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APPENDIX TO THE JOUUNALS 



SENATE AND ASSEMBLY 

OF THE 

\ 

TWENTY-EIGHTH SESSION 



^OF THE i ■' ' '■' ■ 

LEGISLATURE OF THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA. 



T^olume "VII. 




SACRAMENTO: 

STATE OFFICE, : : : : J. D. YOUJfO, SUPT. STATE PRINTING, 

1889. 



LIBRARY OF THE 
LELAND STANFORD JR. UmVERBIVf, 

JUL 13 1900 



OONTEJSfTS. 



l-Report of the Boards of Trustees of the State Normal Schools, 18*7-1888 
2-TeTtin.ony taken before Special Committees from Senate and A-embly relative to 
charges in connection with the erection of the Branch State Normal School, Chico, 

3-Reports?f Snationsof Waters and Water Supply. 188^1889, by the University 

of California. 
4-Twenty-lirst Annual Report of the Insurance Commissioner. 
5-Transactions of the California State Agricultural Society for 1888. 






■fr^ """-'""ST- S P^^ev '^-,-t r n 

■30SST 005 I -^^ ZlUy 



4UAUTT CONTROU MAAK 



IIBPOIIT 



i 




i 





Years ending June 30, 1887, and June 30, 1888. 




SACRAMENTO: 

STATE OFFICE, : : : : : J. D. YOUNG, SXJPT. STATE PRINTING. 

1888. 



L 



r 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE STATE NORMAL SCHOOLS. 



To his Excellency R. W. Waterman: 

Sir: We have the honor to submit the following report of our transac- 
tions as a Board of Trustees of the Normal Schools at San Jose and Los 
Angeles, for the thirty-eighth fiscal year, and of other matters pertaining 
to the schools. The financial report covers all expenditures from July 1, 
1886, to June 30, 1887. These expenditures are given in detail. For each 
amount paid, there is a properly allowed bill, and with the exception of 
six claims yet pending before the State Board of Examiners, there is for 
each, on file in the office of the Board of Trustees, a receipted voucher. 

Assuming, as we must, that the claims alluded- to will be allowed and 
paid, there will be returned to the State for the thirty-eighth fiscal year, 
the following sums: 

From the appropriation for the support of the State Normal School at San Jos€. $1,677 82 
From the appropriation for the support of the Branch Normal School at Los 

Angeles - _ - 1,602 89 

From the appropriation for the Library of the Branch Normal School at Los 

Angeles _ 6 42 

From the appropriation for additional furniture for the Branch Normal School at 

Los Angeles _. - -,_ _ 12 48 

From the appropriation for payment of gardener for the Branch Normal School 

at Los Angeles 19 20 

Total amount $3,318 81 

This amount, and the amount of the pending bills, stands to the credit 
of the schools, on the books of the State Controller. 

From the amount collected for tuition in the Training Department, from 
which mainly the grounds are kept in order, we have also, with the Treas- 
urer of the Board, the sum of $2,633 35. 

For a statement of the scholastic work of the schools, we beg to refer 
you to the reports of the Principals of the schools, herewith transmitted. 

We have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servants, 

RALPH LOWE, 

President of Board of Trustees. 
C. H. Allen, Secretary. 

San Jqg^, December 21, 1887. 



4 EEPORT OF TRUSTEES OF STATE NORMAL SCHOOLS. 

FINANCIAL REPORT 

Of State Normal School, San Jose, for the Thirty-eighth Fiscal Year^ ending June SO, 1887. 



Date of 

Auditing. 



1886. 



July 15. 
July 15. 
July 15. 

Aug. 26. 
Aug. 26- 
Aug. 26. 
Aug. 26. 
Aug. 26. 
Aug. 26. 
Aug. 26- 
Aug. 26. 
Aug. 26- 
Aug. 26. 
Aug. 26. 
Aug. 26-. 
Aug. 26., 
Aug. 26. 
Aug. 2^,. 
Aug. 26. 

Aug. 26-. 

Aug. 26-. 

Aug. 26.. 

Aug. 26- 

Aug. 26.. 

Aug. 26.. 

Sept. 23., 

Sept. 23- 

Sept. 23. , 

Sept. 23. . 

Sept. 23.. 

Sept. 23.. 

Sept 23,. 

Sept. 23... 

Sept. 23. . 

Sept, 23-. 

Sept. 23.. 

Sept. 23- . 

Sept. 23.. 

Sept. 23. . 

Oct. 15. 



No. of 
Voucher. 



Oct. 
Oct, 
Oct. 
Oct. 
Oct. 
Oct. 
Oct. 
Oct 
Oct. 
Oct. 
Nov, 18.. 
Nov, 18-. 
Nov. 18-. 
Nov. 18-. 
Nov. 18-. 
No7. 18.. 



15- 
15- 
15. 
IS- 
IS. 
15.. 
15- 
15- 
15.. 
15.. 



T. 1 
T. 2 



1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

T. 3 

T. 4 

T. 5^6 

T. 7 

T. 8 
T. 9 
T. 10 
T. 11 
T. 12 
T. 13 



12 

13 

14 

15 

16 

17 

18 

T. 14 

T. 15 

T. 16 

T. 17 

T. 18 

T. 19 



T. 22 
T. 23 
T. 24 



24 
25 

26 

27 
28 



General Fund. 

Balance of appropriation from thirty-seventh 
fiscal year, as per last report - 

Appropriation for thirty-eighth fiscal year 

Balance of tuition fund from thirty-seventh 
fiscal year, as per last report _. 

Tuition collected for thirty-eighth fiscal year... 

Library receipts, piano rent, etc 

Paid for salaries for July, 1886 

Paid for payroll on grounds, July, 1886 

Paid D. J. Hobson, services as watchman 

Paid for salaries for August, 1886- - - 

Paid Sterling Furniture Company, desks 

Paid T. K. Black & Co., janitor, tools and supplies 

Paid E. H. Guppy <fe Son, stationery and models 

Paid Henry D. Noyes & Co., periodicals-.- 

Paid Bartling & Phillips, bookbinding 

Paid C. H. Allen, material for slating- 

Paid C. F. Willey, slating boards 

Paid Geo. B. McKee <fe Co., slating 

Paid McNeil Bros., circulars 

Paid L. Aubert, cleaning carpets 

Paid Daunes <fe Van Doren, coal, etc.-. 

Paid for payroll on grounds, August, 1886 

Paid Daunes <S; Van Doren, coal 

Paid C. H. Allen, wood for engine 

Paid for decorations for building. Grand Army 
celebration - 

Paid Mercury and Herald, advertising -,. 

Paid S. C. V. M. & L. Co., lumber 

Paid John Stock Sons, hose connections... 

Paid Peter Henderson, seeds 

Paid Charles Oeckel, hay , - ^ 

Paid Farmers' Union, oil -, 

Paid for salaries for September, 1886. 

Paid J. W. Cook, toweling- - -. 

Paid Davis & Co., hardware- 

Paid Farmers Union, hardware .- 

Paid John Stock Sons, pails _- 

Paid Gilbert & Moore, desks 

Paid C. H. Allen, freight on desks 

Paid T. Soper, tables - 

Paid J. A. Belloli, supplies for grounds 

Paid Farmers Union, belting 

Paid Davis & Co., tools , .._. 

Paid Bank of San Jos6, discount _., 

Paid for payroll on grounds, September, 1886... 

Paid Ed. Wale, water cart 

Paid for salaries for October, 1886 - 

Paid State of California, text-books _. 

Paid Boston School Supply Co., maps .- 

Paid E. H. Guppy & Son, books .-- 

Paid T. Soper, carpenter work- 

Paid Home for Adult Blind, brooms - 

Paid for paj^roU on grounds, October, 1886 

Paid Charles Bernhardt, wood 

Paid Dayid Walsh, blacksmithing 

Paid Hawley Bros. & Co., lawn mower knives __ 

Paid Bank of San Jose, discount 

Paid for salaries for November, 1886 

Paid John S. Fox, map holders 

Paid E. J. GiUespie, drawing paper, etc 

Paid Farmers Union, tools 

Paid Milton Campbell, tinware 

Paid O. A. Hale, velvetine for cases I 



Dr. 



$2,969 53 
38,000 00 

4,385 10 

3,845 50 

164 95 



$2,552 25 

220 00 

10 00 

2,702 05 

199 00 

56 95 

104 07 

43 25 

36 45 

27 50 

17 75 

5 50 

6 50 

18 40 
9 35 

316 90 

94 90 

118 00 

50 00 

14 35 
13 43 
12 00 

3 15 

19 15 

2 50 
2,702 05 

6 75 

7 40 
6 55 

3 30 
125 70 

17 95 
41 00 
10 84 

3 04 

2 95 

10 48 

230 00 

15 00 
2,702 05 

67 50 
39 75 

2 10 
29 25 

5 80 
183 50 

28 00 

21 50 

8 90 
. 3 10 

2,702 05 

22 00 

6 25 

18 60 

3 75 
6 20 



REPORT OF TRUSTEES OF STATE NORMAIi SCHOOLS. 

Financial Rkport— Continued. 



Date of 
Auditing. 



Nov. 18. 

Nov. 18- 

Nov. 18- 

Nov. 18- 

Nov. 18- 

Nov. 18- 

Nov. 18- 

Dec. 15- 

Dec. 15- 

Dec. 15- 

Dec. 15- 

Dec. 15- 

Dec. 15- 

Dec. 15. 

Dec. 15- 

Dec. 15- 

Dec. 15- 

Dec. 15. 

Dec. 15. 

Dec. 15. 

Dec. 15. 

Dec. 15. 

Dec. 15. 

Dec. 15- 

Dec. 15- 

Dec. 15- 

Dec. 15. 

Dec. 15- 

Dec. 15- 

Dec. 15. 

Dec. 15. 

1887. 

Jan. 20- 

Jan. 20. 

Jan. 20. 

Jan. 20. 



Jan. 


20 


Jan. 


20 


Jan. 


20 


Jan, 


20 


Jan. 


20. 


Jan. 


20 


Jan. 


20 


Jan. 


20 


Jan. 


20 


Jan. 


20. 


Jan. 


20. 


Jan. 


20, 


Jan. 


20. 


Jan, 


20. 


Jan. 


20. 


Feb. 


17. 


Feb. 


17. 


Feb. 


17. 


Feb. 


17. 


Feb. 


17. 


Feb. 


17 


Feb. 


17 


Feb. 


17 


Feb. 


17 


Feb. 


17 


Feb. 


17 



No. of 
Voucher. 



29 
30 
T. 25 
T. 26 
T. 27 
T. 28 
T. 29 



31 
32 
33 
34 
35 
36 
37 
38 
39 
40 
41 
42 

43 
44 



T. 30 
T. 31 
T. 32 
T. 33 
T. 34 
T. 35 
T. 36 
T. 37 



45 

46 

47 

48 

49 

50 

51 

52 

53 

54 

T, 38 

T, 39 

T, 40 

T. 41 

T. 42 

T. 43 

T. 44 

T. 45 



55 

56 

57 
58 
59 
60 
61 
62 
46 
,47 



Paid Loeb & Etchebarne, velvetine for cases 

Paid S. H. Wagener, chemicals. -. 

Paid for payroll on grounds, November, 1886.. 

Paid V. Pachaud, plowing and hauling ._ . 

Paid for labor hauling manure 

Paid Milton Campbell, repairs and supplies 

Paid Ed. Wale, cart - 

Paid for salaries for December, 1886 

Paid E. H. Guppy & Son, stationery 

Paid H, W. A. Nahl, diplomas 

Paid Geo. W. Welch, map-.- 

Paid S. H. Wagener, chemicals and supplies -.. 
Paid S. C. V. M. <fe L. Co., lumber and mill work 

Paid J. C. Corcoran, plumbing 

Paid Geo. B. McKee & Co., glazing and slating.. 

Paid Farmers Union, lanterns ,- 

Paid C. Sproat, repairs to battery 

Paid R. Royce. Librarian, postage, express, etc. 
Paid Mrs. A. E. Bush, museum expenses ,....-. 
Paid Mrs. A. E. Bush, traveling expenses, col- 
lecting for museum 



Dr. 



Paid J . W. J ameson , j anitor supplies 

Paid Daunes & Van Doren, coal -. 

Paid Fannie M, Estabrook, extra services dur- 
ing fall term ,-,-.- , 

Paid for payroll on grounds, December, 1886 ... 

Paid J. C. Corcoran, pipes, laying same, etc 

Paid R. Royce, Librarian, books and papers 

Paid Bank of San Jos^, discount , 

Paid Daunes <fe Van Doren, coal 

PaidS. C. V. M. & L. Co., lumber.- 

Paid J. C, Belloli, supplies for grounds -., 

Paid Geo. F, Wells, piano 



Paid for salaries for January, 1887 

Paid San Jos6 Gas Company, gas six months, to 
December 31, 1886 

Paid Sunset Telephone Company, box rent six 
months, to December 31, 1886 .- 

Paid C- H. Allen, commencement expenses, De- 
cember, 1886 - 

Paid F- Goldstein, filhng diplomas ..- 

Paid J. W. Jameson, feather dusters 

Paid John Stock Sons, janitor supplies 

Paid T. Soper, carpenter work 

Paid C. L. Morris, stuffed bird for museum 

Paid F. Kuchenbeiser, repairs to desks 

Paid State of California, text-books 

Paid for payroll on grounds, January, 1887 

Paid Guy Douglas, hauling rock and sand 

Paid Milton Campbell, repairing tanks 

Paid Charles Oeckel, hay - 

Paid Farm ers tJnion, oil for engine 

Paid L. Callisch, gopher poison - 

Paid F. Kuchenbeiser & Son, repairing tools 

Paid Bank of San Jos^, discount 

Paid for salaries for February, 1887 

Paid S. J. Furniture Co., library cases and tables. 

Paid T. Soper, fitting up classroom and making 
tables - 

Paid T, Soper, carpenter work - 

Paid C. H. Allen, slating 

Paid L. M. McKenney & Co., Directory 

Paid A. R. Denike, tuning and repairing pianos. 

Paid David Walsh, blacksmithing _. 

Paid Ed. Wale, wood -.-. 

Paid for payroll on grounds, February, 1887.-— 

Paid V, Pachaud, plowing and sand 



Cr. 



|5 10 


19 42 


182 50 


196 87 


3 75 


6 60 


55 00 


},702 05 


142 92 


30 00 


5 00 


11 47 


15 00 


14 35 


8 50 


2 00 


4 75 


38 80 


17 20 


20 00 


4 05 


672 34 


100 00 


182 50 


671 51 


4 25 


2 52 


06 30 


14 90 


100 47 


340 00 



2,722 05 
51 95 
15 00 



50 70 


25 00 


15 00 


4 80 


9 25 


500 


7 00 


24 80 


185 00 


7 25 


38 98 


20 22 


7 50 


5 75 


10 30 


5 58 


2,862 05 


105 50 


108 38 


13 00 


15 00 


4 00 


7 00 


5 75 


5 60 


180 00 


25 50 



REPORT OF TRUSTEES OF STATE I^ORMAL SCHOOLS. 
Financial Report— Continued. 



Date of 


No. of 


Auditing. 


Voucher. 


Feb. 17.. 


T. 48 


Feb. 17- 


T. 49 


Feb. 17-. 


T. 50 


Feb. 17.. 


T, 51 


Mar. 17 




Mar. 17.. 


63 


Mar. 17„. 


64 


Mar. 17.. 


65 


Mar. 17.. 


66 


Mar. 17.. 


67 


Mar. 17 _. 


68 


Mar. 17.. 


69 


Mar. 17_. 


70 


Mar. 17.. 


71 


Mar. 17.. 


72 


Mar. 17-. 


73 


Mar. 17.. 


74 


Mar. 17.. 


75 


Mar. 17.. 


76 


Mar. 17-. 


77 


Mar. 17- 


78 


Mar. 17.. 


T.52 


Mar. 17-. 


T.53 


Mar. 17.. 


T.54 


Mar. 17.. 


T.55 


Mar. 17-. 


T.56 


Mar, 17.- 


T.57 


Mar. 17.. 


T.58 


Mar. 17.. 


T. 59 


Mar. 17-- 


T.60 


ApriI14.. 




April 14- 


79 


Aprill4.. 


80 


ApriI14.. 


81 


Aprill4.. 


82 


ApriI14.. 


T.61 


ApriI14.. 


T.62 


ApriI14.. 


T.63 


Aprill4.. 


T. 64 


April 14__ 
May 12.. 


T.65 


T.66 


May 12.. 


T.67 


May 12.. 


T.68 


May 12.. 


T.69 


May 12.. 


T.70 


May 25 




May 25.. 


*83 


May 25.. 


*84 


May 25.. 


85 


May 25.. 


86 


May 25.. 


87 


May 25.. 


88 


Mav 25.. 


89 


May 25-. 


90 


May 25.. 


91 


May 25.. 


92 


May 25.. 


93 


May 25.- 


94 


Mav 25.. 


96 


Mav 25.. 


96 


May 25.. 


97 


May 25.. 


T. 71 


Mav 25.. 


T. 72 


May 25.. 


T. 73 



Paid Charles Bernhardt, fertilizer 

Paid S. C. V. M. & L. Co., skylights ... . 

Paid David Walsh, blacksmithmg 

Paid Mercury and Herald, advertising . 

Paid for salaries for March, 1887 

Paid E. H, Guppy & Son, stationery. .. 
Paid E, H. Guppy & Son, dictionaries . 
Paid McNeil Bros., bookbinding 



Paid McNeil Bros., printing 

Paid A, Waldteufel, Vol. 21, Encyclopaedia Bri- 
tanica - 

Paid Rand, McNally & Co., maps 

Paid A. Friant & Co., manila paper 

Paid J. P. Jarman, painting and slating 

PaidE. T. Barnes, table 

Paid H. Kosekranz, catches for cases. 

Paid Davis & Co., tools 

Paid S. H. Wagener, drugs, etc 

Paid Gillespie, Saph, & Mabury, wood 

Paid Frank B. Smith, cleaning and repairing 
clocks 

Paid R. Royce, Librarian, postage, express, etc.. 

Paid Mrs. A. E. Bush, postage, express, etc., for 
museum 

Paid for payroll on grounds, March, 1887 

Paid R. D. Fox, trees. 

Paid C. H. Allen, seeds, etc., for grounds 

Paid J. Bosch ken, tools and hardware 

Paid Milton Campbell, hardware and repairs... 

Paid Davis & Co., hardware 

Paid F. Schilling, locksmithing 

Paid John B. Alden, books for library 

Paid R. Royce, library expenses 

Paid for salaries for April, 1887 

Paid San Jose Furniture Co., tables and step- 
ladder 

Paid T. Soper, carpenter work 

Paid S. H. Wagener, chemicals 

Paid Farmers Union, hardware 

Paid for payroll on grounds, April, 1887 

Paid Luther & Schroeder, hose 

Paid Farmers Union, hose and hardware . 

Paid John Rock, trees 

Paid S. C. V. M. & L. Co., lumber. 

Paid sundry persons, loam for grounds 

Paid F. Altman, repairs to engme 

Paid J. A. Belloli, supplies for grounds 

Paid J. W. Jameson, hay -.. 

Paid Farmers Union, supplies 

Paid for salaries for May, 1887 

Paid G. W. Welch, books.. 

Paid History Co., 4 vols. Bancroft's History 

Paid L. P. McCarty, Statistician for 1887 

Paid H. W. A. Nahl, diplomas _ 

Paid F. Kuchenbeiser & Son, blacksmithing... 

Paid Sunset Telephone Co., repairs to electrical 
apparatus. 

Paid J. W. Jameson, curtains and clothes hooks 

Paid J. W. Jameson, sawdust 

Paid S. H. Wagener, chemicals, 

Paid California Distilling Co., alcohol 

Paid L. Chaize, brass head for cask 

Paid M. E.Nichols, collection birds for museum. 

Paid Mrs. A. E. Bush, collection of shells 

Paid T. K. Black & Co., janitor supplies 

Paid John Stock Sons, coal screen and grate . 

Paid for pavroU on grounds, May, 1887 

Paid John Stock Sons, sprinklers, etc 

Paid Bank of San Jos^, discount on warrants 



Dr. 



Or. 



$14 25 


48 00 


6 50 


5 50 


2,792 05 


88 74 


84 00 


24 10 


3 75 


10 50 


30 90 


3 50 


43 50 


12 50 


6 75 


10 00 


4 55 


5 00 


5 00 


36 45 


17 95 


180 00 


13 50 


12 00 


15 40 


4 48 


8 60 


3 00 


37 50 


7 10 


2,792 05 


71 00 


37 05 


17 41 


2 60 


246 25 


126 00 


84 10 


53 90 


20 42 


84 75 


18 00 


13 94 


900 


300 


2,792 05 


57 98 


22 00 


4 00 


4125 


20 65 


600 


6 00 


3 50 


17 81 


3125 


10 00 


30 00 


25 00 


8 25 


12 75 


208 00 


29 00 


11 00 



REPORT OF TRUSTEES OF STATE NORMAL SCHOOLS. 
Financial Repobt— Continued. 



©ate of 
Auditing. 



No. of 
Voucher. 



May 25- 


T. 74 


May 25.. 


T. 75 


June 24.. 




June 24.. 


98 


June 24.. 


99 


June 24.. 


100 


June 24.. 


lot 


June 24.. 


102 


June 24., 


103 


June 24,. 


104 


June 24-. 


105 


June 24.. 


106 


June 24.. 


107 


June 24.. 


108 


June 24.. 


109 


June 24. _ 


110 


June 24- 


111 


June 24_, 


112 


June 24.. 


113 


June 24.. 


114 


June 24-. 


115 


June 24-. 


116 


June 24.- 


T. 76 


June 24., 


T. 77 


June 24- 


T.,78 


June 24.. 


T. 79 


June 24.. 


T. 80 


June 24-. 


T. 81 


July 28.- 


T. 82 


July 28-- 


T. 83 


July 28-. 


T. 84 


July 28-. 


T. 85 


July 28- 


T, 86 


July 2S.. 


T. 87 


July 28.. 


117 


July 28.. 


118 


July 28.. 


119 


July 28., 


120 


July 28.. 


121 


July 28.. 


122 


July 28.. 


123 


July 28.. 


124 


July 28- 


125 


July 28.. 


126 


July 28- 


127 


July 28.. 


128 


July 28.. 


129 


July 28.. 


130 


July 28.. 


131 


July 28.. 


132 


July 28.. 


133 


July 28.. 


134 


July 28-. 


135 


July 28- 


136 


July 28.. 


137 


Aug. 25- 


*138 


Aug. 25.. 


*139 



Paid J. W. Jameson, hay....... 

Paid C. H. Allen, wood tor engine 

Paid for salaries for June, 1887 

Paid E. H. Guppy & Son. stationer jr 

Paid J. C. Corcoran, j)luriibing repairs 

Paid T. K. Black, janitor supplies 

Paid C. H, Allen, commencement expenses 
Paid R. Royce, Librarian, miscellaneous expenses 
Paid Mrs. A. E. Bush, Curator, museum expenses 

Paid T. Soper, carpenter work... 

Paid the J . Dewing Co., apparatus 

Paid the J. Dewing Co., books 

Paid Jas. W. Queen <fc Co., apparatus 

Paid Battle Creek Mach'y Co., turning lathes, etc. 
Paid John Taylor & Co., chemical apparatus... 

Paid C. T. Ryland, case of birds 

Paid Van Horn, Mather & Frost, anatomical 

chart _ .- 

Paid D. Appleton & Co., charts, etc 

Paid Rucker Bros., carpet for office 

Paid California Wire works, wire guard for stage . 
Paid T. Hermann & Co., specimens for museum . 

Paid T. Soper, cases 

Paid for extra labor on grounds 

Paid for payroll on grounds, June, 1887 

£*aid J . C. Corcoran.laying pipe, etc , 

Paid Clayton Jones, wood .- — _. 

Paid Farmers Union, supplies for grounds 

Paid D. C. Dunn, painting signs 

Paid Hawley Bros. Hardware Co., lawn mower. 

Paid Daunes & Van Doren, coal 

Paid Charles Oeckel,hay 

Paid S. 0. V. M. & U Co., lumber 

Paid J. Boschken, supplies for grounds , 

Paid Chas. H. Allen, traveling expenses as Sec'y 

Paid James W. Queen & Co., apparatus 

Paid H. A. Ward, models and casts for museum. 
Paid O shorn & Alexander, tools 



Paid T. Soper, carpenter work and material . 
Paid Farmers' Union, tools, etc 



Paid Parker & Lacy, forge. 

Paid George F. Wells, piano 

Paid G. G. Wickson & Co., type writer, desk, etc.. 

Paid L. Lion, carpet for platforms 

Paid S. J. Gas Co., gas 6 months, to June 30, 1887. 

Paid S. H- Wagener, chemicals 

Paid Daunes & Van Doren, coal 

Paid A. B. Denike, tuning and repairing pianos . 

Paid L. Aubert, cleaning carpets 

Paid C. H. Allen, freight and hauling 

Paid Miss B. Warren, filling diplomas , 

Paid J. P. Jarman, slating boards . 

Paid George B. McKee & Co., paint, oil, etc 

Paid Sunset Telephone Co., box rent 6 months, 
to June 30, 1887 

Paid Milton Campbell, tanks 

Paid S. C. V. M. <fc L. Co., lumber and mill work. 

Paid Sterling Furniture Company, tables 

Paid G. G, Wickson & Co., autocopyist and sup- 
plies - 

Balance of Tuition Fund, close of thirty-eighth 
fiscal year - - 

Balance of appropriation not drawn from State 
Treasury 

Totals 



Dr. 



Cr. 



$9 00 

40 00 
2,652 50 

41 60 
104 55 

28 28 
41 85 
75 15 
15 15 
3 15 
299 05 

6 80 
203 25 
109 88 

22 62 
125 00 

35 00 
17 90 
96 55 

23 10 

7 00 
75 00 

95 70 
231 25 

98 02 

96 00 
800 
600 

80 00 

36 15 
15 10 

5 80 

5 05 

70 00 

681 25 

156 80 

157 55 
104 70 

43 03 
35 00 
250 00 
135 60 
28 65 
28 35 
12 08 
12 00 
22 50 
22 60 
45 34 
33 50 
35 50 
10 05 

15 00 
17 00 
12 59 

75 00 

22 15 
2,633 35 

1,677 82 



$49,366 08 $49,365 08 

■ 



* Vonchera Nos. 83, 84, 138, 139 have Dot been allowed by the State Board of Examiners, amouiitiiig to: 

No. 83, ^7 98; No. 84, $22; No. 138, 175 ; No. 139, $22 15 ; total, $177 13. 



REPORT OF TRUSTEES OP STATE NORMAL SCHOOLS. 
Summary of Above Bbport. 



Total income for thirty-eighth fiscal year 

Expended for salaries of teachers and janitor . 

Expended for stationery. 

Expended for furniture and apparatus 

Expended for fuel and gas 

Expended for general supplies __.. 

Expended for books and periodicals _ 

Expended for repairs and improvements 

Miscellaneous expenditures .— - 



Total for current expenses of school 

Expended for salaries of gardeners and other labor on grounds - 

Expended for fuel for engine 

Expended for tools and repairs to same 

Expended for water pipes and hose. 

Expended for supplies and repairs on grounds .._ 

Expended for trees and seeds - 

Total for grounds 

Total unexpended balance 



Totals . 



Dr. 



$49,365 08 



Cr. 



$32,774 80 
369 58 
3,881 97 
779 8^ 
310 37 
436 33 
456 12 
844 03 



$39,853 09 



$2,969 72 

478 35 

229 19 

1,020 63 

423 38 

79 55 



$5,200 82 
$4,311 17 



$49,365 08 $49,365 08 



Appropriation for Library of State Normal School, San Jose. 



Date of 
Auditing. 



1886. 



July 15.. 

Nov. 18-, 

1887. 

Jan. 20.. 
Jan. 20., 
Jan. 20.. 
April 14.. 



No. of 
Voucher. 



Dr. 



Balance of appropriation unexpended, as per 

last report 

Paid J. Dewing Co., Life of Grant 

Paid Geo. W. Welch, books. 



Paid Geo. W. Welch, books , 

Paid E. L. Kellogg & Co., books . 

Paid A. W. HolUs, atlas 

Paid Geo. W. Welch, books.. 



Totals. 



$487 55 



$487 55 



Cr. 



$10 00 
26 92 



315 70 

58 20 

9 00 

67 73 



$487 55 



REPORT OP TRUSTEES OP STATE NORMAL SCHOOLS. 



REPORT OF PRINCIPAL OF STATE NORMAL SCHOOL, SAN JOSE. 



To the Board of Trustees of the California State Normal Schools: 

Gentlemen: I have the honor to submit the following report of the 
Normal School in San Jose, under your charge, for the school year ending 

May 26, 1887: 

STATISTICAL. 

During the year there have applied for admission two hundred eighty- 
four pupils. These applied for and were admitted to classes, as given 
below: 



Applied for Senior Class 10 

Applied for Second Term, Middle Class . 8 
Applied for Pirst Term, Middle Class _._ 55 
Applied for Second Term, Junior Class - 77 
Applied for First Term, Junior Class ...134 

Total number examined 284 



Admitted to Senior Class - 5 

Admitted to Second Term, Middle Class. 2 
Admitted to First Term, Middle Class .. 26 
Admitted to Second Term, Junior Class. 42 
Admitted to First Term, Junior Class -.164 

Total number admitted .239 



Rejected, or assigned to Preparatory Class, 45. 

Holders of Grammar School Diplomas admitted to Junior B, 64. 

Holders of Grammar School Diplomas admitted on examination to higher classes, 18. 

Holders of High School Diplomas admitted to Junior B, 11. 

Holders of High School Diplomas admitted on examination to higher classes, 16. 

Holders of Teachers' certificates admitted to Junior B, 4. 

Admitted by transfer from other Normal Schools, 3. 

Many of those admitted to Junior Classes were pupils who had applied 
for admission to advanced classes. Applicants for admission have repre- 
sented forty-two counties of this State, and eight other States and Terri- 
tories. 

Forty-six counties of California have had representatives in the school 
during the past year. 

The counties not represented are Alpine, Inyo, Lassen, Los Angeles, San 
Bernardino, and Ventura. 

Besides students residing in this State, there have been representatives 
from eight other States and four Territories. Of these, twelve are from the 
State of Nevada. 

The highest enrollment during the year was 586, in January; average 
enrollment, 573; average daily attendance, 560; average percentage of 
attendance, 98,7; average percentage of punctuality, 99.7, 

The table given below, showing the enrollment for the last ten years, is 
instructive. Prom 1876 to 1879, the Preparatory Class was so large that 
two teachers were employed. In 1879-80 the class was reduced to about 
fifty and put in charge of one teacher. This, and some other considerations, 
reduced the total, something more than one hundred. 



10 



KEPOBT OP TRUSTEES OP STATE NORMAL SCHOOLS. 





! 

-I 


1 

00 




i 


00 




t 


t 


i 


1 


i 


Senior.-, __ 


53 

164 
242 

78 


69 
207 
224 

103 


60 
189 
223 

76 


57 
169 
184 

58 


52 

181 
199 

57 


96 
237 

215 
52 


177 
209 
247 

48 


180 
196 
224 

45 


175 

137 
216 

38 


137 
157 

203 
56 


164 


Middle 


178 


Junior 


290 


Preparatory -. 


59 






Total in Normal. 


537 

128 

665 


603 
109 


548 
113 


468 
109 


489 
101 


600 
103 


681 
115 


645 
115 


666 
135 


553 
129 


691 


Training Department 


136 






Grand total 


712 


661 


577 


590 


703 


796 


760 


701 


682 


827 











During the present year, as will be seen, we have reached the highest 
number ever enrolled in the school, namely, six hundred and ninety-one 
in the Normal Department, and more than eight hundred in the entire 
school. We have had a larger number of Normal pupils enrolled than any 
other State Normal School in the United States. The Normal College of 
New York City, and the Normal School for Girls in Philadelphia, alone 
outnumber us. 

The changes in the course of study, particularly advancing the grade for 
admission, will doubtless reduce the number of pupils for the next year or 
two; closing the Preparatory Class will contribute to the same result. The 
additional interest in normal instruction, and the increasing demand for 
trained teachers will, however, keep the attendance pretty nearly what it 
has been in previous years. 

The liberal provision made for supplying the school with additional illus- 
trative apparatus will make the work of the coming year easier and more 
efficient, and some good practical results are anticipated from the establish- 
ment even of a small mechanical department. 

The appropriation of one thousand dollars a year for the library will 
enable us to add greatly to the means of culture already placed within the 
reach of our pupils. It is a gratifying fact that the library is becoming a 
more and more important feature in the school, and its influence is being 
felt in the work of every class. It is no small part of the equipment of a 
young teacher that he has formed even a casual acquaintance with a library 
of well selected books. 

In regard to the general work of the school, my report made at the De- 
cember meeting was so full that I do not deem it necessary to repeat any 
part of it here. 

Thanking you, again, gentlemen, for your uniform kindness, and for the 
patience with which you have listened to and provided for our wants, I am, 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 



San Jos^, May, 1887. 



CHARLES H. ALLEN, 

Principal. 



REPOBT OP TBUSTEES OF STATE NORMAL SCHOOLS. 11 



FINANCIAL REPORT 

of Branch State Normal School, Los Angeles^ for Thirty-eighth Fiscal Year, er^ditig June . 

•' J887. 



Date of 


No.of 


Auditing. 


Voucher. 


1886. 




July 15- 


1-8 


Aug. 26- 


9-17 


Aug. 26._ 


18 


Aug. 26- 


19 


Aug. 26.. 


20 


Aug. 26- 


21 


Aug, 26- 


22 


Aug. 26- 


23 


Aug. 26- 


24 


Sept. 23- 


25 


Sept. 23- 


26 


Sept. 23- 


27 


Sept. 23- 


28 


Sept. 23- 


29^7 


Oct. 15— 


38-46 


Oct. 15— 


47 


Oct 15-- 


48 


Oct. 15 - 


49 


Oct. 15— 


50 


Oct, 15— 


51 


Oct. 15-_ 


62 


Oct. 15 — 


53 


Nov. 18- 


54-62 


Nov. 18- 


63 


Nov. 18- 


64 


Nov. 18.. 


65 


Nov. 18- 


m 


Nov. 18- 


67 


Nov. 18- 


68 


Bec. 15- 


69-77 


Bec. 15- 


78 


Bec, 15- 


79 


Dec. 15- 


80 


Bec. 15- 


81 


1887. 




Jan. 20- 


82-90 


Jan, 20- 


91 


Jan. 20— 


92 


Jan. 20- 


93 


Jan. 20— 


94 


Jan. 20- 


96 


Jan. 20— 


96 


Jan. 20- 


97 



General Fund. 

Balance of appropriation for thirty-seventh fis- 
cal year on hand July 1, 1886, as per last report- 
Amount of appropriation for thirty-eighth fiscal 
year 

Balance of Petty Cash Fund on hand July 1, 1886, 
as per lastreport-.. 

Amount of receipts for rent of rooms, tuition, 
and sundries, thirty-eighth fiscal year 

Paid for salaries for July, 1886 

Paid for salaries for August, 1886 

Paid L. A. Gas Co., gas for July, 1886 

Paid L. A. City Water Co., water for July, 1886.. 

Paid V. Beaudry , water for J uly, 1886 

Paid Sunset Telephone Co., rent for July, 1886- . 

Paid Sunset Telephone Co., rent for August, 1886. 

Paid Whittier, Fuller & Co., paints, oils, etc 

Paid Jos. Gastreich, painting and graining 

Paid L. A. City Water Co., water for August, 1886. 

Paid Sunset Telephone Co., rent for Sept., 1886.. 

Paid Home of Adult Blind, brooms 

Paid History Co., two vols. Bancroft's History., 

Paid for salaries for September, 1886 , 

Paid for salaries for October, 1886 

Paid L. A. Gag Co., gas for August, 1886 

Paid L. A. Gas Co., gas for September, 1886 

Paid L. A. Citv Water Co., water for Sept., 1886- 

Paid Citizens Water Co., water for August and 
September, 1886 

Paid Sunset Telephone Co., reut for Oct., 1886. - 

Paid Weinshank<fe Knox, plumbing 

Paid W. C. Furrey, tools, school supplies, etc 

Paid for salaries tor November, 1886 

Paid Hirschf eld & Seldner, stationery 

Paid S. M. Perry, plumbing ..: 

Paid Citizens Water Co., water for October, 1886 - 

Paid Los Angeles City Water Company, water 
for October, 1886 _.. 

Paid Los Angeles Gas Company, gas for October, 
1886 

Paid Sunset Telephone Company, rent for No- 
vember, 1886 

Paid for salaries for December, 1886 __.. 

Paid Citizens Water Company, water for No- 
vember, 1886 

Paid Los Angeles City Water Company, water 
for November, 1886 

Paid Sunset Telephone Company, rent for De- 
cember, 1886 

Paid J. A. Cline, mounting birds 



Paid for salaries for January, 1887...^ 

Paid W. H. Maxwell, coal 

Paid Hirschf eld & Seldner, stationery 

Paid Los Angeles City Water Company, water 
for December, 1886 

Paid Citizens Water Company, water for De- 
cember, 1886 

Paid Los Angeles Gas Company, gas for Novem- 
ber, 1886 

Paid Los Angeles Gas Company, gas for Decem- 
ber, 1886.- 

Paid Sunset Telephone Company, rent for Jan- 
uary, 1887 



Dr. 



$1,070 07 

16,000 00 

56 74 

353 50 



Cr. 



$1,116 75 

1,166 65 

90 

925 

3 67 
500 
5 00 

12 90 
14 OO 

13 80 
500 

16 25 

11 00 

1,166 65 

1,166 65 

2 70 

4 50 

14 75 

2 70 
500 
22 50 
30 95 
1,166 65 
m 80 
13 00 
11 00 

9 75 

390 

5 00 
1,166 65 

13 60 

11 10 

500 

27 00 

1,166 65 
175 75 

• 80 85 

900 
8 85 
4 80 
600 
500 



12 



REPORT OP TRUSTEES OF STATE NORMAL SCHOOLS. 

FijTANCiAi. KEPOBT—Continued. 



Date of 
Auditing. 



Jan. 20.. 

Jan. 20., 

Jan. 20.- 

Jan. 20.. 

Jan. 20-. 

Feb. 17.. 

Feb. 17.- 

Feb. 17.- 

Feb. 17.- 

Feb. 17.- 

Feb. 17- 
Mar. 17.. 
Mar. 17.- 

Mar. 17.- 

Mar. 17. _ 

Mar. 17-- 
Mar. 17.. 
Mar. 17-- 
Mar. 17- _ 
Mar. 17.- 

Aprill4„ 

AprU14.. 

April 14-. 
April 14-. 
April 14.. 
April 14-- 
April 14-. 
April 14.. 
April 14.. 
April 14-. 
May 25-- 
May 25.- 
May 25.- 
May 25-- 
May 25-- 

May 25-. 

May 25.- 
Jnne 24-. 
June 24. _ 
June 24- , 
June 24-- 
June 24.- 
Juue 24- . 
June 24-- 
June 24.- 
June 24,. 
June 24.- 
June 24- . 
June 24.- 

June 24. - 
Juhe 24-- 

Aug. 25-, 

Aug. 25-- 



No.of 
Voucher. 



100 
101 
102 
103-111 
112 

113 

114 

115 

116 

117-125 
126 

127 

128 

129 
130 
131 
132 
133 

134-142 

143 

144 
145 
146 
147 
148 
149 
150 
151 
152-160 
161 
162 
163 
164 

165 

166 
167-174 
175 
176 
177 
178 
179 
180 
181 
182 
183 
184 
185 

186 

187 

*188 
*189 



Paid 0. W. Chi Ids, rent of Opera House, Decem- 
ber, 1886.-- --- 

Paid Times- Mirror Company, programmes 

Paid H. P, McKusick, books 

Paid J. A. Cline, mounted birds 

Paid Weinshank & Knox, plumbing- ._ _ 

Paid for salaries for February, 1887 

Paid Citizens Water Company, water for Janu- 
ary, 1887 - - 

Paid Los Angeles City Water Company, water 
for January, 1887 

Paid Sunset Telephone Company, rent for Feb- 
ruary, 1887 1 

Paid Los Angeles Gras Company'', gas for Janu- 
ary, 1887 --- - 

Paid J. Dewing Co., Atlas _ 

Paid for salaries for March, 1887 .- 

Paid Los Angeles City Water Company, water 
for February, 1887 -- 

Paid Los Angeles Gas Company, gas for Febru- 
ary, 1887 - - , -- 

Paid Sunset Telephone Company, rent for 
March, 1887 . — 

Paid The J. Dewing Co., blackboard erasers .-.- 

Paid W. C. Furrey, hardware and supplies 

Paid E. H. Grassett & Co., chemicals 

Paid F. H. Rogers, photographs ,. 

Paid Hirschfeld & Seldner, subscription to pe- 
riodicals _ 

Paid for salaries for April, 1887 -- 

Paid Citizens Water Co., water for February 
and March, 1887--. 

Paid L. A. City Water Co., water for March, 1887. 

Paid L. A. Gas Co., gas for March, 1887 - 

Paid Hirschfeld <fe Seldner, stationery 

Paid Cooke, Wiseman & Co., binding magazines 

Paid History Co., 2 Vols. Bancroft's History 

Paid Theo . W oUweber, chemicals 

Paid L. A. Electrical Works, barometer. 

Paid T. A. Garey, roses __ 

Paid for salaries for May, 1887 

Paid L. A. City Water Co., water for April, 1887_ 

Paid Citizens Water Co., water for April, 1887 -. 

Paid L. A. Gas Co., gas for April, 1887. 

Paid Sunset Telephone Co., rent and service for 
April, 1887 - 

Paid Sunset Telephone Co., rent and service for 
May, 1887 

Paid H. W. A. Nahl, diplomas 

Paid for salaries for June, 1887 - 

Paid L. A. Citv Water Co., water for May, 1887_- 

Paid L. A. City Water Co., water for June, 1887- 

Paid Citizens Water Co., water for May, 1887 .-- 

Paid Citizens Water Co., water for June, 1887 ... 

Paid L. A. Gas Co., gas for May, 1887 

Paid L. A. Gas Co., gas for June, 1887 

Paid Sunset Telephone Co., rent for June, 1887- _ 

Paid H. C Wyatt, rent of Opera House 

Paid Times-Mirror (Jo., programmes .- 

Paid L. B. Lawson, lettering diplomas , 

Paid P. Hirschfeld & Co., stationery and period- 
icals _ 

Paid W. C, Furrey, tools and hardware 

Paid Brown & Foster, tools and agricultural im- 
I)lemeut3- 

Paid Antonin Sperl, extension and repairing of 
fence - 

Paid Asa Adams, lumber and labor 



Dr. 



Cr. 



$25 00 
15 00 
15 00 
27 00 

4 20 
1,166 65 

9 92 

1 40 

5 00 

2 40 

22 50 
1,166 65 

5 50 

4 50 

5 00 
27 50 
15 40 
11 60 

15 00 

11 00 
1,166 m 

16 15 
11 20 

1 80 
19 00 

17 00 

11 00 

36 17 
15 00 

37 85 
1,166 65 

8 10 

7 70 
1 50 

6 00 

5 25 

21 75 

1,116 65 

10 80 

12 00 
5 00 

8 40 

3 00 
3 90 
5 00 

25 00 
12 00 
10 00 

76 75 
48 00 

23 28 

16143 
88 16 



*yoiichers Nob. 188 and 189 havo not been allowed bv the State Board of Examiners, amounting to $249 59. 



EEPORT OF TKUSTEES OF STATE NORMAL SCHOOLS. 18 

Financial Report— Continued. 



Date of 
Auditing. 



No. of 
Voucher. 



Bills Paid by Ira More, Principaly from Petty Cash 
Fund. 

Paid for postage, freight, express, exchange, and 

advertising for proposals -^ 

Paid for furniture and apparatus 

Paid for books and periodicals 

Paid for sundry supplies 

Paid for commencement expenses ,.. 

Paid for labor and tools on grounds 

Paid for discount on warrants in payment on 

contracts - , 

Balance of appropriation not drawn from State 

Treasury, at close of thirty-eighth fiscal year. 
Balance of pettj^ cash fund on hand, at close of 

thirty-eighth fiscal year 



Totals . 



Dr. 



117.480 31 



Cr. 



$52 72 
16 35 
44 50 
12 63 
27 50 
26 30 

146 00 

1,602 89 

84 24 



$17,480 31 



Summary of Above Report. 



Total income for support for thirty-eighth fiscal year. 

Expended for salaries of teachers and Janitor 

Expended for stationery _, 

Expended for furniture and apparatus 

Expended for fuel, water, and gas 

Expended for books and periodicals 

Expended for general supplies ._ 

Expended for repairs and improvements 

Expended for grounds _ 

Miscellaneous expenditures 



Total amount expended 

Total unexpended balance. 



Totals . 



Dr. 



$17,480 31 



$17,480 31 



Or. 



$13,899 90 
230 15 
120 10 
419 19 
145 25 
194 28 
66 60 
313 74 
403 97 



$15,793 18 
1,687 13 



$17,480 31 



Appi'opi'iation for the purchase of books for the Library of the Branch State Normal School at 

Los Angeles. 



Date of 
Auditing, 


No. of 
Voucher. 




Dr. 


Cr. 


1886. 


7 


Balance of appropriation unexpended, as per 
last report- >,._.._.. ..-,---.-_ ._-.-_.,... 


$143 78 




Dec. 15 


Paid George W. Welch, books 


$137 36 




Balance of appropriation not drawn from State 
Treasury ... - 




6 42 




Totals 








$143 78 


$143 78 









14 REPORT OF TRUSTEES OF STATE NORMAL SCHOOLS. 

Appropriation for additional furniture for the Branch Normal School at Los Angeles, 



Date of 
Auditing. 



1886, 
Nov. 18-. 

Dec. 15.. 

1887. 
Feb. 17.. 



No. of 
Voucher. 



Balance of appropriation unexpended, as per 
last report .- 

Paid James W. Queen <fc Co., solar microscope 
and fittings 

Paid James W. Queen & Co., binocular micro- 
scope and fittings 



Paid Bancroft Bros. & Co., maps, charts, etc. ... 

Balance of appropriation not drawn from State 

Treasury 

Totals 



Dr. 



$358 83 



1358 83 



Cr. 



$100 (X> 

200 00 

46 35 

12 48 



$358 83 



Appropriation for payment of Gardener for Branch Normal School at Los Angeles. 



Date of 
Auditing. 



1886. 

Sept. 23. 

Oct. 16- 

Nov. 18. 

Nov. 18- 

Nov. 18. 

Dec. 16, 

Dec. 15. 

Dec, 15_ 

1887. 

Jan. 20. 

Jan. 20. 

Jan. 20- 

Feb. 17. 

Feb. 17. 

Mar. 17. 

Mar. 17. 

Mar. 17. 

Apr. 14. 

Apr. 14- 

Aj)r. 14. 

May 25. 

June 24- 

June 24. 



Ko.of 
Voucher. 



17 

18 
19 
20 
21 
22 
23 
24 
26 
26 
27 
28 
29 
30 



Balance of appropriation unexpended, as per 

last report — 

Paid John W. Hoyt, work on grounds 

Paid John W. Hoyt, work on grounds 

Paid John W. Hoyt, work on grounds 

Paid M. J. Clark, work on grcmnds 

Paid M. 8. Whitcomb, hauling manure 

Paid John W. Hoyt, work on grounds 

Paid M. J. Clark, work on grounds _ 

Paid M. S. Whitcomb, hauling manure 



Paid John W. Hoyt, work on grounds 

Paid M. J. Clark, work on grounds 

Paid M. S. Whitcomb, work on grounds , . 

Paid John W. Hoyt, work on grounds 

Paid M. S. Whitcomb, work on grounds .. 

Paid John W. Hoyt, work on grounds 

Paid M. J. Clark, work on grounds 

Paid M. S. Whitcomb, work on grounds .. 

Paid John W. Hoyt, work on grounds 

Paid M. J. Clark, work on grounds 

Paid M. S. Whitcomb. work on grounds -. 

Paid John W. Hoyt, work on grounds 

Paid John W, Hoyt, work on grounds 

Paid M. S. Whitcomb, work on grounds . . 

Balance of appropriation not drawn 

State Treasury 



from 



Totals. 



Dr. 



Cr. 



$957 70 



$957 70 



$50 00 
46 50 
51 00 
44 00 
30 00 
46 50 
46 00 
58 00 



63 50 
39 00 

48 00 
48 50 

18 00 
39 50 
23 00 
35 00 

43 00 

44 00 
16 00 
54 00 
79 00 
16 00 

19 20 

$957 50 



REPORT OP TRUSTEES OP STATE NORMAL SCHOOLS. 15 

Appropriation for improvement of grounds of Branch Normal ISchool, Los Angeles, 



Date of 
Auditing. 



1886, 

Aug. 26. 
Aug. 26. 
Aug. 26- 
Aug. 26. 
Sept. 23- 
Sept. 23- 
Sept. 23. 
Sept. 23. 
Sept. 23. 
Sept. 23. 
Sept. 23. 

Sept 23- 
Oct, 15. 
Oct. 15. 

Oct, 15. 

Oct. 15. 

Oct. 15. 

Nov. 18. 

Nov. 18. 

Nov. 18. 

Bee. 15. 

Dec. 15. 

1887. 

Mar. 17. 
Mar. 17. 
May 25- 
June 24. 



No. of 
Voucher. 



16 
17 
18 
19 
20 
21 
22 
23 
24 
25 
26 

27 
28 
29 

30 
31 
32 
33 
34 
35 
36 
37 



38 
39 
40 
41 



Balance of appropriation unexpended, as per 

last report 

Paid Bly & Son, stonework, on account 

Paid P. J. Boland, balance on grading 

Paid M. S. Whitcomb, sand 

Paid M. B. Gridley, gravel , 

Paid Bly & Son, stonework, on account .- 

Paid S. M, Perry, water pipes and laying ^•-- 

Paid M. R. Gridley, gravel. 

Paid G. H. Williams, gravel , 

Paid J, C, Hill, gravel 

Paid M, S. Whitcomb, sand 

Paid Perry Mill and Lumber Company, lumber 

and labor on bridges , 

Paid E. T. Wright, surveying 

Paid Bly & Son, balance on stonework 

Paid Snaith, Hutton & Clark, drawing contracts, I 



Dr. 



$5,509 65 



etc. 



Paid M. S. Whitcomb, sand 

Paid M. R. Gridley, gravel... 

Paid G. H. Williams, gravel _, 

Paid Baker Iron Works, hitching posts 

Paid M. R. Gridley, gravel 

Paid G. H. Williams, gravel _. 

Paid A. Sperl, payment on fence contract , 
Paid M, S. Whitcomb, sand , 



Paid 0. W. Childs, nursery stock-. 

Paid Milton Thomas, nursery stock , ' 

Paid Hansen & Solano, engineering work -..; 

Paid Antonin Sperl, balance on fence contract. -| 

Totals ! $5,509 56 



Cr. 



$1,000 00 


S8 60 


75 00 


65 00 


1,000 00 


280 06 


40 00 


30 00 


21 50 


75 00 


15 35 


900 


1,712 57 


30 00 


75 00 


40 00 


30 00 


40 00 


16 40 


12 30 


300 00 


42 75 


46 96 


12 75 


291 00 


160 32 



$5,509 55 



16 



REPORT OF TRUSTEES OF STATE NORMAL SCHOOLS. 



REPORT OF PRINCIPAL OF BRANCH NORMAL SCHOOL, LOS ANGELES. 



To the Board of Trustees of the California State Normal Schools: 

Gentlemen: The fifth and last year of the Branch Normal School is 
about closing, and the institution is to assume its new standing and added 
duties as one of the State Normal Schools of California. 

The growth of the school has during the year been continuous with that 
of the four previous years since its organization. The following table of 
aggregates show this: 

1882-83 127 

1883-84 _ _ 187 

1884-85 __ 231 

1885-86 252 

1886-87 278 

A class of twenty was graduated at Christmas, and we now present 
a class of twenty-eight for graduation, they having completed in full the 
course of study and discipline prescribed by you for the Normal Schools of 

the State. 

Graduates of the school year 1886-87 48 

Accompanying this report is a list of the graduates from the sending out 
of the first class in the summer of 1884 to the present time. We are too 
young yet as an institution to sum the results of our work. The oldest 
class has been out but three years. I have given in the record of this class, 
opposite each name, the length of time the student has devoted to teaching 
since graduating, and find the rather remarkable average of more than 
two and one half years^ teaching, where only three years was possible. 
Other classes have done as well in the shorter time they have been at work. 
I think we may confidently expect that no class will close its record with 
less than ten years' teaching for its average. 

The grounds, some five and one half acres in extent, belonging to the 
school, have been graded, the retaining walls built, the needful walks laid 
down, and roads made, fitting them for the use of the school so far as it 
was possible with the appropriation made for the purpose. The work was 
done early enough to be tested by the last rainy season, and found to be 
all that could be desired; and although more money might well be spent 
in fitting up and beautifying the grounds, they are now in excellent order 
so far as the comfort and convenience of the school is concerned. 

I have arranged the calendar for the coming year, 1887-88, in accord- 
ance with the published report of your action at the last meeting, making 
July and August vacation months. It makes no change in the arrangement 
of the studies, and will, I think, be an improvement upon the calendar of 
past years in several respects, prominent among which is the avoidance of 
the warmest part of the season, and the accordance with the year as 
arranged for the public schools. 

The prospect for the future of the school was never brighter than now. 
Southern California is rapidly filling up with people, her school facilities 



REPOBT OF trustees OF STATE NORMAL SCHOOLS. 



17 



fire keeping pace with her increased population, giving us at once better 
material and requiring well fitted teachers at our hands. And the public 
know well what to expect of a normal school. The day is past when people 
raight talk of the normal method as though the work of the normal school 
was to teach a special method for doing this or that. It is now seen that 
the good teacher is broader than any method. He bases his work upon 
deeper principles, going down to the substratum upon which rest all 
raethods. He then originates or selects the best from all. With a wide 
command of language, he never quibbles on disputed niceties of grammar; 
with a thorough mathematical knowledge, he never prides himself upon 
the tricks by which special examples are wrought. The methods of normal 
schools are but samples of the infinite variety at command of him who has 
thoroughly mastered the underlying thought. 

Very respectfully submitted. 

IRA MORE. 

Los Angeles, May, 1887. 



18 



REPORT OF TRUSTEES OF STATE NORMAL SCHOOLS. 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE STATE NORMAL SCHOOLS. 



Office of the Board of Trustees of the 1 
State Normal School at San Jos^, October, 1888. f 

To his Excellency R. W. Waterman, Governor: 

Sir: We have the honor to submit the following detailed report of receipts 

and expenditures for carrying on the Normal School under our charge, for 

the thirty-ninth fiscal year. We ask a careful scrutiny of this report, 

believing it will afiford the best guarantee of an economical expenditure of 

' future appropriations. 

The number in attendance upon the school is largely increased, probably 
owing to the increased demand for teachers. 

For the next two fiscal years, to enable the school to do the work for 
which it is designed, the following appropriations will be needed: 

For current expenses $78,000 

For library 2,000 

For care of grounds , _ 2,000 

For painting and repairing building _ _*.... 750 

Total 182,750 

For a statement of the scholastic work of the school, we respectfully call 
attention to the catalogue and to the report of the Principal herewith sub- 
mitted. 

In the erection of the building for the Branch Normal School at Chico, 
we have audited and allowed to date, bills to the amount of $32,088 85, 
all properly attested. The detailed report of this expenditmre will be made 
at the proper time. 

We have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servants, 



Ruth Royce, Secretary. 



RALPH LOWE, 

President Board of Trustees. 



REPORT OF TRUSTEES OF STATE NORMAL SCHOOLS. 19 

FINANCIAL REPORT 

Of State Noi-mal School, San Jose^ for Thirty-ninth Fiscal Year, ending June SO, 1888, 



Pate of 
Auditing. 



1887. 



July 28- 
July 28- 
July 28. 
Aug. 25- 
Aug. 25- 
Aug. 25. 
Aug. 25- 
Aug. 25- 
Aug. 25- 
Sept. 29, 
Sept. 29. 
Sept. 29- 
Sept. 29. 
Sept. 29. 
Sept. 29- 
Sept. 29. 
Sept. 29- 
Sept. 29- 
Sept. 22- 
Sept. 29- 
Sept. 29. 
Sept. 29. 
Sept. 29. 

Oct. 27. 

Oct. 27. 

Oct. 27_ 

Oct. 27. 

Oct. 27. 
Oct. 27. 
Oct. 27. 
Oct. 27. 
Oct. 27- 
Oct. 27- 
Oct. 27. 
Oct. 27- 
Oct. 27- 
Oct. 27- 
Nov. 28- 
Nov. 28- 
Nov. 28- 

Nov. 28- 

Nov. 28. 

Nov. 28- 

Nov. 28. 

Nov. 28. 

Nov. 28- 

Nov. 28- 

Nov. 28. 

Nov. 28- 

Dec. 21- 

Dec, 21- 

Dec. 21- 

Dec. 21- 

Dec. 21, 

Dec. 21, 

Dec. 21. 

Dec. 21. 



No. of 
Voucher. 



A. 1 
T. 1 



A. 2 

T. 2 

T. 3 

T. 4 

T. 5 



A. 3 

A. 4 

A. 5 

A. 6 

A. 7 

A. 8 

A. 9 

T, 6 

T. 7 

T. 8 

T. 7 

T. 10 

T. 11 



A. 10 
A. 11 

A. 12 

A, 13 
A. 14 
A. 15 
A. 16 
T. 12 
T. 13 
T. 14 
T. 15 
T. 16 
T. 17 



A. 17 
A. 18 

A. 19 
A. 20 
A. 21 
A. 22 
A. 23 
T. 18 
T. 19 
T. 20 
T. 21 



A. 24 
A. 25 
A. 26 

A. 27 
A. 28 
A. 29 
A. 30 



Appropriation, thirty-ninth fiscal year. 
Balance of tuition fund from thirty-eighth 

fiscal year, as per last report _ 

Tuition collected for thirty-ninth fiscal year 

Received for sale of engine 

Library receipts, piano rent, etc 

Paid for salaries lor July, 1887 _. 

Paid P. A. Taylor, periodicals 



Paid for payroll on grounds, July, 1887 

Paid for salaries for August, 1887 

Paid State of California, text-books 

Paid for payroll on groan ds, August, 1887 

Paid L. Chaize, valves for engine 

Paid Ed. Wale, wood _ 

Paid Ed. Wale, wood _ _ 

Paid for salaries for September, 1887. . _ 

Paid Flora E. Lacy, services as substitute 

Paid Davis <fe Co., hardware ._ ., 

Paid J. H. El wood, music charts.. _. 

Paid Charles H. Parsons, finishing cases 

Paid Friant & Co., manilla paper _ - . 

Paid A. Waldteufel, Encyclopedia Brit. (Vol. 22) 

Paid McNeil Bros., bookbinding. 

Paid for payroll on grounds, September, 1887 

Paid George Koerber, wood -._- 

Paid Charles Oeckel, hay 

Paid F. Altm an, repairing engine 

Paid McNeil Bros., spelling blanks 

Paid Mercury and Herald, advertising training 
department _ 

Paicf for salaries for October, 1887 

Paid Daunes & Van Doren, coal _ 

Paid E. H. Guppy & Son, stationery 

Paid Ruth Royce, Secretary, postage, express- 
age, etc .-T --. 

Paid Farmers Union, tools and hardware , 

Paid A. & J. Martin, piano cover _ 

Paid S. J. Mercury, advertising for stationery _> 

Paid Herald Co., advertising for stationery 

Paid for payroll on grounds, October, 1887 , 

Paid Victor Pach and, loam 

Paid Frank W. McEwen, wood 

Paid Ed. Wale, wood - 

Paid Farmers Union, supplies 

Paid Bank D. O. Mills & Co., collecting warrants. 

Paid for salaries for November, 1887 

PaidS. H. Wagener, chemicals 

Paid George Denne, framing and mounting 
jjictures _ - 

Paid T. Soper, carpenter work __- 

Paid Ruth Royce, Secretary, freight and hauling 

Paid A. R. Denike, tuning piano 

Paid D . A ppleton & Co., text-books 

Paid G. W. Welch, text-books 

Paid for payroll on grounds, November, 1887.-- 

Paid J. A. Belloli, barley and seed 

Paid Morgan Miles, grass seed - 

Paid J. Boschken, tools and hardware -. 

Paid for salaries for December, 1887 

Paid Daunes <fe Van Doren, coal 

Paid E, H. Guppy <fe Son, stationery 

Paid Gillespie <fe Saph, lumber 

Paid 1). Appleton & Co., text-books - 

Paid H. W. A. Nahl, diplomas 

Paid Lambert Hay man, filling diplomas 

Paid J.H. Elwood, sheet music 



Dr. 



$39,000 00 

2,633 35 

3,006 00 

250 00 

211 00 



Or. 



$2,442 89 

43 m 

232 50 

2,837 89 

30 00 

230 00 

4 00 
90 00 
72 50 

2,872 89 
45 00 

5 00 
20 00 

8 50 
4 80 
10 25 
33 05 
232 60 
70 00 
28 90 

7 55 
52 50 

8 50 
2,872 89 

360 58 
115 06 

59 75 

10 75 

4-75 

300 

2 00 

210 00 

19 12 
174 60 

13 00 

14 05 
13 00 

2,872 89 

12 90 

7 80 

9 92 

13 24 

2 60 
54 71 

3 00 
188 75 

48 59 

32 00 

28 50 

2,872 89 

387 75 

294 79 

59 32 

20 30 
45 00 

15 00 
. 7 20 



20 



REPORT OF TRUSTEES OF STATE NORMAL SCHOOLS. 

Financial Report— Continued. 



Date of 
Auditing, 



Dec. 21- 
Dec. 21. 

Dec. 21. 
Dec. 21. 

1888. 

Jan. 24- 
Jan. 24- 
Jan. 24. 
Jan. 24. 
Jail. 24. 
Jan. 24. 
Jan. 24. 
Jan. 24- 
Jan. 24. 
Jan. 24. 
Jan. 24. 
Jan. 24- 
Jan. 24- 
Jan. 24. 
Jan, 24- 
Jan. 24. 
Jan. 24. 
Feb. 28- 
Feb. 28. 
Feb. 28. 
Feb. 28. 
Feb. 28. 
Feb. 28- 
Feb. 28. 
Feb. 28. 
Feb, 28. 
Feb. 28. 
Feb. 28- 
Feb. 28- 
Mar. 29. 
Mar. 29- 
Mar. 29. 
Mar. 29. 
Mar. 29. 
Mar. 29. 

Mar, 29- 
Mar. 29. 
Mar. 29. 
April 26. 
April 26. 
April 26. 

April 26- 

April 26. 

April 26- 

April 26. 
April 26. 
April 26. 
April 26- 
April 26- 
April 26. 
May 24. 
May 24. 
May 24. 

May 24. 
May 24. 
May 24- 



No.of 
Voucher. 



A. 31 
A. 32 

T. 22 
T. 23 



A. 33 
A. 34 
A. 35 
A. 36 
A. 37 
A. 38 
A. 39 
A. 40 
A. 41 
A. 42 
A. 43 
A. 44 
T. 24 
T. 25 
T. 26 
T. 27 



A. 46 
A. 46 
A. 47 
A. 48 
T. 28 
T. 29 
T. 30 
T. 31 
T. 32 
T. 33 
T. 34 



A, 49 
A. 50 
A. 51 
A. 52 
A. 53 

A. 54 
T. 35 
T. 36 



A 55 

A. 56 

A. 57 

A. 58 

A. 59 

A. 60 
A. 61 
T. 37 
T. 38 
T. 39 
T. 40 



A. 62 
A. 63 

A. 64 
T. 41 
T. 42 



Paid Mrs. A. E, Bush, museum expenses 

Paid Ruth Royce, services as Secretary, six 
months 

Paid for payroll on grounds, December, 1887 .-. 
Paid George Schmidt, loam 



Paid for salaries for January, 1888 

Paid J. C. Corcoran, plumbing repairs 

Paid McNeil Bros., bookbinding 

Paid T. Soper, carpenter work . 

Paid S. L. Close, repairing blackboards 

Paid San Jos^ Gas Company, gas six months. .. 

Paid A. H. Randall, apparatus 

Paid W. D. Allison, clock... 

Paid E. J. Gillespie, drawing-books 

Paid Ruth Royce, Sec'y, postage, express, etc. .. 

Paid C. H. Allen, commencement exercises 

Paid A. R. Denike, tuning pianos 

Paid sundry persons, premiums on insurance.. 

Paid for payroll on grounds, Januarj^, 1888 

Paid J. C. Corcoran, waterpipes, etc... 

Paid Charles Oeckel, hay 

Paid David Walsh, blacksmithing 

Paid for salaries, for February, 1888 

Paid C. F, Willey, slating and repairing boards. 

Paid T, Soper, carpenter work and material 

Paid Lloyd E. Schallenberger, screen 

Paid J. Boschken, shears 



Paid for payroll on grounds, February, 1888 

Paid S. 0. V. M. & L. Co., skylights and lumber. 

Paid Oohn Rock, trees.-, 

Paid R, D. Fox, trees 

Paid H. Booksin, Jr., spraying trees 

Paid Mercury and Herald, advertising 

Paid William Grey, repairing engine 

Paid for salaries for Ml^arch, 1888 

Paid Sunset Telephone Co., box rent six months . 

Paid Daunes <& Van Doren, coal 

Paid T. K. Black & Co., Janitor supplies.-. 

Paid C. H. Allen, freight and hauling 

Paid Fannie L. Matson, reading and number- 
ing frame , 

Paid A. Friant & Co., manilla paper. 

Paid for payroll on grounds, March, 1888 

Paid Charles Oeckel, hay ^_.. 

Paid for salaries for April, 1888 

Paid Mary E. Wilson, supplies, Training Dep't.. 

Paid James Denra an, traveling expenses, August, 
1887 

Paid James Denman, traveling expenses, April, 
1888 

Paid Lawrence Archer, traveling expenses, 
April, 1888 

Paid T. EUard Beans, traveling expenses, April, 
1888 

Paid T. H. Laine, traveling expenses, April, 1888. 

Paid Ralph Lowe, traveling expenses, April, 1888. 

Paid for payroll on grounds, April, 1888 ... . 

Paid Milton Campbell, repairs to pipes andpump. 

Paid W. J. Wolcott, settmg boiler 

Paid Charles Oeckel, straw 

Paid salaries for May, 1888 



Paid E. H. Guppy & Son, stationery 

Paid C. H; Allen, Secretary joint Boards, 



and 



sundries 
Paid C. H. Allen, traveling expenses, April, 1888. 

Ppid for payroll on grounds, May, 1888 

Paid J. T. Cammeyer & Co., belting for engine.. 



Dr. 



Or. 



$6 10 



75 00 


180 00 


5 00 


3,106 22 


144 16 


41 70 


49 83 


11 75 


35 70 


12 20 


6 50 


2 10 


39 55 


32 25 


5 00 


750 00 


192 50 


283 02 


19 05 


17 25 


3,106 22 


10 00 


7 44 


9 00 


4 50 


187 50 


49 46 


51 30 


1 80 


60 00 


9 15 


3 00 


3,106 22 


16 00 


20 00 


5 65 


13 32 



40 00 

5 10 

225 25 

19 10 

3,106 22 
28 98 

10 00 

96 40 

91 60 

91 60 

91 60 

91 60 

275 50 

900 

45 70 

15 00 

3,176 22 

72 45 

25 15 

49 00 

235 00 

53 14 



REPORT OF TRUSTEES OF STATE NORMAL SCHOOLS. 

Financial Report— Continued. 



21 



Date of 
Auditing. 



May 24.. 
May 24- 
May 24- 
May 24- 
June 18.. 
June 18- 
June 18-. 
June 18-. 
June 18- 
June 18- 
June 18.. 
June 18-. 
June 18.. 
June 18.. 
June 18.. 
June 18-. 
June 18.. 
June 18.. 
July 26,, 
July 26-. 
Aug. 28-. 
Aug. 28.. 
Oct. 1-. 
Oct. 1.. 

Oct. 1.. 



Oct. 

Oct. 



No. of 
Voucher. 



T. 43 
T. 44 

T. 45 
T. 46 



A. 66 
A. 66 
A. 67 
A. 68 
T. 47 
T. 48 
T. 49 
T. 50 
T. 51 
T. 52 
T. 53 
T. 54 
T. 55 
A. 69 
A. 70 
A. 71 
A. 72 
A. 73 
T. 56 

T. 57 

T. 58 
T. 59 



Paid Luther & Schroeder, hose and sprinklers. . 

Paid John Stock Sons, hose 

Paid F. Kuchenbeiser, iron fence --. 

Paid M. W. Lipe, cutting wood-.. 

Paid for salaries for June, 1888 

Paid C. Jost & Son, alcohol 

Paid H. W. A. Nahl, diplomas 

Paid McKeil Bros., printing 

Paid Bertha Warren, filling diplomas 

Paid for payroll on grounds, June, 1888 

Paid Charles Oeckel, hay 

Paid Sidney Brown, painting fence 

Paid J. Boschken, hardware 

Paid J. A. Belloli, barley - 

Paid Excelsior Wood Yard, wood 

Paid Presho Bros., wood , 

Paid William Grey, repairs. 

Paid C. H. Allen, sundry bills 

Paid San Jose Gaa Co., gas six months 

Paid Sunset Telephone Co., box rent six months . 

Paid Farmers Union, supplies 

Paid S. C. V. M. & L. Co., lumber and miU work. 

Paid Mrs. A. E. Bush, museum expenses 

Paid Ruth Royce, Secretary, miscellaneous ex- 
penses 

Paid National Bank D. O. Mills & Co., forward- 
ing warrants.. _-- 

Paid Bank of San Jos^, exchange --. 

Paid C. H. Allen, exchange 

Balance of appropriation at close of thirty-ninth 
fiscal year 

Balance of tuition fund at close of thirty-ninth 
fiscal year _ _-. 



Totals , 



Dr. 



$45,100 35 



Cr, 



1199 00 


41 90 


185 80 


6 00 


2,701 22 


62 18 


30 00 


18 75 


32 00 


266 25 


12 60 


15 00 


10 80 


19 06 


48 00 


66 00 


22 50 


61 55 


23 80 


15 00 


1 25 


21 40 


38 95 


47 15 


5 00 


7 81 


9 70 


2 06 


1,378 95 



$45,100 35 



Summary of Above Report. 



Total income for thirty -ninth fiscal year 

Expended for salaries of teachers, Secretary, and Janitor. 

Expended for stationery 

"Expended for furniture and apparatus , 

Expended for fuel and gas 

Expended for general supplies _ 

Expended for repairs and improvements 

Expended for books and periodicals. 

Expended for traveling expenses 

Expended for insurance. 

Expended for iron fence and gates 

Miscellaneous expenditures 



Total for current expenses of school _ -.. 

Expended for payment of gardeners and other labor on grounds.. 
Expended for fuel for engine, hay, and sundry supplies for grounds. 

Expended for waterpipes and hose .- 

Expended for setting engine, and repairs to engine and tools 

Expended for plants, trees, and seed 



Total for care and improvement of grounds- 
Total unexpended balance. 

Totals 



$45,100 35 



$45,100 35 



Or. 



$35,214 66 
546 80 
190 73 
827 83 
246 93 
196 68 
240 81 
521 80 
750 00 
200 80 
476 06 



$39,413 10 



$2,705 75 
797 33 
523 92 
162 14 
117 10 



$4,306 24 
1,381 01 



$45,100 35 



22 REPORT OF TRUSTEES OF STATE NORMAL SCHOOLS. 

Appropriation for Library of State Normal Schooly San JosS. 



Date of 
Auditing. 



1887. 
Sept. 29- 
Sept. 29-. 
Sept. 29.. 

Oct 27.. 

Nov. 28_, 

Nov. 28.. 

1888. 

Jan. 24., 

May 24.. 

May 24.. 

May 24.. 

May 24., 



No. of 
Voucher. 



Appropriation 

Paid D. Appleton & Co., books 

Paid Bancroft Bros. & Co., books,.. 

Paid Annie Stockton, agent, " Wonders of Uni- 
verse" 

Paid John B. Alden, books 

Paid G. W. Welch, books 

Paid D. Lothrop & Co., books 



Paid G. W. Welch, books 

Paid Thos. Nelson & Son, books 

Paid The History Company, 4 vols. "Bancroft's 
History". _ 

Paid The J. Dewing Company, " Great Crypto- 
gram" , -- 

Paid The J. Dewing Company, ** People's Cyclo- 
pedia" ,-- 

Balance of appropriation at close of thirty-ninth 
fiscal year _ 

Totals 



$1,000 00 



$1,000 00 



Cr. 



$25 45 
35 80 

5 50 

25 95 

691 41 

37 31 

13 55 

15 68 

22 00 

7 00 

22 00 

98 35 



$1,000 00 



REPORT OF TRUSTEES OF STATE NORMAL SCHOOLS. 



REPORT OF PRINCIPAL. 



23 



To the Board of Trustees of the State Normal School^ at San Jose: 

Gentlemen: We have just closed what has been, in many respects, the 
best year's work the Normal School has ever accomplished, since my con- 
nection with it. From year to year, for the last ten years, in my reports I 
have been obliged to call attention to the fact that the teaching force in 
the school was quite too small. This year, through your liberality, we 
have had teachers enough to do the work of the school well. The number, 
however, has not been greater than our attendance has justified. In a 
Normal School, where pupils should receive a great amount of training in 
expression, there should be, in my opinion, at least one teacher for every 
twenty-five pupils, as shown in the average enrollment. 

I give below the statistics of this year, and, for comparison, of the next 
preceding year: 

1887-8. 1886-7. 

Total enrollment 793 827 

Distributed as follows: 

Senior Class 193 164 

Middle Class 199 178 

Junior Class 205 290 

Training Department 196 

Preparatory _ _ 59 

Training Department 136 

The average enrollment for the year, in the Normal School proper, has 
been four hundred and ninety. For the instruction of these we have had 
sixteen regular and two special teachers, aggregating, say, seventeen teach- 
ers, or one teacher to a little more than twenty-eight pupils. 

It is noticeable that the advanced classes have been relatively larger 
this year than last. This has been the constant tendency in the school 
for several years, showing that it holds its pupils, and that a larger number 
of those who enter remain until they graduate. 

The falling off in the Junior Class of from two hundred and ninety to 
two hundred and five is partly due to the fact that the Board avowed the 
policy of graduating hereafter but one class each year; and instead of hav- 
ing, as is usual, one hundred and twenty to one hundred and thirty to 
examine at the opening of the winter term, but about eighty presented 
themselves. 

I am glad to report that graduates of the school are constantly in demand, 
and that reports from those who are at work in the schools of the State are 
in the main satisfactory. 

The small appropriation made for the beginning of an Industrial Depart- 
ment has enabled us to furnish a room with suitable wood-working tools, 
comprising two lathes, saws, planes, and other necessary appliances. We 
have neither room nor instructors enough to give the advantages of the 
department to all our pupils, but the results with those who have taken 
even a limited course has been satisfactory, and in some cases, really sur- 
prising. 

I am not now prepared to recommend any addition to the department. 
Being entirely new, both to teachers and pupils, there has been some friction 



24 



REPORT OF TRUSTEES OF STATE NORMAL SCHOOLS. 



in getting the different matters adjusted; but I trust these will all disappear 
as we become more accustomed to the work. 

Of the desirability of giving some industrial training to our pupils there 
is no question. How to find the time for it in our already crowded course, 
and exactly how to conduct the department, are open questions. 

The changes made by the Board at the joint meeting in the Course of 
Study, Terms, and Time of Graduation, are so great, that it will require 
the experience of a year or two to determine fully their effect. It is per- 
haps best to wait for this experience before expressing any opinion in 
reference to the subject. 

Hoping and working for the best results, I am, very respectfully, your 
obedient servant, 

CHAS. H. ALLEN, Principal. 



REPORT OF TRUSTEES OF STATE NORMAL SCHOOLS. 



25 



TRUSTEES' REPORT, CALIFORNIA STATE NORMAL SCHOOL, LOS ANGELES. 



To his Excellency R. W. Waterman: 

Sir: We herewith submit for the State Normal School at Los Angeles, 
under our charge, the financial report of the thirty-ninth fiscal year, end- 
ing June 30, 1888; together with the report of the Principal of the school 
for the same year, as required by law. 

We trust you will find upon examination of the financial report, that a 
due care and economy has been exercised in disbursing the funds intrusted 
by the State to our keeping. 

Very respectfully submitted. 

0, W. CHILDS, 
President of Trustees. 

Ira More, Secretary. 



26 



REPORT OP TRUSTEES OF STATE NORMAL SCHOOLS. 



FINANCIAL REPORT 



Of the California State Normal School at Los Angeles^ for the Thirty-ninth Fiscal Year^ ending 

June 30, 1888." 



Date of 
Auditing. 



1887, 

July 31- 
July 31. 
July 31. 
July 31. 
July 31, 
July 31, 
Aug. 31. 
Aug, 31. 
Aug. 31. 
Aug. 31. 
Aug. 31. 
Aug. 31. 
Aug. 31. 
Sept. 30. 
Sept. 30. 
Sept, 30- 
Sept. 30. 
Sept. 30. 
Sept 30. 
Sept. 30. 
Sept. 30. 
Sept. 30. 
Sept. 30. 
Oct. 31, 
Oct. 31. 
Oct. 31. 
Oct. 31. 
Oct. 31. 
Oct. 31. 
Oct. 31- 
Nov. 30. 
Nov. 30. 
Nov. 30- 
Nov. 30. 
Nov. 30. 
Nov. 30. 
Nov. 30. 
Nov. 30, 
Nov. 30. 
Nov. 30- 

Dec. 31. 

Dec. 31, 

Dec. 31- 

Dec. 31- 

Dec. 31. 

Dec. 31. 

Dec. 31. 

Dec. 31. 

1888. 

Jan.' 31- 

Jan. 31- 

Jan. 31- 

Jan. 31. 

Jan. 31. 

Jan. 31- 

Feb. 29- 

Feb. 29- 

Feb. 29- 

Feb. 29- 

Feb. 29. 

Feb. 29. 

Feb. 29- 



No. of 
Voucher. 



3 
4 
.5 
6 
9 
10 
11 
12 
13 
14 
15 
16 
17 
18 
19 
20 
21 
22 
23 
24 
26 
27 to 39 
40 
41 
42 
43 
44 
45 
46 
47 
48 
49 
50 
51 
52 
53 
54 
55 

57 
58 
59 
60 
61 
62 
63 
64 



65 

66 
67 
68 
69 
70 
75 
76 
77 
78 
79 
80 
81 



Current "Expense Account 



To appropriation for current year 

By Sunset Telephone Company, for July 

By Wein shank & Knox, plumbing 

By Richardson & Son, blackboard material 

By F. H. Angell, slating blackboards _ 

By salaries of employes for July, 1887 

By Samuel J. Hinckley, Janitor, for July 

By salaries of employes for August, 1887 

By Los Angeles City Water Co., supply for July. 

By Sunset Telephone Company, August 

By Richardson & Son, paints, varnishes, etc 

By L. A. Furniture Company, teacher's desk 

By C. C. Bonn ell, repairing desks 

By M. S. Whitcomb, hauling sand, etc. 

By salaries of employes for September 

By L. A. Gas Company, supply for August 

By Sunset Telephone Co., for September 

By Los Angeles City Water, for August 

By Phil. Hirschfeld'& Co., for stationery 

By H. Jevne & Co., for dusters 

By W. C. Furrey, for Janitor's supplies 

By Richardson & Son, paints and oil 

By J. W. Queen & Co., microscope apparatus... 

By S. M. White, mileage to San Jos6 

By salaries of employes for October 

By Sunset Telephone Company, for October 

By Citizens Water Company, for September 

By Los Angeles City Water Co., for September.. 
By TjOs Angeles Gas Company, for September... 

By J, Dewing & Co., for school furniture.. 

By Perry L. & M. Co., for plank walk 

By salaries of employes for November 

By Citizens Water Company, for October 

By Los Angeles City Water Co., for October 

By Los Angeles Gas Company, for October 

By Hend^son & Co., for ntting kej^s 



By W. C. Furrey, hardware, etc. 
By Brown & Foster, hardware.. 
By Sunset Telephone Company, for November . 

By F. W. Blanchard, tuning piano 

By Van Horn, Mather & Frost, anatomical 

charts 

By salaries for December, 1887 

By Sunset Telephone Company, for December.. 
By Los Angeles Gas Company, for November .. 

By Citizens Water Company, for November 

By Los Angeles City Water Co., for November.. 
By Ira More, salary as Secretary to January 1. .. 

By Hirschfeld & Seldner, for stationery 

By Antonin Sperl, for repairing fence -.., 



By 

By 
By 

By 



salaries for January, 1888 

W. S, Maxwell, for coal 

Los Angeles Gas Co., for December, 1887 

Los Angeles Gas Co., for July, 1887 (duplicate) 

Sunset Telephone Co., for January, 1888 

Citizens Water Co., for December, 1887 

salaries for February, 1888 

W. S. Maxwell, for coal and wood 

Sunset Telephone Company, for February.. 

Los Angeles Gas Company, for January 

Citizens Water Company, for January, 

L, B. Lawson, for lettering diplomas 

W. H. A. Nahl, for blank diplomas 



Dr. 



$18,000 00 



Cr. 



$5 00 


57 90 


18 78 


14 00 


1,166 65 


50 00 


1,216 65 


1 50 


5 00 


31 55 


35 00 


101 50 


500 


1,266 65 


1 50 


5 00 


2 25 


8 00 


960 


20 25 


11 00 


16 94 


96 00 


1,296 65 


5 00 


6 50 


6 75 


2 70 


179 90 


78 04 


1,296 65 


10 60 


6 75 


6 30 


990 


10 30 


305 


5 00 


10 00 


52 00 


1,296 65 


5 00 


4 20 


15 90 


3 00 


75 00 


47 25 


900 


1,296 65 


73 25 


600 


4 20 


500 


16 80 


1,296 65 


140 30 


500 


540 


17 25 


600 


30 00 



REPORT OF TRUSTEES OP STATE NORMAL SCHOOLS. 

FiNANCiAii Report— Continued. 



Date of 

Auditing. 



Feb. 29. 

Feb. 29. 

Feb. 29- 

Feb. 29- 

Mar. 31. 

Mar. 31. 

Mar. 31. 

Mar. 31, 
April 30. 

April 30- 
April 30. 
April 30. 
April 30. 
May 31. 
May 31. 
May 31- 
May 31- 
May 31, 
May 31- 
May 31. 
May 31. 
May 31- 
May 31. 
May 31. 
June 30. 
June 30. 
June 30. 
June 30. 

June 30. 
June 30. 
June 3o- 
June 30. 
June 30. 
June 30- 

June 30. 
June 30. 
June 30. 
June 30. 
June 30. 
June 30. 
June 30_ 
June 30. 
June 30, 



No. of 
Voucher. 



82 

83 

84 

85 

99 

100 

101 

102 

105 

106 
107 
108 
109 
111 
112 
113 
114 
115 
116 
117 
118 
119 
120 
121 
123 
124 
125,126 
127 

128 
129 
130 
131 
133 
132 

134 
135 
136 
137 
138 
140 
141 
142 
143 



By D, Knox, for plumbing repairs 

By Adolf Ekstein, for chemicals 

By tririch Knoch, for printing programmes 

By H. C. Wyatt, for rent of Opera House 

By salaries for March, 1888 

By Phil. Hirschfeld, for stationery 

By Los Angeles Gas Company, for February ... 

By Sunset Telephone Company, for March 

By Ghas. H. Allen, salary. Secretary joint Nor- 
mal Board , 

By Los Angeles Gas Co., for March, 1888 

By Citizens Water Co., for March, 1888 

By Sunset Telephone Co., for April 

By salaries for April, 1888 ..,. 

By salaries for May, 1888 

By Z. L. Parmelee, for glass tubes 

By Phil. Hirschfeld & Co., for stationery 

By Merrill & Cook, for ruled paper 

By Citizens Water Co., for April 

By Sunset Telephone Co., for May. 

Bjr Los Angeles City Water Co., for April 

By Fannie L. Matson, for number frame 

By Los Angeles Gas Co., for April 

By A. S. Davidson, for mileage .- - _. 

By Clara S. Foitz, for mileage 

By salaries for June, 1888 

By Home Insurance Co., for premiums on $8,000_ 

By Jas. W. Queen, for skeleton and apparatus.. 

By Ira More, Secretary to Trustees, salary to 
June 30, 1888 

By Los Angeles Gas Co., for May and June 

By Sunset Telephone Co., for June ., 

By L. B. Lawson, for lettering diplomas 

By Wells, Fargo & Co., expressage on package.. 

By Citizens Water Co., for May and June 

By Los Angeles City Water Co., for May and 
June 

By Adolf Ekstein, for chemicals 

By Phil. Hirschfeld & Co., stationery ... 

By W. C. Furrey, for hardware, etc 

By Richardson '& Son, paints and oils 

By Times-Mirror Co., programmes 

By J. Kuhrts, rent of Turner Hall 

By C. W. Hodson, for educational periodicals.. 

By California Central Railroad, for freight 

By Powell, Haskell & Co., moving piano 

By balance 



Dr. 



27 



$18,000 00 



Cr. 



$5 00 


46 10 


15 00 


25 00 


1,296 65 


49 25 


7 20 


5 00 


20 00 


3 30 


11 75 


6 26 


1,296 65 


1,296 65 


1 85 


24 73 


42 00 


5 45 


6 05 


450 


30 00 


3 60 


12 00 


30 00 


1,296 65 


144 00 


97 62 


75 00 


7 20 


5 25 


10 00 


11 25 


20 55 


9 00 


2 60 


37 00 


54 55 


52 00 


11 25 


27 00 


15 00 


6 20 


700 


376 69 



$18,000 00 



28 



REPORT OF TRUSTEES OF STATE NORMAL SCHOOLS* 

Library and Museum — Thirty-ninth Fiscal Year. 



Date of 
Auditing, 



1887. 
July 1. 

Dec. 1.. 

1888. 

Jan. 31- 
Jan. 31. 
Feb. 29. 
Feb. 29. 
June 30- 



No. of 
Voucher. 



m 



73 

74 



89,90,98 



To appropriation for thirty-ninth fiscal year, 

ending June 30, 1888- - -.' 

By Ginn & Co., for books for library _ 



By Perry L. & M. Co., for library cases 

By History Co., for 3 vols. Bancroft's History . 

By Thomas J. Neuner, for binding 

By Merrill & Cook, for books for library 

By balance _ 



Totals 



$1,000 00 



$1,000 00 



Cr. 



$161 02 



280 00 
16 50 
25 25 

513 16 

4 07 



$1,000 00 



Care of Grounds, 



Pate of 
Auditing. 



1887. 

July 1. 
July 31. 
Aug. 31. 
Sept. 30. 
Oct 31- 
Nov. 30. 
Dec. 31. 
Dec. 31, 

1888. 

Jan. 31. 
Jan. 31. 
Feb. 29. 
Feb. 29. 
Mar. 31. 
Mar. 31. 
April 30. 
May 31. 
June 30, 
June 30. 



No. of 
Voaclier. 



7 

8 
25 
46i 
66 



71 

72 
87 
88 
103 
104 
110 
122 
139 



To appropriation for thirty-ninth fiscal year . 

By John W. Hoyt, for work in July 

By John W. Hoyt, for work in August 

By John W. Hoyt, for work in September 

By John W. Hoyt, for work in October 

By John W. Hoyt, for work in November --. 

By John W. Hoyt, for work in December 

By M. S. Whitcomb, with team 



By William Capple, work in January, 1888 - .. 

By F. McCracken, for stakes and frames 

By H. Jevne,for materials for tree wash 

By WilUam Capple, for work in February ..- 

By William Capple, for work in March 

By Occidental Niirsery, for trees and shrubs. 

By William Capple, for work in April 

By William Capple, for work in May 

By William Capple, for work in June 

By balance 



Totals 



Dr. 



$750 00 



$750 00 



Cr. 



$47 00 
53 00 
52 00 
52 00 
48 00 
50 00 
40 00 



44 00 
86 00 
12 25 
50 00 
54 00 
19 20 
50 00 
52 00 
40 50 
05 

$750 00 



REPORT OF TRUSTEES OP STATE NORMAL SCHOOLS. 

Thikty -NINTH Fiscal Year, ENPiNa Jtjne 30, 1888. 

Summary of Petty Cash Account, 



29 



To cash on hand 

To rent of room to United States Observatory 

To water furnished United States Observatory 

To coal furnished Model School and United States Observatory 

To amount received for duplicate library book _ 

By amount paid for express charges _ 

By amount paid for freight and cartage 

By amount paid for postage 

By amount paid for 30 vols. "Art Treasures of Italy" 

By amount paid for books - , 

By amount paid for advertising ..,., 

By amount paid for work 

By amount paid for sundry small bills. 

By balance 



Dr. 



$84 29 

72 00 

24 00 

55 75 

3 20 



$239 24 



Cr. 



$60 35 
15 35 
26 25 
30 00 
17 80 
12 S^ 
43 33 
25 75 
7 56 



$239 24 





Summary foe Thikty-ninth 


Fiscal Yeak. 








Dr. 


Cr. 


To receipts 


Current Expense. 




$18,000 00 




By disbursements 


$17,623 31 


By balance - -- . - - -- - - - - 




376 69 




Library and Museum. 










$18,000 00 


$18,000 00 


To receints 


$1,000 00 




By disbursements 


$995 93 


Bv balance - ^ . 




4 07 




Care of Grounds. 










$1,000 00 


$1,000 00 


To receipts 


$750 00 




Bv disbursements - .._,- ............. _........._._..... 


$749 95 


Bv balance -....»._. .. _. 




05 




Petty Gash. 










$750 00 


$750 00 


To receipts 


$239 24 




Bv disbursements -. ......... .. ... ..-.. ................. 


$231 es 


By balance - -...._ 




7 56 














$239 24 


$239 24 



30 



REPORT OF TRUSTEES OF STATE NORMAL SCHOOLS, 



PRINCIPAUS REPORT. 



To the Board of Trustees of the California State Normal School at Los 
Angeles: 

Gentlemen: The sixth year since the organization of this school is now 
closing and has been fairly prosperous. We have been hampered some- 
what in growth by the great difficulty in procuring rooms and board for 
the students; but as the rapid building of the past year seems to approach 
the needs of the people, we apprehend less difficulty in the future. 

The following table shows the aggregate attendance each year since the 
organization of the school, September, 1882: 

1882-83 ■ 126 

1883-84,. 187 

1884-85 - 2*51 

1885-86 _ 252 

1886-87 — 278 

1887-88 279 

Of this number every student pledges his intention to teach in the pub- 
lic schools of this State; no others are received. 

The average attendance this year is larger than last year, though the 
aggregate shows but slight increase. In comparing the size of this school 
with other public normal schools, the last data obtainable are in 1885-86, 
In that year there were one hundred and seventeen public normal schools 
in the United States, with an aggregate attendance of twenty-three thou- 
sand normal students, making an average of one hundred and ninety-seven 
at each school. Our attendance that year was two hundred and fifty-two, 
making us considerably larger than the average. Our increase must have 
since been more rapid than in the older States; so that we may safely 
assert that this school is at the present time decidedly larger than the 
average public normal school in the United States. 

We present at this time a class of twenty-two for graduation, making, 
with a class of thirteen at the middle of the year, thirty-five graduates for 
the school year. The entire number of graduates from the school is one 
hundred and eighty-three — the first class graduating in 1884. We have 
kept a record of this first class as a sample of the work done by the stu- 
dents after leaving tl^e Normal School. They have been out four years, 
and though some have fallen out by the way, as must be expected, the 
average length of time taught is three and one fourth years. Experience 
of older normal schools shows the average length of time taught by grad- 
uates to be about ten years. From present appearances, our classes thus 
far sent out will equal or exceed that time. 

As before stated, all who enter the Normal School pledge an intention to 
fit themselves for teaching, and to teach in the public schools. All, or 
nearly all, are undoubtedly sincere in making this pledge, for there is little 
to attract one in the rugged work of the school, unless ne needs the disci- 
pline for teaching. Yet there are many who do not graduate; some find 
they have attempted more than their strength will allow; some are not pro- 



REPORT OF TRUSTEES OF STATE NORMAL SCHOOLS. 



31 



moted regularly, and become discouraged; others are found by natural 
aptitudes unfitted for the teacher's vocation, and are advised' to withdraw; 
some move away and join themselves to other schools; and possibly some, 
in this day of sudden riches, find themselves beyond the prospect of earn- 
ing their own livelihood, and desire a different culture. Those also must be 
mentioned who join the school for a brief period to gain such benefit as they 
may, but win their certificates in the county examinations. But a careful 
numbering of the admissions and the graduations shows that an unusually 
large number of those who enter, thirty-seven per cent in all, take the 
diploma of the school. 

The library having outgrown its accommodations, new cases were put in 
about Christmas time, and some seven hundred volumes added to the list. 
The Librarians, Misses Dunn and Merritt, of the Faculty, have spent much 
time in rearranging and cataloguing the collection, and their catalogue, 
which is now in press, will add much to the facilities of using the books to 
the best advantage, and with the least loss of time. 

A great press of other matters has prevented giving the attention to the 
museum which it deserves. The collection is already a creditable one, and 
time must be taken the coming school year to insure its increase on a scale 
commensurate with the needs of this portion of the State, 

The addition of the fourth year to the course of study makes necessary 
some apparatus not before needed; especially a portable telescope for class 
use, without which the study of the heavens is comparatively uninteresting. 
A four-inch object glass, if perfect, makes an instrument excellently adapted 
to school purposes, indeed better for such use than a larger glass. I hope 
you will see fit to order the purchase of such an instrument, which is of 
quite moderate cost. 

It is to be hoped that many graduates will avail themselves of the ad- 
vantages of the Post Graduate Course, and thus increase their power of 
usefulness to the State. 

Very respectfully submitted, 

IRA MORE, 



TESTI m: O N Y 



TAKEN BEFORE 



JOINT SPECIAL WilTEES EOM ASSEMBLY AND SENATE 



APPOINTED TO INVESTIGATE CERTAIN 



es ID iDBDwn Willi me hmuod 
State NoniialS()W,Clii(;o,Botte 




TESTIMONY. 



The special committees appointed from the Senate and Assembly to 
investigate certain charges made against the Board of Trustees and Super- 
intendent having in charge the construction of the State Normal School, 
located at Chico, Butte County, in regard to the erection of said building, 
met February 16, 1889, ten o'clock A. m., at the office of F. C. Lusk, Esq., 
when the following proceedings were had: 

Present: Senator Campbell, Assemblymen Dobbin, Burwell, Davis, 
Maher, and Porter. 

Senator Campbell was unanimously elected Chairman of the joint com- 
mittee. 

The Chairman swore L. J. Gillin to act as official stenographer of the 
joint committee, to correctly report and transcribe the testimony taken 
before said committee. 



F. C. Lusk. 

Sworn. 

The Witness: I would like to make a full statement of facts in this 
matter relating to the charges made, and then the committee can ask any 
questions they may desire. Myself, General Bid well, A. H. Crew, L. H. 
Mcintosh, and T. P. Hendricks were appointed Trustees of this Branch 
State Normal School, The erection of the building really came under the 
supervision of the Board of Trustees of the Normal School at San Jos6, 
but they did not desire to undertake the trouble of superintending its 
erection, as it would necessitate the annoyance of their coming away up 
here, and so this Board was appointed to take the matter under their per- 
sonal supervision, they to act as the San Jose Board's executive agents for 
the purpose of erecting this building. All bills, however, go to the Board 
at San Jose, who are legally the Board superintending the construction of 
the school. 

Regarding the cost of the building: When we came to consult with Pro- 
fessor Allen, who was the superintendent of the building of the State 
Normal School at Los Angeles, we found that a building adapted to the 
purposes ought to be of a certain size; that it should contain a certain 
number of rooms, they being of a certain size; that there should be many 
things in connection with the building of a certain size and quality, to 
erect a good building for the purpose. Of course the labor having to be 
done by the days work, it could not be done as cheaply as otherwise. We 
employed Percy & Hamilton, of San Francisco, as architects, and desired 
them to draw plans and specifications of a building suitable for the pur- 
pose intended. They did so, and also employed Mr. Kent of San Fran- 
cisco to make the estimates of the cost of the erection of the building, 
and we found that by no possibility could we construct a building for fifty 
thousand dollars, the price allowed for its building, that would answer the 
purpose. The citizens of Chico, taking an active interest in the matter, 
subscribed ten thousand dollars towards the erection of this Normal 
School. General Bidwell had donated eight acres of land from his ranch, 



r 



worth a considerable amount of money, for the site of the building. This 
ten thousand dollars • donated by the citizens was in the hands of the 
Board to use as they saw proper. When we went to San Jose with our 
plans, it was argued by Mr. Kent and the architect that the building 
could be put up inside of sixty thousand dollars, so the Board adopted 
the plan in view of that estimate of cost. Well, when we came to get 
along with the building of the school we found some things came a good 
deal higher than we had expected they would. We found, for instance, 
that we could not get brick for the purpose required at the price we ex- 
pected to, because brick heretofore had always been made by Chinamen 
in this part of the State; they were the only ones who knew how to make 
brick, and we were compelled to hire white men and train them iji the 
trade, and teach them how to make the brick. We had considerable trouble 
too, about the making of the brick. Well, that trouble about the brick made 
our expense in that direction a couple of thousand dollars more than we 
had expected, and then several things transpired in the course of the 
erection of the building to run up the cost of the building a great deal 
higher than we had ever expected it would amount to. We started in to erect 
this Normal School as we would a private dwelling house — sl house of our 
own — to build it at the least possible expense to the State and at the same 
time to make a good, substantial building, and have everything first-class 
about the school; that everything connected with the school should be of 
a good character; the workmanship should be good, and at the same time 
we should get everything as cheaply as possible, as we would if we were 
to erect a house for ourselves — ^as economically as we possibly could. 

Now, in reference to low prices for wages being paid workmen: When 
we first started the erection of the school, and before we had a superin- 
tendent of construction, there was some work necessary to be done to get the 
ground donated by General Bid well for a site, cleared off and in order for 
the work. There were some trees to be taken out, and General Bidwell 
wanted to superintend that part of the work, as he knew just what had to 
be done and how it ought to be done; so we permitted him to take charge 
of that portion of the work. We knew nothing whatever as to the wages 
he was paying — the prices he paid for labor. The fact is though, I sup- 
pose, that he just took the men from his own ranch and just transferred 
them to the ground where the work was to be done; had them do the work 
and paid them just what he had been paying them on the ranch. I under- 
stand objections have been made to the prices paid for labor. I don't 
understand; I don't know the sum that was paid now from memory, to 
the men working for him at that time. I suppose it was a dollar and a 
half a day; anyway, it was the usual price paid for labor — the usual price 
that General Bidwell paid his employes, and that is the history of how it 
came that those extremely small wages, as I have heard them called, were 
paid. It was at the beginning of the work, and before we had a superin- 
tendent. In fact, that work was not on the building at all; it was before 
the building was commenced — ^getting the ground ready. 

After the building was started we found a great deal of trouble getting 
bricklayers to do the work. Men who did other work, I think, were not 
particularly scarce, but bricklayers were. We went to San Francisco and 
could not get bricklayers; we went to Sacramento and could not get them, 
and we were obliged to get along as best as we might with bricklayers 
who lived in this vicinity, and who lived in this portion of the State. 

We held almost daily sessions of the Board of Trustees during the erec- 
tion of the building; not every day, but frequently every day for a week 
and sometimes three or four times a week. At none of our meetings did 



any man employed on the building ever complain or appear before the 
Board with any charges or complaints, or to express any dissatisfaction 
regarding the wages paid or the time of working. Nor did we ever hear 
any complaint about the conduct or treatment of Mr. Bryant, the Superin- 
tendent. No complaint was ever made to us by any man working on the 
building. Then at the outset of the work there came up the question of 
how many — about eight hours work a day. The men who were working 
on the building mainly lived around here, were in the habit of working 
nine, nine and a half, and ten hours a day, according to the season of the 
year. All the carpenters and all the other mechanics who were employed 
on that building had been used to working that number of hours. And I 
had a talk, or rather had the Superintendent talk with the men as to 
whether they would rather work eight hours or work the usual number of 
hours and receive the usual pay — to work the number of hours they had 
been accustomed to around here. They all agreed to work the usual 
number of hours that they worked around here. 

Mb. Campbell: They would rather work ten than eight hours for the 
same pay? Answer — I didn't say that. I said, and receive the same pay 
they had received around here. And if they worked, that is, suppose they 
were paid a certain price per hour, it would amount to more for them by 
working the longer number of hours. It would be better for them to work 
nine or nine and a half or ten hours than eight at that rate. If they were 
working here ten hours a day for three dollars per day, why paid at the 
rate of thirty cents an hour would give them just the same rate of wages 
that they had been accustomed to. They were satisfied and willing to 
work for a sum per hour which would give them, which would amount to, 
a regular day's pay around here at the same number of hours. They 
were perfectly satisfied with that arrangement, and there was no com- 
plaint made as to the hours of labor, and it was understood as being satis- 
factory that the work should be done in that way. The work went right 
on in that way and nothing further was ever heard by the Board about it, 
and it was never called to the Board's attention if there was any com- 
plaint regarding the number of hours worked — no complaint made to the 
Board whatever until the committee from the Legislature at Sacramento 
came here, and then the committee spoke of the fact of the men being 
worked ten hours a day. The men, as far as I know, were perfectly satis- 
fied with the hours they were working and pay they were receiving until 
the committee from the Legislature came here from Sacramento. It was 
then stated by several members of that committee that they thought the 
men should have worked a less number of hours or else should have 
received more pay, one or the other. And we stated that if that was the 
proper course it was something of which we had not been advised ; and if 
we had done anything wrong in the matter we had done so innocently, and 
that no complaint had ever been made to us about it; if there was any com- 
plaint in regard to it, it was not here ; but that if the committee thought that 
was the proper course we would certainly do what the committee thought 
right. But we told them we could not finish the building if we worked 
the men but eight hours a day and gave them the same wages they were 
then receiving; that it would require twenty-five hundred dollars more to 
finish the building on account of paying a larger price for the work than 
we had been doing; and they said they would rather that the work would 
go on that way and that they would see that the additional money was appro- 
priated by the Legislature ; they would rather that the work was properly 
done. Of course we were entirely satisfied with that, so long as we were 
assured of the appropriation. Whatever we did in the matter of employing 



6 

men and as regards the prices paid for their labor, we did in entirely 
good faith and entirely innocent of doing wrong, deeming that we were 
acting for the best interests of the State and that we were expending the 
State's money properly and judiciously. 

Mr. Campbell: What is your profession ? A. Lawyer. I will state right 
here that I went on this Board of Trustees with the utmost reluctance. I 
only did so at the earnest solicitation of Governor Bartlett, who desired 
me to go on the Board at a personal interview. It has been a great annoy- 
ance to me. It has taken a great deal of my time and has given me a 
great deal of trouble, without compensation. 

Mr. Campbell: As a lawyer, you must surely be aware of the existence 
of a section in the Constitution of the State which makes a day's labor on 
all public works? A. It is expressed in the bill appropriating — erecting a 
branch school here, that the building should be put up by day's work. 

Q. Would not this section I refer to govern the whole thing ? This is 
article twenty of the Constitution of the State of California, and at section 
seventeen we find the words: "Eight hours shall constitute a legal day's 
work on all public works." That is as the Constitution reads, and I believe 
that is the law as it stands now. It says in the Political Code: "All work 
done upon public buildings of this State must be done under the super- 
vision of a superintendent or State officer or officers having charge of the 
works, and all labor employed on such buildings, whether skilled or 
unskilled, must be employed by the day, and no work upon any of such 
buildings must be done by contract." "All materials to be used on all 
public buildings must be furnished by contract, and in accordance with 
the plans and specifications therefor." " Eight hours shall constitute a 
legal day's work in all cases where the same is performed under the 
authority of any law of this State, or under the direction, control, or by 
the authority of any officer of this State acting in his official capacity or 
under the direction, control, or by the authority of any municipal corporation 
within this State, or of any officer thereof acting as such, and a stipulation 
to that effect be made a part of all contracts to which the State or any 
municipal corporation therein is a party." Now, Mr. Lusk, did you know 
that that law existed at the time ? A. I don't suppose I ever read and 
didn't know it existed until this time. I knew, however, generally that 
eight hours was regarded as a legal day's work. 

Q. At what time did you become aware of that fact? A. Before the 
selection of Chico as the site. 

Q. You knew that at that time? A. Certainly. The law was very fre- 
quently read. It is a short law. 

Q. Is there an}^ difference in the magnitude of one law from another? 
A. I suppose all laws are of equal dignity. All laws should be obeyed. 

Q. You think all laws should be obeyed. This law was then not 
obeyed? A. I think it was obeyed. 

Q. You think it was obeyed? A. I don't understand that there is any 
law fixing the price per day for any labor on State work or any other 
work. 

Q. We don't pretend that there is. We are only laymen. A, Of course, 
if we employed men at one dollar a day, then we would certainly be under 
the letter of the law. 

Q. The law says that eight hours is a legal day's work. Now, then, you 
say that all these men wanted to be worked the usual number of hours 
they had been working ? A. I understood it so. 

Q, Then you state that they preferred to work ten hours rather than 
eight. Again, you state that they wanted to work by the hour, if by 



so doing they could get a full day's pay? A. A full day's pay being the 
amount which they usually worked for around here; in other words, labor- 
ers that worked on this building, if they received three dollars a day on 
work they did in this vicinity, they were willing to work for the State for 
the same wages. 

Q. No laborer ever made complaint as to the manner of treatment or the 
number of hours he was working? A. Never made any complaint to the 
Board in my presence. 

Q. How then did it come to your knowledge that they would prefer to 
work ten than eight hours if they did not make some complaint ? A. Be- 
cause, immediately after the erection — the construction — of the building 
was started, the Superintendent saw the men and reported that they pre- 
ferred to work the usual number of hours that they were in the habit of 
working around here, and were willing to work at a price per hour that 
would amount to the same wages that they had been accustomed to receive 
when working around here; and that seemed to be satisfactory to both the 
Board and the men. We thought the law was acted up to. 

Q. Well, provided that the law providing for the erection of the build- 
ing and appointing the officers to superintend and manage its erection was 
^Dbeyed, should not the law providing for the number of hours that labor- 
ers were to work on all public buildings — should not that law be main- 
tained as well as the other ? A. If any law was not obeyed it certainly 
ought to have been obeyed. Every law should be observed by every citi- 
zen, undoubtedly. 

Q. Then you will admit, or will you admit, that the law governing the 
hours of labor, providing for the number of hours to be worked on build- 
ings of the State, was violated in the construction of this building? A. I 
do not think it was violated, but a number of the committee that was 
here from the Legislature — ^that is, I don't think it was violated, either in 
substance or in spirit — but some of the members of the committee thought 
it was violated while other members thought it was not. 

