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SOLDIERS' MONUMENT IN NATIONAL CEMETERY, 
VICKSBURG, MISS. 



HISTORY 



OF THE 



NINETY-THIRD REGIMENT 

Illinois Volunteer Infantry 



FROM 



ORGANIZATION TO MUSTER OUT 



STATISTICS COMPILED 

BY 

AARON DUNBAR 

Sergeant, Company "B" 

REVISED AND EDITED 

BY 

HARVEY M. TRIMBLE 

Adjutant 



OCTOBER 5. 1898 



CHICAGO 
The Blakely Printing Co. 



HARVARD 

UNIVERSITY 

LIBRARY 

SEP 12 1944 



US 



( rf / I /\ 






\^ 



DEDICATION. 

In memory of our brave comrades who fell in defense of the 
Union and Flag, and of all our comrades since deceased, and to the 
surviving members of the Ninety-Third Regiment Illinois Volun- 
teer Infantry, this volume is dedicated. 

No braver men than thev who fell, 
E'er heard, unblanched, the battle yell; 
They fought as only heroes light. 
And died as heroes only might. 



PREFACE. 

The following history, dedicated to the memory of the de- 
ceased heroes of the Ninety-Third Regiment Illinois Volunteer In- 
fantry, and to its surviving members, has been compiled from such 
sources of information as were available, including diaries kept 
during the war, regimental records preserved, the reports of the 
Adjutant General of Illinois, and other war publications. 

It was in the hearts of those connected with its preparation to 
make particular mention of and give personal credit for many brave 
deeds performed by officers and men of this hard-lighting regi- 
ment, but neither time nor space would admit of it. The effort 
has been to present a true statement of the principal movements 
and services of the regiment. That errors will be found is not 
doubted. It would be vain to expect absolute accuracy after the 
lapse of so many years, although it is only an attempt to give the 
history of a single regiment, and not a history of the war. Some 
movements of the armies are given as written by others, in order 
that the reader may better understand and appreciate the move- 
ments of this command. It was also deemed advisable to give the 
most graphic description ever written of the great Chattanooga 
Campaign, and its marvelous battles and battlefields, to convey a 
better view of the realities of modern warfare than might otherwise 
be presented. 

The particular dates and times of the movements of the regi- 
ment, the places of its encampment, and the lines of its travels and 
marches, have been inserted, because the same may, at some time, 
be of service to the surviving members of the command, even at 
the risk that they may be monotonous and tedious to the general 
reader. 

The labor of preparing these pages has been extended over a 
considerable period of time, because it has been performed, of neces- 
sity, in the few leisure hours that busy men could find to devote to 
it. The imperfect result is now very respectfully submitted to the 
kind consideration of the surviving members of the Grand Old 
Regiment, and to the like kind consideration of those who, by the 
ties of kinship, and from patriotic impulses, may be interested in its 
membership, living and dead, and in the history of its services and 
achievements in the cause of the Union. 

Princeton, Illinois. '^ THE EDITOR. 

October 5, 1898. 



HISTORY OF NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 

CHAPTER I. 

ORGANIZATION AND MOVEMENTS TO THE FIELD. 

At the date of the enlistment and organization of the Ninety- 
Third Regiment Illinois Volunteer Infantry, the people of the 
North, as well as the Government, were well aroused to the neces- 
sity of a vigorous prosecution of the war for the Union. Calls for 
six hundred thousand men had lately been issued by President Lin- 
coln, and were being responded to in a manner theretofore un- 
known in history. Every city and village and country schoolhouse 
all over the northern states was a recruiting station. Volunteers 
not in the service were acting as recruiting officers, enrolling vol- 
unteer soldiers and organizing companies and regiments with mar- 
velous facility and speed. Hundreds of thousands so organized 
were asking and begging the Government for arms and that they 
might be sent to the front for active service in the field. Drill and 
discipline were acquired, if at all, while companies and regiments 
were really moving toward the front. Under such conditions as 
these, this regiment was enlisted and organized and sent to the 
field. 

The experiences through which it passed, its wondrous activ- 
ity, covering over six thousand five hundred miles of distance, its 
power as a fighting force, and its immense losses in battle, make its 
early history, as well as the days of its valiant service, intensely 
interesting to its surviving members and to the kindred of those 
who fell fighting in its ranks and of- those who otherwise died in its 
membership. And, certainly, its entire history will not be wholly 
uninteresting to the people of the three counties and state out of 
which it came to do service for their cause, the preservation of the 
Union, and to bind them yet a little closer, by its great sacrifices, to 
patriotic love of the great republic. 

The ten companies of the regiment were organized wnhin the 
limit of ten days in the month of August, A. D. 1862. Company 
A was organized on the T4th day of that month, at Camden Mills, 
in Rock Island County, Illinois. Companies D and G were organ- 
ized in Stephenson County, Illinois, the first at Freeport, about the 



8 HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 

1 2th day of that month, and the other at Cedarville, on the 15th day 
of the month. Company F was organized on the 9th day of that 
month, at Albany, in Whiteside County, Illinois. The other six 
companies were organized in Bureau County, Illinois; Company 
B on the nth day of that month, at Dover; Company C on the 15th 
day of the month, at Wyanet; Company E on the 13th day of the 
month, at Tiskilwa; Company H on the 14th day of the month, at 
Neponset; Company I on the 13th day of the month, at Princeton, 
and Company K on the 19th day of the month, at Princeton. 

At the date of its organization. Company B was named 
"Bureau County Rifles." In like manner Company C was named 
"Wyanet Union Guards;" Company E was named "Tiskilwa 
Tigers;" Company H was named "Bureau County Tigers;" Com- 
pany I was named "Princeton Light Infantry," and Company K 
was named "Princeton Guards." If any of the other companies 
had names, they have escaped. These names, so taken, were des- 
tined to be very short lived. They had one insertion in the news- 
papers of that time, and if ever heard of thereafter no one is now 
able to remember it. 

The company rosters contained in this volume show the origi- 
nal officers, commissioned and non-commissioned, chosen for each 
of the several companies at the dates of organization, except in four 
cases. Lieut. Col. Nicholas C. Buswell was chosen as the first 
Captain of Company H; Major James M. Fisher was chosen as the 
first Captain of Company I; Adjutant David W. Sparks was chosen 
as the first First Lieutenant of Company C, and Quartermaster 
Edward S. Johnson was chosen as the first Second Lieutenant of 
Company E. When the regiment was organized these officers 
were elected to the positions in the field and staff of the regiment 
indicated above and were never commissioned as officers of those 
companies. 

On the 2d day of September, A. D. 1862, all of these com- 
panies, except A, assembled at Princeton, and made their camp on 
the fair grounds. It was called "Camp Bureau." Here they 
remained just a half month. Here these men, just entering upon 
their soldiership, first divided straw for their beds. And it was 
their last divide of that kind, too — for lack of straw. Here they 
first shared blankets with each other. Here they first "drank 
from the same canteen." Here began that comradeship which was 
to continue for three long years, on the march and in bivouac and 
camp and on bloody fields of battle, and thereafter through life for 
all who should survive the conflict. And here, also, began the 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 9 

squad and company drills and the dress parades. They were well 
dressed then, (much better than on numerous occasions afterward), 
hut, from a military point of view, their dress parades were simply 
horrid. Here, it has been stated, (although it cannot now be satis- 
factorily verified, perhaps, because of the great lapse of time and 
consequent loss of valuable testimony), they received their first 
lessons in the art of foraging. It is barely possible that it may 
then have been true. Watermelons were ripe and chickens 
liatched that year were not quite full grown. The truth of history 
requires it to be stated that they were not then anything like as 
^ood foragers as they were a couple of years later. 

On the 8th day of September, A. D. 1862, the regiment was 
organized at Princeton, Illinois, by the election of officers, as fol- 
lows: Colonel, Holden Putnam, of Freeport, Illinois; Lieutenant 
Colonel, Nicholas C. Buswell, of Neponset, Illinois; Major, James 
M. Fisher, of Princeton, Illinois; Adjutant, David W. Sparks, of 
Wyanet, Illinois; Quartermaster, Edward S. Johnson, of Tiskilwa, 
Illinois; First Assistant Surgeon, Samuel A. Hopkins, M. D., of 
Dover, Illinois; Chaplain, Rev. Thomas H. Haggerty, of Prince- 
ton, Illinois; Sergeant Major, Harvey M. Trimble, of Princeton, 
Illinois; Quartermaster Sergeant, William M. Herrold, of Fulton, 
Illinois; Commissary Sergeant, Phineas T. Richardson, of Prince- 
ton, Illinois; Hospital Steward, Leroy S. Hopkins, of HoUoway- 
ville, Illinois; and Principal Musician, Myron W. Lyman, of Free- 
port, Illinois. The Surgeon and Second Assistant Surgeon were not 
then chosen. This election was by the officers of the nine companies 
then in Camp Bureau. Thus an agreement was reached for the 
regimental organization. Measures were immediately inaugurated 
to secure the tenth company, which resulted in procuring Company 
A to join the other nine companies after they had reached Chicago 
and gone into Camp Douglass. 

On the same day that these nine companies entered Camp 
Bureau, the following verses, written by Lieutenant Colonel Bus- 
'well, were published in the Bureau County Patriot, at Princeton, 
Illinois. 

**THE SOLDIERS* FAREWELL." 

Tune: "J^"^^^'s on the Stormy Sea." 

Friends, farewell, we now must sever, 
Till this bloody war is over; 
We will fight, and yielding never, 
'Till our land from rebels free. 



10 HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 

With our flag high floating o'er us, 
We will drive our foes before us; 
Then we'll sing the joyful chorus, 
Dixie's land from rebels free! 

South we go to meet in battle; 
In that land of human chattel 
Freedom's drum shall loudly rattle. 

Rebels' slaves shall then be free. 
We will fight to save our nation 
From a shameful separation; 
Rebel food shall be our ration, 

As we fight for unity. 

If John Bull should wish to meddle, 
We will show our Yankee mettle; 
Eastward front, in line of battle. 

Drive them back across the sea. 
Should European combination 
Seek to crush this noble nation, 
We will fight the whole creation ; 

Then, dear friends, return to thee. 

Then farewell, we now must sever, 
Till this bloody war is over; 
We will fight, unyielding, ever 

Fighting for our flag and thee. 
With our flag high floating o'er us. 
We will drive all foes before us ; 
Then we'll sing the joyful chorus, 

Dixie's land from rebels free! 

On the 17th day of September, A. D. 1862, under the first 
"marching orders" received, the nine companies, then in Camp 
Bureau, broke camp and moved, on the Chicago, Burlington and 
Quincy Railroad, to Chicago, Illinois, and took quarters in Camp 
Douglass that evening. Soon after, they were joined by Company 
A, from Rock Island County, as indicated above. Joseph Huyett, 
M. D., of Camden Mills, Illinois, was selected as Surgeon of the 
regiment. 

Drill and discipline and the perfection of the organization of 
the command and the making of preparations to take the field now 
engaged the constant and undivided attention of all. Squad drills, 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. II 

and platoon drills, and company drills, and regimental drills, and 
dress parades, every day ; preparing the muster rolls, and beginning 
the records of the companies and of the regiment; making arrange- 
ments to be mustered into the service; procuring clothing and quar- 
termaster's stores and camp and garrison equipage; the desperate 
struggle for arms and ordnance stores; all this, and more, was real 
work, for serious purposes, and it was all prosecuted with great zeal 
and energy. 

On the 13th day of October, A. D. 1862, these ten companies 
were mustered into the service of the United States, "for three 
years or during the war,*' by Capt. T. Barri, United States Muster- 
ing Officer, at Camp Douglass, as the Ninety-Third Regiment Illi- 
nois Volunteer Infantry. The regimental organization was thus 
completed. It then consisted of thirty-eight commissioned officers 
and nine hundred and twenty-two non-commissioned officers and 
privates. Eleven privates, whose names appear in the company 
rosters, were rejected on account of physical disqualification, and 
four others have no record as to what became of them, but they 
were not mustered in. Three commissioned officers and forty 
privates who were assigned to companies were added afterward,, 
making the total membership of the regiment, as shown by the 
rolls, one thousand and eighteen. Shortly before the war closed, 
thirty-two recruits were sent to the regiment, who were never 
assigned to companies. Their names appear in the roll of "Unas- 
signed Recruits," following the company rosters. They are not 
included in the one thousand and eighteen above enumerated; but, 
being added, make one thousand and fifty, all told, as the total 
membership of the companies and regiment, from first to last. 

On the 1 6th day of October, the barracks that were occupied 
by four companies of the regiment were burned. It was rumored, 
at the time, that the fire was willfully ignited by paroled prisoners 
from Harpers Ferry. Two days later, the regiment moved out of 
Camp Douglass, and occupied Sibley tents, in a new camp ground,, 
near Douglass Place. This was called "Camp Putnam," in honor 
of the Colonel. The command remained in that camp twenty-two 
days. 

On the 8th day of November, A. D. 1862, orders were re- 
ceived directing the regiment to move to Columbus, Kentucky, 
without delay. The next day the command left Chicago, traveling 
on the Illinois Central Railroad, and reached Cairo, Illinois, about 
3 o'clock p. m. the following day, and immediately embarked on 
the steamer "Tecumseh," for Columbus, Kentucky, reaching there 



12 HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 

at 10 o'clock p. m. the same day. The next morning, before the 
regiment had disembarked, the destination was changed to Mem- 
phis, Tennessee, and the steamer resumed its course down the 
Mississippi River. At 11:30 o'clock a. m. on the 12th day of No- 
vember, the steamer went aground on a sandbar. The "Emerald*' 
put the troops ashore on the Arkansas side. After marching about 
two miles, the command reembarked and proceeded on its course 
down the river. During the afternoon of the same day it disem- 
barked again, to enable the steamer to pass another bar. But, after 
it was thought the bar had been safely passed, she ran aground 
again, about four rods from the shore, in the attempt to make a 
landing. It was late that night when she was again released. The 
regiment then reembarked and proceeded on its way. On the 
13th day of November, at 4 o'clock p. m., the command went ashore 
again, to permit the steamer to pass still another bar, and marched 
about four miles before going on board again. On the 14th day 
of the month, at 10 o'clock a. m., the regiment arrived at Memphis, 
and immediately disembarked from the steamer, and went into camp 
a little more than a mile from the citv. 

The trials and tribulations of this first experience in military 
movements were quite sufficient to fix the belief in the individual 
minds of the members of this raw command that their days of 
soldiership were not to be surfeited with comfort and pleasure. It 
was, indeed, a severe lesson, for the first one; but it was of con- 
siderable value. In view of the campaigns in which the regiment 
was so soon to bear a part, it was, perhaps, necessary that the change 
from the ordinary pursuits of home life to the rugged realities 
of soldiering should be quickly realized. And it was. 

On the same day the regiment reached Memphis, November 
14th, 1862, it was assigned to Col. R. P. Buckland's Brigade, of 
General Lauman's Division, in the right wing of the Army of 
West Tennessee. The next twelve days were full of active and 
energetic preparations for the campaign in Northern Mississippi. 
Forts Henry and Donelson were then safely in the possession of 
our troops; the battle of Shiloh had been fought and won; and 
Corinth and Island No. 10 were securely in the grasp of our army. 
Memphis was the base of supplies for the Army of West Tennes- 
see. The silent soldier, who was already famous as "Unconditional 
Surrender" Grant, was in command. His two great lieutenants, 
Sherman and McPherson, were with him. Vicksburg, Mississippi, 
was the next objective point. "We are coming, Father Abraham, 
six hundred thousand more," was heard at every camp in the 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. la 

army and everywhere throughout the northern states. It was at 
once the Nation's song and the Nation's hope of ultimate victory. 
Thousands upon thousands of new troops, with those who had 
already seen considerable service, were assembled at Memphis and 
quickly organized into that marvelous and irresistible military force, 
the Army of the Tennessee. Before thei end of that month it was 
ready to move, and did move. 

From the time the regiment left "Camp Bureau," at Prince- 
ton, Illinois, to this date, it had traveled, by rail, four hundred 
and forty miles; by water, one hundred and sixty miles; and had 
marched six miles; making the total distance of six hundred and 
six miles. 



CHAPTER II. 

THE CAMPAIGN IN NORTHERN MISSISSIPPI. 

What was afterward known as the Campaign in Northern 
Mississippi was, in fact, the initial movement of a campaign against 
Vicksburg. General Grant's plan seems to have been to dislodge 
the rebel forces of General Pemberton, consisting of about forty 
thousand men, from their positions on the Tallahatchie River, and 
then, by rapid movements, gain the possession of Grenada, Green- 
wood, Yazoo City, Canton and Jackson, Mississippi, and establish 
liis army for an attack upon Vicksburg from the rear. 

General Grant, in person, was in command of one column, 
which started from Jackson, Tennessee; General Sherman com- 
manded another column, which started from Memphis, Tennessee; 
and Gen. C. C. Washburne commanded a small cavalry force, which 
started from Helena, Arkansas. TTieir combined forces numbered 
about fifty thousand men. These movements were inaugurated 
soon after the middle of November, A. D. 1862. 

On the 26th day of November, A. D. 1862, the Ninety- 
third Regiment IlHnois Volunteer Infantry broke camp and moved 
in a southeasterly course from Memphis. The destination was, 
of course, unknown to the army; but many rumors, as to what 
the campaign was to be, floated along the lines. All tents, save 
three for each company and three for headquarters, were left behind. 
Those then in use were the "Sibley" tents. They were large, 
that is, tall, cone shaped, and very cumbersome. After a march 
of twelve miles, camp was pitched for the night in a cornfield. 
The next day the regiment marched eighteen miles, and camped 
near Cold Water Creek. On the third day, the march covered 
twenty miles, passing through Byhalia, Mississippi, and the camp 
that night was on Clear Creek. The firing of cannon at the front 
was heard several times during the day. The next day, the com- 
mand remained in camp. On Sunday, November 30th, after a 
march of eight miles, the regiment camped at Chulahoma, Missis- 
sippi, and remained there the following day. On December 2d, 
all trains were left behind, in anticipation of a skirmish with the 
forces under General Price. Reports of cannon at the front were 
again heard, but this command did not reach the skirmishing. 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 15 

Price skedaddled. General Washburne's cavalry had so oppor- 
tunely and strongly threatened Grenada that General Pemberton 
abandoned his positions on the Tallahatchie River without a battle, 
and fell back to Grenada, south of the Yalobusha River, and from 
thence to Canton, only a short distance north of Jackson, Missis- 
sippi. Those two rivers, uniting a short distance north of Green- 
wood, Mississippi, form the Yazoo River. After marching eight 
miles, the regiment went into camp about two miles from Wyatt, 
a small village on the Tallahatchie River, and remained there five 
days. The trains came up on the third day. On Sunday, Decem- 
ber 7th, after another march of eight miles, the command went 
mto camp three miles west of College Hill, and remained there 
five days. For two weeks the army had been on three-quarters 
rations, and that allowance was now reduced. Beef and pork and 
corn, gathered from the country, supplied the deficit. Corn was 
ground in a mill located on Hurricane Creek, the first experience 
of that kind. From the corn bread and mush used there, the 
camp was named "Mush Hill." On the 12th day of December, 
the regiment marched fourteen miles, passing General Grant's head- 
quarters at Oxford, Mississippi, a pretty little town on what is now 
the Chicago, St. Louis & New Orleans Railroad, and went into 
camp about six miles southeast of that place, on Yocona Creek. 
This was the first time, after leaving Memphis, that the command 
was within convenient reach of good water. It remained there 
eight days. This last movement was made by this regiment alone, 
and for the purpose of joining the new brigade to which it had 
been assigned, to wit, the Third Brigade, of the Seventh Division, of 
the Left Wing of the Army of the Mississippi. George B. Boomer, 
Colonel of the Twenty-sixth Missouri Volunteer Infantry, was the 
Brigade Commander; Brig. Gen. Isaac F. Quimby was the Division 
Commander; General Hamilton was Commander of the left wing of 
the Army of the Mississippi; and General Grant was in command 
of all. This division was afterward transferred to General McPher- 
son's corps. The Ninety-Third Illinois remained in this brigade 
nearly two years. It contained three other regiments, namely, the 
Twenty-Sixth Regiment Missouri Volunteer Infantry and the Fifth 
and Tenth Regiments Iowa Volunteer Infantry. These three other 
regiments had fought together around Corinth and at luka, Mis- 
sissippi, and won great praise. And this brigade afterward became 
famous in the Army of the Tennessee. The different regiments 
soon became well acquainted with each other, and fraternized in 
a very unusual manner. The battles of Jackson and Champion 



16 HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 

Hill and siege of Vicksburg welded the friendship so strongly that 
it became almost impossible to get an admission, from anyone, of 
membership in the regimental or company organizations. The bri- 
gade came to be recognized by all as the unit. It was the "Third 
Brigade," in which all claimed membership when interrogated as- 
to the command to which they belonged. 

On Sunday, December 21st, at 8 o'clock in the morning, this 
command "about faced," marched to Oxford, and went into camp 
a half mile east of the town. This movement was occasioned by 
the presence of General Van Dorn's rebel cavalry, in force, in North- 
em Mississippi and their unceremonious maneuvers. On the pre- 
vious day, they had made a dash on Holly Springs, destroyed a 
large amount of commissary and quartermasters' stores and muni- 
tions of war, burned cotton, and torn up the railroad track between 
the Springs and Waterford. Troops on every hand were now 
put in rapid motion. The army was falling back to reestablish 
its lines of communication. At 10:30 o'clock that night the Third 
Brigade was called to arms. The pickets reported that an attack 
by rebel cavalry was imminent. Regiments were everywhere in 
line, and artillery rapidly moving into position. At midnight the 
Third Brigade moved about a mile from camp and went into line 
of battle, in an open field, with a ravine and heavy timber in the 
rear, the Ninety-Third Illinois being on the left of the line. No 
attack was made. An hour after sunrise the next morning the 
command returned to camp. Such was the first night of this regi- 
ment under arms. All kinds of rumors were heard in camp that 
day, some probably true, but many wholly false. The one that 
w-as true was most disgracefully true. Holly Springs had been 
surrendered on the 20th by Col. R. C. Murphy without the firing 
of a single gun. It was bald cowardice. It practically overturned 
the plans of General Grant, and ended the campaign against Vicks- 
burg from that direction. Much rain and deep mud and over- 
flowing streams doubtless contributed somewhat to the result; but 
the disgraceful surrender of Holly Springs, and the consequent 
destruction of the large quantities of supplies and munitions there, 
settled it. The campaign was practically ended. General Grant 
had been so confident, early in the month, of the success of his 
plans, that he had detached General Sherman with about ten thou- 
sand of the troops then under his command, and about thirty-two 
thousand more taken from Memphis and Helena, and sent him 
to the mouth of the Yazoo River, only a short distance above 
Vicksburg, in the expectation of joining forces with him there when 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 17 

he should reach the rear of Vicksburg by the inland routes above 
indicated. General Sherman left Memphis for the mouth of the 
Yazoo on the very day that Holly Springs was so disgracefully 
surrendered without hearing of it. 

On the 23d and 24th days of December this regiment marched 
from Oxford to Lumpkin's Mill, Mississippi, passing through Abbe- 
ville, a distance of twenty-three miles. The next day, Christmas, the 
regiment was ordered out to gather forage. Sixty wagon loads of 
corn and fodder, ten cattle, three mules and two ponies, besides 
a large quantity of provisions gathered by individuals for them- 
selves and their "messes," was the result of the day's work. Rain 
fell nearly all the day, and the roads were becoming almost im- 
passable. Early in the morning, on December 26th, General Quim- 
by's Division started for Memphis, in charge of a large train sent 
there after provisions. The extent of the disaster at Holly Springs 
can be better understood when it is stated that this train, the send- 
ing of which was made necessary by it, contained nearly onje thou- 
sand wagons, all told. Five companies of the Ninety-Third Illinois 
were detached as rear guard for the train. The train did not get 
straightened out on the road until 11 o'clock a. m. The advance 
marched about twelve miles, but the rear guard covered no more 
than half that distance. The regimental wagons were near the 
middle of the train, and both ends of the regiment were without 
tents that night. It was the hardest day and night so far expe- 
rienced by the command. The next morning the head of the train 
moved forward at 4 o'clock. The rear guard moved at an early 
hour, and at 11 o'clock a. m. reached the other five companies of 
the regiment. They had not yet left their camp of the previous 
night. That afternoon the entire command marched twelve miles, 
and encamped, for the night, one mile east of Byhalia, Mississippi. 
On the 28th day of December, just one month from the day 
Byhalia was passed on the way out, the regiment again passed 
through the town, marched twenty-two miles, and went into camp 
seven miles from Memphis, Tennessee. On the 29th, the command 
marched to Memphis, and remained there the next day. On the 
morning of the 29th, before the regiment moved. Lieutenant Lee 
and two men of his company, B, came into camp. They had lost 
their way while out on the foraging expedition, on Christmas Day, 
and came in by the way of Holly Springs. Sergeant Jacob Houck, 
of Company C, who was captured by the enemy on Christmas Day, 
came in with the others, having met them on the way. On the 
last day of the year 1862, the regiment, still with the provision train, 



18 HISTORY OF THE N.INETV-THIRD ILLINOIS. 

which was then loaded with supphes, marched fifteen miles, and 
camped on the east side of Germantown, Tennessee. Early the 
next morning-, New Year's Day, 1863, the march eastward was re- 
sumed, and fifteen miles farther on the command encamped, near 
Lafayette, Tennessee. On the morning of January 2d, the train 
was placed in charge of other troops, and this command marched 
back to Germantown. On the 3d day of January, the connnand 
marched to a point about two miles west of (Germantown, and 
encamped near the plantation of a man named l>rooks. The place 
was called Ridgeway. The regiment remained there until the 30th 
day of that month. 

Thus ended the campaign in Northern Mississippi. The regi- 
ment had marched two hundred and twenty miles, and had acquired 
much knowledg-e of the uncomfortable features of a military cam- 
paign. 

Had this not been the first campaign made by the regiment, 
and a very hard one, particularly for new and inexperienced troops, 
on account of excessive rains and bad roads, much of the details 
given in this chapter might have been omitted. 1 hit the surviving 
members of the regiment, at least, will not object that their first 
experiences in the field are now so particularly called up before 
them. Not, perhaps, because they were important; but the more, 
because, for lack of importance, many of the details may have es- 
caped from memory. 



CHAPTER III. 

THK YAZOO PASS EXPEDITION. 

On December i8th, A. D. 1862, an order was issued from the 
War Department, at Washington, whereby the Army of the Ten- 
nessee was divided into four army corps, as follows: The Thir- 
teenth, under the command of General McClernand; the Fifteenth, 
under the command of (leneral Sherman: the Sixteenth, imder the 
command of (ieneral Hurlbut: and the Seventeenth, under the 
command of ( General McPherson. The Seventh Division, in which 
the Ninety-Third Illinois was then serving, was assigned to the Sev- 
enteenth corps. 

During the ])eriod of encampment at Ridgeway nothing trans- 
])ired. out of the ordinary routine, other than a short scout, made by 
four companies of the regiment, under the command of Lieutenant 
Colonel Ikiswell, on the 13th day of January, A. D. 1863. The Ser- 
geant Major and Wagonmaster and three men of Com])any I and 
three men of Company K were captured, while executing orders 
which detached them from the command, by the same rebel force 
against which the scout was directed, it being a ]>art of Major 
Blyth(*'s battalion of Mississippi state trooi)s. After an absence of 
seventeen days, they all returned, reaching the command on the 30th 
day of the month. ( )n that day. the regiment moved to a new camp, 
about two miles from Memphis, where it remained during all the 
month of Fel)ruary following. ( )n the 2d day of March, on board 
the steamer Henry \'on IMiul, the command moved down the 
Mississi])pi River, and landed, the evening of the 4th day of March, 
near (^rand Lake, Arkansas.* On the morning of March 5th, 
the command disembarked and went into cam]). ( )n the 7th and 
8th days of the month, the command, on board the same steamer, 
moved back up the river to a point five miles l)elow Helena, Arkan- 
sas, opposite Yazoo Pass, and, on the i ith day of the month, went 
into camp on the Arkansas side of the river, and remained there 
until the 22(1 day of the month. The \'azoo Pass expedition fol- 
lowed. 

The plan was to reach the Yazoo River, destroy the rebel 

* It has sometimes bet-n stated, erroneously, that this lamlinjj was at Lake 
Providence. That lake is farther south, and in l.ouisiana. 



20 HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 

transports on that stream, and also the Confederate gunboats then 
being constructed there, and also the small navy-yard and arsenal 
at Yazoo City, Mississippi, and possibly gain a footing for the 
army on the high lands above Haines' Bluff. A canal had been 
cut from the Mississippi River into Moon Lake. A small natural 
channel, called Yazoo Pass, connects Moon Lake with Cold Water 
River. That stream empties into the Tallahatchie River, and the 
latter and the Yalobusha River form the Yazoo River. Greenwood, 
where the rebel forces located to oppose the movement, is but 
a short distance south of the confluence of the Tallahatchie and 
Yalobusha Rivers. The expedition was made by a considerable 
part of the Seventeenth Corps, and under the command of General 
McPherson. 

The Ninety-Third Illinois boarded the steamer Jesse K. Bell 
on the 22d day of March. The evening of the 23d, found the 
steamer passing out of Moon Lake and entering Yazoo Pass. Cold 
Water River was reached on the 27th, and the Tallahatchie River 
on the 30th day of the month. At night, on the 31st day of 
March, the command was no more than seventy-five miles from 
its last camp in Arkansas, and slowly moving down the Tallahatchie. 
On the 2d day of April, a guerrilla fired a shot, from the shore, into 
the troops on board the boat, and severely wounded Chester Tracy, 
of Company K. He was the first man wounded in the regiment. 
The steamer landed, and the Colonel, with a small force, went ashore 
and burned every building on the plantation from whence the shot 
was fired, and took the owner as a prisoner for having harbored 
,the guerrilla. This loss was two-tenths of one per cent of the 
number on the expedition. The regiment reached the camp of 
McPherson's troops, near Greenwood, on the 3d day of April, 
and, on the 4th, made a reconnoissance of a portion of the enemy's 
position at Greenwood. The fortifications there were so surrounded 
with water and by swamps that infantry could not reach them. 
When General McPherson became satisfied of this fact, he withdrew 
his forces without delay, and returned to Helena. The Ninety-Third 
Illinois began the return trip on the Sth day of April, and 
reached the point from whence it started at 10 o'clock p. m. on 
the 9th day of the month. In addition to five hundred and twenty- 
seven miles made by the command after leaving Ridgeway and 
before entering upon the Yazoo Pass expedition, the distance trav- 
ersed was about three hundred and forty-four miles. A consid- 
erable part of that distance was, literally, a boat ride through big 
timber. The small steamers used were rent and torn, in terrible 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 21 

manner, by frequent contact with overhanging limbs of large trees 
and with the trunks of many smaller ones on either side and in 
the channels. The railings and cornices and fancy woodwork 
of the upper decks were broken into splinters and carried away. 
The outside walls of the cabins were penetrated in many places by 
great limbs of trees and considerable portions of the same practically 
destroyed. Smokestacks were thrown down, and pilot houses rid- 
dled. Paddle wheels were half destroyed, and rudders many times 
broken. When it again reached the Mississippi River, the fleet 
w^as little else than so many dismantled hulls. The crashing and 
smashing through the timber was full of danger and accident, to 
those on board, as well as fearfully disastrous and destructive to 
the boats. And thus ended, without any effective result, another 
experiment which had been expected to contribute something to- 
ward the reduction and capture of Vicksburg, the rebel stronghold 
that blocked the great waterway of the West, and securely held 
the great states of Louisiana and Texas, with their wealth of sup- 
plies, to the cause of the rebellion. 



CHAPTER IV. 

THE VICKSBURG CAMPAIGN BATTLE OF JACKSON, MISS. — BATTLK OF 

CHAMPION HILL, MISS. — CHARGES AT VICKSBURCi, MISS. — 
THE SIKGE OF VICKSBURG, MISS. 

During the three days following the return from the Ya?oo 
Pass expedition, the Ninety-Third Illinois, still on board the little 
Steamer, laid ofT the Arkansas shore about five miles below Helena. 
On the 13th day of April, A. D. 1863, the command again started 
down the Mississippi River, and reached Milliken's Bend, Loui- 
siana, in the evening of the 15th, and went into camp the next morn- 
ing, and remained there until the 2Sth day of that month. During 
that period preparations were being made for the Yicksburg cam- 
paign. 

On the night of the J 6th day of April, Admiral Porter's fleet of 
gimboats and transports successfully ran the blockade and passed 
below Vicksburg. The fleet consisted of the gunboat Benton, 
which was the flagship, the steam ram Lafayette, with a coal 
barge and the previously captured rebel ram General Price lashed 
to her, and the gunboats Louisville, Mound City, Pittsburg, Tus- 
cumbia and Carondelet, followed by the transports Silver Wave, 
Forest Queen and Henry Clay. The transports were loaded with 
army supplies. Their machinery was protected, as much as possi- 
ble, by cotton bales. Tliese gunboats and transports, in addition 
to their own crews, carried a considerable number of soldiers, well 
armed, who had volunteered from the army, on the call of the com- 
manding general, for this hazardous undertaking. Many of them 
were from the Seventh i^ivision of General McPherson's corps. 
Tlie night was intensely dark. Not a glimmer of light was to be 
seen from any one of the vessels. Silently, down the mighty river, 
into the sullen darkness, the fleet moved on its short l)ut perilous 
voyage. The genius of (irant and the courage of the army and 
navy were in the venture, challenging the enemy's powers of de- 
struction and trusting Providence for success. The powerful bat- 
teries on the east shore gave out no signs of life. The hope began 
to be indulged that the passage would be made unobserved by the 
enemy. But it was soon dispelled. As suddenly as volcanoes 
burst, the fires of hostile cannon flashed and blazed from every bat- 
tery on the shore and from every direction. The gunboats an- 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 23 

swered with equal fury. The sky was red with flames of war. The 
city and the river and the shores were ilhiniinated many miles 
around. The earth and the waters trembled 'neath the shock of 
battle. An hour later, the scene was changjed. Silence and dark- 
ness again reigned. Far down the stream, below the city, (he 
signal lights were telling the story of the night. How small they 
were, compared with the flames through which that fleet had 
passed. How peaceful they seemed, and how beautiful in their 
many colors. And what a story they were telling, (iladness and 
success and glory were in those little rocket lights. Toward 
heaven they flew, and carried with them joyful i)raise. The fate of 
Vicksburg was sealed. 

Xone of the gimboats were seriously hurt. A shell passed 
through the steam-drum of the Forest Queen and instantly disabled 
her. She was immediately taken in charge by one of the gimboats 
and safely towed down the river. The Henry Clay stopped, to 
avoid collision with the Forest Queen, and her cotton bales were 
at once set on fire by a shell from one of the enemy's guns. She 
was abandoned by her crew, floated down the river, and disap- 
peared below Warrenton. The Silver Wave was not injured. Xo 
one was killed, and only eight, on the gunboats, were wounded. 

The army was now moved, as ra])idly as ])ossiblc, on the Loui- 
siana side of the Mississippi River, through great swamps, and 
over corduroy roads made by the troops as they advanced, to iK)ints 
below N'icksburg. (leneral McClernand's cori)s had preceded 
these movements, and was located at Perkin's Plantation before the 
fleet ran the blockade. 

On the 25th day of April, the Ninety-Third Illinois entered 
upon the campaign, and marched to Richmond. The next day the 
regiment marched to Smith's Plantation, and remained in camp 
tho'-c the following day. On the 28th, the marcli was continued to 
Fisk's IMantation. On the 29th. Perkin's Landing was reached, 
and on the 30th, the command halted at Hard Times Landing. 
On May 1st, before noon, the regiment marched to Bruinsburg, 
and crossed the Mississippi River, on the steam ram Lafayette, 
landing a short distance below Oakland College, in Mississip])i. 
That afternoon, starting about 2 o'clock, the regiment made a rapid 
march toward the Port Gibson battlefield. The battle was on in 
earnest, and the roar of cannon, plainly heard, increased the speed 
of the column. A little before 5 o'clock, after marching twelve 
miles in iess than three hours, the command halted, and later went 
into camp for the night, a short distance west from the battlefield. 



24 HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 



The battle was over. General McClernand's corps, assisted near 
the close of the battle by Gen. John E. Smith's brigade, of General 
McPherson's corps, had met about fifteen thousand Confederates, 
commanded by General Bowen, and signally defeated them. The 
Federal loss in the battle was reported at 130 killed, and 718 
wounded. The Confederate loss is stated at 150 killed, 1,000 
wounded, and 500 captured and missing. 

At 3 o'clock the next morning, the Ninety-Third Illinois was on 
the road, and moved rapidly to the town of Port Gibson, on the 
north fork of Bayou Pierre. The enemy had partially destroyed 
the bridge over that stream. The bridge was repaired, and troops 
began to move over it about noon that day. This regiment took the 
advance, in pursuit of the enemy, now four or five hours ahead, 
and marched until 11 o'clock that night. • At midnight, General 
Logan's division passed to the front. On the morning of May 3d, 
the Ninety -Third Illinois was again in line before 3 o'clock, but did 
not move until after daylight. General Logan's division overtook 
the rear guard of the rebel army and skirmished with them all that 
day. At Fourteen Mile Creek, (so called because of its distance 
from Vicksburg), this regiment went into line of battle once, but 
the lebels ran away. At 9 o'clock that night, the command went 
into camp on the east side of Big Black River, and remained there 
five days. On the 9th and loth, it moved again, in an easterly 
course, by the way of Rocky Springs, to a point two miles east of 
Utica; and the next day, a mile farther on, went into camp in line 
of battle. On the 12th, the Ninety-Third Illinois was again leading 
the division, and marched to Raymond. A little after noon, that 
day, the command halted about three miles southwest from Ray- 
mond, and about three-quarters of a mile from the battlefield where 
General Logan's division was engaging a Confederate force of 
about six thousand men, under the command of Generals Gregg 
and Walker. The Seventh Division, (General Quimby's), of Gen- 
eral McPherson's corps, was then temporarily commanded by Gen. 
M. M. Crocker. General Logan declined assistance, tendered by 
General Crocker, and made short rift of the Confederates, although 
they fought stubbornly for two hours or more, and drove them, pell 
mell, from the field, and hotly pursued them through and beyond 
Raymond. The reports show the loss of General Logan's division 
at 69 killed, and 341 wounded. The loss of the enemy was placed 
at 100 killed, and 869 wounded. Some were captured, and many 
deserted. On the 13th, this regiment marched through Clinton, 
and camped one mile east of the town. 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 25 

THE BATTLE OF JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI. 

On May 14th, A. D. 1863, the march was continued toward 
Jackson, the capital of Mississippi. At 10 o'clock a. m., about 
three miles west of that place, on the road leading from Jackson to 
Vicksburg, the Seventh Division, at the head of General McPher- 
son's corps, found the enemy in force, on the crest of a ridge which 
extends a considerable distance along the west side of the city. 
The division was immediately formed in line of. battle, extended to 
the right and left across the road, at the foot of the western slope 
of that ridge, full three-quarters of a mile from the enemy's posi- 
tion. That slope, covered with green grass and dotted here and 
there with small groves and short stretches of young timber, was as 
beautiful as nature could make it. It was a subject for an artist's 
pencil. The Third Brigade was on the left of the division, and the 
Ninety-Third Illinois on the left of the brigade, thus forming the 
extreme left of the line. The batteries were soon brought into 
position, and the battle was commenced without much delay. ' 




'^"'■'^^S^^-^yK' 



BATTLE GROUND AT ]ACKSON, MISS.— FARM OF O. P. WRIGHT. 

The Ninely-Tbird ILUoois was on the eitreme leCl of the line of battle, to Ihe letl at Ihe 
Toad. There was limber there at the lime of the bmtle. WriKhl's house.— since bumed,— naa 
between the two chimoevs in the leFi foreground. The Confederate line of bailie was behind the 
buildings. They had a ballerr in the coad and another in the orchard south of the buildings. 

General Sherman's corps approached Jackson about the same 
time, from the south, and found the enemy there, about the same 
distance from the city, in what appeared to be a much stronger 
position than that in front of General McPherson's forces. But, as 
was soon developed, it was feebly defended. 

The batteries of Captains Dillon and McMurray opened on the 
enemy's hues in front of the Seventh Division, and the division, un- 
der General Crocker's orders, soon advanced. The line had tra- 
versed a little more than half the distance, and was still steadily ad- 



2<) HISTORY Ol- THE XIXETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 

vancing, when siidclenly, like a storm cloud breaks, a whole hrip^ade 
and more, from out the center, burst into an impetuous charge up 
that beautiful slope. Instantly, the whole division was madly rushing- 
onto the enemy's position. It was a sight beyond (lescri])tion. 
The Confederates were swept, like chaff in a gale, back to and out 
of and beyond their breastworks. The ])atteries were rushed to 
the front, and shelled them as thev fled. The battle was ended. 
Gen. Joseph E. Johnston, who was conducting the battle on the 
side of the Confederates, immediately withdrew his forces and 
abandoned the city. At 4 o'clock p. m., the flag of the h'ifty-ninth 
Indiana was unfurled over the state capitol of Mississippi, (jen- 
eral Sherman's corps entered the city, from the south, about the 
same time that (General McIMierson's cori)s reached it, from the 
west. The reports gave the losses of (leneral McPherson's corps 
at 2J killed, and 228 wounded. Tlie total Federal loss has been 
stated at 40 killed, and 240 wounded. The Confederate loss has 
been stated at 50 killed, and 400 wounded. There were also about 
400 prisoners taken, making a total loss of about 850. 

The Xinetv-Third Illinois lost two killed, one mortalh' 
wounded, and five others wounded, not mortally. The one mor- 
tally wounded fell into the hands of the enemy, a few days later, and 
died. He was never heard from afterward. The loss was one and 
six-tenths per cent- of the number engaged. 

\ C )n;the morning of the I5tli, the command started back, toward 
Vicksburg, and camped that night seven miles west of Clinton. 

THK BATTLE OF. CHAMPION HILL, MISSISSIPPI. 

May 16th, A. D. 1863, was destined to be a memorable day in 
the history of this regiment. The morning was beautiful and cool. 
The natural surroundings foretold nothing of the field of blood 
.only a few miles distant. And yet, as it is remembered now, from 
out all the surrounding l)eauty there came no smile. If the birds 
sang, their notes were mournful. The murmuring streams sang 
only the recjuiems of those who stopped to (jucnch their thirst. A 
somber hue overspread the verdant green of fields and woods. The 
sunlight was lusterless and cold. All nature seemed waiting, in 
fearful suspense, until the catastroi)he of that day should transpire 
and be passed. 

Just at sunrise the Xinetv-Third Illinois resumed its march 
toward Vicksburg. After numerous delays along the road, the 
command had marched no more than three or four miles when the 
sound of cannon, in front, foretold the battle. After marching 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 27 

eight miles, the scene of the conflict at Champion Hill, Mississippi, 
was reached. The battle was fought about three and a half miles 
southeast of Edward's Station, south of the Vicksburg & Jack- 
son Railroad, on the hills and through the ravines along the left 
bank of Baker's Creek. Tliere was a road, running in a course 
north-northw^esterly, from Raymond to Bolton, the latter being a 
small railroad station. Departing from or crossing that road, at 
different points between Raymond and Bolton, were three other 
roads, running toward Edward's Station. The longest of these 
three roads left the Raymond and Bolton road a little more than a 
mile north of Raymond and ran in a tolerably direct line to Ed- 
ward's Station, the course being about west-northwest. The 
middle road was about two miles farther north, and the third about 
four miles north of the middle one and about one mile south of 
Bolton, The middle road intercepted the south one a half mile 
east of Edward's Station. The north road intercepted the middle 
one about three miles farther east. The enemy's iK)sition was on a 
ridge, or, rather, a succession of hills, covered with heavy timber, 
and, in some places, with an undergrowth almost as dense as a 
jungle. The highest and most southerly of those hills was called 
Champion Hill. The north road mentioned above, the general 
course of which, from the point of its departure from the Raymond 
and Bolton road, was almost due west, turning sharply to the left, 
and describing a curve much like the upper half of an elongated 
letter S, ran up that ridge, and around on the left of and near to the 
crest of Champion Hill, passed over the ridge, and describing a 
curve much like the lower half of an elongated letter S, turned again 
to its westerly course, and intercepted the middle road at the last turn 
about a half mile south of Champion Hill. The enemy's forces had 
reached that point, and were met there, early in the morning, by 
General Osterhaus' division of General ^IcClernand's corps. That 
division, supported by the division of General Carr, of the same 
corps, had reached there by the middle road. Gen. A. J. Smith's 
division had previously met and skirmished with the advance gfuard 
of the enemy on the south road. That division was supported by 
the division of Gen. Erank P. Blair, who was then under orders to 
intercept and join General Sherman's forces at or near Bolton. 
General Hovey's division, of General McQernand's corps, had 
moved westward on the north road, and soon met the enemy, in 
strong force, on the ridge and hills on the left bank of Baker's 
Creek, at or near the point where the road turned to the left, as 
above indicated. Baker's Creek, south of the railroad, flows 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 




HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 29 

almost due south, bearing a little to the west, and empties into 
Fourteen Mile Creek. General Hovey immediately disposed his 
division, extending his line of battle southward, in such manner 
that he was at once ready for attack or defense. General McPher- 
son's corps was moving on the north road, to the support of Gen- 
eral Hovey's division. General Logan's division, of that corps, had 
the advance, and, on reaching the field, went into position on the 
right of General Hovey's division, extending the line up Baker's 
Creek. Thus, it will be observed, the divisions of Generals Hovey 
and Logan formed the right of the Federal forces, the divisions of 
Generals Osterhaus and Carr the center, and the divisions of Gen- 
erals A. J. Smith and Blair, the left. The left of General Hovey's 
division was separated, a full half mile or more, from the right of 
General Osterhaus' line by the dense jungle on the eastern and 
southeastern slopes of Champion Hill. 

General Pemberton was intending to move his army north- 
ward, on the east side of the Big Black River, with the view of 
joining forces with Gen. Joseph E. Johnston, in compliance with 
his orders, dated late on the 14th, and received by General Pem- 
berton early on the morning of the i6th.* Hence, it was that, 
although Gen. A. J. Smith's division, on the south road, first met 
and skirmished with the enemy, the brunt of the battle finally fell 
upon the positions occupied by the divisions of Generals Hovey and 
Logan, on the right of the Federal lines. Those divisions blocked 
General Pemberton's intended movement. 

When the Third Brigade (of which the Ninety-Third Illinois 
formed a part) reached the field, the battle had already been in 
progress nearly three hours. For two hours it had been furious. 
General Logan's division, on the extreme right, had gained con- 
siderable ground, and was still heavily pressing the enemy's left. 
But for two hours General Pemberton had been massing his forces 
against General Hovey's division, making a desperate effort to 
break the lines and cut through on his course northward. That 
division had gained some ground during the first hour of the battle, 
and, although now greatly outnumbered by the enemy, was still 
holding it. As soon as the Third Brigade arrived at a point near 
the first turn of the north road, it moved into the dense woods on 
the left of the road, and, extending its line of battle beyond the 
left of General Hovey's division, attempted to move up the south- 

*General Pemberton afterwards claimed, that this order was not received by him 
until the evening of the 16th, after the battle of Champion Hill was fought and lo^t 
to him. 



30 HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 

east slope of Champion Hill, with the view of striking the enemy's 
right flank. After a half hour or more had been spent, struggling 
and floundering and tearing through the dense jungle of under- 
growth and tangled vines which covered that slope of the hill, 
the brigade was withdrawn, and moved into an open field on the 
right of the road. Could that movement have been continued, an 
effective blow would have been delivered; but it was simplv im- 
possible. The Xinety-Third Illinois was again on the left of the 
brigade, the Twenty-sixth Missouri on the right, and the two Iowa 
regiments in the center. The brigade remained in the open field 
i)uc a short time. About 2 o'clock, a brigadier general, (said to 
have been dencral McGinnis), came dashing down the road, from 
tlie hill, spurring his horse at every jump, approached the brigade 
commander. Col. George II. r>oomer, and said to him: **l^"or God's 
sake, put this brigade into this fight." Instantly the voice of 
Colonel lioomer rang out: "Attention, brigade! Shoulder, arms! 
Left, face! Forward, march! Right shoulder shift, arms! Double 
quick, march!'' And up that hill, left in front, the brigade flew. 
AV'hen the command had passed around the turn in the road and 
was approaching the crest of the hill, "Shoulder, arms! Wy the 
right flank, march!" came from Colonel Boomer. And now, in 
line of battle, still at double-quick time, down the slope of the hill, 
the brigade rushed into the thickest of the fight. The left of 
(ieneral Hovcy's division was just beginning to break, under the 
repeated onslaughts of greatly superior numbers. The coming of 
this brigade, and its vigorous participation in the battle, checked 
the advancing lines of the enemy, and restored the broken lines 
of (jeneral Hovev's division. lUit the Confederates still continued 
to mass their forces for the purpose of turning the left of this 
position. The battle was a continuous flame of fire from thousands 
of muskets. At the end of twenty minutes, a heavy force of the 
enemy passed around to the left of the brigade and j^oured a galling 
fire into the ranks of the Xinety-Third Illinois. The line must, of 
necessity, recede. Uj) the steep slope the left fell back, changing 
front to conform to the new position gained l)y the enemy. On 
this new line, for twenty minutes more, the battle increased in 
fury every minute. \'olley after volley was poured into the ranks 
of the Confederates as they came up the slope. But on they came, 
in constantly increasing numbers. Another column was passed 
around the left, and the Xinety-Third Illinois was again raked with 
an enfilading fire. The regiment again retired, and clianged its 
front as ])cfore. In ])oth these retrograde movements, the line of 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 31 

the brigade was made to conform to the movements of the Ninety- 
Third Illinois, the extreme right representing a pivot on which it 
swung. The situation was now extremely critical. The Second 
1 brigade of the division was an hour behind when the Third Brigade 
went into action. Forty minutes of that hour had elapsed. The 
left of the Xinety-Third Illinois was then in the road, a considerable 
distance down the slope, northeast of the crest of that hill. The 
two changes of front were nearly equal to the fourth part of a circle. 
.\nd this position must be held for twenty minutes more against 
an exultant foe. Captain Lloyd and a large number of men were 
already killed, and nearly, if not quite, a hundred officers and men 
wounded. Xearly one-third of the entire regiment, and nearly 
lialf of Company K, on the extreme left, had fallen on the first 
vAul second lines. The conflict had been unequal from the first; but 
now it was thousands against hundreds. The enemy, at this critical 
juncture, brought a battery, fairly flying, to the crest of the hill, 
and ])egan to ])lant it within less than forty rods from the line of 
this regmieni. Two guns were planted. Two charges of grape 
and canister were fired from one of them and one charge from the 
other. I'or ten minutes the battle was more intense, if possible, 
than at any time before. Then, for ten minutes more, it gradually 
decreased in furv. Scmie of the enemy's forces were evidently 
being withdrawn, (ieneral Logan's division was heavily pressing 
its advantage in front of the Confederate left, and getting danger- 
ously near the road on which General Pemberton's army, if defeated, 
must return to Vicksburg. At this moment the Second Brigade of 
V ieneral Crocker's division, of (ieneral MclMierson's corps, reached 
the field, and two regiments of it made a brilliant charge upon 
the right of the Confederate line and the battery mentioned above. 
Their yell was the first notice to the contending forces of their 
l»resence, and it was a most glorious shout. L']) the hill they swept, 
(Mito the enemy's right, battery and all, just before they were ready 
to withdraw their remaining forces. The two ])lanted guns of the 
battery were cai)tured. their lines were broken, and the enemy fled 
|)recipitately from the field. The retreat soon became a rout, and a 
mad rush to get back to the west bank of the liig lUack River. 
General Logan's division at once secured a position so close to 
the road which was (ieneral Pemberton's only line of retreat, that 
(ieneral Loring's division was cut off from the 'remainder of the 
C onfederate r.rmy, k)st all -its batteries, and barely escaped capture 
by ])assing out, in a southerly course, between the division of 
(]en. A. J. Smith and the l>ig lUack River. The divisions of 



32 HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 

Generals Carr and Osterhaus immediately pursued the flying Con- 
federates, and continued the pursuit until about 9 o'clock that night. 
A great battle was ended. 

The Third Brigade, with the Ninety-Third Illinois forming its 
extreme left, with every man engaged, and wholly without support, 
had most desperately fought the enemy, who at no time had less 
than two, and a part of the time had four, well formed lines, for 
a whole hour. During this time it was twice terrifically enfiladed 
on the left, and forced to fall back and change its front under fire. 
It was a test of endurance and discipline and courage that brought 
great praise, and made the brigade famous throughout the army. 
It was no light honor to bear such reputation in an army so illus- 
trious as the Army of the Tennessee. 

After the battle was over, Lieut. Col. (afterward Colonel) B. D. 
Dean, then in command of the Twenty-sixth Missouri, who had 
experienced hard fighting before, at Corinth and luka, paid the 
Ninety-Third Illinois a very high and well-deserved compliment. 
He said that when he saw the massive forces of the enemy in 
front of the extreme left of the brigade, while on the first line of 
battle, and realized that a movement was being made to turn the 
left of the line, he became extremely solicitous as to whether or 
not the Ninety-Third Illinois would be equal to the emergency. He 
rode, as rapidly as possible, toward the left, to render aid, if neces- 
sary, and reached a good point of observation just in time to witness 
the first retrograde movement and change of front made by the 
regiment. When it was completed, he immediately returned to his 
own command, fully satisfied that the left was in safe keeping, and 
wondering why he had ever doubted it. When the emergency 
arose the second time, he said, that, although he watched it with 
much anxiety, he entertained no fear that the regiment would break 
or yield until it should be literally swept from the field. Neither 
the one thing nor the other happened. 

Considering the numbers engaged, and the duration of the 
battle, the losses were very great, and clearly show that the divisions 
of Generals Hovey and Logan and Colonel Boomer's brigade, 
contaming no more than 14,000 men, practically fought the battle 
on the Federal side. General Grant estimated the Confederate 
forces engaged at 25,000. As reported. General Hovey's division 
lost 211 killed, 872 wounded, and 119 missing, which must have 
been fully one-fourth of his entire force, engaged. General Oster- 
haus' division lost 14 killed, 76 wounded, and 20 missing. Gen. 
A. J. Smith's division lost 24 wounded, and 4 missing. General 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 33 

Logan's division and Colonel Boomer's brigade, both of General 
McPherson's corps, lost 201 killed, 870 wounded, and 46 missing. 
The loss of the two regiments that made the charge just at the 
close of the battle is not known, but it was very small, not exceeding 
10 or 12 men. The total loss was 426 killed, 1,842 wounded, and 
189 missing, making 2,457 i^ ^^l- The Confederates lost 500 killed, 
2,000 wounded, and 1,800 captured, making 4,300 in all, and also lost 
fifteen or twenty cannon, several thousand muskets, and large quan- 
tities of supplies and munitions. 

The Ninety-Third Illinois lost Capt. David Lloyd and 37 
men killed, 33 officers and men mortally wounded, 82 officers 
and men wounded, not mortally, and i officer and 10 men 
missing. The total loss was 164. Three of those missing 
were never heard from afterward. There were present with the 
regiment a little less than 500 officers and men when it went 
into action. The loss was thirty-three and two-tenths per 
cent of the number engaged. This regiment contained, when it 
went into the battle, about three and a half per cent of the entire 
number engaged on the positions occupied by the right wing of 
the army, where the principal part of the fighting occurred. Its 
loss was about six and two-thirds per cent of the entire loss on 
the Federal side. These facts are wholly sufficient, without com- 
ment, to show the vital importance of its position in the battle, 
as well as the manner in which it responded to the emergencies oi 
that houf-. 

After the battle was over the decimated ranks were closed up, 
the regiment re-formed, cartridge boxes refilled, and the march 
toward Vicksburg resumed. There was some delay before the 
command moved. This afforded a little time in which those who 
survived eagerly sought their friends who fell. It was not long, 
but sufficient to bind up many wounds, and to say the last good- 
bye to those whose wounds were mortal. Between 9 and 10 o'clock 
that night, after moving two and a half miles, the regiment went 
into camp. Some returned to the battlefield to render further aid 
to wounded comrades ; some, exhausted, laid down and slept. All 
were sad. 

Why the divisions of Generals Osterhaus and Carr, the center 
of the Federal army, and the divisions of Generals A. J. Smith and 
Blair, the left wing, were not put into action, has never been satis- 
factorily explained, so far as is now known. General Grant was 
on the right, with Generals Hovey and Logan and McPherson, from 
the beginning to the end of the battle. The positions of his forces 

3 



34 HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 

were most advantageous, and his plan of battle was beyond criticism. 
Shortly after noon, he sent orders to General McClernand, direct- 
ing him to advance his forces as rapidly as possible. At least one, 
and perhaps two, of his divisions were within sight of the battle 
fully two hours. Had Generals Osterhaus and Carr's divisions ad- 
vanced, at any time between i and 3 o'clock, they could have struck 
the right flank of the Confederate forces that engaged General 
Hovey's division and Colonel Boomer's brigade, and between 2 
and 3 o'clock could have struck a considerable part of those forces 
well in the rear, and quickly relieved General Hovey's division 
and Colonel Boomer's brigade. Had Generals A. J. Smith and 
Blair advanced their divisions, at any time during the same period, 
they could have struck the Confederate rear a full mile from the 
right of their line, that was so engaged, literally cut their army in 
two, and caused the certain capture of at least half of it. EarHer 
in the day. General McClernand had shown his knowledge of the 
situation by his expressed solicitude that General McPherson's 
forces should vigorously support General Hovey's division. Not- 
withstanding this, two of his divisions, during two full hours, were 
not only in hearing of the battle, where the forces of Generals Hovey 
and McPherson were fighting to the death, but actually in sight of it. 
That these divisions were not vigorously brought into action was 
wholly inexplicable. When General Grant called for an explanation, 
no satisfactory one was given. General Grant would have been justi- 
fied had he relieved General McClernand of his command that 
evening, instead of a few days later, at Vicksburg, after he had 
committed another blunder that cost the army very dearly, and 
included the loss of about one hundred brave men of the Third 
Brigade. Perhaps General Grant never doubted his fidelity. But 
certain it was that his military career was most unfortunate for 
himself and disastrous to the army. 

General Quimby reached the field while the battle was in prog- 
ress, but did not assume command of the Seventh Division until 
the next day. Without disparagement of General Quimby, because 
he was a brave and able commander, the entire command regretted 
General Crocker's departure. He was kind, brilliant and coura- 
geous, and had endeared himself to all by the exercise of those 
qualities. But his health was then failing, and he died, of con- 
sumption, befpre the close of the war. 

At 9 o'clock the next morning, the regiment was again formed 
to move forward. Then tears came, unbidden, to the eyes of brave 
men. The fearful losses of the previous day had not until then 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 35 

been fully realized. That short line told all. The command 
marched about six miles that day, and camped near Big Black 
River. On the i8th, the regiment crossed that river, on a bridge 
made of cotton bales, lashed together, marched eight miles, and went 
into camp twelve miles from Vicksburg. On the 19th, after a 
march of nine miles, the command arrived, about noon, within a 
half mile of the enemy's works at Vicksburg, was immediately 
formed in Hne of battle, and advanced about a quarter of a mile 
under fire of the Confederate artillery. The position was south 
of the public highway leading into the city from Jackson. One 
man was mortally wounded. On the 20th, in the forenoon, the Hne 
was again advanced about two hundred yards. One man was 
slightly wounded. In the afternoon, the command moved some dis- 
tance to the left, but no nearer the enemy's works. On the 21st, 
no change of position was made. During the day, the line was 
lightly shelled by the Confederate batteries. 

THE CHARGE. 

On May 22d, A. D. 1863, at 10 o'clock a. m., the regiment 
took an advanced position on the left of Fort Hill. The command 
had been in line of battle four or five hours before the movement 
was executed. While making the charge that carried the regiment 
to that position, at the brow of the last hill in front of the Confed- 
erate works, the line was somewhat exposed to the fire of the 
enemy, and eight or nine men were wounded. The brigade had 
orders to secure that position, and, after doing so, to remain there 
until the brigade next on its right, of General Logan's division, 
should advance. Then the whole line was to have moved on the 
enemy's works. While there two or three more men were wounded. 
The day was excessively hot, and it was necessary that the com- 
mand should lie flatly on the ground to be protected from the 
enemy's guns. The hillside squarely faced toward the sun. While 
there a considerable number of men were sunstruck. The brigade 
on the right did not move, and consequently this command ad- 
vanced no farther. 

At 2 o'clock p. m., the brigade was withdrawn from that posi- 
tion, and moved about three miles to the left, under orders to sup- 
port some of General McClernand's forces. At 3:30 o'clock p. m., 
it reached General McClernand's lines, just north of the railroad 
leading into Vicksburg from Jackson. Instead of being placed as 
support, merely, the brigade was immediately ordered to charge the 
enemy's rifle pits, located between two large forts. It was reported 



30 HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 

that the batteries in those forts had been silenced. The statement 
was soon proved erroneous. The brigade was formed for the 
charge and ready to make it, at 4 o'clock p. m. The formation was 
in two lines. The Ninety-Third Illinois and the Twenty-sixth Mis- 
souri in front, the Ninety-Third Illinois being again on the left and 
the Twenty-sixth Missouri on the right. The Fifth Iowa was 
behind the Twenty-sixth Missouri, and the Tenth Iowa behind the 
Ninety-Third Illinois. Between the line where the brigade was so 
formed and the rifle pits there were two ridges, not more than 
thirty or forty rods apart, which formed the two sides of a shallow 
ravine. The rifle pits were not more than forty rods beyond the 
west side of that ravine. The south end of the ridge, on the west 
side of the ravine, was quite low, and, a short distance farther south, 
sank to the general level. The south end of the rifle pits, and the 
fort located there, were a little south of southwest from the south 
end of that ridge, and commanded the major part of the ravine. 
The lines of the enemy's range, from those points, cut across the 
line of the west ridge, and over the south end of it, at an angle of 
fifty degrees, or more. Under those conditions the brigade had 
orders to charge across the ravine, rest behind the brow of the west 
ridge, and, from thence, make the final charge on the rifle pits. If 
a soldier might at any time, or at all, weigh his life, in the scales, 
against his honor, that was a time to determine which he would 
lose. The rifle pits and forts were filled to their utmost capacity, 
and the glitter of Confederate arms in the evening sunlight told 
only too plainly how desperate the venture was. Time and time 
and again that day the Federal troops had charged, and charged, 
and charged, and gained no tenable position on the lines of the 
enemy. It was much like marching men to their graves in line of 
battle. But there was little time for cool calculations. The voice 
of the brigade commander ended that. The command being given, 
the brigade moved forward, at first in common time. "Double- 
quick, march!" rang out, in clear and penetrating tones, from Col- 
onel Boomer. As the enemy's fire began to reach the ranks, the 
brigade swept over the first ridge and into the ravine. The storm 
of bullets and shot and shell that was there hurled against those 
lines was simply appalling. Increasing the speed every second, 
the command rushed across the ravine to the protection afforded by 
the ridge on the other side, and there halted. Over forty men of 
the Ninety-Third Illinois had fallen in less than a minute and a half. 
On the left, near the south end of the ridge, it was necessary to lie 
prostrate on the ground to be protected from the guns of the enemy. 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 37 

While resting there, Col. George B. Boomer, the brigade com- 
mander, was instantly killed, probably by a shot from the gun of a 
Confederate sharpshooter. Colonel Putnam, of the Ninety-Third 
Illinois, immediately assumed command. After a little delay, he 
called the lines to attention, for the final charge. The brigade rose 
up, but only to take one quick glance into the jaws of certain death. 
The sheet of flame, from thousands of muskets, that burst from 
those rifle pits in front, the thousands of bullets that came whistling 
over, and screaming shells and grape and canister from both forts, 
foretold nothing less than the complete annihilation of the entire 
command if it should pass beyond the protection of that ridge. 
The whole brigade, as a single man, went down to its prostrate 
position more quickly than it had risen. Colonel Putnam immedi- 
ately reported to General Carr, (the charge having been made in 
front of the lines of his division), that the enemy was heavily rein- 
forced in front, and that the brigade would advance no farther with- 
out positive orders so to do. He received orders back, from Gen- 
eral Carr, that the command should remain where it was until 
dark, and then withdraw. That was done. 

It was near midnight when the last of the dead and wounded 
were removed from the ravine. The sun went down, nor moon, 
nor stars gave any light upon that field. The darkness was both 
shroud for the dead and garb of mourning for the living. A heavy 
mist was falling. The night was painfully silent. The profound 
quiet was only occasionally broken by sounds from moving troops 
in the rear, or by the inquiries of those, now seeking their com- 
mands, who had escaped, under cover of the darkness, from their 
places of concealment and protection where they had taken refuge 
when their lines had been shattered and broken and repulsed by 
the enemy earlier in the day. With only the bare ground for beds, 
and rocks for pillows, it was not a night for sleep. 

On May 23d, at 3 o'clock p. m., the brigade moved back to its 
own command, and was placed in reserve, in rear of the lines occu- 
pied by General McPherson's corps. This command had been 
four days within range of the enemy's guns, and a considerable 
part of that time under fire. It was now given a chance to breathe 
a little more freely for a short time. 

THE SIEGE. 

It was now generally understood that no further attempt 
would be made to take Vicksburg by assault, and the siege was 
immediately entered upon. It may be true, as has been stated, that 



38 HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 

the assault made on the 22d was necessary to satisfy the army that 
the place could not be so taken, in order that it might the more 
contentedly and zealously enter upon a long and tedious siege. 
Certain it is, that the army, flushed with the victories on five sepa- 
rate battlefields, during the campaign, before reaching the city, (the 
battle at the Big Black River, on the morning of the 17th of May, 
having been omitted from these pages, because this command was 
not engaged in it), was not only not averse to it, but actually clam- 
ored for the assault. It is not intended, in this volume, to enter into 
the details of the siege beyond what is necessary to show the part of 
the Ninety-Third Illinois in it in such manner that its movements 
can be identified. 

The besieging lines were immediately formed, with General 
Sherman's corps on the right, extending from the Yazoo River, or 
Bayou, to the right of General McPherson's corps, which occupied 
the center of the lines. General McClemand's corps, (the command 
of which was finally transferred to General Ord), occupied the left. 
Other forces soon arrived, and were located on different parts of the 
lines, particularly on the left. Heavy siege guns and batteries were 
soon planted all along the lines, from the Yazoo, above the city, t:) 
the Mississippi River, below it. A large number of gunboats and 
mortarboats, in the Mississippi, closed the lines around the fated city, 
and vigorously prosecuted the siege from that side, bombarding 
the place every day and night. Forts were constructed every- 
where, trenches and roadways were cut through the hills and in 
the ravines at every conceivable angle, under the direction of 
skillful engineers, and the Federal lines gradually advanced to posi- 
tions closer and closer to the Confederate works. The under- 
mining of the Confederate works, particularly Fort Hill, in front 
of General Logan's division, was vigorously prosecuted, and 
counter-mining, by the enemy, was indulged in to some extent. 
Almost every command in the army participated, more or less, in 
these operations, which were general. The rule was, that some 
progress should be made, and was made, and some advantage 
gained, eveiy day. The enemy must be securely held until he 
should surrender. And he was. Gen. Joseph E. Johnston was all 
the time making vigorous eflforts to gather an army, in the rear, 
sufficient to raise the siege. His forces must of necessity be kept 
east of the Big Black River. And they were. Such was the gen- 
eral situation, and the general progress of events, and the results. 

During the 24th and 25th days of May, the Ninety-Third Illi- 
nois rested in the camp taken on the 23d. On the 26th, the regi- 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 




40 HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 

ment, and brigade, again moved to the front, and occupied the posi- 
tion from which it moved on the morning of the 22d, and con- 
tinued to occupy the same position until the 21st day of June, 
inclusive. During that period, the regiment was on the skirmish 
line as often as every second day, and many times during the inter- 
vening days also. Within that period, one man was wounded. On 
the 3d day of June, General Quimby was assigned to another com- 
mand, and Gen. John E. Smith became the commander of the 
Seventh Division, and continued in command until the close of the 
war. On June 22d, the command left the lines immediately 
around Vicksburg, and marched seven miles, in a northeasterly 
course, toward the Big Black River; and on the 23d, marched nine 
miles farther in the same direction. On the 24tK, the regiment 
moved four miles, camped on Bear Creek, and remained there that 
day and the next. On the 25th, a small force of guerrillas fired a 
volley or two into the camp and then ran away. No one was hifrt. 
On the 26th, the command marched back toward Vicksburg, about 
five miles, to McCall's Plantation, and remained there the three 
days following. On the 30th, the regiment, and brigade, after mov- 
ing three miles, took position, facing toward the east, in the rear 
line around Vicksburg, to aid in the defense against the forces of 
General Johnston, which were then threatening the rear of the 
besieging army. July ist to 6th, inclusive, the command 
remained in the position occupied on June 30th. 

On the morning of July 4th, A. D. 1863, Vicksburg was sur- 
rendered. On that occasion. General Pemberton turned over to 
General Grant more than 31,000 prisoners of war, including about 
fifteen Generals, about one hundred and twenty-five cannon and 
eighty siege guns, arms and munitions of war for more than 50,000 
men, and a large amount of public property, such as railroad loco- 
motives and cars, steamboats, etc., and a large quantity of cotton. 
Everything was surrendered except the side arms and individual 
property of officers. Negotiations for the surrender began on the 
3d. It was said, that General Logan's division was fully prepared 
for a Fourth of July celebration, in which the other commands 
around the city were expected to participate, the prominent features 
of which were to have been the explosion of the mines laid by that 
division under Fort Hill, and a general assault, all along the lines, 
upon the enemy's works. General Pemberton, as was reported, 
being apprehensive that such events might then transpire, and also 
fearful of the results, and being satisfied that General Johnston's 
army would not be able to raise the siege, and that there was no 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 41 

longer any hope of relief from any other source, surrendered the 
place at an earlier date than had been anticipated. Information of 
the surrender reached the army on the rear lines, along the Big 
Black River, soon after noon that day, and that army immediately 
became delirious with joy. It was one continuous round of very 
demonstrative rejoicing from that moment until late that night, 
and, in fact, it continued all night. Nothing like it was ever wit- 
nessed before, and its equal nefver afterward. The demonstrations 
at the close of the war were sufficiently hilarious, but that occasion 
was tumultuous. The surrender of Vicksburg was thought to be, 
as it really was, the beginning of the end. 

General McPherson issued the following congratulatory order, 
which was read on the color line of every regiment in the corps : 



"Headquarters Seventeenth Army Corps, 

"Department of the Tennessee. 

"Vicksburg, Miss., July 4th, 1863. 

"General Order No. 20. 

"Soldiers of the Seventeenth Army Corps: 

"Again I rejoice with you over your brilliant achievements and 
your unparalleled success. Hardly had your flag floated to the 
breeze on the Capitol of Mississippi, when, springing to the call of 
your noble commander, you rushed upon the defiant columns of the 
enemy, at Champion Hill, and drove him in confusion and dismay 
across the Big Black to his defenses within the stronghold of Vicks- 
burg. 

"Your assaulting columns, which moved promptly on his 
works on the 226. of May and stood for hours undaunted 
under a withering fire, were unsuccessful only because no men 
could take the position by storm. 

"With tireless energy, with sleepless vigilance, by night and 
by day, with battery and rifle pit, with trench and mine, you made 
your sure approaches, until, overcome by fatigue and driven to des- 
pair in the attempt to oppose your irresistible progress, the whole 
garrison of over thirty thousand men, with all their arms an4 muni- 
tions of war, have on this, the Anniversary of our National Inde- 
pendence, surrendered to the invincible troops of the Army of the 
Tennessee. The achievements of this hour will give a new mean- 
ing to this memorable day, and Vicksburg will brighten the glow in 
the patriot's heart which kindles at the mention of Bunker Hill and 
Yorktown. 

"This is, indeed, an auspicious day for you. The God of Bat- 



42 HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 

ties is with you. The dawn of a conquered peace is breaking upon 
you; the plaudits of an admiring world will hail you wherever you 
may go; and it will be an ennobling heritage, surpassing all riches, 
to have been of the Seventeenth Army Corps on the Fourth day of 
July, A. D. 1863. 

"JAMES B. Mcpherson, 

"Major General." 

• 

On the 5th and 6th, a considerable part of the Confederate 
army, on their way out from Vicksburg, then under parole, and 
without arms, passed the camp of the Ninety-Third Illinois. They 
were treated courteously, and many of them seemed to appreciate it. 
Many of the Union soldiers divided the contents of their haversacks 
with hungry Confederates. It was "bread cast upon the waters.'^ 
How much of it was lost can never be known. But it was humane* 
and that was sufficient for the victorious army. 

The Vicksburg campaign, however, was not yet ended. Gen- 
eral Johnston had gathered a considerable army, perhaps about 
25,000 men, on the east side of the Big Black River, and that 
force must be defeated and dispersed. General Sherman had been 
in immediate command of the rear lines, and was then there. The 
remainder of his corps, and a part of General McPherson's, not 
already there, were sent to him, and he immediately crossed the 
Big Black River and moved against the forces of General Johnston. 
General Johnston at once retired to Jackson, and there made a 
stand the second time. General Sherman followed him. 

On July 7th, the Third Brigade, including the Ninety-Third 
Illinois, marched to the Big Black River, six miles, and camped 
near the railroad bridge, and remained there until the 12th, in- 
clusive. 

On the 13th, the command marched again, to Champion Hill, 
and camped on that battlefield. It was an uncanny place for the 
camp of that brigade. It was midsummer. But the foHage of 
the trees there was half green and half in the colors of autumn. 
Y^ellow leaves, on branches cut by bullets and shot and shell and 
grape and canister during the battle there, were hanging every- 
where among those that were still green, and told only too plainly 
how sanguinary the conflict had been. A few unknown skulls, 
some of them marked "C. S. A.,'' were found on different parts of 
the field, and added much to intensify the weird feelings inspired 
by such surroundings. All felt a sense of relief when the command 
moved the next morning. On the 14th, the march was continued 
to Clinton; and on the 15th, to the lines around Jackson. 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 43 




L/xikiiig Easl from 



44 HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 

General Sherman had reached Jackson on the 9th, and had 
invested the place as early as the 12th, extending his lines to the 
Pearl River above and below the city. His army there must have 
numbered nearly, if not quite, 40,000 men, and he must have had 
nearly a hundred cannon planted on the hills. On the night of 
the i6th. General Johnston evacuated the place, crossed Pearl River, 
burned the bridges behind him, and fell back to Meridian, about 
a hundred miles east of Jackson. Nothing less than that was safe 
distance then. General Sherman's army pursued the Confederates 
as far as Brandon, and then returned to the west side of the Big 
Black River. 

The Ninety-Third Illinois had no part in the capture of Jackson 
the second time. On the same day the command reached the 
lines around Jackson, it returned to Clinton. On the i6th, the regi- 
ment marched to Bolton; on the 17th, to Champion Hill again, 
and camped there the second time; on the i8th, to Edward's 
Station, and remained there until the 22d, inclusive. On the 
23d, the command moved to the railroad bridge over the Big 
Black River, wading through water, of varying depth, nearly 
every foot of the distance, seven miles, and remained at that place 
the next day. On the 25th, the regiment marched to Vicksburg, 
and camped just inside the fortifications, on the hills east of the 
city, and remained there until the 30th, inclusive. On the 31st, 
the regiment moved two miles, and went into camp in the city, and 
there remained, doing post duty, the average detail being about 
eighty men daily, until the nth day of September following, and 
inclusive. 

On the I2th day of September, A. D. 1863, the regiment em- 
barked on the steamer Schuyler, and again moved up the Mississippi 
River. It was rumored that the destination was Little Rock, 
Arkansas, but it was not generally credited. It was soon proved 
to be another false rumor. On the 15th, the command reached 
Helena, Arkansas, disembarked and went into camp, and remained 
there until the 29th, inclusive. On the 30th, the regiment embarked 
on the steamer Liberty No. 2, and again moved up the river, reach- 
ing Memphis, Tennessee, at midnight. October ist, the command 
disembarked, and went into camp a mile and a half north of the 
city, and remained there the next day. While the command was 
leaving the steamer, some member of the regiment shouted: 
"Change cars for Chattanooga and all points east." That settled it. 

While these movements were not a part of the Vicksburg 
campaign, they have been included in this chapter, for no better 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 45 

reason, perhaps, than that of chronological separation from the 
campaign which followed. 

The Vicksburg campaign was really ended when General Sher- 
man's army returned from Jackson to the west side of the Big 
Black River, after the second capture of that place. The large 
Confederate army that blocked the great waterway of the West 
had been completely destroyed as a military force, defeated, cap- 
tured, dispersed and scattered to the four winds. The total loss 
of the enemy was not only an army of over 50,000 men, with all 
its arms and munitions and equipments, but the great states of 
Arkansas, Louisiana and Texas, with their wealth of supplies, were 
now severed from the other states of the Confederacy. 

The Federal losses at the siege of Vicksburg, from May 19th 
to July 4th, have been stated, probably correctly, at 545 killed, 3,688 
wounded, and 303 captured and missing; making the total loss 

4,536. 

The losses of the Ninety-Third Illinois were 4 killed, 10 mor- 
tally wounded, and 41 wounded, not mortally; making the total 
loss 55. The total loss was sixteen and two-thirds per cent of 
the number engaged. Those who were sunstruck on the 22d day 
of May are not included. 

P>om the date of its departure from Helena, Arkansas, April 
13th, until its arrival at Memphis, Tennessee, October ist, inclusive, 
covering the whole period of the Vicksburg campaign, and more, 
the regiment traveled by water about seven hundred miles, and 
marched about three hundred and thirty miles. 



CHAPTER V. 

THE CHATTANOOGA CAMPAIGN. — BATTLE OF MISSION RIDGE. 

On the 3d day of October, A. D. 1863, late in the evening, 
the Ninety-Third Illinois boarded cars on the Meniphis &, Charleston 
Railroad, and, a little after midnight, at 12:10 a. m., on the 4th day 
of that month, left Memphis, to return there no more. It was, surely 
enough, a "Change cars for Chattanooga and all points east." 
Glendale, Mississippi, was reached that evening, and the command 
went into camp there, and remained until the 7th, inclusive. On 
the 8th, the command marched to Burnsville, Mississippi, and re- 
mained there, in camp, until the i8th, inclusive. The troops re- 
ceived pay on the last mentioned date. On the 19th, the regiment 
marched to luka, Mississippi, and remained there the next day. 
On the 21 St and 22d, the march was continued to Bear Creek, 
Alabama, and on the 23d, to Dixon's Station, Alabama, where 
the command remained, in camp, until the 28th, inclusive. On the 
29th, the regiment marched to Chickasaw Landing, on the Ten- 
nessee River. On the 30th, the command crossed the Tennessee 
River, on a gunboat, camped at Waterloo, Alabama, and remained 
there the next day. At 5:30 p. m. on November ist, the regiment 
marched again, and went into camp, at midnight, near Gravel 
Springs, Alabama. On November 2d, the command marched to 
Florence, Alabama; and on the 3d, to Taylor's Springs, Alabama; 
and on the 4th, to Anderson's Creek, Alabama; and on the 5th, to 
Gilbertsboro, Tennessee; and on the 6th, to Richland Creek, 
Tennessee. The Ninety-Third Illinois was rear guard to the train 
that day. On November 7th, the regiment waded Richland Creek, 
a stream about three feet deep, and marched to Bradshaw Creek, 
Tennessee; and on the 8th, to within three miles of Fayetteville, 
Tennessee; and on the 9th, to Kane Creek, Tennessee, and rested 
there the most of that day, having moved only one mile. On the 
loth, the command crossed Elk River at Fayetteville, and marched 
eleven miles; and on the nth, marched to within six miles of Win- 
chester, Tennessee; and on the 12th, after moving four miles, went 
into camp for the rest of that day and the night. On the 13th, the 
regiment marched seventeen miles, a considerable part of the dis- 
tance being up the western slope of a spur of the Cumberland 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 47 

Mountains, and camped on top of the mountain; and the next day, 
marched down the mountain, and camped on Battle Creek; and on 
the 15th, marched to Bridgeport, Alabama, and remained there the 
two following days. On the i8th, the command crossed the Ten- 
nessee River, at Bridgeport, and marched to Shellmound, then 
•called Shell Mountain. On the 19th, the regiment marched twenty 
miles, passed within range of the Confederate batteries on Lookout 
Mountain without eliciting their fire, again crossed the Tennessee 
River, and camped on the north side of it; and on the 20th, at 3 
o'clock a. m., after moving up the river about four miles, went into 
camp, and remained there until after midnight of the 23d. This 
last movement was covered from the observation of the enemy, on 
Lookout Mountain and Mission Ridge, by a range of high hills on 
the north side of the river, as well as by the night. Gen. John E. 
Smith's division was the first that crossed the Tennessee River 
l)elow the point of Lookout Mountain and occupied this position. 
Gen. Morgan L. Smith's division crossed the river and came to the 
same position on the 21st. The bridge then broke and caused two 
•days' delay. Then General Ewing's division crossed and occupied 
the same position on the 23d. Then the bridge broke again, leav- 
ing the division of General Osterhaus on the south side of the 
river; whereupon, that division was ordered to join the forces of 
General Hooker, then in Lookout Valley and behind the Raccoon 
Mountains west of Lookout. The division of Gen. Jeflf C. Davis 
took the place of General Osterhaus' division, in the Fifteenth 
Corps, on the 24th. General Sherman had been assigned to the 
command of the Army of the Tennessee, and his corps, the Fif- 
teenth, had been reorganized for this campaign, and, on the 24th 
day of October, placed under the command of Gen. Frank P. Blair, 
Jr. The corps, as so reorganized, was composed of the divisions 
of Generals Osterhaus, Ewing, John E. Smith and Morgan L. 
Smith, in all between sixteen and twenty thousand men. The 
number of Gen. John E. Smith's division was changed from Sev- 
enth to Third. The Third Brigade was commanded by Brig. Gen. 
Charles L. Matthias. Thus general Sherman's forces were massed 
on the north side of the Tennessee River, above Chattanooga, 
ready to perform the part assigned them in the battles planned by 
General Grant against the army of General Bragg, which then 
occupied apparently invincible positions on Lookout Mountain and 
Mission Ridge. 

Before proceeding further, it might be of benefit to trace the 
path of General Sherman's forces from Memphis to Chattanooga 



48 HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 

over again, and take a glance at the country through which it 
passed, the conditions then existing along the route, the scenery, 
and the rugged character of the roads over which the army moved. 
The march from Glendale, Mississippi, was quite rapidly made, over 
difficult roads a considerable part of the distance, and, therefore, an 
unusually hard one for the troops. But all the surroundings, in 
other respects, were so unusual that the troops endured the hard- 
ships with little or no murmuring, being deeply interested in what 
they saw and heard from day to day, and zealously intent upon the 
object of the campaign, which was very soon generally understood 
and appreciated throughout the army. The description of this 
march, and the country through which it passed, and of these con- 
ditions, and scenery, and roads, written by the distinguished author, 
Benjamin F. Taylor, who was then the army correspondent for the 
Chicago Evening Journal, has never been equaled, and cannot be 
excelled. It is, therefore, deemed advisable to let him tell the story 
here. He wrote as follows: 

"The land has gone to seed. The villages lie asleep, like lazy 
dogs in the sun; stores are closed, and shops deserted. The print 
of war's finger is before you. Now you see a gate left standing be- 
tween its two posts, — a gate without a fence. And there it swings 
open upon a path leading to nowhere! Not a house, not a 
threshold, only a heap of stone and a blackened tree to tell the 
story. And there you see a chimney standing, by some strange 
freak, without a house. Now you see the skeleton of a house, 
stripped of all covering, gaunt and ghastly in its bones. Now a 
brick mansion catches the eye; its doors, weary of turning, stand 
wide open; its garden shivers with weeds; the negro quarters 
empty; the fields ragged, and fenceless as the air, and not a living 
soul! Broad forests of tall corn, the blackened stalks two years 
old, and ears of the withered grain yet clinging to the russet stems ; 
visions of 'hoecake' far oflf and dim; the rusted plow careened in 
one comer, a wreck on a lea shore; the masters away in the rebel 
ranks; the 'people' strewn to the four winds. 

"As you near the region of the Cumberland, the scenery begins 
to grow grand; the. great wavy lines of the mountains sweep up 
bravely toward heaven, and sink down into great troughs of green; 
but the road makes steadily for the strong horizon, between ledges 
of God's masonry, through grooves hewn in the rocks running this 
way and that; a gorge, half a mile in length, yawns to swallow us 
with a throat as black as a wolf's mouth; above it towers the 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 49 

wooded crown, hundreds of feet; close at our left the world seems 
to make a misstep and tumble into a deep ravine; but we got safely 
over, and thanked God. 

"The route between Bridgeport arid Chattanooga is one of the 
wildest and most picturesque on the continent. You make straight 
at the solid mountain, but creep through a cleft and keep on; you 
swing around a curve, and hang over a gorge; you run, like a 
mouse along a narrow shelf, high up the rocky wall, the bewildered 
Tennessee far beneath, winding this way and that to escape from 
the enchanted mountains. It flashes out upon you here, curved 
like a cimeter; it ties the hills up there, with love-knots of broad 
ribbon. The sky line rises and falls around you like a heavy sea; 
black heaps of coal, high up the mountains, look like blots on this 
roughest of pages in Nature's * writing book.' You go through a 
stone gateway of the Lord's building, and a deep valley is under 
your feet; look far across to the other side, and dark cedars counter- 
feit deep shadows; look down from the bridge at Falling Water, 
and the boys in blue, far down, are like drops of indigo. And all 
along this rugged way, at every station and bridge and ravine, are 
rifle pits and earthworks, the rude signature rebellion has com- 
pelled; grim war's mark visible in every direction. 

'*So, through these grand and everlasting halls we made our 
way, and when the morning walked to and fro upon the top of 
night, and stepped from height to height, and pines took fire 
and cliflfs of gray were glorified, it seemed a mighty minster, and 
I did not wonder that God gave the law from Sinai ; that the beati- 
tudes were shed, like Hermon's dew, from a mountain. 

"We wind around the angle of the mountain wall of Lookout, 
and camps are glittering on the hills everywhere, sentinels pacing 
to and fro, regiments checkering the low grounds, trains moving 
in diflferent directions, the whole landscape alive with crowds and 
caravans, and forts dumb but not dead; and there, in the middle 
of it all, lies Chattanooga, with its ceaseless eddies of armed life, 
swords and muskets forever drifting and shifting about in them; 
good words and bad stirred in together; 'hardtack' and hard talk 
struggling in and out together at the same mouths; and hurry 
treading on the heels of haste. Upon all sides you see a ceaseless 
play of blue legs, with an unending procession of blue coats. And 
on all this multitude you may look all day, and not see one woman 
of the noble race that put men upon their honor and make the 
world braver and purer. To be sure, there is Aunt Dinah in turban 
all afire, like a very sooty chimney red-hot at the top; and there» 
4 



60 HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 

too, is a colorless native from the rural districts, dressed in white, 
uncrinolined, unflounced, unwashed, as limp as a wet napkin; see 
her, standing on a corner, spitting at a mark — tobacco juice at 
that — and she delivers her fire with great accuracy. 
• "But it was not this stronghold, nor all this beautiful scenery, 
that we came to see. It was to find our neighbors over on Mission 
Ridge and on the summit of Lookout, where they are arranging a 
reception for us. 

"It was to see the old deeds, long packed away in history, 
step out from the silent lines of the printed page, and stand un- 
sandaled on the ground, to make room for the new, of the year 
just closing, realized already, and so soon to be made tangible, 
earnest, solemn and glorious." 

On the 3d day of July, 1863, the Potomac army had won a 
great victory at Gettysburg; and on the 4th day of that month, 
Vicksburg had been surrendered to the Army of the Tennessee. 
A glance at the map will quickly reveal the fact, that Qiattanooga 
lies very near the direct line between those two places, but some- 
what nearer to the latter. It was the center of the Confederate 
lines east of the Mississippi River. Their right and left wings had 
been defeated at Gettysburg and Vicksburg, respectively. After 
the defeat of the Army of the Cumberland, on September 20th, 
1863, the Confederate forces, under General Bragg, occupied and 
fortified Mission Ridge and Lookout Mountain. Their com- 
manders gave it out, defiantly, and with much assurance, that their 
position was invulnerable. It commanded East Tennessee, and 
was a menace to any further advance of the Federal armies on either 
side east or west of it. It was, therefore, necessary that the Army 
of the Cumberland should be supported, and that the army of 
General Bragg should be dislodged from its commanding position. 
The task had been confided to General Grant late in September 
of that year. Before the end of October, he had fought and won 
the battle of Wauhatchie, and thereby opened up and secured com- 
munications directly from Bridgeport, Alabama, to Chattanooga, 
Tennessee, by a good wagon road only thirty-five miles long, and 
also by the Tennessee River as far as Kelly's Ferry, which was 
within nine or ten miles of Chattanooga. He had, by nightfall on 
November 22d, gathered an army of about 60,000 men in and 
around Chattanooga. 

It was particularly auspicious and fortunate that this force, 
gathered at this central position, at once represented all the great 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 51 

armies of the Union. The Army of the Cumberland was there. 
The Army of the Ohio went to its support with great alacrity. 
General Hooker's forces, of the Army of the Potomac, came with 
marvelous speed and much enthusiasm from the far east. And 
General Sherman, with a part of the invincible Army of the Ten- 
nessee, swept across the country, from the far west, like a cyclone, 
into this vortex of war. 

General Grant was becoming extremely solicitous as to the 
safety of General Burnside's army at Knoxville, Tennessee. 
General Longstreet was already moving against that place with a 
formidable force, and was likely to be reinforced from General 
Bragg's army. To prevent this, General Grant determined to 
attack General Bragg's forces without further delay. But, before 
the curtain is raised upon that drama, which was to be completed 
in three acts, and in three days, the 23d and 24th and 25th days 
of November, A. D. 1863, a glance at the field on which it was to 
be enacted might be profitable. 

The Tennessee River flows in a southwesterly course to a 
point about three miles above Chattanooga. There it turns 
sharply to the south, makes a bend of more than a mile around 
high hills on the north side, and from thence flows nearly due west 
to a point just below the city. There it turns again sharply to the 
south, bearing a little west, and makes straight for the rugged face 
of Lookout Mountain, full three miles away. There it makes a 
turn, or curve, like the front end of a horseshoe, and then, as if it 
were thrown back by the mountain, flows in a northerly direction 
three miles, or more, and there turns again to its southwesterly 
course. North Chickamauga Creek, which flows nearly due south, 
empties into the Tennessee River, on the north side, six or seven 
miles above Qiattanooga. South Chickamauga Creek, which rises 
at the head of the cove formed by the union of the south end of 
Mission Ridge with Pigeon Mountain, about thirty miles south of 
Chattanooga, flows in a north-northeasterly course until it passes 
the north end of the mountain spur that lies west and north of 
the north end of Mission Ridge, and from thence across 
the valley, in a northwest course, and empties into the Tennessee 
River, on the south side, about four miles above Chattanooga. 
Mission Ridge, from its northern extremity, which is about six 
miles east-southeast from Chattanooga, extends about six or seven 
miles nearly southwest, and then bears to the course about south- 
southwest and unites with Pigeon Mountain as above indicated. A 
mountain spur, terminating abruptly, at its northern extremity, on 



52 HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 

South Chickamauga Creek, extends from thence, in a southwest- 
erly course, and laps the north end of Mission Ridge about an 
eighth of a mile, forming a deep valley between the two. This val- 
ley, passing around the north end of Mission Ridge, broadens out 
and ultimately becomes merged in the valley of South Chicka- 
mauga Creek. The country south of the north end of Mission 
Ridge, and west of that valley, is somewhat lower than the Ridge, 
but still quite high, uneven and hilly. The road to Dalton, Geor- 
gia, passes across this table-land beyond the Ridge. The Chatta- 
nooga & Cleveland Railroad crosses the Ridge, through a tunnel, 
about three-eighths of a mile from the north end. Nearly due 
south of Chattanooga, Mission Ridge is separated from the Look- 
out range of mountains by Chattanooga Creek. That stream 
winds its way northward between the two mountain ranges, and 
eftipties into the Tennessee River on the east side and near the base 
of Lookout Mountain. Citico Creek heads in two branches, one 
having its source in the valley and the other in Mission Ridge, far- 
ther to the south, flows in a northerly course, passing some dis- 
tance east of Orchard Knob, and empties into the Tennessee River 
about midway between South Chickamauga and Chattanooga 
Creeks. The Tennessee Valley, between the river and Mission 
Ridge, from Chickamauga Creek to Chattanooga Creek, is from 
two to four miles wide. Lookout Mountain is the northern ex- 
tremity of the Lookout Range. That range extends south-south- 
west, parallel with and west of Mission Ridge, sixty miles, or more, 
across the corner of Georgia and into Alabama. Lookout Moun- 
tain rises, very abruptly, a little more than sixteen hundred feet 
above the level of the Tennessee River, and about three thousand 
two hundred feet above the level of the sea. The Raccoon Moun- 
tains lie west of and parallel with the Lookout Range. Lookout 
Valley, broad and beautiful, lies between the two ranges. Lookout 
Creek flows northward, through that valley, and empties into the 
Tennessee River on the west side and near the base of Lookout 
Mountain. Fort Wood was on a high hill, nearly due east from 
Chattanooga, and about one mile distant. General Grant's head- 
quarters were there on the night of the 226. and morning of the 
23d. Orchard Knob was nearly a mile farther east and between 
Fort Wood and Mission Ridge, the latter two miles farther away. 

The defensive lines of the enemy were on the crest of Mission 
Ridge and Lookout Mountain, extending from the tunnel to Chat- 
tanooga Creek, across that stream and valley, and to the point of 
Lookout, and also reaching far down the eastern slope of that tow- 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 53 

ering palisade of rocks. More than ten miles of formidable forts 
and earthworks, commanding every foot of ground below, gave 
warning to the Federal armies of the desperate character of the 
enterprise before them. The advanced lines of the Confederates 
extended far down into the Tennessee Vallev. Orchard Knob was 
in their possession. Their pickets touched the Tennessee River at 
the big bend above Chattanooga, and guarded the south bank of 
the river from that point to the mouth of South Chickamauga 
Creek, from whence their picket line was extended up that stream 
to the mountain spur, and from thence around to their main line 
on Mission Ridge. Pickets were also stationed, for the purposes 
of observation, on the east bank of North Chickamauga Creek. 
Small cavalry forces, mostly for the purposes of observation, were 
on each flank. The total forces of the enemy numbered about 45,- 
000 men. 

The Armies of the Cumberland and Ohio were mostlv in the 
Tennessee Valley, between Citico and Chattanooga Creeks, in and 
around Chattanooga, and between the city and Fort Wood. Gen- 
eral Thomas was in command of the Army of the Cumberland, and 
his headquarters were at Fort Wood. The forces of General 
Hooker, and the division of General Osterhaus, were behind (west 
of) the Raccoon Mountains and in Lookout Valley. Three of 
General Sherman's divisions, and the division of General Jeff C. 
Davis, were behind the hills on the north side of the Tennessee 
River, nearly opposite the mouth of South Chickamauga Creek. 
The Federal forces numbered about 60,000 men. 

Such w^as the field, and the disposition of the opposing forces, 
in a general way, immediately preceding those three historic days 
in November. 

That the part taken by the Ninety-Third Illinois may be better 
understood and appreciated, it may be helpful to quote the general 
stor>' of those three days as told by Mr. B. F. Taylor, the dis- 
tinguished author already quoted above. He wrote: 

"The smiting of the enemy's crescent front at Mission Ridge 
on Monday, the 23d of November, 1863, the capture of Lookout 
Mountain on Tuesday, the 24th, and the storming of Mission Ridge 
on Wednesday, the 25th, were really the three acts of one splendid 
drama. But first let us take a survey of the scene just before the 
battle. It was Sunday by the calendar; Sunday by the sweet .Sab- 
bath bells of the peaceful North; but what shall I name it here? 
Look southwestward from the camps, just across the river, and 



54 HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 

you will see Chattanooga, and men hurrying in all directions. The 
doors of the ordnance depot are thrown wide open, and wagon trains 
are being loaded with materials that make heavy loads and heavy 
hearts. They are to be held in readiness to supply any part of the 
line with their missiles of death. Men are busy wrenching up and 
carrying away seats in a church, leaving a clear area for a hospital; 
pallets for j>ews. Yesterday was gloomy with clouds and rain. 
To-day dawned out of Paradise. Would you have the picture? 
Stand with me, as I stood this morning, in Chattanooga. As the 
sun comes up, the mists lift grandly, trail along the tops of the 
mountains, and are folded up in heaven. The horizon, all around, 
rises and falls like the waves of the sea. Stretching along the 
east, and trending slightly away to the southwest, you see an un- 
dulating ridge, edged with a thin fringe of trees. Along the sides, 
which have been shorn of their woods for the play of the battle- 
hammers, if you look closely, you can see camps, sprinkled like 
flocks, away on until the ridge melts out of sight; and you can see 
guns, and men in gray. That is Mission Ridge, and you are look- 
ing upon what your heart does not warm to. You are in the pres- 
ence of the enemy. Now, turning to the right, you look south upon 
the lowlands, and the farther edge of the picture is dotted with more 
tents and more men in gray. Away in the distance a cone rises, 
not far enough off to be blue, but you forget it in an instant as the 
eye climbs bravely up a wooded line, higher and higher, to a 
craggy crown, wrinkled with ravines and crested with trees; then, 
dropping abruptly away, as you turn southwestward, subsides into 
a valley, through which the wandering Tennessee creeps into this 
Federal stronghold. Lookout Mountain is before you, grim and 
grand. Tlie glorious glimpses of Hve states granted to them who 
stand upon the mighty threshold between this world and that, are 
denied to us- just now, and we must bide our time. The morning 
has worn away to 8 o^clock, when from the very tip of the 
crest rolls a little gray cloud, as if unseen hands were about to wind 
the rugged brow with a turban. In an instant, a heavy growl, and 
the rebel gun has said *good morning' to Hooker's camps in the 
valley beyond. Y'ou cannot get out of sight of Lookout. Go 
where you will within all this horizon, yet, turning southward, there 
frowns the mountain. It rises like an everlasting thunderstorm 
that will never pass over. Seen dimly through the mist, it looms 
up nearly two thousand feet and recedes, but when the sun shines 
strongly out it draws so near as to startle you, and you feel as if 
you were beneath the eaves of a roof whence drips an iron rain. 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 55 

And yet, from the spot where we stand, it is three miles to its sum- 
mit, three miles to Mission Ridge, and three miles to Moccasin 
Point. 

"But your eyes are not weary, and so they follow down the fal- 
tering line of Lookout, dip into the gateway of the Tennessee, and 
rise again to a red ridge, that seems to you, where you stand, like 
a vast tumulus, big with the dead of an elder time. From it, even 
while you look, comes the Federal 'good morning' back again. 
You hear the gun as it utters the shell, and then, traveling after it, 
the crash of the iron egg as it hatches on Lookout. That red ridge is 
Moccasin Point. Glancing up the western horizon is Raccoon 
Range, and upon a peak of it, just west of us, is a Federal sig^ial- 
station. Then awav to the northwest and across the north, the 
mountain edges trace the line of beauty, curving and blending until 
the graceful profile of the horizon is complete. And within this 
sweep of grandeur lies a city whose name, made famous forever by 
the events of these three November days, shall endure when yours 
and mine, like a writing upon a slate by a wet finger, have been 
effaced by time- — Chattanooga. Once a town with one main busi- 
ness street, and residences built up in the true Southern architecture, 
holes in the middle, or balconies, and the chimneys turned out of 
doors. As you pass down the central street, the dingy signs of old 
dead business catch the eye. Where 'A. Baker, attorney at law,' 
once uttered oracles and tobacco-juice, Federal stores have taken 
Blackstone's place; where ribbons ran smoothly over salesmen's 
fingers, boxes of hardtack are piled; for groceries and provisions, 
you will find kegs and kegs of the fine black grains that sow fields 
with death and homes with desolation; boxes of cartridges without 
end; rows of canister; nests of shells, out of which shall be hatched 
a terrible brood; clusters of grape, containing no wine, that quickly 
crush out the wine of life; and thousands of cases of every species 
of death-dealing combustibles known in warfare. Fences have 
gone lightly up in campfires; tents are pitched, like mushrooms, 
in the fiower-beds; trees have turned to ashes, and shrubbery is 
trampled under foot; gardens are nothing better than mule-pens; 
shot and shell have left a token here and there, and, across the 
whole, War has scrawled his autograph. But never think you have 
seen the town at one glance ; it is down here and up there and over 
yonder; the little hills swell beneath it like billows; you will gain 
the idea if I say it is a town gone to pieces in a heavy sea. 

"But a new architecture has sprung up. Slopes, valleys and 
hills, as far as you can see, are covered with Federal camps. It is 



56 HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 

nothing but camps, and then more camps. I wrote about 'old dead 
business/ but I was too fast. It is all business, but conducted by 
the new firm of 'U. S/ The anvils ring, the stores are filled, 
wagons in endless lines and hurrying crowds throng all the streets, 
but the workman and the clerk and the patron is each a boy in 
blue. Chattanooga is as populous as an ant-hill. And there is more 
of the new architecture. Breastworks, rifie pits, forts, defenses of 
every name and nature, crown the hills and slopes. Here, is Fort 
Wood, talking to Mission Ridge, and there are Negley and Palmer, 
and so on around the horizon. Spreading away to the left and 
right and south, as you face Lookout, are Federal camps, drift- 
ing on almost to the base of the mountain, and lying bravely be- 
neath its grim shadow. You look, and wonder how it can all be. 
This neighborly nearness overturns all your notions of hostile arm- 
ies. Two thin picket lines, parallel and a few rods apart — not so far 
as you can jerk a peach-stone. They pass thus lovingly together 
from your left, down Mission Ridge, curve to the right along the 
lowlands and past the foot of the great mountain. They are lines of 
the blue and the gray. 

"There in those lowlands, and sloping up the side of Lookout 
and curving away to the east and north along Mission Ridge, lie 
the masses of the enemv, a crescent front five miles and more in 
length, and throughout all we are snug up to them, breast to breast. 
What effect do you think it would have upon that hostile host to 
strike it near its northern horn and turn it back on Mission Ridge 
away from its railroad communications, and strike it, too, where 
it is wedged into the foot of Lookout, thus doubling it back upon 
itself? We will wait and see. 

"Signal-lights are features in celestial scenery that never ap- 
pear in your peaceful Northern skies. Had you stood with me upon 
the hills last night, you would have seen, just over the edge of the 
highest lift of the Raccoon Range, a crazy planet, bigger than Venus 
at the full, waltzing in mad fashion about another soberer light. 
Watch it for a while. There is method in its madness after all. 
The antic light describes a quadrant, makes a semicircle, stops, 
rises, falls, sweeps right, sweeps left, rounds out an orbit, strikes off 
at a tangent. It is talking to somebody behind Lookout. On Mis- 
sion Ridge are lights of evil omen. The hostile signals are work- 
ing, too; blazing, disappearing, showing here and there and yon- 
der; now on the mountain, now all along the ridge, like wills-o'-the- 
wisp. To-day the army telegraph gesticulates like Roscius, but it 
is flags and not lights that have gone crazy, and so the talk goes on 
around the sky. 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 57 

"At lo o'clock this morning Fort Wood spoke, a roar, and 
then a long, rushing, shivering cry quivers through the air; the shell 
crosses the interval, strikes at the heels of a lazy column moving 
along the Ridge, and changes its rate of motion. No steed was 
ever more obedient to the touch of the rowels. Again the *Rod- 
man' speaks, and down goes the carriage of an angry gun for 
kindling wood. It can toss its compliments as lightly over to Mis- 
sion Ridge as you can toss an apple over the orchard fence. The 
shriek of a shell, with no musketry to soften it, is terrible, un- 
earthly, the wail of a lost spirit. A solid shot has a soberer way, 
utters but one syllable of loud talk, plunges like a big beetle into 
the earth, and there's an end of it; while a shell, that does its duty, 
has thunder and a cloud at both ends of its line of flight. There 
goes Fort Wood again. Listen! A few beats of the pulse, and 
yonder, well up the side of the Ridge, lies a fleece of smoke that 
was not there an instant ago, and here — bomb — comes the sound 
of the bursting missile. A shell is a dissyllable." 

MONDAY, NOVEMBER 23D, 1863. 

