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FALL 1983 



If PERKINS SCHOOL 
FOR THE BLIND 



1 $**i 



Published three times a year in print and Braille editions by 

PERKINS SCHOOL FOR THE BLIND 
WATERTOWN, MA 02172-9982 FOUNDED 1829 



Srpfetf 






n accredited member since 1947 of The New 
ngland Association of Colleges and Secondary 
Schools. 

An accredited member since 1970 of the National 
Accreditation Council for Agencies Serving the Blind. 

"The Perkins School for the Blind admits 
students of any race, color, national and ethnic 
origin to all the rights, privileges, programs, and 
activities generally accorded or made available 
to students at the school. It does not discrimi- 
nate on the basis of race, color, national or 
ethnic origin in the administration of its 
educational policies, admissions policies, 
scholarship and loan programs, and athletic 
and other school-administered programs." 

Editor: Ronald C. Trahan 
VOL LIIINO.1 FALL, 1983 



The Perkins Programs 




PRESCHOOL 
SERVICES 

Ages 0—6 





SECONDARY SERVICE 

Ages 15—22 




W 



PRIMARY & 
INTERMEDIATE 

Ages 6—15 




DEAF-BLIND 

Ages 5—22 



SEVERE IMPAIRED 

Ages Up To 22 



TABLE OF 
CONTENTS 



"In This Issue" 

Editorial 4 

Announcing 5 

Severe Impaired Program 6 

On and Off Campus 12 

Occupational Training 

for the Blind 14 

Photo Essay 16 

Graduation Day: 

June 17, 1983 18 

Hearing Handicap: 

The Communication Barrier 20 

On Sale Now! 21 

The Perkins Endowment 23 





ADULT 
SERVICES 

Ages 18 and Up 




COMMUNITY 
RESIDENCE & 
INDEPENDENT LIVING 



I V^# SERVICES 




Other Services 



CLINICAL SERVICES 

(Diagnostic and Evaluative) 

HOWE PRESS 

(Aids & Appliances) 

PUBLIC RELATIONS 
AND PUBLICATIONS 

REGIONAL LIBRARY FOR THE 

BLIND AND PHYSICALLY 

HANDICAPPED 

SAMUEL P. HAYES 
RESEARCH LIBRARY 

TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAM 




EDITORIAL 

Always on the Threshold 



Charles C. Woodcock 
Director 



Any agency, institution, or school that 
wants to "keep up with the times ", wants to 
continue to be "mission oriented" and 
"service-minded", will experience change — 
almost constant change. 

Since first incorporated in March of 1829, 
Perkins has had several locations, several names, and has initiated more than just 
a few new ventures. 

Because there was a rather lengthy period when Perkins' services were geared 
toward the education of blind individuals without added impairments, which at that 
time was appropriate and relevant, many people were conditioned to think of 
Perkins as a rather non-changing entity. 

In some of our publications, a year or two ago, we began using the slogan: "We 
might be different than you think." The slogan made its point — Perkins has been 
changing: if you haven't been in touch with what we are doing you may be out of 
touch with what has been happening recently. Still, if you have been following 

Perkins in these changing times, you know who and what 
we are. You know the relationship between our past and our 
present and have some feeling for our future. 

We are now moving away from the use of the "We might 
be different than you think" wording. We are different! But 
because of what we have written and published, because of 
our outreach and demonstration activities, because of our 
interacting with other schools, agencies, and organizations, 
most of our supporters know us for what we are now. They 
equate us with the Perkins of today, and not the institution of 
former decades. 

There is an old Indian expression about not criticizing 
another person until you have walked in that person's 
moccasins. Keeping this in mind, I trust that those who have 
held responsible positions in the education of the blind in the 
past hold a measure of understanding for what is the 
challenge of today, as those of us today hold some 
understanding for the challenges faced in times past. 

Taking a good look at the service needs today, we find a 
repetition on a theme: "early intervention," "cooperation 
between education and rehabilitation," and "recognizing 
individual needs." So as you can see not everything 
changes. In some respects, by being different we remain 
the same. We remain relevant and mission oriented — and 
we keep up with the times. 

Diversification and unification seem to be the current 
service themes at Perkins. The Infant-Toddler (0-3) and Pre-school (3-5) programs 
are now recognized as Preschool Services. Special Programs and Junior-Senior 
High School are now operating under the title Secondary Services. 

All programs have strengthened their efforts at outreach — being service 
minded. This is not to say that outreach has not been a part of Perkins' tradition in 
the past. Perkins has conducted such activities as the Regional and Research 
libraries, teacher education, and regional and worldwide service for the deaf-blind 
for many years. 

In this issue of The Lantern, we take a look at a new thrust — the Severe 
Impaired Program. The individual attention, detailed monitoring and analyzing of 
patterns of behavior to be changed makes this a staff-intensive program. This 
program provides a real service. Not only will the success of this program relieve 
society of the cost of many long-term institutional placements, but also it will assist 
parents by developing in those served by the program a degree of independence 
that will make home life less stressful, the need for respite service less often, and 
community placement a real option. 

If we are successful, it will be because we are capable of perceiving when to 
change. It will be because we continue to use new knowledge and develop and 
initiate innovative practices. This program, like others at Perkins, will enrich the 
lives of those it serves. 

I hope you find this issue of The Lantern as interesting as I did. 




ANNOUNCING . . . 

Now there 's an affordable way for Braille 
readers to work with computers! 

The Cranmer Modified Perkins Braider 
(CMPB) is a Braille-oriented computer 
device capable of Braille embossing, 
composing and editing text, and interacting 
with computers as a smart terminal. 

Based on the reliable Perkins Brailler — 
manufactured and distributed by The Howe 
Press at Perkins — the CMPB incor- 
porates a 3V2" case (housing electronic 
components), an electronic keyboard, 
and various input/output connectors. The 
keyboard resembles the traditional Perkins 
keyboard, but is electronic and requires 
minimal pressure to activate. 

Capable of connecting to computers 
ranging from a small microcomputer 
to a large computer system, the CMPB 
functions as a computer terminal. 
Commands and text are entered with 
the Perkins-style keyboard. Information 
transmitted is embossed. 

And, as a stand-alone device (not 
connected to a computer), the CMPB is 
similar to an electric Perkins Brailler, with 
the added convenience of an electric 
keyboard and command-driven carriage 
return, line feed, back space, margin 
setting, etc. Information in CPMB's buffer 
can be transmitted to tape or to an ink 
printer. 

Combining the CMPB and a microcomputer with the proper software creates 
a Braille production system . . . This enables anyone who can type to produce 
contracted Braille without the traditional delays and special skills required. 

Direct all inquiries to: 

Howe Press of Perkins School for the Blind 175 N. Beacon St. 

Watertown, MA 02172-9982 (617) 924-3434 




Fall 1983 The Lantern 




The SEVERE IMPAIRED 

PROGRAM at Perkins 




Although the last decade has seen a positive trend in special 
education, there remains at least one group, the severely and 
profoundly impaired, who are still underserved. In recognition of the 
many needs of this population of students, Perkins developed a new 
program in 1982: The Severe Impaired Program. 

This new program serves severely and/or multi-impaired 
blind, deaf-blind, visually impaired, and sighted students from 
ages ten through twenty-two. These students include those who 
have severe cognitive, motor, sensory, and/or behavioral training 
needs. It is presently approved as a forty-eight-week program by 
the Massachusetts Division of Special Education on a day and 
residential basis. 

Prior to accepting its first students, the Program needed to 
modify existing facilities. For example, architectural barriers 
were removed to allow wheelchair accessibility; automatic fire 
door closures were installed; and special furniture and adaptive 
equipment was ordered. In addition, a highly qualified staff was 
hired, which included teachers certified in severe special needs, 
and support staff, including an occupational therapist, a 
physical therapist, a speech therapist, a social worker, and a 
behavior management specialist. 

The Severe Impaired Program is a 24-hours-a-day seven- 
days-a-week program, with a highly structured data collection 
strategy and recordkeeping system so that all progress is noted. This 
necessitates teamwork on the part of the Program's staff: There are 
numerous opportunities for teachers, teacher aides, houseparents, 
child care workers, and clinical staff to interact together in order to 
develop the most beneficial and functional program for each individual 
student . . . So that he or she can some day move on to a less intensive 
educational environment. 

The following case history is presented here because we feel that 
Scott O'Sullivan is "typical" of the students referred to our Severe 
Impaired Program. This is not to say, however, that we do not educate 
and train students with more or less ability than Scott. 



There was the usual warning . . . 

She expects it every morning, says 
Child Care Worker, Donna Smith. 
"Right after he wakes up. He gets very 
lethargic. You just know a seizure is 
coming on." 

Scott's body quickly becomes rigid 
and stiff. He falls forward, face 
twitching, eyes rolled back. His 
muscles react spasmodically, jerking 
to a silent electrical rhythm originating 
in his brain. He clenches his teeth. His 
body will shake, now, for the next 
several minutes. 

Donna Smith remains calm. 
Because she could sense the seizure 
coming, she was able to ease Scott to 
the floor. She loosened the top button 
of his shirt, checked his mouth and 
nose, and turned his head to one side. 



Now she would let the seizure run its 
course. 

"It's a matter of knowing — really 
knowing — the child you're 
responsible for," Donna insists. "I know 
what to expect from Scotty, so I'm 
prepared." 

Scott O'Sullivan is twelve years old. 
He is one of more than two million 
epileptics in the United States, enough 
to populate the city of Philadelphia. 

The word "epilepsy" comes from 
the Greek word for "seizure." Epilepsy 
is not contagious, nor is it a mental 
illness. Rather, it's a disorder of the 
central nervous system. Damaged 
brain cells create the abnormal 
electrical discharges that cause a 
seizure, which is a temporary loss of 
control over the body. 



The Lantern Fall 1983 



Epilepsy is not "curable." In most cases, however, it can 
be partially or even completely controlled by a number of 
treatments, including diet, surgery, and anticonvulsant 
medication. More than a dozen such medications are 
available. Usually, a combination is prescribed, in daily 
dosages. 

Scott O'Sullivan, unfortunately, is one of the twenty 
percent of the country's epileptics who cannot, at least 
at this point, exert total or almost total control over his 
seizures. 

"The vast majority of epileptics," says Perkins' Nurse 
Practitioner, Carolyn Dobies, "lead normal lives. In Scotty's 
case, however, the doctors haven't yet been able to 
determine the right combination of medications to control 
his seizures. And they may never, because an EEG 
(electroencephalogram) performed last 
August showed constant seizure 
activity in his brain." 

Epilepsy is not Scott's only 
impairment: He is mentally retarded, 
autistic, and hyperactive. However, 
the epilepsy is perhaps the most 
detrimental to the boy in terms of his 
being able to make progress in the 
classroom. 

"He has to lose a certain amount of 
class time," says Teacher Aide, Christa 
Gicklhorn, "because of the seizures. 
They take a lot out of him. Some 
mornings he may have two or three 
seizures." 

Scott O'Sullivan has normal vision. 
He is the middle child in a family of 
three boys. Institutionalized at age five, 
he manifests a mental age far below 
his chronological age. He has no 
speech; he makes only loud sounds. 

"He needs constant care," says his 
father, Richard. "He can't dress, toilet, 
feed, or wash himself. He requires full- 
time one-to-one supervision, like a very 
young child." 

According to Mr. O'Sullivan, though, 
Scott's impairments were not 
congenital. 

"He started to regress at about 
eight months old," he recalls. "For 



Fall 1983 The Lantern 




'We are making 
progress," says Scott's 
teacher, Marisa Edwards. 
"He's beginning to react 
consistently to me." 





example. At one time Scotty could say, 'Da Da.' But it 
was at eight months that he started having noticeable 
seizures. My wife and I took him to a pediatrician. He 
thought we were just being overly concerned. So we went 
out and got a second opinion. We took Scotty to Children's 

Hospital in Boston. That's 
where we got the bad news: 
MR (mental retardation). It was 
like someone pulled the rug 
right out from under us. A 
tremendous shock. My wife, to 
make things even worse, was 
already five months pregnant 
with our third child. So it was 
hard, wondering if the next one 
would have a problem too." 

Soon thereafter Scott began 
a home therapy program. 

"But it reached the point," 
admits Mr. O'Sullivan, "where 
he was just too hard to handle 
at home. But I didn't want to put my boy in a residential 
school. I was stubborn ... I thought we could take care of 
him all by ourselves. 
"I was wrong." 

At age five, then, Scott was institutionalized. For 
the next six years he went to a school in western 
Massachusetts. But the O'Sullivans missed their son a 
great deal. And, the 100-mile roundtrip trek to see him 
became increasingly more difficult for them to bear. They 
wanted their son closer to home. 

Coincidentally about the time the O'Sullivans were 
looking to place Scott in an educational setting closer to 
their Melrose, Massachusetts home, their city's Special 
Needs Liaison, Rosemary McGrath, had just learned that 
Perkins had recently developed a new program for the 
severely and profoundly impaired. 

"We — that is, the O'Sullivans and I — were searching 
for a program that would look at Scott as a total child. 
That would look at him from a developmental point of 
view," explains Ms. McGrath. 

"Just walking around the Perkins campus I got an 
immediate sense of caring and warmth and concern. I 
know how good that makes me feel as a representative of 
the school system (Melrose, MA) responsible for Scott. I 
could only imagine if I were Scott's parents, the feeling 



The Lantern Fall 1983 



that it would give me, the feeling of security that if my 
child needed around-the-clock programming, Perkins is 
the place I would want him to be." 

During the subsequent evaluation of Scott to determine 
whether or not Perkins would be a viable educational 
placement for the boy, Mr. and Mrs. O'Sullivan were 
emphatic that if their son could be toilet-trained and could 
develop an effective communication system, then they 
could see the possibility of bringing Scott home to live with 
them again some day. 

"Otherwise," says Mr. O'Sullivan, "it's an impossible 
situation. Scotty lacks awareness of even the most 
common dangers, like putting his hand on a hot stove 
for example. 

"We wanted him placed in a setting which would be 
capable of stimulating his development, yes. But we 
were also looking for a school which was highly safety 
conscious and could provide medical care if necessary." 

The evaluation of Scott determined that Perkins would 
in fact be an appropriate educational setting for the boy. An 
individualized program was designed to stimulate optimal 
cognitive development, self-care and independent 
living skills, interpersonal awareness, an effective 
communication system, and, eventually, prevocational 
skills development. There would be ongoing medical, 
dental, and audiological monitoring; physical, occupa- 
tional, and speech therapies; and music therapy to 
enhance interpersonal awareness, body image, and self- 
expression. Also, teacher aides would provide ongoing 
supervision for special activities such as community 
integration experiences. 

Moreover — and perhaps equally as important as any 
of the direct intervention on Scott's behalf — it was 
agreed that a Perkins social worker 
would establish and maintain contact 
with Scott's parents, so that they 
would be kept abreast of their son's 
needs and progress . . . and made 
aware of community resources 
available to them. 

"You can't brush kids like Scotty 
under a rug," insists Mr. O'Sullivan. "We wanted to give 
him a chance. Perkins has a fantastic reputation for 
helping blind and deaf-blind people, so we figured maybe 
they could also help our mentally retarded son." 



"It's a matter of knowing — really 
knowing — the child you 're 
responsible for, ' ' Donna insists. ' 'I 
know what to expect from Scott, so 
I'm prepared. " 



Fall 1983 The Lantern 



Four months have passed. 
"We are making progress," insists Severe Impaired 
Program Supervisor, Dae Murphy. "When we started with 
Scotty, he was unable to pay attention to me or anyone 
else for more than a few seconds. Instead he'd do many 
self-stimulating behaviors using his hands, head, and 
some vocalizing. 

"Now though, he's beginning to react consistently to his 
teacher and other adults, making frequent eye contact 
and following simple directions. 

"He's beginning — just beginning — to come out of 
himself." 

"I don't expect Perkins to perform any miracles," 
concludes Mr. O'Sullivan. "All we want is for them to get 
out all the possible potential Scotty has locked away 
inside him. 

"He may never learn to read or write. But if he can 
learn to put on his own shirt and ask me for a drink of 
water, well . . . 

"I'll thank God for that." 




□ Ronald Trahan, Coordinator 
Public Relations & Publications 



Frequent daily seizures 
drain Scott of much of his 
energy. Scott is shown 
here with Child Care 
Worker, Kathy Collins. 



10 



The Lantern Fall 1983 




Fall 1983 The Lantern 



11 




ACCESS — The recent completion of a $700, 000 construction 
project at Perkins now makes our school's gymnasiums, 
swimming pool, and centers of instructional materials and 
industrial arts accessible to multi-handicapped children and 
adults. The official ribbon-cutting ceremony on Thursday, May 
26th, 1983 was attended by (see photo, from left to right): C. 
Richard Carlson, President, Perkins Corporation; Charles C 
Woodcock, Perkins ' Director; Perkins students Lisa Lafleur and 
David Flood; Tom Lewis, Perkins' Facilities Manager; Mrs. Helen 
Fernald, Vice President, Perkins Corporation; and Dudley H. 
Willis, Vice President, Perkins Corporation. 

Photo by Ronald Trahan 



ON AND 

OFF CAMPUS 



LIVING WITH 
HEAD INJURY 
. . . Perkins was 
host to the 
Massachusetts 
Chapter of the National Head Injury Foundation 
on Sunday, October 9th. The organization held a 
workshop, "Living With Head Injury," a day-long 
program for families, head-injured individuals, and 
professionals. Workshops included "Managing the 
Physical Problems of the Head-Injured," "The Path 
to Recovery," and "Vocational-Educational 
Opportunities." Closing remarks were made by Mr. 
Elmer Bartels, Commissioner, Massachusetts 
Rehabilitation Commission. 



PERKINS TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAM 
Once again Perkins is educating American and 



12 



The Lantern Fall 1983 



foreign teachers. These teachers 
come to us from around the world, 
as well as the United States, and 
they bring with them a wealth of 
experience in the areas of blind or 
deaf-blind education. All of our 
foreign trainees are looked upon 
as potential educational leaders 
in their countries, and many will 
have the added responsibility of 
developing needed services for 
the blind and deaf-blind or multi- 
impaired children in their country. 
This year's foreign trainees come 
from Puerto Rico, Colombia, India, 
Pakistan, Argentina, Kenya, 
Guatemala, and Japan. 

BLINDSKILLS . . . Blindskills Inc. 
is a new non-profit corporation 
whose primary purpose is to help meet the living 
skills needs of visually impaired children and young 
adults. Their principal initial project is publication of 
a new magazine, "Lifeprints." Five issues a year are 
available in large print, Braille, and cassette. The 
contents of "Lifeprints" is written by visually impaired 
adults and youths whose careers and life skills are 
showcased in an effort to assist visually impaired 
students in their daily pursuits. For a complimentary 
copy, write: Blindskills Inc., P.O. Box 5181, Salem, 
Oregon 97304. Include your name, address, and which 
of the three formats you wish to receive. 




C. Richard Carlson 
(left), President of the 
Perkins Corporation 
and Charles C. 
Woodcock, Perkins' 
director, consult with 
Madeleine C. Will, 
Assistant Secretary for 
Special Education and 
Rehabilitative Services 
with the U.S. Depart- 
ment of Education. Ms. 
Will visited the Perkins 
campus on September 
19th. 




Fall 1983 The Lantern 



U 



OCCUPATIONAL 
TRAINING 
FOR THE BLIND 




Many blind and visually impaired persons 
continue to face employment problems, which 
include . . . 

Unemployment. 
Underemployment. 
Stereotypic employment. 
And career-limiting employment. 

Realizing that few training resources exist to 
prepare blind and visually impaired persons for 
successful employment, Perkins has initiated a 
special project to study and remediate these 
problems. 

Funded by the Executive Office of Human 
Services through the Massachusetts 
Commission for the Blind, Perkins — through 
Occupational Training for the Blind — provides 
support services to existing training programs in 




14 



The Lantern Fall 1983 



the community, so that legally blind clients — 
referred to us by the Massachusetts 
Commission for the Blind — can be served in 
the least restrictive and most meaningful way 
possible. The Perkins staff work with clients 
within the already-existing training program. The 
Perkins staff also provide formal and informal 
training to the sponsoring training program staff. 

Our aim is to integrate clients, and we are 
continually striving to insure that clients are 
mainstreamed. To that end, we work closely 
with the Massachusetts Commission for the 
Blind's staff, so that the training programs we 
develop for their clients are appropriate to their 
needs and expectations. 

For further information please call or write: 
Project Coordinator, Occupational Training for 
the Blind, c/o Perkins School for the Blind, 
175 N. Beacon Street, Watertown, 
MA 02172-9982. Tel: (617) 924-3434, Ext. 434. 




Fall 1983 The Lantern 



15 





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GRADUATION DAY: 

JUNE 17, 1983 





Dr. Edward J. Waterhouse, former director of Perkins and principal speaker at the 1983 Graduation 
Exercises, poses for a picture with graduate, Cynthia Devries of Brockton, MA. It was Dr. Water- 
house who helped bring Cynthia to Perkins from her native country, Holland. He had met her parents 
in Holland at an institute for the blind and helped the family emigrate to the United States. 




1983 graduates: (top row, left to right) John Luland, Nutley, NJ; John Russo, Medford, MA; 
Cynthia Devries, Brockton, MA; Pamela Dove, Fairfax, VA; Margaret Stevens, Poultney, VT; John 
DiPierdomenico, Kensington, CT; William Pensivy, Pittsfield, MA; (second row) Charlene Gionet, 
Shirley, MA; Teresa Jo Crowley Aztec, NM; Lisa Aleshire, Centerville, VA; Ginger Burke, Newport, 
Rl; Sheila Duarte, Taunton, MA; Deborah Pooley, Audubon, NJ; and Kimberly Kingsley East 
Bridgewater, MA. 



18 



The Lantern Fall 1983 




Happy graduates William Pensivy (Pittsfield, MA) and Deborah Pooley (Audubon, NJ) file out of 
Dwight Hall after receiving their high school diplomas. 



Fall 1983 The Lantern 



19 



HEARING HANDICAP: 
The Communication Barrier 




— WHAT IS USHER'S 
SYNDROME? 

Usher's Syndrome is a hereditary 
recessive genetic disease that causes 
deafness and retinitis pigmentosa. 

— WHAT IS RP? 

Retinitis Pigmentosa is the name 
applied to a group of hereditary 
diseases that affect the retina, the 
filmlike tissues in the back of the eye. 
Retinitis stands for the retina of 
"seeing" back layer of the eye; 
Pigmentosa for the abnormal clumps 
of pigment which form on the retina in 
the disease's advanced stages. What 
happens, simply, is that the retina 
slowly degenerates and loses its ability 
to transmit pictures to the brain. 

The first symptom is often "night- 
blindness," followed by a narrowing 
state of side vision until the person has 
what is known as "tunnel vision." In 
many cases, RP leads to total 
blindness. 

There is no known treatment that 
can stop the progress of RP, or cure it. 

— WHOM DOES USHER 'S 
SYNDROME AFFECT? 

Recent research indicates that 
Usher's Syndrome may not be limited 



to children who are born with a 
profound hearing loss. It now appears 
that some children with Usher's 
Syndrome have a mild to moderate 
hearing loss that remains stable, and 
others have a mild to moderate 
hearing loss that gets progressively 
worse as the children get older. 

— HOW IS IT TRANSMITTED? 

Usher's Syndrome is transmitted to 
a child in double dose — one from 
each parent, who themselves do not 
have the visible disease, which means 
Usher's Syndrome can strike without 
warning in a family with no previous 
history of the disease. It is estimated 
that 3-6% of the deaf population is 
affected with "Usher's Syndrome." 

— WHAT ABOUT 
EDUCATION? 

In most cases, the deaf youth can, 
and usually does, receive his 
education at a residential school for 
the deaf or in a public school offering 
deaf education programs. 



20 



The Lantern Fall 1983 



On Sale Now! 




The Perkins School for the 
Blind is pleased to offer a 
1983 holiday greeting card, 
available for purchase by 
mail. 



Fall 1983 The Lantern 



21 



ORDER FORM 
Perkins Christmas Card 



Remembering Perkins School for the Blind is a 

good way to participate in the seasonal spirit of 

giving. Celebrate the holidays this year by sending 

this special greeting to your relatives and friends. 



The card contains a striking color photograph of the 

renowned Perkins Handbell Ensemble against a field of dark 

blue and a gold leaf border. The written message "Season's 

Greetings" is also embossed in Braille. 



The cards cost $1.00 each and may be purchased in any 

quantity. Proceeds from the sale of the card will be used to 

help Perkins continue to give the best possible education 

and training to blind, visually impaired, deaf-blind, and 

multi-impaired children, teenagers, and adults. 







Name 



Address 
City 



State 



Country 



Zip 



Note: Payment in full must accompany this order. Make check or money order payable to Perkins 
School for the Blind. Mail check and order form to Perkins School for the Blind, Watertown, MA 
02172-2790 Attn: Public Relations & Publications 



No. of cards 



at $1 ea. = 



Total Remittance 



22 



The Lantern Fall 1983 



THE PERKINS ENDOWMENT 

The Perkins Program as it has developed and been maintained for 
more than one hundred and fifty years has relied upon a growing 
endowment at every step along the way. 

Endowments which are adequate to put a program into effect are 
rarely sufficient to keep it going. As with every private school and 
college that is keeping abreast — or ahead — of the times, Perkins 
needs to see its endowment grow. Through bequests and donations, 
and through a few government grants, we have been able to expand 
existing services and add new ones as needed. We are confident that 
our friends will continue to support us in ever increasing amounts. 

FORM OF BEQUEST 

I hereby give, devise and bequeath to the Perkins School for the Blind, 
a corporation duly organized and existing under the laws of the 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts, the sum of dollars 

($ ), the same to be applied to the general uses 

and purposes of said corporation under the direction of its Board of 
Trustees; and I do hereby direct that the receipt of the Treasurer for the 
time being of said corporation shall be a sufficient discharge to my 
executors for the same. 



FORM OF DEVISE OF REAL ESTATE 

I give, devise and bequeath to the Perkins School for the Blind, 
a corporation duly organized and existing under the laws of the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts, that certain tract of real estate 
bounded and described as follows: 

(Here describe the real estate accurately) 

with full power to sell, mortgage and convey the same free of all trust. 



NOTICE 

The address of the Treasurer of the corporation is as follows: 

JOHN W.BRYANT 
Fiduciary Trust Co., 175 Federal Street, Boston, MA 02110-2289 






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Published three times a year in print and braille editions by 

PERKINS SCHOOL FOR THE BLIND 
WATERTOWN, MA 02172-9982 FOUNDED 1829 



An accredited member since 1947 of The New 
England Association of Colleges and Secondary 
Schools. 

An accredited member since 1970 of the National 
Accreditation Council for Agencies Serving the Blind. 

"The Perkins School for the Blind admits students of any 
race, color, national and ethnic origin to all the rights, 
privileges, programs, and activities generally accorded or 
made available to students at the school. It does not dis- 
criminate on the basis of race, color, national or ethnic 
origin in the administration of its educational policies, 
admissions policies, scholarship and loan programs, 
and athletic and other school-administered programs." 



"'•"a. 



VOL Llll No. 2 Winter, 1984 



The Perkins Programs 




PRESCHOOL 
SERVICES 

Ages 0—6 



PRIMARY & 
INTERMEDIATE 

Ages 6—15 




SECONDARY SERVIC 

Ages 15—22 



DEAF-BLIND 

Ages 5—22 




PROGRAM for the 
SEVERELY IMPAIRED 

Ages Up To 22 



TABLE OF I 
CONTENTS I 

"In This Issue" 

A Message from the Director 4 

Announcing 5 

Community Residence and 

Independent Living Services 6 

On and Off Campus 12 

Summer Programs 1984 14 

Photo Essay 16 

Christmas at Perkins 

1983 18 

Deaf-Blind Update 20 

On Sale Now! 21 

The Perkins Endowment 23 





ADULT 
SERVICES 

Ages 18 and Up 




COMMUNITY 
RESIDENCE & 
INDEPENDENT LIVING 
SERVICES 

Ages 18 and Up 



>ther Services 

CLINICAL SERVICES 

(Diagnostic and Evaluative) 

HOWE PRESS 

(Aids & Appliances) 

PUBLIC RELATIONS 
AND PUBLICATIONS 

REGIONAL LIBRARY FOR THI 

BLIND AND PHYSICALLY 

HANDICAPPED 

SAMUEL P. HAYES 
RESEARCH LIBRARY 



TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAM 



"A Message from the Director" 





Charles C. Woodcock, 
Director 



This issue of The Lantern, a Perkins publication which 
over the years has been favorably received by its readers, 
continues to tell the Perkins story. 
''■■'.■-" 

As the story unfolds, new grants, new pro- 
grams, and new projects are introduced to 
readers. This issue contains a "brief" about our 
exciting "Project with Industry" grant. Heavy 
support from the three private enterprise part- 
ners identified in this report indicates a growing 
1 awareness of the value to individuals, society, 

and specific businesses when equal opportu- 
r nity is fostered and becomes a part of our 

/*, ^J thinking. 

m Basic human needs translate into basic 

m human rights, '"life, liberty and the pursuit of 

happiness," and — even more basic — food, 

clothing and shelter. 

Perkins' Community Residence and Indepen- 
dent Living Services program attempts to assist 
where needed, and only where needed, as 
clients move to independent or semi-independent housing. 
There is never an attempt to run someone's life or to main- 
tain any form of jurisdictional control. The staff involvement 
is many times a launching operation, or just an initial assist. 

The justifiable pride that comes when one pays one's 
own rent, buys one's own food and puts down the neces- 
sary money in payment, is not the pride that goes before a 
fall, but the pride which breeds confidence. 

In these pages, the reader will find a story about what it 
means to extend a helping hand and what it means to 
receive it. Delicate balances and relationships are always 
involved when humans interact. Interacting with care may 
be the essence of this program. 




The Lantern Winter 1984 



■■■n 



announcing . . . 

"Project with Industry' ' 
Grant 





□ This three-year grant — developed 
through Occupational Training for the Blind at 
Perkins — is designed to reduce unemploy- 
ment among blind and partially sighted Mas- 
sachusetts residents by identifying and 
creating employment opportunities in the 
telecommunications and computer industries. 

□ Project staff survey and analyze job posi- 
tions within New England Telephone, Ameri- 
can Telephone and Telegraph Company, and 
WANG, Inc. Two Occupational Training Spe- 
cialists then assist these companies to 
screen and train visually impaired clients re- 
ferred from the Massachusetts Commission 
for the Blind. 

□ The project intends to replicate these 
employment opportunities nationwide by pro- 
viding consultation on the use of advanced 
technological adaptations for visually im- 
paired persons. 



For further information write: 

Project with Industry 
c/o Office of Public Relations 
& Publications 
Perkins School 
for the Blind 

175 North Beacon Street 
Watertown, MA 02172-9982 
Winter 1984 The Lantern 5 




Community Residence and Independent 
Living Ser vices 

at Perkins 




The problem of providing appropriate community housing options for 
severely impaired and multi-impaired persons has reached major propor- 
tions. These individuals — many of whom were once routinely institu- 
tionalized — are now being mainstreamed back into a society that is not 
always adequately prepared to help them function in the day- 
to-day life of the community. The issue of housing is an 
especially critical problem because training and employment 
of severely impaired and multi-impaired adults cannot be 
accomplished unless appropriate community living situations 
are available to them. 
B JB In 1980. Perkins became actively involved in considering 

i^^^F this issue for a broad range of multi-impaired blind, visually 
^^r impaired, and deaf-blind individuals. We identified a need to 

| develop a comprehensive continuum of housing services to 

adequately serve a substantial number of individuals who had 
completed, or who were about to complete, their formal edu- 
j ! cation and training at Perkins. A number of our previous gradu- 

ates, we learned, were unemployed or underemployed — due 
™ not to a lack of skill development or job opportunities but, 

rather, an absence of appropriately structured living options in 
the community. 

In recognition of this need — a need that goes far beyond what is 
offered in traditional educational settings — Perkins developed a new pro- 
gram in 1982: Community Residence and Independent Living Services. 
This program — under the umbrella of Perkins' Adult Services — provides 
a continuum of residential services to prepare individuals for independent 
living or to assist them in maintaining residence in their home communi- 
ties. Perkins staff supervise and direct several off-campus community 
residences and semi-independent apartments for adults who are blind, 
visually impaired, deaf-blind, and multi-impaired. Residences and 
apartments are equipped and staffed appropriately for clients' needs, 
with structures ranging from full-time supervision to part-time visitation 
support. The emphasis, however, is on a program, rather than on a group 
of facilities, to assist severely and multi-impaired individuals to minimize 
unnecessary dependence on others and to function at the level of 
highest potential in all aspects of their lives. 

Within a residential program, instructional staff can play the most sig- 
nificant role in the teaching of independent living skills. These pro- 
fessionals also provide the necessary expertise and advocacy which 
further enable the special needs individual to establish vital links to the 
community at large. We present the following profiles of two Perkins 
community residence program staff because we feel that Linnae and 
Katy exemplify our commitment to helping severely impaired and multi- 
impaired persons achieve the highest possible quality of life. 



LINNAE SULLIVAN 



"I think the first time I realized the importance of my 
role as a Residence Manager," recalls Linnae Sullivan, 
"was one night last fall when the fire alarm went off. We 
were all sleeping. It was very early in the morning, and I 
had to wake all the residents— four visually and 

The Lantern Winter 1984 



physically impaired men— and make sure they were out 
of the house as quickly and safely as possible. 

"Luckily, it was a false alarm, but it did make me realize 
just how much responsibility rested on my shoulders." 

Linnae Sullivan came to the Community Residence and 
Independent Living Services program at Perkins in 1983 
with a strong background in behavior intervention, after 
working with problem adolescents for nearly six years. 
She has managed the Beechwood Avenue residence 





since its opening early last September. 

The two-family home, located in a 
tree-lined neighborhood, provides a 
program of moderate, full-time super- 
vision for up to eight visually impaired 
and multi-impaired male adults, 
twenty-two years of age and older. 

The four men who currently reside 
in the home are all recent graduates of 
Perkins. For some of them, the Beech- 
wood residence is providing a transi- 
tion point to another, more indepen- 
dent type of living situation— for 
example, a minimally supervised 
apartment setting. For others, the resi- 
dence reflects a more permanent kind 
of living option. 

All four residents are now partici- 
pating in day programs or employment 
training. 

"They're really a varied group of 
people in terms of their interests and 



abilities," says Linnae. "Two of the 
residents— Bill, who is visually 
impaired, and Chris, who is totally 
blind— are undergoing evaluations at 
a vocational training program in 
Boston. Another, Paul, will hopefully 
leave the Head-Injury Unit of the Adult 
Services program at Perkins to start 
the same vocational evaluation within 
the next two months. And Bob, who is 
visually impaired, is studying elec- 
tronics at Sylvania Technical Institute 
in Boston. He's their first special 
needs student. . . and he's doing quite 
well." 

Because the Beechwood residence 
is a twenty-four hour program, Linnae 
"lives in" five days a week to provide 
overnight and early morning coverage. 

"Coverage," however, is an 
oversimplification of Linnae's actual 



responsibilities as Residence Manager. The specialized 
training in daily living skills that she provides is compre- 
hensive, functional, and vital if any of these adults is to 
successfully live in the community— either on his own or 
with others in a semi-independent setting. Money man- 
agement, health care, meal planning, shopping, food prep- 
aration, housekeeping, and use of leisure time and com- 
munity resources are all incorporated into the day-to-day 
activities of the Beechwood household. 

"My day usually starts at 4:00 in the afternoon," says 
Linnae, "when the residents begin to arrive home from 
their programs. At that time, I try to get everyone involved 
in dinner: Paul, for example, sets the table; Chris helps 
cook; and Bob does the dishes. Billy usually shops and 
cooks for himself, but sometimes he'll eat with us. It's 
really the most enjoyable part of my day because it's one 
of the few times that we all sit down together and enjoy 
each other's company. 

"After dinner, the residents are pretty much on their 
own except for a few nights which we reserve for specific 
activities. Every Tuesday, for example, we conduct a 
house meeting where issues and problems can be dis- 
cussed openly by the group. 
Of course," adds Linnae, "they 
all have roommate problems 
just like anyone else, but 
that's actually good because it 
gives them an opportunity to 
learn to resolve conflicts with 
other people. My role is to 
help them deal with those 
conflicts on their own as 
much as possible. 

"Wednesday nights," she 
continues, "are usually re- 
served for household chores 
like cleaning and laundry— 
probably the least favorite ac- 
tivities but often the ones 
where I need to provide the 
most instruction and gui- 
dance. And weekends are de- 
voted to running errands — 
banking, shopping— and 
spending as much leisure 
time in the community as 
possible. 

"As you might imagine," 
says Linnae, "I'm constantly 
changing hats depending on 
the day, the person, and the 
situation. When I first started 
working here, I always wanted 



Funding . . .an Issue of Dollars and Sense 

Many obstacles exist to creating housing alternatives for blind, 
visually impaired, deaf-blind, and multi-impaired individuals, not 
the least of which is adequate funding to support the operational 
costs of community residence programs. A considerable amount 
of creativity is needed to adequately meet these financial 
constraints, which can vary significantly depending on the amount 
of supervision and staff intervention needed. 

For example, in lower cost living arrangements, i.e., minimally 
supervised facilities, an individual would in most cases be able to 
support himself or herself through wage earnings and/or 
Supplemental Security Income (S.S.I.). Thus, for these individuals, 
employment or other substantial income becomes a necessary 
condition for successful independent living. 

On the other hand, more expensive programs — those which 
are heavily supervised or highly structured — require the 
coordinated efforts of a number of individuals and resources. 

Perkins staff are presently researching and studying a number 
of financial options and funding mechanisms which can contribute 
to effective long-term economic planning for individual residents. 
The planning alternatives under investigation include, but are not 
necessarily limited to, the following: 

• Federal HUD monies for Elderly and Handicapped 
Individuals 

• Estate and Trust Funds 

• Insurance Settlements 

• Guardianship 

• Medicaid Funds 

• Private Monies 
To ensure that these resources are utilized appropriately, 

regular and open communication must be maintained among 
parents/legal guardians, human service professionals, funding and 
licensing agents (Departments of Mental Health. Public Health, 
Welfare, etc.), local housing authorities, and attorneys. Within the 
area of estate and trust planning, for example, competent legal 
counsel is a necessity to thoroughly understand the various dis- 
ability classifications and the emerging yet ever-changing issue of 
legal rights. An evaluation of the individual client, an analysis of 
available resources, and the objectives of both the client and his 
or her family must all be carefully reviewed. 

As we become more and more knowledgeable about these 
resources, we can better assist clients and their families to seek 
the most competent, professional advice, and to choose the most 
effective economic options available for community housing. 



to be a friend. But then I realized that 
there were times when I had to be 
firm, and so I've learned to balance a 
lot of different roles. . . I am, after all, 
here to provide as much of a normal 
living experience as possible— and 
that includes supervision and 
guidance." 

Linnae shares the responsibilities of 
supervision and training at the Beech- 
wood residence with an Assistant 
Residence Manager, Sue Aptaker, who 
works with Linnae two days a week 
and runs the residence on her own 
during Linnae's days off. 

"Sue and I give each other tremen- 
dous support," says Linnae. "I feel that 
it's critical for residential staff to be 
able to get along well and work 
closely together— not only for one 
another's emotional well-being but 
also to set an important example for 
the people who live here. We try to 
keep our home as family-like as 
possible." 



Though a major focus of the Beech- 
wood residence program is the pro- 
vision of functional living skills, it is, 
perhaps, a feeling of contributing and 
participating in a household setting— 
a sense of truly belonging— that 
proves to be one of the most valuable 
aspects of this community residence. 

"A group arrangement," explains 
Sally Sparks, Assistant Supervisor of 
Community Residence and Indepen- 
dent Living Services at Perkins, 
"allows young adults to live together 
and support each other instead of 
living alone and becoming isolated." 

"Some of these men," adds Linnae, "could have been 
placed in an institutional setting had there not been a 
housing option appropriate to their needs. I think that's 
why we've had such a positive response from the families 
. . . they feel fortunate that their sons finally have the 
opportunity to lead dignified, productive lives. 

"It gives me a real sense of satisfaction to know that 
I'm helping them do that." 



A CONTINUUM OF LIVING 
OPTIONS IN THE COMMUNITY 

Community Residence & Independent 
Living Services at Perkins 



Intermediate Care 
Facility for the 
Mentally Retarded 

Type B (ICF-MR-B) 

Heavily Supervised 
Total Capacity: 8 



Community Residence 

Moderately Supervised 
Total Capacity: 8 



Community Residence 

Moderately Supervised 
Total Capacity: 8 



Community Residence 

Moderately Supervised 
Total Capacity: 8 



Community Residence 

Part Time Live-In 
Staff Supervision 
Total Capacity: 6 



Staffed Apartment 

Part Time Live-In 
Staff Supervision 
Total Capacity: 3 



Semi-Independent 
Apartments 

Part Time 
Visitation Support 
Total Capacity: 9 



Key: 

■ Presently in Operation 

□ Under Development for 1984-85 Opening 



The successful acquisition of 
independent living skills requires 
the development of community 
resources and a variety of 
potential living situations/options. 



Winter 1984 The Lantern 




KATY FRASER 



"I've always been involved in community housing and in- 
dependent living services and, for a long time, I've been 
frustrated with the lack of options available to blind and 
visually impaired persons," says Katy Fraser. "So, pro- 
fessionally, it's exciting for me to see the development 
of the community residence program at Perkins. 

Katy Fraser is an Independent Living Specialist in the 
Community Residence and Independent Living Services 
program at Perkins. Her training as a rehabilitation home 
economist reflects a distinct personal commitment to 

helping special needs adults 
achieve their highest levels of 
independence in a community 
setting. 

"It sounds funny, but my 
job is to ultimately make 
myself unnecessary. . .to 
become less and less impor- 
tant in the lives of the people I 
work with." 

