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Double Issue: 



July- August, 79 



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OVfATTO AND OPERA 7*7) B K THE PA CIFICA EOUNDA TION, 
RECAN BliOADCASTlXG 0\ JViY 26. 1959. LISTENER-SPONSORED KPFK IS A 
\0\PROFIT INSTITUTION CREATED AS AN EDUCATIONAL, NONCOMMERCIAL 
RADIO STATION SERVING SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA: AND 



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WHER EAS. KPEK WAS FOUNDED ON THE BELIEF THAT RADIO, FULLY ACCES- 
'sIBLETG COMMUNITY Ml \IBI:RS, PROVIDES A UNIQUE SCOPE OF PROGRAMMING 
NOT AVAILABLE THROUGH THE COMMERCIAL MEDIA: AND 

jXi^ . 

C WHEREAS, KPFK PROGRAMS TO A IJSTExVING A UDIENCE OF MORE THAN 100.000 
H«0 SHARE A CONCERN FOR THE IMMEDL/KTE AND OFTEN CONTROVERSIAL 
EVENTS IN MUSIC, DRAMA. POETRY. NEWS AND PUBLIC AFFAIRS, AND KPFK 
■> SERVICI::. nir i\rh RESTS OE THE ETHNIC, .MINORITY AND WOMEN'S COMMUNI- 
TIES THI<>iUt,ll US PROGR.UmiNG AND OUTRE.ACH: AND 

A^Ji. . 

t^;H^K.jlS, KPEK FOR TWO DECADES HAS ENCOURAGED AND URGED PARTICI- 
PATION IN ITS PROGRAMMING PRODUCTION FOR THE SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA 
CO.MMUNITY OE LISTENERS, WITH SPECIFIC EMPHASIS ON PROGRAMMING TO 
THOSE NOT FULLY REPRE.SENTED IN THE COM.HERCIAL .MEDIA: AND 

WHEREAS, KPEK ON JULY 26, 1979 CELEBRATES ITS 20TH BIRTHDA Y: 



NOW. THEREFORE, I. TOM BRADLEY. MA YOR OE THE CITY OF LOS ANGELES. DO 
HEREBY COMMFYd KPIK FOR THE ACTIVE ROLE IT HAS TAKEN IN ITS CONTRF 
BCriONS TO THE CO.M.MUNITY, AND 

iJJ^RTH'^ii. PROCLAIM THE WEEK OF JULY 26 THROUGH AUGUST I, I»79~AS 
■'KPFK WEEK" 




3:^- x^. 




KPFK FOLIO 
90.7 FM 



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Double Folio: July -August 



KPFK STAFF 

General Manager 
Exec. Secretary 
Program Director/ 
Afternoon Magazine 
Music 



N;ws 



Public Affairs 

Nite Magazine (M-Th) 

& Traffic 

Drama 

Cultural Affairs 

Operations 



Chief Engineer 
Subscriptions 
Community Events 
Reception 
Folio Editor 



|im Bt'rlaiid 
Beverly ZcIIlt 

Anita Frankel 

Carl Stone, Director 

Lcni Isaacs 

|ohn Schneider 

Lois Vicrk 

Richard Mahler, Director 

Chris Lautcrbach 

Mike O'Sullivan 

Earl Ofari 

Roy E. Tuckman 
Paul Vangclisti 
Bill Hunt 

Peter Suthcim, Director 
Heiene Rosenbluth, 
Production Training Co-ord. 
Margaret Fowler 
Linda Mack 
Sylvester Rivers 
Don Wilson 
Ahna Armour 
Mario Casetta 
Terry Hodci 
lane Gordon 



KPFK SWITCHBOARD: ?13/ 877-2711 



KPFK LOCAL ADVISORY BOARD 

David Abcrson, Dori Aberson, Jacki Addis, Jack Berman, 
Mario Casetta, Mocte^fuma Esparza, David Finkcl, Peter 
Flaxman, Ruth Galantcr, Clifford Geiz, Brownlee Maydon, 
Linda Hunt, David Levy, Mel Reich, lonas Rosenficld Jr., 
Leonard Ungcr, Dclfino Varela, David Wesley. 

PACIFICA FOUNDATION NATIONAL 
BOARD OF DIRECTORS & OFFICERS 

R. Gordon Agnew, Hon. Chair; Jack O'Dell, Chair; 
Peter Tagger, President; Victor Honig, Trcas. Peter 
Franck, 1st V.P.; Marge Glascr, 2nd V.P.; Ralph Engie- 
man, 3rd V. P.; Greg Lewis, Sec'y; Deifino Varela, Ass't. 
Sec'y; Steve Berncr, Gabriellc Edgcomb, Clifford Getz, 
Oscar Hanigsberg, Kenneth Jenkins, David Lampel, 
Acklyn Lynch, Jean Molyneaux, Vyilliam Sokol, William 
Swenson, Alex Vavoulis. 

PACIFICA FOUNDATION NATIONAL STAFF 

Joel Kugelmass, Exec. Director; Mike Krycler, Controller; 
Vicki Kirsch, Admin. Ass't. Marianna Berkovich, Book- 
keeper; Ira Slobodien, Director of Data Processing. 

Pacifica National Office 

5316 Venice Blvd., Los Angeles CA 90019 
213/931-1625 

Pacifica National News Service (Patti Neighmond, Dir.) 
& Washington News Bureau (Ted Clark, Bureau Chief) 
868 National Press Building, Washington DC 20045. 
202/628-4620 

Pacifica Program Service & Tape Library 
(Helen Kennedy, Director) 

5316 Venice Blvd.. Los Angeles CA 90019 
213/931-1625 

PACIFICA NETWORK SISTER STATIONS 

KPFA: 2207 Shattuck Ave., Berkeley CA 94704 
WBAI: 505 Eighth Ave., New York NY 10018 
KPFT: 419 Lovett Blvd., Houston TX 77006 
WPFW: 700 H St.-NW, Washington DC 20001 




Volume 21, Number 7/8 

The Folio is a monthly publication of KPFK, 3729 Cahuenga Blvd. West; North Hollywood CA 91604. Application 
to mail at 2nd Class postage rates is pending at No. Hywd. CA and additional mailing offices. The KPFK Folio is 
not sold. It is sent free to each subscriber supporting our non-profit, non-commerical educational station, and con- 
tains the most accurate possible listings of the programs broadcast. Subscriptions are S30 per year, and are transfer- 
rable to the other Pacifica Stations. Our transmitter is on Mt. Wilson. We bioadcast in stereo multiplex with 25 micro- 
second pre-emphasis. We broadcast Dolby calibration tones daily, before the principle evening music program. 
KPFK's mailing address is PO Box 8639, Universal City CA 91 608. Phones: 21 3/877271 1 and 984-271 1 . KPFK is 
owned and operated by the Pacifica Foundation, a non-profit institution. KPFK is a member of the Association of 
California Public Radio Stations. 



KPfK Folio Page 2 



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Demographic Checklist 

STATISTICS 

I . Sex 2. Age 3. Marital status 

4. Number of people in your household 

5. Highest grade, year at college, or degree completed 

6. Present job title Present employment status: 

Fulltime Part time Student Not employed 

8. Combined annual income of your household: $ 

9. Do you live in: Your own home or condo Rented home or apartment 

READERSHIP 

10. How many of the last four issues of the Folio have you read or looked into? 

I I . How much time do you spend reading an issue of the Folio? 

12. On how many different days do you usually consult an issue of the Folio? 

13. What do you do with your copy of the Folio after you have finished with it? 

Save it for future reference Return it to the person who loaned it to you 

Pass it on to a friend Discard it Other 

14. How long have you been a subscriber to KPFK/Folio? 

15. How do you feel about the Folio? Look forward to each issue Find at least 

one interesting feature in each issue Folio hasn't lived up to the concept it 

promised Just glance at it_:: 

16. What do you think of our covers and the overall graphic design? 

17. Do you have any suggestions that would help us make the Folio better or more 



appealmg? 



18. Do you think the Folio should accept all advertising without any restrictions on 
content or corporate source? 



19. What restrictions would you like to see imposed?- 



PLEASE USE MORE PAPER FOR ANY OF THE ABOVE ANSWERS IF NEED BE. 

LISTENING HABITS 

20. Do you listen most to: Music News Public Affairs Cultural 

Name your favorite program: .. 

ACTIVITIES 

21. Which of the following recreational activities have you participated in this year? 
Tennis Snow skiing Boating Bicycling Camping Golfing 

Water sports Running/jogging Yoga Health club/gym Racquet- 
ball Rollerskating Other 

22. Which of these things have you EVER done? Voted in a public election 

Wrote a letter to the editor Wrote a letter to a public official Worked for 

a political/issue-oriented organization Volunteer work Participated in a 

phone-in radio show None of the above 

Please turn over the page for more questions — 
P.S. We are grateful for the guidance ofSE VEN DA YS Magazine in preparing this survey. 



DEAR KPFK 
LISTENER- SPONSORS: 

You've probably ^ecn noticing a 
number of changes in the Folio 
recently. We've been working on 
improving the overall design, add- 
ing features, and generally up- 
grading the quality of the publi- 
cation. 

We want to continue to grow and 
improve, but we are at the point 
where that is only possible if we 
increase our advertising income, 
and we can only do that if we start 
to attract new advertisers. And the 
problem is that trying to convince 
corporate advertising-directors to 
buy space in the Folio is like try- 
ing to convince meat-and-potato 
lovers to introduce brown rice & 
lentils into their diet: not many 
have heard of us, and those that 
have, tend to dismiss us as a bunch 
of quixotic "hold-outs from the 
sixties. . ." 

Of course, we tell advertisers that 
we and our subscribers consider 
ourselves progressive, active and 
aware individuals, and that we re- 
main-for better or worse— consumers 
But what impresses advertising dir- 
ectors seems to be demographics: 
They want facts and figures on the 
who, where, why, when and how of 
our subscribers. And statistics on 
your buying habits. So we're asking 
you to help. . . by filling out the 
following survey and returning it 
immediately. Call us at 877-271 1 
if you have any questions or, even, 
hesitations. 

The sooner we get the news to ad- 
vertisers, the sooner we'll begin to 
have the kind of financial security 
we need to bring the potential of 
the Folio to real fruition. 

Thanks for your time. We need it. 
Please return the completed survey 
to: 



DANIELS & ASSOCIATES 
c/o KPFK 

3729 Cahuenga Blvd. West 
North Hollywood CA 91604 



FOLIO PAGE 3 



I 

TRAVEL 

23. How may trips of over 100 miles (one way) have you taken within the U.S. in the past year? 

How many domestic trips have you talsen by each of the following means of transportation during the past year? 
Automobile Bus Train Airplane^ Boat Other 

24. Do you hold a valid passport? 

25: What foreign countries have you visited in the past five years? 

26. What foreign countries do you wish to visit within the next five years? 



ENTERTAINMENT 

27. How many times during the past year have you attended an event of the following kind? Rock or "pop" concert 

Symphony concert Opera Jazz concert Theater (live) "Little" (equity waiver) theater 

Art show Gallery Disco event or place Folk dance event or place Cabaret or nite club 

28. How many times have you gone to the movies in the last three months? 

RECORDS, TAPES, STEREO EQUIPMENT 

29. How many records or tapes have you bought during the past year either in anticipation of or as a result of 
attending concerts, plays and/or movies? 

30. How many records and tapes have you purchased during the past year? Record albums Prerecorded tapes 

Blank tapes (to record) Are you a member of a record club? 

31 . How many of each of the following items does your household own? Component system Console system 

Record changer or turntable Speaker system Tuner, amplifier or receiver Headphones Tape deck 

or cassette player Car stereo or tape deck Video tape recorder 

CONSUMER PRODUCTS 

32. How many of the following items does your household own? AM/FM radio Electronic calculator Sew- 
ing machine B&W tv Color tv Manual typewriter Electric typewriter Food processor 

Phone answering machine Hot tub 

BOOKS & READING 

33. How many books does your household own? Hardcover Paperback Are you a member of a book club? 

How many magazine subscriptions do you get? Newsmagazines Feature/entertainment Other 

CAMERAS 

34. How many of the following kinds of photo equipment does your household own? Slide projector Movie 

projector Movie camera Instant-developing camera Instant-loading camera Other still camera 

SLR 35mm Other 35mm Electronic flash Accessory lenses Enlarger Other darkroom 

HOME IMPROVEMENT 

35. In the past six months have you: Added a room redecorated worked on kitchen worked on the 

exterior Insulated Put in solar heating Landscaped Bought new house plants 

36. In the past six months have you investigated or planned doing any of the above? 

NATURAL LIFESTYLES 

37. Does your household regularly use: Natural or health foods Non-polluting, alternative household products, 

cosmetics, or hygiene products Home-grown food Yoga or meditation techniques Alternative, holistic 

health & healing practices crafts made at home art made at home 

EDUCATION & GROWTH 

38. How many of the following did you attend last year? Classes in a school or college Lectures or seminars 

Holistic health or therapy sessions Music lessons Arts or crafts lessons 

39. How many school-age children in your household . How many take lessons outside of school :_ 

I 

FOLIO PAGE 4 



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THE VOLUNTEERS 

They turn the station tm and otl, and niaLii' it jjo in between. Thev run errands, prnducc programs, engineer, stufi 
envelopes, answer phonos, build things, help at oll-aii evesiis in ■iihct words, we couldn't exist without them. 
Those not listed elsewhere in the lolio arc: 



Joe Adams 
Richard Amromin 
Art Aratin 
Anthea Ashe 
Steve Barker 
Bruce Bidlack 
John Bliss 
Rene Bohne 
Lucia Chappelle 
Louise Chevlin 
B) Clark 
Peter Cole 
Gail Diane Co.x 
Peter Cutler 
Mike Davis 
Andrea Enthal 
Laura Ewig 
Mark Farjean 
Joe Feinblatt 
Frances Fischer 
Dan Fitzgerald 
Ronald Fong 
Cecilia Ford 
Leigh Garner 



Matt Gibson 
Suzanne Gilbert 
Marsha Golde 
Greg Gordon 
Gail Valerie Griffin 
Robert Griffin 
Cy Guis 
Rick Haley 
Eda Hallinan 
Edward Hammond 
Bill Handelsman 
Burt Handelsman 
Virginia Harvey 
Jeanne Henley 
April Hill 
Fred Jones 
Susan Judy 
Alan Kanter 
Nick Kawaguchi 
Michael Kearns 
Jim Kepner 
Dave Krebs 
Jay Kugelman 



Chuck Larson 
Lezlic Lee 
Rachel Levario 
Ro^fix Eighty 
Barbara Like 
Vandcr Lockett 
Michael Lombardi 
Elizabeth Luye 
Iris Mann 
Michael Manning 
Maureen Mcllroy 
Bill McKinley 
Joan Midler 
Sam Mittleman 
Paul Nash 
Nicole Oiknine 
Dan Paik 
Bob Pond 
Robert Portillo 
Jan Potts 
Richard Rowa 
David Rubin 
Cindy Sardo 
J eff Schafer 



Lisa Schlien 
David S';idman 
Richard Shea 
Phyllis Siegel 
Pearl Skot'nes 
Pat Smith 
Diane Streett 
Ron Streichcr 
Gary Taylor 
Ed Thomas 
Jim Tindall 
Tom Turner 
Howard Vanucci 
Bill Vestal 
Bert White 
Julie Wilkerson 
Katie Wise 
Mark Wren 
. . . and any 
others we've 
inadvertently 
omitted. 



^ 



Volunteer 



Nev^s 



Summer is a great time for taking on a new volunteer project— how about taking on KPFK? 
We're pruning our volunteer files, and would like to add your name to our list of helpers. 
Please check off the kind of work you would like to help with: 



I'm Available 



Davs 



Evenings 



WORK AT THE STATION 



—Answering pledge calls during fundraising 

-Taking Film Club reservations 

—Packaging premiums, stuffing envelopes, labeling mailings 

-Typing correspondence, address lists, etc. 

—Making deliveries and pickups in own car 

-Clean-up projects around the station 

—Electronic equipment repair 

—Special skills (carpentry, painting, gardening, plumbing, etc' 



] Weekends 

WORK AT EVENTS 

Putting up and taking down booths, stages, etc. 

—Truck for transporting things 

—Preparing food 

—Serving food and drinks 

—Clean-up and general volunteer work 

—Distributing flyers in own neighborhood 

—Distributing flyers at other events 

—Other volunteer projects I'd like to work on: 



J 



Name Phone (day) (nite). 

Address ^ City Zip — 

Mail to: Volunteer Coordinator, KPFK, PO Box 8639, tiniversal City CA 91608. 



FOLIO PAGE 5 



Report to the Listener 



Rather than a lengthy report fronn me this month, I offer an article from KPFA's Folio on the subject of impending 
changes in the Communications Act of 1934. Changes do continue around here in our staff: we wish every good thought 
to Linda Hunt and Mike Baiter, as they move on to other endeavors. Enjoy the summer! Jim Berland, Manager. 



THE DEREGULATION OF RADIO. 
A Bill to Alter the Media 

by Helen Mickiewicz 

News Director, KPFA Berkeley 

Imagine this: radio stations with rock music (or blues 
or disco or jazz or classical) 24 hours a day, interrupted 
only for twenty minutes of commericals an hour. No 
ncws,\no public affairs, no community service announce- 
ments, no public service messages^. Maybe it's not so dif- 
ferent from some stations now. But to many radio and 
television managers, and to commercial sponsors, it 
sounds like a dream. Then again, it may be much more 
than a dream— it may soon become a reality if Congress 
passes one of thret bills it is considering, each of which 
would deregulate the broadcast industry. 

While all three call for some forms of deregulation, the 
most extreme (and the one receiving the most attention) 
is that sponsored by Lionel van Deerlm (OCal), a former 
newscaster from San Diego. The Van Deerlin bill, if passed, 
would mandate sweeping changes in the broadcast media. 
Most notable among these would be elimination of the 
Fairness Doctrine, Equal Time considerations. Equal 
Employment Opportunity, restrictions on commercial 
advertising, and minimal requirements for news and pub- 
lic affajrs programming. In addition, the Van Deerlin bill 
would remove most ownership restrictions for the broad- 
cast industry. At present, for example, radio license owner- 
ship is limited to one AM and one FM station in any given 
major market area. The only current regulations that 
would remain intact are technical (i.e., no station could 
broadcast beyond its alloted power). 

The Van Deerlin bill is, essentially, a re-write of the Federal Com- 
nnunications Act of 1934. The guidinj; principle of this rewrite 
is that market forces, not the government, should determine the 
nature and quality of media offerings. If a radio station's program- 
ming is offensive to a community or to an ethnic group, then it 
is up to that community or thai group to take action (and not the 
FCC). Presumably that action would have economic consequences, 
since the bill speaks to market forces. Fhe FCC will then cease to 
exist. It will be replaced by a body called the Communications Re- 
gulatory Commission. Having considerably less to regulate, the size 
of this body would be smaller and its budget halved from that of 
the FCC. 

There is a trade-off in this arrangement. It is not one iilh «ould 
be of particular or direct benefit to radio or television audiences, 
although the broadcast industry may have voii believing otherwise. 
Under the Van Deerlin bill, the owners of radio and television li- 
censes would pay the federal government an annual tec for the usi- 
of the airwaves. That (ee would be computed as a set- percentage 
of the licensee's net annual income, and would, ot course, vary 
from station to station. Now, the idea behind the spectrum use 
fee, as this is called, is that the public owns the airwaves and is 

FOLIO PAGE 6 



renting them out to the licensees. The concept, proponents say, 
is analoguous to the government charging lor the use ol public 
lands lor grazing purposes, or the granting ol drilling rights on 
public lands. Both require the user to pay the government a lee. 
But opponents ot the spectrum use fee argue that it constitutes a 
tax on the use o* an enlliy (the airwaves) which the government 
clearly does not own. Also, thev add, unlike oil resources, airwaves 
are not depicted. Therefore, use of the airwaves should nor be 
subiected to a tec. 

In addition, opponents ol deregulation argue that the spectrum use 
fee, far from being a tax or rental fee, would establish the concept 
ot the public airwaves as private property. They point out that the 
bill provides for no license renewal process, and theretore no way 
to challenge the holder ot a broadcast license except through civil 
proceedings. The government's rcgulatoiy role wouHJ be reduced 
to technical monitoring. Radio and television licenses would be 
granted in perpetuity, with no provisions whatsoever for govern- 
ment review or revocation except for technical violations. In other 
words, radio stations (immediately upon passage) would not be 
responsible to any government body nor to the general public for 
programming quality or content. 

The advantages of deregulation for commercial media are fairly 
obvious. But what would be contained in the Van Deerlin bill 
for public radio (and this includes Pacifica stations)? Some of 
the provisions make the bill's potential impact on public radio 
clear, but other provisions leave a number ol questions unan- 
swered. The original Van Deerlin bill, called Rewrite 1, was first 
proposed in the House in 1978. The response to the bill, particu- 
larly to the spectrum use tee, was generally negative. The bill was 
revised and then reintroduced this year as Rewrite II. Rewrite I 
had earmarked the revenues collected as spectrum use Ices lor 
public radio. That, naturally, elicited howls Irom the commercial 
broadcast industry, they would be subsidizini! their competition, 
they cried, and that is not within the bounds of free enterprise. 
So, Rewrite II eliminated that provision. The spectrum use (ee 
is still there, but the funds will go directly to the Treasury, with- 
out being earmarked lor any specific purpose. 

On initial glance, the Van Deerlin bill may not mean much to the 
casual observer. Bui consider this: without minimal requirements 
for news and public affairs pro^jramming. It may be safe to assume 
that some (if not many) radio stations television is different in 
that news is a big draw will drop their news and public allairs 
programming. If one has doubts about this possibility, keep In 
mind that at a recent conierence held in San Francisco, public 
affairs directors repeatedly expressed their dilficullies in convinc- 
ing station managers thai news and public affairs programs have 
significant audiences. Interestingly, thqse same public affairs 
directors were optimistic that their jobs were not in jeopardy. 

The Van Deerlin bill would allov. programming decisions to be 
determined by the free-market forces that currently determine 
the unprofitabliily of public affairs programs. Following this 
line ot thinking, ixing public affairs is not unlikely should de- 
regulation go into effect (again, in some, if not many radio sta- 
tions). 

If commercial radio reduces its contribution to public affairs, 
then the onus will be on public radio to produce this type of 
programming. The idea may not be a bad one, as many indus- 
try people openly admit that the best and most comprehensive 
public affairs programs are produced in public modi.-. But with 
an increased load ot programs to produce, and an abundance of 



unemployed proKrammors to produce them, additional funds 
will be essential. Keep in mind, too, thai public affaiis programs 
are far more labor-intensive than music programs. Bui the Van 
Decrlin bill provides lor little in the way of increased funding 
loi public media. 

Rewrite II, however, docs provide for alternative means ol raising 
funds. TheVan Deerlin bill would allow public media to sell com- 
mercial advertising for the first time. The restrictions on the airing 
of ads for public media would include that advertising time be 
limited to approximaleU one-halt hour a day, and that ads be 
grouped in th'ee separate slots of airtime. This idea undoubtedly 
will appeal to some Pacitica listeners, who indicated in a KPFA 
survey last December that a limited foim ol local commercial 
sponsorship would be acceptable, and perhaps preferable to on- 
air pleas for money. 

And finally, though perhaps most importantly , the Van Deerlin 
bill would allow public media stations to take editorial positions. 
Currently, the FCC cnfoaes a law which prohibits editorial stands 
by public media. That law is under attack. In Los Angeles on May 
1st, the League of Women Voters, ioined by Rep. Henry Waxman 
(D-Los Angeles], the Pacitica Foundation, and four other FM sta- 



tions filed suit against the FCC, charging that the editorial restric- 
tions are unconsitiutional. The FCC was named as delendant be- 
cause it enforces the law. An end to the ban on editorials for 
public media is the best that the Van Deerlin bill has to offer 
stations like KPFA. Given the internal political structure of 
the station, one can conjure up ominous images ol editorial 
debates. But, then, that would certainly be more democratic 
than having our general manager (or any other single person) 
take the stand for us. 

The Van Deerlin bill is in Congress right now, proceeding through 
committee hearings. Most observers agree lh<t the bill will not 
make it through Congress in one piece. The usual additions and 
deletions will be interesting to keep'track of. 

The consensus in the industry is thai the bill will pass in some 
form, probably not in this session, but certainly in the 1980 
session. Lest you think, however, thai deregulation is way off 
in the distance, keep in mind thai the Federal Communications 
Commission does exist, and it still does regulate the broadcast 
media. The FCC is currently considering its own sweeping 
changes that would deregulate radio immediately. Those changes 
may have been announced by the time you read this. 



Highlights 



SPECIAL DAYS FOR KPFK'S 20th BIRTHDAY. 
Welcome!. . . 

". . . we hope to initiate a new spirit of excitement in 
Southern California, a spirit conducive to the creation 
of worlds and words of significance. It is our conviction 
that the other mass media have erred in underestima- 
ting the hunger and capacity of man for a diet based 
upon our great literary and musical traditions, and 
their readiness to hear new and creative ideas. " 

-KPFK Folio, Vol. 1, No. 1 

KPFK's life began with those words, written by the sta- 
tion's first Genera! Manager, Terry Dnnkwater. Has the 
station lived up to that credo? 

Between July 26 and August 4, you may hear the answer 
to that question as well as some of the best programming 
KPFK has produced in its first two decades. Documen- 
taries, interviews, concerts, plays and some things that 
defy categorization will be featured. Starting at 6:00 a.m. 
on Thursday, July 26 and running until 6:00 p.m. on Sa- 
turday, July 28, you will hear without interruption many 
of those programs. 

Then, following the Evening News on the 28th, we'll be 
intermixing the vintage programming with fundraising. 
Even with all the "oldies but goodies," we'll take the 
time to bring some live jazz concerts from Studio Z, as 
well as one of the three Simulcasts with KCFT. A sa- 
lute to the past cannot ignore what's happening in the 
present! 

So, enjoy the special programming and reflect on what 
it means. Take a few minutes to leaf through the pages . 
of listings and mark the ones of special interest to you, 
then listen, and tell your friends and family. 

— Mike Model, producer 



SUMIVIERFEST: Three Simulcasts with KCET 

We are delighted to share with KCET another series of 
presentations in July: They provide the pictures and 
we offer Dolby-encoded, stereo sournd. The whole then 
is more than the sum of its parts, and everybody enjoys 
the result. Program details are limited as we go to press, 
but we know that on Saturday, July 7, 21 , and 28, at 
9:00 p.m. we'll have "Great Jazz Pianos" featuring 
George Shearing, Eubie Blake, Marian McPartland and 
Teddy Wilson; Ashford & Simpson and the Mississippi 
River Festival; and "American Dance Festival" featur- 
ing the Paul Taylor Dancers. Respectively. All three 
programs were recorded live in concert. So don't for- 
get to watch Channel 28, but listen to stereo 90.7 FM! 



THE AFTERNOON AIR 

Afternoon programming on KPFK this month continues 
to evolve into what's known in the trade as "stream pro- 
gramming." The "islands" in the stream include some of 
your regular favorites, only now most are listed as ap- 
pearing within a given hour, but not at a pre-determined 
minute. Why do it this way? Because we're aiming for 
maximum flexibility for the "islands" that erupt spon- 
taneously-those features, often live, where things are 
really cooking, sometimes phone-ins, and where we feel 
it would be wrong to cut it off. With the Afternoon Air 
as "stream program," we can give each feature, each seg- 
ment, the time it takes to really work well. And then, 
over and out. We figure that we'll make some mistakes, 
and we encourage your constant feedback. So bow about 
making it a hatiit to check out the Afternoon Air. 



Anita Frankel, producer 



More Highlights on page 8. 



FOLIO PAGE 7 



Added Attractions for the Afternoon Air: 



4th of July: 



Grace Jacobs will be Speaking of Seniors on Thursdays 
within the 3-4 hour as a summer replacement for vaca- 
tioning Aurelia Morris. 

Social critic, labor historian, author and professor Stanley 
Aronowitz joins us irregularly for commentary, and regu- 
larly once a month for Motel Madness— v\ih\ch happens to 
be the name of a book he's concocting about American 
culture in the 70s. It airs Friday the 13th of July and the 
17th of August, after Media Watch in the 5-6 hour. 

We also expect to be adding a new regular feature on 
health care, Western and alternative, on Mondays twice 
monthly in the 5-6 hour. We're looking for a way to 
present new therapies, and old, with a critical ear and a 
sympathy for people's pocketbooks. 

