 
StriDifham, Oliver E.. Co. D, 1.54th Inf.; enl. Aug. 5. 

1j62, three years; priiOner2u months. 
Sutton, Charles G..sergt. Co. D, 1.54th Inf.; enl. Aug. 

6, 18t'>2, three years: disch. at close of war. 
Thornton, >[arion F., Co: K, 105th Inf.; wounded at 

White Oak Swump; prisoner at Gettysburg: 

disch. at exp. of terra. 
Tuhn, Martin, Co. E, 2d Cav.: wounded at second 

Bull Kun; disch. at close of war. 



Turner, Josephus M., Co. H, 2d Mtd. Rifles; enl. Dec. 

10, ISCo, three years; disch. at close of war. 
Turner. Orlando, 1st A. C; discharged at e.xpiration 

of term. 
Turner, Ozro, Co. I, 1.54th Inf.; enl. Sept. fi, 1862, 

three years; disch. for disability. 
Wheeler, Edgar W., Co. K, 10.5th Inf.; enl. Feb. 25, 

1S«52; wounded at second Bull Run; disch. for dis- 
ability. 
■Wheeler, John H., Co. H, 44th Inf.: enl. Sept. 1.5,lS*il, 

three yeai-s; disch. at exp. of term. 
Wheeler, Joseph A., Co. A, ISSth Inf.; enl. Sept. 3, 

1S64, one year; disch. at close of war. 
Whiting, Walter H., Co. K, U6th Inf.; enl. Jan. 2, 

1S(52, three vears: disch. at close of term. 
Wilber, Salah J., capt. Co. K, lOoth Inf.; enl. Dec. 10, 

1S6I; must, out ISSi for disability. 
Wilder, Job T., Co. G, TSth Inf.; enl. Dec. 7, ISUl, 

three years. 
Woodworth, Charles A., Ut lieut. Co. H, 44th Inf.; 

enl. Aug. S, 1S61, three years; pro. capt. Co. K; 

lost an eye at Malvern Hill, I8t!2; disch. July, 

1S63; re-enl.l3t lieut. V. R. C; disch. at close of 

war. 
Woodworth, Eli D., 2d lieut. Co. K, 105th Inf.; enl. 

Dec. 2, 1*31, three years. 
Woodworth, Judson N'., 2d lieut. Co. H, 44th Inf.; 

disch. at exp. of term. 
Worden, Benjamin, Co. H, 44th Inf. 



CHAPTER XVII. 



BEXCH AND BAR Cip CATTARAUGUS COUNTV. 



[By Cbables Z. Lincoln, Esq.] 



CIVILIZATION has not yet accomplished the achievement of lifting 
mankind to a plane of intelligence and morals where the aid of the 
Bench and Bar is no longer necessary in protecting the citizen in the 
enjoyment of his rights and privileges under our complicated social system. 
"Man," says Aristotle, " is a social being"; and the Scriptures declare that 
" God setteth the solitary in families." Some form of organized society is a 
necessary condition of mankind, but this social arrangement demands the 
surrender of certain rights which a person might enjoy alone, and imposes 
new duties and responsibilities in his relations with his fellows. The proper 
adjustment of these relations, with the aim of producing the greatest good to 
the greatest number, is the great work of the philosopher, the statesman, and 
the patriot. Life has been defined to be the sum of the forces which resist 
death. We may paraphrase this definition and define civilization as the sum 
of the forces which resist barbarism. Withdraw or cut off the resisting forces 
in the human mechanism and death ensues. So nations relapse into barbar- 
ism when the benign influences of a resisting and progressive culture are 
turned aside or destroyed. 

Society is not maintained without an effort. "The bond which holds it 
together would be weak indeed, and forever in jeopardy, if a protective power 



246 History of Cattaraugus County. 

were not established superior to individual wills, to keep them within bounds, 
and defend the persons and the rights of each against the attacks of violence." 

"As soon as a people emerge from barbarism a body of men who make it 
their business to expound the law, and assist those who may need assistance 
in legal matters, is always observed to make its appearance as one of the 
requisites of civilization and legal order, and the State confers upon its mem- 
bers special and peculiar privileges, and at the same time places them under 
regulations more or less strict for the protection of the public and of those 
who may place their interests in their care." " 

The proper administration of justice has been an indispensable factor in the 
development of civilization ; and this has been due to the intelligence and pat- 
riotism of the legal profession. Every civilize'd nation has felt this influence. 
De Tocqueville remarks that "the m.embers of the legal profession have taken 
a part in all the movements of political society in Europe for the last five 
hundred years," and he observes that the authority which the American peo- 
ple have intrusted to this profession, and the influence which they exercise in 
the government, is the most powerful existing security against the excesses of 
democracy. " Wen who have made a special study of the laws derive from 
this occupation certain habits of order, a taste for formalities, and a kind of 
instinctive regard for the regular connection of ideas, which naturally render 
them very hostile to the revolutionary- spirit and the unreflecting passions of 
the multitude." "Lawyers are attached to public order beyond every other 
consideration, and the best security of public order is authority. The courts 
of justice are the visible organs by which the profession is enabled to make 
itself felt in its love of order and stability. The judge is a lawyer who, inde- 
pendently of the taste for regularity and order which he has co'ntracted in the 
study of law, derives an additional love of stability from the inalienability of 
his own functions." " The lawyers of the United States form a party which 
is little feared and scarcely perceived; which has no badge peculiar. to itself; 
which adapts itself with great flexibility to the exigencies of the time and 
accommodates itself without resistance to all the movements of the social 
body." 

The celebrated French philosopher and statesman, from whose great work, 
" Democracy in America," I have quoted somewhat freely, visited this country 
in 183 1 and remained two years examining our institutions with a critical but 
not unfriendly eye. Later, another acute observer, Prof. James Bryce, of 
England, visited this country and made a careful study of American institu- 
tions and gave expression to his views in " The American Commonwealth," 
published in 1888. Upon the subject now under consideration he says: "As 
the respect of the judges for the bar tends to keep the judges in the straight 
path, so the respect and regard of the bar for the bench, a regard founded on 
the sense of professional brotherhood, insures the rrioral influence of the court 

» Cooley. 



The Bench and Bar. 247 



in the country. The bar has usually been very powerful in America, not only 
as being the only class of educated men who are at once men of affairs and 
skilled speakers, but also because there has been no nobility nor territorial 
aristocracy to overshadow it. Politics have been largely in its hands, and 
must remain so as long as political questions continue to be involved in the 
interpretation of constitutions. For the first sixty or seventy years of the 
Republic the leading statesmen were lawyers, and the lawyers as a whole 
moulded and led the public opinion of the country." 

The legal profession has always and necessarily been a learned profession. 
The laws of any civilized community are sufficiently complicated to require 
special study. Besides, every aspect and interest of our social system re- 
ceives, at some time, the attention of the bar. Public, political, and economic 
questions, as well as those relating to the more private rights of the individ- 
ual, are presented to the lawyer for solution. All learning is laid under trib- 
ute to assist in their elucidation. The limits of civilization are onlv measured 
by man's wants and his ability to accomplish his desires. The constant strug- 
gle for advancement requires a constant change in the mutual relations of man- 
kind and a new and shifting application of the fundamental principles by 
which human society is governed. This necessitates a class of men trained 
in the science of law, skillful in the art of applying known principles of law to 
the varying circumstances of everyday life, and devoted to the good order and 
well-being of the community. 

Every civilized community has made provision for the training of this 
class of men. In the consummate jurisprudence of Rome great care was taken 
in the instruction of those who were to take a part in the administration of 
justice. In the early period legal instruction was imparted principally by 
private teaching, though lectures and practical demonstration were used as 
methods of tuition. At a later period public schools were established. Mr. 
Hunter, in his work on Roman law, says that one probably existed in the end 
of the fourth century. " In A. D. 425 Theodosius II. established one for the 
study of rhetoric, philosophy, and jurisprudence at Constantinople, prohibit- 
ing the professors from giving private instruction and all others from giving 
public instruction. In the time of Justinian we hear of another recognized 
public school of law at Berytus. On the promulgation of the Digest (A. D. 
533) Justinian addressed a constitution to the eight professors of law, re- 
marking on the ineffective practice of the schools in the past, and prescribing 
a reformed course to be followed in the future." Hitheito the law course had 
occupied four years, with a "miserably deficient" system, which Justinian 
superseded by a course of five years, beginning with the institutes of Justin- 
ian and ending with the constitutions in the Code. 

Sir William Blackstone, in his lecture at Oxford on the opening of the 
Vinerian course, deplores the fact that in the knowledge of the laws and con- 
stitution of their country the gentlemen of England were more remarkably 



248 History of Cattaraugus County. 

deficient than those of all Europe besides. He refers to the excellent law 
schools on the Continent, where the civil law was studied, and to which En- 
glish youth were sent to complete their education ; and he urges them to be- 
gin at home a systematic study of law drawn from English sources. Since his 
day no student has been without a guide in the study of English jurispru- 
dence. His commentaries have been the basis of legal study for more than a 
century, and they have been fitly supplemented to the American student by 
the great work of our own unrivalled Kent. With these great commentaries 
on English and American law every lawyer who aims at a complete survey of 
our jurisprudence must become acquainted, and the deeper he drinks at these 
fountains of law the more thoroughly will he become equipped for the proper 
discharge of the duties of his profession. 

By the first constitution of the State, which went into effect in 1777, it 
was provided (Art. 27) that "all attorneys, solicitors, and counselors at law, 
hereafter to be appointed, be appointed by the court, and licensed by the 
first judge of the court in which they shall respectively plead or practice, and 
be regulated by the rules and orders of said courts." On the 9th of October, 
1779, the Legislature passed an act (Chap. 12) providing that attorneys who 
had been practicing in the colony before the independence of the State was 
declared should prove their loyalty, and means were prescribed for making 
the necessary proof; and attorneys were prohibited from practicing until they 
were able to .satisfy the Supreme Court of their loyalty. A general act for the 
admission of attorneys was passed Februar)- 20. 1 787 ( Chap. 35), and it was en- 
acted "that no person shall henceforth be admitted a counselor, attorney, 
solicitor, advocate, or proctor, in any court, but such as shall have been 
brought up in the same court, or are otherwise well-practiced in soliciting causes, 
and have been found by their dealings to be skillful and of honest disposition ; 
and that every person hereafter to be admitted a counselor, attorney, solicitor, 
advocate, or proctor of any court shall, before such admission, be examined 
by the judges or justices of the same court, and such only as shall be found 
virtuous and of good fame, and of sufficient learning and ability, .shall be ad- 
mitted." Their names were required to be put on a roll or book, and they 
were required to take an oath " to truly and honestly demean " themselves in 
their business. They were required to render a bill for fees eight days be- 
fore bringing suit for the same. Another general act similar to this was 
passed in 1801 (Chap. 32); no other general statutes relating to the admission 
of attorneys were passed until the general revision of 1828. 