Those people are seven 
visually impaired, head-injured, 
and deaf-blind adults who 
reside in the Arsenal Street 
Apartments, a modern, fed- 
erally-subsidized housing 
complex for elderly and 
special needs individuals. Five 
of the apartments in the com- 
plex are managed by Perkins 
as a transitional living pro- 
gram for blind, visually im- 
paired and multi-impaired 



Partnership in Planning 

With passage of the Rehabilitation Amendments of 1978 (Public Law 
95-602), independent living became an official service entitlement, avail- 
able — in theory — to all severely impaired and multi-impaired individuals 
throughout the country Yet more than five years later we are challenged to 
rethink our goals and to question whether our efforts have truly fostered 
the standard of independence to which we all subscribe philosophically. 

Who has taken responsibility for planning and coordinating the services 
necessary for blind, visually impaired, deaf-blind, and multi-impaired indivi- 
duals to live independently? 

Educators have traditionally been accountable for providing services to 
special needs students from birth to twenty-two years of age; rehabilitation 
personnel usually assume responsibility for special needs adults twenty- 
two years of age and older. In theory, then, the life-long needs of these indi- 
viduals should be met by two professional disciplines. 

In reality, however, the transition from one service provider to another is 
not always systematically nor cooperatively planned. As a result, the needs 
of the severely or multi-impaired individual — and his or her basic right to 
participate to the maximum extent possible in the day-to-day life of the 
community — are often bypassed. 

With the development of the Community Residence and Independent 
Living Services program, Perkins has begun to bridge an enormous "gap" 
in the delivery of these services to our multi-impaired students and 
clients. . 

But we cannot solve the housing needs for all. 

If the complex needs of a wide range of individuals are to be effectively 
addressed — especially those pertaining to housing and community living 
— educators and rehabilitation professionals must begin to work and plan 
together during the early adolescent years. Timely communication and 
coordination of services are essential. 

A partnership combining the efforts and expertise of both professional 
communities will ensure that a continuum of comprehensive services — 
including a variety of appropriate residential options — is available to the 
severely impaired and multi-impaired adult. What must be avoided are last- 
minute "crisis-oriented" transfers of individuals from an educational 
system to a rehabilitation network unprepared to meet their needs. 



adults. The residents in this 



program all have the potential to live independently in the 
community. Most are here because they need some time 
and assistance to bridge the jump from a school environ- 
ment to the community at large. Hence, the apartments 
provide support services which facilitate movement from 
relatively dependent living situations to comparatively in- 
dependent situations. Most residents are expected to 
make that transition within two years. 

Monday through Friday of each week, Katy travels one 
mile from her office at Perkins to the apartment complex. 
"All of the residents have jobs or are involved in training 
programs, so my work with them doesn't start until 4:30 
or 5:00 p.m. Because I'm here for only two or three hours 
in the evening, they have to be medically stable and have 



10 



The Lantern Winter 1984 



the ability to deal with emergencies or administer basic first aid. They are, essen- 
tially, pretty much on their own ... I'm really just a very small part of their lives." 

Small, perhaps, but not insignificant. For the training and guidance that Katy 
provides to these young men and women foster exactly those skills needed for 
truly independent living in the community. 

"What I do varies tremendously from day to day and person to person," says 
Katy. "For example, today I'll probably help Anna, a totally blind resident, read her 
mail and budget her earnings— which is often a big problem area for many indivi- 
duals when they first move into the community. They simply have never had to 
assume responsibility for all of their finances before. 

"Anna and I," Katy continues, "have worked out an arrangement in which she 
gives me a certain amount of money from her paycheck each week to 'hold' for 
her until rent is due or bills come in. Hopefully, she'll learn to set aside that money 
on her own without my assistance. The idea is for her to learn to use one portion 
of her paycheck for fixed expenses, such as rent and utilities, and the other portion 
for short-term variable costs, like food and entertainment. 

"I also provide, when necessary, practical kinds of instruction in kitchen safety, 
housekeeping, shopping, and food selection," says Katy. "But I think one of the 
most important things I do is to help these adults learn to use the services in the 
community ... to know when and who to ask for help, and how to do it . . . espe- 
cially in the area of obtaining proper medical care. Locating and choosing a doctor, 
for example, is a very basic and essential health care need. But it's something that 
most of these individuals have never had to do before. 

"I am, in a nutshell, a facilitator," says Katy. "The people who live here now have 
most of the skills necessary to make it on their own. I'm really here to guide them 
in using those skills effectively on a day-to-day basis ... to help them make intelli- 
gent decisions . . . which is tricky, because I can't make those decisions for them, 
but I can help them to clarify all their options. 

"I think that's what this program is all about, really. . . enabling special indivi- 
duals to have more options . . . 

"And I like being a part of that." 



Denise L. Goros 




1 'It sounds funny, but my job is to 
ultimately make myself unnecessary 
. . . to become less and less 
important in the lives of the people I 
work with. " 



1984 INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ... The 

International Association tor Education of the Deaf-Blind 
(I.A.E.D.B.) will sponsor an International Conference in New 
York City August 5th-10th. World-renowned leaders and edu- 
cators of the deaf-blind will convene to share important devel- 
opments in their respective countries and discuss current 
research in the field of deaf-blindness. The conference is 
hosted by the New York Institute for the Education of the 
Blind. For further information, call or write: 

Richard G. Colby, 1984 Conference Director 

The New York Institute for the Education of the Blind 

999 Pelham Parkway 

Bronx, New York 10469 Tel.: 212/519-7000 



THINKING ABOUT THE FUTURE . . . a weekend 

of self-awareness and career exploration for visually impaired 
high school students was provided by Perkins' Outreach 
Services from October 28th-30th. Twelve blind and partially 
sighted public school students from Massachusetts, New 
Hampshire, and Connecticut participated with their parents 
in the first of a series of experiences designed to help these 
teenagers plan for the future. Discussions throughout the 
weekend were led by a professional rehabilitation consultant. 
Additional conferences are planned for 1 984. 



STUDENT ART EXHIBIT. . . Students from the 
Primary & Intermediate Program and Secondary Services 
program at Perkins are exhibiting their artworks at the 
Wheelock College Gallery in Boston, Massachusetts. The 
exhibit — open to the public from February 5th through 
March 5th — includes paintings and sculpture produced 
by blind, visually impaired, and multi-impaired Perkins 
students between the ages of 6 and 22. 



12 The Lantern Winter 1984 




SWIMMING POOL DEDICATED. The recently renovated swimming pool at Perkins has been named in honor of the 
late Richard and Mary B. Saltonstall, whose financial support made the renovations possible. On behalf of the 
Saltonstalls, the dedication ceremony in December was attended by: Sally (SaltonStall) Willis and Dudley Willis, Vice 
President, Perkins Corporation; and their children: (left to right) Will, David, Chris, and Debbie. 



ACCESSING MICROCOMPUTERS . . . Perkins' 

Outreach Services presented two day-long workshops, No- 
vember 15th and 16th, on microcomputer technology for blind 
and visually impaired high school students. The workshops — 
second in the series, "Frontiers in Educating the Visually 
Impaired" — attracted nearly 100 participants, including 
visually impaired students and adults, public school teachers, 
and vocational rehabilitation professionals. Inservice sessions 
were led by three consultants with extensive backgrounds in 
educational applications of microcomputers. Participants were 
also provided with "hands-on" experience in accessing three 
output modalities — braille, speech and large type — by ten 
exhibitors of computer products, including IBM, Howe Press 
and Kurzweil. 



Winter 1984 The Lantern 



13 



ffe#Mv< 



□ Ages 3-6 



Daily Living Skills 



□ Day Program 




□ Ages 14-22 



□ Focus: Daily Living Skills 



Mobility 



Recreation 



Prevocational Training 



□ Day or Residential Program 




□ Ages 18 + 



□ Focus: Daily Living Skills 



Orientation & Mobility 



Recreation 



□ Day or Residential Program 



SUMMER P 



□ Focus: Language & Communication 



Many individuals who have 
exceptional needs often benefit 
from a program of continuous 
education and intervention. 

Recognizing the importance 
of providing ongoing services, 
Perkins offers six specialized 
summer programs for visually 
impaired persons and for per- 
sons with non-visual handicaps 
— children, teenagers, and 
adults who are deaf-blind, head- 
injured, and multi-impaired. 
Eligible students and clients 
come from diverse educational 
backgrounds, including public 
schools and residential programs. 



14 



The Lantern Winter 1984 



ROGRAMS 



1984 summer programs begin 
on Sunday June 24th, and run 
through Friday July 27th. Our 
goal for these five-week ses- 
sions is to provide individual- 
ized services based on each 
student's or client's present 
functioning level. 

For further information please 
fill out the attached reply card 
and mail to: 

Perkins School for the Blind 
Office of Public Relations 
& Publications 
175 North Beacon Street 
Watertown, MA 021 72-9982 

Please Note: Application Deadline 
for Summer Programs is April 1 , 
1984. 




□ Ages 5-16 



□ Focus: Daily Living Skills 



Recreation 



Orientation & Mobility 



□ Day or Residential Program 




□ Ages 5-22 



□ Focus: Language & Communication 



Recreation 



Daily Living Skills 



□ Day or Residential Program 




□ Ages 1 0-22 



□ Focus: Diagnostic Evaluation 

□ Day or Residential Program 



Winter 1984 The Lantern 



15 



We kneel, how weak! 

We rise, how full of power! 

—Richard Chenevix Trench 
(1807-1886) 







>i< 



Avat 





( . / | ■■■• 




& w up 

Each year for the past 
seven decades, the 
combined music organi- 
zations of Perkins have 
presented their tradi- 
tional Christmas con- 
certs to standing- 
room-only crowds. The 
1983 program consisted 
of a variety of special 
Christmas selections by 
the Perkins Handbell 
Ensemble, the Lower 
School and Upper 
School choruses, and 
the Chamber Singers. 




Daniel J. Mazeika, chairperson of the Music Department at Perkins, 
leads the Christmas choristers for the tenth consecutive year. Judith 
Bevans directed the Perkins Lower School Chorus. Singers were 
accompanied by pianist and Perkins Music teacher, Maria-Pia Antonelli. 



RIGHT: Perkins' Handbell Ensemble 

— under the direction ofAdele Trytko 

— begin the Christmas concert with 
performances of seven well-known 
carols. Pictured (left to right) are bell 
ringers: Diane April, Michele Pierce, 
James Desrosiers. OPPOSITE PAGE: 
Deaf-blind student Eric Teece 
accompanies the Handbell Ensemble. 

photos by John Shesler 




Deaf-Blind Update 



Meeting the needs of Deaf -Blind Adults . . . 

Between 1986 and 1989, a considerable number of 
deaf-blind students now enrolled in special school 
programs will complete their education under 
Public Law 94-142. Consequently, there is an 
urgent need to develop a broad range of adult 
services which will meet the complex multi-handi- 
caps of these students. 

Perkins, with its long history of educating and 
training deaf-blind persons, has recently been 
awarded two grants from the U.S. Department 
of Education to identify and plan for the provision 
of these services. 



"Prevocational and Vocational 
Training for Deaf Blind Youth " 

□ This model project will determine 
the most successful and appropriate 
methods for integrating severely 
retarded deaf-blind individuals into 
existing sheltered workshop programs. 

□ A team of four professionals will 
also develop a meaningful and produc- 
tive day habitation model for pro- 
foundly retarded deaf-blind persons 
who are unable to benefit from tradi- 
tional work programs. 



"Innovative Project for Total Life 
Planning for Deaf Blind Youth " 

□ Project staff will develop a model 
interagency plan to fully identify and 
provide for the adult service needs of 
Massachusetts deaf-blind residents, 
particularly in regard to residential and 
support services. 

□ A model training program in com- 
munity living will be implemented, 
with the goal of demonstrating how 
to best prepare and train deaf-blind 
students for community-based 
residences. 



It is intended that the service delivery models developed by both projects will have 
significant implications for a majority of deaf-blind persons in this country. 

For further information about the model projects, write: 

Deaf-Blind Model Projects 

c/o The Office of Public Relations & Publications 

Perkins School for the Blind 

175 North Beacon Street 

Watertown, MA 021 72-9982 
20 The Lantern Winter 1984 










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renowned author and educator of the deaf-blind. 




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Publication Title 


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Copy 


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Deaf-Blind Education 
Books A and B 


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$29.00 


$28.00 


$27.00 




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9.00 


10.00 






Proceedings of the 
International Symposium on 
Visually Handicapped Infants 
and Young Children 


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Auditory Training in the 
Perkins Deaf-Blind Dept. 


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Bibliography of the Deaf-Blind 


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Body Image and the Severely 
Handicapped Rubella Child 


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Educational Beginnings with 
Deaf-Blind Children 
(2nd edition) 


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Fourth International Conference 
on Deaf-Blind Children 


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Perkins Sign Language 
Dictionary 


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9.50 


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Speech Beginnings for the 
Deaf-Blind Child 


2.50 


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The Deaf-Blind Rubella Child 


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The Story of Leonard Dowdy - 
Deaf-Blindness Acquired 
in Infancy 


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Understanding our Movement 
Problems 


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Note: Payment in full must accompany this order. Make check or money order payable 
to Perkins School for the Blind. Mail check and order form to Perkins School for the Blind, 
Watertown, MA 02172-9982. Attn: Public Relations & Publications 



22 



The Lantern Winter 1984 



_ 



THE PERKINS ENDOWMENT 

The Perkins Program as it has developed and been maintained for 
more than one hundred and fifty years has relied upon a growing 
endowment at every step along the way. 

Endowments which are adequate to put a program into effect are 
rarely sufficient to keep it going. As with every private school and 
college that is keeping abreast — or ahead — of the times, Perkins 
needs to see its endowment grow. Through bequests and donations, 
and through a few government grants, we have been able to expand 
existing services and add new ones as needed. We are confident that 
our friends will continue to support us in ever increasing amounts. 

FORM OF BEQUEST 

I hereby give, devise and bequeath to the Perkins School for the Blind, 
a corporation duly organized and existing under the laws of the 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts, the sum of dollars 

($ ), the same to be applied to the general uses 

and purposes of said corporation under the direction of its Board of 
Trustees; and I do hereby direct that the receipt of the Treasurer for the 
time being of said corporation shall be a sufficient discharge to my 
executors for the same. 



FORM OF DEVISE OF REAL ESTATE 

I give, devise and bequeath to the Perkins School for the Blind, 
a corporation duly organized and existing under the laws of the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts, that certain tract of real estate 
bounded and described as follows: 

(Here describe the real estate accurately) 

with full power to sell, mortgage and convey the same free of all trust. 



NOTICE 

The address of the Treasurer of the corporation is as follows: 

JOHN W. BRYANT 
Fiduciary Trust Co., 175 Federal Street, Boston, MA 02110-2289 



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Spring 1984 
PERKINS SCHOOL FOR THE BLIND 






Published three times a year in print and braille editions by 

PERKINS SCHOOL FOR THE BLIND 
WATERTOWN, MA 02172-9982 FOUNDED 1829 

An accredited member since 1947 of The New 

England Association of Colleges and Secondary 

Schools. 

An accredited member since 1970 of the National 

Accreditation Council for Agencies Serving the Blind 

and Visually Handicapped. 

"The Perkins School for the Blind admits students of any 
race, color, national and ethnic origin to all the rights, 
privileges, programs, and activities generally accorded or 
made available to students at the school. It does not dis- 
criminate on the basis of race, color, national or ethnic origin 
in the administration of its educational policies, admissions 
policies, scholarship and loan programs, and athletic and 
other school-administered programs." 



4& 



\T'\VA5 



VOL. Llll No. 3 
Spring, 1984 



The Perkins Programs 




SECONDARY SERVICE! 

Ages 15—22 



PROGRAM for the 
SEVERELY IMPAIRED 

Ages Up To 22 



TABLE OF 
CONTENTS 

"In This Issue" 

A Message from the Director 4 

Announcing 5 

The National Accreditation Council for 

Agencies Serving the Blind 

and Visually Handicapped 6 

Deaf-Blind Update 13 

On and Off Campus 14 

Blind, Deaf Boy Sees a Future 16 

On Sale Now! 21 

The Perkins Endowment 23 




SERVICES 

Ages 18 and Up 





COMMUNITY 
RESIDENCE & 
INDEPENDENT LIVING 
SERVICES 

Ages 18 and Up 



CLINICAL SERVICES 

(Diagnostic and Evaluative) 

HOWE PRESS 

(Aids & Appliances) 

PUBLIC RELATIONS 
AND PUBLICATIONS 

REGIONAL LIBRARY FOR THE 

BLIND AND PHYSICALLY 

HANDICAPPED 

SAMUEL P. HAYES 
RESEARCH LIBRARY 









TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAM 



Wdti 






W&*1 




Charles C. Woodcock, 
Director 




Credit Where Credit is Due 

The processes by which change is wrought in our educa- 
tional system in the United States have frequently been 
criticized. Even when research clearly indi- 
cates the need, achieving change may take 
two decades or more. 

It is something of a miracle when those 
within the system recognize a need, initiate 
action, develop and implement plans, and 
bring something entirely new into being within 
a short time. Such a phenomenon occurred in 
the field of education of the blind when the 
necessity was recognized for a system of 
accrediting schools and agencies. 

This issue of The Lantern describes the 
evolution of the National Accreditation Council 
for Agencies Serving the Blind and Visually 
Handicapped (NAC). It is an almost unparal- 
leled success story. This agency has provided 
channels of communication and cooperation 
hitherto impossible; and, in helping others to 
achieve high standards of care for the visually 
impaired, it brings credit not only to itself but 
to the whole field of accredited organizations. 
These are schools and agencies which have opened 
their doors, their reports, and their financial and corporate 
records to professional observers. They have brought staff 
together to reflect on objectives, to study operations in 
every detail, and to measure performance against recog- 
nized standards. They have acknowledged a commitment 
to excellence. Organizations that have experienced this 
process are unanimous in their testimony as to its benefits. 

Any investment, whether public or private, deserves a 
good return. NAC has done much to assure this for those 
seeking an effective school program or services from an 
agency in the field. Every organization accredited by NAC 
has a star in its crown which represents quality, sincerity, 
and a continual commitment to self-study and performance 
of the highest standard. 

We should look for this seal of approval. We owe it to 
those we serve. 




The Lantern Spring 1984 



1984 Annual Meeting of the 

National Accreditation Council 
for Agencies Serving the Blind & 
Visually Handicapped 



November 10-11, 1984 
The Colonnade 
Boston, Massachusetts 



The National Accreditation Council is recognized 
by the U.S. Department of Education as the 
reliable authority for accreditation of specialized 
schools for the blind and visually impaired. 

Accreditation by NAC signifies that an organization 
meets nationally accepted standards for quality 
services, responsible management, and public 
accountability. 



For further information about the 1984 Annual 
Meeting contact: 

1984 NAC Conference Coordinator 
Director's Office 
Perkins School for the Blind 
175 North Beacon Street 
Watertown, MA 02172 
(617)924-3434, extension 203 



Spring 1984 The Lantern 



"The National Accreditation Council for Agencies 

Twenty years ago, the range of services for blind persons was incom- 
plete and poorly coordinated, and professional practice uncertain, since 
there had been no codification of accumulated knowledge in the field. 

Prior to the 1960s, there existed a number of standard-setting systems 
that directly or indirectly affected voluntary and governmental agencies 
purporting to provide social, educational, or rehabilitative service for 
visually impaired Americans. For instance, regulations governed the use of 
Federal funds by state agencies or by private agencies from whom serv- 
ices were purchased. In some localities, a private group sought and won 
United Fund (UF) support, having met the UF standards. The American 
Association of Workers for the Blind (AAWB) had promulgated its "Seal of 
Good Practice," largely directed at administrative structure and fund 
raising. The National Information Bureau (NIB) was in the wings, checking 
into national voluntary agency operations when requested by its members. 

Except for government control of public agencies, none of such 
standard-setting systems really had any authority, and only the few 
agencies that understood the practical value of endorsement paid them 
any attention. 

In the early sixties, the first murmurings about a system for standard- 
setting and certification of voluntary agencies began to be heard. As the 
idea gained momentum, it elicited reactions somewhere between 
indifference and ridicule. 

Some leaders in the field were convinced of the need for such a system 
but equally convinced that it would be hard to sell. There were two selling 
jobs to be done: to the supporting public and its generic institutions, and to 
the organizations within what was called "work for the blind." 

A smattering of entrepreneurs confused the public mind, either 
unconsciously or deliberately. Vendors of soap, greeting cards, or neckties, 
for example, let it be believed their products were manufactured to provide 
jobs for blind persons. At least two dozen agencies training guide dogs 
collectively let it be believed that a blind person was living in dependency, 
isolation, and, of course, darkness without the magic and loving assistance 
of a dog. Even highly respected civic organizations were, with great zeal 
and self-satisfaction, funding programs which were either unprofessionally 
planned or unnecessary. 

There were, in addition, instances of actual fraud with some "agencies" 
cited by the U.S. Postal Service for using the mails to defraud. Some local 
attorneys-general exposed violations of state laws, while some contributor- 
protection agencies, most aggressively in Los Angeles, made life difficult 
for both good and bad enterprises. As one employee at NIB put it: "The 
field of services to the blind and its fund raising is the most puzzling and 
confusing of any voluntary category in the country." 

In addition, several centuries of the asylum syndrome had built up 
formidable barriers to intelligent adjustment to blindness "even by the 
unlucky and unhappy persons so afflicted." Individuals who "overcame the 
scourge" were said to be remarkable, perched on pedestals of personal 
courage. The sighted public remained content to give donations for only 
basic food and shelter. So what was to be done? Could anything really be 
done? Conscientious and established organizations wished for something 
to be done. Blind persons, unwilling to be exploited further, said something 
had to be done. 

The idea of accrediting, then, was inevitable. 

Thus, in 1961 the American Foundation for the Blind (AFB) created an 

The Lantern Spring 1984 



Serving the Blind and Visually Handicapped" 

Ad Hoc Committee on Accreditation, headed by Jansen Noyes, Jr, 
president of the Foundation. The other committee members were: Dr. 
William Selden, executive secretary of the National Commission on 
Accreditation; Robert E. Bondy, executive director of the National Social 
Welfare Assembly; Peter J. Salmon, executive director of the Industrial 
Home for the Blind; and Dr. Joseph L. Hunt, assistant director, Office of 
Vocational Rehabilitation, U.S. Department of Health, Education and 
Welfare. 

In April, 1963 this advisory committee completed its work by recom- 
mending the appointment of an independent commission to: (1) formulate 
standards for agency administration and service programs, and (2) establish 
an on-going organization to administer a nationwide system of voluntary 
accreditation based on these standards. 

AFB, acting on these recommendations, created an autonomous 
Commission on Standards and Accreditation of Services for the Blind 
(COMSTAC). Its goal was the establishment, in the United States, of a 
voluntary, self-policing and self-supporting process for identifying problem 
areas, developing standards and procedures for evaluation, and achieving 
public awareness that such information existed. Simply stated, the hope 
was that blind persons (or their families) seeking assistance would know 
where to go for reliable services, and that financial supporters of agencies 
would have some assurance that the recipient was worthy, both ethically 
and professionally. 

COMSTAC was headed by Dr. Arthur L. Brandon, vice-president of 
New York University and chairman of the policy board of the Institute for 
Economic Affairs. It included, among its 22 blind and sighted members, 
representatives of governmental and voluntary agencies, as well as civic 
leaders ranging from a governor of Maine to the executive secretary of a 
foundation in San Francisco. 

Dr. Brandon set a fast pace for all those associated with COMSTAC. The 
response to tasks undertaken by COMSTAC was enthusiastic, and soon 
twelve technical committees were established with responsibility for 
developing standards for five administrative areas and seven types of 
service programs. Each committee was made up of nationally recognized 
leaders in the relevant field of practice. All in all 136 individuals gave 
generously of their time and expertise to this project. 

When the technical committees completed their drafts, the Commission 
convened a national conference on standards. This conference brought 
together 374 persons from 45 states, the District of Columbia, and Canada 
to participate in 17 intensive workshops at which the proposed standards 
were discussed and debated line by line. This conference was sponsored 
and financed by the Commission and 66 agencies in the field. 

While the technical committees were codifying standards, COMSTAC's 
long range planning committee, chaired by Benjamin F. Boyer, dean of the 
law school of Temple University, was projecting detailed plans for the 
establishment of the organization that was to implement the standards 
developed by COMSTAC. In 1966, COMSTAC projected a tentative five- 
year budget, articles of incorporation, and a plan of operation for its 
successor organization, the National Accreditation Council for Agencies 
Serving the Blind and Visually Handicapped (NAC). 

Before 1966 drew to a close, The COMSTAC Report: Standards for 
Strengthened Services was published, and soon found its way into libraries 
on six continents. 

Spring 1984 The Lantern 



In January, 1967, NAC opened its doors in a small suite of offices in New York City. Its first 
task was to develop detailed criteria for each of the hundreds of standards codified by 
COMSTAC. These criteria (with revisions) are still used today for both the self-study and on- 
site review phases of the accreditation process. 

There are today 93 agencies and schools all committed to the COMSTAC legacy of "a new 
sense of hope and a new spirit of determination that blind men, women and children shall 
have the best that organized community effort can produce for their well-being, now and in 
the future." 

Catalyst for Constructive Change 



After an intensive study by a national 
commission made up of leading laymen 
and professionals in the field of blind- 
ness, the National Accreditation Council 
for Agencies Serving the Blind and 
Visually Handicapped (NAC) was 
founded in 1967. Its goal: To improve 
services for blind persons and provide a 



way of identifying schools and agencies 
that are doing a worthwhile job of help- 
ing them. An independent, nonprofit 
organization, NAC develops standards 
and administers a nationwide, voluntary 
program of self-improvement through its 
accreditation process. 



NAC— Accredited Residential Schools for 



Two dates appear for 
each school: the year 
when accreditation was 
first achieved, and the 
year through which 
accreditation is awarded. 

ALABAMA 

Alabama School for the Blind 

Talledega, AL 

Ronald L. Garrett, Principal 

(78-85) 

ARIZONA 

Arizona State School for the 

Deaf and Blind 

Tucson, AZ 

Barry L. Griffing, 

Superintendent 

(72-87) 

ARKANSAS 

Arkansas School for the Blind 

Little Rock, AK 

Hugh A. Pace, Superintendent 

(69-84) 

FLORIDA 

Florida School for the Deaf 

and Blind 

St. Augustine, FL 

Tuck Tinsley, III, Principal 

(78-88) 



GEORGIA 

Georgia Academy for the Blind 

Macon, GA 

Richard E. Hyer, Jr., 

Superintendent 

(78-88) 

ILLINOIS 

Hadley School for the Blind 

Winnetka, IL 

Robert J. Winn, President 

(70-85) 

Illinois School for the Visually 

Handicapped 

Jacksonville, IL 

Richard G. Umsted, 

Superintendent 

(75-85) 

IOWA 

Iowa Braille and Sight Saving 

School 

Vinton, IA 

Richard M. DeMott, 

Superintendent 

(71-86) 



MARYLAND 

Maryland School for the Blind 

Baltimore, MD 

Richard L Welsh, 

Superintendent 

(69-85) 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Perkins School for the Blind 

Watertown, MA 

Charles C. Woodcock, Director 

(70-86) 

MICHIGAN 

Michigan School for the Blind 

Lansing, Ml 

A. Charles Weir, Principal 

(70-86) 

MISSISSIPPI 

Mississippi School for the Blind 

Jackson, MS 

R. C. Benton, Superintendent 

(80-83) 

NEW JERSEY 

St. Joseph's School for 

the Blind 

Jersey City, NJ 

Sr. Mary Kuiken, CSJ, 

Administrator 

(72-85) 



The Lantern Spring 1984 



NAC helps residential schools and 
other agencies for the blind to study their 
own services and measure their per- 
formance against objective standards. 
Teams of qualified professionals — who 
volunteer their time as their contribution 
to the pursuit of excellence within the 
field — make on-site reviews of those 
schools and agencies that complete self- 
studies in pursuit of accreditation. NAC's 
Commission on Accreditation then deter- 
mines whether to grant or withhold 
accreditation. Accredited schools and 
agencies must report annually on steps 
they have taken to remedy any remain- 



ing weaknesses; they are given an 
opportunity to outline new and innovative 
undertakings; and they are reviewed 
periodically to determine whether they 
qualify for reaccreditation. 

Why is NAC accreditation important? 

Schools and agencies for the blind 
now receive and spend nearly one billion 
dollars annually in tax and contributed 
funds. When these funds are not well 
spent, the result is worse than waste of 
money — it is a waste of lives that could 
have been made more worth living. The 
schools and agencies which support the 
National Accreditation Council are thus 



the Blind and Visually Handicapped 



NEW YORK 

New York Institute for the 

Education of the Blind 

Bronx, NY 

Robert Guarino, Director 

(78-85) 

NEW MEXICO 

New Mexico School for the 

Visually Handicapped 

Alamogordo, NM 

Jerry Watkins, Superintendent 

(79-84) 

NORTH CAROLINA 

Governor Morehead School 

Raleigh, NC 

George N. Lee, Director 

(72-87) 

NORTH DAKOTA 

North Dakota School for 

the Blind 

Grand Forks, ND 

Charles R. Borchert, 

Superintendent 

(80-85) 

OHIO 

Clovernook Home and School 

for the Blind 

Cincinatti, OH 

Gerald W. Mundy, Executive 

Director 

(76-85) 

Ohio State School for the Blind 

Columbus, OH 

Dennis L. Holmes, 

Superintendent 

(69-85) 



OKLAHOMA 

Parkview School 

Muskogee, OK 

Ronald M. Casey, 

Superintendent 

(70-85) 

PUERTO RICO 

Loaiza Cordero Institute for 

Blind Children 

Santurce, PR 

Angel L. Quinones, Director 

(81-83) 

SOUTH DAKOTA 

South Dakota School for the 

Visually Handicapped 

Aberdeen, SD 

Charles B. Boyer, 

Superintendent 

(80-84) 

TENNESSEE 

Tennessee School for the Blind 

Donelson, TN 

Jack Rumbaugh, 

Superintendent 

(70-85) 



TEXAS 

Texas School for the Blind 

Austin, TX 

William H. Miller, Executive 

Director 

(82-84) 

VIRGINIA 

School for the Blind, Virginia 

School for the Deaf and Blind 

at Hampton 

Hampton, VA 

Stewart T Bowden, Principal 

(83-85) 

WEST VIRGINIA 

West Virginia School for 

the Blind 

Romney, WV 

Jack W. Brady, Superintendent 

(76-85) 

WISCONSIN 

Wisconsin School for the 

Visually Handicapped 

Janesville, Wl 

William H. English, 

Superintendent 

(73-88) 

* This listing includes 
only NAC-accredited resi- 
dential schools for the 
blind and visually handi- 
capped. For a complete 
listing of NAC-accredited 
agencies write to NAC. 



helping to ensure that blind persons will 
continue to have access to quality 
services. 

NAC itself is recognized as the only 
"reliable authority as to the quality of 
training provided by specialized schools 
for the blind and visually handicapped" 
by the Secretary of the United States 
Department of Education. Having 
achieved this honor in 1971, NAC peri- 
odically undergoes reevaluation by the 
U.S. Department of Education in order to 
retain this important distinction. 

In addition to the U.S. Department of 
Education's endorsement, there have 
been comprehensive and highly favor- 
able Federal-level reviews of NAC's work 
by the General Accounting Office and 
the Rehabilitation Services Administra- 
tion. Moreover, NAC has received recog- 
nition that it is in full compliance with the 
standards for fund-raising practices and 
internal management established for 
nonprofit organizations by the National 
Charities Information Bureau. 

Indeed, the largest organization of the 
blind in the United States, the American 
Council of the Blind (ACB), has long 
endorsed the concept of objective 
accreditation through NAC. 

"If," says Oral 0. Miller, ACB's Nation- 
al Representative, "the field of services 
for the blind is to escape the chaos, 
inconsistencies, extremes, abuses, and 
incompetence which have plagued many 
heretofore unaccredited human service 
programs, there must be a viable organ- 
ization such as NAC to establish mean- 
ingful, objective standards, and to 
administer them fairly." 

Perhaps, though, the most important 
endorsements come from those who 
have chosen to undergo NAC's scrutiny. 

"I know firsthand how NAC accredita- 
tion can help organizations which take 
advantage of it," insists Dr. Richard G. 
Umsted. "As superintendent of the 
Illinois School for the Visually Impaired, I 



have used accreditation to improve the 
quality of our services and strengthen 
our relationships with community 
leaders, consumers, and funding 
sources." 

The Illinois School for the Visually 
Impaired, a state-supported residential 
school located in Jacksonville, was 
established in 1848. Its 140 full-time staff 
serve visually impaired, deaf-blind, and 
multi-impaired blind children from kinder- 
garten through the twelfth grade. 

Dr. Umsted has been president of the 
Association for Education of the Visually 
Handicapped (AEVH) and the Division for 
the Visually Handicapped of the Council 
for Exceptional Children (CEC). "Every- 
one," he says, "who is concerned with 
ensuring the highest quality services for 
blind and visually handicapped children 
and adults should insist on accreditation 
of schools and agencies. 

"It (the accreditation process) is not 
an inquisition," explains Dr. Umsted. "It's 
voluntary self help. When you apply for 
accreditation, what you're saying is that 
you're willing to compare your school or 
agency to certain accepted standards. 
It's a road map for self improvement." 

While it is true, then, that the accredi- 
tation process — the self study a school 
or agency undergoes — stimulates the 
organization to enhance itself, there are 
other possible benefits to the schools 
and agencies seeking accreditation. 

"Accredited schools and agencies 
have a greater ability to raise funds for 
themselves," says Tuck Tinsley III, Prin- 
cipal of the Department of the Blind at 
the Florida School for the Deaf and 
Blind in St. Augustine. Dr. Tinsley was 
appointed principal in 1980. When the 
accrediting process began at his school 
in 1978, he was a math teacher there. 
The school, which will celebrate its 100th 
anniversary in 1985, focuses on provid- 
ing "the blind and partially seeing chil- 
dren of the State of Florida with educa- 



10 



The Lantern Spring 1984 



tional programs adapted to their specific 
needs." 

"We can't afford to be nearsighted," 
says Dr. Tinsley. "In our era of restricted 
funds and increasing demands, the 
public expects and demands that their 
dollars get quality services. Accreditation 
means you're totally accountable for 
how you're spending the money you're 
being alloted. 

"When your school depends on the 
support of the public for its funding," 
adds Dr. Tinsley, "I think it behooves you 
to demonstrate just what that money is 
buying. Because, in the long run, if you 
can demonstrate need and the fact that 
you're doing a quality job, that's got to 
help you when it comes time for the 
legislators to dole out public dollars." 

Another accredited residential school 
for the blind which has found it easier to 
raise funds because it is accredited is 
the Texas School for the Blind in Austin. 
A state-supported school established in 
1856, the Texas School for the Blind 
serves visually impaired Texans who are 
between the ages of five and twenty-two. 
Its Executive Director, Mr. William Miller, 
agrees that accreditation and funding 
are linked. 

"Accreditation can and does have 
impact upon legislative appropriations," 
he says. "I firmly believe that accredita- 
tion by NAC. . .had a significant effect in 
our legislature. In an era of 'tight money', 
the Texas School for the Blind enjoyed a 
27% increase in appropriations and $3 
million for capital improvements follow- 
ing our accreditation." 

Perhaps, though, the third benefit of 
NAC accreditation is the most important: 
The symbol of accreditation is tangible 
evidence that the accredited school or 
agency is doing a very good job. And 
that kind of recognition goes a long way 
with the public. 

Says Dr. Philip Hatlen, former presi- 
dent of the Association for the 

Spring 1984 The Lantern 



Education of the Visually Handicapped 
(AEVH): "As the oldest national profes- 
sional organization serving blind and 
visually impaired people, AEVH is 
deeply committed to improving the 
quality of services to blind persons. 

"One of the most effective ways to 
assure that an institution will strive to 
provide the best possible services is the 
process of accreditation. For this reason, 
AEVH is a strong supporter of the 
National Accreditation Council for 
Agencies Serving the Blind and Visually 
Handicapped." 

John S. Crowley, president of the 
American Foundation for the Blind (AFB), 
agrees with Dr. Hatlen's assessment that 
schools and agencies which serve the 
blind must opt to study themselves and 
measure their performance against 
objective standards. 

"For more than 60 years," says Mr. 
Crowley, "the Foundation has been 
making its presence known and felt 
within the field of blindness. . .the Foun- 
dation's field staff has been working 
closely with the National Accreditation 
Council for Agencies Serving the Blind 
and Visually Handicapped and with 
organized groups of blind and visually 
impaired persons to assist more 
agencies within the field in those areas 
where help is needed to meet standards 
for accreditation. 

"We believe that accreditation will be 
the single most influential factor in the 
ultimate survival of specialized services 
for blind and visually impaired persons." 

Ronald Trahan 







11 



The On- Site Review 

The On-Site Review 

Since the incorporation of the National 
Accreditation Council for Agencies Serv- 
ing the Blind and Visually Handicapped 
(NAC) in 1967, over 100 agencies and 
schools for the blind have been 
accredited. Currently, there are 93 ac- 
credited organizations. In achieving this 
status, each of them successfully com- 
pleted a complex, many-faceted process. 
At present, there are many agencies 
involved in one step or another of the 
process and even more are contemplat- 
ing involvement. The following is intended 
to clarify just one of the steps — the 
on-site review. 

The Self-Study Process 

The heart of the accreditation process 
lies in the self-study and evaluation guides 
published by NAC. Through the use of 
these practical working tools, agencies, 
sheltered workshops, and residential 
schools for the blind are able to assess 
their strengths and weaknesses and, with 
the help of these assessments, to plan for 
improved services in the future. Self-study 
undertaken with accreditation as a 
specific goal, however, assumes greater 
dimensions and more significant benefits 
result. Most important among these is the 
validation of the agency's own findings by 
an objective group of professional col- 
leagues during an on-site visit. The expe- 
rience of having a program reviewed by 
qualified professional peers is also apt to 
produce fresh, problem-solving insight. 

Function of the On-Site Review 

The role of the on-site review team in 
the accreditation process is intimately 
bound up with the self-study phase. In its 
self-study, the agency evaluated itself 
within the framework of the standards 
embodied in the guides and in the light of 
its own stated purposes and objectives. 
Then the on-site review team assesses 
the validity of the agency's seif-evaluation 
through observation of agency work in 
progress, meeting with agency staff re- 
sponsible for its administrative activities 
and service programs, consumers and 
representatives of other organizations. 
The team also reviews records and 
examines the agency's plans for making 
needed improvements. Basic to the eval- 
uations of both the self-study and on-site 
review phases of the accreditation proc- 
ess is the principle of self-improvement, 
for it is not perfection that is sought, but 



the willingness and ability of the agency 
to remedy any existing deficiencies within 
a reasonable period of time. 

The On-Site Review Team 

The on-site review team, consisting of 
at least three members who serve on a 
voluntary basis, is appointed by NAC 
from its panel of professionally qualified 
persons. Following the on-site visit itself, 
the team members, whose number varies 
according to the size of the agency, the 
diversity of its services, and the geo- 
graphic dispersion of its units, prepare 
individual reports on the specific aspects 
of the agency under review. These individ- 
ual reports are then considered by the 
team as a whole and an overall report, 
which includes both commendations of 
strengths and recommendations for 
improvements, is prepared and submitted 
to the Commission on Accreditation at 
NAC. 

Actions of the Commission on 
Accreditation 

After consideration of the report and 
recommendation of the on-site review 
team, the Commission arrives at a deci- 
sion based on an evaluation of all the data 
presented. It will then take one of four 
actions: (1) approve the agency for ac- 
creditation and award accredited status 
for a full five years, contingent on the 
agency's compliance with all other re- 
quirements for membership in the Nation- 
al Accreditation Council; (2) approve the 
agency for accreditation for a period of 
less than five years, during which time 
specific weaknesses can be corrected 
(review at the end of the shorter period 
may result in extending accreditation for 
the full five years, or in withdrawal of 
accredited status); (3) postpone final 
action, specifying the reasons for its deci- 
sion and outlining the steps the agency 
may take to remove obstacles in the way 
of accreditation; or (4) deny accredited 
status, specifying the reasons for its 
decision and perhaps setting a date for 
reapplication. All accredited agencies 
submit annual reports to NAC and are 
subject to re-evaluation every five years. 



12 



The Lantern Spring 1984 



Bwlt 




'A'^Z 



Planning for the Future. . .A Transition 



For a number of years, special education services to deaf-blind children and young adults 
(ages 3 through 22) have been funded through Public Law 91-230, Section 622, Title Vl-C. 

The recent passage of Public Law 98-199 — Education of the Handicapped Act Amendments 
of 1983 — now gives new emphasis to the development and funding of transitional services 
for special needs individuals who are twenty-two years of age and older. 

Transition is the key concept here. These new amendments mandate closer cooperation in 
planning and providing appropriate adult services. The implication is that cooperative plan- 
ning must take place between special education providers and adult service providers well 
before the disabled young adult exits the educational system. 

Perhaps no group of individuals will benefit more from closer cooperation among service pro- 
viders than those who are deaf-blind and multi-impaired — those whose needs as adults have 
often gone under-served. With funds allocated to implement the new amendments, it is antici- 
pated that Public Law 98-199 will greatly change and improve services to these special 
persons. 

Six Regional Deaf-Blind Centers currently assist state agencies to assure that deaf-blind indi- 
viduals receive appropriate educational and transitional services. For more information about 
the new amendments, contact the regional center which serves your state. 




Region 1 

New York Institute for the Education of the Blind 

999 Pelham Parkway 

Bronx, N.Y. 10469 

Khogendra Das, Director 

212/519-7000 

Region 2 

North Carolina Department of Public Instruction 

Education Bldg., Room 449 

Raleigh, N.C. 27611 

Jeff Garrett, Director 

919/733-3619 



Region 4 

Michigan Department of Education 

Davenport Bldg., 5th Floor 

Ottawa and Capitol Sts., P.O. Box 30008 

Lansing, Ml 48909 

George Monk, Director 

517/373-0108 

Region 5 

165 Cook St., Room 304 
Denver, CO 80206 
Dennis Hanley, Director 
303/399-3070 



Region 3 

Alabama Institute for Deaf-Blind 
Box 698 

Talladega, AL 35160 
John Crosby, Director 
202/362-8460 

Spring 1984 The Lantern 



Region 6 

California Department of Education 
721 Capitol Mall 
Sacramento, CA 95814 
Dr. William Blea, Director 
916/322-2173 



13 





LOOKING BACK. . .Kook-Hee Choo 
(Lee), Founder and Director of the 
Speech and Hearing Center at Ewha 
Woman's University in Seoul, Korea, 
reminisces with Perkins Director Charles 
C. Woodcock (left) and Robert Dantona 
(middle), Coordinator of the Perkins 
Teacher Education Program. Ms. Choo 
(Lee) — now a full professor — was the 
first Korean woman to participate in the 
Teacher Education Program at Perkins. 
After her graduation in 1957, she went on 
to earn a Master's Degree and Certifi- 
cate of Advanced Graduate Studies in 
Special Education at Boston University 
before returning to her native Korea. 
While in the United States, she will re- 
new her acquaintance with William T. 
Heisler, Coordinator of Teacher Training 
in 1957, who now lives (retired) on Cape 
Cod. 