Cuba in the Afternoon: 

The 26th of July is KPFK's birthday; it is also the 26th 
anniversary of the attack on the Moncada which launched 
the Cuban revolution. It's Cuba's July 4, and several Paci- 
fica people have been to that island nation in the past 
year, including our own Sam Kushner. We'll run Sam's 
impressions of Cuba on Tlie Afternoon Air in July. Tune 
to Coming Attractions at 3:00, or keep an ear out for 
special announcements. 

Cuba in the Evening: 

On Thursday July 12 and 19 at 8:00 p.m., we'll be pre- 
senting A/hs/ci; Cubana—a music documentary in two 
parts on music in Cuba's history. Cuba's aboriginal in- 
habitants were exterminated soon after the Spaniards 
reached the New World. To take their place, slaves were 
imported from Africa. The African slaves brought their 
drums, with their undreamed-of rhythmical richness 
and vitality and mysterious tribal rites, which included 
much singing and dancing. During the course of the cen- 
tury, on Cuba the melting pot, the blending of Spanish 
and African created one of the most extraordmary mu- 
sic cultures in the world. The program is produced by 
Peter Berggren, who currently directs and produces mu- 
sic documentaries for Radio Sweden. 



Aaron Copland, Charles Aniirkhaniari, featured participants 
in the 1978 Cabrillo Festival. Aired all day, |uly 4th. 



THE 1978 CABRILLO MUSIC FESTIVAL 

KPFK will broadcast tapes of this outstanding Festival 
from 9:00 a.m. until midnight on Wednesday, July 4. 
Below are excerpts of an article by Charles Amirkhan- 
ian, KPFA 's Music Director. 

The 1978 Cabrillo Festival was, in many ways, the most 
illustrious ever. Guest conductor and composer, Aaron 
Copland was a charming friend to all with whom he 
spoke. His vigorous conducting of his own music was 
received with standing ovations at several concerts. And 
his witty answers to questioners from the audience at a 
panel discussion recorded by Pacifica were a highlight 
for many concert-goers. 

Festival Music Director Dennis Russell Davies. an out- 
standing pianist as well as conductor, arrived for the 
second weekend after a resounding triumph in Bayreuth. 
With the announcement that the Cabrillo Guild of Mu- 
sic has offered a three-year renewal of his contract, much 
comfort is afforded those of us who follow the Euro-Am- 
erican classical music scene on the West Coast. 

Already, Davies has put forth some exciting and innova- 
tive plans for the 1979 Cabrillo Festival. But it will be 
hard indeed to match his and musicians' achievement in 
1978. Not only were the concerts completely sold out 
for the first time in Festival history (largely due to Davies' 
success in persuading Aaron Copland to participate) but 
the programming Choices, with few exceptions, seemed 
to resonate with a maturity which indicate that Davies 
has found a winning combination of forces among both 
the California musicians who largely make up the fine 
Festival Orchestra and Davies' ever-growing roster of per- 
former colleagues whom he annually brings out West for 
a little California sunshine. 

All the concerts and discussions at the 1978 Cabrillo 
Festival were recorded by KPFA 's Doug Maisel and 
Larry Wood. Once again, KPFA wishes to thank the 
Cabrillo Guild of Music, Radio KUSP, the Festival 
and Cabrillo College Theatre Staff, and the Festival 
composers and performers who have made possible 
these broadcast concerts. Special thanks to the Musi- 
cians Local 346 of Santo Cruz for their continued 
cooperation. And of course, KPFK thanks KPFA for 
making their tapes available to us. 





FOLIO PAGE 8 



As you have seen. 

We are frequently unable to confirm details for the month's screening(s) 
by Folio press deadline. And in a double Folio, the possibility became 
even more remote that information for August would be available in 
June. ... As always, we'll be happy to send you personal notifica- 
tion if you submit a packet of self-addressed regulation Postal 
Service 10c postcards (the only size that will go through the 
mimeo). Then, we can let you know whenever there's a 
surprise bonus feature, too. Remember that reserva- 
tions information is always announced for a week 
before the show, always before the morning 
and evening news, and at other sensible 
intervals. 



jULY/AUGUSn979 
DEAR KPFK PEOPLE 



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KPFK-FEEDBACK 
PO Box 8639 
Universal City CA 91608 



(name & address optional) 

Name 



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Do you wish a written response? 



Address 



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SUNDAY JULY 1 



6;00 GOSPEL CARAVAN 

Hosted by the legendary Prince Dixon. 

9:00 BIO-MEDITATION/ Jack Gariss 

Experiential, experimental explorations of states 
of consciousness, feeling states, body states, and 
the rest of the multi-dimensional universe of you. 

10:00 FRONTIERS OF A NEW AGE/ Judy Walker 

Rosalyn on the first objective evidence of the aura. 

11:00 DOROTHY HEALEY: Marxist commentary 

Dorothy and guests cover the spectrum of social 
change organizing. With open phones. 

12:00 MANY WORLDS OF MUSIC/ Mario Casetta 

1:00 THE SUNDAY OPERA/ Fred Hyatt 

July IS VERDI IVIONTH on the Sunday Opera. 
Today: Verdi's Giovanna d'Arco with Montserrat 
Caballe, soprano; Placido Domingo, tenor; Sherrill 
Milnes, baritone. The London Symphony Orches- 
tra and Ambrosian Opera Chorus are conducted 
by James Levine. Angel 3791. Also, Verdi's 
Requiem, w'nh Leontyne Price,, soprano; Rosa- 
lind Elias, mezzo-soprano; Jussi Bjoerling, tenor; 
Giorgio Tozzi, bass. Fritz Reiner conducts the 
Vienna Philharmonic and Chorus of the Society 
of the Friends of Music, Vienna. RCA LD 6091. 

5:00 THE SOUR APPLE TREE/ Clare Spark 

Form, ideology and consciousness. Critical analy- 
sis of current cultural history. Guests, phones, 
recent scholarship. Entertaining. 

6:00 THE SUNDAY NEWS 

6:30 THE SCIENCE CONNECTION 

Scientists Steve and Vera Kilston explore the ad- 
venture of humans trying to understand nature. 
Call in if you have questions. Or answers. 

7:00 PREACHIN' THE BLUES/ Mary Aldin 

Blues, Black gospel and boogie woogie, spanning 
60 years of recorded music. Tonight begins a new 
format: within each program, a half hour segment 
devoted to the work of one particular bluesman. 
This evening's focus is on Texas bluesman 
Lightnin' Hopkins. 

8:30 LESBIAN SISTERS/ Helene Rosenbluth 

Information, guests and cultural expression of 
and for LA's Lesbian community. 

9:30 FOLKSCENE/The Larmans 

Traditional and contemporary American folk 
music, and music from the British Isles, France, 
Australia, New Zealand and Canada. Featuring 



live music, interviews with the performers, and 
the finest in recorded music. 

12:00 SMOKE RINGS/ John Breckow 

As the smoke rings clear. . . join John and guests, 
noted jazz musicians, writers, archivists, and re- 
cord producers for conversation and music. 



1 



MONDAY JULY 2 



6:00 SUNRISE CONCERT/ Carl Stone 

9:00 THIS MORNING 

A gathering of morning news, commentary, articles 
from various print media, and Terry Model's Calender. 

10:00 FOLKDANCE WITH MARIO! 

11:00 THE MORNING READING 

Bedhovt'ii: His Spiritual Development, Book 2, 
Chapter 9 "The Late Quartets" part 4. We can 
well believe that no man ever saw the face of the 
transfigured Beethoven. But we believe that this 
man had suffered so greatly that the Beethoven 
men saw was the normal Beethoven of those days, 
poor, ill, stone-deaf, wretchedly housed, utterly 
alone, betrayed and abandoned by the one human 
being whose love he so desperately and pitifully 
craved. And from the depths of this man rose that 
solemn, pure and profound song of thanksgiving 
to the Godhead. By J.W.N. Sullivan. Read by 
Dudley Knight. Produced by Roy E. Tuckman. 

11:30 KULCHUR: In the Wings/ John Medici 

12:00 NOON CONCERT: 

Music of the Americas/ John Schneider 
VARESE: Ameriques: KOUSSEVITSKY: Double 
Bass Concerto (1902); PISTON; Concertino ('76); 
VILLA-LOBOS: Bachianas Brasilieras No. 3. 

2:00 ECLECTICA 

Tu inaugurate the first week of fuiectica, we pre- 
sent this week a 4-hour documentary: Upton Sin- 
clair: The Reverent Radical. Today, part 1 about 
childhood memories, early and late experiences 
with alcoholism, early reading and homelife, col- 
lege, beginning of socialism, social morality, sexu- 
ality, religion and general foundations of his char- 
acter. Produced by Roy E. Tuckman. The other 
3 parts will be broadcast this week on Eclectica. 

THE AFTERNOON AIR 

An audio journey on the drive-time airstream, 
with regular features and irregular surprises. Your 
host is Anita Frankel; your co-host and technical 
producer is Linda Mack. 

3:00 AIRING IN THIS HOUR: 

Coming Attractions: A billboard of today's air 
fare. . . News Highlights with Richard Mahler. . . 
Your Angle on the News: phone in and tell us 
how you'd cover today's top stories. . . ja/z Close- 
Up with Rick James. Today's focus is on pianist 
Monty Alexander. . . Organic Gardening with Will 
Kinney and Barbara Spark, at about 3:30. 

4:30 AIRING IN THIS HOUR: 

Dealing: Barbara Cady's fair exchanges with peo- 
ple who write books. . . Open Air: A non-scheduled 
departure m the Afternoon Air. 

5:00 AIRING IN THIS HOUR: 

Body Politics: Separating the wise from the foolish 



FOLIO PAOE 10 lULY 



,.>«.^-i'-4*.-iTr 



i^*M»' -i^^ntMti-- 



on the contemporary healing scene. Conversations 
with both holistic and Western medicine men and 
women. . . Open Air: Likely to be another edition 
of our Onergy Alert, broadened to include other 
fronts in the battle for a liveable future, . . The 
Events Calendar with Terry Model, at 5:50. 

6:00 THE EVENING NEWS 

6:45 COMMENTARY/ Charles Morgan 

7:00 LABOR SCENE/ Sam Kushner 

News, guests and features on organized labor. 

7:30 REPORT TO THE LISTENER/ Jim Berland 

8:00 LA VIDA LATINA 

News, features, guests and music from the Latino 
community. David Sandoval and Luis Torres host. 

9:00 CHAPEL, COURT AND COUNTRYSIDE 

Joseph Spencer hosts this weekly series of Early 
Music, exploring the music of the European heri- 
tage from the early Middle Ages up to the days of 
Mozart and Beethoven. Rebroadcasts of previous 
programs air Thursdays on Noon Concert. 

10:30 IN FIDELITY/ Peter Sutheim 

Making the most of your audio equipment is the 
subject of KPFK's Operations Director, with oc- 
casional guests and often open phones. 

12:00 SOMETHING'S HAPPENING!/ Roy of Hollywood 

We continue with Alan Watts speaking on "Indi - 
vidual and the World" part 3 (44'). Then Dudley 
Knight will pay a surprise visit and read a horror 
or sf story on "Graveyard Shift" (ca 1 hr.). We then 
inaugurate again our Monday open liight, tonight 
featuring amateur night when Roy of H. will play 
his drawerful of cassettes and tapes sent in over the 
past months. 



L 



TUESDAY JULY 3 



6:00 SUNRISE CONCERT/ Carl Stone 

9:00 THIS MORNING: News, calendar, features 

10:00 FOLKSCENE/The Larmans 

Today: folk music of the British Isles. 

11:00 THE MORNING READING 

Beethoven: His Spiritual Development, Book 2, 
Chapter 10 "The Final Stage" (part 1). Beethoven's 
late music communicates experiences that very few 
people can normally possess. But we value these ex- 
periences because we feel they are not freakish. 
They correspond to a spiritual synthesis which 
the race has not achieved hut which, we may sup- 
pose, it is on the way to achieving. By J.W.N. Sul- 
livan. Read by Dudley Knight. Produced by Roy. 

11:30 KULCHUR: Backstage/ Gil Laurence 

12:00 NOON CONCERT: 

At the Keyboard / Leonid Hambro 

How's That Again? Leonid Hambro presents one 
of his special features: different artists playing 
the same works. Rubinstein, Gutierrez, Richter, 
Graffman, Bachhaus, Horowitz, and of course 
(live) Hambio play Intermezzi of Brahms, and 
the 2nd movement of Tchaikovsky's Concerto 
No. I. This program was originally broadcast 
live December 6, 1977. 



MidBt^UMd^^^ 



2:00 ECLECTICA 

We continue "Upton Sinclair, The Reverent Ra- 
dical" with the 2nd of this 4-hour documentary, 
dealing with sexuality and morality and its effect 
on his art education and mentality; poverty and 
wealth, early literature nad spiritual experience, 
research on "The Jungle" and readings from that 
work, its effects, labor unions and gangsterism, 
and some principles of Industrial Democracy. 
Produced by Roy E. Tuckman. 

THE AFTERNOON AIR 

Drive-time radio with Anita Frankel and Linda 
Mack. 

3:00 WITHIN THE HOUR: 

Coming Attractions: Details of this afternoon's 
excursion. . . News Highlights with Richard Mah- 
ler. . .Your Angle on the News: Got any leads? 
. . . jazz Close-Up with Rick James: focus today 
is on pianist Monty Alexander. . .Strawberry 
Shortbread: Pat Benson takes apart the public 
schools. 

4:00 WITHIN THE HOUR: 

Open Air: Flying objects, unidentified (at Folio 
press time). . . Dealing: Barbara Cady, letting 
authors put their cards on the table. 

5:00 WITHIN THE HOUR: 

LA 5 PM: Burt Wilson, washing the System's 
dirty laundry, with a little help from his friends 
. . . Events Calendar with Terry Model at 5:50. 

6:00 THE EVENING NEWS 

6:45 TAKING SIDES 

Topical debates between spokesworthy people. 

7:30 OPEN JOURNAL: Late breaking features 

8:00 CARLOS HAGEN PRESENTS 

American Music and the Depression Years. 
Despite the hardships and "craziness" of the per- 
iod centered around the Great Depression, Ameri- 
can composers produced some remarkable musical 
experiments in those years. Well illustrated with 
many recordings of the period. 

9:00 BOSTON SYMPHONY: Live in Concert 

MAYDIM: Symphony No. 64 in A major; MOZART: 
Bassoon Concerto in B flat major, K. 1 91 ; PROKG- 
FIEV: Symphony No. 5 in B flat major. Soloist is 
Sherman Walt. Joseph Silverstein conducts. William 
Pierec hosts. Recorded using the Dolby A Noise- 
reduction system (program subject to change). 

1 1 :00 THE BIG BROADCAST/ Bobb Lynes 

Yours Truly, Johnny Dollar, a 5-part CBS serial, 
1950s. Part 1 ; "The Curse of Kamershek."5(7/r7 
Spade (CBS, 1940s). 

12:00 SOMETHING'S HAPPENING/ Roy of Hollywood 

We continue with "Beethoven: Mis Spiritual Devel- 
opment" by J.W.N, Sullivan, read by Dudley Knight 
parts 6 and 7 on "The Morality of Power." Then a 
special request, "The Blood Jet is Poetry, the Life 
and Work of Sylvia Plath" (2 hrs.). We inaugurate 
our special "X Minus Oneathon" tonight present- 
ing "Universe" (1955), "Two by Bradbury" (Nov. 
23, 1955) and "No Contact" (4/24/55). Some re- 
peats, some new on this show. This continues week- 
ly for 2-3 months. At 5:00, Jack Gariss with "Bio- 
Meditation." 



FOLIO PAGE 11 -JULY 




WEDNESDAY JULY 4 



6:00 SUNRISE CONCERT/ Carl Stone 



8:00 THE CABRILLO MUSIC FESTIVAL OF 1978 

From now until midnight tonight, we'll be airing 
almost the entire program of this important mu- 
sical event, recorded for Pacifica by Doug Maisel 
and Larry Wood of KPFA. The narration is from 
Charles Amirkhanian and Steve Wolfe. 

We must apologize for listing the concerts with 
no times -we were provided with none. If there 
is a specific concert or discussion that interests 
you, check with the Music Department in advance 
of the day to see if they can give you a rough es- 
timate. 

An overview of the Festival appears in the High- 
lights section, in an article by Charles Amirkhanian, 
KPFK's Sound Sensitivity Information Director. 

CONTEMPORARY CHAMBER MUSIC 

Friday, August 25, 1978. David Keckley: The 
Funky Chicken (1978); Alan Dorsey: Walter 
Blue (75); Aaron Copland: Two Pieces for String 
Quartet (1923-28); Kenneth Benshoof: Traveling 
Music (74); Arnold Schoenberg: Quartet No. 4 
for Strings, Op. 57 ('36). 

ORCHESTRA CONCERT 8/25/78 

Conductor: William McGlaughlin In his West 
Coast debut, and soloist James Tocco on piano 
in his West Coast debut. Narrators: Lou Harrison 
and William Colvig. Aaron Copland: Short Sym- 
phony; Lou Harrison: Marriage at the Eiffel To- 
wer; Johannes Brahms: Concerto No. 2 in B flat 
Major for Piano, Op. 83. 

AN EVENING OF NEW MUSIC ZllGm 

William McGlaughlin, conductor; soloists: Kronos 
String Quartet, Ron Erickson, violin; Ed Harkins, 
trumpet; Charles Amirkhanian, drums; Nathan 
Schwartz, piano; Barbara Beisch, accordion; the 
Cabrillo Festival Orchestra, Charles Amirkhanian, 
coordinator. John Adams, world premiere: Wave- 
maf!cr for Amplified Quartet ('78); Ivan Wyschne- 
gradsky, world premiere: Composition for String 
Quartet in Quarter-tones, Op. 43 ('60); Percy 
Grainger, world premiere: Free Music No. I for 
4 Theremins or Strings (1935; transcribed by Alan 
Stout); Molly on the Shore for String Quartet ; 
Ezra Pound: Fiddle Music: Suite I, 6th Movement 
for Violin Solo ('24); and, west coast premiere: 
Ghuidonis Sonata for Violin Solo ('31); George 
Antheil: Sonata No. 2 for Piano and Drums ('23); 
John Mizelle, world premiere: Polytcmporality 
for Trumpet and Tape ('78); Ernst Krenek: Von 
Vorn Herein. Op. 219 ('74); and, world premiere: 
Acco-Music, Op. 225 ('76); Chopin: Impromptu 
in F sharp Major, Op. 36, No. 2; Arne Nordheim: 
Dinosaurus for Accordion and Tape ('70). 



NEW AMERICAN MUSIC FOR GAMELAN SmilZ 

Soloists: An American Gamelan; The Berkeley Ga- 
melan; S.J.S.U. Gamelan Degung; Other Music. 
Coordinator: Lou Harrison. David B. Doty: Mu- 
sic with Four Tones; Daniel Schmidt/Lou Harrison: 
Fanfare to Lancaran Daniel ('76); Daniel Schmidt: 
//; My Arms. . . Many Flowers ('78); D.B.Doty: 
Recombinant Gamelan Music ; Pamela Sawyer: 
Main Bersama-Sama I (William George, french 
horn; Lou Harrison, Balinese flute); and Molak 
Malik ('78); Nancy Karp: Music for a Small Ga- 
melan ('78); D.B.Doty: Song of the Apostate: 
Lou Harrison: Serenade; Kathy Sheehy: Green 
Hungarian; Stephen DeWitt: A Treewithlightsin It: 
Henry S. Rosenthal: 'Now' 'You' 'Hear' '//,•' Dale 
S. Soules: Blue; Barbara Bent: Well -Rounded Fan- 
fare (-77). 

ORCHESTRA CONCERT 8/27/78 

Aaron Copland, conductor. Soloists: Leslie Guinn, 
baritone; Donald O'Brien, clarinet. Copland: 
Statements for Orchestra; Concerto for Clarinet 
and Orchestra; Dance Panels; Old American Songs. 

INTERLUDE CONCERT 8/31/78 

Guest composer-in-residence/conductor: Aaron 
Copland. Soloists: Leslie Guinn, baritone; Romu- 
ald Tecco, violin; Roy Malan, violin; Kenneth Har- 
rison, viola; Susan Winterbottom, viola; Loren 
Brown, cello; Judiyaba, cello; Emily Wong, piano. 
Brahms: Sextet in G, Op. 36: Stephen Foster: Six 
Songs; Copland: Appalachian Spring (original ver- 
sion for 13 players). 

FREE OUTDOOR CONCERT 9/2/78 

Kenneth Harrison, conductor. Soloists: The Ca- 
brillo Percussion Trillo (Ric Kvistad, David Ro- 
senthal, Gary Kvistad). Copland: Fanfare for the 
Common Man; Carl Ruggles: Angels: Henry Brant: 
Signs and Alarms: David Rosenthal: Perpetual Mo- 
tion (just-intoned Marimba); Ric Kvistad: Trio 
for Percussion; Larry London: Santa Cruz Skies; 
Russell Peck: Lift-Off. 

CHAMBER MUSIC CONCERT 9/2/78 

An Evening of Copland and Brahms. Soloists: 
Leslie Guinn, baritone; Romuald Tecco, violin; 
Kenneth Harrison, viola; Loren Brown, cello; 
Frederick Bergstone, french horn; Dennis Russell 
Davies, piano. Copland: Sonata for Violin and 
piano; Quartet for Piano and Strings; Brahms: 
Zigeunerlieder, Op. 103: Op. 112/3-6: Trio in E 
flat Major for Horn, Violin, Piano, Op. 40. 

EVENING CONCERT 9/3/78 

Dennis Russell Davies, conductor. With the Mas- 
terworks Chorale of the College of San Mateo, 
Galen Marshall, Director. Soloists: L-uana de Vol, 
soprano; Daniel Parkerson, tenor; Leslie Guinn, 
baritone. Franz Josef Haydn: The Creation. 

PANEL DISCUSSION: Aaron Copland & Friends 
8/30/78. Charles Amirkhanian chairs an inter- 
change between members of the Cabrillo Festival 
audience and three 1978 Gestiva! guest compo- 
sers: Aaron Copland, Lou Harrison and Francis 
Thome. 



FOLIO PAGE I2-IULY 



12:00 SOMETHING'S HAPPENING/ Roy of Hollywood 

We celebrate July 4th by presenting parts 19 & 20 
of "Last and First Men" by Olaf Stapleton, read 
by Baird Searles (30' each), and beginning a 12- 
part series on science for the non-scientist, "The 
Next Billion Years." Part 1, "Our Future in a Cos- 
mic Perspective" with Margaret Mead, anthropolo- 
gist (53'). Then we re-rebroadcast Earplay's "The 
Argive Soliloquies" by John Reeves in 6 parts, re- 
lating the Agamemmnon family story from Ancient 
Greece to our time. Then from Radio Canada Inter- 
national, "Great Balls of Fire," on UFO-phenomena 
part 3 on psychological aspects and part 4, "Is 
Someone Out There?" (30' each, we don't have 
parts 1 & 2). We then continue Krishnamurti 
goes to College, with a series of 4 talks from Berk- 
eley, 1969. At 4;25, talk 1 from 2/3/69 (93'). 



THURSDAY JULY 5 



6:00 SUNRISE COIMCERT/ Carl Stone 

9:00 THIS MORNING: News, features, calendar 

10:00 FOLKSCENE/The Larmans 

Bluegrass, original music, and some fine picking 
and singing from Eddie Adcock and Martha. 

11:00 THE MORNING READING 

The final episode of J.W.N. Sullivan's Beethoven: 
His Spiritual Development. Book 2, Chapter 10 
"The Final Stage" (part 2). But we know, from 
the rest of his music, that Beethoven was a man 
who experienced all that we can experience, who 
suffered all that we can suffer. If, in the end, he 
seems to reach a state 'above the battle' we also 
know that no man ever knew more bitterly what 
the battle is. Read by Dudley Knight. Produced 
by Roy E. Tuckman. 

11:30 KULCHUR 

The Cultural Affairs Department keeps this slot 
open for special interviews and events of interest. 

12:00 NOON CONCERT: Chapel, Court & Countryside 

Rebroadcasts of previous editions of Joseph Spen- 
cer's Early Music program. 

2:00 ECLECTICA 

Today, the third of our 4-hour documentary, 
"Upton Sinclair: The Reverent Radical." In this 
portion we hear of his early experiences with so- 
cialism, meeting with Henry Ford and King C. 
Gillette, how Sinclair helped unionize Ford Motoir 
Co., the San Pedro strike, Sinclair's arrest and ov- 
erthrow of the LA Police Chief, remarks on humor, 
psychic research, relations with Albert Einstein, 
boom and bust cycles, and background to the 
1934 EPIC Campaign. Produced by Roy Tuckman. 

THE AFTERNOON AIR 

KPFK's audio magazine. Anita Frankel hosting; 
Linda Mack on vibes. 

3:00 Within the hour: 

Coming Attractions: Who's on first. . . News High- 
lights with Richard Mahler. . . Your Angle on the 
News: Phone us. . . Speaking of Seniors: Grace 
Jacobs fill in for Aurelia Morris and Grey Power 
. . . The Health Department: Al Huebner takes 
the health and drug industry apart, deftly. 



4:00 Within the hour: 

Open Air: unforcastable weather. . . Dealing: 
authors and others play poker with Barbara Cady 
. . . more Open Air. 

5:00 Within the hour: 

LA 5 PM with Burt Wilson. . . and the Events 
Calendar with Terry Hodel at 5:50. 

6:00 THE EVENING NEWS 

6:45 COMMENTARY 

7:00 INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL 

7:30 OPEN JOURNAL: Late breaking features 

8:00 THE GREAT AMERICAN HOAX 

No industry has more influence over determining 
tastes and buying patterns of the American public 
than the advertising industry. As a result, the in- 
dustry has often been referred to by its critics as 
specialists in deception, manipulation, and fraud. 
A multi-billion dollar business, its prime concern 
remains the sale and marketing of every conceiv- 
able kind of consumer product. Thousands of ad 
agencies, national and local ad "councils," and 
public relations firms have been created to build 
product markets. Producer Earl Ofari examines the 
growth and operations of these agencies, the me- 
thods of advertisers and their effects on the pu- 
blic, and the controversy over the role of adver- 
tising in American society. 

9:00 CLEVELAND ORCHESTRA: Live in Concert 

MAHLER; Symphony No. 3, with Maureen For- 
rester, contralto, and the Cleveland Orchestra 
Women's and Children's Choruses. Lorin Maazel 
conducts. Robert Conrad hosts, (subj. to change) 

11:00 JANUS COMPANY RADIO THEATRE 

A seedy fun zone and its House of Glass is the 
setting for Jan and Mallory Geller's original radio 
play Laffing Looie, featuring Jan Rabson, Mike 
Hodel, Mallory and Jan. LIVE! 

11:30 BEETHOVEN: Portrait of his Life 

Part 9; "Dubious Noble Patronage and Chaos 
of War." Tapes courtesy of Deutsche Welle. 

12:00 SOMETHING'S HAPPENING/ Roy of Hollywood 

Live guest psychic Athala for phone readings and 
possibly some psychometric readings of the KPFK 
staff if we can collect enough stuff (the secret 
word is "kitty"). Open night until 5 when we be- 
gin a series of talks by author Joseph Campbell 
on "The Function of Mythology in Cultures." 
(1971 ). Tonight, two 30' talks on the general dis- 
cussion of mythology. 



FRIDAY JULY 6 



6:00 SUNRISE CONCERT/ Carl Stone 

9:00 THIS MORNING: News, features, calendar 

10:00 INDEPENDENT MUSIC/ Mario Casetta 

Mario showcases the music produced on the little 
labels. Sort of equal time for the underdogs. 

11:00 THE MORNING READING 

11:30 KULCHUR 

The regular weekly wrap-up of the arts with Paul 
Vangelisti, Dean Cohen and Bill Hunt. 



FOLIO PAGE 13-JULY 



12:00 NOON CONCERT: 

Soundboard/ John Schneider 

Music for Guitar and Strings ■featuring Giuliani's 
Concerto Op. 30, Paganini's5o/7c;/c/s' for violin 
and guitar; Lucky 's Duo Concertante (1970) for 
cello and guitar; Boccherini's Quintet, Music by 
de Falla, and the broadcast premiere of a piece 
for electric guitar and string quartet by LA com- 
poser Jim Helms. 

2:00 ECLECTICA 

Last of the 4-hour docutrentary "Upton Sinclair: 
The Reverent Radical" with anecdotes on the 
1934 EPIC Campaign for California governor, 
nature of the LA Times and media opposition, 
communist opposition, loss of election, effect of 
the campaign on California politics, "What God 
Means to Me," Sinclair's personal economic life, 
and statements on poverty, birth control and his 
life accomplishments. Produced by Roy E. Tuck- 
man. 