It seems that lawyers in the earlier days sometimes engaged in duels, and 
an act to suppress this practice was passed November 5, 1816, which, among 
other things, provided that any person who should be admitted to practice in 
any of the courts of the State should, in addition to the ordinary oath upon 
admission, take an oath that he had not been engaged in duelling, either by 
sending or accepting a challenge or by fighting a duel. By the revised 



OUAIJKKATInXS OV AtT( )kXl-:VS. 249 

statutes of 1830 it was provided that attorneys should be licensed and 
appointed by the several courts in which they intended to practice, and should 
hold their offices during life, subject to removal orsuspension for cause. The 
Supreme Court adopted rules regulating the admission of attorneys. An 
applicant must be a citizen of the United States, and must be examined under 
the direction of the court and appro\'ed for his good character and learning. 
He must also have served a regular clerkship of seven years in the office of a 
practicing attorney of the court, but if he had regularly pursued classical 
studies for four years, or for an\" sliorter period after the age of fourteen 
years, it' might be allowed in lieu of an equal term of clerkship. 

The constitution of 1846 removed many of the restrictions which had been 
placed upon admission to the legal profession, and substantially opened the 
profession to all by providing that "any male citizen of the age of twenty-one 
years, of good moral character, and who possesses the requisite qualifications 
of learning and ability, shall be entitled to admission to practice in all the 
courts of this State." This constitution re-organized the judiciary of the 
State and was followed by the judiciary act of 1847, intended to provide in 
detail for the re-organization of the courts in conformity to the constitutional 
changes. ]^y this act attorneys were to be admitted by the general term of 
the Supreme Court after examination by the justices thereof. The court 
was required, by general rules, to prescribe what should be deemed sufficient 
proof of good moral character, ■"and no term of clerkship or period of study 
shall be required." A new judiciary article of the constitution was adopted 
in 1869, which contained no pro\isions relating to the admission of attorneys. 
In 187 1 an act was passed on this subject (Chap. 486) which made it the 
duty of the judges of the Court of Appeals to prescribe such rules and regu- 
lations as they might deem proper in relation to the admission of attorneys, 
solicitors, and counselors in all the courts of this State. Rules were accord- 
ingly adopted which, with some modifications, are still in force. These rules 
require a three years' course of study unless the applicant is a gra:duate of a 
college or university, in which case an allowance of one year is to be made. 
"Any portion of time, not exceeding one year for graduates receiving the 
foregoing allowance and two years for other applicants actually spent in 
regular attendance upon the law lectures, or law school connected with any 
college or university having a department organized with competent 
professors and teachers in which instruction is regularly given, shall be 
allowed in lieu of an equal period of clerkship in the office of a practicing 
attorney of the Supreme Court, but in no case shall an applicant be entitled 
to admission as an attorney and counselor without having served a clerkship 
in the office of a practicing attorney of the Supreme Court for the period of at 
least one year." The applicant must either be a college graduate or he must 
have passed the examination prescribed by the Regents of the University of 
the State of New York, and he must pass a satisfactory examination upon the 

32 . 



HisTuKV OF Cattaraugus Cuuntv. 



law of pleadings, practice as regulated by the code of civil procedure, and by ■ 
the Supreme Court rules, and generally upon the laws of real and personal 
property, contracts, partnership, negotiable paper, principal and agent, prin- 
cipal and surety, insurance, executors and administrators, bailments, corpora- 
tions, personal rights, domestic relations, wills, equity jurisprudence, 
criminal law and the law of evidence, and such additional subjects as to the 
court or committee shall seem advisable. Such examination shall be 
conducted both orally and in writing, and when in writing the answers to the 
questions presented shall be written by the applicant in the presence of the 
court or of the committee. 

Thus, after the loose system under the constitution of 1846, we have 
again a system which aims to make the legal profession what it has always 
claimed to be — a learned profession. By Chap. 425 of the Laws of 1886 it was 
provided that the race or sex of the applicant shall constitute no reason for 
refusing admission to practice in the courts of this State as an attorney and 
counselor. 

In 1883 an act was passed which provided that "any male citizen of this 
State of good moral character, who shall have served a full term as surrogate 
of any county of this State, shall, on passing a satisfactory examination, be 
entitled to admission to the bar of this State." The examination was to be 
conducted in the same manner as in cases of ordinary applicants. 

It has been said that the judicial system of the State of New York is a 
growth of the soil. It has been developed from small beginnings, and has a 
mixed Dutch and English origin. The system, which is the pride of the Flm- 
pire State today is the result of many struggles, much halting and uncertainty, 
and numerous compromises. The judicial system of any commonwealth is an 
index of its character, customs, and civilization. The rude judicial tribunals 
of the early colonial periods were copied from those of European countries, 
with the modifications required by pioneer conditions and the necessary sim- 
plicity of provincial life. The development of those tribunals during two 
centuries and a half is an interesting study; and it will be profitable to trace 
briefly the development of our judicial system from the earliest Dutch occu- 
pation of Manhattan Island. In doing this the writer has freely gleaned from 
various sources, including the work of Hon. Charles P. Daly, of the New York 
Court of Common Pleas, who wrote a history of that court which is found in 
the first volume of E. D. Smith's Reports; and also from a series of articles 
written by Robert Ludlow Fowler, of New York, and published in volume 
nineteen of the Albany Lazu Journal. The documents relating to the colonial 
history of New York and the early statutes and constitutions have also been 
consulted. 

The colony of New Netherland was planted by the great West India Com- 
pany, a commercial corporation of Holland. This gigantic corporation was 
invested not only with vast commercial privileges, but also with the 



Early Judicial Tribunals. 251 



most comprehensive judicial powers. " It was exclusively entrusted with the 
admjiistration of justice in the colonies it should establish, having the right 
to appoint governors, officers of justice, and all other public officers; to main- 
tain order and police ; and generally, in the language of the charter, to do all 
that the sei'vice of those countries might require." From the discovery of 
Manhattan Island by Capt. Henry Hudson, in 1609, to 1623 no regular attempt 
had been made to establish a colony ; but in the latter year the colony of New 
Netherland was formally organized by May, the first director or governor ap- 
pointed by the Amsterdam Chamber, and a settlement was established at 
Manhattan, the present site of the city of New York. Whether during May's 
• administration or that of his successor, Verhulst, any provision was made for 
judicial tribunals can not no\\- be determined. The number of the colonists 
was so small, and they were so fully occupied in providing for their immediate 
wants, that there could be little, if any, occasion for organizing courts. 

Minuit came out as go\-ernor in 1626, and "he had, to assist him, a council 
of five, who, with himself, were invested with all legislative and judicial 
powers, subject to the supervision and appellate jurisdiction of the Chamber 
at Amsterdam." There was also attached to the body an officer well known 
in Holland by the name of the "schout fiscal." " He was a kind of an attorney- 
general, uniting with the power of a prosecuting officer the executive duties 
of a sheriff." The administration of justice was left to this body — the gover- 
nor, the council, and the schout fiscal — during the six years of Minuit's 
incumbency and the four of his successor. Van Twillcr; that is, from 1626 to 
1637. In what manner judicial proceedings were conducted is unknown. 
Records were kept under Van Twiller, but they are utterly lost. Governor 
Clinton, in 1816, suggested to the Legislature that an effort be made to col- 
lect information respecting our early colonial history. At that time the volum- 
inous records of the Dutch West India Company were in existence and would 
have been willingly presented to the State by the Dutch government, but 
when, in 1841, the State undertook to collect this information it was found 
that the records had been sold but a few years before as waste paper. We ma}- 
conjecture how the keen historical instinct of a Macaulay, a Motley, or an 
Irving would have revelled in this mass of material, bringing from it a clear 
statement of the affairs of this great corporation and incidentally the story of 
the early development of our commonwealth. 

William Kieft came out as governor in 1638, and he misgoverned the col- 
ony for nine years, ruling with a high hand, and retaining in his own hands 
the sole administration of justice. He was obliged to have a council, but he 
reduced it to one member, reserving two votes to himself. The administra- 
tion of Kieft was so oppressive and tyrannical that he was constantly in trouble 
with his people, who demanded the establishment of the courts to which they 
had been accustomed in Holland. This agitation finally resulted in Kieft's 
recall. He was succeeded in 1647 by Peter Stuyvesant, who immediately es- 



>52 History of Cattaraugus County. 



tablished a court of justice with power to decide "all cases whatsoever," sub- 
ject to appeal to the governor in certain cases. 

The desire for popular government had manifested itself very strongly 
during Kieft's administration; and soon after Stuyvesant's arrival he found 
the sentiment so vigorous that he was obliged to make some concessions. He 
ordered an election of eighteen men from different parts of the colony, and 
from these he selected nine "as interlocutors or trustees of the common- 
wealth" or "tribunes" of the people. "Tiiese nine men were to hold courts 
of arbitration weekly, and were to give advice to the director and council in 
all matters submitted to them. They received their appointments September 
25, 1647. Three were taken from the merchants, three from the burghers, and 
three from the farmers. Thus was preserved and continued the system of 
giving representation to the various vocations which formed the groundwork 
of municipal organization in the Netherlands." Three of their number at- 
tended in rotation upon every court day, to whom civil causes were referred 
as arbitrators. This tribunal of the nine men continued for seven years. But 
there was constant collision between the governor and the people. His gov- 
ernment became insufferably oppressive. The colonists appealed to the home 
company, and after five years of struggle succeeded in procuring an order for 
the establishment in the colony of a municipal court of justice, to be com- 
posed of one schouc, two burgomasters, and five schepens. A burgomaster was 
a kind of mayor; a schepen was an officer resembling an alderman; and a 
schout combined the functions of a sheriff and a district attorney. "On the 
2d of February, 1653, Governor Stuyvesant issued a proclamation apppoint- 
ing as burgomasters Arent Van Hatten and Martin Krieger, and as schepens 
Paulus L. Vander Grist, Maximilian Van Gheel, AUard Anthony, Peter W. 
Cowenhoven, and William Beekman ; Cornelius Van Tienhoven was schout 
and Jacob Kip was clerk." The magistrates met on the jth and gave notice 
that the court would meet at the city hall "every Monday morning at 9 
o'clock" for hearing and determining all disputes between parties as far as 
practicable. The city hall not being in readiness on the following Monday 
the next meeting took place four days afterwards at the fort, when the court 
was organized for the despatch of business and the proceedings were opened 
with prayer. This court was called the " Worshipful Court of the Schout, 
Burgomasters, and Schepens." Stuyvesant did not like the court. He and the 
members of it were frequently in collision, and he sometimes contemptuously 
referred to it as "the little bench of justice"; but it seems to be well estab- 
lished that " the court was composed, in the main, of magistrates who were 
men of intelligence, independence, and high moral character, evincing an un- 
swerving adherence to established rules and customs, sterling good sense, and 
a strong love of justice." The procedure in this court was simple and sum- 
mary, and strongly resembles, in many respects, the procedure established for 
the Roman people by the law of the TweKx- Tables. The court exercised 



Early Judicial Tribunals. 253 



unlimited civil and criminal jurisdiction, except the infliction of punishment 
in capital cases. When judgment was given against a defendant for a sum 
of money time was given for payment, usually fourteen days for the discharge 
of one-half and the remainder in a month. If he did not pay within the time 
fixed poceedings were taken to le\-y on his goods, which were taken by the 
officer and detained six days subject to redemption; at the end of that time, 
if not redeemed, the property was sold at auction in a very peculiar manner. 
"The officer lighted a candle and the bidding went on while it was burning, 
and he who had offered the most at the extinction of the candle was declared 
the purchaser." 