STUDENT ART EXHIBIT . .Perkins stu- 
dents Thomas Gilbert (left) and Mark 
Torvinen (right) admire one of fifty art 
pieces recently displayed at the 



14 





Wheelock College Art Gallery in Boston, 
Massachusetts. The month-long art 
exhibit featured paintings, sculpture, 
ceramics, and textiles produced by stu- 
dents from Perkins' Primary & Inter- 
mediate Program and Secondary Serv- 
ices program. Highlighting the exhibit 
was a special gallery reception for the 
artists hosted by Wheelock College. 
(Photo by John Shesler) 



EXTENDING A HELPING HAND. . .Perkins 
School for the Blind and the Committee 
for the Blind of Poland (New York) are 
helping to give Robert Rybczynski a last 
chance to save his sight. Sixteen-year- 
old Robert has received a series of 
operations — unavailable in Poland — 
through Retina Associates, Inc. of 
Boston, Massachusetts, which could pre- 
vent him from becoming totally blind. In 
February of this year, Robert — who has 
been suffering from detached retinas in 
both eyes — travelled by himself from 
Warsaw to Montreal, Canada. There he 
was met and personally escorted by 
Charles C. Woodcock, Director of 
Perkins, to the Perkins campus, where 
Robert lived for the duration of his stay 
in the United States. Perkins provided 
Robert with an interpreter and transpor- 
tation to and from Boston for the neces- 
sary operations and medical treatment. 




Spring 1984 The Lantern 



FOURTH ANNUAL SERVICE AWARDS 
CEREMONY. . .On March 14, 1984, 
Perkins formally honored 26 employees 
for their loyal and dedicated service of 
a decade or more. Pictured here are 
employees who have provided Perkins 
with twenty or more years of contin- 
uous service: (front row, left to right) 
Dorothy Dowe, Child Care Program, 35 
years; Sally Stuckey, Secondary Serv- 
ices Program, 20 years; Richard 
Brown, Howe Press, 25 years; (second 
row, left to right) Elizabeth Perry, 
Regional Library, 30 years; Elizabeth 
O'Brien, Development Office, 20 years; 
Claire Cowing, Dietary, Laundry & 
Housekeeping Services, 20 years; 
(third row, left to right) Perkins's 
Director, Charles Woodcock; Catherine 
Thorns, Dietary, Laundry & House- 
keeping Services, 25 years; Kathleen 
McLaughlin, Regional Library, 25 years; 
John Marchant, Dietary, Laundry & 
Housekeeping Services, 25 years; (rear 
row, left to right) Maria-Pia Antonelli, 
Secondary Services Program, 30 
years; Judith Bevans, Primary & 
Intermediate Program, 20 years; and 
Fred Conner, Howe Press, 20 years 



15 



Blind, deaf boy 
sees a future. . . 



by Susan Schneck 
' 'In Focus ' ' Editor 
NEWS-TRIBUNE 
(re-printed by permission) 



Ajay Bhattacharyya proudly watched his deaf, blind son rapidly 
form sentences in the palm of his teacher's hand. The father's 
large, brown eyes radiated happiness. 

With incredible speed, Anindya's fingers spelled out his excite- 
ment at being interviewed. 

"Did a reporter also write about Helen Keller?" the boy from 
India asked. "Will I be as famous as her?" 

Before flying about 8,000 miles to Perkins School for the Blind in 
Watertown last September, Anindya could only palm write in his 
native Bengali. He knew no other language. 

Now, Anindya communicates in English and Bengali, through 
palm writing and pencil and paper. The boy also reads braille and 
understands sign language by placing his hands over those of his 
teacher, Carol Crook. 

Anindya paused for a moment before delivering another burst 
into Crook's palm. "Be sure to tell the reporter that I make a lot of 
things with wood and that I do a lot of things," he said before 
grabbing the reporter's hand himself and spelling out his urgent 
message again. 

Bhattacharyya sighed and blinked his eyes as if to make sure 

' 7 remember mv mother he wasnt dreamin 9- 
i rvmemuer my mower „ God has gjven us a gjft through Perkins ;' the 

always told me, 'In 46-year-old Indian said softly. "Whenever my 

every cloud, there is a fami| y became hopeless, I told them, "As long as 

silver lining " ' we ^ a , ve faith in God ' God wi " do somethin 9 for 

Ajay Bhattacharyya Years of searching and an extraordinary amount 

of faith and persistence finally paid off last year 
when both the father and son were awarded 
scholarships to attend Perkins for a year. 
But it was an uphill fight from the start. When 



Anindya was three months old, his parents discovered their baby 
was deaf. At the age of six, the boy lost the sight in his right eye. A 
year later, he was totally blind. 

"I did as much as I could for his medical treatment, but nothing 
was done about his speech," Bhattacharyya recalled in his gentle 
voice. "I tried to give him an education but I didn't know how. I went 
to speech therapists to try to get him to speak but they didn't know 
how. At home, my wife and I would teach him to make words in the 
palm of our hands. 

"I wanted him to go to a normal school to get some companions 
but the schools said that was not possible." 

Doctors and specialists in India shook their heads sympathetical- 
ly as they listened to Bhattacharyya's plight. Teachers and school 
administrators had the same reaction. "Only God can help you," 
was their answer to the father's desperate pleas for an education 
for Anindya. "There is nothing we can do." 

Relatives and friends began to lose hope. But the 46-year-old 
Hindu man never gave up. 

16 The Lantern Spring 1984 



Art lllman Photos 

The only school in India for 
children who are both blind and 
deaf was located on the other 
side of the country in Bombay. It 
was a day school and it was im- 
possible for Bhattacharyya to 
relocate his family. 

Fueled by an unfaltering faith 
in God and the strong conviction 
that his faith would eventually 
reward him, Bhattacharyya kept 
trying. 

"I remember my mother 
always told me — how do you 
say it — 'In every cloud, there is 
a silver lining,' " he offered in 
slow but understandable 
English. 

"I kept trying but I got no 
positive reply," he said. "Then in 
1982, 1 went to the Calcutta 
Blind School, about 20 miles from my 
home and wrote to the National Asso- 
ciation for the Blind in Bombay asking, 
'Will you please give me some job in 
your school so I could learn how to 
teach Anindya myself?' They told me it 
was impossible because I had no train- 
ing for that. My sister went to the prin- 
cipal of that (Calcutta) school and asked 
her for help and the principal said, 'I do 
not know how to help him, but as I look to your brother's son, I think 
God will do something.' " 

Shortly afterwards, Bhattacharyya was speaking with a teacher 
at the Calcutta school who happened to have trained at Perkins in 
1973. "Is there no school where they educate blind, deaf children?" 
the desperate father asked. 

It was then that Bhattacharyya first learned of Perkins. 

He quickly wrote for a scholarship application. But at the same 
time, his wife, Shanti, developed a brain tumor. 

"I was thinking to myself, 'What will I do?' " he said, dropping his 
shoulders as if a burden had become too heavy. "My wife had a 
brain tumor, my son was deaf and blind, my other son was two 
years old, my old mother was living with us — I had all these people 
depending on me." 

Then, assuming his strong, upright posture again, he added, "But 
life is duty and if we keep our faith, we will not have problems. 

"I told my wife, let me put away our son's case for now and take 
yours," he continued. "By the grace of God, her operation was 

Spring 1984 The Lantern 




Deaf, blind boy talks 
with his hands. 



17 



Indian father 
communicates with his 
deaf, blind son. 




Faith fuels father to find — 
future for deaf-blind son 

successful and I told my wife, 'God has given you a second life and 
I'm sure God will do something good for you. Now, I can put you 
aside and take care of my son.' " 

Bhattacharyya said he never once considered giving up. 
"It is my duty because he's my son," the father explained in a 
firm but patient manner. "If I didn't try, I would have a biting 
conscience. Now, my son will know his father has done at least a 
little bit to help him." 

Something worked. In March of 1983, Perkins awarded the 
scholarships. "I put down my head to God," the Indian man said. 
Bhattacharyya did not have much time to celebrate, however. 
"Then there was the problem about money," he noted. "I didn't 
have money for incidental expenses, about $2,300, and roundtrip 
airfare which costs about $5,000." 

After another round of letter writing and personal requests, the 
$2,300 had been collected. A businessman with a partially-sighted 
son donated the airfare after one meeting with Bhattacharyya. 

"Mr. Bhattacharyya has given us a fine example of what one's 
faith can do for a person," noted Robert Dantona ,who coordinated 
the curriculum for the Indian father and son. "It sounds trite, but in 
this day and age, that faith is rare. Much of his son's success is a 
result of his faith in his god and his people. 

"It's a rather beautiful example of how literally hundreds of 
people on both sides of the ocean made it possible for his son to 
have a future." 

Anindya is enrolled in the Deaf-Blind program. Bhattacharyya, 
who took a leave of absence from his position as a math teacher in 
an Indian public school, attends the school's Teacher Education 
Program. 

"Our major goals with Anindya are to get him to communicate 
well enough so he can learn through books," Crook noted. "As far 
as speech is concerned, he considers himself a speaker so we'll 
work on his English. I don't know how far he'll go with that, but 

since he considers himself 
a person who speaks, I 
want to try." 

In addition to swimming 
and learning to walk with a 
cane, Anindya spends his 
time writing many letters 
to his family in India. Smil- 
ing, the boy held up his 
latest correspondence, a 
thick document with neat 
Bengalese letters printed 
on the raised lines. 

"When he first arrived 
at Perkins, Anindya knew 
only enough English to 
write, 'I love you,'" 
Dantona recalled. "He 




1 'Whenever my 
family became 
hopeless, I told 
them, as long as we 
have faith in God, 
God will do some- 
thing for him. " 

Ajay Bhattacharyya 




Anindya Bhattacharyya 



Spring 1984 The Lantern 



19 




Father walks with Anindya on his job of delivering mail. 



won everybody over right away. 

"The big question is what is there 
for Anindya after this?" Dantona con- 
tinued. "Education seems to be the 
only answer to his future. 

"But it's difficult to know how to 
train him here for something later." 





Anindya types on braille typewriter 



20 




In-depth information and innovative "how- 
to" ideas for meeting the vocational training 
needs of deaf-blind adolescents in com- 
munity work settings. 

Written and edited by Perkins' model 
project staff. 

Quantity discount. 



21 





.^^v ■ ^ 


DB 


RF( 


DR 






CVR 


M 




V^Xl 


LTJL 




Publication Title 


Cost Per Publication 

Single 2-5 6-10 
Copy Copies Copies 


11 or more 
Copies Qty. 


Total 


Advancements: Implementation 
Guide to Community- Based 
Vocational Training Program 
for Deaf- Blind Youth 


$ 7.00 


$ 5.50 


$ 5.00 


$ 4.50 




Vocational Curriculum 
for Deaf- Blind Youth 


9.00 


7.50 


6.75 


6.25 




Deaf-Blind Education 
Books A and B 


$30.00 


$29.00 


$28.00 


$27.00 




Shipping/Handling Add 


3.00 


6.00 


9.00 


10.00 




Proceedings of the 

International Symposium on 
Visually Handicapped Infants 
and Young Children 


$20.00 


$19.00 


$18.00 


$17.00 




Shipping/Handling Add 


1.50 


4.00 


7.00 


10.00 




Auditory Training in the 
Perkins Deaf-Blind Dept. 


$ 2.50 


$ 2.25 


$ 2.00 


$ 1.75 




Bibliography of the Deaf-Blind 


5.00 


4.50 


' 3.50 


2.50 




Body Image and the Severely 
Handicapped Rubella Child 


2.50 


2.25 


2.00 


1.75 




Educational Beginnings with 

Deaf-Blind Children 
(2nd edition) 


2.50 


2.25 


2.00 


1.75 




Fourth International Conference 
on Deaf-Blind Children 


5.00 


4.50 


3.50 


2.50 




Perkins Sign Language 
Dictionary 


10.00 


9.50 


9.25 


9.00 




Speech Beginnings for the 
Deaf-Blind Child 


2.50 


2.25 


2.00 


1.75 




The Deaf-Blind Rubella Child 


2.50 


2.25 


2.00 


1.75 




The Story of Leonard Dowdy — 
Deaf-Blindness Acquired 
in Infancy 


3.00 


2.75 


2.50 


2.25 




Understanding our Movement 
Problems 


4.00 


3.75 


3.50 


3.25 




Shipping/Handling Add 


.75 


2.00 


3.50 


5.00 





TOTAL REMITTANCE $ 



Name 



Address 



City 



State 



Zip 



Note: Payment in full must accompany this order. Make check or money order payable 
to Perkins School for the Blind. Mail check and order form to Perkins School for the Blind, 
Watertown, MA 02172-9982. Attn: Public Relations & Publications 



22 



The Lantern Spring 1984 



THE PERKINS ENDOWMENT 

The Perkins Program as it has developed and been maintained for 
more than one hundred and fifty years has relied upon a growing 
endowment at every step along the way. 

Endowments which are adequate to put a program into effect are 
rarely sufficient to keep it going. As with every private school and 
college that is keeping abreast— or ahead — of the times, Perkins 
needs to see its endowment grow. Through bequests and donations, 
and through a few government grants, we have been able to expand 
existing services and add new ones as needed. We are confident that 
our friends will continue to support us in ever increasing amounts. 

FORM OF BEQUEST 

I hereby give, devise and bequeath to the Perkins School for the 
Blind, a corporation duly organized and existing under the laws of the 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts, the sum of dollars 

($ ), the same to be applied to the general uses 

and purposes of said corporation under the direction of its Board of 
Trustees; and I do hereby direct that the receipt of the Treasurer for the 
time being of said corporation shall be a sufficient discharge to my 
executors for the same. 



FORM OF DEVISE OF REAL ESTATE 

I give, devise and bequeath to the Perkins School for the Blind, 
a corporation duly organized and existing under the laws of the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts, that certain tract of real estate 
bounded and described as follows: 

(Here describe the real estate accurately) 

with full power to sell, mortgage and convey the same free of all trust. 



NOTICE 

The address of the Treasurer of the corporation is as follows: 

JOHN W. BRYANT 
Fiduciary Trust Co., 175 Federal Street, Boston, MA 02110-2289 



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The Myths Behind 

Residential Schools 6 

Coping with Vision Loss 14 

Important Notice 23 



r/ «* 

« ♦ « % * 

***** *♦• 




Perkins School for the Blind 

Fall 1984 



Published three times a year in 
print and braille editions by 

PERKINS SCHOOL 

FOR THE BLIND 

WATERTOWN, MA 

02172-9982 

FOUNDED 1829 

An accredited member since 
1947 of the New England 
Association of Schools and 
Colleges, Inc. 

An accredited member since 
1970 of the National Accredi- 
tation Council for Agencies 
Serving the Blind and Visu- 
ally Handicapped. 




NEA 
Se?C 



^.W«t, A , 



The Perkins School for the 
Blind admits students of any 
race, color, national and ethnic 
origin to all the rights, privileges, 
programs, and activities gener- 
ally accorded or made available 
to students at the school. It does 
not discriminate on the basis of 
race, color, national or ethnic 
origin in the administration of its 
educational policies, admissions 
policies, scholarship and loan 
programs, and athletic and other 
school-administered programs." 



VOLUME LIV NO. 1 FALL, 1984 



cover illustration • Martha Dillard 






%** 



«»%** 




Contents 

4 A Message from the 
Director 

5 Announcing. . . 

a new film from 
Perkins 

6 The Myths Behind 
Residential Schools 

a look at the public vs. 
private school 
controversy 

12 On & Off Campus 

14 Coping with 
Vision Loss 

an interview with a 
young woman who's 
losing her sight 

18 Graduation at 
Perkins, 1984 

20 Deaf-Blind Update 

new cooperative 
agreements awarded 



21 On Sale Now! 

"Perky" 

22 The Perkins 
Endowment 

23 Important Notice: 

The Lantern 
Order Form 



The Perkins Programs 

PRESCHOOL 

Ages Birth— 6 



/L? PRESCHOOL SERVICES 



{fa PRIMARY & 
m* INTERMEDIATE 

Ages 6-13 



d 



SECONDARY 
SERVICES 

Ages 13-22 



ft 



: DEAF-BLIND 

Ages 5-22 



W PROGRAM for the 
SEVERELY IMPAIRED 

Ages 10-22 



ADULT SERVICES 

I Ages 18 and Older 



ft? 



Other Services 

CLINICAL SERVICES 

(Diagnostic and Evaluative) 

OUTREACH SERVICES 

PUBLIC RELATIONS 
& PUBLICATIONS 

REGIONAL LIBRARY for the 
BLIND & PHYSICALLY 
HANDICAPPED 

SAMUEL R HAYES 
RESEARCH LIBRARY 

TEACHER EDUCATION 
PROGRAM 

NEW ENGLAND CENTER 
for DEAF-BLIND SERVICES 

HOWE PRESS 

(Aids & Appliances) 



A Message 
from the Director 

The Expansive Environment 

We can open doors to anyone for almost any reason, but if there is nothing 
inside that the individual needs, or if what is inside is insufficient for the person's 
use, where is the benefit? 

Suppose for a moment that behind the door are 
materials essential for survival, but inadequate in 
quantity or combination. One might make an 
analogy with the situation in a school or learning 
environment in which everyone is treated equally, 
but under conditions that do not provide the kind of 
support that some students need in order to realize 
their potential. 

These comments are intended to put us in a 
questioning frame of mind as we reflect on a phrase 
now frequently used in talking about placement for 
individuals with special needs. It is often said that 
placement must be in the "least restrictive environ- 
ment" possible. 

In many situations such terminology has clear 
meaning. A judge, in sentencing, may have a range 
of options from probation to life imprisonment. A 
physician treating mental illness might recommend 
anything from out-patient therapy to institutionaliza- 
tion with heavy medication. 
The identification of a "least restrictive environment" for students with special 
needs is less clear-cut, however, because those students' needs vary so greatly. 
Public school placement may or may not be suitable. Too frequently in the past, 
because of improper diagnosis or lack of understanding, such children have 
been placed in institutions for the severely mentally impaired. Other blind, 
visually impaired, or deaf-blind individuals have been happily placed in residen- 
tial schools geared to their individual requirements. 

My experience is that in a school with a residential component, concentrating 
its efforts on educating children with special learning needs, one does not find 
a restrictive environment — but rather one that is constantly expanding for the 
individual child. This kind of school is able to offer a full array of services which 
responds to the diversity of its population. This kind of school recognizes that 
an individual, properly placed, must be in an environment which has been 
expanded exactly to the point at which his or her needs can best be met. 

At the Perkins School there is only one focus, and that is upon the student or 
client. We start with an individual who has special needs. These are articulated 
in terms of educational programs. The resources and facilities that are most 
appropriate are identified, and the student's individual program is carried for- 
ward with flexibility and room for alteration as progress occurs. This is what a 
residential school like Perkins can offer — an environment that is less, or more, 
"expansive" or "restrictive," according to individual needs. 

The selection of a suitable environment for any student is certainly a question 
of judgement. Reasonable people do differ, and this can create a dilemma in 
the matter of placement. But I would suggest that the focus be kept on the 
individual with special needs, not on theory or formulae. 





4 



The Lantern 



Charles C. Woodcock 
Director 



ANNOUNCING 





i j i, i i i 



Challenging, Changing, Growing 



16mm 
Color 

15.5 minutes 
Rental: $25* 



and 



• Shows the variety of 
daily living, vocational, 
habilitative education pro^ 
to blind, deaf-blind, 
and multi-impaired stu- 
dents and clients at 
Perkins School for the 
Blind in Watertown, 
Massachusetts — as 
seen through the indi- 
vidual perspectives of 
students, graduates, 
teachers, parents, and 
administrators. In- 
tended for general audi- 
ences, ages 10 and older. 

*Please note: Rental fee includes all first-class 
shipping et) handling charges and Perkins infor- 
mation packet. Rental period is one week. 
We regret that we are unable to accept overseas 
rental requests. 



aca< lemic 



I am interested in renting 
the new Perkins film for 
one week beginning 



(date). Enclosed is my pay- 
ment for $25. 
Please tell us: 
• Who will be viewing this film? 



• How many viewers do you expect in 
your audience? 





Name 



Address 



City 



State 



Zip 



Please note: Payment in full must accompany this order. Make check or money order 
payable to Perkins School for the Blind. 

Mail to: Public Relations & Publications 
Perkins School for the Blind 
175 N. Beacon Street 
Watertown, MA 02172-9982 



The Lantern 



The 

Myths Behind 

Residential 

Schools 



For a number of years, there's been some con- 
troversy about residential schools. 

While the wide variety of placement options and 
supportive services available today to the special 
needs child has proven to be positive and beneficial, 
debate has arisen as to whether a public school 
program or a residential school setting provides the 
most appropriate, "least restrictive" type of educa- 
tional placement. Some proponents of public school 
programs have even argued that all residential 
schools, by their very nature, are restrictive and con- 
trary to the popular notions of "mainstreaming" or 
"normalization" and therefore should be closed. 

Is there a place in today's special education system 
for the residential program? Can a residential school 
provide the necessary education and training that will 
allow the special needs individual to function as inde- 
pendently as possible in the community-at-large? And 
when is a residential placement appropriate? 

Following we explore some of the myths about resi- 
dential schools that have evolved from this "public vs. 
private" controversy. . . 



MYTH #1: a separate (residential) 
school is a more restrictive, less nor- 
malized setting than a regular (public) 
school, which is least restrictive. 



"There is a tendency," 
says Michael Collins, 
Supervisor of Perkins's 




Deaf-Blind Program, "to — 
think of all residential 
facilities as institutions 
that are antithetical to 
mainstreaming. 

"If you look back in his- 
tory," he continues, "you'll 
find that schools for deaf 
and blind individuals were 
not necessarily created for 



the same reasons that 
state schools were — they 
were not attempts to 
remove people from the 
community. Rather, they 
were centralized out of 
necessity in order to serve 
a number of individuals of 
a low-incidence popula- 
tion. Some low-incidence 
populations do have 
special needs that can be 
met once services are 
specialized. For many, a 
centralized setting that pro- 
vides these services is the 
only way to meet those 
needs." 

Collins oversees the 
educational and residential 
programming for 68 deaf- 
blind and deaf multi- 
impaired students, ages 
five through twenty-two — 
nearly one-third of the total 
number of students and 
clients enrolled at Perkins. 
Though instruction in tradi- 
tional academic subjects 
is provided as part of the 
Deaf-Blind Program curric- 
ulum, there is a decided 
emphasis on teaching stu- 
dents important daily living 
skills in preparation for 
future community settings. 

"For 90% of our stu- 
dents," Collins explains, 
"our ultimate goal is place- 
ment back into the com- 
munity. Many of our stu- 
dents cannot transfer the 
skills they learn from one 
setting (the classroom) to 
another (the community). 
So it's important to teach 
those skills in a number of 
settings designed to pre- 
pare the student for his or 
her future environment." 



The Lantern 




"By providing appro- 
priate peer groups and 
Structured activities 
^designed to foster social 
interaction, then you're 
affording the student the 
opportunity to build 
social competencies. . . 
Is it normalized to place 




a deaf-blind child into a 
setting where only one 
person can sign and 
interpret? Isn't that 
restrictive? 5 



Instruction in this program is indi- 
vidualized and intensive. A teacher, 
classroom aide, or therapist usually 
works with no more than one or two stu- 
dents at a time — and community set- 
tings frequently become the "class- 
room." A lesson in budgeting and meal 
planning, for example, is carried out at 
a local supermarket; mobility classes — 
instruction in the skills and techniques 
of travelling safely both within and out- 
side a particular setting — are conducted 
in quiet neighborhoods, at busy traffic 
intersections, and on public transporta- 
tion; and vocational training takes place 
in actual businesses where students are 
paid by employers for the jobs they per- 
form alongside non-disabled co- 
workers. 

In addition to the practical daily living 
skills that they learn, students in the 
Deaf-Blind Program are also provided 
with the opportunity to acquire important 
social skills — skills that they are unable 
to learn incidentally in day-to-day inter- 
actions due to their multiple visual and 
hearing impairments. 

"At Perkins, our students are in an 
environment with peers who have the 
potential for interacting," says Collins. 
"By providing appropriate peer groups 
and structured activities designed to 
foster social interaction, then you're 
affording the student the opportunity to 
build social competencies." 

Cynthia Essex, Supervisor of Secon- 
dary Services at Perkins, agrees. 
"Ideally, we strive for integration and 
socialization with both sighted and visu- 
ally impaired individuals. One of our 
goals, for example, is to enroll our stu- 
dents in classes in the local public 
school system. But a multi-impaired 
student who is functioning at a different 
level than his or her non-disabled peers 
may become isolated. If that happens, 
he or she won't learn important social 
skills and — at that point — may need to 



>fos • Ronald Trahan 



The Lantern / 



In 
Retrospect 

From the time the 
first residential 
schools for the blind 
were founded in this 
country in the early 
1830s, educational 
programs for visually 
impaired and blind 
individuals have con- 
tinued to evolve and 
diversify. 

The earliest schools 
— largely modeled 
after schools for the 
blind in Europe — were 
private institutions in 
Boston, Philadelphia, 
and New York. But by 
the turn of the century, 
public residential 
schools had been 
established in most 
states, followed 
shortly in the early 
1900s by public 
school programs for 
visually impaired 
students. 

The real expansion 
of public school pro- 
grams and support 
services, however, did 
not occur until the late 
1940s and early 
1950s in response to 
the "RLF (retrolental 
fibroplasia) wave. A 
growing population of 
blind and visually 
impaired children — 



premature infants who had been 
exposed to high levels of oxygen 
used in incubators at that time — 
were reaching school age and 
inundating a residential school 
system unable to accommodate 
their numbers. Consequently, edu- 
cational programs and services in 
public schools for the visually 
impaired and blind child began to 
proliferate. 

In 1975, additional impetus to 
the growth of special education 
programs in public schools was 
provided by the passage of Public 
Law 94-142, which mandates that 
all handicapped children "receive 
special education and related 
services in the least restrictive 
environment commensurate with 
their needs." In essence, this law 
guaranteed equal educational op- 
portunity in the public school sys- 
tem to all special needs children. 

But PL. 94-142 also had signifi- 
cant consequences for residential 
schools: as public school services 
expanded more and more to meet 
the needs of the visually impaired 
and blind child, residential schools 
began to serve the needs of chil- 
dren with multiple disabilities. 
Where once the residential school 
offered primarily academic and 
college-oriented programs, cur- 
ricula and services were modified 
to accommodate severely and 
multiply impaired students whose 
visual loss was not necessarily 
their most handicapping condition. 
And so while the percentage of all 
visually impaired and blind chil- 
dren attending public schools has 
risen dramatically in the last dec- 
ade, the number attending resi- 
dential schools has significantly 
decreased with the advent of an 
increasingly more multi-impaired 
student population. 



identify and interact with other 
students who have similar dis- 
abilities and competencies. A 
residential placement may pro- 
vide the environment where 
that can happen." 

There is also the matter of 
availability of appropriate serv- 
ices and programs in a stu- 
dent's home region, particu- 
larly when the student is multi- 
impaired or severely impaired 
and resides in a predominantly 
rural area. Automatic place- 
ment of that child in a public 
school program that has not 
established the specialized 
services or hired personnel to 
meet that child's needs could 
be, some argue, a more restric- 
tive educational environment 
for the child. 

"Some of our students," 
says Essex, "have very limited 
educational resources in their 
home area, especially for 
training in vocational and inde- 
pendent living skills." 

"For a deaf-blind child," adds 
Collins, "the amount of serv- 
ices will vary greatly according 
to the location of their home. 
In many cases, the services 
that create opportunities for 
meaningful interaction with the 
community just don't exist. And 
sometimes the child ends up 
being a real 'misfit' — staff don't 
know how to interact or com- 
municate with the child. 

"Is it normalized to place a 
deaf-blind child into a setting 
where only one person can 
sign and interpret? Isn't that 
restrictive?" 



8 



The Lantern 



MYTH #2: residential schools are a convenient 

place to put special needs children when their parents can't cope. 



Having a special needs child 
who lives at home and attends 
a local school can place a tre- 
mendous burden on parents ::::::::::::::: 
and siblings. 

"There's an expectation," 
says Michael Collins, "that every family can and should be the ideal family for all 
their children, and most especially for their disabled child. But some families just 
cannot provide the support and consistency in programming no matter how much 
we want them to. It's impossible to expect that a family carry out all the intensive 
programming that we do here, unless you provide a professional in the home." 

Most educational professionals would agree with Dr. Spencer Moore, Coordinator 
of Clinical Services at Perkins, that "the decision to place a student residentially 
must be based on an assess- 

m nr lnl'n U i!f^i! y t h» ™'m ' * The decision to place a 

Dr. Moore oversees the com- T - * 

prehensive evaluation process Student resideiltiaUy ttlUSt be 

Z&ttEfiZ based on ™ ™essment of the 

grams and also supervises a tOtdl family Meed. * ' 

full spectrum of clinical special- 
ists, including psychologists 

and social workers. He finds that what often appears to be a chaotic family environ- 
ment actually stems from the stresses imposed on the family unit by the impair- 
ments of their special needs child. In these instances, a residential placement can 
be healthy — even therapeutic — for the family as a whole, thereby benefiting indi- 
vidual family members. And that includes the special needs child. 

There's a need, then, to carefully weigh what type of program — be it public school 
or residential — can best help both the individual child and the family as a unit. A 
good residential program, however, will not simply take over the family's respon- 
sibilities. Rather, it will help parents meet those responsibilities by allowing and 
encouraging as much parental involvement as possible. The ultimate goal is, once 
again, placement back into the family and the community. 

"At Perkins, we encourage as much family support and contact as is possible," 
says Dr. Moore. 

MYTH #3: the residential component is unnecessary because it is 
not educational. 

"Residential is educational," says Debra Murphy, Supervisor of Perkins's Program 
for the Severely Impaired. "In our program, the residential component is just as 

highly structured as the day 
component." 

The Program for the 
Severely Impaired was estab- 
lished at Perkins in recognition 
that a traditional nine-month 
school year was inadequate 



The Lantern 



■ ■ These are the skills that 
they need to learn for future 
placements. . .We're really 
providing what I call transi- 
tional programming. ' 5 




X U The Lantern 




for many severely multi-impaired children. 
These students needed a year-round, 
highly structured program within a 24- 
hour educational setting, as they tend to 
regress when away from school programs 
for long periods of time. 

"I really believe in integration into the 
community," says Murphy, "but some indi- 
viduals simply aren't ready. Our students 
do not know how to occupy their time 
independently. They don't have basic 
safety awareness. What they need now is 
a structured, supervised setting where 
daily living skills can be taught and fol- 
lowed throughout the whole day. These 
are the skills that they need to learn for 
future placements such as group homes. 
We're really providing what I call 'transi- 
tional programming'." 

Certified teachers and classroom 
aides in this program work closely with 
residential staff to provide consistency 
in programming throughout the day. Clin- 
ical specialists — a speech therapist, 
behavior management specialist, phys- 



ical therapist, and mobility specialist — 
also provide an approach, a treatment, 
that can be modeled and carried out by 
residential staff. And because this inten- 
sive, interdisciplinary program continues 
throughout a 14- to 16-hour day, stu- 
dents often realize much larger gains in 
individual growth and independence. 



Many observers today agree that we 
are still in a transitional phase of devel- 
oping appropriate special education 
programs for children who are multiply 
impaired. And so, the "public vs. private 
school" dilemma will continue. 

What does seem clear at this point is 
that the enormous variety of individual 
needs among visually and multi- 
impaired children necessitates a con- 
tinuum of educational and placement 
options to meet those needs. Whether 
for short-term training or longer-term 
placement, a residential school with a 
strong community orientation, a high 
degree of parental involvement, and an 
array of comprehensive services can 
continue to play a vital role in providing 
appropriate education for those special 
needs individuals who may be unable to 
benefit from public school placement. . . 

Shouldn't that option be available to 
them? 



.Denise Goros 




Students in Perkins's Program for the Severely Impaired par- 
ticipate in highly structured programming throughout a 14- to 
16-hour day. Pictured is student Louise Nowell in a variety of 
'after-school' activities including (top to bottom) mobility train- 
ing, sftftftfift, therapy,; .movement ancf music therapy, yygrft, 
activities, and cooking. 




_ On &) Off 

Campus 



INTERNATIONAL 
EDUCATION. . . 

The Teacher Education 
Program (TUP) at 
Perkins provides a 
unique educational 
and training opportu- 
nity for American and 



overseas professionals who wish 
to supplement their training in 
the education of blind, deaf- 
blind, and multi-impaired chil- 
dren. Many of our trainees, who 
come to us from all over the 
world, will have the responsibility 
of developing services for these 
special needs children in their 
native countries. TEP is affiliated 
with the Division of Special Edu- 
cation and Rehabilitation at 
Boston College in Newton, 
Massachusetts. Pictured here 
are the 1984 TEP graduates: 
(front row, left to right) Cafer Bar- 
kus, TEP Assistant Coordinator; 




Photo • Ronald Trahan 



Rachel Noyes, USA; Sirish 
Chandra Das, INDIA; Anindya 
Bhattacharyya, son of Ajay 
Bhattacharyya, INDIA; and 
Elizabeth Sparks, TEP Assistant 
Coordinator; (second row) 
Robert Dantona, TEP Coor- 
dinator; Victoria Garcia, PUERTO 
RICO; Edgar Rico Hernandez, 
COLOMBIA; Graciela 



12 



The Lantern 



Ferioli, ARGENTINA; Lezlie Schull, USA; 
Edward Wairi, KENYA; Masashi Taniuchi, 
JAPAN; and Perkins Director, Charles C. 
Woodcock. 

1984 NAC CONFERENCE. . . The 

National Accreditation Council for 
Agencies Serving the Blind and Visually 
Handicapped will hold its 1984 Annual 
Meeting November 10-11 at the Colon- 
nade Hotel, Boston, Massachusetts. NAC 
is recognized by the U.S. Department of 
Education as the reliable authority for 
accreditation of specialized schools for 
the blind and visually handicapped. 
Accreditation by NAC signifies that an 
organization meets nationally accepted 
standards for quality services, responsi- 
ble management, and public accountabil- 
ity. For further information about the 
Annual Meeting contact: 1984 NAC Con- 
ference Coordinator, Director's Office, 
Perkins School for the Blind, 175 North 
Beacon Street, Watertown, MA 02172. 
Tel: (61 7) 924*3434, extension 203. 







TALKING BOOKS MARK GOLDEN 
ANNIVERSARY. . . October marked 
the 50th anniversary of the Talking Book 
program, which now reaches 635,000 
blind, visually impaired, and physically 
impaired children and adults throughout 
the United States. Talking Books are 
recorded on special long-playing cas- 
settes, records, and flexible discs. Twenty- 
five years ago, the average Talking Book 
required sixteen long-playing records. 
Today, the same book requires only two 
cassettes or four records. Thirty-eight 
thousand magazine and book titles are 
currently available, delivered through the 
mail free of charge. The Talking Book pro- 
gram is financed by Congress and admin- 
istered by the Library of Congress 
through 170 regional libraries and state 
agencies. If you would like more informa- 
tion about Talking Books, write: National 
Library Service for the Blind and Physi- 
cally Handicapped, Library of Congress, 
Washington, D.C. 20542. Attention: 
Reference Section 

REACHING OUT. . .Outreach Services 
at Perkins provides services to blind and 
visually impaired students mainstreamed in 
public school programs, and to students 
enrolled at Perkins who also attend public 
school classes. Weekend 'retreats' — 
conducted on the Perkins campus for stu- 
dents and their families — provide partici- 
pants with the benefits of a peer group for 
social/emotional interaction, recreational 
activities, and prevocational skills. Outreach 
also provides support services to teachers 
and schools in the form of workshops and 
videotapes. Topics have included vision 
therapy, microcomputers, and main- 
streaming visually impaired students. For 
more information about Perkins's Outreach 
Services contact: Supervisor of Outreach 
Services, Perkins School for the Blind, 175 
North Beacon Street, Watertown, MA 02172. 
Tel: (617) 924-3434, extension 433. 



The Lantern 



13 



Coping with Vision Loss 



7e live in a visual world. 

Nearly 80% of the information we receive about our 
world comes to us through the visual sense. Consequently, 
our vision impacts almost everything we do. It is no won- 
der, then, that vision loss or blindness can oftentimes 
seem almost overwhelming to both the individual ex- 
periencing the loss and his or her family. 

In May of this year, a group of parents and professionals 
gathered at Perkins for the third in a series of workshops 
sponsored by Perkins's Outreach Services — "VISION 
CHANGES: What does the future hold?" From a special 
emphasis on the physical and emotional issues accom- 
panying vision loss evolved a series of interviews with 
three participants of that workshop — a young woman ex- 
periencing a progressive visual loss; the mother of a blind, 
physically impaired child; and a resource specialist who 
helps individuals and their families cope with vision loss. 

We begin, in this issue, with Kate Van Kleeck, a 25-year- 
old Claims Coordinator in a Brookline, Massachusetts 
hospital. Kate's diagnosis of RP (Retinitis Pigmentosa) 
was made five years ago. 



/jR\ When did you first learn 
^inthat you had RP? 
A. I was twenty years old 
and had just moved to Boston 
for my junior year of college. 
I kept tripping over things — 
not enough to injure myself, 
but just enough to be socially 
uncomfortable. Then one 
evening I tripped over a 'cru- 
cial' curb and slid head first 
for about six feet. My friend 
was just stunned. He helped 
me up and said, "Something 
is definitely wrong. Why don't 
you get your eyes checked?" 
So when I made the appoint- 
ment, all I thought was that I 
just needed glasses. 

Q, What kinds of tests did 
you undergo? 

A. I had tests for color blind- 
ness, glaucoma, visual acuity, 
and a number of visual field 
tests. Finally, after appoint- 
ments with several doctors, 
the chief of the department 



& &I just looked at rjgpi and asked, point 
blank, "Am I going blind?" And he 



talked and he said, 




said to me, "That's the ballpark 
we're talking about. 3 J 



problem with your 
retina." He explained 
the function of the retina, and 



The Lantern 



fcfc Now I finally 
see myself as Kate 
Van Kleeck. That's 
who I am. I am 
many things, but 
I also just happen 
to have RE 5 J 



then stopped briefly. . .and I 
just looked at him and asked, 
point blank, "Am I going 
blind?" And he said to me, 
"That's the ballpark we're 
talking about." 

Q. How did you react to 
that? 

A. I was incredulous, I was 
stunned, and I was very quiet. 
I looked at him to see if he 
was kidding, but he wasn't. 
Then he said, "But, we're not 
sure. We'd like you to have 
one more test at Tufts Univer- 
sity. It's the definitive test." 



Q. What did you do when 
your RP was finally con- 
firmed? 

A. Initially, I slept a great 
deal. Then, as I felt more 
comfortable with the diagnosis, I decided 
that I wasn't going to give many things 
up. I was just going to learn to do them 
differently. For example, I put on make- 
up with my eyes closed. . .1 made quite 
a mess! Then, I went out and memorized 
— absolutely memorized — seven or 
eight different sunsets so that if there 
ever came a time when I wasn't going to 
be able to see a sunset, I could think a 
sunset. . .which is almost as good. 

Q. Did you feel at any point that you 
had to maintain a stiff upper lip? 
A. Absolutely. In the beginning, I viewed 
RP as my personal 'cross to bear.' I was 
raised to believe that 'God fits the back 
to the burden,' so it was a very difficult 
time for me. Now I try to view things 
much differently. . .hopefully more 
positively! 





Photo • Denise Goros 



Q. How has RP affected your 
lifestyle on a day-to-day basis? 
A. Maintaining good relation- 
ships with my friends has 
become very important to me. 
Since I'm unable to drive at 
night, I make arrangements to either 
take the T (mass transit) or have 
someone pick me up. And I've made 
sure that the security in my apartment is 
very tightly controlled and that I always 
have, via the telephone, someone close 
by to contact if I need help. 

Q. What about your goals toward mar- 
riage and having children? 
A. I think the most frightening thing for 
me about RP is the fact that I could have 
children who have RP. So I won't con- 
sider marriage unless it's with an incred- 
ibly special person who hopefully will be 
able to understand some of the issues 
involved, and the seriousness of these 
issues. 



Q. Have you altered your career or 
professional aspirations? 

The Lantern 



15 



A. Yes. I was an Urban Studies major when I was 
diagnosed with RR I've been advised by my doctors 
to prepare for the future by choosing a career in 
which vision is not the central issue. The problem is 
that the specialists who help people make these 
kinds of decisions are found in the agencies who 
serve the legally blind. That is the ultimate paradox. 
You can't obtain the services of those people 
because you don't meet a minimum level of legal 
blindness. Now that, to me, doesn't make any sense, 
selor to help me? I have to wait until I'm legally blind? 
to wait. 



■ ■ mat is me ulti- 
mate paradox. . . I 
can't get a vocational 
counselor to help 
me. . . I have to wait 
until I'm legally 
blind. 5 9 

I can't get a vocational coun- 
I'm sorry, but I'm not content 



Q. RP is a slow, almost silent type of visual loss. Does that make it difficult for 
others to understand or even accept what's happening to you? 
A. Socially, RP is a tough thing to have. It's a very private thing to admit that you 
have a visual loss so you have to really trust someone to be able to convey that 
information. I've had a few negative reactions when I've talked about my 'eye prob- 
lem.' People don't know how to deal with it, and they don't want to deal with it. It's 
too serious. So I've learned to keep it on the quiet side. . .to slip in a comment and 
'test the waters.' 