THE AFTERNOON AIR 

Host is Anita Frankel; co-host and technical pro- 
ducer is Linda Mack. 

3:00 Within the hour: 

Coming Attractions. . . News Highlights with 
Richard Mahler. . . Your Angle on the News. . . 
jazz Close-Up with Rick James: focusing on 
pianist Monty Alexander. . . Open Air. 

4:00 Within the hour: 

Open Air, . . Dealing with Barbara Cady & guests. 

5:00 Within the hour: 

Media Watch: Claudia Fonda-Bonardi & guests. . . 
Open Air. . . Events Calendar with Terry Hodel 
at 5:50. 

6:00 THE EVENING NEWS 

6:45 NEWSLINE: Open phones 

7:00 INSIDE LA / Bob Pugsley 

Interviews and discussion on a broad range of 
contemporary issues— from the environment to 
literary criticism— and focuses on their impact 
in the Los Angeles Metropolitan Area. 

7:30 CHILD'S PLAY 

Ruth Buell offers stories for kids of all ages. 

8:00 MINGUS: A Live Concert 

A live concert series dedicated to the memory of 
Charles Mingus, his music, his humor, his philo- 
sophy. Joining host Bob Frazier will be bassist 
Red Callender, friend and instructor of the late 
genius. This will be the first of six live, free 
concerts produced by Bob, and broadcast live 
from KPFK's Studio Z. You can be a part of 
our audience by calling for reservations between 
9:30 and 5 p.m. at 213/877-271 1 . Technical as- 
sistance by Ed Hammond and David Rubin. 

10:00 HOUR 25: Science Fiction 

Mike Hodel, John Henry Thong & Terry Hodel 

11:30 FUTUREWATCH/ Linda Strewn 

Monitoring the cutting edge, where religion and 
science are forming our future. 

12:00 GOODBYE PORKPIE HAT/ Paul Vangelisti 
Jazz live and recorded. 



2:00 NOCTURNAL TRANSMISSIONS 

Radio Free Anarchy. . . a circus of sounds for the 
creatures of the night. "Turn off your mind, relax 
and float downstream." And bring your head 
phones. Ed Hammond and David Rubin host. 



SATURDAY JULY 7 



6:00 NO STRINGS ATTACHED/ Scott Bodell 

Wake-up music from acoustic instruments. 

7:30 FUSION/ Lauren Lee 

Fusion and progressive jazz. 

8:30 THE NIXON TAPES/ Tom Nixon 

Musical potpourri, with a unifying theme. 

9:30 HALFWAY DOWN THE STAIRS 

Uncle Ruthie (Buell) perseveres in her lifelong 
attempt to prove that there is no such entity 
as a "child" (or no such person as an "adult!). 

10:30 FOLK MUSIC/ John Davis 

Good old and good new folk favorites, with a 
list of what folkies are doing around town. 

12:30 THE CAR SHOW/ Len Frank, John Retsek 

Answers about what makes your pinto pant, 
your dyna flow and your suba rue. . . 

1:50 WEEKEND CALENDAR/ Terry Hodel 

2:00 BALLADS, BANJOS & BLUEGRASS 

Live & recorded, with Tom Sauber. 

3:30 SONG & CELEBRATION/ Dan Wright 

5:00 OUT LOUD!/ Frank Greenwood 

The first and third Saturdays, information and 
opinion focusing on the Black community. 

6:00 THE SATURDAY NEWS/ Larry Moss 

6:30 DOUBLE TAKE/ Paul Lion 

Paul reviews selected play; representatives of the 
play respond. Tonight: Premiere of logo, by C. 
Bernard Jackson (Inner City Cultural Center). 
Revisionist view of Othello and lago, both Moors, 
seen through lago's wife's eyes. Based on differ- 
ing Shakespearean and original Italian stories. 
Guest: C. Bernard Jackson, playwright-director. 

6:45 ON FILM/ Dean Cohen 

7:00 THE PERFECT CRIME/ Mike Hodel 

Someone left a fingerprint on the frequency 
modulation, so you could catch this program. 

8:00 THE WILLIAM MALLOCH PROGRAMME 

A musical (mostly classical) treasure hunt con- 
ducted by the copnposer, critic and former music 
director of KPFK. 

9:00 SUMMERFEST: KCET Simulcast 

Tune to Channel 28 and listen to the Dolby-en- 
coded audio on KPFK as we cooperatively pre- 
sent "Great Jazz Pianos," recorded live at Wolf 
Trap. George Shearing, Eubie Blake, Marian Mc- 
Partland, Teddy Wilson are featured. 

12:00 TESSERACT/ Phil Mendelson 

Contemporary and electronic music. 

2:00 OBLIQUE COLLAGE/ Maurice Walker 



FOLIO PAGE 14-)ULY 



SUNDAY JULY 8 



6:00 GOSPEL CARAVAN/ Prince Dixon 
9:00 BIO-MEDITATIOIM/Jack Gariss 

10:00 FRONTIERS OF A NEW AGE/ Judy Walker 

Judy's guest is Dr. David Bresslor, head of the 
Pain Control Unit at UCLA. 

11:00 DOROTHY HEALEY: Marxist commentary 

12:00 MANY WORLDS OF MUSIC/ Mario Casetta 

1:00 THE SUNDAY OPERA-VERDI/ Fred Hyatt 

VERDI: Rigolctto with Jan Peerce, tenor; Leo- 
nard Warren, baritone; Italo Tajo, bass; Erna 
Berger, soprano; Nan Merriman, mezzo-soprano. 
The Robert Shaw Chorale and RCA Victor Or- 
chestra are conducted by Renato Cellini. RCA 
LM(X) 6101. 

5:00 THE SOUR APPLE TREE/ Clare Spark 

6:00 THE SUNDAY NEWS 

6:30 THE SCIENCE CONNECTION/ S. & V. Kilston 

7:00 PREACHIN' THE BLUES/ Mary Aldin 

Blues, Black gospel and boogie woogie; tonight 
the spotlight is on John Lee Hooker. 

8:30 IMRU/ The Gay Radio Collective 

Lively discussions with gay newsmakers and per- 
sonalities; music and poetry by gay artists; special 
features; open phones for listener participation; 
also, the regular IMRU news report of events in 
or affecting the gay community, and calendar. 

9:30 FOLKSCENE/The Larmans 

Live and recorded traditional and contemporary 
folk music, and interviews with the performers. 

12:00 SMOKE RINGS/ John Breckow 



MONDAY JULY 9 



6:00 SUNRISE CONCERT/ Carl Stone 

9:00 THIS MORNING: News, features, calendar 

10:00 FOLKDANCE WITH MARIO! 

11:00 THE MORNING READING 

The Autobiography of AHiC B. Toklas, by 
Gertrude Stein. Read by Margaret Fowlei. 
"Gertrude Stein blew the American trumpet as 
though it were the whole of Sousa's band, and 
she always spoke European brokenly, she was 
perhaps the last of our serious writers to, in the 
square sense, love her country." — Professor 
William H. Gass, in his intro to her "Geographical 
History of America." The reading will continue 
through the month of July and into August. The 
very first chapter is special: we have unearthed 
the taped voice of Alice B. herself, and although 
it is but a short two pages, we offer tfiem here as 
a bit of a flourish to begin this reading. 

11:30 KULCHUR 

News, views and interviews as they appear on 
the cultural horizon. 




Statue of Gertrude Stein by jo Davidson, 1920. This month's 
Morning Reading is her "Autobiography of Alice B. Toklas, at 
11:00 a.m. Monday through Friday. Read by Margaret Fowler. 

12:00 NOON CONCERT: 

Music of the Americas/ John Schneider 

VILLA-LOBOS: Momoprecoce (1920), Cello 
Concerto No. 2 (('54); HARRIS: Folk-Song 
Symphony ('40). 

2:00 ECLECTICA 

Today we tune in on the ongoing series of talks 
by Alan Watts from MEA, Box 303, Sausalito CA 
94965. Today: "The Individual and the World." 
There is in man's relation to the universe and hu- 
man ecology a problem which may be solved only 
by radical change in man's sensation of his own 
existence. Then a 5-minute talk from Lucis Trust 
(866 United Nations Plaza, New York 10017) 
from a series "Ponder on This," entitled "Energy 
Follows Thought." 

THE AFTERNOON AIR 

An audio journey on the drive-time airstream. 
Your host is Anita Frankel; co-host and technical 
producer is Linda Mack. 

3:00 AIRING IN THIS HOUR: 

Coming Attractions: today's itinerary. . .News 
Highlights with Richard Mahler. . . Your Angle 
on the News: your contribution to the top stories 
of the day. . . Ja^z Close-Up with Rick James: to- 
day focusing on trumpeter and flugelhornist Art 
Farmer. . . Organic Gardening with Will Kinney 
and Barbara Spark at about 3:30. 

4:30 AIRING THIS HOUR: 

Dealing: Reading between the lines, with Barbara 
Cady and guests. . . Open Air: Whatever the San- 
tanas blow in. 

5:00 AIRING IN THIS HOUR: 

Consumer Awareness w\\h Ida Honorof: today, 
An Update on Toxaphene. Animals continue to 
die after Toxaphene spraying; the meat still gets 
to your table, says Ida. . . Open Air: Fresh, hot 
or sultry. . . Calendar with Terry Model at 5:50. 



J 



FOLIO PAGE 15-)ULY 



6:00 THE EVENING NEWS 

6:45 COMMENTARY/ Charles Morgan 

7:00 LABOR SCENE/ Sam Kushner 

7:30 REPORT TO THE LISTENER/ Jim Berland 

8:00 LA VIDA LATINA/ Sandoval & Torres 

9:00 CHAPEL, COURT AND COUNTRYSIDE 

KPFK's Showcase of Early Music, conceived, 
produced and hosted by Joseph Spencer. 

10:30 IN FIDELITY/ Peter Sutheim 

12:00 SOMETHING'S HAPPENING!/Roy of Hollywood 

Alan Watts ends his series of talks on "Individual 
and the World" from MEA, (Box 303, Sausalito 
94965) ( 53'). Then Dudley Knight will imitate 
Bill Hunt trying his had at a "Graveyard Shift." 
Open night follows with the end of our amateur 
night cassettes and whatever else good comes up. 



TUESDAY JULY 10 



6:00 SUNRISE CONCERT/ Carl Stone 

9:00 THIS MORNING: News, features, calendar 

10:00 FOLKSCENE/ The Larmans 

The Music of Woody Guthrie in honor of the 
celebration of his birth on July 14, 1912. 

11:00 THE MORNING READING 

Gertrude Stein's classic, the Autobiography of 
Alice B. Toklas, read by Margaret Fowler. 

11:30 KULCHUR 

Judith Weiner interviews film people. 

12:00 NOON CONCERT: 

At the Keyboard/ Leonid Hambro 

Keys and their Implications. As musical examples, 
Lee played live from KPFK's studios; BACH: Chro- 
matic Fantasy and Fugue; SCHUBERT: Impromp- 
tu, Op. 90, No. I; CHOPIN : Manirka in B minor. 
Op. 24 No. 1; Etude in E major. Op. W. No. 3; 
Barcarolle, Op. 60; SCRIABIN: Etudes, Op. 2 No. 
1; Op. 8 No. 12; Op. 1 7 No. 13; LISZT: Sonetto 
No. 104 del Petrarca. Lorna Little, pianist and 
Dane Little, cellist perform. SHOSTAKOVITCH: 
Sonata in D minor Op. 40. Original broadcast was 
January 15, 1979. 

2:00 ECLECTICA 

We begin a Spart series on the History of Astro- 
nomy with Dr. James S. Pickering, Astronomer 
Emeritus of the American Museum, Hayden Pla- 
netarium in New York. Today, Pickering tells the 
story of the ancient astronomers from Thales the 
Greek who lived in 800 BC and traces the achieve- 
ments to Ptolemy and his theory that the earth 
was stationary and at the center of the universe. 
Plato, Aristotle, Pythagoras and Hippacus are also 
discussed (parts 2-6 will be aired weekly at this 
time). Then the Eclectica Soap Opera Co. ("Some- 
thing's Happening Players") presents Bertha and. . . 
Wendall, a bi-weekly soap opera. Tod^y, "Ignor- 
ance is Bliss," Bertha and her new husband plan 
their first evening together. This is produced by 
David L. Krebs. 



THE AFTERNOON AIR ^ 

Drive time radio with Anita Frankel and Linda 

Mack. 

3:00 WITHIN THE HOUR: 

Coming Attractions. . . News Highlights. . . Your 
Angle on the News. . . la/i Closc-Up with Rick 
James: today, trumpeter-flugelhornist Art Framer 
. . . Strawberrry Shortbread: Pat Benson on public 
schools. 

4:00 WITHIN THE HOUR: 

Open Air: Flying Objects, Unidentified. . . Deal- 
ing with Barbara Cady. 

5:00 WITHIN THE HOUR: 

LA 5 PM with Burt Wilson and guests on topics 
happening here and now. . . Terry Hodel's Calendar 
at 5:50. 

6:00 THE EVENING NEWS 

6:45 TAKING SIDES: Debate 

7:30 OPEN JOURNAL: Late breaking features 

8:00 CARLOS HAGEN PRESENTS 

Memories and Sounds of the Vietnam War. This 

conflict, after a decade, is now generating re- 
newed interest and controversy. For the next 3 
weeks, Carlos brings a vivid picture in sound of 
that conflict. These three programs are based on 
a candid conversation with a young Army officer 
who served in Vietnam between 1967—70. John 
Bartos, just after his return, talks frankly about 
his personal experiences. Included are pertinent 
readings, excerpts from official Army recordings 
and samples of the most popular songs among 
American troops. The result is a powerful and 
vividly painful recreation of one of the most 
traumatic periods in recent American history. 
Today part 1 . Parts 2 & 3 the next 2 Tuesdays. 

9:00 BOSTON SYMPHONY: Live in Concert 

MAHLER: Symphony No. 2 in C minor, "Resur- 
rection. " Barbara Hendricks, soprano; Jessye Nor- 
man, soprano; The New England Conservatory 
Chorus, Lorna Cooke de Varon conductor. Claudio 
Abbado conducts. William Pierce hosis. Dolby-A 
Noise-reduction System (prog. subj. to change). 

11:00 THE BIG BROADCAST/ Bobb Lynes 

Yours Truly, Johnny Dollar, part 2; Let George 
Do It (3/7/49). 

12:00 SOMETHING'S HAPPENING/ Roy of Hollywood 

"Beethoven, His Spiritual Development" by J.W.N. 
Sullivan, read by Dudley Knight continues with 
parts 8 & 9, "The Mind of Beethoven" and "The 
Hero" (30' each). Then from KPFA, Eric Bauers- 
feJd's "Black Mass" presenting "The Rats in the 
Walls" by H.P. Lovecraft (30'). From Radio Ca- 
nada International, "Last Summer of Childhood" 
by John Reeves, winner of the 1959 Italia Prize 
(1 hr.). Continuing our X Minus Oneathon with 
"Starbright" (4/10/56), "The Student Body" 
(7/31/56) and "The Last Martian" (8/7/56). At 
5:00, Jack Gariss with "Bio-Meditation." 



FOLIO PAGE 16-)ULY 



WEDNESDAY JULY 11 



6:00 SUNRISE CONCERT/ Carl Stone 

MOZART: Lf No/zc cli Flyuro with Hermann 
Prey, baritone; Eidth Mathis, soprano; Gundula 
Janoyvitz, soprano; Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau, 
baritone; Tatiano Troyanos, mezzo-soprano. The 
Choir and Orchestra of the German Opera of Ber- 
lin are conducted by Karl Boehm. Deutsche Gram- 
mophon 139 276/79. 

9:00 THIS MORNING: News, features, calendar 

10:00 FOLKDANCE WITH MARIO! 

11:00 THE MORNING READING 

Gertrude Stein's Autobiography of Alice B. To- 
l^las, as interpreted by Margaret Fowler. 

11:30 KULCHUR: Theater CloseUp/ Ray Tatar 

12:00 NOON CONCERT: Jazz at Noon/ John Schneider 

Featuring "Azimuth" album of John Taylor, Bri- 
tish jazz composer/pianist. 

2:00 (THE BIG) ECLECTICA 

Bobb Lynes presents The Big Broadcast, with 
"The Charlie McCarthy Show" (12/26/48) and 
"The Bing Crosby Show" (without Crosby) from 
Armed Forces Radio Service, 1949. 

THE AFTERNOON AIR 

Winging it on the audio airstream. Anita Frankel 
hosts; Linda Mack is at the controls. 

3:00 Within the hour: 

Coming Attractions. . . News Highlights with 
Richard Mahler. . . Your Angle on the News: 
You give us your leads. . . Open Air. . . Ruth 's 
Kitchen: Ruth Ziony, with lots of salt. 

4:00 Within the hour: 

Open Air. . . Jon Brower's Eye on Sports. . . and 
more Open Air. 

5:00 Within the hour: 

More than Half the Sky: Of, by and for women- 
as-women. . . Open Ai.r. . . and the Events Calen- 
dar with Terry Hodel at 5:50. 

6:00 THE EVENING NEWS 

6:45 COMMENTARY/ Charles Morgan 

7:00 THE VEGETARIAN MOVEMENT 

Why the urge for a meatless diet? Betty Sandoval 
examines thi's controversial issue, with input from 
several experts on the many aspects of vegetarian- 
ism. Person-on-the-street interviews reasons for 
limiting meat and interest in other sources of pro- 
tein. Included are excerpts from an award-win- 
ning documentary on the D.E.S. controversy. 
Produced by Betty Sandoval. 

8:00 UP FROM THE ASH GROVE/ Ed Pearl 

Music of the people, country and city, old and new. 

9:30 EARPLAY 1979 

Another in the series of dramas produced from 
National Public Radio. 



10:30 RADIO FREE OZ 

The weekly rain of madness has a way of providing 
fertile soil for rife creativity, with Phil, Peter, Ray, 
Harvey, Phyllis, John Kip, Roger, Alan, Mary Kate 
and surpris(ing) guests. 

12:00 SOMETHING'S HAPPENING/ Roy of Hollywood 

Parts 21 & 22 of "Last and First Men" by Olaf Sta- 
pleton read by Baird Searles (30' each). Then from 
"The Next Billion Years" series, no. 2, "An Artifi- 
cial Ocean for an Artificial Planet," a talk by Jacques 
Yves Cousteau, (63'): extraordinary! Then Earplay's 
"ARgive Soliloquies" by John Reeves part 2 of 6, 
"Death of a Royal Virgin" (60'). From Radio Cana- 
da International, "Rendezvous with Death," a docu- 
mentary on the sinking of the Lusitania (60'). At 
4:25, Krishnamurti speaks from Berkeley, 2/4/69. 



THURSDAY JULY 12 

6:00 SUNRISE CONCERT/ Carl Stone 

9:00 THIS MORNING: News, features, calendar 

10:00 FOLKSCENE/ The Larmans 

Traditional music of Ireland played on the Irish 
harp and pipes from Joe and Antoinette McKenna. 

11:00 THE MORNING READING 

Margaret Fowler reads Gertrude Stein's The 
Autobiography of Alice B. Toklas. 

11:30 KULCHUR: Late breaking cultural features 

12:00 NOON CONCERT: 

Chapel, Court and Countryside/ Joseph Spencer 

2:00 ECLECTICA 

The first of six parts offHeinar Kipphardt's In the 
Matter of j. Robert Oppenheimer with the Reper- 
tory Theatre of Lincoln Center, directed by Jules 
Irving. Oppenheimer is played by Joseph Wiseman, 
with Harry Townes, Eduard Franz, Whitrifid Con- 
nor, Philip Bosco (Caedmon TRS 336). Act 1, be- 
ginning: Alamogordo, excerpts from proceedings 
of the first day, and the second day (parts 2—6 
will be aired weekly at this time). Then Bertha 
and. . . Wendall, "Plans Must Be Made." Follow- 
ing Wendall's unfortunate accident. Bertha and 
friend Eunice make the necessary preparations. 

THE AFTERNOON AIR 

Audio magazine, vuith Anita Frankel and Linda 
Mack hosting and producing. 

3:00 Within the hour: 

Coming Attractions. . . News Highlights. . . Your 
Angle on the News. . . Speaking of Seniors with 
Grace Jacobs. . . The Health Department with Al 
Huebner's look at health care. 

4:00 Within the hour: 

Open Air. . . Dealing with Barbara Cady. . . 
Open Air. 

5:00 Within the hour: 

LA 5 PM with Burt Wilson, followed by Terry 
Hodel's Calendar at 5:50. 

6:00 THE EVENING NEWS 

6:45 COMMENTARY 



FOLIO PAGE 17-IULY 



7:00 INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL 

7:30 OPEN JOURNAL: Late breaking features 

8:00 MUSICA CUBANA: Parti 

Drums Come Over the Sea. This two part program 
attempts to cover the history and development 
of music in Cuba. Drawing on the traditional "torn- 
ba Frances" and other musicaJ forms, we start with 
a historical panorama covering the traditions of 
both "high society" and the Black slaves during 
the 19th Century, the slave revolts, and the origi- 
nal tribal rites brought over from Africa. We then 
move on to life in Cuba and the attitudes of Cubans 
to the revolution. Along with its political role in 
the Carribean, Cuba also has a cultural role: it of- 
fers an alternative to the commercial American 
pop that is becoming predominant in the North, 
South and Central Americas. We see how Cuban 
society is permeated with the living tradition of 
"musica popular," both in everyday life and at 
grand festive events. While the encouragement 
and development of such music is an aspect of 
Cuba's cultural policy, music also serves as an im- 
portant political vehicle. Music, musicians and 
singers— both traditional and contemporary— are 
active and important forces in Cuban politics. 
The 2-part program is written by Per-Anders Hell- 
qvist and produced by Peter Berggren. Live recor- 
dings are by Peter Hennix. Part 2 Next Thursday 
at this time. 

9:00 CLEVELAND ORCHESTRA: Live in Concert 

An all-MOZART program: Symphony No. 31 
"Paris;" Symphony No. 36 "Lin/;" Symphony 
No. 38 "Prague." Lorin Maazel conducts. Robert 
Conrad hosts (program subject to change). 

11:00 JANUS COMPANY RADIO THEATRE 

Repertory dramatic presentations written especi- 
ally for KPFK with an emphasis on speculative 
fiction, adult fantasy, mystery and comedy. Pro- 
duced by Mallory and Jan Geller. 

11:30 BEETHOVEN: A Portrait of his Life 

Part 10: "Fresh Impetus: Seventh and Eighth 
Symphonies." Tapes courtesy of Deutsche Welle. 

12:00 SOMETHING'S HAPPENING/ Roy of Hollywood 

Live guest Swami Shankarananda, a former teacher 
of literature at Indiana University who studied 
with Baba Muktananda, and who heads the Sidda 
Yoga Dham. Meditation Center in LA. We'll add 
him to our Americans who have achieved "it" list, 
and maybe get more insight into what "it" is. Then 
at 5, two 30' talks by Joseph Campbell on "Compa- 
rison of Eastern and Western Mythology." 



FRIDAY JULY 13 



6:00 SUNRISE CONCERT/ Carl Stone 

9:00 THIS MORNING: News, features, calendar 

10:00 INDEPENDENT MUSIC/ Mario Casetta 

11:00 THE MORNING READING 

Margaret Fowler reads Gertrude Stein's novel 
The Autobiography of Alice B. Toiilas. 

11:30 KULCHUR: Weekly wrap-up/ Vangelisti, Hunt 



12:00 NOON CONCERT: 

Soundboard/ John Schneider 

The Music of John Dowland. Featuring perfor- 
mances from Book of Ayres (1—3), Consort Mu- 
sicke, solo songs and solo lute music by Paul 0' 
Dette, Anthony Rooley and the Consort of Mu- 
sicke and others. 

2:00 ECLECTICA 

On this fateful day, we air part 1 of ZBS Media's 
8-part science fiction/fantasy surrealistic Stars N' 
Stuff Xo run on the next 8 Fridays (except special 
days at the end of the month). Today, "Wino Wil- 
lie and the Dream Juice," "The Padre's Soul As- 
cends to Heaven" and "The Thing That Ate Aunt 
Sophie." Produced by ZBS Media, RD 1, Fort Ed- 
ward New York 12828. 

THE AFTERNOON AIR 

Host is Anita Frankel; co-host and technical 
producer is Linda Mack. 

3:00 Within the hour: 

Coming Attractions. . . News Highlights. . . Your 
Angle on the News. . . jazz Close-up with Rick 
James: today, trumpeter/flugelhornist Art Far- 
mer. . . American Indian Airwaves with Liz Lloyd. 

4:00 Within the hour: 

Open Air. . . Dealing with Barbara Cady. 

5:00 Within the hour: 

Media Watch with Claudia Fonda-Bonardi. . . 
Motel Madness: Stanley Aronowitz explains 
things. . . followed by Terry Ho6e\'s Calendar. 

6:00 THE EVENING NEWS 

6:45 NEWSLINE: Open phones 

7:00 INSIDE LA/ Bob Pugsley 

A broad range of contemporary issues and their 
impact of the Los Angeles Metropolitan Area. 

7:30 CHILD'S PLAY/ Ruth Buell 

8:00 JAZZ OMNIBUS: "Hittin' It" 

The Charles Owens Quartet participates in the 
first of a summer series of concert/broadcasts, 
live from Studio Z. The series is made possible 
by the American Federation of Musicians Local 
47 Performance Trust Fund, and of course the 
public is invited to attend free of charge (Please 
arrive by 7:40 for best seats). The Charles Owens 
Quartet is: Charles Owens, tenor saxophone; Ted 
Saunders, piano; Richard Reid, bass; Carl Burnett, 
drums. Owens' past musical experiences include 
stints with Buddy Rich, Mongo Santamaria, 
Frank Zappa, Gerald Wilson, and the like. 

10:00 HOUR 25/ Science Fiction 

12:00 GOODBYE PORKPIE HAT/ Paul Vangelisti 

2:00 THE BIG SLEEP/ John Breckow 

Uncorking a vintage bouquet of fine recordings, 
rare "airchecks," and rare live performances. 



SATURDAY JULY 14 



6:00 NO STRINGS ATTACHED/ Scott Bodell 

7:30 FUSION/ Lauren Lee 

8:30 THE NIXON TAPES/ Tom Nixon 



FOLIO PAGE 18-IULY 



9:30 HALFWAY DOWN THE STAIRS/ Uncle Ruthie 

Children's show for adults and/or adults' show 
for children. Songs, stories, t^lk, laughter & love! 

10:30 FOLK MUSIC/ John Davis 

12:30 THE CAR SHOW/ John Retsek & Len Frank 

1:50 WEEKEND CALENDAR/ Terry Hodel 

2:00 BALLADS, BANJOS & BLUEGRASS/ T. Sauber 

3:30 SONG & CELEBRATION/ Dan Wright 

6:00 THE SATURDAY NEWS/ Larry Moss 

6:30 CONVERSATIONS WITH HENRY MILLER 
KPFK's Judith Weiner spent sonne fascinating 
hours with one of America's most eminent wri- 
ters. In this 90 minute documentary culled from 
those conversations, the author talks about his 
life, work, loves, literature and philosophy, and 
includes some interesting sidelights on astrology, 
helped by his favorite Stargazer, Sidney Omarr. 
Produced for KPFK by Judith Weiner. 

8:00 THE WILLIAM MALLOCH PROGRAMME 

10:00 IMAGINARY LANDSCAPE 

Lily Greenham/John Cage: An Evening of Sound- 
Poetry. The first part of tonight's program is de- 
voted to the work of the British sound-poet Lily 
Greenham who will talk about and perform her 
work. Recorded by Charles Amirkhanian in Paris, 
this program was first heard on KPFA in Berkeley. 
Then John Cage perfoims his own Empty Words 
(part 4), a mix of letters and (sometimes lengthy) 
silences obtained by subjectmg the Journal of 
Henry David Thoreau to a series of I Ching opera- 
tions. Recorded at the Los Angeles Country Mu-- 
seum of Art by Carl Stone March 27, 1979. 

12:00 TESSERACT/ Phil Mendelson 

2:00 OBLIQUE COLLAGE/ Maurice Walker 




John Cage on "Imaginary Landscape," Saiurday at 10;00 p.m. 
Above right, Henry IVIiller, Saturday at 6:30 p.m. 




The man alone: one of Henry Miller's favorite photos of himself. 



SUIMDAV JULY 15 



6:00 GOSPEL CARAVAN/ Prince Dixon 

9:00 BIO-MEDITATION/ Jack Gariss 

10:00 FRONTIERS OF A NEW AGE/ Judy Walker 

Guest is Zipporah Dobbyns, astrologist/psychologist. 