Q. Well, will you give us your reasons why you think it was not vio- 
lated ? A. Yes, sir. Because the men we employed on this building were 
in the — we had only a small amount of money; we wanted to make it go 
as far as possible, and the men that we employed in the construction of the 
building all, or nearly all of them, lived around here — were almost exclu- 
sively citizens of this town and interested in the building, and they were 
perfectly satisfied and willing to work, as stated to us, ten hours a day at 
such a price per hour as amounted to the same wages that they had been 
in the habit of receiving for a day's work on work in town. I don't know 
that I make myself clear, but I am simply stating what I have stated in 
substance two or three times before. 

Q. In law, can you waive the right of others? A. Well, that is rather 
an abstract question. There are many legal rights which may be waived. 
Of course a person cannot waive the rights of other persons unless he has 
the authority to do it. He can waive his own rights, but I don't think he 
has the power to waive the rights of others without their permission and 
authority. 

Q. You say that you did all this in the interest of the State, of which I 
have not the slightest doubt, and the committee does not attempt to ques- 
tion that fact; but, in the interest of economy, do you think you have taken 
away from any one employed on the building any of the rights which be- 
longed to him, allowed to them by law? Do you think you have done so? 
A. Certainly not. 



8 

Q. Well, in this case has it been done? A. I claim not. In my view 
of the matter, I claim it has not been done. 

Q. Did you not work them by the hour for ten hours a day? A. Well^ 
whether they made their time out by the day or hour I do not know. I 
presume it was made out by the day. But when this matter was dis- 
cussed they stated they were willing to work at a certain price per hour, so 
long as that price would allow them to make their usual wages. If a car- 
penter that we employed, living here in town, and who had received as a 
usual day's pay three dollars, and work for that from nine to ten hours a 
day, according to the season of the year, he was satisfied to work for us on 
that building at a price per hour and the usual number of hours per day 
that he was in the habit of working around here. That would pay him 
the same rate of wages per day as that to which he had been accustomed. 
He was perfectly satisfied to do so. We were informed that it was cus- 
tomary to work men by the hour. We did not know that we were 

Q, [Interrupting.] When was that brought to your notice that it was 
proper to work men by the hour on public buildings, if you will tell us?' 
A. Well, we were informed that the usual way of working on buildings 
was to work by the hour. 

Q. Will you be kind enough to give us the name of any witness or per- 
son who told you that it was the usual custom to work by the hour on 
public buildings — any one person who told you that? A. I could not, but 
I know that was the discussion that men had worked eight hours; had 
worked a larger number of hours than eight on public buildings, and had 
been paid by the hour. 

Q. Well, if you will give me the name of any person who told you that — 
tell me any building upon which that was done since 1867? A. I could 
not do that. 

Q. You don't know then of your own knowledge ? A. I do not. 

Q. You simply know from hearsay. Can you give me the name of any 
reliable or responsible person who says that such is the fact? A. That was 
the discussion. I cannot give the name of any particular person. 

Mr. Davis: In the meeting of the Committee on Public Buildings which 
met here — perhaps Mr. Lusk has forgotten it, but both Superintendent 
Hoitt and Mr. Brierly stated in this room that the Branch Normal School 
at Los Angeles was built and paid for by the hour. Do you remember 
that, Mr. Lusk? A. I remember that now, but I had forgotten it at the 
time Mr. Campbell asked me. And I had heard similar statements made 
by others, but as to who made them I cannot now remember. I do not 
remember the buildings mentioned either. I presume I may have heard 
those statements made by our architect and by Mr. Kent and Professor 
Allen, but I couldn't definitely state who they were; and I think I have 
heard of similar cases, where men have worked by the hour on buildings- — 
and a good many buildings outside of State work — that eight hours con- 
stituted a day's labor, a legal day's work. Of course in this country every- 
body works a greater number of hours; everybody works more than eight 
hours a day in almost every employment. We expressed to the committee 
which was here that if we were not doing what they thought was right, and 
they thought the work should be done differently regarding the number of 
hours, that we were perfectly willing to do as thej^ thought right. 

Q. About what was the highest day's payroll on the works, merely to 
get at an estimate? A, We have all the payrolls here. Well, the highest 
week's payroll was from $900 to $1,100. I suppose $150 would be the 
highest day's pay. Of course the payroll was sometimes much lower than 



that. There were some days when the heat was so excessive that the men 
did not work — would not work all the day. 

Q. About $150 would be the highest day's pay? A. Yes, sir, 

Mr. Dobbin: Those laborers you speak of as having been taken from 
General Bid well's ranch, they were taken from the ranch to work on the 
building when labor was scarce? A. No; you did not understand me 
correctly. I didn't say they were taken to do that work because labor was 
scarce. I said before the building was — before the erection of the build- 
ings was commenced there was some work to be done on the grounds — 
preparing the grounds for the foundation of the building. We did not 
have a Superintendent then, and General Bid well offered to superintend 
the work and do it for us, and we permitted him to do so for us. He 
wanted to take out the trees and see that it was done properly — ^the site of 
this building was an orchard, and the trees had to be taken out, and the 
roots, in order to make clear ground for the building. General Bidwell 
gave this orchard site for the purpose, and he said that the trees had to be 
taken out very deep, and that the roots had to be removed very thoroughly 
from the ground. I suppose he just took his men from his ranch — I don't 
know that — but I suppose he simply took the men he had employed on 
his ranch and put them at work on this ground, on the grubbing of those 
trees, and he paid them, I suppose, just what he was paying for labor of 
that character on his own ranch, 

Q, Do you know of any of those men who were working as laborers, 
taken from General Bidwell's ranch; do you know of them being em- 
ployed on the building as skilled mechanics, when in fact they were only 
laborers and not able to do skilled work? What I mean by skilled me- 
chanics is carpenter work or lathing work? A. That question I am 
entirely unable to answer. 

Q. You do not know of that fact? A.. No, sir; I do not know that to be 
a fact. The employment of the men on that building was principally left 
to the Superintendent, and perhaps he employed men who were not me- 
chanics. I certainly do not know. I saw that in the papers, but I never 
heard any complaint of that kind from the mechanics around here who 
were employed on the building. That is the payroll for the week ending 
the sixth of October, 1888. Here is the payroll of October — October, 1887; 
one of General Bidwell's payrolls for that work which I mentioned, made 
out in General Bidwell's own handwriting. Part of the men received 
$1 25 a day, some $1 50, and some two or three $1 75. I presume the 
men who received $1 75 were wagoners. There are two of those payrolls. 

Mr. Campbell: This is the complete payroll? A. For one week. 
There are only two of these payrolls of General Bidwell's in which men 
appear at $1 50 and $1 75 per day. I was referring to these two payrolls 
in answer to the question of Mr. Dobbin. 

Q. Who is the Superintendent? A. This gentleman here — Mr. Bryan. 
These two payrolls of General Bidwell's at which men appear at $1 50 
and $1 75 per day, amount to $54 50 and $85 65; and that covers the 
work which I speak of that General Bidwell did in preparing the grounds. 

Q. Is this the complete payroll of that week [showing]? A. I do not 
know that these men came from General Bidwell's ranch, but that was the 
work done before we had a Superintendent. This was before the erection 
of the building was commenced, in October, 1887. 

Mr, Dobbin: This was before the building was in course of construction 
at all? A. In preparing the ground for the building. The site of the 
building was covered with trees, which had to be taken out. 



10 

Mu. Campbell: Were there not men employed for less wages than 
appears on this payroll ? I atn simply referring to two documents which 
I saw at the Controller's of&ce. On that payroll there were some men got 
as low as 86 J cents per day. There were others who got $1 a day; others, 
$1 12; others, $1 50; others, $1 75. A. The lowest that has ever been 
paid is $1 50, and that is on those two payrolls of work done by General 
Bid well. On Mr. Bryan's payrolls it has very seldom, if ever, been lower 
than $2. 

Q. I am making a copy of a payroll I saw in the Controller's office in 
my mind. I shall certainly get a copy of the document I mention as 
having seen in the Controller's office. A. It might have been for half a 
day's work. I don't think any man got as low wages. Permit me to make 
an explanation. When we first commenced work on the building for a 
short time some of the common laborers were paid $1 50 a day, but when 
the matter was called to the attention of the Board we at once raised their 
■ wages to 20 cents an hour. 

Q. Well, you have here another item referring work done in a brick 
yard? A. That was for some brick made at Anderson. 

Q. I asked you if this was a complete payroll? A. Oh, no. We made 
some brick at Anderson; there was a payroll for that. If you desire to 
see that it can be procured. We employed a man at Anderson to make a 
kiln of brick, by the name of Steven Roycroff. This is the payroll you 
refer to. When we came to consider the question of making brick we 
found that we encountered a great deal of difficulty. Brick had always 
been made about here by Chinamen. The white men who took contracts 
to make brick for building purposes always had their work done by China- 
men, and they said they did not care to take a contract to furnish the 
brick for the building, because they said they would have to train white 
men to do the work — teach them how to make brick — and they would 
consequently lose money on the contract. We employed Mr. Steven Roy- 
croff to make us some brick at Anderson. He made the brick and they 
were delivered to us. We found that they were not very satisfactory, how- 
ever, and we did not continue the brickmaking at Anderson. We knew 
nothing about how he was to pay the men for the making of those brick, 
nor what it was to cost him for making them. When he got through he 
turned in a payroll for the making of that brick, and in that payroll 
appears that men (I suppose that was the one you referred to, Mr. Camp- 
bell) — there appears on that payroll one man who received $1 12 per day 
for three days, and two or three men who received $1 a day for three days, 
and it also states in that payroll, ^' one man at 62^ cents," but whether 
that was for half a day or a day I don't know. I don't know what that 
was for. We paid this money as per the payroll to Mr. Roycroff, but in 
reference to the prices, we had nothing to do with them. Mr, Roycroff 
engaged the men to make the brick for him, and also paid them himself 
I presume this 62^ cents, I presume that was for a half day's work. 

Mr. Campbell: No; it simply saj^s here ''62Jcts.," with nothing to show 
whether it was for a day or not. I want to ask another question. In 
addition to this pay, did these men get board in addition to this compen- 
sation for a day's pay, or did they pay for their boarding out of this 
amount? A. That is something I cannot tell you. Mr. Roycroff, who 
made that kiln of brick at Anderson, paid for the board of those men he 
had working for him there, $23 30, and we paid that in addition to the 
price paid for days' labor. 

Q. In addition to that? A. Yes, sir. 

Q. He charged you how much a day ? A. For his own services ? 



11 

Q. No, for the board. A. Well, it is in here by the gross. This man 
made a kiln of brick for us, some eighty miles from here, at Anderson, which 
ip in Shasta County. This bill was for his making that kiln of brick. He 
furnished us those bills of the price he paid for the labor of the men en- 
gaged in the work, and the price he paid for their board, $123, in addition 
to the sum for labor on the payroll. We had nothing whatever to do with 
fixing the sum that Mr. Roycroff should pay the men for working on the 
brick in Shasta County, except to approve the payroll after it came to us. 

Q. You had nothing to do with that? A. Nothing to do with that. This 
Mr. Roycroff resided at this Town of Anderson, Shasta County, and he 
undertook to make us a kiln of brick for a sample, and we were to pay 
him all costs connected with the making of it, and when he got through 
and delivered the brick, he also presented these bills, and we paid him. 

Q. He charges 60 cents a day for board. I believe that statement is 
in the Controller's office. A. Well, possibly it amounts to that — $123 30. 
This Mr. Roycroff made this kiln of brick and employed the men to help 
him make it, furnished all the materials, and at the conclusion delivered 
us the brick and rendered us his bills which are the ones now before the 
committee. The one I have in my hand is one for material — digging well, 
and wood for making brick, and so forth. But the making of that one 
kiln of brick proved that the making of brick at Anderson and shipped 
here by railroad from Anderson was not a success, cost too much money, 
and we stopped it. They made no more after that. Here is another one 
of Mr. Roycroff's bills, a payroll containing men from a $1 50 to $5 a day. 
The history of it was that General Bidwell thought brick could be made 
up there and shipped here that would do well for the erection of the build- 
ing, and we authorized him to make this contract with Mr. Roycroff, and 
he did so. It is some time since and I have forgotten the details. 
This making of the brick at Anderson was simply a contract with Mr. 
Roycroff for which he was to receive a certain compensation for his labor. 
I think he was to employ all the men and pay the expenses and do the 
whole work and fix their compensation himself. Here is another bill, 
$64 80, for the board of men, also in connection with that kiln of brick. 
And here is another one of Roycroff s payrolls, in which men are paid 
at the rate of from a $1 50 to $3 a day — none lower than $1 50. Here is 
the item to which you refer, Senator Campbell: " Board of William You- 
bank, while on the burn, ^ve days, at 60 cents, $3; board of John Mackey, 
while on the burn, five days, at 60 cents, $3." 

Q. What class of work did you employ on the building lately; what 
did the men getting $2 50 a day do? A. Well, we will ask the Superin- 
tendent about that. [The witness reads Section 3235 of the Political Code, 
as follows: "No supplies of any kind or character for the benefit of the 
State, or to be paid for by any moneys appropriated or to be appropriated 
by the State, employed or grown in this State, which are in whole or in 
part the product of Mongolian labor, shall be purchased by officials for 
the State having the control of any public institution under the control of 
the State, or of any county, city and county, city, or town thereof."] We 
exercised the utmost care to comply with the provisions of that section, 
and I have detailed a portion of it in regard to that brick. 

Mr. Campbell: Do you know whether there were any Mongolians 
employed in connection with the manufacture of any articles which went 
towards the construction of this building? A. Not that I know of. We 
strictly endeavored to comply with that section always. We were ever 
careful to comply with its provisions. 



12 

Q. May I ask you why the other section of the Political Code should not 
have been observed equally as rigidly as that? A. One section should be 
observed as rigidly as another; I have no doubt of that. I would like to 
make a statement in reference to the price of lumber. 

Q. You had better leave that to the lumberman. A. I will say, in ref- 
erence to the price of lumber, that we advertised for bids to furnish lumber, 
and we received answers from several parties, and we purchased the lum- 
ber of the lowest bidder, and that it was regarded as a very cheap bid and 
was below the price at which they were selling the same class of lumber 
in this town, and our Superintendent and our Architect both expressed 
surprise that the lumber was put in at such a low figure. 

Q. What prices did you pay for lumber, Mr. Lusk? A. Of course the 
prices variea that we paid for the lumber. 

Mr. Dobbin: You have no knowledge, then, of any brick being manu- 
factured, wholly or in part, by Chinese, and which was used in the con- 
struction of the building — any brick made by Chinese? A. No, sir; I 
have none. We supposed that we rigidly complied with that section. We 
always endeavored and intended to do so. 

Q. Do you know anything about some brick being made by white men 
and loaded in with that which came from a Chinese brickyard? A. I do 
not. We made a contract for the brick, and stipulated that it should be 
made by white labor, and we supposed that it was made by white labor. 
We never heard anything to the contrary. In fact, it has always been so 
stated. 

Mr. Davis: This lumber company employed Chinese of which you pur- 
chased the lumber? A. To some extent, probably. I do not know to what 
extent. 

Q. Indirectly. Of course, you do not know whether they did or not; 
you do not know of your own knowledge whether they employed Chinese 
in the manufacture of the lumber, either in whole or in part? A. I do not 
know whether it was manufactured by Chinese in whole or in part. I do 
not think it was manufactured by Chinese. 

Mr. Dobbin: Do you know what was the prevailing rate per thousand 
of lumber used on the building? A. I have sent for papers which will 
tell. I will state that we let it by contract to the lowest bidder, and we 
got it at a very low figure. There was some timber used in the construc- 
tion of the school we had to get from Oregon. It couldn't be got here* 
We got it from San Francisco, but it came from Oregon. 



A. J. Bryan. 

Sworn. 

Examined by Mr. Lusk: I would like you to state the prices of lumber 
and the character of lumber used on this building, of the lumber bought 
here. You need not state that of the lumber bought in San Francisco, but 
that bought here. Answer — ^Well, that lumber was charged as $21 a thou- 
sand — say, three by sixteen joist. That was the largest could be got on a 
special order. I believe the shortest twenty-two feet, and the longest 
twenty-eight feet. Those joist were sized on saw, crowning. They had to 
be run through the mill twice. Crowning on one side and milling on the 
other. 

Q. How did that price of $21 compare with the usual price paid for 
lumber here? A. Well, in my judgment it was at least $4, if not $5, less 
than we ever bought lumber for here on contract. It is very seldom we 
buy timber of that character here. 



13 

Q. How long have you been a contractor in this locality, Mr. Bryan? 
A. About eighteen years. 

Q. What was the price of that other lumber ? A, Well, as I remember the 
other lumber was — that was below this size — it was $18, and the ordinary 
size of lumber $17. 

Q. How does that compare with the prices usually paid? A. They were 
low, below the prices which I have paid for material on my contract work, 
and below the prices which other contractors have paid, as far as I know. 

Q. There have been charges stated in the papers that you have received 
from men working on that school building twenty -five 

Mr. Campbell [interrupting]: What he has said now, while it may be 
the truth, it will not establish the truth. There must be some document- 
ary evidence. I think the better way would be to get lumbermen here to 
give us the prices from their books. 

Mr. Lusk: We will have the Superintendent of the Lumber Company 
here to give the prices. 

Q. In reference to the charges about your receiving twenty-five cents or 
four bits a day, directly or indirectly, from men while working on that 
building — what have you to say in regard to that? A. I have never 
received one cent from any man that has ever been employed on that 
building. 

Q. Nor ever charged them any commission for putting them at work? 
A. No, sir; nor never had a conversation with any man employed on the 
building about any such a matter. I never heard anything about it what- 
ever, until since the charges have been made in the papers the men have 
been talking about the matter. 

Q. Now, state anything you desire to state in reference to the charges, 
which you may desire to state. A. Well, I don't really know what the 
charges are. AH I wish to state is what I have stated ; and I would like 
to have every man, so far as it is convenient for the committee to call 
them — I would like to have every man employed on the building called 
and asked that question, in regard to that. 

Mr. Lusk: I would like to ask, Mr. Chairman, if there are any other 
charges, either directly or indirectly, against the Superintendent. 

Mr. Dobbin: Outside of the lumber charges, and that the Superintend- 
ent of Construction required the men to return a portion of their wages at 
the expiration of the week, in order to retain their position, I don't think 
there is anything. 

Mr. Lusk: What about that, Mr. Br3'an, if any man at the end of the 
week — or undertook at the end of the week — to return part of his salary 
to you, in order that he should not lose his position? A. No, sir; they do 
not, nor have they ever returned one cent. They have never been required 
to, and they have never done so. 

Mr. Lusk: The lumber question, Mr. Dobbin, I don't suppose we can 
place against him, anyhow. That was a matter that we contracted for 
ourselves. 

Mr. Dobbin: In connection with that charge of work having been done 
by Chinese, do you know anything of work having been furnished, in part 
or in whole, by Chinese towards the construction of the Normal School 
here? A. I do not. I don't believe there was ever a brick went in the 
building manufactured, even in part or in whole, by Chinese. 

Q. Do you know of any other material furnished to the institution in 
the manufacture of which Chinese were employed? A. I think a great 
deal of the material was furnished by companies which employed Chinese, 
but whether they were directly interested in the manufacture of the 




14 

material is something I am unable to say. There is another matter I 
would like to speak about, I see that Mr. Davis' name is mentioned in 
connection with a communication sent to the " Examiner." That is in 
reference to the lathing. They claim that the lathing is not done prop- 
erly, I will state that during the time the lathing on that building was 
being done I had four or five as good lathers working on it as, in my 
opinion, there were in the State, on that work. Of course there were some 
men who applied for positions at lathing that I didn't know, and I put 
them on; but they only lathed for an hour or two, and I required them to 
quit the work. I think the men were as good lathers as could be found 
anywhere, and that in the lathing — I wish to state that in the eight thou- 
sand yards of lathing work, not quite eight thousand yards — I don't think 
in the whole of it there are twenty yards in the whole building that will 
need overhauling at all. And as to the charge of having hired ranch 
hands with hatchets and axes, and so forth, to do the lathing, I know 
nothing about that. They were all good lathers working on that building^ 
and as far as I know there was no man who did any such thing. 

Mr. Lusk: In reference to your employing men who were ranch hands, 
laborers working around as carpenters, what of that? A. There is not a 
man who is employed as a carpenter who was a ranch hand. There has 
not been a ranch hand hired as a mechanic on the building to my knowl- 
edge. The work won't show it. 

Q. How many carpenters did you employ on that building? A. Perhaps 
ten or twelve. 

Q. What pay did you give them? A. There is one man who has been 
on the payroll at $4 per day. 
Q. Four dollars ? A. Yes, sir. 
Q. What is the next? A. Three and a half. 
Q. What is the next? A. The others are three. 
Q. What is the next? A. No wages below that. 

Q. What class of men do you give $2 50 to on that building? A. We 
gave two and a half to men who wheeled mortar at the time we were doing 
the brick work. 

Q. What did you pay the brick masons? A. Five dollars a day. 
Q. Five dollars a day? A. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Dobbin: Is that the regular union rates? A. I know nothing about 
union rates, on account of never having to go by any. We have no unions 
in this part of the country. 

Mr. Campbell: You get $6 a day? A. Yes, sir. 

Q. Now, is there such a thing as three classes of men who can be called 
mechanics or average mechanics? A. I think so. 

Q. Is there any rule by which you can call them that? I see here you 
pay three different rates of wages, and it is to be presumed that there are 
three different classes of mechanics. A. I wish to say that we had three 
classes of carpenters on this building. The first men who were employed 
on this building were men who had worked for me on contract work. 
There was one man among the lot that I had always given $4 a day to, 
and when he went to work on the school building I continued to give him 
$4 a day, because he is a man who is competent to act as foreman, although 
I have not had him exactly as a foreman, but when I left here for San 
Francisco I just left him in charge of the work. 

Q. I am only trying to get at your ideas of mechanics, I want to know 
if there is such a thing as that among carpenters — three classes? A. In 
our business here we have two rates of carpenter wages. There are men 
on that building that worked for three dollars a day; they are good men 



15 

on rough work, but they are not as good as men who are not only good on 
rough work, but can also do finishing work. In other words, a man who 
can do all kinds of carpenter work is certainly worth more wages than a 
man who can certainly do but the rough work. 

Q. Is it not a fact that the better the mechanic the cheaper he is — ^that 
it is always better to employ a really good mechanic and pay him good 
wages, than to pay smaller wages to a poorer man who can do as good 
work? A. I say when you get a man who is a good hand on framing and 
work of that kind, but who is not good at finishing, I do not consider him 
as good as a man who can do both rough work and also do finishing work. 
I said that. 

Q. Well, you have been the Superintendent of this building since its in- 
ception? A, I have since the commencement of its construction. I was 
not when the first work was done. 

Q. Who gave you your first orders to work the men on that building? 
A. I do not think I ever had any definite instructions from any source. 

Q. Then you have used your own judgment as to the hours of labor you 
required the men to work on the building — ^the hours they were to work? 
A. When I took charge of that building I found about twenty men 

Q. [Interrupting] Answer the question, please. You simply used your 
own judgment, or did you use your own judgment, when you required the 
men at work on that building to work ten hours a day? A. Well, I was 
just going to explain. 

Q. I will ask you the question again. The question I asked you prior 
to that was: Who gave you instructions to work the men on that school 
over eight hours a day ? A. I say that I don't remember I ever had any 
definite instructions from any source. 

Q. You don't recollect ever having any definite instructions. Then you 
simply used your own judgment regarding the number of hours they were 
to work? A. That is what I was going to try to tell when you stopped me. 
I say, when I started that work, I found about — nearly twenty-five men 
employed there in excavating the cellar. Those men, I think, were work- 
ing about ten hours a day and, as has been stated to you, they were on 
General Bid well's payroll at $1 50 per day. There were no persons em- 
ployed but laborers who were excavating the cellar — there may have been 
some of those men getting $1 75 per day. I talked with the members of 
the Board of Trustees afterwards and I advanced the men afterwards to 
20 cents an hour, and I so informed the men, and I informed them that 
they could quit at eight hours work or at ten. 

Q. Who established the hours of work ? A. That I can't tell you. 

Q. Did you establish them ? A. Well, I have explained the matter that 
far. 

Q. Then you will acknowledge that you established them, and you say 
you never got an order from anybody else to establish them? A. I say, I 
accepted the situation as I found it. They were working ten hours a day 
when I found them and only getting $1 50. I raised them to 20 cents an 
hour. 

Q. And you continued working them the ten hours a day, as you found 
them working ? 

Mr. Maker: At any time during the construction of the building did 
you work less than ten hours? A. Oh, yes, sir. 

Q. Was there any difference in the wages received as between the time 
when you worked ten hours and when you worked less? A. As I said, 
when I went there there were a number of laborers employed there in dig- 
ging the hole, excavating a cellar. Some had $1 50 a day, and some 



16 

$1 75. Their wages were advanced to $1 80 for nine hours work, which 
is marked on the original time book, wjiich you gentlemen can examine. 
After the days got long enough to work to work ten hours we did so, and 
their wages were raised to $2 a day, or twenty cents an hour. During the 
summer we worked ten hours a day, but when the days began to get short 
we dropped off from ten to nine and a half ; then to nine, and then to 
eight, without any redaction of any person's wages. 

Mr. Campbell: You did not reduce the wages when you worked short 
hours? A, No, sir; I did not. 

Q. You did not raise them when you worked long hours? A. I did. I 
have just stated that their wages were raised from $1 50 a day to $1 80 
for nine hours work, and then we worked ten hours, and raised the wages 
again to $2 a day. 

Q. Well, we will take the mechanics, and hodcarriers, and brickmasons, 
laborers, and so forth, did the reducing of the hours of labor make any 
difference in their wages? A. No, sir. 

Q. When they went on a ten hour shift again, did that make any dif- 
ference ? A. The men first employed 

Q. [Interrupting] I am asking you now about the carpenters, brick- 
layers, and so forth; the excavators, we have got through with them 
for the present. Now we are on the mechanics. A. Their wages were not 
reduced at all. 

Q. Were they increased? A. No, sir; they were not increased. 

Q. They were left stationary, as they were. By what rule did you estab- 
lish their wages? A. These laborers were employed about the fall of the 
year, and the mechanics were employed later on in the season when they 
could work a longer time. At the time the mechanics were put on the 
building here, they could work ten hours a day, and when the days short- 
ened and work was quit sooner, neither their wages nor those of the labor- 
ers were reduced. That is what I wanted to explain. The laborers went 
on in the fall of the year and as the days got longer and they worked 
longer hours, their pay was increased. The mechanics, however, did not 
go to work on the building until summer time, when we were working ten 
hours, during the long days of the summer. 

Q. Did you have any mechanics on last summer? A. Yes, sir. 

Q. Did you pay them the same wages you did as when they worked the 
short hours? A. Yes, sir; and 

Q. [Interrupting] Then you paid them the same rate of wages for the 
short hours as for the long? A. Paid the same wages as during the sum- 
mer season. 

Q. Well, do you think that is according to law. A. It is according to 
custom here. 

Q. Then we are governed by custom and not by law? A. Well, I sup- 
pose that would simply 

Q. [Interrupting] Well, I simply ask that question and I wish an 
answer to it. Whether it is by custom or by law we are governed in work- 
ing. If you deem it is by custom we will make a note of it; if you say 
under the law we will take the other view of it. It was neither custom or 
law — ^it was simply "go as you please?" A. I say it was custom. That is 
my answer; it is custom with the contractors. 

Q. That might be so among contractors working on their own responsi- 
bility, but this is an establishment which is being put up at the cost of 
the State. From your answer I could not understand whether you said 
it was governed by custom or by the law, because the law says that eight 
hours is a day^s work. You say that custom is what governed you in the 



17 

construction of the building? A. It is my understanding that all the men 
who started to work on that building originally started there with the dis- 
tinct understanding that they could quit at eight hours if they wished to. 
Now, I say it is customary with us to work ten hours here, and the wages 
which we have paid on that building and the shortening of the hours is 
simply following a custom which all follow here, just as we would do if we 
were building a house by the day's work or contract work. 

Q. Have you any way of giving us about the entire cost of labor paid 
to date, or since you have been there as Superintendent? 

Mr. Lusk: You could only do that by getting all the payrolls. 

Mr. Dobbin: Why is work stopped on the building at the present tin.e 
A. At the present time? 

Q. Yes, sir; at the present time ? A. I was asked by the Secretary to 
stop it. 

Mb. Lusk: He was ordered by the Board to suspend work, because we 
had used up our $50,000, and there was nothing left for us to continue the 
work with. In fact, we had used up about $10,000 more, I think, before we 
stopped. 

Mr. Campbell: Have you any funds on hand now? A. No, sir. 

Q. Are you in debt? A. I think we are about $3,000 or $4,000 in debt. 
We used up the $50,000 which was originally appropriated, and $10,000 
which we had on hand, and we are now $2,000 or $3,000 in debt, I sup- 
pose. 

Mr, Dobbin: It was not for the reason that this investigation was to be 
held here that the work was stopped on the building ? A. No, sir. 

Mr. Lusk: We had a meeting of the Board of Directors, and concluded 
that we would not be justified in gbing on expending money for which we 
were personally liable until we knew whether the Legislature was going to 
pass an appropriation. I called a meeting of the Board as President, and 
we found that we had expended some $63,000 or $64,000 on the work, 
being some $3,000 or $4,000 more than we should have, taking the money 
we had on hand, and until an appropriation was passed I didn't think we 
were justified in going on with the work, because I thought if we would 
spend more money we would be personally liable for perhaps $20,000 or 
$30,000, and I for one did not intend to be personally liable for any such 
amount. 

Mr. Campbell: I am under the impression that there is a clause in the 
bill which provides for the construction of the building for $50,000. 

Mr. Lusk: When I went down to Sacramento to appear before the com- 
mittee in reference to this matter Governor Waterman said: ''You have 
made a deficiency; that is something I do not like. When people come to 
the end of their appropriation they ought to stop." So we did stop. 

Mr. Campbell: At the time you commenced you were told it would cost 
about $60,000? 

Mr. Lusk: Yes, sir. 

Mr. Campbell: Well, how is it now that you think it will cost a hun- 
dred? 

Mr. Lusk: Well, it won't cost a hundred. 

Mr. Campbell: You have asked for $40,000 more, 

Mb. Lusk: Ten of the forty is for furnishing the building. We never 
asked for forty. That was introduced without our knowledge. 

Mr. Campbell: I do not mean you. I don't mean to be personal. The 
bill that I read in the Senate and was called to our attention required 
$40,000 for the completion of the building here and $25,000 for furnish- 
ing it 

2j 



18 

Mr. Lusk: No, I think you are mistaken, Senator. The total was fifty- 
twenty-five for finishing, and twenty-five for furnishing. The total cost o( 
the building will not exceed $83,000, and the bill will not cover over that 
amount. The total is forty thousand — ten thousand for furnishing, an^ 
thirty for finishing. 

Mk. Dobbin: I was informed at Sacramento by the representatives from 
this county in the Assembly that one of the reasons that work was ceased 
on this building was that they wanted the investigation finished before the 
work went on, and that they wanted it held as speedily as possible, for the 
reason that there was one thousand dollars worth of mortar on the ground 
that was liable to spoil, and they wanted to use it up just as soon as they 
could. Is there that much mortar on the ground liable to be spoiled if not 
used soon ? 

Me. Lusk: No, sir; there is only about one hundred barrels mixed up. 
The brick for this building at first designed by our architect and approved 
at San Jose, and contemplated two classes of work, the main work to he 
made of what they call common brick, the exterior wall, the facing to be 
made of what they term stock brick — that is what they term it. There is 
quite a difference in the prices of the different brick. The common brick 
was made and delivered on the ground for $7 75 a thousand; the stock 
brick, $15 15 a thousand. Then, of course, there was some little extras 
for fancy shaped bricks for the corners, and one thing and another of that 
kind. The brick work was laid out by our architect in the plans in a very 
original manner, so that it was a very stiff and rich mortar that was used. 

Mr. Dobbin: Can you give us the name of the San Francisco firm that 
supplied the brick? 

Mr. Lusk: No brick supplied from San Francisco. This brick I have 
spoken of was shipped from Anderson to us and was not a success; 
then we contracted and had it made on the Sacramento River, down 
here about five miles from this town. The contractor who made them 
first got Mr. Davis, from Sacramento — a brickmaker in Sacramento, and 
I believe one of the best in the State — and two or three others, to get their 
views about the making of the brick, and about the proper manner of mak- 
ing this stock brick; and the result was that we got a brick as good as 
ever came into San Francisco. Our architect said it was as good as ever 
went into San Francisco. The same class of brick at San Francisco were 
selling at $9 50 to $14 50 per thousand, and we got our common brick for 
$7 76, which was considerable less, and our stock brick we have paid $1 
more for, $15 50. There is considerable trouble in manufacturing them, 
and they have to be hauled in straw so their corners won't be marked. 



Hon. John Davis, 

Sworn. 

Mr. Campbell: Now, Mr. Davis, whatever you know of the case, yon 
will please state to the committee. Answer — I will state, Mr. Chairman 
and gentlemen, it is not anything in regard to the case; it is only my posi 
tion I wish to explain. There is a gentleman in San Francisco who is 
connected with the Federation of Trades. When he found I was on this 
Public Buildings Committee, he came and asked me and Mr. Mullaney, 
and requested us to investigate certain matters, when we came up, in con- 
nection with the construction of this building; that their attention had 
been called — reports made to them. I told him I would do all in my powei 
in doing so. And I will state that I have no information whatever of th^ 
charges written with my name attached to them. I have never made any- 



19 

When we came up here Mr. Mullaney went all around the building, and 
went outside and talked to different persbns employed about the building. 
I stayed with the balance of the members of the committee, and thor- 
oughly inspected every portion of the building with them. Before we 
returned to Sacramento, in the hotel, Mr. Mullaney was talking to some 
gentleman who lived here who had formerly been employed on the build- 
ing. He introduced the gentleman to me, and Mr. Mullaney was talking 
about the thorough inspection he had made. This gentleman made cer- 
tain statements, and I told the gentleman if there was any truth in any 
of these statements it would be a great benefit to me if he would go to the 
lumber company and ascertain the price of lumber here and what lumber 
was sold for in Sacramento; and that if there was any truth in the rumor 
that men employed on the building was paying anything out of his wages 
to keep his position, to inform me at once, and he promised to do so, but I 
have never received any word from him since. The first notice of this 
examination was given to me by Mr. Porter, So far as the report about 
the laths not being put on properly, I positively deny that. I claim 
it is a very good job, and in my experience as a builder for eighteen 
years, I never saw a better. I have never made any charges what- 
ever and have never authorized my name to be used in any case 
whatever regarding any, and was as much surprised as any one upon 
seeing my name attached to them. I promised to investigate the matter 
and that is as far as I went in the matter. In justice to the Directors of 
this institution I make this statement, as well as in justice to myself. I 
do not know of any reason why I was placed on this committee except 
what Mr. Porter said, that my name had been coupled with the matter. 

Mr. Porter: What is your business ? A, Contractor. 

Q. When did you start in the business of contracting? A. Started in 
the business in 1869. 

Q. Have you followed it continuously ever since? A. Continuously. 
You and I have had a number of talks about this matter; does it bear out 
my statement? 

Mr. Porter: Yes, sir. 

Mr. Campbell: I got my information from some of the committee that 
were up here, and it was common rumor; even on the railroad car, coming 
from San Francisco, a week ago last Monday, nearly everybody had it, 
and when the bill for an additional appropriation came up in the Senate I 
antagonized its passage, simply to give me an opportunity to place my 
statement before the Senate, Since that was accomplished, Senator Jones 
appealed to me to lay my objections aside, and I did so, so the building 
could go on. This same man you speak of, if it is the same man, came to 
me several times, and was very persistent in forcing his views on me. The 
man was under the influence of liqaor, and I told him — I got away from 
him as quickly as I could, and told him if he had any charges to make, 
to do it and put them in shape, and send to me or some other person in 
the Assembly or Senate, and we would investigate them. 

Mr. Davis: You and I have never had any conversation on this matter, 
have we ? 

Mr. Campbell: Not to my knowledge. We have spoken several times, 
but never in reference to this particular matter. 

Mr, Davis: I simply wished to make my position clear to the commit- 
tee and the Board, 

On motion of Mr. Davis the Joint Committee adjourned to meet at one 
o'clock p. M. 

[During recess the full committee visited the building in course of con- 
struction, known as the " Branch State Normal School," and examined 
the lathing referred to in the previous testimony.] 



20 



AFTERNOON SESSION/ 
The committee met at 1:30 o'clock p. m. 

F. C. LusK. 

Recalled. 

In reference to the prige of lumber, the offer that we accepted, the low- 
est bid, was as follows: 

Sierra. Lumber Company, Ohico, Cal,, April 18, 1888, 

The honorable Board of Trustees of the State Normal School, Chico : 

Gentlemen: We offer to furnish lumber for the State Normal School (signed as per 
memorandum of Mr. Bryan), as follows: 

3x16 joists, 12 feet to 38 feet sized on saw, crowning, 139,688 feet, at $21 per thou- 
sand _ _ _ _ $2,933 45 

22,524 feet rough lumber, at $17 382 91 

24,000 linear feet 1x2 furring, 3-8 90 00 

37,000 feet crowning, 8. 1. S.. at $18 50 _ ._ 684 50 

46,456 feet 2x6 and 3x6, sized on plane, at $18 _ 836 21 

$4,927 07 
Respectfully, 

SIERRA LUMBER COMPANY, 

By C. E. TiNKHAM. 

That being the lowest offer of those bids for lumber, was accepted, and 
they made contracts. Here is another bid which was accepted: 

Sierra Lumber Company 

The Sierra Lumber Company, a corporation, hereby agrees to furnish to the State of 
California, to be used in the erection of a Normal School at Chico, that certain lot of lum- 
ber described and set forth in a certain bill furnished it and marked Bill No. 2, for the fol- 
lowing sums: 

Twenty-four thousand lineal feet of 1x2 furring, for $90; 37,000 feet common S. I, S., fox 
$18 50 per thousand feet, and 46,456 feet 2x6 and 3x6, sized on the planer, at and for $18 
per thousand feet. 

The said lumber is to be furnished in accordance with the figures thereof contained in 
said bill. It is to be furnished and delivered under the direction of, to the site of, and at 
the time or times required by the Superintendent of said building. 

Dated, April 24th, 1888. 

SIERRA LUMBER COMPANY, 

By C. E. TiNKHAM. 

The contract for the making of the brick was as follows: 

Contract made March 12, 1888, for the making and delivery of brick for the State Normal 
School at Chico, California. 

The Board of Trustees of the State Normal School by their executive agents, the Board 
of Trustees of the State Normal School at Chico, is the party of the first part herein. 

Biirnham & King of Chico, aforesaid, is the party of the second part herein. 

The second party agrees that it wiU manufacture and deliver to the first party at the 
building site of Normal School at Chico, 300,000 ordinarj^ brick and 190,000 stock brick. 

The said brick are to be made on or near the Sacramento River, and are to be done and 
ready for delivery from the kiln on or about the fifteenth day of June, 1888, 

Said brick are to be wholly made by white labor; no Chinese labor can be employed in 
the manufacture thereof. 

The said brick are to be burned with dry wood. The brick are to be in molds nine by 
four and three eighths by two and a half in size. The said brick are to be ready for 
delivery from the kiln on or about the fifteenth day of June, 1888. They are then to be 
delivered to the first party at least as fast as the first party may want to use them, and are 
to be delivered at the site as the Superintendent may from time to time direct. 

The 300,000 ordinary brick are to be good, hard "^merchantable brick. They are to be 
made in sanded molds, and to be what are termed sand-made bricks, and to be of uni- 
form size. 

The 190,000 stock brick are to be so molded and made that they will be about an eighth 
of an inch larger each way than the ordinary brick. They are to be in their manufacture 
in all things Tike what is known in the San Francisco market as stock brick, and that 



21 

sells in that market for $5 50 to $6 more per thousand than ordinary brick. They are to 
be made in sand molds. They are to be made in finely ground selected clay. They are 
to be hand-rolled in the usual way before placing in the mold. In their manufacture 
everything is to be done and everything used that is used and done in the manufacture 
of the brick known in the San Francisco market as the stock brick, as aforesaid. They are 
to be as near like the sample now before the parties as the nature of the clay of which 
they are made will permit. They are to be made in the same manner and soil of said 
sample, and with the same concave depression on one side. 

All brick, when delivered, are to be taken from the wagon by hand, and are not to be 
dumped to the ground. ^ 

The first party agrees to pay for all brick delivered in accordance with the terms of 
this contract, viz., $15 50 for each thousand of said stock brick, and $7 75 for each thou- 
sand of said ordinary brick. 

Executed in duplicate. 

STATE BOARD OF TRUSTEES OP THE NORMAL SCHOOL OF 

CALIFORNIA, 
BY THEIR EXECUTIVE AGENTS THE BOARD OF TRUS- 
TEES OF THE NORMAL SCHOOL AT CHiCO. 

P. C. LUSK, President. 

JNO. E. GLEASON, Secretary. 

BURN HAM & KING. 

In reference to the amount of payrolls on the building for lumber from 
the beginriing, including the payroll for making brick at Anderson, the 
total amount, if added correctly, is $21,740 08, 

Mr. Campbell: That is the payroll A, For the entire thing from 

the time it was started. I think it is correct. 

Q. If not absolute it is supposed to be correct? A. Yes, sir. It was 
added hurriedly here. 

Q. Well, Mr. Lusk, in the brick part of the business there is just one 
little item in my mind. The brick ought to be furnished, 300,000, at 
$17 50? A. No, sir,- $7 75. 

Q, At $7 75, and one hundred thousand at $15 50? A. One hundred 
and ninety thousand. 

Q. Does that include the Roycroff cost for burning them ? A. The Roy- 
croff brick are in addition to that, 

Q. They are in addition to that? A. Yes, sir, 

Q. These bricks are not the ones that were made at Anderson? A. All 
the stock brick are made here. The Roycroff brick was a kiln we had 
made first, and we were not satisfied with it; we found it was not going to 
pay us to ship them by railroad from there. 

Q. If they were to furnish them for that amount of money per thousand, 
why should the State have to pay for the kiln and labor of making them? 
That is what I want to know. A. The Roycroff brick are not included in 
these prices. The Roycroff brick were made by themselves under a con- 
tract by which he was to burn a kiln for us by contract. 

Q. And that has nothing to do with these four hundred and ninety 
thousand brick? A, Nothing at all. Those we contracted for. 

Q. Speaking of lumber, was that about the market price for lumber at 
Chico at that time ? A. It was below the market price for lumber at Chico 
at that particular time, for each kind, 

Q. Is there any way that we can get proof of that, from any lumber 
merchant in town ? A, I presume so, if proof is desired in that way. We 
advertised for bids for lumber, and we took the lowest bid, 

Q. There was no purchase at all? A. How? 

Q, There was no purchase at all of lumber? A. Oh, yes; there was 
some in San Francisco — that Oregon pine; and then flooring was another 
kind. We were advised by the Attorney-General up here that we need 
not advertise for bids under $3,000, We just went to different houses, and 
saw where we could do the best, and bought it there. 



22 

Me. Lusk: Mr. Bryan, you were familiar with the market price of lumber 
in this town for how many years? A. About eighteen. 

Q. Those contracts made with the Sierra Lumber Company, how were 
the prices of that lumber — ^the figures given — how did they compare with 
the figures for lumber in this town? A. They were all contracted for at a 
lower price than the ordinary price. 

Q. And such bills of lumber that you purchased in San Francisco, how 
did they compare with the market price for the same kind of lumber in 
San Francisco? A. I got three bills, I think. 

Mr. Campbell: Who did you get the lumber from*? 

Mr. Bryan: The San Francisco Lumber Company — ^the Oregon pine. 
Their figures were the lowest. 

Q. What was that a thousand? A. Well, it was different prices. It 
ranged from about thirty-six feet up to seventy-five feet. There is a differ- 
ent price on the different sizes. I can give you the prices by looking at 
the bills. The prices on each item were below what was on the printed 
schedule of the Lumber Union at that time. 

Mr. Lusk: All the lumber companies of San Francisco had a union at 
that time, had they, to sell at a uniform price? A. Yes, sir. 

Q. And that combination is since broken? A. Yes, sir. We got the 
benefit of it on the later purchases. 



J. J, Barham. 

Sworn, 

Mr. Lusk: Mr. Barham, have you ever worked on the Normal School at 
Chico ? Answer — Yes, sir. 

Mr. Campbell: What is your occupation? A. Laborer. 

Mr, Lusk: What class of labor were you doing on the building? A. 
Well, when I first went there I was helping to do the excavating, and so 
on, and helping on the concrete — done different kinds of work. 

Q. And received what wages? A. Well, when I was first hired General 
Bid well hired me. I got $1 75 a day. I worked for that up to the time 
that Mr. Bryan raised the wages to 20 cents an hour. I don^t recollect 
how long that was. 

Q. So, then, what labor you have done since that has been at 20 cents 
an hour? A. Yes, sir. 

Q. If you worked ten hours it would be $2? A. Yes, sir. 

Q. Well, Mr. Barham, do you know anything about Mr, Bryan ever 
having exacted or taken back part of the wages of the men on that build- 
ing'? A. No, sir. 

Q. Did you ever hear of such a thing? A. No, sir; and I don't think he 
ever done it, either. 

Q. Did you ever hear of any complaint or dissatisfaction on the build- 
ing among the men with the Superintendent? A. No, sir. 

Q. Or with the wages they were getting? A. Well, no; not particularly; 
but I have heard them say they thought they were working longer hours 
than they ought to, some of them. 

Mr. Campbell: How long did you work at $1 75 per day? A. Well, 
now, sir 

Q. About how long? I don't care about a day or ten — about how long? 
A. Well, it must have been probably a month; maybe not quite so much 
and maybe more. 



23 

Q. Probably a month ? A. Yes, sir. It was all during the time that 
we -were excavating the cellar out. 

Q. Was there ever any talk amongst the men on the building, to your 
knowledge, in relation to thp hours of labor or the wages paid ? A. Was 

there ever any 

Q. Was there any dissatisfaction, any talk amongst the men; any agita- 
tion? A. Well, yes, sir; I have heard some. 

Q. Well, tell us what you have heard? A. Well, all I ever heard was 
some few parties talking about it. * 

Q. You need not be afraid now; go right ahead and tell us what you 
have heard? A. 1 am not afraid; I will tell you all I heard and what I 
know and nothing else. I have heard some of them talking, and one party 
I think, wrote a letter to find out the wages. Whether he found out any- 
thing or not I could not tell you, because I never heard. 

Mr. Lusk: That was a party that was working at $1 50, wasn't it? 
A. Well; I don^t know what they was working for. 

Mr. Lusk: There was a party working for $1 50 a day understood all 
State work was $2, and wrote to the Superintendent of Instruction to ascer- 
tain if such was the fact. 

The Witness: There was some men there worked for $1 50 that Gen- 
eral Bidwell 

Mr. Campell [Interrupting]: I didn't ask you about that; I asked you 
about the general opinion among the men, if there was any dissatisfaction 
among them; if there was any agitation; if the men themselves were dis- 
satisfied about the pay and hours of labor? A, Well, yes; like all other 
men working, like all men, they talked among themselves a great deal 
about wages and one thing and another, and it never amounted to any- 
'.hing, 

Q, Why didn^t it amount to anything, sir? A. Well, if they didn't 
want to work for the wages they should have quit. 

Q. Did they ever ask the Superintendent or Trustees about it? A. No, 
I don't think they did. 

Q, They did not. Why was it they didn't ask ? A. That I couldn't 
tell you. 

Q. Well, why didn't you ask? A. Why didn't I ask? 

Q. Yes, sir. A. Well, I supposed I was getting probably as much as I 
would get if I asked the Trustees. 

Q, Was it because you were afraid you would be discharged 1 A. No, 
sir; not particularly. 

Q. Why did the}'^ raise the wages to 20 cents an hour? What was 
the difference between 20 cents an hour at ten hours a day and $1 75 
for a legal day's work, which is eight? A. I couldn't tell you. 

Q. Did they increase your wages then? A. That increased my wages; 
yes, sir. After Mr. Bryan got in, a few days after — I don't know how 
many it was — he raised the wages to 20 cents an hour. 

Q. Did he tell you he paid you by the hour? A. Did he? 

Q. Yes. A. That was my understanding, sir, 

Mr. Dobbin: Mr. Barham, you first went to work on that institu- 
tion helping to make the basement; and how long did you work at that, 
you say? A. Well, the first work I done on the grounds there was digging 
some trenches to drain the water, which, I believe, pretty much surrounded 
all the ground. It was to drain the water off in case of a heavy rain. 

Q. Well, after that? A. I went to work helping to excavate. 



24 

Q. And after that was finished? A. Then I went, I think, to helping 
on the concrete. Right away after that I couldn^t tell you what I done. 
There was so many different jobs I done. 

Q. And after the concrete part of the job was finished, what else did 
you do? A. I haven ^t done anything since th*e foundation was completed. 

Q. You never did any skilled labor on the building? A. No, sir. 

Q. Or attempted to do any skilled labor ? A. No, sir; nothing of the 
kind. 



George Goodrich. 
. Sworn. 

Mr. Campbell: The order of the Chairman is that all witnesses not 
being examined remain outside of doors during the examination. 

Question — What is your occupation? Answer — Laboring man. 

Q. Laborer. Have you ever worked on the State Normal School — the 
one here ? A. Yes, sir. 

Q. You worked as a laborer on it? A. Yes, sir. 

Q. About how long have you worked there? A. Well, I think I put in 
about two months and a half or three months altogether. 

Q. About three months altogether. About what time did you go to work 
there ? A. I think it was 

Q. Was it in the earty part of the commencement of the construction of 
the building ? A. Yes, sir. They were laying the foundation. 

Q. About the time they were laying the foundation. What wages did 
you receive ? A. $1 90. 

Q. Did you ever hear any agitation or dissatisfaction amongst the men 
as to the hours they were working or the pay they got? A. No, sir. 

Q. Were you dissatisfied ? A. No, sir. 

Q. Did you ever ask for more ? A. No, sir. 

Q. Were you ever asked to work by the hour or by the day? A. Well, 
that is something I couldn't answer. 

Q. You canH answer that. Well, could you if you wished ? A. Well, 
I supposed when I went to work there I worked by the day. 

Q. You worked by the day? A. I supposed the $1 90 was a day's 
work. 

Q, You worked ten hours a day for that $1 90? A. Well, didn't get in 
a full ten hours; nine hours, and nine and a half, it was. 

-Q. Did you ever work ten hours? A. Yes, sir; I have. 

Q. Did you get any more pay for the ten hours than you did for nine 
and nine and a half? A. No, sir. 

Q. You got the same pay no matter how long you worked ? A. Yes, sir. 

Q. During the time you worked on that building, did you ever hear any 
person say — or have you ever heard since, or at any time-^any person say 
that they had to give anything or contribute anything to any person con- 
nected with the construction of the building, either the Superintendent or 
any person in any other capacity? A. No, sir. 

Q, Was it ever rumored in any way? A. I never heard any one say 
anything of the kind. 

Mr. Dobbin: Did you ever pay the Superintendent of construction any- 
thing to secure you the position *? A. No, sir, 

Q. You did not? A. No, sir. 

Q. Did you ever know of anybody who did ? A. No, sir. 



25 

Mr. Lusk: Did you ever hear, Mr. Goodrich, of anything of the kind 
until it came up in the newspapers a week or so ago? A. No, sir; the first 
I ever heard of it was in the papers. 

Mb, Dobbin: In justice to the Superintendent it is necessary to ask 
those questions. 

Mr. Ryan: I don't see Mr. Goodrich's name on the payroll for $1 90. 
It is on the payroll $1 80. A. It was ^l 80 for nine hours, nine and a 
half. 



Thomas Scott. 

Sworn. 

Mr. Campbell: What is your occupation, sir? Answer — Laborer — 
common laborer. 

Q. Have you overworked on the State Normal School at Chico? A. 
Yes, sir. 

Q, About how long have you worked there? A. Well, oflp and on since 
it started. 

Q. Off" and on since it started? A. That is, since they went in to put 
in the foundation. 

Q. What pay did you receive for the time you worked there ? A. Well, 
I got $1 80 a day when I started in. That is last winter. 

Q. That is all you got? Your pay was always uniform; the same — 
$1 80 a day? A. Well, if I worked a full day. 

Q. I am speaking of a day's work — $1 80. Then did you ever w^ork 
nine hours a day ? A. Yes, sir. 

Q. Got $1 80 ? A. Yes, sir. 

Q. Did you ever work nine and a half? A. I don't remember whether 
I worked nine and a half or not. 

Q. Well, 3'^ou worked nine? A. Yes, sir. 

Q. And ten ? A. Yes, sir. 

Q. You got the same pay for nine you did for ten ? A. No, sir. 

Q. Did not? A. No. 

Q. How much did you get for nine hours? A. I got $1 80. 

Q. How much did you get for ten ? A. I got $2. 

Q. You got $2 for ten ? Well, were you working by the day or by the 
hour when you got the $2? A. Well, there was nothing said, but I sup- 
pose it was by the day. 

Q. You supposed by the day? A. Yes, sir; that was what J calculated. 

Q. After you got $2 a day did you ever work nine hours again? A. Yes. 

Q. What did you get then? A. Two dollars. 

Q. You got $2 then, whether you worked nine hours or ten. Do I under- 
stand right now? A, Yes, sir. 

Q. What I am after is simply this: If the hours of labor made any dif- 
ference in the day's pay, whether you worked nine hours or worked ten 
hours; if you worked nine hours you got $2 a day; if you worked ten hours 
you got $2 a day? A. Yes, sir; that is, the last winter. 

Q. I am speaking generally, from the time the building started up to 
the present time. Now, have you ever heard of any one being dissatisfied 
with the hours of labor they were working, or with the pay they were 
receiving? A. No; not that I could remember any names. 

Q. Well, general rumor or general talk. Were you yourself? Take 
yourself, for instance. A. Well, I was satisfied with what the balance were 
getting. 



26 

Q. Were you satisfied yourself that you were treated right, and that you 
were working the hours the law required you to? A. Well, no; I always 
supposed 

Q. You were not satisfied? A. I supposed that eight hours was a day's 
work. 

Q. Yes, and you were dissatisfied in your own mind because you had to 
work ten? A. W^ell, yes. I never complained. 

Q, Now, did you ever make any complaint or ever make your opinion 
known to the Superintendent, or to any one who had authority to control 
the time or pay in connection with the work done on that building? A. 
No, sir; I did not. 

Q. You never did ? A. No, sir. 

Q. You only nursed your wrath to keep it warm ? A» Yes, sir. 

Q, But never made it known to any one during the time you worked on 
the building and in conversation with any one. Have you ever heard any 
one express an opinion that he ought to contribute anything to anybody? 
A. No, sir. 

Q. To get work or to retain it after he got it? A. No, sir. 

Q. Never did? A. No, sir. 

Mr. Lusk: When you started in it was the winter of 1887-88? A, Yes, 
sir. 

Q. And you were working this winter? A, Yes, sir. 

Q. When you were working nine hours you got $1 80? A. Yes, sir. 

Q. After the days got so you could work ten hours, you got the same? 
A. Yes, sir. 

Q. Your wages were still kept at $2? A. Yes, sir. 



Alexander N. McGilvky. 

Sworn. 

Mr. Campbell: What is your occupation? Answer — ^Mason. 

Q. A mason, a stonemason? A. Plasterer and bricklayer. 

Q. Have you worked on the State Normal School at Chico? A. I have 

Q. How long have you worked there? A. Probably four or five days. 

Q. When have you worked that four or five days'? A. On the coping, 
on the cementing; on the coping. 

Q. Did you ever lay any brick on it? A. No, sir, 

Q, Did you ever do any plastering on it? A. There is no plastering on 
it. There is nothing but the cementing on the coping. 

Q. You only worked four or five days? A. Yes, sir. 



Charles Marshall. 

Sworn. 

Mr. Campbell: What is your occupation? Answer — Bricklayer; general 
mason. 

Q. Have you ever Avorked upon the State Normal School at Chico? A- 
Yes, sir. 

Q. How long did you work there ? A. Well, I worked there all summeTj 
perhaps one hundred and forty or fifty days, in that neighborhood. 

Q. What wages did you receive per day, Mr. Marshall? A. Five dd' 
lars per day. 



27 

Q. How many hours did you work? A. Well, I worked ten hours a 
portion of the time. 

Q. You worked ten hours. Did you work any more or any less ? A. 
Well, I expect I worked a little less during a part of the time; in the fall, 
when we couldn't see to work at night. 

Q. How much diflerence *? A. I could not tell. 

Q. Did you ever work nine hours? A. Yes; I think about nine hours. 

Q. Did you ever work nine and a half? A. About that time, probably. 

Q. Probably about that time. Was there any difference in the rate of 
pay that you received ? A. No, sir. 

Q. You got the same pay for ten hours work you did for nine or nine 
and a half hours? A. Yes, sir. 

Q. Do you belong to any society or trade organization? A. No, sir. 

Q. Do you know anything about the rules of the society? A. No, sir. 

Q. bid you ever work in the City of San Francisco? A. I have worked 
there. 

Q. How long since? A. I have worked there fourteen or fifteen years. 

Q. At the time you worked there did you know of any trades union or 
society'? A. I knew there was such a thing. 

Q. Did you belong to it there ? A. No, sir. 

Q. Did you work at bricklaying then ? A. Yes, sir. 

Q. Well, were you considered a skilled mechanic? A. I was on that job; 
yes, sir. 

Q. Did skilled mechanics allow you to w^ork with them? A. Yes, sir. 

Q. And you not a union man ? A. Yes, sir. 

Q. During the time that you w^orked on this building was there any dis- 
satisfaction, open or private, manifested by the men as to the pay they got 
or the hours of work? A. Nothing in particular. 

Q. Nothing in particular. Well, then, was there anything? A. Well, I 
heard men eay that they thought they ought to work eight hours only. 

Q. Did you volunteer to work ten hours a day? A. I guess I did. 
There was nothing said about it. I was not asked to work any particular 
'time. I was just asked to go to work and I went to work. 

Q. You were satisfied to work as long as the boss told you? A. I was 
satisfied; yes, sir. 

Mr. Dobbin: You would rather work eight hours, wouldn't you? A. 
Well, of course I would. 

Mr. Campbell: Outside of State work, do bricklayers throughout the 
State work ten hours a day? A. Generally they do. 

Q. Take San Francisco, Sacramento, Alameda, Stockton, or anywhere 
else ? A. I do not think they do. 

Q. How many hours do they work? A. I suppose nine hours. 

Q. And nine hours on private work is a day's work? A. That I don't 
know anything about. 

Q. What is the present rate of wages for bricklayers at the present time? 
A. I suppose the average is ^ve dollars a day. 

Q. Is it not six? A. Well, that I don't know. 

Q. You don't know anything then about the relations — ^the rules or reg- 
ulations governing the rates of bricklaying? A. No, sir. 

Q. You would be what would be called in San Francisco one outside 
of the society — a scab — meaning no disrespect to you whatever? A. I 
know the meaning of it exactly. 

Q. You know what I mean? A. Yes, sir. 

Q. Then understand right? A. Yes, sir. 



28 

Q. At any time since the commencement of the erection of the building 
have you known or have you heard of any person having offered or given 
to any person connected with the management of the construction of the 
building any bonup or anything for giving them work or keeping them at 
it after they got it? A. No, sir; I have not. 

Mr. Dobbin: I ask you this question as a bricklayer. During the time 
you worked on that institution, laying brick, did you know that there was 
any Chinese brick, or brick used in the construction of that school which 
Chinese had been employed to manufacture? A, No, sir; I did not. 

A. Did you ever hear it rumored? A. No, sir; not during the time I 
was working there. 

Q. You worked there a hundred and forty days? A. About that; I am 
not sure. 

Mr. Lusk: I suppose a rumor would not be taken as evidence. 

Mr. Dobbin: I have been instructed to look into this particular matter 
relating to Chinese. 



Robert Humphrey. 

Sworn. 

Mr. Campbell: What is your occupation? Answer — Bricklayer and 
plasterer. 

Q. Have you ever worked on the State Normal School at Chico? A. 
Yes, sir. 

Q. How long, or about how long? A. Seventy-five days, about. 

Q. About seventy-five days; about what time of the year was that? A. 
The latter part of July until the last of September. 

Q. The days that you worked there; about how many hours did you 
work? A. How many hours 1 Ten hours. 

Q. You worked ten hours? A. Yes, sir. 

Q. Did you work by the day or hour? A. By the day. 

Q. What wages did[ you receive? A. Five dollars. 

Q. You received $5 a day; you never worked less than ten hours, did 
you? A. Yes, sir. 

Q, You did? A. Yes, sir. 

Q. About how many hours did you work then? A. Nine and a half. 

Q. Work any less than nine and half? A. Yes; there was one or two 
days about nine hours, I guess. 

Q. Did you receive $5 a day for the nine hours and nine and a half as 
well as for the ten? A. Yes, sir. 

Q. It didn't make any difference? A. It didn't make any difference; 
no, sir. 

Q. Do you know what are the current rates for bricklayers in Califor- 
nia ? A. Five dollars. 

Q. Do you know that ? Did you ever work outside of here? A. Yes, 
sir. 

Q. Did you ever work in San Francisco? A. No, sir. 

Q. Ever in Oakland? A. No, sir. 

Q. Sacramento? A. Worked in North Sacramento. 

Mr. LrsK: Would it not be best to confine that question to this part of 
the State? These witnesses cannot be expected to know the rates in the 
northern part of the State, or in the southern part of the State, 

Mr. Campbell: I will tell you what I am getting at. I want to find out 
if all these men who were employed on this building were what are known 
as 



29 

Mr. Lusk: There is no law to the effect that a man must belong to a 
labor union. 

Mb. Campbell: No, sir. It is a standard rule that those who will not 
maintain the dignity of their own crafts or calling, is not maintaining 
what is known as the full dignity of mankind. Because they are outside 
of their union, or crafts, or guilds, or whatever they are called, they are 
ready to accept any work, because they are in rebellion to the society to 
which they belong. 

Q. Now, while you were working on the building as a bricklayer, about 
how many bricks a day did you lay? Do you know the average number 
of bricks that a good brickmason is satisfied to lay a day? A. There is 
no average; I couldn't state it. 

Q. Well, we want to know about how many you lay in a day ? A. About 
how many I lay? 

Q. Yes, sir? A. Well, part of the time I would be on the outside, and 
wouldn't lay so many as if on the inside. 

Q. Well, I ask you as a general thing. Would you lay five hundred? 
A. Yes, sir. 

Q. Would you lay a thousand? A. Some days, yes, sir. 

Q. Do you know what is a full day's work for a bricklayer? A. No, 
sir; nor anybodj'' else. 

Q. I am speaking of an average. If you were working for a contractor 
in San Francisco about how many would you average a day ? A. It would 
depend where I was. It is like driving nails. 

Q. Well, now, give us an average. A. Well, it might average from five 
hundred to fifteen hundred, front. It depends on where you are. 

Q. About how many, then, did you lay in a day? A. I couldn't tell 
you. 

Q. You can't tell us? A. No, sir. 

Q. You never kept any account of the brick you laid ? A. Never kept 
any account; no, sir. 

Q. But you worked ten hours or nine hours, just as it would come, 
maybe as you were told ? A. Yes, sir. 

Q. And you don't know how many bricks you laid nor a day's average 
number of bricks any mason will lay in a day ? A; I can't tell you. If 
you could tell me where he was working I might tell you. 

Q. Well, outside or inside. A. He might lay three thousand on the 
inside. 

Q. How many on the outside? A. From five hundred to fifteen 
hundred. 

Q. And you can't tell how many you would lay in a day ? A. I might 
tell you what I would lay one day and then the next I would lay less. 

Q. Well, I am taking either outside or front. I am only asking you 
what you would do in a day. Give me any average day's work you did 
there on that building. I only simply ask the question to test your knowl- 
edge of your own trade. A. Well, let it be outside eight hundred, and 
two thousand on the inside. 

Q. You laid two thousand on the inside ? A. Well, fifteen hundred. 

Q. Will you swear that you ever laid two thousand brick on the inside 
in a day on that building ? A. Two thousand ? 

Q. Yes, sir. A. Yes, sir, I will; one day, on one day. 

Q. You will swear you laid two thousand "2 A. Yes, sir; I might not 
have done it many days, but I have done it one day. 



30 

Mb. Lusk: Did you ever hear of any of the men on that building being 
required to give back part of their wages to the Superintendent as a con* 
dition for their remaining there? A. No, sir; never. 

Q. Did you ever hear any dissatisfaction expressed as to the way he 
was doing the work, the Superintendent? A. No, sir; I did not. 



-I am 



Evan Knapp. 

Sworn. 

Mr. Campbell: What is your occupation, Mr, Knapp? Answe 
a bricklayer. 

Q. Have you ever worked on the State Normal School at Chico? A. I 
have. 

Q. About how long have you worked there? A. Well, I should judge 
it was about seventy-five days, may be; I don't really recollect. 

Q. About seventy-five days? A. I think so. 

Q. What wages did you receive, Mr. Knapp? A. Five dollars a day. 

Q. Five dollars ? A. Yes, sir. 

Q. About how many hours a day would you usually work? A. Most ot 
the time it was ten hours. 

Q. Ten hours. What was the balance? A. Well, part of the time it 
was nine. 

Q. Nine. Any other time ? A. Well, sometimes probably nine and fa 
half. Getting towards the latter part of the season it was nine hours. 

Q. Was there any difference in the pay ? A. None whatever. 

Q. None whatever ? A. No, sir. 

Q. You got $5 a day whether it was ten hours, nine hours, or nine and a 
half? A. Yes, sir; I worked there some eight hours, too. 

Q. You worked eight hours? A. Yes, sir. 

Q. What did you get for that? A. Five dollars. 

Q. Five dollars for eight, nine, nine and a half, and ten. During the 
time you worked there did you ever hear any dissatisfaction amongst the 
men as to the hours they worked, or the rate of pay that they got? A. It 
was frequently talked about among us. 

Q. It was considerably talked of? A. Among us; yes, sir. 

Q. Did you think that the law was carried out in your favor? A. I 
knew that the law was eight hours. 

Q. You knew that the law was eight hours? A. I did. 

Q. Why then did you work ten? A. Well, circumstances. 

Q. Was it compulsory or voluntary? A. Well, both. I would rather 
do it than do nothing. 

Q. Then you were compelled to do it, else you could not get work on 
that building? A. Well, I thiak so; at least, I should judge so. There 
was no proposition made about it, but then 

Q. Did you ever make any application to the Superintendent? A. I 
never did. 

Q. Or do you know of anybody else that did ? A. I do not; no. 

Q. Or did you make any application to Mr. Lusk, or any one connected 
with the management outside of the Superintendent? A. No, sir. 

Q. Never made any? A. No, sir. 

Q. Well, why was it that you did not make any, if you were dissatisfied? 
A. I was busy with a contractor on a building right across the street here. 

Q. You were busy? A. Was building a house here. 



31. 

Q. I asked you why, when you were dissatisfied with the hours, why 
didn't you make application about it? A. I didn't think it was necessary. 

Q. Didn't think it was necessary? A, No. 

Q. Or, in other words, it was dangerous to do so? A. Well, I might 
have thought that, too. 

Q. Now, at any time that you worked there did you ever hear of any 
rumor, or do you know of your own knowledge, of any one having 
secured — ^where any person gave to the Superintendent or any one con- 
nected with the management or control any bonus to get work there or to 
keep the work after they had received it ? A. I never have. 

Q. Never have? A. No, sir. 

Q. I atn satisfied there never was, but I asked it to develop it right here. 
Do you belong to any trades union ? A. I do not. 

Q. Did you ever ? A. Yes, sir. 

Q. Where? A. San Francisco. 

Q. How long ago ? A. It was in 1866, 1867. 

Q. You never heard of any one giving anything to anybody connected 
with that work ? A. No, sir. 

Q. Do you know what is the current wages of your craft outside of this 
locality? A. Five and a half a day, I believe, in San Francisco and Oak- 
land. 

Q. For how many hours ? A. For nine hours. 

Q. About how many brick is a good bricklayer supposed to lay for an 
average day's work on the front of a building, and on the inside of it, giving 
an answer to each ? A. Well, that would depend entirely upon the portion 
of the building he is working on. 

Q. Well, as I said — of course I don't mean fancy and ornamental work; 
I mean plain work ? A. A good man would lay five or six hundred on 
some portions of the work, and in other portions eight hundred, on that 
class of work. 

Q. Well, does that five or six hundred or eight hundred mean the front 
of the building or the inside ? A. The inside would include the eight hun- 
dred. Outside would be from five to six hundred. 

Q. Well, on the inside wall it would be eight hundred? A. Eight hun- 
dred, 

Q. That is plain, rough work? A. Yes, sir; good, solid work; good and 
soHd. 

Mr. Bryan: How much do you pay your bricklayers, when they work? 
A. Five dollars. 

Q. For how many hours' work? A. Ten hours. 

Q. Do you know whether there is any difference here as to those belong- 
ing to a union and those who do not belong to it ? A. None at all. 

Q. Did you ever make any difference when you employed them? A. 
Never did.*^ 

Mr. Davis: Is there a Union of bricklayers north of Sacramento in the 
State of CaUfornia that you know of? A, None that I know of. 

Q. Then it is not governed by the Union at all north of Sacramento? A. 
Not at all. 

Mr. Lusk: Five dollars is the current wages here? A. It is. 

Q. And when you say five and a half you refer to San Francisco and 
Oakland exclusively? A. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Campbell: Do you know the current rate of wages in San Fran- 
cisco, do you know it? A. I did last year. I was in Oakland, City of 
Oakland. 

Q. What was it there? A. Five and a half. 



32 

Q. Was it not six? A. I think some of them got six. 

Q. Didn't bricklayers that can lay from fifteen hundred to two thousand 
brick a day get six dollars? A. Not that I know of. I had some work 
there of my own and I didn't pay but five. 

Q. Well, in contract work in San Francisco, how many brick is a day's 
work for an average workman 1 A. Well, I should judge about two thou- 
sand brick is an average day's work. 

Q. And you laid from five to six hundred here? A. I mean on contract 
work. 

Q. This is the same as contract work; it is a day's work? A. Quite a 
difference. 

Mr. Dobbin: If you hired a man to work for you, and paid him five 
dollars a day, would you be satisfied with him if he only laid five hun- 
dred brick a day ? A. Well, no; not if I had a contract. I think if I was 
doing such work as that I would be satisfied with it. 

Mr. Lusk: It is your idea that workmen, working there on that build- 
ing, for five dollars a day, and working ten hours a day, were laying con- 
siderably less brick than they would if working on a contract? A. Of 
course they did, because it was a different class of work entirely from con- 
tract work. There is no such work done on contract here. 

Q. Do I understand, then, that a workman working over there — working 
this summer, ten hours a day, at $5 a day, did no more work than a work- 
man, working around here on contracts, would in eight hours ? A. Well, 
he might do a little more in ten hours — I know he would. 

Q. He might do a little more in ten hours than he would over there in 
the same time? A. Yes, sir. 

Q, Now, as I understand you, you never made any expression of any 
kind to any member of the Board of Trustees, or the Secretary, or to Mr. 
Bryan, that you were dissatisfied with your wages or your work? A. I 
did not. 

Q. If you had any dissatisfaction, it was not made known to them*? A. 
Only in one instance, where we all expressed dissatisfaction, one evening, 
and quit work and demanded nine hours. There was a general dissatis- 
faction expressed, some reluctantly and some voluntarily. 

Q. You speak of working eight hours; that has been the last week or 
two, hasn't it? A. Yes, sir. 

Q. After the former committee of the Legislature was here? A. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Dobbin: How long ago was it that the dissatisfaction of the brick- 
layers was expressed by quitting — do you remember? A. I can't remem- 
ber when that was. It was after I had worked there some four or five 
weeks, I think, 

Q. How long is it since you went to work there? A. I went to work 
there the third day of September, 

Q. And some time after that the bricklayers expressed some dissatis- 
faction at working longer hours than the Constitution calls for? A. Yes, 
sir. 

Mr. Lusk: Was that made known to the Board of Trustees to your 
knowledge? A. Not that I know of. 

Mr. Campbell: When the men struck who did they make known their 
grievance to? A. It was not made known until they struck. 

Q, I said when they did strike? A. To the Superintendent. 
. Q. To the Superintendent? A. Yes, sir. 

Q. What did he say to you, do you know? A. Well, I don't know much 
about it, because I walked off the building. 

Q. You walked off the building ? A. Yes, sir; I went away. There was 
others did more talking than I did. 



33 

Q. Now, you say that the day's work of a good bricklayer is about two 
thousand brick, while on this job you say that from five hundred to six 
hundred on one part of the work and about eight hundred on another part 
would be a day's work ? A. Yes, sir. 

Q. Is that all that a man would be willing to do, or forced to do, or com- 
pelled to do? A. That would be about all he would be justified in doing. 

Q. By what rule do you govern your conscience when you say that? 
A. I should judge by the class of work. 

Q. In what respect does the class of work on that building differ from 
work outside? A. Because it is solidel* and better filled with mortar, 

Q. Is not all brick work supposed to be solid or to be cemented ? A. It 
is supposed to be. It is not always the case. 

Q. Is there any more solidity in that work than there is in this building 
we are now sitting in? A, Well, this one I don't know anything about. 
I built a house over here, and quite a number of other buildings around 
here. 

Q. And I suppose it was done, as people say in a joke, as a person would 
put their clothes on with a pitchfork; that is, it would fall down before it 
was put up? A. Well, yes, sir. 

Q. Well, is there any better class of work on the inside than there is on 
any building of equal size, or solidity? A. I think there is, pretty sure 
there is. 

Q, Well, I will go over there again with you, if you will be kind enough 
to show me where it is? A. Well, on the surface it would not show so 
readily. You would have to tear a portion of it down. 

Q. What width is the walH A, Seventeen inches. 

Q, Hollow wain A. With a hollow; yes, sir. That would leave twenty- 
one. 

Mr. Davis: Let me suggest, that in a class of work of that kind there is 
a great deal more labor attached to it, with a hollow wall, than there is in 
a solid wall. 

Mr. Campbell: Perhaps it was because the Superintendent did not make 
the men work enough, or does not know a full day's work, that you did 
no more work than that ? A. I think he does. 

Q. You think he does not want any more work done by the men ? A. 
Sir? 

Q. He doesn't want any more work done by the men than has been 
done? A. I think he has been perfectly satisfied. I never saw him urge 
a man to do a great deal of work, but what he did should be done well. 

Mr. Lusk: Mr. Knapp, you mean when the men worked over there, as 
I understand you, the men that worked on brick, the work they did was 
considered the work which had to be done on the building? It was a 
good, fair day's work? A. Yes, sir. 

Q. And they would do a good day's work laying the number of brick 
you have mentioned per day ? A. Yes, sir. 

Q, And they laid all the brick that could be laid according to the char- 
acter of the work? A. Yes, sir. 

Q. And it is good work? A. Yes, sir, 

Q. You don't mean to say that the Superintendent allowed the men to 
lay as little brick as they wished to? A. No, sir; I do not. 

Q. But he would enforce them to lay it well? A. Yes, sir. 

Q. Then he would allow them to lay as little brick as they wanted to, 
tut it must be laid well; is that it? A. Yes, sir. 

3j 



34 

Mr. Maher: What is your opinion of the qualifications and skill of the 
majority of the bricklayers that worked on the building? A. Well, the 
majority of them were pretty fair bricklayers. 

Q. Well, was there a respectable minority that were not good ? A. Well, 
there were two or three that couldn't be called first class workmen; but 
then at the class of work they were employed at probably they would do 
as well as the others. 

Mb. Bryan: Did I understand you to say that you belonged to the 
Bricklayers' Union? A. I did in 1866-67. 

Q. Now, you have worked on thaf building nearly all the time the brict 
work was built; did you notice if the Union bricklayers laid more brick 
than the scabs? A. Well; I don't think they did. 

Q. Were they better bricklayers; did they do better Tvork? A. Some of 
those who belonged to the Union were really inferior workmen, while others 
were good workmen. 

Q. Is it not a fact that with one or two exceptions the best work was 
done by up-country men ? A. That is the fact. 

Mr. Campbell: Did you ever notice the Superintendent or Foreman urge 
the men; finding fault with them for not working more? A. No, sir. 

Q. Never urged them; never found any fault? A. I never heard it, 
although I believe there was some fault found ; that they were not doing 
enough; but to hear it with my own ears 1 never did. 

Mr. Dobbin: In reply to the question, Is it not a fact that the better 
class of work on the institution was done by up-country men ? you answered 
yes. Well, is it the fact that the poorer class of work — ^is it a fact that they 
were first-class workmen and could get work in the southern part of the 
State or around San Francisco? A. Well, they would probably get some 
work; but they wouldn't be considered first-class workmen. There are 
some men from the lower part of the country that I guess are Union men, 
too —good men. 

Mr. Campbell: You stated in the early part of your testimony, you 
recollect, that you would have asked for a reduction of the hours but you 
were afraid that you might lose your position, or something tantamount to 
that — ^you might be injured by doing so? A. I felt satisfied I would be 
told "no." 



Fred. Pfeifer. 

Sworn. 

Mr. Campbell: What is your occupation? Answer — Bricklaying. 

Q. Have you ever worked on the State Normal School at Chico? A. 
Yes, sir. 

Q, About how long? A. Well, I think about one hundred days. I 
have worked on it something near that. 

Q. About one hundred days. What pay did you receive ? A.I received 
$5 a day. 

Q. Five dollars? A. Yes, sir. 

Q. Did you work — ^how many hours did you work in a day? A. Well, 
we worked ten hours a day, and when it grew dark before six o'clock in 
the evening we worked until dark — ^nine and a half, nine and three quar- 
ters. I don't know; something like that. 

Q. The time that you worked there did you ever hear any dissatisfac- 
tion expressed at being required to work ten hours a day on the building? 
A. Well, sir, I heard some of it, and some of them one day — ^I was sick that 
day and was not at work — they struck and wanted to work nine hours a 
day. 



35 

Q. How do you know that they did ask ? By the men telling you, by 
common rumor ? A. Yes, sir; by the men, by some of the bricklayers 
telling me so. 

Q, Did that all spring up in a minute or was it a common feeling? A. 
Well, there was a little talk about it before, but it didn't amount to much. 

Q. It amounted to so much that at the time you were sick they all 
struck? A. Yes, sir; they all struck. 

Q. Well, if you had been there would you have joined the strike ? A. 
Well, I think so; I don't know. 

Q. Well, at the time that this affair occurred, why was it that it did 
occur? A. Well, they expected to work for the State eight hours a day. 
Of course there was some kick. They wanted to work eight hours a day 
if they could, but there was some men come here and worked in our 
places for ten hours a day, so we worked ten hours a day. 

Q. Do you think you could get bricklayers to work ten hours a day ? 
A. Yes, sir; they could. 

Q. They did? A, Yes, sir. 

Q. From where did they come? A. From San Francisco, some of them. 

Q. And worked ten hours a dayl A. Yes, sir. 

Q. Why, then, didn't you make your dissatisfaction known to the offi- 
cers in charge of the work, or to the Superintendent? A. Well, as far as 
I know — I am a German, and am not able to speak the language very cor- 
rectly, anyhow, and I thought there was some men would come — I thought 
there was some men here could talk better than I could, around here, and 
I would let them talk. 

Q. You thought that silence was a virtue, then, so long as you could not 
talk well 1 A. Yes, sir. 

Q. But all that time you thought the law was not being carried out? A. 
Yes, sir; and some of them told me about it, but I didn't kick, because I 
would be discharged if I would kick. 

Q. You were always dissatisfied, because you knew that the law was 
not being carried out? A. Y^es, sir; that is what I heard from a great 
many of the men. 

Mr. Davis: Which did you think was to blame, the law or yourself? A. 
Well, I worked. I have a family to take care of and make a living for. 

Mr. Campbell: You were dissatisfied, but you were afraid to make your 
dissatisfaction known? A. Yes, sir. 

Q. During the time that you worked on the building did you ever know 
of anybody to give, or say that they gave, anything to any of the .officers 
connected with the management of the construction of the building, or to 
the Superintendent ? A. No, sir. 

Q. And you always believed that every person working on the building 
received all his pay that was charged to his account on the books? A. 
Yes, sir. 

Q. And there was no deduction for any purpose whatever ? A. Yes, sir. 

Q. You know so in your own case? A. Yes, sir; I know so in my case. 

Q. And you never heard anything contradictory of that from anybody 
else? A. No, sir; I never heard anybody say he had to pay anything; 
never did hear that. 

Q. Belong to any Trades' Union? A. I used to belong to a Union in 
'Frisco. 

Q. How long ago? A. That was in 1883, I believe; 1884—1 don't 
know; 1884, 1 think. I got a card home. 

Q. Do you know what hours they worked, the men belonging to that 
Union? A. Down in 'Frisco they worked nine hours. 



36 

I 

Q. Do you know what pay they get? A. Well, five and a half a day 
there. 

Q. Do you know what work they usually do on a contract building in 
San Francisco, how it compares with the work done in outside places — ^the 
same class of work? A. Well, I believe they do just as much here as 
they do down in 'Frisco, I have worked there, and I never worked any 
harder than I do here. 

Q. The average class of mechanics who worked on the State Normal 
School, were they all first class? A. Yes, I think they were all first class 
bricklayers; yes, sir. 

Q. All first class? A. Yes, sir. 



A. HONOJDO. 

Sworn. 

Mr. Carpenter: What is your occupation? Answer — Carpenter. 

Q. Have you worked on the State Normal School at Chico? A. Yes, air. 

Q. And about how long have you worked there? A. Well, I worked 
two hundred days, or something like that, I believe — ^in or about — ^perhaps 
a little more. I don^t know just exactly. 

Q. What wages did you receive? A. Three dollars and fifty cents. 

Q. What were the hours that you were required to work? A. Ten hours. 

Q. You were required to work ten. Did you work less or more at any 
time? A. Well, I worked less. 

Q. About how much less ? A. Well, we worked through the winter at 
the rate of nine or nine and a half hours. 

Q. Ever work less than nine ? A. Not until the last two weeks. 

Q. And you worked eight hours in the last two weeks? A. Yes, sir. 

Q. Did you find at that time, when you were working nine or nine and 
a half hours, and ten, was there any difierence in your pay ? A. No dif- 
ference in the pay. 

Q. No difierence ? A. Same pay. 

Q. Were you always satisfied to work ten hours a day for $3 60 on that 
work? A. Well, I couldn't say; but those were the hours we always 
worked here, 

Q. Sir ? A, It is the same hours we always worked on any other job. 

Q. You were perfectly satisfied *? A. Satisfied? Of course. 

Q. I ask you if you were perfectly satisfied? ' A. Yes, sir; I was satisfied 
with it. 

Q, You were perfectly satisfied. Did you hear any dissatisfaction dur- 
ing the time that you worked there about being compelled or required to 
work ten hours a day, or nine hours a day, on the building among the 
workmen, any class of workmen, bricklayers, hod-carriers, concretors, oi 
any other class? A. Well, I couldn't say whether it was dissatisfaction. 
I heard some talk about it. 

Q. Well, what was the talk? A. They talked about working more hoiirJ 
than the law required. 

Q. And yet you were perfectly satisfied to work more hours than the la^ 
required you to? [No answer to last question.] 



37 

George Harney. 

Sworn. 

Mr. Campbell: What is your occupation? Answer — Painter. 

Q. Have you worked on the State Normal School at Chico at any time 
since it was commenced? A. Yes, sir. 

Q. How long or about how long have you worked there? A. Well, I 
haven^t got the time book with me. Two or three weeks. I don't know 
exactly how long it was, 

Q. You only went to work recently? A, Recently, yes, sir. 

Q. Have you heard of any dissatisfaction amongst the men for working 
more hours, or have you heard any dissatisfaction expressed at the num- 
ber of hours the men were required to work each day"? A. No, sir. 

Q. Never heard any dissatisfaction ? A. No. I was ofi* by myself much 
of the time. 

Q. Were you perfectly satisfied with the number of hours you had to 
work? A. Yes, sir. 

Q. You believed that the law was carried out? A. I didn't know any- 
thing about the law, what the law required. 

Q. You have only worked there two or three weeks and that is recently ? 
A. Yes, sir. 

Q, Then you say you have always been principally by yourself, and did 
not have any conversation with the other men? A. Yes, sir. 



Herbert Avery. 

Sworn. 

Mr. Campbell: What is your occupation? Answer — Carpenter. 

Q. Have you ever worked on the State Normal School at Chico? A. 
Yes, sir. 

Q. About how long. A. I think some time in July, I believe; I couldn't 
say exactly. 

Q. You worked there since July all the time? A. Yes, sir; with the 
exception of a day or so. 

Q. What rate of pay do you get? A. Thirty-five cents an hour. 

Q. Are you employed by the day or hour? A. I don't know, by the 
day or the hour. 

Q. You don't know whether you are employed by the day or by the 
hour? A. I work ten hours. 

Q. That is not the question I asked you. A. Well, by the da;y, I sup- 
pose. 

Q. Then you get $3 50 a day in place of 35 cents an hour? A, Yes, sir. 

Q. Were you ever asked to work by the hour ? A. No, sir. 

Q. Did you ever hear of any one else who was asked to work by the 
hour? A. No. 

Q. Did you ever hear of any dissatisfaction existing amongst the men 
because they were required to work ten hours a day ? A. No, sir. 

Q. You never did? A. No, sir. 

Q. Never heard of any strike among any class of mechanics on the 
building? A. No, sir. 

Q. I^ever heard of any? A. No, sir. 

Q. How many hours — have you worked ten hours continuously, or was 
there any difference in the time you worked? A. Oh, yes; in the winter 
time we wouldn't work much over eight hours. 



38 

Q. Did you get as much pay for the days that you worked only a little 
over eight hours as you did when you worked ten hours? A. Yes, sir. 

Q. No difference in the pay? A. No, sir. 

Q. Do you know of anybody who stated, or do you know of your own 
knowledge, that any person connected with the building as Superintend* 
ent or otherwise, ever received any consideration for giving men work, or 
keeping them at work? A, No, sir. 

Mb. Dobbin: Do you know of any person employed on the building as 
a skilled mechanic, when in fact they were only laborers? A. No, sir. 

Q. You don't know of any one being taken from General BidwelPs ranch 
and given a hatchet or axe, and told to put lathes on the building? A. 
No, sir; I do not know of any. 

Mr. Campbell: Is there more than one class of carpenters working 
there ? A. Not that I know of 

Q. All the carpenters working there are getting the same rate of pay? 
A. Well, that I couldn't say. I don't believe I ever heard any one say what 
they were getting. 



Theodore Rinehart. 

Sworn. 

Mr. Campbell: What is your occupation? Answer — I am a carpenter. 

Q. Have you ever been employed on the State Normal School at Chico? 
A. Yes, sir. 

Q. About how long have you been there? A. I think it was a little over 
a year ago the first work I done, and then there was a little time I was off. 
1 probably worked between two and three hundred days. 

Q. About a year? A. Hardly a year. No, sir; not quite a year. 

Q. What pay do you receive, Mr. Rinehart? A. Four dollars a day. 
There was a few days on the first that I only got $3 50, but the greater 
part of the time I got $4. 

Q, Generally paid $4? A. Yes, sir. 

Q. How many hours a day were you required to work ? A. Most of the 
time we worked ten hours. 

Q. What hours were you required to work other days ? A. Well, nine 
or nine and a half. 

Q. Do you know why you have been required to work ten hours and 
nine and nine and a half hours ? A. Why we were required ? 

Q, Yes, sir? A. Well, I do not, only that was the rule on that job. 

Q. Were you a foreman on that building? A. No, sir; I don't know 
that T was, although I had charge of the men when the Superintendent 
was gone many times. 

Q. Have you always been satisfied to work ten hours a day on the 
building? A. Yes, sir; I was satisfied. 

Q. You believed that you were justly treated and dealt by in being 
required to work ten hours? A. Of course I understood on State work that 
eight hours was a day's work; but then the rule here was given us for ten 
hours, and I worked ten hours. 

Q. Do you know who made the rule to work ten hours? A. I don't 
know, sir. 

Q. You do not know who made the rule? A. No, sir. 

Q. Did you ever hear of any dissatisfaction amongst any class of 
workmeA on that building as to the hours they were required to work? 
A, Oh, I heard them talk about it many times, yes, sir. 



39 

Q. Did they ever make any complaint to you or to the Superintendent 
about it? A. No, sir; not directly to me, or him that I know of, 

Q. Did you ever know of any strike to have occurred on the building ? 
A. I did. 

Q, And who did they make their grievances known to when they 
struck? A. Well, I think to the Superintendent, as he was there. 

Q. Do you know what was done in that case ? A. Well, I think they 
came back and went to work again. 

Q. Did they have their grievances adjusted? A. Not that I know of. 

Q. They went back on the same terms that they had when they struck? 
A. Yes, sir; I think so, so far as I know. 



A. J, Bryan. 

Recalled. 

Mr. Campbell: When the men struck — ^the bricklayers, as I understand, 
struck for other terms than what they were then receiving — did they make 
their complaint known to you? Answer — They did not. There was no 
individual of the crowd nor any delegation, as far as I remember, that 
made any statements about it. There was about half the number that 
quit when they come down from the building and simply told me they 
quit because the other men quit. I was told that the men had not agreed 
on any line of action, so they couldn't do anything. 

Q. They all went back? A. The only conversation we had particularly 
about it was the next morning, about coming to somebody and making 
known their grievances. When they quit they left a lot of mortar morti- 
fying on the boards without any one knowing anything about it, but there 
was no delegation or any individual that I remember said anything to me 
about it except the next day, and then they hadn't agreed on any line of 
action. It seemed they had started up to do something, but they couldn't 
agree to anything. They neither came to me with any request as a body 
or otherwise. 

Q, They simply went off of their own accord and left the material there 
on the boards? A. Yes, sir. 

Q. And then came back to work the next morning? A. They all came 
to the building the next morning, I believe; the entire lot. 

Q. And you allowed them all to go to work? A. Not all of them. A 
statement had been made that there had been a few outside men trying to 
get the men to strike on the building ever since the work was started, and 
there was one or two men told me they wanted to go north. 

Q. About how many of them did you lay oft'? A. About three quit, I 
think. 

Q. Did they quit of their own accord or did you make them quit? A. 
There was one, I believe two, quit; one I discharged. I discharged him 
simply because he was a quarrelsome fellow, and I didn't need any more 
men particularly. 

Q. You believed that he was trying to get the other men to quit ? A. 
The statement was made frequently that there was an attempt to make 
trouble among the men on the building, and this man was the one I heard 
mentioned in connection with the matter. 

Q. On what grounds, did you hear, was he trying to start the trouble ? 
A, I never heard any explanation. I expect they would meet together 
"down town and talk about it. 



40 

Q. Well, what appeared to be the complaint? A. I never heard what 
the complaint was. Some were talking about time and others about wages, 
and so forth, but there was never any delegation waited on me or the 
Trustees, so far as I know, to make any complaint. There was a good deal 
of talk about it the next morning though, especially about the mortar 
being left at the building. 

Q. Well, you laid one man off and two quit? A. I think there were 
three out of the party that quit. 

Q. Then if you were not acquainted with the action of this man, as W 
what he was doing, why was it necessary to discharge him? A. Simply 
because he had been coming around full of whisky. That is, in a condi- 
tion that he was hardly able to do his work; I had been thinking of dis- 
charging him. 

Q. Why didn't you discharge him ? A. Well, simply because brick- 
layers were scarce; it was difficult to get bricklayers, and I suppose I was 
not quite strict enough to discharge a man because he was, I will say, 
slightly under the influence of whisky. 

Q, Do you know where this man is now? A. I do not. He was from 
Oakland, or rather Jack Metzer telegraphed before the man came here to 
know if I needed any men, and to learn the wages paid. I always suj> 
posed Jack sent the man here from Sacramento. 

Q. What is his name? A. I don't know that I can remember his name. 
By referring to the payroll I can get it. He is an Oakland man, but was 
sent here, as I always understood, by Jack Metzer, foreman of the railroad 
shops in Sacramento, His name was Alsop — Robert A-1-s-o-p, 

Mr. Maker : Is there any paper in your possession to show when the 
time was changed from nine to ten or half-past nine at any time during 
the work on the building'^ A, No; except when we changed to eight hour& 
a short time ago. 

Q. Nothing to show now when there was any change made between nine 
and ten? A. No, sir. We just dropped off as the days shortened. There 
is nothing on the time book which will show the exact time. 

Mr. Lusk: You could tell by the calendar. 



Theodore Rinehart. 

Recalled. 

Mr, Lusk: How long have you lived around here? Answer — Twenty- 
eight years, 

Q. Did you know all those men working on that building as carpenters? 
A. Most of them; not all. 

Q. Were there any common laborers taken from General Bidwell's 
ranch and given carpenter work and paid carpenter's wages ? A. No, sir; 
there was not. 

Q. You have been a carpenter all your life? A. Yes, sir. 

Q. What is the character of the work done on that building as regarda 
being good or bad? A. It is very good. 

Q. 1 am referring now to the carpenter work ? A. Yes, sir. 



41 

T. P. Hendricks. 

Sworn. 

Mb. Ltjsk: You are one of the Trustees of this Normal School are you, 
Mr. Hendricks? Answer — Yes, sir. 

Q. Was any complaint ever made to you by any of the men that ever 
worked on that building as to being dissatisfied with the wages paid, or the 
hours of labor worked, or any treatment of the Superintendent? A. No, 
sir. 

Mb. Campbell: Mr, Hendricks, you are one of the Directors of the Nor- 
mal School located here? A. Yes, sir, 

Q. Have' you exercised any supervision over its management or con- 
struction? A, Well, no, sir; not further than — no, I have not. 

Q. Then how could you have ever known anything about it ? How could 
you have known what might have occurred if you exercised no jurisdiction 
or control over its management? A. I was asked if any man employed on 
that building had ever made any complaint to me as to his hours, wages, 
or general treatment. My answer was ''no." 



L. H. McIntosh. 

Sworn. 

Mr. Lusk : You have been a Director since the school was organized ? 
Answer — ^Yes, sir. 

Q. During the construction of that building you have been frequently 
there? A. Yes, sir. 

Q. Has any man ever employed on that building ever expressed any 
dissatisfaction to you as to the hours of his labor, his wages, or the treat- 
ment of the Superintendent towards him ? A. No, sir. 

Mr. Campbell: Have you ever heard that any of the men were dis- 
satisfied? A. Yes, sir; I have. 

Q. Who gave you the information? A. The Superintendent told me 
that there had been a little strike on the building, last fall, I believe. 

Q. Were you ever at a meeting of the Board of Directors at which the 
hours of labor was discussed? A. Yes, sir. 

Q. Will you state what was said at that meeting? A. At the meeting 
I had reference to, when we took charge of the work, we had agreed to 
pay the men 20 cents an hour, for common laborers. 

Q. That was discussed at the meeting of the Directors? A. Yes, sir. 

Q, Was the Superintendent present? A. I think he was. He was noti- 
fied of it, 

Q. Then, at that meeting, you established in your own mind, and as a 
governing rule of your action during your supervision of the construction of 
that building, that the men should be employed by the hour ? A, That 
was the understanding at that time; the common laborers; yes, sir. 

Q. Why by the hour and not by the day? A. Well, the men were at 

work there, as I understood General Bidwell had some men there 

before we took charge of the work, and they were working for $1 50 a day. 
I don't know exactly what they were getting, but we talked it over and 
concluded to pay them 20 cents an hour. 

Q. Did you know at that time that there was a } aw in the statute book 
and also a clause in the Constitution providing that eight hours was a 
day's work? A. Yes, sir; I knew that there was such a law of that kind, 
although I didn't know exactly what it was. . I did not understand that 
they could not work longer. 



42 

Q. And was it not for the purpose of getting around that clause in the 
Constitution and the Act in the Political Code that the men were to be 
paid by the hour instead of the day? A. No, sir. As I understand, the 
men would rather put in ten hours and get paid for ten hours than to work 
eight hours and be paid for working eight hours, but we gave them the 
privilege of working longer hours if they wished. 

Q. When did you give them that privilege ? A. It was understood thai 
the Superintendent from that time was to pay them by the hour. 

Q. If they worked eight hours, you would pay them for eight; if they 
worked ten, pay them for ten ? A, Yes, sir. 

Q. Now, it was at that time that you established that rule ? A. Yes, sit. 




A. Button. 
Sworn. 

Mr. Dobbin: What is your occupation? Answer — ^Well, I do carpenter 
work. 

Q. Have you been employed on the Normal School? A. No, sir. 

Q. Not at all? A. No, sir. 

Q. Do you know anything about that institution? A. No, sir; not pai- 
ticularly. I have been there two or three times. 

Q. You know it is there? A. It is there; yes, sir. 

Q. Well, are you personally acquainted with any of the employes, any 
one who has been working on the institution ? A. Well, I have seen several 
of them; yes, sir. 

Q. With any of those you have seen, have you ever had any conversa- 
tion with them in reference to the hours of labor and the pay, and so forth? 
A. Not particularly; no, sir. 

Q. Did you ever hear any of the employes on that building say that they 
had paid a bonus to obtain a situation there? A. Never did; no, sir. 

Mr. Campbell: Did you ever tell anybody that you did know it? A. 
Not that I recollect of. No, I don't think that I ever did. 



J. M. GUGGER. 

Sworn. 

Mr. Campbell: What is your occupation? Answer — Carpenter. 

Q. Have you ever worked upon the Branch State Normal School at 
Chico? A. Yes, sir; I have. 

Q. You have worked there ? A. Yes, sir. 

Q. What pay did you receive? A. Three dollars and a half a day. 

Q. What hours did you have to work ? A. Well, sir, when I first went 
to work there we worked ten hours, I believe, as near as we could. 

Q. You got $3 50 and worked ten hours. Did you ever work less or 
more ? A. Never worked more. Worked less than that when the days 
were short. 

Q. When the days were short ? A. Yes, sir. 

Q. About what time, then, did you work — as low as nine 1 A. Yes, siii 
a little less sometimes. I never paid much attention to it. 

Q. Who made the order to go to work, and who gave the order to 
quit; does a bell ring? A. We usually went to work by a whistle — we 
usually went to work by the whistle of the waterworks. 



43 

Q. Did you always get the same pay for nine hours as you did for ten? 
A. Yes, sir; I never worked for less than $3 50 a day. 

Q, Do you know of any carpenter working for less than $3 50? A. No, 
sir; I never asked any man what he was getting on the job. 

Q. Nor ever told any one what you wer^e getting? A. I don^t remember 
that I did. If any one asked me I would certainly tell him. 

Q. Do you know of any reason to complain as to treatment you get, the 
hours you work, and the treatment you receive? A. No, sir. 
Q. You never heard any dissatisfaction amongst the men? A. Not a bit. 
Q. Did you know that there was an eight-hour law and that it only 
required eight hours for a day's work? A. I heard the question asked 
several times. 
Q. But never answered satisfactorily? A. No, sir. 
Q. Did you elect to work eight hours or ten, or were you asked to work 
eight or ten? A. That question was never put to me at all. I went to 
work there. 

Q. Went to work and were willing to work so long as the other men 
alongside of you were working? A. Yes, sir. 

Q. Have you ever heard it rumored, or do you know of your own knowl- 
edge to be the case, that any person connected with the management, 
either the Superintend ant, any of the Directors, or any person in any other 
capacity having received any bonus or compensation for giving work or 
keeping men at work after they went to work? A. No, sir; never heard 
anything of the kind. 
Q. Of your own knowledge you know nothing of it? A. Nothing at all. 



William Day. 

Sworn. 

Mr. Campbell: What is your occupation? Answer — Bricklayer. 

Q. Have you ever worked on the State Normal School at Chico? A. Yes, 
sir. 

Q. How long have you worked there? A. Well, I have worked there 
quite awhile. I commenced along about the first she started. 

Q. What hours did you generally work there? A. Well, I started in on 
ten hours. 

Q. What pay did you receive ? A. Five dollars. 
, Q. Did you work less hours or more than ten? A. We worked less. 

Q. Get the same pay for less hours that you did for ten? A. Yes, sir. 

Q. The same pay.? A. Yes, sir. 

Q. Did you ever hear of any dissatisfaction or know of any dissatisfac- 
tion having existed amongst the men about being required to work ten 
hours a day or nine hours a day, instead of eight? A. Oh, well; nothing 
more than when they were together they all seemed to think eight hours 
was all they had to work, or something of that kind. Just a general talk 
amongst the men. 

Q. Do you believe that the men were satisfied? A. Well 

Q. Were you satisfied yourself? A. Well, I was satisfied — yes. I had 
either to work for the wages or quit. 

Q. That is not the question I asked you. Were you satisfied — ^you, your- 
self—with having to work ten hours a day ? A. Yes, sir. 

Q, You were perfectly satisfied? A. Yes, sir; of course I was, if all the 
rest of them was. I would do what the rest done; if they worked ten 
hours, I w^ould work ten hours. 



44 

Q. Then, might I ask you this question, Was it because you wer^ 
required to work ten hours, or because the other men worked ten hows 
that you were satisfied to work ten hours? A. Well, they was working 
ten hours when I went there, and I never — they worked ten hours, and ] 
worked with the rest of them. 

Q. Were you on this strike that occurred one certain day ? A. Yes, sir. 

Q. Then being on that strike would indicate that you were not exactly 
satisfied with working ten hoars a day? A. Not any more than any of the 
rest of them. ^ 

Q. What did you strike for? A. Well, they didn't seem to want to 
work ten hours; wanted to quit at five o'clock; they all agreed to it; I 
done the same as the rest. 

Q. Did they make any complaint to any of the officers in charge of the 
building, or to the Superintendent? A. No, sir; I don't think so. 

Q. Did they seem to have any spokesman, any one with more courage 
than the others, to go and speak to him? A. No; they worked until five 
o'clock and simply climbed off the scaffold, and some did not. 

Q. Well, now, wasn't it the fact that they were all afraid to speak to the 
Superintendent to make any complaint known to him? A, Well, I m^ 
pose they was. 

Mr. Dobbin: Subsequently to the strike were the hours of labor reduced 
on the building? A. No, sir. 

Q, The strike availed nothing, then? A. No, sir. 

Q. Do you know if the attention of the Board of Directors was called 
to the hours of labor exceeding the constitutional limit? A. No, sir. 

Mr. Campbell: Did all these men go back to work that struck? A. 
Well, I think all of them except three of the parties. I was one of the 
men that was laid off for awhile; I think there was only three of them 
didn't go back; I was one of them. 

Q. You did not go back ? A. Not for a couple of days. 

Q. How long did yon stay off? A. Two days. 

Q. You were not the one that the Superintendent laid off? You stopped 
off of your own accord? A. No, sir; he told me I could lay off until 1 
could think the matter over and understand the thing. He seemed to 
think I had something to do with it, but I told him I didn't have any- 
thing to do with it, and I laid off two days. 

Q. Then he kept you off, although you were no more guilty than the 
others? A. Yes, sir. 

Q. And when he found you were as innocent as they were he let you 
back? A. Yes, sir. 

Q, He kept you out for three or four days? A. Two days. 

Q. Then what became of the other men; were they allowed to go back? 
A. No, sir; they both went away. 

Q. They both went away ? Did they go away of their own accord oi 
were they compelled to go away? A. No, I don't suppose — ^they both got 
up and left. 

Q. Did either one or both of these men, were they in the habit of drink- 
ing so as to be intoxicated ? A. One of them was; I don't think the other 
was. 

Q. One of them was, but don't think the other was. Well, was that the 
ringleader of the strike? A. The ringleader; I never saw him to know 
him in my life. 

Q. You never saw the ringleader? A. Not that I know of. 

Q. That was the man who had the moral courage. Now, in all the time 
that you have been working there and living around Chico, have you ever 



45 

heard it rumored, or do you know it of your own knowledge, that any per- 
son connected with the management of the construction of that building, 
either as Superintendent, Director, or in any other capacity, ever received 
anything? A. No, sir. 

Q. In the way of compensation to put men at work, or to keep them at 
work after they were at work? A. No, sir. 

Q. Perfectly satisfied on that? A. I am on my part. 

Q. You never heard of it? A. No, sir. 

Mr. Dobbin: Did you ever hear of any material being used in the con- 
struction of the building on which Chinese were employed in the making? 
A. No, sir. 

Q. Never heard that mentioned? A. No, sir. 



C. F. MUNSEY. 

Sworn. 

Mr. Campbell: What is your occupation? Answer — Day laborer. 

Q. Have your ever worked upon the State Normal School ? A. Yes, sir. 

Q. How long? A. I could not say how long. I didn't keep the time 
exactly. 

Q. About how long; we are not particular? A. Probably two or three 
weeks. 

Q. What w^ages did you receive at that time ? A. Dollar and a half a 
day. 

Q. What hours did you have to work? A. Went to work at seven 
o'clock, and quit at six. 

Q. Ten hours; all the time you worked there? A. Yes, sir. 

Q. What did you leave there for? A. Well, I understood that I would 
be discharged if I didn't leave, so I quit before I was discharged. I don't 
know whether there was any truth in it or not — ^just some conversation 
among some of the workmen. 

Q. What made you think that ? Had you done anything, or had any- 
thing been said about it ? A. Yes, sir. I wrote a letter to Ira G. Hoitt, 
Superintendent of Public Instruction, at Sacramento. 

Q. You wrote a letter to him? A. Yes, sir. 

Q. To what did your letter relate ? A. Well, I think I asked him in 
the letter — the purport of the letter was in regards to whether the State 
allowed so much wages or whether the State allowed ten hours for a day's 
work. I have the answer in my pocket. You can tell what he wrote back 
to me. [Witness produced letter referred to, which Mr. Campbell read as 
follows:] 

State of Califobnia, Department Public Instruction, ) 
Sacramento, October 29, 1887. ) 
Charles F. Munsey, -Esg., Chico, California: 

Dear Sir: Yours of the twenty-sixth instant is before me and at once noted. The 
matter of going ahead with the work on the Normal School at Chico was left by the Trus- 
tees to a committee composed of Chico members. I am not aware that there is any price 
fixed by the State or its Legislature as to State wages. The Legislature appropriated 
$50,000 with which to erect the Normal School at Chico. The matter of employing help 
is entirely with the Chico Board, only they must not overreach the appropriation. Thej'^ 
fix the prices they can afford to pay, but they cannot oblige any one to work for such 
prices unless he chooses to do so. 

What are the prices usually paid to day laborers in the fall and winter at Chico and 
vicinity? I should think that the ruling rates paid in Chico and vicinity would have 
much to do with the Board or committee in fixing the pay at the Normal School. They 
certainly ought not to pay more than a private individual, nor, in my opinion, should 
they pay less. 

Yours sincerely, 

IKA a. HOITT, 
Superintendent of State. 



46 

P. 8.— If you are working under or for a contractor, then you will get what he agrees 
to pay you and what you agreed to work for. In such cases the Board does not control 
the wages. 

I. G. H. 

Mr. Campbell: That was the answer you got to that letter you wrote to 
Mr. Hoitt? A. Yes, sir. 

Q. Then how did anybody know that you had written the letter to Mr. 
Hoitt? Did you tell anybody? A. There was several parties that I 
showed the letter to before I signed it, or one or two parties at least. 