Q. How have your colleagues at work dealt with this? 

A. My supervisors are aware of my RP diagnosis and have been quite supportive of 
me, especially during some of the more difficult times when I've been distracted by 
it. They've allowed me to work these distractions out, and I think they're grateful 
when I go back to being 'normal'! 

Q. Have you been in contact with other people who have RP? 
A. Yes, the RP Foundation in Baltimore. Although they've been supportive and posi- 
tive, the local RP chapter here in Boston has been somewhat inactive of late. So I've 
begun a support group called 'RP Outreach' to help myself and others cope with the 
fallout of RP. It makes me feel so much better if I can find a positive way to deal with 
something very negative. 

Q. Who or what has helped you the most in 
dealing with your vision loss? 
A. My family and friends have been a constant 
source of quiet — but firm — support. They've shared 
all the bad times with me, as well as the good ones. 
They're people who really care about me — willing 
to just listen. 



Q. Do you feel that eye specialists are sensitive to 
the needs of their patients who are experiencing a 
visual loss? 

A. Just as someone would find one very sensitive 
person among many, I believe the same can be 
said of ophthalmologists. I've oftentimes thought, 
"Why can't ophthalmologists have 'empathy train- 
ing' so that they'd understand not only the physical 
problems of just trying to function in daily life, but 



M I think normalcy 
with its sense of 
balance comes with 
acceptance. And it 
comes with trial and 
error. And finally it come! 



16 



The Lantern 



\J U U UliiiLb 



nwf 




RP — Retinitis Pigmentosa— is one of a 
group of inherited diseases which causes 
degeneration of the retina of the eye. The 
retina is a delicate layer of cells located in 
the back of the eye which "picks up" visual 
images and transmits them to the brain. 
With RP, certain cells in the retina called 
rods and cones die and vision begins to 
diminish. 

RP usually appears during childhood or 
the young adult years; One of the earliest 
symptoms is difficulty seeing at night or in 
dimly lit places (night blindness). Later 
there is a reduction in side (peripheral) 
vision which leaves only a small central 
area of vision, as if the person were look- 
ing through a tunnel. 

Although the symptoms of RP generally 
increase with time, the rate of progression 
varies significantly from one person to 
another. Most RP individuals experience 
a very gradual visual loss and retain at 
least limited vision — "legal blindness"-— 
throughout their lives. 

Though at present there is no known 
cure or treatment for RP, persons with 
retinal degenerative diseases can con- 
tinue to lead full, productive lives. Inten- 
sive research is currently being carried 
out by the RP Foundation Fighting Blind- 
ness. For more information contact the 
RP Foundation Fighting Blindness chapter 
nearest you or write: 

RP Foundation Fighting Blindness 
8331 Mindale Circle 
Baltimore, MD 21207 

Tel.: 1-800-638-2300 (toll-free) 

(301 ) 655-1011 (MD residents) 
TDD: (301) 655-1190 (for deaf) 



vith growth. M 




also get a sense of the social and 
psychological ramifications?" They make 
the diagnosis, but / have to live with it. 

Q. Has having RP changed the way 
you view yourself? 

A. I like to think that I have a sense of 
strength and a sense of bearing. I used 
to think of my RP as something separate 
from me. Now I finally see myself as 
Kate Van Kleeck. That's who / am. I am 
many things, but I also just happen to 
have RP. It's certainly a very big part of 
me because it affects me in a lot of dif- 
ferent areas. But nevertheless, it's not 
all of me. 

Q. Based on your experiences, what 
advice would you give to someone who 
was where you were five years ago, 
someone who just received a diagnosis 
of RP? 

A. First, I would learn as much as I 
possibly could about RP and how it will 
affect you. Another thing I would do is, 
in my mind, sort out those people who 
mean a very great deal to me and work 
to maintain those relationships. I would 
want someone I could tell my worst fears 
to and also my greatest joys, somebody 
that I would respect, whose ideas could 
help. And I would talk to that person and 
just let it all out. And give yourself time 
to adjust to it. Figure out what things 
you really enjoy and that you want to 
keep the rest of your life, no matter what 
happens. I think the enormity and seri- 
ousness is so great that you constantly 
feel out of balance, you feel skewed in 
one direction. . .it seems the best of 
times and the worst of times. And there's 
no gray area. You just want to be 'nor- 
mal.' I think normalcy with its sense of 
balance comes with acceptance. And it 
comes with trial and error. And finally it 
comes with growth. 



. . .Denise Goros 



The Lantern 



17 




HON at PERKINS 



June 15, 
1984 






A O The Lantern 




(1) The Honorable 
Sheila E. McGovern, 
Presiding Judge of the 
Middlesex Division, 
Massachusetts Pro- 
bate Family Court, 
inspires the graduates 
with her commence- 
ment address. 

(2) Class President 
James Burke presents 
a check to Perkins's 
director, Charles C. 
Woodcock. Funds 
raised by the senior 
class will be used 
toward an improved 
public address system 
for Dwight Hall. 

(3) Happy graduates 
Robert Leonard, Jr. and 
Linda Caverly enter 
Dwight Hall for the 
1984 graduation 
exercises. 



Li ™ ■■■ ■ 
i II "II 



IF ^t 




(4) James Levin is 
awarded a Certificate 
of Accomplishment by 
Perkins's Corporation 
President, C. Richard 
Carlson. 

(5) 1984 Graduates: 
(seated, left to right) 
James Desrosiers, 
Coventry, Ri; Linda 
Caverly, Ballston Lake, 
NY; Robert Leonard, 
Jr., New Milford, CT; 
David Spade, Fremont, 
IN; Kimberly Linne- 
meyer, Fort Wayne, IN; 
and Debra Ravenalle, 
Westport, MA; (stand- 
ing, left to right) Ralph 
Frasier, West Yarmouth, 
MA; Sandra Babcock, 
Tyngsboro, MA; 
Josephine Fleming, 
Brockton, MA; James 
Levin, Scarsdale, NY; 
Janice Valiton, Shel- 




WMi-M^ ■ ; " >::§■ : i-R 



burne Falls, MA; 
Denise Anderson, 
Lexington, MA; James 
Burke, Saugus, MA; 
and David Flood, 
Wakefield, MA. 



Dsaf Blind Update 



NEW 

COOPERATIVE 

AGREEMENTS 

for Services to Deaf-Blind Children and Young Adults 



The Special Needs Section of the U.S. Office of Special Education Programs has 
awarded new cooperative agreements (or grants) for fiscal year 1984. 

Approximately $10,140,000 in funds have been allocated to support projects that 
provide special education and related services to deaf-blind children and young 
adults (ages 3 through 22) and technical assistance to state educational agencies 
to ensure the provision of these services. Funds will also be utilized to make pro- 
grams and services available to deaf-blind individuals to facilitate their transition 
from educational programs to employment and other adult services when they 
reach the age of 22. 

Funds for these cooperative agreements have been apportioned as follows: 



Priority Area 

Services for Deaf-Blind Children 
and Youth 

Technical Assistance to Entities 
Providing Services to Deaf-Blind 
Children and Youth 

Services to Deaf-Blind Youth 
Upon Attaining the Age of 22 

Data Collection and Recon- 
ciliation and Information 
Dissemination 



Anticipated 

Funding 

Level 

$8,140,000 



$1,000,000 
$ 700,000 

$ 300,000 



At this writing, a 
iist of the specific 
recipients of these 
funds is expected 
to be forthcoming 
from the U.S. De- 
partment of Edu- 
cation in Washing- 
ton. For more infor- 
mation, contact: 
Chief of Special 
Needs Section, 
U.S. Department 
of Education, 
400 Maryland 
Avenue, S.W., 
Washington, D.C. 
20202. 
Telephone: 
202/732-1161. 



Z\) The Lantern 



O. "Perky" is a braille-oriented computer 
device capable of braille embossing, 
composing and editing text, graphics, 
and interacting with computers as a 
smart terminal. 

O Based on the reliable Perkins BraiHer 
— m an u fact u red by Howe Press at 
Perkins School for the Blind—this port- 
able braille system can also be used 
alone as a standard braille embosser. 
Text may be saved on a standard tape 
cassette recorder for future editing and 
printing. 



"IHBFKf 



mmer 
Modified 

Perkins 
Bmiller) 




v^:-» 



O "Perky" is being used in schools, 
businesses, and braille production 
houses. By combining "Perky" with a 
microcomputer and the proper braille 
translation software, teachers Without 
any braille skills can communicate with 



their students in hard copy braille. Tests 
and instructional material can be typed 
into any microcomputer for braille trans- 
lation at any time. 

"Perky" carries on the reliable reputation 
of the Perkins BraiHer. 




I am interested in "Perky"! 
Please send me more 
information and an order form. 



Name 



Address 



City_ 



State. 



Country. 



Zip. 



Mail to: Public Relations & Publications, Perkins School for the Blind, 
175 N. Beacon Street, Watertown, MA 02172 



The Lantern 







The Perk ns Program as it has developed and been maintained for 
more than one hundred and fifty years has relied upon a growing 

endowment s at every step along the way. 

Endowments which are adequate to put a program into effect are 
rarely sufficient to keep it going. As with every private school and college that is 
keeping abreast— or ahead— of the times, Perkins needs to see its endowment 
grow. Through bequests and donations, and through a few government grants, 
we have been able to expand existing services and add new ones as needed. 
We are confident that our friends will continue to support us in ever increasing 
amounts. 



FORM OF BEQUEST 

t hereby give, devise and bequeath 
1 to the Perkins School for the 
Blind, a corporation duly organized 
and existing under the laws of the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 

the sum of dollars 

($ ), the same to be 

applied to the general uses and 
purposes of said corporation under 
the direction of its Board of Trus- 
tees; and I do hereby direct that the 
receipt of the Treasurer for the time 
being of said corporation shall be a 
sufficient discharge to my exec- 
utors for the same. 



NOTICE 

The address of the Treasurer of the 
corporation is as follows: 
JOHN W. BRYANT 
Fiduciary Trust Co., 175 Federal 
Street, Boston, MA 02110-2289 



FORM OF DEVISE 
OF REAL ESTATE 

T[ give, devise and bequeath to the 
Ji Perkins School for the Blind, a 
corporation duly organized and 
existing under the laws of the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 
that certain tract of real estate 
bounded and described as follows: 

(Here describe the real estate 
accurately) 

with full power to sell, mortgage 
and convey the same free of all 
trust. 




iitfi<ii 



22 The Lantern 




Staple Here 



pstadtops tf®or mmmm^ 



1. 



2. 

3. 
4. 
5. 
6. 



Check your mailing label on outside 
back cover: Is it affixed securely? 

Are name & address correct? 
Detach entire survey along dotted line 
inside. 

Fold this flap over. 

Fold again in half, as indicated below. 
Staple edges together, as indicated. 
Affix .20 postage. 



FOLD HERE 



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.20 

POSTAGE 



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1218 Massachusetts Avenue 
Cambridge, MA 02138 



Staple Here 



RfllfWmiM 



i©T 



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Which of the 
following 

describes you? (Pick only one) 

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General Public 




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.Director's 
Message 
.Special 

Announcements 
.Feature Story 
.On and Off 
Campus 



.Photographs 
.Deaf-Blind 
Update 

.On Sale Now! 
.Information 
about Perkins 
Programs 





Which type of 
story do you 
prefer to 
read in 

The Lantern? (Pick only one) 

Stories about Perkins programs and students 

Stories of general interest about visual impairment, 

blindness, and deaf-blindness 



Are you in 
a position 
to refer 

students/clients 
to Perkins? 



.yes 



.no 




Are you in a 
position to 
buy goods 
and/or services 
from Perkins? 




.yes 



.no 



If yes, what 
are your 
total average 
expenditures 
per year for 
goods/services? 

up to $20,000 

$20,000-$50,000 

$50,000 -$100,000 

$ 1 00,000 -$200,000 

$200,000 -$500,000 

Over $500,000 



DC LU ?5 

O ljj CD "* - 

ll dc w br z i- 

CE DC 



7 m 



o 



lu o 




p-E-R-rrrs 

lantern 



Big Business 

in 

New England: 

NOT SHORT SIGHTED 



SPRING 1985 



Published three times a year 
in print and braille editions by 

PERKINS SCHOOL 
FOR THE BUND 
WATERTOWN, MA 
02172-9982 

FOUNDED 1829 

® <s> 

An accredited member 
since 1947 of the New 
England Association of 
Schools and Colleges, 
Inc. 

An accredited member 
since 1970 of the Na- 
tional Accreditation 
Council for Agencies 
Serving the Blind and 
Visually Handicapped. 

"The Perkins School for 
the Blind admits students 
of any race, color, nation- 
al and ethnic origin to all 
the rights, privileges, pro- 
grams, and activities gen- 
erally accorded or made 
available to students at 
the school. It does not 
discriminate on the basis 
of race, color, national or 
ethnic origin in the ad- 
ministration of its educa- 
tional policies, admissions 
policies, scholarship and 
loan programs, and ath- 
letic and other school- 
administered programs." 



The Lantern 



VOLUME LIV NO. 2 SPRING, 1985 




Contents 



4 
6 




Message from the 
Director 



Perkins' 'Project with 
Industry' 

a look at how such 
industry giants as 
AT&T, Wang, and New 
England Telephone are 
helping Perkins adapt 
high technology work 
environments for blind 
workers 



On & Off Campus 



The Perkins 
Endowment 



The Perkins 
Program 

fr PRESCHOOL SERVICESl 
f# AgesBirth-6 



PRIMARY & 
INTERMEDIATE 

Ages 6-13 



JK secondary 

U SERVICES 

Ages 13-22 

ttj DEAF-BLIND 

1 ' Ages 5-22 

f PROGRAM for the 
SEVERELY IMPAIRED 

.Ages 10-22 

* ADULT SERVICES 

Ages 18 and older 

OUTREACH SERVICES 



Other Services 

CLINICAL SERVICES 

(Diagnostic and 
Evaluative) 

PUBLIC RELATIONS & 
PUBLICATIONS 

REGIONAL LIBRARY 
for the BLIND & 
PHYSICALLY 
HANDICAPPED 

SAMUEL P. HAYES 
RESEARCH LIBRARY 

TEACHER EDUCA- 
TION PROGRAM 

NEW ENGLAND 
CENTER for DEAF- 
BLIND SERVICES 

HOWE PRESS 

(Aids and Appliances) 




provided mearjii 
communities 



We have been 
tif ied job poss 
placements 



with 



In this issue of The Lantern we highlight PerHins 
proud of our efforts, and we are grateful to 
their time, energy, and resources to help insipre 
ment record fq>r blind, visually impaired, and 



to 



The capacity 
tions has occuire 
Massachusetts 
Rehabilitation 
industries. 



Wang 

catalysts for 
technology, 



the 



ard 



ngful and reality-based 
Massachusetts. 



fortunate to have a creative 
bilities but have also provided 
business and industrial contacts 



A Message 
from the Director: 

Spring '85 Lantern 



During the past five years at Perkins there 
has been a significant effort made to ex- 
pand and enhance the prevocational and 
vocational training opportunities for a 
wide-functioning range of students and 
clients. 

Various training and placement options 
have been identified in local businesses 
and industries, and our teaching staff has 
vocational training programs within a number of 



and 



The Trustees ahd Staff at Perkins express thei 
England Telephone Company, and AT&T Communications 
going support of the Perkins Project With Inpustry 
to the Massac lusetts Commission for the B 
Group of Cambridge, Massachusetts for their 



train blind adults in meanin 

because of the joint effort 
Commission for the Blind, as 
3 roup, =is private consultants, 



Laboratories, New England Telephone, 
successful integration of 
they should be commendec 



blird 



responsive staff who have not only iden- 
the leadership skills needed to negotiate 



Project With Industry Program. We are 
the many individuals who have contributed 
a comprehensive and successful place- 
deaf-blind adults. 



r appreciation to Wang Laboratories, New 
for their contributions and on- 
Program. We also express our thanks 
ind and the Occupational Rehabilitation 
invaluable contributions and their expertise. 



Sful 



and well-paying high technology occupa- 
between Perkins, as the private agency, the 
the public agency, The Occupational 
and interested and responsive businesses and 



and AT&T Communications have served as 
adults into the competitive field of high 
for their effort and commitment. 



^C 




Kevin Lessard, 
Acting Director 



The Lantern 



ANNOUNCING 

A NEW FILM ABOUT 

"PERKINS... 

CHALLENGING, CHANGING, 
GROWING " 

• 16 mm • Color • 15.5 minutes • Rental $25* 

• Shows the variety of academic, daily living, 
vocational, and rehabilitative education provided 
to blind, deaf-blind, and multi-impaired students 
and clients at Perkins School for the Blind in 
Watertown, Massachusetts— as seen through the 
individual perspectives of students, graduates, 
teachers, parents, and administrators. Intended for 
general audiences, ages 10 and older. 

• Please note: Rental fee includes all first-class shipping & handling 

charges and Perkins information packet. Rental period is one week. We 
regret that we are unable to accept overseas rental requests. 



Yes! 



I am interested in renting the new Perkins film for 
beginning (date' 



• payment for $25. 
Please tell us: 
• Who will be viewing this film? 



• How many viewers do you expect in your 
audience? 



Name . 
Address. 
City _ 



State 



Zip 



Please note: Payment in full must accompany this order. Make crjieck or money 
payable to Perkins School for the Blind. 

Mail to: Public Relations & Publications 
Perkins School for the Blind 
175 N. Beacon Street 
Watertown, MA 02172-9982 

5 




one week 
Enclosed is my 



i 



The Lantern 



Big Business 
in New England: 

NOT SHORT SIGHTED 

by Ronald Trahan 

The rate of unemployment among blind persons is sixty 
percent . . . 



For nearly two years, then? 
laborative effort underway 
blind, state vocational rehabil 
businesses— an effort to t 
handicapped workers into 



This collective endeavor is 
with Industry (PWI). 



This effort began almost 
1983, when the Pert 
awarded a three-yea ■ 
Special Education and Rehabilitation 
was designed to allow the 
work closely with three 
AT&T Communications, 
Laboratories. 



"The purpose of our pre 
Anderson, "is to expand ei 
blind and visually impairec 



"What is extraordinary 
eral different agencies, 
fice. The Massachusetts 
our chief referral source fc 
engineers, low-vision spec 
adapt jobs and prepare cli 



Outside of Massachusetts 
tional rehabilitation agencjes 
generally provided by the 
incurred by the company. 



great 



"Our success in surveying 
adaptable jobs has, to a 
from The Occupational Rejhab 
contracted with this private 
engineering and installation 



- „i' 



Hi 



Thomas A. Andruskevich 

New England Telephone 
Company 



has been an extraordinary col- 
— involving a school for the 
itation agencies, and big 
ain and place blind and visually 
meaningful jobs. 



known as: The Perkins Project 




Glen A. Costa, Sr. 

Wang Laboratories, Inc. 



major 
New 



two years ago, in September, 
ins School for the Blind was 
federal grant from the Office of 

Services. The grant 
Perkins School for the Blind to 
New England businesses: 
England Telephone, and Wang 




Thomas J. O'Connell 

Wang Laboratories, Inc. 



projejet," explains coordinator, Julie 

dmployment and training opportunities within New England for 
persons. 



ab<{)ut this project is the involvement and cooperation among sev- 

ns coordinates the project through its Outreach Services of- 

Gbmmission for the Blind is also integrally involved. They've been 

r clients. We work closely with the Commission's rehabilitation 

alists, rehabilitation counselors, and administration— in order to 

?nts for employment." 



the Perkins staff work in a similar way with other state voca- 

for the blind. Adaptive equipment for a particular job is 
;tate rehabilitation agency, and so, frequently, there is no cost 



job sites within businesses," says Anderson, "and identifying 
degree, depended on the work of our project consultants 
ilitation Group (TORG) in Cambridge, Massachusetts. We've 
rehabilitation agency to help us in the job survey process, in 
of modified hardware, and, occasionally, in case management. 



The latvtern__. 




Fred Greeham (left) of the Massachusetts Commission for the Blind presents 
an award to Dennis Case, a repair service assistant with New England 
Telephone Company. Dennis, who was a client of the "Perkins Project with 
Industry', was one of the six finalists in the Thomas J. Carroll Award for the 
"Most Outstanding Blind Employee of 1984" in Massachusetts. 



"And, too, since many of the jobs we're adapting involve 
computerized workstations, we've integrated the computer 
evaluation and training program (CABLE) at the Caroll 
Center for the Blind in Newton, Massachusetts, into the 
preparation and screening process for PWI clients." 

Is this extraordinary collaborative effort working? 

Emphatically, yes. 

Hundreds of different jobs have thus far been identified 
within dozens of New England companies as being adap- 
table to blind and visully impaired persons. PWI clients, for 
example, have been trained and placed as repair assem- 
blers, lawyers, customer service representatives, program- 
mers, telemarketing specialists, collection clerks, PC board 
testers, claims investigators, receptionists, and many more. 






". . . an extra- 
ordinary 
collaborative 
effort . . . 

It's the kind 
of thing that 
company 
ought to be 
doing." 




: 



Tk« I -.►»+«. 




An essential element in the success of the project has been 
the Business Advisory Council. In its monthly meetings, the 
Council gives participating business representatives a 
chance to meet with project staff and discuss company 
needs and strategies for further development. 

"Our common goal," explains Thomas A. Andruskevich, 
manager of the handicapped affirmative action program 
for New England Telephone, "is to promote opportunities 
for disabled persons. 

"And it's not entirely an altruistic endeavor," insists An- 
druskevich, who also chairs the PWI Business Advisory 
Council. "To keep a person out of the work force just 
because of a disabiltiy, without looking at his or her other 
qualifications, is very short-sighted. Particularly with labor 
shortages like we're finding in Massachusetts, those 
employers who are willing to take a look at themselves and 
identify jobs within their companies which can be adapted 
for blind and visually impaired persons . . . These com- 
panies will create for themselves a very substantial and 
capable pool of workers." 




' The 'Perkir: Project with In- 
dustry' is good business ... a 
mutually beneficial partnership 
between business and the han- 
dicapped community." 




* 



■i 



New 



"The 'Perkins Project with In- 
dustry' means making special 
efforts . . ." 



Thomas A. Andruskevich 

Manager of the Handicapped 
" "' rmative Action Program 
England Telephone 
ipany 



Glen A. Costa, Sr. 

Senior Affirmative Action 

Representative 

Wang Laboratories, Inc. 



"A modification of equipment or materials," says Valerie Hartt, 
training at AT&T Communications, and a key member of the PWI 
cil, "is often all that's needed to enable a blind or visually im 
to a particular job." 



assistant staff manager for 
Business Advisory Coun- 
person to have access 



paired 



AT&T Communications is working with PWI to place four blind LJDng Distance Operators 
and an indefinite number of Account Representatives. 



Sometimes, though, much more is involved than 'mere' modification 
materials. Much of PWI's placement work demands complex coord 
company— so staff in employment, medical, and engineering dep 
ing with the floor manager who will be supervising the new em 



"That doesn't bother us," insists Glen A. Costa, Sr., the senior affirmative 
tative at Wang Laboratories. "The Perkins Project with Industry 
forts to include in the work force those who, in the past, have n 



"It's a mutually beneficial partnership," concludes Andruskevich 
that a company ought to be doing. Not just because the federal 
ments might be looking at you— but because it's the right thing 
good in it for the company— qualified workers— and something 
people— meaningful employment. 

"Why wouldn't a company want to get involved?" 




of equipment or 
ination within a 
artments are all work- 
ployee. 



action represen- 
njieans making special ef- 
Dt been included." 



"It's the kind of thing 
and the state govern- 
to do. There's something 
good in it for disabled 



"We're enthusiastic supporters 
of the 'Perkins Project with 
Industry'. " 




Thomas J. O'Connell 

Corporate Director, 
Affirmative Action 
Wang Laboratories, Inc. 



Valerie Hartt 

Assistant Staff Manager 

for Training 
AT&T Communications 



ipilS Former Pro Hockey Star 

Visits 
Perkins 




Bobby Orr, when he was a 
star defenseman for the 
Boston Bruins of the National 
Hockey League. 

Student Brenda Elliot shares a 
laugh with Bobby Orr. 



The Lantern 



The Perkins 
Endowment 



effe<:t 



The Perkins Program as it has developed and been maintaine 
dred and fifty years has relied upon a growing endowment 
the way. 

Endowments which are adequate to put a program into 
keep it going. As with every private school and college that is 
ahead — of the times, Perkins needs to see its endowment 
donations, and through a few government grants, we have 
services and add new ones as needed. We are confident that 
support us in ever increasing amounts. 



i for more than one hun- 
at every step along 



grow, 

been 

ojr 



FORM OF BEQUEST 

I hereby give, devise and bequeath to the Perkins School for 
duly organized and existing under the laws of the Commomh/ec 
the sum of dollars ($ 



to the general uses and purposes of said corporation under the 
Trustees; and I do hereby direct that the receipt of the Treasure | 
said corporation shall be a sufficient discharge to my executors 



are rarely sufficient to 
kjeeping abreast — or 
Through bequests and 
able to expand existing 
friends will continue to 



tjhe Blind, a corporation 

of Massachusetts, 
the same to be applied 
direction of its Board of 
for the time being of 
for the same. 



FORM OF DEVISE OF REAL ESTATE 

I give, devise and bequeath to the Perkins School for the Blin$ 



organized and existing under the laws of the Commonwealt|h 
certain tract of real estate bounded and described as follows: 



(Here describe the real estate accurately) 
with full power to sell, mortgage and convey the same free of ell trusl 



NOTICE 



The Address of the Treasurer of the corporation is as follows: 

JOHN W. BRYANT, Fiduciary Trust Co., 

175 Federal Street, Boston, MA 02110-2289 




a corporation duly 
of Massachusetts, that 




11 



The Lantern 




Published three times a year in 
print and braille editions by 

Perkins School 
for the Blind 
Watertown, Ma 
02172-9982 

Founded 1 829 



fgggr 



An accredited member 
since 1947 of the New 
England Association of 
Schools and Colleges, 
Inc. 

An accredited member 
since 1970 of the Na- 
tional Accreditation 
Council for Agencies 
Serving the Blind and 
Visually Handicapped. 



Volume LV 

No. 1 
Fall, 1985 



"The Perkins School for the 
Blind admits students of any 
race, color, national and ethnic 
origin to all the rights, privi- 
leges, programs, and activities 
generally accorded or made 
available to students at the 
school. It does not discriminate 
on the basis of race, color, 
national or ethnic origin in the 
administration of its educa- 
tional policies, admissions poli- 
cies, scholarship and loan 
programs, and athletic and 
other school-administered 
programs." 




Contents 



The 

Perkins 

Programs 



New Director appointed 

at Perkins 4 


/^r Preschool Services 

1 • Ages Birth-6 

• Primary & 
•QQ* Intermediate 

lit Ages 6-1 3 

^k Secondary 
vJ' Services 

U Ages 13-22 


Toward 1995: 

Perkins completes 

major Self-Study. 6 


On and off 

Campus 10 


jfij Deaf-Blind 

1 1 Ages 5-22 

(m§p Program for the 
inT Severely Impaired 

W Ages 1 0-22 


The Perkins 


Endowment 1 1 


otKo» Adult Services 
| ' | Ages 18 and older 




Outreach Services 




Other Services 




Clinical Services 

(Diagnostic and 
Evaluative) 




Public Relations & 
Publications 




Regional Library 
for the Blind & 
Physically Handicapped 




Samuel P. Hayes 
Research Library 




Teacher Educa- 
tion Program 




New England 
Center for Deaf- 
Blind Services 




Howe Press 


I 3 


(Aids and Appliances) 



Lessard appointed Director 
at Perkins 




Kevin J. Lessard 



K 



evin J. Lessard, 40, was appointed 
director of the Perkins School for 
the Blind by its Board of Trustees on 
July 18, 1985. Mr. Lessard had served 
as acting director at Perkins since Janu- 
ary 1, 1985. 

Mr. Lessard has been employed 
in various professional capacities at 
Perkins for the last 17 years... As an 
orientation and mobility teacher, as su- 
pervisor of the Adult Services program, 
and— prior to his appointment as acting 
director— Perkins' assistant director for 
the last seven years. 



Mr. Lessard 's appointment makes 
him only the eighth man in 156 years to 
serve as director of the Perkins School 
for the Blind. 



[ t's an honor for me to write the intro- 
duction to the Fall, 1985 issue of 
The Lantern, as the newly appointed 
director of Perkins School for the Blind. 
I've had the privilege of serving the 
school for the past seventeen years and, 
during that period of time, I've always 
recognized and appreciated the contri- 
butions of many dedicated trustees 
and staff. 

Perkins is a large, diverse, and 
responsive organization that has ex- 
panded and developed programs and 
services for a wide-chronological and 
wide-functioning range of students 
and clients. 

We are proud of our Instructional, 
Clinical, and Support Services depart- 
ments, and we recognize our respon- 
sibility to monitor and oversee 
comprehensive and accountable 
services to every student and client 
we serve at Perkins. 

We are pleased with our on- 
campus program development in the 
areas of the Preschool Services, the 
Lower School Program, Secondary 
Services, the Severe Impaired Pro- 



A Message from 
the New Director 



gram, Adult Services, Community Liv- 
ing Services, the Deaf -Blind Program, 
and Teacher Training. 

We are all pleased with our off- 
campus programs which are providing 
Community-Based Housing Services, 
Outreach Services to public school stu- 
dents, and job placement opportunities 
for adults in business and industry 
through our Projects with Industry 
Program. Many of these outreach 
efforts will be integrated with our 
Teacher Training Program and services 
that emanate from the Howe Press at 
Perkins. 

Coordinating such a broad range 
of Programs and Services will always 
be made easier for me in that I'm fortu- 
nate to have a highly competent, re- 
sourceful, and committed staff who 
provide administrative, direct, and 
indirect services to our students 
and clients. 

Programmatically, we are ready 
to face the future with much optimism, 
and the Program Studies that have 
been developed during the past year, 
along with the Masterplan of the 
Perkins Campus, will allow us to make 
intelligent and informed decisions, as 
we prioritize our facility needs during 
the next few years. 

During the School Year 1985- 
1986, 1 look forward to working closely 



with the trustees and the administra- 
tive and supervisory staff at Perkins in 
attending to the present-day needs and 
our plans for the future. 

Our Program Plans are coordi- 
nated on a regular basis with our Finan- 
cial and Support Services. We have 
analyzed and defined budget parame- 
ters for each program and department 
at Perkins, and we have effectively 
implemented accountable financial 
systems which are responsive to the 
instructional and clinical service needs 
of our students and clients. 

We also look forward to expand- 
ing our development and public rela- 
tions efforts during the present school 
year, and we feel confident that our 
Program and Masterplan Studies will 
serve us well as we continue to articu- 
late and define the full scope of services 
at Perkins. Our responsiveness to com- 
munity needs and our ability to develop 
programs and services for individuals 
who are blind, deaf -blind, and multi- 
impaired will continue to expand. 

On behalf of the trustees and the 
staff, I would like to thank the large 
number of individuals who have always 
supported Perkins, and the time, effort, 
and resources that you have contributed 
are very much appreciated by all of us. 



IKks 




Toward 1995: 

Perkins completes a program plan 
for the future and a masterplan 
of the campus. 



I erkins School for the Blind is located 

just five miles west of Boston, in 
Watertown, Massachusetts. The original 
buildings on the 38-acre campus were 
designed by a well-known Boston archi- 
tect, R. Clipston Sturgis. Constructed 
circa 1910, these buildings not only com- 
bine high quality in both exterior and 
interior design, but remain structurally 
sound seventy-five years after completion. 

However, the exterior envelopes 
of these original buildings, which were 
completed at the turn of the century, 
are understandably in need of repair, 
restoration, and renovation. And, too, 
a general upgrading of the buildings' 
interior finishes is needed— as well as 
repair of walls and ceilings— where 
damage has been done by water from 
breaks in the antiquated exterior 
envelopes. 



Perhaps more importantly, 
though, much of the forthcoming re- 
pair, restoration, and renovation will be 
done for the general welfare and safety 
of students and clients who, increas- 
ingly, are more multi-impaired than in 
the past. Renovation and new additions 
in the Lower School complex, for exam- 
ple—which serves and houses students, 
6 to 13 years of age, some of whom are 
blind and deaf or have cerebral palsy 
and are mentally retarded— will bring 
all student bedrooms and living and 
dining areas to the ground floor level, 
while shop areas, program classrooms, 
administrative and clinical therapy 
offices, and mobility training areas will 
be moved to the second floor. These 
changes will enhance the safety and 
accessibility of the Lower School com- 
plex for the benefit of orthopedically 
and otherwise impaired youngsters. 

Furthermore, campus renovation 
is necessary, not only to make neces- 
sary repairs and enhance daily living 
and educational programming for all 
our students and clients, but also so 
that new roads and pathways can be 
developed to augment mobility train- 
ing, an essential component of the Per- 
kins educational experience. Mobility 
training at Perkins utilizes the entire 
campus as its training ground. Physical 



75-year-old facility 
in need of 
repair, restoration, 
and renovation 
to accommodate 
future program needs. 




Recent aerial photo of the Perkins School 
for the Blind and its 38-acre campus, 
which borders the Charles River just 
5 miles west of Boston. 



conditions that currently exist on the 
campus need to be modified to meet 
these important training needs. 

When complete, this new effort 
will not only allow Perkins to continue 



to serve the educational and residential 
components of its various programs at 
an optimal level— but, it will also allow 
Perkins to persevere in keeping its 
landmark and historic architecture in- 



tact, as monuments that reflect the ex- 
cellence of the activities and pursuits 
within their walls. 

The commitment of the Perkins 
School for the Blind to make these nec- 
essary repairs, renovations, and resto- 
rations is the result of a comprehensive 
self-study, which began in 1983— when 
the Dimeo Construction Company of 
Providence, Rhode Island was retained 
by the Perkins Board of Trustees to 
study the campus facility and make 




recommendations as to the eight- 
decade-old facility's need for repair 
and renovation. 

Following the delivery of the Di- 
meo Construction Report, the Perkins 
Board of Trustees then retained the Ar- 
thur D. Little Company of Cambridge, 
Massachusetts, so that the firm could 
assist the administrative directors and 
program and service supervisors at 
Perkins to develop the future direc- 
tional thrusts of the school's programs 
and services over the next decade. 

Finally once future programmatic 
thrusts were known, the Perkins Board 
of Trustees retained the Boston archi- 



The repairs, renovations, and restorations 
of the Perkins School campus will main- 
tain the landmark and historic architec- 
tural integrity of the 75-year-old 
buildings... 



"...forthcoming repair, restoration, 
and renovation will be done for the 
general welfare and safety of stu- 
dents and clients who, increasingly, 
are more multi-impaired than in 
the past. 



tectural firm of Shepley Bullfinch 
Richardson & Abbott to help Perkins 
staff evaluate alternatives and prioritize 
the repairs and renovations suggested 
by the earlier Dimeo Construction 
Report. 

It should be noted that the re- 
pairs, renovations, and restorations 
represent the consensus of architects, 
administrators, teachers, houseparents, 
and clinical staff. This consensus— and 
the future repairs, renovations, and 
restorations— will allow the Perkins 
School for the Blind to provide pro- 
grams and services to students and 
clients who can advance from one 



. . . while improving the general safety and 
accessibility of the entire campus, which 
is used, increasingly, by more severely 
handicapped students and clients. 



educational level to another, and who 
can eventually either care for them- 
selves or function as independently 
as possible in the care of a community- 
based, Perkins-operated housing pro- 
gram, another person, or another 
program or organization. 

The school is presently develop- 
ing a Feasibility Study to determine the 
scope and direction of a capital cam- 
paign which will be announced in the 
near future. 




On and Off 
Campus 



Graduation Day: 
June 14, 1985 



^::2:,'ri::7::^ 




The Class of 1985. . . (Front row, left to right) Irene 
Mescall, 21, Cambridge, MA; Stephanie Roberts, 
21, Boston, MA; Norma Morales, 21, Jersey City, 
NJ; Melissa Merrill, 19, Citrus Heights, CA;]ane 
Aniolek, 21, Madison, CT; (Second row) Todd 
Patkus, 21, Westport, MA; Michael Latour. 22, 

Former Perkins Corporation 
President Dies 

Samuel Cabot, Jr. of Beverly Farms, Massa- 
chusetts, retired president of Samuel Cabot, Inc., 
Boston paint manufacturers, died on September 
11, 1985, after a brief illness. He was 74. 

From 1971 to 1978, Mr. Cabot was president 
of the Perkins Corporation. His association with 
the Perkins School as a corporator and a trustee 
began in 1952 and lasted more than 33 years. 

Mr. Cabot went into his family's paint busi- 
ness, founded by his grandfather in 1877, after 
graduation from college. He held various jobs in 



Ipswich, MA; Charles St. Denis, 21, Tiverton, RI; 
Brian Coppola, 21, Methuen, MA; Mark 
McGovern, 22, Winthrop, MA; Robert Bonito, 22, 
Maiden, MA; James Coty, 20, Lewiston, ME; 
Stephen Wenzler, 20, Mt. Laurel, NJ; and Doulas 
Lepore, 21, Chelmsford, MA. 

the company's factory and laboratory in Chelsea, 
Massachusetts and in the Boston office, and 
was made traffic manager and then, in 1940, 
treasurer. 

After service in England and Africa as a lieu- 
tenant in the Army Air Corps during World War II, 
he returned to his family's firm as treasurer and 
later became its president, remaining at that post 
until his retirement in 1977. After retirement he 
served as a director of the company until his death. 

Mr. Cabot leaves his wife, the former Virginia 
Ward; two sons, Samuel 3rd and Christopher; two 
daughters, Ellen Cabot and Joan Gardiner; six 
grandchildren and a sister, Elizabeth Cochran. 



10 



The Perkins 
Endowment 



______ 



The Perkins Program as it 
has developed and been main- 
tained for more than one hun- 
dred and fifty years has relied 
upon a growing endowment at 
every step along the way. 

Endowments which are 
adequate to put a program into 
effect are rarely sufficient to 
keep it going. As with every 
private school and college that 
is keeping abreast— or ahead— 
of the times, Perkins needs to 
see its endowment grow. 
Through bequests and dona- 
tions, and through a few govern- 
ment grants, we have been able 
to expand existing services and 
add new ones as needed. We are 
confident that our friends will 
continue to support us in ever 
increasing amounts. 



Form of Bequest 

I hereby give, devise and be- 
queath to the Perkins School for 
the Blind, a corporation duly 
organized and existing under 
the laws of the Commonwealth 
of Massachusetts, the sum of 
dollars 



($- 



.), the same to be 



applied to the general uses and 
purposes of said corporation 
under the direction of its Board 
of Trustees; and I do hereby 
direct that the receipt of the 
Treasurer for the time being 
of said corporation shall be a 
sufficient discharge to my 
executors for the same. 




11 



Form of Devise 
of Real Estate 

I give, devise and bequeath to 
the Perkins School for the 
Blind, a corporation duly orga- 
nized and existing under the 
laws of the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts, that certain 
tract of real estate bounded and 
described as follows: 

(Here describe the real estate 
accurately) 

with full power to sell, mort- 
gage and convey the same free 
of all trust. 

Notice 

The Address of the Treasurer of 

the corporation is as follows: 

JOHN W.BRYANT, 

Fiduciary Trust Co., 

175 Federal Street, Boston, MA 

02110-2289 

Thank You! 




T) 








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Perkins School 
for the Blind 




Ml// /)& 



S 




Volume LV 
No. 2 
Spring, 1986 



Published three times a year in print and braille 
editions by 

Perkins School for the Blind 

Watertown, MA 021 72-9982 

Founded 1892 




An accredited member since 1947 of 

the New England Association of 

Schools and Colleges, Inc. 

An accredited member since 1970 of 

the National Accreditation Council for 

Agencies Serving the Blind and Visually 

Handicapped. 

"The Perkins School for the Blind 
admits students of any race, color, 
national and ethnic origin to all the 
rights, privileges, programs, and activi- 
ties generally accorded or made avail- 
able to students at the school. It does 
not discriminate on the basis of race, 
color, national or ethnic origin in the 
administration of its educational poli- 
cies, scholarship and loan programs, 
and athletic and other school- 
administered programs." 



The Perkins Programs 

ft 



Preschool Services 

Ages Birth-6 



Lower School 

Ages 6-13 



Secondary Services 
Ages 13-22 

Deaf-Blind 

Ages 5-22 

Severe Impaired 
Program 

Ages 10-22 

o^o Adult Services 
| ■ | Ages 18 and Older 

Outreach Services 
Other Services 



Projects with 
Industry Program 

Community Living 
Services 

Clinical Services 

(Diagnostic 
and Evaluative) 



Samuel P. Hayes 
Research Library 

Teacher Training 
Program 

New England 
Center for Deaf- 
Blind Services 



Regional Library for H owe Press 

the Blind & Physi- (Aids and Appliances) 
cally Handicapped 



A Message from 
the Director 



The era we live in provides us with 
opportunities to expand our roles 
as educators and it is our respon- 
sibility to foster the need for 
specialized vision services... 




0, 



ne hundred years ago this month 
I I Michael Anagnos, the second 
Director of Perkins School for the Blind, 
was in the process of initiating a new 
program for young blind children. His 
creation, the first Kindergarten Pro- 
gram for the blind in the United States, 
was based on the strong philosophical 
and educational commitment to early 
intervention for blind children. 

For over a century and a half, the 
staff at Perkins has been providing qual- 
ity education and clinical services to 
young blind, visually impaired, and 
multi-impaired students. 

Staff have constantly recognized 
the needs of these young students and 
they have developed and adapted curric- 
ulum and instructional techniques to 
meet the individual needs of each 
student. 



The Lower School Program at 
Perkins, which is highlighted in this 
issue of the Lantern, is a comprehen- 
sive, responsive, and quality program. 
The Program Staff are not only respon- 
sive to students' instructional and clini- 
cal needs, but they are strong advocates 
for students' and parents' rights. 

Early intervention and elementary 
school programs for blind, visually 
impaired, and multi-impaired students 
serve as the educational cornerstones 
which will ensure successful commu- 
nity integration in the future. Our com- 
mitment to the young students we serve 
and their parents also includes a recog- 
nition of their basic human and legal 
rights, as well as a commitment to 
accessible and available services. 