"Let me show you a landscape that shall not fade out from *the 
lidless eye of time' until long after we are all dead. A half mile 
from the eastern border of Chattanooga is a long swell of land 
sparsely sprinkled with houses, flecked thickly with tents, and 
checkered with two or three graveyards. On its summit stand the 
red earthworks of Fort Wood, with its great guns frowning from 
the angles. Mounting the parapet and facing eastward you have 
a singular panorama. Away to your left is a shining elbow of the 
Tennessee, a lowland of woods, a long-drawn valley, glimpses of 
houses. At your right you have wooded undulations, with clear 
intervals, extending down and around to the valley at the eastern 
base of Lookout. From the Fort the smooth ground descends 
rapidly to a little plain, a sort of trough in the sea, then a fringe of 
oak woods, then an acclivity, sinking down to a second fringe of 
woods, until full in front of you, and three-quarters of a mile dis- 
tant, rises Orchard Knob, a conical mound, once wooded, but now 
bald. Then ledges of rocks and narrow breadths of timber, and 
rolling sweeps of open ground, for two miles more, until the whole 
rough and stormy landscape seems to dash against Mission Ridge, 
three miles distant, that lifts like a seawall eight hundred feet high, 
wooded, rocky, precipitous, wrinkled with ravines. This is, in 
truth, the grand feature of the scene, for it extends north as far as 
you can see, with fields here and there cut down through the woods 



58 HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 

to the ground, and lying on the hillsides like brown linen to bleach; 
and you feel, as you look at them, as if they are in danger of slipping 
down the Ridge into the road at its base. And then it curves to the 
southwest, just leaving you a way out between it and Lookout 
Mountain. Altogether the rough, furrowed landscape looks as if 
the Titans had plowed and forgotten to harrow it. The thinly 
fringed summit of the Ridge varies in width from twenty to fifty 
feet, and houses looking like cigar -boxes are dotted along it. On 
the top of that wall are rebels and batteries; below the first pitch, 
three hundred feet down, are more rebels and batteries, and still 
below are their camps and rifle pits, sweeping five miles and more. 
At your right, and in the rear, is Fort Negley, the old 'Star* Fort of 
Confederate regime; its next neighbor is Fort King, under the 
frown of Lookout; and farther to the right is the battery of Moc- 
casin Point. Finish out the picture on either hand with Federal 
earthworks and saucy angles, fancy the embankment of the Mem- 
phis & Charleston Railroad drawn diagonally, like an awkward 
score, across the plain far at your feet, and I think you have the 
tremendous theater. And now what next, if not, in Hamlet's 
words, 'the play's the thing?' 

"The P'ederal forces lay along the ridgy slope to the right and 
left of Fort Wood; the enemy's advance held Orchard Knob in 
force, and their breastworks and rifle pits seamed the landscape. At 
half past 12 o'clock, Major General Granger received an order 
to make a reconnoissance in force toward the base of Mission 
Ridge, and feel the enemy, supposed to be massing in our immedi- 
ate front and on Lookout Mountain. It was a change of scene. 
There was to be no more use for the two lines of pickets that for 
so many days and nights had stood in friendly neighborhood, ex- 
changed the jest and daily news, and sat at each other's fires. Ours 
were to be recalled; theirs were to be thrust back, and the thin 
veneering of battle's double front rudely torn away. At half past 
12 the order came; at i, two divisions of the Fourth Corps 
made ready to move; at ten minutes before 2, twenty-five thou- 
sand Federal troops were in line of battle. The line of skirmishers 
moved lightly out, and swept true as a sword-blade into the edge 
of the field. You should have seen that splendid line, two miles 
long, as straight and unwavering as a ray of light. On they went, 
driving in the pickets before them; shots of musketry, like the first 
great drops of summer rain upon a roof, pattered along the line. 
One fell here, another there, but still, like joyful heralds before a 
royal progress, the skirmishers passed on. From wood and rifle 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 59 

pit, from rocky ledge and mountain-top, forty-five thousand rebels 
watched these couriers bearing the gift of battle in their hands. 
The bugle sounded from Fort Wood, and the divisions of Wood and 
Sheridan began to move; the latter, out from the right, threatened 
a heavy attack ; the former, forth from the left, dashed on into the 
rough road of the battle. Black rifle pits were tipped with fire; 
sheets of flame flashed out of the woods; the spatter of musketry 
deepened into volleys and rolled like muffled drums; hostile bat- 
teries opened from the ledges; the 'Rodmans' joined in from Fort 
Wood; bursting shells and gusts of shrapnel filled the air; the, echoes 
roused up and growled back from the mountains, the rattle was a 
roar, and yet those gallant fellows moved steadily on; down the 
slope, through the wood, up the hills, straight for Orchard Knob 
as the crow flies, moved that glorious wall of blue. 

"The air grew dense and blue; the gray clouds of smpke 
surged up the sides of the valley. It was a terrible journey they 
were making, those men of ours; and three-fourths of a mile in 
sixty minutes was splendid progress. They neared the Knob; the 
enemy's fire converged; the arc of batteries poured in upon them 
lines of fire, like the rays they call a 'glory' about the head of 
Madonna and the Child, but they went up the rugged altar of 
Orchard Knob at the double-quick with a cheer; they wrapped, 
like a cloak, round an x\labama regiment that defended it, and 
swept them down on our side of the mound. Prisoners had be- 
gun to come in before; they streamed across the field like files of 
geese. Then on for a second altar, Brush Knob, nearly a half- 
mile to the northeast, and bristling with a battery ; it was swept of 
foes and garnished with Federal blue in thirty mintues. 

"The Federal line had bent outward to the enemy, like Apollo's 
bow, and Howard's corps, at Wood's right, and Sheridan's division, 
at his left, swung out and cut new swaths, and left the edges even, 
as they went through this harvest-field of splendid valor and heroic 
death. At 4 o'clock the storm still beat on. From Orchard 
Knob, two twelve-pound Parrott guns, of Bridges' battery, enfiladed 
the enemy's rifle pits on the left, and thrice drove out the stubborn 
foe. At the same time, Hazen's division charged on the right, and 
carried the rifle pits there at the point of the bayonet, and swooped 
up three hundred prisoners. While the terrible play was going on 
here, Moccasin Point thundered at the camps in the valley at the 
south, and Lookout growled back at the Point; Fort King uttered 
a few words on its own account, and Fort Wood laid its shells where 
it pleased, their little rolls of smoke lying on the Ridge like fleeces 



60 HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 

of wool. And through all this action, you might have seen the 
white wings of the signal flags fluttering from Fort Wood, from 
away to the left of the line, from the brow of Orchard Knob, and 
from the left of the Raccoon Range across the town. On the sum- 
mit of Mission Ridge, a little east of south from Fort Wood, was 
General Bragg. His horse was ready saddled for the mount. All 
these hours he watched the impetuous surge of Federal gallantry 
that swept his smoky legions out of their rifle pits, off from their 
vantage ground, over the swells, through the selvedge of woods, 
and into their defensive lines far up the slope of the Ridge. 

*'And thus the battle ends with the ended dav. General Grant, 
the commanding genius of the great drama, is in the center of 
his new front, far out in the field, on Orchard Knob. The pickets 
again draw near together in a new neighborhood. No musket shot 
startles the silence, but behind the fresh breastworks, that have car- 
ried the heavy labors of soul and sinew far on into the night, the 
Federal forces sleep upon their arms; to dream, perchance, of 
fierce assault and sweeping triumph; to wake, perhaps, to a half 
reluctant sense of another heavy day of struggle and of blood, for 
only the threshold of approach is swept, and there before them 
waits the enemy." 

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 24TH, A. D. 1863. 

The forces of General Sherman had no part in the movements 
and battle of the 23d. They were still on the north side of the Ten- 
nessee River, behind the hills. General Ewing's division did not 
reach that position until late in the afternoon that day. In the 
meantime, the brigades of Generals Lightbum and Giles A. Smith, 
of Gen. Morgan L. Smith's division, had moved well up toward 
North Chickamauga Creek, taking the pontoon boats with them. 
At midnight, of that day, those two brigades put the pontoon 
boats into North Chickamauga Creek, and began the movement 
that was to land all of General Sherman's forces on the south side 
of the Tennessee River. A small force first crossed to the north 
bank of North Chickamauga Creek and captured all the rebel 
pickets there. Then dropping down that stream and into the Ten- 
nessee River, they quietly moved down and across the latter stream 
and landed on the south side of it, about a half mile below the 
mouth of South Chickamauga Creek. The night was damp and 
foggy. Immediately after the landing was made, General Light- 
burn took two regiments of his brigade, moved up South Chicka- 
mauga Creekj and captured every rebel picket, save one, between 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 61 

the Tennessee River and the mountain spur that laps the north end 
of Mission Ridge, that line being about two miles long. The other 
two regiments of that brigade executed a similar movement down 
the Tennessee River, on the south bank, and up Citico Creek to the 
left of the Federal line, as established the day before, and no rebel 
picket escaped them. Both these forces returned to the starting 
point just before daylight. In the meantime, by the pontoon boats 
and the steamer Dunbar, the remainder of Gen. Morgan L. Smith's 
division and all of Gen. John E. Smith's division had been landed on 
the south bank of the Tennessee, at the same point. The Ninety- 
Third- Illinois crossed m the pontoon boats, and reached the south 
side just before daylight. 

The pontoon boats were now swung into place for the bridge, 
rapidly and noiselessly, and before ii o'clock a. m. the bridge was 
completed, and troops and batteries were moving over it. The 
bridge was thirteen hundred and fifty feet long. The construction 
of it was not excelled, either in time or manner, during the war. 
By I o'clock p. m.. General Sherman's whole force had crossed to 
the south side of the river, and Gen. Jeff C. Davis' division was in 
position to co-operate, as a reserve force, in the movements about 
to be commenced against* Mission Ridge. Before noon, General 
Howard had moved his forces to the left, and connected with the 
right of the forces of General Sherman. While the bridge was be- 
ing constructed, the two divisions already on the south side of 
the river made a splendid line of rifle pits along their entire front, 
near to and parallel with the river. A heavy fog, or mist, filled the 
entire valley until noon, or a little later, and completely covered 
and concealed the movements of this army from the enemy. Twice, 
before noon, the lines of these two divisions, that first crossed the 
river, were advanced farther and farther out into the valley, to 
make room for the accumulating forces there, and two more lines 
of rifle pits were constructed all along their front. And so, when 
the log and mist were lifted and cleared away, the enemy, with 
much surprise and great consternation, beheld the lines of that 
powerful army, nearly 20,000 strong, in battle array, threatening 
his extreme right flank. The valley beneath their feet, and behind 
them, was check-rowed with rifle pits, dotted all around with bat- 
teries, and covered with blue coats; and the whole force was still 
moving, straight as an arrow flies from the bow, for the mountain 
spur that laps the north end of Mission Ridge. 

By 3 o'clock in the afternoon, that mountain spur and some 
lower hills beyond were gained and occupied, without loss. There 



62 HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 

was no considerable force of the enemy north of the railroad tunnel. 
Later in the day, the enemy attempted to dislodge General Sher- 
man's forces from their position, and attacked the left. But they 
were quickly repulsed. Gen. Giles A. Smith was severely wounded 
in the engagement, and carried to the rear. The Army of the 
Tennessee was planted on that mountain spur, and those hills, to 
stay until the harvest should be gathered from Mission Ridge. 
And it did stay. That night those heights were fortified, batteries 
dragged up, by hand, to their summits and planted there, and every- 
thing made ready for the morrow, the last and final act of the great 
drama. A-nd on the morrow, the defeat at Chickamauga was *to be 
avenged; the backbone, the center, of the Confederacy was to be 
broken; a new star was to be set in the galaxy of heroic achieve- 
ments, and the heart of the Nation prepared for its day of 
Thanksgiving, only just beyond. 

And here we pause again to listen to the eloquent story of 
that whole day, all along the Hnes, as told by the matchless B. F. 
Taylor. He wrote: 

"Tuesday broke cold and cheerless; it was a Scottish morn- 
ing, and the air was dim with mist. Our wicked little battery on 
Orchard Knob had 'ceased from troubling;' Fort Wood was dumb, 
and not a voice from the Tarrott' perches anywhere. Stray ambu- 
lances — those flying hospitals- — were making their way back to the 
town, and soldiers were digging graves on the hillsides. Interro- 
gation points glittered in men's eyes as they turned an ear to the 
northeast and listened for Sherman. By and by a little fleet of 
soldier-laden pontoon-boats came drifting down the river. The 
boys in high feather tumbled out, the inevitable coffee kettle swing- 
ing from their bayonets. If a Federal soldier should be fellow 
traveler with Bunyan's Pilgrim, I almost believe that tin kettle of 
his would be heard tinkling to the very threshold of the 'Gate Beau- 
tiful.' 'Well, boys — what now! We've put down the pontoon — 
taken in the rebel pickets without firing a gun — run the rebel 
blockade — drawn a shot — nobody hurt — Sherman's column is half 
over — bully for Sherman!' Those fellows had been thirty hours 
without rest, and were as fresh hearted and dashing as so many 
thoroughbreds. They had wrought all night long with their lives 
in their hands, and not a trace of hardship or a breath of complain- 
ing. 

"Perhaps it was ii o'clock on Tuesday morning when the 
rumble of artillery came in gusts from the valley to the west of 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 63 

Lookout. Climbing Signal Hill, I could see volumes of smoke 
rolling to and fro, like clouds from a boiling caldron. The mad 
surges of tumult lashed the hills till they cried aloud, and roared 
through the gorges till you might have fancied all the thunders 
cf a long summer tumbled into that valley together. And yet the 
battle was unseen. It was like hearing voices from the under 
world. Meanwhile it began to rain; skirts of mist trailed over the 
woods and swept down the ravines; but our men trusted in Provi- 
dence, kept their powder dry, and played on. It was the second day 
of the drama; it was the second act I was hearing; it was the touch 
on the enemy's left. The assault upon Lookout had begun! Glanc- 
ing at the mighty crest crowned w^ith a precipice, and now hung 
round about, three hundred feet down, with a curtain of clouds, my 
heart misgave me. It could never be taken. 

"It was a formidable business they had in hand: to carry a 
mountain and scale a precipice near two thousand feet high, in the 
teeth of a battery and two intrenched brigades. But Hooker's 
design was admirable. Cruft's brigade was to move directly south 
along the western base of the mountain, while Hooker himself 
would remain in the valley, close under Lookout, and make a 
grand demonstration with small arms and artillery. The enemy, 
roused out by all this 'sound and fury,' were to come forth from 
their camps and works, high up the western side of the mountain, 
and descend to dispute Hooker's noisy passage; Cruft's brigade, 
when the roar behind should deepen into 'confusion worse con- 
founded,' was to turn upon its heel, move obliquely up the moun- 
tain upon the enemy's camps, in the enemy's rear, wheel round the 
monster, and up to the white house, and take care of himself while 
he took Lookout. 

"Hooker thundered, and the enemy came down like the Assy- 
rian. Whittaker's brigade on the right, and Colonel Ireland's com- 
mand on the left, having moved out from Wauhatchie, some five 
miles from the mountain, at 5 in the morning, pushed up to 
Chattanooga Creek, threw a bridge over it, made for Lookout 
Point, and there formed the right under the shelf of the mountain, 
the left resting on the creek. And then the play began. The 
enemy's camps were seized, his pickets surprised and captured, the 
strong works on the Point taken, and the Federal front moved on. 
Charging upon him, they leaped over his works as the wicked twin 
Roman leaped over his brother's mud wall, captured his artillery 
and a Mississippi regiment, and gained the white house. And there 
they stood, 'twixt heaven and — ^Chattanooga. But above them, 



64 HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 

grand and sullen, lifted the precipice; and they were men and not 
eagles. The way was strewn with natural fortifications, and from 
behind rocks and trees they delivered their fire, contesting inch by 
inch the upward way. The sound of the battle rose and fell; now 
fiercely renewed, and now dying away. And Hooker thundered 
on in the valley, and the echoes of his howitzers bounded about 
the mountains like volleys of musketry. That curtain of cloud was 
hung around the mountain by the God of battles — even our God. 
It was the veil of the temple that could not be rent. A captured 
Colonel declared, that had the day been clear their sharpshooters 
would have riddled our advance like pigeons, and left the command 
without a leader; but friend and foe were wrapped in a seamless 
mantle, and two hundred will cover the entire Federal loss, while 
our brave mountaineers strewed Lookout with four hundred dead, 
and captured a thousand prisoners. Ah, I wish you had been here. 
It needed no glass to see it; it was only just beyond your hand. 
There, on the shorn side of the mountain, below and to the west of 
the white house, was the head of the Federal column! And there it 
held, as if it were riveted to the rocks, and the line of blue, a half 
mile long, swung slowly around from the left, like the index of a 
mighty dial, and swept up the brown face of the mountain. And 
there, in the center of the columns, fluttered the blessed flag! 'My 
God! what flag is that?' men cried. And up steadily it moved. I 
could think of nothing but a gallant ship-of-the-line grandly lifting 
upon the great billows and riding out the storm. It was a scene 
never to fade out. Pride and pain struggled in my heart for the 
mastery, but faith carried the day. I believed in the flag and took 
courage. 

"The night was rapidly closing in, and the scene was growing 
sublime. The battery at Moccasin Point was sweeping the road 
to the mountain. The brave little fort at its left was playing like a 
heart in a fever. The cannon on the top of Lookout were pounding 
away at their lowest depression. The flash of the guns fairly 
burned through the clouds; there was an instant of silence, here, 
there, yonder, and the tardy thunder again leaped out after the 
swift light. For the first time, perhaps, since that mountain began 
to burn beneath the gold and crimson sandals of the sun, it was in 
eclipse. The cloud of the summit and the smoke of the battle had 
met half way and mingled. Here was Chattanooga, but Lookout 
had vanished! It was Sinai over again with its thunderings and 
lightnings and thick darkness, and the Lord was on our side. Then 
the storm ceased, and occasional dropping shots told off the even- 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 65 

ing till half past 9, and ^then a crashing volley and a rebel yell 
and a desperate charge. It was their good-night to our boys; good- 
night to the mountain. They had been met on their own vantage 
ground; they had been driven from their stronghold. The Federal 
foot touched the hill, indeed, but above still towered the precipice. 

"At 10 o'clock a glowing line of lights glittered obliquely across 
the breast of Lookout. It made our eves dim to see it. It was the 
Federal autograph scored along the mountain. They were our 
campfires. Our unharmed heroes lay there upon their arms. Our 
wounded lay there all the dreary night of rain, unrepining and con- 
tent. Our dead 'lay there, 'and surely they slept well.' At dawn, a 
regiment crept up among the rocky clefts, handing their guns 
one to another above, and stood at length upon the summit. Then, 
forming in line, threw out skirmishers, and advanced five miles to 
Summerton. Artillery and infantry had all fled in the night, nor 
left a wreck behind. The plan was opening as beautifully as a 
flower. General Sherman's apprehended approach upon the other 
extremity, had set the enemy's line all dressing to their right. 
Hardee, of 'Tactics' memory, who had been upon the mountain, 
moved round the line on Sunday, leaving two brigades and the 
attraction of gravitation, to wit, the precipice, to hold the 
left, yet farther depleted by the splendid march made upon the 
enemy's center on Monday. Then God let down a fold of his 
pavilion, our men were heroes, and the work was done. The cap- 
ture afforded inexpressible relief to the army. There the enemy 
bad looked down defiant, sentries pacing our very walls. Every 
angle of a Federal work, every gun, every new disposition of a 
regiment, was as legible as a page of an open book. You can never 
quite know how beautiful was that cordon of lights flung, like a 
royal order, across the breast of the mountain. 

"One thing more, and all I shall try to give of the stirring 
story will have been told. Just as the sun was touching up the old 
Department of the Cumberland, Captain Wilson and fifteen men 
of the Eighth Kentucky, near where the gun had crouched and 
growled at all the land, waved their regimental flag from the crest 
of Lookout, in sight of Tennessee, Alabama, Georgia, the old 
'North State' and South Carolina — waved it there, and the right 
of the Federal front, lying far beneath, caught a glimpse of its 
flutter, and a cheer rose to the top of the mountain, and ran from 
regiment to regiment, through whole brigades and broad divisions, 
till the boys away round in the face of Mission Ridge passed it 
along the line of battle. 'What is it? Our flag? Did I help put 
5 



66 HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 

it there?' murmured a poor wounded fellow, and died without the 

sight. 

"Oh, Flag glory-rifted! 

To-day thunder drifted. 
Like a flower of strange grace upon Lookout's grim surge, 

On some Federal fold 

A new tale shall be told. 
And the record immortal emblazon thy verge! 

"And so, at Wednesday's dawn, ended the second act of the 
drama — Wednesday, whose sun should set upon the third, the 
grandest and the last." 

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 25, A. D., 1863. 

The day had come which was to end the struggle for Mission 
Ridge. The sky was clear, and the air fresh and bracing. The 
only clouds in sight were clouds of war, the only thunder heard 
was the roar of cannon, the only storm apprehended was a storm 
of leaden hail and shot and shell and shrapnel and grape. The 
clouds of war were there, and the thundering of Sherman's g^ns 
foretold the coming storm. 

During the entire forenoon the Ninety-Third Illinois (and the 
Third Brigade) waited, under arms, for the call to battle. It was 
sure to come, and did come at i o'clock p. m. The battle-line was 
then formed, at the edge of the woods that bordered a broad open 
field, which laid directly in front of that portion of Mission Ridge 
north of the railroad tunnel and south of the south end of the 
mountain spur that laps the Ridge. The foot of the Ridge, across 
that open field, was nearly a half mile away, and the crest of it 
more than six hundred feet above. Half way up, there was a white 
house and portions of a rail fence. The corps of Hardee and 
Buckner were massed behind the Ridge and their batteries were 
on its crest. They gave fair warning that every foot of ground in 
their front was measured, and within their range, by throwing two 
shells, each of which exploded fairly in the line of the Tenth Iowa. 
Whole brigades of the enemy were moving to their extreme right, 
and were plainly seen as they passed the depression in the Ridge 
just over the tunnel. The Army of the Tennessee was threatening 
the Dalton road. If that should be lost, Bragg's army would be 
hopelessly undone. The necessity of holding it, caused the enemy 
to weaken his left and center and concentrate his forces at this 
point on the Ridge. Nearly if not fully one-half of all his troops 
were now confronting the Army of the Tennessee. The hands on 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 67 

the dial marked the time at the half hour, after i o'clock. -The 
order is given, and this command goes into the battle. The Ninety- 
Third Illinois is again on the left of the brigade, the Tenth and Fifth 
Iowa in the center, and the Twenty-sixth Missouri on the right. 
The order was, to move across that open field, and to the line of 
that white house and rail fence, half way up the Ridge, and engage 
the enemy from that position. The line advanced, in quick time, 
the left of the Ninety-Third Illinois passing close to the south end 
of the mountain spur. When the spur was passed, the whole 
brigade moved obliquely to the left for some distance, and then 
began the ascent of the Ridge. Under a deadly fire, the line of the 
white house and rail fence was reached — and passed — and on and 
up, and still on, and still up, without halting, that bleeding brigade 
still climbed and rose and fought its way to the very crest of the 
Ridge, nay, to the very jawis of certain death, to the very summit 
of those embattled heights blood-red with flames of fire from hostile 
guns and swept by shot and shell and fairly trembling beneath the 
surges of the conflict. And there, within twenty paces of the 
enemy's lines, with only the very crest of the mountain between, 
baptized in blood, and falling and dying here and there and every- 
where, for two hours and a half, the battle is maintained. It was 
a most desperate struggle, if not a useless one. Why the brigade 
went up to that position, exceeding its orders, was never very 
clearly told. All those who were responsible for it, as well as 
those who were responsible that it should not have been, have long 
since joined the majority on the other side the Silent River, and 
criticism, now, stands silent on the nearer shore. How the posi- 
tion was ever reached "in the teeth of the storm no man can tell!" 
General Grant, from his position, then on Orchard Knob, was 
watching the movements on the left, and when he saw this brigade 
pass the line of the white house, moving still on and up the Ridge, 
he impatiently inquired: "Who ordered that? Who ordered 
that?'' and then exclaimed: "They cannot go up there! They 
cannot go up there!" But they did go up to the very crest! After 
the position was reached, and steady fighting had been continued 
for some time, General Grant lowered his field glass and said: 
"They cannot stay there long! They will have to go down!" But 
they did stay there two hours and a half! Two hours and a half! 
A century of peace contains less time! They knelt there, "at the 
crimson shrine," as at an altar of sacrifice, and many of them 
"never rose from worshiping." And still the battle raged on. 

Let us now turn aside from this portion of that great battle- 



68 HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 

field,' which is elsewhere and everywhere crimson with bright red 
blood, and listen to the recital of that marvelous struggle as told 
by the gifted and eloquent Taylor. He can be heard, even above 
the din and rattle of musketry and the thunders of artillery, furious 
and tumultuous as they still are all along the crest of Mission 
Ridge north of the railroad tunnel. He wrote as follows: 

"If seeing for one's self is an art, seeing for another is a mys- 
tery, requiring, I mistrust, a better pair of eyes than mine. But 
if my readers will accept a straightforward, simple story of what 
one man saw of Wednesday's work, as bare of embellishment as 
the bayonets that glittered to the charge, here it is. You are stand- 
ing again on Orchard Knob, the center of our line of advance; 
Mission Ridge is before; Fort Wood behind; the shining elbow of 
the Tennessee to the left; Lookout to the right. Never was theater 
more magnificent. Never was drama worthier of such surround- 
ings. 

'^The same grand heroic line of battle, but a little longer arid 
stronger, silently stretches away on either hand. For the center, 
you have the corps of Howard, the divisions of Baird and Wood 
and Sheridan and Johnson, and King's brigade of regulars. And 
then, at the tips of the wings, on farthest left and right, are Sher- 
man and Hooker. That portion of the line distinct from where 
you stand — how rich the homes of Illinois have made it! Seven- 
teen regiments — each with its tale of battle, its roll of honor and 
its glorious dead — how glows the glittering line! Illinois was on 
Lookout yesterday; Illinois is over there with Sherman to-day. 
God bless the mother — God save the sons! 

"Imagine a chain of Federal forts, built in between with walls 
of living men, the Hne flung northward out of sight, and southward 
beyond Lookout. Imagine a chain of mountains crowned with 
batteries and manned with hostile troops through a six-mile sweep, 
set over against us in plain sight, and you have the two fronts — 
the blue, the gray. Imagine the center of our line pushed out 
a mile and a half toward Mission Ridge — the boss, a full mile 
broad, of a mighty shield — and you have the situation as it was on 
Wednesday morning, at sunrise. 

"The iron heart of Sherman's column began to be audible, like 
the fall of great trees in the depth of the forest, as it beat beyond the 
woods on the extreme left. The roar of his guns was like the 
early striking of a great clock, and it grew nearer and louder as the 
morning wore away. Along the center all was still. Our men there 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. • 69 

lay, as they had lain since Monday night, motionless behind the 
works. Generals Grant, Thomas, Granger, Meigs, Hunter, Rey- 
nolds, were grouped at Orchard Knob, here; Bragg, Breckenridge, 
Hardee, Stevens, Clebum, Bates, Walker, were waiting on Mission 
Ridge, yonder. And Sherman^s Northern clock tolled on! 

"At I o'clock, the signal-flag at Fort Wood was a-flutter. 
Scanning the horizon, another flag, glancing like a lady's handker- 
chief, showed white across a field lying high and dry upon the Ridge 
three miles to the northeast, and answered back. The center and 
Sherman's corps had spoken. As the hour went by, all semblance to 
falling tree and tolling clock had vanished; it was a rattling roar; 
the ring of Sherman's iron knuckles knocking at the northern door 
of Mission Ridge for entrance. Moving nearer the river, I could 
see the breath of Sherman's panting artillery, and the fiery gust 
from the enemy's guns on Tunnel Hill, the point of Mission Ridge. 
They had massed there the corps of Hardee and Buckner, as upon 
a battlement, utterly inaccessible, save by one steep, narrow way, 
commanded by their guns. A thousand men could hold it against 
a host. And right in front of this bold abutment of the Ridge is 
that broad, clear field, skirted by woods. Across this tremendous 
threshold, up to death's door, moved Sherman's column. Twice 
it advanced, and twice I saw it swept back in bleeding lines before 
the furnace-blast, until that russet field seemed some strange page 
ruled thick with blue and red. Bright valor was in vain. It was 
the devil's own corner. Before them was a lane whose upper end 
the rebel canndn swallowed. Moving by the right flank or the 
left flank, nature opposed them with precipitous heights. There 
was nothing for it but straight across the field swept by an en- 
filading fire, and up to the lane down which drove the storm." 

It was across that "broad, clear field," up that "lane whose up- 
per end the rebel cannon swallowed," into that "devil's own cor- 
ner," over that "tremendous threshold, up to death's door," into 
that "russet field ruled thick with blue and red," at the very crest 
of that "bold abutment of the Ridge," the Third Brigade, including 
the Ninety-Third Illinois, was sent; and it was there, on that very 
crest, they were fighting when we left them to recite the eloquent 
story of Mr. Taylor. The two hours and a half that they remained 
there have not yet expired ; they are there still ; and we leave them 
there, in that terrific storm, yet a little while, and proceed with Mr. 
Taylor's story of the day : 



70 • HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 

"If Sherman did not roll the enemy along the Ridge like a 
carpet, he at least rendered splendid service, for he held a huge 
ganglion of the foe as firmly on their right as if he had them in the 
vice of the 'lame Lemnian,' who forged the thunderbolts. And 
Illinois was there, too, with her veterans. The Tenth, Sixteenth, 
Twenty-sixth, Thirty-fourth, Fortieth, Forty-eighth, Fifty-fifth, 
Fifty-sixth, Sixtieth, Sixty-third, Seventy-eighth, Eighty-second, 
Eighty-fifth, Eighty-sixth, Ninetieth, Ninety-Third, One Hundred 
and First, One Hundred and Third, One Hundred and Tenth, 
One Hundred and Sixteenth, One Hundred and Twenty-fifth and 
One Hundred and Twenty-seventh regiments were all there. Such 
was the magnificent material from the Army of the Tennessee. I 
thank God that not a tithe of them could be called into action; the 
day was won without it. To living and dead in the commands of 
Sherman and Howard who struck a blow that day — out of my heart 
I utter it — hail and farewell ! And as I think it all over, glancing 
again along that grand heroic line of the Federal Epic, I commit 
the story with a childlike faith to History, sure that when she gives 
her clear, calm record of that day's famous work, standing like 
Ruth among the reapers in the fields that feed the world, she will 
declare, that the grandest staple of the great Northwest is Man ! 

"The brief November afternoon was half gone; it was yet 
thundering on the left; along the center all was still. At that 
very hour Hooker's forces were making a fierce assault upon the 
enemy's left near Rossville, four miles down toward the old field 
of Chickamauga. They carried the Ridge; Mission Ridge seems 
everywhere; they strewed its summit with the dead; they held it. 
And thus the tips of the Federal army's widespread wings flapped 
grandly. But it had not swooped; the gray quarry yet perched 
upon Mission Ridge ; the hostile army was terribly battered at both 
its wings, but there full in our front it grimly waited, biding out its 
time. If the horns of the crescent could not be doubled crushingly 
together in a shapeless mass, possibly it might be sundered at its 
center and tumbled in fragments over the other side of Mission 
Ridge. Sherman was hammering upon the left; Hooker was hold- 
ing fast in Chattanooga Valley; the Fourth Corps, that rounded 
out our center, grew impatient of restraint; the day was waning; 
but little time remained to complete the commanding General's 
grand design; his hour had come; his work was full before him. 

"And what a work that was, to make a weak man falter and 
a brave man think! One and a half miles to traverse, with narrow 
fringes of woods, rough valleys, sweeps of open fields, rocky acclivi- 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 71 

ties, to the base of the Ridge, and no foot in all the breadth with- 
drawn from rebel sight; no foot that could not be played upon by 
rebel cannon. The base attained, what then? A heavy work, 
packed with the enemy, rimming it like a battlement. That work 
carried, and what then? A hill struggling up out of the valley four 
hundred feet, rained on by bullets, swept by shot and shell ; another 
line of works and then, up like a Gothic roof, rough with rocks, 
a-wreck with fallen trees, four hundred more; another ring of fire 
and iron, and then the crest, and then the enemy. 

"To dream of such a journey would be madness; to devise it a 
thing incredible; to do it a thing impossible. But Grant was guilty 
of them all, and was equal to the work. The story of the battle of 
Mission Ridge is struck with immortality already; let those match- 
less leaders and armies bear it company. 

"That the center yet lies along its silent line is still true; in 
five minutes it will be the wildest fiction. Let us take that little 
breath of grace for just one glance at the surroundings, since we 
shall have neither heart nor eyes for it again. Did ever battle have 
so vast a cloud of witnesses! The hive-shaped hills have swarmed. 
Clustered like bees, blackening the house-tops, lining the fortifica- 
tions, over yonder across the theater, in the seats with the Catalines 
— everywhere, an hundred thousand beholders. Their souls are in 
their eyes. Not a murmur that you can hear. It is the most solemn 
congregation that ever stood up in the presence of the God of Bat- 
tles. I think of Bunker Hill as I stand here; of the thousands who 
witnessed that immortal struggle, and fancy there is a parallel. I 
think, too, that the chair of every man of them all will stand vacant 
against the wall to-morrow — for to-morrow is Thanksgiving — ^and 
around the fireside they must give thanks without him, if they can. 

"At half past 3, a group of generals stood upon Orchard 
Knob. The hero of Vicksburg was there, calm, clear, persistent, 
far-seeing; Thomas, the sterling and sturdy; and Meigs, Hunter, 
Granger and Reynolds. Clusters of humbler mortals were there, 
too, but it was anything but a turbulent crowd ; the voices naturally 
fell into a subdued tone, and even young faces took on the gravity of 
later years. An order was given, and in an instant the Knob was 
cleared like a ship's deck for action. At twenty minutes of 4, 
Granger stood upon the parapet by Bridges' battery; the bugle 
swung idly at the bugler's side, the warbling fife and grumbling 
drum unheard; there was to be louder talk — six guns, at intervals 
of two seconds, the signal to advance. Strong and steady Jiis voice 
rang out: 'Number one, fire! Number two, fire! Number three. 



72 HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 

fireT — it seemed to me the tolling of the clock of destiny — and 
when at 'Number six, fire!' the roar throbbed out with the flash, 
you should have seen the dead line that had been lying behind the 
works all day, all night, all day again, come to resurrection in the 
twinkling of an eye, leap like a blade from its scabbard and sweep 
with a two-mile stroke toward the Ridge. From divisions to 
brigades, from brigades to regiments, the order ran. A minute, 
and the skirmishers deploy; a minute, and the first great drops be- 
gin to patter along the line; a minute, and the musketry is in full 
play like the crackling whips of a hemlock fire; men go down here 
and there, before your eyes; the wind lifts the smoke and drifts it 
away over the top of the Ridge ; everything is too distinct ; it is fairly 
palpable; you can touch it with your hand. The divisions of Wood 
and Sheridan are wading breast-deep in the valley of death. 

"There was no reservation in that battle. On moves the skir- 
mish line, like a heavy frown, and after it, at quick time, the splendid 
columns. At right and left and in front of us the bayonets glitter 
in the sun. It is of a truth the harvest of death to which they 
go. And so through the fringe of woods went the line. Now, out 
into the open ground they burst into the double-quick. Shall I 
call it a Sabbath day's journey, or a long half-mile? To me, that 
watched, it seemed endless as eternity, and yet they made it in thirty 
minutes. The tempest that now broke upon their heads was terrible. 
The enemy's fire burst out of the rifle pits from base to summit of 
Mission Ridge; five batteries of Parrotts and Napoleons opened 
along the crest. Grape and canister and shot and shell sowed the 
ground with rugged iron and garnished it with the wounded and the 
dead. But steady and strong our columns moved on. 
'By heaven ! It was a splendid sight to see. 
For one who had no friend, no brother there.' 
but to all loyal hearts, alas ! and thank God, those men were friend 
and brother, both in one. 

"And over their heads, as they went. Forts Wood and Negley 
struck straight out like mighty pugilists right and left, raining their 
iron blows upon the Ridge from base to crest; Forts Palmer and 
King took up the quarrel, and Moccasin Point cracked its fiery 
whips and lashed the surly left till the wolf cowered in its comer 
with a growl. Bridges' battery, from Orchard Knob below, thrust its 
ponderous fists in the face of the enemy, and planted blows at will. 
Our artillery was doing splendid service. It laid its shot and shell 
wherever it pleased. All along the mountain's side, in the enemy's 
rifle pits, on the crest, they fairly dotted the Ridge. Granger leaped 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 73 

down, sighted a gun, and in a moment, right in front, a great vol- 
ume of smoke, like 'the cloud by day,' lifted off the summit from 
among the batteries, and hung motionless, kindling in the sun. 
The shot had struck a caisson and that was its dying breath. In 
five minutes another floated away. 

"And all the while our lines were moving on; they had burned 
through the woods and swept over the rough and rolling g^round 
like a prairie fire. Never halting, never faltering, they charged up 
to the first rifle pits with a cheer, forked out the foe with their 
bayonets, and lay there panting for breath. It was now growing 
sublime; like the footfall of God on the ledges of cloud. It was 
rifles and musketry, grape and canister, shell and shrapnel. Mis- 
sion Ridge was volcanic; a thousand torrents of red poured over 
its brink and rushed together at its base. And our men were there, 
halting for breath! And still the sublime diapason rolled on. 
Echoes that never waked before roared out from height to height, 
and called from the far ranges of Waldron's Ridge to Lookout. 
As for Mission Ridge it had jarred to such music before; it was the 
'sounding-board' of Chickamauga; it was behind us then; it frowns 
and flashes in our faces to-day. The old Army of the Cumberland 
was there; it breasted the storm till the storm was spent, and left 
the ground it held. The old Army of the Cumberland is here! 
It shall roll up the Ridge like a surge to its summit, and sweep 
triumphant down the other side. That memory and hope may 
have made the heart of many a blue-coat beat like a drum. 'Beat,' 
did I say? The feverish heart of the battle beats on. Fifty-eight 
guns a minute, by the watch, is the rate of its terrible throbbing. 
That hill, if you climb it, will appal you. Furrowed like a summer 
fallow; bullets as if an oak had shed them; trees clipped and shorn, 
leaf and limb, as with the knife of some heroic gardener pruning 
back for richer fruit. How you attain the summit, weary and 
breathless, I wait to hear; how they went up in the teeth of the 
storm no man can tell! But our gallant legions are out in the 
storm; they have carried the works at the base of the Ridge; they 
have fallen like leaves in winter weather. Blow, dumb bugles! 
Sound the recall! 

" 'Take the rifle pit,' was the order, and it is as empty of enemies 
as the tombs of the prophets. Shall they turn their backs to the 
blast? Shall they sit down under the eaves that drip iron? Or 
shall they climb to the cloud of death above them, and pluck out 
its lightnings as they would straws from a sheaf of wheat? And 
now the arc of fire on the crest grows fiercer and longer. Fleeces of 



74 HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 

white smoke dot the Ridge, as battery after battery opens upon 
our line. I count till that devil's girdle numbers thirteen batteries, 
and my heart cries out: 'Great God, when shall the end be?' 

"At this moment the commanding General's aides are dashing 
out with an order, to left, right and front: 'Take the Ridge if 
you can' — and so it went along the line. But the advance had 
already set forth without it. They were out of the rifle pits and into 
the tempest and struggling up the steep, before you could get your 
breath to tell it, all along the line. 

"And now you have before you one of the most startling 
episodes of the war; I cannot render it in words; dictionaries are 
beggarly things. But I may tell you they did not storm that 
mountain as you would think. They dash out a little way, and 
then slacken; they creep up, hand over hand, loading and firing, 
and wavering and halting, from the first line of works tgward the 
second; they burst into a charge with a cheer and go over it. Sheets 
of flame baptize them; plunging shot tear away comrades on left 
and right; it is no longer shoulder to shoulder; it is God for us all! 
Under tree-trunks, among rocks, stumbling over the dead, strug- 
gling with the living; facing the steady fire of eight thousand 
infantry poured down upon their heads from the Ridge. Ten, 
fifteen, twenty minutes go by like a reluctant century. The batter- 
ies roll like a drum ; between the second and the last line of works 
is the torrid zone of the battle; the hill rises up like a wall at an 
angle of forty-five degrees, but our brave mountaineers are clam- 
bering steadily on — up — upward still ! They would have lifted you, 
as they lifted me, in full view of the region of heroic grandeur; they 
seemed to be spurning the dull earth under their feet, and going 
up to do Homeric battle with the greater gods. 

"And what do these men follow? All along the Gothic roof of 
the Ridge a row of inverted V's is slowly moving up almost in 
line, a mighty lettering on the hill's broad side. At the angles of 
those V's is something that glitters like a wing. Your heart 
bounds when you see what it is — the regimental flags — and many 
of them were borne at Pea Ridge, waved at Shiloh, were glorified 
at Stone River, and riddled at Chickamauga. Nobler than Caesar's 
rent mantle are they all ! And up those banners move, now flutter- 
ing like a wounded bird, now faltering, now sinking out of sight. 
And you know why. Dead color-sergeants lie just there, but the 
flags are immortal — thank God — and up they come again, and the 
V's move on. On the left, on a plateau under the frown of the hill, 
against a bold point strong with rebel works, three flags are 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 75 

perched and motionless for a long quarter of an hour. Will they 
linger forever? I look at the sun behind me; it is not more than 
a hand's breadth from the edge of the mountain; its level rays 
bridge the valley from Chattanooga to the Ridge with beams of 
gold; it shines in the hostile faces; it brings out the Federal blue; 
it illuminates the flags. Oh, for the voice that could bid that sun 
stand still ! I turn to the battle again ; those three flags have taken 
flight. They are upward bound! Though vexed by an enfilading 
fire, those men steadied into rock and swept the enemy before them 
with a broom of bayonets. It cost them fifty of the rank and file and 
two lieutenants, all wounded or dead, and all of Illinois. 

"The race of the flags is growing every moment more terrible. 
One of the inverted V's is turning right side up ! The men strug- 
gling along the converging lines to overtake the flag have dis- 
tanced it, and there the colors are, sinking down in the center 
between the rising flanks. The line wavers like a great billow, and 
up comes the banner again, as if it heaved on a surge's shoulder! 
The iron sledges beat on. Hearts, loyal and brave, are on the 
anvil all the way from base to summit of Mission Ridge, but those 
dreadful hammers never intermit. Swarms of bullets sweep the 
hill. Things are growing desperate up aloft ; the enemy tumble rocks 
upon the rising line; they light the fuses and roll shells down the 
steep; they load the guns with handfuls of cartridges in their haste; 
and as if there were powder in the word, they shout 'Chickamauga!' 
down upon the mountaineers. But it would not all do. Just as the 
sun, weary of the scene, was sinking out of sight, with magnificent 
bursts all along the line, as the crested seas leap up at the break- 
water, the advance surged over the crest, and in a minute those 
flags fluttered along the fringe where fifty guns were kenneled. 
God bless the Flag! 

"What colors were first upon the mountain battlement? I 
dare not try to say. Bright honor's self might be proud to bear — 
bear? — nay, proud to follow the hindmost. Foot by foot they had 
fought up the steep, slippery with much blood; let them go to glory 
together. A minute, and they were all there, fluttering along the 
Ridge from left to right. And the routed hordes of the enemy 
rolled oflf like the clouds of a wornout storm. But the ocene on 
that narrow plateau can never be painted. As the blue-coats 
surged over its edge, cheer on cheer rang like bells through the 
valley of the Chickamauga. Men flung themselves exhausted upon 
the ground. They laughed and wept, shook hands and embraced; 
turned round and did all four over again. It was as wild as a 
carnival. 



76 HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 

"But you must not think that was all there was of the scene on 
the crest, for fight and frolic were strangely mingled. Bayonets 
glinted and muskets rattled. The artillerists are driven from their 
batteries at the edge of the sword and point of the bayonet. Granger 
turns captain of the enemy's guns, and in a moment they are swung 
around upon their old masters and are growling after the flying foe. 
1 say flying, but that is figurative. The many run like Spanish 
merinos, but the few fight like lions at bay; they are fairly scorched 
out of position. But I can render you no idea of the battle caldron 
that boiled on the plateau. An incident, here and there, I have 
given you, and you must fill out the picture for yourself. Dead 
soldiers lay thick around Bragg's headquarters and along the Ridge. 
Scabbards, broken arms, artillery horses, wrecks of giin c^arriages, 
bloody garments, strewed the scene; and, tread lightly, oh, true- 
hearted, the boys in blue are lying there; no more the sounding 
charge; no more the brave wild cheer; and never, for them, sweet 
as the breath of new mown hay in the old home fields, 'The Soldier's 
Return from the War.' A little waif of a drummer boy, somehow 
drifted up the mountain in the surge, lies there, his pale face up- 
ward, a blue spot in his breast. MufHe his drum for the poor 
child and his mother. 

"With the receding flight and swift pursuit the battle died away, 
in murmurs, far down the valley of the Chickamauga. The sun, 
the golden disk of the scales that balance day and night, had hardly 
gone down when up, beyond Mission Ridge, rose the silver side, 
for that night it was full moon. The troubled day was done." 

But that was at the center of the Federal line. That was what 
ptie man saw therey and told. How was it on the left, where 
General Sherman's army was threatening to turn the Confederate 
right wing, as Hooker had turned the left on Lookout the day be- 
fore? On Monday, the Army of the Cumberland had swept the 
enemy out of the Tennessee Valley, and into his stronger defensive 
lines on Mission Ridge, in front of the Federal center. General 
Bragg weakened his left through fear that his center' would be 
broken the next day. On Tuesday, the Federal center stood mo- 
tionless all day, under arms, and ready to assault at any moment, 
while General Hooker's forces turned the enemy's weakened left 
and hurled it oflf Lookout Mountain. On that same day, General 
Sherman's army gained commanding positions on the enemy's right 
flank. Early Wednesday morning, the Army of the Tennessee 
gave General Bragg a continuing promise, for that whole day, that, 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 77 

unless he should most zealously guard against it, the same fate 
that overtook his left wing on Lookout would be visited on his 
right at the north end of Mission Ridge. And General Sherman 
kept that promise good and emphasized it more and more strongly 
every hour from sunrise until late in the afternoon. Hence, Gen- 
eral Bragg" weakened his center for the better protection of his 
right wing, which was all-important to him. And so it was, that 
the operations of the Army of the Tennessee, which caused General 
Bragg to weaken his center, enabled the Army of the Cumberland 
to achieve one of the most brilliant victories in modern warfare. 
It was no less a victory for the Army of the Ohio, the Army of the 
Potomac, and the Army of the Tennessee. Each performed its 
part, and performed it so well that all must **go to glory together.'' 
How was it on the left? What became of the Ninety-Third 
Illinois? and of the Third brigade? They had been fighting at the 
crest of the Ridge, north of the tunnel, for two hours, and we left 
them there, still fighting at half past 3. And there they con- 
tinued the battle until 4 o'clock. Mark the hour! The signal- 
guns for the assault on the enemy's center had sounded twenty 
minutes before, and that assault was then in progress. General 
Sherman's guns were thundering still, and his troops were still 
persistently pressing nearer and nearer to the enemy on the north 
end of the Ridge, and nearer and nearer to the Dalton road. Gen. 
Morgan L. Smith's division had secured position in the valley be- 
tween the mountain spur and Mission Ridge, lapped its lines around 
the north end of the Ridge, and there held fast. That whole slope 
had turned blue, and there was no room for any gray anywhere 
in the picture, not even at the outer edges of it. The batteries on the 
mountain spur behind protected it. The Ninety-Third Illinois, and 
all the brigade, were still kneeling and fighting and bleeding at 
the crest of the Ridge, on its westerly slope. The opposing lines 
were no more than sixty feet apart, so close together that large 
stones were hurled from each line at the other, over the crest of the 
Ridge. Several men were seriously injured by such rocks thrown 
from the enemy's lines. Six times the colors of this regiment went 
out of sight. Once, the life of the brave Colonel Putnam went out 
when the flag went down; twice, the spirits of brave sergeants took 
their flight when the banner fell; and three times, wounded and 
bleeding heroes relinquished it to other hands. The staff that sup- 
ported its shining folds was splintered and shivered and shot in 
twain. The banner itself was riddled and tattered and 
torn into shreds. Not a twentieth part of it remained 



78 HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 

upon the broken staff. Carried away by shot and shell, 
it fragments were scattered on the mountain side among 
the dead and bleeding heroes who followed it there. God save 
the mark! how many they were! Twenty killed; eight mortally 
wounded; nineteen missing who died in prison or were never heard 
from again; forty-one wounded, not mortally; and eight missing 
who returned. The total loss was ninety-six. Two hundred and 
ninety-three went into the battle. The loss was thirty-two and sev- 
enty-six hundredths per cent of the number engaged. 

At 4 o'clock, or a few minutes later, the enemy moved a 
heavy column of troops through the railroad tunnel, an eighth of 
a mile beyond the right of the brigade. Another force was quickly 
passed over the Ridge, at the point of the depression just above 
the tunnel. These two forces, in four lines, charged up the western 
slope of the Ridge, from the direction of the tunnel, upon the flank 
and rear of the Federal Hne next on the right of this brigade. 
That line was literally doubled up and captured and swept away in 
less time than it can be told. Instantly following, the full force of 
the enemy's blow fell upon the right of this brigade, well in rear 
of the line. The words of General Grant : **They will have to go 
down," were immediately realized. The whole brigade, raked by 
an enfilading fire, was swept from the crest of the mountain, into 
the valley below, like chaflf before a cyclone. The Federal batteries 
on the mountain spur could not play upon the enemy until the 
brigade was a considerable distance down the slope. Then they 
opened upon them, with terrific effect, and quickly hurled the 
Confederates back behind the crest of the Ridge. 

The disaster to this regiment, and the brigade, was nothing 
more than the correction of the error committed when they went 
to the crest of the Ridge. The Army of the Tennessee lost no foot 
of its tenable ground. Nor did the enemy gain the release of a single 
brigade or regiment, from his right, to aid his weakened center, in 
the emergency already then upon him there, full three miles away. 
In less than thirty minutes thereafter his center was broken, and the 
battle of Mission Ridge, and all of East Tennessee, irretrievably lost 
to him. 

The shattered lines of the Ninety-Third Illinois, and of the 
brigade, were immediately re-formed, at the edge of the woods, near 
the position occupied just before the battle. The lurid sun, as 
seen through battlesmoke, was just sinking in the West. Tall 
mountains were rapidly casting the mantle of their lengthening 
shadows over all the valley of the Tennessee; and yonder, up the 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 79 

slope of Mission Ridge, where armed hosts had struggled all the 
day, those shadows are creeping, creeping, mounting higher and 
higher, until they fall upon the crest and hide it from view. 'Twas 
welcome relief from the conflict and scenes of that day. "It is 
strange that a battle almost always lies between two breaths of 
sleep; the dreamless slumber into which men fall upon its eve; the 
calm repose they sink in at its end. Night fairly held its breath 
above the camps; the wing of silence was over them all. No sigh, 
no groan, nothing but the sobbing lapse of the Tennessee." 

It is to be noted, and not omitted, that the battlefields of Mission 
Ridge and Chickamauga were connected. On September 20th, 
1863, at the battle of Chickamauga, Gen. Gordon Granger's com- 
mand reached the right of the Union line at an opportune moment, 
about 4 o'clock in the afternoon ; and on the westernmost of a range 
of hills, that extends westward about a mile from Kelley's house 
and forms the southern extremity of Mission Ridge, made a most 
desperate and successful fight against the greatly superior numbers 
of General Longstreet's forces, and checked, in fact stopped, his 
movement, which, had it been successful, must have crushed the 
right of the Union line, and resulted in the destruction of the army 
of General Thomas, and consequent almost irretrievable disaster to 
the Union cause. That fight saved McFarland's Gap, near the 
point where the battle was most furious, which was then the great 
strategic point of that battlefield, the gateway to Chattanooga Val- 
ley. On November 24th, 1863, the troops on General Brecken- 
ridge's right were beaten and driven from Lookout Mountain, and, 
on that night, crossed Chattanooga Creek and took position on 
Mission Ridge, well down toward the south end of it. And on No- 
vember 25th, 1863, at 4 o'clock in the afternoon, the command of 
General Breckenridge was on the extreme south end of Mission 
Ridge. His left, being refused at McFarland's Gap, occupied the 
same breastworks that were held by the Union forces, at the same 
hour of the day, on September 20th, 1863. The two battlefields 
were thus connected at this point. Here General Granger's com- 
mand had saved the Union army from overwhelming disaster, at 
the close of the battle of Chickamauga, a little over two months be- 
fore. But now, (even while the forces of General Bragg, "as if 
there were powder and bullets in the word," were shouting "Chick- 
amauga" down from the crest of Mission Ridge upon the hosts of 
Generals Granger and Thomas and Sherman, all under General 
Grant, as they were fighting their way up those apparently impreg- 
nable heights, in front of Chattanooga), the divisions of Generals 



80 HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 

Cruft and Osterhaus and Gean*, under General Hooker, were 
driving the forces of General Breckenridge from that same line, at 
the southern extremity of the ridge, where General Granger's 
heroes checked and stopped the rush of General Longstreet's hosts 
on September 20th, and saved the Union army. The shout of 
"Chickamauga," neither in front of Chattanooga nor where the two 
battlefields met, could check the tide of battle, on that November 
day, that was fast carrying disaster to the Confederate cause. The 
defeat at Chickamauga was to be, and was, on that day, most glori- 
ously avenged. 

It was fitting that the two battlefields should be connected, 
should meet and become as one; that the unyielding heroism of the 
one should be blended with the brilliant achievements of the other; 
that the burial places of those heroes who fell at Chickamauga, to 
save the Union army from irretrievable disaster, should be joined, 
as in common sepulture, with the graves of those who fell at Mis- 
sion Ridge, to retrieve and avenge their defeat. In glory they 
sleep together! 

In the eloquent words of Mr. Taylor: 

"The battle has been given and won; the dear old flag streams 
like a meteor from the craggy crown of Lookout Mountain; Mis- 
sion Ridge has been swept with fire and steel as with a broom ; the 
grim crescent of the enemy, curving away along the range, from 
the far northeast, south to the base of Lookout, has been crushed 
like a buzzard's ^gg; the terrible arc of iron, five miles long, that 
bent like a quadrant around half of our horizon, is broken and scat- 
tered; the key has at last been turned in the Chattanooga lock; 
the enemy must fly from East Tennessee, like shadows before the 
morning; Chattanooga, to the Federal army, is no longer the end, 
but the beginning of things; our eyes may now be lifted and look 
beyond Chattanooga. Thanks be to God, and the Boys in Blue ! 

"I sit down utterly unequal to a task in which pride and grief 
are strangely blended ; and yet, in an instant, a half cheer, exultant, 
triumphant, comes to my lips, and to-night, under this cloudless 
sky, the way swept clean to Heaven for our boys going there, I 
turn to the painted emblem that blossomed so strangely on Look- 
out at break of day, a thousand times more dear for their dear sake 
who died, and say: Oh, Flag, that loss would make us bankrupt 
but that thy folds are priceless! The work on the right, left and 
center cost us full four thousand killed and wounded! 

"There was a species of poetic justice in it all that would 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 81 

have made the prince of dramatists content. The ardor of the men 
had been quenchless ; there had been three days of fitful fever, and 
after it, alas, a multitude slept well. There is a trembling of the 
lip but a flash of pride in the eye as the soldier tells with how 
many he went in — how expressive is that Svent in!' Of a truth it 
was wading in dead waters — with how few he came out. I cannot 
try to swing the burden clear from any heart by throwing into the 
scale upon the other side the deadweight of fifty-two pieces of cap- 
tured artillery, ten thousand stand of arms, and heaps of dead 
enemies, or by driving upon it a herd of seven thousand prisoners. 
Nothing of all this can lighten that burden a single ounce. But 
those three days' work brought Tennessee to resurrection; and set 
th^ flag, that fairest blossom in all this flowery world, to blooming 
in its native soil again. 

"That splendid march from the Federal line of battle to the 
crest, was still a grander march toward the end of carnage; a 
glorious campaign toward the white borders of peace. It made 
that fleeting November afternoon imperishable. Let the struggle 
be known as the Battle of Mission Ridge. And now that calmer 
days have come, men make pilgrimage and women smile again 
among the mountains of the Cumberland, but they need no guide. 
Rust may have eaten the guns; the graves of the heroes may have 
subsided like waves weary of their troubling; the soldier and his 
leader may have lain down together; but there, embossed upon the 
globe. Mission Ridge will stand its fitting monument forever." 

THE NEXT DAY. 

"I am looking down upon hundreds of the *boys in blue' that 
lie side by side on the mountains. Bits of twine bind their willing 
feet, that shall never again move at 'the double-quick' to the charge. 
They were among the heroes of Mission Ridge and Lookout Moun- 
tain. They were killed yesterday and the day before and Mon- 
day. And to-day — let me think — ^what is to-day? Away there, at 
the North, there were song and sermon ; and the old family table, 
that had been drooping in the corner, spread its wide wings; and 
the children came flocking home, 'like doves to their windows;' 
and the threshold made music to their feet — alas, for the hundreds 
of pairs beside me here! — and the welcome went round the bright 
hearth. It is Thanksgiving to-day ! Let the mothers give thanks, 
if they can, for the far-away feet that grew beautiful as they has- 
tened to duty and halted in death! Even while the heart of the^ 
loyal land was lifted in a psalm for the blessings it had numbered, 
6 



82 HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 

another was winging its way northward — the tidings of triumph 
from the mountains of the Cumberland!" 

BATTLE OF MISSION RIDGE. 

November 23, 24 and 25, 1863. 
By Col. N. C. Buswell, Ninety-Third Illinois Volunteer Infantry. 

We cannot forget the bold mountains before us, 
Nor the camp in the valley, in years long ago, 

The blue lines of battle — our flag floating o'er us — 
On the heights far above us, a resolute foe. 

From the crest of each mountain their cannon are bristling, 
And the face of each hillside is grim with the Gray, 

Where line above line their bay'nets are glistening, 
Entrenched and awaiting the bloody affray. 

Nor long do they wait, for the columns of Granger, 
Out from the center, are sweeping the plain; 

Are cheering and charging, regardless of danger. 
Where death-dealing missiles are falling like rain. 

On the right, the heroes of Hooker are forming: 
They charge 'cross the valley ; they cheer as they go ; 

The bold heights of Lookout are gallantly storming; 
Are striving, are driving, pursuing the foe. 

A sulphurous mantle, the mountain enfolding. 
Creeps steadily onward and up the steep way, 

Till shouts of the loyal are loud, on beholding 
Our flag on the crest, at the close of the day. 

The vale is now vacant where Sherman was camping; 

They stem the dark flood at the hush of the night; 
Along the broad valley their columns are tramping; 

Are nearing the tunnel; are climbing the height. 

On right, left and center the battle is raging 
From brow of the mountain to valley and plain ; 

And doubtful the contest the Union is waging; 
And woeful the sight of our comrades there slain. 

The foe in confusion, in darkness retreating. 

Encumbered the highways, as southward they flee ; 

The sound of the bugle and drums loudly beating — 
Our army pursuing — ^well remembered by me. 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 83 

We cannot forget the dead and the dying 

That cumbered the crest, as the smoke cleared away; 

When there, side by side like brothers, were lying 
In death's calm repose, both the blue and the gray. 

Nor can we forget the brave comrades we carried, 
And laid, side by side, in the long shallow grave; 

Nor the field on the hillside, where those heroes were buried, 
To await the reward of the true and the brave. 

On November 26th and 27th, the Ninety-Third Illinois consti- 
tuted part of the force that pursued General Bragg's army after its 
<iefeat. The regiment marched to Grayson, Georgia, about four- 
teen miles from the battlefield, and went into camp there, in the 
evening, on the 27th; and, on the 28th, returned to the camp occu- 
pied on the 23d inst., north of the Tennessee River, where it re- 
mained until the morning of the 3d day of December. This ended 
the Chattanooga campaign. From October ist to this date, the 
regiment moved by rail one hundred and one miles, and marched 
two hundred and ninety-nine miles. 



CHAPTER VI. 

SUBSEQUENT TO THE CHATTANOOGA CAMPAIGN, AND PRIOR TO THE! 

BATTLE OF ALLATOONA, GA. 

On the 3d, 4th and 5th days of December, 1863, the Ninety- 
Third IlHnois marched to Bridgeport, Alabama, where it remained 
in camp until the morning of the 22d inst. On December 22d ancj 
23d, the command marched to Stevenson, Alabama. 

From Stevenson, Alabama, the regimental flag, which had 
been literally shot to pieces in battle, was sent home, to Bureau 
County, Illinois, accompanied by the following address : 

Headquarters Ninety-Third Regiment Illinois Infantry Volunteers^ 

Stevenson, Alabama, December 24th, 1863. 
To the Honorable War Committee of Bureau County, 

Gentlemen : — In consideration of the fact, that the Regimental 
Banner of this regiment, presented by you, in behalf of the people 
of Bureau County, has been so nearly destroyed, by the shot and 
shell of the enemy, in the several engagements through which it 
has been borne, that it is no longer fit for service, we deem it 
proper to return it to you again, to be preserved among the records 
of Bureau County. And, feeling that our interests and the interests 
of those we represent are the same, and that the incidents in our 
history, as a regiment, are interesting to us and to our friends at 
home alike, we think it not amiss to accompany the banner with 
a brief memoranda of facts, that you may know we have not been 
idle. Though hastily prepared, it may give you some idea of the 
labor performed, hardships endured, and dangers encountered since 
we have been in the field. 

Leaving Chicago, Illinois, November 9th, 1862, the regiment 
has traveled by railroad four hundred and sixty-six miles, on 
steamers and transports one thousand seven hundred and eighty- 
four miles, and has marched nine hundred and three miles. This 
in the space of thirteen months and fifteen days. During this time 
we have been in the field constantly; and one-fourth of the time 
have been without tents, exposed to the storm or a scorching^ 
southern sun. We were engaged in the battles of Jackson, Mis- 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 85 

sissippi, May 14th, 1863; Champion Hill, Mississippi, May i6th, 
1863; siege of Vicksburg, Mississippi, from May 19th to July 4th, 
1863; Mission Ridge, Tennessee, November 25th, 1863. In these 
engagements our losses were as follows, to wit: Killed, two 
officers and sixty-two enlisted men; wounded, eight officers and two 
hundred and twelve enlisted men; missing, three officers and thirty- 
six enlisted men. Total loss, three hundred and twenty-five offi- 
cers and men. Of those wounded, fifty-two have died; making the 
list of mortality in action or of wounds received there, two officers 
and one hundred and fourteen enlisted men. Of those missing in 
action, twenty-three have not been heard from. One officer and 
seventy-eight enlisted men have died of disease contracted while 
in the line of duty. As those who have fallen upon the field, they 
as much were martyrs to their country's cause. Ten officers have 
resigned, and ninety-nine enlisted men have been discharged for 
disability. Of these, fourteen enlisted men have died on their way 
or after reaching home. Total list of mortality, three officers and 
two hundred and twenty-nine enlisted men. Eighty-three enlisted 
men have been transferred to other branches of the service. Of 
nine hundred and sixty-four officers and men mustered, five hun- 
dred and fifty-four are now members of the regiment. Total loss, 
from all causes, four hundred and ten officers and men. Accom- 
panying this we send a complete list of all casualties in battle, which 
renders more particular remark here, under that head, unnecessary. 
It might be expected, and, indeed, our own feelings would 
seem to suggest, that a memorandum of the minor incidents con- 
nected more directly with the Banner itself should be attached. 
But when we look at those folds, now torn and mutilated, and that 
staff, now broken, we think it needless. Though silently, it tells 
its own history in language more adequate than we can command. 
Go read it there! that conquered traitors have bent to it the knee. 
Go read it there! that treason crushed has paid it homage due. 
Read it! that fighting 'n^ath its shadow brave men have fallen! 
Friends! as it is, with its own history written upon it, we return to 
you to-day that Banner, which, but a little more than a year ago, 
we bore proudly to the field. To-day we return it to you with con- 
scious pride that since it has been in our keeping it has never been 
dishonored. And yet, a sad thought comes with our pride, that 
so many of the noble and the brave should have fallen while fight- 
ing in its defense. Let it be preserved — a sacred relic — in memory 
of those fallen heroes ! Upon its folds their names are written in 
never dying honor! Is it the name of your friend? Read it there, 



^6 HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 

and be proud that he was such to you. Perchance, it may be a 
dearer, holier name — brother, son, or husband! Read it there, 
and if a tear unbidden starts, restrain it not. 'Tis fit that kindred 
tears with kindred blood should mingle. But, oh ! shed not the tear 
of bitter regret, that to preserve our Nation's life, our country's 
liberty, his life should have been demanded. Think not your 
country asks of you too dear a price ! It is the great lesson taught 
by the world's history, that the price of civil liberty is blood! That 
for us it must be purchased with kindred blood would seem to rob 
the precious boon of half its worth. But no! 'Twill render it 
dearer, sweeter, more lasting and more permanent. 

And now, take home our Banner, but forget us not. As we 
have received it heretofore, we still ask for your support. Let the 
fathers and fair maidens preserve our old Banner, while with an- 
other you send us brave sons. Take home our Banner, forgetting 
not that hovering near it are the spirits of the fallen brave — im- 
mortal sentinels! Old Banner, return! Go tell our friends and 
loved ones that we still seek the foe! Bear tidings home to them of 
a brighter day! As we have been proud of thy once beautiful 
folds, so now, reluctantly, we bid thee adieu ! 

Old Banner, farewell ! to our friends now return, 

Who gave your bright folds to our care; 
Return to our friends ; though ragged and torn. 

No marks of dishonor you bear. 

To our friends and our homes, in peace to remain, 

While in battle we still seek the foe; 
In peace may we hope to meet thee again; 

Until then, we bid thee adieu! 

Go tell them, in combat, that you have been borne 

By their sons, in battle array. 
By the missiles of death your folds have been torn. 

And your staff well nigh shot away. 

Old Banner, return! thou hast served us full well; 

And should we not see thee again, 
Though silent, to friends our story you tell, 

That few in our ranks now remain. 

May our friends, as they look on thy much wasted form, 

Remember the brave that have bled; 
As they look on thy staff, now broken, behold 

Our Colonel — brave Putnam — now dead. 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 87 

Tell our friends, should they fill up our ranks again, 

And give us a banner once more. 

That its folds shall float over Georgia's plain, 

To the far off Atlantic's shore. 

N. C. BUSWELL, 

Lieutenant Colonel, Commanding Regiment. 

On December 24th, 25th and 26th, the regiment marched, via 
Bellefonte, to Larkinsville, Alabama, and remained in camp there 
until the morning of the 7th day of January, A. D. 1864. On Jan- 
uary 7th and 8th, the command marched to Brownsville, Alabama, 
and on the 9th, to *Huntsville, Alabama, and remained in camp 
there until the 27th, inclusive. January 28th and 29th, the regi- 
ment marched to Mooreville, Alabama, and on the 30th and 31st, 
returned to Huntsville, Alabama. From February ist to nth, in- 
clusive, remained in camp at Huntsville. Left Huntsville, on the 
Memphis & Charleston Railroad, at 6 o'clock p. m., on the 12th day 
of February, and arrived at Bridgeport, Alabama, at midnight fol- 
lowing. On February 13th and 14th, marched to a point near 
Chattanooga, Tennessee, and remained there one day. On the 
1 6th, marched to near Ooltewah, Tennessee, and on the 17th, to 
Cleveland, Tennessee, and remained there until the 22d, inclusive. 

RECONNOISSANCE TO DALTON, GEORGIA. 

On the 23d, the regiment marched to within three miles of 
Ringgold, Georgia, making twenty-eight miles that day, which was 
a very hard day for the command. On the 24th, the regiment 
moved to a point near Tunnel Hill, Georgia, and was in line of 
battle nearly all day. There was some fighting in the direction of 
Tunnel Hill. The force here consisted of about eleven thousand 
men, under command of General Palmer, and was engaged in a 
forced reconnoissance against Dalton, Georgia, to ascertain the 
strength of the enemy at that place, and to prevent the reinforce- 
ment of the enemy then opposing General Sherman in Mississippi. 
On the 25th, the regiment moved forward at 4 o'clock in the morn- 
ing, and, after marching about seven miles, went into line of battle 
and advanced, in line, about one mile, when the command was 
halted at a point about a half mile from and in plain sight of Rocky 
Face Gap, .which is about three miles west from Dalton, where 
Turchin's brigade did some sharp fighting during the day. The 
Ninety-Third Illinois was held in reserve, in line of battle, all day 
and until 10 o'clock at night, but were not engaged at any time. 



88 HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 

although a few cannon shots and a good many bullets 
passed over and came among the command. At lo o'clock that 
night, the regiment was withdrawn, and moved back to the camp 
occupied the previous night. On the 26th, the regiment again ad- 
vanced, about one mile, toward Dalton, and was in line of battle all 
day and until 10 o'clock at night. At that time, the command was 
withdrawn, and marched back to a point within two miles of 
Ringgold, Georgia, and on the 27th and 28th, returned to Qeveland, 
Tennessee, and remained there the next day. The reconnoissance 
to Dalton was ended. 

On the 1st day of March, the regiment marched to Ooltewah, 
Tennessee, and on the 2d, to Chattanooga, Tennessee, and on the 
3d and 4th, to Bridgeport, Alabama. Leaving Bridgeport at 4 
o'clock in the morning, on the 5th, on board cars, on the Memphis 
& Charleston Railroad, the command reached Huntsville, Alabama, 
at 6 o'clock in the morning on the 6th instant, and occupied the 
camp from which it had moved on the 12th day of February. Re- 
mained in the same camp until April 29th, inclusive. It was the 
best and finest camp the regiment had during its term of service, 
being nearly perfect in all respects. On the 19th day of March, 
Company B was detached and located at, to guard the railroad 
bridge over, Piney Creek, about nineteen miles west of Huntsville, 
and Company H was detached, for the same kind of duty, at Lime- 
stone Creek, about eighteen miles from Huntsville. During the 
stay at Huntsville, the duty required of the command was very 
onerous. The entire membership of the regiment did either guard 
duty or fatigue service every second day. On April 30th, after 
being mustered for pay, and paid, the regiment moved, by rail, on 
the Memphis & Charleston Railroad, to Decatur, Alabama, where it 
remained in camp until, and including, June 14th following. On 
the 19th day of May, Companies B and H rejoined the regiment at 
Decatur. While here the men were on duty full half the time, guard 
duty and building fortifications, and the officers a greater propor- 
tion of the time. The brigade constructed a very fine fort. While 
here, also, the command had frequent skirmishes with the enemy 
around the lines. Quite a large force of Confederate cavalry 
infested the country south of Decatur, and frequently annoyed the 
Federal lines around the place. On this account it was necessary 
to maintain very heavy picket lines, which made heavy duty for the 
command. 

On June 15th and i6th, the regiment marched to Huntsville, 
Alabama, and remained there five days. On the 22d, orders were 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 89 

received to join General Sherman's army near Atlanta, Georgia, 
and the regiment marched to Brownsboro, Alabama. Camp and 
garrison equipage was sent by rail to Chattanooga, Tennessee. 
June 23d, marched at 5 o'clock in the morning, and went into camp, 
at 3 o'clock in the afternoon, two miles east of Point Rock Station, 
-Alabama. June 24th, marched through Larkinsville to a point near 
Scottsboro, Alabama. June 25th, marched through Bellefonte, 
and went into camp on Crow Creek, three miles from Stevenson, 
Alabama, and remained there during the next day. On June 27th, 
in the afternoon, the command marched to Stevenson, Alabama, 
and there boarded the cars, on the Memphis & Charleston Rail- 
road, and rolled out at 5 o'clock, the same afternoon, for Chatta- 
nooga, Tennessee, reaching that place at 9 130 o'clock that evening, 
and remained there that night. 

RAILROAD COLLISION. 

The next morning, June 28th, the regiment changed cars, and at 
9 o'clock, started, on the Western & Atlantic Railroad, leading from 
Chattanooga to Atlanta, for Kingston, Georgia. There were four 
cars, in this train, loaded with percussion shells. When about one mile 
•northwest of Dalton, Georgia, the train collided with another train, 
coming up on the road, with wounded from General Sherman's 
army. When the men of the regiment, many of whom were on 
the top of the train, saw that a collision was inevitable, they began 
to shout: "Get off of this ordnance train." Many of them jumped 
off, althVDugh there was a grade ten to fifteen feet high on the left 
side of the track, which, at this point, had been cut into the side of 
a ridge, by reason of which they could only jump off on the left side, 
ivithout great risk of going under the train if they should go off on 
the other side. Lieut. Milton Cross, of Company C, and thirty 
men of the regiment, were injured. Sylvanus P. Whitehead, of 
<rompany K, was mortally hurt, and died on the 3d day of July fol- 
lowing. He received his injuries in attempting to go down the end 
ladder between two cars. As the trains came together he was 
caught there and crushed. Fifteen others were so badly disabled, 
with sprained ankles and knees and hips, and divers and sundry 
bruises, that they had to be sent back to hospital, at Chattanooga, 
Tennessee. Tlie others, whose injuries were not so severe, re- 
mained with the regiment. The fronts of the two engines were 
•considerably damaged; but fortunately, by reason that both of the 
engines were reversed, the shock was not sufficient to explode the 
fixed ammunition. Had an explosion occurred, and it was mirac- 



90 HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 

ulous that it did not, the major part, at least, of this regiment would 
have been mustered out of service then and there in less than two 
seconds. After the debris was cleared away, the train that was 
coming north backed down, and the train bearing this regiment 
went forward, to Dalton, and remained there that night. 

At 4 o'clock in the morning, on June 29th, the train moved on 
down the railroad and reached Kingston, Georgia, about noon. 
The regiment left the train, at once, and went into camp, and 
remained there until the evening of July 2d. On the date last men- 
tioned, the command marched to Gillem's bridge, over the Etowah 
River, four miles southeast of Kingston. From thence. Companies 
A, D and F went to Island Ford, two miles below, and Companies 
C and G went to Caldwell Ford, three miles above. The other five 
companies remained at Gillem's bridge. The regiment was so 
located to guard those several crossings of the Etowah River. The 
command remained on duty, as above located, until the afternoon 
of July nth, when orders were received to return to Kingston. 
The detached companies were immediately called in, and the regi- 
ment started, a little after dark, for Kingston, and reached there 
about 10 o'clock that night, and occupied the same camp it left on 
the 2d instant. On July 12th, the command moved into the town 
of Kingston, and nearly all the officers and men occupied vacant 
houses. The regiment remained here until the ist day of August,, 
inclusive, and during that time parts of it made several scouts, and 
performed such other services as were usually required when in 
camp. The scouting expeditions were not very exciting, nor very 
useful to the service, but such as they were will be briefly stated 
here. 

On the 15th of the month, a scouting party, consisting of a 
sergeant and ten men, mounted on mules, made a scout to Cass- 
ville. It was a fruitless effort to find a small number of guerrillas 
reported in that vicinity. The names of those who went on the 
expedition are not now remembered. The next day, a squad of 
seven or eight men, belonging at the post hospital, had a skirmish 
with guerrillas, just beyond Cassville, and one of the eight was mor- 
tally wounded. 

On the 17th, Sunday, Captain Gray, Adjutant Trimble, Ser- 
geant Abbott and eleven men, all mounted, made a scout to Cass- 
ville, in the hope that on Sunday some of these guerrillas might be 
found in the town. Dividing into four or five squads, a dash was 
made through the town, on as many different streets, to the oppo- 
site side of the town, where the squads met again at a point agreed 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 91 

upon beforehand. No guerrillas were found. After assembling all 
the male citizens of the town, and placing a guard over them, the 
other members of the party went about four miles beyond the town, 
passing the place where the man, referred to yesterday, was mor- 
tally wounded. An investigation of that affair being made, it was 
learned, from citizens who helped take care of him, that he was shot 
three times. It was not possible to locate the miscreants who did 
the shooting. On returning to Cassville, seven men, who were 
liable to arrest under military orders then in force, were taken, and 
the scouting party returned to Kingston, reaching there at 5 o'clock 
in the afternoon. 

On July 2 1st, at i o'clock in the morning, a courier came from 
Wooley' s bridge, over the Etowah River, and reported, that a Con- 
federate force had driven the pickets from Merkerson's Ford, two 
miles below the bridge, and were crossing there. The regiment 
was called to arms, and ten or fifteen mounted men of the com- 
mand were immediately sent to reconnoiter and ascertain the 
strength and probable movements of the enemy. The scouting 
party returned a little after daylight, having found nothing. A few 
"bushwhackers" had probably crossed the river in the night, but so 
few that they accomplished nothing. About 9 o'clock in the fore- 
noon, after the scouts had rested. Lieutenant Colonel Buswell and 
Adjutant Trimble went with them on another scout, expecting to 
meet about three hundred Federal cavalry from Cartersville. 
Crossing the Etowah River at Island Ford, they moved on to 
Euharlee. Failing to meet the cavalry force, they returned, by the 
way of Gillem's bridge, to Kingston, reaching there late in the 
afternoon. 

On the 23d and 24th, great excitement prevailed in camp, 
caused by news of hard fighting, and conflicting rumors as to the 
result, in front of Atlanta, Georgia. The next day, definite infor- 
mation of victory came to hand, and the excitement subsided. But 
the confirmation of the report of the death of General McPherson, 
on the 22d instant, caused great grief everywhere, and cast a shadow 
of gloom over the whole army. 

At 9 o'clock p. m. on the 24th, orders were received, directing 
that one hundred men of this regiment, properly officered, should 
be sent to Gillem's bridge, to reinforce the command on guard 
there. The information was, that an attack was about to be made 
by a considerable force of the enemy. The force ordered was im- 
mediately sent. But there was no fight. A few guerrillas made a 
large demonstration. They played an old lumber-wagon for artil- 



^2 HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 

lery, scattered themselves out, in a thin line, extending a consider- 
able distance above and below the bridge, and each one began to 
^ive commands, and make other demonstrations, indicating a con- 
siderable force. Covered by darkness, the farce was not dis- 
-covered until after the reinforcements arrived and a force was sent 
across the bridge to develop the strength and position of the sup- 
posed enemy. When that was done all danger vanished at once. 
The reinforcements returned to Kingston the next morning. 

On July 26th, Major Fisher, Adjutant Trimble and about two 
hundred officers and men made an expedition across the Etowah 
River, for the purpose of removing some Union families to the 
north side of the river and to gather forage. Both objects were 
accomplished without trouble. Two supposed guerrillas were ar- 
rested and taken into camp. 

On July 27th, at 8 o'clock p. m., under orders. Lieutenant 
Colonel Buswell, Adjutant Trimble, Lieutenant Davis and sixty-six 
men, sixteen of the latter being mounted, started for a scout on the 
south side of the Etowah River. Crossing the river at Gillem's 
bridge, they left there about 1 1 o'clock that night for active opera- 
tions in the country beyond. About five miles from the bridge, the 
houses of two notorious guerrillas, named Barnes and Wilson, were 
surrounded, and they were captured, with their horses, saddles, 
bridles, spurs, guns, revolvers, etc. A citizen, named Stone, who 
lived near by, was also taken, on suspicion. The command then 
moved about three miles farther on, to Collester's Mill, reaching 
there just at daylight, 4 o'clock a. m., July 28th. Another guerrilla, 
named Jasper N. Garrison, was captured there, with his gun, ac- 
couterments, etc. He was in Confederate uniform, and tried to 
hide under a bed. He and Barnes claimed to be of the regular 
army, and that they were at home on furlough. But their guns and 
other trappings gave them away. The command remained at the 
mill during the day. Hearing that about three or four hundred 
guerrillas were encamped on Euharlee Creek, five or six miles far- 
ther south. Lieutenant Colonel Buswell sent five mounted men 
back to Kingston with a request that seventy-five more men should 
be sent to him, to make the command sufficiently strong to move 
on the guerrilla camp that night. These mounted men were 
attacked, on their way in, by about twenty-five guerrillas, and 
George B. McConnell, of Company A, was captured by them. His 
mule fell over a fence. The other four couriers escaped, and the 
message was delivered at Kingston in due time. Just at twilight, 
that evening, a squad of guerrillas made a demonstration against the 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 9a 

command from two different points. Tlie command was then in 
and near the mill. The guerrillas, after firing fifty or sixty shots, 
which were quickly returned by our 'men, formed a thin line, more 
than a quarter of a mile long, in the heavy timber just west of the 
mill, and each of them began to give loud commands as if advanc- 
ing in line of battle. That ruse did not work. Our boys, shout- 
ing to them, told them to come out of the woods and show up like 
men, and not to hide in the woods and darkness Hke guerrillas, etc., 
etc. But they did not come out. After a little while they rode 
away. At 9 o'clock that evening, the reinforcements asked for, to 
the number of about seventy-five officers and men, reached the 
command at the mill. Having heard, late in the day, that the guer- 
rillas had moved from their camp on Euharlee Creek, above men- 
tioned, and knowing that every guerrilla in that part of the coun- 
try would be warned of the presence of our force by those who had 
paid us the short call early in the evening, Lieutenant Colonel Bus- 
well concluded that the command should, and it did, remain at the 
mill that night. On July 29th, early in the morning, about three 
hundred Federal cavalry came to the mill, from a scout along 
Euharlee Creek. After breakfast they turned back, on a new route. 
Lieutenant Colonel Buswell then divided his command into three 
parts, and started back to Kingston, on as many different routes. 
All met again at Gillem's bridge.- The command reached Kings- 
ton at 4 o'clock that afternoon. The net result of the scout was 
four prisoners, four or five horses, fifteen head of cattle, and a good 
time, marred only by the loss of McConnell, who was captured by 
the enemy. 

ESCAPE OF GEORGE B. McCONNELL. 

After his capture, McConnell was taken to Selma, Alabama, 
and, with a considerable number of other prisoners, placed in the 
third story of a building that stood a short distance from the bank 
of the Alabama River. From that place, he, with two or three other 
soldiers, made his escape in a manner so different from ordinary 
feats of that kind and so full of deliberate calculation and cool dar- 
ing and courage, that the story is worthy of being related here. 

Near this building where he was confined, moored to the bank 
of the river, were a large number of small rowboats, good, bad and 
indifferent. There was a lightning-rod on the end of the building 
next to the river, extending from the top of the building to the 
ground, which passed near a window of the room occupied by Mc- 
Connell and his companions. Under these conditions he and his 



^ HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 

companions planned to escape. The plan was, to take one of those 
boats and go down the Alabama River to a desirable point, and, 
from thence, across the country, to Pensacola, Florida, which was 
then in the possession of the Federal forces. When a sufficiently 
dark night came, and with it the opportune moment, McConnell 
and his companions went down the lightning-rod, hand under hand, 

' (whereby the palms of their hands and the inside of their fingers 
were so thoroughly blistered that all the skin afterward came off), 
seized an old rowboat and a pair of discarded oars, so that the 
taking of them would not be discovered, and quietly pulled out 
down the Alabama River. The river was full of Confederate trafts- 
ports and steamers, and other crafts, coming and going, which sub- 
jected them to great danger of being discovered. Hence, when a 
transport or steamer, or any other craft, came in sight of them, they 
went ashore; or under the dense growth that in many places over- 
hung the river banks, and remained quiet until the danger was 
passed. Of course, they could only move at night. Each morn- 
ing, before daylight, they went into hiding for the day. They pro- 
cured food from the negroes on shore. Thus, they made their way 
down the river. One day, while on shore, they got hold of a south- 
ern newspaper, from which they learned that Admiral Farragut's 
fleet was in Mobile Bay. Thereupon, they abandoned the idea of 
going to Pensacola, and determined to reach the fleet if possible. 
Hence, they continued their course down the river until they 
reached the Confederate fortifications at Mobile. There were bat- 
teries and fortifications nine miles in extent, above and below the 
city. Farragut's fleet was three miles below out in the bay. The 
water, all along in front of these batteries and fortifications and in 
front of the city, was full of all kinds of crafts, some of which were 
moving at all times of the night. Here was a condition of things, 
when they obtained full information of it, that tested their wits and 
genius and courage at the same time. But they solved it correctly. 
Timing their start as late at night as they thought was safe to enable 
them to make the distance before daylight, they boldly pushed off 
from the shore and pulled out, down stream, for the fleet, and for 
their freedom. When daylight came, and the curtain of night 
began to roll up, they were just outside of the range of the nearest 
guns of the enemy, wearily approaching Admiral Farragut's flag- 
ship. The face of the bay was as smooth as glass. Had it not been 

• their frail old boat could not possibly have survived. Although their 
physical strength was well nigh exhausted, their hearts must have 
rapidly grown lighter now. Imagine their exultation when a small 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 95 

boat was lowered from the davits of the flagship and they were 
h'fted on board among the other heroes that walked that deck! 
Their eight days of cautious hiding and their nine nights of arduous 
toil ended! And all the lurking dangers of those days and nights 
behind them ! And no more visions of horrible Confederate prisons 
before them! They were free! And they were standing there, on 
the deck of that good ship, among the grandest heroes of the 
world! It was a consummation only rarely to be realized, even in 
the most heroic of wars. It was great! 

They remained on the fleet until after Fort Morgan was taken, 
and were sent to New Orleans, Louisiana. They were there fur- 
nished with new clothing, and from thence rejoined their regiments. 
McConnell reached the Ninety-Third Illinois at Allatoona, Georgia, 
on the 1 2th day of September, 1864, on the forty-sixth day after he 
w^as captured. The old skin was not yet entirely removed from 
the palms of his hands and the inside of his fingers from the blis- 
tering received in going down the lightning rod, but he immediately 
reported for duty. The regiment was justly proud of him. 

July 31st the regiment was paid for May and June, 1864. 

August 2d, orders were received directing the command to 
move to Allatoona, Georgia. Starting at 10 o'clock a. m., the regi- 
ment marched to Cartersville, Georgia. This was a sad day to every- 
one in the regiment. The old Third Brigade is broken up. The regi- 
ments composing that brigade, to wit, the Fifth and Tenth Iowa 
and the Twenty-sixth Missouri and the Ninety-Third Illinois, had 
served together since the 12th day of December, 1862, and had 
earned great reputation as a fighting brigade throughout the Army 
of the Tennessee. They had passed through the fiery flames and 
terrific storms of hard-fpught battles together. Each regiment 
recognized in all the others that unflinching and unyielding courage 
that made them fast friends. The close friendship and cordial 
relations that existed among both officers and men were remarka- 
ble and unusual. There was not a weak spot nor a mean streak 
anywhere in the brigade. The dissolution of it caused universal 
and sincere regret. 

The Ninety-Third Illinois was assigned to the First Brigade, 
and the other regiments to other brigades of the division. The 
division and corps were not changed. It was still the Third Divi- 
sion, Fifteenth Army Corps. 

The brigade was then composed of the Sixty-third and Ninety- 
Third Illinois, the ^if'orty-eighth and Fifty-ninth Indiana, the Fourth 
Minnesota and the Eighteenth Wisconsin. Col. Jesse I. Alexander, 



96 HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 

of the Fifty-ninth Indiana, was in command. Col. Joseph B. 
McCown, of the Sixty-third Illinois, afterward commanded the bri- 
gade, on the Georgia campaign. 

August 3d, the regiment marched to AUatoona, Georgia, and 
went into camp high up on the hills. The mountain scenery all 
around, except on the western side, was quite picturesque. The 
course of the railroad resembled the trail of a great serpent. And 
one wondered how the tortuous route was traced from valley to val- 
ley between and through those towering hills and mountains; and 
wondered, top, if trains ever got lost there! From this time until 
the 14th, inclusive, the command remained in camp. "All quiet 
on the hills at AUatoona." 

August 15th, in the morning, rumors came of a Confederate 
raid on the railroad between here and Chattanooga. At 10 o'clock 
a. m., orders came, to hold the regiment in readiness to move, by 
rail, at a moment's notice. At 3:30 o'clock p. m., orders came, to 
move, with one hundred rounds of ammunition per man and three 
days' rations. In thirty minutes the command was on board the 
cars, and started north on the railroad. Reached Resaca, Georgia, at 
10 o'clock p. m. The Confederates are on the railroad both north 
and south of Dalton, Georgia, firing on that place with light artil- 
lery, and demanding the surrender of our forces there. They have cut 
the telegraph lines at Tilton, Tunnel Hill and Calhoun, Georgia, and 
seem to be doing a "cash business." August i6th, the regiment 
remained in camp, at Resaca, during the day and night. The raid- 
ers left the railroad last night, and concentrated their forces. General 
Wheeler's cavalry, at Spring Place. Our cavalry drove in their 
pickets there this afternoon. Between 5 and 6 o'clock on the 
morning of the 17th, this regiment moved toward Spring Place, 
a small village about eighteen miles northeast of Resaca. There 
were eight regiments, the Fifth, Tenth and Thirty-ninth Iowa, 
Forty-eighth Indiana, and the Fifteenth, Fifty-seventh, Thirty- 
second and Ninety-Third Illinois, two pieces of artillery, twelve- 
pounders, and about three hundred cavalry, in the column. The 
forces halted when within about six miles of Spring Place. Gen. 
John E. Smith, who was in command of our forces, took the 
cavalry with him and went forward to the village. The Confed- 
erates had left there at 10 o'clock that morning, going in the direc- 
tic»n of Cleveland, a small town in Tennessee, on the Chattanooga & 
Knoxville Railroad, thirty miles from Spring Place. After General 
Smith's return, the whole force started back, at 7 o'clock in the 
evening, for Resaca, and reached there at midnight. At noon, on 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 97 

the i8th, this regiment boarded the cars again and started back 
to Allatoona, reaching there between 5 and 6 o'clock that evening. 
SHght demonstrations have been made during the last two or three 
days all along the line of this railroad. The railroad and telegraph 
were cut this evening at Ackworth, five or six miles below this 
place. A force from this place went down there to look after the 
matter. From this date until the nth day of November, the regi- 
ment remained at Allatoona. During that period momentous events 
were continually happening at and below Atlanta, Georgia, be- 
tween the armies of General Sherman and General Hood. Sherman 
had the best of it all the time. And during that same period, 
some minor events, and one very important event, the battle, were 
transpiring at Allatoona. They will be mentioned here in their 
order. 

On the 2d day of September, General Sherman's forces entered 
Atlanta, Georgia. This news caused great rejoicing throughout 
the army. 

On the 3d day of September, a foraging party, consisting of 
one sergeant and fifteen men of this regiment, while gathering 
forage, under orders, about six miles east of Allatoona, were at- 
tacked by a force of Confederate cavalry, and ten men, together 
v/ith the six-mule team and army wagon, were captured. Those 
taken were Sergeant John Sharp and Lorenzo D. Hopkins and 
William W. Doolittle, of Company K; Marion Hite and George 
Menelaus, of Company B; David Shearer, of Company D; George 
\V. Burch and Nelson Babcock, of Company E; and David H. 
Reynolds and Moses Fox, of Company L 

ESCAPE OF LORENZO D. HOPKINS. 

On the night of the 8th day of September, the Confederates who 
had the captured parties above mentioned in charge went into camp 
about seventy miles southeast of Atlanta, Georgia. During that 
evening an opportunity of escape oflfered itself to Lorenzo D. Hop- 
kins, and he quickly seized it. Under cover of the darkness, when a 
short distance from the camp, in the heavy timber and undergrowth, 
he reported himself "absent without leave" from that camp, and 
made his way as rapidly as possible in the direction of Atlanta. 
As soon as his absence was discovered the Confederates gathered 
about twenty bloodhounds, and, as soon as it was sufficiently light 
the next morning, put them upon his trail. They followed him 
all the next day until night. He went into a heavy canebrake, and 
waded in a creek, that ran through it, the distance of a mile or 

7 



98 HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 

more, and then laid down, in his wet clothes, in as dense a portion 
of the canebrake as he could find, and remained there. The dogs 
and the Confederates, too, came very close to him several times 
during the afternoon. At night they withdrew and returned to 
their camp. When he was assured that they had abandoned the 
search for him, he came out of his hiding-place and started again 
for Atlanta. That night he ran into a camp of Confederate cavalry 
before he knew it. They were encamped on both sides of the road 
on which he was moving. They had no pickets out; and thus, 
before he was discovered, he quietly retraced his steps and went 
around them. When daylight came he again went into hiding. 
The next night, continuing his journey, he met a company of Con- 
federate cavalry on the road. Before they discovered him he hid 
in the brush by the roadside, and permitted them to pass unmo- 
lested. He didn't even say "Good evening" to them. That night, 
or early the next morning, he reached the Federal lines at Atlanta. 
He had made the distance of seventy miles in three nights. He 
could not move in the daytime, of course, without extreme danger 
of being recaptured, and he did not. He only procured food twice 
during the trip, of negroes both times, but he got quite a supply 
each time, although it was nothing but cornbread. But he was 
glad to get even that for such a trip as he was then making. It 
was a good escape. It required quick decision and good courage 
to enter upon it, and quick wit and cool judgment to execute it. 
He had all those qualities, and used them, and gained his freedom 
from imprisonment. The regiment was proud of him when he 
returned and ever afterward. He reached the command, by rail 
from Atlanta, on the nth day of September, the day before Mc- 
Connell returned. When he came in, the next day, there were 
"two of a kind." A good kind, too. 

Nothing further of particular interest transpired prior to the 
battle of Allatoona. From the 3d day of December, A. D. 1863, 
to the 5th day of October, A. D. 1864, the regiment traveled, 
by rail, three hundred and sixty-two miles, and marched five hun- 
dred and seven miles. 



CHAPTER VII. 

THE BATTLE OF ALLATOONA, GA. 

On the 3d day of October, during the afternoon, there was 
some excitement among the troops at Allatoona, caused by the 
reported movements of the Confederate army be'.ow. All of General 
Hood's forces had crossed the Chattahoochie River, and the 
main body of his army was in the neighborhood of Lost Mountain. 
General Stewart's corps, however, was moving to strike the railroad 
between Marietta and Allatoona. Marietta is about twenty miles 
below Allatoona. Some cannonading was heard during the after- 
noon. Precautions were taken by our garrison to guard against 
a night attack by the enemy. On the morning of October 4th, 
the situation was strongly indicative of a battle at Allatoona; but 
just when it might come no one was able to determine. Big 
Shanty, a railroad station, was located about midway between 
Allatoona and Marietta; and Ackworth, another railroad station, 
was located about midway between Allatoona and Big Shanty. 
Early in the day, heavy firing was heard in the direction of Big 
Shanty, and later in the neighborhood of Ackworth. During the 
day, both those places were taken, and the garrisons, consisting of 
about four hundred men, were captured. The railroad was torn 
up and the telegraph lines cut at both places. The smoke of the 
fires of destruction along the railroad was seen all day. At 
night, the situation at Allatoona was very tense. No one any 
longer doubted that a severe battle would be fought there the next 
day. New rifle pits were made, and our defenses were otherwise 
strengthened as rapidly as possible. From Vining's Station, during 
the day. General Sherman sent a signal message to the officer 
of the signal station on Kenesaw Mountain, which was repeated 
from there, over the heads of the enemy, to the signal officer at 
Allatoona, and from thence, by telegraph line, to Brig. Gen. John 
M. Corse, at Rome, Georgia, by which General Corse was ordered 
to move immediately with his command to Allatoona. General 
Corse commanded a division. General Sherman said: *Tf he 
(Hood) moves up to Allatoona, I will surely come in force." 
Another message, sent in the same manner, said: "Corse, Rome, 
Georgia : — Move with your command to Allatoona. Hold the place.. 



100 HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 





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HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 101 

I will help you. — Sherman." This was the message that suggested 
the Gospel hymn, ''Hold the fort, for I am coming." But could 
he get there? His most advanced troops could scarcely pass 
Marietta that night; and all of them were well nigh exhausted, 
having marched almost continuously for three days and nights. It 
really seemed that the enemy "had the move on him." Allatoona 
at once became the central point of interest and attention, not 
only to and of the enemy, but to and of our army as well. There 
were more than a million rations stored there; and only just 
across the Etowah River, five miles farther north, there was a gov- 
•ernment herd of nine thousand cattle. If the enemy should capture 
or destroy all these rations and cattle, the great Atlanta campaign 
might even yet result disastrously. And more than that, the cam- 
paign across Georgia, the "March to the Sea," might never be 
executed and its great results achieved. General Sherman now 
realized, no doubt, that it was an error to have left the bulk of 
the supplies for his army so weakly defended. The garrison at 
Allatoona, Lieut. Col. John E. Tourtellotte, commanding, consisted 
of the Ninety-Third Illinois, the Fourth Minnesota, the Eighteenth 
Wisconsin, and 15 men of the Fifth Ohio Cayalry, in all about 
905 men, and the Twelfth Wisconsin Battery, of about 60 to 
80 men. This battery had four Rodman rifled cannon, ten- 
pounders, and two brass pieces, twelve-pounders. It was not to 
be wondered at that General Sherman became extremely solici- 
tous when he learned, on the 4th inst., that the whole Confederate 
corps of Lieut. Gen. A. P. Stewart was within ten to fifteen miles 
of Allatoona, within easy striking distance of that million of rations 
and those nine thousand cattle. But nothing in war was impos- 
sible to General Sherman. So, now, he was equal to the emergency. 
He sent a signal message, straight over General Stewart's head, 
to General Corse, at Rome, telling him to reinforce Allatoona, 
and to hold the place. Rome was about thirty miles away, by rail. 
General Corse reached Allatoona, by rail, at 12 o'clock midnight 
on the night of the 4th. He brought with him the Thirty-ninth 
Iowa, the Seventh, Twelfth and Fiftieth Illinois, and two companies 
of the Fifty-seventh Illinois, in all 1,054 men, and 165,000 rounds 
of ammunition. These troops were a part of Colonel Rowett's 
brigade, and Colonel Rowett, of the Seventh Illinois, was in com- 
mand of them. General Corse immediately assumed command of 
all the troops at Allatoona. The entire force was now 1,959 J^en, 
beside the battery, and, with those, about 2,030 men all told. 
Another train, carrying more troops of General Corse's division, 



102 HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 

was derailed, and failed to reach Allatoona before the battle. That 
night the command slept under arms. All knew that the morn- 
ing reveille would be sounded with muskets, on the picket lines, and 
that it would call them to desperate battle. And all knew that 
before the setting of another sun many would fall to that sleep 
from whence no reveille nor sound of bugle could ever again 
call them to arms and to battle. And yet, they slept! 

At Allatoona, Georgia, there is a rugged mountainous ridge, 
which is cut and carved, in many different directions, down its sides 
and across its top, by ravines and deep gorges. Spurs and peaks 
rise above its average level to different heights and in various 
forms. In many places it is covered with heavy timber, and in 
others with a dense covering of smaller growth. I-ooking to almost 
any point of the compass, the scenery is picturesque, and from 
some of the higher peaks the limits of vision are more than twenty 
miles away. Hills, ravines and valleys, and winding streams, and 
forests and fields, and dense jungles of undergrowth and vines, all 
combine to produce many views that arrest attention and command 
admiration. The village of Allatoona, then containing no more 
than six or seven houses, was located west of the railroad, on the 
south side of the hills, in the edge of the valley of Allatoona Creek. 
The Allatoona range of mountains rises a few miles north of the 
village; and away off to the east much greater mountains lift 
their heads into plain view. Allatoona Creek, which has its source 
at Lost Mountain, about fifteen miles south of Allatoona, flows, 
first, in a course north-northwest, then gradually curves to north- 
northeast, then runs due north to and under the railroad at a point 
about two miles south of Allatoona, then curves to the west and 
back again to the east, making the form of an open letter C, with 
the upper line extended beyond the lower, then flows north-north- 
west, passing a half mile east of Allatoona, from whence its general 
course bears a little west of north, but with many windings and 
short turns through the mountains, to a point a little west of 
north from Allatoona and due east from Cartersville, and from 
thence, making a sharp turn, it flows in a course west-southwest 
to a point near the railroad, and from there southwest to its con- 
fluence with Pumpkinvine Creek, about three miles due south 
from Cartersville. Pumpkinvine Creek heads about twenty miles 
southwest from Lost Mountain, and flows, in its general course, 
but with much winding and many short turns, a little north of 
northeast, almost directly toward Allatoona. About three miles 
from Allatoona it turns sharply to a course south-southeast, and 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 103 

from thence, making another short turn, it flows northeast to 
the hills just west of Allatoona. Here, turning to the left, it forms 
the half of a circle about a mile in diameter, and flows back in 
a southwesterly course to a point again about three miles from 
Allatoona and within about a half mile of the point mentioned 
above as being three miles from that place, thus, nearly surround- 
ing a tract of land much like the shape of an egg with a small 
portion of the big end cut away, the smaller end of which was 
within a half mile of Allatoona. From the last point above men- 
tioned, it flows northwesterly to its confluence with Allatoona Creek, 
three miles south of Cartersville. Tliese two creeks form the 
Etowah River. Fox Creek rises about nine miles east-southeast 
from Allatoona, and flows west-northwest, and empties into Alla- 
toona Creek less than a mile southeast from Allatoona. 

The Western & Atlantic Railroad, in its general course from 
Cartersville to Marietta, runs nearly southeast. From a point a 
little more than a mile west of Allatoona, it runs in a course east- 
northeast, then makes a curve to the right, resembling the side 
of a horseshoe, about three-quarters of a mile long, and then de- 
scribes a greater curve, equal to the half of a circle about a mile and 
three-quarters in diameter, the course of which is southwest, south, 
southeast and east, to a point about two miles south and a little 
east from Allatoona. These two curves make a figure resembling 
the letter S with both curves reversed, the lower curve being 
a little more than double the size of the upper one, and the 
upper one being somewhat elongated. Allatoona is located about 
a half mile from the upper end and about a quarter of a mile 
from the lower end of the first curve. The middle third of the 
first curve is in a cut, through the ridge, between two hills, eighty 
feet through earth and ninety-five feet through rock, making it 
one hundred and seventy-five feet deep. 

When General Sherman's army was advancing on Kenesaw 
Mountain, in June, 1864, two small forts, or redoubts, were con- 
structed at Allatoona, under the supervision of Col. O. M. Poe, 
United States Engineers, who was then a member of General 
Sherman's staff. One of them was located on a hiU about north- 
northwest from the village of Allatoona, and about sixty feet west 
of the railroad cut. It had six sides and six angles, and was 
about seventy-five feet long and sixty feet wide. The other was 
located on a hill about northeast from the village, and about six 
hundred and seventy-five feet east of the railroad cut. It was 
nearly square, and averaged about sixty feet long and fifty feet 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 




HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 105 




106 HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 

wide. These forts were so located that each could afford the 
other some support; and the two protected the warehouses where 
the rations were stored. There was a lower hill, between the 
two mentioned above, about one hundred feet east of the rail- 
road cut. The railroad cut was about sixty feet wide. There was 
a foot-bridge, four feet wide, over the railroad cut, at a point about 
seventy-five feet north of a direct line between the two forts. It 
was ninety-five feet above the railroad track, at the top of the 
rock strata. Running due west from the northwest corner oi 
the eastern fort, and refused in a curve, toward the south, at the 
west end, there was a line of intrenchments about three hundred 
and thirty feet long. Covering the northwest slope of the lower 
hill, close to and on the east side of the railroad cut, there was 
another line of intrenchments, with four unequal sides, like the 
half of an irregular octagon, in all about one hundred and eighty 
feet long. About west-southwest from the western fort, and five 
hundred and eighty feet distant therefrom, there was still another 
line of intrenchments, about two hundred and seventy-five feet 
long, constructed upon irregular curves, across and covering the 
Cartersville road, about equal distances on each side of it. The 
north half of those intrenchments was west of the head of the 
ravine hereafter mentioned, at the top of the rise on the west side 
of the ravine. Farther Qut, on both sides of the Cartersville road 
and toward the southwest^ the ground was considerably higher, 
and was covered with heavy timber. There were rifle-pits around 
each of the forts, close up against the outside base of the walls; 
and there was also a riflie-pit which extended from the western 
fort, in a southerly direction, about ninety feet, to the cut made 
in the side of the hill in the construction of the public highway 
leading from Allatoona to Cartersville. There was a house, and 
several outbuildings, about two hundred and eighty feet west- 
southwest from the western fort. That house was headquarters 
of the Ninety-Third Illinois. There was a smaller house about 
sixty feet north of the western fort. There was also a large double 
house on the lower hill, about one hundred feet east of the railroad 
cut, nearly on' a direct line between the two forts. That house 
was headquarters of the Fourth Minnesota. The warehouses, where 
more than a million of rations were stored, were located just east 
of the railroad at the south end of the railroad cut. Immediately 
west of the house first mentioned, was the head of a deep ravine 
which extended northward until it merged into the valley through 
which the railroad passed some considerable distance above the 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 107 

1 ailroad cut. The public highway leading from Allatoona to Car- 
tersville, as it climbed up the ridge, was cut deep into the side 
of the hill on which the western fort was located. Its first course 
was about west-northwest, then it formed two curves, like an 
elongated letter S, and then two lesser curves of similar form, 
and just beyond the outer line of intrenchments resumed its first 
course again. Where it passed the head of the ravine mentioned 
above, this road was laid on the crest of the ridge that formed the 
northern boundary of Pumpkinvine Creek Valley. Between the 
head of the ravine and the south slope of the ridge the road 
was not more than four rods wide. This point was about three 
hundred feet from the western fort. Another road, known as the 
'*New F'ort'' road, branched from the one last above mentioned, at 
a point about six hundred and forty feet west from the western 
fort, and ran in a southwesterly course. The public highway, known 
as the Marietta road, left Allatoona in a course about southeast, 
and held about the same direction to within a short distance of 
Ackworth. About a quarter of a mile from Allatoona, another 
highway, known as the Dallas road, branched from the Marietta 
road, and ran, first, southwest, then nearly south to and across 
the railroad, and then nearly southwest again, toward Dallas. 
Another public road leads out of Allatoona in a course nearly 
northeast, then turns a curve to the north and north-north- 
west, and passes up onto and over the ridge at a point about 
half-way between the eastern fort and the railroad cut. There 
was no timber on the tops or sides of either of the hills on which 
the forts were located. The same was true of the ravine and the 
ridge west of the western fort, to the distance of fifty or sixty 
rods. Everything had been cut down, and mostly cleared away, to 
afford greater range for the artillery. There were some small 
trees and scattering brush on the lower ground northwest from 
the western fort. Across Allatoona Creek, southeast from Alla- 
toona and three-quarters of a mile away, there is a long mountain 
slope, sparsely covered with timber. A little farther away the 
ascent becomes steeper and steeper up to the crest of a high 
mountain. Beyond the sloping foot of this mountain there was 
a heavy growth of timber. Allatoona Creek Valley, averaging 
about a mile in width, passes around from the west side to the 
north end and northeast of this mountain slope, and from thence 
sweeps north around the hills at Allatoona. Pumpkinvine Creek 
Valley lies southwest of Allatoona, and is separated from the valley 
of Allatoona Creek by only a very slight rise of ground, barely 



108 HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 

perceptible to the eye. They so nearly merge into each o 
that the casual observer would not discover that there are 
separate valleys. 