Q. You were getting $1 50 for ten hours at that time? A. Yes,. sir. 

Q. And you wrote to Mr. Hoitt to inquire if that was regular or State 
wages, and you got that answer? A. Yes, sir. 

Q- Then how can you know, or can you establish the fact, that you 
would be discharged if you tender your own discharge, on account of hav- 
ing written that letter? A. No; I could not say that I would have been 
discharged, although I was told to go to work the next morning. After I 
wrote the letter I heard General Bid well say that whoever wrote the letter 
he would discharge him. He was talking with other parties at the time, 
wasn't talking to me, but I overheard that remark. I don't know whether 
he referred to the letter I wrote or somebody else's letter, or what letter 
he referred to, but that was the language he used, I think. 

Q. You do not know then that General Bidwell in that conversation or 
remark that you say you overheard referred to your letter? A. No; I 
couldn^t say. 

Q. He may have referred to a letter frojn somebody else? A. Car- 
tainly. 

Q. Have you ever worked on the building since ? A. No, sir. 

Q. Have you ever made application for work there since? A. I believ« 
I did. 

Q. Who did you make application to ? A. I think I wrote a letter to 
Mr. Bryan asking him if there was a vacancy if I could go to work. 

Q. Who is the person who usually takes on the men — Mr. Bryan ? A, 
I suppose so. He was the man I went to work under. 

Q. How long have you lived in Chico? A. I have lived here off and on 
for over a year. 

Q. You never made application to Mr. Bryan for work after you left? 
A. I wrote him a letter; yes, sir. 

Q. You wrote him a letter? A. Yes, sir. 

Q. Did he ever answer your letter? A. No, sir; if he did I never got it. 

Q. Why didn't you make personal application? A. Because I was busy 
at the time and hadn't time to go and see him. I was working at that 
time and couldn't see him on the street, so I just dropped him a note to 
the office. 

Q. Did you ever hear that any person ever gave anything for getting 
work ? A. No, sir. 

Q. You never heard that any person ever gave anything ^for retaining 
work after they went to work? A. No, sir; I never did. 



47 

Prank Clijivblanb. 

Sworn. 

Mb. Campbell: What is your occupation? Answer — Well, last two 
or three years I have been doing different^ jobs — one thing and another. 

Q, Have you ever worked on the State Normal School ? A. Yes, sir. 

Q. In what capacity? A. Well, wheeling brick, building scaffolds — 
different things. 

Q. What pay did you receive ? A. Two dollars a day. 

Q. How long did you work there? A. Well, I don't recollect just exactly. 
I guess about eight or ten days. 

Q. How many hours a day did you work ? A. Ten hours. 

Q. Did you leave of your own accord ? A, Yes, sir. 

Q. You did leave of your own accord? A. Yes, sir. 

Q. Ever ask for work since you left ? A. No, sir. 

Q. Were you dissatisfied with the work? A. No, sir. 

Q. Dissatisfied with the hours? A. No, sir. 

Q. Do you know of anything or of any irregularity going on that you 
wish to tell the committee? A. No, sir; I do not. 

Q. Ever hear of any ? A, No, sir. 

Mr. Dobbin: Did you ever hear of any grievance or imaginary grievance 
that the bricklayers had on that building? Did you ever hear them dis- 
cuss among themselves that the State law was being violated as to hours 
of labor? A. No, sir. 

Q. Do you know anything about a little strike they had, or were you 
employed on the building at that time? A, I guess not. 

Q. You are positive you never heard of anybody pajdng money to receive 
a position there, and paying money to retain the position after they had 
secured one? A. Never heard of anything of the kind. 



F. C. LusK. 

Recalled. 

The Witness: In reference to this letter of Mr. Munsey's that he wrote 
Mr. Hoitt, my remembrance is that Mr. Hoitt sent that letter to me as 
President of the Board, It is possible that he may have written me only 
the substance of the letter, and showed me the letter at Sacramento, but 
at any rate he called my attention to it. It did not refer to hours of labor. 
He wanted to know if $2 was not the State wages. Upon that letter being 
called to the attention of the Board it was discussed, and there was no 
thought or disposition on the part of any of us to discharge Mr. Munsey, 
but that it was a thing which he had a perfect right to do. As to the 
statement he attributes to General Bidwell, that he would discharge the 
person who wrote that letter, that I don't know anything aboiit. I do not 
think. he did, however, because such an expression would not be in con- 
sonance with the discussion we had in the Board. 

There has never been a disposition on the part of any of the members 
of this Board to jew down the men. We simply supposed that if these 
men living up here were willing to work the usual number of hours at a 
rate per hour which would make up their usual pay, that it would surely 
be satisfactory to all. 

And I never heard of this strike until to-day. And we never ordered 
the discharge of any man from that building. Such a thing never occurred 
in the Board. 



48 



TESTIMONY CLOSED. 



Mr. Maker: I move you, sir, that the thanks of this committee be 
extended to Mr. Lusk for the use of his private office during our investiga. 
tion. 

Motion carried. 

On motion of Mr. Maher, committee adjourned to meet at the call of 
the Chair. 



UjjiVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA-COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE. 
AGEIOULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION. 



REPORTS OF EXAMINATIONS 



WATERS, WATER SUPPLY, 



AND RELATED SUBJECTS, 



DURING THE> YEARS 1886-80. 



By E. W. HILGARD, 

Professor of Agriculture and Director of the Station. 



ADVANCE SHEETS FROM THE COMBINED REPORTS FOR 1888 AND 1889. 




STATE OFFICE, 



SACRAMENTO: 

: : : J. D. young, suft. state printtog. 
1889. 



T 



TABLE OF CONTENTS. 



Page. 

ISTBODUCTORY NoTE ^ 7 

CiBCULAR Concerning Analyse^ of Waters * 9 

Thk Softening of Hard Waters fob Domestic Use 11 

Analyses of Waters 13 

A. Common Wells 13 

From St. Helena; L. Zierngibi 13 

From Mission Hills, San Francisco ; B. Strozynski .,.- 13 

From North Berkeley (tank water) ; Dr. M. 0. O'Toole 14 

From North Berkeley (creek water); same 14 

From North Berkeley (well water); same 15 

From Saratoga, Santa Clara County ; G. E. Plnder 16 

From Saratoga, Santa Clara County ; Gr. E. Hyde - 16 

From San Jos^; P. O. Burns Wine Company (well water) 16 

From San Jos^; P. 0. Burns Wine Company (boiler water) - 16 

From San Jos^; P. O. Burns Wine Company (spring water) 17 

From Fresno; Thomas E. Hughes •. 18 

From Polonio Pass; John R, Carr , 18 

From Alpine Station, Los Angeles County; H. Slotterbeck 18 

From Fulton Wells, Los Angeles County ; W. F. Nimmocks 19 

From Riverside ; Henry Jarecki 20 

From San Bernardino; Mrs. C. M. Davis 20 

From Alturas Ranch, San Diego County ; Cave J. Couts 20 

B. Spring Waters - — 21 

From Paradise, Butte County; Irving A. Coonradt 21 

From Oakville, Napa County ; John Benson 22 

From Vacaville ; J, R. Collins 22 

From Applegate (Oakland ranch), Placer County ; A. T. Perkins. 22 

From Livermore Mountains; M. M. MendenhalL.. 23 

From JjosGatos; F. H. McCuIlagh 23 

From Skyland, Santa Cruz Mountains ; Augusta C. H. Weber 24 

From HoUistex , S an Benito County ; J ames McM ahon 24 

From Bryson, Monterey County; D. Sturges- 25 

From Coulter ville, Mariposa County; Philip Hope. 25 

From Camulos, Ventura County; D. C. Cook 25 

From Coast Range foothills, Tulare County ; L. L. Robinson - 26 

C. Mineral Waters 26 

From Mt. Lassen Springs, Plumas County; E. R. Drake 26 

From Sonoma Hot Springs, H. E. Boyes 27 

From Samuel's Napa Soda Springs, Napa County .-- --. 27 

From Milton, Calaveras County ; George W. Gllmore 28 

From Ojai Hot Springs, Nordhoff, Ventura County 28 

i>. Artesian Waters .-,_ , 28 

From Beckwith, Plumas County; Thomas Black 28 

From Patterson's Landing; William Ryan 29 

From Borden, Fresno County; A. L. Sayre_ 29 

From Carpinteria, Santa Barbara County; T. W.Ward 30 



4 TABLE OF CONTENTS. 

From Carpi nteria; P.O. Higgins ^H 

From " The Palms," San Diego County ; Howard & Atwater ^ 

E. River avd Irrigation Waters _ _ 3^ 

From Carmel River, Monterey Connty; , 3j 

From Owen's River, Independence Station ; Emmet Rixford ._ 3^ 

The Water Supply of the San Bernardino ValiiEy 3j 

The upper San Bernardino Valley 

. Cienegas 33 

Flood plain of the Santa Ana River 3j 

The Victoria Oieftega 35 

Development by Mr. Matthew Gage ^^ 

Surface and surface waters... 

Natural springs - , 

Origin of Warm Creek 

Artesian Wells ^ 38 

Materials penetrated 

Proper size of pipes 35 

Details of water discharge - - --- 3S 

Group "A" J 3! 

Group "B" 3« 

Group "C» 3« 

Group " D" 

Interdependence of these Wells , 3J 

Experiments on mutual interference 374j 

"Local Head" .—. 38 

The Substrata of the Valley _ 38 

Source of the Water Supply 33 

Absorption of water at mouth of canon 41 

•Cobble beds of Santa Ana and Mill Creek Oafions ^ 

No gravel from San Timoteo Cafion ^ 

Smaller affluents — Plunge, City, and Lytle Creeks ^ 

Possible Production from a given Area - - 

Coincident of ancient and modern channels 

Was there a stream down the main valley - ^ 

Chemical Composition of the Waters 

Table of Analyses — Artesian Wells, Warm Creek 

Small amount of Mineral Stilts 

Importance of Potash contained; value of same ^ 

Cienegas of the Chino Raixchand Pomona Slope - --- 

The Lakes of the San Joaquin Valley - 

Rapid Evaporation 

Condition in 1880 

Dying of Fish in Kern Lake -^— ^ 

Buena Vista Lake 

Tulare Lake - 

Comparative Analyses of Waters - - 

Sea Water and Lake Water Salts, • 

Condition of Tulare Water in 1888 , 

Analysis of the Water • 

Rate of concentration and survival of fish 

CoTidition of Tulare Lake in Winter 1888-89 

*' Fish Dying by Shoals " - 



TABLE OF CONTENTS. 5 

Page. 

Expedition of Mr. J. G, Woodbury 46 

Description of Cross Creek fisheries 46 

Voracity of Lake Perch 46 

Retirement of Catfish to the Sloughs ..-; 47 

Circumnavigation of the Lake— its depth and channel 47 

Character of the Water , 47 

Abundance of Mussel Shells - ^ 47 

Character of the lake-shore lands 47 

The future of the Lake.l 47 

Previous epoch of low water 47 

Results of Draining the Lake 47 

Present composition of Tulare Lake water _ 48 

Table of Composition 48 

Composition of the Water at different Periods — - 48 

Comparative Table 48 

Great progress of concentration during 1888 49 

Possible inflow of Alkali 49 

Alternatives in regulating the Lake 49 

Examination of Lake-border Soils 49 

Mechanical and Chemical Analyses 49-50 

Need of Fallow and Neutralization of Alkali 50 

Diflferent condition of soils at different points 51 

Investigations on the Proximate Composition of the Saline Contents of Waters 

AND OF Natural Alkali - 61 

" On ike Mutual Reactions of Carbonates, Sulphates and Chlorides of the Alkaline 

Earths andAlkalies^^ 61 

Early observations on the subject - — - 52 

Neglect of these observations, and practical importance of the same. - 52 

Verification of previous experiments, and new forms of same 53-54 

Paradoxical lecture experiment - 54 

Quantitative experiments, showing limits of complete reaction 54^55 

Behavior of Alkali Chlorides 55 

Wide importance of these reactions 56 

Table showing their effect in Kern and Tulare Lakes 56 

Great possible variations of conditions 57 




INTRODUCTORY NOTE. 



In view of the continued, great pressure of personal work upon the Direct- 
or, and the resulting delay or forced omission of the timely publication of 
the annual reports and even of bulletins, it is deemed advisable to change 
the policy pursued heretofore, at least for the time being, and to publish 
separately the parts of the report as fast as they can be prepared for pub- 
lication. 

Thus far, two series of publications have been issued by this depart- 
ment (embracing the instructional as well as the experimental work), to 
wit: Annual or biennial reports^ in which all the matter accumulated since 
the closing of the previous report was systematically set forth and fully 
discussed; and buUetinSy in which special subjects of immediate interest 
were treated in a rather brief and popular manner, and which were origi- 
nally designed chiefly for publication in the newspapers of the State, but 
also circulated extensively by direct mailing to applicants or others known 
to be interested. These bulletins were not put in paged forna, not being 
intended for permanent preservation, since their contents were to be repro- 
duced in a more complete and final form in the next succeeding report. 

Some of the earlier stations have pursued the same policy, until the 
enactment of the Hatch bill freed them from the payment of postage, and 
they were thus enabled to circulate their publications at a merely nominal 
cost, thus reaching directly the persons interested. The newly established 
stations appear to have almost unanimously adopted the pohcy of publish- 
ing in full every series of experiments as soon as concluded, in the (pre- 
sumed) final form of octavo pamphlets; and having once gone to the 
expense of printing these, it is presumable that they will not reproduce 
them in the form of annual reports. 

While in some respects this mode of publication has its advantages and 
is most convenient for the stations, the omission of the brief summaries 
followed by the practical conclusions to be drawn from the work, and which 
readily found a place even in the daily papers, but very generally in the 
weeklies, cuts off a kind of communication with the bulk of the population 
that cannot readily be replaced by the direct circulation of the paged and 
more elaborate and lengthy reports now mostly issued under the name of 
bulletins. They could not find a place in the newspapers unless previously 
''boiled down," a process which in the case of technical papers is not often 
accurately or properly performed in a newspaper office, and the paged form 
adds to the repugnance of the printer toward its reproduction. 

It may then be fairly questioned whether the abandonment of the brief 
summaries suited to publication in the general newspapers, and the sub- 
stitution therefor of the full record, often ill adapted to the comprehension 
of unprofessional readers, is an improvement so far as the popular under- 
standing and availability of the work of the station is concerned. More- 
over, the more ambitious form of a pamphlet discourages the publication 
of much timely matter which in transient form it should not be deemed 
beneath the dignity of the stations to impart to the public. 

In pursuance of this view, this station is not yet prepared to abandon the 
first plan of transient bulletins; distinct in their nature and object from the 



8 



REPORTS OF EXAMINATIONS OP 



final report, which is to be made up annually at least, in the permanent 
form of octavo pamphlets, and to contain a full record and connected dis^ 
cussion of the matter of the bulletins previously published, as well as all 
other matter of interest that may have remained unpublished on account 
of unsuitableness for the general public. It is thought that thus, without 
incurring unnecessary delay in the publication of practically important mat 
ter, a well matured and fruitful discussion of experiments and results can 
best be assured. 



WATERS AND WATER SUPPLY. 



EXAMINATION OF WATERS. 



The investigations of waters and of questions relating to water supply, 
that form the subject of the present publication, while serving to illustrate 
and elucidate the importance and variety of the various phases of the sub- 
ject in this State, might with some create an impression that, as so many 
questions are asked and such frequent doubts of the quality of the waters 
are expressed, a lack of really drinkable waters may be characteristic of 
the State at large. This, however, would be an entirely erroneous infer- 
ence. It is true that the "arid" climate of California tends to the retention 
in the soils of a great deal of the soluble salts that in the Mississippi Val- 
ley are currently washed into the country drainage by the abundant rain- 
fall; and hence "mineral" waters are very abundant On the whole, there 
is very little difficulty in securing supplies of good, potable water outside 
of the "desert" Regions; but the doubtful samples find their way to the 
station laboratory and are thus gazetted, while the abundant supplies of 
pure water remain unheralded. 

The following circular was issued in order to define the scope of the 
Station's work, and to insure a full understanding on the part of persons 
desiring such investigations, of the conditions necessary to secure correct 
results: 

CIRCULAR COKCERNING ANALYSES OF WATERS. 

Agricultural Experiment Station, ) 
Berkeley, Cal., March 30, 1889. ) 

The frequency with which analyses of water of various kinds are called for, renders it 
desirahle to formnlate special directions for the taking of proper samples, and also to state 
what the Station can and can not undertake to do in the direction of water investigation. 
Our working force being limited, it becomes necessary to discriminate somewhat closely 
between cases of merely individual interest, and those .which may be considered as more 
or less affecting a wider circle, or the public at large. 

Of the latter class of cases, those involving irrigation water and the water supply of 
towns or cities, are of such wide importance that the Station will undertake to carry the 
analyses to the limit required by the objects in view. 

The waters of artesian wells, forming outlets of extended artesian reservoirs, which may 
be still further tapped and used for irrigation or household purposes, manifestly fall 
within the same category. 

Of the above classes or water, therefore, both " qualitative " and " quantitative" analyses, 
sufficiently detailed for all practical purposes, will be made upon request, as rapidly as 
they can be reached upon the regular docket. 

The waters of private wells and small springs, interesting only the owners, will, as a 
rule, be analyzed *' qualitatively" only, so far as to determine their healthfulness or adap- < 
tationfor domestic use; except that in all cases the total quantity of solid ingredients, 
and the proportion of earthy and saline (permanently soluble) matters will be deter- 
mined. These determinations will, as a rule, be amply sufficient to decide whether or not 
such waters are suitable for the uses contemplated, and, if faulty, to determine the means, 
if any, for improving their quality. Waters suspected of sewage contamination will also 
be investigated with respect to their contents of improper ingredients of animal origin. 

The analysis of supposed medicinal waters will, as a rule, be carried only so far as to 
determine if they are likely to prove of value, so that the sender may decide whether or 
not it may be worth while to go farther and incur the expense of a detailed quantitative 
analysis for commercial purposes. The Station does not undertake the latter class of work 
under any ordinary circumstances. 

When for special reasons persons interested desire to have work, not included in the 
above categories, done under the supervision of the Director, it may usually be done 
by competent volunteers temporarily employed for the purpose, when such persons are 
available; the charges to be agreed upon between them and the applicant. 



10 



REPORTS OF EXAMINATIONS OF 



Mode of Taking 8ample$,~Sin<ie the value of any analysis is essentially dependent upoti 
the correct sampling of the material, the following directions should be carefully observei 
when waters are sent for examination : 

1. Not less than two wine bottles of the water should be sent in any case. An ample 
supply of material not only greatly facilitates the chemist's work, but also enables him to 
control at once, by repetition, any unexpected or questionable result he may have obtained. 

2. Of irrigation or any other waters intended for quantitative analysis, at least twogalhn 
should be sent in every case. Such samples should be put up in new, or very carefully 
deans ed, demijohns, not in ear fch en ware jugs, and least of all in tin or other metallic cans. 
In both of the latter class of vessels the water is almost sure to be so contaminated before 
arrival, as to render the samples useless. Deniijohns, and bottles as well, should be rinseci 
with sand or fine gravel (not with bird-shot) until it is absolutely certain that nothing 
adheres to the inside, and until all odor of previous contents (vinegar, wine, molasses 
whisky, etc.) has been removed. The corks used for closing should also be new, or, if used 
before, should be boiled with water until fully cleansed of all odors or adherent deposits. 

3. The water should in all cases be taken directly from the well or spring when bottled. 
If gas escapes with the water, a sample of the gas should be collected in a bottle first filled 
with the water and then inverted in the spring basin so as to allow the gas to bubble into 
and fill the bottle ; which should then be immediately corked underwater, the cork promptly 
dried and then (after cutting down to the level of the bottle neck) carefully covered with 
sealing-wax, or beeswax, if the former be not available. 

4. All samples should be accompanied by full statements of the location of the source o( 
the water, or the depth of well, amount of water or flow of spring or stream; as far as 
possible, of the nature of the rock or other material from which the water comes, and o{ 
all other facts bearing upon its nature and possible origin. In case of warm springs the 
temperature should also be given. 

All such packages should be forwarded by express, charges prepaid, to University of 
California, Berkeley, care of 

E. W. If ILGARD, 
Director of Experiment Station. 

For the information of chemists, it may be appropriate to state that the 
restriction of the examination of waters to such points as will suffice to 
determine their practical uses, is rendered necessary by the large volume 
of work called for, and for the performance of which but a small force is 
available. It is only in cases of special importance that the observance of 
the elaborate precautions and processes of Bunsen can come within the 
limits of the Station work. 



WATERS AND WATER SUPPLY. 



11 



THE SOFTENING OF HARD WATERS FOR DOMESTIC USE 



Since waters possessing an inconvenient degree of hardness are very 
common in this State, owing to the almost universal prevalence of calca- 
reous soils and geological deposits, it is of no little interest to have some 
simple means of doing away with this property, so as to render such 
waters more convenient for domestic uses. This is the more important, as 
in some cases the presence of a large proportion of magnesia te^ds to 
cause serious, even though usually only temporary, gastric disturbance with 
persons unused to such waters, whereby quite frequently an unfounded 
prejudice against the general health-conditions of perfectly healthful 
localities is created. This subject has been heretofore discussed in Bulle- 
tin No. 20 of the College of Agriculture, as well as in the report for 1884, 
pages 59 and 60. Its continued importance and the frequent demand for 
information in the premises justifies a more elaborate consideration in this 
place. 

When, as is most commonly the case, this hardness is due to the pres- 
ence of large proportions of the carbonates of lime and magnesia, it can be 
recognized by the extent to which the water becomes turbid, op forms 
whitish scum or incrustations, when boiled. 

Boiling, then, is one of the means for softening waters that are hard and 
"curdle the soap" from this cause; and this fact is well known to house- 
keepers, but owing to the inconvenience of the application of this remedy, 
it is rarely resorted to except for drinking water. For this purpose, boiling 
has the special and additional advantage of insuring the destruction of 
any minute germs of disease that might contaminate the water. 

To soften water for washing, a common and very good remedy is the use 
of carbonate of soda (" sal soda'') in sufficient quantity to bring down the 
lime and magnesia, and thus insure the proper solution of the soap to 
form suds. Only there is too often a mistake made in not allowing time 
for the soda to bring down the lime and magnesia in a powdery form, 
which requires from half an hour to an hour when the water is cold, but 
occurs very quickly when the water is hot. When, as is commonly done, 
the soap is put into the water while the lime is still in the gelatinous 
form and diffused in the water, a certain amount of ^' curdling" will still 
happen, and the washed clothes (especially flannels) will have that soggy 
and unpleasant touch which is caused by the accumulation of the lime- 
and magnesia-soaps in them. 

That it is undesirable to use soda for softening water to be used for 
drinking hardly needs more than mention. The natural hard waters 
usually contain quite as much of saline matters as is desirable in drinking 
water. 

Soda, however, does not in any manner correct the sanitary condition of 
a water; on the contrary, it aids in keeping vegetable and animal matters 
in solution, and unless added in very large excess does not interfere with 
the vitality of fungous or other germs. 

By far the most convenient and effective mode of purifying larger quan- 
tities of hard water for domestic use, is the introduction of a definite 
amount of quicklime, proportioned .to the requirements of each particular 



12 



REPORTS OF EXAMINATIONS OF 



water; a point that can be readily ascertained by anyone having an ordi, 
nary capacity for observation. 

The principle upon which this apparently paradoxical process is based 
is this: The lime and magnesia in most hard waters are contained in the 
form of carbonates, dissolved in the water by the aid of free carbonic acid. 
Whatever drives off or takes possession of this free acid will bring down 
the earthy substances in an insoluble form, and thereon depends the eifi. 
cacy of boiling as well as of the addition of "washing soda" ("cooking 
soda" or bi-carbonate will not produce the effect) , Now, lime in the caustk 
condition (as lime water, or " milk-of-lime," freshly prepared) will most 
effectually take possession of any free carbonic acid, and will form with it 
the same insoluble compound that, when hard water is boiled, settles to the 
bottom or incrusts the boiler. Hence, when an amount of clear lime water, 
just sufficient to absorb all the carbonic acid in a water, is added to it, 
both the lime added, and the lime and magnesia originally contained, are 
brought down in the insoluble form, and the mineral contents of the water 
are diminished very materially, sometimes to less than one half of the 
original amount. With the sediments thus brought down there also usually 
comes a large proportion of the vegetable or animal matters contained in 
the water; so that instead of perhaps becoming putrid in a tank serving 
for domestic supply, water so treated will remain clear and odorless for a 
long time, if protected from re-contamination by insects, falling leaves, dust, 
etc. 

The only practical difficulty in carrying out this purification is the ascer- 
tainment of the proper proportion of lime or lime water to be used, so thai 
the water shall neither retain too much of its original hardness nor acquire 
an unpleasant taste and astringent action from an excess of lime. 

This can, however, be done quite readily by a few tests with different 
proportions of lime water, and the very simple trial as to which will pro- 
duce the least " curdling " of soap when ready-made soapsuds are added 
in small proportion. Whatever proportion of lime water or lime satisfies 
this easil}'' ascertained condition, is the best for all purposes. 

I have found by numerous experiments that for the waters of the wells, 
springs, and smaller streams, as well as the catchment reservoirs of the 
middle coast ranges and their valleys, the best effect is usually produced 
by the addition of from one tenth to one twentieth of clear lime water. 

As one part by weight of pure, unslaked lime requires seven hundred 
parts of water for its solution, a simple calculation shows that the above 
proportion corresponds to from five to eight grains of lime per gallon, or 
about three quarters to one pound per thousand gallons. 

In the practical working of this process, it is best to have, for small 
tanks up to one or two hundred gallons, a supply barrel in which cleat 
lime water of full strength can always be kept on hand ready for use. A 
few pounds of lime, slaked into a creamy mass, may be put in the barrel, the 
sediment being stirred up from time to time as the clear water standing 
over it is replaced. Of course, in order to preserve the proper proportioui 
once determined, only clear water must be used, otherwise more lime than 
is called for, will be introduced into the water. The lime-water barrel 
should be kept closely covered. 

For larger tanks it will be more convenient either to take a weighed 
amount of unslacked lime for each one thousand gallons, slack it into 
" milk-of-lime " and stir it in, or else to prepare a large quantity of " mitt- 
of-lime " which, when thoroughly stirred, will for each measure (bucketful) 
contain a known amount of lime. This would be the best way to handl« 
cases like one reported in the present report (see p. 16), in which the feed- 



WATEBS AND WATER SUPPLY. 



13 



ing water of boilers requires to be corrected. It should, in this connection, 
be understood that the lime-treatment is very efficacious against the froth- 
ing produced in boilers by waters containing a large amount of vegetable 
matter, as is commonly the case in tUat from ponds or other catchment 
resen^oirs. 

The sediment that accumulates in tanks used for this treatment is 
usually of a sandy nature, and not readily stirred up; it therefore causes 
little inconvenience, and can be removed at leisure, from time to time, as 
it becomes too large. 

It is true that, like some other household measures conducive to sanita- 
tion and comfort, the maintenance of this system requires some regular 
personal interest and attendance on the part of some member of the 
family. If carelessly handled, there may be unaccountable variations in 
the gastric conditions of the family, from one extreme to the other, and 
the soap may curdle from the water's natural hardness one week, and from 
excess of lime the next. But there is no excuse for such occurrences, 
except as the result of carelessness or negligence, and the advantage 
gained, whether as to health or comfort, amply repays the trouble when 
these hard waters require to be used. 



ANALYSES OF WATERS. 

A. Common Well Waters. 

Well watery sent by Mr. L. Zierngibl, St. Helena. *' The well is on a hill 
near St. Helena; dug in August, 1887, to a depth of sixty-two feet. At a 
depth of thirty-seven feet water came in slowly from the sides, and to secure 
a good quantity of water the well was dug twenty-five feet further. Until 
about two weeks ago the water was crystal clear; since then it looks bluish, 
and when boiled deposits a brown sediment." 

The analysis gave: 



Total residue upon evaporation 

Again soluble after evaporation 

Insoluble after evaporation 

Organic matter and combined water 
Silica 



Grains per 
Gallon. 



13.27 
1.57 
9.07 
2.63 
7.00 



Parts in 

10,000. 



2.272 

.262 
1.552 

.452 
3,200 



The soluble part consists in the main of chloride of sodium, or common 
salt, with some carbonate of soda and small amounts of lime and potash. 

The insoluble part consists mainly of silica, with small amounts of the 
carbonate and sulphate of lime, and a little magnesia. 

The residue from evaporation blackens considerably when heated, from 
the presence of vegetable matter, and the water on boiling forms a deposit, 
consisting mainly of silica. 

This water is quite peculiar in that its chief mineral ingredient is silica, 
while the usually predominant ingredients — compounds of sodium, calcium, 
and magnesium — are present in very small amounts only. It is, of course, 
quite unobjectionable for domestic and other uses. 

Well water^ from a well on one of the Mission Hills; sent by Mr. B. Stro- 
zynski, San Francisco. The well is three hundred feet above sea-level, 



14 



REPORTS OF EXAMINATIONS OF 



was formerly seventy-seven feet deep and has since been sunk to the depth 
of eighty-five feet, when a spring was struck which gives forth water such 
as the sample analyzed. The water from the original well was very hard 
and not good for family use. The result of the analysis is as follows: 



Total residue by evaporation , 

Again soluble after evaporation (common salt with a little chlo- 
ride of magnesium and carbonate of sodium).— 

Insoluble after evaporation (gypsum ) 

Insoluble after evaporation (carbonate of calcium with some car- 
bonate of magnesium).. 

Insoluble in acid (silica) 



Grains per 
Gallon. 



216.88 

142.82 
51.07 

21.61 
1.38 



Pai-ts in 
10,000. 



37.m 

24,452 
8.744 

3.700 



The amount of organic matter present is very slight. Both the water 
itself and the soluble portion shows considerable alkalinity to test paper, 
indicating the presence of soda carbonate. 

It will be seen that the greater part of the mineral contents of this water 
consists of common salt, to such extent as to render it unfit for domestic 
uses. In its general character the mineral residue resembles greatly that 
from the evaporation of sea water, and for medicinal uses its properties 
would be very nearly the same. 

Tank water (No. 1); sent by Dr. M. C. O'Toole, North Berkeley. The 
water was clear, but had a flat taste and a weakly alkaline reaction. It 
was suspected of having caused illness. 



Solid residue on evaporation 

Soluble in water after evaporation 

Insoluble after evaporation 

Organic matter and water 



Parts in 

10,000. 



4.928 
1.512 

1.996 
1.420 



Grains per 
Gallon. 



11.7 



Upon ignition the residue blackened strongly. The soluble part had a 
faintly alkaline reaction, and contained chiefly common salt with some 
Glauber's salt; while the insoluble part consisted of gypsum and carbo- 
nates of lime and magnesia, with a small proportion of silica. A strong 
reaction was obtained in a test for free ammonia, and similarly for com- 
bined ammonia. The water had evidently received sewage contamination 
in some way, and was unfit for domestic use. 

Running creek water (No. 2) ; sent by Dr. M. C. O'Toole, North Berkeley. 
The sample received was turbid from clay. After filtration the analysis 
gave: 



Total residue on evaporation . 
Organic matter and loss 



Parts ia 
10,000. 



3.75 
1.20 



Grains per 
Gallon. 



2U 
7.0 



Upon ignition the residue became intensely black. The test for chlorine 
showed only a moderate amount present; similarly the reaction with lime 



WATERS AND WATER SUPPLY. 



15 



water produced only a moderate pulverulent precipitate. There was very 
little carbonate in the residue. A water of doubtful quality for domestic 
purposes. 

Well water (No. 3) ; sent by the same*. The water was tasteless, odor- 
less, and clear. 



Total residue by evaporation 

Again soluble after evaporation 

Insoluble after evaporation.. _ 

Organic matter and chemically combined water 
Silica 



Grains per 
Gallon. 



62.4 
21.5 
16.2 
15.2 
1.2 



Parts in 
10,000. 



8.97 
3.60 

2.77 

2.60 

.21 



The residue became intensely black upon ignition. The soluble part 
consisted mainly of common salt with small amounts of potash and mag- 
nesia salts. The part insoluble in water consisted of carbonates of lime 
and magnesia with gypsum, and traces of alumina and iron. 

The excessive amount of saline and organic matter in this water, as well 
as the predominance of common salt, indicate outside contamination which 
renders it unfit for domestic use. 

Well and spring waters, from the neighborhood of Saratoga, Santa Clara 
County; sent by Mr. G. E. Finder. Of three samples sent, No. 1 is from 
a well thirty feet deep, in which a light will not burn; No. 2 is from a 
spring in the creek; No. 3, from a galvanized iron pipe, running as a siphon 
six hundred feet to a well thirty feet deep. 



Total solid residue by evaporation (grains per gallon) - 
Again soluble, after evaporation (grains per gallon)., 

Insoluble, after evaporation (grains per gallon) 

Organic matter and combined water (grains per gal- 
lon) 



21.89 

2.83 

13.06 

6.00 



23.36 
4.41 

12.89 

• 6.05 



21.32 
6.83 
9.81 



All these waters are alike in qualitative composition. The soluble part 
consists largely of carbonate of soda, with smaller amounts of the sulphate 
and chloride of sodium and some potassium. 

The insoluble part, which in all greatly exceeds the soluble, consists 
chiefly of carbonate of lime, with a little gypsum, carbonate of magnesia, 
and considerable silica. 

These are simply hard waters, like most of those of the Santa Cruz 
Mountains; they can readily be softened by boiling or by the addition of 
about one tenth of clear lime water, or (for washing) by the use of a 
little sal soda or borax. No. 3 blackens considerably on ignition, from 
the presence of vegetable matter, and should be purified by means of lime 
water for domestic use. (See, on this subject, the directions given under 
the preceding head. ) 



T 



16 REPORTS OF EXAMINATIONS OF 

Well water, from a well near Saratoga; sent by Mr. George E, Hyde, 
Saratoga, Santa Clara County. The water is slightly alkaline, and clear. 




Grains per 
Gallon. 


Parte in 

10,000. ' 


Total residue by evaporation - 


14.50 

4.88 
6.63 
2.99 
2.40 


2M 
.836 

1.136 
.512 
.412 


Again soluble after evaporation .. 


Insoluble after evaporation 


Organic matter and combined water 


Silica --, - 




The soluble part consists chiefly of sodium chloride, or common salt, 
with a very little sulphate, and a small proportion of potash salts. 

The insoluble part contains the carbonates of lime and magnesia, in 
about equal proportions, and fully one third of the whole is silica. Only 
a very small amount of organic matter is present. 

This is a well water of excellent composition, softer than most others ol 
the region, and suitable for every domestic use. 

Well and spring waters, from the property of the Paul 0. Burns Wk 
Company, San Jose. These waters were sent for examination on account 
of vexatious difficulties encountered in their use for steam and other pur- 
poses. 

Sample No. 1 was taken from the supply tank (filled with well water), 
which had been lately cleaned but not whitewashed; it is a new tank and 
before had not been cleaned for four months; the water had acquired a 
very offensive odor. The water sample sent gave off a strong odor of sul- 
phuretted hydrogen; it was quite alkaline to test paper. The water becomes 
turbid on opening the bottle and gradually loses its odor. 




Parts in 
10,000. 


Grains per 
Gallons. 


Total residue by evaporation . 


3.846 

.825 

1.825 

1.195 


4.8J 
10.« 
6J 


Again soluble in water after evaporation --- -- -- -_»- _»-_-_ 


Insoluble in water after evaporation . ..-^- .._-___ 


Combined water and organic matter - 




The residue blackened strongly on ignition and bur 
difficulty. The water-soluble part had an alkaline xoi 
common salt, Glauber's salt, and some carbonate of 
potassium. The part insoluble in water was compos 
of calcium and magnesium with a small amount of gj 
silica. The test for ammonia gave a decided indicati 

This water is not materially different from the i 
waters in the Santa Clara Valley and Santa Cruz ran^ 
large amount of organic matter, and especially the p 
which indicate contamination of some kind. 

Boiler water (No. 2) ; sent by the above. '' Water as 
boiler, at blowing off, cleaned internally, and still i 
sediment, causing the water to foam and become mud 
glass and making much trouble." The water gives 
reaction to test paper. 


ned white 
iction, anc 
soda and g 
ed of the 
rpsum and 
on of its J 
usual run 
;e, except i 
resence of 

it comes 1 
t throws 1 
dy, stuffini 

a decide 


with soni« 
containeii 
sulphate ol 
carbonates 
very littk 
)resence. 
of natural 
Ln the veil 
ammoniJi 

rom steaiJ 
this heaTj 
^thegaug^ 
d alkaline 



WATERS AND WATER SUPPLY. 



17 



Total solid contents by evaporation 

Again soluble after evaporation 

Insoluble after evaporation 

Organic matter and water 




Grains per 
Gallon. 



50.75 

41.44 

2.80 

6.61 



The residue blackens very strongly upon ignition and burns white with 
great difficulty. The soluble part contained in the main chloride of sodium 
with smaller amounts of sulphate of potassium, and gypsum ; it was quite 
strongly alkaline. The insoluble part was formed of carbonate of magne- 
sium and a little gypsum and silica. The test for ammonia gave a strong 
reaction. 

It appears from the above data that in using it for making steam the 
tank water had been boiled down to somewhat over one third of its bulk, 
and the bulk of the earthy matters had come down in the insoluble form 
of "slush"; while the organic matter remained dissolved in the alkaline 
water, causing it to froth. 

Spring water (No. 3); sent by the same, with the view of possibly substi- 
tuting it for the well water heretofore used. The water was clear and 
colorless; emitted a faint odor of sulphuretted hydrogen; its reaction was 
quite alkaline. 

Grains per 
Gallon. 



Total solid contents by evaporation 
Soluble in water after evaporation. _ 
Insoluble in water after evaporation 
Organic ma tter and water 




43.89 
15.33 

20.47 
8.09 



The residue becomes quite black on ignition, and burns with difficulty. 
The soluble part is quite alkaline, and contains chloride of sodium, Glau- 
ber^s salt, and traces of sulphates of potassium and magnesium. The 
insoluble part is composed of gypsum, carbonates of magnesia and lime, 
and silica. The reaction for ammonia is extremely faint. 

It appears from the above analysis that this spring water would doubt- 
less make matters worse if used in the steam boiler. It would yield just 
double the amount of '' slush," and its saline contents being three times 
greater, while the organic matters are still somewhat excessive, the frothing 
would probably be quite as inconvenient. 

The cause of the trouble with the boiler is amply apparent from the 
statement of No. 2, the tank water, as compared with the boiler water, 
which is understood to be originally the same. It appears that for every 
gallon of evaporated, over ten and one half grains of sediment are deposited 
in the boiler. 

That sediment consists in the main of carbonates of lime and magnesia, 
while the soluble part is mainly common salt and Glauber's salt, or sul- 
phate and chloride of sodium, with some carbonate of soda. At the same 
time the water contains a remarkably large amount of organic impuri- 
ties, creating the presumption of sewage contamination, which is further 
strengthened by the fact that both Nos. 1 and 2 contain ammonia in no 
inconsiderable proportion. The organic matters with the sulphates present, 
passing into putrid fermentation, create the putrescent odor. 



18 



REPORTS OF EXAMINATIONS OF 



The difiSculty with the boiler might doubtless be remedied, and % 
water rendered sufficiently pure for most uses, by purification with lini« 
water according to the process described above; i, e., by the addition of 
about I pound of unslaked lime, first slaked into a thin slush, stirred 
into the tank for every one thousand gallons of water. This will thron 
down nearly all the earthy matters, and most of the organic, and rendu! 
the water applicable to nearly all ordinary domestic purposes. 

Well water; sent by Thomas E. Hughes, of Fresno. The water m 
clear, odorless, tasteless, with a slightly alkaline reaction. 



Total residue by evaporation 

Again soluble after evaporation 

Insoluble in water after evaporation 

Water and organic m atter 

Silica 



Parts in 

10,000. 



2.000 
.620 

1.113 
.260 
.489 



Grains per 
Gallon. 



Ill 

ai 
as 



Upon ignition the residue darkens slightly. The soluble part is stronglj 
alkaline, and consists of Glauber's salts, with small amounts of commoi 
salt, carbonate of soda, and gypsum. The insoluble part is composed o 
carbonate of lime, silica, and a small amount of carbonate of magnesia. 

This is a very good water for all domestic uses as well as for irrigate 
having rather an unusually low amount of mineral contents of unobjectioD 
able character. 

Well water, from near (one mile from) Polonio Pass, T. 26, R. 17 E., Sec 
15; on road from Bakersfield to San Luis Obispo, in the northwest come 
of Kern County; sent by John R. Carr. This well is fifty-six feet deep 
and yields fifty to sixty gallons of water daily. In boring it there wei 
found: first, fifteen feet of soil and subsoil; then a gray slate, whicl 
crumbles on exposure to air. The water comes from the (clay) slafc^ 
smells strongly of sulphuretted hydrogen, and is strongly alkaline to tefil 
paper. The analysis gave: 



Residue upon evaporation 

Again soluble after evaporation 

Insoluble after evaporation -, ._, 

Organic matter ana combined water 



Grains per 
Gallon. 



147.08 

118.22 

19.62 

9.23 



Parts in 

10,000. 



25.1!! 
20. 

I 



The soluble part is strongly alkaline to test paper, and consists large 
of carbonate of soda, with sulphate (Glauber's salt), and chloride of sodiuH 
(common salt), and small amounts of potash, lime, and magnesia. 

The insoluble part consists mainly of the carbonate and sulphate of lim 
(gypsum), with some carbonate of magnesia and silica. 

This water is far too strong in mineral ingredients for any domestic itf«i 
as a mineral water it would be a saline purgative of moderate strength. 

Water from a dug well^ near Alpine Station, Los Angeles County; 
by H. Slotterbeck, of Los Angeles. The wells from which this water WJ 
obtained are on Sections 34 and 35, T. 6 N., R. 12 W., about two miW 
from the above station and immediately adjoining the foothills of tl 



WATERS AND WATER SUPPLY, 



19 



northern slope of the mountains bordering the Mojave desert. From the 
description given the formation of the region is somewhat complex, con- 
sisting of both granite with more or less quartz, and sandstone with sub- 
ordinate beds of calcareous and gypseous clay and marl. In the wells a 
sandstone ledge was encountered at from forty to fifty-eight feet, and beneath 
the same a small quantity of water seeped in, of which the above is a 
sample. It is also stated that on an adjoining section, higher up, a plenti- 
ful supply of good water was obtained at fifty feet, while elsewhere in the 
region no water is found at a less depth than two hundred feet. 

The water was quite clear, faintly alkaline to test paper, had a saline, 
flattish taste. 



Total residue by evaporation 

Again soluble after evaporation 

Insoluble after evaporation 

Organic matter and combined water 



Grains per 
GalloQ. 



406.07 

269.80 

98.60 

37.60 



Parts in 
10,000, 



69,520 

46.200 

16.880 

6.440 



The soluble part consists mainly of Glauber's and common salt, or sul- 
phate and chloride of sodium, considerable Epsom salt (sulphate of* mag- 
nesia) and small amounts of gypsum and sulphate of potassium. 

The insoluble part consists chiefly of gypsum with some carbonate of 
magnesia. 

This is a strong saline purgative water, fit only for careful medicinal 
use. 

Well water, from Fulton Wells, near Los Angeles City; sent by W, F. 
Nimmocks. Water clear, with strong odor and taste of sulphuretted 
hydrogen. The analysis gave: 



Total residue by evaporation 

Soluble in water after evaporation . . 
Insoluble in water after evaporation 

Orpnic matter and water _ 

Silica - _ _ 



Parts in 
10,000. 



4.800 

3.158 

.952 

.690 

.022 



Grains per 
Gallon. 



28.0 

18.5 

5.5 

4.0 

.1 



The residue became intensely black upon ignition. The soluble part 
consisted chiefly of chloride of sodium (common salt), with very small 
amounts of chloride of potassium and gypsum. The insoluble part con- 
sisted of the carbonates of calcium and magnesium, with a trace of silica. 

A sulphur water of good strength and slightly saline character. From 
some cause the sample contained a very large proportion of vegetable mat- 
ter, causing the blackening of the residue when heated and modifying the 
taste as well. Whether this matter was accidental or is derived from the 
rock through which the water passes, could not be determined. 



20 



REPORTS OF EXAMINATIONS OF 



Water from a driven well at Riverside; sent by Henry Jarecki. The water 
was clear, odorless, tasteless, and had a faintly alkaline reaction. 



Solid contents upon evaporation 

Again soluble after evaporation 

Insoluble after evaporation . 

Silica 

Combined water and organic matter 



Parts in 
10,000. 



5.975 
2.683 
2.171 
.402 
1.220 



Grains per 
Gallon. 



34J 
15.01 

m 
n 
m 



The residue did not blacken on ignition, showing that very little organic 
matter was present. 

The soluble part contained in the main common salt with very small 
amounts of gypsum and chloride of potassium ; while the insoluble portion 
consisted chiefly of carbonate of lime, with smaller amounts of gypsum, 
carbonate of magnesia, and silica. The soluble portion had a faintly alka- 
line reaction, doubtless due to the presence of a trace of carbonate of soda. 

Notwithstanding its relatively large proportion of mineral salts (whicl 
render the raw water very hard), it is unobjectionable for domestic use on 
account of their innocuous character. Nearly half of the entire amount is 
carbonate of lime, which may be thrown down by boiling or in other ways 
mentioned above, leaving the water with but fifteen grains per gallon, oi 
common salt. 

Well water^ from San Bernardino; sent by Mrs. C. M. Davis, San Bernai- 
dino. Water clear, no special taste. 



Total solid residue upon evaporation --. 

Soluble after evaporation •. 

Insoluble after evaporation 

Chemically combined water and little organic matter. 



Parts in 
10,000. 



2.330 

.600 

1.200 

.630 



Grains per 
GalluD. 



lai 



The soluble part consists of chlorides of the alkalies with very smal 
amounts of sulphates. 

The insoluble part consists mainly of gypsum, very little carbonate o 
lime and magnesia being present. 

This water is fully available for all domestic uses, the mineral matte 
present being quite moderate in amount. It can be softened by the usee 
a little sal soda, or lime water. 

Well waters, from two wells on Alturas Rancho, near San Luis Rey, Sal 
Diego County; sent by Cave J. Gouts, Esq., who makes the foUowifl 
statement in regard to it: " Of the two wells, one is over four hundred fe« 
above the sea level, fifty feet deep; the other, three hundred and fifty fe« 
above sea level, ninety-eight feet deep. The water in the upper well, whic' 
is on a sidehill in adobe formation, is so thoroughly impregnated wi 
mineral of some kind that I have feared using it for stock or irrigatiof 
The lower well is six hundred feet from the upper one; after the first gi 
feet, it is all through decomposed granite. Its water also has some minerJ 
and I use it for stock, but have not dared to use it for irrigation until I coul' 
find out if its properties were not injurious to trees or vines. Nearly all ^ 
water in this neighborhood has the same taste as that of the lower wett 



WATERS AND WATER SUPPLY. 



21 



The water from the upper well is clear, and has a distinct saline taste. 

That of the lower well is also clear; on opening the bottle, a strong odor 
of sulphuretted hydrogen was noted, but not enough to be quantitatively 
determined. 

The analyses resulted as follows: 



• 


Uppee Wexx. 


Lower Wblx. 




Grains per 
Gallon. 


Parts in 

10,000. 


Grains per 
Gallon. 


Parts in 
10,000. 


Total solid residue by evaporation..—. 
Soluble part after evaporation ^^ 


600.00 

368.86 

19.67 

111.57 


85.60 

63.16 

3.35 

19.10 


84.11 

62.69 

8.64 

22.78 


14.40 
9.02 


Insoluble part after evaporation 

Chemically combined water and organic 
•matter 


1.48 
3.90 







In the water of the upper well, the soluble part consists in the main of 
common salt, with considerable quantities of chlorides of calcium and 
magnesium, and a small amount of gypsum. The insoluble part con- 
sists chiefly of silica with a little gypsum. 

In the water of the lower well, the ingredients were nearly the same as 
above, with the addition of some carbonates both of the alkalies, and of 
lime and magnesia. 

As to the water of the upper well, it is too strongly mineral, and medi- 
cinally too energetic a purgative to be used for any domestic or agricult- 
ural purpose whatsoever. Its ingredients are doubtless derived from the 
rock from which the adobe soil was formed. The water of the lower well 
is in substance the same, but less strongly tainted with salts, in conse- 
quence of an accession from the purer granite drainage, which has imparted 
to it some of its ingredients. The water is still, however, (quite five times) 
too strongly mineral for continued domestic use, and few plants would long 
resist its use in irrigation. 

It is to be hoped that good water may be found deeper within the granite, 
from which, as a rule, the purest waters flow. 

SPRING WATERS. 

Spring water, from a farm near Paradise, Butte County; sent by Mr. 
Irving A. Coonradt, Paradise, Butte County. The water is very faintly 
alkaline, and contains: 



Total residue by evaporation - 

Again soluble after evaporation 

Insoluble after evaporation , 

Organic matter and combined water. 



Gains per 
Gallon. 



5.35 

.85 

3.41 

1.09 



Parts in 
10,000. 



.916 
.144 

.584 
.188 



The soluble part consists mainly of Glauber's salt or sulphate of soda, 
with small amounts of common salt and of magnesium chloride or bittern. 

The insoluble part consists in the main of carbonate of lime, with a 
little magnesia and silica, and a not inconsiderable amount of iron oxide. 

When fresh the water is clear, but on exposure to air becomes turbid 
and deposits .64 grains per gallon of ferric hvdrate or iron rust, from which 
its peculiar taste is derived. / 



22 



REPORTS OF KXAMINATIONS OF 



Apart from this, the water is remarkably free from mineral ingredients, 
and resembles a river water more than that of a spring. It can therefore 
hardly count as a mineral water. It may be termed a very weak chaly. 
beate. 

Spring water, from the " Par Niente " farm ; sent by Mr. John Benson, 
Oakville, Napa County. The water is quite alkaline and contains: 



Total residue after evaporation 

Again soluble after evaporation 

Insoluble after evaporation 

Organic matter and combined water 



Grains per 
Gallon. 



23.22 

12.59 

9.02 

1.61 



Parts in 
10,000. 



3.9?6 
2.156 
1.54i 

.276 



The soluble part is strongly alkaline to test paper and contains, besides 
carbonate of soda, chiefly the sulphate (Glauber's salt) and some chloride 
or common salt. 

The insoluble part (forming less than three sevenths of the total min* 
eral matter) consists mainly of carbonate of lime, with a small amount of 
magnesia. 

The residue blackens when heated, showing the presence of some organic 
matter; but no ammonia was detected, showing the water to be free from 
sewage contamination, despite a rather large proportion of common salt. 
This water, though very hard, is fully available for domestic use, and may 
be softened as described above. 

Spring water, irom the Blue Mountains near Vacaville; sent by Mr. J. 
R. Collins, Vacaville. The water was clear but had a strong taste and odor 
of sulphuretted hydrogen; became turbid on standing; slight alkaline 
reaction. Lime water produced a slight turbidity. 

The water contained: 



Total residue upon evaporation 

Soluble in water after evaporation. _ 
Insoluble in water after evaporation 
Combined water 



Parte in 
10,000. 



3,600 

.780 

2,132 



Grains pet 
Gallon, 



21.02 
4.58 

12.45 
4.01 



The soluble part was quite alkaline, and contained carbonate and sul- 
phate of sodium, with a smaller amount of common salt, sulphate of 
potassium, and gypsum. The insoluble part was composed mainly of car- 
bonate of calcium, with small amounts of carbonate of magnesium and 
silica. 

This water is too weak to be considered a mineral one, its contents scarcely 
exceeding those of ordinary drinking waters in the State. Its sulphureus 
odor, from a small proportion of sulphuretted hydrogen, alone imparts to 
it a somewhat unusual character. It is very hard. 

Spring water, ^ from Oakland Ranch, Applegate, Placer County; sent l)y 
Rev. A. T. Perkins, of Alameda. The water as received contained consider- 
able brownish flocculent matter, which was removed before evaporation. 
The filtered water was clear and colorless, but had a faint styptic taste. 



WATERS AND WATER SUPPLY. 



23 



The analysis gave: 



Total solid residue by evaporation 

SolaWe part after evaporation _ 

Insoluble part after evaporation 

' Chemically combined water and small amount organic matter. - 



Grains per 

Gallon. 



12.6 

2.8 
7.5 
2.3 



Parts in 

10,()00. 



2.160 

.490 

1.280 

.390 



The soluble part consists of chiefly chlorides and bicarbonates of the 
alkalies, with a trace of sulphates. 

The insoluble part consists of chiefly carbonate of lime, with a small 
amount of carbonates of magnesia and iron. The amount of carbonate of 
iron is in the insoluble part about 1.5 grains per gallon; the suspended 
matter, consisting chiefly of ferric hydrate, amounts to about 6.5 grains 
per gallon. The total amount of carbonate of iron would, therefore, in the 
fresh water, amount to about eight grains per gallon, making the original 
total of solid contents about nineteen grains. The water thus appears as 
a chalybeate of fair strength, but without other active ingredients of any 
importance. 

Spring water, from a spring twelve miles south of Livermore, in the mount- 
ains, about one thousand eight hundred feet above sea level ; sent by W. 
M. Mendenhall, Livermore. The water was clear, tasteless, and odorless, 
with a slightly alkaline reaction. 



Total residue by evaporation ..., 

Again soluble after evaporation 

Insoluble after e vaporati on 

Combined water and organic matter 



Parte in 
10,000. 



6.610 

1.980 
2.615 
1.015 



Grains per 
Gallon. 



32.76 

11.57 
15.27 

5.92 



The soluble part is quite alkaline, and is composed of chloride of sodium, 
Glauber^s salt, some carbonate of sodium, and sulphate of potassium. 

The insoluble part consists of the carbonates of calcium and magnesium 
and gypsum. 

The mineral contents of this water are rather high for daily use, but 
most persons could probably become accustomed to its use. In medicinal 
character it is slightly purgative. 

Spring water from a tunnel, twenty to thirty feet deep, near Los Gatos, 
Santa Clara County; sent by F. H. McCullagh. Only a very small supply 
of this water was obtained, and hence it was abandoned as a source of 
supply for domestic use, but from the strong sulphurous odor in the tun- 
nel it was thought the waters might possess medicinal value. It is clear, 
slightly alkaline to test paper, but when received had no sulphurous odor. 



Total residue by evaporation 

Soluble in water after evaporation _ . 
Insoluble in water after evaporation 
Silica 



Grains per 
Gallon. 



17.13 

1.83 

15.30 

2.41 



PartB in 

10,000. 



2.932 
.313 

2.619 
.412 



24 



REPORTS OF EXAMINATIONS OF 



The residue upon ignition blackens slightly along the upper edge. Thu 
soluble part is slightly alkaline, due to a small amount of carbonate of 
sodium, oesides which it chiefly contains sodium chloride and sulphate. 
The insoluble part consists of carbonates of magnesium and calcium, mi 
some silica. 

The mineral matter in this water is not higher in amount than is usual 
in the waters of the region, but it is somewhat peculiar in that quite seven 
eighths of the total amount present is of an earthy nature, and that chiejj 
carbonate of magnesia. The saline ingredients are exceptionally low. As 
it stands, the water would probably exert a slightly laxative effect up 
persons of delicate digestion, and might be useful in that direction. 

Spring water^ from Skyland, five miles south of Wright's Station, Santa 
Cruz Mountains; sent by Miss Augusta C. H. Weber. The water has a 
very faintly acid reaction, and contains some free carbonic acid gas. 



On evaporation it leaves a total residue of 

Again soluble after evaporation 

Insoluble after evaporation . 

Organic matter and combined water 

The silica (Insoluble in acid) 



Grains per 
Gallon. 



5.93 

1.50 
3.17 
1.26 
2.66' 



Parts in 

10,000. 



1.018 
.258 
M 
M 



The residue does not blacken much on ignition. The soluble part has a 
faintly alkaline reaction, and contains chiefly common salt, with smal 
amounts of gypsum, sulphate of potassium, and a trace of magnesia. 

The insoluble part, constituting nearly two thirds of the total mineral 
matter, consists chiefly of silica, with small amounts of gypsum and ' 
carbonates of lime and magnesia. 

This is a remarkably pure water, resembling more a river water (e. j. 
that of Kings River) than that of a spring, especially in a region wher« 
strongly calcareous waters prevail so generally. Few natural waters witk 
so little mineral matter have been found in this State. 

Spring water, from a spring near HoUister; sent by Mr. James McMahoD 
of San Jose. The water is clear, colorless, odorless; the residue left aftei 
evaporation does not blacken upon ignition. 



Total residue by evaporation .». 
Again soluble after evaporation 

Insoluble after evaporation 

Combined water 

Silica.- 



Parts in 
10,000. 



6.165 
2.242 
2.790 
1.140 
.391 



GraJns per 
Gallon. 



3ao 

131 



The soluble part was faintly alkaline, and contained chiefly common salt 
with some gypsum and Glauber's salt, while the insoluble part consisted 
of the carbonates of calcium, and magnesium, and silica. 

The water of this spring is rather strong in mineral ingredients for many 
domestic uses, being exceedingly hard; but on boiling, or treatment with 
lime, comes within the limits of ordinary potable waters. It would pro])' 
ably exert a somewhat purgative efi'ect upon many persons, and might 



WATERS AND WATER SUPPLY. 



25 



serve as a gentle aperient, but others may become used to it and drink it 
without special effects. 

Spring water , from near Bryson, Monterey County j sent by D, Sturgis, 
of that place. " I»t discharges from sandrock at the rate of eight gallons 
per hour." The water is clear and odorless, but tastes somewhat flattish. 



Total solid residue by evaporation 

Soluble part after evaporation 

Insoluble part after evaporation 

Chemically combined water and small amount of organic matter 



Grains per 
Gallon. 



108.87 

91.24 

8.93 

8.70 



Parts in 
10,000, 



18.640 

15.620 

1.630 

1.490 



The soluble part consists chiefly of Glauber's salt with chlorides and 
bicarbonates of the alkalies, and a small amount of calcium sulphate. 

The insoluble part consists of carbonates of lime and magnesia, with a 
small quantity of gypsum. 

This water is far too heavily charged with saline purgative ingredients 
to serve for domestic use. For use as a mineral water, as a purgative, it 
shares the qualities of too many waters in this State to promise commer- 
cial success. 

9 

Sp'rmg water, from a spring five miles southeast of Coulterville; sent by 
Phil. Hope, Coulterville, Mariposa County. The spring flows at a rate of 
three gallons per minute, is not affected by the seasons, and issues from 
very hard granite. The water has a taste like swamp water ; is very hard 
and alkaline to test paper. 



Total solid residue by evaporation. . 

Again soluble after evaporation 

Insoluble after evaporation 

Organic matter and combined water 



Grains per 
Gallon. 



24.7 
4.4 

16.9 
3.4 



Parte in 
10,000. 



4.230 
.760 

2.890 
.680 



The soluble part, forming only one fifth of the mineral matter, consists 
of the sulphate and chloride of sodium, with a not inconsiderable admix- 
ture of potassium salts. 

The insoluble part mainly of carbonate of lime, with some carbonate of 
magnesia, gypsum, and a considerable amount of silica. 

This is simply an exceedingly hard, calcareous water, which by simple 
boiling becomes a rather unusually pure spring water, suitable for all house- 
hold purposes. It can also, of course, be softened by the addition of lime 
water to the extent of about one tenth. 

Spring and seepage waters, fiowing from different sides of a canon, near 
Camulos, Ventura County; sent by David C. Cook, Esq. 

No. 1. Strongly alkaline to test paper; of a light amber color, showing 
a large amount of dissolved organic matter. Taste, flattish and saline. 

No. 2. Also quite alkaline to test paper, but clear and colorless. 

The composition was as follows: 



26 



REPORTS OF EXAMINATIONS OF 



Total solid residue by evaporation 

Soluble part after evaporation 

Insoluble part (carbonate of soda) 

Chemically combined water, and little 
organic matter...-.,.--- 



No. 1. 



Grains per 
Gallon. 



326.8 

189.7 
(4.4) 

86.7 

60,2 



Parts in 

10,000. 



55.7 
32.6 
(.7) 
14.7 

8.6 



No. 2. 



Grains per 
Gallon. 



369.9 
243.4 
(3.1) 

76.7 

49,8 



Parts io 
10,000. 



m 

41.7 

m 



In qualitative composition the two waters are also very nearly 
The soluble part consists in the main of sulphate of soda, or Glauber's 
salt, with some carbonate and chloride of sodium (common salt) , and a 
little sulphate of potash; the common salt being somewhat more abundant 
in No. 2 than in the other. 

The insoluble part consists of a mixture of gypsum with some carbomte 
of lime and magnesia, and a little silica. 

Both these waters are altogether too strongly mineral to be used other- 
wise than as a purgative medicine, mitigated somewhat for the animal 
system by the carbonate of soda, but rendered more injurious to soil and 
vegetation by that very fact. They presumably represent the percolates of 
highly alkaline soils existing at the heads of the canons. 

Spring water, from a spring in the foothills of the Coast Range, in west 
em Tulare County; said to have produced disease in cattle drinking it; 
sent by L. L, Robinson, San Francisco. The water is clear, odorless, ' 
with a flat, brackish taste; it has a strong alkaline reaction. ConsideraM 
residue had settled in the bottle. ^ 



Total residue by evaporation , 

Again soluble in water after evaporation 

Insoluble in water after evaporation 

Silica-.-- 

Organic matter and combined water 



Parts in 
10,000. 



35.680 

22.600 

8.762 

1.644 

4.300 



Grains per 
Gallon. 



mi 
m 

511 

m 



The residue blackens somewhat upon ignition. The soluble partwaj 
weakly alkaline, and contained chiefly common and Glauber's salts, wM« 
the insoluble part was composed mainly of gypsum, with a little carbonais 
of magnesium and some silica. 

This water is by far too strongly mineral to be safely used by either mat 
or beast, being a saline purgative of considerable strength, and unfit foi 
any but careful medicinal use. 

The frequent occurrence of saline crusts and efflorescences in the foot 
hills of the Coast Range, from Fresno to Kern County, suggests that caii 
should be exercised in the use of spring waters occurring in this region, ft 
either man or beast. 

MINERAL WATERS. 

Mineral water y from Mt. Lassen Springs, in the northwest corner of Pluro^ 
County; sent by Mr. E. R. Drake, Prattville, Plumas County. 

The water is clear, and when fresh quite acid to test paper from M 
carbonic acid; on boiling the reaction changes to alkaline and the wat" 



WATERS AND WATER SUPPLY. 27 

becomes turbid. The residue upon ignition did not blacken much. Its 
contents were: 



Total residue by evaporation ^.. 

Soluble after evaporation 

Insoluble after evaporation - - - 

Organic matter and combined water 



Farts in 
10,000. 



8.310 
1.790 
4.840 

1.680 



Grains per 
Gallon. 



48.54 
10.46 

28.27 
9.81 



The soluble part was quite strongly alkaline and contained chiefly car- 
bonate of sodium, with a small amount of carbonate of potassium and 
traces of chloride of sodium and gypsum. The insoluble residue contained 
the carbonates of calcium and magnesium in large quantities, with quite 
an amount of ferric hydrate and silica, beside a small amount of gypsum. 

An alkaline water of moderate strength, with enough of iron (carbonate) 
to impart to it tonic properties. 

^^Hot Springs^^ water j from near the residence of Captain H. E. Boyes, 
Sonoma. This .water has a strong and rather unpleasant odor, partly of 
sulphuretted hydrogen; it was slightly turbid when received. To test 
paper it is slightly acid at first, but changes to alkaline on boiling and evap- 
oration. 



Total residue by evaporation 

Again soluble after evaporation 

Insoluble after evaporation 

Silica - -^ 

Combined water an "organic matter 



Parts in 
10,000. 



9.540 
6.445 
1.936 
1.114 

1.160 



Grains per 
Gallon. 



55.72 

37.66 

11.30 

6.51 

6.77 



The soluble part has an alkaline reaction, and consists of chloride of 
sodium with traces of carbonate and Glauber's salts. The insoluble part 
consists of carbonates of calcium and magnesium, with some ferric hydrate 
and considerable silica. A saline water of moderate strength and slightly 
tonic (chalybeate) properties. 

Water from SamuePs Napa Soda Springs, Napa County. The analysis 
of this water was made for the proprietor by Mr. A. H. Weber, with the 
following result. The water was clear, strongly effervescent, and of pleasant 
taste: 



Total solid residue after evaporation 

Soluble part after evaporation -. 

Insoluble part after evaporation. __ 

Chemically combined water, carbonic acid, and organic matter. 
The soluble part consi sts of : Bicarbon ate of soda .-_ _-, 

Sulphate of soda 

Common salt 

Chloride of magnesium - 

Potash salts. - ^ 

The insoluble part consists of : Carbonate of lime 

Carbonate of magnesia 

Carbonate of iron 

Silica 



Grains per 
Gallon. 



88.08 

30.69 

62.49 

4.90 

32.99 

.25 

16.87 

2.38 

trace. 

17.23 

7.82 

.78 

4.86 



Parts in 
10,000. 



15-080 
5.254 
8.986 

.840 
5.648 

.044 
2.888 

.408 
traces. 
2.950 
1.339 

.134 

.832 



28 • REPORTS OF EXAMINATIONS OF 

Free carbonic acid gas, 335 cubic inches per gallon. 

Mineral water; sent by Mr. Geo, W. Gilmore, Milton, Calaveras County, 
The water is slightly turbid and slightly alkaline, but becomes vei^ 
strongly alkaline when boiled. 



Total residue by evaporation 

Again soluble after evaporation 

Insoluble after evaporation 

Organic matter and combined water. 
Alumina, silica and ferric oxide 



Grains per 
Gallon. 



12.6 
3.0 

7.4 
2.2 
4,9 



Parts in 

10,000. 



2.172 

.511 

m 



The soluble part contains a large proportion of carbonate of soda, mi 
some sulphate and chloride, or Glauber's and common salt. 

The insoluble part consists in the main of silica, alumina (phosphate?), 
and ferric oxide, with smaller amounts of the carbonates of lime and ma{ 
nesia. The amount of water sent was too small to serve for a full detei 
mination in so weak a water; were it stronger it would serve an excellec 
purpose as an alkaline chalybeate mineral water, 

"Water from Ojai Hot Springs, near NordhofF, Ventura County; sent Ij 
A. W. Blumberg, the proprietor. 

This water is clear, and when fresh, smells strongly of sulphurette 
hydrogen, which imparts to it an acid reaction on test paper. As receivei 
the water contained about ten cubic inches per gallon of sulphydric gas. 



Total solid residue by evaporation 

Soluble after evaporation 

Insoluble after evaporation -v. 

Chemically combined water and little organic matter 



Grains per 
gallon. 



^al 



82.69 

22,20 

4.66 

5.84 



Parts ii 

10,000. 



5ii 
U 

U 



The soluble part consists chiefly of chloride of sodium or common sal 
with small amounts of the carbonate of the same, and of the sulphates « 
sodium and potassium. 

The insoluble part consists of the sulphate and carbonate of lime, \rii 
some carbonate of magnesia and a very small amount of the phosphafe 
of the same. 

This water is of very moderate mineral strength, and derives its S 
value from its sulphuretted gas, as a " white sulphur " water. 

D. Artesian Waters. 

Artesian water ^ from Beckwith, Plumas County, Cal.; sent by Thoifi' 
Black, Beckwith. From an artesian well, four hundred and twenty-fi' 
feet deep; temperature of water, 89 degrees Fahrenheit. " It has W 
used for irrigating a garden, and when it overflows the surface and d^ 
ofi" it leaves a white substance on the surface which resembles alkali. 
have used it for cooking and drinking, and washing our butter, and 
making brine for curing our meat; but imagine that our meat does 
keep well with it. Our horses are very fond of It. The substance we ^ 
is what adheres to the nozzle of the pipe as it flows from below throtl! 



WATERS AND WATER SUPPLY. 



29 



the casings, and a great deal of such sediment forms in tanks into which 
it flows. There are a great many wells struck in Sierra Valley, ranging 
in depth from three hundred and eighty to twelve hundred feet. Some 
of them have the water as hot as 180 degrees Fahrenheit." 



Total solid residue on evaporation 

Solublepart after evaporation ._ _ .-. 

Insoluble part after evaporation «_. 

Chemically combined water and small amount of organic matter 



Grains por 
Gallon. 



79.61 
71^6 

6.07 
2.28 



Parts in 
10,000. 



13.630 
12.200 

1.040 
.390 



The soluble part consists of a large amount of common salt, consider- 
able Glauber's salt, with small quantities of carbonates of soda, sulphates 
of potash, lime and magnesia. The insoluble part consists of gypsum, 
carbonates of lime and magnesia, and silica. 

The amount of mineral matter contained is about four times as great as 
IS usually considered compatible with the use of water for irrigation, unless 
special precautions are observed. The main ingredient is common salt, 
which is not very injurious unless accumulated in large quantities. This 
accumulation can be prevented by proper draining from time to time. 

Water from artesian well, at Patterson's Landing, two miles south of Alva- 
rado, Alameda County; sent by Mr. William Ryan. Depth of well, three 
hundred and twenty feet; water clear, and alkaline to test paper, although 
soft to the taste. The examination gave: 



Residue upon evaporation 

Soluble in water after evaporation . , 
Insoluble in water after evaporation 
Organic matter and combined water 



Parts in 
10,000. 



3.828 

2.772 

.740 

.316 



Grrains per 
GalZon. 



22.36 

16.20 

4.32 

1.84 



The soluble part was very strongly alkaline, and gave a heavy precipi- 
tate with lime water, showing it to contain a large amount of carbonate of 
soda; besides, there were present common salt, Glauber's salt, and very 
small amounts of gypsum and sulphate of magnesia. 

The insoluble part consisted chiefly of carbonate of calcium, with a 
smaller amount of carbonate of magnesium, some silica, and very small 
quantities of gypsum and ferric hydrate. 

This water, in common with that of other deep wells located near the 
bay shore, shows the soda carbonate as its characteristic ingredient; while 
the shallower wells, as well as those lying nearer the edge of the valley, 
have neutral or but very slightly alkaline waters. The mineral ingredients 
are not, however, too abundant for ordinary uses, and the water is soft and 
pleasant to the taste. 

Water from artesian well near Borden, Fresno County; sent by A. L. 
Sayre, of Borden. The well is one thousand two hundred feet in depth. 
The water is clear, faintly alkaline to test paper, and has a slight brack- 
ish taste. It contains: 



30 



BEPORTS OF EXAMINATIONS OF 



Total residue by evaporation 

Again soluble after evaporation 

Insoluble after evaporation 

Organic matter and combined water 



Grains per 
Gallon. 



142,5 

116.3 

11.4 

14.8 



Parts in 
10,000. 



2lin 

19.921 

m 



The soluble part consists mainly of the chlorides of sodium and calcium, 
with a little potassium. 

The insoluble part consists in the main of carbonate of lime, with a small 
amount of silica. 

This water is altogether too strongly impregnated with mineral salts foi 
domestic use, and could be used for irrigation only under exceptional cofr 
ditions. There is no practically feasible way of correcting it. 

Artesian water, from Carpinteria, Santa Barbara County; sent by T. 1 
Ward. From a flowing well one hundred and forty-seven feet deepjo 
which gravel was reached. "Several families are interested in the result, 
as they are using the water, and I am laying pipes so that others can do8« 
if it is desirable. Others have wells here, and still others are considering 
the matter of putting them down, so you see it is a matter of neighborhood 
interest to find out about the healtbfalness of the water." It is clear 
tasteless. 



Total solid residue by evaporation - 

Soluble part after evaporation - --. 

Insoluble part after evaporation 

Chemically combined water and a little organic matter 



Grains per 
Gallon. 



28.0 
11.8 
13.7 

2.5 



Parts in 

10,000. 



481 



The soluble part consists of carbonates and chlorides of the alkalies, 
with small quantities of sulphates of same, gypsum, and Glauber's salt. 

The insoluble part consists of carbonates of lime and magnesia, with J 
small amount of gypsum and silica. 

This is quite a hard water, but not more so than those in common use in 
the Santa Clara Valley, with which it agrees very closely in composition. 
In case it should at first disagree with any one, it can be softened either 
by boiling, or by the use of a little sal soda, or by mixing it with one tenli 
of its bulk of clear lime water and allowing it to settle. 

Water from a bored well, five hundred feet deep, half a mile east of Cat' 
pinteria, Santa Barbara County; sent by the owner, P. C. Higgins, who 
makes the following statement regarding it: 

The pipe in this well is one and seven eighths inches wide. The water, 
we think, comes in about four hundred feet below the surface, from a cret 
ice in rock. The auger passed principally through soft, dry shale — so drj 
that it was nearly impossible to bore without using water. Combustible 
gas comes in, apparently, from a crevice below the water. By pumpbg 
with a pitcher pump about thirty gallons of water, the gas will heave oot 
some five hundred gallons more, and then will subside until again relieved 
by the pump. I have arranged to separate the gas from the water as it 
comes to the surface, and while the water is running we will burn the ga^i 
which makes a very hot fire, burning first blue and then red. We passed 



WATERS AND WATER SUPPLY. 



31 



through no beds of sand, and had some thick oil mixed in all the way 
down. I have had corn grow in the soil that came from four hundred and 
fifty feet below the surface." 
The water is clear and quite saline to the taste. The analysis gave: 



Total solid residue by evaporation ^ 

Soluble part after evaporation _ 

Insoluble part after evaporation 

Chemically combined water and small amount of organic matter. 



Grains per 
Gallon. 



1253.6 

1184.9 
35.1 
33.2 



Parts in 

10,000. 



214.56 

202.76 
6.00 
5.80 



The soluble part consists mainly of common salt, with an appreciable 
amount of carbonates of the alkalies and a small amount of magnesic 
chloride. 

The insoluble part consists of carbonates of lime and magnesia, the lat- 
ter predominating, also a small quantity of silica. 

Arksian water, from "The Palms," Cal.; sent by Howard & Atwater. 
Prom a well one hundred and twenty-five feet deep, supplying the public 
fountain in part. Samples clear; odor of sulphuretted hydrogen percepti- 
ble on opening demijohn. 



Total solid residue by evaporation 

Soluble part after evaporation --. 

Insoluble part after evaporation 

Chemically combined water and small amount of organic matter. 



Grains per 
Gallon. 



32.53 
14.66 

14.78 
3.09 



Parts in 
10,000. 



5.57 

2.51 

2.53 

.53 



The soluble part consist of chlorides and sulphates of the sodium and 
some potassium, common salt (sodium chloride) predominating. The 
insoluble part consists of carbonates of lime and magnesia with small 
amount of silica. 

The mineral ingredients of this water hardly exceed in amount and kind 
what is admissible in a water for domestic use, although it is exceedingly 
hard, and might exert a slight purgative effect on persons unaccustomed 
to it. For such cases it might be softened by the admixture of one tenth 
of its bulk of clear lime water. 

E. River and Irrigation Waters. 

Oarmel River water, from the main of the Pacific Improvement Company, 
Carmel Valley, Monterey County. The water is clear, but shows a marked 
alkaline reaction. 



Total residue by evaporation 

Again soluble after evaporation... 

Insoluble after evaporation 

Water and a little organic matter 



Parts in 
10,000. 



2.70flt^ 
.920 

1,375 
.405 



Grains per 
Gallon. 



15.77 
5.37 

8.0S 
2.37 



32 



REPORTS OP EXAMINATIONS OF 



The soluble part is quite strongly alkaline, and contains chiefly chloride 
of sodiuui, with a small amount of sodium carbonate, and traces of sulphate 
of magnesia. 

The insoluble part is largely gypsum, with carbonates of lime and mag- 
nesia, and some silica. There is no ammonia. An unexceptionable water 
for either irrigation or domestic use, of moderate hardness. 

River water ^ taken from Owens Eiver at Independence Station; sent by 
Mr. Emmet K-ixford. The water had a brownish tinge, and was very faintly 
alkaline. Lime water produced turbidity. The water contained: 



Total residue by evaporation 

Again soluble after evaporation 

Jn soluble after evaporation 

Silica-. - 

Combined water and some organic matter 



Parts in 

10,000. 



2.760 
1.284 

1.008 
.404 

.468 



Grroins p«r 
GttUon. 



16.11 

7.9(1 

n 



The soluble part was very strongly alkaline, lime water producing a Iieavy 
turbidity; showing the presence of considerable carbonate of sodium. In 
addition, it contained considerable common and Glauber's salts, some 
phate of potassium, and a small quantity of sulphate of magnesia. 

The insoluble part consists only of carbonate of lime and silica. 

This water contains no unusual amount of mineral ingredients, and is 
fully as well adapted to irrigation purposes as many of the waters so used 
in the San Joaquin Valley, It contains a rather unusually large amount 
of potash salts, thus contributing this important fertilizer to the soils on 
which the water is used. The sample, unfortunately, was too small ii 
amount to permit of a quantitative determination of this substance. 



THE WATER SUPPLY OF THE SAN BERNARDINO VALLEY. 

The question of an adequate water supply for irrigation purposes is of 
such capital importance to the southern portion of California that every- 
thing bearing on that question assumes exceptional interest. Irrigation, so 
far as it has gone, has transformed seeming deserts into a maze of gardens, 
orchards, and orange groves. It is of no little importance to know hov 
far this transformation can go in the future, on the basis of the possibl« 
supply of water from all sources — streams, springs, surface wells or sumps, 
and, finally, artesian or bored wells in which the water either actuallf 
overflows, or comes so near to the surface that it can be raised at a s: 
cost. 

This question has formed the topic of much discussion in the San Ber- 
nardino Valley; and anything that can throw farther light upon the s\i>- 
ject is of the utmost consequence to its inhabitants. The natural livinj 
waters have been fully appropriated long ago, and the building of the Beal 
Eiver reseevoir for the storage of winter flood waters, at heavy expense, 
shows the pressing need of farther supplies. Artesian wells, also, hav« 
long ago been resorted to; but the extent to which the supply from thj^ 
source could be lieveloped has never been made the subject of systematic 
investigation. 

The City of San Bernardino lies near the lower end of what is known ^ 
the "upper valley," about fifteen miles from its head, on the gentle sloped 



WATERS AND WATER SUPPLY. 



33 



of which the towns of Redlands and Lugonia are located. This upper val- 
ley seems to be quite sharply defined from the higher and drier lands (such 
as those upon which Colton is situated) by a sandy ridge running diagon- 
ally from the Cajon Pass in a southeasterly direction, and terminating in 
abrupt bluffs, the base of which is washed by Lytle and Warm Creeks 
near their junction, about a mile south from the town of San Bernardino. 

This ridge is composed of stratified sand and gravel, and is evidence that 
similar materials have at a former geological period covered part or per- 
haps the whole of the upper valley* but have since been removed by denu- 
dation. At the eastern base of this bluff* is a characteristic " cienega," with 
black alluvial soil, from which water oozes wherever a ditch is dug, and on 
which are some ponds that retain water during the entire season. 

These cienegas form so frequent and so important a feature in Southern 
California that the question of their origin is of exceptional interest. For 
from them is derived a good deal of irrigation water even at present, and 
if it could be shown that they are connected with sources of water supply 
not merely local, but general, that supply might be utilized to a much 
greater extent than is now the case. 

A cienega is, in general, a spot or tract of moist land, usually character- 
ized by a tree growth of cotton wood, willow, or sycamore; sometimes 
showing a definite spring or springy place from which water issues or 
moisture spreads; sometimes simply a general humidity that sustains the 
growth of the water-loving trees, and oftentimes bunches of "tule" or 
rushes. Wells dug in cienegas always find water; sometimes flowing 
springs are developed, and of late borings made to various depths in such 
tracts have been found to yield artesian water in abundance. While in 
general cienega lands are most commonly low, yet in many places they are 
found quite high up on sloping uplands, where their appearance excites 
special remark, in view of the prevailing impression that Southern Cali- 
fornia is a very dry country. 

The Santa Ana River, issuing from its canon near the northeastern 
border of the upper valley, traverses the latter rather diagonally, toward 
the southwest. Its course is marked by a denser growth of trees than is 
seen elsewhere, although the entire upper valley is more or less dotted with 
trees, in contrast to the higher lands beyond the cross ridge, which are 
generally treeless, except where a cienega affords unusual moisture. In 
the river bottom or flood plain itself, also, clumps of dense tree growth 
indicate areas of exceptionally abundant moisture. It is, in fact, a series 
of cienegas, the development of water from which has only just begun; 
and a special investigation of one of these was made at the request of the 
proprietor during the April recess of the University, 1889. 

The '^ Victoria " Cienega. 

As the development of water on this cienega, undertaken by Mr. Matthew 
Gage of Riverside, is probably the most extensive and systematic enter- 
prise of the kind in the country, the subject is of general interest; and the 
results of the observations are here given to the public by permission of 
Mr. Gage. 

As is well known, that gentleman has undertaken to bring under irriga- 
tion the higher lands of the Riverside Valley — " East Riverside" and 
"Arlington Heights" — ^ partly by means of water taken from the Santa 
Ana River, some miles above the inlet of the old Riverside Canal, but 
chiefly through the supply derived from artesian wells, a large number of 
which have been bored by him at various points, but most extensively in 



34 



REPORTS OF EXPERIMENTS OF 



what is known as the " water tract" of his property of two thousand fom 
hundred and thirty acres, named by him the '^ Victoria Ranch," and locateil 
about twelve miles from the head of the valley, and three miles from % 
City of San Bernardino. It is, therefore, near the lower end of the **up] 
valley," and by barometric measurement lies about seven hundred t 
below the mouth of Santa Ana Canon, and probably a thousand feet belon 
the mouth of Mill Creek Canon, at the extreme eastern end of the vallej, 
The '* water tract " above referred to is, in reality, merely an extensi^ 
(five hundred and forty acres) tract of cienega land, lying almost entirel| 
within the first bottom of the Santa Aua River, that is here bordered bj 
steep bluffs of alluvial deposits from fifteen to thirty feet high. 

Surface and Surface Waters. — ^The surface of the river bottom is genet 
ally sandy, and shows the usual marks of successive changes of tlij 
channel, which at some points even now encroaches upon the borderinj 
bluffs, causing them to topple into the water at times of flood. The bottom 
is sparsely timbered with cottonwood, sycamore, and several varieties i 
willows, mostly second growth, the larger timber have been cut away. It 
is noticeable that these trees grow quite impartially on what appears toli 
arid sand, and on the dense turf of grass and rushes that covers the outfi( 
and as usual, lower portion of the flood plain. 

The cause of this uniform distribution of the water-loving trees becomei 
apparent when we find that in digging almost anywhere to the depth of 
few feet, water is encountered ; and ditches, partly natural, partly artificial 
along the foot of the bluff on either side, soon gather considerable strean 
of running water. One of these, on the north edge of the bottom (the " Pai 
rish ditch"), had at the time a running stream of one hundred and '\ 
seven miner's inches (of four inches head) , although greatly obstructed t 
vegetation and frequently spreading out laterally. A corresponding stream 
estimated at about seventy-five inches, was running at the foot of tl 
south-side bluff and reached the river a short distance below. The wais 
enters these streams mostly in the shape of an imperceptible sidevfii 
ooze, so that they seem to grow without reasonable cause. At some poinl 
however, copious springs boil up from below with considerable energy, 
once suggesting an artesian rise. Several of the artesian wells now extat 
have been bored on the site of such springs, whose water still boils 
around the pipe, not having apparently any direct connection with 4 
source from which the wells are supplied. A number of similar spring 
in which poles may be pushed down to great depths, exist elsewhere inll 
region, one of the most notable being " Hunt's Spring." 

These springs, as well as the streams in the river bottom, mentioD« 
above, are said on all hands to continue to flow without material dimiu^ 
tion throughout the dry season; and it is obvious to. the observer thatti 
supply thus obtainable from mere surface ditches in the vast " cieneg" 
lands of the Santa Ana Valley is extraordinarily large, and can be w 
to add considerably to other sources of supply. Certainly not less tM 
three hundred inches of water can thus easily be developed upon Ji 
Gage's " water tract," and with lateral ditches this amount can doubtl^ 
be greatly increased. A still further increase could, in case of need, 
obtained by pumping from pits, as is done in the Sacramento Valley. 

It is instructive to note that the present large supply of the RiverSJ^ 
Water Company's canals, viz. : the entire volume of Warm Creek, oi 
nates in manner very similar to that mentioned in connection with ^ 
Parrish Ditch. The sources of Warm Creek lie in cienegas in the 1«^ 
valley, miles away from the foothills and unconnected with the suoii*' 



WATERS AND WATER SUPPLY. 



35 



flow of the canons of the north border. From small springy places, e. g,y 
near the Harlem Springs Hotel, and in other localities, there issue little 
rivulets which, without the inflowing of any tributary worth considering, 
increase in the course of eight miles to a. volume of two thousand five hun- 
dred to three thousand inches, constituting during the summer season the 
bulk of the flow of the old Riverside Canal. This case exemplifies strik- 
ingly the unusual abundance of water lying near the surface in this por- 
tion of the valley. 

Artesian Wells. — In the borings made in the "Water Tract" there 
was usually penetrated from twenty to fifty feet of alluvial soil and sand, 
the latter gradually increasing in coarseness downwards and bearing more 
and more and larger gravel, until at the depth of ninety to one hundred 
feet the material was largely cobbles of considerable size, rendering bor- 
ing very difiicult, and at times, when a vigorous flow of water was struck, 
resulting in the forcible ejection of stones almost filling the (seven-inch) 
pipe. It being found very difiicult to reach any considerable depth with 
so small a diameter of pipe, the ten-inch borehole has now been adopted 
as the regular size on these lands. It has been noticed that the size of the 
cobbles decreases towards the sides of the valley, where greater depths 
are easily reached, while here two hundred and eleven feet is the greatest 
depth attained with a ten-inch bore, and most of the good wells range 
from about one hundred and forty feet upwards. 

The interspaces between the cobbles are everywhere found filled with 
sand and gravel; and the water-bearing gravel beds alternate with more or 
less impervious beds of clayey material or hardpan, at intervals varying 
from a few to fifteen and more feet. As each additional layer of impervious 
material is penetrated by the auger, the rise of water is more energetic and 
copious. But the gravel beds continue to the lowest depth reached; and, 
according to the usual rule, they probably fill the depths of the valley to 
the bedrock. How deep this may be we can but conjecture from the steep- 
ness of the granite slopes that form the sides of the valley, and from the 
fact that a borehole situated not far from the mouth of the San Timoteo 
Canon, on the southeast corner of the valley (where the Southern Pacific 
Railroad ascends to the Gorgonio pass), the depth of eight hundred and 
fifty feet was reached while the auger was still bringing up the sandy and 
gravelly clay characterizing that canon; in contrast to the streams enter- 
ing the valley from the north and northeast, that discharge only cobbles, 
gravel, and sand. 

Details of Water Discharge. — As an illustration of the supply that may 
reasonably be hoped for under the conditions here existing, a detailed 
enumeration of the groups and individual wells thus far flowing, or ready 
to flow, on the " water tract " of the Gage system is given below. The 
tables show the number in each group, diameter of pipe used, distance of 
wells from each other, and the water discharge of each. Both the lettering* 
of the groups and the numbering of the wells proceeds up stream, or from 
south to north, as the case may be. 

Group ''J.." 

Six wells, in line along the canal, the nearest being two thousand four 
hundred feet south from the headgate, and the total distance from No. 1 
to No. 6, one thousand six hundred and sixty-five feet. 

*The lettering is the same as that used by State Engineer Hall in his report on Irriga- 
tion in South California, p. 251; but the number of wells has been increased since. 



36 



REPORTS OF EXPERIMENTS OF 



No. OP Well. 



Total for group . 



Distance from Well 
Next Above — Teet, 



249 
304 
323 

722 
67 



Diameter of 
Pipe — Inches. 



10 
10 
10 
10 

7 
7 



Water Discharge, 
Miner's Inches.* 



Group *'jB." 

Six wells, occupying an area of somewhat less than one tenth of an acK 
(three thousand nine hundred square feet) , distant one thousand two im 
dred feet from the headgate in a northwest direction; distant from (centei 
of) group "A" three thousand two hundred and seventy-six feet. 



No. OF Well 



Total for group . 



Difltance from Well 
Next Above — ^Feet. 



16 
15 
40 
60 
40 



Diameter of 
Pipe — Inches. 



Water Discharge- 
Miner's Inches,* 



Group ''C:' 

Four weak wells, all with seven-inch pipe; among the first bored, aD( 
left as they are, with an average depth of only one hundred and ten 
on account of difficulties encountered in the cobble layer at bottom, ffli 
overcoming which, tools were not at hand at the time. The wells 
between ten and eighteen feet apart only, and yield from seven to twehf 
inches of water each — ^total thirty-five inches. Doubtless the product of i 
single ten-inch well successfully sunk to one hundred and fifty feet at thii 
place, would exceed the present flow of the four shallow wells. 

This group is distant four thousand five hundred and fifty feet northeai 
from group '' B," and two thousand one hundred feet northwest from th 
center of group " D." 

Group "D:' 

This group consists of eleven wells, all with ten-inch pipe, and ranging i 
depth from one hundred and ten to one hundred and sixty feet. Nine ai 
located on the south side and mostly quite near to the river bed; twoai 
near the north bank, one being in the present bed. The distance betwe^ 
the centers of groups "A" and "D'' is about five thousand eight hundr^* 
feet; between " D " and " B," two thousand four hundred feet. The avert 
elevation of ''D" above group "B/^is about eighteen feet; above ''A 
thirty-one feet. 

* Fifty miner's inches, under a four-inch head, are equal to one cubic foot per second' 



WATERS AND WATER SUPPLY. 



37 



No. OF Well. 


Distance from Well 
next above— Feet. 


Water Discharge— 
Miner's Inches. 


1 


80 
687 
117 
139 
666 
♦ 315 

42 
440 




61 


2 . .-.•_. 


51 


3 _ 


43 


4 


65 


5 


82 


6 


66 


7 


35 


8 


22 


9 


37 


10 - _ 


300 (to No. 3 

and No. 11) 




11 


66 
74 










Total of firrouD > _ 




671 









Jtecapitulation. 

Oroup" A." discharges _ 260 miner's inches. 

Group "B" discharges. _ - 225 miner's inches. 

-Groupie discharges^.- .__ 35 miner's inches. 

Group "D" discharges. 571 miner's inches. 

Total for the twenty-seven wells ^ 1,091 miner's inches. 

All the measurements recorded above correspond to the condition of the 
wells about thirty-six hours after all had been uncapped * and had been 
running their full streams. 

This point is some importance, because measurements made imme- 
diately, or soon after uncapping a well that has remained closed for some 
time, show at first a considerably larger discharge, evidently due to accu- 
mulated pressure, or what might be called a " local head," requiring some 
time to run down to the normal discharge. 

Degree of Interdependence of these Wells, — ^The extent to which the dis- 
charge of any well or group of wells is influenced by that of others situ- 
ated at a greater or less distance, is a question of great practical interest, 
since upon the answer depends the aggregate amount of water to be ex- 
pected from the farther development by the boring of additional wells. I 
have tested the point in a variety of ways, the more important being the 
following: 

1. Well No. 6, in group '* B," had for some time past remained capped 
with an inch pipe carrying the water supply to a dwelling-house some 
three hundred yards away; the water reaching the level of twenty feet six 
inches above the casing when all the other wells of the group are capped. 
It was found that when all the other wells of the group are itncapped, the 
water level at the house falls about three feet seven inches. As stated 
-above, the total flow of the wells of this group is two hundred and twenty- 
five inches; that of No. 6, twenty inches; it is distant only forty feet from 
the well No. 5, having a flow of sixty-three inches, and all the rest of the 
group lie within one hundred and thirty feet. Yet the measurement shows 
that the opening or shutting-down of a flow of two hundred and five inches, 
or ten times the amount of the flow of No, 6, influences it only to the 
extent of not quite 18 per cent, or 1| per cent of the total flow concerned. 

2. Well No, 2, of group " D," had been steadily running for more than 
a year, all the rest of the group, as well as those of groups ''B " and " C," 
being closed; it was discharging about sixty-one inches. After nine other 
wells (Nob. 3 to 11 inclusive) had been uncapped. No. 2 was found to have 



38 



REPORTS OJ*^ EXPERIMENTS OF 



decreased to fifty-seven inches in the course of about three hours. On 
opening No, 1, within eighty feet of No. 2, its flow suddenly fell off to fifty, 
five inches, and forty-eight hours afterwards it had reached its minimum 
flow of forty-eight and four tenths inches; which, however, five hours afej 
was found to have risen again to fifty-one, the figure adopted in the tabid 
above. Such fluctuations of a few inches appeared at measurements mads 
at different times of the day, in almost all cases of strong flow; possibly aj 
the result of barometric variations or other diurnal causes. 

It will be seen that in the case of this well the letting loose of five hun. 
dred and twenty inches of water within an area of seventeen acres suF' 
rounding it, caused a decrease of the flow it had when running by itself, o! 
only ten inches, being about one sixth, or 17 per cent, of its own flow when 
all were closed, and 1| per cent of the total discharge of the group, Thig 
result agrees very closely with that obtained in the case of well No. 6, of 
group ^* B," reported above. 

3. After all the wells had reached a state of constant discharge, the ^ 
hundred and six inches of groups " C " and '^ D " were shut off at about 5 
p. M., in order to observe the effects on the other groups. 

Group " B " was measured at 10 p. m., and was found to be dischargioj 
two hundred and eleven inches; six hours before, when all the other welk 
were still open, the discharge was two hundred and five inches, showinga 
difference of six inches, apparently caused by the shutting down of fiw 
aggregate of six hundred and six inches at a distance averaging a mile. 
This is a very slight effect, at best, being less than 1 per cent of the total 
discharge shut off, and only | per cent of the total discharge concerneJ, 
But the fact that on the morning of the same day the discharge of group 
" B " was found to be two hundred and fifteen inches, renders it doubf ^ 
that even the effect observed was directly due to the shutting down ol 
groups *' C '^ and " D." Unfortunately time did not permit of the contift 
nation of the observations so as to settle this point definitely. 

On the following day, eighteen hours after the shutting down of all tli« 
other groups (representing an aggregate of eight hundred and thirty-ono 
inches at an average distance of about five thousand feet), group "A" w 
remeasured. It was found that the discharge of well No. 1 had decreasei 
from thirty-six to twenty-nine inches, evidently in consequence of being 
loaded down with a quantity of gravel that had slid in from above, tb 
pipe having sunk below the ground level. In the rest of the group (No& 
2 to 6) there had been an increase over the discharge observed in the afleF 
noon of the previous day, from two hundred and twenty-four to two Im 
dred and thirty-three inches; a difference of nine inches, or 4 per cent in 
the total discharge of the group, but only .37 per cent, or a little overJ 
third of 1 per cent of the total discharge concerned. In view of the dailj 
variations noted, it must here also remain in doubt to what extent the dif 
ference observed is due to the closing of the other wells. 

4. A striking proof of the relative independence of these wells of oi* 
another, when situated reasonable distances apart, is found in the " lociJ 
head,'^ or accumulation of pressure that takes place so soon as an inl 
vidual well or a group of wells is shut down. Measured immediately i * 
uncapping a well that has remained closed for some time, the discharge^ 
found to be, in strong wells, from about 15 to 18 per cent; in very weaJ 
wells, such as some of group *'C," as much as 36 per cent more than tba* 
to which the well finally settles down after a lapse of from twenty to thirtj 
hours. This accumulation and slow running-down of pressure proves W 
these vents cannot be considered as connected by a hydrostatic preset 
column pure and simple, as is sometimes the case. Manifestly the m^ 



WATERS AND WATER SUPPLY. 



39 



of water is so subdivided by the frequently close-packed materials inter- 
vening, laterally as well as vertically, between the vents made by the auger, 
and in the interspaces of which the water is stored, that a rapid transmis- 
sion of pressure is not possible, and that the laws of hydraulics and fric- 
tion so materially modify the hydrostartic effect as to essentially govern 
the actual discharge of each well. Moreover, the facts observed prove that 
hundreds of inches of water-discharge bear but a very small ratio to the 
total supply that lies behind these artesian fountains. 

The Substrata of the Valley. — The nature of the materials underlying 
the valley at large, below the alluvial silt and sand, is shown by the auger 
to be gravel, ranging from pea size to cobbles of larger diameter than even 
the ten-inch casings of the wells, more or less tightly packed with sand of 
varying degrees of fineness. Cobbles nearly filling the large pipes have, as 
before stated, repeatedly been ejected by water pressure. The character of 
these cobbles cannot be mistaken; they represent the same rocks that are 
now brought down from the canons of the Mill Creek and Santa Ana River, 
at the head of the valley, where a wilderness of the same materials, rang- 
ing all the way from sand to boulders four and five feet in diameter, cover 
many square miles of actual surface, and are exhibited in every break of 
the country. There, as well as in the borings, occasional sheets or strata 
of clay or other impervious materials alternate with the gravel deposits; 
and it is known that with the penetration of each such impervious layer 
additional water pressure is obtained in the wells. It can scarcely be 
doubted that the sources of Warm Creek, and such outflows as Hunt's 
Spring, above mentioned, indicate either the termination, or the perforation 
from some cause, of such impervious water-shedding strata near the surface, 
and that the origin of all these waters is essentially the same. 

Source of the Water Supply, — A consideration of the above facts leads us 
directly to the solution of the question regarding the derivation of the 
water supply. What we now see happening during the rainy season at 
the mouths of the canons has happened from time immemorial; the 
original depths of the San Bernardino Valley have been filled up to within 
twenty or thirty feet of the present surface, with just such masses as we 
now find surrounding the mouths of the canons, and this immense mass 
is filled with water, annually replenished during the flood season, by the 
absorption of a portion of the water issuing from the mountains, the rest 
passing directly to the sea. The Santa Ana River issues from its canon 
about twelve miles above the head of the Gage Canal; by barometric meas- 
urement it descends about seven hundred feet in that distance, while Mill 
Creek issues several hundred feet higher still. The water absorbed by the 
gravel masses, and afterwards confined between successive clay sheets, 
might at the headgate, in a well two hundred feet deep, be under nearly 
a thousand feet of pressure from the head of the valley. No such degree 
of pressure can, however, manifest itself, because of the enormous friction 
opposed to any movement, and doubtless also because of a steady though 
slow seepage toward the sea, which relieves it below. It is this steadily 
moving column that the artesian auger intercepts and taps; and the ques- 
tion naturally presents itself whether, and to what extent, boreholes made 
in the lower part of the valley would be likely to deplete those located 
higher up, as would ordinarily be expected. 

While in the absence of more exact data a close calculation in the 
premises is not possible, the observations made in regard to the effects of 
wells and groups of wells upon each other's flow suffices to show that such 



40 



REPORTS OF EXPERIMENTS OF 



depletion is not at all likely to happen; on the contrary, under existi^ 
conditions it is probable the boreholes tapping the slowly moving column 
higher up the valley will, when tapping the same water-bearing stratum^ 
have somewhat the advantage of those located lower down. But as the 
latter are more likely to reach the lower portions of the water-bearing mm^ 
and as the extent of that mass is so great, it is not likely that the calli 
made upon the great stock will, for some time to come, be such as to create 
serious interference. This conclusion is the more probable, as in case of 
any material lowering of the water level at the head of the valley, the 
absorption during flood time would doubtless be increased in a certain ratio 
to that lower level, and a larger proportion of flood waters would be stored 
instead of rushing uselessly to the sea. To some extent, therefore, the 
increased demand would doubtless be offset by an increased supply. 

That such absorption does actually occur in the cobble beds at 
canon outlets, is plainly shown by the tunneling operations which have 
been undertaken at that of the Santa Ana River, as well as on Mill Creek, 
for unappropriated water. Water was found in these workings at from 
twenty to forty feet, but not in very large supply, the leachy bottom also 
causing much loss, as might be expected; yet the water supply for the 
nascent town of Mentone has been thus obtained from the Mill Greet 
gravel bed. 

Appearances indicate that no very large accession of either water or 
gravel comes or has come from the most southern of the three watercourses 
entering the head of the valley, viz., the San Timoteo. Clay and silt witl 
but few cobbles form, and in the past have formed the deposits from that 
stream; so that in a well sunk to the depth of eight hundred and fifty feet, 
near Brookside Station, on the Southern Pacific Railway, nothing but sucl 
clayey material with a little gravel has been found. But in a well bored 
by Mr. Gage near Mound City, three miles farther down the valley, the 
gravel and cobble beds were met with at about one hundred and twenty 
feet. We are therefore justified in considering the whole width of the val- 
ley as being occupied by the water-bearing gravel; and thus an area of 
about ten by fourteen miles, filled with water-bearing deposits to unknowD 
depths, assuredly not less than one thousand feet, must be assumed as 
representing the water reserve, replenished during each rainy season. This 
enormous mass has thus far been tapped to no greater depth than two 
hundred and eleven feet (the maximum depth of any of the wells on the 
" water tract " ) ; and in comparison with it, the water discharge from all th« 
wells, and even that of several times their number, appears quite small. 

Besides the main affluents of the valley, mentioned above, the smaller 
streams issuing from the north side of the valley, viz., Plunge, City, anJ 
Lytle Creeks, as well as DeviPs Canon, doubtless contribute somethiDg 
towards the general store of water by absorption into the gravel beds througl 
which they have cut their present channels; and , in flood-time these con- 
tributions may be very considerable. 



WATERS AND WATER SUPPLY. 



41 



:tJ Wft^ 



Possible Production from a given Area. — While, of course, there must bo 
in every artesian basin or storage mass, a limit beyond which the multi- 
plication of boreholes, fails to add to the total discharge, it is of interest to 
estimate on the basis of the facts recorded above, the possible product of all 
area advantageously situated, as is the " water tract " of the Gage systeiD) 
in the trough of the valley. For such estimate group ^' D '^ can most fairly 
serve as a basis, as it contains the largest number of wells (eleven), moS* 
uniformly distributed, and all of the same diameter of ten inches, which, aS 
stated above, is the minimum width that should be used here. 



The extreme dimension of the rectangular area obtained by multiplying 
together the greatest longitudinal and lateral distances of any two oi the 
eleven wells, is nineteen hundred by four thousand feet, equal to about 
seventeen acres. If we increase these dimensions by adding to each, one 
half of the average distance between the wells of the group {L e., one hun- 
dred and sixty-eight feet), the area that on ample allowance may be con- 
sidered as occupied by these eleven wells would become twenty-seven 
acres, or one twentieth of the whole tract (five hundred and forty acres). 
Multiplying by twenty the total present discharge of the group — five hun- 
dred and seventy-one inches — we obtain as the possible product of the 
tract from artesian sources, eleven thousand four hundred and twenty 
inches of water. 

If we apply the same method of calculation to Group "A,'^ using the 
corresponding figures (sixteen hundred and sixty-five by two hundred and 
seventy-seven), we find that they may be estimated to occupy an area of 
eleven acres, being nearly the forty-first part of the total area. Multiply- 
ing by forty-one the product of these six wells, being two hundred and 
sixty inches, we come to a result not far different from that obtained in 
thacase of group "D," to wit, ten thousand six hundred and sixty inches 
for the whole tract. Averaging the distances between the wells of the 
respective groups to three hundred feet, we should, upon the above basis, 
obtaiu from two hundred and seventy wells, each occupying about two 
acres of ground, about ten thousand inches of water. 

When it is considered that the experiments made have failed to show 
unequivocal evidence of any influence of the several groups upon each 
other, and that in the case of well No. 2, of group " D," the joint influence 
of ten neighboring wells within an area of twenty-seven acres, when in full 
flow amounted to only 17 per cent, or 1| per cent of the total discharge of 
the group; and when it is farther considered that the deepest well thus 
far bored on the " water tract " in question has only reached two hundred 
and eleven feet out of the great depths still remaining untapped, it would 
seem that the above calculation does not necessarily exaggerate present 
possibilities, whatever might be the ultimate result of a very great or 
indefinite multiplication of boreholes elsewhere in the valley. Even with 
an allowance of 50 per cent discount on the above estimate for the '* Vic- 
toria" cienega, it and similar ones that may hereafter be developed, will 
remain of first-class importance as sources of irrigation water. 

The very large size of the cobbles encountered here indicates that the 
present flood plain practically coincides with that of ancient times in which 
the subterranean stream still moves, and is tapped most readily, and 
toward which, rather than to the sides of the valley, it will always tend. 
Whether this coincidence of the modern watercourse with the ancient one 
is general or only local, cannot be determined from the facts now known. 
The general conformation of the country admits of the supposition that 
the original great stream flowed directly from the head of the valley toward 
Los Angeles, and that the segregation of the Santa Ana and San Gabriel 
Valleys into separate drainage systems was a comparatively late event. 
If so, the main subterranean stream may still follow the old channel, and 
could then be tapped by deep borings at points on the line between San 
Bernardino, Pomona, and Los Angeles. If, on the other hand, there never 
was a direct flow from San Bernardino Peak to Los Angeles, the most pro- 
ductive wells would still have to be sought in or near the present axes of 
the two valleys. 

Considering the conditions set forth above, in connection with the large 
watershed and extensive area of absorption and storage, we may reasona- 



42 



REPORTS OF EXPERIMENTS OF 



bly expect that, until the ratio of the artificial outflow to the natural sup 
ply shall be very materially increased, the boring of additional wells in 
such favorable localities will continue to yield remunerative returns, and 
to increase very greatly the available water supply of the valley. 

In this connection it should not be forgotten tfiat the water power from 
higher-lying wells may be made available for raising to higher ground 
either the water from wells not having a sufficient rise, or that derived 
from surface ditches, or even from the river itself. Thus in the case of the 
^* water tract" specially examined, the five hundred and seventy-one 
inches emerging from group " D " at an elevation of nearly twenty-eight 
feet above the headgate of the canal, might be very efloctively used in 
pumping water from low-lying sumps in the river bottom, up to an avaik 
ble level. 

While there is reason to expect that the river bottom will furnish 
largest outflows, experience has amply shown that boreholes sunk even 
quite near to the edges of the valley yield good results, and may generally 
be relied upon for a generous domestic supply. Locally, and in the low^ 
part of the valley, outflows adequate for irrigation purposes may doubflees 
be had on the higher lands, also. 

Chemical Oomposition of the Waters. — It is of interest to compare tie 
mineral ingredients of these waters among themselves as well as witk 
those of others of similar origin in the State; for it is well known thai 
while some of the artesian waters thus far obtained are very pure, others 
again are so highly charged with mineral matters as to render their m 
for irrigation impracticable, especially in presence of '* alkali" s' 
already preexisting in the soils. 

The subjoined analyses of two waters from artesian wells of the " Gage 
system" and of the water of Warm Creek (constituting the main bulk of 
the Riverside Canal), make a very favorable showing for the water supplj 
of the San Bernardino Valley: 

Analyses of Waters from San Bernardino Valley, 

Composition in 10,000 Paris. 



Total residue -. 

Soluble part _ 

Sodium chloride (common salt). , 
Sodium sulphate (Glauber's salt). 