The era we live in provides us with 
opportunities to expand our roles as 
educators and it is our responsibility to 
foster the need for specialized vision ser- 
vices for young blind, visually impaired, 
deaf -blind, and multi-impaired students 
and their parents. These opportunities 
also mandate that we provide compre- 
hensive and accountable services which 
will ensure community based place- 
ments for our students in the future. 
The Lower School Staff recognize and 
accept these new responsibilities and 
through their efforts, the parents of our 
students can look more optimistically 
toward the future. 



1 1 has been nearly twelve years since 
I the Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
initiated its Special Education Act, 
named Chapter 766. This Legislation 
and the Federal Government's counter- 
part, Public Law 94-142, have had a 
significant and dramatic impact on Spe- 
cial Education, and in particular, ser- 
vices for blind, visually impaired, and 
multi-impaired students. 

During the past decade a consider- 
able number of program options have 
been developed to serve younger blind 
students. For many students and their 
parents the development of multiple 
program options has been a positive 
experience. The evolution of parents' 
legal rights, which are clearly defined 
within both National and State Legisla- 
tion, have offered parents a new and 
evolving role in the educational decision 
making process relating to placement 
options for their sons and daughters. 

Some parents have advocated that 
their blind or visually impaired child be 
placed full time or part time in a public 
school program while other parents 
have analyzed programmatic and diag- 
nostic evaluation material and have 
made a decision with their local educa- 



tion authorities to place their child in a 
day or residential program, such as the 
Lower School Program at Perkins. 

Parents' participation in educa- 
tional decisions and school placements 
are perhaps the most significant and 
important components of both National 
and State Legislation. The administra- 
tion and staff at Perkins recognize 
parental rights and we are commited to 
working with parents on a regular basis. 

The current population of the 
Lower School Program at Perkins is 
thirty four students. While this repre- 
sents a decline in the number of stu- 
dents from the 1970 's and while our 
Program has been changing to meet the 
needs of a more multi-impaired popula- 
tion, it is also clear that the quantity 
and quality of our education and clinical 
services and our participation with par- 
ents in the educational process, have 
increased dramatically over the past 
decade. 



The evolution of parents' legal 
rights have offered parents a new 
and evolving role in the educational 
decision making process relating 
to placement options for their sons 
and daughters. 



For children who have two, three, 
or more educationally significant 
impairments, the availability of a multi- 
ple service delivery program is para- 
mount. First and foremost it is the 
primary goal of the program to educate 
the entire child. Formal academic edu- 
cation is only one aspect of a person's 
life. It is important, to be sure, and we 
continue to achieve full accreditation 
from the New England Elementary and 



Secondary School Association, and the 
National Accreditation Council for the 
Blind. In addition to offering a compre- 
hensive curriculum of academic sub- 
jects, we feel that the emotional, social 
and self-help needs of each child is 
every bit as critical if each child is to 
reach his or her maximum potential. In 
this regard we are constantly striving to 
provide innovative and comprehensive 
programming. 




Parents' participation in educational 
decisions and school placements 
are perhaps the most significant 
and important components of both 
National and State Legislation. 



We are fortunate to have the ser- 
vices of a number of experts in the field 
of the education of the visually impaired 
and special education as part of the 
staff. The accumulated experience of 
our teachers and clinical staff is note- 
worthy. Yet, we are always aware that 
each child is unique and that if each 
child is to make progress we cannot be 
complacent with past accomplishments. 




Currently, our staff includes ten 
classroom teachers, eight special sub- 
ject teachers, sixteen houseparents and 
teacher aides, and a number of Clinical 
Services personnel who work entirely 
with Lower School students and their 
parents. Our Clinical Staff consists of 
two psychologists, a social worker, two 
physical therapists, an occupational 
therapist, educational consultant, two 
speech therapists, and the availability 
of additional consultants in the areas of 
audiology, low vision and general medi- 
cal. In addition, within each of the two 
residences for our students, there are a 
number of residence personnel, cooks, 
and domestic service workers who pro- 
vide both direct and indirect services to 
our students and staff. 

Altogether, the staff to student 
ratio that is currently provided in the 
Lower School is very attractive and the 
ratio supports the additional hand-over- 
hand and one-to-one instruction that is 
required if a visually impaired, multi- 
impaired child is to understand his or 
her environment. There are also a num- 
ber of special offerings within the pro- 
gram which have proved to be very 



Our curricula is reality oriented and 
we recognize our responsibility to 
provide services that will have 
direct relevance to students and 
their parents. 




valuable to all of our students. Music 
therapy classes have enabled our stu- 
dents with musical strengths and inter- 
ests to develop many other skills such 
as increased language, movement, lis- 
tening, following directions, reinforcing 
basic concepts and socialization. Sen- 
sory Motor Integration has proved to 
be very successful in increasing each 
student's motor development while 
decreasing mannerisms. Independent 
travel skills and community experience 
classes help each student become more 
independent and comfortable in the 



community. In addition, classes in daily 
living skills provide individual instruc- 
tion for each child in a variety of self- 
help skills, utilizing techniques that 
have been developed for the blind and 
visually impaired. 

Adaptive physical education, 
swimming, arts and crafts, piano, typ- 
ing, computer education, pre-vocational 
education and cooking classes are regu- 
larly provided as part of the curriculum. 
Special off-campus horseback riding 
classes have been made available in 
recent years, as have Scouting and a 
wide variety of field trips and cultural 
opportunities. 

We continue to analyze and 
explore innovative techniques that will 
allow each of our students to progress 
at his or her own rate of learning within 
a positive and supportive system of 
instruction. Our curricula is reality ori- 
ented and we recognize our responsibil- 
ity to provide services that will have 
direct relevance to students and their 
parents. 

Lawrence J. Melander 
Supervisor— Lower School Program 



7 



A t Programs 



and Services 



Preschool Services 
Lower School 
Secondary Services 

Deaf-Blind 

Program for the Severely Impaired 

Adult Services 



Secondary Services has expanded 
its computer program, adding a number 
of Apple computers and printers. Large 
print screens make many of these com- 
puters more accessible to students, 
allowing them to gain skills such as 
word processing and printing. 

The Deaf -Blind Program has 

received a new three-year grant to con- 
tinue their federally funded efforts in 
Total Life Planning. Grant concerns 
include state services to deaf -blind stu- 
dents as they become adults, and the 
development and implementation of a 
daily living skills program. The Deaf- 
Blind Program has also developed a 
new unit serving ten children, ages 5-7, 
with an early developmental program 
emphasis. 

The Severe Impaired Program has 

expanded its residential programming 
with input from our occupational and 
physical therapists, adaptive physical 
education teacher, speech pathologist 
and educational consultant. Staff have 
developed structured programming in 
many new areas including housekeep- 
ing tasks, active play, movement and 
language activities, and relaxation. Our 
full range of services also include fine 
and gross motor activities, music ther- 
apy, community awareness, and an 
excellent swimming program. 



Adult Services continues to seek a 
wider variety of vocational options for 
clients in both the Multi-Impaired Blind 
Unit and the Head Injury Unit. The use 
of computers in being explored as a 
means of enhancing the clients rehabili- 
tation programs. Community Living 
Services has opened the Beechwood 
residence, an off -campus community 
residence for six visually impaired 
adults. Currently all of the residents are 
recent graduates of Perkins Secondary 
Services Program. 

Community Outreach continues its 
Teen Weekend program with monthly 
offerings throughout the spring of 1986. 
Serving students from 12 to 20 years of 
age and older, teen weekends combine 
seminars exploring various career and 
social issues with structured recreation 
and social activities. 

The Clinical Services staff continues 
to expand its delivery of therapeutic 
services, leading to the implementation 
of a program-based system of clinical 
accountability. One staff member in 
each program has been designated as 
the clinical coordinator and functions as 
a liaison between the Director of Clini- 
cal Services and the program staff, 
ensuring effective communication and 
support. 



Outreach Services 
Clinical Services 
Regional Library for 
the Blind & Physically 
Handicapped 
Samuel P. Hayes 
Research Library 



Teacher Training Program 

New England Center 

for the Deaf-Blind Services 

Howe Press 

Community Living Services 

Projects with Industry Program 



To All Former Perkins Teacher 
Trainees: Please feel free to write to 
us about your work and your current 
position. We are developing a newslet- 
ter about our former trainees and we 
will gladly send you a copy of the news- 
letter during the summer of 1986. 
Please be sure to mention the year you 
were a trainee at Perkins. 

Recently, Perkins began an on campus 
low vision service in affiliation with the 
New England College of Optometry. 
The Low Vision Clinic currently 
serves students and clients who are 
enrolled at the school and is staffed by 
Perkins personnel and optometrists 
who are faculty members at the Col- 
lege. The service, which is open two 
days a week, supplements the ophtha- 
mological services provided, with 
assessments and training in visual func- 
tioning levels, visual acuities, field 
assessment, prescriptions for glasses 
and/or contact lenses, low vision aids, 
and special sunwear. 

Perkins honored twenty-two school and 
twelve Howe Press employees who have 
given a decade or more of dedicated 
service at its Sixth Annual Service 
Award Ceremony in March. 
Honored were Albert Czub, 55 years; 
A. Claude Ellis, 35 years; Leon J. 



Murphy, Elaine M. Tulis, William J. 
Webber, 25 years; Charles R. Carley, 
Bridget D Alanno, Peter Fusco, Nancy 
J. Hannah, Carolyn L. Hodgen, Paula 
Huffman, Dorothy M. Jackman, 
Kenneth A. Stuckey, 20 years; John 
Boudreault, Eugene Curtis, George 
Goodwin, Dennis A. Lolli, Dennis J. 
Levesque, Costa C. Santoro, Emery 
Stephens, 15 years; Katerina A. Fraser, 
John T. Gleason, William M. Graham, 
Beatrice A. Guiggey, Nora Kilraine, 
Robert Leonard, Eloise Lyman, Paul 
A. Mason, Anna Peeling, Anna Roselli, 
Robert A. Rowley, James A. Servello, 
Thomas Trapasso, Carmelo 
Vincent-Laboy, 10 years. 

Congress has passed two resolutions 
signed by President Reagan which have 
established the last week in June as 
"Helen Keller Deaf-Blind Aware- 
ness Week." Celebrated this year 
from June 22 to June 28, this week is 
particularly symbolic because June 
27th marks the birthday of the most 
respected and renowned deaf -blind 
American, Helen Keller. As a student, 
Helen Keller attended the Perkins 
School from 1888 to 1892. 



Liz Walker 

visits 

Perkins Campus 




Liz Walker, of WBZ-TV, Channel 4, 
visited Perkins School in December. 



Former Perkins Corporation 
President Dies 

Dr. Augustus Thorndike of Chest- 
nut Hill, Massachusetts, died on Janu- 
ary 29, 1986 at the age of 89. 

From 1954-1971, Dr. Thorndike 
was President of the Perkins Corpora- 
tion and his association with Perkins as 
a trustee extended over 33 years. 

For 31 years, Dr. Thorndike was 
Chief of Surgery of Harvard University 
Health Services and was best known 
for his work with athletes. He wrote the 



Here she is shown talking with John 
Cunniff , a student in our Deaf-Blind 
Program. 



first book on athletic injuries which has 
been widely used by trainers and doc- 
tors ever since. 

Dr. Thorndike leaves three sons, 
Augustus Jr., John L., and W. Nicholas 
Thorndike; a daughter, Sarah E. 
Haydock; 13 grandchildren; and 10 
great grandchildren. 



10 



The Perkins 
Endowment 



.-■:-:-vv.^fcv." 






:':' 



The Perkins Program as it has 
developed and been maintained for 
more than one hundred and fifty years 
has relied upon a growing endowment 
at every step along the way. 

Endowments which are adequate 
to put a program into effect are rarely 
sufficient to keep it going. As with 
every private school and college that is 
keeping abreast-or ahead-of the times, 
Perkins needs to see its endowment 
grow. Through bequests and donations, 
and through a few government grants, 
we have been able to expand existing 
services and add new ones as needed. 
We are confident that our friends will 
continue to support us in ever increasing 
amounts. 

Form of Bequest 

I hereby give, devise and bequeath 
to the Perkins School for the Blind, a 
corporation duly organized and existing 
under the laws of the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts, the sum of dol- 
lars ($ ), the same to be applied 

to the general uses and purposes of said 
corporation under the direction of its 
Board of Trustees; and I do hereby 
direct that the receipt of the Treasurer 
for the time being of said corporation 
shall be a sufficient discharge to my 
executors for the same. 



Form of Devise of Real Estate 

I give, devise and bequeath to the 
Perkins School for the Blind, a corpora- 
tion duly organized and existing under 
the laws of the Commonwealth of Mas- 
sachusetts, that certain tract of real 
estate bounded and described as follows: 

(Here describe the real estate 
accurately) 

with full power to sell, mortgage and 
convey the same free of all trust. 

NOTICE 

The address of the Treasurer of the 
Corporation is as follows: 
JOHN W.BRYANT 
Fiduciary Trust Co. 
175 Federal Street 
Boston, MA 02110-2289 

Thank you! 



11 



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Perkins School 
for the Blind 




Anne Sullivan: Perkins Graduate 1886 




Volume LVI 
No.1 
Fall 1986 

Published twice a year in print and braille 
editions by 

Perkins School for the Blind 

Watertown, MA 02172-9982 
(617)924-3434 

Founded 1829 




An accredited member since 1947 of 

the New England Association of 

Schools and Colleges, Inc. 

An accredited member since 1970 of 

the National Accreditation Council for 

Agencies Serving the Blind and Visually 

Handicapped. 

"The Perkins School for the Blind 
admits students of any race, color, 
national and ethnic origin to all the 
rights, privileges, programs, and activi- 
ties generally accorded or made avail- 
able to students at the school. It does 
not discriminate on the basis of race, 
color, national or ethnic origin in the 
administration of its educational poli- 
cies, scholarship and loan programs, 
and athletic and other school- 
administered programs." 



The Perkins Programs 



ft 






Preschool Services 

Ages Birth-6 

Lower School 

Ages 6-13 

Secondary Services 

Ages 13-22 

Deaf-Blind 

Ages 5-22 

Severe Impaired 
Program 

Ages 10-22 

Adult Services 

Ages 18 and Older 



Outreach Services 
Other Services 



Projects with 
Industry Program 

Community Living 
Services 

Clinical Services 

(Diagnostic 
and Evaluative) 



Samuel P. Hayes 
Research Library 

Teacher Training 
Program 

New England 
Center for Deaf- 
Blind Services 



Regional Library for Howe Press 

the Blind & Physi- (Aids an d Appliances) 

cally Handicapped 



A Message from 
the Director 




a 



ne hundred years ago, Anne Sullivan 
I graduated from Perkins School for 
the Blind as valedictorian of the Class of 
1886. It was shortly after her graduation 
that Michael Anagnos, the second Direc- 
tor of Perkins, sent Anne to Tescumbia, 
Alabama to work with a young deaf-blind 
child whose name was Helen Keller. 

Anne Sullivan and Helen Keller's 
contributions to the field of blindness 
and deaf-blindness are well-known 
around the world and they have had a 
dramatic impact on programs and ser- 
vices on every continent. Perhaps their 
most significant contribution was the 
changing of the general public's attitude 
and awareness of handicapped people. 
Recognition of the potential of handi- 
capped people has developed over time 



and we owe a great deal of gratitude to 
both Anne Sullivan and Helen Keller 
for their contributions. 

Today, one hundred years later, 
the staff at Perkins continues to edu- 
cate, counsel, and enjoy working with 
our young deaf-blind students. Teachers, 
clinical staff, houseparents and program 
aides provide daily training, consistent 
teaching, and a constant sense of secu- 
rity and understanding for our students. 
The training our young deaf-blind stu- 
dents receive today will help prepare 
them for full integration into community 
based services in the future. 

We look forward to the school year 
1986-87, and we remain committed to 
the education of the deaf-blind, realizing 
their special and unique needs and recog- 
nizing their special talents and abilities. 

Our one-hundred year commit- 
ment to young deaf-blind children will 
be enhanced during the next few years 
as we undertake a major Capital Cam- 
paign to raise funds to restore, reno- 
vate and adapt their classroom and 
cottage facilities. 




Kevin J. Lessard 
Director 



I n October of 1880, Anne Sullivan 
■ arrived at Perkins School for the Blind 
unable to spell her name. Six years later 
she graduated as valedictorian of her 
class. Anne then began a career which 
would reveal her as a dedicated and 
undaunted teacher and pioneer in the 
field of deaf-blind education. 

She came to Perkins with virtually 
no educational background. The poverty- 
stricken daughter of immigrant farmers, 
her previous home was a state infirmary 
in Tewksbury, Massachusetts where she 
was sent upon the death of her mother 
and disappearance of her father. She 
lived with the mentally ill and aged, but 
she had a dream. She dreamt of learning 
to read, she was determined to be edu- 
cated. This determination took her to 
Perkins School for the Blind, located in 
South Boston at the time. Anne had bat- 
tled trachoma since the age of three, an 
eye disease which left her vision con- 
stantly clouded and eventually led to 
blindness in her later years. A series 
of delicate operations did help her 
although reading was still difficult and 
often quite painful. 

During her schooling at Perkins, 
Anne met Laura Bridgman, the deaf- 
blind child educated by Dr. Samuel 
Gridley Howe, the school's first Direc- 



tor. Longing to converse with her, Anne 
learned the manual alphabet, the foun- 
dation for her future work with the 
deaf-blind. 

About the time of Anne's grad- 
uation from Perkins School, a family in 
Alabama was searching for help. Their 
six-year-old child had lost her sight and 
hearing in early childhood and they were 
questioning any hope for her future. A 
reference to Perkins School in Charles 
Dickens' "American Notes" and a pas- 
sage on the education of Laura Bridgman 




Helen Keller (left) and teacher Anne Sullivan 



"We receive impressions and arrive at 
conclusions without any effort on our part; 
but we also have the power of controlling 
our lives. 



by Dr. Howe, the school's director, fos- 
tered some hope. The Kellers were 
referred through many specialists to 
scientist Alexander Graham Bell. Dr. 
Bell suggested they contact Michael 
Anagnos, director of Perkins School 
at the time. 

Anne had, by this time, graduated 
as valedictorian of the Class of 1886. She 
graduated from the respected school, 
but there were few opportunities for a 
partially sighted woman with only six 
years of high school education. 

Michael Anagnos received a let- 
ter from Captain Arthur H. Keller of 
Tescumbia, Alabama requesting help for 
his deaf-blind daughter. Knowing Anne's 
determination and strong will, Anagnos 
suggested that she consider working 
with the Keller family. 

This challenge appeared to be 
almost overwhelming, but Anne derived 
inspiration from Dr. Howe and his world 
reknown work with Laura Bridgman, 
Howe's first deaf-blind student. Anne 
decided to travel to Alabama to begin 
her work with Helen Keller. 

Anne's first challenge was to com- 
municate with Helen and to teach her 
an appropriate form of communication; 
a language. She began with the manual 
alphabet she had learned at Perkins, 



spelling words into Helen's hand. This 
initiated Anne's lifetime work with Helen 
which would herald her as one of the 
most respected teachers in the field of 
deaf-blind education; a field pioneered 
by Dr. Howe, enhanced by Anne Sullivan 
and continued today at the Perkins 
School, some 150 years later. 

The Deaf-Blind Program at Perkins 
School provides education for deaf-blind 
individuals, emphasizing communication 
and language development of all forms. 
Instruction is developmental and individ- 
ualized, stressing the total social devel- 
opment of each child. Due to the greater 
incidence of multi-impairments in Perkins 
students, emphasis is also placed on daily 
living skills such as dressing, eating, and 
bathing. Younger students, ages five to 
thirteen, receive instruction in a class- 
room setting, where the focus is on early 
elementary education, with emphasis on 
daily living and social skills. Classroom 
instruction is reinforced in the residential 
component of the program, the cottages 
where students and staff live. 

The Deaf-Blind Program strives 
to help each child realize his or her full 
potential, allowing the student to become 
more active, independent and expres- 
sive. This allows each student to best 
interact with, communicate about, and 



We can educate ourselves; we can, 
by thought and perserverance, 
develop all the powers and capacities 
entrusted to us, and build for ourselves 
true and noble characters. 



react to the environment. Anne Sullivan 
suceeded in fulfilling these goals with 
Helen Keller, helping her to "develop 
all the powers and capacities entrusted" 
to her; leading Helen from her isolated 
world as a deaf-blind child, to almost 
total integration with her environment 
as an adult. 

Heather Smith is a six-year-old 
child presently enrolled in the Deaf-Blind 
Program at Perkins. She came to Perkins 
in September of 1985 with very little for- 
mal communication or language abilities 
and minimal attempts to communicate. 
Heather was somewhat isolated in her 
environment, with profound hearing loss 
and only partial vision. She exhibited lit- 
tle effort to cooperate in both teaching 
and daily living situations, often result- 
ing in tantrums. Her daily living skills 
were minimal, requiring frequent assis- 
tance in the basics of dressing, bathing 
and eating. 

The last twelve months have seen 
great improvement in Heather s ability 
to communicate and interact with her 
environment. Through individualized 
instruction, much like that Anne Sullivan 
used with the young Helen Keller, 
Heather has learned and actively uses 
more than forty signs. She can combine 
these signs into two word phrases to 



communicate her needs, indicating the 
intial stages of language acquisition and 
communication ability. Heather's ability 
to communicate and interact with her 
environment has reduced her isolation. 
She is more cooperative and exhibits a 
longer attention span in both teaching 
and residential environments. These 
communication and behavior advance- 
ments are the foundation for future 
life skills, language and academic 
development. 




Heather Smith (left) and her teacher Cynthia Maker 




All the wondrous physical, intellectual 
and moral endowments with which 
man is blessed will, by inevitable law, 
become useless unless he uses and 
improves them" 

Anne Sullivan, Valedictorian 
Class of 1886 



Language and life skills, an inte- 
gral part of each student's instruction, 
are reinforced in the residential compo- 
nent of the Deaf-Blind Program. Heather 
lives in Glover Cottage in our Lower 
School complex. Lower School houses 
students ages six to thirteen in four cot- 
tages from both the Lower School and 
Deaf-Blind Programs. The social interac- 
tion of these students is very important 
developmentally. 

Integration of our blind, deaf-blind, 
visually and multi-impaired students in 
the six to thirteen age range calls for a 
variety of environmental adaptations of 
the Lower School, an area which has 



been targeted for major restoration, ren- 
ovation and adaptation. As the student 
population at Perkins has changed, so 
must the physical surroundings; chang- 
ing and upgrading for the most efficient 
use of the available facilities. Constant 
improvements in programs and facilities 
allow for development of the most bene- 
ficial educational environment for Perkins 
staff and students, enhancing the learn- 
ing experience. It is only through im- 
provements and the ability to change that 
we can expand and improve our environ- 
ment and resulting learning experience. 

Susan C. Bower 
Michael Collins 




li» 

Programs 



and Services 



Preschool Services 

Lower School 

Deaf-Blind 

Severe Impaired Program 

Adult Services 




Sy Kraut, (left), Vice President and General 
Manager of Honeywell's Customer Services Divi- 
sion, accepts a raised print and braille plaque from 



lerkins School honored Honeywell's 
I Customer Services Division for its 
contributions to the Perkins Project 
With Industry Program at a luncheon 
held in late May. Sy Kraut, Vice Pres- 
ident and General Manager of the 
Honeywell division, accepted the award 
from C. Richard Carlson, President of 
Perkins' Board of Trustees. Honeywell's 



C. Richard Carlson, President of Perkins Board of 
Trustees in recognition of Honeywell's support of the 
Perkins Project with Industry Program. 



efforts for the project include contribut- 
ing the design and production costs of 
the Perkins Project with Industry bro- 
chure, the hiring of three blind employ- 
ees and networking assistance. Charter 
members of the Perkins project are 
Wang Laboratories, Inc. , New England 
Telephone Company, and AT&T 
Communications. 



Outreach Services 

Clinical Services 

Regional Library for 
the Blind & Physically 
Handicapped 

Samuel P. Hayes 
Research Library 



Teacher Training Program 

New England Center 
for Deaf-Blind Services 

Howe Press 

Community Living Services 

Projects with Industry Program 



During the month of June, Howe Press 
reached a goal that surpassed all original 
production expectations for the Perkins 
Brailler. On June 26, 1986 at 12:53 p.m., 
brailler number 175,000 was completed, 
far exceeding the initial projected de- 
mand of three thousand braillers. The 
original Perkins Brailler was designed 
by David Abraham at Howe Press 
in 1951, with production beginning 
that same year. Composed of some 311 
parts, the Perkins Brailler is produced at 
Howe Press, and distributed world-wide. 

Alumni Calendar 1986-87 

November 3: Corporation Day 

Director's Memorial 
Exercises 11:30 AM 

December 14: Christmas 

Concert 3:00 PM 

December 18: Christmas 

Concert 7:30 PM 

May 2: Alumni Baseball Game 1: 00 PM 

June 12: Graduation Exercises 11:00 AM 

June 12-14: Alumni Weekend 

Thirty-one senior class members from 
Secondary Services and the Deaf- 
Blind Department graduated during 
1986 commencement exercises held in 
Dwight Hall on Friday, June 13, 1986. 
The commencement address was deliv- 



ered by William E Gallagher, Executive 
Director of The American Foundation for 
the Blind in New York, and a graduate 
of Perkins. 

Graduated were: Tina Lynn Bailey, 
China, ME; Elizabeth Boneski, Wood- 
bury, CT; Frank Carpenito, Salem, NH; 
John Cecchini, Oakdale, CT; Kent 
Corliss, Rutland, VT; John Brian 
Cunniff, Maiden, MA; Anthony M. Days, 
Provincetown, MA; Maria DiGiacomo, 
Granby, MA; Louis Edward Duson, 
Beloit, WI; Judith Ann Eagan, St. James, 
NY; Denise Emerson, Peabody, MA; 
Anne Marie Foster, Waltham, MA; 
Juanita Herrera, Dorchester, MA; Irene 
LaFleur, New Bedford, MA; Jaimi Lynn 
Lard, Manchester, MA; Robert H. 
Look, Cumberland Foreside, ME; 
Edward Matos, Somerville, MA; Tad 
Montgomery Pike, Mansfield, MA; John 
Andrew Puglisi, Newington, CT; James 
Reynolds, Winthrop, MA; Kristen Ripke, 
Shelton, CT; Henry Rodriguez Rivera, 
North Providence, RI; Steven Paul 
Roberts, Lowell, MA; Timothy Rooney, 
Waltham, MA; Diane St. Pierre, Lewis- 
ton, ME; Brian Thomas Scanlon, War- 
ren, RI; Margaret Sheehan, Mumford, 
NY; Cassandra Joy Thomas, Altoona, 
PA; Mark D. Torvinen, Forrestville, 
CT; Peter Tremblay, Danvers, MA; and 
Bruce Westfall, Cape Elizabeth, ME. 



Teacher Trainees 
Graduate 
May 7, 1986 




Front row, L-R: Elizabeth Sparks, Assistant 
Coordinator, Teacher Training Program; Kanak 
Lai, India; Paula Charnesky, Michigan; Patricia 
Lee, New Jersey; Wondwossen Tekle, Ethiopia; 
Chang Hyun Shin, Korea. 



T 



he Teacher Training Diploma Cer- 
■ emony was held on May 7, 1986 in 
Allen Chapel on the school's campus. 
Director Kevin J. Lessard awarded the 
diplomas, assisted by Elizabeth Sparks 
and Cafer Barkus, Assistant Coordina- 
tors of the Teacher Training Program. 
Nine trainees were graduated as teach- 
ers of the visually handicapped, deaf- 
blind, and peripatology and rehabilitation. 
The Teacher Trainee Program was 
initiated in 1920 and is presently affiliated 



Back row, L-R: K. Mariyappan, India; Cynthia 
Cook, Michigan; Cafer Barkus, Assistant Coordi- 
nator, Teacher Training Program; Zareen Battiwala, 
India; Kevin J. Lessard, Director, Perkins School. 



with the Special Education Department 
of Boston College. The program at 
Perkins offers a residential environ- 
ment for practical experience with blind, 
deaf-blind, visually impaired, and multi- 
impaired populations in conjunction with 
graduate level coursework at Boston 
College. Trainees live in the cottages 
with students and staff, participating in 
many recreational and daily living activi- 
ties, allowing for day-to-day interaction 
with special needs students on all levels. 



10 



The Perkins 
Endowment 



The Perkins Program as it has 
developed and been maintained for 
more than one hundred and fifty years 
has relied upon a growing endowment 
at every step along the way. 

Endowments which are adequate 
to put a program into effect are rarely 
sufficient to keep it going. As with 
every private school and college that is 
keeping abreast-or ahead-of the times, 
Perkins needs to see its endowment 
grow. Through bequests and donations, 
and through a few government grants, 
we have been able to expand existing 
services and add new ones as needed. 
We are confident that our friends will 
continue to support us in ever increasing 
amounts. 

Form of Bequest 

I hereby give, devise and bequeath 
to the Perkins School for the Blind, a 
corporation duly organized and existing 
under the laws of the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts, the sum of dol- 
lars ($ ), the same to be applied 

to the general uses and purposes of said 
corporation under the direction of its 
Board of Trustees; and I do hereby 
direct that the receipt of the Treasurer 
for the time being of said corporation 
shall be a sufficient discharge to my 
executors for the same. 



Form of Devise of Real Estate 

I give, devise and bequeath to the 
Perkins School for the Blind, a corpora- 
tion duly organized and existing under 
the laws of the Commonwealth of Mas- 
sachusetts, that certain tract of real 
estate bounded and described as follows: 

(Here describe the real estate 
accurately) 

with full power to sell, mortgage and 
convey the same free of all trust. 

NOTICE 

The address of the Treasurer of the 

Corporation is as follows: 

JOHN W.BRYANT 

Fiduciary Trust Co. , 

Box 1647 

Boston, MA 02105-1647 



Thank you! 



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Volume LVI 
Number 2 
Spring 1987 

Published twice a year in print and 
braille editions by 

Perkins School for the Blind 

1 75 North Beacon Street 
Watertown, MA 02172-9982 
(617)924-3434 

Founded 1829 



*iy 



An accredited member since 1947 of 

the New England Association of 

Schools and Colleges, Inc. 

An accredited member since 1970 of 

the National Accreditation Council for 

Agencies Serving the Blind and Visually 

Handicapped. 

"The Perkins School for the Blind 
admits students of any race, color, 
national and ethnic origin to all the 
rights, privileges, programs, and activi- 
ties generally accorded or made avail- 
able to students at the school. It does 
not discriminate on the basis of race, 
color, national or ethnic origin in the 
administration of its educational poli- 
cies, scholarship and loan programs, 
and athletic and other school- 
administered programs." 



Front Cover: 

The Howe Building 



The Perkins Programs 



ft 



I ■ I 



Preschool Services 

Ages Birth-6 

Lower School 

Ages 6-13 

Secondary Services 

Ages 13-22 

Deaf-Blind 

Ages 5-22 

Severe Impaired 
Program 

Ages 10-22 

Adult Services 
Ages 18 and Older 



m 



Other Services 

Outreach 
Services 

Projects with 
Industry Program 

Community Living 
Services 

Clinical Services 

(Diagnostic 
and Evaluative) 

Regional Library 
for the Blind 
and Handicapped 



Samuel P. Hayes 
Research Library 

Teacher Training 
Program 

New England 
Center for Deaf- 
Blind Services 

Howe Press 

(Aids and Appliances) 



A Message from the Director 




D 



uring the school year 1986- 
1987, the staff at Perkins has 
continued to provide quality and 
comprehensive services to a 
large number of blind, deaf- 
blind, multi-impaired and vis- 
ually impaired students and 
clients. As the on-campus popu- 
lation of the school has stabil- 
ized over the past few years, we 
have also seen a large increase 
in the number of students and 
clients that we serve on a com- 
munity and outreach basis. 

In this issue of the Lantern, 
we have outlined for our readers 
the scope of our on- and off- 
campus services which have 



developed and evolved during 
the past two or three years. This 
expansion of Programs and Ser- 
vices at Perkins has been in 
direct response to identified 
needs within the community as 
expressed by parents, profession- 
als within the field, funding 
agencies, and consumers. 

The Trustees at Perkins 
have been supportive of our out- 
reach efforts and their commit- 
ment to program expansion has 
been a comprehensive and 
dynamic response to the needs 
of handicapped individuals in 
the 1980s. The Board's respon- 
siveness to program develop- 
ment has helped to establish a 
network of services that will 
serve the School throughout the 
next few decades. 

The following represents the 
range of programs and services 
presently available both on cam- 
pus and in various communities. 

On campus programs and 
services are provided to stu- 
dents and clients through our 
ten, eleven, and twelve month 
programs. We serve a total on- 
campus population of 201 stu- 
dents and clients in both resi- 
dential and day programs. This 
population is comprised of the 



enrollment of our six programs, 
as detailed below. 

Program Enrollment 

Pre-School Program 5 

Lower School Program 30 

Secondary Services 65 

Severe Impaired Program 13 

Deaf-Blind Program 65 

Adult Services 23 

Total On-Campus Program.... 201 

This on-campus population 
is only part of the total number 
of students, clients, families and 
consumers served by Perkins 
School for the Blind. Many more 
individuals are served by our off- 
campus services, services that 
extend from Watertown to New 
England and around the world. 
Let me take this opportunity to 
briefly detail the scope of some 
of these services. 

Infant Toddler Program : 
Serves 35 infants, toddlers and 
their families. This early inter- 
vention program entails both 
home- and school-based pro- 
gramming, along with extensive 
consultation and outreach 
services. 

Outreach Services Program : 
Conducts weekend activities for 
blind students who are enrolled 
full-time in public school pro- 



4 



grams. Approximately 40 stu- 
dents will be involved in the 
sixteen weekends planned for 
this school year. 

Diagnostic Evaluation 
Services : Evaluates students or 
clients who are seeking admis- 
sion to Perkins School or who 
are in need of an up-dated eval- 
uation. These two or three day 
evaluations take place on our 
campus with the direct involve- 
ment of supervisory, teaching 
and clinical staff. 

The Federally-funded New 
England Regional Center for 
Deaf-Blind Services : Provides 
consultation and direct services 
to deaf-blind students and their 
families throughout New Eng- 
land. The center will serve ap- 
proximately 230 students this 
year. 

Regional Library for the 
Blind and Handicapped : Pro- 
vides talking books and Braille 
materials to over 12,000 
patrons. 

Outreach Services for 
Professionals : Provides in-ser- 
vice training for itinerant teach- 
ers and other professionals in 
New England. Two workshops 
are planned for this school year, 
with an expected attendance of 
over 80 professionals. 




Teacher Training Program : 
Affiliated with the Special Edu- 
cation Department at Boston 
College; presently has an enroll- 
ment of 8 students. This program 
has been in operation since 1920 
and over 1500 professionals 
from all over the world have 
trained at Perkins through 
the program. 

Parent and Family Services : 
Provides consultation, counsel- 
ling, and small group in-service 
training to over 400 parents and 
families both at Perkins and on 
an outreach basis. 

Howe Press : Provides servi- 
ces, products and appliances to 
over 7,000 blind individuals 
each year. Services include the 
sale and repair of the Perkins 



Brailler and other products, as 
well as customer assistance and 
technical advice. Since 1951, 
Howe Press has sold over 
175,000 Perkins Braillers world- 
wide. 

The Projects with Industry 
Program : Works to identify and 
adapt job opportunities for the 
blind and visually handicapped 
with many different businesses 
and industries. Evaluation, on- 
the-job training and instruction, 
as well as follow-up services, are 
provided to an average of 25 
clients each year. 

This brief description of our 
programs and services highlights 
the full scope of options avail- 
able, both on and off campus. 
More detailed information on 
these services is available upon 
request. 

The Trustees, adminis- 
tration, and staff at Perkins 
remain committed to program 
development and the provision 
of quality services to a wide- 
chronological and wide-func- 
tioning range of students, cli- 
ents, and consumers. 






Kevin J. Lessard 
Director 



^^^^■^^^■■■■■■HSBH 



U.S. Postal Service Honors 
Julia Ward Howe 



!l ebruary 12, 1987 marked 
the issuance of a stamp 
honoring a friend of Perkins 
School for the Blind; a great 
poet, abolitionist, and social 
reformer. February 12 was the 
first day of issue of the United 
States Postal Services' Julia 
Ward Howe stamp. The Post 
Office chose Perkins School for 
the Blind as the location for the 
official first day of issue cere- 
mony because of Mrs. Howe's 
close association with the 
school. This association began 
with her thirty year marriage to 
Dr. Samuel Gridley Howe, the 




Julia Ward Howe 



first director of Perkins School 
for the Blind, and continued 
when Michael Anagnos, her son- 
in-law, succeeded Dr. Howe up- 
on his death in 1876. Anagnos 
then became Perkins' second 
director, and served the school 
for 30 years. 

Miss Ward met Dr. Howe in 
the summer of 1841, during a 
visit to Perkins School with 
friends Henry Wadsworth 
Longfellow and Charles Sumner. 
In 1843, Miss Ward and Dr. 
Howe were married. An ardent 
social reformer, Dr. Howe 
sparked his wife's interest in, 
and support of, his efforts 
toward the abolition of slavery 
and advances in the field of 
special education. Dr. Howe is 
most noted for his educational 
achievements with Laura Bridg- 
man, the first deaf-blind student 
at Perkins School; and his direc- 
torship at Perkins, the first 
school for the blind in the Uni- 
ted States. 



The Howe Stamp was designed by artist 
Ward Brackett. The pencil drawn design 
was based on a photo of Julia Ward Howe 
circa 1860. 



m 




Perkins School for the Blind's Upper School 
Chorus performs The Battle Hymn of The 
Republic, written by Julia Ward Howe. 



Julia Ward Howe is most 
noted for her role as author of 
The Battle Hymn of the Repub- 
lic. The ceremonial anthem 
began as a poem written from 
the inspiration of seeing Union 
troops in battle and the soldiers 
rendition of the old plantation 
song "John Brown's Body". 
Howe's friends urged her to pen 
"some good words for that stir- 
ring tune." The result was The 
Battle Hymn of the Republic, 
published by Atlantic Monthly 
in February of 1862. To this day, 
the stirring anthem is sung at 
most major functions of Perkins 
School by the school chorus. 



Mrs. Howe, a mother of six, is 
also credited for proposing 
Mothers Day, a national day 
honoring mothers, and dedi- 
cated to world peace. 

Julia Ward Howe's accom- 
plishments and her dedication 
to the ideal of freedom for all 
was formally recognized by the 
United States government by 
the issuance of a stamp in her 
honor. The U.S. Postal Services 
Julia Ward Howe stamp is the 
36th stamp in the Great Amer- 
ican series, the first to be issued 
in 1987. 

"Our Great American Series 
of stamps," said Northeast Re- 
gional Postmaster General John 
G. Mulligan, "has honored indiv- 
iduals who have made signifi- 
cant contributions to this great 
nation's heritage and culture... 
Through stamps, Americans 
have been encouraged to learn 
more about the important 
accomplishments of these indiv- 
iduals, which have not always 
been displayed in the center of 
the limelight... the issuance of 
the Julia Ward Howe Stamp 
will shed additional light on her 
many accomplishments." 



1887-1987 

100th Anniversary of the 
First Kindergarten for the Blind 



O 



nMay2, 1887, a school, 
1 created through the dedi- 
cation and inspiration of Michael 
Anagnos, second director of 
Perkins School for the Blind, 
opened its doors. It was the first 
kindergarten for the blind in the 
world. 

This innovative school was 



made possible by the generosity 
of many individuals and organi- 
zations whose continued support 
allowed the school to expand to 
meet the population demand. 
The original group of 10 children 
quickly grew to 1 7 by the end of 
the first year and to 70 by the 
year 1895. Blind children, ages 




five to nine, from all over New 
England were eligible for admis- 
sion. The numbers grew to a 
point that, upon the 1912 unifi- 
cation and relocation of Perkins 
School and the kindergarten, 
the kindergarten comprised 
about one third of the school's 
total population. 

An 1895 article in the New 
England Magazine gave credit to 
the school staff of "earthly 
saints" who watched over and 
guided the growth of the chil- 
dren. In this same article Dinah 
Sturgis wrote: "Helen Keller, 
whose name and fame are now 
world-wide, is the oldest of the 
children who must be counted 
the chief glory of the teaching 
being perfected at the Kinder- 
garten for the Blind." Helen, 
along with three other deaf- 
blind children, began their for- 
mal education in the kinder- 
garten. 

The goal of the Kinder- 
garten and the Primary and 
Intermediate Program has 
always been to educate the total 
child by providing tangible 
experiences in life, tied closely 
with emotional and social 
growth. In 1895 Mr. Anagnos 
said, "What has been accom- 




Lower School class, 1987 

plished at the Kindergarten is 
but a small part of what remains 
to be achieved." In the ensuing 
decades much was achieved, and 
Michael Anagnos' dream for 
young blind children has in large 
measure been realized. As we 
begin our second hundred years, 
more remains to be accom- 
plished, and we are committed 
to continuing the dedicated 
work of those who have pre- 
ceded us. 

Lawrence J. Melander, 
Supervisor-Primary and 
Intermediate Program 



Regional Library for the Blind 
and Handicapped 



erkins School for the Blind 
houses a large collection of 
recorded and braille books, a 
collection valued at over 1.8 
million dollars and cataloged by 
the Library of Congress. It is 
known as the Regional Library 
for the Blind and Handicapped, 
a part of Perkins School for the 
Blind since 1931. The Library is 
administered by Perkins School 
and funded in part by the Massa- 
chusetts Commission for the 
Blind, although it also receives 
support from grants and private 
donations. 

One of 13 original members 
of the Library of Congress/ Na- 
tional Library Service for the 
Blind and Physically Handi- 
capped (NLS) network of librar- 
ies, Perkins' Library provides 
free, mail-order public library 
services in audio and braille 
formats to Massachusetts resi- 
dents of any age who are unable 
to read conventional print 
books. Braille circulation servi- 
ces are provided for eligible 
readers in Maine, Vermont, and 
New Hampshire as well. 