The foregoing minute description of this battlefield, and 
surroundings, is given here, because the battle fought there 
so hotly contested, and was of such importance in its results, 
it was immediately recognized as a great battle, and as one 
historic import. Great things depended upon the ultimate i 
of it, upon a Federal victory there. The map which is here inse 
in connection with this description of the field, will enable 
careful reader to fully appreciate the splendid valor of the Fed 
troops who held Allatoona Pass, and won a most glorious vie 
against an overwhelmingly superior force, on the 5th day of O 
ber, A. D. 1864. 

All night long the night of the 4th, the campfires of the en 
and the flames of burning railroad ties cast red light through 
the forests and hills and valleys between Allatoona and Big Sha: 
tinged the clouds with bright colors, and, at times, clearly disci 
the rugged outlines of Kenesaw Mountain, eighteen miles a 
And this foretold, in language not to be doubted, that the eai^ 
morning hours of the coming day would bring an overwhelminid 
force of the enemy to the attack and battle at Allatoona. Watching^ 
and sleeping, by turns, the mere handful of Federal troops waited 
there, with calm patience and fixed resolution, for the onslaught 
There was not the slightest sign of weakness or of possible yields 
ing anywhere discoverable among either officers or men. The calm, 
deliberate judgment of all was, that it was to be a fierce conflict; 
and the calm, deliberate and irrevocably fixed purpose of all waB^ 
to make it a battle royal, a battle to the last extremity of possible 
resistance, in which every life was pledged for victory to our 
arms, and that defeat should never come save hand in hand with 
death. 

Long before daylight, at 1:30 o'clock a. m., on the morning 
of the 5th, a volley of musket shots, on the picket line south o£ 
Allatoona, gave warning that the hour for deadly strife had come. 
The Confederate division, Maj. Gen. S. G. French, commanding, 
(of General Stewart's corps), having moved up from Big Shanty 
and Ackworth, on the Marietta and Dallas roads, immediately after 
reaching the Federal lines, attacked and drove the pickets back 
to their reserves. That division included General Ector's brigade, 
then commanded by Col. W. H. Young, composed of the Twenty- 
ninth and Thirty-ninth North Carolina, the Ninth, Tenth, Four- 



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«oo rr. 



CtNTRt 



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HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 109 

teenth and Thirty-second Texas, (and these last four were really 
consolidated Texas and Mississippi regiments), and Major Jacques^ 
battalion; General CockrelFs brigade, then commanded by Col. 
E. Gates, composed of the First, Second, Third, Fourth, Fifth and 
Sixth Missouri Infantry, and the First and Third Missouri Cavalry; 
General Sears' brigade, then commanded by Col. W. S. Barry, 
composed of the Fourth, Seventh, Thirty-fifth, Thirty-sixth, Thirty- 
ninth and Forty-sixth Mississippi; and two batteries of six guns 
each. It is beheved that the whole force numbered not less than 
6,700 officers and men. 

Within ten minutes after the first shots were fired on the picket 
lines, the whole Federal force at Allatoona was in battle array. Dis- 
position of our troops was immediately made to meet and repel 
the enemy at different points of the field. The right wing of the 
Ninety-Third Illinois, under command of Maj. James M. Fisher, 
was sent out to hold a commanding position on the **New Fort'^ 
road, southwest from the western fort. Three companies of the 
left wing of the regiment occupied the rifle-pits around the western 
fort, and the other two companies were in the fort. Other troops 
occupied the intrenchments on and across the Cartersville road 
west of the western fort. Seven companies of the Eighteenth Wis- 
consin were sent to the support of the picket reserves on the Ma- 
rietta and Dallas roads. The Fourth Minnesota and the Twelfth 
Illinois and the two companies of the Fifty-seventh Illinois occu- 
pied the fort and intrenchments on the east side of the railroad 
cut. Other troops were placed, fronting toward the south and 
Avest and north. There were no indications of an attack by the 
enemy from the east, and it was not probable that any attack 
would come from that direction. The territory between the points 
of the compass due north and east-southeast from the eastern fort, 
for a full half-mile all around, was in the open valley of Allatoona 
Creek, and every foot of it was within point-blank range of the 
guns of that fort. Hence, attack from that quarter was extremely 
hazardous. None was made at any time during the battle. The 
guns of the Twelfth Wisconsin Battery were equally divided be- 
tween the two forts, two Rodmans and a brass piece in each fort. 

^ During the night, the enemy moved a large part of his forces 
around to the ridge, to and beyond the Cartersville road west of 
the western fort; and extended his lines, with other forces, to 
and beyond the railroad to a point nearly north from the eastern 
fort; thus forming fully five-eighths of a circle around the Federal 
position. He also planted eleven pieces of artillery on the mountain 



no HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 

slope beyond Allatoona Creek, southeast from the. village, about 
three-quarters of a mile away. General French also sent one 
regiment and one cannon to attack the blockhouse, at the railroad 
bridge over Allatoona Creek, about two miles south of Allatoona. 
Three companies of the Eighteenth Wisconsin, under command 
of Captain Mclntyre, defended it. 

Such, substantially, was the situation at daylight. Skirmish- 
ing, more or less lively, had continued at intervals, and at different 
pdints, after the first approach of the enemy, and was still in 
progress. 

At 6:30 o'clock in the morning, the cannon, on both sides, 
opened fire, the first shots being fired from the guns at the eastern 
fort. This artillery duel at once became as furious as the number of 
guns engaged could make it, and continued two hours. The 
Twelfth Wisconsin Battery had much the best of it. One of 
the enemy's guns was soon dismounted, and one or two others 
disabled. At the end of an hour, nearly all of the others were 
moved farther up the slope into the edge of the heavier timber. 
The range was too great for the Confederate guns, else their guns 
or ammunition were defective, or their marksmanship bad, or 
something else was the matter. Nearly all their shots went 
wild and did no damage. They were not effective at any time 
during the battle. During the period of the cannonading, the 
skirmishing in the southern portions of the field became quite 
brisk, but elsewhere there was, comparatively, but little musketry 
firing. Soon after the artillery duel began, it became plainly ap- 
parent that the main attack of the enemy would come from the 
west, on and north of the Cartersville road, and from the valley 
northwest of the forts; and the positions of the Federal forces were 
slightly changed, and the lines strengthened, at those points. At 
7:30 o'clock, the left wing of the Ninety-Third Illinois was placed 
across a small ridge on the slope of the hill northwest of the western 
fort, commanding a part of the valley down which the railroad was 
laid. Other troops were located to meet other new movements of 
the enemy. 

At 8:30 o'clock, a Confederate Major, bearing a flag of truce, 
came in on the Cartersville road, from the west, and delivered to 
Lieut. William C. Kinney, of the Ninety-Third Illinois, who was 
on picket duty there, a demand, in writing, for the surrender of 
the Federal forces, in the following words: 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. Ill 

Around Allatoona, October 5, 1864. 
Commanding Officer, United States Forces, Allatoona: 

I have placed the forces under my command in such positions 
that you are surrounded; and, to avoid a needless effusion of blood, 
I call on you to surrender your forces at once, and unconditionally. 
Five minutes will be allowed you to decide. Should you accede 
io this, you will be treated in the most honorable manner as pris- 
oners of war. 

I have the honor to be very respectfully yours, 

S. G. FRENCH, 
Major General, Commanding Confederate Forces. 

General Corse at once sent his reply, in writing,' by an officer, 
to wit : 

Headquarters Fourth Division, Fifteenth Army Corps, 

Allatoona, Ga., 8:30 a. m., October 5, 1864. 
Maj. Gen. S. G. French, Confederate States, etc.: 

Your communication, demanding surrender of my command, I 
acknowledge receipt of; and respectfully reply, that we are prepared 
for the "needless effusion of blood" whenever it is agreeable to you. 

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

JOHN M. CORSE, 
Brigadier General, Commanding United. States Forces. 

General French stated, in his report of the battle, that he 
received no reply to his demand for surrender. The reply was 
immediately delivered to his officer, at the picket post, and he 
rode away with it. It may be, that, on account of the conduct 
of General French and his troops while the flag of truce was in 
our lines, his officer concluded that it was unnecessary to deliver 
the reply to him. Or, it may be, that the statement was made in 
his report as a partial excuse for that conduct. But, in either case, 
the conduct was wholly inexcusable. When he started a flag of 
truce to our lines it was the duty of General French to have stopped 
all movements of his troops where they then were until the flag 
returned to him. This he did not do. While his flag of truce 
was in our lines, his troops were continually advancing, every- 
where, to more advantageous positions. Captain Morrill, of the 
Fourth Minnesota, who, with his company deployed as skirmishers, 
was on the east side of the railroad cut, said, that Maj. R. J. Durr, 



112 HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 

of the Thirty-ninth Mississippi, with a white handkerchief tied 
to his sword, approached him and said: "Do you not know that 
there has been a flag of truce sent in to your commanding officer 
demanding your surrender?'' The captain repHed, very emphat- 
ically: "No. What do yqu want? Do you want to surrender?" 
The Major answered: "I do not." The Captain then told him, 
that he had better drop down out of sight, as his boys were not 
feeling very friendly toward him and his command just then. 
The Captain was just then informed, by men whom he had sent 
out on his two flanks, that, at the very time he was engaged in 
this conversation, the enemy were moving around his company, 
both to the right and to the left. Losing no time, he rallied his 
men and took them out of the danger. The right wing of the 
Ninety-Third Illinois barely escaped capture by its timely with- 
drawal from the position which it occupied at dayHght. Even 
though General French might not have received the reply to his 
demand for surrender, that could not, in any manner, excuse his 
and the conduct of his troops while his flag of truce was in our lines. 
The old saying, "Everything is fair in war," is a great big old 
falsehood; and the general who acts upon it deserves nothing bet- 
ter than ignominious defeat. General French got it. 

After its withdrawal from the position which it occupied at 
daylight, at the extreme left and front of the Federal lines, the 
right wing of the Ninety-Third" Illinois was first formed back of 
the intrenchments on the Cartersville road, and from that point 
was very soon moved to the support of the troops at the intrench- 
ments, west of the fort, where the brunt of the enemy's attack was 
made. 

As soon as the flag of truce left the Federal lines the battle 
began, on the Cartersville road, and immediately became general. 
Large bodies of the enemy were very rapidly advanced, and pressed 
our lines back to the outer works at all points around our position. 
The brass cannon, from the western fort, had been taken out to 
the intrenchments on the Cartersville road. Grape and canister 
from that gun, double shotted, and a most galling fire of mus- 
ketry, well directed and rapidly delivered, somewhat confused their 
lines and temporarily checked the advance of the enemy. The 
Federal line was now in the intrenchments on the Cartersville 
road, on the west side of the ravine, and from there extended north 
along the top of the rise on the same side of the ravine. It soon 
became painfully apparent that this position could not long be 
maintained. The enemy immediately ralHed and massed his forces 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 113 

for an assault on those intrenchments, and, at the same time, 
rapidly moved a heavy force, from the west, down the valley in 
which the railroad was laid, for the purpose of turning the right 
of the Federal line. The enemy executed this movement with 
great speed and enthusiasm, and simultaneously advanced their 
lines everywhere. The fighting immediately became furious. Solid 
shot and shells, grape and canister from double-shotted cannon, 
and a hailstorm of bullets were rapidly and accurately poured into 
the ranks of the Confederates as they recklessly advanced. They 
had been made to believe that thev were to have an easv and 
speedy victory. They were half starved, and more than a million of 
rations were before their eyes. But they were quickly undeceived. 
And vet, notwithstanding their fearful losses at every step, they 
still advanced, faster and faster, until their whole force, west of 
the railroad cut, burst into an impetuous charge. The spectacle 
was sublime. But it was an appalling moment for the Union 
forces. The Confederate force that moved down the railroad val- 
ley, rushed into the mouth of the ravine, and immediately delivered 
a most withering enfilading fire upon the right of the Federal 
line, and viciously fought their way up the ravine. Almost simul- 
taneously, their heaviest charge fell upon the Federal intrenchments 
on the Cartersville road and on the line just north of there. Torn 
and fearfully decimated by the enfilading fire on the right, and 
overborne everywhere along this front by the weight of numbers 
three or four to one, the Federal forces fought with persistent des- 
peration, rarely equaled, and never excelled, in the annals of war. 
It was, indeed, a battle royal. But it was of no avail, other than 
to partially break the force and spirit of the enemy, and to cause 
them to know that victory for them that day could only come 
in a deluge of blood, on the wings of the angel of death. Under 
this tremendous shock of battle, the Federal line trembled and shook 
and became steady, by turns, wavered and rallied again and again, 
until it was finally swept before the storm, like chaff in a gale, 
and hurled back into the western fort on the crest of the hill. 
On the east side of the railroad cut, our forces were driven back 
to the intrenchments and fort. On the south side of the field, every 
outer line was forced back into the forts and rifle-pits around 
them. 

It was now about half-past lo o'clock. The climax of the 

battle was reached; and the isSue of it was there suspended, vibrating 

with all the uncertainty of a restless, feverish pulse, between those 

hostile lines. Minutes were as hours, and even seconds became im- 

8 



114 HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 

portant to the Union cause. General Corse immediately ordered, 
that a portion of the troops on the east side of the railroad cut be 
sent over to the west side. Captain Wilkinson, of the Ninety-Third 
Illinois, who was then acting as Post Adjutant, on the staflf of 
Lieutenant Colonel Tourtellotte, carried the order to Lieutenant 
Colonel Tourtellotte, crossing on the narrow footbridge over the 
railroad cut, which was then under fire from the enemy, and within 
point-blank range. The Twelfth Illinois and the two companies of 
the Fifty-seventh Illinois immediately came around to the west 
side. About the same time, three companies of the Eighteenth 
Wisconsin reached the western fort. The other four companies of 
that regiment, went to the eastern fort when they were driven back 
from their position of the early morning. There were a few men 
in and around the warehouses where the rations were stored. Thus, 
the entire Federal force, except the Fourth Minnesota and four 
companies of the Eighteenth Wisconsin and those at the ration 
warehouses, was now united in and around the western fort. That 
narrow portion of the field was to be the very storm-center of 
the battle from that time forth. Indeed, it was then, already, the 
very vortex of it; the funnel of the cyclone, hanging there in 
mad rage. The Confederates were rapidly forming a solid column, 
of two or three regiments, in the narrow road at the head of the 
ravine, not more than eighteen rods west of the western fort; 
and this column would soon be hurled against the shattered Union 
forces now gathering at the fort, after being swept from the outer 
line. A ten-pounder Rodman rifled cannon, double-shotted with 
grape and canister, was ready and about to be fired into and to 
stop that formation. The command to fire it had already been 
given, and the artilleryman, with the lanyard in hand and drawn 
taut, was in the act of executing it. Just then, when the fate of 
that battle seemed to hang upon the immediate discharge of that 
one gun. Major Fisher, of the Ninety-Third Illinois, and full two 
hundred men, on their way back from the outer line, up the steep 
slope to the western fort, suddenly appeared immediately in front 
of the cannon, thus doubly charged with death and about to be 
fired. It was a moment that curdled the hottest blood and caused 
all hearts to stand still. An officer of the Ninety-Third Illinois 
sprang to the lanyard, caught it and held it. The discharge of 
the gun was prevented, and a great calamity averted. And now, 
that the firing of that gun must necessarily be delayed until our 
troops in front of it should get into the fort, or otherwise out of 
its range, the dangers of the situation rapidly increased, and be- 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 115 

came painfully depressing. If that Confederate column should 
charge before that cannon could be fired, the chances were hun- 
dreds to one that the fort would be taken. Men standing in the 
embrasure, over the cannon, and on the parapet, seized the extended 
hands of those outside, and, with the aid of those in the rifle- 
pits at the base of the wall, literally lifted them into the fort. The 
shouts of those near the embrasure, pleading with those in front of 
the big gun to clear the way, rose even above the roar of the battle. 
No other cannon bore upon that forming column of the enemy. 
Every minute was an eternity of waiting. Perhaps the sun stood 
^till. Everything appeared to stop, except the formation of the 
enemy's column on the Cartersville road. But the Lord was on 
our side. Finally, as if it were an inspiration, all eyes were turned 
to the cotton bales that blocked the gateway into the fort, which 
^vas only a few feet north of the embrasure. A hundred hands, 
at once, seized them and lifted them out of the way. The brass 
cannon that was on the other line had been dragged back, and 
was now immediately in front of the gate. As soon as the cotton 
l)ales were removed, there was one great surge, and that mass of 
men swept through the gate into the fort. The weight and strength 
■of their movement carried that brass cannon in with them. In- 
stantly, the way being clear, the double-shotted cannon in the 
embrasure was carefully trained on that solid column of the enemy, 
now just ready to start on a charge up the slope and against the 
fort. A moment later it was fired. As leaves before a hurricane, 
that mass of the enemy was swept from the road. That double 
charge of grape and canister struck at the feet of the front rank, 
and cut a swath, broad and deep, and of continually increasing 
breadth, from the front to the rear of the column. And it was 
the last charge of grape and canister in that fort. Straight through 
the center of the column, the road was red with blood and cov- 
ered with the dead and dying and wounded. It was appalling! 
Into the head of the ravine on one side, and down the slope of 
the ridge on the other, the two sides of the Confederate column 
disappeared. Then, from the fort, a shout of exultant defiance 
rose high above the rattle of musketry and roaring of cannon that 
ioretold our victory, and carried dismay to the enemy. It told 
our foes, that the flag that waved above those hills would be kept 
there so long as there was a man and a round of ammunition 
left to defend it. 

Now, that the destruction of their assaulting column gave us 
needed respite from further immediate onslaught by the enemy. 



116 HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 

every effort was directed to the reorganization of the shattered 
Federal forces that were now in and around the fort. Those from 
the outer Hne came back in masses, and were badly disorganized. 
The gateway was immediately closed again with the cotton bales^ 
and those who had been so swiftly hurled back from the outer 
lines began, with marvelous speed and courage, to find places 
at the parapets in the forts, and in the rifle-pits around it, for further 
resistance. The fighting, by those already there, had continued with 
unabated vigor, and their ranks were now rapidly augmented until 
every space from which a gun could be fired was occupied. At 
least two companies of the Seventh Illinois were armed with Henry 
rifles, a magazine g^n capable of repeating sixteen times almost 
as rapidly as the shots could be counted. They did splendid work. 
It was now approaching 1 1 o'clock. From this time forth, a battle 
was waged there, for four hours, in which every Union soldier was 
his own commander, and which tested the endurance and courage 
of both sides to a degree never surpassed in history. There was 
not even a lull in the musketry firing from the beginning to the 
end of it. It was all the time as rapid and intense as the number 
of men and guns engaged could make it. On our side the artillery 
was served with great skill and effect. Edwin R. Fullington, a 
private of the Twelfth Wisconsin battery, crossed and recrossed 
the narrow and rickety footbridge over the railroad cut three times, 
under direct fire from the enemy, and carried grape and canister 
ammunition from the eastern to the western fort. Prior to 12 
o'clock, the enemy attempted four separate charges upon the western 
fort, from the ravine west of it. Each time, as they rose into 
sight, out of the ravine, less than a hundred yards away, the Union 
forces in the fort and rifle-pits rose up and poured a sheet of 
flame and lead, and grape and canister from double-shotted can- 
non, full into their faces. It was more than they could withstand. 
Each time, their lines were riddled and their columns broken, and 
again and again they returned to the protection of the ravine. 

The fighting east of the railroad cut was the counterpart of 
that on the west side, except that it was less severe. On that 
side, also, two or three charges were attempted by the enemy, and 
repulsed; but the numbers of the assaulting forces there were much 
less than of those on the west side, the ascent to the fort and 
intrenchments was steeper, and the starting point was farther away. 
The Federal force there was only about one-half as great as that 
on the west side, but they were much better distributed, and the 
fortifications were better and better located. Hence, the main attack 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 117 

and most vigorous fighting of the enemy was on the west side 
of the railroad cut. Nevertheless, that on the east side was quite 
severe, and was maintained with great persistency to the end. 
A part of the troops on the east side were so located that they 
could, and at times did, render valuable assistance to those on the 
west side. But the greater part of the time they had all they 
could reasonably be expected to attend to on their own side of the 
railroad. As a matter of fact, however, they attended to what 
they had to do there, and did it remarkably well, and still had a few 
spare moments in which they sent many whistling messengers 
to the enemy across the railroad. The last charge of the enemy on 
the east side of the railroad cut was made, a little before noon, by 
the Thirty-fifth and Thirty-ninth Mississippi regiments. They suf- 
fered heavy losses, and the larger part of both regiments retired 
from the onset. But small detachments of each pushed forward 
to a deep gulch, near the railroad, in front of one of the companies 
of the Fourth Minnesota. Once there, they were protected from 
fire, but immediately discovered that they were in a trap. They 
could not climb the steep gulch in their front, and to retreat would 
have been sure death to most of them. Hence, they remained there, 
and surrendered at the end of the battle. Eighty prisoners were 
captured there, including Major Durr, commander of the Thirty- 
ninth Mississippi, and several lin^ officers. The colors of both 
regiments were taken there. This was a very proper sequel to 
the attempt of those two regiments to capture Captain Morrill 
and his company, in the morning, when the flag of truce was in 
our lines. That evening, while at coffee and hardtack with a num- 
ber of the officers of the Fourth Minnesota, Captain Morrill ques- 
tioned Major Durr quite sharply about the incident of the morn- 
ing. 

After 12 o'clock, no assault was attempted by the enemy on 
cither fort. But the Confederates, still clinging to every hillside 
and every knoll and every ravine, and every house and outbuild- 
ing, and every other place that afforded the least protection from 
our fire, maintained the battle with wonderful pertinacity. From a 
distance not exceeding one hundred yards on the west side, and 
not much greater on the north and south sides, they kept the 
air, over the forts and rifle pits, literally full of bullets all the time. 
For full three hours, no man could expose any part of his body 
above the forts or rifle-pits for the space of ten seconds without 
extreme danger of being killed or wounded. In this part of the 
fighting the enemy had great advantage over the Federal loto.^^. 



118 HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 

They were concealed behind stumps and clumps of brush and 
small trees and buildings and the uneven surfaces of the gjound^ 
and could look out from behind these with much greater safety 
than the Federal troops could do from the even top surfaces of 
the forts and rifle-pits, where there were no other obstructions to 
conceal them in any manner. But, notwithstanding this, the ene- 
my's fire was returned with as much persistency and vigor as 
theirs was maintained. 

To avoid confusion, on account of the lack of room at the para- 
pet on the west side of the fort, and to maintain a steady and 
continuous fire, three men worked together. One of the three,, 
standing at the parapet, fired the guns of all, while the other two,, 
standing farther back in the fort, did the loading. Thus, each 
of the three always had a gun in hand, one being fired and the 
other two being loaded. This somewhat increased the rapidity, as 
well as the effectiveness, of the firing. 

Just at noon, a shell lodged, and became fixed, half-way down 
the Rodman rifled cannon that stood at the west embrasure of the 
western fort, which was the only one that bore on the main posi- 
tion of the enemy. The danger of explosion was too great to 
risk firing it out; and it could not be removed otherwise. General 
Corse directed that this gun be moved back, and that the one, just 
like it. then at the south embrasure, be moved over to take its 
place. The ground inside the fort was then literally covered with 
our dead and wounded, and roads had to be cleared through these 
in order to make the change. Nearly an hour was consumed in 
its accomplishment. During this period, a considerable number 
of the enemy crept up, from the ravine, behind and into the house 
and outbuildings that stood between the ravine and fort. From 
that protection, they engaged in sharpshooting at every man that 
passed the embrasures or showed any part of his body above the 
fort or rifle pits. Major Fisher, of the Ninety-Third Illinois, was 
severely wounded, in the left side, while passing one of the em- 
brasures. Several others were hit. When the other Rodman can- 
non was gotten into place at the west embrasure, it was imme- 
diately manned, and wonderfully well served by a very expert 
gunner of the Twelfth Wisconsin Battery. He sent three per- 
cussion shells into the house, and one through each of the out- 
buildings. These shells exploded, of course, as soon as they 
struck, and wrought great havoc among the enemy. Those not 
killed or wounded, immediately fled to the ravine, and our men 
iired upon them as they ran. Within less than fifteen minutes the 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 119 

enemy's sharpshooting ceased. This gunner then began to crack 
percussion shells on the stumps of trees that stood, all along, just at 
the eastern brow of the ravine. It was an ingenious thought, 
and resulted most disastrously to the enemy. These shells ex- 
ploded when they struck the stumps, and hundred of their frag- 
ments went tearing down the side of the ravine through the Con- 
federate ranks. No stump was missed at which a shell was fired. 
The scene in that ravine, after the battle was ended, was beyond 
all powers of description. All the languages of earth combined 
are inadequate to tell half its horrors. Mangled and torn in every 
conceivable manner, the dead and wounded were everywhere, in 
heaps and windrows. Enemies though they were, their conquer- 
ors, only a few minutes removed from the heat and passion of 
the battle, sickened and turned away, or, remaining, looked only 
with great compassion, and through tears, upon that field of blood 
and carnage and death, upon that wreck of high hopes and splendid 
courage, that hecatomb of human life. 

A little after i o'clock in the afternoon, word was passed along 
the west line of the fort, to the effect, that firing should cease. It 
was said, that the fort was to be surrendered. Instantly, twenty 
guns, or more, in the hands of private soldiers, were turned toward 
the inside of the fort, and those who held them shouted, that they 
would shoot the first man who dared to raise a white flag, and 
clinched the threat with fearful oaths. The firing did not cease. 
No white flag was raised. The officer who was then supposed to 
have been responsible for this episode of the battle, immediately 
denied that he had intended to surrender, and said that the rumor, 
to that effect, circulated in the fort, was attributable to no word 
uttered by him. The origin of it was, therefore, never definitely 
known. No one seemed to care about tracing it out. 

About 2 o'clock in the afternoon, after the Confederates had 
concluded that they could not take Allatoona, they made an effort 
to burn the rations. A lieutenant colonel of a Texas regiment, at 
the head of more than a hundred picked men, with many burning 
fagots in their hands, made a rush from behind the ridge, into the 
road near the foot of the hill west of the south end of the railroad 
cut, and attempted to reach and fire the warehouses. A well- 
directed volley of musketry, laid nearly forty of them dead in their 
tracks in the road, and many more were wounded. The force was 
shattered. Only a few of them reached the nearest warehouse. It 
was said, that one of them burst the door and entered, and was im- 
mediately cut down, with an ax, by Lieutenant Colonel Tourtel- 



120 HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 

lotte's negro servant. One or two others were killed in the build- 
ing, and several near it. A Confederate lieutenant, maddened by 
their frequent repulses, seized a firebrand and made a rapid run, 
from a house near the railroad depot, toward the nearest warehouse, 
for the purpose of applying the torch. He fell dead before reaching 
the warehouse. A good marksman sent a bullet that pierced the 
center of his forehead. 

A little while before the enemy withdre\V- from AUatoona, Gen- 
eral French sent additional troops and artillery against the block- 
house at the railroad bridge two miles south of AUatoona. Early 
in the morning, the three companies of the Eighteenth Wisconsin had 
refused to surrender, on demand made therefor, and had success- 
fully defended the place all day against the Confederate regiment 
and one cannon first sent against them. The blockhouse was now 
furiously bombarded, and set on fire thereby. This compelled Cap- 
tain Mclntyre to yield. He surrendered his command, consisting 
of four officers and eighty men, about 4 o'clock in the afternoon. 
The blockhouse was burned to the ground. 

A short time previously, the Twelfth Wisconsin Battery had re- 
ceived a new flag. It was floating in the western fort during the 
battle. After the battle ended, there were one hundred and ninety- 
two bullet holes in that flag. It told the story of a terrific battle^ 

The tent of the Adjutant of the Ninety-Third Illinois stood be- 
tween the western fort and the ravine west of it. That ravine was 
occupied by the enemy all the time after the outer lines were lost 
to the Federal forces. The tent was an ordinary wall-tent, the side 
walls of which were about four feet high, and the ridge-pole was 
about eight feet above the ground. It was supported by sixteen 
ropes, four on each side from the tops of the walls, and four on each 
side from the fly, or second top of the tent. When the battle was 
ended, the tent was still standing, but only so because it was on the 
slope of the hill. It was supported, however, by only three ropes, 
two on the upper and one on the lower side. Thirteen of the ropes 
had been completely severed by bullets. There was not a single 
square inch in either wall of the tent that had not been penetrated 
by one or more bullets. But in the top portion of the tent, above 
the walls, there were whole square feet through which no bullet had 
passed. The walls were so completely riddled that it was impos- 
sible to set the tent up again, after it was taken down. That tent, 
also, told the story of furious fighting. And not only that, it told, 
also, how the battle was won, by the accurate firing of the Federal 
troops. It was a marvel, that, although the firing was down quite 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 121 

a steep slope, the tendency always being to fire too high, so few of 
the shots went more than four feet above the ground. The cease- 
less storm of bullets that were thrown over and close to the brow 
of that ravine, through all those long hours, won the battle of Alla- 
toona. 

General Sherman reached the signal station on Kenesaw 
Mountain about 8 o'clock on the morning of the 5th, and from there 
anxiously watched the progress of the battle. He said, in his 
Memoirs: "I watched with painful suspense the indications of the 
battle raging there, and was dreadfully impatient at the slow pro- 
gress of the relieving column, whose advance was marked by 
smokes which were made according to orders." 

The history of the Fourth Minnesota contains the following 
statement: 

"A corporal of the Ninety-Third Illinois, having in his posses- 
sion a Spencer rifle, was captured. The rebels threatened to shoot 
liim unless he showed them how to use it. He told them to go to 
hades, or any other seaport. We recaptured our corporal." . 

Of course, that may be a true story; but it is not the intention 
to vouch for it here. If such a demand had been made upon a 
member of the Ninety-Third Illinois, under such circumstances, the 
probability is, that the answer would have been given in somewhat 
stronger terms. It is hardly probable that the very mild word, 
^'hades," would have been used. And it is not to be doubted that 
the "other seaport" would have been wholly omitted. Still, the 
.story may be true. 

But it was not the intention here to narrate what were merely 
incidents of this great battle, but rather to present an account of its 
main features in such manner that all readers, with or without mili- 
tary experience, may comprehend it and form a just estimate of the 
^reat fortitude and courage and splendid valor displayed there. 

The purpose of the enemy in fighting the battle was, to secure 
the large quantity of rations then at Allatoona. And it was a 
•double purpose. First, the loss of them would be a severe blow to 
General Sherman's army. And second, the Confederates were 
liungry, and were willing to fight for food. The first, caused Gen- 
eral Stewart to send a force of veteran troops there, of such over- 
whelming strength as would, in his judgment, render success cer- 
tain. He also sent a train of about two hundred empty wagons, 
in which they fully expected to carry away a large quantity of the 
rations. Instead of rations, many of their wounded were carried 
away in those wagons. The second, caused the Confederates to 



123 HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 

continue the battle at least three hours after all hope of taking the 
place by assault must have been abandoned by their commanding 
officers. This would probably not have been but for the hope^ 
which they could not easily relinquish, that they might still, in some 
way, by some fortunate turn, or by reason of some failure of the 
Federal forces to properly defend against it, secure sufficient of 
the rations to appease their pressing hunger, and, possibly, enough 
to fill their empty haversacks. Or, failing in this, that they might,, 
possibly, destroy them all, and thus partially avenge their defeat. 
The haversacks of their killed and wounded were mostly empty; 
and those that were not contained only pieces of sugarcane and ears 
of corn. In some of them tin plates were found, punched full of 
holes in such manner as to convert them into graters, on which to 
grate their corn into meal. One other inciting cause of the des- 
perate character of their fighting is not to be overlooked. General 
Hood, in swinging around Atlanta, crossing the Qiattahoochie 
River, and moving his army northward, had entered upon a most 
hazardous undertaking. And it is not to be doubted that he, and 
his officers, had successfully wrought into his army a considerable 
amount of that enthusiastic recklessness which inspired the des- 
perate venture. All these things, working together, produced the 
result. It is not believed that its parallel, or anything like its equal, 
can be found in the history of warfare. That Confederate army 
had been swept from the crest of Lookout Mountain and Mission 
Ridge only a little more than ten months before. From the ist 
of May, 1864, the beginning of the Atlanta campaign, for full five 
months, that same Confederate army had been hammered and 
pounded by General Sherman's forces, defeated again and again,, 
and driven from point to point and from stronghold to stronghold^ 
all the way from Dalton to Atlanta, and only thirty-three days be- 
fore had been compelled to abandon Atlanta, the last of its defensi- 
ble positions. The best of that army, after all those defeats and 
disasters, with no base of supplies nor any lines of communication 
left, with the failing fortunes of their cause plainly before their eyes^ 
came back to Allatoona, and there, urged on by hunger, the sting 
of their long continued misfortunes rankling deep in their souls^ 
and inspired by the very madness of despair, sought to snatch vic- 
tory from defeat, and save for yet a little while the crumbling fabric 
of their hopes. It was a supreme effort of misguided valor and 
heroism. And it was only surpassed by the unequaled fortitude, 
invincible courage, splendid valor and unyielding heroism of that 
mere handful of Union veterans who successfully withstood and 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 123: 

repelled the overwhelming numbers and repeated assaults of the 
enemy from half past i o'clock in the morning until 3 o'clock in 
the afternoon, a period of thirteen and a half hours. And in that 
period the breakfast and dinner hours, for that day, came and 
passed unheeded by all. Without food for more than twenty-one 
hours, those men continued the fighting with unabated fury to the 
end. The smoke of the battle stood like a pall over the field, and 
shut out the light of the sun. The hills trembled beneath its shock. 
The valleys gave added force to the deafening din of its musketry, 
and echoed and re-echoed the thunderings of its artillery. The 
cries of the wounded, for help, and the moans of the dying, mingled, 
most discordantly, with the angry shouts of the living. It was ter- 
rible, appalling, splendid, magnificent, sublime! And the victory 
there added another gem, of ever increasing brilliancy and splendor, 
to the crown of fame and glory, the great achievements of the 
Army of the Tennessee. 

It was a dearly bought victory; but it was a great stake. Gen- 
eral Sherman's army, of a hundred thousand men, had wrought 
and struggled and marched and fought, day and night, for full five 
months, and had achieved a victory over the enemy, in the capture 
of Atlanta, of immense value to the Union cause. The enemy now 
sought, by success at Allatoona, to convert that victory into defeat,. 
in a single day. Under these conditions, the loss of the battle ta 
the Union forces would have been a terrible disaster, and would 
have cast a deep, dark stain of shame upon the otherwise spotless and 
peerless record of the Army of the Tennessee. It was not so to be. 
A new page of high hopes had already been written, to the honor of 
the American Volunteer Soldier, that he was equal to every emer- 
gency in the hour of extremest danger, and that he would save the 
Union, and save the starry Flag of Freedom to the world. And 
now, here, that Volunteer was to be tested by fire; by those supreme 
tests, of skill that comes only from practice, of endurance that 
comes only from discipline, of fidelity that comes only from intel- 
ligent conviction, and of courage that comes only from patriotic 
manhood and devotion. Would he fail, and cast the shadows of 
doubt and uncertainty upon that bright new page of the world's his- 
tory? It could not be. To save their country and their coun- 
try's liberties from a ruthless foreign foe, Leonidas and his band of 
brave Spartans, though overwhelmed and defeated by superior 
numbers, at the Pass of Thermopylae, fought to the death, and 
won imperishable fame. Here, at Allatoona Pass, a small band of 
Union Volunteers, against overwhelming numbers of their own 



124 HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 

race and blood, when great things hung upon the issue of the battle, 
fought with equal courage and valor, and won a splendid victory 
for the Union, for freedom, and for humanity. Shall their renown 
be less enduring than that of Leonidas and his Spartans? No, 
oh, no! By that victory, by all those supreme tests of skill, en- 
durance, fidelity and courage, by the heat and flames of battle 
unsurpassed, the American Volunteer Soldier was made immortal; 
and that new page of high hopes was set in the skies, brighter than 
«ver before, illumined with enduring light, to teach the world the 
way to Freedom's holy shrine. 

Colonel Redfield, commander of the Thirty-ninth Iowa, was 
killed. Lieutenant Amsden, commander of that section of the Twelfth 
Wisconsin Battery that was in the western fort, was mortally 
wounded, and died the next day. General Corse, commander of all 
the Union forces. Lieutenant Colonel Tourtellotte, commander of 
the garrison. Colonel Rowett, commander of the brigade that rein- 
forced the garrison, Major Fisher, commander of the Ninety-Third 
Illinois, were wounded. Every field officer, except two on the east 
and two on the west side of the railroad cut, was either killed or 
wounded. Officers of the line fell everywhere. Captains came into 
the command of regiments, and sergeants into the command of com- 
panies. And yet, the battle never flagged for a single moment. If 
every officer in that whole command had fallen, the battle .would 
have been fought out to the end just as it was. As it was, officers and 
enlisted men alike loaded and fired muskets and cannon, fighting 
side by side, elbow to elbow and shoulder to shoulder. Rank 
neither gave nor sought immunity from the heat and burdens of 
the battle. It was steady, persistent fighting, and for hours no 
commands were necessary. Capt. Clark Gray was in command of 
the Ninety-Third Illinois when the battle ended. 

At 3 o'clock in the afternoon, the enemy ceased firing. Hats, 
placed on the ends of ramrods, were immediately raised just above 
the walls of the western fort, to test whether it was merely a tem- 
porary suspension, or, in fact, the end of the battle. After a few 
seconds elapsed without any firing at these hats, men began to take 
quick observations over the parapets. Within less than three min- 
utes it was developed that the battle was over. First, a single 
man, of the Ninety-Third Illinois, then a half dozen others, then a 
larger number, and then all, rose up and leaped over the parapets 
and ran out on the Cartersville road. When the "New Fort" road 
was reached, it was at once discovered that the Confederates were 
in full retreat, on that road, their rear guard being fifty or sixty 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 125 

rods away. Other portions of their command, and their artillery, 
retreated by the Marietta and Dallas roads. The great battle was 
ended. 

Then a shoiit of triumph rolled over those hills and through 
those valleys louder and longer than they ever heard before. Men 
grasped hands and shouted; and shouted and embraced each other. 
The wounded joined in the delirium of rejoicing. The dying 
looked to the Flag, still proudly floating above those hills, and 
thanked God that they had helped to keep it there. Then tears 
came; tears of joy for the victory; tears for the wounded; tears for 
the dying; and tears for the dead. Hearts that had stood unmoved 
and immovable through all that fierce storm of battle, uncovered to 
every danger, could not withstand the power of that incomparable 
scene of blood and suffering and death, after the storm had passed. 
Wildly throbbing, they yielded and melted into tears. Then came 
the care of the wounded. Willing hands soon carried them to hos- 
pitals, and helped dress and bind up their gaping wounds. With 
what cheerfulness and fortitude they bore their pains and suffering 
no words can ever tell. The surgeon's probe and knife sometimes, 
made them wince and cringe; and sometimes their pains caused 
them to writhe and give utterance to cries of anguish and for some 
relief from suffering; but still, they talked of the great victory, and 
were content with the price they had paid for its achievement. 
Then came the burial of the dead. Gathered together, by com- 
panies and regiments, they were laid side by side near the great 
trenches that were to receive them. Those burial scenes can never 
be forgotten. The roar of battle is now exchanged for silence that 
is oppressive. Men whose voices shouted only defiance to the 
enemy, now speak in low whispers, or stand wholly silent, in the 
presence of their dead comrades. Eyes that gave out only flashes 
of fire through all the hours of strife, are kindly now and full of 
tears. Men who stood proudly erect against the storm of death 
that swept those hills, now humbly bow their heads in sorrow above 
those open graves. Hands that swiftly and savagely wrought 
destruction to the foe, now slowly and gently lower those dead 
heroes to their final rest, and cover them into the bosom of the field 
which they so bravely defended and on which they fell. The in- 
audible expression of every heart was, "Brave souls, farewell!" and 
"God be with you till we meet again.'' 

"Slowly and sadly we laid them down. 
From the field of their fame fresh and gory! 



126 HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 

Carved only their names, we raised not a stone, 
But left them together in glory/' 

< 

The next day after the battle. General Corse sent to Captain 
Dayton, an aide-de-camp on General Sherman's staff, the follow- 
ing dispatch: 

Allatoona, Georgia, October 6, 1864, 2 p. m. 

Capt. L. M. Dayton, Aide-de-Camp: 

I am short a cheek bone and an ear, but am able to whip all 
hell yet! My losses are very heavy. A force moving from Stites- 
boro to Kingston gives me some anxiety. Tell me where Sher- 
man is. JOHN M. CORSE, 

Brigadier General. 

In his memoirs, General Sherman said: 

"Inasmuch as the enemy had retreated southwest and would 
probably next appear at Rome, I answered General Corse with 
orders to get back to Rome with his troops as quickly as possible." 

It is not to be doubted that the element of egotism, and the 
strong language used, in the dispatch of General Corse to Captain 
Dayton, will readily be pardoned by most readers. But many of 
the survivors of that battle, while they never strongly criticised it, 
because of his bravery there, would have much more highly appre- 
ciated the underlying sentiment of it had it been framed in milder 
language and in terms a little less personal to himself. 

The losses in this battle, on both sides, considering the num- 
bers engaged, were very great. Colonel Young, the commander of 
one of the Confederate brigades, who was captured, estimated that 
the entire Confederate loss would reach two thousand; and that esti- 
mate was then accepted as being nearly correct. Their dead and 
wounded were scattered through the woods and ravines and gulches 
all around, and were continually found, and the dead buried, from 
day to day, until the 22d of October. A publication in a southern 
newspaper, soon after the battle, which purported to quote General 
French as authority, stated his total loss at fifteen hundred. But a 
compilation, which is reproduced in this volume, showing the total 
losses and casualties in all the battles and engagements of the Civil 
War, gives the Confederate losses at Allatoona as follows: Killed, 
231; wounded, 500; captured and missing, 411. This makes the 
total loss, 1,142. The numbers of the killed and captured, so given, 
agree with the report of General Corse. And because that is so, the 
statement given above is believed to be incorrect. General Corse, 
with his command, left Allatoona on the 7th day of October, and it 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 1S7 

is certain that a considerable number of dead and wounded, found 
after that date, could not have been covered by his report. A con- 
siderable number of those captured were wounded. General Corse 
seems (o have made no report of their wounded. It is also known 
that many of their wounded were carried away in the wagons 
which they brought with them for the purpose of carrying away 
rations. Thus, their wounded were divided, a large number 
being left on the field and a large number carried away in the 
wagons. Hence, it was impossible that either General Corse 
or General French could give the total number of their wounded 
correctly. Considering all known facts, the particular statement 
given above cannot be accepted as correct. It is believed that their 
total loss was not less than fifteen hundred, and it may have ex- 
ceeded that number. Even at that figure, the percentage of loss 
was not so great as that on the Union side. That was attributable 
to the severe fighting on the outer lines. There, the Federal forces 
had but little, if any, advantage of position, and being greatly out- 
numbered by the enemy, they sufifered heavy losses, not only at the 
outer lines, but, also, after being driven therefrom, while on the way 
back into the forts. The Confederates also lost three regimental 
flags, and eight hundred muskets. 

The total Federal loss was seven hundred and thirteen officers 
and men, being a little more than thirty-five per cent of the entire 
force engaged. The heaviest losses, in killed and wounded, fell 
upon the 7th Illinois, 39th Iowa, 50th Illinois, 93d Illinois, and 12th 
Wisconsin Battery, in the order given. 

The Ninety-Third Illinois lost twenty-one (21) men killed, three 
(3) officers and fifty-five (55) men wounded, and ten (10) men miss- 
ing. The total loss was eighty-nine (89) officers and men, being 
thirty and three-tenths per cent of the total number engaged. The 
regiment went into the battle with fourteen officers and two hundred 
and eighty enlisted men. 

The table following shows the loss of each command in detail, 
to wit : 



Commands. 


= 


1 


1 


1 


Ninety-Third Illinois Infantry 


2 58 
2 12 

5 16 


10 

84 


89 

44 
98 
21 

I 


Eighteenth Wisconsin Infantry 

Twelfth Wisconsin Battery 

Detachment Fifth Ohio Cavalry 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY -THIRD ILLINOIS. 



Commands. 

Seventh Illinois Infantry i 35 671 39I141 

Twelfth Illinois Infantrv | 9 49I... 58 

Fiftieth Illinois Infantry | 15 63!.. .| 78 

Two companies 57th Illinois Infantry | 4 8^ I j 13 

Thirty-ninth Iowa Infantry 140 54] 76I170 

Total loss 1 1421361 |2io'7i3 



Lieut. Col. John E. Tourtellotte, post commander, issued a con- 
gratulatory order, as follows: 

Headquarters Post, Allatoona, Georgia, October 8, 1864. 
Special Order \o, 11. 

The Lieutenant Colonel commanding desires to express his 
thanks to the individual officers and men of his command for the 
promptness and earnestness with which they laid aside feelings of 
selfishness and devoted themselves to the public service, October 5, 
1864, at this place. Among the ancients you would be termed 
gods; with us, living or dead, will be heroes. Deport yourselves 
thus and you will ever be successful. I am proud to be in command 
of such troops; you may be proud of yourselves. Your services in 
the campaign have been important. Commanding officers will 
communicate this order to their respective commands in such way 
as they may deem most convenient. 

By order of JOHX E. TOURTELLOTTE, 

Lieutenant Colonel, Commanding Post. 

Immediately after the battle, General Sherman issued the fol- 
lowing order: 

"The General commanding avails himself of the opportunity, 
in the handsome defense made of Allatoona, to illustrate the Most 
important principle in war, that fortified posts should be defended 
to the last, regardless of the relative numbers of the party attacking 
and attacked. The thanks of this army are due and are hereby ac- 
corded to General Corse, Colonel Tourtellotte, Colonel Rowett, 
officers and men, for the determined and gallant defense of Alla- 
toona, and it is made an example to illustrate the importance of pre- 
paring in time, and meeting the danger, when present, boldly, man- 
fully and well. 

"Commanders and garrisons of the posts along our railroad are- 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 129 

hereby instructed that they must hold their posts to the last minute, 
sure that the time gained is valuable and necessary to their com- 
rades at the front." 

The night after the battle, Sergeant Major Flint, of the 7th Illi- 
nois, wrote a poem, which was published in the history of that regi- 
ment, and is deemed worthy of a place here, as follows : 

Winds that sweep the Southern mountain 

And the leafy river's shore! 
Bear ye not a prouder burden 

Than ye ever learned before? 

And the hot blood fills 

The heart until it thrills. 
At the story of the terror and the glory of the battle 

Of the Allatoona hills. 

Echoes from the purple mountains 

To the dull surrounding shore — 
'Tis as sad and proud a burden 

As ye ever learned before ! 

How they fell like grass 

When the mowers pass. 
And the dying, when the foe was flying, swelled the cheering 

Of the heroes of the Pass. 

Sweep it o'er the hills of Georgia 

To the mountains of the North; 
Teach the coward and the doubter 

What the blood of man is worth. 

Hail the flag you pass! 

Let its stained and tattered mass 
Tell the story of the terror and the glory of the battle 

Of the Allatoona Pass. 



130 HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 




CHAPTER VIII. 

AFTER THE BATTLE. 

The night, after the day of battle at Allatoona, was dark and 
dreary. The sun, as it sank behind the western hills, only occasion- 
ally threw faint streams of light, through gathering clouds, upon 
that blood-red field. A little later, the face of the moon was heavily 
veiled, and the mutterings of thunder came rolling through the val- 
leys and gorges, and lightning flashed and blazed around the tops 
of the mountains. It was a fitting afterpiece, following the great 
tragedy of the day. Then rain fell, in torrents, as if to wash the red 
stains from those hills. All night long, the cries and shrieks of 
many Confederate wounded, the moans of the dying and the mut- 
terings of thunder were continually heard, from every direction, and 
the downpour of rain was incessant. Recurring flashes of lightning 
cast lurid light upon many scenes, there, of indescribable horror. 
It would have been kindlier had they remained undisclosed. And 
so the long, weird and dreary night wore away. 

At daylight, on the morning of the 6th, the command at Alla- 
toona resumed the unpleasant work that follows every battle. Our 
wounded had been taken to hospitals immediately after the battle 
closed the day before. Rain, in gradually diminishing quantity, 
continued to fall for two or three hours, and then ceased. The 
enemy's wounded were suffering severely, and measures were at 
once inaugurated for their relief. By noon, all of them, except 
those more or less concealed in the woods and valleys, were re- 
moved to hospitals where they could receive proper care and atten- 
tion. 

During the day, all the Federal dead were gathered and buried. 
Those of the Ninety-Third Illinois were buried on the crest of the 
Ridge, near the Carters ville road, about two hundred feet, almost 
due southwest, from the western fort. As they fought side by side 
in the battle, so, now, they were laid side by side in one common 
grave. A headboard was placed above each one, his name, com- 
pany and regiment being carved thereon. After the war ended, 
their bodies were removed and placed in the National Cemetery at 
Marietta, Georgia. 

During that day, also, a considerable number of the Confed- 



132 HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 

erate dead were buried, but not all of them. That work was 
finished the next day, except as to those that were afterward found 
and buried as heretofore mentioned. 

When night came, at the end of the second day after the bat- 
tle, the depleted garrison at AUatoona, worn and wear\' and sad, 
many of them well nigh exhausted, found opportunity for rest and 
sleep. General Corse, with his command, returned to Rome on 
the 7th. But a brigade of the Twenty-third Army Corps reached 
AUatoona that afternoon, went into camp there, and furnished 
pickets for the night. General Sherman's whole army, except the 
Twentieth Corps, was now moving northwest along the line of the 
railroad, and that brigade was the first to reach AUatoona. After 
the battle was fought and won, the head of the column that w-as 
moving to our aid on the day of the battle was halted between AUa- 
toona and Big Shanty, and remained there until the movements of 
the main body of the Confederate army, then in the neighborhood 
of Lost Mountain and Dallas, should be developed. On the 7th, 
General Sherman telegraphed to General Corse, that he was appre- 
hensive that General Hood would swing back against Atlanta and 
the Chattahoochie bridge, rather than against Kingston and the 
Etowah bridge. And he added, speaking of General Hood: **He 
is eccentric, and I cannot guess his movements as I could those oi 
Johnston, who was a sensible man, and only did sensible things. If 
Hood does not mind, I will catch him in a worse snap than he has 
been in yet." 

On the 8th, 9th and loth, three whole days and nights. General 
Sherman's army was continually passing AUatoona. It was im- 
mense; apparently, and in fact, an irresistible military force. Xo 
one, at AUatoona, any longer wondered that the Contederates had 
been beaten and driven from every position. And no one doubted 
the ability and power of that army to accomplish any task that 
might be set before it. It was a grand army, under a great com- 
mander. It will be borne in mind, however, that although General 
Sherman was in the immediate command of that army, he was, in 
addition, the commander of the military division of the Mississippi, 
which included all the armies in the West. 

On the loth. General Hood's army crossed the Coosa River, 
about eleven miles below Rome, Georgia. The confluence of the 
Oostanaula and Etowah Rivers, near Rome, forms the Coosa River, 
which flows southwest from there. General Sherman reached 
Kingston that day. With a considerable force of his cavalry, 
(about one-fourth of the Confederate army was cavalry), General 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 133 

Hood moved rapidly upon Resaca. On his arrival there, he de- 
manded the surrender of the place, and notified Colonel Weaver, 
who was in command at Resaca, that if his demand for surrender 
was refused he would take no prisoners. General Sherman had 
caused the garrison at Resaca to be well reinforced, and was mov- 
ing his army as rapidly as possible to reach there. Colonel Weaver 
flatly refused to surrender. General Hood did not attack, fearing, 
if he did, that General Sherman might force him to a general 
engagement before he could get away. General Hood then pushed 
rapidly on to Dalton, destroying the railroad as he went. On his 
demand, the garrison at Dalton ignominiously surrendered, at a 
time when General Sherman could have forced a general engage- 
ment within twenty-four hours had the garrison held fast; provided, 
of course, that General Hood had, in that case, attacked the place. 
General Hood immediately moved on, through Tunnel Hill, to Vil- 
lanow. General Sherman was now maneuvering to force him to 
battle. General Howard's army went to Snake Creek Gap, where 
the enemy had taken possession of the former Federal works, and 
tried to hold General Hood's forces there until General Stanley's 
corps could reach his rear at Villanow. But General Hood did not 
intend to hazard a battle, and immediately retired to Gadsden, Ala- 
bama. General Wheeler's cavalry covered his retreat. General 
Sherman followed him as far as Gaylesville, Alabama. Both armies 
now paused for a time. 

General Sherman's forces now covered Bridgeport, Alabama, 
Chattanooga, Tennessee, and Dalton, Resaca, and Rome, Georgia, 
and also the railroad to Atlanta. He did not propose to continue a 
fruitless chase after an army that would not fight. He did not pro- 
pose to be drawn away from the great advantages gained by the At- 
lanta campaign. Neither did he propose to abandon the great 
^*March to the Sea," the plans for which were already formed in his 
own mind, and, in fact, had already been communicated to General 
Grant and the War Department. His positions, now, were such 
that he could protect all he had gained in the Atlanta campaign, 
and hold the use of the railroad, to transport supplies and muni- 
tions of war to Atlanta for his contemplated campaign across Geor- 
gia, and until he, himself, should be ready to destroy it before start- 
ing on that famous march. The Confederates had destroyed about 
twelve miles of the railroad, burning every tie and bending many of 
the rails. In his Memoirs, General Sherman said, that the repair 
of it called for thirty-five thousand new ties and six miles of new 
iron; and he added, that Col. W. W. Wright came down from Chat- 



134 HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 

tanooga, with ten thousand men, iron, spikes, etc., and in about 
seven days the road was all right again. The repairing of it was 
completed about the 25th day of October. 

General Hood had hoped that General Sherman would divide 
his army and give him a chance to fight it in detail. If General 
Hood had only then crossed the Tennessee River, General Sherman 
would have divided his army immediately. With one part of it he 
would have fought and whipped the Confederates on the north side 
of the river, while with the other part, on the south side, he would 
have cut off their retreat and captured them. But General Beaure- 
gard, who had then joined General Hood, and out-ranked him, fore- 
saw the danger and averted it. 

On October 26th, General Sherman telegraphed to General 
Thomas as follows: "A reconnoissance pushed down to Gadsden 
to-day, reveals the fact that the rebel army is not there, and the 
chances are it has moved west. If it turns up at Guntersville, I will 
be after it, but if it goes, as I believe, to Decatur and beyond, I must 
leave it to you at present, and push for the heart of Georgia." And 
on October 29th, he sent another message to General Rosecrans, as 
follows: "I have pushed Beauregard to the west of Decatur, but I 
know he is pledged to invade Tennessee and Kentucky, having his 
base on the old Mobile and Ohio road. I have put Thomas in Ten- 
nessee, and given him as many troops as he thinks necessary, but I 
don't want to leave it to chance, and, therefore, would like to have 
Smith's and Mower's divisions up the Tennessee River as soon as 
possible. * * * I propose, myself, to push straight down into 
the heart of Georgia, smashing things generally." 

Prior to the ist day of November, General Sherman had sent 
twenty-five thousand infantry, from his Altanta army, to General 
Thomas, and Gens. A. J. Smith's and Mower's divisions were ex- 
pected to reach him before General Hood's army could attack him, 
and, in the meantime. Gen. James H. Wilson was expected to take 
command of and reorganize his cavalry, which, it was believed, 
could be increased to about twelve thousand men. The corps of 
Generals Stanley and Schofield, the Fourth and Twenty-third, sent 
by General Sherman to General Thomas, were veterans. New 
regiments of recruits were continually reaching General Thomas, 
and these were being grafted into those two veteran corps. The 
Confederate army, when it crossed the Chattahoochie River, about 
the 1st of October, and started north, contained, of all arms, about 
thirty-six thousand men, all veterans. This force had been aug- 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 135 

mented by Generals Forrest's and Rhoddy's cavalry, and some ad- 
ditional troops, until the total must have been nearly fifty thousand. 
The army under the immediate command of General Thomas was 
being augmented and strengthened to such extent that no doubt 
should remain of its ability to defend Tennessee against General 
Hood's army. When that was assured. General Sherman would 
start through Georgia. 

On November 3d, General Beauregard, with General Hood's 
army, was intrenched at Florence, Alabama. He had a pontoon 
bridge across the Tennessee River, which was protected from the 
Federal gunboats by the Muscle Shoals above and the Colbert 
Shoals below it. He could cross his army only between those two 
shoals. At that date. General Sherman had shifted his forces back 
toward Atlanta. The Twentieth Corps had remained at Atlanta, 
the Fifteenth and Seventeenth Corps were near Kenesaw Mountain, 
and the Fourteenth Corps was at Kingston. General Sherman was 
at Kingston. On that day, he said: "I can be ready in five days, 
but am waiting to be more certain that Thomas will be prepared 
for any contingency that may arise. It is now raining, which is 
favorable to us and unfavorable to the enemy, Davis has utterly 
failed in his threat to force me to leave in thirty days, for my rail- 
road is in good order from Nashville to Atlanta, and his army is 
farther from my communications now than it was twenty days ago. 
* * * I propose to adhere, as nearly as possible, to my original 
plan, and, on reaching the seacoast, will be available for reinforcing 
the army in Virginia, leaving behind a track of desolation, as well as 
a sufficient force to hold fast all that is of permanent value to our 
cause." 

On the 6th day of November, General Sherman sent his final 
communication to General Grant, about his plans, and discussed 
the merits of the three different routes, on either of which he might 
go. The first, was to Charleston or Savannah, cutting the only 
east and west railroad remaining to the Confederacy, and destroy- 
ing the enemy's depots at Macon and Augusta; the second, and 
easiest route, was down the fertile valley of Flint River, to the navi- 
gable waters of the Appalachicola River, taking up our prisoners 
of war still at Andersonville, and destroying about four hundred 
thousand bales of cotton near Albany and Fort Gaines, Georgia; 
and the third, down the valley of the Chattahoochie River, to Ope- 
lika and Montgomery, Alabama, and thence, to Pensacola or 
Tensas Bayou, in communication with Fort Morgan, at the en- 
trance to Mobile Bay. In this communication, he said to General 



136 HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 

Grant: "In my judgment, the first would have a material effect 
upon your campaign in Virginia; the second, would be the safest of 
execution; but the third, would more properly fall within the sphere 
of my own command, and have a direct bearing upon my own 
enemy, Beauregard. If, therefore, I should start before I hear 
farther from you, or before farther developments turn my course, 
you may take it for granted that I have moved via Griffin to Bames- 
ville; that I break up the road between Columbus and Macon good, 
and then, if I feign on Columbus, will move via Macon and Millen 
to Savannah, or, if I feign on Macon, you may take it for granted I 
have shot off toward Opelika, Montgomery, Mobile Bay or Pen- 
sacola." Curiously enough, this seems to be about the only point 
in General Sherman's plan that he departed from, and it was the 
very one that he had given General Grant for the purpose of 
enabling him to determine which was finally pursued. General 
Sherman made no feint on Columbus at all. He did make a strong 
feint on Macon. And then took the route to Savannah, instead of 
that to Opelika, Montgomery, Mobile Bay or Perisacola, as he said 
he would do. The probability is, that, in his communication to 
General Grant, he unintentionally reversed his feints. No expla- 
nation of the reversal was ever made. It is known that General 
Sherman thought the first route much more effective, in anticipated 
results, than either of the others. 

On the 8th day of November, General Sherman wired to G. W. 
Tyler, at Louisville, Kentucky: "Dispatch me to-morrow night 
and the next night a summary of all news, especially of elections, 
that I may report them to Governor Brown, at Milledgeville, where 
I expect a friendly interview in a few days. Keep this very secret, 
for the world will lose sight of me shortly, and you will hear worse 
stories than when I went to Meridian. Jeff Davis* thirty days are 
up for wiping us out, and we are not wiped out yet by a good deal." 
He clearly shows, in this dispatch, that he intended to go to 
Savannah. 

On the nth day of November, General Sherman wired to Gen- 
eral Halleck, at Washington: "My arrangements are now all com- 
plete. Last night, we burned all foundries, mills and shops of ever}' 
kind in Rome, and to-morrow I leave Kingston, with the rear- 
guard, for Atlanta, which I propose to dispose of in a similar man- 
ner, and to start on the i6th on the projected grand raid. * * ♦ 
I have balanced all the figures well, and am satisfied that General 
Thomas has in Tennessee a force sufficient for all probabilities. * * * 
To-morrow our wires will be broken, and this is probably my last 
dispatch. I would like to have Foster break the Savannah and 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 137 

Charleston Road about Pocotaligo about the ist of December. All 
other preparations are to my entire satisfaction." That again indi- 
cated the route to Savannah very clearly. On the same day, Gen- 
eral Sherman wired to General Thomas, that Atlanta would be 
burned in two days more, that the wires would be broken the next 
day, and that he would leave Atlanta on the i6th, with sixty thou- 
sand men, well provisioned, but expecting to live liberally on the 
country. On the 12th, General Thomas answered: *'I have no 
fears that Beauregard can do us any harm now, and if he attempts 
to follow you, I will follow him as far as possible. If he does not 
follow you, I will then thoroughly organize my troops, and, I be- 
lieve, shall have men enough to ruin him unless he gets out of the 
way very rapidly. * * * j am now convinced that the greater 
part of Beauregard's army is near Florence and Tuscumbia, and 
that you will at least have a clear road before you for several days, 
and that your success will be fully equal to your expectations." 
General Sherman replied: "All right." And the wires were then 
cut. 

By the 14th day of November, the Fourteenth, Fifteenth, Sev- 
enteenth and Twentieth Corps, sixty thousand strong, were at At- 
lanta. Brig. Gen. Judson Kilpatrick's cavalry division, five thou- 
sand five hundred strong, was also there. The artillery consisted of 
sixty guns, one to each thousand men. All the useless baggage 
had been sent to the rear. The railroad had been destroyed as far 
north as Dalton. Rome and Atlanta had been burned. Dwell- 
ings and churches only escaped destruction. Everything was 
ready for the grand "March to the Sea." 

These general movements of the army are given here more 
fully than might be deemed necessary in a regimental history. But 
it is done for several purposes. First, to illustrate the marvelous 
energy and endurance and force and powers of a large army when 
skillfully directed. Considering that General Sherman's army had 
just completed the Atlanta campaign, covering full five months of 
continuous marching and intrenching and fighting, and that it was 
about to enter upon the campaign across Georgia, the duration and 
hardships and dangers of which were uncertain and problematical, 
these movements, detailed in this chapter, were really wonderful. 
Under the circumstances existing, it is quite safe to say, that the 
marching done, and the work performed, and the results accom- 
plished by this army, in the month and a half that intervened be- 
tween the end of the Atlanta campaign and the begmning of the 
campaign across Georgia, were never exceeded, it, indeed, they 
were ever equaled, by any other army. Second, to illustrate the 



138 HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 

superior generalship of General Sherman. He closely watched and 
accurately measured eveiy movement of, and persistently denied 
every temptation offered him by, Generals Hood and Beauregard; 
he held fast to and secured all the material results of the Atlanta 
campaign; sufficiently strengthened the hands of General Thomas 
to enable him to hold Tennessee; and, at the same time, prepared 
a new thunderbolt for the enemy. And third, to lay the foundation 
for a better understanding of the campaign across Georgia; the 
reasons underlying the successful execution of it, and its effect as a 
factor in the termination of the war. 

During the period of these general movements of the army, 
from the 5th day of October to the i ith day of November, inclusive, 
the Ninety-Third Illinois remained at AUatoona, pursuing the daily 
routine of garrison duty. On the 30th day of October, Lieutenant 
Colonel Bu swell, who had been at home, on leave of absence, re- 
turned to and assumed command of the regiment. On the 7th of 
November, Captains Brown and Taggart started home, on leave of 
absence; and on the 8th, Captain Lee returned from absence with 
leave. 

Rain had been falling for five or six days, when, on the 8th of 
November, General Sherman telegraphed to all post commanders: 
"This is the storm I have been waiting for. When it is over we 
will move." When the telegram was read, some one said: **Thc 
old woman knew the cow would eat the grindstone." And the dis- 
patch did remind one of the humor of that old saying. But the 
General did not say, that he knew beforehand that the storm would 
come. He only said, he had been ''waiting for" it. Of course, he 
had been "waiting for" it — to quit. He could do nothing else. 

On the 9th, loth and nth days of November, the regiment 
made all necessary preparations to move. On the loth, all the sick 
and disabled were sent to Chattanooga. All tents and extra bag- 
gage being sent to the rear, everything was in readiness. On the 
nth, in the evening, marching orders came. On the 12th, at 9 
o'clock in the morning, the regiment left AUatoona, and marched, 
on the Marietta road, to a point a mile and a half southeast of Ack- 
worth. On the 13th, the march was continued to a point four miles 
south of Marietta. On the 14th, the regiment crossed the Chatta- 
hoochie River about 9 o'clock in the morning, marched to Atlanta, 
Georgia, and went into camp one mile south of the city. The dis- 
tance marched, from AUatoona to Atlanta, was thirty-six miles. 
This closes the record down to the Georgia campaign. All the 
forces that were to participate in it were now at and near Atlanta, 
and ready to start. 



CHAPTER IX. 

THE GEORGIA CAMPAIGN — ** MARCH TO THE SEA.** 

After what General Sherman did, and what he said about it, 
there was much keener appreciation generally throughout the civil- 
ized world, that war was organized cruelty. What he did was not 
materially different from what had always been done before, and 
what he said had always been known before. But the manner in 
which he wrought all kinds of destruction to the enemy, and to the 
people who gave encouragement and aid to the rebellion, and the 
reasons he assigned for it, and the terse manner in which he ex- 
pressed himself about it, caused thoughtful men and women every- 
where to realize the extreme cruelty of war more fully than they had 
ever done before. In this, he did the world a great service. The 
destruction and desolation wrought by his army was something 
terrible to contemplate. The power of the people of Northern 
Georgia to make further successful war against the Nation was 
completely destroyed. The destruction of railroads by General 
Hood's army was the merest child's play as compared with that 
executed under General Sherman's orders. The method was 
simple, expeditious and effective. An ingenious instrument was 
made for the purpose. It was a clasp, which locked under the rail, 
with a ring in the top of it, into which a long lever was inserted. 
With this, the rails were easily and quickly rippied from the ties. 
The ties were then collected in piles and set on fire, and the rails 
thrown across them. When the rails were sufficiently heated to 
bend by their own weight, they were taken off, with wrenches made 
to fit closely over the ends, and twisted in opposite directions until 
they looked like corkscrews. A rolling machine could not re-shape 
them. Sometimes, too, if it were convenient, the rails were 
wrapped two or three times around trees, and left to cool there. To 
recover them would be more expensive than new ones. Thirty 
miles of rails, which were found in Atlanta, all those on the road 
from Dalton to Atlanta, and all on the road from Atlanta to Madi- 
son, and a large quantity on the Georgia Central, and other Hnes, 
east and southeast of Atlanta, and the ties on all the roads torn up, 
were destroyed in the manner indicated. To repair these roads 
simply meant to build new ones. Rome and Atlanta, except dwell- 



140 HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 

ings and churches, were panoramas of desolation. Arsenals, 
armories, mills, factories, machine shops, cotton gins, and every- 
thing else, out of which war materials or any kind of aid to the 
rebellion could be furnished, were laid in ruins. Major Nichols 
described the destruction of Atlanta, as follows: "A grand and 
awful spectacle is presented to the beholder in this beautiful city, 
now in flames. By order, the chief engineer has destroyed by 
powder and fire all the storehouses, depot buildings and machine 
shops. The heaven is one expanse of lurid fire; the air is filled with 
flying, burning cinders; buildings covering two hundred acres are 
in ruins or in flames; every instant there is the sharp detonation or 
the smothered booming sound of exploding shells and powder con- 
cealed in the buildings, and then the sparks and flames shoot away 
up into the black and red roof, scattering cinders far and wide. 
These are the machine shops where have been forged and cast the 
rebel cannon, shot and shell that have carried death to many a brave 
defender of our Nation's honor. These warehouses have been the 
receptacles of munitions of war, stored to be used for our destruc- 
tion. The city which, next to Richmond, has furnished more 
materials for prosecuting the war than any other in the South, exists 
no more as a means of injury to be used by the enemies of the 
Union. A brigade of Massachusetts soldiers are the only troops 
now left in the town; they will be the last to leave it. To-night I 
heard the really fine band of the Thirty-Third Massachusetts play- 
ing 'John Brown's Soul Goes Marching On,' by the light of the 
burning buildings. I have never heard that noble anthem when it 
was so grand, so solemn, so inspiring." And even that vivid 
description now seems tame to one who witnessed that and other 
scenes of destruction. 

Was it justifiable? Yes. No one has yet successfully shown 
the contrary, nor made more than a very feeble effort to do so- In- 
deed, what General Sherman said about it, at the time, quite con- 
clusively settled that question. It came of the necessities of cruel 
war. It was a part of the necessary preparation for the great cam- 
paign then about to be inaugurated. A campaign that was to teach 
the people of the South, and through them the leaders of the rebel- 
lion, the enormity of their crime against the Nation; and that was 
to demonstrate to them that continued resistance could only end 
in universal ruin and desolation. One great result of that cam- 
paign was, that it prepared the minds of the Southern people and 
of the Southern soldiers for surrender. Otherwise, the great dan- 
ger was, that those large Confederate armies might break up into 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 141 

small marauding bands and continue a sort of guerrilla warfare 
indefinitely. That no such result was realized was, indeed, most 
fortunate for the South and the whole country. 

On the 8th and 9th days of November, 1864, General Sherman 
issued two orders, from Kingston, Georgia, each of which forms an 
essential part of the history of that great march, and the two to- 
gether show how carefully and thoroughly he had made all his 
plans for the undertaking. Referring to them, in his Memoirs, 
General Sherman said: "The two general orders made for this 
march appear to me, even at this late day, so clear, emphatic and 
w^ll-digested, that no account of that historic event is perfect with- 
out them, and I give them entire, even at the seeming appearance 
of repetition; and although they called for great sacrifice and labor 
on the part of officers and men, I insist that these orders were 
obeyed as well as any similar orders ever were by an army operating 
wholly in an enemy's country and dispersed, as we necessarily were,^ 
during the subsequent period of nearly six months." The last of 
the two was not only the plan, but, after the march was executed, it 
became, in great measure, a history of it. Because they will be of 
great benefit to the reader of the following sketch of the campaign^ 
both orders are inserted here in full, as follows : 

Headquarters Military Division of the Mississippi. 

In the Field, Kingston, Georgia, November 8, 1864. 

Special Field Orders, No. 119: 

The General commanding deems it proper at this time to in- 
form the officers and men of the Fourteenth, Fifteenth, Seventeenth 
and Twentieth Corps that he has organized them into an army for a 
special purpose, well known to the War Department and to General 
Grant. It is sufficient for you to know that it involves a departure 
from our present base and a long and difficult march to a new one. 
All the chances of war have been considered and provided for, as 
far as human sagacity can. All he asks of you is to maintain that 
discipline, patience and courage which have characterized you in the 
past; and he hopes through you to strike a blow at our enemy that 
will have a material effect in producing, what we all so much desire, 
his complete overthrow. Of all things, the most important is that 
the men during the marches and in camp keep their places and do 
not scatter about as stragglers and foragers, to be picked up by a 
hostile people in detail. It is also of the utmost importance that 
our wagons should not be loaded with anything but provisions and 



142 HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 

ammunition. All surplus servants, non-combatants and refugees 
should now go to the rear, and none should be encouraged to in- 
cumber us on the march. At some future time we will be able to 
provide for the poor whites and blacks who seek to escape the 
bondage under which they are now suffering. With these few 
simple cautions, he hopes to lead you to achievements equal in im- 
portance to those of the past. 

By order of Maj. Gen. W. T. Sherman. 

L. M. Dayton, Aid-de-Camp. 

Headquarters Military Division of the Mississippi. 
In the Field, Kingston, Georgia, November 9, 1864. 
Special Field Orders, No. 120: 

I. For the purpose of military operations, this army is divided 
into two wings, viz: The right wing, Maj. Gen. O. O. Howard 
commanding, composed of the Fifteenth and Seventeenth Corps; 
the left wing, Maj. Gen. H. W. Slocum commanding, composed of 
the Fourteenth and Twentieth Corps. 

IL The habitual order of march will be, whenever practicable, 
by four roads, as nearly parallel as possible, and converging at points 
hereafter to be indicated in orders. The cavalry. Brigadier General 
Kilpatrick commanding, will receive special orders from the com- 
mander-in-chief. 

HL There will be no general trains of supplies, but each corps 
will have its ammunition and provision train, distributed habitually 
as follows: Behind each regiment should follow one wagon and 
one ambulance; behind each brigade should follow a due proportion 
of ammunition wagons, provision wagons and ambulances. In 
case of danger, each corps commander should change this order of 
march, by having his advance and rear brigades unencumbered by 
wheels. The separate columns will start habitually at seven o'clock 
a. m., and make about fifteen miles per day, unless otherwise fixed 
in orders. 

IV. The army will forage liberally on the country during the 
march. To this end, each brigade commander will organize a good 
and sufficient foraging party, under the command of one or more 
discreet officers, who will gather near the route traveled corn or 
forage of any kind, meat of any kind, vegetables, corn meal, or 
whatever is needed by the command ; aiming at all times to keep in 
the wagon trains at least ten days' provisions for the command and 
three days' forage. Soldiers must not enter the dwellings of the 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 143 

inhabitants or commit any trespass; but during a halt or camp they 
may be permitted to gather turnips, potatoes and other vegetables, 
and drive in stock in front of their camps. To regular foraging 
parties must be intrusted the gathering of provisions and forage at 
any distance from the road traveled. 

V. To corps commanders alone is intrusted the power to 
destroy mills, houses, cotton gins, etc., and for them this general 
principle is laid down: In districts and neighborhoods where the 
army is unmolested, no destruction of such property should be per- 
mitted; but should guerrillas or bushwhackers molest our march, 
or should the inhabitants burn bridges, obstruct roads, or other- 
wise manifest local hostility; then army corps commanders should 
order and enforce a devastation more or less relentless, according 
to the measure of such hostility. 

VI. As for horses, mules, wagons, etc., belonging to the in- 
habitants, the cavalry and artillery may appropriate freely and with- 
out limit; discriminating, however, between the rich, who are 
usually hostile, and the poor or industrious, who are usually neutral 
or friendly. Foraging parties may also take mules or horses to 
replace the jaded animals of their trains, or to serve as pack-mules 
for the regiments or brigades. In all foraging, of whatever kind, 
the parties engaged will refrain from abusive or threatening lan- 
guage, and may, when the officer in command thinks proper, give 
written certificates of the facts, but no receipts; and they will en- 
deavor to leave with each family a reasonable portion for their 
maintenance. 

VII. Negroes who are able bodied and can be of service to 
the several columns, may be taken along; but each army com- 
mander will bear in mind that the question of supplies is a very im- 
portant one, and that his first duty is to see to those who bear arms. 

VIII. The organization at once of a good pioneer battalion 
for each army corps, composed, if possible, of negroes, should be 
attended to. The battalion should follow the advance-guard, 
should repair roads, and double them if possible, so that the col- 
umns will not be delayed after reaching bad places. Also, army 
commanders should practice the habit of giving the artillery and 
wagons the road, marching their troops on one side; and also in- 
struct their troops to assist wagons at steep hills or bad crossings 
of streams. 

IX. Capt. O. M. Poe, chief engineer, will assign to each wing 
of the army a pontoon train, fully equipped and organized, and the 



144 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 



commanders thereof will see to its being properly protected at all 
times. 

By order of Maj. Gen. W. T. Sherman. 

L. M. Dayton, Aide-de-Camp. 

The roster of the army was as follows, to wit : 



right wing, 

Major General 
O. O. Howard. 



< 



left wing, 

Major General 
H. W. Slocum. 



corps. 

Fifteenth, 
Major General 
p. j. osterhaus. 

Seventeenth, 

Major General 

Frank P. Blair, Jr. 

Fourteenth, 

Brev. Major General 

Jeff. C. Davis. 

Tzventieth, 

Brigadier General 

A. S. Williams. 



divisions. 

fBRiG. Gen. C. R. Wood's 
W. B. Hazens 
J. E. Smith's 
J. M. Corse's. 






< I 



i I 
I ( 
( I 



I Maj. Gen. T. A. Mower's. 
I Brig. Gen. M. D. Leggett's. 
[ " " G.A.Smith's. 

Brig. Gen. W. P. Carlin's. 
J. D. Morgan's. 
A. Baird's 



< I 

< i 



I i 
i I 



f Brig. Gen. N. T. Jackson's. 
I * " J. W. Geary's. 
t •• " W. T. Ward's. 



And Brig. Gen. Judson C. Kilpatrick's cavalry division con- 
sisted of two brigades, commanded by Cols. Eli H. Murray and 
Smith D. Atkins. And the artillery consisted of sixty cannon, or- 
ganized into batteries. 

The Ninety-Third Illinois was in the First Brigade, Third 
Division, Fifteenth Army Corps, Right Wing. The brigade was 
composed of the Sixty-third and Ninety-Third Illinois, the Forty- 
eighth and Fifty-ninth Indiana, and the Fourth Minnesota, and 
was commanded by Col. Joseph B. McCown, of the Sixty-third 
Illinois. The Eighteenth Wisconsin started home, on veteran fur- 
lough, on the 8th day of November. The division was commanded 
by Brig. Gen. John E, Smith. 

Some histories say the campaign began on the i6th day of 
November, A. D. 1864; doubtless, because General Sherman, before- 
hand, fixed that as the day when he would start. But, certain it is, the 
march began one day earlier. Every corps and the artillery and cav-^ 
airy left Atlanta on the 15th. Of this, there is not the least doubt. 
The Fifteenth Corps was on the extreme right, and moved in the 
direction of McDonough and Jonesboro. The Seventeenth Corps 
was on the right center. The Fourteenth Corps was on the left 
center, and General Sherman was with that corps. And the Twen-^ 
tieth Corps was on the extreme left, and moved on the Atlanta and 
Decatur road. The artillery and trains were distributed among the 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 145 

several corps, and always moved with them. The cavalry was on 
the right flank until the army passed Macon, Georgia, and then 
shifted over to the left flank. 

On the 15th day of November, A. D. 1864, the Ninety-Third 
Illinois marched from Atlanta at i o'clock p. m. Progress was very 
slow during the afternoon, while the trains were straightening out, 
and not more than four miles had been covered before dark. But 
the march was continued until i o'clock that night, when the com- 
mand went into camp about six miles below Rough and Ready, 
having made fifteen miles during the day and night. During the 
day there was some light skirmishing heard in front. On the i6th, 
between half past 6 o'clock in the morning and half past 3 o'clock in 
the afternoon, the regiment marched eighteen miles, and went into 
camp a mile west of McDonough, the county seat of Henry County. 
A large Confederate mail was captured there, but there was nothing 
of consequence in it, mostly love-letters. On the 17th, the com- 
mand, from 6 o'clock a. m. until 5 o'clock p. m., covered twenty- 
three miles, and camped three miles east of Jackson, the county 
seat of Butts County. Our division was in the advance. The 
Ninety-Third Illinois was a part of the division train guard. Some 
skirmishing was heard at the front and on the right flank. A com- 
pany of state militia, drilling at Jackson, scattered in every direction 
when our cavalry approached. They were completely surprised. 
The country was fine, for Georgia, and everybody went into camp 
with full haversacks. On the i8th, the regiment marched at 5 
o'clock a. m., at the head of the division and army, and reached the 
Ocmulgee River at half past 8 o'clock in the morning. Crossing 
the river on a ferry-boat, the command moved about two miles be- 
yond it and went into camp at 3 o'clock in the afternoon, having 
covered eight miles of distance. The river was crossed just above 
Ocmulgee Mills, large flouring-mills, and near "Planters Factory," 
a large cotton factory containing about seventy looms. At the 
point of crossing, the river is about fifty yards wide. It narrows at 
that point and makes very fine water-power. On the 19th, the regi- 
ment marched fifteen miles, between 9 o'clock in the morning and 
quarter past 8 o'clock in the evening, and camped one mile south of 
Hillsboro. Was rear guard for the division train. A heavy rain 
fell last night, which made the roads muddy and bad. On the 20th, 
the command marched fourteen miles, between 6:30 o'clock a. m. 
and 3 o'clock p. m., and camped one mile south of Clinton, the 
county seat of Jones County. More rain fell last night, and a little 
this evening. During the day, we passed the place, about seven 
10 



146 HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 

miles north of Clinton, where General Stoneman and the most of 
his force were captured, by the Confederates, in August last. It 
was the result of bad discipline. After going into camp, there was 
some brisk fighting, quite heavy cannonading, heard in front. On 
the 2ist, the regiment marched at 8 o'clock a. m., and camped at 5 
o'clock p. m., having covered ten miles. Was rear guard for the 
division train again. The course to-day was nearly southeast. 
Passed four miles north of Griswoldville at noon, and then moved 
nearly parallel with the Georgia Central Railroad. Rain fell nearly 
all day, making the roads very muddy. The First and Fourth 
Divisions made a strong feint on Macon. A force of the enemy, 
consisting mainly of General Cobb's state militia, advanced from 
Macon to Griswoldville, and attacked General Walcott's infantry 
brigade and a part of General Kilpatrick's cavalry. They were 
severely punished for their temerity. The Federal loss was ten 
killed, and fifty-two wounded. The Confederate loss was fifty killed, 
two hundred wounded, and four hundred captured. General Wal- 
cott was wounded. News came, in the evening, that General 
Slocum's forces had cut the railroad north of Milledgeville, Georgia, 
the capital of the state, at that time. On the 22d, the command 
marched at half past 7 o'clock a. m. and went into camp at 3 o'clock 
p. m., at Gordon, Georgia, on the Georgia Central Railroad, the 
distance being eight miles. It was a cold day. Some snow fell in 
the early morning. This regiment led the division, the line of 
march being through the woods and plantations, moving abreast 
with the Seventeenth Army Corps. At half past 6 o'clock p. m., the 
regiment was ordered out and directed to destroy a half mile of 
the railroad. The task was most effectively executed, and at the 
end of three hours the command was back in camp. Other regi- 
ments performed like tasks. Miles of road were destroyed, beyond 
repair, that evening. Between 5 and 6 o'clock, for about an hour, 
fighting was heard in the direction of Macon, which is about twenty 
miles west of Gordon. The feint on Macon was being continued, to 
hold the enemy there. On the 23d and 24th, the regiment remained 
in camp; but on the last of the two days the camp was changed to 
the opposite side of the town, about a mile from the first one. 

During the period covered above, the Twentieth Corps, being 
a part of the left wing of the army. General Slocum commanding, 
and being on the extreme left, moved from Atlanta, via Decatur, 
Rockbridge, Sheffield, Social Circle, Rutledge, Madison and Eaton- 
ton, to Milledgeville, a distance of one hundred and five miles, 
reaching the latter place on the 23d of November. General Slo- 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 147 

cum's forces prevented the destruction of the bridge across the 
Oconee River, at Milledgeville, and obtained possession of it. A 
few days before, the state legislature, then in session there, hur- 
riedly dispersed ; and there was also a great exodus of citizens from 
the city. All the magazines, arsenals, armories, factories, depots 
and storehouses, containing property of the Confederate govern- 
ment, and seventeen hundred bales of cotton, were burned. General 
Sherman occupied the executive mansion of Governor Brown. 
Brown did not stay for the "friendly interview" mentioned by General 
Sherman in his dispatch to Tyler. 'He removed himself, and every- 
thing else, even his cabbages, it was said. On the 22d, General 
Kilpatrick was ordered to move rapidly eastward with his cavalry, to 
cut the railroad between Augusta and Millen, and, if possible, 
release the Federal prisoners at the latter place. General Wheeler's 
cavalry opposed his progress. Skirmishing daily, the Confederate 
cavalry was rapidly forced back to Waynesborough, near which 
place the railroad bridge across Brier Creek was destroyed. On 
reaching Millen, General Kilpatrick learned that all the prisoners 
had been removed to points out of reach of our army. A few dead 
prisoners, yet unburied, were found there, and about seven hundred 
graves. The graves were designated by head-boards, by fifties only. 
Crossing the Oconee River, and continuing his march eastward, 
General Slocum found General Wheeler's cavalry in his front, cov- 
ering the roads to Sandersville. Moving on, however, the Four- 
teenth and Twentieth corps occupied that place on the 26th day 
of November, driving the Confederate cavalry before them. In 
the meantime, the right wing of the army crossed the Oconee River 
lower down, in the face of General Wayne's Confederate cavalry, 
and reached Tennille Station, on the railroad, a little east of south 
from Sandersville, five miles distant. 

On the 25th, this regiment marched thirteen miles, starting 
at 10:30 o'clock a. m., and stopping at 5:15 o'clock p. m., going into 
camp at IrAvinton, the county seat of Wilkinson County. The 
country here, and twenty or thirty miles back, is poor; and yet, 
there seems to be plenty of forage. On the 26th, the march was 
continued eleven miles, between 6:30 and 11:15 a. m., when the 
command went into camp within four miles of the Oconee River. 
The Seventeenth Army Corps did not get the pontoon bridge laid 
across the river until yesterday, one day late, on account of the op- 
position made by Confederate cavalry under General Wayne. On 
the 27th, the regiment marched fifteen miles, between 6 o'clock 
a. m. and 3 o'clock p. m., and went into camp at Irwin's Cross 



148 HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 

Roads, in Washington County. Crossed the Oconee River at 8 
o'clock a. m., on a pontoon bridge at Ball's Ferry. The country 
passed through was somewhat better. On the 28th, starting at 8:3a 
o'clock a. m., the regiment marched eighteen miles, and went into 
camp in a field, at no particular place, at 8 o'clock p. m. To-day 
we marched in rear of the brigade, and the brigade in the rear of 
the division train. Up to this date our division had picked up about 
two hundred prisoners. On the 29th, starting at 7:15 o'clock in 
the morning, the march was continued twenty miles, when the 
command camped in the pine woods, at 5 o'clock in the evening. 
We fell in with the Seventeenth Corps this morning, and our divi- 
sion "took to the woods,'* moving on a "blind" road. The country 
here was a wilderness. The natives called it a "Pine Opening." 
In fact, it was a dense pine forest, reaching back to the Oconee River, 
In the evening there was a rumor in camp, that Admiral Farragut 
had taken Savannah. That was all, just a rumor. No one believed it. 
On the 30th, starting at 7:15 o'clock a. m., the regiment marched 
twelve miles, and camped at 5 o'clock p. m., at a little hamlet called 
Sumnerville, in the northern part of Emanuel County, (there was 
no other Emanuel in that neighborhood). It was seven miles 
from, and on the west side of, the Ogeechee River, near the Georgia 
Central Railroad. Still in the pine forest. The houses could hardly 
be called houses, they were merely places to "stay in," and only 
occasionally one of them, such as they were. But the whistle of a 
railroad locomotive was heard in the evening, and the hope was 
immediately raised that the edge of the wilderness was not far dis- 
tant, and that daylight would soon be reached. No one wondered 
that the Confederates did not fight much for that part of the coun- 
try. It was not worth it. On December ist, the command marched 
eight miles, starting at 9 o'clock a. m., and going mto camp at 5 
o'clock p. m. Just where the camp was makes no difference. It 
was said to be south of "No. 9," whatever and wherever that was. 
This was a busy day for the Pioneer Corps. Many bad sloughs 
were bridged or corduroyed with rails and poles, to make them 
passable for the artillery and trains. Our camp was made among 
the famous "turpentine pines." They were from one to two feet in 
diameter, and from seventy-five to one hundred and twenty-five 
feet high. The trunks were smooth, and without limbs, except 
near the tops. The leaves were from eight to fifteen inches long. 
The trees were thinly scattered over the ground, and there was no- 
undergrowth. Turpentine, tar and resin, in great quantities, was 
made from these trees. Found more cultivated land in this neigh- 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 149 

borhood than for several days past. On the 2d, starting at 6:30 
o'clock a.m.,the regiment marched twelve miles, and went into camp 
at 5 o'clock p. m., on Scull's Creek, in the edge of Emanuel County. 
The creek was the county line. Still among the tall turpentine 
pines. The ignorance of the people there was very dense. On 
the 3d, the command rested in camp, and was inspected by In- 
spector General Warren, of the brigade staff. A foraging party 
went out about five miles from the camp, and brought in a good 
supply of pork, sweet potatoes, corn, fodder, etc. On the 4th, 
starting at 7 o'clock a. m., the regiment marched eighteen miles, 
and camped at 6:45 o'clock p. m., within one mile of Statesboro, 
the county seat of Bullock County. It was a small dilapidated town, 
containing about two hundred inhabitants. The foragers of the 
Second Division, and their escort, had a lively skirmish with the 
enemy at that place, on entering the town. Seven of the enemy 
were killed, and thirty-five or forty wounded. Our loss, mostly 
of the Seventieth Ohio, was three men killed, and nineteen wounded 
and missing. The enemy were now continually hanging on our 
flanks, although they fought but little. In this part of the country 
the Pioneers were always very busy building bridges and making 
roads, although the country was somewhat better than that passed 
a few days ago. The pine timber was not so heavy, and there were 
a few small oak trees among it. A few cannon shots were heard 
early in the morning, on the left, over on the east side of the 
Ogeechee River. On the 5th, the command moved at 7 o'clock 
a. m., marched seventeen miles, and camped at 4:30 o'clock p. m. 
Passed through a considerably better country, more level, smaller 
timber, and more thickly settled, than for several days past. Found 
plenty of provisions and forage, and a good deal of both was taken. 
Rations from the Commissary Department were getting quite short, 
less than half-rations of hard bread, only half of coffee, and no 
sugar. But we got plenty from the country, and lived well. No 
complaints were heard. A plantation was passed to-day that was 
cultivated during the Revolutionary War by the grandfather of 
the present proprietor. The latter appeared to be a man seventy- 
five or eighty years of age. There was a negro on the place who 
was over a hundred years old. Ancient marks! On the 6th, the 
regiment remained in camp. We were now on the extreme right 
of the army, and were halted because we were ahead of the rest of 
the army. The Second and Third divisions of the Fifteenth Corps 
were together, and the other two divisions of the corps were be- 
tween us and the Ogeechee River, on the west side of that stream. 



150 HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 

The other three corps had crossed to the east side of the river sev- 
eral days before. The Fourteenth and Twentieth corps crossed at 
Louisville, in Jefferson County, and the Seventeenth Corps some- 
where south of Millen, on the east line of Bullock County. The 
latter corps crossed about the first of December, and the others be- 
fore then. On the 7th, starting at 8:30 a. m., the command marched 
eleven miles, and camped at 5:30 p. m., east of Eden, the county 
seat of Bryan County, within two miles of the Ogeechee River. 
Rain fell all the forenoon, and a little in the evening. The country 
here was level and more open, and the roads bad. The timber 
was all pine, but it was not so large, nor was there so much of it 
as was found farther back on the route. A part of the Second 
Division of the Fifteenth Corps crossed to the east side of the Ogee- 
chee River to-day. The enemy made a slight resistance. The Sec- 
ond Iowa Regiment lost two men killed, and seven or eight wounded. 
On the 8th, at 10:30 o'clock a. m., the regiment, simply to change 
the camp, moved one mile nearer to the river, and remained there 
during the day and night. About 8 o'clock p. m., in a southeasterly 
direction from camp, heavy discharges were heard, like the firing 
of gun-boats. Rumors were also flying about the camp, to the 
effect, that the Confederates, twenty thousand strong, were in- 
trenched on the east side of the river, about eight miles away 
from us. On the 9th, at 7:15 o'clock a. m., the command was on 
the move. Marching to the Ogeechee River, the regiment crossed 
to the east side of that stream, on a pontoon bridge, laid at a point 
nearly due east from Eden. Then moving in a southeasterly direc- 
tion, nearly parallel with the river, and having covered fifteen miles 
of distance during the day, the command went into camp at i 
o'clock p. m., near the Ogeechee Canal, among the pines and live 
oaks. Cannonading was heard all the day, on our left. Also heard, 
in the evening, that the Savannah & Charleston Railroad had been 
cut, west of the Savannah River, by the Fourteenth Corps. On the 
loth, starting at 6:30 o'clock in the morning, the regiment marched 
nine miles, very rapidly, in a northeasterly direction, to a point 
within six miles of Savannah, Ga. Having crossed to the south 
side of the Ogeechee Canal, early in the morning, this march was 
made on the towpath of the canal. Leaving the canal, at 10 o'clock 
a. m., the regiment moved two miles to the right, to open communi- 
cation with the Fourth division of the Fifteenth Corps, which had 
moved up along the Gulf Railroad. When communication was 
established, and a road opened, the regiment moved back to the 
canal and rejoined our division about noon. Just as we started 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 151 

back, a Confederate battery fired two shots at us that came uncom- 
fortably close. The division had advanced about a mile from 
where we left it, and had found the enemy. Skirmishing was then 
in progress, and continued until dark, the enemy throwing shells 
occasionally for variety. A chilly mist, half fog, enveloped the 
field. The long lines of blue-coated skirmishers, moving through 
the gloom, presented a most spectral appearance; and the continual 
crack, crack, crack, of their firing, and the curling smoke from 
their guns, floating through the mist all along the Hues, intensified 
the weird scene to a degree that caused creeping sensations down 
the spine. At 9 o'clock p. m., the left wing of the Ninety-Third 
Illinois went on the skirmish line for the night, reHeving the skir- 
mishers of our brigade. And what a night it was! Rain began to 
fall about 11 o'clock p. m., and continued until 5 o'clock the next 
morning. The weather was cold. The Confederates were in a fort 
behind a swamp that was almost impassable, and there were 
swamps on either side of us. Pines, cypress, live oak and magnolia 
trees, full of that gloomy Spanish moss hanging from every limb, 
rose out of the swamps into the mist and rain, like spectres, on every 
hand. With mud and water underfoot, cold mist and ram overhead, 
and spectral gloom everywhere, it was a night never to be forgotten ! 
Waiting for the "clouds to roll away," and for the coming of the 
morning, we leave this command there, and take a little time to 
briefly sketch the general movements of the army from Gordon and 
Milledgeville to Savannah. 

The route of the Ninety-Third Illinois, after leaving Gordon, as 
given above, was substantially, the route of the Fifteenth Army 
Corps. The route of the Seventeenth Corps was on the left of that 
followed by the Fifteenth, that is, farther east. The route of the 
Twentieth Corps, after leaving Milledgeville, was via Hebron, San- 
dersville, Davisboro, Louisville, Millen and Springfield to Savan- 
nah. The route of the Fourteenth Corps was between that of the 
Twentieth and that of the Seventeenth Corps. It will be noted, that 
the Fifteenth Corps crossed the Ogeechee River at a point nearly 
due west from Savannah, and only about twenty miles away, and 
that the Seventeenth Corps crossed about fifty miles farther north, 
and the Fourteenth and Twentieth Corps about one hundred miles 
farther north. For forty miles north of Savannah the average 
width between the Savannah and Ogeechee Rivers is about eight- 
een miles. Then the width gradually increases, going north, as far 
as Louisville, where it is about forty-five miles. The Savannah 
River forms the boundary between Georgia and South Carolina 



152 HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 

for about three-quarters of the entire distance on the line between 
those two states. Hence, it will be perceived, the whole country 
between those two rivers, for a full hundred miles north of Savan- 
nah, was literally swept by this great army, in its march, as well as 
a strip ten miles or more in width down the right bank of the 
Ogeechee. Everything that could be of use to the enemy was de- 
stroyed. Substantially the entire line of the Georgia Central Rail- 
road from Atlanta to Savannah, a part of the railroad from Augusta 
to Millen, where the left wing crossed it, and a part of the Savan- 
nah & Charleston Railroad, west of the Savannah River, as well as 
parts of several other lines at and near Milledgeville, were completely 
destroyed, and rendered utterly useless to the enemy. Never were the 
movements of any army better protected and covered by cavalry, 
than were thoSe of the right wing of this army from Atlanta to Gor- 
don, and those of the left wing from Milledgeville to Savannah. 
General Kilpatrick's cavalry division was everywhere; and all the 
time an impenetrable cloud to the enemy. They marched day and 
night, skirmished with and fought and drove the Confederates 
wherever and whenever they were found, gathered forage and pro- 
visions, destroyed mills and factories and warehouses, burned rail- 
road bridges, tore up railroads, and "raised the devil" generally. 
The Confederate papers confidently predicted the destruction of 
the army. There was great anxiety in the North as to the result of 
the campaign. This confidence on the one side, and the appre- 
hensions on the other, indicated the impressions then prevalent as 
to the audacity of the movement. But the people of the North, 
even then, did not comprehend the energy and power and resources 
of a great army, well disciplined and ably commanded. Neither did 
the people of the South. And beside, the Confederate generals 
seemed to have no accurate knowledge of the strength and numbers 
of this army. Hood and Beauregard estimated it at about thirty-six 
thousand strong, while, in fact, it numbered sixty-five thousand five 
hundred men. No serious opposition was encountered until the 
heads of the different columns were within fifteen miles of Savan- 
nah. On each of the five different approaches to the city, (unless 
the canal towpath be counted as another), at about that distance, 
the enemy felled timber and made earthworks and planted artillery. 
These approaches, (other than the towpath), were the two railroads 
and three dirt pikes. They were narrow causeways, through other^ 
wise impassable swamps. Those obstructions were quickly swept^ 
away, however, and the Confederates driven within their intrenchecf 
lines at Savannah. This was done by the loth day of December^ 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 153 

At night, that day, the city was completely invested, except on 
the northeast. The city is about five miles from the mouth of 
the river, which at that point flows nearly due east, a little south, 
and just across the river, on the South Carolina shore, was a 
plank road, the "Union Causeway," leading from the city out 
into South Carolina. This avenue of escape was, per force, left 
•open to the Confederates, because they had gunboats in the Savan- 
nah River, with which they could have quickly destroyed any 
pontoon bridge that might have been laid across the river for 
the passage of Federal troops to the opposite shore; and thus, 
any force that might have been sent across would have been isolated, 
and left in great danger. General Foster and Admiral Dahlgren 
had already located a division of troops between Coosawatchee and 
TuUifiny creeks, at the head of Broad River, in the eastern central 
portion of Beaufort County, South Carolina, about forty miles from 
Savannah, in such position as to threaten the Savannah & Charleston 
Railroad. In fact, the road was within range of their artillery; but 
that force was not sufficient to oppose the exit of the Confederates 
from Savannah. General Hardee was defending Savannah with 
about ten thousand troops, mostly state militia. Admiral Dahlgren's 
fleet was off Tybee, Warsaw and Ossibaw Sounds, awaiting the ad- 
vent of General Sherman's army at Savannah. The fleet had supplies 
for the army. The Ogeechee River empties into Ossibaw Sound 
about twenty or twenty-five miles south of Savannah. The en- 
trance to the river, from Ossibaw Sound, was guarded by Fort 
McAllister, containing twenty-three cannon, en barbette, and one 
mortar, and manned by about two hundred and fifty Confeder- 
ates under the command of Major Anderson. Captain Duncan, 
one of General Howard's scouts, had passed down the Ogeechee 
River, in a canoe, and informed Admiral Dahlgren of General Sher- 
man's movements and situation. Such was the situation at night 
on the loth day of December. The indications were that a siege 
would be necessary to take the city. The matter of provisions 
for the army was likely to become serious very soon; in fact, it 
was even then causing much concern, a number of historians to 
the contrary, notwithstanding. So that, all in all, the situation 
was not at all free from anxiety and dangers. That energetic 
measures were immediately necessary no one doubted. They were 
taken. 

At daylight on the morning of the i ith, brisk skirmishing began 
all around the lines. A Federal battery was planted near that 
part of the lines occupied by the left wing of the Ninety-Third Illi- 



154 HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 

nois, and opened on the enemy, firing rather slowly. They replied 
quite rapidly, but without harm to us. At 8 o'clock a. m., the Third 
Division moved out for a change of position, our skirmishers 
being, left on the line. At noon, the right wing of the regiment went 
to the skirmish line and relieved the left wing. During the after- 
noon, there was some very hard skirmishing. Sergeant Elijah 
Vangilder, of Company H, was mortally wounded. He died on 
the 13th, at Station No. i, on the Gulf Railroad, and was buried 
there. Sergeant John F. Irey, of Company B, and Corporal Wil- 
liam J. Lafferty, of Company F, were also slightly wounded.- Re- 
maining until dark, the right wing was then withdrawn from the 
skirmish line, being relieved by a part of the Eleventh Iowa, of the 
Seventeenth Corps. At 8 o'clock p. m., the regiment moved about 
one mile to the rear, and there rejoined the division. The division 
then moved about six miles to the right, starting on the road opened 
by the Ninety-Third Illinois yesterday. On the 12th, starting at 
8 o'clock in the morning, the command marched six miles, and 
went into camp, at noon, at Station No. i, on the Gulf Railroad. 
It was sometimes called * Miller's Station," and sometimes "Miller's 
Plantation." It was eleven miles, by rail, a little west of south, from 
Savannah. On the march we passed a large grove of very fine 
palmettos, cabbage palms. The camp was within a half-mile of 
tide-water, and only a little farther from those immense rice fields, 
extending as far as eyes can reach, between this place and the 
mouth of the Ogeechee River. In sight of the camp there were 
many live oak and magnolia trees, as large and beautiful as any 
on earth. On the 13th, the regiment remained in camp. During 
the afternoon of that day, about 4 o'clock, the Second Division, 
(Gen. W. B. Hazen's), of the Fifteenth Corps, assaulted and captured 
Fort McAllister. The fort was on the right bank of the river, 
three or four miles above its mouth. General Hazen's division 
ciossed the river, above the fort, on a pontoon bridge, and then 
moved down and made the assault from the west and south. While 
the division was crossing the river. Generals Sherman and Howard 
v/ent to Dr. Cheves' rice mill, on the east bank of the river, from 
which they had a full view of the fort. The guns of the fort began, 
firing inland about noon, and General Hazen's skirmishers replied. 
Later, a signal message was sent to General Hazen, from the rice 
mill, to take the fort that day, if possible. He did it. The cannon 
in the fort, being en barbette, were of no utility for defense. The 
Federal loss was twenty-five killed, and one hundred and ten 
v/ounded. Of the enemy, forty were killed and wounded, and 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 155 

the rest of the garrison, with all t"he cannon, and supplies of am- 
munition and provisions for two months, were captured. The 
Confederates continued the fight after our troops entered the fort. 
The next day, the prisoners, on two tugs, were required to remove 
the torpedoes from the river. Admiral Dahlgren's flagship fol- 
lowed them up. That night, after the fort was taken, Generals 
Sherman and Howard went down the river, in a small boat, to 
the fort, and from thence below to a steamer, from the fleet, 
that came up the river during the battle to a point within sight 
of the army. The way was now open for the bringing of supplies 
for the army, and also heavy guns for use against Savannah. That 
night, there was rejoicing everywhere in the army. The capture 
of Savannah was assured, and that within a few days. And if 
only the avenue of retreat toward the northeast could be blocked, 
General Hardee and his whole force would also be captured. 
Everything now was bright enough, except that. 

From the 14th to the 20th, both days inclusive, the Ninety-Third 
Illinois remained in camp at Station No. i, on the Gulf Railroad. 
On the 14th, the Confederates somewhat contracted their lines 
around Savannah, but there was not much fighting. On the morn- 
ing of the 15th, there was considerable cannonading. The i6th 
was a quiet day all around the lines. Admiral Dahlgren's fleet 
was visible at Fort McAllister. 

