Skip to main content

Full text of "Manual of English Pronunciation and Spelling: Containing a Full Alphabetical ..."

See other formats


Google 



This is a digital copy of a book that was preserved for generations on library shelves before it was carefully scanned by Google as part of a project 

to make the world's books discoverable online. 

It has survived long enough for the copyright to expire and the book to enter the public domain. A public domain book is one that was never subject 

to copyright or whose legal copyright term has expired. Whether a book is in the public domain may vary country to country. Public domain books 

are our gateways to the past, representing a wealth of history, culture and knowledge that's often difficult to discover. 

Marks, notations and other maiginalia present in the original volume will appear in this file - a reminder of this book's long journey from the 

publisher to a library and finally to you. 

Usage guidelines 

Google is proud to partner with libraries to digitize public domain materials and make them widely accessible. Public domain books belong to the 
public and we are merely their custodians. Nevertheless, this work is expensive, so in order to keep providing tliis resource, we liave taken steps to 
prevent abuse by commercial parties, including placing technical restrictions on automated querying. 
We also ask that you: 

+ Make non-commercial use of the files We designed Google Book Search for use by individuals, and we request that you use these files for 
personal, non-commercial purposes. 

+ Refrain fivm automated querying Do not send automated queries of any sort to Google's system: If you are conducting research on machine 
translation, optical character recognition or other areas where access to a large amount of text is helpful, please contact us. We encourage the 
use of public domain materials for these purposes and may be able to help. 

+ Maintain attributionTht GoogXt "watermark" you see on each file is essential for in forming people about this project and helping them find 
additional materials through Google Book Search. Please do not remove it. 

+ Keep it legal Whatever your use, remember that you are responsible for ensuring that what you are doing is legal. Do not assume that just 
because we believe a book is in the public domain for users in the United States, that the work is also in the public domain for users in other 
countries. Whether a book is still in copyright varies from country to country, and we can't offer guidance on whether any specific use of 
any specific book is allowed. Please do not assume that a book's appearance in Google Book Search means it can be used in any manner 
anywhere in the world. Copyright infringement liabili^ can be quite severe. 

About Google Book Search 

Google's mission is to organize the world's information and to make it universally accessible and useful. Google Book Search helps readers 
discover the world's books while helping authors and publishers reach new audiences. You can search through the full text of this book on the web 

at |http: //books .google .com/I 



MANUAL 



ov 



ENGLISH PRONUNCIATION 



AKD 



SPELLING: 



COMTAIXXXO 

A PULL ALPHABETICAL VOCABULARY OF THE LANGUAGB 

WITH A rHBLoasAxr 

EXPOSITION OF ENGLISH OKTHOEPT AND ORTHOORAPHT; 

ft 

A2n» 

HBSIQNSD AS A WORK OF REFERENCB VOR GEilERAL U8B, ANP 

AS A TEXT-BOOK IN SCHOOLS. 



BY 

RICHARD SOULE. 

▲BBOCIATX KDITOB OP WOBCS8TXR*8 QUABTO DIOTIOHASTa 

AKD * 

WILLIAJM A. WHEELER. ■"//. .^ ,^ (;<>"] ^ 

A880CXATK XDXTOB OV WXBSTSB'S DICTIOIIABIX8 



/ / 



^iyt<. \dir ^^tA^rU^^ 






BOSTON: 

LEE AND SHEPARD, PUBLISHERS. 

NEW YORK: 
LEE, SHEPARD, AND DILLINGHAM. 

1674* 



i:,-^^. ^ 






HARVARD COLLEGE LJBRARY 

FRON THE LIBRARY OF 

JOHN GRAHAM BROOKS 

APRIL 25, 1939 



Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1861. bj 
Richard Soule, Jb , and Wiluam A. Wheeler, . 
In the Clerk^s OfSce of the District Court of the District of Massachusetts 



's 



PREFACE. 



Thb design of this work is' to provide a conyenienft 
manual for consultation, whenever a doubt arises in regard 
to the pronunciation or the spelling of any word now 
commonly or occasionally used in English speech, or often 
met with in modem writings ; and also to furnish a text-^ 
book for teaching English pronunciation and orthography 
in a more systematic and thorough manner than has here- 
tofore been possible by the use of the common spelling* 
books alone. 

So difficult is it to become thoroughly versed in eithes»of 
these branches of learning, that an English dictionary is 
probably quite as often consulted to ascertain the pronun- 
ciation or the spelling of a word, as to leam its meaning. 
As works of reference for this purpose, the smaller dio 
tionaries are often found to be defective in their vocabu- 
laries, and the larger ones are too bulky for convenient 
use. In order that this volume might contain a very full 
vocabulary, and at the same time be kept within a small 
colnpass, definitions have been omitted, except when they 
seemed to be required for some purpose of distinction, as 
in the case of words pronounced alike but differently 
spelled, or of words spelled alike but differently pro- 
nounced. 

The words which it has been thought best, as a general 
rule, to omit from the Vocabulary are all such as are obso- 

(Ui) 



ly FBEFAGB. 

lete, most of those that are very rarely used, or are ez- 
dusively technical and not Anglicized, and many deriva- 
tives ending in -^r, 'iih, -ly, "leu, -like, -ness^ or -ihipy which 
present no difficulty either of prpniiaciittion or of spelling. 
Most of the words compounded with the prefixes aU', 
counter^y tn-, out; overly stdh, super-y ufi', under-, as they 
are attended with no difficulty that is not explained under 
their simple forms, have also been omitted. 

The Introduction contains a description of the organs 
of speech, preliminary definitions of' a few terms, and an 
account of the elementary sounds of the language, with 
a statement of the views in respect to these sounds, held 
by the most eminent orthoepists, and of the various ways 
in which they are represented by the lettens of the alpha- 
bet. It also embraces, under distinct heads, a succinct 
tl^eatment of the fi)ll6wing' topics; nainely, syllables, the 
seat and the influence of the accent, the causes which 
reiider words liable to be mispronounced or misspelled^ 
eompopnd words, prefixes, and syllabication. 

A marked feature of the plan is, that, though the words 
cif the Vocabulary are arranged in alphabetical order, the 
more important of them are classified according to some 
prominent diaracteristics, either of pronunciation or of speU- 
ing, by means of figures referring them to the sections of 
the Introduction in which those characteristics are described 
and exemplified. This method of reference, so far as it 
relates to pronunciation, was introduced by Nares, in his 
« Elements of Orthoepy," and has been adopted by Walker, 
Smarts Worcester, and Groodrich. Smart remarks : ^ I 
have ... copied irom Walker the method of referring, 
throughout the Dictionary, to principles of pronuncia- 
tion laid down at the commencement ; I believe his Dic- 
tionary owes its reputation to die obvious excellence of this 



plan.'' The attempt has not hitherto been made to appi j 
the same method of reference, in a ML alphabetical Tocaba- 
laiy of our langoa^ to preliminary statements of the prin- 
ciples and difficulties of its orthogiaphj. It has been a 
gratifjing result of such anattempt^on the part of the com- 
pileiSy to find how easily the great mass of English words 
may be grouped under a comparatiTely few principles, and 
how readily the difficulties in the way of learning to spell 
may be overcome by classifying these difficulties and ex- 
plaining their causes. 

Particular attention has been paid to tiiose words in re- 
gard to the pronunciation of which good authorities are 
at yanaacei and the method suggested and applied by 
Walker, and more completely and ingeniously carried out 
by Worcester, of exhil»ting the different modes of pronun- 
ciation preferred w sanctioned by such authorities, has 
been adopted in this work. It has not been thought advisa- 
ble, however, to record the q[>inions upon this point of 
others beside Walker and Smart, among English orthoe- 
pists, and Webster, Worcester, and Goodrich, among 
American orthoepists* A careful examination of their 
Dictionaries has been made with reference to the purposes 
of this Manual, and no pams has been spared to report 
accurately their modes of pronunciation, wherever there is 
any essoitial difference, though, in a very few cases, the 
precise sound intended by them may not be adequately 
represented by the notation used, which is, in some re- 
spects, diffident firom theirs. 

(X the Englisb wnters upon orthoepy. Walker and 
Smart are the most eminent. The authonly of the fitt^ 
mer».at the time he wrote, was texy great;, add, though 
^lite ttsageia&e ptoniuiciation'Of some wcfifds has^dnoe 
nmcb changed, end tbgugpt later wxite» have shawit 



that -he was in error on several points, still his opin- 
ion in regard to the proper mode of pronouncing most 
words, founded, as it was, upon an attentive study of 
the analogies of the language, is too valuable* to be alto- 
gether neglected. Smart is one of the most recent writers 
upon this subject, and, by general consent, is regarded as 
the highest single authority, at the present day, upon Eng- 
lish orthoepy and English usage in the matter of pro- 
nunciation. 

Of American writers who have given a careful attention 
to the subject of pronunciation. Dr. Webster stands first in 
point of time, and probably first, also, as regards the ex- 
tent to which the influence of authority upon this subject 
has prevailed in the United States, if we may judge from 
the large circulation in this country of his Dictionary and 
his Spelling-book. But it is to be observed that both these 
works have been subjected to considerable revision by their 
editors, since Dr. Webster's death, in 1843, with respect 
both to pronunciation and to orthography. In order, there- 
fpre, to ascerttun the mode in which Dr. Webster himself 
pronounced words, the compilers of this Manual have exam- 
ined very careftilly the edition of his Dictionary published 
in 1841, which was the last issued during his lifetime. To 
this was appended, in 1843, shortly after the author's death, 
a Supplement of new words, which was prepared by his 
own hand, and which has accordingly been examined with 
the same object By comparing this edition with that of 
1859, edited by Dr. Groodrich, the changes of pronunciation 
iijitroduced by the latter have been determined. They 
were made, according to the statement of Dr. Goodrich in 
reply to a letter addressed to him on the subject, in con- 
formity with Dr. Webster^s known prihdples, and in con- 
sultation with hi& son, Mr. William G. Webster, who had ^ 



fbbfagb; ?ii 

been associated with him in his literaiy labon. ^ We sap* 
posed oarselves," says Dr. Goodrich, '^ to be well acquaint^ 
ed with the principles on which he woald have wished snch 
a revision to be conducted. . • . It is matter of mere 
conjecture how &r he might have been satisfied with each 
individual alteration. I am not certain he would have 
rejected any of them* I am sure he would have embraced 
nearly all, had he lived to understand the progress of the 
public mind as we have endeavored to do in his behalf. A 
dictionary, from the nature of the case, is Aprogremve 
thing. As the language is in a state of slow but continual 
progress, the volume that records it must &om time to 
time undergo corresp<mding changes." 

As it is chiefly the editions edited with eminent ability 
by Dr. Goodrich that are now much used or circulated, 
and that are regarded by the public as Webster^s Diction- 
aries, it has not been deemed important to record pronun- 
daticms which, though originally adopted by Dr. Webster, 
were subsequently altered by his editor, with the view of ■ 
conforming, as nearly as could be judged, to the principles 
by which the author himself would have been guided. 
Whenever, therefore, the name of Webster is given as an 
authority for pronunciation, it is accompanied with that of 
Goodrich, to show that the latter made no change ; and 
whenever that of Goodrich is unaccompanied with that 
of Webster, it is to be inferred either that Dr. Goodrich 
introduced a change which he supposed Dr. Webster would 
have sanctioned, or that the word in question was added by 
the editor. It is to be observed that the pronunciation of 
some, words, as noted in the abridged Dictionaries of the- 
series . edited by Dr: Goodrich, ^ddes not - correspohd >vith 
that of .the same words; as noted in the unabridged edition 
of .195a ;, but. this, being the most tebeAt and the most. 



knpoFtant work of the series^ baa been taken As the dti^d" 
ard of reference. 

To Dr. Worcester, the other dietingnished American 
authority quoted for pronundation, is justly awarded ^& 
praise of having bestovred great care upon this subject, and 
of having, given the results of his extensive resear^ in » 
(Condensed and simple focnr, wdl adapted to diake theiin m- 
telligible and usefol. His method of exhibiting the opin* 
i6ns of various orthoepists about woids of disputed pro- 
nunciation is particularly valuable, as it enal>]es aii inquirer 
to select, without the labor of looking inta many volumes, 
that mode of pronouikang any of these words lirhich deenii' 
to be sustained by the greatest weight of authority. An 
English writer, Mr. Alexander J. E}lis, who has himself 
nlade the subject of orthoepy a special study, truly remarks 
of what Dr. Worcester has contributed to this department 
of leamiilg, that it is ^^ deserving of great attention." 

It should be stated that in most of tibe cases in which the 
name of Worcester appears, as quoted, to stand alone in 
support of any mode g£ pronunciation, his decision has ap- 
pikrently been influenced by the opinions of orthoepists or 
lexicographers whose ndmes he uses as authorities, btit 
which it has not been thought advisable to dto in this 
work. 

In regard to words of various orthography there seemed 
to be no better rule to follow than to record in their differ- 
ent forms all such, and only such, as are variously written 
by respectable English and American authors at the pres- 
ent day. There is dotmudi cUfieren^e <£ usage between 
Englimd itnd the United Stated in the mode of spdlkig 
woixki^ extept in reference to at ^w wends,; mosdf 6i 
Fren<^ <»jgin, which are Still generally speUed^. m £ng- 
land) wilh the termiaalioii^ au^f as eo&>t<i^,Jtoiour,,4bi34 in^ 



fliead of or, which is now tho tenninatum giyea to this 
dasa ^ words ahnost uniyersaUj in the United States ; 
and except, also, as respects those words in the orthog- 
raphy of which Dr. Wehster made changes that have been 
extensivelj adopted in the United States, bnt which have 
not found equal favor in England. The number of words, 
however, which have a peculiar spelling in the latest 
edition of Webster's Dictionary, is comparatively small, 
amounting in all to only about two hundred and eighty. 
In the case of about sixty of this number, the spelling found 
in the Dictionaries of Walker, Smart, and Worcester, is 
allowed as an alternative mode ; and of the rest, about one 
hundred and seventy are derivatives of words ending in 
ly not accented on the last syllable. In regard to Webster^s 
mode of spelling these words, without doubling the ( on 
adding a syllable beginning with a vowel, Smart, Worces<- 
ter, and almost all other recent lexicographers, though they 
do not consider that the prevailing usage warrants them in 
adopting this mode, agree that it is more in accordance 
with analogy than the practice by which the I is doubled. 
AU the words referred to as having a peculiar spelling in 
the latest edition of Webster's Dictionary will be found 
recorded in this Manual in the same manner as other 
words are recorded in regard to the orthography of which 
there is any difference of usage, and they may be known 
by the abbreviations for the names of Webster and Good* 
rich which follow them. 

The proper mode of joining the constituent parts of 
compound words is a subject necessary to be eonsideredy in 
connection with that of spelling, in a complete and system- 
atic exhibition of thQ principles of English orthography. 
This difficult subject has received special attention in this 
work. It ha9 not been deemed adviMble, however, to swell 



Z PBEFACS. 

the Yocabalary with wordli of this class, which may be 
coined ahnost at will, and which exist, unregistered, bj 
hundreds or thousands, in books of every description. 
Were the German method of writing compound words, 
without the hyphen, uniformly followed in our own lan- 
guage, such words would have no peculiar claim to be con- 
sidered at all in a manual of orthography ; but, as we com- 
pound words, sometimes with, and sometimes without, the 
hyphen, it is a matter of no small difficulty to know when 
to use this connecting mark, and when to omit it. The 
statement, in the Introduction, of a few simple rules of 
extensive application, and deduced from the best sources by 
a careful examination and comparison of authorities, has 
rendered it unnecessary to insert the greater number of 
compound words, while the exceptional cases, which are 
comparatively few, are entered in their proper alphabetical 
places. A few compounds of regular formation and very 
common occurrence have been retained for the purpose of 
illustrating the rules, in conformity with the general plan. 

In this pari of the work, and in what relates to the 
mode of joining prefixes, and to the principles of syllabi- 
cation, — topics also concisely treated of as connected with 
orthography, — much assistance has been derived from 
Mr. John Wilson's valuable '^ Treatise on English Punc- 
tuation," in which the usage of the best writers of the pres- 
ent day, as ascertained by the ample observation of a prao* 
tical printer and corrector of the press, is fully and clearly 
set forth. 

It will, perhaps, be sufficiently obvious, without much ex>- 
planation, how the present work may be used as a text-book 
for teaching English pronunciation and spelling. All the 
principles and all the difficulties which relate to either are 
stated, in distinct sections, m the Introduction, with illus- 



, PBEFAGE. Xi 

tnJ&ve examples. In order that pnpib may make extended 
lists of such examples, and thus classifj the more impor- 
tant words <^ the language for special study, according to 
their analogies of pronunciation or of orthography, these 
words in the Vocabulary are referred to the group to which 
they belong by having figures affixed corresponding to the 
figures prefixed to the section in which some characteristic 
of this group is treated of. In many ca8es,aword is thus 
distinguished by more than one numerical reference, for the 
reason that it has characteristics which ally it with differ- 
ent groups. 

Afler pupils* have become familiar, by careful study, 
with the principles contained in the earlier portions of the 
Introduction relating to the elementary sounds and the 
modes, of representing them, and to the influence of accent 
on the vowel sounds, their attention may be called to what 
relates to pronunciation in Parts YL and VII., or to what 
pertains to spelling in Parts VlLL and DL, as may be 
thought best In either case, the mode of study recom^ 
mended is, that,at first, the pupils should take up a single 
section at a time, either in its order or otherwise, as the 
teacher may direct, and, after committing it to memory, or 
reading it so attentively as to be able to repeat the sub- 
stance of it, should turn to certain pages of the Vocabula- 
ry assigned for each exercise, and selecting there, by the 
aid of the figures corresponding to this section, the illus- 
trative words, copy them on a slate or on paper. 

In the lists copied for pronunciation, the accents and all 
other diacritical marks should be omitted, and the pupils 
should be required to pronounce the words from the lists 
by inspection merely of the forms which they ordinarily 
have in books. The lists copied for spelling are to serve 
tb^ purpose, primarily, of training the eye to determine 



xii nwACn. 

the coneet orthographical forms of words ; but, la ord^to 
impress these forms more distinctly on the memory, the 
words should also be given out by the teacher, either from 
the copied lists or from the Vocabulary itself, to be spelled 
orally. The words that are particularly difficult to spell, 
and which the teacher, therefore, would do well to assign 
most frequently lor spedal attention, are those referred to 
by the figures 162, 169, 170, and 171. The cbisses of words 
referred to by the figures 160 and 161 will be especially 
useful in exemplifying the different modes in which the 
elementary sounds are represented by the letters of the 
alphabet. 

Occasionally, the pupils may be separately called upon 
to copy words upon the blackboard to be used in a gener- 
al exercise for the whole dass or the whole school. The 
teacher, for example, may direct a pupil to copy upon the 
blackboard such words as may be found in any assigned 
portion of the Vocabulary having the reference figures 
153, that is to say, words which affi^rd examples of unau- 
thorized or vulgar pronunciations. When the list is fin- 
ished, this pupil, or any other, may be required to point out 
what errors are apt to be made in pronouncing these 
words. To take another example, some of the words 
distinguished by the numerical reference 155, as being of 
disputed pronunciation, may be advantageously copied in 
the same way, and made the subject of remark as to which 
piode is to be preferred. As an example of a similar ex- 
ercise in spelling, the teacher may call out, or dictate, from 
the Vocabulary some of the words having . the reference 
figures 171, as among those particularly difficult to spell, 
and any pupil, or several pupils in turn or simultaneously, 
may be required to write them down as they are uttered. 

By this method of stfidying pronunciation a&d or&ognu 



phj, besides the advantnge ariang from die intefett whicM 
the pupils will take in preparing lists of words for them- 
selves, — thus makings in fact, their own Spelling-book, — - 
thej will also have the benefit of practioe in writing thenit 
which, so &r as spelling is concerned, is the only sure way 
of becoming skilful in this difficult art And it should nol 
be foigptten that it is for the purpose of writing, chiefly, that 
spelling needs to be made a part of education. In order 
to insure a repetition of this practice, and to awaken anew 
the interest and attention d the pupils, it will be well to 
lay aside or to erase the lists, after they have once served 
the purpose of recitation, and to recur, at intervals, to the 
same exercise under each of the sections, or under such of 
them as relate to matters of the most importance. 

The mode of study may be varied by taking up oertaiB 
words which have figures affixed, and occasionally, also^ 
some of those which are not so distinguished, and by eensid'* 
ering them in reference to the several principles or points 
which they exemplify. For an examination of the pupils 
in order to test their knowledge of the subjects treated of 
in the Introduction, this method will perhaps be found te 
be the best . The teacher may accomplish the same db^ 
j^ct by writing words upon the blackboard, and requiring 
the pupils to refer each of them to the group or groups to 
which it belongs. 

The sections in Parts X., XL, and XIL, on Compound 

Words, Prefixes, and Syllabication, should be carefully 

read, and questions should be put to the pupils from time to 

time in regard to them, — though it has not been thought 

advisable to multiply references to these sections. Only a 

few compound words have been inserted, these having been 

selected, as before stated, merely for the sake of illustra« 

tion. The matter of syllabication, it is obvious, may be 

b 



xiV • PBEFACJfi. 

amply exemplified by the words found on any page of the 
Vocabulary. 

In the Table of Contents, a pretty full analysis of the 
several sections of the Introduction is given, not only to 
serve the purpose of an index, but to assist teachers in 
framing questions suitajble to be put to their pupils in ref- 
erence to the various matters treated of Discretion must 
be used as to which of these should receive the most at- 
tention, or which may be most fitly studied by any class 
of pupils. The anatomical structure of the vocal organs, 
for example, need not be dwelt upon any farther than a 
natural curiosity prompts inquiry in regard to it. These 
organs are described, not in the belief that the processes of 
speech will be any better performed by knowing how they 
are performed, but merely with the view of explaining, to 
those who desire the information, the wonderful mechanism 
by which the phenomena of spoken language are produced. 

A list of the principal works made use of in the prep- 
aration of the volume is appended to the Preface, both 
for the purpose of acknowledging indebtedness to their 
authors, and of furnishing the inquirer with the means of 
verifying any of the statements made by the compilers, 
or of examining the ground over which they have passed.^ 
Brief critical notices of such of these works as may not 
be generally known are quoted, to show in what estima- 
tion they are held by good judges. 

BosToy, March, 1861. 



A LIST OP THE PRINCIPAL WORKS USED IN THE 
PREPARATION OP THIS MANUAL 



Bbix, Alex. M. A new Elucidation of the Principles of Speech 
and Elocution. 8vo., pp* viii, 311. Edinburgh, 1849. 

Bell, Sir Chablbs. Article on the Organs of the Human Voice, 
in the Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society 
of London, for the year 1832. Vol. 132, pp. 29(^34. 

Brown, Goold. The Grammar of English Grammars. 8vo., 
pp. XX, 1070. New York, 1857. 

Ellis, Alex. J. The Alphabet of Nature. 8yo., pp. t, 194. 
Bath, 1844-45. 

" An excellent aioooant of the researches of the most dis- 
ttngnished physiologiifitB on the human voice and the for- 
mation of letters [sounds] is found in Ellis, The AlphaJbei 
of Nature^ a work full of accurate observations and original 
thouffht.»»— Prof. Max AMler of (ktford^ Proposals ror a 
Missionary Alphabet. Appendix D. III., vol. 2 of Chev. 
Bunsen's Outlines of the Philosophy ot Universal History. 

Ellis, Alex. J. The Essentials of Phonetics. 8yo., pp. xyi, 
275. London, 1848. 

*• Mr. Ellis's work, The Eatentiala of PhoruHct, [is] by 
fiir the naost complete and accurate of all. . . . Those who 
delight in phonetic investigations will find the subject 
almost exhausted in this treatise. . . . An invaluable work 
to those interested in the scientific part of the question.'*— 
Westminster Review^ Aprils 1»I9. 

Ellis, Alex. J. A Plea for Phonetic Spelling, [with an Appen- 
dix showing the inconsistencies of the common or- 
thography.] 8yo., pp. ix, 180. London, 1848. 

Ellis, Alex. J. English Phonetics. 12mo., pp. 16. London, 
1854. 

Ellis, Alex. J. XJniyersal Writing and Printing with Ordinary 
Letters. 4to., pp. 22. Edinburgh and London, 1856. 

" The very able writings of Mr. Alexander John Ellis, on 
phonetics, have done much to enlighten the public, and to 
awaken the attention of men of sdenoe to the alphabet of 
sounds as a practical question." — Richard (hUl, Address 
to the Ethnological Society of London, 1854. 

(xy) 



XVl UST OF WORKS USED. 

FowLEB, W. C. The English Language in its Elements and 
Forms. 8vo., pp. xxxii, 754. New York, 1857. 

GooDBiCH, C. A. A Pronouncing and Defining Dictionary of 
the English Language, abridged firom Webster's 
American Dictionary. Svo., pp. xxiv, 610. Phila- 
delphia, 1856. 

Goodwin, D. R. The North American Review, No. CLIV, Ar- 
ticle I., pp. 1-24. Boston, 1852. 

"A paper In the North American Review (Jan., 1862) 
where the sounds ol' the Euglish, and in general of the 
Teutonic and Pelasgic lanofufl^es, are thoroughly and sci- 
entitically treated."— ProJ. F. J. Ckildy Advertisement to 
the second American edition of Latham*» Elementary Eng- 
lish Grammar. 

Orat, Henry. Anatomy, Descriptive and Surgical. 8vo., pp. 

xzxii, 750. London, 1858. 
Hunt, James. A Manual of the Philosophy of Voice and Speech. 

12mo., pp. xvi, 422. London, 1859. 

Jbnnison, James. Lessons ia Orthoepy. 16mo., pp. 68, 1856. 

Printed for use in Harvard College, but not published, 
except iu the form of an Introduction to Hillard's Readers. 

Latham, R. 6. A Handbook of the English Language. 12mo., 

pp. xxiv, 398. London, 1851. 

"The ... part . . . on the Phonology of the EnjgrliBh 




Mttller, J. Elements of Physiology, translated from the German, 
by William Baly. 2 vols. 8vo. Vol. I., pp. 848 ; 
Vol. n., pp. 889. 

Philological Society. Proceedings for 1850-51, and 1851-52. 
8vo. London, 1854. 

QuAiN, Jones, and Wilson, W. J. K A Series of Anatomical 
Plates. Third Edition, Revised, with Additional 
Notes, by Joseph Pancoast, M. D. 4to. Five 
Parts, pp. 92, 104, 100, 88, 64. Philadelphia, 1845. 

Rush, James. The Philosophy of the Human Voice, (fifth edition, 

enlarged.) 8vO., pp. Ixt, 677. Philadelphia, 1859. 

** For the advance which has been made in elocuttanarv 
sdence in modern times, we are indebted to the useful 
labors of Steele, Odell, Walker, Thelwell, Chapman, Smart, 
and Husk, especially to the last, who has done much to per- 
fect what was he^nn by others, and whose * Philosophy 
of the Human Voice ' contains a more minute and satisfac- 
tory analysis of the snbiect than is to be found in any other 
work."— Penny Cyclopadia. 



List OP WORKS USED. ZtH 

fltiTSSELL, William. Orthophony, or fhe CuItiTatioii of iSb» Toioe 
in Elocution. [With a Supplement on Purity of 
Tone, by G. J. Webb.] 12mo., pp. 300. Boston, 
1855. 

BkAAJ, B. H. A Practical Orammar of English Pronundatioii. 
8vo., pp. XT, 397. London, 1810. 

SxAXT, B. H* Walker's Pronouncing Dictionary of the English 
Language, adapted to the present state of Litera- 
ture and Science. Fifth Edition. 8to., pp. czxriiit 
792. London, 1857. 

8kast« B. H. Pronouncing Dictionary of the English Language 
Epitomized, (second edition, revised.) 16mo., pp. 
zxzi, 694. London, 1846. 

Smart thus alliides to his own qaaiMcstlons for editing a 
Pronouncing Dictionary of the English Lsnguagpe : ** I pre- 
tend to refleot the onu uMge of jLuc^lish, 8ucb as it is at 
present [ISM] among the sensible and well-educated in the 
British metropolis ; und T am now to state wnat my oppor- 
tunities have been of learning that osage. I am a Londoner, 
the son of a Londoner, and nave lived nearly all my life in 
London. My early days were spent in preparing for a lit- 
erary profession ; ana a * Practical Grammar of Knglish 
Pronunciation,' which I published thirty years ago, n an 
eyidence of the length or time during which my attention 
has been fixed on the sublect in view. It has been said that 
the example of pronunciation should be taken not exclu- 
sively from those who move only in the highest circles, nor 
ret irom those who devote all their time to learning, t 
haye been able to observe the nsase of all classes. As a 
teacher of the English language and literature, 1 have been 
admitted into some of the nrst families of the kingdom ; as 
one partial to books, I have oome much into contact with 
bookish men ; while, as a public render and lecturer, I have 
been obliged to fashion my own pronunciation to the taste 
of the day. Thus prepared, I may not unwarrantably be- 
Ueve that my opinion may have some value with those 
who seek the opinion of another to regulate their pro- 
nunciation." 

Spux&exx, William. The Elementary Sounds of the English 

Language and their Classifications. 12mo., pp. 23. 

Carmarthen, 1850. 
StBABirSt Edw. J. Jl^Fractical Guide to English Pronunciation. 

12mo., pp. Ixzx, 55. Boston, 1857. 
Stod^akz* Snt John. Glossology, or the Historical Relations of 

Langoagea. 8to., pp. 387. London and Glasgow J858. 
tt BoBSST B. The Cyclopaedia of Anatomy and Physiology. 

iTols. 8to. London, 1839-1853; and Supplement, 

1 Tol. London, 1859. 

5» 



JCVlil UST op WORKS U8B1>. 

Todd, Bobebt Bentley, and Bowman, William. The Physio- 
logical Anatomy and Physiology, of Man. 2 vols. 
8yo. Vol. I., pp. XY, 448 ; Vol. II., pp. xziv, 660. 
London, 1856. 

Walker, John. A Critical and Pronouncing Expositor of the 
English Language. 4to., Introduction, pp. 87, Vo- 
cabulary, pp. 263. Fourth Edition. London, 1806. 



This edition of Walker's Dictionary was the last that 
was published during his lifetime. 

Walker, Jobn. A Rhyming Dictionary, ... in which the 
whole Language is arranged according to its Termi- 
nations. (A New and Revised Edition.) 12mo., pp. 
xxiv, 684. London, 1851. 

Webster, Noah. An American Dictionary of the English 
Language. 2 vols. 8to. Vol. I., pp. Ixxyi, 938 ; 
Vol. n., pp. 1004. Nsw Haren, 1841. 

Webster, Noah. The same, [with a Supplement by the author, 
first published in 1843, after his decease.] 2 toIs. 
8vo. Vol. I., pp. Ixxvi, 944 ; Vol. II., pp. 1020. 
Springfield, 1845. 

Wbbsteb, Noah. The same, revised and enlarged, by Chauncey 
A. Goodrich. (Pictorial Edition.) 4to., pp. ccxxxvi, 
1512. Springfield, 1859. 

Willis, Robebt. Article on the Mechanism of the Larynx in the 
Transactions of the Cambridge Philosophical Society 
for the year 1829. Vol. IV., pp. 313-362. 

** We strongly recommend any one who wishes to under- 
stand the operation of the muscles of the larynx, and the 
production of vocal sound by the glottis, to read Professor 
Willises paper with great attenuon." — Alexander John 
EUiSy Essentials of Phonetics. 

Wilson, Ebasmus. A System of Human Anatomy, Greneral and 
Special. Fourth American, from the last London 
Edition. Edited by Paul B. Goddard. 8vo., pp. 
xxiv, 576. Philadelphia, 185^ 

Wilson, John. A Treatise on English Punctuation. 12mo., pp. 
• xii, 334. Boston,. 1855. ♦ • 

..." **. "We have a beantlfhl monograph on Punctuation, by 

' John Wllsori (Boston, 1850). It'fe ihorouffh, so as to em- 

.. - brace his whole topic, and criticalyso as to exclude jsrbat 

does not belong there.*' — Prq^. J". W. Gibbs, * 

Wo&cestbb, Joseph E. A Dictionary of the English Language. 

4to., pp. Ixviii, 1786. Boston, I860; - 



CONTENTS. 



INTRODUCTION. 

I. DESCRIPTION OP THE OBOANS OP SPEECH, AND 

PBELIMINABY DEFINITIONS, 1 to 11 

f 1. Of what Speech conaiBts, . 

}2. Organs of Speech ; Lnng^} Trachea, 

Thyroid Gland ; Larynx, • 

Cricoid Cartilage; Thyroid Cartilage ; Adam'a-Apple, 

Thyro-hyoid Membrane ; Epiglottia, 

Arytenoid Cartilages; Cuneiform Cartilages; ThynHuryta- 
noid Ligaments, or Vocal Chords, 

Palse Yocal Chords ; Tme Vocal Chords ; Ventricles of the 
Larynx; Laryngeal Pouch, • . 

Glottis ; Extrinsic and Intrinsic Muscles, 

Posterior and Lateral Crico-arytenoid Muscles; Arytenoide- 
us Muscle; Crico-thyroid and Thyro-arytenoid Muscles, 

Pharynx ; Mouth ; Palate ; Uvula ; Arches of Palate, 

Tonsils ; 'toagae ; Hyold Bone ; Nasal Passages 10 

}3. Definition of Whisper, . . • 10 

§4. Definition of Voice, 

§ 5. Definition of Vowel Sound, , 

§6. Definition of Compound Vowel Sound, or IHpkthong, .... 

i 7. Definition of ConeonarU Sound, , 

$8. Definition of Z>^rapA, 

§ 9. Definition of Elementary Sound, , 

n. ELEMENTARY SOUNDS 12 to 35 

Table of Elementary Sounds, 12 

BEHARKS OS THE ELEMENTARY SODITDS, 13 tO 35 

1. Simple Vowel Sounds. 

§ 10. (1) Sound of a in and (short a), .13 

§ 11. (2) Sound of a in far (Italian a), 14 

Note. >- Cases in which a J^bb, and those in which it hac not, 

thi« sound, before r, 14 

§ 12. (3) Sound of a in fast (intermediate a), ............ . 14 

§13. (4) Sound of e in m« (long«)»* • • • • '• •• IS 

§ 14. (5) Sound of e in there, . . , . .' 15 

§15. (G) Sound ofe in <^len( short e),. » . . . 15 

§16. (7) Soundof {in {{{( short {) 15 

(xix) 



ZX CX)NTENTS. 

§ 17. (8) Sound of o in orb (of aw In 010/, of a in /iittf broad a, or 

German a), 10 

§18. (9) Soundofoino/»(»!iorto), 16 

Note. — Sound of o before /, s, th, n, ng, in the same syllabLe, 16 

§ 19. (10) Sound of 00 in /oodt 16 

$20. (11) Sound of 00 in /oo^ 17 

$21. (12) Qound of u in urn (the natural vowel), ......... 17 

Note. — Sound of «, eo, i, and y before rin certain caaes, ... 17 

$22. (13) Sound of u in lip (abort tt), 18 

2. Ck>mpoimd Vowel Sounds* 

$23. (14) Sound of a in ofe (longr a), 18 

$24. (15) Sound of o in o^d (long o), 18 

$25. (16) Sound of t in ft'me (long t) 19 

$26. (17) Sound of tt in tMe, Ctt60 (long tt), 19 

$27. (18) Sound of o» in oU,. 20 

$28. (19) Sound of otf in ounce, 21 

NOTB A.— Organic Kelation of the Vowela to each other, . . 21 

3. Aspirate Sound. 

$ 29. (20) Sound of A in home, 22 

4. ConsozittUt Sounds. 

$30. (21) Soundofpinpe^, 22 

$ 31. (22) Sound of bin bet, 22 

$ 32. (23) Sound of m in man, i 22 

$ 33. (24) Sound of wh in when, 22 

$ 34. (25) Sound of w in wen, 23 

§ 36. (26) Sound off In feel, 24 

$ 36. (27) Sound of v in veal, 24 

$37. (28) Sound of th in thin, 24 

§ ^. (29) Sound of th in this 24 

$ 39. (30) Sound of s in seal, 24 

Note. — Sound of s preceded by that of k, represented in some 

words by a;, 24 

f 40. (31) Sound of is; in zeal, 24 

Note. — Sound of « preceded by tha,t of ff, represented in 

some words by or, 25 

$41. (32) Sound of t in tale, 25 

$42. (33) Sound of rf in Aife, . 25 

$43. (34) Sound of n hi name, 26 

$44. (35) Soxmd of ch tn' ehureh, 25 

Note 1. — Substitution of the sonnd of ch for the sounds of 

tandobnsonanty, in some words, 26 

Note 2. ^ The digraph ch after ? or n sounded by Walker iu 9h, 26 

§45. (36) Sound of i in ifWrtf, 26 

Note.— Substltutlou of the sonnd of j for the sounds of d 

and consonant y, in sotae words, 26 

' #46. (37)8oiuidof Okina^loO, 27 



OOKTBNTS. XXt 

KoTB 1.- Sound of a preMdedbr that •fife, feptcwtod In 
■ome words by x, ^ ^ «- 

NOTK 2— Substitution of the toand'of tft'fortlie'Miadg'or 

M and oonaonaDt y, in many worda, , , 07 

f47. (38) Sound of « in azure, [' ' ' ^ 

Note. — Substitution of tiie sound of M, in En'gUah wofda, ft>^ 

the sounds of « and eonionant y, ^ m 

948. (39) Sound of r in roM., .^prW (tnUed r, or iwlgh r)] ! ! ! ! » 

§ 49. (40) Sound of r in nor, tort (untrilled r, or smooth r), . 28 
Note. — English mode of sounding r between two Yoweli, the 

first of which is long ; as hi aeriau; pirate, tory, fury, . . 29 

$50. (41) Sound of i hi toir, ¥»• ir. . . w 

§61. (42) Sonndof y toye*, . ..!!.* .* '////'' ^ 

Note. - Sound of consonant y heard, hi an aspiivtcd torn, bel 

fore long u preceded by *, ^ 

§52. (43) Soundof i; ini-»U, .....'**' 31 

Note. -Sound of * foUowed by that of *s wmetimes 'r«>iel 

sented by ar, . 31 

§53. (44) Sound of ^ in ^ (hard g), !!!!!!!!! 32 

|64. (46) Sound of 9^ in aing, .' .' ij ! ! ! ! ! ! 32 

Note !. - Opinion of Webster and Goodrich *ai to the Mukd 

^^"* 32 

Note 2. — Sound of « hi such words as longer, stronger, Ac, 32 

Note B. — (Ossifications of the C!onsonants, 33 

Tahle showing these Classifications, 34 

Bemark 1.— Liquid Consonants, ;,m,n,r, 34 

Bemark 2. — Explosive Clonsonants, p, 6, t, d, k, g, termed 

mutes, 34 

Bemark 3.— The Consonants Z, r- (rough), -r (smooth), m, n, 

ng, all vocal opiy, In English Speech, « 8| 

Note C— Belation of Aspirate and Vocal Consonants, ... 34 

m. NUMBEB OF SOUNDS BEPBESENTED BY THE SEV- 
EBAL LETTEBS OF THE ALPHABET, OB BY COM- 
BINATIONS OF THESE LETTEBS, 36 

§65. Number of Yowel Sounds represented by the Letters a, e, i, 

OiU,y, 35 

§6d. Number of Vowel Sounds represented by the 0>mbined Let- 
ters €8, ai, ao,/m, am, awe, ay, aye, ea, eau, ee, ei, eo, eoi, eu, 
ew, ewe, eg, eye, ie, tea, iew, oa, oe, ce, ceu, oi, 00, on, ow, owe, 

oy, ua, uay, ue, ui, uy, ye, yew, you, yu, 36*^ 

Bemark — The Digraphs ay, ey, oy, uy, merely final forms of 
ai,ei,oi,ui, 30 

§67. Single Sound represented by the Aspirate Letter A, 36 

§ 58. Number of Consonant Sounds represented by the Letters b, 

c,d,/,g,j,k,l,m,n,p,q,r,s,t,v,w,x,y,z, 96 

§ 59. Number of Ck)nsonant Sounds represented by the Combinad 



XXii CONTENTS.^ 

Letters M, oe, elk, ei, ek^ eg, dd, dff, ditffi ffff> gK ^t U, mm, 
nUi ng, ph, pp, rr, tc, scht sett ««, »h, sit m, tch, <A, M, trA, M, 

««, as 

Bbxabk. — One letter of « Digraph, in many eases, to be oon- 
sidered as significant of its Sound, while the other is silent y 
in some cases, both Letters jointly represent its Sound, . . 37 

Note D.— Effect of certain Letters which hare no Sound in 
themselves, 37 

IV. SYLLABLES, 38 

§ 00. Of what a Syllable consists, 38 

§ 61. One Vowel Sound or one Liquid Sound, at least, in a Syllable. .38 

§ 62. An Aspirate Sound cannot, alone, form a Syllable 38 

$ 03. Two Vowel Sounds not forming a Diphthong cannot occur in 

the same Syllable 38 

§ 64. Consonant Sounds in a Syllable arranged according to an in- 
variable Law, 38 

§ 66. The closest contact or the smallest opening of the Organs of 

Speech, a point of separation between Syllables, 38 

Note.— Exception to this Rule, 38 

S 66. Half of a Ck>n8onant Sound between two Vowels belongs to 

one Syllable, and half to the other, . 30 

Note. — Only one contact of the Organs of Speech in such a 
case, though the final and initial Effects are sometimes sep- 
arated, 39 

§ 67. Distinction in the Pronunciation of such Words as pairtpajfer, 

hirej higher, &c., 39 

Note. — General Principle to be observed in such Cases, ... 39 

V. INFLUENCE OF ACCENT ON THE VOWEL SOUNDS, . 40 

§ 68. Primary and Secondary Accent, 40 

§ 69. Vowel Soundn sometimes indistinct in certain Particles, ... 40 
§ 70. Distinctness or Indistinctness of Vowel Sounds in Unacoent- 

ed Syllables, 40 

§71. Sounds of the Vowels in Unaccented Syllables best learned 

by the Ear, 41 

A in an IJnaooented Syllable. 

§ 72. Sound of a when final ; its Sound when not final ; its Sound 

when followed by A, 41 

§73. Sound of a in the Final Syllable afe, 41 

§ 74. Sound of a in the Flniil Syllable ar 42 

E in an IJnacoented Syllable. 

§ 75. Sound of e when final and not silent, 42 

§ 76. Sound of e in a Syllable ending in a Consonant, 42 

§ 77. Sound of e in the Final Syllable er, 42 



• •• 



CONTENTS. XXUl 

I in aa Unaoomitad ByllAbto. 

§ 78. Sound of < when final, and Immediateljr following an Aoeent- 

ed Syllable, tf 

f TV. Sound of i when final, and inunedlately preceding an Ac- 
cented Syllable, tf 

§ 80. Sound of < In a Syllable ending In a Consonant, ....... tt 

§81. Sound of < In the Final Syllable tie, 42 

§824 Sound of < in the Final Syllable <ne, >• ; 42 

§ 83. Sound of < in the Final Syllable ite, 41 

§8i. Sound of < In the Final SylUbleioe, ; 41 

§86. Sound of < in the Final Syllable ir 41 

O in an Unaooented Syllable. 

§ 86. Sound of *o when final ; its sound when not final, 43 

§ 87. Sound of o in the Final Syllable ague, ............ 43 

§88. Sound of o in the Final Syllable or, 43 

U in an Unaooentad SyllaUo. 

§ 89. Sound of « when final, ..••• 43 

§ 90. Sound of u before any Consonant except r, in a Syllable end* 

ing with silent e, 44 

§01. Soundof « before r in a Syllable ending with silent e, .... 44 

§ US. Sound of « in the Final Syllable «r, 44 

T in an IJnaooentad Syllable. 

§ 03. Sound of y except in the Final Syllable of yerbe, 44 

§ 94. Sound of y in the Final Syllable of Verbs, 44 

- §06. Sound of y in the Final Syllable yr, . 46 

AI in an Unaooented Syllable. 

§06. Sound of the Digraph a< in an Unaooented Syllable, 46 

3SI in an Unaooented Syllable. 

§07. Sound of the Digraph ei in an Unaccented Syllable, 46 

WSr in an Unaooented Syllable. 

§ 08. Sound of the Digraph «y in an Unaccented Syllable, ..... 46 

US in an Unaooented Syllable. 

§00. Sound of the Digraph {« in an Unaccented Syllable, ..... 46 

OU in an Unaooented Syllable. 

§ 100. Sound of the Dign4>h om in an Unaeoented Syllable, • • . .. 46 

OW in an Unaooented Syllable. 

§ 101. Sound of the Digraph otr in an Unaccented Syllable, .... 46 

VL SEAT OF THE ACCENT, 46 

§102. Seat of the Aooent governed by General Laws, » 46 



ZXIT CONTENTS* 

§10S. Sector the Aeeent In Word! of two Syllables, ....... 46 

\ IM. Seat of the Accent in Verbs encUng hi en, er, Uh, om, on, cp, 

ry,le, . 46 

f 106. Seat of the Aocent generally on the Antepenult, hi Worda 

of more than two Syllables, 40 

§ 100. Derivatives generally follow the Aooent of their Primitivea, 47 

S 107. Accentuation sometinies determined by Ease of Utterance, • 47 
§ 108. Words of certain terminations having the Accent oa the An- 

tepenult, 47 

§ 100. Words of certain termlnationa having the Aocent on the F^< 

nult, , 48 

§ 110. Seat of the Accent in Words ending in e^n, 48 

$U1. Seat of the Accent in Words ending in e-4(m, 48 

§ 1A2. Words the last Syllable of which begins with the Sound of 

8h, zh, or y, accented on the Penult, 49 

§ 1}3, Seat of the Accent in many Words from the Classical Lan- 

gnages, 49 

§ 114. Seat of the Accent in many Words from the French, .... 49 
§ 115. Accent transferred when Words are used antithetically, . . 69 
§ 116. Effect of the Secondary Accent, and the Mode of determin- 
ing its Place, . . . . • 49 

§ 117. Interval which separates the Primary and Seoondaxj Accents, 49 
§ 118. Primary Accent' pUtoed upon Prefixes or Suffixes when 

Words are used antithetically, • ., 60 

i 119. Primary and Secondary Accents change places when Words 

are used antithetically with respect to a Syllabic, 50 

VII. CLASSES OF WORDS LIABLE TO BE MISPBONOUNCED, 50 

§ 120. Attention to be directed to particular Classes of Words, . . 50 

S 121. Some Nouns and Adjectives accented on the Second Syllable, 50 
$ 122. Many Words of three or more Syllables not accented on the 

Antepenult, 50 

§ 123. Some Derivatives not accented like their Primitives, .... 51 
$ 124. Words of the same Spelling but of different Meanings and 

Accentuation, ......; 51 

§125w Words from the Classical Languages which retain their . 

original Accent, • ; 51 

§ 126. Secondary Accent sometinies used when it should not be, 

and sometimes improperly made to change places with tho 

Primary, 61 

§.127. One Vowel Sound sometimes substituted (or another, ... 51 
§ 128. The Vowel «, or the Digraph eir, sometimes improperly 

sounded, • • 51 

§ 129. An affected Pronunciation sometimes given to e, i, and ea be- 

Ibre r, . . 61 

$ 130. The Sound of long improperly shortened in some Words, • 61 

f 131. Words in wlfieh a is sounded as ln/a«f, . . . . . ; 52 

§ 132. Sounds of Vowels sometimes improperly suppreaai^d, ... 62 



ooimifnk xxw 

• 

f 1S3. Soiiad of ilMirttt Improparljr Int e ip oted bctwioi » and <» f» 

orlfc, •••• •••••••••.•• 

f ISi. Sound of t eomeCimei Improperly ehaagod Into that of eft» 
and the Sound of d lometlaMe improperljr ehanged Into 

thatof J, tt 

f 135. Errors jrith reapeet to pronouncing amooth r» ••••••* 02 

§130. Errora In pronouncing f i caaeainwlilelif haa theSoandofa, tt 

f 137. Errora in pronouncing x ; General Rule, •••••••••. 02 

f 138. Worda in which g la hard before e, <, or y, 63 

1139. Worda In whioh Ala aUent, and thoae In whldi It la aonndad, M 

f li0« Worda In which a haa ita Aaplrate or Ita Tooal Sound, . • M 

fl41. Some Conaonant Sounda apt to be confounded, M 

1^142. Conaonant Sounda aometlniea Improperlj omitted, . • • . • M 
f 143* DerlTatives In which a ahort Vowel anawcra to a long one In 

thePrimiUTe, 56 

fl4ft. Two Syllablea aometbnea ImpAperlf blended, 66 

1 145. Worda aometimea diyided into too manj Syllablea, .... 66 

f lift. Sound of Conaonant y wrongly luti i fp oae d In a6me Worda, • 66 

f 147. Worda of the aame Spelling, but of diflbrent Pronunciation, 66 

f 14B. Worda nearly alike In Spelling, but diibrentlj prononneed, 66 

f 149. Worda ending in el, cti, if, <n, on, 66 

|160. Worda ending in ed, and Worda Ibrmed hf adding Ip or nei§ 

to thia Termination, 65 

f 151. Words in which final i ia long, and thoae In which it la 

abort, - 65 

1152; Worda ending In ile,<«e,«B, 56 

f 153. Tnlgar Errora, or uttai|thorlaed Modea of Pronunciation, • 56 

f 154. Pronnneiatiott of Foreign Worda, 57 

|155. Words of disputed Pronundatton, 57 

§156. Worda eapedallj liable to beoplapronouneed, ....••• 57 

Tm. GLASSES OF WOBDS LIABLE TO BE MISSPELLED, . 58 

1 167. DiiBcnltips in Spelling, result from yarioua Cauaea, . • . • • 58 
f 158^ Several Lettera or ComUnatloua of Lettera rqpreaent the 

aame Sound, • 58 

f 159. The aame Letter or Combinationa of Lettera used to repre- 
sent different Sounds 58 

f 1^. Words pronounced alike, but differently apelled, 58 

f loi. Words spelled alike, but differently pronounced, 58 

§162. Words in which silent Consonanta occur, 69 

iltii. Final e\ ita uanal effect; exceptionaf .......••.••• 59 

f 'l<4. Worda ending In Ms, e£i, <Ne, MtffU, ifcie, pis, <2e,' ste, re, . . 09 

§165. Words cniUng In edj 69 

f 16&; The Towel e silent In the termination at, • • .• • 51 

f 157. The Towela a, <, o, aflent before n, and ^ <, aiieiit befitfe U • 51 

f 158. The DIgrapli «a aHent In aome WoMa, 51 

§169. Claaaea of Worda' tliai* ibr apedal reaaona, are dlttonli to 

■paU* 51 

a" 



XXVI CONTENTS. 