Anyone who is unable to 
read standard print for a visual 
or physical reason is eligible for 
our service. Our patrons include 



victims of multiple sclerosis and 
cerebral palsy, those suffering 
from sight loss or a severe learn- 
ing disability, and stroke 
victims. 

Patrons receive a bimonthly 
catalog called Talking Book 
Topics which lists new books 
and includes ordering informa- 
tion. Users may request specific 
titles or may ask the library 
staff to make selections for 
them based on their reading 
interests. Today the book collec- 
tion contains 6,994 disc, 12,544 
cassette, and 5,854 braille titles. 
These include Gothic and roman- 




Books from the Perkins Regional Library 
talk... on cassette and disks. ..to blind and 
physically handicapped individuals. 



m 



tic novels, books on travel, histo- 
ry, and religion, as well as clas- 
sics, best-sellers, mysteries, 
biographies, and how-to books. 
Last year, the library circulated 
263,233 books to 12,145 patrons 
throughout New England. The 
library also assists patrons in 
receiving about 100 magazine 
titles in recorded and brailled 
formats. 

If you know of someone who 
can use this free reading pro- 



gram - someone temporarily or 
permanently unable to read stan- 
dard print - you can help them 
fill leisure hours, continue stud- 
ies, or just keep in touch with 
the world by applying for free 
reading materials from the Per- 
kins Library. Just call (617) 924- 
3434, X240 for details on how to 
apply. 

Pat Kirk 
Librarian 




Books and magazines in braille are avail- 
able to eligible readers in Massachusetts, as 



well as those in Maine, Vermont and New 
Hampshire. 



11 



Perkins Project With Industry 



T. 



he Perkins Project with 
■I Industry Program is a feder- 
ally funded project operated by 
Perkins and dedicated to expan- 
ding employment opportunities 
for blind and visually impaired 
adults. The Project was origin- 
ally chartered in September of 
1983 to work with AT&T Comm- 
unications, New England Tele- 
phone, and Wang Laboratories, 
but has recently expanded to 
included a wide range of com- 
panies - from small businesses 
and state agencies to com- 
panies such as Honeywell and 
Raytheon. 




(l-r) William Carney, Tom Andruskevich, 
Jack Cooney, New England Telephone. 




Thomas J. O'Connell, Wang Laboratories, 
Cleft); Tamara Bliss, Chairperson, PPWI 
Business Advisory Council. 



The Perkins Project with 
Industry Program has been 
successful in providing direct 
services such as job analysis, 
adaptive engineering, training 
support and awareness training 
for companies interested in 
hiring a blind or visually im- 
paired employee. Project staff 
work directly with interested 
companies to evaluate job oppor- 
tunities, and then match those 
opportunities with qualified 
candidates. On-the-job training 
and instruction is provided, as 
well as follow-up services and 
evaluations. 

Working closely with both 
public and private agencies with- 
in the New England Region, the 
Project has expanded career 



■12- 



opportunities for blind and vis- 
ually impaired adults. Assist- 
ance is also offered to employ- 
ees and employers with job 
retention issues. 

The Project with Industry 
has successfully assisted in the 
placement of 100 clients over 
the past 3 years and maintains 
an active caseload of approx- 
imately 70 clients. 

Susan Plunkett 
Project Director 

Perkins School for the Blind 
and the Perkins Project with 
Industry Program formally recog- 



nized the founding companies of 
the project at a reception held 
in their honor on March 26, 
1987. Representatives of the 
three founding companies; 
AT&T, New England Telephone, 
and Wang Laboratories, were 
presented with braille and 
raised print plaques in honor of 
their support and contributions 
to blind and visually impaired 
individuals. The reception, held 
at the Harvard Club in Boston, 
included demonstrations of 
adaptive equipment such as 
speech synthesis, large print 
displays, and various software 
packages. 




(l-r) C. Richard Carlson, President, Board of 
Trustees, Perkins School for the Blind; 
Susan Plunkett, Project Director, Perkins 
Project with Industry; Valerie Hartt, AT&T; 



David D. Parker, AT&T; Tamara Bliss, 
Chairperson, PPWI Business Advisory 
Council; Kevin J. Lessard, Director, Perkins 
School for the Blind. 



13 



Seventh Annual 
Service Award Ceremony 



Perkins honored twenty-one 
'M school and eight Howe Press 
employees who have given a dec- 
ade or more of dedicated service 
at its seventh annual Service 
Award Ceremony on March 25, 
1987. A luncheon at the direc- 
tor's house was also held in their 
honor. Honored were: Leo F. 
Harrington, 40 years; Jean Di- 
Lorenzo, 30 years; Cristina G. 
Castro, Aliens Damwyk, John 
N. Kovich, 25 years; Carol A. 
Benoit, Michael J. Cataruzolo, 



Janice A. Deyoe, Mary R. Duval, 
Aldo P. Re, William M. Reagan, 
20 years; Patrick Connaughton, 
Barbara Cunningham, Elizabeth 
R. Holbrook, Gerald E. Pease, 
Joseph Terrasi, 15 years; Wendy 
L. Buckley, William K. Forte, 
Mildred M. MacLeod, Margaret 
M. Murphy, Phyllis Rapier, Doro- 
thy M. Robinson, Elvira Rosati, 
William J. Shippie, John J. 
Smith, Elizabeth A. Sparks, 
Juan A. Torres, Earl J. Warner, 
10 years. 




Row 1 (l-r): Ariens Damwyk, Earl R. Warner, 
Michael J. Cataruzolo, Jan Deyoe, Mary R. 
Duval, Leo F. Harrington, Phyllis Rapier, 
Dorothy Robinson, Wendy L. Buckley, 
Cristina G. Castro. 
Row 2 ( l-r): Juan A. Torres, John Kovich, 



William J. Shippie, Miguel C. Ruiz , 
Jean DiLorenzo, Elizabeth A. Sparks, 
Elizabeth R. Holbrook, Mildred M. MacLeod, 
Carol A. Benoit. 

Row 3 (l-r):Adlo Re, Kevin J. Lessard, John 
J. Smith. 



@ 



The Perkins Endowment 






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T h 



he Perkins Program as it has 
developed and been main- 
tained for more than one hun- 
dred and fifty years has relied 
upon a growing endowment at 
every step along the way. 

Endowments which are ade- 
quate to put a program into ef- 
fect are rarely sufficient to keep 
it going. As with every private 
school and college that is keep- 
ing abreast-or ahead-of the 
times, Perkins needs to see its 
endowment grow. Through be- 
quests and donations, and 
through a few government 
grants, we have been able to 
expand existing services and add 
new ones as needed. We are con- 
fident that our friends will con- 
tinue to support us in ever in- 
creasing amounts. 

Form of Bequest 

I hereby give, devise and 
bequeath to the Perkins School 
for the Blind, a corporation duly 
organized and existing under the 
laws of the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts, the sum of 
dollars 



($. 



), the same to be 



applied to the general uses and 
purposes of said corporation un- 
der the direction of its Board of 



Trustees; and I do hereby direct 
that the receipt of the Treasurer 
for the time being of said corpor- 
ation shall be a sufficient dis- 
charge to my executors for the 
same. 

Form of Devise of 
Real Estate 

I give, devise and bequeath 
to the Perkins School for the 
Blind, a corporation duly organ- 
ized and existing under the laws 
of the Commonwealth of Massa- 
chusetts, that certain tract of 
real estate bounded and des- 
cribed as follows: 

(Here describe the real estate 
accurately) 

with full power to sell, mortgage 
and convey the same free of all 
trust. 

Notice 

The address of the Treasurer of 

the Corporation is as follows: 

JOHN W.BRYANT 

Fiduciary Trust Co., 

175 Federal Street 

P.O. Box 1647 

Boston, MA 02105-1647 

Thank you! 



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The Lower School: An Aerial View. 





Volume LVII 
Number 1 
Fall 1987 

Published twice a year in print and 
braille editions by 

Perkins School for the Blind 

1 75 North Beacon Street 
Watertown, MA 02172-9982 
(617)924-3434 

Founded 1829 

An accredited member since 1947 of 
the New England Association of 
Schools and Colleges, Inc. 
An accredited member since 1970 of 
the National Accreditation Council 
for Agencies Serving the Blind and 
Visually Handicapped. 

"The Perkins School for the Blind 
admits students of any race, color, 
national and ethnic origin to all the 
rights, privileges, programs, and 
activities generally accorded or 
made available to students at the 
school. It does not discriminate on 
the basis of race, color, national or 
ethnic origin in the administration 
of its educational policies, 
scholarship and loan programs, and 
athletic and other school-adminis- 
tered programs." 



The Perkins Programs 

4t 



Preschool Services 

Ages Birth - 6 



ft 



Lower School 

Ages 6-13 

Secondary Services 

Ages 13 -22 

Deaf-Blind 

Ages 5 -22 

Severe Impaired 
Program 

Ages 10-22 

Adult Services 

Ages 18 and Older 



Other Services 

Outreach 
Services 

Projects with 
Industry Program 

Community Living 
Services 

Clinical Services 

(Diagnostic 
and Evaluative) 

Regional Library 
for the Blind 
and Handicapped 



Samuel P. Hayes 
Research Library 

Teacher Training 
Program 

New England 
Center for Deaf- 
Blind Services 

Howe Press 

(Aids and Appliances) 



A Message from the Director 



•-/:-'- . :" ■ * r-'^'iiiP:^^::': :- ->: 




D 



uring the past school year, the 

students, staff and trustees at 
Perkins School for the Blind cele- 
brated a number of important 
events in the history of our school. 

In February, 1987, the United 
States Postal Service and Perkins 
School for the Blind honored the life 
and contributions of Julia Ward 
Howe, wife of Dr. Samuel Gridley 
Howe, first Director of Perkins 
School. The Postal Service issued a 
new 14 cent stamp in recognition of 
Julia Ward Howe, the author of the 
"Battle Hymn of the Republic" and 
a well-known advocate of human 
rights in the mid 1800's. 

In May, 1987, Perkins cele- 
brated the accomplishments of 
Michael Anagnos, the second Direc- 
tor of Perkins School. On May 1, we 



held a centennial celebration in the 
Lower School courtyard recognizing 
the 100th anniversary of the found- 
ing of the first kindergarten for the 
blind in the world. The kindergar- 
ten was founded by Michael Anag- 
nos during his directorship at 
Perkins School. 

In June, 1987, I had the privi- 
lege of travelling to Tuscumbia, 
Alabama to participate in ceremo- 
nies marking the 1 00th anniversary 
of Anne Sullivan beginning her 
work with Helen Keller at Ivy 
Green. 

These three major events in 
Perkins history are important to all 
of us who are part of the School. 
Being associated with a school, 
chartered since 1829, that has been 
adapting and changing to meet the 
present day needs of its students 
and clients gives all of us a sense of 
history, perspective and pride. 

As we begin the school year 
1987-88, we recognize our on-going 
commitment to the wide-chronologi- 
cal and wide-functioning range of 
students and clients of today. 

Our on-campus programs for 
this coming year will serve over two 
hundred students and clients in 
Preschool Services, the Lower 
School, Secondary Services, the 
Severe Impaired Program, the 



■B 



Deaf-Blind Program and Adult 
Services. 

We will also continue to serve 
over three hundred students and 
clients through our Infant/Toddler 
Program, Outreach Services, New 
England Regional Center, Commu- 
nity Living Services and Project 
with Industry Program. Many more 
patrons will use our Regional 
Library and its services. 

During the past few years, we 
have gradually been implementing 
a masterplan for our on-campus 
programs. A considerable amount of 
work has been completed to date; 
however a significant amount of 
internal renovation work will need 
to be completed during the next 
three years. Recognizing the impor- 
tance of renovating our facilities to 
meet the the needs of today's stu- 
dents and clients, we are pleased to 
announce the first Capital Cam- 
paign in the history of Perkins 
School. 

The primary focus of the Capi- 
tal Campaign is to raise two million 
dollars for the renovation of our 
Lower School complex which con- 
sists of Anagnos, Bradlee, Glover 
and Potter cottages. Many individu- 
als will participate in the Cam- 
paign, including corporation mem- 
bers, staff, friends and associates, 



as well as many foundations and 
corporations. 

The Development Committee of 
the Board of Trustees, chaired by 
Trustee Dudley Willis, will direct 
the campaign. Other trustees 
serving on the committee include: 
Mary Alice Brennan-Crosby, John 
Bryant, C. Richard Carlson, 
Frederic Clifford, Dr. Frederick 
Lovejoy, and Paul Goodof. 

Facility renovations in our 
Lower School complex will modern- 
ize living and dining rooms for our 
younger students, as well as kitch- 
ens, bedrooms and bathrooms. 
Classrooms and therapy areas will 
also be made fully accessible. 

We are proud of our history at 
Perkins School and the significant 
contributions that so many men 
and women have made to Perkins 
since its founding in 1829. We are 
proud of our present day programs, 
our dedicated trustees and staff, 
and all of the students, clients, and 
consumers we are serving on a 
regular basis. 

We continue to plan for the fu- 
ture, recognizing our responsibili- 
ties and our commitment to blind, 
visually impaired, deaf-blind, and 
multi-impaired individuals. 

Kevin J. Lessard 
Director 



$2,000,000 

Capital Campaign To Fund 

Lower School Renovations 



.■;'•> ;;r ■ : *■;: ■>■■:■ 




I n December 1986, almost a year 
ago, we launched the first Capi- 
tal Campaign in our long history. 
The goal of two million dollars, 
voted by the Trustees, was the 
result of extensive studies con- 
ducted by Dimeo Construction, the 
architectural firm of Shepley 
Bulfinch Richardson and Abbott, 
and a campaign feasibility study. 
These studies were carried out over 
a three year period. 

With 100% Trustee participa- 



The original Lower School build- 
ings were constructed in 1910; they 
are in need of extensive renovation. 

tion and major leadership commit- 
ments from the Amelia Peabody 
Foundation, the Richard Saltonstall 
Charitable Foundation, and the 
Carter Trust, over $1,000,000 has 
been raised. 

The original buildings of the 
Lower School Complex were built in 
1910, and are very much in need of 
renovation. They were designed for 
the blind, not the multi-impaired 
population. 

In addition to necessary electri- 



cal, plumbing, brick and mortar re- 
pairs and reconstruction, some of 
the specific needs of our present 
multi-handicapped students are: 

1. Four kitchens, in which daily 
living skills can be learned, must 
be renovated and adapted to meet 
the needs of multi-handicapped 
youngsters. 

2. Six bathrooms must be de- 



signed and built to accommodate 
our multi-handicapped students. 

3. An elevator must be installed 
to provide accessibility for children 
who cannot climb stairs because of 
their physical handicaps. 

4. Playground equipment is 
needed to develop and enhance 
visual, tactile, and auditory senses 
of these young children 6-13 years 




The Lower School Complex was 
originally built for the blind, not the 
multi-impaired population. 



Individual and small group coun- 
seling rooms must be renovated and 
expanded. 






old. The playground will be built 
according to the latest safety 
standards. 

5. Individual and small group 
counseling rooms must be reno- 
vated and expanded to enable social 
workers and psychologists to work 
with students on their individual 
programs. 

These are but a few of the 
changes we must make to adapt 
our facilities to meet the needs of 
today's students. 

Perkins Trustees have always 
committed the School to meeting 
the program needs of its students. 
During the past two decades, they 
have chosen to allocate the School's 
resources to staff and programs. 
Now the need for building mainten- 
ance and renovation is critical; 
it can no longer be delayed. With its 
present endowment, however, the 
School cannot undertake the 
necessary repairs and renova- 
tion while continuing to maintain 
the current level of programming. 
Therefore, the Trustees must look 
to outside help in this — its first 
major Capital Campaign. Because 
of the difference in purpose between 
the campaign for capital needs and 
our requests for annual support, we 
will be offering everyone the oppor- 
tunity to give to Perkins for both 




Playground equipment is needed to 
develop and enhance the senses of 
our Lower School students. 



purposes. 

Each purpose is extremely im- 
portant to the welfare of our chil- 
dren, because each is needed to 
maintain the quality of the services 
we provide. 

If you are interested in making 
a gift to the Campaign and would 
like more information, please call 
Harry Colt or Betsy O'Brien at 
(617) 924-3434, x284. 



& 



Programs and Services 



I n June of 1987, Kevin J. Lessard, 
Director of Perkins School, par- 
ticipated in the 100th anniversary 
of Anne Sullivan beginning her 
work with Helen Keller. The cele- 
bration was held at the historic 
Keller home at Ivy Green in 
Tuscumbia, Alabama. 

Mr. Lessard presented a plaque 
to the Board of Directors of Helen 
Keller's Home in commemoration 
of the Centennial and Perkins' 
participation in the celebration. The 
plaque is now part of the Helen 
Keller Museum at Ivy Green. 



I n August, Kevin J. Lessard; 

Martin Kennedy, Manager, Howe 
Press; and Vicki Brennan, Low Vis- 
ion Specialist attended the Inter- 
national Council for the Education 
of the Visually Handicapped Con- 
ference in Wurzburg, Germany. 
They participated in many pro- 
grams at the conference, and Mr. 
Lessard led a day-long program 
which explored better ways to 
provide services to multi-impaired 
individuals. 

As a result of discussions at the 



conference, Perkins School will be 
expanding its involvement in the 
education of the visually handi- 
capped in many ways. Future plans 
include: expanding training pro- 
grams for teachers of the visually 
handicapped, developing an inter- 
national low vision program at 
Perkins School in cooperation with 
the staff of the Pennsylvania 
College of Optometry, initiating 
two international brailler repair 
training programs, sponsored by 
Howe Press and to be held in 
Kuala Lumpur in May of 1988, and 
Nairobi, Kenya in August of 1988, 
and publishing the "Educator"; the 
semi-annual newsletter of the 
ICEVH presenting information 
from around the world. 



I n late July of 1987, a number of 

staff from Perkins School joined 
over 500 individuals from more 
than 40 countries at the Interna- 
tional Association of Educators of 
the Deaf-Blind Conference in 
Poiters, France. 

Perkins staff presented a num- 
ber of training sessions at the con- 



a- 



/.;•*-.;*•■■ ^- ■;':."■ ■'.•./•.•..•. ::.:■<-:.■■ 



ference, and Michael Collins, 
Supervisor of the Deaf-Blind Pro- 
gram at Perkins, was elected as one 
of three United States representa- 
tives to the Executive Committee of 
the IAEDB. Perkins School was 
also chosen to work with Pro- 
ject Sense of the United Kingdom 
and other professionals around the 
world on the publication of future 
IEADB newsletters. 

At the closing ceremonies of the 
conference, Mr. Lessard presented 
the distinguished Anne Sullivan 
Medal to four professionals in the 
international field of deaf-blind- 
ness. The medal is awarded "in rec- 
ognition of outstanding achieve- 
ments, contributions, and efforts on 
behalf of deaf-blind children. 
Honored were: 

Lieke de Leuw - Holland 
John Mclnnes - Canada 
Patricia Taylor - United States 
Paulette Degorce - France 

The students, clients, trustees 
and staff at Perkins are pleased to 
recognize these four professionals 
for a lifetime of work dedicated to 
deaf-blind individuals within their 
countries. 



Alumni 
Calendar 
1 987-88 



Monday, November 2 

Corporation Day 

Director's Memorial 

Exercises 11:30AM 

Sunday, December 13 

Christmas Concert 3:00PM 

Thursday, December 17 

Christmas Concert 7:30PM 

Saturday, May 7 

Alumni Baseball Game 1:00PM 

Friday, June 17 

Graduation Exercises 11:00AM 

June 17 - June 19 

Alumni Weekend 



Graduation 1987 



d ighteen senior class members 

from Secondary Services and the 
Deaf-Blind Department graduated 
during 1987 Commencement Exer- 
cises held on Friday June 12, 1987. 
Graduated were: Kelly Arthur, 
Northboro, MA; Krista Burtis, 
Brattleboro, VT; Robert Dunton, 
Gorham, ME; Deborah Eaton, 
Tyngsboro, MA; Stephen Lawrence 
Eckert, Medford, MA; Dawn Marie 
Estes, Lynnfield, MA; William D. 




Fairfield, Salem, MA; Lianne 
Lawrence, Littleton, MA; Steven 
Mark Michienzi, Norton, MA; 
Howard Miller, Merrick, NY; 
Renee Miranda, Quincy, MA; 
Noreen Ellen Moynahan, Rye, NH; 
Maureen Anne Quinn, Port Mon- 
mouth, NJ; Ellen Rys, Springfield, 
MA; James Siopes, Lowell, MA; 
Steve H. Slack, Norfolk, MA; Eric 
W. Teece, West Springfield, MA; 
Calvin Todman, Charlotte Amalie, 
St. Thomas. 




The Perkins Endowment 



• 



I he Perkins Program as it has 

developed and been main- 
tained for more than one hun- 
dred and fifty years has relied 
upon a growing endowment at 
every step along the way. 

Endowments which are ade- 
quate to put a program into ef- 
fect are rarely sufficient to keep 
it going. As with every private 
school and college that is keep- 
ing abreast-or ahead-of the 
times, Perkins needs to see its 
endowment grow. Through be- 
quests and donations, and 
through a few government 
grants, we have been able to 
expand existing services and add 
new ones as needed. We are con- 
fident that our friends will con- 
tinue to support us in ever in- 
creasing amounts. 

Form of Bequest 

I hereby give, devise and 
bequeath to the Perkins School 
for the Blind, a corporation duly 
organized and existing under 
the laws of the Commonwealth 
of Massachusetts, the sum of 
dollars 



($_ 



), the same to be 



applied to the general uses and 
purposes of said corporation un- 
der the direction of its Board of 



Trustees; and I do hereby direct 
that the receipt of the Treasurer 
for the time being of said 
corporation shall be a sufficient 
discharge to my executors for 
the same. 

Form of Devise of 
Real Estate 

I give, devise and bequeath 
to the Perkins School for the 
Blind, a corporation duly organ- 
ized and existing under the 
laws of the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts, that certain 
tract of real estate bounded and 
described as follows: 

(Here describe the real estate 
accurately) 

with full power to sell, mortgage 
and convey the same free of all 
trust. 

Notice 

The address of the Treasurer of 
the Corporation is as follows: 

JOHN W. BRYANT 
Fiduciary Trust Co., 
175 Federal Street 
P.O. Box 1647 
Boston, MA 02105-1647 



Thank you 



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Perkins School 
for the Blind 




Secondary Services: A Program of Options 





Volume LVIII 
Number 1 
Fall 1988 

Published twice a year in print and 
braille editions by 

Perkins School for the Blind 

175 North Beacon Street 
Watertown, MA 02172-9982 
(617)924-3434 

Founded 1829 

An accredited member since 1947 of 
the New England Association of 
Schools and Colleges, Inc. 
An accredited member since 1970 of 
the National Accreditation Council 
for Agencies Serving the Blind and 
Visually Handicapped. 

"The Perkins School for the Blind 
admits students of any race, color, 
national and ethnic origin to all the 
rights, privileges, programs, and 
activities generally accorded or 
made available to students at the 
school. It does not discriminate on 
the basis of race, color, national or 
ethnic origin in the administration 
of its educational policies, 
scholarship and loan programs, and 
athletic and other school-adminis- 
tered programs." 



The Perkins Programs 

ft 



Preschool Services 

Ages Birth - 6 



ft 



Lower School 

Ages 6-13 

Secondary Services 
Ages 13 -22 

Deaf-Blind 

Ages 5 -22 

Severe Impaired 
Program 

Ages 10-22 

Adult Services 
Ages 18 and Older 



Other Services 

Outreach 
Services 

Projects with 
Industry Program 

Community Living 
Services 

Clinical Services 

(Diagnostic 
and Evaluative) 

Regional Library 
for the Blind 
and Handicapped 



Samuel P. Hayes 
Research Library 

Teacher Training 
Program 

New England 
Center for Deaf- 
Blind Services 

Howe Press 

(Aids and Appliances) 



A Message from the Director 




he administration of Perkins 
School for the Blind has, for 
many years, recognized the need to 
develop and expand a wide range of 
educational options for blind, 
visually-impaired, deaf-blind, and 
multi-impaired students and their 
parents. We have respected the fact 
that the development of these 
options includes the expansion of 
public education placements for stu- 
dents who are capable of being 
integrated into public schools. 
However, we feel strongly that 
students and their parents have the 
legal right to select a day or resi- 
dential placement in a school like 
Perkins if they feel that specific 
educational and clinical programs 
should be delivered in an organized 
and comprehensive fashion. 

The staff at Perkins has devel- 
oped strong working relationships 
with local education authorities and 
special education directors, assur- 
ing cooperative programs where 
students can be enrolled in a partic- 
ular educational option, public or 
private, and attend Perkins on a 
part-time basis. 



In addition to providing compre- 
hensive and quality services to 
students and their families in our 
on-campus program, we help to 
support students who are enrolled, 
full-time, in public school programs. 
We offer support and encourage- 
ment for parents through work- 
shops and in-service training 
programs. These programs are also 
offered to itinerant teachers who 
work with blind and visually im- 
paired students in public schools in 
Massachusetts and New England. 

During the school year 1987-88, 
the field of special education in the 
United States received a policy 
clarification from the Office of 
Special Education and Rehabilita- 
tion Services (OSERS) in Washing- 
ton D.C. This clarification comes 
after years of uncertainty. The 
OSERS policy statement clarifies 
their position on the scope of 
education service placement for 
special needs students by stating 
the following: 

"The Department has never 
intended to imply that the regular 
classroom is always the appropriate 
location of services for handicapped 
children. In some cases, separate 
environments have been recognized 
as the least restrictive for some in- 
dividual children. We recognize that 



inherent in a free appropriate 
public education is a continuum of 
services, including separate facili- 
ties both public and private." 

Following the publication of this 
policy statement, the Commission 
on Deafness (a Commission author- 
ized by the Congress of the United 
States) delivered a series of findings 
and recommendations. Many of the 
Commission's recommendations are 
directly applicable to the field of 
blindness, including a provision 
that requires school personnel to 
inform parents of all placement 
options for their children on an 
annual basis. We strongly support 
these recommendations. 

In this issue of the Lantern, we 
are pleased to highlight the Secon- 
dary Services Program at Perkins 
School for the Blind. Under the 
direction of Cynthia Essex, Supervi- 
sor of Secondary Services, the 
teaching, clinical, and cottage staff 
have developed a comprehensive 
program that addresses the wide 
variety of needs of adolescent blind, 
visually impaired, and multi- 
impaired students. 

Our on-campus programs 
provide an educational and thera- 
peutic environment, striving to 
maximize each student's potential 
while assuring a consistent and 



supportive atmosphere for parents 
and families. In addition, our 
positive and very productive affili- 
ation with the Watertown Public 
School System, under the leader- 
ship of Dr. Daniel O'Connor, Super- 
intendent of Schools, and Dr. James 
Early, Director of Special Educa- 
tion, has, for many years, provided 
successful integration opportunities 
for many of our high school stu- 
dents who are mainstreamed, part- 
time, into public education. 

Developing a comprehensive 
network of relevant and meaningful 
programs and services for adoles- 
cent blind and visually impaired 
students is a complex and con- 
stantly challenging opportunity. 
Professionals from the public and 
private sectors of the Watertown 
School System and Perkins School 
for the Blind should feel proud of 
their efforts during the past decade. 
They have responded to this chal- 
lenge and have afforded a unique 
educational opportunity to many 
students and parents; an opportu- 
nity to receive comprehensive, 
responsive, and relevant services, 
assuring students a greater degree 
of success and integration into the 
community than ever before. 

Kevin J. Lessard, 
Director 



Secondary Services 



What is 

Secondary Services 
at Perkins School 
for the Blind? 



T 



he Secondary Services Program 
is a specialized program for stu- 
dents between the ages of 13 and 22 
who are blind or multi-impaired. 
Upon graduation, students receive a 
High School Diploma or a Certifi- 
cate of Accomplishment. The 
Program emphasizes academics, in- 
dependent living, pre-vocational, 
and social skills. Secondary Serv- 
ices creates an individualized 
education program for each student 
and can help to integrate a student 
into a public school academic main- 
stream. Secondary Services offers 
training in social and recreational 
skills, and a wide variety of clinical 
therapies and services. 

Secondary Services is complex 
and serves such a wide range of 
students that it is often difficult to 
explain the structure of the pro- 
gram and describe all of the serv- 
ices that are available. The ultimate 
goal is simple: to maximize the po- 
tential of every student; to help 
each student grow to become a 
competent and independent individ- 
ual and a contributing member of 
his or her community; to help the 
students "be all they can be." 



Secondary Services is a commu- 
nity of 60 students, and almost as 
many teachers, clinicians, and 
residence staff. Our students range 
in age from 13 to 22, and have 
visual or multiple impairments. 
They can be either day or residen- 
tial students; most come from New 
England, but some come from 
outside the region as well. Some 
students work toward high school 
diplomas, attending Watertown 
High School for several courses. All 
students develop pre-vocational 
skills through courses on-campus, 
and some participate in supervised 
work experience off-campus at 
companies like Polaroid and Wilson 
Farms, or at sites like Government 
Center. Daily living and social skills 
that allow students to use the 
resources of the community such as 
the supermarket, the bank, or the 
library, are important components 
of the program for all students. 
Some students learn in small 
structured classes and are taught 
by only a few staff. Others attend 
larger classes, travel from class to 
class, and have many teachers. 
Individual programs are designed 
by the student, the parents, and 
Perkins staff according to the 
individual needs, desires and 



Secondary Services 



interests of that student. All stu- 
dents are encouraged to help plan 
their own programs and their 
futures, and to take responsibility 
for themselves. 

The Secondary Services staff is 
very diversified. Many teachers are 
certified in vision or mobility, 
others are certified in moderate or 
severe special needs or in special 
subjects like industrial education, 
music, physical education, home & 
personal management, or vocational 
areas. Years of experience and 
specialized training provide individ- 
ual teachers with specialities such 
as music braille, algebra or geome- 
try in Nemeth code, or computer. 
Residence staff work in the cottages 
and usually hold bachelors degrees. 
Each cottage houses from six to 
fifteen students, allowing students 
to learn social skills and the give 
and take that is necessary for 
successful family life. Students 
learn to be supportive of others, as 
well as learning practical skills like 
budgeting an allowance, preparing 
a meal, cleaning a floor, or playing 
pool for recreation. Both school and 
residence staff emphasize independ- 
ence, taking pride in a wide range 
of student achievements. Whether a 
student gives excellent music 



recitals, earns good grades, learns 
to write simple sentences, learns to 
travel independently, shows sup- 
port to his peers, learns to commu- 
nicate his desires clearly, begins to 
walk again, pushes his own wheel- 
chair or learns to button a coat, 
accomplishments are highly valued 
by the students and the staff who 
work with them. 

Secondary Services staff and 
students share joy and sorrow, and 
face many changes like any commu- 
nity. In the span of a year, we 
celebrated Halloween with a tea 
attended by clowns, ballerinas, 
zebras, and a costumed Halloween 
Band. We congratulated two teach- 
ers who became new parents. We 
enjoyed the efforts of our musical 
groups and their teachers in the 
wonderful Christmas concerts, and 
applauded the drama club's presen- 
tation of the "Wizard of Oz." We 
bought tickets to the seniors' 
Mexican Dinner, a fund raiser for 
their senior class trip. We stood in 
sorrow with the family of a Secon- 
dary student who graduated in 
June and died in the fall. We met 
together at a final breakfast to say 
good-bye to staff and students who 
were leaving. And finally, we 
listened as the chorus sings a song 



that reminds us what Secondary 
Services is all about: 

"No man is an island; 

No man stands alone; 

Each man's joy is joy to me, 

Each man's grief is my own." 




Scott Minott works in the green- 
house at Wilson Farms, Waltham, 
MA, as part of his vocational 
training program. 



^J cott Minott and Deidre Martin, 

two of Secondary Services' 
diverse group of sixty students, 
illustrate the variety of program- 
ming options available in Secondary 
Services. 

Scott entered the Secondary 
Services Program at Perkins in 
June of 1985, at the age of sixteen. 
Previously he attended a special 
program for visually impaired 
students at his junior high school. 
Scott was referred to Perkins 
because he was not making prog- 
ress in his academic program. 
Scott's motivation had decreased; 
he seemed to need a program with a 
different emphasis, a program 
where he could realize more suc- 
cess. 

Scott is visually impaired, has 
reduced hearing, and has some 
difficulty with fine motor coordina- 
tion. 

Since Scott came to Perkins, he 
has made progress in every area. 
Involvement in pre-vocational 
courses and off campus work 
experiences at Polaroid and Wilson 
Farms have helped him develop 
good work skills. He has also been 



a 



Secondary Services 



very successful in his food service 
classes, and is ready for an off 
campus placement in the food 
service area. 

Success has built his self- 
esteem. In every area of his pro- 
gram he demonstrates excellent 
motivation and increasing inde- 
pendence. Scott has made many 
friends, and enjoys these friend- 
ships. Although Scott has only been 
at Perkins for a short time, the staff 
feels he has gained a great deal 
from his individualized program. 

Scott will graduate in 1989. 
Perkins staff will work closely with 
Scott, his family, and state vision 
services to plan his return home. At 
this time, it appears that he will be 
eligible for available horticulture or 
food service jobs in the community. 
Scott also should be ready for 
community living. He will continue 
to need some supervision, but 
should attain a high level of inde- 
pendence. 



D 



eidre is 22 years old and gradu- 
ated from Perkins in 1988. She 
began her schooling in our Lower 
School Program and continued on to 
complete the Secondary Services 
Program. Deidre's program involved 




Senior Deidre Martin performs her 
solo, "The Greatest Love of All" 
during the 1988 Graduation Exer- 



cises. 



academics, both on campus and, in 
the past few years, off campus at 
Watertown High School; prevoca- 
tional training, again, both on and 
off campus; independent living 
training; and social and recrea- 
tional skill training. 



Deidre is originally from the 
Watertown area and was referred to 
Perkins because of her visual 
impairments. Deidre needed a 
stable, nurturing environment that 
allowed her the special program- 
ming and skill training she needed 
to gain her independence. 

Deidre's involvements during 
her senior year at Perkins School 
illustrate the progress she has 
made toward achieving her full 
potential. Deidre has done well 
academically and completed all of 
her required academic work, 
including a number of classes at 
Watertown High School, doing 
exceptionally well in English and 
the humanities. Deidre is very 
creative and talented and Perkins 
has afforded her a number of 
creative outlets. This past school 
year, Deidre was a member of the 
Chorus and the Chamber Singers. 
She was involved in a number of 
musicals put on by the Secondary 
Services Program. Deidre took voice 
lessons as part of her curriculum, 
culminating in her solo, "The 
Greatest Love of All", performed 
during the 1988 Graduation Exer- 
cises. Writing and poetry, as well as 
many other forms of art, are also 



creative outlets for Deidre. She has 
had written pieces published in 
Perkins' and other local publica- 
tions. 

Upon her graduation, Deidre 
was awarded her diploma and three 
awards: The Reginald Fitz Memo- 
rial Prize for Scholarship, The 
Samuel P. Hayes Memorial Prize 
for Music, and The English Prize 
Award for Essay, recognizing her 
academic, creative and musical 
talents. 

Deidre is now in a training 
program at Childrens Hospital in 
Boston and living in a semi-inde- 
pendent group home setting. The 
staff at Perkins feel that as a result 
of this experience and her training 
at Perkins, Deidre will eventually 
be able to live and work independ- 
ently in the community of her 
choice. 

Although Scott and Deidre have 
different programming and educa- 
tional needs, both have benefited 
greatly from their individualized 
programs. Secondary Services has 
allowed them to explore many 
educational, vocational and recrea- 
tional options, leading to the 
ultimate goal of the program - 
striving to reach their maximum 
potential. 



Graduation 1988 



T 



wenty members of the senior 
class of Perkins School for the 
Blind graduated at Commencement 
Exercises on Friday, June 17, 1988 
in Dwight Hall. Senator Edward M. 
Kennedy, D - Massachusetts, 
addressed the graduating class. 
"Today," said Kennedy, "you are 




Senator Edward Kennedy, D - 
Massachusetts, accepts the Anne 
Sullivan Medal from Kevin J. Les- 
sard, Director, Perkins School for 
the Blind. 



graduating from an institution rich 
in tradition, and at the cutting edge 
of innovation and technology. The 
Perkins School has not only given 
all of the graduates a fine educa- 
tion, it has provided a wealth of 
knowledge to the New England 
area and the nation as a 
whole... because of your experience 
here at Perkins, and the academic 
and social education you have 
gained you will have fuller and 
richer lives, and extraordinary 
opportunities for careers and a 
lifetime of achievements." 

C. Richard Carlson, President 
of the Board of Trustees of Perkins 
School recognized Senator Kennedy 
for "his years of commitment to and 
legislative efforts for individuals in 
the United States who are deaf- 
blind" by awarding him the Anne 
Sullivan Medal. The Medal is 
internationally recognized as the 
most prestigious award within the 
field of deaf-blindness. 

Kevin J. Lessard, Director 
of Perkins School, and C. Richard 
Carlson, President, presented four 
Diplomas and sixteen Certificates 
of Accomplishment to the graduat- 
ing class. Graduated were: Ray- 
mond Barton, Roxbury, MA; Joel 
Battaglino, Waltham, MA; Mark H. 



'r:;^ :-■■:.■:■■■■;. 




The Class of 1988. Seated (l-r): Lisa 
Frenette, Daniel Sack, Jr., Cather- 
ine McGahran. Standing (l-r): 
Stephanie Cox, Senior Class Advi- 
sor, Keith Rozzelle, Tracey Rey- 
nolds, Jeffrey Oliveira, Cheryl 
Jones, Joseph Provost, Sandra 
Washington, Julie Judge, Raymond 

Belair, Metheun, MA; Lisa Elaine 
Frenette, Lawrence, MA; Cheryl 
Lynn Jones, Northampton, MA; 
Julie M. Judge, Wayland, MA; 
Craig Lavache, Braintree, MA; 
Theodore Losacano, Concord, NH; 
Robert Lynch, Allston, MA; Deidre 
Lee Martin, Marlboro, MA; Cather- 
ine Mary McGahran, Englishtown, 
NJ; Jeffrey Roy Oliveira, New 
Bedford, MA; Joseph Provost, Ply- 



Barton, Mark Belair, Kenneth 
Reynolds, Deidre Martin, Suzanne 
Graff, Senior Class Advisor. Not 
Pictured: Joel Battaglino, Craig 
Lavache, Theodore Loscano, Robert 
Lynch, Christopher Rouse, Andrea 
Wright. 



mouth, MA; Kenneth Reynolds, 
Bedford, MA; Tracey Reynolds, 
Hartland Corners, VT; Keith 
Douglas Rozzelle, Rahway, NJ; 
Christopher Rouse, Billerica, MA; 
Daniel James Sack, Jr., Framing- 
ham, MA; Sandra Washington, 
Boston, MA; Andrea Wright, Dorch- 
ester, MA. 



Laura Bridgman at Perkins: 
150th Anniversary Celebration 



1 sometimes wonder what my life might have 
been if Doctor Howe had not had the imagination 
to realize that the immortal spirit of Laura 
Bridgman had not died... 

"Thanks to our friend and helper, our world lies 
upward; the length and breadth and sweep of the 
heavens are ours." 

--Helen Keller 



L- aura Bridgman was born in the 
year 1829. At the age of two she 
developed scarlet fever; it left her 
deaf and blind. By the age of eight, 
Laura was severely isolated by the 
loss of her hearing and sight, her 
family could barely communicate 
with her. It was then that she was 
discovered by Dr. Samuel Gridley 
Howe, the first Director of Perkins 
School for the Blind. Dr. Howe 
brought Laura to Perkins during 
the 1837-1838 school year and thus 
began his work in the field of deaf- 
blindness. 

Dr. Howe's pioneering effort 
with Laura Bridgman became world 
renowned, offering the promise of 
education to the deaf-blind. The 
achievements of Laura and Dr. 
Howe were chronicled by British 
novelist Charles Dickens in his 
1868 book, American Notes. It was 
this reference to Perkins School for 
the Blind that led the Keller family 



of Tuscumbia, Alabama to the 
School in search of help for their 
deaf-blind daughter, Helen. 

Perkins School celebrated the 
150th Anniversary of the com- 
mencement of Dr. Howe's work 
with Laura Bridgman on Friday, 
May 13, 1988. A reception and 
presentation was held in the North 
Building Auditorium for staff and 
invited guests. The celebration 
included remarks from Kevin J. 
Lessard, Director; Michael Collins, 
Supervisor of the Deaf-Blind 
Program; a one act play, Laura 
Bridgman s Life and Times, per- 
formed by deaf-blind students; and 
the presentation of awards by C. 
Richard Carlson, President of the 
Board of Trustees. 

"We realize," said Carlson, "that 
the events that occurred here at 
Perkins 150 years ago have had a 
profound and dramatic impact on 
the education of the deaf-blind in 



m 



%$:?;<■: ;' : >;V: '■ 



the United States and in over one- 
hundred and twenty countries 
around the world... One hundred 
and fifty years later, here in the 
Deaf-Blind Program at Perkins, we 
continue to see competent and 
qualified staff providing comprehen- 
sive and quality services to a large 
number of students who are deaf- 
blind." 

Mr. Carlson, on behalf of 
Perkins School for the Blind, 
recognized two individuals for their 
efforts for deaf-blind children. 
Congressman Joseph D. Early, D - 
Massachusetts, District 3, was rec- 
ognized for his legislative efforts on 
a national level. Congressman 
Early and his staff have been in- 
strumental in assuring the continu- 
ation and stability of federal fund- 
ing for the education of deaf-blind 
children. Dr. Edward J. Water- 
house, Director of Perkins School 
from 1951-1971, was awarded the 
Anne Sullivan Medal (internation- 
ally recognized as the most prestig- 
ious award in the field of deaf- 
blindness) "in recognition of his 
years of commitment and exem- 
plary efforts in behalf of deaf-blind 
children throughout the world." 



/jfc 





Laura Bridgman and her teacher, 
Dr. Samuel Gridley Howe. 



11 



Eighth Annual Service Award 
Ceremony 



^ mployees who have given 10, 15, 

20, 25, and 30 years of service to 
Perkins School for the Blind were 
honored at the Eighth Annual 
Service Award Ceremony, held 
Wednesday, March 23, 1988. 