On the 17th, General Sherman made demand for the surrender 
of Savannah. He offered General Hardee liberal terms in case 
he surrendered; but otherwise, he notified him, that harsher meas- 
ures would be resorted to, and told him plainly that he would 
make but little effort to restrain his army, ^'burning to avenge the 
great national wrong they attach to Savannah and other large 
cities, which have been so prominent in dragging our country 
into civil war." And he added: "I enclose you a copy of General 
Hood's demand for the surrender of the town of Resaca, to be 
used by you for what it is worth." That was a very pointed sug- 
gestion as to what might happen. General Hardee refused to 
surrender, because, he said, he still maintained his defensive lines, 
and was in communication with his superior officer. On the i8th, 
this command received rations from the fleet. On the morning of 
the 20th, General Sherman gave his army commanders orders to 
prepare for attack on the enemy's lines around the city, and 
started, by water, for Port Royal, to confer with General Foster and 
Admiral Dahlgren about measures necessary to close up the enemy's 
avenue of escape toward Charleston. But that night, General 



156 HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 

Hardee evacuated Savannah. And on the morning of the 21st, 
the Federal army took possession of the enemy's Hnes. General 
Sherman having returned up the Ogeechee River, early in the fore- 
noon, rode directly into the city of Savannah. That day, he an- 
nounced the termination of the campaign, and sent to President 
Lincoln a characteristic dispatch, as follows: *'I beg to present 
you, as a Christmas gift, the city of Savannah, with one hundred 
and fifty heavy guns and plenty of ammunition, and also about 
twenty-five thousand bales of cotton." President Lincoln replied: 
*'My Dear General Sherman: Many, many thanks for your 
Christmas gift. When you were about leaving Atlanta for the 
Atlantic coast, I was anxious, if not fearful; but, feeling that you 
were the better judge, and remembering that 'nothing risked, 
nothing gained,' I did not interfere. Now, the undertaking being 
a success, the honor is all yours; for I believe none of us went 
farther than to acquiesce. And, taking the work of General 
Thomas into the count, as it should be taken, it is indeed a great 
success. Not only does it afford the obvious and immediate mili- 
tary advantages, but, in showing the world that your army could 
be divided, putting the stronger part to an immediate new service, 
and yet leaving enough to vanquish the old opposing force of 
the whole — Hood's army — it brings those who sat in darkness to 
see a great light. But what next? I suppose it will be safer to 
leave General Grant and yourself to decide." 

On the 2ist, at 10 o'clock a. m., the Ninety-Third Illinois 
received orders to be ready to move at any moment. Starting at 
I o'clock p. m., the regiment marched thirteen miles, without a 
halt, and went into camp, in a beautiful grove of live-oaks, at 
5 o'clock p. m., at Fort No. 11, near the city of Savannah. And 
here, for this command, the great Georgia campaign, the "March 
to the Sea," ended. Since leaving Atlanta, the regiment had 
marched three hundred and twenty-three miles. The losses in 
battle were one man mortally wounded, and two men slightly 
wounded, as stated under date of the nth instant, being one and 
two-tenths per cent of the number engaged. 

The distance marched by this regiment, and also by our 
brigade and division, was somewhat greater than that traversed by 
the army generally. The cavalry, doubtless, traveled a consider- 
ably greater distance. The average distance marched by the Fif- 
teenth Army Corps was about three hundred miles. That marched 
by the Twentieth Corps was about two hundred and fifty-five 
miles. These corps were on the extreme flanks of the army, the 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 15T 

right and left, respectively. The distances marched by the Seven- 
teenth and Fourteenth Corps, on the right and left centers, respec- 
tively, fell proportionately between those made by the two other 
corps, that of the Seventeenth corps being less than that of the 
Fifteenth, and that of the Fourteenth being greater than that of 
the Twentieth. 

In the campaign just closed, together with the Atlanta cam- 
paign, this army had covered more than one-third of the State 
of Georgia. General Sherman estimated the damage to the state 
at one hundred millions of dollars, one-fifth of which had been 
of use to his army, and the remainder absolute waste and destruc- 
tion. He said: "This may seem a hard species of warfare, but 
it brings the sad realities of war home to those who have been 
directly or indirectly instrumental in involving us in its attendant 
calamities." It is beyond dispute, that the campaign was a most 
effective blow to the Confederacy. The quantities of supplies and 
forage captured and used by the army were enormous, almost 
beyond belief. And the destruction of property was even more 
fabulous. The statistics given in the reports of Generals Howard 
and Slocum are inserted here, as the only adequate means of 
showing how great they were. General Howard's report, for the 
right wing, contained statistics as follows : 

Negroes set free, (estimated number) 3,ooo 

Prisoners captured — ^By Fifteenth Army Corps : 

Commissioned officers 32 

Enlisted men 515 547 

By Seventeenth Army Corps : 

Commissioned officers 2 

Enlisted men 117 119 

Total prisoners captured . 666 

Escaped Federal prisoners: 

Commissioned officers 6 

Enlisted men 43 49 

Bales of cotton burned : 

At Ocmulgee 'Mills 1,500 

Spindles ^nd large amount of cotton 
cloth burned, value not known. 

Subsistence captured : Namely, bread- 
stuflfs, beef, sugar and coffee, at gov- 
ernment cost of rations at Louisville. . $283,202 



156 HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 

Hardee evacuated Savannah. And on the morning of the 21st, 
the Federal army took possession of the enemy's Hnes. General 
Sherman having returned up the Ogeechee River, early in the fore- 
noon, rode directly into the city of Savannah. That day, he an- 
nounced the termination of the campaign, and sent to President 
Lincoln a characteristic dispatch, as follows: **I beg to present 
you, as a Christmas gift, the city of Savannah, with one hundred 
and fifty heavy guns and plenty of ammunition, and also about 
twenty-five thousand bales of cotton/' President Lincoln replied: 
"My Dear General Sherman: Many, many thanks for your 
Christmas gift. When you were about leaving Atlanta for the 
Atlantic coast, I was anxious, if not fearful; but, feeling that you 
were the better judge, and remembering that 'nothing risked, 
nothing gained,' I did not interfere. Now, the undertaking being 
a success, the honor is all yours; for I believe none of us went 
farther than to acquiesce. And, taking the work of General 
Thomas into the count, as it should be taken, it is indeed a great 
success. Not only does it afford the obvious and immediate mili- 
tary advantages, but, in showing the world that your army could 
be divided, putting the stronger part to an immediate new service, 
and yet leaving enough to vanquish the old opposing force of 
the whole — Hood's army — it brings those who sat in darkness to 
see a great light. But what next? I suppose it will be safer to 
leave General Grant and yourself to decide." 

On the 2ist, at 10 o'clock a. m., the Ninety-Third Illinois 
received orders to be ready to move at any moment. Starting at 
I o'clock p. m., the regiment marched thirteen miles, without a 
halt, and went into camp, in a beautiful grove of live-oaks, at 
5 o'clock p. m., at Fort No. 11, near the city of Savannah. And 
here, for this command, the great Georgia campaign, the "March 
to the Sea," ended. Since leaving Atlanta, the regiment had 
marched three hundred and twenty-three miles. The losses in 
battle were one man mortally wounded, and two men slightly 
wounded, as stated under date of the nth instant, being one and 
two-tenths per cent of the number engaged. 

The distance marched by this regiment, and also by our 
brigade and division, was somewhat greater than that traversed by 
the army generally. The cavalry, doubtless, traveled a consider- 
ably greater distance. The average distance marched by the Fif- 
teenth Army Corps was about three hundred miles. That marched 
by the Twentieth Corps was about two hundred and fifty-five 
miles. These corps were on the extreme flanks of the army, the 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 157 

right and left, respectively. The distances marched by the Seven- 
teenth and Fourteenth Corps, on the right and left centers, respec- 
tively, fell proportionately between those made by the two other 
corps, that of the Seventeenth corps being less than that of the 
Fifteenth, and that of the Fourteenth being greater than that of 
the Twentieth. 

In the campaign just closed, together with the Atlanta cam- 
paign, this army had covered more than one- third of the State 
of Georgia. General Sherman estimated the damage to the state 
at one hundred millions of dollars, one-fifth of which had been 
of use to his army, and the remainder absolute waste and destruc- 
tion. He said: "This may seem a hard species of warfare, but 
it brings the sad realities of war home to those who have been 
directly or indirectly instrumental in involving us in its attendant 
calamities." It is beyond dispute, that the campaign was a most 
effective blow to the Confederacy. The quantities of supplies and 
forage captured and used by the army were enormous, almost 
beyond belief. And the destruction of property was even more 
fabulous. The statistics given in the reports of Generals Howard 
and Slocum are inserted here, as the only adequate means of 
showing how great they were. General Howard's report, for the 
right wing, contained statistics as follows: 

Negroes set free, (estimated number) 3,ooo 

Prisoners captured — -By Fifteenth Army Corps : 

Commissioned officers 32 

Enlisted men 515 547 

By Seventeenth Army Corps : 

Commissioned officers 2 

Enlisted men 117 119 

Total prisoners captured . 666 

Escaped Federal prisoners: 

Commissioned officers 6 

Enlisted men 43 49 

Bales of cotton burned : 

At Ocmulgee Mills 1,500 

Spindles ^nd large amount of cotton 
cloth burned, value not known. 

Subsistence captured : Namely, bread- 
stuffs, beef, sugar and coffee, at gov- 
ernment cost of rations at Louisville. . $283,202 



158 HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 

Command started from Atlanta with head 

cattle i,o<xi 

Took up as captured 10,500 

Consumed on the trip 9,000 

Balance on hand December 18, 1864. ... 2,500 

Horses captured: 

By the Fifteenth Army Corps 369 

By the Seventeenth Army Corps 562 931 

Mules captured: 

By the Fifteenth Army Corps 786 

By the Seventeenth Army Corps 1,064 i350 

Corn taken: 

By the Fifteenth Army Corps, lbs 2,500,000 

By the Seventeenth Army Corps, lbs ... . 2,000,000 4,500,000 

Fodder taken: 

By the Fifteenth Army Corps, lbs 2,500,000 

By the Seventeenth Army Corps, lbs ... . 2,000,000 4,500,000 

Miles of railroad destroyed 191 

General Slocum's report, for the left wing, contained statistics, 
as follows: 

It was thirty-four days from the date my command left Atlanta 
to the day supplies were received from the fleet. The total number 
of rations required during this period was 1,360,000. Of this 
amount there were issued by the Subsistence Department 440,900 
rations of bread, 142,473 rations of meat, 876,800 of coffee and tea, 
778,466 of sugar, 213,500 of soap, and 1,123,000 of salt. As the 
troops were well supplied at all times, if we deduct the above issues 
from the amount actually due the soldiers, we have the approximate 
quantities taken from the country, namely, rations of bread, 919,100; 
meat, 1,217,527; coffee, 483,200; sugar, 581,534; soap, 1,146,500; 
and salt, 237,000. The above is the actual saving to the government 
in issue of rations during the campaign, and it is probable that even 
more than the equivalent of the above supplies was obtained 
by the soldiers from the country. Four thousand and ninety (4,090) 
valuable horses and mules were captured during the march, and 
turned over to the Quartermaster's Department. Our transpor- 
tation was in far better condition on our arrival at Savannah than it 
was at the commencement of the campaign. 

The average number of horses and mules with my command, 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 159 

including those of the pontoon train and a part of the Michigan 
engineers, was fourteen thousand five hundred. We started from 
Atlanta with four days' grain in wagons. Estimating the amount 
fed the animals at the regulation allowance, and deducting the 
amount on hand on leaving Atlanta, I estimate the amount of grain 
taken from the country at five million pounds ; fodder, six million 
pounds; besides the forage consumed by the immense herds of cat- 
tle that were driven with the different columns. It is verv difficult 
to estimate the amount of damage done the enemy by the operations 
of the troops under my command. During the campaign one hun- 
dred and nineteen miles of railroad were thoroughly and effect- 
ually destroyed, scarcely a tie or rail, a bridge or culvert on the 
entire line being left in a condition to be of use again. At Rut- 
ledge, Madison, Eatonton, Milledgeville, Tennille and Davisboro, 
machine shops, turntables, depots, water-tanks, and much other 
valuable property was destroyed. The quantity of cotton destroyed 
is estimated by my subordinate commanders at seventeen thousand 
bales. A very large number of cotton gins and presses were also 
destroyed. 

Negro men, women and children joined the column at every 
mile of our march, many of them bringing horses and mules, 
which they cheerfully turned over to the officers of the Quarter- 
master's Department. I think at least fourteen thousand of these 
people joined the two columns at different points on the march; 
but many of them were too old and infirm, and others too young, to 
endure the fatigues of the march, and were therefore left in the 
rear. More than one-half of the above number, however, reached 
the coast with us. Many of the able-bodied men were transferred 
to the officers of the Quartermaster's and Subsistence Departments, 
and others were employed in the two corps as teamsters, cooks 
and servants. 

Those two reports make a showing that is really startHng. 
And yet, it is not to be doubted that the actual losses and damage 
to the enemy were largely in excess of the amounts given in the 
reports. 

But, of course. Savannah was the great prize. And it was 
gained without any great battle and consequent loss of life. Other 
than the assault on Fort McAllister, some heavy skirmishing was 
all. The total Federal casualties, killed, lo officers and 93 men, 
wounded, 24 officers and 404 men, and missing, i officer and 2^7 
men, making a total of 809, was remarkably small. While the 
casualties of the enemy probably reached nearly three thousand 



160 HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 

men, a large number of them were really deserters from the sink- 
ing ship, and willingly surrendered. It is not beHeved that the 
killed, on either side, exceeded fifty men. In this regard, consider- 
ing the important consequences of it, the campaign was without 
a parallel in history. Great in conception and great in execution. 
The conduct of the army while on this great march has been 
severely criticised in some quarters. And truth requires the admis- 
sion, that some wrongs and a few outrages were committed. 
General Sherman said, that his soldiers "did some things they 
ought not to have done." But those occurrences were not nearly 
so numerous as some critics have imagined. Negroes sometimes 
disclosed the hiding-places where fine jewels and ornaments, and 
gold watches and silver plate, and the like, were concealed, and 
they were taken. But the number of such instances and the 
quantities taken, were greatly exaggerated by a few wealthy people 
who suffered such losses; and, afterward, such losses were claimed 
by people who never had any such property. And the army was 
accused of other wrongs that never transpired at all. That the 
better and more humane sentiments of the American people had 
fixed a higher standard for the conduct of army operations than 
had ever before been established, is not to be denied. Neither can 
it be successfully asserted that the standard so fixed was too 
high. But certain it is, that a just standard, so fixed, should never 
have been used as a cloak for exaggeration and barefaced false- 
hood. General Sherman recognized the standard, and issued pos- 
itive and very explicit orders, for the prevention of all unlawful 
acts, and therein prescribed heavy penalties for violations thereof; 
and, it must be admitted, he and his subordinate commanders did 
all they could to enforce obedience to such orders, and to punish 
offenders against them. So that, while the wrongs that were 
actually perpetrated cannot be justified. General Sherman and his 
subordinate commanders must be exonerated of the responsibility 
for them. No disciplinary restrictions could have prevented aU 
wrongdoing. And it is safe to say, the number and character of 
the wrongs actually perpetrated was much less and milder than 
might have been expected under the circumstances. No European 
army would have done so little wrong, and no American army 
would have done less. No army was ever under better discipline 
than this one; otherwise, that march could not have been so 
promptly executed as it was. And when the army reached Savannah, 
its organization was thoroughly efficient. Every corps, and divi- 
sion, and brigade, and regiment, was well in hand, and ready for 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 161 

any duty. After the army entered, and while it occupied the city 
of Savannah, there was no breach of good discipline; nor were there 
then any complaints of bad discipline from any quarter. On that 
subject, in his report, General Sherman said: "The behavior of 
our troops in Savannah has been so manly, so quiet, so perfect, that 
I take it as the best evidence of discipline and true courage. Never 
was a hostile city, filled with women and children, occupied by 
a large army with less disorder, or more system, order and good 
government. The same general and generous spirit of confidence 
and good feeling pervades the army which it has ever afforded me 
especial pleasure to report on former occasions." Certainly, if 
the army had been so very bad on the march, it must have con- 
tained remarkably active and effective elements of a reformatory 
nature. The fact is, that it was not so very bad on the march, after 
all. If it had been, its reformation was, indeed, miraculous. 

It is matter of great satisfaction, now, to the members of the 
Ninety-Third Illinois that the discipline of the regiment was most 
excellent throughout the entire campaign, as it was, in fact, during 
its entire service. 

It remains to be added, of this campaign, that the most san- 
guine hopes of Generals Sherman and Grant, and the expressed 
belief of General TTiomas, were fully realized. The anxious doubts 
of many Northern people, as to the ultimate issue of it, were happily 
dispelled. Confederate leaders, and people who had confidently 
predicted its failure and the utter ruin of the army, were deeply dis- 
appointed and chagrined. Its great success filled their hearts and 
souls with deep grief and gloomy forebodings. As the capitulation 
of Vicksburg and the Union victory at Gettysburg, together, were 
the turning point of the war, this great victory was "the begin- 
ning of the end." And it was then plainly "written on the wall" 
that the end was not far away. It was the dawn of early peace. 



II 



CHAPTER X. 

THE CAMPAIGN OF THE CAROLINAS. 

After the conclusion of the Georgia campaign, from the 22d 
day of December, 1864, to the 2d day of January, 1865, both days 
inclusive, the Ninety-Third Illinois remained in camp near the 
city of Savannah. On the 24th day of December, 1864, the Fif- 
teenth Army Corps was reviewed by General Sherman, and the 
other corps on the days immediately following. This was at 
once interpreted to mean that the army would very soon enter 
upon another campaign. It was said, that by the capture of Savan- 
nah, the army had established a new base of operations more exten- 
sive and important than the capture of that city; and Special Field 
Orders, No. 119, was quoted. It was soon developed that this view 
of matters was correct. 

On the night of December 28th, a small blockade runner 
dropped into the port, its officers being ignorant of the fact that 
the city had changed hands. She was surrendered to the military 
authorities, and her cargo was turned over to the Chief Quarter- 
master of the army. She came directly from Nassau. Her cap^ 
tain. King, was greatly grieved. 

On January 3d, 1865, the Ninety-Third Illinois marched two 
miles, and went into camp in the city, reporting to General Easton, 
Chief Quartermaster of the Military Division of the Mississippi, 
as per orders, for guard and fatigue duty. The command continued 
on this duty until the i6th of that month, when it was relieved. 
But it still remained in camp in the city until the i8th of the 
month, inclusive. On the morning of the 7th of that month, Major 
Fisher and Captain Brown returned to the regiment. On the 
8th of the month, Maj. Gen. John A. Logan returned, and at once 
assumed command of the Fifteenth Army Corps. On the i6th 
of the month, Chaplain Charles M. Barnes, of the Ninety-Third 
Illinois, was mustered into service, to take effect from the 5th day 
of December, A. D. 1864. 

On December 6th, 1864, before any part of the army reached 
Savannah, General Grant had written to General Sherman, sug- 
gesting that General Sherman's army, after establishing a base 
on the coast, should be transferred to the James River, by ocean 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 163 

steamers, to cooperate with the Potomac Army against General 
Lee. General Sherman's original plan contemplated the contin- 
uance of his march, through the Carolinas, to Virginia, for the 
same purpose. But, after the capture of Fort McAllister, he at 
once began to plan for the carrying out of the instructions, or 
suggestions, of General Grant. In the delay incident to getting 
transportation. General Sherman determined to capture Savannah, 
and did so, as stated in the previous chapter. In the meantime, he 
had heard of the battle with General Hood's army at FrankHn, 
Tennessee, on November 30th, 1864, and also of General Hood's 
defeat at Nashville, Tennessee, on December 15th and i6th, 1864. 
The capture of Savannah so soon after General Hood's defeat, 
strongly illustrated to the outside world what had all along been 
clear to General Sherman's rhind, namely, the tremendous sig- 
nificance of the "March to the Sea." Immediately, out of a silence 
that had been intense, there was a universal shout of triumph, and 
of praise to General Sherman, doubly crowned victor by his own 
success at Savannah, and by the no less signal victory of his 
subordinate. General Thomas, at Nashville. In consideration of 
these events, and upon more mature consideration of the subject. 
General Grant seems to have changed his mind somewhat, and 
drifted toward General Sherman's original plan of marching to 
Virginia. And he so wrote to General Sherman on December 
18th, 1864. Although it is clear that General Sherman had formed 
that plan in his own mind, he had not communicated it to General 
Grant. That each of these great leaders reached the same conclu- 
sion, without conference between them, demonstrates the superior 
military genius of both. General Sherman was greatly pleased, 
and on December 24th, 1864, he fully communicated his plans for 
the campaign of the Carolinas to General Grant. General Grant 
replied, three days later, giving his assent, and making some sug- 
gestions. 

General Geary had been assigned to the command of the city 
of Savannah, and his division was on duty there. The mayor, R. D. 
Arnold, was left in the exercise of his functions, subject, however, 
to the military authorities. The defenses of the city were over- 
hauled and put into good condition. Some of the old Confederate 
forts were dismantled, and their heavy guns moved to Hilton Head, 
South Carolina, which was then in Federal possession. Orders 
were issued for the regulation of the internal trade of the state of 
Georgia. A national bank was established in Savannah. The 
city was to be left in the enjoyment of tranquillity, the people pur- 



164 HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 

suing their usual avocations. General Grover's division, of the 
Nineteenth Army Corps, had been taken from General Sheridan's 
army and brought to Savannah. This division now relieved General 
Geary's division, and took charge of the city; and the city and 
adjacent territory, in Federal possession, were made a part of 
General Foster's department for all military purposes. 

On January 19th, 1865, the army was ready to move, and the 
campaign of the Carolinas was inaugurated on that day, with 
Goldsboro, North Carolina, as the first objective point. The right 
and left wings of the army were substantially the same as on the 
Georgia campaign. One brigade, under the command of Colonel 
Spencer, had been added to General Kilpatrick's cavalry division. 

On January 19th, 1865, ^^ 8:30 o^clock in the morning, the 
Ninety-Third IlHnois moved out of* the city of Savannah, crossed 
the Savannah River, and started on the campaign. After marching 
about two miles, the whole command *'stuck in the mud." Rain, 
fell nearly all day. At dark, all efforts to proceed were abandoned, 
and shelter was found in the houses on a large plantation near by. 
On the morning of the 20th, we woke up, as we went to sleep the 
night before, **stuck in the mud." Everybody was **stuck;" and 
the waters were still rising, and overflowing the whole country in 
our front. It soon became evident that we could not advance^ 
Hence, after much hard work, pulling wagons out of the mud and 
building roads, the command returned to the city of Savannah. 
All were convinced that, in times of high water, at least, the "sacred 
soil of South Carolina" was a "hard road to travel." On the 21st 
and 22d, the regiment remained in camp at Savannah. Rain con- 
tinued to fall during the most of both days. 

General Howard, with the Seventeenth Corps, established a 
depot for supplies at Pocotaligo, near the mouth of PocotaHgo 
Creek, in communication, down Broad River, with Hilton Head. 
Three divisions of the Fifteenth Corps now followed the Seventeenth 
Corps. General Corse's division was cut off by the freshets, and 
moved with the left wing of the army. The "Union Causeway" 
was covered with water, four feet deep, after that division 
crossed it. 

On the 23d, the Ninety-Third Illinois embarked on the steam- 
ship "Mary A. Boardman," which, at 3 o'clock in the afternoon, 
steamed down the Savannah River, bound for Beaufort, South Caro- 
lina. We reached the open sea, then tolerably smooth, just before 
dark. About 7 o'clock p. m., the wind rose, blowing from the 
shore, and from that time until 11 o'clock p. m. the sea was quite 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 165 

rough. A large number of the regiment were seasick. The ship 
arrived off Beaufort at 2 o'clock that night, and anchored in Broad 
River. The command remained on board until morning. On the 
24th, the regiment disembarked from the steamship, and marched 
to camp, four miles west of the city, or town, of Beaufort. 
Lieutenant Ogan, of Company B, returned to the regiment that 
<lay. From the 25th to the 28th, both days inclusive, the command 
remained in camp. Teams and wagons were back at Savan- 
nah. On the 27th, Brevet Brig. Gen. William T. Clark, formerly 
Assistant Adjutant General of the Army of the Tennessee, was, by 
orders, assigned to the command of the First Brigade. He reached 
the brigade and assumed command on the 28th, evening. 

On January 26th, General Slocum, with the left wing of the 
army, went up the Savannah River to Sister's Ferry, and found that 
the river there was then three miles wide. He did not get across un- 
til the 7th day of February. Two divisions of the Twentieth Corps, 
•Generals Jackson's and Geary's, had crossed the river at Pureys- 
burg, several days earlier, and moved out to Hardeeville, on the 
Savannah & Charleston Railroad, and communicated with General 
Howard at Pocotaligo. As on the Georgia campaign he feigned 
on Macon and Augusta, and passed both by, so now, it was General 
Sherman's purpose to demonstrate against both Augusta and 
Charleston, and take neither. The scheme was bolder than the 
one he had just executed, because the enemy would now have time 
and opportunity to concentrate in his front. But his plan was to 
keep them divided, by causing them to hold fast to both Augusta 
and Charleston, as he believed they would do, the same as they 
"had to both Macon and Augusta before. General Sherman was 
with the right wing. The enemy's defensive line covering Charles- 
Ion, was on the Salkehatchie River. From January 25th, for about 
a week, the Seventeenth Corps threatened the railroad bridge over 
that stream, on the Savannah & Charleston line, as a feint on Charles- 
ton. While still maintaining the feint a few days later, the main 
body of the right wing, about February ist, moved in a northwest- 
erly course up the Salkehatchie River. 

On January 29th, between i and 5 o'clock p. m., the Ninety- 
Third Illinois marched twelve miles, in a northwesterly direction, 
and went into camp for the night. The roads were fair. On the 
^oth, starting at 5 o'clock a. m., the regiment, after marching six 
miles, joined the division, which had previously moved ahead. 
Between i and 5 o'clock that afternoon, the command marched 
five miles, and went into camp near McPhersonville. On the 31st, 



166 HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 

the division remained in camp. The Ninety-Third Illinois went 
two and a half miles to the front, to protect the Pioneer Corps 
while removing obstructions from the road. Found no enemy, and 
returned to camp. On the ist day of February, starting at 'r 
o'clock a. m., the regiment marched fifteen miles, and went into 
camp, at dark, at Hickory Hill, or McBrideville. There was some 
skirmishing at the head of the column. Nearly every house on 
the line of march was burned. They were dilapidated concerns, 
and all deserted. No citizen has been seen since leaving Beaufort. 
Country poor. On the 2d, starting at 11:15 o'clock a. m., the 
command marched twelve miles, and camped at 7 o'clock p. m. 
There was more skirmishing in front to-day. About dark, heavy 
cannonading was heard on the left. Probably the Twentieth Corps. 
On the 3d, starting at 7 o'clock a. m., the regiment marched five 
miles, and went into camp at Owen's Cross Roads. The First 
Brigade had the advance, and this command was second in the 
line of march. The Fifteenth Corps was the only one on that 
road. The advance regiment skirmished a little with the enemy,, 
but the Confederates quickly ran away. On the 4th, starting at 
6:15 o'clock a. m., the command marched ten miles, and camped, at 
3:30 o'clock p. m., near Buford's Bridge, over the Salkehatchie 
River. Left the swamps to-day, and found higher country and 
plenty of forage. The system of foraging is well organized. On 
the 5th, starting at 7 o'clock a. m., the regiment crossed the Salke- 
hatchie River, at Buford's Bridge, marched four miles, and went 
into camp at 10:30 o'clock a. m., and remained until the next 
morning. The weather was like May in Illinois. 

The Seventeenth Corps crossed the Salkehatchie River at 
River's Bridge, on the 3d, and the Fifteenth Corps crossed higher 
up, west-northwest, on the 4th and 5th. The crossing at River's 
Bridge was opposed by a brigade of the enemy. Generals Mower's 
and G. A. Smith's divisions crossed a swamp, three miles wide, 
below the bridge, wading through water from knee-deep to shoulder- 
deep, and then turned upon and whipped the Confederates at the 
bridge. The enemy's loss was not known, except that eighty-eight 
wounded were sent back to Pocotaligo. The enemy then fell back 
to their lines on the South Edisto River. 

On February 6th, starting at 6:30 o'clock a. m., the Ninety- 
Third Illinois marched nine miles. The Third Division had the 
advance, the Si^cond Brigade leading. This regiment crossed the 
north branch of the Salkehatchie River at 12:30 o'clock p. m. 
Confederate cavalry made slight opposition. Four companies of 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 167 

one of the regiments of the Second Brigade ousted them, losing 
one or two men, wounded, in the skirmish. One of the enemy 
was killed. The command camped two miles from the .river. A 
raw day. A little rain. On the 7th, starting at 9:50 o'clock a. m., 
the regiment marched five miles, and camped, at 2 o'clock p. m., 
near Bamberg, in Barnwell County, fourteen miles west-northwest 
of Branchville. The First and Second Divisions were in advance. 
The First Division reached the South Carolina Railroad, leading 
from Augusta to Charleston, at a point near Bamberg, this morn- 
ing. A portion of the railroad was destroyed, without opposition 
by the enemy. On the 8th, the command did not move camp. In 
the forenoon, the regiment went three miles west of Bamberg and 
destroyed three-eighths of a mile of railroad, and, in the afternoon, 
went three miles east of the town and destroyed one-eighth of a 
mile of the same road. 

At this time the right wing of the army destroyed the South 
Carolina Railroad from the South Edisto River to Blackville, a 
distance of about twenty miles. And about the same time, General 
Kilpatrick, with his cavalry division, went to Aiken, and made a 
feint against Augusta, Georgia. 

On the 9th, the Ninety-Third Illinois, between 6:45 o'clock a. m. 
and 12 o'clock m., marched eight miles, and went into camp a 
mile and a half west of Graham, in Barnwell County. A cold and 
disagreeable day. On the loth, at 6:30 o'clock a. m., the regiment 
marched five miles from camp, tore up fifteen rods of railroad 
and twisted the rails of a mile more, and returned to camp at 
3 o'clock p. m. At 4 o'clock p. m., the regiment marched in a 
northerly course, three miles, and at 5:30 o'clock p. m., went into 
camp a mile south of Binnakin's Bridge, over the South Edisto 
River. 

The left wing of the army reached Blackville on the loth, and 
destroyed the South Carolina Railroad from that place to Windsor, 
in Aiken County, a distance of about sixteen miles. 

On the II th, starting at 6:45 o'clock a. m., the regiment crossed 
South Edisto River, at Binnakin's Bridge, marched fifteen miles, 
and, at 5:15 o'clock p. m., went into camp at Poplar Springs. 

On this date, the whole army was well consolidated between 
Augusta and Charleston, and the forces of the enemy were divided. 
They were vigorously defending those two cities, although General 
Sherman had not the slightest intention of attacking either of them. 
He judged them correctly. 

On the 1 2th, the Ninety-Third Illinois, starting at 8 o'clock 



168 HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 

a. m., marched six miles, crossing the North Edisto River during 
the day, and camped, two miles beyond that stream, at lo o'clock 
p. m. A. brigade of the enemy opposed the crossing of the river. 
The Second Division did the small amount of fighting necessary to 
dislodge them. Considerable work was required to repair the 
bridge and road for the passage of the trains. 

On this date, the Seventeenth Corps appeared in front of 
Orangeburg, the county seat of the county of the same name, and 
at once swept the Confederates out of their intrenched position 
there, pushed them across the North Edisto River, and flanked 
them out of their fortifications there. After crossing the river, a 
portion of the railroad, leading from Orangeburg to Columbia, was 
destroyed. The left wing was moving on roads farther west, cov- 
ered on its left flank by General Kilpatrick's cavalry. 

On the 13th, the Ninety-Third Illinois, starting at 6:30 o'clock 
a. m., marched twenty miles, and camped at 3:45 o'clock p. m. 
Passed Orangeburg, a half mile to the right of us.. The Third Divi- 
sion had the advance. The weather was cold. Roads good. Since 
leaving the North Edisto River the country is more undulating. 
From several hills, over which we passed to-day, the Seventeenth 
Corps was seen on our right, and the Twentieth Corps on our left. 
There was a great deal of burning on all the roads. On the 14th, 
starting at 9 o'clock a. m., the regiment marched twelve miles, and 
camped at 3:15 o'clock p. m. Rain fell during the afternoon and 
evening. This side of Orangeburg we have been on the direct 
road to Columbia. On the 15th, starting at 9 o'clock a. m., the 
command marched four miles, and, having left the main road» 
reached the Congaree River at Bates' Ferry. There, we skirmished 
with a small squad of the enemy's cavalry, across the river, and 
drove them away. At 8 o'clock p. m., the division moved forward, 
leaving the Ninety-Third Illinois at the ferry, to picket the river, 
On the i6th, the regiment moved at 6 o'clock a. m., joined the 
division an hour later, when the whole division moved forward. 
Between 11 and 12 o'clock in the forenoon, we came in sight of 
the city of Columbia, the capital of the State. All of the right wing, 
certainly, and, it was said, the whole army, was maneuvered, in 
plain view of the city, in a large open field southwest from the 
city, on the opposite side of the Congaree River. The field was on 
a slope that gradually rose from the river and extended to the heav}' 
limber, nearly two miles away. Over this fine open field, that great 
mass of troops, infantry, artillery and cavalry, marched and counter- 
marched to positions, in such manner as produced one of the most 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 169 

brilliant and imposing spectacles ever witnessed in this country, 
or, perhaps, anywhere. Infantry, with colors flying, moved by 
the flank, as when on the march, in line of battle, and in solid 
columns, and en eschalon; and artillery, with banners waving, moved 
by the flank, in double columns, and in line, slowly, on a trot, and 
at the gallop; and cavalry, with flags and streamers fluttering, 
moved by the flank, in line of battle, in solid columns, squadrons, 
regiments, and brigades, walking, on a trot, and at the mad gallop; 
and all were moving, in all those different forms, and at different 
rates of speed, at the same time; and the entire field, the whole 
scene, was all the time in view, under any and every glance of 
the eyes. It was inspiring beyond description. The bands played 
patriotic airs, flags wildly waved and fluttered, and cheer upon 
cheer rose everywhere all over that vast field. It was most thrilling, 
magnificent and sublime! And it was all in plain view of the 
capital of South Carolina! Think of that! 

During tlie day, there was considerable skirmishing and can- 
nonading at different points along the rivers near the city. The 
confluence of the Saluda and French Broad rivers, just at the 
west side of the city, forms the Congaree River. A pontoon bridge 
was laid across the Saluda River at a point where it was about 
one hundred yards wide, on which the Ninety-Third Illinois crossed 
the river at midnight. The regiment, having marched fifteen miles, 
went into camp at 1:15 o'clock that night. 

On that day, the i6th, the two wings of the army, (if the left 
wing, as above indicated, was not actually in the open field south- 
west of the city), were practically united again. But they again 
immediately diverged, as we shall see. The left wing did not 
enter Columbia at all. About this time. General Sherman received 
a communication from General Wheeler, proposing that he would 
burn no more cotton, if General Sherman would burn no more 
liouses. General Sherman replied: '*I hope you will burn all the 
cotton, and save us the trouble. We don't want it, and it has 
proved a curse to our country. All you don't burn I will. As 
to private houses, occupied by peaceful families, my orders are not 
to molest or disturb them, and I think my orders are obeyed. 
Vacant houses, being of no use to anybody, I care little about, as 
the owners have thought them of no use to themselves." That 
•ended the correspondence on those two subjects. 

On the 17th, General Slocum, with the left wing of the army, 
crossed the Saluda River at Zion Church, and then the French 
Broad River, above Columbia, destroyed the bridges and railroad 



170 HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 

about Alston, and proceeded directly to Winnsboro, the county 
seat of Fairfield County, due north of Columbia, and about twenty- 
five miles distant. 

On the 17th, General Wood's division, of the Fifteenth Corps, 
was skirmishing with the enemy early in the morning. General 
Stone's brigade, of that division, crossed the French Broad River, in 
pontoon boats, before daylight that morning, and were covering the 
laying of the pontoon bridge across the river. The enemy made 
only a faint resistance. The bridge was laid but a short distance 
above Columbia, at a point where the river was about one hundred 
and seventy-five yards wide. Before 10 o'clock in the forenoon, 
after the bridge was laid, and while the troops of the Fifteenth 
Corps were crossing the river on it, the mayor of Columbia rode 
out and surrendered the city to General Stone, and he immediately 
moved his brigade into the city. Soon after. Generals Sherman and 
Howard crossed the river, on the pontoon bridge, and rode inta 
the capital city of South Carolina. They found everything quiet. 

At 2:30 o'clock p. m. that day, the Ninety-Third Illinois crossed 
the French Broad River, on the pontoon bridge, and marched into 
and through the city of Columbia, with colors flying. After hav- 
ing marched five miles, the regiment went into camp one mile east 
of the city. 

The city was, of course, plundered to some extent by foragers 
and stragglers, but not nearly to the extent claimed by some criticjv 
of the army. That night, the greater part of it was burned. That 
was a most terrible calamity, and a most terrific thing to witness. 
The heart of the army then, as well as the heart of humanity since, 
cried out in sympathy, but in vain. It made all shudder, while the 
city burned, to contemplate such possibilities of war. But, that 
the Federal army was responsible for it, none who were there then 
believed, nor has it ever been, nor can it be, so demonstrated. Much 
has been written, and more said, on that subject, and different and 
contrary opinions are still adhered to by fair and honest people. 
The probability is that the truth lies between the two extremes. 

What were the facts? Gen. Wade Hampton had ordered the 
rear guard of his Confederate cavalry, to burn all the cotton in 
the city before leaving there. The cotton was largely in the 
southern and southwestern portions of the city. There were small 
quantities scattered elsewhere through the city. The wind was 
blowing from the south and southwest all day, and during the last 
half of the afternoon it increased in strength until it became a gale, 
and so continued until nearly midnight. Thousands, who were 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 171 

there in and with the army, can now, still, well remember and testify 
to this. The Confederate rear guard piled the cotton bales in the 
streets, near the different places where they found them, cut the 
ropes and bagging that held the bales together, and set the cotton 
on fire. In the early part of the day, the wind carried burning cot- 
ton to the nearest buildings and caused them to take fire. Soon 
after General Stone, with his brigade, reached the city, there were 
a considerable number of fires, so ignited, in the southern and south- 
western parts of the city. The soldiers of that brigade, and others 
of General Wood's division, then arrived and arriving, assisted 
the citizens in subduing the flames. Before the middle of the 
afternoon, all the fires of any considerable consequence were extin- 
guished. But the burning cotton was still smoldering in the 
streets. As every one knows, who has^ had the benefit of observa- 
tion, it is very difficult to completely extinguish fire in cotton, 
and particularly in large quantities, when once well ignited. So 
that, while the flames were mostly, if not entirely, subdued, there 
was still a good deal of smoldering fire among the cotton. When 
the wind rose to a gale, later in the afternoon, this loose cotton was 
carried all over the city. It was blown through the streets, into 
the yards, lodged in the small trees and shrubbery and on the roofs 
of houses. It was everywhere. The main street in the city was 
ragged with tufts of cotton. Many of those tufts were partially 
blackened, showing that they had been on fire; and some of them 
were then smoking, showing that they were still on fire. Every 
man in the army who marched through the city of Columbia that 
day, can well remember what a gale of wind there was, and from 
what directions it came, and how it whirled and swirled through 
the city and carried those half-blackened tufts of cotton and other 
debris everywhere. Late in the afternoon, the fierce wind rekindled 
the flames in the smoldering piles of cotton, and in the larger 
bunches that had been carried away from the piles, and carried 
fire with them, and the flames were again communicated to the 
surrounding buildings. A little after dark, the fires began to 
spread, and by 9 o'clock in the evening it was a conflagration. 
It was not gotten under control until 4 o'clock the next morning. 
Generals Sherman, Howard, Logan, Wood, Stone, and many 
others, and General Wood's whole division, worked hard and faith- 
fully nearly all night, endeavoring to subdue the flames; and only 
succeeded in doing so after the wind subsided, and after the main 
part of the city had been destroyed. A small portion of the city was 
saved; but it was not much, compared with what was burned. 



172 HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 

Such was the origin and the cause for the rapid spreading of the 
great fire that destroyed the city of Columbia. There are very 
many reasons to believe it, and the writer has no doubt of it. 
The testimony of one's own eyes always induces conviction. But, 
while that is true, it is scarcely to be doubted, that, after the fire was 
started, and was well under headway, there were flames there that 
must have been kindled otherwise than as hereinbefore stated 
There were in the city, that night, a considerable number of rescued 
Federal prisoners, and about two hundred who had escaped from 
the cars while being conveyed from there to Qiarlotte, and who had 
returned to the city that day, beside a number of political prisoners 
who were released on the entrance of the army. All these had been 
confined there, and many of them had been abused and suffered 
indignities until they were full of vengeance. And it is not to be 
doubted that some of them obtained their revenge, that night, by 
spreading the flames, more or less, after the fire was under way. 
General Sherman, and Major Nichols, of his staff, both frankly 
admitted this. 

But General Sherman boldly charged the origin of the fire, and 
the responsibility for it, upon General Hampton, as being caused 
by the orders issued by him for the burning of the cotton by 
his rear guard. It is true, that General Hampton afterward said, 
that he gave a positive order that no cotton should be burned. 
And his word must be accepted to that extent. But he did not 
say, however, that none was fired. His order either reached his 
rear guard too late, after a former order had been given to bum 
it, or else it was fired in violation of his order that it should not 
be burned. Certain it is, that it had been fired before any Federal 
troops reached the city; and fired, too, by his rear guard. Numer- 
ous citizens said so then, and those who had suffered pecuniary 
losses in cotton severely denounced General Hampton and his 
soldiers for it. And that the Confederates were burning cotton, 
is clearly manifest from the correspondence on that subject between 
General Wheeler and General Sherman, which transpired only a 
few days before then. General Sherman said, very positively, that 
long before any public building was fired by his order, the whole 
city was swallowed by the conflagration. Mr. James McCarter, a 
prominent citizen and business man who lived there, fully exon- 
erated General Sherman from any responsibility for it. Major 
Nichols told the whole story about as it was, as nearly to the truth 
as any man could arrive at it. 

But, since it is not probable that the responsibility for it will ever 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 175 

be any more definitely fixed than it has heretofore been, further dis- 
cussion of the matter can be of but little, if any, practical utility, 
unless it might possibly modify the extreme views still held, in 
some quarters, regarding it. It was simply one of the possible 
results of war; and war, particularly internecine war, has always 
been, and will always be, attended by such calamities, events wholly 
unintended by any one res|)onsible for the conduct of affairs, but 
which, nevertheless, always shock the better elements of civiliza- 
tion, and cause all manner of bitterness and recrimination. And 
this calamity was much deplored, not only by the army there 
present, but by the people generally throughout the Northern States. 
Doubtless, it would have been more deeply deplored, had the suf- 
fering city been any other, Charleston alone excepted, than the 
capital city of South Carolina. There were some good people who 
then felt, and said, that the visitation, even had it been deliberately 
inflicted by the army as punishment,- was no more than adequate 
atonement for the treason of that state; but the better judgment was, 
and still is, that it was, even from that point of view, too severe upon 
those people, especially women and children, who were not respon- 
sible for the rebellion, nor leaders of it or in it, and who were, at all 
times, utterly powerless to avert it. That it was accompanied by 
only a very small loss of human life, was indeed a great consolation^ 
and about the only one, except that the army was not responsible 
for it. History has already fully acquitted General Sherman and 
his commanding generals and his army of that charge, which was 
then immediately made, with much bitterness and denunciation, by 
some Confederate leaders who were not there. And history will, 
no doubt, ultimately leave it, where it properly belongs, among the 
unpremeditated and unintended possible calamities of war. 

On the i8th and 19th, the Ninety-Third Illinois remained in 
camp. Many visited the ruins of the burned city. On the 19th, John 
Templeton, wagoner of Company G, was mortally wounded by the 
accidental explosion of shells. He died on the 25th, and was buried 
at Columbia. The explosion was caused by the dropping of a 
shell onto the hard road, at the river bank south of the city, while 
shells were being unloaded from wagons and thrown into the river, 
the shells having been taken from the Confederate armory. The 
shell that was dropped exploded, and that caused the explosion of 
three wagon-loads of shells then at the river bank and being dis- 
posed of as before stated. A captain and four men were instantly 
killed, and about twenty others wounded, some of them mortally. 
There were about thirty men engaged there. The captain and one 



174 HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 

or two of the men were literally blown away, so that no part of their 
bodies or clothing was to be found anywhere. They were mostly of 
the Sixty-Third Illinois. On the i8th and J9th, the arsenals, 
armories, machineshops, factories, railroad depots and warehouses 
and public buildings, that had escaped destruction in the conflagra- 
tion of the previous night, were all destroyed, under orders for that 
purpose. 

On the 20th, starting at 7:15 o'clock a. m., the Ninety-Third 
Illinois marched seventeen miles, on the road leading to Camden, 
the county seat of Kershaw County, and camped, at 5 o'clock p. m., 
at Muddy Springs. The day was fine, and the roads good. On 
the 2 1 St, starting at i o'clock p. m., the regiment marched seven- 
teen miles, and went into camp at 11 o'clock p. m. The country 
was barren, but the roads were good. Notice was received that no 
more hardtack would be issued until further orders. Everybody is 
mad to-night. On the 22d, starting at 8 o'clock a. m., the command 
marched twelve miles, and camped, at dark, at Peay's Ferry, on the 
Wateree River. The regiment was placed on guard at the crossing 
of the river, and also over a corral of '^picked up'* horses and mules. 
The brigade crossed the river. On the 23d, the regiment crossed 
the river, the Wateree, at 6 o'clock a. m., and marched fifteen miles 
during the day. Passing through Liberty Hill, a very pretty place, 
on the route, the command camped, at 3:15 o'clock p. m., near Flat 
Rock, in Kershaw County. Our brigade had the advance of the 
army to-day. We got plenty of forage. The country was hilly. 

After destroying the railroad from Columbia to Winnsboro, 
and burning the bridge over the Wateree River at Camden, the Fif- 
teenth Corps crossed that river at Peay's Ferry. 

On the 24th, starting at 8 o'clock a. m., the Ninety-Third Illi- 
nois marched fifteen miles, and camped, at 6 o'clock p. m., near 
West's Comers. Rain fell nearly all day. Foragers from depart- 
ment and corps headquarters, with some others, captured twenty 
or thirty wagons of a refugee train, with mules, horses and pro- 
visions. About 4 o'clock this afternoon, a rumor was started, prob- 
ably by foragers, that a large body of the enemy was moving upon 
us. It caused our trains to be closed up very quickly. Only a 
rumor. 

General Slocum, with the left wing, reached Winnsboro on 
the 2 1 St. On the 23d, the Twentieth Corps crossed the Catawba 
River, (one of the tributaries to the Wateree River), and General 
Kilpatrick's cavalry followed that night. Then those forces made 
a demonstration against Charlotte, North Carolina, to which place 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 175 

General Beauregard and the Confederate cavalry had retreated. 
General Cheatham's corps, of General Hood's old army, which had 
been cut ofif by the rapid movements of the left wing of our army, 
was also expected to reach there very soon. The Twentieth Corps 
waited, at Hanging Rock, until the Fourteenth Corps could cross 
the Catawaba River and reach that place. The waters of the river 
were greatly swollen by recent rains, which caused some delay. 
When the Fourteenth Corps reached the Twentieth, both moved 
directly to Cheraw, South Carolina. On the 22d. General Kilpat- 
rick reported to General Sherman, that eighteen of his men had been 
murdered by Gen. Wade Hampton's cavalry, and left in the road, 
with labels on them threatening a similar fate to all foragers. Gen- 
eral Sherman immediately replied, that such conduct left General 
Kilpatrick no alternative but retaliation, man for man; and added: 
*'Let it be done at once." He said it was pretty nonsense for 
Generals Wheeler and Beauregard, and such vain heroes, to talk 
about our warring against women and children, since they know 
we have a perfect war right to collect provisions and forage. He 
said: "I want foragers to be regulated and systematized, so as not 
to degenerate into common robbers ; but foragers, as such, to collect 
corn, bacon, beef, and such other products as we need, are as much 
entitled to our protection as skirmishers and flankers. If our for- 
agers commit excesses, punish them yourself, but never let an 
enemy judge between our men and the law." And he immediately 
notified General Hampton, that he had ordered retaliation, man 
for man, for those already murdered, and added: ''Of course you 
cannot question my right, *to forage on the country.' It is a war 
right as old as history. * * * Personally I regret the bitter 
feelings engendered by this war, but they are to be expected, and 
I simply allege that those who struck the first blow and made war 
inevitable, ought not in fairness to reproach us for the natural conse- 
quences. I merely assert our 'war right/ to forage, and my resolve 
to protect my foragers to the extent of life for life." That ended 
the matter. The killing of our foragers immediately ceased, 
although another incident of the kind transpired on the 25th, which 
was probably before, or about the time, General Hampton received 
General Sherman's communication. 

It seems appropriate, here, to say a few words relating to the 
foragers and foraging of General Sherman's army. And what is 
said, is applicable to the Georgia campaign, as well as to this one; 
although the system of foragers and foraging was much better 
organized and regulated during this campaign than during that 
through Georgia. That was by reason of experience. 



176 HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 

Just how no one ever knew, unless it was the result of some 
waggish remark, but, in some way, the foragers of the army came to 
be generally designated as "Sherman's Bummers;" and ultimately, 
that designation was applied to the whole army. Although the 
army, generally, were rather delighted than offended with or by the 
appellation, (because the foragers constituted no particular or sep- 
arate part of the army), nevertheless, it created a false impression 
outside of the army, by casting an imputation against the army of 
the character impHed from the literal meaning of the word **Bum- 
mer." Nothing could have been farther from the truth. In the 
first place, the orders relating to foragers and foraging were very 
strict, for the prevention of all excesses and wrongs, and severe 
penalties were prescribed, and enforced, for violations of them. 
And second, all foraging was done by details, sent out under com- 
mand of commissioned officers who were held responsible for the 
conduct of their men. And these details were not the same men, 
nor the same officers, every day ; but they were continually chang- 
ing from day to day, in the regular order of making details for all 
the different kinds of duty required; so that, any particular officer 
or man might only be on foraging duty once or twice during a cam- 
paign, or might not happen to be on that duty at all. And third, 
the foragers, being so taken from the body of the army, were no 
worse than the whole army. And the army was not made up of bad 
men. It was gathered from the great body of the people, and those 
who composed it were as good as the average of the people of the 
Northern States, and that was good enough. Hence, it follows, that 
the foragers of the army were mostly right-mmded men, educated 
and intelligent, and possessed of as many of the Christian virtues 
as were then prevalent in the country. While they were not all 
Christians, in the proper meaning of that term, and did not so claim 
or pretend, the most of them, no doubt, were much nearer to the 
"Golden Gate" than many of those who so freely criticised them, 
and accused them of sins they never committed. The business and 
duties in which they were engaged were fully recognized by the 
usages of civilized warfare, and they knew it; and they knew, too, 
where the proper limits were. They knew that such business and 
duties were being pursued and performed for the legitimate purpose 
of furnishing the army, in the enemy's country, with necessary pro- 
visions and forage, and other means, for the prosecution of success- 
ful warfare; and they knew, too, that, while pursuing that business 
and performing those duties, within proper limits, they were entitled 
to, and would have, all the protection that the army and the usages 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 177 

of war could give them. In other words, they were, each day, and 
every detail sent out, a part of the army, entitled to, and sure to 
have, all the protection which the usages of war accord to every 
soldier. This made them efficient and courageous. They marched 
and rode long distances; they endured hardships without complaint; 
they worked hard and faithfully to find and procure food and forage 
and horses and mules and other necessaries for the army; they 
fought the enemy whenever and wherever found, and many times 
without regard to disparity of numbers; and they behaved them- 
selves better than any other soldiers ever did, anywhere on earth, 
in the performance of like duties. They were efficient, untiring, 
faithful, honest and upright, brave and courageous soldiers, of 
credit to themselves, to the army, and to the Nation. 

On the 25th, the Ninety-Third Illinois remained in camp. 
Between 8 and 9 o'clock in the forenoon, a small force of Confed- 
erate cavalry made a dash upon the foraging party of our division^ 
while they were getting corn about a mile and a half from the camp. 
Joseph Hamilton, of Company I, of the Ninety-Third Illinois, was 
severely wounded, and two men were killed and one mortally 
wounded, of the Sixty-Third Illinois, and one man of the Eighteenth 
Wisconsin was wounded, and several men, of different regiments 
of the division, were captured, and four or five wagons, with their 
teams, were also captured. The Confederates were dressed in Fed- 
eral uniforms. The lieutenant, in command of the foraging party, 
rallied his men, after they were somewhat scattered by the sudden 
attack of the enemy, as the result of being completely surprised, 
by reason of the blue uniforms worn by the Confederates, and made 
a counter attack and charge with so much vigor that all the men, 
and everything else captured, were retaken, except the two men 
of the Sixty-Third Illinois who were killed. These two men had 
been captured, and were fairly in the hands of the enemy as prison- 
ers. When the Confederates were being so closely pressed that 
they were about to lose them, they deliberately shot and killed them. 
Two Confederates were captured by the foraging party. The 
division general, John E. Smith, on hearing the firing, went imme- 
diately to the scene of action, with two regiments. On the above 
state of facts being communicated to him, he instantly ordered, 
that the two captured Confederates be sljot, without any delay, in 
retaliation. His order was immediately executed. His action w^s 
reported to General Logan, the corps commander, and was approved 
by him, and afterward approved by General Howard, commander 
of the Army of the Tennessee, and by General Sherman. 
12 



178 HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 

On the 26th, starting at 10:30 o'clock a. m., the regiment 
marched thirteen miles, and camped a little before sunset, near 
Keily's Bridge, on Lynch Creek. The day was fine, and the roads 
good. On the 27th and 28th, the command remained in camp. 
Lynch Creek was all over the country, on account of heavy rains. 
A bridge across it, a half mile long, was being built by General 
Hazen's division. We were awaiting its completion. On March 
1st, the command still remained in camp, waiting for the completion 
of the bridge. On the 2d, the bridge was completed, and the regi- 
ment marched at 2 o'clock p. m., crossed Lynch Creek, and after 
proceeding eight miles, camped, at 11 o'clock p. m., at Kellysvi.le. 
It was a hard march, in fact, an awful time, in the mud and througli 
tne swamps. On the 3d, starting at 6 o'clock a. m., the regiment 
marched twenty-four miles, and went into camp, at dark, ten miles 
southwest of Cheraw, in Chesterfield County. At 9 130 o'clock a. m., 
while the column was halted, Lieut. Col. James Isaminger, of the 
Sixty-Third Hlinois, and a number of men of the Pioneer corps, 
were captured by a squad of Confederates, dressed in Federal 
uniforms, within three hundred yards of our advance, while they 
were engaged in clearing away some trees from the road, which the 
Confederates had felled therein. This was near Black Creek. The 
Confederates came out of and went back into a very deep ravine 
near the road. The trap was set, and the Pioneer corps fell into it. 
On the 4th, starting at 8:45 o'clock a. m., the regiment marched 
eleven miles, and went into camp, at 10 o'clock p. m., one mile north 
of Cheraw. The roads were very bad. We passed some very 
good Confederate fortifications at Thompson's Creek. We were 
short of rations that night, and received two boxes of hardtack for 
the regiment. On the 5th, starting at 6 o'clock a. m., the regiment 
marched five miles, crossed the Great Pedee River, on a pontoon 
bridge, and camped four miles from the river. On the 6th, the 
command remained in camp. On the 4th, First Lieut. Rufus H. 
Ford, of Company H, and fifteen mounted foragers of his com- 
pany, were sent on an expedition to Florence, in Darlington 
County. The whole expedition contained a little more than four 
hundred men. The purpose of it was, to surprise the place and 
release some Federal prisoners then confined there. They reached 
Florence, forty miles away, the next day, skirmished with the enemy 
for an hour and a half, and, finding the Confederate force too strong 
for them, withdrew from the undertaking and started back for the 
main body of the army. They reached camp on the 6th, at 4 o'clock 
p. m., having traversed the distance of eighty miles. It was a wonder 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 179 

that they were not all captured. On the 7th, starting at 9:30 o'clock 
a. m., the regiment marched ten miles, and camped on Crooked 
Creek, at 3:15 o'clock p. m. The day and roads were both very 
^ood. On the 8th, starting at 9 o'clock a. m., the command 
inarched twelve miles, and camped at 8 o'clock p. m., at Laurel Hill, 
North CaroHna, having crossed the state line early in the morning, 
about a mile from the camp of last night. This was a hard march, 
as the roads were very bad. Rain fell nearly all day; and the regi- 
ment made corduroy road from 3 o'clock p. m. until after dark. On 
the 9th, the regiment marched at 11 o'clock a. m. A little after 
noon, the trains all stopped in a quicksand swamp. And then — 
well, such a time! It was the worst day and night the command 
ever saw in the service. The swamp was about sixty rods wide. 
The horses and mules could do but little better than to get through 
it without their loads and wagons. The army wagons, instantly 
that they entered the swamp, dropped into the quicksand down to 
and over the axles; and it was all alike for a long distance above 
and below the line of the road. The mules laid down in the sand, 
in utter despair. Think of that! Mules in despair! But they 
were! Any situation was always considered discouraging long 
before that condition was reached. But when the army mule quit, 
"'laid down," absolutely gave it up, the situation was immediately 
considered desperate. And there we were, the extreme point of 
•desperation reached, within fifteen minutes after we found the edge 
of that swamp! Recent rains had fully prepared it. The all- 
absorbing question was, what was to be done? It was soon solved. 
That army was equal to any task. The horses and mules were 
removed from the ambulances and army wagons, and lead across 
to the opposite side of the swamp. All the ropes that could be 
found were gathered together and brought there. Ropes were 
fastened, on each side, to the forward axles of the ambulances, first, 
and they were dragged through the swamp, to the opposite side, by 
the men. Thirty or forty men on each rope were sufficient to take 
an ambulance through. After a few of them were taken through 
in that manner, the track was reduced to the consistency of thick 
mush, and as the process was continued the mush became thinner 
and thinner, and deeper and deeper, until the road was literally a 
canal filled with mud and slush. Then came "the tug of war " to 
^et the heavy army wagons through. Two hundred feet of rope on 
^ach side, and a hundred men, or more, on each rope, were required 
to take one of them through the canal. Each one of them sank 
lower and lower into the mire than the preceding one had done, 



180 HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 

until they really floated on the mud and slush. But one after 
another, during all that afternoon and until half past two o'clock 
that night, were dragged through and through and through that 
canal, until the last one was landed on the solid ground (not very 
solid either) beyond. Rain fell, in torrents, during the latter part of 
the afternoon. General Logan was there nearly all night, tugging at 
the ropes like a trojan, covered with mud from head to feet, and 
shouting: "Hee, o'hee!" Everybody else was there, too, doing the 
same thing, in the same condition, and shouting the same shout, all 
together. Through the rain, and in the mud and slush knee-deep, 
and deeper, it was a "long pull, and a strong pull, and a pull alt 
together," during the whole of the afternoon and nearly all the nighty 
without cessation, and with a will that was simply marvelous. You 
may talk of pluck, and endurance, and "sand!" There was never 
anything, anywhere, that exceeded that, particularly the "sand." 
There was "sand" everywhere. That is, "sand" and water — and, 
maybe, occasionally a little whiskey around the edges. But the 
train was taken through that swamp all right! And to finish the 
tribulations of that day, the command, two or three miles farther 
on, crossed Lumber Creek, waded it, waist-deep in water, swollen 
as it was by the rain of the afternoon. At the end of seven miles, 
marched during the day and night, camp was pitched, at half past 
three o'clock in the morning, at McCloud's plantation. On the 
loth, starting at 7:30 o'clock a. m., somewhat tired and sleepy, the 
regiment marched twelve miles, and camped, a little before dark, 
just north of Big Raft Swamp. On the nth, starting at 9 o'clock 
a. m., the command marched seven miles, and went into camp, a 
little before dark, after a most tedious march, at Nelson's Postoffice. 
On the I2th, starting at 9 o'clock a. m., the regiment marched thir- 
teen miles, and went into camp, at dark, two miles west of Fayette- 
ville, the county seat of Cumberland County. 

On the 3d and 4th days of March, the whole army reached Che- 
raw. In the meantime, Charleston had been evacuated by the enemy,, 
and many of the Confederate cannon had been taken from there to 
Cheraw. From this point the weather and roads were bad. There 
was much rain. The army, however, crossed the Great Pedee 
River, and marched to Fayetteville, North Carolina, reaching there 
on the nth and 12th of that month. On the night of the 9th, Gen- 
eral Kilpatrick's three brigades of cavalry were separated, guard- 
ing three different roads east of the Great Pedee River. General 
Hampton discovering this, made a rapid movement, with a portion 
of his cavalry force, and, at daylight the next morning, completely 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 181 

surprised Colonel Spencer's brigade, captured their artillery and 
camp, and also the house where General Kilpatrick and Colonel 
Spencer took quarters for the night. General Kilpatrick and 
Colonel Spencer escaped, en deshabille, through a rear door, rallied 
the brigade, and made a counter-attack upon the Confederate force, 
like tigers suddenly roused from sleep. They re-captured their 
artillery and camp, and everything else they had lost, except Gen- 
eral Ealpatrick's hat and some of his clothes, and drove the enemy 
from the field. 

At Fayetteville, the arsenal was destroyed. Every building 
connected with it was knocked down and burned, and every piece 
of machinery was broken up and utterly ruined. 

Up to this time General Sherman's strategy and rapid move- 
ments had been successful, and kept the enemy divided. But now. 
General Cheatham's corps had reached General Beauregard, Gen- 
eral Hardee's command was across Cape Fear River, just ahead of 
our army, and both were about to join the Confederate forces in 
North Carolina, under the command of Gen. Joseph E. Johnston, 
General Sherman's old-time antagonist. He had more cavalry than 
General Sherman, and a formidable force otherwise. General Sher- 
man had previously sent two scouts to Wilmington, then in Federal 
jKDSsession, and, on the 12th, the army tug, '"Donaldson," from Wil- 
mington, reached General Sherman at Fayetteville. He immedi- 
ately sent dispatches back, by this tug, to Generals Terry and 
Schofield, (the latter, with the Twenty-Third Army Corps, having 
been transferred from Tennessee to Newbern, North Carolina), to 
the effect that he would move on Goldsboro on the 15th instant. 
The commands of Generals Terry and Schofield were immedi- 
ately ordered to proceed to that place. General Sherman now 
became a little more cautious. 

. On the 13th, the Ninety-Third Illinois remained in camp. On 
the 14th, starting at 11:15 o'clock a. m., the regiment marched four 
miles, crossing Cape Fear River, and went into camp a half mile 
from it. On the 15th, starting at 3:15 o'clock p. m., the regiment 
marched eleven miles, and, at 7:15 o'clock p. m., went into camp near 
South River. Rain fell nearly all the afternoon. The command 
waded in water knee-deep. On the i6th, starting at 9 o'clock a. m., 
the regiment marched eight miles, crossing South River, and went 
into camp at 7 o'clock p. m. The roads were bad. 

The army crossed the Cape Fear River on two pontoon bridges. 
General Kilpatrick's cavalry was to move to and beyond Averysboro 
in advance of the left wing, and make a feint on Raleigh, North 



182 HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 

Carolina, the capital of the state. But the main army was to move 
for Goldsboro. Four divisions of the left wing were to follow the 
cavalry, and the other two divisions were to escort the trains. Gen- 
eral Sherman went with the left wing. The right wing moved on a 
more easterly route toward Goldsboro; but four divisions of the 
right wing were to move within supporting distance of the left wing, 
in order to reach it in case of a battle. Before reaching Averysboro, 
the left wing came upon General Hardee's forces, on the i6th, where 
the road branches toward Goldsboro, through Bentonville. It was 
necessary to take the position in order to reach the Goldsboro road, 
and also to continue the feint on Raleigh. General Ward's division, 
of the Twentieth Corps, in advance, developed the position of the 
enemy, and General Casey's brigade turned their left wing. Their 
line was broken, and three guns and two hundred and seventeen 
prisoners were captured. Advancing, General Ward's division 
then developed a second and stronger line of the enemy. General 
Jackson's division then came up on the right of General Ward's 
division, and the Fourteenth Corps on the left. General Kilpat- 
rick massed his cavalry on the right and felt forward for the Golds- 
boro road. One of his cavalry brigades reached the road, but was 
driven back by General McLaw's Confederate Division. Late in 
the afternoon, the whole Federal line advanced, and quickly drove 
the enemy behind their intrenchments. That night they retreated. 
The next day. General Ward's division advanced beyond Averys- 
boro, and then learned that General Hardee, with his army, had 
fallen back on Smithfield, the county seat of Johnston County. The 
Federal losses in the battle at Averysboro were, seventy-seven killed, 
and four hundred and seventy-seven wounded. The Confederate 
losses were, one hundred and eight kflled, five hundred and forty 
wounded, and two hundred and seventeen captured. The Goldsboro 
road was now in possession of the left wing, and, on the night of the 
i8th, that wing of the army encamped five miles from Bentonville 
and twenty-seven miles from Goldsboro. No further resistance to 
its progress was then expected. 

On the 17th, starting at 12 o'clock m., the Ninety-Third Illi- 
nois marched six miles, and camped, at sunset, at Jackson's Cross 
Roads. On the i8th, starting at 7 o'clock a. m., the regiment 
marched twelve miles, and went into camp, at 3 130 o'clock p. m., at 
Benton's Corners. This was a fine day. On the 19th, starting at 6 
o'clock a. m., the regiment marched fourteen miles, and went into 
camp, at dark, near Falling Creek. This, also, was a fine day. A 
heavy battle was in progress, nearly all day, on our left, at Benton- 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 183 

ville, in Johnston County. At times the cannonading was very 
rapid. The Fourteenth and Twentieth Corps were engaged. 
Reports in the evening were to the effect that the battle of the day 
resulted favorably to General Slocum's army, although at times it 
was a hard struggle against superior numbers. The right wing 
moved rapidly during the day, toward the Confederate left, and, in 
the evening, it was expected that we would get into the battle early 
the next morning. 

On the night of the i8th, the left wing of the army was only two 
miles away from the right wing. The right encamped on the road 
two miles farther south, and had orders to move to Goldsboro, via 
Tulling Creek Church. General Sherman joined the right wing 
that night. On the morning of the 19th, he was no more than six 
miles from General Slocum's army, when he heard artillery firing 
on the left. One of General Slocum's staff officers soon reported to 
General Sherman, that General Carlin's division, of the Fourteenth 
Corps, had met General Debbreirs Confederate cavalry, and was 
driving them easily. Shortly after, others of General Slocum's staff 
reported to General Sherman, that General Slocum had developed 
the whole of General Johnston's army, near Bentonville, and that a 
battle was on. General Johnston had about twenty thousand infan- 
try and about five thousand cavalry. He made a most vigorous 
attack upon the left wing of the Federal army. Two of General 
Carlin's brigades were driven back, and three of his cannon were 
captured, as the result of the first onset. General Slocum, fully 
aware of the threatening danger, promptly brought up all his avail- 
able forces, hastily constructed light barricades in the timber, and 
at once assumed the defensive, knowing that General Sherman 
would hasten the right wing to his assistance. General Johnston 
fought his army with considerable desperation, making six or seven 
charges upon Gen. Jeflf. C. Davis' corps, the Fourteenth, in the open 
timber. But they were all unsuccessful. After the first repulse of 
General Carlin's two brigades, the corps could not be moved back 
another inch. It was planted to stay. Later in the day, portions 
of the Twentieth Corps came to the battlefield in the same obstinate 
mood, and would not recede an inch after they reached there. Time 
and again General Johnston's lines and charging columns were 
broken and dashed to pieces against those invincible and immovable 
lines of western veterans and western pluck. At no time during the 
day was there more than four divisions of the left wing engaged, and 
during the early part of the battle there were only two divisions. 
The third division reached the battlefield before noon, and the 



184 HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 

fourth between two and three o'clock in the afternoon. The upshot 
of the fighting was, that General Johnston, with his whole army, was 
unable, in a half day, to drive two divisions, one-third of the left 
wing, from their position in an almost open field, and was not able, 
in a whole day, to defeat four divisions, two-thirds of the left wing, 
in an open field fight. What hope could he have entertained of 
success as against the whole of that wing, to say nothing of a battle 
against the united army? And the next day, if he had fought at all., 
he would have had to fight the entire army. 

While General Hardee was fighting at Averysboro, General 
Johnston concentrated his army at Smithfield, where General Har- 
dee joined him, and immediately made this rapid movement against 
General Slocum's army, the left wing, intending to crush it before it 
could be reinforced by the right wing. But his reckonings were 
erroneous, and he failed. No part of that army could be so easily 
crushed. 

During the night of the 19th, General Slocum got his wagon 
train up, and the two divisions that were with it, and General Hazen's 
division, of the Fifteenth Corps and of the right wing, reached him. 
These, on the morning of the 20th, made his position absolutely safe 
and impregnable. General Johnston could now only hope to suc- 
ceed in his designs by putting his whole army between General Sher- 
man's two wings. This he did not have the courage to do, and his 
judgment was correct. Under the circumstances, very soon devel- 
oped, it would have ruined him. 

On the 20th, the Ninety-Third Illinois marched, at 5 130 o'clock 
in the morning, prepared for battle. After moving a half mile, the 
brigade was massed in column by regiments. At 7:15 o'clock a. m., 
the command moved forward about a mile, and. was then halted. 
Our course up to this time had been due north. At 8:10 o'clock 
a. m., the march was continued, but the course was now directly 
west. The command halted at 12:30 p. m. There was lively skir- 
mishing then in our immediate front. The brigade went into line 
of battle, in reserve. At 4 o'clock p. m., the whole Fifteenth Corps, 
and part of the Seventeenth, were close to the front, and ready for 
battle. The First and Fourth Divisions, of the Fifteenth Corps, 
were in the advance, skirmishing with the enemy. Just at dark, the 
Ninety-Third Illinois, with the brigade, moved a half mile to the 
left, and bivouacked for the night. The distance marched during 
the day was eleven miles. The camp was full of rumors. 

During the battle on the 19th, General Logan's corps, the 
Fifteenth, rapidly approached Bentonville, without meeting much 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 185 

resistance, and compelled General Johnston to refuse his left 
flank, and intrench. So that, on the 20th, General Johnston was 
put upon the defensive, with three of General Sherman's army corps 
in his front. It was not General Sherman's purpose to fight a battle 
here, and hence, that day, he simply held General Johnston's army 
where it was. General Johnston's flanks were well protected by 
swamps, and he made very strong intrenchments in his front on the 
night of the 19th, after the battle. 

On the 2 1 St, skirmishing began early in the morning; in fact, 
it had continued nearly all night. At 12:30 o'clock p. m., the Ninety- 
Third Illinois, and the brigade, moved nearly a mile, to the left, and 
went into camp. Skirmishing continued all the day; and a part of 
the time it was quite lively. Between 8 and 10 o'clock p. m., it was 
very heavy. 

On the 2 1 St, General Schofield's corps reached Goldsboro, with 
l)Ut little opposition, and General Terry's command connected with 
the Seventeenth Army Corps, at Cox's Bridge, on the Neuse River. 
The Federal lines then reached from Goldsboro to Bentonville, and 
the entire army contained one hundred thousand men. General 
Johnston, fearing that his retreat might soon be cut off, as it would 
have been, had he remained, withdrew his army to Smithfield, on the 
north side of the Neuse River. 

The Federal losses at the battle of Bentonville were, one hun- 
dred and ninety-one killed, eleven hundred and sixty-eight wounded, 
and two hundred and eighty-seven missing. The Confederate 
losses were, two hundred and sixty-seven killed, twelve hundred 
wounded, and sixteen hundred and twenty-five missing. 

On the 22d, the Ninety-Third Illinois remained in camp. Early 
in the morning it was discovered there was no enemy in our front. 
They withdrew about 3 o'clock in the morning, behind Mill Creek. 
The First Division, of the Fifteenth Corps, pressed them so closely 
that the bridge was saved. Many of our regiment visited the Con- 
federate fortifications during the day. On the 23d, starting at 7 130 
o'clock a. m., the regiment marched nine miles, and went into camp, 
at 3:30 o'clock p. m., near Falling Creek, in Lenoir County. This 
was a very windy and disagreeable day. On the 24th, starting at 
7 o'clock a. m., the regiment marched thirteen miles, and, at 4 
o'clock p. m., went into camp one mile and a half east of Goldsboro, 
North Carolina. And here, and on this day, another great cam- 
paign was ended. 

From the date of its departure from Savannah to this date, 
inclusive, the Ninety-Third Illinois marched four hundred and 



186 HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 

ninety-five miles, and moved by steamship sixty-two miles; making 
a total distance of five hundred and fifty-seven miles. On February 
25th, one man was wounded, and that was the only casualty in the 
regiment during the campaign, being only four-tenths of one per 
cent of the number engaged. 

The objective point of the campaign was now reached, namely, 
the possession of Goldsboro, North Carolina, with its two railroads, 
leading to Wilmington and Beaufort, North Carolina. The whole 
of this immense army, one hundred thousand strong, was now con- 
centrated at Goldsboro, in perfect communication with Newbem 
and Morehead City, North Carolina, and the campaign was ended. 
It was great! 



CHAPTER XI. 

GENERAL JOHNSTON'S SURRENDER. 

After the battle of Bentonville, General Johnston's army was 
increased until it contained between forty and fifty thousand men; 
and with this army he at once took up defensive positions covering' 
Raleigh, North Carolina, the capital. And General Sherman imme- 
diately began the work of reorganizing his army and accumulating 
sufficient supplies, of clothing and provisions, for his next campaign. 
This would require at least two weeks' time, or a little more, and, 
therefore, he fixed the loth day of April for his next movement. 
General Howard's army, the Army of the Tennessee, remained, as 
before, under that title. General Slocum's army was continued as 
before, but it was now called the Army of Georgia. The Tenth and 
Twenty-Third Corps were united into one army, and called the 
Army of the Ohio, under command of General Schofield. The 
cavalry was somewhat increased, but remained under command of 
General Kilpatrick. General Sherman's plan, (which had been 
agreed upon between him and General Grant), was, to make a 
feint on Raleigh and a strong demonstration against General John- 
ston's army, and then, passing both by, move his army straight to 
Burkesville, in Nottoway County, Virginia, nearly due west from 
Petersburg, and about forty-five miles distant therefrom. This 
would place General Sherman's army on the left of that of General 
Grant, and between the two armies of Generals Lee and Johnston, 
and about twenty-five miles west of a direct line between Richmond 
and Raleigh. His base was to be Norfolk, Virginia, with which he 
would communicate by way of the Chowan River and Albemarle 
Sound. From that position General Sherman's army might coop- 
erate with that of General Grant, against Richmond, or, it could 
strike in any other direction that probable exigencies might re- 
quire. The army w^as fully prepared to move on the loth of April, 
as intended. 

But, in the meantime, events were moving very rapidly, and 
plans were necessarily changed with equal rapidity. In fact, it 
might be said, that new plans were made and changed, or wholly 
abandoned, almost daily. Prior to the loth of April, Mobile, Ala- 
bama, had fallen; General Wilson, with his cavalry, had taken 
Selma, Alabama, and was well on his way to Montgomery ; General 



188 HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 

Stoneman, with his cavalry, had destroyed the railroads west and 
southwest of Lynchburg, Virginia, and all along through and 
between Greensboro and Salisbury, North Carolina, and had 
reached the Catawba River; Petersburg and Richmond had been 
abandoned, and General Lee's Confederate Army of Northern Vir- 
ginia had been beaten and captured. On the Sth, General Grant 
warned General Sherman, that General Lee would attempt to reach 
Danville, Virginia, with his army, and urged him to move on Gen- 
eral Johnston at once. "Rebel armies now," he said, "are the only 
strategic points to strike at." Hence, instead of making a feint 
on Raleigh, General Sherman, on the loth of April, moved directly 
upon the place, with the purpose of fighting a battle with General 
Johnston's army, if he should conclude to stand in defense of the 
capital of the State. 

General Johnston, of course, had heard of the surrender of 
General Lee's army, and at once recognized the fact that that event 
carried with it the termination of the war; and, at the same time, he 
fully realized that his army was wholly unable to cope with the 
immense army of General Sherman in open battle. Therefore, as 
soon as General Sherman moved against him, he withdrew his 
army from the defense of Raleigh, and retreated toward the north- 
west. How far he could go, in that direction, before his progress 
would be blocked, was extremely problematical with him, and he 
knew that General Sherman had already taken steps to cut off his 
retreat toward the south; and he also knew that General Sherman 
had nothing whatever to do, now, but to take care of him, and get 
him; and he was extremely suspicious that he would do both very 
soon. And here we leave the general situation, for a time, to trace 
the history of our regiment down to the same point. The army 
moved on the loth of April. 

From the 25th to the 31st of March, 1865, both days inclusive, 
the Ninety-Third Illinois was in camp at Goldsboro. The regiment 
had a splendid camp, as good as any during its service. On the 
28th, Adjutant H. M. Trimble was detached from the regiment, by 
orders, to serve as Acting Assistant Adjutant General of the First 
Brigade, Third Division, Fifteenth Army Corps. April ist to 9th, 
both days inclusive, the command still remained in camp. On the 
Sth, Sergt. Maj. A. M. Trimble started home on sick furlough. 
During the period the regiment was at Goldsboro, strong forti- 
fications were constructed, miles of them, all around the place, this 
regiment assisting. 

On the loth of April, 1865, the Ninety-Third Illinois, starting 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 18^ 

at II o'clock a. m., marched fifteen miles, and went into camp, at 
midnight, near Pikeville, in Wayne County, North Carolina, the 
same county in which Goldsboro is situated. Rain fell nearly all 
day, and the roads were bad. On the nth, starting at lo o'clock 
a. m., the regiment marched twelve miles, and again camped at 
midnight, near Lowell Factory. The roads were still bad. The 
brigade built four miles of corduroy. On the 12th, starting at 6:15 
o'clock a. m., the regiment marched thirteen miles, and camped, at 
3 o'clock p. m., near Princeville. The Third Division had the 
advance. The day was warm. During the day, official informa- 
tion was received, that General Lee had surrendered his army to 
General Grant, on the 9th instant, near Appomattox Courthouse, 
Virginia. It caused great enthusiasm throughout the army. From 
that time, during the remainder of the day, there was continual 
shouting and cheering until the command went into camp, and, in 
fact, until night. On the 13th, starting at 5:15 o'clock a. m., the 
regfiment marched sixteen miles, and went into camp, at 3:30 
o'clock p. m., near Hilton's Bridge, or Neuse Mills. The day was 
fine, and the roads were good. The country was undulating, and as 
fine as any we had seen in the South. Our brigade was the rear of 
the division in the line of march. 

On this day, the advance of the army entered and took posses- 
sion of the city of Raleigh, with but little opposition, General John- 
ston's army having retreated toward the northwest, as heretofore 
stated; 

On the 14th, the Ninety-Third Illinois, starting at 7:30 o'clock 
a. m., marched six miles, to and through Raleigh, and went into 
camp, at i o'clock p. m., one mile from the city. The Fifteenth 
Army Corps was reviewed by General Sherman, in front of the 
State Capitol, as it passed through the city. Our brigade, and, 
in fact, the whole corps, marched well, and made a very fine 
display, as the entire army were feeling well and very jubilant. 

On this day, General Johnston sent a flag of truce to General 
Sherman, asking for an armistice, and for a statement of the best 
terms on which he could surrender his army. General Sherman 
replied, offering him the same terms upon which General Lee's 
army surrendered to General Grant, on the 9th instant, near Appo- 
mattox Court House, Virginia. Arrangements were then made for 
a conference, to be held on the 17th. 

On the 15th, the Ninety-Third Illinois, starting at 6:30 o'clock 
a. m., marched about two miles, in a northwesterly course, being 
ti*ain guard on one of the flanks of the division train, and was 



UK) HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 

then halted. It was soon reported, and generally believed, that 
General Johnston was about to surrender his army. It was now 
evident that he must surrender or fight very soon. At 10:30 
o'clock a. m., this regiment returned to and occupied the same 
camp from which it had marched in the early mornng. On the 
1 6th, the regiment remained in camp. The whole brigade attended 
church at General Howard's headquarters. Negotiations were 
in progress between Generals .Sherman and Johnston for the sur- 
render of the Confederate army. It was no longer doubted by 
any one that the end of the war was very near at hand. On the 17th, 
the regiment still remained in camp. The day was most beautiful 
and pleasant. 

On this day, Generals Sherman and Johnston met and held a 
conference, relating to the surrender of the Confederate army, about 
five miles from Durham, a station on the Raleigh & Greens- 
boro Railroad, located about twenty-three miles northwest of 
Raleigh. General Sherman, and his staff, went out under a flag 
of truce, according to an arrangement previously made. These 
two great generals (General Johnston was one of the greatest, if 
not the greatest, on the Confederate side) had never met before, 
cilthough they had confronted each other, for two years, on many 
battlefields. General Johnston freely admitted that the war was 
practically ended, and also that the terms of surrender granted 
to General Lee's army were magnanimous. But, still, he begged 
for something more than merely military terms. General Sherman 
plainly informed him, that he could not, for want of authority, 
enter the domain of political terms, and General Johnston 
conceded that he was correct in that; but he still insisted upon 
something more than was granted to General Lee's army. Under 
these conditions, no agreement was reached that day, but arrange- 
ments were made for further conference the next day. During 
the day, it was reported that Generals Forrest and Rhoddy had 
surrendered fifteen thousand Confederate cavalry to General Wilson, 
in Alabama. 

On that day, the 17th, news came of the terrible crimes at 
Washington: that President Lincoln had been assassinated, Sec- 
retary Seward stabbed and left as dead, and that Frederick Seward 
had been seriously wounded also. Profound silence and deep 
gloom at once fell upon and enveloped the army. No one could find 
words bitter enough or curses deep enough for the perpetrators of 
those crimes, and, hence, all were silent. The silence was painful. 
In whispers, on every hand, it was asked: "Are murder and assassi- 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 191 

nation, now, to follow the war? Is the history of the barbarous past 
to be repeated?" And, "May God forbid!'' was in every heart, 
and on many tongues. But, it cannot be doubted, had that 
army been led to battle against the enemy that day, it would 
liave bathed the field in blood, without any compunctions of con- 
science then, nor stopped the slaughter until the "last armed 
foe expired." When sober judgment returned, there came with 
it an abiding faith, that the broad sunlight of peace, which the 
angel of hope so lately promised, was still very near at hand. 
And so it was proven. But all the Nation, and the civilized 
world, were in tears at the tomb of the great and good President, 
the martyred Lincoln. His blood had been added to the immense 
sacrifices already before then made for the unity of these states; 
his pure soul, that bespoke "charity for all, and malice toward 
none,'' had joined the great host that had gone before, through 
the flames and crash of battle; and his peerless crown of glory, 
with theirs, was blazing in humanity's sky, with fadeless and 
^•nduring light, to teach the world, in all time to come, true patriot- 
ism, pure and unselfish love of country. Malice should have ended 
there. And may be, in the ways of Providence, it did then beg^n 
to die. If, sometimes, it has still prevailed, yet, nevertheless, since 
then, charity has risen to grander heights than ever before, and may 
yet, let us hope, be triumphant over all. 

From the i8th to the 28th, both days inclusive, the Ninety- 
Third Illinois remained in camp at Raleigh. The army was wait- 
ing patiently, more patiently than might have been expected, for 
the end. 

On the i8th, Generals Sherman and Johnston held another 
conference. Mr. Breckenridge, who was the Secretar>^ of State of 
the Confederacy, was thrust into this conference, by the persistency 
of General Johnston, as a Major General. He was a Major Gen- 
eral, but really such only in name. General Johnston desired his 
presence for the purpose of securing the insertion of some political 
terms in the articles of capitulation, for his army, and even beyond 
that, although General Sherman had previously told him that he 
had no authority to go beyond military terms, and General John- 
ston had admitted that fact. But Mr. Breckenridge was there. 
A memorandum agreement was then and there made and entered 
into, between Generals Sherman and Johnston, whereby the con- 
tending armies were to maintain the status quo then existing until 
one of the commanding Generals should give the other forty- 
^ight hours' notice of the breaking of the armistice, and embodying 



Id2 HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 

terms of capitulation, which were to be submitted to the Federal 
Government, at Washington, and to the proper authorities of the 
Confederacy, for ratification or rejection. That was the much talked 
of memorandum, that caused General Sherman to be so severely 
criticised at the time and immediately afterward. It is not deemed 
necessary to repeat its terms here. The Government, at Washing- 
ton, was in no mood to approve it. No one there, excepting General 
Grant, was even calm about it. And although he did not approve 
of it, he neither denounced nor criticised General Sherman on 
account of it. The result was, that the memorandum was not 
approved by the Government. General Grant, having offered his 
services for the purpose, was authorized to proceed to Raleigh, 
immediately, to communicate the action of the Government to 
General Sherman. Having reached Morehead City, on the evening 
of the 23d, he communicated, from there, with General Sherman, 
informing him of the result. General Sherman immediately gave 
General Johnston notice of the termination of the truce, informed 
him that their memorandum agreement had been disapproved, and 
demanded the surrender of his army on the same terms that had been 
granted to General Lee's army. Without the slightest ill-feeling, on 
account of the rejection of the memorandum, General Shennan at 
once returned to these terms, which were the same he had offered 
General Johnston in the first instance. And General Grant was 
so confident of General Sherman's attitude, and also of his ability 
to manage the affair, that he kept himself entirely in the back- 
ground, so that General Johnston did not know of his presence 
in Raleigh until after he had surrendered his army. That was not 
only characteristic of General Grant, but it was in harmony with 
the very cordial relations that had always existed between these 
two greatest Generals developed by the war. General Sherman 
wrote to Mr. Stanton, Secretary of War, on the 25th, frankly 
admitting his "folly in embracing in a military convention any 
civil matters," but he added: "I had flattered myself that, by four 
years of patient, unremitting, and successful labor, I deserved no 
reminder such as is contained in the last paragraph of your letter 
to General Grant." But it was quite sufficient compensation to 
General Sherman, that General Grant did not comply with the last 
paragraph of that letter. 

On the 26th day of April, A. D. 1865, the army of General 
Johnston was surrendered to General Sherman, in pursuance of 
his last demand therefor, and on the terms offered therein. The 
surrender included all of the Confederate troops east of the Chat- 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 193 

tahoochie River, estimated at about fifty thousand men. But the 
lists, when made out, only showed about thirty thousand men, 
many having abandoned their commands, there and elsewhere, 
during the time negotiations were in progress. And only about 
ten thousand small arms were surrendered by the Confederates. 
The final articles of capitulation were concluded and executed at 
Bennett's house, near Durham Station. Thus, the greatest civil 
war in the world's history was practically ended. All the plans 
executed by General Sherman, and his great army, from the date 
when they left Atlanta, Georgia, in fact, from the beginning of the 
Atlanta campaign, on the first day of May, A.D. 1864, were now fully 
justified by complete success, the ripe fruit of final triumphant 
victory for the Union. And, although, on the 4th day of May, 
Gen. Dick Taylor surrendered to General Canby all other Confed- 
erate troops east of the Mississippi River, and on the 26th day of 
May, Gen. Kirby Smith surrendered his Confederate army, yet, 
nevertheless, the war was practically ended when General Johns- 
ton surrendered his army to General Sherman on the 26th day of 
April, A. D. 1865. 

In his letter to General Grant, dated on the i8th of April, 
in which he transmitted the celebrated memorandum agreement, 
General Sherman said: "The question of finance is now the chief 
one, and every soldier and officer not needed ought to go home 
at once. I would like to be able to begin the march north by 
May 1st." He did begin it on the morning of April 29th, in less 
than thred full days after the surrender of General Johnston's army, 
and two full days prior to the date fixed in his letter to General 
Grant. 

On the 26th day of April, orders were issued, from the head- 
quarters of the Fifteenth Army Corps, dissolving the Third Division 
of that corps. The Ninety-Third Illinois was transferred to the 
First Brigade, of the First Division, of that corps, and the other 
regiments of the old First Brigade, of the Third Division, were 
consolidated with the Second Brigade, of the Fourth Division, of 
that corps. The First Brigade, as then constituted, was composed 
of the Ninety-Third Illinois, the Seventy-Sixth Ohio, the Twenty- 
Sixth Iowa, the Twenty-Seventh and Thirty- First and Thirty-Sec- 
ond Missouri, and the Twelfth Indiana, and Col. William B. Woods, 
of the Seventy-sixth Ohio, was commanding. Adjutant H. M. Trim- 
ble remained, as A. A. A. General of the last mentioned brigade. 
Gen. John E. Smith was given the command of a division in the 
Southwest, which was to be a part of the force being then organ- 

13 



194 HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 

ized there, in anticipation of a movement into old Mexico, for 
the purpose of assisting the Mexicans in ousting Maximilian and 
his forces from that country, and ending pretensions of Louis Napo- 
leon there. Happily, the Mexicans defeated Maximilian's forces, 
and captured him, before the invading column of United States 
troops was ready to move, and that complication with the French 
Government and people was avoided. 

From the date of leaving Goldsboro, the Ninety-Third Illinois 
had marched sixty-two miles, the shortest campaign in its history. 
The whole command was now ready to start on the homeward 
march, the sooner the better. It was, indeed, the happiest time 
the regiment had enjoyed since it was mustered into the service. 
But a happier one, still, the muster out, was only a short way off 
in the future. 



CHAPTER XII. 

THE HOME-WARD MARCH — GRAND REVIEW. 

On the 29th day of April, A. D. 1865, the Ninety-Third Illi- 
nois, at the end of two years, five months, and three days from 
the date when it started on its first campaign in Northern Missis- 
sippi, broke camp at 6 o'clock in the morning and started on its 
liomeward march. Marching on the direct road from Raleigh to 
Lrouisburg, N. C, the regiment proceeded ten miles, then crossed 
the Neuse River, on a pontoon bridge, and went into camp, at 2 
o'clock p. m., one mile from the river. On the 30th, the command 
remained in camp, waiting for the artillery and trains to get 
straightened out and under way on the road. On May ist, starting 
at 5 130 o'clock a. m., the regiment marched twenty-three miles, and 
camped, at 6:30 o'clock p. m., at Davis' Cross Roads, near Cypress 
Creek, and also near Louisburg, the county seat of Franklin 
County. During the day we crossed Little River and Tar River. 
On the 2d, starting at 5 o'clock a. m., the command marched 
twenty-five miles, crossed Cedar Creek and Schoeco Creek, and 
camped, at 5:45 o'clock p. m., on Little Fishing Creek, three miles 
from Shady Grove, and near Warrenton, the county seat of Warren 
County. The weather was fine and the roads good, but it was a 
hard day's march. On the 3d, starting at 4:30 o'clock a. m., the 
regiment marched twenty-three miles, and went into camp, at 
3:15 o'clock p. m., at Robinson's Ferry, on the Roanoke River, 
near the State Hne. On the 4th, starting at 5 45 o'clock a. m., the 
regiment crossed Roanoke River, on a pontoon bridge, at Robin- 
son's Ferry, where the river was two hundred and sixty yards wide, 
and, after marching ten miles, went into camp, at 10 o'clock p. m., 
at Tabernacle Church, near White Plains, in Brunswick County, 
Virginia. On the 5th, starting at 5 o'clock a. m., the regiment 
marched twenty-seven miles, crossing the Meherrin River, at West- 
ward Bridge, and passing through Lawrenceville, the county seat 
of Brunswick County, and camped, at 6:30 o'clock p. m., near 
Cutbank, (or, Double Bridge), on the Nottoway River. It was a 
hard march. There was a light fall of rain in the morning, and 
the weather was very hot. On the 6th, starting at 5:30 o'clock 
a. m., the regiment crossed the Nottoway River, marched twenty- 



196 HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 

two miles, and went into camp, at 6:30 o'clock p. m., on Stony 
Creek. The day was hot. Another hard march. On the 7th, 
starting at 6:30 o'clock a. m., the regiment marched eighteen miles,, 
and camped, at 6:30 o'clock p. m., inside the old Confederate 
works, near Fort Robinson, a half mile south of Petersburg, Va. 
The command reached the Weldon Railroad at a point three miles 
south of Ream's station, and passed through that place, finding it 
practically destroyed. Also passed General Grant's line of works 
on the Weldon Railroad. They were very formidable; much 
stronger than the Confederate works. Also passed the place at 
which General Meade's headquarters were when he was in that 
vicinity, during the time the army was operating to get possession 
of the railroad there. On the 8th, the regiment remained in camp. 
Many visited Petersburg and were disappointed. The place was 
much smaller than was supposed, and very much damaged by the 
long continued military operations there. On the 9th, starting at 7 
o'clock a. m., the regiment marched fifteen miles, and went into 
camp, at 3 o'clock p. m., on Proctor's Creek. While passing 
through Petersburg, early this morning, the command was reviewed 
by General Howard, Generals Hartranft and Ferrero being present 
with him, upon his invitation. Shortly after passing in review, the 
regiment crossed the Appomattox River, on an old bridge that 
had been partly destroyed by fire, and continued the march toward 
Richmond, moving on the main road, which was a very beautiful 
one. The camp that night was on the ground where General 
Butler fought a battle just one year ago to-day. Human skulls 
and bones were still lying around in every direction; whole skele- 
tons, just as they fell, and others partly covered. They were mostly 
Confederates. It was a gruesome, sickening sight. A heavy rain 
fell during the afternoon. Rain also fell last night, which made 
fine marching for the day. On the loth, starting at 5:30 o'clock 
a. m., the regiment marched nine miles, and went into camp, at 
9 o'clock a. m., near Manchester, Va., and remained in camp there 
during the remainder of the day. First Lieut. William M. Morris, ^ 
who was captured at the battle of Mission Ridge, Tennessee, on the 
25th day of November, A. D. 1863, and had been in Confederate 
prisons ever since then, returned to the regiment and assumed 
the command of his Company, A. He was, during that day, mus- 
tered into service as Captain of that Company, the commission, 
promoting him, having been received some time before during his 
absence in prison. The Confederate works at this place, extending 
up the river, and west from Fort Darling, were very formidable. 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 197 

three lines where we passed them. Since leaving Raleigh, we have 
passed through the best country we have seen in the South, unless, 
perhaps, Northern Alabama and Eastern Tennessee might be 
excepted. On the nth and 12th, the regiment remained in camp. 
On the nth, the Fourteenth and Twentieth corps crossed the James 
River, and proceeded north, and on the 12th, the Seventeenth Corps 
followed. We will move to-morrow. On the night of the nth, 
rain fell, for an hour, in a manner that caused us to think that all 
the sluice-gates of the "upper deep" had been thrown wide open. 
On the 13th, starting at 9 o'clock a. m., the regiment passed through 
Manchester, crossed the James River, on a pontoon bridge, and 
marched into Richmond, Va., the capital of the Confederate States 
of America, that was, but then defunct. Passing down River 
Street, by Castle Thunder and Libby Prison, the command then 
marched through the principal part of the city. The most of the 
public buildings on River Street had been destroyed, but the prin- 
cipal parts of the city were not much damaged. Leaving Richmond 
about I o'clock p. m., the command went into camp, at 6 o'clock 
p. m., after having marched twelve miles during the day, on Stony 
Run, near the Chickahominy River. A hot day. On the 14th, 
starting at 7:30 o'clock a. m., the regiment marched seven miles, 
and camped, at 10:30 o'clock a. m., near Hanover Courthouse, on 
the Pamunky River, and remained there the remainder of that day. 
The roads were bad. On the iSth, starting at 5:30 o'clock a. m., 
the regiment passed the Hanover Courthouse, which was erected 
in the year A. D. 1736, crossed the Pamunky River, and also the 
Mattapony River, and having marched eighteen miles during the 
<jay, went into camp, at 6 o'clock p. m., about eight miles from 
BowHng Green. The roads were good. The weather was clear 
and hot. That evening, orders were received, that no whole rails 
should be burned. Everybody said, that "whole rails" were too 
long to burn, anyhow; and they were immediately broken in pieces. 
It was not long until it was impossible to find any "whole rails" in 
that neighborhood. And then everybody began to inquire why it 
was that the people there always made their rails in pieces ; adding, 
that they had never seen the like in any other part of the Con- 
federacy. On the i6th, starting at 5 o'clock a. m., the regiment 
marched twenty-five miles, passed through Bowling Green, crossed 
Massaponox Creek, waded it, and camped, at 3 o'clock p. m., a 
half mile beyond the creek. The day was very hot and the roads 
were dusty. It was a hard day's march. On the 17th, the regi- 
ment started at 7:30 o'clock a. m., marched eighteen miles, passed 



198 HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 

through Stafford Courthouse, and camped near that place, on 
Austin Creek, at 6 o'clock p. m. During the day the command 
passed through Fredericksburg. The city had been badly used up 
by the war. There were but few houses in the place that had not 
been pierced by cannon shot. The regiment crossed the Rappahan- 
nock River, one hundred and sixty yards wide, at Fredericksburg, 
on a pontoon bridge. The scenery, in the valley, and on each side 
of the river, was very fine. The day was hot and the march a 
hard one. On the i8th, the command marched at 4:30 o'clock 
a. m., and camped at 3:30 o'clock p. m., near Ocoquan, on the 
Ocoquan River, having made twenty miles of distance. We crossed 
Aquia Creek early in the day, and afterward passed through Dum- 
fries, one of the oldest towns in the United States, all the buildings 
being after old styles. A heavy rain fell just at dark. On the igth^ 
starting at 4:30 o'clock a. m., the regiment crossed the Ocoquan 
River, on a pontoon bridge, at Ocoquan, where the stream was one 
hundred yards wide, and marched, from thence, to Mount Vernon. 
There the command marched through the grounds and to the tomb 
of Washington, with drooping colors, the bands playing patriotic 
music. After resting there a short time the march was continued 
until twenty miles had been covered during the day, when the regi- 
ment went into- camp, at 5 o'clock p. m., about five miles from 
Alexandria, Va. The roads were muddy and the march was a very 
hard one. During the day, Marion Hite and George Menelaus, of 
Company B, both of whom were captured by the enemy on the 
3d day of September A. D. 1864, near Allatoona, Ga., returned to 
the regiment, having been released from prison some time before. 
On the 20th, the command remained in camp. On the 21st, starting 
at daylight, the regiment marched five miles, and went into camp, at 
9 o'clock a. m., on Arlington 'Heights, near Alexandria. The camp 
was on a high and bare hill, where a crow couldn't have found sticks 
enough to build a nest. Rain fell nearly all day and continued 
to fall during the evening. The weather was very disagreeable 
and the roads were muddy. On the 22d, the regiment remained in 
camp. On the 23d, starting at 8 o'clock a. m., the regiment marched 
eight miles, and bivouacked, on Fourth Street, in the city of Wash- 
ington, the capital of the Nation. The regiment crossed the Poto- 
mac River on the Long Bridge, one and a half miles long, and was 
the first of General Sherman's army to enter the city of Wash- 
ington. That day the Army of the Potomac was on grand review* 
General Sherman's army will pass in review to-morrow. On the 
24th, the day of the grand review, the regiment marched twelve 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 199 

miles, between 8 o'clock in the morning and 4 o'clock in the after- 
noon, and went into camp, at the latter hour, near Crystal Springs, 
on Piney Branch, and also near the Piney Branch Hotel, three miles 
north of Washington City, D. C. 

After leaving Raleigh the regiment had marched three hun- 
dred and twenty-eight miles. 

THE GRAND REVIEW. 

The day, May 24th, 1865, was beautiful, almost perfect. Roll- 
call in the Ninety-Third Illinois, was at 5 o'clock in the morning.. 
At 7 o'clock a. m., the command was in line, in marching order, and 
the companies were equalized. At 8 o'clock a. m., the regiment 
marched around, on West Capitol Street, to the head of Pennsyl- 
vania Avenue, west of the National Capitol, stacked arms, and 
remained there an hour, waiting for the signal gun. At precisely 
9 o'clock in the morning, the signal gun was fired, and the head of 
the column at once moved down Pennsylvania Avenue. The 
Seventy-Sixth Ohio, of the First Brigade, First Division, Fifteenth 
Army Corps, had the advance, and led General Sherman's army in 
the grand review. The Ninety-Third Illinois was the second regi- 
ment in the column. The Second Division followed the First, and 
the Fourth Division followed the Second. (The Third Division had 
been dissolved.) The Second Brigade, of the Fourth Division, was 
the rear brigade of the infantry of the Fifteenth Corps. The artil- 
lery of the corps followed. Then came the Seventeenth, Twentieth 
and Fourteenth Army Corps, in the order named, the artillery of 
each following the corps. Then came General Kilpatrick's cav- 
alry and light artillery. The command moved, In Order of Review, 
at Company Front, Closed in Mass, Guide Left. The Reviewing 
Stand was in front of the Whte House. From the moment the 
start was made, every regiment in that great column at once assumed 
that strong step, long stride, and stately bearing, perfectly typifying 
the well known strength, and speed, and confidence of that immense 
army, acquired by its long marches, rapid movements, and many 
victories in battle. Arms were carried with that ease and precision 
that told of familiarity with their use. Colors were waving and 
fluttering, and bands were playing the national airs and the music 
of victory. The demonstration was imposing and inspiring, mag- 
nificent and grand. It represented at once the military strength 
and endurance and discipline of the Nation, and the "pomp and 
pageantry" and the enthusiasm and exultation of successful war. 
The city of Washington, everywhere, was no less than an ocean 



200 HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 

of humanity. Both sides of the broad and beautiful Pennsylvania 
Avenue, from one end to the other of it, were literally packed with 
men and women, from the building lines to the two sides of the 
moving column. All the porches and balconies, and all the doors 
and windows, were filled to their utmost capacity with radiant faces. 
The tops of houses and business buildings, and all other places 
that commanded even the slightest view of any part of the grand 
parade, were covered with multitudes of people. And, for blocks 
upon blocks, away from the line of march, there were still addi- 
tional multitudes upon multitudes. And all these people had flags 
and banners, of all sizes, and wreaths and bouquets and flowers, of 
all colors, and in all imaginable forms, and parasols and handker- 
chiefs, in red, white and blue, and all manner of devices, in bright 
colors, and all of them were happy and enthusiastic and exultant. 
They cheered in groups, and cheered all together. To the music 
of the bands they joined their voices, singing the National airs and 
the Battle Hymn of the Republic. They showered the troops with 
flowers until the broad avenue was covered. Thev covered the 
bands with wreaths and bouquets until they were moving flower 
gardens. Generals Sherman, Howard, Slocum, Logan, Blair, 
Davis and Williams, and many others, were wreathed and garlanded 
over and over again, until they were almost hidden from view, with 
a very harvest of flowers, as rich and beautiful and fragrant as ever 
grew beneath the sun. Never was any army more cordially 
received. The welcome home was free, hearty, earnest and enthu- 
siastic. The enthusiasm was unbounded. It was gladness and 
joy gone wild. The whole scene, together, the moving army and 
the people, the music and the flowers, the brave men and beautiful 
women, the waving colors and the fluttering plumes, the cheers and 
hearty greetings, the shouts of praise and the shouts of victory, the 
shouts for the army and shouts for the navy, and shouts for the 
"Union Forever," and the earnestness of all of it, and the enthu- 
siastic and zealous patriotism that impelled it and gave it meaning, 
was not only beautiful and brilliant, magnificent and grand, but it 
was characteristically American. Nothing like it, in its character 
and impulses, had ever before been witnessed on earth. No event, 
of man's accomplishment, ever before celebrated, contained within 
itself so much of human hopes and aspirations, or held so much of 
hopeful promises for humanity's future. The mighty ship that 
bore the best and brightest hopes of all the world, was safely 
moored in the harbor of enduring peace. The bright and shining 
star, toward which all eyes had turned for light upon the paths of 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 201 

human progress, was anchored in the sky. Liberty was triumphant 
there! And that grand army, that had borne its victorious banners 
round the circuit of the rebelHous States, moved through it all, an 
unbroken column, with conscious pride in its great strength and 
great achievements, with patriotic zeal, but without vanity, bearing 
no spoils of war, but lifting high above all else the emblem of the 
Nation's great victory, the flag of the Union, the flag of freedom! 
Moved through that gorgeous throng, down the broad avenue 
from the capjtol to and beyond the White House, with all its 
illustrious leaders and its much loved and peerless commander. 
Passed before that "Silent Soldier," the great commander-in-chief, 
whose matchless genius had pointed out the ways to victory, and 
iilled the world with the fame of his armies. And, at the end of 
its victorious march, that great army quietly dispersed to its hun- 
dred camps around the capital of the Nation, and, from thence, re- 
turned to thousands of homes all over the land, and quickly melted 
away and merged into the great body of the commonweath, out 
of which it came. Altogether, it was a scene that can neither be 
adequately described, nor ever forgotten; a consummation that set 
a new page in the world's history, and filled it with a new Hght 
that will continue to shine, for the generations of men yet to 
come, through all the cycles of time. 



CHAPTER XIII. 

THE END. 

From the 25th to the 30th of May, both days inclusive, the 
Ninety-Third Illinois remained in the camp in which it located 
on the 24th. Rain fell all day on the 26th and in ftie morning on 
the 27th and in the evening on the 28th. The weather was dis- 
agreeable, and it was muddy everywhere. On the 31st, Adjutant 
H. M. Trimble was, on his own request, relieved from duty as 
A. A. A. General of the Second Brigade, Fourth Division, Fifteenth 
Corps, and returned to duty with the regiment, in order to close 
up its business and prepare for its muster out of service. At 5 
o'clock a. m. on that day, the regiment broke camp, and marched 
to the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad depot, in Washington City, four 
miles from its last camp. At 9 o'clock a. m., the command was on 
board the cars, and the train moved out toward Baltimore, Md., 
bound for Parkersburg, West Virginia. At noon, the junction, or 
Relay House, was reached, and there the train was switched onto 
the main line of the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad. There were 
thirty-six freight cars in the train when it left Washington. But 
on account of the heavy grades on this railroad, through the moun- 
tains, the train was now divided into two sections. Just at twilight, 
the command reached Harper's Ferry, crossed the Potomac River 
there, and was again in old Virginia. Harper's Ferry showed 
many battle scars and traces of the war. At 10 o'clock p. m., the 
regiment passed through Martinsburg, Va., in the Shenandoah 
Valley. The place had been almost demolished by shot and shell. 
All the business part of the town was no better than a heap of 
unsightly ruins. At midnight, the command was about one hun- 
dred and fifty miles from the city of Washington. 