Sodium car Donate (sal soda) 

Potassium sulphate 

Insoluble after evaporation 

Calcium sulphate 

Calcium carbonate 

Magnesium carbonate 

Silica - 



Gage System — Aetesian 
Wells. 



Group D, 

No. 5. 



1.911 
418 
,063 
.193 
.102 
.060 

1.49$ 



1.017 
.232 
.244 



Group A, 

No. 2. 



2.266 

.091 
.313 
,021 
.063 

1.775 
.078 

1.212 
.249 
.239 



WaehOrebi 



At Mill. 



2.9)1 
Jj 

.58! 



.76! 



Summary Statement in Grains per Gallon. 



Total residue 

Soluble part -- 

Insoluble after evaporation . 




WATERS AND WATER SUPPLY. 



43 



In order to appreciate the meaning of the above analyses, it should be 
understood that of the solid contents of the waters the portions designated 
as "insoluble after evaporation " are not only either unobjectionable or use- 
ful to vegetation, but are in a short time absorbed and retained in the soil; 
their tendency is to render the water ^ hard '' in domestic use, but their 
quantity in all three waters is very moderate only; considerably less, for 
example, than is found in the waters of the Santa Clara Valley, and in the 
Coast Range generally, where twenty and more grains per gallon, of which 
two thirds of the 'insoluble '^ character, is of common occurrence. 

Most important to the irrigator, however, are the '' soluble " or saline 
ingredients, which when in large amounts represent so much "alkali" 
added to a soil perhaps already alkaline. It mil be seen that these ingre- 
dients are in the well waters represented by the very small amount of about 
two and two thirds grains (taking the average), being only a little more 
than is found in the water of Kern River, and about one third of the corre- 
sponding contents of the Los Angeles River, the latter having seventeen and 
one half grains of total mineral contents. 

It will be noted that the water of Warm Creek, while having no more of 
the "insoluble" or earthy ingredients than the wells, carries more than 
twice as much of the "soluble" or saline compounds; whether originally 
or from outside accessions, is not clearly apparent from the nature of the 
salts. The quantity of the latter is not yet large, and is, moreover, of little 
consequence in the porous and well-drained soils of Riverside. 

There is, however, one point that must not be passed over in the valua- 
tion of these waters for irrigation purposes. It is the unusually large pro- 
portion oi potash salts contained in them, which, at the rate at which water 
is commonly used in that region, say one inch to five acres, will amply 
suffice to provide all that most crops require of that important fertilizer. 
For with the full use of one-fifth inch through each year (corresponding 
to a rainfall of nearly thirty-five inches) , each acre would currently receive 
no less than forty-seven pounds of potash sulphate, worth over $1 65 at 
wholesale, from the well water, and about sixty-three pounds of the same 
jfrom the creek water. Considering the quality of their soil, this means 
that the purchase of potash fertilizers will hardly ever trouble the irri- 
gators of Riverside. 

Oienegas of the China Ranch and of the Pomona Slope. — During a short 
sojourn at Pomona, I had occasion to observe cursorily, under the courte- 
ous guidance of Mr. H. A. Palmer, the conditions of water supply in that 
region. 

The Pomona settlement occupies a gentle southward slope descending 
from the direction of the canon of San Antonio Creek, which drains the 
slopes of "Old Baldy " and San Antonio Mountains. On the Pomona slope 
there fCre numerous (mostly small) cienegas, characterized by sycamore, Cot- 
tonwood, and willow trees, and showing a growth of grass and tule through- 
out the season. In some of these, flowing springs actually exist; in others, 
artesian wells have been successfully sunk, contributing materially to the 
irrigation supply of the settlement. It is probable that here the waters of 
the canon have played the same part as have those of Mill Creek and Santa 
Ana River in the upper valley, first depositing great gravel beds in front, and 
then filling them with its waters, which find local outlets in the cienegas . 
and apparently a more general one in the plain occupied by the great 
Chino Ranch, finally joining the Santa Ana River below South Riverside. 
On the latter, copious natural springs and a large area of moist lands, on 
which drainage rather than irrigation is called for, and in which ditches 



44 



REPOETS OF EXPERIMENTS OF 



find the same general and abundant seepage referred to in connection witli 
the *' Victoria" water tract, create a surprise to those who have heard bo 
much of the "dry southern country." The natural remark called forig 
that if oiily all this water could be suitably distributed over the higher 
lands, there need not be an acre of unirrigated land in that fair valley. 

As Pomona is situated on the divide between the waters of the Santa 
Ana and San Gabriel Rivers, the precise derivation of this abundant 
moisture is somewhat uncertain, and is a question of no mean practical 
importance. The geological nature of the western border of the valley 
proves that no large accession to the waters of the region can come from 
that direction; and the head of Chino Creek, like that of Warm Creek, lies 
in a nearly level country and seems to have no particular beginning. A 
systematic investigation of the structure of this region would probably leai 
to important results, in respect to additional sources of water supply avail- 
able for the irrigation of the higher lands. 

THE LAKES OF THE SAN JOAQUIN VALLEY. 

The rapid contraction by evaporation of the three lakes of the upper 
San Joaquin Valley, the consequent concentration of their waters into 
alkaline lyes too strong for animal life, and the nature of the soils laid bare 
on their margins, have formed the subjects of investigation and discussion 
in former reports of this department, especially in connection with the 
reclamation and cultivation of alkali soils. (See reports for 1879, pp.91 
to 39; 1880,pp.l2to33; 1882, pp. 56 to 60; 1884,pp. 61to69; 1886, revisej 
reprint from report of 1880: ^* Alkali Lands, Irrigation and Drainage ii 
their Mutual Relations," 45 pp.) It is a matter of regret that it has nol 
been possible to pursue the subject by personal visits as systematically as 
its practical importance and theoretical interest might have warranted; for 
we are here in presence of a group of phenomena that have been repeated 
many times in past geological epochs, and for the study of which, in theii 
physical, chemical and biological aspects, opportunity is not often afforded 
Hence, while the information and data here given are of necessity incom- 
plete and fragmentary, they are of interest as affording an insight into 
processes regarding which but little is thus far on record; and their com- 
munication may perhaps serve to incite others having the opportunity to do 
so, to a closer study of the progressive changes. . 

For a better understanding of the situation in the Kern and Tulaie 
basins, the following statements from former reports are reprinted: 

A personal examination of Kern Lake, and of the region lying between it and Bueu* 
Vista Lake, as well as of the Mussel Slough country, made under the auspices of tfc 
United States census, in March, 1880, satisfied me that in none of these rich agricultUTai 
sections could the slightest increase of alkali be safely risked ; and analyses subsequentll 
made of the waters of both Kern and Tulare Lakes prove that a very few years' use of tin 
water then filling either of these reservoirs would be promptly fatal to the productiveness 
of the lands irrigated. As regards Kern Lake, this was obvious enough from a casujl 
examination and tasting of the water. Having been shut off from the natural influx (^ 
Kern River for a number of years, it has been rapidly evaporating and receding fromiti 
former shores, so that at the time of my visit a difference in level of over four feet had 
been produced in fifteen months, leaving high and dry a boat wharf built at that distant* 
of time. About eighteen months before all the fish and turtles in the lake had suddenly 
died, creating a pestilential atmosphere by their decay; and even the mussels were no« 
mostly dead, a few maintaining a feeble existence, A strong alkaline taste and soapy feel' 
ing of the water fully justified their choice of evils* The tule marsh, laid dry by the receS' 
• sion of the lake, was thickly crusted with alkali, and the tules were dead, except whef 
still moistened by the water of the lake, showing that the latter was not yet too strong fflf 
such hardy vegetable growth, albeit fatal to animal life. 

Buena Vista Lake was stated to be in a similar condition, but not yet quite so fJf 
advanced in evaporation, and still maintaining some animal life in its waters, having lo^ 
its connection with the riyer more recently. Tulare Lake is well known to be full of fish 



WATERS AND WATER SUPPLY. 



45 



and as it annually receives the overflow of Kern and the regular inflow of Kings River, 
its evaporation and recession has been much slower; yet its water's edge is now distant 
several miles from the former shore line, and as the water of the rivers is more and more 
absorbed by irrigation, it will doubtless continue to recede until a point is reached at 
which the regular seepage from the irrigated lands will balance the evaporation. This 
epoch would seem, however, to be quite in the future as yet, for the rate of recession has, 
apparently, not sensibly changed in the last few years. It is not likely in any case that 
the water of the lake will be more abundant or less' imi>regnated with mmeral matter than 
is now the case, at the time when the state of equilibrium shall have been reached. 

With the lights now before us, it can hardly be regretted that the old Westside ditch, 
which was to irrigate the lower country with the corrosive waters of Tulare Lake, was not 
successful. The lake level is now several feet below the bottom of that outlet, and the 
lake keeps receding annually, and its alkali becomes stronger as the mass of the water 
decreases. It is difficult to say where it will stop; hut if, as is probable, a state of 
equilibrium is reached whenever the waters of Kern and Kings Rivers shall have fully 
filled the parched depths of the plains by a more general system of irrigation, it is not at 
all probable that the lake water will thereby become fresher; on the contrary, such seep- 
age water will be likely to bring into it the alkali now dried up in the lower strata, and the 
annual evaporation will concentrate the solution more and more. It would certainly be 
most desiraole to utilize the lake as a great reservoir for irrigation supply ; but to render 
this practicable, it would be necessary to first empty out or displace the mass of alkaline 
water at present occupying the basin. The discussion of the feasibility of such an under- 
taking, however, belongs to the province of the engineer corps. 

The analyses referred to above gave the following results (in grains per gallon) : 



Pate of taking sample 

Total solid contents 

Soluble after evaporation 

Potassium sulphate 

Sodium chloride (common salt).. 
Sodium sulphate (Glauber's salt). 

Sodium carbonate (sal soda) 

Itisoluhle after evaporation .._ 

Calcium carbonate 

Magnesium carbonate - 

Silica , 



Organic matter and water . 



Kern Lake. 



March, 1880 
211.50 

182.75 

115.41 
64.37 



22.43 



Tulare Lake. 



January, 1880 
* 81.80 
71.16 
3.24 
22.77 
17.23 
27.92 
8.36 
2.97 
4.95 
.44 
2.28 



{ 



To convey to those unaccustomed to the consideration of such matters an idea of the 
meaning of the above figures, it may be stated that the solid contents of river waters vary 
usually from five to twdve grains per gallon. The water of Tulare Lake, where it is undi- 
luted by the inflow of Kings River, is therefore about ten times, and that of Kern Lake 
about twenty-six times, stronger than an average river water. Even this, however, con- 
veys but an inadequate idea of the relation sustained by these waters to organic life. The 
average sea water (containing mainly common salt) is about ten times stronger than tlie 
water of Kern Lake as regards its solid contents ; yet in sea water fresh water fish live 
freely during part of the season, while in Kern Lake the fish died at a time when, accord- 
ing to a minimum estimate, the water must have had about twice the strength of Tulare 
Lake, or about one thirteenth of the strength of sea water. This shows strikingly the 
deadlinessof the Kern Lake alkali as compared with sea salt, or, in other words, of Kern 
Lake water as compared with tide water. 

Condition of the Lake Water in June^ 1888, 

Early in June, 1888, at my request, Mr. B. P. Moore, Patron of the 
Experimental Station near Tulare City, sent a messenger to obtain a 
sample of the lake water in order to ascertain the progress of evaporation. 
The sample was taken two and one half miles out in the lake, eight 
miles east of the mouth of Kings River, not far from the Cross Creek 
fisheries. 

The water had a general greenish turbidity and considerable greenish 
sediment at the bottoni of the bottles. This sediment showed under the 
microscope an abundance of green cellular plants, mingled with adherent 
fine silty matter, partly silicious, partly calcareous. 



46 



REPORTS OF EXPERIMENTS OP 



A partial analysis of this water by Assistant Geo. E. Colby, resulted a 
follows: 



Total solid contents , 

Soluble after evaporation 

Sodium carbonate (sal soda) 
Insoluble part - 

Organic matter and water.— 




The qualitative analysis of the soluble and insoluble parts showed the 
same ingredients as found in the previous examination. 

It will be seen from a comparison of this analysis with those made in 
1880, that the solid contents of the lake water had increased very nearlj 
two and one half times in the eight years, and that its concentration approx. 
imated closely to that of Kern Lake in 1880. Yet it appears that an 
abundance of fish survived, at least of certain kinds, although, as will k 
seen below, the mussels had already succumbed. 

* The Condition of Tulare Lake in Winter of 1888-9, 

Having been informed in November, 1888, that " the fish in Tulare Lab 
were dying by shoals," I concluded that the water of that basin had, bj 
evaporation, at length reached the limit of endurance of its inhabitants, 
who had probably found themselves unfit to survive the altered surrouni!' 
ings. Desiring to verify the facts, I, in January, 1889, made arrangement 
to visit the lake in company with Mr. J. G. Woodbury, of the State 
Commission; but being delayed by imperative duties, I requested Mr. 
Woodbury to proceed alone, and while making his observations on tli! 
economic side of the question, to collect a sample of water and such otto 
data as might present themselves. He accordingly visited the northeasir 
em part of the lake, near the mouth of Cross Creek, during the first weel 
in February, and on his return communicated to me the following interest 
ing account, which is here reproduced by his consent: 

On the train I met several gentlemen who live along the railroad, opposite the late 
and was told by them that Tulare City was the best place to start from for a visit to tin 
fishing grounds. I engaged team and driver to take me to the fishery near Cross Creel^ 
a distance of about twenty-five miles, according to the driver's statement, and not less 
than twenty by my own estimate. At this point the lake receded last year about half J 
mile, and in consequence the fishermen were compelled to move their position abouti 
mile farther into the lake. Their pound for the fish is half a mile from the shore, an^ 
their seine is pulled two and one half miles farther out into the lake. It is afterwari 
pulled in by a horse and windlass located about two hundred yards from the shore, 0D> 
platform where the horse is also stabled. 

They catch about one hundred and twenty-five pounds at a haul at this fishery; tht 
fish come in on the seining grounds in warm weather rather than when it is cold; andiH 
the same ground is continually seined over, it seems that the fish must travel considef 
ably to keep it constantly stocked. 

I inquired about the reported dying of the fish» The fishermen said that it occunei 
last summer and autumn, and that it was mostly catfish," greasers," and some of the 80" 
called trout, also some carp, but very few perch. Now, it is the perch that is so mud 
valued hy the fi'shermen ; in fact, the perch is what they fish for, as the catfish do notsdl 
so well, and the greasers are of no account. The "trout," of which 1 did not see any, th?f 
say are very soft and do not keep well, also are very insipid. 

The perch is certainly a very fine fish, large, bright, and clean-looking; they are velf 
good eating, as I had occasion to verify. These perch have enormous mouths, and ft 
that of every one in the pound can be seen a " shiner" (or " slick," as they call the Mi 
with fee tail sticking OTit of the great mouth, being drawn farther in as the process ^ 
digestion proceeds. One perch which I took along to have cooked, I took by the gills, as» 
looking down his big mouth, I saw the tail of a fish, which I readily got hold of with b^I 
fingers and pulled out. It was six inches long and only its head partly digested, W 



WATERS AND WATER SUPPLY. 



47 



flshennen say that all these perch when caught have fish in their mouths, in proof of 
which he pulled out one at random with a dip net, and showed the perch with a shiner^s 
tail still out of the mouth. 

The fishermen state that no catfish are now caught, while two and three years ago they 
would get a wagon load at each haul; also, that trout are now seldom caught, although 
they used to be very abundant. The men expressed no opinion as to the cause of the 
death of the fish, but stated that the catfish especially were drifted upon the shore, dead, 
by thousands. 

Catfish, however, are found by millions at present in the creeks and sloughs that run 
into the lake. A gentleman who lives on his farm fully ten miles from the lake, and who 
fishes in a small way for his own table, is of the opinion that the destruction of the catfish 
and carp is caused by their being driven on the shallows by the wind, and left in shallow 

Eools which, when the water recedes, soon become so hot that the fish die. I questioned 
im very particularly about this; and as he is very intelligent, and his father was a fish- 
erman whom he frequently assisted in his work, his views are entitled to weight. He has 
a boat and sailed around the lake last summer, and states that the deepest part of the 
lake, in the channel which runs from south to north in the direction of the old outlet into 
the San Joaquin Hiver, does not exceed twenty feet ; that outside of that channel it is gen- 
erally not over four feet, gradually shallowing toward the shore. Notwithstanding this 
shallowness, the action of the wind should mingle the different portions pretty thoroughly 
and render the alkali about even throughout. 

Before starting on this trip he was told that he would have a good wind throughout his 
iourney, as the wind blew from the center of the lake toward the shore. He states that 
ne found it to be true ; that he had the wind " abeam " all the way. 

The two bottles of water I sent you were taken at various distances, from the shore out 
to the fish-pound. Although the fishery is located off the mouth of Cross Creek, as there 
is no water in that creek for several miles out from the lake the water of that portion 
could not have been perceptibly freshened by its influx at this season, although some 
seepage doubtless occurs. The water of the lake is very muddy, and has a nasty taste and 
smell; very much like that of a well about a mile from shore and one hundred feet deep, 
which was, however, drank by the people at the farmhouse, as well as by their stock, and 
left them all healthy. One of the horses of my team, however, was relaxed in the bowels 
all the way to Tulare, and the same happened to the driver and to myself. 

All the shore of the lake for miles, as far as I could see, was strewn with mussel or clam 
shells; the surface of the ground was white with them, and the wheels of the carriage 
crashed through them as though more than half the substance of the ground was actually 
made up of shells, as I have uo doubt is really the case. They told me that these shells 
extend here, as thickly as on top, down to the depth of a hundred feet, as shown in the 
well referred to above. Not a live clam can be found in the lake now. 

I have subsequently been informed that ten years ago there were large numbers of live 
mussels in Tulare Lake, and that the hogs used to live on them then ; that they would wade 
out into the lake and plunge their heads under water, get hold of a mussel and hold their 
noses up in the air and chew them up. 

All the (seven or eight) fisheries are located within four miles of Cross Creek mouth ; 
no fishing is now or appears to have been done near the mouth of Kings River, ten miles 
to northward, for the reason (according to the fishermen) that the water is too shallow. 

For the whole distance of twenty miles from Tulare City the country is of remarkable 
fertility, almost level, and where put into wheat the growth was strong, even to within 
two miles of the shore of the lake, where the land had been plowed through solid tule roots. 
The growth was very compact, strong, and of a beautiful green color, and had stooled out 
abundantly; which, to my mind, showed that the rawness of the soil or the quantity of 
alkali had but little effect upon the growth. For long distances among the tules, alfileria 
covered the ground, I hadfno idea of the value and extent of the arable land of Tulare 
County until I rode over the immense extent of that plain to the lake. 1 think the time 
will come when Tulare will be one of the very best of the agricultural counties of the State. 

Speaking of the future of the lake — ^it must have been a good deal lower than it is now, 
for near the mouth of Cross Creek there are many stumps which were under water only 
last year, afid among which the fishermen used to get their nets entangled ; these stumps 
are now just at the water's edge. Of course they could not have grown under water. 
Again, in a little surface well near the landing place at the fishery, there is at the depth of 
about eighteen inches, all around, a ring of blackish organic matter or mold, quite distinct 
from the yellowish clayey earth both above and below it. It looked as it it might be 
decomposed tule?, and if so, the water must have been off the ground long enough to 
allow these tules to be decomposed and made into soil. There are now under this water 
about two hundred thousand acres of land of what might be made the best quality, and 
this land under alfalfa would be worth many times what it is now under water, for fishes. 
Why would it not be a good idea to drain this lake down four feet lower, to the banks of 
that channel, into the San Joaquin River, through a canal that would at the same time 
serve as a waterway up to that old channel in the lake, through which boats could ffo 
with freight-? I think that by this scheme in a short time all the surplus alkali would be 
drained into the ocean from the lake and the surrounding country, for as the fresh water 
from the mountains is spread over the land it must sink down and gradually push the 
more alkaline waters down the canal. So the land would in time be freed from alkali and 
the canal would be kept full by underdrainage, which the lake now receives and evapo- 
rates. 



48 



REPORTS OF EXPERIMENTS OF 



Present Composition of Tulare Lake Water. — The sample of water sentb) 
Mr, Woodbury was quite turbid, partly from fine mud, partly from % 
presence of greenish micro-organisms. Its taste was flattish saline, ani 
quite nauseous to the stomach. Exposed to the light, it soon became fiUej 
with rapidly increasing green gelatinous films and cocci, the exact nature 
of which was not investigated. 

Upon filtration, which progressed very slowly, and did not clear the watet 
completely (as is usual with waters impregnated with alkaline carbonates), 
considerable organic matter still remained in solution, and had tok 
removed by ignition before proceeding with the analysis. In presence of 
an excess of carbonate of soda, this ignition could not interfere with the 
accuracy of the determinations of acidic ingredients. 

The result was as follows: 

Analysis of Lake Tulare Water* 
Specific gravity, 1.0050 at 62.5 degrees. 



Total solids 

So luble after evaporation 

Sodium chloride (common salt).. 
Sodium sulphate (Glauber's salt) 

Sodium carbonate (sal soda) 

Potassium sulphate _ 

Insoluble after evaporation 

Calcium sulphate (gypaum) 

Calcium carbonate 

Magnesium carbonate 

Silica -- 

Organic matter and water ,. 



Grains per 


Parts itt 


Gallon. 


10,000. 


303.07 


51^ 


297,97 


S 


95.79 


73.76 


m 


94.74 


m 


15.68 


2.«J 


6.97 


U 


1.47 


.% 


1.07 


M 


2.55 


M 


1.87 


1 


16.12 


2.78 



Comparison of the Water at Different Periods, 

The following table summarizes the composition of the Tulare lake watei 
at the three different periods (in grains per gallon) : 



Bate of taking sample 

Total solid contents 

Soluble after evaporation 

Sodium chloride (common salt) .. 
Sodium sulphate (Grlauber's salt). 

Sodium carbonate (sal soda) 

Potassium sulphate 

Insoluble after evaporation 

Calcium sulphate (gypsum) _ 

Calcium carbonate..., 

Magnesium carbonate 

Silica - 

Organic matter and water 



1880. 



January. 
81.80 
71.16 
22.11 
17.23 
27.92 
3.24 



2.97 

4.95 

.44 

2.28 



1888. 



June, 

204.7 
186.9 



74.3 



14.1 



Februarf. 

303.M 

mi 

95.1! 

73.16 

m 
m 

6.11 

i.(» 

2.S) 
1^ 

lau 



The figures in the above table hardly require comment unless it ig iD 
draw attention to the extremely rapid increase of the solid contents of tb" 
water between June, 1888, and February, 1889, as compared with the eSd 
produced during the previous seven and a half years. The latter waH 



*Analysis by Mr. E. M. Hilgard, special student in the Agricultural Laboratory. 



WATERS AND WATER SUPPLY, 



49 



about two and a half times, or 150 per cent on the whole, or an average of 
13 per cent a year; while in the eight months preceding the last examina- 
tion, the increase was nearly 45 per cent. It should be noted that these 
eight months were remarkable for very great evaporation elsewhere on the 
coast, also; and that they formed the end of three years of rather deficient 
rainfall in the State. The more abundant moisture of the season just 
passed may have stopped, or perhaps even reversed the process — a point 
which will receive attention within a short time. It will then be possible 
to predict with some degree of approximation how nearly the condition of 
natural equilibrium between the evaporation from the lake surface and the 
seepage from the streams and irrigated plains referred to above, is being 
approached, and to forecast the future of the lake and of its inhabitants if 
left to themselves. 

Whether or not it will be expedient to interfere with the natural course 
of events, either for the establishment of a great irrigation reservoir, or (as 
suggested by Mr. Woodbury) for the reduction of the lake to a mere water- 
way in order to reclaim the lands now covered by it, is a question too com- 
plex to be discussed here. The answer will in a measure be determined 
by the decision of another question, viz.: Whether the increased saline 
strength of the lake water is due wholly to evaporation, or in part to con- 
centrated solutions of alkali extracted from underlying beds by the inward 
seepage. If a consideration of the area and depth lost by the lake within 
the last year shall show that there has been a distinct accession of alkali 
salts from the outside, the use of the drained lake-bed as an irrigation 
reservoir will be of very doubtful practicability, as it would imply an annual 
addition of such salts to those already contained in the natural soils irri- 
gated therewith. 

The importance of the latter consideration is made apparent from the 
results of an examination of a soil from the immediate border of Tulare 
Lake, near its then (1879) southeast corner, made in 1879 and given in 
the report for 1879, p. 27. 

No. 77 — "Drt/ hog soil ^^^ from Tulare Lake; sent by Mr. E. R. Thomason, 
August 12, 1878. 

The specimen was taken from the reclaimed " swamp and overflowed " 
land, on the east side of Tulare Lake; is inclosed by a levee, and lies 
below the high-water mark of the lake ; eighteen months before it was all 
under water, but at the time of taking the sample the water was half a 
mile from the levee. The first vegetation that started after it was laid dry 
was **wild parsley," followed later by wire grass, salt grass, and tule. 
The surface at the present time shows no salt and but little indication of 
alkali. Grain, however, *^ burns up " when hot weather comes, even though 
the ground be moist. Garden vegetables look well until blooming time, 
and then die. 

When sampling the soil at the time stated, it was found to be baked 
quite hard for the first six inches; from that line down to twenty inches, 
to which depth it was taken, it was '^ boggy and soft," The soil as received 
is a somewhat bluish-gray clayey sediment, containing a good deal of 
small gravel and shells intermixed. Its reaction is alkaline, though not 
sharply so. 

Mechanical Analysis. 

Gravel and shells above 0.6 mm. in diameter 4.1 per cent. 

Pine earth > 95.9 per cent. 

4' 



50 



REPORTS OF EXAMINATIONS OF 



Mechanical Analysis of Fine Earth. 



Clay 29.793 per cent 

Sediment of <0.25mm 13.840 per cent 

Sediment of 0.26 mm _ 1.567 per cent 

Sediment of 0.5 mm 1 2.195 per cent 

Sediment of 1.0mm 8.183 per cent. 

Sediment of 2.0 mm 8.622 per cent 

Sediment of 4.0 mm 9.722 per cent 

Sediment of 8.0 mm -. 6.641 per cent 

Sediment of 16.0 mm 2.115 per cent 

Sediment of 32.0mm 2.407 per cent 

Sediment of 64,0mm -. 1.275 percent 

*86.360 per cent 

According to this analysis this is a clay soil, which, however, should 
till well, in consequence of the uniform distribution of the sediments. It 
seems, however, to acquire tilth with some difficulty at present. 

Chemical Analysis. 

Insoluble residue _ 67.34 per cent 

Potash - 1.05 percent 

Soda 84percQ]t 

Lime _ .'.- ^ 6.51 percent 

Magnesia _ __ > _- 3.96 per cent 

Br. ox. manganese -- - 04 percent 

Ferric oxide - 5.05 percent 

Alumina - 7.97 percent 

Phosphoric acid 32 percem 

Sulphuric acid 08 percent 

Organic matter and water 3.71 percent 

Carbonic acid _ _ 4,42 per cent 

101.29 per cent 

Humus - - -.. .468 

Available inorganic - >.-_ _ -. 2.184 



This shows the general composition of the soil to be excellent, so far as 
the important ingredients of plant food are concerned. The amounts i 
potash and phosphoric acid are equal to those in the most productive soils 
of the Mississippi bottom, and the large percentage of lime should insure 
its thriftiness and kindly tillage. But it is evident from its alkaline reae 
tion, and the large percentage of soda shown, that it contains enough ol 
the true " alkali " to interfere seriously with tillage as well as with the wel- 
fare of vegetation. At the same time the solution formed by hydrochloric 
acid showed the want of aeration in giving an indication of iron protoxide 
These inferences are, moreover, corroborated by the observation made by 
Mr, Thomason, that wheat made some fine ears on the upper portion of J 
part of the levee where, of course, the rain had washed out the soda anl 
the air had had ample access. On the basis of these facts the followinj 
advice as to the treatment of the land was given to Mr. Thomason: 

First of all give the soil a dressing of at least six hundred pounds of plaster per aci« 
You will then find that it will till better, and that weeds will giow on it different fro!" 
those it now bears. 

The soil evidently has not had sufficient time and tillage to get thoroughly aired afteriU 
reclamation from the waters of the lake. It evidentlj^ needs greatly a summer's fallout 
and that to the greatest depth that a big plow and a strong four-horse team can go. 

If I understand correctly that it was ^'^hoggy^'' at a depth a little below six inches,'itij 
too full of water yet to allow of the healthy life of crop roots. This implies drainage o' 
some kind, and protection against the backwater of the lake. 



*NoTE.— The low summation of this analysis is due to the dissolution of lime, and son' 
alkaline salts, in the large quantity of water employed, the clay at first failing altoget¥ 
to diffuse until these salts had been washed out. The loss bears mainly, of course, iip<'' 
the fine sediments. 



WATERS AND WATER SUPPLY* 



51 



It would seem from the account given of the condition of crops near 
the lake, in the communication of Mr. Woodbury, that the difficulties 
experienced in the case of the soil of Mr, Thomason's land do not exist 
everywhere on the present and ancient lake border. Such differences 
doubtless arise from location near to of away from the mouths of streams, 
as against that in bays or inlets, or along the general shore line. But 
while these various soils may differ in respect to their mechanical com- 
position, there can be little question of their eminent intrinsic fertility 
when reclaimed from the water and cultivated with due regard to the 
avoidance of the " rise of the alkali " which not only exists within the 
sediments themselves, but also (as has been often observed) at some points 
exists in solid form deposited at some distance beneath the surface. It 
will therefore require special precautions to cultivate these lands success- 
fully, but their immense stock of native fertility will amply repay consid- 
erable care in their management, which can undoubtedly prevent injury 
jfrom, or perhaps even permanently cure, the surplus of alkali. It should 
not be overlooked that the latter contains among its ingredients so large 
a proportion of potash salts, that the cultivator will probably be relieved 
of the need of replacing this portion of the drain caused by cropping, for 
an indefinite length of time. 

INVESTIGATIONS ON THE PROXIMATE COMPOSITION OF THE SALINE CONTENTS 



J) 



OF WATERS, AND OF NATURAL 'ALKALI.' 

While the analysis of the mineral portions of natural waters must, when 
properly carried out, yield identical results in the hands of different chemists 
so far as the ultimate ingredients are concerned, the exact manner of their 
grouping, or, in other words, the compounds formed by them in presence 
of each other, often admits of discussion, and in some cases presents ques- 
tions of extreme difficulty, requiring the best resources of chemistry and 
physics for their solution. As in many cases, moreover, the exact nature 
of the compounds present is of directly practical importance in determin- 
ing the uses to which waters or alkali soils may or may not be put, I have 
thought it necessary to investigate more exactly some points which fre- 
quently present themselves in the examination of such questions, in this 
State and elsewhere. These investigations are as yet far from being com- 
pleted, but have already yielded results of sufficient interest to have formed 
the subject of a communication to the American Society for the Promotion 
of Agricultural Science, at its meeting held at Cleveland, Ohio, in August, 
1888. This communication was published in the proceedings of that meet- 
ing; but^the limited circulation of that publication renders it desirable to 
reproduce it here, although, on account of its somewhat abstrusely techni- 
cal nature, it may be, in large part, intelligible only to professional chem- 
ists. Its very direct bearing upon the important subject of the formation 
and repression of " black alkali " commends it to the forbearance of unpro- 
fessional readers: 

On the Mutual Reactions of Carbonated., Sulphates.^ and Chlorides of the 
Alkaline Earths and Alkalies. 

By E. W. HiLGARD and A. H. Weber. 

[In the course of a long series of water analyses naade in connection with 
Geological Surveys and Experiment Station work, I have been struck witli 
the almost invariable occurrence of sulphates (usually, gypsum) in the 
"insoluble residue " obtained by the evaporation of the waters and leaching- 



52 



REPORTS OF EXAMINATIONS OF 



out of the soluble salts. That this should occur in the case of acid an 
neutral saline waters, almost always containing gypsum in more or leas 
considerable amounts, is natural enough; for even when gypsum is not 
contained as such in the natural water, it is predicable that it might form 
in the process of evaporation under various conditions, by double decom* 
position. 

Upon the suppositions ordinarily held, the filtrate from such a residue 
should have a neutral reaction; the existence of alkali carbonate beinj 
supposed to be inconsistent with that of an earthy sulphate or chloride. 
Only, the alkaline reaction ensuing in the course of time as the result o{ 
the slight solubility of calcic and magnesic' carbonates, must not be con^ 
founded with that which appears instantly, or after a very short lapse of 
time, when an alkali carbonate is present even in minute quantities. 

A common source of error in this connection is the strongly alkaline 
reaction consequent upon an excessive ignition of the evaporation residue, 
whereby the earthy carbonates may have been rendered caustic. In ordei 
to avoid errors from this source, the residue must always after ignition be 
recarbonated by means of carbonic acid gas; recarbonation by means of 
ammonic carbonate being of course inadmissible in the presence of sul- 
phates. 

But after the observance of all these precautions, there still remains a 
large number of cases in which the leached residue contains gypsum, and 
yet the filtrate is unmistakably alkaline from the presence of sodic or 
potassic carbonate. This alkalinity is sometimes exceedingly strong in the 
unignited residue; it is greatly diminished after ignition, but yet in mauy 
cases remains very obvious despite the visible presence of gypsum crystals 
in the solid residue. 

These apparent discrepancies having become especially notable in con- 
nection with the analyses of the natural '' alkali salts " in the soils of tk 
Pacific slope, it became necessary to investigate the conditions governing 
them in a definite manner. The more as the use of gypsum recommended 
by me as an antidote to alkaline carbonates in the soil seemed to be in 
danger of becoming of doubtful value, though in many cases proved to be 
of excellent effect in practice. 

The investigation of this somewhat complex subject, involving the 
mutual reactions particularly of alkaline sulphates and chlorides wiih the 
carbonates of calcium and magnesium under different conditions of con- 
centration, temperature, pressure, and relative proportion, in the presence 
of carbonic acid, has been zealously begun by Mr. A. H. Weber, Assist- 
ant in the Agricultural Laboratory of the University of California; anJ 
the results and discussion of some of the preliminary experimjents aw 
here communicated. — E. W. H.] 

Concerning the mutual reaction of alkaline carbonates and salts of lime, 
Rose states pointedly (Pogg. Annalen, vol. 95, p. 289), that the earth salt 
is precipitated completely as carbonate; and saving the consideration of 
the solubility of calcic carbonate in water, he recommends this reaction 
for the quantitative determination of the earth, without special limitation 
as to dilution. 

Yet in 1826 already, Brandes (Schweigger's Journal, vol. 43, p. 156, as 
quoted in Storer's Dictionary of Solubilities) had called attention to tbJ 
fact that calcic carbonate is not precipitated from solutions containiuj 
only one part in six thousand to seven thousand of water. This ef / 
appears to have been ascribed by him, as well as by Storer and others, iP 
this and other cases, to the "solvent effect" of the soluble salts upon th« 



WATERS AND WATER SUPPLY, 



53 



calcic carbonate. The nature of this supposed solvent effect is not dis- 
cussed; but it appears that the data thus obtained for the solubility of 
calcic carbonate differ widely from those obtained by direct experiment. 

These data refer to the " neutral '' or mono-carbonates of soda and potash.* 
But however abundant in the solid state, these mono-carbonates can hardly 
be assumed to occur by themselves in any natural waters, and least of all 
in the soil solutions. The air of the soil being always largely charged 
with carbonic gas, the formation of more highly carbonated alkali salts 
must be the rule instead of the exception, whenever the conditions for the 
formation of such carbonates exist. 

The unstable bi-carbonates will exist only under exceptional conditions 
of excess of carbonic acid, as in the case of carbonated waters. Else- 
where we must, as a rule, expect to find mixtures of the alkali mono- and 
eesqui-carbonates in varying proportions, according to conditions of tem- 
perature, supply of carbonic acid gas, and other conditions presently to be 
considered. It is well known that while the sodic bi-carbonate, for example, 
readily loses a portion of its carbonic acid on exposure to even a moder- 
ately high temperature, the complete expulsion of the carbonic acid in 
excess of that corresponding to the mono-carbonate, or what is equivalent, 
the decomposition of the sesqui-carbonate into the mono-carbonate and free 
carbonic acid, is accomplished only at a low red heat in the dry way, and 
cannot be brought about by the boiling of the solution. 

Hence, the residues from the evaporation of natural alkaline waters will, 
as a rule, contain a certain variable proportion of sesqui-carbonate when- 
ever in that evaporation the deposition oi the earthy carbonates gives proof 
that excess of free carbonic acid has been present. We are thus obliged, 
in seeking an explanation of the apparently abnormal occurrence of gyp- 
sum in such residues, to consider, not so much the behavior of the earth 
salts toward the mono-carbonate, but rather towards the more highly car- 
bonated (hi- and sesqui-) compounds, and often in presence of free carbonic 
acid besides. 

How greatly these conditions may serve to change the reactions to be 
looked for, appears from a simple experiment originally indicated by Alex- 
ander Miiller (Kgl. Vetensk. Akad Forhandl., Stockholm, Nov., 1859; Jour, 
pr. Chem., vol. 82, p. 53), who, however, did not pursue the subject into its 
ulterior consequences. When a dilute neutral solution of sodic sulphate 
is brought in contact with calcic carbonate in the powdery form (precipi- 
tated, or powdered marble) no reaction ensues. But when carbonic gas is 
now passed into the mixture, the neutral reaction of the solution soon 
changes to a decidedly alkaline one, and gypsum passes into the precipitate. 

The following is the record of experiments made by us in the premises: 

Five grams precipitated calcic carbonate was introduced into solutions 
of chlorides and sulphates of sodium and potassium having a perfectly 
neutral reaction and varying in strength from one to ten grams per liter. 
Carbonic gas was then passed into the solutions at the ordinary temperature, 
during a time varying from ten minutes to two hours. In all cases a decid- 
edly alkaline reaction ensued, covered at first by the presence of free car- 
bonic acid; becoming perceptible even after a ten-minute treatment, but 
increasing decidedly with time. Upon the addition of alcohol to the extent 
of 50 to 60 per cent, a white gelatinous precipitate of gypsum and calcic 

*For the sake of simplifying discussion, the compounds here discussed are named and 
treated^ as though consisting, according to the older views, of basic oxides, and acids. 
Whatever view may be held of their ultimate molecular structure, this point of view is 
almost necessarily maintained in analytical and agricultural chemistry, to avoid endless 
and pedantic circumlocution. 



54 



REPOKTS OF EXAMINATIONS OF 



carbonate formed, becoming crystalline so as to be easily recognized abj 
filtered, after a lapse of twelve hours. 

This fundamental experiment, which well deserves a place on the lectuij 
table, is interesting from many points of view. The production of an alk 
line reaction by the addition of an acid is odd enough to our sense of chemi. 
cal propriety. It becomes still more striking when, in lieu of evolving % 
carbonic gas outside of the solution, it is set free from the calcic carbonafc 
present in the mixture, by the gradual and cautious addition of chlorhy. 
dric acid, taking care to leave a sufficient excess of the earth salt undi- 
solved. Again we obtain a strongly alkaline reaction, as the result of fc 
addition of one of our strongest acids to a neutral mixture. 

But its function as a piece of chemical legerdemain is a small part ol 
the merit of this experiment. When it is considered that the two sodium 
salts — ^the chloride and sulphate — -are the most common and abundanl 
ingredients produced by the leaching of rocks and soils in the process ol 
weathering, while calcic and magnesic carbonates, with free carbonic acid, 
are almost omnipresent, the possible importance of the reactions between 
these compounds under varying conditions of temperature, pressure, dili^ 
tion and relative proportion, is readily appreciated. It is not a little sing^ 
lar that among the many who have investigated the subject of chemical 
geology, mineral waters, the formation of mineral veins and the chemistrj 
of soils, this remarkable reaction seems to have remained almost unnoticei 
Even in the late and excellent work of Storer, we find that the reactioi 
whereby (as is alleged) ^' a little caustic (sic) soda is formed in compos! 
heaps containing a mixture of salt and lime," is supposed to be dependent 
upon the porous nature of the materials admixed, rendering a dialytic dl 
fusion and local separation of the soda from calcic chloride possible; eioct 
"' if lime and salt were to be mixed in a bucket of water, the reaction woqII 
not occur." Further on (Agriculture, vol. 2, p. 169), the author goes 
to say that, ^'itis seen in alkali deserts that the reaction between salt an 
limestone (sic) does really occur in nature." This is the strongest state 
ment in the premises that we have been able to find in the literature beai 
ingon the subject. But Storer evidently assumes that either caustic lime 
calcic carbonate may act in the manner specified, and overlooks the indi 
pensable cooperation of carbonic acid. When that is present, the reacts 
does occur in the bucket of water, and no porous bodies or dialytic diffusim 
need be called in; and in the soil, and a fortiori in the compost heap, theB 
is no lack of that agent. 

A long vista of cases in which this reaction evidently plays a part, ojjen 
up before us; and the investigation of its limitations by physical condition' 
and the presence of other substances involves the possibilities of permutt 
tions and combinations enough to form the work of several lifetimes. 

In order to gain some insight into the drift and limitations of these, 
have made a number of preliminary quantitative experiments with Bolj 
tions of varied degrees of concentration. Among these, the following, W 
with potassic sulphate, are the most instructive: 

The bulk of solution used was in all cases one liter; in this, precipi 
calcic carbonate was kept in suspension by constant agitation, while cjj 
bonic gas was being passed into it at a temperature of about 18' 
usually for forty minutes. The first effect was always a slight reddeni^ 
of the litmus, due to the carbonic acid; but generally this reaction chan^ 
to alkaline during the first ten minutes, becoming stronger as time ^ 
gressed. But comparative experiments showed that nothing was gaifl^ 
in alkalinity by a longer passage of the gas than above indicated. 

In each experiment 100 ccm. was decanted immediately after the d^ 



WATERS AND WATER SUPPLY. 



55 



ing of the magma and titrated for " total alkalinity," including the calcic 
carbonate remaining in solution. When an alkaline sulphate was em- 
ployed, the undissolved carbonate was tested for SOs^ which in all cases 
was found to be present. 

Another portion of the decanted solution was evaporated to dryness, and 
the residue weighed as a whole after drying at 110'' C, afterward leached 
and the filtrate titrated for its alkalinity. 

Another portion was mixed with alcohol so as to carry its percentage to 
about 60 per cent. This caused a gelatinous precipitate, which after twelve 
hours standing condensed into easily recognizable crystals of gypsum and 
calcic carbonate. The filtrate from this deposit was also titrated for its 
alkalinity. The subjoined table summarizes these results: 

EXPERIMENTS WITH POTASSIC SULPHATE. 



Grams per Liter. 


J. 


h 


1 


2 


Evaporation residue 110 degrees, per liter ( gram s) 


0.837 

0.35 

9.95 


1.195 
0.50 
14.10 

5.75 
100 


1.619 
0.45 

12.25 
9.70 

83.6 


2.735 


Residuary alkalinity in same (ccm. Standard H2SO4) 

Total alkalinity of decanted solution . -.. " 


0.75 
14.10 


Residuary alkalinity after precipitation with alcohol 

Corresponding KHCO3 (per cent of total possible) 


2.675 
100 


12.90 
55.6 







The table shows that up to one half gram per liter, and beyond to a point 
not yet ascertained, there is complete decomposition of the potassic sul- 
phate, resulting in the formation of gypsum and potassic hi- (hydro-) car- 
bonate. In a solution containing a gram of the sulphate per liter, only 
83.6 per cent of the total possible amount of the carbonate is formed, and 
in a solution of double that strength (two grams per liter) only 65.6 per 
cent. But up to that point, and evidently some distance beyond, the 
absolute amount of alkaline carbonate is still on the increase; its ultimate 
limit remains to be ascertained. 

The irregularity of the figures for '4otal alkalinity '^ and for the alka- 
linity of the residue dried at 110° shows that a uniform degree of satura- 
tion of the solution with calcic carbonate had not been attained, and that 
either the temperature of drying the residue was not entirely uniform, or 
that the composition of the residue influences the alkalinity. But all 
the evaporation residues were distinctly alkaline, in entire accord with the 
observations made on natural mineral waters. The alkaline salt causing 
the reaction is doubtless sesqui-carbonate. 

It is hardly necessary to mention that on heating and finally boiling the 
decanted solution saturated with carbonic gas, the alkalinity promptly 
decreases; according to what law remains to be ascertained. But even 
long boiling and evaporation with the calcic carbonate does not again bring 
about neutrality. This cannot be done by any means short of actual igni- 
tion of the mixed mass. 

Behavior of Alkali Chlorides. — In the experiments with solutions of alkali 
sulphates, the long known ^^ tendency to the formation of difficultly soluble 
compounds" in complex solutions might be called into play. But in the 
case of the chlorides, the reverse tendency should be manifested ; and yet 
substantially the same reaction occurs. In presence of carbonic acid, 
alkali carbonates are formed, and chlorides of calcium or magnesium; 
and the reaction occurs at least as promptly as in the case of sulphates. 
But our experiments in this direction have thus far been only qualitative, 



56 



REPORTS OF EXAMINATIONS OF 



1 



SO that we are not prepared to give any figures in the premises. Nor c^j, 
we as yet state whether the intensity of the reaction follows the moleculsn 
weights of the two alkalies, or is governed by other conditions. 

In view of the practical as well as theoretical interest attaching to \\ 
subject, we intend to pursue it into its various ramifications as rapidly a, 
time will permit. For the present we present only one instance in whi 
a change now going on on a large scale in nature, is at once explained i)| 
even the preliminary experiments reported above. 

The three Lakes of the Upper San Joaquin Valley — Kern, Buena Vishj 
and Tulare — were once connected, and the alkali contained in their wateij 
is manifestly of the same origin. Evaporation has for years past gradi 
concentrated their waters, for want of the natural influx (Kern River) noj 
diverted by irrigation ditches. But analysis showed that apart from con- 
centration, a change in the ratio between the soluble salts has been goinj 
on as evaporation progressed. The cause of this change was not obvioiij. 

The table below gives the results of the analyses made in 1880, and oik 
lately made of the water of Tulare Lake, which has likewise been seriouslj 
diminished by evaporation so as to more than double its solid contente, 
shows a difference has occurred corresponding to that which in 1880 existel 
between Kern and Tulare Lakes. That is, the relative proportions between 
sodic carbonate on one hand and common and Glauber's salts on the other, 
have changed, and are tending toward the same ratio that then existed in 
Kern Lake, evidently as the result of concentration. There has been 
relative diminution of the sodic carbonate; in conformity with the ruk 
shown in our experiments, above reported, that as the amount of neutral 
alkali salts is increased, a relatively smaller amount of carbonate is formei 
under the influence of CaCOs and CO2. The calcic carbonate required fii 
the reaction is abundantly present both in the waters and in the depoali 
of the lake, 

TABLE SHOWING THE INCREASE OF ALKALI CARBONATES BY CONCENTRATI05 



LOCALITT. 



1880, Talare Lake, near mouth of Kings River 

1880, Tulare Lake, middle 

1880, Tulare Lake, south end 

1888, Tulare Lake, middle-- 

*1889, Tulare Lake, north end 

1880, Kern Lake 



Total Residue. 



38.55 

81.83 

81.49 

204.00 

303.07 

211.50 



Carbonate of 
Soda. 



Common 
Glauber'sS^ 



Doubtless a host of similar examples can be found within arid region 
We hope before l(^g to communicate additional results. 



It may be necessary to remark that while the above table shows no (P 
stant ratio between concentration and the proportion of alkali carbonate i" 
solution, the discrepancies are readily accounted for by the possible pi^ 
ence of other conditions that undoubtedly influence the relations betwe'' 
the earthy and alkali carbonates; among these the prevailing temperattf' 
and the relative proportion of lime carbonate in direct contact with ^ 
water, are probably the most important factors. 

* Added to the table originally given, from the analysis reported above. 



1,1 
li 
IJ 

li 
li 

LI 



WATERS A^B WATER SUPPLY, 



57 



Where the lake is shallow, not only will the temperature be higher 
rluring th^ daytime, but the stirring up of the calcareous mud by the wind 
wSl give opportunity for action for which the smallness of the '* chemical 
mass of earthy carbonates in actual solution may not be adequate. 
Again, in the shallower parts of the lake the green vegetation of cellular 
nlaats' may materially influence the supply of free carbonic acid, that 
plays the principal part in these cross-reactions. While, therefore, it 
remains true, in a general way, that the alkali carbonates decrease with 
greater concentration, many conditions may arise to make the exact pro- 
portions vary quite materially, even within the same sheet of watery as is 
actually shown to be the case in Tulare Lake by the comparative analyses 
made of water from different portions of the lake, and samples taken at 
different depths, as given in the Report of the College of Agriculture for 
1880, p. 24. 



1 



TWENTY-FIRST ANNUAL REPORT 



Insurance Commissioner 



STATE OF CALIFORNIA. 



YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1888. 




SACRAMENTO: 
STATE OFFICE, : : : : : J. d. young, supt. state pbintimo. 

1889. 



TWENTY-FIRST ANI<^UAL REPORT 

OF THE 

INSURANCE COMMISSIONER FOR THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA. 



Insukance Depaktmejvt, \ 
San Francisco, May 31, 1889. J 

To the honorable R. W. Waterman, Governor of California: 

Sie: I herewith present the twenty-first annual departmental report, 
showing generally the condition of the insurance business in this State for 
the year ending December 31, 1888, in accordance with the requirements 
of Section 595 of the Political Code. 

During the year 1888 the following named companies were admitted to 
transact business in this State: 

Penn Mutual Life , PMladelphxa. 

Manufacturers and Builders Fire - , _ ___New York. 

Syndicate - - Minneapolis. 

Germania _ --_ New Orleans. 

Alta Fire (incorporated May 9, 1888) Stockton, California. 

Long Island Brooklyn. 

Exchange Fire -. - New York. 

American Boston. 

General Life and Fire -- - London. 

Scania Fire and Life _ -..Malmo, Sweden. 

Indemnity Mutual Marine - - London. 

Provident Savings Life - - -New York. 

And the following named companies have discontinued doing business 
in this State: 

London and Provincial Fire - London. 

Insurance Company of Dakota - Sioux Falls. 

Merchants .- New York. 

Howard -." New York. 

Eliot -- -- - Boston. 

Prescott - - -.Boston. 

Fire Insurance Association _ .-- London. 

Chinese - Hong Kong. 

The average percentage of losses to premiums on fire risks for 1888 is 
50.1. 

The average percentage of losses to premiums on marine risks for 1888 
is 54.5. 

The ratios of losses to premiums on fire risks for the thirteen years next 
preceding, were: 

For the year 1875 _ 28.3 

For the year 1876 i 34.2 

For the year 1877 _ 31.0 

For the year 1878' 263 

For the year 1879 ' 32 5 

For the year 1880 . " 32*5 



4 REPORT OF THE INSURANCE COMMISSIONER. 

For the year 1881 - 3S.5 

For the j^ear 1882 ^ 39.9 

For the year 1883 - - 39.1 

For the year 1884 28.5 

For the year 1885 44^ 

For the year 1886 - 61.2 

For the year 1887 ZU 

Having ascertained to my satisfaction that the Insurance Company ot 
Dakota was insolvent within the true intent and meaning of Section 6O0 
of the >Political Code, I, on the seventh day of September last, revoked ija 
authority to transact business in this State, by notice to the company, and 
advertisement, as required by said section. 

The Alta Fire Company of Stockton was the only insurance company 
incorporated under the laws of this State during the year 1888. 

Eleven companies of other States and countries were admitted, of wHcl 
eight transact fire, two life, and one marine business. 

Eight companies discontinued business, of which seven transacted a fire, 
and one a marine business. 

The total number of companies acting under authority of this depart- 
ment on the thirty-first day of December, 1888, was one hundred and 
eighty-two, classified as follows: 

Fire M 

Fire and Marine L' 

Marine,-^ - _ . w- 33 

Life - 21 

Life and Accident - _ 2 

Accident _ 

Surety and Accident - i 

Surety _ 

Steam boiler J 

Plate glass 2 

Title insurance 1 

Total MS 

The business transacted in this State was as follows: 

PIBE INSURANCE. 

Amount written - $352,831,786]! 

Premiums on same 6,087,(H1« 

Losses paid - 3,O49,O30jj 

Ratio of losses to premiums ...,_ _ 

MABIUE INSUBANCE. 

Amount written '. $134,273,834J 

Premiums on same 1,752,696J 

Losses paid 955,239« 

Ratio of losses to premiums ,-- ^ 

LIFE INSUBANOE. 

Amount written (new policies, 4,216) $20, 

Amount written (renewed policies, 14,582) _ 49,i 



Total amount written $70,57 0^ 

Premiums on new policies - $958,' 

Premiums on renewed policies V'^' 

Total amount premiums $2,8^jg i^ 

Losses and endowments paid 



$1,205,10^* 



ACCIDENT INSUBANCE. 

Amount written ^3^>?i^'I^| 

Premiums on same 

Losses paid - ■ 



120,6^' 



REPORT OP THE INSURANCE COMMISSIONER. 5 

SUBETY INSUBANCE. 

Amount written - $4,382,381 00 

Premiums on same 31,361 84 

Losses paid 3,930 00 

STEAM BOII-EB INSUBANCE, 

Amount written $1,902,760 00 

Premiums on same 26,898 55 

Losses paid 641 53 

PLATE GLASS INSUBANCE. 

Amount written ., $308,696 67 

Premiums on same , 8,881 73 

Losses paid 2,838 92 

TITLE INSUBANCE. 

Amount written $3,165,901 00 

Premiums on same 24,466 75 

Losses None. 

Apportioned as follows: 

TO COMPANIES OF THIS STATE— FIBE INSUBANCE. 

Amount written $87,446,368 00 

Premiums on same 1,472,306 89 

Losses paid .._ ._ 666,239 03 

Ratio of losses to premiums 45.3 

MABINE INSURANCE. 

Amount written _ : $25,093,798 00 

Premiums on same 455,629 51 

Losses paid - - 295,177 05 

Ratio of losses to premiums _ 64.8 

TO COMPANIES OF OTHEB STATES — FIBE INSUBANCE. 

Amount written $116,408,549 00 

Premiums onsame -- - _ 2,114,964 04 

Lossespaid 1,089,058 80 

Ratio of losses to premiums -_- 51.5 

MABINE INSURANCE. 

Amount written-- -- $4,119,603 00 

Premiums onsame- 110,144 33 

Lossespaid 26,043 84 

Ratio of losses to premiums ._- -- 23.6 

TO COMPANIES OF FOBEIGN COUNTBIES— FIBE INSUBANCE. 

Amount written - - $148,976,869 00 

Premiums onsame 2,499,770 55 

Lossespaid - 1,293,732 59 

Ratio of losses to premiums 51.8 

MABINE INSUBANCE. 

Amount written $105,060,433 00 

Premiums on same - 1,186,912 74 

Lossespaid : 634,018 60 

Ratio of losses to premiums 53.4 

TO COMPANIES OF THIS STATE— LIFE INSUBANCE. 

Amount written - -- _ $5,575,026 00 

Premiums on same 275,990 20 

Losses and endowments paid - -.. i 115,371 00 

TO COMPANIES OF OTHEB STATES. 

Amount writtfen $65,004,852 00 

Premiums on same 2,563,151 60 

Losses and endownments paid 1,089,735 91 

TO COMPANIES OF THIS STATE— ACCIDENT INSUBANCE. 

Amount written $9,696,250 00 

Premiums on same 52,981 39 

Lossespaid 14,006 77 



6 REPORT OP THE INSURANCE COMMISSIONER. 

TO COMPANIES OF OTHER STATES. 

Amount written _ _ $27,118,622 oj 

Premiums on same -. 65,08874 

Losses paid ^^♦SOVfi! 

TO COMPANIES OF FOREIGN COUNTRIES. 

Amount written $602,OOOOft 

Premiumson same - _ 3,585 jn 

Losses paid ^2% 

TO COMPANIES OF THIS STATE— SURETY INSURANCE. 

Amount written $2,727,245 05 

Premiums on same 19,003^ 

Losses paid _ 3,205^ 

TO COMPANIES OF OTHRR STATES. 

Amount written , $1,665,136 do 

Premiums on same 12,358 55 

Losses paid ..-, _ 724§j 

TO COMPANIES OF OTHER STATES— STEAM BOILER INSURANCE. 

Amount written _ $1,902,750(10 

Premiums onsame->- »_ o/va^.. 

Losses paid _ 



64185 



TO COMPANIES OF OTHER STATES— PLATE GLASS INSURANCE, 



Amount written 

Premiums on same . 
Losses paid 



TO COMPANIES OF THIS STATE— TITLE INSURANCE. 



8,8! 
2,8< 



Amount written $3,155,9011 

Premiums on same ..; 24,466^ 

Losses paid Nont 

The details of which will be found in Tables 1 to 8, inclusive. Tabk 
9 and 10 show the business of the life, accident, surety, plate glass, steau 
boiler, and title insurance and trust companies. 

Table 11 gives the name, location, date of organization, date of certil 
cate of authority, and the officers and agents in California. 

Tables 12 to 35, inclusive, show the capital, assets, liabilities, income, 
expenditures, net surplus, risks written, and risks in force of all the fim 
and marine companies. 

Tables 36 to 41, inclusive, are a recapitulation of Tables 12 to 35, 
inclusive. 

Tables 42 to 45, inclusive, show the assets, liabilities, income, expendi- 
tures, and net surplus of the life companies. 

Table 46 shows the number and amount of policies of life companies 
in force at the close of the previous year; also an exhibit of the policies 
issued, of those which have ceased to be in force, and those in force of 
the thirty-first day of December, 1888. 

Table 47 shows the number and amount of policies of life companfe 
which have ceased to be in force during the year, with the mode of i]0 
termination. 

Table 48 gives the amounts collected from the different companies ft 
fees, taxes, etc. 

PIKE INSURANCE. 

The fire risks written in 1888 exceed those written in 1887 !- $24,920,8 

The premiums received in 1888 exceed those in 1887 $496,6»'5 

The losses in 1888 exceed those in 1887 • $947,54T'* 

The fire rists in force December, 31, 1888, exceed those in force December /, 

31, 1887 - $39,859,494' 

The premium s on fire risks in force December 31, 1888, exceed those in force 

December 31, 1887 - $681,507 

The percentage of losses to premiums of 1888 exceeds that of 1887 by 12.5 per cent 



REPORT OF THE INSURANCE COMMISSIONER. 7 

MARINE INSURANCE. 

The marine rists written in 1888 exceed those written in 1887 $12,6J 6,805 00 

The premiums received in 1888 exceed those in 1887 $253,531 13 

The losses in 1888 exceed those in 1887.- - $141,297 80 

The marine risks in force December 31, 1888, exceed those in force December 

31,1887 - 1 - -. $10,014,401 00 

The premiums on marine risks in force December 31, 1888, exceed those in 

force December 31, 1887 $176,022 83 

The percentage of losses to premiums of 1888 exceeds that of 1887 by two tenths of one 

per cent. 

MFE INSURANCE. 

The amount of insurance on new policies written in 1888 exceeds that writ- 

teninl887 $9,162,652 00 

The premiums received for new policies written in 1888 exceed those in 1887. $443,390 72 

The amount of insurance on policies renewed in 1888 exceeds that in 1887-. $8,662,058 00 

The premiums received for policies renewed in 1888 exceed those in 1887 .-> $322,547 43 

The losses and endowments paid in 1888 exceed the amount paid in 1887 --- $154,051 80 
The amount of insurance in force December 31, 1888, exceeds that in force 

December 31, 1887 $13,131,673 00 

The number of new policies written in 1888 exceed those written in 1887 by 1.002 

The policies renewed in 1888 exceed those renewed in 1887 by 1. 2,194 

The number of policies in force December 31, 1888, exceed those in force 

December 31, 1887 2,029 

ACCIDENT, FIDELITY, STEAM BOILER, PLATE GLASS, AND TITLE INSURANCE. 

As two companies transact more than one class of business named 
above, and as until this year their business v^ras not segregated in their 
statements made to this office (I having given them notice that such seg- 
regation must be made in future), I am unable to make a separate com- 
parison of each business with that of the preceding year, as has been 
done with the fire, marine, and life companies. I therefore give the figures 
collectively: 

The amount of insurance on new policies written in 1888 exceeds that 

written in 1887 $13,405,699 46 

The premiums received for new policies written in 1888 exceed those in 1887 _ $38,331 81 
The amount of insurance on policies renewed in 1888 exceeds that in 1887.. $1,218,762 20 

The premiums received for policies renewed in 1888 exceed those in 1887 $5,960 58 

The losses paid in 1888 exceed the am ount paid In 1887 _ ^~. $7,212 18 

The amount of insurance in force December 31, 1888, exceeds that of Decem- 
ber 31, 1887 - _ _ $6,655,035 90 

The number of new policies written in 1888 exceed those written in 1887--. 4,642 

The policies renewed in 1888 were less than those renewed in 1887 39 

The number of policies in force December 31, 1888, exceed those in force 
December 31, 1887 796 

EXAMINATION OP COMPANIES. 

I made the annual examination of the local companies immediately 
after their statements were filed, and found their business prudently con- 
ducted, and their capital and accumulations invested in such securities as 
the Code designates. 

The statements of the companies of other States and foreign countries 
were carefully examined and found satisfactory and in accordance with 
the requirements of the insurance laws. 

UNAUTHORIZED INSURANCE. 

In the month of June last, having ascertained that certain parties were 
engaged in soliciting insurance in this State, without authority from this 
department, for a company calling itself " The Northwestern Insurance 
Company of Wahpeton, Dakota," I caused to be published in San Fran- 
cisco, Los Angeles, and Sacramento daily newspapers the following notice: 



O REPORT OP THE INSURANCE COMMISSIONER. 

NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC. 

Office of Insurance Commissioneb of the State of Caiiifohwia,) 

San Francisco, June 28, 1888. ( 
To all whom it may concern: 

Satisfactory evidence having been furnished me that a company calling itself the Norft, 
western Insurance Company of Wahpeton, Dakota, is soliciting insurance in this State,! 
hereby give notice that said insurance company is not authorized to transact business in 
this State, and any one soliciting business for it is liable to prosecution, under the ]m. 
From the information furnished me, I am satisfied this company is fraudulent, and kj 
no intention of paying any loss that might occur under its policies, and advise all persons 
to be on their guard against W» G. Whitcomb and Frank McGuire, who have been solicit 
iiig business and issuing policies for the said company, but cannot now be found by thia 
department. 

J. C. L. WADS WORTH, 
Insurance Commissioner. 

This effectually put a stop to the business. The parties engaged in it 
left for parts unknown, and have not been heard from since. 

During the year 1888 it came to the knowledge of this office that the 
firm of Johnson & Higgins, eastern insurance brokers, were engaged in 
procuring for citizens of this State marine insurances in companies not 
authorized to do business here, and that such business was carried on 
through one R. B. Hooper, acting as the agent of the firm. Much difficulty 
was experienced in procuring proof of specific cases, as the parties tor 
whom these insurances were obtained were loath to give the information 
upon which a criminal prosecution against Mr. Hooper could be based. 
But I finally procured such information, and after consultation with the 
Attorney-General, I caused Mr. Hooper to be arrested on the twenty-nintl 
day of September, upon a complaint filed in the Police Judge's Court of 
San Francisco, charging him with misdemeanor in procuring insurance 
for a resident of this State, in violation of Section 439 of the Penal Code. 
Messrs. Van Ness & Roche were authorized by the Attorney-General to 
prosecute the case upon behalf of the State, and upon the trial of Hooper 
in the Police Court procured a conviction. An appeal was taken by the 
defendant, Hooper, to the Superior Court of the City and County of Saa 
Francisco. The matter was there fully argued, and the result was thft 
affirmation of the judgment of the lower Court. Mr. Hooper's attorney? 
have taken steps to carry the matter to the Supreme Court of the United 
States, where the constitutionality of the California statute will ultimately 
be determined. 

On the twenty-sixth day of October last, I caused a complaint to be filed 
against R. P. Thomas, President, and D. F. Leahy, Secretary of the Fiie 
Relief Association of California (which had been organized without anj 
capital stock for the purpose of transacting a fire insurance business upon 
the assessment plan), for issuing, in the month of September previous, » 
policy of fire insurance without authority of this department, as provided 
in Section 596 of the Political Code. Mr. T. C. Coogan is acting as attomej 
for the State by authority of the Attorney-General. Judgment was w 
dered in the lower Court in favor of the State and the case was appealed 
to the Supreme Court. The action has been argued and submitted, an' 
the decision is expected soon. 

At Los Arvgeles, on the twenty-sixth day of December last, I caused ti« 
arrest of M. Whaling for procuring fire insurance for the Pierre Fire ao' 
Marine Insurance Company of Pierre, Dakota, in violation of Section 43' 
of the Penal Code, said company not being authorized to transact busine^ 
in this State. Mr. Whaling acknowledged that he had procured sudj 
insurance, and upon his promise to the District Attorney of Los km "' 
County and myself that he would at once cancel all policies obtained W 



BEPORT OF THE INSURANCE COMMISSIONER. 



9 



him, refrain from doing any more business of this nature in future, and pay 
aU costs of the proceedings, I authorized the dismissal of the suit. 

LEGISLATION. 

Of the large number of bills affecting insurance introduced at the recent 
session of the Legislature, the only one that became a law was one prepared 
by myself amending Section 447 of the Civil Code, relating to the valua- 
tion of policies of life insurance, whereby the rate of interest was changed 
from four and one half per cent to four per cent per annum, based upon 
the rate of mortality established by the Combined Experience or Actu- 
aries' Table, to take efiect from and after the thirty-first day of December, 
1891. This will make a rate of valuation uniform with nearly all the 
other States, and increase the security of the policy holders, as the com- 
panies will be obliged to hold a larger amount in reserve. 

I also prepared and had introduced a bill entitled ^' An Act relating to 
life and casualty and annuity or endowment insurance on the assessment 
plan, and the conduct of the business of such insurance." The object of 
the bill was to subject assessment companies to the same authority which 
this department exercises over the other forms of insurance. The passage 
of this bill would have enabled the Insurance Department to protect the 
people of this State from the fraudulent insurance schemes of mere adven- 
turers. All the reputable assessment or cooperative companies operating 
in this State favored the proposed law, and several gave the bill their active 
support; but the more numerous disreputable assessment companies suc- 
ceeded in defeating it. 

The opposition came mainly from the thirty so called endowment asso- 
ciations, which, under the proposed law, would have had few or no oppor- 
tunities for the practice of the gross deceptions by which they thrive at the 
expense of ignorant people. Two of these mushroom endowment associa- 
tions which bitterly fought any legislation designed to curtail their oppor- 
tunities to defraud their members, have since failed, leaving nothing but 
a bad name and many dupes with claims which never will be paid. 

When my bill was before the Legislature, representatives of these 
endowment associations swarmed the lobbies, and covered the desks of leg- 
islators with printed protests, appeals, and ingenious misrepresentations. 
It was such opposition that defeated the bill. I can not hope, therefore, 
that it would be of any use to reiterate the reasons I have advanced in 
former reports in behalf of much needed assessment legislation similar to 
that of the Eastern States. Some day, perhaps, without any urging from 
this department, the Legislature will impose wholesome restraints upon 
these swindling assessment insurance schemes which now with impunity 
filch the savings of the toilers, and defraud helpless widows and orphans. 

The result attending the amendment of Section 617 of the Political Code, 
by the Legislature of 1887, whereby the penalty for failure to file the 
annual statements of the companies within the time prescribed by law was 
reduced from $1,000 for the first month^s failure, and $2,000 for each and 
every month thereafter, to $100 for the first month and $200 for each suc- 
cee(fihg month until filed, realized my anticipations by the promptness in 
which the statements were subsequently filed, and the penalty when 
delinquent was paid. The original penalty was so large that no attempt 
had ever been made to enforce its payment, in consequence of which the 
law had come to be considered a "dead letter." Many statements were 
not received in time, thereby delaying the compilation of the annual report. 
Last year only ten statements were behind time, for which the penalty was 



JO 



BEPORT OP THE INSURANCE COMMISSIONER. 



promj>tly paid, adding $1,000 to the revenue of the State. This year only 
six statements are delinquent. 

I am not aware of any business that is called upon to defend and pro- 
tect itself against inimical legislation to the same extent as the insurance 
business. Whenever the Legislature meets, numerous bills are introduced 
tending to hamper and annoy the underwriting interests. Many of them 
are gotten up by men having but little knowledge of the principles of in- 
surance, for personal ends, or to cater to popular clamor. 

^' In the Legislature of one of the Eastern States, at its last sessioii, 
more than forty bills were introduced for various forms of insurance legiB^ 
lation. A member remarked that he did not so much care which of these 
bills passed, but something must be done to appease the popular clamor." 

The public should be protected from irresponsible companies, and all 
companies should be so looked after by the State officials having charge o! 
the insurance departments, that no doubt could be entertained of theii 
responsibility. No other business is subject to the same surveillance, or 
has had placed around it by the State as many safeguards for the people's 
protection. All companies are obliged to make annually a sworn state- 
ment of their entire business and condition, which is open at all times to 
public inspection and which the law compels them to have published in 
the daily newspapers. They are subject to examination at any moment 
the Commissioner may choose to make one, and are obliged (under a hea^y 
penalty in case of reftisal) to give full and true information in writing, k 
answer to any inquiry in writing by the Commissioner relating to the busi- 
ness of insurance as carried on by them. 

The vast interests which may be injuriously affected by hasty fire insur- 
ance legislation may be conceived from the fact that over fourteen billion 
dollars of risks are in force in the United States. This sum is almoel 
beyond comprehension. The average profit is less than 5 per cent of thii 
premium income. The extent of these interests and the narrow margin of 
profit for the great risks assumed by capital, suggest cautious deliberation 
in fire insurance legislation. 

Receipts— 1888. 
Received for fees and taxes. _ |28,928W 

ExPENDITUilES— 1888. 

Office salaries $4,800 00 



Office rent. 

Janitor , , 

Advertising >— - 

Stationery - _ 

Newspapers _ 

Fuel - ... 

Incidentals, postage stamps, expressage, etc. 



600 00 


360 00 


98 60 


82 20 


39 46 


35 50 


125 90 



6,141 ' 

Balance in State Treasury $22,786 J 

The amount of money received for fees, taxes, etc., since the organization of 

this department in 1868, to January 1,1880, is $297,686 J 

The total expenditure for the same time, including salaries, have been 167,264 ^ 

Net revenue to the State $140,321^ 

I again take pleasure in recording my acknowledgments to Mr. M.''^ 
Rhorer^ Deputy Commissioner, for his able and efficient conduct of ^^ 
business of his office. 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 

J. C. L. WADSWORTH, 
Insurance Commissioner- 



REPORT OF THE INSURANCE COMMISSIONER. 



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REPORT OF THE INSURANCE COMMISSIONER, 



Table No. 4. 

Showing the Fire Risks in Force in California on December 31, 1888— Companies of other Statet 



Name. 



MUm _ 

Agricultural 

Amazon--- --- 

American _ 

American 

American Central. - -. 

American Fire 

American Fire 

Boylston 

Citizens - 

Citizens _ _ 

Citizens _ 

Concordia _ _ 

Connecticut Fire - 

Continental m 

Eliot 

Exchange 

Farragut Fire - 

Fire Association of Philadelphia 

Firemen's - 

Firemen's 

Franklin Fire 

German 

Germ an- American 

Germania _ 

Germania Fire -_. 

Girard Fire and Marine -.- 

Glen's Falls 

Granite State Fire 

Hanover 

Hartford Fire 

Home 

Howard 

Insurance Company of North America. 

Insurance Co. of the State of Penn 

Liberty _ — 

Long Island--- - 

Manufacturers and Builders 

Mechanics and Traders 

Merchants 

Michigan Fire and Marine -. 

National Fire -- --- 

National Fire - 

New Hampshire Fire 

Niagara Fire 

North American 

Oregon Fire and Marine 

Orient . 

Pacific Fire - 

Pennsylvania Fire 

People's Fire , 

Phenrx.., - - __. 

Phoenix _ 

Prescott , 

Providence- Washington 

Security _ 

Southern -__ _ 

Springfield Fire and Marine 

St. Paul 

Sun Mutual 

Syndicate - --. 

Teutonia - 

Traders 

Union-. 

United States Fire 

Westchester Fire -. 

Williamsburg City Fire _- 

Totals 



Location. 



Hartford 

Watertown, N. Y.. 

Cincinnati ->-. 

Newark 

Boston 

St. Louis.- 

Philadelphia 

New York 

Boston 

St. Louis 

New York 

Cincinnati , 

Milwaukee 

Hartford - 

New York 

Boston 

New York 

New York , 

Philadelphia 

Baltimore 

Newark 

Philadelphia 

Freeport, 111 

New York 

New Orleans 

New York 

Philadelphia 

Glen's Falls, N.Y.. 
Portsmouth, N. H.. 

New York ,_. 

Hartford -. 

New York 

New York 

Philadelphia , 

Philadelphia 

New York .- 

Brooklyn 

New York 

New Orleans 

Newark , 

Detroit *.., 

New York 

Hartford 

Manchester 

New York 

Boston 

Portland 

Hartford - 

New York 

Philadelphia , 

Manchester, N.H.. 

New York ,. 

Hartford 

Boston --. 

Providence, R. I... 

New Haven 

New Orleans 

Springfield, Mass.. 
St.Paul, Minit..-. 

New Orleans, 

Minneapolis 

New Orleans 

Chicago -.- 

Philadelphia 

New York 

New York 

Brooklyn ._, 



$U,508,741 00 

3,537,486 00 

953,732 00 

2,084,779 00 

188,547 00 

2,786,965 00 

2,397,538 00 

1.328,851 00 

632,313 00 

256,393 00 

1,836,687 00 

594,699 00 

697,242 00 

4,351.669 00 

2,917,438 00 



145,810 00 

124,376 00 
2,116,000 00 

545,514 00 

985,784 00 
1,256,733 00 
1,643,150 00 
4,484,712 00 

231,624 00 
2.847,494 00 

642,107 00 
1,264,047 00 

498,000 00 
3,673,375 00 
12,499,881 00 
6,796,853 00 
1,105,692 00 
6,806,718 00 

792,267 00 
1,071,507 00 

374,040 00 

375,817 00 

386,202 00 
1,154,623 00 

750,132 00 
1,758,230 00 
1,715,357 00 

827,098 00 
2,348,368 00 

429,582 00 

530,931 00 
2,060,722 00 

669,049 00 
2,011,679 00 

420,917 00 

16,619,550 00 

6,649,535 00 



1,049,407 00 
909,102 00 
849,020 00 

4,403,692 00 
955,844 00 
745,676 00 
309,618 00 
308,689 00 
933,491 00 
693,162 00 
331,610 00 

3,069,544 00 

1,343,797 00 



$140,589,208 00 



Premiuma. 



$196,466 70 

49,939 1 

20,483 70 

34,464 28 

3,529 38 

42,735 47 

55,138 2* 

25,519 SO 

9,86388 

4,474 15 

28,872 13 

14,561 15 

12,55600 

77,459 70 

47,352 96 



2,294 00 

1.979 98 

37,000 00 

11,676 13 

20,001 01 

20,881 00 

29,857 75 

79,288 72 

5,098 62 

45,695 SO 

10,824 08 

22,955 39 

11,000 00 

67,744 28 

203,049 7i 

121,517 n 

20,162 50 

110,96998 

15.210 51 

18,283 2f 

7,428 18 

7,526 65 

6,014 ?I 

20,96929 

12,620 S) 

35,170 W 

36,47813 

16,778 « 

45,8803] 

8,923 (» 

13,184 5J 

35,676 f 

10,678 

45,773 1 

8,261 «^ 

524,637 

118,916 iS 



21,825 2 
79967^ 



6,620 J 

5,63 2 
22,3601" 



$2,724,8393 



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REPORT OF THE INSURANCE COMMISSIONER. 



17 



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REPORT OF THE INSURANCE COMMISSIONER. 



Table No. 6, 



19 



Fire Risks in Force on December SI, 1888 — Companies of Foreign Countries — Califor- 
nia business. 



Name. 



Atlas 

British America 

Caledonian 

City of London Fire 

Commercial Union .^ 

Economic Fire 

Fire Insurance Association _ , 

General Life and Fire 

Guardian Fire and Life 

Hamburg-Bremen _. 

Hamburg-Magdeburg 

Helvetia Swiss Fire 

Imperial Fire '. 

Lancashire „. 

Lion Fire 

Liverpool and London and Globe... 

London , 

London and Lancashire 

Magdeburg Fire 

Manchester Fire 

National - 

New Zealand 

North British and Mercantile 

North German Fire 

Northern _. 

Norwich Union __. 

Phoenix - 

Prussian National _ 

Queen 

Koyal - 

Scania _ _. 

Scottish Union and National 

South British Fire and Marine 

Straits Fire 

Sun Fire 

Svea - 

Transatlantic Fire 

Union Fire and Marine 

United Fire 

Western - 



Totals - 



Location. 



London 

Toronto 

Edinburgh --- 

London 

London 

London 

London 

London--- 

London.-- 

Hamburg 

Hamburg 

St. Gall, Switzerland- . 

London- - 

Manchester.^ 

London 

Liverpool 

London 

Liverpool 

Magdeburg 

Manchester 

Dublin 

Aucldand 

London--- 

Hamburg 

London 

Korwichj England ,-. 

London-- 

Stettin 

Liverpool 

Liverpool 

Malmo, Sweden 

Edinburgh 

Auckland 

Singapore 

London-- -. 

Gothenburg, Sweden 

Hamburg 

Christchurch, N. Z 

Manchester 

Toronto - - 



Risks. 



$3,074,178 00 
1,959,845 00 
3,239,986 00 
3,528,009 00 
8,921,094 00 

495,126 00 
1,852.917 00 

353,200 00 
9,365,083 00 
6\860,842 00 
3,332,807 00 
6,679,712 00 
2,708,666 00 
3,552,977 00 
3,420,680 00 
24,190,980 00 
4,082,845 00 
5,765,228 00 
1,264,977 00 
4,152,477 00 
3,560,113 00 
7,545,385 00 
6,776,350 00 
5,689,935 00 
4,082,845 00 
3,552,977 00 
6,011,732 00 
4,149,745 00 
4,082,845 00 
3,552,977 00 

143,477 00 
3,230,413 00 
2,697,552 00 

567,515 00 
3,693,930 00 
2,127,269 00 
2,449,880 00 
2,343.219 00 

840,630 00 
2,425,412 00 



$168,325,830 00 



$56,434 33 
28,326 53 
58,960 88 
65,325 32 

155,732 24 

10,287 43 

33,635 20 

5,053 60 

141,764 45 

117,172 19 
54,501 50 
99,457 10 
52,573 89 
58,023 43 
07,786 30 

376,867 12 
69.816 64 

100,442 57 
22,121 60 
75,387 36 
62,301 75 

113;i84 60 

114,262 63 
97,303 85 
69,816 64 
58,023 43 

107,650 80 
77,029 85 
69,816 64 
58,023 43 
3,412 97 
55,086 16 
43,099 03 
10,141 19 
57,049 12 
32,779 89 
46,589 29 
42,696 27 
16,918 11 
44,958 85 



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BEPOBT OF THE INSURANCE COMMISSIONER. 



21 






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22 



BEPOBT OF THE INSURANCE COMMISSIONER. 



Table No. 8. 



1 



Showing Marine Risks in Force, of Foreign Companies and Companies of other States, on Deem- 
her Slf 1888 — California business. 



Alliance Marine 

Australian General _ 

Baloise 

Boston Marine 

British and Foreign Marine 

Canton. -_ , 

China Traders . 

Commercial Union 

Fonciere .__ _ _ 

Franco-Hungarian 

Globe Marine 

Helvetia General 

Indemnity Mutvial Marine , 

Insurance Company of North America 

International Marine 

London _ 

London and Provincial Marine- _ 

Magdeburg General 

Mannheim _ _ 

Man On _ 

Marine 



Maritime 

National Marine 

New Zealand- 

North China 

OnTai 

Providence- Washington - 
Reliance Marine 



South British Fire and Marine . 

Standard Marine... 

St. Paul ., 

Straits 

Switzerland Marine 

Thames and Mersey 

Transatlantic Marine 

Union Fire an d Marine 

Union Insurance Society 

Union Marine ,..". 

Universal Marine , 

Yangtsze _ _. 



Totals. 



Location. 



London 

Sydney _ 

Basle, Switzerland _.. 

Boston 

Liverpool 

Hong Kong 

Hong Kong 

London 

Paris 

Buda-Pesth 

London 

St. Gall, Switzerland . 

London 

Philadelphia 

Liverpool 

London 

London 

Magdeburg 

Mannheim 

Hong Kong 

London 

Liverpool 

London.. 

Auckland 

Shanghai ,-_ 

Hong Kong._ 

Providence, R. I 

Liverpool 

Liverpool 

Auckland 

Liverpool , 

St. Paul, Minnesota .. 

Singapore 

Zurich 

Liverpool 

Berlin 

Christchurch, N . Z.. .. 

Hong Kong 

Liverpool.-. 

London -. 

Shanghai 



Bisks. 



$91,374 00 
34,082 00 

198,390 00 

350,081 00 
4,159,230 00 
2,262,320 00 

270,339 00 
1,089,228 00 
1,698,9(33 00 

464,868 00 
None. 

198.390 00 
323,623 00 
359,507 00 

39,250 00 

1,375,421 00 

848,393 00 

450,959 00 

35,285 00 

133,066 00 

1,000 00 

262,872 00 

172,201 00 

708,330 00 

903,863 00 

323,239 00 

324,262 00 

74,045 00 

. 753,000 00 

' 1,364,016 00 

290,778 00 

9,950 00 

87,028 00 

198.391 00 
6,795,967 00 

354,993 00 
671,921 00 
407,418 00 
308,872 00 
None. 
241,552 00 



$28,636,467 00 



Premiums, 



$3,427 99 

602 67 

2,982 20 

22,347 « 

51,022 13 

38,410 «1 

877 66 
15,471 58 
18,987 5o 
11,455 85 



2,98220 
4,537 48 

22,992 S3 
1,285 28 

15,314 88 
9,875 9i 

10,83405 

450 32 

795 71 

17 5(1 

4,082 78 

2,25615 

26,03398 

11,599 U 
1,567 96 

20,797 15 
1,287 02 
9,300 Oft 

54,914 69 

4,81191 

212 5i 

1,076 85 

2,982 2ft 

95,421 83 
5,153 06 

31,854 41 
3,80021 
6,38277 



2,150 iJ 



$520,35705 



REPORT OF THE INSURANCE COMMISSIONER. 






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1 



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25 




Year of Or- 
gamzation- 



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REPORT OF THE INSURANCE COMMISSIONER. 



l>CCOlOOinO<Wrt^t!COC5'>l«01^*'COCvl«OCiO«0«DOOO-100(?3000-*t-0(yTCilC505CO«0(»0«#,Hai 

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ganization. 









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REPORT OF THE INSURANCE COMMISSIONER. 







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REPORT OF THE INSCFRANCE COMMISSIONER. 



,. . ..^ior-'^'*t-i-H^i-ai 

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REPORT OF THE INSURANCE COMMISSIONER. 



29 



ANNUAL STATEMENTS. 



ALTA FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY. 

Located at Stockton, California — Organized January 30, 1888, 



J. M. WELSH, President. 



M". D. BAKER, Secretary. 



Joint stock capital authorized... $200,000 00 

Joint stock capital paid-up in cash - 100,000 00 



FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1888. 



assets. 

Loans on mortgages (tirst liens) upon which not more than one year's 
interest la due 

Interest due and accrued on said mortgage loans 

Stocks and bonds owned absolutely by the company: 

Par Value. 2dJirket Value. 

4 bonds Willow School District, San Joaquin 

County, 6 per cent.- , _ |4,000 00 $4,100 00 

Cash in office and in banks 

Interest accrued on bonds, not included in "Market Value" ..--- 

Gross premiums in due course of collection - - 

Total - 



LIABILITIES. 



Gross premiums on fire risks running one year or less, $29,697 21; 
unearned premium, 50 per cent $14,848 60 



Gross premiums on hre risks running more than one j^ear, 
$4,161 61; unearned preniium, pro rata 

Commissions and brokerage due and to become due . 

Gross liabilities, except capital stock 

Surplus as regards policy holders --- 

Capital stock paid up in cash 



3,477 09 



Surplus over paid up capital and all other liabilities-. 

INCOME. 

Net cash received for premiums 

Received for interest on bonds and loans 



Total cash income . 



EXPENDITURES. 



Amount paid for losses - ._ 

Paid for commissions and brokerage 

Salaries, fees, and all other charges of officers, clerks, agents, and all other 

employes . — ' 

All other payments and expenditures , 

Total cash expenditures - 



$74,825 00 
2,383 50 



4,100 00 

17,586 41 

253 75 

19,818 69 



$118,967 25 



$18,325 69 
494 55 



$18,820 24 



$100,147 '01 
100,000 00 



1147 01 



123,256 71 
381 55 



$23,638 26 



$5,517 62 
5,667 89 

7,315 26 
8,923 25 



$27,424 02 



30 



REPORT OF THK IN8URANCK COMMISSIONER. 
Alta Fire Insurance Company — Continued. 



RI8KS a:nd premiums. 



Written during the year 

Deduct expirations and cancellations . 



In force at the end of the year. 
Deduct amount reinsured 



Net amount in force. 



$3,042,547 00 
827,906 00 



$2,214,641 00 
428,839 00 



;j51,785,802 00 



Premiums 

thereon. 



$52,954 75 
11,519 52 



$41,435 23 
7,576 41 



$33,858 82 



ANGLO-NEVADA ASSURANCE CORPORATION. 

Located at San Francisco— Organized November, 1885. 



LOUIS SLOSS, President. 



Z. P. CLARK, Secretary. 



Joint stock capital authorized.- --- $2,000,000 00 

Joint stock capital paid up in cash _ 2,000,000 00 



YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1888. 



Loans on mortgages (first liens) upon which not more than oue year's in- 
terest is due _ __ 

Interest accrued upon said mortgage loans _,. 

Bonds owned absolutely by the company: 

Par Value. Market Valne. 
Southern Pacific Railroad of Arizona bonds, 6 per 

cent $695,000 00 $733,225 00 

Sutter Street Railway first mortgage bonds 100,000 00 105,000 00 

City of Portland, Oregon, Water bonds _ 50,000 00 57,805 55 

Omnibus Cable Compan3^ first mortgage bonds, 6 

percent... 50,000 00 55,000 00 

Lo6 Angeles City Water Company, first mortgage 

bonds, 6 per cent 20,000 00 21,000 00 



$915,000 00 $972,030 55 
Stocks, bonds, and other securities, hypothecated to the company as collat- 
eral security for cash loaned by the company: 

Market Value. Am{. Loaned. 

150,000 wheat bags in warehouse - $11,625 00 $7,500 00 

157 bags coffee in warehouse 3,464 46 2,500 00 

168 bags cofliee in warehouse _ 3,941 00 2,750 00 

1,091,045 pounds wheat in warehouse 15,820 15 11,800 00 

1,859,067 pounds wheat in warehouse 26,956 47 20,000 00 

663,323 pounds wheat in warehouse 9,618 18 7,100 00 

1,532,475 pounds wheat in warehouse 22,220 88 16,500 00 

1,885,000 wh eat bags in warehouse - _ 122,525 00 70,687 50 

4,271,000 wheat bags in warehouse 331,002 50 211,950- 00 

2,320,372 pounds wheat in warehouse _.. 33,645 39 25,000 00 



Cash in office and in banks _ _ 

Interest due and accrued on bonds, not included in "Market Value "- 

Interest due and accrued on collateral loans _ 

Gross premiums in due course of collection 

Due from other companies for reinsurance on losses already paid 



Total. 



$1,021,807 55 
14,862 13 



972,030 55 



375,787 50 

81,860 89 

3,025 00 

1,905 67 

151,190 29 
1,618 66 



$2,624,088 24 



.ii 



REPORT OF THE INSURANCE COMMISSIONER, 
Anglo-Nevada Assurance Corporation— Continued. 

lilABIIilTIES. 

} adjusted and unpaid _ _ $13,270 44 

Losses in 'process of adjustment _ _ __ 39,669 13 

Losses resisted-. - 1 750 00 

Total _ _ _. $53,689 57 

Deduct reinsurance thereon 360 84 

Gross premiums on fire risks running one year or less, $580,833 07; 

unearned premium, 50 per cent $340,410 58 

Gross premiums on fire risks running more than one year, 

$209,176 55 ; unearned premiu m , pro rata _ 130,865 74 

Gross premiums on marine and inland navigation risks, $7,281 79; 

unearned premium, 100 per cent 7,281 79 

Gross premiums on marine time risks, $16,120 83; unearned 

premium, 50 per cent- _ _ 8,060 41 

Commissions and brokerage due and to become due _ 

Return premiums __. 

Gross liabilities except capital stock 

Surplus as regards policy holders 

Capital stock paid up in cash _ 

Surplus overpaid up capital and all other liabilities.. ,. 

INCOME. j,i^^_ jj^^.„3 

Net cash received for premiums $932,661 63 $99,861 84 

Received for interest on mortgages. ._ _ 

Received for interest and dividends on stocks and bonds and collateral loans, 

Total cash income 

expenditures. j,j^^_ ^j^^.^^^ 

Paid for losses, including $41,154 48, losses in 

previous years _ __. .$505,954 62 $80,127 34 

Paid for commissions and brokerage 

Salaries, fees, and all other charges of officers, clerks, agents, and all other 

employes _, 

Paid for taxes _ 

All other payments and expenditures 

Total cash expenditures ___ 



31 



$53,328 73 



486,624 52 
7,4H0 96 
3,391 06 



$550,775 27 



$2,073,312 97 
2,000,000 00 



$73,312 97 



$1,032,523 47 
63,159 87 
45,032 81 



$1,140,716 15 



$586,081 96 
221,388 62 

54,789 38 

10,660 71 

104,567 46 



$977,488 13 



RISKS AND PREMIUMS. 





Fire Risks. 


Premiums 

thereon. 


Marine and In- 
land Risks. 


Premiums 
tbereon. 


In force on December 31 of the 
nreceding vear 


$53,723,205 00 
75,152,714 00 


$883,645 21 
1,305,170 51 


$3,132,399 00 
18,057,904 00 


$57,152 91 


Written during the j'^ear 


127,483 60 


Totals 


$128,875,919 00 
55,790,980 00 


$2,188,815 72 
1,194,328 95 


$21,190,303 00 
19,516,975 00 


$184,636 51 


Deduct expirations and can- 
cellations -.- - -- -. 


151,153 16 






In force at the end of the year 
Deduct amount reinsured 


$73,084,939 00 
9,165,546 00 


?994,486 77 
104,477 15 


$1,673,328 00 
735,217 00 


$33,483 35 
10,080 73 


Net amount in force 


$63,919,393 00 


$890,009 62 


$938,111 00 


$23,402 ^2, 







32 



REPORT OF THE INSURANCE COMMISSIONER, 

CALIFORNIA INSURANCE COMPANY. 

Located at San Francisco— Organized February, 1861. 



L. L. BROMWELL, President. 



W. H. C. FOWLER, Secretary. 



Joint stock capital authorized $600,000 00 

Joint stoclt capital paid up in cash--. 600,000 OO 



YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1888. 



Value of real estate owned by the company __- 

Loans on mortgages (iirst liens) upon which not more than one year's 

interest is due I__ __ _,_' 

Interest accrued on said mortgage loans _,. 

Stocks and bonds owned absolutely by the company: 

Par "Value. 
150 United States 4 per cent bonds $150,000 00 



25 Oakland Gas bonds. 

35 Northern Pacific Railroad bonds 

24 Spring Valley Water bonds 

8 Pacific Rolling Mill Company bonds 

25 San Diego Gas and Electric Light bonds 

272 shares Bank of California stock .-_ __- 

300 shares First National Bank of S. F. stock... 

551 shares Oakland Bank of Savings stock 

200 shares Grangers Bank stock 

100 shares California Wire Works Co. stock 

200 shares Pacific Rolling Mill Co. stock ... 

150 shares Cat. Safe Deposit and Trust Co. stock 

200 shares Wells, Fargo & Co. Bank stock 

200 shares London, Paris, and Am. Bank stock 
400 shares Oakland Gaslight and Heat Co. stock 

600 shares Spring Valley Water Co. stock 

200 shares Merced Sec. Savings Bank stock 

300 shares Contra Costa Water Co. stock 

160 shares San Francisco Gaslight Co. stock 

$663,415 00 
Cash in office and in banks-,. -. 

Interest due and accrued on stocks, not included in "Market Value" 

Gross premiunjs in due course of collection .-_ __. 

Bills receivable, not matured^ taken for iire, marine, and inland risks 



25,000 00 
35,000 00 
24,000 00 
8,000 00 
25,000 00 
27,200 00 
30,000 00 
27,550 00 
20,000 00 
10,000 00 
20,000 00 
15,000 00 
20,000 00 
20,000 00 

"so'ooo'oo" 



16,000 00 



Market Value 

,$191,250 00 

25,500 00 

41,300 00 

29,820 00 

8,400 00 
25.750 00 
59,840 00 
43,500 00 
35,815 00 
12,000 00 

5,000 00 
20,000 00 

8,250 00 
28,000 00 
20,400 00 
14,000 00 
50,250 00 

7,000 00 
27,900 00 

9,440 00 



Total . 



LIABILITIES. 



Losses adjusted and unpaid - $18,970 00 

Losses in process of adjustment _-_ _ 71,500 92 

Losses resisted , 4,100 00 



Gross premiums on fire risks running one year or less, $391,- 

348 47; unearned premium, 50 per cent -__ _ $195,674 23 

Gross premiums on fire risks running more than one year, 

$183,859 27; unearned premium, pro rata. 105,871 90 

Gross premiums on marine and inland navigation risks, $31,- 

714 03; unearned premium, 100 per cent 31,714 63 

Gross premium on marine time risks, $94,038 97; unearned 

premium, 50 percent 47,019 47 

Commissions and brokerage due and to become due - 

Total liabilities, except capital stock - , 

Surplus as regards policy holders -,. , ^ -- 

Capital stock paid up in cash- - - ■ 



Surplus over paid up capital and all other liabilities , 



$104,000 00 

21,386 32 
520 00 



663,415 CO 
335,400 87 

11,663 36 
132,082 46 

30,138 26 

$1,313.286 04 



$94,570 92 



380,280 23 
17,085 ^ 



$491,936?? 



$821,349 06 
600,000 00 



$221,34905 



REPORT OF THE INSURANCE COMMISSIONER. 
Caliporjtia Insurance CoMpANY—Continued. 



83 



INCOME. j,.^^ jj^rt^^ 

Net cash received for premiums _ $469,128 53 $194,100 47 

Received for interest on mortgages 

Received for interest and dividends on stocks and bonds, and from all other 

sources - 

Received for rents - ..-- 

Received for profit on sale of investments 

Total cash income 

EXPENDITURES. ^. ,, . 

Fire. Marine. 

Amount paid for losses, including $36,577 32, losses 

in previous years $226,241 87 $89,590 43 

Cash dividends paid stockholders -._ - 

Paid for commissions and brokerage 

Salaries, fees, and all other charges of officers, clerks, agents, and all other 

employes _ _ 

Paid for taxes 

All other payments and expenditures .__, 

Total cash expenditures 



$663,229 00 
$1,457 54 

35,846 26 
1,125 00 
1,000 00 



$702,657 80 



$315,832 30 

72,000 00 

120,046 49 

45,900 36 
13,447 00 
59,015 19 



$626,241 34 



RISKS AND PREMIUMS. 





Tire Risks. 


Premiums 
thereon. 


Marino and Inland 
£iBks. 


Premiums 
thereon. 


In force on December 3l of the 
preceding y ear . - . - _ > . 


$34,251,243 00 
42,599,880 00 


$488,401 50 
590,036 24 


$1,924,851 00 
14,706.834 00 


$96,352 50 
300,876 61 


"Written during the year 


Totals 


$76,851,123 00 
34,661,714 00 


$1,078,437 80 
461,624 55 


$16,631,694 00 
12,934,546 00 


$397,229 11 
240,389 42 


Deduct expirations and can- 
cellations 






In force at the end of the year. 
Leduct amount reinsured 


$42,189,409 00 
2,442,705 00 


$616,813 25 
41,605 51 


$3,697,148 00 
592,062 00 


$156,839 69 
31,086 09 


Net amount in force -- _>--. 


$39,746,704 00 


$575,207 74 


$3,105,086 00 


$125,753 60 





COMMERCIAL INSURANCE COMPANY. 
Located at San Fbancisco— Okganized February, 1882. 



JOHN H. WISE, President. 



CHARLES A. LATON, Secretary. 



Joint stock capital authorized _$200,000 00 

Joint stock capital paid up in cash 200,000 00 

YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1888. 



ASSETS. 

Value of real estate owned by the company 

Loans on mortgage (first liens) upon which not more than one year's inter- 
est is due __ 

Interest due and accrued on said mortgage loans 

Stocks and bonds owned absolutely by the company : 

50 United States bonds, 4-20's _ $50,000 00 $63,562 5o' 

19 Shasta County bonds, 7 per cent 17,600 00 18,775 00 

1,900 shares Merchants' Exchange Bank stock, in 

liquidation 190,000 00 41,800 00 

205 shares Spring Valley Waterworks stock _ 20,500 00 20,653 75 

$278,000 00 $144,791 25 

Amount carried forward - 

322 



$5,030 80 

174,650 00 
1,641 17 



144,791 25 
$326,113 22 



34 



REPORT OF THE INSURANCE COMMISSIONER. 
OoMMEBCiA-ii Insubancb COMPANY— Continued. 



Amount brought forward. 



Stocks hypothecated to the company as collateral security for cash loaned 
by the company: 

Par Value. Market Value. Amt. Loaned. 
115 shares First National Bank of San 

Diego $11,500 00 $18,250 00 $10,000 00 

Cash in office and in banks 

Interest due and accrued on collateral loans 

Gross premiums in due course of collection 

Bills receivable, not matured^ taken for fire, marine, and inland risks 



Total 



I/IABILITIES. 



Losses in process of adjustment 

Gross premiums on fire risks, running one year or less, $256- 

025 96 ; unearned premium, 60 per cent $128,012 98 

Gross premiums on fire risks, running more than one year, 

$64,890 13 ; unearned premium, i)ro rata 1 37,567 74 

Gross premiums on marine and inland navigation risks, $2,- 

576 37 ; unearned premium, 100 per cent ... 2,576 37 

Gross premiums on marine time risks, $9,277 34; unearned 

premium, 50 per cent..^ 4,638 67 

Commissions and brokerage due and to become due-- - - 

Return premiums 



Total liabilities, except capital stock . 

Surplus as regards policy holders 

Capital stock paid up in cash 



Surplus over paid up capital and all other liabilities 

INCOME. p.,^ jjl^riae. 

Net cash received for premiums $379,407 99 $23,316 64 

Received for interest on mortgages , 

Received for interest on stocks and bonds and from other sources.— 



Total cash income . 



Fire. Manne. 

Paid for losses, including $12,434 16, losses in 

previous years $237,359 58 $16,968 82 

Cash dividends paid stockholders 

Paid for commissions and brokerage - 

Salaried, fees, and all other charges of officers, clerks, agents, and all other 

employes ^ 

Paid tor taxes ^ 

All other payments and expenditures 

Total expenditures 



:risks and premiums. 



$326,113 22 



10,000 00 

25,026 82 

264 74 

84,415 02 

4,266 90 



$450,086 70 



$25,227 44 



172,794 76 
1,468 70 
1,870 62 



$201,361 52 



$248,725 18 
200,000 00 



$48,725 18 



$402,724 63 
11,742 54 
24,491 52 



$438,958 69 



$254,328 40 
24,000 00 
86,649 70 

33,299 62 

8,04149 

30,29104 



$435,610 25 





Fire Risks. 


Premiums 
thereon. 


Sfarine and 
Inland Bisks. 


Premiums 
thereon. 


In force on December 31 of the 
preceding year 


$22,963,775 00 
30,713,144 00 


$336,522 89 
473,647 38 


$192,675 00 
2,209,181 00 


$14,359 47 


Written during the year 


29,460 13 


Totals 


$53,676,919 00 
29,255,965 00 


$810,170 27 
467,051 31 


$2,401,866 00 
2,078,800 00 


$43,819 60 


Deduct expirations and can- 
cellations . 


30,822 35 






In force at the end of the year. 
Deduct amount reinsured 


$24,440,954 00 
1,233,510 00 


$343,018 96 

22,102 87 


$323,056 00 
28,617 00 


$12,997 25 
1,144 53 


Net amount in force 


$23,207,444 00 


$320,916 09 


$294,439 00 


$11,852 72 



i 

\ 



REPORT OF THE INSURANCE COMMISSIONER. 

FIREMAN'S FUND INSURANCE COMPANY. 

Located at Sa» Fbancisco— Organized May, 1863. 



35 



D. J. STAPLES, President. 



WM. J. DCJTTON, Secretary. 



Joint stock capital authorized $1,000,000 00 

Joint stock capital paid up in cash 1,000,000 00 

YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1888. 



Value of real estate owned by the company - 

Loans on mortgages (first liens) upon which not more than one year's 
interest is due 

Interest due and accrued on said mortgage loans 

Stocks and bonds owned absolutely by the company: 

Par Value. 

Omnibus Cable Company bonds $100,000 00 

Market Street Cable Kailroad Company bonds. 90,000 00 
Powell St. Railway Company mortgage bonds. . 25,000 00 

Oakland City . Gaslight and Heat Co. bonds 50,000 00 

Los Angeles Gas Company bonds 10,000 00 



San Diego Gas and Electric Light Co. bonds 20;000 00 

Riverside Water Company bonds 70,000 00 

City of Portland, Oregon, Water bonds 50,000 00 

Spring Valley Water Company bonds 29,000 00 

California Dry Dock Company bonds 45,500 00 

Pacific Rolling Mills bonds 22,000 00 

IJnionlron Works bonds.- 6,000 00 

60 shares Bank of California stock 6,000 00 

107 shares First National Bank of 8. F. stock., . 10,700 00 

100 shares Anglo-Califor nian Bank stock 5,000 00 

277 shares Grangers Bank of California stock .. 16,620 00 

270 shares Cal. Safe Deposit and Trust Co. st'k . 12,160 00 

450 shares Oakland Bank of Savings stock 22,600 00 

100 shares Savings Bank of Santa Rosa stock... 10,000 00 

1,000 shares California Street Cable Co. stock .._ 100,000 00 

650 shares Presidio and Ferries R. R. Co. stock. 30,260 00 

300 shares N. Beach and Mission R. R. Co. stock 30,000 00 

440 shares Sutter Street Railroad Co. stock 44,000 00 

650 shares Oakland Gaslight and Heat Co. stock 11,000 00 

250 shares Stockton Gaslight and Heat Co. stock 10,000 00 

200 shares Pacific Gas Improvement Co. stock _ 6,666 66 

600 shares California Dry Dock Company stock. 50,000 00 

250 shares Pacific Rolling Mills stock 25,000 00 



Market Value. 
$110,000 00 

113,860 00 
27,600 00 
51,600 00 
10,350 00 
20,000 00 
73,500 00 
56,750 00 
36,106 00 
46,865 00 
23,320 00 
6,125 00 
12,900 00 
15,247 50 
6,250 00 
17,312 50 
14,040 00 
29,250 00 
15,000 00 

111,000 00 
23,376 00 
26,100 00 
35,200 00 
19,250 00 
11,250 00 
13,000 00 
17,500 00 
25,000 00 



Stocks and bonds hypothecated to the 
cash loaned by the company: 

Par Value, 

60 shares Bank of California stock $6,000 00 

188 shares First National Bk S. F. st'k . 18,800 00 

30 bonds Pi oneer Woolen Factory 15,000 00 

100 shares San Francisco Gaslight stock 10,000 00 

25 shares Sonoma County Bank stock. . 2,600 00 

2,950 shares Am. Biscuit Co. stock 295.000 00 

440 shares Masonic Hall stock 4,400 00 

90 bonds G. H. & S. A. R. R. Co. .- 90,000 00 

400 shares Sonoma Co. Bank stock 40,000 00 

20 shares Sonoma Co. Bank stock 2,000 00 

25 shares Savings B'k of Santa Rosa st'k 2,500 00 

10 shares Knapton Packing Co. stock .. 1,000 00 

56 bonds S. P. Branch Railway Co 55,000 00 

48 shares Savings B'k of Santa Rosa st'k 4,800 00 

100 shares Bank of California stock 10,000 00 

205shares Fresno Gaslight stock 20,500 00 

eisharea Bank of Sonoma County stock. 6,100 00 



$906,386 66 $966,540 00 
company as collateral security for 



Market Value. Amt. I^oaned. 
$12,900 00-^ 
26,790 00 \ $35,000 00 
15,000 OOj 
6,900 00 



3,750 00 
221,250 00 

5,060 00 
90,000 00 
44,800 00 

2,240 00 ) 

3,760 OO / 

1,260 00 
55,000 00 

7,200 00 
21,500 00 
10,250 00 

6,832 00 



2,750 00 

2,250 00 

89,000 00 

4,000 00 

76,000 00 

40,000 00 

4,000 00 

960 00 

50,000 00 

4,800 00 

11,000 00 

5,000 00 

4,800 00 



Amount carried forward $583,600 00 $633,472 00 $328,560 00 $1,544,736 71 



$300,000 00 

277,200 00 
996 71 



966,540 00 



36 



REPORT OF THE INSURANCE COMMISSIONER. 
Fireman's Pund iNStrRANCE Company— Con timaed. 



Par Value. Market Value. Am't. Loaned. 

Amount brought forward $583,600 00 $533,472 00 |328,550 00 

300 shares Savings and Loan Society, 

San Francisco, stocK 30,000 00 24,000 00 13,500 00 

20 shares Spring Valley Water Company 

stock 2,000 00 2,000 00 1,600 00 

130 shares Santa Rosa Athenaeum Com- 
. pany stock 13,000 00 13,000 00 8,000 00 



$628,600 00 $572,472 00 $351,550 00 

Cash in office and in banks _ ,.., 

Interest due and accrued on bonds and stocks, not included in " Market 

Value" 

Interest due and accrued on collateral loans - _- - 

Gross premiums in due course of collection 

Bills receivable, not matured, taken for fire, marine, and inland navigation 

risks ,- 

Rents due and accrued , - 

Dae from other companies for reinsurance on losses already paid 



Total 



I/IABIIilTIES. 



Losses adjusted and unpaid $13,159 31 

Losses in process of adjustment > 54,295 79 

Losses resisted 12,725 00 



Total $80,180 10 

Deduct reinsurance thereon 11,196 57 



Gross premiums on fire risks running one year or less, $742,527 43; 

unearned premium, 50 per cent - $371,263 71 

Gross premiums on fire risks running more than one year, 

$522,692 82 ; unearned premium, pro rata 296,194 24 

Gross premiums on marine and Inland navigation risks, $9,528 26; 

unearned premium, 100 per cent --_ __ 9,528 26 

Gross premiums on marine time risks, $95,258 04; unearned 

premium, 50 per cent 47,629 02 

Commissions and brokerage due and to become due 

Marine biUs payable ,. 