These dedicated employees were 
also recognized at a luncheon at the 
Director's house on Tuesday, March 
22. A gift was presented to each 
School and Howe Press employee in 
appreciation of their dedication and 
service. The Service Award Cere- 
mony was held the next day, and all 
staff were invited. Director Kevin J. 
Lessard presented a Certificate of 
Appreciation to each long term em- 
ployee. Employees with over 25 
years of service were also recog- 
nized and introduced by their 
supervisors. 

"Our greatest resource," said 
Mr. Lessard, "has always been our 
staff... This has been the major 
reason that Perkins has been able 
to provide quality services to our 
students and clients for over 156 
years. 

"Today we honor a number of 
individuals and we recognize their 



contributions to our School and to 
our students, clients and staff... We 
recognize their professionalism and 
their commitment. We thank them 
for their years of service and we 
hope they will be with us for years 
to come." 

Honored for 30 years of service 
were: Barbara H. Birge, Deaf Blind 
Program; Richard G. Brown, Howe 
Press; Catherine Cowan, Lower 
School; Julian Green, Adult Serv- 
ices; Lillian T. Peterson, Lower 
School; and Adele M. Trytko, Lower 
School and Secondary Services. 
Elizabeth A. O'Brien, Development 
and Public Relations, was honored 
for 25 years of service. Honored for 
20 years of service were: Helen M. 
Gazarian, Howe Press; Lawrence J. 
Melander, Lower School; Doris L. 
Nicholas, Howe Press; Ida M. 
Scarlett, Switchboard; and Marcy 
A. Scott, Secondary Services. 
Honored for 15 years of service 
were: Cafer T. Barkus, Adult 
Services and Teacher Training; 
Martha M. Majors, Deaf Blind 
Program; Martin McDonagh, 
Grounds and Maintenance; Susan 



12 




Row 1 (l-r): Barbara Birge, Helen 
Gazarian, Sue Lind-Sinanian, 
Doris Nicholas, Dorothy Parsikian, 
Catherine Cowan, Marcy Scott. 
Row 2 (l-r): Martha Majors, Eliza- 
beth O'Brien, Margaret Sutton, 



M. Lind-Sinanian, Secondary 
Services; and Margaret W. Sutton, 
Howe Press. Honored for 10 years of 
continued service were: Margaret F. 
Carney, Secondary Services; Mi- 
chael T. Collins, Deaf Blind Pro- 
gram; Paul Doerr, Secondary 
Services; Kenneth R. Durand, In- 



Lillian Peterson, Adele Trytko, 
Chrys Peralta, Ida Scarlett. 
Row 3 (l-r): Ken Durand, Richard 
Brown, Cafer Barkus, Larry Melan- 
der, Alexandra Smith, Kevin Les- 
sard, Director, Michael Collins, 
Julian Green. 



structional Support Services; 
Howard Easter, Howe Press; 
Dorothy Parsikian, Secondary 
Services; Elizabeth Peebles-Under- 
wood, Lower School; Denise Chrys- 
tine Peralta, Adult Services; and 
Alexandra Smith, Secondary 
Services. 



13 



Programs and Services 



T 



he Teacher Training Program 

Graduation was held on April 29, 
1988 in Allen Chapel. The class of 
1988 was comprised of several 
Perkins-based short-term trainees 
and several trainees in the full-year 
course. Mr. Longinus Kateme from 
Tanzania; Ms. Sonya Osborne from 
Guyana, and Ms. Sudkhaneung 
Phudphechgaq from Thailand each 
spent three or four months at 
Perkins. The participants in the 
Perkins-based two-semester course 



were Ms. Mary Senaye from Ghana, 
Ms. Debora Valente from Argen- 
tina, and Ms. Ximena Serpa de 
Rubio from Columbia. Others 
combined a Perkins experience with 
Boston College studies: Ms. Margie 
Carney from Massachusetts, 
Master's Degree program; Mr. 
Richard Ely from Massachusetts, 
post-graduate studies; Ms. 
Gretchen Good from Michigan, 
Master's Degree program; Mr. 
Farouk Khalil from Egypt, PhD 




Teacher Training Class of 1988 (l-r): 
Anjali Ramakrishna, Christine 
Reekie, Mary Senaye, Margie 
Carney, Ximena Serpa, David 



Seyfert, Gretchen Good, Cafer 
Barkus, Supervisor, Debora Valente, 
Sudkhaneung Phudphechgaq. 



14 



program, Ms. Anjali Ramakrishna 
from India, Master's Degree pro- 
gram; Ms. Christine Reekie from 
England, Master's Degree program; 
and Mr. David Seyfert from New 
York, Master's Degree program. 

All trainees gained experience 
in the field of education of blind and 
low vision individuals of all ages, as 
well as knowledge in their area of 
concentration. They shared infor- 
mation about each other's countries 
and had the chance to talk with 
visitors from a variety of other 
countries such as Germany, Swe- 
den, and Zimbabwe. Most of the 
international trainees will be doing 
staff training upon their return 
home, in addition to their other 
professional responsibilities. 



D 



uring this school year, the stu- 
dents and staff of the Severe 
Impaired Program have spon- 
sored dances, bake sales and craft 
fairs. The proceeds from these ac- 
tivities have helped to fund dinners 
at local restaurants, overnight trips 
to the Cape, and special events 
such as harbor cruises. 

The first two graduates of the 
Severe Impaired Program have 
successfully entered apartment pro- 
grams in the community. The 
Severe Impaired Program continues 
to increase the independent skills of 
all our students. 



15 



Programs and Services 



T 



he Lower School has continued 
to expand its nutrition education 
program. This program has helped 
a number of students behaviorally 
and educationally. Plans are also 
underway to expand low vision 
services. Several Lower School staff 
members are involved in writing an 
extensive curriculum and practical 
handbook for parents and educators 
of elementary-aged multi-impaired 
students. 

Students and staff made their 
annual trip to the Cape Cod Na- 
tional Seashore from June 1 to June 
5 this year, enjoying the sun and 
sand of Nauset Beach in Eastham, 
MA. Lower School students and 
staff have been making the trip for 
over 20 years. A former Coast 
Guard station on Nauset Beach has 
been converted to a living facility 
for school groups such as Perkins' 
Lower School. The students stayed 
in the facility for the week, but 
made a variety of day trips and 
excursions on the Cape. 



T 



he increased enrollment of 
young children in the Deaf- 
Blind Program has resulted in a 
greater emphasis upon program de- 
velopment for this 5 - 10 year age 
group. Simultaneously, we have 
managed to maintain the excellent 
functional life skills program for 
adolescents, which has developed 
over the past 10 years. The Total 
Life Planning Grant is coming to a 
close in September, 1988, conclud- 
ing a very successful three year 
project. This project encouraged 
program development for our 
graduates, and assured that our 
students were placed in appropriate 
programs when they left Perkins. 
All services of this project will 
continue in the future. 

Low vision services for deaf- 
blind children have been signifi- 
cantly expanded in our clinic. A 
new Federal grant, effective in 
October, 1988, will allow these 
outreach services to grow even 
further. 

This past year has also brought 
new developments in outreach serv- 



16 



ices, with the deaf-blind program 
assisting several countries to 
develop and expand their services. 
Our program is now actively en- 
gaged in helping the countries of 
Spain and Portugal initiate services 
to deaf-blind children. More locally, 
our staff have also been active in 
assisting other educational and 
group home providers. 



O tudents from Secondary Serv- 
ices, Lower School, the 
Severe Impaired Program, and 
the Deaf-Blind Program partici- 
pated in the Seventh Annual Jump 
Rope for Heart on March 2nd. 
Students raised a total of $1085.49, 
bringing the seven-year total raised 
to $6877.62. Theresa White of Sec- 
ondary Services was the big winner, 
collecting $416.00 in pledges. For 
her winning effort, Theresa was 
awarded two tickets to the April 8th 
Boston Celtics Game at Boston Gar- 
den. This year the money collected 
was given in memory of Howard 
Rozelle, the father of a student in 
our Secondary Services program. 



T 



he Preschool Program hosted 
The Fifth Annual New England 
Regional Seminar for Families of 
Visually Impaired Preschool Chil- 
dren Ages Birth to Seven at Perkins 
School on April 30, 1988. The 
conference, "Taking Care of Our 
Children... Taking Care of Our- 
selves" was a joint planning effort 
of parents and professionals from 
six New England States and was 
attended by over 150 parents and 
professionals. Topics included 
mobility, braille, adaptive toys, 
mainstreaming and family con- 
cerns. 



17 



Programs and Services 



1 1 erkins School for the Blind's 
Low Vision Services and the 

Pennsylvania College of Optom- 
etry's Institute for the Visually 
Impaired presented a five day 
workshop entitled "Low Vision and 
the Multi-Impaired Child: Assess- 
ment and Intervention" for profes- 
sionals in the field. The workshop, 
held at Perkins from July 17-21, 
provided coursework and experience 
in low vision assessment techniques 
and intervention strategies, and 
was geared toward young (birth 
through six years) low vision 
individuals. Beth Langley, M.Ed., a 
nationally recognized expert on 
working with the severely impaired, 
was a featured speaker at the work- 
shop. The workshop was attended 
by more than 60 educators from all 
over the world. 



Alumni Calendar 
1988-1989 

Monday, November 7 

Corporation Day 

Director's Memorial 

Exercises 11:00AM 

Sunday, December 11 

Christmas Concert 3:00PM 

Thursday, December 15 

Christmas Concert 7:30PM 



Saturday, May 6 

Alumni Baseball Game 

Friday, June 16 

Graduation Exercises . . 

June 16 - June 18 

Alumni Weekend 



1:00PM 



11:00AM 



18 



; - 






T 



he Precision Products Division of 
Northrop Corporation recently 
donated a scale model of NASA's 
Space Shuttle to the Perkins 
Museum. On Wednesday, June 15, 
1988, the model was presented to 



Ken Stuckey, Curator of the Mu- 
seum, by Mr. John R. Baraniak, 
Northrop's Vice President of Indus- 
trial and Community Relations. 
The model will be permanently dis- 
played in the school library. 




Ken Stuckey, left, accepts a model of 
NASA's Space Shuttle from John R. 



Baraniak, Vice President of Indus- 
trial and Community Relations for 
Northrop. 



19 



Capital Campaign at 85% of 
$2,000,000 Goa 



W 



ith three months to go until 
December 31, over $1,700,000 
has been given or pledged toward 
the Lower School Renovation Goal 
of $2,000,000. 

A special mailing was sent in 
September to over 20,000 generous 
donors to our Annual Fund (Chil- 
dren of the Silent Night), so that 
these special friends of Perkins 
might have an opportunity to 
participate in helping us to reach 
our goal of $2,000,000. 

Work has already started 
toward providing the necessary 
additional electrical service for the 
Lower School, and actual renova- 
tion of the buildings will commence 
in early 1989. 



T 



he Henney Archives Room was 
dedicated on June 17, 1988 in 
memory of Nella Braddy Henney. 
The Room was given by Mr. Keith 
Henney in memory of his wife, who 
was the close friend and companion 
of Helen Keller and Anne Sullivan. 




Helen Keller, left, Polly Thompson 
and Nella Braddy Henney. 



20- 



The Perkins Endowment 



I he Perkins Program as it has 

developed and been main- 
tained for more than one hun- 
dred and fifty years has relied 
upon a growing endowment at 
every step along the way. 

Endowments which are ade- 
quate to put a program into ef- 
fect are rarely sufficient to keep 
it going. As with every private 
school and college that is keep- 
ing abreast-or ahead-of the 
times, Perkins needs to see its 
endowment grow. Through be- 
quests and donations, and 
through a few government 
grants, we have been able to 
expand existing services and add 
new ones as needed. We are con- 
fident that our friends will con- 
tinue to support us in ever in- 
creasing amounts. 

Form of Bequest 

I hereby give, devise and 
bequeath to the Perkins School 
for the Blind, a corporation duly 
organized and existing under 
the laws of the Commonwealth 
of Massachusetts, the sum of 
dollars 



($. 



), the same to be 



applied to the general uses and 
purposes of said corporation un- 
der the direction of its Board of 



Trustees; and I do hereby direct 
that the receipt of the Treasurer 
for the time being of said 
corporation shall be a sufficient 
discharge to my executors for 
the same. 

Form of Devise of 
Real Estate 

I give, devise and bequeath 
to the Perkins School for the 
Blind, a corporation duly organ- 
ized and existing under the 
laws of the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts, that certain 
tract of real estate bounded and 
described as follows: 

(Here describe the real estate 
accurately) 

with full power to sell, mortgage 
and convey the same free of all 
trust. 

Notice 

The address of the Treasurer of 
the Corporation is as follows: 

JOHN W. BRYANT 

Fiduciary Trust Co., 
175 Federal Street 
P.O. Box 1647 
Boston, MA 02105-1647 

Thank you! 



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PERKINS SCHOOL FOR THE BLIND SPRING 1989 



TheLantern 



A Message From The Director 

Yesterday And Today . 
Courage, Opportunity, 
And Independence 



R 




uring the School Year 1888 -1989, Helen Keller began her 
formal education at Perkins School for the Blind. She went on 

to attend several other schools, and her academic career culminated with her graduation 
from Radcliffe College in 1904. f As we celebrate the 100th anniversary of Helen's arri- 
val at Perkins, we applaud her many achievements. In particular, we recognize the tre- 
mendous opportunities that she afforded all handicapped individuals throughout the United 
States and around the world, f Helen Keller's courage and her achievements have helped 
professionals and parents, as well as educators, rehabilitation specialists, and government 
officials recognize the ability and potential of every handicapped person to live as a pro- 
ductive and contributing member of society, f In the Spring 1989 issue of The Lantern, 
we highlight the accomplishments of today's students, and we recognize their right to a 
quality and comprehensive education program, f Our Scouting Program is just one of 
a large number of off-campus activities that our students participate in on a regular basis. 
One of their most recent experiences - a camping trip in the Adirondack region of New 
York - is featured in this issue, f Also highlighted is the work of a young man in our . 
Deaf-Blind Program. Anindya Bhattacharyya is maintaining high academic standards at 
Perkins and the Belmont Hill School, and computer technology is supporting his progresss. 
f The School Year 1988-1989 provides us with the opportunity to celebrate the one hun- 
dredth anniversary of Helen Keller beginning her studies at Perkins. It also provides us 
an opportunity to reaffirm the right to quality education for each individual student and 
their parents, f I hope you enjoy reading this issue of The Lantern. 

Kevin J. Lessard, Director 



Are The Stars Out Tonight ? 4 

Perkins Explorer Post 225 traveled to Lake George and 
the Adirondack Mountains of New York for a week of 
camping, sailing, swimming, and high adventure. 

The Beginning Of Everything 8 

One hundred years ago Helen Keller began her formal 
education at Perkins, hoping "to learn much about every- 
thing." With admirable industry, she surpassed her goals 
and created opportunities for those who have followed her. 



Of Other Beginnings 



11 



After spending a year in a classroom of hearing children, 
Isaac Hawke has begun to learn sign language and is off to 
a fresh start in the Perkins Deaf-Blind Program. 



Following A Dream: From Calcutta To Perkins 



12 



Anindya Bhattacharyya sets high goals for himself. Hard 
work and computer technology are bringing his goals 
within reach. 



Cover Photo: Perkins 
Explorer Scout Christine 
Daniels scales a sheer 
plywood wall as part of her 
Adirondack high adventure 
camp experience. 



Capital Campaign Surpasses Goal 22 

Perkins first Capital Campaign succeeded in raising over 
two million dollars, thanks to the efforts of all of the Perk- 
ins community. 

Reflections 17 

Service Awards, Perkins Project With Industry 20, 21 







The Lantern 

Volume LVFII, Number 2 
Spring 1989 



Contents 



In the early hours, New York 
state's famous Lake George is a 
pussycat: Hardly a ripple ruffles 
its glassy surface. But come late 
morning, when the cool Adi- 
rondack wind begins whis- 
tling down its 30-mile length, 
don't be surprised if the 
pussycat turns into a tiger. 
Then is when the real adven- 
ture begins, and that's why 
they went- twice. 

The first time, three years 
ago, they sailed, camped on an island, 
snorkeled, and water-skied. This time 
they sailed, camped on an island, sail 
boarded, and scaled a sheer plywood 
wall 20 feet high to sharpen their 
mountain-climbing skills. 

On trips to other places they've 
tried caving, white water rafting, rock 
climbing, and hot air ballooning. 
Some have hit the high trails at Phil- 
mont Scout Ranch. Some have even 
traveled to Greece. 

And get this: Every member of this 
group, and one of its leaders, is blind. 
Some even have a second handicap, 



By Jim Morse 
Photography by 
Russell Dian 




such as cerebral palsy. One is near- 
deaf. And all of them are determined, 
high-energy examples of their motto: 
Obstacles are things to be overcome. 

Meet 
Explorer Post 
225, chartered 
to the Perkins 
School for the 
Blind in Wa- 
tertown, Mass. 
Perkins, the 
oldest such 
school in the country, has been on the 
job for over 150 years training young 
people to overcome the obstacle of 
blindness — and for nearly 50 of those 
years the school has used Scouting as 
an important tool in its work. 

How does Post 225 do the outra- 
geous things it does? Let's join the 
group as their big Tanner cruise-class 
sailboats nose into the dock on Lake 
George's Long Island, where for the 
next five days they will camp, sail, 
swim, learn, achieve, and enjoy! 

The sun has just set behind a 
cloudy sky, and their job is to unload 
the boats, carry the gear to the camp- 
site, pitch the tents, cook and eat sup- 
per, and clean up — all before the cer- 
tain coming of a starless dark. For 



AreThe Stars 
Out Tonight? 



most posts it would be a "hurry" situ- 
ation, yet nobody is hurrying. Why not? 
Because the leaders-Margie Carney, 
Ken Stuckey, Cafer Barkus, and BSA 
High Adventure guide Bill 
Richardson-have working flashlights 
and a good memory. They never forget 
that the Explorers neither know or 
care whether the sun is shining or not. 
The camp takes form quickly, and 
as it does you watch the guidance of- 
fered by the leaders. It is unobtrusive, 
smooth, often downright subtle: A 
quiet word or two to establish their 
nearness, a reassuring touch, a conven- 
ient elbow to grasp for help across a 
rough stretch of ground. It is seamless, 
natural, perfectly timed, always handy 
but never pushy. 



What is remarkable is how quickly 
the Explorers seem to orient them- 
selves to the camp layout and begin to 
get around on their own. It is as if they 
are listening to some inner voice: 

"Here is my tent, and over that way lies 
the cooking area and the big table. I can 
smell the smoke, and as I move closer I can 
feel the heat of the fire. I move toward the 
talk of those at the table, probing with my 
feet for the large stone I must step over along 
the way. Beyond the table is the rocky path to 
the latrine. Maybe I can make it by myself 
this time. I think I' 11 try ..." 

A stranger, coming upon Post 225 
in action, might at first assume it is just 
another post. And the (continued) 





longer it takes him to discover his er- 
ror the happier Post 225 will be. 

As the twilight dims, an Explorer 
(discreedy guided by a leader) cheer- 
fully stirs something steaming and fra- 
grant in a large cooking pot. Another, 
under equally minimal supervision, 
mixes the punch. A third, with no help 
whatever, announces that he is starving 
and wonders how many will still be 
alive to eat whatever the cooks are 
preparing. 

When, close to dark, they sit down 
to share their dehydrated chicken a la 
king, rice, applesauce, and cherry 
punch, they also share in the talk. You 
listen in — and learn more about the 
very high adventure of Post 225. 

Jeff... "and the wind came up so 



quick the boat started 
to lean way over, and 
we all tried to move to 
the other side to bal- 
ance it. For a minute 
there I thought we 
were going over for 
sure." 

Chris . . ."so don't 
ask me what I like 
best. We've done so 
many things I've lost 
track. Where were we 
yesterday morning for 
instance?" 

Mike: "Hey, it was 
neat the way Bill 
taught us to judge the 
wind direction by 
feeling how it blows 
on your cheeks. And 
how about that Braille 
compass we tried?" 

Jeff. . ."and I ad- 
mit I was scared when 
I stood on that ladder in the survival 
area and forced myself to fall back- 
wards. I wasn't sure you were going to 
catch me." 

Cafer: "We weren't sure we wanted 
to catch you!" 

(Laughter from everybody.) 
Christine: 'The other day, after I'd 
climbed that 20-foot wall, some staff 
man asked me if I'd felt I was going to 
make it, and I said, 'Yep!' Next he 
asked if I felt a little scared, and I said, 
'Yep! ' Next he wanted to know how I 
felt when I made it, and I said 'Good!' 
Finally he asked if I thought I could do 
it again, and I said, 'Yep!' He told me I 
talked like a Yankee." 

Mike: "Well didn't you?" 
Christine: 'Yep!" 



Kay: "Margie, did you ever climb a 
wall?" 

Margie: "Look, as the Advisor of 
this bunch of renegades I climb walls 
everyday!" 

(More laughter.) 

And so went the talk at that far- 
away dinner table on Long Island in 
the middle of Lake George, talk as 
boisterous and typical as that of any 
post anywhere. But there are also re- 
minders of differences between this 
post and others. Some of these re- 
minders are poignant and gende, as in 
the moments when a deaf-blind Ex- 
plorer reads aloud from a Braille edi- 
tion of the Scout Handbook. 

Other reminders can hit with stun- 
ning impact — as does one Explorer's 
outburst on public attitudes toward 
the blind: "Some people are scared to 
approach a blind person, or talk to us 
or make friends. What are they scared 
of? We're not going to 
punch them out! They're 
not going to go blind if 
they touch us! We're just 
as human as they are, ex- 
cept we can't see!" 

A different kind of 
problem, says Advisor Car- 
ney, is the occasional par- 
ent who is overcautious - 
a trait known to affect the 
parents of the nonhandi- 
capped as well. Says Car- 
ney, 'They feel our pro- 
gram should be less de- 
manding, that we're aiming at too 
high a target. What we say to them is, 
'Don't lower the target-raise your 
sights.'" 

Why do Post 225 's Explorers like 
being Explorers, especially in Post 



"When I stood 
on that ladder in 

the survival 

area and forced 

myself to fall 

backwards, 

I wasn 't sure you 

were going to 

catch me. " 



225? The leaders reflect: 

"For one thing," says veteran trip 
leader Ken Stuckey smiling, "it's the 
program. We try to give them experi- 
ences they can go back and tell their 
families and friends about, and every- 
body will say, 'Wow!'" 

"Another big point," says Associate 
Advisor Barkus, "is that Exploring en- 
ables them to be part of a program de- 
signed for all young people. Unless 
you're blind yourself, like me, you may 
not realize how important this is." 

"Our members," adds Stuckey, "go 
through a two-step routine. Step one 
is, 'I could never do that! ' And step two 
is, 'Hey, I did it!' Then they feel good 
about themselves, and it's hard not to 
like something that makes you feel 
good about yourself." 

"I'd say the bottom line is confi- 
dence," declares Bill Richardson, the 
BSA expert who guided Post 225 

through its Adirondack 
high adventure. 'They 
have more confidence 
about things after an 
experience like this. 
Someday that's going 
to pay off." 

At the last campfire 
Christine brings out her 
guitar, and they all sing 
and talk until the fire is a 
bed of softly burning em- 
bers. "Are the stars out 
tonight?" someone asks. 
'Yes they are," someone 
else answers. For a few moments there 
is silence — and then one by one, they 
trail off to bed. 

Only the leaders need flashlights. 

This article first appeared in the September 1 988 issue 
of Scouting magazine, (reprinted by permission) 



"The 
Beginning 

Of 
Everything 



Celebrating The l 00 ' h Anniversary 
Of Helen Keller's First Year at Perkins 



Helen Keller remembered her 
first visit to Perkins and New 
England in her 
autobiography, The Story of 
My Life. She thought of that 
first trip north as "the begin- 
ning of everything." 

"... I returned to my 
Southern home with a heart 
full of joyous memories. 
As I recall that visit North I 
am filled with wonder at the 
richness and variety of the experiences 
that cluster about it. It seems to have 




Helen and 
Perkins' 



been the beginning of everything. The 
treasures of a new beautiful world were 
laid at my feet, and I took in 
pleasure and information at 
every turn . . . The barren 
places between my mind and 
the minds of others blos- 
somed like the rose." 

Prior to coming to Per- 
kins for the first time, Helen 
anticipated the nip with 
high hopes. In letters to Di- 
rector Michael Anagnos, she expressed 
an ambitious wish for the time she was 



Michael A nagnos, 
second director. 




to spend here. "I do want to learn 
much about everything." In other 
letters she told Mr. Anagnos of her 
desire to meet the blind boys and girls 
who were attending the Perkins 
Kindergarten. 

Helen's expectations turned out 
to be modest. Helen, her mother, and 
her teacher Anne Sullivan, were re- 
ceived by President Grover Cleveland 
and Alexander Graham Bell on the 
trip north from her home in 
Tuscumbia, Alabama. 

When she arrived at Perkins she 



met students and teachers who could 
communicate with her using the man- 
ual alphabet. This was just what Helen 
had hoped for. 

New friends, new ideas . . . her 
world was expanding. With its expan- 
sion came increasing knowledge and 
freedom, and Helen compared this ex- 
perience to the blossoming of a flower. 

Over the next three-and-one-half 
years Helen's flower continued to 
bloom. Her writing improved dramati- 
cally. She began to master French 
without the benefit of a (continued) 



mil 



textbook or dictionary. 
She learned the basics of 
Greek and Latin. She de- 
veloped a love of poetry 
and literature which led 
to correspondence with 
John Greenleaf Whittier, 
Dr. Oliver Wendell 
Holmes, and Mark Twain. 
She began to learn to 
speak, raised funds to 
provide scholarships for 
less fortunate children to 
attend Perkins, and 
worked so hard at every- 
thing she did that her 
teachers feared for her 
health. 

Helen Keller came 
to Perkins with a wish "to 
learn much about every- 
thing." She made her 
wish come true and ac- 
complished much more. 
Perhaps the words of 
Helen's teacher, Perkins 
graduate Anne Sullivan, 
best describe the twelve 
year old Helen Keller 
who left Perkins in 1892. 
"(Helen is) a very bright 
and lovely child, un- 
marred by self-conscious- 
ness or any taint of evil. 
Every thought mirrored on her beauti- 
ful face, beaming with intelligence and 
affection, is a fresh joy, and this work- 
aday world seems fairer and brighter 
because she is in it. And while it is un- 
safe to predict what Helen's future will 
be, I know she is destined to be the in- 
strument of great good in the world, 



E IE I E B Si 






Perkins School for the 
Blind, 1889. 



We had scarcely 

arrived at the 

Perkins School for 

the Blind when I 

began to make 
friends with the 
little blind chil- 
dren. What a joy to 
talk with other chil- 
dren in my own lan- 
guage. Until then 
I had been like a 
foreigner speaking 
through an inter- 
preter. In the school 
where Laura 
Bridgman was 
taught I was in my 
own country. " 



Helen Keller 
Excerpt from 
The Story Of My Life 



not only by drawing forth 
the sympathies, and put- 
ting into exercise the 
kind emotions of others, 
but by teaching them 
how great things may be 
achieved under the worst 
difficulties and how 
pure, and sweet and 
joyous may be the exis- 
tence under the darkest 
cloud." 

It has been one hun- 
dred years since Helen 
began her formal aca- 
demic training at Per- 
kins. As we celebrate the 
anniversary of her new 
beginning, we must also 
celebrate the new begin- 
nings, opportunities and 
inspiration that her life 
has provided to so many 
others through the past 
hundred years. Anne 
Sullivan's prediction of 
greatness was propheti- 
cally accurate. 



R efe rences 

Hall, Florence Howe. 
"Helen Keller." St. Nicho- 
las, September 1889, pp. 
834-43. 
Keller, Helen. The Story of My Life. 
New York: Airmont, 1965. 

Lash, Joseph P. Helen and Teacher: 
The Story of Helen Keller and Anne Sulli- 
van Macy. New York: Dell, 1980. 

Waterhouse, Edward J. 'Helen 
Keller at Perkins." The Lantern, Spring 
1980, pp. 9-24. 



10 



Of Other Beginnings 



One hundred years ago, Helen 
Keller arrived at Perkins. Today, 
and throughout the past century, 
Helen's legacy of courage and inde- 
pendence has created opportunities for 
handicapped children like Isaac Hawke 
to learn and to grow. 

Little Isaac, who can't speak and 
communicates by tugging on people, 
is finally escaping his silent world. Only 
months after leaving the frustration of 
a classroom full of hearing children, 
he is attending Perkins, learning sign 
language and making good progress. 

"He's made a wonderful adjust- 
ment to Perkins," said Emily Lowell, 
one of his teachers. "He's calmer and 
he's started to understand signing. 
When he first came here he seemed 
unhappy. Now he is learning and en- 
joying himself in school." 



Isaac's mother, Nancy Hawke, 
said the transformation in her son 
has been "incredible," and that 
many of his behavior problems have 
disappeared. 

"He'd slap his head with his hand 
because he was so frustrated at not 
understanding," she said. "He rocked 
to ease the burden of being there." 

"His previous teachers didn't want 
to bother with him so they labeled him 
autistic and gave up on him. " 

Last May Isaac's former teachers 
reported he had shown "no significant 
progress in communications skills." In 
September Mrs. Hawke received a 
note from Perkins with a different mes- 
sage: "Isaac signed 'eat' today. Imag- 
ine three weeks of school and he's al- 
ready expressed his first formal sign! 
He's a great pleasure in our class." 



Part of this story is 
from an article by 
Andrea Estes that 
appeared in the No- 
vembers, 1988 
issue of The Boston 
Herald. 

Photography by Jim 
Davis. 




11 



As the first light of day brightens the 
Perkins campus, the cold February 
wind reminds you that the groundhog has 
just seen his shadow. Most of the students are 
sleeping. Their teachers hurry from the frosty 
morning into the warmth of the cottages, and 
a heavily bundled figure emerges from the 
Tompkins independent living apartment. 
He holds a cane in one hand, has what looks 
like a small suitcase slung over his shoulder, 
and carries a bookbag on his back. 



Follow Anindya Bhattacharyya as he 
makes his way along the brick walkway 
through the east close. As you do, you sense a 
determined purpose in what he is doing. 
Obviously, he has gotten an early start on 
the day for a reason. As he turns into an icy 
gust of wind and heads toward the North 
Building, you luonder what that reason 
might be. 

Anindya, or Andy as he is sometimes 
called, comes in from the cold and goes 



Follow Your Dreams . 
For As You Dream So 
Shall You Become. 




Following 
A Dream: 

From 
Calcuttalb 

Perkins 





12 



downstairs to the computer classroom. From 
the suitcase he takes apiece of equipment 
that at fast glance resembles a child 's phono- 
graph. Andy wouldn 't have much use for 
one of those. He is deaf-blind. Besides, this 
box is more valuable to Andy than any toy. 
Andy connects the box - a VersaBraille 
-to a computer. He inserts a cassette tape, 
makes the necessary keystrokes on the com- 
puter and on the braille keypad of the Ver- 
saBraille. He is up and running. 



Today Andy needs to print a paper 
he wrote on the VersaBraille for a European 
history class he attends at the Belmont 
Hill School. He inserts another cassette into 
the VersaBraille, and keys instructions to 
produce a print copy for his teacher and a 
braille copy for himself . As the title page 
rolls out of the printer . . . "The Dawn 
of the French Revolution" . . . Anindya 
Bhattacharyya begins another day. 
('Following A Dream" continues onpg. 14) 



Charles H. Thomas 




i 





Anindya, born deaf, attended pub- 
. lie school in Telrari, a village near 
Calcutta, India until he lost his vision 
in an accident at age nine. For the 
next four years his parents searched in 
vain for a school that could educate 
their deaf-blind son. Indian schools for 
the blind did not have the facilities or 
personnel to teach the deaf-blind. An- 
indya says that his family's strong faith 
kept them from giving up hope. A 
chance meeting with a former Perkins' 
teacher trainee encouraged the family 
to contact Perkins. 

In September 1983 Anindya ar- 
rived at Perkins as a scholarship stu- 
dent. He knew litde English and com- 
municated primarily by printing his 
native Bengali in his father's palm. He 
quickly began to learn English, sign 
language, and braille. The more he 
learned, the greater his appetite for 
knowlege became. After four years of 
communicating only with his immedi- 
ate family, the opportunity to begin re- 
lationships with the students and staff 
at Perkins opened a door to a new 
world. Anindya says, "When I came to 
Perkins my life changed a great deal. I 




Charles H. Thomas 



could go to school, make friends, and 
experience many new things. I en- 
joyed myself more and my motivation 
and independence increased. Most 
importantly, I learned to accept my 
blindness — I learned how much I 
could do." 

Anindya' s father stayed with him 
that first year. Since then Carol Crook, 
Anindya's first teacher at Perkins, has 
been his guardian. Although he corre- 
sponds with his family at least once a 
week, Anindya acknowledges that it 
has been difficult being away from 
them for much of the past six years. 

In that time, however, Andy's prog- 
ress at Perkins has been remarkable. 
His facility for learning language en- 
ables him to communicate fluendy in 
English, sign language, and braille. He 
is currentiy studying French through a 
braille correspondence course and 
with the guidance of a tutor. 

In September, 1987 another door 
opened. The Belmont Hill School ac- 
cepted Anindya as a part-time student. 
At Belmont Hill his studies have fo- 
cused on English literature and gram- 
mar, and United States and world his- 
tory. He dreams of 
attending college 
and hopes his 
preparation at 
Belmont Hill will 
sufficiendy comple- 
ment his education 
at Perkins to make 
that dream a reality. 
Anindya works 
hard at his studies, 
but the classroom is 
not the only place 
he has made his 
mark. He competes 



14 



for Perkins' athletic teams in track and 
field, swimming, and wresding. He 
also loves to work with his hands and is 
especially skilled in woodworking and 
sculpting with clay. 

Andy lives in the Tompkins inde- 
pendent living apartment where he 
and his two roommates are respon- 
sible for doing their own cooking, 
shopping, laundry, cleaning, and rec- 
reational planning. When Andy and 
his roommates graduate, their apart- 
ment living experience will enable 
them to live as more independent and 
productive members of the community. 

Apartment responsibilities, athlet- 
ics, hobbies, friends, church, commu- 
nity activities . . . and an ambitious aca- 
demic program; Anindya does not lack 
for things to do. Anything that can 
help him live more independently and 
make more productive use of his time 
is valuable. 

When Anindya talks about inde- 
pendence and making productive use 
of his time, a broad smile lights up his 
face. He immediately brings up the 
VersaBraille and how it has changed 
his life. 

Anindya uses the VersaBraille to 
talk with a computer just as a sighted, 
hearing person uses a keyboard or a 
mouse. Information is sent to the com- 
puter using the VersaBraille 's key- 
board which consists of the seven keys 
found on manual braille writing ma- 
chines. Information is received from 
the computer on a panel that can dis- 
play up to 20 braille characters. An- 
indya runs his finger over this panel 
and reads the braille just as a sighted 
person reads a line of text from a com- 
puter monitor. He continues to the 
next or previous line of text by tapping 




From Anindya To Everyone: 
Thank You! 

Anindya will not be taking any more 
early morning walks to use the Perkins 
VersBraille. He has his own now. 

When Mrs. Marcella Serafini of Milton, 
Mass. saw a local television segment on 
Andy and other Perkins students, she 
called to help. 

Her generous donation, joined with 
others from Trustees and friends of 
Belmont Hill School and Perkins, made 
the purchase possible. The new equip- 
ment - a VersaBraille and an IBM P/S 2 
computer with a printer and a modem - 
resides in Andy's dorm and offers access 
whenever needed. His grades have stead- 
ily improved, and quality study time has 
increased dramatically. 



the space bar on the VersaBraille 's key- 
board. 

When he talks about the Versa- 
Braille, however, Anindya does not 
spend much time explaining how it 
works. With the assistance of Perkins 
computer teacher Wendy Buckley, he 
has mastered the machine's operation. 
Anindya wants to talk about what he 
can do with this new technology. 

"When I started at Belmont Hill 
two years ago, I wanted to be able to 
compete with the other students there. 
I didn't do that well at first. When I 
wrote a term paper or an essay, I did it 
in braille first. Then I used a typewriter 
to make a print copy that my teacher 
could read. The problem with typing 
was that I couldn't see if I'd made a 
mistake. All the extra time and work I 



15 



was doing could have been used for 
reading or studying for tests. 

'With the VersaBraille I can proof- 
read my papers as much as I need to. 
Changes are easy to make on the com- 
puter, and my grammar is improving 
because I have more time to check my 
work. Also it is very easy to make a print 
copy for my teacher and a braille copy 
for myself." 

"My schoolwork is still very chal- 
lenging, but now I have more time to 
do it. I can pay attention to history, 
English, and grammar instead of 
spending all my time brailling and typ- 
ing. The VersaBraille has made it pos- 
sible for me to compete at Belmont 
Hill, and if I can keep doing that 
maybe I can go to college." 

The VersaBraille can do more than 
make writing papers easier. Think 
about communicating with a deaf- 
blind person. You could probably only 
do it with a third person interpreting 
in sign language. With the VersaBraille 
an interpreter is not needed. Anindya 
can braille into the VersaBraille and 
his words are displayed in print on the 
computer monitor. You can type into 
the computer via the keyboard and 
messages are displayed in braille on 
the panel of Anindya's VersaBraille. 
During this process, barriers to com- 
munication are removed. Once the 
door is opened, there is quite a lot to 
be heard and to be said. 

This makes Anindya smile even 
more brightly. You'll probably even 
hear the deep laugh that has become 
so recognizable around the Perkins 
campus. You see Anindya wants to at- 
tend college as a means to an even 
greater goal. There are many doors 
that need to be opened. 



'When I finish studying English 
and Communications in college," ex- 
plains Anindya, "I want to become an 
advocate for deaf-blind people 
throughout the world. I want to en- 
courage people to become more 
aware of deaf-blind and other handi- 
capped people. I want to see services 
for the deaf-blind in other countries 
improve. The United States has the 
most advanced services and technol- 
ogy, but third world countries need 
help setting up services and schools for 
the deaf-blind." 

When he is asked what he would 
communicate if he was an advocate for 
deaf-blind people today, Anindya does 
not hesitate. " I want people to under- 
stand that deaf-blind people are not so 
different. We use our minds the same 
way sighted, hearing people do. We 
have goals and dreams just like they 
do. Deaf-blind people have a lot to 
offer. 

'We want to be treated the same as 
other people. Sure we need help to do 
some things, but everyone needs help 
sometimes. We want what we can do to 
be recognized. 

"Finally, I want people to realize 
that they can't accept an attitude that 
says 'I couldn't live if I became deaf- 
blind or handicapped or if I had to 
face some other great problem.' They 
can! They can work through their 
problems and learn so much. It is im- 
portant to realize how you can deal 
with a handicap or other problem." 

Follow Anindya Bhattacharyya as he 
steps to the podium and begins to lecture 
about challenges facing handicapped people 
in the 21st century. His day is just begin- 
ning. . . 



16 



Introducing 
Reflections 

Reflections is a new col- 
umn designed to keep you 
up to date on the many 
events and activities hap- 
pening at Perkins. 

This column is for eve- 
ryone, so send us your sto- 
ries, snap shots and ideas - 
anything that you think is 
interesting. 

Jump Rope 
For Heart 

For the eighth consecu- 
tive year, Perkins students 
jumped rope, roller skated, 
pogo sticked and had a lot 
of fun while raising funds 
for the American Heart 
Association. This year al- 
most $1 ,200 was collected 
and Secondary Services' 
student Theresa White was 
the top fund raiser for the 
second year. 

Lower School 

student Jessica 

Flores hippity- 

hops for heart. 





Reflections 



Project Close Up 

During the week of 
April 23rd, four students 
from Secondary Services 
participated in the Project 
Close Up program held in 
Washington, D.C. The 
Close Up Foundation is a 
nonprofit, nonpartisan 
organization that has 
brought more than 
250,000 participants to 
Washington for a unique 
experience of studying our 
government. The Founda- 
tion strives to help people 
of all ages understand the 
responsibilities and oppor- 
tunities of citizenship in 
the United States. 

During the weeklong 
program, our students vis- 
ited the halls and commit- 
tee rooms of government 
and met the men and 
women who influence 
the course of American 
history. As Perkins 
Close Up participants, 
Sonja Allen, Tho- 
mas Gilbert, Kay 
Kelleher, and 
Frank Mclssac 



took part in daily study vis- 
its to the House of Repre- 
sentatives and the Senate, 
the Capitol, the Supreme 
Court, and various federal 
agencies. Throughout the 
week our students met 
high school students from 
across the United States, 
participated in workshops, 
and worked closely with 
their advisor, Secondary 
Services history 
teacher Mr. Ray 
Kiley. 







WiWir i 




Grappling With 
The Perkins 
Towermen 

The Perkins Towermen 
wrestling squad recently 
hosted the Park School of 
Brookline. Photos (clock- 
wise, upper left):Juana 
cheers for a Perkins pin 
while Jason does his best to 
avoid one. Michael puts his 
best move on classmate 
Luis. 



Doe -A- Deer... 

Secondary Services 
theatre classes de- 





lighted all who had the op- 
portunity to enjoy their 
performance of 'The 
Sound of Music." Coming 
soon to the Dwight Hall 
stage . . .'The King and I." 





Gymnastics 
Demonstration 

Tumbling routines, per- 
formances on the rings 
and the trampoline, the 
Perkins cheerleaders, and 
a floor hockey game com- 
bined to make this year's 
gym demonstration almost 
as much fun for the specta- 
tors as it was for the gym- 
nasts. 




International 
Day At Perkins 

Every school year men and 
women from around the 
world come to Perkins to 
further their educations in 
the fields of blindness and 
deaf-blindness. This year 
our teacher trainees 
hosted an International 
Day that gave Perkins stu- 
dents and staff the chance 
to experience culture and 
sample food from around 
the world. The Perkins 
community benefits in 
many ways from the pres- 
ence of our teacher train- 
ees, and the effort that 
went into organizing 
International Day was 
appreciated. 



Irham Hosni demon- 
strates a puppet from 
Indonesia. Teacher 
trainees from Korea, 
Sriljinka, Gambia, 
Colombia, Thailand, 
Argentina, and Spain 
participated in Inter- 
national Day. 