11:00 DOROThfY HEALEY: Marxist Commentary 

Wtih guests and open phones. 

12:00 MANY WORLDS OF MUSIC/ Mari,o Casetta 

1:00 THE SUNDAY OPERA/ Fred Hyatt 

VERDI; / Vespri Sicilian} with Martina Arroyo, 
soprano; Placido Domingo, tenor; Sherrill Milnes, 
baritone; Ruggero Raimondi, bass. The New Phil- 
harmonia Orchestra and the John Alldis Choir 
are conducted by James Levine. RCA ARL 4- 
0370. 

5:00 THE SOUR APPLE TREE: The Arts & Politics 

Clare Spark hosts. Guests, open phones. 

6:00 THE SUNDAY NEWS 

6:30 THE SCIENCE CONNECTION/ S. & V. Kilston 

7:00 PREACHIN' THE BLUES/ Mary Aldin 

Tonight's featured artist is Mississippi John Hurt. 

8:30 IMRU/ The Gay Radio Collective 

Information, features, and guests of interest to 
the gay community, often with open phones, mu- 
sic, drama and poetry. Also, the IMRU IMews re- 
port and the calendar of events. 

9:30 FOLKSCENE/The Larmans 

The finest in live and recorded traditional and 
contemporary folk music, with artist interviews. 

12:00 SMOKE RINGS/ John Breckow 



MONDAY JULY 16 



6:00 SUNRISE CONCERT/ Carl Stone 

9:00 THIS MORNING: News, features, calendar 

10:00 FOLKDANCE WITH MARIO! 

11:00 THE MORNING READING 

Margaret Fowler continues reading Gertrude 
Stein 'i, The Autobiography of Alice B. Toklas. 



FOLIO PAGE 19-JULY 



11:30KULCHUR: In the Wings/ John Medici 

12:00 NOON CONCERT: 

Music of the Americas/ John Schneider 

CHAVEZ: \'inli„ tDiiccilo, BUXTEHUDE: 
CIntconne: VARESE: Aaaini ('27). 

2:00 ECLECTICA 

Alan Watts with the first of 4 talks on "Oriental 
Philosophy and the West" from MEA. An intro 
duction to the basic forms of Oriental Philosophy, 
Buddhism, Hinduism and Taoism, stressing their 
reievance to the technological civilization of the 
western world and the problems of man's relation- 
ship to nature. Then from Llicis Tiust, the 2nd 
talk from the series "Ponder on This," on "Basic 
Esotericism (5 minutes). 

THE AFTERNOON AIR 

An audio journey on the drive-time airstream. Your 
/ host is Anita Frankel, co-host and technical pro- 
ducer is Linda Mack. 

3:00 WITHIN THE HOUR: 

Coming Attractions: a billboard of today's air- 
•fare. . . News Higliligfits with Richard Mahler. . . 
y'our Angle on tlie News: phone m and tell us 
how you'd cover today's top stories. . . jazz 
Close-up with Rick James: focusing today on 
pianist, singer and composer Bob Dorough. . . 
Organic Gardening with Will Kinney and Barbara 
Spark at about 3:30. 

4:30 WITHIN THE HOUR: 

Dealing: Barbara Cady's fair exchanges with people 
who write books. . . Open Air: a non-scheduled 
departure in the Afternoon Air. 

5:00 WITHIN THE HOUR: 

Body Politics: Separating the wise from the foolish 
on the contemporary healing scene. Conversations 
with both holistic and Western medicine men and 
women. . . Open Air: likely to focus on energy, 
broadened to include other fronts in the battle 
for a liveable future. . . Terry Model's Calendar at 
5:50 

6:00 THE EVENING NEWS 

6:45 COMMENTARY/ Charles Morgan 

7:00 LABOR SCENE/ Sam Kushner 

7:30 REPORT TO THE LISTENER/ Jim Berland 

8:00 LA VIDA LATINA/ Luis Torres, David Sandoval 

9:00 CHAPEL, COURT AND COUNTRYSIDE 

KPFK's Showcase of Early Music, conceived, 
produced and hosted by Joseph Spencer. 

10 30 IN FIDELITY/ Peter Sutheim 

12:00 SOMETHING'S HAPPENING!/ Roy of Hollywood 

Alan Watts speaks on "Oriental Philosophy and the 
West," talk 1 of 4 (40') right at 12! Because Johnny 
Page, clairvoyant, and Bob Paige, Sidereal Astrologei 
return to read regular old time subscribers like you. 
(the secret word is "honey.") Then open night if 
there is any time left. 



TUESDAY JULY 17 



6:00 SUNRISE CONCERT/ Carl Stone 



9:00 THIS MORNING: News, features, calendar 

10:00 FOLKSCENE/ The Larmans 

Folk music of the British Isles 

11:00 THE MORNING READING 

li}c XiiKihiiigniphy ul Miic B. Tnl'lus by Ger- 
trude Stein. Read by Margaret Fowler. 

11:30 KULCHUR: Backstage/ Gil Laurence 

12 00 NOON CONCERT: 

At the Keyboard/ Leonid Hambro 
Lee had as his very special guests Arnold Stein- 
hardt, violin, and David Soyer, cello, both of 
the Guarnari Quartet. Played live were BRAHMS: 
Sonata in 11 minor: and DEBUSSY: Sonata for 
Violin and Piano. Included in the program was a 
recording of the Guarnari Quartet's performance 
of BRAHMS: Quintet for Piano and Strings with 
Aitur Rubinstein. This program was originally 
broadcast January 29, 1979. 

2:00 ECLECTICA 

Part 2 of thi,' History of Astronomy, the story of 
the life and work of Nicolaus Copernicus, who 
caused a scientific revolution with the theory of 
the sun-centered universe. Dr. James S. Pickering 
also describes the life and work of Tycho Brahe, 
the first great observer. For 20 years, Tycho plot- 
ted and recorded the polistions of the planets at 
his island observatory off the coast of Denmark 
in the late 1590s. Then, Bertha and. . . Bernie 
continues with "Bertha Discovers the Truth." 
The man Bertha met at Wendall's funeral has 
something to hide. Features the Eclectica Soap 
Opera Co. (Something's Happening Players), 
under the stern tutelage of David L. Krebs.- 

THE AFTERNOON AIR 

Drive-time radio with Anita Frankel and Linda 
Mack. 

3:00 WITHIN THE HOUR: 

Coming Attractions. . . News i-lighlights with 
Richard Mahler. . . Your Angle on the News: 
Got any leads?. . . /a/z Close-Up: today Rick 
James focuses on pianist-singer-composer Bob 
Dorough. . . Strawberry Shortbread: Pat Benson 
takes apart the public schools. 

4 00 WITHIN THE HOUR: 

Open .Mr. . . Dealing with Barbara Cady . 

5:00 WITHIN THE HOUR: 

LA 5 PM Burt Wilson washing the System's dirty 
laundry, vi/ith his guests. . .fluents Calendar with 
Terry Hodel at 5:50. 

6:00 THE EVENING NEWS 

6:45 TAKING SIDES: Debate 

7:30 OPEN JOURNAL: Late breaking features 

8:00 CARLOS HAGEN PRESENTS 

memories and Sounds of the Vietnam War, part 2. 
A conversation with a returned young officer^ ex- 
cerpts from official Army recordings and samples 
of the most popular songs among American troops 
—all and more are elements of this powerful and 
vividly painful re-creation of one of the most trau- 
matic periods in recent American history. 



FOLIO PAGE 20 JULY 



9:00 BOSTON SYMPHONY: Liwe in Concert 

COPLAND: "Hoe-Down" from Rodeo; MOZART: 
Violin Concerto No. Sin A maior, K. 219; BRAHMS: 
Symphony No. 1 in C minor, Op. 68. Joseph Silver- 
stein conducts and is the violinist. William Pierce 
hosts. Dolby-A Noise-reduction System. 

11:00 THE BIG BROADCAST/ Bobb Lynes 

Yours Truly, lohnny Dollar, part 3; The Whistler: 
"Attorney for the Defense" (1940s). 

12:00 SOMETHING'S HAPPENING/ Roy of Hollywood 

Parts 10 & 11 of "Beethoven, His Spiritual Devel- 
opment" by J.W.N. Sullivan on "The Hero" and 
"The End of a Period" (30' each). Then "Rhino- 
ceros" by Eugene lonesco starring Zero Mostel, 
Gene Wilder and Karen Black (90', Caedmon 
TRS 364), a sound track recording. Our X Minus 
Oneathon will present "Th6 Snowball Effect" 
(8/14/56), "Map Makers" (9/26/56) and "Pro- 
tective Mimicry" (10/3/56). At 5:00, Jack Gariss. 



WEDNESDAY JULY 18 



6:00 SUNRISE CONCERT/ Carl Stone 

Featured today: RAVEL's L 'Heure Espagnole 
with Suzanne Danco, soprano. Ernest Ansermet 
conducts rOrchestre de la Suisse Romande. 
London R23249. 

9:00 THIS MORNING: News, features, calendar 

10:00 FOLKDANCE WITH MARIO! 

11:00 THE MORNING READING 

The Autobiography of Alice B. Toklas, by Ger- 
trude Stein, read by Margaret Fowler. 

11:30KULCHUR: Theater Close-Up/ Ray Tatar 

12:00 NOON CONCERT: Jazz at Noon/John Schneider 

Today featuring Carmen McCrae's album Ms. Jazz. 

2:00 ECLECTICA 

Bobb Lynes presents his Big Broadcast with 'The 
Third Man" from BBS in the 40s-the first show 
in the series, "Budapest Robbery Plan," without 
Welles. Then an "Inner Sanctum" from the 40s. 

THE AFTERNOON AIR 

Anita Frankel hosts; Linda Mack is at the controls. 

3:00 Within the hour: 

Coming Attractions. . . News Highlights with 
Richard Mahler. . . Your Angle on^the News. . . 
Open Air. . . Ruth's Kitchen with Ruth Ziony. 

4:00 Within the hour: 

Open Air. . . Jon Brewer's Eye on Sports. . . and 
more Open Air. 

5:00 Within the hour: 

More than Half the Sky: of, by and for women. . . 
Open Air. . . Events Calendar with Terry Hodel. 

6:00 THE EVENING NEWS 

6:45 COMMENTARY/ Charles Morgan 

7:00 NEWSLINE: Open phones 

7:30 OPEN JOURNAL: Late breaking features 

8:00 UP FROM THE ASH GROVE/ Ed Pearl 

9:00 TEATRO DE LA UNIDAD: "Ulysses" 

El Teatro de la Unidad in cooperation with the 
Los Angeles Theater of the Ear present an adap- 



tation from James Joyce's novel by Paul Vangelisti 
translated into Spanish by Jaime Jaimes. This week 
the play is presented in Spanish; next week at this 
time the same work will be presented in English. 
This Spanish language production, under the di- 
rection of Jaimes, marks the first total collabora- 
tion between the Teatro de la Unidad and L.A.T.E. 
The Teatro production is a radiodrama realized for 
audiotape, while the L.A.T.E. piece will be broad- 
cast live before a studio audience in keeping with 
L.A.T.E.'s concept of radiotheater. 

10:30 RADIO FREE OZ 

12:00 SOMETHING'S HAPPENING/ Roy of Holyrood 

Concluding "Last and First Men" by Olaf Staple- 
ton, read by Baird Searles iwth parts 23 & 24. 
From "The Next Billion Years," talk no. 3, "The 
Population Bloom" with Dr. Roger Revelle, Direc- 
tor, Harvard Center for Population Studies (72'). 
Mai Sharpe then attacks the air with more strange- 
interviews with "Man on the Street" ca. 60' then 
"The Argive Soliloquies" from Earplay, part 3 of 
6, "This Smashed City Unearthed." At 4:50, 
Krishnamurti at Berkeley, 2/5/69 (67'). 



THURSDAY JULY 19 



6:00 SUNRISE CONCERT/ Carl Stone 

9:00 THIS MORNING: News, features, calendar 

10:00 FOLKSCENE/ The Larmans 

Two greats of folk music, Erik Darling and Frank 
Hamilton get together for an hour of reminiscing, 
conversation and some fine music. 

11:00 THE MORNING READING 

Margaret Fowler reads Gertrude Stem's Autobio- 
graphy of Alice B. Toklas. 

11:30 KULCHUR: Late breaking cultural features 

12:00 NOON CONCERT: 

Chapel Court and Countryside/ Joseph Spencer 

2:00 ECLEC!TICA 

From In the Matter of J. Robert Oppenheimer by 
Heinar Kipphardt (Caedmon TRS 336), part 2 of 
6. Act 1 (continued): Excerpts from the proceed- 
ings of the 3rd day, 5th day and 9th day. Then 
Bertha and. . . Bernie, "A Bad News Phohecall." 
Bernie is poisoned and the bridge club prepares 
to meet at Bertha's house. Features the New Ge- 
neration Players (206 Players). 

THE AFTERNOON AIR 

Anita Frankel and Linda Mack host & produce. 

3:00 Within the hour: 

Coming Attractions. . . News Highlights with 
Richard Mahler. . . Your Angle on the News. . . 
Speaking of Seniors with Grace Jacobs. . . The 
Health Department with Al Huebner. 

4:00 Within the hour: 

Open Air. . . Dealing with Barbara Cady. . . and 
more Open Air. 

5:00 Within the hour: 

LA 5 PM with Burt Wilson. . . and the Events 
Calendar with. Terry Hodel at 5:50. 



FOLIO PAGE 21-IULY 



6:00 THE EVENING NEWS 

6:45 COMMENTARY 

7:00 INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL 

7:30 OPEN JOURNAL: Late breaking features 

8:00 MUSICA CU3ANA: Part 2 

Songs of Wrath-Songs of Victory. On the music 
and politics of Cuba. Cubans always express 
through singing and rhythm whatever affects them 
deeply. It has been so since the days of the War of 
Independence in the 19th Century, and it is so in 
today's revolutionary Cuba. The feeling and ideas 
are given expression both in improvised folk songs 
and in carefully composed lyric love songs. And 
Cuba has countered the radio propaganda from 
North America with a barrage of fervent music 
"of the people," which makes mass-produced, 
commercial music seem pallid in comparison. Per- 
Anders Hellqvist wrote and Peter Berggren pro- 
duced the program. Live recordings by Peter Hennix. 

9:00 CLEVELAND ORCHESTRA: Live in Concert 

LISZT: Piano Concerto No. 1 in E flat major; 
TCHAIKOVSKY: Symphony No. 4 in F minor; 
op. 36. The soloist is Daniel Adni. Lorin Maazel 
conducts. Robert Conrad hosts, (subj. to change). 

11:00JANUS COMPANY RADIO THEATRE 

Pan-demic. LIVE! The very latest in the startling 
developments in the unfolding lunar situation 
brought to you live with the cooperation and 
facilities of the Tri-Vid System and the Janus 
Broadcasting Company. 

11:30 BEETHOVEN: A Portrait of his Life 

Part 11: "Afflictions— Successes-Honors." Tapes 
courtesy of Deutsche Welle. 

12:00 SOMETHING'S HAPPENING/ Roy of Hollywood 

Because of special day and night programming next 
week, we will have our ritual open phones tonight 
for terrestrial communication. Open night if time 
allows until 5 when Joseph Campbell gives two 30' 
talks on Tantric Kundalini Yoga. 



">i 



FRIDAY JULY 20 



6:00 SUNRISE CONCERT/ Carl Stone 

9:00 THIS MORNING: News, calendar, features 

10:00 INDEPENDENT MUSIC/ Mario Casetta 

11:00 THE MORNING READING 

Autobiography of Alice B. Tok/as. 

11:30 KULCHUR/ VangellstI, Hunt, Cohen 

12:00 NOON CONCERT: 

Soundboard/ John Schneider 

Nineteenth Century Music for Guitar: featuring 
live performance by Richard Glenn & friend on 
authentic original instruments. Music by Fernan- 
do Sor, Mauro Giuliani, Carulli and others. 

2:00 ECLECTICA 

Part 2 of ZBS Med'ia'i Stars N' Stuff, presenting 
"Rocket Pierre and the Peanut People of Pluto," 
"The Flatback Dragon" or "Oh Those China 
Nights," and "The Tongue that Licked Tuscon." 



THE AFTERNOON AIR 

Anita Frankel and Linda Mack host/produce. 

3:00 Within the hour: 

Coming Attractions. . . News Highlights. . . Your 
Angle on the News. . . jazz Close-Up with Rick 
James: today, pianistsingercomposer Bob Do- 
rough. . . Open Air. 

4:00 Within the hour: 

Open Air. . . Dealing with Barbara Cady & guests. 

5:00 Within the hour: 

Media H^o/c/7/Claudia Fonda-Bonardi. . . Open 
Air. . . Events Calendar IJerry Model. 

6:00 THE EVENING NEWS 

6:45 NEWSLINE: Open phones 

7:00 INSIDE LA/ Bob Pugsley 

7:30 CHILD'S PLAY/ Ruth Buell 

8:00 JAZZ OMNIBUS/ Ron Pelletier 

A collection of jazz today, in all its styles. 

10:00 HOUR 25/ Science Fiction 

12:00 GOODBYE PORKPIE HAT/ Paul Vangelisti 

2:00 NOCTURNAL TRANSMISSIONS 

Radio free anarchy hosted by Ed Hammond and 
David Rubin. 



SATURDAY JULY 21 

6:00 NO STRINGS ATTACHED/ Scott Bodell 

7:30 FUSION/ Lauren Lee 

8:30 THE NIXON TAPES/ Tom Nixon 

9:30 HALFWAY DOWN THE STAIRS/ Ruth Buell 

10:30 FOLK MUSIC/ John Davis 

12:30 THE CAR SHOW/ Len Frank, John Retsek 

1:50 WEEKEND CALENDAR/ Terry Hodel 

2:00 BALLADS, BLUEGRASS / BANJOS/ T. Sauber 

3:30 SONG & CELEBRATION/ Dan Wright 

5:00 OUT LOUD!/ Frank Greenwood 

6:00 THE SATURDAY NEWS/ Larry Moss 

6:30 DOUBLE TAKE/ Paul Lion 

Play reviews with response from the play's repre- 
sentative. Tonight: Farenheit 451 , by Ray Brad- 
bury (the Colony at Studio Playhouse). World 
premiere of Bradbury's stage adaptation of his 
novel about revolt in a bookburning, television- 
narcotized futureworld. Guest: Ray Bradbury. 

6:45 ON FILM/ Dean Cohen 

7:00 THE PERFECT CRIME/ Mike Hodel 

All about criminal books, not types. 

8:00 THE WILLIAM MALLOCH PROGRAMME 

9:00 SUMMERFEST: KCET Simulcast 

Tune to Channel 28, but listen to KPFK's audio, 
as we bring you "The Mississippi River Festival" 
featuring Ashford and Simpson, and others. 

12:00 TESSERACT/ Phil Mendehon 

2:00 OBLIQUE COLLAGE/ Maurice Walker 



FOLIO PAGE 22-)ULY 



SUNDAY JULY 22 

6:00 GOSPEL CARAVAN/ Prince Dixon 
9:00 BIO-MEDITATION/ Jack Gariss 

10:00 FRONTIERS OF A NEW AGE/ Judy Walker 

Judy's guest is Olga Worral, faith healer and Psy- 
chotherapist, specialist in psychiatric nursing. 

11:00 DOROTHY HEALEY: Marxist Commentary 

12:00 MANY WORLDS OF MUSIC/ Mario Casetta 

1:00 TENOR OF THE TIMES 

Tenor buff Fred Hyatt pays a rare visit to the 
all-but-forgotten recordings of Alfred Piccaver. 

1:30 THE SUNDAY OPERA/ Fred Hyatt 

VERDI : // Trovatore with Antonietta Stella, so- 
prano; Fiorenza Cossotto, mezzo-soprano; Carlo 
Bergonzi, tenor; Ettore Bastianini, baritone. Tul- 
lio Serafin conducts the Chorus and Orchestra of 
La Scala, Milano. Detusche Grammophon 2728 
008. 

5:00 THE SOUR APPLE TREE/ Clare Spark 

6:00 THE SUNDAY NEWS 

6:30 THE SCIENCE CONNECTION/ Kiistons 

7:00 PREACHIN' THE BLUES/ Mary Aldin 

A potpourri of Mississippi Delta blues, wtih a 
special segment on Robert Johnson. 

8:30 IMRU/TheGay Radio Collective 

News, features, guests and cultural expression of 
and for the gay and lesbian communities. Also, 
the regular IMRU News Report and calendar. 

9:30 FOLKSCENE/ The Larmans 

Live and recorded folk music, and interviews. 

12:00 SMOKE RINGS/ John Breckow 



MONDAY JULY 23 



6:00 SUNRISE CONCERT/ Carl Stone 

9:00 THIS MORNING: News, features, calendar 

10:00 FOLKDANCE WITH MARIO! 

11:00 THE MORNING READING 

The Autobiography of Alice B. Toklas by Ger- 
trude Stein, read by Margaret Fowler. 

11:30 KULCHUR: Cultural features 

12:00 NOON CONCERT: 

Music of the Americas/ John Schneider 

Music from Bennington College Composers: 
NOWAK: Concert Piece for Kettle Drums {'61 ); 
Henry BRANT: Hieroglyphics 3; CALABRO: 
Environments. 

2:00 ECLECTICA 

Alan Watts continues the series of 4 talks on 
"Oriental Philosophy and the West" with talk 
no. 2 (43'). Then from Lucis Trust, "Ponder on 
This" talk no. 3, "Meditation as a Way of Life (5'). 



THE AFTERNOON AIR 

An audio journey on the drive-time airstream. 
Your host is Anita Frankel; co-host and technical 
producer is Linda Mack. 

3:00 WITHIN THE HOUR: 

Coming attractions: today's itinerary. . . News 
Highlights with Richard Mahler. . . Your Angle 
on the News, jazz Close-Up with Rick James: to- 
day's focus is on the stubbornly individualistic 
and delightful vocalist, Betty Carter. . . Organic 
Gardening with Will Kinney and Barbara Spark 
at about 3; 30. 

4:30 WITHIN THE HOUR: 

Deali/ig: Barbara Cady's interviews. . . Open Air: ' 
Whatever the Santanas blow in. 

5:00 WITHIN THE HOUR: 

Consumer Awareness wtxU Ida Honorof: today. 
The Herbicide Time Bomb— our own G.l.s have 
become victims of U.S. defoliation in Vietnam, 
and the USDA continues to saturate us with these 
poisons at home. . . Open Air: Fresh, hot or sul- 
try. . . Calendar with Terry Hodel at 5:50. 

6:00 THE EVENING NEWS 

6:45 COMMENTARY/ Charles Morgan 

7:00 LABOR SCENE/ Sam Kushner 

7:30 REPORT TO THE LISTENER/ Jim Berland 

8:00 LA VIDA LATINA/ David Sandoval, Luis Torres 

9:00 CHAPEL, COURT AND COUNTRYSIDE 

Joseph Spencer hosts. 

10:30 IN FIDELITY/ Peter Sutheim 

12:00 SOMETHING'S HAPPENING/Roy of Hollywood 

Alan Watts continues with talk 2 on "Oriental 
Philosophy and the West" from MEA (43'). Then 
open night for 5 minutes until Dudley Knight 
comes in for another "Graveyard Shift" live read- 
ing. Then open night for the rest of the night for 
whatever great happens to be ar/iund. 



TUESDAY JULY 24 

6:00 SUNRISE CONCERT/ Carl Stone 

9:00 THIS MORNING: News, features, calendar 

10:00 FOLKSCENE/ The Larmans 

A sampler of traditional and contemporary 
folk music. 

11:00 THE MORNING READING 

Margaret Fowler continues her reading of The 
Autobiography of Alice B. Toklas by Gertrude 
Stein. 

11:30 KULCHUR/ Judith Weiner 

12:00 NOON CONCERT: 

At the Keyboard/ Leonid Hambro 

Improvisation with Richard Grayson, Claire Fish- 
er, Lincoln Mayorga, Dave MacKay, Tom Souza, 
Eunice Shinneman, Craig Whipps and Leonid 
Hambro. Need any more be said? Aired originally 
April 10, 1979, live from KPFK's studios. 



FOLIO PAGE 23-JULY 



2:00 ECLECTICA 

In part 3 of the 6-part History of Astronomy, 
James S. Pickering tells the story of the life and 
work of Johannes Kepler, who became Tycho 
Brahe's assistant and inherited his observational 
data on planets. This enabled Kepler to mathe- 
matically describe three laws of planetary motion 
which proved Copernicus' theory. Then, on Bertha 
and. . . Wilbur, "An Old Flame Blown Out." Wil- 
bur tastes the oatmeal and rushes to the emergency 
hospital for treatment. 

THE AFTERNOON AIR 

Anita Frankel and Linda Mack drive. 

3:00 WITHIN THE HOUR: 

Coming Attractions: details of this afternoon's 
excursion. . . News Highlights. . . Your Angle on 
the News. . . jaza Close-Up: Rick James looks at 
vocalist Betty Carter. . . Strawberry Shortbread: 
Pat Benson takes on the public schools. 

4:00 WITHIN THE HOUR: 

Open Air: Frought with flying objects, unidenti- 
fied (at press time). . .Dealing with Barbara Cady. 

5:00 WITHIN THE HOUR: 

LA 5 PM: Burt Wilson and guests. . . Calendar 
with Terry Model at 5:50. 

6:00 THE EVENING NEWS 

6:45 TAKING SIDES: Debate 

7:30 OPEN JOURNAL: Late breaking features 

8:00 CARLOS HAGEN PRESENTS 

Memories and Sounds of the Vietnam War, part 3. 
The concluding hour of this vividly evocative re- 
creation of one of the most traumatic periods in 
recent American history. Includes a conversation 
with a young returned Army officer, readings, ex- 
cerpts from official Army recordings, and some of 
the most popular songs among the Vietnam GIs. 

9:00 BOSTON SYMPHONY: Live in Concert 

VERDI : Overture to La Forza del Destino; 
MOZART: Violin Concerto No. 5 In A major, 
K. 219; WU; "Little Sisters of the Grassland: " 
Concerto for Pipa and Orchestra; LISZT; Piano 
Concerto No. I In E flat major. With Liu Teh- 
Hai, pipa; Liu Shih-Kun, piano; Joseph Silverstein, 
violin. Seiji Ozawa conducts. William Pierce hosts. 
Recorded with Dolby-A Noise-reduction System. 
Programs subject to change. 

11:00 THE BIG BROADCAST/ Bobb Lynes 

Yours Truly, Johnny Dollar, part 4; Rogue's 
Gallery with Dick Powell (4/4/46). 

12:00 SOMETHING'S HAPPENING!/ Roy o'Hollywood 

Parts 12 & 13 of "Beethoven: His Spiritual Devel- 
opment" by J.W. N. Sullivan on "The End of a 
Period." Then from KPFA, Eric Bauersfeld's 
"Black Mass" reading "The Renegade" by Albert 
Camus (30'). Then "Silence," by Michael Mant- 
let, an adaptation of the play by Harold Pinter 
with Caria Bley, Robert Wyatt, Kevin Coyne, Chris 
Spedding and Ron McClure (60'), (Watt 5 record). 
Our X Minus Oneathon continues with "Soldier 
Boy" (10/17/56), "Pictures Don't Lie" (10/24/56) 
and "Appointment in Tomorrow" by Fritz Lieber 
(11/7/56). At 5:00, "Bio-Meditation"-Jack Gariss. 



WEDNESDAY JULY 25 



6:00 SUNRISE CONCERT/ Carl Stone 

In honor of the 277th anniversary of the birth of 
FRANCESCO CORTECCIA (July 27, 1502-1571), 
Carl presents the Florentine composer's Passione 
Secondo Giovanni (St. John Passion). The part of 
the evangelist is spoken by Arnoldo Foa. Fosco 
Corti conducts the Schola Cantorum Francesco 
Coradini Arezzo. DGG Archiv 2533 301. 

9:00 THIS MORNING: News, features, calendar 

10:00 FOLKDANCE WITH MARIO! 

11:00 THE MORNING READING 

Autobiography of Alice B. To k I as. 

11:30 KULCHUR: Theater Close-Up/ Ray Tatar 

12:00 NOON CONCERT: Jazz at Noon/ John Schneider 

The Great Concert of Cecil Taylor is featured to- 
day. Wild Piano! 

2:00 ECLECTICA 

Surely some old radio stuff. 

THE AFTERNOON AIR 

Anita Frankel hosts; Linda Mack at the controls. 

3:00 Within the hour: 

Coming Attractions. . . News Highlights. . . Your 
Angle on the News. . . Open Air. . . Ruth 's Kitchen 
with Ruth Ziony. 