On June ist, at 6 o'clock a. m., the regiment reached Cumber- 
land, in Hampshire County, Virginia, and had breakfast there. 
The good people there furnished hot coflfee, but we had to furnish 
the hardtack and other provisions. At 8 o'clock a. m., the com- 
mand reached the foot of the Alleghany Mountains. Here the 
trains were again subdivided, each engine taking five cars. Even 
then the different sections of the train moved so slowly that some 
of the boys said they could get off and gather winterg^een and 
birchberries and catch up easily enough. At the end of about 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 203 

twelve miles, we reached the summit of the mountains. There 
the trains were connected up again into two sections, and went sail- 
ing* down into the valley below. Cheat River was reached at 2 
o'clock in the afternoon. Here additional engines were supplied, 
to assist the trains in climbing Cheat Mountain. The command 
arrived at Tunnelton, on that mountain, about 6 o'clock in the 
evening, and stopped there for coffee and lunch. Before leaving 
there the troops were required to leave the tops of the cars until 
the trains should descend several steep grades and pass through a 
number of tunnels. Starting at 6:30 o'clock p. m., the regiment 
reached Grafton, in West Virginia, at 11 o'clock that night, and 
found more than sufficient coffee and meats to supply all wants, 
ready prepared for us by the good people of that place. After par- 
taking of their hospitality, they filled our canteens with coffee and 
our haversacks with meats, and sent us on our way rejoicing. After 
boarding the trains again, they were switched onto the Grafton 
and Parkersburg branch of the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad, and the 
next morning at daylight, on June 2d, reached Salem, eighty miles 
from Parkersburg. At 12:30 o'clock p. m., on that day, the regi- 
, ment arrived at Parkersburg, where plenty of coffee was again 
found, ready prepared by the citizens of that place. Between 
Grafton and Parkersburg the trains passed through twenty-three 
tunnels. The regiment left the cars immediately after reaching 
Parkersburg, having made the distance of four hundred miles by 
rail. One day's rations were issued to the command by the 
commissary. The regiment immediately embarked on the steamer 
"Ella Faber," and at 5:30 o'clock p. m., the steamer left the wharf 
and moved down the Ohio River, bound for Louisville, Kentucky. 
There were eight steamers in the fleet. Ours was second in the 
line as they moved down the river. The Ninety-Third Illinois and 
the Seventy-Sixth Ohio were on board the "Ella Faber." All 
along down the river, much enthusiasm was exhibited everywhere, 
at the villages, towns and cities. Crowds of people gathered at 
the wharves, cheered and waved flags and made other demonstra- 
tions, and sometimes fired salutes, while the steamers were pass- 
ing down the river. June 3d was a pleasant day on the steamer. 
Everybody had a good time. At midnight, the steamer reached 
Cincinnati, Ohio, and stopped there an hour. Of course, but little 
could be seen of that city at that time. On June 4th, at 3 o'clock in 
the afternoon, the regiment arrived at Louisville, Ky., and imme- 
diately disembarked from the steamer, and marched to camp, three 
miles northeast of the city. From the 5th to the 22d of June, both 



204 HISTORY OF THE NIXETV-THIRD ILLINOIS. 

days inclusive, the regiment remained in camp at Louisville. On 
the 15th, a telegram was sent to Washington, D. C, asking for 
orders to muster the regiment out of service. On the 17th, an 
order was received, from Assistant Adjutant General Vincent, 
directing that the regiment be mustered out at once. On June 23d, 
A. D. 1865, the Ninety-Third Regiment Illinois Volunteer Infantry 
was mustered out of the military' service of the United States of 
America, by Capt. William L. Alexander, of the Thirtieth Regiment 
Iowa Volunteer Infantry, and Assistant Commissary of Musters for 
the First Division, Fifteenth Army Corps. On the same day, the 
regiment marched, six miles, to New Albany, Ind., and there 
boarded cars, and moved north, bound for Chicago, Illinois. On the 
24th, the command was en route to Chicago. On the 25th day of 
June, 1865, at 12:30 o'clock a. m., the regiment reached Chicago, 
and immediately went into quarters in Camp Douglass. Rain was 
falling while the command was moving from the train to the camp. 
This brought the fact to mind again, that rain was falling when the 
regiment first entered Camp Douglass, on the 17th day of Septem- 
ber, 1862. On that day, June 25th, 1865, the Adjutant's office and 
records were turned over to the government. 

From the 26th day of June until the 6th day of July, both days 
inclusive, the regiment remained in quarters at Camp Douglas. 
On June 29th, however, a considerable number of the members of 
the regiment went to their respective homes, for the purpose of 
spending the Fourth of July with their friends, and returned to 
Camp Douglass on July 5th. And on the 6th day of July, A. D. 
1865, the regiment was paid in full, by Capt. E. H. Gratiot, Pay- 
master United States Army, at Chicago, Illinois, and finally dis- 
charged. 

Nearly all the members of the regiment started for their re- 
spective homes on that day. A few remained in the city until the 
7th. On that day, the Adjutant made final adjustments of all 
unfinished regimental affairs, received final vouchers for every- 
thing not previously receipted for, and closed the record of the 
regiment as a military organization in the service of the govern- 
ment. 

The average distance from Chicago to the respective homes 
of the members of the regiment, by rail, was one hundred and ten 
miles, and this is included in the statement of distances traveled 
since leaving Washington. 

From and including the day of leaving Washington City, the 
regiment traveled, by rail, eight hundred miles; by water, four 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 205 

hundred and fifty miles; and marched, thirteen miles; making the 
total distance of one thousand two hundred and sixty- three miles. 

During its entire term of service, from the date of organization 
to the return home, the Ninety-Third Illinois traveled, by rail, one 
thousand seven hundred and three miles; by water, two thousand 
two hundred and thirty-one miles; and marched, two thousand six 
hundred and thirty-one miles; making the total distance of six 
thousand five hundred and sixty-five miles. 

During the term of its service, the regiment passed through 
portions of the following States, to wit: Illinois, Kentucky, Ten- 
nessee, Arkansas, Mississippi, Louisiana, Alabama, Georgia, South 
Carolina, North Carolina, Virginia, Maryland, West Virginia, and 
Indiana, and also the District of Columbia. Nine of them were 
States that seceded from the Union. The onlv two of the Con- 
federate States not visited by the regiment, were Texas and Florida. 

The casualties of the Ninety-Third Illinois, during its terms 
of service, were enormous. The cold figures, found in the tables 
inserted later on in this volume, are enough to cause the lips to 
quiver with emotion and the eyes to fill with tears, even at this late 
day, a full third of a century since the war closed. But the figures, 
alone, do not fully disclose how great the losses suffered really were. 
Therefore, that the same may be more readily understood and 
more fully appreciated, a brief analysis is given here. 

Excluding the thirty-two *'unassigned recruits," who came 
to the regiment just at the close of the war, and who never partici- 
pated in the active services of the command, the tables show a total 
membership of one thousand and eighteen. Of that number, eleven 
were rejected as unfit fgr service, and were never mustered in; four 
others have no records as to what became of them, but they were 
never mustered into the service; thirty-three deserted after being 
mustered in, the most of them before and about the time the regi- 
ment went to the field; one was furloughed before the regiment 
went to the field and never returned: sixteen were recruits who 
came to the regiment too late to participate in any battle or skir- 
mish; fifty-nine died of disease, eighty-six were discharged for 
disability, and fifteen were transferred out of the regiment, before 
it was engaged in any battle or skirmish; and seventy-five others, 
at least, on account of sickness and disability and subsequent dis- 
charge or death, were at no time present with the regiment at or 
after its first engagement in battle; and it is believed that this last 
number does not include one-half of those who should really be 
enumerated under that head, because none have been so counted 



206 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 



except those now known to have been so absent. Hence, it will 
be observed, there were three hundred out of the one thousand and 
eighteen members of the regiment, who were at no time present 
in any battle or skirmish in which the command participated. And 
hence, all the casualties in battle, four hundred and eighteen, and 
all the other casualties incident to the service, fifty-six, as shown by 
the tables and records, were suffered by seven hundred and eight- 
een members of the regiment. So that all percentages of losses 
in battle, and of other casualties, must be computed the same as if 
the regiment had only contained seven hundred and eighteen mem- 
bers. With these facts before us, the losses of the regiment assume 
appalling proportions. They were as follows: 



Officers 


Non-Commis- 
sloned Officers 


Men. 


Total. 


Killed in Battle 


2 


19 
19 

7 


64 
41 

19 


85 
60 


Mortallv Wounded in Battle 


Missing in Battle and Died, or Never Heard 
from 




26 








Total Fatalities in Battle 


2 


45 


124 


171 




"Wounded in Battle, not Mortallv. 


12 

3 


57 
3 


155 
17 


224 
23 


Missin&r in Battle, who Returned 




Total Casualties in Battle, not fatal 


15 


6o 


172 


247 




Total Casualties in Battle 


I? 


105 


296 


418 




Casualties not in Battle: 

Killed on Railroad, on Furlough 







14 
21 




Drowned ... 


1 

r 




Mortally Wounded, Explosion of Shells 








Mortally Wounded, Collision on Railroad 








Killed by Guerrillas, under Cook, A. D 


■ 




Captured, not in Battle, who Returned 




7 
8 


21 


Iniured in Collision on Railroad 


I 


30 




Total Casualties, not in Battle 


I 


15 
120 


40 


56 




Total Casualties during Service 


i8 


336 


474 





The fatalities in battle, 171 out of 718 engaged, were 2381% 

The casualties in battle, 418 out of 718 engaged, were 5821% 

All casualties in the service, 474 out of 718 engaged, were. .66% 

In addition to the one hundred and seventy-one fatalities in 
battle and five from other casualties, there were ninety-six deaths 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 207 

in the service, from disease. There were also fourteen deaths, from 
disease, after the discharge of members of the regiment, but during 
the period of the war. Thus the total number of deaths, in the 
service, was two hundred and seventy-two; and during the period 
of the war, two hundred and eighty-six. The percentages here 
must be computed on the entire membership of the regiment, and 
they are as follows: 

The deaths in the service, 272 out of 1,018, were .2672% of the 
whole number. 

.The deaths during the war, 286 out of 1,018, were .281% of the 
\vhole number. 

Since the war, one hundred and twenty-five members of the 
regiment have died. There may have been, and probably have 
been, a few more, but only those known are counted as deceased. 
Thus, during and since the war, the total number of deaths appears 
to have been four hundred and eleven, leaving six hundred and 
seven of the members of the regiment still surviving. The per- 
centages here must be computed on the entire membership of 
the regiment, and they are as follows: 

The deceased members, 411 out of 1,018, constitute 4037% 
of the whole. 

The surviving members, 607 out of 1,018, constitute .5963% 
of the whole. 

These figures make an eloquent history of the splendid services 
and immense sacrifices of the Ninety-Third Illinois in the cause of 
the Union. And yet, the story is underdrawn. The truth is, that 
the regiment never took more than five hundred and two officers 
and men into any battle. That was about the number at the battle 
of Jackson, Miss., and it never reached that number afterward. 
There were about four hundred and ninety-four at Champion Hill, 
Miss.; three hundred and thirty at Vicksburg, Miss.; two hundred 
and ninety-three at Mission Ridge, Tenn.; two hundred and ninety- 
four at Allatoona, Ga.; and about two hundred and fifty on the 
Georgia campaign, and on the campaign of the Carolinas. The 
percentages of loss, in killed, wounded and missing, in the diflferent 
battles and campaigns in which the regiment participated, were as 
follows: 

In the Yazoo Pass Expedition. .. ' i out of 525 engaged, .002% 

In the Battle of Jackson,Miss . . . 8 out of 502 engaged, .016% 
In the Battle of Champion Hill, 

Miss 164 out of 494 engaged, .332% 



208 HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 

In the Siege of Vicksburg, Miss. 55 out of 330 engaged, ^\(^% 
In the Battle of Mission Ridge, 

Tenn 96 out of 293 engaged, .^276% 

In the Battle of Allatoona, Ga . . 89 out of 294 engaged, .3039^? 

In the Battle of Savannah, Ga. . . 3 out of 250 engaged, .012% 

In the Campaign of the Carolinas, i out of 250 engaged, .004% 

These figures only include the casualties actually suffered in 
battle; the fifty-six other casualties, not in battle, but which were 
incident to the service, being wholly omitted from these computa- 
tions. 

In the charge of the Light Brigade, the "Brave Six Hundred,'^ 
at Balaklava, Lord Cardigan took in six hundred and seventy-three 
officers and men. The charge was a senseless and useless blunder. 
But it has been much written about, and praised in verse and song, 
because of the great losses suffered. Yet the fatalities, in killed 
and mortally wounded, were only one hundred and thirteen, being 
.168% of the number engaged. And the Light Brigade never 
repeated that great loss. The fatalities of the Xinety-Third Illinois, 
in killed and mortally wounded and captured who died in prison, at 
the battle of Champion Hill, Miss., were seventy-four out of four 
hundred and ninety-four, being .15% of the number engaged; and 
at the battle of Mission Ridge, Tenn., they were forty-seven out 
of two hundred and ninety-three, being .16% of the number en- 
gaged, thus duplicating a loss almost equal to that of the Light 
Brigade; and then a supplement was added, at Allatoona, Ga., of 
thirty-one fatalities, out of two hundred and ninety-three, being 
.106% of the number engaged. And the total fatalities of this 
regiment, as shown above, in the first table of percentages given,, 
exceeded those of the Light Brigade by a little more than seven per 
cent. When it is remembered that the average rate of fatalities in 
battle, in the wars of the last hundred years, in Europe as well as 
in this country, has scarcely reached fiwt per cent of the numbers 
engaged, the full meaning and force of the statements made above 
become apparent. 

After thirty-three years of peace these figures are indeed 
starthng. During the excitement of the war, under the pressure 
of the stupendous issues involved, the sacrifice did not seem so 
great. But in the cool and deliberate judgment of the after-time, 
that always comes with advancing years, we more fully realize 
and appreciate the full measure of the responsibilities met and 
discharged during the momentous period of the war, and begin^ 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 209 

at least, to comprehend the marvelous and astounding price then 
so freely and willingly paid for the preservation of the Union, 
and that this "government of the people and by the people and 
for the people might not perish from the earth/' As the length- 
ening shadows of the evening of our lives stretch across the plains 
behind us, we halt a moment at the graves of our fallen comrades, 
looking to that bright emblem that blazed in lustrous beauty over 
more than three thousand battlefields, now "a thousand times more 
dear for their dear sake who died, and say: Oh, flag, that loss 
would make us bankrupt but that thy folds are priceless!" In 
the memories of the past their forms rise up before us in heroic 
grandeur. They stand on the beautiful slopes of Jackson, on the 
crest of Champion Hill, and the fortresses at Vicksburg, upon the 
embattled heights of Mission Ridge, and the rugged hills at 
AUatoona, and in the marshes at Savannah, everywhere baring 
their breasts to the enemies who assail it, and lifting that flag 
higher and higher above the storm-clouds and carnage of war into 
the clear blue sky of enduring peace, as the emblem of union 
and universal liberty! The benediction of all the best impulses 
of our hearts are laid upon their graves, and we again march on, 
and on, to join them in their great encampment on the shore beyond. 



14 



CHAPTER XIV. 

FAREWELL ORDERS. 

On the thirteenth day of July, A. D. 1865, Major General 
Logan issued the following farewell order: 

Headquarters Army of the Tennessee, 
Louisville, Ky., July 13, 1865. 

Officers and Soldiers of the Army of the Tennessee: 

The profound gratification I feel in being authorized to release you from 
the onerous obligations of the camp and return you laden with laurels to 
homes where warm hearts wait to welcome you, is somewhat embittered 
by the painful reflection that I am sundering the ties which trials made 
true, time made tender, suffering made sacred, heroism made honorable, 
and fame made forever fearless of the future. It is no common occasion 
that demands the disbandment of a military organization, before the resist- 
less power of which mountains bristling with bayonets have bowed, cities have 
surrendered, and millions of brave men have been conquered. Although I 
have been but a short period your commander, we are not strangers ; affections 
have sprung up between us during the long years of doubt, gloom and 
carnage which we have passed through together, nurtured by common perils, 
sufferings and sacrifices, and riveted by the memories of gallant comrades 
whose bones repose beneath the sod of a hundred battlefields, which neither 
time nor distance will weaken or efface. The many marches you have made, 
the dangers you have despised, the haughtiness you have humbled, the 
duties you have discharged, the glory you have gained, the destiny you have 
discovered for the country in whose cause you have conquered, all recur 
at this moment, in all the vividness that marked the scenes through which 
we have just passed From the pens of the ablest historians of the land, 
daily, are drifting out upon the current of time, page upon page, volume 
upon volume, of your heroic deeds, which, floating down to future genera- 
tions, will inspire the student of history with admiration, the patriotic Ameri- 
can with veneration for his ancestors, and the lover of republican liberty 
with gratitude to those who, in a fresh baptism of blood, reconsecrated the 
powers and energies of the republic to the cause of constitutional freedom. 
Long may it be the happy fortune of each and every one of you to live in 
the full fruition of the boundless blessings you have secured to the human 
race! Only he whose heart has been filled with admiration for your impetu- 
ous and unyielding valor in the thickest of the fight can appreciate with what 
pride he recounts the brilliant achievements which immortalize you and 
enrich the pages of our national history. Passing by the earlier, but not 
less signal triumphs of the war, in which most of you participated, and in- 
scribed upon your banners, such victories as Donelson and Shiloh, I recur to 
campaigns, sieges and victories that challenge the admiration of the world 
and elicit the unwilling applause of all Europe. Turning your backs upon 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 211 

the blood-bathed heights of Vicksburg, you launched into a region swarm- 
ing with enemies, fighting your way and marching without adequate sup- 
plies to answer the cry for succor that came to you from the noble but 
beleaguered Army of Chattanooga. Your steel next flashed among the 
mountains of Tennessee, and your weary limbs found rest before the embat- 
tled heights of Missionary Ridge, and there, with dauntless courage, you 
breasted again the enemy's destructive fire, and shared with your comrades 
of the Army of the Cumberland the glories of a victory than which no 
soldier can boast a prouder. In that unexampled campaign of vigilant and 
vigorous warfare, from Chattanooga to Atlanta, you freshened your laurels 
at Resaca, grappling with the enemy behind his works, hurling him back 
dismayed and broken. Pursuing him from thence, marking your path by 
the graves of fallen comrades, you again triumphed over superior numbers 
at Dallas, fighting your way from there to Kenesaw Mountain, and under the 
murderous artillery that frowned from its rugged heights, with a tenacity and 
constancy that find few parallels, you labored, fought and suffered through 
the broiling rays of a Southern midsummer sun, until at last you planted 
your colors upon the topmost heights. Again, on July 22, 1864, rendered 
memorable through all time for the terrible struggle you so heroically main- 
tained under discouraging disasters, and the saddest of all reflections, the 
loss of that exemplary soldier and popular leader, the lamented McPherson, 
your matchless courage turned defeat into a glorious victory. Ezra Chapel 
and Jonesboro added new luster to a radiant record, the latter unbarring 
to you the proud Gate City of the South. The daring of a desperate foe, in 
thrusting his legions northward, exposed the country in your front, and 
though rivers, swamps and enemies opposed, you boldly surmounted every 
obstacle, beat down all opposition and marched onward to the sea, without 
any act to dim the brightness of your historic page. The world rang plaudits 
when your labors and struggles culminated at Savannah and the old starry 
banner waved once more over the walls of one of our proudest cities of 
the seaboard. Scarce a breathing spell had passed, when your colors faded 
from the coast, and your columns plunged into the swamps of the Caro- 
linas. The sufferings you endured, the labors you performed and the suc- 
cesses you achieved in those morasses, deemed impassable, form a creditable 
episode in the history of the war. Pocotaligo, Saulkehatchie, Edisto, Branch- 
ville, Orangeburg, Columbia, Bentonville, Charleston and Raleigh are 
names that will ever be suggestive of the resistless sweep of your columns 
through the territory that cradled and nurtured, and from whence was sent 
forth on its mission of crime, misery and blood, the disturbing and disor- 
ganizing spirit of secession and rebellion. 

The work for which you pledged your brave hearts and brawny arms 
to the government of your fathers you have nobly performed. You have 
seen in the past, gathering through the gloom that enveloped the land, rally- 
ing as the guardians of man's proudest heritage, forgetting the thread 
unwoven in the loom, quitting the anvil and abandoning the workshops, 
to vindicate the supremacy of the laws and the authority of the constitution. 
Four years have you struggled in the bloodiest and most destructive war 
that ever drenched the earth with human gore; step by step you have borne 
our standard, until to-day, over every fortress and arsenal that Rebellion 
wrenched from us, and over city, town and hamlet, from the lakes to the gulf. 



212 HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 

and from ocean to ocean, proudly floats the starry emblem of our nationaf 
unity and strength. Your rewards, my comrades, are the welcoming plaudits 
of a grateful people; the consciousness that, in saving the republic, you have 
won for your country renewed respect and power at home and abroad; that 
in the unexampled era of growth and prosperity that dawns with peace, there 
attaches mightier wealth of pride and glory than ever before to that loved 
boast, "I am an American citizen!" 

In relinquishing the implements of war for those of peace, let your 
conduct, which was that of warriors in time of war, be that of peaceful citi- 
zens in time of peace. Let not the luster of that brighter name that you 
have won as soldiers be dimmed by any improper acts as citizens, but as 
time rolls on let your record grow brighter and brighter still. 

JOHN A. LOGAN, Major General. 

On the thirtieth day of May, A. D. 1865, Major General 
Sherman issued the following farewell order: 

Headquarters Military Division of the Mississippi, 

In the Field, Washington, D. C, May 30, 1865. 

Special Field Orders, No. 76: 

The general commanding announces to the armies of the Tennessee 
and Georgia that the time has come for us to part. Our work is done and 
armed enemies no longer defy us. Some of you will go to your homes and 
others will be retained in military service till further orders. And now that 
we are all about to separate, to mingle with the civil world, it becomes a 
pleasing duty to recall to mind the situation of national affairs when, but 
little more than a year ago, we were gathered about the cliffs of Lookout 
Mountain and all the future was wrapped in doubt and uncertainty. Three 
armies had come together from distant fields, with separate histories, yet 
bound by one common cause — the union of our country and the perpetua- 
tion of the government of our inheritance. There is no need to recall to 
your memories Tunnel Hill, with Rocky Face Mountain and Buzzard Roost 
Gap and the ugly forts of Dalton behind. We were in earnest, and paused 
not for danger and difficulty, but dashed through Snake Creek Gap and 
fell on Resaca; then on to the Etowah, to Dallas, Kenesaw, and the heat 
of summer found us on the banks of the Chattahoochie, far from home and 
dependent on a single road for supplies. Again we were not to be held 
back by any obstacle and crossed over and fought four hard battles for the 
possession of the citadel of Atlanta. That was the crisis of our history. A 
doubt still clouded our future, but we solved the problem, destroyed At- 
lanta, struck boldly across the state of Georgia, severed all the main arteries 
of life to our enemy, and Christmas found us at Savannah. Waiting there 
only long enough to fill our wagons, we again began a march which, for 
peril, labor and results, will compare with any ever made by an organized 
army. The floods of Savannah, the swamps of Cambahee and Edisto, the 
"high hills" and rocks of the Santee, the flat quagmires of the Pedee and 
Cape Fear rivers, were all passed in mid-winter, with its floods and rains, 
in the face of an accumulating enemy; and after the battles of Averysboro- 
and Bentonville we once more came out of the wilderness to meet our 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 213 

friends at Goldsboro. Even then we paused only long enough to get hew 
clothing, to reload our wagons — again pushed on to Raleigh and beyond, 
until we met our enemy suing for peace instead of war and offering to sub- 
mit to the injured laws of his and our country. As long as that enemy was 
<iefiant, nor mountains nor rivers nor swamps nor hunger nor cold had 
checked us; but when he who had fought us hard and persistently offered 
submission your general thought it wrong to pursue him further and ne- 
gotiations followed which resulted, as you all know, in his surrender. 

How far the operations of this army contributed to the final overthrow 
of the Confederacy and the peace which now dawns upon us must be judged 
by others, not by us, but that you have done all that men could do has been 
admitted by those in authority, and we have a right to join in the universal 
joy that fills our land because the war is over and our government stands 
vindicated before the world by the joint action of the volunteer armies and 
navy of the United States. 

To such as remain in the service your general need only remind you 
that success in the past was due to hard work and discipline, and that the 
same work and discipline are equally important in the future. To such as 
^o home^ he will only say that our favored country is so grand, so extensive, 
so diversified in climate, soil and productions, that every man may find a 
home and occupation suited to his taste. None should yield to the nat- 
ural impatience sure to result from our past life of excitement and adventure. 
You will be invited to seek new adventures abroad; do not yield to the 
temptation, for it will lead only to death and disappointment. 

Your general now bids you farewell, with the full belief that as in war 
you have been good soldiers, so in peace you will make good citizens, and 
if, unfortunately, new war should arise in our country "Sherman's Army" 
will be the first to buckle on its old armor and come forth to defend and 
maintain the government of our inheritance. 

By order of Major General W. T. Sherman, 

L. M. Dayton, 
Assistant Adjutant General. 

On the second day of June, A. D. 1865, Lieutenant General 
Grant issued the following farewell order: 

Soldiers of the Armies of the United States: 

By your patriotic devotion to your country in the hour of danger and 
alarm, your magnificent fighting, bravery and endurance, you have main- 
tained the supremacy of the Union and the constitution, overthrown all 
armed opposition to the enforcement of the laws and of the proclamations 
forever abolishing slavery — the cause and pretext of the rebellion — and 
opened the way to the rightful authorities to restore order and inaugurate 
peace on a permanent and enduring basis on every foot of American soil. 
Your marches, sieges and battlfes, in distance, duration, resolution and 
brilliancy of results, dim the luster of the world's past military achievements, 
and will be the patriots' precedent in defense of liberty and right in all time 
to come. In obedience to your country's call you left your homes and 
families and volunteered in its defense. Victory has crowned your valor 



214 HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 

■ 

and secured the purpose of your patriotic heaits, and with the gratitude of 
your countrymen and the highest honors a great and free nation can accord^ 
you will soon be permitted to return to your homes and families, conscious 
of having discharged the highest duties of American citizens. To achieve 
these glorious triumphs and secure to yourselves, your fellow countrymen 
and posterity the blessings of free institutions, tens of thousands of your 
gallant comrades have fallen and sealed the priceless legacy with their blood 
The graves of these a grateful nation bedews with tears, honors and mem- 
ories, and will ever cherish and support their stricken famihes. 

U. S. GRANT, 
Lieutenant General. 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 



I 


Field and Slaff. 

Non-Commis- 
sioned Staff. 

C, 
D. 
E. 
F, 
G- 
H. 
I. 
K. 


Field and Staff, 
Non-ComtnU^ioned SlaB, 




_ 


_ 


Wounded, not Motlallj. 


Apr"!'6; 






- 


Total on this Expedition. 




„ 




Killed. 


i 
If* 




„ 


„ 


Morully Wounded, 




„ 


„ 


Hissing and Died, 




, 




Wounded, no! Mortally. 




1^ 


„ i „ „ „ 1 Totals in this Ballle. 




ft 


o-« -w-^u.* oil- " 


Killed. 


-'SI 






0.-W** »tU. MU.+ 


Mortally Wounded. 




1- 


- - 


Mi..ing and Died, orNeverHe=rd 
From, 




i? 




Wounded, not Mortally. 




^ 




Missing Whn Returned. 




? 


^ -^ H s,;-:^!:;; ac: 


Tolala in this Battle. 


! 




, 




Killud, 


•?«<„ 




- 


- „ „ 1 Morlally Wounded. 


iflfl 




t 


- o>« i - u. * o-o Wouaded, not Mortally. 




■n 


B-j-j CTw 0=1/. dr.- Totals in ihiiSieite. 




fi 


-«HM»w« o,- - Ki'l^'l- 


1 

sit. 

n 






„„ „„„ „ Mortally Wounded, 




£ 






t 






nn 


„ „ „„ „ MissinR. Who Kemrnfd. 




R 


2r.S^.„E^.,^« . Totals in ihUBattlo, 








Si 

III 

IF" 




,, 






u. 


^ __ MiBEiDR and Died, or Never Heard 




■s 


*w«o«o>ch*>D^ - " Wounded, not Mortally. 




„ 


^ _ _, _ ^ _ Mi-islng. WhoRetunied. 




!? 


»i-,u,>::*-_>p>o-^» - - 1 TotaUio this Bailie. 






Motially Wounded. 






„ 


■Wonnded, nol Mortally. 


"'■fi' 




1,1 






- 


WDunded. not Mortally. 


%i^: 




H 


iTotalitilhisSkirmisli. 




^ 


1 Killed on Railroad While on Furlough. 



1 

s 

% 

I 




^ 1 ^ 1 Mortally Wounded in ColHsicn on Railroail. 




„ 1 „ 1 MorlalljWounrtedbyE.plQ6icqofSh 


Us. 




- t - 1 Dtowned, 




^ 


WU-OI-UlB*0l" 


Injured in Collision on Railroad. 
Captured OihErwiie than ia Battle. 






O.U. w H U » - M 




^ 1 „ 1 KilledbyGuBrrillBS, Under Cook o!A.D. 




S 1 =-.-„-»„« ». - 1 T,,.,...Th„.0,h.,C....,,l... 





HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 



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ROLL OF HONOR OF NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 

KILLED IN BATTLE. 

Colonel, HOLDEN PUTNAM, November 25, 1863, at Mission 

Ridge, Tenn. 
Company A. 

Corporal, BENJAMIN I. MARSHALL, May 16, 1863, at Cham- 
pion Hill, Miss. 
Musician, WILLIAM C THOMPSON, October 5, 1864, at 

Allatoona, Ga. 
WILLIAM H. VALENTINE, October 5, 1864, at 

Allatoona, Ga. 
ROSS WELLER, October 5, 1864, at Allatoona, Ga. 
IRVING M. WHITEHEAD, November 25, 1863, at 

Mission Ridge, Tenn. 
WILLIAM H. WHITEHEAD, May 16, 1863, at 

Champion Hill, Miss. 
Company B. 

ist Sergt., JOHN A. REINOHL, November 25, 1863, at Mission 

Ridge, Tenn. 
Sergeant, OSCAR A. WEBB, October 5, 1864, at Allatoona, Ga. 
Sergeant, JOHN MATSON, November 25, 1863, at Mission 

Ridge, Tenn. 
Corporal, GEORGE FREASE, October 5, 1864, at Allatoona, Ga. 
Corporal, JAMES M. SMITH, November 25, 1863, at Mission 

Ridge, Tenn. 
WILLIAM R. BATES, October 5, 1864, at Allatoona, 

Ga. 
SAMUEL CREPPS, November 25, 1863, at Mission 

Ridge, Tenn. 
SAMUEL GORDON, May 16, 1863, at Champion 

Hill, Miss. 
ARCHIBALD JAMES, October 5, 1864, at Allatoona, 

Ga. 
JOHN D. KIRKPATRICK, November 25, 1863, at 

Mission JRidge, Tenn. 
JOHN B. MARTIN, October 5, 1864, at Allatoona, 

Ga. 



218 ROLL OF HONOR OF NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 

PETER C. STONER, May i6, 1863, at Champion 

Hill, Miss. 
JAMES WORMWOOD, May 16, 1863, at Champion 

Hill, Miss. 
Company C, 

Corporal, CYRUS A. BLACK, October 5, 1864, at AUatoona, Ga. 
Corporal, ALVIN B. CHURCH, October 5, 1864, at AUatoona, 

Ga. 
TALCOTT T. BLOOD, May 16, 1863, at Champion 

Hill, Miss. 
CHARLES M. BRYAN, May 16, 1863, at Champion 

Hill, Miss. 
PAUL COLBURN, May 16, 1863, at Champion 

Hill, Miss. 
JAMES E. MASON, October 5, 1864, at AUatoona, Ga. 
JOHN C. McDonald, October 5, 1864, at AUa- 
toona, Ga. 
THOMAS C. McMURRY, May 16, 1863, at Champion 

Hill, Miss. 
WILLIAM A. SWOPE, May 16, 1863, at Champion 

HiU, Miss. 
FRANCIS B. WILCOX, May 16, 1863, at Champion 

HiU, Miss. 
Company D, 

Sergeant, WILLIAM P. ERWIN, November 25, 1863, at Mis- 
sion Ridge, Tenn. 
Sergeant, THOMAS PHILLIPS, May 16, 1863, at Champion 

HiU, Miss. 
Sergeant, JOHN RIMA, November 25, 1863, at Mission Ridge, 

Tenn. 
Corporal, JAMES HICKEY, May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, 

Miss. 
ISAAC BRANDT, October 5, 1864, at AUatoona, Ga. 
RUDY ERWIN, May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, 

Miss, 
THOMAS O. K. MITCHELL, May 16, 1863, at 

Champion Hill, Miss. 
Company E. 

WILLIAM T. BROOKIE, October 5, 1864, at AUa- 
toona, Ga. 

HENRY BURCH, November 25, 1863, at Mission 

Ridge, Tenn. 



ROLL OF HONOR OF NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 21& 

PETER CAVANAUGH, October 5, 1864, at Alia- 

toona, Ga. 
WILLIAM E. GULP, May 22, 1863, at Vicksburg, 

Miss. 
CORNELIUS DEWITT, October 5, 1864, at AUa- 

toona, Ga. 
LAFAYETTE M. FOOS, May 16, 1863, at Champion 

Hill, Miss, 
MARTIN S. HITCHCOCK, May 16, 1863, at Cham- 
pion Hill, iMiss. 
HENRY DEEPER, November 25, 1863, at Mission 

Ridge, Tenn. 
GEORGE RILEY, May 16, 1863, at Champion 

Hill, Miss. 
GARDNER ROGERS, May 16, 1863, at Champion 

Hill, Miss. 
WILLIAM C. SIMMONS, May 16, 1863, at Champion 

Hill, Miss. 
MIOHAEL SHEA, November 25, 1863, at Mission 

Ridge, Tenn. 

Company F, 

ergeant, IRA A. PAYNE, November 25, 1863, at Mission 

Ridge, Tenn. 
WILLIAM BENNETT, May 16, 1863, at Champion 

Hill, Miss. 
JOHN H. BRIGHTMAN, May 22, 1863, at Vicks- 

burg, Miss. 
PATRICK MARRAN, May 16, 1863, at Champion 

Hill, Miss. 
JOHN McCLINE, May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, 

Miss. 
ASA W. MITCHELL, November 25, 1863, at Mission 

Ridge, Tenn. 
RUSSELL S. PARK, October 5, 1864, at Allatoona, 

Ga. 
THOMAS SHAY, May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, 

Miss. 

Company G, 

brporal, ADAM M. BROUGHLER, May 16, 1863, at Cham- 
pion Hill, Miss. 

orporal, LYMAN HULBERT, October 5, 1864, at Allatoona, 

Ga. 



^20 ROLL OF HONOR OF NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 

JOHN B. BOLLMAN, May i6, 1863, at Champion 

Hill, Miss. 
ISAAC ERB, May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. 
WILLIAM G. HAAS, May 22, 1863, at Vicksburg, 

Miss. 
SAMUEL W. LOGAN, November 25, 1863, at Mission 

Ridge, Tenn. 
HENRY ROSWEILER, May 16, 1863, at Champion 

Hill, Miss. 
DANIEL WOLF, May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, 

Miss. 

Company H, 

Corporal, GEORGE S. ROBINSON, May 14, 1863, at Jackson, 

Miss. 
LEVI G. BAKER, May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, 

Miss. 
HOMER S. CLARK, May 14, 1863, at Jackson, Miss. 
GEORGE GARDNER, May 22, 1863, at Vicksburg, 

Miss. 
FREDERICK PETERSON, November 25, 18^, at 

Mission Ridge, Tenn. 
THEODORE RILEY, October 5, 1864, at Allatoona, 

Ga. 
WILLIAM E. SCOTT, November 25, 1863, at Mission 

Ridge, Tenn. 
Company I. 

1st Sergt., EZfeKIEL G. NEFF, May 16, 1863, at Champion 

Hill, Miss. 
Sergeant, ROBERT J. SAMPLE, November 25, 1863, at Mission 

Ridge, Tenn. 
DANIEL W. HUDNUT, May 16, 1863, at Champion 

Hill, Miss. 
ELIAS NEVIUS, November 25, 1863, at Mission 

Ridge, Tenn. 
Company K, 

Captain, DAVID LLOYD, May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, 

Miss. 

HUBBARD BRIGGS, October 5, 1864, at Allatoona, 

Ga. 

DUNCAN GOWER, November 25, 1863, at Mission 

Ridge, Tenn. 



ROLL OF HONOR OF NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 221 

CHARLES E. HART, May i6, 1863, at Champion 

Hill, Miss. 
ISAAC MARTIN, May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, 

Miss. 
CHARLES W. SCURR, May 16, 1863, at Champion 

Hill, Miss. 
JOHN S. WALQUIST, May 16, 1863, at Champion 

Hill, Miss. 
AMOS N. WILKINSON, May 16, 1863, at Champion 

Hill, Miss. 
WILLIAM R. QUEEN, October 5, 1864, at Allatoona, 

Ga. 

MORTALLY WOUNDED IN BATTLE. 

Company A, 

ergeant, JOHN W. MUSE, May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill. 

Miss. 
Corporal, JOHN H. FOX, May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. 

JASPER N. BROWN, May 22, 1863, at Vicksburg, 

Miss. 

JOHN downer; May t6, 1863, at Champion Hill, 

Miss. 

JOHN A. S. GIBSON, October 5, 1864, at Allatoona, 

Ga. 

GEORGE MILLS, May 22, 1863, at Vicksburg, Miss. 

JOHN SHANNON, Mav 14, 1863, at Jackson, Miss. 

THOMAS P. WAMACks, May 16, 1863, at Cham- 
pion Hill, Miss. 

Company B, 

;ergeant, RICHARD T. SHORT, May 16, 1863, at Champion 

Hill, Miss. 
:orporal, THOMAS D. KEADLE, May 16, 1863, at Champion 

Hill, Miss. 

ERASTUS DOUGLAS, November 25, 1863, at Mis- 
sion Ridge, Tenn. 

AUSTIN L. DURLEY, May 16, 1863, at Champion 

Hill, Miss. 

BENJAMIN F. KISER, October 5, 1864, at Alla- 
toona, Ga. 

JAMES McCRANK, May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, 

Miss. 



222 ROLL OF HONOR OF NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 

SAMUEL M. ZEARING, May i6, 1863, at Champion 

Hill, Miss. 
Company C\ 

Sergeant, JOHN MONTGOMERY, October 5, 1864, at Alla- 

toona, Ga. 
DAVID R. MURPHY, May 22, 1863, at Vicksburg, 

Miss. 
THOMAS SHAY, May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, 

Miss. 
Company D, 

Sergeant, JOHN B. NEWCOMER, May 22, 1863, at Vicksburg, 

Miss. 
Corporal, GEORGE W. KLECKNER, October 5, 1864, at AUa- 

toona, Ga. 
Corporal, GEORGE SILLS, May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, 

Miss. 
JOHN BOLINGER, May 16, 1863, at Champion 

Hill, Miss. 
SAMUEL F. DEVORE, May 22, 1863, at Vicksburg, 

Miss. 
SAUMEL KNEDLE, May 16, 1863, at Champion 

Hill, Miss. 
JACOB LEONARD, May 22, 1863, at Vicksburg, 

Miss. 
Company E, 

Corporal, JOSEPH H. BILL, JR., May 22, 1863, at Vicksburg, 

Miss. 
WALLACE FORBES, May 16, 1863, at Champion 

Hill, Miss. 
JULIUS HIRTH, May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, 

Miss. 
ALEXANDER WATSON, November 25, 1863, at 

Mission Ridge, Tenn. 
Company F, 

ist Sergt., ROBERT A. ADAMS, May 16, 1863, at Champion 

Hill, Miss. 
Corporal, CHARLES DOTY, May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, 

Mi^. 
Corporal, JOSEPH A. MILLER, May 16, 1863, at Champion 

Hill, Miss. 
FRANCIS M. BAIRD, May 22, 1863, at Vicksburg, 

Miss. 



ROLL OF HONOR OF NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 223 

EDWARD P. BLISS, May i6, 1863, at Champion 

Hill, Mi^s. 

HENRY HAWK, November 25, 1863, at Mission 

Ridge, Tenn. 

Company G, 

orporal, HENRY C. CARL, October 5, 1864, at AUatoona, Ga. 

ALVIN ADAMS, May 22, 1863, at Vicksburg, Miss. 

WILLIAM EISENHOWER, May 16, 1863, at Cham- 

pion Hill, Miss. 

WILLIAM KRISE, May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, 

Miss. 

BENJAMIN F. SHOCKLEY, May 16, 1863, at Cham- 
pion Hill, Miss. 

JOEL WAGNER, November 25, 1863, at Mission 

Ridge, Tenn. 

WILLIAM J. WILSON, May 16, 1863, at Champion 

Hill, Miss. 

Company H. 

ergeant, ABRAHAM SMITH, May 16, 1863, at Champion 

Hill, Miss. 
ergeant, ELIJAH VANGILDER, December 11, 1864, at 

Savannah, Ga. 

DAVID BUNNELL, May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, 

Miss. 

THOMAS GOODWIN, October 5, 1864, at AUa- 
toona, Ga. 

WILLIAM WEBSTER, October 5, 1864, at AUa- 
toona, Ga. 

DANIEL WEST, May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, 

Miss. 

Company I, 

JAMES FRANKS, May 22, 1863, at Vicksburg, Miss. 

ANDREW J. NEIGHBOR, May 16, 1863, at Cham- 
pion Hill, Miss. 

WILLIAM H. RICHARDS, November 25, 1863, at 

Mission Ridge, Tenn 

DANIEL R. SMITH, November 25, 1863, at Mission 

Ridge, Tenn. 

Company K, 

ergeant, CHARLES S. CLAPP, May 16, 1863, at Champion 

Hill, Miss. 



234 ROLL OF HONOR OF NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 

Sergeant, SAMUEL WILEY, November 25, 1863, at Mission 

Ridge, Tenn. 
Corporal, ALBERT MASOX, May 16, 1863. at Champion Hill, 

Miss. 
Corporal, AUGUST WARNER, May 16, 1863, ^^ Champion 

Hill, Miss. 
MARTIN B. BARRETT, May 16, 1863, at Champion 

Hill, Miss. 
FRANKLIN HINMAN, May 16, 1863, at Champion 

Hill, Miss. 
ENOS W. SMITH, November 25. 1863, at Mission 

Ridge, Tenn. 
THOMAS SMITH, May 16. 1863, at Champion Hill, 

Miss. 

MISSING IN BATTLE AND DIED IN PRISON, OR NEVER HEARD FROM. 

Company A. 

Wagoner, ALEXANDER WEAVER, November 25, 1863, at 

Mission Ridge, Tenn. 
WILDER M. CRANDALL, November 25, 1863, at 

Mission Ridge, Tenn. 
ALBERT WAMACKS, November 25, 1863, at Mission 

Ridge, Tenn. 
Company B. 

Sergeant, DAVID BEAR, November 25, 1863. at Mission 

Ridge, Tenn. 
DELOS W. DARLING, November 25, 1863, at Mis- 
sion Ridge, Tenn. 
LEWIS H. LISTNER, November 25, 1863, at Mission 

Ridge, Tenn. 
THOMAS B. MASON, November 25. 1863, at Mission 

Ridge, Tenn. 
Company C, 

CONRAD BODE, November 25, 1863, at Mission 

Ridge, Tenn. 
Company D. 

GEORGE THOMAS, May 16, 1863, at Champion 

Hill, Miss. 
Company E. 

MICHAEL McMAHAN, November 25, 1863, at Mis- . 

sion Ridge, Tenn. 



ROLL OF HONOR OF NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 225 

MICHAEL McCarthy, October 5, 1864, at Alla- 

toona, Ga. 
Company F. 

ROBERT M. BAIR'D, May 14, 1863, at Jackson, Miss. 
HERMAN GRIFFIN, May 16, 1863, at Champion 

Hill, Miss. 
Company G, 

Corporal, WILLIAM H. COLLIER, November 25, 1863, at 

Mission Ridge, Tenn. 
Corporal, DAVID FORNEY, November 25, 1863, at Mission 

Ridge, Tenn. 
HENRY LAW, November 25, 1863, at Mission Ridge, 

Tenn. 
Company H, 

Corporal, JAMES DALEY, November 25, 1863, at Mission 

Ridge, Tenn. 
MICHAEL BATDORF, November 25, 1863, at Mis- 
sion Ridge, Tenn. 
Company I. 

Corporal, WILLIAM CODDINGTON, November 25, 1863, at 

Mission Ridge, Tenn. 

CLARK J. BULL, November 25, 1863, at Mission 

Ridge, Tenn. 

STEPHEN CONLEY, May 16, 1863, at Champion 

Hill, Miss. 
Company K. 

Corporal, HOWARD D. GIBSON, November 25, 1863, at Mis- 
sion Ridge, Tenn. 
Corporal, JOHN NELSON, November 25, 1863, at Mission 

Ridge, Tenn. 
THOMAS CRAIG, November 25, 1863, at Mission 

Ridge, Tenn. 
JAMES GIBSON, October 5, 1864, at Allatoona, Ga. 
CHARLES P. JOHNSON, October 5, 1864, at Alla- 
toona, Ga. 



15 



CASUALTIES OF NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 

LISTS OF OTHER CASUALTIES IN BATTLE. 



WOUNDED IN BATTLE. 



' Fit Id and Staff. 
Major, James M. Fisher, 

Adjutant, Henry G. Hicks, 

Xo9i - ( "ommisst'ofted Staff. 
ComSergt., Marcus B. Taylor, 

Company A. 
S«?rK«Hnt, CfEORGE E. Brown, 

Siirf(r<ant, Erasmus F. Bailey, 



Surgiittnt, 
^♦^rKWtnt, 



PiionoN Bryan, 
Ahnkr C?. Knapp, 
Benjamin F. Bailey, 
Edwin Burlingham, 
Jacob Evans, 

William Goldsmith, 
Thomas Holm an, 
Alonzo McClain, 
Jacob V. Nimrick, 
William J. Reed, 
Thomas J. Shires, 
William Taylor, 
Levi C. Valentine, 
Albert Wamacks, 
Alvin T. Wamacks, 
Henry Williams, 

Company B, 

I si Lieut., Leroy S. Hopkins, 
I St Lieut., Allen Ogan, 

isl Sergt , Jacob F. Ellis, 

Sergeant, David Bear, 

Sergeant, Aaron Dunbar, 
Sergeant, John F. Irey. 

Sergeant, John N. Knoblauch, 



May i6, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss., and 

October 5, 1864, at Allatoona, Ga. 
November 25, 1863, at Mission Ridge, Tenn. 

October 5, 1864, at Allatoona, Ga. 



May 22, 1863, at Vicksburg, Miss., and No- 
vember, 25, 1863, at Mission Ridge, Tenn. 

May 22, 1863, at Vicksburg, Miss., and Octo- 
ber 5, 1864, at Allatoona, Ga. 

November 25, 1863, at Mission Ridge, Tenn. 

May 22, 1863. at Vicksburg, Miss. 

May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. 

May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. 

May 22, 1863, at Vicksburg, Miss., and 
October 5, 1864, at Allatoona, Ga. 

October 5, 1864, at Allatoona, Ga. 

May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. 

May 22, 1863, at Vicksburg, Miss. 

May 22, 1863, at Vicksburg, Miss. 

May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. 

May 22, 1863, at Vicksburg, Miss. 

May 22, 1863, at Vicksburg, Miss. 

May 22, 1863, at Vicksburg, Miss. 

May 16. 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. 

May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. 

May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. 



May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. 

November, 25, 1863, at Mission Ridge, Tenn., 
and October 5, 1864, at Allatoona, Ga. 

November 25, 1863, at Mission Ridge, Tenn., 
and October 5, 1864, at Allatoona, Ga 

May 22, 1863, at Vicksburg, Miss., and No- 
vember 25, 1863. at Mission Ridge, Tenn. 

May 22. 1863. at Vicksburg, Miss. 

November 25, 1863, at Mission Ridge, Tenn., 
and December 11, 1864, at Savannah, Ga. 

October 5, 1864, at Allatoona, Ga. 



CASUALTIES OF NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 



227 



Sergeant, 
Corporal, 
Corporal, 
Corporal, 
Corporal, 
Corporal, 
Corporal, 



John Matson, 
Joseph M. Coulter, 
George Frease, 
Watson T. Palmer, 
James M. SMrTH, 
Thomas B. Smith, 
John R. Warkins, 
George W. Boeman, 
William H. Burnham, 
John H. Corey, 
Jacob Etsell, 
George Hubbard, 
Archibald James, 
Alexander H. Limerick, 
Patterson McClurg, 
James Nottingham, 
Barney O'Hare, 
William S. Ring, 
Anderson N. Searl, 
Allison Wilson, 



May 22, 1863, at Vicksburg, Miss. 
October 5, 1864, at Allatoona, Ga. 
November 25, 1863, at Mission Ridge, Tenn., 
November 25, 1863, at Mission Ridge, Tenn. 
May 22, 1863, at Vicksburg, Miss. 
May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. 
October 5, 1864, at Allatoona, Ga. 
May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. 
Octobers, 1864, at Allatoona, Ga. 
May 14, 1863, at Jackson, Miss. 
May 22, 1863, at Vicksburg, Miss. 
May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. 
May 22, 1863, at Vicksburg, Miss. 
October 5, 1864, at Allatoona, Ga. 
May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. 
May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. 
November 25, 1863, at Mission Ridge, Tenn. 
May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. 
October 5, 1864, at Allatoona, Ga. 
October 5, 1864, at Allatoona, Ga. 



2d Lieut., 

Sergeant, 

Corporal, 

Corporal, 

Corporal, 



Company C. 

Captain, William J. Brown, 

Thomas J. Lockwood, 
William L. Garwood, 
Solomon Carl, 
Robert Mowry, 
Elijah Spangler, 
Conrad Bode, 
Orange Carter, 
Burnham M. Decker, 
Samuel Garman, 

Frederick Gifford, 
James H. Larimore, 
Jonah F. R. Leonard, 
John C McDonald, 
Ezra Osborn, 

QUINTON WeSCOTT, 



October 5, 1864, at Allatoona, Ga. 
May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. 
May 16. 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. 
October 5, 1864, at Allatoona, Ga. 
May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. 
November 25, 1863, at Mission Ridge, Tenn. 
May 22, 1863, at Vicksburg, Miss. 
May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. 
May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. 
May 22, 1863, at Vicksburg, Miss., and 
October 5, 1864, at Allatoona, Ga. 
October 5, 1864, at Allatoona, Ga. 
May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. 
May 22, 1863, at Vicksburg, Miss. 
November 25, 1863, at Mission Ridge, Tenn. 
May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. 
May 22, 1863, at Vicksburg, Miss. 



Company D. 

2d Lieut., George S. Kleckner, May 22, 1863, at Vicksburg, Miss. 

Albert F. Childs, May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. 

Samuel R. Hutchison, November 25, 1863, at Mission Ridge, Tenn. 

George W. Kleckner, May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. 

Balser Bistline, May 22, 1863, at Vicksburg, Miss. 

Jacob Brenner, May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. 

Jacob Gable, October 5, 1864, at Allatoona, Ga. 

Calvin Giddings, May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. 



ist Sergt. 
Sergeant, 
Corporal, 



228 



CASUALTIES OF NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 



Isaac Hahn, 
Jacob Hahn, 
Henry W. High. 
David Kiester, 
Paul Lahr, 
Cyrus A. Robey, 
Andrew Shearer. 
Hiram Shippey, 



May 22, 1863, at 
May 16, 1863, at 
October 5, 1864, 
May 16, 1863, at 
May 16, 1863, at 
October 5, 1864, 
May 22, 1863, at 
October 5. 1864, 



Christopher Washburn, May 22, 1863, 
John D. White, May i6, 1863, at 

LuciEN W. Yeigh, October 5, 1864, 

Christian Yordy, October 5. 1864, 

Simon Young, May 16, 1863, at 



Vicksburg, Miss. 
Champion Hill, Miss, 
at Allatoona, Ga. 
Champion Hill, Miss. 
Champion Hill, Miss, 
at Allatoona, Ga. 
Vicksburg, Miss, 
at Allatoona, Ga. 
at Vicksburg, Miss. 
Champion Hill, Miss, 
at Allatoona, Ga. 
at Allatoona, Ga. 
Champion Hill, Miss. 



Comfany E 



istSergt., 
ist Sergt., 
Corporal, 

Corporal, 
Corporal, 



William F. Dunn, 
Thompson M. Wylie, 
Roger W. Phelps, 

Washington Prunk, 
Daniel Warren, 
Levi Akers, 
Jeremiah Ammons, 
Nelson Babcox, 
Joseph Bates, 
Cornelius Dewitt, 
James D. Livingston. 
Francis M. Owen, 
John Ready, 
John M. St. John, 
Alfred M. Stringer, 
William H. Walker 
Martin S. Walters, 
Robert Whitworth, 



October 5, 1864, at Allatoona, Ga. 
May 22, 1863, at Vicksburg, Miss. 
November 25, 1863, at Mission Ridge, Tenn., 

and October 5, 1864, at Allatoona, Ga. 
May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill. Miss. 
October 5, 1864, at Allatoona, Ga. 
May 16, 1863. at Champion Hill, Miss. 
May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. 
November 25, 1863, at Mission Ridge, Tenn. 
May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. 
May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. 
May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. 
November 25, 1863, at Mission Ridge, Tenn. 
October 5, 1864, at Allatoona, Ga. 
October 5, 1864, at Allatoona, Ga. 
October 5, 1864, at Allatoona, Ga. 
November 25, 1863, at Mission Ridge, Tenn. 
November 25, 1863, at Mission Ridge, Tenn. 
May 16, 1863. at Champion Hill, Miss. 



Comfany /. 



Sergeant, 
Corporal, 



James P. Early. 



May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss., and 
October 5, 1864, at Allatoona, Ga. 
Deloraine p. Chapman, May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. 
Horace L. Abbott, May 22, 1863, at Vicksburg, Miss. 

May i6, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss, 

May 22, 1863, at Vicksburg, Miss. 

May 14, 1863, at Jackson, Miss. 

May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. 
William J. Lafferty, October 5, 1864, at Allatoona, Ga., and De- 
cember n, 1864, at Savannah, Ga. 
Joseph Langston, May i6, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. 

Henry B. Love, May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. 

Samuel N. Miller, May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. 



Bethuel Adams, 
William S. Austin, 
Robert M. Baird, 
Henry Hawk. 



CASUALTIES OF NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 



229 



William L. Mitchell, May i6, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. 

Ira a. Payne, May 20, 1863, at Vicksburg, Miss. 

Henry Slater, May 22, 1863, at Vicksburg, Miss. 

Joseph C. Snyder, November 25, 1863, at Mission Ridge, Tenn. 



Comfany G. 



Sergeant, 
Corporal, 



ist Lieut., Jeremiah J. Piersol, 
Sergeant, Elias Kostenbader, 
Hugh Moser, 
Henry C. Carl, 
Daniel M. Bordner, 
Joseph Crane, 
Daniel Dauber. 
Henry Erb, 
Joseph- W. Fogel. 
John P. Garman, 

George W. Graham, 
Joseph F. Grawe, 
Henry Hockman, 



May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. 
May i6, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. 
November, 25, 1863, at Mission Ridge, Tenif. 
May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. 
May i6, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. 
May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. 
October 5, 1864, at Allatoona, Ga. 
May 22, 1863, at Vicksburg, Miss. 
May i6, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. 
November 25, 1863, at Mission Ridge, Tenn., 

and October 5, 1864, at Allatoona. Ga. 
May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. 
October 5, 1864, at Allatoona, Ga. 
November 25, 1863, at Mission Ridge, Tenn., 

and October 5, 1864, at Allatoona, Ga. 
May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss., and 

October 5, 1864, at Allatoona, Ga. 
May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. 
May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss., and 

October 5, 1864, at Allatoona, Ga. 
May 22, 1863, at Vicksburg, Miss. 
October 5, 1864, at Allatoona, Ga. 



John M. Humphrey, 

David M. Ilgen, 
Emanuel Kahley, 

John J. Kryder, 
Lester Nigh las, 
Reuben R. Reubendall, May i6, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. 



Levi Sheckler, 
James C. Stewart, 

Jacob R. Wagner, 
Robert Wardlow, 

Nathan Wertman. 
George Zerbe, 



October 5, 1864, at Allatoona, Ga. 

May 22, 1863, at Vicksburg, Miss., and Octo- 
ber 5, 1864, at Allatoona, Ga. 

November 25, 1863, at Mission Ridge, Tenn, 

May 22, 1863, at Vicksburg, Miss., and Octo- 
ber 5, 1864, at Allatoona, Ga. 

May 22, 1863, at Vicksburg, Miss. 

May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. 



Comfany H. 



Captain, 
I St Sergt., 
Corporal, 
Corporal, 



John A. Russell, May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill. Miss. 

RuFUS H. Ford, May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. 

James Daley, November 25, 1863, at Mission Ridge, Tenn. 

Charles B. Hamilton, May 22, 1863, at Vicksburg, Miss., and 

November 25, 1863, at Mission Ridge, Tenn. 

November 25, 1863, at Mission Ridge, Tenn. 

May 14, 1863, at Jackson, Miss., and May 22, 
1863, at Vicksburg, Miss. 

November 25, 1863, at Mission Ridge, Tenn. 

May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. 



Jonathan Batdorf, 
William O. Church, 

Thomas Fallon, 
Thomas Finlan, 



230 



CASUALTIES OF NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 



Milton B. Hull, 
Patrick M. Kane, 
Matt Landon, 

Ezra McIntire, 
James M. Park, 
Theodore Riley, 
Talbert Sayers, 
William E. Scott, 
James C. Schroufe, 
William Smith, 

• 

Andrew Spears, 
Seth D. Stoughton, 
William Webster, 



June I to 21, 1863, at Vicksburg, Miss. 

May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. 

May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss., and 
October 5, 1864, at Allatoona, Ga. 

May 22, 1863, at Vicksburg, Miss. 

November 25, 1863, at Mission Ridge, Tenn. 

May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. 

October 5, 1864, at Allatoona, Ga. 

May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. 

November 25, 1863, at Mission Ridge, Tenn. 

May 22, 1863, at Vicksburg, Miss., and No- 
vember 25, 1863, at Mission Ridge, Tenn. 

May 22, 1863, at Vicksburg, Miss. 

May 14, 1863, at Jackson, Miss. 

May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. 



Com f any I. 

Captain, Mills C. Clark, May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss, 

ist Sergt., Franklin M. Coddington, May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss., and 

November 25, 1863, at Mission Ridge, Tenn. 
October 5, 1864, at Allatoona, Ga. 
November 25, 1863, at Mission Ridge, Tenn. 
May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. 
November 25, 1863, at Mission Ridge, Tenn., 
and October 5, 1864, at Allatoona, Ga. 
William Coddington, May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. 



Sergeant, 
Corporal, 
Corporal, 
Corporal, 



Daniel Wolf, 
Franklin R. Betz, 
Cyrus H. Cauffman, 
Philip R. Toll, 



Edward Doran, 
Joseph O. Eastman, 
Joseph Hamilton, 
William P. Hosier, 
Isaac Hubbard, 



May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. 
May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. 
February 25, 1865, at West's Comers, S. 
May 22, 1863, at Vicksburg, Miss. 
May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. 



Jasper N. Kitterman, October 5, 1864, at Allatoona, Ga. 



Nathan R. Meek, 
Myron Palmer, 

David Reynolds, 
Thomas Smiley, 
Levi Triplett, 

Com f any K. 

ist Sergt, John H. Dye. 
ist Sergt., James S. Martin, 
Sergeant, Newell A. Bacon, 
Sergeant, Francis W. Norton, 
Corporal, Peter Pierson, 
Edwin Berlin, 
Peter Campbell, 
Lorenzo D. Hopkins, 
John S. Johnson, 



November 25, 1863, at Mission Ridge, Tenn. 
May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss., and 
November 25, 1863, at Mission Ridge, Tenn. 
May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. 
November 25, 1863, at Mission Ridge, Tenn. 
November 25, 1863, at Mission Ridge, Tenn. 



October 5, 1864, at Allatoona, Ga. 
May 14, 1863, at Jackson, Miss. 
May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. 
November 25, 1863, at Mission Ridge, Tenn. 
May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. 
May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. 
October 5, 1864, at Allatoona, Ga. 
October 5, 1864, at Allatoona, Ga. 
May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss., and 
November 25, 1S63, at Mission Ridge, Tenn. 



CASUALTIES OF NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 



231 



Henry Kirby, 
Patrick McClusky, 
John Nelson, 
Michael Sullivan, 
Chester Tracy, 
Henry Ward, 
Solomon Williams, 



May i6, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. 
November 25, 1863, at Mission Ridge, Tenn. 
May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. 
November 25, 1863, at Mission Ridge, Tenn. 
April 2, 1863, at Yazoo Pass, Miss. 
May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. 
October 5, 1864, at Allatoona, Ga. 



CAPTURED in BATTLE, WHO RETURNED, 



Comfany A. 

I St Lieut., William M. Morris, 
Edwin R. Heflin, 
William J. Reed, 



November 25, 1863, at Mission Ridge, Tenn. 
Octobers, 1864, at Allatoona, Ga. 
November 25, 1863, at Mission Ridge, Tenn. 



Comfany B. 

Captain, John W.. Hopkins, May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. 

Corporal, Louis B. Gesner, October 5, 1864, at Allatoona, Ga. 

Alexander H. Limerick, October 5, 1864, at Allatoona, Ga. 

Comfany C. 

John C. McDonald, May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. 



Comfany I). 

George F. Lusk, 

Comfany E. 

Corporal, Washington Prunk, 
Corporal, Abram G. Spellman, 
Isaac Demaranville, 



October 5, 1864, at Allatoona, Ga. 



October 5, 1864, at Allatoona, Ga. 
November 25, 1863, at Mission Ridge, Tenn. 
November 25, 1863, at Mission Ridge, Tenn. 



Comfany F. 

Bethuel Adams. October 5, 1864, at Allatoona, Ga. 

William H. H. Bliss, November 25, 1863, at Mission Ridge, Tenn. 

Francis M. Thomas, May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. 



Comfany G. 

Henry Ere, 

Comfany H. 

Captain, John A. Russell, 
• Henry Strong, 

Comfany K. 

Andrew J. Dahlen. 
Maxim Dushim, 
Edward Killian, 
Edgar Phillips, 
George W. White, 
Solomon Williams, 



October 5, 1864, at Allatoona, Ga. 



November 25, 1863, at Mission Ridge, Tenn 
May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. 



May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. 
May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. 
May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. 
November 25. 1863, at Mission Ridge, Tenn. 
November 25, 1863, at Mission Ridge, Tenn. 
May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. 



i 



232 CASUALTIES OF NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 

LISTS OF CASUALTIES NOT IN BATTLE. 

KILLED ON RAILROAD, WHILE ON FURLOUGH. 

Company C. 

William Karnes, In 1864, near LaFayette, Ind., en routehomt. 

MORTALLY WOUNDED BY ACCIDENTAL EXPLOSION OF SHELLS. 

Company G. 

WjiKoner, John Templeton, February 19, 1865, at Columbia, S. C, Died 

February 25, 1865. 

MORTALLY INJURED IN COLLISION ON RAILROAD. 

Company A'. 

Sylvanus p. Whitehead, June 28, 1864, near Dalton, Ga., Died July 

3, 1864. 

DROWNED. 

Company A". 

William H. Vallins, March 3, 1863, between Memphis, Tenn., and 

Vicksburg, Miss., from a steamer. 

killed BY GUERRILLAS. 

Company G. 

Under ) 

Cook of V Daniel I. Rone, March 21, 1865, at Mills' Creek, near Benton- 

A. D., ) ville, N. C. 

CAPTURED, otherwise THAN IN BATTLE, AND RETURNED. 

iVon- Commissioned Stajf. 
Sergt. Major, Harvey M. Trimble, January 13, 1863, near Ridgeway, Tenn. 

Company A. 

George B. McConnell, July 28, 1864, near Etowah Bridge, Ga. 

Company B. 

(Corporal, George Menelaus, September 3, 1864, near AUatoona, Ga. 
Wagoner, Marion Hite, September 3, 1864, near AUatoona, Ga. 

Company C. 

Jacob Houck, December 25, 1862, near Lumpkin's Mill, Miss. 

Nathan A. Lathrop, Not recorded when or where. 

(Company D. 

David Shearer, September 3, 1864, near AUatoona, Ga. 

Company E. 

Wagon Master, William H. Robertson, January 13, 1863, near Ridgeway, Tenn, 
Nelson Babcock, September 3, 1864, near AUatoona, Ga. 

George W. Burch, September 3, 1864, near AUatoona, Ga. 



CASUALTIES OF NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 



233 



Company I. 

Samuel Butterfield, January 13, 1863, near Ridgeway, Tenn. 

Moses Fox, September 3, 1864, near Allaloona, Ga. 

Erick North, January 13, 1863, near Ridgeway, Tenn. 

Myron Palmer, January 13, 1863, near Ridgeway, Tenn. 

David R. Reynolds, September 3, 1864, near Allatoona, Ga. 



Company K. 
Sergeant, John Sharp, 



Corporal, 
Corporal, 



September 3, 1864, near Allatoona, Ga. 
Anson C. Taylor, January 13, 1863, near Ridgeway, Tenn. 

Samuel Wiley, January 13, 1863, near Ridgeway, Tenn. 

William W. Doolittle, September 3, 1864, near Allatoona, Ga. 
Lorenzo D. Hopkins, September 3, 1864, near Allatoona, Ga. 
Isaac Martin, January 13, 1863, near Ridgeway, Tenn, 



injured in collision on railroad, JUNE 28, 1864, near dalton, ga. 



Com fatly A. 
Sergeant, George E. Brown. 

Com, f any B. 

ist Sergt., Jacob F. Ellis. 
Corporal, John Knoblauch. 

John B. Taylor. 

Jacob Huffman. 

Watson T. Palmer. 

Alexander H. Limerick. 

Company C. 

ist Lieut., Milton Cross. 

William L. Garwood. 
John Churchill. 
WilliamKarnes. 
Quinton Wescott. 
Napoleon B. No yes. 



ist Sergt., 
Corporal, 



Company D. 

James Bergstre.sser, 
Cyrus A. Robey. 

Company E. 
Sergeant, Chester H. Baker. 



John M. Smith. 
George Ammons. 
William T. Brookie. 
William Rhodes. 

Company F. 

Patrick Keaff. 

Company G. 

Adam K. Dinges. 
John P. Garman. 
George W. Graham. 

Company H. 

Thomas Goodwin. 

Company I. 

Sergeant, Edward P. Sellers. 
Michael Ryan. 

Company A". 

Sergeant, Hugh K. Vickroy. 
John S. Johnson. 
Edward Killian. 



S34 HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 




Colonel HOLDBN PUTNAM. 
KlUeil Id linttle, at MlMlon BlUgc, Tenn., November 25, 1 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 235 



RESOLUTIONS UPON THE DEATH OF COLONEL PUTNAM. 

Camp Ninety-Third Regiment Illinois Volunteer Infantry, 

Bridgeport, Ala., December 7th, A. D. 1863. 

At a meeting of the officers of the Ninety-Third Regiment 
Illinois Volunteer Infantry, called to-day, to commemorate the 
■death of their late lamented colonel, Holden Putnam, who fell in 
the battle of November 25th, 1863, on Mission Ridge, a com- 
mittee was appointed, consisting of Maj. J. M. Fisher, Capt. J. P. 
Reel, and Capt. Orrin Wilkinson, to draft appropriate resolutions, 
the following were reported. and unanimously adopted: 

Whereas, In the mysterious providence of an all-wise God, we 
are called upon to mourn the loss of our beloved commander, the 
late Col. Holden Putnam, who was killed in the battle of Chatta- 
nooga, Tenn., November 25th, 1863; therefore. 

Resolved, That the heart which ceased to beat when he fell 
upon the crest of Tunnel Hill, bearing down with him the emblem 
of our national life, yet speaks to us of the brave and efficient offi- 
cer, the genial friend, and the earnest soldier. 

Resolved, That the regiment has lost a friend and valiant leader 
and faithful commander; the country a true and pure patriot, and 
an unselfish son; his fellow citizens an active and generous helper 
<ind a noble delegate in arms. 

Resolved, That we tender our heartfelt sympathies to his be- 
reaved family and friends, and pray that God may assuage the 
grief of the household. 

Resolved, That a copy of these resolutions be transmitted to 
the family, and also sent for publication to each of the county 
papers of the counties represented in the regiment. 

N. C. BUSWELL, Lieut. Col., Commanding Regiment, 

Chairman. 
Attest: C. A. Griswold, Surgeon, Secretary. 



336 HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 




col. N, C. UUSWKl.L, 18G5. 




Lieut. Col. N, C. BUSWELL, I885. 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 237 



SKETCH OF NICHOLAS C. BUSWELL, LIEUTENANT COLONEL. 

NICHOLAS COLBY BUSWELL, was born December stli, 
1 83 1, at Peachem, Caledonia County, Vermont. His father, James 
Buswell, moved to Peoria, 111., in 1834, and in 1837 to Osceola, 
Stark County, Illinois. In 1857, N. C. Buswell moved to Neponset, 
in Bureau County, Illinois, where he resided at the beginning of 
the war. At that place he recruited Company H of the Ninety- 
Third Regiment Illinois Volunteer Infantry, in 1862. 

In 1866, after the war, he received an appointment in the regu- 
lar army, which he declined. In November of that year he was 
elected sheriff of Bureau County, Illinois. After the expiration 
of his term of office he was for eight years engaged in the livery 
business with Mr. Benjamin F. Cox, in Princeton, Illinois. 

During the years 1873 and 1874, as agent for several farmer 
clubs, he went to Europe to purchase and import draft horses. 

In 1877, he returned to his old home, at Neponset, where, in 
1890, his wife, to whom he was married when he was but twenty 
years of age, departed this life. On April 21st, 1896, he was mar- 
ried again. His home is at Neponset, Illinois. 



238 HISTORY OF THE NIKETV-THIRD rLLINOIS. 




Major J. M. FISH 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 230 



SKETCH OF JAMES M. FISHER, MAJOR. 

JAMES M. FISHER, was born in Belmont County, Ohio, 
April 15, 1822. • He came to Illinois with his mother and her family 
in 1842. He worked on a farm until 1854. He was married to 
Matilda Thomas in December, 1847. He was engaged in the 
grocery and grain business from 1854 until 1862. In the last men- 
tioned year he recruited Company I of the Ninety-Third Regiment 
Illinois Volunteer Infantry, and was elected Captain of the com- 
pany. On the 8th day of September, 1862, when the regiment was 
organized, at Princeton, Illinois, he was elected Major of the regi- 
ment by the line officers. At the close of the war he again engaged 
in the grain business at Princeton, Illinois, for about fifteen years. 
Since he retired from that business he has attended to his farm 
interests. He was for many years supervisor for the town of 
Princeton, on the county board. 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 




EEV. T. H. HAGGERTY, Chaplain. 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 241 



SKETCH OF REV. THOMAS H. HAGGERTY, CHAPLAIN. 

THOMAS H. HAGGERTY resigned his commission as chap- 
lain of the Ninety-Third Illinois on account of illness. In June, 
1863, he res\imed the ministry. He was stationed at St. Joseph, 
Mo., where he remained until March, 1865. He was then placed 
over the Jefferson City District, of Missouri, embracing all the coun- 
try from Kansas City to near St. Louis, and presided there for a 
full term. He then served a full term in the Springfield District of 
Missouri. Bishop Bowman then sent him to the St. Louis District, 
of Missouri, where he remained until he resigned, and was sent, by 
Bishop Peck, to Jefferson City, Mo., as pastor, where he remained 
two years. Bishop Bowman sent him to Pleasant Hill, Mo. From 
there he went to Kansas City, Mo. From there he was again sent to 
the St. Louis District, where he served until he again resigned, and 
Avas placed in one of the city churches as pastor, where he remained 
a full term. He was then elected chaplain of the Evangelical Alli- 
ance, which position he still occupies, having under his charge about 
twenty thousand people annually. 

For a number of years he was president of the board of trus- 
tees of the Missouri Military Institute, in Lexington, Mo., and so 
continued up to the time the institute was turned over to the state 
and to the M. E. Church South. He was a member of the board 
of trustees of Lewis College, at Glasgow, during its life. For many 
years he has been in the board of. trustees of McKendree College, 
Lebanon, Illinois. He is at present president of the board of 
trustees of Carleton College, at Farmington, Missouri. 

For many years he has been a member of the Grand Army of 
the Republic, Department of Missouri, and has been department 
chaplain three times. In 1895 he was chaplain-in-chief of the 
National Encampment G. A. R. When General Sherman organ- 
ized Ransom Post, G. A. R., at St. Louis, Missouri, he requested 
Chaplain Haggerty to join it and become its chaplain, which he did, 
and he has continued as its chaplain ever since. He is now about 
seventy years of age, and is still a vigorous man. He remembers 
his old comrades with much pleasure, and writes frequently for 
Grand Army papers. 



16 



242 HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 




Adjutant DAVID W. SPARKS. 



r,:-\ 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY -THIRD ILLINOIS. 




. TRIMBLE. AdJutHDt. 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 345 

SKETCH OF HARVEY M. TRIMBLE, ADJUTANT. 

HARVEY MARION TRIMBLE, who resides at Princeton, 
Illinois, was born near Wilmington, in Clinton County, Ohio, Jan- 
uary 27th, 1842. His father's name was Mathew Trimble, and his 
mother's maiden name was Lydia Thatcher. The family home was 
removed from Ohio to Illinois, and located on a farm near Prince- 
ton, in Bureau County, Illinois, October 25, 1843, and remained 
there until 1867, when it was changed to Princeton. 

The subject of this sketch was the sixth son. He has two 
sisters and one brother younger than himself. His education was 
obtained in the common schools, supplemented by a partial course 
at Eureka College, Illinois, He quit college to enter the army. 

While executing orders received from his commanding officer, 
on January 13th, 1863, while on a scout, he was captured by the 
enemy, near Ridgeway, Tennessee, and remained a prisoner four- 
teen days, being released on January 27th, 1863, which was the 
twenty-first anniversary of his birth. He rejoined the regiment 
January 30, 1863, near Memphis, Tennessee. 

During the entire period of his service, he was on every march, 
(except about ten miles, when he was a prisoner), and in every 
battle and skirmish in which the command participated. 

In August, 1863, Colonel Putnam recommended him, to the 
Governor of Illinois, for promotion to a captaincy. He had no inti- 
mation of the recommendation until several days had elapsed after 
it was made. When he learned of it, he promptly declined the 
promotion, and so wrote to Governor Yates, and the commission 
was not issued. 

On January 27th, 1864, Lieut. Col. Buswell gave him a mili- 
tary album, inscribed as follows : 

''Head Quarters 93rd 111. Inf'ty. Vols., 

"Huntsville, Ala., January 27th, 1864. 

"Harvey M. Trimble, Sergeant Major 93rd 111. Infty. 

"Allow me to present to you, on this, your 22nd birth- 
day, this album, as a slight token of respect for your manly 
courage at the battles of Jackson^ May 14th; Champion Hill, May 
i6th; Siege of Vickshurg, from May 19th to July 4th, and Tunnel 
Hilly November 25th, 1863. Also for your gentlemanly and sol- 
dierly hearing and strict attention to duty, whether in Camp, on the 
March or Field of Battle. N. C. BUSWELL, 

Lt. Col., Comd'g Regt." 



246 HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 

On being relieved from duty as Acting Assistant Adjutant 
General of the brigade, the Brigade Commander issued and pre- 
sented to him the following complimentary order: 

"Head Quarters 2nd Brig., 4th Div., 15th A. C, 

"Near Washington, D. C, May 31st, 1865. 

''General Orders No. 11. 

"Lieut. H. M. Trimble, having, at his own request, been relieved 
from duty as A. A. A. General of this Brigade, The General Com- 
manding desires to express his pleasure at the manner in which he 
has performed his duties, and his high appreciation of him as an 
efficient officer, in office, camp and field.'* 

"By order of 

"BRIG. GEN. WM. T. CLARK, 
"J. B. Stanford, Capt. and A. A. A. Gen." 

"To Lieut. H. M. Trimble, Adjt. 93d 111. Vol. Infty.'' 

On his return home, in the employ of the clerk of the Circuit 
Court, he arranged and indexed all the cases previously disposed 
of in that court. 

On December 4th, 1865, he was appointed deputy clerk of the 
Circuit Court of Bureau County, Illinois, and served in that capac- 
ity until November 20th, 1867, when he resigned. 

On October 9th, 1866, he was married to Miss. Margaret S. 
Pakin. They have five sons, viz.: Winfred K., Cairo A., Robert 
C, Harvey D. and Perry D., and three grandchildren, viz.: Win- 
fred E., Margaret V., and Cairo W., children of the three oldest 
sons, respectively. 

Immediately after the close of the war, he resumed the study 
of law, and was admitted to the Bar, licensed as an Attorney and 
Counselor at law, on November 20th, 1867, and has been in regular 
practice continuously ever since, at Princeton, Illinois. 

He was Master in Chancery of the Circuit Court of Bureau 
County, by successive appointments, made by Judge Edwin S. 
Leland, from April ist, 1868 until December 26, 1877, at which 
latter date his resignation of the office, dated December 3d, 1877, 
was accepted. 

He was elected as a Member of the Board of Education of 
School District No. i, in Princeton Township, April 6th, 1878, for 
one year, to fill a vacancy, and was reelected, for terms of three 
years each, successively, April 5th, 1879, April ist, 1882, April 4th, 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 247 

1885, April 7th, 1888, April i8th, 1891, and April 21st, 1894, and 
serv-ed continuously until April 17th, 1897. And he served as 
Secretary of that Board of Education from April 12th, 1880 until 
April 17th, 1897, being elected each year by the Board. 

He was elected as a Member of the Board of Education of the 
Princeton High School District, June 7th, 1881, for two years, to 
fill a vacancy, and was reelected, for three years, June 5th, 1883, 
and serv'ed until June ist, 1886. 

On February 27th, 1886, he was appointed by the mayor and 
confirmed by the city council, as one of the first Board of Directors 
of the Public Library and Reading Room of Princeton, Illinois, (the 
Matson Library), and served until July ist, 1888, assisting in the 
organization of the library. 

He was four times elected County Judge of Bureau County, 
Illinois, to wit, November 6th, 1877, November 7th, 1882, Novem- 
ber 2d, 1886, and November 6th, 1894. He was commissioned as 
County Judge, December ist, 1877 ^^ date from December 3d, 1877. 
and December /ist, 1882 to date from December 4th, 1882, and 
December 6th, '1886 to date from then, and November 21st, 1894 
to date from December 3d, 1894. He served continuously as 
County Judge from December 3d, 1877 ^^"^^^ December 4th, 1890, 
and again from December 3d, 1894 until June i8th, 1897. He 
resigned the office June 8th, 1897, and the resignation became eflfect- 
ive June i8th, 1897, when he was commissioned as Circuit Judge. 

He was elected President of the Bureau County Soldiers' Asso- 
ciation at the date of its organization on July 8th, 1896, and re- 
elected, at the first annual Re-Union, October 15th, 1896, for the 
term of one year. 

He was elected Commander of Ferris Post No. 309, Grand 
Army of the Republic, Department of Illinois, located at Prince- 
ton, Illinois, December 9th, 1896, and was installed January 13th, 
1897, (just thirty-four years after he was captured by the Con- 
federates), for the term of one year. 

On June 7th, 1897, he was elected Circuit Judge, in the Thir- 
teenth Judicial Circuit of Illinois, composed of the counties of 
Bureau, La Salle and Grundy. He was commissioned as Circuit 
Judge June l8th, 1897, for tlie term of six years, and took the oath 
of office on that dav. 



248 HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 




SAMUEL DORR, Quartermaster. 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 249 



SKETCH OF SAMUEL DORR, QUARTERMASTER. 

SAMUEL DORR, after the war closed, returned to his farm 
life, with his wife, near Neponset, Illinois, where two daughters, 
named Myra and Edna, were bom to them. His wife died March 
3d, 1871. On November i8th, 1872, he was again married, to 
Nellie Sanborn. A few years later he sold his farm and moved 
to Bedford, Iowa, where he engaged in the grain business. From 
there he moved to Burlington Junction, Missouri, and continued 
in the same business there. In 1887, he went to Brewton, Alabama, 
with the purpose of benefit to the health of his wife. He was pre- 
paring to go into business there, when, on September 15th, 1887, he 
suddenly died. His wife returned to Neponset, Illinois, with his 
body, where he was buried. His family resides in Chicago, Illinois, 



250 ROSTER OF NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 

Roster of Field and Staff. 
Colonel. 

HoLDEN Putnam.... Of Freeport, 111. He was elected Colonel, by the line 

officers, Sept. 8, 1862, commissioned to rank from Oct. 
13, itS62, and mustered into service Oct. 13, 1862. He 
was a brave and fearless officer, and was killed in battle, 
at Mission Ridge, Tcnn., Nov. 25, 1863. He was buried 
at Freeport, 111. 

Lieut enani Cobftel 

Nicholas C.BuswELL. Of Neponset, 111. He enrolled Company H of this 

regiment, and was elected Captain of the company 
Aug. 14. i852. He was elected Lieutenant Colonel, by 
the line officers, Sept. 8, 1862, and commissioned as 
such to rank from Oct. 13, 1862, and mustered into 
service Oct. 13, 1862. He was commissioned Colonel, 
by the Governor of Illinois, with that rank from Nov. 
25, 1863, but could not be mustered into service in that 
rank because the regiment then contained less than the 
minimum number of men, as specified in orders of the 
War Department, to admit of his muster. He served, 
however, and commanded the regiment from Nov. 25, 
1863, until the close of the war, and was musered out 
June 23, 1865, near Louisville, Ky., and was finally paid 
off and discharge<;l at Chicago, 111., July 6, 1865. 

Major. 

James M. Fisher Of Princeton, 111. He enrolled Company I of this regi- 
ment, and was elected Captain of the company Aug. 

12, 1862. He was elected Major, by the line officers, 
Sept. 8, 1862, and was commissioned as such to rank 
from Oct. 13, 1862, and was mustered into service Oc'. 

13, 1862. He was wounded in battle, severely, in the leg, 
May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. He was again 
wounded in battle, severely, in the side, Oct. 5, 1864, at 
Allatoona, Ga. He was commissioned Lieutenant Col- 
onel, by the Governor of Illinois, with that rank from 
Nov. 25, 1863, but could not be mustered into service in 
that rank because there was no vacancy, for the reason 
that Lieutenant Colonel Buswell could not then be mus- 
tered into service as Colonel, as stated above. He 
served with the regiment until the close of the war, and 
was mustered out June 23, 1865, near Louisville, Ky., 
and was finally paid ofT and discharged, at Chicago, 
111., July 6, 1865. 

Adjutants. 

David W. Sparks. . .Of Wyanet, 111., was the first Adjutant. He was elected 

First Lieutenant of Company C of this regiment Aug. 
15, 1862. He was elected Adjutant, by the line officers, 
Sept. 8, 1862, and was commissioned as such, with the 



ROSTER OF NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 251 

rank of First Lieutenant from Oct. 13, 1862, and was 
mustered into service Oct. 13, 1862. He resigned Nov. 
15, 1862, and his resignation was accepted as of that 
date. His present residence is Phoenix, Ariz. 

!-Ienry G. Hicks.... Of Freeport, 111., was the second Adjutant. He was 

commissioned as such, with the rank of First Lieu- 
tenant from Nov. 15, 1862, and was mustered into serv- 
ice Dec. 15, 1862. He was severely wounded, in the 
face, at the battle of Mission Ridge, Tenn., Nov. 25, 
1863. He resigned soon after, and his resignation was 
accepted Feb. 26, 1864. His present address is 720 
Third avenue, Minneapolis, Minn. 

Iarvey M. TRiMBLE.Of Princeton, 111., was the third Adjutant. He enlisted 

as a Private in Company K of this regiment Aug. 21, 
1862. He was elected Sergeant Major of the regiment, 
by the line officers, Sept. 8, 1862, and was so appointed, 
by warrant of the Colonel, Nov. 24, 1862, with rank 
from Sept. 8, 1862. He was commissioned Adjutant 
March 29, 1864, with rank as First Lieutenant from 
Feb. 26, 1864, and was mustered into service as Ad- 
jutant, April 20, 1864, to date from April 13, 1864. He 
served as A. A. A. General of the First Brigade, Third 
Division, Fifteenth Army Corps, from March 28, 1865 
to April 26, 1865, and of the Second Brigade, Fourth 
Division, Fifteenth Army Corps, from April 26, 1865 
to May 31, 1865, and, excepting those periods, served 
with the regiment until the close of the war. He was 
mustered out, near Louisville, Ky., June 23, 1865, and 
was finally paid oflf and discharged, at Chicago, 111., 

July 6, 1865. 
quartermasters. 

Edward S.Johnson. Of Tiskilwa, 111., was the first Quartermaster. He was 

commissioned, with rank as First Lieutenant from Oct. 

13, 1862, and was mustered into service Oct. 13, 1862. 

He resigned, and his resignation was accepted as of 

date Aug. 29, 1864. His present address is 969 West 

Madison street, Chicago, 111. 

Samuel Dorr Of Neponset, 111., was the second Quartermaster. He 

was elected First Lieutenant of Company H, of this 
regiment, Aug. 14, 1862, and so commissioned, with 
rank from Oct. 13, 1862, and mustered into service 
Oct. 13, 1862. He was commissioned as Quartermaster, 
• with rank as First Lieutenant from Aug. 29/1864., and 
mustered into service as such Oct. 21, 1864. He served 
with the regiment until the close of the war, and was 
mustered out, near Louisville, Ky., June 23, 1865, and 
was finally paid off and discharged, at Chicago, III., 
July 6, 1865. He died at Brewton. Ala., Sept. 15, 1887, 
and was buried at Neponset, 111. His family resides in 
Chicago, 111. 



252 ROSTER OF NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 

Surgeons. 

Joseph Huyett Of Camden Mills, 111., was the first Surgeon. He was. 

commissioned, with the rank of Major from Oct. 13, 
1862, and mustered into service Oct. 13, 1862. He re- 
signed, and his resignation was accepted as of date 
July 29, 1863. His present address is Milan, 111. 

Samuel A. Hopkins. Of Dover, 111., was the second Surgeon. He was com- 
missioned First Assistant Surgeon, with the rank of 
First Lieutenant from Oct. 13, 1862, and was mustered 
into service as such Oct. 13, 1862. He was commis- 
sioned as Surgeon, with the rank of Major from July 
29, 1863, and was mustered into service as such Dec. 
28, 1863. He resigned, and his resignation was ac- 
cepted as of date Dec. 21, 1864. He died at Maiden, 
HI., March 30, 1886, and was buried at Maiden, 111. 

Chas. a GRiswoLD..Of Fulton, 111., was the third Surgeon. He was com- 
missioned as Second Assistant Surgeon, with the rank of 
Second Lieutenant from Oct. 16, 1862, and was mus- 
tered as such Dec. 15, 1862. He was commissioned as 
Surgeon, with the rank of Major from Dec. 21, 1864, 
and was mustered into service as such March 27, 1865. 
He served with the regiment until the close of the war, 
and was mustered out, near Louisville, Ky., June 23,. 
1865, and was finally paid oflf and discharged, at Chi- 
cago, 111., July 6, 1865. P. O., Fulton, 111. 

First Assistant Surgeon. 

Samuel A. Hopkins. See history under the title of Surgeon. 

Second Assistant Surgeon. 

Chas. A. Griswold. .See history under the title of Surgeon. 

Chaplains. 

Rev. Thomas H. Haggerty. .Of Princeton, 111., was the first Chaplain. He 

was commissioned with the rank ot Captain from Oct. 
13, 1862, and was mustered into service. Oct. 13, 1862^ 
He resigned, and his resignation was accepted to take 
effect Jan. 24, 1863. His present address is 1909 Grand 
avenue, St. Louis, Mo. 

Lewis S. AsHBAUGH.Of Camden, 111., who was Captain of Company A, of 

this regiment, having resigned the captaincy of that 
company, was commissioned Chaplain of the regiment, 
with the rank of Captain from July 27, 1863, but he 
was never mustered into service as such, and the com- 
mission was canceled. 

Rev.Chas. M. Barnes . Of Neponset, III., was the second Chaplain. He was 

commissioned, with the rank of Captain from Oct- 

10, 1864, and mustered into service, at Savannah, Ga., 

Jan. 16, 1865, to take effect from Dec. 5, 1864. He 



ROSTER OF NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 253 

served with the regiment until the close of the war, 
and was mustered out, near Louisville, Ky., June 23, 
1865, and was finally paid off and discharged at Chi- 
cago, 111., July 6, 1865. His present address is 253 State 
street, Chicago, 111. 

Chaplain Barnes was born at Canton, 111., Sept. 3, 
1833. He graduated from Knox College in 1856, and 
from the Chicago Theological Seminary in 1859. He 
served as Pastor of the Congregational Church at 
Lamoille, 111., for one year, and thereafter was Pastor 
of the Congregational Church at Neponset, 111., until 
he enlisted as a Private in the One Hundred and Forty- 
fourth Regiment Illinois Volunteer Infantry. After a 
few weeks' service in that regiment he was commis- 
sioned Chaplain, as stated above. After the war, he 
was for a time Pastor of the Congregational Church 
at Plymouth, 111. But illness soon compelled him to 
give up his studies and professional work. He was 
ill about a year, and was thereafter, for about two years, 
in the postal service of the United States, as a route 
agent. Since then he has been engaged in business 
as a jobber of school books and stationery. 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 




TRIMBI-E, SerKeanf Major 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 255 



SKETCH OF ALBERT M. TRIMBLE, SERGEANT MAJOR. 

ALBERT MILTON TRIMBLE, was born near Wilmington, 
in Clinton County, Ohio, February i6th, 1840. He enlisted 
August 15th, 1862, in Company K of this regiment. He was pro- 
moted to Sergeant Major of the regiment July nth, 1864. He was 
mustered out of service, near Louisville, Kentucky, June 23d, 1865, 
and was finally paid off and discharged, at Chicago, Illinois, July 6th, 
1865. 

After returning to his home, at Princeton, Illinois, he served 
for a time as deputy postmaster at that place. Later he located in 
Mendota, Illinois, where he engaged in business as proprietor of a 
book store. 

On January 14th, 1869, at Duquoih, Illinois, he was married to 
Miss Mary E. Bingham, formerly of Dover, Illinois. 

In 1870 he removed from Mendota to Sycamore, Illinois, where 
he engaged in selling agricultural implements. In February, 1873, 
he removed from Sycamore to Ottawa, Illinois, where he served 
nearly six years as deputy clerk of the Supreme Court, for the 
Northern Grand Division of Illinois, under his brother, Cairo D. 
Trimble, who was then clerk of that court. During this period, in 
1877, he was Junior Vice Commander of the Department of Illinois, 
Grand Army of the Republic, and also a member of the city council 
of the city of Ottawa, and also a captain in the Illinois National 
Guard, which he assisted in organizing. He resigned his commis- 
sion as captain in the I. N. G. in the spring of 1879. 

In March, 1879, he removed from Illinois to Nebraska, and 
settled near Lincoln, the state capital, where he engaged in farm- 
ing and stock-raising, and where he nqw resides. In the years 
1892 and 1893 he was deputy sheriff of Lancaster County, Nebraska. 
He was Assistant Adjutant General of the Department of Nebraska, 
Grand Army of the Republic, for the year 1894, under Gen. Church 
Howe, then department commander. 

On November 5th, 1895, he was elected county clerk of Lan- 
caster County, Nebraska, and was reelected in November, 1897, 
and is now serving his second term in that oflfice. His address is 
Lincoln, Nebraska. 



350 HISTORY OF THi; NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 




HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 257 

SKETCH OF MARCUS B. TAYLOR, COMMISSARY SERGEANT. 

MARCUS B. TAYLOR, was born near Watertown, New York. 
When he was three years old his parents removed to Illinois, and 
after a short residence in Whiteside and Mercer counties, settled 
on a farm in Rock Island County. In 1859 he entered Knox Col- 
lege, at Galesburg, Illinois, with the view of preparing for the 
ministry. His health soon failed and he returned to the farm. 

He enlisted August 2d, 1862, in Company A of this regiment, 
and on the organization of the company was elected second Sergeant 
and served as such until July 13th, 1863. On July 13th, 1863, he 
was promoted to Commissary Sergeant of the regiment by Colonel 
Putnam. He served in that place constantly until October 5th, 
1864, when he was wounded in the right shoulder at the battle of 
Allatoona, Ga. The bullet has never been removed. After the 
expiration of a furlough, on account of his wound, he returned to 
the regiment, at Savannah, Georgia, and served until the end of the 
war. He was mustered out June 2d, 1865. 

On reaching home the county commissioners of Rock Island 
County appointed him to take the census of the county, which he 
did. In 1866, he removed to Kansas, and engaged in the drug 
business. For nine years, in Kansas and Iowa, he pursued a busi- 
ness career. In 1874, he entered the ministry, in the Pittsburg Con- 
ference of the M. P. Church, and served a year at Browns- 
ville, Pennsylvania. He then served Grace Church, Cincinnati, 
Ohio, for two years, and went from there to Beaver Falls, Pennsyl- 
vania, where he remained two years. Then he went to Boston 
University for a special course of study, supplying a pulpit near the 
city of Boston at the same time. At the end of a year's study he 
went to Adrian, Michigan, as pastor of Plymouth Church there, at 
the same time acting as president of Adrian College. Then, after 
another year's study at Boston, he went as pastor to a Congrega- 
tional Church in Canton, Massachusetts, where he remained twelve 
vears. 

In 1885 he was mustered into Post No. 94, Department 01 
Massachusetts, G. A. R. He served that post six years as com- 
mander and four years as chaplain. He was department chaplain 
in 1895 and 1896. He was a delegate to the Thirtieth National 
Encampment, held at St. Paul, Minnesota, in September, 1896, and 
was then elected chaplain-in-chief of the G. A. R. His present 
address is 300 Eighth Street, Brooklyn, New York. 



17 



258 HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 




UYRON W. LYMAM, Principal MaBlcIin. 



ROSTER OF NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 259 

Roster of Non-Commissioned Staff. 
Sergeant Majors. 

Harvey M. Trimble. Of Princeton, 111., was the first Sergeant Major. He 

served as such from Sept. 8, 1862 until April 12, 1864, 
He was discharged as Sergeant Major April 19, 1^64, 
to date from April 12, 1864, to enable him to accept 
promotion and be mustered into service as Adjutant 
of the regiment. See his history under that title, and 
in the sketch of him. 

Thompson M. Wylie. Of Indiantown, 111., was the second Sergeant Major. 

He served as such from April 13, 1864 tmtil July 11, 
1864. On July II, 1864, he was promoted First Lieu- 
tenant of Company I, of this regiment. See his his- 
tory under that title, and in the sketch of him. 

Albert M. Trimble. Of Princeton. 111., was the third Sergeant Major. He 

served as such from July 11, 1864 until the close of 
the war. See his history in the sketch of him. 

Quartermaster Sergeants. 

Wm. M. HERROLD..Of Fulton, 111., was the first Quartermaster Sergeant, 

He served as such from Sept. 8, 1862 until Aug. 12, 
1863. On Aug. 12, 1863, he was promoted First Lieu- 
tenant of Company F, of this regiment; and on April 
29, 1864, he was promoted Captain of the same Com- 
pany. See his history under those titles, and in the 
sketch of him. 

Jas: W. Newcomer.. Of Rock Run, 111., was the second Quartermaster Ser- 
geant. He enlisted as a Private in Company D, of this 
Regiment, Aug. 7, 1862, and was mustered into service 
Oct. 13, 1862, at Chicago, 111. He was promoted Quar- 
termaster Sergeant Aug. 12, 1863. He served as such 
until the close of the war, and was mustered out, near 
Louisville, Ky., June 23, 1865,. and was finally paid off 
and discharged at Chicago, 111., July 6, 1865. He was 
commissioned as First Lieutenant of Company D, of 
this regiment, to rank frorri June 6, 1865, but was not 
mustered into service as such, because the commission 
was not received in time sufficiently prior to muster out. 

His address is Sterling, 111. See title of First Lieu- 
tenant of Company D. 

Commissary Sergeants. 

Phinneas T. Richardson. Of Princeton, 111., was the first Commissary Ser- 
geant. He enlisted as a Private in Company I, of this 
Regiment, Aug. 13, 1862. He was promoted Commis- 
sary Sergeant to date from September 8, 1862, and 
served as such from that date until July 13, 1863. On 
July 13, 1863, he was promoted Second Lieutenant of 
Company I, of this regiment, with rank from May 16, 



260 ROSTER OF NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 

1863, but could not be mustered as such, because, under 
orders of the War Department, the company then con- 
tained less than the minimum number to entitle it to 
a Second Lieutenant. He served a short time, how- 
ever, as such Lieutenant. He was mustered out, and 
finally discharged as Commissary Sergeant July 13, 
1863. See title of Second Lieutenant of Company I. 

Marcus B. Taylor. .Of Camden, 111., was the second Commissary Sergeant. 

He served as such from July 13, 1863 until the close 
of the war. See his history in the sketch of him. 

Hospital Stewards. 

Leroy S. Hopkins.. Of Hollowayville, 111., was the first Hospital Steward. 

He served as such from Sept. 8, 1862 until April 12, 
1863. On April 12, 1863, he was promoted First Lieu- 
tenant of Company B, of this regiment. See his his- 
tory under that title. 

James Cozad Of Fulton, 111., was the second Hospital Steward. He 

enlisted as a Private in Company F, of this regiment, 
Aug. 5, 1862. He was promoted Hospital Steward 
April 12, 1863, and served as such until the close of the 
war. He was mustered out, near Louisville, Ky., June 
23, 1865, and was finally paid off and discharged at Chi- 
cago, 111., July 6, 1865. He died Aug. 14, 1897, at 
Reynolds, 111. Buried there. 

Principal Musicians, 

Myron W. Lyman. .. Of Freeport, 111., enlisted as a Musician in Company 

D, of this regiment, Aug. 7, 1862, and was mustered 
into service, at Chicago, 111., Oct. 13, 1862. He was 
promoted Principal Musician Sept. 8, 1862, and served 
as such until March 4, 1863, when he was transferred 
10 the Brigade Band, in which he served until the close 
of the war. He was mustered out with the Band, and 
the date and place are unknown. His address is 195 
South California avenue, Chicago, 111. 

George D. Vannest. Of Albany, 111., enlisted as a Musician in Company F, 

of this regiment, July 25, 1862, and was mustered into 
service, at Chicago, 111., Oct. 13, 1862. He was pro- 
moted Principal Musician Sept. 8, 1862, and served 
with the regiment until the close of the war. He was 
mustered out, near Louisville, Ky., June 23, 1865, and 
was finally paid off and discharged, at Chicago, III, 
July 6, 1865. His address is Marshalltown, Iowa. 

Geo. B. Turneaure. Of Freeport, 111., enlisted as a Musician in Company 

D, of this regiment, Aug. 6, 1862, and was mustered 
into service, at Chicago, 111., Oct. 13, 1862. He was 
promoted Principal Musician March 4, 1863, and served 
with the regiment until the close of the war. He was 



ROSTER OF NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 261 

mustered out, near Louisville, Ky., June 23, 1865, and 
was finally paid off and discharged, at Chicago, 111., 
July 6, 1865. His address is Freeport, 111. 

Sutler. 

David Knight Of Princeton, 111., was appointed Sutler on the organiza- 
tion of the regiment, Sept. 8, 1862, and continued as 
such until about Nov. 26, 1862. 



362 HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 




WILLIAM M. MORRIS, C.iptalu, Company "A. 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 




JOSEPH A. McCr.AUGHLIN, Company 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 




WILLIAM M. MORRIS. Ciptalu. Compaay " 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 




JOSKl'H A. McCLAI'OHLIX, Compniij 



266 ROSTER OF NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 

May i6, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. Discharged, on 
account wounds, Oct. 13, 1863. 

Joseph A. Blair Aug. 9, 1862. Mustered out June 2, 1865. P. 0., 

Mackey, Iowa. 

Erasmus F. Bailey. Aug. 9, 1862. Promoted Corporal, and Sergeant. 

Wounded in battle May 22, 1863, at Vicksburg, Miss. 
Wounded in battle, slightly, in back, Oct. 5, 1864, at 
Allatoona, Ga. Mustered out June 2, 1865. P. 0., 
Humboldt, Kan. 

Benjamin F. Bailey. Aug. 14 ,1862. Wounded in battle, slightly in the neck, 

May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss.. Mustered out 
June 2, 1865. P. O., Springfield, Mo. 

WM.KBRANDENBURG.Aug. 9, 1862. Died Feb. 2, 1863, at Fort Pickering, 

Tenn. Buried at Memphis, Tenn. 

Hugh A. Conner. .. Aug. 14, 1862. Mustered out June 2, 1865. P. O., 

Carroll, Iowa. 

Wilder M.Crandall. Aug. 9, 1862. Captured in battle Nov. 25, 1863, at 

Mission Ridge, Tenn. Died in prison June 15. 1854. 

Robert Cathcart. . Aug. 7, 1862. Died May 4, 1863, at Memphis, Tenn. 

Buried there. 
Edwin M. Dack Aug. 9, 1862. Mustered out June 2, 1865. P. O., 

Thayer, Kan. 

John Downer Aug. 6, 1862. Mortally wounded in battle May 16, 1863, 

at Champion Hill, Miss. Died June 2, 1863. Buried 
at V^icksburg, Miss. 

Jacob Evans Aug. 5, 1862. Wounded in battle May 22, 1863, at Vicks- 
burg, Miss. Wounded in battle, slightly, in the back, 
Oct. 5, 1864, at Allatoona, Ga. Mustered out June 2, 
1865. P. O., Rock Island, 111. 

Joseph A. Essex Aug. 6, 1862. Died March 24, 1863, at Memphis, Tenn. 

Buried there. 
George Fox Aug. 9, 1862. Promoted Corporal. Mustered out June 

2, 1865. 

Wm. W. Ferguson. .Aug. 11, 1862. Mustered out June 2, 1865. P. O., Lone 

Elm, Kan. 

William Goldsmith. Aug. 5, 1862. Slightly wounded in battle, in the shoul- 
der, Oct. 5, 1864, at Allatoona, Ga. Mustered out June 
2, 1865. P. O.. Milan, 111. 

John A. S. Gibson.. Aug. 9, 1862. Mortally wounded in battle, through 

bowels, Oct. 5, 1864, at Allatoona, Ga. Died Oct. 6, 
1864. Buried at Marietta, Ga. 

Thomas Holmes Aug. i, 1862. Severely wounded in battle May 16, 

1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. Transferred to Invalid 
Corps Feb. 16, 1864. P. O., Milan, 111. 

Joseph Haynes Aug. 3, 1862. Promoted Corporal. Mustered out June 

2, 1865. P. O., Duffer, Ore. 



ROSTER OF NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 267 

John Heverling Aug. 7, 1862. Mustered out June 2, 1865^ P. O., Milan, 

111. 

Edwin R. Heflin. .July 14, 1862. Captured in battle Oct. 5, 1864, at Alla- 

toona, Ga. Mustered out June 24, 1865. P. O., Wood- 
bine, Iowa. 

James K. Howard.. Aug. i, 1862. Died April i, 1863, at Memphis, Tenn. 

Buried there. 

William Jacobs. .. .Aug. i, 1862. Died Sept. 21, 1863, at Memphis, Tenn. 

Buried there. 
George Klink Aug. 7, 1862. Died June 30, 1864, at Huntsville, Ala. 

Buried at Chattanooga, Tenn. 

James Linton Aug. 5, 1862. Discharged for disability Aug. 6, 1863. 

Died March 13, 1864, at Milan, III. Buried there. 

Oliver S. McCLAiN.July 14, 1862. Promoted Corporal. Mustered out 

June 2, 1865. P- O., Denver, Colo. 

Alonzo McClain. .. July 14, 1862. Wounded in battle May 22, 1863, at 

Vicksburg, Miss. Promoted Corporal. Mustered out 
June 2, 1865. P. O., Des Moines, Iowa. 

Hiram R. Mixer Aug. 5, 1862. Mustered out Aug. 19, 1865. 

Jos. A. McClaughlin. Aug. 6, 1862. Mustered out June 2, 1865. P. O., Gene- 

seo. 111. 

Geo. B. McCoNNELL.Aug. 9, 1862. Captured near Etowah Bridge, Ga., 

July 28, 1864, while on a scout. Escaped, and returned 
to the regiment Sept. 12, 1864. Mustered out June 2, 
1865. P. O., Deweese, Neb. 