KOTE. — Rule fbr obyiatlng the diffleiiltj of spelling wordi In- 

wMeh the Boand of long e is represented by ei or ie, ... 

f 170. Words difficult to spell on account uf the different Modes of 

representing a Consonant Sound between two Vowel 

Sounds, 62 

. f 171. Words peculiarly difficult to spell, <S2 

IX. RULES FOR SPELLING CERTAIN CLASSES OF WORDS, 63 

f 172. (1) Words at the end of which I is doubled, . 03 

$ 173. (2) Words at the end of which/ is doubled, 63 

§ 174. (3) Words at the end of which s is doubled, 63 

§ 175. (4) Words at the end of which b, d, ff, m, n, r, ^ or e^ is 

doubled, 63 

§ 176. (6) Cases in which the Final Consonant of a Primitive Word 
is to be doubled on adding a Syllable beginning with a 
Vowel, 65 

f 177. <6) Exoeptions to the Rule for doubling the Final Consonant 

in Derivatives, 64 

$ 178. (7) Derivatives formed by adding a Syllable to Words that 
end in a Double Consonant ; exceptions in such Deriv- 
atives from Primitives ending in tt, 64 

f 179. (8) Derivatives formed by prefixing a Syllable to words that 
end in a Double Consonant ; exceptions in such Deriv- 
atives from Primitives ending tally 65 

§ 180. (9) Compound Words generally retain all the Letters used 

in the simple Words that compose them ; exceptions, 65 

§ 181. (10) Sound of k generally represented by ck at the end of 

Monosyllables ; exceptions, 65 

f 182. (11) The letter k inserted after c in most Monosyllables, . 65 

f 183. (12) Silent final e omitted in Derivatives formed by adding 
a Syllable beginning with a Vowel, except in eertain 

cases, 65 

. f 184. (13) Formation of the Present Participles of Verbs that end , 

infe, 66 

$ 185. (14) Silent final e retained in Derivatives formed by adding 
a Syllable beginning with a Consonant, except in cer- 
tain cases, . 66 

§ 186. (15) The final y of tk Primitive, when preceded by a Conso- 
nant, generally changed into i on adding any termina- 
tion except one b^inning with i ; exceptions, • • . . 66 

§ 187. (16) The final y of a Primitive, when preceded by a Vowel, 
unchanged, in most cases, on adding any termination ; 
exiceptions, •• •'.. 67 

§ 188. (17) Letter or Letters representing a Vowel Sound at the end 
of a Word g^erally retained on adding4i Syllable be- 
ginning with a Vowel, .• V 

f 189. (18) Regular Formation of the Plural of Nouns, 67 

§ 190. (19) Plural of N'oims ending in y preoeded by a Cooioiumt, 67 



CONTENTS. XXrU 

|1M.*(90) FluTal of Nomie ending In {, ••••••• 87 

$ 192. (2!) Plttral of Nouns ending in o, • • • 68 

f 193. (22) Plaral of Noons ending tn/orfs, 68 

1 194. (23) Flnral of hrotkert die^ pea^ penny , formed In two waje, 68 
§ 195, (24) Plttral of cMM, foot, goot, loute, man, moute, ox, tooth, 

woman, • • . . 68 

1 196. (25) Floral of Words ending in man, • . . . • 68 

§ 197. (26) Plaral of Compoonds consisting of a Nonn and an Ad- 
jective, 68 

f 196. (27) Plural of Nouns from Foreign f<aiignagea, 68 

f 199. (28) Words ending In or, or our, 68 

1 200. (29) Words of two or more Syllables ending In <e, 68 

1 201. (30) Words rarioosly written with the Prefix en or M, • • . 00 

§202.(31) Verbs ending in i«« or ise, 00 

{203. (32) Words in the Spelling of which usage is dlrided, .... 70 

Note £.— Peculiar Modes of Spelling in Webster's Dictionarj, 70 

X. COMPOUND WORDS, 72to75 

{204. Of what a Ck>mponnd Word consists, •• 78 

Boles tot writing Coinx>oand 'Words. 

{206. I. Hyphen used when both parts are aooented, 73 

KXCBPTIOirS. 

1. Oomponnds beginning with the prepositions over, vnder, . 72 

2. A few common Compounds, 72 

8. Gompounds terminating in monger, 7S 

{206. n. Hyphen not used when only one part is accented, . ... 72 

BXCEPtlONS. 

1. Compounds in which the first part ends with the same Let- 

ter or Digraph as that with which the second begins, • . 73 
.2. Compounds of which the first part ends, and the second be- 
gins, with a Vowel, « • 73 

8. Compounds, the Meaning or the Pronunciation of which 

would be obscured if the parts were written continuofusly, 73 

4. Compounds formed of a Verb with an Adverb, a Preposi- 

tion, or a Noon -, end Compounds ending in book, or tree, 73 

5. Compound Acyeetiyes, 73 

Words whdob «re, and "Words wbioli are not. Compounds. 

' { 207. Difficulty of determining whether Words form a Compound 

or not, 78 

{ 206. How two Words are written when they are in ^[fposition ; 

■ exception, 78 

{309. How two Nouns are written when they are not in apposi- 
tion, or when the first may be placed after the second with 

a paepoBition interrening, 78 



f 210. How two Noiins are written when biytli ttn auunilult; md 

when the first ia uaed a^jeetivelf to denote the aafoatmoe 

of which the thing designated by the second is made, • « . 73 
1211. How two Nonna are written when the first takes the plaoe of 

an Adi}eetlFe» 74 

f 212. How two Words are written when both are used a^jectivdj, 74 
§ 213. How two Noons are written when the first ia in the poases^ 

aiire caae, though no idea of Property is conyejred, .... 74 
§ 214. How two nonns are written when the firat is in the posses* 

alTe cascyboth being, used literally* and only one aoqented^ 74 
§21ft. How two Words are written when the first ia a Verb,, and 

both Jointly eonyey the idea of a single Noun, 74 

S 216. How an Ad^tdre and a Noun are wdttm, when used Joint> 

ly to convey the idea of a single Noun, or of a single Ad> 

JeotiTe» . • 74 

§217. How to write two Numerals ; a Numeral followed by fold, 

penny f or pence ; Fractional Terms, and Expressions in 

which halfi quarter^ Ac, are used,. 75 

§ 218. How to write Epithets formed of an Adverb ending in ly, and 

a FastPActiclple, » 7S 

f 219. How to write an Adverb and a Fartidple, or a- Preposition 

and a Participle, when placed after a Noun, ........ 7S 

§ 2B0i How to write Words that fbrm a Phrase or Idiomatic Eic> 

pression, 75 

§ 221. Precise rules for all cases impossible ; General Kule of Goold 

Brown, • . , • • 76 

PREFIXES, 76 

% TaSL How to write a Prefix when it ends with a different Letter 

firom that with which the Badieal Word begins, 76 

Note. — Exoeptiona in the cases of the Prefixes ex and vice, . 76 
1 223. How to write a Prefix when it ends, and the Badical Word 

begins, with a Vowel, *. . 76 

Note.— Diaeresis eometimeansed ; Prefixes hi and <W excepted, 76 
S';224. How to write a prefix when it ends with the same Consonant 
' as that with whidi the Badical Word beginr; and, also, 
Prefixes of race ooeuncnee, m^ m • 76 

SYLLABICATION, 76 to 7» 

§225. What oonstitutei a Syllable, ^ . . ... • 76- 

§226. Definition of syUabictUiony Importanea of a pi»oitloal.ao« 

quaintance with this subject, 76 

BuIiBS f6r SyUabioation. 

1227. (1) How to sQMtrate Compound Words at the end of a Una^ 77 
f;228. (2).PKi^lxes, Suflixei, and Grammatical Terminations, to be 

lepan^ fromtheBadioalWonlatiiiJBoat oa«ea, •• 77 



CONTENTB. 

HoTB.— One nue of thii nila ; Modo of Mpwattng tlio Soflbc 
of iome Words at the Bud of « Line dURcfeiit InordliMrx Writ- 
ing «nd PHutbiif ftom the Kode praetiMd in DIetionariee, of 
■eperatittg the Syllables so as to distinguish the Snflx flpom 
the Boot; Mode of sc|iavatlng QrammatJeai Tenninatloas 
when tlie Final Consonant of the Badleal Word is doaMed, 77 
f S29. (8) Vwo Vowels I'lOn^ng' together, and not ibming « Dl- 

gmph or a Diphthong, to be separated, 77 

f 230. (4) How to separate the Byllidiles when two or more Conso- 

nants eoae between two Vowels, 78 

f ttl. (5) How to separate the Syliables when a single Consonant 
or aConsonsnt Dlgn^h eomea between two Voweia, 

of i^ich Ute flrst is under the Aeoeot, 78 

KOTB.— Sffeet of the Consonant or Consonant Digraph, in 

tfalseaae, • ,••••.•••• 78 

f 238. (•) How to separate the Syllablea when a single Consonant 
or a Consonant Dign^ oomes between two Vowels, 

of whidi the second Is under the Aeeent, 78 

SxGBPnoir.— The letter « Joined to tiie fbnner Vowel, ... 78 
f23S. (7) How to separate the SyMaMes whan a M^ Consonant 
eomea between two Vowels, neither of whidi Is nnder 

the Aoeent, 78 

Excspnovs. —When the latter Vowel begins a tennhistion, 
the Consonant is Joined to the former; when e saeeeeds an 
aoeented Syllable and Is followed by r, the two Letters are 

Jolned,^ 78 

§ 234. (8) The Terminations eean, eUm^ etai, Ao., not to be divided, 78 
f 235. (9) Some words not capable of being so divided at the Snd of 

a Line as to shpw their Frononelatlon, • 78 

§236. (10) Letters forming a Syllable not to be separated, .... 78 

KOTS F.— SyllaUoatlon dUforent aooording to the ends pro- 
posed by It, •••• ««... 79 

XXFLAHATIONS, .••«»«•. «•• 80 



YOCABULABY, , 83tod87 



nC.I. MottOBOfttWEUdSBdKM^BlWWlDStbaOntUUOf >P*«l>ll., 



6. BrifMUi. K. ThriMil (U 

r. B;iildgrHii(B>ll>«i. U. TncbH. 

1. latafta Tooit (kotd otiu iM*. U, IT. Riutu 



INTRODUCTION. 



I. DESCRIPnON OV THE ORGANS OF SPEECH. ANB 
PREUMINABY DEFINITIONS. 

{ 1. Spbzch consists of a series of significant sounds pro- 
duced by emissions of breath, Ysriously modified, and in the fbnn 
cither of whisper or of yoice. 

i 2. The Okgaks op Speech are the brngg^ the traehsa or wind" 
jfipe, the larynx, the pharynx, the mouth, and the immo/ paaMage», 
with Tarious appendages. The organs more directly concerned 
in modifying the sounds of which speech consists are the l^, the 
tongue, the teeth, the hard palate, and the uvulOf which are parts 
of the mouth. 

The two bmffi, which are the essential organs of jrespiration, are 
placed one in each of the lateral cayities of the chest, separated 
from each other by the heart and the large arteries and Teins con- 
nected with it. They are alternately dilated and compressed for 
the inspiration and expiration of air by the action of the dia- 
phragm and certain muscles of the ribs. 

The trachea, or windpipe, ia a cartilaginous and membranous 
tube in the anterior part of the neck, extending from the lower 
part of the larynx downward about fi>ur inches to a point oppo- 
site the third dorsal vertebra, where it divides into two bronehit 
or branches, which connect it, one with each lung. It is from 
three quarters of an inch to an inch in diameter, and is composed 
of from sixteen to twenty imperfect, elastic rings formed of car- 
tilage and fibrous membrane, one above another, and separated by 
narrow strips of membrane. The cartilaginous and cylindrical 
portion of the rings occupies about two thirds of the circumfer- 
ence in front and on the sides, and the remaining part behind is 
nearly flat, and conasts principally of ^rous membrane and 9l 

I CD 



s 



INTBODUCnON* 



fine, Tery regnlar layer of muscular fibres on tiie outside. IRiis 
structure enables it, while serring the purpose of an air-tube, to 
acoommodate itself to the motions of the head and neck, and to 
yield, in the act of swallowing, to the distended cesophagus, or 
gullet, which is ntuated behind it. The thyroid gland ^^ so called, 
though it has np jexcretory duct— is a Ann, ^vascular substance^ 
lying, like a cushion, in two lobes across the upper part of the 

trachea, to which it is capable 
of bdng braced by four flat 
muscles that pass over its sur- 
fiu». Its Amotion is generally 
stated to be unknown ; but Sir 
Charles Bell supposes that it 
is designed to check the Tibra- 
tions of sound, "and so im- 
pede the motions originating 
in the larynx from being prop- 
agated downward." The thyr 
roid gland is always larger in 
the female than in the male 
sex, and it is occasionally of 
an enormous size, constituting 
the disease called ffoitrff or 
bronekoeele* 

The larynx, which is the im- 
mediate seat and instrument 
of sound, is situated between 
the trachea an4 the base of the 
tongue. It is a complex piece 
of mechanism, resembling, in 
its general form, a kind oi 
box, or an inregulsr holloif 
body triangular at top, but i^- 
proaching nearly to a circle at 
its junction with the trachea. 
Q)j^ It is compQsed of mne carti- 

lages ; three single, namely, the cricoid (or ring-shaped) cartilage^ 
the thyroid (or shield-shaped) cartilage, and the epiglottis ; and six 
in pairs, namely, two ariftenoid (or pitcher-shaped) oartHagcif two 




Pig. IZ. Vront Tipw of the Larynx 
and 4 part of the ilrachea. 

1. Epiglottla. ~ S. Tfayroid eartiUige.— 
9. Grieo-thyroid menbiaDe. — 4. Cricoid 
cartilaf*. •— A. Thyroid gluid.— tt. Txa^ 



tttmcd tomhula Imynfi* (or little bonu «f tlw Jtrjnx), laA two 

ai aieifrn H (or wedge-ibiq>ed) am^ilmpm. 

Hie eriaoid eartHofft, ntuated at the baae of I)m iMjUa wUoh 
it mpporlB, U thicker and itronger thta the other eartiUcM^ and 
k in tbe tana of a ring sHghtly elliptiaal, and oouMnaMj deepar 
■t the posterior part than in froot. It ii -"-"— ^rfl betow to the 
2tm ling of the tncbcA 
bj ligament! and muconi 
flwmbrane, and it articn- 



«nter aidei with the thf- 
toid cartU«c*t *nd, oa the 
nj^er margin, with the 
wrytenoid eaitiltgea, 

Tka tJijfnid amilagt ia 
the largtat of the entilagea 
e^ponng the larynx, (ud 
paitiAllj embtacea the cri- 
coid cartilage, with which 
It it «Mieal»ted, nd also 
otherwiae oonnected by 
wtMlea and figamenta. It 
oonaata of two lateral, 
Ibnr-iiided l^tei, or wtnga, 
open bdiiad, bnt anbed at 
an acute an^ in front, 
I Tertical lidge. 




torn poaterioT angles, are **■ 

iitnstcd &nr mrmxi, or horns, two tnperior and t 

The MiperifHr bomi, being longer than the inferior, are called 

gnat /umt, and arc connected with the bone at fbe base of the 

longae (liniiinal bcme, hyoid bone, or w ^muta) by ligaments. 

ThB Utml md front pottiou of A* apgm bradsr of the thyrsU 



4 ISTRODnCTKMl. 

eartilaiie axt oontiMted with the ttate btme b; what u osUed th« 
Ihifni-Ai/oid membrant. The inferior honis are curved tttrwaiA, 
and aie articulated at their extremities to the cricoid cartUagc by 
oblique planes directed forward and inward. The thyroid car- 
tilage overlaps the cricoid cartilagiD on each side, but in Econt 
there ia a apace between the two, over which the eriea-thyroid 
manirnu extenda. This space may be easily felt on applying 
the finger at the i^per and firost part of the neck. 

, The tpiglotttM is a 
thin, flexible plate of 
2 carcil&ge, having ahal- 
low pits upon its aur- 
fikce, and abaped like 
a cordate Uaf, with a 
broad, rounded upper 
extremity, which ts free 
to mo*e. It 'is placed 
behind the tongue, to 
% the bone of which it ia 
connected by an dastio 
ligament, and it ia at- 
tached below by a long, ' 
narrow ligament to the 
receding angle between 
, the two plates of the 
thyroid cartilage. Dur- 
ing respiration, its direc- 
tion 19 nearly vertical, 

tng forward toward* the 

rUt rr. v«tl«l saetten of tb* Ltryax ''^^ "^ ^^ tongue, 

and » put of lb* Tiuhaa. ■ above which it projects ; 

n^h.^'J!!'''^*'"-'"'"" "■'''"■ "™ ^^ When the larynx 
»rtiiu<.-e. £iiiiiouii,-& oiu Ting at atxhj- " drawn upward m 
Tt^^;i,i,t^^'"li^jT^^at"^^'^Z ^^ '^' °^ BwaUowing, 
*' " "" '"^ "''"'^ atavt ride. -7, ThTwi* the epiglottis ia carried 
Sl*oftb^^^!lViTS!^M^ll^~''""" downward and back- 
ward, so as to serve 
the pnrpose of a valve and completely close the glottis, or opoi^ 
~ ing of the larynx. 



DITBODnCIION. 



T!ie two myUneid carUkigu aie ntnated on the poilerior inner 
and upper margin of the cricoid cartilage in each a manner as 
to resemble, when approximated, the mouth of a pitcher, from 
which circumstance they take their name. Thej are of an irreg- 
ular ehape, hut may he considered aa having the fonn of a pyra- 
mid with a broad base, and presenting surfiuses for the attachment 
of muscles and ligaments. The posterior surfkces are triangular, 
smooth, and concaye, and give attachment to the arytvnoideua 
muscle. The anterior sur&ces *are somewhat coutcx and rough, 
and giye attachment to the ihyro-aryUnoid musdes and to the 
superior, or fidse, Tocal chords. The interior surfiices are nar- 
row, smooth^ and flattened, and form a part of the lateral wall of 
the larynx. Of the three oomtTt of the bases, the external one is 
short, rounded, and prominent, and gives attachment to the pos- 
terior and lateral erieo-inytemnd rmudei; and the anterior one, 
also prominent, ^t more pointed, gives attachment to the true 
TOcal chord. The apex of each of these cartilages is pointed and 
curved backward and inward. The two small cartOages termed 
eomieula laryngU are situated on the apexes of the arytenoid car- 
tilages, with which they are sometimes united, and serve to pro- 
long them backward and inward. 

The euneifbrm caiiUageM are two small, elongated bodies, placed 
one on each side in the fold of mucous membrane which extends 
from the apex of the arytenoid cartilage to the side of the epi- 
glottis. 

The cavity of the larynx is divided into two parts, with a 
narrow, oblong opening between them, by the ihfra-^aytenoid 
Uffamenis, or vocal ehordt, on each side, and the thyro^arytenoid 
muMdes parallel with these chords, both of which are enclosed in 
folds of mucous membrane, stretched between the sides of the 
epiglottis and the apexes of the arytenoid cartilages, and are 
attached in front to the thyroid cartilage at the angle formed by 
the meeting of its two plates, or wings, and behind to the aryte- 
noid cartilages. ' The form of this cavity is broad and triangular 
at top, and becomes gradually narrower downward towards the 
vocal chords, below which it becomes gradually broader and 
nearly cylindrical, its circumlerenoe coinciding below with the 
inner part of the ring of the cricoid cartilage. The vocal chords 
axe in pairs on each side, one over the other. The superior 

1* 



Chora* (edled &b JiOte ■nbJ (Aordt, bemiua thtyu* RtppMed 

not to be coBcemed, gr to bare only • inbotdiiista purt, in rtw 

production of rmce) are delicMe, nsirow, fibroui bandi, ^idoud 

in thiok folds of the nnconi membmie, and attached, in front, to 

tlta receding angle of the thjnoid cartilage b^w the cpiglottia, 

■nd behind, to the interior woe- 

face of the aiTtenoid eartilag*. 

The interior TOcal chorda (called 

the trtH topol cAerA, becasM tha^ 

ar* chiefly concerned in the pro- 

daction of Toica by their vibn- 

tiou) arc two thick and strong 

fibroiia band*, covered cxtemallj 

by • thin and delicate nuctnu 

membrane. They are attached, is 

front, to the centre of the depraa- 

aiom between the two plate* or 

u tta lAiTBx, vinga of the thyroid eartilag*, and 

behind, to the anterior angle of 

the ba«e of the arytenoid eartUeg*. 

On their onler side*, they are con- 

ii B<i»-v7inicM ancia.- nccted -with the thyro- arytenoid 
_^ m. . lujjj^jj^^ ^^ lower borden at 
"■» the (uperior Tocal chords hare lb* 

fbrm of a crescent, and constitute the upper boundaries of the 
vaitrielM of tht iaryits, of which the lower bonndarie* are th* 
■uperioi Unught bordera of the inferior Tocal chords. 

The vttOritla ^ the larynx are two oblong, otbI cavitieB be-r 
twecn the auperioi and inferior Tocal chorda, extending nearly 
their entire length, one on each eide, and fbimed by the &lding 
inward of the mucous membrane which coTers them. The chief 
office of tbe«e earitiea is to afford sufflcieitt space foi the vibra- 
tions of the inferior, or true, vocal chorda. 

Each of the ventricles of the larynx leads upward on the 
outer side of the «uperior vocal chord into the taeeahu Uuyngit, 
or Inryngeal pouch, which is a membranona sae of a conical Airm, 
and of a variable SIM between this chord and the inner anifiu!* of 
the diyivid cartilage. 
Hi* naiTpw opening b*tw*M tb ii^brior, « tnu^ voail aboidl 



ttnWDUffBOIfk 




bodied tin pkUit, ta^ekkUtofihs f^oUk. Its length in the adult 

male is .i»ther teas than an inoh, and it Taiiea in breadtk at iti 

videat part fram a third of an ineh to half an inch. In tiw fmala, 

these dimensions are somewhat Ibm. The fann o^ tha a per tw ra is 

vsnahle. In a state «f repose^ 

or thl^ of ovdinary rei^nrationy 

it ia tiiangnlar, or narrower in 

front than hefaind, dilating some- 

vhat during inspiration and eon- 

tracting during expiration. In 

tha act of prodndng Tolae, aa 

in spsaking or in singing, the 

g^ottia ia nearly dosed, the tnie 

iN>oaL dM>ids heing hrooght into 

« neairly paraUel positiMi, and 

separated only about one tendi 

of an inch hy the i^^prozima* 

bases ef ^ arytenoid eartikages 

to which they mn attaobed. Tha 

breath being Ibreed through the 

glottia when these ehords are ht 

this poritipn, eanses them to iu 

brate end produce a sound, tiie 

pitch <rf which dependa entiiely 

iqpon thei^ t^mfriow. The speitwe 

between the soperiovs or ff^w^ toosI chorda is sometimes celled 

the fiffu ghMiB* 

The mucous membrane of the larynx is contmuona with that 
which lines the pharynx aiftd mouth above, and it is prolonged 
downward trough the trachea and brondual tubea into the 
lungs. The whole apparatus of the laiynz, being suspended 
loosely in front of the phaxynx and the oesophagus, may be moved 
fredy «9 and down in the neok, approirimating to, or receding 
from, the l^wer jaw by means of what are caUed the pztrinaio 
mu9cU»t while the movements of its varioQSi segments are cen« 
troiUed by what a^ called tha itniriim^ smirf#t. 

The <r^rtfi#t0 muielea ai^ arranged symmetocslly, and 



inc th« form of tha osvlty of 
tt« IiM9<mx» tte tni« Tooal 
•hnrdfl b«laf aaarlx parallaly 
or la aposMMi to Tibnto. 



1-S. liM iknm^ Iht 

ft ^ TM«i duMS* and %\n gliiMta ^ 
S-4. Iia« tbrong h the rcatrielM of tha 
la>yax.*>S-S. Um^ throi«h tha ia*- 
lior ar Irae recal ehprdi and traa 
SloM**-7, 7. Scctioa of tha thyroia 
aarta>iga.-» a. SwUtow af tha ari«oM 
autUas** 



attached to corresponding points on each side of the ^M^ 



8 nfTBODucnoir* 

Thofe of tlMOL which open or close the glottis, or regulate the 
tensioii of the Tocal chords, are the following : the potterior 
erieo-'aryUnoid, the lateral erieo^arytmoid^ the aryUntridtut^ ' the 
crieo-'thyroid^ and the thyro^aryUnoid. 

The two potterior erico^arytenoid wiuielet are attached to the 
posterior surfiu;e of the cricoid cartilagei and passing obliquely 
upward and outward, conTerge to be inserted into the outer 
angles of the bases of the arytenoid cartilages. They open the 
glottis by drawing the bases of the arytenoid cartilages outward 
and backward. 

The two lateral erieo-^arytenoid muselM arise from the upper bor- 
ders of the sides of the cricoid cartilage, and passing obliquely 
upward and backward, are inserted into the outer angles of the 
bases of the arytenoid cartilages in front of the posterior crico- 
arytenoid muscles. They close the glottis by drawing the bases 
of the arytenoid cartilages inward and forward. 

The arytenoideui muscle is single, though it consists of three 
planes of fibres, two oblique and one transverse. It fills up the 
posterior concaye surjfoce of the arytenoid cartilages, arising from 
the posterior surfiice and outer border of one of them, and being 
inserted into the corresponding parts of the other. It approx- 
iinates these cartUages, and thus doses the glottis. 

The two erieo-thyroid mutclea arise from the front and lateral 
parts of the cricoid cartilage, and diverging, pass obliquely up- 
ward and outward, to be inserted into the lower and inner 
borders of the thyroid cartilage from near the median line in front 
as fax back as the inferior horns. They stretch the vocal chords 
by rotating the cricoid cartilage on the inferior horns of the 
thyroid cartilage. 

The two thyro^arytenoid mueelee are broad and flat, and Ue 
parallel with the outer side of the true vocal chords. They are 
attached in front to the receding angle of the thyroid cartilage, 
and passing horizontally backward and outward, are inserted 
into the bases and anterior and outer surfiices of the arytenoid 
cartilages. They approximate the anterior angles of these car- 
tilages, and thus dose the glottis. According to WUlis, they 
also draw the arytenoid cartilages, together with the cricoid 
cartilage, forward, and thus shorten and relax the vocal 
diords. . 



INTBODUCnON. 9 

The pharynx is a kmd of dilatable bag, tnd eonsitto of all that 
ftnmel-ahaped catity, lined with mueous membrane and aeted on 
by many miucles, which is situated in front of the cenrieal ver^ 
tebre behind the nose, mouth, and larynx, and aboTS the oesopha^ 
gas, widi which it is continuous. It is about four inches and a 
half in length, extending from the base of the skuU to a point 
between the cricoid cartilage in front and the fifth cervical ver- 
tebra behind. There are seyen openings communicating with it, 
namely, the two posterior nares or nostrils, the two Eustachian 
tubes (canals leading from the tympana of the ears), the mouth, 
the lar3nuc, and the cesophagus. The pharynx exercises a con- 
siderable influence on the modulation of the Toice ; and, accord- 
ing to Sir Charles Bell, it is a Tery important agent in the artic- 
ulation of the consonants, especially the explosiTC consonants. 
Being dilated at the moment when the articulating organs come 
in contact, it. ''is prepared," he remarks, **to giye an appulse 
by its muscular action, exactly in time" with the separation of 
these organs. The guttural murmur which is heard before the 
mouth is opened to pronounce certain consonants, as 6, if, and 
y, is due, UL the opinion of this author, to the vibration of the 
Yocal chords by the ascent of air from the lungs in consequence 
of the dilation of the pharynx, the nasal passages being closed 
by the soft palate. In the process of articulation, '* this smaller 
cavity [the pharynx]," he remarks, «• is substituted for the larger 
cavity of the chest, to the great relief of the speaker." 
, The mouth is a nearly oval-shaped cavity, bounded in front by 
the lips ; laterally by the internal sur&ce of the cheeks ; above 
by the hard palate and the teeth of the upper jaw ; below by the 
tongue, by the mucous membrane stretched between the lower 
surfiice of the tongue and the inner surfiu^ of the lower jaw, and 
by the teeth of this jaw ; and behind by the aoft pakOe^ which is 
a movable fold of mucous membrane containing muscular fibres 
and glands suspended from the posterior border of the hard palate 
between the mouth and the pharynx. Hanging from the middle 
of its lower border, is a small, roimded process called the umUt, 
Passing outward from the uvula, on each side are two curved 
folds of the mucous membrane called the arehf of the palate^ or 
the ptOan of the palate. The anterior arches run downward and 
forward from the base of the uvula to the sides of the base of tha 



10 nmiODucnov, 

tongue. The potterior srehes epproadi netter to eedi other, ere 
longer than the anterior* and run downward and backward tnm 
the base of the uvula to the eidee of the pharynx. In tike tri« 
angular intenrale between the arches of the palate are situated the 
fontih, one on each side. These are glandular organs, •'varying in 
size in different individuals. When enlarged from inflammationt 
they give to the Toioe a peculiar nasal tone* 

The itrnffugf being chiefly composed of mnscnlar fibres, and 
having a thin, flexible tip snd a large, fleshy root, is capable of 
taking a great variety of positions and shapes. It is connected 
by muscles to the soft palate, to the hyoid bone^ and to the 
lower jaw. It is also connected by the mucous membrane with 
tiie soft palate, as well as with the epiglottis and the pharynx. 

The lingual bone, or bone at the base of the tcmgue, — called 
also the ot hyoide$, or kyoid bon9, on account of its resemblanee 
to the Greek letter v, •— consists of a bony arch, with a curvature 
neaily approaching a parabola, convex in front and concave be* 
land. Situated in an almost hmriaontal position bdund, and 
rather below, the lower jaw, it petlbnns the triple office of a 
basis of the tongue, a point of support to the larynx, and a ful- 
crum by whtdi the contractions of the intrinaio musdes of the 
tongue and the larynx may be impressed on these organs. It is 
not immediately joined to any other bone^ but the muscles and 
li(i;aments which converge to it from different directions effectually 
prevent its displacement. Being thus suspended between the 
tongue and the larynx, it impresses on each the movement of th^ 
other, and is the mcxlittm by which these two organs are so inti^ 
mateiy associated. 

The noMai paumsfm consist of several channels among the bones 
of the head ia front, terminating externally in the anterior narea, 
or nostrils, and internally in the postmor nares, or nostrik, which 
are two nearly oval apertures opening into the pharynx, and 
capable of being dosed by the soft palate. 

} S« Whisper is the sound, or series of sounds, produced bj 
an emission of breath through the larynx, when the vocal chords 
are relaxed, or in such a position that they will not vibrate. 

i 4* YoxcB is the sound, or series of sounds, produced by an 
emission of breath through the larynx, when the vocal chords are 
tensok or in a position very nearly parallel to each other, so aa to 
be made to vibrate. 



mrkomsoaiom. 11 

{ 5. A TOWML sonm It a Mrand prodoMd by an imobttniotod 
ntteraiioe <rf the brealli (at. Id wfaiqieniig), or of the Toica (at in 
speaking aloud), more or lest modified bj the poeition of the 
tongoe, the loft palate^ and the lips, or by the motions of the 
lower jaw in Tarying ^tm canity of the mouth. The letter which 
represents such a sound is called a voieil; but Has l«m la sosBa* 
times applied to' the sound itsell 

f 6. A COXPOUNB YOWWL SOUITDt Or niPHTKOHO, COBSifti of 

two simple vowel sounds connected by a glide, or continnoua 
emission of the breath or the Toioe, while the organs of s pe e c h 
are rapidly changing from their position in forming the first to 
that necessary for forming the second. 

§ 7* A coMsoMANT souMD Is a Bouud produced by flie partial 
or the total obstruction of the breath or the Toice, on passing 
through the mouth or the nose» by the contact or the approzi- 
mation d two of the organs of speech, as the two Ups (d, ioA» ai), 
the lower lip and the upper teeth (^ e), the tip of flie tongue 
and the upper teeth (<4 as in ikin, a as in <Mf), the tip of the 
tongue and the hard palate (th, cA), tiie badi of the tongue and 
the soft palate (g, ng) ; or it is a sound produced by an utterance 
of the breath at the moment of separating two of these organs 
(A, Pf 0* ^^^ letter which represents sudi a sound, and some- 
times the sound itseU^ is called a eontonant (from the Latin eon- 
rnnang, xnettiinjg literally mmnding wth\ a name probably sug^ 
gested by the &ct that f vowel sound is usually joined with a 
consonant sound in forming syllaljiles, though not meant to im- 
ply, as some writers seem to have supposed, that no consonant 
sound can be uttered without being joined with a vowel sound. 

{ 8, A DiosAFH is a combination of two letters to represent 
a single sound ; as, ees in fear^ n in Mm, aw m mUw, eh in e kwr e h f 
th in thint this, ng in thing* 

$ 9. An BLpxsMTABV aouvp, or element of speech, is a eound 
which is, in its nature, essentially simple^ or which cannot bo 
ahown to conaiat of any otlMT ioiuida» 



12 



IBTBODUGHOK* 



n. ELEHENTABY SOUND& 

The fonowing is a Table of the Elementary Sounds of tiie 
English Language, with the letters or characters used in this 
work to indicate them : — 



1. Simple Vowel Sounds. 

1. &(bund of a in and^ indicated hj d 

** d (before r, by a) . 

« d 

** € 



2. 
3. 
4. 

5. 

6. 

7. 

8. 

9. 
10. 
11. 
12. 
13. 



(I 
tt 
«« 
it 

4« 
tt 
tt 
tt 
tt 
« 
« 
« 



"/or, 

" fut, 

** me, 

** there, 

" then, 

" ill, 

** orb, (or a in aU) aw, d (before r, by o) 

♦ o ** on, 

♦ 00 " food, 

♦ 00 ♦« foot, " ** dS 

« II *♦ urn, " " uh (before r, by «) . 



* a 

* a 

« 

« 

« e 

« » 



tt 
tt 
tt 
tt 
tt 



tt 
tt 
tt 
tt 






«♦ 00 



• u 



t( 



tip, 



<« 



«« « 



14. Sound 

15. " 

16. " 

17. " 

18. " 

19. " 



8. ' Compound Vowel Sounds, 

of a in ale, indicated by d • • 

«• o ** old, ♦« " tf . . 

«« % ** time, •* «« I . . 

«« u " 1M0, «<4«, " «, or yoo 

«« o» «♦ oi^ " " oi, or oy 

« ott <* ounce, « << on, or oto 



8. Aspirate Sound. 
20. Sound of A in home, indicated by h 



4. Consonant Sounds* 

21. Sound of j» in pet, indicated by >i « 

22. " ** b ** bet, " « 6 . 

23. •« " m «« man, •« «« m • 

24. " " itA" wAen, " «« loA • 
26. •« «• 10 " «wi, «• «« fo . 



$ 10 
§11 
§ 12 
\ 13 
§ 14 
§ 15 
§ 16 
§17 
§18 
§ 19 
§20 
§21 
22 



§23 
§24 
§25 
§26 
§27 
§28 



§29 



§80 
§81 
§82 
§83 
§34 



mTBODUcnoN. 18 

26. Sound of/ in fed^ indicated by/. • • \tS 

27. " " 9 " fwo/, «♦ «« • § 36 

28. « « M •' MtM, «• «« <A {37 

29. <* *' th <« tAw, « «« ^ {38 

SO. «* «* « *• fM/, ** ** t • . {39 

31. « <« s «< Mo^ ** '* s {40 

32. " «« i " <«/^, «« " < {41 

33. «* *' d «' dofe, " *< if {42 

34. <' ** n « name, « •* n {43 

35. <• «« ch (^ cAurcA, *< *< cA {44 

36. " «« / ♦• juat^ " " y {45 

37: «• •♦ «* " «Aal^ «« «« lA . . .^ . . . . { 46 

38. " *« « " osure, «« " «A . . .^ . . . . { 47 

39. «« «« r " nwTO, /oruf, «• r {48 

40. ♦« " r «« nor, «or<, «• r {49 

41. " " I " fow, «• «« I {60 

42. " " y ** yet, «• " y {61 

43. « <' A *« A»fl; « «* A {62 

44. " ** ff* ** ffOi «« «« ^(before0,t,ory,bt^A){63 
46. «• <* n^ " M'n^, *• ** ng {64 

Remabkb on ths Elsmbhtabt Sovims. 

In the following remarks, the elementary sounds are treated 
In the order in which they are given in the Table, and the modes 
in which they are represented in the established system of orthog- 
raphy, as they occur in monosyllables or in accented syllables, 
are illustrated by examples. 

1. Simple Vowel Bounds. 

{10* (1.) The sound of a in and (short a, marked tf). 

This sound, which is peculiarly English, is commonly reckoned 
the short form of a in far (No. 2, { 11), differing from it only 
in duration ; but between these two sounds, as Bell remarks, 
« there is a great organic difference," the tongue being raised 
higher for the former than for the latter. Smart .says of a in 
ashd^ that " it differs in quality as well as in quantity both from 
a [in oZff] and^a [in/ir]. It is much nearer the latter than the 
ianaeg" According to Ellis, the long, or protracted, sound of 

2 



14 cnmeDuonoN. 

this ekment oecnn as a provindalism in the west of Bn^a&d, In 
Irdand, and in New England. — See No. 5, § 14. 

It U represented by a, and also by at (plaid), — See § 11, Notb. 

{ 11. (2.) The sound of a ia/ar (the Italian a, marked a). 

This sound is represented by a before h in the same syllable 
(oA), and before r (cor, cart, martyr), except in the cases men- 
tioned in the Note ; also by au (aunt), ea (heart), and ua (gtiard). 
— See §72. 

Note.— The vowel a represents the soand of a in. far before r In a 
monosyllable or an aoeented syllable of some words, and in their derit- 
atiTes (as in 'itoTf atar'ry, tar^ tar*ry, de-lKir', de^r^rinff) ; but when a 
eomes before r In an accented syllable of a word net a derhrative, and is 
feUowed by a syllable commencing with another r or with a vowel, it 
hfM its short sound (as In mar'ryy €ur'id), 

§ 12. (3.) The sound of a iafart (kitemediate a, marked ^). 

There is a class of words, mostly monosyllables, ending in 
o^, afit asSf a&t, ask^ tupt with a few ending in once and an/, 
{as stafft fff^fii Sfiasa, /astt b<uk, greup, daneet chanf) in the pro- 
imneiaftion of which good usage, both in England and in America, 
is hi from being umform, some speakers giving them the long, 
fiill sound of a in far (No. 2, { 11), while others — including 
most of the orthodpists ** pronounce them with the extreme short 
sound of a in and (No. 1, { 10). According to Smart, as stated 
by Goodrich, the sound of a in and is, in such words, **at 
present [1856] the pronunciation of well-educated London people 
under sixty-five or sixty years of age." Ellis, however, main- 
tains that ** it is usual," in such words, ** to pronounce the clear 
Towel ah" not only in London, but throughout the south of 
England, and that the sound of short a is *< seldom or never 
heard" instead of- it. This conclusion he arrived at, he says, 
« after mimy observations on the pronunciation of different speak- 
ers, instituted solely with a view of discovering whether this was 
or was not the case." Bell remarks : ** The extreme pronuncia- 
lions [a in and, and a mfar] are, at the present day [1849], com- 
paratively seldom heard. The precise quality of the prevailing 
Intermediate sound cannot be correctly noted ; for it ranges 
among different speakers through every practicable shade within 
these limits.'^ The orthofipists Fulton and Knight regard this 
mtermediate sound as a shortened form of the Italian a (No. 2, 



jimoiiuc'iiuii* 10 



{11% aad Wofoester Hid Goodrioh adopt gMtKhmtially th* 

new. 

This sound is always represented by a, as in tha daaa of worda 
above mentioned (staff, ff^Mst^ ifafiea* ftc.)* 

i 13. (4.) The sound of « in mm (long «, maiked €)• 

This sound is represented by e and also by « (C«aar)» ao (saal)! 
00 (sea), «• (s^se), eo (people), «y (luy)t t (rartee), is (fitld), • 
(fotus), nay (qtiay).— See No. 7, { 16. 

{ X4« (6.) The sound of in th§re (marked 4y 

This sound is heard, in English, only before that of r (So, 
40, § 49) in the same syllable, and it is considered by Walker, 
Smart, and most orthoepists, to be the same as that of long a 
(No. 14, $ 23). Worcester characteriaes it as the sound of long 
« ** qualified by being followed by the letter f." But Bell and 
Spurrell regard it as a lengthened form of short • (No. 6, } 16). 
The former remarks: **An ear imaccustomed to analyse Tocal 
sounds may possibly, at first, fail to recognise the same Towel 
formation in the words ett, ere, air, heir, arising firom its com- 
bination in the [three] latter words with the open r" (No. 40, 
4 49) ; <*but close obseryation and careful experiment will satisfy 
the demurring ear of tiie correctness of our daasiflcation." Rus- 
sell describes the sound in question as ** approaching to the e in 
eiM^" and Smarts though he maintains its identity with that of 
long a, approves, according to the statement of Goodrich, tho 
mode of obtaining it by " prolonging our short e before r." It ia 
a common practice in some parts of the United* States to substi- 
tute for the true sound of the first in tkere a protracted sound 
of » in and (No. 1, { 10) ; but this pronunciation is countenanced 
by no good authority. 

Tins sound is represented by e, and also by a (fore), at (otr), 
atfe (prayer, in the sense of a petition), ea (bear), and ei (hetr). 

i 16. (6.) The sound of e in then (short e; marked If). 

This sound is merely a shortened form of the first • in there 
(No. 5, § 14); 

It is represented by e, and also by a (any), (di«reftis), a» 
(said). Of (Botffi), ea (hsod), st (h#tfer), ea (Uapnd)i i» (firtand), 
w (asafMdai), u (bury), and tt& (guest). 

] 16. (7.) The sound of i in tff (short ^ marked I). 

This aound has been considered by many writers to bo an ex* 



16 INTBODUCnON. 

tremely shortened fotm eft e in me (So, 4, } 13) ; but by BusK 
BeU, Ellis, and Goodrich, it is re^rded as a distinct element. 
Bell remarks: <*The shortest utterance of e [in me] will be a 
distinctly different sound from this [short t]. . . . There is no 
longer form of this Towel [I] in English, than that of the word 
hinge; but the prolongation of the sound is, of course, quite 
practicable. . . . The tendency of all vowels is to 'open in pro- 
longation ; but * short t ' is more open than e, and would not, 
therefore, naturally be lengthened into e. On the contrary, if 
any person, guided by his ears, and not by preconceived classifi- 
cations, strive to lengthen the generally short vowel t, as in 
visiont himy iU, &c., he will find that the tendency of the pro- 
longed sound will be towards a [in ale] rather than e [in me]. 
This may be well tested by singing the words to long notes." 
Ellis notices the fiict "that almost all English orthoGpists, as 
Walker, Smart, and Worcester, confound [long] e and [short] t, 
in unaccented syllables." 

This sound is represented by t, and also by e (pretty), eau 
(beaufin), ee (been), xe (sieve), o (women), u (busy), ui (gutlt), and 
y (myth). 

{ 17. (8.) The sound of o in orft (or of avo in awl, or of a in 
faU, called broad a, or German a, marked d). 

This sound is represented by o (before r), and also by a (fall), 
ao (extraordinary), au (haul), aw (atrl), awe (awe), eo (georgic), 
oa (brood), and ou (ought). 

i 18. (9.) The sound of o in oit (short o, marked d). 

This sound is the shortened form of o in orb (No. 8, § 17). 

It is represented by o, and also by a (wash), ou (cough), and oto 
(knotcledge). 

Note. — According to the marking of most orthoSpists, this short 
sound of o occurs before the sound of /, s, or th in the same syllable 
(as in off, cough, soft, cross, cost, hroth), though some authorities give to 
o in this situation its broad sound of o In orh (the same as that of aw 
in awl. No. 8, § 17). In regard to the pronunciation of words of this 
class, Smart remarics that ** ja medium between the extremes is the prac- 
tice of the best speakers." Tforcester observes that **thiB sound [S] 
is somewhat prolonged also in gone and begone, and in some words end' 
ing in ng, as, long, along, prong, song, strong, thong% throng, wrong*^ 

{ 19. (10.) The sound of oo m food, 

Thia sound is represented by oo, and also by eu (rhtftanatism)^ 



INlBObUCTIOik. 17 

ao (brM0)» (do), oe (shoe), au (muuntfie), mt (wwp), u (rule), 
ue (true), and ui (frii«t) ; the digraphs eu, ew, ue, and tM, having 
this sound when that of r immediately precedes thera, and the 
Towel u having this sonnd when it is immediately preceded by that 
of r, and followed by a consonant and a silent e final, or when it 
is immediately preceded by the sound of tk (mre). 

§ 20. (11.) The sound of oo in foot (marked op). 

This sound is the shortened form of oo in food (No. 10, { 19). 

It is represented by oo, and also by o (wolf), ow (ooidd), and 
ff (full). 

{ 21. (12.) The sound of u in «»• (called the natural vowd)» 

This sound is heard only before that of tmooth r (No. 40, { 49). 
By most orthoepists it is not distingnished from the sound of u 
in vp (No. 13, { 22). 

It is represented by «, and also by o (work), and on (journal) ; 
the vowel u having this sound before r in a monosyllable or an 
accented syllable of some words and in their derivatives (as in 
fur, fur*ry, in^-cur', %n-^ur*ring) ; but when u comes before r in an 
accented syllable of a word not a derivative, and is followed by 
another r, in the next syllable, it has its short sound ; as in oMr'ty, 
hur^ry, 

NoTE.-> Aeeordfaig to the common praetiee In the United States, the 
sonnd of u In urn Is lepreaented also in monosyUaUes, and In accented 
syllables, before r (when not oocnning before another r, In a word not 
a derivative, as In mer'ry, or before a rowel, in the next syllable, as 
in mer'it), by e (term, 8«r'vant, de-fer', de-f«r'ring), by ea (earth, ear'ly), 
by i (girl, trk'Bome, stsr'ring), and by p (myrrh, myr'tle). But the best 
English speakers give a somewhat dliTerent sound to the vowels e, i, 
and ff, and the digraph ea, when they occur before r, as stated above. 
Sheridan, YTalker, Knowles, and some other writers, erroneously identify 
this peculiar English sound with that of e in then (No. 6, f 15). Good- 
rich considers it as Intermediate between the sonnd of e in then, and that 
of Ufa up (No. 13, $ ^), or rather of tt In um (No. 12, f 21), whidi Is 
merely a lengthened quantity ofuiaup, *« In a eorree^ pronundation," 
he says, ** the organs are placed in a position for forming the short e, and 
then open instantly (as the sound begins to form) into the short u [or the 
tf In urn], thus making (as Smart observes) *a compromise between the 
two.' " Smart speaks of this peculiarity of English pronunciation as 
a delicacy which prevails only In the more refined dasses of society. 
** Even in these classes," he says, " »ur, durt, burd, Ac, are the current 
pronunciation of eir, dirt, bird, &c ; and, indeed. In all very common 
words It would be somewhat affeeted to Insist on the delicacy referred 
%a,v «lt Is only ^rery eareful speakers,*' says Ellis, *«wbo make thia 

2* 



18 BmODUCTlOlt 

distlDCtioii ; and onl j a very small minoritj of tlioae iHm do malm ft afc 
all, keep up the distinction in unaccented syllables.'* In the opinion of 
Worcester, ** there is Uttle or no difference " in the Towel sounds of such 
words as Aer, earn, Jtr, far, myrrh ; and Spnrrell says' that " the distine- 
tion, if any, is so slight that writers of the best anthorfty disregard it." — 
See No. 40, f 49. 

$ 22. (13.) The soimd of « in t^ (short tc, marited il). 
This sound ia the shortened Ibrm of ti in wn^ (No. 12^ f 21), 
It ik represented by ti, and also by o (son), oe (doea), oo (blood), 
and ou (tonoh). — See } 2 1 . 

2k Ckimpoiuid Vowel Soundi; 

{ 23. (14.) The sound of a in oi^ (long a, marked d). 

This sound is generally regarded by English ortho^Spiats aa a 
simple element ; but Rush, Smart, Goodrich, Bell, Spurrell, and 
some other writers regard it as ending in a brief sound of e in mm 
(No. 4, { IS). Spurrell, .moreover, considers its initial or radical 
part to be l^e sound of the first e in there (No. 5, f 14). Bell 
remarks that the omission of the ** vanishing sound ** of € is **tt 
marked provincialism, and is one of the leading features of the 
Scottish dialect." ElUs, on the contrary, asserts that the addition 
of this vanishing sound <* is a peculiarly English misprontincia- 
tion,*' and maintains that the vowel should be ** kept pure " ; 
though he admits that ** it is very common to let it glide almost 
imperceptibly into the distinctive vowel e" 

This sound is represented by a, and also by at (aim), ao (gaol), 
au (gauge), ay (day), aye (dye), ea (great), ei (veil), and ey (thtfy).. 

i 24* (1^.) The sound of om old (long o, marked d). 

This soimd is regarded by some writers as simple, by others as 
ending in a slight sound of oo in food (No. 10, § 19). The former 
view is that taken by Walker, Ellis, and most other writers ; tho 
latter that adopted by Rush, Smart, Bell, Russell, Spurrell, Good- 
rich, and others. Ellis allows that the sound of o is often made 
tb taper off into that of oo, but this practice he characterizes as an 
^rror. BeU, on the.other hand, remarks that ** with less or mOro 
distinetness, its compound quidity should be heard in every com-~ 
binatioh, in careful reading." SmaTt and Goodrich observe' that 
the final oo sound is omitted in unaccented syllables; asino-pin'iont 
tb-bac'co, fellow. 
. It it a very comnum pxactijBe,«in the. XJsited: Stato%^ to dmrtnr 



lOTBOPUCnON. 19 

m 

the sound of long o in some words, chiefly, if Jiot exclusiTelj, the 
following : boat, bolster, bolt, bone, both, broke, broken, choke, eloak, 
€^om (the adjectiye), ooach, coat, eoU, comb, doU, hobter, home, komefy, 
hope, jbit, load, nudten, moult, only, open, poultice, road, rode, ropie, 
emoke, spoke, spoken, stone, throat, toad, upholsterer, whole, whoBy, 
wholesome, wrote. The effect thus produced is due, in the opinion 
of Goodrich, to the omission of the brief sound of oo, which 
should properly be preserved. The shortening of long o in the 
words here enumerated, is contrary to English usage, and is not 
sanctioned by any orthoCpist. 

This sound is represented by o, and also by au (lumtboy), 
eau (b«ati), eo (yeoman), ew (sew), oa (oak), oe (£00), 00 (brooch), 
cu (soul), ow (snotr), owe (owe). 