The court did a general business, and was also a court of admiralty and a 
court of probate in taking proof of last wills and testaments and in appoint- 
ing curators to take charge of the estates of widows and orphans. Some of 
its proceedings in the exercise of this branch of its jurisdiction will serve to 
illustrate how tenaciously the Dutch clung to old forms or legal ceremonies: 
as when a widow, to relie\'e herself from certain obligations, desired to 
renounce her husband's estate it is, in all such cases, recorded that the 
intestate's estate "has been kicked away by his wife with the foot" and that 
she has duly "laid the key on the coffin." 

It is worthy of note that the origin of a fee bill for regulating, by a fixed 
and positive provision of law, the costs of attorneys and other public officers 
is to be traced to Stuyvesant. On the 25th of January, 1658, he issued a proc- 
lamation with a preamble reciting the abuses that had arisen, by reason of 
the conduct of certain officers, in demanding excessive fees, and fixing, with 
detail, the fees thereafter to be charged. " It is then provided that the officers 
enumerated shall serve the poor gratis for God's sake, but may take from the 
wealtliy the fees specified." 

Courts of a similar character were established in other parts of the prov- 
ince. From all these local courts an appeal lay to the appellate court, com- 
posed of the Governor and Council at New Amsterdam. These constituted 
the judicial tribunals of New Netherland until the colony passed into the 
hands of the English, which event occurred on the 6th of September, 1664. 
Col. Richard NicoUs, the first English governor, immediately changed the 
name of the colony and city to New York, but no change was made in the 
courts until a later period. Early in the year 1665 a code prepared by Lord 
Chancellor Clarendon, called the " Duke's Laws," was promulgated and went 
into operation at Long Island and Westchester ; afterwards its provisions 
slowly made their way in New York and the remainder of the province. 

Under the " Duke's Laws" justices of the peace were commissioned for 
the various towns who were clothed with all the powers exercised by such of- 
ficers in England. A local court was created in each town for the trial of 
actions of debt or trespass, under five pounds. Si.x overseers, elected by the 
people, with a constable, or seven without him, constituted a quorum for the 



254 History of Cattaraugus County. 

transaction of business ; all questions were determined by a vote of the ma- 
jority, and if the overseers were evenly divided the constable had the casting 
vote. In 1666 the number of overseers was reduced to four, and any two of 
them, with the constable, held the court ; the town clerk was clerk of the 
court. 

The pro\ince was di\'ided into three ridings, known as the east, west, and 
north riding, and in each a Court of Sessions was established, which was held 
twice a year; that is, on the first, second, and third Wednesdays in March and 
the corresponding Wednesdays in June. The Court of Sessions was held by 
all the justices living in the riding. All actions at law and all criminal cases 
were tried before a jury. The jurors were drawn from the overseers, each 
town electing eight. " Seven jurors were empanelled for the trial of a cause 
and the verdict of a majority was sufficient, except in capital cases, when the 
court might empanel twelve, which was uniformly done, and the twelve were 
required to be unanimous." This court had both civil and criminal jurisdic- 
tion. It was also a court of probate and exercised the jurisdiction now in- 
trusted to surrogates. 

The highest tribunal in the province was the Court of Assize, or, as it was 
sometimes called, the General Assizes. It was held once a year in the city of 
New York by the Governor and Council and such, of the justices of the peace 
as saw fit to attend it. This court had original jurisdiction, civil, criminal, 
and equitable, and was the appellate court from the inferior tribunals. 

In June, 1665, the Court of Burgomasters and Schepens was abolished in the 
city of New York and a new court organized called the Mayor's Court, a title 
by which it was known for 146 years afterwards. The members of the court 
were the mayor, aldermen, and sheriff. The change was more formal than 
real; "it was merely altering the burgomaster into a mayor, the schepen into 
an alderman, and the schout into a sheriff." The records were directed to 
be kept in English and Dutch, and a jury of twelve was required to be 
empanelled for the trial of civil causes. 

There was no Court of Chancery, but matters in equity were heard in any 
of the courts organized in conformity to the Duke's Laws. On the gth of 
August, 1673, the city was retaken by the Dutch, who immediately under- 
took to re-establish the former judicial tribunals; but they held the city only a 
little more than a year when the English reconquered it and terminated the 
Dutch dynasty. The English courts were re-organized in 1674, and continued 
from that time, with various modifications, until 1685, when a momentous 
change occurred in the system of government. Dongan was appointed gov- 
ernor in 1682. For sixteen years the people of the colony had felt and often 
expressed the need of a representative assembly, by which they might exercise 
more power in the administration of the government. " Taxation only by 
consent " was one of the principles of government strenuously maintained by 
the Dutch, and they would not consent to any form of government where 



The First Assemulv of New York. 255 



they were denied a voice upon questions of taxation. Hence the constant 
agitation upon this subject, which was but a prelude to a remarkable change 
in the judicial history of New York, "the establishment of constitutional gov- 
ernment, the foundation of a provincial legislature." Upon the advice of 
William Penn King James yielded to numerous requests made by men of 
ever\' rank in the province and ordered Governor Dongan to call an assem- 
bly. Writs were issued by the governor for the election by the freeholders 
of deputies to a general assembly, to be held in the city of New York on the 
17th day of October, 1683. " On this day met the first General Assembly of 
New York — the reign of constitutional government had at last begun. Its 
first acts will never cease to be of interest in New York history. The Assem- 
bly of today is its successor. Changes of dynasty and government have 
passed by this institution, but it is almost the same now as at its origin." In 
tracing the institutions of our State Mr. Fowler remarks: "Our present law is 
the result, modified by certain accidents, of all that which has been happening 
among the European residents of this territory since their sojourn here. It is 
the result of natural development and not the result of political miracles, and 
if it is looked on in any other light it can not be understood." "The acts of 
the first Assembly are still discernible in the law of today, and some of the 
courts created then are still tribunals in the same jurisdiction, and precedents 
then are recognized still." 

Not only was the first Assembly an important element in the develop- 
ment of our jurisprudence, but its work makes an interesting chapter in the 
" story of liberty." Its first act was called " The charter of liberties and privi- 
leges granted by his Royal Highness to the inhabitants of New York and its 
dependencies," passed October 13, 1683. By this act the supreme legislative 
authority under his Majesty and Royal Highness the Duke of York was 
declared " to be and reside in a governour, councill, and the people mett in 
general assembly." It was afterwards objected by the Crown that these 
words, "the people," were not in any other of the constitutions in America. 
It is worthy of remembrance by every citizen of the Empire State that these 
great words — "the people," — the keystone of our political system, were first 
used in New York. The principal features of Magna Charta are contained in 
this act. It is said that eighteen nationalities were represented in the prov- 
ince under Stuyvesant, yet they all united in framing the " charter of liberties." 
The Duke of York signed this charter October 4, 1684, but kept it in his pos- 
session. While deliberating upon the matter Charles II. died and the duke, 
in February, 1685, became King James. As king he objected to certain pro- 
visions in the charter and withheld his royal assent ; nevertheless Dongan's 
Assembly stands as the pioneer in the struggle for a broader freedom for the 
people. 

This Assembly passed an act dividing the province into twelve counties. 
Its third act was entitled "An act to settle courts of justice." By this act four 



2^6 History of Cattaraugus Countv. 



distinct tribunals were created — "a petty court for the trial of small causes for 
every town ; a Court of Sessions for each county ; a Court of Oyer and Ter- 
miner and general gaol delivery ; and a Court of Chancery for the entire 
province." The Court of Assize was abolished. The fluctuation of the juris- 
diction of courts in matters of equity cognizance will be observed when we 
recall the fact that the Court of Assize, which was the first English court of 
the province, possessed both law and equity jurisdiction like the present Su- 
preme Court of the State. The Court of Oyer and Terminer had both civil 
and criminal jurisdiction, and a term was required to be held in each county 
once every year. 

In October, 1688, William of Orange landed in England and James II. fled 
from his kingdom. " For the third time a Dutchman reigned in New York." 
Henry Sloughter was the first governor of New York appointed by William 
and Mary, and he came out in 1691. By his commission he was authorized 
to call an assembly to be elected from the freeholders. The first provincial 
assembly in this reign met at New York on the 9th of April, 1691. The gov- 
ernor advised them to establish new courts of justice by act of Assembly. It 
passed in all fourteen laws, among them an act substantially re-enacting the 
" charter of liberties" of 1683. But the most important act of this Assembly, 
for our present purpose, was the act re-organizing the judicial system of the 
colony. This was prepared by James Graham, the speaker of the Assembly, 
and was introduced and passed on the 17th of April, 1691. Upon this statute 
Mr. Fowler, in his " Observations," comments as follows : "This act founded 
the Supreme Court. It seems strange that an act of so much importance, 
not only in the judicial history of the province, but in that of the State, 
should be so obscure and so difficult of access as it now is. Not only did this 
act erect the tribunal which still continues the great law court of the State, 
but it vested in it a jurisdiction which change of government and constant 
reforms and revolutions in procedure have been powerless to abridge in any 
material respect, for while its jurisdiction has been enlarged by its union with 
the Court of Chancery its ancient jurisdiction still remains unimpaired. The 
Supreme Court of the province was the instrument by which the great bod\- 
of the jurisprudence of the English common law was applied to New York. 
This court was the King's Bench of the province, where the King himself 
{coram ipso rcgc) theoretically sat in person to administer justice to his sub- 
jects in this part of his dominion. It was from the act of 1691 that the Su- 
preme Court of this State inherited not only the traditions of the Sa.xon Aula 
Regis, but the best fruits of centuries of English'*law. So wise were the pro- 
visions of that early act of 1691 that the patriotic framers of the first State 
government recognized its creation, the supreme court of the province, as an 
appropriate tribunal for a free people and a new order of things. And yet 
this act which founded the Supreme Court and invested it with a jurisdiction, 
the result of centuries, is now to be found onlv in the back of an obsolete 



Act Establishing the Supreme Court. 257 

Dookon Practice and in several rare volumes preserved as unique specimens of 
:he printer's art. But so important is this act in its every aspect that always 
n the history of the State it will be still the link which connected the judi- 
cial system of New York and the very dawn of English law." 

This act was regularly approved by the Governor and Council and became 
I law on the 6th of May, 1691. It is not generally accessible, and the editor 
of this chapter deems it of sufficient importance in our judicial history to war- 
rant its publication here in full : 

" An Act for Establishing Courts of Judicature, for the Ease and Benefit of each respective City, Town 
and County, within this Province. 