Benj. I. Marshall. Aug. 9, 1862. Promoted Corporal. Killed in battle 

May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. Buried at Vicks- 
burg, Miss. 

Thomas Martin Aug. 9, 1862. Died Feb. 24, 1863, at Memphis, Tenn. 

Buried there. 

Thomas M. Martin. Aug. 9, 1862. Mustered out June 2, 1865. P. O., IIH- 

nois City, 111. 

Joseph Mills Aug. 6, 1862. Transferred to Invalid Corps Feb. 15, 

1864. P. O., Rock Island, 111. 

George Mills Aug. 9, 1862. Mortally wounded in battle May 22, 1863, 

at Vicksburg, Miss. Died Aug. 5, 1863, at Milliken's 
Bend, La. Buried at Vicksburg, Miss. 

Perry Nimrick Aug. 9, 1862. Promoted Corporal. Mustered out June 

2, 1865. P. O., Cable, 111. 

Jacob V. Nimrick. .Aug. 7, 1862. Wounded in battle May 22, 1863, at 

Vicksburg, Miss. Transferred to Invalid Corps Sept. 
9, 1863. P. O., Cable, 111. 

William J. Reed... Aug. 9, 1862. Wounded in battle, slightly in the head. 

May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. Captured in 
battle Nov. 25, 1863, at Mission Ridge, Tenn. Mus- 
tered out June 2, 1865. 



268 ROSTER OF NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 

Enos H. Reed. Aug. 14, 1862. Mustered out June 2, 1865. P. 0., 

Filley, Neb. 

Henry E. RANTZANC.Aug. 14, 1862. Mustered out June 2, 1865. P. 0., Hen- 
derson, Iowa. 

John W. Sinex July 14, 1862. Mustered out June 2, 1865. P. O., Ster- 
ling, 111. 

Johnson SoLMONSON.July 29, 1862. Died Aug. 10, 1863, at home. Buried 

at Rock Island, 111. 

Andrew Sword July 29, 1862. Discharged for disability Aug. 19, 1S63. 

Died at Milan, 111. Buried at Rock Island, 111. 

Harper Scott Aug. 6, 1862. Transferred to Invalid Corps Feb. 15, 

1864. P. O., Vinton, Iowa. 

Thomas J. Shires... Aug. 6, 1862. Wounded in battle May 22, 1863, at 

Vicksburg, Miss. Mustered out May 9, 1865. P. 0., 
Geneva, Neb. 

Jacob D. Settle Aug. 9, 1862. Mustered out June 2, 1865. Died March 

4, 1887, at Milan, 111. Buried at Rock Island, 111. 

John L. Settle Aug. 9, 1862. Furloughed Oct. 28, 1862. Never re- 
turned. 

Lester Seward Aug. 11, 1862. Died Sept. 25, 1863, at Vicksburg, Miss. 

Buried there. 

John Shannon July 18, 1862. Mortally wounded in battle May 14, 

1863, at Jackson, Miss. Died May 16, 1863. 

David H. Smith Aug. 14, 1862. Mustered out June 2, 1865. P. 0., 

Davenport Iowa. 

John Thomas Aug. 9, 1862. Promoted Corporal. Mustered out June 

2, 1865. P. O., Illinois City, 111. 

William Taylor. .. Aug. 11, 1862. Wounded in battle May 22, 1863, at 

Vicksburg, Miss. Transferred to Invalid Corps Feb. 
15, 1864. P. O., Illinois City, 111. 

Porter Templeton. Aug. 12, 1862. Died March 14, 1863, at Memphis, Tenn. 

Buried there. 

Wm. C. Thompson. .Aug. 23, 1862. Promoted Musician. Killed in battle 

Oct. 5, 1864, at Allatoona, Ga. Buried at Marietta, Ga. 

Wm. H. Valentine. July 14, 1862. Killed in battle Oct. 5, 1864, at Alla- 
toona, Ga. Buried at Marietta, Ga. 

Levi C. Valentine. Aug. 9, 1862. Wounded in battle May 22, 1863, at 

Vicksburg, Miss. Mustered out June 2, 1865. P. 0., 
Majors, Neb. 

Henry Vanheren. . Aug. 9, 1862. Transferred to Brigade Band March 4, 

1863. P. O., Vinton, Iowa. 

Perry B. Weaver ling Aug. 9, 1862. Mustered out June 2, 1865. P. 0., 

Rock Island, 111. 

Charles K. Werden. Aug. 9, 1862. Deserted Jan. i, 1863. 



ROSTER OF NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 269 

Henry Williams... Aug. 8, 1862. Slightly wounded, in the face and arm, 

in battle, May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill. Miss. Mus- 
tered out June 2, 1865. P- O., Bentonville, Ark. 

Thomas P. WAMACKS.Aug. 9, 1862. Mortally wounded in battle May 16, 1863, 

at Champipn Hill, Miss. Died May 28, 1863. Buried 
at Vicksburg, Miss. 

Albert Wamacks. ..Aug. 9, 1862. Wounded in battle, slightly, in thigh, 

May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. Missing in 
battle Nov. 25, 1863, at Mission Ridge, Tenn. Never 
heard from. 

Alvin T. WAMACKS.Aug. 9, 1862. Slightly wounded, in the thigh, in battle. 

May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. Mustered out 
June 2, 1865. P. O., Elsie, Neb. 

Ross Weller Aug. 9, 1862. Killed in battle Oct. 5, 1864, at AUatoona, 

Ga. Buried at Marietta, Ga. 

Irving M. Whitehead. July 30, 1862. Killed in battle Nov. 25, 1863, at Mis- 
sion Ridge, Tenn. Buried at Chattanooga, Tenn. 

Wm. H. Whitehead . Aug. 6, 1862. Killed in battle May 16, 1863, at Cham- 
pion Hill, Miss. Buried at Vicksburg, Miss. 

Ira G. Whitehead. Aug. 6, 1862. Mustered out June 2, 1865. P. O., 

South Rock Island, 111. 

Franklin W.Wilson. Aug. 6, 1862. Mustered out June 2, 1865. P- O., Milan, 

111. 

John T. Weaver. .. .Aug. 2, 1862. Promoted Corporal. Mustered out June 

2, 1865. 

Daniel Wright. .. .Aug. 23, 1862. Mustered out June 2, 1865. P. O., 

Kalo, Iowa. 

Enoch Zachary. . . . Aug. 5, 1862. Mustered out June 2, 1865. Died in 1867, 

at Garnet, Kan. Buried there. 

Recruit. 

George B. Blades.. Enrolled at Black Hawk, 111., Oct. 4, 1864. Trans- 
ferred to Company I, of this regiment, June 2, 1865. 
P. O., Irwin, Iowa. 



♦Explanation: The residence of all the members of this company, except the last one, 
as given on the Muster Roll, was Camden, Illinois. The first date given, in each case, is the 
<late of enrollment. In all cases where it is not given, the present P. O. address is unknown. 



270 HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 




JAJIES W. r.KE, Oiptaln, Company ' 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 271 

SKETCH OF JAMES W. LEE, CAPTAIN, COMPANY "bJ 



»f 



JAMES WESLEY LEE, was born November 4th, 1835, at 
Double Creek, Maryland. Moved to Baltimore, Maryland, in 1838. 
He was educated in the public schools of Baltimore, Newton Acad- 
emy and Maryland University, in Maryland, and at Garrett Biblical 
Institute of the Northwestern University, at Evanston, Illinois. 

He engaged in commercial business from 1849 until 1854, when 
he reentered school, and graduated in 1857. He taught in Newton 
Academy until July, i860, when he removed to Illinois and settled 
near Lincoln. He moved to Chicago in 1861, where he was tutor 
in the Rev. Dr. O. H. Tiffany's family, and at the same time attended 
the Garrett. Biblical Institute at Evanston, Illinois. He entered the 
Rock River Conference of the M. E. Church and was appointed to 
Dover, Illinois, in October, 1861. 

He enlisted August i ith, 1862. He was elected Second Lieuten- 
ant of Company B of the Ninety-Third Regiment Illinois Volunteer 
Infantry August nth, 1862, and was commissioned as such with 
rank from October 13th, 1862, and was mustered into service Octo- 
ber 13th, 1862, at Chicago, Illinois. He was wounded in the left 
arm May 22d, 1863, at Vicksburg, Mississippi. He was promoted 
First Lieutenant and commissioned as such with rank from July 31st, 
1863, and mustered into service as such November 29th, 1863. He 
was promoted Captain and commissioned as such with rank from 
March ist, 1864, and mustered into service as such April 4th, 1864. 
He served with his company and regiment until the close of the war, 
and was mustered out June 23d, 1865, near Louisville, Kentucky, 
and was paid off and finally discharged, July 7th, 1865, at Chicago, 
Illinois. 

After the close of the war, he reentered Garrett Biblical Insti- 
tute, at Evanston, Illinois, in July, 1865. He was married to Miss 
Eliza Ann Emerson, at Dover, Illinois, on November ist, 1865. 
They have one child. 

He reentered the Rock River Conference of the M. E. Church 
and was appointed to Yorkville, Illinois, in October, 1866. He was 
transferred to the Georgia Conference of the M. E. Church and ap- 
pointed to the First M. E. Church, Atlanta, Georgia, in October, 
1868. He was presiding elder of the North Georgia District from 
1869 until 1872. He was elected president of Clark University, At- 
lanta, Georgia, in 1872. He was presiding elder of the Atlanta Dis- 
trict in 1874. He returned to the Rock River Conference and was 
apointed to Palatine, Illinois, in October, 1876; to Newark, Illinois, 



272 HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 

in 1877; to Mendota, Illinois, in 1879; l^ool^ ^ supernumerary relation 
and went with a colony to Dakota in 1881 ; served the church at Ma- 
homet, Illinois, until 1882, and was associate editor of the "Chicago 
Lever'' and pastor of the Asbury Church, Chicago, Illinois, until 
1885. He was appointed to Pullman, IlHnois, in October, 1885; to 
Lanark, Illinois, in October, 1886; to Elizabeth, Illinois, in October, 
1890; to Montrose, Chicago, in 1892; and to Ada Street M. E. 
Church, Chicago, Illinois, in October, 1895. 

His present home is at Mayfair, Chicago, Illinois. 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILUNOIS. S73 




LUN OGAN, First UeuteDsiit, Couipauy -IV 



274 HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 




REV. JACOB F. F.LLIS, First Sergt 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 275 



SKETCH OF JACOB F. ELLIS, FIRST SERGEANT, COMPANY "B. 



M 



JACOB F, ELLIS, was born in Fremont, Ohio, in October, 
1842. When he was thirteen years old the family removed to Illi- 
nois. By industry and economy he worked himself into Wheaton 
College, Illinois, at the age of nineteen years. Though eager for 
education, he left college for the army in 1862, and served as shown 
in the roster of his company. 

At the close of the war he went back to Wheaton College and 
graduated from that institution .in 1869. In that year he was* mar- 
ried to Miss Nettie Cowen of Wheaton, Illinois. She only survived 
about a year. After a year, spent as principal of the preparatory 
department of Wheaton College, he began a seminary course at 
Chicago and finished it at Oberlin, Ohio, in 1873. That year he 
was again married, to Miss. Mary H. Hall, of Oberlin, and was that 
year ordained a minister at Toledo, Ohio. In 1874, he went as 
pastor to Forest Grove, Oregon, and thereafter spent seventeen 
years on the Pacific Coast. He was pastor at Seattle, Washington, 
and president of the Pacific University. As home missionary, pastor 
and educator, the chief inspiring spirit of a college, and the center of 
beneficent activities radiating over those young and expanding com- 
munities, he gave impulse, direction and vigor to all forms of re- 
ligious work. The labor and toil, the energy and thought, the zeal 
and resolution, the patience and courage, that marked his work 
there can never be told. 

In the fall of 1893, he went as pastor to the Congregational 
Church at Neligh, Nebraska, and was soon made president of Gates 
College, located there. Later he removed to Norfolk, Nebraska, 
where he was endeavoring to found an educational institution, when 
his health suddenly failed. He died June 28th, 1896, at Norridge, 
Conn., and was buried at Norfolk, Nebraska. 



376 HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 




DUN'BAR, Sergeant. Company ■■B." 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 277 

SKETCH OF AARON DUNBAR, SERGEANT, COMPANY "B." 

AARON DUNBAR, was born November 25th, 1842, near 
Newville, in Cumberland County, Pennsylvania. His father^s name 
was John Dunbar. His mother^s maiden name was Maria Oiler, 
who departed this life when he was only six years old. The family 
was of Scotch origin, and the subject of this sketch inherited very 
much of the sturdy character of that ancestry. He was an only 
son, and for four generations before him there was only one son 
m the Dunbar family. He removed from Pennsylvania with his 
father to Bureau County, Illinois, a few years before the war. He 
was educated in the common schools of Pennsylvania, and after 
coming to Illinois was a student, for two years and a half, at the 
Dover Academy, before the war and one year after the war. 

He enlisted as a private, for three years or during the war, was 
soon promoted to sergeant, and served to the end of the war, when 
he was mustered out with the company and regiment, as shown 
by the roster of the company. He was wounded in the charge at 
Vicksburg, Mississippi, May 22d, 1863, which disabled him for a few 
weeks. But notwithstanding that, he was with the regiment in every 
battle and on every march in which it participated. 

After the war he taught school during the winter months and 
engaged in farming during the summer seasons. On May 28th, 
1868, he was married to Miss Emily Thompson, the only daughter 
of Dwight Thompson. His wife is one year younger than he. 
They have three daughters, viz. : Mary, Carrie and Pearl. After his 
marriage he settled down for life in the business of farming, and 
has been very prosperous in his business, having become the owner 
of a goodly quantity of fine and well improved land. He is one of 
the substantial men of Bureau County, highly respected by all who 
know him. 

He was town collector of the town of Dover for the years 
1869 and 1870. He was one of the commissioners of highways of 
that town from April, 1877, to April, 1883. He was the assessor for 
that town from April, 1883, to April, 1895, excepting one year. He 
was elected supervisor of that town in April, 1895, and reelected in 
April, 1897, and is now serving his second term in that office. A 
good soldier during the war, he has been a good citizen ever since. 
And the editor of this volume assumes the responsibility of saying 
that but for his untiring industry in the collection of statistics and 
information, and his persistent eflforts in such behalf, this history of 
the Ninety-Third Regiment Illinois Volunteer Infantry would never 
have been published. His address is Dover, Illinois. 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 




JUUN N. KNOWLAUGH, SKrijeaut, Uompunj- "I 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 




JOSUril II. UOULTEE, 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 




UEOltGE H. BAIIK, UoQjpaQy "B," 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 




i U. Cllll.DS, 



284 HISTORY OF THE NIXETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 




HAM-ll T. WKTIIEKEI.L, Coniiiaii.v "U," 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 



,4Xi^, 



^^1^/ 




286 ROSTER OF NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 

Roster of Company B. 

Enrolled in Bureau County, Illinois. 

Organized August ii, 1862, at Dover, Bureau County, Illinois. 

Muster fd into service October /j, 1862, at Chicago, Illinois* 
Captains. 

John W. Hopkins. .Maiden, 111. Commissioned to rank from Oct. 13, 1862.. 

Mustered into service Oct. 13, 1862. Captured in battle 
May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. Resigned 
Feb. 29, 1864. Died Aug. 10, 1869, at Unionville, Mo. 
Buried there. 

James \V. Lee Dover, 111. Commissioned to rank from March i, 

1864. Mustered into service April 4, 1864. Mustered 

out June 23. 1865, near Louisville, Ky. Paid off and 

finally discharged July 6, 1865, at Chicago, 111. P. 0., 

Mayfair, Chicago, 111. See his history in the sketch 

ante. 
First Lieutenants. 

David Deselms. .. .Princeton, 111. Commissioned to rank from Oct. 13, 

1862. Mustered into service Oct. 13, 1862. Resigned 
Jan. 24, 1863. Died March 10, 1871, at Newton, Iowa. 
Buried there. 

Lerov S. Hopkins. .Hollowayville, 111. Enlisted Aug. 13, 1862, as a Pri- 
vate in this Company. Appointed First Sergeant on 
the same day. Promoted Hospital Steward Sept. 
8, 1862. Commissioned First Lieutenant to rank from 
Jan. 24, 1863. Mustered into service as such April 12, 

1863. Slightly wounded, in the leg, in battle, May 16, 
1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. Resigned July 31, 1863. 
He is a practicing physician. P. O., Bradford, 111. 

James W. Lee Dover, 111. Commissioned First Lieutenant to rank 

from July 31, 1863. Mustered into service as such 

Nov. 29, 1863. Promoted Captain April 4, 1864. See 
that title, and see his history in the sketch ante. 

Allen Ogan Dover, 111. Enlisted Aug. 11, 1862, as a Private in 

this Company. Appointed Sergeant on the same day. 
Severely wounded, in the side, in battle, Nov. 25, 1863, 
at Mission Ridge, Tenn. Commissioned as First Lieu- 
tenant to rank from March i, 1864. Mustered into 
service as such Sept. i, 1864. Slightly wounded in 
battle, in the left thigh, Oct. 5, 1864, at AUatoona, Ga. 
Mustered out June 23, 1865, near Louisville, Ky., and 
paid oflf and finally discharged July 6, 1865, at Chicago, 
111. After the war closed, in 1865, he removed to Mar- 
shall County, Iowa. He was married April 18, 1869. 
He is a farmer, and owns a farm two miles east of 

Marshalltown, Iowa. P. O., Marshalltown, Iowa. 
Second Lieutenant. 

James W. Lee Dover, 111. Commissioned Second Lieutenant to rank 

from Oct. 13, 1862. Mustered into service as stich Oct. 



ROSTER OF NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 287 

13, 1862. Promoted First Lieutenant Nov. 29, 1863. 
Promoted Captain April 4, 1864. See those titles, and 
see his history in the sketch ante. 

First Sergeant. 

Leroy S. Hopkins.. HoUowayville, 111. Aug. 13, 1862. Promoted Hospital 

Steward, and then First Lieutenant. See those titles. 
Sergeants. 

John A. Reinohl. ..Princeton, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Promoted First Ser- 
geant. Killed in battle Nov. 25, 1863, at Mission Ridge, 
Tenn. Buried at Princeton, 111. 

Edward J. MojER. ..Dover, 111. Aug. 11, 1862. Transferred to Veteran 

Reserve Corps Sept. 6, 1863. Died about May 30, 1896, 
at Harvard, Neb. Buried there. 

Allen Ogan Dover, 111. Aug. 11, 1862. Promoted First Lieutenant. 

See that title. 

Fletcher M.Garton. Dover, 111. Aug. 11, 1862. Discharged for disability 

Aug. 5, 1863. Died a few days after reaching home 
at Dover, 111. Buried there. 

Corporals. 

Dennis S. Baker. ..Dover, 111. Aug. 12, 1862. Reduced to ranks. Dis- 
charged for disability March 2, 1863. 

John F. Irey Princeton, 111. Aug. 12, 1862. Promoted Sergeant. 

Wounded in battle Nov. 25. 1863, at Mission Ridge, 
Tenn. Wounded in battle, slightly in the arm, Dec. 
II 1864, at Savannah, Ga. Discharged May 24, 1865. 
P. O., Marion, Ohio. 

Richard T Short. .Dover, 111. Aug. 12, 1862. Promoted Sergeant. Mor- 
tally wounded in battle May 16, 1863, at Champion 
Hill, Miss. Died the same day. Buried at Vicksburg, 
Miss. 

David G. Wilson. .Dover, 111. Aug. 12, 1862. Discharged for disability 

Dec. 14, 1862. P. O., Effingham, Kan. 

Robert Emerson. .. Dover, 111. Aug. 12, 1862. Died Oct. 22, 1862, at 

Dover, 111. Buried there. 

James Harrison. ... Dover, 111. Aug. 12, 1862. No record as to what 

became of him. 

Oscar A. Webb Dover, 111. Aug. 12, 1862. Promoted Sergeant. 

Killed in battle Oct. 5, 1864, at Allatoona, Ga. Buried 
at Marietta, Ga. 

Watson T. Palmer. Dover, 111. Aug. 12, 1862. Slightly wounded in the 

leg, in battle, Nov. 25, 1863, at Mission Ridge, Tenn. 
Injured June 28, 1864, in the right foot, in a collision 
on the railroad, near Dalton, Ga. Mustered out June 
23, 1865. P. O., Mendota, 111. 

Musicians. 

Wm. C. Doutheit. .Lane Station, 111. Aug. 12, 1862. Discharged for dis- 
ability Jan. 12, 1863. 



h 



288 ROSTER OF NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 

John M. Howe Princeton, 111. Aug. 12. 1862. Discharged for dis- 
ability March 10, 1863. P. O., Monroe, Wis. 

Wagoner. 

William Powers. ..Hollowayville, 111. Aug. 12, 1862. Deserted March 2, 

1863, and Oct. 6, 1863. 

Privates. 

Francis Atkins. ...Maiden, 111. Aug. 12, 1862. Discharged for disability 

June 30, 1863. P. O., Princeton, 111. 

George W. Boeman . Maiden, 111. Aug. 12, 1862. Wounded in battle, se- 
verely in the leg. May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. 
Mustered out June 23, 1865. P. O., Cullom, 111. 

John P. Burnh am.. Dover, 111. Aug 12, 1862. Transferred to Vet. R. C. 

Feb. II, 1864. P. O., Ohio, 111. 

William R. Bates. .Princeton, 111. Aug. 12, 1862. Killed in battle Oct. 5. 

1864, at Allatoona, Ga. Buried at Marietta, Ga. 

Joseph Barnard. ... Berlin, 111. Aug. 15, 1862. Mustered out June 23, 

1865, P. O., Soldiers' Home, Milwaukee, Wis. 

George H. Bahr. ..Princeton, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Discharged for disa- 
bility Aug. 24, 1863. P. O., Vinton, Iowa. 

David Bear Dover, 111. Aug. 12, 1862. Promoted Sergeant. Se- 
verely wounded, in battle, May 22, 1863, at Vicksburg, 
Miss. Severely wounded, in battle, Nov. 25, 1863, at 
Mission Ridge, Tenn. Captured, in battle, Nov. 25, 
1863, at Mission Ridge, Tenn. Died Aug. 20, 1864, 
in prison at Andersonville, Ga. Number of his grave 
is 6644. 

John H. Corey Dover, 111. Aug. 12, 1862. Slightly wounded, in battle, 

May 14, 1863, at Jackson, Miss. Mustered out June 
23, 1865. Died Dec. 19, 1892, at Galesburg, 111. Buried 
in North Prairie Cemetery, Bureau Coimty, 111. 

Jonathan J. Closson. Dover, 111. Aug. 12, 1862. Discharged Jan. 15, 1863. 

Died Oct. i, 1889, at Des Moines, Iowa. Buried there. 
His home was in Chicago, 111. 

Samuel Crepps Dover, 111. Aug. 12, 1862. Killed in battle Nov. 25, 

1863, at Mission Ridge, Tenn. Buried at Chattanooga, 
Tenn. 

Franklin Covert. .Princeton, 111. Aug. 12, 1862. No record as to what 

became of him. 

Richard H. F. Cook. Dover, 111. Aug. 12, 1862. Died June 3, 1863, at Mem- 
phis, Tenn. Buried there. 

William H. Carter. Arispie, 111. Aug. 12, 1862. Discharged for disability 

Jan. 12, 1863. P. O., No. 320 Twelfth street. East Des 
Moines, Iowa. 

Austin L. Durley. Dover, 111. Aug. 12, 1862. Mortally wounded, in bat- 
tle, May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. Died the 
same day. Buried at Vicksburg, Miss. 



ROSTER OF NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 289 

Moses Dickens... .Dover, 111. Aug. -12, 1862. Mustered out June 20, 

1865. Died at Bloomfield, Ind. Buried there. Date 
of death unknown. 

Aaron Dunbar Dover, 111. Aug. 12, 1862. Promoted Sergeant. Slightly 

wounded in battle, May 22, 1863, at Vicksburg, Miss. 
Mustered out June 23, 1865. P. O., Dover, 111. 

Erastus Douglas. .Dover, 111. Aug. 12, 1862. Mortally wounded, in bat- 
tle, in side and arm, Nov. 25, 1863, at Mission Ridge, 
Tenn. Died Dec. 20, 1863. Buried at Chattanooga, 
Tenn. 

Delos W. Darling. Princeton, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Captured, in battle, Nov. 

25, 1863, at Mission Ridge, Tenn. Died June 10, 1864, 
in prison at Andersonville, Ga. Number of his grave 
is 1826. 

Isaac Eberly Princeton, 111, Aug. 14, 1862. Mustered out June 23, 

1865. Died soon after the close of the war, in New 
York. 

Jacob Etsell West Bureau, 111. Aug. 13, 1862. Slightly wounded, in 

battle, May 22, 1863, at Vicksburg, Miss. Mustered out 
June 23, 1865. Died July 25, 1891, at Aurora, 111. Bur- 
ied there. 

Jacob F. Ellis West Bureau, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Promoted Corporal 

and 3ergeant and First Sergeant. Slightly wounded 
in battle, in the elbow, Nov. 25, 1863, at Mission Ridge, 
Tenn. Injured June 28, 1864, left ankle sprained, in 
a collision on the railroad, near Dalton, Ga. Severely 
wounded in battle Oct. 5, 1864, in shoulder and leg, 
at Allatoona, Ga. Mustered out June 23, 1865. Died 
June 28, 1896, at Norridge, Conn. Buried at Norfolk, 
Neb. See sketch ante. 

George Frease Ohio, 111. Aug. 12, 1862. Promoted Corporal. 

Wounded in battle, slightly in the abdomen and breast, 
Nov. 25, 1863, at Mission Ridge, Tenn. Killed in bat- 
tle Oct. 5, 1864, at Allatoona, Ga. Buried at Marietta, 
Ga. 

Hiram Frease Ohio, 111. Aug. 12, 1862. Mustered out June 23, 1865. 

P. O., Brooklyn, Iowa. 

Jacob Gesner Selby, 111. Aug. 15, 1862. Died Jan. 13, 1863, at Mem- 
phis, Tenn. Buried there. 

Franklin Gardner. Dover, 111. Aug. 15, 1862. Discharged for disability 

Aug. 24, 1863. P. O., Esmond, S. D. 

Henry M. Gesner. . Bureau, 111. Aug. 13, 1862. Died Aug. 23, 1863, at 

Quincy, 111. Buried at Limerick, 111. 

Louis B. Gesner. . . Bureau, 111. Aug. 13, 1862. Promoted Corporal. Pro- 
moted Sergeant. Captured in battle Oct. 5, 1864, at 
Allatoona, Ga. Mustered out June 23, 1865. ?• O., 
Downers Grove, 111. 

19 



290 ROSTER OF NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 

Samuel Gordon... .Limerick, 111. .Aug. 13, 1862. Killed in battle May 16, 

1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. Buried at Vicksburg^ 
Miss. 

James Gormly Berlin, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Died March 23, 1863, on 

the steamer Jesse K. Bell, while on the Yazoo Pass 
expedition. Buried at Memphis, Tenn. 

John W. Hope Dover, 111. Aug. 12, 1862. Discharged for disability 

May 26, 1863. P. O., Oakland, Cal. 

David N. Hahn Dover, III. Aug. 12, 1862. Transferred to Brigade 

Band March 4, 1863. P. O., Redding, Cal. 

George Hubbard. .Dover, 111. Aug. 12, 1862. Wounded in battle, severely 

in the leg, May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. 
Transferred to V. R. C. Sept. 6, 1863. P. O., Argentine,. 
Kan. 

Jacob Huffman Dover, 111. Aug. 15, 1862. Severely injured June 28, 

1864, both ankles sprained, in a collision on the railroad 
near Dalton, Ga. Promoted Corporal. Mustered out 
June 23, 1865. P. O., Fall City, Wash. 

Marion HiTE Berlin, 111. Aug. 15, 1862. Promoted Wagoner. 

Captured Sept. 3, 1864, near Allatoona, Ga., while out 
with a foraging party, under orders for that purpose. 
Mustered out June 23, 1865. P. O., Red Oak, Iowa. 

Archibald James. ..Dover, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Slightly wounded, in bat- 
tle. May 22, 1863, at Vicksburg, Miss. Killed in battle 
Oct. 5, 1864, at Allatoona, Ga. Buried at Marietta,. 
Ga. 

George W. James. .Dover, 111. Aug. 12, 1862. Mustered out June 23,. 

1865, P. O., Princeton, 111. 

Aaron Kiser Dover, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Died March 4, 1863, at 

Memphis, Tenn. Buried there. 

Thomas D. KEAOLE.Ohio, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Promoted Corporal. Mor- 
tally wounded in battle May 16, 1863, at Champion HilU 
Miss. Died the same day. Buried at Vicksburg, Miss. 

Jas. W. Kirkpatrick . Ohio, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Discharged for disability 

Oct. 31, 1862. P. O., Bostwick, Neb. 

Jno. D. Kirkpatrick. Arispie, 111. Aug. 15, 1862. Killed in battle, Nov. 25,, 

1863, at Mission Ridge, Tenn. Buried at Chattanooga,. 
Tenn. 

Lewis Kiser Arispie, 111. Aug. 15, 1862. Transferred to V. R. C- 

May 31, 1864. Died Feb. 7, 1897, at Hubbell, Neb. 
Buried there. 

Benjamin F. Kiser. Ohio, 111. Aug. 12, 1862. Mortally wounded in battle,. 

in abdomen, Oct. 5, 1864, at Allatoona, Ga. Died Oct. 
7, 1864. Buried at Marietta, Ga. 

John N. Knoblauch. Ohio, 111. Aug. 12, 1862. Promoted Sergeant. In- 
jured June 28, 1864, right ankle sprained, in a collision 



ROSTER OF XIXETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 291 

on the railroad near Dalton, Ga. Severely wounded, in 
battle, in left ankle. Oct. 5. 1864, at Allatoona, Ga. 
Discharged on account of wounds Feb. 25, 1865. P. O., 
Hiawatha. Kan. 

Robert S. Kerr Berlin, IlL Aug. 12, 1862. Transferred to Brigade 

Band March 4, 1863. P. O.. Bellefontaine, Ohio. 

Lewis H. Listner. .Berlin. 111. Aug. 12, 1862. Captured in battle Nov. 

25. 1863. at Mission Ridge. Tenn. Died . in prison 
April 10, 1864, at Richmond, Va. 

Thomas B. MASox..Ohio. 111. Aug. 13, 1862. Captured in battle Nov. 

25, 1863, at Mission Ridge, Tenn. Died in prison May 
3. 1864. at Andersonville. Ga. Number of his grave is 
863. 

George Menelaus.. Dover, 111. Aug. 15, 1862. Promoted Corporal. Cap* 

tured Sept. 3, 1864, near AUatoona, Ga., while out with 
foraging party under orders for that purpose. Mus- 
tered out June 23, 1865. P. O.. Des Moines, Iowa. 

John B. Martin Selby, 111. Aug. 15. 1862. Killed in battle Oct. 5, 1864, 

at AUatoona, Ga. Buried at Marietta, Ga. 

Patterson McClurg. Bureau, 111. Aug. 15, 1862. Wounded in battle, 

slightly in the shoulder, May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, 
Miss. Transferred to Fortieth Regiment Illinois Veteran 
Volunteer Infantry June 18, 1865. P. O., Blooming- 
ton, 111. 

James Mulvane. .. . Ohio, 111. Aug. 15, 1862. Transferred to Brigade 

Band March 4, 1863. P. O., Topeka, Kan. 

James McCrank Ohio, 111. Aug. 15, 1862. Mortally wounded in battle 

May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. Died May 20, 
1863. Buried at Vicksburg, Miss. 

Wilson L.McKisson. Berlin, 111. Aug. 12, 1862. Promoted Corporal. Mus- 
tered out June 2S, 1865. Died Jan. 24, 1891, at Newton, 
Kan. Buried there. 

John Matson Ohio, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Promoted Sergeant. 

Slightly wounded in battle May 22, 1863, at Vicksburg, 
Miss. Killed in battle Nov. 25, 1863, at Mission Ridge, 
Tenn. Buried at Limerick, 111. 

Thomas C. Murphy. Dover, 111. Aug. 15, 1862. No record as to what be- 
came of him. 

Henry Mohler... .Ohio, 111. Aug. 15, 1862. Died Nov. 7, 1862, at Dover, 

111 Buried there. 

James Nottingham . Selby, 111. Aug. 13, 1862. Slightly wounded in bat- 
tle, in the side. May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. 
Mustered out June 23, 1865. P. O. Princeton, 111. 

Barney O'Hare Selby, 111. Aug. 10, 1862. Slightly wounded in battle, 

in the wrist, Nov. 25, 1863, at Mission Ridge, Tenn. 
Mustered out June 23, 1865. P. O., Russell, Iowa. 

John C. Piper Selby, 111. Aug. 13, 1862. Discharged for disability 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 




GEORGE H. BAlIit, (JoDipHoy -U." 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 




U. CHIJ.US. Oinpi.uj ■ 



284 HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 




RALPH T. WRTHERELL, Comiiany -U." 



HISTOKV OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 



,4X*, 




286 ROSTER OF NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 

Roster of Company B. 

Enrolled in Bureau County, Illinois. 

Organized August ii, 1862, at Dover, Bureau County, Illinois. 

Muster fd into service October /j, 1862, at Chicago, Illinois* 
Captains. 

John W. Hopkins. .Maiden, 111. Commissioned to rank from Oct. 13, 1862.. 

Mustered into service Oct. 13, 1862. Captured in battle 
May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. Resigned 
Feb. 29, 1864. Died Aug. 10, 1869, at Unionville, Mo. 
Buried there. 

James W. Lee Dover, 111. Commissioned to rank from March i, 

1864. Mustered into service April 4, 1864. Mustered 

out June 23, 1865, near Louisville, Ky. Paid off and 

fmally discharged July 6, 1865, at Chicago, 111. P. 0., 

Mayfair, Chicago, 111. See his history in the sketch 

ante. 
First Lieutenants. 

David Deselms. .. .Princeton, 111. Commissioned to rank from Oct. 13, 

1862. Mustered into service Oct. 13, 1862. Resigned 
Jan. 24, 1863. Died March 10, 1871, at Newton, Iowa. 
Buried there. 

Lerov S. Hopkins. .Hollowayville, 111. Enlisted Aug. 13, 1862, as a Pri- 
vate in this Company. Appointed First Sergeant on 
the same day. Promoted Hospital Steward Sept. 
8, 1862. Commissioned First Lieutenant to rank from 
Jan. 24, 1863. Mustered into service as such April 12, 

1863. Slightly wounded, in the leg, in battle, May 16, 
1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. Resigned July 31, 1863. 
He is a practicing physician. P. O., Bradford, 111. 

James W. Lee Dover, 111. Commissioned First Lieutenant to rank 

from July 31, 1863. Mustered into service as such 

Nov. 29, 1863. Promoted Captain April 4, 1864. See 
that title, and see his history in the sketch ante. 

Allen Ogax Dover, 111. Enlisted Aug. 11, 1862, as a Private in 

this Company. Appointed Sergeant on the same day. 
Severely wounded, in the side, in battle, Nov. 25, 1863, 
at Mission Ridge, Tenn. Commissioned as First Lieu- 
tenant to rank from March i, 1864. Mustered into 
service as such Sept. i, 1864. Slightly wounded in 
battle, in the left thigh, Oct. 5, 1864, at Allatoona, Ga. 
Mustered out June 23, 1865, near Louisville, Ky., and 
paid oflf and finally discharged July 6, 1865, at Chicago, 
111. After the war closed, in 1865, he removed to Mar- 
shall County, Iowa. He was married April 18, 1869. 
He is a farmer, and owns a farm two miles east of 

Marshalltown, Iowa. P. O., Marshalltown, Iowa. 
Second Lieutenant. 

James W. Lee Dover, 111. Commissioned Second Lieutenant to rank 

from Oct. 13, 1862. Mustered into service as such Oct. 



ROSTER OF NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 287 

13, 1862. Promoted First Lieutenant Nov. 29, 1863. 
Promoted Captain April 4, 1864. See those titles, and 
see his history in the sketch ante. 

First Sergeant. 

Leroy S. Hopkins.. Hollowayville, 111. Aug. 13, 1862. Promoted Hospital 

Steward, and then First Lieutenant. See those titles. 
Sergeants. 

John A. Reinohl. ..Princeton, III. Aug. 14, 1862. Promoted First Ser- 
geant. Killed in battle Nov. 25, 1863, at Mission Ridge. 
Tenn. Buried at Princeton, 111, 

Edward J. MojER. ..Dover, 111. Aug. 11, 1862. Transferred to Veteran 

Reserve Corps Sept. 6, 1863. Died about May 30, 1896, 
at Harvard, Neb. Buried there. 

Allen Ogan Dover, 111. Aug. 11, 1862. Promoted First Lieutenant. 

See that title. 

Fletcher M.Garton. Dover, 111. Aug. 11, 1862. Discharged for disability 

Aug. 5, 1863. Died a few days after reaching home 
at Dover, 111. Buried there. 

Corporals. 

Dennis S. Baker. ..Dover, 111. Aug. 12, 1862. Reduced to ranks. Dis- 
charged for disability March 2, 1863. 

John F. Irey Princeton, 111. Aug. 12, 1862. Promoted Sergeant. 

Wounded in battle Nov. 25, 1863, at Mission Ridge, 
Tenn. Wounded in battle, slightly in the arm, Dec. 
II 1864, at Savannah, Ga. Discharged May 24, 1865. 
P. O., Marion, Ohio. 

Richard T. Short. .Dover, 111. Aug. 12, 1862. Promoted Sergeant. Mor- 
tally wounded in battle May 16, 1863, at Champion 
Hill, Miss. Died the same day. Buried at Vicksburg, 
Miss. 

David G. Wilson. .Dover, 111. Aug. 12, 1862. Discharged for disability 

Dec. 14, 1862. P. O., Effingham, Kan. 

Robert Emerson. .. Dover, 111. Aug. 12, 1862. Died Oct. 22, 1862, at 

Dover, 111. Buried there. 

James Harrison. ... Dover, 111. Aug. 12, 1862. No record as to what 

became of him. 

Oscar A. Webb Dover, 111. Aug. 12, 1862. Promoted Sergeant. 

Killed in battle Oct. 5, 1864, at Allatoona, Ga. Buried 
at Marietta, Ga. 

Watson T. Palmer. Dover, 111. Aug. 12, 1862. Slightly wounded in the 

leg, in battle, Nov. 25, 1863, at Mission Ridge, Tenn. 
Injured June 28, 1864, in the right foot, in a collision 
on the railroad, near Dalton, Ga, Mustered out June 
23, 1865. P. O., Mendota, 111. 

Musicians. 

Wm. C. Doutheit. .Lane Station, 111. Aug. 12, 1862. Discharged for dis- 
ability Jan. 12, 1863. 



288 ROSTER OF NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 

John M. Howe Princeton, 111. Aug. 12, 1862. Discharged for dis- 
ability March 10, 1863. P. O., Monroe, Wis. 

Wagoner. 

William Powers. ..HoUowayville, 111. Aug. 12, 1862. Deserted March 2, 

1863, and Oct. 6, 1863. 

Privates. 

Francis Atkins. .. .Maiden, 111. Aug. 12, 1862. Discharged for disability 

June 30, 1863. P. O., Princeton, 111. 

George W. Boeman . Maiden, 111. Aug. 12, 1862. Wounded in battle, se- 
verely in the leg. May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. 
Mustered out June 23, 1865. P. O., CuUom, 111. 

John P. Burnh am.. Dover, 111. Aug 12, 1862. Transferred to Vet. R. C. 

Feb. II, 1864. P. O., Ohio, 111. 

William R. Bates. .Princeton, III. Aug. 12, 1862. Killed in battle Oct. 5, 

1864, at AUatoona, Ga. Buried at Marietta, Ga. 

Joseph Barnard. ... Berlin, 111. Aug. 15, 1862. Mustered out June 23, 

1865, P. O., Soldiers' Home, Milwaukee, Wis. 

George H, Bahr. .. Princeton, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Discharged for disa- 
bility Aug. 24, 1863. P. O., Vinton, Iowa. 

David Bear Dover, 111. Aug. 12, 1862. Promoted Sergeant. Se- 
verely wounded, in battle. May 22, 1863, at Vicksburg, 
Miss. Severely wounded, in battle, Nov. 25, 1863, at 
Mission Ridge, Tenn. Captured, in battle, Nov. 25. 
1863, at Mission Ridge, Tenn. Died Aug. 20, 1864, 
in prison at Andersonville, Ga. Number of his grave 
is 6644. 

John H. Corey Dover, 111. Aug. 12, 1862. Slightly wounded, in battle, 

May 14, 1863, at Jackson, Miss. Mustered out June 
^3, 1865. Died Dec. 19, 1892, at Galesburg, 111. Buried 
in North Prairie Cemetery, Bureau County, 111. 

Jonathan J. Closson. Dover, 111. Aug. 12, 1862. Discharged Jan. 15, 1863. 

Died Oct. i, 1889, at Des Moines, Iowa. Buried there. 
His home was in Chicago, 111. 

Samuel Crepps Dover, 111. Aug. 12, 1862. Killed in battle Nov. 25, 

1863, at Mission Ridge, Tenn. Buried at Chattanooga, 
Tenn. 

Franklin Covert. .Princeton, 111. Aug. 12, 1862. No record as to what 

became of him. 

Richard H. F. Cook. Dover, 111. Aug. 12, 1862. Died June 3, 1863, at Mem- 
phis, Tenn. Buried there. 

William H. Carter. Arispie, 111. Aug. 12, 1862. Discharged for disability 

Jan. 12, 1863. P. O., No. 320 Twelfth street. East Des 
Moines, Iowa. 

Austin L. Durley. Dover, 111. Aug. 12, 1862. Mortally wounded, in bat- 
tle. May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. Died the 
same day. Buried at Vicksburg, Miss. 



ROSTER OF NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 289 

Moses Dickens.... Dover, 111. Aug. -12, 1862. Mustered out June 20, 

1865. Died at Bloomfield, Ind. Buried there. Date 
of death unknown. 

Aaron Dunbar Dover, 111. Aug. 12, 1862. Promoted Sergeant. Slightly 

wounded in battle, May 22, 1863, at Vicksburg, Miss. 
Mustered out June 23, 1865. P. O., Dover, 111. 

Erastus Douglas.. Dover, 111. Aug. 12, 1862. Mortally wounded, in bat- 
tle, in side and arm, Nov. 25, 1863, at Mission Ridge, 
Tenn. Died Dec. 20, 1863. Buried at Chattanooga, 
Tenn. 

Delos W. Darling. Princeton, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Captured, in battle, Nov. 

25, 1863, at Mission Ridge, Tenn. Died June 10, 1864, 
in prison at Andersonville, Ga. Number of his grave 
is 1826. 

Isaac Eberly Princeton, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Mustered out June 23, 

1865. Died soon after the close of the war, in New 
York. 

Jacob Etsell West Bureau, 111. Aug. 13, 1862. Slightly wounded, in 

battle, May 22, 1863, at Vicksburg, Miss. Mustered out 
June 23, 1865. Died July 25, 1891, at Aurora, 111. Bur- 
ied there. 

Jacob F. Ellis West Bureau, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Promoted Corporal 

and 3ergeant and First Sergeant. Slightly wounded 
in battle, in the elbow, Nov. 25, 1863, at Mission Ridge, 
Tenn. Injured June 28, 1864, left ankle sprained, in 
a collision on the railroad, near Dalton, Ga. Severely 
wounded in battle Oct. 5, 1864, in shoulder and leg, 
at Allatoona, Ga. Mustered out June 23, 1865. Died 
June 28, 1896, at Norridge, Conn. Buried at Norfolk, 
Neb. See sketch ante. 

George Frease Ohio, 111. Aug. 12, 1862. Promoted Corporal. 

Wounded in battle, slightly in the abdomen and breast, 
Nov. 25, 1863, at Mission Ridge, Tenn. Killed in bat- 
tle Oct. 5, 1864, at Allatoona, Ga. Buried at Marietta, 
Ga. 

HtRAM Frease Ohio, 111. Aug. 12, 1862. Mustered out June 23, 1865. 

P. O., Brooklyn, Iowa. 

Jacob Gesner Selby, 111. Aug. 15, 1862. Died Jan. 13, 1863, at Mem- 
phis, Tenn. Buried there. 

Franklin Gardner. Dover, 111. Aug. 15, 1862. Discharged for disability 

Aug. 24, 1863. P. O., Esmond, S. D. 

Henry M. Gesner. .Bureau, 111. Aug. 13, 1862. Died Aug. 23, 1863, at 

Quincy, 111. Buried at Limerick, 111. 

Louis B. Gesner... Bureau, 111. Aug. 13, 1862. Promoted Corporal. Pro- 
moted Sergeant. Captured in battle Oct. 5, 1864, at 
Allatoona, Ga. Mustered out June 23, 1865. P. O., 
Downers Grove, 111. 

19 



200 ROSTER OF NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 

Samuel Gordon Limerick, 111. .Aug. 13, 1862. Killed in battle May 16, 

1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. Buried at Vicksburg^ 
Miss. 

James Gormly Berlin, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Died March 23, 1863, on 

the steamer Jesse K. Bell, while on the Yazoo Pass 
expedition. Buried at Memphis, Tenn. 

John W. Hope Dover, 111. Aug. 12, 1862. Discharged for disability 

May 26, 1863. P. O., Oakland, Cal. 

David N. Hahn Dover, 111. Aug. 12, 1862. Transferred to Brigade 

Band March 4, 1863. P. O., Redding, Cal. 

George Hubbard. .Dover, 111. Aug. 12, 1862. Wounded in battle, severely 

in the leg. May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss.^ 
Transferred to V. R. C. Sept. 6, 1863. P. O., Argentine,. 
Kan. 

Jacob Huffman Dover, 111. Aug. 15, 1862. Severely injured June 28, 

1864, both ankles sprained, in a collision on the railroad 
near Dalton, Ga. Promoted Corporal. Mustered out 
June 23, 1865. P. O., Fall City, Wash. 

Marion Hite Berlin, 111. Aug. 15, 1862. Promoted Wagoner. 

Captured Sept. 3, 1864, near Allatoona, Ga., while out 
with a foraging party, under orders for that purpose. 
Mustered out June 23, 1865. P. O., Red Oak, Iowa. 

Archibald James. ..Dover, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Slightly wounded, in bat- 

tic. May 22, 1863, at Vicksburg, Miss. Killed in battle 
Oct. 5, 1864, at Allatoona, Ga. Buried at Marietta,. 
Ga. 

George W. James. .Dover, 111. Aug. 12, 1862. Mustered out June 23,. 

1865, P. O., Princeton, 111. 

Aaron Kiser Dover, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Died March 4, 1863, at 

Memphis, Tenn. Buried there. 

Thomas D. KEADLE.Ohio, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Promoted Corporal. Mor- 
tally wounded in battle May 16, 1863, at Champion HilU 
Miss. Died the same day. Buried at Vicksburg, Miss. 

Jas. W. KiRKPATRicK.Ohio, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Discharged for disability 

Oct. 31, 1862. P. O., Bostwick, Neb. 

Jno. D. KiRKPATRicK.Arispie, III. Aug. 15, 1862. Killed in battle, Nov. 25,, 

1863, at Mission Ridge, Tenn. Buried at Chattanooga,. 
Tenn. 

Lewis KiSER Arispie, 111. Aug. 15, 1862. Transferred to V. R. €► 

May 31, 1864. Died Feb. 7, 1897, at Hubbell, Neb. 
Buried there. 

Benjamin F. Kiser. Ohio, 111. Aug. 12, 1862. Mortally wounded in battle,. 

in abdomen, Oct. 5, 1864, at Allatoona, Ga. Died Oct. 
7, 1864. Buried at Marietta, Ga. 

John N. Knoblauch. Ohio, 111. Aug. 12, 1862. Promoted Sergeant. In- 
jured June 28, 1864, right ankle sprained, in a collision 



ROSTER OF NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 291 

on the railroad near Dalton, Ga. Severely wounded, in 
battle, in left ankle, Oct. 5, 1864, at AUatoona, Ga. 
Discharged on account of wounds Feb. 25, 1865. P. O., 
Hiawatha, Kan. 

Roberts. Kerr Berlin, 111. Aug. 12, 1862. Transferred to Brigade 

Band March 4, 1863. P. O., Bellefontaine, Ohio. 

Lewis H. Listner. .Berlin, 111. Aug. 12, 1862. Captured in battle Nov. 

25, 1863, at Mission Ridge, Tenn. Died . in prison 
April 10, 1864, at Richmond, Va. 

Thomas B. Mason.. Ohio, 111. Aug. 13, 1862. Captured in battle Nov. 

25, 1863, at Mission Ridge, Tenn. Died in prison May 
3, 1864, at Andersonville, Ga. Number of his grave is 
863. 

George Menelaus. .Dover, 111. Aug. 15, 1862. Promoted Corporal. Cap- 
tured Sept. 3, 1864, near Allatoona, Ga., while out with 
foraging party under orders for that purpose. Mus- 
tered out June 23, 1865. P. O., Des Moines, Iowa. 

John B. Martin Sclby, 111. Aug. 15, 1862. Killed in battle Oct. 5, 1864, 

at Allatoona, Ga. Buried at Marietta, Ga. 

Patterson McClurg. Bureau, 111. Aug. 15, 1862. Wounded in battle, 

slightly in the shoulder, May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, 
Miss. Transferred to Fortieth Regiment Illinois Veteran 
Volunteer Infantry June 18, 1865. P. O., Blooming- 
ton, 111. 

James Mulvane. .. . Ohio, 111. Aug. 15. 1862. Transferred to Brigade 

Band March 4, 1863. P. O., Topeka, Kan. 

James McCrank Ohio, 111. Aug. 15, 1862. Mortally wounded in battle 

May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. Died May 20, 
1863. Buried at Vicksburg, Miss. 

Wilson L.McKisson. Berlin, 111. Aug. 12, 1862. Promoted Corporal. Mus- 
tered out June 23, 1865. Died Jan. 24, 1891, at Newton, 
Kan. Buried there. 

John Matson Ohio, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Promoted Sergeant. 

Slightly wounded in battle May 22, 1863, at Vicksburg, 
Miss. Killed in battle Nov. 25, 1863, at Mission Ridge, 
Tenn. Buried at Limerick, 111. 

Thomas C. Murphy. Dover, 111. Aug. 15, 1862. No record as to what be- 
came of him. 

Henry Mohler Ohio, 111. Aug. 15, 1862. Died Nov. 7, 1862, at Dover, 

111 Buried there. 

James Nottingham . Selby, 111. Aug. 13, 1862. Slightly wounded in bat- 
tle, in the side. May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. 
Mustered out June 23, 1865. P. O. Princeton, 111. 

Barney O'Hare Selby, 111. Aug. 10, 1862. Slightly wounded in battle, 

in the wrist, Nov. 25, 1863, at Mission Ridge, Tenn. 
Mustered out June 23, 1865. P. O., Russell, Iowa. 

John C. Piper Selby, 111. Aug. 13, 1862. Discharged for disability 



292 ROSTER OF NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 

March ii, 1863. Died April 26, 1864, at Selby, III. 
Buried there, in Ridge Cemetery. 

William H. Piper.. Selby, 111. Aug. 18, 1862. Died Dec. 13, 1862, at 

Holly Springs, Miss. Buried there. 

Joseph Rinker Princeton, 111. Aug. 16, 1862. Transferred to 40th 

Illinois V. V. Infantry June 18, 1865. P. O. Alexis, 
111. 

William S. Ring. ..Dover, 111. Aug. 13. 1862. Severely wounded in bat- 
tle, in the neck and leg, May 16, 1863, at Champion 
Hill, Miss. Mustered out June 23, 1865. P. O. De 
Pue, 111. 

Benjamin Snapp Ohio, 111. Aug. 18, 1862. Discharged Feb. 15, 1863, 

for promotion as Second Lieutenant in the 12th U. S. 
Colored Infantry. P. O. Lloydsville, O. 

Anderson N. SEARL.Dover, 111. Aug. 13, 1862. Wounded in battle Oct. 

5, 1864, at Allatoona, Ga. Mustered out June 23, 1865. 
Died in Nov., 1893, at Prescott, Kan. Buried there. 

George A. Searl. ..Dover, 111. Aug. 15, 1862. Mustered out June 23, 1865. 

P. O. Tyron, Neb. 

John Stuchell Ohio, 111. July 31, 1862. Transferred to V. R. C. 

Feb. 15, 1864. Died July 23, 1891, at Princeton, 111. 
Buried there. 

Peter C. Stoner. ..Ohio, 111. Aug. 12, 1862. Killed in battle May 16, 

1863,- at Champion Hill, Miss. Buried at Vicksburg, 

Miss. 

Franklin M. SNELL.Ohio, 111. Aug. 13, 1862. Discharged for disability 

Jan. 15, 1863. 

James M. Smith Princeton, 111. Aug. 12, 1862. Promoted Corporal. 

Slightly wounded in battle May 22, 1863, at Vicksburg, 
Miss. Klled in battle Nov. 25, 1863, at Mission Ridge, 
Tenn. Buried in North Prairie Cemetery, Bureau 
County, 111. 

Thomas B. Smith. .Kendall County, 111. Aug. 12, 1862. Promoted Cor- 
poral. Severely wounded in battle, in the shoulder, 
May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. Discharged 
Oct. 7, 1864, on account of wounds. P. O. Muscoiah, 
Kan. 

Jacob Storms Princeton, 111. Aug. 12, 1862. Discharged for disa- 
bility Jan. 12, 1863. P. O. Princeton, 111. 

John B. Taylor Oho, 111. Aug. 12, 1862. Injured June 28, 1864, right 

ankle sprained, in a collision on the railroad, near Dal- 
ton, Ga. Mus ered out June 23, 1865. P. O. Oilman, 

111. 

Nathaniel J.Thomas. Ohio, 111. Aug. 12, 1862. Transferred to V. R. C. 

Feb. 15. 1864. P. O. Aurora, 111. 

William A. TnoMAS.Ohio, 111. Aug. 12, 1862. Died April 8, 1863, on the 

steamer Jesse K. Bell, while on the Yazoo Pass ex- 
pedition. Buried at Helena, Ark. 



ROSTER OF NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 293 

Ferdinand Walser. Princeton, 111. Aug. 13, 1862. Discharged for disa- 
bility June 30, 1863. P. O. Princeton, 111. 

Hugh Wilson Princeton, 111. Aug. 12, 1862. Deserted Nov. 10,1862. 

Allison Wilson Maiden, 111. Aug. 12, 1862. Severely wounded in bat- 
tle, through both thighs and hip, Oct. 5, 1864, at Alla- 
toona, Ga. Discharged Feb. 17, 1865, on account 
wounds. P. O. Kasbeer, 111. 

James Wormwood. .Walnut, 111. Aug. 4, 1862. Killed in battle May 16, 

1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. Buried at Vicksburg, 
Miss. 

John R. Warkins. ..Dover, 111. Aug. 12, 1862. Promoted Corporal. 

Slightly wounded in battle Oct. 5, 1864, at AUatoonsP, 
Ga. Mustered out June 23, 1865. P. O. Dover, 111. 

JosiAH Winkler Dover, 111. Aug. 12, 1862. Mustered out June 23, 

1865. P. O., Ogallala, Neb. 

Ralph T.Wetherell. Maiden, 111. Aug. 12, 1862. Mustered out June 23, 

1865. P. O., Clarks, Neb. 

William J. Young. .Ohio, 111. Aug. 15, 1862. Promoted Sergeant. Mus- 
tered out June 23, 1865. P. O., Ohio, 111. 

Samuel M. ZEARiNG.Dover, 111. Aug. 12, 1862. Mortally wounded, in the 

leg, in battle, May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. 
Died June 14, 1863. Buried at Vicksburg, Miss. 

Recruits. 

Wm. H. Burnham. .Dover, 111. Feb. 11, 1864. Wounded in battle Oct. 

5, 1864, at AUatoona, Ga. Transferred to 40th Illinois 
V. V. Infantry June 18, 1865. P. O. Bigelow, Minn. 

John H. Childs. .. .Dover, 111. Feb. 14, 1864. Transferred to 40th Illinois 

V. V. Infantry June 18, 1865. P. O., Princeton, III. 

Joseph M. Coulter. Dover, 111. Feb. 11, 1864. Promoted Corporal. Se- 
verely wounded in battle, in thigh and leg, Oct. 5, 1864, 
at AUatoona, Ga. Discharged June 11, 1865, on ac- 
count of wounds. P. O. Orleans, Neb. 

Robert E. Limerick . Dover, 111. Feb. 20, 1864. Promoted Corporal 

Transferred to 40th Illinois V. V. Infantry June 18, 
1865. Died July 21, 1883, at Limerick, 111. Buried 
there. 

Alex. H. Limerick. Dover, 111. Feb. 11, 1864. Injured June 28. 1864, in 

the right foot, in a collision on the railroad, near Dal- 
ton, Ga. Wounded and captured in battle Oct. 5, 1864, 
at AUatoona, Ga. Transferred to 40th Illinois V. V. 
Infantry June 18, 1865. P. O. Winfield, Kan. 

Under Cook of A.. D. 

John Leachman . . . March 1, 1864. Transferred to 40th Illinois V. V. In- 
fantry June 18, 1865. P. O., Clinton, Miss. 

* Explanation : The first place given, in each case, was the residence at the date of enlist- 
ment, as stated on the Muster Roll. The first date given, in each case, is the date of enroll- 
ment. In all cases where it is not given, the present P. O. address is unknown. 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 




BKOWN. On[i(Hln, Coinponr ' 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 295 



LETTER FROM WILLIAM J. BROWN, CAPTAIN OF COMPANY "C. 

l^Viend Dunbar: 

You ask for a sketch of my life since we left the service. 

On my restoration to health, in the spring of 1866, with my 
family, I settled in Geneva, Illinois, where I reviewed my studies of 
the law. In 1867, I became a partner of the late state senator, Maj. 
J. H. Maybourn, then actively engaged in the practice of the law. 
This quite profitable and agreeable relation continued until 1877, 
when we dissolved, the Major turning his attention to politics. At 
this time, I opened an office in St. Charles, Illinois, and soon ob- 
tained business in this and the adjoining counties, which occupied 
my time and attention until January, 1882, when I moved to Kin- 
mundy, Illinois, and became interested in raising fruit. During the 
spring of the same year I returned to Kane County, Illinois, and 
again resumed my business, and have from thence continued in 
the practice of the law. 

I have had reasonable success in the profession, and in no 
small degree have enjoyed the friendship and confidence of the 
members of the bar, and hope, with reasonably good health, com- 
mon industry and moderate economy to retain enough for all we 
may need during our remaining years. My home life is all that 
any mortal could hope for or desire. 

With unabated admiration for all connected with Company C, 
and the entire command, and with profound respect for all the oflfi- 
-cers of the Ninety-Third Illinois, I submit this sketch. 

Respectfully, W. J. BROWN. 



2M HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 




WM, VOVNOaON, First Llcuteuunt. Coiui 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 297 



LETTER FROM WILLIAM YOUNGSON, FIRST LIEUTENANT OF 

COMPANY **C." 

Mr. Aaron Dunbar, 

Dear Sir and Comrade: 

After the war, I lived in Wyanet, Illinois, until 1871, and 
then started for Colorado, and arrived in Denver, March ist, 
1871. I settled in Central City; went into business, and was 
burned out at the end of two years. From there, I moved to 
Georgetown, Clear Creek County, and started in business, and 
did well for thirteen years. I made money and put it into the 
ground and lost it. **Such is life in the far West." Business be- 
coming slack, I moved to Leadville, and stayed there two years, but 
had to leave on account of ill-bealth. From there, I moved to 
Aspen, where I am at the present time. Would like to hear from 
the old comrades once in a while to keep up a friendly intercourse^ 

I remain yours, in F. C. and L., 

WM. YOUNGSON. 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 




THOMAS J. LOCK WOOD, 



Lleuteoaat, Coiupaar "0." 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 299 



LETTER FROM THOMAS J. LOCKWOOD, SECOND LIEUTENANT, 

COMPANY "C." 

Buda, 111., March loth, 1896. 
Friend Dunbar: 

Being called upon to give a short sketch of my life during 
and since the war, I would state: That I was wounded at 
the battle of Champion Hill, Mississippi, May i6th, 1863, 
both eyes being shot out. I was on and about the battlefield for ten 
days, and then, working my way up to Memphis, Tennessee, I re- 
mained there some time, and arrived home, at Buda, Illinois, August 
1st, 1863. Received notice of being mustered out of the army Janu- 
ary I2th, 1864, retired on a pension of fifteen dollars per rnonth. Then 
it seemed necessary that I should do something for a livelihood. I 
commenced canvassing for books and various kinds of publications, 
which I followed for about two years. Engaged in the show busi- 
ness somewhat then and canvassed for the sale of nursery stock, and 
the sale of patent rights, and also sold farm implements until I was 
well established in the agricultural implement business. In 1880, 
I was engaged in building quite extensively, and also running the 
implement and hardware business, until 1888, when I commenced 
the clothing business, in which I am engaged at the present day. 

LIEUT. T. J. LOCKWOOD, 
Co. C, 93d Reg. 111. Vols. 



liCK) HISTORY OF THlv NTXl'VI'V-TEITRn ILLINOIS. 



ROSTER OF NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 301 

Roster of Company C. 

Enrolled in Bureau County, Illinois. 

Organized August 15, 1862, at Wyanet, in Bureau County, Illinois. 

Mustered into Service October /j, 1862, at Chicago^ Illinois* 
iptain. 

'iLLiAM J. Brown.. Wyanet, 111. Commissioned to rank from October 13, 

1862. Mustered into service October 13, 1862, at Chi- 
cago, 111. Slightly wounded, in the neck, in battle, 
October 5, 1864, at Allatoona, Ga. Served until the 
close of the war. Mustered out June 23, 1865, near 
Louisville, Ky., and paid off and finally discharged July 
6, 1865, at Chicago, 111. P. O., St. Charles, 111. See 
his history in the sketch ante. 

rst Lieutenants. ! ^^ 

ILLIAM YoUNGSON. Wyanet, 111. Commissioned to rank from October 13, 

1862. Mustered into service October 13, 1862, at Chi- 
cago, 111. Resigned Jan. 11, 1864. Died at Aspen, 
Colo., June 29, 1896. Buried there. See his history 
in the sketch ante. 

ILTON Cross Wyanet, 111. Enlisted Aug. 10, 1862, as a Private in 

this Company. Appointed First Sergeant Aug. 15, 
1862, on the organization of the Company. Promoted 
First Lieutenant and commissioned as such to rank 
from Jan. 11, 1864. Mustered into service as such April 
13, 1864. Injured June 28, 1864, severely, in right ankle, 
in a collision on the railroad, near Dalton, Ga. Re- 
signed Nov. 3, 1864. Last known P. O. Elk City, Kan. 
Reported as deceased, but the date is unknown. 

'^M. L. Garwood... Fairfield, 111. Enlisted Aug. 10, 1862, as a Private in 

this Company. Appointed Sergeant Aug. 15, 1862, on 
the organization of the Company. Slightly wounded 
in battle May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. Pro- 
moted First Sergeant. Injured June 28, 1864, face 
badly bruised, in a collision on the railroad, near Dalton, 
Ga. Promoted First Lieutenant and commissioned as 
such to rank from April 20, 1865. Mustered into serv- 
ice as such May 19, 1865. Served until the close of the 
war. Mustered out June 23, 1865, near Louisville, Ky., 
and finally paid ofif and discharged July 6, 1865, at Chi- 
cago, 111. P. O. New Bedford, 111. 

econd Lieutenant. 

HOS. J. LocKwooD.Buda, 111. Commisisoned to rank from Oct. 13, 1862. 

Mustered into service Oct. 13, 1862, at Chicago, 111. 
Severely wounded, both eyes being shot out, in battle. 
May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. Resigned Jan. 
II, 1864, being totally blind. P. O. Buda, 111. He is 



:m ROSTER OF NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 

one of the leading business men of Buda, 111., and does 
many marvelous things, in the way of business, for 
a blind person. See his history in the sketch ante. 

First Sergeant. 

Milton Cross Wyanet, 111. Aug. lo, 1862. Promoted First Lieuten- 
ant. See that title. 

Sergeants. 

jAroB HoucK Wyanet, 111. Aug. 10, 1862. Captured by the enemy 

Dec. 25, 1862, near Lumpkin's Mill, Miss., while forag- 
ing under orders. Died July 6, 1863, at Memphis, Tenn. 
Buried there. 

Stephen A. Trtplett. Buda. 111. Aug. 10, 1862. Discharged for disability 

May 26, 1863. 

Wm. L. Garwood. ..Fairfield. 111. Aug. 10, 1862. Promoted First Lieu- 
tenant. See that title. 

Emanuel Collins. .Wyanet, 111. Aug. 10, 1862. Discharged for disability 

Nov. 8, 1863. Reported deceased, but the date and 
place are unknown. 

Corporals. 

Robert MowRY Wyanet, 111. Aug. 10, 1862. Promoted Sergeant. 

Severely wounded, in the leg, in battle. May 16, 1863, 
at Champion Hill, Miss. Reduced to ranks. Mustered 
out June 23, 1865. 

Jeremiah Brown. . .Wyanet, 111. Aug. 10, 1862. Died Sept. 4, 1863, at 

St. Louis, Mo. Buried at Jefferson Barracks, St. Louis, 
Mo. 

Charles Parsons. ..Wyanet, 111. Aug. 10, 1862. Discharged for disability 

March 5, 1863. P. O. Malcom, Iowa. 

John Montgomery. Concord, 111. Aug. 10, 1862. Promoted Sergeant 

Mortally wounded in battle, in the right leg, and the 
leg amputated, Oct. 5, 1864, at Allatoona, Ga. Died 
Oct. 21, 1864, at Rome, Ga. Buried at Marietta, Ga. 

George Hamilton.. Greenville, 111. Aug. 10, 1862. Transferred to V. R^C. 

Sept. 15, 1863. Died at New Bedford, 111. Buried there. 
Date unknown. 

Thomas Reuble. ...Bureau, 111. Aug. 10, 1862. Promoted Sergeant. Mus- 
tered out June 23, 1865. P. O. Seney, Iowa. 

Robert Mosher Wyanet, 111. Aug. 10, 1862. Promoted First Sergeant. 

Mustered out June 23, 1865. Died Sept. 8, 1871, near 
Shell City, Mo. Buried there. 

James T. Hall Wyanet, 111. Aug, 13, 1862. Discharged June 4, 1863. 

Promoted Captain of Company F, 49th U. S. Colored 
Infantry. P. O. Wyanet, 111. 



ROSTER OF NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 30a 

Musicians. 

Jesse Clough Bureau, 111. Aug. 12, 1862. Mustered out June 9, 1865* 

P. O. Dial, Kan. 

Frank Scovill Princeton, 111. Aug. 15, 1862. Transferred from Com- 
pany K of this Regiment. See that Company. Mus- 
tered out May 31, 1865. Died Feb. 10, 1887, at Blains- 
burg, Iowa. Buried there. 

Wagoner. 

Solomon C. Sparks. Wyanet, 111. Aug. 13, 1862. Mustered out June 23, 

1865. P. O. Montrose, Mo. 

Privates. 

Talcott T. Blood.. Concord, 111. Aug. 10, 1862. Killed in battle May 16, 

1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. Buried at Vicksburg, 

Miss. 

James Batchelor. . .Bureau, 111. Aug, 10, 1862. Mustered out June 23, 1865. 

P. O. Salem, Ore. 

Sylvanus Baxter.. Greenville, 111. Aug. 10, 1862. Promoted Sergeant. 

Mustered out June 23, 1865. P. O. Olney, Wash. 

William Baxter. ..Greenville, 111. Aug. 10, 1862. Mustered out June 23, 

1865. P. O. New Bedford, 111. 

John Burling Wyanet, 111. Aug. 10, 1862. Mustered out June 23, 

1865. P. O. Mayflower, Neb. 

Walter H. Bell. ..Wyanet, 111. Aug. 10, 1862. Absent sick at the date of 

the muster out of the regiment. P. O. La Porte, Iowa. 

Conrad Bode Buda, 111. Aug. 10, 1862. Slightly wounded in battle 

May 22, 1863, at Vicksburg, Miss. Captured in battle 
Nov. 25, 1863, at Mission Ridge, Tenn. Died in prison 
Feb. I, 1864, at Belle Island, Va. Buried there. 

John W. Blake Buda, 111. Aug. 10, 1862. Died Oct. 24, 1863, at Buda, 

111. Buried there. 

Charles M. Bryan. Buda, 111. Aug. 10, 1862. Killed in battle May 16, 1863, 

at Champion Hill, Miss. Buried at Vicksburg, Miss. 

Cyrus A. Black. ...Buda, 111. Aug. 10, 1862. Promoted Corporal. Killed 

in battle Oct. 5, 1864, at Allatoona, Ga. Buried at Mari- 
etta, Ga. 

Oliver Cook Concord, 111. Aug. 10, 1862. Discharged for disability 

March 25, 1863. P. O. Princeton, 111. 

Alvin B. Church. ..Wyanet, 111. Aug. 10, 1862. Promoted Corporal. 

Killed in battle Oct. 5, 1864, at Allatoona, Ga. Buried 
at Marietta, Ga. 

Orange Carter... .Wyanet, 111. Aug. 11, 1862. Slightly wounded in battle 

May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. Discharged for 
disability July 23, 1864. Died at Wyanet, 111. Date 
unknown. Buried there. 

Solomon Carl Manteno, 111. Aug. 11, 1862. Promoted Corporal. 

Slightly wounded in battle, in the leg, Oct. 5, 1864, at 
Allatoona, Ga. Mustered out June 23, 1865. 



304 ROSTER OF NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 

John Churchill Wyanet, 111. Aug. ii, 1862. Promoted Corporal. In- 
jured June 28, 1864, left leg badly bruised, in a collision 
on the railroad near Dalton, Ga. Absent sick at the 
date of the muster out of the regiment. P. O. Geneseo, 
111. 

Paul CoLBURN Wyanet, 111. Aug. 11, 1862. Killed in battle May 16, 

1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. Buried at Vicksburg, 
Miss. 

Harvey Colburn.. Wyanet, 111. Aug. 12, 1862. Discharged Jan. 11, 1863. 

Hiram Churchill.. Buda, 111. Aug. 12, 1862. Transferred to Inv. Corps 

March 5, 1864. P. O. Geneseo, 111. 

Burnham M. Decker . Greenville, 111. Aug. 12, 1862. Severely wounded in 

battle, in the leg. May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. 
Discharged Sept. 6, 1864, on account of wounds. P. 0. 
St. Joseph, Mo. 

Robert S. Decker. .Greenville, 111. Aug. 12, 1862. Transferred to Inv. 

Corps March 5, 1864. 

Simeon M. Decker. Greenville, 111. Aug. 12, 1862. Discharged June 18, 

1863. P. O. Lake City, Kan. 

Ansel Dimmock Buda, 111. Aug. 12, 1862. Died Dec. 18, 1864, at home. 

Buried at Princeton, 111. 

Lyman L. Eddy Buda, 111. Aug. 13, 1862. Mustered out June 23, 1865. 

P. O. Belle Flaine, Iowa. 

Caleb H. FLEUGLE..Buda, 111. Aug. 13, 1862. Mustered out June 23, 1865. 

P. O., Galion, Iowa. 

John H. Fifield Buda, 111. Aug. 13, 1862. Died June 25, 1863, at Jef- 
ferson Barracks, Mo. Buried there. 

Herman GiLBRAiTH.Buda, 111. Aug. 13, 1862. Died Nov. 26, 1862, at Mem- 
phis, Tenn. Buried there. 

Frederick Gifford. Wyanet, 111. Aug. 13, 1862. Severely wounded in bat- 
tle, through the hip, Oct. 5, 1864, at Allatoona, Ga. Mus- 
tered out June 23, 1865. P. O. Concordia, Kan. 

Samuel Garman Princeton, 111. Aug. 13, 1862. Slightly wounded in bat- 
tle May 22, 1863, at Vicksburg, Miss. Severely wounded 
in battle, through the lung, Oct. 5, 1864, at Allatoona, 
Ga. Discharged June 22, 1865, on account of wounds. 
P. O. Princeton, 111. 

Tyler Hunt Greenville, 111. Aug. 13, 1862. Transferred to 40th 

Regiment Illinois Vet. Vol. Infantry June 18, 1865. P. 
O. Rock Island, 111. 

John Jarvis Wyanet, 111. Aug. 13, 1862. Died July 12, 1863. 

at Jefferson Barracks, Mo. Buried there. 

Mich'lN.Kauffman. Concord, 111. Aug. 13, 1862. Mustered out June 23, 

1865. P. O. Little Rock, Ark. 

William Karnes. ..Buda, 111. Aug. 13, 1862. Injured June 28, 1864, right 

leg badly bruised, in a collision on the railroad near 



ROSTER OF NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 305 

Dalton, Ga. Killed in 1864, in a collision on a railroad 
near Lafayette, Ind., while on his way home on fur- 
lough. 

James H. LARiMORE.Buda, 111. Aug. 13, 1862. Severely wounded in battle 

May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. Mustered out 
June 23, 1865. 

Jonah F. R. Leonard . Fairfield, 111. Aug. 13, 1862. Slightly wounded in bat- 
tle, in the leg. May 22, 1863, at Vicksburg, Miss. Mus- 
tered out June 23, 1865. P. O. Ainsworth, Iowa. 

Thos. LiNEWEAVER..Buda, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Died Oct. 29, 1863, at Jack- 
son, Tenn. 

Nathan A. Lathrop . Manlius, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Was a prisoner. Mus- 
tered out June 23, 1865. P. O., New Bedford, III. 

Silas H. Little. ...Macon, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Promoted Sergeant. Mus- 
tered out June 23, 1865. P. O. Saxton, Pa. 

James E. Mason Wyanet, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Killed in battle Oct. 5, 

1864, at Allatoona, Ga. Buried at Marietta, Ga. 

David R. Murphy. .Wyanet, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Mortally wounded in bat- 
tle May 22, 1863. at Vicksburg, Miss. Died June 19, 1863. 
Buried at Vicksburg, Miss. 

John C. McDonald. Buda, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Captured in battle May 16, 

1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. Slightly wounded, in the 
finger, in battle Nov. 25, 1863, at Mission Ridge, Tenn. 
Killed in battle Oct. 5, 1864, at Allatoona, Ga. Buried 
at Marietta, Ga. 

John O. Milligan.. Wyanet, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Discharged for disabiUty 

Dec. 19, 1863. P. O. Scribner, Neb. 

James M. Miller... Wyanet, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Mustered out June 23, 

1865. P. O. Effingham, 111. 

Thos. H. McMuRRY.Buda, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Killed in battle May 16, 

1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. Buried at Vicksburg, 
Miss. 

Henry C. Marvin.. Jo Daviess County, 111. Aug. 22, 1862. Deserted Nov. 

I, 1862. 

Thomas Miller... .Bureau County, 111. Aug. 15, 1862. Deserted Nov. i, 

1862. 

Napoleon B. NovES.Buda. 111. Aug. 15, 1862. Injured June 28, 1864, bruised, 

in a colli ion on the rai road near Dalton, Ga. Promoted 
Corporal. Mustered out June 23, 1865. ?• O. Buda, 
111. 

Ezra Osborn Buda 111. Aug. 15, 1S62. Severely wounded, in the leg, 

in battle, May 16. 1863. at Champion Hill, Miss. Dis- 
charged Ma\ 2^, 18O4. on account of wounds. P. O. 
Creston. Iowa. 

Emanuel Renner.. Greenville, 111. Aug. 15, 1862. Died in June, 1864, at 

Huntsviile. Ala. Buried at Chattanooga, Tenn. 

20 



306 ROSTER OF NINETV-THIRD ILLINOIS. 

John Renner Greenville, 111. Aug. 15. 1862. Died March 19, 1863, 

at Helena, Ark. Buried there. 

William Renner... Greenville, III. Aug. 15, 1862. Mustered out June 23, 

1865. P- O. Barnuin, la. 

Elijah Spangler. ..Walnut, III. Aug. 15, 1862. Promoted Corporal. 

Slightly wounded, in the side, in battle, Nov. 25, 1863, 
at Mission Ridge, Tenn. Promoted Sergeant. Mus- 
tered out June 23, 1865. P. O. Mitchell, South Dakota. 

Fred'k Schwartz. ..Buda. 111. Aug. 15, 1862. Deserted April 17, 1863. 

P. O. Oskaloosa, Iowa. 

William A. SwoPE.Buda, 111. Aug. 15. 1862. Killed in battle May 16, 

1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. Buried at Vicksburg^ 
Miss. 

James Stanage Wyanet. 111. Died Nov. 8, 1863, at St. Louis, Mo. 

Buried at Jefferson Barracks, near St. Louis, Mo. 

Samuel Sapp Bureau. 111. Aug. 15, 1862. Mustered out June 23, 1865. 

Died Sept. 11. 1879. at Wyanet, 111. Buried there. 

George Stickle Manlius. 111. Aug. 15. 1862. Died Oct. 29, 1862. at 

Manlius. III. Buried there. 

Thomas Shay Concord. 111. Aug. 15, 1862. Mortally wounded in bat- 
tle May 16. 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. Died July 
18. 1863. of wounds, at Memphis, Tenn. Buried there, 

Warner S. TiLDEN. .Concord. 111. Aug. 15. 1862. Promoted Corporal. 

Mustered out June 2^, 1865. 

Isaac S. Smith Concord. 111. Aug. 15. 1862. Died April 20, 1863, at 

St. Louis. Mo. Buried at Jefferson Barracks, near 
St. Louis, Mo. 

Alex. Schaffer Buda, 111. Aug. 15. 1862. Transferred to 1st U. S. 

Cavalry Nov. i, 1862. 

RuFUS Tift Wyanet, 111. Aug. 14. 1862. Deserted Aug. 17, 1862. 

John S. Webd Buda, 111. Aug. 15, 1862. No record as to what be- 
came of him. 

James Winner Concord. 111. Aug. 15. 1862. Died March 14, 1863, 

at Memphis, Tenn. Buried there. 

Jacob Wyatt Bureau, 111. Aug. 15. 1862. Died March 19, 1863, at 

St. Louis, Mo. Buried at Jefferson Barracks, near 
St. Louis, Mo. 

Quinton Wescott. .Greenville, 111. Aug. 15, 1862. Slightly wounded in 

battle May 22, 1863, at Vicksburg, Miss. Injured June 
28, 1864, left ankle sprained, in a collision on the rail- 
road near Dalton, Ga. Mustered out Junue 23, 1865. 
P. O. Athol, Kan. 

JosiAH H. Waite. ..Buda. .111. Aug. 15. 1862. Died Jan. 15, 1863, at his 

home in Buda. III. Buried there. 

David Wright Buda. 111. Aug. 15, 1862. Deserted Nov. i, 1862. 



ROSTER OF NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 307 

Francis B. WiLCOX.Wyanet, 111. Aug. 15, 1862. Killed in battle May 16, 

1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. Buried at Vicksburg, 

Miss. 

Jacob E. Wise Concord, 111. Aug. 15, 1862. Transferred to Inv. Corps 

Sept, 15, 1863. P. O. Buda, 111. 

Recruits. 

Thomas R. Co rwin. Peoria, 111. April 12, 1865. Transferred to 40th Illinois 

V. V. Infantry June 18, 1865. 

WiLLOUGHBY H.King. Shelby County, 111. Dec. 5, 1864. Transferred to 40th 

Illinois V. V. Infantry June 18, 1865. 

John Parsons Peoria, 111. April 5, 1865. Transferred to 40th Illinois 

V. V. Infantry June 18, 1865. 

James Parker Peoria, 111. April 11, 1865. Transferred to 40th Illinois 

V. V. Infantry June 18, 1865. 

John Ryon Peoria, 111. March 31, 1865. Transferred to 40th Illi- 
nois V. V. Infantry June 18, 1865. 

Thomas Ricks Place and date not given. Transferred to 40th Illinois 

V. V. Infantry June 18, 1865. 

John TiMMONS Peoria, 111. April 12, 1865. Transferred to 40th Illi- 
nois V. V. Infantry June 18, 1865. 

'^ Explanation : The first place given, in each case, was the residence at the date of enlist- 
ment, as stated on the Muster Roll. The first date given, in each case, is the date of enroll- 
ment. In all cases where it is not given, the present P. O. address is unknown. 



308 ROSTER OF NINETY -THIRD ILLINOIS. 

Roster of Company D. 

Enrolled in Stephenson County, Illinois. 

Organized August 12, 1862, at Freeport, Stephenson County, Illinois. 

Mustered into Service October ij, 1862, at Chicago^ IlHnois* 
Captains. 

Charles F. Taggart. Freeport, 111. Commissioned to rank from Oct. 13, 

1862. Mustered into service Oct. 13, 1862, at Chicago, 
111. Resigned Jan. 10, 1865, on account of the failure of 
his health. P. O. Freeport, III. 

Geo. S. Kleckner. .Kent, III. Commissioned to rank from April 11, 1865. 

Mustered into service April 28, 1865. Served until 
the close of war. Mustered out June 23, 1865, near 
Louisville. Ky., and finally paid off and discharged 
July 6. 1865, at Chicago. 111. P. O., Pearl City, 111. See 
the titles of First Lieutenant and Second Lieutenant. 

First Lieutenants. 

Alpheus P. GoDDARD . Freeport, 111. Commissioned to rank from Oct. 13, 

1862. Mustered into service Oct. 13, 1862, at Chicago, 
111. Resigned Feb. 9, 1864, on account of the failure 
of his health. P. O. Freeport, 111. 

Geo. S. Kleckner. .Kent, 111. Commissioned to rank from Feb. 9, 1864. 

Mustered into service April 13, 1864. Promoted Cap- 
tain April 28, 1865. See the titles of Second Lieuten- 
ant and Captain. 

James W. Newcomer . Freeport, 111. Enlisted Aug. 7, 1862, as a Private in 

this Company. Promoted Quartermaster Sergeant of 
the Regiment Aug. 12, 1863. Commissioned First 
Lieutenant, to rank from June 6, 1865, but was not mus- 
tered into service as such because the commission was 
not received in sufficient time prior to the muster out 
of the regiment to admit of his being mustered. He 
was mustered out of service, as Quartermaster Sergeant, 
June 23, 1865. F- O. Sterling, 111. See title of Quar- 
termaster Sergeant. 

Second Lieutenant. 

Geo. S. Kleckner. .Kent, 111. Commissioned to rank from Oct. 13, 1862. 

Mustered into service Oct. 13, 1862, at Chicago, 111. 
Slightly wounded, in the face, in battle, May 22, 1863, 
at Vicksburg, Miss. Promoted First Lieutenant April 
13, 1864. Promoted Captain April 28, 1865. See those 
two titles. 

first Sergeant. 

j^I^ERT F. Childs., Shannon, 111. July 25, 1862. Appointed First Ser- 
geant when the Company was organized. Severely 
wounded, in the leg, in battle. May 16, 1863, at Cham- 



ROSTER OF NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 309 

pion Hill, Miss. Mustered out Aug. 17, 1865. P. O. 
Washington, D. C. 
Sergeants, 

Lansing Eells Winslow, 111. July 28, 1862. Discharged for disability 

May 31, 1863. Reported as deceased, but the time and 
place of death are unknown. 

Ed w. P. Reynolds.. Kent, 111. Aug. 7, 1862. Died March 12, 1863, at 

Memphis, Tenn. Buried there. 

John B. Newcomer. Freeport, 111. Aug. 2, 1862. Mortally wounded in 

battle May 22, 1863, at Vicksburg, Miss. Died June 

21, 1863. Buried at Vicksburg, Miss. 

Benj. E. Go ddard.. Freeport, 111. Aug. 12, 1862. Reduced to ranks. 

Transferred to 40th Regiment, Illinois V. V. Infantry, 
June 18, 1865. Reported as in Iowa. 

Corporals. 

Samuel Shriver. ..Freeport, 111. Aug. 6, 1862. Discharged for disability 

Aug. II, 1863. Reported deceased, but the time and 
place are unknown. 

James Rickey Freeport, 111. Aug. s, 1862. Killed in battle May 16, 

1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. Buried at Vicksburg, 
Miss. 

Enos W. Derricks. Shannon, 111. Aug. 4, 1862. Died Jan. 27, 1863, at 

Memphis, Tenn. Buried there. 

George Sills Freeport, 111. Aug. 6, 1862. Mortally wounded in bat- 
lie May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. Died May 

22, 1863. Buried at Vicksburg, Miss. 

Isaac L. Burger Shannon, 111. Aug. 6, 1862. Discharged for disability 

April 15, 1863. Reported to be in Kansas. 

John Rima Oneco, 111. Aug. 5. 1862. Promoted Sergeant. Killed 

in battle Nov. 25, 1863, at Mission Ridge, Tenn. Buried 
at Chattanooga, Tenn. 

William P. Erwin. Woods' Grove, 111. Aug. 7, 1862. Promoted Sergeant. 

Killed in battle Nov. 25, 1863, at Mission Ridge, Tenn. 
Buried at Chattanooga, Tenn. 

Walker TEMPLETONDakota, 111. Aug. 15, 1862. Promoted Sergeant. 

Mustered out June 23, 1865. P. O., Dakota, 111. 

Musicians. 

Myron W. Lyman. .Freeport, 111. Aug. 7, 1862. Promoted Principal Mu- 
sician of the Regiment. Transferred to Brigade Band 
March 4, 1863. See title Principal Musician. 

Geo. B.Turneaure.. Florence, 111. Aug. 6, 1862. Promoted Principal Mu- 
sician of the Regiment. Mustered out June 23, 1865. 
See title Principal Musician. P. C, Freeport, 111. 

Wagoner. 

Silas Andrews Loran, 111. Aug. 7, 1862. Discharged for disability 

Aug. 5, 1863. P. O., Cameron, Mo. 



310 ROSTER OF NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 

Privates. 

Chas. J. Andrews. .Loran, 111. Aug. 6, 1862. Transferred to 40th Illinois 

V. V. Infantry June 18, 1865. P. O., Omaha, Neb. 

Robert Ayers Loran, 111. July 25, 1862. Rejected and discharged 

Oct. 13, 1862, by the Mustering Officer who mustered 
in the regiment. 

John Bolinger Shannon, 111. Aug. 6, 1862. Mortally wounded, in the 

arm, in battle. May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss, 
Died July 9, 1863, of wounds, at St. Louis, Mo. Buried 
at Jefi'erson Barracks, near St. Louis, Mo. 

Benjamin F. Brandt. Kent, 111. Aug. 5, 1862. Mustered out June 23, 1865. 

P. O., Unadilla, Neb. 

James Blue Kent, 111. July 25, 1862. Died Jan. 11, 1863, at Ridge- 
way, Tenn. Buried at Memphis, Tenn. 

Nathaniel BowKER.Kent, 111. Aug. 9. 1862. Transferred to Invalid Corps 

Jan. 28, 1865. Died at Pine Island, Minn. Date of death 
unknown. 

Isaac Brandt Kent, 111. Aug. 5, 1862. Killed in battle Oct. 5, 1864. 

at Allatoona, Ga. Buried at Marietta, Ga. 

Wm. F. Brillh art.. Florence, 111. Aug. 9, 1862. Transferred to Inv. Corps 

Jan. 28, 1865. Reported as deceased, but the time and 
place of death are unknown. 

Jacob Brenner Shannon, 111. July 25, 1862. Slightly wounded, in the 

hand, in battle May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. 
Transferred to Invalid Corps Feb. 11, 1864. P. 0., 
Porterville, Kan. 

Charles Bender. ..Kent, 111. Aug. 9. 1862. Died Feb. 27, 1863, at Mem- 
phis, Tenn. Buried there. 

Merrion S. BROWN.Foreston, 111. Aug. 6, 1862. Discharged for disability 

Aug. 5, 1863. P. 0., Marshalltown, Iowa. 

Ephraim B. Brewer. Freeport, 111. Aug. 6, 1862. Died April 17, 1863, at 

Memphis, Tenn. Buried there. 

Henry Brillhart.. Florence, 111. Aug. 9. 1862. Discharged for disability 

Aug. 5, 1863. Reported deceased, but the time and 
place of death are unknown. 

James BERCSTREssER.Foreston, 111. Aug. 9, 1862. Injured June 28, 1864. 

ankle sprained, in a collision on the railroad near Dal- 
ton, Ga. Promoted Corporal. Mustered out May 31, 
1865. P. O., Chicago, 111. 

Balser Bistline. ..Kent, 111. Aug. 5, 1862. Slightly wpunded in battle 

May 22, 1863, at Vicksburg. Miss. Promoted Corporal. 
Mustered out June 2^, 1865. Died at Shannon, Ill.r 
Jan. 9, 1897. Buried there. 

Christian Bender. Kent, 111. Aug. 14. 1862. Transferred to Veteran Re- 
serve Corps Sept. 28, 1863. P. O., Shawville, Wis. 

George Bishop Berryman, 111. Aug. 7, 1862. Deserted April 19, 1863. 



ROSTER OF NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 311 

David BoGENREiF... Lena, 111. Aug. 7, 1862. Discharged for disability 

Feb. I, 1864. P. O., Champion, Neb. 

Morgan L. CoRNviLLE..Waddams, 111. Aug. 7, 1862. Discharged for disa- 
bility May 25, 1864. Died Oct. 7, 1864, at Chicago, 
111. Burial place unknown. 

Charles Crane. .. .Dunkirk, Wis. Aug. 9, 1862. Discharged for disability 

Jan. 10, 1863. 

George Davis Loran, 111. Aug. 5, 1862. Mustered out June 23, 1865. 

reported deceased, but the time and place of death are 
unknown. 

Samuel F. DEVORE.Kent, 111. Aug 8, 1862. Mortally wounded in battle 

May 22, 1863, at Vicksburg, Miss. Died of wounas 
July 27, 1863, at Nashville, Tenn. Buried there. 

Rudy Erwin Freeport, 111. Aug. 10, 1862. Killed in battle May 16, 

1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. Buried at Vicksburg, 

Miss. 

George W. Fry Kent, 111. Aug. 5. 1862. Mustered out June 23, 1865. 

P. O., Broken Bow, Neb. 

Isaac Fry Kent, 111. Aug. 9, 1862. Promoted Corporal. Mus- 
tered out June 23, 1865. P. O., Diller, Neb. 

Edward Givens Cherry Grove, 111. Aug. 7, 1862. Transferred to V. R. 

Corps Dec. 12, 1863. P. O., Lincoln, Neb. 

Calvin Giddings. ..Foreston, 111. Aug. 5, 1862. Severely wounded, in 

shoulder, in battle, May 16, 1863. at Champion Hill, 
Miss. Mustered out June 23, 1865. P. O., Masonville, 
Iowa. 

Pred'k Goodwill. .Kent, 111. July 26, 1862. Discharged for disability Jan. 

. 10, 1863. P. O., Pecatonica, 111. 

Jacob Gable Kent, 111. Aug. 7, 1862. Slightly wounded, in the 

shoulder, in battle, Oct. 5, 1864, at Allatoona, Ga. Pro- 
moted Corporal. Mustered out June 23, 1865. P. O., 
Cortland, Neb. 

Howard L. Hopkins. Rock Run, 111. Aug. 7, 1862. Mustered out June 23, 

1865. 

Sam'lR. Hutchinson. Berryman, 111. Aug. 9, 1862. Promoted Sergeant 

Severely wounded, in the arm, in battle, Nov. 25, 1863, 
at Mission Ridge, Tenn. Discharged for disability 
Aug. 18, 1864. Died May 17, 1869, at Rock City, 111. 
Buried there. 

Isaac Hahn Loran, 111. Aug. 7. 1862. Slightly wounded in battle 

May 22, 1863, at Vicksburg, Miss. Mustered out June 
2;^, 1865. P. O., Freeport, 111. 

Jacob Hahn Loran, 111. Aug. 7, 1862. Severely wounded, in the 

mouth, in battle, May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. 
Mustered out June 23, 1865. P. O., Morrill, Brown 
County, Kan. 



3l:» ROSTER OF XIXETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 

HcxKY W. HiGH...Freeport, 111. Aug. lo, 1862. Slightly wounded, in the 

shoulder, in battle, Oct 5, 1864, at Allatoona, Ga. Mus- 
tered out June 23. 1865. P. O., Grand Island, Neb. 

Fbkxezer E. Hood. Kent. 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Mustered out June 23, 1865. 

P. O., Marshalltown, Iowa. 

John G. Jewell Kent, 111. Aug. 13, 1862. Died July 12, 1863, at Mem- 
phis, Tenn. Buried there. 

Samvel Kieler Cherry Grove, 111. Aug. 7, 1862. Deserted March 2^ 

1863. 

David Kiester Foreston, III. Aug. 9, 1862. Wounded severely, in the 

hip, in battle, May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. 
Mustered out June 23, 1865. Reported as deceased, 
but the time and place of death are unknown. 

Adam E. Kauffman . Kent, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Mustered cut June 27,, 1865. 

P. O.. Freeport, 111. 

Samuel Knedle Kent. 111. Aug. 6, 1862. Monally wounded, in the 

hand, in battle. May 16. 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. 
Died Sept. i, 1863. at Vicksburg, Miss. Buried there. 

Geo, W. KLECKNER.Rock Run. 111. Aug. 5, 1862. Promoted Corporal. 

Severely wounded, in the leg. in battle. May 16, 1863^ 
at Champion Hill, Miss. Mortally wounded, in left 
breast, in battle, Oct. 5. 1864. at Allatoona, Ga. Died 
Oct. 13. 1864, at Rome. Ga. Buried at Marietta, Ga. 

J.uv^B Leonard Shannon. III. Aug. 9. 1862. Mortally wounded in 

bailee. May 22, 1863. at X'icksburg. Miss. Died May 
23, 1863. Buried at Vicksburg, Miss. 

WlLUAM W. Lyons. Shannon. III. Aug. 7. 1862. Mustered out June 23,. 

1865. Reported to be somewhere, in Colorado. 

KXRA Lansing Freeport. III. Aug. 8. 1862. Discharged for disability. 

Date unknown. Reported deceased, but the time and 
place of death are unknown. 

Xathan Liscom Freeport. 111. Aug. 10, 1862. Died Aug. 3, 1863, at 

\*icksburg. Miss. Buried there. 

QeoR^^e C. LENHART.Freepon, III. Aug. 14, 1862. Discharged for disability 

Jan. 5, 1863. P. O.. Lincoln, Xeb. 

QlOi(v;H M. LASUELL-Shannon, 111. Aug. 0. 1S62. Discharged for disability 

Feb. 25, 1S63. P. O.. Shannon. 111. 

QCO^O.E F. LvsK Waddams. III. Aug. 5. 1862. Captured in battle Oct. 

5, ivkx4. at Ailaicona, Ga Transferred to 40th Illinois 
\\ V. Infantry June 18, 1805. P. O.. Kellerton, S. D. 

1W*» 1--^*^*^ Dakota. 111. Aug. 7. iSdj. Slightly wounded, in the 

har.vl. in ba:ile. May 10. 1S03. at Champion Hill, Miss, 
Proir.o:ed Sergean:. Mustered out June 23, 1865. 
i\ O.. Sabatha, Kan. 



li|iltyKtix^MML> ^ . . Place ar.d date not given. Mustered out June 2, 1865. 




ROSTER OF NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 313 

Henry Metz Kent, 111. Aug. 9, 1862. Discharged for disability Feb. 

23, 1863. P. O., Painter City, Kan. 

Aaron E. Machiner. Place not given. Aug. 15, 1862. Discharged Oct. 13, 

1862, by Mustering Officer, at muster in of the regiment 

THOS.O.K.M1TCHELL. Woods* Grove, 111. Aug, 15, 1862. Killed in battle 

May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. Buried at Vicks- 
burg. Miss. 

Foster D.McKiBBEN. Rock Run, 111. Aug. 7, 1862. Mustered out June 23, 

1865. Reported in Dakota. 

Roland McKiBSEN.Rock Run, 111. Aug. 15, 1862. Promoted Sergeant 

Mustered out June 23, 1865. Died June 16, 1885, in 
Florence Township, Stephenson County, 111. Buried 
at Dakota, 111. 

Thomas Plush Florence, 111. Aug. 6, 1862. Died March 12, 1863, at 

Memphis, Tenn. Buried there. 

Thos. M. C. PATTON.Kent, III. Aug. 5, 1862. Promoted Corporal. Mus- 
tered out June 23, 1865. P. O., Elmwood, Neb. 

George H. Paul... Cherry Grove, 111. Aug. 9, 1862. Promoted Corporal. 

Mustered out June 23, 1865. P. O., Lanark, III. 

Thomas Phillips. .Freeport, 111. Aug. 7, 1862. Promoted Sergeant 

Killed in batlte May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. 
Buried at Vicksburg, Miss. 

William Pattinger. Dakota, 111. Aug. 15, 1862. Mustered out June 23, 

1865. P. O., Wichita, Kan. 

Cyrus A. Robey Waddams, 111. Aug. 15, 1862. Injured June 28, 1864, 

ankle sprained, in a collision on the railroad near Dal- 
ton, Ga. Severely wounded, in the neck, in battle, Oct 
5, 1864, at Allatoona, Ga. Discharged for disability, 
on account wound, June 8, 1865. Reported to be in 
the State of Washington. 

John Ratzler Freeport, 111. Aug. 6, 1862. Transferred to Brigade 

Band March 4, 1863. P. O., Freeport, 111. 

Carlton S. Solace. Waddams, 111. Aug. 5, 1862. Discharged for disability 

Feb. 5, 1863. P. 0., McConnells, 111. 

Carson Sprague Harlem, 111. Aug. 9, 1862. Discharged for disability 

Aug. 15, 1863. Reported as having died at Vicksburg, 
Miss. Date of death unknown. 

Peter Shearer Kent, 111. Aug. 5, 1862. Deserted March 2, 1863. 

David Shearer Kent, 111. Aug. s, 1862. Captured by the enemy Sept. 3, 

1864, near Allatoona, Ga., while on a foraging expedi- 
tion under orders for that purpose. Died in New York 
Harbor April 18, 1865. Burial place is unknown. 

Andrew Shearer. . Kent, 111. Aug. 7, 1862. Slightly wounded in battle 

May 22, 1863, at Vicksburg, Miss. Mustered out June 
23, 1865. 



314 ROSTER OF NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 

Hiram Shippey Waddams, 111. Aug. lo, 1862. Severely wounded, in 

the breast, in battle, Oct. 5, 1864, at Allatoona, Ga. 
Mustered out June 23, 1865. Reported as deceased, 
but the time and place of death are unknown. 

David H.Templeton .Dakota, 111. Aug. 15, 1862. Died Oct. 30, 1862, at Da- 
kota, 111. Buried there. 

-George Thomas Loran, 111. Aug. 9, 1862. Captured in battle May 16. 

1863. at Champion Hill, Miss. Never heard from. 
Supposed to have been killed. 

Franklin Unangust . Kent, 111. Aug. 6, 1862. Promoted Corporal. Mus- 
tered out June 23, 1865. 

William Updegraff . Shannon, 111. Aug. 6, 1862. Promoted Corporal 

Mustered out June 23, 1865. Reported as deceased, but 
the time and place of death are unknown. 

Thomas Watson Adeline. 111. Aug. 7, 1862. Mustered out June 23, 

1865. Reported to be somewhere in Kansas. 

John Whitehorn. .Freeport, 111. July 28, 1862. Discharged for disability 

May 7, 1865. 

Christopher Washburn. Loran, 111. Aug. 11, 1862. Slightly wounded 

in battle May 22, 1863, at Vicksburg, Miss. Promoted 
Corporal. Mustered out June 23, 1865. P. O., Free- 
port, 111. 

William B. Ward. .Waddams, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Died June 29, 2863, 

at Vicksburg, Miss. Buried there. 

John D. White Florence, III. Aug. 8, 1862. Severely wounded, in the 

face, in battle. May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. 
Discharged May 28, 1864, on account of wound. P. O., 
Kansas City, Mo. 

Christian Yordy. .Cherry Grove, 111. Aug. 9, 1862. Slightly wounded, 

in the shoulder, in battle, Oct. 5, 1864, at Allatoona, 
Ga. Detached at muster out of the regiment June 23, 
1865. P. O., Rockford, 111. 

LuciEN W. Yeigh.. Cherry Grove, 111. Aug. 9, 1862. Slightly wounded, 

in the leg, in battle, Oct. 5, 1864, at Allatoona, Ga. 
Promoted Corporal. Mustered out June 23, 1865. P. 
O., Unadilla, Neb. 

John Young Loran, 111. Aug. i, 1862. Discharged March 11, 1863. 

P. O., Freeport, 111. 

Henry Young Loran, 111. Aug. 5, 1862. Mustered out June 23, 1865. 

Simon Young Loran, 111. Aug. 5, 1862. Severely wounded, in the 

side, in battle. May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. 
Mustered out June 23, 1865. P. O., Tecumseh, Neb. 

Recruits. 

James Garrett Waddams, III. Oct. 3, 1864. Transferred to 40th 

Illinois V. V. Infantry June 18, 1865. P. O., Lowell, 

Neb. 



ROSTER OF NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 315 

John Klotz Waddams, 111. Oct. 3, 1864. Transferred to 40th 

Illinois V. V. Infantry June 18, 1865. P. O., McCon- 
nells Grove, 111. 

Peter Reeder Waddams, 111. Oct. 3, 1864. Transferred to 40th 

Illinois V. V. Infantry June 18, 1865. P. O., McCon- 
nells Grove, 111. 

♦Explanation : The first place given, in each case, was the residence at the date of enlist- 
ment, as stated on the Muster Roll. The first date given, in each case, is the date of enroll- 
ment. In all cases where it is not given, the present P. O. address is unknown. 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 




HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 317 



« TT' ** 



SKETCH OF ORRIN WILKINSON, CAPTAIN, COMPANY " E. 

ORRIN WILKINSON, was born September 27th, 1836, in 
Tioga County, Pennsylvania. In 1838, he was brought by his par- 
-ents to La Salle County, Illinois, and in 1844, to Bureau County, 
Illinois, where he has resided ever since. He was reared on a 
farm adjoining Buda, where he resided until 1852. He was edu- 
cated in the common schools. In 1852, he removed to Tiskilwa and 
continued his home there until 1892. Since that year his residence 
lias been in Princeton, Illinois. 

In 1859, he formed a copartnership with Mr. John H. Welsh, 
:and engaged in mercantile business, keeping a general store, until 
August, 1862. At that time, he enlisted and organized Company E, 
Ninety-Third Regiment Illinois Volunteer Infantry, of which he 
was elected captain, and with which he served during the war until 
mustered out in 1865, as shown in the roster of that company. 

He was married to Miss. Margaret A. Welsh March 13th, 1861. 
She departed this life June 19th, 1862. He was married to his 
present wife. Miss. Sarah A. Smith, October loth, 1865. 

After the war, he was engaged in the insurance and general 
collecting business until 1877. In that year, he formed a copartner- 
ship with Mr. Max W. Keigley, and engaged in a general mercan- 
tile business until December, 1890, when he disposed of his interest 
to accept office as county clerk. 

In April, i860, he was elected justice of the peace and was con- 
tinuously reelected and held the office ifntil December ist, 1890. 
In April, 1859, before he was twenty-three years old, he was elected 
supervisor of the town of Arispie, and served as such one year. In 
April, 1880, and continuously thereafter, he was elected supervisor 
of that town, and served until December ist, 1890. He was con- 
tinuously appointed by the school trustees of that town as township 
treasurer, and served as such from 1872 to 1891. On November 
4th, 1890, he was elected county clerk of Bureau County, Illinois, 
took the office December ist, 1890, and served therein until Decem- 
ber 3d, 1894. He retired from active business at the expiration of 
liis term of office as county clerk. His address is Princeton, Illinois. 



318 HISTORY OK THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 




LYUAN J. WILKINSON', First Liciitoiinnt. Corapiinj -K." 



k 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 31^ 



SKETCH OF LYMAN J. WILKINSON, FIRST LIEUTENANT, COMPANY " E."^ 

LYMAN J. WILKINSON, was born August 17th, 1833, in 
Tioga County, Pennsylvania. In 1838, he came with his parents to 
La Salle County, Illinois, and from thence, in 1844, to Bureau 
County, Illinois. He was educated in. the common schools. He 
was reared on a farm and made farming his business in early life. 
From 1844 to 1852, he resided on a farm adjoining Buda, and there- 
after for two years he resided in Tiskilwa. 

In 1854, he was married to Miss. Emeline Stevens. From that 
time until i860, he was engaged in farming, a part of the time in 
Bureau County, and a part in Henry County, Illinois. In the latter 
year, he moved back to Tiskilwa, and resided there until August, 
1862, when he assisted in the enlistment and organization of Com- 
pany E, Ninety-Third Illinois Volunteer Infantry. On the organi- 
zation of the company, he was elected First Lieutenant, and served 
with the company until his health failed, in 1863, when he resigned, 
as shown by the roster of the company. 

In 1869, he was appointed superintendent of the Bureau County 
Farm, by the board of supervisors of the county, and served until 
March, 1872. At that time, he resigned the place to accept the 
superintendency of the Henry County Infirmary, to which he had 
been elected by the board of supervisors of that county. He has 
been continuously reelected and has served in that capacity ever 
since, more than twenty-five years. His address in Geneseo, Illi- 
nois. 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 




C, KINNEY, Flrsl Lleulenant, Comjiimj "E. 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 321 



SKETCH OF WILLIAM C.KINNEY, FIRST LIEUTENANT, COMPANY " E." 