{ 25. (16.) The sound of i in time (long t, marked I). 

>Yich regard to the composition of this sound, considerable 
difference of opinion exists. Some writers, as Smart, consider it 
to be compounded of u in urn (No. 12, § 21) and em me (No. 4, 
§ 13). Ellis resolves it into a in and (No. 1, § 10) and % m iU 
(No. 7, $16). But Walker, Bell, and most other orthoGpists 
maintain that it is composed of a in far (No. 2, § 11) and em me 
(No. 4, § 13). 

It is represented by t, and also by ai (otsle), ei (hetght), ey 
(eying), eye (eye), ie (tie), ui (guide), uy (buy), y (by), and 
ye (rye). 

§ 26. (17.) • The sound of u in use, cube (long u, marked A). 

All orthofipists, except Webster, agree that this sound termi- 
nates in the sound of 00 in food (No. 10, § 19), and a majority 
of them agree that, when it begins a word or a syllable, its initial 
element is the soimd of consonant y, being equivalent, in that 
case, to the syllable yoo. As to its composition when it follows a 
consonant in the same syllable, there is a difference of opinion, 
some writers, as Smart, Bell, and Goodrich, considering that its 
initial element remains, as before, the sound of consonant y slightly 
uttered, and others, as Walker and Spurrell, that it is rather the 
sound of long e. The former orthoSpists, however, admit that 
the initial element y is heard less distinctly after some consonants, 
as J and / (Jew, Ittte), than after others, as e and m (cttbe, mute). 
Smart describes tiie sound which is properly heard as the initial 
element of long u after J and I, as **b, slight semi-consonant sound 



20 INTBODUCnON. 

[noted in his Dictionary by an apostrophe (')] between # [short- 
ened quantity of €] and y consonant, — a sound so short and 
alight as to be lost altogether in the mouth of an unpolished 
speaker, who says lootf joo^ &c., for Poot^foot &c/' "On the other 
hand," he adds, << there are persons who, to distinguish them- 
selves from the vulgar, pronounce y consonant distinctly on the 
occasions which call for this slighter sound. • , • To say /iZto, 
l^^cid^ lu'natic, with the u as perfect [i. e. with the consonant 
element y as distinct] as in cfi5e, cu'bic^ is Northern or laboriously 
pedantic in effect ; and the practice of good society is Voot, Voo^dd^ 
Voc^na-Hc^ fte. ; avoiding, at the same time, the vulgar extreme 
looti loo'cidf Mna'tic, &c/' It is, perhaps, not of much practical 
importance whether the initial element of long u, after a conso-. 
nant, be considered as the sound of consonant ^ or as that of the 
vowel e, since, in either case, it is only slightly pronounced, and» 
especially, since these sounds are nearly alike in their organic 
formation. (See No. 42, § 51.) It is more important to observe 
that the compound sound of long u is not properly heard after 
the soimd of either r, ch, or ah, the letter u taking, when so situ- 
ated, the nmple sound of oo in food^ or in Jbot, The words rule, 
truth, chew, sure, sugar, for example, should be pronounced toU, 
trooth, choo, shoor, shdbg^ar. 

According to Webster, the sound of long u, when it follows a 
consonant in the same syllable, is not compound, but a distinct 
and simple element. *« Dr. Webster," says Goodrich, " did not 
consider it to be diphthongal, except at the commencement of a 
syllable, as in unite. In all other cases, he regarded our long u 
as a distinct elementary sound." 

The sound of long u is represented by u, and also by eau 
(beauty), eo (feodal), eu (fewd), ew (few), ewe {ewe), ieu (lieu), tew 
(Ytew), ue (due), ui (suit), yew (jyew), you (j^outh), and yu (ytde). 

} 27. (18.) The sound of oi in oil. 

This sound is compounded, according to Smart, Bell, Spurrell, 
and most orthoSpists, of that of o in orb (No. 8, § 17), and that 
o£eiD.me (No. 4, § 13). Some writers, as Walker and Worcester, 
consider its final element to be the sound of » in iU, which, 
however, they regard as only a shortened quantity of long £, — 
See No. 7, i 16. 

It is represented by o», eaoA also by oy (boy), and eoi (burgMw). 



unsoDtTcnoif. 



21 



{28. (19.) The sound of ou in otmef* 

The final element in this compound sound, as all orthofipists 
agree, is the sound of oo in food (No. 10, { 19), or its shortened 
form in foot (No. 11, § 20); and most writers, as Smart, Bell, 
Spurrell, and others, consider its initial element to be the sound 
of a in fear (No. % § 11). But, according to Walker and Worces- 
ter, its initial element is the sound of o in wh (No. 8, } 17); 
according to Russell, the sound of ii in up (No. 13, § 22) ; and, 
according to Ellis, the sound of a in and (No. 1, § 10), or of ii in 
up (No. 13, § 22). Bell characterizes the combination ^oo as 
peculiar to Scotland. 

This sound is represented by ou^ and also by 010 (note), and to 
(Macltfod). 

Note A. — The precediiig rowel sounds may be arnunged In sndi a 
nuoiner m to show their organic relation to each other. We nuj consider 
them as fonaing two series extending (1) from the palate to the throat, 
and (2) from the throat to the lips. The vowels which derive their char- 
acteristic quality from the influence of the pharynx and posterior part of 
the mouth may he termed guttural (L. guttuvt the throat) i those which 
reoeiye their peculiar modification from the gradual elevation of the tongue 
towards the palate may be termed patatal i and those which are due, in 
some measure, to the position of the lips, may be termed labial. The 
following diagram will make this classification more evident. It will be' 
observed that the short forms of some of the vowels, namely, 00 in foot 
<<$&), o in on (d), uiaup (fi), a in /cut (a), e in then (S), — shortened forms 
respeetiveiy of 00 in food (00), o in orb or a in aU (ft), u in t«m (uh), a in far 
(a), and e in there (6), — are not represented, regard heiag had to the quality 
of the sounds, rather than to simple difiterences of quantity. The vowels 
a (No. 14, § 23) and (No. 16, f 2i) are included in this scheme, because, in 
foreign languages, they represent simple sounds, and because they are con- 
sidered to do so, in English also, by many orthoepists of high authority. 




22 INTRODUCTION. 

3. Aspirate Sound. 

§ 29. (20.) Tlie sound of A in home. 

As no contact of the articulating organs is necessary for the 
formation of this elementary sound, it is clearly distinguished, 
from the consonants. It is a mere aspiration, or, as Bell describes 
it. *• simply a breathing of the vowels " ; and, in forming it. *• the 
organs," he says, ** are adjusted to the vowel position before the 
breathing of k is emitted." 

It is always represented by A. 

4. Consonant SoundB. 

§30. (21.) The sound of p in jpc^ 

This sound is formed by a firm contact of the edges of both 
lips, and a compression of the breath within the mouth and 
pharynx, followed by a sudden separation of the lips, allowing 
the compressed breath to escape. — See Rem. 2, p. 34. 

It is represented by ^, and also hyph (diphthong), gh (hiccou^A), 
and pp (steppe), 

§ 31. (22.) The sound of bm bet. 

This sound differs in the mode of its formation froT^ that of p 
in pet only in a slighter contact of the edges of the lips, and in 
the compression of the voicct instead of simple breatht within the 
mouth and pharynx, causing a muffled sound or murmur to pre- 
cede the separation of the lips. — See Rem. 2, p. 34. 

It is represented by 6, and also by bb (ebb), 

§ 32. (23.) The sound of m in man. 

In the production of this sound, the lips are closed as for 5, but 
the nasal passages are imcovered, and the voice, instead of being 
compressed within the mouth and pharynx, flows continuously 
through the nostrils. — See Rem. 1, p. 34. 

It is represented by m, and also by mm (rammed). 

§ 33. (24.) The sound of wh in when. 

In the digraph why the h is regarded by many ortho€pists as 
representing a simple aspiration preceding the sound of tr, as if 
the letters toh were written, according to the original Anglo-Saxon 
mode, hto. But by Rush, Ellis, Bell, Spurrell, and some other 
recent writers of high authority, this digraph is regarded, with 
good reason, as representing a simple elementary sound which 



INTRODUCTION. 23 

consists of a mere emission of breath when the lips hare been 
placed in a position to sound w (No. 26, f 34), the voice not 
being heard till the following vowel is commenced. ** We doubt 
not," says Br. D. B>. Goodwin, "that, if a man will observe 
carefully for himself how and with what difference he pronounces 
tint and tohit, he will be satisfied that the h is really pronounced 
neither before nor after the to, but in a sort of constant combina- 
tion with it. Whether the h, therefore, should be printed before 
or after the ir, is a matter of indifference, except so fiir as con- 
sistency in the notation of a given alphabet is concerned. Wh 
is certainly the most consistent with the rest of the English alpha- 
bet." Upon this subject. Bell remarks : ** This element [toh] is 
a whispered form of w. In its formation, the lips are closely 
approximated, and then rapidly separated : the breath is not 
obstructed." 

This sound is always represented by loA. 

{ 34. (26.) The sound of to in wen. 

This sound nearly resembles that of oo in Jbod (No. 10, § 19), 
and by some writers, as Lowth, Webster, and Latham, is consid- 
ered identical with it. But in forming it the lips are more closely 
approximated than for the sound of oo. Besides, it is to be 
observed that the sound of v> occurs in some words before the 
sound of oo in the same syllable, as in tooof, wood ; and it is gen- 
erally admitted that two and the same vowel sounds cannot occur 
in succession without forming two syllables. *»This letter \w]" 
says Bell, " has been called a vowel by some ortho^pists, by others 
a consonant, and by others both. When before a vowel, it is 
imquestionably an articulation [or consonant] ; and when in other 
situations, it is either a redundant letter, as in flovTy or merely an 
auxiliary mark to make up the writing of some sound which has 
no fixed simple symbol." Smart remarks in regard to w, when it 
occurs before a vowel, that it *' is a consonant having for its basis 
the most contracted of the vowel soimds, namely oo, which soxmd, 
being partially obstructed by an inward action of the lips, and 
then given off by an outward action, is changed from a vowel to 
a consonant." — See No. 42, § 51. 

This sound is represented by tr, at the beginning of a word or 
a syllable, and also by u, when q precedes it (qtdt), and, in some 
words, by u, when g ot a precedes it (angt«ish, persuade). 



24 INTBOBTrcnON, 

i SBs (26.) The tcmnd of / in fsel. 

This sound is fonned by placing the under lip against the edges 
of the upper front-teeth, so as partially to intercept the paashig 
of the breath. 

It is reiHresented by /, and also by ff (j^ff)t ff^ QKogK), and 
ph (syipX). 

i 80. (27.) The sound of « in veai. 

The formation of this sound differs from that ot/m /kel only 
in the substitution of voiee for breath. 

It is represented by v, and also by/ (in the word of, oalj), and 
bypA (in the proper name St^pAen). 

§ 37. (28.) The sound of rA in thin. 

This sound is produced by placing the tip of the tongue against 
the inner surface of the upper front-teeth, while the breath escapes 
over the sides of the forepart of the tongue. 

It is always represented by th. 

i 38. (29.) The sound of th in this (marked &). 

The distinction between this sound and that of th in thin c(m- 
sists only in the substitution of voice for AreoM, producing a spoken 
instead of a whispered articulation. 

It is always represented by th. 

i 39. (30.) The sound of < in aeal. 

In the formation of this sound, the tip of the tongue is rounded 
and brought near the upper frt)nt-teeth, while its sides are pressed 
firmly against the inner surfoce of the upper side-teeth, leaving a 
yery narrow channel for the passing of the breath. 

It is represented by <, and also by es (gnas), by e (called aoft c) 
before e, t, or y in the same syllable (cent, nice, cite, cyst), or be- 
tween two Towels the second of which is e, t, or y (racer, fiacile, 
spicy) ; and also by z when it follows the sound of t (waits). — 
See NoTB C, p. 34. 

KOTE.— The soimd of $, combined with that of h hefbre It, Is repre- 
sented, in some words, hy «,8S in wso? (prononnoed waitf). — See § 40, 
Note, sad § 62, Notb. 

§ 40. (310 ^® sound of :s in zeai. 

To form this element, it is necessary only to place the tongue 
in the proper position for making the sound of s, and allow the 
passing of tfoice instead of breath. 

It is represented by », and also by zz (buzz), c (suffice), a (haa). 



IHTBODUCnON* 25 

10 (dUeerft), m (hoMax), and, ait the bfghwifng of words» hj m- 

(Xenophon). 

KoTE.— The sound of « In zeal, combined with that of ^In ^pre- 
ceding^ it, 1b K^Mreaented by « at the end of a ■yllable, in lome wordi, 
before an aecented syllable beginning^ with a vowel, as in ex-act' (e^s-aotO« 
l«v-B'rt-oas (lujjr;!;-u'ri-ous). It is also represented by x, inunediately after 
the sound of n^, in tbe word anx4'e-ty (aa^-d'e-ty).— See ( 30^ NOTS, and 

$fi2,NOTB. 

§41. (32.) The sound of ^ in to&. 

This sound is prodnced by placing the margin of the forepart 
of the tongue firmly against the inside of the upper teeth, so aa 
perfectly to obstruct the breath, till, by continued pressure, it 
removes some part of the obstructing edge, and thus escapes. — 
See Rem. 2, p. 34. 

It is represented by f, and also by U (bu^), by d (lookaif, pro- 
nounced look^. — See Note C, p. 34), and by th (thjme), 

§ 42. (33.) The sound of din dale. 

This element differs from that of ^ in tale, just as b does from p ; 
that is to say, voice instead of breath is compressed within the 
mouth and pharynx, while the organs remain in the same position 
as for t, — See Hem. 2, p. 34. 

It is represented by d^ and also by dd (pdd)^ 

} 43* (34.) The soimd of *» in name. 

In the formation of this element, the tongue is placed in the 
same position as for t and d, but the nasal passages are uncoTered, 
and the Toice, instead of being compressed within the mouth and 
pharynx, passes freely through the nostrils. — See Rem. 1, p. 34. 

It is represented by n, and also by rm (iitit). 

{ 44. (35.) The sound of eh in ehureh. 

This sound has been regarded by most orthoSpists as com- 
pounded of the soimd of t and that of eh* But this 'view seems 
not to be correct. «< It is produced," says Goodwin, " by placing 
a certain portion of the tongue near the tip, but not the tip itself^ 
against a certain part of the palate, and, after pressure, suddenly 
withdrawing it with a viojlent emission of breath. It has no t" 
sound in its compo^tion, for neither the tip of the tongue nor the 
teeth are used in its production. Neither does it end in an «A- 
sound ; for, in that case, it could be prolonged ad Hbitum, which 
the true English ch cannot be. Moreoyer, it does not begin with 

3 



26 INTEODUCnON. 

any one sonnd and end with another, but is the same simple 
sound throughout its whole extent." 
It is repaesented by ch, and also by tch (la^cA).— See Kote D, p. 37. 

Note l.~ When the aspirate aonnd represented by t immediately pre- 
cedes, in an accented syllable, the sound of consonant y (as represented in 
long Uf or by one of the letters e, i) in the next syllable, the two sounds 
are apt to be exchanged for the similar aspirate sound represented by 
ch, as in the words nat'ure (nat'yur), rigJU'eotu (rit'yas), Christ'ian 
(Christ'yan), which are often pronounced, and, according to some ortho- 
epists, correctly pronounced, na'chur, ri'chus, Chris'chan, This stibstl- 
tutlon of cA for t-^, is due to the difficulty with which, in rapid utterance, 
the tongue passes from its position in sounding t (with the margin of the 
forepart ai^inst the inside of the upper teeth) to its position in sound- 
ing y (being raised toward the hard palate and dilated against the upper 
side-teeth), and the greater ease with which it assumes the intermediate 
position necessary for sounding ch (with its upper sur&ce, near the tip, 
against the upper part of the hard palate).— See § 45, Note ; § 46, Note 2 ; 
and § 47, Note. 

Note 2. — When the digraph ch is preceded by I or n, as in belcA, 
bencA, filcA, fincA, it is marked with the sound of sh by Walker and 
some other orthoepists, as if pronounced helsh, bensA, filsA, finsA ; but 
by Smart, Worcester, Webster, Goodrich, and most other authorities, 
the regular sound of cA in cAurcA is given to words of this class. 

§45. (36.) The sound of J in yiM*. 

This sound is produced in the same way as that of ch, and 
differs from it only in being vocal instead of aspirate. It has been 
regarded by most orthoepists as compounded of the sound of d in. 
dale (No. 33, § 42), and that of « in azure (No. 38, § 47). But 
«<it may be shown," says Goodwin, "by a similar experiment 
and proof [referring to his remark, above quoted, in regard to 
the sound of ch] that j is a simple elementary sound." 

It is represented by^, and also by ch (sandwicA), dg Qudgment\ 
di (scienter), g (called soft g) before c, », and y (^em, ajre, ^be, 
le^on, 5yve), and by gg (exa^^erate). 

Note. — When the vocal sound represented by d immediately precedes, 
in an accented syllable, the sound of consonant y in the next syllable, the 
two sounds are apt to be exchanged for the similar vocal sound repre- 
sented by ^, for the same reason that the sounds of t and y, when so 
situated, are apt to be exchanged for the corresponding aspirate sound 
represented by cA ; as in the word grand' ear (grand'yur), which is often 
pronounced, and, according to Walker, rightly pronounced, gran'Jur, So 
the word soldier may be supposed to have been originally pronounced 
sold'yur, and, for the reason indicated, to have subsequently taken the 



INTRODUCTION. 27 

pronimcistioii Bdt'jur, u at present sanctioned bj all the orthoSpists. «' 
See § 44, Note 1 ; § 46, Note2; and { 47, Notb. 

{ 46. (37.) The sound of th in shaU. 

This sound is produced by drawing the tip of the tongue inward 
from the position it takes to sound a in seal (No. 30, { 39), slightly 
enlarging the aperture through which the breath issues, while, at 
the same time, the middle of the tongue rises within the arch of 
the palate. 

It is represented by «A, and also by c (acana) ; by ee^ ct, te, 
«t, «c», ti, before a yowel in a syllable following an accented 
syllable (o'cean, so'ctal, nau'««ous, pen'«ton, con'M»ence, ac'^ton), 
by 8 before e or u (nau'«e-a, «u'gar, in-«ure'), by aeh (schist'), and 
by eht especially in words deriyed from the French (cAaise, cAa- 
rade', ay'a-lancAe). 

Note l. — The soimd of sk in shatt (No. 37, § 46), combined with that 
of it; in kill preceding it (No. 43, § 62), is represented bj x in the words 
an:c'iotra, noar'ioas (angk-«?^aB, nok-«Aus), and their derivatives. — See 
S 40, Note, and § 62, Note. 

Note 2. ~ It is suggested by Smart, Latham, £llis,and others, that the 
sound of 8h may have replaced, in many words, the sounds of s and con- 
sonant f/f in the same manner, and for the same reason, that ch tends to 
replace t and y. Thus, the words noxiouSf ocean, social, notion, sure, may 
have been originally pronounced noks'yus, dsfyan, sds^yal, nOs'ffun, syoor, 
and subsequently have come to be pronounced, as at present, nok'shus, 
&8han, so'sbal, no' shun, shoor. — See § 44, Note 1, { 45, Note, and § 47, 
Note. 

§ 47. (38.) The sound of s in azure (indicated by xh). 
This sound differs from the preceding in a manner analogous to 
the difference between the sounds of s and z, (See No. 30, { 39, 
and No. 31, § 40.) It is never found at the beginning, or at the 
end, of any purely English word. 

It is represented by z, and also by si, ti, xi before a Towel in 
a syllable following all accented syllable (fu'«ton, tran-si'^'on, 
gla'sier), by g (rou^), and by s (mea'<ure, u'm-al). 

Note. — It is suggested by Smart, Latham, Ellis, and others, that the 
sound of zh may have replaced, in all English words, the sounds of z and 
consonant y (the former occurring in an accented syllable immediately 
before the latter in the next syllable), in the same manner, and for the 
same reason, that j tends to replace d and y, when so situated. Thus, the 
words brazier, glazier, pleasure, vision, may have been originally pro- 
nounced brilz'yur, glUz'yur, plez'yur, viz'yun, and subsequently have come 



28 INTBODUCnOK. 

to be proii<Mm«Ml, m at ptMcnt, hra'nikMr, gWzkur^ pfesjk'sr, vldt'im.-^ 
See § 44, Note 1; § 45, Notb; and §4e, Note 2. 

{ 48. (39.) The sound of r in roam^ florid (called triUtd r, or 
rough r). 

This sound is produced by a more or less forcible vibration of 
the tip of the tongue against the inner gum of the upper teeth. 
It occurs only before vowels, or between two vowels of which 
the first is short, and is thus distinguished from the sound of r in 
fwr^ tort (No. 40, § 49). — See Rbx. 1, p. 34 ; see also § 66. 

It is always represented by r. 

{ 49. (40.) The sound of r in nor, tort (called untriUed r, or 
smooth r). 

This sound, which occurs only after a vowel in the same syU 
hible, is much softer than that of initial r (No. 39, } 48), and is 
regarded by all the best modem orthoSpists as a distinct element. 
As to its true nature and its proper position in the scale of sounds, 
authorities are widely at variance. By Bell it is considered to be 
B. vowel. "When the tongue is so placed," says this writer, ** as 
just to fed the passing stream of air, not yield to it, we have the 
condition of the flital r. The aperture for the emission of the 
voice is so free that the vowel quality of the soimd is scarcely — 
if at all — affected. . . • The formation of this vowel differs but 
slightly from that of vowel [u in urn. No. 12, } 21] ; and the 
difference between these sounds is, therefore, though clearly ap* 
preciable, not very strongly marked. This leads to a confusion, 
on the part of ordinary speakers, of such words as flr and fitr, 
earn and urn, ftc, but the ttudible distinction, though sl^ht, 
should always be preserved." [See { 21, Notb.] BeU states 
that the visible difference bet^'een the formation of this element 
and that of «i in urn (No. 12, { 21) is « a slight depression of the 
posterior part of the tongue, which directs the breath against the 
palate somewhat farther back for the latter than for the former." 
Ellis regards the final r as a consonant sound produced by a 
greater or less elevation of the tongue, and an indistinct or very 
slight vibration of the uvula ; but he admits that the sound par- 
takes 90 much of the nature of a vowel as to form distinct sylla- 
bles. "The letter r," says Smart, « is sometimes a consonant, as 
in rag, tray, stray, &c., and sometimes a guttural vowel sound 
[L e. when it follows a vowel» as in the terminations or, er, ir, or^ 



IKTBOmTCTION. 29 

ur^ fTt oiv, «f», tfv, orv, uiv, oor, oioer]* Li the former capttcitjr, it is 
fomed by a ttnmg trill of the tongue against the upper gum ; in 
the latter case, there is no trill, but, the tongue being enrled baek 
during the progpress of the yowd preceding it, the sound becomes 
guttural, -while a slight vibration of the back part of the tongue 
is perceptible in the sound.*' This author, accordingly, q>eaks of 
the vowels, when followed by r, as « terminating in guttural 
vibration*" •* A vowel," he says, *< terminating in this manner, 
according to the idiomatic pronunciation of the English language 
as heard in well-bred London society, is properly considered as 
a single, though not a simple, dement [i. e. though of a com* 
pound nature, going to form one and the same syllable]. ... Of 
this blending of- the r with the previous vowel, it is further to 
be observed that the union is so smooth, in polite utterance, at 
to make it imperceptible where one ends and the other begins." 
Smooth r is represented by r, and also by rr {wr)m 

Note. — It is a marked peonliarity ef Bnglish niags, as staled hj Smart, 
Bell, Ellis, and SpiurreU« that the letter r, when it ia followed by a vowel, 
and is, at the same time, preceded, in an accented syllable, by a long vowel 
or a comiwand vowel, has always both Ita final and its initial Value, or, in 
other words, is pronounced as if it both ended the former syllable with 
its smooth sound and began the latter syllable with Ita rongh, or trilled, 
sonnd. To use the language of Smart, " the r,'* in this situation, ** be- 
sides blending itself with the previous vowel, is also heard [with ita 
initial value] in the articulation of the vowel which begins the following 
syllable." TBtis, the words serious j pirate^ tory, fury^ are pronounced, 
according to this orthoSpist, as if spelled Ur'n-mta^ p^HrtUe, t^ry^ 
/^r^ry. In such cases, the omission of the final or smooth r, in tiie pro- 
nunciation, is, according to him, *< decidedly provincial " ; and Ellis states 
that it is a Scottish peculiarity. Yet, in the United States, it is, in many 
words, — chiefly primitives,— the common praotioe to sound the r, thus 
situated, as if it had merely its initial value, or was united only to the 
following syllable ;• for. example, the words above mentioned are here 
usually pronounced sE'rious, pVrate, td^ry, f^'ry. The best speakers in 
this oountrj, however, follow the English usage in pronouncing a few 
primitive words of this class, as fairy, parent, apparent, trafisparent, and 
especially almost all words derived from primitives ending in the sound 
of smooth r, as desirous (from desire), poring (from pore), sourish (from 
sour), Ac, giving the r both its final and its Initial value ; thus, f^ry^ 
ph^rent, ap-pir^rent^ trans-pir^rent, de-Sirfrous, p9r'ring, sour'rish, 

§ 50. (41.) The sound of / in low. 

This sound, which Smart characterizes as being « the most 

harmonious of the consonants," is produced by a simple contact 

3» 



30 INTBODUCnON. 

between the tip of the tongue and the upper gain, while the aides 
of the tongue remain free for the continuous passage of the voice. 
^- See Rem. 1, p. 34. 

It is represented by I, and also by U (ba//). 

§ 61. (42.) The sound of y in yet. 

In forming this element, the tongue is raised toward the hard 
palate and dilated against the upper side-teeth, being placed very 
nearly in the same position as for the vowel e, with which, by 
some writers, it has been confounded, as w has also been with oo, 
(See No. 25, § 34.) But the tongue is brought closer to the palate 
for y than for ^, and the aperture through which the yoioe passes is, 
in consequence, still further diminished. In relation to the sounds 
of y and w, Goodwin remarks : <* In y€tm, toit, we may give first 
the fiill sounds M* -am, oo*-it, where, between the initial vowel 
sounds, eCf oo, and the following vowel sounds, the organs pass 
through a certain momentary but definite position, which gives 
the character of a consonant sound, and which we have denom- 
inated a fiilcnun or pivot. If now the vowel part, the ee or 
oo sound, be reduced to a minimum, and we begin immediately 
upon this pivot or fulcrumj and pronounce yard, wit, we shall 
have y and w representing sounds of a proper consonant char- 
acter." 

This sound is represented by y, when it begins a syllable before 
a vowel, and also by «, when it begins an unaccented syllable im- 
mediately following an accented syllable (JU'icUf pm'ion), and by 
J in haUdujah* 

Note.— In the opinion of most orthoepists, the sound of consonant y 
is heard as the initial element of long u, especially when long u begins 
a word or a syllable. According to Bell, Ellis, and Spurrell, it is also 
heard, in an aspirated form, before long u preceded by h at the beginning 
of a syllable, as in hue, hu'mid, poat'humoua, where u, as has been already 
explained (See § 26), is equivalent to yoo ; and, in this form, it is regarded 
by them as a distinct element of the English Iang:uage, and is represented 
|)y the digraph yh, which bears the same relation to y that wh bears to w. 
(See § 33). By some authorities, however, the compound sound of long 
u is, in all situations, resolved into the elements l-oo, and this analysis 
would make v preceded by ft to be equivalent in sound to Ke-oo, As this 
diversity of opinion respecting the composition of long u affects the ques- 
tion of the existence, in English speech, of such a sound as yh^ no aspirate 
correspondent of y is given in the Table of Elementary Sounds, on p. 12> 
but it is recognized in the tabular olassification on p. 34. 



INTBODUCnON. * 81 

. { 52. (43.) The soimd of ib in kiU. 

This sound is formed by bringing the back of the tongue into 
close contact with the posterior part of the palate, and then 
separating it by a continued pressure of the breath. — - See Kbm. 
2, p. 84. 

When the sound of k (or of the corresponding Tocal element ff. 
No. 44, {53) precedes the sound of Italian a (No. 2, {11), of 
long i (No. 16, § 26), or of e or i before r in certain cases (§ 21, 
Note), (as in the words eardt gwtrd, kind, sky, guide, kerchief, 
girt), many speakers suffer a Tcry delicate and slight sound, which 
resembles that of y in yet (No. 42, § 51) or of e in mtf (No. 4, 
§ 13), to intervene between the sound of the consonant and 
that of the following vowel ; and this practice is sanctioned by 
the authority of some eminent orthoGpists, as BeU and Smart. 
By some speakers, a full and distinct sound of € or of consonant 
y is interposed between the sound of A or of ^ and that of the 
following vowel (as kldrd, gkeUrd, or k-yard, gh-yaard, &c.) ; but 
this style of speech — though sanctioned by Walker as **a polite 
pronunciation ** -«- is strongly condemned by the best ortho^pists 
at the present day. Ellis, indeed, asserts that ** it is now con- 
sidered better to pronounce the pure k, g,** in all such words, — 
by which he means that neither long e, consonant y, nor any 
sound approximating to either of these, should be allowed to 
slide in between the soiuid of k or g and that of the succeeding 
TOwel. The best American usage inclines to the easy and natu- 
ral way of pronouncing words of this class indicated by Ellis, 
though some speakers go so fiir as to adopt the affected mode 
recommended by Walker. 

This BOimd is represented by k, and also by ck at the end of a 

word or a syllable (dock, feoUck-ing), by c at the end of a word 

(arc), at the end of a syllable when the next syllable begins with 

the sound of a consonant (flars'cid, hec'tic), and before a, o, u, I, r, 

and anal t (cat, cot, cup, cloud, crown, act), by kh (khan), by 

q bec<3ore u (^tmil, pu^ue), by cq (lacquer), by ch (ch&sm, echo, 

bald a-cAin, and other words of Greek and Italian origin), and 

hy gh (lough"). 

Note. — The sotind of k, combined with that of « in teal (Ko. 30, § 39) 
following it, is represented in some words by ;e, as in wa« (prononnoed 
wait«). — See § 39, Note, and § 40, Note. 



82 INTBODUCnOfiL 

} 63. (44.) The sound of ^ in ^o (called hard gy. 

This Bound is formed by the same contact of Uie tongue and the 
palate as that for the sonndof A^withthesubstitutionof aaeffortof 
voice instead of simple breath, — See Rbm. 2, p. 34. 

The Tiews of orthoGpists respecting the pronunciation of words 
in which g precedes the sound of the Italian a, of long t, or of 
e or t before r in certain cases, are giyen in the preceding section, 
as they apply equally to words in which the corresponding aspi- 
rate element k precedes any one of these sounds. 

This sound is represented by g, and also by gg {egg\ gh 
(^Aerkin), and, in combination with the sound of s in zeal (No. 
31, § 40) following it, by «, in certain words. ^ See ^ 39, Notb^ 
and { 40, Note. 

§ 54. (45.) The sound of n^ in ting. 

This sound, which never occurs at the beginning of a syllable, 
is related to the sound of ^ in ^o (No. 44, { 53) as that of m 
(No. 23, § 32) to that of h (No. 22, § 31) and as that of n (No. 
34, § 43) to that of d (No 33, } 42). (See Table, p. 34.) In its 
formation, the back of the tongue is applied to the soft palate, 
but the Toice, instead of being retained and compressed in the 
pharynx, is allowed to pass freely out of the nostrils. 

It is represented by ng, and also by n before the sound of ^, in 
a monosyllable (drimk) or in an unaccented syllable (lar'ynx), 
and at the end of an accented syllable (except in words in which 
this syllable is one of the prefixes tn, non, or tm) before the sound 
of k or of hard g at the beginning of the next syllable (trinlEetr 
ban'quet, con'cord, an'gle, hun'ger). 

Note 1. — By Webster and Goodrich, the letters nk oeearring in the 
some syllable are eomidered to represent ^ a shaple elementary sound," 
or a sound entirely distinct from that represented by ngk. ** It is, there- 
fore," says the latter, " undesirable to respell such words as Hnk^ brink, 
hy the n»e of ng [singk, hringk]. They are not so pronounced." But this 
view is supported by no other authorities. 

Note 2. — In most words formed by adding the terminationB er, ing, y, 
&e., to primitives in which ng is final, the ng retains its simple sound j 
as in Jiang'er (from hang), ring'ing (from ring), spring' y (from spring). 
But in the following- words of this class, the n alone is made to represent 
^he sound of ng, while the second letter of this digraph is pronounced 
with the next syllable; nsmdy, lon'ger, stron'ger, youn'ger, Um'gest, 
etron'geet, youn^gest, diph-tJum'gca, triph4hon'g€U. These words would 



DfTBODUCnON. 88 

ondogleilly be p rono uno ed kmg*ert strong* er^ foung'erf *e., aid Walker 
states that in Ireland thU ia the cuatomary pronunciation. 

KoTB B. ~- The consonants are capable of four distinct classifies* 
tions ; — 

"L They may be classed according to the organs by which they are 
formed. 

Those in pronouncing which the lips are used, are called UMaU, They 

Those in forming which the lower lip touches the upper teeth, are 
called laMa-dentals, They are /, v. 

Those in forming which the tongue touches the teeth, are called dei^ 
t4il8. Thej are th, th. 

Those in pronouneing which the tongue touches the upper gum at 
rarions points between the teeth and the hard palate^ may be called dtnio- 
paiataU, They are t^ d, $, z, n. 

Those formed near the roof of the mouth are called pakUalt, They are 
eA,i, «A, zh, r- (rough, or trilled). U yh, y. 

Those formed in the throat are called gutturdU, They are I;, ^, -r 
(smooth, or nntrilled), ng. 

2. They may be daased according to the ehannel through whidi 
the air from the lungs passes in pronouncing them. 

Those In prono u ncing which the sir passes through the mouth, are oftil 
consonants. They are p, ft, f , <f, cA» i, 1;, ^, toA, w, /, v, th, tkt «, s, ik, zh^ 
r- (rough, or trilled), 2, yh, y, -r (smooth^ or untiilled). 

Those in pronouncing whioii the air passes through the nose, are namU 
oonsonants. They are st, «, »^. 

3. They may be classed according to the manner in which they are 

pronounced. 

Those which are incapable of being pronounced eonthinously, the air 
being first stopped in its passage, and then issuing with a sort of burst, 
may be called exploHve consonants. They are p, b, f, rf, cA,^, I;, g* 

Those in pronouncing which the air passes continuously may be called 
eontinuous consonants. Most of them hare more or less of a hissing or 
buzzing sound. They are toh, w, /, v, iht (ft, «« z, sft, zh, r- (rough, or 
trilled), I, yh, y, -r (smooth, or nntrilled). 

4. The consonants may again be classed into those which are 
formed without any vibration of the vocal chords, and those which 
are formed with a vibration of these chords ; that is, those in which 
the whisper, or pure breath alone (§ 3) is heard, and those in which 
the voice (§ 4) is heard. They may be distinguished by applying 
the term aspirate to the former and the term vocal to the latter. 

The aspirate consonants are p, t, ch, k, wh,f, th, s, »h, yh. 
The vocal consonants are b, d, J, g, w, Vfth^ZtZh, r^ (rongti, or Mlled), 
A IT} ^ (smooth, or nntrilled), m, n, ng. 



84 



INTRODUCTION. 



The following Table exhibits the four systems of dassiflcatioii at one 
view: — 







ORAL. 


NASAL. 


CLASSES. 


EXPLOSIVE. 


CONTINUOUS. 


CONTINUOUS. 


Aspirate. 


Vocal. 


Aspirate. 


Vocal. 


Aspirate. 


Vocal. 


Labial. 


P 


b 


wh 


w 


— 


m 


Labio-dental. 






f 


V 








Dental. 






th 


tfe 








Dento-palatal. 


t 


d 


8 


z 


— 


n . 


• 

•a 


Palat-al. 


ch 


J 


Bh 


zh 






&< 


(« 






— 


r- 






I 








yh 


1 
7 








. Guttural. 


k 


e 




-r 


— 


ngr 



Bemarrs. — 1. The consonant elements 2, i», n, r, which are both con- 
tinuous and vocal, are often called liquidSt from, their smooth and flowing' 
sound. 

2. The explosive consonants p, b, t, d, k, g, are frequently termed 
mutes. For the vocal forms h, d, g, the voice is heard only while the air 
from the lungs is compressed in the mouth and pharynx, and all sound 
ceases as soon as the articulating oi^fans separate. For the aspirate 
forms Pt t, k, the breath only is compressed, producing no sound till the 
articulating organs are separated (hence these three last consonants are 
termed pure mutes), when it issues as simple whisper, if the consonant is 
final, as in up, at, eke, or as vocalized breath, or voice, if followed by a 
vowel, as in paw, too, key, 

3. The oral consonants I and r- (rough, or trilled, r), and the three nasal 
consonants m, n, and ng, are, in English speech, all vocal. In some lan- 
guages, however, as the Welsh, I and r-have corresponding aspirates, 
produced by pronouncing them forcibly with the breath alone. It is pos- 
sible to whisper m, n, ng, in like manner, but the breath passing freely 
through the nose, without the voice, would be both very indistinct and 
incapable* of variation. Yet the aspirates of these sounds, though not 
acknowledged elements of any language, are, as Rush remarks, "con- 
stantly used before the vocality of m or n or ng, as the inarticulate symbol 
of a sneer." The vocal element -r (stnooth, or untrilled), which, indeed, 
is by some writers considered to be truly a vowel, has no related aspirate 
whatever. — See § 49. 

Note C— ^The aspirate and vocal consonants are so related that gen- 
erally two of the same class are more easily united in pronunciation than 
two of a different class. In English, the difficulty of pronouncing an 



iNTBODncnoN. 85 

aspirate and a vocal eonsonant together is so great that when thejr meet 
in a word, one is often changed from vocal to aspirate, or the reverse, to 
suit the sound of the other. Thas,the letter «, in the third person singu- 
lar of verbs, and in the plural of nouns, is pronounced as s or as «, accord- 
ing as it is preceded by an aspirate or a vocal consonant. In the verbs 
Jeaps, beats, and the nouns caps, hats, for example, the t is sounded as t 
in seal (No. .%, § 30), because it follows an aspirate consonant ; but in the 
verbs robs, bids, and the nouns tvbs, bags, the s is sounded as « in zeal 
(No. 31, § 40), because it follows a vocal consonant. So also in the past 
tense and past participle of verba, when either ends in d after a silent e, 
this consonant takes the sound of < or of d aocording as it is preceded by 
an aspirate or a vocal consonant. It takes the sound of t, for example, 
in walked, washed, because it follows the aspirate sounds represented by 
h and sh ; and in judged, moved, it retains the sound of d, because It fol- 
lows the vocal sounds represented by j and v. 

The difficulty experienced in pronouncing consonants of opposite char- 
acters is much less when an aspirate follows a vocal than when it pre- 
cedes it ; and less after some vocal consonants than after others. The 
words width, breadth, &c., in which the d is vocal and the th aspirate, are 
easily pronounced ; and such combinations aa Ip (heZp), Is (fii/«e), U (be/f ), 
mp (hemp), ns {once), nt (wenOi ngk {ink), rs (curse), ri {maai), together 
with various others, are of very frequent occurrence. 



m. NUMBER OF SOUNDS REPRESENTED BY THE 
SEVERAL LETTERS OF THE ALPHABET, OR BY 
COMBINATIONS OF THESE LETTERS. 

The following summary includes only such of the representa- 
tives of vowel sounds as are uttered distinctly in monosyllables 
or in accented syllables. — See Influence of Accent on the Vowd 
Sounds, p. 40. 

§ 65. Of the Yowels, a has 8 sounds (and, ale, far, fast, fare, 
&11, wash, any) ; e, 6 (me, th^e, then, pretty, mercy) ; t, 5 (time, 
til, trksome, raytne, filial) ; o, 9 (old, orb, on, do, work, son, wol^ 
women, one) ; u, 8 (use, rtile, tim, up, full, bury, busy, quit) ; 
y» 3 (by, myth, myrtle). 

§ 66. Of the combinations representing vowel sounds, <e has 
2 sounds (Ctssar, diuresis) ; jd, 6 (gim, o^, s^, pWd, oesle) ; 
€io, 2 (gaol, extraordinary) ; jm^^ (haul, a*mt, gouge, hautboy) ; 
^119^1 sound (a«d] ; avfe, 1 (/twe) ; py, 2 sounds (day, aciys) ; ^e^ 



r 



86 nmtoDUOTiON. 

2 (>sft; Xff^tget) \ M, 6 (aM^ h«0d, birtr, MfCh, gxwit, b0itrt) ; Am, S 
(b«a«ty, beati, beaufin) ; m» 2 (sm, Ima) ;.«f, 5 (setz^, li«»g!it, >0fl, 
\^t \mUx) ; 00, 6 (people, yeoman, leopard, georgic, feodal, 
Macleod) ; eot, 1 sound (burgeots) ; 0ti 2 soiinds (fipMd, r)i#tl6iia- 
tism) ; 01^ 3 (bjM<9, £^, seio) ; ei^, 1 sound (Mi'e) ; jyrS sounds 
(tMy, ke^ «^g) ; ^1 1 sound (ajr^ ; j^ 4 sounds (fiM^ M$; 
^Eiend, Steve) ; ieii^ 1 sound (lieu) ; ietr, 1 (y tete) ; >ett; 2 sounds 
(otfk, brood) ; $ie, 3 (Cem,' d^, s^^ ; a», 2 (fivtais, asafotida) ; ceu, 1 
sound (mBsamtvre) ; o», 2 sounds (o^ cb^r) ; oo^ 4 (food, fiwt, blood, 
bzoocb) ; oUt S (ocellce, >mp, .sotil, ioneh, >»ig)it, omM, jovi^al* 
( / .. / CQn^) ; 010, 3 (notr, snoio, kpMeledge) ; oteeT 1 sound -{pm) ; 
^» 1 (W) ; «». 1 (g««rd) ; pmff, 1 Ctt>««y) ; <«. 3 sounds (duoi 
twe, guest) ;ti^' 4 (^iirt; ^:«i«; giWde, gj^ ; >/, 1 sound (jK<y) ; 
y< 1 (jp^) ; yeto, 1 (yete) ; yoUf 1 (you) ; yu, 1 (yule). 

Bemark. — The combinationB <mi/, ey, oy, and up should not be r^;arded 
as distinct dignq[»h8, but simply as the forms which at, e», bi, and ui take 
xespeotively, when written at the end of a word, the vowel i not being 
used at the end of any word purely English. 

{ 57* Of the aspirate letter, h, there is but one sound (^ome). 

{ 58. Of the consonants, b has 1 sound (6et) ; e, 4 sounds 
(eat, eent, suffiee, acaeia) ; J, 2 (<iale, looke<Q ; /, 2 (^eel, of) ; 
9i 3 (yo, yem, rouye) ; j\ 2 (Just, hallelu;ah) ; k, 1 sound (Aill) ; 
/, 1 (low) ; m, 1 (man) ; n, 2 sounds (name, drink) ; p, 1 sound 
(pet) ; q, I (^uail) ; r, 2 sounds (roam, nor) ; e, 4 (eeal, hae, 
eugar, meaeure) ; t, 1 sound (tole) ; v, 1 (veal) ; te, 1 (iren) ; 
X, 4 sounds (w&r, Xenophon, &ract, anxious) ; y, 1 sound (yet) ; 
z, 3 sounds (zeal, azure, waltz). 

§ 59. Of the combinations representing consonant sounds, 
bb has 1 soimd (ebb) ; ee, 1 (ocean) ; ch, 4 sounds (cAurch, eAaise, 
cAasm, sandwich) ; et, 1 sound (social) ; e&, 1 (doeA;) ; oq^ 1 (lae^uer) ; 
ddt 1 (add) ; d^, 1 (judjrment) ; rf», 1 (sokKer) j f, 1 (st%^ ; yy, 
2 sounds (eyy, exayyerate) ; yA, 3 (yAerkin, hicconyA, lauyA) ; kh, 
I soqnd (khan) ; tt^ I (ball) ; mm, 1 (rammed) ; nn, I (inn) ; ny^ 
1 (siny) ; ph, 3 sounds (pArase, Steph&it dipAthong) ; pp, 1 sound 
(steppe) ; rr, 1 (err) ; ee, 1 (diecem) ; ecA, 1 (ecAist) ; seit 1 (con- 
science) ; ee, 1 (naueeous) ; th, 1 (eAall) ; H, 2 sounds (peneion, 
fueion) ; ee, 2 sounds (graee, hueear) ; tch, I sound (WcA) ; th, 3 
sounds (tAin, ^Ais, Myme) ; tit 2 (action^ transi^n) ; whp 1 sound 
OcAen) ; it, 1 (hutf) ; sr, 1 (buzz). 



nTBODUGXION. 8T 

Bemark. —When the lound expressed by a dlg^nph Is the same as 
that which either of its letters is generally used to represent alone, thst 
letter may be regarded as significant of the sound, and the other as silent. 
Thii8,the letter having the diacritical mark in each oi the digraphs of, eo, 
ie, oe, «<, as they occur in the words iLim,pldidi sial^ htadt tie, /HMnd,/iie^ 
gaU, guide, may be taken to signify the vowel sound which that digraph 
has in^those words. So also in the consonant digraphs M, ek, dd, /JT, gg^ 
as they occur in the words etb, dockt add, staff ^ egg^ only one of the letters 
is to be taken as significant of the sound intended, the other being necessar 
lily silent. Some digraphs, it is to be observed, express simple sounds 
quite different from the sound regularly expressed by either of their let< 
ten taken stegly ; as,s» ia vtilt eg im tkeg^ ih la <Mii, tkU^ wh in wAsn, 
mg in sing. 

"SfOTK 1>. — In some words, oertsitt letters of the English alphabet« 
flkOQgh not in themselves representtaig any sound, have an effect upon 
the sound of another letter that precedes any one of them in the same 
syllable. Thus, a silent final e, when it follows a single consonant, a 
consonant digraph, or the combined consonants si in a monosyllable, 
or an accented syllable, lengthens the preceding vowel, as in babe^ btUhe, 
patie, a-baUf (See % 163), and when It fellows c or ^, it gives to each 
its soft sound, as in voice, peaceable, scarce, trance, ttage^ dkangeable^ 
georgie^ range, furge. A silent final e also prevents the letter s follow- 
ing a liquid consonant from taking the sound of z, as in elte, nurse, 
rinse; and it always glres to th its vocal sound, as tn bathe, breathe, 
hUthe, except in the word toUhe, in which most orthoSpists give to th 
its aspirate sound, to distinguish this word from the preposition with. 
In some words, as browse, lapse, tease, the final e appears at first sight 
to be useless, yet,without it, the s would seem to be the sign of the plu- 
ral number. So the letter k after e and before e or I, as in trafficker, 
iraificking, the letter u alter e or g, and theletter h after g and before e 
or i, as in biscuit, gueti, guide, gfiterkin, nay be regarded as mere ortho- 
graphical expedients to keep the c or the g hard. In some words whidi 
have the termination gue, as fugue, plague, vogue, both e and u, though 
silent, have the influence referred to, the e serving to lengthen the Towel 
that precedes g, and the u serving to keep g hard. 

In the oomUnation teh nsed to represent tiie sound of c^ in dissreh. Hi* 
i serves to prevent this sound from betog obaaged into that of ik (as in 
ache), or of sA (as in oartoueh), 

4 



88 mTBODucnoN. 



IV. SYLLABLES. 

§ 60. A syllable consists of an elementary sound or a com« 
bination of elementary sounds uttered by a single impulse of the 
Yoice, and forms either a word or a part of a word. — See § 65. 

Note. — A word of one syllable is called a monosyllable } of two syllar 
bles, a dissylldble ; of three Byllablest a trisyllable ; and of more than three 
syllables, a polysyllable. 

§ 61. Every syllable must contain at least one yowel sound, 
— either simple or compound, — or one liquid sound, before and 
after which may be placed various combinations of consonant 
sounds ; as, a, an, man, seo-en (sev-n), a-ble (a-bl), en-a-bled (en- 
a>bld), re'VokecTat (re>voktst), plunged (plunjd), strength, twelfths* 

§ 62. An aspirate sound cannot, alone, form a syllable. 

§ 63. Two vowel sounds cannot come together in the same 
syllable, unless they form a compound vowel, or diphthong (} 6). 
^ See { 229. 

§ 64. The consonant sounds in a syllable are arranged ac- 
cording to a determinate and invariable law; namely. Aspirate 
consonants precede vocal consonants, in beginning a syllable, and 
follow them in closing one ; as, fledst, shrunk, strength. 

{ 65. In general, the closest contact, or the smallest opening, 
of the organs of speech that occurs in uttering any combination 
of elementary soimds, is a point of separation between syllables. 
Thus, in priest-ly, Joy-otu, the consonant t and the final element 
of the diphthong oy (No. 18, § 27) respectively require for their 
enunciation a closer contact and a smaller opening of the organs 
than either the sounds which immediately precede or those which 
immediately follow; hence the voice, or vocal sound formed in 
the larynx (§ 4), instead of flowing freely and continuously through, 
the throat and mouth, is more or less interrupted in its passage, 
and issues in the separate impulses which form the essential 
characteristic of syllables. 

Note. — In one class of cases, the principle laid down in this section 
does not hold true. It has already been stated (§ 62) that an aspirate 
sound cannot, of itself, form a syllable : it follows, therefore, that sach a 
word as casks consists of one syllable only, though a closer contact of the 
articulating organs is necessary for the sound of k than for that of «• 



INTBODUCnON. 89 

} 66* When a consonant sonnd, whether represented by a 
single letter, a double letter, or a digraph, occurs between two 
vowels, half of the sound belongs to one syllable and half to the 
other. Thus, in hap-pt/, the first syllable is ended by the closure 
of the lips which is necessary to form the articulation of p, and 
the next syllable begins with the opening of the lips which gives 
to ^ its peculiar explosive character. 

Note. — It must be observed that, in such cases, there is bat one con- 
tact of the organs of speech. The reduplication of the consonant hi the 
written word, as in happy, is a mere orthographical expedient to keep the 
preceding vowel short, which otherwise would be liable to have a long 
Boond given to it. But in compound words, in which one word ends with 
the same consonant sound as that with which the next begins (as in hook- 
cttse, boot-tree, ftah-shop), and in most derivatives having a prefix of Eng- 
lish origin that ends, or a sufflx of English origin that begins, with the 
same consonant sound as that with which the primitive respectively begins 
or ends (as in misspell, otUteUk, soulless, meanness, viMy), though there is 
still but one articulation, or contact of the organs, yet, as the sound of 
the consonant, or the contact necessary for its formation, is dwelt upon 
for some little time, the final and initial eflfccts are clearly separated, and 
the division of the written syllables accordingly fklls between the two 
letters. 