" Whereas, the orderly Regulation, and the establishment of Courts of Justice throughout this Prov- 
ince, as well in the respect of Time as Place, doth tend very much to the Honour and Diirnity of the 
Crown, as well as to the Ease and Benefit of the Subject, Be it Enacted by the Governour and Council and 
Representatives convened in General Assembly, and it is hereby Enacted and Ordained by the Authority 
of the same. That ever}- Justice of the Peace that resides within any Town or County within this Province, 
are hereby fully impowered and authorized to have Cognizance of all Causes. Cases of Debt, and Trespass 
to the value of Forty Shillings or under ; which Causes and Cases shall be heard, tried, and finally deter- 
mined without a jury, by every Justice of the Peace that resides within any Town or County, within this 
Province; he taking to his Assistance, at the time of his hearing and determining such Cause or Cases of debt 
and Trespass to the value of Forty Shillings and under, one of the Freeholders of the Town and place where 
the cause of Action doth arise. The Process of warning shall be a summons under the band of the Justice, 
directed to the Constable of the Town or Precinct, or any deputed by him, where the Party complained 
against doth live. Winch Summons being Personally served, or left at the Defendant's House two days 
before the Day of Hearing ot the Plaint, shall be sufficient .\uthority to and for the said Justice, assisted 
with one ot the Freeholders, as aforesaid, to proceed on such Cause and Causes, and determine the same in 
the Defendant's absence; and to grant execution thereon against the Defendant's Person, or tor want 
thereof, his Estate, which the Constable of the Town or Precinct, or his Deputy, shall or may serve. 

"Always provided, and bo it further Enacted, by the Authority aforesaid, That if the Plaintiff or 
Defendant shall desire a Jury, it shall be allowed, but at the proper cost and charges of the Person desiring 
the same. 

" And for the Increase of Virtue, and Discouraging of Evil-doers throughout this Province, Be it 
further Enacted, by the Authority aforosail, that there shall be held and kept in every respective City 
and County within this Province, lat the Times and Places hereafter named and expressed.) a Court of 
Sessions of the Peace, that is to say, 

" For the City and County of New York, at the City Hall ot the said City, four times every year, viz. 
The fust Tuesday in May, the Hrst Tuesday in August, the flrst Tuesday in Xovember, and the first Tuesday 
ill February. 

" For the City and County of Albany, at the City Hall of the said City, the first Tuesday in June, the 
first Tuesday in October, and the first Tuesday in February. 

" For Westchester, at Westchester, the first Tuesday in June, and the first Tuesday in December. 

" For Ulster, at Kingston, the Hrst Tuesday in September, and the first Tuesday in March. 

" For the County of Richmond, at the Court House, the flrst Tuesday in September, and the first Tues- 
day in March. 

"For Kings County, at Flatbush (fdiVj.s Midwout), the second Tuesday in May, and the second Tuesday 
in November. 

" For Queens County, at Jamaica, the third Tuesday in May, and the third Tuesday in September. 

" For Suffolk County, at Southold, the last Tuesday in September. 

"And the last Tuesday in March at Southampton. Orange County to be annexed to the County of 
New York, and Dutchess County to the County of Ulster. 

" Which Sessions of the Peace shall onl.v hold and continue for the space and time of two Dayes, and 
no longer. 

" And tor the more regular and beneficial Distribution of Justice to the Inhabitants of each respective 
City and County within this Province, Be it further Enacted by the .Authority aforesaid. That there be kept 
and held a Court ot Common Pleas in each respective City and County within this Province, at the Times 
and Places hereafter named and Expressed : That is to say. At such Places in each respective County as the 
said Court of Sessions are to be kept ; and to begin the next day after the Sessions terminates, and only to 
hold and continue for the Space and time of two days, and no longer; And that there be one Judge, with 
three .Justices, in each County, Appointed and Commissionated to hold the same Court of Pleas; Three 
whereof to be a Quorum. And that the several and respective Courts, hereby established, shall have Juris- 
diction to Hear, Try, and finally to Determine all Actions or Cause of Actions, and all Matters, and Things, 
and Causes Tryable at the Common Law of what Nature or Kind soever. 

33 



258 History of Cattaraugus County. 

"Provided alwayes. and it is hereby Enacted, that there shall not be any" Appeal or Removal by Habeas 
Corpus, of any pei-son, or of any Action or Suit, or of any Judgment or Execution, that shall be determined 
in this Court to the value of Twenty Pounds or under, anything contained herein to the contrary in any 
ways notwithstanding. 

" Provided alwayes, and it is hereby Enacted, That the Courts of Mayor and Aldermen of the respective 
Cities of New York and Albany, shall have in each of their respective Cities the Power and Authority to 
Hear, Try, and finally to Determine all such Actions and Suits as is commonly cognizahle before them, 
from which final Determination, there shall not be any Appeal or Removal by Habeas Corpus, of any 
Person, or of any Action or Suit, or of any Judgment or Execution, to the value of Twenty Pounds, or 
under, any thing contained herein to the contrary in any ways notwithstanding. 

"To which respective Courts of Common Pleas there shall belong, and be appointed, and Commission- 
ated for that purpose, one Clark of the Court, lo draw, enter, and keep the Records, Declarations, Pleas, 
and Judgments, then to be had and made— And one Marshal or Cryer of the Court, to call the Jurors, and 
proclaim the Commands and Orders of the Court. 

" And for the more regular Proceedings in the said Court, all Processes and Writs, of what nature 
soever, for the command of Persons to appear, and to execute the Judgments and Executions of the re- 
spective Courts aforesai'l, shall be directed to the respective Sheriffs of each City and County within this 
Province, and executed by them, their Under-Sheritts, or Deputy or Deputies. And all Processes and Writs 
for Actions betwixt Party and Party in the said Court shall issue out of the Office of the Clark of the Court 
in each City and County respectively, signe I Per Curiam. 

"And that their Majesties Subjects inhabiting within this Province, may have all the good, proper, and 
just wayes and means, for the securing and recovering their just Rights, and Demands,within the same. Be 
it further Enacted, and it is hereby Enacted and Ordiiined, by Authority aforesaid. That there shall be held 
and kept, a Supream Court of Judicature, which shall be duly and constantly kept, at the city of New 
York, and not elsewhere, at the several and respective times hereafter mentioned. And that there be five 
Justices at least, appointed and commissionated to hold the same Court. Two whereof, together with one 
Chief Justice, to be a Quorum. Which Supream Court is hereby fully Impowered and Authorized to have 
Cognizance of all Pleas, Civil, Criminal, and Mixt, as fully and amply to all intents and purposes whatso- 
ever, as the Courts of King's Bench, Common Pleas and Exchequer, within their Majesties Kingdom of 
England, have or ought to have. In and to which Supream Court all and every Person and Persons what- 
soever, shall or may, if they shall so see meet, commence or remove any Action or Suit, the Debt or Dama- 
ges laid in such Action or Suit being upwards of Twenty Pounds, and not otherwise ; or shall or may by 
warrant. Writ of Error, or Certiorari, remove out of any of the respective Courts of Mayor and Alder- 
men, Sessions and Common Pleas, any Judgment, Information, or indictment there hud or depending ; 
and may correct Errors in Judgment, or Revise the same, if there be just cause. Provided alwayes, that 
the Judgment removed, shall be upwards the value of Twen y Pounds. 

"Always provided, and be further Enacted by the Authority aforesaid. That this Supream Court shall 
be duely and constaiftly Kept once every six Moneths, and no of tener ; That is to say. On the first Tuesday 
of October and on the first Tuesday of April annually, and every Year, at the City Hall of the said City of 
New York ; provided they shall not sit longer than eight dayes. 

"And be it further Enacted by the Authority aforesaid. That it shall not be lawful for any Person or 
Persons whatsoever, appointed, or elected, or commissionated to be a Justice or Judge of the aforesaid 
to ctecute or officiate his or their said place or Otliee until such Time, as he or they shall respectively 
take the Oathes appointed by Act of Parliament, to be taken instead of the Oathes of Allegiance and 
Supremacy, and Subscribe the Test in open Court. 

"And be it further Enacted by the Authority aforesaid. That all and every of the Justices or Judges of 
the several Courts before mentioned, be and are hereby sulliciently impowed to make, order, and establish 
all such Rules and Orders, for the more orderly practicing and proceeding in their said Courts, as fully and 
amply to all intents and purposes whatsoever, as all or any of the said Judges of the several Courts of the 
Kings Bench, Common Pleas, and Exchequer in England legally do. 

" Provided alwayes, and be it further Enacted by the Authority aforesaid. That no Person's Riorht or 
Property shall be by any of the aforesaid Courts determined, except where matters of Fact are either 
acknowledged, or passeth by the Defendants Fault for want of Plea or Answer, Unless the Fact be found 
by the Verdict of Twelve Men of the Neighborhood, as it ought of Right to be done by the Law. 

" Be it further Enacted by the Authority aforesaid. That there shall be a Court of Chancery within 
this Province, which said Court shall have power to Hear and Determine all Matters of Equity, and shall 
be esteemed and accounted The High Court of Chancery of this Province. 

"And be it further Enacted by the Authority aforesaid. That the Govemour and Council be the said 
High Court of Chancery, and hold and keep the said Court ; and that the Governour may depute, nominate, 
and appoint in his stead, a Chancellor, and be assisted with such other Persons of the Council as shall by 
him be thought fit and convenient, together with all necessary Officers, Clerks, and Registers, as to the said 
High Court of Chancery are needful. 

" Provided alwayes, and it is hereby further Enacted by the Authority aforesaid. That any Free-holder, 
Planter, Inhabitant, or Sojourner within this Province, may have Liberty, if he or they see meet, to make 
his or their Appeal or Appeals, from any Judgment obtained against him or them, in case of Error, in the 
several Courts aforesaid, in such manner and form as is hereafter expressed, that is to say. From the Court 



The Courts and Their Officers. 259 

of Mayor and Aldermen, and Courts of Common Pleas, To the Supream Court, for any Judgment above the 
value of Twenty Pounds : And from the Supream Court at New York, to the Goveruour and Council, for 
any JuJ.iment above the value of One Hundred Pounds ; And from the Governour and Council, To Their 
Majesties Council, for any Decree or Judgment above the value of Three Hundred Pounds, as in their 
Majesties Letters Patent to his Excyllency doth and may more fully appear. Alwayes provided. That the 
Party or Parties so -Appealing shall first pay all Costs of such Judcrment or Decree from which the Appeal 
ariseth, and enter into Recognlzeance, with two sulBcieutsurities. for double the value of the Debt, Matter, 
or Thing recovered, or obtained by Judgment or Decree against him or them, to the said Court from which 
they Appeal, That they will prosecute the said Appeal or Appeals with effect and make Return thereof 
within twelve months after the said Appeal or Appeals here made. And if default happen thereon then 
Execution to issue out upon the Judgment, against the Party, or their Sureties, in course, without any 
Scire facias. Provided alwayes. That the Establishing of these Courts shall not be or remain longer in 
force, than for the time and space of two Years, and until the End of the sitting of the next As.sembly, 
after the expiration of the said two Years." 

Immediately upon the passage of this act the Supreme Court was or- 
ganized and Joseph Dudley appointed chief justice ; Thomas Johnson, second 
judge; and William Smith, Stephen Van Cortland, and William Pinthorne, 
associate judges. The act took effect but for ten years, but it was re-enacted 
from time to time and continued by proclamations, and was in force, with 
some modifications, at the time of the Re\olution and organization of the 
State government in 1777. 