WILLIAM CRANE KINNEY, was born on a farm in Lena- 
wee County, Michigan, February 3d, 1838. He was educated in 
the public schools there. He removed to Bureau County, IlUnois, 
in 1859, and engaged in teaching, reading law during his leisure 
moments. In i860 to 1861, he attended law school, graduating from 
the Union College of Law, at Chicago, Illinois. In July, 1862, he 
unlisted and assisted in raising Company E of the Ninety-Third 
Regpiment Illinois Volunteer Infantry, and was elected Second Lieu- 
tenant of that company in September of that year, vice Edward S. 
Johnson, who was elected quartermaster of the regiment. He was 
mustered into service at Chicago^ Illinois, October 13th, 1862. He 
served as aide-de-camp on the brigade staff for about a year. 

At the close of the war he settled at Nashville, Tennessee, where 
he remained until 1870, when he removed to Kansas City, Missouri. 
In 1872 he removed to Chicago, Illinois, where he has since resided, 
being engaged in real estate and mortgage loan business. 

He was married in 1869, to Miss. Mary C. Troy, of Jacksonville, 
Illinois, who departed this life in 1891, leaving one son, Troy S. 
Kinney, who was born in 1871. 

While living in Nashville, Tennessee, he served two years in the 
city council, one year of which he was president of the board of 
aldermen. Since he has resided in Chicago, he was for two years a 
member of the board of trustees of Hyde Park, and for two years 
an alderman of the city of Chicago. 



21 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 




I, Sergeant. Company ' 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 333 



I 




324 ROSTER OF NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 

Roster of Company E. 

Enrolled in Bureau County, Illinois. 

Organized August i8, 1862. at Tiskilwa, Bureau County, Illinois. 

Mustered into Service October ij, 1862, at Chicago, Illinois.'^ 
Captain, 

Orrin Wilkinson.. Arispie, 111. Commissiotied to rank from Oct. 13, 1862. 

Mustered into service Oct. 13, 1862, at Chicago, 111. 
Served as Post Adjutant at AUatoona, Ga., while the 
regiment was located there. Served until the close of 
the war, and was mustered out June 23, 1865, near 
Louisville, Ky., and was finally paid off and discharged 
July 6, 1865, at Chicago, 111. P. O., Princeton, 111. 

First Lieutenants. 

Lyman J. Wilkinson. Arispie, 111. Commissioned to rank from Oct. 13, 1862. 

Mustered into service Oct. 13, 1862, at Chicago, 111. 
Resigned September 3, 1863. P. O., Geneseo, 111. 

William C. Kinney. . Indiantown, 111. Commissioned to rank from Sept. 

3, 1863. Mustered into service March 16, 1864. Served 
as an Aide on the Brigade Staff about one year. Mus- 
tered out June 23, 1865, near Louisville, Ky., and finally 
paid oflf and discharged July 6, 1865, at Chicago, 111. 
P. O., 108 Dearborn street, Chicago, 111. See sketch 
ante. 

Second Lieutenant. 

William C. KiNNEY.Indiantown, 111. Commissioned to rank from Oct. 13, 

1862. Mustered into service Oct. 13, 1862, at Chicago, 
111. Promoted First Lieutenant March 16, 1864. See 
that title, and sketch, ante. 

First Sergeant. 

Thompson M. Wylie. Indiantown, 111. Aug. 13, 1862. Severely wounded in 

battle May 22, 1863, at Vicksburg, Miss. Promoted 
Sergeant Major of the Regiment April 13, 1864. Pro- 
moted First Lieutenant of Company I, of his regiment. 
July II, 1864. See those titles, and sketch, ante. P. O., 
Tampico, 111. 

Sergeants. 

Chester H. Baker. Arispie, 111. Aug. 12, 1862. Injured June 28, 1864, 

severely, in the left foot, in a collision on the railroad, 
near Dalton, Ga. Mustered out May 27, 1865. Died 
Jan. 19, 1876, at Rhinehart, Mo. Buried there. 

Wm. H. Robertson. Arispie, 111. Aug. 12, 1862. Reduced to the ranks to 

be appointed Wagon Master for the regiment. Cap- 
tured by the enemy Jan. 13, 1863, while on a scout. 
Discharged March 18, 1863. P. O., Buda, 111. 

Aaron B. Blake.... Arispie, 111. Aug. 13, 1862. Discharged for disability 

April 15, 1863. P. O., Tiskilwa, 111. 



ROSTER OF NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 325 

James McCarthy. ..Macon, 111. Aug. 15, 1862. He was in every battle 

and on every march in which the regiment participated. 
Mustered out June 23, 1865. Died at Tiskilwa, 111. 
Date of death unknown. Buried there. 

Corporals. 

Daniel Warren Wheatland, 111. Aug. 15, 1862. Dangerously wounded, 

in the breast, in battle, Oct. 5, 1864, at Allatoona, Ga. 
Mustered out June 23, 1865. Reported as having died 
in Missouri, but the time and place of death are un- 
known. 

Jonathan H. Baker. Indiantown, 111. Aug. 15, 1862. Discharged for disa- 
bility May 25, 1863. P. O., Wichita, Kan. 

Joseph H. Bill, jR.Milo, 111. Aug. 13, 1862. Mortally wounded in battle 

May 22, 1863, at Vicksburg, Miss. Died May 26, 1863. 
Buried at Vicksburg, Miss. 

Luther Demaranville .Wheatland, 111. Aug. 17, 1862. Died March 14, 

1865, at Nashville, Tenn. Buried there. 

Daniel Welsh Arispie, 111. Aug. 13, 1862. Died Feb. 14, 1863, at 

Memphis, Tenn. Buried at Tiskilwa, 111. 

Abram G. SPELLMAN.Milo, 111. Aug. 12, 1862. Captured in battle Nov. 25, 

1863, at Mission Ridge, Tenn. Mustered out June 23, 
1865. P. O., Lincoln, Neb. 

Albert C. Hirth. .Arispie, 111. Aug. 13, 1862. Promoted Sergeant. He 

was in every battle and on every march in which the 
regiment participated. Mustered out June 23, 1865. 
P. 0„ Mayville, Wis. 

Washington Prunk. Indiantown, 111. Aug. 13, 1862. Slightly wounded, 

in the foot, in battle, May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, 
Miss. Captured in battle Oct. 5, 1864, at Allatoona, 
Ga. Mustered out June 23, 1865. P. O., Tiskilwa, 111. 

Musician. 

Albert M. Towner. Arispie, 111. Aug. 15, 1862. Discharged for disability 

Feb. 13, 1863. P. O., Fort Scott, Kan. 

V/agoner. 

Edwin S. Abbott. ..Milo, 111. Aug. 15, 1862. Never mustered into service. 

Privates. 

Levi Akers Arispie, 111. Aug. 15, 1862. Slightly wounded, in the 

hand, in battle, May 16, 1863, ^t Champion Hill, Miss. 
Transferred to Inv. Corps Feb. 15, 1864. Died in 1889, 
at Barry, 111. Buried there. 

George Ammons. . .Wheatland, 111. Aug. 13, 1862. Injured June 28, 1864, 

bruised, in a collision on the railroad, near Dalton, Ga. 
Mustered out June 23, 1865. 



826 ROSTER OF NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 

Jeremiah Ammons. .Wheatland, 111. Aug. 13, 1862. Severely wounded, in 

the side, in battle, May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. 
Transferred to Inv. Corps Sept. 6, 1863. P. O., Ancona, 
111. 

Edwin Alfred Milo, 111. Aug. 13, 1862. Died April 8, 1863, at Mem- 
phis, Tenn. Buried there. 

JosKni Bates Indiantown, 111. Aug. 13, 1862. Severely wounded, 

in the shoulder and wrist and ankle, in battle. May 16. 
1863, 2it Champion Hill, Miss. Transferred to Inv. 
Corps Jan. 15. 1864. P. O., Providence, 111. 

Wm. T. Brookie. ..Milo, 111. Aug. 15, 1862. Injured June 28, 1864, bruised, 

in a collision on the railroad near Dalton, Ga. Killed 
in battle Oct. 5, 1864, at Allatoona, Ga. Buried at 
Marietta, Ga. 

MtcuAEL Blessing.. \rispie, 111. Aug. 13, 1862. Discharged for disability 

April 9, 1863. Died soon after. Buried at Tiskilwa, 
111. 

Henry Burch Macon, 111. Aug. 13, 1862. Killed in battle Nov. 25, 

1863, at Mission Ridge, Tenn. Buried at Chattanooga, 
Tenn. 

George W. Burch. Macon, 111. Aug. 13, 1862. Captured by the enemy 

Sept. 3, 1864, near Allatoona, Ga., while on a foraging 
expedition under orders for that purpose. Mustered out 
June 23, 1865. P. 0., Olivia, Minn. 

Thomas Bolton Arispie, 111. Aug. 15, 1862. He was in every battle 

and on every march in which the regiment participated. 
Mustered out June 23, 1865. P. O., Tiskilwa, 111. 

Nelson Babcock. ..Milo, 111. Aug. 13, 1862. Slightly wounded, in the 

head, in battle Nov. 25, 1863, at Mission Ridge, Tenn. 
Captured by the enemy Sept. 3, 1864, near Allatoona, 
Ga., while on a foraging expedition under orders for 
that purpose. Mustered out June 23, 1865,. P. O., 
Harford, N. Y. 

William E. Culp. .Arispie, 111. Aug. 13. 1862. Killed in battle May 22, 

1863, at Vicksburg, Miss. Buried there. 

Bknnett Crossley. Arispie, 111. Aug. 13, 1862. Mustered out June 23, 

1865. 

Amariaii Crossley. Indiantown, 111. Aug. 13, 1862. Rejected by muster- 
ing officer. 

Pkter Cavanaugii. .Indiantown, 111. Aug. 13, 1862. Killed in battle Oct. 

5, 1864, at Allatoona, Ga. Buried at Marietta, Ga. 

J AS. B. Chamberlin. Indiantown, 111. Aug. 13, 1862. Transferred to Iny. 

Corps April 2^, 1864. P. O., Clarinda, Iowa. 

John W. Crossley. Marion, 111. Aug. 13, 1862. Mustered out June 23, 

1865. 

i Thomas Daly Indiantown, 111. Aug. 13, 1862. Mustered out June 

f: 23, 1865. P. O., Pulaski, 111. 



ROSTER OF NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 327 

William F. DuNN..Arispie, 111. Aug. 13, 1862. Promoted First Sergeant. 

Severely wounded, in the leg, and the leg amputated, 
in battle Oct. 5, 1864, at Allatoona, Ga. Discharged, 
on account of wound, June 14, 1865. P. O., Tiskilwa, 
111. 

Isaac DEMARANViLLE.Indiantown, 111. Aug. 13, 1862. Captured in battle 

Nov. 25, 1863, at Mission Ridge, Tenn, Mustered out 
June 23, 1865. P. O., Bonar Springs, Kan. 

Elisha p. Dem ARAN ville. Wheatland, 111. Aug. 13, 1862. Rejected by 

mustering officer. P. O., Tiskilwa, 111. 

David E. Dunbar.. Arispie, 111. Aug. 15, 1862. Promoted Corporal. He 

was in every battle and an every march in which the 
regiment participated. Mustered out June 23, 1865. 

Cornelius Dewitt. Macon, 111. Aug. 13. 1862. Severely wounded, in the 

hip, in battle, May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. 
Killed in battle Oct. 5, 1864, at Allatoona, Ga. Buried 
at Marietta, Ga. 

James H. Davis Milo, 111. Aug. 15, 1862. Died Jan. 19, 1863, at Co- 
lumbus, Ky. Burial place is unknown. 

Jacob Ditman Millers Point, Wis. Oct. 11, 1862. Deserted Oct. 17, 

1862. 

Benj. F. Eastman.. Arispie, 111. Aug. 15, 1862. Deserted Nov. 3, 1863. 

Wallace Forbes. ..Wheatland, 111. Aug. 15, 1862. Mortally wounded, in 

the hip, in battle. May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. 
Died July 28, 1863, at Memphis, Tenn. Buried there. 

Lafayette M. Foos.Arispie, 111. Aug. 13, 1862. Killed in battle May 16, 

1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. Buried at Vicksburg, 
Miss. 

Nathan M. GiLLETT.Indiantown, 111. Aug. 13, 1862. Discharged for disa- 
bility Aug. 21, 1863. Died soon after reaching home. 
Buried at Tiskilwa, 111. 

John H. Gould Indiantown, 111. Aug. 13, 1862. Discharged for disa- 

b.lity March 30, 1863. P. O., Griswold, Iowa. 

David Hunter Arispie, 111. Aug. 13, 1862. Discharged for disability 

March 11, 1863. P. O., Burns, Kan. 

John N. Howe Milo, 111. Aug. 13, 1862. Transferred to Inv. Corps 

Feb. 15, 1864. At Soldiers' Home, Quincy, III. 

Martin S. Hitchcock. Princeton, 111. Aug. 13, 1862. Killed in battle May 

16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. Buried at Vicksburg, 
Miss. 

Julius Hirth Arispie, III. Aug. 13, 1862. Mortally wounded, in 

the thigh, in battle. May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, 
Miss. Died May 29, 1863. Buried at Vicksburg, Miss. 

Thomas Hamilton. Arispie, 111. Aug. 13, 1862. Discharged for disability 

March 28. 1863. 



328 ROSTER OF NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 

Jeremiah Holbrook.MiIo, 111. Aug. 13, 1862. Discharged April 4, 1864. 

P. O., Arlington, 111. 

Daniel O. Hunter. Wheatland, 111. Aug. 15, 1862. Discharged for disa- 
bility June 16, 1863. Died at Atkinson, 111. Buried 
there. Date of death unknown. 

Jas. D. Livingston. Milo, 111. Aug. 13, 1862. Severely wounded, in the 

hip, in battle, May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. 
Transferred to Inv. Corps Feb. 15, 1864. 

Joseph M. Lea Wheatland, 111. Aug. 13, 1862. Mustered out June 

23, 1865. P. O., Joliet, 111. 

Benj. F. Lombard. .Milo, 111. Aug. 15, 1862. Discharged for disability 

May 7, 1863. Died at Milo, 111. Buried there. Date 
ot death unknown. 

Richard R. Luce*. Milo, 111. Aug. 13, 1862. Mustered out June 23, 1865. 

P. O., Murray, Iowa. 

Henry Leeper Arispie, 111. Aug. 15. 1862. Killed in battle Nov. 

-*5» 1863, at Mission Ridge, Tenn. Buried at Princeton,, 
111. 

Samuel J. Lowery. Arispie, 111. Aug. 15, 1862. Mustered out June 23,. 

1865. P. O., Clay City, Ind. 

George Miller Millers Point, Wis. Oct. 11, 1862. Deserted Oct. I7„ 

1862. 

Michael McMAHAN.Arispie, 111. Aug. 15, 1862. Captured in battle Nov. 

^5, 1863, at Mission Ridge, Tenn. Died in prison Aug. 

4, 1864, at Andcrsonville, Ga. Number of his grave is 

4725. 
Jonathan Miller. .Arispie, 111. Aug. 15, 1862. Mustered out June 23, 

1865. P. O., Shelby, Neb. 

William Nye Princeton, 111. Aug. 15, 1862. Discharged April 16, 

1863. P. O., Bingham, Iowa. 

James O'Brien Wheatland, 111. Aug. 15, 1862. Promoted Corporal. 

He was in every battle and on every march in which 
the regiment participated. Mustered out June 23, 1865. 
P. O., Lombardville, 111. 

Francis M. Owen.. Wheatland, 111. Aug. 13, 1862. Wounded slightly, in 

the hand, in battle, Nov. 25, 1863, at Mission Ridge» 
Tenn. Mustered out June 23, 1865. Died Nov. 8, 1889,. 
at Putnam, 111. Buried there. 

Jos. Y. Provance. .Indiantown, 111. Aug. 13, 1862. Discharged for disa- 
bility April 16, 1863. Died in June, 1863, at Tiskilwa, 
111. Buried there. 

Roger W. Phelps.. Milo, 111. Aug. 13, 1862. Promoted Corporal, Slightly 

wounded, in the leg, in battle, Nov. 25, 1863, at Mission 
Ridge, Tenn. Severely wounded, in arm and side, in 
battle, Oct. 5, 1864, at Allatoona, Ga. Promoted Ser- 
geant. Discharged March 25, 1865, on account of 
wounds. P. O., Princeton, 111. 



ROSTER OF NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 329 

William H. Poole. Arispie, 111. Aug. 13, 1862. Deserted April 13, 1863. 

William Rhodes... Arispie, 111. Aug. 13, 1862. Injured June 28, 1864, 

badly bruised, in a collision on the railroad, near Dal- 
ton, Ga. He was in every battle and on every march 
in which the regiment participated. Mustered out June 
23, 1865. P. O., Tiskilwa, 111. 

George Riley Arispie, 111. Aug. 13, 1862. Killed in battle May 16, 

1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. Buried at Vicksburg, 
Miss. 

Gardner Rogers. ..Wheatland, 111. Aug. 13, 1862. Killed in battle May 

16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. Buried at Vicksburg, 
Miss. 

John Ready Arispie, 111. Aug. 13, 1862. Slightly wounded, in the 

leg, in battle, Oct. 5, 1864, at Allatoona, Ga. Mus- 
tered out May 22, 1865. P. O., Tiskilwa, 111. 

Reuben U. Sergeant. Wheatland, 111. Aug. 13, 1862. Deserted Oct. 13, 1863. 

Wm. C. Simmons Indiantown, 111. Aug. 15, 1862. Killed in battle May 

16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. Buried at Vicks- 
burg, Miss. 

Alfred M. Stringer . Milo, 111. Aug. 13, 1862. Slightly wounded, in the 

hand, in battle, Oct. 5, 1864, at Allatoona, Ga. He 
was in every battle and on every march in which the 
regiment participated. Mustered out June 23, 1865. 
P. O., Ancona, 111. 

Michael Shea Indiantown, 111. Aug. 13, 1862. Killed in battle Nov. 

25, 1863, at Mission Ridge, Tenn. Buried at Chatta- 
nooga, Tenn. 

John M. St. John.. Indiantown, 111, Aug. 15, 1862. Slightly wounded, in 

the side, in battle, Oct. 5, 1864, at Allatoona, Ga. Mus- 
tered out June 23, 1865. P. O., E. Douglas avenue, 
35th street, Chicago, 111. 

Charles Smith.... Indiantown, 111. Aug. 15, 1862. Deserted May 28, 1863. 

John M. Smith Arispie, 111. Aug. 15, 1862. Injured June 28, 1864, left 

knee sprained, in a collision on the railroad, near Dal- 
ton, Ga. Mustered out June 23, 1865. Died at Tis- 
kilwa, 111. Buried there. Date of death is unknown. 

John Ulch Indiantown, 111. Aug. 15, 1862. Promoted Corporal. 

He was in every battle and on every march in which 
the regiment participated. Mustered out June 23, 1865. 

Alexander Watson. Arispie, 111. Aug. 15, 1862. Mortally wounded, in the 

leg, in battle, Nov. 25, 1863, at Mission Ridge, Tenn. 

Died Dec. 28, 1863. Buried at Chattanooga, Tenn. 

• 

Martin S. Walters. Indiantown, 111. Aug. 15, 1862. Severely wounded, in 

the hand and shoulder, in battle, Nov. 25, 1863, at Mis- 
sion Ridge, Tenn. Discharged June 25, 1864, on ac- 
count of wounds. P. O., Luray, Kan. 



330 ROSTER OF NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 

Jeremiah Walker. .Hall, 111. Aug. 15, 1862. Discharged for disability 

July 27, 1863. 

Francis M. Walker. Wheatland, 111. Aug. 13, 1862. Died April 12, 1863, 

near Helena, Ark. Buried at Helena, Ark. 

Wm. H. Walker... Hall, 111. Aug. 15, 1862. Slightly wounded, in the leg, 

in battle, Nov. 25, 1863, at Mission Ridge, Tenn. Pro- 
moted Sergeant. Mustered out June 23, 1865. P. 0., 
Beatrice, Neb. 

Robert Whitworth. Wheatland, 111. Aug. 13, 1862. Severely wounded, in 

the leg, in battle. May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. 
Transferred to Inv. Corps March 16, 1864. P. O., 
Marksburg, Iowa. 

Wellington WATsON.Indiantown, 111. Aug. 15. 1862. Mustered out June 23, 

1865. P. O., Hemingford, Neb. 

Recruits. 

John Warburton. .Arispie. 111. Aug. 15, 1862. Discharged in April, 1863. 

Michael McCarthy. Arispie, 111. Nov. i, 1862. Captured in battle Oct. 5, 

1864, at Allatoona, Ga. Never heard from afterward. 

James H. Simmons. .Wheatland, 111. Nov. i, 1862. Mustered out June 23, 

1865. P. O., Beatrice, Neb. 

Waldo M. Tozier. .Bureau County, 111. Feb. i, 1864. Transferred to 40th 

Illinois V. V. Infantry June 18, 1865. 

Under Cooks of A. D. 

Cleveland Gardner . Place not given. March i, 1864. Transferred to 40th 

Illinois V. V. Infantry June 18, 1865. 

Felix Johnson Place not given. March i, 1864. Transferred to 40th 

Illinois V. V. Infantry June 18, 1865. 

♦Explanation : The first place given, in each case, was the residence at the date of enlist- 
ment, as stated on the Muster Roll. The first date given, in each case, is the date of enrollment. 
In all cases where it is not given, the present P. O. address is unknown. 



L 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 331 



LETTER FROM WILLIAM A. PAYNE, CAPTAIN, COMPANY " F." 

Aaron Dunbar, Esq., 

Dear Comrade: 

Your circular of 12th received, requesting a short sketch of my 
life since the war. 

I'm like the needy knife grinder's story: "God bless you, Tve 
none to tell." When I enlisted, August 9th, 1862, I was by occupa- 
tion a pilot on the upper Mississippi River. After my discharge, 
April 1 2th, 1864, 1 returned home, and did nothing for a year, being 
disabled by the disease for which I was discharged. In the spring of 
1865, 1 returned to my former occupation, and remained at the busi- 
ness until the fall of 1873, when I got the position of deputy county 
clerk of Whiteside County, which place I still hold. I have not 
acquired wealth, nor have I ever been hungry from lack of means to 
buy bread. My life has been quiet and peaceful, with none but the 
ordinary vicissitudes. 

I was married in 1858, and had one child when I enlisted and 
two since, all married and having children themselves. So I am 
already "grandpa," who tells stories of the war, although it does 
not seem long since I bade the boys good-bye at Huntsville, Ala- 
bama. Yours respectfully, 

W. A. PAYNE. 



382 HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 




WILLIAM M. HMUKOM), Cnpliiln, CompBiiy • V.' 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 333 



LETTER FROM WILLIAM M. HERROLD, CAPTAIN, COMPANY " F." 

415 N. Fifth Street, San Jose, Cal., Feb. 28th, 1896. 
A. Dunbar, Esq., 

Dear Comrade: 

Below find short sketch of my life since muster out of service, 
as per your request: 

I engaged in general merchandising from October 5th, 1865, 
imtil May, 1883, in Fulton, Illinois. Then in the milling business 
one year. Then merchandising in Sloan, Iowa, from March, 1884, 
to April, 1888. Did very well. In 1886, I attended the National 
Encampment of the G. A. R. at San Francisco, and was taken with 
the California fever. I closed out my mercantile business in Iowa, 
and arrived in San Jose, California, with my family, in August, 1888, 
and have been engaged in fruit-growing and evaporating up to the 
present time very successfully. Remember me, with kind regards, 
to all the boys. Yours truly, 

W. M. HERROLD. 



334 HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 




JOHN DYER, First LleiiteDaut, Cooipan; "B*."- 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 335 




HENRY H. EDDY, First Lieutenant, Complin^ "F." 



838 HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILUNOia 




SIDNEY K. DYEll, Corporal, Comjiany "P." 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 337 




WILI.IAU W. WILDEK, CompBiiy "K." 



338 ROSTER OF NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 

Roster of Company F. 

Enrolled in Whiteside County, Illinois. 

Organized August 9, 1862, at Albany, Whiteside County, Illinois. 

Mustered into Sennce October ij, 1862, at Chicago, Illinois * 
Captains. 

Alfred F. Knight.. Albany, III. Commissioned to rank from Oct. 13, 1862. 

Mustered into service Oct. 13, 1862, at Chicago, 111. 
Died April 29, 1863, at Milliken's Bend, La. Buried at 
Vicksburg, Miss. 

William A. Payne. Newton, 111. Commissioned to rank from April 29, 

1863. Mustered into service Sept. 23, 1863. Resigned 
April 5, 1864. P. O., Morrison, 111. 

Wm. M. Herrold. .Fulton, 111. Enlisted Aug. 20, 1862, as a Private in this 

Company. Promoted Quartermaster Sergeant of the 
Regiment Sept. 8, 1862. Promoted First Lieutenant 
of this Company Aug. 12, 1863. Commissioned Captaiir 
to rank from April 5, 1864. Mustered into service 
as such April 29, 1864. Served until the close of the 
war. Mustered out June 22,, 1865, near Louisville, Ky., 
and paid off and finally discharged July 6, 1865, at Chi- 
cago, 111. See titles Quartermaster Sergeant and First 
Lieutenant, and also the sketch, ante. P. O., 415 North 

5th street, San Jose, Cal. 
First Lieutenants. 

John Dyer Fulton, 111. Commissioned to rank from Oct. 13, 1862. 

Mustered into service Oct. 13, 1862, at Chicago, 111. 
Resigned March 20, 1863. P. O., Fulton, 111. 

William A. Payne. Newton, 111. Commissioned to rank from March 20. 

1863. Mustered into service May 26, 1863. Promoted 
Captain Sept. 23, 1863. See that title. 

Wm. M. Herrold. .Fulton, 111. Commissioned to rank from April 29, 

1863. Mustered into service August 12, 1863. Pro- 
moted Captain April 29, 1864. See that title. 

Alex. Littlejohn.. Fulton, 111. Enlisted Aug. i, 1862, as a Private in this 

Company. Appointed Sergeant at the organization of 
the Company. Commissioned Second Lieutenant, of 
this Company, to rank from June 22, 1863. Was not 
mustered into service as such. He could not be so 
mustered, because the number of men then in the Com- 
pany was less than the minimum required to admit of 
a Second Lieutenant, under orders of the War De- 
partment. Commissioned First Lieutenant to rank 
from April 5, 1864. Not mustered into service as such. 
Commission canceled. Mustered out, as Sergeant, 
June 23, 1865. Said to be in Idaho. 

Henry H. Eddy. ...Morrison, 111. Enlisted Aug. i, 1862, as a Private in 

this Company. Appointed Sergeant at the organization 



ROSTER OF NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 339 

of the Company. Commissioned First Lieutenant to 
rank from April 5, 1864. Mustered into service as 
such March 31, 1S65. Served until the close of the 
war. Mustered out June 23, 1865, near Louisville, Ky., 
and paid off and finally discharged July 6, 1865, at 
Chicago, 111. P. O., Lake Charles, La. 

Second Lieutenants, 

William A. Payne. Newton, 111. Commissioned to rank from Oct. 13, 

1862. Mustered into service Oct. 13, 1862, at Chicago, 
111. Promoted First Lieutenant and Captain. See 
those titles. 

Robert A. Adams.. Garden Plain, 111. Enlisted July 20, 1862, as a Private 

in this Company. Appointed First Sergeant at the or- 
ganization of the Company. Commissioned Second 
Lieutenant to rank from March 20, 1863. Mortally 
wounded in battle May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, 
Miss. Died May 29, 1863, before receiving his com- 
mission. Hence, he was not mustered into service as 
a Second Lieutenant. Buried at Vicksburg, Miss. 

Alex. Littlejohn. .Fulton, 111. Enlisted as a Private. Appointed Ser- 
geant. Commissioned Second Lieutenant to rank from 
June 22, 1863. Not mustered. Commissioned First 
Lieutenant to rank from April 5, 1864. Not mustered. 
Commission canceled. See all those titles. 

First Sergeant. 

Robert A. Adams. .Garden Plain, 111. July 20, 1862. Enlisted as a Pri- 
vate. Promoted First Sergeant. Promoted Second 
Lieutenant. Mortally wounded in battle. Died before 
he received his commission. See title of Second Lieu- 
tenant. He gave his country all; valuable service, 
splendid courage, and his life. 

Sergeants. 

William F. Griffin. Fulton, 111. Aug. i, 1862. Discharged June 4, 1863, 

for promotion in the Eleventh Regiment, U. S. Col- 
ored Troops. P. O., 23 Milk street, Boston, Mass. 

Henry H. Eddy. .. .Morrison, 111. Aug. i, 1862. Promoted First Lieu- 
tenant. See that title. 

Alex. Littlejohn. .Fulton, 111. Aug. i, 1862. Commisioned Second Lieu- 
tenant and First Lieutenant. Not mustered. See those 
titles. Mustered out June 23, 1865. 

Edwin H. Pease Albany, 111. Aug. i, 1862. Reduced to the ranks. 

Mustered out June 23, 1865. Died in Feb., 1890, at Ra- 
cine, Wis. Buried there. 

Corporals, 

Jno. C. Martindale. Fulton, 111. Aug. i, 1862. Promoted Sergeant. Dis- 
charged for disability Feb. 23, 1863. P. O., Fulton, 111. 



340 ROSTER OF NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 

James P. Early Newton, 111. July 24, 1862. Promoted Sergeant. 

Wounded in battle, slightly in the arm, May i^, 1863, 
at Champion Hill, Miss. Wounded in battle, severely 
in the leg, Oct. 5, 1864, at AUatoona, Ga. Promoted 
First Sergeant. Mustered out June 23, 1865. P. 0., 
Albia, Iowa. 

SCHAFER B. Cross. .Morrison, 111. Aug. i, 1862. Transferred to Invalid 

Corps Aug. I, 1863. Said to be in Missouri. 

Joseph A. Miller.. Newton, 111. July 24, 1862. Mortally wounded, in 

battle, in the leg, leg amputated^ May 16, 1863, at Cham- 
pion Hill, Miss. Died July 13, 1863. Buried at Vicks- 
burg, Miss. 

John E. Ingham York, 111. Aug. i, 1862. Promoted Sergeant. Mus- 
tered out June 23, 1865. P. O., University Place, Neb. 

Deloraine p. Chapman. Ellington, 111. Aug. i, 1862. Wounded in battle, se- 
verely, in the leg, May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. 
Discharged Feb. id, 1864, on account of wound. 

Charles Doty Albany, 111. July 25, 1862. Mortally wounded in bat- 
tle May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. Died May 
2Zy 1863. Buried at Vicksburg, Miss. 

William N. Secord. Albany, 111. Aug. i, 1862. Mustered out June 23, 1865. 

P. 0., Cordova, 111. 
MMsicians, 

George D. VANNEsx.Albany, 111. July 25, 1862. Promoted Principal Mu- 
sician of the Regiment Sept. 8, 1862. See that title, 
under the head of Non-Commissioned Staff. P. O., 
Marshalltown, Iowa. 

Sidney R. Dyer. ..Fulton, 111. Aug. i, 1862. Promoted Corporal. Mus- 
tered out June 2Z, 1865. P. O., Boone, Iowa. 

Wagoner. 

Samuel Armstrong. Garden Plain, 111. Aug. 9, 1862. Transferred to Inv. 

Corps Dec. 15, 1863. 
Privates. 

Henry E. Allen. ..Union Grove, 111. Aug. 9, 1862. Died July 13, 1863, 

at Memphis, Tenn. Buried there. 

Albert F. Abbott. .Garden Plain, 111. July 20, 1862. Mustered out June 

23, 1865. P. O., Garden Plain, 111. 

Horace L. Abbott. Garden Plain, 111. Aug. 9, 1862. Slightly wounded in 

battle May 22, 1863, at Vicksburg, Miss. Mustered 
out June 2Z. 1865. P. O., Fulton, 111. 

William S. Austin. Morrison, 111. Aug. i, 1862. W^ounded in battle, 

slightly, in the hand. May 22, 1863, at Vicksburg, Miss. 
Discharged March 17, 1865, on account of wound. 
P. O., Morrison, 111. 

Bethuel Adams Albany, 111. Aug. i, 1862. Wounded in battle, se- 
verely, in the leg. May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. 
Captured in battle Oct. 5, 1864, at AUatoona, Ga. 
Mustered out June 23, 1865. P. O., Cordova, 111. 



ROSTER OF NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 341 

Moses H. Bishop. . Albany, 111. Aug. i, 1862. Mustered out June 23, 

1865. Said to have died in Kansas. Place and date 
of decease are unknown. 

Edward P. Bliss. .. Newton, 111. July 25, 1862. Mortally wounded in bat- 
tle May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. Died May 
17, 1863. Buried at Vicksburg, Miss. 

Wm. H. H. Bliss. .. Newton, 111. July 25, 1862. Captured in battle Nov. 

25, 1863, at Mission Ridge, Tenn. Mustered out June 
23, 1865. P. O., Albany, 111. 

William H. Barnes. Albany, 111. July 25, 1862. Promoted Sergeant. Mus- 
tered out June 23, 1865. P. 0., Albany, 111. 

Joseph C. Baird Garden Plain, III. July 25, 1862. Promoted Sergeant. 

Mustered out June 23, 1865. P. C, Beatrice, Neb. 

James N. Bull Fenton, 111. Aug. 5, 1862. Transferred to Signal 

Corps. Date not given. Died May 30, 1890, at Clark, 
S. D. Buried there. 

Daniel S. Betts Garden Plain, 111. Aug. 5, 1862. Absent sick at the 

date of the muster out of the regiment. 

Robert M. Baird. . Garden Plain, 111. Aug. 9, 1862. Wounded in battle, 

severely, in the groin. May 14, 1863, at Jackson, Miss. 
Said to have died in prison, but the place and date of 
decease are unknown. He fell into the hands of the 
enemy after he was wounded, and was still absent at 
the date of the muster out of the regiment. 

Francis M. Baird. .Garden Plain, 111. Aug. 22, 1862. Mortally wounded 

in battle May 22, 1863, at Vicksburg, Miss. Died May 
23, 1863. Buried at Vicksburg, Miss. 

George R. Bent Fulton, 111. Aug. 9, 1862. Discharged for disability 

March 16, 1863. P. C, 150 North Ashland avenue, 
Chicago, 111. 

John H. Brightman. Garden Plain, 111. Aug. 9, 1862. Killed in battle May 

22, 1863, at Vicksburg, Miss. Buried at Vicksburg, 
Miss. 

William Bennett. . Fulton, 111. Aug. 9, 1862. Killed in battle May 16, 1863, 

at Champion Hill, Miss. Buried at Vicksburg, Miss. 

Noble A. Boyes Fulton, 111. Aug. i, 1862. Mustered out June 23, 1865. 

Marsden K. Booth. Fulton, 111. Aug. 9, 1862. Died Aug. 25, 1863, at 

Vicksburg, Miss. Buried there. 

William B. Beacon. Albany, 111. Aug. 9, 1862. Mustered out June 23, 1865. 

P. 0., Albany, 111. 

William J. Burns. . Fulton, 111. Aug. 9, 1862. Discharged for disability 

March 2, 1863. 

John W. Crocker. . Fulton, 111. July 25, 1862. Mustered out June 23, 1865. 

P. O., Fulton, 111. 

James Cozad Fulton, 111. Aug. 5, 1862. Promoted Hospital Stew- 
ard of the regiment Aug. 12, 1863. See that title. 



fc 



342 ROSTER OF NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 

John Conaway Albany, 111. July 2, 1862. Mustered out June 23, 1865. 

Died soon after the close of the war, near Albany, 
111. Date of death is unknown. 

William W. Durant . Albany, 111. Aug. 9, 1862. Mustered out June 23,1865. 

P. O., Albany, 111. 

James H. Ege Newton, 111. July 24, 1862. Promoted Corporal. 

Mustered out June 23, 1865. P. O., Minneapolis, Minn. 

John F. Ellsbury.. Albany, 111. July 28, 1862. Mustered out June 23, 1865. 

P. O., Farnhamville, Iowa. 

Herman Griffin. .. Newton, 111. July 29, 1862. Missing in battle May 

16, 186}, at Champion Hill, Miss. No record as to 
what became of him. 

David F. Heffelbower. Newton, 111. Aug. 3, 1862. Mustered out Tune 23, 

1865. Died Feb. 21, 1897, at Morehead, Ky. Buried 
at Denison, Texas. 

Thom.\s Hoobler. . . Newton. 111. July 27, 1862. Mustered out June 23, 

1865. P. 0.. Albany, 111. 

Geo. \V. Hilem.\n.. .Newton, 111. Aug. 9, 1862. Promoted Corporal. Mus- 
tered out June 23, 1865. P. O., Dysart, Iowa. 

John H. Henry Albany, 111. Aug. 9, 1862. Transferred to Signal 

Corps. Date unknown. 

Henry Hawk Erie, 111. Aug. 9, 1862. Wounded in battle, slightly, 

in the leg, May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. Mor- 
tally wounded in battle Nov. 25, 1863, at Mission Ridge, 
Tenn. Died Dec. 5, 1863. Buried at Chattanooga, 
Tenn. 

John Hoobler Newton, 111. July 27, 1862. Promoted Corporal. 

Mustered out June 23, 1865. P. O., Newton, 111. 

David Kidd Albany, 111. July 30, 1862. Discharged Oct. 26, 1863, 

for promotion in a U. S. Colored Regiment. 

Patrick Keaff Fenton, 111. Aug. 29, 1862. Injured June 28, 1864, 

leg broken, in a collision on the railroad, near Dalton, 
Ga. Discharged for disability March 26, 1865. P. O., 
Morrison, 111. 

Willi AM J. Laffert Y.Garden Plain, 111. July 27, 1862. Wounded in battle 

Oct. 5, 1864, at Allatoona, Ga. Promoted Corporal. 
Wounded in battle, slightly, in the ankle, Dec 11, 1864, 
at Savannah, Ga. Discharged May 8, 1865, on account 
of wounds. P. O., Pillsbury, Pa. 

Jesse B. Long Garden Plain, 111. July 20, 18612. Mustered out June 

23, 1865. Said to be dead, but the date and place oi 
decease are unknown. 

Henry B. Love Albany, 111. July 25, 1862. Wounded in battle, se- 
verely, in the hand. May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, 
Miss. Mustered out June 23, 1865. P. O., Albany, 111. 

Ps&RY Langford... Albany, 111. July 20, 1862. Mastered out on June 23, 

1865. P. O., Albany, IlL 



ROSTER OF NINETY-THIRD ILfclNOIS. 343 

Joseph Langston. ..Fenton, III. July 25, 1862. Wounded in battle, slightly 

in the arm, May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. 
Mustered out June 23, 1865. P. O., Bennington, Kan. 

Henry Lewis Morrison, 111. Aug. 6, 1862. Died July 13, 1864, at 

Nashville, Tenn. Buried there. 

Robert B. Myers.. Fulton, 111. Aug. 6, 1862. Transferred to Inv. Corps 

Feb. 15, 1864. Died Feb. 26, 1882, at Fulton, 111. Bur- 
ied there. 

Robert McGee Morrison, 111. Aug. 9, 1862. Mustered out June 23, 

1865. Died Sept. 17, 1891, at Kingsley, Iowa. Buried 
at Lemars, Iowa. 

Joseph B. Mills. ...Albany, 111. Aug. 6, 1862. Transferred to Inv. Corps 

Feb. I5» 1864. P. O., Perry, Iowa. 

Patrick Marran. ..Fulton, 111. Aug. 6, 1862. Killed in battle May 16, 

1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. Buried at Vicksburg, 
Miss. 

John H. Miller Albany, 111. July 24, 1862. Promoted Corporal. Mus- 
tered out June 23, 1865. P. O., Erie, 111. 

Samuel N. Miller. Newton, 111. July 24, 1862. Wounded in battle, slightly, 

in the neck, May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. 
Mustered out June 23, 1865. 

James A. McMAHAN.Garden Plain, 111. Aug 9, 1862. Mustered out June 

23, 1865. P. 0., Albany, 111. 

John McCline Newton, 111. July 26, 1862. Killed in battle May 16, 

1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. Buried at Vicksburg, 

Miss. 

Randolph Mitchell. Newton, 111. July 27, 1862. Transferred to the First 

Regiment U. S. Cavalry Nov. 4, 1862. Said to be dead. 
Date and place of death are unknown. 

John Miller Abingdon, Mo. July 20, 1862. Mustered out June 23, 

1865. P. O., Wilton Junction, Iowa. 

Wm. L. Mitchell.. Garden Plain, 111. July 27, 1862. Wounded in battle, 

severely, in the foot. May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, 
Miss. Discharged Feb. 8, 1865, on account of wound. 
P. 0., Morrison, 111. 

Asa W. Mitchell.. Newton, 111. July 30, 1862, Killed in battle Nov. 25, 

1863, at Mission Ridge, Tenn. Buried at Chattanooga, 
Tenn. 

Lebbius S. McAllister. Morrison, 111. Aug. 6, 1862. Died Jan. 28, 1863, at 

Ridgeway, Tenn. Buried at Memphis, Tenn. 

JosiAH Nutter Fulton, 111. Aug. 5, 1862. Discharged for disability 

Nov. 30.. 1863. Died at Fulton, 111. Buried there. 
Date of decease is unknown. 

Homer I. Olmstead. Morrison, 111, Aug. 5, 1862. Transferred to Brigade 

Band March 4, 1863. P. O., Lockland, Ohio. 

Horatio F. Olmstead. Morrison, 111. Aug. 5, 1862. Mustered out June 23, 

1865. 



344 ROSTER QF NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 

Ira a. Payne Newton, 111. Aug. 9, 1862. Wounded in battle, slightly 

in the hand, May 20, 1863, at Vicksburg, Miss. Pro- 
moted Sergeant. Killed in battle Nov. 25, 1863, at Mis- 
sion Ridge, Tenn. Buried at Chattanooga, Tenn. 

Russell S. Park... Garden Plain, 111. July 20, 1862. Killed in battle Oct. 

5, 1864, at AUatoona, Ga. Buried at Marietta, Ga. 

George W. Rarey. .Garden Plain, 111. July 20, 1862. Mustered out June 

23, 1865. P. O., Hiattville, Kan. / 

Henry H. Rumsey. .Garden Plain, 111. July 23, 1862. Mustered out June 

23, 1865. P- O., Lehigh, Iowa. 
Elijah Rood Garden Plain, 111. July 23, 1862. Promoted Corporal. 

Mustered out June 23, 1865. P. O., Sterling, 111. 

Edgar C. Simpson.. Garden Plain, 111. July 27, 1862. Transferred to Inv. 

Corps March 16, 1865. Died March 21, 1882, at Proph- 
elstown, 111. Buried there. 

Joseph C. Snyder. .Garden Plain, 111. July 28, 1862. Wounded in battle, 

slightly in the ankle, Nov. 25, 1863, at Mission Ridge, 
Tenn. Mustered out June 23, 1865. P* O., Albany, 111. 

Isaac Still Fulton, 111. July 29, 1862. Discharged for disability 

March 15, 1863. 

Thomas Shay Garden Plain, 111. July 30, 1862. Killed in battle May 

16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. Buried at Vicksburg, 

Miss. 

John M. Stertzm an. Garden Plain, 111. July 30, 1862. Discharged for dis- 
ability May 2, 1863. P. O., Savanna, 111. 

Henry Slater Garden Plain, 111. July 27, 1862. Wounded in battle, 

slightly in the hand, May 22, 1863, at Vicksburg, Miss. 
Transferred to Inv. Corps Feb. 15, 1864. P. O., Reams- 
ville, Kan. 

William V. Smith. Albany, 111. July 23, 1862. Mustered out June 23, 

1865. P. O., Cuba, Kan. 

Nicholas Suiter. . .Albany, 111. July 28, 1862. Mustered out June 23, 

1865. P. O., Albany, 111. 

Francis M. TnoMAS.Morrison, 111. July 30, 1862. Captured in battle May 

16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. Promoted Corporal. 
Mustered out June 23, 1865. 

George H. To vvnley. Albany, 111. July 20, 1862. Mustered out June 23, 1865. 

P. O., Princeton, 111. 

John A. Thompson. Garden Plain, 111. July 29, 1862. Mustered out June 

^3, 1865. Said to be in Kansas. 

William W. Wilder. Newton, 111. July 27, 1862. Mustered out June 23, 

1865. P- O., Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Cassius West Garden Plain, 111. Aug. 9, 1862. Mustered out June 

23, 1865. P. O., Wichita, Kan. 

Geo. C. Wilkinson. Newton, 111. Aug. 2, 1862. Mustered out June 23, 

1865. P. O., Virginia, Neb. 



ROSTER OF NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 345 

Henry Wagoner... Union Grove, 111. July 9, 1862. Mustered out June 

23, 1865. 
James M. York.... Gar den Plain, 111. Aug. 20, 1862. Died March 2, 1863, 

at Memphis, Tenn. Buried there. 
Recruits. 

Christopher Carpenter. Newton, 111. Jan. 23, 1865. Transferred to 40th 

Illinois V. V. Infantry June 18, 1865. P. O., Fulton, 111. 

JosEPHUS Kirk Belleview, 111. Oct. 31, 1864. Transferred to 40th 

Illinois V. V. Infantry June 18, 1865. 

Lewis Lyman Belleview, 111. Oct. 31, 1864. Transferred to 40th 

Illinois V. V. Infantry June 18, 1865. 

John R. Niblock... Albany, 111. Jan. 12, 1865. Transferred to 40th Illinois 

V. V. Infantry June 18, 1865. P- O., Vinton, Iowa. 

'^Explanation : The first place given, in each case, was the residence at the date of 
enlistment, as stated on the Muster Roll. The first date given, in each case, is the date of 
enrollment. In all cases where it is not given, the present P. O. address is unknown. 



846 HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 




JOSI'^l'H r. KKKL. CapiHiii, CouipBpy ■■(! '■ 



i 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 347 



SKETCH OF JOSEPH P. REEL, CAPTAIN, COMPANY "O 



II 



In 1867, which was as soon after the war as his health would 
permit, Captain Reel resumed his former occupation of a millwright, 
and superintended the building of several flouring mills in Illinois. 
In 1883, he removed, with his family, to Cameron, Missouri, and en- 
gaged in the milling business there. In 1888, he sold his interest in 
that business, and from that time until his decease he was engaged 
in no business actively. His wife died in October, 1893, and he 
greatly grieved over his bereavement. But his mourning was not to 
last any great length of time. He died very suddenly, April 2d, 
1896, of apoplexy, at Cameron, Missouri, and was buried there. 

He was a brave soldier, a splendid officer, and a most noble- 
hearted man. 



M8 HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 




SAUVEL 11. U.Vl'CHEMUVUIl. Captaid. Compui; >■«." 



k 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 




DANIEL G. ILOEN, CompBOy 



350 ROSTER OF NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 

Roster of Company G. 

Enrolled in Stephenson County, Illinois. 

Organized August 15, 1862, at Cedarville, Stephenson County, Illinois. 

Mustered into Service October ij, 1862, at Chicago, Illinois * 
Captains. 

Joseph P. Reel. . . . Cedarville, 111. Commissioned to rank from Oct. i^ 

1862. Mustered into service Oct. 13, 1862, at Chicago^ 
111. Resigned July 20, 1864. Died April 2, 1896, at 
Cameron, Mo. Buried there. See sketch ante. 

Sam'l M. Daughenbaugh . Cedarville, 111. Enlisted as a Private in this Com- 
pany Aug. II, 1862. Appointed First Sergeant Aug. 15, 

1862, at the organization of the Company. Commis- 
sioned Second Lieutenant, of this Company, to rank 
from Jan. 24, 1863. Mustered into service as such Aprit 
12, 1863. Commissioned First Lieutenant, of this Com- 
pany, to rank from Jan. 5, 1864. Mustered into service- 
as such April 15, 1864. Commissioned Captain to rank 
from July 20, 1864. Mustered into service as such Sept. 
I, 1864. Served until the close of the war. Mustered 
out June 23, 1865, near Louisville, Ky., and paid off 
and finally discharged July 6, 1865, at Chicago, Ill- 
See the other titles mentioned. P. O., Gowrie, Iowa. 

First Lieutenants. 

Geo. W. HARTSOUGH.Oneco, 111. Commissioned to rank from Oct. 13, 1862^ 

Mustered into service Oct. 13, 1862, at Chicago, 111. 
Resigned Jan. 24, 1863. P. O., Cedarville, 111. 

Jeremiah J. Piersol. Cedarville, 111. Commissioned Second Lieutenant, of 

this Company, to rank from Oct. 13, 1862. Mustered 
into service as such Oct. 13, 1862, at Chicago, 111. 
Commissioned First Lieutenant to rank from Jan. 
24, 1863. Mustered into service as such April 17, 1863. 
Wounded in battle, severely in the shoulder. May 16, 

1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. Resigned Jan. 5, 1864^ 
on account of wound. P. O., Freeport, 111. 

Sam*l M. Daughenbaugh .Cedarville, 111. Commissioned to rank from 

Jan. 5, 1864. Mustered into service April 13, 1864. 
Promoted Captain Sept. i, 1864. See that title. 

George L. Piersol. Lancaster, 111. Enlisted Aug. 11, 1862, as a Private- 

in this Company. Promoted Corporal. Promoted 
Sergeant. Commissioned First Lieutenant to rank 
from July 20, 1864. Mustered into service as such 
Sept. I, 1864. Served until the close of the war. Mus- 
tered out June 23, 1865, near Louisville, Ky., and paid 
off and finally discharged July 6, 1865, at Chicago, 111. 
See the other titles mentioned. Killed Dec. 8, 1881, 
on railroad, at Freeport, 111. Buried at Cedarville, IlL 



ROSTER OF NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 351 

Second Lieutenants, 

Jeremiah L. Piersol. Cedarville, 111. Commissioned to rank from Oct. 13, 

1862. Mustered into service Oct. 13, 1862, at Chicago, 
111. Promoted First Lieutenant April 17, 1863. See 
that title. 

Sam'l M. Daughenbaugh. Cedarville, 111. Commissioned to rank from Jan. 

24, 1863. Mustered into service April 12, 1863. Pro- 
moted First Lieutenant April 13, 1864. Promoted Cap- 
tain Sept. I, 1864. See those titles. 

First Sergeant. 

Sam'l M. Daughenbaugh. Cedarville, 111. Aug. 11, 1862. Promoted Sec- 
ond Lieutenant, First Lieutenant and Captain. See 
those titles. 

Sergeants. 

Abner H. Howe.... Buckeye, 111. Aug. 10, 1862. Rejected by Mustering 

Officer. 

Elias Kostenbader. Cedarville, 111. Aug. it, 1862. Slightly wounded in 

battle May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. Pro- 
moted First Sergeant. Mustered out June 23, 1865. 
P. O., Des Moines, Iowa. 

Hugh Moser Oneco, 111. Aug. 2, 1862. Wounded in battle, severely 

in the back, Nov. 25, 1863, at Mission Ridge, Tenn. 
Mustered out June 23, 1865. Died in the Soldiers' 
Home at Milwaukee, Wis. Buried there. Date of 
death unknown. 

Charles Yunt Cedarville, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Mustered out June 23, 

1865. P. O., Siam, Tenn. 

,Corporals. 

Daniel L Cobb.... Cedarville, 111. Aug. 12, 1862. Discharged for disa- 
bility Aug. II, 1863. Died at Cedarville, 111. Buried 
there. Date of death unknown. 

Nathan Wertman. . Oneco, 111. Aug. 6, 1862. Wounded in battle, se- 
verely. May 22, 1863, at Vicksburg, Miss. Promoted 
Sergeant. Discharged Aug. 16, 1863, on account of 
wound. P. O., Greenfield, Iowa. 

Daniel Keiser Cedarville, 111. Aug. 11, 1862. Deserted Oct. 16, 1863. 

HenryH.Shoemaker. Lancaster, 111. Aug. 11, 1862. Mustered out June 23, 

1865. P. O., 78 Mozart street, Chicago, 111. 

John B. Bollman. .Oneida, 111. Aug. 2, 1862. Reduced to the ranks, at 

his own request. Killed in battle May 16, 1863, at 
Champion Hill, Miss. Buried at Vicksburg, Miss. 

Daniel W. Jones. . Cedarville, 111. Aug. 11, 1862. Died Sept. 7, 1863, at 

Cairo, 111. 

Adam M. Broughler. Cedarville, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Killed in battle May 

16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. Buried at Vicksburg, 

Miss. 



352 ROSTER OF NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 

Luther M. Hess. . . Oneco, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Promoted Sergeant. Mus- 

tered out June 23, 1865. P. O., Rockford, III. 
Musicians. 

William Vore Cedarville, 111. Aug. 12, 1862. Transferred to Invalid 

Corps Sept. 30, 1863. Mustered out July 20, 1865. 
P. O., Cedarville, 111. 

Edward Owen Freeport, 111. Aug. 6, 1862. Discharged March 2, 

1863. P. O., Memphis, Neb. 
IVagoner. 

John Templeton. ..Lancaster, 111. Aug. 4, 1862. Mortally wounded Feb. 

19, 1865, by an accidental explosion of shells, at Co- 
lumbia, S. C. Died Feb. 25, 1865. Buried at Co- 
lumbia, S. C. 

Privates. 

Alvin Adams Buckeye, 111. Aug. 11, 1862. Mortally wounded in 

battle May 22, 1863, at Vicksburg, Miss. Died May 
24, 1863. Buried at Vicksburg, Miss. 

John J. Andre Cedarville, 111. Aug. 11, 1862. Mustered out June 23, 

1865. P. O., Freeport, 111. 

John Brown Buckeye, 111. Aug. 11, 1862. Mustered out June 23, 

1865. Said to be dead. Place and date of decease are 
unknown. 

Daniel M. Bordner. Dakota, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Slightly wounded in bat- 
tle May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. Mustered 
out June 23, 1865. P. O., Rock Grove, 111. 

Jno. G. Bennetthine .Cedarville, 111. Aug. 11, 1862. Mustered out June 23. 

1865. P. O., Iowa Center, Iowa. 

Levi Cade Buckeye, 111. Aug. 7, 1862. Rejected by the Muster- 
ing Officer. 

Joseph Crane ..Lancaster, 111. Aug. 11, 1862. Slightly wounded in 

battle May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. Mus- 
tered out June 23, 1865. 

Henry C. Carl Oneco, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Promoted Corporal. 

Slightly wounded in battle May 16, 1863, at Champion 
Hill, Miss. Mortally wounded in battle, in the left 
breast, Oct. 5, 1864, at Allatoona, Ga. Died Oct. 22, 
1864. Buried at Marietta, Ga. 

Wm. H. Collier. ..Oneco, 111. Aug. 15, 1862. Promoted Corporal. Cap- 
tured in battle Nov. 25, 1863, at Mission Ridge, Tenn. 
Died in prison March 30, 1864, at Andersonville, Ga. 
Number of his grave is 256. 

Amos Diemer Buckeye, 111. Aug. 15, 1862. Discharged for disability 

Sept. II, 1863. P. O., Davenport, Iowa. 

Adam K. Dinges. ..Oneco, 111. Aug. 12, 1862. Injured June 28, 1864, 

ankle sprained, in a collision on the railroad, near 
Dalton, Ga. Mustered out June 23, 1865. P. O., West 
Point, Neb. 



ROSTER OF NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 353 

Henry Denh art. ..Buckeye, III. Aug. 14, 1862. Promoted Corporal. 

Mustered out June 23, 1865. P. O., Troskey, Minn. 

Daniel Dauber. ...Oneco, 111. Aug. 22, 1862. Wounded in battle, slightly, 

in the right arm, Oct. 5, 1864, at Allatoona, Ga. Mus- 
tered out June 23, 1865. Reported dead, but the date 
and place of decease are unknown. 

Henry C. Eastman. Buckeye, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Promoted Corporal. 

Mustered out June 23, 1865. P. O., Fredericsburg, 
Iowa. 

Isaac Erb Buckeye, 111. Aug. 11, 1862. Killed in battle May 16, 

1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. Buried at Vicksburg, 

Miss. 

Henry Erb Oneco, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Slightly wounded in bat- 
tle May 22, 1863, at Vicksburg, Miss. Captured in bat- 
tle Oct. 5, 1864, at Allatoona, Ga. Mustered out June 
23, 1865. Reported dead, but the date and place of de- 
cease are unknown. 

Wm. H. EiSENHOUR.Waddams, 111. Aug. 11, 1862. Mortally wounded in 

battle May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. Died 
May 19, 1863. Buried at Vicksburg, Miss. 

William Frank... .Buckeye, 111. Aug. 9, 1862. Absent sick at the date 

of the muster out of the regiment. 

David Forney Buckeye, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Promoted Corporal. 

Captured in battle No. 25, 1863, at Mission Ridge, 
Tenn. Died in prison June 27, 1864, at Andersonville, 
Ga. Number of his grave is 2564. 

Robert FoGEL Cedarville, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Died Dec. 26, 1862, 

at Memphis, Tenn. Buried there. 

Joseph W. Fogel. ..Cedarville, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Severely wounded in 

battle May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. Mus- 
tered out June 23, 1865. P. O., Jewell, Kan. 

Thomas Folgate. .. Dakota, 111. Aug. 11, 1862. Mustered out June 23, 

1865. 

Geo. W. Graham... Oneco, 111. Aug. 11, 1862. Slightly wounded in battle 

May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. Injured June 28, 

1864, face and hand bruised, in a collision on the rail- 
road, near Dalton, Ga. Promoted Corporal. Mustered 
out June 23. 1865. P. O., Freeport, 111. 

John P. Garm AN.... Dakota, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Wounded in battle, se- 
verely, in the thigh. Nov. 25, 1863, at Mission Ridge, 
Tenn. Injured June 28, 1864, ankle sprained, in a col- 
lision on the railroad, near Dalton, Ga. Wounded in 
battle, severely, in the left hand, Oct. 5, 1864, at Alla- 
toona, Ga. Mustered out June 23, 1865. 

Joseph F. Grawe. ..Oneco, 111. Aug. 9» 1862. Wounded in battle, severely, 

in the left side, Oct. 5, 1864, at Allatoona, Ga. Pro- 

23 



354 ROSTER OF NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 

moted Corporal. Mustered out June 23, 1865. P. O., 
Waverly, Iowa. Editor of the "Bremer County Inde- 
pendent." 

Benj. Green WALT.. Buckeye, 111. Aug. 11, 1862. Mustered out June 23,. 

1865. Reported in Iowa. 

Franklin B. Grissinger. Buckeye, 111. Aug. 12, 1862. Promoted Corporal. 

Mustered out June 23, 1865. P. O., McConnell Grove^ 
111. 

August Granzo. ... Buckeye, 111. Aug. 11, 1862. Mustered out June 23, 

1865. Died in 1890, at Clarno, Wis. Date and place 
of decease are unknown. 

Henry Hockm an... Buckeye, 111. Aug. 11, 1862. Wounded in battle, se- 
verely, in the arm, Nov. 25, 1863, at Mission Ridge, 
Tenn. Wounded in battle, severely, in the left leg, 
Oct. 5, 1864, at Allatoona, Ga. Mustered out June 
23, 1865. P. O., Cedarville, 111. 

Chas. Humphrey... Buckeye, 111. Aug. 11, 1862. Mustered out June 23, 

1865. P. O., Jewell, Kan. 

John M. Humphrey. Buckeye, 111. Slightly wounded in battle May 16, 1863. 

at Champion Hill, Miss. Wounded in battle, severely, 
in the left side, Oct. 5, 1864, at Allatoona, Ga. Mus- 
tered out June 23, 1865. Died in 1886, in Kansas. 
Date and place of decease are unknown. 

Lyman IIulbert. ...Oneco, 111. Aug. 10, 1862. Promoted Corporal. Killed 

in battle Oct. 5, 1864, at Allatoona, Ga. Buried at 
Marietta, Ga. 

Tobias Helm Lancaster, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Died May i, 1863, at 

Milliken's Bend, La. Buried at Vicksburg, Miss. 

Samuel Hartsell. .Buckeye, 111. Aug. 20, 1862. Mustered out June 23, 

1865. P. O., Unadilla, Neb. 

Willis G. Haas... .Buckeye, 111. Aug. 19, 1862. Killed in battle May 22, 

1863, at Vicksburg, Miss. Buried there. 

Daniel G. Ilgen... Cedarville, 111. Aug. 11, 1862. Mustered out June 23, 

1865. P. O., Cedarville, 111. 

David M. Ilgen Cedarville, 111. Aug. 11, 1862. Severely wounded in 

battle May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. Pro- 
moted Corporal. Mustered out June 23, 1865. P. O., 
Palmyra, Neb. 

Solomon S. Kostenbader. .Cedarville, 111. Aug. 11, 1862. Mustered out 

June 23, 1865. P. O., Lena, 111. 

Henry Kahley Buckeye, 111. Aug. 11, 1862. Mustered out June 23,. 

1865. P. O., Des Moines, Iowa. No. 976, 23d street, 

John J. Kryder Lancaster, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Severely wounded in 

battle May 22, 1863, at Vicksburg, Miss. Discharged 
Feb. 22, 1864, on account of wound. Died in 1871 at 
Cedarville, 111. Buried there. 



ROSTER OF NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 355 

Emanuel Kah ley. .Buckeye, 111. Aug. ii, 1862. Slightly wounded in 

battle May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. Wounded 
in battle, severely, in the hip, Oct. 5, 1864, at AUatoona, 
Ga. Discharged March 28, 1865, on account of wounds. 
P. O., Lena, 111. 

Charles B. Klapp. Dakota, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Mustered out June 23, 

1865. Died in 1889 at Buckeye, 111. Buried there. 

James E. Knock Oneco, 111. Aug. 7, 1862. Mustered out June 23, 1865. 

William Krise Lancaster, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Mortally wounded in 

battle May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. Died 
Sept. 27, 1863, at Benton Barracks, Mo. Buried there. 

James N. Logan Dakota, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Mustered out June 23, 

1865. P. O., Jennings, Kan. 

Samuel W. Logan.. Dakota, 111. Aug. 10, 1862. Killed in battle Nov. 25, 

1863, at Mission Ridge, Tenn. Buried at Chattanooga, 
Tenn. 

George W.LoTT Oneco, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Discharged for disability 

March 31, 1865. P. O., Quincy, 111. 

Henry Law Oneco, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Captured in battle Nov. 

25, 1863, at Mission Ridge, Tenn. Died in prison May 
28, 1864, at Andersonville, Ga. Number of his grave 
is 1233. 

George M. Lattig. Buckeye, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Mustered out June 23, 

1865. P. O., Lanark, 111. 

Dominicus Liebe. ..Oneco, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Died Feb. 22, 1863, at 

Memphis, Tenn. Buried there. 

Reuben Myers Buckeye, 111. Aug. 15, 1862. Mustered out June 23, 

1865. Died in 1889, at Sibley, Iowa. Buried there. 
Date of decease is unknown. 

MosES Matteo Dakota, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Transferred to Inv. Corps 

Sept. I, 1863. P. O., Dakota, 111. 

Oliver McHolt. ..Buckeye, 111. Aug. 11, 1862. Died Nov. 30, 1863, at 

St. Louis, Mo. Buried at Jefferson Barracks, Mo. 

Jefferson Morse. .Buckeye, 111. Aug. 12, 1862. Mustered lout June 23, 

1865. 

Jno. P. McCoNNELL. Buckeye, 111. Aug. 12, 1862. Died Oct. 4, 1863, at 

Cairo, 111. Buried there. 

Lester Nichlas. .v. Buckeye, 111. Aug. 11, 1862. Wounded in battle, 

slightly, in the right side, Oct. 5, 1864, at AUatoona, 
Ga. Mustered out June 23, 1865. 

Albert M. Nichlas. Lancaster, 111. Aug. 11, 1862. Discharged for disa- 
bility April 2, 18^3. Reported deceased. Place and 
date of death are unknown. 

George W. Nichlas. . Lancaster, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Transferred to Invalid 

Corps Feb. 15, 1864. Reported deceased, but the date 
and place of death are unknown. 



356 ROSTER OF NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 

Conrad Reiser Dakota, III. Aug. ii, 1862. Died May 28, 1863, at 

Jackson, Miss. Buried at Vicksburg, Miss. 

Henry Rosweiler. .Buckeye, III. Aug. 14, 1862. Killed in battle May 16, 

1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. Buried at Vicksburg, 
Miss. 

Reuben R. Reubendall. Lancaster, 111. Aug. 11, 1862. Severely wounded 

in battle May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. Trans- 
ferred to Invalid Corps Feb. 15, 1864. P. O., Pipe- 
stone City, Minn. 

Jno. W. Sindlinger. Buckeye, 111. Aug. 12, 1862. Discharged for disa- 
bility July 23, 1863. Died at Freeport, 111. Buried 
there. Date of death is unknown. 

James C. Stewart.. Oneco, 111. Aug. 11, 1862. Severely wounded in battle 

May 22, 1863, at Vicksburg, Miss. Wounded in battle, 
slightly, in the left leg, Oct. 5, 1864, at AUatoona, Ga. 
Mustered out June 23, 1865. Reported to be in Mis- 
souri. 

Benj. F. Shockley. Buckeye, 111. Aug. 12, 1862. Mortally wounded in 

battle May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. Died 
May 19, 1863. Buried at Vicksburg, Miss. 

Thomas K. St. John. Oneco, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Died Oct. 22, 1862, at 

Camp Douglas, Chicago, 111. 

David Y. Seyler. ..Oneco, 111. Aug. 15, 1862. Transferred to Inv. Corps 

Aug. I, 1863. 

Sanford Smith Oneco, 111. Aug. 15, 1862. Mustered out June 23, 

1865. P. O., Oneco, 111. 

William Sands.... Oneco, 111, Aug. 15, 1862. Mustered out June 23, 1865. 

P. O., Melvern, Kan. 

Levi Sheckler Oneco, 111. Aug. 10, 1862. Wounded in battle, slightly, 

in tTie left leg, Oct. 5, 1864, at AUatoona, Ga. Mus- 
tered out June, 23, 1865. P. O., Howard, S. D. 

Thompson Vantilburg . Lancaster, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Died Aug. 14, 1863. 

at Jefferson Barracks, Mo. Buried there. 

N. H. Vantilburg.. Lancaster, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Discharged for disa- 
bility Feb. IS, 1863. P. O., Cedar Falls, Iowa. 

Jno. H. Werkheiser . Oneco, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. By reason of severe ill- 
ness contracted during the campaign in Northern Mis- 
sissippi, in November and December, 1862, he was in- 
capacitated for field service for nearly two years. Dur- 
ing this time, preferring to remain in the service, he 
was Chief Clerk in the Judge Advocate General's office, 
and Secretary to Major Benner, Chief Aide-de-Camp 
to General Stephen A. Hurlbut, at general headquar- 
ters, Memphis, Tenn. He then returned to the regi- 
ment, and served as Clerk in the Adjutant's office dur- 
ing the Georgia and Carolinas campaigns, to the close 
of the war. He is now Cashier of the First National 



ROSTER OF NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 357 

Bank of Silverton, Colo. Mustered out June 23, 1865. 
P. O., Silverton, Colo. 

Daniel Wolf Buckeye, 111. Aug. 10, 1862. Killed in battle May 16, 

1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. Buried at Vicksburg, 

Miss. 

Peter Wetzel Buckeye, 111. Aug. 11, 1862. Mustered out June 23, 

1865. P. O., Three Oaks, Mich. 

Willlam J. WiLsoN.Buckeye, 111. Aug. 12, 1862. Mortally wounded in 

battle May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. Died 
May 25, 1863. Buried at Vicksburg, Miss. 

John Wertman Oneco, 111. Aug. 12, 1862. Mustered out June 23, 

1865. P. O., Sioux Falls, S. D. 

Francis M.WiCKwiSE. Oneco, 111. Aug. 12, 1862. Died Aug. 17, 1863, at 

Vicksburg, Miss. Buried there. 

Jacob R. Wagner... Oneco, 111. Aug. 12, 1862. Wounded in battle, slightly, 

in the thigh, Nov. 25, 1863, at Mission Ridge, Tenn. 
Promoted Corporal. Mustered out June 23, 1865. P. 
O., Marble Rock, Iowa. 

Joel Wagner Oneco, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Mortally wounded in bat- 
tle Nov. 25, 1863, at Mission Ridge, Tenn. Died Nov. 
29, 1863. Buried at Chattanooga, Tenn. 

Robert WARDLOW..Rock Run, 111. Aug. 21, 1862. Severely wounded in 

battle May 22, 1863, at Vicksburg, Miss. Wounded in 
battle, severely, in the hip, Oct. 5, 1864, at Allatoona, 
Ga. Discharged March 15, 1865, on account of wounds. 
P. O., Freeport, 111. 

George Zerbe .Oneco, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Severely wounded in bat- 
tle May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. Transferred 
to Veteran Reserve Corps March 16, 1864. Died at 
Oneco, 111. Buried there. Date of death is unknown. 

William Zerbe. ...Oneco, 111. Aug. 10, 1862. Rejected by Surgeon, and 

not mustered in. 
Recruits. 

William Garm an.. Buckeye, 111. Oct. 15, 1864. Transferred to 40th 

Illinois V. V. Infantry June 18, 1865. Died at Cedar- 

ville, 111. Buried there. Date of death is unknown. 

Albert Youndt.... Dakota, 111. Dec. 29, 1863. Transferred to 40th Illi- 
nois V. V. Infantry June 18, 1865. P. O., AUentown, 

Pa. 
Under Cook of A. D. 

Daniel I. Rone Place not given. April 28, 1864. Killed March 21, 

1865, by guerrillas, at Mills Creek, near Bentonville, 

N. C. Buried there. Was of Huntsville, Ala. 

James Rose Place not given. April 28, 1864. Deserted Feb. 21, 

1865. Was of Huntsville, Ala. 

^Explanation : The first place given, in each case, was the residence at the date of enlist- 
ment, as shown by the Muster Roll. The first date given, in each case, is the date of enlistment. 
In all cases where it is not given, the present P. O. address is unknown. 



348 HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 




UEL M. UAt'GHBNUAL'OH, Capuln, Company "i 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 




DANIEL G. ILOEN, Compnny 



350 ROSTER OF NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 

Roster of Company G. 

Enrolled in Stephenson County, Illinois. 

Organized August 15. 1862, at Cedarville, Stephenson County, Illinois. 

Mustered into Serznce October ij, 1862, at Chicago, Illinois* 
Captains. 

Joseph P. Reel... . Cedarville, 111. Commissioned to rank from Oct. 13^ 

1862. Mustered into service Oct. 13, 1862, at Chicago^ 
111. Resigned July 20. 1864. Died April 2, 1896, at 
Cameron, Mo. Buried there. See sketch ante. 

Sam'l M. Daughenbaugh . Cedarville, 111. Enlisted as a Private in this Com- 
pany Aug. II, 1862. Appointed First Sergeant Aug. 15, 

1862. at the organization of the Company. Commis- 
sioned Second Lieutenant, of this Company, to rank 
from Jan. 24, 1863. Mustered into service as such Aprit 
12, 1863. Commissioned First Lieutenant, of this Com- 
pany, to rank from Jan. 5, 1864. Mustered into service 
as such April 15, 1864. Commissioned Captain to rank 
from July 20, 1864. Mustered into service as such Sept. 
I. 1864. Served until the close of the war. Mustered 
out June 23, 1865, near Louisville, Ky., and paid off 
and finally discharged July 6, 1865, at Chicago, 111. 
See the other titles mentioned. P. O., Gowrie, Iowa. 

First Lieutenants. 

Geo. W. HARTSOUGH.Oneco, 111. Commissioned to rank from Oct. 13, 1862^ 

Mustered into service Oct. 13, 1862, at Chicago, III. 
Resigned Jan. 24, 1863. P. O., Cedarville, 111. 

Jeremiah J. Piersol. Cedarville, 111. Commissioned Second Lieutenant, of 

this Company, to rank from Oct. 13, 1862. Mustered 
into service as such Oct. 13, 1862, at Chicago, III. 
Commissioned First Lieutenant to rank from Jan.^ 
24, 1863. Mustered into service as such April 17, 1863. 
Wounded in battle, severely in the shoulder. May 16, 

1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. Resigned Jan. 5, 1864^ 
on account of wound. P. O., Freeport, 111. 

Sam'l M. Daughenbaugh .Cedarville, 111. Commissioned to rank from 

Jan. 5, 1864. Mustered into service April 13, 1864. 
Promoted Captain Sept. i, 1864. See that title. 

George L. Piersol. Lancaster, 111. Enlisted Aug. 11, 1862, as a Private 

in this Company. Promoted Corporal. Promoted 
Sergeant. Commissioned First Lieutenant to rank 
from July 20, 1864. Mustered into service as such 
Sept. I, 1864. Served until the close of the war. Mus- 
tered out June 23, 1865, "ear Louisville, Ky., and paid 
off and finally discharged July 6, 1865, at Chicago, 111. 
See the other titles mentioned. Killed Dec. 8, 1881, 
on railroad, at Freeport, 111. Buried at Cedarville, 111^ 



ROSTER OF NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 351 

« 

Second Lieutenants, 

Jeremiah L. Piersol. Cedarville, III. Commissioned to rank from Oct. 13^ 

1862. Mustered into service Oct. 13, 1862, at Chicago, 
111. Promoted First Lieutenant April 17, 1863. See 
that title. 

Sam'l M. Daughenbaugh. Cedarville, 111. Commissioned to rank from Jan. 

24, 1863. Mustered into service April 12, 1863. Pro- 
moted First Lieutenant April 13, 1864. Promoted Cap- 
tain Sept. I, 1864. See those titles. 

First Sergeant, 

Sam'l M. Daughenbaugh . Cedarville, 111. Aug. 11, 1862. Promoted Sec- 
ond Lieutenant, First Lieutenant and Captain. See 
those titles. 

Sergeants, 

Abner H. Howe. ...Buckeye, 111. Aug. 10, 1862. Rejected by Mustering 

Officer. 

Elias Kostenbader. Cedarville, 111. Aug. it, 1862. Slightly wounded in 

battle May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. Pro- 
moted First Sergeant. Mustered out June 23, 1865. 
P. O., Des Moines, Iowa. 

Hugh Moser Oneco, 111. Aug. 2, 1862. Wounded in battle, severely 

in the back, Nov. 25, 1863, at Mission Ridge, Tenn. 
Mustered out June 23, 1865. Died in the Soldiers* 
Home at Milwaukee, Wis. Buried there. Date of 
death unknown. 

Charles Yunt Cedarville, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Mustered out June 23, 

1865. P. O., Siam, Tenn. 

,Corporals. 

Daniel I. Cobb.... Cedarville, 111. Aug. 12, 1862. Discharged for disa- 
bility Aug. II, 1863. Died at Cedarville, 111. Buried 
there. Date of death unknown. 

Nathan Wertman. . Oneco, 111. Aug. 6, 1862. Wounded in battle, se- 
verely. May 22, 1863, at Vicksburg, Miss. Promoted 
Sergeant. Discharged Aug. 16, 1863, on account of 
wound. P. O., Greenfield, Iowa. 

Daniel Keiser Cedarville, 111. Aug. 11, 1862. Deserted Oct. 16, 1863. 

HenryH.Shoemaker. Lancaster, 111. Aug. 11, 1862. Mustered out June 23, 

1865. P. O., 78 Mozart street, Chicago, 111. 

John B. Bollman. .Oneida, 111. Aug. 2, 1862. Reduced to the ranks, at 

his own request. Killed in battle May 16, 1863, at 
Champion Hill, Miss. Buried at Vicksburg, Miss. 

Daniel W. Jones. . CedarviDe, 111. Aug. 11, 1862. Died Sept. 7, 1863, at 

Cairo, 111. 

Adam M. Broughler. Cedarville, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Killed in battle May 

16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. Buried at Vicksburg, 

Miss. 



352 ROSTER OF NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 

Luther M. Hess. . . Oneco, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Promoted Sergeant. Mus- 
tered out June 23, 1865. P. O., Rockford, 111. 
Musicians. 

William Vore Cedarville, III. Aug. 12, 1862. Transferred to Invalid 

Corps Sept. 30, 1863. Mustered out July 20, 1865. 
P. O., Cedarville, 111. 

Edward Owen Freeport, 111. Aug. 6, 1862. Discharged March 2, 

1863. P. O., Memphis, Neb. 
IVagoner. 

John Templeton. ..Lancaster, III. Aug. 4, 1862. Mortally wounded Feb. 

19, 1865, by an accidental explosion of shells, at Co- 
lumbia, S. C. Died Feb. 25, 1865. Buried at Co- 
lumbia, S. C. 

Privates, 

Alvin Adams Buckeye, 111. Aug. 11, 1862. Mortally wounded in 

battle May 22, 1863, at Vicksburg, Miss. Died May 
24, 1863. Buried at Vicksburg, Miss. 

John J. Andre Cedarville, 111. Aug. 11, 1862. Mustered out June 23, 

1865. P. O., Freeport, 111. 

John Brown Buckeye, 111. Aug. 11, 1862. Mustered out June 23, 

1865. Said to be dead. Place and date of decease are 
unknown. 

Daniel M. Bordner. Dakota, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Slightly wounded in bat- 
tle May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. Mustered 
out June 23, 1865. P. O., Rock Grove, 111. 

Jno. G. Bennetthine. Cedarville, 111. Aug. 11, 1862. Mustered out June 23. 

1865. P. O., Iowa Center, Iowa. 

Levi Cade Buckeye, 111. Aug. 7, 1862. Rejected by the Muster- 
ing Officer. 

Joseph Crane ..Lancaster, 111. Aug. 11, 1862. Slightly wounded in 

battle May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. Mus- 
tered out June 23, 1865. 

Henry C. Carl Oneco, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Promoted Corporal. 

Slightly wounded in battle May 16, 1863, at Champion 
Hill, Miss. Mortally wounded in battle, in the left 
breast, Oct. 5, 1864, at Allatoona, Ga. Died Oct. 22, 
1864. Buried at Marietta, Ga. 

Wm. H. Collier. . .Oneco, 111. Aug. 15, 1862. Promoted Corporal. Cap- 
tured in battle Nov. 25, 1863, at Mission Ridge, Tenn. 
Died in prison March 30, 1864, at Andersonville, Ga. 
Number of his grave is 256. 

Amos Diemer Buckeye, 111. Aug. 15, 1862. Discharged for disability 

Sept. II, 1863. P. O., Davenport, Iowa. 

Adam K. Dinges. ..Oneco, 111. Aug. 12, 1862. Injured June 28, 1864, 

ankle sprained, in a collision on the railroad, near 
Dalton, Ga. Mustered out June 23, 1865. P. O., West 
Point, Neb. 



ROSTER OF NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 353 

Henry Denhart... Buckeye, III. Aug. 14, 1862. Promoted Corporal. 

Mustered out June 23, 1865. P. O., Troskey, Minn. 

Daniel Dauber. . . . Oneco, 111. Aug. 22, 1862. Wounded in battle, slightly, 

in the right arm, Oct. 5, 1864, at Allatoona, Ga. Mus- 
tered out June 23, 1865. Reported dead, but the date 
and place of decease are unknown. 

Henry C. Eastman. Buckeye, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Promoted Corporal. 

Mustered out June 23, 1865. P. O., Fredericsburg, 
Iowa. 

Isaac Erb Buckeye, 111. Aug. 11, 1862. Killed in battle May 16, 

1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. Buried at Vicksburg, 
Miss. 

Henry Erb Oneco, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Slightly wounded in bat- 
tle May 22, 1863, at Vicksburg, Miss. Captured in bat- 
tle Oct. 5, 1864, at Allatoona, Ga. Mustered out June 
23, 1865. Reported dead, but the date and place of de- 
cease are unknown. 

Wm. H. EiSENHOUR.Waddams, 111. Aug. 11, 1862. Mortally wounded in 

battle May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. Died 
May 19, 1863. Buried at Vicksburg, Miss. 

William Frank. ...Buckeye, 111. Aug. 9, 1862. Absent sick at the date 

of the muster out of the regiment. 

David Forney Buckeye, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Promoted Corporal. 

Captured in battle No. 25, 1863, at Mission Ridge, 
Tenn. Died in prison June 27, 1864, at Andersonville, 
Ga. Number of his grave is 2564. 

Robert Fogel Cedarville, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Died Dec. 26, 1862, 

at Memphis, Tenn. Buried there. 

Joseph W. Fogel. ..Cedarville, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Severely wounded in 

battle May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. Mus- 
tered out June 23, 1865. P. O., Jewell, Kan. 

Thomas Folgate. .. Dakota, 111. Aug. 11, 1862. Mustered out June 23, 

1865. 

Geo. W. Graham... Oneco, 111. Aug. 11, 1862. Slightly wounded in battle 

May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. Injured June 28. 

1864, face and hand bruised, in a collision on the rail- 
road, near Dalton, Ga. Promoted Corporal. Mustered 
out June 23. 1865. P. O., Freeport, 111. 

John P. Garm AN.... Dakota, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Wounded in battle, se- 
verely, in the thigh. Nov. 25, 1863, at Mission Ridge, 
Tenn. Injured June 28, 1864, ankle sprained, in a col- 
lision on the railroad, near Dalton, Ga. Wounded in 
battle, severely, in the left hand, Oct. 5, 1864, at Alla- 
toona, Ga. Mustered out June 23, 1865. 

Joseph F. Grawe. ..Oneco, 111. Aug. 9, 1862. Wounded in battle, severely, 

in the left side, Oct. 5, 1864, at Allatoona, Ga. Pro- 

23 



354 ROSTER OF NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 

moted Corporal. Mustered out June 23, 1865. P. O., 
Waverly, Iowa. Editor of the "Bremer County Inde- 
pendent." 

Benj. Greenwalt.. Buckeye, 111. Aug. 11, 1862. Mustered out June 23, 

1865. Reported in Iowa. 

Franklin B. Grissinger. Buckeye, 111. Aug. 12, 1862. Promoted Corporal. 

Mustered out June 23, 1865. P. O., McConnell Grove^ 
111. 

August Granzo. ... Buckeye, 111. Aug. 11, 1862. Mustered out June 23, 

1865. Died in 1890, at Clarno, Wis. Date and place 
of decease are unknown. 

Henry Hockm an... Buckeye, 111. Aug. 11, 1862. Wounded in battle, se- 
verely, in the arm, Nov. 25, 1863, at Mission Ridge, 
Tenn. Wounded in battle, severely, in the left leg, 
Oct. 5, 1864, at Allatoona, Ga. Mustered out June 
23, 1865. P. O., Ccdarville, 111. 

Chas. Humphrey... Buckeye, 111. Aug. 11, 1862. Mustered out June 23, 

1865. P. O., Jewell, Kan. 

John M. HuMPHREY.Buckeye, 111. Slightly wounded in battle May 16, 1863, 

at Champion Hill, Miss. Wounded in battle, severely, 
in the left side, Oct. 5, 1864, at Allatoona, Ga. Mus- 
tered out June 2S, 1865. Died in 1886, in Kansas. 
Date and place of decease are unknown. 

Lyman Hulbert Oneco, 111. Aug. 10, 1862. Promoted Corporal. Killed 

in battle Oct. 5, 1864, at Allatoona, Ga. Buried at 
Marietta, Ga. 

Tobias Helm Lancaster, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Died May i, 1863, at 

Milliken's Bend, La. Buried at Vicksburg, Miss. 

Samuel Hartsell. .Buckeye, 111. Aug. 20, 1862. Mustered out June 23, 

1865. P. O., Unadilla, Neb. 

Willis G. Haas. .. .Buckeye, 111. Aug. 19, 1862. Killed in battle May 22, 

1863, at Vicksburg, Miss. Buried there. 

Daniel G. Ilgen. ..Cedarville, 111. Aug. 11, 1862. Mustered out June 23, 

1865. P. O., Cedarville, 111. 

David M. Ilgen. .. .Cedarville, 111. Aug. 11, 1862. Severely wounded in 

battle May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. Pro- 
moted Corporal. Mustered out June 23, 1865. P. O., 
Palmyra, Neb. 

Solomon S. Kostenbader. .Cedarville, 111. Aug. 11, 1862. Mustered out 

June 23, 1865. P. O., Lena, 111. 

Henry ICahley Buckeye, 111. Aug. 11, 1862. Mustered out June 23, 

1865. P. O., Des Moines, Iowa. No. 976, 23d street, 

John J. Kryder Lancaster, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Severely wounded in 

battle May 22, 1863, at Vicksburg, Miss. Discharged 
Feb. 22, 1864, on account of wound. Died in 1871 at 
Cedarville, 111. Buried there. 



ROSTER OF NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 355 

Emanuel Kahley.. Buckeye, 111. Aug. ii, 1862. Slightly wounded in 

battle May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. Wounded 
in battle, severely, in the hip, Oct. 5, 1864, at Allatoona, 
Ga. Discharged March 28, 1865, on account of wounds. 
P. O., Lena, 111. 

Charles B. Klapp. Dakota, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Mustered out June 23, 

1865. Died in 1889 at Buckeye, 111. Buried there. 

James E. Knock Oneco, 111. Aug. 7, 1862. Mustered out June 23, 1865. 

William Krise Lancaster, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Mortally wounded in 

battle May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. Died 
Sept. 27, 1863, at Benton Barracks, Mo. Buried there. 

James N. Logan Dakota, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Mustered out June 23, 

1865. P. O., Jennings, Kan. 

Samuel W. Logan.. Dakota, 111. Aug. 10, 1862. Killed in battle Nov. 25, 

1863, at Mission Ridge, Tenn. Buried at Chattanooga, 
Tenn. 

George W. LoTT Oneco, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Discharged for disability 

March 31, 1865. P- O., Quincy, 111. 

Henry Law Oneco, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Captured in battle Nov. 

25, 1863, at Mission Ridge, Tenn. Died in prison May 
28, 1864, at Andersonville, Ga. Number of his grave 
is 1233. 

George M. Lattig. Buckeye, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Mustered out June 23, 

1865. P. O., Lanark, 111. 

DoMiNicus Liebe. ..Oneco, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Died Feb. 22, 1863, at 

Memphis, Tenn. Buried there. 

Reuben Myers Buckeye, 111. Aug. 15, 1862. Mustered out June 23, 

1865. Died in 1889, at Sibley, Iowa. Buried there. 
Date of decease is unknown. 

Moses Matteo Dakota, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Transferred to Inv. Corps 

Sept. I, 1863. P. O., Dakota, 111. 

Oliver McHolt. ..Buckeye, 111. Aug. 11, 1862. Died Nov. 30, 1863, at 

St. Louis, Mo. Buried at Jefferson Barracks, Mo. 

Jefferson Morse. .Buckeye, 111. Aug. 12, 1862. Mustered t>ut June 23, 

1865. 

Jno. p. McConnell. Buckeye, 111. Aug. 12, 1862. Died Oct. 4, 1863, at 

Cairo, 111. Buried there. 

Lester Nichlas. .v. Buckeye, 111. Aug. 11, 1862. Wounded in battle, 

slightly, in the right side, Oct. 5, 1864, at Allatoona, 
Ga. Mustered out June 23, 1865. 

Albert M. Nichlas. Lancaster, 111. Aug. 11, 1862. Discharged for disa- 
bility April 2, 18^3. Reported deceased. Place and 
date of death are unknown. 

George W. Nichlas. . Lancaster, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Transferred to Invalid 

Corps Feb. 15, 1864. Reported deceased, but the date 
and place of death are unknown. 



356 ROSTER OF NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 

Conrad Reiser Dakota, III. Aug. ii, 1862. Died May 28, 1863, at 

Jackson, Miss. Buried at Vicksburg, Miss. 

Henry Rosweiler.. Buckeye, III. Aug. 14, 1862. Killed in battle May 16, 

1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. Buried at Vicksburg, 
Miss. 

Reuben R. Reubendall. Lancaster, 111. Aug. 11, 1862. Severely wounded 

in battle May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. Trans- 
ferred to Invalid Corps Feb. 15, 1864. P. O., Pipe- 
stone City, Minn. 

Jno. W. Sindlinger . Buckeye, 111. Aug. 12, 1862. Discharged for disa- 
bility July 23, 1863. Died at Freeport, 111. Buried 
there. Date of death is unknown. 

James C. Stewart.. Oneco, 111. Aug. 11, 1862. Severely wounded in battle 

May 22, 1863, at Vicksburg, Miss. Wounded in battle, 
slightly, in the left leg, Oct. 5, 1864, at Allatoona, Ga. 
Mustered out June 23, 1865. Reported to be in Mis- 
souri. 

Benj. F. Shockley. Buckeye, 111. Aug. 12, 1862. Mortally wounded in 

battle May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. Died 
May 19, 1863. Buried at Vicksburg, Miss. 

Thomas K. St. JoHN.Oneco, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Died Oct. 22, 1862, at 

Camp Douglas, Chicago, 111. 

David Y. Seyler. ..Oneco, 111. Aug. 15, 1862. Transferred to Inv. Corps 

Aug. I, 1863. 

Sanford Smith Oneco, 111. Aug. 15, 1862. Mustered out June 23, 

1865. P. O., Oneco, 111. 

William Sands.... Oneco, 111, Aug. 15, 1862. Mustered out June 23, 1865. 

P. O., Melvern, Kan. 

Levi Sheckler Oneco, 111. Aug. 10, 1862. Wounded in battle, slightly, 

in tTie left leg, Oct. 5, 1864, at Allatoona, Ga. Mus- 
tered out June, 23, 1865. P. O., Howard, S. D. 

Thompson Vantilburg . Lancaster, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Died Aug. 14, 1863. 

at Jefferson Barracks, Mo. Buried there. 

N. H. Vantilburg.. Lancaster, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Discharged for disa- 
bility Feb. 15, 1863. P. O., Cedar Falls, Iowa. 

Jno. H. Werkheiser. Oneco, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. By reason of severe ill- 
ness contracted during the campaign in Northern Mis- 
sissippi, in November and December, 1862, he was in- 
capacitated for field service for nearly two years. Dur- 
ing this time, preferring to remain in the service, he 
was Chief Clerk in the Judge Advocate General's office, 
and Secretary to Major Benner, Chief Aide-de-Camp 
to General Stephen A. Hurlbut, at general headquar- 
ters, Memphis, Tenn. He then returned to the regi- 
ment, and served as Clerk in the Adjutant's office dur- 
ing the Georgia and Carolinas campaigns, to the close 
of the war. He is now Cashier of the First National 



ROSTER OF NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 357 

Bank of Silverton, Colo. Mustered out June 23, 1865. 
P. O., Silverton, Colo. 

Daniel Wolf Buckeye, 111. Aug. 10, 1862. Killed in battle May 16, 

1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. Buried at Vicksburg, 
Miss. 

Peter Wetzel Buckeye, 111. Aug. 11, 1862. Mustered out June 23, 

1865. P. O., Three Oaks, Mich. 

Willlam J. Wilson. Buckeye, 111. Aug. 12, 1862. Mortally wounded in 

battle May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. Died 
May 25, 1863. Buried at Vicksburg, Miss. 

John Wertman Oneco, 111. Aug. 12, 1862. Mustered out June 23, 

1865. P. O., Sioux Falls, S. D. 

Francis M.Wickwise. Oneco, 111. Aug. 12, 1862. Died Aug. 17, 1863, at 

Vicksburg, Miss. Buried there. 

Jacob R. Wagner. ..Oneco, 111. Aug. 12, 1862. Wounded in battle, slightly, 

in the thigh, Nov. 25, 1863, at Mission Ridge, Tenn. 
Promoted Corporal. Mustered out June 23, 1865. P. 
O., Marble Rock, Iowa. 

Joel Wagner Oneco, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Mortally wounded in bat- 
tle Nov. 25, 1863, at Mission Ridge, Tenn. Died Nov. 
29, 1863. Buried at Chattanooga, Tenn. 

Robert Wardlow. .Rock Run, 111. Aug. 21, 1862. Severely wounded in 

battle May 22, 1863, at Vicksburg, Miss. Wounded in 
battle, severely, in the hip, Oct. 5, 1864, at Allatoona, 
Ga. Discharged March 15, 1865, on account of wounds. 
P. O., Freeport, 111. 

George Zerbe ;Oneco, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Severely wounded in bat- 
tle May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. Transferred 
to Veteran Reserve Corps March 16, 1864. Died at 
Oneco, 111. Buried there. Date of death is unknown. 

William Zerbe. ...Oneco, 111. Aug. 10, 1862. Rejected by Surgeon, and 

not mustered in. 
Recruits. 

William Garm an.. Buckeye, 111. Oct. 15, 1864. Transferred to 40th 

Illinois V. V. Infantry June 18, 1865. Died at Cedar- 

ville, 111. Buried there. Date of death is unknown. 

Albert Youndt Dakota, 111. Dec. 29, 1863. Transferred to 40th Illi- 
nois V. V. Infantry June 18, 1865. P. O., AUentown, 

Pa. 
Under Cook of A. D. 

Daniel I. Rone... .Place not given. April 28, 1864. Killed March 21, 

1865, by guerrillas, at Mills Creek, near Bentonville, 

N. C. Buried there. Was of Huntsville, Ala. 

James Rose Place not given. April 28, 1864. Deserted Feb. 21, 

1865. Was of Huntsville, Ala. 

^Explanation : The first place given, in each case, was the residence at the date of enlist- 
ment, as shown by the Muster Roll. The first date given, in each case, is the date of enlistment. 
In all cases where it is not given, the present P. O. address is unknown. 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 




lA., CaiilBlu, Company "H." 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 359 



SKETCH OF JOHN A. Rl>SSELL, CAPTAIN, COMPANY " H. 



>f 



JOHN A. RUSSELL, was born in Madison, Somerset County, 
Maine, March 14th, 1838, When sixteen years old he removed to 
Bureau County, Illinois, and made his home with his uncle, Joseph 
Webb, near Buda. At twenty-two years of age he married Miss. 
Sophronia P. Barrett, and soon after, with his brother, Charles K. 
Russell, began to improve a farm in Macon township. 

In 1861, the two brothers enlisted in Company I of the Twenty- 
Seventh Regiment Illinois Volunteer Infantry, and on the organiza- 
tion of the company, John A. was elected Second Lieutenant thereof. 
Charles K. was killed at the battle of Belmont, being among the 
first from Bureau County who fell. John A. tried to rescue his 
body, but failed on account of the close pursuit being then made by 
the enemy. 

In the spring of 1862, on account of failing health, John A. 
resigned his commission as lieutenant and returned home. That 
summer, his health having improved, he again enlisted, in Company 
H of the Ninety-Third Regiment Illinois Volunteer Infantry. After 
N. C. Buswell, who raised this company, was elected lieutenant col- 
onel of the regiment, John A. Russell was unanimously elected 
captain of the company. 

He was always on duty with his company until he was danger- 
ously wounded in the neck at the battle of Champion Hill, Mississippi, 
May i6th, 1863. Before he was fully recovered from the wound, he 
returned to his command and participated in the Chattanooga cam- 
paign. At the battle of Mission Ridge, Tennessee, November 2Sth, 
1863, he was captured by the enemy. Then he was thirteen months 
in "Libby" and other Southern prisons. During that period he 
escaped twice, but was each time recaptured, with the aid of blood- 
hounds. He was exchanged in December, 1864. His health was 
broken, and on his return home he resigned, on January loth, 1865. 
In more than one hotly contested battle he sealed the bond which 
reads : "To thee, O my country, will I devote and, if necessary, give 
my life." 

After the close of the war, Captain Russell engaged in the mer- 
cantile business at Neponset, Illinois, and followed it with marked 
success to the time of. his death, December 8th, 1883. He left, sur- 
viving him, his wife and three daughters, and left them an ample 
fortune, and, better still, the legacy of an irreproachable character 
and a noble Christian life. No person in need was ever turned from 
his door empty handed. He was kind to all, 'but extremely kind to 
the poor. His aid to the poor was so liberal and so quietly bestowed 
that none but they knew the extent of it, or, in fact, knew of it at 
all, until their tears at his grave told the story of his gracious heart. 
His soldiership was patriotically brave and courageous; his life was 
pure and noble, but through those tears around his grave his great 
soul shone out like a splendid diamond set in the sky. 



SeO HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 




CYRUS H. ABBOTT, First LleMtenant, Company "H." 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 361 



LETTER FROM CYRUS H. ABBOTT, FIRST LIEUTENANT, COMPANY " H.'* 

Modesto, Cal., March 3d, 1896. 
Mr. Aaron Dunbar, 

Dear Comrade: 

I will try to give you a few lines of my life since the war. 
Do as you think best about putting it in print. If it does not suit 
you, drop it in the waste basket. 

I am married and have four children. I have been a farmer 
all my life. At the close of the war, I again engaged in farming in 
the township of Mineral, in Bureau County, Illinois. In 1868, I 
lemoved to Iowa, bought a farm of one hundred and sixty acres and 
improved it, and remained there until the spring of 1872. I then 
sold my farm in Iowa, and, with my family, removed to California. 
I rented lands here and engaged in wheat-raising on a large scale. 
I followed that business until the year 1888, when I quit large farm- 
ing. I then bought a small farm of one hundred and sixty acres, for 
a home, which I am now occupying. 

Yours truly, CYRUS H. ABBOTT, 

Late First Lieut. Co. H. 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 




tiAll C. LOWRESy, HecoQd LleutoiiaQi, Couipauy 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 363 



l-ETTER FROM GAD C. LOWREY, SECOND LIEUTENANT, COMPANY " H. 



>» 



Pomeroy, Iowa, March 5th, 1896. 
Mr. Aaron Dunbar, Secretary, 
Dear Comrade: 

After leaving the service, I resided at my old home near 
Mineral, in Bureau County, Illinois, until September, 1868, 
-at which time, with my family and personal effects, in two 
<:overed wagons, I started for Iowa, with the intention of making 
that state my future home. I arrived in Des Moines in the fall of 
1868, and resided there until the spring of 1869, at which time I 
Jiioved to Fort Dodge, Iowa, and afterward took up a homestead 
in Pocahontas County, thereby gaining some of the benefits of the 
Homestead Law, so heartily indorsed by our martyr. President Lin- 
coln. Myself and wife and six children went on to this homestead 
and tried to make a living. It was pretty hard work those times, 
almost as hard as soldiering, for the country was new and had no 
railroad within thirty miles. I believe my house was the first one 
l)uilt in the township in which I settled. I lived on this homestead 
for about ten years. My family grew up and one by one left the 
liome nest. I then moved to Pomeroy, a little town that sprung 
up on the line of the Illinois Central Railroad, (that ran through this 
country after I had taken up my homestead), about two and one- 
Tialf miles from my homestead. 

I have resided in Pomeroy ever since 1878, enjoying fairly good 
Tiealth in a general way, but still suffering from the old trouble con- 
tracted while in the army, epilepsy. I have not been able to engage 
in any labor of any consequence for fifteen years. I have not been 
very prosperous, as the world looks at it, yet I have enjoyed life 
fairly well. All of my children who are living have settled near me, 
and this part of the state of Iowa has so grown and improved that it 
is a very pleasant place now in which to have one's home. I found 
a good many of the old boys scattered around in this section of 
Iowa, and we have a small post of the G. A. R. here, of which I am 
t^ommander. We often get together and fight the old battles over 
again; but the ranks of the Grand Army are thinning very rapidly. 
I never expect to meet many of the boys of the Ninety-Third again 
in this world. I am getting to be an old man, and expect soon to join 
those "gone before/' and be present at that final reunion in that 
better world, where peace and harmony prevail, and parting will be 
no more. Yours truly, 

GAD C. LOWREY, 

Second Lieut. Company H, 93d 111. Vol. 



3M HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 




lAM SORTON, Corporal, Company 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 366 




EDMUND B. JONES. Miislclflu, Compaur "H, 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 




EZRA MclNTIRE, 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 367 



SKETCH OF EZRA McINTIRE, PRIVATE, COMPANY " H. 



»» 



EZRA McINTIRE, was born in Bloomfield, Somerset County, 
Maine, February 2d, 183 1. He was the youngest of four brothers 
who reached manhood. There were eleven brothers and sisters, 
three of whom died young. His father's name was Ezra, and his 
mother's maiden name was Clarina Parsons Stanchfield. The sub- 
ject of this sketch was educated in the common school at his native 
place, supplemented by a few terms in the Bloomfield Academy. 
This enabled him to teach, which he did, in the wintertime, for 
three or four years, working on the farm during the summer 
seasons. 

Early in 1851, he was attacked with the gold fever, and in 
September of that year started for California. He went from New 
York to the Isthmus of Panama on the steamship "Illinois." From 
thence he proceeded to San Francisco on a Pacific steamer, reach- 
ing there in October that year. He engaged in mining while he 
was in California. 

Returning to Maine, he came from thence to Illinois in the fall 
of 1854, visited friends in Bureau County, spent that winter in Fond 
du Lac County, Wisconsin, teaching school in the village of 
Ceresco. In the spring of 1855, he returned to Maine and spent a 
year there, assisting his father on the old home farm again. In 
April, 1856, he removed to Illinois, and settled upon the quarter- 
section of land, near Neponset, in Bureau County, Illinois, where 
he now resides. He immediately began to improve the land, break- 
ing fifty acres that season. 

On August 14th, 1862, at duty's call, he left the plow for the 
camp and field, enlisting in Company H of the Ninety-Third Regi- 
ment Illinois Volunteer Infantry. He was continuously with the 
company during its entire service, until it reached Goldsboro, North 
Carolina. From thence, on account of sickness, he was sent to the 
hospital at Newbern, North Carolina, and from there was trans- 
ferred to Madison General Hospital, Indiana, from whence he was 
discharged, May 26th, 1865. 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 




T A I.BERT BAYERS, CompsDji 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 




UEOllOE SADLER, ComnRny "11." 



370 ROSTER OF NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 

Roster of Company H. 

Enrolled in Bureau County, Illinois. 

Organized August 14, 1862, at Neponset, Bureau County, Illinois. 

Mustered into Sermce October jj, 1862, at Chicago, Illinois * 
Captains, 

John A. Russell..,. Neponset, 111. Commissioned to rank from Oct. 13, 

1862. Mustered into service Oct. 13, 1862, at Chicago, 
111. Wounded in battle, severely, in the neck, May 
16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. Captured in battle 
Nov. 25, 1863, at Mission Ridge, Tenn. Resigned Jan. 
10, 1865. Died Dec. 8, 1883, at Neponset, 111. Buried 
there. See his further history in the sketch ante. 

RuFUS H. FoRD....Buda, III. Enlisted Aug. 14, 1862, as a Private in this 

Company. Appointed Corporal at the organization 
of the Company. Promoted Sergeant and First Ser- 
geant. Wounded in battle, slightly, in the hand, May 
16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. Commissioned First 
Lieutenant, of this Company, to rank from Aug. 29, 
1864. Mustered into service as such Oct. 21, 1864. 
Commissioned Captain to rank from April 11, 1865. 
Mustered into service as such April 28, 1865. Served 
until the close of the war. Mustered out June 23, 1865, 
near Louisville, Ky., and paid ofif and finally discharged 
July 6, 1865, at Chicago, 111. P. O., Buda, 111. 

First Lieutenants. 

Samuel Dorr Neponset, 111. Commissioned Oct. 13, 1862. Mus- 
tered into service Oct. 13, 1862, at Chicago, 111. Com- 
missioned Quartermaster of the regiment, with rank 
as First Lieutenant, Oct. 21, 1864. See that title, and 
the sketch, ante. 

RuFUS H. Ford.... Buda, 111. Commissioned to rank from Aug. 29, 1864. 

Mustered into service Oct. 21, 1864. Promoted Cap- 
tain April 28, 1865. See that title. 

Cyrus H. Abbott. .. Mineral, 111. Enlisted Aug. 14, 1862, as a Private in 

this Company. Appointed Corporal at the organiza- 
tion of the company. Promoted Sergeant and First 
Sergeant. Commissioned First Lieutenant to rank 
from April 11, 1865. Mustered into service as such 
April 28, 1865. Served until the close of the war. Mus- 
tered out June 23, 1865, near Louisville, Ky., and paid 
off and finally discharged July 6, 1865, at Chicago, 
111. See sketch ante. P. O., Modesto, Cal. 

Second Lieutenant. 

Gad C. LoWREY Mineral, 111. Commissioned to rank from Oct. 13, 

1862. Mustered into service Oct. 13, 1862, at Chicago, 
111. Resigned Dec. 30, 1863. P. O., Pomeroy, Iowa. 
See sketch ante. 



ROSTER OF NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 371 

First Sergeant, 

George W. Flick. . . Neponset, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Transferred to Veteran 

Reserve Corps Sept. 3, 1863. Said to be in South Da- 
kota. 

Sergeants, 

Jno. W. Robinson.. Neponset, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Discharged for disa- 
bility in May, 1863. 

Elijah Vangilder. Knoxville, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Mortally wounded in 

battle Dec. 11, 1864, at Savannah, Ga. Died Dec. 13, 

1864, at Savannah, Ga. Buried at Station No. i, on 
the Gulf Railroad, south of Savannah, Ga. 

Abraham Smith. ...Mineral, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Mortally wounded, in 

battle, May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. Died 
June 16, 1863. Buried at Vicksburg, Miss. 