{ 67. When the consonant called " the smooth r," which 
partakes largely of the nature of a vowel (See j 49), is imme- 
diately preceded by the sound of a long vowel, the combination 
is uttered by one impulse of the voice, and forms, or helps to 
form, a single syllable ; as in pair, hire, more* If, however, the 
sound of " the natural vowel " (« in urn* No. 12, § 21) intervenes 
between the smooth r and a preceding vowel, it becomes impos- 
sible to avoid a double impulse of the voice, and the combination 
is therefore resolved into two syllables; as in pay-er, kigh-er, 
mow-er. 

Note. — These doubtful combinations may obviously be made, as Smart 
remarks, to " pass on the ear as either one or two syllables." Hence it is 
important to observe that derivative words, like payer, higher, mower 
(from pay, high, mow), are properly pronounced as dissyUables. But 
primitive words, like ewer, flower, tower, should be pronounced, in pro«e, 
as monosyllables. By the jpqetB, however, they are sometimes made to 
form two syllables. 

49- For the Bales which govern the division of words into syllables, 
hi writing and printing, see pp 76 to 79. 






, , '•"», aw 






I. «n£ aHuK srill iA« ^M« m m 



471- *- 



▼ ^ *^ ^^^^^ ^^i^^^p^^H' ^^1 am^ ^M^ "^1 




in*«- T'- t:j» far It-jb t*r .i}* 



7iAru0 ia#, 4flr 



'jg^^ 



end of a vord. )■§ ^fc «vBiit ^ » a far T* ^i^tfi « r v 2r ' 
tfie next srZjaiaJe^ Vr » tr in- *' r lam t*^«K • *i> *«#v<*<, v^ «<«/.^ ^ 

* * ■* ^ 

lowed l>r a ^ ttwU a. 'fer aaag fi>'!imi4» r <«;«» ^u* •^^i/' ^^ >/«'/# 
fiJI into &e MKOfd 1^ lOMBt • ">v. 'sX^Src,\m i^ ^i^4^ 



as in ..fc ti^wl, Mut^^Au ^im *v»h a *f^^/^^*-A, v/ »»'' "*^ 

final in a tvCdoie* W49«y;*A^^ ?♦?««***•/* ^^^ *♦ * v^'V^'/ ''*a>J W 
the end of a word apfrM(*a<»si ^ ^;t» ««. *vvi«^ ^ «/' W W//i« 
that **A final pamfc<» leJL sm^ 5^ <•</* ^^' (t>ii i»</v«^ ^^ 

I 78. In tibe nn>ri?i!.Biii £ ib^u rfi>^^^, ^4 *^^ tvw*/ ^ ^««<i' y/ /^' 
endly a Sorter wiimiI, — ayjiri**^- a^ tSw^ -vf •I'-vf^ 4^ '^ *v *» S^*Ot 

4^ 




40 nnsoDucnoK. 



V. INFLUENCE OP ACCENT ON THE VOWEL 

SOUNDS. 

§ 68. In the English language, every word of more than 
one syllable is pronounced with a stress of the voice, called 
accent, upon one of its syllables, and many words, besides this 
primary accent, have a slighter, or secondary, accent upon another 
syllable or upon two other syllables. Thus, the words cahHn^ 
e-vent*, ar^dentf ob-actire', va'cate, de-cide', have one accent; the 
words ad^'ver-tuef , comf^pre-hend^ con"tra-vene', off't^cuWure^ 
al'a'ba9"tert and cffi-gar"ehyt have two accents, one primary 
and one secondary ; and the words in**eom-pat^H'hiPi-ty and 
in-com'*pre'hen"n-bUfi'ty have three accents, one primary and 
two secondary, — the mark ( ' ) being used in this Introduction to 
denote the primary accent, and the mark ( " ), to denote the sec- 
ondary accent. 

{ 69. The vowel sounds are always uttered with distinctness 
in those syllables of a word which have an accent either primary 
t)r secondary ; and they are also uttered distinctly in mono- 
syllables, except some of the particles, as, a, an, the^ and, at, of^ 
&c., the vowel sounds of which are usually pronounced somewhat 
indistinctly in ordinary discourse. 

§ 70* When a syllable has no accent, its vowel sound is, in 
some cases, uttered distinctly, and, in others, it is pronounced 
with so much indefinitoness as hardly to be distinguished from 
some other vowel sound. Thus, the sounds of the vowels are 
uttered distinctly in the unaccented syllables of the following 
words : dd-vert', as'pid, bisect', bra'vO, cav'il, cku'Hc, graph'lte, 
e'pUct, prO'vid^, roid'Oto, But the sounds of the vowels a and e, 
and of the digraphs at, ei, ia, and t«, in the unaccented syllables 
of the words cab'boffe, college, faunt'ain, Jbr'feU, car^riage, cit'ies, 
are scarcely distinguishable from the sound of i in the word 
vesHige, And in the terminations or, er, ir, or, ur, yr, of final 
unaccented syllables, all the vowels are sounded exactly alike ; 
as in doVlar, mem^ber, na'dir, auHhor, eul'phur, mar'tyr. «« Un- 
accented sounds," says Smart, " will generally verge towards^ 
other sounds of easier utterance, and this will take place in a 
greater or less degree according as the pronuadation ia coUoquial 
or solemn." 



INTBODUCnOlf. 41 

{ 71. It 18 obTioiuly impossible to give firedse Tules for the 
proper sounds of the Towels in all cases when not under the 
accent, or to express all these sounds accurately by any system 
of notation. They can be learned only by the ear from the lips 
of good speakers. ** Those who wish to pronounce elegantly,*' 
as WiUker truly remariu, ** must be particularly attentiTe to the 
luiaccented vowels, as a neat pronunciation of these Ibnns one 
of the gieatest beauties of q>emking." Though the ear must be 
clnefly trusted in attaining this accomplishment, some aesistance 
may be derived from the following general rules and remarks 
drawn from waiters of tJie highest authority upon this subject. 

A in an unaooented sjllabla. 

{ 72. The Towel a, when it is final in a syllable not having 
an accent primary or secondary, and is followed, in the next 
syllable, by any consonant except n and r, or when it is at the 
end of a word, has the sound of a in far (Italian a, No. 2, § 11) 
somewhat shortened ; as in a-boufu^, tra-dtte^, ag'gro'Vatet i-d^a, 
eom'ma. This shortened soimd of the Italian a, as commonly 
uttered, resembles very nearly that of short u (No. 13, { 22). 

When a, at the end of an unaccented syllable, is followed, in 
the next syllable, by n or by r, it has nearly the sound of short e 
(No. 6, § 15) ; as in mis'eel-la-ny^ cuaHom-a-ry, When it is fol- 
lowed by a vowel in the next syllable it has the sound of long a 
(No. 14, § 23) somewhat shortened, or without its vanishing ele- 
ment e ; as in a-e'ri'alf eJia-otfic, 

When a is not final in an unaccented syllable, it is apt to 
&11 into the sound of short u (No. 13, § 22) ; as in hag'gard^ 
fHor^cUt ty'rantt tcom^an. 

When the aspirate h follows a in a final unaccented syllable, 
as in Je-hohnthf Mes-si'ctkf this vowel is considered by all the 
orthoepists, except Worcester, to have the same sound as when 
final in a syllable. Worcester remarks that ** a unaccented at 
the end of a word approaches the Italian sound of a" but adds 
that ** oA final partakes still more of the Italian sound." 

§ 73. In the unaccented final syllable cUe, the vowel a has gen- 
erally a shorter sdimd, — approaching that of short e (No. 6, § 15), 
— in adjectives and nouns than in verbs. Thus, it is shorter in deVi^ 
cate^ in'iri-ctUe, prPmate, than in eal^eU'late, dedU'eate, reg^u-late* 

4* 



42 INTBODUCnON. 

{ 74. In the unaccented final sellable aft the Towel a has 
the sound of w in urn (No. 12, { 21), but less prolonged; as in 
doPlar, piPlar, tchoVar. 

S in an unaooented syllable. 

{ 76. The Towel 0, when final in an unaccented syllable, and 
not silent, has the sound oi e in me (No. 4, § 13), but less pro- 
longed ; as in e-jeet^ ce'tnerUf, pre-fer', ap'pe-Hte^ ePe-gant, 

{ 76. The vowel e, in an unaccented syllable ending in a 
consonant, has properly, in most cases, the sound of in then 
(No. 6, } 15) ; as in ab'aent, ^ greats prob'tem, prefect : though, in 
some words, it is liable to be sounded like short t (No. 7» \ 16) ; 
as in heVmetf du'el^ boz'et. 

{ 77. In the unaccented final syllable 0r, the vowel e has the 
sound of u in urn (No. 12, { 21), but less prolonged; as in 
bar'ber, offer, rob'ber, suffer, 

I in an unaccented syllable. 

{ 78. The vowel t, when final in an unaccented syllable that 
immediately follows an accented syllable, has the sound of % in 
iU (No. 7, § 16) ; as in a-bUH-ty, difji-dent, fal'li-ble, witfti-ciam. 
— See §16. 

§ 79. The vowel », when final in an unaccented syllable that 
immediately precedes an accented syllable, is sometimes short, or 
has the sound of i in ill (No. 7, § 16) ; as in di-gest', di'min'iah, 
fi-deVi-tyy I-taffian : and sometimes it is long, or has the sound 
of % in time (No. 16, { 25) ; as in d\-opHric», dl'ttHnal. In the 
prefixes bi and tri, it is generally long. 

§ 80. The vowel i in an unaccented syllable ending in a con- 
sonant is short ; as in art'ist, clcu'sic^ pump'kin, viv'id, 

§ 81. The vowel i in the final syllable ile, when not under the 
primary accent, is generally short ; as in fer^tile, hos'tile, rep'tile, 
sub'tile. It is long only in a few words ; as in e'dile, ex'ile, genHile, 
cham'O'milef e-^lU-pilet rec'on'Cilef 

§ 82. The vowel i in the final syllable ine, when not tmder 
the primary accent, is generally long in words accented on the 
antepenult ; as in asU-nine, crya'tal-Une, tur^pen^tine : but in many 
words, — especially those accented on the penult, — it is short, 
as in dia'd'pline, hcT'o-ine, doc'trine, de-ter'mine. 



IKTBODUCnON. 48 

{ 83. The Towd • in the final lyllable Ue, when not under the 
primary accent, is long in some words ; as in ae'O'mte, ap'pe'tiUt 
par'a^nie ; and in some words it is short; as in defi-mU^ fa'vor* 
ite, cp'po-tite, 

i 84. The Yowel • in the nnaccented final syllaUe to* is short ; 
as in ao'tive^ paa'aive^ ad^jeo^iive, ^en'i-tive, 

§ 85. In the unaccented final syllable »r, the yowel i has the 

souBd of « in urn (No. 12, { 21), but less prolonged; as in §'lix'ir, 

na'ihr, 

O in an unaooented eyllabla, 

§ 86. The Towd o, when final in an unaccented i^Uable, has 
its long sound (No. 15, { 24) without the •vanishing element oo ; 
as in croc'o'dile, he'ro, mot'to, o-bey', tyPkh^iim, Uhhat^eOf wd-oa'no. 
But before the final syllables ny and ry this modified sound is 
so much shortened as to resemble the sound c^ short u (No. 13, i 
§ 22) ; as in ac'i-i-mo-ni/^ ter^n-tp-ry. When not final in an un- | , ^ 

accented syllable, it is apt to &11 iato the sound of short » ; as in ^ . f^ *5 . ~ 

big^ot, citr'oly toan'ton, 

i 87. The Towel o in the unaccented final syllable oyue has its 
short sound (No. 9, } 18) ; as in di'ti'U^ffue^ ^%-Viffuey mon'o^ldgue, 
prol'6gue. 

§ 88. In the unacc^ited final syllable or, the vowd o has, in 
most words, the sound of w in urn (No. 12, { 21), but less pro- 
longed; as in av^thor, er^ror^ fer'vory la'bWf ier*ror, <*This sound 
[or imaccented]," says Smart, <* which, under the remission of 
accent always rerges towards ur, in most cases sinks completely 
into it." " We may be justified," he adds, ** in saying ca'hr^ 
MtufpoTy &c., with that attention to the final syllable which pre- 
serves the sound ; but the same care would be pedantic or 
puerile in errwy orator^ &c." 

TJ in an onaooented ayllabla. 

§ 89. The Towel tf, when final in an unaccented syllable, has 
its long sound (No. 17, § 26), and when it forms a syllable by 
itself; its initial element y is yery distinctly pronounced,* except 
when the preceding syllable ends with r ; as in hu^col'ic, eu-ra'ior, 
eePu-cate, nat'u-raly u-'9urp'» When this vowel forms a syllable 
by itself and the preceding syllable ends with r, it has its long 
aound, according to Smart, with the initial element y very slightly 



44 introduction: 

pronotinced ; as in er'u-dite, vir'n-lent. «It is not possible," 
says this author, ** to give the distinct sound [yoo to the vowel u 
so situated] without pedantic effort, and an approach to the sound 
signified by *oo is all that correct utterance requires." (See § 26.) 
But some writers are of the opinion that the vowel u in this 
case has the simple sound of oo in food (No. 10, § 19), precisely 
as it does when r precedes it in the same syllable. 

{ 90. The vowel u, when it precedes any consonant in an 
unaccented syllable ending with a silent e, except the consonant r 
in such a syllable immediately following an accented syllable, has 
generally its long sound (No. 17, § 26) ; as in deVuge^ fort^une, 
stat^ute, lit'er-a-ture. The only exceptions are the words fer^rule, 
let'tttcet min'ute, in which u has the soimd of short t (No. 7, } 16), 
and the word ar^qtie-buae (spelled also ar'que-bus), in which this 
vowel, according to most orthoCpists, has its short sound (No. 
13, § 22). 

} 91. The vowel u, vtrhen it precedes r in an unaccented sylla- 
ble ending with a silent e and immediately following a syllable 
that is under the accent, primary or secondary, has a sound con- 
sidered by Smart and some other orthoSpists to be identical in 
quality with that of long u (No. 17, § 26), though somewhat 
shortened in quantity ; asin^^'wrc, ten'ure, verd'ure, ar^chi'tect"ure. 
This shortened sound of long u resembles the shortened sound 
of « in urn (No. 12, {21) with the sound of consonant y pre- 
fixed, except when the sound of j, aA, or ah precedes the «, in 
which case that of y is omitted ; as in in'jure^ cen^hure, treas'ure. 
The same remark applies to derivatives, although the final e of the 
syllable ure is omitted on adding a syllable beginning with a vow- 
el ; as in ad-vent' ur-eTf man-u-fact^ur-er^ pleas' ur-a-ble, 

§ 92. In the unaccented final syllable w the vowel « has 
the sound of w in wm (No. 12, § 21), but less prolonged; as in 
mur'mtirf auVphtir, 

7 in an unaccented syllable. 

§ 93. The vowel y in an unaccented syllable, except the cases 
noticed in §§94, 96, has the sound of short % (No. 7, § 16); as in 
a-nal'y-sis, a-poc'ry-pha^ €q!)'a'thy, pit'y, o*nyx^ phar'ynx. 

§ 94. The vowel y in the unaccented final syllable^ of verbs 
has the sound of long % (No. 16, § 25) ; as in iJ^or't-^, grat'i-fy^ 



INTRODUCTION. 45 

pu'ri'fyt te^ti-fy. The vowel y has also the sound of long t in 
the unaccented final syllable of the following verbs; namely, 
mul'ti-plyf oc'cU'py, proph'e'Sy, 

§ 95. In the unaccented final syllable yr, the vowel y has 
the sound of w in urn (No. 12, § 21), but less prolonged; as in 
mar'tyTf zeph'yr» 

AI in an nnaooented ajUable. 

§ 06. The digraph at in an unaccented syllable has the sound 
of short i (No. 7, § 16) ; as in eap'tcnn, cer'tain, eur'tainf fount'ain^ 
mowfU'edn. 

EI in an xxnacoented syllable. 

§ 97. The digraph et in an unaccented syllable has the sound 
of short t (No. 7, § 16) ; as in coun'ter-feit, for'eign, foT'eign-er^ 
for'feUy mul*lein, sur'feit, 

£7 in an unaccented syllable. 

} 98. The digraph ey in an unaccented final syllable has 
the sound of short t (No. 7, § 16) ; as in aPley, gcLpley^ hon'ey^ 
jour'ney^ mon'eyt vaVley, The noun sur'vey {sur'vd'), as pro- 
nounced by most orthofipists with the accent on the first sylla- 
ble, is an exception to this rule. 

HE in an unaccented syllable. 

§ 99. The digraph i^ in an unaccented final syllable, as in 
the plurals of nouns ending in y preceded by a consonant, and in 
the third person singular present tense, and the imperfect tense 
and past participle of most of the verbs that end in y preceded by 
a consonant, has the sound of short t (No. 7, § 16) ; as in cit'teSf 
duUies, carries, mar^ried. But in the third person singular pres- 
ent tense, and in the imperfect tense and past participle of verbs 
ending in fy^ and of the verbs multiply, occupy, prophesy, this di- 
graph has the sound of long t (No. 16, § 25). 

OU in an unaccented syllable. 

} 100. The digraph ou in the unaccented final syllable oui 
has the sound of u in up (No. 13, § 22) ; as in cal'loua, /a'mmtt, 
em'ti-lous, ob'vi'Out, 



46 INTRODUCTION. 

OW in an unaooented syllable. 

} 101« The digraph mo in an tmaocented final syllable has the 
sound of long o (So. 15, § 24), without the yanishing element oo; 
aa in bihr'roiifffdfhw, sdr'rtnOf wm'dow. 



VI. SEAT OF THE ACCENT. 

§ 102. The seat of the accent in English words is governed 
by the following general laws or principles, of which sometimes 
one predominates and sometimes another. 

i 103. Of words of two syllables, nouns and adjectiyes, for 
the most part, have the accent on the first syllable, and verbs on 
the second syllable. Thus, some nouns and some adjectives are 
distinguished firom verbs of the same spelling by this difference of 
accent, as the following : •— 



Nouns, 


VerbB, 


jic^ectivea. 


Verbs. 


Ac'cent 


ac-cent' 


Ab'sent 


ab-sent' 


Con'duct 


con-duct^ 


Com'pound 


corn-pound' 


Con'tract 


con-tract' 


Con'crete 


con-crete' 


In'sult 


in-sult' 


Fre'quent 


fre-quent' 


Tor'ment 


tor-ment' 


Pres'ent 


pre-sent' 



§ 104. Verbs of two or more syllables having the following 
endings are accented on the penult, or last syllable but one; 
namely, en (fiight'en, en-light'en) ; er preceded by a consonant 
(al tor, differ, con-sid'er, &c., except a few ending infer, as de-fer', 
pre-fer', &c., min'ts-ter, reg'ia-ter, and de-ter') ; ish (per'ish, 
es-tab'lish) ; om (fath'om, ac-cus'tom ) ; on (beck'on, a-ban'don) ; 
op (gallop, de-vel'op) ; ry (car'ry) ; le preceded by a consonant 
(am'ble, as-sem'ble, cir'cle, cur'dle, sti'fle, strug'gle, in-vei'gle, 
pick'le, grap'ple, bot'tle, puz'zle^ &c., except a few derived 
from nouns or adjectives, as ar'ti-cle, chron't-cle, tnan'a-cle, 
quacPru-ple). 

§ 106. Words of more than two syllables have the primary 
accent, for the most part, on the antepenult, or l^st syllable but 



iNTSODUcrnoN. 47 

two, this being, as Walker expresses it, *' the &Torite accent of 
the language*' ; aSfdis'pu-tanty efjlu-ence, in'dua-try, poat^hu-tnouif 
cen-trif^u-galf ceti'trip^e-talt in-ter'po-latet mit-an'thro^py, 

§ 106* Words derived from other words in the language 
g^erally retain the accent of their primitives. Thus, the deriva- 
tives ser^vice-a-Ue^ aer^vice'O'ble'nesif hap^pi'-neast w^hap^pi'neUt 
tnis'chieV'Oust ad'/ni-ral-ti/, Hm'i-lar'ltf, have the accent respec- 
tively on the same syllable as the primitives $erhnce^ hap'py^ 
mishhieft tuPmuralt Hm'i-lar, 

§ 107. With regard to some words, in the accentuation of 
virhich there is at any time a diversity of usage, that mode is 
most likely to prevail which most favors ease of utterance. 
Thus, as stated by Goodrich, the mode of accentuating the 
vrords tic'cept-a-ble, re^'ept-ct-cle, and vften-tU on the first sylla- 
ble, — a pronunciation fashionable in the time of Walker, — has 
given place to the easier accentuation on the second syllable 
(ac'Cept*<i-blet re-cept'a-cle, u-ienfsU), So, for the same reason, 
jhere is a strong tendency to transfer the accent from the first 
syllable of the words an'ces-tra l, dia'cnp'^m^cy, ex^em-pta-ry, in*' 
ven-to-ryt — as they are pronounced by most of the orthoCpists, 
— to the second syllable (an-ces'trcU, dia'Crep^an-^, ex-em^pUi-ryf 
in-ven*to-ry), 

§ 108. Words which have a common termination, such as 
i'ble, ic'ol, lo-gy, ic^ tiouj &c., generally have the primary accent 
on the syllable which precedes this termination or which marks 
the limit where it begins. 

Words of more than two syllables, having the following end- 
ings, take the primary accent on the antepenult, thus conform- 
ing to the general rule (§ 105) ; namely, ac-al (he-li'ac-al) ; 
cra-cy (de-moc'ra-cy) ; e-fy (rSr'e-fy) ; e-gate (del'e-gate) ; e-ona 
(ex-tra'ne-ous, &c., except when the sound of ah or of g soft 
precedes ouSf as in crus-ia'ceotiat cour-a'geoua) ; er-al (gen'er-al) ; 
er^ate (mod'er-ate) ; er-ous (gen'er-ous) ; e-tude (qui'e-tiide) ; e-ty 
(so-ci'e-ty) ; Jltt-ent (af flu-ent) ; flu-oua (su-per'flu-ous) ; go-nal 
(di-ag'o-nal) ; go-ny (cos-mog'o-ny) ; gra-pher (bi-og'ra-pher) ; 
gra-phist (chi-rog'ra-phist) ; gror-phy (ge-og'ra-phy) ; »-ac (ma'- 
ni-ac, &c., except, according to some orthofipists, el-e-gi'ac) ; 
i-ate (ra'di-ate) ; i-ble (cred'i-ble, &c., except elfi-gi-ble, in-ePi- 
gi-ble, in-tel'H-gi-blet cor^ri-gi-ble) ; ic-al (log'ic-al) ; i-cate (dedl- 



1 



48 INTBODUCnON, 

cate, &c., except nid'i'fi'eate) ; i-cide (hom'i-cide) ; i-date (can'di- 
date) ; i-dence (diffi-dence) ; indent (ac'ci-dent) ; i-form (u'ni- 
form) ; i-fy (pa^'i-fy) ; i-gate (nav'i-gate) ; i-UUe (ven'ti-late) ; 
Umate (an'i-mate) ; i-ment (con'di*inent) ; i-nate (cul'mi-nate) ; 
%-nence (em'i-nence) ; i-nent (per'ti-nent) ; in-ous (om'in-ous) ; 
%'tant (in-hab'i-tant) ; i'tate (ag'i-tate) ; i-tive (gen'i-tive) ; i-ty 
(a-bil'i-ty) ; »-8m (o'di-um) ; Jo-ger (as-trol'o-ger) ; lo-gist (ge- 
ol'o-gist) ; lo^gy (phi-lol'o-gy) ; Jo-guy (col'lo-quy) ; ma-chy 
(lo-gom'a-chy) ; ma-thy (po-lym'a-lhy) ; me-ter (ba-rom'e-ter) ; 
me-try (ge-om'e-try) ; no-my (e-con'o-my) ; o-to (pa-rab'o-la) ; 
or-oua (rig'or-ous, &c., except ca-no'rotia, so-no'rotis, and, accord- 
ing to some ortho(*pl8t8, de-co'irous and in-de-c<^rous) ; pa-rous 
(o-vip'a-rous) ; path-y (ho-moe-op'a-thy) ; pho-ny (sym'pho-ny, 
&c., except, according to some orthoCpists, col'o-pho-ny) ; sco-py 
(a-e-ros'co-py) ; po-tent (om-nip'o-tent) ; so-nant (con'so-nant) ; 
stro-pke (a-pos'tro-phe) ; to-mt/ (a-nat'o-my) ; u-al (an'nu-al) ; 
u-ence (af flu-ence) ; u-ent (can'flu-ent) ; u-la (neb'u-la) ; u-lar 
(sec'u-lar) ; u-ktte (cir'cu-late) ; u-lent (op'u-lent) : u-lous (fab'u- 
lous) ; u-aua (sumpt'u-ous) ; u-ral (nat'u-ral) ; u-tive (con-sec'u- 
tive, &c., except confBti-iiiUive) ; y-sis (a-nal'y-sis). 

§ 109. Words of more than two syllables, having the follow- 
ing endings, take the primary accent on the penult, or last sylla- 
ble but one ; namely, erU-aZ (or-na-ment'al) ; ic (an-gel'ic, &c., 
except ag^ar-ic, Ar'a-bic, a-ritk*me-tic, ar^se-nic^ the noun, hish'" 
op'Hct cath'o-liCf choPer-ic, cU-mac^ter-iCf em'pir-ic, the noun, — as 
the last two are often pronounced, — e-phem'e-riCf her'e-tic, im- 
pol'i-tic, lu'na-tiCf poVi-iiCy rhet'o-rict schU^mat-ic, — as some orthoG- 
pists pronounce the noun^ — splett'e-tict tur'mer-ic) ; tea (me-chan'- 
ics, &c., except poVi-tics) ; o-sis (a-nas-to-mo'sis, &c., except 
ap'O-the'o-sis and. met-a-mor'phO'Sis) ; sive (ad-he'sive). — See § 104. 

§ 110. Of the words ending in e-atiy some have the primary 
accent on the penult, as,ad-a-maH-te'an, At'lan-te^an^ co^los-se'an, 
em-py-re'an^ ep-t'Cu-re^ an^ Eu-ro-pe'arit hy-me-ne'an, pyg-me'an ; 
and 'some on the antepenult, as,ce-j'M7^-a», her-cu^le-an, Med-i-ter' 
ra^ne-ariy suh'ter-ra^ne-an^ tar-ta're-an, 

} 111, Of the words ending in e-um, some have the primary 
accent on the penult, as, ly-ce^um^ maU'SO'le^unif mU'Se'um ; and 
some on the antepenult, as, cos-to're-um, attC'Ce-da'ne'Umf per-i" 
os'te-um. 



INTBODUCTION. 49 

§ 112. Words the last syllable of which begins with the 
sound of «A (except when eh has this sound, as in mo-cAme'}, 
of 2 as in a'zure {zK), or of y consonant, constituting a yery 
large class, have the primary accent on the penult (ab-lu'tion, 
ad-di'tion, ac-ces'sion, a-tro'cious, pro-vin'cial, mu-si'cian, cre- 
ta'ceous, ex-plo'sion, se-clu'sion, dc-ci'sion, ex-pOs'ure, ci-vil'ian, 
com-pan'ion). 

§ 113* Many words, especially scientific words derived from 
the Greek or the Latin with no change or only a slight change of 
orthography, retain the accent given to them by the rule accord- 
ing to which those languages are pronounced by modem scholars ; 
namely, that words of two syllables are invariably accented on 
the first syllable ; and that, in words of more than two syllables, 
if the penult is long, it is accented, but if the penult is short, the 
accent &lls upon the antepenult. The following are examples of 
words which belong to this class: o-cu'nMn, a-ay'lum, bi-tu^mmf 
de-co'rumf hO'ti'zon, cat^ci'Chre'sis, ex^e-g^M, paT'O-go'ge, prot'O* 
po'pae^ia. But the analogy of the English prevails over what 
may be termed the classical accent in many words of common 
occurrence ; as, aufdi-tor, or'a-torj fnin'ts-'ter, aen'o^tor, 

§ 114. Many words derived without change of orthography 
from the French are accented on the last syllable ; as, cm-tique', 
bas'tile^f bour-geois', cha'teau', cor-vette', Ji-nesse'f gi^rafftf^ cheO'O- 
Uer^t cui-raS'Sier', gcn-do-lierK 

§ 115. When two words, which differ only or chiefly in one 
of their syllables, are used antithetically, the primary accent is 
transferred to that syllable^ Thus, the accent of the words for^ 
beaiHing, tn^Jits'tioe, un-done^^ is transferred to the first syllable 
when for^bear-ing is contrasted with bearding, in'jut'tice with 
jutHice, unfdone with done, 

§ 116. With respect to the secondary accent, Smart remarks 
that, though it is not indispensable, ** its effect is very generally 
felt in the rhythm of the word, and still more generally in the 
distinctness it gives to the syllable under it." The place of this 
accent may, in most cases, be easily determined by the ear, when 
that of the primary accent is known. 

§ 117. The secondary accent is generally separated from the 
primary by the intervention of an unaccented syllable or of two 
unaccented syllables ; as in (tc^'ci-dent'ol, cdr^'i-ca-ture'. But the 

6 



V 



50 INTBODUCnON. 

two accents tre sometimes consecutiye ; as in the words e^*mm\ 
eo^'efqual, rtf^echfo^ and in those with a negatiTe prefix in the 
following lines: — 

And, doubly dyins^, Bhall go down 

To the Tile dust from whence he sprang^, 

Un"wept', un^hon'ored, and un^sung'. 

{ 118. When two words are used antithetically with respect 
to their prefixes or suffixes, the prefix or the suifix takes a pri- 
mary accent, and the syllable which is ordinarily accented takes 
a secondary accent ; as, vnfcreauf^ when opposed to defcrecuef'^ 
pro^eeedf' to pr«^eede"j imfpuP'tion to ex*pul'^tion, ex'te^^rt'or to 
in'Uf'ri-or ; de-pentP'onif to de-pend'^mt't les"9Se' to le^^toH, 

4 119* The accents primary and secondary sometimes change 
places when two words are used antithetically with respect to a 
syllable which ordinarily has the secondary accent ; as in prop^o^ 
ai"tion when opposed to prep'O'sV'tionf afflo-cu'Uion to el'o^cu'Uum, 
prob'a-lnP^i'tyy.to plam^i^bWi'^ty, 



Vn. CLASSES OF WORDS LIABLE TO BE MIS- 
PRONOUNCED. 

§ 120. In acquiring a correct pronunciation, attention should 
be directed especially to such words as form exceptions to any 
of the general principles in regard to the seat of the accent, or to 
such as, being exceptional under one law, are embraced under 
another. It will be well to point put, also, for particular con- 
sideration, all other words or classes of words in pronouncing 
which errors of any kind are apt to be made. 

} 121. Some nouns and adjectives accented on the second 
syllable, contrary to the principle stated in § 103, are often mis- 
pronounced; as, ca-mW, con-dignf^ con-jtmct^^ mo-ras^t re-cesa', 
research'^ re-source^ ro-manoe^^ ro-bust^t ver-hose*, 

{ 122. Many words of three or more syllables, not accented 
on the antepenult according to the principle stated in { 105, are 
liable to be mispronounced ; as, man-u-mW, mar-mo^aet't moff'O-' 



INTBODUCWOH. 61 

stfi^, pon-ia-loons' ; con-tem'plaiet de^mtm*$trate, ex-po^ngut, ap^pcf^ 
nent ; leg'ta-lAt^ure, or*tho-e'-jnff per'etnp'tO'ry, 

§ 123. Some deriyatiye words are frequently mispronounced 
on account of not being accented like their primitlTeB, in conform- ) 
ity with the principle stated in { J06 ; BSfChaa'tise^ment, eomfpti-ra' 
hlCf dis'pii'ta-ble, lam'ent'a''hle. 

§ 124. Care should be taken to discriminate by the right ac- 
cent two such words as, being of the same tpelling, have different 
meanings, or are classed under different parts of speech ; aa^eofi'- 
jure and ctm-jwref^ pre'Cidfent and preg'&'dent, — See § 103. 

{ 126. Persons unacquainted with the classical languages are 
apt to mispronounce such words as, being derived from these lan- 
guages, retain the accent given to them in the original by scholars ; 
as, off'TUj^mm, al'bur'num, ea-nofrinttf fy'-ce^um, nm-ttftim, -» See 
{113. 

§ 126. The secondary accent is sometimes placed upon a syl- 
lable which should properly have no accent, as in dif^Ji-euP'ty^ 
memfbra**nou9y penfe^trd'Uej ter'ri^tof'ry ; and sometimes it is very 
improperly made to change places with the primary, as in off 'a-' 
btufter, in'^ter-ett'inff (properly al'a'btu^ter, in*ter»e9t*'ing), 

{ 127. It is a common error of pronunciation to substitute 
one vowel sound for another ; as in saying dnfgel for dn'gel^ erik 
for creek, cu'pa-'lO for eu^po-la, d€f for diaf, jest for just, paHa- 
graph forpar'a-grdph, pUt for pldit, H^htrU for n^lerU, una for eitux, 
eSan for eocn, toe'eei for tae^sel, yoXwr for yePUhe, yia for yea, 

{ 128. The vowel ii, or the digraph ew, when it follows the 
sound of r or of ah, is sometimes erroneously pronounced with 
the sound of long u (No. 17, } 26), instead of its proper sound of 
oo. Thus, the words rule, true, ahrew, are sometimes pronounced 
as if they were written r-yool, tr^yoo, ahr^yoo, or reool, treoo, ahreoo, 
and not, as they should be to represent their correct pronuncia* 
tion, rool, troo, ahroo, 

{129. An affected pronunciation is sometimes given to e, 
i, and ea before f ; as in saying mir^ey for mer'cy, air'vant 
for aer*vant, vSrt'ue for virt^ue, iam for earn, irth for earth. — 
See § 21, Note. 

{ 130. The practice, common in the United States, of shorten- 
ing the sound of long o in some words, as eoat, home^ atone, &c., is 
condemned by the best orthoflpists. — See { 24. 



62 INTRODUCTION. 

} 131* Particular attention should be paid to those words 
in which the rowel a is sounded as mfast (No. 3, § 12). 

§ 132. It is a common error of careless speakers to suppress 
the sounds of vowels in unaccented syllables ; as in saying comf' 
ta-ble for com'/ort-a-hlet dea'prate for dea'per-ate^ ec^ry for ev'er-y, 
hU'try for his'to^ry, niemfry for mem'o-ry, part'ci-ple for part'i- 

ci-ple, 

§ 133. The sound of short u should not be interposed be- 
tween that of a final m and that of /, », or th which precedes it ; as 
in saying heVlum for A«/m, ehaz'um for chaam^ rhyth^um for rhythm, 

} 134. The sound of it when it immediately precedes e in a 
syllable immediately following an accented syllable, is sometimes 
improperly changed into the sound of ch ; and the sound of d^ 
when so situated before e or t, is sometimes improperly changed 
into the sound oij\ as in pronouncing the words bounteous, plan" 
teoust hideous, odious, as if they were written boun'che-us, pten'ohe- 
us, hife-us, o'ji-us. This mode of pronouncing these and similar 
words was sanctioned by Walker, but it is now generally agreed 
that he was in error ; inasmuch as such a substitution of ch for t 
and of y for d cannot take place, in conformity with the principle 
by which the sounds of t and consonant y, or of d and consonant 
y are sometimes properly exchanged for the sounds of ch and j 
(See § 44, Note 1, and } 45, Note), without making e or i do 
double duty, in representing the sound of consonant y, and at the 
same time retaining its vowel character. An error equally great, 
and of which the like pernicious influence may be observed in 
some modern 'mispronunciations, was made by Sheridan, as point- 
ed out by Walker himself, in allowing the sound of ^ to be changed 
into that of ch when it occurred before long u in the same sylla- 
ble, as in the words tune, Tues'day, tu'tnuU, which, according to 
Sheridan, should be pronounced ehoon, chooz'dA, choo'muU, 

§ 135. The smooth r (No. 40, § 49), should never be trilled, as 
in saying /aw-rm for form, wuh-rld for vjorld; nor should it be sup- 
pressed, as in saying faw instead of for, cawd for cord, lawd for 
lord, nus for nurse ; nor sounded where it does not properly be- 
long, as in saying lawr for law, saxor for saw, 

§ 136. The consonant s is frequentiy sounded like s in seal 
when it should have the sound of 2 in zedl\ as in dis^arm^ (diz- 
arm'), flim'sy (flim'zy), greas'y (greaz'y), na^sdl (na'zal), possess' 



INTRODUCTION. * 63 

(poz-zes'). It will be well to remember that $ has always the 
sound of z ; 1st, when it immediately follows a Tocal consonant 
or a Yocal consonant and a silent e in the same syllable, as in tubi 
(tubz), drags (dragz), /a<iM (ftdz) ; 2d, when it comes immediately 
before the liquid consonant m in the same syllable, as in chasm 
(kazm), prism (prizm) ; 3d, in the additional syllable e» forming 
the plural of nouns and the third person singular of yerbs, as in 
box^es (boks'ez), prlz'es (priz'ez), pleas'es (pl6z'ez) ; 4th, at the end 
of all plural nouns whose singular ends with the sound of a Towel, 
as in op'er-as (op'er-az), shoes (shooz) ; in the final syllable of 
verbs that end in se preceded by u, as in O'buse* (a-baz'), ac'cuuf 
(ak-kuz') ; also of verbs that end in m preceded by «, as in ad'viuf 
(ad-Yiz'), de-spise' (de-splz'), except moHtise, prac^tise, prom^ise; 
and in the third person singular of verbs that end with the sound 
of a vowel, as in he-trays' (be-trdz'), sees (s6z) ; 5th, in some verbs, 
in order to distinguish them from nouns of the same spelling, as 
in the verbs to grease (grSz), to house (howz), to use (ilz). 

The letter s has the sound of z, generally, when it follows an 
accented syllable ^ding with a vowel or a liquid ; as in ea*sy 
ij^'zy), ro'sy (ro'zy), elum'sy (klum'zy), pAfsy (pAl'zy), tan'sy 
(tan'zy). 

This letter has also the sound of 2 in the prefix dis^ according 
to Smart, when the following syllable is accented and begins with 
a vocal consonant, or with any vowel sound except that of long t<; 
as in dis-guet' (^-g\iSt% dis-own' (diz-6n')t dis-hon'or (diz-on'ur). 
Walker gives substantially the same rule ; and Worcester follows 
it in marking the pronunciation of those words to which it ap- 
plies. But Perry, Knowles, Webster, Goodrich, and some other 
ortho6pists, not adopting this rule, pronounce dis aa diz in tk very 
few words only. 

The consonant s is also sometimes sounded like z when it should 
have its aspirate sound ; as in saying ad-he^ziv for ad-he' Ave^ met- 
a-m^'phOz for met-a-mof^phose, pre-clz'lg for pre-eise'ly, 

§ 137. The consonant x is sometimes sounded like ks when it 
should have the sound of gz. The general rule is, that x has the 
sound of A« when it ends an accented syllable, as in ex^er-cise (eks'^- 
er-siz), ex'e-crate (eks'e-krftt), and when it ends an unaccented 
syllable, if the next syllable is accented and begins with a conso- 
nant, as in ex-cuse' (eks-kas'), ex-pens^ (eks-pens') ; and that it 

6» 



54 INTBODUCnON. 

hag th« Bonnd of ^ when it ends an unaccented syllable, and the 
next syllable, having the accent, begins with a vowel or the let- 
ter A, as in ex^am'pte (ega-am'pl), ex-eH' (egz-erf), ex-hort' {egz- 
hort'), hiahvfrx-^ma (lugz-yoo'ri-us). The word ex^em-pla-^, pro- 
nounced egt'em-pJa-ry according to most orthofipists, and the word 
tx-udef, pronounced ek^-Hdf, are exceptions. 

i 138. Care should be taken to note those words in which ff, 
usually sounded like J before 0, », or y, has its hard sound, or the 
sound of y in ^fo (No. 44, { 53), before any one of these vowels ; as 
in ffear, geese, gew'gaw, gib'cat, gib'boua, brag'ger, rag^ged, drugfgist, 
rig'ging, crag'gy, fog^gy. This consonant has necessarily its hard 
sound (See § 66) when it occurs, as in the last six examples, at 
the beginning of a syllable before 0, », or y, in consequence of be- 
ing doubled at the end of a word, in which it has its hard sound, 
on adding a termination that begins with any one of these vowels. 
— See § 176. 

{ 130. The cases m which the letter h is sQent at the begin- 
ning of a word, as in hour (our), hon'or (on'or), should be care- 
fully discriminated from those in which it is sounded, as in hos'pi- 
tal, hos'tage. It is to be observed that h must always be sounded 
when it begins a syllable not initial, as in ab-hor', be-hest't per* 
haps*, ve^he-ment ; and that it is always silent when it does not be- 
gin a syllable, as in ah, eh, Brah^ma, Mes'si'ah, 

} 140. It is important to distinguish those words in which the 
digraph th has its aspirate sound {th in thin, No. 28, § 37), as in 
path (singular), truth, truthe (singular and plural), breath, &c., 
from those in which it has its vocal sound {th in this, No. 29, § 38), 
as in beneath, breathe, Kthe, paths (plural). The plural of truth 
should be especially noted in respect to the sound of th, as it is 
frequently mispronounced by giving to th the same vocal sound 
which it properly has in the plural of path (paths). 

§ 141. Some consonant sounds are apt to be confounded; as 
those of sh and s in saying sririk for shrink, srub for shrvb ; of d 
and g, in saying dloom for gloom ; of t and k, in saying tlaim for 
claim ; of ph (equivalent to /) and p, in saying ty^pus for ty^phus ; 
of th and gh (equivalent to /), in saying troth for trough (trof) ; 
of wh and w, in saying weth'er for wheth^er ; of n and ng, in saying 
eing'in for 'singling, and van^quish for vang'quish ; of w and r, in 
saying hetreen for bettoeen. 



nvTBODUcnoif. 65 

{ 142. Consonant sonnds are sometimea omitted where they 

should be heard ; as m saying coti'-dem^f for wr^dem^ntr, mutfard 
for east^ward, Fd^^tt^a-ry for Feb'ru-a^^ handful for handfful, 

\ 143. Deriyatire words that hare a short vowel in one syl- 
lable answering to a long one in the primitiTe are apt to be mis- 
pTononnced; as in saying hl'ro-ine, ht'ro-ism (from k$'ro) instead 
of hir^o-inet hir^o^itm^ and in saying tia^ai, ttafcuu (from z€qI) 
instead of ziafoC, ziafoua, 

$ 144. Some words are erroneously pronounced in conse- 
quence of blending two syllables into one ; as in saying an'ti-podei 
for an-tip'o-dea, ex^tem'pon for tZ'tem^po-ref we'riea for ae'ri-et, 

§ 145. Some words are mispronounced by dividing them into 
more syllables than properly belong to them ; as in saying brevet* 
a-ry for hrev^ia-ry (brey'ya-ry), tinf^ii^er^y Isxt M'^uM-fy, aoe'o- 
ger-y for nkv^cufe-ry, , 

$ 146. The sound of y consonant is sometimes wrongly inter- 
posed between that of one of the guttural consonants, k (or e 
hard) and g^ and that of a in far (No. 2, { 11), t long, er ox vr\ 
as in saying e^yw for car^ k^yind for kind, k-yeHchief fi)r ker' chief, 
g-yirl for girl, — See § 52. 

§ 147. Mistakes are sometimes made in pronunciation through 
inattention to the meaning of two words which though spelled 
alike, are differently pronounced; t^eUan'ly and dian'ly, hin'der 
and hind'er, sidv'er and sldv'er, — See } 161. 

{ 148. Words nearly alike in spelling are sometimes con- 
founded in pronunciation ; astootpa (kOr) and corpM, nap and nape, 
stalk and stork, 9ubt*le (suti) and eub'tile. — See $ 67. 

{ 149. Of words ending m. el, en, U, in, or on, the cases in 
which the Towels e, i, and o ought to be sounded, as in civ'tV, kitch'- 
en, ros'in, ten'don, trav'el, should be carefrilly discriminated from 
those in which they ought not to be sounded, as in ha'tin (ba'sn), 
hut'ton (but'n), e^vil (e'vl), ha'zel (ha'zl), often (of n). 

§ 150. Of words/ ending in mj it should be observed that the 
e is generally suppressed in those which are verbs or participles, 
the root of which does not end in the sound of i2 or of < ; as in 
blamed, framed^ believed, posaeaeed. When the root ends in <l or in 
t, the e is necessarily sounded before d following it, as in oc- 
ceded, col-leet*ed, ex-peet'ed, because two consonant sounds ut- 
tered through the same position of the organs cannot be easily 



56 • INTRODUCTION. 

blended. The of this termination is sounded in most adjectives, 
as a^ged, crab'bed, dog'ged^ narked, rctg^ged^ wretch'ed; unless it is 
preceded by I and another consonant) when it is suppressed, as in 
hrin'dUdf ciHcledf dim'pled^ freck^led, mot'tledf griz^zled. It is sound- 
ed also in a few participles used as adjectives, as be-ht'ed, bless'ed^ 
erook'ed, leam'ed, streak'e d, wing'^ed. Thus, the « of the termina- 
tion ed is suppressed in the past tense and past participle of the 
yerb pick, as in the expressions, ** He picked Ins men,'* " A hun- 
dred picked men " ; but it is sounded in the adjective pickled 
(point'ed), as in the phrase, ** A picked stake." So, also, it is sup- 
pressed in the word beloved, used participially, as in the sentence, 
<*He is much beloved** ; but it is sounded when the same word 
becomes an adjective, as in the expression, ** A bc'lov'ed son." 

The termination ed is sometimes sounded as a distinct syllable 
in poetry, for the sake of the metre, though the word in which it 
occurs is not so pronounced in prose ; as in the following lines : 

Arrived there, the little bouse they fill. Spenser, 

T is mig^htiest in the mightiest ; it beoomes 

The throned monarch better than his crown. Shakespeare. 

In notes, with many a winding bout 

Of linkM BweetnesB long drawn out. MiUon, 

Or hear old Triton blow his wreath&d horn. Wordsworth. 

In a derivative formed by adding either of the syllables Ig, ness, 
to a word ending in ed, this termination is pronounced as a dis- 
tinct syllable, though the e is suppressed in the primitive ; as in 
con-fess'ed-lg, de-sign'ed-lg, blear' ed-ness, pre-par'ed-ness, 

§ 151. Of words which have an unaccented syllable ending 
in the vowel i immediately preceding an accented syllable, the 
cases in which i is long (No. 16, § 25), as in bl-lin'gual, duam'e" 
ter, vi-vip'a-rous, should be carefully discriminated from those in 
which it is short (No. 7, { 16), as in bi-tu men, dUvide', qui-nine'm 

§ 152. Of words ending in ile^ ine, and He, the cases in which 
the vowel •', when not under the accent in these terminations, is 
long (No. 16, § 25), as in ac'o-nite, crys'tal-line, gen'tile, should be 
carefully discriminated from those in which it is short (No. 7, 
§ 16), as in defi'nite, doc' trine, fer'tile. 

§ 153. No pains should be spared to correct such vulgar er- 
rors, or unauthorized modes, of pronunciation as these: cram}- 



INTRODUCTION. 67 

ber-ry for cran'ber'iy, settrs for scarce (sk^rs), gahs for aduee, toClunt 
for vi^O'lefU, toinfdur for win'dOto, €ui'uU for a-dttU*, ad'Vers^ for 
ad' verse, a-menfa-ble for a-me^na-hle, &c. ; and all words that ex- 
emplify this kind of pronunciation should be carefully noted. 

§ 154. With regard to the pronunciation of foreign words 
sometimes used in English speech, as those from the French and 
the Italian, Smart remarks : "At their first introduction, such 
words are pronounced, or attempted to be pronounced, without 
corruption of their original sounds ; by being much used, they 
gradually resign their foreign cast, -Mid some of them at length 
become quite English. It must therefore happen, while in transi- 
tion from one of these states to the other, that they will be neither 
English nor foreign, — a condition it were bootless to complain 
of, injudicious to alter by going back to the original pronuncia- 
tion, and quixotic to amend by reducing them at once to the state 
of English words." The same author says: <*With regard to 
Latinized names in modem science, many of which have a form 
half Latin, half English, it is absurd to tie them to any classical 
law : their current will be their proper pronunciation, be it, in 
other respects, what it may." 

§ 165. There are many words in regard to the pronunciation 
of which both good speakers and the best orthoCpists differ. In 
such cases, individual taste must be consulted, or, if that is dis- 
trusted, the safest course will be to adopt ^at mode of pronuncia- 
tion which seems to be supported by the greatest weight of authority. 

In estimating authorities, caution should be observed with re- .. 
spect to the name of Walker, whose peculiarities of pronuncia- /j 
tion, or the modes recommended by him, in certain cases, have 
been condemned by the best modem orthoepists. — See §§ 52, 107, 
134. 

{ 156. The number of this section (156) is affixed to such 
words in the Vocabulary as may, for any of the causes enumerated 
in the preceding sections, or for any other cause, be especially 
liable to be mispronounced* 



68 INTRODUCTION. 

Vin. CLASSES OF WORDS LIABLE TO BE MIS- 
SPELLED. 

§ 157. The difficulties usually experienced in learning to spell 
English words correctly, arise from various causes* These are 
separately enumerated in the following sections, with examples 
illustrating several classes of words. Other examples may be 
collected from the Vocabulary by means of the numbers which 
refer to the corresponding sections of this Introduction. 

§ 158. Several letters or several combinations of letters are 
used to represent the same sound ; as, a, a», oo, au, ay, aye, ea, ei, 
and ey to represent the sound of long a, respectively, in the words 
cUe, aim, gaol, gauge, day, aye, great, veil, they. Numerous simi- 
lar examples for each of the elementary sounds, especially the 
vowel sounds, may be collected from the Vocabulary by means of 
the numbers there inserted corresponding to the sections in which 
the several elementary soimds are treated of. 

§ 159. The same letter or the same combination of letters is 
used to represent different sounds ; as, the letter o for the different 
sounds it has in old, on, orb, do, work, eon, wolf, tcomfen, and the 
combination ou for the different sounds it has in <mnce, eoup, fotir, 
touch, ought, could, Jour'nal, cough. So the letter x is sometimes 
equivalent in sound tm ks (waa;), sometimes to ksh (an^'ious), 
sometimes to gz (ea;-act'), and sometimes to « (anaj-i'e-ty). 
Other examples may be found in §{ 55, 56, 57, 58, 59, and more 
may be added to these by a comparison of the words noted by 
numbers in the Vocabulary as illustrating the several elementary 
sounds. 