By the first constitution of 1777 the existing courts were recognized and 
continued, and a new court for the trial of impeachments and the correction 
of errors was established, familiarlj- known as the " Court of Errors," which 
continued down to the adoption of the constitution of 1846. Sheriffs and 
coroners were to be annually appointed and no person could hold either of 
said offices more than four years successively, and the sheriff could not hold 
any other ofifice at the same time. It was also provided that registers and 
clerks in chancery be appointed by the chancellor, the clerks of the Supreme 
Court by the judges of said court, the clerk of the Court of Probates by the 
judge of said court, and the register and marshal of the Court of Admiralty 
by the judges of the Admiralty. It was also provided that new commissions 
should be issued to judges of the County Courts (other than the first judge) 
and to justices of the peace once at least in ever\- three years. The Legisla- 
ture was prohibited from instituting any new courts but such as should proceed 
according to the course of the common law. 

As already stated, the Supreme Court was at first composed of five judges. 
From 1701 to 1758 the number was three — a chief justice and two associate 
justices. In the latter year a fourth was added. It may perhaps indicate 
somewhat the growth of the State to note that there are now forty-five jus- 
tices of the Supreme Court, besides the Court of Appeals, the various city 
and county courts, and the inferior local tribunals in towns and villages. The 
judicial machinery of the State has assumed vast proportions. In 177S the 
Supreme Court was re-organized. The judges were empowered to devise a 
seal and the proceedings were directed to be in the name of the people of the 
State instead of that of the king. The judges were appointed by the Council 
of Appointment and their terms of office limited to the age of sixty years. It 



26o History of Cattaraugus County. 

is said that in 1741 the duty of revising the laws in force, with notes and ref- 
erences, was assigned to Daniel Horsmanden, a justice of the Supreme Court, 
but this, from his advanced age, was not performed. This is said to have 
caused the adoption of the principle of limiting the office of the judges to 
sixty years of age to avoid the inconvenience that might result from the in- 
firmities of advanced age. This limitation has since been extended to the 
last day of December next after a judge shall be seventy years of age. 

Of the early courts it is said that the judges and those practicing before 
them wore no particular costume, nor was there any distinction or difference of 
degrees among the lawyers. Persons who had served seven years under an 
attorney, or had taken a collegiate course and ser\-ed a three years' appren- 
ticeship, were granted license to practice in the Supreme Court by the gov- 
ernor under his seal, on the recommendation of the chief justice, and on 
subscribing the usual oaths. The first rules of the Supreme Court were drawn 
by Judge Egbert Benson, and were adopted at the April term of 1796. The 
decisions of the Supreme Court have been reported since the January term of 
1799. In 1804 an act was passed providing for an official reporter of the 
court, and William Johnson was first appointed to this office. He also be- 
came the first reporter of the Court of Chancery and began reporting for that 
court in 1814. 

Important and organic changes were made in the Supreme Court by the 
constitution of 1821. The court was to consist of a chief justice and two jus- 
tices, any of whom might hold the court. The State was to be divided into 
not less than four nor more than eight circuits, for each of which a circuit 
judge was to be appointed, who had the powers of a justice of the Supreme 
Court at chambers and in the trial of issue and in Courts of Oyer and Termi- 
ner. The judges were appointed by the governor with the advice and con- 
sent of the senate, and held office during good behavior, or until they arrived 
at the age of sixty years. Clerk's offices were continued at New York, Al- 
bany, and Utica. In 1829 an additional clerk's office was established at Can- 
andaigua, which was removed in 1831 to Geneva and in 1841 to Rochester. 
The clerks were appointed for three years, unless sooner removed. 

A radical re-organization of our judicial system was effected by the consti- 
tution of 1846. The old Supreme Court and the Court of Chancery were 
abolished, and our Supreme Court created with full legal and equitable juris- 
diction. Intermediate general terms were provided, to which appeals from 
the lower branches of the Supreme Court were carried. A Court of Appeals 
was also created, taking the place of the old "Court of Errors," which was 
abolished. A further re-organization of these courts was accomplished by an 
amendment to the constitution, which was adopted in 1869; and the system 
then established is still in e.xistence. The Court of Appeals is composed of a 
chief judge and six associate judges, and it has a clerk and a reporter. The 
State is divided into eight judicial districts, each with the following number 



Civil Organizations of the State. 261 

of justices of the Supreme Court : First district, six ; second, six ; third, five ; 
fourth, five ; fifth, six ; sixth, five ; seventh, six ; and eighth, six ; making 
forty-five in all. The State is also divided into five judicial departments, each 
with a General term, composed of justices of the Supreme Court. Each justice 
may hold Special terms. Circuit Courts, and Courts of Oyer and Terminer in 
any county in the State. 

The State of New York formerly had a Court of E.xchequer, originally cre- 
ated by Governor Dongan in 1685, discontinued in 1691, and re-organized as a 
branch of the Supreme Court in 1786 " for the better levying and accounting 
for fines, forfeitures, issues, amercements, and debts due to the people of the 
State." The court ceased to e.xist January i, 1830. There was also a Court 
of Admiralty, which was discontinued upon the adoption of the federal con- 
stitution in 1789. 

The first Assembly of the colony of New York met on the 17th of Octo- 
ber, 16S3. The second act of the Assembly, passed November ist, divided 
the pro\ince into shires and counties. The counties were twelve in number, 
viz.: Albany, Cornwall, Dukes, Dutchess, Kings, New York, Orange, Queens, 
Richmond, Suffolk, Ulster, and Westchester. The second Assembly, which 
met in 1691 under authority of the new sovereigns, William and Mary, passed 
a resolution declaring the legislation of the previous Assembly null and void. 
This resolution was never presented to the Governor and Council for their 
concurrence as was required by law, and therefore is said not to have had any 
effect. By an act passed October i, 1691, re-organizing the counties, the 
county of Albany was " to contain the manor of Rensselaervvyck, Schenec- 
tada, and all the Villages, Neighborhoods, and Christian Plantations on the - 
east side of Hudson's River from Roeloff Jansen's Creek, and on the west 
side from Sawyer's Creek to the outmost end of Saraghtoga." Subsequent 
legislation extended the boundaries of Albany county so as to embrace all of 
New York to its northern and western limits. An act was passed March 12, 
1772, erecting Tryon county from a portion of Albany county. The new 
county included all of the province west of the Delaware river and a line 
extending northwardly through Schoharie county and along the eastern 
boundaries of the present counties of Montgomery, Fulton, and Hamilton, 
and thence continuing north to the Canada line. "The county was named in 
honor of William Tryon, the last royal governor of the province whose 
authority was recognized by the people of New York. This name was dis- 
continued September 2, 1784, and that of Montgomery was substituted in 
honor of the hero who-fell in the assault on Quebec." 

March 7, 1788, the Legislature passed an act dividing the State into coun- 
ties. By this act all that part of the State bounded easterly by the counties 
of Ulster, Albany, Washington, and Clinton, southerly by the State of Penn- 
sylvania, and westerly and northerly by the west and north bounds of the 
State was erected into a county called Montgomery. This embraces the 



262 History of Cattaraugus County. 



present territory of Cattaraugus county. By Chap. 64, passed the same day, 
the Leo-islature divided the counties into towns. By this act that part of 
Montgomery county embracing the present county of Cattaraugus and con- 
siderable other territory was erected into a town called White's Town. In 
1789 Montgomery was divided, and the western part, embracing Cattaraugus 
and other counties, was erected into a separate county called Ontario. April 
3, 1801, another general act was passed dividing the State into counties, by 
which Ontario county was continued substantially as originally erected. 
April 7th of the same year an act was passed dividing the State into towns, 
by which it was provided that "All that part of the county of Ontario which 
lies westerly of the following described line, viz. : Beginning at the mouth of 
the Genesee river on Lake Ontario, thence running southerly up 'the middle 
of said river, following the courses thereof, to the confluence of the said river 
with the Canaseraga creek, and thence south on the Indian line (so called), 
beino- a meridian line, to the north line of the State of Pennsylvania, shall be 
and continue a town by the name of Northampton." March 30, 1802, the 
county of Genesee was erected, to embrace all that part of Ontario which had 
been included in the town of Northampton. By the same act the town of 
Batavia was erected, forming a part of Genesee county and embracing the 
present county of Cattaraugus and other territory. 

April II, 1804, Batavia was divided into four towns: Wiilink, Erie, Chau- 
tauqua, and Batavia. By this division the town of Batavia as then estab- 
lished would include the present town of Portville, the eastern half of Hins- 
dale, Ischua, Farmersville, and Freedom, and the greater part of Lyndon. 
The remainder of Freedom, Farmersville, Lyndon, Ischua, and Hinsdale, all 
of the towns of Olean, Allegany, Humphrey, Franklinville, Machias, York- 
shire, Carrolton, Great Valley, and Ellicottville, with the southeast part of 
East Otto and all of Ashford except the northwest corner between the Cat- 
tarauCTus and Connoirtoirauley creeks, were then included in Wiilink. All 
the remainder of Cattaraugus (that is, the western half of the county), with 
the eastern range of townships in Chautauqua county, were covered by the 
town of Erie. The town of Chautauqua included all the territory within the 
present county of the same name except the tenth range of townships. April 
7, 1806, Allegany county was erected from Genesee, and its boundaries in- 
cluded Olean, Portville, Allegany, Hinsdale, Ischua, Humphrey, Franklin- 
ville, Lyndon, Farmersville, Machias, Yorkshire, and Freedom in Cattaraugus 
county. 

On the iith of March, 180S, an act was passed which provided that that 
part of Cattaraugus county embraced in the towns above named be annexed 
to the county of Genesee. This restored to Genesee county all the territory 
now within the county of Cattaraugus which had previously been held by 
Alleo-anv. This act also provided for the erection of the county of Cattarau- 
gus, as follows: "That that part of the county of Genesee bounded north by 



Civil and Juhicial Organizations. 263 

the division line, being part of the south bounds of the county of Niagara, 
west by the east bounds of the county of Chautauqua aforesaid, south by the 
north bounds of Pennsylvania, and east by the west bounds of the county of 
Allegany aforesaid, be erected into a county by the name of Cattaraugus." 
Another act dividing the State into counties was passed March 6, 1813, 
by which the boundaries of Cattaraugus were continued substantially as given 
in the act of 1808. The present boundaries of the county are defined in that 
part of the revised statutes of 1828 providing for the division of the State 
into counties, and are as follows: " Easterly by the county of Allegany; north- 
erly by the counties of Genesee and Erie ; westerly by a meridian line between 
the ninth and tenth ranges of townships of the Holland Company's purchase ; 
and southerly by the south bounds of the State." May 19, 1841, the 
southern part of Genesee county was erected into a county called Wyoming, 
which is its present name, and which is a part of the northern boundary of 
Cattaraugus. 

ORGANIZATION OF THE COURTS. 