Agents balances -- - _ 



Total liabilities, except capital stock . 

Surplus as regards policy holders — 
Capital stock paid up in cash 



Surplus over paid up capital, and all other liabilities 

INCOME. j,.^^ ^^.^^ 

Net cash received for premiums $950,344 53 $164,792 70 

■^ ' - - ' ■ 1 collateral loans . ._. 

I stocks and bonds 



Received for interest on mortgages and collateral loans . 
Received for interest and dividends on s 



Received for rents 
Total cash income , 



EXPENDITURES. ^. ^ . 

Tire. Manne. 

Paid for losses, including $95,819 68 losses in previous 

years — $529,283 84 $82,637 61 

Cash dividends paid stockholders 

Paid for commissions and brokerage _ 

Salaries, fees, and all other charges of officers, clerks, agents, and all other 

employes ..,: - 

Paid lor' taxes. _ 

All other payments and expenditures - 

Total expenditures in cash...- - 



$1,544,736 71 



351,550 00 
133,136 24 

14,289 5t 

2,522 08 

200,362 50 

65,772 64 

175 00 

2,23164 



$2,314,776 31 



$68,983 53 



724,615 23 

19,335 17 

8,140 52 

13,985 68 



$835,060 13 



$1,479,716 18 
1,000,000 00 



$479,716 18 



$1,115,137 23 
39,44194 
43,457 06 
20,438 22 



$1,218,474 45 



$611,921 45 
120,000 00 
147,561 98 

104,577 37 

16,107 21 

112,758 24 



$1,112,926 25 



i 



REPORT OF THE INSURANCE COMMISSIONER. 
Fireman's Fund Insurance Company — Continued. 



37 





RISKS AND PREMIUMS. 








Fire ttisks. 


Premiums 
thereon. 


Marine and Inland 
Bisks. 


Premiums 
thereon. 


In force on December 31 of 

the preceding year 

Written during the year 


$90,187,839 00 
95,016,180 89 


$1,253,084 65 
1,290,389 86 


$2,290,586 00 
16,141,219 00 


$149,266 22 
322,155 11 


Totals 


$185,204,019 89 
82,720,131 89 


$2,543,474 61 
1,136,210 49 


$18,431,805 00 
15,645,431 00 


$471,421 33 
292,392 89 


Deduct expirations and can- 
cellations --.»«--. 




In force at the end of the year- 
Deduct amount reinsured... 


$102,483,888 00 
7,175,821 00 


$1,407,264 02 
142,043 77 


$2,786,374 00 
1,166,332 00 


$179,028 44 
74,242 14 


Net amount in force 


$95,308,067 00 


$1,265,220 25 


$1,630,042 00 


$104,786 30 



HOME MUTUAL INSURANCE COMPANY. 

Located at San Francisco — Organized September, 1864. 



J. F. HOUGHTON, President. 



CHARLES R. STORY, Secretary. 



Joint stock capital authorized $300,000 00 

Joint stock capital paid up in cash ..- 300,000 00 



YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1888. 



Value of real estate owned by the company — 

Loans on mortgages (first liens) upon wnich not more than one year's inter- 
est is due 

Interest due and accrued on said mortgage loans 

Stocks and bonds owned absolutely by the company : 

Par Value. Market Value. 

20 Riverside Water Company bonds $20,000 00 $20,600 00 

5 Portland, Oregon, school bonds -- 50,000 00 51,000 00 

10 Prospect School District bonds, San Bernardino 

Coimty 10,000 00 

5 Grafton School District bonds, San Bernardino 

County 6,500 00 

4 SanPascual School District bonds, Los Angeles Co, 25,000 00 

5 Pasadena School District bonds, Los Angeles Co. 5,000 00 
2 Centralia School District bonds, Los Angeles Co.- 2,000 00 
300 shares Pacific Gas Improvement Company stock 30,000 00 
200 shares Bather Banking Company stock 20,000 00 



10,600 00 

6,890 00 
26,000 00 
2,500 00 
2,080 00 
19,600 00 
22,000 00 



$168,500 00 $163,870 00 

Stocks hypothecated to the company as collateral security for cash loaned 
by liie company : 

Par Value. Market Value. Amt. Loaned. 

225 shares Merced Security Savings Bank 
stock $22,500 00 

425 shares Commercial and Savings Bank 
of San Jos6 stock 42,500 00 

500 shares San Jos6 and Santa Clara 
Railroad stock ^ 50,000 00 

7,000 shares Paul 0. Burns Wine Com- 
pany stock 7,000 00 



$5,825 00 $4,000 00 

25,500 00 I 20,500 00 
10,000 00 J 

6,600 00 3,500 00 



$122,000 00 $46,925 00 $28,000 00 



Amount carried forward. 



$137,000 00 

327,173 60 
4,99 064 



163,870 00 



28,000 00 



$661,034 24 



38 



BEPORT OF THE INSURANCE COMMISSIONER. 
Home Mutual Insurance Company — Continued. 



Amount bought forward 

Cash in office and in banks 

Interest due and accrued on stocks and bonds, not included in " Market 

Value" 

Interest due and accrued on collateral loans 

Gross premiums in course of collection 



Total 



LIABILITIES. 



Losses adjusted and unpaid $300 00 

Losses in process of adjustment 425 00 

Losses resisted 2,400 00 



Total $3,125 00 

Deduct reinsurance thereon - - 2,000 00 



Gross premiums on fire risks running one year or less, $233,437 97; 

unearned premium, 60 percent - $116,718 98 

Gross premiums on fire risks running more than one year, 

$234,445 67; unearned premium, pro rata 121,637 76 

Cash dividends remaining unpaid 

Commissions and brokerage due and to become due 

Total liabilities, except capital stock _ 

Surplus as regards policy holders 

Capital stock paid up in cash , 



Surplus over paid up capital and all other liabilities 

INCOME. 



Net cash received for premiums 

Received for interest on mortgages ,^ 

Received for interest and dividends on stocks and bonds and collateral loans 

Received for rents _-_ _,. 

Received for profit on sale of real estate .- . 



Total cash income . 



EXPENDITURES. 

Paid for losses, including $5,889, losses in previous years _ 

Cash dividends paid stockholders 

Paid for commissions and brokerage. ., 

Salaries, fees, and all other charges of officers, clerks, agents, and all other 

employes .— ._ - _ : 

Paid for taxes 

All other payments and expenditures 

Total expenditures, in cash 



$661,034 24 
90,026 39 

6,650 00 

54 45 

85,798 62 



$843,163 70 



$1,125 00 



238,356 74 

1,136 00 

15,014 62 



$255,632 36 



$587,531 34 
300,000 00 



$287,531 34 



$319,871 15 

28,721 61 

9,961 33 

3,053 75 

9,500 00 



$371,107 84 



$173,678 GO 
36,000 00 
78,803 64 

38,715 00 

6,577 48 

43,624 53 



$377,399 25 



RISKS AND PREMIUMS. 








Kre Risks. 


PremiumB 
thereon. 


In force on December 31, of the preceding year 


$25,177,811 00 
21,932,896 00 


$445,778 90 
405,603 5S 


Written during the year-, ^ 






Totals 


$47,110,707 00 
20,186,250 00 


$851,382 48 


Deduct expirations and cancellations — . 


356,502 70 




In force at the end of the year -. 


$26,924,457 00 
1,440,695 00 


$494,879 78 


Deduct amount reinsured . 


26,996 24 






Net amount in force — - - 


$26,483,762 00 


$467,883 54 





REPORT OF THE INSURANCE COMMISSIONER. 

OAKLAND HOME INSURANCE COMPANY. 

Located at Oakland, California — Organized January, 1880. 



39 



WM. P. JONES, President. 



WM. P. BLOOD, Secretary. 



Joint stock; capital authorized $200,000 00 

Joint stock capital paid up in cash 200,000 00^ 

YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1888. 



Value of real estate owned by the company - 

Loans on mortgages (first liens) upon which not more than one year's 

interest is due - . 

Loans oii mortgages (first liens) upon which more than one year's interest 

is due 

Interest due and accrued on said mortgage loans 

Bonds owned absolutely by the company : 

Par Value. Market Value. 

United States bonds, registered 4J per cent $20,000 00 $21,675 00 

Multnomah County, Ofegon , school bonds 10,000 00 10,250 00 

Baker County, Oregon, school bonds 20,000 00 20,500 00 



Cash in office and in banks 

Interest due and accrued on bonds not included in " Market Value" - . 
Gross premiums in due course of collection - 

Due from other companies for reinsurance, premiums, and brokerage. 

Total 



liabilities. 



Losses adjusted and unpaid -.- $8,552 33 

Losses in process of adjustment _ 16,753 14 

Losses resisted-- 5,323 94 



Total $29,629 41 

Deduct reinsurance thereon _ 8,040 98 



Gross premiums on fire risks running one year or less,$l72,334 66; 

unearned premium, 50 per cent $86,167 32 

Gross premiums on fire risks running more than one year, 

$75,012 57 ; unearned premium, pro rata 43,076 02 

Cash dividends remaining unpaid 

Commissions and brokerage due and to become due 

Due other companies for reinsurance and premiums 

Total liabilities, except capital stock 

Surplus as regards policy holders .- 

Capital stock paid up in cash 



Surplus over paid up capital and all other liabilities . 

INCOME. 

Net cash received for premiums 1 

Received for interest on mortgages 

Beceived for interest on bonds ,-- 

Received for rents 

Received for premiums on United States bonds sold --. 

Total cash income - 



$93,000 00 

98,625 00 

1,431 62 
1,295 68 



52,425 00 
58,686 09 
883 33 
88,621 86 
19,814 37 



$414,682 95 



$21,588 43 



129.243 34 

'766 16 

6,160 85 

3.852 14 



$161,610 92 



$253,072 03 
200,000 00 



$53,072 03 



$289,582 96 
8,867 31 
1,850 00 
5,213 95 
2,050 00 



$307,564 22 



40 REPORT OP THE INSURANCE COMMISSIONER. 

Oakland Home Insurance CoMPANY—Continued. 

EXPENDITURES. 

Paid for losses, including $17,224 85, losses in previous years 

Cash dividends paid stockholders - 

Paid for commissions and hrokerage 

Salaries, fees, and all other charges of officers, clerks, agents, and aU other 

employes - 

Paid for taxes 

All other payments and expenditures 

Total expenditures ^ 




$135,083 08 
16,666 67 
56,721 72 

24,699 68 

5,609 28 

36,6U 07 



$274,394 50 



RISKS AND PREMIUMS. 



Fire Riflka. 



Preiniams 
thereon. 



In force on Decemher 31 of the preceding year . 
Written during the year -. 



Totals -. 

Deduct expirations and cancellations. 



In force at the end of the year , 
Deduct amount reinsured 



Net amount in force - 



112,467,495 00 
22,775,386 00 



$35,242,881 00 
17,963,420 00 



$17,279,461 00 
2,382,960 00 



$14,896,501 00 



$209,053 13 
404,637 00 



$613,690 13 
318,088 76 



$295,601 3B 
48,224 16 



$247,377 22 



SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA INSURANCE COMPANY. 

Located at Los Angeles, Caufobnxa— Organized February, 1885. 



E. F. SPENOE, President. 



D. E. MILES, Secretary. 



Joint stock capital authorized. _$2O0,O00 00 

Joint stock capital paid up in cash ^ 200,000 00 

YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1888. 



Value of real estate owned hy the company 

Loans on mortgages (first hens) upon which not more than one year's 

interest is due -. 

Interest due and accrued on said mortgage loans 

Cash in office and in hanks 

Gross premiums in due course of collection 

Bills receivahle, not matured^ taken for fire, marine, and inland risks _ 

Due from other companies for reinsurance on losses already paid 



Total . 



LIABILITIES. 



Losses adjusted and unpaid $9,014 56 

Losses in process of adjustment L051 00 

•Losses resisted 1,487 40 



Total $11,552 96 

Deduct reinsurance thereon -.- 2,104 87 



Amount carried f orward. 



$85,479 34 

138,503 33 

5,835 24 

38,848 32 

44,164 01 

476 20 
288 36 



$313,594 80 



$9,448 09 



$9,448 09 



BEPOBT OF THE INSURANCE COMMISSIONER. 

Southern California Insurance Company — Continued, 



Amount brought forward 

Gross premiums on fire risks running one year or less, $107,- 
937 33; unearned premium, 50 per cent $63,968 66 

Gross premiums on fire risks running more than one year, $43,- 
634 66; unearned premium, pro rata 26,224 26 

Due and accrued for salaries, rent, etc - 

Commissions and brokerage due and to become due _ 

Due for reinsurance - - -- 



Total liabilities, except capital stock . 



Surplus as regards policy holders . 
Capital stock paid up in cash 



Surplus over paid up capital and all other liabilities. 

INCOME. 

Net cash received for premiums 

Eeceived for interest on mortgages 

Received for rents 



Total cash income . 



EXPENIUTUBES. 

Paid for losses, including $2,527 74 losses in previous years 

Cash dividends paid stockholders 

Paid for commissions and brokerage 

Salaries, fees, and all other charges of officers, clerks, agents, and all other 

employes --. _- , -.- 

Paid for taxes 

All other payments and expenditures 

Total expenditures - 



41 



$9,448 OS 



80,192 92 

705 05 

5,624 22 

1,226 62 



$ 97,196 90 



$216,397 90 
200,000 00 



$16,397 90 



$128,783 61 

15,426 03 

3,926 98 



$148,136 62 



$62,412 35 
12,000 00 
29,490 56 

12,700 75 

1,615 15 

13,159 93 



$131,378 74 



RISKS AKD PREMIUMS. 








Pire Bisks. 


Premiums 
thereon. 


In force on December 31 of the preceding year- .. 


$7,818,278 00 
11,215,651 00 


$127,858 70 
194,941 66 


Written during the year .. 






Totals 


$19,033,929 00 
8,840,500 00 


$322,800 36 
141,808 11 


Deduct expirations and cancellations 




In force at the end of the year . .— 


$10,193,429 00 
1,452,385 00 


$180,992 25 


Deduct amount reinsured - .► - -. 


29.420 26 






Net amount in force ---. --• , -.---».-.------,--_---- 


$8,741,044 00 


$151,571 99 







42 



REPORT OP THE INSURANCE COMMISSIONER. 



STATE INVESTMENT AND INSURANCE COMPANY. 

Located at San Fbancisco— Obganizbd December, 1871. 



GEORGE L, BRANDER, President. 



CHARLES H. GUSHING, Secretary. 



Joint stock capital authorized $400,000 00 

Joint stock capital paid up in cash -. 400,000 00 



YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1888. 



Value of real estate owned by the company 

Loans on mortgages (first liens) upon which not more than one year's in- 
terest is due , 

Interest due and accrued on said mortgage loans 

Stocks and bonds owned absolutely by the company: 

Par Value. Market Value. 

United States bonds, 4 per cent $50,000 00 $64,000 00 

Dakin Publishing Company stock 2,600 00 760 00 



$52,500 00 $64,750 00 
Stock hypothecated to the company as collateral security for cash loaned 

by the company: 

Par Value. Market Value. Ami. Loaned. 
30 shares California Savings and Loan 

Society $3,000 00 $3,750 00 $3,023 22 

Cash in office and in banks 

Interest due and accrued on bonds, not included in "Market Value" 

Interest due and accrued on collateral loans 

Gross premiums in due course of collection - 

Rents due and accrued 



Total 



LIABILITIES. 



Losses in process of adjustment $3,917 13 

Losses resisted ^- 1,800 00 



Gross premiums on fire risks running one year or less, $188,485 26; 

unearned premium _ $94,242 62 

Gross premiums on fire risks running more than one year, 

$52,725 57 ; unearned premium, pro rata 26,663 46 

Cash dividends remaining unpaid , 

Commissions and brokerage due and to become due 

Total liabilities, except capital stock 

Surplus as regards policy holders ,-,_. 

Capital stock paid up in cash 



Surplus over paid up capital and all other liabilities 

INCOME. 



Net cash received for premiums 

Received for interest on mortgages . 

Received for interest on bonds 

Received for rents „ 



Total cash income 



EXFBNDITUBES. 



• Paid for losses, including $5,007 losses in previous years 

Cash dividends paid stockholders 

Paid for commissions and brokerage 

Salaries, fees, and aU other charges of officers, clerks, agents, and employes 

Paid for taxes *. 

All other payments and expenditures 

Total expenditures 



$138,765 12 

211,800 00 
1,739 87 



64,750 00 



3,023 22 

49,887 80 

600 00 

8 79 

63,867 70 

85 00 



$534,427 50 



$5,717 13 



120,906 08 

976 00 

3,802 06 



$131,401 27 



$403,026 23 
400,000 00 



$3.026 23 



$214,498 59 

14,384 52 

1,769 01 

10,186 20 



$240337 32 



$110,337 60 
20,717 00 
44,531 04 
25,770 00 
4,774 51 
Sl,508 65 



$227,638 80 



REPORT OF THE INSURANCE COMMISSIONER. 

State Investment and Insubancb Company— Continued. 



43 



RISKS AND PREMIUMS. 





Fire Risks. 


Premiuma 
thereon. 


In force on December 31 of the preceding year 


$14,060,677 00 
14,110,554 00 


$246,189 93 


Written during the year 


250,943 13 






Totals. - 


$28,171,231 00 
12,910,186 00 


$497,133 06 


Deduct expirations and cancellations . .- -. --- 


233,372 35 




In force at the end of the year 


$15,261,045 00 
1,143,430 00 


$263,760 71 


Deduct amount reinsured ____..-_, »--« --- 


22,549 89 






Net amount in force i 


$14,117,615 00 


$241,210 82 





SUN INSURANCE COMPANY. 

Located at San Francisco—Organized February, 1882. 



C. L. TAYLOR, President. 



E. E. POTTER, Secretary. 



Joint stock capital authorized $300,000 00 

Joint stock capital paid up in cash 300,000 00 



YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1888. 



Value of real estate owned by the company 

Loans on mortgages (first liens) upon which not more than one year's 
interest is due - 

Loans on mortgages (first liens) upon which more than one year's interest 
is due 



Interest due and accrued on said mortgage loans . 
Bonds owned absolutely by the company : 

Stockton bonds, 6 per cent ..— $35,000 00 

Portland, Oregon, bonds, 5 per cent 23,500 00 

Forest Grove. Oregon, bonds, 8 per cent 4,500 00 

Newport, Oregon, bonds, 8 per cent 2,000 00 

Multnomah, Oregon, bonds, 8 per cent 20,000 00 



Par Value. Market Value. 

$36,187 00 

23,963 70 

6,246 60 

2,130 25 

20,588 93 



Cash in office and in banks 

Interest due and accrued on bonds, not included in " Market Value" . 
Gross premiums in due course of collection 

Bills receivable, not matured, taken for fire, marine, and inland risks , 
Due from other companies for reinsurance on losses already paid 

Total : 



LIABILITIES. 



Losses adjusted and unpaid $13,400 60 

Losses in process of adjustment 5,245 90 

Losses resisted _ , 1,000 00 



Gross premiums on fire risks running one year or less, $148,578 21; 

unearned premium, 50 per cent s $74,382 60 

Gross premiums on fire risks running more than one year, 

$74,835 54; unearned premium, pro rata 41,1Q0 93 

Gross premiums on marine and inland navigation risks, $3,696 26; 

unearned premium, 100 per cent - 3,696 26 

Gross premiums on marine time risks, $68,461 88; unearned 

premium, 50 per cent 34,230 94 



Amount carried forward , 



$90,000 00 

257,205 00 

. 2,000 00 
4,162 57 



88,115 48 
16,260 85 

1,844 57 
57,222 87 
27,928 15 

7,116 98 



$550,856 47 



$19,646 50 



163,410 73 



$173,057 23 



44 REPORT OF THE INSURANCE COMMISSIONER, 

Sun Insurance Oompaky— Continued. 

Amount "brought forward _ 

Commissions and brokerage due and to become due 

Totalliabilities except capital stock 

Surplus as regards policyholders — -> 

Capital stock paid up in cash - 

Surplus over paid up capital and all other liabilities 

INCOME. j..^^^ jj^^j^^ 

Net cash received for premiums |174,749 76 $97,955 95 

Received for interest on mortgages ,. . 

Received for interest on bonds _ 

Received for rents _ 

Sundries .' 

Total cash income 

EXPENBITUEES. „. „ . 

Tire. Mann«. 

Paid for losses, including $11,670 43, losses in pre- 
vious years $97,604 59 $60,568 70 

Cash dividends paid stockholders _ 

Paid for commissions and brokerage 

Salaries, fees, and all other charges of officers, clerks, agents, and all other 
employes 

Paid for taxes 

All other payments and expenditures, _. 

Total expenditures , , 



RISKS AND PREMIUMS. 



$173,057 23 
13,926 65 



$186,983 88 



$363,872 59 
300,000 00 



$63,872 59 



$272,705 71 

16,632 44 

5,267 05 

5,550 00 

145 64 



$300,300 84 



$158,173 29 
30,000 00 
44,341 62 

26,399 43 

2,815 38 

20,589 01 



$282,318 73 





rire Risks. 


Premiums 
thereon. 


Marine and 
Inland Risks. 


Premiums 
thereon. 


In force on December 31 of the 
nrecedine vear 


$14,208,065 00 
19,154,644 00 


$205,867 62 
261,610 55 


$796,478 00 
4,738,022 00 


$54,129 28 


Written during the year 


159,719 97 


TotalrS - 


$33,362,709 00 
14,839,155 00 


$467,478 17 
207,736 17 


$5,534,500 00 
3,252,539 00 


$213,849 25 
90,798 33 


Deduct expirations and can- 
cellations.. 




In force at the end of the year. 
Deduct amount reinsured 


$18,523,554 00 
2,816,942 00 


$259,742 00 
36,328 25 


$2,281,961 00 
1,127,757 00 


$123,050 92 
50,892 78 


Net amount in force 


$15,706,612 00 


$223,413 75 


$1,154,204 00 


$72,158 14 



BEPORT OF THE INSURANCE COMMISSIONER. 

UNION INSURANCE COMPANY, 

Located at San Francisco— Organized Apeil, 1865. 



45 



NATHANIEL T. JAMES, President 



JAMBS B. BAILEY, Secretary. 



Joint stock capital authorized $750,000 00 

Joint stocK capital paid up in cash 750,000 00 

YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1888. 



Value of real estate owned by the company 

Loans on mortgages (first liens) upon which not more than one year's inter- 
est is due 

Interest due on said mortgage loans 

Bonds and stocks owned oy the company : 

Par Value. Market Value. 

United States bonds, 4 per cent $200,000 00 $254,000 00 

Oakland City bonds 8,000 00 10,000 00 

Alameda Town bonds- 4,000 00 4,250 00 

Montgomery Avenue bonds, San Francisco 120,000 00 36,000 00 

Burlington, Cedar Rapids, and Northern Railroad 



first mortgage bonds 23,000 00 

Chicago, Burlington, and Quincy Railroad first 
mortgage bonds - 25,000 00 



Chicago and Northwestern Railroad consolidated 
Sinking Fund bonds __ 35,000 00 

Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis, and Omaha Rail- 
road consolidated mortgage bonds 25,000 00 

Chicago, Milwaukee, and St. Paul Railroad (ter- 
minal) mortgage bonds ,._ _ 25,000 00 

Chicago, Rock Island, and Pacific Railroad exten- 
sion and collateral bonds -._ 25,000 00 

Chicago, Rock Island, and Pacific Railroad first 
mortgage bonds 20,000 00 

Delaware, Lackawanna, and Western Railroad first 
mortgage bonds - 2,000 00 

Lake Shore and Michigan Southern Railroad con- 



solidated mortgage bonds 25,000 00 

Michigan Central Railroad first mortgage bonds 25,000 00 

Metropolitan Elevated Railroad (N. Y. C.) first 



21,064 00 


32,437 50 


49,466 65 


29,687 50 


25,250 00 


26,187 50 


26,150 00 


2,713 35 


31,500 00 
32,333 00 


16,800 00 


46,637 50 
61,750 00 
27,500 00 
24,500 00 
22,613 00 



mortgage bonds ^ 15,000 00 

New York Central and Hudson Railroad first mort- 
gage bonds - -.- 35,000 00 

Market Street Cable Railroad (San Prancisco) bonds - 50,000 00 

Powell Street Cable Railroad (San Prancisco) bonds . 25,000 00 

Spring Valley Waterworks (San Francisco) bonds . . 20,000 00 

Spring Valley Waterworks (San Francisco) stock. . . 22,500 00 

$729,500 00 $780,840 00 

Stocks hypothecated to the company, as collateral security, for cash loaned 
by the company: 

Par Value. Market Value. Amt. Loaned. 

200 shares London, Paris, and American 
Bankstock $20,000 00 $20,200 00 $15,000 00 

100 shares Union Savings Bank (Oak- 
land) stock 10,000 00 12,500 00 8,000 00 



$30,000 00 $32,700 00 $23,000 00 

Cash in office and in banks 

Interest due and. accrued on stocks and bonds, not included in " Market 
Value" 

Gross premiums indue course of collection _. 

Bills receivable, not matured, taken for fire, marine, and inland risks 



Total 



$115,000 00 

198,550 00 
783 00 



780,840 00 



23,000 00 
49,680 06 

11,623 00 
99,028 49 
40,558 73 



$1,319,063 28 



46 



REPORT OF THE INSURANCE COMMISSIONER. 



Uniok Insurance Company— Continued. 



LIABILITIES. 



I adjusted and unpaid $22,212 40 

Losses in process of adjustment.-. 41,128 46 

Losses resisted 12,888 87 



Gross premiums ou fire risks, running one year or less, $417,- 

189 40 ; unearned premium, 50 per cent $208,594 70 

Gross premiums on fire risks, running more than one year, 

$162,362 28 ; unearned premium, pro rata 96,961 53 

Gross premiums on marine and inland navigation risks, $8,- 

780 88; unearned premium, 100 per cent 8,780 88 

Gross premiums on marine time risks, $63,286 13; unearned 

premium, 50 per cent 31,642 56 



Unused balances of notes taken in advance for premiums on open marine 

policies 

Due and accrued for salaries, rent, etc , 

Commissions and brokerage due and to become due 

Totalliabilities, except capital stock — .. 



Surplus as regards policyholders 

Joint stock capital paid up in cash 

Surplus over paid up capital and all other liabilities . — 

IBCOMB. j,.^^^ jiarine. 

Net cash received for premiums $565,701 14 $128,854 32 

Received for interest on mortgages 

Received for interest and dividends on stocks and bonds and collateral 
loans 



Received for rents -.. 
Total cash income . 



BXPENDITUEES. 



rire. 



Marine. 



Paid for losses, including $46,311, losses in previ- 
ous years _ $312,861 22 $70,390 37 

Cash diyidends paid stockholders 

Paid for commissions and brokerage - 

Salaries, fees, and all other charges of officers, clerks, agents, and all other 
employes ,_,. - 

Paid lor taxes 

All other payments and expenditures 

Total expenditures 



$76,229 72 



345,979 67 

14,140 56 
3,715 60 
2,416 67 



$442,482 22 



$876,581 06 
750,000 00 



$126,581 06 



$694,556 46 
11,794 06 

21,832 52 
8,461 10 



$736.643 14 



$383,251 59 

30,000 00 

169,181 22 

42,340 92 
15,604 03 
39,439 14 



$679,816 90 





RISKS AND PREMIUMS. 








Fire Risks. 


Premiums 
thereon. 


Marine and In- 
land Eieks. 


Premiums 
thereon. 


In force on December 31 of 

the preceding year 

Written, during the year 


$40,301,147 00 

54,256,418 00 


$482,661 31 
727,287 GG 


$1,510,776 00 
15,780,522 00 


$73,931 00 
238,645 48 


Totals 


$94,557,566 00 
46,342,619 00 


$1,209,948 97 
598,576 86 


$17,291,298 00 
15,529,722 00 


$312,576 48 


Deduct expirations and can- 
cellations .. 


213,880 79 






In force at the end of the 
year ...^. >_..... .......... 


$48,214,946 00 
2,429.819 00 


$611,372 11 
31,820 43 


$1,761,576 00 
569,282 00 


$98,695 69 


Deduct amount reinsured .. 


26,629 68 


Net amount in force 


$45,785,127 00 


$579,561 68 


$1,192,294 00 


$72,066 01 



REPORT OF THE INSURANCE COMMISSIONER, 



47 



PACIFIC MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY. 

Located at San Francisco— -Obgabized December, 1867. 



GEORGE A. MOORE, President. ' J. N. PATTON, Secretary. 
Joint stock capital paid up in cash $100,000 00 



TEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1888. 

INCOME. 

Received for premiums for first year's insurance| j^ffe*^®"^""*^6l'261 19 
Received for premiums for subsequent year's insurance.. 324,769 76 

Total - 584,959 15 

Deduct amount paid for reinsurance 3,131 13 

Total premium income $581,828 02 

Received for interest on mortgage loans 

Received for interest and dividends on bonds and stocks 

Received for interest on premium notes 

Received for interest on other debts due the company 

Received for rents 

Total income 

DISBUS8EMBNTS. 

Paid for losses and additionsj Lffe™^-IIIIII.'ri"'IIIir'IIIII lul^O 32 
Paid for matured endowments and additions _. . 27,286 08 

Total $220,531 99 

Deduct amount received on reinsurance .,. 364 28 

Paid to annuitants--. 

Paid for surrendered policies 

Paid for dividends to policy holders - ^ 

Paid for dividends to stockholders 

Paid for commissions to agents w-.,, 

Paid for salaries and traveling expeilses of agents 

Paid for medical examiners' fees 

Paid for ofl&ce salaries , 

Paid for taxes "- 

Paid for rent 

Paid for advertising 

Paid for printing and stationery -w,^.. 

Paid for legal fees - 

Paid for general expense 

Total disbursements - --. 

ASSETS. 

Value of real estate owned by the company , 

Loans on mortgages (first liens) on real estate 

Loans secured by pledge of bonds, stocks, or other marketable collaterals.. 

Premium notes on policies in force - 

Cash loans to policy nolders on this company's policies assigned as collateral 

Cash value of stocks and bonds owned by the company 

Cash in office and in banks 

Interest due and accrued on mortgage loans. 

Interest accrued on stocks and bonds - 

Interest due on collateral loans _ 

Interest due and accrued on premium notes - 

Gross premiums due and unreported on policies in force Decem- 
ber 31, 1888 $167,775 85 

Gross deferred premiums on policies in force December 31, 1888 20,831 00 

Total $188,606 85 

Deduct loading on above gross amount 43,780 37 

Total admitted assets , 



$581,828 02 

101,110 49 

4,612 50 

• 3,284 45 

6,909 69 

1,708 80 



$699,453 95 



$220,167 71 

3,275 75 

49,532 85 

32,508 97 

10,000 00 

88,426 05 

20,109 16 

5,277 70 

32,218 27 

3,391 44 

4,831 64 

3,636 05 

6,185 m 

3,389 76 

6,801 15 



$489,752 16 



$114,565 40 

1,431,365 58 

1,711 94 

52,576 98 

25,167 34 

23,700 00 

97,107 91 

52,846 30 

345 00 

1,472 13 

8,745 21 



$144,826 48 



$1,954,448 27 



48 ' REPORT OF THE INSURANCE COMMISSIONER. 

Pacific Mutual Life Insurance Company— Continued. 

LIABILITIES. 

Claims for death losses and matured endowments in process 

of adjustment $4,187 00 

Claims for death losses resisted 6,000 00 

Net present value of all outstanding policies in force on December 31, 1888, 
computed according to the American Table of Mortality, with 4^ per cent 
interest _ - 

Reserve on accident policies in force on December 31, 1888 - . 

Total liabilities 

Surplus as regards policyholders 

PREMIUM NOTE ACCOUNT. 

Premium notes on hand December 31, 1887 $48,807 40 

Premium notes received during the year 38,968 28 

Total 

Premium notes used in payment of losses and claims. $404 67 

Premium notes used in purchase of surrendered policies 2,582 26 

Premium notes used in payment of dividends to policy holders. 967 07 

Premium notes used in payment of matured endowments 325 00 

Premium notes redeemed by maker in cash 30,919 70 

Total reduction of premium note account 

Balance of premium notes at the end of the year 



$9,187 00 



1,665,328 00 
127,643 00 



$1,692,168 00 



$262,290 27 



$87,775 68 



35,198 70 



$52,576 98 



EXHIBIT OF POLICIES. 





Whole Life Pol- 
icies. 


Endowment Pol- 
icies. 


All Other Pol- 
icies. 


Total Numbers 
AND Amounts. 




No. . 


Amount. 


No. 


Amount. 


No. 


Amount. 


No. 


Amount. 


In force on December 
31, 1887 


2,736 

676 

5 


$7,063,627 

1,666,116 

18,000 


390 
160 

1 


$940,267 

615,406 

1,000 

17,193 

2,332 


187 


$425,900 


3,313 

725 

7 


$8,429,794 

2,181,622 

21,000 

18,196 

14,132 


New policies issued ._. 
Old poKcies revived ..- 
Old policies increased . 
Additions . 


1 


2,000 
1,003 




11,800 















Totals 


3,316 


$8,759,643 


541 


$1,476,198 


188 


$428,903 


4,045 


$10,664,644 


Deduct policies ceased 

to be in force: 
By death 


38 


$92,079 


A 


$9,194 
22,600 


5 


$11,000 


48 

11 

7 

58 

199 


$112,273 
22,600 


Bv maturitv - - -- - 


Bv exnirv 






7 
2 
4 


23,000 

6,103 

23,000 


23,000 


By surrender 


43 

165 

'""60' 


130,600 

407,600 

1,000 

141,480 


13 
30 


35,000 

54,700 

2,500 

33,000 


170,703 


By la"pse 


486,200 


B v chan ere anddecr ease 


3,500 
174,480 


Not taken 






65 










Total terminated 

Net numbers and 
amounts in force at 
the end of the year.. 


296 
3,020 


$772,669 

$7,986,884 


74 
467 


$166,994 
$1,319,204 


18 
170 


$62,103 
$366,800 


388 
3,657 


$991,756 
$9,672,888 


Policies reinsured 


2 


$28,471 










2 


$28,471 













REPORT OF THE INSURANCE COMMISSIONER. 



49 



PACIFIC SURETY COMPANY. 

Located at San Francisco— Organized May, 1885. 



WALLACE BVERSON, President. 



A. P. REDDING, Secretary. 



Joint stock capital authorized - $100,000 00 

Joint stock capital paid up in cash 100,000 00 



YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1888. 



Loans on mortgages (first liens) upon which not more than one year's 

interest is due _ 

Interest due and accrued on said mortgage loans 

Cash in office and in banks 

Interest due and accrued on savings bank deposits 

Gross premiums in due course of collection 

Total 



LIABILITIES. 



Losses in process of adjustment. - 

Gross premiums on guarantee risks running one year or less, 
$19,039 15; unearned premium, 50 per cent $9,519 57 

Gross premiums on accident risks running one year or less, 
$10,534 38 ; unearned premium, 50 per cent 5,267 19 

Premiums paid in advance .-. 

Cash dividends remaining unpaid 

Total liabilities except capital stock 



Surplus as regards policy holders , 
Capital stock paid- up in cash 



Surplus over paid up capital and all oth er liabilities 

INCOME. Guarantee. Accident. 

Net cash received for premiums .,$17,825 44 $10,727 12 

^Received for interest on mortgages _ 

Received for interest on sayings bank depositsi 

Received for rents - 



Total cash income . 



EXPENDITURES. 

Paid for losses, including $3,252 46, losses in previous years , ,_. 

Cash dividends paid stockholders 

Paid for commissions and brokerage ^ 

Salaries, fees, and all other charges of officers, clerks, agents, and all other 

employes - 

Paid tor taxes. - 

All other payments and expenditures 

Total expenditures _ - 



$93,850 00 

2,409 16 

34,232 66 

986 63 

5,305 92 



$136,784 26 



$2,819 23 



14,786 76 

2,893 55 

65 00 



$20,554 54 



$116,229 72 
100,000 00 

$16,229 72 



$28,552 66 

7,209 12 

661 51 

120 00 



$36,543 19 



$6,052 14 
7,945 00 
3,633 29 

8,132 41 
1,491 74 
4,460 91 



$31,705 49 



50 



BEPORT OF THE INSURANCE COMMISSIONER. 
Pacific Surety Company— Continued. 



RISKS AND PREMIUMS. 





Guarantee Bisks. 


Premiums 
thereon. 


Accident Bisks. 


Premiums 

thereon. 


In force on December 31 of the 
preceding year................ 


$2,302,290 00 
3,162,795 00 


$16,920 81 
21,795 80 


$1,433,500 00 

2,126,000 00 


$10,333 90 
12,272 40 


"JVritten during the year 


Totals 

Deduct expirations and cancel- 
lations 


$5,465,085 00 
2,736,190 00 


$38,716 61 
19,677 46 


$3,559,500 00 
1,746,500 00 


$22,606 30 
11,968 57 




In force at the end of the year .- 
Deduct amount reinsured ...._. 


$2,728,895 00 


$19,039 15 


$1,813,000 00 
22,600 00 


$10,637 73 
103 35 










Net amount in force - 


$2,728,895 00 


$19,039 15 


$1,790,500 00 


$10,534 38 





CALIFORNIA TITLE INSURANCE AND TRUST COMPANY. 

Located at San Francisco — Organized February, 1886. 



GEORGE T. MARYE, Jr., President. 



MILTON B. CLAPP, Secretary, 



Joint stock capital authorized $250,000 00 

Joint stock capital paid up in cash 250,000 00 



YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1888. 

ASSETS. 

Value of real estate owned by the company 

Loans on mortgages (first liens) upon which not more than one year's in- 
terest is due — - 

Cash in office and in banks _ _ 

Plant 

Total 

liabilities. 

Capital stock paid up in cash 

Net surplus 

Total 

INCOME. 

Net cash received for premiums , - 

Received for interest on mortgages .-, 

Received for rents ^ 

Total 

expenditures. 

Paid for commissions and brokerage 

Salaries, fees, and all other charges of officers, clerks, agents, and all other 

employes 

Paid for taxes 

All other payments and expenditures 

Total 



$14,272 67 

108,553 50 

13.696 30 

124,998 51 



$261,520 98 



$250,000 00 
11,520 98 



$261,520 98 



$24,466 75 
7,600 95 
2,141 75 



$34,169 45 



$1,111 20 

20,231 96 
1,972 03 
6,841 12 



$30,156 30 



REPORT OF THE INSURANCE COMMISSIONER. 



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Table No. 48. 



Statement of Office Collections f showing amounts collected from the different Companies for the 
year ending December 31, 1888 j for filing and certifying copies of papers^ taxeSf arid suhstitw- 
tion of securities. 



Name. 



California Companiesi, 

Alta Fire 

An^lo-l^eyada 

California 

Commercial 

J?'ireman's Fund.-. - 

Home Mutual 

Oakland Home 

Southern California 

State Investment 

Sun _. 

Union _ _ 

Pacific Mutual Life 

Pacific Surety- __- 

California Title Ins. and Trust Co, 

Companies of other States. 

Mtnsi 

Agricultural 

Amazon 

American — . 

American Central 

American Fire 

American Fire ^ 

Boylston 

Citizens 

Citizens 

Citizens 

Clinton Fire 

Concordia Fire 

Connecticut Fire 

Continental ^ 

Eliot 

Farragut Fire 

Fire Association of Philadelphia. 

Firemen's 

Firemen's _ 

Franklin Pire 

German ._. 

German- American. 

Germania Fire 

Girard Fire and Marine 

Glen's Falls 

Granite State Fire 

Hanover Fire 

Hartford Fire 

Home 

Howard 

Insurance Co. of Dakota 

Insurance Co. of North America- 
Insurance Co. of the State of Penn. 

Liberty 

Manufacturers and Builders Fire. 

Mechanics and Traders 

Merchants 

Merchants 

Michigan Fire and Marine 

National Fire - 

National Pire 

New Hampshire Fire 

Niagara !^ire 



Amount carried forward- 



Amount. 



$35 00 

20 00 

21 00 
20 00 
20 00 
20 00 
20 00 
34 00 

20 00 

21 00 
20 00 
55 00 
20 00 
20 00 



20 00 
667 47 

30 00 
498 87 

50 00 

1,482 78 

105 67 

178 59 

60 00 
403 30 

20 00 
366 73 

20 00 

20 00 
610 09 
137 60 

41 72 
771 87 
372 36 
352 20 
462 32 

20 00 
854 66 
621 23 
32127 
454 73 

20 GO 
786 61 

20 00 

1,108 06 

685 05 

20 00 

3,440 95 

305 30 

134 68 

75 00 

20 00 
375 58 
149 30 
362 38 
253 47 

46 00 

30 00 
656 36 



$17,667 19 



!NAM£. 



Amount brought forward 

North American _.. 

Oregon Fire and Marine 

Orient , 

Pacific Fire 

Pennsylvania Fire 

People's Fire _ 

Phenix _ 

Phoenix 

Prescott 

Providence- Washington 

Security 

Southern _ 

Springfield Fire and Marine 

St. Paul 

Sun Mutual -.. 

Teutonia 

Traders 

Union - 

United States Fire_- 

Washington Fire and Marine... 

Westchester Fire ^ 

Williamsburg City Fire 

Syndicate _ - 

Germania -.. .-. 

Long Island 

Exchange 

American _ 



Companies of Foreign Countries. 

Atlas - 

British America 

Caledonian _ _-. 

City of London Fire 

Commercial Union , 

Economic Fire 

Fire Insurance Association 

Guardian Fire and Life-. .. 

Hamburg-Bremen 

Hamburg-Magdeburg 

Helvetia Swiss Fire 

Imperial Fire 

Lancashire 

Lion Fire 

Liverpool and London and (ilobe 

London 

London and Lancashire 

London and Provincial Fire 

Magdeburg Pire _ 

Manchester Pire_- 

i^ational - 

New Zealand .-- 

North British and Mercantile.. 

North German Fire. 

Northern 

Norwich Union 

Phcenix 

Prussian National .-. 

Queen ._ 

Royal 

Scottish Union and National 



Amount carried forward $25,889 81 



Amount. 



$17,667 19 

137 60 

20 00 

20 00 

224 59 

1,190 79 

20 00 

1,407 37 

20 00 

137 60 

30 00 

31 50 
20 00 

1,661 30 
361 12 
120 00 

20 00 

20 00 
349 40 

82 04 
671 25 
526 35 
206 71 

65 00 
. 35 00 

ee 50 

65 00 
65 00 



20 00 
20 00 
22 00 
20 00 
20 00 
20 00 
20 00 
20 00 
20 00 
20 00 
20 00 
20 00 
20 00 
20 00 
20 00 
30 00 
22 00 
20 00 
20 00 
22 00 
20 00 
20 00 
20 00 
20 00 
20 00 
20 00 
20 00 
20 00 
20 00 
20 00 
32 50 



KEPORT OF THE INSURANCE COMMISSIONER. 

Table No. 48 — Continued. 



127 



Namb. 



Amount brought forwards 

South British Fire and Marine.. 

Straits Fire 

Sun Fire 

Svea 

Transatlantic Fire 

Union Fire and Marine _ 

United Fire 

Western 

Scania - - 

General Life and Fire 

Marine Companies. 

Alliance Marine 

Australian General 

Baloise 

Boston Marine 

British and Foreign Marine 

Canton 

China Traders 

Chinese 

Fonciere 

Franco-Hungarian --^_ 

GlobeMarine 

Helvetia General 

International Marine..^ 

London and Provincial Marine. . 

Magdeburg General _ 

Mannheim. _. 

Man On ^. 

Maritime - 

National Marine 

North China 

OnTai 

Reliance Marine.,.- 

Sea... 

Standard Marine- 

Straits 

Switzerland Marine 

Thames and Mersey 

The Marine.-- 

Amount carried forward 



$25,889 81 
38 50 
20 00 
20 00 
35 00 
20 00 
20 00 
120 00 
30 00 
65 00 
65 00 



20 00 
120 00 
20 00 
20 00 
20 00 
20 00 
20 00 
20 00 
20 00 
120 00 
20 00 
20 00 
20 00 
30 00 
20 00 
30 00 
20 00 
20 00 
20 00 
20 00 
30 00 
20 00 
20 00 
20 00 
20 00 
20 00 
20 00 
20 00 



$27,113 31 



I^AMB. 



Amount brought forward 

Transatlantic Marine 

Union 

Union Marine - 

Universal Marine 

Yangtsze - 

Indemnity Mutual Marine - 

Life Companies. 

JEtna Life 

Broooklyn Life 

Connecticut Mutual Life 

Equitable Life 

Germania Life 

Hartford Life 

Home Life.-- 

Manhattan Life 

Mutual Benefit Life. 

Mutual Life 

National Life 

New England Mutual Life. 

New York Life _ 

Northwestern Mutual Life. 

Penn Mutual Life - 

Travelers 

Union Central Life. 

Union Mutual Life 

United States Life 

Washington Life -- 

Phoenix Mutual Life. 

Provident Savings Life 

Miscellaneous Companies. 

American Steam Boiler 

American Surety^ 

Employers Liability 

Fidelity and Casualty. . 

Hartford Steam Boiler 

Lloyds Plate Glass. 

Metropolitan Plate Glass..- 

Total 



$27,113 31 

20 00 
120 00 

20 00 

20 00 
120 00 

65 00 



20 00 
30 00 
20 00 
20 00 
20 00 
20 00 
30 00 
20 00 
20 00 
20 00 
30 00 
20 00 
20 00 
120 00 
30 00 
20 00 
130 00 
495 29 
20 00 
20 00 
20 00 
65 00 



20 00 
20 00 
120 00 
20 00 
20 00 
20 00 
20 00 



$28,928 60 



I certify the foregoing to be a full, true, and correct statement of the 
receipts of the Insurance Department of the State of California for the year 
eighteen hundred and eighty-eight, to the best of my knowledge and belief. 

J. C. L. WADSWORTH, 

Insurance Commissioner. 

Subscribed and sworn to before me, this thirty-first day of May, 1889. 
[seal.] GEO. T. KNOX, Notary Public. 



128 REPORT OF THE INSURANOK COMMISSIONER. 

CHAPTER XXVIII. 

An Act to amend section four hundred and forty-seven of the Civil Code of 
the State of California^ relating to the valuation of policies of life insur- 
ance. 

[Approved February 26, 1889.] 

The People of the State of California, represented in Senate and AsseTribly, 

do enact as follows: 

Section 1. Section four hundred and forty-seven of the Civil Code of 
the State of California is amended to read as follows: 

447. Every life insurance corporation organized under the laws of this 
State must, on or before the first day of February of each year, furnish the 
Insurance Commissioner the necessary data for determining the valuation 
of all its policies outstanding on the thirty-first day of December, then 
next preceding. And every life insurance company organized under the 
laws of any other State or country, and doing business in this State, must, 
upon the written requisition of the Commissioner, furnish him, at such 
time as he may designate, the requisite data for determining the valuation 
of all its policies then outstanding; such valuations must be based upon 
the rate of mortality established by the American Experienced Life Table, 
and interest at four and one half per cent per annum; provided j that from 
and after the thirty-first day of December, A. D. one thousand, eight hun- 
dred and ninety-one, such valuations must be based upon the rate of mortal- 
ity established by the Combined Experience or Actuaries' Table of Mortality, 
with interest at the rate of four per cent per annum. When the laws of 
any other State or Territory require of a life insurance company organized 
under the laws of this State a valuation of its outstanding policies by any 
standard of valuation different from that named in this section, the Insur- 
ance Commissioner is hereby authorized to make such valuation for use in 
such other State or Territory, and to issue his certificate in accordance 
therewith. For the purpose of making the valuations, the Insurance Com- 
missioner is authorized to employ a competent actuary, whose compensation 
for such valuations shall be three cents for each thousand dollars of 
insurance, to be paid by the respective companies whose policies are thus 
valued. 

Sec. 2. All Acts and parts of Acts in conflict with the provisions of this 
Act are hereby repealed. 




TRANSACTIOISrS 



CALIFORNIA 



STATE AGRICOLTURAL SOCIETY 



DURINO THE YEAR 1888. 




STATE OFFICE, 



SACRAMENTO^ 
: : : J* D» young, supt. state printing, 
1889. 



STATE BOARD OF AGRICULTURE FOR 1888. 



DIRECTORS, 

CHRISTOPHER GREEN Sacramento. 

JESSE D. CARR Salinas, Monterey County. 

J. MoM. SHAFTER San Francisco, 

G. W. HANCOCK Sacramento. 

FREDERICK COX Sacramento. 

L. J, ROSE San Gabriel, Los Angeles County. 

DANA PERKINS Rocklin. 

E. C. SINGLETARY San Jos6. 

L. U, SHIPPBE '- Stockton. 

JOHN BOGGS Princeton, Colusa County. 

0. M. CHASE San Francisco. 

H. M. La rue Sacramento. 



OFFICERS OF THE BOARD. 

PRESIDENT, 

L. U. SHIPPEE - Stockton. 

SECRETARY, 

EDWIN F. SMITH Sacramento. 

TBEASUEEB, 

L. A. UPSON Sacramento. 

SUPEEINTEHDENT OF PARK, 

G.W.HANCOCK Sacramento. 

SUPERINTENDENT OF PAVILION, 

H. M. La rue Sacramento. 



STATE AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY. 



AN ACT 



TO PROVIDE FOR THE MANAGEMENT AND CONTROL OF THE STATE AGRI- 
CULT QRAL SOCIETY BY THE STATE. 

[Approved April 15, 1880-] 

The People of the State of Galiforniay represented in Senate and Assembly, do enact as follows : 

Section 1. The State Agricultural Society is hereby declared a State institution. 

Sec. 2. Within ten days after the passage of this Act, the Governor shall appoint twelve 
resident citizens of the State, who shall, when organized, constitute a State Board of Agri- 
culture, who shall, except as hereinafter provided, hold office for the term of four years, 
and until their successors are appointed and qualified. Vacancies occurring from any 
cause in the Board shall be filled by appointment of the Governor for the unexpired term 
of the office vacated. 

Sbc. 3. Within ten days after their appointment, the persons so appointed shall qualify, 
as required by the Constitution, and shall meet at the office of the State Agricultural 
Society, and organize by the election of one of their number as President of the Board and 
said society, who shall hold said ofi&ce of President for the term of one year, and until his 
successor is'dected and qualified. The Board shall also elect a Secretary and Treasurer, 
not of their number, who shall each hold office at the discretion of the Board. 

Sec. 4. At the same meeting the members of the Board shall, by lot or otherwise, clas- 
sify themselves into four classes of three members each. The term of office of the first 
class shall expire at the end of the first fiscal year; of the second class, of the second year ; 
of the third class, of the third year; of the fourth class, at the end of the full term of four 
years. The fiscal year shall be from the first of February to the first of February. 

Sec 5. The State Board of Agriculture shall be charged with the exclusive management 
and control of the State Agricultural Society as a State institution ; shall have possession 
and care of its property, and be intrusted with the direction of its entire business and 
financial affairs.' They shall define the duties of the Secretary and Treasurer, fix their 
bonds and compensation, and shall have power to make all necessary changes in the Con- 
stitution and rules of the society, to adapt the same to the provisions of this Act, and to 
the management of the society, its meetings and exhibitions. They shall provide for an 
annual Fair or exhibition by the society of all the industries and industrial products of 
the State, at the City of Sacramento; movlded, that in no event shall the State be liable for 
any premium awarded or debt created by said Board of Agriculture. 

Sec. 6. The Board shall have power to appoint all necessary Marshals and police to 
keep order and preserve peace at the annual Fairs of the society; and the officers so 
appointed shall be vested with the same authority for the preservation of order and peace, 
on the grounds and- in the buildings of the society, that executive peace officers are vested 
with by law. 

Sec 7. Said Board shall use all suitable means to collect and disseminate all kinds of 
information calculated to educate and benefit the industrial classes, develop the resources, 
and advance the material interests of the State, and shall, on or before the first day of 
February of each year, report to the Governor a full and detailed account of their trans- 
actions, statistics, and information gained, and also a full financial statement of all funds 
received and disbursed. They shall also make such suggestions and recommendations as 
experience and good policy may dictate to the improvement and advancement of the 
agricultural and Kindred industries. 

Sec 8. The Superintendent of State Printing shall, each year, print and bind in cloth 
four thousand volumes of said transactions, and deliver the same to said Board of Agri- 
culture for distribution and exchange. He shall also do such job printing as said Board 
may require to carry out the provisions of this Act. 

Sbc 9. The Directors or Board of Managers of each county and district agricultural 
society or association, and of county, district, or State horticultural and stock breeding 
association or society, organized and acting under the laws of this State, shall report 



4 TRANSACTIONS OF THE 

annually, on or before the first day of April, to the State Board of Agriculture, the name 
and Post Office address of each officer of such society or association; and, on or before 
the first day of December, shall report to the Board of Agriculture the transactions of 
said society, including the premiums offered, the list of stock and articles exhibited, and 
the premiums paid ; the amount of receipts and expenditures for the year, the new indus- 
tries inaugurated, and any and all facts and statistics showing the development and extent 
of the industries, products, and resources of the country or district embraced within the 
management of such society or association; provided, that the provisions of this Act shall 
not apply to any Board of Commissioners or other body organized under the laws of this 
State, the object of which is to promote vinicultural industries, unless such Board or body 
shall voluntarily request the privilege of making such reports as are called for by this Act, 
in which case this Board or body shall enjoy equal privileges as are accorded to other 
institutions devoted to agriculture. ^ „ ^ 

Sec. 10. To facilitate such reports, the State Board of Agriculture shall have prepared, 
and shall furnish such societies with necessary schedules and blanks for such reports, and 
such State Board shall include such reports from societies and associations, or so much 
thereof as they may deem advisable, in their report to the Governor. 

Sec. 11. When said State Board of Agriculture shall have been organized and classified 
as provided herein, the Secretary of the Board shall report such organization and classi- 
fication to the Governor. He shall also report any vacancy that may occur in said Board 
at any time. ^ , , i -, 

Sec. 12. All laws and parts of laws in conflict with this Act are hereby repealed. 

Sec. 13. This Act shall take effect and be in force from and after its passage. 



STATE AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY. 



^ OOIsrSTITUTIOl^ 

OF THE 

CALIFORNIA STATE AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY. 



[Revised and adopted by the State Board of Agriculture, April 20, 1886.] 



NAME. 



Section 1. This soc^iety shall be called " The California State Agricultural Society." 
* object. 

Sec. 2. It shall be the object of this society to encourage the cultivation of the soil, and 
the general development of all the agricultural resources of this State. 

Sec. 3. To foster every branch of mechanical and household arts calculated to increase 
the comforts of home life. 

Sec. 4. To extend and facilitate the various branches of mining and mining interest. 

aL£MBEBSHIP. 

Sbc. 5. Annual Members. — Any person who shall pay into the funds of this society the 
sum of five dollars, may become a member of the same; such membership to expire at 
V the end of the current fiscal year. 

Sec. 6. Life Members. — ^Any person may become a member for life by the payment of 
fifty dollars ; or, if already a member, by the payment of forty-five dollars, or by serving 
a full term as a member of the State Board of Agriculture, and shall thereafter be exempt 
from all dues and assessments. 

Sec. 7. Honorary and Corresponding Members. — Any person whom the Board shall pro- 
pose may be elected an honorary or corresponding member, and shall enjoy, free of charge, 
all the privileges of the society, except voting and holding office. 

Sbo. 8. Privileges of Members. — Any citizen of this State, being a life member of this 
society, shall be furnished with a personal badge for his separate use, which shall entitle 
him to admission to all the exhibitions of the society, the quarter-stretch, the Grand Stand 
at Park, during his lifetime, and a separate ticket for the use of his wife and minor chil- 
dren only, which will entitle them to admission to aU the exhibitions of the society, each 
day, as follows : a coupon for the Park (morning), a coupon for the Park (afternoon), a 
coupon for Pavilion afternoon and evening, and shall be permitted to compete for pre- 
miums in any and all departments. 

Annual members will be furnished with a ticket that will entitle him, accompanied by 
a lady, and one child under fifteen years of age, or, if purchased in the name of a lady, 
will admit the owner and lady, and one child under fifteen years of age, twice daily at 
Park and Pavilion, and permission to compete for premiums in any and all departments. 

Sec. 9. Expulsion of Members. — Any member who shall present for exhibition any article 
or animal which he is not entitled oy the rules of the society to exhibit, or who shall 
attempt to deceive, or be guilty of a breach of good faith toward the society, may be 
expelled by a vote of two thirds of the members present at any meeting of the Board; 
provided, always, that no member shall be expelled unless written notice of the alleged 
offense shall have been served on him, or left at his usual place of residence at least 
twenty days previous to the action. 

OFFICERS. 

Sec. 10. The officers of this society shall consist of twelve Directors, to be appointed 
by the Governor, who shall constitute a State Board of Agriculture, seven of whom shall 
constitute a quorum. The Board shall be charged with the exclusive management and 
control of the State Agricultural Society as a State institution ; shall have possession and 
care of its property, and be intrusted with the direction of its entire business and financial 
afiairs; shall nave power to make all necessary changes in the Constitution and rules of 
the society; shall provide for an annual Fair or exhibition by the society of all the indus- 
tries and industrial products of the State, at the City of Sacramento, and such other 
exhibition as they may deem important. They shall elect one of their members as Presi- 
dent of the Board and society, and a Treasurer and Secretary, not members of the Board. 
They may also appoint, annually, as officers of the Board, a chemist, a botanist, a miner- 
alogist, a geologist, a metallurgist, an ornithologist, and an entomologist, and define the 



6 



TBANSACTIONS OF THE 



duties of each. They may appoint such committees on the various departments of agri- 
culture, mining, and manufactures, either generally or for specific purposes, as they may 
deem important for the best interests of the State, and require such committees to report 
the results of their investigations to the Board at such times as may be named by them. 

Sec. 11. Duties of President— The President shall preside at all meetings of the Board 
and of the society; shall have power to call special meetings of the Board when neces- 
sary, and at the written request of ten members may call eytra meetings of the society; 
shall appoint all meetings not otherwise provided for ; and shall sign all financial and 
official documents emanating from the society, and not otherwise provided for. In the 
absence of the President from any meeting of the Board or society, any Director may be 
called to the chair, and, during such meeting, and for the completion of any business 
transacted, or ordered at the same, shall have the same powers as the President. 

Sec. 12. Duties of Secretary. —The Secretary shall conduct the correspondence of the 
Board or society, keeping copies of all important letters written in the name or on behalf 
of the Board or society, holding the same free to the inspection of any member of the 
Board or society, at any regular meeting of the same. He shall also receive and file all 
letters addressed to the Board or society, holding the sanie subject to the Board of Direct- 
ors. He shaU attend all meetings of the society and the Board, keeping a full record of 
the proceedings of each in a book for that purpose. He shall prepare and publish all 
notices of meetings, shall keep a roll of standing committees, and call the same (noticing 
absences) whenever desired to do so by the Chair; shall sign all certificates for honorary 
and corresponding and life memberships, and forward the same to those entitled to receive 
them. He shall keep, in a book prepared for that purpose, the nanie and address of every 
member ; shall prepare and sign all gratuitous or complimentary cards or tickets of admis- 
sion ; shall countersign all diplomas, certificates of merit, etc., awarded by the Board, and 
forward the same to their respective claimants. He shall be ex ofiicio Librarian; shall 
keep the seal and all the plates, dies, engravings, etc., belonging to the society, and shall 
cause to be struck therefrom such medals and impressions as may, from time to time, be 
required. He shall have charge of aU specimens, models, plants, seeds, books, etc., and 
arrange, prepare, or distribute the same under the direction of the Board. He shall pre- 
pare all reports to be made by the Board to the society, and to the State. He shall receive 
all moneys due or payable to the society, and pay the same to the Treasurer, taking his 
receipt therefor ; shall hold all bonds filed by officers of the society, for the faithful per- 
formance of their duty, and all vouchers for every class of expenditure. He shall coun- 
tersign all drafts ordered by the Board, and aU certificates of annual and life membership, 
and keep an account of the same in a book as they are issued, and shall, in December of 
each year, prepare a tabular statement of the receipts and expenditures of the Board 
according to the law organizing the same. 

Sec. 13. Duties of the Treasurer. — The Treasurer shall receipt for aU funds at the hands 
of the Secretary, and shall disburse the same only on the order of the Board, attested by 
the President and the Secretary. He shall also hold in trust all certificates of stock, 
and shall transfer, invest, or dispose of the same only by direction of the Board. He 
shall file with the Secretary a bond for the faithful performance of his duties, said bond 
to be approved by the Board, and shaU, at the annual meeting, make to the society a 
detailed report of all his transactions. 

STANDING COMMITTEES. 

Sec. 14. Committee of Finance. — The Committee of Finance shall consist of five mem- 
bers of the Board, tbe President being one, whose duty it shall be to audit the Secretary's 
and Treasurer's accounts, to examine and approve all bills before they are paid, to have 
general supervision of the finances of the society, and to report their transactions and 
financial condition of the society in full to the Board whenever called on so to do. 

Sec. 15. Library Committee. — The Library Committee shall consist of four members of 
the Board, and the Secretary, whose duty it shall be to have the general supervision of the 
library and cabinet, and make all necessary rules and regulations for the government of 
the same (said rules and regulations being subject to the approval of the Board), to sug- 
gest such means for the safe-keeping and enlargement of both the library and cabinet as 
they raay deem expedient, and to make a full report of their transactions, together with 
the state of the department under their charge, at each annual meeting. 

Sec. 16. Visiting Committee.—The Visiting Committee, to be appointed by the Board, 
from their own number, shall visit and examine all farms, orchards, vineyards, nurseries, 
field crops, irrigating works, agricultural machine works, agricultural machinery in oper- 
ation, etc., which maybe entered for competition, and which require examination at other 
times and places than the annual Fair; to award premiums for the same according to the 
schedule, and recommend such gratuities as they may deem proper, and make a full 
report to the Board at least one day previous to the annual Fair. 

Sec. 17. Printing aad Publication Committee.— The Committee on Printing and Publica- 
tion shall consist of five (the President and Secretary being two), whose duty it shall be 
to contract for and superintend, under the direction of the Board, all printing and pub- 
lishing necessary for the society. 

OFFICE AND BOOMS. 

Sec. 18. The office, rooms, library, and cabinet of the Board and society shall be per- 
manently located at the Capital of the State. 



STATE AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY. 



LAWS RELATING TO DISTRICT AGRICULTURAL ASSOCIATIONS. 



AN ACT 



TO FORM AGRICULTURAL DISTRICTS, TO PROVIDE FOR THE ORGANIZA- 
TION OF AGBICULTUBAL ASSOCIATIONS THEREIN, AND FOR THE 
MANAGEMENT AND CONTROL OF THE SAME BY THE STATE. 

[Approved April 15, 1880.1 

The People of the State of Calif ornia^ repi'esented in Senate and Assembly j do enact as follows: 

Section 1. The Counties of Alameda, Contra Costa, and San Francisco shall constitute 
Agricultural District No. 1. 

Sec. 2. The Counties of San Joaquin, Calaveras, Fresno, Kern, Merced, Mariposa, Stan- 
islaus, Tulare, and Tuolumne shall constitute Agricultuxal District No. 2. 

Sec 3. The Counties of Sutter, Yuba, Butte, Colusa, Tehama, Yolo, and Sacramento 
shall constitute Agricultural District No. 3. 

Sec. 4. The Counties of Sonoma, Marin, Solano, Napa, and Lake shall constitute Agri- 
cultural District No. 4. 

Sec 5. The Counties of Santa Clara and San Mateo shall constitute x^gricultural Dis- 
trict No. 5. 

Sec 6. The Counties of Los Angeles, San Diego, San Bernardino, Santa Barbara, Ven- 
tura, and Inyo shall constitute Agricultural District No. 6. 

Sec. 7. The Counties of Monterey, Santa Cruz, San Luis Obispo, and San Benito shall 
constitute Agricultural District No. '/. 

Sec. 8. The Counties of Nevada, Placer, El Dorado, Amador, Alpine, and Mono shall 
constitute Agricultural District No. 8. 

Sec 9. The Counties of Mendocino, Humboldt, and Del Norte shall constitute Agri- 
cultural District No. 9. 

Sec. 10. The Counties of Siskiyou, Trinity, and Shasta shall constitute Agricultural 
District No. 10. 

Sec. 11. The Counties of Plumas, Lassen, Modoc, and Sierra shall constitute Agricult- 
ural District No. 11. 

Sec. 12. Any fifty or more persons representing a majority of the counties within any 
one of the districts above constituted, may form an association for the improvement of 
the material industries within such district, and when so formed the association shall be 

known and designated by the name of Agricultural Association, and by such name 

and style shaU have perpetual succession, and shall have power and authority to contract 
and be contracted with, to sue and be sued, to have and use a common seal, to purchase 
and hold and lease real estate, with such buildings and improvements as may be erected 
thereon, and raay sell and lease and dispose of the same at pleasure. The said real estate 
shall be used by such association for the i)urpose of holding exhibitions of horses, cattle, 
and other stock, of the agricultural, horticultural, viticulturai, mechanical, manufactur- 
ing, and domestic products of such district, with view to the improvement of aU the 
industries in the same. 

Sec 13. The officers of such association shall consist of eight Directors, who shall con- 
stitute a District Board of Agriculture for District Number , a President, who shall 

be one of their number, and a Secretary and Treasurer, not of their number. 

Sec 14. Within ten days after the formation of an agricultural association within any 
of the districts above constituted, in accordance with the provisions of this Act, and 
notice of such formation to the Governor, the Governor shall appoint eight resident citi- 
zens of such district as members of a District Board of Agriculture for said district, 
whose term of office shall be four years, except as hereinafter provided. 

Sec 15. Within ten days after their appointment, the persons so appointed shall qual- 
ify, as required by the Constitution, and shall meet at a place within the district, and 
organize by the election of one of their number President of the Board and association, 
who shall hold said office of President one year, and until his successor is elected ; they 
shall also elect a Secretary and Treasurer. 

Sec. 16. At the same meeting the members of the" Board shall, by lot or otherwise, 
classify themselves into four classes of two members each. The terms of office of the 
iirst class shall expire at the end of the first fiscal year; of the second class, of the second 
fiscal year; of the third class, of the third fiscal year; and of the fourth class, at the end 



8 



TRANSACTIONS OF THE 



of the full term of four years. The fiscal year shall be from December first to December 
first. 

Sec. 17. Each association so formed and org^anized is hereby declared and shaU be 
recognized a State institution, and the Board so appointed and qualified shall have the 
exclusive control and management of such institution for and in the name of the State, 
and shall have the possession and care of aU the property of the association, and shall fix 
the terms of office, and the bonds of the Secretary and Treasurer, and determine their 
salaries and duties. They shall have power to make all necessary by-laws, rules, and 
regulations for the government of the association and the management of its prudential 
and financial affairs. They shall provide for an annual Fair or exhibition by the associa- 
tion of all the industries and industrial products In the district, at such time and place as 
they deem advisable ; j/rovided, that no District Pair shall be held in any of the districts 
at the same time of the State Fair; and provided further, that the State shall in no event 
be Uable for any premium offered, or award, or for any debt contracted by any District 
Board of Agriculture or Agricultural Association. 

Sec. 18. When any District Board of Agriculture shall have been classified and organ- 
ized as herein provided, the Secretary of the Board shall report such classification and 
organization to the State Board of Agriculture; he shall also report the same to the Gov- 
ernor, and shall report any vacancy that may occur in the Board to the Governor, who 
shall fill the same by appointment for the unexpired term. 

Sec. 19. All laws and parts of laws in conflict with this Act are hereby repealed. 

Sfic. 20. This Act shall take effect from and after its passage. 



STATE AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY. 



AN ACT 



TO AMEND AN ACT ENTITLED "AN ACT TO POEM AGRICULTUKAL DIS- 
TRICTS, TO PROVIDE FOR THE ORGANIZATION OF AGRICULTURAL 
ASSOCIATIONS THEREIN, AND FOR THE MANAGEMENT AND CONTROL 
OF THE SAME BY THE STATE," APPROVED APRIL 15, 1880. 

[Approved March 9, 1885.] 

The People of the State of Calif omia^ represented in Senate and Aswmbly, do enact as follows: 

Section 1, Section eighteen of said Act is hereby amended so as to read as follows: 
Section 18. When any District Board of Agriculture shall have been classified and 
organized as herein provided, the Secretary of the Board shall report such classification 
and organization to the State Board of Agriculture. He shall also report the same to the 
Governor, and shall report any vacancy that may occur in the Board to the Governor, 
who shall fill the same by appointment for the unexpired term. The Governor shall have 
the power and authority to remove a Director at any time for good and sufficient cause, 
and to appoint a Director to fill the vacancy. 
Sec. 2. This Act shall take effect immediately. 



AN ACT 

TO AMEND SECTIONS THREE, FOUR, NINE, AND ELEVEN OF AN ACT ENTI- 
TLED "AN ACT TO FORM AGRICULTURAL DISTRICTS, TO PROVIDE FOR 
THE ORGANIZATION OF AGRICULTURAL ASSOCIATIONS THEREIN, AND 
FOR THE MANAGEMEi^T AND CONTROL OF THE SAME BY THE STATE," 
APPROVED APRIL 15, 1880, SO AS TO CREATE TWO ADDITIONAL DIS-^ 
TRICTS. 

[Approved March 6, 1883.] 

The People of the State of Calif omia^ represented in Senate and Assembly , do enact cts follows: 

Section 1. Section three of the Act of which this is amendatory, entitled an Act to 
form agricultural districts, to provide for the organization of agricultural associations 
therein, and for the management and control of the same by the State, approved April 
fifteenth, eighteen hundred and eighty, is amended to read as follows : 

Section 3. The Counties of Butte, Colusa, and Tehama shall constitute Agricultural 
District Number Three. 

Sec. 2. Section four of said Act is amended to read as follows : 

Section 4. The Counties of Sonoma, Marin, Solano, and Napa shall constitute Agricult- 
ural District Number Four. 

Sec. 3. Section nine of said Act is amended to read as follows : 

Section 9. The Counties of Humboldt and Del Norte shall constitute Agricultural Dis- 
trict Number Nine. 

Sec. 4. Section eleven of said Act is amended so as to read as follows : 

Section 11. The Counties of Plumas, Lassen, Modoc, and Sierra shall constitute Agri- 
cultural District Number Eleven. The Counties of Mendocino and Lake shall constitute 
Agricultural District Number Twelve; and the Counties of Sacramento, Yolo, Yuba, and 
Sutter shall constitute Agricultural District Number Thirteen. 

Sec. 5. This Act shall take effect immediately. 



AN ACT • 

TO AMEND SECTION EIGHT OF AN ACT ENTITLED 'AN ACT TO FORM 
AGRICULTURAL DISTRICTS, TO PROVIDE FOR THE ORGANIZATION OF 
AGRICULTURAL ASSOCIATIONS THEREIN, AND FOR THE MANAGE- 
MENT AND CONTROL OF THE SAME BY THE STATE," APPROVED APRIL 
15, 1880. 

[Approved March 14, 1885.] 

The People of the State of Calif omia^ represented in Seriate and Assembly , do enact as follows: 

Section 1. Section eight of the Act recited in the title hereto is amended so as to read 
as follows: 

Section 8. The Counties of Nevada and Placer shall constitute Agricultural District 
Number Seventeen; and the Counties of Alpine, Amador, El Dorado, and Mono shall 
constitute Agricultural District Number Eight. And the sum of three thousand dollars 
is hereby appropriated out of any money in the State Treasury not otherwise appropri- 
ated, for the aid of District Agricultural Society Number Seventeen, to be audited and 
paid the same as appropriations for other district agricultural societies. 

Sec. 2. This Act shall take effect immediately. 



AN ACT 

TO AMEND SECTIONS TWO, FOUR, SIX, SEVEN, AND EIGHT OF AN ACT 
ENTITLED "AN ACT TO FORM AGRICULTURAL DISTRICTS, TO PROVIDE 
FOR THE ORGANIZATION OF AGRICULTURAL ASSOCIATIONS THEREIN^ 
AND FOR THE MANAGEMENT AND CONTROL OF THE SAME BY THE 
. * STATE," APPROVED APRIL 15, 1880, SO AS TO CREATE CERTAIN ADDI- 
TIONAL DISTRICTS. 

[Approved March 9, 1887.] 

The People of the State of Calif omia^ represented in Senate and Assembly ^ do enact as follows: 

Section 1. Sections two, four, six, seven, and eight t>f an Act entitled '*An Act to form 
agricultural districts, to provide for the organization of agricultural associations therein, 
and for the management and control of the same by the State," approved April fifteenth, 
eighteen hundred and eighty, is hereby amended so as to read as follows : 



10 



TRANSACTIONS OP THE 



Section 2. The Counties of San Joaquin, Merced, Stanislaus, and Tuolumne shall con- 
stitute Agricultural District Number Two; the Counties of Tulare and Kern shall consti- 
tute Agricultural District Number Fifteen ; the Counties of Merced, Mariposa, and Fresno 
shall constitute Agricultural District Number Twenty-one. 

Section 4. The Counties of Sonoma and Marin shall constitute Agricultural District 
Number Four; and the Counties of Solano and Napa shall constitute Agricultural District 
Number Twenty-five; the Counties of Los Angeles, San Bernardino, and Ventura shall 
constitute Agricultural District Number Six, and the County of Santa Barbara shall con- 
stitute Agricultural District Number Nineteen. 

Section 7. The Counties of Monterey and San Benito shall constitute Agricultural 
District Number Seven ; the County of Santa Cruz shall constitute Agricultural District 
Number Fourteen; the County of San Luis Obispo shall constitute Agricultural District 
Number Sixteen. 

Section 8. The Counties of Nevada and Placer shall constitute Agricultural District 
Number Seventeen ; and the County of El Dorado shall constitute Agricultural District 
Number Eight; the Counties of Alpine, Inyo, and Mono shall constitute Agricultural 
District Number Eighteen ; the Counties of Amador and Calaveras shall constitute Agri- 
cultural District Number Twenty -six. 

Sec. 2. This Act shall take eflect immediately. 

Sec. 3. All Acts and parts of Acts in conflict with this Act are hereby repealed. 



AN ACT 



TO AMEND SECTION ONE, TO REPEAL SECTIONS TWO, THREE, FOUR, FIVE, 
SIX, SEVEN, EIGHT, NINE, TEN, AIND ELEVEN, AND TO RENUMBER SEC- 
TIONS TWELVE, THIRTEEN, FOURTEEN, FIFTEEN, SIXTEEN, SEVEN- 
TEEN, EIGHTEEN, AND NINETEEN OF AN ACT ENTITLED "AN ACT TO 
FORM AGRICULTURAL DISTRICTS, TO PROVIDE FOR THE ORGANIZA- 
TION OF AGRICULTURAL ASSOCIATIONS THEREIN, AND FOR THE 
MANAGEMENT AND CONTROL OP THE SAME," APPROVED APRIL 15, 
1880, AMENDED MARCH 6, 1883, AMENDED MARCH 9, 1885, AMENDED 
MARCH 14, 1885, AMENDED MARCH 9, 1887, TO REPEAL ALL LAWS 
AMENDATORY THEREOF, AND TO PROVIDE FOR THE REORGANIZA- 
TION OF EXISTING DISTRICTS AND THE FORMATION OF NEW DIS- 
TRICTS. 

[Approved March 6, 1889.] 

The People of the State of California, represented in Senate and Assembly ^ do enact as follows: 

Section 1. Section one of said Act is hereby amended so as to read as follows : 
Section 1. The several counties of this State divided and classified into agricultural 
districts and numbered as follows, to wit: The Counties of San Francisco and Alameda 
shall constitute Agricultural District No. 1. The Counties of San Joaquin and Stanislaus 
shall constitute Agricultural District No. 2. The Counties of Butte, Tehama, and Colusa 
shall constitute Agricultural District No. 3. The Counties of Sonoma and Marin shall 
constitute Agricultural District No, 4. The Counties of San Mateo and Santa Clara shall 
constitute Agricultural District No. 6. The Counties of Los Angeles and Veutura shall 
constitute Agricultural District No. 6. The Counties of Monterey and San Benito shall 
constitute Agricultural District No. 7. The County of El Dorado shall constitute Agricult- 
ural District No. 8. The Counties of Del Norte and Humboldt shall constitute Agricult- 
ural District No. 9. The Counties of Siskiyou and Trinity shall constitute Agricultural 
District No. 10. The Counties of Plumas, Sierra, Lassen, and Modoc shall constitute Agricult- 
ural District No. 11. The Counties of Lake and Mendocino shall constitute Agricultural 
District No. 12. The Counties of Sutter, Yolo, and Yuba shall constitute Agricultural Dis- 
trict No. 13. The County of Santa Cruz, save and except that part thereof southeast 
of the line beginning at a point where the Aptos Creek empties into the Bay of Monterey 
and extending directly northeast to the boundary line of Santa Clara County, shall con- 
stitute Agricultural District No, 14. The Counties of Tulare and Kern shall constitute 
Agricultural District No. 15. The County of San Luis Obispo shall constitute Agricultural 
District No. 16. The County of Nevada shall constitute Agricultural District No. 17. 
The Counties of Alpine, Mono, and Inyo shall constitute Agricultural District No. 18. The 
County of Santa Barbara shall constitute Agricultural District No. 19. The County of 
Placer shall constitute Agricultural District No. 20. The Counties of Merced, Mariposa, 
and Fresno shall constitute Agricultural District No. 21. The County of San Diego shall 
constitute Agricultural District No. 22. The County of Contra Costa shall constitute 
Agricultural District No. 23. All that part of Santa Cruz County southeast of a line 
beginning at a point where the Aptos Creek empties into the Bay of Monterey, and 



STATE AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY. 



11 



• « ^iTf^ct line northeast to the boundary line of Santa Clara County, shall 
extending ^^ ? ^^^^^ 24. The Counties of Solano and Napa shall constitute 

constitute Agricultu^ Sacramento and Amador shall constitute 

Agricultural Distric^^^ xne u ^^^^^ ^^^^ constitute Agricultural Dis- 

tSricultural ^^LTnl,"^?;/^'? s«n Cm ^/dino shall constitute Agricultural District No. 



Sec ii. '^^'^ — p n 
are i^^re^yQ^^Ffons twelve thirteen, fourteen, fifteen, sixteen, seventeen, eighteen, nine- 

^^'- % twX are here^^^^^^ as 'follows respectively, to wit: Section twelve 

teen, and ^^f V^. ^1^"^^ thirteen is hereby numbered three, section fourteen is 

'' ^T^l^r^h^rldfon^^^^^^ is hereby numbered five, section, sixteen is hereby 

hereby nuinbereaiour,se^^^^^ hereby numbered seven, section eighteen is hereby 

SSSblred Ight, sectfon n?n^^^^ is hereb/ numbered nine, and section twenty is hereby 
Numbered ten ^j^^ndatory of «An Act to form agricultural districts, to Provide for 

..^^^- t'r.^tf\anoi aSicultural associations therein, and for the management and control 
i^ fheTame " a^^^^^^ eighteen hundred and eighty, and all laws or parts 

*i«t«inconflictwiththis Act are hereby repealed. , ,, .^ 

""Virs S Act sh^li take effect and be in !orce from and after its passage. 



12 



TRANSACTIONS OP THE 



AGRICULTURAL DISTRICTS 

ORGANIZED UNDER AN ACT APPROVED APRIL 15, 1880. AND AMENDED 
MARCH 6, 1883; MARCH 14, 1885; MARCH 9. 1887; MARCH 6, 1889. 



No. 1. The Counties of San Francisco and Alameda shall constitute Agricultural Dis- 
trict No. 1. 

No. 2. The Counties of San Joaquin and Stanislaus shall constitute Agricultural Dis- 
trict No. 2. 

No. 3. The Counties of Butte, Tehama, and Colusa shall constitute Agricultural District 
No. 3. 

No. 4. The Counties of Sonoma and Marin shall constitute Agricultural District No. 4. 

No. 5. The Counties of San Mateo and Santa Clara shall constitute Agricultural Dis- 
trict No. 5. 

No. 6. The Counties of Los Angeles and Ventura shall constitute Agricultural District 
No. 6. 

No. 7. 
No. 7. 

No. 8. 

No. 9. 
No. 9. 

No. 10. 
No. 10. 

No. 11. 



The Counties of Monterey and San Benito shall constitute Agricultural District 

The County of El Dorado shall constitute Agricultural District No. 8. 

The Counties of Del Norte and Humboldt shall constitute Agricultural District 

The Counties of Siskiyou and Trinity shall constitute Agricultural District 

The Counties of Plumas, Sierra, Lassen, and Modoc shall constitute Agricultr 
Ural District No. 11. 
No. 12. The Counties of Lake and Mendocino shall constitute Agricultural District 



No, 12. 

No. 13. 
No. 13. 

No. 14. 



The Counties of Sutter, Yolo, and Yuba shall constitute Agricultural District 



The County of Santa Cruz, save and except that part thereof southeast of the 
line beginning at a point where the Aptos Creek empties into the Bay of Monterey and 
extending directly northeast to the boundary line of Santa Clara County, shall constitute 
Agricultural District No. 14. 
No. 15. The Counties of Tulare aud Kern shall constitute Agricultural District No. 15. 

The County of San Luis Obispo shall constitute Agricultural District No. 16. 

The County of Nevada shall constitute Agricultural District No. 17. 

The Counties of Alpine, Mono, and Inyo shall constitute Agricultural District 



No. 16. 
No. 17. 
No. 18. 
No. 18. 
No. 19. 
No. 20. 
No. 21, 



The County of Santa Barbara shaU constitute Agricultural District No. 19. 
The County of Placer shall constitute Agricultural District No. 20. 
The Counties of Merced, Maripbsa, and Fresno shall constitute Agricultural 
District No. 21. 

No. 22. The County of San Diego shall constitute Agricultural District No. 22. 

No. 23. The County of Contra Costa shall constitute Agricultural District No. 23. 

No. 24. All that part of Santa Cruz County southeast of a line beginning at a point 
where the Aptos Creek empties into the Bay of Monterey, and extending in a direct line 
northeast to the boundary line of Santa Clara County, shall constitute Agricultural Dis- 
trict No. 24. 

No. 25. The Counties of Solano and Napa shall constitute Agricultural District No, 25. 

No. 26. The Counties of Sacramento and Amador shall, constitute Agricultural District 
No. 26. 

No. 27. The County of Shasta shall constitute Agricultural District No. 27. 

No. 28. The County of San Bernardino shall constitute Agricultural District No. 28. 

No. 29. The Counties of Calaveras and Tuolumne shall constitute Agricultural District 
No. 29. 



STATE AQRICULTUBAL SOCIETY. 



13 



REPORT. 



Office of the State Board of Agriculture, \ 
Sacramento, February 1, 1889. j 

His Excellency R, W. Waterman, Governor of California: 

Sir: The closing of our fiscal year on this date makes it incumbent upon 
us to present a review of our transactions for the term. Herewith is 
handed the* usual statistical matter, together with many other items of 
interest pertaining to the welfare of the State, as well as our complete 
financial statement. The reports of the District Agricultural Associations 
accompany, and form a part of this volume. 

The closing of the thirty-fifth year of our existence as a society that 
was formed to aid and encourage agriculture and mechanical arts, and 
the improvement of all breeds of live stock, at a period when California 
was in great need of an organized and cooperative policy on the part of 
those who had the forethought to inaugurate the encouragement of these 
industries, that their followers might be benefited and the State put upon 
a more substantial footing, reminds us that their anticipations were right, 
and that they labored not in vain. 

The year just past has been one of unusual prosperity to our State; in 
short, the tillers of the soil have had an abundant harvest, and it is safe 
to say that when this character of success comes among our community, 
the results in all walks of life are gratifying. 

The products of the soil that are here reaped in abundance insures us 
the prosperity we have. The opportunities and advantages offered to the 
industrious leave but little chance for failure to those who are attentive 
and energetic. In no other country are the people favored with climate, 
soil, and markets as are those of California. 

In all occupations contentment reigns supreme, so much so that we are 
often charged with egotism and exaggeration, whereas they are but the 
expression of a happy people, and those who come among us and stand 
shoulder to shoulder in our achievements readily become converts, and 
are even more enthusiastic than many of the older settlers of this prolific 
commonwealth. 

the value of annual exhibitions. 

The vast increase of interest taken each year in the annual exhibitions 
given by this Board is a sure indication that our pioneers " builded better 
than they knew." Each season brings renewed vigor, successful experi- 
ments, extended facilities, abundance of products, an unusual number of 
visitors from abroad, and oceans of applications for information regarding 
our State. In years past it required all our energy to induce exhibits, and 
all our tact to attract home seekers. The result of this tenacity to make 
ourselves known has attracted strangers from all parts of the civilized 
world. 

These alluring reports have received the indorsement of the new-comers, 
and resulted in our success, so that praises sung have had the desired 



14 



TKANSACTIONS OF THE 



effect, and we are no longer looked upon as a distant land where the wan- 
derer went to se^k pastures anew, but are known in all lands and climes 
as the land of prosperity and plenty. 

The results are made manifest in the large increase of small homes and 
the cutting up of large tracts of land for this purpose. It is shown by the 
increased inquiries by new-comers for suitable locations, and by increased 
shipment of products, that were heretofore little known outside of our own 
border. 

At our annual exhibitions new faces are seen, and the exhilarating effect 
upon the stranger is noticeable at once; as in the days of old, the gold 
fever was contagious, so now the land fever, the fruit fever, and the home 
fever have been spread instead, until the procession of new-comers to this 
State has taxed the facilities of the transportation companies far in excess 
of their ordinary capacity to accommodate the travelers. 

Our aim each year is to so arrange the exhibition that it shall illustrate 
to the best advantage the various productive resources of the entire State; 
our constant study is to most thoroughly inform all by actual observation 
of the great agricultural capabilities of our soil, the }deld of our shops, 
mines, mills, and forges, to the end that the hesitating settler will be over- 
come by the .facts shown, cast aside all prejudices, and become one of us. 

Our extensive pavilion was heretofore looked upon as one out of all 
proportion, and of greater capacity than was needed, which premoni- 
tion was predicated upon experience of years past, when the few producers 
of the State were only induced to exhibit their products by the personal 
solicitation of the workers that managed the institution. The responses 
given to these appeals were generally that the growers could sell all their 
products at their doors, and the vast tracts of land uncultivated were 
needed for grazing. But, the almost superhuman efforts of the energetic 
citizens having the management of these exhibitions in hand, has resulted 
as was best shown by the display made in this great building during the 
Fair of 1888, when we were overcrowded for space; and had the coun- 
ties that engaged space not cut down their exhibits, nothing but the 
products of the soil would have covered the one hundred and twenty-four 
thousand square feet of floor space. As it was, the display of agricultural, 
horticultural, viticultural, and mechanical products were never before 
equaled in this or any other State. 

Many of our agricultural implements are unknown outside of this 
State. Our combined harvesters, that cut, thrash, and sack at one opera- 
tion the products of our vast grain fields, thereby enabling the farmer to 
market his yield of grain, if needs be, you might say the day of ripening, 
illustrates the spirit that predominates in our wide awake California 
farmer. 

THE PROPOSED FOREIGN EXHIBIT. 

As has been shown what our efforts are at home in making exhibitions 
of products a successful stimulant to the growth of our State, the same 
principle, if properly carried out in foreign lands, would, in our opinion, 
have the same effect. As the producer was encouraged to produce, he 
must now produce to encourage and build up markets for the large in- 
crease of products. The more products, the more market capacity 
needed; the more market capacity, the more products. Therefore we 
believe in every stimulation of a practical nature that will afford increased 
opportunities to market supplies. We have always advocated object les- 
sons that fully illustrate, by the actual exhibition of products, as more 



STATE AQRICULTURAIi SOCIETY. 



15 



preferable than printed matter of any character. ^'To see is to believe,'' 
to read is but to think. 

An exhibit of California's products in the City of London will awaken a 
new source of demand that can certainly be met by the abundant supply 
•that is bound to come .from our increased acreage each year cultivated, 
and an interest in the "Old World " that will attract capital for invest- 
ment not only in the establishment of small homes, but factories of all 
kinds. The success of one, means a sympathetic movement in all branches 
of trade; therefore all should be interested in spending the money neces- 
sary to make the trial a success. 

The advantages offered in making such exhibits are many. A significant 
index of a future conflict (indeed a present one too) between a higher civ- 
ilization and despotism, may be readily disarmed in this evolution, and 
their actions and reactions, in the ownership of land. Whenever direct 
ownership and indirect ownership come in conflict the latter invari- 
ably yields to the former. So true is it that thousands of vessels of bread 
stuff and meats are regularly sent to Europe from the United States and 
meet in successful competition similar products of the world which are 
produced on lands tilled by indirect ownership, and that too in the face of 
cheap peasant labor. It is highly important that we of California should 
understand this matter thoroughly, for by so doing we may avail ourselves 
of advantages greatly to our interest. Great as the advantage is in being 
able, through the direct ownership of land, to compete in the European 
markets in breadstuffs and meat, the yet greater achievement presents 
itself to the growers of Cahfornia in their ability to compete successfully 
in the costly products of the vine and fruit tree. 

That this can be done may be readily admitted, and if proof is neces- 
sary we need only examine the Custom House records for the past few 
years; two hundred and ten thousand cases of California canned fruits were 
sold in London in one season. This amount, although seemingly large, is 
not by any means all that might be sold, provided proper attention is given 
to the subject; it is only an indication that we can, if we choose, open out 
avenues that will readily create a demand for all we can produce, and 
that too at profitable prices. If accomplished, then the inevitable result 
must be to place California in the front rank of the States of this Union, 
and that with giant strides. We maintain there is a way to accomplish 
this, and that way is to carry out the plan proposed of holding this grand 
exhibition of the products of our soil. The men of action, the men of 
capital and energy, throughout the State, are of one opinion on this sub- 
ject, they earnestly favor and indorse this plan; more than that, they 
desire to see it carried out on a scale at once grand and impressive. 

In America the tiller inherits directly the results of his labor. He is 
careful as to details; his expenses are kept within limit. In short, he 
gives personal attention to receipts and disbursements, and profits by 
experience. Whereas, the entailment of large estates in the Old World, 
under the management of inexperienced men, which, with their inattention 
to production, results in the consuming by expenses of what would be to 
our people a profit, nothing but the cheap labor of Europe prevents in the 
former cases entire failures. So, when competition strikes, they have no 
way of reducing their extravagant ideas and customs, consequently no 
reduction of prices can be made; whereas our products, if properly mar- 
keted, can be sent over and undersell the home productions, for the rea- 
sons assigned. 

To educate the people, then, up to this fact, our products must go over 
in a blaze of glory, as it were. We must do something to attract the 



16 



TRANSACTIONS OF THE 



attention of the consumers. We must in so doing prepare our exhibits as 
to command attention from both press and public. Nor must this be all. 
The quality of our products sent this far from home must be such that they 
speak for themselves. Care and attention in packing must be such as to 
leave no room for doubt that we fully understand our undertaking. It« 
must be fully shown that we come not for a day, but for all time. To 
send our fruit, poorly canned or dried, means failure. To be sure the 
methods of the Old World in preserving fruits are ahead of ours, as a rule. 
To profit by their experience in this industry we* must have the opportu- 
nity to observe and examine into their methods. Would it not be advisa* 
ble to have the individual counties that contemplate sending an exhibit 
on, to each send a Commissioner, selected with a view of gaining knowl- 
edge on this subject that would benefit us in future in the packing and 
preserving of our fruits? As it now is, the producer markets his products 
in the eastern cities in a green state. Could he not do the same in Europe 
in their canned and dried state ? Say that our goods are properly put up, 
and the auction plan introduced, how much longer would it take the pro- 
ducer to get returns than it now does on his green fruit? The situation is 
in his hands; let him not ignore it. Let us profit by the experience of 
other countries, and let that experience be gained by actual observation. 

Take as an example our own exhibition. The farmer attends, observes 
the different breeds of live stock, he is mindful of the fact that when 
numerous breeds are together congregated he can best make selection. 
The particular fancy of a character he admires meets his eye, he purchases 
with a view of improving his own stock, he is aware that the expense of 
breeding and raising good stock is no greater than to raise inferior ones, 
and he profits by his purchase. The seller is encouraged, as he himself 
began this way, and the result is the taxable property of the State is 
enhanced, and the $10, $20, or $50 in premiums awarded has been returned 
many fold. So it will be in the enterprise suggested in making foreign 
exhibits, and our returns are sure to more than ofi*set the outlay. 

FRUIT GROWING AND SHIPPING. 

The advancement in this industry during the year past has been most 
prodigious. The yield from increased acreage, that is now beginning to 
bear, shows to what extent tree-planting has been in the past few years. 

The demand has kept up for our green fruits, and there is a very per- 
ceptible increase of canneries and driers. 

The plan adopted by the organization of the California Fruit Union in 
the handling of fruit is, to our mind, a most acceptable one. It is a cor- 
poration composed of growers, for the shipping and sale of their products 
in the East. They have a total stock issue of twelve thousand six hun- 
dred and fifty-eight shares, held by four hundred and ninety-nine individ- 
uals, scattered through twenty-seven counties. Many, in fact the greater 
portion, have taken stock for only one quarter their acreage, so as each 
share represents one acre of land, they handle in reality the products of 
fifty thousand acres of land set to fruit in this State. So there is little 
wonder that much competition exists in the Eastern States for the agency 
of the Union. This fact enables the Union to be very careful in selection 
and exacting in requirements of those desiring to represent the organiza- 
tion. 

In financial affairs the Union has been quite prosperous. They have 
received during the year from agents some $20,000 commissions, and have 
paid out in expenses about $9,000, leaving a balance on hand of about 



STATE AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY. 



17 



$11,000. As the organization is preeminently a cooperative one, this sur- 
plus, instead of swelling the bank account of any corporation or private 
individual, is returned to the members themselves, after 6 per cent is 
declared on the stock and 2 per cent reserve is set aside; the residue is 
'divided among those who have shipped with them, in proportion to the 
amount so shipped by each one. This will amount to a trifle over 1 per 
cent on the gross sales this season, or will be in reality a return of 1 per 
cent of the amount of commission charged for handling the product. 

In the amount given above for expenses, is included salaries, traveling 
expenses of their eastern manager, who makes Chicago headquarters dur- 
ing the summer, and has general supervision of all agents, advertising, 
and business of the Union, The telephone and telegraphing of this 
organization amounts to about $3,000 per annum, not a cent of which is 
charged to members. 

The Union charged last season a uniform 10 per cent for handling the 
fruit; of this the agents received 7^ per cent (out of which is paid auction- 
eer 2^ per cent at points when auction method of selling is pursued), and 
the remaining 2^ per cent was returned by the agents to the proper officers 
of the Union. 

Had those who shipped through the Union sent their fruit east on their 
own account, they would have necessarily paid 10 per cent, just the same, 
and would in addition have been compelled to pay their own telegraphing, 
which item often runs $10 to the car. 

It is the intent of the Union in handling the great fruit output of the 
State to charge a lower commission for the coming year; how low, they 
are unable to say, but in all probability not to exceed 8 per cent. 

The establishing of the auction method of selling our green and perish- 
able products is one of the very best plans yet inaugurated. This plan 
will lessen the charges and quicken the returns of all fruit handled. This 
is the principal method used in selling our products in Chicago, which is 
the chief market so far, although the prospects are good for both New 
York and Boston, which, with London for our dried and canned fruits, 
will soon overcome the cry of over production. It is only two years since 
we made any attempt of selling our fruits at auction in New York and 
Boston, and the result far exceeded the expectations of the many. 

Chicago receives about .one half of our fruit product, and this plan of 
sale enables the buyers from all places adjacent to receive their fresh sup- 
ply of California fruit without the intervention of the middle man, who 
profits to the injury of the producer, as by the time, under the old system, 
our fruit reached the consumer, the price asked was almost prohibitory, 
so much so that but a small proportion of the people were able to avail 
themselves of this commodity, thereby lessening the demand to the detri- 
ment of the producer. Now, the producer, through the Union, may sell 
almost direct to the consumer, and be interested in all the profits that 
accrue. 

Our early peaches, apricots, and grapes never sold better than under 
this system, nor did they arrive at consumers' hands in such good con- 
dition. This last season much of the table grape crop was so badly 
injured before picking, by the excessive heat of July and August, as to 
render it unfit for shipment. But for this unusual heated term we would 
have made greater shipments than any previous year. As it was our 
grapes carried in poorer condition than for y^ars past, and of course sold 
correspondingly low, and so will bring down the average net for all fruits 
very materially. 

220 



18 



TRANSACTIONS OF THE 



^ The shipment of carload lots of green deciduous fruit to the Eastern 
States during the year of 1888, was about nineteen hundred; of this num- 
ber the Fruit Union, or in other words, the fruit growers, shipped them- 
selves eight hundred and fifty, a gain of ninety carloads over the preced- 
ing year. Had grapes carried well, and as all had a reason to believe 
they would from previous years ^ experience, the Union would have started 
one hundred cars more. 

\ The special train service furnished by the transportation companies was 
excellent in every respect. In point of fact, the time made by the special 
fruit trains was even better than the passenger train shipments, as these 
trains were rarely behind time. 

This year's experience serves to show that shipment of fruit should not 
be made in any other way, as delays are often occasioned upon other 
trains, whereas the special fruit trains have but one object in view, that 
is to get its load to its destination at the earliest moment possible. This 
eight to ten days on the road by the old freight train service will not do 
for this progressive age and increased demand for California fruit. 

As shipments increase further reductions will, no doubt, be made in 
freight rates, when our shippers will be in better condition to compete with 
our eastern fellow workers in years when, as in the one just closed, they 
have full crops and can afford to sell their peaches and grapes at H cents 
per pound, as they did largely the past year. To make our fruit industry 
fairly prosperous we must now receive 5 cents per pound for the fruit in a 
wholesale way. 

The transportation companies have been taxed to their utmost capacity 
to provide suitable cars for the handling of our fruit crop in the past. 
With the thousands of new acres which every year are sending in their 
quota, the problem is one which the railroad companies only can solve by 
the most untiring efforts in building new cars. 

As an illustration of how various portions of the ^ate are coming into 
prominence as fruit-producing sections, one has but to glance at the table 
of shipments showing receipt and distribution of the fruit shipped East for 
the past season. Instead of a great majority coming from one or two points 
we now have many places shipping, and the increase has not come from 
the old established centers, such as Davisville, Natoma, San Jose, Vaca- 
viUe, etc., as, with the exception of Sacramento, they are behind the record 
of 1887, and the increase in the number of cars sent from Sacramento is 
largely due to an increase of small shipments made from all points there, 
to be made up in carload lots. We notice on the list many new places as 
coming into prominence as fruit-shipping points, such as Newcastle, Colfax, 
Santa Rosa, Cordelia, and Mayhews. 

Boston and New York have this year taken, at unusually good prices, 
all the fruit sent there. The Union alone has put one hundred and thirty- 
three cars into these two cities, and others have, without doubt, shipped as 
many more, say in all two hundred and seventy-five carloads, where two 
years ago fifteen carloads at the best were dispatched to them. This pro- 
portion of increase and consumption is certainly very gratifying to those 
who argue on the negative side of over production. 

The total shipment of green fruit from the State during the past season 
will exceed that of 1887 by about one hundred and twenty-five carloads. 
Many more would have been shipped, as the fruit was here, but the cer- 
tainty of a large crop of domestic fruit East, and our inadequate facilities 
for handling, together with chances of failure as to condition, and the fact 
that unless the fruit was fancy the price would be low, prevented a larger 
increase of shipments. 



STATE AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY. 



19 



More fruit was, in consequence, dried and canned. Heretofore prices 
for this character of fruit have been low, but from later advices we believe 
better prices will prevail, and a corresponding increase in shipments will 
result. 

From the Mississippi "River eastward they have not experienced up to 
January, so mild and pleasant a winter for years, a fact which enabled 
shipments of green fruit, such as apples, etc., to be made in barrels long 
after it had been customary, and also created a desire for fresh fruit which 
is not natural when the thermometer is down below zero and the snow 
many feet deep; consequently, there has not been the call for dried fruits 
we usually have and expect during the early winter months. But now the 
green supply has about ceased, and we expect to soon see an upward ten- 
dency in dried fruit prices. 

Those who grow wine grapes have this year made a decided change in 
programme, and many instead of selling their grapes for little or nothing, 
have dried them, and from newspaper reports, the prices offered for this 
article are much more satisfactory and remunerative than selling them at 
prices offered in their green state. 

The winter so far has been very propitious for an abundant crop of fruit 
for the coming season, and, barring accidents, with the increased acreage 
coming into bearing, we should certainly have at a low estimate two thou- 
sand cars of deciduous fruits leaving our well favored State. 

THE WHEAT CROP, 

The year of 1888 opened exceedingly bright for the cereal production of 
California. The acreage sown to wheat was in the neighborhood of three 
million two hundred and fifty thousand. Up to April first, the crops, 
although late, promised well, but the month of April failed to give the 
desired rainfall that is so much needed by growing grain at that particular 
time. Instead of rain, the old enemy of the wheat crops — the hot, dry 
north winds — prevailed most of the entire month. This proved disastrous 
to young grain, and cost the growers at least one quarter of the acreage 
seeded. More favorable weather was had in May and June, and in fact 
up to harvest, that assisted very materially in the maturing of early sown 
grain. The estimated outcome of wheat in 1888 is about twenty-seven 
million seven hundred and fifty thousand bushels, as against a yield of 
nearly twenty-eight million in 1887. 

The year of 1888 can be considered as fairly prosperous for our millers, 
although our trade with China and Japan has been quite* seriously cut into 
by Oregon. As nearly as can be estimated two million barrels of flour 
were turned out by the mills of this State during the year. The exports 
show a slight increase over those of 1887, but are considerably below those 
of 1886. Tables will be found farther on giving the highest, lowest, and 
average prices during each month of the year for No. 1 white wheat, spot; 
also, tables giving the highest and lowest prices of No. 1 feed barley during 
each month of the various options dealt in at the San Francisco Produce 
Exchange Call Board Association, for which, with other data connected 
therewith, we are indebted to Mr. T. C. Friedlander, the obliging Secretary. 

METEOROLOGICAL DEPARTMENT. 

This society has from its own resources, ably assisted by Sergeant James 
A. Barwick, tjnited States Signal Service Observer at Sacramento, issued 
'a report in pamphlet form for the years 1884, 1885, 1886, and 1887, and 



20 



TRANSACTIONS OP THE 



the present report for 1888 being five volumes of climatic matter, culled 
and compiled from various and reliable sources, and replete with meteoro- 
logical lore, including brief, though accurate, descriptions of each county of 
the State. This society feels proud of its efforts on behalf of the State 
to furnish reliable and full data on the peculiar features, conditions, and 
variety of its numerous climates, for it cannot be said, as of many other 
States, " the climate^^^ but the climates of California. 

This State, as those who know it in a meteorological sense know full 
well, can suit the most fastidious and finical hunters after climate, for if 
the coast does not suit them, they can try the valleys, and if not suited 
there, they can hie to the mountains and climb to the eyrie of that noble 
bird, the great American eagle, that soars and builds its nest upon the 
highest pinnacle of this continent, and which is a fit emblem of this 
country. 

This State needs a weather service controlled by itself, so as to be 
enabled to investigate scientifically the peculiarities of its climate, and 
also to discover and define what is termed the frost-belt in and along our 
foothills. Our back reports afford such indisputable evidence that a State 
Weather Service and Crop Report is necessary, that it is needless to dwell 
longer on the subject. 

The people of this State owe very much to Sergeant Barwick for his 
untiring and steady devotion to the gathering and compiling of the most 
complete State weather records of any State in the Union, not even ex- 
cepting those which have a State Weather Service; and as the Sergeant's 
services have been entirely gratuitous for the past seven years, it is cer- 
tainly asking too much of him to continue his full and complete annual 
reports to this society without compensation. And here is where the State 
should step in and take a hand in the matter of gathering weather records, 
by having a Weather Department attached to the State Agricultural 
Society, and obtain the services of the Sergeant through General Greeley, 
the Chief Signal Officer, to assist in its organization. Our annual reports 
are constantly being called for from other States and foreign countries on 
account of its weather records. 

LIVE STOCK. 

One of the first and most staple interests is the breeding of all classes 
of live stock, in California, and the future promises exceptionally fine 
prospects. 

The various improved breeds of horned stock here have such promi- 
nence that insures us the commercial standing given other States less 
favored with advantages, an impetus resulting exceedingly remunerative 
to the breeders of cattle. 

The ^^ breeding up'' of cattle is an advantage that those interested are 
not slow to accept. The introduction and crossing of pure blood in all 
classes, with a view of improving the beef and milk qualities, is the con- 
stant study of successful breeders of cattle, and the increased herds of 
this character that are each season on exhibition at the State Fair is an 
example of what is being accomplished in this respect. It is a highly 
interesting part of the exhibition, and one that attracts the attention of 
all lovers of high-bred stock. 

With our large area of grazing lands we are in a better condition to 
breed on an extensive scale, not only cattle, but sheep, goats, and swine, 
than are many of our sister States. But as new interests are now attract- 
ing the land owners, the raising of sheep and swine has to some extent 



STATE AGKICULTURAL SOCIETY. 



21 



come to be neglected. Where formerly this interest was leading, it is now 
carried on by comparatively few. 

The business of the breeding and raising of horses of all kinds, from 
the fleety thoroughbred to the powerful Clyde, is on the increase, and is 
one of our most successful industries. There is money to be made in this 
business, as the farmer who, by improved breeding, is enabled to sell his 
surplus stock at good prices, can readily substantiate, while those who 
make it a business complain not of the returns made each season. 

In addition to the many staple classes of live stock here bred we are 
fast assuming the lead in the breeding of a class that is commanding the 
attention of all lovers of that noble animal — ^the thoroughbred — throughout 
the United States, thereby creating a market for an additional resource for 
which by reason of climate we are especially adapted to produce. 

The sales by public auction of this one breed of stock, in yearling 
form, for the season of 1888 in the United States amounted to $520,230, 
there being seven hundred and seventy-nine head sold for this sum, and 
they the get of but one hundred and twenty-two stallions, showing an 
average of $667 82. A grand result taking the number into consideration. 

Oneof our principal breeders, taking advantage of the increased demand, 
sold about seventy head of yearling racing colts for $112,000, at an average 
of about $1,600 per head — a phenomenal sale. This event will give Cal- 
ifornia the standing she is entitled to in this important industry. These 
annual sales are a most desirable method, and one which has given 
Kentucky a world renowned reputation as a breeding State, and they have 
already drawn attention to the produce of California by those who are 
desirous of obtaining the produce of our well established breeding farms 
where all can avail themselves of the blood that has proven successful on 
the turf. 

The turf interest to this State is of some magnitude, and should be 
encouraged in every possible way. The breeding and sale of race horses is 
as much of a resource as any other production, and by proper encourage- 
ment can be made valuable to our now prosperous State. This interest 
gave England a prominence that wall last for ages. She is the parent of 
this most fashionable breed of animals. Kentucky was and is still the 
favored spot of America in this interest; but California is fast approaching 
an era when the home of the thoroughbred will here be located; when 
those who are seeking the pure blooded, well muscled colts are bound to 
come to purchase. California now has the reputation of not only producing 
the various necessities of life, but likewise the principal luxuries. The race 
horse is a luxury, and necessarily high priced, which to the producer is a 
grand fault (?), and he can well afford to have it so. 