4:00 Within the hour: 

Open Air. . . Futurewatch: Linda Strawn monitors 
the cutting edge, where religion and science inter- 
sect. 

5:00 Within the hour: 

More than Half the Sky: of, by and for women. . . 
Open Air. . . Calendar with Terry Model at 5:50. 

6:00 THE EVENING NEWS 

6:45 COMMENTARY/ Charles Morgan 

7:00 NEWSLINE: Open Phones 

7:30 OPEN JOURNAL: Late breaking features 

8:00 UP FROM THE ASH GROVE/ Ed Pearl 

9:00 LOS ANGELES THEATER OF THE EAR: Ulysses 

Adapted from James Joyce's novel by Paul Van- 
gelisti, this production is a dramatization of, as 
well as an homage to a day in the life of Dublin. 
Broadcast live before a studio audience, Ulysses 
will be a stern test of of LATE's conception of 
radlotheater. Admission is free but 3eating for 
this broadcast will certainly be limited. For reser- 
vations call 213/877-271 1 druing business hours. 

10:30 RADIO FREE OZ 

12:00 SOMETHING'S HAPPENING!/ Roy of Hywd. 

We present our Second Special Ram Dass Night, 
featuring from our archives six 30-minute. talks 
from the University of Texas. Also, readings from 
the third Chinese Patriarch of Zen (30'), an imag- 
ing meditation (30') and more phone' calls from 
ZBS Media's "Love, Serve, Remember" album. 
But at 4:55, Krishnamurti takes over, speaking 
at Berkeley, 2/6/69 (65'). We promise a fascinat- 
ing contrast. 



FOLIO PAGE 24-1 ULY 



HAPPY 20th BIRTHDAY, RPFR! 




Our special birthday celebration programming begins here, and runs for two days vyith no interruptions. 
We then continue through next Saturday (August 4), interspersed with fundraising periods. Tell a friend! 



THURSDAY JULY 26 



6:00 KPFK DEDICATION CONCERT 

A recreation of the first broadcast concert that 
KPFK listeners heard the day the station went on 
the air, July 26, 1959, featuring works by Beetho- 
ven, Brahms and Ives. 

8:20 KPFK'S DEDICATION PROGRAM 

Southern California gets a new FM station on July 
26, 1959. It begins with v>.'ords of welcome, some 
bright promises and an optimistic outlook. Here's 
how it began. , . . 

10:20 KPFK: The First Six Months 

. . . and here's how it progressed. A look back 
at the first half year, as seen from 1969. 

11:00 MEDEA 

The Greek tragedy, as performed by the Pacifica 
Players in the early 60's. The roots of KPFK's 
commitment to drama. 

12:00 Noon. THE MAGNIFICENT NONSENSE 

Step out of the stream of time and look back at 
a masterwork by William Malloch, as he evokes 
the events that led us into World War I, using po- 
etry and music to take us on a tour of No Man's 
Land— and beyond. Produced in 1969. 

2:00 PORTRAIT OF AN AMERICAN AGITATOR 

In the early 60's, KPFK Public Affairs Director 
Jim Wilcox produced a series of documentaries 
that revolutionized audio techniques. Here is the 
first, a study of an American Nazi, produced in 
1962. 



2:30 



3:00 



LISTEN OFAY! 

Another Jim Wilcox documentary, this one chro- 
nicling the rising tide of Black anger and aware- 
ness. Produced in 1962. 



KPFK: 1962 

With three years of broadcasting under its belt, 
KPFK brings its audience a progress report. 

4:00 JUGGERNAUT 

One more Wilcox documentary, this one drama- 
tizing the lengthy article by journalist Fred Cook 
in the September 1962 issue of the Nation maga- 
zine. 

5:00 WOLFIANA 

Read by Charles Laughton, produced by Norman 
Corwin, this program will cool things down a bit 
and let you catch your breath. It's a beautiful 
piece of literature for radio, produced in 1 1/62. 



5:30 MISCELLANY 

A chance to get back on schedule, lighten things 
up a bit, while Daws Butler reads some pieces by 
Robert Benchley. 

6:00 THE EVENING NEWS 

Get back to today, the news of July 26, 1979. 

6:45 FREEDOM SUMMER IN L.A. 

A documentary on the civil rights issues closer 
to home than Alabama or Mississippi, produced 
in October 1963. 

8:15 THE WONDROUS WORLD OF SEAN O'CASEY 

Maureen Mcllroy gives us a look at the Irish play- 
wright and his work. 

10:00 THE LIE THAT ALWAYS TELLS THE TRUTH 

David Ossman gives us a look at quite a different 
artist—Jean Cocteau, on the occasion of his death. 

11:00 JIM MORRISON: Artist In Hell 

Clare Spark's four-hour tribute to an artist of the 
'60s. it's an intensive look at an intense human 
being, who was tortured in ways his songs only 
touch on lightly. 

3:00 a.m. SYNANON: Miracle or Menace? 

This documentary, produced in June 1961, has 
some disquieting glimpses of the future. 

4:45 a little something's happening 

Roy of Hollywood's Joseph Campbell series con- 
tinues, with two 30' talks on Buddhism in China. 



FRIDAY JULY 27 



6:15 KPFK'S FIFTH ANNIVERSARY-1964 

A look at what the station has accomplished in 
the five years of its life, by staff and programmers. 
You can also expect some bright prorriises and 
some exciting programs. 

7:45 MISCELLANY 

A chance to orient yourself, brought to you by 
Robert Benchley, as interpreted by Daws Butler. 

8:00 THE BATTLE OF HASTINGS 

A documentary on 1066 and most of that. Pro- 
duced 900 years after the fact. 

9:00 HOW CAN A POOR MAN STAND SUCH TIMES 
AND LIVE? A look at the '30s, through the music 
of the times and the songs as produced by Howard 
and Roz Larman. 



FOLIO PAGE 25-1 ULY/SPECIAL DAYS 



10:00 DUST TO DUST 

A documentary study of the 1934 Hawk's Nest 
tLinnel disaster, as produced by Mike Hodel . 

10:45 A LANGSTOIM HUGHES MEMORIAL 

From March 1968, the Black poet and story teller 
reads his own works. This tribute was produced 
shortly after his death. 

11:30 DARK LADY OF THE SONNETS 

A play produced by KPFK In May of 1963. 

12:00 Noon BERLINER MILLOJH 

Another evocation by William Malloch, 1969. 

1:00 THE WORLD SOUNDSCAPE PROJECT 

An anthology of recorded interviews with/by 
members of the World SoundScape Project, de- 
monstrations of acoustic design and (alas) the 
lack of It elsewhere in the wfjrid with examples 
of how natural, human and mechanical sounds 
may be transformed for aesthetic purpose. Pro- 
duced in 1976 by Everett Frost and Leni Isaacs. 

3:00 THE POETRY AND MUSIC OF LEONARD 
COHEN. The composer of "Suzanne," "Dress 
Rehearsal Rag" and other works performs and 
talks in this 1968 program. 

4:20 MISCELLANY 

Some more music by Leonard Cohen to take us to 

4:30 THE FIRST MOVIE DIRECTOR'S NAME 

WAS ALICE. And she worked at the turn of the 
20th Century. She and other feminists In film 
making are profiled in this documentary pro- 
duced by Terry Hodel. 

5:15 HOLLYWOOD BE THY NAME 

Ruth Hirschman produced this evocative look at 
tinsel town, and It's not Invalid today. Close your 
eyes and watch. 

5:50 MISCELLANY 

Movie music to get us into our audio newsreel of 
the day's events, otherwise known as 

6:00 THE EVENING NEWS 

6:45 MISCELLANY 

7:00 THE FIRE THIS TIME 

A documentary about the 1965 Watts riot, pro- 
duced by Trevor Thomas and the staff of KPFK 
before, during and after the action. It features 
tapes of the voices of the people of South Central 
Los Angeles as well as the KPFK people who co- 
vered it. 

8:00 JAZZ OMNIBUS/ Ron Pelletler 

"Light Year"— The title of guitarist Dave Pritch- 
ard's first Inner City release. Now, he has a new 
album on the way, and a new band that you'll 
hear tonight. They are; Dave Pritchard, guitars; 
Patrice Rushen, Keyboards; Larry Klein, bass; 
Charles Orena, reeds; Mike Jochum, drums. This 
Is one of the series of live music and interviews 
broadcast "In concert" from KPFK's Studio Z, 
and made possible by the American Federation 
of Musicians Local 47 Performance Trust Fund. 
You are Invited to attend, free: for best seats, 
please arrive by 7:40 p.m. 



10:00 WORLDCONI 

A look at the World Science Fiction Convention 
of 1972, held m Los Angeles, as produced by 
Mike Hodel, Mitchell Harding and others. 

11:00 BEMS 

Three scientists discuss bug-eyed monsters with 
Forest J. Ackerman in 1968. Honest. 

12:00 Midnight. THE HUMAN SITUATION 

Aldous Huxley, In a series of lectures recorded at 
the University of California at Santa Barbara in 
1959. The nine lectures are presented In their 
entirety. 



SATURDAY JULY 28 



8:00 A CASE IN POINT 

A 1963 documentary on ending de facto segrega- 
tion at South Gate High School and other nergh 
borhood schools. 

9:00 THE LIVELY AIR 

This program, produced in November 1961, is 
described as "a children's documentary." Tune 
In and hear for yourself. 

10:00 MISCELLANY 

Frankly, the previous program comes to us with 
no time length, so this is a breathing space until 
it's time for 

10:30 MY COUNTRY TIL OF THY PEOPLE 

THEY'RE DYING. A documentary on the Ame- 
rican Indian featuring songs of Buffy Saint Marie. 

1:00 p.m. CENTURY PLAZA: June 23, 1967 

LBJ comes to Los Angeles to speak at a fund- 
raiser and Is greeted by tens of thousands of anti- 
war demonstrators. A documentary of what hap- 
pened when the middle-class found out about 
the perils of being against the war in Vietnam. 

2:15 GHANDI CENTENNIAL 

In counter-point, a documentary from the early 
'60s celebrating the 100th anniversary of the man 
who brought the principles of non-violence to 
India. 

3:00 THE FREE AND THE BRAVE 

Author James Baldwin provides an Interpretation 
of American history from the Black perspective 
in this talk recorded in 1963. 

4:00 MISCELLANY 

Catch-up time again. 

4:15 KPFK THROUGH THE YEARS 

This retrospective look at the history of KPFK 
was produced at the end of our first decade; 
featuring voices from the past and the present 
(of 1969) as the staff tried to assess the station's 
impact. 

6:00 THE EVENING NEWS 

Back to 1979 for 45 minutes of the present. 

6:30 KPFK: The First Two Decades 

A two-hour look at us, produced in 1979 by Mike 
Hodel and Lucia Chappelle, with an appraisal of 
the station and some Inside dope about what hap- 
pened off the air as well as on. 



FOLIO PAGE 26-)ULY /SPECIAL DAYS 



8:30 FUNDRAISING 

9:00 SUMMERFEST: KCET Simulcast 

Again, listen to Dolby encoded KPFK and watch 
Channel 28 for "American Dance Festival" with 
the PaL'l Taylor Dancers. Recorded live at Duke 
University. 

12:00 PLEASURE AND PAIN 

A 1977 documentary on sado-masochism'in LA. 
WARNING: language (and roncepts) that some 
may find offensive. 

12:45 LENNY BRUCE FESTIVAL 

Roy Tuckman plays many of the tapes and re- 
cordings of Lenny Bruce between now and early 
morning. He'll (Roy, that is) also ask for finan- 
cial support from those who don't. 



SUNDAY JULY 29 



7:30 I HAVE A DREAM 

KPFK's award-winning documentary on the life 
of the Reverend Martin Luther King Jr., produced 
on April 4, 1968, the day King was assassinated 
in Memphis. 

8:15 FUNDRAISING 

9:00 WHAT HAPPENED TO THE 1960s IN THE 1970s 

Documentary by Carlos Hagen tracing the rural 
communes and hippie urban communities of the 
1960s to their roots in the 19th Century American 
Utopian prototypeis and a hard look at how those 
ideals were ripped off in the 1970s. 

10:00 FUNDRAISING 

11:00 BIRCHERS AND FRIGHT PEDDLERS-I 

In this interview from October 1964, Public Af- 
fairs Director Jim Wilcox questions the Rev. 
Brooks Walker about his experiences with the 
John Birch Society. 

11:25 FUNDRAISING 

12:00 BIRCHERS AND FRIGHT PEDDLERS-II 

Continuing the interview with the Rev. Brooks 
Walker about the radical iight of the 1960s, re- 
corded in 1 964. 

12:30 FUNDRAISING 

1:00 DVORAK IN AMERICA 

A three hour docuemtnary on the composer and 
his ties to the United States, produced by KPFK's 
former Music Director, William Malloch. 

4:00 FUNDRAISING 

4:30 LET 'EM EAT KITSCH! 

Clare Spark's tribute to the worst in American 
taste. And the frightening part is that it's all reaM 

5:30 FUNDRAISING 

From kitsch to pitsch. and contrary to that first 
attempt, we'll try not to be as offensive as the 
prior program. 

6:00 THE SUNDAY NEWS 



6:30 GENETIC ENGINEERING: The Further Adven- 
tures of Superman. This program, produced in 
1971, pre-dates the flap about test-tube babies, 
but you'll hear some fascinating material. 

7:15 FUNDRAISING 

8:15 THE I.W.W. WOBBLES AGAIN 

The songs, stoiies and past glories of the Interna- 
tional Workers of the World, as chronicled by 

Art Wadsworth. 

8:45 FUNDRAISING 

9:30 TRIBUTE TO WOODY GUTHRIE 

Produced by Howard and Roz Larman, with a 
little help from Woody 's friends (which includes 
a goodly portion of the world). 

11:30 FUNDRAISING 

12:00 Midnight. TO BE ANNOUNCED 



MONDAY JULY 30 



6:00 MUSICA PACIFICA 

The Pacifica Singers, under the direction of Paul 
Vorwerk, perform in these tapes recorded at 
KPFK in the early '70s. As counter-point, some 
live fundraising. 

9:00 THIS MORNING 

News, commentary, features and Terry Hodel's 
Calendar of Events. 

10:00 TRIBUTE TO PAUL ROBESON 

Mario Casetta's oft-requested re-working of ma- 
terial by and about the Black artist who was 
blacklisted. With words and music and fundraising. 

12:00 Noon. CHARLES IVES TALKS BACK 

A program featuring the political songs and prose 
of Charles Ives, as produced by David Cloud and 
Everett Frost for their program "Zymurgy" five 
days after the re-election of Richard Nixon to the 
presidency. 

2:00 FUNDRAISING 

3:00 TOPANGA: Hideout or Alternative? 

The closest thing Los Angeles has to an urban 
wilderness is the subject of this spritely docu- 
mentary by Clare Spark. 

4:00 FUNDRAISING 

4:30 DEATH IN VENICE, U.S.A. 

We move down the coast a bit to another kind 
of enclave, in this documentary produced in 
1974 by Petrie Mason. 

:30 FUNDRAISING 

:55 CALENDAR/ Terry Hodel 

:00 THE EVENING NEWS 

:45 COMMENTARY/ Charles Morgan 

:00 FUNDRAISING 



00 XA: A Vietnam Primer 

The Provisional Theater recreates the history of 
Vietnam in this dramamentary (better than docu- 
drama, don't you think?) and what emerges is a 
frightening picture. Originally done In 1973. 



FOLIO PAGE 27-1 ULY /SPECIAL DAYS 



9:30 FUNDRAISING 

10:30 13 SECONDS AT KENT STATE 

One of the most tcirifyiiig manifestations of the 
war in Vietnam took place in 1971, when four 
students were shot and killed by National Guards- 
men at Kent State University in Ohio. Here is a 
documentary presentation of what happened, 

11:30 FUNDRAISING 

12:00 Midnight. IN THE MATTER OF RICHARD 

M. NIXON -I. Less than 24 hours after the U.S. 
Supreme Court heard oral arguments for and a- 
gainst President Nixon's refusal to hand over 
tapes of White House conversations regarding 
Watergate to the Senate Watergate Committee, 
KPFK produced, live, this recreation of those 
oral arguments. This dramatization fcatLires Pe- 
ter Bonerz, Marvin Miller and others. Part I co- 
vers the mtroduction and the case for handing 
over the tapes as made by Leon Jaworski on be- 
half of the Committee. 

1:05 a.m. IN THE MATTER OF RICHARD M. 

NIXON-II. Next, it was the turn of Phillip La 
Covera, arguing in behalf of President Nixon's 
refusal to deliver the tapes. 

2:30 IN THE MATTER OF RICHARD M. NIXON-III 

We skip the rebuttals and the surrebuttals to move 
forward in time a few days to the decision of the 
Supreme Court, as interpreted dramatically by 
Marvin Miller. 

The balance of the evening/morning will be pro- 
duced by Roy of Hollywood, who will flog you 
with appeals for money and varied Watergate 
memorabilia. 



TUESDAY JULY 31 



6:00 MUSICA PACIFICA 

Marco da GAGLIANO: loDufne (1608), per- 
formed by Musica Pacifica, conducted by Paul 
Vorwerk. Robert White, tenor (Apollo), Mary 
Rawcliffe, soprano (Dafne). 

8:00 FUNDRAISING 

9:00 THE MORNING: News, features, calendar 

10:00 FUNDRAISING 

10:30 L.A. PLAYS ITSELF 

A sound collage produced in 1975 by Mike Hodel 
that tries to give you a sense of Los Angeles as it 
has been perceived by writers, poets, visitors and 
those of us who love it. 

11:30 FUNDRAISING 

12:00 Noon. THE UNPERFORMABLE PERFORMED 

From the old "Music Not for Export" series, we 
present SCRIABIN: Mystcrium (edited and com- 
pleted by Alexander Nemtim-A. Liiibimov, piano; 
I. Orlova, organ; with the Russian State Academy 
A Capella Choir and the Moscow Philharmonic 
Orchestra conducted by Kiril Kondrashin. Joseph 
Cooper hosts. 

1:00 FUNDRAISING 



2:00 CENSUS TRACT 2031, Part 1 

We begin an afternoon devoted to a study of one 
of Southern California's neglected areas: East 
Los Angeles. First, a three-part study of E.L^. 
- done in 1963 by KPFK's then-Public Affairs Di- 
rector, Mike Tigar. Part 1 : Problems of the Young. 

3:00 CENSUS TRACT 2031, Part 2 

"Bobby and the Classics." 

3:15 CENSUS TRACT 2031, Part 3 

"Gang Worker." 

4:15 THE CONCRETE KIDS 

The scene is still East L.A. (with some forays 
into Watts), but now the year is 1975. The pro- 
ducer is Vicotr Vasquez, and the subject-is street 
gangs. 

5:15 FUNDRAISING 

5:55 CALENDAR/ Terry Hodel 

6:00 THE EVENING NEWS 

6:45 COMMENTARY 

7:00 FUNDRAISING 

7:30 QUE VIVA, VIVA LA RAZA! 

More on East Los Angeles, this one on the 1970 
march and demonstration. 

8:00 FUNDRAISING 

8:30 JANUARY 31, 1971, EAST LOS ANGELES 

A documentary on the disturbance that followed 
the demonstration called one year to the day after 
the first Chicano Moratorium. 

9:00 FUNDRAISING 

10:00 JOHN CAGE BIRTHDAY PARTY 

"Nothing is accomplished by writing a piece of 
music, nothing is accomplished by hearing a 
piece of music. Nothing is accomplished by play- 
ing a piece of music. Our ears are now in excel- 
lent condition." KPFK pays tribute to one of 
Los Angeles' most neglected native sons, the 
high priest of aleatoria. Originally broadcast on 
Cage's birthday, September 5, 1972. 

11:00 FUNDRAISING 

12:00 Midnight THE EPIC OF GIGGAMESH 

Mitchell Hording reads the oldest known legend 
in this eight-part series produced in 1965. It's 
interspersed with subscription appeals. 



WEDNESDAY AUGUST 1 



6:00 SUNRISE CONCERT 

This morning, Joseph Spencer presents one of 
his favorite broadcasts from his Chapel, Court 
and Countryside series and Carl Stone explains 
why folks should subscribe. 

9:00 THIS MORNING: News, features, calendar 

10:00 FUNDRAISING 

11:00 RICHLAND WOMAN 

Travelling songs are the theme of this broadcast 
of KPFK's former folk music series, originally 
heard January 25, 1978. 



• r)i in p ^(" r -,« 1 1 1, 



/ AUGUST /SPECIAL DAYS 



12:00 Noon. THE SHOSTAKOVICH 13th 

The performance of Shostakovich's 13th Sym- 
phony, done of KPFK for the tiist time outside 
the Soviet Union, almost created an internation- 
al incident. In this program, William Malloch 
explains why and how. 

2:00 FUNDRAfSIIMG 

3:00 LET US NOW PRAISE LABORING MEN 
AND WOMEN. Produced by Jim Berland. 

5:00 FUNDRAISING 

6:00 THE EVENING NEWS 

G:45 COMMENTARY 

7:00 FUNDRAISING 

8:00 CHRIST IN CONCRETE 

Eli Wdllach in a musical drama taken from Pietro 
di Donata's novel. Original music by Harold Seletsky. 

8:30 FUNDRAISING 

9:00 THE TRIP LOG 1960-1973 

Mitchell Harding and some remarks about Ameri- 
cans, the first "trip" in 1960 and the summary 
and conclusion from LSD and Genetic Damage, 
Science Magazine, April 30, 1971. 

10:00 FUNDRAISING 

11:00 THE FIRESIGN THEATER 

Peter Bergman, Phil Procter, David Ossman and 
Phil Austin began as the Firesign Theater on 
KPFK. Here is one of the broadcasts they did 
early on 

12:00 Midnight. TUCKMAN'S CHOICE 

Better known as Roy of Hollywood, the local 
lord of the after midnight-manor ransacks the 
archives for KPFK programs not listed elsewhere. 
He will also give a dramatic reading of an old 
favorite, "985-KPFK," with appropriate sound- 
effects and illuminating commentary. 



THURSDAY AUGUST 2 

6:00 MUSICA PACIFICA 

Claudio Monteverdi's 1610 Vespers, performed 
live May 18, 1974, by Musica Pacifica and the 
Pacifica Singers, Paul Vorwerk conducting. 

9:00 THIS MORNING: News, features, calendar 

10:00 OPEN TIME 

We don't know ourselves what's going to be heard 
but we can promise you that it'll be from the 
KPFK archives and worth listening to. 

11:00 FUNDRAISING 

12:00 Noon. MUSIC DEPARTMENT'S CHOICE 

KPFK's Music Director Carl Stone picks some- 
thing from the music shelf out of KPFK's past. 

2:00 FUNDRAISING 

3:00 THE DARWIN CENTENNIAL 

From October 1959, a discussion of Darwin's 
theory and its impact. A panel moderated by 
Aldous Huxley and featuring Gal Tech's Nobel 
Prize winner George Beadle and two biologists 
from the University of California Santa Barbara, 
Garret Hardin and Walter James. 



4:00 FUNDRAISING 

4:30 RAPE AT BLACK MESA 

A report on a plan to turn the Hopi and Navajo 
reservations into suburbs of Los Angeles and des- 
troy the last vestiges of traditional Indian life 
within U.S. borders Among other things, Mitchell 
Harding talks with David Monongye, 70 year old 
elder of the Hopi Nation. Produced in 1970. 

5:20 FUNDRAISING 

5:55 CALENDAR/ Terry Hodel 

6:00 THE EVENING NEWS 

6:45 COMMENTARY 

7:00 KPFK: What Lies Ahead? 

A live panel discussion, featuring past and present 
programmers and you, in a program designed to 
elicit your views of what the station is doing right 
and wrong, and what we should be doing. Moder- 
ated by Mike Hodel. with Jim Berland and others. 
You're invited to participate by phone. 

9:00 FUNDRAISING 

10:00 FOOD OF THE GODS 

A dramatization of the H G. Welles novel, origi- 
nally performed live by the Janus Company and 
people of Hour 25. 

11:00 FUNDRAISING 

12:00 SCIENCE FICTION TIME 

Roy of Hollywood and Mike of Hollywood team 
up to bring you skiffy and the subscription drive. 



FRIDAY AUGUST 3 



6:00 SUNRISE CONCERT'S CHOICE 

Carl Stone picks one of the best of his programs 
and recreates it before your very ears. He will al- 
so ask non-subscribers to support KPFK's music. 

9:00 THIS MORNING: News, calendar, features 

10:00 FUNDRAISING 

10:30 CORWIN/SEEGER 

That's Norman and Pete, in a conversation re- 
corded at KPFK in April 1968, illustrated with 
Pete's music. 

11:30 FUNDRAISING 

12:00 Noon. CAL ARTS PERCUSSION ENSEMBLE 

Incredible performances mark this program done 
live at KPFK's studios, under the direction of 
James Tenney. The works feature an all-American 
motif: VARESE: Ionization: HARRISON: Canti- 
cle No. 3 (the complete version), COWELL: 
Ostinato Pianissimo; GARLAND: Three Strange 
Angels. 

2:00 FUNDRAISING 

2:30 THE ASCENT OF F-6 

The play by W.H. Auden and Christopher Isher- 
wood, produced by KPFK people. 

4:30 FUNDRAISING 



FOLIO PAGE 29-AUGUST /SPECIAL DAYS 



5:00 THE DESTROYING AiMGELS 

An anonymuiji 'otter sent to KPFK in 1963 that 
answers all your fears about the subversion of the 
American Way of Life. All the signs and portents 
are heie, in this amazing piece read by Lee Whiting, 
in 1963, it was paranoia, but today. . . . 

5:40 FUNDRAISING 

5:55 CALENDAR/ Terry Model 

6:00 THE EVENING NEWS 

6:45 COMMENTARY 

7:00 TAXES FOR TORTURE 

A 19/5 docLjmentaiy produced by Tim McGovern. 
If you thought "Destroying Angels" was scary, 
listen to this one. . . 

8:00 MINGUS 

The second in a series of six live concerts dedi- 
cated to the memory of Charles Mingus. Tonight, 
• bassist Larry Gales and his sextet )oin host Bob 
Frazier in KPFK's Studio Z for an evening of 
beautiful jazz expression. The concert is free of 
charge to the public, and must begin promptly 
at 8. Please arrive early. For reservations, call 
877-271 1 weekdays from 9:30 to 5:30. Techni- 
cal assistance by Ed Hammond and David Rubin. 

10:00 FUNDRAISING 

11:00 PHILIP K. DICK INTERVIEW 

Fiom the "Hour 25" archives, an interview with 
one of the best writers in all of science fiction, 
the author of the Hugo- winning novel, Man in 
the High Castle. 

12:30 BEST OF GOODBYE PORKPIE HAT 

Picked by Paul Vangelisti 

2:00 a.m. BEST OF BIG SLEEP/ John Breckow 



SATURDAY AUGUST 4 



ALL DAY 



20 YEARS UPSTREAM 

Mike Hodel and Roy Tuckman will program this 
day from the archives; their own personal desires 
and yours. Sit down now with a writing tool, and 
search around in your mmd for what's been left 
out that you'd like to hear on this day. Then send 
your suggestions to Mike and Roy at the station 
(3729 Cahuenga West, North Hollywood 91604). 
We'll ao our best to incorporate your lists, to the 
degree that the stuff is still available. 




n-^^ 



It has been predicted that the price of gasoline 
could rise to as much as SI. 50 per gallon by the 
time this issue of the KFPK Folio e.xpires. 

We have already seen what this fuel "shortage" 
has the potential to do. . . long lines at service 
stations and short tempers in those hnes. 

We at the BIKE FACTORY are not anti- 
automobile, but we do believe that cycling is a 
way to cut down on spending money for gasoline 
and even more importantly the best exercise a 
person can engage in and enjoy. 

We believe that everyone able to ride a bike 
should do so for health as well as for enjoyment. 
Therefore, we keep our labor rates low and our 
equipment prices at affordable cost. 

We have had 15 years of experience in repairing 
bicycles and both of us, being competitive racing 
cycUsts, believe that we know how bikes should 
perform for maximuin efficiency and pleasure. 

The new bikes we carry are excellent machines 
and are very affordable. The used bikes we have 
fr.om time to time are put in excellent running 
order before they are even shown. 

As an extra incentive, this month we offer 
you a free Master lock and 6-foot wound steel 
cable for every new bike purchased, or a free 
safety check on your present bike. 

"Happy Cychng and Good Health!" 