The act of March 11, 1808, already referred to, which erected the county, 
provided that Chautauqua and Cattaraugus counties should be organized and 
for all county purposes should act in conjunction with the county of Niagara 
as a part thereof, and should respectively remain so organized until they re- 
spectively should contain five hundred taxable inhabitants qualified to vote 
for member of Assembly; the number to be ascertained by the supervisors 
from the assessment rolls and certified to the governor, and after filing such 
certificate such counties were to be organized as separate counties. This act 
required the first Court of Common Pleas and General Sessions of the Peace 
(including for this purpose Chautauqua and Cattaraugus) to be held at the 
house of Joseph Langdon in the village of New Amsterdam. This act also 
provided that the governor should in his discretion appoint three persons 
commissioners to "explore the counties of Chautauqua and Cattaraugus and 
designate and fix a site for a court house and jail in and for the said counties 
respectively, and file a certificate in the clerk's office of the county of Niagara." 
The act also provided that the supervisors of the counties of Chautauqua and 
Cattaraugus, at their first annual meeting after their organization, should raise 
a sum not exceeding $1,500 for building a court house and jail. The act further 
provided that after the organization of the county "there shall be held a Court 
of Common Pleas and General Sessions of the Peace, and that there shall be 
three terms of said Court of Common Pleas and two terms of the General 
Sessions of the Peace in each year. The terms of the Common Pleas to begin 
the third Tuesday of February and the fourth Tuesdays of June and Novem- 
ber, and the General Sessions of the Peace to begin also the fourth Tuesdays 
of June and November, and may continue to be held until the several Satur- 
days next following, inclusive." The courts were to possess the same power 



264 History of Cattaraugus Couxtv. 

and jurisdiction as like courts in other counties. The courts were directed to 
be held at the court house when it should be in readiness, and until then to be 
held at such place as the supervisors may appoint. The act further provided 
that no Circuit Courts or Courts of Oyer and Terminer and general jail de- 
livery should be held in either of said counties until the same in the opinion of 
the justices of the Supreme Court should be necessary. 

This act also provided that "the county of Cattaraugus be erected into a 
town by the name of Olean, and that the first town meeting in the town of 
Olean be held at the dwelling house of Joseph McClure in said town." By 
Chap. 173, Laws of 1812, passed June i6th, the town of Olean was divided into 
two towns, the new town to be called Ischua. By this act the county of Cat- 
taraugus was annexed to the county of Allegany for county purposes, and the 
inhabitants of the county were exempted from serving as jurors or constables 
in courts of record for the term of three years, or until the county should con- 
tain five hundred ta.xable inhabitants and should be separately organized. By 
an act passed April 13, 1814, it was provided that "All that part of the 
county of Cattaraugus lyingand situated east of the east boundary line of 
the 7th range of townships of the Holland Land Company's lands in the 
county of Cattaraugus shall be annexed to and is hereby considered as a 
part of the county of Allegany for all purposes whatsoever." This part of 
the county \\'as to remain in two towns, Olean and Ischua. The remainder of 
the county was annexed to the county of Niagara, and was erected into a 
town called Perry. 

The organization of the county was completed in 1817 by an act entitled 
"An Act Organizing the County of Cattaraugus," passed March 28th, which 
provided "that the freeholders and inhabitants of the county of Cattaraugus 
shall have and enjoy the rights, powers, and privileges which the freeholders 
and inhabitants of any other county in this State are by law entitled to have 
and enjoy." The act also provided for a new Court of Common Pleas and 
General Sessions of the Peace to be held on the first Tuesdays in February, 
July, and November, and which might continue to be held until the Saturdays 
following, inclusive. No Circuit Courts and Courts of Oyer and Terminer 
and general jail delivery were to be held until the justices of the Supreme 
Court should deem it necessary. It was also provided that courts should be 
held at some convenient place from time to time, to be appointed for that 
purpose by the judges for the time being, and that the prisoners of the county 
be confined in the jail of Allegany county until provision was otherwise made 
for them. It was also provided that after holding the first term of the Court 
of Common Pleas deeds, mortgages, etc., should be recorded in the clerk's 
office of the county. 

Timothy H. Porter was appointed first judge and James Brooks, Ashbel 
Freeman, Francis Green, and William Price were appointed associate judges 
of the first Court of Common Pleas. Judge Brooks took the oath of office 



The Coluxtv Seat. 



May 27, 1S17, Judges Freeman and Green June 5th and Judge Price June 
1 8th of the same year. Judge Porter did not take the oath of office until 
July 1st, the day on which the first court was opened. The associate judges 
made the following order fixing the place for holding the first term of the 
court : 

'• Whereas, Ah act (if the Legislature of the State of New York, for organizinsr the county of Cattarau- 
gus, passed March 28, 1817, has made it a duty of the judges for the time being to appoint a place for holding 
the Courts of Common Plo;is and General Sessions of the Peace, in and for said county : 

"Therefore, we, Francis Green, Ashbel Freeman, and James Brooks, judges of the Court of Common 
Pleas, in and for the county aforesaid, convened at the house of William Baker, in the town of Glean, in 
the county aforesaid, have (conformably to the act above mentioned) appointed, aul by these presents do 
appoint and declare, the house of William Baker, in the said town of Glean, in the county afoiesaid, to be 
the place for holding the first Court of Common Pleas and General Sessions of the Peace, in and for the 
county of Cattaraugus. 

'■ In witness whereof we have hereunto set our hands this .5th day of June, 1817. 

(Signed) "Francis Gkeen, 

" ASHBEL FKEEMA^f, 

"James Brooks." 
THE COUNTY SE.VT. 

As already .stated, the act erecting the county of Cattaraugus authorized 
the governor to appoint three commissioners to "explore" the county and 
locate a suitable site for the court house and jail. Jonas Williams and Asa 
Ransom, of Chautauqua county, and Isaac Sutherland, of Cattaraugus, were 
selected to perform this duty. "At that time the entire county was nearly an 
unbroken wildcrnc.-is, without towns or roads. They started on their mission 
with the \-cry huulabie idea of fixing the site of the future capital as nearly as 
possible in the exact center of the county. After a tedious journey, and evi- 
dently much careful calculation, they fixed on the present site of Ellicottville, 
and a large ironwood post was set up in the wilderness on the bank of Great 
Valley creek to mark the chosen spot from which the edicts and manifestoes 
of the new county magnates were thereafter to be issued." It was further 
provided that the bills of the commissioners for such services be presented to 
the Board of Super\isors at the first annual meeting after the organization of 
the county. At the meeting of the Board of Supervisors held October 7, 
1818, Mr. Sutherland presented a bill for services as commissioner in October, 
1808, in which he charged for ten days at §2 a day and $10 for expenses, in 
all $30, upon which he charged $12.90 interest. The whole account, amount- 
ing to S42.90, was ordered paid by the board. 

April 21, 1818, an act was passed directing the Board of Supervisors to raise 
$1,500 for building a court house in Ellicottville, and the board was authorized 
at its next annual meeting to cause to be levied on the freeholders and inhab- 
itants of the county said sum with the addition of five per cent, on a dollar for 
collecting the same. This act also provided that until the court house should 
be erected courts were to be held at the house of Baker Leonard, in the vil- 
lage of Ellicottville, in the town of Ischua. By Chap. 38, of the Laws of 1819, 
provision was made for building a jail in Ellicottville, and David Goodwin, 

34 



266 History of Cattaraugus County. 

Baker Leonard, and Benjamin Waterman were appointed commissioners to 
superintend its erection. Tlie site for the jail had already been designated 
and Seymour Bouton, Thomas Morris, and Silas Nash had been. paid $5 each 
for services in fixing the site. At a meeting of the Board of Supervisors held 
at the house of Baker Leonard, October 5, 1819, a resolution was adopted 
reciting that the supervisors had designated lots 38 and 39 in the village of 
Ellicottville whereon to build a court house and jail for the county, and had 
requested a deed of the premises from the Holland Land Company, and ap- 
pointing Ebenezer Lockwood, supervisor of Olean, a committee to call on the 
Holland Company's agent at Batavia and ask for and receive a good and suffi- 
cient deed to the supervisors of the county and their successors in office. The 
records of the board also show that a deed of the premises was presented to 
the board at their adjourned meeting on the 2d of November, 18 19, and had 
been duly considered, but the deed not meeting with their approval "it was 
unanimously resolved that the deed or instrument contains provision that 
may at some future period be injurious to the interests of the inhabitants of 
the county and inconsistent with the rights and privileges of its citizens, and 
that a conveyance vesting the fee of the lands described in the aforesaid in- 
strument fully and unconditionally in the supervisors of Cattaraugus county 
and their successors in office forever ought to be obtained " ; and the clerk was 
directed to return the deed to the Holland Land Company. In due time an- 
other deed was received from the company, dated January 17, 1820, which 
was accepted by the Board of Supervisors at their annual meeting October 3, 
1820, and was recorded in the county clerk's office October 4, 1820. 

A building to be used as a court house and jail was erected in 1820 on the 
public square in Ellicottville. The lower story was used as a jail and the sec- 
ond story as the court room or court house. The jail is described as being 
formed of an inner and outer structure of scored logs, there being left between 
these a considerable space which was solidly filled with stones as a means 
of greater security against the escape of prisoners; the building stood upon a 
stone foundation, which was filled in the same manner over the entire surface 
beneath the floors. The jail was divided by a hall through the center. On 
one side were the cells and on the other two large debtors' rooms, each twenty 
feet square. At the November term of the Court of Common Pleas, 1S20, it 
was ordered "that all process hereafter to be made returnable in this court be 
made returnable at the court house in the town of Ischua, and that the build- 
ing now erected in said town for a prison and court house shall in all pro- 
cess and pleadings be denominated the court house in and for the county of 
Cattaraugus." This building was destroyed by fire in the winter of 1829. By 
Chap. 149 of the Laws of 1829 the sum of $6,000 was appropriated to build a 
court house and jail, separately, in Ellicottville, and the Board of Supervisors 
were directed to raise the money for that purpose. Alson Leavenworth, Ben- 
jamin Chamberlain, and Benjamin Searl were appointed commissioners to 



The County Seat. 267 



superintend the building, and the act provided that the next term of court 
should be held at the house of Lothrop Vinton in Ellicottville. The court 
house was built during the same year and so nearly completed that the Janu- 
ary term of court for 1830 was held in it. By an act passed April 5, 1830, the 
comptroller was authorized to loan Cattaraugus county $3,300 belonging to 
the capital of the common school fund at six per cent, interest, to enable the 
county to pay for the court house and jail built in accordance with the act of 
1829. By an act passed March 25, 1831, a further sum of $1,200 was appropri- 
ated to complete the court house and jail, and William Stilwell, Andrew Mead, 
and Abner Chase were appointed commissioners to superintend the comple- 
tion of the buildings. 

A special session of the Board of Supervisors was held at the court house 
in Ellicottville on January 6, 1865. At this meeting James Freeland, super- 
visor from the town of Allegany, offered the following resolution, which was 
adopted by a vote of fourteen to twelve: 

" Reanlrcd, That we, as a Board of Supervisors of Cattarauff us county, respeetf ully petition the Legisla- 
ture of this State to locate the county site of the said county at some place on the line of the Erie railway 
in said county, between Clean an I Dayton. Said site to be located by three commissioners appointed by 
the governor of this State, and that proper action be taken bj' the Legislature to carry into effect the 
removal of said site as soon as it can properly be done." 