The raising of standard bred and roadster classes of horses is likewise 
an important factor in this State; the prominence given some of our young- 
sters abroad has turned the attention of this class of buyers to our shores. 
These light harness classes are desirable in all sections of the country, and 
the sales each season of California bred ones are regular and remunera- 
tive to the breeder. 

The breeding of the heavier classes of horses is one of the best paying 
investments that could be made. The demand for truck and delivery 
wagon animals is continual. One of our breeders of this character sells 
at public sale from $30,000 to $40,000 annually.^ 

It is thus apparent that live stock breeding in this State, of the kind 
and character in demand, is in itself one of our greatest industries, and 
one which we desire to encourage in every possible way. 



22 



TRANSACTIONS OF THE 



QUARANTINE LAWS. 



Accompanying this report will be found one from Thos. Bowhill, M. R, 
C. V. S., upon the diseases of live stock in the State. It is clearly shown 
by examinations made that we have in our midst anthrax and Texas 
fever among the cattle, and cholera in swine. 

It is highly necessary that action should be had at once for the extirpa- 
tion of these plagues. Stringent quarantine laws would, in our opinion, 
be great assistance in preventing the importation, when the necessary 
remedies could be applied to eradicate the diseases now here. The 
appointment of a State Veterinarian is one of the first steps necessary, as 
nearly every case afflicted can be traced to importation. Stop this, burn 
all carcasses of animals dying with disease, destroy all afflicted, and bum 
the ranges traversed, this plague can be easily stamped out. Until quaran- 
tine is placed on all stock coming into the State, it is useless to attempt 
its destruction, as the disease travels faster than remedies unless check is 
placed on the fountain head. 

COUNTY EXHIBITS. 

Individual counties showing their productive qualities in competition 
at the State Fair each year, is a portion of the exhibition that much care 
and attention is given to by this Board, and it is with great difficulty that 
the committees arrive at a decision upon the superiority, so nearly equal 
are exhibits. 

The tasty arrangement and great quantity of diversified products 
makes this department of our exhibition the most attractive. A complete 
report by counties is herein given among the valuable papers published 
in this report. As our province is to furnish all information possible on 
the productive quality of our State, no better table of statistics could be 
prepared than the report made upon the exhibits of the many counties at 
the Fair of 1888. It is our intention, as fast as resources will permit, to 
increase the awards in this department, as the money could not be used 
to a better advantage than by encouraging in this way the growing of 
superior products. 

PERMANENT IMPROVEMENTS. 

The keeping up of a great property like that under the supervision of 
this Board is in itself no small item of expense, and as the payment for 
necessary improvements thereto must come out of the profits of our exhi- 
bitions, irrespective of the money appropriated by the State, it is only 
with the most careful management that we are able to keep pace with the 
wants in this regard. The expenditures for building and improvements 
the past year amounts to $18,642 42. Nearly this entire amount was ex- 
pended in raising and otherwise improving the grand and special stands 
at Park grounds. These improvements were absolutely necessary, as the 
structures were fast approaching decay. 

The money necessary for expenditures of this character is supplied 
upon the personal security of members of this Board, who risk its return 
from the resources of the societ3^ The State does not permit the money 
by them given in aid to be expended for permanent improvements; 
consequently it is to the interest of the members of this Board to see that 
the management is such as will justify them in assuming these personal 
risks. 



STATE AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY. 



23 



During the past eight years this item has been of no small amount, 
there having been expended on this account, exclusive of special appropri- 
ations by State and city for the construction of the exhibition building, 
nearly $100,000. It is our intention to make still further improvements 
by the construction of new stabling at the Park as soon as circumstances 
will permit. 

STATE APPROPRIATIONS. 

Contrary to the expectation of many, the State does not pay one dollar 
expended by this Board, over and above the amount appropriated for the 
aid of this society. Nor is it liable in any way for indebtedness incurred. 
The receipts and disbursements amount each year to from $60,000 to 
$75,000, whereas the amount appropriated by the State, as aid, amounts 
to but $17,500, of which $2,500 is for the care and insurance of the exhibi- 
tion building, leaving $15,000, which amount is devoted to the payment 
of premiums (exclusive of racing). Thus the State money is returned to 
the producers, after doing valuable service. We call your attention to 
these facts, to show that whatever money is received from the State is 
expended in a manner that should meet the approval of all. At least, we 
are perfectly satisfied to have comparisons drawn between this and other 
institutions aided by the State, in the expenditure of State funds. 

experts' report. 

The Board of Directors has caused the books and accounts to be thor- 
oughly examined and experted during the incumbency of the present 
Secretary. The experts selected for this work were Mr. A. W. Bell, of the 
First National Bank of Stockton, and J. M. La Rue, Esq., Secretary of the 
San Joaquin Valley Agricultural Association, both of whom are expert 
accountants of many years' experience. After several weeks of continued 
labor these gentlemen submitted the following report: 

Hon. L. U. Shippee, President State Agricultural Society: 

Sir: The undersigned, having been requested by you to fully and care- 
fully examine the books and accounts of the Secretary of the State Agri- 
cultural Society, beg to submit the following report: 

Our work began with the fiscal year commencing February 1, 1881, and 
our study and examination of the books, accounts, and all financial trans- 
actions of the society extended from that date up to and including Decem- 
ber 31, 1887. 

We had full access to all the books and accounts of the society, and to 
any and all memoranda desired or asked for, and we believe made a 
complete and thorough examination. 

The source of the receipts of the society was a matter that received our 
closest attention, and it was found that everything was accounted for* with 
the exception of $3,037 75 on September 16, 1882, which was erroneously 
entered as $3,037 35. 

All disbursements are represented by correct vouchers produced by the 
Secretary, and thoroughly examined by us, but we found that voucher 
No. 156 of 1883 showed the following amount as having been paid: $17 26, 
which was charged up as $13 56, leaving a balance in favor of the Secre- 
tary of $3 70, 

The system of keeping the accounts adopted in August, 1881, and pur- 
sued to date of the termination our work, is as nearly complete as may be, 



24 



TRANSACTIONS OF THE 



especially considering the fact of the volume of business necessary to be 
transacted, and the handling of large and small sums of money during the 
limited space of time permitted during the State Pair. 

The system used for the receipts and disbursements of moneys that per- 
tained to the speed contests is particularly creditable to the officer respon- 
sible, no error being found that was detrimental to the society, and only 
one that could be to its patrons, and that was corrected immediately after 
its discovery and the proper voucher shown for it. 

We find the total number of premiums unpaid and uncharged to be 
$388 — from 1881 to 1887, both years included. All other claims and 
accounts appearing against the society, exclusive of those shown in the 
profit and loss account, and balance sheet for 1887, are paid and vouchers 
on file. We append herewith a full statement of receipts and disburse- 
ments, together with the profit and loss account for each year, showing in 
the latter account a loss of $5,285 69 on December 31, 1887, being the 
net loss (showing indebtedness on this date) for the years 1881 to 1887, 
inclusive. 

We find that the amount of the appropriations received from the State 
of California from 1881 to 1887 was $77,500; that the amount paid for 
premiums was $77,995 36, and, further, that the disbursements on 
account of permanent improvements made by the society, exclusive of the 
appropriations made by the citizens of Sacramento and of the State of 
California for the building of the exhibition building, have been up to 
December 31, 1887, $57,382 87. We inclose herewith the balance sheets 
for the several years named in this report, with our signatures attached to 
same, which have been in our possession since proof 



EespectfuUy 
[Signed: 



submitted. 
] 



ARTHUR W. BELL, 
J. M. La rue, 

Accountants. 



INDEBTEDNESS. 



The continual improvements to the property under the supervision of 
this Board, made necessary by its long usage, compels us to expend each 
year more than our resources will permit, in order to render the property 
useful. It is our intention to continue these improvements until the 
property has an appearance in keeping with the age and not the dilapi- 
dated look of twenty-five years use. 

On Februarj'- 1, 1888, our indebtedness was __ _ $5,968 28 

Expended in building and improvements 1888- _ 18,642 42 

Making total indebtedness September 1, 1888 124,610 70 

At the end of the fiscal year February 1, 1889, we find our assets and 
liabilities as follows: 

Liabilities, 

D, 0. Mills* Co., loan $6,991 68 

Bills payable account 8,028 26 

Stakes due, race accounts _ 2,880 00 

$17,899 94 
Assets. 

Entrances due, account races , $2,260 00 

Bills receivable 401 66 

Cash 901 31 

$3,562 97 

Net indebtedness, February 1,1889 $14,336 97 



STATE AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY. 25 

Showing net gain for the year to be as follows: 

Indebtedness, September 1, 1888 - $24,610 70 

Indebtedness, February 1, 1889 14,336 97 

Net gain for 1888- ^ $10,273 73 

RESUME. 

It is with much gratification that we note the progress made, likewise 
the interest taken by the public in our exhibitions each year. Our meth- 
ods are progressive, and no doubt faults exist, but to all who are of the 
belief that a public institution can be so managed as to satisfy every one, 
we can but say that theory and practice are at great variance in this 
respect. The time given by the members of the Board in aiding the devel- 
opment of the State's resources, is by no means a small item. The amount 
of business transacted each year may not impress the casual observer with 
its magnitude, but a little calm reflection and careful review of the multi- 
farious labors performed in the extensive sphere under the jurisdiction of 
this Board, can but convince that our achievements are an adequate reward 
for the efforts put forth, and in full keeping with the dignity of the State, 
and the world-wide renown so rapidly being acquired by California. 

We append our financial statement in detail, to which we invite careful 
inspection: 

FINANCIAL SUMMARY. 

Amount on hand at commencement of year _ _-- $409 16 

Total receipts from all sources _ _-- 92,391 73 

$92,800 88 

Total disbursements - $91,899 57 

Cash on hand _ 901 31 

$92,800 88 

L. U. SHIPPEE, 
EDWIN F. SMITH, President. 

Secretary. 



26 



Feb. 



TRANSACTIONS OF THE 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 



FEBHUAHY 1, 1888, TO JANUARY 31, 1889. 



SUMMARY. 

RECEIPTS. 

-Cash balance $409 15 

Rent of Park $3,950 00 

Race entries, forfeits, etc 16,720 00 

Running stakes, 1889-90 305 00 

Occident stakes, 1889-90-91 1,456 00 

Park and Pavilion receipts during Fair _. 36,393 00 

Premiums and care of* exposition building — State war- 
rants and rebates _ 17,570 00 

Expense account rebates 184 63 

Building and improvement accounts, sale of wood, re- 
bates, etc 448 16 

Bills payable 8,028 26 

Bills receivable --- 346 00 

D. 0. Mills & Co., current loan __ 6,991 68 

$92,391 73 



DISBURSEMENTS. 

Building and improvements _ $19,090 58 

Expenses 15,435 44 

Premiums paid ( exclusive of racing) 14,256 98 

Race account, purses, stakes, forfeits, and added money. 25,660 00 

Salaries - - 4,787 60 

Bills payable (balance due on note of 1884). 4,500 00 

Insurance 1,465 06 

Interest 1,050 11 

Advertising 1,973 72 

Entrances due, account races 1888 _ 405 00 

Occident stake, 1888, account collections made 1886 and 

1887 885 00 

Occident stake, 1889, return of stakes account death 35 00 

California annual stake, 1888, account declarations 10 00 

California Derby stake, 1888, account declarations 80 00 

Bills receivable 201 66 

D. 0. Mills & Co., account 0. & D. of 1887 ..-- 2,148 43 

Park and Pavilion receipts, account rebate L. M 25 00 

1889 

Feb. l~Cash balance •- 901 31 



$92,800 88 



$92,800 88 



RECEIPTS. 
1888 

Feb. 1— Cash balance $409 15 

Rent. 

Rent of Park, twelve months $3,850 00 

Rentof Pavilion -- 100 00 

$3,950 00 

Races. 

Race No. 1 — Entrances, stakes, and forfeits received $1,120 00 

Race No. 2— Entrances, stakes, and forfeits received 840 00 

Race No. 3 — Entrances, stakes, and forfeits received 480 00 

Race N o. 4 — Entrances, stakes, and forfeits received 260 00 

Amount carried forward $2,700 00 $4,369 15 



STATE AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY, ^^ 

Amount brought forward $2,700 00 $4,359 15 

Race No. 5— Entrances, stakes, and forfeits received 226 00 

Race No. 6— Entrances^ stakes, and forfeits received 450 00 

Race No. 7~Entrances, stakes, and forfeits received --- 60 00 

Race No. 8— Entrances, stakes, and forfeits received 430 00 

Race No. 9— Entrances, stakes, and forfeits received 2,260 00 

Race No. 10 — Entrances, stakes, and forfeits received 1,000 00 

Race No. ll—En trances, stakes, and forfeits received 670 00 

Race No. 12— Entrances, stakes, and forfeits received 760 00 

Race No. 13— Entrances, stakes, and forfeits received 690 00 

Race No. 14— Entrances, stakes, and forfeits received-- 160 00 

Race No. 15— Entrances, stakes, and forfeits received 975 00 

Race No. 16— Entrances, stakes, and forfeits received 600 00 

Race No. 17— Entrances, stakes, and forfeits received -. 700 00 

Race No. 18— Entrances, stakes, and forfeits received 165 00 

Race No. 19— Entrances, stakes, and forfeits received 350 00 

Race No. 20— Entrances, stakes, and forfeits' received 330 00 

Race No. 21— Entrances, stakes, and forfeits received 180 00 

Race No. 22— Entrances, stakes, and forfeits received 900 00 

Race No. 23— Entrances, stakes, and forfeits received 650 00 

Race No. 24— Entrances, stakes, and forfeits received + - 640 00 

Race No. 25 — Entrances, stakes, and forfeits received 680 00 

Race No. 26 — Entrances, stakes, and forfeits received _ 490 00 

Race No. 27— Entrances, stakes, and forfeits received 205 00 

Race No. 28— Entrances, stakes, and forfeits received 540 00 

Race No. 29— Entrances, stakes, and forfeits received 50 00 

$16,720 00 

Munning Stakes of 1889-90. 

The President stake, payments received-- - _ $225 00 

The California Derby, 1889, account declarations 60 00 

The California Breeders' stake, 1889, account declarations 20 00 

$305 00 

Occident Stakes, 1889-90-91, 

Payments made in 1888 in Occidentfor 1889 - $230 00 

Payments made in 1888 in Occident for 1890 - 696 00 

Payments made in 1888 in Occident for 1891 - 630 00 

$1,455 00 

Park and Pavilion Receipts. 

June 30— Printing and Pavilion privileges $881 00 

Sept. 1— Lif e membership. Matt K. Johnson $50 00 

4— Life membership, H. R. Crouch 50 00 

Life membership, R. H. Hawley — -^ 60 00 

Life membership, "Walter E. Brown 50 00 

Life membership, Louis Nicolaus _ _. 50 00 

Life membership, August Heilbron 60 00 

Sept. 5— Life membership, F. C. Knauer 60 00 

7— Life membership, 0. 0, Perkins _ 50 00 

Life membership, Wm. Dwyer 50 00 

Life membership, Geo. E. Erhart 60 00 

Life membership, Frank Bergman _- 50 00 

Life membership, W. 8. Jacobs 60 00 

* Life membership, J. H. Wieland 50 00 

Life membership, A. Meister 60 00 

Life membership, E. C. Atkinson 60 00 

$750 00 

Sept. 3^Double season tickets $1,065 00 

4^Double season tickets 970 00 

5 — Double season tickets _. 1,025 00 

6— Double season tickets 1,805 00 

7 — Double season tickets 790 00 

8~-Double season tickets _ _ 445 00 

10— Double season tickets 470 00 

11— Double season tickets , 196 00 

12— Double season tickets - 140 00 

13— Double season tickets .: _ 123 00 

14^Double season tickets 33 00 

15— Double season tickets (entry clerks ) i 625 00 

^ ^ $7,576 00 

bept. 3— Single season tickets .\ $72 00 

4— Single season tickets 99 00 

5— Single season tickets 90 00 

Amount carried forward $26100 $32,046 15 



28 



TRANSACTIONS OF THE 



Amount brought forward $26100 $32,046 15 

Sept. 6— Single season tickets _ 456 00 

7— Single season tickets 222 00 

8— Single season tickets -- 99 00 

10— Single season tickets _ _ 183 00 

11— Single season tickets L ^ 51 00 

12— Single season tickets ^ 60 00 

13— Single season tickets _ _ 33 00 

14— Single season tickets 6 00 

$1,371 00 

Sept, 4— Children's tickets. _. $0 25 

6 — Children's tickets - - 1 50 

6— Children's tickets 8 00 

7— Children's tickets _ _ 15 60 

8— Children's tickets _ _ 16 76 

10— Children's tickets _ 30 75 

ll—Chlldren's tickets 19 50 

12— Children's tickets 33 50 

13— Children's tickets 35 50 

14— Children's tickets 30 25 

15— Children's tickets - 19 75 

$211 25 

Sept. 3— Single admission tickets ' $14 00 

4— Single admission tickets 55 00 

5— Single admission tickets 127 00 

6— Single admission tickets 794 60 

7— Single admission tickets _. 944 00 

8— Single admission tickets 1,387 00 

10— Single admission tickets 1,958 00 

11— Single admission tickets 1,199 50 

12— Single admission tickets _ 2,669 50 

13— Single admission tickets 2,334 00 

14— Single admission tickets _._ 2,168 00 

15— Single admission tickets 924 50 

$14,575 00 

Sept 6— Grand stand receipts -- $132 00 

7— Grand stand receipts 150 00 

8— Grand stand receipts - 224 00 

10— Grand stand receipts 337 00 

11 — Grand stand receipts - 186 00 

12— Grand stand receipts 230 00 

13— Grand stand receipts ^ 372 50 

14r— Grand stand receipts - 332 50 

15— Grand stand receipts - 36 50 

$2,000 50 

Sept, 6— Quarter-stretch badges - $160 00 

7— Quarter-stretch badges - 65 00 

8— Quarter-stretch badges 20 00 

10— Quarter-stretch badges - 10 00 

11— Quarter-stretch badges - _ 15 00 

12— Quarter-stretch badges ^ 10 00 

13— Quarter-stretch badges 3 00 

14— Quarter-stretch badges 2 00 

$275 00 

Sept, 6— Special stand receipts $69 00 

7— Special stand receipts - 16 00 

8— Special stand receipts ;. — , 18 50 

lOL—Special stand receipts _ 41 00 

11__ Special stand receipts - _ 16 50 

12— Special'stand receipts _ 25 50 

13— Special stand receipts - , 49 50 

14— Special stand receipts 37 50 

15_Special stand receipts _ - 3 00 

(At office) - - 78 00 

$354 50 

Sept. 10— Carriage badges $9 00 

15— Pool privilege _ 6,878 16 

Programmes and Park privileges * ^. 1,178 30 

Sweepstakes (premiums) 249 00 

Art catalogue and Pavilion privileges ,..- ,_ 84 30 

•■ — $8,398 75 

Amount carried forward $59,232 15 



STATE AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY. 29 

Amount brought forward $59,232 15 

Premiums. 

Sept 15— Rebate - -~ $10 00 

Specials 60 00 

State warrant ...... — 17,600 00 

$17,570 00 

Expense. 

Mar. 31-Saleof hay - $45 18 

Sept. 8— Damage to Pavilion chairs paid by Pastors' Union 15 00 

17 — Hay and straw sold at Park 75 65 

Team at Park _ 12 20 

Wood at Park 2 00 

18— Hay at Park 16 50 

21— Hay at Park 8 10 

19_Wood at Park 10 00 

$184 63 

Building and Trnprovements. 

June 4— Sale of house and barn to L. Howe $100 00 

14— Sale of wood by Superintendent Pierson.. _ .._. 43 50 

18— Sale of wood by Superintendent Pierson 5 50 

30— Sale of wood by Superintendent Pierson 13 00 

July 16— Sale of wood by Superintendent Piers on. > __ 25 00 

Sale of wood by Superintendent Pierson.. 19 00 

Aug. 31- Sale of wood by Superintendent Pierson 40 50 

Building and repairs, account City of Sacramento • 201 66 

^ $448 16 

Bills Payable. 

Oct 4— Richards & Knox, account of lumber $3,182 61 

•Sullivan, Kelly & Co., account of paints and oil 961 31 

Huntinp:ton-Hopkina Company, hardware 541 48 

Friend & Terry Lumber Company, account of lumber.. 1,017 25 

Nov. 19— Sacramento Lumber Company, account of lumber 1,360 58 

Dec. 31— W. K. Vander slice & Co., account of medals - . 965 04 

$8,028 26 

Bills Receivable. 

Mar. 30— A, J, Rhoads, note, account of rent $346 00 

$346 00 

J). 0. Mills <& Co. 
1889 

Jan. 31— Overdraft balance - $6,991 68 



DISBURSEMENTS. 



Building and Improvements. 



$6,991 68 
$92,800 88 



Remodeling grand and special stands at Park, per 
specifications - - ,.. 

Extra work not included in original specifications: 
For raising Superintendent's office, building entry 



$8,589 49 



larging Director's stand, work on ctiairs tor special 

stand, water-closets and screens, chinineys, filling in 

under special stand, plumbing and extra repair work. . 3,228 00 

Making new tools _ 100 00 

Building Judge fc stand 717 20 

New addition to park and grounds, including fence, 

building, and stalls - - 2,621 33 

New tank and piping, and pipe for new addition, and 

tearing down old tank -. 849 14 

New troughs, tubs, and general repairs around grounds, 884 71 

Clearing up debris, cartage, materials, tools, etc.- 395 05 

Salary of Superintendent 300 00 

Drawing specifications, etc... «., 100 00 

New floor in conservatory at Pavilion, new tables, etc... 1,306 66 

$19,090 68 

Amount carried forward $19,090 58 



30 



TRANSACTIONS OF THE 



Amount brougtht iorward - _- $19»090 58 

ExpeTise Account. 
1888 

Feb. 4— Hook & Son, repairs $10 00 

5— M. F.Johnson, legal services 19 00 

26~Geor^e Martin, Park watch 50 00 

28— Sundries - 10 10 

March 6--H, S. Crocker & Co., merchandise 27 60 

6— Holbrook, Merrill & Stetson, merchandise 28 10 

31 — Sundries for the month 35 90 

April 7 — H. Latham, expenses account county exhibits 60 00 

27— Weinstock & Lubin, expense 20 00 

30— E. P. Cole, legal seryicee - 260 00 

30— Sundry monthly accounts-- .--- 46 10 

May 29~Painting smoke stack - 20 00 

29~Sundry monthly bills 40 16 

June 14 — Dr. H. Latham, expenses account county exhibits 60 00 

18— Whittier, Fuller & Co., merchandise 71 20 

30— Sundry small accounts - - 20 00 

July 10— One shorthorn herd book 8 00 

12— C. Herndon, extra watchman 6 00 

15— Telephone account, three months 16 66 

30— Sundry monthly accounts , 66 15 

31— W. J. Parker, hay for team - 26 00 

Aug. 6— National Trotting Association dues _ 166 00 

9— Dr. H. Latham, county exhibit expenses --- - 276 00 

W. F. Smith, services - 50 00 

Sept. 1 — M. F. Johnson, legal services 60 00 

Sundry small accounts for August - 62 76 

Sept. 16— J. F. B. McCleery, biUiard exhibitions 66 00 

17— First Artillery Band, music -.'-, 960 00 

J. F. Toomey, transportation for ticket clerks - 31 00 

George Boyne, decorating building 330 00 

William Curtis, 79 tons oat hay, at $12 948 00 

B. A. Johnson, account Directors' stand 349 70 

0. S. Crittenden, services as starter 95 00 

L. B. Clark, 78^ tons stubble straw, at $6 60 610 25 

Prizes for baseball contest 60 00 

WUliam Curtis, 4,165 lbs, oat hay, at $12 25 00 

$4,827 65 

Pavilion Payroll. 

Sept. 17—0. P. Dodge, Assistant Superintendent $146 50 

J. S. Miller, Financial Secretary 75 00 

Norton Bu sh. Superintendent Art Department 260 00 

H. F. Pierson, Superintendent Machinery Hall 80 00 

J. F. Slater, entry clerk _ 90 00 

W. W. Greer, entry clerk - 90 00 

Samuel Blair, entry clerk--- - -. - 89 00 

C. H. Green, chief ticket clerk 60 00 

E. P. Howe, assistant ticket clerk 30 00 

Lee Brown, assistant ticket clerk 30 00 

A. Keithlv, doorkeeper _.. 48 00 

J. P. Wattins, doorkeeper - 49 50 

H. W. Shea, doorkeeper 47 50 

T. T. Burnett, doorkeeper 9 00 

C. B. Herndon, doorkeeper 9 00 

T. C. Pockman, doorkeeper Machinery Department 37 60 

C. T. Sprague, doorkeeper Machinery Department 35 00 

H. Bagwell, doorkeeper Machinery Department --- 28 00 

G. W. Waldron, membership ticket clerk 12 00 

C. H. Green, ticket counter 27 00 

Mrs. V. Johnson, ladies' room - 24 00 

P. Nash, night watch 42 00 

C. B. Herndon, night watch _ 12 50 

W, C. Holt, night watch machinery 37 50 * 

A. J. Muir, gasman 20 00 

T. C. Raglan, watchman ^ 5 00 

W. F. Jorgensen, laborer Art Department 19 60 

P. Memegoena, laborer Art Department- - 44 50 

E. M.Atkinson, messenger 33 00 

L. T. Hatfield, foreman 57 00 

Amount carried forward $1,638 00 $23,918 13 



STATE AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY. 



31 



Amount brought forward $1,538 00 $23,918 13 

Qprit 17— John Ireland, laborer 33 60 

^^ ' Nat Christopher, laborer 2 60 

W. A. Smith, laborer - 64 00 

Hobert Harvey, laborer 67 60 

C. aFolger, laborer 65 00 

W. M, Smith, laborer 60 76 

Frank N old, laborer- S8 00 

T. C. Eaglan, laborer - 66 60 

L. L. Forrest, laborer 67 60 

S.Addison, laborer- _ 60 60 

J. N. Herndon, laborer 63 00 

Hiram Clock, laborer 46 60 

T. M. Prior, laborer - 69 60 

William Jones, laborer 42 00 

Joseph Harris, laborer -- 43 00 

E. Matheur, laborer 42 00 

L. Moreno, laborer , - - 37 00 

T. H, Lambert, laborer - 12 50 

N. Ross, laborer -.. 32 00 

N.M.Wooly, laborer- 14 60 

W. F. Jorgensen, laborer 31 00 

William Keithley, laborer 32 60 

Messenger for Dodge... -- 6 00 

A. F, ThuZl, carpenters' foreman - 72 80 

John Phoff, carpenter 32 76 

F. Richmond, carpenter *, 7 60 

C. J. Gardman, carpenter-- — 32 70 

Sam Stouns, carpenter -.- _ 18 00 

S. A. Rice, carpenter.- 31 29 

J. R. Parker, carpenter - 39 30 

H. Feon, carpenter 19 20 

A. W.Love, carpenter 19 20 

Charles Thomas, carpenter - — - 3 00 

Fred Nold, laborer Machinery Department 66 00 

M. Lucy, laborer Machinery Department-- -.- 46 00 

E. C. Cook, laborer Machinery Department 36 00 

Hugh Davis, laborer Machinery Department 13 00 

John Bateman, laborer Machinery Department 2 00 

$2,971 85 

Park Payroll, 

A. G. Folger, Assistant Superintendent $85 00 

A. H. Estill, clerk of course 46 00 

H. M. La Rue, Jr., entry clerk - 65 00 

James C. Kelly, chief ticket clerk- 46 00 

B. F. Hancock, assistant ticket clerk 22 60 

Albert Pait, assistant ticket clerk 22 60 

George Waldron , membership ticket clerk -. 36 00 

E. M. Atkinson, assistant membership ticket clerk 22 60 

William N ixon, ticket clerk special stand .-. 22 60 

Robert Sullivan, ticket seller 13 50 

A. Spencer, ticket seller 13 60 

Walter Toomey, ticket seller - 13 60 

A. Trainor, ticket seller 13 60 

A. Roblin, ticket seller - - J3 60 

Harry Williams, ticket seller - 13 60 

George Poor man, Assistant Marshal 45 00 

George S. Milliken, Assistant Marshal 45 00 

M. Judge, Assistant Marshal 45 00 

John La Rue, groom badge clerk - 30 00 

James C. Sto vail, forage clerk - 42 00 

George Bo vyer, milk test clerk.., --- 14 00 

A. F. Dray, usher special stand 18 00 

Ralph Hoyt, stairman special stand 22 60 

Paul Maslin, usher Directors stand..- 18 00 

A. G. Hamilton, blackboard clerk 18 00 

James N. HoU, blackboard clerk 18 00 

L. Whiting, Judges' stand --- -.-- --.- 3160 

Chas. Paine, weighmaster ,-- 32 50 

Carter Jackson, day hay watch--- :i 32 60 

Wra. Nonnan, night hay watch 40 00 

C. V. Garret, poultry watch 27 60 

Amount carried forward $926 60 $26,889 98 



32 



TRANSACTIONS OF THE 



Amount brought forward $926 50 $26,889 98 

Sept. 17 — W' Walters and team, hay delivery 68 00 

A. Doermey, hay delivery help - , 28 00 

Wm. Grant, rear porter grand stand 20 00 

Jog. Williamg, rear porter grand stand 20 00 

J as. Drummond, rear porter grand stand 20 00 

P. O'Meara, tire night watch 33 00 

H. A. Guthin, fire day watch 30 00 

T. T. Burnett, gatekeeper 46 00 

C. B. Herndon, gatekeeper _ 45 00 

Jerome Myers, gatekeeper 46 00 

A. McCloud, gatekeeper _ 45 00 

J no. Shellars, gatekeeper 45 00 

R. H. Newton, quarter-stretch - 45 00 

I). M, Walker, stairman 2150 

S. 0. Clough, stairman - 21 50 

A. Foley, exit gate - 22 50 

W.M.WiUard, exit gate 22 50 

D. P. Coon, quarter-stretcli track gate 18 00 

B. May, quarter-stretch gate --- 18 00 

Geo. Kitchie, quarter-stretch gate 18 00 

Dan Foley, track entrance gate 18 00 

L. Sheehan, back gate -- 18 00 

Wm. Avery, gate Judges' stand -.- 18 00 

J. J. Cahill', stairman grand stand 21 50 

D. H. White, grand stand 21 60 

Jno. Perry, grand stand 21 50 

C. Weinrich, ticket taker grand stand 21 50 

Chas. Fey hi, ticket taker grand stand 21 50 

C. Clark, stairman grand stand 10 00 

J. S. Adams, garbage team 16 00 

J. Bollenbacker, carpenter _ 48 00 

T. Suchan, carpenter helper 28 00 

M. O'Meara, cartage on hose cart 2 00 

A. Grubbs, cartage and care of grand stand 25 00 

R. C. Ferguson, cleaning stands during Fair 80 00 

H . Haldrick, team and helper on track _ 138 00 

J. Miilay, laborer 6 00 

J. M. Sullivan, detective 45 00 

John Ward, police 18 00 

C. Petrie, police 16 00 

P. F. Dolan, police 18 00 

P. J. Brown, police 18 00 

D. M. Cox, police 18 00 

Dan Moran, police 18 00 

Wiley Moss, police - 18 00 

L. Spurgeon, police __- 18 00 

Jas. Patterson, police -.- ---- - -- 18 00 

R. Corsaw, police- 18 00 

H. J. Roach, police 18 00 

A. Greer, police 24 00 

John Koflord, police 18 00 

J. E. Gould, police - 18 00 

Hen rv Myers, police _ 18 00 

A. N. Foote, police 18 00 

Jno. MuUery, police 18 00 

Wm. Burns, police - : 16 00 

R. Strouch, police 16 00 

$2,449 00 

Expense Account Continued. 

Sept. 30— Kullman, Salz & Co., tanbark _ $67 50 

John Rooney, 11 tons 772 pounds alfalfa hay, at $10 117 70 

L. N. Billings, 5 tons 510 pounds alfalfa hay, at $10 55 10 

Mrs. Yule, rent of lot 40 00 

Geo. Muddox, account exhibit 15 00 

Indian exhibition 275 00 

Sundry monthly bills 50 10 

Oct. 2— C. H. Holmes, engraving 12 00 

Pacific Electric Works, elec trie bells 32 50 

J. H. Campbell, excavator 75 00 

E. L. Smith, badges _ 20 00 

4— W. J. O'Brien, lime, etc , 40 00 

Amount carried forward $799 90 $29,338 93 



STATE AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY. 



33 



Amount brought forward $799 90 $29,338 98 

qq^ 4^Wm. McLaughlin, freight and cartage 138 15 

W. H. Murray, extra papers , 50 00 

J. A. M. Martin, merchandise 41 75 

J. A. Laflerty, cartage - 60 00 

C. H. Krebs & Co., repairs, etc 164 80 

J. F. Hill, annual blacksmith account - 129 43 

Grangers Business Association, annual grocery account - 181 72 

Goodwin Bros., account of library 1 28 30 

Wm. Caswell, bill posting 113 57 

Sacramento Glass and Crockery Co., filter 13 00 

R. A. Steinegger, mounting __ 60 00 

Pioneer Box Factory, sawdust- 3 00 

Whittier, Fuller <fc Co., repairs 39 65 

A. S. Hopkins & Bro., merchandise , 63 05 

S.J.Jackson, repairs 9 00 

Kirk, Geary & Co., drugs for team _ 6 00 

E. Lyon & Co., merchandise 14 16 

Locke & Lavenson, merchandise _ 53 36 

J. M. Morrison, merchandise ^ 2 30 

J. A. McCormack, bill posting 7 50 

C. McCreary & Co., merchandise.- 48 90 

C. A. Sawtelle, use of cases 6 50 

Stober Bros., repairs - , 7 00 

Telephone Co., three months 17 55 

J. Win terburn & Co., electros 9 75 

F. Wickwire, merchandise _ 36 25 

J. W. Wilson, horse hire 110 00 

C. E. Adams, hay for team - 13 65 

H. S. Crocker & Co*. San Francisco, merchandise _ 47 50 

H. S. Crocker & Co., Sacramento, merchandise 5 65 

I, Be Turk, merchandise _ 32 00 

M. M. Es tee. merchandise 68 00 

F. & T. Lumber Co., lumber 34 28 

Gattman & Wilson, merchandise 111 78 

R. E. Gogings, merchandise _ _ 4 50 

Capital Gas Compauy, fuel 216 00 

Capital Gas Company, electric light, etc 735 00 

Capital Gas Company, gas _ _ 498 30 

Geo. Murray & Son, repairs 14 00 

12— Smith & Muir, annual account park plumbing 195 63 

Smith & Muir, annual account pavilion plumbing 312 11 

26— Western Union Telegraph Co., telegraphing account 17 60 

L. A. McLean, veterinary services - 12 00 

Sundries for the month - 176 35 

Nov. 2--F. Foster& Co., binding.... 30 00 

19— Hay for team - 31 90 

30— Sundries for month 24 40 

Dec. 3— Dan, Foley, labor 9 00 

Miss Hinkson, filling diplomas 32 75 

17— H.Haedrick, plowing field 17 00 

29— Union Ice Company, ice for season 55 35 

J. Cunn ingham, M achinery Departm ent j,^ ^ 

31— H. Haedrick, hay for team _ 32 30 

Sundries for month.-. 28 20 

H. Haedrick, plowing field 99 00 

Jan. 7— Subscription turf journals, etc 25 00 

10— J. Mc Adams, hay.. 15 50 

12 — Heilbron Bros., merchandise — 9 40 

31— Sundries for month 19 70 

$5,187 04 

Fiemiums, 
1888 

T'eb. i~Root, Neilson & Co., account 1887 $20 00 

Mrs. Taylor, account 1887 8 00 

Sept. 16— Ladies' Tournament 300 00 

First Department— Horses, mules, and jacks 2,416 25 

First Department— Cattle 2,041 32 

First Department— Sheep and goats 613 12 

First Department— Swine . 408 75 

First Department— Poultry ^- 205 00 

Second Department— Machinerv and agricultural imple- 
ments 748 00 

Third Department— Textile fabrics 530 00 

Amount carried forward $7,290 44 $34,526 02 

320 



34 



TRANSACTIONS OF THE 



Amount brought forward 17,290 44 $34,526 02 

Sept. 15— Pour th Department— Mechanical products 524 00 

Fifth Department— Agricultural products ~ 723 00 

Sixth Department— Horticultural products - 989 50 

Seventh Department— Fine Arts. 1,138 00 

Eighth Department— County exhibits -- 2,500 00 

Ninth Department^Miscellaneous 127 00 

Medals, silverware, etc _ - .--- 966 04 

14,256 98 

Races— 1888. 

Race No. 1— Stakes 1,120 00 

Race No. 2— Purse 1,200 00 

Race No. 3— Purse 300 00 

Race No. 4 — Stakes and added money .-L 510 00 

Race No. 5 — Stakes and added money ,.- 525 00 

Race No. 6— Stakes and added money 850 00 

Race No. 7— Purse - -- 250 00 

Race No. 8 — Stakes and added money _ 730 00 

Race No. 9— Stakes and added money 3,600 00 

Race No. 10— Purse 1,000 00 

Race No. 11 — Stakes and added money 1,020 00 

Race No. 12- Stakes and added money _ 1,000 00 

Race No. IS— Stakes and added money 1,190 00 

Race No. 14— Purse 300 00 

Race No. 15— Stakes and added money _ 1,375 00 

Race No. 16— Purse 1,080 00 

Race No. 17— Purse _- 1,000 00 

Race No. 18 — Stakes and added money 365 00 

Race No. 19— Stakes and added money _ _ 750 00 

Race No. 20— Stakes and added money - _ 630 00 

Race No. 21— Purse - - 300 00 

Race No. 22— Purse 1,000 00 

Race No. 23— Stakes 650 00 

Race No. 24— Purse 800 00 

Race No. 25— Stakes and added money , 880 00 

Race No. 26— Stakes and added money 890 00 

Race No. 27— Stakes and added money 605 00 

Race No. 28— Stakes and added money _ — 840 00 

Race No. 29— Purse _ 250 00 

Special 250 00 

$25,560 00 

Entrances Due. 

Sept. 15— Race No. 3— A. Tietiens, on " Ontario " $60 00 

Race No. 7— A. Wakeman, on "Etta W." 25 00 

Race No. 14~A. Wakeman, on "Etta W." 30 00 

Race No. 29— A. Wakeman, on "Etta W." 25 00 

Race No. 21— T. Bally, on "Little Phil" 30 00 

Race No. 29— L. A. Blasingame, on " Hermes" 25 00 

Race No. 14-B. P. Hill, on " Gladstone" 30 00 

Race No. 14— B, P. Hill, on "Adam" 30 00 

Race No. 21-B. P. Hill, on "Mikado" 30 00 

Race No. 21— B. P. Hill, on "Adam" ..., 30 00 

Race No. 14— Robert Munroe, on " Pickpocket" 30 00 

Race No. 21 — Robert Munroe, on " Pickpocket " ._ _ 30 00 

Race No. 21— John Clark, on "Spray" 30 00 

405 00 

Salaries, 

Edwin F. Smith, Secretary $2,400 00 

James Muir, Janitor — 900 00 

Hiram Clock, Watchman 600 00 

A. J. Hopper, Assistant Secretary 300 00 

Trackman- .• 587 60 

$4,787 60 

Bills Payable, 

D. O. Mills & Co.— Balance on note of 1884 $4,500 00 

$4,500 00 

Insurawie. 

Sundry agencies, insurance on Pavilion $1,000 00 

Sundry agencies, insurance on grand stands 375 05 

Sundry agencies, insurance on office, etc 80 00 . 

. $1,455 05 

Amount carried forward $85,490 66 



STATE AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY. 35 

Amount brought forward $86,490 65 

Interest. 

D. O. Mills & Co., account old note and current account. $693 44 

California State Bank, account land purchase _- 356 67 

$1,050 11 

Advertising. 

Mar, 15— Spirit of the Times - - $30 00 

Oct. 2-8pirit of the Times --- 200 00 

Chronicle — - - 200 75 . 

Call Publishing Company - 140 60 

Daily Examiner - 133 82 

Alta Publishing Company -- 79 40 

Bulletin .-— 95 40 

Post Publishing Company - 50 00 

Daily Report.— - 50 00 

Biiral Press 50 00 

Breeder and Sportsman -..- 242 00 

Record-Union - 206 00 

Bee _ 107 00 

Nevada Transcript - 15 00 

California Patron - 45 00 

The Argonaut ._ 30 00 

News Letter _ 25 00 

Tribune Publishing Company , 35 00 

Grass Valley Tidings 15 00 

Stockton Independent- 15 00 

Stockton Mail - 15 00 

Los Angeles Times-Mirror __ - -- 15 75 

Daily Appeal ..- - 14 00 

Woodland Mail _- , 10 00 

Woodland Democrat 12 00 

Colusa Democrat - 12 00 

Chronicle- Record, Chico— 10 00 

Oct. 4— Fresno Expositor - 10 00 

Chico Enterprise _ — 10 00 

Placer RepuDlican 8 00 

Grass Valley Union 8 00 

Amador Dispatch 6 00 

Sutter Farmer 6 00 

Dixon Tribune — . 6 00 

Merced Express 6 00 

Gait Gazette- - 6 00 

Willows Journal 6 00 

Red Bluff Sentinel 12 00 

PlacerviUe Observer- 6 00 

Placer Argus .-_ 7 50 

Peoples' Cause 8 00 

Tulare Times 7 00 

OroviHe Register - - 5 00 

BeniciaEra *2 50 

$1,973 72 

Occident Stakes. 

For 1888— Account collections made 1886 and 1887 $885 00 

For 1889— Account death of entries 35 00 

$920 00 

Running Stakes, 

Calif orriia Annual 1888, account declarations of 1887 $10 00 

California Derby 1888, account declarations of 1887 80 00 

$90 00 

Bills Receivable, 

From Sacramento Waterworks, money advanced to pur- 
chase pipe - $201 66 

n. 0. Mills (& Co. 
Payment of overdraft of 1887 $2,148 43 

Park and Pavilion Receipts. 

Rebate account life memberships -. $25 00 

1889. 
Jan. 31— Cash balance -- - $90^31 

' $92,800 88 



36 



TRANSACTIONS OP THE 



PARK AND PAVILION DAILY RECEIPTS. 

1888. Park, Pavilion 

Sept. 3~Ticket sales .' :.. $1,16100 

4— Ticket sales 1,124 25 

5— Ticket sales 1,243 50 

6— Ticket sales $2,149 50 1,281 00 

7— Ticket sales 1,307 25 876 26 

8~Ticket sales — 1,428 00 782 25 

10— Ticket sales 2,161 00 871 75 

11— Ticket sales 1,051 00 631 60 

12--Ticket sales 1,342 00 1,826 50 

13~Ticket sales 1,948 50 1,002 00 

14— Ticket sales _ 1,740 50 868 75 

15— Ticket sales 232 00 751 75 

Entry clerk certificates 275 00 250 00 

Privileges, programmes, etc 8,056 45 906 00 

Office collections, account life memberships, sweepstakes, 

se'ats, and art catalogues 702 00 434 30 

Totals $22,393 20 $13,999 80 

PROFIT AND LOSS ACCOUNT. 

Dr. 

Balance February 1,1888 $5,968 28 

Building and improvements (net) 18,642 42 

Advertising 1,973 72 

Races 8,840 00 

Insurance 1,455 05 

Interest 1,050 11 

Park and Pavilion receipts, rebate 25 00 

Premiums 14,256 98 

Salaries 4,787 60 

Expense >.. 15,435 44 

Or. 

Rent _ _ $3,950 00 

Park and Pavilion receipts, Fair weeks ..— > 36,393 00 

State warrant and donated premiums — 17,670 00 

Expense account, rebate , 184 63 

Liabilities February 1, 1889 14,336 97 



$72,434 60 



$72,434 60 






STATE AGRICTJLTORAL SOCIETY. 



37 



ANNUAL MEETING. 



The Board of Directors of the State Agricultural Society held their 
annual meeting at the Secretary's office on Friday, January 25, 1889. 
Present — Directors Green, Carr, Shatter, Hancock, Cox, Swan, Perkins, 
Singletary, La Rue, Chase, and President Shippee. 

The meeting was called to order by President Shippee. 

The minutes of previous meeting were read and approved. 

Mr. C. F. Swan, of Los Alamos, Santa Barbara County, who was ap- 
pointed to fill the vacancy occasioned by the resignation of Mr. L. J. Rose, 
presented his commission and took his seat. 

REPORTS OF COMMITTEES, 

The Park Committee made the following report: 

Mb. President: Your committee to whom was referred the leasing of Agricultural Park 
buildings for a term of one, two, or three years, beg leave to report that they duly adver- 
tised and invited bids through the public press, for a period of two weeks, the same to be 
received at this office at twelve o^clock m., November 20, 1888. 

On said date, at the hour named, your committee met and received the bids ; the pasture 
field being reserved the first year. 

The following bids were presented : 

From Robert Allen— $3,000 per year for the first year, and ?3,600 for the two years fol- 
lowing. 

From Willard Gardner— $3,640 for the first year, and $4,152 for the second year. 

Mr. G-ardner's bid being the better one, the Secretary was directed to draw up a lease to 
him for two years, beginning December 1, 1888, and ending December 1, 1890, to have sure- 
ties sign, and acceptance thereof by this committee. We herewith submit said lease, duly 
signed and approved, and ask the Board to ratify our action. 



(Signed) 



G. W. HANCOCK, Chairman. 



Upon motion, the report was received and the action of the committee 
approved. 

The same committee submitted a report of their action relating to the 
disposal of the stable manure: 

Mb. Pbesidknt: Your committee beg leave to report that they have leased to Jacob 
Olsen, for a period of four years from February 1, 1888, the privilege of all the stable man- 
ure accumulating on the Park grounds during said term ; he to remove the same from 
time to time, as directed, and to keep the grounds clear of it; the price paid to be $250 per 
year, in advance. . 

, Proposals were invited by advertisement in daily papers, and two bids were received; 
one from C. H. Todd for $240 per year, and the one accepted. "We herewith submit the 



lease for approval by this Board. 
(Signed) 



G. W. HANCOCK, Chairman. 



Upon motion, the report was received, and the action of the committee 
approved. 

The annual report of the Board to the Governor of the State, and the 
Secretary's financial statement for the fiscal year ending January 31, 1888, 
were then read, adopted, and ordered to prini 

A communication was received from the State Board of Trade, asking 
the appointment of a committee from this Board to meet with them for 
consultation, with reference to the holding of a State Citrus Eair, to be con- 



38 



TRANSACTIONS OF THJE 



ducted by the State Board of Agriculture, and to provide ways and means 
therefor. Upon motion, the President, Messrs. Green, Chase, Shafter, and 
the Secretary were named as such committee. 

After the consideration of other matters of minor importance relating to 
the business of 1888; the Board proceeded to organize for 1889. 

ELECTION OF OFFICERS. 

The Board of 1889 is composed of the same members, Messrs. Green, 
Carr, and Shafter having been reappointed to succeed themselves. 

The election of President being the first order of business. Director 
Shafter named Hon. Christopher Green, of Sacramento, for that position, 
saying it had been quite a number of years since this position had fallen 
to the lot of a member residing in Sacramento. He referred to the many 
years of service given the society by Mr. Green, as Director, also to the ster- 
ling qualities possessed by the gentleman for this position. He bespoke a 
bright future for the society under Mr. Green's guidance should he be 
selected. 

There being no other nominations made, the Secretary was directed to 
cast the ballot for the Hon. Christopher Green for President, as the unani- 
mous choice of the Board. 

Hon, L. U. Shippee, the retiring President, in presenting his successor, 
thanked the Board for the honor they had conferred upon him by election 
for two successive terms, assuring them he would be found in the future as 
in the past, working for the interest of all concerned. He then introduced 
President Green, who, in assuming the chair, thanked the Board for the 
courtesy extended, remarking that it was the happiest moment of his life, 
his aspirations were fulfilled, and he hoped to receive the assistance of the 
entire Board in his endeavors to bring about a successful result. 

Upon motion, H. M. La Rue was reelected Superintendent of Pavilion, 
and G. W. Hancock Superintendent of Park. 

The usual trotting stakes for two, three, and four-year olds were ordered 
to be opened, and close March fifteenth, with the Secretary. 

The Chair named as a Committee on Speed Programme Messrs. Chase, 
Shippee, Hancock, La Rue, and Swan. 

IJpon motion, the President was added. 

President Green named the following members on standing committees: 

Finance— Messrs. Cox, Shippee, La Rue, Chase, and Mr. President. 
Pbinting akd Publication — Messrs. Boggs, Single tary, Shafter, Mr. President, and Sec- 
retary. 
On Library— Messrs. La Rue, Perkins, Carr, Hancock, and Secretary. 

After the consideration of other business relating to the Fair of 1889, 
the Board adjourned to meet Wednesday, March 20, 1889. 



STATE AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY. 



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STATE AGRICULTUKAL SOCIETY. 

ICIEST Department— Continued. 
SHEEP. 



Name. 



CLASS 1 — SPANISH MERINOS. 

Jtam — Two years old and over. 

King George 

Ram-^One year old and under two. 

Clingstone 

Three Ram Lambs. 
Three ram lambs 



Owner. 



Pen of not less than jive Ewes — Two years 
old and over. 

One pen 



Pen of not less than jive Ewes — One year old 
and under two. 

One pen 

Pen of not less than jive Ewe Lamis. 
One pen 

Ram and jive of his Lambs. 
King Oeorge and five lambs 



CLASS II — PEENCH MEEINOS. 

Ram — Two years old and over. 

Fernando 

Ram^One year old and under two. 

Napier,. .• 

Three Ram Lambs. 
One pen 



Pen of not less than five EweSy two years old 
and over. 

One pen 



Pen of not less than jive Ewes^ one year old 
and under two. 

One pen - 

Pen of not less than jive Ewe Lambs. 
One pen 

Ram a'nd jive of his Lambs. 
Fernando and five lambs 



CLASS IV— LEICESTEESHIBK AND COTSWOLD. 

Ram of any age. 
Just Eight 

Pen of Ewesy not less than jive^ of any age. 
One pen _ S': 

Ram and jive of his Lambs. 
Just Right and five lambs : 



CLASS V — SHEOPSHIEE. 

Ram of any age. 



Royal Duke (imported) . 
Jumbo 



F. BuUard. 
F. BuUard . 
F. BuUard . 

F. BuUard . 

F. BuUard . 
F. BuUard . 

F. BuUard . 

J. Roberts , 
J. Roberts , 
J. Roberts.. 



J. Roberts . 



J. Roberts - 
J. Roberts - 
J. Roberts - 



Coleman Younger & Son. 
Coleman Younger & Son. 
Coleman Younger A; Son- 



Andrew Smith . 
J. H. GUde 



65 



Besidence. 



-Woodland. 
-Woodland. 
.Woodland. 

-Woodland. 

-Woodland. 
.Woodland. 
-Woodland. 

- Irvington. 
, Irvington. 

- Irvington. 

. Irvington. 

- Irvington. 

- Irvington. 
. Irvington. 



San Jos^. 

San Jos^. 

. San Jos6. 



. Redwood City. 
... Sacramento, 



66 



TRANSACTIONS Ol? *HE 

FiKST Department— Continued. 



Name. 



Pen of Ewes^ not less than five of any age. 

One pen _ 

Ram and five of his Lambs, 

Royal Duke and five lambs 

Three Ram Lambs. 

Royal Duke, sire; three ram lambs 

Pen of five Ewe Lambs. 
One pen 

ClyASS VI — SWEEPSTAKES. 

Ram of any age or breed and five of his Lambs. 

Royal Duke and five lambs (Shropshire). 
King George and five lambs (Sp. Merino) . 
Just Right and five lambs (Coltswold) __- 
Fernando and five lambs (Ft. Merino)--. 



Owner. 



Andrew Smith , 
Andrew Smith . 
Andrew Smith . 
Andrew Smith. . 



Andrew Smith 

Frank BuUard 

Coleman Younger. 
J. Roberts 



ANGORA GOATS. 



Name. 



THOBOTJGHBBEDS, 

Bucks—Two years old and over, 

Mahomet 2d 

Cc^onel Peters 

Atlanta.— - 

Governor Helm 

Bucks — Under two years old. 

One buck 

One buck , 

One buck 

Anglo - 

Pen of not less than three Does^Two years 
old and over. 

One pen .,- 

One pen 



Pen of not less than three Does — Under two 
years old. 

One pen ., 

One pen - 



Pen of not less than three Does — Two years 
old and over. 

One pen 

One pen 



Pen of not less than three Does — Under two 
years old. 

One pen - 

One pen ., 

Herd of not less than ten — Of any breed or age. 

One herd 

One herd 



Owner. 



Julius Weyand. 
Julius Weyand. 
Julius Weyand. 
T. H. Harlan— 



Julius Weyand - 
Julius Weyand. 
Julius Weyand- 
T. H.Harlan — 



Julius Weyand. 
T. H. Harlan.- 



Julius Weyand - 
T. H. Harlan — 



Julius Weyand - 
T. H. Harlan. -> 



Julius Weyand - 
T. H. Harlan ... 



Julius Weyand. 
T.H. Harlan... 



Beeidence. 



» Redwood City. 
_ Redwood City. 
. Redwood City. 
, Redwood City. 



. Redwood City. 
.__., Woodland. 

San Jos$. 

... _ Irvington. 



[Residence. 



-Little Stoney. 
-Little Stoney. 
-Little Stoney, 
Williams, 



.Little Stoney. 
.Little Stoney. 
-Little Stoney. 
Williams. 



-Little Stoney. 
-.,-. Williams. 



-Little Stoney. 
Williams. 



.Little Stoney. 
Williams. 



..Little Stoney.' 
Williams. 



-Little Stoney. 
Williams. 



STATE AGBICTJLTXJRAL SOCIETY. 
First Department — Continued. 

swAe. 



Name. 



CLASS I— BEKKSHIBE. 

Boar-— Two years old and over. 

Redwood Duke ,..i 

Bismarck,- ,. _.. 

Boar—One year old and under two years. 

Brighton 

Peploe. 

Duke of Pinol 

Boar—Six months old and under one year, 

DanCorbitt ^-. 

Redwood Duke 3d - , 

Hamilton Duke 

Breeding Sow— Two years old and over. 

Redwood Lass 2d---. 

Pino 5th. 

Sow —One year old and under two years. 

Redwood Sallie3d- 

Belle of Pinol 

Sow— Six months old and under one year. 

Redwood Sallie 6th 

Belle Hamilton _.. 

Brighton Lass . 

Sow and six Pigs under three months old. 

Redwood Lass and six pigs 

Redwood Belle and six pigs 

Rosa Pino 1 and five pigs (by common 
consent) 

Pair of Pigs under six months old, 

Brighton Boy 

Brighton Girl 

Redwood Duke 4th , 

Redwood Sallie 10th 

Duke Pino V - 

Duchess Pino V - 

ESSEX. 

Boar — Two years old and over. 
Tyler 

Boar— Six months old and under one year. 

One boar 

Breeding Sow— Two years old and over. 

Josie >.. 

Sow— One year old and under two years. 

Belle Hewitt 

Sow— Six months old and under one year. 

Nan Hewitt - 

Pair of Pigs — Under six months old. 

One pair 

One pair 

One pair 



Owner. 



Andrew Smith -. 
William Jacobs . 



T.Waite 

A. Smith 

William Jacobs . 



T.Waite.. 
A. Smith-. 
W. Jacobs- 



A. Smith .. 
W. Jacobs - 



A.Smith,. 
W. J acobs- 



A. Smith.. 
W. Jacobs. 
T. Waite .. 



A. .Smith. 
T, Waite . 



W. Jacobs - 



T. Waite .. 
T. Waite. - 
A. Smith.. 
A. Smith. - 
W. Jacobs. 
W. Jacobs- 



Geo. 
Geo. 
Geo, 
Geo. 
Geo. 



Geo. 
Geo. 
Geo. 



Bement & Son , 
Bement & Son . 
Bement & Son . 
Bement & Son . 
Bement & Son . 



Bement & Son . 
Bement <fe Son . 
Bement"& Son . 



67 



Residence. 



-Redwood City. 
... Sacramento. 



Perkins, 

.Redwood City. 
._. Sacramento. 



Perkins. 

.Redwood City. 
... Sacramento, 



-Redwood City, 
... Sacramento. 



-Redwood City, 
... Sacramento. 



.Redwood City. 

Sacramento. 

Perkins. 



.Redwood City, 
.- Perkins. 



. Sacramento. 



Perkins. 

Perkins. 

-Redwood Citj\ 
-Redwood City. 

. . . Sacramento. 
... Sacramento, 



-San Pablo. 
.San Pablo. 
-San Pablo. 
-San Pablo. 
-San Pablo. 



-San Pablo. 
_San Pablo. 
.San Pablo. 



TRANSACTIONS OP THE 
First Depabtment— Continued. 



Name. 



CLASS III — POIiAND CHINA. 

Boar — Two years old and over. 
Bismarck 

Boar — Six months old and under one year. 
Young Lamson _ 

Sow — Six months old and under one year. 

Black Beauty --. 

Pair of Pigs— Under six months old. 

Tippecanoe — 

Beauty ^ 



Owner. 



SWEEPSTAKES. 

Boars-— Of any age or breed. 

Redwood Duke (Berkshire) 

Bismarck (Berkshire) 

Bismarck (Poland-China) 

Sow— Of any age or breed. 

Kedwood Sallie 3d (Berkshire) 

Pino 5th. - _ 



Pen of six Pigs — Under six months. 

One pen (Berkshire) _ 

One pen (Essex) _ , 

Family — Of all same breed, cotisisting of one 
Boar, two SowSy and six Pigs. 

Redwood Duke, 1 

Redwood Sallie, [ Berkshire 

Redwood Lass, f *^erkshire 

And six pigs, J 

Family (Essex), as above required 



Paul Sheppa -, 
P. H, Murphy. 
P. H. Murphy. 



Paul Sheppa . 
Paul Sheppa . 



A. Smith-. 

W. Jacobs- 
P. Sheppa . 



A. Smith - 
W. Jacobs - 



A. Smith : 

Geo. Bement & Son . 



A.Smith 

Geo. Bement & Son - 



POULTRY. 



Name. 



LIGHT BBAHMAS. 

Cock and Hen. 

One cock and hen 

One cock and hen ,_. 

Cockerel and Pullet. 

• One cockerel and pullet 

Breeding Pen — One male and four females. 

One breeding pen 

PAKK BRAHMA9. 

Breeding Pen—One male and four females. 
One breeding pen .-. 

LANGSHANS. 

Cock and Hen. 

One cock and hen 

One cock and hen 

Cockerel and Pullet. 

One cockerel and pullet 



Owner. 



T. Waite ... . 

G. E. Duden. 



T. Waite - 
T. Waite , 



G. E. Duden. 



T. Waite.. 
W. Jacobs - 



W. Jacobs. 



Beeidence. 



,. Batavia. 
. Brighton. 
. Brighton. 



Batavia. 
Batavia. 



.Redwood City. 
.,. Sacramento. 
.-- Batavia. 



.Redwood City. 
... Sacramento. 



.Redwood City, 
San Pablo. 



.Redwood City. 
San Pablo. 



Besidence. 



Perkins. 

. Sacramento. 



. Perkins. 
Perkins. 



. Sacramento. 



Perkins. 

. Sacramento. 



. Sacramento. 



STATE AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY. 
First Department— Continued. 



Name. 



Owner. 



Breeding Pen—One male and four females* 

One breeding pen 

One breeding pen — 



BUFF COCHINS. 

Cockerel and Pullet. 
One cockerel and pullet 



PARTRIDGE COCHINS. 

Cock and Hen. 
One cock and hen _. 

Cockerel and Pullet. 

One cockerel and pullet _ ._. 

Breeding Pen — One male and four females. 
Ohe breeding pen 



PLYMOUTH ROOKS. 

Cock and Hen. 



One cock and hen- 
One cock and hen. 



Cockerel and Pullet. 



One cockerel and pullet 

One cockerel and pullet 

Breeding Pen~07ie male and four females. 

One breeding pen 

One breeding pen , 

BROWN LEGHORNS. 

Cock and Hen. 



One cock and hen. 
One cock and hen . 



T. Waite -- 
W. Jacobs- 



T. Waite . 

T. Waite . 
T. Waite - 
T. Waite . 



T. Waite 

G. E. Duden. 



T. Waite — . 
G. E. Duden- 



T. Waite.— 
G. E. Duden - 



T. Waite 

H.L. Nichols. 



Cockerel and Pullet. 

One cockerel and pullet 

One cockerel and pullet 

One cockerel andpuUet 

Breeding Pen — One male and four females. 

One breeding pen.. _ 

One breeding pen _ 

One breeding pen ^--. 

WHITE LEGHORNS. 

Cock and Hen. 

One cock and hen .-- 

One cock and hen 

One cock and hen 

Cockerel and Pullet. 

One cockerel and pullet 

One cockerel and pullet 

Breeding Pen— One male and four females. 

One breeding pen 

white-faced black SPANISH. 

Cock and Hen, 

One cock and hen 

One cock and hen - - 



T. Waite 

H. L.l^ichols. 
G.E. Duden-. 



T. Waite 

H. L. Nichols . 
G. E. Duden... 



T. Waite 

H. L. Nichols . 
G. E. Duden... 



H.L. Nichols - 
G. E. Duden.. 



H. L.Nichols. 



T. Waite.-. 
G. E. Duden 



69 



Besidence. 



Perking. 

. Sacramento. 



. Perkins. 

. Perkins. 

Perkins.' 

. Perkins. 



Perkins. 

. Sacramento. 



.-.-- Perkins. 
. Sacramento. 



Perkins. 

. Sacramento. 



Perkins. 

. Sacramento. 



.-.«. Perkins. 
. Sacramento. 
. Sacramento. 



Perkins. 

. Sacramento. 
. Sacramento, 



Perkins. 

. Sacramento. 
, Sacramento. 



. Sacramento. 
. Sacramento. 



. Sacramento. 



Perkins. 

. Sacramento. 



70 



TRANSACTIONS OF THE 
First Department— Continued. 



Kame. 



One cock and hen - - 

One cock and hen 

Coch&rel and Pullet, 

One cockerel and pnllet - 

One cockerel and pullet 

One cockerel and pullet 

Beeeding Pen — One male and four females. 

One breeding pen.--- 

One breeding pen-.- 

HOUDANS. 

Cock and Sen. 

One cock and hen 

One cock and hen - 

Cockerel and Pullet. 

One cockerel and puUet 

Breeding Pen— One male and four females. 

One breeding pen — . 

SILVEa-SPANQLED HAMBUEQS. 

Cock and Sen. 
One cock and hen _ 

Cockerel and Pullet. 

One cockerel and pullet 

Breeding Pen — One male and four females. 
One breeding pen 

POLISH. 

Cock and Sen. 
One cock and hen 

Breeding Pen — One male and four females. 
One breeding pen 

WYANDOTTES. 

Cock and Sen. 

One cock and hen 

One cock and hen 

Cockei'el and PulleU 

One cockerel and pullet -.- 

One cockerel and pullet 

One cockerel and pullet - 

Breeding Pen — One male and four females. 

One breeding pen — 

One breeding pen 

One breeding pen 

BLACK-BBEASTED RED GAME BANTAMS. 

Cock and Sen, 
One cock and hen 

Breeding Pen— One male a'nd four females. 

One breeding pen 

Special Entry of Black-breasted Bed Game. 
One cockerel and pullet ,.. 



Owner. 



E. B, Robinson - 
Elmo Carey 



G.E. Duden — 
E. B. Robinson . 
Elmo Carey 



T. Waite 

E. B. Robinson. 



T. Waite.— 
a. E. Duden 



T. Waite . 
T. Waite . 

T. Waite . 
T. Waite . 
T. Waite . 

T. Waite . 
T. Waite - 



T. Waite. - 
W. Jacobs. 



T. Waite .-. 

G, E. Duden. 
W. Jacobs... 



T. Waite -..- 

G. E. Duden. 
W. Jacobs... 



T. Waite 

T. Waite..— . 

Frank Lowell . 



Besidence. 



. Sacramento. 
. Sacramento. 



. Sacramento. 
. Sacramento. 
. Sacramento. 



Perkins. 

, Sacramento. 



Perkins. 

. Sacramento. 



. Perkins. 
Perkins. 



. .. Perkins. 

... Perkins. 
... Perkins. 



Perkins. 

Perkins. 



Perkins. 

. Sacramento. 



Perkins. 

. Sacramento. 
. Sacramento. 



Perkins. 

. Sacramento. 
. Sacramento. 



Perkins. 

Perkins. 

. Sacramento. 



STATE AGRICULTURAL. SOCIETY. 
First Depailtment — Continued. 



71 



Name. 


Owner, 


Besidence. 


TURKEYS. 

Bronze Turkeys. 


Thomas Waite 


Perkins. 


Wild Turkeys. 


Thomas Waite 


Perking. 


GEEBE. 

Toulouse Geese, 
Orjp nair ... - -_. _ ...... _ 


Thomas Waite 


Perkins. 


Onp "Dair - .............................. 


Frank H. Burke -.- - 


Menlo Park. 


DtrCKS. 

Rouen Ducks. 
One nair ,- , -........- ,.- ._.. . 


Thomas Waite --. 


Perkins. 


One nair. ._-..«---.. --..^ ....._... - 


Frank H. Burke 


Menlo Park. 


Pekin Ducks. 
One pair , «.-, 


Thomas Waite 


Perkins. 


One nair «.. .-_.-«. __- .- - __- 


Thomas Waite .- 


Perkins. 









GOLD MEDAL ENTKIES. 



Name. 


Owner. 


Besidence, 


horses. 

AU his stock (horses) on exhibition 

Thirteen head of horses 

live stock other than horses. 

Durhams. 

Mugwump, Holdfast, Protector, Rogue, 
Belt, Sonberry, Blood, Cheeseit, Parson, 
Princeps, Gilt Edge, To-morrow, Pick- 
rell, Belle Medico, Malta, Henrietta 
Page, Belle Strawberry, Christmas Eve, 
Enriqueta, Belle of the Oaks, Goldnut, 
Zulieka, Ashburner Lass, Manuela, 
Sweet Milk 


R, J. Merkeley 


Sacramento. 


A. D.MUler. 

• 

WHfred Page --. 


Walsh Station. 

Penn's Grove. 


Solsteins. 

Mahomet of Palo Alto, Nadine Veeman, 
Montague, Capeador, Susto, Village 
Ijad, Brezuelo, Brovura, Bragado, Zelo, 
Duke of Palo Alto, Zorra, Amargon, 
Asuno, Pansyne, Laurentine, Clarissa, 
Pietza Piersma, Ledo, Morosa, Mecox, 
Zonita, Ojinero, Patino 

Durhams. 

Counselor, Sullivan, Maytook, Syoc, 
Chancellor, Cavalier, Mikado, Ben Hur, 
Grover C, Robert I, Uno, Oliver T, Sd 
Belle of Antelope, 4th Belle of Antelope, 
Mountain Maid, Rosaly K, 2d Rosalv 
K, Nettie P, Patty, Ruby B, True B, 
3d Rosaly K, 8th Belle of Antelope 

Kirldevington Oxford Count, Belle 27th, 
Hattie, Flora 7th, Burnetta 7th, Gussie, 
Bed Rose, Prince 2d, Prince 3d. 


Leland Stanford 


San Francisco. 


P.Peterson , 


Sites. 


P. S.Childs 


Davisville 



72 



TRANSACTIONS OF THE 
!FiRST Department— Oontinued. 



Name. 



Owner. 



Holsteins. 

Sedro, El Cuerro Netherlands, Billie Tay- 
lor, Von Moltke, King of Menlo, Sedro's 
Thistle, Navarre, Star of Lee, Silk, Cortez, 
Sylpha, Thissa, Kyeless, Ontarette, 
Edenia, Little Minch, Pamela, Misty 
Morning, Bontje 2d, Aaggie Kathleen.. 

Durhams. 

3d Kirklevington of F. H.»5th Kirkleving- 
ton of F. H., 26th Kirklevington of F. 
H., 43d Kirklevington of F. H., Jessie 
Maynard 3d, 4th Kose of F, H., 21st 
Eose of F. H., Jeasie Maynard 4th, 
Amelia 12th, Oxford Rose 11th, Nevada 
Belle 8th, 28th Rose of F. H., Oxford 
Rose 12th, Red Dolly 27th; and eleven 
head of Cotswoid sheep 



Besidence. 



Angora Goats. 
Gov. Helm and nine of his progeny.. 



F. H. Burke. 



Coleman Younger & Son. 
T.H. Harlan : 



Menlo Park. 



. San Josi 
. Williams. 



SECOND DEPAETMENT. 



CLASS I— MACHINERY, ENGINES, ETC. 



BXHIBITOE. 



Pacific Manufacturing Co.- 

Pacific Manufacturing Co.. 
Stanton, Thomson <fc Co — 
Stanton, Thomson <fc Co 

Pacific Manufacturing Co.. 
Root, Neilson & Co 

Root, Neilson & Co 

Huntington, Hopkins & Co. 

F. A. Huntington ,-. 

Park <fcLacy , 

George W. Topping 

Wm. Gutenberger 

Pacific SawMfg Co _- 

George W. Topping 

William Gutenberger 



Address. 



San Francisco 

San Francisco - 

Sacramento 

Sacramento — 



San Francisco- 
Sacramento -.- 



Sacramento . 



Sacramento _-. 
San Francisco. 
San Francisco. 



Sacramento . 
Sacramento _ 



San Francisco. 
Sacramento... 



Sacramento _ 



Artdclee Exhibited. 



Apparatus 

for raising water for irrigating purposes. 

Well pump. 

- WeU pump. 

~ -.-Machine 

for manufacturing field and garden fence. 

Rotary pump for irrigating purposes. 

Apparatus 

for raising water for irrigating purposes. 

College 

City pump and horse-power combined. 

Sawgunimer. 

Model centrifugal roller quartz miU. 

-.- Westinghouse ateam 

engine, fifteen horse-power (imported). 

.- - - Well pump. 

Apparatus for raising 

water for irrigating or mining purposes. 

Saw gummer. 

, Steam engine, 

two horse-power, California manufacture. 
--- WeU pump. 



STATE AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY. 

Second DspARTMBNi^Continued. 
CLASS II- AGRICULTURAL MACHINES. 



73 



EXHIBITOE. 



S. 0. H. Agricultural W'ks_ 
Stanton, Tliomson <fe Co.. 
Stanton, Thomson & Co — 

Stanton, Thomson & Co 

Stanton, Thomson & Co — 

A. & A. Heilbron 

A. & A. Heilbron 

A. & A.NHeilbron 

Truman, Hooker & Co 

Baker & Hamilton.- 

Baker & Hamilton 

Baker & Hamilton 

Baker & Hamilton 

Baker & Hamilton 

Baker & Hamilton 

Baker & Hamilton 

Benicia Agricultural W'ks. 

Benicia Agricultural W'ks- 
G. G. Wickson & Co 

Minnesota Thresher Mfg Co. 



Address. 



Stockton - 

Sacramento.. - 
Sacramento. - - 
Sacramento... 
Sacramento... 
Sacramento--- 
Sacramento--- 
Sacramento... 
San Francisco - 
Sacramento .- 
Sacramento... 
Sacramento . . . 
Sacramento.-- 

Sacramento 

Sacramento 

Sacramento... 
Benicia 



Benicia 

San Francisco - 
Oakland 



Articles Exhibited. 



- Hay press. 

Cider mill and press. 

..., Horse hay rake. 

Hay and straw cutter. 

- Lawn mower. 

..- __..- Horse hay rake. 

. — - Hay and straw cutter. 

Lawn mower. 

-.-- - -Horse hay rake, 

Thrashing machine. 

Cider mill and press. 

Horse hay rake, Tiger. 

Hay and straw cutter. 

- Power corn sheller. 

Hand corn sheller. 

- Lawn mower. 

— Display of agricultural machinery by 
any one house, California manufacture. 

...^ ...Sweep horse-power. 

- Hay and straw cutter. 

Thrashing machine. 



CLASS III— AGRICULTURAL MACHINES. 



EXHIBITOB. 



J. H. Stevens _ 

S. C. H. Agricultural W'ks 

Theodore Palm 

Holt Bros. .- 

Stanton, Thomson & Co. - . 
Stanton, Thomson & Co. .. 
Stanton, Thomson & Co. .. 
Stanton, Thomson & Co. - . 
Stanton, Thomson & Co. - . 
Stanton, Thomson <fe Co. .. 
Stanton, Thomson & Co. - . 
Stanton, Thomson & Co. _. 
Stanton, Thomson & Co... 

A. B. Brentner 

Burge & Donahoo 

A. & A. Heilbron - 

A. & A. Heilbron 

A. & A, Heilbron _.. 

A. & A. Heilbron 

A. & A. Heilbron 

A. & A. Heilbron ,.- 

A. & A. Heilbron --- 

A. & A. Heilbron 

•Truman, Hooker & Co 

Truman, Hooker c& Co 

Truman, Hooker & Co 

Baker & Hamilton 

Baker & Hamilton 

Baker & Hamilton 

Baker & Hamilton 

Baker & Hamilton 

Baker & Hamilton 

Bakej & Hamilton 

Baker & Hamilton 

Baker & Hamilton 

Baker & Hamilton . . 

Benicia Agricultural W'ks 
♦ Benicia Agricultural W*ks 



Sacramento-.. 

Stockton 

Sacramento ... 
Stockton.— -._ 

Sacramento 

Sacramento--- 
Sacramento... 
Sacramento -. - 
Sacramento... 
Sacramento -. - 
Sacramento--- 
Sacramento-.- 
Sacramento..- 

Fresno _- 

San Fran Cisco - 
Sacramento -. - 
Sacramento--. 
Sacramento --- 



Sacramento--. 
Sacramento..- 
Sacramento... 
Sacramento -._ 
Sacramento -.- 
San Francisco, 
San Fran Cisco - 
San Francisco. 
Sacramento -. - 
Sacramento --- 
Sacramento — 
Sacramento — 
Sacramento ... 

Sacramento 

Sacramento 

Sacramento ... 

Sacramento 

Sacramento — 

Benicia 

Benicia 



Articles Exhibitpd. 



- 1 Harrow. 

-..Con!ibined header and thrasher. 

Derrick for stacking grain. 

-.- -Combined header and thrasher. 

Grain broadcast sowing machine. 

-..Mowing machine. 

- -.Self-binding harvester. 

Hay pitching machine. 

.- Corn planter, hand power. 

-- Harrow. 

--- One-horse cultivator. 

Cultivator. 

- Disk harrow. 

Flexible harrow. 

_..._ Harrow. 

:.. Grain broadcast sowing machine. 

_ Mowing machine. 

Display 

of reaping and mowing machine knives. 

-Self -binding harvester. 

- - Harrow. 

--- One-horse cultivator. 

- .-Cultivator. 

- -Horse hoe. 

- .--1 Harrow, 

One-horse cultivator. 

-- - ..Cultivator. 

- Lifter for header. 

Mowing machine. 

Combined reaper an d m ower. 

Hand corn sheller. 

-- - - Potato planter. 

.- -.- --- One-horse cultivator. 

- Harrow. 

-- Cultivator. 

-- Horse hoe. 

.-.^ Double shovel plow. 

...Grain broadcast sowing machine. 

- - Harrow. 



74 



TRANSACTIONS OF THE 

Second Depaetment— Continued. 



Exhibitor. 



Benicia Agricultural Wks _ 
Benicia Agricultural Wks 
Benicia Agricultural Wks 

William Gutenberger 

Baker & Hamilton 

Bull & Grant 

Minnesota Thresher Mfg Oo. 

Truman, Hooker & Co 

Truman, Hooker & Co 



Address. 



Benicia , 

Benicia 

Benicia 

Sacramento 

Sacramento-,- 
Sacramento... 
Oakland --. .- 
San Francisco 
San Francisco , 



Articles Exhibited. 



One-horse cultivator. 

Cultivator. 

Horse hoe. 

..-Field roller and crusher. 

.-Grain broadcast sowing machine. 

_- Acme harrow, 

.Self-feeder for thrashing machine. 
_ Grain broadcast sowing machine. 
Wheat drill 



CLASS IV-AGKIOULTUKAL MACHIifES. 



EXHIBITOE. 



John Donnelly 

John Klees 

John Klees 

A.T.Ames 

Pacific Manufacturing Co. . 

Henry Goossen 

Stanton, Thomson <fe Co. . 

W.O.Pierce- 

S. C. H, Agricultural W'ks_. 
S. C. H. Agricultural Wks.. 

C.J.Long 

Baker <& Hamilton 

Benicia Agricultural Wks_ 

G. G. Wickson & Co 

G. G. Wickson <fe Co 

G. G. Wickson &Co 



Address. 



San Mateo 

Sacramento 

Sacramento 

Gait 

San Francisco . 

Cordelia 

Sacramento — 

Sacramento 

Stockton 

Stockton 

Williams 

Sacramento 

Benicia 

San Francisco.. 
San Francisco - 
San Francisco - 



Articles Exhibited. 



Farm gate. 

Fanning mill. 

Grain cleaner (Independent). 

Windmill 

Windmill 

.Farm gate. 

Windmill 

.Model farm gate. 

Grain cleaner (Independent). 

-Grain cleaning attachment for thrasher. 

.Model farm gate, 

.Grain cleaning attachment for thrasher. 

Farm feed mill. 

- Farm feed mill 

Beehive, without bees. 

Agricultural boUer. 



CLASS V— TOOLS AND HOUSEHOLD IMPLEMENTS. 



Exhibitor. 



Stanton, Thomson & Co 

Stanton, Thomson & Co — 
Stanton, Thomson & Co — 

Stanton, Thomson & Co 

Huntington, Hopkins & Co. 
Huntington, Hopkins & Co. 
Huntington, Hopkins & Co. 
Huntington, Hopkins & Co. 

A. 8. Hopkins & Bro 

A, 8. Hopkins & Bro 

A. S. Hopkins <fe Bro -.- 

A. S. Hopkins & Bro 

A. S. Hopkins & Bro 

James Linforth 

A. & A. Heilbron _. 

A, & A. Heilbron . 

Benicia Agricultural W'ks- 

Pacitic Saw Mfg Co 

Pacific Saw Mfg Co 

Baker & Hamilton 

Baker & Hamilton 

E. W. Melvin 

B. W. Melvin - 

G. G. Wickson & Co.. 

G. G. Wickson & Co 

G. G. Wickson & Co 

G. G. Wickson & Co.. 

G. G. Wickson & Co 

'^. G. Wickson & Co 



Address. 



Sacramento 

Sacramento — 

Sacramento 

Sacramento 

Sacramento 

Sacramento 

Sacramento 

Sacramento 

Sacramento 

Sacramento — 
Sacramento — 
Sacramento — 

Sacramento 

San Francisco , 

Sacramento 

Sacramento 

Benicia 

San Francisco . 
San Francisco . 
Sacramento — 

Sacramento 

Sacramento — 

Sacramento 

San Francisco. 
San Francisco. 
San Francisco - 
San Francisco-. 
San Francisco- 
San Francisco- 



Articles Exhibited. 



-Display of haying and harvesting tools. 

Farm road scraper. 

Garden seed drill. 

- Washing machine. 

Cabbage cutter. 

Pruning knives. 

Pruning shears. 

Sausage-meat cutter and stuffer. 

Churn. 

Butter worker. 

Washing machine. 

- - Clothes wringer. 

Clothes horse to occupy least space. 

.Zimmerman's fruit evaporator or drier. 
-Display of haying and harvesting tools. 

Farm road scraper. 

Farm road scraper. 

_ — Pruning shears. 

» Pruning knives. 

-Display of haying and harvesting tools- 

-.Garden seed drill 

-. Newbecker washing machine. 

Empire clothes wringer. 

Churn. 

Butter worker. 

Cheese vat with heater attached 

,-_ Display of dairy machinery* 

I Cheese press- 

Washing machine. 



STATE AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY. 
Second Depabtmbnt— Continued. 



75 



Address. 



G. G. Wickson & Co 

Bull & Grant 

W. H. Murray - 

P.R.and Hoi stein Dairy Co. 
P. R. and Holstein Dairy Co. 
P. E. and Hql stein Dairy Co. 



San Francisco. . 
Sacramento — 
San Francisco. 
Point Reyes-.- 
Point Reyes... 
Point Reyes... 



Artioles Exhibited. 



- Milk cooler. 

Farm road scTaper. 

Harvey's Yiot water and steam radiators. 

CViuTn. 

Butter worker. 

.Display of dairy machinery. 



CLASS VI— PLOWS. 



Exhibitor. 



G. W. Hains 

Stanton, Thomson & Co.-. 

Stanton, Thomson & Co 

Stanton, Thomson & Co. _ . . 
Stanton, Thomson & Co..,- 
Stanton, Thomson & Co. . . 
Stanton, Thomson & Co... 
Stanton, Thomson & Co... 
Stanton, Thomson & Co. .- 

Stanton, Thomson & Co 

Stanton, Thomson & Co. . . 
Stanton, Thomson & Co.._ 

Stanton, Thomson & Co 

S. C. H. Agricultural Wks 

G.W. Hains , 

Burge & Donahoo -- 

Burge & Donahoo 

Burge & Donahoo 

Barge & Donahoo 

Burge & Donahoo , 

Burge & Donahoo 

A. & A, Heilbron 

A. & A. Heilbron - — 

A. &A. Heilbron 

A. & A. Heilbron 

A. & A. Heilbron 

A. & A. Heilbron 

A. & A. Heilbron _- 

A. & A. HeUbron 

A. & A. Heilbron 

A. & A. Heilbron ._., 

Truman, Hooker & Co. — 
Truman, Hooker & Co. ._. 

Truman, Hooker & Co 

Truman, Hooker <fe Co. 

Truman, Hooker & Co 

Truman, Hooker & Co. , ... 

Truman, Hooker & Co 

Truman, Hooker & Co 

Truman, Hooker & Co 

Benicia Agricultural Wks. 
Benicia Agricultural Wks 
Benicia Agricultural W'ks. 
Benicia Agricultural W*ks- 
Benicia Agricultural Wks- 
Benicia Agricultural Wks. 
Benicia Agricultural Wks. 
Benicia Agricultural W*ks. 
Benicia Agricultural W'ks. 
Benicia Agricultural Wks. 

Baker & Hamilton--- 

Baker & Hamilton 

Baker <fe Hamilton 

Baker <& Hamilton 

Baker & Hamilton 

Baker & Hamilton 



Address. 



Stockton 

Sacramento 

Sacramento 

Sacramento — 
Sacramento — 

Sacramento 

Sacramento 

Sacramento 

Sacramento .-- 
Sacramento,. - 
Sacramento ... 
Sacramento .._ 
Sacramento --- 

Stockton 

Stockton 

San Francisco. 
San Francisco - 
San Francisco - 
San Francisco - 
San Francisco - 
San Francisco- 
Sacramento .-_ 
Sacramento -.- 
Sacramento .-. 
Sacramento .-- 

Sacramento 

Sacramento... 
Sacramento -.- 
SacramentO-.- 
Sacramento.-- 
Sacramento..- 
Sau Francisco - 
San Francisco. 
San Francisco. 
San Fran Cisco - 
San Francisco. 
San Francisco 
San Francisco. 
San Francisco. 
San Francisco. 

Benicia 

Benicia 

Benicia 

Benicia 

Benicia 

Benicia 

Benicia i 

Benicia 

Benicia 

Benicia 

Sacramento... 
Sacramento,.. 
Sacramento... 
Sacramento--. 
Sacramento. -, 
Sacramento--. 



ATticles Exiiibited. 



Gang plow. 

- Gang plow. 

Sulky plow, 

, Stubble plow. 

-Sod plow. 

Steel plow. 

-_ Cast-iron plow. 

Sidehill plow. 

- - One-horse plow. 

-^ - Dynamometer. 

Chilled plow. 

Plow for all purposes. 

- Vineyard plow. 

Curved standard bench beam gang plow. 

Sulky plow. 

— _-, Gang plow. 

Sulky plow. 

.-- One-horse plow. 

.-- ~. Road plow. 

- .Steel plow. 

Single wheel stubble plow. 

-- - Gang plow. 

- .-Sulky plow. 

Stubble plow. 

■ --.-., Sod plow. 

Steel plow. 

- Cast-iron plow. 

■ .One-horse plow. 

Chilled plow. 

Plow for all purposes. 

Vineyard plow. 

Gang plow. 

■ ^ Sulky plow. 

• - Stubble plow. 

• - -Sod plow. 

-- Steel plow. 

• --- — Subsoil plow. 

- One-horse plow. 

- - ...Plow for all purposes. 

• Vineyard plow. 

• -- Gang plow. 

.-- Sulky plow. 

■ -- Stubble plow. 

■ Sod plow. 

■ Steel plow. 

- , Subsoil plow. 

...Sidehill plow. 

-- One-horse plow, 

- Plow for all purposes. 

- --v Vineyard plow. 

-- Stubble plow, 

■ - Sod plow. 

■-- Steel plow. 

- --.Cast-iron plow. 

— -. Sidehill plow. 

■ - One-horse plow. 



76 



TRANSACTIONS OP THE 

Second Department— Continued. 



EXHiniTOK. 


Address. 


Articles Exhibited. 


Baker & Hamilton . 


Sacram en to 


Chilled plow. 


Baker & Hamilton 


SacraTnento 


Plow for all 'Dumoses. 


Baker & Hamilton . 


Sacramento ,- 


, , , . -- Vineyard plow. 








CLASS Vll-VEHICLES. 


Exhibitor. 


Address. 


Articles Exhibited. 



J.W.Wilson 

W. KShaw 

W. KShaw 

Stanton, Thomson & Co... 
Stanton, Thomson & Co.-- 
StantoD, Thomson & Co._- 
Stanton, Thomson & Co... 
Stanton, Thomson & Co... 

A, Meister 

A. Meister 

A. Meister 

A. Meister 

A. Meister. , 

A. Meister- 

A. Meister 

Charles Ott, Jr „ 

Charles Ott, Jr _- 

Elijah Hickman 

J. F. HiU,Jr 

J. Sovereign 

J. Jepsen 

J. Jepsen ._ 

J. Jepsen 

J. Jepsen 

Chris. Nielsen 

Chris. Nielsen 

Chris. Nielsen 

Chris. Nielsen 

A. & A. Heilbron , 

Baker & Hamilton _ 

Benicia Agricultural Wk's 
Benicia Agricultural Wk's 

A. Meister 

A. Meister. - 

Studebaker Bros. 

Studebaker Bros. ._ _-. 

Studebaker Bros , 

Studebaker Bros 

Studebaker Bros. 

Studebaker Bros. — 

Studebaker Bros. 

Studebaker Bros. _. _ 

Truman & Hooker 



Sacramento 

San Francisco- 
San Francisco. 
Sacramento -.- 

Sacramento 

Sacramento — 

Sacramento 

Sacramento — 
Sacramento... 
Sacramento .. 
Sacramento... 
Sacram en to.- - 
Sacramento--- 

Sacramento 

Sacramento-.- 
Sacramento-.- 
Sacraniento.-- 

RedBluflF 

Sacramento.,., 

Woodland 

Sacramento 

Sacramento --- 
Sacramento- .- 
Sacramento.-, 
Sacramento... 
Sacramento.. .- 
Sacramento..- 
Sacramento-.-. 
Sacramento-... 
{^acramento--- 

Benicia - 

Benicia 

Sacramento... 
Sacramento..- 
Sacram ento.. - 
Sacramento... 
Sacram ento.- - 
Sacramento.., 
Sacramento... 

Sacramento 

Sacramento.-- 
Sacramento... 



San Fran ci SCO - 



Closed family carriage. 

Pleasure cart. 

...Track sulky. 

- Open family carriage. 

Top buggy. 

-..Open buggy. 

-Farm wagon for general purposes. 

Ladies' phaeton. 

Open family carriage. 

top buggy. 

Open buggy. 

- Pleasure cart. 

Ladies' phaeton. 

- Two-seated open wagon. 

Trotting wagon. 

..-■ Spring market wagon. 

Business wagon. 

Farm wagon for general purposes. 

Exhibition of California grown wood. 

Breaking cart. 

Closed family carriage. 

top buggy. 

Two-seated open buggy. . 

Ladies' phaeton. 

- Top buggy. 

._ Ladies' phaeton. 

- Business wagon. 

.- - Open buggy. 

.Farm wagon for general purposes. 

Farm wagon for general purposes. 

Two-seated open wagon. 

Farm wagon for general purposes. 

.,_ Spring market wagon. 

- Business wagon. 

. Open family carriage. 

Top buggy. 

--.Two-seated open wagon. 

Pleasure carb 

Breaking cart* 

Ladies' phaeton. 

- Carriage or cab for children. 

.-, --Assortment 

of carriage material and trimmings. 
Track sulky. 



GOLD MEDAL ENTRIES— MACHINERY, IMPLEMENTS, ETC. 



Exhibitor. 



Studebaker Bros. 

A, Meister 

A. & A. Heilbron «.. 

Stanton, Thomson <fc Co 



Address. 



Sacramento . 
Sacramento . 
Sacramento - 



Sacramento . . 



Articles Exhibited. 



.Carriages, yehicles, trimmings^ etc. 

-Venicles. 

.Agri- 



cultural machinery, vehicles, plows, etc. 
- - Agri- 
cultural machinery, vehicles, plows, etc. 



STATE AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY. 
Second Depaetment— Continued. 



77 



S. C. H. Agricultural Wks. 

Benicia Agricultural Wks. 

G. G. Wickson & Co 

Pacific Manufacturing Co.. 

W.B.Shaw 

Truman, Hooker & Co 



'Address. 



Stockton 

Benicia 

San Francisco - 



Sacram ento.- - 
San Francisco. 
San Francisco. 



Articles Exhibited. 



Combined header and 

thrasher, plow cleaners, and patent shoe. 
Combined header and thrasher, agri- 
cultural machinery, plows, vehicles, etc. 

Agricultural machinery, 

and display of dairy machinery, etc. 

Pumps and windmills. 

— Vehicles. 

• Agri- 
cultural machinery, vehicles, plows, etc. 



THIRD DEPARTMENT. 



CLASS I— CLOTHING AND KINDRED TEXTURES. 



ExniBiTon. 



F.H.Coftman 

David Crise... 

I).H.Quinn 

D.H.Qninn 

D.H.Quinn 

Mrs. M. H. Ober 

Ingram & Bird 

Ingram & Bird 

Ingram & Bird 

Canfornia Cotton Mills ... 
California Cotton Mills . . . 
California Cotton Mills . . _ 
California Cotton Mills ... 
California Cotton Mills . . . 

Cb as. M. Campbell 

Chas. M. Cam pbell 

Chas. M. Campbell 

Weinstock &Lubin 

Weinstock & Lubin 

Golden Gate Woolen Mills 
Christy & Wise 



Address. 



Sacramento 

Escondido 

Sacramento 

Sacramento 

Sacramento 

San Francisco.. 

Sacramento . 

Sacra men to.- J- 

Sacramento 

East Oakland - - 
East Oakland . . 
East Oakland . - 
Bast Oakland . - 
East Oakland-. 

Sacramento 

Sacramento 

Sacramento 

Sacramento 

Sacramento 

San Francisco. . 
San Francisco. - 



Articles Exhibited. 



Twenty-five yards rag carpet. 

-. -Display of burlap rugs, home made. 

Display of- hats and caps. 

Best silk hat 

_.-. Best soft hat. 

...Ladies* shoulder braces and corsets. 

- Exhibition of carpets and rugs. 

Best fifteen yards woolen carpets. 

_ _ ^ Best Turkish rug. 

-Best display of towels and table cloth. 

.- Ten pounds dressed flax. 

.. Ten yards cotton duck and toweling. 

...Linen sack twine. 

Ten yards kersey. 

Exhibits of carpets and rugs. 

Fifteen yards woolen carpet. 

.- Double carpet coverlet. 

..: Mackinac blanket. 

Display of dry goods. 

Mackinac blanket. 



Samples of California wools. 



CLASS II— NEEDLE, SHELL, AND WAXWORK. 



EXHIBITOB. 


Addreas. 


Articles Exhibited. 


Mrs. J. L. Brown 


Sacramento 


Two embroidered velvet banners. 


Miss Lizzie F. Mund 


Sacramento . 


One embroidered table scarf (two ends). 


Mrs. Clara Spooner 

Miss Ida M. Isaacs ~ . 


Ash Valley 


One embroidered piano scarf (two ends). 


Sacramento 


- - One embroidered sofa 


Miss Ida M.Isaacs 


Sacramento 


pillow and one embroi dered handkerchief . 
One 


Miss Ida M. Isaacs 


Sacramento 


embroidered table scarf (raised work). 
- One child's crochet set. 


Miss Ida M. Isaacs 


Sacramento 


, One embroidered lambrequin. 


Miss Ida M Isaacs _-- .--- 


Sacramento . 


One embroidered table cover. 


Mrs. S. M. Leichleiter 


Sacramento 


One embroidered chenille sofa pillow. 


Mrs Dr W R Oluness 


Sacramento . 


One embroidered table cover. 


Mrs. Dr. W. R. Cluness 


Sacramento. 


Onesilk quilt. 



78 



TRANSACTIONS OF THE 
Thied Depabtmbnt— Continued. 



Exhibitor. 



Mrs. J. H. Rothwell 

Mrs. J. C. Jacka 

Mrs. J. C. Jacka 

Mrs. J. C. Jacka 

Mrs. J. C. Jacka 

Miss Loretta Bohl 

Miss Loretta Bohl 

Miss Loretta Bohl 

Miss Loretta Bohl 

Miss Loretta Bohl 

Miss Loretta Bohl _ 

Miss Loretta Bohl 

Miss Hattie M. Houston. 
Miss Hattie M. Houston. 

Mrs. J. G. Jackson 

Mrs. J. G, Jackson 

Mrs. J. G. Jackson 

Mrs. J. G. Jackson 

Mrs. 3. G. Jackson 

Mrs. J. G. Jackson 

Mrs. J. G. Jackson 

Mrs. Horace Adams 

Mrs. Horace Adams 

Mrs. Horace Adams 

Mrs. Hattie Gardiner — 

Mrs. Hattie Gardiner 

Mrs. Hattie Gardiner 

Mrs. Hattie Gardiner 

Mrs. Hattie Gardiner 

Mrs. Hattie Gardiner .... 

Mrs. Hattie Gardiner 

Mrs. Hattie Gardiner — 

Miss Susie V. Staples 

Miss Susie V, Staples 

Miss Susie V. Staples 

Miss Susie V. Staples 

Miss Susie V. Staples 

Miss Susie V. Staples — 

Miss Susie V. Staples 

Miss Susie V. Staples 

Miss Susie V. Staples 

Miss Susie V. Staples — 

Miss Susie V. Staples 

Miss Susie V, Staples 

Miss Susie V. Staples 

Mrs, Mary Strub 

Mrs, Mary Strub 

Mrs. R. S. Frazee 

Mrs. R. S. Frazee 

Mrs. R. S. Frazee 

Mrs, K. S. Frazee , 

Mrs. R. S. Frazee 

Mrs. R. S. Frazee 

Mrs. R, S. Frazee 

Mrs. R. S. Frazee 

Mrs. R. S. Frazee 

Miss Rosa Baumle 

Miss Rosa Baumle 

Mrs. Gushing 

Mrs, Gushing , 

Mrs. S. M. Leichleiter — 

Mrs. M. E. Osgood 

Mrs. A. M. Fish 

Mrs, A. M. Fish 

Mrs. A.M. Fish 

Mrs. A.M. Fish 

Mrs. A. M. Fish 



Address. 



Sacramento - 
Sacramento . 
Sacramento - 
Sacramento - 
Sacramento - 
Sacramento - 
Sacramento - 
Sacramento . 
Sacramento , 
Sacramento . 
Sacramento . 
Sacramento , 
Courtland... 
Courtland-^. 



San Francisco-.. 
SanFrancisco--- 
San Francisco... 
San Francisco -,- 
San Francisco- >. 
San Francisco... 
SanFrancisQo.— 

Oakland 

Oakland 

Oakland ,_ 

Pleasant Valley. 
Pleasant Valley . 
Pleasant Valley, 
Pleasant Valley. 
Pleasant Valley . 
Pleasant Valley . 
Pleasant VaUey . 
Pleasant Valley . 

El Dorado 

El Dorado 

El Dorado 

El Dorado 

El Dorado 

El Dorado 

El Dorado 

El Dorado 

El Dorado 

El Dorado 

El Dorado 

El Dorado 

El Dorado 



Sacramento . 
Sacramento . 
Sacramento . 
Sacramento - 
Sacramento , 
Sacramento - 
Sacramento - 
Sacramento _ 
Sacramento - 
Sacramento . 
Sacramento. 
Sacramento _ 
Sacramento . 
Sacramento _ 
Sacramento . 
Sacramento . 
Sacramento - 
Sacramento . 

Sacramento . 
Sacramento - 
Sacramento - 
Sacramento . 



Articles Exhibited. 



One needlework picture. 

— -. One embroidered shawl. 

One sofa pillow. 

Three pieces Indian embroidery. 

- Five pieces point lace. 

One embroidered table cover. 

_ One handkerchief case. 

- One crochet skirt. 

Two pieces crochet. 

,-.One etched tidy. 

One embroidered traveling satchel 

One. sofa cushion slumber. 

-Twelve pieces variety porcelain painting. 

Display 

of decorative painting on bolting cloth. 

One crochet shawl. 

One crochet skirt. 

._- One crochet bead bag. 

One crochet apron. 

Seven crochet tidies. 

Three crochet cord bags, 

Three embroidered cord bags. 

-- Four embroidered infants' shawls. 

--- - One embroidered infant's dress. 

One embroidered child's skirt. 

>. Two beadwork purses. 

One crochet shawl 

One child's afgban. 

One lounge afghan, 

.- Thirteen varieties ornamented grasses. 

Display of paper flowera. 

One sofa pillow, 

■ Six pieces outlined embroidery. 

Six pieces point and honiton lace, 

Two handkerchiefs, point lace. 

Three handkerchiefs, honiton lace. 

.- -- One barbed honiton lace. 

One collar, honiton and point lace. 

One long piece honiton lace. 

-- One skirt, honiton lace. 

One butterflj'', honiton lace. 

^ Two pieces point applique lace. 

.Two handkerchiefs, Spanish drawn work. 

..One pair drawers, Spanish drawn work. 

One chemise, Spanish drawn work. 

Cotton 

embroidery, one skirt, two pair drawers. 

Two frames of shellwork. 

One small table (shellwork). 

-.-- One crochet afghan. 

Two crochet child's dresses. 

Two crochet tidies. 

Four pairs crochet pillowcases. 

.„ One crochet child's collar. 

One crochet lady's skirt 

One pair crochet window shades. 

: - One crochet apron* 

One card of samples of crochet work. 

- One crazy patchwork quilt 

,-.One sofa cushion. 

One crazy patchwork quilt 

---Two pillow shams. 

Display of shells and corals. 

Three patchwork quilts. 

Three pieces Kensing- 
ton embroidery, with crewel in wool. 

One child's afghan^ 

One needlework picture. 

One lamp mat 

Three knit skirts. 



STATE AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY. 
Third Depaetment— Gontinued. 



79 



EXHIBITOE. 



Address. 



Miss Sophia Conrad 

Miss Sophia Conrad _ 

Miss Sophia Conrad 

Mrs. Chas. Robin 

Mrs. Chas. Robin 

Mrs. Chas. Robin 

Mrs. Chas. Robin __ 

Mrs. Chas. Robin 

Mrs. M. E. Tryon 

Mrs. M. E. Tryon 

Geo. M. Purnell _._ 

Geo. M. Purnell 

Geo. M. Purnell 

Geo. M. Purnell 

Mrs. Ida Branen „. 

Mrs. Ida Branen _. 

Mrs. J. W. Cotton 

Mrs. J. W. Cotton 

Mrs. 3. W. Cotton 

Mrs. Theo. Deming _. 

Mrs. Theo. Deming 

Theo. Deming 

Theo, Deming 

Theo. Deming 

Theo. Deming _. 

Theo. Deming 

Miss 8. Pearaon 

Mrs. W. C. Brown _ 

Mrs. W. C. Brown 

Misses C. and* M. Brothers 
Misses G. and M. Brothers 
Misses C. and M. Brothers 
Misses G. and M. Brothers 
Misses C. and M. Brothers 
Misses G. and M. Brothers . 

Miss A. L. Chandler , 

Miss A. L. Chandler - 

Miss A. L. Chandler 

Miss A. L. Chandler 

Miss A. L. Chandler 

Miss A. L. Chandler 

Miss A. L. Chandler 

Miss A. L. Chandler _ 

Miss A. L. Chandler 

Miss A. L. Chandler , 



Miss A. L. Chandler . 
Miss A, L. Chandler . 

Mrs. J.Corbin _ 

Mrs. W. H.Wright .- 
Mrs. W. H. Wright - 
Mrs. W.H. Wright,. 
Mrs. W.H.Wright.. 



Mrs. C. A. 
Mrs. C. A. 
Mrs. C. A. 
Mrs. C. A. 
Mrs. C. A. 
Mrs. C. A. 
Mrs. C. A. 
Mrs. C. A. 
Mrs. C. A. 
Mrs. C A. 
Mrs. C. A. 



Patrick - 

Patrick . 
Patrick . 
Patrick . 
Patrick . 
Patrick . 
Patrick . 
Patrick - 
Patrick . 
Patrick - 
Patrick . 



Mrs. C. A. Patrick . 
Mrs. C. A. Patrick - 
Mrs. C, A. Patrick - 
Mrs. C. A, Patrick . 



Sacramento . 
Sacramento . 
Sacramento . 
Sacramento . 
Sacramento _ 
Sacramento . 
Sacramento _ 
Sacramento . 
Sacramento _ 
Sacramento . 
Sacramento _ 
Sacramento . 
Sacramento - 
Sacramento - 

Vacaville 

Vacaville 

Dixon 

Dixon 

Dixon 

Sacramento _ 
Sacramento . 
Sacramento . 
Sacramento - 
Sacram'ento . 
Sacramento . 
Sacramento . 
Sttcraraento . 
Sacramento - 
Sacramento . 
Sacramento _ 
Sacramento . 
Sacramento . 
Sacramento . 
Sacramento . 
Sacramento - 

Nicola us 

Nicolaus 

Nicolaus 

Nicolaus 

Nicolaus 

Nicolaus >-- 

Nicolaus 

Nicolaus 

Nicolaus 

Nicolaus 



Nicolaus 

Nicolaus 

Michigan Bar 
Sacramento... 
Sacramento... 
Sacramento .. 
Sacramento . . . 



Sacramento . 
Sacramento , 
Sacramento - 
Sacramento . 
Sacramento , 
Sacramento . 
Sacramento _ 
Sacramento . 
Sacramento . 
Sacramento . 
Sacramento . 

Sacramento, 
Sacramento , 
Sacramento . 

Sacramento . 



Articles Exhibited. 



-.One crochet bedspread. 

- One knit bedspread. 

Three pieces of hand sewing. 

One embroidered piano cover. 

One embroidered table scarf. 

One embroidered table scarf, 

.Two embr'd toilet sets (six pieces each). 
One knitted worsted skirt. 

One embroidered bed quilt. 

--_ One crazy patchwork quilt. 

_. One embroidered chair seat and back. 

One embroidered silk quilt. 

One patchwork quilt. 

One piece of raised wool work. 

- One piece of chenille embroidery. 

One piece of raised chenille embroidery. 

... ._ ...One embroidered wall panel. 

One embroidered banner (arrasene work). 

One scarf (applique work). 

.- _.- One sofa pillow (E!ensington ). 

-One embroidered fire screen. 

One sofa pillow, in Kensington, 

One embroidered fire screen. 

One pair paddles, Kensington work. 

One table scarf, Kensington work. 

-- ..-One pair knit mittens. 

- One knit bedspread. 

One braided pillow scarf. 

One pair braided pillow shams. 

_-- Display of milKnery. 

Velvet l^onnet. 

Velvet hat. 

^^ --Silk bonnet. 

.— - Display of feathers. 

-.- Varieties of artificial flowers. 

---- One lounge afghan. 

One embroidered table cover. 

T wo embroidered table scarfs. 

-One embroidered sofa pillow, two designs. 

.- One sofa pillow, two designs, 

— Three embroidered banners. 

One embroidered drape. 

One embroidered picture frame. 

.Embroidered picture (Knight and Lady). 

-- — One embroidered 

toilet set of cushions and two bottles. 

Three embroidered mats and acarfs. 

One pair pillow shams. 

.--..-— ..One patchwork star quilt. 

One embroidered wall paddle. 

., One embroidered table cover. 

- One embroidered sofa pillow. 

--, One pair knit socks, 

one pair stockings, one pair mittens. 

Display of children's clothing. 

One baby's flannel skirt. 

Two babies' wool hoods. 

., One baby's wool skirt (crochet). 

Two infants' lawn dresses. 

... One baby skirt dress, hand made lace. 

Two infants' night dresses, 

Three little girls' trimm ed dresses, 

. — One child's skirt. 

Two ladies' skirts, crochet trimming. 

..-One set ladies' underwear (nightgown, 

chemise, drawers, and corset covers). 

Three children's aprons. 

.-- One girl's dress. 

.One chemise and drawers, lace trimmed. 
..Two hand made chemise, lace trimmed. 



80 



EXHIBITOE. 



TRANSACTIONS OF THE 

Third DEpARTMENT—Continued, 



Mrs. C. A. Patrick. . - 
Mrs. C.A.Patrick --. 
Mrs. 0. A. Patrick -.. 

McKim&Orth 

McKim & Ori;h 

McXira&Orth 

McKim &Orth 

McKim &Orth 

McKim &Orth 

McKim &Orth 

McKim &Orth 

Mrs. George Muddox 

Mrs. W. M. Lyon 

Mrs. W. M. Lyon 

Mrs. W. M. Lyon 

Mrs. W, M. Lyon 

Mrs, W. M. Lyon 

Mrs. W. M. Lyon 

Mrs. W. M. I^yon 

Mrs. "W. M. Lyon 

Mrs. W. M. Lyon 

Mrs. W. M. Lyon 

Mrs. W. M. Lyon , 

Mrs. W. M. Lyon 

Mrs. W. M. Lyon 

Mrs. W. M. Lyon 

Mrs. W. M. Lyon 

Mrs. W. M. Lyon 

Mrs. Mary Miller 

Mrs. Mary Miller 

Miss Mary E. Miller _. 

Mrs. Hugh Casey 

Mrs. Hugh Casey- 

Mrs. Ravena , 

McKim &Orth 

Mrs. 0. Summers 

Mrs. O. Summers 

Mrs. 0. Summers ._.*-. 

Mrs. 0. Summers 

Miss Eda Mohr 

Miss Eda Mohr 

Miss Eda Mohr 

Miss Eda Mohr 

Mrs, Agnes Hummel , 
Mrs. Agnes Hummel . 