THE 

BIKE FACTORY 



13711 Burbaiik Blvd. 

Vail Nuys, California 91401 

781-7522 



Owned and operated by 

Tim Hopper and Morey Bassman, 

members ot the U.S. Cycling Federation 




FOLIO PAGE 30-AUGUST / SPECIAL DAYS 



(advertisement) 



EXCl-liSIVE SHOWiNG 






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lovely and vibrant." 

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WESTLAND 
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A rich bittersweet comedy overflowing with 
an irresistable Italianate passion for life 
with Monica Vitti in a tour-de-force 
performance in the title role. " 

— Kevin Thomas 
L.A. Times 



Monica Vitti ■' 
in 
Carlo Di Raima's 

TERESA 



tf. 



TflE 



r 



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IDirected by Carlo DiPalma 

Produced by 
Giovanni Bertolucci 



English subtitles 



"A DAZZLING, REMARKABLE 
SUPERNATURAL THRILLER!" 



— KEVIN THOMAS 

LOS ANGELES TIMES 



" 'THE LAST WAVE' IS AN IMPRESSIVE 
WORK from a director whose ability to 
find the eerie in the commonplace might 
please Hitchcock. A movingly moody 
film." 

—Vincent Canby, New York Times 



"A UNIQUE CINEMATIC ACHIEVE- 
MENT. DESTINED TO BECOME A 
CLASSIC!" 

The Village Voice 



Richard Chamberlain m 
Peter Weir's 

THE LAST WAVE 

with Olivia Hamnetl. Gulpllit and Nanjiwarra Amagula 
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FOLIO PAGE 31 




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FOLIO PAGE 32 



SUNDAY AUGUST 5 



6:00 GOSPEL CARAVAN/ Prince Dixon 

9:00 BIO-MEDITATION/ Jack Gariss 

Experiential, experimental exploration of you. 

10:00 FRONTIERS OF A NEW AGE/ Judy Walker 

Judy's guest is Dr. Carl Simonton, MD, oncologist 
and radiologist on curing cancer with imagery 
meditation. 

11:00 DOROTHY HEALEY: Marxist Commentary 

12:00 MANY WORLDS OF MUSIC/ Mario Casetta 

Summer Reruns! Vintage Casetta of the past 
8 years. Tapes of music and interviews from 
many lands. Produced by the Old Ethnic. Opah. 

1:00 THE SUNDAY OPERA/ Fred Hyatt 

August is "Recent Releases" month. Today: 
MOZART: Don Giovanni with Sherrill and Wal- 
ter Berry, baritones, Anna Tomowa-Sintow and 
Teresa Zylis-Gara, sopranos; Peter Schreier, te- 
nor; John Macurdy, bass. The Vienna Philhar- 
monic is conducted by Karl Boehm. Deutsche 
Grammophon 2709 985. 

5:00 SOUR APPLE TREE: Arts & Politics/ Clare Spark 

6:00 THE SUNDAY NEWS 

6:30 THE SCIENCE CONNECTION 

Science workers Steve and Vera Kilston share 
news, information and opinion. 

7:00 PREACHIN' THE BLUES/ Mary Aldin 

Blues, Black gospel and boogie woogie, spanning 
60 years of recorded music. Half an hour tonight 
on Blind Willie McTell. 

8:30 LESBIAN SISTERS/ Helene Rosenbluth 

Information, features, music and guests. 

9:30 FOLKSCENE/The Larmans 

Live and recorded music of America, Brittish Isles, 
France, Australia, New Zealand and Canada. 

12:00 SMOKE RINGS/ John Breckow 



MONDAY AUGUST 6 



6:00 SUNRISE CONCERT/ Carl Stone 

9:00 THIS MORNING: News, features, calendar 

10:00 FOLKDANCE WITH MARIO! 

11:00 THE MORNING READING 

Margaret Fowler continues reading Gertrude 
Stein's The Autobiography of A/ice B. Toklas. 

11:30 KULCHUR 

News, views and interviews as they appear on 
the cultural horizon. 

12:00 NOON CONCERT: 

Music of the Americas/ John Schneider 

VILLA- LOBOS: Fantasia Concertante; (Bach) 
Preludes and Fugues; Fantasia for soprano sax (48). 

2:00 ECLECTICA 

Alan Watts finishes the 4-talk series on "Oriental 
Philosophy and the West" (44'). Then from Lucis 
Trust, "Ponder on This," a 5' talk, "A Clarification 
of Love." 



THE AFTERNOON AIR 

Audio journey on the drive-time airstrefam. Host 
is Anita Frankel; technical producer is Linda Mack. 

3:00 Within the hour: 

Coming Attractions. . . News Highlights with Ri- 
chard Mahler. . . Your Angle on the News. . . Ja/z 
Close-Up with Rick James: focusing on piar><st 
Oscar Peterson. . . Organic Gardening with Will 
Kinney and Barbara Spark at about 3:30. 

4:30 Within the hour: 

Dealing/ Barbara Cady. . . Open Air. 

5:00 Within the hour: 

Body Politics: Separating the wise from the fool- 
ish on the cpntemporary healing scene. Conversa- 
tions with both holistic and Western medicos. . . 
Open .Air on energy and/or features, on making a 
livable future. . . Terry Hodel's Calendar at 5:50. 

6:00 THE EVENING NEWS 

6:45 COMMENTARY/ Charles Morgan 

7:00 LABOR SCENE/ Sam Kushner 

7:30 REPORT TO THE LISTENER/ Jim Berland 

8:00 LA VIDA LATINA 

Luis Torres and David Sandoval share information 
and music with the Latin community. 

9:00 CHAPEL, COURT AND COUNTRYSIDE 

KPFK's Showcase for early musifc, exploring the 
music of the European heritage, from the early 
Middle Ages up to the days of Mozart and Bee- 
thoven. Conceived, written and produced by 
Joseph Spencer, who also hosts. (Rebroadcasts 
air Thursdays on Noon Concert) 

10:30 IN FIDELITY/ Peter Sutheim 

Audio advice from one who knows whereof he 
speaks: KPFK's Operations Director. 

12:00 SOMETHING'S HAPPENING/ Roy of Hollywood 

Alan Watts at 12:00 with the last of his 4-part talk 
on "Oriental Philosophy and the West" (53') from 
MEA, Box 303, Sausalito 94965. Then open night 
for great programs, maybe some leftover amateur 
cassettes. 



TUESDAY AUGUST 7 

6:00 SUNRISE CONCERT/ Carl Stone 

9:00 THIS MORNING: News, features, calendar 

10:00 FOLKSCENE/The Larmans 

Sampler of traditional & contemporary folk music. 

11:00 THE MORNING READING 

Margaret Fowler reads Gertrude Slein's Autobio- 
graphy of Alice B. Toklas. 

11:30 KULCHUR 

Judith Weiner interviews film community people. 

12:00 NOON CONCERT: 

At the Keyboard/ Leonid Hambro 

Tribute to Leopold Godowski. Along with in- 
studio performances by Lee of music by Godow- 
ski and Schumann, were recorded performances 
of DEBUSSY: Clair dc Lune with Godowski, pi- 
ano; SINDING: Rustles of Spring, Godowski, pi- 
ano; SCHUMANN; Carnival w\th Yuri Egorov, 



FOLIO PAGE 33-AUGUST 



piano and also a performance of the Carnival by 
Daniel Pollack; CHOPIN: Funeral March Sonata 
with Godowski, piano. This program was original- 
ly aired February 13, 1979. 

2:00 ECLECTICA 

History of Astronomy part 4-an examination of 
the life and work of Galileo, one of the first to use 
a telescope. He discovered the moons of Jupiter, 
and the phases of Venus, the "seas," "continents" 
and "mountains" on the moon. Because of his 
popular but undiplomatic pronouncements about 
his discoveries and proofs of Copernicus' theory, 
Galileo was summoned to the Inquisition and 
forced to recant. Then, Bertha and. . . Martin in 
"A Sudden Change of Plans." When the test pilot 
fails to show, Mjrtin decides to take the balloon 
■ip himself despite Bertha's pleas. 

THE AFTERNOON AIR 

Drive-time radio with Anita Frankel, Linda Mack. 

3:00 Within the hour: 

Coming Attractions. . . News Highlights/ Richard 
Mahler. . . Your Angle on the News. . . Jazz Close- 
Upl Rick James: focus on Oscar Peterson. . . 
Strawberry Shortbread/Pat Benson. 

4:00 Within the hour: 

Open Air. . . Dealing/ Barbara Cady & guests. 

5:00 Within the hour: 

LA 5 PM/ Burt Wilson with timely topics and 
guests. . . Events Calendar/ Terr'^ Hodel, 5:50. 

6:00 THE EVENING NEWS 

6:45 TAKING SIDES: Debate 

7:30 OPEN JOURNAL: Late-breaking features 

8:00 CARLOS HAGEN PRESENTS 

Surfing. As an appropriate summer program, Car- 
los explores the world of surfing— not only the 
history and varied aspects of the sport, but also 
the sub-culture associated with surfing, including 
many pertinent musical and documentary illustra- 
tions. 

9:00 BOSTON SYMPHONY: Live in Concert 

SCHOENBERG: Gurre-Lleder. Jessye Norman, 
soprano; Tatiana Troyanos, mezzo-soprano; James 
McCracken and Kim Scown, tenors; David Arnold, 
baritone; Werner Klemperer, narrator; The Tangle- 
wood Festival Chorus, John Oliver conductor. 
Seiji Ozawa conducts. William Pierce hosts. Re- 
corded using the Dolby A Noise-reduction System, 
(program subject to change) 

11:00 THE BIG BROADCAST/ Bobb Lynes 

Have Gun, Will Travel (4/17/60), CBS; The 
Stan Freberg Show {no. 14, 10/13/57), CBS. 

12:00 SOMETHING'S HAPPENING/ Roy of Hollywood 

Parts 14 & 15 of "Beethoven, His Spiritual Devel- 
opment" by J.W.N. Sullivan, read by Dudley Knight 
produced by Roy E. Tuckman. Tonight's subject, 
"Love and Money." Then Eric Bauersfeld's "Black 
Mass" with "The Squaw" by Bram Stoker (30'). 
Then the last of the series "Californians of Mexi- 
can Descent" on "Their Values and Psychology" 
(60'). Our X Minus Oneathon continues with four 
30' segments: "Chain of Command" ( 1 1/21/56), 
"Real Gone" (2/27/57), "Drop Dead" (8/27/57), 
and "Double Dare" (12/19/57). At 5:00, Bio- 
Meditation with Jack Gariss. 



WEDNESDAY AUGUST 8 



6:00 SUNRISE CONCERT/ Carl Stone 

Featured work: Matthew LOCKE: Incidental 
Music to "The Tempest;" Music for His Majesty's 
Sackbuls <S Cornctts. The Academy of Ancient 
Music performs on authentic instruments. L'Ois- 
eau-LyreDSLO 507. 

9:00 THIS MORNING: News, features, calendar 

10:00 FOLKDANCE WITH MARIO! 

11:00 THE MORNING READING 

Margaret Fowler reads Gertrude Stein's Autobio- 
graphy of Alice B. Toklas. 

11:30 KULCHUR: Theater Close-Up/ Ray Tatar 

12:00 NOON CONCERT: 

Jazz at Noon/ John Schneider. Today featuring 
Lee Ritenour's album "Feel the Night." Jazz/rock 
guitar and a lot more. 

2:00 ECLECTICA 

Bobb Lynes presents his "Primordial Big Broad- 
cast" with "The Jack Benny Show" (CBS, 5/17/ 
54), and "Phil Harris/Alice Faye Show" (NBC, 
1/23/49). 

THE AFTERNOON AIR 

Winging it on the audio airstream. Anita Frankel 
hosts; Linda Mack is at the controls. 

3:00 Within the hour: 

Coming Attractions. . . News Highlights/ Richard 
Mahler. . . Your Angle on the News. . . Open Air 
. . . Ruth's Kitchen/ Ruth Ziony. 

4:00 Within the hour: 

Open Air. . . Jon Brewer's Eye on Sports. . . Open 
Air. 

5:00 Within the hour: 

More than Half the Sky: features by and for wo- 
men. . . Open Air. . . Events Calendar/Terry Hodel. 

6:00 THE EVENING NEWS 

6:45 COMMENTARY/ Charles Morgan 

7:00 NEWSLINE: Open phones 

7:30 OPEN JOURNAL: Late breaking features 

8:00 UP FROM THE ASH GROVE/ Ed Pearl 

9:30 THE BEST OF L.A.T.E., Part 1 

"The Great Debate," by Ken Girard. A dramatic 
realization of opposing ideologies, or, what might 
happen if. . . If you missed the original live broad- 
cast in May on KPFK's highly acclaimed Los An- 
geles Theater of the Ear, don't blow this special 
rebroadcast. Produced and directed for LATE by 
Paul Vangelisti, engineered by Ed Hammond and 
David Rubin, and featuring Nick Lewis, Demene 
Hall, Bill Hunt, Mike Hodel and Michael Elliott. 

10:30 RADIO FREE OZ 

12:00 SOMETHING'S HAPPENING! / Roy Polloy 

Dimension of Imagination strikes again with 
"Lyrics of Destiny." A trio of strange tales inter- 
woven with songs written by David L. Krebs, pro- 
ducer (30'). Then, "The Next Billion Years, talk 
4 of 12, "Energy and Resources, the Future of a 



FOLIO PAGE 34- AUGUST 



Human Society in a Finite World," with Dr. Wil- 
liam E. Cooper, Prof, of Zoology, Mich. State U. 
(60'). Then the "Argive Soliloquies", no. 4 of 6, 
"The Price of Power" from Earplay. Then "Salome' 
by Oscar Wilde, directed by Leonard Nimoy (92'). 
We then continue, at 4:25 Knshnamurti Goes to 
College, now at San Diego State for the first of 
five talks from 1970. 



THURSDAY AUGUST 9 

6:00 SUNRISE CONCERT/ Carl Stone 

9:00 THIS MORNING: News, features, calendar 

10:00 FOLKSCENE/ The Larmans 

Singer-songwriter Peter Alsop visits and shares 
some of his fine original music. 

11:00 THE MORNING READING 

Gertrude Stein's Autobiography of Alice B. i 

Toklas, read by Margaret Fowler. 

11:30 KULCHUR 

The Cultural Affairs Dep't. keeps this slot open 
for special interviews and events of interest to 
the community. 

12:00 NOON CONCERT: 

Chapel, Court and Countryside/ Joseph Spencer 

2:00 ECLECTICA 

Part 3 of our 6-part presentation of "In the Mat- 
ter of J. Robert Oppenheimer"continues with the 
conclusion of act 1, the statements of Radzi and 
Lansdale. Then Bertha and. . . Ivan, in which 
"Bertha Finds a Silver Lining." At Martin's me- 
morial luncheon, Bertha tells Eunice how it hap- 
pened, and is attracted to Ivan. 

THE AFTERNOON AIR 

An audiomagazine. Anita Frankel hosts; Linda 
Mack is on the board. 

3:00 Within the hour: 

Coming Attractions. . . News Highlights/ Richard 
Mahler. . . Your Angle on the News. . . Speaking 
of Seniors: Grace Jacobs fills in for Aurelia Mor- 
ris and Grey Power. . . The Health Department/ 
Al Huebner takes on the health and drug biz. 

4:00 Within the hour: 

Open Air. . . Dealing/ Barbara Cady. . . Open Air. 

5:00 Within the hour: 

LA 5 PM/ Burt Wilson. . . Terry Model's Calendar. 

6:00 THE EVENING NEWS 

6:45 COMMENTARY 

7:00 INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL 

7:30 OPEN JOURNAL: Late breaking features 

8:00 RADIOFEST: New American Music 

This series represents a cross section of the new 
music activity that has exploded across the US, 
centered in the university, in the 70s. Heard this 
evening: Francis SCHWARTZ: Caligula; Richard 
WILSON: Music for Solo Flute; Robert CEELY: 
Logs; Menachem ZUR: Rondo and Sonata; Karel 
HUSA: Music for Prague. 



9:00 CLEVELAND ORCHESTRA: Live in Concert 

J.S. BACH: Violin Concerto No. 2 in E major; 
MOZART: Violi/i Concerto No. 5 in A major, 
K. 219 "Turkish;" DEBUSSY: La Men The solo- 
ist is Wanda Wilkomirska. Erich Leinsdorf con- 
ducts. Robert Conrad hosts (subj. to change). 

11:00 JANUS COMPANY RADIO THEATRE 

Frankenstein Month begins with The Creature's 
Story. Victor Frankenstein has created a living 
being out of the rotting bits and pieces of the 
dead. Shunned, persecuted and disillusioned, the 
creature seeks his maker hoping for compassion 
and understanding-or, failing that, revenge. Fea- 
turing Mike Hodel as Frankenstein, Mallon/ Gel- 
ler as the creature with Ruth Buell, Jerry Bono, 
Mel Gilden and Jan Ridolphi Geller. Based on 
the novel by Mary Shelley. 

11:30 BEETHOVEN: A Portrait of his Life 

Part 12: "Against a Sea of Trouble." Tapes 
courtesy of Deutsche Welle. 

12:00 SOMETHING'S HAPPEMJNG/ Roy of Hollywood 

Tentative live guest psychic and aura reader (until 
she gets tired) Susan Ford returns for phone read- 
ings (the secret word is DeSoto). // Open night if 
time allows until 5 a.m. when Joseph Campbell 
gives 2 30' talks on "The Individual Nature." 



FRIDAY AUGUST 10 



6:00 SUNRISE CONCERT/ Carl Stone 

9:00 THIS MORNING: News, features, calendar 

10:00 INDEPENDENT MUSIC/ Mario Casetta 

11:00 THE MORNING READING 

Margaret Fowler reading Gertrude Stein's novel. 
Autobiography of Alice B. Toklas. Most likely, 
the reading will be ending here, give or take a 
day. The rest of the month will be shorter works. 

11:30 KULCHUR 

Our regular Friday wrap-up on the arts, with Paul 
Vangelisti, Bill Hunt and Dean Cohen. 

12:00 NOON CONCERT; Soundboard/ John Schneider 

Etudes & Preludes for guitar. Host John Schneider 
performs music by Bach and Villa-Lobos; also, live 
- performances by winners of this year's ASTA solo 
guitar competition Peter Zisa and William Kanengiser. 

2:00 ECLECTICA 

Part 3 of ZBS Media's 8-part senes Stars N' Stuff, 
"Rocket Pierre and the Nincompoor of Neptune" 
and "Jack Flanders in 'The Ah-Ha! Phenomena' " 
(part 1). Produced by ZBS Media, R.D. 1, Fort 
Edward NY 12828. 

THE AFTERNOON AIR 

Host is Anita Frankel, co-host nad technical pro- 
ducer is Linda Mack. 

3:00 Within the hour: 

Coming Attractions. . . News Highlights/ Richard 
Mahler. . . you phone in Your Angle on the News 
. . . jazz Close-up: Rick James on Oscar Peterson 
. . . American Indian Airwaves with Liz Lloyd. 

4:00 Within the hour: 

Open Air. . . Dealing with Barbara Cady & guests. 



FOLIO PAGE 35-AUGUST 



5:00 Within the hour: 

Media Watch, under the eagle eye of Claudia 
FondaBonardi. . . Open Air. . . and Terry Ho 
del's Events Calendar at 5:50. 

6:00 THE EVENING NEWS 

6:45 NEWSLINE: Open Phones 

7:00 INSIDE LA/ Bob Pugsley 

A broad range of contemporary issues and their 
impact on the Los Angeles metropolitan area. 

7:30 CHILD'S PLAY: Children's stories 

8:00 JAZZ OMNIBUS/ Ron Pelletier 

"The Golden Flute:" The Lew Tabackin Trio. 

Lew's primary instruments are the flute and the 
tenor saxophone. He's described his approach to 
these instruments this way: "I try to get inside 
the horn— wholly involved emotionally— breath- 
ing my soul into the horn." Another in the series 
of live music and interviews broadcast "In Con- 
cert" from KPFK's Studio Z, made possible by 
the American Federation of Musicians Local 47 
Performance Trust Fund. You are invited to at- 
tend, free of charge. Arrive by 7:40 for best seats. 

10:00 HOUR 25: Science Fiction 

Mike Hodel, John Henry Thong and Terry Hodel 
share information about sf, in LA & elsewhere. 

12:00 GOODBYE PORKPIE HAT/ Paul Vangelisti 

2:00 THE BIG SLEEP/ John Breckow 



SATURDAY AUGUST 11 

6:00 NO STRINGS ATTACHED/ Scott Bodell 

7:30 FUSION/ Lauren Lee 

8:30 THE NIXON TAPES/ Tom Nixon 

9:30 HALFWAY DOWN THE STAIRS/ Uncle Ruthie 

Uncle Ruthie (Buell) talks in many voices, but 
never down. To kids, grown-ups, all people. 

10:30 FOLK MUSIC/ John Davis 

12:30 THE CAR SHOW/ John Retsek, Len Frank 

1:50 WEEKEND CALENDAR/ Terry Hodel 

2:00 BALLADS, BANJOS & BLUEGRASS/ Tom Sauber 

3:30 SONG & CELEBRATION/ Dan Wright 

6:00 THE SATURDAY NEWS/ Larry Moss 

6:30 IN PRINT/ Robert Peters 

6:45 THE WELL-TEMPERED READER/ Jed Rasula 

7:00 GARDEN THEATER FESTIVAL 

Highlights from last season's outdoor culturefest. 

8:00 THE WILLIAM MALLOCH PROGRAMME 

A musical (mostly classical) treasure hunt. 

10:00 IMAGINARY LANDSCAPE 

Carl Stone's guest is composer George Heusen- 
stamm, who'll be bringing in some of his recent 
composrtions 'or airwaving. 

12:00 TESSERACT/ Phil Mendelson 

Contemporary and electronic music. 

2:00 OBLIQUE COLLAGE/ Maurice Walker 



SUNDAY AUGUST 12 

6:00 GOSPEL CARAVAN/ Prince Dixon 
9:00 BIO- MEDITATION/ Jack Gariss 

10:00 FRONTIERS OF A NEW AGE/ Judy Walker 

Guest is Albert Villoldo PhD on psychic surgery. 

11:00 DOROTHY HEALEY: Marxist Commentary 

12:00 MANY WORLDS OF MUSIC/ Mario Casetta 

Summer Reruns of Vintage Casetta. 

1:00 THE SUNDAY OPERA/ Fred Hyatt 

BRITTEN; Peter Grimes with Jon Vickers, tenor; 
Heather Harper, soprano; Jonathan Summers, ba- 
ritone; the Orchestra and Chorus of the Royal 
Opera House, Covent Garden, are conducted by 
Colin Davis. Philips 6769 014. 

5:00 THE SOUR APPLE TREE/ Clare Spark 

6:00 THE SUNDAY NEWS 

6:30 THE SCIENCE CONNECTION/ S. & V. Kilston 

7:00 PREACHIN' THE BLUES/ Mary Aldin 

Featuring a half-hour with Memphis Minnie. 

8:30 IMRU/ The Gay Radio Collective 

News, features, guests and music produced by 
the all-volunteer Collective, of and for Lesbians 
and Gay Men. Also, calendar of community events. 

9:30 FOLKSCENE/The Larmans 

Live and recorded folk music, with interviews 
with the performers. 

12:00 SMOKE RINGS/ John Breckow/ 



MONDAY AUGUST 13 



6:00 SUNRISE CONCERT/ Carl Stone 

9:00 THIS MORNING: News, features, calendar 

10:00 FOLKDANCE WITH MARIO! 

11:00 THE MORNING READING 

11:30 KULCHUR: In the Wings/ John Medici 

12:00 NOON CONCERT: 

Music of the Americas/ John Schneider 

CARTER: Brass Quintet ('74); Eight Pieces for 
Four Timpani; FELDMAN: Rothko Chapel; 
For Frank O'Hara ('73). 

2:00 ECLECTICA 

We continue our Alan Watts series from MEA 
(title not available at press deadline). Then "Pon- 
der on This" continues with a 5' talk, "Group 
Consciousness." 

THE AFTERNOON AIR 

With Anita Frankel and Linda Mack. 

3:00 Within the hour: 

Coming Attractions. . . News Highlights. . . Your 
Angle on the News. . . jazz Close-Up with Rick 
James: focus on vibes king Lionel Hampton. . . 
Organic Gardening with Will and Barbara at 3:30. 

4:30 Within the hour: 

Dealing with Barbara Cady & guests. . . Open Air. 



FOLIO PAGE 36-AUGUST 



5:00 Within the hour: 

Consumer Av.'oreness with Ida Honorof; focus 
today on birth deformities Among Japanese mon- 
keys, and the relationship to human birth defects. 
. . . Open Air. . . Events Calendar with Terry Model. 

6:00 THE EVENING. NEWS 

6:45 COMMENTARY/ Charles Morgan 

7:00 LABOR SCENE/ Sam Kushner 

7:30 REPORT TO THE LISTENER/ Jim Berland 

8:00 LA VI DA LATIN A/ Sandoval & Torres 

9:00 CHAPEL, COURT AND COUNTRYSIDE 

Showcase for early music, with Joseph Spencer. 

10:30 IN FIDELITY/ Peter Sutheim 

12:00 SOMETHING'S HAPPENING/ Roy of Hollywood 

Alan Watts contributes his thoughts to the night 
people (details unavailable at press), then open 
night until 6 a.m. If you make the right vibrative 
connections, Dudley Knight may drop by for a 
"Graveyard Shift." 



TUESDAY AUGUST 14 

6:00 SUNRISE CONCERT/ Carl Stone 

9:00 THIS MORNING: News, features, calendar 

10:00 FOLKSCENE/ The Larmans 

Folk music of the British Isles. 

11:00 THE MORNING READING 

11:30 KULCHUR: Backstage/ Gil Laurence 

12:00 NOON CONCERT: 

At the Keyboard/ Leonid Hambro 

The Sonata. So what really is a sonata? Lee Ham- 
bro tells all, and plays examples of the sonata 
form by BEETHOVEN; CHOPIN; MOZART; 
SCARLATTI. A rebroadcast of a live program 
aired April 17, 1979. 

2:00 ECLECTICA 

In History of Astronomy, part 5, James S. Pick- 
ering talks about the life and work of Isaac New- 
ton, who described the properties of color and 
light, developed the reflecting telescope, and 
formulated the Universal Law of Gravitation. 
This law solidified Copernicus' theory and Kep- 
ler's work into the foundation of modern astro- 
nomy that led to Einstein's theory of relativity. 
Then Bertha and. . . Karl in "Help Arrives." Ber- 
tha is rescued by a suspicious character. 

THE AFTERNOON AIR 

Anita Frankel and Linda Mack preside. 

3:00 Within the hour: 

Coming Attractions. . . News Highlights. . . Your 
Angle on the News. . . Jazz Close-Up/Rick James 
focusing on Lionel Hampton. . . Strawberry Short- 
bread/ Pat Benson on public schools. 

4:00 Within the hour: 

Open Air. . . Dealing/ Barbara Cady. 

5:00 Within the hour: 

LA 5 PM/ Burt Wilson & guests. . . Events Calen- 
dar/Terry Hodel, 5:50. 

6:00 THE EVENING NEWS 



6:45 TAKING SIDES: Debate 

7:30 OPEN JOURNAL: Late breaking features 

8:00 CARLOS HAGEN PRESENTS 

California, Summer and Surf Music. Part 1. Due 
to many requests, a repeat of this two-parter on 
"surfing music," the kind that flourished especial- 
ly in California between 1960-65. It is a very im- 
portant, yet often ignored, part of American popu- 
lar music, vibrant and indelibly associated with 
summer, California beaches, sun, sand and surf. 
9:00 BOSTON SYMPHONY: Live in Concert 

TIPPETT: Symphony No. 4; BRAHMS: Violin 
Concerto in D major. Gidon Kremer, violin. Colin 
Davis conducts. William Pierce hosts. Dolby A 
Noise-reduction System (subj. to change). 

11:00 THE BIG BROADCAST/ Bobb Lynes 

Surprise special of the month! 

12:00 SOMETHING'S HAPPENING!/ Roy of Hywd 

"Beethoven, his Spiritual Developmeht" by J.W. 
N. Sullivan, parts 16 & 17 on "The Hammerklavier 
Sonata" and "End of a Period" (30' each). Then 
"The Gondoliers" by Gilbert and Sullivan, with 
the D'Oyly Carte Opera Company (London A 
4204, 90'). Our X Minus Oneathon continues with 
three undated programs: "Perrigi's Wonderful 
Dolls," "Martian Sam," and "And the Moon Be 
As Bright." At 5, Bio-Meditation with Jack Gariss. 