§ 160. There are many pairs or groups of words pronounced 
alike, but differently spelled ; as, at/ and afe; aU and awl; cere, 
eear, and eeer. Similar examples are noted in the Vocabulary by 
the number of this section (160). 

§ 161. There are several pairs of words spelled alike but dif- 
ferently pronounced ; a8,l€ad (led) and lead (led) ; slough (slou) 
and slough (sluf ). — See § 147. 

§ 162. There are many words in the orthography of which 
silent letters occur, that is, letters which represent no sound ; as, 
b in debt and doubt, s in island, ch in yacht. The consonants, 



nmtooucnoN. 69 

angle or eombmed, which are sometimea sQent are h (de6t), 
(Turt'uals), d (Wedhes'dAj), ff (fei^, fftUit), h (gAost, Aour), k 
(kn\fe)t I (ta/k, saftn'on), m (mne-mon'ics), n (hymn, con-temn'), 
p (psalm), 8 (Inland), t (of^en, cas'de), to (mite), eh (dracAm), 
^rA (ri^At), ph (pAthis'ije), rh (myrrA). 

*• When two consonant letters,*' says Smart, '* come together 
that are articulated by contact in the same part of the mouth, as 
m and b [lamb], m and p [ademption], I and n [kiM] ; or that are 
sounded in the same region, as m and n [hymn] ; or that are fol- 
lowed by a sound that more readily joins itself to the former of 
the two consonants than the latter, as / when it follows te or 
St [musde, btu^le], m or n when it follows ft ot at [Chrij^mas, 
chestnut], g when it follows rt [moff^age], and o when it follows 
no or tw [«iMird, two] ; — in such cases the latter of the two con- 
sonants is generally dropped in the pronunciation.'* 

From similar causes haying reference to ease of utterance, 
and from the tendency, in adopting foreign words, to make the 
combinations of consonant sounds conlbrm to English analogies, 
the former of two consonants, as the same author remarks, is 
dropped in pronouncing some words; as, 6 in 6<fellium, deM; 
e in ezai, indi^f ; g in gnome, phle^, si^ ; A in Aneel ; / in 
ca^, foZA, ta2A ; m in mnemonics ; p in jMalm, receipt ; • in de- 
mesne, isfe. 

Silent letters, especially silent consonants, may be traced, in 
most cases, to the original languages from which the words con- 
taining them were derived. Thus the silent b in the words debt 
and dovbt may be traced to the Latin words debitum and dubito, 
in which b is soimded. 

§ 163. Of the vowels, e is always silent at the end of words, 
except a few derived from the Greek, the Latin, or other foreign 
languages ; as, apocope, apostrophe, catastrophe, epitome, recipe, 
simile, si/stole, syncope, anime, cicerone, protegi. The usual effect 
of the final e, when it follows a single consonant, a consonant 
digraph, or the combined consonants st, in a monosyllable or in 
an accented syllable, is to lengthen the preceding vowel ; as in 
babe, here, milCf bone, lute, bathe, paste, a-bcUe*, com-plete', re-voke', 
tra-duce', im-batM, dis-tastef. The reason of this is, as Smart 
remarks, « that the e was originally sounded, and made inih. the 
consonant a distinct syllable, leaving the previous vowel final in 



■n^i. 



. U-4<(, Ac;' 
• doulM only 



>i>yII«l.k-» aie cifrjMiiHU b 



AuJ., -«M, Jv..., .(«*, J,!.,, gU., guH4, katt, Uf. hrt, MM. Mf, 

*-'. (^ rt^. iM ^u^ ^ .« u ^OLrtime. ^LW). .Am, ««, 
«■..., -«.l «^«A.. lu II,* «..r,ii,-d .jlUbl*. of the vardt -ipu'. 
6.-.:h»./, ji».l„J.', jiM-ii,.-, uid id th« unuoenud ejUabie* of 
BKiuy .,ij.^r ».>».U, u 4.^-i.i»a.fi,'iiU, pat-tic, tp-pa-ilt, the final 
• ilo« icrt tli.m Uiti qiMMiiy ut Hie pn;ce<liiig towel, bewg, u 
tiiliad ii,i»««,', II, -Lllu u H.ll Ha iUtni." 

( Idi, Jliu.a I. 4 U,(,u .U«i of word. In which Uw Towel 
« final M tiUiit ««..»■ iliu .■■(iiiliiiinl roiuaiunU N (bi'Me). cJ 

"(•""'''Oi-'U"'.'-'')- 

i-K. Ilw U.I sjHabla of B word t 



BylUUi; 



r iu rquinlrut before r 



iwm.al vuu^l » ,N.,. IJ, ^ ui,^ ^m^nlod t.._ ,. 

(luttiil, iJ'-*'" lo-hM), «>. (..'aur), M-At« (M'bur), lA«'a>tr« 
(ihu'u-iui|. Wv-Uur aiul U.....l,uih ns-omracnd tbM words of 
Iliia tW» uliiiulLl iiij »im^i xjUh (hd # prt'mlmg the r, exwiit 
whoii tliu » nDiiiii tiiui Iw tiiatlo lu follow e at g,u in lu'trt, 
f'jf'<^ nla.:li, if »iiu.iu ^t^-, ,.>y,.4.. w^uirt be ii,blo to b« mi*. 
lu:uiiii»ui!L;a hi- gi* ;iig nt *; mt.l u lU^ir -ift wiimd. 

i iflfi, liii: VJw4 « is imwily »i)eM in (he tomiiwtitw td of 
ttw imiMii li.;t luinn: uiid thd |w» |wtu.'i)ae «f regulu miba that 
d« not wti* wilh ll.>i wiuiiil HI' 1* w *if »i M in n«un( (k«u»d). 

te wu>^t mtiwiiyai, in si«ua p«t|w^jB* ttw,) m wliwtiTes. and 
»»m»vm* mU in puvwy ftw iha Mk« trf ttw mm^ — Se* { liO. 

A ftw *w*l*. dwivvd ivsuUtIj ftu» (niiuiiiw* mOins in « or Ja 
« fc; tMma «*. »i« »W w(i,tv« bj a,«HW« l»^ »«mi««t»a». m 



l- 



c . 



TU 



t m 



.SiZl'^l. 



jJOi 



R^^ S. -Ai^^^^ 



3SL r c 



Tifc- 



■s: in 



n.-»T: 



«T.£BI«£' 



311 



"j-^^is: 



ds^IaCS- 




r if^tf*> 



•'-r*^ ■^T.JiiJBL 



r»- a: 



tUfiL tffr. 



la;-* 



' , flHTi 






itir^ $sth^^WN 



60 INTBODUCnON. 

the foregoing syllable. Thus, too, the yowel is long in chaste, 
taste, &c,, because the words were originally chd^ste, td'Ste, &c. ; 
80, likewise, in bathe, &c., because the consonant is double only 
to the eye." 

The following monosyllables are exceptions to the lengthening 
effect of final e preceded by a single consonant ; namely, are, axe, 
hade, eome, done, dove, give, glove, gone, have, live, love, none, one, 
sate (as the past tense of sit is sometimes spelled), shove, some, 
were, and withe. In the accented syllables of the words a-hove-, 
be'come', for-bade', for-give', and in the unaccented syllables of 
many other words, as doc^ trine, fer'tile, ptu'sive, op'po-site, the final 
e does not show the quantity of the preceding vowel, being, as 
Smart expresses it, "idle as well as silent." 

{ 164* There is a large class of words in which the Towel 
final is silent after the combined consonants bl (bi'ble), d 
(cir'cfe), dl (hri'dle), fi (tri'yfe), gl {esi'gle), kl (pic'Afe), pi (ap^pfe), 
tl {hot'tle), zl (puz'zfe). 

When e terminates the last syllable of a word after r, this 
syllable is pronounced as if e, or its equivalent before r, the 
natural vowel u (No. 12, § 21), preceded the r, as in lu'cre 
(lu'kur), o'chre (o'kur), o'gre (o'gur), sa'bi'e (sa'bur), the'a-tre 
(the'a-tur). Webster and Goodrich recommend that words of 
this class should be written with the e preceding the r, except 
when the e would thus be made to follow c or ^, as in lu^cre, 
cfgre, which, if written lu'cer, o*ger, would be liable to be mis- 
pronounced by giving to c and g their soft sound. 

§ 165. The vowel e is usually silent in the termination ed of 
the imperfect tense and the past participle of regular verbs that 
do not end with the sound of <j or of ^ ; as in caused (kauzd), 
de-ceived' (de-a&Yd'),tran8'gressed' (tians-gresV), But it is sounded 
in most adjectives, in some participles used as adjectives, and 
sometimes also in poetry for the sake of the metre. — See § 150. 

A few words, derived regularly from primitives ending in or in 
ss by adding ed, are also written by dropping this termination, as 
well as the final consonant of the primitive, and substituting t ; 
as,spelled, blessed, which are frequently written spelt, blest. When 
the sound of d, which is vocal, follows that of s, which is aspirate, 
it is naturally changed into the sound of t. (See Note C, p. 34.) 
But when the sound of d follows that of /, as these sounds are 



INTBODUCnON. 61 

both Tocal, they may be easily uttered together ; though the 
sound of If being liquid as well as Yocal, may also be easily 
made to blend with that of t. So, too, when the termination ed 
follows the liquid and vocal consonant n, in the regular form 
of a Terb, there is a tendency to replace the sound of d by that 
of ^ ; as in the words burned, learned, which are also sometimes 
written burnt, learnt, 

i 166. The vowel e is silent in the terminaticm m of the plu- 
ral of nouns and the third person singular of the present tense 
of verbs, as in lakes (laks), apples (ap'plz), hastes (hftsts), craves 
(krayz), trem'bles (trem'blz) ; except when it follows a conso- 
nant that does not blend with the sound of « or of z (as 
soft, g soft, s and x), as in ra'cet (ra'sez), sta'ges (sta'jez), 
gas'es (gas'ez), box'es (boks'ez). 

§ 167. The Vowels e, i, and o are silent before n in the final 
syllable of some words, as in heaven (hev'n), cousHn (kuz'n), 
but'ton (but'n) ; and the vowels e and i are also silent before / in 
the final syllable of some words, as in shoo'el (shuv^), efvil (e'vl). 

$ 168. The digraph ue, when final, is silent in some words 
after g and after g ; as in tongue (tung), u-nigue' (u-nfik'). 

§ 169. There are numerous classes of words difficult to spell 
on account of the resemblance in sound of syllables or parts of 
syllables that are spelled differently, or on account of the indis- 
tinctness of the vowel sound in the penultimate syllable ; as, 

Words beginning with the following syllables ; — 

Ante, anti (an^^cedent, antithetical ; antepenult, an^»christian) 

Cer, eir, ser, sur (certaia, circle, Mrvant, surname)* 

De, di (debate, diyide ; <fecline, dtYine ; deception, <fiplomacy). 

Fer, Jir, fur (fertile, ^rkin, furtive ; /«rvid, ^rman, ^mace). 

Mer, tnur, myr (merchant, murmur, myrtle). 

Per, pur (perfect, purpose ; pervade, pursue). 

Ter, tur (terminate, turpentine ; tertiary, turbinate). 

Words ending in the following syllables : — 

Age, ege, tage, idge, ige (adage, college, marriage, porri^e, vestige). 

Ance, ence, (abundance, residence ; utterance, difference). 

Ant, ent (attendant, impendent ; suppliant, recipient). 

Ar, er, ir, or, ur, yr, re (dollar, miller, tapir, sailor, sulphur, 
zeph^, lustre). 

Cede^ ceed, sede (aecede, Bucceed, sngeTsede). 

6 



62 INTRODUCTION. 

Cialf naif tial (beneflc«a/, controvem'a/, proylden/Zo/). 

CiaUf auMf Hon (politician, appreheiuton, satisfaction). 

Ceouti ciou8, ti&ut (herbac^tm*, saga^Mf, yeicaticnis), 

Cityt sity (atrocity ^ yQThosity ; felictYy, necessity), 

Cy, sy (poli<^, heresy ; secrecy, courtesy). 

J5ar, c«r, ere^ ier (appear, engin«^, persev^r*, brigadi^). 

Geotu, gums (couxvigeottSt reWgiotts ; outrageous, conta^'ous). 

Ice^ ise, is (bodt'c?, treatise, trellts ; office, promts^, basts). 

Orrif ome, um (atom, welcome, elum ; idiom, lonesome, Tacutim). 

Ous, us (poTouSf chorus ; odiotcs, radit<s ; perilotis, nautilus). 

PhCf phy (apostrqpAe, philosophy ; catastrop^, biograp%). 

Sy, zy (daisy, lazy ; easy, breezy ; drowsy, blowzy). 

T, ey (lady, barley ; study, honey ; sandy, turkey). 

Words in which the penultimate syllable is unaccented and end9 
in a, e, or i, or in r preceded by e (laudable, edtble, ornament, 
tenement, lim'ment, rarefy, clarify, yitreous, vartous, solitude, 
quietude, lat'ty, piety, delegate, profligate, culinary, millinery). 

Words in which the sound of long e is represented by ei or ie 
(seize, piece, weird, chief, receive, believe, conceit, besiege). 

Note. — It will obviate most of the difficulty of spelling words in 
which the sound of long e is represented by ei or ie, to remember that c£ 
is always used for this purpose rather than ie, when this sound occurs 
Immediately after c; and that ie is used rather than ei after most other 
consonants. The words in which ei represents the sound of long e after 
other consonants beside c, are chieily the following, — inveigle, leisure, 
neither, seignior, seine, seize, weird, and such other words as are deriva- 
tives of any of these. 

§ 170. A doubt frequently arises as to the proper mode of 
spelling a word in which a consonant sound occurs between two 
vowel sounds in different syllables ; a consonant sound so situ- 
ated being, in some words, represented by a single letter, as in 
affid, big'ot, pan'el, trip'le, and, in others, by a double letter, as in 
car'ried, fag^got, chan'nel, rip' pie, — See §§ 66, 176. 

§ 171. The number of this section (171) is affixed to such 
words in the Vocabulary as may, for any of the causes enumer- 
ated in the preceding sections, or for any other cause, be pecu- 
liarly difficult to spell. 



INTBODUOnON. 68 



IX. RULES FOR SPELLING CERTAIN CLASSES OP 

WORDS. 

i 172. (1.) The letter If when preceded by a aingle voweL is 
always doubled at the end of a monosyUable ; as in ballt bellf dM^ 
millj shallf witt, 

§ 173. (2.) The letter J^ when prece dedJg ft singl e Towelj is 
generally doubled at the end of a monosyllable ; as in bluff, diff, 
muff, puff, muff, stuff. The words def, if, and of are the only 
exceptions. 

§ 174. (3.) The letter t, when preceded by a single vowel, 
and when it is not tiie sign of the possessiTe case or of the plural 
of a noun, or of the third person singular of a verb, is generally 
doubled at the end of a monosyllable ; as in brass, ekus, dress, 
glass, kiss, moss, press. The following words are the only excep- 
tions, — cts, gas, has, his, is, pus, this, thus, ui, was, yes. 

§ 176. (4.) The only consonants, except /, /, and s, that are ever 
doubled at the end of a word, are ; b in abb, ebb; d m add, odd, 
rudd ; g in egg ; m in lamm, mumm (verb) ; n in bunn, inn ; r in 
hurr, err, miurr, parr, purr, shirr ; t in buit ; z in buzz, fuzz. These 
consonants are doubled, when final, only in the words enumerated. 

{ 176. (6.) In a derivative formed by adding a syllable begin- 
ning with a vowel to a monosyllable, or to a final accented sylla- 
ble, ending in a single consonant (except h, and also s in the de- 
rivatives of g€u, as g€ueous, gasify) preceded by a vowel sound 
represented by a single letter, that consonant is doubled ; as in 
rob'ber, propeVling, quit! ted, formed by adding the syUables er, ing, 
ed to rob, propel, quit, respectively. In the last of these words 
{quit), the letter u, it will be observed, is a vowel to the eye only, 
being really equivalent to consonant w. If the primitive ends in 
two consonants (as in aet, reform), or if, though ending in a single 
consonant, this consonant is preceded by a vowel sound represent- 
ed by a digraph (as in boil, feel, eon-ceaP), the final letter is not 
doubled in the derivative. So also if the accent is not on the final 
syllable of the primitive (as in big'ot, p^rfit, lim'it), or if the ac- 
cent of the primitive is thrown back in the derivative (as in refer" 
ence from re-fer'), the final consonant is not doubled in the deriv' 
ative, except in the cases mentioned in the next section. 



I 



64 INTRODUCTION. 

The reduplication of the consonant, according to the rule here 
given, is obviously an orthographical expedient to keep the pre- 
ceding vowel short, in conformity with the general principle that 
the vowels have their short sound when followed by a consonant 
in the same syllable. If the final consonant of the primitives 
were not doubled in roffber, propelling^ quitted, for example, these 
words would be liable to be mispronounced in consequence of 
having their syllables wrongly divided ; thus, rolber^ prth-pe'ling, \ 

gm'ted, ' 

§ 177. (6.) In derivatives formed by adding a syllable begin- 
ning with a vowel to most words that end in I, this letter is 
doubled, by most writers, in conformity with a practice long prev- 
alent, though the final syllable is not accented ; as in trav'el-lerf 
trav'el'lingy trav'elled (from trav'ef). But many persons in the 
United States now write the derivatives of such words with one 
/, as recommended by Lowth, Perry, Walker, Webster, and Good- ^ 

rich, who justly maintain that this mode is more in accordance 
with analogy than the other. Both parties, however, agree in 
writing the derivatives of par^al-lel with one /. There is a diver- 
sity of usage, also, with respect to doubling the final consonant in 
the derivatives formed by adding a syllable beginning with a vowel 
to the words 5»'flu, ccur'bU'ret, com^pro-mity tuPphu-ret, and worship. 
The derivatives of kid'nap are uniformly written with the /> doubled. 
The word excellence (from L. exceUentia) is uniformly written with 
the I doubled, though the accent is on the first syllable. Smart 
remarks : ♦* The doublep in worshipped^ toorskipper, &c., the double I 
in travelling , traveller, &c., are quite unnecessary on any other score 
than to satisfy the prejudices of the eye." — See Note E, p. 70. 

§ 178, (7.) Derivatives formed by adding a syllable to words 
that end in a double consonant generally retain both consonants ; 
aSfbliss'Jtd, gruff'lg, stiWness, There are some exceptions in the 
derivatives of words ending in II, When the syllable less or Ig is 
added to a word of this termination, one I is omitted by all lexi- 
cographers, — as in skil'lesa, ful'lg, — in order to prevent the meet- 
ing of three letters that represent the same sound. So also in the , 
derivatives formed by adding the syllable fid or ness to the words 
duUf full, skill, will (duVness, fid'ness, skil'fid, wiVfid), and in those 
formed by adding the syllable ment to en-roW, in-staU', in-tkrall', 
or the syllable dom to thrall (en-rol'menty in-staPmentf in-thral'mentf 



INTRODUCTION. 65 

thrciPdom)^ one Z» according to Worcester, and mopt other lexi- 
cographers, should be omitted; but, according to Webiter and 
Goodrich, these words should be spelled with the I doubled, as 
in the primitives. The derivatives of jxmtifft which have only 
one/, as pon-tifi-cctly are also exceptions. 

§ 179. (8.) Derivatives formed by prefixing a syllable to words 
that end in a double consonant generally retain both consonants, 
VAybe-faW, vn-weWy de-presa' ; though some of this class of deriva- 
tives from primitives ending in U are spelled in some modem 
dictionaries, as Smart's, with one /, as, be-faPt en'roV^ fort'teV^ 
vt^thraV, The words dU-tiV^ fiU-fiV^ in-stiVy and un-tiV^ are gen- 
erally thus written with one I ; but, according to Webster and 
Goodrich, all of these, except the last, should be spelled with 
the / doubled. 

§ 180. (9.) Compound words generally retain all the letters 
which are used in writing the simple words that compose them ; 
BSfOB'Wise, well-bred. The exceptions are some of the compounds 
of ctU I as, tU'Tnighty, cUmostt already ^ also, although^ aUogetfur^ 
akpaySf withalf therewithal^ wherewithal ; the word wherever (where- 
ever) ; the words ehUblairit welfarey Christmas^ candlemas, and others 
compounded with the word mass ; the words artful, awful, sinful, 
and aH others similarly compounded with the word full ; and, 
according to most lexicographers, the words fitlfl and instil, 
though, according to Webster and Goodrich, these should be writ- 
ten with the I doubled in conformity with the general rule. 

§ 181. (10.) 'ITie letter c is generally followed by A to repre- 
sent the sound of k at the end of a monosyllable ; as in back^ 
brick, thick, sick. The words arc, fisc, lac, marc, ore, sac, talc, zinc, 
are exceptions. 

§ 182. (11.) In derivatives formed by adding a syllable 
beginning with e or i to a word ending with c, the letter k is 
inserted after c, in order to prevent it from taking the sound of 
9 ; as in trafficker, trafficking, trafficked (from traffic), 

§ 183. (12.) In derivatives formed by adding a syllable be- 
ginning with a vowel to words that end in a silent e, the e is 
omitted, except when it serves to keep c or g soft, or when its 
omission would obscure the pronunciation or the meaning. Thus 
it is omitted in com'ing, hOpHng, sen'si-ble, spi'cy, suHng (from come, 
hope, sense, spicC) sue) ; but it is retained in peace^a^ble, change'o' 

6» 



66 INTBODUCnON. 

5& (from peace, change), because, otherwiie, c and ff, coining imme- 
diately before a, would have their hard sound. It is also retained 
in hoe'ing, ahoeHng (from hoe, shoe), to prevent the doubt that might 
arise about their pronunciation, if these words were written hoing, 
ehoing ; and in dyeHng, singling, apringe'ing, steingeHng, tingling 
(from dye, tinge, springe, swinge, tinge), in order that these parti- 
ciples may not be confounded with dg'ing, singling, tpring'ing, 
ewingHng, tinging (from die, sing, spring, swing, ting). The e is 
generally retained in the word mileage ; and it was retained by 
Johnson and Walker in the derivatives formed by adding abie to 
the words move, prove, and sale, but these derivatives are now 
more commonly written according to the rule, mamblet provable, 
salable, 

§ 184. (13.) In the present participles of verbs that end in ie, 
not only is the final e omitted on adding the syllable ing, but the 
i is changed into ^ ; as in dyHng, ly'ing, ty'ing, vy'ing (from die. 
He, tie, vie), 

§ 185. (14.) In derivatives formed by adding a syllable be- 
ginning with a consonant to words that end in a silent e, the e is 
generally retained ; as in peace'fiU, tune'less, move'ment, vHe'ly, 
There are some exceptions ; as, aw'ful, ar'gument, a-hridg'ment, 
ac-JcnowV edg-ment, jxidg'^mmt, du'ly, tru'ly, whol'ly, nure'Hng, wis'" 
dom, and such words as are derivatives of any of these. The words 
abridgment, acknowledgment, and the word judgment, with its de- 
rivatives, are, however, by Walker, Smart, and many others, con- 
formed to the rule, and spelled abridgement, acknowledgement. 
Judgement, adjudgement, misjudgement, ^ejudgement. The word 
lodgement is thus spelled, with a silent e in the first syllable, by 
Johnson, Walker, Smart, Worcester, and most other lexicog- 
raphers ; but, by Webster and Goodrich, the e is omitted in this 
word as well as in the others just enumerated. 

} 186. (15.) In derivatives formed by adding any tennination, 
except one that begins with i, to words that end in y preceded by 
a consonant, the y is generally changed into i \ as in ed'i-fies, ed'i- 
fied, ea'si'ly, ea'si-er, fan'ci-ful (from edH-fy, ea'sy, fan'cy). The 
derivatives of dry, shy, and aky retain the y, as in dry'ly, shy'ness, 
sky'ey. In the derivatives of sly, the y is retamed by Worcester 
and some other lexicographers ; but Smart, Webster, and Good- 
rich speU. these words with i instead of y. The y is also retained 



INTRODtfCnON. 67 

when an apostrophe and the letter i are added to* form the poa- 
aessiTe case singular of nouns ; as in citifa^ daisy'Sf $ky'$, 

§ 187. (16.) in deriTatires formed bjr adding any termination 
to words that end in y preceded by a TOWel, the y remains, in 
.most cases, unchanged; as in dit^lajfetP, ga%fer^ de-laytf. The 
words, dail^t knd, lain, saiiht taid (firom dloy, lay, tay)^ and Haid 
(the past tense and past participle of «toy, — vrritten also tiayed)^ 
together ^th thdr compounds, are exceptions. 

§ 188. (17.) In derivatives formed by adding a syllable be- 
ginning with a vowel to words that end in any vowel sound, the 
letter or letters representing this sound are generally retained ; as 
in Htb'poB'naedj O'gree'inff, a-^ret^a^ble, em-har'goed^ wooed, he^ 
stowed^. When, however, the syllable ed is added to verbs that 
end in ee, one e is omitted; as in e^grttdf, de-creedf, freed, 

{ 189. (18.) The plural of nouns is formed regularly by add- 
ing the letter « to the singular, when ending in a vowel, or by 
adding the letter <, or the syllable e$, when ending in a consonant. 
The letter « only is added, when the sing^ar ends in a sound 
which* will' blend with that of « ; as in adieus, ideas; soloa, toys, 
eare, eaicee', cliffs, dueks, hUUi, he§s, ktds, pans, paths, webs (See Nora 
C, p. 34). The syllable* e« is added, when the sin^Iar ends in a 
soimd which will not blend with that of «, as in boxes, bushes^ 
ehutehes, crosses ; but in case the singular ends in a nlent e pre- 
ceded by soft e, by soft g, or by s, the final e is sounded to form 
tiie syllable es ; as in faces, stages, toses. Letters and figures used 
as nouns plural, and words so used without reference to their 
xheaning, commonly have the plural form indicated by an apostro- 
phe and the letter « ; as in the expressions, <* Dot your Cs " ; *< In 
♦i there are two 4V" ; " You use too many alao*s'* 

§ 190. (19.) The plural of noims that end in y preceded by 
a consonant or the sound of a consonant, is fi>rmed by changing 
f into ies, as in^/bUcter, ladies, mercies, ooUoqUies (from fancy, lady, 
therey, coHoguy) ; but the plural of noims ending in y preceded by 
any vowel (except u sounded as to, as in colloquy) is formed rega- 
larly by adding tr to the singular ; $» in boi^, days, tOMrneys, jour^ 
nays, mMne^, tatteys. Nouns which now end in y formerly ended 
in ie, as, ktdie, mereie; so that the plural texmination ies was once' 
regular. 

} 191. (20.) The piural of nouns that end in i is genenOly 



68 INTRODUCTION. 

formed by adding ea to the singular, as in aUeaUes, rabbiea (from 
dUcaUf rabbi) ; but some writers add a only. 

§ 192. (21.) The plural of nouns that end in o is formed reg- 
ularly by adding s to the singular, when the o is preceded by a 
vowel (See {189), as in cameos, folioa (from cameo, folio) ; but, 
when the o is preceded by a consonant, the plural is sometimes 
formed by adding a only, as in bratfoa, oentoa^ eeroa, and some- 
times by adding ea, as in cargoes, echoes, mottoea, potatoes, 

§ 193. (22.) The plural of the following nouns is formed by 
changing the final / or fe into vea ; namely, beef, calf, elf, half 
knife, leaf, life, loaf, aelf, aheaf, shelf, thief, tdfe, wolf (beeves, 
calves, elves, &c.). The plural of ataff (staves) is formed by 
changing^ into ves ; though the plural of its compounds is regu- 
lar, as in fiagstaffs. The plural of wharf, according to English 
usage, is wharfs, but in the United States it is generally written, 
as well as pronounced, wharoes. All other nouns ending in /, ff, 
or fe have the plural formed regularly by the addition of « to the 
singular. 

§ 194. (23.) The- plural of the nouns brother, die, pea, and 
penny is formed in two ways, to distinguish different meanings. 
Thus,^hat of brother is brothers, when children of the same parent 
are referred to, but brethren,- when the reference is to members 
of the same society, or congregation, or of the same profession ; 
that of die is dies, when used in the sense of stamps for coining, 
but dice, if implements for playing are meant ; that of pea is 
pease for the fruit taken collectively, but peas for a number of 
individual seeds ; that of penny is pennies, when a number of 
individual coins is spoken of, huX pence, if reference is made to an 
aggregate sum, or to a coin, equal- in value to a certain number 
, of pennies. 

} 195. (24.) The plural of the following nouns is irregularly ' 
formed ; namely, child (children), foot (feet), goose (geese), Umse 
(lice), man (men), mouse (mice), ox (oxen), tooth (teeth), woman 
(women). 

§ 196. (25.) The plural of compounds of which the word 
man is the final constituent is formed, after the analogy of this 
primitive, by changing man into men, as in freemen, Dutchmen 
(from freeman, Dutchman) ; but nouns not compound, and ending 
in the syllable .man, have the plural formed regularly by adding s 



INTRODUCTION. 69 

to the singular ; as, Germofw, Musauhntms, eaymant, Jlrmcuu (from 
German^ Mussulman, cayman, firman), 

§ 197. (26.) The plural of compounds consisting of a noun 
and an adjective is generally indicated by the same change in the 
noun which it imdergoes for the plural when single ; as in knight'- 
errant (knight«>errant), aon-tn-fofo (son«-in-law). But those com* 
pounds of which the adjective yW/ — as a suffix, written /W — 
constitutes the last part, have their plural formed by adding s to 
the adjective ; a»t hant^ (handful*), spoonful (spoonful*). 

§ 198. (27.) Some, nouns from foreign languages retain 
their original plural, as, amUthens (antitheses), axis (axes), 
ehervib (cherubim), focus (foct), larva (larvcs), slraJtum (strata), 
monsieur (mesn^ur*) ; and some nouns of this class have two 
plurals, one after the foreign form and the other after the Eng- 
lish form, 9A, formula (formulce or formula*), misdiwn (media or 
medium*), memorandum (memoranda or memorandum*), seraph 
(seraphtm or seraph*). 

§ 199. (28.) There is a class of words, which it was formerly 
the general usage to write with the termination our, that are now 
commonly written in the United States with the termination ar^ 
the u being omitted ; as, candor, color, error, honor, rigor. . Many 
of these words, however, are still written in England with the ti. 

§ 200. (29.) Most words of two or more syllables which 
were formerly written with the termination iek are now written 
with the termination ic, the k being omitted ; as, mimic, musiCf 
public, traffic. When, however, a syllable beginning with e or • 
is added to any of these words in forming a derivative, the letter 
k is inserted to keep the c hard. — See ^ 182, Bule 11. 

§ 201. (30.) Several words derived from the Latin through 
the French are variously written with the prefix en or in ; as, 
enquire or inquire, enclose or inclose, endorse or indorse, — the prefix 
en being the French form of the Latin in, 

^ 202. (31.) There is a diversity of usage in regard to the 
mode of spelling the last syllable of many of the verbs which 
terminate in the sound of z preceded by that of long i ; some 
writers spelling this syllable ize, and others, ise ; as, catechize or 
catechise, patronize or patronise, recognize or recognise. As a gen- 
eral rule, though with a few exoeptions, those verbs of this class 
which are derived from Oreek verbs ending in i Ccu (izo), or which 



70 nrntODTicrPKW. 

are fbrmed after the analogj of these Terbs, ba;ve this ftnal sylldp 
ble spelled ize, and in those derived from the French Terb jtrendn 
or its participle pria or prtM, it is written iae, 

§ 209. (32.) With re&pect to those words in the spelling of 
which usage is divided at the present time, both forms, or, if thero 
are more than two, the various forms, are given in this work with 
references from one to the other; and those modes of spelling 
which seem to be least supported by usage and by the weight of 
authority are indicated by printing the w^rds in. spaced letters 
within brackets; though^ in some cases, it is very difficult to 
determine whether one form or anothier is to be preferred. 

KoTB E.— It is well Icnown that Dr. Webster, in his Diotionary of the 
English Language, made changes in the orthography of many words, some 
of which he advocated on the ground of etymology, others on that of 
analogy. Dr. Goodrich, his son-in-law and the editor of the revised edition' 
of that work, published in 1847, four years after the death of Dr. Webster,* 
candidly states that such of these changes as were based on etymology 
(e. g. bridegoom for bridegroom, fether for featlier) were never received 
with favor by the public, and that. Dr. Webster having restored the old 
orthography in a considerable number of cases after an exx>eriment of 
twelve years (1828 to 1840), he himself had restored it, in the revised 
edition, to nearly all that remained. Most of those changes of orthogra- 
phy which seemed to Dr. Webster to be desirable on the ground of analogfy 
have been retained in the editions of his Dictionary published under the 
editorial care of Dr. Croodrich. They have been extensively adoptoU in the 
United States, but they cannot yet be said to have the sanction of any con- 
siderable portion of the British public. The following t^ a brief state- 
ment of the modes of spelling which constitute iiecuBar features of the 
latest edition of Webstcr*s Dictionary, edited by Goodrich, and published 
in 1859, and of the reftsons assigned for them. 

1. Words terminating in r«>, as centre, theatre, have the termination 
changed to er {center, theater), except acre, chancre, m oBsacre, and ogre , 
in which the change would lead to an erroneous pronunciation. Woris 
of this class, however, are given in both modes of si>elliBg, a preference 
only being expressed for the termination er, on the ground that other 
words of like termiuauon, as oftamder, cider, have already undergone this 
change. 

2. 3Iost of those words which by long usage have formed exceptions to 
the general rule that a final consonant preceded by a single vowel tn the 
primitive is not doubled in the derivative, on adding a syllable beginning 
vrith a vowel, unless the accent is on the last syllable, as the derivatives 
of trat^el (usually spelt trav'el-ler, trav'd-ling, tra/^eUed^ &c) and about 
fifty other words ending in ly together with the derivatives of bi'tUj 
carffm-retf eom'promU, nU'pht&-ret, and wor'ship, are spelled without 



IKTBODUCTION* Tl 

doubling fb» ftoal oonionaiit of the primitiTO, In Older thst tlwf may eon- 
form to the general role. (See $ 176.) The flnal eonionant, howerer, it 
doubled in the derivatives of kidnt^. It should be observed that some 
words in which the letter I is doubled are derived flrom other languages, 
as trunquiiUty (ftom L. tranqvUliiaB), cry$talliz« (from Or. vp^raAAaf), 
dmtceUor (from L. eancellarius, through the French), and do not, there- 
line, eome under the operation of the rule referred to, which applies only 
to English formatives. 

3. The words enrollment, inttaUtnentf inthnttt, inthraUment^ thralidom, 
are spelled in this manner, with a double /, for the reason that, if spelled 
with a single I, thef are liable to be mispronounced by giving to the vowel 
that precedes this letter its short sound. 

4. The words dUtUU i nstillj. fii bU^, are spelled in this manner, with a 
double I . because their derivatives, as dUtiUer, inttilHna, AUAUed, Ac,, must 
be written with the I doubled. 

5. The derivatives of duU,JkM, skUly and wUl are spelled with double /, 
as in dullness, fullness, skillful, wiU^U, to prevent the inconvenience of 
exceptions to a general rule. — See § 178. 

6. The words defense, offense, and pretense sa% tima spelled, with $ 
instead of c, because s is used in the derivatives, as in defensioe, qffeiuive^ 
pretauion, and because the same change has already been made in the 
words eaatens e, l icense , and r ecompense . 

7. The verb practice is thus q>eUed, with c instead of s before the final e, 
1st, because similar verbs, as notice, apprentice, in which the accent is not 
on the last syllable, are so spelled ; 2d, because a distinction of spelling 
between a noun and a verb of like origin belongs ]MKq;»erly to worda 
accented on the last syllable, as device, »., devise, v, -, 3d, because such a 
distinction in spelling this verb with sn s (practise) leads to a wrong pro- 
nunciation, the termination ise in verbs being* usually sounded the same as 
ize. Though this spelling (practice) is proposed as the preferable one, tbe 
other form (practise) is also given. 

8. The words mould and moult are given in this spelling, but a prefei^ 
enoe is expressed for the forms mold and molt, on the ground that they 
belong to Hie same class of words as bold, eolt, fold, gold, Ac, in which 
tne u has either been dropped or was never introduced. 

0. Drought and height are given as the established orthography of 
these words, but the forms drouth and hight are, on some accounts, con- 
sidered jfmSdntale, and are given as alternative modes of spelling. 



72 INTiiODUCnON. 



X. COMPOUND WOKDS. 

i 204. A compound word is one that consists of two or moxe 
timple words, each of which is separately current in the lan- 
guage. The simple words of which a compound is formed are 
either consolidated in writing or are joined by a hyphen. 

Bales for writing Oompound Worda. 
{ 205. I. When each of the parts of a compound word is 
pronounced with a distinct accent, they should be joined with a 
hyphen ; Bs,/ei'loto^ea'turef tvumfwi-drop'pingt ttoen'tg-onef , 

Exceptions. 

1. Compounds beginning with the prepositions overy under, unless the 
second jmrt of the compound commences with the letter r; as, o'verbear'- 
ing, un'dertak'ingj o'ver-rvM, un'der-raie'. 

2. A few compounds, mostly pronouns or adverbs, of very common 
occurrence ; as, here'upon't nev'erthelesa'y what'soev'er, 

3. Compounds ter min a t i ng in monger ; as, ir'onmon'ger, 

{ 206. n. When one of the words of which. a compound is 
formed is pronounced without a distinct accent, no hyphen should 
be inserted between them ; as, hlaek^smUhf der^gyman, earth'quake, 
ink'attmd* 

Exceptions. 

1. Compounds in which the first word ends with the same letter or 
digraph as that with which the second begins ; tM^fiah'shop, fiag'-grau^ 
head' -dress, hop'-pole, post' -town, sail' -loft, snow'-vohUe, stair'-rod, 

2. Compounds in which the first word ends, and the second b^ns, 
with a vowel ; BB,love'-<q)ple, paW-eyed, sea' -egg, - 

3. Compounds whose meaning or pronunciation would be obscured by 
writing the parts continuously i as, gas'^tolder, loop'-Jiole, pot'-house, tea'- 
chest. In the first three of these words, if the hyphen were omitted, the 
letters s-h, p-h, t-h, might be mistaken for the digraphs sh, ph, th, and 
the words be improperly pronounced gash' older, loo'phole, poth'ouse. In 
the last of the examples, the omission of the hyphen would confound the 
word intended with the second person singular of the present indicative 
active of the verb to teach (teach'est). 

4. Compounds formed by uniting a verb with an adverb, a preposition, 
or a noun; also those ending in hook or tree; SLB,get'-off, makef -shifty 
pla'ning-mill, set'-to; blank' -book^ bluef-bootc, tcrapf -book -, flr* -tree, pedm'- 
tree, pinef -tree, 

5. Almost all compound ac^ectives of whatever mode of formation ; 



INTRODUCTION. 78 

as, Qod' -fearing^ heart' -Heltt tiV-bred, knee*-detpt odd' 'looking, omtf-eytd^ 
unhoped'-for, vjom'-out. But such adjectives as are formed flroin com- 
pound nouns of one accent, either by the addition of ed or ing, or by 
dianging^ er into one of these terminations, or wlilch end with one of the 
words faced, coming^ Kke, follow the general rule, and omit the hyphen ; 
as cobf webbed (from co6't0e5), tlavtfholding (from $lavefholder), bare^/aeedf 
forth' coming f bird'likCy &o. 

Distinctions between words whloh are, and words whidh are 
not, to be considered as Ck>nipoands. 

{ 207. It is sometimes difficult to determine whether certain 
words should be compounded or written separately; and the 
^decision of the^ question is often made more difficult by the 
conflicting practice of printers and authors, particularly lexi- 
cographers, who are not only at variance with each other in 
innumerable instances, but, from their frequent inconsistencies, 
seem to have consulted only their fancy or their convenience in 
regard to words of this description. The remarks which follow 
are intended to aid the reader in discriminating between com- 
binations of words which are, and |hose which are not, properly 
written as compounds. 

{ 203. When two nouns, or a pronoun and a noun, are in 
apposition, and either of the two is separately applicable to the 
person or thing designated, they are to be regarded as* not con- 
stituting a compound word ; tAtKing David, Lord Byron, Viscount 
Pahneraton, the poet Wordsworth, I Paid, &c. 

Exception. — The pronouns he and she, used merely to express sex, 
are united by a hyphen to the nouns which they precede and qualify ; as, 
he-ccUf, she-bear. 

i 209. Nouns not in apposition, and of which only one is 
separately applicable to the person or thing designated, — or of 
which the first may be placed after the second with a preposition 
or phrase expressing the relation of the two words, — are prop- 
erly regarded and written as compound words ; as, bedtime, the 
time for going to bed; bookseller, a seller of books; corkscrew, a 
screw for drawing corks ; wtne-merchant, a merchant who deals in 
wine ; workshop, a shop for work. 

§ 210. When the first of two nouns is used adjectively to 
express the matter or substance of which the thing designated by 
the second is made, each word preserving its proper accent, 
they are to be regarded as not forming a compoimd word; as, 

7 



74 JNTBOBUCnOlf. 

iro$i key, ecttm eiUh, giau di^, gM ring, atone jar, wOk dreee, 
tin pan* 

i 211. When ^ noun., either simple or compound, is used 
before another noun, instead of an a^j^ctlYe, or to Bupplj the 
place of oue, the t?nro nouns 9xe properly written as distinct 
words ; as, angel visitant (for angelic visitant), ehvrch government 
(for ecclesiastical government), a custom-house officer, noonday sun 
(for meridian stm), party hatred, summer flowers, 

^ 2^2. Two words, of which the latter is a noun, though in 
their usual cojistruction separate, are compounded iiirith a hyphen, 
when put before a noun which they qualify, but are set apart 
if om the word qualified ; as, a bird^s-eye 'view, a first-class hotel, 
high'toater mark, Bowdoin'Sguare church, New-England scenery, 
New-London bridge. 

^ 213. If a noun in the possessiye case, and the noun goTern- 
img it, no loj^r retain the idea of property or ownership whicl^ 
the words, when literally taken, conyey, they should be written 
as a compound word, with an apostrophe and a hyphen; as, 
bisJujp* s-cap, king*s-evil, lad/s-finger, Solomon* s-seal. But such 
phrases as Baffin* s Bay, Blackfriars* Bridge, King*s College, Regents 
Park, St, James* s Palace, and other titles of honor or distinction, 
are properly written as separate words. 

$ 2J.4. If a noun in the possessiye case, and the n<^an gpyerning 
it, are used in their literal sense, and at the same time haye but on^ 
accent, they should be written as compound words, without a hy- 
phen and without any apostrophe ; v^beeswax, doomsday, townsman, 

§ 215. Compound nouns are sometimes formed by uniting 
with a hyphen a yerb and an adyerb, preposition, or noun ; as, 
a break-down, a pulHng-up, a take-offi, a spelling-book, 

{ 216. Adjectiyes are frequently compoiinded with nouns, 
when the compound thus formed admits of but one accent. If 
the adjectiye precedes the noun, the two words are properly writ- 
ten continuously, or without a hyphen ; as, black^bird, blue'bdl, 
fore'ground, recPbreast, strong'hold, wild^flre. When the adjectiye 
follows the noun, the two words should be joined l^ith a hyphen ; 
as, an'kle-deep, bloods-red, foot'-sore, stone'-cold, except word^ end- 
ing with one of the adjectiyes faced, coming, Wee. (See § 206, 
Ezc. 5.) But when the noun apd Uie adjectiye which qualifies it 
are pronounced each with a distinct acpent, the two words should 
hz written separately {9&f church visitant, common sense, high sheriff. 



INTBOI>UCTIOH. 75 

Ufi eternal, prime minieter'), unless they are used as epithets ; as, 
common sense, in the phrase eommot^sense philosophy. 

§ 217. Two numerals expressing a number which is the sum 
of the two are connected with a hyphen {BStthirty-four) ; other- 
wise, no hyphen is used, and the two numerals are written as 
separate words ; diS^four hundred. Monosyllabic cardinal numer- 
als denoting more than one, and followed by either of the words 
fiUd or penny, ar^ consolidated with it; as, three/old, threepenny : 
if of more than one syllable, they are joined with a hyphen ; as, 
sixteen-fold, sixteen-penny. Pence, preceded by a monosyllabic 
numeral, is eonsolidated with it ; as^ sixpence, ninepenee : if pre- 
ceded by a numeral of more than one syllable, the two words are 
written separately; tm,fiwieen pemee* Such fractional terms as 
one-haif, fowr-fifths, five-semenJths, fte., are commonly written with 
a hyphen, as compound vord»; so also such expressions as a 
half-dottor, a quarter-bo^, 9tCn 

i 218. Epithets &)raied of an ad'verb c&ding in ly, and a past 
participle, are generally written as two separate words ; as, a ctm- 
nmgly eomtrimedju^mti^ a newl/y married man, a poorly huiU house. 

4 219« Wkea an advefb and a participle^ or a preposition and 
a fdf tici^, ve placed aHer the noon they qualify, they should 
be written separately, as distinet words ; «s, the sentence above 
9ited» a passi^ m^e& aeimired, a QMttter eoon settied. 

i 220. Wh^ii wo]rd» lonn only a phrase, — an idiomatic ex« 
pression, or a compound term in which each word is taken literally, 
— they should be written as separate words (a8,after ail, by and by, 
for ever, hand in hand, ent^s eelf, on hi^), unless they are used 
adjectiyely and placed before the nouns they qualify, when they 
should be joined by the hyphen ; as, the never-to-be-forgotten hero, 
an out-of-the-way place. 

{ 221. It is impossible to Uy down principles by which the 
inquarec may be enabled, la emaj caae* to decide whether words 
should be oompoimded or not; but, as most anomalous compounds 
are i^yea in their proper places in the Vocabulary, it will be suf- 
ficient to remember the following general rule given by Goold 
Brown, in his " Grammar of English Grammars " : •* Words 
otherwise liable to be misunderstood* must be joined together or 
written separately, as the sense and construction may happen to 
xequire." Thus, nepv^merehant will mean a merchant who buys 
and sells negroes, but neyro merchant, a merchant who is a negro. 



76 INTBOBUCTION. 



XI. PREFIXES. 

§ 222. When a prefix ends with a different letter from that 
with which the radical part of the word begins, the combination 
thus formed should be written continuously, as one unbroken 
word ; as in contradict, pretenuUural, tubstantial, transaction. 

Note.— The prefixes ex and vice are sometimes followed by a hyphen, 
as in ex'preHdent, vice-legate^ vice-preHdent ; bat vic^erent, vic^erencpt 
viceroy, viceroyai, vicercyaUy, follow the rule. 

$ 223. When a prefix ends with a Towel, and the radical 
word with which it is combined begins with a vowel, the hyphen 
is used between them to denote that both vowels are pronoimced 
separately ; as in co^qpercOe, fore-ordain, pr&'Occupy, re^instate, 

NoTR. — Instead of the hyphen between the a4}aeeiit rowels, in saoh 
cases, many printers and authors use a diaeresis orer the second vowel. 
The prefixes H and tri are exempted from the operation of this rule ; as 
in biennial, triune, 

i 224. When a dissyllabic prefix ends with the same con- 
sonant as that with which the radical part of a word of several 
syllables begins, it is followed by a hyphen ; as in counter- 
revolution, inter-racUal, The hyphen is also used after prefixes 
of rare occurrence ending with a vowel, . even when the radical 
word begins with a consonant; 9a, dectrthmagneUo, cmtro-Uneat, 
muco80'8acoharine. 



Xn. SYLLABICATION. 



i 225. A syllable, in the spoken language, has already (§ 60) 
been defined to be an elementary sound or a combination of 
elementary sounds uttered by a single impulse of the voice. A 
syllable, in the written language, is a letter or a combination of 
letters representing a syllable in the spoken language. 

i 226. Syllabication, in writing and printing, is the art of 
arranging the letters of words in groups corresponding to the 
Natural divisions of the spoken words caused by the action of the 
organs of speech. A practical acquaintance with this subject is 



INTRODUCTION. ^ 77 

yery necessary, in order to be able to divide words correctly at 
the end of a line, when, from want of space, one or more syllables 
must be carried over to the beg^inning of the next line. The fol- 
lowing rules are observed, in this case, by the best writers ; and 
they are also generally observed, in this work, in dividing words 
into syllables for the purpose of exhibiting their exact pronunda* 
tion. — See Note F, p. 79. 

Kules for Byllabioation. 

{ 227. (1.) Compound words should be separated, at the 

end of a line, into the simple words which compose them ; ai^, 

apple-tree (not ap-pU'tree), no'hody (not nobod-y), tohot'ever (not 

whatev-er), 

> 

$ 228. (2.) Prefixes, suffixes, and grammatical terminations 
should be separated from the radical words to which they be- 
long, whenever this can be done without misrepresenting the 
pronunciation ; as in Jra^M-mit, lead-ar, rend-»n^ (not <ni»-smit, 
lea-der, Tea-ding), 

Note. — The application of this mle freqnently enables ns to dls- 
tinguiBh words of like spelling but of unlike pronunciation and mean- 
ing; as, re-petition (to petition again) and rq^-etitian (iteration); Ifteas-ed 
{adjective) and blessed (past tense and past participle of <*« verb to 
bless) ; hind-er (in the rear) and hin-<ler (to retard). 

In ordinary writing and printing, whoi a suffix or a grammatical termi- 
nation beginning with a vowel follows a single consonant preceded by a 
single vowel having its long sound, the consonant is attached to the suflSx 
or termination, in order that the preceding vowel may not seem to have 
its short sound ;' as in fra-mer, gra-€e«/, ta-Aref A, vi-ny, wtL-ging^ advisory. 
In some pronouncing dictionaries, however, which indicate the various 
sounds of ^e vowels and consonants by means of diacritical marks, the 
suffix is generally separated from the consonant, in order that the root of 
the word may be more clearly presented to the eye. 

When a suffix or a grammatical termination beginning with a vowel is 
added to a word <^ one syllable ending with a single consonant preceded 
by a sing-le vowel (as glad, plan), or to a word of more than one syllable, 
endin;; in the same manner, and accented on the last syllable (as aUot', 
begin'), that consonant is doubled according to § 176, and the latter of the 
two consonants must be joined to the suffix or the termination; as in 
g\ad-der, gl&d-dest, plan-n€r, plan-ne«f, plan-ne^A, allot-ted, begin-ntn^/.— 
See Bule 4, § 230. 