Mrs. Addie Carter 

Mrs, Addie Carter 

Mrs. Addie Carter 

Mrs. Addie Carter 

Mrs. A. Bonheim 

Weinstock & Lubin.-. 
"Weinstock & Lubin... 
Weinstock & Lubin... 
Mrs. Dr. F. W. Hatch 
Mrs. Agnes Hummel 
Miss Maggie 'Toole. 
Miss Sarah Stayback . 

Mrs. E. W. Norris 

Mrs. E. W. Norris 

Mrs. E. W. Norris 

Mrs. E. W. Norris 

Mrs. B. W. Norris 

Mrs. E. W. Norris 

Mrs. E. W, Norris 

Mrs. E. W. Norris 

Mrs. E. W. Norris 

Mrs. E. W. Norris 



Address. 



Sacramento - 
Sacramento . 
Sacramento - 
Sacramento . 
Sacramento . 
Sacramento - 
Sacramento . 
Sacramento . 
Sacramento . 

Sacramento . 
Sacramento - 
Sacramento - 
Sacramento . 
Sacramento - 
Sacramento . 
Sacramento - 
Sacramento . 
Sacramento - 
Sacramento - 
Sacramento - 
Sacramento . 
Sacramento - 
Sacramento - 
Sacramento . 
Sacramento . 
Sacramento . 
Sacramento , 
Sacramento . 

Dixon 

Dixon 

Dixon 



Sacramento . 
Sacramento . 



San Francisco- 
Sacramento. -- 
Sacramento..^ 
Sacramento.-- 
Sacramento - -- 
Sacramento -. - 
Sacramento -, - 
Sacramento - -- 
Sacramento -. - 
Sacramento - -- 
Sacramento.-- 
Sacramento.-- 
Sacrameijto--- 
Sacramento-.- 
Sacramento-.. 
Sacramento ... 
Sacramento... 
Sacramento -.- 
Sacramento ... 
Sacramento.. - 
Sacramento . . - 
Sacramento --- 

Preeport 

Sacramento. . - 
Sacramento... 
Sacramento -. 
Sacramento . . . 
Sacramento.-. 
Sacramento,.^ 
Sacramento... 
Sacramento --- 
Sacramento — 
Sacramento . . . 
Sacramento --- 



Articles Exhibited. 



Two children's guimpes. 

One plush embroidered tidy. 

Two nightgowns. 

Stocking yarn. 

^-Display of fancy goods. 

Children's clothing, California made. 

Embroidered' handkerchief, 

Silk embroidery on flannel 

, , , -Display of lace 

made by hand, not less than five pieces. 

Crochet shawl. 

._ Crochet cape. 

Two crochet bedspreads. 

One piece Kensington embroidery. 

One painting on bolting cloth. 

Surface plush painting. 

-.. Bead work. 

Kensington painting. 

Piece of raised silk work. 

Three pieces of painting on ivorine. 

One mussel set (thirteen pieces). 

Twelve dinner plates. 

---.--_ One salad set (seven pieces). 

.,_ One chocolate set (twenty-five pieces). 

Six cake plates. 

Six tea plates. 

Three fancy plaques. 

..., One mush bowl and plate. 

Six afterdinner cups and saucers. 

Two fancy plaques. 

.-- -.Six painted vases. 

Largest display and best variety 

of porcelain painting (sixty-six pieces). 

Two needle- worked pictures. 

One em- 
broidered needle- worked picture on silk. 

-Best bead work (by hand). 

- Best silk'hosiery. 

Two embroidered pillow shams. 

One embroidered sheet sham. 

One embroidered table cloth. 

Two embroidered aprons. 

..One embroidered table scarf (two ends). 
..Largest display of Turkish embroidery. 

Kaised silk work. 

- Spanish drawn work. 

Embroidered handkerchief. 

Embroidery on flannel. 

Embroidered toilet set. 

.- Wax flowers. 

- - Skeleton leaves. 

One embroidered infant's robe. 

One patchwork quilt. 

Display of millinery. 

Velvet bonnet. 

- Silk bonnet, 

..-Twelve embroidered dollies or doylies/ 

_ Two painted panels. 

-.- ...-One painting on velvet. 

-.One plaque on velvet. 

Embroidered table scarf (two ends). 

.-- One embroidered fire screen. 

One embroidered sofa pillow and cushion. 

One embroidered wall panel- 

One embroidered wall banner. 

One embroidery on flannel 

, OnecheniUe. 

-- One arrasene. 

.^ One plush ribbon worfc 

--., — - Needlework picture. 



STATE AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY. 

Third DEpABTMENT~Con tinned. 



81 



Exhibitor. 



Mrs. E. W. Norris 

Mrs. E. W. Norris 

Mrs. E.W. Norris... > 
Mrs. E.W. Norris-.-. 

Mrs. E. W, Norris 

Mrs. E. W. Norris 

Mrs. E.W. Norris.... 

Mrs. E. W. Norris 

Mrs. B.W. Norris-.-. 

Mrs. E. W. Norris 

Mrs. E. W. Norris 

Mrs. E. W. Norris 

Mrs. E. W. Norris 

Mrs. E. W. Norris 

,.Mr3.E.W. Norris 

'Miss Hattie Gardiner 
Miss Hattie Gardiner 
Miss Hattie Gardiner 
Miss Hattie Gardiner 
Miss Hattie Gardiner 
Miss Hattie Gardiner 
Miss Kosa Baumle... 
Miss Rosa Baumle - - ~ 
Miss Rosa Baumle.. - 
Miss Rosa Baumle. ._ 
Miss Rosa Baumle... 
Jkliss Rosa Baumle-. - 
Miss Rosa Baumle. .. 
Miss Rosa Baumle- .. 
Miss Rosa Baumle. -- 
Miss Rosa Baumle. -- 
Miss Carrie Davey... 
Miss Carrie Davey - - - 
Miss Carrie Davey - - - 
Miss Carrie Davey. -. 
Miss Carrie Davey ,-„ 
Miss Carrie Davey -.- 
Miss Carrie Davey. -- 
Miss Carrie Davey . . - 
Miss Carrie Davey . - . 
Miss Carrie Davey - - - 
Miss Ahce Watson . . . 

Miss AKce Watson. . - 

Miss Alice Watson - _ - 
Miss Alice Watson - . - 
Miss Alice Watson. ._ 
Miss Alice Watson. . - 
Miss Alice Watson . - - 
Miss Alice Watson.. _ 
Miss Alice Watson- . - 
Mrs. 0. W. McGowan 
Mrs. 0. W. McGowaii 

Mrs. 0. W. McGowau 

Mrs. 0. W. McGowan 
Mrs. 0. W, McGowan 
Mrs. P. A.Arnold-.-. 

Mrs. P. A.Arnold 

Mrs. P. A. Arnold 

Mrs. P. A. Arnold 

Mrs. P. A. Arnold 

Mrs. P. A. Arnold 

Mrs. P. A. Arnold 

Mrs. Chas. Ott, Jr 

Mrs. Chas. Ott, Jr 

g20 



Address. 



Sacramento . 



Sacramento 

Sacramento 

Sacramento. -^.- 

Sacramento 

Sacramento 

Sacramento 

Sacramento 

Sacramento 

Sacramento 

Sacramento . 

Sacramento" 

Sacramento 

Sacramento 

Sacramento 

Pleasant Valley . 
Pleasant Valley . 
Pleasant Valley . 
Pleasant Valley . 
Pleasant Valley 
Pleasant Valley . 

Sacramento 

Sacramento 

Sacramento 

Sacramento 

Sacramento . 

Sacramento 

Sacramento 

Sacramento 

Sacramento 

Sacramento 

Sacramento 

Sacramento 

Sacramento 

Sacramento 

Sacramento 

Sacramento 

Sacramento 

Sacramento 

Sacramento 

Sacramento 

Sacramento 



Sacramento . 



Sacramento . . 
Sacramento . - 
Sacramento _ - 
Sacramento . . 
Sacramento - 
Sacramento - . 
Sacramento.. 
Sacramento . . 
Sacramento . , 



Sacramento . 



Sacramento - - - 
Sacramento... 
San Francisco- 

San Fran Cisco - 
San Francisco. 
San Francisco - 
San Francisco. 
San Francisco. 
San Francisco. 
Sacramento..- 
Sacramento..- 



Articles Exhibited. 



Best, largest, and hand- 
somest display of articles made by lady. 

One tray embroidered pincushion. 

One pair embroidered palettes. 

-One pair embroidered sachet bags. 

One pair embroidered table scarfs. 

.One embroidered toilet cushion. 

-One embroidered flannel skirt. 

One embroidered blotter. 

.- One embroidered banner (raised work). 

One embroidered wall panel. 

One embroidered dressed face. 

One embroidered panel. 

One embroidered column. 

One embroidered lambrequin and drapery, 

One pair embroidered calla lilies. 

Two embroidered slumber rolls. 

- One pair crochet slippers. 

-One crazy patchwork table scarf. 

Two ladies' crochet skirts. 



Two pieces ladies' crochet underwear. 

.-One suit ladies' home-made underwear. 

One pair etched pillow shams. 

One sofa bag (hand painted). 

One embroidered plaque. 

One embroidered lambrequin, 

Two sets rickrack. 

--- --- One Mexican lace work apron. 

One rickrack apron. 

-- One fancy apron. 

— -One Swiss apron. 

Two pieces underwear. 

Forty-one patterns of crochet. 

..Seventeen patterns of crochet knitting. 

Five pieces crochet skirts. 

Pour pieces crochet aprons. 

Three knit pillow cases. 

- Two crochet pillow cases. 

-- One rickrack chemise. 

-.-- Three crochet chemises. 

Two sets pillow shams (etched work). 

-Two sets sheets and shams (etched work). 

- One set 

of underwear, three pieces, hand made. 

-One ladies' 

embroidered skirt, with silk on flannel. 

One ladies' skirt, hand lace trimming. 

-One silk embroidered pillow. 

One Kensington embroidered pillow. 

-_ Two embroidered handkerchiefs. 

Two embroidered towels. 

Two pieces cotton embroidery. 

.-One embroidered toilet set (four pieces). 

One wreath of feather flowers. 

One lyre of 

shavings flowers, made of Oregon cedar. 

- One hand-made shell 

pin and earrings, made of scales of fish. 

One wreath, made of sea moss. 

Two panel paintings on velvet. 

- -.One embroid- 
ered pillow, one bag, and one photo frame. 

- One erobroidered lambrequin. 

.- One embroidered bedspread. 

Six embroidered silk pieces. 

- — Two embroidered Turkish, 

Three pieces Spanish drawn work. 

One painted necktie case, 

.^- - One child's dress. 

Three pieces lace.. 



82 



TRANSACTIONS OF THE 
Third Depaktment— Continued. 



Exhibitor. 


Address. 


Articles Exhibited. 


Mrs. Joseph Morehouse 

Mrs. Joseph Morehouse 

Mrs. Joseph Morehouse 


Grass Vallev 


...._. Four knit Dillow cases 


Grass Valley 


^ Four knit tidies. 


Grass Valley 


Two knit lace collars* 


Mrs. Joseph Morehouse 


Grass Valley 


Twenty samples of knit lace. 







SPECIAL PREMIUMS. 



Exhibitor. 



Miss Maggie O'Toole 

Miss Hattie M, Houston 
Miss Hattie M. Houston 

Miss S. J. Hopper , 

Mrs. F. A. Arnold 

Mrs. F. A. Arnold 

Miss Eda Mohr- 

Miss Maggie O'Toole 

Mrs. F. A. Arnold 

Mrs. M. E. Norris 

Mrs. H. C. Briggs 



Address. 



Freeport - - 
Courtland- 
Courtland, 



Sacramento.-- 
San Francisco. 
San Francisco. 
Sacramento --- 

Freeport 

San Francisco, 

Sacramento 

Oakland 



Articles Exhibited. 



One piece hand painted soup tureen. 

One piece decorative painting. 

On& 



piece decorative painting on porcelain. 

- One China plate, hand painted. 

One China fish set, hand painted. 

One China tea set, hand painted, 

Best piece of embroidery work. 

.- Two plagues on porcelaiu. 

One embroidered tire screen. 

For best piece on embroidery. 

One decorative screen (Art Gallery). 



JUVENILE DEPARTMENT. 



Exhibitor. 



Anna O. Herr.. 

Dora M. Fish, 11 years 

Anna M. Fish, 12 years 

Clarence Ruggles, 10 years, 

Clarence Ruggles 

Clarence Ruggles 

Edna Harvey, 11 years 

Edna Harvey-. _. 

Edna Harvey 

Agnes M. Hopper, 11 years. 
Juanita Pomraer, 13 years- . 
Bertie Wassermann, 15y'rs. 

Bertie Wassermann _ 

Bertie Wassermann 

Bertie Wassermann 

Bertie Wasserm ann 

Bertie Wassermann 

Bertie Wassermann 

Bertie Wassermann 

Daisy Wassermann 

Daisy Wassermann 

Daisy Wassermann 

Daisy Wassermann. — ._, 

Daisy Wassermann 

Daisy Wassermann 

Daisy Wassermann 

Daisy Wassermann 

Daisy Wassermann 

Daisy Wassermann 

Daisy Wassermann 

Edna Harvey 

Ida M. Isaacs ..,. 

Ida M. Isaacs 

Ida M. Isaacs.- .-. 

Ida M. Isaacs 

Ida M. Isaacs 

Ida M. Isaacs 

Miss S. Jennie Hopper. ,. 
Miss S. Jennie Hopper... 



Addrees. 



Sacramento . 
Sacramento . 
Sacramento . 

Winters 

Winters 

Winters 

Sacramento _ 
Sacramento - 
Sacramento . 
Sacramento . 
Sacramento . 
Sacramento . 
Sacramento , 
Sacramento - 
Sacramento _ 
Sacramento . 
Sacramento . 
Sacramento . 
Sacramento _ 
Sacramento _ 
Sacramento . 
Sacramento _ 
Sacramento - 
Sacrameiito . 
Sacramento _ 
Sacramento _ 
Sacramento - 
Sacramento - 
Sacramento . 
Sacramento . 
Sacramento - 
Sacramento . 
Sacramento - 
Sacramento . 
Sacramento - 
Sacramento _ 
Sacramento. 
Sacramento . 
Sacramento , 



Articles Exhibited. 



Two crochet child's skirts. 

One hand-made calico dress. 

One needlework picture. 

One frame of paper flowers. 

One frame of paper flowers (wreath). 

One frame of paper flowers (anchor). 

One calico dress, hand made. 

-One etched apron. 

...One piece silk tatting. 

One calico dress. 

-- One white work dress. 

One fascinator. 

• One crochet shawl. 

One piece of lace for apron. 

One pair wristlets. 

- One knit purse. 

One fancy apron. 

-One sewing apron. 

One pair slippers^ 

One chemise yo^e. 

One fancy apron. 

One baby sacque. 

- One piece of lace for skirt. 

-..One crochet shawl. 

-One purse. 

*. One fascinator. 

One splasher. 

> - One cushion. 

— - One pair armlets. 

One pair slippers. 

One silk quilt. 

One embroidered sofa pillow. 

.-^ One embroidered handkerchief. 

.One embroidered table scarf, raised work* 

-.-One child's crochet set. 

One embroidered lambrequin. 

One embroidered table cover. 

..One panel of poppies and daisies, in oil 
..One panel autumn leaves (Kensington). 



STATE AGRICULTyBAL SOCIETY. 

• Third Department— Continued. 
CLASS III— PRINTING, LITHOGRAPHING, ETC. 



83 



Exhibitor. 


Address. 


Articles Exhibited. 


Geo. W. Haeans 


San Francisco - - 


. Best sheet music. 


W. H. Murray, agent 

W. H. Murray, agent 

McCabe Lithograph Co. . . 


San Francisco 


Best sheet music. 


San Francisco 


..Displav of lithography and zincograph. 


San Francisco 


-.Display of lithography and zincograph. 











GOLD MEDAL 


ENTRIES. 


Exhibitor. 


Address. 


Articles Exhibited. 


Weinstock & Lubin 


Sacramento 


.... ....---..-._.-.. Meritorious exhibit. 


Mrs. M. H. Ober 


San Francisco 


Meritorious display 


Mrs. Hugh Casey 


Sacramento 


of ladies' and children's underwear. 
..--.. Meritorious display of needlework. 


California Cotton Mills .... 


San Francisco 


Meritorious display of cotton goods. 



FOURTH DEPARTMENT. 



CLASS I~MANUFACTURE OP LEATHER, PAPER, AND RUBBER. 



Exhibitor. 



Henrv Berger 

Whittier, Fuller & Co 

Alvedo Meza ,- 

R.W. Neely .— 

KW.Neelv 

KW.Neely 

R. W. Neely 

KW.Neely -.- 

RW.Neely 

RW.Neely - 

J. Jepson&Sou 

James Longshore 

5. P. Taylor & Co 

6. P. Taylor & Co 

T.Devlin 

A. A. Van Voorhies & Co. 
A. A. Van Voorhies & Co. 
A. A. Van Voorhies & Co. 



Address. 



Redwood City. 
Sacramento-.- 
Sacramento--- 

Sacramento 

Sacramento.,. 

Sacramento 

Sacramento ... 
Sacramento --- 
Sacramento _ - . 
Sacramento -. - 
Sacramento -. - 
Sacramento -,- 



San Francisco. 



San Francisco- 

Arcata 

Sacramento . . , 
Sacramento -,. 
Sacramento _-- 



Articles Exhibited. 



Display of leather. 

-.Display of paper hangings and borders. 

-One Mexican saddle, home manufacture. 

.Display of men's boots, shoes, and gaiters. 

- One pair of heavy boots. 

One pair of dress boots. 

One pair of gentlemen's dress shoes. 

.One pair of gentlemen's Congress gaiters. 

One pair of ladies' gaiters. 

. — One pair of ladies' bootees. 

()ne set single harness. 

-__ Exhibition 

of traveling trunks, ba^s, and valises. 

Best general display of paper 

(twenty-one tons), embracing white news, 
manilla, straw, and strawboard papers. 

--- Paper bags (Eagle brand). 

Display of leather. 

One set of patent harness. 

- One patent riding surcingle. 

One pair patent interfering devices. 



( 


CJLASS 11— WORKED METALS. 


BXHIBITOB. 


Address. 


Articles Exhibited, 


Mrs.J.L. Baker 


Sacramento 


Display of kitchen utensils of tin. 


O.W.Goddard 


Sacramento 


Display of horseshoes, hand made. 


Huntington, Hopkins & Co. 
Huntington, Hopkins & Co. 
Huntington, Hopkins & Co. 


Sacramento - 


Display of general hardware. 


Sacramento 


Display of iron and steel. 


Sacramento- 


Display of blacksmithing tools. 



84 



TRANSACTIONS OF THE 
Fourth Depaetment— Continued, 



EXHIBIXOB. 



Huntington, Hopkins & Go. 
Huntington, Hopkins & Co, 
Huntington, Hopkins & Co. 
Huntington, Hopkins & Co, 
Huntington, Hopkins & Co, 
Huntington, Hopkins & Co, 
Huntington, Hopkins & Co. 
Huntington, Hopkins & Co 
Huntington, Hopkins & Co, 

Huntington, Hopkins & Co. 
Huntington, Hopkins & Co, 

A. & A. Heilbron 

J.W.Eaton 

Abner Doble 

Abner Doble 

Abner Doble 

Abner Poble , 

Pacific Saw Mfg Co 

Boyd & Morgan _ 

Selby Lead and Smelt'g Co.. 
Selby Lead and Smelt'g Co.. 
Selby Lead and Smelt'g Co.. 
Selby Lead and Smelt'g Co.. 

T. Doyle 

T. Doyle 



Address. 



Sacramento - 
Sacramento . 
Sacramento . 
Sacramento _ 
Sacramento _ 
Sacramento . 
Sacramento . 
Sacramento . 
Sacramento _ 

Sacramento - 
Sacramento. 
Sacramento - 
Placerville .. 



San Francisco - 
San Francisco - 
San Francisco. 
San Francisco - 
San Francisco. 
Stockton 



San Francisco - 
San Francisco 
San Francisco- 
San Fran Cisco - 
San Francisco. 
San Francisco. 



Articles Exhibited. 



Display of pocket cutlery. 

Display of circular gawa. 

,_., Display of wire goods. 

- Display of copper work. 

,. -Display of files. 

Display of brass work. 

Display of mill saws. 

.Display of mechanics' tools. 

Display 

of horseshoes, Phoenix machine made. 
.Display of butcher's supplies and goods. 
...Display of modern building hardware. 
.Display of butcher's supplies and goods. 
Display of hammsr de- 
signed and manufactured by J. W. Eatoii. 

Best display of copper work. 

Best display of John Wright's picks. 

Best display of blacksmi th tools. 

Best display of iron and steel. 

--.Best display of circular saws. 

Best display 

of horseshoes, hand made and finished. 

.Exhibit of shot. 

Exhibit of block tin pipe. 

.-- Exhibit of lead pipe. 

Exhibit of anti-friction metal. 

Exhibit of hoof clasp. 

Ex- 



hibit of improved beveled horseshoe nails. 



CLASS III-STOVES, CASTINGS, ETC. 



Exhibitor. 



A. Aitken 

B. L. Ball 

Jos. F. Forderer 
C.D.Harvey .- 
Fred. Jantzen... 



Addreas. 



Sacramento... 
Sacramento . , . 
San Francisco. 
San Francisco - 
San Francisco, 



Articles Exhibited. 



One parlor grate. 

, One farm bell. 

Ornamental statuary. 

> Warming furnace or other apparatus. 
- Oil stove. 



CLASS IV~MCJSIOAL INSTRUMENTS. 


Exhibitor. 


Addrese. 


Articles Exhibited. 


Antisell Piano Company, 
E. W. Melvin, agent 


San Francisco 


.Upright piano. 







CLASS V— FURNITUKE. 



Exhibitor. 



J. D. Huffman . 

F. Kuehne 

Ingram & Bird 
Ingram & Bird 
Ingram & Bird 
Ingram & Bird 
Ingram & Bird 
Ingram & Bird 
Ingram & Bird 



Address. 



Lodi -, 

Sacramento . 
Sacramento . 
Sacramento . 
Sacramento . 
Sacramento . 
Sacramento . 
Sacramento . 
Sacramento . 



Articles Exhibited. 



. Display of Cahfornia woods. 
.Two side tables, inlaid wood. 



..Set of parlor furniture. 

Display of upholstery, 

One parlor set. 

-.Six pairs portierres. 

. Three pairs real Brussels lace curtains. 
-Three pairs Nottingham lace curtains. 
.- Five pairs silk curtains. 



STATE AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY. 
FouBTH Depaetment — Continued. 



85 



Exhibitor. 



Ingram & Bird 

Ingram & Bird 

Capital Furniture Co 

Capital Fnrniture Co 

Capital Furniture Co 

Capital Furniture Co 

JohnBreuner __ 

John Brenner 

John Brenner 

JohnBreuner 

JohnBreuner 

JohnBreuner 

John Breuner 

JohnBreuner 

John Breuner 

JohnBreuner 

.JohnBreuner 

JohnBreuner 

JohnBreuner,. 

W. D. Comstock __. 

W. D. Comstock 

W. D. Comstock 

Warren E.Murray 

Chas. M. Campbell 

Chas. M. Campbell 

Chas. M. Campbell 

Chaa. M. Campbell 

Capital Furniture Co 

W.F.Harmon 



Address. 



Sacramento.. > 
Sacramento -.- 
Sacramento ... 
Sacramento.. - 
Sacramento..- 
Sacramento-.- 
Sacramento- .- 
Sacramento --. 
Sacramento-.- 
Sacramento --- 
Sacramento . . - 
Sacramento.-- 
Sacramento-,, 
Sacramento.-- 
Sacramento-.- 
Sacramento... 

Saeramento 

Sacramento. .. 
Sacramento... 
Sacramento.-.. 
Sacramento . - . 
Sacramento... 
San Francisco. 
Sacramento. - - 
Sacramento... 
Sacramento.-- 
Sacramento... 
Sacramento -.- 
San Francisco. 



Articles Exhibited. 



.Fourteen pairs fancy chains for curtains. 
Twelve pairs plush and brass cornice poles. 

- - Dressing bureau. 

Bookcase. 

...Wardrobe and lounge. 

School furniture. 

Sofa. 



_ Lounge. 

Office chair. 

, ..Set of parlor chairs. 

.-Center table. 

Set of parlor furniture. 

Display of furniture. 

Hair mattress. 

Sick chair or couch. 

- Spring mattress. 

.- Display of upholstery. 

Display of willow furniture. 

Displajj- of furniture. 

_ Hair mattress. 

Spring bed. 

Parlor set. 

Best display of California woods, 

,. ...Sofa. 

Wool mattress. 

..Sick chair or couch. 

- Spring mattress. 

.Set of bedroom furniture. 

Spiral spring bed. 



CLASS VI~W0ODENWARE. 



Exhibitor. 


Address. 


Articles Exhibited. 


A. S. Hopkins & Bro 

A. 8. Hopkins & Bro 

A. S. Hopkins & Bro 

A. S. Hopkins & Bro. 

A. S. Hopkins & Bro 

A. S. Hopkins & Bro 

A. S. Hopkins & Bro 

A. S. Hopkins & Bro 

A. S. Hopkins & Bro 

A. S. Hopkins & Bro 

E. N. Hill 


Sacramento .- -. 


Display of cedarware. 


Sacramento 


Display of pineware. 


Sacramento 


_ „ . Display of oakware. 


Sacramento .._---- 


Display of willowware. 


Sacramento 


_ ^ Display of split wood baskets. 


Sacramento - 


Display of osier. 


Sacramento 


.Display of wooden ware. 


Sacramento 


_ Dis- 


Sacramento - - - 


play of broom corn, broom, and brushes. 
- Display of assortment of hair brushes. 


Sacramento 


--Display of assortment of cooper's ware. 


Sacramento ..---. 


Display of inlaid table tops. 


Whittier, Fuller & Co. 


Sacramento. 


Display of window shades. 


Whittier, Fuller & Co 

Theo. W, Schwamb 


Sacramento 


^ Display of gilt frames. 


Sacramento 


Display of gilt frames. 


Theo. W. Schwamb . - 


Sacramento 


Display of samples of twist mold- 






ing, of fancy molding, and scroll sawing. 



CLASS VII^ELECTRICAL APPLIANCES. 


Exhibitor. 


Address. 


Articles Exhibited. 


I. X. L. Truss Company -.. 
C. A.Fisk 


San Francisco 

Sacramento 


- I. X. L. truss. 

_. _ One electric machine. 


W.C.Clark 


San Francisco 


Two electric ffen era tors and dvnamos 


W. C. Clark 


San Francisco 


Four voltaic arc lamns 


W.C.Clark 


San Francisco 


.. _ -Thirtv incandescent lamns 


'W. C. Clark 


San Francisco 


-^. Vnlb m^tpr aiTmiptpr 


Dr. A. T. Sherwood 


San Francisco 


- Pacific electric pad truss. 



86 



TRANSACTIONS OF THE 

Fourth Department — Continued. 



Exhibitor. 


Address. 


Articles Exhibited. 


Dr. A. T. Sherwood 


San Francisco - 


Duplex galvanic belt 


A. C. Shaw -- 


San Francisco 


German tellurium (astronomical). 


Georare ToDDiner 


Sacramento 


Electric light dynamo. 


wc Clark : : : : 


San Francisco 


.. ^ Electric machine. 


W. C. Clark 


San Francisco 


Electrolier incandescent chandelier, 









GLASS Viri— CHEMICALS. 



EXHIBITOB. 



Whittier, Fuller & Co 

Whittier, Fuller & Co 

Whittier, Fuller & Co 

Whittier, Fuller & Co 

Whittier, Fuller & Co 

Capital Soap Company ... 
Capital Soap Company -._ 
Capital Soap Company ._. 
Capital Soap Company .-. 

A. S. Hopkins & Bro 

A. S. Hopkins & Bro 

A. S, Hopkins <fc Bro 

A. S. Hopkins & Bro. 

The Guittard Mfg Co 

The Guittard Mfg Co 

T. W. Jackson, agent 

T, W. Jackson, agent 

Selby Smelt'g and Lead Co. 

Hueter Bros.& Co 

Hueter Bros.<fc Co 

John Reynolds 

C.H, Street 

Alf.R. Kelly 

Alf. E.Kelly 

John Reynolds 

Madame Lee 

Alf. R. Kelly 



Sacramento 

Sacramento 

Sacramento --- 
Sacramento — 
Sacramento — 
Sacramento — 

Sacramento 

Sacramento — 
Sacramento — 
Sacramento-.- 
Sacramento... 
Sacramento,, - 
Sacramento-.. 
San Francisco. 
San Francisco - 
San Francisco. 
San Francisco- 
San Francisco. 
San Francisco. 
San Francisco. 
San Francisco - 

San Francisco 
San Francisco. 
San Francisco. 
San Francisco. 
San Francisco. 
San Francisco - 



Articles Exhibited. 



Best Prussian blife. 

- Best copal varnish. 

, Best glue. 

Best linseed oil (five gallons), 

.- Best white lead, 

Best display of soap. 

- Best display of bleaching soap. 

Best display of toilet soap. 

.— Best display of castile soap. 

Best writing fluid, 

- Best blacking, 

Best stove polish, 

Best axle grease. 

Chief baking powder. 

.Best chocolate (California manufacture), 
..Best display of potash and caustic soda. 

Best display of insecticide potash. 

..Best display of bluestone and copperas, 

.-- Best display of copal varnish. 

Best general display of varnish. 

Best exhibit of 

general display of prussiate of potash. 

- Lu oricating petroleum. 

Golden West oil. 

.- Neal's carriage paints. 

...Oil of vitriol, muriatic and nitric acid. 

Toilet soap. 

- Imperishable paint. 



CLASS IX— STONEWARE, ETC, 



Exhibitor. 



George Muddox 

George Muddox 

George Muddox 

George Muddox 

George Muddox 

George Muddox 

George Muddox 

George Muddox. .- 

George Muddox 

George Muddox 

Gladding, McBean & Co. 
Gladding, McBean & Co. 
Gladding, McBean & Co. 
Gladding, McBean & Co. 
Gladding, McBean & Co, 
Gladding, McBean <fc Co. 
Gladding, McBean & Co. 
Gladding, McBean & Co. 
Gladding, McBean & Go. 
Gladding, McBean & Co, 



Sacramento . 
Sacramento. 
Sacramento - 
Sacramento - 
Sacramento . 
Sacramento. 
Sacramento . 
Sacramento. 
Sacramento. 
Sacramento . 

Lincoln 

Lincoln 

Lincoln 

Lincoln 

Lincoln 

Lincoln 

Lincoln 

Lincoln ... . 

Lincoln 

Lincoln 



Articles Exhibited. 



Best stoneware, 

Best water pipe of water lime, 

Best sample of drain tile. 

Best roofing tile. 

Best flooring tile. 

- Best terra cotta. 

Best fire bricks. 

.-* Best pressed bricks. 

Best pottery, various kinds. 

Best display of stoneware. 

.Best specimen of Rockingham ware. 

Best specimen of stoneware. 

- Best water pipe of water lime. 

Best sample of drain tile. 

- Best roofing tile. 

- Best flooring tiie. 

Best terra cotta. 

-Best fire brickft 

-.Best pressed bricks. 

Best pottery, various kinds. 



STATE AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY. 
Fourth Department— Continued. 



87 



BXHIBItOE. 



Gladding, McBean & Go. 

A. Aitken 

H. Palmer 

C. Newman 

C, Newman 

Inyo Marble Company... 



Address. 



Lincoln 

Sacramento... 
San Francisco - 
San Francisco. 
San Francisco. 
San Francisco. 



Articles Exhibited. 



Best stoneware, 

Best flooring tile. 

.- -- Best demijohn. 

Best display of glassware. 

. Best demijohn, improved box. 
J- Best dressed stone. 



CLASS X— MINERALS, ETC. 



EXHIBITOB. 


Address. 


Articles Exhibited. 


W H Murrav 


San Francisco. ..-.. 


._..- Best suit of useful minerals. 


W. H Murrav - _ _- 


San Francisco 


Collection of minerals. 


AIpx Keller 


Auburn .......... 


....... ... .--.Suit of useful minerals. 


Alex. Keller . _ 


Auburn .,..-_ 


Suit of fossils of California, 


Alex. Keller 


Auburn . 


. Suit of illustrating geology. 


Alex Keller . 


Auburn --- 


Suit of crystallized minerals. 


Alex. Keller 


Auburn 


Suit of polished stone specimens. 


H F. Frye - . 


Relief Hill, Nev. -- 


.__ . Best cabinet of minerals. 


Nevada County. 


California 


Nevada County exhibit of minerals. 


Inyo Marble Company 


San Francisco 


Variety of marble. 







CLASS XI— MARBLE AND GRANITE WORK 


EXHIBITOB. 


Address. 


Articles Exhibited. 


A. Aitken ... 


Sacramento 


Polished marble. 


A, Aitken 


Sacramento 


Statuary marble mantel. 


A. Aitken _ .- _ . 


Sacramento ...... 


Marbleized slate mantel. 


A. Aitken 


Sacram en to 


Marbleized iron mantel. 









GOLD MEDAL ENTRIES. 



Exhibitor. 



John Breuner -., 

Capital Soap Co 

Geo, Muddox 

A. S. Hopkins <fc Bro 

Geo. Topping 

Ingram & Bird 

S. P. Taylor & Co 

Pacific Saw Mfg Co, 

Waterhouse Elctrc. Mfg Co. 



Address. 



Sacramento . 
Sacramento - 
Sacramento - 
Sacramento . 
Sacramento - 



Sacramento 

San Francisco-.. 
San Francisco. -. 
Hartford, Conn.. 



Articles Exhibited. 



Meritorious exhibit of furniture. 

..- Display of soap. 

Display of stoneware. 

Display of wooden ware. 

Display of electro dy na- 

machine, California manufacture, 

- Display of furniture. 

Paper display. 

-Display of saws on exhibition. 

-.Display of incandescent light. 



88 



TRANSACTIONS OF THE 



FIFTH DEPARTMENT. 



CLASS I— SILK, COTTON, AND TOBACCO. 



EXHIBITOE. 


Address. 


Articles Exhibited. 


California Cotton Mills . „ 


San Francisco 


One bale California cotton 


C. H. Street <& Co 


San Francisco 


.Display of silk made in California. 


C. H, Street <fe Co 


San Francisco 


Display of California tobacco in leaf. 


David Bryan , 


Grass Valley 


Display of California tobacco in leaf. 









CLASS II-FLOUR AND ORAIK. 


EXHIBITOB. 


Address. 


Articles Exhibited. 


C. McCrearv & Co. ._ - 


Sacramento 


--- . Whitest samnle familv flour 


C. McCreary & Co.. 


Sacramento . - , 


Sample of baker's flour. 


J. D. Huffman -_. 


Lodi 


Display of grain in sheaf. 


John Reith 


Union House 


SampI e of Australian wheat. 


B. N. Bugbey 


Sutter Countv-... 


...... _- ......Sample of Proper wh$at. 


B. N. Bugbey 

B. N. Bugbey .,« 


Sutter County 


Sample of barley. 


Si'tter County 


Sample of Chevalier barley. 


B. K. Bugbey 


Sutter County 


^ Bushel yellow corn. 


B. K Bugbey 


Sutter County 


Bashel white corn. 


Chas, A. Hull 


Sacramento ....__ 


_ . _ , Sample of Chili wheat. 


Mrs. R. S. Locke tt 


Perkins 


_ _ Exhibit 


J. W. Browning 


Colusa Countv - 


of garden seeds of California production. 
-_ - Samnle of Proner wheat. 


Browuiner & Co. 


Colusa Countv - . 


--- - Samnle of familv flour. 


Browning & Co. 


Colusa County 


Sample of baker's flour. 









CLASS III— VEGETABLES, ROOTS, ETC. 



EXHIBITOE. 



Jos. Putnian 

B.F.Aiken 

E.F.Aiken 

B.F.Aiken 

B.F.Aiken 

B.F.Aiken 

B. F.Aiken 

B. F.Aiken 

Harry Foster 

Harry Foster 

B. N. Bugbey 

B.N. Bugbey 

B-N. Bugbey 

B.N. Bugbey 

B.N. Bugbey 

B.N. Bugbey 

B.N. Bugbey 

B.N. Bugbey 

B. N. Bugbev 

B.N. Bugbey 

B.N. Bugbey 

J. D, Huffman 

Mrs. Geo. Muddox 

C. Langdon 

C. Langdon 

C. Langdon 

W. H. Murrav 

B. A. Bridgford..- 



Address. 



Clements 

Sacramento 

Sacramento 

Sacramento- 

Sacramento 

Sacramento 

Sacramento 

Sacramento 

Sacramento 

Sacramento 

Sutter County 

Sutter County 

Sutter County 

Sutter County 

Sutter County 

Sutter County 

Sutter County 

Sutter County 

Sutter County 

Sutter County 

Sutter County 

Lodi - 

Sacramento 

Humboldt County. 
Humboldt County. 
Humboldt County. 

San Francisco 

Colusa 



Articles Exhibited. 



Large pumpkin. 

Half peck peppers for pickling. 

Six marrow squashes. 

Six hubbard squashes. 

— - Six crookneck squashes. 

Peck of tomatoes. 

Large pumpkin. 

..-.-Three watermelons. 

Six crookneck squashes. 

Six cucumbers. 

Half bushel sweet potatoes. 

- . - Half bushel Irish potatoes. 

Peck of tomatoes. 

Half peck yellow onions. 

Half peck red onions. 

Half peck white onions. 

.- Large pumpkin. 

-Three mountain sweet watermelons. 

Three striped watermelons. 

Half peck lima beans in pod. 

Six marrow squashes. 

Six sugar beets. 

- Six turnip beets. 

Half bushel white potatoes. 

Half bushel red potatoes. 

Half peck yellow onions. 

six sugar beets. 

Half bushel s weet potatoes. 



EXHIBITOB. 



EXHIBtTOB. 



STATE AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY. 
Fifth Department — Continued, 



89 



Mrs. Geo. Muddox 
Mrs. Geo. Muddox 
Felice Gabrielli.-. 
FdiceGabrieUi... 
Felice Gabrielli ._. 
Felice Gabrielli ,.. 
Felice Gabrielli ,.. 
Felice Gabrielli .._ 
Felice GabrieUi ... 
Felice Gabrielli... 
Felice Gabrielli .-. 
Felice Gabrielli... 
Felice GabrieUi,.. 
Felice Gabrielli ... 
Felice GabrieUi... 
Felice Gabrielli ... 
Felice Gabrielli .... 
Felice Gabrielli --. 
Felice Gabrielli, _. 
Felice GabrieUi ... 
Felice Gabrielli... 
Felice Gabrielli .._ 
Felice Gabrielli ... 
Felice GabrieUi... 
Felice GabrieUi ._. 
Felice GabrieUi ... 
Felice GabrieUi... 
Felice Gabrielli .-. 
Felice GabrieUi.. - 
Felice CabrielU .- 
Felice GabrieUi ._- 
Felice GabrieUi-— 
Felice GabrieUi .— 
Felice GabrieUi -.. 
Felice Gabrielli ... 
Felice GabrieUi ... 
Felice GabrieUi... 
Felice Gabrielli ... 
Felice GabrieUi ... 
Felice GabrieUi ... 
Felice GabrieUi ... 
Felice Gabrielli... 

Mrs. R. S. Lockett 
Mrs. R. S. Lockett 
J. D. Huflman..-. 



Address. 



Sacramento. 
Sacramento _ 
Sacramento . 
Sacramento . 
Sacramento . 
Sacramento - 
Sacramento . 
Sacramento - 
Sacramento . 
Sacramento . 
Sacramento . 
Sacramento - 
Sa-cramento . 
Sacramento . 
Sacramento . 
Sacramento 
Sacramento . 
Sacramento . 
Sacramento . 
Sacramento . 
Sacramento - 
Sacramento . 
Sacramento . 
Sacramento . 
Sacramento . 
Sacramento . 
Sacramento . 
Sacramento . 
Sacramento . 
Sacramento . 
Sacramento . 
Sacramento _ 
Sacramento . 
Sacramento . 
Sacramento . 
Sacramento - 
Sacramento _ 
Sacramento - 
Sacramento - 
Sacramento . 
Sacramento - 
Sacramento . 



Perkins . 
Perkins . 
Lodi 



Articles Exhibited. 



Six cucumbers. 

-Half peck gherkin cucumbers. 

Half bushel red potatoes. 

Half bushel white potatoes. 

Half bushel potatoes. 

- ---Variety Irish potatoes. 

.-- _. Half bushel sweet potatoes. 

Twelve parsnips. 

.- --Twelve carrots. 

-Six long blood beets. 

Six turnip beets. 

..-- .Peck of tomatoes. 

Six drumhead cabbage. 

Six heads red Dutch cabbage. 

--.Three heads cauliflower. 

Three heads broccoli. 

- Three heads lettuce. 

- Half peck red onions. 

Half peck yellow onions. 

-.- Half peck white onions. 

Half peck peppers for pickling. 

.-Twelve roots salsify. 

Six stalks celery. 

Six marrow squashes. 

Six crookneck squashes. 

Large pumpkin. 

-Dozen sweet corn (green), 

Three mountain sweet watermelons. 

.- Three watermelons. 

Three cantaloupes. 

- Three muskmelons. 

Six cucumbers. 

Half peck lima beans, in pod. 

Half peck white beans. 

Half peck kidney bush beans. 

Half peck field peas (dry). 

,- Half peck garden peas (dry). 

Half peck castor oil beans, 

Greatest variety peas (dry 

- Half peck gherkin cucumbers. 

.-- -Three purple eggplants. 

-Table 

of vegetables, exhibited by the producer. 

Six crookneck squashes. 

-- Six cucumbers. 

Table 

of vegetables, exhibited by one person. 



CLASS IV— FLOWERS. 



BeU Conservatory Co. 
Bell Conservatory Co. 
BeU Conservatory Co. 
Bell Conservatory Co. 
Bell Conservatory Co. 
BeU Conservatory Co. 
BeU Conservatory Co. 
BeU Conservatory Co. 
BeU Conservatory Co. 
BeU Conservatory Co. 
BeU Conservatory Co. 
BeU Conservatory Co. 
BeU Conservatory Co. 



Address. 



Sacramento 
Sacramento - 
Sacramento . 
Sacramento - 
Sacramento _ 
Sacramento - 
Sacramento - 
Sacramento. 
Sacramento . 
Sacramento . 
Sacramento - 
Sacramento . 
Sacramento . 



Articles Exhibited. 



.Collection of flowering plants in bloom. 
.Collection of ornamental foliage plants. 

Display of cut flowers. 

Collection of new and rare plants. 

Display of coleus. 

,., Exhibit of named varieties of dahlias. 

Collection of roses in bloom. 

Collection of fuchsias in bloom. 

-- Collection of tuberoses in bloom. 

-^. - Collection of pinks. 

."-.. Collection of ferns, 

« ...Display of bouquets. 

-Collection of plants suitable for conserv- 
atory, greenhouse, and window culture. 



90 



TRANSACTIONS OF THE 
Fifth Depaetment— Continued. 



Exhibitor. 


Address. 


Articles Exhibited. 


Bell Conservatory Co. 

Mrs. L. B, Sutliff 


Sacramento 


, Display 


Sacramento 


of hanging baskets containing plants. 
! Exhibit of named 


Mrs. L B. Sutliff 


Sacramento --____- 


varieties of dahlias (twelve varieties). 
Display of cut flowers. 









CLASS y— DAIRY PRODUCTS. 



John Burns. 

John Burns 

John Burns 

J, McM. Shafter, 
J. McM. Shaf ter 
J. McM. Shafter, 



Address. 



Nicolaus 

Nicolaus 

Nicolaus 

San Francisco - 
San Francisco - 
San Francisco. 



Articles Exhibited. 



Cheese one year old. 

. Cheese over one year old. 

Display of cheese. 

Cheese one year old. 

.. Cheese over one year old, 
Display of cheese. 



CLASS VI— BUTTER, BREAD, ETC. 



EXHIBITOB. 



L. F.Eaton 

J. McM. Shafter 

J. McM. Shafter 
J. McM. Shafter 



Address. 



Florin 

San Francisco. 

San Francisco. 
San Francisco. 



Articles Exhibited. 



, --Five pounds 

pure Jersey butter made in California. 

Five pounds 

pure Jersey butter made in California, 

Display of butter in rolls. 

-Tub of firkin butter. 



CLASS yi— BREAD AND CEREAL FOOD. 



Lizzie B. Aiken 

Lizzie B, Aiken -_,-,. 

Lizzie B. Aiken 

Lizzie B. Aiken ._.__. 

Lizzie B. Aiken 

Mrs. G. E. BurwelL.- 
Mrs. a, E. Burwell „ 
Mrs. G. E. Burwell — 
Mrs, G. E. Burwell .. 
Mrs. G.E. Burwell -- 

L. B. Aiken ,:_. 

American Biscuit Oo. 
American Biscuit Co. 
American Biscuit Co. 
American Biscuit Co. 
American Biscuit Co. 
American Biscuit Co. 

Miss S. Sullivan 

Miss S. Sullivan 

Miss S. Sullivan 

Miss 8. Sullivan 

Mrs. K. S. Frazee 

Mrs. D.de Hull 

Mrs. Dde Hull 

Mrs. D.de Hull 

Mrs. D.de Hull 

Mrs. D.de HuU 

Mrs. D.de Hull 

Agnes Hopper 



Address. 



Sacramento .._ 
Sacramento.-. 
Sacramento... 
Sacramento - -- 
Sacramento--. 
Sacramento -.- 
Sacramento ..- 
Sacramento--. 
Sacramento--- 
Sacramento--- 
Sacramento.-. 
San Francisco- 
San Francisco - 
San Francisco- 
San Francisco. 
San Francisco. 
San Francisco - 
Sacramento --. 
Sacramento ... 
Sacramento .,. 
Sacramento... 
Sacramento... 
Union House . 
Union House . 
Union House . 
Union House . 
Union House . 
Union House . 
Sacramento — 



Articles Exhibited. 



..Soda biscuit. 

- Biscuit 

Domestic corn bread. 

Domestic brown bread. 

Cream waffles. 

Domestic corn bread, 

- .. Domestic brown bread, 

Graham bread. 

Domestic wheat bread. 

-Display of domestic bread. 
-Display of domestic bread. 

Pilot 

Biscuit. 

Soda biscuit. 

Crackers (butter). 

Crackers (sweet). 

.Boston crackers, 

Graham bread. 

Domestic wheat bread. 

Domestic corn bread. 

Soda biscuit. 

Domestic wheat bread. 

Biscuit 

Soda biscuit. 

Domestic corn bread. 

Domestic brown bread. 

Domestic wheat bread. 

-Display of domestic bread. 
Soda biscuit. 



STATE AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY. 
Fifth Department — Continued. 



91 



EXHIBITOfi. 



Agnes Hopper 

Agnes Hopper 

Mrs. W.H.Wright-. 
Mrs. W.H.Wright.., 

Mrs.W. H.Wright... 
Mr3,W. H.Wright-.. 
Mrs.W. H.Wright ... 
Mrs. W. H. Wright — 
Mrs. W.H. Wright... 

Mrs. S. Conrad 

Mrs. S. Conrad 

Mrs. S. Conrad 

Mrs. S. Conrad 

Mrs. S. Conrad 

Mrs. S. Conrad 

Miss Emma Muddox . 
Miss Emma Muddox . 
Miss Emma Muddox . 
Miss Emma Muddox , 
Miss Emma Muddox , 
Miss Emma Muddox . 
Miss Agnes Hopper... 
Miss Agnes Hopper. .. 

Miss Ana Fist 

Miss Ana Fist 

MissIdaM. Wolfe... . 
Miss Ida M.Wolfe.-. 
Miss Ida M. Wolfe -- 
Miss Ida M. Wolfe .... 
Miss Ida M. Wolfe — 
Miss Ida M. Wolfe.-.. 

W.P.Peterson 

W.P.Peterson , 

Mrs. P.M. Artz 

Mrs. P.M. Artz 

Mrs. P.M. Artz 

Miss Ella Patton...... 



Address. 



S^ccramento - . 
Sacramento . 
Sacramento - , 
Sacramento .. 
Sacramento - . 
Sacramento - . 
Sacramento . . 
Sacramento .. 
Sacramento . 
Sacramento - . 
Sacramento _. 
Sacramento -- 
Sacramento - . 
Sacramento., 
Sacramento.- 
Sacramento - . 
Sacramento -- 
Sacramento -- 
Sacramento -. 
Sacramento _- 
Sacramento - - 
Sacramento . - 
Sacramento . - 
Sacramento . . 
Sacramento - - 
Sacramento - . 
Sacramento . - 
Sacramento.. 
Sacramento . . 
Sacramento - - 
Sacramento - - 
Sacramento - . 
Sacramento . - 

Perkins 

Perkins 

Perkins 

Florin 



Articles Exhibited. 



Biscuit. 

Domestic brown bread. 

...Soda biscuit 

Domestic corn bread. 

Domestic rye bread. 

Domestic brown bread. 

,. -Domestic graham bread. 

Domestic wheat bread. 

.Display of domestic bread. 

Domestic wheat bread. 

Domestic rj^e bread. 

Domestic corn bread. 

Domestic brown bread. 

Graham bread, 

-Display of domestic bread. 

I)omestic corn bread. 

Domestic rye bread. 

Domestic brown bread. 

.. Domestic wheat bread. 

Graham bread. 

Display of domestic bread. 

Domestic corn bread. 

-_ .Graham bread. 

, Biscuit. 

.Soda biscuit 

Domestic corn bread. 

Domestic rye bread. 

Domestic brown bread. 

Domestic bread. 

Graham bread. 

Biscuit. 

. Four loaves baker's bread. 

Graham bread. 

Biscuit 

Domestic corn bread. 

Domestic brown bread. 

Domestic wheat bread. 



CLASS yil— SUGAR 


, SYRUP, ETC. 


EXHIBITOE. 


Address. 


Articles Exhibited. 


0. F. Barton . . 


Sac r am.en to - - . . 


._ Display of confectionery. 


O.F.Barton 


Sacramento 


: General varieties 


W. H. Murray 


San Francisco 


of candies made in hall during exhibition, 
Display of sugar-cane. 


Mrs. R. S. Lockett _ > . 


Sacr am ento ....... 


, -Display of sugar-cane. 


W.H. Murray 


San Francisco 


._ , One hundred 






pounds of sugar made from sugar beets. 



ENTRIES FOR GOLD MEDALS. 



EXHIBITOB. 


Address. 


Articles Exhibited. 


0. McCreary 

Bell Conservatorv Co 

American B iscuit Co 


Sacramento . 


__ Flour and mill feed. 


Sacramento . 


....Flowers and flowering plants. 


San Francisco 


Display of crackers, etc. 



92 



ElCHIBITOR. 



Exhibitor. 



TRANSACTIONS O*^ THE 



SIXTH DEPARTMENT. 



CLASS I— APPLE3S. 



BXHIBMOB. 


Address. 


Articles Exhibited. 


J. Patman 


Clements 


-Display and variety of apples. 


Clark & WiUianison 


Penryn 


Display and variety of apples. 


H. A. Frost 


Dutch Flat 


,,, Display and variety of apples. 


B. N.Bugbey 


Sutter County 


Display and variety of apples. 


W. D. Carpenter . ,_. 


El Dorado County, 
Nevada City-. 


- Display and variety of apples. 


C. Weiseriberger 


Display and variety of apples. 


W. Wilkenson 


Lowell HiU 


Display and variety of apples. 


S. N. Stranahan,- 


N^evada Citv . - - . 


- - Display and variety of apples. 


A. C, G-uillispie 


Nevada City 


Display and variety of apples. 


J. Levee 


Lowell Hill 


Display and variety of apples. 


Dr. A. Chapman 


Nevada City 


Display and variety of apples. 


J. B. Duprav- - 


Nevada City 


Display and variety of apples. 


Mrs, R. S. Locket t 


Perkins - 


Display and va riety of apples. 









CLASS I— PEARS. 



Jos. Putraan _ . 

J, B.Welty 

Clark & Williamson 
H. A.Frost. 

B. N.Bugbey 

G.H.Kerr. 

J, P. Odbert 

E. F. Aiken 

W. D. Carpenter 

C. Weisenberger 

A. C. GuiUispie 

J. Levee 

Dr. A. Chapman 

J. B. Dupray 

Mrs. U. S. Lockett _ . 



Address. 



Clements., 

Sacramento 

Penryn 

Dutch Flat 

Sutter County 

Elk Grove. — 

Sacramento -.,---- 
Sacramento..----. 
El Dorado County. 

Nevada City 

Nevada City 

Lowell Hill 

Nevada City 

Nevada City 

Perkins. 



Articles Exhibited. 



_ Display 
_ Display 
-Display 
_ Display 
Display 
. Display 

- Display 
. Display 
-Display 

- Display 
. Display 

- Display 

- Display 

- Display 
. Display 



and variety, 
and variety, 
and variety, 
and variety. 
and variety, 
and variety, 
and variety, 
and variety, 
and variety. 
and variety, 
and variety, 
and variety. 
and variety, 
and variety, 
and variety. 



CLASS I— PEACHES. 



John Reith, Jr 

J. A.Robinson 

P.W.Butler 

Jos. Pucman 

Mrs. L, B. Suthff.-. 

C.T.Adams 

J. B.Welty 

Harry Foster 

E.F.Aiken--- 

Clark & Williamson 

B. N.Bugbey 

Mrs. M. B. Fox 

W. D. Carpenter 

J. B. Dupray 

Mrs. R.S. Lockett. -. 
L H.Thomas 1- 



Penryn 

Newcastle . — 

Penryn 

Clements 

Sacramento- 

Newcastle 

Sacramento 

Sacramento--^ 

Sacramento 

Penryn 

Sutter County 

Newcastle _-. 

El Dorado County. 

Nevada City 

Perkins 

Visalia 



Articles Exhibited. 



- Display and 
, Display and 
. Display and 

- Display and 

- Display and 

- Display and 
. Display and 
. Display and 

- Display and 

- Display and 
-Display and 
. Display and 

- Display and 
. Display and 

- Display and 

- Display and 



variety. 

variety, 
variety, 
variety, 
variety, 
variety, 
variety, 
variety, 
variety, 
variety, 
variety, 
variety, 
variety, 
variety, 
variety, 
variety. 



STATE AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY. 

Sixth Depaetment— Continued. 
CLASS I-PLUMS. 



93 



E. F.Aiken --. 

Clark & Williamson 

Mrs, J. Shields 

Mrs.M. E. Fox 

W. D. Carpenter 

Mrs. R.S. Lockett-. 



Address. 



Sacramento 

Penryn 

Routiers 

Newcastle..., 

El Dorado County. 
Penryn .- 



Articles Exhibited. 



- Display and variety. 
. Display and variety. 
. Display and variety. 

- Display and variety. 
-Display and variety. 

- Display and variety. 



CLASS I— FIGS. 



Jos. Putman 

Clark & Williamson 

Harry Foster 

Mrs.M.E.Fox , 

H.E.Parker 

Mrs. R. S. Lockett . 



Clements ... 

Penryn 

Sacramento . 
Newcastle.-. 

Penryn 

Perkins 



Articles Exhibited. 



. Display and variety. 
. Display and varietj'. 
- Display and variety. 
. Display and variety. 
. Display and variety. 
, Display and variety. 



CLASS I— TROPICAL FRUITS. 



EXHIBITOB. 



Clark & Williamson . 
Mrs.M. E. Fos; 



Address. 



Penryn --_ 
Newcastle- 



Articles Exhibited. 



.Display and variety. 
-Display and variety. 



CLASS I— ORANGES AND LEMONS. 



Exhibitor. 


Address. 


Articles Exhibited. 


Isaac Lea.. 


Florin 


Display and variety of oranges. 


Clark & Williamson 


Penryn .--_-..... 


Display and variety of oranges. 


Mrs. M. E. Fox 


N ewcastle 


,^ Display and variety of oranges. 









CLASS I— GENERAL DISPLAY. 



EXHIBITOlft. 


Address. 


Articles Exhibited. 


Joseph Patman 

Clart & Williamson 


Clements -.._.. . 


..-.General display of fruit by producer. 


Penryn 


General display of fruit by producer. 


Mrs. M. E. Fox 


Newcastle 


General display of fruit by producer. 


W. D. Carpenter-. 


El Dorado County - 
Nevada City 


General display of fruit by producer. 

General display of fruit bv producer. 


8. N, Stranahan 


Mrs. R. S. Lockett 


Perkins 


General display of fruit by producer. 









94 



TRANSACTIONS OF THE 

Sixth Dbpabtment — Continued. 
CLASS II— HONEY, PRESERVES, ETC. 



Mrs. Geo. C, McMuUen 
Mrs. Geo. C. McMuUen 
Mrs. Geo. C. McMuUen 
Mrs. Geo. C. McMuUen 
Mrs. Geo. 0. McMuUen 
Mrs. Geo. C. McMuUen 
Mrs, Geo. 0. McMuUen 
Mrs. Geo. C McMuUen 
Mrs. Geo. C. McMuUen 

Mrs. H. E. Parker 

Mrs. H. E. Parker 

Mrs. H. E. Parker 

Mrs. H. B. Parker 

Mrs. H. B. Parker 

Mrs. H. E. Parker 

Mrs. H. E. Parker 

May Kewen 

May Kewen 

May Kewen _.. _. 

May Kewen , 

Mrs. Geo. Muddox 

Mrs. Geo. Muddox 

J. P.Odbert 

J. P.Odbert 

Mrs. Geo. Muddox 

Mrs. Geo. Muddox 

Mrs. Geo. Muddox 

Mrs. Geo. Muddox 

Mrs, Geo. Muddox 

Mrs. Geo, Maddox 

Mrs. Geo. Muddox 

Mrs. Geo. Muddox 

Mrs. Geo. Muddox 

Mrs. Geo. Muddox 

J. B, Dupray. 

Lebenbaum Bros 

Lebenbaum Bros.-i 

Mrs. Addie Carter 

Mrs. Addie Carter 

Mrs. Addie Carter 

Mrs. Ad die Garter 

Mrs. Addie Carter 

Mrs. Addie Carter 

Mrs, Addie Carter 

Mrs. Addie Carter 

Mrs. Addie Carter 

Mrs. Addie Carter 

Mrs. Addie Carter 

Mrs. C.Weber 

Mrs. C.Weber 

Mrs. C, Weber 

Mrs. C. Weber. 

Mrs.W.J.HiU. 

Mrs. E.G. Beaty 

Mrs. P. G. Beaty 

Mrs. F. G. Beaty 

Mrs. F. G. Beaty 

Mrs. E. G, Beaty 



Address. 



Sacramento 

Sacramento 

Sacramento..,-. 
Sacramento--.-, 

Sacramento 

Sacramento 

Sacramento 

Sacramento 

Sacramento 

Penryn 

Penryn 

Penryn 

Penryn 

Penryn 

Penryn 

Penryn _ 

Sacramento 

Sacramento 

Sacramento 

Sacramento 

Sacramento 

Sacramento 

Sacramento.,^-. 

Sacramento 

Sacramento 

Sacramento 

Sacramento 

Sacramento 

Sacramento . .... 

Sacramento 

Sacramento 

Sacramento 

Sacramento 

Sacramento 

Nevada County 
SanErancisco... 
San Francisco... 



Sacramento . 



Sacramento 

Sacramento 

Sacramento 

Sacramento 

Sacramento 

Sacramento 

Sacramento 

Sacramento 

Sacramento 

Sacramento 

Nevada County . 
Nevada County . 
Nevada County _ 
Nevada County . 
Nevada County . 
Nevada County , 
Nevada County . 
Nevada County . 
Nevada County . 
Nevada County . 



Articles Exhibited. 



Six jars raspberry jeUy. 

Six jars red currant 'jelly. 

-Six jars blackberry ^eUy. 

Six jars strawberry ]eUy. 

Six jars quince jelly, 

Six jars blackberry jam. 

Six jars raspberry lam, 

..Best display of jams and jellies in glass. 

Strawberry jam. 

_ __- Six jars strawberry jelly. 

Six jars quince jeUy. 

...Six jars red currant jelly. 

Six jars raspberry jelly, 

-Six jars blackberry jeUy. 

Six jars raspberry jam. 

Display of jams and jellies in ^lass. 

>_ Six jars red currant ]eUy. 

Six jars blackberry jelly. 

_ Six jars blackberry jam. 

Display of brandied peaches. 

Ten pounds California honey. 

Display of pickles, 

Display of fruit in glass. 

Displaj' of pickles. 

Display ot fruit in glass, 

Six jars raspberry jelly. 

,.- Six jars red currant jelly. 

Six jars blackberry jeUy. 

Six jars black currant jeUy. 

Six jars strawberry jelly. 

Six jars quince jeDy. 

Six jars blackberry jam. 

Six jars raspberry jam. 

Display of jams and ieUies in glass. 

.Ten pounds California honey. 

Display of jams and jellies in glass. 

.Display of canned and 

preserved jams, jellies, etc., by factory. 

Display 

of fruit in glass by other than factory. 

Six jars raspberry jelly. 

- Six jars red currant jelly. 

Six jars black currant jelly. 

Six jars blackberry jelly. 

Six jars strawberry jelly. 

Six jars quince jelly. 

._- Six jars blackberry jam. 

Six jars raspberry i am. 

Display of jams and jellies in glass. 

Display of brandied peaches. 

Display of fruit in glass. 

- Display of jams and jellies. 

- Six jars currant jelly. 

- Six jars blackberry jelly. 

Display of fruit in glass. 

Display of fruit in glass, 

Display oi jams and jelUes. 

Six jars raspberry jelly. 

Six jars currant jelly. 

Six jars blackberry jelly. 



STATE AGBICULTUBAL SOCIETY. 

Sixth Dbjpabtment— Continued. 
CLASS III— DKIED AND PRESERVED FRUITS, NTJTS,' ETC. 



95 



Exhibitor. 



D. H. Clippinger . 
D. H. Clippinger _ 

D. H. Clippinger . 

E. Booth.:....... 

E, Booth 

B, Booth 

E. Booth 

B. Booth 

B. Booth 

B. Booth 

WilUam Foster .. 
B.N,Buebev.... 
Mrs. J. Shields- . . 
Mrs. J, Shields... 
Mrs, J. Shields ... 
Mrs. J, Shields... 
D. H. Clippinger . 
B. H. Clippinger . 
D. H. Clippinger . 
B. H. Clippinger . 
Mrs. M, E. Fox .. 

. Mrs, M. E. Fox .. 
Mrs. M. E. Fox .. 
Mrs.M. E, Fox.. 
Mrs. M. E. Fox.. 

P.W.Butler 

H. E. Parker .... 
W. B. Carpenter . 
W. D. Carpenter . 
W. D. Carpenter - 
W. D. Carpenter . 
W. D, Carpenter . 
W. D. Carpenter _ 
W. D. Carpenter . 
W, D. Carpenter _ 
W. D. Carpenter . 
S.N. Stranahan.- 
S,N, Stranahan.. 
8,1^. Stranahan.. 
8. N. Stranahan-. 
S.N, Stranahan.. 
S. N. Stranahan.. 
S. N. Stranahan.. 
S. N. Stranahan.. 
S.N. Stranahan.. 
S.N. Stranahan-. 



Mrs. R, S. Lockett- 



Address. 



Perkins 

Perkins 

Perkins 

RosevUle , 

RoseviUe 

Roseville..-. 

RoseviUe 

RoseviUe 

RoseviUe 

RoseviUe. --. 

Lincoln 

Sutter County 

Routiers __ 

Rentiers 

Routiers — 

Routiers 

Perkins- 

Perkins 

Perkins 

Perkins , 

Newcastle 

Newcastle 

Newcastle.... 

Newcastle 

Newcastle — 

Penryn -.. 

Penryn — 

Diamond Springs . 
Diamond Springs 
Diamond Springs . 
Diamond Springs . 
Diamond Springs . 
Diamond Springs 
Diamond Springs . 
Diamond Springs . 
Diamond Springs . 

Nevada City 

Nevada City 

Nevada City 

Nevada City 

Nevada City 

Nevada City 

Nevada City 

Nevada City 

Nevada City 

Nevada City 

Perkins 



Articles Exliibited, 



..Ten pounds dried j)eaches by producer. 

Ten pounds dried figs by producer. 

General display of dried fruits by factory, 

- Ten pounds dried peaches. 

._ Ten pounds dried nectarines. 

Ten pounds dried plums. 

Ten pounds dried prunes. 

., Ten pounds dried apples, 

- Ten pounds dried pears. 

Ten pounds dried figs, 

Ten pounds dried prunes. 

Ten pounds dried prunes, 

-Ten pounds dried peaches, 

Ten pounds dried plums. 

Ten pounds dried prunes. 

Ten pounds dried apricots. 

.— Ten pounds dried nectarines, 

Ten pounds dried pears. 

. Ten pounds dried apples. 

Ten pounds dried prunes. 

Ten pounds dried peaches. 

Ten pounds dried plums. 

Ten pounds dried prunes. 

Ten pounds dried figs, 

-General display dried fruits by producer. 

.Ten pounds dried i)eaches. 

Ten pounds dried figs. 

Ten pounds dried apples. 

Ten pounds dried pears. 

Ten pounds dried peaches. 

Ten pounds dried plums. 

.Ten pounds dried prunes. 

Ten pounds dried apricots. 

Ten pounds dried nectarines. 

- Ten pounds dried figs. 

Display of dried fruits by producer, 

- Ten pounds dried apples. 

Ten pounds dried pears. 

-Ten pounds dried peaches. 

Ten pounds dried plums. 

Ten pounds dried prunes. 

..Ten pounds dried nectarines. 

Ten pounds dried cherries. 

Ten pounds dried raspberries. 

Ten pounds dried strawberries. 

Gen- 



eral display of dried fruits by producer. 
General display of fruits by producer. 



CLASS III— CULTIVATED NUTS RAISED BY EXHIBITOR. 



BXHIBITOB. 



E. F.Aiken 

W.H. Williamson. - 
Clark & WUliamson 

B.N. Bugbey 

B. H. Clippinger 

Mrs. R'. S. Lockett . . 



Address. 



Sacramento... 

Routiers 

Penryn 

Sutter County. 

Perkins 

Perkins 



Articles Exha)ited. 



Display of peanuts. 

-Display of soft shell almonds. 
-Display of soft shell almonds. 

...Display of peanuts, 

Display of almonds. 

Display of almonds. 



96 



TRANSACTIONS OF THE 

Sixth Department— Continued. 
CLASS III— MISCELLANEOUS. 



EXHIBITOE. 


Address. 


Articles EjtWbited. 


Bean Spray Pump Co 

Bean Spray Pump Co 


Los Gatos 


Wash for destroying scale insects 


Los Gatos 


on fruit trees, with directions for use. 
. -.Washfor 




destroying codlin moth and its larva on 
fruit trees, with full directions for use. 



:E]xhibitor. 



Joseph Putman.-- 

C. T. Adams 

C. T, Adams 

C.T.Adams. 

C.T.Adams- 

E. Booth. 

J. B. Welty 

Wm. Foster 

J. B. Whitcomb-.- 
J.B. Whitcomb... 
J. B. Whitcomb — 
J. B. Whitcomb..- 
J. B. Whitcomb — 
J. B. Whitcomb,.. 
J. B. Whitcomb--. 

Geo. H. Kerr 

Geo. H, Kerr , 

Geo. H. Kerr 

Geo. H. Kerr 

Geo. H. Kerr 

E. L, Hawk 

B. L. Hawk 

B, L. Hawk 

E. L. Hawk 

E. L. Hawk 

John Uieth, Jr. — 

John Rieth, Jr. 

Mrs. M. E. Tox .... 

J.N.Nile 

J.N.Nile 

J.N.Nile 

J.N.Nile 

J.N.Nile.- 

J.N.Nile 

J.N.Nile 

Thos.W. Payne.... 
Thos.- W.Payne.... 
Thos.W. Payne--.. 
Tiios. W.Payne..-. 
Thos. W. Payne--. 
Thos. W.Payne.-.. 
Thos. W. Payne.-.. 
Mrs. R. S. Lockett . 
Mrs. R. S. Lockett . 
Mrs. R. S. Lockett . 
Mrs. R. S. Lockett 
Mrs. R. 8. Lockett . 
Mrs. R. S. Lockett . 
Mrs. R. S. Lockett . 
Mrs. R. S, Lockett . 
W. D. Carpenter . .. 
W. D. Carpenter ... 
W. D. Carpenter . .. 
W, D. Carpenter . .. 
W. D. Carpenter... 



CLASS IV-GRAPES AND RAISINS. 



Address. 



Clements 

Newcastle- 

Newcastle 

Newcastle 

Newcastle 

Roseville 

Sacramento 

Lincoln 

Colfax 

Colfax 

Colfax 

Colfax 

Colfax 

Colfax 

Colfax 

Elk Grove 

Elk Grove 

Elk Grove. 

Elk Grove 

Elk Grove 

Rocklin 

Rocklin. 

Rocklin-, 

Rocklin. - 

Rocklin- - 

Penryn 

Penryn 

Newcastle 

Grass Valley 

Grass Valley 

Grass Valley 

Grass Valley 

Grass Valley ..w-,. 

Grass Valley 

Grass Valley 

Grass Valley 

Grass Valley 

Grass Valley - 

Grass Valley 

Grass Valley 

Grass Valley 

Grass Valley 

Perkins -. 

Perkins - 

Perkins - 

Perkins 1.. 

Perkins .,. — . 

Perkins 

Perkins 

Perkins _-. 

Diamond Springs . 
Diamond Springs . 
Diamond Springs . 
Diamond Springs _ 
Diamond Springs. 



Articles Exhibited. 



Variety of table grapes. 

Six varieties table grapes. 

, - Three varieties table grapes. 

One variety table grapes, 

.General display of grapes by producer. 

Display of raising, 

One variety wine grapes. 

Display of California raisms. 

- Six varieties table grapes. 

-Three varieties table grapes. 

One variety table grapes. 

-.Six varieties wine grapes. 

Three varieties wine grapes. 

-. One variety wine grapes. 

-General display of grai)es by producer. 

- Six varieties table grapes, 

- - . Three varieties table grapes. 

One variety table grapes. 

-One variety wine grapes. 



-General display of grapes by producer. 

Six varieties table grapes. 

Three varieties table grapes. 

One variety table grapes. 

Three varieties wine grapes. 

One variety wine grapes. 

Three varieties table grapes. 

One variety table grapes. 

Display of seedless raisins. 

-.Six varieties table grapes. 

Three varieties table grapes. 

One variety table grapes. 

Six varieties wine grapes. 

Three varieties wine grapes. 

- - One variety wine grapes. 

-General display of graces by producer. 

Six varieties table grapes, 

.-. Three varieties table grapes. 

- One variety table grapes. 

- Six varieties wine grapes. 

- Three varieties wine grapes. 

One variety wine grapes. 



. General display of grapes by producer. 

Display oi California raisins. 

- Six varieties table grapes. 

Three varieties table grapes. 

.,-, One variety table grapes. 

Three varieties wine grapes. 

Six varieties wine grapes. 

-- One variety wine grapes. 

. General display of grapes by producer. 

•. Six varieties table grapes. 

Three varieties table grapes. 

One variety table grapes. 

._ Three varieties wine grapes. 

One variety wine grapes. 



BXHIBITOB. 



STATE AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY. 

Sixth Department— Continued, 



97 



BXHIBITOB. 


Address. 


Articles Exhibited. 


W. D. Carpenter 


Diamond Springs, 
Diamond Springs 
Elk Grove ,' 


.. General display of grapes by producer 
. Six varieties wine grapes 


W. D. Carpenter 


Geo. H.Kerr 


..^ Three varieties wine grapes. 









CLASS V— BRANDIES AND WINES. 



H.W.Crabb 

H.W.Crabb 

H.W.Crabb 

John Kaiser 

John Kaiser 

John Kaiser 

M.S. Nevis 

M. S Nevis 

M.S.Nevis 

H. G. Leemaii ... 

H. G. Leeman ._- 
J. Gundlach & Co, 

J. Gundlach & Co. 
J. Gundlach & Co. 



Exhibitor. 



Address. 



Napa County 

Napa County 
Napa County 
Loomis 



Loomis 

Loomis 

Sacramento - 



Sacramento . . 
Sacramento.. 
Grass Valley . 



Grass Valley .. 
San Francisco. 

San Francisco. 
San Francisco - 



Articles Exhibited. 



. _ General 

display of California brandies and wines. 

.- -Grape brandy over one year old, 

Grape brandy one year old. 

General 

display of California brandies and wines. 

Grape brandy over one year old. 

Grape brandy one year old. 

General 

display of California brandies and wines. 

Grape brandy one year old. 

Grape brandy over one year old. 

- General 

display of California brandies and wines. 

Grape brandy over one year old. 

_ General 

display of California brandies and wines. 

, California brandies and wines. 

Grape brandy over one year old. 



CLASS V-SWEET WINES. 



H.W.Crabb — 

H.W.Crabb 

HW.Crabb 

H.W.Crabb 

H.W.Crabb 

H.W.Crabb 

H.W.Crabb 

H.W.Crabb 

John Kaiser 

Mrs. George Muddox 

M.S. Nevis 

H. G. Leeman 

F. O.Helwig 

M. M. Estee 

J. Gundlach 



Address. 



Napa County . 
Napa County . 
Napa County . 
Napa County . 
Napa County - 
Napa County . 
Napa County . 
Napa County - 

Loomis 

Sacramento ... 
Sacramento .._ 
Grass Valley,. 

Nevada 

Napa 

San Francisco - 



Articles Exhibited. 



- Sweet wine 

,-- Muscatel (vintage of 1884). 

Malaga (vintage of 1886). 

, Madeira (vintage of 1886). 

Port (vintage of 1876 and 1886). 

, Blackberry (vintage of 1883). 

Tokay (vintage of 1884). 

Sherry (vintage of 1886). 

Sweet wine. 

Sweet wine. 

Sweet wine — angelica, sherry, port. 

- Sweet wine. 

Sweet wine. 

- - Sweet wine. 

Sweet wine. 



CLASS V— DRY WINES. 



H.W.Crabb 

H.W.Crabb 

H.W.Crabb 

^20 



Napa County 
Napa County . 



Napa County 



Articles Exhibited. 



-^- White wine 

(vintage of 1886) — sauterne, riesling, 
gautadel, semillion, musque, chablis. 

Claret wine over one year old— cham- 

bertine (vintage of 1886), biclin (vintage 
of 1886), cabernet, sauvignon (vintage 
of 1886), burgundy (vintage of 1884). 

Claret wine one year old (vintage of 

1887)— petit surah, black pinot, zinf andel. 



98 



Exhibitor. 



EXHIBITOB. 



TRANSACTIONS OF THE 
Sixth DEPARTMENT—Continued, 



John Kaiser 

John Kaiser 

John Kaiser 

M. S. Nevis 

M. S. Nevis 

Thomas N, Payne. 
Thomas N. Payne. 

F. C. Helwig 

F. C. Helwig 

M. M. Estee 

M. M, Egtee 

M.S.Nevis 

M.M. Estee 

J. Gundlach & Co. 
J. Gundlach & Co. 
J. Gundlach & Co. 



Address. 



Loomis 

Loomis 

Loomis 

Sacramento , 
Sacramento . 



Grass Yalley.. 
Grass Yalley. - 

Nevada 

Nevada 

Napa 

Napa 

Sacramento ... 

Napa 

San Francisco, 
San Francisco - 
San Francisco. 



Artlclas Exhibited. 



. - White wine (vintage of 1885-86). 

Claret wine over one year old. 

Claret wine one year old. 

, --White wine— riesling. 

Claret wine over one year 

old— zinfandel (vintage of 1883 and 1887). 

White wine. 

Claret wine. 

White wine, 

Claret wine. 

White wine. 

Claret wine over one year old. 

,, Claret wine one year old. 

Claret wine one year old. 

White wine. 

Claret wine over one year old, 

Claret wine one year old. 



CLASS V— SPECIAL WINES. 



H.W, Crabb 

H. W. Crabb 

John Kaiser 

John Kaiser 

H. Palmer & Co.. 

M. S. Nevis 

M. S. Nevis 

A. Combe 

H, G. Leeman 

H. G. Leeman 

J.J. Rolfe 

A. Combe ..- 

F. C. Helwig 

M. M. Estee 

J. R. Nickerson .. 
J. Gundlach & Co, 



Napa County. _ 
Napa County -- 

Loomis 

Loomis 

San Francisco - 
Sacramento... 
Sacramento _.> 
Grass Valley.. 
Grass Valley ., 
Grass Valley .. 

Nevada 

Grass Valley .. 

Nevada 

Napa 

Grass Valley -_ 
San Francisco- 



Articlee Exhibited. 



California port. 

California sherry. 

._- California port 

._ -California sherry, 

California port. 

* California port. 

California sherry. 

California port, 

Calif ornia port. 

California sherry. 

- - .-California sherry. 

* California sherry. 

^ California port. 

California port. 

.California sherry (made from currants). 
California sherry. 





ENTRIES FOR GOLD MEDAL. 


SXHIBITOB. 


Address. 


Articles Exhibited. 


i). H. ClioDineer -. 


Perkins - 


Dried fruit. 


Mrs. R. S. Lockett 


Perkins 


...... Green fruits, dried fruits, and nuts. 


J. Gundlach <feCo 


San Francisco 


Display of wines and brandies. 









STATE AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY. 



SEVENTH DEPARTMENT. 



99 



CLASS I-OIL PAINTINGS, WATER COLORS, CRAYONS, ETC. 



EXHIBXIOB. 



Edward Deakin 

John A. Stanton 

A. Michelson 

Amanda Austin 

Mrs. W.Irelan 

H. Raschen 

Alice H. Vincent- 

Mary Curtis Richardson . 

C.T.Wilson 

Norton Bush 

C, Yon Perbandt- 

F.L. Heath 

J. Rastell 

Oscar Kunath 

A. JouUin -, 

BmU Carlson 

H. W. Arthur Nahl 

Mrs. E. Dedman 

William Keith 

W.F.Jackson 

A.C.Rodriguez 

Fred. Yates 

J. Brouchaud 

S.M, Brookes 

E. Narjot 

RD.YeUand 

L. Roethe 

Eva Withrow 

Mrs, A.E. Rogers 

Charles Prosch 

Chris. J or gensen 

G. Boedewig 

Charles Prosch 

Mrs. S. Farnam 

Oscar Deakin 

Adaline Morse 

W.J. Mier 

H, Raschen 

Kate P. Herrick. 

Mrs, M.H. Payne 

W. J.Straight , 

Mrs. M. C. Boyd - 

R. Helms 

Sacramento Art School 



Address. 



San Francisco - 
San Francisco- 
San Francisco. 
Sacramento-.. 
San Francisco. 
San Francisco. 

Oakland 

San Francisco- 
San Francisco - 
San Francisco. 
San Francisco- 

Santa Cruz 

Oakland 

San Francisco. 
San Francisco - 
San Francisco. 
San Francisco. 

Placerville 

San Francisco. 

Sacramento 

San Fran Cisco - 
San Francisco. 
San Francisco- 
San Francisco, 
San Francisco. 
San Francisco. 
San Francisco - 
San Francisco _ 

San Francisco. 
San Francisco 
San Francisco - 
San Francisco. 
San Francisco. 
San Francisco- 
San Francisco. 
San Francisco - 
Sacramento — 
San Francisco- 
Sacramento — 
San Francisco.. 
Grass Valley.. 
San Francisco. 
Sacramento 



Sacramento - 



Articles Exhibited. 



Thirty-three oil paintings. 

Eight oil paintings. 

One pastel and two crayon portraits, 

Two oil paintings and one crayon. 

Two oil paintings and seven crayons. 

Four oil paintings. 

..-Three oil paintings. 

- Two oil paintings. 

- Two oil paintings. 

Nine oil paintings. 

- Two oil paintings. 

Eight oil paintings. 

Four oil paintings. 

Two oil paintings. 

_._ Five oil paintings. 

Two oil paintings. 

One oil painting and five crayons. 

.^,_ Nine oil paintings. 

Fourteen oil paintings, 

One oil painting. 

..Twelve oil paintings. 

— Seven oil paintings. 

Two oil paintings. 

Ten oil paintings. 

_, Seven oil paintings. 

- ...Four oil paintings. 

Two oil paintings and five pastels, 

- Five 

oil paintings, ten pastels, and charcoals. 

One oil painting. 

Seven oil paintings. 

Seven water colors. 

Three crayons and one pastel. 

, - One water color. 

One water color. 

Six water colors. 

Five water colors. 

Four crayon portraits, 

- Five charcoal drawings. 

._ - Eleven oil paintings. 

Five oil paintings. 

One oil painting. 

Seven oil paintings. 

Exhibition of 

portraits in oil, water colors, and pastels, 
.-Exhibition of oil paintings and crayons. 



CLASS I-AMATEURS' GALLERY-OIL PAINTINGS, WATER COLORS, ETC. 



Exhibitor. 



Mrs. M. E. Tryon 

Mrs. W. G. Richardson . 

Paul Memogoena 

Miss Belle Hey 

Miss Addie L. Hughes... 

Miss Mary Crouch 

Miss Louise Harris 

Mrs. S. S. Boynton 

Miss S. Jennie Hopper- - . 
Miss Maggie O'Toole 



Address.. 



Sacramento 

San Francisco. 
San Francisco. 
San Francisco. 
Sacramento — 
Sacramento — 

Oakland 

Orovilie 

Sacramento 

Freeport ... 



Articles Exhibited. 



- Fourteen oil paintings, 

Five oil paintings. 

Two oil paintings, one crayon. 

., Two oil paintings. 

One oil painting. 

.— One crayon drawing, 

One oil painting. . 

Seven oil paintings. 

Seven oil paintings, one water color. 

. Five crayon drawings, one water color. 



100 



TRANSACTIONS OF THE 
Seventh Department— Continued. 



Exhibitor. 



Address. 



Miss Josephine Hayes . 

Miss Annie 0. Pearl 

Miss Mary Slayback — 

Clarkson JDye--, ,. 

J. R, Lafontaine 

W.B.Sawyer 

Mrs, M. E. Phipps 

Miss Mary Fry 

Misa Mary Horstmeyer 
Miss Louisa J. Conrad- 

Mrs. H.O. Briggs 

Mrs. Frank Powell 



Sacramento..- 

Sacramento 

Sacramento.., 
San Francisco. 
San Francisco. 
Sacramento.-. 
Yuba City _„ 



Walsh Station. 
Sacramento... 
Sacramento . . - 

Oakland 

Folsom 



Articles Exhibited. 



Three oil paintings, 

Three oil paintings. 

Three crayon drawings. 

. Two oil and two water color paintings. 
. Two oil paintings, one crayon drawing. 

Four oil paintings. 

-Two 



oil paintings, one crayon, one India ink.. 

--- Three oil paintings. 

,__. Three oil paintings. 

Four crayons, two pen and ink drawings. 

One painted screen. 

Two oil paintings. 





CI^ASS ir~PHOTOGRAPHS. 


Exhibitor. 


Address. 


Articles Exhibited. 


A. 0. Grefforv 


Sacramento 


.., Display of photographs. 


S. Boysen 


Sacramento 


,. Display of photographs. 


George B. Stewart ... 


Sacramento 


Display of landscape photographs. 


I. Taber 


San Francisco 


Display of photoeranhs. 









CLASS in— ETCHINGS, INDIA INK, PEN AND PENCIL DRAWINGS. 



EXHIBIIOE. 


Address. 


Articles Exhibited.^ 


Carl Eisenchimel 


San Francisco 


Three specimens penmanship. 


Chris. Jorgen sen 

John A.Stanton 


San Francisco... -~ 


Six specimens pen and ink drawing. 


San Francisco 

San Francisco 


Twelve specimens pencil and ink drawing. 
Two specimens pen drawing. 


Oscar Deakin.,-- . 









CLASS IV-STATUARY, FRESCO, MOSAIC, AND CARVED WORK. 



Exhibitor. 


Address. 


Articles Exhibited. 


F. Happersberger - 


San Francisco 


^ Seven specimens statuary. 


Frederick Flohr 


San Francisco 


Fourteen specimens statuary. 


W. A. Newell 


San Francisco 


Three specimens statuary. 


Charles Holland 


Sacramento 


. -..._. Four specimens statuary in soap. 









CLASS V— PENMANSHIP. 



Exhibitob. • 


Address. 


Articles Exhibited. 


Sacramento Business Coll.. 


Sacramento 


Display of penmanship. 


Bainhridge Business Coll... 
Barnard's Business College. 


Sacramento ...... 


... Display of penmanship. 


San Francisco 


.Display of penmanship. 







CLASS VI— JUVENILES. 



Exhibitor. 


Address. 


Articlee Exhibited. 


Fred. Blanchard 


Sacramento 


. Seven crayon drawings. 


Fillmore White 


Sacramento 


. Two pen drawings. 









STATE AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY, 

Seventh Department— Continued. 
CLASS VII-CALIFORNIA DRAWINGS AND DESIGNS. 



101 



Exhibitor. , 


Address. 


Articlefl Exhibited. 


Jacob Lentzen & Son 


San Jos^ -.--.. 


,.„._. Original mechanical drawing. 


Sac'to Grammar School 


Sacramento .., -. 


Display of 


Frederick Flohr 


San Francisco 


drawing: pen, pencil, and water colors. 
One design for Winn monument. 









EIGHTH DEPARTMENT. 



COUNTY EXHIBITS. 



Exhibitor. 



Sam. Hutchins 

B. M. Berry.-.. 
J. D, Huffman. 
J. R. Nickerson 
H. J. Ostrander 
Ray White 

C. Langdon 



Address. 



Colusa 

Newcastle 

Lodi 

Nevada City 

Merced 

Fresno 

Rohnerville - 



Articles Exhibited. 



Colusa County 

Placer County 

-San Joaquin County 

Nevada County 

Merced County 

Fresno County 

_. -Humboldt County 



exhibit, 
exhibit, 
exhibit, 
exhibit, 
exhibit, 
exhibit, 
exhibit. 



NINTH DEPARTMENT. 



MISCELLANEOUS. 



AT. Ames 

S. L. Monday 

John Miller 

Stanton, Thomson & Co.- .. 
Stanton, Thomson & Co.... 
Stanton, Thomson & Co.-.. 
Stanton, Thomson & Co..-. 
Stanton, Thomson & Co.... 

Fred. Rohrer 

S. C. H. Agricultural W'ks. 

J.H.H.Pound 

Pacific Saw Mfg Co 1 - 

W. H. Murray 

D.C.Crunney 

D.C.Crunney 

Baker & Hamilton ,-. 

Benicia Agricultural W'ks 
Benicia Agricultural W'ks 
Benicia Agricultural W'ks 
Benicia Agricultural W'ks 



Gait.--.- 

Black's Station. 

Sacramento 

Sacramento 

Sacramento 

Sacramento --- 

Sacramento 

Sacramento 

Santa Rosa 

Stockton 



San Francisco. 

San Francisco. 
San Francisco. 

Los Gatos 

Los Gatos 

Sacramento ... 

Benicia 

Benicia 

Benicia 

Benicia 



Articles Exhibited. 



.Patent riding attachm't for single plows. 

, Wagon jack. 

Glass white hearse. 

i Sickle grinder. 

.- Wheel scraper. 

- Road grader, 

Sack holder. 

- Wagon jack. 

Diamond fruit pitter. 

- Improved shoe for com- 
bined harvester or thrashing machine. 

, LThe Australian patent fence, 

wire stretcher, and permanent fastener. 

, Duncan's timber jacks. 

Model locomotive, California man'f act're. 

Spray pump, 

- Spray nozzle. 

..-1 Traction engine. 

_> Store or warehouse trucks. 

_ ...-Garden barrows, 

Farm cart. 

Header. 



102 



TRANSACTIONS OF THE 
Ninth Department— Continued. 



EXHIBITOB. 



Benicia Agricultural Wks 

Studebaker Bros 

A. Doble 

A. Doble , 

A. Doble 

N. W. Spaulding 

Pacific Saw MfgCo 

Pacific Saw Mfg Co.. 

Pacific Saw Mfg Co 

W. H. Murray , 

W. H. Murray 

Pacific Saw Mfg Co. 

W. McAlister 

G. G. Wickson & Co 

G. G. Wickson & Co. 

G. G. Wickson & Co.- 

Judson Mfg Co 

L. M.Potter 

Joseph Budde 

Pacific Mfg Co 

Sims & Morris 

John Herrell -- 

Elijah Hickman , 

Mrs. M. H. Ober 

Geo. J. Mathersole 

Geo. J. Mathersole . _ 

E. W.Melvin 

Washington Mfg Co 

Washington Mfg Co 

Washington Mfg Co 

A. A. Van Voorhies & Co.. . 

T. H.Harlan 

S. P.Taylor 

Stoddart Bros. _. 

Stoddart Bros 

Miss Carrie Murray 

Miss Carrie Murray 

A. J, Pommer 

A. J. Pommer 

A. J. Pommer 

H. A. Hebard 

A. S. Hopkins & Bro 

Leduc Improvement Go.,- 

Alt R. Kelly 

Palmer Clark 

E. 0. Mead & Co 

E. 0. Mead & Co 

A. S. Graff , 

T.B.Johnson 

John F. Cooper 

John F. Cooper,—. .— 

John F, Cooper - 

John F. Cooper - 

John F. Cooper 

John F. Cooper 

John F. Cooper 

John F. Cooper 

John F. Cooper 

John F. Cooper 



Address. 



Benicia 

Sacramento -.- 
San Francisco- 



San Francisco. 
San Francisco. 
San Francisco - 
San B'rancisco. 
San Francisco > 
San Francisco. 
San Francisco. 

San Francisco - 
San Francisco - 
San Francisco- 
San Francisco - 
San Francisco. 
San Francisco. 
San Francisco - 
Sacramento,-- 
San Francisco- 



San Francisco- 

San Francisco. 

Plymouth 

Red Bluff 



San Francisco. 

Chili Bar 

Chili Bar 

Sacramento.— 
San Francisco - 
San Francisco - 
San Francisco. 
Sacramento .-, 

Colusa 

San Francisco. 
San Francisco - 
San Francisco. 
San Francisco - 
San Francisco. 
Sacramento ... 
Sacramento .. 
Sacramento.. - 



San Francisco - 



Sacramento — 
San Francisco.. 
San Francisco.. 
Sacramento .., 
San Francisco 
San Francisco 
San Francisco 
San Francisco 
Sacramento — 
Sacramento — 



Sacramento . 

Sacramento . 

Sacramento. 

Sacramento - 
Sacramento - 
Sacramento - 
Sacramento . 
Sacramento . 



Articles Exhibited. 



Saw frame. 

Display of buggy tops. 

Refined 

cast steel, manufactured by Tirth & Son. 

Black Diamond silver tool steel. 

Wright's picks and pick eyes. 

Chisel Dit. 

The Boss wood saw. 



Pruning saw, adjustable blade. 

C. B. Paul's files. 

.-Model of the Hercules dredger, built by 
the Golden State and Miners' Iron Works. 

Barb wire fencing (Bush's patent). 

- Movable blade. 

Model breakwater for levee dams. 

, Creamery engine. 

Set of farm tools. 

Tread horse-power. 

Display of tacks. 

Potter's wire gate for barb wire fence. 

^ Patentwater- 

closets, stop waste, and surface hoppers. 

Lap- welded wrough t-iron 

pipe, with patent lead-lined couplings. 

Wheelbarrows. 

Dried fruit renovator. 

Hickman's 

improved roller bolster for general use, 

., Display of underwear. 

Exhibit of roofing slate. 

-Exhibit of slate roofing. 

Display of installment goods. 

Victor extracts. 

- — . Seagull tea. 

W-. Beehive yeast powders. 

., Display of card horse. 

Crochet work of Mohair fabric. 

.- -Various sizes of Eagle paper bags. 

Damascus creme and poudre. 

Liebig's German In vigorator. 

: Dress stays. 

- Dress extenders. 

..Embroidery, Domestic sewing machine. 
. Family sewingjDomes tic sewingmachine. 

Fine white 

sewing on Domestic sewing machine. 

- The Love 

button hole and family sewing machine. 

Indurated fiber ware. 

_Tule life preservers. 

Kelly's wood stains, aU colors. 

Vigor of Life. 

Samples silver cream polish. 

White's pie turner. 

-Coal oil lamps. 

_-. Special card writing. 

One grand piano (Mathushek make). 

Three styles 

"J," upright pianos (Mathushek make). 

One style 

"H/' upright piano (Mathushek make). 

One square 

orchestral piano (Mathushek make). 

One Wheelock 

cabinet grand piano (Mathushek make). 

Five organs (Chicago cottage make). 

Two large size orchestrones. 

Twelve banjos. 

Five concertinas. 

- Nine accordeons. 



STATE AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY. 
Ninth Department— Continued. 



103 



EXHIBITOB. 



John P. Cooper 

John F. Cooper 

John F. Cooper 

John F. Cooper 

John F. Cooper , 

John F. Cooper 

John P. Cooper 

John F. Cooper 

John P. Cooper 

John F. Cooper 

John F. Cooper 

George Topping 

Theo. W. Schwamb 

Mrs. BeUe Quarles 

Mrs. BeUe Quarles 

Fred. Jantzen -. 

Fred. Jan tzen 

Fred. Jan tzen 

Fred. Jantzen,.. ,- 

James Linforth 

The Guittard Mfg Co 

TheGuittard Mfg Co 

The California Slate Co 

Dickert& Meyers -.. 

Dickert & Meyers 

AsaT. Heyden - 

California Fertilizer Co 

Mexican Phos. & Sul. Co. _. 

J. Everding & Co 

J. Everding & Co 

Risdon Iron Works 

The Guittard Mfg Co 

The Guittard Mfg Co 

Bandmann, Nielsen & Co.-. 
Bandmann, Nielsen & Co... 
Bandmann, Nielsen & Co... 

Mrs. E. A. Wilson 

Mrs. C. A. Blodgett 

James Gamble 

Towle Bros, & Co 

Margaret Leach 

Edith Stone 

Lawrence Valei ga 

Robert Bayley 

McKim & Orth 

McKim & Orth 

MissM. Hinkson -^- 

Mrs. 0. W. McGowan 

Mrs. 0. W. McGowan 

Mrs. 0. W. McGowan 

R. E. Gogings 

R. E. Gogings 

Rev. John F. Von Herrlich 
Rev. John F. Von Herrlich 
Rev. John F. Von Herrlich 
Rev. John F. Von Herrlich 
Rev. John F. Von Herrlich 

Miss Jul la Smith 

Crocker <fc Breuner 

Crocker & Breuner 

Crocker & Breuner 

Crocker & Breuner 

Crocker <fe Breuner 

Crocker <fc Breuner 

Crocker & Breuner.- ^^ 

Crocker & Breuner 

Madame Lee -- 

G. E.Burwell 



Addresa. 



Sacramento . 

Sacramento - 
Sacramento 
Sacramento _ 
Sacramento - 
Sacramento . 
Sacramento . 
Sacramento . 
Sacramento . 
Sacramento - 
Sacramento _ 
Sacramento _ 
Sacramento . 
Sacramento . 



Sacramento 

San Francisco 

San Francisco 

San Francisco 

San Francisco 

San Francisco 

San Francisco 

San Francisco 

San Francisco 

Cove Creek, LT.T.. 
Cove Creek, U. T.. 

San Francisco 

San Francisco 

San Francisco 

San Francisco 

San Francisco 

San Francisco 

San Francisco 

San Francisco 

San Francisco 

San Francisco 

San Francisco 

Temescal -., 

Temescal 

Oakland 

Alta 

Oakland 

Oakland 

Temescal 

San Francisco 

Sacramento 

Sacramento 

Sacramento- 

Sacramento 

Sacramento 

Sacramento 



Sacramento... 
Sacraraento--. 
Sacramento-.- 
Sacramento.— 
Sacramento >.. 
Sacramento... 
Sacramento.., 
Sacramento... 
Sacramento -. - 
Sacramento.^- 
Sacramento-.- 
Sacramento... 
Sacramento... 
Sacramento - . . 
Sacramento.. - 
Sacramento -._ 
San Francisco. 
Sacramento.. - 



Articles Exhibited. 



.«- Six anthropes. 

Four ariston organettes. 

One bass drum. 

Two snare drums. 

Twenty violins. 

Twenty violin boxes. 

Two banjos in boxes. 

-Music foUos. 

- - - -.-Piano stools. 

Six guitars. 

Eighty-four small musical instruments. 

__- -Working model of locomotive. 

Two White sewing machines. 

-Dis- 



play of ideal embroidery (machine made). 

: -,.- Ideal embroidery machine. 

-- Jantzen stove lamp. 

J an tzen billiard- table lamp. 

Jantzen portable lamp. 

, Chicago lamp. 

Bronze statuary and monuments. 

Teas, coffees, and spices. 

Perfumery, California manufacture. 

i Display of roofing slate. 

Roll sulphur. 

Sublimate and fine ground sulphur. 

-Gelatine relief process and photo ener'g. 
Dis. of land fertilizer for orchard or field. 

Guano fertilizer. 

California laundry wheaten starch. 

German granulated soap. 

-.Macbeth steel pulley. 

- Cafe des gourmands, 

Stephane's perfumes, California mf'e. 

Giant powder, N OS. 1 and 2, 

.- Gelatine dynamite. 

Dynamite gelatine. 

- Object lessons. 

, Object lessons. 

Sections of submarine cables. 

Wood pulp. 

, Object lessons. 

- Object lessons. 

Object lessons. 

>. Display of paper boxes, 

-..Display of infants* wear. 

Display of embroidery material. 

One painted satin photograph case. 

-One glass globe of wax harp and flowers. 

One wreath of feather flowers. 

One lyre of 

shavings flowers made of Oregon cedar. 

Display of family medicines. 

_- - V eterinary medical chest. 

One silk bedspread, embroidered. 

- Two silk tidies, embroidered. 

.-'- —.One silk painted tidy. 

-One silk painted wall banner. 

One silk painted handkerchief case. 

One crochet slumber robe. 

- One electro-safety bicycle. 

One electro-safety bicycle. 

One 55-inch Columbia light roadster. 

One 51-inch Columbia light roadster. 

.-.,.One 64-inch Columbia light roadster. 

One 62-inch Victor light roadster. 

.One 42-inch Victor Junior light roadster. 

_ One Victor tricycle. 

Cosmetics and manicure. 

. Home-made doughnuts. 



104 



TRANSACTIONS OF THE 
Ninth Department— Continued, 



EXHIBITOB. 



G, E. BurweU 

Whittier, Fuller & Co 

Whittier, Fuller & Co 

Whittier, Fuller & Co 

James Porderer 

James Forderer , 

James Porderer -•--- 

Cathen, Bell & Co 

Cathen, Bell & Go 

The W. H. Bone Co 

W.F.Harmon 

Selby Smelt'g and Lead Co. 
Selby Smelt'g and Lead Co, 

Selby Smelt'g and Lead Co. 
Selby Smelt'g and Lead Co. 
Selby Smelt'g and Lead Co. 
Selby Smelt'g and Lead Co. 
C. E. Grunsky 

William C. Hevener - 

William C. Hevener 

Mrs. B. Sinkey 

J. T. Dufau 

J. T. Bufau 

J. H. Love 

Mrs. M. H. Ober 

A. C.Shaw 

A. C.Shaw- 

A. C.Shaw 

A. C. Shaw 

A. C.Shaw 

A, C, Shaw 

A. C.Shaw 

Mrs. J. L. Brown 

Mrs. H. Works & Co 

Mrs. S. M. Lechleiter 

Mrs. S. M. Lechleiter 

Mrs. S. M. Lechleiter. 

Charles Gibbons Davis 

William C. Hevener 

WiUiam C. Hevener 

William C. Hevener .: 

William C. Hevener _ 

William C. Hevener 

William C. Hevener 

William C. Hevener 

Wniiam C. Hevener 

William C. Hevener 

William C. Hevener 

William C. Hevener _ 

William C. Hevener 

William O. Heveuer 

William C. Hevener 

William C. Hevener 

H. Merwin 

Mrs. Geo. C. McMulIen 

Mrs. Geo. 0. McMulJen 

Mrs. Geo. 0. McMuUen 

Mrs. Geo. C. McMuUen 

Mrs. Geo. C. McMulIen 

Mrs. Geo. C. McMulIen 



Address. 



Sacramento 

Sacramento... 
Sacramento... 
Sacramento... 
San Francisco. 
San Francisco. 
San Francisco - 
San Francisco - 
San Fran Cisco - 
San Francisco. 
San Francisco, 
San Francisco- 
San Francisco. 

San Francisco. 
San Francisco 
San Francisco- 
San Francisco. 
Sacramento ... 



Sacramento 

Sacramento 

Woodland 

San Francisco. 

San Fran Cisco - 
San Francisco - 
San Francisco - 
Sacramento - — 
Sacramento... 



Sacramento . 
Sacramento . 
Sacramento . 
Sacramento . 



Sacramento ..- 
Sacramento .. 
San Jos6 

Sacramento 

Sacramento . . . 
Sacramento.. - 
San Francisco - 



Sacramento . 
Sacramento , 
Sacramento . 
Sacramento - 
Sacramento . 
Sacramento . 
Sacramento. 
Sacramento . 
Sacramento . 
Sacramento . 
Sacramento , 
Sacramento . 
Sacramento . 
Sacramento . 
Sacramento . 

Sacramento . 
Sacramento .. 
Sacramento. 
Sacramento . 
Sacramento . 
Sacramento . 
Sacramento . 



Articles Exhibited. 



, Home-made crullers. 

Display of parlor easels. 

Display of gilt tables, 

Display of fretwork. 

Display of zinc castings. 

Display of e^alvanized ornamental work. 
, Display of skylights for roofs of buildings. 

Display of Little's chemical flmd. 

... Display of sheep dip (non-poisonous). 

Display of C. C. liniment. 

Display of douDle spiral bed springs. 

Display of Standard machine loaded. 

Display of 

shotgun cartridges, Chamberlin patent 

Exhibition of shot. 

- Display of block tin pipe. 

Display of lead pipe. 

Display of bJuestone and copperas. 

Display of Maston's 

reading language and number frame. 

One 48-inch special Star bicycle. 

One 44-inch full nickel Ideal bicycle. 

One ocean-wave quili 

One patent packing 

casefor demijohns, bottles, and glassware. 

.One Davey box fastener. 

- Manufactured tablets. , 

Display of ladies' under w'r in Union suits. 
One Morris upright piano, style "10," Bos. 

One Spencer 

upright piano, style '*C," grand, Boston. 

One Con over Bros, upright piano, 

style "2," rosewood case, New York. 

Two Conover Bros, upright 

pianos, style " 6," grand, ebonized frames. 

- .One Conover Bros. 

upright piano, style" G," French walnut. 

....One Conover Bros. 

upright piano, style "6," extra ebonized. 

One patent piano player. 

.--.^ ^... One lace apron. 

Mansfield's capillaris. 

.Three banners embroidered in fish scales. 
-One handkerchief b'x emb. in fish scales. 
.-Two cologne bottles emb. in fish scales. 

The Wels- 

back system of incandescent gaslighting. 

One 38-inch American Ideal bicycle. 

One 48-inch American Ideal bicycle. 

One 42-inch American Ideal bicycle. 

One 34-inch American Ideal tricycle, 

.One 42-inch American Challenge tricycle. 
One 48- inch, full nickel, Champion bicycle. 
One 54-inch, full nickel, Champion bicycle. 
.C>ne 60-inch Standard Champion bicycle. 
One 30-inGh Singer Safety Cha'n bicycle. 

American Rambler Safety bicycle. 

One Electro Safety bicycle. 

-...One Eureka tricycle. 

One Western Toy tricycle. 

One chain tricycle. 

One 60-inch, 

full nickel, American Champion bicycle. 

,.- Sample broom corn. 

Six jars apple jelly. 

Six jars plum jelly. 

Six jars prune ^elly. 

.- -__ Six jars apricot ^elly 

Six jars pear jelly* 

Six jars peach jelly' 



SXUIBITOR. 



E. Booth- 

H. Foster 

C.H. Street & Co 

B. N. Bugbey 

Mrs. G.C. McMulIen. 

B. N. Bugbey 

B. N. Bugbey 

B. N. Bugbey 

B. N. Bugbey 

B. N. Bugbey 

Thomas Lovdal 

Mrs. H. E.Parker - — 
Mrs. H. E. Parker.-. 

Mrs. H. E. Parker 

Mrs. H. E. Parker 

Mrs. H.E. Parker.— 
Mrs. H. E. Parker..- 
Mrs. H. E. Parker. — 
Mrs. H.E. Parker- — 
Mrs. H. E.Parker,. — 

Mrs. H. E. Parker 

Mrs. H.E.Parker.... 
Mrs. H. E. Parker.-. 

Mrs. H. E. Parker 

G.L.Hunt 

Mrs. C. Murray 



STATE AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY. 
Ninth Department— Continued. 



105 



Address. 



J.D. Huffman.;. 
Joseph Putman — 

Isaac Lea.-, 

Isaac Lea 

Isaac Lea 

Isaac Lea 

Isaac Lea — . 

E. F.Aiken 

E. F.Aiken 

E. F.Aiken 

E. P. Aiken 

E. F.Aiken 

E. F.Aiken 

E.F. Aiken 

E. F.Aiken 

E. P.Aiken 

E. F.Aiken 

E. P. Aiken 

E. P. Aiken 

E. P. Aiken 

E.F.Aiken 

E.P.Aiken 

E. P. Aiken 

E. P. Aiken 

E. P. Aiken 

E.P.Aiken 

E. P. Aiken 

E. P. Aiken 

E. P. Aiken 

E. P. Aiken 

P.M.Artz 

P.M.Artz 

P. M.Artz 

Mrs. L. B. Sutliff. 

Mrs. L. B. Sutliff. 

C.T.Adams 

J.P.M.Perham.. 

W.H.Murray... 



liodi 

Clements 

Florin 

Florin 

Florin 

Florin 

Florin 

Sacramento ... 
Sacramento — 

Sacramento 

Sacramento..- 
Sacramento.— 
Sacramento.. - 
Sacramento... 
Sacramento — 

Sacramento 

Sacramento 

Sacramento.. - 

Sacramento 

Sacramento... 
Sacramento... 
Sacramento-.- 
Sacramento-.- 
Sacramento ... 
Sacramento... 
Sacramento . .. 
Sacramento .. 
Sacramento . -^ 
Sacramento., - 
Sacramento -.- 

Perkins 

Perkins . 

Perkins ." 

Sacramento..- 
Sacramento... 

New castle 

San Francisco- 
San Francisco. 



Roseville 

Sacramento... 
San Francisco. 
Sutter County. 
Sacramento.— 
Sutter County. 
Sutter County. 
Sutter County- 
Sutter County. 
Sutter County. 
Sacramento ... 

Penryn . 

Penryn 

Penym 

Penryn 

Penryn 

Penryn , 

Penryn _. 

Penryn 

Penryn , 

Penryn ..- 

Penryn 

Penryn , 

Penryn 

Elk Grove 

San Francisco.. 



Articles Exhibited. 



Artistic figure of Ceres. 

Hops. 

Mission olives. 

Picholine olives. 

- - Dried olives. 