WEDiMESDAY AUGUST 15 



6:00 SUNRISE CONCERT/ Carl Stone 

Featured: SATIE: Monotones (orchestrated by 
Lanchbery, Debussy & Roland-Manuel). The Or- 
chestra of the Royal Opera House, Covent Gar- 
den is conducted by John Lanchbery. Angel S 
037580. 

9:00 THIS MORNING: News, features, calendar 

10:00 FOLKDANCE WITH MARIO! 

11:00 THE MORNING READING 

11:30 KULCHUR: Theater Close-Up/ Ray Tatar 

12:00 NOON CONCERT: 

Jazz at Noon/ John Schneider 

More jazz guitar: Music by Howard Roberts, 
Al Dimeola, Django Reinhardt and others. 

2:00 ECLECTICA 

Bobb Lynes presents the Big Broadcast with 
"The Thin Man" (CBS, 12/1/44), and "Mr. and 
Mrs. North" (CBS, 1940s). 

THE AFTERNOON AIR/ Frankel & Mack 

3:00 Within the hour: 

Coming A ttractions. . . News Highlights. . . Your 
Angle on the News. . . Open Air. . . Ruth 's Kitch- 
en/ Ruth Ziony. 

4:00 Within the hour: 

Open Air. . . John Brewer's Eye on Sports. . . 
Open Air. 

5:00 Within the hour: 

More than Half the Sky. . . Open A ir. . . Events 
Calendar / Terry Hodel, at 5:50. 

6:00 THE EVENING NEWS 



FOLIO PAGE 37-AUGUST 



6:45 COMMENTARY/ Charles Morgan 

7:00 NEWSLINE: Open phones 

7:30 OPEN JOURNAL: Late breaking features 

8:00 UP FROM THE ASH GROVE/ Ed Pearl 

9:30 THE BEST OF L.A.T.E., Part 2 

"Pinter— Live." Rebroadcast from February. This 
dramatic presentation, originally aired live with a 
studio audience on Los Angeles Theater of the 
Ear, is an overview of Pinter's art: a full produc- 
tion of his one-act play, Landscape (1968), and 
selections from his seldom performed earlier 
prose, poetry and drama— "Kullus," a dramatic 
monologue (1949); "I Shall Tear Off My Terrible 
Cap," (1951); and a selection from the one-act 
The Dwarfs (1960). Conceived for radio and di- 
rected by Gillian Fleming, produced by Bill Hunt 
and Paul Vangelisti, engineered by Peter Sutheim 
and featuring Patty Edwards, Larry Moss and Bill 
Hunt. 

10:30 RADIO FREE OZ 

12:00 SOMETHING'S HAPPENING/ R of H 

Dimension of Imagination (Something's Happen- 
ing Players) strikes yet again with David L. Krebs' 
"The Hidden People," a play in the spirit of nu- 
clear disasters plus a generation or two (30'). // 
(Roy: how about using "//" in between segments 
instead of "theip we continue with. . . " or those 
other time & space consuming transitions I'm so 
borreddd of typesettinggggg. . . . Jane) (folks: 
what do you think? My composer does not have 
a backwards P for "paragraph" mark. It does 
have a "t" or a "*" or a ][ or a @ or a + ox a = 
and a few other INappropriate marks like S or %, 
so you could participate in this decision impor- 
tant only to R of H listener-sponsors, by letting 
me or Roy know your choice of transition marks, 
but please don't vote for "then we have. . . "as I 
am boooorrrrred by it. Love, Jane) // Talk no. 5 
of "The Next Billion Years:" "Intelligent Mach- 
ines, Partner or Master?" a talk by Dr. Michael Ar- 
bib, computer development scientist (73'). // From 
Earplay, "The Argive Soliloquies," no. 5, "Under 
Moonlight, A Winter Man With a Knife" (60') by 
John Reeves. // Gilbert & Sullivan's "H.M.S. Pi- 
nafore" with the D'Oyly Carte Opera Co. (London 
A 4234) (100'). // At 4:35, Krishnamurti as San 
Diego State, talk 2, recorded in 1970. 



THURSDAY AUGUST 16 



6:00 SUNRISE CONCERT/ Carl Stone 

9:00 THIS MORNING: News, features, calendar 

10:00 FOLKSCENE/ The Larmans 

Old-timey music at its finest from the Iron 
Mountain String Band. 

11:00 THE MORNING READING 

11:30 KULCHUR; Late breaking cultural features 

12:00 NOON CONCERT: 

Chapel, Court and Countryside/ Joseph Spencer 

2:00 ECLECTICA 

Part 4 of "In the Matter of J. Robert Oppenhei- 
mer," the beginning of act 2, "The Hydrogen 



Bomb." Then Bet tha and. . Karl, "Destination 
Unknown." Karl blindfolds Bertha and takes her 
to his secret hideout. 

THE AFTERNOON AIR 

Anita Frankel hosts; Linda Mack gets technical. 

3:00 Within the hour: 

Coming Attractions. . . News Highlights with 
Richard Mahler. . . Your Angle on the News. . . 
Speaking of Seniors: Grace Jacobs. . . Al Huebner 
offers The Health Department. 

4:00 Within the hour: 

Open Air. . . Dealing I Barbara Cady. . . Open Air. 

5:00 Within the hour: 

LA 5 PM/ Burt Wilson. . . Terry Hodef's Calendar. 

6:00 THE EVENING NEWS 

6:45 COMMENTARY 

7:00 INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL 

7:30 OPEN JOURNAL: Late breaking features 

8:00 RADIOFEST: New American Music 

Emma Lou DIEMER: Declarations for Organ; 
Vincent McDERMOTT: Three for Five; Yehudy 
YANNAY: Two Fragments for Violin and Piano; 
Robert NEWELL: Ryo-nen; F. Gerard ERRANTE: 
Souvenirs de Nice; Robert STERN: Three Chinese 
Poems. 
9:00 CLEVELAND ORCHESTRA: Live in Concert 
HANDEL: Concerto Grosso in C minor, Op. 6, 
No. 8; SCHOENBERG: Variations for Orchestra, 
Op. 31;STRAVINSKY; Capriccio for Piano and 
Orchestra; PROKOFIEV; "Classical" Symphony, 
Op. 25. The pianist is Rudolf Firkuany. Lorin 
Maazel and Yoel Levy conduct. Robert Conrad 
hosts. Program subject to change. 

11:00 JANUS COMPANY RADIO THEATRE 

Frankenstein, Part 2: The Creature's Challenge. 
Frankenstein month continues as the Creature, 
spurned and detested by his maker, threatens 
unspeakable havoc unless Frankenstein does his 
bidding. Mallory and Jan Geller's adaptation of 
the classic was originally aired live. 

11:30 GARFIAS TAPES 

Robert Garfias, noted musicfan and ethnomusi- 
cologist, gives examples of the end-blown flute 
in north India, Iran, Morocco, Uganda, Japan, 
and Bali. 

12:00 SOMETHING'S HAPPENING/ Roy of Hollywood 

Live guest Dore Deverell who discusses the tech- 
niques she used to cure herself of cancer, includ- 
ing food, vitamins, psychosynthesis, etc. We will 
also try to have another guest who did the same 
thing-that's tentative. Open phones. // Open 
night until 5. // Concluding the Joseph Campbell 
series on the "Functions of Mythology in Culture" 
with two 30' talks on "Western Psychology as 
Related to Myth." 



1 



FRIDAY AUGUST 17 



6:00 SUNRISE CONCERT/ Carl Stone 

9:00 THIS MORNING: News, features, calendar 

10:00 INDEPENDENT MUSIC/ Mario Casetta 



FOLIO PAGE 38-AUGUST 



11:00 THE MORNING READING 

11:30 KULCHUR: Weekly wrap-up on the arts 

Bill Hunt, Dean Cohen and Paul Vangelisti host. 

12:00 NOON CONCERT: 

Soundboard/ John Schneider. Music of lutenist 
Sylvius Leopold Weiss, featLitinij newly discovered 
and transcribed works, discussed and performed 
by LA guitarist Paul Mayer. 

2:00 ECLECTICA 

Part 4 of ZBS Media's Stars N' Stuff: "The Ah-Ha! 
Phenomena" (part 2), "The First Voyage to An- 
dromeda," "Motorcyclists from Mars," and "The 
Cheesemen of Mars." 

THE AFTERNOON AIR/ Frankel & Mack 

3:00 Within the hour: 

Coming Attractions. . . News Highlights. . . Your 

Angle on the News. . . Jazz Close-up: Rick James 

on vibes great Lionel Hampton. . . Open Air. 
t 

4:00 Within the hour: 

Open Air. . . Dealing/ Barbara Cady & guests. 

5:00 Within the hour: 

Claudia Fonda-Bonardi's Media Watch. . . Motel 
Madness: Stanley Aronowitz explains things. . . 
then at 5:50, Terry Hodel's Events Calendar. 

6:00 THE EVENING NEWS 

6:45 NEWSLINE: Open phones 

7:00 INSIDE LA/ Bob Pugsley 

7:30 CHILD'S PLAY/ Ruth Buell 

8:00 JAZZ OMNIBUS/ Ron Pelletier 

10:00 HOUR 25/ Hodel, Thong, Hodel 

12:00 GOODBYE PORKPIE HAT/ Paul Vangelisti 

2:00 NOCTURNAL TRANSMISSIONS 

Ed Hammond and David Rubin float downstream, 
musically and audiotically. 



SATURDAY AUGUST 18 



6:00 NO STRINGS ATTACHED/ Scott Bodell 

7:30 FUSION/ Lauren Lee 

8:30 THE NIXON TAPES/ Tom Nixon 

9:30 HALFWAY DOWM THE STAIRS/ Uncle Ruthie 

10:30 FOLK MUSIC/ John Davis 

12:30 THE CAR SHOW/ Len Frank, John Retsek 

1:50 WEEKEND CALENDAR/ Terry Hodel 

2:00 BALLADS, BANJOS & BLUEGRASS/ T. Sauber 

3:30 SONG & CELEBRATION/ Dan Wright 

5:00 OUT LOUD!/ Frank Greenwood 

Information, guests, open phones, focusing on 
Los Angeles' Black community. 

6:00 THE SATURDAY NEWS/ Larry Moss 

6:30 DOUBLE TAKE/ Paul Lion 

Paul reviews a select play; representative of play 
responds. Tonight; the Los Angeles Actors' The- 
ater Third Annual One-Act Play Festival. World 
premieres of works developed in LAAT's Play- 
wrights' Workshop I. Guest: James Shepard, 
playwright and Festival associate producer. 



6:45 ON FILM/ Dean Cohen 

7:00 THE PERFECT CRIME/ Mike Hodel 

8:00 THE WILLIAM MALLOCH PROGRAMME 

10:00 IMAGINARY LANDSCAPE 

Other Voices, Other Sounds/ Joan LaBarbara 

Composer and experimental vocalist Joan LaBai 
bara focuses on contemporary piano music. Her 
guest is pianist Ralph Grierson, recent wmner of 
the Most Valuable Player Award given by the Na- 
tional Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences 
(NARAS). Featured is music by Bill Kraft, Fre- 
derick Leseman, Mort Subotnick, performed by 
Grierson on his not-yet-released Town Hall record. 

12:00 TESSERACT/ Phil Mendelson 

2:00 OBLIQUE COLLAGE/ Maurice Walker 



SUNDAY AUGUST 19 



6:00 GOSPEL CARAVAN/ Prince Dixon 
9:00 BIO- MEDITATION/ Jack Gariss 

10:00 FRONTIERS OF A NEW AGE/ Judy Walker 

Guest is EIroy Schwartz, on hypnosis and past 
and future lives. 

11:00 DOROTHY HEALEY: Marxist Commentary 

With guests and open phones. 

12:00 MANY WORLDS OF MUSIC/ Mario Casetta 

Featuring reruns of the Best of Mario. 

1:00 THE SUNDAY OPERA/ Fred Hyatt 

VIVALDI: Orlando Furioso with Marilyn Home 
and Lucia Valentini-Terrani, mezzo-sopranos; 
Victoria de los Angeles, soprano; Carmen Gon- 
zales, contralto; Lajos Kozma, tenor; Sesto Brus- 
cantini, baritone; Nicola Zaccaria, bass. I Solisti 
Veneti and Amici della Polifonia Chorus are con- 
ducted by Claudio Scimone. RCA ARL32869. 

5:00 THE SOUR APPLE TREE/ Clare Spark 

ForiVi, ideology and consciousness. Critical analy- 
sis of current cultural history. Guests, phones, 
recent scholarship. Entertaining. 

6:00 THE SUNDAY NEWS 

6:30 THE SCIENCE CONNECTION 

Astronomer Steve Kilston and physicist Vera 
Kilston endeavor to understand humans under- 
standing nature. Call in with questions or answers. 

7:00 PREACHIN' THE BLUES/ Mary Aldin 

New and recent releases, plus a close look at 
Barbecue Bob Hicks. 

8:30 IMRU/ The Gay Radio Collective 

News, features, guests, music and calendar of and 
for the gay community. Often with open phones. 

9:30 FOLKSCENE/The Larmans 

Traditional and contemporary folk music, live 
and recorded, with conversations with the artists. 

12:00 SMOKE RINGS/ John Breckow 



FOLIO PAGE 39-AUGUST 



MOIMDAY AUGUST 20 



6:00 SUNRISE CONCERT/ Carl Stone 

9:00 THIS MORNING: News, features, calendar 



10 
11 
11 
12 



00 FOLKDANCE WITH MARIO! 
00 THE MORNING READING 
30 KULCHUR: Cultural features 



:00NOON CONCERT: 

Music of the Americas/ John Schneider 

GERSHWIN/ 2 pianos: American In Paris; Three 
Preludes; CAGE: Three Dances for amplified pre- 
pared pianos (1945). 

2:00 ECLECTICA 

Alan Watts shares some thoughts (details unavail- 
able at pre^s). Lucis Trust, "Ponder on This:" 
"The Path, The Way," five minutes. 

THE AFTERNOON AIR 

Anita Frankel hosts, Linda Mack on the board. 

3:00 Within the hour: 

Coming Attractions. . . News Highlights. . . Your 
Angle on the News. . . jazz Close-Up with Rick 
James: focus on female vocalist Lorez Alexandria. 
. . . Organic Gardening at about 3:30, with Will 
Kinney and Barbara Spark to answer phones. 

4:30 Within the hour: 

Dealing with Barbara Cady. . . Open Air. 

5:00 Within the hour: 

Body Politics: Conversations with holistic and 
traditional health advocates. . . Open Air with 
a focus on energy and a livable future. . . at 5:50 
Terry Hodel and the Events Calendar. 

6:00 THE EVENING NEWS 

6:45 COMMENTARY/ Charles Morgan 

7:00 LABOR SCENE/ Sam Kushner 

7:30 REPORT TO THE LISTENER/ Jim Berland 

8:00 LA VIDA LATINA/ L. Torres, D. Sandoval 

9:00 CHAPEL, COURT AND COUNTRYSIDE 

Joseph Spencer hosts this Early Music program. 

10:30 IN FIDELITY/ Peter Sutheim 

12:00 SOMETHING'S HAPPENING/ Roy of H-wood 

Another in the series of talks by Alan Watts sans 
details will start off the show. Then open night. 



TUESDAY AUGUST 21 

6:00 SUNRISE CONCERT/ Carl Stone 

9:00 THIS MORNING: News, features, calendar 

10:00 FOLKSCENE/The Larmans 

A program of French folk music. 

11:00 THE MORNING READING 

11:30 KULCHUR 

Judith Welner interviews film community people. 



12:00 NOON CONCERT: 

At the Keyboard/ Leonid Hambro 

Chopin's World (originally aired 2/22/79). The 
program included Lee's live performances of 
CHOPIN'S Barcarolle, Op. 60; Ballade in G Minor, 
Op. 23, as well as Nocturnes, Etudes and Mazurkas. 

2:00 ECLECTICA 

In History of Astronomy, part 6 (& last), James 
S. Pickering tells the story of the life and work of 
William Herschel, who was the first great telescopic 
observer. He discovered the planet Uranus, which 
doubled the size of the known solar system. His 
work concentrated on the stars, which led him to 
describe the shape of the galaxy. He named the 
hazy patches of light "nebulae," which we now 
know to be exterior galaxies. Then, Bertha and. . . 
Karl In "Bertha gets Grilled, part 2." Karl Is de- 
termined. Bertha is puzzled. 

THE AFTERNOON AIR 

Anita Frankel and Linda Mack host/produce 

3:00 Within the hour: 

Coming Attractions. . . News Highlights. . . Your 
Angle on the News. . . Jazz Close-Up/ Rick James 
focuses on Lorez Alexandria. . . Strawberry Short- 
bread: Pat Benson covers the public schools. 

4:00 Within the hour: 

Open Air. . . Dealing/ Barbara Cady. 

5:00 Within the Hour: 

LA 5 PM/ Burt Wilson and friends. . . Terry Hodel 
and the Events Calendar at about 5:50. 

6:00 THE EVENING NEWS 

6:45 TAKING SIDES: Debate 

7:30 OPEN JOURNAL: Late breaking features 

8:00 CARLOS HAGEN PRESENTS 

California, Summer and Surf Music, part 2. See 
details under part 1, Tuesday 8/14, 8:00 p.m. 

9:00 BOSTON SYMPHONY: Live In Concert 

SIBELIUS: Karelia Suite, Op. ]]:EnSaga; 
WALTON; Symphony No. 7. Colin Davis con- 
ducts. William Pierce hosts. Dolby A Nolse-reduc- 
tlon system (program subject to change). 

1 1 :00 THE BIG BROADCAST/ Bobb Lynes 

Mr. President with Edward Arnold (9/15/53); 
CBS Radio Workshop: "Record Collectors" 
(4/27/56). 

12:00 SOMETHING'S HAPPENING/ Roy of Hollywood 

"Beethoven, His Spiritual Development" parts 18 
and 19 on "The Last Quartets" by J.W.N. Sullivan, 
read by Dudley Knight. Then Eric Bauersfeld's 
"Black Mass" from KPFA with two by Edgar Al- 
len Poe (ca 30'). Then Bauersfeld directs ' The Cri- 
tic as Artist" by Oscar Wilde (60'). We continue 
our X Minus Oneathon with three more undated 
programs: "The Parade," "Dr. Grimshaw's Sani- 
tarium" and "Nightfall." At 5:00, Jack Gariss. 



FOLIO PAGE 40- AUGUST 



WEDNESDAY AUGUST 22 



6:00 SUNRISE CONCERT/ Carl Stone 

HAYDN: La Fedelta Premiata with lleana Cotru- 
bas, soprano; Frederica von Stade, mezzo-soprano; 
Lucia Valentini, contralto; Luigi Alva, tenor. The 
Suisse Romande Radio Chorus and Lausanne 
Chamber Orchestra are conducted by Antal Dora- 
ti. Phihps 6706 028. 

9:00 THIS MORNING: News, features, calendar 

10:00 FOLKDANCE WITH MARIO! 

11:00 THE MORNING READING 

11:30 KULCHUR: Theater Close-Up/ Ray Tatar 

12:00 NOON CONCERT: 

Jazz at Noon / John Schneider. Featuring " The 
Paris Concert" of Oscar Peterson, piano; Joe Pass, 
guitar; and Niels Pederson, bass. 

2:00 ECLECTICA 

Bobb Lynes presents another Big Broadcast, fea- 
turing "Kraft IVlusic Hall" with A! Jolson (NBC, 
10/2/47), and "Screen Guild Theater: Junior Miss' 
(CBS 9/30/46). 

THE AFTERNOON AIR 

Anita Frankel and Linda Mack co-produce, host. 

3:00 Within the hour: 

Coming Attractions. . . News Highlights. . . Your 
Angle on the News. . . Open Air. . . Ruth's Kitch- 
en! Ruth Ziony. 

4:00 Within the hour: 

Open Air. . . Jon Brower's Eye on Sports. . . and 
more Open Air. 

5:00 Within the hour: 

More than Half the Sky. . . Open Air. . . Events 
Calendar with Terry Hodel at 5:50. 

6:00 THE EVENING NEWS 

6:45 COMMENTARY/ Charles Morgan 

7:00 NEWSLINE: Open Phones 

7:30 OPEN JOURNAL: Late breaking features 

8:00 UP FROM THE ASH GROVE/ Ed Pearl 

9:30 THE BEST OF L.A.T.E., Part 3 

"The Condor," by Corrado Cost, originally aired 
live on Los Angeles Theater of the Ear in Novem- 
ber 1978. This play on history, by one of Italy's 
most interesting new poets, was translated, ad- 
apted for radio and directed by Paul Vangelisti. 
The action takes place after two actors have 
walked into the sunset looking for the past. 
Features Bill Hunt and Patrick Tovatt. 

10:30 RADIO FREE OZ 

12:00 SOMETHING'S HAPPENING!/ Roy of Herenow 

An unprecedented series of about 30 irregularly 
broadcast productions (Take That Dimension of 
Imagination!) of "Mind's Eye Theater" from 
WBAI New York. Tonight, "Avenue of Dreams" 
by Elyse Nass (24') and "Fortune" (14'). // "The 
Next Billion Years" talk 6, "The Evolution of the 
Earth's Biosphere" with Dr. William Schopf. sci- 



entist (ca 60'). // We complete Earplay's "The Ar- 
give Soliloquies" with no. 6, "The Iron Ring" 
(All requests for rebroadcast must be accompa- 
nied by a check for 31000.00 or so) by John 
Reeves. // By special request, Carlos Hagen's "Ho- 
mage to Truckdrivers" (60'). // At 4:25, Krishna- 
murti with the 3rd talk from San Diego State '70. 



THURSDAY AUGUST 23 

6:00 SUNRISE CONCERT/ Carl Stone 

9:00 THIS MORNING: News, features, calendar 

10:00 FOLKSCENE/ The Larmans 

Some fine original music from one of the best 
contemporary singing duos, Diane Berglund and 
Jim Phillips. 

11:00 THE MORNING READING 

11:30 KULCHUR: Late breaking cultural features 

12:00 NOON CONCERT: 

Chapel, Court and Countryside/ Joseph Spencer 

2:00 ECLECTICA 

"In the Matter of J. Robert Oppenheimer," Part 
5: Act 2 continues with the testimonies of Teller 
and Bethe. Then, Bertha and. . . Karl: "Bertha 
Gets Grilled, Part 4." Karl is bound and deter- 
mined. Bertha is bound and gagged. Features the 
Something's Happening Players, directed by Da- 
vid L. Krebs of Dimension of Imagination. 

THE AFTERNOON AIR 

Audiomagazine hosted by Anita Frankel, techni- 
cal producer is Linda Mack. 

3:00 Within the hour: 

Coming Attractions. . . News Highlights. . . Your 
Angle on the News. . . Speaking of Seniors/Grace 
Jacobs. . . Al Huebner's Health Department. 

4:00 Within the hour: 

Open Air. . . Barbara Cady's Dealing. . . Open Air. 

5:00 Within the hour: 

Burt Wilson's LA 5 PM. . . Events Calendar with 
Terry Hodel at 5:50. 

6:00 THE EVENING NEWS 

6:45 COMMENTARY 

7:00 INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL 

7:30 OPEN JOURNAL: Late breaking features 

8:00 RADIOFEST: New American Music 

David COPE: Koosharem; Hubert S. HOWE Jr: 
Third Study in Timbre; Jonathan KRAMER: 
Fanfare for Tape; Allen BRINGS: Three Pieces 
■ for Violin and Piano; William PENN ; Designs. 

9:00 CLEVELAND ORCHESTRA: Live in Concert 

KOKKONEN: S>wp/70rty No. 4; BRUCKNER: 
Symphony No. 8. Lorin Maazcl conducts. Robert 
Conrad hosts, (program subject to change). 

11:00 JANUS COMPANY RADIO THEATRE 

Frankenstein, Part 3; The Monster's Mate. Suc- 
cumbing to the creature's threats, Frankenstein 
agrees to make his creation a suitable mate. Fea- 
turing Mel Gilden, Jan Geller, Mike Hodel and 
Mallory Geller. 



FOLIO PAGE41-AUGUST 



r 



11:30 GARFIAS TAPES 

Ethnomusicologist Robert Garfias presents a pro- 
gram of music from Moslem Africa. 

12:00 SOMETHING'S HAPPENING/ Roy of Hollywood 

We greet the return of our resident right-wing 
anarchist Lowell Ponte who will clearly explain 
to us and with us all problems of the world and 
universe, from gas lines to black holes. // Open 
night if time allows until 4:50 when Eric Bauers- 
feld begins a reading of Herman Hesse's "Journey 
to the East" which continues next week. 



FRIDAY AUGUST 24 



6:00 SUNRISE CONCERT/ Carl Stone 

9:00 THIS MORNING: News, calendar, features 

10:00 INDEPENDENT MUSIC/ Mario Casetta 

11:00 THE MORNING READING 

11:30 KULCHUR: Cohen, Hunt, Vangellsti 

12:00 NOON CONCERT: 

Soundboard/ John Schneider. Today's feature is 
music written for Andres Segovia. Pieces by Tu- 
rina. Ponce, Rodrigo, Duarte, Tansman, others. 

2:00 ECLECTICA 

Part 5 of Stars N' Stifff Produced by ZBS Media. 

A woman detective strikes with 'Tired of the 

Green Menace?" 

THE AFTERNOON AIR 

Host is Anita Frankel, at the controls is Linda 

Mack. 

3:00 Within the hour: 

Coming Attractions. . . News Highlights . . . 
Your Angle on the News. . . jazz Close-Up: Rick 
James plays vocalist Lorez Alexandria. . .Ameri- 
can Indian Airwaves with Liz Lloyd. 

4:00 Within the hour: 

Open Air. . . Dealing featuring Barbara Cady. 

5:00 Within the hour: 

Media Watchl Claudia Fonda-Bonardi. . . Open 
Air. . . Cvvnts Calendar with Terry Hodel, 5:50. 

6:00 THE EVENING NEWS 




Billy Higgins, live on "iaii Omnibus," Friday at 8:00 p.m. 



6:45 NEWSLINE: Open phones 

7:00 INSIDE LA/ Bob Pugsley 

7:30 CHI LD'S PLAY/ Ruth Buell 

8:00 JAZZ OMNIBUS/ Ron Pelletier 

"Our Man Higgins." Billy Higgins is probably the 
most recorded drummer in the history of jazz. A 
list of his credits would look like an entire jazz 
encyclopedia itself. Tonight he performs in Studio 
Z, leading his own quartet. Another in the series 
of live summer concerts, free to the public, made 
possible by the American Federation of Musicians 
Local 47 Performance Trust Fund. 

10:00 HOUR 25: Science Fiction 

12:00 GOODBYE PORKPIE HAT/ Paul Vangelisti 

2:00 THE BIG SLEEP/ John Breckow 



SATURDAY AUGUST 25 



6:00 NO STRINGS ATTACHED/ Scott Bodeli 

7:30 FUSION/ Lauren Lee 

8:30 THE NIXON TAPES/ Tom Nixon 

9:30 HALFWAY DOWN THE STAIRS/ Ruth Buell 

10:30 FOLK MUSIC/ John Davis 

12:30 THE CAR SHOW/ Len Frank, John Retsek 

1:50 WEEKEND CALENDAR/ Terry Hodel 

2:00 BALLADS, BANJOS & BLUEGRASS/ T. Sauber 

3:30 SONG & CELEBRATION/ Dan Wright 

6:00 THE SATURDAY NEWS/ Larry Moss 

6:30 IN PRINT/ Robert Peters 

6:45 THE WELL-TEMPERED READER/ Jed Rasula 

7:00 A SCOFF OF REVIEWERS 

Gathering to receive your phone calls are various 
KPFK critics and reviewers. 

8:00 THE WILLIAM MALLOCH PROGRAMME 

10:00 IMAGINARY LANDSCAPE 

Ritual and Magic, Music and Chant. A rebroad- 
cast of one of our most requested programs, fea- 
turing ceremonial music from Africa, Pakistan, 
Morocco and Yugoslavia. 

12:00 TESSERACT/ Phil Mendelson 

2:00 OBLIQUE COLLAGE/ Maurice Walker 



SUNDAY AUGUST 26 

6:00 GOSPEL CARAVAN/ Prince Dixon 
9:00 BIO-MEDITATION/ Jack Gariss 

10:00 FRONTIERS OF A NEW AGE/ Judy Walker 

Guest is Paul Solomon, healer in the tradition 
of Edgar Cayce. 

11:00 DOROTHY HEALEY: Marxist commentary 

12:00 MANY WOR LDS OF MUSIC/ Mario Casetta 
Mario is in "summer reruns" this month. 