§ 229. (3.) Two vowels coming together, and neither form- 
ing a digraph nor representing a compound vowel sound (See § 6), 

7* 



78 INTRODUCTION. 

mint be diyided into leparMe syUablep; «9 in t^-^urta, euri-o$ify, 

{ 230. (4.) When two or more cpneonantay capable of begin- 
ning a Bjll^blet come between two vowels of which the first 19 
long, they are joined to the second (as in £&-&&, tn-fle^ ho-stride), 
unless the second vowel begins a suffix, when they are joined to 
the first Towel (as in wai^-ed, wai^-ing). (See Rule 2.) lYheii 
the consonants are not capable of beginning a syllable, or when 
the yowel preceding them is short, the first consonant must 
be joined to the former vowel ; as in a»-^lt ban-ner, cam-6ric» 
fer-file, oc-tove, sym-iol ; pe<-rify, 6a<;-rament, min-«6%L 

§ 231. (5.) When a single consonant or a consonant digraph 
occurs between two vowels, the first of which is under the accent, 
it is joined to the former vowel, if that is short, as in h&&'-it, 
prqpA'-et, viv'-id, £p''-id6m'-ic, except when the consonant and 
the following vowel have together the sound of ^h in shall (No. 
. 37, § 46), or of 2 in azure (No. 38, § 47), as in of-f I'cial, vi'^'on. 
(See § 234, Rule 8.) If the former vowel is not short, and is un- 
der the accent, the consonant or digraph is joined to the latter 
vowel ; as in fa'^Aer, fB'ver, vi'fel, h6'/y, da'^. 

Note. —In all the cases embraced by this role, the siiigle consonant or 
the oonsooant digraph between two vowels has the effect described in § 66. 

§ 232. (6.) When a single consonant or a consonant digraph 

occurs between two vOwels, the second of which is under the 

accent, the consonant or digraph is joined to that vowel ; as in 

a-nde', be-neath', de-ceive', epi-dem'ic, e-jiAem'eral. 

Exception.— The letter «, so 8itaated,is Joined to the fbrmer rowel 
(as in lux^'rirOUB)^ both to keep the vowel in its short sound, and because 
this consonant, when initial, always' represents the sound of « in zeai.-' 
See $40. 

§ 233. (7.) When a single consonant occurs between two 

vowels not under the accent, it is joined to the latter ;. as in 

ni'ce-<y, mem'o-ry, mod'^i-^i-ca'tion. 

Exceptions.— If the latter vowel begins a termination, the consonant 
is Joined to the preceding vowel ; as in rig'or-ous. (See Rule 2, § 228.) 
When the vowel e succeeds an accented syllable, and is followed by the 
single consonant r, these two letters are Joined in the same syllable ; as ixi 
lit'er-al, gen'er-al, mis'er-y, Ac. These words, as Walker remarks, « can 
never be pronounced litrs-rai, gen-e-ral, mis-e-ry, 4«., without the appear- 
ipce of aifeotatlon.'* 



{ 234. (8.) The tenninations eean^ eia$^ eial^ tiaif c§ou$^ ei&ua, 
ffeouB, tious, sion, turn, and others of simUgr formation, must not 
be dirlded ; as in the words o-c^an, physi-mon, sO'Oialf par-^to/^ ' 
preda-ceou«, gra-c»ou«, coura-^«otM, ambi-^unu, man-fion, nA-tiofi, 

§ 236 • (9.) Some words cannot he so divided, at the end of # 
line, as nnequivocallj to show their true pronunciation; as,actd^ 
doeile, htrinfft mtry, paring^ regiwUr, It is, therefore, desirable to 
avoid the division of such words. 

§ 236. (10.) .The letters which form a syllable must oeveri 
from want of space, be sepacatod ftt the end of a line. 

• 

KOTB F.— As the word 9yUable (Gr. nXXaffii^ from o^v, with, togeOier, 
and Xait^dyo), to take) literally means only a coUeetion, it is not neoessarily 
restrieted dther to a combinatton of sounds produced by a single impulse 
of the voice, or to the collection of letters by which such a eomblnation of 
sounds is represented. SyUaUcation may, therefore, be a very different 
operation, according^ to the different ends proposed by it. In spellingf- 
books, in which the sound of words forms a main otiject of attention, the 
division into syllables Is intended to represent the true pronunciation as 
accurately as possible, no regard being paid to the derivation or mode of 
composition. Etymological syllabication is a different operation ; it Is a 
division of words into such parts as serve to show their origin and pri- 
mary meaning ; as, ortho-grt^hyy theo-logy^ Ac In the division of worda 
at the end of a line, the etymological principle of syllabication is gen- 
erally allowed to prevail over the orthoSpical, unless the pronunciation 
is misrepresented by it. The rules generally adopted, in this case, by 
American writers and printers, are those given above ; and it will be 
observed that, in every instance in which an etymological division would 
corrupt or obscure the pronunciation, the ortho^pical mode prevails over 
It. In Bnglish practice, however, the etymological principle is followed 
to a somewhat greater extent than in the United States, derivative words 
being resolved into their primitives (as apostrophey caml-^porotis), and a 
single consonant or a osnsonant digraph between two vowels being Joined 
to the latter (as ba-2anoe, le-«el, spi-rit, pro-pftet, sy-nod, mo-no-po-^). 
The letter x^ however, and single consonants belonging to the former i>art 
of a compound or derivative word, are exempted from tiie operation of 
the latter role (as ea;-lBt, up-on, dis-arm). 



80 EXPLANATIONS. 



EXPLAJ^ATIONS. » 

In addition to what appears in the Table of Elementary Soande (p. 12) 
and in the key-line at the bottom of each page of the Vocabularyi the fol- 
lowing^ explanationB will be needed for nnderstanding the notation made 
nae of in this Manual :— 

Words are not respelled for pronunciation exo^ when the sound of a 
letter or of letters in the ordinary orthography is liable to be mistaken for 
some other sound ; and often, when such a case occurs, the single syllable 
only which presents the difficulty is respelled. 

As e final Is, in most cases, silent, and usually haa the effect, when fol- 
lowing a single consonant, to lengthen the vowel that precedes it, as in 
alct glebe, site, tone, tune, words and syllables in which a silent e final fol- 
lows a single consonant and a single vowel are not generally marked nor 
respelled for pronunciation, except when the rowel that precedes the con- 
.sonant is short. 

When one letter of a vowel digraph is marked, it is to be considered as 
representing the sound of that digraph, and the other letter is to be 
regarded as silent ; as in gain, d&y, plAid, fyHiad, die, Heve, b6tol, fSur, 
door, dlle, feod. No mark is used for the digraph ee for the reason that 
its sound is almost invariably that of long e. 

The combined letters ou and ow, when unmarked, and when the word 
in which they occur is not respelled, are sounded as in our, now. 

As it is a general rule of the language that the vowels a, e, i, o, «, 9 
have their long sound at the end of an accented syllable, as in fa'tai, 
lefgal, Won, to'tal, tu'tor, ty'rant, and their short sound when followed 
by a consonant in the same syllable, as in an' tic, hel'met,fin'ish,f^oVic, 
mtts'ket, mya'tic, they are not generally marked in either of these situ- 
ations, except in cases that do not conform to the rule. 

The letter c is hard, or has the sound of k, before a, o, u, I, and r, and 
also before t when final ; as in cap, coldy cup, cloak, crag, act t it is hard at 
the end of a word, and also at the end of a syllable unless the next syl- 
lable begins with e, i, or y as in arc, hav^oc, sec^ond. It is soft, or has the 
sound of • before e, i, or y in the same syllable, ayd also at the end of a 
syllable, if the next syllable begins with any one of these letters, in which 
case it is represented by p; as in cent, cite, face, cy'preaa^ fan'cy, ap^id. 

The letter g is hard, or has the sound of g in go, before a, o, u, h, I, r, 
and 10 f it is hard also at the end of a word and at the end of a syllable, 
unless the next syllable begins with e, i, or y. It is soft, or has the sound 
of jf, before e, i, or y, unless the respelling indicates a difiierent sound. 

The letter q has always the sound of k, and it is always followed by u ; 
and these letters have together the sound of kw, as in quail (kwal), quit 
(kwit), except in some words firom the French in which the u is silent, as 
in pique (pek), co-quette' (ko-ket'). 

The letter x has the sound of ks, as in ttix, wax, except when the 
respelling indicates a difTerent sound. 

The digraph ph has generally the sound of/, as in phrase, seraph. The 
few words in which it has not this sound are respelled. 



EXPLANATIONS. 



81 



The syllable Hon is generally prononnoed ihun, as in na'Hon ; and the 
syllable sion has also the same sound, exoept when It Is preceded by a 
vowel, in which case It has the sound of zhun, as in e^va^gioitt ad^'Hon, 
de-ci'sian, es^plo'sion^, eon-/ii'»ion. 

The vowels «, i, and y, before r in a monosyllable or in an acoented sylla- 
ble, are sounded as in Aer, mer'cy, vir'tue, myr'tle. -^ See $ 21, Mote. 

The combined consonants ng are nsed, in the respellin^ of French 
words, to replace n or m, as a^mere sign of nasality in the preceding' vowel 
Bonnd. The French nasal vowel sounds differ from the sounds of the En- 
glish syllables Ung, dngy Ung, Ung, in being formed by allowing the voice 
to pass simultaneously through the nose and the mouth, and without any 
contact of the tongue and the soft palate. 

Words from foreign languages, often nsed in English, but not thor- 
oughly Anglicized, as Ennuij Verhatimy are printed in Italics. 

Spaced Roman letters are used, within brackets, to distinguish 
modes of spelling that are not so generally prevalent or so well authorized 
as the other form given in the Vocabulary, but which are sanctioned or 
recorded as modem by one or more of the eminent lexicographers whose 
names are given below in the list of abbreviations. (See Abridgement.) 
A few words, in regard to which there may be a doubt whether one or 
the other of two modes of spelling them is the more common or the 
better authorized, are printed in both forms, — in spaced letters within 
brackets, as well as in dose type without brackets. (See Apophthegm and 
Apothegm.) 

A heavy hyphen ( • ) is nsed to distinguish such compound words as 
should have their parts connected by a hyphen in ordinary writing and 
printing ; as,to-niorroir. Such derivative words as have prefixes that are 
commonly Joined to the primitive by a hyphen are distinguished in the 
same way j as, co*opera^e. 

The exhibition of authorities for the different pronunciations of a word 
applies to all the derivative or related words, unless some intimation is 
given to the contrary. 

The figures which follow words in the Vocabulary refer to correspond- 
ing sections in the IntroductlOB. 



ABBREVIATIONS. 



a. .... adjective. 
adv. . . . adverb. 
colL . . . colloquial. 
conj, . . ..conjunction. 
Eiig, • • . English or 
England. 
Exc, . • . exception. 
fbn. . . . feminine. 

int inteijection. 

ma8. ... masculine, 
n. • . . .noun. 



^. . . . . note. 
part. . . participle. 
pi. ... plural. 
prep. . . preposition. 
pron, . . pronoun. 
Rem. . . . Remark, 
r. .... verb. 

Ar. . . . Arabic. 
Fr. . . . French^ 
Oer. . . . German. 



Gr Greek. 

Heb Hebrew. 

It Italian. 

L Latin. 

Sp Spanish. 

Od Goodrich. 

Sm Smart. 

Wh Webster. 

Wk Walker. 

Wr Worcester. 



MANUAL. 



OV 



ENGLISH PRONUNCIATION 



AHD 



SPELLING. 



AABOinC 

Aa<ron'ic (a-ron'ik)tl€9. 
Aa-ron'ic-al, 106, 171. 
Al/a-ca, 72. 
Ab'a-cist. 

Ab'a-cas, 105, 170. 
A-baft', 12, 131. 
Ab-al'ien-ate (-aPpm-)- 
Ab-al'ien-at-ed, 1^,228. 
Ab-al'ien-at-ing. 
Ab-al-ien-a'tion, 40, 112. 
A-ban'don, 86. 
A-ban'doaed (-dund)f 
A-ban-don-ee', 122. [166. 
A-ban'don-er, 77. 
A-ban'don-ing. 
A-ban'don-ment. 
Ab'a-net, 170. 
Ab-ar-tic-u-la'tion, 112. 
' A-base', 23. 
A-based' (-&a«0> l^ote 

C, p. 34. 
A-base'meiKt. * 

A-bash', 10. 
A-bash'xnent. 
A-bas'ing, 183. 
A-bat'a-ble, 164, 183. 
A-bateS 23. 
A-bat'ed, 183. 
A-bate'naent. 
A-bat'er, n. one who 

abates. {See Abator, 

160.1 
A-baving. 
Abatis (Fr.) (€a>'a-4is or 

ab-a-U', 154} (161), ». 

a kind of intreuch- 

ment. 



ABHOBBEKCB 



A-ba'tUri61),j».anoa- 

oer of the atablea. 
AVa-tised i-ttz€^, 
A-bat'or, n* one who 

abates. [Law term. 

jSise Abater. 160.] 
Abattoir (Fr.) (^aihth 

twor'). 
Abb, 31, 175. 
Ab'ha (Heb.), 66, 72. 
AbniNM^Y, 109, 170. 
Ab-ba'tUd C-ba'shal)^ 46. 
Ab-bat'ic-ai. 
AbM (Fr.) (ofr'M). 
Ab'bess. 
Ab'bey, 98. 
Ab'bot,66,86. 
Ab'bot-shtp. 
Ab-bre'vi-ate. 
Ab-bre'vi-at-ed, 183. 
Ab-bre-vi-a'tioa. 
Ab-bre'vJ-at-or, 88. 
Ab-bre'vl-a-to-ry, 86. 
Ab-bre'vi-a-ture. 
Ab'dals (-daZ2r),NoteC, 
Ab'de-rite, 106. [p. 34. 
Ab'dest. 
Ab'di-oant. 
Ab'dl-cate, 73. 
Ab'dl-cat-ed, 183. 
Ab'di-cat-ingf. 
Ab-di-ca'tion, 112. 
Ab'di-cat-Ive [so Wk. 

Sm. Wr. ', ah'di-ka4iv 

or ab-diVa^iv, Gd. 

1651. 
AVjH^-to-ry, 86. 
AlMo'mcn [so Wk. 



Bm. Wr.; ab-doft 
or ab'tk^-mftiu Gd. 
155]. 

Ab-dom'in-al, 228. 

Ab-dom-in-OB'oo-p7. 

Ab-dom'in-o&s. 

Ab-duoe', 26, 103. 

Ab-duoed'(-a«<f ), Note 

Ab-da'cent. [(^,p. 34. 

Ab-du'dng. 

Ab-dact', 22, 103. 

Ab-duo'tion. 

Ab-duet'or (L.). 

A-bdar'anoe. 14, 160. 

1-be-oe-da'ri-an, 49, I^. 

i-be-oe'da-ry, 72. 

A-bed', 16. 

A-bGle'. 

A-bePian (-UVyan), 61. 

An)el-ite, 83, 162. 

A-bel-o'ni-an. 

A'bel-mosk. 

A-ber'de-ylne, 21, K. 

Ab-^r'ranoe, 170. 

Ab-^r'ran-oy, 160. 

Ab-€r'rant. 

Ab-er-ra'tion, 112. 

Ab-e-mn'cat-or(-n»iM^}, 

A-bet', 16, 103. [H. 

A-bet'tal, 176. 

A-bet'ted. 

A-bet'tinsr. 

A-bet'tor, 88, 160. 

A-bey'anoe (-^Want). 

A-bey'ant(-fto'-),23, 160. 

Abhor', 17, 136. 

Abhorred', 165, 176. 

Ab-hdr'rence, 160. 



a, c, 1, o, u, 9, lonff ; K, ^, Y, 5, tt, jf, short ; a a« <n far, k<is in fast, & a« {9 
fiill; ^asin there \<Sbasin foot \qasin fiidle ; gh cm g in go ; th a« in this. 

(«3) 



AimORRKNCir 

Ab-MKren-or, M. 
Ab-hor'KT. 
Ab-bar'H-ble, 4S, IM. 

Ab-hor'rins, 170. 
A-Wd'uioe, 183. 

A bidtf, a. 
A-bld'Se. 

A-bl'e-tliw, l«i. 

AVi-EvlLTD, 170. 
A-bin-ty, ■(«,]». 

Ab-Ia-tee'tale. 
Ab-ir-ri-u'tlon. 

Ab; mP, p. lOS.' 



Ab-lae-ulloii, 112, 
Ab-tt-quE-ii'Uon [m 
Wk. Wr.i ofc-ioi-Kf- 
<1'->»U», Sm.Wb.Gd., 

AMa'tton. 

Ab-ls-tlve (M) rmrf «b'- 

i-Mv, isa, isaj. 

A-blu*', 29. 
A'ble, IM. 
Ab'l«p-aj, 199. 
Ab'lUH>nt, sa, lOS. 
Ab-lu'tioQ, 112. 
Ab-la'tlon-«-i7, 72, 171. 

A'bly, B3. 
Ab'iie-e»te. 
Ab'ne-^t-ed, 183. 
Ab'ue-eat-lnc;. 

■a'tlon, lia. 



Ab-norm'»l. 
Ab-norm'l-tT, 108. 
A-baard', 24. 
A-bode', Z*. 
A-bol'lah,(W,lM, IJO. 
A-bal')eh-a-ble, IM. 
A-bal'lahed(-f>At),Note 
A-bol'lBh*r. [C,- - 



84 

. . -alC-r^O- 

J^o-Hir'<iK» (L. pi 

iHj'i-ntt). 
A^r'tiDn, 112. 
A-bor'tTre, M. 
A*ound', 28. 
A-boiind'ed, 22S. 

A-boyQ'\a-ime'),Zi, 18 
Jb-r»-ca-ilab'rB,7a, IH 
A-brade', 23. 
A-briid'ed, 183. 

■■-Ok 



.-braiiiuii-it'l 

k-brwi'cbl-ui 



(-ro'ifcunl. 



A-brldgr.'(-ftr«'),1fl,4B. 

A-bridjf'JDff. ' 
A-bride'nteut (I7i, iss) 
[Abrrdg;emei.t,aOSJ. 
gs- The pKnlUjiii amti 



ro-Bnt-«d, 183. 
ro-ffit-jng. 



AVHWaafoCtwi), 162. 
Ab-eclad'l-tfrui'], l«f. 
Ab'adaar->i» ipl.ab'- 

jictM-n], 171. 
^6-iid«'«o (L.) (n6- 



ABSTBACTLT 
tiii'a) [pi. Ab-teit'ia, 
Lb-uia'alon (-liiJt'un), 



AD-aein-«e', i:^ 
Ab-aent-ee'lam l-lrm), 
Ab-aent'er, 77. [133. 
Ab-eenl'lng:. 
Ab'BlDtlw r~Hnth). 
Ab-ain'thl-an, ITO. 
Ab-BlD'thl4t«d. 
Ab-aln'thTne, m, 171. 
Ab'BO-lDte, lOS. 
Ab-ao-lu'tioD, 112. 
Ab'aa-lut-lBin (inn). 
AbiBO-lut-lat, l«e. 

lo-lu-to-rv in ab-$oP- 
u-io^nft ud. ISA]. 

Ab-Bol?'a-Ui-ry,ta, 171. 

Ab-Bo1ve'<-soJG'),W. 

Ab-aolved { -xolm'). 

Ab-BOliF'lna (zolB'ing), 

Ab-BOrb', 17, 103. [m. 

Ab-aorb-a-bil'l-ty, 108. 

Ab-BOrb'n-ble, IM, IW. 

At^iorbed' lab^tnidn, 

Ab-aarb'nit. [16&. 

Ab-BorWIn^. 

Ab-at^', m' lOa. 
Ab-Btilncd', IfiS. 

Ab-Btc'ml^a, 171. 
Ab-aterge' 21,K.jia(. 
Ab-Blergod', 165. 
Ab-ater^gent, 183,171. 
Ab-Bl«r'glag, 183. 

Ab-a«er'8lTe,'8*. 
Ab-atl-ncnce, 171, 

Ab-atniot'.B. 1<«,1«. 
Ab'BtrBCt, a. & K. 103, 
Ali-atnct'ed. [101. 



Ab-Blrsctlve, * 



Wr. V^6. G 



ABSTBACTNESS 



85 



ACCOUlhlNO 



ttraia'ly, Wk. Sm. 

1551. 
AVBaract-nesB, 106. 
Ab-Btruse' {alhstroo8')t 

19, 121. 
Ab-BurdS 21, 121. 
Ab-snrd'i-ty, lfl9, 171. 
A-bun'dance, 160, 230. 
A-bun'dant, 160. 
A-buse' (-btus')t v. 136, 

101. 
A-buBe', n. 161. 
Abused' (-hazd'), 183. 
A-bitB'er (-iHiz'-). 
A-bus'ingr (-MLs'-). 
A-ba'Blve, 8i. 
A-but', 22. 
A-bnt'ment. 
A-but'tal, 176. 
A-but'ted, 171. 
A-but'ter. 
A-but'tlnff. 
A-byBB'j 16, 171. 
Ab-yg-Bm'l-an, 171. 
A-ca^ci-a (L.) (-to'«ft1-), 

46. 
A-ea'dan (-ka'shan), 46. 
A<ya-dem'ic, 52, 109. 
Ac-a-dem'ic-al, 106. 
Ao-a-de-m)'cian (-misA'- 

an), 171. 
A-cad'e-my [so Sm.Wr. 

Wb. Gd. ; a-kad'e-my 

or aVa-dein-y, Wk. 

1551. 
Ao-a-le'phan, 35, 122. 
A-cal-y'dne, 82, 152. 
Ao-a-lyc'i-noOs, 39, 171. 
Ao-a-na'oeons (-^Atu), 
A-can'tha, 72. ril2. 
A-can-tha'oeofiB(-«AtM), 

112, 160. 
A-can'thlne, 82, 152. 
A-can-tho-ceph'a-lan, 

35, 116. 
A-«an'tho-pod. 
A-can-thop-te-ryg/i-olls 

(-rv'l-tw), 116, 171. 
A-can'th%u (L.). 
A-car'di-ac, 106. 
A-c&r'i-dan, 160. 
A-car'pofiB. 
Ae'or^rua (L.) [pi. Ae'cb- 

W, 1081. 
A-cat-a-fec'tio, 109. 
A-cat'a-lep-BY, 160. 
A-cat-a-lep'tic, 109. 
A-cau-les'oait, 171. 
A-^au'Ilne, 82, 152. 
A-cau'lotts, 100. 
Ac-oede', 39, 169. 
Ao-oed'ed, 183. 
AcHsed'ing. 



Ae-eel'ei^ate, 171, 233. 

Ac-oeFer*At-ed. 

Ao-oel'ei-at-liig. 

Ao-oel-er-a'tl<Hi, 112. 

Ac-oel'er-at-Iye, 84, 106. 

Ac-cel'er^a-to-ry, 86,106. 

Ac-cend-ibil'i-ty, 106. 

Ac-erad'i-ble, 108, 104. 

Ac'oent. n. 103, 161. 

Ao-C9Dt', V. 103, 161. 

Ao-oent'ed. 

Ao-oent'ing'. 

Ac-oent'or, 88, 160. 

Ao-oent'a-al, 89. 

Ao-cent'a-ate, 73, 89. 

Ac-oent-u-a'tlon, 112. 

Ao-oept', 15, 103. 

Ac-cept-arbU'i-ty, 108, 
171. 

Ac-oept'a-ble (169) [so 
Sm. Wr. Wb. Gd. , 
aJk'«<^<-a-5/,Wk.l55]. 

Ac-oept'a-bly, 03. 

Ao-oept'anoe, 160. 

Ae-cept-a'tion, 112, 228. 

Ac-cept'ed. 

A<H^t'er, n. one who 
aooepts. [SeeAooeptr 
or, IflOl. 

Ac-oept'mg. 

Ac-oept'or, n, one who 
accepts a draft, Ac. 
[Law term.— See Ac- 
cepter, 1601. 

Ac-cesa/, or Ac'ceBsTso 
Wr. Gd.; akses'y Wk. 
Sm. 155]. 

Ao'oes-sarri-ly, 106. 

Ac'ces-sarry (72) f Ac- 
cessory, 203.] 

Ac-ces-si-bil'i-ty. 

Ao-oes'si-ble, 104, 171. 

Ac-ces'si-bly, 93. 

Ac-oes'gion, 112. 

Ao-oes'slon-al. 

Ac-tesslve, 84. 

Ao-ces-so'ri-al. 

Ao'oes-so-ri-ly. 

Ac'oes-so-ry (86) Ac- 
cessary, 203]. 

i^ ** Aeeemorjf elaimi a 
■light etymoloolMl prefer- 
enoe, but is 1«m tuiud.** 
Smart, 

Ac'ci-denoe, 105, 171. 
Ac'd-dent. 
Ac-d-dent'al, 228. 
Ao-cip'i-trlne, 82, 152. 
Ac-claim', 23, 52. 
Ac-cla-ma'tion (112). 
[See AocUmation,148.J 
Ao-elam'a-to-ry, 86. 
Ac-cli'mate, 122. 



Ao^U'mJ&t-ed, 183. 

Ao-cli'miit-in£f. 

Ac-cU-ma'tion. fiS^M Ac- 
clamation, 14N.J 

Ac-cli'ma-tizc, 202. 

Ac-cll'ma-tized, 166. 

Ao-cli'ma-tlz-lng, 183. 

Ac-clivM-ty, 108. 

Ao-cli'voOs. 

Ac-co-Iade', or Ac-eo- 
IMe' [so Wr. ; ak-o- 
lAd\ Wb. Gd. i ak-o- 
tudy Sm. 155]. 

Ac-oom'mo-date, ITOi 

Ac-com'mo-dat-ed. 

Ac-com'mo-dat-iny. 

Ao-com-mo-da'tion, 116. 

Ac-<»ro'mo-dat-1ve, 84. 

Ac-com'mo-dat-or, 88 

Ac-com'pa-nled l~nid)t 
171, 186. 

Ac-com'pa-nl-er(-lr«m' -) 

Ao-oomj)a-ni-ment 
(-i'um' ), 169. 

Ac-com'pa-ni8t( -Arum' ). 

Ac-com'pa-ny {-kumf-)^ 
171. 

Ac-com'pa-ny-lnff 
{-kumf). 

Ac-com'pUce, 160, 171. 

Ac-com'plish. 

Ac-com'plish-a-ble, 164. 

Ac-com'plished (-kom*- 
plisht), Note C, p. 34. 

Ac-com'plish-er. 

Ac-com'pliBh-ingf. 

Ac-com'pliBh-ment. 

Ac-cord', 17. 

Ac-cord'anoe, 169. 

Ac-cord'ant, 160. 

Ac-cord'ed. 

Ao-cord'ing. 

Ac-cord'i-on, 171. 

Ae-cdst', 18, Note. 

Ac-c5st'a-ble, 164. 

Ac-cdst'ed. 

Ac-o5st'ing. 

Accouchement (Ft.) ak- 

^ koosh'mong, 154). 

Ac-count', 28. 

Ac-count-a-bii'i-ty. 

Ac-count'a-bie, 164^ 171. 

Ao-count'ant. 

■^Sometimes ipelled 
Aecomptant when 
vted In a technical senie, 
u in the term AccoiupUnU' 
OenerfU^ an officer in the 
EngUah Court of Chance- 
ry. 

Ao-connt'-bdbk, 206, 
£xc. 4. 

Ac-Gount'ed. 

Ac-count'ing'. 



fidl ; a M <n there; C^aain foot j 9 a» in iadle ; gh a« g in go j th a« <fi tlilflu 

8 



AOCOUPLE 



86 



ACQUISE 



▲e-oottp'led (-jtvj/ld). 
Ac-co&p'le-ment {4etip'' 

l-foent). 
Ac-eoiiu'UngC-kup'ttng) 
▲o-oou'tre {ax-too'tur), 

(160, 171) [Accou- 

t e r preferred hj Wb. 

and Gd, — S€e Note 

£, p. 70.] 
Ao-ooa'tred (-terd), 183. 
Ac-cou'tre-ment (4so&- 

tur-). 
Ao-cou'tring(4»o'-),l88 
Ac-cred'it. 
Ac-cred'it-ed. 
Ae-cres'cenoe. 
Ac-cres'cent, 171. 
Ac-ore'tioiit 112. 
Ac-cre'tlve, 84. 
Ac-crue' (-kroo^)t •!• 
Ao-crued' (-jtrood'), 18S. 
Ac-oru'ing (-iroo'-). 
Ac-cn-ba'tion. 
Ao-cam'ben-cy. 
Ac-cum'bent, 160. 
Ac-ca'mu-late, 73. 
Ac-cn'mu-lat-ed. 
Ao-cu'mu-Ut-ing, 183. 
Ac-cu-mu-U'tioii, 112. 
Ae-cu'ma-Ut-Ive, 84. 
Ac-eu'mu-lat-or) 160. 
Xc'ou-ra-cy, 160, 171. 
Ac'cu-rate, 73, 80. 
Ac-eurse', 21, 103. 
Ac-cvrsed' (ab-ktir9tf)t 

Note C, p. 34. 
Ae^urs'iuff. 
Ac-cub's4)& (-kuz*-), 

164, 160. 
Ac-ou-sa'tioii (-«a'- 

shun), 112. 
Ac-cus'a-tlye (•l««'-)34. 
Ac-cus'a-to-rjr, (-k^z'-) 

86 
Ao-cuse' (-kite'), 26. 
Ac-cus'er {-kaz'er), 183. 
Ac-coB'ing (-kaz'ing). 
Ac-cus'tom, 86. 
Ac-cua'tom-a-ri-ly, 72, 

106. 
Ac-oas'tomm-ry, 72,160. 
Ac-cus'tomed (-«tM'- 

tumd), 166. 
Ac-cus'tom-ing. 
Ace, 23, 30. 

A-cel'da-ma (Heb.), 72. 
A-ceph'a-lan, 36. 
A-ccph'a-lofie, 36, 171. 
Ace'polnt, 206. 
A-cerb% 21, Note. 
A-cerb'i-t7, 78. 108, !«•. 



Ao-er^u' (888, Exe.) 
[BO Sm. Wr. ; aa'er- 
98, Wb. Gd. 165.] 

A9'ier-ofi8. 

A-eea'een-cy, 160, 171. 

A-oea'oent, 171. 

Af-e-ta'ri-oliB. 

A^'e-ta-ry, 72, 160. 

A9'e-tate, 171. 

A-cet'ic, or A-oe'tio [a- 
set'ik, 8m. Wr. ; a-uf- 
tik, Wb. Gd. 166.] 

A-oe1/i-fied, or A-oe'tl- 
f ied, 166. 

A-oet'I-f^, or A-ce'U4j, 
04 108. 

A-cet'i-fy-ing, or A-oe'- 
U-€y-ing. 

A9-e-tim'e-ter, 160. 

Aj5-e-tiin'e4a'y. 

A9'e-tone, 169. 

Ac-e-tose'. 

A-ce'tous, 171. 

A-chat'aa (a-k^an) (62) 
(Acheaa, Wb. Gd. 

A-dia'ian (a-ka^pan), 
62, 61. 

Ache (ak), 52, 171. 

Ached {akt), Noto C, p. 
34 

Aefa'ing iMkfinff), 188. 

A-che'ni-ujii {a-kdnir 
wn), 160. 

Ach'e-ron (akfe-ron). 

A-chiev'a-ble, 160, 183. 

A-chieVe', 13, 171. 

A-obieved', 160. 

A-«hieve'ment, 186. 

A-chiev'er. 

A-chiey'ing, 188. 

Ach'ing {Hkfing), 188. 

A'chor {a'kor), [See 
Acre, 148.1 

Ach-ro-mat^c (a*-ro-), 
or A-chro-mat'ic*(a'- 
kro-) (171) lak-ro- 
tnat'ik, Wr. Gd.j «- 
kro-mat'ik, 8m. 165.] 

Ach-ro'ma-ti8m(aik-ro'- 
ma4izm), or J-chro'- 
ma-tism {d-kro'ma- 
tizm) [ak-ro'martizm, 
Gd. ; a-kro'ma4izm, 
Sm. Wr. 166.] 

Ach-ro'ma-tixe (tik-n^-) 
or l-chro'ma-tixe (<- 
kro'-), 202. 

A-cic'u-Iar, 80, 108, 171. 

A-cic'a-late, 73, 80. 

A-dc'a-li-form. 

Aq'iiA, .%», 171, 236. 

Af-id-ifer-ottB, 108. 



A^d'l-n-a-We, UO. 
A-cid-i-fi-ca'tioii. 
A-cid'i-Hed, 171. 
A-cid'i-fi-er. 
A-cidM-^, 04, 106. 
A-cid'i-fyinff. 
A9-id-im'e>ter, 169. 
A94d-im'e-try, 170. 
A-cid'i-ly, 171. 
A-cid'u-lote, 73, 80. 
A-cid'u-lat-ed. 
A-cld'u-IaA-ing'. 
A<Gid-u4a'tion, 112. 
A-cid'u-lous, 80, 106. 
A9'i-form, 160. 
A9-i-na'ceoft8 (-fia'altol) 

112, 100. 
A94-na9'i-form, 171. 
A-cin'i-1'orm, 160. 
Ac-i-no8e' [so Wr. ; as^^ 

i-n0«, Sm. Wb. Gd. 

165.] 
A9'i-nofi8. 
Ao-k]idwl'edge(^nal'^, 

171. [OVI)r 

Ac-kn6wl'edged (-lior- 
Ac-kii5vl'edg-er. 
Ac-kndwi'edg-hig'. 
Ao-kn6wl'edg-menft 

(171, 186). ^S«« 

Abridgment.] 
Ao'me, liS3. 
A-col'o-gT, 108. 
A-ool'o-thist. 
Ac'o-lyte. 
Ac'o-l^th, 170. 
A-coB-dy-lofle'. 
A-c<MiMy-ioii8. 
Ac'o-nite, 83, 162. 
A'oom. 
A'conued, 160. 
A-co-tyl-e'don, 122. 
A-co-tyl-e'don-ottB fs* 

Sm. Wb. Gd. ; A-cifU 

y-led'o-nus, Wr.,165.] 
A-cou'chy {ct-koo'chp). 
A-coiis'tic, 28, 100. 
A-eouB'ticB, 28, 109. 
Ac-qaaint', 34, 171. 
Ac-qnaiat'aBce, 169. 
Ao-quaint'ed. 
Ac-quaint'ing. 
Ae-quest', 34. 
Ao-qui-esoe' (oJk-tpY-et'), 

162, 163, 171. 
Ac-qui-eseed' (-«»<')> 

Note C, p. 34. 
Ac-qui-eB'oenoe, 171. 
Ac-qui-es'oent. 
Ao-qul-ea'cine'. 
Ao-quir-a-bill-tr. 
Ao-quir'a-ble, 154. 
Ac-quire', 25. 



Ititit^Utfthngi ft»<t]««,tt»f»«Aorti li <» in Ikr, a oi in fiut, a <» in 



ACatTIBEV 



87 



ADHERING 



Ao-quired', 100; 
Ac-quire'ment. 
Ao-quir'er, 77, W9, 
Ao-quir'in^. 
Ac-qui-si'tion (oJ^ioV- 

zish'un), 171. 
Ao-quia'i-tlve {bwiz*^-)j 

108, 171. 
Ac-quis'i-tlye-nesB {ae- 

Jewish-), 
Ac-quit', 16, 34. 
Ac-quit'tal, 176. 
Ac-quit'tance. 
Ac-quit'ted. 
Ac-quit'tdng. 
Ac'ra-sy cm) [so Wr. 

Wb. Gd.j a'crthWt 

Sm. 155.1 
A'cre (a'kur) (164, 171). 

t5ec Achor, 148.] 
A'cre-age (a'kur-). 
A'cred (a'itttrd), 166,183. 
Ac'rid, 10. 

Ao-ri-mo'ni-ofiB, 171. 
Ac'rl-mo-ny, 86, 93, 171. 
A-crit'io-al. 
Ac'ri-tude, 169. 
Ac-ro-a-mat'ic, 109. 
Ac-ro-a-maf io-ai, 106. 
Ac-ro-a-mat'i<». 
Ac-ro-at'io. 
Ac-rO-at'ics. 
Ac'ro bat [so Gd. j Ao- 

robate,Wr. 203.] 
Ac-ro-ce-rau'i»l-«n, 171. 
Ac'ro-gen. 

Ac-ro^'e-nottB (-rq;'-). 
Ac'ro-iith. 
A-cnrf'Ith-an. 
A-cro'mi^al. 
A-ero'mi-on, 1(K>. 
A-cron'ic. 
A-oron'y-«al [Acronl- 

cal,203.] 
A-cron'y-cal-ly, 93^ 
A-crop'o-lis, 170. 
Ao'ro-spire. 
Ac'rb-Bpired, 165. 
A-cr58s', 18, Note. 
A-croB'tic, 109, 171. 
A-cros'tie-al. 
Ao-ro-te'ri-wii (L.) [pi. 

M^o-ii^rihdj 198.] 
Act, 10, 52. 
Act'ed. 
Ats'ti-an. 
ActMng-. 
Ac-tin'p<t (Jj.) [pi. Ac- 

tin'i-cei 198.] 
Ac-tin'i-form, 169. 
Ac-tln'ic. 

Ac'tin-ism (-izm), 133. 
Ac-tin'o-gfraph, 127. 



Ao-tlii'o-lite. 
Ao-tin-o-ltt'lo. 
Ao-tin-oPo-gy. 
Ac-tin -om'e-tcr, 106. 
Ae'tion, 10, 46. 
Ac'tion-a-ble, 164. 
Ac'tion-»-bly, 93. 
Ac'tion-a-ry, 758. 
Ac'tioa-ist. 
Act'Ive. 84. 
Ao-tiv'i-tT. 
Act'or, 88, 169. 
Act'ress, 228. 
Act'u-al, 89. 
Aot-u-al'i-ty, 169. 
Act'u-al-ize, 202. 
Act'u-al-ly, 93. 
Act'u-a-ry, 72. 
Act'umte, 73, 89. 
Act'u-at-ed, 1^ 
Act'a-at-ing. 
A-cu'le-ate. 
A-cu'le-at-ed. 
A-eu'le-otlB. 
A-eu'men, 113, 125. 
A-cu'min-ate, 171. 
A-ca' min-at-ed. 
A-cn'mln-alr-iiig. 
A-cu-mln-a'tioii. 
A-ca'min-o&B^ 
Ac-u-punct-u-n'tloii, 

112, lie. 
Ac-u-pimcf nre, 91. 
A-cute', 26. 
A-dac'tyl. 
Ad'age, 169. 
Ad'a-mant, 171. 
Ad-a-mant-e'an, 110. 
Ad-a-mantlne, 84, 152, 

171, 
Ad-am'ic, 109. 
Ad'am-ite, 152. 
Ad-am if io, 109. 
Ad^am's-Ap'ple, 213. 
A-dapt', 10, 103. 
A^iapt-»-bll'i-ty, 108. 
A-dapt'a-ble, 164, 169. 
Ad'-apt-a'tion, 112. 
A-dapt'ed. 
A-dapt'er, 169. 
A-dapt'ing. 
A-dapfYve, 84. 
Add, 10, 175. 
Ad-den'dum (L.) [pi. 

Ad-den'dat 106.1 
Ad'der, flfli, 170. 
Ad-di-bil'i-ty. 
Ad'dible, 164, 169. 
Addict', 16, 103. 
Ad-dlct'ed. 
Ad-dic'tion. 
Add'ing, 228. 
Ad-dit'a-ment; 1(19. 



Ad-di'tion (-dUh'un), 

112, 171, 231. 
Ad-di'tion-al (-dish'unr) 
Ad'dlc, 164. 
Ad'dle-hC'ad'ed, 205, 

£xc. 5, 
Ad'dling.230. 
Ad-^refla', n. A v, 
Atl-dreBsed' (-drett')f 

165, Note C, p. 34. 
Ad-drees'er, 77, 109. 
Ad-dress'ing. 
Ad-duce'. 26, 103. 
Ad-duced' (-dfM')* ^ote 

C, p. 34. 
Ad-du'cent. 
Ad-du'oer. 
Ad-du'ci-ble, 164. 
Ad-du'cing. 
Ad-duc'tion. 
Ad-diic'tlve, 84. 
Ad-duc'tor. 88, 169. 
A-del'o-pod, 105. 
A-demp'tion. 
Ad-e-nog'ra-phy, 106. 
Ad'e-noid. 
Ad-e-no-log'io-al 

(-to/-). 
Ad-e-nol'o-gy , 108. 

Ad-e-no-pIivi'lotiB, or 
Ad-e-noph^yHottB [bo 
Wr.] 

ly lexfcographer, except 
Knowlet, who is uniform 
In his mode of pronouii<y 
iBf word* that end in pJtyl' 
Unt9. Knowlea pl'ices tne 
accent on the antepenult. 
Of the faurtem words of 
ttifa claM found in Smart's 
Dictionary, six are accent- 
ed on the antepenult, and 
eight on the penult. Of 
the sevMiteea round in the 
last edition of Wehster^s 
Dictionaty, edited by 
Goodrich, fifteen have the 
accent on the antepenult, 
and ttoo, which are added 
In the Appendix, on the 
penult. 

Ad-e-ndse' [bo "Wr. ; 
ad'e-nOSy Sm. Grd.155.] 
Ad'e-nofis. 
Ad-e-not'o-my, 106. 
A-dept', 15, 232. 
Ad'e-qua-cy, 169, 171. 
Ad'e-quate, 73. 
Ad-en-se-na'ri-aii, 49, IT. 
Ad-here', 13, 103. 
Ad-hered', 165, 183. 
Ad-her'ence, 169, 183. 
Ad-her'ent, 169. 
Ad-hCr'er. 
Ad-her'ing, 183. 



falli d^a» ih^ihiatid'i d&arjf^dof ; 9 orfn flMito; ghttf g <» go ; th otf in thift 



ADVENTUAL 



Ad-he'ilon (-At'ikun), 



Ad-minlatra'trlx. 

Ad-ml-ra-bfl'i-ly. 
■ •■ il-r»-blB, list, 1 



Ad'mi-nl-lr, IM, 1 



^d-mTr'lqg. 
.d-mla-Bllill'l-ty, 170. 

^d-mlB'el-bly', 93. 

,d mla'dDD (-RitJk'un), 

id-ioli'K-ry, ««, 93. 

Ad-mtt'tance, I7fl. 
Ad-mlt'ted. 
Ad-mit'ter. 
Ad mit'tln^. 
Ad-mlic', IB, 103. 
Admixed' (ad-mixt'i. 
Note C, p. 34. 

Ad-mix'tlon ind-mOit'- 
cAun), 44, Kote 1. 



lo-ni'tlaii 'i-nUli'- 



l-raon'i-to-iy, 8fl, t 
l-mor-tl-u'flOD. 



A-do' t.a-doo'), 19. 



|)t', IS, 103. 

. A^dopl'ed. 

I A-dopt'lng:. 



A-duD'coDa ((Hfnnjf'- 

A-dust', St. 
A-duit'ion (-yun), Kl. 



'taped, ISO. 1 

is, 1^ 171. ' 
-KBo'ta-ring. 

Wl03.' 

f'tiona (-ti 



i. i, i, a, u, f, long } ft, «, I, it, B, }, akort ; i 



ADVEKTURE 



89 



AFFIXTURE 



Ad-rent/ure, 01. 
Ad-vent'ured, 165. 
Ad-vent'ure-ful (-/o60i 

180. 
Ad-vent'ur-er, 91, 183. 
Ad-vent'ure-Bome 

(-sum). 
Ad-venfur-ins:, 91, 183. 
Ad-vcnt'ur-otfs. 
Ad'verb, 10, 103. 
Ad-verb'i-al, 123. 
Ad-ver-sa'ri-a (L. pL). 
Ad'ver-8a-ry, 72, 93. 
Ad-ver'Ba-tive, 84. 
Ad'yerse [not ad-vene', 

153.] 
Ad'verse-ly [bo Sm. 

Wk. Wb. Gd.i ad- 

vera'ly, Wr. 155.1 
Ad-ver'si-ty, 21, N. ; 93. 
Ad-vert', 21, Note. 
Ad-vert'ed. 
Adrvert'ence, 189. 
Ad-vert'en-oy, IW. 
Ad-vert'ent. 
Ad-vert'Inff. 
Advertise*, or Ad'ver- 

tise (-««) (136, 202) [so 

Wr. ; ad-ver-tW, Wk. 

Wb. Gd.j ad'ver-tlz, 

Sm. 155.] 
Ad-ver-tised' {-tlzd'). 
Ad-ver'tlse-ment (-««-), 

or Ad-ver-tise'ment 

(-tlz) [80 Wk. Wr.; 

€ul-ver'tiz-fnentf Sm. 

Wb. Gd. 155.J 
Ad-ver-ti8'er(-m'-)»183. 
Ad-ver-tis'lng (-<!«'-)• 
Ad- vice', 25. 
Ad-vis-a-bil'i-ty (^Iz-), 

116. 
Ad-vls'a-ble (viz'a-bl)j 

40, 164. 
Ad-vi8'a-bly (ad-^z'a- 

bly), 93. 
Advise' ( rU;')* 103* 1-36, 

202. 
Ad-vised' {-fflzd'), 165. 
Ad-vis'cr ( vlz'er)^ 183. 
Ad-vis'ing {-vlz'ing). 
Ad'vo-ca-cy, 109. 
Ad'vo-cate, n. & v. 105. 
Ad'vo-cated, 228, Note. 
Ad'vo-cat-ing". 
Ad-vo-ca'tion, 112. 
Ad-vow-ee', 122, 171. 
Ad-vow'son, 28. 
Ad-y-nam'ic [so Wr. ; 

tL-dy-nam'iky*W\i, Gd. 

155.J 
Ad-y-nam'lc-al. 
Ad'y-tum {lu.) [pl.^rf'- 



[■o Wr.; 
Wb. Gd. 



40) 



T^ 



y-ioy 106] 

155.] 
Adze (adz), (10, 

[Adz, 203.] 
^dile(e'-),(i3)[Kdlle, 

2a3.1 
JR-gii^tin (€-Je'an)t 110 
.£'ai-lops (e'Ji-lops), or 

JE^'i-Iops (^Mf 

Itji-lopSy Sm. 

&l.; (ij'i-lops, Wr. 

155.] 
iE'gis (L.) ie'jis). 
JB-ne'id ie-tieftd), or 

JE'ne-id {efneid) I bo 

Wr. i e-ne'id, Sm. Gd 

155.] r£neid,20J.] 
^-o'li-au {e-o'li-an) 

[Eoliaii,2a3.J 
-fi-ol'ic, {e-ol'ik) fE o 1 '- 

Jc,2a3.J 
JB-ol'l-pile (e-oVi-pU) 

rEoliplle,2a3j 
^on le'on) [Eon, 

2a3.J 
A'cr-ate, 233. 
A'er-at-ed, 183. 
A'er-at-ing. 
A-er-a'tion. 
A-e'ri-al, 78, 171. 
lAe'rie {e'ry)^ or A'cr-ie 

(j^^-P) l*o Wr. ; 6'ry, 

Wk. Sm. J a'er-t/j or 

e'ry, Gd. 155.] fAy- 

ry,Eyry,203.J 
A-er-i-fi-ca'tion, 116. 
A'er-i-form [so Wb. 

Gd. ; dr'i-form, Sm. ; 

a'e-ri-form^ Wr. 155.] 
A'er-i-Sr, 94, 169. 
A-er-o-dy-mim'ics, 116, 

171. 
A-er-og'ra-pby, 108. 
A'er-olite, 152. 
A-er-o-lit'ic. 
A^r^-lojf'ic (lofik). 
A er^ log^'l-cai(-toJ*ifc-). 
A-er ol'o-gist. 
A-cr-ol'o-gry, 108. 
A'cr b man-cy, 122, 169. 
A-er-om'e-ter, 108. 
A-er-o-met'ric. 
A-er-om'e-try, 93. 
A'cr-o-nftiit, 122. 
A-er-o-nAufic, 109. 
A-er-o-naut'ie-al, 108. 
A-er-o-naut'ics, 109. 
A'cr-o-phyte, 171. 
A -er-os'co-py, 93, 108. 
A'er-o-stat. 
A-er-o-stat'ic, 109. 
A-er-o-Btat'ic-al, 106. 



A-er-o-8tat'ic«, 100. 
A-cr-OB-ta'tion. 
JS-ru'i^-ao&8 {e-roo'Ji' 

nus) [EruginouB, 

203.1 
JSs thct'io (esthei'U:) 

(171) [EBthetlo, 

203.J 
JBs-thGt'iofl (e»-tket'' 

ikal). 
.£Btliet'ics (estket'' 

a»), 109, 171. 
[JSativatlon.— See 

Estivation, 20.3.] 
A^-the-og'a-mooa, 116. 
A-far', 11. 

Af-fa bil'i-ty, 108, 160. 
APfa-ble, 06, 1<H, 170. 
Ai'fa broflB [so Wk. 

Wr.i <tf/i»'6ru$tSta, 

155.) 
Af-fair' (q/y»r'), 14, M. 
Af-fcct', 15, lai. 
Af-i'cct-a'tion, 228. 
Af-lfect'ed. 
Af-fect'er. 

Af-foct-i bll'Wy, 116. 
Af-fect'i-ble, IM, 100. 
Af-fect'injf. 
Af-fec'tion. 
Af-foc'tion-al. 
Af fec'tion-ato, 73. 
Af-fec'tioned {pfftk?- 

shund)^ 166. 
Af-fec'tlvc, 84. 
Af-i§ar'. 
Af-fear'er. 
Af-fear'ment. 
Affer-ent. 
Af-fi'anoe, 122. 
Af-fi'anced (•Jlfan9t\ 

Note C, p. 34. 
Af-fi'an-eer. 
Af-fi'an-cing. 
Af-fi-da'vit, 170. 
Af-fled'. 
Af-fil'i-ate, 73. 
Af-fil'i-at-ed, 183. 
Af-fll'i-at-ingr. 
Af-fil-i a'tion, 17a 
Affin-aj2^. 
Af-fin'i-ty, 171. 
Affirm', 21, Note. 
Af-flrm'a-ble, 160. 
Af-firm'ant. 
Af-firm-a'tion. 
Af-firm'a-tlve, 108, 171. 
Af-firmed', 166. 
Af-flrm'cr, 77, 160. 
Af-firm'ing. 
Af-flx', V, 161. 
Affix, n. 161. 
Af-fixt'ure, 91. 



fkll ; 8 M «fi there -, ^asin foot , 9 a« tn facile ighaagingoi^aa in this. 

8* 



AFFLATIOl^ 



90 



AGiAlaAl^ 



Af-fla^on. 