April 17, 1865, the Legislature passed an act entitled "An Act to Remove 
the County Site of Cattaraugus County to the Erie Railway and Locate and 
Procure a new Site and to Build County Buildings thereon, and to Sell the 
Old County Buildings." The act required the governor immediately upon its 
passage to appoint three persons, not residents of Cattaraugus county, to 
designate some central and convenient point on the line of the Erie railway 
at which to locate the county buildings and site of the count}-. The commis- 
sioners were required to e.xamine the premises and file in the office of the 
clerk of Cattaraugus county a certificate under their hands, or a majority of 
them, designating such point by the name of the town in which the same is 
located, which point so designated should be at or near some of the villages 
on the line of said railroad between the villages of Dayton and Olean. The 
certificate was to be filed on or before the annual meeting of the Board of 
Supervisors in November, 1865. The act also authorized the Board of Super- 
visors to appoint three building commissioners "to select and determine upon 
a suitable site whereon to build a court house, jail, and clerk's office at such 
point as shall be designated in such certificate." The building commissioners 
were required to be appointed at the annual meeting of the board either in 
1865 or 1866. Such building commissioners were required within sixty days 
after appointment to file in the county clerk's office a survey and description 
of the site so selected by them, with a certificate that they had selected the 
same for the purposes above stated ; and they were also required to procure 
by purchase or otherwise a good and sufficient conveyance in fee of the title 
to the lands so selected as a site to the supervisors for the county. By the 



268 History of Cattarauous County. 

act the building commissioners were given charge of the work of erecting the 
buildings. The Board of Superx'isors were authorized to borrow of the comp- 
troller of the State not e.xceeding S40,ooo, to be used in erecting the buildings ; 
or the county might loan it elsewhere, to be paid by a tax on the property of 
the county. The act also provided that when the new buildings were com- 
pleted and accepted by the building commissioners the records and offices 
were to be removed thither from Ellicottville, and such court house, jail, and 
clerk's office "shall be and remain the court house, jail, and clerk's of^ce of 
said county, and thereafter the said place shall be the county seat of said 
county, and all public ofificers required by law to reside thereat shall there 
reside, and all public offices and records required to be there kept shall be 
removed to and kept at said county seat." It was further provided b\' section 
13 of the act that the commissioners appointed to designate the town for a 
site might consider any donations of land for a site or money to defray the 
expense of building in designating the town. Such designation was to be 
void unless ratified by the supervisors in 1865 or 1866. By virtue of the 
authority conferred in the act the governor appointed Orsell Cook, of Chau- 
tauqua, Robert B. Van Valkenburgh, of Steuben, and Seth Wakeman, of Gen- 
esee county, commissioners to designate the point for the new county seat. 
A special town meeting was held in Little Valley on May 26, 1865, and the 
following resolution was unanimously adopted: 

" Reaalved, That the town of Little Valley raise by tax on the taxable propei-ty of said town the sura of 
ten thousand doll.nrs for the purposeot exi'cnding in the bnildinsf of the court house, jail, county clerk's 
olKcc, and such other buildings as shall be deemed nectssury for county purposes in the village of Little 
Valley, county of Catcarausrus, to be raL^.-'i by said town, and paid to the treasurer of said county in 
such proportions and at such times as tlie Board of Supervisorsof said county shall by resolution determine." 

A special town meeting was held in the "town of Napoli on June 24, 1865, 
at which a resolution was adopted similar in form to that adopted in Little 
Valley and appropriating §3,000 for the same purpose. The commissioners 
appointed by the governor examined the various locations and on July 25, 
1865, filed the following certificate in the county clerk's office designating 
Little Valley as the point for the new county seat: 

"The UQdersi!?ned, comraissionei-s appointed by the governor of the State of New York, under and in 
pursuance of an act enticled 'An Act to Remove the County Site of Cattaraugus County to the Line of 
the Erie Railway and Locate and Procure a new Site and Build County Buildings and Sell the Old County 
Buildings,' passed April 17, \^i.'>, having met pursuant to notice at Salamanca, in said county of Cattaraugus, 
on the 18th da.v of July, ISB."), and having examined the localities between the villages of Dayton and Olean 
in said county, and having taken into consideration the several donations of land and money to defray the 
expenses of building saiil county building?, after consultation and delibenition have determined that the 
village of Little Valley in said county is the most central and convenient point on the line of said Erie, 
railway, between the points designated in said act, to locate the said county buildings and site for said 
county of Cattaraugus, and we, the said commissioners, appointed as aforesaid, and by virtue of the power 
conferred upon us by the act aforesaid, and in consideration of the facts aforesaid, and in furl her consider- 
ation that the citizens of Little Valley will donate the necessary lands on which to locate said buildings, 
not exceeding live acres, and S2.5,UUO in money towards building said necessary buildings, do certify that 
we locate said county buildings and site for the said county of Cattaraugus at the said village of Little 
Valley. 

"Jamestown. July 21, 1865. " O. Cook, 

" Seth Wakeman, 
" R. B. Van Valkenburgh. 
" 0<i»mi*(ioners." 



Removal of the County Seat. 269 

At the annual meeting of the Board of Supervisors in November, 1865, an 
attempt was made to ratify the designation made by the commissioners and 
provide for the erection of the county buildings at Little Valley. The reso- 
lutions offered for this purpose were rejected by the board by a vote of thir- 
teen to sixteen. At the annual meeting of the Board of Supervisors in 
November, 1866. the designation of Little Valley as the county seat was rati- 
fied by the adoption of the following preambles and resolutions, presented 
by Erastus N. Lee, supervisor from the town of Little Valley: 

"Whereas, The Letriilature of tbo State of New York, on the 17th day of April, 1S65, passed an act. 
Chapter 479, entitled "An Act to Kemove the County Site of Cattaraugus County to the Erie Railway, and 
Locate and Procure a New Site and Build County Buildings thereon, and Sell the old County Buildings.' 
And 

" Whereas, By rirtue of the authority conferred in the first section of said act, the governor of the 
State of New York appointed Hon's. Orsell Cook, of Chautauqua county, Robert B. Van Valkenburg, of 
Steuben county, and Seth Wakeraan, of Genesee county, commissioners to designate some central and 
convenient point on the line of the Erie railway at wliich to locate the county buildings and site of the 
said county of Catlaraus:us, and the said commissioners having e.xamined the various locations designated 
the town of Little Valley for the location of such new county site, and duly filed a certificate of such loca- 
tion in the oltice of the clerk of Cattaraugus county on the i'lth day of July, 18(m. Tlierefore, be it 

" BcsDlfi-Ll, 1 hut in conformity with the provisions of section two, of said act, Frank L. Stowell of tlic 
town of Clean, Lemuel S. Jenks of the town of Persia, and John Manley of the town of Little Valley be 
and they are hereby appointed building commissionei'S, and tl\at upon the execution of the oath of office 
and giving tlie bond rfcijuired by section seven of Slid act the said building commissioners be and they 
hereby are instruote>l and required to select and determine upon a suitable site in the villa:.;e of Little 
Valley, of not less than five acres, whereon to erect a court house, with county clerk's, comity treasurer's, 
county judge's, and surrogate's olHces, court room and Jury rooms therein, and a jail, and that they pro- 
cure a title thereto, free from all incumbrance, at a cost to the county of not exceeding one dollar, and 
that tliey immediately proceed in conformity with section three of said act to cause to be erected and 
built on the siie aforisaid Ht and convenient buildings for a court house, with the otiices above designated 
therein, and a jail, but without cost to the county for such buildings, and the s;iid building commissioners, 
or a majority of tliem. are hereby empowered to do all acts authorized by law, or by the Board of Super- 
\'isors. And 

"WirEREAS, In conformity with the provisions of section thirteen of the said act. Chapter 479, Laws 
of lSfi«, the towns of Little Valley and Napnli at special town meetings, called for that purpose, voted the 
sum of ten thousand dollars and three thousand dollars respectively, and the proceedings of such town 
meetings having bc-en legalized by the act in Chapter (iK3, Laws of New York, l.'!*ii. And 

•■ Whereas, Jn conformity with the provisions of section thirteen. Chapter 479, Laws of 18G.5, bonds of 
individuals formoncy and material have been given for tlie purposeof erecting said new county buildings; 
tlierefore, be it 

'■/li'.soireJ, That the said building commissioners be and they are hereby instructed to accept bonds of the 
town of Little Valley for the sum of ten thousand dollars, and of Nanoli for the sum of three thousand 
dollars, bearing interest at seven per centum, and payable at stated periods, and they are also instructed to 
accept bonds of individuals, payable in money or materials, and payable at stated periods, which may bo 
guaranteed by responsible parties satisfactory to the building commissioners, or which may be accepted by 
contractors ; or to accept sums of money ; and that such bonds, materials, and money shall be used for the 
purposeof erecting said new county buildings in the village of Little Valley, and for no other purpose. 

"Rcmih-ed, That it shall be the duty of the building commi.ssiouers hereby appointed, before taking any 
title to tlie proposed site for the new county buildings, or doing any other act or thing that shall commit 
the county to the removal of the county site, to receive from the towns of Little Valley and Napoli valid 
bonds of those towns, and individual bonds, money, and materials, of sufficient amount, not less than thirty 
thousand dollars in amount and value, to guarantee the erection and completion of all the buildings herein 
provided for, and to insure the county against any and all ta.xation for the erection and completion of 
said buildings, or the site therefor, and that the said building commissioners be and they hereby are 
instructed in building such buildings to conform lo the plans in style and material as furnished by H. N. 
White, architect, which plans are now in the county clerk's office." 

Later in the same session of the board James T. Henry, supervisor from 
the town of Olean, offered resolutions, which were adopted, providing that the 
bonds to be issued by the towns of Little Valley and Napoli in accordance 
with resolutions adopted by special town meetings for the purpose of raising 



270 History of Cattaraugus County. 

moneys to aid in the erection of county buildings in the village of Little Val- 
ley, and also the individual bonds, money, and material of divers persons 
pledged for the erection of county buildings in case the same should be located 
in the village or Little Valley, should be " and are hereby accepted on the 
part of the countv, and the commissioners appointed by this board are hereby 
directed to apply the same or the proceeds thereof to the erection of such 
county buildings as are required to be erected for the county seat at the vil- 
lage of Little Valley." Another special town meeting was held in Little 
Valley, November 30, 1866, and a resolution adopted appropriating an addi- 
tional sum of $5,000 to aid in the erection of the county buildings. 

At the annual meeting of the Board of Supervisors in November, 1867, 
the building commissioners submitted a report in which they stated that the 
contract for erecting the buildings had been let to Porter Welch, of Gowanda, 
for the sum of $29,500; that the court house and jail were built of brick with 
stone foundations (cut stone above ground), cut stone steps, window sills, 
window caps, belting, with slate roofs; and that the buildings were nearly com- 
pleted. The commissioners further reported that they had received bonds of 
the town of Little Valley amounting to $15,000 and of Napoli amounting to 
$3,000, and personal bonds for an amount sufficient to guarantee the sum of 
$30,000 as required by resolution of the Board of Supervisors. They further 
reported that they had received title to the Board of Supervisors of five 
acres of land at a cost of one dollar. At the annual meeting of the board in 
November, 1868, the building commissioners submitted a report in which they 
stated that the buildings were substantially completed and that the commis- 
sioners had accepted the same; that the county clerk removed the records of 
his office from Ellicottville and occupied his office in the new court house on 
the 2 1st of May, 1868; that the sheriff removed the prisoners to the jail on 
the 28th of the same month, and the first session of the Supreme Court, Hon. 
George Barker presiding, was held in the court house on the 8th of June, 
1868. They further say that "the towns of Little Valley and Napoli have 
complied with the stipulations made by them regarding the construction of 
the buildings and gift of the land." 