Wm. W. Buswell. ..Neponset, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Discharged June 4, 

1863, for promotion in a U. S. Regiment of Colored 
Infantry. P. O., Osceola, 111. 

Corporals. 

RuFUS H. Ford Buda, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Promoted Sergeant, and 

First Sergeant, and First Lieutenant and Captain. See 
the last two titles. 

Jos. B. BENNiNGTON.Neponset, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Mustered out June 23, 

1865, P. O., Perry, Iowa. 

Chas. B. Hamilton. Neponset, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Wounded in battle May 

22, 1863. at Vicksburg, Miss. Wounded in battle, se- 
verely, in the leg, Nov. 25, 1863, at Mission Ridge, 
Tenn. Discharged for disability Oct. 29, 1864. P. O., 
Geneseo, 111. 

Isaac N. Winn Selby, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Deserted Feb. 24, 1863. 

Went to Gilford, Neb. Reported as having died in 

1866, on a steamboat on the Mississippi River. Date 
of decease is unknown. 

John C. Tompkins. .Mineral, 111. Aug. 14 1862. Died March 19, 1863, at 

Memphis, Tenn. Buried there. 

Joseph W. Hoig.... Neponset, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Reduced to the ranks. 

Mustered out June 23, 1865. Died in Oct., 1893, at 
Pawnee City, Neb. Buried there. 

Cyrus H. Abbott.. Mineral, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Promoted Sergeant, and 

First Sergeant, and First Lieutenant. See last men- 
tioned title, and sketch, ante. 

Geo. S. Robinson; . Neponset, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Killed in battle May 14, 

1863, at Jackson, Miss. Buried at Vicksburg, Miss. 

Musicians, 

Edmund B. Jones. . Neponset, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Discharged for disa- 
bility April 21, 1865. P- O., Holton, Kan. 



372 ROSTER OF NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 

William A. Winn. . Neponset, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Reduced to ranks. 

Transferred to Veteran Reserve Corps Sept. 15, 1863. 

iVagoner, 

Curtis H. Gile. ...Neponset, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Discharged for disa- 
bility, in June, 1863. Died March 6, 1876, at Platts- 
ville, Colo. Buried there. 

Privates. 

Chester W.Aldrich. Neponset, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Mustered out June 23, 

1865. P. O., Neponset, 111. 

Daniel Booker. ... Trenton, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Discharged for disa- 
bility Aug. 6, 1863. Died soon thereafter, at Peru, 111. 
Buried there. 

Nicholas C.Buswell, 2d. Neponset, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Died Aug. 7, 1864, at 

Kingston, Ga. Buried at Marietta, Ga. 

Sam'l F. Bennett. .Neponset, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Transferred to Veteran 

Reserve Corps Sept. 15, 1863. Died Nov. 23, 1897, 
at- Boyleston, 111. Buried there. 

Adelbert Brown.. Neponset, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Discharged for disa- 
bility April 18, 1863. Died April 18, 1863, at Princeton, 
111. Buried at Neponset, 111. 

Jesse Bunnell Mineral, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Promoted Wagoner. 

Mustered out June 23, 1865. Died at Montezuma, Iowa. 
Buried there. Date of death unknown. 

Jonathan Batdorf. Neponset, 111. y\ug. 14, 1862. Wounded in battle, se-^ 

verely, in the face, Nov. 25, 1863, at Mission Ridge, 
Tenn. Mustered ouL June 23, 1865. P. O., Pollock, 
Mo. 

Michael Batdorf. .Neponset, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Captured in battle Nov. 

25, 1863, at Mission Ridge, Tenn. Died in prison 
Aug. 3, 1864, at Andersonville, Ga. The number of 
his grave is 4618. 

Lyman M. Baker... Neponset, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Mustered out June 23, 

1865. P- O., Newton, Iowa. 

Parker Buchanan. Neponset, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Promoted Corporal and 

Sergeant. Mustered out June 23, 1865. P. O., Spring 
Ranch, Neb. 

Henry Brown Mineral, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Mustered out June 23, 

1865. P' O., Coon Rapids, Iowa. 

Levi G. Baker Neponset, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Killed in battle May 

16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. Buried at Vicks- 
burg. Miss. 

David Bunnell Neponset, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Mortally wounded in 

battle, in the shoulder, May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, 
Miss. Died Sept. 13, 1863, at Neponset, 111. Buried 
there. 



ROSTER OF NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 373 

William CoNLEY...Neponset, 111. Aug. 14. 1862. Discharged for disa- 
bility March 18, 1863. P. O., Sheffield, 111. 

Nathan Church. ..Sheffield, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Mustered out June 23, 

1865. 

George Clark Neponset, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Transferred to Veteran 

Reserve Corps June 15, 1864. P. O., Streator, 111. 

Homer S. Clark... .Neponset, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Killed in battle May 

14, 1863, at Jackson, Miss. Buried at Vicksburg, Miss. 

William O. Church . Neponset, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Wounded in battle, 

slightly, in the hand, May 14, 1863, at Jackson, Miss. 
Wounded in battle May 22, 1863, at Vicksburg, Miss. 
Transferred to Veteran Reserve Corps Sept. 28, 1863. 
P. O., Big Rock, Io\ya. 

Hugh Dunn Neponset, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Died Sept. 9, 1863, at 

Memphis, Tenn. Buried there. 

Daniel R. Dean. .. Monroe, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Discharged for disability 

Aug. 26, 1863. P. O., Montezuma, Iowa. 

James Daley Neponset, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Promoted Corporal. 

Wounded and captured in battle Nov. 25, 1863, at Mis- 
sion Ridge, Tenn. Died in prison, of wound, Dec. 
17, 1863, at Atlanta, Ga. 

Cornelius S. Dunham. Neponset, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Transferred to Inv. 

Corps, Jan. 15, 1864. Died at Grinnell, Iowa. Buried 
there. Date of decease is unknown. 

Stephen A. Dean. .Neponset, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Discharged for disa- 
bility Sept. 16, 1864. Died Feb. 24, 1873, near Min- 
eral, 111. Buried at Mineral, 111. 

Hazzard Dunn Neponset, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Discharged for disa- 
bility Aug. 23, 1863. P. O., Creston, Iowa. 

Thomas Fallon Neponset, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Wounded in battle, se- 
verely, in the arm, right arm amputated, Nov. 25, 1863, 
at Mission Ridge, Tenn. Mustered out July 19, 1865. 
Died in 1879 at Neponset, 111. Buried there. Date of 
death is unknown. 

Thomas Finlan Njeponset, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Wounded in battle, 

slightly, in the hand. May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, 
Miss. Mustered out June 23, 1865. Supposed to be 
dead. Disappeared in Dec, 1882, and has not been 
heard of since. 

Casper B. Fox Trenton, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Deserted Nov. 16, 1862. 

Thomas Gunning. ..Neponset, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Died Jan. 27, 1864, at 

Point Rocks, Ala. Buried at Chattanoogaville, Ga. 

Thomas Goodwin. .Osceola, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Injured June 28, 1864, 

ankles sprained, in a collision on the railroad, near 
Dalton, Ga. Mortally wounded in battle, in the groin 
and arm, Oct. 5, 1864, at Allatoona, Ga. Died Oct. 
25, 1864, at Rome, Ga. Buried at Marietta, Ga. 



374 ROSTER OF NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 

George Gardner. ..Kewanee, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Killed in battle May 

22, 1863, at Vicksburg, Miss. Buried there. 

Milton B. Hull.... Mineral, 111. Aug. 14, i852. Wounded in battle, be- 
tween June 1st and 21st, 1863, at Vicksburg, Miss. 
Promoted Corporal and Sergeant and First Sergeant. 
Mustered out June 23, 1865. P. O., Grant, Neb. 

Stephen Handy.... Neponset, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Promoted Corporal and 

Sergeant. Mustered out June 23, 1865. F- O., Des 
Moines, Iowa. 

Martin R. Harlan.. Neponset, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Mustered out June 23, 

1865. P. O., Neponset, 111. 

Michael Hannefin. Neponset, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Mustered out June 23, 

1865. Died April 20, 1888, at Neponset, 111. Buried 
at Kew.anee, 111. 

William C. Hall.. Toulon, III. Aug. 14, 1862. Died Jan. 17, 1863, at 

Memphis, Tenn. Buried there. 

Edgar Hall Osceola, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Died March 5, 1863, at 

Ridgeway Station, near Memphis, Tenn. Buried at 
Memphis, Tenn. 

John Hellener Osceola, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Died Sept. 9, 1863, at 

Vicksburg, Miss. Buried there. 

Sylvester Hall Neponset, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Discharged for disa- 
bility May 13, 1863. Killed Feb. 14, 1889, on the rail- 
road, at Kevvanee, 111. Buried at Woodburn, Iowa. 

Levi Joy Neponset, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Deserted June 24, 1863. 

P. O., Windsor, Ontario, Canada. 

Isaac Kinkead Mineral, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Discharged for disa- 
bility June 20, 1863. P. O., Aurora, Neb. 

Patrick M. KANE..Buda, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Wounded in battle, severely, 

in the bowels. May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. 
Mustered out June 2^, 1865. P. O., Manlius, 111. 

Matt Landon Osceola, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Wounded in battle, se- 
verely, in the hip, May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, 
Miss. Wounded in battle, severely, in the head, Oct. 
5, 1864, at Allatoona, Ga. Promoted Corporal. Mus- 
tered out June 23, 1865. P. O., Cromwell, Iowa. 

Chas. McDaniels.. Neponset, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Died April 11, 1863, at 

Memphis, Tenn. Buiied there. 

John Muhlies Trenton, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Deserted Nov. 8, 1862. 

Ralph McCLiNTOCK.Mineral, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Discharged for disabil- 
ity Jan. 18, 1863. P. O., 1216 West Third street. Little 
Rock, Ark. 

Ezra McIntire... .Neponset, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Wounded in battle May 

22, 1863, at Vicksburg, Miss. Discharged for disa- 
bility May 26, 1865. P. O., Neponset, 111. 

William Mitchell . Neponset, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Deserted Nov. 5, 1862. 



ROSTER OF NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 375 

Adam Norton Neponset, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Promoted Corporal. . 

Mustered out June 23, 1865. P. O., Westboro, Mo. 

Charles H. OEHLER.Mineral, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Mustered out June 23, 

1865. P. O., Grant City, Mo. 

William W. Otwell . Neponset, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Mustered out June 23, 

1865. P. O., Banyan, Fla. 

James M. Park Sheffield, 111. Aug.* 14, 1862. Wounded in battle, 

slightly, in the leg, Nov. 25, 1863, at Mission Ridge, 
Tenn. Discharged in Oct., 1864, on account of wound. 
P. O., Yates Center, Kan. 

Benj. F. Pounds Mineral, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Discharged for disabil- 
ity Jan. 20, 1863. Reported as deceased. Date and 
place of death are unknown. 

Fred'k Peterson... ShefTield, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Killed in battle Nov. 

25, 1863, at Mission Ridge, Tenn. Buried at Chatta- 
nooga, Tenn. 

Theodore Riley... Neponset, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Wounded in battle, 

slightly, in the chin. May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, 
Miss. Killed in battle Oct. 5, 1864, at Allatoona, Ga. 
Buried at Marietta, Ga. 

William Russell. .Mineral, 111. * Aug. 14, 1862. Discharged for disabil- 
ity Jan. 20, 1863. Died in 1863, at Neponset, 111. Bur- 
ied there. Date of death is unknown. 

Robert S. Rice Neponset, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Discharged for disa- 
bility Jan. 20, 1863. P. O., Nevada, Mo. 

Henry Strong Neponset, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Captured in battle May 

16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. Mustered out June 

21, 1865. 

Andrew Spears Neponset, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Wounded in battle May 

22, 1863, at Vicksburg, Miss. Promoted Corporal and 
Sergeant. Mustered out June 23, 1865. P. O., Min- 
eral, HI. 

James C. ScHROUFE.Manlius, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Wounded in battle, 

slightly, in the arm, Nov. 25, 1863, at Mission Ridge, 
Tenn. Mustered out June 23, 1865. Died at Victor, 
Iowa. Buried there. Date of decease is unknown. 

Wm. H. Suffecool. Mineral, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Mustered out June 23, 

1865. P. O., New Berlin, Ohio. 

Talbert Sayers Neponset, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Wounded in battle, se- 
verely, in the left breast, Oct. 5, 1864, at Allatoona, 
Ga. Mustered out June 23, 1865. P. O., College 
Springs, Iowa. 

Richard -Sadler. ..Neponset, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Transferred to Brigade 

Band March 4, 1863. P. O., Neponset, 111. 

William Studley. .Neponset, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Discharged for disa- 
bility Aug. 12, 1863. Died Aug. 2, 1864, at Mineral, 
111. Buried there. 



376 ROSTER OF NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 

William Smith. ...Neponset, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Wounded in battle 

May 22, 1863, at Vicksburg, Miss. Wounded in battle, 
severely, in the side, Nov. 25, 1863, at Mission Ridge,. 
Tenn. Discharged Feb. 8, 1865, on account of wounds. 

William E. Scott.. Trenton, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Wounded in battle, se- 
verely, in the hand. May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill^ 
Miss. Killed in battle Nov. 25, 1863, at Mission Ridge,. 
Tenn. Buried at Chattanooga, Tenn. 

Seth D. Stoughton. Osceola, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Wounded in ba'.tle^ 

slightly, in the face. May 14, 1863, at Jackson, Miss. 
Mustered out June 23, 1865. P. O., Sherwin Junction^ 
Kan. 

George Sadler Trenton, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Mustered out June 23, 

1865. P. O., Neponset, 111. 

Fred'k Schlagter.. Osceola, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Mustered out June 23, 

1865. Reported to be deceased. The date and place 
of death are unknown. 

Duncan Stewart... Mineral, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Discharged for disabil- 
ity Feb. 24, 1863. Died Feb. 25, 1863, at Memphis, 
Tenn. Buried there. 

Nathan Thorn Osceola, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Promoted Corporal. Mus- 
tered out June 2S, 1865. P. O., Lodi, Cal., or Waukee^ 
Iowa, or Adel, Iowa. 

Morgan C. Vangilder. Knoxville, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Died May 5, 1863, 

on hospital boat, on the Mississippi River. Buried 
at Memphis, Tenn. 

Wm. H. Vangilder. Knoxville, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Promoted Corporal. 

Mustered out June 23, 1865. P. O., Neligh, Neb. 

Daniel West Buda, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Wounded in battle, mortally, 

in the leg, May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. Died 
Sept. 13, 1863, in Tioga County, Pa. Date and place of 
death and burial are unknown. 

Nelson L. WELTON.Buda, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Discharged for disability 

Aug. 22, 1863. P. O., Red Oak, Iowa. 

James T. Wroe Sheffield, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Mustered out June 23^ 

1865. P. O., Exira, Iowa. 

William West Mineral, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Mustered out June 23, 

1865. P. O., Wert, Iowa. 

John W. Wroe Mineral, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Discharged for disabil- 
ity March 11, 1863. P. O., Sulphur Springs, Ore. 

Daniel Williamson .Neponset, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Mustered out June 23, 

1865. 

William Webster.. Neponset, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Wounded in battle^ 

slightly, in the shoulder, May 16, 1863, at Champion 



ROSTER OF NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 377 

Hill, Miss. Mortally wounded in battle, through the 
bowels, Oct. 5, 1864, at Allatoona, Ga. Died Oct. 
14, 1864, at Allatoona, Ga. Buried at Marietta, Ga. 

Albert Walters. ..Oneida, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Died March 28, 1863, at 

Memphis, Tenn. Buried there. 

Morgan L. Weaver. Osceola, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Died Nov. 21, 1863, at 

Osceola, 111. Buried there. 

Under Cook of A, D. 

Jackson Carter... .Raymond, Miss. Aug. 25, 1864. Mustered out June 

23, 1865. 



♦Explanation : The first place given, in each case, was the residence at the date of enlist- 
ment. The first date given, in eacn case, is the date of enlistment, as shown on the Muster 
Roll. In all cases where it is not given, the present P. O. address is unknown. 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 




SlH.r,S C. CLARK, Cai.talii. CouipnHjr 



:m HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 




JACOB S. KINNAN, Cii^tfllo, Company "1." 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 381 



SKETCH OF JACOB S. KINNAN, CAPTAIN, COMPANY ** I." 

JACOB S. KINNAN, was born November loth, 1836, in 
Morris County, New Jersey. The family came to Illinois when 
Jacob was a lad, and for many years lived on a farm about a mile 
and a half southeast of Princeton. He enlisted as a private, 
August 13th, 1862, and was appointed second Sergeant on the 
organization of the company, the same day, and was afterward 
promoted to First Lieutenant and Captain. He served with his com- 
pany until the close of the war. He was present in every battle 
and on every march in which the regiment participated. 

In the spring following the close of the war, he began farm- 
ing, in Bureau County, Illinois, and continued in that business for 
twenty years. He then sold his farms, and removed to Jefferson, 
Iowa, and resided there about three years. He then returned to 
Princeton, Illinois, where he continued to reside until the death of 
his wife, December 28th, 1891. He then spent one year traveling. 
But he soon became discontented with a life of leisure and returned 
to Iowa and occupied a farm which he had purchased in Adair 
County, consisting of about six hundred acres of good land, which 
he continued to manage until his decease. He was a successful 
business man, and left quite a large estate to an only daughter. 

He died June 9th, 1896, at Jefferson, Iowa, and was brought 
hack to his old home and buried, at Princeton, Illinois. 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 




THOMPSON M. WiXIK, First Lieutenant, Company "].'* 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 383 



SKETCH OF THOMPSON M. WYLIE, FIRST LIEUTENANT, COMPANY " I. 



>> 



THOMPSON M. WYLIE, in the fall of 1866, settled in Buda, 
Bureau County, Illinois, and remained there about one year, when 
he removed to Tiskilwa, Illinois, and engaged in business there for 
about two years. In the spring of 1871, he removed to Tampico, in 
Whiteside County, Illinois, and engaged in the lumber business 
there with Mr. D. McMillen as a partner. In the spring of 1876, 
they began dealing in hardware, in connection with their lumber 
business, which was continued until the fall of 1886, when thev 
dissolved the partnership, Lieutenant Wylie retaining the hardware 
business, in which he continued until the fall of 1890, when he sold 
out. He has not been engaged in active business since then. Dur- 
ing these years his business was prosperous. He purchased a 
farm and is now occupying it, in the northwestern part of Bureau 
County, three miles from Tampico. He was married in the fall of 
1871, and has three children. 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 




PHINEAH T. RICHARDSON. Second Lieutenant, Comp«ny "I.-' 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 




WILMAM VAN RUFF, Sei-gennt, Couiyanj- 



HISTORY OF THE XIXETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 




FF.LIX LAUGHLIN, CuupBDy 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 




:«8 ROSTER OF NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 

Roster of Company I. 

Enrolled in Bureau County, Illinois. 

Organized August 13, 1862, at Princeton, Bureau County. Illinois. 

Mustered into Seri'ice October ij, 1862, at Chicago^ IHhiois* 
Captains. 

Ellis Fisher Wyanet, 111. Commissioned to rank from Oct. 13, 

1862. Mustered into service Oct. 13, 1862, at Chicago, 
111. Resigned Dec. 31, 1862. Died Oct. 9, 1878, at 
Wyanet, 111. Buried there. 

Mills C. Clark. .. .Princeton, 111. Commissioned Second Lieutenant, of 

this Company, to rank from Oct. 13, 1862. Mustered 
into service Oct. 13, 1862, at Chicago, 111. Commis- 
sioned Captain to rank from April 23, 1863. Wounded 
in battle, severely, in the bowels and wrist, May 16, 

1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. Mustered into service 
as such Aug. 15, 1863. Resigned Feb. 10, 1864, on ac- 
count of wounds. P. O., Princeton, 111. 

Jacob S. KiNNAN. ...Princeton, 111. Enlisted Aug. 13, 1862, as a Private 

in this Company. Appointed Second Sergeant, on the 
same day, on the organization of the company. Com- 
missioned First Lieutenant, of this Company, to rank 
from April 23, 1863. Mustered into service as such 
July 14, 1863. Commissioned Captain to rank from 
Feb. II, 1864. Mustered into service as such April 
3, 1864. Served until the close of the war. 
Mustered out June 23, 1865, near Louisville, Ky., and 
paid off and finally discharged July 6, 1865, at Chicago, 
111. Died June 9, 1896, at Jefferson, Iowa. Buried at 

Princeton, 111. See sketch of him, ante. 
First Lieutenants. 

Elijah Sapp Bureau, 111. Commissioned to rank from Oct. 13, 

1862. Mustered into service Oct. 13, 1862, at Chicago, 
HI. Resigned April 22, 1863. P. O., Wyanet, 111. 

Jacob S. Kinnan. ...Princeton, 111. Commissioned to rank from April 23, 

1863. Mustered into service July 14, 1863. Promoted 
Captain April 3, 1864. See that title. 

TnoMPSON M. WvLiE.Indiantown, 111. Enlisted Aug. 13, 1862, as a Private 

in Company E of this regiment. Appointed First 
Sergeant of that Company on the same day at the or- 
ganization of the Company. Severely wounded in bat- 
tle May 22, 1863, at Vicksburg, Miss. Promoted Ser- 
geant Major of the regiment April 13, 1864. Com- 
missioned First Lieutenant, of this Company, to rank 
from Feb. 11, 1864. Mustered into service as such 
July II, 1864. Served until the close of the war. Mus- 
tered out June 23, 1865, near Louisville, Ky. Paid off 
and finally discharged July 6, 1865, at Chicago, 111. See 
sketch of him ante. P. O., Tampico, 111. 



ROSTER OF NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 389 

Second Lieutenants. 

Mills C. Clark. .. .Princeton, 111.. Commissioned to rank from Oct. 13, 

1862. Mustered into service Oct. 13, 1862. Promoted 
Captain Aug. 15, 1863. See that title. 

Ezekiel G. Neff... Center, 111. Enlisted Aug. 13, 1862, as a Private in 

this Company. Appointed Sergeant, at the organzat'.on 
of the Company, on the same day. Promoted First 
Sergeant. Commissioned Second Lieutenant to rank 
from April 23, 1863. Not mustered. Killed in battle 
May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss., before he re- 
ceived his commission. Buried at Vicksburg, Miss. 

PiJiNEAs T. Richardson. Princeton, 111. Enlisted Aug. 13, 1862, as a Pri- 
vate in this Company. Promoted Commissary Sergeant 
of the regiment Sept. 8, 1862. Commissioned Second 
Lieutenant of this Company to rank from May 16, 1863. 
Not mustered, because the Company then contained 
less than the minimum number to admit of a Second 
Lieutenant, under orders of the War Department. He 
received his commission July 13, 1863, and was im- 
mediately placed on duty as such Second Lieutenant 
of this Company, by the order of Colonel Putnam. 
Served in that capacity until Sept. 29, 1863, when he 
received notice that his discharge as Commissary Ser- 
geant, which had been issued to take effect July 13, 
1863 to enable him to be mustered in as Second Lieu- 
tenant, was approved as a final discharge from the 
service. And hence, he was finally mustered out and 
discharged as of date July 13, 1863, but really not un- 
til Sept. 29, 1863, as Commissary Sergeant. In 1888 
a special act of Congress was passed, providing that 
he should then be paid for such services as he had 
rendered as Second Lieuteant. See the other titles 
hereinbefore mentioned. P. O., Princeton, 111. 

First Sergeant. 

William T. Reed. .Princeton, 111. Aug. 13, 1862. Discharged for disa- 
bility March 10, 1863. Died at Princeton, 111. Buried 
there. Date of decease is unknown. 

Sergeants. 

Jacob S. KiNNAN. .. .Princeton, 111. Aug. 13, 1862. Promoted First Lieu- 
tenant and Captain. See those titles. 

David N. Thorp. .. .Princeton, 111. Aug. 13, 1862. Reduced to the ranks. 

Mustered out June 23, 1865. Died Dec. 5, 1890, at Ala- 
meda, Cal. Buried there. 

William Van Ruff. Princeton, 111. Aug. 13, 1862. Mustered out June 23, 

1865. P. 0.,Villisca, Iowa. 

Ezekiel G. Neff. ..Center, 111. Aug. 13, 1862. Promoted First Sergeant. 

Promoted Second Lieutenant. See that title. 



390 ROSTER OF NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 

Corporals. 

Arthur C. Stephens. Ohio, 111. Aug. 13, 1862. Reduced to the ranks. Mus- 
tered out June 23, 1865. 
William Dillon. ..Center, 111. Aug. 13, 1862. Mustered out June 23, 1865. 

Benj. F. FoREMAN..Wyanet, 111. Aug. 13, 1862. Reduced to the ranks at 

his own request. Transferred to the Brigade Band 
March 9, 1863. P. O., Marshalltown, Iowa. 

Cyrus H. Cauffman . Center, 111. Aug. 13, 1862. Wounded in battle, se- 
verely, in the back, May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, 
Miss. Transferred to Invalid Corps Oct. 28, 1864. 
Died Feb. 17, 1897, at Princeton, 111. Buried there. 

Harvey Thomas.... Bureau, III. Aug. 13, 1862. Transferred to Invalid 

Corps Feb. 11, 1864. P. O., Princeton, 111. 

Robert J. Sample. ..Greenville, 111. Aug. 13, 1862. Promoted Sergeant. 

Killed in battle Nov. 25, 1863, at Mission Ridge, Tenn. 
Buried at Chattanooga, Tenn. 

William H. Wood. Dover, 111. Aug. 13, 1862. Promoted Sergeant. Trans- 
ferred to Veteran Reserve Corps in March, 1863. Did 
duty in Washington, D. C, until the close of the war. 
Mustered out July 29, 1865. P- O., Aurora, III. 

Edward P. Sellers. Center, 111. Aug. 13, 1862. Promoted Sergeant. In- 
jured June 28, 1864, knee sprained, in a collision on the 
railroad, near Dalton, Ga. Mustered out June 23, 1865. 
P. O., Conway, Iowa. 

Musicians. 

Charles W. Reed.. Princeton, 111. Aug. 13, 1862. Discharged for disabil- 
ity Feb. 21, 1863. Died in March, 1873, at Cedar Rapids, 
Iowa. Buried there. 

William H. Reed.. Princeton, HI. Aug. 13, 1862. Mustered out June 23, 

1865. P. O., Denver, Colo. 
IVagoner. 
Phillip Schmaus. ..Selby, 111. Aug. 13, 1862. Discharged for disability 

Jan. 15, 1863. Died April 7, 1884, at St. Louis, Mo. 

Buried there. 
Privates. 
Franklin R. Betz. .Princeton, 111. Aug. 13, 1862. Promoted Corporal. 

Wounded in battle, severely, in the arm, Nov. 25, 1863, 

at Mission Ridge, Tenn. Mustered out June 23, 1865. 

P. O., Otis, Ind. 

Clark J. Bull Bureau, 111. Aug. 13, 1862. Missing in battle Nov. 25, 

1863, at Mission Ridge, Tenn. Never heard from after- 
ward. 

Thomas C. Bennett. Princeton, 111. Aug. 13, 1862. Mustered out June 23, 

1865. 

Sam'l Butterfield. Dover, 111. Aug. 13, 1862. Promoted Corporal. Cap- 
tured by the enemy Jan. 13, 1863, while on a scout. 
Mustered out June 23, 1865. P. O., Bloomington, Neb. 



ROSTER OF NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 391 

Michael Bolen Center, 111. Aug. 13, 1862. Mustered out June 23, 

1865. P. O., Tama, Iowa. 

John R. Bull Ohio, 111. Aug. 13, 1862. Mustered out June 23, 1865. . 

P. O., Malcom, Iowa. 

Ephraim S. Butler. Selby, 111. Aug. 13, 1862. Died March 9, 1863, at 

Memphis, Tenn Buried there. 

• 

Peter Burling Macon, 111. Aug. 13, 1862. Mustered out June 23, 

1865. P. O., Wyanet, 111. 

William Beale Princeton, 111. Aug. 13, 1862. Promoted Corporal. 

Mustered out June 23, 1865. P. O., Forest City, Iowa. 

James J. Burk Walnut, 111. Aug. 13, 1862. Mustered out June 23, 

1865. P. O., Walnut, 111. 

Lemuel Camp Princeton, 111. Aug. 13, 1862. Deserted Nov. 5, 1862. 

Stephen Conley. ..Bureau, 111. Aug. 13, 1862. Missing in battle May 16, 

1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. Never heard from after- 
ward. 

Franklin M. Coddington. Princeton, 111. Aug. 13, 1862. Promoted Cor- 
poral. Promoted Sergeant. Promoted First Sergeant. 
Wounded in battle, slightly, in the arm, May 16, 1863, 
at Champion Hill, Miss. Wounded in battle, slightly, 
in the wrist, Nov. 25, 1863, at Mission Ridge, Tenn. 
Absent, sick, at the date of the muster out of the regi- 
ment. Died Feb. 10, 1882, at Westfield Township, Bu- 
reau County, 111. Buried at Princeton, 111. 

Wm. Coddington. ..Dover, 111. Aug. 13, 1862. Wounded in battle, slightly, 

in the arm. May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. Pro- 
moted Corporal. Captured in battle Nov. 25, 1863, at 
Mission Ridge, Tenn. Died in prison May 18, 1864, 
at Andersonville, Ga. The number of his grave is 1198. 

William H. Cork.. Princeton, 111. Aug. 13, 1862. Mustered out June 23, 

1865. P. O., Princeton, 111. 

Christopher Craver. Walnut, 111. Aug. 13, 1862. Mustered out June 23, 

1865. P. O., Maywood, 111. Box 528. 

John H. Downer. ..Princeton, 111. Aug. 13, 1862. Absent, sick, at the date 

of the muster out of the regiment. P. O., Princeton, 
111. 

Patrick Dillon Bureau, 111. Aug. 13, 1862. Mustered out June 23, 

1865. 

Edward Doran Princeton, 111. Aug. 13, 1862. Wounded in battle, se- 
verely, in both hips. May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, 
Miss. Transferred to Inv. Corps Feb. 11, 1864. P. O., 
Ohio, III. 

Robert Davis Indiantown, 111. Aug. 13, 1862. Mustered out June 

^3, 1865. P. O., Chicago, III., 1664 Park avenue. 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 




PHINEAS T. RICHARDSON, Bec'ina Lieutenant, Company "I '' 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 




WILLIAM VAN RUFF, Se/gi 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 




FELIX LAUaHI.IN, ConipSBy "I.'' 



ROSTER OF NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 395 

George Waltf:rs Place not given. Aug. 13, 1862. Rejected by the mus- 
tering officer. 

Daniel Wolf Princeton, 111. Aug. 13, 1862. Promoted Corporal and 

Sergeant. Wounded in battle, slightly, in the arm, Oct. 
S, 1864, at Allatoona, Ga. Mustered out June 23, 1865. 
Died at Princeton, 111. Buried there. Da'.e of decease 
is unknown. 

Alvah M. Whit marsh. Princeton, 111. Aug. 13, 1862. Discharged July 

26, 1863, to be appointed Paymaster's Clerk. Died 
in July, 1863, at Cairo, 111., while en route for his home. 
Buried at Princeton, 111. Date of death is unknown. 

George W. Young.. Center, 111. Aug 13, 1862. Died Jan. 21, 1863, at Keo- 
kuk, Iowa. Buried there. 

William Young... Center, 111. Aug. 13, 1862. Transferred to Inv. Corps 

Feb. 15, 1864. P. O., Wyanet, 111. 

David Young Center, 111. Aug; 13, 1862. Mustered out June 23, 1865. 

Reported in Missouri. 

Recruits. 

Lewis Butterfield . Dover, 111. Feb. i, 1864. Died April 25, 1864, at 

Huntsville, Ala. Buried at Chattanooga, Tenn. 

George B. Blades.. Rock Island, 111. Oct. 4, 1864. Transferred to 40th 

Illinois V. V. Infantry June 18, 1865. P. O., Irwin, Iowa. 

Jacob Fox Peoria, 111. March 14, 1864. Transferred to 40th 

Illinois V. V. Infantry June 18, 1865. P. O., Princeton, 
111. 

Jasper N.KiTTERMAN. Princeton, 111. Feb. 2, 1864. Wounded in battle, 

slightly, in the breast, Oct. 5, 1864, at Allatoona, Ga. 
Transferred to 40th Illinois V. V. Infantry June 18, 
1865. P. O., Bradford, 111. 

John J. Knox Dover, 111. Feb. .20, 1864. Transferred to 40th Illi- 
nois V. V. Infantry June 18, 1865. P. O., Clearfield, 
Iowa. 

Orwin W. Merriam. Champaign, 111. Feb. 2, 1864. Transferred to 40th 

Illinois V. V. Infantry June 18, 1865. 

J 

♦Explanation : The first place given, in each case, was the residence at the date of enlist- 
ment, as shown on the Muster Roll. The first date given, in each case, is the date of enlistment. 
In all cases where it is not given, the present P. O. address is unknown. 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 




DAVID LI.OYD. Capiu 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 397 

SKETCH OF DAVID LLOYD, CAPTAIN, COMPANY " K." 

DAVID LLOYD, was born August 23d, 1810, at Springfield, 
Massachusetts. He was married to Eliza Seaver, October 9th, 
1833, and removed to Illinois in 1838. They had three sons and 
two daughters, viz.: D. H. Lloyd, of Champaign, Illinois, Mrs. 
Jennie Lees, of Attica, Kansas, J. H. Lloyd, of Milo, Missouri, who 
served in the Civil War as a member of the Fifty-Second Illinois, 
Mrs. Francis M. Herrick, of Princeton, Illinois, whose husband was 
also in the service, and George O. Lloyd, of Bloomington, Illinois. 

Captain Lloyd showed a military turn of mind during the 
earlier years of his life. He was for several years a member of the 
State Military Band, and captain of a militia company at Spring- 
field, Massachusetts. After coming to Illinois, he was active in all 
the musical and martial festivities of the early frontier settlements. 
His first business venture, in Illinois, was in company with a Mr. 
G. Bliss. They kept a small hotel, and cultivated a farm, for a year 
or two at Lamoille. Then Captain Lloyd kept a new hotel, built by 
Mr. Kendall. The operatives and passengers of the then celebrated 
Frank Walker & Co. stage line always stopped there. Some years 
later. Captain Lloyd and Mr. Hiram Johnson were in business 
together as brick masons and builders. They built some of the 
earlier brick residences of Princeton and vicinity, among others 
the homes of some of the Bryants and of Parker N. Newell. In 
1842, Captain Lloyd and a Mr. T. T. Thompson bought govern- 
ment lands together, a part of which afterward became the Lloyd 
homestead in Clarion township, southeast of Lamoille. In 1856, 
Captain Lloyd and Captain White of Princeton formed a partner- 
ship as contractors and builders. That firm built the present 
county jail, courthouse, American House, Presbyterian Church, 
Stevens home, and several buildings on Main Street, in Princeton, 
and also the schoolhouse at the railroad crossing east of Princeton. 
The firm was dissolved when Captain Lloyd entered the service in 
1862. Captain Lloyd was a very active man of affairs, and for many 
years was supervisor and justice of the peace for the town of 
Clarion. 

He was strongly identified with the Abolition Party, and such 
men as Owen Lovejoy, Caleb Cook, Seth C. Clapp and Deacon Hol- 
brook were quite frequently at his home. Mrs. Lloyd is still liv- 
ing, with her daughter, Mrs. Francis M. Herrick, at Princeton, Illi- 
nois, enjoying quite good health, and has clear recollections of the 
scenes and events of the past sixty years in Bureau County. 



398 HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 

Captain Lloyd, with the aid of his lieutenants, recruited Com- 
pany K of the Ninety-Third Regiment Illinois Volunteer Infantry 
in August, 1862, and was elected Captain of the company at the 
date of its organization, August 19th, 1862. He served continu- 
ously with the command until he was killed in battle, at Champion 
Hill, Mississippi, May i6th, 1863. His company was the extreme 
left of the right wing of the army, in that battle, and it was twice 
flanked and enfiladed by the enemy, and lost about one-half its 
entire membership present at the battle, in the short space of one 
hour. Neither he nor his company flinched for a single moment at 
any time during that terrific hour ,from the immense responsibility 
cast upon them by reason of their position in the battle. The cap- 
tain fell on the line, **with his face to the foe." His son, George, al- 
though then only sixteen years of age, was with his father in the 
service, and remained all night by the side of his father's dead body 
on the battlefield. Subsequently, the boy returned to his home 
with Major Fisher and Captain Crooker, of Mendota, Illinois, and 
soon after enlisted in the Fifty-Second Regiment of Illinois Volun- 
teer Infantry, and served until the close of the war. The body of 
Captain Lloyd was removed from the place of its first interment, at 
Champion Hill, and placed in Grave No. 4,314, in the National 
Cemetery at Vicksburg, Mississippi. And there he fills a hero's 
grave and rests in peace. 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 




CLAKK GRAY. Capli 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 401 



SKETCH OF CLASRK GRAY, CAPTAIN, COMPANY " K. 



It 



CLARK GRAY, in 1866, engaged in the mercantile and grain 
business at Arlington, Illinois. 

In 1868, he was elected clerk of the Circuit Court and ex-officio 
recorder of Bureau County, Illinois, and held the office four years. 

From 1873 ^o 1875, he was engaged in business at St. Louis, 
Missouri, from whence he returned to Princeton, Illinois, during 
the last of those years, and became cashier of the Farmers' National 
Bank at that place. 

In the fall of 1876, he removed to Chicago, Illinois, where, as 
part proprietor of the Clifton House, he remained two years, and 
then returned to Princeton. 

In 1883, he removed to Larned, Kansas, where for seven years 
he was president of the Larned State Bank, and afterward engaged 
in the practice of law. 

In 1893, he was elected grand commander of Knights Templar 
of Kansas by the grand commandery of that state. During the same 
year, he removed to Columbus, Nebraska, having been*elected cash- 
ier of the Commercial Bank of that city, and remained there until 
1895, when, on account of bronchial and lung troubles, he removed 
to Denver, Colorado, under advice of his physician. There he soon 
became interested in mines and mining stocks. 

In 1873, ^^ was married to Miss. Anna M. Cushman of Paw- 
tucket, Rhode Island, who, in 1885, died of consumption, at Aiken, 
South Carolina, to which place she had been taken by her husband 
in the hope that the genial air of that climate might stay the progress 
of the dread disease. 

In 1887, h^ was again married, to Miss. Elnora Martin of 
Rochester, New York, who continues to share his fortunes. 

His present address is Denver, Colorado, and at his home there 
all old friends and comrades will receive a hearty welcome. 



26 



402 HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 




HARRISON I. DAVIS, First Lleuteuaut, Company " K" 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 




JOHN H. DYB, First Sergeaiit. UOTapaay "K." 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILUNOIS. 




LOBDNZO D. HOPKINS. Compaoy "K." 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 405 



SKETCH OF LORENZO D. HOPKINS, PRIVATE, COMPANY " K. 



»f 



LORENZO D. HOPKINS, soon after the close of the war, 
became engaged in railroad service. He passed through all the 
different grades in the transportation department, to wit, brakeman, 
freight conductor, passenger conductor, trainmaster and division 
superintendent, to the position of superintendent, which he now 
holds. He has charge, as superintendent, of all the lines operated 
and controlled by the Missouri Pacific Railway Company in the 
state of Missouri. His headquarters and address are at Sedalia, 
Missouri. 



Mi HISTORY OF THE XIXETV-THIRD ILLINOIS. 




ROSTER OF NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 407 

Roster of Company K. 

Enrolled in Bureau County, Illinois. 

Organized August 19, 1862, at Princeton, Bureau County, Illinois. 

Mustered into Service October /j, 1862, at Chicago, Illinois* 
Captains. 

David Lloyd Clarion, 111. Commissioned to rank from Oct. 13, 1862. 

Mustered into service Oct. 13, 1862, at Chicago, 111. 
Killed in battle May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. 
Buried at Vicksburg, Miss. Grave No. 4314 in the Na- 
tional Cemetery. Of advanced years when he entered 
the army, he served his country with all the zeal of 
early manhood, and with unyielding courage died at 
his post, at a critical position and time in that battle, 
on the extreme left, and when the enemy, with four 
battle lines, were making a desperate effort to turn the 
left of the Federal line. He fought most heroically, 
and gave his life as a guaranty of victory. 

Clark Gray Westfield, 111. Commissioned First Lieutenant, of this 

company, to rank from Oct. 13, 1862. Mustered into 
service Oct. 13, 1862, at Chicago, 111. Commissioned 
Captain to rank from May 16, 1863. Mustered into 
service as such Sept. 2, 1863. Came out of the battle 
at Allatoona, Ga., Oct. 5, 1864, in command of the 
regiment. Served until the close of the war. Mus- 
tered out June 23, 1865, near Louisville, Ky., and paid 
off and finally discharged July 6, 1865, at Chicago, 111. 
See sketch of him ante. P. O., Denver, Colo. 

First Lieutenants. 

Clark Gray Westfield, 111. Commissioned to rank from Oct. 13, 

1862. Mustered into service Oct. 13, 1862, at Chicago, 
111. Dismissed the service and pay forfeited from Jan. 
14, 1863, hy the finding of a Court Martial convened 
Jan. 22, 1863, and the order of General McPherson 
made April 2, 1863. This finding and order were set 
aside and revoked, early in June, 1863, by President 
Lincoln. Lieutenant Gray was again commissioned, 
as First Lieutenant, to rank from April 3, 1863, and 
again mustered into service as such July 9, 1863. Pro- 
moted Captain Sept. 2, 1863. See that title. 

Harrison I. Davis. .Princeton, 111. Commissioned Second Lieutenant, of 

this company, to rank from Oct. 13, 1862. Mustered 
into service Oct. 13, 1862, at Chicago, 111. Commis- 
sioned as First Lieutenant to rank from May 16, 1863. 
Mustered into service as such Sept. 2, 1863. Served 
until the close of the war. Mustered out June 23, 
1865, near Louisville, Ky., and paid off and finally dis- 
charged July 6, 1865, at Chicago, 111. He was present 



408 ROSTER OF NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 

with the regiment in every battle and on every march 
in which the command participated. P. O., Grinnell, 
Iowa. 

Second Lieutenant. 

Harrison I. Davis. Princeton, 111. Commissioned to rank from Oct. 13, 

1862. Mustered into service Oct. 13, 1862, at Chicago, 
111. Promoted First Lieutenant Sept. 2, 1863. See 
that title. 

First Sergeant. 

Peter Bryant Princeton, 111. Aug. 15, 1862. Discharged for disa- 
bility Jan. 15, 1863. P. O., Holton, Kan. 

Sergeants. 

John H. Dye Walnut, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Promoted First Sergeant. 

Wounded in battle, slightly, in the ankle, Oct. 5, 1864, 
at Allatoona, Ga. Mustered out May 27, 1865. P. O., 
Walnut, 111. 

Newell A. Bacon. . Princeton, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Wounded in battle,. 

severely, in the shoulder. May 16, 1863, at Champion 
Hill, Miss. Transferred to Invalid Corps Jan. 15, 1864. 
P. O., Lincoln, Neb. 

Charles S. Clapp... Clarion, 111. Aug. 12, 1862. Mortally wounded in bat- 
tle, in the neck, May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. 
Died May 25, 1863. Buried at Vicksburg, Miss. 

William T. Griggs. Walnut, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Reduced to the ranks, at 

his own request. Mustered out June 23, 1865. Died 
in New Jersey. 

Corporals. 

Anson C. Taylor... Westfield, 111. Aug. 12, 1862. Captured by the enemy 

Jan. 13, 1863, while on a scout. Deserted Feb. 17, 1863. 

Reuben Graves Hall, 111. Aug. 13, 1862. Mustered out June 23, 1865. 

P. O., Peru, Neb. 

Albert Mason Princeton, 111. Aug. 13, 1862. Mortally wounded in 

battle, in the leg, leg amputated. May 16, 1863, at Cham- 
pion Hill, Miss. Died July 29, 1863, at Memphis, Tenn. 
Buried there. 

Samuel Wiley Westfield, 111. Aug. 12, 1862. Captured by the enemy 

Jan. 13, 1863, while on a scout. Promoted Sergeant. 
Mortally wounded in battle, through bowels, Nov. 25, 

1863, at Mission Ridge, Tenn. Died Nov. 29, 1863. 
Buried at Chattanooga, Tenn. 

Gilbert D. Jackson. Princeton, 111. Aug. 12, 1862. Transferred to Brigade 

Band March 4, 1863. Transferred to Invalid Corps 
Dec. 15, 1863. P- O., Joplin, Mo. 

NiRAM S. Wheeler. .Princeton, 111. Aug. 15, 1862. Reduced to the ranks. 

Discharged for disability Sept. 11, 1863. P. O., Cherry- 
vale, Kan. 



ROSTER OF NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 40^ 

Peter Pierson Princeton, 111. Aug. 13, 1862. Wounded in battle, se- 
verely, in the shoulder, May 16, 1863, at Champion 
Hill, Miss. Transferred to Invalid Corps Jan. 15, 1864. 
P. O., Princeton, 111. 

August Warner Princeton, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Mortally wounded in 

battle, in the abdomen. May 16, 1863, at Champion 
Hill, Miss. Died May 25, 1863. Buried at Vicksburg, 
Miss. 

Musicians. 

Andrew J. Snow.... Princeton, III. Aug. 14, 1862. Transferred to Inv. 

Corps Aug. I, 1863. P. O., Kearney, Neb. 

Samuel Patterson. Princeton, 111. Aug. 15, 1862. Mustered out June 23, 

1865. Dead, but the time and place of decease are 
unknown. 

Wagoner. 

Valorous H.Porter. Clarion, 111. Aug. 15, 1862. Mustered out June 23,. 

1865. P- O., Santa Barbara, Cal. 

Privates. 

Andrew Anderson. Princeton, 111. Aug. 13, 1862. Died Jan. 28, 1863. 

John Alm Princeton, III. Aug. 21, 1862. Mustered out June 23, 

1865. P. 0., Dover, 111. 

Martin B. Barrett. Leepertown, 111. Aug. 18, 1862. Mortally wounded 

in battle, in the shoulder. May 16, 1863, at Champion 
Hill, Miss. Died May 23, 1863. Buried at Vicksburg, 
Miss. 

Andrew Benson. ..Princeton, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Transferred to Invalid 

Corps Feb. 15, 1864. 

Edwin Berlin Hall, 111. Aug. 13, 1862. Wounded in battle May 16, 

1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. Transferred to Invalid 
Corps Feb. 15, 1864. P. O., London, Neb. 

James H. Brown. ..Selby, III. Aug. 15, 1862. Discharged for disability 

March 10, 1863. P. C, Holdredge, Neb. 

Charles Brady Princeton, 111. Aug. 21, 1862. Mustered out June 23,. 

1865. P. O., Amboy, 111. 

Hubbard Briggs. ..Princeton, 111. Aug. 15, 1862. Killed in battle Oct. 

5, 1864, at Allatoona, Ga. Buried at Marietta, Ga. 

Louis A. Brown Westfield, 111. Aug. 15, 1862. Mustered out June 23, 

1865. P. O., Wichita, Kan. 

Joseph R. Bruce. ...Walnut, 111. Aug. 21, 1862. Discharged for disability 

Jan. 12, 1863. 

Sylvester Bryner. Walnut, 111. Aug. 15, 1862. Promoted Corporal. Mus- 
tered out June 23, 1865. P. O., Roseville, 111. 

Peter Campbell. ..Princeton, 1111. Aug. 15, 1862. Wounded in battle, 

slightly, in the hand, Oct. 5, 1864, at Allatoona, Ga. 
Promoted Corporal. Mustered out June 23, 1865. 



410 ROSTER OF NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 

Died at Princeton, 111. Buried there. Date of decease 
is unknown. 

Geo. E. Conkling.. Lamoille, 111. Aug. 12, 1862. Died Aug. 7, 1863. 

John H. Conkling. Lamoille, 111. Aug. 12, 1862. Transferred to Invalid 

Corps Feb. 15, 1864. 

Thomas Craig Princeton, 111. Aug. 20, 1862. Captured in battle Nov. 

25, 1863, at Mission Ridge, Tenn. Died in prison 
Sept. 30, 1864, at Andersonville, Ga. The number 
of his grave is 10087. 

Andrew J. Dahlen. Princeton, 111. Aug. 15, 1862. Captured in battle May 

16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. Transferred to Vet- 
eran Reserve Corps Sept. 30, 1864. Died in Arispie 
Township, Bureau County, 111. Buried there. The 
date of decease is unknown. 

Isaiah B. Dewey. ..Ohio, 111. Aug. 15, 1862. Transferred to V. R. Corps 

Sept. 30, 1864. Died in Ohio, 111. Buried there. The 
date of decease is unknown. 

William DicKiNSONLamoille, 111. Aug. 12, 1862. Discharged for disa- 
bility Feb. 24, 1863. Died Jan. 21, 1894, at La Porte, 
Ind. Buried at Webster, S. D. 

Wm. W. DooLiTTLE.Princeton, 111. Aug. 15, 1862. Captured by the enemy 

Sept. 3, 1864, near Allatoona, Ga., while on a foraging 
expedition, under orders for that purpose. Mustered 
out June 23, 1865. Died June 30, 1881, at Hoxie, Texas. 
Buried there, in "Laws Chapel Cemetery." 

Maxim Dushim Westfield, 111. Aug. 13, 1862. Captured in battle May 

16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. Promoted Corporal 
and Sergeant. Mustered out June 23, 1865. P. O., 

Wilmette, 111. 

Daniel Fox Selby, 111. Aug. 18, 1862. Mustered out June 23, 1865. 

P. O., Lavacca, Neb. 

Nelson E. Fretdeuickson. Princeton, 111. Aug. 21, 1862. Mustered out 

June 23, 1865. Died at Princeton, 111. Buried there. 
Date of decease is unknown. 

James H. Frost Princeton, 111. Aug. 15, 1862. Mustered out June 23, 

1865. Died at Princeton, 111. Buried there. The date 
of decease is unknown. 

Charles Geske. .., .Princeton, 111. Aug. 15, 1862. Transferred to Invalid 

Corps Dec. 15, 1863. P. O., State Soldiers' Home, 
Fort Dodge, Kan. 

Howard D. Gibson. Clarion, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Promoted Corporal. 

Captured in battle Nov. 25, 1863, at Mission Ridge, 
Tenn. Died in prison May 27, 1864, at Andersonville, 
Ga. The number of his grave is 1416. 

James Gibson Clarion, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Captured in battle Oct. 

5, 1864, at Allatoona, Ga. Last heard from in prison 
at Andersonville, Ga. Death never reported. 



ROSTER OF NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 411 

Duncan GowER Lamoille, 111. Aug. i8, 1862. Killed in battle Nov. 

25, 1863, at Mission Ridge, Tenn. Buried at Chatta- 
nooga, Tenn. 

Thomas W. Griffin. Princeton, 111. Aug. 15, 1862. Discharged for disa- 
bility June 15, 1863. P. O., Princeton, 111. 

Jacob O. Hetherington. Clarion, 111. Aug. 12, 1862. Died Sept. 9, 1864. 

Charles E. Hart. Westfield, 111. Aug. 15, 1862. Killed in battle May 

16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. Buried at Vicks- 
burg. Miss. 

Pranklin HinMzVN. Princeton, 111. Aug. 21, 1862. Mortally wounded in 

battle, in the neck. May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, 
Miss. Died May 25, 1863. Buried at Vicksburg, Miss. 

JLorenzo D. Hopkins . Clarion, 111. Aug. 12, 1862. Captured by the enemy 

Sept. 3, 1864, i^car Allatoona, Ga., while on a foraging 
expedition, under orders for that purpose. A few days 
later, one dark night, he escaped from his guards, 
and returned to the command at Allatoona, Ga., trav- 
eling, for the most part, at night, a distance of nearly 
one hundred miles. Wounded in battle, slightly, in 
the forehead, Oct. 5, 1864, at Allatoona, Ga. Mus- 
tered out June 23, 1865. P. O., Sedalia, Mo. 

Chas. p. Johnson. ..Princeton, 111. Aug. 18, 1862. Captured in battle Oct. 

5, 1864, at Allatoona, Ga. Never heard from afterNvard. 
Supposed to have died in prison. 

John S. Johnson. ..Princeton, 111. Oct. 7, 1862. Wounded in battle, 

slightly, in the shoulder, and buckshot in the nose. 
May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. Wounded in 
battle, knocked senseless, by the explosion of a shell, 
Nov. 25, 1863, at Mission Ridge, Tenn. Injured June 
28, 1864, ankles bruised, in a collision on the railroad, 
near Dalton, Ga. Transferred to the Veteran Reserve 
Corps April i, 1865. 

Geo. E. Kennard.. Berlin, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Died July 10, 1863. 

Edward Killi an. ..Lamoille, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Injured June 28, 1864, 

ankles bruised, in a collision on the railroad, near 
Dalton, Ga. Captured in battle May 16, 1863, at Cham- 
pion Hill, Miss. Mustered out June 23, 1865. P. O., 
Cooper, Blaine County, Okla. 

Henry Kirby Ohio, Hi. Aug. 21, 1862. Wounded in battle, slightly, 

in the arm. May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. 
Transferred to Invalid Corps March 15, 1864. P. O., 
Gregory, Ala. 

Charles Koch Princeton, 111. Aug. 15, 1862. Died Jan. 14, 1863. 

James S. Martin. .. Princeton, 111. Aug. 15, 1862. Promoted Corporal 

and Sergeant and First Sergeant. Wounded in battle, 
severely, in the arm, May 14, 1863, at Jackson, Miss. 



412 ROSTER OF NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 

Transferred to Invalid Corps March 15, 1864. Died 
in Princeton, 111. Buried there. The date of decease 
is unknown. 

Isaac Martin Lamoille, 111. Aug. 15, 1862. Captured by the enemy 

Jan. 13, 1863, while on a scout. Killed in battle May 
16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. Buried at Vicksburg, 
Miss. 

Patrick McKlusky. Princeton, 111. Aug. 15, 1862. Wounded in battle, se- 
verely, in the thigh, Nov. 25, 1863, at Mission Ridge, 
Tenn. Mustered out June 23, 1865. P. O., Edgar, 
Neb. 

Joseph H. Monroe. Sclby, 111. Aug. 15, 1862. Discharged for disability 

April 14, 1863. 

John Nelson Walnut, 111. Aug. 15, 1862. Wounded in battle, 

slightly, in the face, May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, 
Miss. Promoted Corporal. Captured in battle Nov. 
25, 1863, at Mission Ridge, Tenn. Died in prison 
Sept. 22, 1864, at Andersonville, Ga. The number of 
his grave is 9531. 

Francis W. Norton. Princeton, 111. Aug. 15, 1862. Promoted Corporal 

and Sergeant. Wounded in battle, slightly, in the 
hand, Nov. 25, 1863, at Mission Ridge, Tenn. Mus- 
tered out June 23, 1865. P. O., Carleton, Neb. 

DusTiN Paige Princeton, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Mustered out June 2, 

1865. Died July 18, 1883, at Dover, 111. Buried at 
Princeton, 111. 

Lemuel Paine Princeton, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Promoted Corporal. 

Mustered out June 23, 1865. P. O., Streator, 111. 

J. C. Parsons Indiantown, 111. Aug. 15, 1862. Deserted Dec. 5, 1862. 

P. O., Oakland, Cal. 

Joseph Perkins. .. .Ohio, 111. Aug. 18, 1862. Promoted Corporal. Mus- 
tered out June 23, 1865. P. O., Van Orin, 111. 

Chas. M. Peterson. Princeton, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Died Feb. 9, 1863. 

Samuel Peter.son. .Princeton, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Mustered out June 23, 

1865. 

Edgar Phillips Princeton, 111. Aug. 15, 1862. Captured in battle Nov. 

25, 1863, at Mission Ridge, Tenn. Exchanged. Died 
Dec. 26, 1864, soon after he was exchanged. 

Martin V. Ravenscroft. Lamoille, 111. Aug. 12, 1862. Mustered out June 

23, 1865. 

Benton Ravenscroft. Lamoille, 111. Aug. 18, 1862. Rejected by the mus- 
tering officer. 

John Rawson Princeton, 111. Aug. 12, 1862. Died Jan. 21, 1863. 

JosiAH Rice Hall, Ifl. Aug. 13, 1862. Discharged for disability 

Aug. 6, 1863. 

Anton Schultze Princeton, 111. Aug. 15, 1862. Discharged for disa- 



ROSTER OF NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 413 

bility May i, 1865. Reported dead. Date and place 
of decease are unknown. 

Frank Scovill Princeton, 111. Aug. 15, 1862. Transferred to Com- 
pany C of this Regiment. See that Company. Mus- 
tered out May 31, 1865. Died Feb. 10, 1887, at Blains- 
burg, Iowa. Buried there. 

Charles W. ScuRR.Westfield, 111. Aug. 15, 1862. Killed in battle May 16, 

1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. Buried at Vicksburg, 
Miss. 

John Sharp Princeton, 111. Aug. 21, 1862. Promoted Corporal and 

Sergeant. Captured by the enemy Sept. 3, 1864, near 
Allatoona, Ga., while on a foraging expedition, under 
orders for that purpose. Mustered out June 29, 1865. 
P. O., Davenport, Iowa, 601 North street. 

Ends W. Smith Berlin, 111. Aug. 15, 1862. Mortally wounded in bat- 
tle Nov. 25, 1863, at Mission Ridge, Tenn. Died Jan. 
2, 1864, at Nashville, Tenn. Buried there. 

Thomas Smith Hall, 111. Aug. 15, 1862. Mortally wounded in battle. 

in side, May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. Died 
June 10, 1863. Buried at Vicksburg, Miss. 

James H. Spencer. .Westfield, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Deserted Dec. 5, 1863. 

Michael Sullivan. Lamoille, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Wounded in battle, se- 
verely, in the thigh, Nov. 25, 1863, at Mission Ridge, 
Tenn. Mustered out June 23, 1865. Died Aug. 22, 
1882, in the Soldiers* Home at Milwaukee, Wis. Bur- 
ied there. 

Chester Tracy Princeton, 111. Aug. 14, 1862. Wounded April 2, 1863, 

severely, in the right side, by a shot fired by a guerrilla, 
on the steamer 'Jesse K. Bell," while on the Yazoo 
Pass expedition and in the Yazoo Pass. He was the 
first man wounded in the regiment. Transferred to 
Invalid Corps Feb. 15, 1864. P. O., 83 Aberdeen street, 
Chicago, 111. 

Harvey M. Trimble . Princeton, 111. Aug. 21, 1862. Promoted Sergeant 

Major of the regiment Sept. 8, 1862. Promoted Ad- 
jutant of the regiment April 13, 1864. See those titles, 
and the sketch of him, ante. P. O., Princeton, 111. 

Albert M. Trimble. Princeton, 111. Aug. 15, 1862. Promoted Sergeant 

Major of the regiment July 11, 1864. See that title, and 
the sketch of him, ante. P. O., Lincoln, Neb. 

William H.Vallins. Princeton, 111. Aug. 20, 1862. Supposed to have been 

drowned March 3, 1863, by falling from a steamer into 
the Mississippi River, while en route, down said river, 
from Memphis, Tenn. Never heard from afterward. 

Hugh K. Vickroy.. Princeton, 111. Aug. 12, 1863. Promoted Corporal and 

Sergeant. Injured June 28, 1864, leg broken, in a col- 
lision on the railroad, near Dalton, Ga. Mustered out 



4U ROSTER OF NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 

June 23, 1865. P. O., No. 534 St. Paul avenue, Los 
Angeles, Cal. 

John S. Walquist.. Princeton, 111. Aug. 15, 1862. Killed in battle, May 

16, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. Buried at Vicks- 
burg, Miss. 

Harvey Ward Princeton, 111. Aug. 20, 1862. Wounded in battle, se- 
verely, in the foot, May 16, 1863, at Champion Hill, 
Miss. Transferred to V. R. Corps Jan. i, 1865. P. O., 
Santa Barbara, Cal. 

Noah Watson Walnut, 111. Aug. 15, 1862. Discharged for disability 

May 29, 1863. Died in 1863, at Walnut, 111. Bur- 
ied there. Date of decease is unknown. 

Jesse Wise Dover, 111. Aug. 18, 1862. Mustered out June 23, 1865. 

John Westman Princeton, 111. Aug. 15, 1862. Discharged for disabil- 
ity March 20, 1863. Died at Princeton, 111. Buried 
there. Date of decease is unknown. 

George W. White.. Princeton, 111. Aug. 15, 1862. Captured in battle Nov. 

25, 1863, at Mission Ridge, Tenn. Was in prison one 
year, at Andersonville, Ga. Mustered out May 20, 
1865. P. O., Princeton, 111. 

Svlvanus p. Whitehead. Berlin, 111. Aug. 21, 1862. Mortally injured, in- 
ternally, June 28, 1864, in a collision on the railroad, 
near Dalton, Ga. Died July 3, 1864. Buried at Chatta- 
nooga, Tenn. 

Amos N. Wilkinson . Bureau, 111. Aug. 21, 1862. Killed in battle May 16, 

1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. Buried at Vicksburg, 
Miss. 

Solomon Williams. Princeton, 111. Aug. 13, 1862. Captured in battle May 

]6, 1863, at Champion Hill, Miss. Wounded in battle, 
severely, in the right side, Oct. 5, 1864, at Allatoona, 
Ga. Mustered out June 23, 1865. P. O., Princeton, 111. 

Recruits. 

Michael Godfrey. .Peoria, 111. March 31, 1865. Discharged for disability 

June 10, 1865. 

Alonzo Lewis Princeton, 111. Feb. 20, 1864. Deserted June 15, 1864. 

William R. Queen. Allatoona, Ga. Aug. 24, 1864. Was a native of 

Georgia, and lived near Allatoona. He had served in 
the Confederate army, by compulsion, but, being a 
"Union man," had deserted that service, and enlisted 
in this Company. Killed in battle Oct. 5, 1864, at Alla- 
toona, Ga. Buried at Marietta, Ga. 

Under Cook of A. D. 

Abner Goodelow.. Place not given. March i, 1864. Deserted May i, 
1865. 

* Explanation : The first place given, in each case, was the residence at the date of enlist- ' 
ment, as shown by the Muster Roll. The first date given, in each case, is the date of enlist- 
ment. In all cases where it is not given, the present P. O. address is unknown. 



ROSTER OF NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 415 

Roster of Unassigned Recruits.* 

James Baker Limestone, 111. April ii, 1865. Record does not show 

what became of him. 

John Clemens Evans, 111. April 5, 1865. Record does ^ot show 

what became of him. 

Patrick Cody Limestone, 111. April 11, 1865. Record does not show 

what became of him. 

Thomas J. Clark... Limestone, 111. April 11, 1865. Record does not show 

what became of him. 

John Daugherty. ..Peoria, 111. March 9, 1865. Record does not show 

what became of him. 

Frank Edwards. .. .Evans, 111. April 5, 1865. Record does not show what 

became of him. 

John Foster Evans, 111. April 5, 1865. Record does not show what 

became of him. 

Frank Flynn Peoria, 111. March 9, 1865. Record does not show 

what became of him. 

George Flarington. Peoria, 111. March 29, 1865. Record does not show 

what became of him. 

John Higgins Limestone, 111. April 11, 1865. Record does not show 

what became of him. 

Thomas Hillyard.. Peoria, 111. March 22, 1865. Record does not show 

what became of him. 

Thomas Hickey. .. .Henry Co., 111. March 31, 1865. Record does not show 

what became of him. 

Frank Haman Evans, 111. April s, 1865. Record does not show 

what became of him. 

John R. Hasty Belleview, 111. Oct. 31, 1864. Record does not show 

what became of him. 

Daniel Harlan... .Belleview, 111. Oct. 31, 1864. Record does not show 

what became of him. 

William K. jENKiNsLimestone, 111. April 11, 1865. Record does not show 

what became of him. 

Isaac Jackson Peoria, 111. March 11, 1865. Record does not show 

what became of him. 

Thomas J. KiNDRED.Westfield, 111. March 28, 1865. Mustered out May 23, 

1865. 

Wm. E. Kindred... Westfield, 111. March 28, 1865. Mustered out May 11, 

1865. 

Patrick Kenafick. Stark Co., 111. March 31, 1865. Record does not show 

what became of him. 



416 ROSTER OF NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 

C. B. McLaughlin. Rock Island Co., 111. Oct. 4, 1864. Rejected. 

Patrick Mulcauy. .Limestone, 111. April 11, 1865. Record does not show 

what became of him. 

James McAuther... Evans, 111. April 5, 1865. Record does not show what 

became of him. 

James Morgan Peoria, 111. March 11, 1865. Record does not show 

what became of him. 

Patrick O'Brien... Peoria, 111. March 9, 1865. Record does not show 

what became of him. 

William Powers. ..Peoria, 111. March 9, 1865. Record does not show 

what became of him. 

Henry Shehan Henry Co., 111. March 31, 1865. Record does not 

show what became of him. 

John Shannon Place and date not given. Record does not show what 

became of him. 

James Welsh Limestone, 111. April 11, 1865. Record does not show 

what became of him. 

Alfred M. Walton. Belleview, 111. Oct. 31, 1864. Record does not show 

what became of him. 

Silas W. West Chicago, 111. March 19, 1864. Record does not show 

what became of him. 

Louis Zenowski.... Peoria, 111. March 23, 1865. Record does not show 

what became of him. 

^Explanation : The first place given, in each case, was the residence at the date of enlist- 
ment. The first date given, in each case, is the date of enlistment and muster into the service. 
The present P. O. address is not known in any case. It is probable that all these "tinassigned 
recruits," except the two mustered out and the one rejected, were transferred to the Fortieth 
Regiment Illinois Veteran Volunteer Infantry June i8, 1865, as was done in a namber of other 
cases. 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 




Major Geii. JOHN E. SMITH, ComniaDder M Dtv., I5th Army Corps. 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 




GEORGE 11. llOOMEn, (.■imiiniintlor 3d Brlgarte. 3U Dlv., IBIh Army (. 
KlllPt] nt Vlcksburg, MIsb., May ^. 1863. 



HISTORY OF THE NINETY-THIRD ILLINOIS. 




EmflfT 3d Brigade, 3il 1>1T„ IStb 
Ridge, Tend., November 25, 18*3. 



ADDENDA 



CIVILWARINTHE UNITED STATES 



D Recorc of Emo» 



S BSTWEEN THE TaOOPS 



SHOWING TOTAL*. LOSSES AND CASUALTIES IN EACH ENGAGEMENT. 



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INDEX. 



MAPS AND ILLUSTRATIONS. 

Frontispiece, Soldiers* Monument, Vicksburg, Miss i 

Battle Ground at Jackson, Miss 25 

Battlefield of Champion Hill, Miss 28 

Siege of Vicksburg, Miss 39 

Scenes at Vicksburg, Miss., three 43 

Army Operations, Atlanta Campaign 100 

Allatoona Heights and Pass, showing Western Fort 104 

Allatoona Pass in 1888, looking souih 105 

Battlefield of Allatoona, Ga 108% 

Allatoona Pass in 1888, looking north 130 



PORTRAITS. 



Abbott, Cyrus H 360 

Bahr, Geo. H 282 

Beale, William 387 

Boomer, George B 418 

Brown, William J 294 

Burch, George W 323 

Buswell, Nicholas C 236 

Childs, John H 283 

Clark, Mills C 379 

Coffee, Robert 300 

Cork, William H 387 

Coulter, Joseph M 279 

Daughenbaugh, Samuel M 348 

Davis, Harrison 1 402, 406 

Dean, Daniel R 406 

Dorr, Sanmel 248 

Dunbar, Aaron 276, 285 

Dyer, John 334 

Dyer, Sydney R 33^ 

Dye, John H ^03 

Eddy, Henry H 335 

Ellis, Jacob F 274 

Fisher, James M 238 

Frease, Hiram 285 

Geske, Charles 406 

Gesner, Louis B 285 

Gray, Clark 400 

Griffin, William F 300 

Haggerty, Thomas H 240 



Herrold, William M 332 

Hirth, Charles A 323 

Hite, Marion 280 

Hopkins, Lorenzo D 404 

Hosier, George ■ 406 

Hubbard, Isaac 387 

Hunter, David L 323 

Ilgen, Daniel G 349 

Jones, Edmund B 365 

Kerr, Robert 281 

Kinnan, Jacob S 380 

Kinney, William C 320 

Kinsman, James W 387 

Knoblaugh, John N 278 

Langston, Joseph 300 

Laughlin, Felix 386 

Lee, James W 270 

Leonard, Jonah F. R 300 

Limerick, Robert E ^85 

Lloyd, David 396 

Lockwood, Thomas J 298 

Lowrey, Gad C 362 

Lyman, Myron W 258, 285 

Matthias, Charles L 419 

Mclntire, Ezra 366 

McClaughlin, Joseph A 263 

Morris, William M 262 

Norton, Adam 364 

Norton, Francis W ^06 



428 



INDEX. 



Nye, William 323 

Ogan, Allen 273 

Phelps, Roger W 322 

Putnam, Holden 234 

Reel, Joseph P 346 

Richardson, Phinneas T 384 

Ruff, William V 385 

Russell, John A 358 

Sadler, George 369 

Sayers, Talbert 368 

Smith, John E 417 

Sparks, David W 242 



St. John, John M 323 

Taylor, Marcus B 256 

Trimble, Albert M 254 

Trimble, Harvey M 244 

Wetherell, Ralph T 284 

Wilder, William W 337 

Wilkinson, Lyman J 318 

Wilkinson, Orrin 316 

Wood, William H 387 

Wylie, Thompson M 382 

Youngson, William 296 



GENERAL INDEX. 

"A" Company 90, 92, 196, 215, 216, 217, 221, 224, 226, 231, 232, 233, 262-269 

Abbeville, Miss 17 

Abbott, Cyrus H 90, 360, 361, 370, 371 

Ackwoi th, Ga 97, 99, 138 

Adams, Robert A 339 

Address, sent home with flag 84-87 

Aiken, S. C 167 

Alabama River 93, 94 

Alexandria, Va 198 

Allaloona, Ga., and battle of 95, 96, 97, 99, 102, 104, 105, 138, 198, 209, 215 

Allaloona Creek, and Valley 102, 106 

Alleghany Mountains, Va 202 

Alston, S. C 17a 

Ancients 149 

Anderson's Creek, Ala 46 

Appomattox River, Va 196 

Aquia Creek, Va 198 

Arlcansas 12 

Arlington Heights, Va 198 

Ashbaugh, Lewis S 252, 264 

Atlanta, Ga 91, 97, 138, 139, 140 

Augusta, Ga 167 

Austin Creek, Va 198 

Aver\ sboro, X. C t8i, 182, 184 

*'B" Company 

88, 90, 97, 154, 165, 198, 215, 216, 217, 221, 224, 226, 231, 232, 233, 270-293 

Babcock, Nelson 97, 232 

Bahr, George H ' 282, 288 

Baker's Creek, Miss 27 

Balaklava 208 

Ball's Ferry. Ga 148 

Baltimoi e, Md 202 

Baltimore & Ohio Railroad 202 

Bamberg, S. C 167 

Barnes, Charles M 162, 252 



INDEX. 429 

Barracks burned ii 

Barri, T ii 

Bates' Ferry, S. C i68 

Battle of Jackson, Miss 25, 215 

Battle of Champion Hill, Miss 26, 215 

Battle, Charge, at Vicksburg, Miss 35, 215 

Battle of Mission Ridge, Tenn 53, 57, 60, 66, 69, 77, 81, 82, 215 

Battle of Allatoona, Ga 99, 215 

Battle of Savannah. Ga 151, 153, 154, 215 

Battle of Averysboro, N. C 182 

Battle of Bentonville, N. C 182, 183 

Battles of Civil War 421-426 

Battle Creek, Tenn 47 

Beale, William 387, 391 

Bear Creek, Miss 40 

Bear Creek, Ala n 46 

Beaufort, S. C 165 

Bellefonte, Ala 87, 89 

Benton's Corners, N. C 182 

Bentonville, N. C 182, 184 

Big Black River, Miss 24, 29, 35, 42, 44 

Big Raft Swamp, N. C 180 

Big Shanty, Ga 99, 108 

Binnakin's Bridge, S. C 167 

Black Creek, S. C 178 

Blackville, S. C 167 

Blades, George B 216, 269, 395 

Blockade ran, at Vicksburg, Miss 22 

Blockade runner captured 162 

Boardman, Mary A., steamer 164 

Bolton, Miss 44 

Boomer, George B , 15, 37, 418 

Bowling Green, Va 197 

Bradshaw Creek, Tenn 46 

"Brave Six Hundred" 208 

Bridgeport, Ala 47, 84, 87, 88 

Brier Creek, Ga 147 

Brown, William J 138, 162, 227, 294, 295, 301 

Brownsboro, Ala 89 

Brownsville, Ala 87 

Buford's Bridge, S. C ' 166 

Burch, George W , 97, 232, 323, 326 

Bureau County Rifles, Co. B ; . . 8 

Bureau County Tigers, Co. H 8 

Burial of dead 125, 131 

Burning of Columbia, S. C 170 

Burnsville, Miss 46 

Buswell, Nicholas C 8, 9, 19, 82, 91, 92, 93, 138, 236, 237, 250 

Byhalia, Miss 14, 17 



430 INDEX. 

"C ' Company 90, 215, 216, 218, 222, 224, 227, 231, 232. 233, 294-307 

Cairo, 111 11 

Caldwell Ford, Ga go 

Camden, S. C 174 

Camp Bureau 8 

Camp Douglass 10, 204 

Camp Putnam 11 

Cape Fear River, N. C 181 

Carolinas. Campaign of 162, 164 

Cartersville, Ga 95, 103 

Cassville. Ga 90, 91 

Castle Thunder, Va 197 

Casualties 19. 89. 97. 205, 206, 207, 208, 215, 216, 217-225, 226-233, 421-426 

Catawba River, S. C 174, 175 

Cedar Creek, N. C 195 

Champion Hill, Miss 26, 42, 44. 209, 215 

Chapter I, Organization and Movements to the Field 7-13 

** II, The Campaign in Northern Mississippi 14-18 

** III, The Yazoo Pass Expedition 19-21 

IV, The Vicksburg Campaign and Battles 22-45 

" V, The Chattanooga Campaign and Battles 46-85 

" VI, After Chattanooga Campaign, before Allatoona 86-98 

VII, Battle of Allatoona, Ga 99-130 

VIII, After the Battle of Allatoona Ga 131-138 

IX, The Georgia Campaign — "March to the Sea" 139-161 

X, The Campaign of the Carolinas 162-186 

" XI, General Johnston's Surrender 187-194 

" XII, The Home-ward March — Grand Review 195-201 

" XIII, The End ' 202-209 

" XIV, Farewell Orders 210-214 

Charleston, S. C 165, 180 

Charlotte, N. C 174 

Chattahoochie River 99, 138 

Chattanooga, Tenn 44, 46, 87, 88, 89 

Cheat Mountain, Va 203 

Cheat River, Va 203 

Cheraw, S. C 175, 178, 180 

Chicago, 111 10, 11,204 

Chickahominy River, Va 197 

Chickamauga Creeks, North and South 51, 52, 53, 60 

Chickamauga, Tenn 62, 79 

Chickasaw Landing, Ala 46 

Childs, John H 283, 293 

Christmas Gift 156 

Chulahoma, Miss 14 

Cincinnati, Ohio 203 

Citico Creek, Tenn 52 

Civil War, Battles of 421-426 

Clark, Mills C 230, 379, 388, 389 



<< 

<< 



ADDENDA 



CIVIL WAR IN THE UNITED STATES 

A ChBONOLOOICAI. SUMM1.RV AND RECORD OF ENCACEMENTS BETWEEN THE TROOPS 



SHOWING TOTAL. LOSSES AND CASUALTIES IN EACH ENGAGEMENT. 



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432 INDEX. 

Distances 13, 18, 20, 45, 83, 98, 138, 156, 185, 194, 199, 204, 205 

Dixon's Station, Ala 46 

Donaldson, Army-tug 181 

Doolittle, William W 97, 233, 410 

Dorr, Samuel 216, 248, 249, 251,370 

Double Bridge, Va 195 

Dumfries. Va 198 

Dunbar, Aaron 276, 2^7, 285, 289 

Dye, John If 403, 408 

Dyer, John 334, 338 

Dyer, Sydney R 336, 340 

"E" Company 90, 97, 215, 216, 218, 222, 224, 228, 231, 232, 233, 316-330 

Eatonton. Ga 146 

Eddy, Henry H 335, 339 

Eden, Ga 150 

Edisto Rivers, South and North 166, 167, 168 

Edward's Station, Miss 27 ^ 44 

Elk River, Tenn 46 

Ella Faber, steamer 203 

Ellis, Jacob F 274,275, 289 

Emanuel County, Ga 148, 149 

Emerald, steamer 12 

End, The 202 

Etowah River, Ga 90, 91, 92 

Euharlee, Ga 91 

Euharlee Creek, Ga 92, 93 

"F"' Company 90, 154, 215, 216, 219, 222, 225, 228, 231, 233, 331-345 

Falling Creek, N. C • 182, 185 

Farewell Orders 210-214 

Farragut's fleet 94 

Fatalities 206, 207, 2c8, 215, 216, 217-225, 232, 421-426 

Fayetteville, Tenn 46 

Fayetteville, N. C 180, 181 

Field and Staff 215, 216, 234-253 

Fisher, Ellis 388 

Fisher, James M 8, 9, 92, 109, 114, 118, 124, 162, 226, 238, 239, 250 

Fisk's Plantation 23 

Flag riddled 77 

Flag sent home 84-87 

Flat Rock, S. C 174 

Flint, Sergeant Major, Poem by 129 

Florence, Ala 46 

Florence, S. C 178 

Food given Confederates 42 

Foragers and foraging 160, 166, 174, 175, 176, 177 

Ford, Rufus H 178, 229, 370, 371 

Fort Darling, Va 196 

Fort McAllister, Ga 153, 154 

Fort Robinson, Va 196 



INDEX. 433 

Fourteen Mile Creek, Miss 24, 29 

Fox Creek, Ga 103 

Fox, Moses 97, 232 

Frease, Hiram 285, 289 

Fredericksburg, Va 198 

French Broad River, S. C 169, 170 

Fullington, Edwin R 116 

"G" Company 90, 173, 215, 216, 219, 223, 225, 229, 231, 232, 233, 346-357 

Garwood, William L 227, 233, 301, 302 

General Summary 216 

Georgia Campaign, and Orders for same 139, 141, 142 

Georgia Central Railroad 146, 148, 152 

Germantbwn, Tenn 18 

Geske, Charles 406, 410 

Gesner, Louis B 285, 290 

Gilbertsboro, Tenn 46 

Gillem's Bridge, Ga 90, 91, 92, 93 

Glendale, Miss 46 

Goddard, Alpheus P 308 

Goldsboro, N. C 164, 181, 182, 183, 185, 186, 188 

Gordon, Ga 146 

Grafton, W. Va 203 

Graham, S. C 167 

Grand Lake, Ark 19 

Grand Review 198, 199 

Grant, U. S 213 

Gravel Springs, Ala 46 

Gray, Clark 90, 124, 400, 401, 407 

Grayson, Ga 83 

Great Pedee River, S. C 178, 180 

Greenwood, Miss " 20 

Griffin, William F 300, 339 

Griswold, Charles A 252 

Griswoldsville, Ga 146 

Gulf Railroad, Ga 150, 154, 155 

"H" Company. . . .88, 90, 154, 178, 215, 216, 220, 223, 225, 229, 231, 233, 358-377 

Haggerty, Thomas H 9, 240, 241, 252 

Hamilton, Joseph 177, 392 

Hanging Rock, S. C 174 

Hanover Courthouse, Va 197 

Hard Times Landing, La 23 

Harper's Ferry, Va 202 

Hartsough, George W 350 

Headquarters 106 

Hebron, Ga 151 

"Hee o' hee" 180 

Helena, Ark 19, 22, 44 

Henry Von Phul, steamer 19 

Herrold, William M 9, 216, 259, 332, 333, 338 

28 



434 INDEX. 

Hickory Hill, S. C i66 

Hicks, Henry G 226, 251 

Hillsboro, Ga 145 

Hilton's Bridge, N. C 189 

Hirth, Charles A 323, 325 

Hite, Marion 97, 198, 232, 280, 290 

*'Hold the Fort" '.99-101 

Holly Springs, Miss 16 

Home-ward march 193, 195, 204 

Honor, Roll of 217-225 

Hopkins, Samuel A 9, 252 

Hopkins, John W 231, 286 

Hopkins, Leroy S 9, 216, 226, 260; 286, 287 

Hopkins, Lorenzo D., and his escape 97, 233, 404, 405, 411 

Hosier, George 392, 406 

Houck, Jacob 17, 232, 302 

Hubbard, Isaac 387, 392 

Human skulls 196 

Hunter, David L 323, 327 

Huntsville, Ala 87, 88 

Hurricane Creek, Miss 15 

Huyett, Joseph 10, 252 

"r* Company 19. 90, 97, I77, 215, 216, 220, 223, 225, 230, 233, 379, 395 

Ilgen, Daniel G 349 

Irey, John F 154, 287 

Irwin's Cross Roads, Ga 147 

Irwinton, Ga 147 

Island Ford, Ga 90, 91 

luka, Miss 46 

Jackson, Miss., Battle of, etc 25, 42, 44, 209, 215 

Jackson, Ga 145 

Jackson's Cross Roads, N. C 182 

James River, Va 197 

Jesse K. Bell, steamer 20 

Johnson, Edward S 8, 9, 251 

Johnston's, General, surrender 187 

Jones, Edmund B 365, 372 

Jubilee 41 

"K" Company. .19, 31, 90, 97, 215, 216, 220, 223, 225, 230, 231, 232, 233, 396-414 

Kane Creek, Tenn 46 

Keily's Bridge, S. C 178 

Kenesaw Mountain 99, ic8 

Kerr, Robert 281, 291 

Kilpatrick, General, surprised 180 

Kingston, Ga 90, 91, 92, 93 

Kinnan, Jacob S 380, 381, 388, 389 

Kinney, William C no, 320, 321, 324 

Kinsman, James W 387, 392 

Kleckner, George S 227, 308 



ADDENDA 



CIVILWARINTHE UNITED STATES 

A Chronolocical Summary and Record of Ehoacements Between the Troops 



SHOWING TOTAL', LOSSES AND CASUALTIES IN EACH ENGAGEMENT. 




436 INDEX. 

Massaponax Creek, Va 197 

Mattapony River, Va 197 

Matthias, Charles L 47, 419 

McAllister, Fort, Ga 153, 154 

McBrideville, S. C 166 

McCairs Plantation, Miss.- 40 

McCloud's Plantation, N. C 180 

McConnell, George B., and his escape 92, 93, 232, 267 

McDonald, Samuel F 264 

McDonough, Ga 145 

Mclntire, Ezra 366, 375 

McClaughlin, Joseph A 263, 267 

McPherson's, General, congratulatory order 41, 91 

McPhersonville, S. C 165 

Meherrin River, Va 195 

Membership 11, 205, 215, 216 

Memphis, Tenn 12, 17, 19, 44 

Menelaus, George 97, 198, 232 

Merkerson's Ford, Ga 91 

Mexico and Maximilian 194 

Mill Creek, N. C 185 

Milledgeville, Ga 146, 147 

Millen, Ga 147, 151 

Milliken's Bend, La 22 

Miller's Station, or Plantation, Ga 154 

Mission Ridge, Tenn., Battle of, etc. .52, 53, 57, 60, 66, 69, 77, 81, 82, 209, 215 

Mobile Bay, Ala 94 

Moon Lake, Miss 20 

Morehead City, N. C 186, 192 

Mooreville, Ala . . : 87 

Morris, William M 196, 231, 262, 264 

Mount Vernon, Va 198 

Muddy Springs, S. C 174 

Mush Hill, Miss 15 

Mustered into service 11 

Mustered out of service 204 

Names of Companies, when organized 8 

Neflf, Ezekiel G. . : 389, 390 

Nelson's Post Office, N. C 180 

Neuse Mills, N. C 189 

Neuse River, N. C 185, 195 

New Albany, Ind 204 

Newbern, N. C .* 181, 186 

Newcomer, James W 216, 259, 308 

New Orleans, La 95 

Night after battle 131 

No. 9, Ga 148 

Non-Commissioned Staff 215, 216, 254-261 

North Edisto River, S. C 168 





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INDEX. 



Nye, William 323 

Ogan, Allen 273 

Phelps, Roger W 322 

Putnam, Holden 234 

Reel, Joseph P 346 

Richardson, Phinneas T 384 

Ruff, William V 385 

Russell, John A 358 

Sadler, George 369 

Sayers, Talbert 368 

Smith, John E 417 

Sparks, David W 242 



St. John, John M 323 

Taylor, Marcus B 256 

Trimble, Albert M 254 

Trimble, Harvey M 244 

Wetherell, Ralph T 284 

Wilder, William W 337 

Wilkinson, Lyman J 318 

Wilkinson, Orrin 316 

Wood, William H 387 

Wylie, Thompson M 382 

Youngson, William 296 



GENERAL INDEX. 

"A" Company 90, 92, 196, 215, 216, 217, 221, 224, 226, 231, 232, 233, 262-269 

Abbeville, Miss 17 

Abbott, Cyrus H 90, 360, 361, 370, 371 

Ackworth, Ga 97, 99, 138 

Adams, Robert A 339 

Address, sent home with flag 84-87 

Aiken, S. C 167 

Alabama River 93, 94 

Alexandria, Va 198 

AUatoona. Ga., and battle of 95, 96, 97, 99, 102, 104, 105, 138, 198, 209, 215 

Allaloona Creek, and Valley 102, 106 

Alleghany Mountains, Va 202 

Alston, S. C 17a 

Ancients 149 

Anderson's Creek, Ala 46 

Appomattox River, Va 196 

Aquia Creek, Va 198 

Arlcansas 12 

Arlington Heights, Va 198 

Ashbaugh, Lewis S 252, 264 

Atlanta, Ga 91, 97, 138, 139, 140 

Augusta, Ga 167 

Austin Creek, Va 198 

Averysboro, N. C t8i, 182, 184 

**B" Company 

88, 90, 97, 154, 165, 198, 215, 216, 217, 221, 224, 226, 231, 232, 233, 270-293 

Babcock, Nelson 97, 232 

Bahr, George H - 282, 288 

Baker's Creek, Miss 27 

Balaklava 208 

Ball's Ferry, Ga 148 

Baltimoie, Md 202 

Baltimore & Ohio Railroad 202 

Bamberg, S. C 167 

Barnes, Charles M 162, 252 



INDEX. 429 

Barracks burned 1 1 

Barri, T ii 

Bates' Ferry, S. C i68 

Battle of Jackson, Miss 25, 215 

Battle of Champion Hill, Miss 26, 215 

Battle, Charge, at Vicksburg, Miss 35, 215 

Battle of Mission Ridge, Tenn 53, 57, 60, ^, 69, yy, 81, 82, 215 

Battle of Allatoona, Ga 99, 215 

Battle of Savannah. Ga 151, 153. 154, 215 

Battle of Averysboro, N. C 182 

Battle of Bentonville, N. C 182, 183 

Battles of Civil War 421-426 

Battle Creek, Tenn 47 

Beale, William 387, 391 

Bear Creek, Miss 40 

Bear Creek, Ala n 46 

Beaufort, S. C 165 

Bellefonte, Ala 87, 89 

Benton's Corners, N. C 182 

Bentonville, N. C 182, 184 

Big Black River, Miss 24, 29, 35, 42, 44 

Big Raft Swamp, N. C 180 

Big Shanty, Ga 99, 108 

Binnakin's Bridge, S. C 167 

Black Creek, S. C 178 

Blackville, S. C 167 

Blades, George B 216, 269, 395 

Blockade ran, at Vicksburg, Miss 22 

Blockade runner captured 162 

Boardman, Mary A., steamer 164 

Bolton, Miss 44 

Boomer, George B , 15, 37, 41S 

Bowling Green, Va 197 

Bradshaw Creek, Tenn 46 

^'Brave Six Hundred" 208 

Bridgeport, Ala 47, 84, 87, 88 

Brier Creek, Ga 147 

Brown, William J. 138, 162, 227, 294, 295, 301 

Brov/nsboro, Ala 89 

Brownsville, Ala 87 

Buford's Bridge, S. C 166 

Burch, George W 97, 232, 323, 326 

Bureau County Rifles, Co. B ; . . 8 

Bureau County Tigers, Co. H 8 

Burial of dead 125, 131 

Burning of Columbia, S. C 170 

Burnsville, Miss 46 

Buswell, Nicholas C 8, 9, 19, 82, 91, 92, 93, 138, 236, 237, 250 

Byhalia, Miss 14, 17 



430 INDEX. 

"C" Company 90, 215, 216, 218, 222, 224, 227, 231, 232, 233, 294-307 

Cairo, 111 11 

Caldwell Ford, Ga 90 

Camden, S. C 174 

Camp Bureau 8 

Camp Douglass 10, 204 

Camp Putnam 11 

Cape Fear River, N. C 181 

Carolinas, Campaign of 162, 164 

Cartersville, Ga 95, 103 

Cassville. Ga 90, 91 

Castle Thunder, Va 197 

Casualties 19, 89, 97. 205, 206, 207, 208, 215, 216, 217-225, 226-233, 421-426 

Catawba River, S. C 174, 175 

Cedar Creek, N. C 195 

Champion Hill, Miss 26, 42, 44, 209, 215 

Chapter I, Organization and Movements to the Field 7-13 

II, The Campaign in Northern Mississippi 14-18 

III, The Yazoo Pass Expedition I9-2E 

IV, The Vicksburg Campaign and Battles 22-45 

V, The Chattanooga Campaign and Battles 46-85 

VI, After Chattanooga Campaign, before Allatoona 86-98 

VII, Battle of Allatoona, Ga 99-130 

VIII, After the Battle of Allatoona Ga 131-138 

IX, The Georgia Campaign — "March to the Sea" 139-161 

X, The Campaign of the Carolinas 162-186 

XI, General Johnston's Surrender 187-194 

XII, The Home-ward March — Grand Review 195-201 

XIII, The End ' 202-209 

XIV, Farewell Orders 210-214 

Charleston, S. C 165, 180 

Charlotte, N. C 174 

Chattahoochie River 99, 138 

Chattanooga, Tenn 44, 46, 87, 88, 89 

Cheat Mountain, Va 203 

Cheat River, Va 203 

Cheraw, S. C 175, 178, 180 

Chicago, 111 10. 11,204 

Chickahominy River, Va 197 

Chickamauga Creeks, North and South 51, 52, 53, 60 

Chickamauga, Tenn 62, 79 

Chickasaw Landing, Ala 46 

Childs, John H 283, 293 

Christmas Gift 156 

Chulahoma, Miss 14 

Cincinnati, Ohio 203 

Citico Creek, Tenn 52 

Civil War, Battles of 421-426 

Clark, Mills C 230, 379, 388, 389 



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INDEX. 433 

Fourteen Mile Creek, Miss 24, 29 

Fox Creek, Ga 103 

Fox, Moses 97, 232 

Frease, Hiram 285, 289 

Fredericksburg, Va 198 

French Broad River, S. C 169, 170 

Fullington, Edwin R 116 

"G" Company 90, 173, 215, 216, 219, 223, 225, 229, 231, 232, 233, 346-357 

Garwood, William L , 227, 233, 301, 302 

General Summary 216 

Georgia Campaign, and Orders for same 139, 141, 142 

Georgia Central Railroad 146, 148, 152 

Germantbwn, Tenn 18 

Geske, Charles 406, 410 

Gesner, Louis B 285, 290 

Gilbertsboro, Tenn 46 

Gillem's Bridge, Ga 90, 91, 92, 93 

Glendale, Miss 46 

Goddard, Alpheus P 308 

Goldsboro, N. C 164, 181, 182, 183, 185, 186, 188 

Gordon, Ga 146 

Grafton, W. Va 203 

Graham, S. C 167 

Grand Lake, Ark 19 

Grand Review 198, 199 

Grant, U. S 213 

Gravel Springs, Ala 46 

Gray, Clark 90, 124, 400, 401, 407 

Grayson, Ga 83 

Great Pedee River, S. C 178, 180 

Greenwood, Miss " 20 

Griffin, William F 300, 339 

Griswold, Charles A 252 

Griswoldsville, Ga 146 

Gulf Railroad, Ga 150, 154, 155 

"H'' Company. . . .88, 90, 154, 178, 215, 216, 220, 223, 225, 229, 231, 233, 358-377 

Haggerty, Thomas H 9, 240, 241, 252 

Hamilton, Joseph 177, 392 

Hanging Rock, S. C 174 

Hanover Courthouse, Va 197 

Hard Times Landing, La 23 

Harper's Ferr3% Va 202 

Hartsough, George W 350 

Headquarters 106 

Hebron, Ga 151 

"Hee o' hee" 180 

Helena, Ark : 19, 22, 44 

Henry Von Phul, steamer 19 

Herrold, William M 9, 216, 259, 332, 333, 338 

28 



432 INDEX. 

Distances 13, 18, 20, 45» 83. 98, 138, 156, 185, 194, 199, 204, 205 

Dixon's Station, Ala 46 

Donaldson, Army-tug 181 

Doolittle. William W 97, 233, 410 

Dorr, Samuel 216, 248, 249, 251, 370 

Double Bridge, Va 195 

Dumfries, Va 198 

Dunbar. Aaron 276, 2TJ, 285, 289 

Dye, John If 403, 408 

Dyer, John 334, 338 

Dyer, Sydney R 336, 340 

"E" Company 90, 97, 215. 216, 218, 222, 224, 228, 231, 232, 233, 316-330 

Eatonton. Ga 146 

Eddy, Henry H 335, 339 

Eden, Ga 150 

Edisto Rivers, South and North 166, 167, 168 

Edward's Station. Miss 27, 44 

Elk River, Tenn 46 

Ella Faber, steamer 203 

Ellis, Jacob F 274,275, 289 

Emanuel County, Ga 148, 149 

Emerald, steamer 12 

End, The 202 

Etowah River, Ga 90, 91, 92 

Euharlee, Ga 91 

Euharlee Creek, Ga 92, 93 

*'F*' Company 90, 154, 215, 216, 219, 222, 225, 228, 231, 233, 331-345 

Falling Creek, N. C * 182, 185 

Farewell Orders 210-214 

Farragut's fleet 94 

Fatalities 206, 207, 2c8, 215, 216, 217-225, 232, 421-426 

Fayetteville, Tenn 46 

Fayetteville, N. C 180, 181 

Field and Staff 215, 216, 234-253 

Fisher, Ellis 388 

Fisher, James M 8, 9, 92, 109, 114, 118, 124, 162, 226, 238, 239, 250 

Fisk's Plantation 23 

Flag riddled yy 

Flag sent home 84-87 

Flat Rock, S. C 174 

Flint, Sergeant Major, Poem by 129 

Florence, Ala 46 

Florence, S. C 178 

Food given Confederates 42 

Foragers and foraging 160, 166, 174, 175, 176, 177 

Ford, Rufus H 178, 229, 370, 371 

Fort Darling, Va 196 

P'ort McAllister, Ga 153, 154 

Fort Robinson, Va 196 



INDEX. 433 

Fourteen Mile Creek, Miss 24, 29 

Fox Creek, Ga 103 

Fox, Moses 97, 232 

Frease, Hiram 285, 289 

Fredericksburg, Va 198 

French Broad River, S. C 169, 170 

Fullington, Edwin R 116 

"G" Company 90, 173, 215, 216, 219, 223, 225, 229, 231, 232, 233, 346-357 

Garwood, William L 227, 233, 301, 302 

General Summary 216 

Georgia Campaign, and Orders for same 139, 141, 142 

Georgia Central Railroad 146, 148, 152 

Germantbwn, Tenn 18 

Geske, Charles 406, 410 

Gesner, Louis B 285, 290 

Gilbertsboro, Tenn 46 

Gillem's Bridge, Ga 90, 91, 92. 93 

Glendale, Miss 46 

Goddard, Alpheus P 308 

Goldsboro, N. C 164, 181, 182, 183, 185, 186, 188 

Gordon, Ga 146 

Grafton, W. Va 203 

Graham, S. C 167 

Grand Lake, Ark 19 

Grand Review 198, 199 

Grant, U. S 213 

Gravel Springs, Ala 46 

Gray, Clark 90, 124, 400, 401, 407 

Grayson, Ga 83 

Great Pedee River, S. C 178, 180 

Greenwood, Miss ' 20 

Griffin, William F 300, 339 

Griswold, Charles A 252 

Griswoldsville, Ga 146 

Gulf Railroad, Ga 150, 154, 155 

"H" Company. . . .88, 90, 154, 178, 215, 216, 220, 223, 225, 229, 231, 233, 358-377 

Haggerty, Thomas H 9, 240, 241, 252 

Hamilton, Joseph 177, 392 

Hanging Rock, S. C 174 

Hanover Courthouse, Va 197 

Hard Times Landing, La 23 

Harper's Ferr3% Va 202 

Hartsough, George W 350 

Headquarters 106 

Hebron, Ga 151 

"Hee o' hee" 180 

Helena, Ark 19, 22, 44 

Henry Von Phul, steamer 19 

Herrold, William M 9, 216, 259, 332, 333, 338 

28 



434 INDEX. 

Hickory Hill, S. C i66 

Hicks, Henry G 226, 251 

Hillsboro, Ga 145 

Hilton's Bridge, N. C 189 

Hirth, Charles A 323, 325 

Hite, Marion 97, 198, 232, 280, 290 

"Hold the Fort" tgg-ioi 

Holly Springs, Miss 16 

Home- ward march 193, 195, 204 

Honor, Roll of 217-225 

Hopkins, Samuel A 9, 252 

Hopkins, John W 231, 286 

Hopkins, Leroy S 9, 216, 226, 260; 286, 287 

Hopkins, Lorenzo D., and his escape 97, 233, 404, 405, 411 

Hosier, George 392, 406 

Houck, Jacob 17, 232, 302 

Hubbard, Isaac 387, 392 

Human skulls 196 

Hunter, David L 323, 327 

Huntsville, Ala 87, 88 

Hurricane Creek, Miss 15 

Huyett, Joseph 10, 252 

"r* Company 19, 90, 97, 177, 215, 216, 220, 223, 225, 230, 233, 379, 395 

Ilgen. Daniel G 349 

Irey, John F 154, 287 

Irvvin*s Cross Roads, Ga 147 

Irwinton, Ga 147 

Island Ford, Ga 90, 91 

luka. Miss 46 

Jackson, Miss., Battle of, etc 25, 42, 44, 209, 215 

Jackson, Ga 145 

Jackson's Cross Roads, N. C 182 

James River, Va 197 

Jesse K. Bell, steamer 20 

Johnson, Edward S 8, 9, 251 

Johnston's, General, surrender 187 

Jones, Edmund B 365, 372 

Jubilee 41 

"K" Company. .19, 31, 90, 97, 215, 216, 220, 223, 225, 230, 231, 232, 233, 396-414 

Kane Creek, Tenn 46 

Keily's Bridge, S. C 178 

Kenesaw Mountain 99, ic8 

Kerr, Robert 281, 291 

Kilpatrick, General, surprised 180 

Kingston, Ga 90, 91, 92, 93 

Kinnan, Jacob S 380, 381, 388, 389 

Kinney, William C no, 320, 321, 324 

Kinsman, James W 387, 392 

Kleckner, George S 227, 308 



/• 



436 INDEX. 

Massaponax Creek, Va 197 

Mattapony River, Va 197 

Matthias, Charles L 47, 419 

McAllister, Fort, Ga 153, 154 

McBrideville, S. C 166 

McCairs Plantation, Miss .• 40 

McCloud's Plantation, N. C 180 

McConnell, George B., and his escape 92, 93, 232, 267 

McDonald, Samuel F 264 

McDonough, Ga 145 

Mclntire, Ezra 366, 375 

McClaughlin, Joseph A 263, 267 

McPherson's, General, congratulatory order 41, 91 

McPherson ville, S. C 165 

Meherrin River, Va 195 

Membership 11, 205, 215, 216 

Memphis, Tenn 12, 17, 19, 44 

Menelaus, George 97, 198, 232 

Merkerson's Ford, Ga 91 

Mexico and Maximilian 194 

Mill Creek, N. C 185 

Milledgeville, Ga 146, 147 

Millen, Ga 147, 151 

Milliken's Bend, La 22 

Miller's Station, or Plantation, Ga 154 

Mission Ridge, Tenn., Battle of, etc. .52, 53, 57, 60, 66, 69, yy, 81, 82, 209, 215 

Mobile Bay, Ala 94 

Moon Lake, Miss 20 

Morehead City, N. C 186, 192 

Mooreville, Ala . , : 87 

Morris, William M 196, 231, 262, 264 

Mount Vernon, Va 198 

Muddy Springs, S. C 174 

Mush Hill, Miss 15 

Mustered into service 11 

Mustered out of service 204 

Names of Companies, when organized 8 

Neff, Ezekiel G. . : 389, 390 

Nelson's Post Office, N. C 180 

Neuse Mills, N. C 189 

Neuse River, N. C 185, 195 

New Albany, Ind 204 

Newbern, N. C 181, 186 

Newcomer, James VV 216, 259, 308 

New Orleans, La 95 

Night after battle 131 

No. 9, Ga 148 

Non-Commissioned Staflf 215, 216, 254-261 

North Edisto River, S. C 168 



INDEX. 435 

Knight, Alfred F 338 

Knight, David 260 

Knoblaugh, John N 278, 291 

Lafayette, Tenn 18 

Lafferty, William J 154, 342 

Langston, Joseph 300, 343 

Larkinsville, Ala 87, 89 

Laughlin, Felix 386, 393 

Laurel Hill, N. C 179 

Lawrenceville, Va 195 

Lafayette, steam ram 22, 23 

Lee, James W 17, 138, 270, 271, 286, 287 

Leonard, Jonah F. R 300, 305 

Libby Prison, Va 197 

Liberty Hill, S. C 174 

Liberty, No. 2, steamer 44 

'Light Brigade*' 208 

Limerick, Robert E 285, 293 

Limestone Creek, Ala 88 

Lincoln, President, assassinated 190 

Little Fishing Creek, N. C 195 

Littlejohn, Alexander 338, 339 

Little River, N. C I95 

Living and dead 215, 216 

Lloyd, David 3i> 33, 220, 396, 397, 407 

Lockwood, Thomas J 227, 298, 299, 301 

Logan, John A 210 

Long Bridge, Va 198 

Lookout Mountain, Tenn 47 

Losses in battle 

20, 24, 25, 32, 33, 35, 36, 45, 78, 126, 127, 146, 154, 156, 159, 

167, 182, 185, 186, 205, 206, 207, 208, 215, 216, 217-225, 226-231, 421-426 

Lost Mountain 102 

Louisburg, N. C 195 

Louisville, Ga 151 

Louisville, Ky 203 

Lowell Factory, N. C 189 

Lowrey, Gad C 362, 363, 370 

Lumber Creek, N. C 180 

Lumpkin's Mill, Miss 17 

Lyman, Myron W 9, 216, 258, 260, 285, 309 

Lynch Creek, S. C 178 

Macon, Ga., feint on 146 

Madison, Ga 146 

Manchester, Va 196, 197 

"March to the Sea" 139 

Marietta, Ga 103, 138 

Martinsburg, Va 202 

Mary A. Boardman, steamer 164 



i 



440 INDEX. 

Tallehatchie River, Miss 20 

Tar River, N. C 195 

Taylor, Benj. F., quoted 48-50, 53-60, 62-66, 68-69, 70-76, 80-82 

Taylor, Marcus B 216, 226, 256, 257, 260 

Taylor's Springs, Ala 46 

Tecumseh, steamer 11 

Templeton, John 173, 232 

Tennessee River 46, 47, 60, 61, 83 

Tennille Station, Ga 147 

The End 202 

Thermopylae, Pass of 123 

Third Division dissolved 193 

Tiskilwa Tigers, Company E 8 

Tourtellotte's, Colonel John E., congratulatory order 128 

Tracy, Chester 20, 413 

Trimble, Albert M 188, 216, 254, 255, 259, 413 

Trimble, Harvey M 9, 19, 90, 91, 92, 188, 193, 202, 204, 216, 232, 244, 

245, 247, 251, 259, 413 

Tulling Creek Church, N. C 183 

Tunnel Hill, Ga 87 

Tunnelton, Va 203 

Turneaure, George B 216, 260, 309 

Turpentine pines 148 

Unassigned recruits 415, 416 

Union Causeway, Ga 153, 164 

Vangilder, Elijah I54» 37i 

Vannest, George D 216, 260, 340 

Vicksburg, Miss 14, 22, 35, 37, 40, 44, 209 

Victory 125 

Vital statistics 216 

Warehouses 106 

Warrenton, N. C 195 

Washington, tomb of 198 

Washington City, D. C 198, 199, 202, 204 

Wateree River 174 

Waterloo, Ala 46 

Waynesborough, Ga 147 

Weldon Railroad, Va 196 

Western & Altantic Railroad 103 

West's Corners, S. C 174, 215 

Westward Bridge, Va 195 

Wetherell, Ralph T 284, 293 

What won battle of Allatoona, Ga 120 

Whitehead, Sylvanus P 89, 232, 413 

White Plains, Va 195 

"Whole rails" 197 

Wilder, William W 337, 344 

Wilkinson, Lyman J 318, 319, 324 

WJJkJnson^ Orrin 114, 316, 317, 324