Af-fia'^^ (L-) (125) [not 

af-fla'tuB, 163.J 
Af-fllct', IG, 52, 103. 
Af-fliet'er, 77, IW. 
Af-fllct'inff. 
Af-flic'tlon. . 
Af-flictave, 84. 
At^'flu-ence, 106, 160. 
Al^flu-ent, 89. 
Afflux. 
Af-flux'ion i-fiuJcfshiin)- 

46, Note. 
Afford', 24, 103. 
Af-ford'ed. 
Af-iord'inff. 
Afflir'est, 170. 
Af-f5r-eBt-a'tion. 
Af-fran'chise {-frinf- 

ch\z)i 202. 
Af-fran'cblse-ment {af- 

frAn' chlz-iMnt)^ U3. 
Af-frayS 23. 
Af-frefeht' {af-frAt'\ 

102, 171. 
Af-frig:ht' {af-fr\t'\ 162. 
Af-frlght'cd i-frlt'ed). 
Af-fright'ing l/rU'-). 
Af-front' (af-frunt'), n. 

(^22). [^TecXfront, 148.] 
At-front'ed {^-/runt'ed). 
Af-fronf ing {(tf-frunt*- 

ing). 
Af-linse' (af-fBLz')t 26, 40. 
Af-fti'8ioii(-A*'«A«n),47. 
Af fV', 25. 
Af-fy'ing. 
Arghan, 53. 
A-fire', 25. 
A-float', 24. 
A-fdbt', 20. 
A-fore', 24. 
A-fore'hand. 
A-fore'said (•Y8r'««f). 
A-fore'tbpugfht 

{-thawt). 
A-fore'time. 
A-foul',.28. 
A-ft-aid', 23. 
A-freah', 15. 
Af ric, 10. 
Afric-an. 

A-front' («-/H«nf), ad. 
. ISee Affront, 148.1 
Aft. 12, 131. 

AfVer-mOst, 200. 

Aft^er-noon. 

j^ft'er-piece. 

Aft'er-warda (-wcfrdz). 

Note C, p. 34. 
Again' {a-ghen') (15, 



171) [not K-ttkaf, 127, 

153.J 
A-gainst' (^arghenst') 

(15, 171) [not a-ganst', 

127, 153.] 
Ag'al-loch i-lok)^ 52. 
A-^al'lo-chum {;'kum)i 

Ag'a-miat, 170. 

Ag'Br-mot&s. 

Ag'a-p<B (L. pi.) (a^a- 

pe). 
A-gape'feo Wr.Wb.Gd. ; 

a-gap% Wfc 8m. 155.J 
Ag'a-ric, 109, 170. 
[ A g a B t .—See Aghast, 

Ag'atej 7.3, 170. 
Ag'a-tize, 202. 
Ag'a-tlzed, 160, 105. 
Ag'a-tizlng, 183. 
Ag'a-ty, 93. 
Age, 23, 49. 
A'gcd, 150, 166. 



Pronoun eed afjed, 
excvpt in comitound 
M'orus, u fuHrOffed, in 
whicli U if pronoonoed 

A'gen-cy, 169. 

A'gent, 23, 46. 

A^gcnt-ship. 

Ag-ger-a'tfon (c^/'er-). 

Ag-glom'er-ate, 73. 

Ajj-glom'er-at-ed, 228, 

Ag-glom'er-at-ing. [N. 

Ag-glom-er-a'tion, 110. 

Ag-glu'ti-nant, 169. 

Ag-glu'ti-nate, 78. 

Ag-glu'ti-nat-ed. 

Ag-glu'ti-nat-lng. 

Ag-glu-ti-na'tion, 112, 
116. 

Ag-gln'ti-nat-Yve, 84, 
116. 

Ag'gran-dize (202) [not 
ag-gran'dize, 153. J 

Ag°gran-dized, 165. 

Ag'gran-dTze-ment, or 
Ag-gran'dlze-meot 
[so Wr. ; ag^gran-dlz- 
ment^ Wk. Sm.; ag- 
gran'dlz-mentf or ^' - 
gran~dtz-ment, Qd, 
155.] 

Ag'gran-dTz-ing, 183. 

Ag'gra-vate. 

Ag'gra-vat-ed. 

Ag'gra-vat-ing, 

Ag-gra-va'tion. 

Ag'gre-gate, a. & v. 73, 
170. 

Ag'gre-gat-«d. 



A-gii'i-ty, iw. 
Amo (It.) {ajje^^i 

je-o) [so wr.; 

Wt). Crd. ; c 




Ag'gre-gat-Iag. 
Ag'gre-gat-Tve, 84. 
Ag'gre-gat-or, 100. 
Ag-gress'. 
Ag-gressed' {ag-grest^)^ 

165. 
Ag-greB8'ing. 
Ag-grea'sion (-grem'- 

un)y 46. 
Ag-greBsIre, 84. 
Ag-grcBs'or, 88, 100. 
Ag-grieve', 13, 171. 
Ag-grieyed', 165. 
Ag-griSv'ing, 171, 183. 
Ag-gronp' {-groop')t 19. 
Ag-groupt' {-groopt')y 

Note C, p. 34. 
A^-group'ing igroop'- 

A-ghaat' (12, 53, 131) 

[Aga8t.203.] 
Ag'Ile iqyil)j 46, 182, 
A-gll'i-ty, 109. [171. 

■^ "- ' orW- 

afje-o, 
ad'je-Of 
Smi. 155.] 
■ ■ " or Ag*!-©- 

i^o4c0f 

Wrri55.] ' 
A-glst^ 
A-gist'ment. 
A-gist'or. 

Afe°I-tatc (aj'i-tat), 109. 
Arl-tat-ed (rtj'f-), 183. 
Ag'i-tat-ing (ty'i-}, 
Ag-i'^ta'tion (<w-4-). 
Ag'i-tat-Ive i^i-). 
'Ag'i-tat-or, 109. 
Ag'letr Aiglet, 208.1 
Aglow', 24. 
Ag'nail. 
Ag'nate. 
Ag-nat'ie, 109. 
Ag-na'tion. 
Ag-no'men (L.), 125. 
Ag-nom-in-a'tion. 
A-go',24. 
A-gog', 18. 
A-go'lng. 
A-gon'ic. 
Af o-nist. 170. 
Ag-o-nlBt'ic, 109. . 
Ag-o-nist'ic-al, 106. 
Ag-o-nlst'icB. 
Ag'o-nize, 202. 
Ag'o-nized, 150. 
Ag'o-niz-ing, 18S. 
Ag'o-ny, 170. 
A-gou'ti {a-goo'ty)t 10^ 

171. 
A-gra'ri-an, 49, Note. 



a, e, i, o, ii, y, long; &, S, Yj d, &, y» ^wrt ; ft cm «i» far, a a$ intuit, A or fM 



AfiEASiANfSM 



Sa, 136. 
A-gra'ri-an-ize, 208. 
A-gree', 13. 
A-gree-«-bil'i-tT, 106. 
A-gree'a-ble, m, 171. 
A-greed', i8& 

A-gree'meat. 
A-gree'tic. 
A-greB'tio-«l. 
A-gric'o-liBt, 105. 
A^grie'o-loiU. 
Ag'ri-cult-or, 88. 
Ag-ri-cult'u-ral, 89. 
Ag'ri-euit-nre, 91. 
Ag-fi^sttlt^ur-ist, 91. 
Ag'ri-mo-HF, 86. 
Ag-ro-nom'ic 
Ag-ro -nom'ie-«L 
A-gron'o-my, 108. 
Ag-rM8-toir'r».ph3r. 
Ag-roB-toPo-gy, 106. 
A-gTonnd', 2& 
A'gue, 171. 

A'gued, 183. (*. 

A'goe-proof, 206, £xo. 
A'gu-iah. 

A-hr. 

Aha', 72. 

A-head', 16. 

Ahold'. 

A-hoy', 27. 

A-hulF. 

Xjd, 23. 

Aide-de-camp (Fr.H&f- 
de-Jang^\H){%o Wr.\ 
Aid -de -camp, Wk. 
8m. Wb. Gd. 203.1 

lid'ed. 

lid'er, 109. 

lid'M (-/Qoly 180). 

Aid'iBe. 

[Aiefe\.—See Aglet, 

Ai'gret. 

Ail, V. to be m. r^ee 

Ale, 160.1 
liled, 165. 
AiFiDg. 
Ail'ment. 
Aim, 23. 
Aimed, 166. 
Aim'er, 169. 
Aim'ing. 
Aim'lefls. 
Air {Br) (14), ». the «tr 

mospheie. {j9ee JBre, 

Heir, 160.] 
Aired iird), 
Air'er {ir*ur')^ 
Alr'-hole i^lM), »1. 
Air'i-ly {ir'i-ly)^ 78, 93. 



Alr'i-iiMs (ir'i-\ Vtl. 

Aiding {ir»ing). 

Air'pump lir-)t 206. 

Air'tight (Ir'ttI), 216. 

Air'y (Ir'y), 93. 

Aisle (10 ( 162), n, a walk 
in a church. {See lale, 
160.1 

A-jar*; 11. 

AJ'tttage [Adju- 

tage, 203.] 

A-kim'bo, 86. 

Akhi', 16. 

Al'a-bas-ter (131, 170) 
[not al^baa'ter, 158.] 

A-hus'ri-ty, 171. 
Ji-ia-mode' (Ft,) [b o 

Sm, -fAl-a-mdd', Wh. 

Gd. Wr. 165.] 
A'lar, 169. 
AUrm', 135. 
Alarmed', 165. 
A-larm'lng. 
A-larm'iat. 
A-lftr'am [so Sm. ; a- 

ktr*vm, Wr. Gd. 156.1 
Alas', 12, 131. 
A'late, a. 161. 
A-Iate', ad. 161. 
Alb, 10. 
Al'barcore [so Wr.: 

Albicore,Gd.203.j 
Al-ba'ni-aa. 
Al'ba-trOBS, 171. 
Al-be'it, 17, 171, 180. 
Al-bes'oent. 
Al-bi-gen'tCM (L. pL) 

(-}en'8lz). 
Al'bin-ism (-ism) [so 

Gd.; al-bt'nizMj or 

al'bin-izm, Wr. 1 55.] 
Al-bi'no [so Sm. Wb. 

Crd. ; at-Wno, or al- 

Wno, Wr. 155. J . 

Al-M'no-iRm (^um), 133, 

136. 
Al-bu-gin'e-ofts. 
Alrbu'fjfo (L.) [pi. Al- 

bu'fft-nSs (iUz)j 108. 
Al'bum. 
Al4ni'meH (L.) [not al'- 

bn-men, 125, 1&3.] 
Al-btt'men-ize, 202. 
Al-bu'min-oiis, 171. 
Al-imrfmun (L.), 125. 
[Alcade.— 5ee Al- 

caid,203.] 
[Aloahest.— iSee Al- 
kahest, 203.] 
Al-ca'io. / 
Al-caid' {Aloade, 

203.] 



AIAUftAIO 

AUaifde (8p.) (ol-ter. 

Al-ohMBm'ie (kem'ik). 
Al-«hem'ic-al (-kern^Ht-). 
Al'che-mist (be-misti 
Al'cbe-my (ie), 171.r5£ 
Al'co-hol, 171. 
Al'oo-hol-ate. 
Al-oo-hol'io, 100. 
Al-co-hoM.za'tloii, 116. 
Al'co-hoMze, 208. 
Al-oo-hol'me<tcr. 
Al -oo-hol-met'rio-al,ll<. 
Al'co-raa [Alkoran. 
203.] 



■er ** Ori«Bteltoli . 

•futjr pronoanM Mb wortt 
oMo-raioii'.*' Snutui, 

Al-co-ran'lc, 109. 
Al'oo-rai|-iBt [so Gd.: 

ai-oo-ron'a«,Wr. 155.f 
Al'oove, or Al-eove' [so 

Gd. ; alrk^vfj Wk. Sm. 

Wr. 155.] 
Al-de-ba'ran [so Gd.; 

at-defa-roHy Wr.l55.] 
Al'de-hyde, 171. 
Al'der, 17, 169. 
Al'der-man, 196. 
Xl-der-man'lc, 170. 
Al'dine, or~A.l'dTiie QiT- 

<n», Wr. Gd. ; ol'tflM, 

Sm. 155.1 
Ale (23),».a liquor made 

from fermented malt. 

[See Ail, 160.] 
A-leak', 13. 
Al'e-a-to-ry, 86. 
A-lec'try-o-man-ej, I6O1. 
A-lee', 13. 
Ale'hoof, 206. 
Al-e-man'nio, 170. 
A-lem'bic. 
A-lem'broth, 122. 
A-lert', 21, Note. 
Al-eu'ro-man-cy(-«'ro-) 
A-leu'ti-an [so Sm. 

Wr. ; orlu'dhan, Wb. 

Gd. 155.] 
A-leu'tio. 
Ale'wife, 206. 
Al-ex^n'drlne [so Sm. 

Wr. ; al-ex-an'drinf 

Wb. Gd. 155.] 
A-lex-i-phar'mfe. 
A-lex-i-fer'ic. 
A-lex-i-ter'ic-aL 
A-lex-i-t«r'ica. 
AVga (L.) [pL AJPgm 

(^), 198.] 
AJ'ge-bra (72) [noi 

Je-bra, 15:i.] 
Al-ge-bra'ie, 109. 



fi^; 4ft9#»tb^rei ^of ^IMi 9«'•»fMU0^Cb4«gillgo>.y|i^<Alhi» 



ALGEBRAICAL 



02 



ALLUDING 



Al-g«-bni'io4a, 106. 
Al'?e-bra-iBt [bo Sm. 

Wr. ; alJe4yra'Ut, 

Qd. 165.] 
Al'ge-neb. 

Al-ge-rine' i^in*), 171. 
Al'grol. 
Al'gorab. 
AFgo-rithm, 133. 
Al'g^ua-ill (cU'gehzll) 

[so Sm. Wr. ; M-gwck- 

zM'y Wb. Gd. 166.] 
Al-ham'hra ( Ar.). 
A'li^u (L.). 
AVi-tH (L.). 
li'ien {ttVyen\ 23, 61. 
11-ien-a-bil'i-ty {(U- 

yen-), 
irien-a-ble (eUV«n-)t 

171. 
Xl'ien-age (dVpen-itf), 
Al'ien-ate (aVyen^t). 
Al'ien-at-ed i-yen-), 183. 
Al'len-at-iiig {dl'yen-). 
Al-ien-a'tioD {al-yen-). 
Al'ien-at-or (dVyenr^), • 
Al-iene' (a^y«»0» 61,171. 
Al-ien-ee' (-|fen-), 122. 
APien-ism (al'yen-izm). 
Alienor' {fiUertrori)^ 
Al'i-form, 78. [122. 

A-Ilgrht' ifl-dV), m. 
A-Ugrht'ed (-Zir-). 
A-Ugn' (a-An')» 102. 
A-lign'ment (4ln'-)fU0IL 
A-like', 26. 
Al'1-ment, 170. 
Al-i-ment'al. 
AI-i-meat'a-TT, 72, 170. 
Al-i-ment-a'tion. 
Al-i-mentlve-nesa. 
Al-i-mo'ni-otis, 169. 
Al'i-mo-ay, 126. 
A'U^th [bo Wr.; cWi- 

oth, Gd. 156.] 
Al'i-ped. 
Aia-quftiit [so Sm. Wr. 

Wb. Gd. ; al'i-kwSntt 

Wk. 156.] 
Al'i-quot, 170. 
Aiash, 183. 
A-llve', 25. 
A-liz'a-rlne J A 1 i z a • 

riii,Sm. 203.] 
Al'ka-heBt [Alca- 

he8t,203.] 
Al-ka-hest'io. 
Al-kales'oen-cy, 171. 
Al'ka U, or AKka-lfTso 

Wr.; al'karll, Wk. 

Sm. ; aPka-H, or aV- 

ka-n, Gd. 165.] 
Al'ka-U-fi-a-bie (116)[80 



Wb. Gd. J al-kalfi-/%- 
a-bl, Wr. 165.] 

Al'ka-li-fied, 186. 

Al'ka-li-ff (W) [»o Wb. 
Gd.; al-kalH-fy, Sm. 
Wr. 156.] 

Al'ka-ll-fy-in&r, 116. 

Al-ka-ligVnoas {4iS'-). 

Al-ka-lim'e-ter, 108. 

Al-kal-i-met'ric. 

Al-kal-i-met'ric-al. 

Al-ka-Um'e-try, 160. 

Al'ka-Une, or Al'ka- 
line [so Wr. ; al'ka- 
An, Wk. Sm. ; al'ka- 
An, or al'k<k-{lni Qd. 
166.1 

Al-kain'i-ty, 171. 

Al-ka'li-otiB. 

Al'ka-Uze, 202. 

Al'kalold. 

Al'ka-net. 

Al-ker'mes (-mC«), 21, 
Note. 

[Alkoran.— /Siee Al- 
coran, 203.] 

Ill,(i7,i72,>».tbe whole. 
[See Awl, 160.] 

AVlah (Ar.), 72. 

Al-lan-to'ic, 100. 

Al-lan'toid, or Al-lan- 
told' [80 Wr. : al-lan- 
toid', Wb. Gd. 165.] 

Al-lan'to-is, or Al-lan- 
tois' [bo Wr. J al-lai^ 
<ow',Wb. Gd.166.] 

Al-lay', 23, 170. 

Allayed', 166. 

Al-lay'er. 

Al-lay'ing. 

Al-le-ga'^on (170). [See 
AlUgation, 148.1 

Al-lege'(aM^'),45,17L 

Al-l«ge'a-ble, 171, 183. 

Alleged' (JgW), 166. 

Al-leg'er (-i<3'-), 183. 

Al-le'gianoe (al-lefjaru) 
[ao Wk. Wr.j oZ-fe'- 
gi-ans, Wb. Gd. 166.] 

wr* Smart reipells thli 
word thus, ctNieyeotcet the 
apostrophe being used by 
him to represent a slight 
sound resembling that of 
consonant y.— ^See § 26. 

AMeg'ing (-««j/'-), 171. 
AMe-g6i*lc, 48, 109, 170. 
AMe-gdr'io4d, 108. 
Al'le-go-rist, 126. 
Al'le-go-rlze,202. 
Al'le-go-rized, 166. 
Al'le-go-riz-er. 
Al'le-go-ria ing. 



Al'le-go-ry, 86, 170. 
Al-le-jffret'to (It.). 
Allegro (It.), 164. 
[AUeluiah, Alle- 

lujah. — See Ualle- 

li^ah, 203.] 
Al-le'ri-ate, 160, 170. 
Al-le'vi4it-ed, 183. 
Al-le'vi-at-lng. 
Al-le-vi-a'tion. 
Al'ley, 98, 169 [pi. AF- 

levB, 187.] 
Al-u-a'ceouB (-a'shus), 

112, 170. 
Al-li'anoe. 
Al-lied', 186. 
Al-li-ga'tion (170) [See 

Allegation, 148.] 
Al'11-gJ-tor, 116, 170. 
Al-U'Blon (-Uzhfun), 47, 

234. 
Al-lit-er-a'tion, 170. 
Al-Ut'er-arUre. 
Al'lo-cate. 
Al-lo-ca'tion. 
Al-lo-ca'tur (L.), 
Al'lo-ehro-ite (-tro-U) 

[bo Sm. Wb. Gd. ; al- 

loVro-U, Wr. 165.^ 
Al-lo-cu'tion [See Elo- 
cution, 148.] 
AMo'di-al, 1^, 170. 
Al-lo'di-um, 78, 109. 
AMonge' (al-lur0'), 22. 
Al-lo-path'ic, 126, 170. 
Al-lop'a-thist. 
Al-lop'a-thy (108) [nof 

al'lo-pftth-y, 163.J 
Al'lo-phane. 
AMot^ 18. 
Al-lot'ment. 
Al-lo-trop'ic. 
Al-lot'ro-piBm (^-pizm), 
Al-lot'ro-py, 93. [136. 
Ai-lot'ted, 176. 
AMot'ting. 
Al-low', S, 66. 
Al-low'a-ble, 164. 
Al-low'anoe. 
Al-low'anced (-ofMf)* 

Note C, p. 34. 
Al-low'an-<)ing. 
Al-lowed. [JeeAloudy 

148.] 
AMow'er, 77. 
Ai-low'ing. 
Alloy', 27. 
Al-loy'age, lOOl 
Alloyed', 188. 
All'spioe, 171, 206. 
Allude'', 26. 
Al-lud'ed, 188. 
Al-lud'ing. 



i, «, !, 5, a, y, long i ft, «, X, 5, tt» f» short : S <w <» far, & cm <» ilMt, %a§im 



ALLU&B 



98 



AMBASSADOR 



Al-lnre', 26. 

Al-lured', 188. 

Al-lure'ment. 

Al-lur'er, 77. 

AMur'ing^. 

Al-lu fBionC-lu'sehmn),i7, 

AMu'slve, M. [112. 

Al-lu'so-ry, S». 

Al-lu'vi-al, 78, 160. 

Al-lu'vi-on. 

Al4u'vi-um (L.) [pi. Al- 

lu'vi-a, 108.] 
Ai-ly', n. A v. [pi. of n. 

Al-lie8', lOU] [not 

al'ly, al'Ues, 163.1 
Al-ly^lng. 
Al'ma-^Bt. 
Al'mA-nac (171) [bo Wk. 

Wr. Gd.; iVma-nac, 

Sm. 155.1 [Alma- 
nack, 203.] 
Al'man-dine [so Sm. 

Wr. ; hl'man-dln^Vfh. 

Gil. 155.J 
Al-might'f-nesB {awl- 

mW), 162, 171. 
^l.might'y r-mU'y), 162. 
Xl'mond \vmund) [so 

Wk. Sm. Wr.; al'- 

fRund, popalarly. 

. a'muiuf, Wb. Gd.166.1 

Xl'mond*tree (jn^mund^ 

iri)^ 206, Exc i. 
Al'mo-ner. 
Al'mon-ry, 03. 
Al'moBt, 180. 
Alms (jomz), 162; Note 
. C,p.34. 
Alms'hoaBe (JOma^hous^ 

206. 
Al'na-ger [Alnagar, 

Aulnager, 203.1 
Al'oe (170) [pi. Allocs 

(a^'««).] 
Alo-et'ic. 
Al-o-ct'lc-aL 
Al-o-et'ics. 
Aloft', 18, Note. 
Al-o-got'ro-phy fso 

Wr. ; ai'lo-go-trO-phy, 

Wb. (M. 156.1 
Al'o-man-cy, 170. 
A-lone'. 24. 
Along' 18, Note. 
A-loor, 10. 
Al'o-pe-cy, 160, 170. • 
Alp, 10, 30, ftO. 
Al-pac'a, 145, 170. 
Al'pka f Gr.), 36. 
AKpha-oet, 35. 
Al pha-bet-a'ri-an, 110. 
Al-phB-bet'ic, 109. 
Al'pha-bet'ic-al, 108. 



Al-phe'iiie [so Wr. ; A 1- 
phenix, Wb. Gd. 
20:j.j 

Al-pliit'o -man-cv. 

Al-phon'Bin, n. [bo Wb. 
Gd. Wr.; Alphon- 
8ine,Sm. 203.] 

Al-phon'Blne, a. [bo 
Sm. Wr.; Alphon- 
Biii,Wb.Qd. 203.1 

Al'jplne, or Al'pine [bo 



Wr. ; alfpln, Sm. ; al'- 

pm, or wpin, Gd. 

165.] 
Al-rSad'y, 03, 180. 
Al'BO, (180) [not Sl'BO, 

145, 153.] 
Al'tar, A. a plaoe fbr 

Bacrifioes. [See Alter, 

160.] 
Al'tar-age, 160. 
ll't«r , V. to change. [ See 

Altar, 160.] 
21-ter>a-bil'i-ty, 171. 
21'ter-a-ble, 164. 
Al'ter-ant, 160. 
Al-term'tlon, 112. 
^'ter-a-tlve, 84, 171. 
Al'ter-cate, 73. 
Al'ter-cat-ing, 183. 
Ai-terHsa'tion [not U- 

ter-ka'Bhun, nor 61- 

ter-ka'shun, 163.] 
Al-tem'. 
Al-tem'a-cy, 160. 
Al-tem'ate, a. 73. 
Al-tem'ate, or Al'tem- 

ate, V. [bo Wr. ; al- 

temfat, Wk. Sm. ; aP- 

tem-Ht, Gd. 155.] 
Al-tem'at-ed, or Al'- 

tem-at-cd. 183. 
Al-tem'ate-Iy, 03. 
Al-tem'aMng, or Al'- 

tem-at-ing. 
Al-tem-a'tion, 112. 
Al-tem'a-tlve, 84, 171. 
Al-the'a[^{«AcBa(L.), 

203.1 
i^l-thoagh' i-tjjfl% 162, 

171, m. 
Al-tim'e-ter, 160. 
Al-tim'e-try, 03. 
Al'ti-tade, 106, 171. 
AVto (It.^. 
21-to-geth'er, 180.' 
Al'u-del, 80. 
Al'um, 169, 170, 231. 
A-la'mi-na, 78, 171. 
A-lu'mi-nate. 
Al'u-mlne, 82, 152. 
A-lu-ml-nifcr-oliB, 108, 
A-lu'mi-nite. [116. 



A-ln'mi-nofiB, 160. 

A-lu'mi-num. 

Al'um-iBh. 

A-lum'nu8 (L.) [pi. A* 
lum'ni, 108.] 

Al've-a-ry. 72. 

Al've-at-ttd. 

Al've-o-lar [bo Sm.Wb. 
Gd. ; al-v^oiar, or 
al've-o-lar, Wr. 165. J 

Al've-o-la-ry, 72. 

Al'v&^>-late [bo Wb. 
Gd. ; at-v^o^Atf or aP- 
ffe-o-lAt, Wr. 165.] 

Al've-o-lite. 

Al-Te'o-luB (L.) [pi. Al- 
ve'o-li, 108.1 

Al'vlne [bo Sm. Wr.l 
al'Vtn, Gd. 166.] 

Al'way, 230. 

Al'ways r-wfts), 180. 

Am, 10, 32. 

Am-a-dou' (Fr.) (om-o- 
doo') [bo wr.; am'a- 
doo, Gd. ; am'a-doWf 
Sm. 156.1 

A-main', 23. 

A-mal'gam, 17L 

A-mal'gam-ate. 

A-mal'gam- at-ed. 

A<mal'gam-at-ing. 

A-mal-gam-a'tion, 112. 

A>man-a-en'BlB (L.) [pi. 
A-man-n-en'seB (-en'- 
8iz), 108.1 

Am'a-rantD, 170. 

Am-a-ranthane, 171. 

A-maBB', 12, 131. 

A-maBBed' (o-nuUt'), 
Note C, p. 34. 

A-maBs'ing. 

A-maBB'ment. 

Amateur (Fr.) (am-a- 
t9r*, or a-ma-turf) 
[bo Wr. ; am^chtlkr*, 
Wk. Wb. Gd. ; a-ma- 
tur*, Sm. 164, 166.] 

Am'a-t!ye>neBB, 166. 

Am-a-to'ri-al. 

Am'a-to-ry,.86. 

A-maze', 2). 

A-mnzcd', 165, 183. 

A-maze'ment. 

A-maz'lng, 183. 

Am'a-zon, 170. 

Am-a-zo'ni-an. 

Am-bas'Ba-dor (S6, 170) 
[Emba8Bador,203.J 



Smart say*, **£m- 
hancutor \* consistent with 
emhoMty. but is not asual.** 
Worcester remarks, "The 
immediate derivation of 



fall; 6 « in there; &b a$ in foot; ^ aa in fwoiie; ^aa gin go i^ as in tbi§» 



J1BA8BADBBS8 



Am-bM'aiHlmB, 170. 

Am'ber-Eiia [om'fter- 

grti), lio, in. 
Am-bl-dex-ter'l-lT, llB. 
Am-bi-dvx'troli*. 

Ani-liig'e-Ml(-i(f '-), 171, 

Ani'blI,:JM. 
Am-bl'tlon C-Mti'uB), 

Am-bl'ttcniB (-fiiaJl'uj). 

Am'blel (a«'^,'l7I, 
Am'Wcr, rr. TISS. 

Am'bllQK' 
Am'bly-gon, 171, 
Am-blrtfoD-ml. 

ira'iAl.n) >o Wt 
Sm. Wr.; am-bro'- 
zHo.Wb. Gd. 1S6.] 

Am-bro'»l-al( -iM-),!?!. 

Am-bro'sl-an (,-!»-). 

Amtiro-type, lOS. 

XmbB'ace lamt'at) [ao 
Sm. Vn>. Gd.> tiu- 
f, Wk. Wr. IM.l 
[AmeBace, 203.1 

Am'bo-Unce, 1<W. 



om'biu-iMii, W1>. Gd. 

A m -bus-ud'ed. 

Am-bua-ciid'bis- 
Ain'buib {am'SSbiV). 
A'tttello-nite (-meCvo-), 



i.e.I.fi.D.f.'OHffi' 



A-mend'a-Kny, S8, 171, 



e'c, p. M. ' ' 
■J (IN) [IH< 



A-m«r'l-oui-l(Bi (-iaM), 

A-roirt-nui-ize, SM. 
[Amc«.oe.-S« 

AmbBBce-ae.] 
A-met-a-bo'U-u. 
Am'e-tbT»t, 170. 
Am-e-tbTBt'lne, 84, 102. 



-Wy, 93, 
in'thi-tU 



iIe[Ai 



•ii), les, 1». 
amld.iOJ.] 



A-miaa', iS^ 

AB.'1-ty, W, 170. 
[Ammfd.Stn.— SM 

Amldf.j 
Am-mo'ni-a, im, 170- 
Am-mo'nl-sc, IIW. 
Am-mo-Dl'iK-il, 106,171. 
Am'mo-mte, 162. 
Ammo'iil-uiii, lOS. 

Am-inu-nl'tlon l-niM- 

Am'nl-on, or Am'ol-oa. 
Am-n-be'im {am-tAxf- 
A-mong' (a-mune'l, 22. 



mar 'lira ta-mor'tUi 
BO Wk. Sm. Wr.i 
> aKuJlIi), Wb. Od. 



Am-phib-l o-loK'le^l 

(■Irg'ilt-atj, US. 
Am-pbf-bol'o-ert KB. 
Am-pblb'o-loDi. 
Ata'phl-bracb {am>Jl- 



Am-plite'a-niona. 
Am-phl^ltei-a-he'dnl, 

Ani-pbil'a-E7, HB. 
Am'pbl-poo. 
Am-pbip'o-doBa. 
Am-pblp'ro-Btyle. 
Am-pblB-bia'iu (bCiM), 



un-phl'sd 

iri. 

'.WhpkX'Kf' 



Note E, p. 70.1 
Am-pbl-thfrat'rio. 
Am-phi-thc-at'ilc^ 
Am-phit'ra-psl. 
Am'nho-ra ( L.) [pl..^n'- 

Ain'pba-Tal. 
Am-pho-Wr'lB. 
Am'p]*, 10, 164. 
Am-plei'l-oinl, IN. 
Am-pil-a-ca'tlDii, 112, 

Aa'pU-n-ca-llTe, lU. 
An'pU-fied, IBfl. 
Am'pU-fl-er, 
'-I'plIJJ, »■ ■~ 
— .'pH-ly-la^. 
Am'pli-tude, 108, 171. 



Am'pH-R-loe. 
'.m'pli-tude, 108 
m'pis, JO, W. 






, A, j), lAori ; £ oa At &r, ■ iM » &M. k a> 4n 



AKPOLLACXOUB 



Am'pD-tit-ed, 183. 



13«. 
A-noMd' (a-iM»i'),1S3. 
A-muae'ment (-•••i'-). 
A-mBa'er (-■rti'-). 
A-mua'lDg t***-)- 

A'iDyfr'dft Ikte. 
A-mfg'diiUna, IK, m. 
A-mvK'iia-iolil, 171. 
Am-rna'ceoiii (-titHt), 

Am'JlB Caw'iO. 171. 



(Qr.) (lm-a^>if^^l-Um'- 

An-acb'To-nlam (oinif - 

rn-aittn), Si, 133. 
An-mh-HHilrt'tc C-a*->. 
Anwh ra-iilsIlD«I 

An-A-clu'uo. 
An-a-clu'daa. 

Aii-.-o™'di, JE, 170. 

A-iud'ri>-nK>>a. 



AB'»-glnth, Si, 170, 
An-n-gljph'lc. 
An-A^t Tikh'le-«L 

An..Rln>'tlt 
An-s^lm tog'n-phT', 
10, M, 119. 



95 

,n4-gT(ini-mjit'lo.*L 



An-a-gTmm'niB-IJst, 170. 

An-a-gTHia'jiU'tiBfi af" 



ASCHTLOnRO 
A-nu'to-mew (-mtt). 



IS,!, 138. 
A-ut'o-Kiit, 
A-n»l'o-Klm, 
A-iui]'o-K°ti< 

A-iuJ'rSi' 1 



, (171), n. oi 
skilled in uuOtiI 

[SiwAiiiuUitri«&.i 
An-ii-lyl'lo, lOB. 



An'a-I>H (171), V. to r*- 
lolTC 6t miulrsli. 
[Su AniuUn, lao.l 

AD'a-lried, lU. 

Aii'ii-1;i-er, im. 

An'a-lyi-lag. 

,^7i.fi-fW>r'pA^fU, or 




-luu-Uhmo'iU (Or.), 



A-Il»th'«10»-Ul-ltlB. 

. An-k-UCcr-otti, IMt, IS 
-toni'lcHil, I'w. 



-nit'o-my, U3, 108,17 
Aa-t-tTlp.sol'o.^, ](M 



Anoei-lo'rt-mL 
Aii'e«-trtl[ 1 Or)(» Wk, 

8m. Wr. i an-ceftnO, 

Wb. Od. ISS.I 
An'oe*-trE(g [so Wr.i 

ati-cei'frti, G4. l&J.I 
Aooh'or (nnpf «r) (si, 

M), n. in rnitramenl 

to hold s tbsihI. [S« 



Anch'or-«ge (onfft'tii"- 
Ancb'ared (anfifurd), 



Anch'T-loaa (<»ial'<- 

Mf). 
Anch'T'toBed (angj^i- 

19*11 fM CM.; Kiufl- 
(airf.TFr. ISS.I 
Anch'r-16«-lDK (arngV^ 



bill lMiwtlier«)ObiM£«G>ati;a<lfiIUlleigliiUKingoilbal 



ANCHYLOSIS 

Anch-y-lo'sis (angk-4n) 
(109) [Ankylosis, 

Anch-y-lot'ic (angki-), 
An'cient {dn'ahent), M, 

Note 2 ; 171. 
An'cient-ry (dn'ahent-). 
An'cil-la-ry, 72, 171. 
An-clp'i-tal, 109, 171. 
An-cip'i-totts. 
An'con, 230. 
An'cone. 
And, 10, 42, 43. 
An-de'an (110, 109) Tso 

Wr. ; an'de-anf Od. 

165.] 
And'i-ron (and't-um), 

171. 
An-dra-nat'o-my, 106. 
An-drog'y-nal (^-drqi'i-). 
An-drog'y-nofis {-arqj'- 

i-nUg), 
An'droid. 
An-droid'es (-droid'tz) 

[bo Gd. ; an-dr</i-diZf 

Wr. 1S5.] 
An'dron. 
An'droQs. 
An'co-ddt-al. 
An'eo-dote. 170. 
An-ec-dot'fc, 143. 
An-ec-dot'io-al. 
An'ec-dot-ist. 
A-nel'li-dan [Annel- 

lidan, Anneli- 

dan, 203.] 
An-e-mog^'ra-phy, 108. 
An-e-mol'o-gy, 108. 
An-e-mom'e-ter, IdO. 
An-e-mom'e-try. 
A-nem'o-ne, (163, 170) 

[not an-e-mo'ne, 163.J 
A-nem'o-Boope. 
An'er-old, 170, 233. 
An'eu-rism (an'u-rizm), 

133. 
A-new' ra-ntt')» 26. 
An-fract'u-OBe. 
An-fVact-u-OB'i-ty, 108. 
An-fract'u-oliB, 89. 
[Angeiography. — 

See Angiography, 

203.1 
An'gel [not ftnMel, nor 

an'Jl, 127, 153.] 
An-gel'ic, 109, 170. 
An-gel'ic-aL 
An'gel-winged (-Jd- 

wingd)j 206, Exo. 5. 
An'ger {ang'gur) (64, 

138), n. wrath. [See 

Angor, 148.] 
An-gi-o-car'pottB. 



96 

Anwgfi-og'ra-phy (106) 
[Angeiography, 

m] 

An-gi-ol'o-gy. 
An-gi-o-mon-o-sperm'* 

OQB, 116. 
An'g^-o-sperm. 
An-gi-o-sperrn'otta. 
An-gi-ot'o-my. 106. 
An'gle (ang'fft). 54, 164. 
An'gled {angfatd). 
An'gler (ano'glur), 54, 

77. 
An'gli-can (ang*-\ 54. 
An'^U-can-lBm (-irm), 

An'g'u-ce (L.) (ang'-). 
An'gli-ciBm (-«t«fn), 136. 
An'«[li-cize, 202. 
An'glo-Sax'on, 224. 
An'gor (ang'gawr) (88), 

n. intense pain. [S«e 

An'ger, 148.] 
An'gri-ly (an^'-)i 171. 
An'gry lang*-), 64, 93. 
An-giul'li-lorm (-gtoU-), 

34, 178. 
An'guish (ang'gwish)t 

34, 64. 
An'gu-lar (ang'gu-)^ 89. 
An-gu-lftr'i-ty, 5*, 108.. 
An'gu-lat-ed {ang'gu-), 
An-nar-mon'ic. 
An har-mon'ic-al. 
An-he-la'tion, 112. 
An-hy'drofis. 
An'il, 170, 231. 
Anile, 81, 162. 
A-nll'i-ty, 143, 169. 
An-i-mad-yer'sion, 110. 
An-i-mad-yert', 122. 
An-i-mad-yert'ed. 
An-i-mad-yert'er. 
AnJ-mad-yert'ing. 
An'i-mal, 169, 170. 
An-i-mal'ca-lar, 109. 
An-i-mal'cu-Une, 162. 
An-i-mal'cule. 
An-i mal'cu-list, 89. 
An-i-indl'cu-lum( L.)[pL 

An-i^nuU'ctt-la.] 

a^ The plural form, 
Animalcuke, aometimei 
used, ia erroneous. 

An'i-mal-ism (-i2;m),133. 
An-i-mal'i-ty, 108, 169. 
An-i-mal-X-za'tion, 116. 
An'i-mal-ize, 202. 
An'i-mate, 170. 
An'i-mat-ed, 183. 
An'i-mat-ing. 
An-i-ma'tion, 112, 170. 
An'i-mat-Iye, 84. 



ANNOTANCE 

An'i-mat-or, 169. 
An'i-me (Sp.), 163. 
An'i-mism (-mi«m), 136. 
An'i-mist. 

An-i-mos'i-ty, 106, 171. 
An'i-on. 

AnTse, 160, 170, 231. 
An'Ise-seed, 206, Exc.8. 
An-i-settef (Fr.), 114. 
An'ker {ang'kur) (54. 

77), n. a Dutch liquid 

measure. [See An- 
chor, 160.] 
An'kle {ang'kl), 64, 164. 
An'kle^eep. 216. 
[Ankylosis. — See 

Anchylosis, 203.] 
An'nal-ist (170), n. a 

writer of annals. [See 

Analyst, 160.1 
An'nal-ize (170). n. to 

record in annals. [See 

Analyze, 160.1 
An'nals {an^ncUz), 136, 

230. 
An'nats, 170. 
Annual', 13, 108. 
An-ncaled', 166. 
An-neal'ing. 
[Anneliaan, An* 

nellidan. — See 

Anellidan, 203.1 
An-nexS 16, 39, Note. 
An-nex-a'tion, 170. 
An-nexed' (^next')jSoio 

C, p. 34. 
An-nex'ing. 
An-ni'hi-la-ble, 164. 
An-ni'hl-late, 171. 
An-ni'hi-lat-ed. 
An-ni'hi-lat-ing. 
An-ni-hila'tion, 112,116. 
An-ni'hi-Iat-or, 169. 
An-ni-yer'sa-ry, 72, 171. 
An'no-tate, 170. 
An'no-tat-ed, 163. 
An'no-tat-ing. 
An-no-ta'tion. 
An-no-tat'or, 169. 
An-no'ta-to-ry, 86. 
An-not'i-notlB, 106, 169. 
An-not'to (170) [An- 

notta, Anotta, 

Arnotto, Arnot- 

ta, Arnatto,203.] 
An-nounce', 28, 39. 
An-nounced' (-^nounsf), 

Note C, p. 34. 
An-nounce'ment, 186. 
An-noun'oer, 183. 
An-noun'oing. 
An-noy', 27. 
An-noy'anoe, 169. 



ft, d, i, 5, tt, f, long', ft, C, X, 5, fi, y, short ; Jiaain fiur, has in tut, A <u in 



ANNOYED 

An-noyed', 106. 
An-noy'er. 
An-noy'ing. 
An'nu-al, 170. 
An'nu-al-ly, 03, 170. 
An'nu-ent, tfl, 160. 
An-nu'i-timti 170. 
An-nu'ity, 93, 160, 17a 
An-nuF, 22, 17a 
An'nu-lar, IW. 
An'nu-late, 73. 
An'nu-lat-cd, 183. 
An-Du-la'tion. 
Au'nu-let, 170. 
Annulled' (-nttl<20> 170« 
An-nul'Ung, 176. [183. 
An-nul'ment. 
An'nu-lose [so Gd. ; an- 

nu-IOi'y Sm. Wr. 165.] 
An-nu'mer-ate, 73. 
An-nun'ci-ate (an^un'- 

the-dt) (46) [so Sm. 

Wr. ; an-nun'sh(Ut 

Wb. Gd. 165.1 
An-nun'ci-at-ea (ski-), 
An-nun'cl-at*in^ (-«/^1-). 
An-nun-ci-a'tion {-thl- 

A'shun). 
An-nun'oi-at-or (-«A1-). 
An-nun'ci-arto-ryC^Al-) 
An'odej 170. 
An'o-dyne, 170. 
An'o-dyn-oiia, lOa 
A-noiat', 27. 
A-noint'ed. 
A-noint'er. 
A-noint'ing-. 
A<noint'ment. 
A-no'Us, 156. 
A-nom'a-li-ped. 
A-nom'a-lism (-Uzm), 

133. 
A nom-a-list'ic, 100. 
A-nom-a-list'ic-al, 106. 
A-nom'a-lo&s, 170. 
A-nom'a-Iy, 03, 170. 
A-non', 18. 
A-no'na. 

A-non'y-mofis, 171. 
A-norm'al. 
An-oth'er (ai»-K|ft'er), 

22,'lB6. 
[Anotta. — See An- 

notto, 203.] 
An'scr-at-ed. 
An'ser-ine, 82, 152. 
An'swer (an'eur), 162, 

171. 
An'swer-a-ble (-Mtr-), 

171. 
An'swer-a-bly (sur-)t 

0». 
An'swered (-9urd)t 165. 



97 

An'swer-er (tur-er),77, 
^n'swcr-ine (-«ir-). 
Ant (12, 131), n. an em- 
met. IS€€ Aunt, 160.1 
An'ta (L.) [pL An*ta, 

106.1 
Ant-af'id, 235. 
An-tag'o-niam (■ litem), 

133, 136. 
An-taj^o-nist. 170. 
An-tag-o-nist'lc, 100. 
An-tag-o-nist'io-al, 108. 
Ant-aPfl^o, 171. 
Ant-al'ka-ll, or Ant-al'- 

ka-U. 
Ant-anra-go^gi (Or.), 

163. 
Ant-aph-ro<dX'si-«c C-q/'- 

ro-aiz'i-ak). 
Ant-aph-ro-dit'ic. 
Ant-ap-o-plec'tio. 
Ant-arc'tfc, 142. 
Ant-ar-thrit'ic. 
Ant-astb-mat'io (-ofl- 

mai'ik), 162. 
Ant-a-troph'&c. 
An'te (L.), prqf. before. 

[^eeAnti,160.] 
An-te-ce'dence. 
An-te-ce'dent, 160. 
An-te-ceg'sor. 
An'te-ch^-ber. 



SometinMg iaoor- 
tecUy written Anti- 
chamber. 

An'te-chap-el. 

An-te'dan (-fe'«Aan),46. 

An'te-date. 

An'te-dat-ed, 183. 

An'te-dat-ing. 

An-te-dl-lu'vi-an, 160. 

An'te-Jlx-a (L. pi.), 196. 

An'te-lope [Anti- 
lope, 203.] 

An-te-lu'can, 100. 

An-te-me-rid'i-an. 

[Antemetio. — See 
Antiemetic, 203.] 

An-te-mnn'dane. 

An-te-mu'ral. 

An-te-ni-cene' [so Wk. ; 
cm4e^i^cin, Gd. 155.] 

An-ten'na <L.) [pi. An- 
ten'fMBf 196.] 

An-t«n-nif er-otts, 170. 

An-ten'ni-form, 170. 

An-te-nup'tial(-«Aaf),40. 

An-te-pas'chal (-JMii),52. 

An'te-past, 12, 131. 

An-te-pe-nulf . 122. 

An-te-pe-nnlt'i-mate, 
116, 160. 

Ant-ep-i-lep'tio. 



ANTHYSTEBIC 

An-te-po-sl'tion {-gith'' 

«n), 40, 112. 
An-te-pre-dlo'a-ment. 
Ante'ri-or. 40, Note. 
An-to-ri-ori-ty, 03. 
An'te-room, 160. 
Ant-hiifi-<m (Gr.) [pL 

Ant-hil'i^ 19^] 
Ant-he'lix. 
An-thel-min'tic [so Sm. 

Wb. Gd^ ant-hel- 

min'ta, Wr. 155.] 
An'tbem, 10, 37. 
An'tber, 10, 37, 77. 
An'ther-al. 
An-ther-if er-oUs, 106. 
An'ther-oid. 
An-tho'di-um, 106, 100. 
Antho-log'io-al i-U^'-), 
An-thol'o gy. 106, 170. 
An-tbo-phyr iite,or Anr 

thophVllltefsoWr.,- 

an-thoph'^l4ae, Gd. 

155.] 
An'tho-rism (-rizm) [tp 

Sm. Gd. ; anU'ho^rizm, 

Wr. 155.] 
An'tbra-dte, 17L 
An-thnMdt'ic. 
An-throp'o-elot. 
An-thro-po^ra-phy. 
An-tbrop'o-lite. 
An-thro-po-lofif'io-al 

(-/oi-'flfc-). 
An-thro-pol'o-glst, 106. 
An-thro-pol'o-gy, 106. 
An'thro-po-man-ey [so 

Gd. ; thpihro-porn'on- 

cy, Wr. 165.] 
An-thro-pom'e-try. 
An>thro-po-mor'phism 

(mor'Jizm), 116, 133. 
An-thro-po-mor'phist. 
An-thro-po-mor'phite. 
An-thro -po-mor-phit'ie 
An-thro-po-mor'phit- 

iem (^-mor'JU-izm)^ 116, 
An-thro-po-mor^photta. 
An-thro-pop'a-tbf. 
An-thro-poph'a-gi,n.pl. 

196. 
An-thro-poph'a-gotts. 
An-thro-poph'arffy, 03, 
An-thro-pos'o-pny. 
An-thro-pot'o-my. 
Ant-hyp-not'io [Anti* 

hypnotic, 203.1 
Ant-hyp-o-chon'dri-ac 

i-hip-o-kon'-) (108,116) 
Antihypoohon- 
Lriao,20:i.] 
Ant-hys-ter'io [Anti- 
hysteric, 203.] 



fidli d as t» there; db aaiutoat ; gas in fiuUe -, gh aa g in go ',^ a» in thia. 



ANn 



d8 



APEX 



An^ti (Or.). prep. 
against [See Ante, 

iSo.l 

An-ti-ag'id. 

An-ti-asth-mat'le (-<Ml>- 
mat'). 

An-ti-bae-ehM'ue (L.) 
{-bak-kl'us) [so Wr. , 
an-ti-bak'kl-U8, 8m. 
6d. 155.1 

An-ti-bracVi-al (-ftraJb'- 
<-«/, or -bra'Id-aX) 
r-ftroJb'i-ol, Gd. ; 6ra'. 
«-«?, Wr. 155.1 

An'tic, 10, 52, 230. 

[Antiehamber. -> 
See Anteehamber, 
203.) 

An'ti^hrist {-krUt), 52, 
109. 

An-tich'ro-nism (-fO;'- 
ro-nizm), 

An-ti^'i-pant. 

An-tic'i-pate, 169, 171. 

An-tl9'i-pat-ed, 183. 

An-ti^'i-pat-ing. 

An-ti9-i-pa'tion, 112,171. 

An-ti9'i-pat-Tve. 

An-ti9'i-pat-or, 88. 

An-ti^'i-pa-to-ry, 86. 

An-tt-cli'max. 

An-ti-cli'nal, 109. 

An'ti-cor. 

An-ti'coQs. 

An-ti-ddt'al, 228. 

An'ti-dote, 169. 

An-ti-dot'ic-al [so Wr. ; 
an-ti-dot'ik-w, Gd. 
155-1 

An-tl-djrs'u-rie f so Grd. ; 
an-ti-dizfu-rihi Wr. 
155 J 

An-ti-feb'rile [so Wk. 
Sm. Wr. ; an-tife' 
bril, or an-ti-/eb'rUt 
Gd. 155.] 

An-ti-fed'er-al, 233. 

An-ti-fed'er al-ism 
(-al-izm\ 13rt. 

An-ti-fed'er-alist, 171. 

An'ti-grftph, 35. 

An-ti-nyp-not'io [Ant- 
hypnotic, 203.1 

An-ti-hyp-o-chon'dn-ae 
(-kon'-) fAnthypo- 
ohondriao,203.j 

An-ti-hys-ter'ic [Ant- 
hysteric, 203.] 

An-ti-Iog'a-rithm, 133. 

'An-tI-loPmic.~ 

[A ntilope.^iSto An- 
telope, 203.J 

An'ti-mask» 



An-ti-ma'son (^fnafen). 
An-ti-ma-son'ic, 109. 
An-ti-ma'son-ry, 93. 
An-ti-^ne4€U>'o-'U (Gr.), 
An-tim'e-ter, 170. [1«8. 
An-ti-mo'ni-al. 
An-ti-mo'nl-ate. 
An-ti-mon'io. 
An-ti-mo'ni-ofis. 
An'ti-mo-ny, 169, 171. 
An-ti-ne-phrit'io. 
An-ti-no'mi-an, 109. 
An-ti-no'mi-an-ism 

('izfn)t 136. 
An'ti-no-my [so Sm. 

Wb. Gd.; an^nfo- 

my^ Wk.; an'ti-^ruy-my, 

or an-tin'o-myt Wp. 