November 25, 1868, the building commissioners made a final report, stating 
that they had settled with Porter Welch, the contractor, for building the court 
house and jail. The report was accepted, the commissioners were discharged, 
and their bonds ordered cancelled. The old county buildings at Ellicottville 
were sold to that town for $i,ooo. 

A proposition to remove the county seat from Little Valley to Salamanca 
was presented to the Board of Supervisors in 1879, ^^^ ^^'^^ rejected. A like 
proposition with the same result was presented to the board in 1884 and again 
in 1891. During the time that these several propositions were under consid- 
eration by the board the general law of the State required a vote of two-thirds 
of the supervisors elected to the board to authorize a removal. By a general 



The Court of Co>[mox Pleas. 271 



revision of the laws relating to boards of supervisors and county affairs in 1892 
this rule was altered so as to permit a change of a county seat b\" a \ote of a 
■majority of the supervisors to be ratified by a vote of a majority of the voters 
at the succeeding genera! election. A petition for the removal of the county . 
seat to Olean and also one for its removal to Salamanca were presented to the 
Board of Supervisors at their annual meeting in November, 1893. The Olean 
petition was rejected. A resolution based upon the petition for the removal 
of the county seat to Salamanca was adopted by a vote of eighteen to fifteen, 
as follows : 

'^Resolved, That the site of the court house, the county clerk's office, the sheriff's office, and the 
county jail, so described in said petition, be removed from their present location in the village of Little 
Valley in said county to the village of Salamanca in Siiid county, as the boundaries of said village are now 
by law fixed, located, and determined, asshown by the proceedings to incorporate said village, and that the 
location of all said county offices so described be changed from the village of Little Valley to the village 
of Salamanca aforesaid. " 

To be effectual this resolution must be ratified by a majority of the votes 
cast upon the question at the general election in November, 1893. 

COURTS OF COMMON I'LEAS AND GENERAL SESSIONS. 

It has already been stated that a Court of Common Pleas and General 
Sessions of the Peace was provided in each county during the colonial period. 
These courts were continued, with some modifications, after the organization 
of the State government. In the early years the number of judges composing 
the court varied in different counties, in some counties the number being as 
high as twelve. By an act passed March 27, 1818, the office of assistant justice 
was abolished and the number of judges was limited to five, including the 
first judge. This system was continued by the revised statutes and remained 
in force until the adoption of the constitution of 1846, when the Court of Com- 
mon Pleas was superseded by the present County Courts. 

The Common Pleas in this county was evidently a popular court. This is 
manifest from the amount of business done, which, during the entire period of 
its history, was very largely in excess of that transacted in the Circuit. It was 
the people's court; it possessed original and appellate jurisdiction ample for 
the litigation of the period. More than 400 causes were disposed of in this 
court from its organization in July, 1817, until the first Circuit was held in 1 
August, 1823; and from that time to the close of its existence, in 1847, 1,600 
causes were tried in this court, while only 200 were disposed of in the Circuit 
during the same period. The Court of Common Pleas was in existence thirty 
years — from 1817 to 1847 — and during that period it disposed of over 2,000 
civil causes in some form or other, besides doing a large amount of criminal 
business and other incidental business which was within its jurisdiction. It 
was a hard working court. The terms were usually limited by statute to five 
days, and the records show that its sessions almost invariably began as early 
as 8 o'clock in the morning, and during the summer terms court was frequently 
opened at 7 o'clock. Under the practice then in force judgments could not 



272 History of Cattaraugus County. 

be entered in vacation ; all business was done at the term. This required all 
parties, witnesses, and attorneys to attend court and remain until their busi- 
ness was done. Before the advent of the railroad and the telegraph business 
at court could not be watched from a distance as now. Hence, "going to 
court" was an event as well as a business. The Circuits were not held very 
frequently nor very regularly. The judge came from a distance and was a 
stranger. The Common Pleas was held by men selected from the body of 
the county, acquainted with the people, their wants, their relations to each 
other and to the community, and it is not strange that the court should have 
been selected as the tribunal in which to settle the common differences and 
disputes which arose under pioneer conditions. Besides, the judges were men 
from the ranks of everyday business. Judge Porter, the first presiding judge 
of this court, was a lawyer. The others were business men and not trained . 
lawyers, yet it is the universal testimony of the older members of the bar and 
others who remember this court that the Common Pleas judges were men of 
good sense and judgment, able to deal fairly with the questions which came 
before the court, and familiar with the principles upon which justice should be 
administered. The large amount of business done testifies to the confidence 
and respect in which the court was held by the people of the county. 

James Brooks took the oath of office as judge May 27, 1817 ; Ashbel Free- 
man and Francis Green took the oath June 5th and William Price June iSth 
of the same year. July 1, 1S17, Timothy H. Porter took the oath as first judge 
and again July 7, 1818. James Brooks was re-appointed judge in i8i8and 
again in 1820. James Adkins, Israel Curtis, Dan Allen, Ira Norton, William 
Kimball, and Royal Tefft were appointed judges during 1820, and James Ad- 
kins took the oath as first judge July 21st of that year. In 1821 Israel Curtis 
was re-appointed judge and Thomas Morris, Alson Leavenworth, and James 
Green were appointed judges. Judge Leavenworth was re-appointed in 
1823, and was appointed first judge in 1828 and held the office until 1833. 
Griswold. E. Warner, Benjamin Chamberlain, Phineas Spencer, and Peter Ten 
Broeck were appointed judges in 1823. James Parmelee was appointed judge 
in 1826. Dan Allen and Henrj- Day were appointed in 1828. Israel Day 
was appointed judge in 1829 and Andrew Mead in 1831. Benjamin Cham- 
berlain took the oath of office as first judge March I, 1833; he was re-appointed 
in 1838 and again in 1843. ^^^ Allen and Thomas J. Wheeler were ap- 
pointed judges in 1833. Israel Day was re-appointed in 1834 and Richard 
Wright was appointed in 1836. Isaac Hall was appointed in 183S and Fred- 
erick S. Martin in 1840. Ashbel H. Hurd was appointed judge in 1843, and 
Thomas J. Wheeler and Peter Ten Broeck were again appointed the same 
year. Rensselaer Lamb took the oath of office as judge January 18, 1845, 
and as county judge June 26, 1847, under the new constitution, succeeding 
Judge Chamberlain as first judge. Lewis P. Thorp was the last judge appointed 
to the old Court of Common Pleas, taking the oath of office January 29, 1846. 



Judges of thk Court (jf COiMMON Pleas. 



James Brooks, who was the first member of the old Court of Common Pleas 
to take the oath of office, was a son of Cornelius Brooks, a Revolutionary 
soldier who was taken prisoner at the battle of Long Island, and who came to 
this county in 1806. He permanently settled here in 1808. It is said in 
Everts's History of the county that "Judge Brooks was noted for his profuse 
hospitality, and it is said by one who knew him well that for several years 
prior to his death the family scarcely ever sat down to a meal without some 
visitor. The judge's residence was familiarly known as the 'Methodist Tav- 
ern ' and ' House of Refuge' from the fact that the itinerancy of the Meth- 
odist church always found a cordial welcome there. Judge Brooks was rev- 
erently recognized as the father of Methodism in this part of the country. 
He was also a firm supporter of the temperance cause." He was an ardent 
abolitionist and his house was frequently made a station on the "underground 
railroad" by fugitive slaves escaping to Canada. Judge Brooks died at the 
old homestead April 17, 1854. 

Ashbel Freeman, who was also a member of the first Court of Common 
Pleas, was one of the early settlers of Farmersville, where he lived several years 
until his death in 1823. A daughter of Judge Freeman married Peter Ten 
Brocck, who was afterwards a member of the same court. 

Francis Green, another member of the first court, came to Great Valley 
from New Hampshire about 1812 and settled with his brother Richard near 
the mouth of Wright's creek. Judge Green represented the town of Great 
Valley on the Board of Supervisors in 1828, 1838, 1840, and 1842. 

William Price, who took the oath of office as a member of the court June 
18, 1817, was a resident of the town of Freedom. At the first town meeting 
held in that town, in 1821, he was elected supervisor and was again elected in 
1828, 1829, and 1830. 

A sketch of Timothy H. Porter, first judge of the court, will be found in 
this chapter on a subsequent page. 

James Adkins, who became a member of the court February 28, 1820, 
seems to have been a resident of Ellicottville. 

Israel Curtis, who took the oath of office February 28, 1820, came into 
that part of the county which is now Hinsdale in i8i2,and settled upon lot 3, 
section 4, township 2, range 4. "A few years later Mr. Curtis purchased 
other lots situated in the central part of the town, and in 1820 was the owner 
of about one thousand acres. He was the first justice of the peace within the 
present limits of Hinsdale, the first supervisor, and in 1817 was appointed the 
first sheriff of Cattaraugus county. He was also an early innkeeper at the 
stand first opened by Elihu Murray, Jr. He is described as having been a 
gentleman of large proportions, commanding presence, educated, and the pos- 
sessor of ability of a high order. He removed to the far west in 1826. Judge 
Curtis represented the town of Olean on the Board of Supervisors in 1820 and 
the town of Hinsdale in 1821-23, and was chairman of the board in 1820 and 

35 



2/4 History of Cattaraugus County. 

1823. He also had the honor of being defendant in the first case in the Court 
of Common Pleas. 

Dan Allen, who also became a member of the court in 1820, was one of 
the early settlers of the town of Perrysburg, from which the town of Persia 
was afteirwards formed. The first settlement in that part of the county which 
is now the town of Persia was made by Ahaz Allen, a brother of Judge Allen, 
who came to the county from Vermo.it. Judge Allen came from Cayuga 
county in 1813 and engaged with his brother Ahaz in carrying on some of the 
most important pioneer enterprises. He represented the town of Perrysburg 
on the Board of Supervisors in 1819. 

Ira Norton, who took the oath of office July 25, 1820, was one of the early 
settlers of the town of Great Valley. He came to Franklinville in 1807, and 
in 1816 located on a farm near Peth. He was the father of the late Nelson I. 
Norton, of Hinsdale (q. v.). 

William Kimball, who also became a member of the court July 25, 1820, 
lived in Hinsdale. 

Royal Tefft, who took the oath of office August i, 1820, was a resident of 
Little Valley. He was supervisor of the town in 18 19 and 1820. 

Thomas Morris became a member of the court in 1821, and was also a res- 
ident of Hinsdale, or of that part of the town embraced in the present limits 
of Ischua. 

Alson Leavenworth, who became an associate judge in 1821, again in 1823, 
and first judge in 1828, was a prominent physician, and a sketch of his career 
appea