Maria-Pia Antonelli accepts the Director's congratulations for her 
35 years of sendee. 



Honored for service 
and commitment 

Longtime School and Howe Press 
employees were recognized at the 
Ninth Annual Service Awards Cere- 
mony. Those honored for their dedica- 
tion received a Certificate of Apprecia- 
tion and a gift. They also enjoyed a 
luncheon in the Director's home. 

"We have been blessed with many 
resources," said Perkins Director Kevin 
Lessard, "and our greatest resource 
has always been our staff. In a world 
that is increasingly complex, they have 
provided continuity of care and service 
for our students and clients." 

In accepting her award, Carol 
Crook said, "I'm grateful to Perkins for 
allowing me to experience and share 
in the joy and wonder involved in 
teaching a deaf-blind child language." 
Judy Bevins was thankful for the free- 
dom to be creative in her teaching, 
and Maria-Pia Antonelli said, "Music is 
the noblest of the arts. I hope our stu- 
dents have experienced some of that 
nobility." 



Honored for service and commitment to 
Perkins were: 

3 5 y e a r s Maria-Pia Antonelli, Teacher, 
Secondary Services 



3 y e a r s 

Lower School 



Judith A. Palmer, Teacher, 



2 5 y e a r s Judith E. Bevans, Teacher, 
Lower School; Ann Brennan, Accounting 
Clerk, Business Office; Ronald Caterino, Pur- 
chasing Coordinator, Howe Press; Sadie M. Clif- 
ford, Machine Operator, Howe Press; Carol L. 
Crook, Teacher, Deaf-Blind; Sarah A. McPhil- 
lips, Office Manager, Howe Press; Sally Stuckey, 
Teacher, Secondary Services 

2 y e a r s Dianne E. Curry, Teacher, 
Lower School; Mary McDonagh, Supervisor of 
Child Care, Lower School/Deaf-Blind; Gumer 
Padron, Final Assembler, Howe Press; Eu- 
staquio E. Sosa, Machine Shop Supervisor, 
Howe Press 

1 9 y e a r s Theodore Alger, Machine 
Operator, Howe Press; George Ball, Teacher, 
Lower School;Judith Cannon, Tour Guide/ 
Sales Clerk, Howe Press; Elizabeth Parkhurst, 
Secretary, Pre-School 

1 y e a r s Rose Agahigian, Secretary, 
Adult Services; Linda T Ahern, Teacher, Secon- 
dary Services; Julie Anderson, Supervisor, Out- 
reach Services; Sandra Boris-Berkowitz, 
Teacher, Deaf-Blind/Grants Office; Camille 
Bourque, Sub-Assembler, Howe Press; Wendy 
Wright Bridgeo, Teacher, Adult Services; Kath- 
erine A. Bull, Teacher, Deaf-Blind; Janet F. Ca- 
son, Teacher, Lower School; Frederick D. 
Craine, Appliance Department Assembler, 
Howe Press; Stephen Fox, Teacher, Secondary 
Services; Charles M. Pean, Machine Shop, 
Howe Press; Shrimathy Rajangam, Social 
Worker, Lower School; Judith Ann Sayenga, 
Teacher, Secondary Services; Arlene M. Velle- 
man, Teacher, Deaf-Blind 




20 




Perkins Project With 
Industry s Don Breda 
Honored 

The Carroll Awards are presented by 
the Massachusetts Commission for the 
Blind and the Carroll Center for the Blind 
to honor committed and dedicated blind 
and visually impaired employees who have 
made outstanding contributions in their 
fields. Donald J. Breda, Perkins Project 
with Industry's Training and Technical 
Specialist recently received the Carroll 
Award and was selected as a member of 
the Carroll Society. We recognize his con- 
tributions to Perkins and the clients he 
works with, and we congratulate Don for 
receiving this prestigious award. 



PERKINS 
PROJECT 
WITH 
INDUSTRY 



Are you or your employer looking for quali- 
fied employees ? Perkins Project With Indus- 
try could be a recruiting resource for you. 

The Perkins Project With Industry 
offers comprehensive recruitment services 
for New England employers. We provide 
services to approximately 200 employers 
a year, and we have a large pool of pre- 
screened candidates for your considera- 
tion. 

We specialize in placing and training 
individuals who are blind or visually handi- 
capped. The following services are avail- 
able to your company: 

Employer training: Disability awareness 
training and specific training for co-work- 
ers and supervisors. 

Candidate referred: Pre-screened candi- 
dates are available for entry-level to man- 
agement positions. 

Worksite Access: Suggestions about 
worksite accessibility are provided. 

Rehabilitation Engineering: If access is 
needed (i.e. speech, large print, or braille 
output on computers) a rehabilitation en- 
gineer will work with the employer. 

On-Site training: Technical and Uansi- 
tional support for new employees is avail- 
able. 

Candidates have varied abilities and 
their educational backgrounds range from 
high school diplomas to doctoral degrees. 

For more information, please call 
Susan Plunkett, the Project Director, at 
924-3434 ext. 433, or write the Perkins 
Project With Industry, 175 North Beacon 
Street, Water town, MA 02172. 



21 



Rear h i n g H i g h 

Perkins First-Ever 
Capital Campaign 
Surpasses Goal 

Trying something for the first time 
brings inherent uncertainty. Yet cover- 
ing new territory can be challenging 
and tremendously satisfying and 
fulfilling... especially with devoted, loyal 
friends sharing the experience. 

As is invariably the case when cov- 
ering uncharted territory, we have 
learned a great deal. Perhaps the sim- 
plest yet most important lesson 
learned is that the support of caring 
friends is crucial to the success of any 
worthwhile undertaking. 

We are pleased to announce that 
in Perkins' first-ever Capital Campaign 
we have surpassed our two million dol- 
lar goal. To our Trustees, Corporation 
members, and staff, the participating 
foundations and corporations, and to 
our generous Annual Fund (Children 
of the Silent Night) donors, thank you. 
We could not have reached our goal 
without your support. 

Work on the Lower School has al- 
ready begun. Additional electrical serv- 
ice has been provided and renovations 
in the buildings will continue through 
the summer. From everyone at Perk- 
ins, especially from our Lower School 
students who will benefit the most 
from your generosity, thank you all. 




In Gratitude 



Perkins School for the Blind gratefully ac- 
knowledges recent donations in memory of 
Concetta Anderson, Donald Apple ton, Lillian 
Baker, Florence W. Barbour, Raymond E. Bar- 
ton, Donald H. Blair, Jennie T. Caira, Armand 
J. Carrier, Paul Chaisson, Elizabeth Clancy, Ber- 
tram Clayton, David Sampson Coish, Grace Con- 
nelly, Merle Cummings, Patrick Dalton, Stephen 
R. Davenport, Frank DiNatali, Guy D'Orlando, 
John Earl, Louise Eaton, Walter Floren, Debo- 
rah I. Flynn, Jimmy Foley, Nora Foley, Richard 
Fox, Members of the Gaines Family, Kathleen 
M. Gauss, Carl R. Hannus, Margery Hegarty, 
Arthur Heidhe, Margaret K. Joyce, Thomas 
Kane, Ruth Kiddy, Marion Page Kimball, Mi- 
chael J. Kovalski, William C. Lane, Paul I,au- 
ricella, J. Ward Leonard, Ira G Libby, Charles 
Herbert Listman, Mae Lovett, Margaret Driscoll 
MacLeod, William J. Mahony, Charles Maniace, 
Florence E. Martin, Rose M. Martin, Lena M. 
McCarthy, Virginia McConnell, Henry Morning- 
star, Armando Nappi, Evelyn Northrup, Frank 
O'Malley, Michael Osborn, Harry Osterofsky, 
Emil M. Pistoresi, Elizabeth S. Proctor, Thomas 
Pugliese, Violet Ronson, A. Arthur Rosse, Dr. 
Linus Sheehan, Carmela Sicuso, Ray N. Simpson, 
Amy Somers, Leila Straw, Sereno E. Streeter, 
Mary Thorner, Tom Walker, Mildred Webster. 



22 




Perkins Endowment 

The Perkins Program as it has de- 
veloped and been maintained for 
more than one hundred and fifty years 
has relied upon a growing endowment 
at every step along the way. 

Endowments which are adequate 
to put a program into effect are rarely 
sufficient to keep it going. As with 
every private school and college that is 
keeping abreast or ahead of the times, 
Perkins needs to see its endowment 
grow. Through bequests and dona- 
tions, and through a few government 
grants, we have been able to expand 
existing services and add new ones as 
needed. We are confident that our 
friends will continue to support us in 
ever increasing amounts. 



Form of Bequest 

I hereby give, devise, and be- 
queath to the Perkins School for the 
Blind, a corporation duly organized 
and existing under the laws of the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts, the 

sum of dollars 

($ ) , the same to be applied to 

the general uses and purposes of said 
corporation under the direction of its 
Board of Trustees; and I do hereby di- 
rect that the receipt of the Treasurer 
for the time being of said corporation 
shall be sufficient discharge to my ex- 
ecutors for the same. 

Form of Devise of Real Estate 

I give, devise and bequeath to the 
Perkins School for the Blind, a corpo- 
ration duly organized and existing un- 
der the laws of the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts, that certain tract of real 
estate bounded and described as fol- 
lows: 

(Here describe the real estate accu- 
rately) 

with full power to sell, mortgage and 
convey the same free of all trust. 

Notice 

The address of the Treasurer of 
the Corporation is as follows: JOHN 
W. BRYANT, Fiduciary Trust Co., 175 
Federal Street, P.O. Box 1647 
Boston, MA 02105-1647 



23 



Perkins School for the Blind 



Perkins School for the Blind was in- 
corporated March 2, 1829. The school is 
an accredited member of the New Eng- 
land Association of Schools and Colleges, 
the National Accreditation Council for 
Agencies Serving the Blind and Visually 
Handicapped, and the National Associa- 
tion of Independent Schools. It is licensed 
by the Massachusetts Departments of Edu- 
cation and Mental Retardation — and by 
the Commonwealth's Office for Children. 



'The Perkins School for the Blind 
admits students of any race, color, national 
and ethnic origin to all the rights, privi- 
leges, programs, and activities generally ac- 
corded or made available to students at the 
school. It does not discriminate on the ba- 
sis of race, color, national or ethnic origin 
in the administration of its educational 
policies, scholarship and loan programs, 
and athletic and other school-admini- 
stered programs." 



Perkins School 

for the Blind 

175 North Beacon Street 

Watertown, MA 

02172-9982 

(617) 924-3434 



Non-Profit 
Organization 

Bulk Rate 

U.S. Postage 

PAID 

Permit No. 56547 

Boston, MA 



TheLantern 




Perkins School For The Blind Fall 1989 



The Lantern 



Message From The Director 

The Hilton/Perkins Program 
Responsibility And Vision 



Perkins School for the Blind's long and distinguished history is often 
highlighted in TJie Lantern as a reminder to all of us of the legacy of ac- 
complishment and innovation that we continue to carry on today, f 
Our legacy of past accomplishment serves as a reminder of current 
responsibility, and although remembering our history is important, 
when we celebrate the past we must do so with a clear view of the fu- 
ture. We must meet the emerging needs of students, clients and their 
families today and tomorrow, f On August 8th of this year, the Conrad 
N. Hilton Foundation of Los Angeles, California awarded Perkins a 
grant that will enable us to make major advances in providing serv- 
ices to multi-handicapped blind children and their families in this 
country and internationally. The funds provided by the Hilton Foun- 
dation will be directed to the new programs and services described later 
in this issue of The Lantern, f The dedication and commitment of our 
current staff and our history of successful response to challenge 
qualifies Perkins to administer the Conrad N. Hilton Foundation 
Grant. I am confident that with the continued dedication of our staff 
and the commitment of our friends, we will suc- 
cessfully implement the new and much needed 
Hilton/Perkins Program, while continuing to pro- 
vide quality services in all of our ongoing programs. 
Kevin J. Lessard, Director 







4 Learning To See 

Low Vision Services is helping Perkins students like Beth Gannon 
and Katy Gareau make the most of the vision they have. 




Though summer is 
gone, its warmth is 
still with us. 

Cover and above: 
Jason Kuzmeskus 



9 Summer School 

As autumn ushers in cooler weather and brilliant colors, 
share our students' warm memories of summer and perhaps be 
reminded of some of your own. 

12 The Hilton/Perkins Program 

A major grant from the Conrad N. Hilton Foundation of Los 
Angeles, California will enable Perkins to initiate new programs 
in underserved areas. 



14 Young Artists 

Bright, bold and inspired. The art created by our Lower School 
students is uniquely expressive. 



16 Graduation 

18 Teacher Training Graduation 

20 Reflections 

22 Development 



The Lantern 

Volume LIX, Number 1 
Fall 1989 



Contents 



JL riends and visi- 
tors often ask if 
all the Perkins stu- 
dents and clients 
are blind The an- 
swer is not simply 
yes or no. Our stu- 
dents are not all 

totally blind. They have a wide range of 
visual impairments and visual abilities. 
Some perceive only light, while others 
can read normal size print. Beth Gan- 
non and Katy Gareau provide two re- 
vealing examples of students who have 
some visual ability. Our challenge is to 
teach Beth, Katy, and all our students 
to use their vision to the fullest extent 
possible. 

Low Vision Services Coordinator 
Vickie Brennan, Low Vision Education 




Specialist Dennis 
Lolli, and each 
member of the 
Perkins staff meet 
this challenge ev- 
ery day. The Low 
Vision Program, 
initiated on the 
Perkins campus in 1983, provides a full 
complement of vision services. Each of 
our students and clients is examined by 
a doctor of optometry at least once a 
year in our on-campus low vision clinic. 
The Perkins Clinic is associated with 
the New England College of Optome- 
try, and students from the college serve 
as interns at Perkins. 

In addition to doing examinations 
and prescribing optical aids for our 
students, low vision specialists and op- 



o & r 



Learning 
To See 



* 






Treasure hunt 




Watching 1 year old Lower 
School student Beth Gannon and 
Low Vision Specialist Donna 
Duggan during mobility class 
illustrates that Iiard work can be 
a lot of fun. 

As class begins, Beth reaches 
into a shopping bag filled with 
brightly colored objects and picks 
out a red shoelace. Size looks it over 
and describes what she sees to 
Donna. 

Now the real fun - and work - 
begins. Beth needs to find another 
shoelace just like the one she s cho- 
sen from the shopping bag. Donna 
gives Beth a clue— 
"Look on the Lower 
School bulletin 
board." Beth de- 
cides on a route 
and heads off to 
find the missing 
shoelace. 

As tliey cross 
the Lower School 
campus Donna oc- 
casionally has to remind Beth to 
keep her head up and to use her vi- 
sion. Beth soon finds the bulletin 
board and locates the shoelace. 
"How did you find it?" Donna 
asks. "I used my vision, " is the 
immediate reply. 



Beth finds several other items 
and matches them with things site's 
drawn from Donna s shopping 
bag. She is obviously enjoying the 
class, but she is also concentrating 
hard on using her vision. 

Although this class may have 
seemed like a simple treasure hunt, 
it was much more than that. When 
Beth arrived at Perkins, her medi- 
cal records indicated that she had 
virtually no vision — she was 
thought to see only shadows. Four 
years later, "games " like the one she 
played with Donna are in a sense 
teaching Beth to see. 







Surprise! 



When Katy Gareau arrives for 
her mobility lesson she seems on the 
verge of bubbling over. Something 
is funny and Katy has the giggles, 
but she won 't tell mobility instruc- 
tor Janet Cason why. She luants to 
keep it a secret. 

As their lesson begins, Katy 
guides herself through the Lower 
School courtyard, across the Perk- 
ins campus, and into the Howe 
Building snack bar using her cane 
and her vision. The twelve year old 
has practiced this route often, and 
she travels quickly and confidently. 
Her cane frees her to use her vision 
to look for landmarks along her 
route, rather than at the path di- 
rectly in front of her. 

When they arrive at the snack 
bar, Janet helps Katy establish a 
"home base " near the light switch. 
From there Katy is asked to stop, 
look around the room, and get 
herself oriented. She focuses on the 



windows that line t/ie snack bar 
walls, walks to one window, then 
finds the plants hanging near cm- 
other window. As Katy moves 
through the room, Janet reminds 
her to use her vision. She does. 

She avoids the various tables 
and, chairs, sees tlie juice machine, 
and begins to giggle again. After 
returning to "home base" and mov- 
ing through the room several more 
times for practice, Katy goes back to 
the machine and selects two apple 
juices. Her smile and laugh make it 
evident that she has enjoyed the 
lesson, but she has also worked 
hard at using her vision. As she sits 
down to enjoy iter cool drink, Katy 
reveals her secret. She offers the sec- 
ond juice to her teacher. "Surprise!" 

Katy s records, like Beth s, indi- 
cated that she had virtually no 
vision when she arrived at Perkins 
four years ago. And, like Beth, 
Katy is learning to use the vision 
she has. 




tometrists are available to consult with 
teachers and do environmental evalu- 
ations and vision stimulation training. 
These services are not available in most 
conventional low vision clinics. Accord- 
ing to mobility instructor Janet Cason, 
"Vickie's consultation reinforced what 
I learned in graduate school. She 
helped me formulate goals to encour- 
age Katy to use her vision." 

Katy's situation demonstrates the 
value of Low Vision Services. Katy's first 
teacher, Mary McCarthy, believed that 
her new student possessed more vision 
than was indicated in the reports she'd 
read. She set up an appointment with 
Vickie and clinic optometrist Dr. Charles 
Patorgis. Mary wanted to know if Katy 
had usable vision. 

According to Vickie Brennan, the 
results of Katy's first evaluation were 
remarkable. 'The most striking mem- 
ory I have from that first day," said 



Vickie, "is of an assessment we did 
with colored pictures. Although Katy 
couldn't name the different colors, she 
sorted the pictures by color. This was 
extremely surprising for someone who 
was thought to perceive only light." 

We know students like Katy have 
visual impairments. We use functional 
vision evaluations to find out how they 
perform with the vision they have, 
and how we can enhance their vision 
or their environment so they can 
perform better. 

Vickie and Dr. Patorgis believe that 
such evaluations contribute to make 
Perkins Low Vision Services unique. 
According to Vickie, "What makes us 
different is that we are serving a multi- 
handicapped population, and we are 
educationally rather than medically 
based. We have some very creative ways 
of evaluating the vision of students who 
are difficult to test because of their 



It is a mistake to 

assume that someone 

who has vision 

will automatically 

use it. Learning to 

see is learning to use 

existing vision 

in the most effective 

way possible. 





other disabilities. Also, our evaluations 
are ongoing because we are constantly 
getting input from parents, teachers, 
houseparents, and program aides - the 
people who know our students best. 
Finally, we take a multi-sensory ap- 
proach to low vision. If a student has 
poor vision and does not receive assis- 
tance interpreting what is seen, that 
student tends to rely on other senses. 
We teach them to use their remaining 
vision with their other senses." 

Dr. Patorgis adds that "the on-cam- 
pus clinic is incredibly valuable. Stu- 
dents are evaluated in a natural envi- 
ronment, and their progress is closely 
monitored so examinations are more 
reliable." 

Reliable examinations usually lead 
to progress. Through a series of evalu- 
ations, Beth and Katy were found to 
have usable vision, and this knowledge 
was effectively communicated to their 
parents and to the Perkins staff who 
work with them. According to Dr. 
Kathy Miller, another optometrist in 
our clinic, "It is crucial that everyone 



working with a student encourage and 
reinforce the use of vision. Improving 
our students' visual skills must be part 
of a team effort." 

Beth Gannon's classroom teacher, 
Mary McCarthy, is a key member of the 
"team" Dr. Miller is referring to. Mary 
often reminds Beth to use her vision in 
the classroom. "We are treating her as 
a seeing person. Her confidence and 
the good feeling that comes from 
being able to do things for herself must 
continue to develop." 

Coordinator Vickie Brennan sums 
up the work of Low Vision Services say- 
ing, "It is a mistake to assume that if 
someone has vision they will automati- 
cally use it. Many of our students do 
not know how to interpret what they 
are seeing. Our goal is to understand 
how our students see so we can help 
them to understand what they are see- 
ing. Learning to see is learning to use 
existing vision in the most effective way 
possible. Beth, Katy, and many of our 
other students are learning to do this, 
and it makes a difference." 

We hope to provide low vision services to 
multi-handicapped children beyond the Perk- 
ins campus. This hope has been partially re- 
alized through a federally funded project that 
brings our services to deaf-blind children 
throughout New England. Perkins Low Vi- 
sion specialists are assessing children in their 
homes and schools and assisting families 
and teachers develop and implement pro- 
grams to help deaf-blind children "learn to 
see. " If you know of a child with vision and 
hearing impairments who might benefit 
from this service, please call us at (61 7) 
924-3434, extension x296. 



S. II M H E ft 



SCHOOL 



Summertime. What memories return from 
past summers? The beach ... the mountains ... a favor- 
ite lake ... keeping cool when it was hot. Devouring ice 
cream after a cookout ... gazing at fireworks ... read- 
ing a good book. Perhaps trying something for the first 
time... like water skiing, sculling, or kayaking. 

Summer is a special time for all of us, and the 

students at Perkins are no exception. For them summer 
school provides an opportunity to improve daily 
living, social, and academic skills. And as you can 
see, it also provides an opportunity for much more. 






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12 



Director Kevin J. Lessard announc 
ed recently that the School has 
received a $15 million grant from the 
Conrad N. Hilton Foundation of Los 
Angeles, California. This grant, to 
be distributed over 
the next five years, 
is one of the largest 
ever made in the 
area of blindness 
and special educa- 
tion. It is the largest 
grant ever received 
by the Perkins 
School. 

The Hilton 
Foundation, established in 1944 by 
Conrad Hilton, the founder of Hilton 
Hotels Corporation, has provided 
Perkins with funding for the develop- 
ment of new programs designed to 
support the multi-handicapped blind 
and their families in the United States 
and around the world. 

"Major new program initiatives will 
be undertaken in a variety of areas," 



This is a unique opportunity 



TO PROVIDE NEW SERVICES 



FOR MULTI-HANDICAPPED BLIND 



CHILDREN AND THEIR PARENTS. 



said Lessard. 'The Hilton/Perkins 
National Program will include 
home-based services for blind multi- 
handicapped infants and their families, 
support systems for parents of blind 

multi-handicapped 
children, and fi- 
nancial assistance 
for the training of 
teachers at colleges 
and universities. 
Perkins welcomes 
the opportunity to 
initiate the innova- 
tive programs to be 
funded by the 
Conrad N. Hilton Foundation." 

Presendy, few services exist for 
comprehensive care of multi-handi- 
capped blind infants. Parents often 
endure the early weeks and months of 
their children's lives with very little 
support. The goal of the Hilton/ 
Perkins Infant Toddler Program is to 
provide early intervention and consul- 
tation to under-served populations in 



Perkins Receives 

Hilton Foundation Grant 

For The Creation Of 

New Programs 



13 



four model service areas around the 
country. 

Parents also often need support 
raising their multi-impaired blind chil- 
dren. The Hilton/Perkins program 
will include a component designed to 
give parents support and direction for 
the training and education of their 
children. It will help parents care for 
and advocate on behalf of their chil- 
dren as they grow older, begin school, 
and eventually become integrated into 
the community. 

Unfortunately, as multi-handi- 
capped blind children approach 
school age, their parents find that 
there is a great shortage of trained 
teachers for special needs students in 
the United States. To address this ur- 
gent need, the Hilton/Perkins 
Program plans to expand teacher 
training and in-service training on a 
national level. 

The Hilton/Perkins Program also 
provides for an international compo- 
nent which includes some services that 



are similar to those in the National 
Program. Services will be provided for 
parents of blind and multi-handi- 
capped infants in several countries in 
Asia, Africa, and Latin America. The 
Hilton/Perkins International 
Program also will emphasize teacher 
training as the most effective way to 
expand services for multi-handicapped 
blind children and adults throughout 
the world. In addition to ongoing 
training of special education teachers, 
the program will sponsor special tech- 
nical assistance projects each year for 
the training of parents and profession- 
als in foreign countries. 

C. Richard Carlson, the President 
of the Board of Trustees at Perkins, 
expressed the gratitude of the Perkins 
community to the Conrad Hilton 
Foundation "for a special and unique 
opportunity to expand services for 
multi-handicapped blind children and 
their parents in the United States and 
around the world." 




II 




Young 
Artists 




The creations of our 
Lower School students 
are displayed each 
May at the Parents' 
Week Art Show. This 
exhibit is the culmina- 
tion of a year's work 
on projects that incorporate a variety 
of materials. Clay, wood, fabric, card- 
board, and more are used in creations 
that are as pleasing visually as they are 
tactually. 



The artistic efforts of these stu- 
dents, ages 5-14, have been directed by 
Ms. Robby Tomascoff for the past 10 
years. Her objectives are similar to 
those of our other teachers - improv- 
ing hand, language, and social skills, 
and expanding expressive abilities. 

The Art Show allows Robby' s stu- 
dents to experience the pride and satis- 
faction of sharing their work with par- 
ents, classmates, and the entire Perkins 
community. 



15 






T 




i / Every year, the 

\ ^|l highlight of the 

show is an original 
quilt based on a different 
theme such as "Imaginary 
Animals," "Seasons^' or "Environments." 
Students each create their own 
squares. They choose fabrics, then cut, 
pin, and sew each square with Robby's 
guidance. Individual squares are 
joined together, and the finished quilt 
is a true work of art. 



Our students wish their work could 
be seen and touched by more people. 
They'd like to share it with you. 

If you know of a place - a library, 
office building, or 
mall - where one 
of our quilts might 
be enjoyed, call 
Public Relations W^Pt 
at (617) 924-3434, 
extension 335. 








16 



Nineteen members of the 
Class of 1989 participated 
in Commencement Exercises on 
the morning ofjnne 16, 1989. 
Patricia M. Taylor, the Coordina- 
tor of Deaf -Blind Services for the 
Connecticut Board of Education, 
addressed the class. 

Patty Taylor was praised 
by Director Kevin Lessard for 
providing almost fifty years of 
service to blind and deaf-blind 
students. The Anne Sullivan 
Medal winner began her career 
in 1941 after graduating from 
the Perkins Teacher Training 
Program which was then affili- 
ated with Harvard University. 
Prior to the graduation exercises 
that year, she left Perkins to 
start work at The Seeing Eye in 
Morristown, NJ. She never re- 
ceived her diploma. To the de- 
light of the Class of 1989 and 
their guests, the Director made 
up for this and awarded Patricia 
M. Taylor with a well deserved 
and long awaited Teacher 
Training Diploma. 

Kevin Lessard and C. Richard 
Carlson, President of the Perkins 
Board of Trustees, presented 
Diplomas and Certificates of 
Accomplishment to the graduates. 





The Class of 1989 - Denise Theresa 
Baker, Quincy, MA; Dolly Lynn 
Boyce, Belmont, MA; Cynthia 
Jeanne Connors, Epsom, NH; 
Michael Lawrence Dolan, Peabody, 
MA; James Edward Feeney, Jr., 
Cumberland, RI; Matthew John 
Fitzgerald, Marblehead, MA; 
Thomas James Gilbert, Somerville, 
MA; Dean Lamar Gordon, Warrens- 
ville Heights, OH; Kerry Wayne 
Ingalls, North Springfield, VT; Brian 
David Kelly, Franklin, MA; Thomas 
Aithony Lennon,Jr., Maiden, MA; 
Francis Raymond Mclsaac, East 
Weymouth, MA; Erin Janette 
McNamara, Dorchester, MA; Derek 
David Meachen, Trumbull, CT; 
Ronald Scott Minott, Windham, ME; 
Valerie Jean Morris, Holyoke, MA; 
Louise Nowell, Woburn, MA; James 
Thomas Ryan, Swansea, MA; 
Elizabeth Souza, Dorchester, MA. 

Annual Awards: The RobertJ. 
Giggey Award for Reading - Chui 
Hei Chan; The Carl H. Waddell 
Memorial Prize for Girls' Athletics - 
Denise Theresa Baker; The Joseph 
E. Wiedenmayer Achievement 
Award -James Thomas Ryan; The 
Rose Vivian Academic Achievement 
Award -James Thomas Ryan. 



Graduation 



17 








J. o everyone at Perkins 
who has helped James and 
touched our lives . . . thank you 
for all you have done to help 
our son become the man he is 
today. You met him at the 
worst time of his life and saw 
him leave on one of the happi- 
est and proudest days of his 
life and ours, f Being a par- 
ent was made easier knowing 
that a support system was 
there and ahoays willing to 
help, f As you continue to 
share with the students en- 
trusted to your care, know that 
you will never be forgotten. 

With much love and gratitude, 
Barbara andJimRyan, parents 
of James Ryan, Class of 1989 




James Ryan is all smiles after receiv- 
ing his high school diploma and two 
awards for academic excellence. 



18 



Every graduating class at every 
school is composed of a unique- 
blend of personalities and talents, but 
there was something special about the 
1989 Perkins Teacher Trainees. Perhaps 
it was the two Inter- 
national Days they 
hosted for the Per- 
kins community, or 
the motivation and 
spirit they exhibited 
in all they did. Pro- 
gram Supervisor 
Cafer Barkus said 
of the class, 'These 
trainees were in- 
volved even more than usual. There 
was a liveliness, an enthusiasm, that 
lent itself to greater integration into 
the life of the school. They got along 
extremely well among themselves, with 
the Perkins staff, and with our students 
and clients. The chemistry was abso- 
lutely right! " 




This class was also special in an- 
other way. The majority of the nine 
trainees will return home to begin 
teacher training programs. By educat- 
ing teachers in their own countries, 

they will multiply the 
knowledge they 
gained in the Perk- 
ins Program. As the 
saying goes, "you 
can give a man a fish 
and feed him for a 
day -but if you 
teach him to fish, 
you've nourished 
him for a lifetime." 
Our graduates and the teachers they 
train will improve the lives of blind 
and visually impaired children 
throughout the world. 

Good chemistry was certainly on 
display at the Teacher Training 
Graduation Exercises held on the 
morning of May 26th. Students and 
staff greeted the graduates with a 



Teacher Trainees 
Graduate And Return 
To The Far Corners 

Of The World 




19 



warm ovation and, following remarks 
by Kevin Lessard and Perkins' Direc- 
tor of International Services, Larry 
Campbell, the Secondary Services 
Choir treated the graduates to a rendi- 
tion of "The Greatest Love of All." Mrs. 
Betty Fulton of Sherwood, Michigan 
was then recognized for her contribu- 
tion to the Teacher Training Program. 
For years Betty has welcomed Perkins 
Trainees into her home prior to 
their arrival in Watertown, and she 
also has hosted many trainees during 
Christmas vacations. 

Danuta Wojnacki of Argentina 
spoke for the class and expressed 
thanks for the opportunity to partici- 
pate in the Perkins Program. Diplomas 
and Certificates were then awarded, 
and the class received another ovation. 

We wish them all the best as they 
return home to begin their crucial 
work. 




Former Teacher 
Training Pro- 
gram Supervisor 
Liz Sparks shares 
a joyful moment, 
with graduate 
Suwimon 
Udom-Piriyasak 
of Thailand . 



The 1989 Graduates: 
Amadou Kebbeh, Gambia 
Suwimon Udom-Piriyasak, Thailand 
Irham Hosni, Indonesia 
Yang Su Cho, South Korea 
Danuta Wojnacki, Argentina 
Luz Elena Tirado, Colombia 
Sari Rudiyati, Indonesia 
Bart DeVries, Holland 
Ranjith Dhanapala, Sri Lanka 




20 




Outreach Services 

The Perkins Outreach 
Sendees brings mainstream- 
ed visually impaired students 
together with their peers. 
The importance of meet- 
ing friends who can under- 
stand the frustrations and 
accomplishments of being 




a blind student in a public 
school classroom cannot 
be underestimated. In the 
past, Outreach Teen 
Weekends have provided 
the opportunity for main- 
streamed students to spend 
time together. This summer 
we organized a five-week 
program which included 
academic and computer 
skills tutorials, career 
counseling, and a variety 
of outdoor activities. The 
students were terrifically 
enthusiastic, and we hope 
to offer a similar program 
next summer. 



Reflections 

Perkins people and happenings 



on campus and abroad 



Perkins in Poland 
With Barbara Bush 

This past July, as President 
George Bush travelled 
through Europe, first lady 
Barbara Bush made some 
side trips on her own. 
When she visited the Laski 
School for the young dis- 
abled in Warsaw, Poland, 
Mrs. Bush received a choral 
welcome and a bouquet of 
red, white, and blue flowers 
from the students there. 
In return, Mrs. Bush pre- 
sented a Perkins Brailler to 
the school as a gift from 
the American people. 




The Perkins 
Brailler was designed 
in the 1940's by David 
Abraham, a teacher in our 
Industrial Arts Department. 
The machine is basically 
a braille typewriter. Howe 
Press here on the Perkins 
campus has produced 
almost 200,000 braillers 
since 1951. 

We are pleased that our 
small contribution helped 
make Mrs. Bush's visit a 
success, and we hope that 
the brailler will help the 
Polish students as they 
strive to improve their lives 
and increase their inde- 
pendence. 



21 



Alumni Weekend 

Kevin Lessard received this 
thank you note from our 
alumni following their re- 
cent reunion weekend. We 
share it here with friends of 
Perkins hoping that it com- 
municates the warm feel- 
ings shared by the School 
and our students. 

Dear Mr. Lessard: 

The members of the Perkins 
Alumni Association wish to ex- 
press to you their heartfelt thanks 
for a wonderful weekend reunion. 
Old friendships were renewed, new 
friendships were made, and with so 
many members of the 50th reunion 
class returning, it was a chance for 
many members to see classmates 
they d been out of touch with 
foryears. 

The membership is well aware 
of the needs of the School. Sent with 
a strongfeeling of love and dedica- 
tion for our former School, and in 
many cases home away from home, 
we hope the enclosed gift will, in 
some small way help those who, 
; like us in past years, currently 
receive so much from their Perkins 
educations. 

With Sincere Best Wishes, 
George E. Blake, 
Class of 1955 
Treasurer, 
Perkins Alumni 
Association 



Reflections 

We hope you've enjoyed 
the first two editions of 
Reflections. It's designed to 
bring you closer to the 
people and the wide variety 
of happenings at Perkins. 

Reflections is a column for 
everyone. Please send your 
ideas and photos! 



That's Why We Call 
Them Explorers 

You never know where the 
Explorers of Perkins Post 
225 and their fearless 
leader, Perkins Research 
Librarian Ken Stuckey, are 
going to wind up next. It 
could be high adventure 
camp in the Adirondacks, 
Fenway Park, Mystic Sea- 
port, or a sugar farm in 
New Hampshire. How 
about llama trekking 
through the woods of 
Maine?! 





The King and I 
The King and I 
The King and I 

In Siam, no one's head can 
be higher than the King's. 
Fortunately, the rules are 
different here at Perkins. 
All of the Secondary Serv- 
ices students who contrib- 
uted to the musical produc- 
tion of 'The King and I" de- 
serve to hold their heads 
high . . . whether the King 
approves or not! 

Alumni 
Calender 

Monday, November 6, 1 1 am 
Corporation Day Director's 
Memorial Exercises 

Sunday, December 17, 3 pm 
Holiday Concert 

Tuesday, December 19, 7:30 pm 
Holiday Concert 

Saturday, May 5, 1 pm 
Alumni Baseball Game 

Friday, June 15, 11 am 
Graduation Exercises 

June 15 -17 
Alumni Weekend 



22 



Inaugural Pooled Life 
Income Gift 



Raymond Vernon of 
Harvard University's 
Kennedy School of 
Government has had a 
keen interest in the educa- 
tion of blind and visually 
impaired students for 
many years. 

Professor Vernon has 
had recurring eye prob- 
lems for most of his life. 
During the 1940's his vis- 
ual impairment became 
so severe that he taught 
himself to read braille. As a scholar 
and a voracious reader, his braille 
skills and the talking books his wife 
Josephine created proved invaluable to 
him as his vision continued to fluctuate. 

Today, the 76 year old professor 
continues to teach at the Kennedy 
School. He bicycles to work and is on 
the Charles River in his shell at every 
opportunity. In addition to keeping fit, 
Professor Vernon completes a regular 
routine of eye exercises to improve and 
protect his sight. He began wearing 
special contact lenses eight months ago 
and reports such a miraculous im- 
provement in his vision that he has 
resumed driving and reading normal 
sized print. 

Mr. and Mrs. Vernon have been 
active supporters of Perkins for many 
years. Recently, when they decided to 
make a larger commitment, we re- 
ceived the inaugural gift to the Perkins 
Pooled Life Income Fund. 

The Perkins Fund operates very 
much like a mutual fund. The Vernons 



The Perkins 



Pooled Life 

Income Fund 

operates 

very much 



like a mutual 



fund 



enjoy the satisfaction of 
making a significant 
contribution today, while 
protecting their future 
financial security. They 
receive income for life, 
an immediate income tax 
charitable deduction, 
and because they donated 
appreciated securities, 
capital gains taxes were 
eliminated. A gift to the 
Perkins Pooled Life 
Income Fund could also 
increase a donor's annual income. 

For additional information on the 
Perkins Pooled Life Income Fund or 
other planned giving opportunities 
contact Harry Colt or Bill Brower at 
(617) 924-1239. 



In Gratitude 

Perkins School for the Blind gratefully 
acknowledges recent donations in memory of 
Margaret Leona Alther, Helen T. Armstrong, 
Cy Aron, Kelly Arthur, Edna M. Blair, Agnes 
Boumeuf, Jeannette Boyer, James Burke, Eva 
Cahoon, Helen Chaffee, Eloise Clark, D. 
Elizabeth Clarke, James Clarke, Agnes W. Deal, 
Ann Ditzler, Members of the Duban Family, 
Albert M. Durgin, Luigi Fantoni, Helen Funk, 
' Gertrude Gauthier, Robert J. Giggey, Sarah and 
Robert Ginsberg, Horatio William Hendrick, 
Harold C. Knight, Jacob Koss, George 
Lambrenos, Nora Leary, William F. LeBlanc, 
Mr. Kneeland, William J. Maher, Caroline Malo, 
Margaret McDonald, Barbara Mareaie, Joseph 
F. Mello, Amelia Mercandetti, Mary Motta, 
Mary Murphy, John A. Noonan, Ernest Pennell, 
Lillian Rogers, Annie M. Roy, Carmin Sarlo, 
CeceliaJ. Sheridan, Edward J. Sheridanjames 
Snoffield, Sally Victor, Alfreda Walsh, and 
Thomas C. Winsor. 



23 



Dr. Augustus Thorndike served as 
the President of the Perkins Board 
of Trustees from 1954 through 1971- 
one of the longest tenures in the 
school's history. Dr. Thorndike 's presi- 
dency is memorable, however, for 
much more than its length. Under his 
leadership the school met the chal- 
lenges presented by a rapidly chang- 
ing student population. Dr. Thorndike 
and Dr. Edward J. Waterhouse, Perkins' 
fifth director, expanded services, 
initiated new programs, and enlarged 
facilities. Their legacy of responsive- 
ness and adaptability in the face of 
change lives on at Perkins today. 

On May 10, 1989 the Dr. Augustus 
Thorndike Room was dedicated in the 
Howe Building. The generosity of 
Thorndike family members and 
friends provided for improvements, 
and the redecorated room will con- 
tinue to serve as a staff meeting place. 
Dr. Thorndike's children Sally, John, 



Thorndike 
Dedication 



and Nick, as well as many of his old 
friends and members of the Perkins 
community, were present for the 
dedication. 

Dr. Waterhouse reminisced about 
the years he served with Dr. Thorndike, 
while current Board President C. 
Richard Carlson summed up the dedi- 
cation nicely when he said, "I think 
Dr. Thorndike would approve of 
the Perkins 
of today - a 
school which 
continues 
to evolve in 
response to 
the needs of 
its students." 




Perkins 
Endowment 



The Perkins Program as it has developed 
and been maintained for more than one 
hundred and fifty years has relied upon a grow- 
ing endowment at every step along the way. 

Endowments which are adequate to put a 
program into effect are rarely sufficient to keep 
it going. As with every private school and college 
that is keeping abreast or ahead of the times, 
Perkins needs to 
see its endowment 
grow. Through be- 
quests and dona- 
tions, and through 
a few government 
grants, we have 
been able to ex- 
pand existing serv- 
ices and add new 
ones as needed. 
We are confident 




that our friends will continue to support us in 
ever increasing amounts. 

Form of Bequest 

I hereby give, devise, and bequeath to the 
Perkins School for the Blind, a corporation duly 
organized and existing under the laws of the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts, the sum of 

dollars ($ ) , the same to be 

applied to the general uses and purposes of said 
corporation under the direction of its Board of 
Trustees; and I do hereby direct that the receipt 
of the Treasurer for the time being of said 
corporation shall be sufficient discharge to my 
executors for the same. 

Notice 

The address of the Treasurer of the 
Corporation is as follows: JOHN W. BRY\NT, 
Fiduciary Trust Co., 175 Federal Street, P.O. 
Box 1647, Boston, MA 02105-1647. 



Perkins School for the Blind 



Perkins School for the Blind was 
incorporated March 2, 1829. The school is 
an accredited member of the New England 
Association of Schools and Colleges, the 
National Accreditation Council for Agen- 
cies Serving the Blind and Visually Handi- 
capped, and the National Association of 
Independent Schools. It is licensed by the 
Massachusetts Department of Education 
and Mental Retardation - and by the 
Commonwealth's Office for Children. 



The Perkins School for the Blind 
admits students of any race, color, creed, 
national and ethnic origin to all the rights, 
privileges, programs, and activities gener- 
ally accorded or made available to students 
at the school. It does not discriminate on 
the basis of race, color, creed, national or 
ethnic origin in the administration of its 
educational policies, scholarship and loan 
programs, and athletic and other school- 
administrated programs. 



Perkins School for the Blind 
175 North Beacon Street 
Watertown,MA02l72 
(617) 924-3434 
Editor: Bill Brower 



Non-Profit 
Organization 

Bulk Rate 

U.S. Postage 

PAID 

Permit No. 56547 

Boston, MA 



The Lantern 



y 



O 1 



i Kj