FOLIO PAGE 42-AUGUST 



1;00 TENOR OF THE TIMES 

The mighty voice of the wonderful tenor Cesare 
Vezzani will again fill KPFK's air, courtesy of 
Fred Hyatt. 

1:30 THE SUNDAY OPERA/ Fred Hyatt 

BERLIOZ: Beatrice ft Benedict with Janet Baker, 
mezzo-soprano; Robert Tear, tenor. Colin Davis 
conducts the John Alldis Choir and London 
' Symphony Orchestra. Philips 6700 121. 

5:00 THE SOUR APPLE TREE/ Clare Spark 

6:00 THE SUNDAY NEWS 

6:30 THE SCIENCE CONNECTION/ S.& V. Kilston 

7:00 PREACHIN' THE BLUES/ Mary Aldin 

Tonight's feature segment is on Leroy Carr and 
Scrapper Blackwell. 

8:30 IMRU/ The Gay Radio Collective 

News, features, guests, music and calendar. 

12:00 SMOKE RINGS/ John Breckow 



MONDAY AUGUST 27 

6:00 SUNRISE CONCERT/ Carl Stone 

9:00 THIS MORNING: News, features, calendar 

10:00 FOLKDANCE WITH MARIO! 

11:00 THE MORNING READING 

11:30 KULCHUR: In the Wings/ John Medici 

12:00 NOON CONCERT: 

Music of the Americas/ John Schneider 

REICH: Four Organs (70); CHAVEZ: Esfudio 
a Rubinstein (74); Five Caprichios for Piano (75). 

2:00 ECLECTICA 

Another Alan Watts talk (details unavailable). Our 
"Ponder on This" is on "The Constitution of Life.' 

THE AFTERNOON AIR 

Anita Frankel hosts; Linda Mack technicates. 

3:00 Within the hour: 

Coming Attractions. . . News Highlights. . . Your 
Angle on the News. . . jazz Close-Up with Rick 
James: focus on saxist Gerry Mulligan. . . Organic 
Gardening at about 3:30, with Will Kinney and 
Barbara Spark to answer "our gardening puzzles. 

4:30 Within the hour: 

Dealing IQzibaxa Cady. . . Open Air. 

5:00 Within the hour: 

Consumer Awareness! Ida Honorof: Is our sugar 
contaminated? Ida sez our sweet tooth may be 
our downfall, in more ways than we think . . . 
Open Air. . . Calendar! Terry Hodel at 5:50. 

6:00 THE EVENING NEWS 

6:45 COMMENTARY/ Charles Morgan 

7:00 LABOR SCENE/ Sam Kushner 

7:30 REPORT TO THE LISTENER/ Jim Berland 

8:00 LA VIDA LATINA/ L.Torres, D. Sandoval 

9:00 CHAPEL, COURT AND COUNTRYSIDE 

Joseph Spencer showcases early music. 



10:30 IN FIDELITY/ Peter Sutheim 

12:00 SOMETHING'S HAPPENING/ Roy of Hollywood 

Alan Watts title not available at piess time, but he 
will start off the night. Dudley Knight will read a 
sf or horror story on "Graveyard Shift" (ca 60'/, 
and then open night follows for groat radio exp. 



TUESDAY AUGUST 28 



6:00 SUNRISE CONCERT/ Carl Stone 

9:00 THIS MORNING: News, features, calendar 

10:00 FOLKSCENE/ The Larmans 

Folk music of the British Isles. 

11:00 THE MORNING READING 

11:30 KULCHUR: Backstage/ Gil Laurence 

12:00 NOON CONCERT: 

At the Keyboard/ Joe Benti 

Delores Stevens was Lee's in-studio guest on March 
6, 1979, performing live, works from the contem- 
porary piano literature. Works included IVES; 
Three Page Sonata; Ligeti: Musica Ricercata (1951- 
53); CAG E : Piece No. I, No. 2, No. 3; SATl E : 
Trois Gymnopedie; Sports et Divertissements 
performed by Hambro, voice; and Stevens, piano. 
Hambro opened the program with live perform- 
ances of BACH, CHOPIN, SCHUMANN and 
SHOSTAKOVITCH. 

2:00 ECLECTICA 

Part 1 (of 2) of "Dear Brother Erika," a fascinat 
ing reading by Erika Seastrom, a member for 20 
years of the Printers Union, describing her life 
working under terrible conditions in an almost 
entirely male trade. She discusses how she got 
started in printing, and the attempts she made to 
get into the all-male union. From her unpublish- 
ed biography. Produced by Bonnie Bellow, KPFA. 
(apologies: "bad" words are inverted on the tape 
to protect us all). Then, on Bertha and. . . Karl, 
"Bertha Gets Grilled, part 7." Bertha is forced to 
relive a past love as Karl piobes the deep dark se- 
crets of her past. Produced by David L. (as in Lux) 
Krebs, with the Eclectica Soap Players Co. (De- 
mension of Imagination). 

THE AFTERNOON AIR 

Hosted by Anita Frankel, piloted by Linda Mack. 

3:00 Within the hour: 

Coming Attractions. . . Richard Mahler with News 
Highlights. . . Your Angle on the News. . . Jazz 
Close-Up: Rick James focusing on Gerry Mulligan 
. . . Strawberry Shortbread with Pat Benson. 

4:00 Within the hour: 

Open Air. . . Barbara Cady's Dealing. 

5:00 Within the hour: 

Burt Wilson offers LA 5 PM. . . Events Calendar 
with Terry Hodel at 5:50. 

6:00 THE EVENING NEWS 

6:45 TAKING SIDES: Debate 

7:30 OPEN JOURNAL: Late breaking features 



FOLIO PAGE 43 AUGUST 



f 



8:00 CARLOS HAGEN PRESENTS 

Tex Ritter and the Legends of the Old West. A 
brief survey of the art and career of Tex Ritter, 
one of the most popular country & western sing- 
ers and a well known Texas folklorist. He was es- 
pecially known as the singer who innmortalized 
the tamed song "High Noon" featured in the 
1'952 V/estern movie classic of the same name 
produced by Stanley Kramer. 

9:00 BOSTON SYMPHONY: Live in Concert 

BEETHOVEK. Symphony No. 9 in D minor. 
Faye Robmson, soprano; Patricia Payne. Mezzo- 
soprano; Neil Rosenshein, tenor; Robert Lloyd, 
baritone; the Tanglewood Festival Chorus, John 
Oliver conductor; Colin Davis conducts. William 
Pierce hosts. Dolby-A recorded, (subj. to change). 

11:00 THE BIG BROADCAST/ Bobb Lynes 

Mysterious Traveler: "HideOut" (MBS, 1940s); 
Screen Guild Theater: "Amazing Dr. Clitterhouse" 
with Edward G. Robinson (11/2/41). 

12:00 SOMETHING'S HAPPENING/ Roy of Hollywood 

"Be-3thoven, His Spiritual Development" by J.W.N. 
Sullivan parts 20 & 21 finished the chapter on 
"The Last Quartets. ' (the last two parts will air 
next month at this time). Then Eugene O'NeiH's 
"A Moon for the Misbegotten" with Salome Jens, 
Mitchell Ryan and W.B. Brydon, directed by The- 
odore Mann (Caedmon TRS 333) (126'). Then 3 
more X Minus One programs with no dates: "The 
Last Martian," "How To," and "The Man in the 
Moon." At 5:00, Bio-Meditation with Jack Gariss. 



WEDNESDAY AUGUST 29 

6:00 SUNRISE CONCERT/ Carl Stone 

Featuring SCHUBERT: Mass No. 5 in A flat ma- 
jor, D. 678. Marlee Sabo, soprano; Jan DeGaetani, 
mezzo-soprano; Paul Sperry, tenor; Leslie Guinn, 
baritone. The Carleton College Choir, Chamber 
Singers and Festival Chorale and the Saint Paul 
Chamber Orchestra are conducted by Dennis Rus- 
sell Davies. Nonesuch H-71335. 

9:00 THIS MORNING: News, calendar, features. 

10:00 FOLKDANCE WITH MARIO! 

11:00 THE MORNING READING 

11:30 KULCHUR. Theater Close-Up/ Ray Tatar 

12:00 NOON CONCERT: 

Jazz at Noon/ John Schneider. Today featuring 
the music of Duke Ellington. 

200 ECLECTICA 

Bobb Lynes presents The Big Broadcast with 
some heavies this afternoon: The Adventures of 
Sam Spade (CBS, 6/19/49), Ar\6X Minus One 
(NBC, 7/18/57). 

THE AFTERNOON AIR 

Audiomagazine with Anita Frankel and Linda 
Mack. 

3:00 Within the hour; 

Coming A ttractions. . . Highlights on the News 
with Richard Mahler. . . Your Angle on the News 
. . . Open Air. . . Ruth's Kitchen/ Ruth Ziony. 



4:00 Within the hour: 

Open Air. . . FuturewatchI Linda Strawn moni- 
tors the cutting edge, where religion and science 

intersect. 

5:00 Within the hour: 

More than Half the Sky. . . Open Air. . . Events 
Calendar with Terry Hodel at 5:50. 

6:00 THE EVENING NEWS 

6:45 COMMENTARY/ Charles Morgan 

7:00 NEWSLINE: Open phones 

7:30 OPEN JOURNAL: Late breaking features 

8:00 UP FROMFHE ASH GROVE/ Ed Pearl 

9:30 THE IMAGINATIVE QUALITIES 

OF ACTUAL THINGS: An Interview with 
Gilbert Sorrentino. Conducted chez Sorrentino, 
in New York, April 1, 1979, this important if 
often overlooked literary artist discusses his ca- 
reer as poet, novelist, critic and editor. As Baude- 
laire had his Paris, so Sorrentino dissects the last 
30 years of "culture" in New York. He is the 
author of numerous books of poetry and novels, 
including The Perfect Fiction, Steelwork, The 
Imaginative Qualities of Actual Things, Corrosive 
Sublimate, and Orangery. The program was pro- 
duced for KPFK by Paul Vangelisti. 

10:30 RADIO FREE OZ 

12:00 SOMETHING'S HAPPENING/ Roy of Hollywood 

Mind's Eye Theater presents "The Stranger" by 
Maxine Haleff, music by Sun Ra. // "The Next 
Billion Years" 7: "Ending Man's Isolation in the 
Universe" by Dr. Bernard Oliver, Vice President 
of R. & D. Hewlett Packard Co. (57'). // By spe- 
cial request, two stories by J.D. Salinger: "A Per- 
fect Day for Banana Fish" (24') and "Just Before 
the Wat with the Eskimos" (24'), read by S.J. 
Stearnes. // At 4:30, Krishnanrujrti at San Diego 
State (talk 4 of 5). 



THURSDAY AUGUST 30 



6:00 SUNRISE CONCERT/ Carl Stone 

9:00 THIS MORNING: News, features, calendar 

10:00 FOLKSCENE/The Larmans 

Bluegrass music from the Southland which fea- 
tures Tom Sauber, Bill Bryson, John Schlocker, 
Daryl Boom, and Dennis Fetchet. 

11:00 THE MORNING READING 

11:30 KULCHUR: Late breaking cultural features 

12:00 NOON CONCERT: 

Chapel, Court and Countryside/ Joseph Spencer 

2:00 ECLECTICA 

The conclusion of "In the Matter of J. Robert 
Oppenheimer" (Caedmon TRS 336) by Heinar 
Kipphardt with the Center Theatre Group of Los 
Angeles, directed by Gordon Davidson. The end 
of act 2 with the testimonies of Adams, Lehmann 
and the final decision. Then Bertha and . . . Karl, 
"Bertha Gets Grilled, Part 9." Will this mad Ger- 
man stop at nothing to achieve his nefarious pur- 
pose? Stars the Eclectica Theatre. 



FOLIO PAGE 44-AUGUST 



THE AFTERNOON AIR 

Anita Frankel and Linda I 



lack do liveradio. 



3: 00 Within the hour: 

Coming attractions. . . News Highlights. . . Your 
Angle on the News. . . Speaking of Seniors with 
Grace Jacobs. . . Al Huebner's Health Department. 

4:00 Within the hour: 

Open Air. . . Dealing/ Barbara Cady & guests. . . 
and more Open Air. 

5:00 Within the hour: 

Burt Wilson's LA 5 Pl^. . . Events Calendar with 
Terry Model at 5:50. 

6:00 THE EVENING NEWS 

6:45 COMMENTARY 

7:00 INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL 

7:30 OPEN JOURNAL: Late breaking features 

8:00 RADIOFEST: New American Music 

Priscilla McLEAN: Night Images; Frank 
BOEHNLEIN:/'/c7A?oSo/7£7f(;^Karl KORTE: 
Facets; Ernesto PELLEGRINI: Music for 16 
Instruments and Percussion; Stuart SM ITH : 
Faces; Barton McLEAN: The Sorcerer Revisited. 

9:00 CLEVELAND ORCHESTRA: Live in Concert 

Cleveland Orchestra 60th Anniversary Gala Con- 
cert. HERBERT: American Fantasy; BEETHO- 
VEN: Egmont Overture; VIVALDI: Concerto in 
B minor for Four Violins; ROSSINI: "Une voce 
poco Fa" from The Barber of Seville; BIZET: 
Carmen Suite No. 1 ; TCHAIKOVSKY: Rocco 
Variations; SMUl- SAENS: Introduction and 
Rondo Capriccioso; THOMAS: "Je Suis Titania" 
from Mignon; PROKOFIEV: Romeo and Juliet 
Suite; plus encores. The soloists are Beverly Sills, 
soprano; Isaac Stern, Josef Gingold, Rafael Dru- 
ian, Daniel Majeske, Raymond Kobler, violins; 
Leonard Rose, cello. Lorin Maazel conducts. Ro- 
bert Conrad hosts, (subject to change). Tonight's 
concert runs until 1 1 :35. 

11:35 JANUS COMPANY RADIO THEATRE 

Frankenstein, Part 4: The Wedding. Despite the 
creature's vow to destroy Frankenstein and his 
bride, so that his creator may personally know 
the depth of his own sorrow, should Franken- 
stein dare to go through with his wedding, the 
scientist has other plans. With Mallory Geller, 
Mike Hodel, Eliza Lewin, Jan Geller and Mel 
Gilden. 

12:05 SOMETHING'S HAPPENING!/ Roy of Hoy 

Again our ritual-end-of-the-month-open-phones- 
night-for-discussion-debateclarification-and-some- 
requests-to-be-considered -arguments -exchange- 
etc. Open time if any until 4:50 when Eric Bauers- 
feld finishes "Journey to the East" by Herman 
Hesse. 



FRIDAY AUGUST 31 



6:00 SUNRISE CONCERT/ Carl Stone 

9:00 THIS MORNING: News, features, calendar 

10:00 INDEPENDENT MUSIC/ Mario Casetta 



11:00 THE MORNING READING 

11:30 KULCHUR: Weekly Wrap-up on the arts 

12:00 NOON CONCERT: 

Soundboard/ John Schneider . Music of Castel- 
nuevo-Tedesco including his Concerto for Guitar 
(1939), Platcro & I, Concerto for Two Guitars 
(1962), and more. 

2:00 ECLECTICA 

Part 6 of ZBS Media's 8-part series. Stars N' Stuff 
with "Bobby Bonecutter vs. The Pink Pearl Era- 
sers" and "Boogie Woogie to the Stars and Bach 
Again" (part 1). This infernal series will continue 
in September. 

THE AFTERNOON AIR 

Anita Frankel hosts; Linda Mack at the controls. 

3:00 Within the hour: 

Coming A ttractions. . . News Highlights. . . Your 
Angle on the News. . . Jazz Close-Up: Rick James 
focuses on saxophonist Gerry Mulligan. . . Open 
Air. 

4:00 Within the hour: 

Open Ail. . . Dealing with Barbara Cady. 

5:00 Within the hour: 

Claudia Von^aQomrtiW Media Watch. . . Open 
Air. . . Events Calendar! Terry Hodel at 5:50. 

6:00 THE EVENING NEWS 

6:45 NEWSLINE: Open phones 

7:00 INSIDE LA/ Bob Pugsiey 

7:30 CHILD'S PLAY: Stories for Kids 

8:00 JAZZ OMNIBUS/ Ron Pelletier 

10:00 HOUR 25: Science Fiction 

Mike Hodel, John Henry Thong and Terry Hodel. 

12:00 GOODBYE PORKPIE HAT/ Paul Vangelisti 
2:00 THE BIG SLEEP/ John Breckow 




— u M r i L ^5:p7^v^ 3* ^R 



FOLIO PAGE 45-AUGUST 



i 



\ 



SJBSCRJPTJQI^S 



THE COMPUTER 

Our computer Is locatr.'d in BerkeU.'v. which saves us a 
lot of money but which is uK-onvenient. We send subscrip- 
tions information to the computer twice a month. Around 
the middle of the month we do the regular Folio label run 
which returns the Folio labels, bills, renewal letter labels 
and income statements a few days later. The following 
week we do a "catch up" Folio label run for payments 
received late or for corrections processed after the regular 
run. 

Your payment may not go into the computer as 
quickly as you might think because: payments go to our 
lockbox at the Terminal Annex Post Office in Los Angeles, 
thefi they go to the bank and the bank processes the pay- 
ments and sends them to us-through the mail. This 
process often takes more than a vveek from the time you 
send your payment. So, if you send your check around 
the 8th of the month, there's a good chance you should 
receive the Folio for the following month and you'll also 
avoid duplicate billing, which has been the scourge of our 
subscriptions system. 

BILL PAYMENT 

Always send a bill with your check! A SI 5 paymetit 
received without a bill or renewal notice might be credited 
as a Film Club payment, a straight donation to the station 
or the Expansion Fund. If you send a check in for a 
pledge payment without a bill, you mighit be credited for 
a new subscription and still be billed for your original 
pledge. Likewise, if you send a payment for a subscription 
renewal on a company check without a renewal notice, 
you're likely to receive a new s ibscription at your com- 
pany address and still receive a renewal notice for your 
original subscription. So always be sure to refer to your 
account by the name on the account and the address at 
which you receive your Folio. 

FIRST CLASS FOLIO MAILING 

The Folio goes out by 2nd Class mail, and should 
take 2-5 days to get most places. Theoretically, 2nd Class 
gets better handling than our old non-profit permit, but 
our experience with the Post Office defies theory. First 
Class mailing is available for 88 extra per year (pro-rated 
at 75 cents per month for current subscriptions). This is 
often the answer for slow mailing areas like Goleta, Santa 
Barbara, Leucadia, Simi Valley or Pearblossom— to name just 
a few. If you live in an area that gets relatively prompt 
service but want the Folio well before the beginning of 
the month, then you might want your Folio by 1st Class. 

I DIDN'T GET MY FOLIO 

The Folio IS mailed around the 20th of the month. If 
you have not received your Folio by the first of the month: 
(1) check your subscription expiration date on the previous 
Folio label (upper right hand corner of label). (2) Make 
sure you haven't moved without notifying us. (3) If you 
haven't moved and are currently enrolled as a subscriber, 
contact your local postmaster about delivery. (4) send us 
a previous Folio label with an explanatory note or call for 
a new Folio to be sent to you. 



MOVING-ADDRESS CHANGES 

If you move, your Folio will not be forwarded unless 
you request 2nd class forwarding from the Post Office. The 
best way to expedite an address change and assure continued 
receipt of the Folio is to call the station and ask for subscrip 
tions or leave your name, old zipcode, and new address with 
the switchboard. There is an address change form on the 
back page of the Folio that can be used also. Whenever you 
do an address change with us, always include your account 
number at the top of your Folio label-that will insure 
instant handling. Address changes returned to us by the 
Post Office cost us 25 cents apiece and frequently take a 
month to be returned to us. 

PRISONER SUBSCRIPTIONS 

KPFK seends free to any prisoner, upon request, the 
Folio. 

CASSETTE FOLIOS FOR THE PRINT HANDICAPPED 

The Folio is available on cassette (returnable) to all 
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receive the Folio in this form, please tear off the address 
label on the back of the Folio and send it along with 
a note (or you may call). Within two months, you will 
be receiving your complete program guide on cassette. The 
cassettes are returned to us at the end of each month. 

EXCHANGE MAILING LISTS 

KPFK exchanges and rents its subscriber lists to 
other organizations of common interest (Channel 28, 
Ralph Nader, ACLU, etc.). If you don't want to be 
on exchange mailing lists, send your Folio label to the 
Subscriptions Department and ask for an "NJ" Code. 
Your name will then be automatically removed from 
all mailings except for the Folio and renewal letters. 



NEW SUBSCRIPTION 

[ 1 $30/ year regular [ ] SI 5/ 6 months 

[ ] 315/ year ioyv income [ ] $8/ 6 months 
[ ] 875/ year Film Club [ ] $40 down Film Club, 

then bill $5/month. Plus $5 service 

GIFT SUBSCRIPTION 

Check subscription type, include your 
name & address as well as recipient's 

FILM CLUB CONVERSION OF CURRENT SUBSCRIPTION 
(S15 credit given— new subscription for 12 months created) 



[ ] $60 Full payment 



S30 down, bill at S5/mo 
(add $5 service charge) 



Name 



Address 



City and zip 



MAIL COUPONS AND CHECKS TO KPFK, PO BOX 5421 J TERMINAL ANNEX, Los Angeles, CA 90054 

FOLIO PAGE 46 




^^N^S^N^^^N^NA^^^N^S^t^N^^^S^^N^^^^^^^^S^^^^^^^^^^^^^ 



Natural Foods Started In 
The Valley At AL KAISER'S 
for those who are 
otoore enough to caT«- 

ware Inn Ki/^ 

■• RESTAURANT "' 

I362S Viiuura Blvd . Shtrman Oaks 

tj^i III WooOnian 

Cocktail! . . . OInntr Dally from 5 P.M. 
Lunch Mon. thru Frl. from 11:30 A.M. 
ALL CREDIT CARDS HONORED 
Va//ey 783-5616 

LA. 872-1138 



^^S^«^WN^MNAAA#N#MM^^MN^N^N^^^M*^N^^^^iA^«^^ 



Are you a friend of 

the ALICE A. BAILEY books, 

looking for companions and 

co-workers to study with? 

We invite you to join us 

in the adventure— 
ARCANA WORKSHOPS 

407 NORTH MAPLE DRIVE 214 
BEVERLY HILLS, CA 90210 

213/273-5949 or 540-8689 

Let's meet each other at our next 

COMMUNITY MEDITATION 

MEETING 

Tuesday, August 7, 1979, 7:45pm 

(Inquire About Our Weekly Workshops) 

and 
Wed., September 5, 1979, 7:45pm 

(Inquire About Our Weekly Workshops) 



PROFESSIONAL COUNSELING 
FOR GAYS & BISEXUALS. Gay 

therapists (lie. M12758). Mental/ 
emotional/relational /sexual concerns 
Flex. hrs. & fees. MediCal insurance 
accepted. 1st visit no charge. Don 
Levy, MA. Info: 650-1812. 



OPEN QUEST WORKSHOPS 

Low-cost drop-in discussion groups 
for & by Gays, 4 evenings/week. 
Don Levy MA (Counselor, Lie. no. 
Ml 2758), Laud Humphreys, PhD 
(Sociology) & Martin Hoffman MD 
(Psychiatry). Info, calendar, locat'n: 
213/650-1812. 



Classified 



FLUTE LESSONS — ALL AGES 

Experienced teacher/performer provides 
holistic approach to flute playing. 
Stanford, UCLA graduate with teachirig 
credential. Also available for entertainmt. 
with my trio. Leigh Garner 213/762-4355 



CUSTOM DESIGNING AND 
DRESSMAKING. 10 years sewing ex 
perience. Specializing in bridal wear, 
formals, restaurant apparel. Reason- 
able and reliable. Call evenings and 
weekends 213/438-1488. Ask for Donna. 



ALAN WATTS AUDIOCASETTES 

MEA 

Box 303 

Sausalito CA 94965 



HIGHLIGHTS FROM SPEECHES 

of the May 6 Coalition Rally against 
Nuclear Power held in Washington DC 
$15 includes tax and shipping. Pacifica 
Program Service, 5316 Venice Blvd. 
Los Angeles CA 90019. 



SUBLET-CHARMING 4-ROOM 

1920's cottage, view, greenery, pri- 
vacy. Echo Park. Aug. 25— Sept. 16, 
$200. 483 3677 before 10 AM or 
after 7 PM, or weekends. 



No endorsement is implied by 
KPFK or Pacifica Foundation, 

YOUR AD WILL BE READ 
BY 15,000 SUBSCRIBERS. 
And their families & friends. 

Classified rate: $10 per inch, 
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DEADLINE: 1st of month 
PRECEDING the month of 
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PAYMENT IN ADVANCE. 
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% 



ALL ADS MUST BE 
PAID IN ADVANCE. 
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WHEN I GO. . . 

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with non-profit 

simplicity, Dignity^ 
and Economy 
Write or call Eleanor, 
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10-3 - PO Box 44188 
Panorama City, 91412 



Join us in the 
Meeting of Minds! 

Explore the world of New Age Philosoptlies. Oc- 
cult Phenomena. Consciousness-raising programs 
and Self-discovery therapies in a totally unique and 
exciting way! Discover what ideas are out there and 
share your own experiences 

For free mformation on this long-awaited 
fellowship of operv minded individuals, write to us at 
our mailing address below: 

Dynamic Dimensions 

249 S. Western Ave., L.A., CA 



moving? 

The Folio will NOT be automatically 
forwarded to your new address. It 
will be returned to .us after a few 
weeks with your new address on it- 
probably not in time for the next 
Folio. So to avoid missing out, fill 
out this coupon and return it to Sub- 
scriptions. Be sure your label is on 
the back. (We get 500-1000 address 
changes a month). Thank-you. 


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Mail to: Subscriptions Dept., KPFK, 3729 Cahuenga Blvd. West, No. Hywd. CA 91604 



FOLIO PAGE 47 



i 



JMI-=y¥C 



It's live, it's free, it's happening this sunnmer upstairs in KPFK's Studio "Z"-and you're invited. 
Two new series of jazz concerts are beginning in July and continuing through August and into 
the Fall. Both series share Friday qvenings from 8:00 to 10:00 p.m. One series is dedicated to 
Charles Mingus, and is produced by Bob Frazier. The other is produced by Ron Pelletier, made 
possible by the American Federation of Musicians Local 47 Performance Trust Fund, under the 
title "Jazz Omnibus." Dates and details are listed below. We hope you make your plans to be 
with us for one or more--or all-of these summer jazz concerts here at KPFK. Seating is limited, 
so we'll be taking reservations weekdays during business hours, at the usual number: 213/877-2711. 



DURING JULY: 

July 6: Mingus 1 

Dedicated to- the memory of Charles Mingus, 
his music, his humor, his philosophy. Joining 
host Bob Frazier is bassist Red Callender, friend 
and instructor of the late genius. 



DURING AUGUST: 

August 3: Mingus 2 

Bassist Larry Gales and his sextet join host 
Bob Frazier for an evening of beautiful jazz 
expression dedicated to the memory of 
Charles Mingus. 



July 13: "Hittin' It:" The Charles Owens Quartet August 10: "The Golden Flute:" The Lew Tabackin Trio 

First in the "Jazz Omnibus" series, featuring Charles Lew's primary instruments are the flute and the tenor sax. 
Owens, tenor sax, Ted Saunders, piano; Richard He describes his approach to these instruments: "I try to 
Reid, bass; Carl Burnett, drums. Owens has played get inside the horn— wholly involved emotionally— breathing 
with Buddy Rich, Mongo Santamaria, Zappa, my soul into the horn." The series of "Jazz Omnibus" con- 
Gerald Wilson, and others. cert broadcasts is hosted and produced by Ron Pelletier. 



July 27: "Light Year:" Dave Pritchard 

His new album title. His new band includes Patrice 
Rushen, keyboards, Larry Klein, bass; Charles Ore- 
na, reeds; Mike Jochum, drums. Ron Pelletier is 
host and producer of the "Jazz Omnibus" series. 



August 24: "Our Man Higgins:" Billy Higgins 

Higgins is probably the most recorded drummer in the 
history of jazz. A list of his credits would look like a jazz 
encyclopedia. He'll be playing with his own quartet, in the 
"Jazz Omnibus" series made possible by the American Feder- 
ation of Musicians Local 47 Performance Trust Fund. 



><. 



LIVE BROADCAST/CONCERTS, FREE TO THE PUBLIC: FRIDAYS IN JULY & AUGUST. AT 8:00 P.M. 



FOLIO 

KPFK 90.7 FM 

3729 Cahuenga Blvd. West 

North Hollywood CA 91604 



Application to mail at Second Class 
rates is pending at North Hollywood 
Ca. and Additional mailing offices. 



pacifica