, Chestnuts. 

.__ Licorice root. 

.Mammoth Tours pumpkins. 

__ Potiron pumpkins. 

, Custard pumpkins. 

Banana pumpkins. 

Striped bergine pumpkins. 

-_. Large cheese. 

Mammoth Chili squash. 

Marblehead squash. 

Boston marrow squash. 

Nest egg gourd. 

Sugar trough gourd. 

._ New red China squash. 

.Early white bush squash. 

Perfect gem squash. 

_. Small cocoanut squash. 

...White pineapple squash. 

Essex hybrid squash. 

Winter crookneck squash. 

: Winter crookneck pumpkins. 

Salem improved squash. 

._ Turban squash, 

_. -..Brazil sugar pumpkin. 

Early yellow bush squash. 

Yankee squash. 

Green tobacco. 

Stringbeans. 

Gourds. 

Quinces. 

Persimmons. 

Vermont maple syrup, 

Special display of 

May's models, representing our State in 
commerce, trade, her manufactories, em- 
bracing cotton, silk, ramie, jute, kindred 
resources, both foreign and domestic. 

Quinces. 

Evergreen millet. 

Display of CaHf ornia products. 

Individual farm exhibit. 

, Grape jelly. 

Yellow tomatoes. 

Red pepper, 

Egyptian corn. 

..One bale and six bunches broom corn. 
.One sack, two bunches broom corn seed. 

Two bales hops. 

.Ten jars prune jelly. 

, Six jars gooseberry jeUy. 

Six jars gros prune ^elly. 

Six jars grape jelly. 

Six j ars black raspberry j elly . 

Six jars apricot jelly. 

Six jars strawberry jara, 

Six jars gooseberry jam. 

Six jars grape ;j am. 

--Six jars quince jam, 

Six jars blacK raspberry jam. , 

-^- Six glasses spiced figs. 

Fourteen bottles tomato catsup. 

One sack and sheaf black-bearded wheat. 

- Display of 

olive oil from Quito farm, Santa Clara. 



106 



TRANSACTIONS OP THE 

Ninth Department— Continued. 



Exhibitor. 



Maye Kewen 

Maye Kewen 

Maye Kewen 

Maye Kewen 

Maye Kewen 

J. li. Buniell 

J. H. Burnell 

France Whittaker 

W.H.Murray. 

S. F. Produce Exchange 

Mattie Bates 

N.Wilcox 

J. Wieland 

J. Wieland ..,. 

J. Wieland- 

Mrs. R. S. Frazee 

Mrs. Geo. Muddox 

Mrs. Geo. Muddox 

Mrs. Geo. Muddox 

Mrs. Geo. Muddox ■. . 

Mrs. Geo. Muddox 

Mrs. Geo. Muddox 

Mrs. Geo. Muddox 

Mrs. S. Conrad. -w 

Mrs. 8. Conrad- 

Harry Foster 

J. B. Nickerson 

P. M.Artz- 

D.F. Fryer 

Lebenbaum Bros 

Lebenbaum Bros 

Lebenbaum Bros 

Lebenbaum Bros 

8. N. Stranahan 

Mrs. R. S. Lockett 

Mrs. K. S. Lockett 

J. H. Murray 

0. McOreary & Co 

F.V.Flint 

Mrs. Addie Carter 

Mrs. Addie Carter 

Mrs. Addie Carter 

Mrs. Addie Carlter 

Mrs, Addie Carter 

Liebenbaum Bros 

Liebenbaum Bros 

Mrs. Addie Carter 

Mrs, Addie Carter 

Mrs. Addie Carter 

Mrs. Addie Carter 

Mrs. Addie Carter 

Mrs, Addie Carter 

Mrs. George Muddox ... 
J. E. Camp 



Address. 



Articles Exhibited. 



Sacramento... 
Sacramento... 
Sacramento... 

Sacramento 

Sacramento.-- 
San Francisco - 
San Francisco. 
San Francisco. 

San Fran Cisco - 
San Francisco - 



Sacramento... 
Sacramento --- 
San Francisco - 
San Francisco - 
San Francisco. 
Sacramento..- 
Sacramento.-- 

Sacramento 

Sacramento - -- 
Sacramento... 
Sacramento..- 
Sacramento... 

Sacramento 

Sacramento... 
Sacramento-.- 

Sacramento 

Grass Valley .- 
Sacramento.-. 

Oroville 

San Francisco. 
San Francisco. 
San Francisco. 
San Francisco- 
Nevada City -- 

Perkins 

Perkins 

San Francisco. 
Sacramento — 

Sacramento 

Sacramento 

Sacramento — 
Sacramento — 

Sacramento 

Sacramento — 
San Francisco- 
San Francisco - 
Sacramento — 

Sacramento 

Sacramento — 

Sacramento 

Sacramento 

Sacramento 

Sacramento — 
Perkins 



Apple jeUyv 

, Strawberry jam. 

_» Spiced peaches. 

,.- Cherry preserves. 

-Peaches. 

_. Albion ale. 

, - Albion porter. 

Pure lard» free from 

cotton seed and other adulterations. 

__ Natural asphaltum. 

— -- Standard 

of grain for California, for 1888 harvest. 

Two cotton plants. 

Display of quinces. 

Display of beer. 

-Export beer. 

, Draught beer. 

Rolls (wheat). 

Bottled chowchow. 

- Bottled pickled olives. 

Bottled tomato catsup. 

Bottled tomatoes (canned). 

_ Bottled green peas. 

Bottled egg tomatoes. 

-Bottled popcorn. 

One fancy tart. 

One coffee cake. 

-- _ Japanese persimmons. 

Cultivated grasses and grain. 

Green tobacco. 

Abietine remedies. 

Hawley*s bar sugar and frosting. 

"La Favre " Sarasota chips. 

California olive oil. 

: Imported olive oil. 

Sun-dried hops. 

- Display of gourds. 

Display of cotton. 

Dr. Henley's celery, beef, and iron. 

Superfine shipping flour. 

One bale of hops. 

- Pineapple jam. 

Orange jam. 

- - Lemon jam. 

- Plum jam. 

- Currant jam, 

California plum pudding sauce. 

Display of fancy groceries, 

Six lars of strawberry jam, 

Six jars of orange jelly. 

Six jars of plum jelly. 

Peach pickles. 

.Pear pickles. 

Grape pickles. 

Bottle of chowchow. 

One bale of hops. 





GOLD MEDAL ENTRIES. 


EXHIBITOE. 


Address. 


Articles Exhibited. 


Mrs. M. H. Ober 


San Francisco 


Most meritorious exhibit of ladies' 






and children's underwear and corsets. 



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STATE AGBICULTURAL SOCIETY. 



DEPARTMENT GOLD MEDALS. 



143 



- FIRST DEPARTMENT. 

To E. J. Merkeley, of Sacramento, for most meritorious exhibit of horses. 
To P. Peterson, of Sites, Colusa County, for most meritorious exhibit of live stock other 
than horses. (Herd of Durham cattle.) 

SECOND DEPARTMENT. 
To Benicia Agricultural Works, for most meritorious display of agricultural machinery. 

THIRD DEPARTMENT. 

To Mrs. M. H. Ober, of San Francisco, for the most meritorious display of textile fab- 
rics. (Ladies and children's underwear and fancy goods.) 

FOURTH DEPARTMENT. 

To Capital Soap Co., for the most meritorious display of mechanical products. (Display 
of soaps.) 

FIFTH DEPARTMENT. 

To San Joaquin County, for the most meritorious display of agricultural products. 
(Cereals.) 

SIXTH DEPARTMENT. 

To H. W. Crabb, of Oakville, Napa County, for the most meritorious display of brandies 
and wines. 

SEVENTH DEPARTMENT. 

To E. Narpt, of San Francisco, for the most meritorious display of fine arts. 

NINTH DEPARTMENT. 

To Philadelphia Brewing Co., San Francisco, for the most meritorious display in the 
Miscellaneous Department. (Lager beer.) 

FOR THE MOST ATTRACTIVE DISPLAY. 

To Huntington, Hopkins <fc Co* (George K. Hansbrow, designer), the most attractive 
display in the Pavilion. 



144 



TRANSACTIONS OF THE 



SAN FRANCISCO JOURNAL OF COMMERCE SPECIAL DISPLAY 

OF EXHIBITS. 



Although in the fair there were many exhibits worthy of mention, there 
were none that exceeded the really magnificent and extensive display of 
the " Journal of Commerce'' of San Francisco. The various counters, 
shelving, pyramids, and tables occupied an area on the main floor near 
the band stand aggregating two thousand eight hundred and sixteen 
square feet. To give a complete description of this attractive as well as 
instructive exhibit would take up too much space at this time, so but a 
passing reference will be made. 

On a wall space, forty feet long, was to be seen one of the most striking 
signs ever exhibited at any fair, and read " San Francisco Journal of Com- 
merce display — Special exhibits." The monster letters represented every 
department of commerce — ^metals, grains, products, etc. — each letter being 
composed of a cereal or metal, the whole forming one of the most interest- 
ing things to be seen, and the crowds who constantly assembled compli- 
mented the ingenuity and enterprise of the journal. 

Turning to the right, at the end of the wall-table, was found a display 
of varnishes in a magnificent case, as well as the materials from which 
they were manufactured. Above this there was an artistic oil painting, 
some ten by fifteen feet in size, forming an attractive feature. Heuter 
Bros., proprietors of the pioneer varnish works, were entitled to the credit 
of home-made varnishes. Then, neatly arranged, came grain exhibits, 
topographical maps, mineral exhibits, models in eilegant cases, including 
the powerful Hercules dredger employed on the Panama Canal, and 
manufactured by the Golden Gate and Miners' Iron Works of San Fran- 
cisco; and numerous other instructive and interesting articles. Near the 
stairway a blaze of light fell on a display of crackers, staple and fancy. 
Artistically arranged was the display of the Selby Smelting and Lead Com- 
pany, consisting of standard cartridges, bar lead, lead pipe in cabinet, tin 
pipe, lead pipe, and anti-friction metal, which attracted much attention. 
A display of bluestone and copper was made by this company. 

Arranged in the form of a triple pyramid was a fine display of Albion 
ale and porter, made by J. H. Burnell, of San Francisco. 

A display by James Linforth, of San Francisco, consisting of roll, pul- 
verized, and sublimed sulphur, being the product of the Dickert & Meyers 
Sulphur Company's mine at Cove Creek, Utah. Adjoining, Messrs. C. H. 
Street & Co., successors to the Immigration Association of California, made 
a display of California products, consisting of cotton, silk, mohair, alfalfa, 
California woods, etc. 

A table forty feet long had a fine exhibit from the California Cotton 
Mills, of Oakland, which attracted a large share of attention, and which 
will certainly result in much benefit to the industry. The display con- 
sisted of towels and tablecloths, dressed flax, yards of cotton duck and 
toweling, linen sack twine, and yards of kersey. 

Maps, charts, artistic designs, and a series of large photographs of Cali- 
fornia scenes and views, the latter from Taber, of San Francisco, showed 



STATE AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY. 



145 



unequaled proficiency in this art. A view of San Francisco Bay, eight 
feet long, together with large crayon portraits of the late Charles Crocker, 
C. P. Huntington, Senator Stanford, and Governor Waterman, combined 
to form a display of great interest and excellence. 

J. Qundlach, of San Francisco, filled in magnificent designs with a very 
creditable display of Sonoma wines and brandies. The arrangement of 
the exhibit was excellent, being in the center of the main hall. The Ries- 
ling of Gundlach & Co., of San Francisco, had a most palatable taste, 
retaining the natural flavor of the grape, showing that careful vintage had 
accomplished the result, 

A little cottage manufactured of slate by the California Slate Company, 
of San Francisco, surrounded by samples, came in for its share of attention. 

Exhibits of wood pulp for paper, from Towle Bros. , of Alta, Sierra Nevada 
Mountains. An elegant display of pure Vermont maple syrup was made 
by J. M. P. Perham. 

Francis Whittaker & Sons,Thos. Loughran & Co., agents, for lard man- 
ufactured free from cotton seed oil, attracted much attention. Little's 
sheep dip, in tanks covered with attractive labels, caught the eye of the 
sturdy stockman. Messrs. Catton, Bell & Co., of San Francisco, made this 
display. 

The California Chemical Works, John Reynolds, proprietor, did its estab- 
lishment ample justice by a complete exhibit of oil of vitriol, muriatic and 
nitric acids, nitric of iron, and excelsior soldering solution. Jute in vari- 
ous forms, sent by the management of San Quentin Prison, including bags 
and bagging, proved very interesting to visitors. 

A display of the famous California port wine manufactured by H. 
Palmer, of San Francisco, came in for a large share of attention. The 
exhibit of potash and caustic soda from the Greenbank Alkali Works, of 
England, by T. W, Jackson & Co., of San Francisco, was one of the finest 
in the fair. 

One pyramid was a display of camphor and chloral liniment by the W. 
H. Bone Company, of San Francisco. 

Jos. F. Forderer, of San Francisco, made a fine exhibit, especially pre- 
pared for this fair, of his galvanized iron work for the ornamentation of 
buildings. Iron work is of short life compared to this new process. This 
was one of the most interesting and attractive exhibits of the fair. Olive 
oil from the famous Quito Olive Farm, Santa Clara County, showed Cali- 
fornia excellence in olive oil country. 

Entering Machinery Hall from the main building the Pacific Saw Man- 
ufacturing Company made a fine display of saws. Their pruning saws 
with adjustable blades that can be turned on any angle and also can be 
detached and reversed if necessary — ^the backs being of steel always keep 
the blade strained properly; which together with N. W. Spalding's patent 
chisel bit circular saw, which had been entered for a gold medal, forms a 
central figure in the display, making it complete. 

To the right of the main aisle of the general exhibit arranged in pyramid 
were a hundred varieties of bottles, flasks, etc., from the San Francisco and 
Pacific Glass Works. It gave evidence that the facilities of the establish- 
ment were complete, and any demand that may arise can be met by Mr. 
Carlton Newman. 

We may follow with mention of a rare lot of samples of Pacific Coast 

wools, scoured and fleece wools from the firm of Christy & Wise, of San 

J^rancisco. The fiber was compared by experts, and the superiority of 

localities easily ascertained. A single fleece from a young sheep attracted 

10 20 



146 



TRANSACTIONS OF THE 



attention by its fineness and heavyweight, tipping the scales at sixteen 
pounds. 

Near the electric light in Machinery Hall, a large and heavy sheet of 
pure Michigan copper, bearing the address of Abner Doble, was a conspicu- 
ous object. It was surrounded by blacksmith^s tools and John Wright's 
famous Washoe picks, making a very credible display. Many a remem- 
brance of the lively times was recalled to old time miners by the sight of 
those industrious looking picks as they lent their graceful curve and strong 
eye for the purpose of making an attractive representation. 

The champion metallic wheelbarrow, as manufactured by Sims & Mor- 
ris, was exhibited by them in Machinery Hall. 

A very novel and excellent invention known as the double spiral spring 
bed, exhibited by the manufacturer, Mr. Harmon, of San Francisco. This 
bed is destined to have an enormous sale. 

The Guittard Manufacturing Company, of San Francisco, exhibited in 
great abundance their famous teas, coffees, and spices, fancy chocolates, 
perfumes, Florida water, bay rum, etc., arranged in an attractive manner. 
This company had also a special brand of Chef baking powder. 

G. W. Hagens, of San Francisco, had a display of sheet music. 

Mr. Alf. R. Kelly, of San Francisco, had Golden West oil, NeaVs car- 
riage paints, also imperishable paint. 

Mr. T. D. Doyle, of San Francisco, exhibited a clasp, and an improved 
beveled horseshoe nail that has much credit. 

H. M. Newhall & Co., agents for Mexican Phosphate and Sulphur Com- 
pany, made a good showing of guano fertilizer. Samples of this were 
placed in the hands of an expert to report on same. 

The Giant Powder Company, of San Francisco, made an exhibit of a 
case filled with bottles, containing dynamite gelatine, gelatine dynamite 
blasting and Judson powder, Giant powder cartridges, and various other 
explosives. 

The San Francisco Produce Exchange made a display of Standard Cali- 
fornia grain. This company shipped to Europe during 1888 over $600,000 
worth, and the demand is rapidly increasing. 

The Business College, conducted by Professor G. B. Barnard, of San 
Francisco, made a fine display of the work of the commercial school. It 
reflected credit on the scholars. 

The exhibit of California starch and granulated soap, by J. Everding, 
Jr., of San Francisco. Both soap and starch are manufactured from wheat, 
while the former has properties for beautifying the complexion and soften- 
ing the skin, which will commend it to the ladies in particular. This new 
product is certain to become extremely popular, and will have an immense 



STATE AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY. 



147 



The Leduc Tule Improvement Company exhibited a tule life preserver; 
also, a working model of F. A. Huntington's centrifugal roller quartz mill, 
thorough and complete. They have been thoroughly tested in hundreds of 
instances, and have never failed to perform their work. 

An exhibit of zinco-relief plates was made by McCabe & Co., of San 
Francisco. The display was a credit to this enterprising firm. 

Steam and hot water radiators, made by C. D. Harvey, of San Francisco, 
were exhibited in a very neat manner. 

Celery, beef, and iron made a notable display. 

L. H. Thomas, of Visalia, made a fine display of peaches and assorted 
fruits. 

The model of the locomotive, " Governor Stanford," the first built on the 
Pacific Coast, was a great attraction, and as the old locomotive is still 



doing excellent service in the yards at Sacramento, it is proof positive that 
thB workmanship was of a superior quality, and stands the heavy usage 
without strain or injury. 

S. P. Taylor & Co., the pioneer paper manufacturers of the Pacific Coast, 
exhibited a beautiful pyfamid of paper, containing two tons of vari-colored 
paper and eagle paper bags. It proved to many visitors from the East that 
California can manufacture as fine paper as any State in the Union. 

Tancredi Vallerga, of Temescal, exhibited a map of California. The 
various sections being represented by the leading product, either in metals 
or product; it was highly complimented. 

. Miss Edith Stone and Miss Margaret Leach, members of Mrs. J. O'Meara's 
class of the Lincoln Grammar School, of Oakland, exhibited object lessons, 
consisting of a map of the United States. It was handsomely arranged, 
faithfully representing our products, and was artistic in detail. 

Mrs. Clara A. Blodgett, a teacher in the Temescal public school, exhib- 
ited language lessons from her pupils, and the display was carefully scru- 
tinized and complimented by hundreds and thousands of visitors. 

Mrs. E. A. Wilson, Principal of the Temescal School, contributed object 
lessons, which were exceedingly meritorious, and showed plainly artistic 
and skillful work. 

James Gamble, of Oakland, exhibited sections of submarine cables, 
together with a submarine chart of the world, showing all telegraph lines, 
both by lands and seas. 

An architectural drawing of the California Hospital for the Chronic 
Insane, at San Jose, an original mechanical drawing by Jacob Lenzen & 
Son, architects, San Jose, was awarded a medal. 

The exhibit made by the " San Francisco Journal of Commerce " of the 
manufactures, products, and goods of California, was one of the prominent 
features of the fair. It was unique in design, and comprehensive in scope, 
and will undoubtedly be of great benefit as setting forth the resources and 
capabilities of the State, embracing as it does a great variety of valuable 
and useful articles. The display was under the charge of W. H. Murray, 
the Secretary of 4he companv, to whose taste and ingenuity in arrange- 
ment of details was largely due the credit of the exhibit, and who orig- 
inated the idea, and carried it to a successful issue. The forty large shields, 
which were so conspicuous a feature, were also designed by the same gentle- 
man. The large and plain lettering on these shields, in a concise and well 
arranged manner, gave the facts desirable to be known regarding the State, 
its products, population, wealth, manufactures, and commerce. 



148 



TRANSACTIONS OF THE 



THE PROFITABLE OLIVE. 



Every few days the experience of some olive grower appears in the papers. 
With all that can be truthfully said about the large profits from oranges, 
raisins, and other products, the olive will equal, if not exceed, them all, 
verifying the old adage that '' an olive plantation is a gold mine on the 
surface of the earth." The " Templeton Times," San Luis Obispo County, 
lately gave the following in point: 

" Major Utt has an olive orchard of twenty-five bearing trees, planted in 
orchard seven years to include 1886; the product of ten of them last year 
was seven hundred and fifty gallons of olives. He sold the surplus crop 
at 40 cents per gallon, casks furnished, for $12 per tree. Fifty gallons of 
average crop to the tree at twelve years from the planting of the orchard 
would be a low estimate, and this amount would make six and a quarter 
gallons of oil. Ell wood Cooper gets $10 a gallon for his oil. Increased 
production will lower the wholesale price to $4 per gallon, or at the lowest 
$26 per tree, equal to $900 per acre. Allow one half for expenses and 
interest on investment, and you have the net sum of $450 per acre as net 
profits. Mr. Loop has been offered 80 cents a gallon for all the pickles." 

All authorities from one thousand years back to this day say the olive 
should be planted on dry soil, and needs but little water. Good cultivation 
is essential, as it is to success in the growth of any profitable crop. 

An authority on olive growing says : " The trees grow readily from cuttings, 
and begin to bear in the fourth year of their permanent planting from one- 
year old rooted cuttings. A paying crop will be gathered on favorable soil 
the fifth year." 



STATE AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY. 



149 



ALFALFA AS A HORSE FEED. 



B. F. Johnson writes the " New York Tribune: " "Intelligent and obser- 
vant horse men tell us the California two-year old thoroughbred is, as an 
average, quite as well grown and as fully developed as the three-year old 
of our Side of the mountain. This, they say, is probably owing to the 
mildness of the climate and a green forage all the year round, if needed, 
that keeps a colt growing right along. These are, no doubt, good reasons, 
but possibly they do not embrace all of them. Has it ever been sufficiently 
considered whether the feeding of alfalfa (lucerne), green and dry, may not 
have something to do with the rapid growth and size attained at an early 
age ? We know there are no better pastures in the world for putting on fat 
and flesh than those of Kentucky; where blue grass abounds, supported 
by timothy and clover, red and white; and we know, too, that in spite of 
all these advantges, Kentucky bred stock is losing in size and weight every 
year, however it may gain in quality. And the same is, to a certain extent, 
true of the blue grass, timothy, and clover pastures of the entire blue grass 
region west of the AUeganies and north of the Ohio River. In view of these 
several facts, will it be worth while to try experiments with alfalfa and 
learn by actual trial whether it may liot do for eastern stock what it has 
done for that of the Pacific Slope — given it the lead in fast and fine horses, 
with other kinds of stock to be heard from later on?" 

In commenting on the above, the " Rural Press " says: " It will be a good 
thing to try it, but one need not expect to reproduce at the East all the Cali- 
fornia conditions which contribute to the rapid and magnificent develop- 
ment of the animal merely by growing alfalfa. The fact of the matter is 
that even alfalfa owes its excellence here to local climatic conditions which 
cannot be transplanted. Alfalfa was grown in Central New York when we 
were there fifteen years ago, but it was mighty poor alfalfa compared with 
what grows here." 



150 



TRANSACTIONS OF THE 



THE RAISIN INDUSTRY.. 



[From tlie "Chino Champion," San Bernardino County.] 

Fresno seems to stand ahead in the quantity of raisins cured and ship- 
ped this year, but neither the soil nor climate there is better than in this 
valley for growing the raisin grape and making raisins. About a month 
ago the "San Bernardino Index ^^ interviewed a former resident of the 
county, then on a visit down here, who has spent some years in Fresno, 
on the raisin business. While giving Fresno credit for great success 
honestly earned, he said: 

"Yes, but it is all a mistake to credit Fresno with better facilities for 
growing and curing fine raisins than are possessed here, for those of this 
county are in nearly every respect superior. The raisin here is more deh- 
cate in flavor and richer in sugar, and Fresno vineyards do not begin to 
jdeld like those of this county." 

The ^^ Index '^ Bays: *'W, T. Henderson was present at the interview, 
and said that his young vineyard at Highlands was doing well; that, 
although it was not by any means in full bearing, he had sold over sev^n 
tons of cured raisins from a little less than four acres, from which state- 
ment we infer that he received considerably over $200 an acre for the crop." 

Wherever the raisin grape has been planted and properly cultivated in 
this county, the results have been large. Right around Chino there are 
many thousand acres of choice land for the profitable raisin grape. 



STATE AGRICULTtJRAL SOCIETY, 



159 



SPEED PROGRAMME. 



THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 1888. 

Race No 1~Trotting. 

The Occident Stake. For foals of 1885. Entries closed January 1, 1886. One hundred 
dollars entrance; of which ten dollars must accompany nomination; fifteen dollars to be 
paid January 1, 1887; twenty-five dollars to be paid January 1, 1888, and fifty dollars 
thirty days before the race. The Occident Gold Cup of the value of four hundred dollars 
to be added by the society. First colt, cup and six tenths ; second colt, three tenths ; and 
third colt, one tenth of stake. Mile heats, three in five, to harness. Fourth payment was 
made on the following entries: 



Name and Pedigree of Horse. 



Monteith, b. c, by Electioneer; dam, Mamie C, 
by iraponed Hercules 

Sol Wilkes, b. c, by Guy Wilkes ; dam, Mora 
Langford, by Langford 

Redwood, b. c, by Anteeo; dam, Lou Milton, 
by Milton Medium 



By Whom Entered. 



Address. 



Palo Alto Stock Farm. 

Wm. Corbitt 

A, McFadyen , 



— Menio Park. 
_San Francisco. 
Santa Rosa. 



Redwood (Donathan> — . _2 111 

Sol Wilkes (Brandow) 12 2 2 

rime— 2:47; 2:39i; 2:36i; 2:40^. 



Race Ko. 2~-Tbottihg. 
2:23 Glass. Purse, one thousand two hundred dollars. Mile heats ; three in five. 



Name and Pedigree of Horse. 



Thapsln, blk. g., by Berlin; dam, Lady Hub- 
bard - - _-. 

Gertrude Eussell, b. f,, by Electioneer; dam, 

Winnie, by Planet _. 

Alfred S, b. g., by Elmo; dam, Nora Marshall, 

by Union — 

Mamie Com.et, ch. m., by Nutwood; dam, by 

Sportsman - 

A-lcazar, b. c, by Sultan; dam, Minnehaha 

Valentine, br. g., by Parrell Clay ; dam, Queen.. 
Crus Wilkes, b. g., by Mambrino Wilkes ; dam, 

by Bonner - 



By Whom Entered, 



W.P.Smith- 

Palo Alto Stock Farm. 
H.W. Scale 



San Mateo Stock Farm. 

L. J. Rose..-^ . 

J.H.Kelly 

J. A. Dustin 



Address. 



->_ Sacramento. 
--- Menlo Park. 
- San Francisco. 



.. San Mateo. 
_ Los Angeles. 
. Los Angeles. 

Oakland. 



SUMMARY. 

Valentine (Kelly). 4 4 111 

Thapsin (W. F. Smith) 2 2 4 4 3 

Gus Wilkes (Dustin) .\ 3 3 3 3 2 

Alfred S (McManus) 1 1 2 2di5. 

nm6~-2:22; 2:21J; 2:24^; 2:24; 2:28i. 



160 



TRANSACTIONS OF THE 



Race No. 3— Facing, 
2:30 Class. Purse, six hundred dollars. Mile heats ; three in five. 



Kame aod Pedigree of Horse. 


By Whom Entered. 


Address. 


Ontario, blfc. g., by Crown Point ; dam, unknown . 

Ned Winslow, blk. g., by Tom Benton ; dam, by 

David Hill, Jr.. - - - . . 


A. Tietjens 


Sacramento 


J. L. McCord 


.- - Sacramento. 


Yolo Maid, b. m., by Alex Button; dam, by 
Dietz's St. Clair _ - 


C. R. Hoppin 


Yolo. 


Goldleaf, ch. f., by Sidney; dam, Fernleaf 

El wood, b. ra..by A. W. Richmond; dam,Creigh- 
ton's First, by Creighton 


Pleasanton S'tk Farm , 
Hemett Stable 


Pleasanton. 

Los Angeles. 


Little Doc, b. g., by Jack Hawkins; dam, un- 
known - 


F. Sequin 


lone. 


San Diego, b. g., by Victor; dam, thoroughbred . 
Cricket, b. m.; pedigree unknown 


H. C. Airhart 


San Diego. 


J. A. Dustin ,-,. 


Oakland. 







Yolo Maid (Goldsmith)- 

San Diego (Walsh) 

Goldleaf (McDowell) .- 
Ned Winslow (McCord) . 

El wood (Durfee) 

Cricket (Dus tin). 

Little Doc (Ober) 



Time-2'.19; 2:23J; 2;21i. 



FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 1888. 

Race No. 4— Running. 

The Introduction Stake. For two-year olds. Twenty -five dollars entrance; ten dollars 
forfeit; two hundred and fifty dollars added, of which fifty dollars to second; third to 
save stake. Winner of any two-year old race this year, to carry three pounds ; of two or 
more, five pounds extra. Three quarters of a mile. 



Name and Pedigree of Horse. 



Alniont, b, c, by Three Cheers ; dam, Question, 

by Joe Hooker 

G W, b. g.,by KyrleDaly; dam, by Thad Stevens 
The Czar, ch. c, by Norfolk ; dam, Marian, by 

Malcolm 

Barham,b. c, by Norfolk; dam, sister to Lottery 
Don Jos6, ch. c, by Joe Hooker; dam, Countess 

Zeika, by Norfolk 

Bessie Shannon, b. f ., by Shannon ; dam, Betty 

Bishop 

Little Phil, ch. c, by Leinster; dam, Lillie H... 
Duke Spencer, b, c, by Duke of Norfolk; dam, 

Lou Spencer- 

Libertiflibbet, b. f., by Bullion; dam, Fibberti- 

gibbet 

Glencola, b. f., by Glengarry? dam, Marcola 

Lucknow, br. g., by Longfield; dam, Sweetbrier. 

Reward, b. g., oy Jim Brown; dam. Trophy 

Rosebug, ch. g., by Jim Brown; dam, Rosemary . 
Joe Hoge, ch. c, by Joe Hooker; dam, Viola R- 
Young Prince, b. c, by imported Young Prince; 

dam, Mercedes 

Jack Pot, br. g., by Joe Hooker ; dam, Liigena.. 
Futurity, br. or blk, f., by John A ; dam, Ella 

Doane 

Lady Helen, b. f., by Norfolk; dam, Jessie R-,. 

Naicho B, ch. g., by Wanderer; dam. Flower Girl. 

Four Aces, ch. c, by Hock Hocking; dam, Maid 

of the Mist 



By "Whom EDtered. 



W. M. Murry-- 
G. W. Trahern 

Theo. Winters- 
Theo. Winters- 



Theo. Winters Sacramento, 



Address. 



. Sacramento. 
Stockton. 



. Sacramento. 
. Sacramento, 



J. Reavey & Co.. 
T. Bally- 



F. Depoister. 



L. TJ. Shippee 

L. XJ. Shippee 

Rancho Del Paso 

Rancho Del Paso 

Rancho Del Paso , 

H.L Thornton 



C. Farnum 

Thos. G, Jones . 



ppK 

T. H. WilUams 

Los Angeles Stable . 

John D.Dunn 



. Sacramento. 
. Sacramento, 

. Sacramento. 



Stockton. 

Stockton. 

— Sacramento. 
-__ Sacramento. 
--. Sacramento. 
.San Francisco. 

-San Francisco. 
-San. Francisco. 



- Santa Clara. 

Stockton. 

.Los Angeles. 

.Los Angeles. 



STATE AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY. 161 

eUMMABY. 

Don Jos^ (Holloway, 115 pounds) 1 

Lady Helen (Hitchcock. 110 pounds) 2 

Duke Spencer (O'Neil, 113 pounds) ---3 

Libbertiflibbet, Reward, and Futurity ran unplaced. 

Time— 1:17. 



Race No. 5 — Running. 

California Breeders' Stake. For foals of 1885. To be run at the State Fair of 1888. 
Entrance, fifty dollars; twenty-five dollars forfeit, or only ten dollars if declared January 
1, 1888; three hundred dollars added, of which one hundred dollars to second, and fifty 
dollars to third. One mile and a quarter. 



Name and Pedigree of Horee. 



(imp.), br. f., by Isonomy; dam, im- 
ported Flirt, by The Hermit 

Peel, b. c, by Monday; dam, Precious, by Lever . 

Snowdrop, ch, f ., by Joe Hooker ; dam, Laura 
Winston 

Surinam, b. c, by Joe Hooker; dam, Ada C 

Peregrine, ch. c, by Joe Hooker, or Jumbo; 
dam, Irene Harding 

Ed McGinnis, b. c, by Grinstead ; dam, Jennie G. 

Carmen, ch. f., by Wildidle; dam, Nettie Brown. 

Kyrle D, b. c, by Kyrle Daly; dam, Maggie S.. 

Partisan, b. c, by imp. Partisan ; dam, Mamie, 
by Specter. _. 

Theo. Winters, ch. c, by Joe Hooker; dam, 
Mattie C, by Specter 

King Idle, br. c, by Wildidle; dam, Augusta E. 



By Whom Entered. 



George Hearst 

Palo Alto Stock Farm. 



James Garland. 
George Hearst - 



W. M. Murry .^ 

H. L. Samuels 

Laurel Wood Stable- 
Laurel Wood Stable. 



C. Dorsey - 



Matt. Stom 

L. H. Todhunter . 



Address. 



-San Francisco. 
... Menlo Park. 



.-.Sacramento. 
.San Francisco. 



- Sacramento. 
-Los Angeles. 
. Santa Clara. 

- Santa Clara. 

Oakdale. 



-San Francisco. 

..- Sacramento. 



SUMMARY. 

Peel (Courtney, 118 pounds) ^ 1 

Snowdrop (Kelly, 115 pounds) 2 

Carmen (Appleby, 115 pounds) - 3 

riwi€— 2:12i. 



Race No. 6— Running. 

Capital City Stake. A sweepstake for three-year olds and over, in which only non-win- 
ners in any event this year will be eligible to start. Winners of any race, entered herein, 
may be withdrawn without incurring a forfeit. Entrance, fifty dollars, h. f., with four 
hundred dollars added; of which one hundred dollars to second; third to save stake. 
One mile and one eighth. 



Name and Pedigree of Horge. 



1 



J M R, ch. h. (3), by imported Kelpie ; dam, by 
Joe Daniels — 

Etta W, ch. m. (4), by Joe Hooker; dam, by 
Foster 

Haidee, br. m. (5), by King Alfonzo ; dam, In- 
verness - 

Daisy D, b. m. (6), by Wheatly; dam. Black 
Maria 

Al Farrow, b. s. (3), by Connor; dam, Delia 
Walker 

Heliotrope, b. m. (3), by Joe Hooker; dam, 
Yolone - - 

Leon, b. c. (3), by Leinster; dam, Ada A, by 
Asteriod.. •-- 



By Whom Entered. 



J as. Woodburn 

Andy Wakeman 

G. W. Trahern 

B. CockrHl 

M.T.Walters 

Mrs. S. B. WolfskilL 
F.P.Lowell- 



Address. 



.. Sacramento. 

Elk Grove. 

Stockton. 

Salinas. 

.-Lake view, Or. 
. Santa Monica. 
... Sacramento. 



162 



TRANSACTIONS OP THE 
Race No. 6— Running— Continued. 



Name and Pedigree of Horse. 



Moses B, ch. a. (3), by Leinster; dam, Aunt 
Jane 

Hermes, b. s. (5), by Wayswater; dam, Her- 
clade - 

Brutus (imp.), b. c. (3), by Macgregor; dam, im- 
ported Teardrop, by Scottish Chief 

Extract, br. f. (3), by Virgil; dam, Tincture 

Nancy, ch. f. (3), by Jim Brown ; dam, Naunie 

Hubbard .* 

Mart Gibson, ch. c. (3), by Joe Hooker ; dam, 

Jennie Gibson ,.- 

Sunday, b. g. (4), by Ironclad; dam, Nellie 

Shannon - 

Jack Brady, b. s. (4), by Wildidle; dam, Sour 

Grapes ,-- I , _ 

Kildare, ch. g. (3), by Kyrle Daly; dam, Mistake- 
Applause, b. g. (4), by Three Cheers; dam, 

AlweN 

Not Idle, ch.f.(4), by Wildidle; dam, Bonanza.. 
Del, bVk g, (3), by Falsetto; dam, Mattie 

Severn 

Nerva, ch. m. (5), by Bob Wooding; dam, Lizzie 

Marshall > 

Valido, b. g, (5), by Bob Wooding; dam. Brown 

Maria 

Nabeau, b. g. (3), by Nathan Coombs; dam, 

Beauty — . 

Ledon, brk g. (3), by Nathan Coombs; dam, 

Gypsy 

Vinco, b. g. (3), by Bob Wooding; dam, MollieH. 



ByTVhom Entered. 



M.S.Bryan 

L. A. Blasin^arae 

Palo Alto Stock Farm. 
Rancho Del Paso 



B. C. Holly 

B. C. Holly 

Thomas Kinney. 



W. F. Davis 

Thos, G. Jones. 



Thos. G. Jones. 
M. F. Tarpey.— 



Los Angeles Stable . 

Wm. Boots 

Wm. Boots 

Wm. Boots 



Wm. Boots - 
Wm. Boots.- 



Address. 



-Phoenix, AT, 
Fresno, 



. Menio Park, 
. Sacramento. 



Vallejo. 

Vallejo. 

Vallejo. 

. Copperop< 
.--Santa E( 



tolls. 
:osa. 



.Santa Rosa. 
Oakland, 



_Los Angeles. 

Milpitas. 

Milpitas, 

Milpitas, 



. Milpitas. 
. Milpitas. 



Extract (Kelly, 105 pounds) 

Brutus (Slocum, 108 pounds) 

Not Idle (Appleby, 115 pounds) 

Hermes, Heliotrope, Del, Nancy, and Nabeau ran unplaced. 

3^me— 1:58^. 



.*1 

. 2 
, 3 



Race No. 7 — Rttnning. 

Free purse, two hundred and fifty dollars; of which fifty dollars to second; for all ages. 
. Thinners of any race this year to carry five pounds; maidens, if three years old, allowed 
five pounds; if four years old, or upwards, fifteen pounds. Mile heats. 



Name and Pedigree of Horse. 



Etta W, ch. m. (4), by Joe Hooker; dam, by 

Foster 

Dave Douglas, b. g. (6), by Leinster ; dam, Lily 

Simpson 

Hermes, b. s. (6), by Bayswater; dam, Her- 

clade 

Canny Scot, ch. s. (3), by Leinster ; dam, Tibbie 

Dunbar 

Sid, br. s. (3), by imported Sidarthur; dam, 

Vestella 

Ledor, b. or br. g. (4), by Nathan Coombs; dam, 

Gypsy 



By "Whom Entered. 



A. Wakeman--,^. 
G. W. Trahern ..- 
L. A. Blasingame. 
Oak Grove Stable . 

B.C. Holly 

Wm. Boots 



Address. 



.--Elk Grove, 

Stockton. 

Fresno, 

. Sacramento. 

Vallejo. 

Milpitas. 



STATE AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY. 

SUMMARY. 

Canny Scot (Hollo way, 108 pounds) _ 1 1 

Dave Douglas (Dennison, 115 pounds) _ 2 2 

Ledor (Hart, 95 pounds) - dis. 

Sid (O'Day, 108 pounds) dis, 

Time— l:45i; 1:44^, 



163 



SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 1888. 

Race No. 8— Trotting. 

Two-year old Stake. Fifty dollars entrance, of which ten dollars must accompany nom- 
ination ; fifteen dollars payable July first, and remaining twenty-five dollars payable Aug- 
ust 10, 1888; three hundred dollars added by the Society. Closed March fifteenth, with 
sixteen nominations. MUe heats. The following have made third payment: 



Name aod Pedigree of Horse. 



Palo Alto Belle, br.f., by Electioneer; dam, Beau- 
tiful Bells, by The Moor -.- 

Sunol, b. f., by Electioneer; dam, Waxana, by 
General Benton 

Kilrain, b. c, by Hawthorne; dam, bj'^ Whip- 
ple's Hambletonian.. 

Vasolia, b. f., by Stamboul; dam, Inez, by The 
Moor 

Margaret S, b. f., by Director; dam, May Day, 
by Cassius M. Clay, Jr 

Fortuna,b.f.,by Florida; dam, by George Wilkes. 



By "Whom Entered. 



Palo Alto Stock Farm. 
Palo Alto Stock Farm- 

L. U. Shippee 

L. J.Rose- 



Pleasanton St'k Farm, 
Z. E. Simmons _. 



Address. 



- Menlo Park. 
. Menlo Park. 

Stockton. 

-Los Angeles. 



Pleasanton. 

Lexington, Ky. 



Margaret S (McDowell) - 1 1 

Fortuna (Donathan) 2 2 

VasoUa (Maben) _ dis. 

Kilrain (Whiting) dis. 

Time— 2:31i; 2:31. 



Race No. 9— Stallion Stake — Trotting. 

The Grand StalUon Stake. Closed March first, with six nominations; five hundred 
dollars added for each starter up to four. Five hundred dollars entrance, of which two 
hundred and fifty dollars must accompaiiy -nommatioii', two YiMiv^TC^^ as\d Mty dol\axs, 
payable August 1, 1888. The following have made second payment : 



* Name and Pedigree of Horse. 


By Wtom Entered. 


Address. 


Guy Wilkes, b. s., by George Wilkes ; dam, Lady 
Bunker, by Mambrino Patchen 


William Corbitt . . — — 


San Francisco. 


Woodnut, ch. s,, by Nutwood; dam, Addie, by 
Hambletonlan Chief .., 1 


B. C. Holly 


Vallejo. 


Stamboul, b. s., by Sultan ; dam, Fleetwing, by 
Hambletonlan . - .. 


•L. J. Rose 


Los Angeles. 









Woodnut (Holly) ? 1 

Guy Wilkes (Goldsmith) r — J 2 

Stamboul (Maben) ^ 3 

rime-2:22i; 2:16i; 2:17i; 2:19i; 2:211. 



3 3 3 



164 



TRANSACTIONS OF THE 



Race No. 10— Trotting. 
2:30 Class. Purse, one thousand dollars. 



Name aud Pedigree of Horse. 



Rosie Mc, b. m., by Alex Button ; dam, Rose- 
dale ., 

Express, b. g., by Electioneer ; dam, Esther, by 
Express 

Elector, b. g., by Electioneer ; dam, Lady Bab- 
cock 

Ha Ha, br. s., by Nephew ; dam, by McCrack- 
en's Black Hawk _ 

Pen Ali, b. g., by George M. Patchen, Jr.; dam, 
thoroughbred.- - 

Bonanza, ch. s., by Arthurton; dam, Sister, by 
John Nelson 

Dubec, b. g., by Sultan ; dam, Madam Day 

Franklin, blk. g., by General Reno ; dam, un- 
known .\. -. 

Victor, br. s., by Echo; dam, by Woodburn 

Judge, b. g.; pedigree unknown 



By Whom Entered. 



G. W. Woodard 

Palo Alto Stock Farm. 

0. A. Hickok 

Houser & Boule 

J. A. Goldsmith 



R. Havey - 
L, J. Rose - 



Oh as. Davis _-- 
G. A. Doherty. 
J. A. Dustin ... 



Address. 



Yolo. 

...Menlo Park. 

,San Francisco. 

Stockton. 

-San Francisco. 

-San Francisco. 
_.-Los Angeles. 



-San Francisco. 
.Crescent Mills. 
Oaldand. 



Rosie Mc (Goldsmith) - 1 14 1 

Victor (Walsh) 3 2 12 

Franklin (Donathan) 2 3 2 3 

Ha Ha (Houser) - — 4 4 3 4 

Bonanza (Havey) dis. 

TYme— 2:20i; 2:23i; 2:23i; 2:26. 



MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 10, 1888. 

Race No. 11— Running. 

The Premium Stake. For all ages. Fifty dollars entrance, h. f., or only fifteen dollars 
if declared on or before September first, with three hundred and fifty dollars added; of 
which one hundred dollars to second; third to save stake. Horses that have started and 
not won this year, allowed five pounds; maidens, if three years old, allowed five pounds; 
if four years old or over, seven pounds. Three quarters of a mile. 



Name and Pedigree of Horse. 



Peregrine, ch. h. (3), by Jumbo or Joe Hooker; 
dam, Irene Harding 



Spray, ch. f. (5), by Joe Hooker; dam, Big Gun. 
Idalene Cotton, ch. t (4), by Jim Brown; dam, 

Lizzie P - - - -, 

Jack Brady, b, h. (4), by Wildidle; dam, Sour 

Grapes -- 

^lue Bonnet, ch. m. (4), by Joe Hooker; dam, 

Kate Carson 

J)aisy D, b. m. (6), by Wheatly; dam. Black' 

Maria 

Al Farrow, b. h. (3), by Connor; dam, Delia 

Walker 

Edelweiss, b.m. (5), by Joe Hooker; dam, Yolone. 

Welcome, b. 1 (3), by Warwick; dam, ^ola 

Serpolette, ch. f. (3), by Norfolk; dam, Mattie 

Glenn _-., _ _. 

Johnny Grey, g. g. (aged), by Shiloh; dam, 

Margery 

Lucifer, b. c. (3), by Hindoo; dam, by King 

Alfonso ' 

Extract, b. f. (3), by Virgil; dam, Tincture 



By Wtom Entered. 



W". M. Murry. 
John Clark... 



Maltese Villa Stables. 

W. L. Davis 

G.W. Trahern — 

B. Oockrill 



M. T.Walters 

Mrs. S.B. Wolfskin. 
D. Hennessv -. 



Owens Bros. 
Owens Bros. 



Rancho Del Paso . 
Rancho Del Paso . 



Address. 



. Sacramento. 
. Sacramento. 



Merced. 

. Copperopolis. 

Stockton. 

•-SaUnaS. 



..Lakeview, Or. 
. Santa Monica. 
... Sacramento. 



. Fresno. 
. Fresno. 



. Sacramento. 
. Sacramento. 



STATE AGKECULTUKAL SOCIETY. 
Kaob No. 11 — Running — Continued. 



165 



Kame and Pedigree of Horse. 



Nancy, ch. f . (3), by Jim Brown ; dam, Nannie 

Hubbard - - 

Klldare, ch. g. (3), Kyrle l^aly ; dam. Mistake.. 
Applause, b. g. (4), by Three Cheers; dam, 

Alice N 

Not Idle, ch. f. (4), by Wildidle; dam, Bonanza - 
Futurity, br. or blk.f. (2), by John A; dam, Ella 

Doane 

Carmen, ch. f. (3), by Wildidle; dam, Nettie 

Brown. 

Carmelita, b. m. (4), by Hardwood; dam, by 

ShUoh 

Mikado, ch. g. (4), by Shiloh; dam, by Error .. 
Ariola, b. m. (7), by "Bob Wooding ; dam, Glad- 

iola 



Valido, b. g. (5), by Bob Wooding; dam. Brown 
Maria 

Sleepy Dick, ch. g. (aged), pedigree unknown .. 



By Whom Entered. 



B. C. HoUy- 
T. G.Jones, 



T.G.Jones 

M, F. Tarpey.>. 

W. L. Appleby . 

W. L. Appleby . 



B. P. Hill . 
B. P. Hill . 



William Boots . 

William Boots . 
F.M.Starkey--. 



Address. 



Vallejo. 

.Santa Rosa. 

-Santa Rosa. 
Oakland. 



, Santa Clara. 
, Santa Clara. 



. M Caion, 
. El Oajon. 

.-Milpitas. 

..Milpitas. 
. Stockton. 



SUMMARY. 

Daisy D (Hennessy, 115 pounds) — > 1 

Not Idle (Hitchcock, HO pounds) i 2 

Applause (HoUoway, 115 pounds) 3 

Sleepy Dick, Peregrine, Welcome, Al Farrow, Extract, Idalene Cotton, and Edelweiss 
ran unplaced. 

Time— 1:1^. 



Race No. 12 — Running. 

California Annual Stake. For foals of 1886, to be run at the State Fair of 1888. One 
hundred dollars entrance; twenty-five dollars forfeit, ox only ten dollars if declared Jan- 
uary 1, 1888; two hundred and fifty dollars added, of which one hundred dollars to second ; 
fifty dollars to third. One mile. 



Name aud Pedigree of Horse. 



Philander, ch. c, by Wildidle; dam, Precious, 
by Lever — 

Ehona, ch. c, by Flood ; dam, imp. Rosetta 

Kenneth, b. c, by J oe Hooker ; dam, Katharion . 

Geoflrey, b. c, by Flood; dam, Glendew 

Mood I'ide, b. c, by Flood ; dam, Lady Evange- 
line 



Picnic, br. f „ by imp, Mr. Pickwick ; dam, imp. 

Countess 

Mia HiU, b. f., by Wildidler ; dam, Phoebe Hall. 
Hotspur, b. c, by Joe Daniels; dam, sister to 

Douglass -- 

Longshot, ch. c, by Duke of Norfolk; dam, bj' 

Longfellow 

Little Rose, ch. t, by Joe Hooker; dam, Roset- 

land 

Sonoma, ch.f., by LouKfield; dam, Carrie C 

Regina, ch. f., by Joe Hooker ; dam, Hattie Ball. 
DonJos^,ch,c., by Joe Hooker; dam, Countess 

Zeika _ ° 

The Czar, ch. c, by Norfolk ; dam, Marian 

Bronco, ch. c, by Joe Hooker; dam, Laura 

Winston. _ 

Telish, ch. or b. c, by Norfolk; dam, Ballinette. 
Leh, b. c, by Joe Hooker ; dam, Hlusion -.>...- 
Lady Overton, b,f.,byimp. Partisan; dam, Pet- 



By Wtom Entered. 



Palo Alto Stock Farm 
Palo Alto Stock Farm. 

George Hearst 

Palo Alto Stock Farm. 



R. P. Ashe . 



L. U. Shippee 

J.G.HilL 

W. B. Todhunter. 

J. A. McBride..-. 



Thomas Atchison . . 

H.L Thornton 

H.I.Thornton 



Theo. Winters. 
Theo. Winters - 

Theo.'Winters- 
Theo. Winters. 
Theo. Winters. 
C. Dorsey 



AddreBB. 



--- Menlo Park. 
..- Menlo Park. 
-San Francisco. 
... Menlo Park. 



-San Francisco. 



Stockton. 

-Los Angeles. 

. Sacramento. 

- Sacramento. 



San Francisco. 
-San Francisco. 
.San Francisco. 



. Sacramento. 
. Sacramento. 

. Sacramento. 
- Sacramento. 
. Sacramento, 
Oakdale, 



166 



TBANSACTIONS OF THE 
Race No. 12— Running— Continued, 



Kame and Pedigree of Horee. 



By Whom Entered. 



Addreas. 



March Wind, b. f., by imp. Partisan; dam, 
Mattie -. 

Robin Hood, b. c. by Flood; dam, Robin Girl.. 

N Y M, b- c, by Snannon; dam, Demirep 

Almont, b. c, by Three Cheers; dam, Question. 
Queen Daniels, b. f., by Joe Daniels; dam, 

Emma 

Wild Oats, b. c, by Wildidle ; dam, Mary Givens. 

Lakme, ch. f., by John A; dam, Lottie J - 

Duke Spencer, b. c, by Duke of Norfolk ; dam, 

Lou Spencer 

Persuasion, b. c, by Storey; dam, Occasion 



C. Dorsey 

W. M. Murry, 
W. M. Murry. 
W, M. Murry- 



John Arnett 

W. L. Appleby 

Laurelwood Stables . 



W. H. Hobbs. 
C. Schlutius - . 



Oakdale. 

. Sacramento. 
. Sacramento. 
. Sacramento. 



.-Pleasanton. 
Santa Clara. 
Santa Clara. 



-San Francisco. 
.-. Sacramento. 



Note, — ^Ecart, Scat, Ernestine, Kathlene, Freelove, declared January first, at ten dollars 
each. 

SUMMARY. 

Almont (Lloyd, 110 pounds) 1 

Don Jos4 (Holloway, UO pounds) _ 2 

Picnic (Courtney, 107 pounds) 3 

Time—l'A2l 



Race No. 13— Running. 

The La Rue Stake. Handicap for all ages. One hundred dollars entrance; fifty dollars 
forfeit, with five hundred dollars added, of which one hundred and fifty dollars to second; 
one hundred dollars to third. Weights announced September first. Declaration, twenty 
dollars; to be made with the Secretary by eight o'clock p.m., September third. In no 
event will declaration be received unles*^s accompanied with the amount fixed. Two and 
one quarter miles. 



Name and Pedigree of Horse. 



Dave Douglas, b. h. (6), by Leinster; dam, Lily 

Simpson 

Leon, b. h. (3), by Leinster; dam, Ada A , 

Moses B, ch. h. (3), by Leinster; dam, Aunt 

Jane _ 

Hermes, b. s. (5) by Bays water ; dam, Herclade. 
Canny Scot, ch. h.(3), by Leinster; dam, Tibbie 

Dunbar .- 

Laura Gardner, ch. m. (4), by Jim Brown ; dam, 

Avail - - 

Carmen, ch. f. (3), by Wildidle ; dam, Ella Doane. 
Index, blk. g. (6), by Thad Stevens; dam, Gypsy- 
Ledor, br. g. (4), by Nathan Coombs; dam, 

Gypsy 



By Wkom Entered. 



G. W. Trahern . 
F. P. Lowell,-.. 



M. S. Bryan 

L, A. Blasingame. 

Oak Grove Stable. 



W. L. Appleby . 
W. L. Appleby . 
Wm. Boots 



Wm. Boots . 



Address. 



Stockton. 

. Sacramento. 



-Phoenix, A. T. 
Fresno. 



- Sacramento. 

. Santa Clara. 
. Santa Clara, 
Milpitas. 



- Milpitas. 



SUMMABY. 



Canny Scot (Cook; entitled weight, 104 pounds; weight, 102 pounds) 1 

Index (Hart; entitled weight, 118 pounds; weight, 100 pounds) -.. 2 

Laura Gardner ( Ho wson; entitlea weight, 116 pounds ; weight, 116 pounds). _ 3 
Dave Douglas, Hermes, and Leon ran unplaced. 

Time— 4:02, 



M 



STATE AaRICULTUBAL SOCIETY. 



Race No. 14— Running. 



167 



SelUng purse, three hundred dollars, of which fifty dollars to second; for all ages. 
lioTsea entered to be sold for one thousand five hundred dollars to carry rule weights ; two 
pounds allowed ioi eac\i oneYiMndted d6Wats\esa,do^n.to one ^on.aa,n.^d.oW^Ta,\\xeivpxv.<i 

pound for each one hundred dollars less, down to five hnndted. doYlata. Valuation to \)fe 
' placed on starters only, by Six o'clock p. m. the day preceding the race. One mile and a 

sixteenth. 



Ifame and Pedigree of Horse. 



El wood, ch. g. (4), by Norfolk ; dam, Ballinette . 
Etta W, ch. m. (4), by Joe Hooker ; dam, by 

Foster 

J M R, ch. h. (3), by imported Kelpie ; dam, by 

Joe Daniels _ ._ 

Blackstone, blk. s. (4), by Wildidle; dam, by 

Monday _ 

Oro, b. s. (4), by Norfolk; dam. Golden Gate 

Pickpocket, ch. h. (5), by Joe Daniels; dam, 

MattieO 

Fusilade's Last, ch. f. (3), by J. "W. Norton; 

dam, Fusilade 

Wild Oats, br. c.(2),by Wildidle; dam, Mary 

Givens - _ 

Gladstone, ch. g. (4), by Reveille ; dam, by Ham- 
ilton 

Adam, ch. g. (6), by Shiloh ; dam, unknown 

Nerva, ch. m. (5), by Bob Wooding; dam, Lizzie 

Marshall 



By Whom Entered. 



Maltese Villa Stables .. 

A. Wakeman 

J. Woodburn 



F. Depoister . 
Owens Bros. . 



Robert Munroe . . 

B.C. Holly 

W. L. Appleby .-. 



B. P. Hill . 
B. P. HiU , 



Wm. Boots. 



Address. 



Merced^ 

...Elk Grove. 

. Sacramento. 

. Sacramento. 
Fresno. 



Oakdale. 

Vallejo. 

Santa Clara. 



, El Oajon. 
. El Cajon. 



.Milpitas. 



Elwood, $800 (Cook; entitled weiehfe, 115 pounds; weight, lOS pounds). 1 

Oro,$500(Howson; entitled weight, 118 pounds > weight, 103 pounds) 2 

15 erva, ^1,000 (Haxt; entitled weight, 116 poaads; weighty 105 pounds) 3 

Fusilade's Last at $1,000, Blackstone at |500, and Wild Oats at $2,400, ran unplaced. 

Time— 1:51. 



TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 11, 1888. 

Race No. 15--Trotting. 

Three-year Old Stake. One hundred dollars entrance, of which twenty-five dollars 
must accompany nomination; twenty-iive dollars payable July first; remaining fifty dol- 
lars payable August 10, 1888; $400 added. Closed March fifteenth, with nineteen nomina- 
tions. The following have made third payment: 



Name and Pedigree of Horee. 



By "Whom Entered. 



Balkin, br. c, by Mambrino Wilkes; dam, Fanny 
Fern, by Jack Hawkins _ 

Monteith, b. c., by Electioneer; dam, Mamie 0, 
by imported Hercules .., 

Moses 8, b. c, by Hawthorne; dam, by Mc- 
cracken's Black Hawk 

Grandee, b. g., by Le Grand; dam, Minnie, by 
Arthurtou- 

Direct, blk. c, by Director; dam, Echora. 

Memo, b. c, by Sidney; dam. Flirt 



Irving Ayres 

Palo Alto Stock Farm. 
L. U. Shippee 



Wm. Corbitt 

Pleasanton St'k Farm 
J.P.Kerr 



Address. 



— Oakland. 
. Menlo Park. 
Stockton. 



.San Francisco. 
.^. Pleasanton. 
-San Francisco. 



Grandee (Goldsmith) --- 1 

Balkan (Hinds) 2 

Direct (McDowell) - - - 4 

S (Whiting) 3 

Tme— 2:30; 2:28 J; 2:29. 



168 



1 



TRANSACTIONS OF THE 



Race No. 16— Teotting. 
2:20 Class, Purse, one thousand two hundred dollars. 



Name aad Pedigree of Horse. 



Kate Ewing, Wk. m., hy Berlin; dam, Lady 
Washington 

Woodnut, ch. h., by Nutwood; dam, Ad die 

Lily Stanley, b. m., by Whippleton ; dam, DoUie 
McMahan _ 

Alfred S, b. g., by Elmo ; dam, Nora Marshall-. 

Alcazar, b. c, by Sultan; dam, Minnehaha 

Mt. Vernon, b. s., by Nutwood; dam, by Chief- 
tain 1 



By Whom Entered. 



A. Gonzales. 

B. C. Holly.. 

N. Coombs .. 
H. W.Seale. 
L. J. Rose... 



M, Salsbury , 



Address. 



-San Francisco. 
Vallejo. 



Napa. 
Maylield. 



.Loa Angeles, 
.-Pleasanton. 



SUMMARY. 

Woodnut (Holly) - 1 

Lily Stanley (Hickok) 2 

Mt, Vernon (McDowell) - -. 3 

Time~2:22i; 2:22i; 2:22 J, 



Race No, 17— Trotting. 
J:00 Class. Purse, one thousand dollars. 



Name and Pedigree of Horse. 


By Whom Entered. 


Address. 


Blockade, b. g. ; pedigree unknown- 


Marion Biggs, Jr. 


..^ Biggs. 


Perihelion, b. h., by Admiral; dam. Flora 

Ross S, b.h., by Nutwood; dam, by State of 
Maine --- 


W S Ray 


-San Francisco. 


R. 8. Sargent 


Lodi. 


Economy, b. t, by Echo; dam, Lady Berkey... 
Steve Whipple, br. s., by Chrism an^s Hambleto- 

nian \ dam, by WhioiQle's H&mbletomaTi 

Maggie B, br. m., by Nutwood; dam, by Geo. 

M Patrhpn 7r 


B Hollv 


Vallejo. 


C E. Needham 


--Stockton. 


8 B Emerson 


- . Mountain View. 


Lady Escott, ch. m. ; pedigree unknown 


7 A Dnstin ....... 


Oakland 







Maggie E (Donathan)... 
Steve Whipple (Parker). 

Perihelion (David ) 

RossS (Ober)— •- 



Ill 

2 2 3 
4 3 2 

3 4 4 



rme— 2:26i; 2:23; 2:30. 



STATE AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY. 169 

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 1888. 

Race No. 18— Running. 

The Sunny Slope Stake. For two-year old fiUiea. Entrance, twenty -five dollars ; fifteen 
dollars forfeit, or only ten dollars if declared on or before September first ; two hundred 
dollars added, of which twenty-five dollars to second. Those that have started and not 
run first or second in any race this year, allowed five pounds. Five eighths of a mile. 



^Mk^^ 



Name and Pedigree of Horse. 



Bessie Shannon, b. 1, by Shannon; dam, Bettie 
Bishop - -.---. 

Little Rose, ch. f., by Joe Hooker; dam, Roset- 
land--- - - - - 

Picnic, br. f., by imp, Mr. Pickwick; dam, imp. 
Countess 

Libbertiflibbet, b. t, by Bullion ; dam, Flib- 
bertigibbet - 

Glencola, b. f., by Glengarry; dam, Marcola 
AureUa, b. f ., by Wildidle; dam, Amelia, by 

Lowlander _ 

Jj'austine, b. f ., by Flood ; dam, imp. Flirt, by 

The Hermit 

Futurity, br. f., by John A; dam, Ella Doane .. 
Lady Helen, b. f., by Norfolk; dam, Jessie R -. 
Qdette, br. f., by Shiloh ; dam, by Error 



By Whom Entered. 



J. Reavey & Co 

Thomas Atchison- 
L. TJ. Shippee 



L.TJ. Shippee,. 
L. V. Shippee . 



Palo Alto Stock Farm 

Palo Alto Stock Farm. 

W. L, Appleby ^ 

Th OS. H. Williams .-. 
B.P.Hill - 



Address. 



... Sacramento. 
-San Francisco, 
Stockton. 



. Stockton. 
. Stockton. 



- Menlo Park. 

. Menlo Park. 
. Santa Clara. 

Stockton. 

El Cajon. 



Faustine (Hitchcock, 107 pounds) -, - 1 

Picnic(Hart, 102 pounds)- -- - 2 

Bessie Shannon (Lloyd, 107 pounds) 3 

Futurity, 102, and Libbertiflibbet, 102. ran unplaced. 

• Time— l:02i. 



Race No, 19— Running. 

The Shafter Stake. For three-year olds. Fifty dollars entrance; twenty-five dollars 
forfeit, or only fifteen dollars if declared on or before September first; with four hundred 
dollars added; of which one hundred dollars to second; third to save stake. Winner of 
any race this year to carry five pounds extra ; of two or more, ten pounds; maidens allowed 
five pounds. One mile and a quarter. 



Name and Pedigree of Hotse. 



Heliotrope, b. m.,by Joe Hooker; dam, Yolone. 

Brutus, imp., b. c, by McGregor; dam, imp. 

Teardrop, by Scottish Chief 

Extract, br. f., by Virgil ; dam. Tincture 

Lucifer, b. c, by Hindoo; dam, by King Alfonso. 
KUdare, ch. g., by imp. Kyrle Daly; dam, Mis- 
Del, blk. g., by F^setto; dam, Mattie Severn-.. 
Vinco, br. g.,by Bob Wooding; dam, MoUie H- 
Nabeau. b.g., by Nathan Coombs; dam. Beauty 
Ledon, blk. g.,by Nathan Coombs; dam, Gypsy 



By Whom Entered. 



Mrs. S. B. Wolfskin. 



Palo Alto Stock Farm. 

Rancho Del Paso 

Rancho Del Paso 



T. G.Jones 

Los Angeles Stable. 

William Boots 

William Boots 

William Boots 



Address. 



. Santa Monica. 



. Menlo Park. 

. Sacramento, 
. Sacramento. 



.-Santa Rosa. 
. Los Angeles. 

Milpitas, 

Milpitas. 

Milpitas. 



SUMMARY. 

Brutus (Courtney, 113 pounds) --- 1 

Heliotrope (CarrUlo, 110 pounds) 2 

Extract (Kelly, 120 pounds) --- 3 

Del (Hoag, 110 pounds) 

Ledon (O'Neil, 110 pounds) 

Nabeau (Hill, 110 pounds) 



'^m 



170 



TRAJSSACTIONS OF THE 



Race No. 20— Running. 



The Del Paso Stake. For all ages. Fifty dollars entrance ; twenty-five dollars forfeit, or 
only fifteen dollars if declared on or before September first, with three hundred dollars 
added; of which one hundred dollars to second; third to save stake. Three-year olds to 
carry one hundred pounds ; four-year olds, one hundred and ten pounds; five-year olds 
and upwards, one hundred and twelve pounds. Sex, but not heat allowances. Three- 
quarter mile heats. 



Name and Pedigree of Horse. 



El wood, ch. g. (4), by Norfolk; dam, BalUnette. 
Jack Brady, b. h. (4), by Wildidle ; dam, Sour 

Grapes .1 

Peregrine, ch. h. (3), by Jumbo or Joe Hooker; 

dam, Irene Harding 

Blue Bonnet, ch. m. (4), by Joe Hooker ; dam, 

Lily Simpson 

Daisy D, b. m. (6), by Wheatly; dam, Black 

Maria - 

Heliotrope, b, m. (3), by Joe Hooker; dam, 

Yolone - -- 

Welcome, br. f. (3), by Warwick; dam, ^ola... 
Serpolette,ch. f. (3), Norfolk ; dam, Mat tie Glenn 

Sid, br. c. (3), Sid Arthur; dam, Vestella 

1^ ot Idle, ch. m. (4), by Wildidle ; dam, Bonanza - 
Carmen, ch. f. (3), by Wildidle; dam, Nettie 

Brown \ 

Carmelita, b. m. (4), by Hardwood; dam, by 

Shiloh. - 

Gladstone, ch. g. (4), by Reveille ; dam, by Ham- 



By Whom Entered. 



Maltese Villa S tables - 

W.L.Davis.. 

W. M. Murry 

G. W. Trahern 

B. Cockrill 



Mrs. S. B. WolfskiU 

D. Hennessy 

Owens Bros. 

B C. Holly 

M. F. Tarpey 



W. L. Appleby , 

B.P.Hill 

B.P.Hill 



Address. 



Merced, ♦ 

. Copperopolis. 
. . Sacramento, 

Stockton. 

Salinas, 



Santa Monica. 
_. Sacramento. 

_ Fresno, 

Vallejo. 

Oakland, 



. Santa Clara. 
.-..ElCajon. 
. El Ca]on. 



SUMMARY. 

Not Idle (Hitchcock, 109 pounds) 2 11 

Peregrine (Lloyd, 110 pounds) 12 2 

Jack Brady (Casey, 110 pounds) "_ 5 3 r.o. 

El wood (Cook, 107 pounds) 3- 4 r.o. 

Blue Bonnet (Hennessy, 107 pounds) 4 5 r.o. 

Time— 1:16; 1:151; 1:16. 



Race No. 21— Running. 

Free purse, three hundred dollars, of which fifty dollars to second. For all ages. Horses 
that have started and not won at this meeting allowed ten pounds. Winners of any race 
at this meeting, when carrying rule weights, or more, to carry five pounds extra. One 
mile. 



Name and Pedigree of Horse. 



Idalene Cotton, ch. f. (4), by Tim Brown ; dam, 

Lizzie P ,- 

Spray, ch. f, (5), by Joe Hooker; dam, Big Gun. 
J M R, ch. h. (3), by imported Kelpie; dam, 

by Joe Daniels .-. -- 

Haidee, b. m. (5), by King Alfonzo; Inverness. 
Al Farrow, b. s. (3), by Connor; dam, Delia 

Walker 

Edelweiss, br. m. (5), by Joe Hooker; dam, 

Yolone -- -. 

Little Phil, ch. c. (2), by Leinster; dam, Lily H. 

Oro, b. s. (4), by Norfolk; dam, Golden Gate 

Pickpocket, ch. h. (5), by Joe Daniels; dam, 

MattieC, by Specter 

Fusilade's Last, ch. f . (3), by J . W. Norton ; dam, 

Fusilade. 



By Whom Entered. 



Maltese Villa Stables. 
John Clark 



James Woodburn . 
G.W. Trahern 



M. T. Walters . 



Mrs. S. B. WolfskUl. 

T. Bally. 

Owens "feros 



Robert Munroe . 
B. C. Holly 



Merced. 

. Sacramento. 

- Sacramento. 
Stockton. 



.Lakeview, Or. 

-Santa Monica. 
- - Sacramento. 
Fresno. 



. Oakdale. 

..Vallejo. 



STATE AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY. 
Rack No. 21 — Running — Continued. 



171 



Name and Pedigree of Horse. 



Sunday, b. g. (4), by Ironclad; dam, Nellie 
Shannon I 

Futurity, blk. f , (2), by 3ohn A; dam, Ella Doane. 

Wild Oats, b. c. (2), by Wildidle; dam, Mary 

Givens 

Del, blk. g. (3), by Falsetto; dam, Mattie Severn, 

^Mikado, ch. g. (4), by Shiloh ; dam, by Error 

* Adam, ch. g. (6), by Shiloh ; dam, unknown 

Nerva, ch. m. (5), by Bob Wooding ; dam, Lizzie 
Marshall- 



By Whom Entered. 



B.C. Holly 

W. L. Appleby . 



W. L. Appleby - - , - . 
Los Angeles Stable. 

B.P.Hill 

B.P.Hill 



Wm. Boots- 



Address. 



Vallejo. 

-Santa Clara. 



.-Santa Clara. 
-Los Angeles. 

El Caion. 

ElCajon. 



-Milpitas. 



Edelweiss (Hazlett, 105 pounds) 

Idalene Cotton (Cook, 105 pounds) . 

Haidee (Dennison, 115 pounds) 

J M R (Lloyd, 108 pounds) 

Fusilade's Last, (O^Day, 95 pounds) . 

Wild Oats (Ward, 71 pounds) 

Oro(Howson, 108 pounds) 

Al Farrow (Sparger, 98 pounds) 

Nerva (Hart, 105 pounds). - 



rime— 1:43J. 



THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 1888. 

Special Running Race. 

Purse, two hundred and fifty dollars, of which fifty dollars to second. Horses beaten 
once at this meeting allowed five pounds; twice, ten pounds. Entries closed at eleven 
A. M. September 13, 1888. Seven eighths of a mile and repeat. 



Name and Pedigree of Horae. 


By Whom Entered. 


Address. 


Kildare, ch, g. (3), by imp. Kyrle Daly; dam. 
Mistake ._ 


T. G, Jones , 


, Santa Rosa. 


Oro, b. s. (4), by Norfolk; dam. Golden Gate... 

Blue Bonnet, ch. m. (4), by Joe Hooker; dam, 

Lily Simpson.^., . , ^ 


Owens Brothers.. 


. Fresno. 


G. W. Trahern 


Stockton. 









SUMMARY. 

Blue Bonnet (Dennison, 105 pounds) 12 1 

Kildare (Cook, 106 pounds) - 2 12 

Oro (Hows on, 107 pounds) 3 3 r.o. 

Note.— After the first heat Hitchcock was by the Judges put on Kildare. 

rim«— 1:3Q|; 1:30; 1:32|. 



172 



TRANSACTIONS OF THE 



Kace No. 22— Tbotting. 
2;25 Class. Purse, one thousand dollars. 



Name and Pedigree of Horse. 


By Whom EDtered, 


Address. 


Don Tomaa, blk. g., by Del Sur; dam, Vasti, by 
Manibrino Pafcchen . - 


C.A. Durfee 


-__. Los Aneelea 


John E, blk. g.,by Startle; dam, by Belmont--, 

Ha Ha, br. s.,by Nephew; dam,by McCracken's 

Black Hawk — - 


F.B. Glenn 


-.-_, ...-Jacinto. 


Houser & Sonle.— 


Stockton. 


Alio, br. s., by Altoona ; dam, Nellie, by son of 
Vermont Black Hawk 


A. 0. Davenport 


Stockton. 


Eros, br. s., by Electioneer ; dam, Son tag Mo- 
hawk 


La Siesta Ranch 


Menlo Park, 


Artist, blk. g., by Golddust; dam, by Dave Hill, 
Jr _. 


J. R. Hodson 


Sacramento. 


Alpheus, b. h., by Mambrino Wilkes; dam, by 
Maior Mono -_---- - ._>--.--»-- 


A. L, Hinds - - _--. 


. Oakland. 


Eva W, ch. m,, by Nutwood; dam, unknown, .. 

Longfellow, ch. g., by Whipple's Hambletonian ; 

dam, unknown 


S. C. Tryon. 


Sacramento. 


H. W. Seale 


Mayfield. 


Victor, b. s., by Echo; dam, by Woodburn 


G. A. Doberty 


...Crescent Mills. 







Victor ( Doherty ) 

Bon Tomas (Durfee) . 

Allo(Dustin) 

Eva W (McConnell).. 

Alpheus (Hinds) 

Ha Ha (Houser) 

Artist (Shaner) -.. 

John R (Johnson) 



1 1 

3 2' 

4 3 

2 4 

5 5 

6 dis. 



7 dis. 
dis. 



nme—2:25i; 2:22J; 2:24^. 



Race No. 23 — ^Trotting. 

Four-year Old Trotting Stake. Closed on March fifteenth, with twelve nominations. 
Four hundred dollars added. (Conditions same as No. 15.) Third payment has been 
made on the following : 



Name and Pedigree of Horse. 


By Whom Entered. 


Address. 


Ella, b. t, by Electioneer; dam, Lady Ellen 

Carlisle, ch. c, by Piedmont; dam, idabella 

Mosea S, b. c, by Hawthorne; dam, by Mc- 
Cracken's Black Hawk 


Palo Alto Stock Farm, 
Palo Alto Stock Farm. 

L. U.Shippee 


Menlo Park. 

Menlo Park. 

Stockton. 


Dubec, b, g., by Sultan ; dam, by Cal. Dexter... 


L. J. Rose 


Los Angeles. 







Dubec (Maben) Ill 

Moses S (Whiting) 2 2 2 

Time~2:2Si; 2:29|; 2:34 J. 



STATE AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY. 

Race No. 24— Pacing. 
Free for all. Purse, eight hundred dollars. 



173 



Name and Pedigree of Horse. 



Belmont Boy, ch. g., by Nutwood ; dam. Lady 
, Vernon 

Pocahontas, ch. m., by Washington; dam, by 
Glencoe --...- 

Ned Winslow, blk. g., by Tom Benton; dam, by 
Dave Hill, Jr 

Damiana, ch. g., by Admiral ; dam, unknown .- 
Almont Patchen, br. s., by Juanito ; dam, Glady, 

by Gladiator __. 

Bracelet, b. g., by Nephew; dam, hj Mambrino. 
Elwo*od, b. m., by A. W. Richmond;, dam, 

Creigh ton's First, by Creighton 

San Diego, b. g. (formerly Yolo), by Victor; 

dam, thoroughbred _ 



By Whom Entered. 



C. S. Roberts . 
S. C. Try on.. - 



J. L. McCord- 
L. B. Clawson. 



W. M. Bil ups- 
J. B. Hodson - - 



C.A. Durfee .. 
H. C. Airhart . 



Address. 



San Jos6. 

. Sacramento. 



-.- Sacramento. 
-San Francisco. 



Colusa. 

. Sacramento". 



-Los Angeles. 
...San Diego. 



Almont Patchen (Sullivan).* 4 111 

San Diego (Walsh) 1 3 4 3 

Belmont Boy (Bayless) _ 2 2 2 2 

Ned Winalow (McCord) 3 4 3 4 

Pocahontas (McConnell) _. 7 6 5 5 

Bracelet (Dona than) 5 5 dis. 

Damiana (McDowell) ..w 6 dis. 

NoTE.~Postponed after second heat, on account of darkness. Finished Sept. 14, 1888. 
Time-~2:21; 2:21; 2:22; 2:22J. 



FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 1888. 

Race No. 25— Running. 

The California Derby Stake. For foals of 1885, to be run at the State Fair of 1888. 
Entrance, one hundred dollars ; fifty dollars forfeit, or only ten dollars if declared Jan- 
uary 1, 1887 ; fifteen dollars if declared January 1, 1888 ; twenty-five dollars if declared 
May 1, 1888; three hundred dollars added, of which one hundred dollars to second; fifty 
dollars to third. One mile and a half.. 



Name and Pedigree of Horso. 



Donald, g. c, by Joe Hooker ; dam, Lexington 
Belle 

Phantom, ch. c, by Joe Hooker ; dam, Cordelia 
Planet - 

Sunset, ch. c, by King Alfonso; dam, Faahion- 
ette 

Partisan, br. c, by imported Partisan; dam, 
Mamie .. 

Troubler, br. c, by imported Partisan; datn, 
Partisana 

Theo. Winters, ch. c, by Joe Hooker; dam, 
Mattie C 

Surinam, b. c, by Joe Hooker; dam, Ada C 

Leon, b. c, by Leinster ; dam, Addie A 

Canny Scot, ch. c, by Leinster; dam, Tibbie 
Dunbar... 

Verona, ch. t,.by Jim Gannon; dam, Lizzie P._ 
Ledon, blk. g., by Nathan Coombs ; dam, Gypsy. 
Vinco, b. g., by Bob Wooding; dam, Mollie H, . 
NabeaUj b. g., by Nathan Coombs; dam, Beauty . 
King Idle, br. c, by Wildidle; dam, Augusta E_ 
Pocatello, ch. c, by Joe Hooker ; dam. Count- 
ess Zeifca - 



By Whom Entered. 



J. B. Haggin->. 
Harry Howard . 
W. M. Murry... 

C. Dorsey 

C. Dorsey 



Matt, Storn . 
Geo. Hearst. 
F. P. Lowell. 



W. L. Pritchard... 
Phil. Siebenthaler . 

Wm. Boots 

Wm. Bi30ts 

Wm. Boots 

W. B, Todhunter.- 



W. B. Todhunter. 



Address. 



... Sacramento. 
.San Francisco. 
.._ Sacramento, 

Oakdale. 

Oakdale. 



Oakland. 

.San Francisco. 
--- Sacramento. 



. Sacramento. 
. Sacramento. 

Milpitas. 

Milpitas. 

Milpitas. 

. Sacramento. 



. Sacramento. 



174 



TRANSACTIONS OF THE 
Race No. 25— Running— Continued. 



Name and Pedigree of Horee. 


By Whom Entered. 


Address. 


Snowdrop, ch. f., by Joe Hooker; dam, Laura 
Winston- 


James Garland 


Sacramento. 


Alma E, br. t (formerly Tricksy), by Joe 
Hooker; dam, Abbie W-- 


C. H. Eldred 


Sacramento. 


Bolero, b. or br. c, by Norfolk; dam, Neapolitan- 
Emperor of Norfolk, b. c, by Norfolk; dam, 
Marian-, --,- _- - . 


D, J. McCarty 


...San Francisco. 


E. J. Baldwin 


. .San Francisco. 


Coloma, ch. c, by Joe Hooker; dam, Callie 
Smart ._- - .-- --. ........ 


W. L. Whitmore 


Portland, Or. 


Peel, b. c, by Monday; dam. Precious 


Palo Alto Stock Farm, 


MenloPark. 







SUMMARY. 

Peel (Courtney, 118 pounds) 1 

Snowdrop (Kelly, 115 pounds) .• 2 

Canny Scot (Holloway, 118 pounds) 3 

Leon (Bally, 118 pounds) 

Time— 2:$Si. 

Note, — Peter, Jr., Ceres, declared January 1, 1887, at $10 each. General Gordon, Bruce, 
"Winrow, Brutus, declared January 1, 1888, at $15 each. Glimpse, Kyrle D, declared May 
1, 1888, at $25 each. 



Race No. 26— Running. 

The Palo Alto Stake. A handicap for two-year olds. Fifty dollars entrance ; twenty- 
five dollars forfeit; ten dollars declaration; four hundred dollars added; of which one 
hundred dollars to second ; third to save stake. Weights announced at 10 o'clock a. m., 
Saturday, September first. Declarations due at eight o'clock p. m., Monday, September 
third. One inile. 



Name and Pedigree of Horse. 



G. W, b. g., by Kyrle Daly; dam, by Thad 

Stevens ..-. 

Albatross^ b. g., by PUlbox ; dam» DeUa Walker 

The Czar, ch. c, by Norfolk; dam, Marian 

Barham, b. c, by Norfolk ; dam, sister to Lottery 
Don Jos6, ch, c, by Joe Hooker; dam, Countess 

Zeika .— ' 

Bronco, ch. c, by Joe Hooker; dam, Laura 

Winston 

Bessie Shannon, b. f., by Shannon ; dam, Bettie 

Bishop - - 

Little Phil., ch. c, by Leinster ; dam, Lily H,.. 
Duke Spencer, b. c, by Duke of Norfolk ; dam, 

Lou Spencer 

Glencola, b. f,, by imp. Glengary ; dam, Marcola 
Picnic, br. f ., by im.p. Mr. Pickwick ; dam, imp. 

Countess _.— ._ - 

Shannon Rose, b. f ., by Shannon ; dam, imp. 

Rose, by Kisber 

Aurelia, b. f .,by Wildidle ; dam, Amelia, by Low- 
lander ^ - 

Faustine, b, f., by Flood; dam, imp. Flirt, by 

The Hermit- 

Reward, b. g., by Jim Brown ; dam, Trophy 

Joe Hoge, ch. c, by Joe Hooker; dam, viola R. 
Young Prince, b. h., by imp. Young Prince ; 

dam, Mercedes (dead) 

Jack Pot, b, g., by Joe Hooker; dam, Mistake.. 
Wild Oats, b. c.,l)y Wildidle ; dam, Mary Givens 
Futurity, blk. f.,by John A; dam, Ella Doane... 
Naicho B, ch. g., by Wanderer ; dam, Flower 

Girl 



By Whom Entered. 



G. W. Trahern . 
M. T.Walters - 
Theo. Winters . 
Theo. Winters . 

Theo. Winters . 

Theo. Winters _ 

J. Reavey & Co. 
T. Bally 



F. Depoister 

L, U,Shippee 

L. U. Shippee . 

Palo Alto Stock Farm. 

Palo Alto Stock Farm. 

Palo Alto Stock Farm. 

Rancho del Paso , 

H. L Thornton 



T. G. Jones 

W. L. Appleby 

W.L.Appleby 

Los Angeles Stable .-. 



Address. 



Stockton! 

-Lakeview, Or. 
. . Sacramento. 
- - Sacramento. 



. Sacramento. 

- Sacramento. 

- Sacramento. 
. Sacramento. 

- Sacramento. 
Stockton. 



Stockton. 

. Menlo Park 
. Menlo Park. 



... Menlo Park. 
... Sacramento. 
-San Francisco. 



..Santa Rosa. 
. Santa Clara. 
- Santa Clara. 

-Los Angeles. 



STATE AGRlCULTtBAL SOCIETY. 

SUMMARY. 

The Czar (Carrillo, 110 pounds) 1 

Wild Oats (Hitchcock, 95 pounds) 2 

Shannon Rose (Tompkins, 107 pounds) 3 

Futurity (Murphy, 90 pounds) - - 

Naicho B (Keene, 90 pounds) 

Reward (Hart, 95 pounds) _ 

Duke Spencer (Cook, 103 pounds) 

Timcy 1;44. 



175 



Race Jso. 27— Running. 

The Golden Gate Stake. For three-year olds. Fifty dollars entrance. Twenty-live 
dollars forfeit, or only fifteen dollars if declared on or before September first; with four 
hundred dollars added, of which one hundred dollars to second; third to save stake. 
Winner of any three-year old race at this meeting to carry five pounds extra; colts not 1, 
2, 3, in No. 19, allowed ten pounds. One mile and three quarters. 



Name and Pedigree of Horse. 


By Whom Entered. 


Address. 


Sunset, ch. h., by King Alfonso; dam, Fash- 
ionette -._ . _- __>. 


W. M. Murry 


.^ - Sacramento. 


Moses B, ch. s., by Leinster; dam, Aunt Jane-- 
Peel, b. c, by Monday ; dam, Precious, by Lever - 
Brutus (imp.), b. c, by Macgregor; dam, imp. 

Teardrop, by Scottish Chief 

Carmen, ch. f., by Wildidle ; dam, Nettie Brown. 
Vinco, b. g., by Bob Wooding; dam, MoUie H_- 
Nabeau, b. g., by Nathan Coombs ; dam. Beauty . 
Ledon,blk. g,, by Nathan Coombs ; dam, Gypay^. 


M.S.Bryan 


Phoenix, A. T. 


Palo Alto Stock Farm. 
Palo Alto Stock Farm. 


Menlo Park. 

Menlo Park. 


W. L Anplebv 


Santa Clara. 


William Boots 


Milpitas. 


William Boots 


Milpitas. 


William Boots 


Milpitas. 







SUMMARY. 

Moses B (Carrillo, 118 pounds) - 1 

Brutus (Courtney, 123 pounds) 2 

Nabeau (O'Neil, 105 pounds) 3 

?Vme— 3:08i. 



Race No. 28— Running. 

The Nighthawk Stake. For all ages. Fifty dollars entrance. Fifteen dollars forfeit; 
three hundred dollars added, of which one hundred dollars to second; third to save 
stake; two hundred dollars additional if 1:41J is beaten. Stake to be named after the 
winner if Nighthawk's time (1:42J) is beaten. One mile. 



Name and Pedigree of Horse. 



Idalene Cotton, ch. f. (4), by Jim Brown; dam, 
Lizzie P 

AJmont, b. h. (2), by Three Cheers; dam. Ques- 
tion 

Spray, ch. f . (5) (formerly Queen Kapiolana), by 
Joe Hooker; dam, Big Gun 

Jack Brady, b. h. (4), by Wildidle; dam, Sour 
Grapes 

Daisy D, b. m. (6), by Wheatly; dam, Black 
Maria.. « 

Al Farrow, b. s. (3), by Connor; dam Delia 
Walker 

Edelweiss, b, m. (5), by Joe Hooker; dam, Yo- 
lone X 

Welcome, br, f. (3), by Warwick; dam, ^ola... 

Hermes, b.s, (5), by Bays water; dam, Herclade- 

Canny Scot, ch. c. (3), by Leinster; dam, Tib- 
bie Dunbar *. 



By "Whom Entered. 



Maltese Villa Stables. 

W. M. Murry 

J.Clark 

W.L.Davis 

B. Cockrill 

M.T. Walters 



Mrs. S. B. WoUskill . 

D. Hennessy 

L. A. Blasingame ... 



Oak Grove Stables. 



Addrees. 



Merced, 

-- Sacramento. 
._ Sacramento. 
V- Sacramento. 

Salinas. 

.Lakeview, Or. 



. Santa Monica. 
..- Sacramento. 
Fresno. 



. Sacramento. 



I 



176 



TBANSACTIONS OF THE 
Rack No. 28 — Running— Continued. 



T 



Ifame and Pedigree of Horse. 



Leap Year, b. m. (4), by Norfolk; dam, Lady- 
Jane i - 

Brutus (imp.), b. c. (3), by Macgregor; dam, 
imp. Teardrop-- 

Nancy, ch. f. (3), by Jim Brown; dam, Nannie 
Hubbard 

Applause, b. g. (4), by Three Cheers; dam, 
Alice N 

Carmen, ch. f. (3), by Wildidle; dam, Nettie 
Brown - _ 

Wild Oats, b. c. (2), by Wildidle; dam, Mary 
Givens - 

Not Idle, cli. f. (4), by Wildidle; dam, Bonanza - 

Naicho B, ch. g. (2), by Wanderer; dam, Flower 
Girl 



Bel, blk. g. (3), by Falsettoj dam, Mattie Severn . 
loh 



Carmelita, b. m. (4), by Hardwood; dam, Shi- 



Mikado, ch. g. (4), by Shiloh; dam, by Error. _. 

John Treat, g. g. (5), by Shiloh; dam, by Nor- 
folk 

Valid o, br. g. (5), by Bob Wooding; dam, Brown 
Maria 

Ariola, b. m. (5), by Bob Wooding; dam, Glad- 
iola 

Index, blk. g. (6), by Thad Stevens; dam, Gypsy. 

Four Aces, ch. c. (2), by Hock Hocking; dam, 
Maid of the Mist __ - .-- 



By Whom Entered. 



L. A. Blasingame 

Palo Alto Stock Farm. 

B. a Holly 

T. G, Jones.— 

W. L. Appleby 



W. L. Appleby . 
M. F. Tarpey.-, 



Los Angeles Stable --. 
Los Angeles Stable 



Al. Morine . 
B. P. Hill .. 



Al. Morine 

William Boots . 

William Boots , 
William Boots . 

John D, Dunn . 



Address. 



Fresno. 

. Menlo Park. 

Vallejo. 

Oakland. 

. Santa Clara. 

- Santa Clara. 
Oakland. 



_Los Angeles. 
.Los Angeles. 

-Los Angeles. 

ElCajon. 



.Los Angeles. 
Milpitas. 



- Milpitas. 

- MiJpitas. 



-Los Angeles. 



Alraont (Madden, 81 pounds) 

Daisy D ^Hennessy, 115 pounds) 

Edelweiss (Hazlett, 115 pounds) - - 

Idalene Cotton (Kelly, 105 pounds) 

Not Idle (Hitchcock, 115 pounds) 

Index (Hill, 115 pounds) 

Welcome (Cook, 105 pounds) 

Applause (O'Brien, 115 pounds) 

Al Farrow (Carrillo, 108 pounds) 

Time— 1:4 



. 1 
. 2 
. 3 


. 







Race No. 29— Running. 

Free purse, two hundred and fifty dollars ; of which fifty dollars to second. For non- 
winners at this meeting. Horses that have started and" not run second allowed ten 
pounds. Winners of any race, entered herein, may be withdrawn without penalty. One 
mile and a sixteenth and repeat. 



Name and Pedigree of Horse. 



El wood, ch. f. (4), by Norfolk; dam, Ballinette . 
Etta W, ch. m. (4), bv Joe Hooker ; dam, by 

Foster .' 

Dave Douglas, b. g. (6), by Leinster ; dam, Lily 

Simpson.- - 

Hermes, b. s. (5), by Bayswater; dam, Herclade. 

Sid, br. c. (3), by Sidarthur; dam, Vestella 

Mart Gibson, ch. c. (3), by Joe Hooker ; dam, 

Jennie Cribs on 

Kildare, ch. g. (3), by imp. Kyrle Daly ; dam. 

Mistake 



By Whom Entered 



Maltese Villa Stables _ 
A. Wakeman 



G. W. Trahern -.. 
L. A. Blasingame - 
B.C. Holly 



B. C. Holly. 
T.G.Jones, 



Merced. 

. Elk Grove. 



. Stockton. 
... Fresno, 
... Vallejo. 



Vallejo. 

-Santa Rosa. 



STATE AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY. 
Race No. 29— Runnikg— Continued. 



177 



Name and Pedigree of Horse. 



Laura Gardner, ch. f. (4), by tJim Brown ; dam, 
Avail 

Carmen, ch. f. (3), by Wildidle; dam, Nettie 
Brown 

Not Idle, ch. f. (4), by Wildidle; dam, Bonanza. 

Ledor, b. or br. g. (4), by Nathan Coombs; dam, 
Gypsy - 



By Whom Entered. 



W. L. Appleby . 

W. L. Appleby . 
M. T. Tarpeyl.. 



Wm. Boots. 



Address. 



„ Santa Clara. 

. Santa Clara. 
Oakland. 



. Milpitas. 



Laura Gardner (Hitchcock, 100 pounds) 

Dave Douglas (Dennison, 110 pounds) 

Mart Gibson (Richardson, 103 pounds) 

Sid (O'Day, 93 pounds) 

Time— 1:51; 1:63. 



1 1 

2 2 
dis. 

dis. 



SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 1888. 
Race No. 30~Trotting, 
Free for all. Purse, one thousand five hundred dollars. 



Name and Pedigree of Horse. 



By Whom Entered. 



Address. 



Lot Slocum, br. h., by Electioneer; dam, a Mo- 
hawk mare 



A. Gonzales . 



_San ^Francisco. 
.San Francisco. 



Arab, b.g., by Arthur ton; dam. Lady. Hamilton. O. A. Hickok 

Ouy Wilkes, b. s., by Geo. Wilkes ; dam. Bunker, 

by Mambrino Patchen ._ San Mateo Stock Farm San Mateo. 

Stamboul, b. s., by Sultan; dam, FJeetwing f L. J. Rose... / Los Angeles. 

Tempest, b,m.,by Hawthorne; dam,by Chieftain. L. U. Shippee Stockton. 

Adair, b. g., by Electioneer; dam, Addie Lee .-./J, A. Dustin 1 Oakland. 

Note.— Declared off on account of rain, under Rule 18, National Trotting Association. 



Race No. 31— Trotting. 
2:40 Class. Purse, one thousand dollars. 



Name and Pedigree of Horse. 



Perihelion, b. h., by Admiral; dam. Flora 

Jim Blaine, ch. g., by Oakland Boy; dam, by 
Flying Morrell--- 

EoaaS,b.h.,by Nutwood; dam, by State of Maine. 

Sonnet, b. f->t>y Bentonian; dam, Sontag Dixie, 

by Toronto Sontag - 

The Dude, ch. g., by Gold Dust; dam, by Chief- 
tain 



Ben Ali, b. g., by Geo. M. Patchen, Jr.; dam, 
thoroughbred _ 

Maggie E, br,m.,by Nutwood; dam, by Geo. M. 
Patchen, Jr 

Stoneman, br. g., by Hambletonian; dam, by 
Reuben 



By Whom Entered. 



W.S.Ray. 

Raymond & Boucher. 
R. C.Sargent 



Palo Alto Stock Farm. 

J. R. Hodson — . 

J. A. Goldsmith 

S. B. Emerson 

C. F. Bjinch 



Address. 



-San Francisco. 



. Porterville. 
.-- Stockton. 



Menlo Park. 

Sacramento. 

_--San Francisco. 
- Mountain View. 
-.- lone. 



Note.— Declared off on account of rain, under Rule 18, National Trotting Association. 

1220 



178 



TRANSACTIONS OF THE 



Race No. 32— Pacing. 
Three-year old Class. Purse, three hundred dollars. 



Kame and Pedigree of Horse. 



Adonis, b. h., by Sidney; dam, Venus 

Creole, blk. s., by Prompter; dam, Grace, by 

Buccaneer 

Yolo Maid, b. m., by Alex Button; dam, by 

Dietz's St. Clair 

Wing Wing, b. m., by Privateer; dam, Mahaska 

Belle, by Flaxtail 

Gold Leaf, ch. t, by Sidney; dam, Fern Leaf... 
Cricket, b. m. _: 



By Whom Entered. 



A. B. Gonzales . 
T.O. Snider.... 
0. R. Hoppin... 



Frank Hawkins 

Pleasanton St'k Farm. 
J. A. Dustin 



Address. 



.San Francisco^ 
--Washington^ 
YoK 



- Woodland, 
. Pleasanton. 
Oakland, 



Note. — Declared off on account of rain, under Rule 18, National Trotting Association. 



STATE AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY. 



REPORT OF RACES. 



179 



Bbeedeb and Sportsman. 



FIRST DAY. 

The racing programme of the California State Fair opened at Sacramento 
on Thursday, September sixth. The city is unusually full of people, and 
the weather exceedingly hot. 

The first race was the Occident Stake, for which there were but two 
starters: Redwood, by Anteeo, and Sol Wilkes, by Guy. Wilkes. Both 
horses were quite lame. 

SUMMARY. 

Califobnia State Faie, Sacramento, September 6, 1888. — Occident Stake ; cash to win- 
ner, 11,120. 

A. McFady en's b. s. Redwood, bv An teeo — Donathan -_ 2 111 

S. Solomon's b. s. Sol Wilkes, by^Guy Wilkes— Brandow 1 2 2 2 

rime— 2:47; 2:39^; 2:36^; 2:40^. 

The next race was for the 2:23 class, and resulted in heavy betting at 
big odds — Alfred S selhng for $50 against $6 for the field of Valentine, 
Thapsin, and Gus Wilkes. Alfred S won the first and second heats, when 
pool selling stopped. In the third heat Valentine won, when the pools 
showed $40 for Alfred S and $10 for the field. The fourth heat was stub- 
bornly contested, but Valentine won by half a length, Alfred S tiring and 
quitting badly. The last heat was an exciting one, Valentine breaking so 
badly at the quarter that his chance for the heat looked slim. Alfred S 
took the lead but was collared and passed by Wilkes, who led to the half. 
On the turn Alfred S quit and fell behind Thapsin. Valentine was, how- 
ever, fast closing up the gap, created by his breaking, and at the head of 
the stretch had succeeded in reaching Wilkes and Thapsin — from here he 
came very fast, winning by five lengths. Gus Wilkes took second money, 
and Thapsin third money, while Alfred S was distanced. 

SUMMARY. 

California State Fair, Sacramento, September 6, 1888.-^Purse, $1,200; 2:23 class. 

J. H. Kelly's b. g. Valentine— Jones..-- 4 4 111 

E.H. Miller, Jr.'s blk. g. Thapsin— Smith 2 2 4 4 3 

Mr. Ayers' b. s. Gus Wilkes— Dustin 3 3 3 3 2 

H. W. Scale's b. g. Alfred 8— McManus 1 1 2 2dls. 

rtm€— 2:22; 2:214; 2:24^; 2:24; 2:28^. 

The chief interest of the day was in the pacing race for the 2:30 class. 
Gold Leaf was a great favorite, selling for $25, Yolo Maid (her first appear- 
ance) at $10, and the field of five — Cricket, San Diego, Ned Winslow, 
Elwood, and Little Doc — bringing $13. Goldsmith was in the sulky behind 
the newcomer, Yolo Maid. He went off in the lead with Gold Leaf, and it 
was soon seen that she could outfoot the latter, and that the others could, 
also. The greatest applause greeted Yolo Maid when she passed under 
the wire the winner of the heat in 2:19. 



180 



TRANSACTIONS OF THE 



The second heat was an easy win also for Yolo Maid, as she won as she 
pleased in 2:23^. Before the start for this heat Yolo Maid sold for $100, 
field $32, and Gold Leaf $13. 

The third heat was a wonderful exhibition of Gold Leaf's ability to stand 
punishment of the most severe kind. Never till the head of the stretch 
would she yield the lead to Yolo Maid, who had been lapped on her from 
the wire, but from here the Maid outfooted her, and came on and won the 
heat, race, and first money, in the fast time of 2:21 j; Gold Leaf third; San 
Diego second money ; and Ned Winslow fourth money. Time, 2:211. 

SUMMARY. 

California State Fair, Sacramento, September 6, 1888.~Pacing; purse |600; 2:30 class. 

C. R. Hoppin's b. m. Yolo Maid, by Alex Button — Goldsmith Ill 

H. C. Airhart's b. g. San Diego— Walsh 2 2 3 

Pleasanton Stock Farm's s. m. Gold Leaf— McDowell 4 6 2 

J. L. McCord's b. g. Ned Winslow— McCord 3 4 4 

Hemett Stable's b. m. Elwood—Durfee 5 3 5 

H. Meek's b. m. Cricket— Diistin - 6 5 6 

F. Seguin's b. g. Little Doc— Ober .._ 7 7 7 

Ttme-2:19; 2:23i; 2:21^. 

. The winner, Yolo Maid, is the property of C. R. Hoppin, and is a half- 
sister to Kosie Mc, being by the same horse, Alex Button, OAit of a mare 
by Dietz's St. Clair. Her performance was wonderful, notwithstanding the 
fact that it has been beaten, and is the third time in an actual race that 
the world's record (2:22^) has been beaten in three weeks by California 
three-year olds, and while Gold Leaf holds the record (2:18) , it is undisputed 
that in her first heat Yolo Maid could have knocked at least a second off 
it, as she actually jogged home in 2:19. 



SECOND DAY. 

While a majority of the races at the State Fair have proved to be of the 
best description, some of them can fairly be classed as exciting in the 
bigbest degree. Although on the opening day the Occident only brought 
out two starters, the 2:23 made amends, as the favorite Alfred S met with 
defeat when least expected^ and not only was beaten but left behind the 
flag in the finishing heat. This may be attributed to the serious illness 
which overtook him at Stockton last year, or rather a return of the malady. 
The 2:30 pacing brought out another great three-year old to the credit of 
California, three of them winners in faster time than has been shown by 
the class heretofore, and the fourth evidently capable of beating any other 
record excepting the Pacific Coast mark. The first day was given last 
week, the second was a racing day, and as will be seen by the following 
account was a good begining on the "legitimate," although the favorites 
made a clean sweep. 

The first race was the Introduction Stake for two-year olds, a dash of 
three quarters of a mile. There were seven starters in the pools as follows: 
Don Jos6 $70, Reward $18, field $10. After several attempts at a fair 
start Lady Helen led off, followed by Duke Spencer, with the favorite in 
the bunch clos^ behind. As they swung into the stretch Don Jose cut 
loose from the crowd and soon had the leaders in trouble and both driving 
hard. He came away easily and won in a gallop. Lady Helen second and 
Duke Spencer third. Time, 1:17. 



STATE AGRICULTX3RAL SOCIETY. 



181 



SUMMARY. 

Theo. Winters' ch. c. I>on Jos€, by Joe Hooker-Countess Zeika — Holloway, 110 .._. 1 

Thomas H. Williams' b. m. Lady Helen, by Norfolk-Jessie B— Hitchcock, 107 - 2 

F. Depoister's b. c. Duke Spencer, by Duke of Norfolk-Lou Spencer— 0' Neil, 110 3 

Little Phil, Libertiflibbet, Reward, and Futurity also ran. 

TiTne— 1:17. 

The second race on the card was the California Breeders' Stake for the 
three-year olds, one mile and a q^uarter. Only three appeared, Peel selling 
for $100, Snowdrop for $16, and Carmen $10. At the first attempt they 
got away, and on passing the stand the first time Peel was two lengths in 
the lead of Snowdrop, with Carmen several lengths back. The race from 
here needs no further description, more than to say the favorite increased 
his lead at will, and was ten lengths ahead of Snowdrop on the upper turn, 
when Courtney took a pull and finished easy two lengths ahead of Snow- 
drop. Time, 2:12^. 

SUMMABY. 

Palo Alto's b. c. Peel, by Monday-Precious— Courtney, 118 1 

Jam e5* Garland's ch. f. Snowdrop, by Joe Hooker-Laura Winston— Kelly, 115 2 

Laurel wood Stable's ch. f . Carmen, oy Wildidle-Nettie Brown— Appleby - ~ 3 

Time— 2:12^. 

Betting— Auction pools: Peel $50, Snowdrop $8, field $5. 

The next on the programme was the Capital Stake, three-year olds and 
over, one mile and an eighth. In the pools the talent, with rare, good judg- 
ment, selected Brutus and Extract at even mone}^ $100 each, while the 
field went hegging at $35. 

For ten minutes the horses were paraded in Indian file with their jockeys 
in colors, up in front of the Grand Stand, and this new rule of the Directors 
met with general approbation. It gave all an opportunity to learn their 
colors before the race. A beautiful start was given, and on reaching the 
stand for the first time Not Idle led Duke Spencer, with the others well up, 
and all under a heavy pull. They ran bunched around the turn, with these 
two still leading. Up the backstretch both Extract and Brutus moved 
into better positions, and both looked like winners as they came into the 
stretch. About midway in the straight, Brutus was seen coming fast on 
the inside and mowing the field down like grass, until at the drawgate he 
Vas running easily a length in the lead, Extract coming fast. She was on 
the outside, and was hardly seen in the crowd until the last few yards, 
when she came with a terrific rush, and, catching Slocum, the jockey on 
Brutus, napping, snatched the race by a nose at the very wire. Not Idle 
was third. Time, 1:68^. 

SUMMARY. 

Rancho Del Paso'^ br. f . Extract, by Virgil-Tincture, 3— Kelly , 105- 1 

Palo Alto's b. c. imp. Brutus, by McGregor-imp. Teardrop, 3 — Slocum, 108 - 2 

M. F. Tarpey's ch, i. Not Idle, ^ Wildidle-Borianza, 4— Appleby, 115 3 

Heliotrope, Hermes, Nancy, Del, and Nabeau ran unplaced. 

JVme— 1:58J. 

Betting— Auction pools: Imp. Brutus $100, Extract $60, field $32. 

The last race on the card was the free for all for a purse of $250, heats 
of a mile, and brought out four -starters that were held as follows in the 
pools: Canny Scot $40 to $22 50 before the first heat. This start proved 
a great failure for the starter, as he sent them off with Sid and Ledor stand- 
ing still, and the other two, Canny Scot and Dave Douglas, running six 



182 



TRANSACTIONS OF THE 



STATE AGRICUL'IUBAL SOCIETY. 



183 



lengths away. Canny Scot at once took the lead and won the heat as he 
pleased. Dave Douglas second, and Sid and Ledor distanced. Time, lAb^. 
Canny Scot now sold for $50 against $8 for Douglas. Douglas led the 
way to the quarter, when Scot moved up, and after a brush on the back- 
stretch was first to the half-mile pole. Around the upper turn Douglas 
again made play for the lead, and the sight as they ran was like one horse 
to the head of the stretch. Down the straight Canny out footed Dave and 
reached the wire first by a length, winning the heat and race. Time, 1 :44^. 

SUMMABT. 

Oak Grove Stable's ch. g. Canny Scot, by Leinster-Tibbie Dunbar, 3— HoUoway, 108 -. 1 1 

G. A. Trahern's b. g. Dave Douglas, 6— Dennison, 115 2 2 

Holly's Sid and Boot's Ledor dis. 

Time—XA6h 1:44J. 
Betting— Auction pools : First heat— Canny Scot $40, field $27 50. Second heat— Scot |50, 
I>oug}as $a 



THIRD DAY. 

The third day was looked for with great interest in all parts of the State. 
Those who had the means and leisure to gratify their fondness for trotting 
sport resolved to witness the contests which were on the bill, and the great 
army compelled to stay at home anxiously awaited the reports, the first 
papers to contain them being seized with an eagerness which showed the 
anxiety felt. There was an immense crowd at the park, larger even than 
the most sanguine anticipated, and that they were well repaid, though the 
air was somewhat overheated, the accounts of the races will show. The 
first trotting race was a two-year-old stake, and four good youngsters put 
in an appearance. Two great fillies, none too high praise to award, Veso- 
lia and Margaret S; and though Dame Fortune frowned on the handsome 
filly from Los Angeles in this race, she is well entitled to the rank. For- 
tuna is not far behind, and Kilrain has shown so well at home as to raise 
hopes that his time would come. Previous to the trotting match a race 
was run between Peregrine and Lida Ferguson, which was handily won by 
the colt of double paternity. 

The first race was a match for $500 a side between Peregrine and Lida 
Ferguson, five eighths of a mile. The betting before the start was $50 
on Peregrine against $16 for Lida, and although this was big odds against 
a mare of such reputation for short races, the backers of Peregrine proved 
correct in their judgment, as the horse took the lead by a length soon after 
the flag fell and was never headed, although Lida closed with him at the 
head of the stretch, but was in trouble, her rider using