155.1 
Anti-o'chi-an (-o'W-). 
An-ti-o-don-tai'eio, 109, 

116. 
An-ti-path'ie. 
An-tip'a-thy, 171. 
An^i-pe-ri8't€i-3i8 (Gf.). 
An-tl-phlo-gis'tlc. 
An'ti-phon. 
An-tiph'o-nal, 35. 
An-tiph'o-na-ry, 35, 72. 
An-ti-phon'ic-al. 
An-tiph'o-ny, 35, 98. 
An-tiph'ra-sis, 85. 
An-ti-phras'tic. 
An-ti-phras'tic-al. 
An-tip'o-dal, 170. 
An'ti-pode, 169. 
An-ti-po'de-an, 110, 109. 
Anrtip'o-di8 (-diz) (L. 

pi.), 156. 
An-tip-to'sis (Gr.), 109. 
An-ti-qua'ri-an, 49, N. 
An-ti-qua'ii-an4sm 

(■izm), 136. 
An'ti-qua-ry, 72, 171. 
An'ti-quate. 
An'ti-quat-ed, 183. 
An-ti-qua'tion. 
An-tiquo' (an-tikf), 114. 
An-tique'ness (tek'-), 
An-tiq'ui-ty(-«tVw«-%), 

171. [46. 

An-tl'sdan (-tish'an), 
An-t%'8ci-l (L.pl.) (tishf- 

i-l)j 171. 
An-ti-soor-bn'tic [not 

an-tl-Bkor-but'ik, 163.] 
An-ti-script'n-ral, 91. 
An-ti-sep'tic. 
An-ti-slar'er-y, 233. 
An-tis't€hsis (Gr.). 
Anntie'tro-phM (Gr.),163. 
An-tl-stroph'ic. 
An-tith'e-8iB (Gr.) [pi. 



An-tith'e-sSs (-e^i»X 

198.1 
An-ti-thet'ie, 109. 
An-ti-thet'lc-ai. 
An-tit'ro-pal. 
An-tit'ro-pofis. 
An'ti-type, 109. 
An-ti-typ'ic-al, 148. 
Ant'ler, 10, 77. 
Ant'lered {arU'lurd)., 
Ant'like, 13, 131. [166. 
Afi-io-no-ma' td-a (L.) 

(an-to-no-ma'zhi-a) 

f soWr.j an-to-no-ma^' 

zJm, Gd. 155.1 
An'Til, 10, 230. 
Anx-i'e-ty(on(^-«l'e-«y), 

40, N. ; 171. 
Anx'ious (angk'shus), 

46, N. J 171. 
An'y (en'y), 16, 98 [5«e 

Note under Many,] 
An'y-how (en*y-). 
An'y-whftre («n'y-), 15. 
An'r-wiBe(en'y-%eilz)fd^ 
A-o'ni-an, 72. 
A'o-rist. 
A-o-rist'ic, 109. 
A-o-rist'ic-al, 10& 
A-op'ta, 72. 
A-or'tal. 
i-or'tlc. 

Ap^ct-ffo-gB (Gr.), 108. 
Ap-a-gog'ic-al i-go^'ik-), 

143, 171. 
Ap'a-nagce [Appa- 
nage, Appenage> 

2a3.] 

Ap-a-rith*me-9i9 (Or.). 
Apart', 11. 
A-part'ment. 
Ap-a-thet'ic, 109. 
Ap-a-thet'ic-al, 106. 
Ap'a-thlst, 170. 
Ap-a-thist'ic-al. 
Ap'a-thy, 93, 120. 
Ap'a-tite [See Aj^etttf^ 

148.1 
Ape, 23. 
A-peak', 13. 
A-pellollB, 170. 
Ap'en-nine, 152, 170. 
Ajp^'sy (169) [so Sm. 

Wb. Gd.j afe^MV* 

Wk. Wr. 165.] 
Ap'er, 183. 

A-pe'ri-ent, 49, N. ; 109. 
A-per'i-ttve, 84, 170. 
Ap'er-ture, 170. 
A-pet'a-lofis, 170. 
A'pex [L. pi. Ap'i-e99 

{-sez) ; Eng. pi A'pex- 

es (-*»). 1 



&,€,i,d,u,9, longi &,4)X,d,tt,f, thorti ft im <» fltr, a <M <« fast,! ai l» 



APHJERESIS 



A-phaer'e-sis (n-f^r't- 

«w) [so Wk. Wr. Gd ; 

a-fe'rt-sUt Sm. )&5] 

[AphcreBis, 20:1.] 
A-phe'U-on [so Wk.Sio. 

Wr. ; OrftVyon, Wb. 

Gd. 155.1 [pi. A-phe'- 

li-a, 108.] 
A-phid'i-aD, 35, 160. 
Aph-i-lan'thro-pjr. 
Af^phit [pi. Jphfi-dts 

i-dBz)y 108,J 
Aph-lo-gis'tic. 
Apli'o-nofts, 35. 
Aph'o-ny, 35, 93. 
Aph'o>nBm (-rizm), 133, 

136. 
Aph-OHris'inic (-rit/-). 
Aph'o-rist. 
Airfi-o-rist'ic, 109. 
Aph-o-rist'ic-ia, 106. 
Aph'rite, 35, 152. 
Aph-ro-dl'fliae i-dizh'i- 

al:). 
Aph-nMii-ei'ae-al (-«<'- 

afc-). 
ApVrD^te,36, 152. 
Aph'thje (L,. pi.) («/*- 

Aph'thoii4°^ (fip'tk&i^) 
[so Sm. Wr.: af- 
l^umg^ Wb. Gd. 155.] 

Aph'thofis. 

A-phyt'lons, <fr AfitJ- 
yl-lons [«S<ee Adeno- 
phyllouB.] 

JL-pi-a'ri-an, 49, N. 

A'pi-a-rist. 

A'pi-ar-ry, 72. 

Ap'i-cet (L. pi.) {apfi- 
Hz) [See Apex.] 

A-pSc'u-late, 80. 

A-pic'a-Jat-ed, 183. 

A-piece', 13. 

A'pi-Yne, 152. 

A'pis (L.). 

Ai/f fih, 23, 183. 

Ap-Ia-nat'io. 

A-plfts'tic. 

Ap'lome r«o Gd.; o- 
pl9m', Wr. 155.] 

A-plot'o-my, 106. 

A-plus'tre (L.), 164. 

A-poc'a-Iypse, 171. 

A-poe-a-lyp'tic. 

A-poo-a-lyp'tio-al. 

Ap-o-«ar'po1ig. 

A-poc'o-pate, 170. 

A-porJo-pi (Gr.), 163. 

Ap-o-cms'tic 

A-poe'ry-pha, 171. 

A-poc'ry-phal. 

A-poc'ry-phal4y,03,171. 



99 

Ap'<Mla!, 1^ 
Ap'ode. 
Ap-ordic'tic. 
Ap-o-dic'tie4d. 
Ap'o-dtm (L.) [pL A^o- 

da, 108.1 
A-pod'o-»u (L.), 170. 
Ap'o-gee, 170. 
Ap'o-gTiiph. 
A-pog'ra-phal. 
A-poT-U-iia'riwui, 49, N. 
A-pol'ld-Bcl-ve4lere' 

(210) [so Gd. J A-poi*' 

lo'Betff^^Ur, Wr. 

155.1 
A-pol'ly-on, 170. 
A-pol-o~get'ie, 109, 170. 
A^pol-o-get'io-al, 106. 
A-pol-o-get'ics, 109. 
A-i)ol'o^|i8t, 170. 
A-pol'O^ae, 170, 902. 
Ap'o-16grue, 87, 170. 
A-pol'o-gy, 170. 
Ap-o-me-com'e-try. 
Ap-o-nett-rog'ra-phy. 
Ap-o-neu-roPo-gy. 
Ap-o-nea-ro'Mi9 (Gr.) 

[pi. Ap-^MtH^HTOfBiS 

l-9ez)j 196.1 
Ap-o-neQ-rot'ic 
Apo-neu-rot'o-my. 
Ap-o~pemp'tic. 
A-poph'ik-^U (Gr.) [pi. 

A-poph'a-8ia (-9€z), 

196.] 
Ap-o-phleg-mat'ie [w 

Sm. Wb. Gd. ; <um>- 

fieg'nub4iky Wk. Wr. 

155.] 
Ap-o-phleff'ma-tigm, 

i-Hzm). 
Ap-o phleg-mat'l^za&t, 

116. 
Ap'oph-thegm (iip'4>- 

them) (i«2)rApo> 

the(2r.,203.] 



' Both modes of spell- 
ing this word have the 
BsnctioB of good aathority. 
AptpMOiegm is fkrered 1^ 
the etgrnuriogy <Gr. dn6i^- 
$€yfta)t but Apothegm^ 
s«ys Worcester, "Is per- 
haps best supported fegr 
common usage." 

A-poph'y-ee, 163r 
Ap-o-phyllite, or A- 

poph'yl-lite T»o Wr. ; 

a-pofU-tU, Gd. 155.J 
Ap-o-plec'tio, 109. 
Ap-o-plec'tie-al, 108. 
Ap'Orplex-y, 93, 170. 
A-pos'ta-sy, 169. 



APPEAR 

A-pon'tate. 

A-pos'ta-tize. 202. 

A-pos'ta-tfz«d, 18S. 

•A-poB'tartiz-ing. 

Ap'o-Bteme, 170. 

A-poB'til. 

A-i)OB'tlc (-pof'«0» 102, 
171. 

A-pos'tolate. 

Ap-08-toric. 

Ap-OB-tol'ic-al. 

A-po8-to lig'l-ty. 

A-poB'tro-ph$, 103, 171. 

ApK»-trophMc. 

A-poB'tro-phTse, 202. 

A-pos'tro-phized, 183. 

A-poB'tro-phiz -Ing. 

A-poth'e-ca-ry, r-J, 171. 

Ap'o-th^^m {apio-them) 
(102) [Apoph- 
thegm, 203.J 

O^Sse Note imdBr 
Apophthegm. 

Ap-o-<]i^-mat'ie. 
Ap-o-theg-mat'io-al. 
Ap-o-theg'ma-tiBt, 171. 
Ap-o-theff'ma-tise, 202. 
Ap-o-the^OHiiB, 109. 
Ap-o-the'o-Bize, 202. 
A-pot'o-me, 103. 
A|Fo-zem. 
Ap-o-zemMc-al. 
Ap-pa-la'chi-an, 170. 
Ap-pall' (17) [Appal, 

Sm. 203.1 
Ap-p&UedS 166. 
Ap-p&ll'ing. 
[Appanage. — See 

Apanage, 203.] 
Ap-pa-raMaiB (170) [pU 

Ap-pa-ra'tu8, or Ap- 

pa-ra'tus-es, 198.] 
Ap-par'el, 170. 
Ap-p&r'elled (-pir'eld) 

(177) [Appareled, 

Wb. Gd. 203.— Sec 177, 

and Note E, p. 70.] 
Ap-p&r'el-ljng [ A jp - 

pareling,Wb. GML 

203.] 
Ap-par'ent (ap-pir'eni) 

(14, 171) [not ap-pa'- 

rent, 153.] 
Ap-pa-rY'tioB (-KBft'wn), 

46, 170. 
Ap-p&r'i-tor, 
Ap-peal', 13. 
Ap-poal'a-ble, 164, 169. 
Ap-pealed', 165. 
Ap-peal'er. 
Ap-peaPing. 
Ap-pear', 13. 



fldli OaitethCMi 4&aitiifoot$$a<i»fiu)ilejgiia»gingOitha<<»thi8. 



APPEARANCE 



100 



APSIS 



Ap-pear'anoe, 109. 
Ap-peared', 105. 
Ap-pear'inof, 4», N. 
Ap-pGas'a-ble {-piz'-), « 
Ap-pease' {-piz'), 40, 

130. 
Ap-peaned' (-pizd'), 186. 
Ap-pr'ase'ment {-piz'), 
Ap-peas'er {-piz'ur), 77, 

183. 
Ap-peasTve (-piz'-), 
Ap-pel'lant, 170. 
Ap-periate, 170. 
Ap-pcl'la-tlve, 170. 
Ap-pel'la-to-ry, 86. 
Ap-pel-lee', 122, 170. 
Ap-pel-lor'( 1 18) [ so Wb. 

Grd. ; ap-pel'lor, Sm. ; 

ap-peVlor, or ap-pel- 

lar\ Wr. 155. J 
[ A p p e n a g c, 203^~56e 

Apanag'eJ 
Ap-pend', 16, 108. 
Ap-pend'age, 171. 
Ap-pend'ant, 109. 
Ap-pen'di-ele, 164, 109. 
Ap-pen-dic'u-late. 
Ap-pen'dix (170) [pi. 

Ap-pen'dl-ces (slz), 

or Ap-pen'dix-es,198.] 
Ap-per-cep'tion, 170. 
Ap-por-tain', 122, 170. 
Ap'pe-tence, 160. 
Ap'pe-ten-cy, 169. 
Ap'pe-tTte (152, 170) 

See Apatite, 148.1 
Ap'pe-tJ-tlve, 84, 170. 
Ap'pe-tTze, 170, 202. 
Ap'pe-tiz-er, 183. 
Ap'pi-an, 169, 170. 
Applaud', 17, 103. 
Ap-plaud'cd. 
Ap-pl&ud'er. 
Ap-plaad'ing. 
Ap-plaase' {-platoz'), 17. 
Ap-plau'sTve, 156. 
Ap'ple (ap'l), 10, 164. 
Ap'ple-tree, 206, £xo.4. 
Ap-pli'a-ble, 164. 
Ap-pli'ance, 160. 
Ap-pli'an-cy, 169. 
Ap-pU-ca-bil'1-ty, 171. 
Ap'pli-ca-ble, 164, 170. 
Ap'pii-oan-cy, 109. 
Ap'pli-cant, 170. 
Ap'pli-cate. 
Ap-pli-ca'tion, 112. 
Ap'pli-ca-tlve, 84. 
Ap'pli-ca-to-ry, 86. 
Ap-plTed', 186. 
Ap-pli'er. 
Apply', 25. 
Ap-ply'ingr. 



Appogiaiura (It.) (<q>- 

poj-a-too'ra), 
Ap-point', 27. 
Ap point'a-ble, 104, 109. 
Ap-poiDt'cd. 
Ap-point-ee', 122. 
Ap-point'er. 
Ap-point'ingp. 
Ap-point'ment. 
Ap-por'tlon, 67. 
Ap-pdWtioned (■p(yr'- 

shund.) 
Ap-por'tion-ep. 
Ap-por'tion-ing. 
Ap-por'tion-ment. 
Ap-pds'cr (-pdz'-), 
Ap'po-Blte (-arW), 83, 170. 
Ap-po-Bl'tion (-«{«A'«n), 

40. 
Ap-poB'1-tive (-poz'-). 
Appraise' (-pr&z'), 40, 

43, 13(K 
Ap-praised' C-prBzd'), 

166. 
Ap-praise'ment {-prttz'- 

ment.) 
Ap-prais'er (-prfte'-), 
Ap-prais'ine^ l-prAz'-). 
Ap-pre'ci-arble {-pre'- 

ahi-a-bl), 46, 109, 171. 
Ap-pre'ci-ate lap-pr^- 

shim (171) [so Wk. 

8m. Wr. ; ap-pre'ahdt, 

Wb. Gd. 155.J 
Ap-pre'ci-at-ed (-«A1-)* 
Ap-pre'ci-at-ing {shi- 

at-). 
Ap-pre-ci-a'tion (-pre- 

ahX-a'shun), 171. 
Ap-ppe'ci-a-tlve(-»W-a-) 
Ap-pre'cl-a-to-ry(n«fcl-), 

86,93. 
Ap-pre-hend', 170. 
Ap-pre-hend'ed. 
Ap-pre-hend'er. 
Ap-pre-hend'Inff. 
Ap-pre-hen'si-ble, 104. 
Ap-pre-hen'slon. 
Ap-pre-hen'slve. 
Ap-pren'tlce, 109, 171. 
Ap-pren'ttced {-Hat), 

Note C, p. 34. 
Ap-pren'ti-cing, 183. 
Ap-pressed' {-preat'), or 

Ap-prest'. 
Ap-pnse' (-prf«') (25, 

1.36), V. to inform [See 

Apprize, 160.1 
Ap-prize', v. to set a 

price upon [See Ap- 
prise, 160.] 
Ap-prized', 150. 
Ap-prize'ment. 



Ap-prTz'er. 

Ap-proacb', n. & v, 24. 

Ap-proach'a-ble, 164. 

Ap-prdacbed'(-pr0cM'X 
Note C, p. 34. 

Ap-proach'er. 

Ap-proach'ing. 

Ap'pro-bate. 

Ap'pro-bat-ed, 183. 

Ap'pro-bat-ing. 

Ap-pro-ba'tion, 112. 

Apjoro-bat-Ive [so Bm. 
Wb. Gd. ; ap'pro4>a- 
«r, Wr. 155.J 

Ap'pro-ba-to-ry, 86. 

Ap-pro'pri-a-ble, 16*. 

Ap-pro'pri-ate, 171. 

Ap-pro'pri-at-ed, 183. 

Ap-pro-pri-a'tion. 

Ap-pro'pri-a-tlve, 84. 

Ap-ppo'pri-at-or. 

Ap-pro'pri-e-ta-ry (72) 
[so Wd. Gd.i<xp-pro- 
pri'e4a-rv. Wr. 166.1 

Ap-ppov'a-Dlc {-proov- 
ahl), 169. 

Ap-proy'al (-proofofalii 
183. 

Ap-prove' (-proof?'), 19. 

Ap-proved' (-proovdf^ 
183. 

Ap-prove'ment {ap- 
proov'-), 186. 

Ap-prov'er {^proov'nr), 

Ap-prov'ing {-proov'-). 

Ap-prox'i-mate, a. & « 

Ap-prox'i-mat-ed. [73. 

Ap-prox'i-mat-ing. 

Ap-prox-i-ma'tion, 112. 

Ap-prox'i-ma-t!ve. 

Ap-pulse' [so 8m. Wb. 
Gd. ; ap*pula, Wk. ; 
ap'pula or ap-puU't 
Wr. 165.J 

Ap-pul'sion. 

Ap-pul'slve. 

Ap-pur'te-nanoe, 169. 

Ap-pur'te-nant, 72, 169. 

A'pri-cot (171) [not ap'- 
ri-cot, 153.1 

A'pril, 23, 2.30. 

A'pron (171) (ajpum or 
a'prun)\f^o Wr. ; a'- 
pum, Wk. Grd. ; a'- 
prun, colloquially 
a'pum^ Sm. 165.1 

A'proned(a'ipunul),171. 

Ap'ro-poa (Fr.) {ap' ro- 
pe) [BO Sm. Ga. ; c^- 
ropo'^ Wr. 166.] 

Ap'sl-dal. 

Ap'ais (Gr.) [pi. Ap'ai- 
dia {-dtz), 196.] 



a, e, i, 5, ii, y, long ; ft, fi, Y, d, tt, f, ahori iHasin far, kaain fkst, kwin 



APT 



101 



ABCHITEOTURE 



Apt, 10, 30, 41. 
Ap'ter-al, 233. 
Ap'ter-an. 
Ap'ter-o&s. 
Ap'ter-j^x, 171. 
Apt'i-tude, 160, 171. 
Ap'tote, 230. 
A-py-ret'ic [bo Gd. ; ap- 

y^ret'iCy Wr. 165.] 
Ap'y-rex-y, 93, 171. 
Ap'jr-rofis [so Wr. ; af- 

plr-UBy Sm. ; a-j^'rtu^ 

Gd. 155.1 
A' qua <L.) ^a'kwa), 
A-qua'ri-al, 40, N. 
A-qua'ri-an, 100. 
A-qua'ri-um (L.) [fd. 

A-qua'ri-(h 106.] 
A-qua'ri<u (L.). 
A-quat'ic. 
A'aua-tint. 

Aq'ue-dttct (aiftoe-),171. 
A'que-otts, 171. 
A'qai-form (a'kwt-) [so 

Wb. 6d. ; aVioe- 

fwrmy Wr. 155.] 
Aq'ui-Une {ak'wi-lln)^ 

or Aq'ui-lme iaVwi- 

An) [so Wr. Ga. ; aV- 

toi-lln, Wk. Sm. 165.) 
Aq'al-lon {aVwi-lon). 
Ar^ab or A'rab (170) [so 

Wr. J Ar'ab^ Gd. l&.J 
Arna-besqae'(-^>e«ik'),168. 
Ar-a-besqaed' {-b^kt')^ 

Note Cf, p. 34. 
A-ra'bi-an, 78. 
Ar'a-bic, 109, 150, 170. 
A-rab'ic-al, 108. 
Ar Vblne [ A r ab 1 n , 

203.1 
Ar'a-blsm l-bizm). 
Ar'a-bist. 
Ar'a-ble, 164, 170. 
A-ra'oeons (-ra'«A«M). 
A-rach'ni-dan (-roA'-), 

52. 
A-rach'noid {;^raV-), 
A-rach-noI'o-gist {-rak- 

noV-)y 106. 
A-rach-nol'o-^f7 {-rtA')y 

106. 
Ar'a-gon-ite [Arra- 

gonite,20:).] 
Ar-a-mie'aii (-me'on). 
Ar-a-ma'io. 
Ar-a-ne'i-dan. 
Ar-a-ne'l-form, 108. 
A-ra'ne-o&i. 
A-ra'tion. 
Ar^bal-ist. 
Ar'bal-ist-er. » 

Ar'bl-ter, 77. 



Ara>i.tra-ble, 104. 
Ar-bit'rarment [ A r - 

bitremeiit,203.] 
Ar'bi-tra-ri.ly. 
Ar'bi tra-ry, 72, 03. 
Ar'bitrate, 73. 
Ar'bltrat-«d, 183. 
Ar'bi-trat-ing. 
Ar-bi-tra'tion. 
Ar'bi-trat-or. 
Ar'bi-trat-rlx [to Sm. 

Wr. } ar-H4ratfrix^ 

Wb. Gd. 155.] 
[Arbitremont.— 

Set Arbitrament,203.] 
Ar'bi-treaa. 
Ar'bor (11, 109) [Ar'- 

bour.Sm. 199,203.] 
Ar'bored {ar'burd), 
Ar-bo're-o&s, 160. 
Ar-bo-res'oent, 171. 
Ar'bo-ret. 

Ar-bor-l-calt'ur-al, 01. 
Ar-bor-i-eiilt'ure, 91. 
Ar-bor-i^ult'a' Ist. 
Ar-bdr'i-form, 143. 
Ar'borist. 
Ar-bor-l-za'tion. 
Ar'bor-ofta. 

Ar-buB'de (-&im'«I)> 102* 
Ar-bus'cu-Iar, 106. 
Ar-bu8t'Ive. 
Ar'bute, 11, 26. 
Ar-bu'te-an, 110. 
Arc (11, 49, 52), «. a part 

of a eircumferenoe 

[See Ark, 160.] 
Ar-cade^ 11, 23. 
Ar-cad'ed, 183. 
Ar-ca'di-aa, 109. 
Arch, 11, 44. 
Ar-chc-og'ra-phr (-he- 

og'-), 108. 
Ar-chae-o-lo'gi-an {ar- 
te-). 
Ar-chae-o-l(^'ic (-ke-o- 

lofik). 
Ar-ehae-o-log'io-al (-ke- 

o-iofik), 
Ar-chae-ol'o-giBt {-be- 

ol'-), 108. 
Ar-'chje-ol'o-gy (-fe-)» 

106. [Arobaiolo- 

gy,2a3.l 

Archaic (-kaHk), 52. 
Aycharism {ar'kordzm), 
Arch-an'gcl (arifc-)i 171. 
Arch-an-gel'ic {-ark). 
Arch-a-pos'tle {-potest). 
Arch-btsh'op. 
Arch-bish'op-ric. 
Arch-chem'ic (arc/^ 
kem'ik)y 44, 52. 



Areh-dia'oon (-de'Aii), 

167. 
Arch-dto'eon-ry C-dM*' 

kn-), 03. 
Arch-di'o-eeie (-o-df), 
Arch-du'eal. [17L 

Arch-duoh'eta, 44. 
Aroh-duoh'y, 44, 93. 
Arch-dttke'. 
Aroh-duke'dom. 
Arched (arcW,or mrtikf-' 

ed), 150. 
Ar-chel'o-gy {-ttV^Jif), 
Arch'er, 77. 
Arch'er-eas. 
Arcb'er-f , 93. 
Ar-ehe-typ'ai (ar-ke-)^ 

183. 

Ar'ohe-type(ar'4:e-)tl71« 
Ar-che-typ'i(val(ar4!e). 
Arch-fleod', 206. 
Ar-chi'a-ter (ar-ki'a- 

tur) [so Wr.: ar^ki^ 

a-tur, Wb. Gd. 155.] 
Arch'ic-al (orlr'ti:-}. 
Ar-chf<lj<ao'(>-iial (or- 

W-). 
A-«hi-«-pis'eo-pa-ey(ar- 

JW'-), 171. 
Ar-€hl-e-pta'oo>pal {atr- 

ki). 

Ar'chll (arfeha or ar*- 

kU) [so Wr. ; ar'chU, 

Sm. i ark'U, Wb. (M. 

155.1 
Ar-chi-lo'ohi-an {ar-kl- 

hfki-an), SSI, 171. 
Ar-chi-man'drite <ar- 

kt). 
Ar-chlm-e-de'an {-kim- 

e), 110, 171. 
Arch'hig. 
Ar-chi-pe-lag'ic (ar-kU 

pe4qyik), 171. 
Ar-ohi-pel'a-go (ar-ki- 

pel'a-ao) (171) [fwt 

arch-i-pel'a-go, 163.1 
Ar'ohi-tect (ar*ki-tekt) 

?17n [not arch'i-tekt, 

Ar-chi-tect1ve (ar-l!l>). 
Ar-chi-teo-ton'io (ar- 

tl'). 
Ar-chi-teo-ton'io-al (ar- 

k\-). 
Ar'chi-teet-ress (ar'JW- 

tekl-res) [so Wr. ; ar- 

ki-tekt'resy Wb. Gd. 

165.1 
Ar-chi-tect'ttr.al (ar- 

kX-). 
Ar'cni-tect-ure (ar'ki- 

tekt-yur) (52, 91, 171) 



lall; 6a«i» there; Ob a« in foot j 9 as tn fiusUe ; gh a« g in go ; th a« in this. 

9* 



ABCHITEAVB 



102 



ABO0SE 



Imai anh'l-toot-TQr, 

^63.1 
▲r'chl-trsre iar*m-%\7\ 
▲r-chiy'al (^ar-kiv'al) 

[bo Wr. ; arVi-val, 

Wb. Gd. 166.J 
Arohiyes (ar'tlvz) [n(4 

ar'chiTz, 153.1 
Ar'chi-vist («r^-). 
Ar'chi-volt (ar'tl-), 
Ar'dum (arkon). 
Arch-pres'by-ter 

i-pr^g*') [80 Wk.Wr. ; 

arch-prt»'1»i-tur, Gd. 

156.] 
Archpres'by-ter-y, 

(-priz'-), 171. 
Arch-priests 206. 
Areh-pri'mate. 
Arch'stone, 24, 200. 
Arch'way, 206. 
ArQh'wise ^-tcte). 
Ar'oo-CT&ph. 
Aro-ta^tion. 
Aro'tic. 49, 52. 
Aro-ttt'rus, 40, K. 
Ar'cu-ate, 80. 
Ar-ca-«'tion. 
Ar'cu-bal-ist. 
Ar-cu-bal-ist'er, or Am- 

cu-bal'ist-er [so Wr. ; 

ar-eu-bal^iai^urt Sm. ; 

ar-cu-beU'iat^W', Wb. 

Gd. 165.] 
Ar'den-cy, 160. 
Ar'dent, 160, 230. 
ArMor (11, 88) [Ar- 
dour, Sm. 100, 263.] 
Ard'u-o&s [bo Sm. Gd. ; 

ar^du^us, Wr. ; ar'jH- 

usj Wk. 166.1 
Are {(ir)y 11, m. 
A're-a, 49, N. ; 171. 
A-reek'. 
Ar-e-fac'tion. 
Ar'e-ff , 94, 160. 
A-re'na, 171. 
Ar-e-na'oeons (-na'- 

9kus), 112, 160. 
Ar-e-na'ri-ofis, 49* H. 
Ar^-na'tion. 
A-ren-i-lit'lo. 
Ar-e-nose'. 
Ar^e-nottB. 
A-re'o-la (L.) [pi. A-ref- 

o-kBy 198.1 
A-re'o-lar, 74. 
A-re'o-late, 73. 
A-re-o-la'tion. 
2-re-om'.e-ter (49, N.) 

[80 Sm. Wr. ; ilr-e- 

om'e4urj Wb. Gd. 
j(-re-o-met'rio. [166.] 



2-re-o>iiiet'i4e-«L 

A-rfr^m'e-try. 

Ar-e-op'a^8t. 

Ar-e-op'a-gite [so Wk. 
Wr. Wb. GW. ; «r-«- 
op'€^^t, Sm. 155.1 

Ar-e-i^'a-ffus (^170) [bo 
Wr. Wb, Gd. ; «r-e- 
op'a-gu$, Sm. 165.1 

Ar^. 

Ar'gand. 

Ar'gent. 

Ar-gent'al [io Gd.; mH- 
jent-al, Wr. 165.] 

Ar-gent'ie. 

Ar-gen-tifer-otta. 

Ar'gent-ine [bo Wr.Gd.; 
ar*jerU%n, Sm. 156.] 

Ar'gfll, 171. 

Ar-gil4a'oeoii8 (-fAiM), 
IW, 171. 

Ar-gil-lifer-otta. 

Ar-iU'lo-cal-ca're-ott8. 

Ar-fiiiaoi&8 [BO Wk.Wr. 
Wb. Gd.; orfJiNus, 
Sm. 155.] 

Ar'gol. 

Ar-gol'ie. 

Ar'gfo-n&iit. 

Ar-go-n&vt'ie, 1081 

Ar'gro-sy, 160. 

Ar'gue. 

Ar'g^ed, 183. 

Ar'gru-er, 77, 89. 

Ar'gu-fa^. 

Ar'gn-ment. 

Ar-gu-ment-a'ttoiL 

Ar-gu-menfa-tlre, 171. 

A'rf-an, 49, N. ; 169. 

A'ri-an48m {-izmy, 183. 

Ar'id, 66, 170, 231. 

A-rid'i-ty, 108, 171. 

A'ri-ta (L.) (a'r»-««). 

A-risrht> (<hrU')9 100. 

Ar'il, 170, 231. 

Ar'il'late. 

Ar'il-lat-ed. 

Ar'l-oae, 170. 

A-rise' (a-rl«')« 25, 40. 

A-ri8'lag (€hriz'ing),iJBi 

Ar'is-tarch (-tark). 

Ar-is-tardi'l-aii 
(-tor*'-). 

A-ris'tate. 

Ar-ls-too'ra-cy, 108. 169. 

A-ris'to-crat, or Ar'iB- 
to-crat [80 Wr. ; ar- 
i8-to-krat'y Wk. ; oW- 
iS'to-krai, Sm. ; ar'is- 
to-krat or a-ria'to- 
krat, (M. 166.1 

Ar-i8-to-crat'io, 109. 

Ar-is-to-orat'ic-al, 106. 



Ar-ia-to-ttni-im [aoW)!^ 

Wb. Gd. ; ar-i8-to4a*- 

yan, Sm. 165.] 
Ar-i8-to-tel'ie, 170. 
A-rith'man-cy (169) [bo 

Wk. Wr.; arftth-maf^ 

9y, Sm. i ar'ith-man- 

Mf or Orriik'ntan-eih 

Gd. 156.J 
A-rith'me-tic, 109, 171. 
Ar-itfa-met'ie-al, 108. 
A-ritfa-mc^'cian(-<i8V- 

an), 46, 112, 171. 
Ark ( 1 1, 49, 62), n. a kfaid 

of veBBel. [See Are, 

160.] 
Arm, 11, 3SL40. 
Ar-mit'da (Sp.). 
Ar-ma-dUao (170) [pL 

Ar-ma-dil'loB (-{6«)| 
Ar'ma-ment. £192.] 
Ayma-tar^ 171. 
Armed, 165. 
Ar-me'ni-an [iSiw Ar- 

min'i-an, 148.] 
Arm'fttl (rf66l) (180, 

197). 
Arm'il-la-ry, 72, 170. 
Arm'ioff. 
Ar-min'iaii (ar-min'' 

uan) [See Armenian, 

148.1 
Ar-mm'ian-iBm f-mfn'- 

yan-izm)t ia% 136. 
Arm'iB-tloe, 160, 171. 
Ar'mor (11, 88) [A rm- 

our, Sm. 199, 203. J 
Ar'mor-er. 77, 88. 
Ar-mo'ri-al. 
Ar-4ndr'ic» 109. 
Ar-mdr'io-an. 
Arm'o-ry, 86, 03. 
Anna (Hrrnz), 130. 
Ar'my, 93. 
AWnl-ea, 160, 171. 
[Ar notto . — See An- 

notto, 203.] 
A-ro'ma, 72, 171. 
Ar-o-mat'ic, 109, 170. 
Ar-o-mat'ic8. 
A-ro'ma-tize, or AWo- 

ma-tize (202)[a-ro'ma- 

ttZf Sm. Wb. Gd.; 

dr'o^ina4lz, Wk, ; ar'- 

o-ma-tlz or o-ro'ina- 

ft«, Wr. 165.] 
A-ro'ma-tiz-er, or Ar*- 

o-ma-tiz-er. 
A-ro'ma-toiis. 
A-rose' (o-rS«')i 136. 
A-round', 28. 
A-rouse' (a-rouz')y ^ 

136. 



a, d, 1, Of tt, y, Umq ; ft» i$i Xi d» tt, t» ^^^i ilae tn fiff, aew #» ft^t, A a» in 



AROUBID 



108 



AaCIAN 



165, 183. 
X-TOJXB'ixkgUt-romt^ing). 
A-roynt', 27. 
Ar-peg'gio (It.) (ur- 

Ar'pent. 
Ar-que-bua-ade'. 
Ar'que-b&se {ar*hu>&- 

bus) [bo Wk. Wr. ; 

ar^ktoe-b^a, Wb. Gd. : 

ar'Xrtne-^oos, Son. 1&5. ] 
Ar-qne-hun-ier'^ar-kwe- 

bus-irf), 114, 160. 
Arrack' (170} fao Wk. 

Wj-.Wb.(Jd.} 9r*mk, 

8m. 1S5.] 
[ArrBgonite,203.— 

See J^agonite.l 
Ar-raign' (o-rAnOf 1<C» 

171. 
Ar-raigB6d' (o-rAiid')* 
Ar-raiin'inff (o-rOn'- 

Ar-raign'ment (-rfln'). 
Ar-iinge', 48, 66, K.; 

170. 
Ar-ranged', 166, 188. 
Ar-ranie'ment. 
Ar-ran^er. 
Ar-ran'glng. 
Afrant, 48, 17a 
Ar'raa, 170. 
Ar-ray', n. & v. 
Ar-rayed', 160, 187. 
Ar-ray'er. 
Ar-rily'ing. 
Ar-rear', T71i. 
Ar-rear'age, 160, 171. 
Ar-recf. 
Ar-reat', 15, 103. 
Ar-rest'ed. 
Ar-reat'er, or Ar-reaf- 

or, 77, 88. 
Arrh (Fr.) (ar-ret^ or 

ar-rl^) [so Wr. : or- 

rrt', (Jd. 164, 165.] < 
Ar-riire' (Fr.) {fir^ir'), 
AJ-'ris, 170. 
Ar-riv'al, 228. 
Ar-rive', 26. 
Ar-rived', 165, 183. 
Ar-flv'Ing. 
^r-ro'6o (Sp.). 
Ar'ro-eance, 170. 
Ar'ro^ant, 170. 
Ar'ro-gate, 73. 
Ar'ro-gatHHl, 183. 
Ar'ro^t-ing. 
Ar-ro-ga'tion. 
Ar'ro-gw-tlve, 84. 
ArroTMiesement (Fr.) 

{ar-ran'dit-mdng). 



170. 
Ar'rdw-root. 

215. 
Ar'row-y, 03. 
Ar'ae-nal, 171. 
Ar-Be'ni-ate. 
Ar'aen;^. «. ri«l) [so 

Sm. wb. Gd.; «r«'- 

nikt Wk. ; ar'een^ 

or ars'nil;, Wr. 165.) 
Ar-aen'le, •• 161. 
Ar-aen^ic-al. 
Ar-aen'i-^ate. 
Ar-Be'Dl-oHB, 160. 
Ar'ae-Bite. 
Ar-ae-nl'tt-feC 
Ar-ae-nl'm-ret-ted. 
[Araetainreted,803] 
Ar'aoH, 171. 
Art, 11, 41,401 
Ar-te'ri-ac 
Ar-te'ri-al, 40, K. 
Ar-te-ri-al-I-«a'tioB, 112. 
Ar-te'rl-al-lze, 208. 
Ar-te-ri-og'ra-phy, 108. 
Ar-te-ri-oFo^y, 108. 
Ar-te-ri-ot'o-my, 106. 
Ar'ter-T, 03, 233. 
Ar-te'Uan (mr-*e'zhan}t 

112. 
Art'Ail (ari'/66t). 
Arthritic 
Ar-thrifti» (Gr.). 
Ar-throd4c. 
Ar-thro-dynlo. 
Ar-throl'o-gy. 106L 
Ar'ti-choke, 171. 
Ar'ti-cle, 78, 164. 
Ar'ti-cied («r'«<.JkU), 

166,183. 
Ar'ti-cliiig, 183. 
Ar-tic'a-lar, 80. 
Ar-tic'u-late, a, A v. 72. 
Ar-tic'u-lat-ed. 
Ar-tio'u-lat-ing. 
Ar-tio-a-la'tion, 112. 
Art'i-floe, 160, 171. 
Ar-tlfi-cer. 
Art-i-fl'dal ('ftsh'aX) 

( 1C9) [80 Wk. Wr.Wb. 

Gd.; art-i^'yal^ 

Sm. 165.1 
Ar-ti-n-ci-al'1-ty (-JUh- 

i-al'Uy), 108, 116. 
Ar-til'ler-iat, 170. 
Ar-tU'ler-y, 93, 170. 
Art'i-aan hzan) fao £kn. 

Wb. Gd. ; art-i-zan', 

Wk. ; ari'i-xan or 

art-i-zan'j Wr. i65.J 
Art'iat, 80. 



ArtUU (F^.) (oriW). 
Art-iat'ic, 100 
Arto-c'vr'uoika. 
Ar-un-dcl'iaB (Sr-«f»> 

diVyan) [ao Sm. Gd.; 

&r^un-4iH%<Mt Wr. 

165.] 
Ar-un-dlfer-otta, 108. 
A-ntn-di-na'oeooa (na'- 

Mttf), 160. 
A-run-diD'e-oHt. 
A-rua'ploe, 160. 
A-rua'pl-cy. 160. 
A-rjrt'e-Doid. 
A» (L.) (161), i». a Bo- 

mjui eoiB. 
Aa (a2) ( 161), ad, ft eoi^. 

In the "nn""**'' that; 

becauae. 
Aaa-ftBt'i-da [Aatft- 

f<Btida,a03.1 

aV WSnMr. BBMTt, WML 
Goodrich, prenr the fli«t 
Itomi f WoreMter the ««- 
ond. Goodrich irive* aIm 
tiie forma Atafetlda, 
and Attafetida. 

Aa-bea'tic. 
Aa-bes'ti-form, 171. 
Aa-bea'tlne, 82, 162. 
Aa-bee'toid. 
Aa-bea'toa, cr Aa-bea'- 

taa, 203. 
At'ca-rxM (L.) [pi. At- 

carfirdit l-diz^j 106.] 
Aa-eend', 30, 230. 
Aa-eead'a-ble, 161. 
Aa-oend'an-cy [A a- 

cendencr,2U3.] 
Aa-eend'aat (a a c e n d - 

ent,203.J 
Aa-cend'ed. 
Aa-cend'en-ey [Aa- 

cendanc7,203.) 
Aa-oend'ent [ A a e e n d - 

8Bt,203.] 
Aa-cend'ing. 
Aa-oea'^on, 17L 
Aa-cen'gion-al. 
Aa-oent', n. aot of ria- 

ing [ See Aaaent, 160. : 
As-oer-tain', 171. 
Aa-oer-taiii'a-ble, 190. 
Aa-oer-tained', 166. 
A8-«cr-tain'er. 
Aa-oer-taia'ing. 
Aa-oer-taln'ment. 
Aa-cet'ic, 30, 171. 
Aa-cet'i-ciam (-Hem), 

133, 136. 
Aa'ci-an (ash^-an) [no 

Gd. , aaft'yofi), Wr. 

155.] 



fidl^ doain there; dbMinfootjQOf mfiMUejghaagmgo^tbaaiiithiB. 



ASCIDIAN 



104 



A8800IABLE 



At-eid'i-an, 109. 
As'ci-IJL. pi.; (ash't-l) 

[BO Wr. Gd. J ash'yh 

8m. 155.] 
As-dt'ic. 
AB-cl-tl'cious (-tish'tu), 

160, 231, Exo. 
AB-cle'pi-ad. 
AB-crib'a-ble, IM. 
Ascribe', 25. 
As-cribed', 165. 
As-crib'ing, 183. 
AB-crip'tioa. 
A-Bep'tic. 
Ash, 10, 40. 

A-Bhamed' (a-^Kdmd'), 
ABh'en. [150. 

Ash'er-y, 93, 233. 
ABh'es lash'ez)^ 40, 40. 
Ash'lar, or ABh'ler, 74, 
Ash'ler-ingf. [77. 

A-Bh5reS 24. 
Ash'y, 93. 
A'Bian ^a^ahan) [bo Wb. 

Gd. ; Hah'yarit Sm. 

Wr. 165.] 
A'si-areh (a'9h%-ark). 
A-Blatao (^ashl-afik), 

109. 
A-si-at'l-dBm (H-sKl-aif- 

%-Hzm)j 133, 130. 
A-Blde', 25. 
4kB'i-nine, 78, 170 
Ask, 12, 131. 
A-Bkance', 11. 
A-8kant', 11. 
Asked (dskt), 150, ISotfi 

C, p. 34. 
Ask'er. 

A-8kew' ia^hu'), 20. 
Ask'ing'. 
A-Blant^ 11. 
A-sleep', 13. 
A-slope', 24. 
As-mo-nae'an (-ne'an) 
. [Asmonean, 203.] 
Asp, 12, 131. 
As-p&r'a-gas (170). 



^ Thia word hM been 
Tulgariy corrupted into 
tparrow-grau. Walker re- 
marks of thia form of the 
word : '* It may be ob- 
served that Buch words as 
the vulgar do not know 
how to spell, and which 
convey no definite idea of 
the thing, are flrequentlv 
changed Dy them into such 
words as they do know 
how to spell, and which do 
cnnvejr some definite idea. 
The word in questi<m is an 
instance of itJ*' 

Ail'pect, 10. 



As'pen, 10, 149. 

As-pfir'i-ty, 169, 170. 

A-sperm'ottB. 

As-perse', 21, Note. 

As-persed' (-J9er«<')>105» 
Note C, p. 34. 

As-pers'er, 183. 

As-pers'in^. 

As-per'sion, 171. 

As-pers'Tve, 84. 

As-phalt'. 121. 

As-phalt'ie, 35. 

As-phal'tam, 35. 

As'pho-del. 

As-phyx'i-a, 16, 171. 

As-phyx'y, 93, 169. 

As-pir'ant (49 N.) [so 
Sm. Wb. (5d.; as- 
plr'arU, or a»'pi-ranif 
Wr. 155.] 

As'pi-rate, n. & v. 73. 

As'pi-rat-ed. 

As'pi-rat-ing. 

As-plre', 25. 

As-pired', 105, 183. 

As-pir'ing, 49, Note. 

A-squintS ai, 52. 

Ass, 12, 131, 174. 

rABBaf(Btida,203.— 
iS^ee Asafoatida.] 

As-sail', 23. 

As-sail'a-ble, 104. 

As-sail'ant, 169. 

AB-sailed', 165. 

As-sail'er. 

As-sail'lng. 

As-sas'sin, 170, 230. 

As-sas'sin-ate, 169. 

As-sas'sin-at-ed, 183. 

As-sas'sin-at-ing. 

A8-sas-Bin-a'tion. 

As-sas'sin-at-or. 

As-sault', 17. 

As-siult'ed. 

As-siult'er. 

As-sftult'ins;. 

AB-say', n. A V. 23. 

As-saycd', 165. 

As-say'er. 

As-Bay'ing. 

As-sem'blage. 

As-sem'ble, 164. 

As-sem'bled (-bid), 183. 

As-sem'bler. 

As-sem'blinfi^ 

As-sem'bly, 93. 

As-sent' (15), n. agree- 
ment: — V. to agree; 
to consent. [5ee As- 
cent, 160.1 

As-scnt-a'tion. 

As-sent'ed. 

As-seut'er. 



AB-Bcn'tieiit (shent), 46, 
As-sent'ing. 
As-sert', 21, Note. 
As-sert'ed. 
As-sert'ing. 
As-ser'tiou. 
As-sert'Ive, 84. 
As-sert'or, 109. 
As-sert'o-ry [so Sm. 

Wb. Gd.; a8'8er-to- 

ry, Wr. 155.] 
As-Bess', 15, 174. 
As-Bess'a-ble, 104. 
As-sessed' (-M«eO» 105, 

Note C, p. 34. 
As-sess'ing. 
As-Bes'sion-a-ry (^feeA'- 

ten-), 46, 72. 
As-sess'ment. 
As-sess'or, 160. 
As'sets, 170. 
As-sev'er-ate, 72. 
As-sev'er-at-ed, 183. 
As-sev'er-at-ing. 
As-sev-er-a'tion. 
As'Bi-dent, 169, 170. 
As-si-du'i-ty, 108, 170. 
As-sid'tt-oiis, 91. 170. 
As-sign' (as-slw), 162. 
A8-sign'a-ble(-«l}»'a ■bl)^ 

162, 164. 
AsHgnat (Fr.) {as-sinr 

ya')[fl0 Sm.; Hs-in-y'd'', 

OTa»Ag-nat',WT.\ a»'- 

aig^nat, Gd. 154, 155.] 
As-sig-na'tion, 170. 
As-signed' {-alrut'^ 165. 
As-sign-ee' (-«19»-«'),122» 

162. 
As-Bign'er (-»ln't«r). 
As-sign'ing (sln'ing), 
As-sign'ment {sin'-). 
As-slgn-or' (-»ln-or'), 

(118, 122) [correlative 

of Assignee.] 
As-Bigns' (a9n8Sn«'),130. 
'As-sim'i-la-ble, 164. 
As-sim'i-Iate, 109, 170. 
As-sim'i-lat-ed. 
As-sim'i-lat-ing. 
As-sim-i-la'tion. 
As-sim'i-Ia-tlve, 84. 
As-sim'i-la-to-ry. 
As-sist', 16. 
As-sist'ance, 160. 
As-sist'ant, 169. 
As-sist'ed. 
As-sist'ing. 
As-size', 16. 
As-Biz'er, 183. 
As-so-ci-a-bil'I-ty (so- 

sh%-). 
As-so'ci-a-ble (-so'shl-ct- 



a, e, i, d, u, f, Umg ; &, £, 1, d, fi, f, short \ Has in far, kasin fast, ft a< in 



ASSOCIATE 



105 



ATTACK 



bij [bo Wk. Sm. Wr.; 

(<M-*o'«Aa-60»Wb.Gd. 

155.1 
As-Bo^d-ate, n, A v. 

(8o'ah%-dt) [so Wk. 

Sm. Wr. ; as-Bo'shiU, 

Wb. Gd. 155.] 
AB-Bo'd-at-ed (-«M<A^), 

183. 
As-so'd-at-ing^ (-•A1-M-) 
A8-BO-d-a'tion(-«M-a'-}. 
As'so-nance, 109, 170. 
As'so-nant. 
Ag-Bort^ 17, 103. 
As-sort'ed. 
As-sort'lng. 
As-Bort'ment. 
As-suage' (m-mvO/Oi 34, 

45, 171. 
As-Buaffed' {-twBjdf), 

165. 
As-suag'er (-«ira/-))183> 
AB-snai'iiig (-mt^/'-). 
AB-Bua^slve (-mdo'-), 

171. 
As'sae-tade {ja$*9W&- 

tlid)y 174. 
As-Bume', 26, 103. 
AB-Bumed', 1G6, 183. 
AB-Bum'er. 
As-Bum'inff. 
A8-9ump'»U <L.). 
AB-Bump'tion {-turn'-), 

162. 

As-Biunp't!ye (-«tfm'-)> 

102. 
Aa-snr'anoe C€htkoar*-)t 

171. 
AB-snre' ((ushoor*), 46, 
As-Bnred' (a-skoord'), 
As-Bur'ed-iy iashoor*- 

ed4y), 150. 
Afl-Bur'er (o-»*oor'«r). 

AB-tat'io. 

AB'te-iflm (-izm), 136, 

109. 
As-te'rf-at-ed, 49, K. 
As'ter-iBk, 171. 
As'ter-iBm (-isni), 133. 
As'ter-Tte, 162. 
A-Bteni', 21, N. 
AB'ter-old, 171, 233. 
AB-t«r-oid'aL 
As'the-nv. 
A8-then'ic. 
ABth'ma (off'ina), 41, 

72, 171. 
ABtb-mat'ic (asU), 
A-Btir', 21, N. 
AB-ton'ish, 104. 
AB-ton'ished {-iOU), 
AB-ton'iBh-ing. 



AB-ton'lBh-meiit. 

Aa-tound', 28, 103. 

Aa-tound'ed. 

AB-toand'ing. 

A-8trad'dle, 164. 

As-4ra'a (L.) (as^refa) 

As'tra-gal. 

As'tral, 10, 230. 

A-Btray', 23, 232. 

Aa-tric'tion. 

Aa-trio'tlve. 

A-8tride%25. 

Aa-triu'g^en-cy, 109. 

Aa-trin'ifeut. 

Aa-trog'ra-phy, 106. 

Aa'tro-ite, 152. 

Aa'tro-labe. 

Aa-trol'o-fi'er. 

Aa^ro-lospic (Iq^'ti:). 

As-trol'o-g^, 93, 106. 

Aa-tron'o-mer, 170. 

As-tro-nom'to, 109. 

A8-tro-nom'lc-al, 106. 

Aa-tro-nom'io-al-ly. 

Afl-tron'o-my, 170. 

As'tro-Boope. 

A8'tro-the*ol'a«T, 224. 

A-Btrut'. 

Aa-tute', 20. 

A-Bun'der. 

A-By'lam (125, 171) [not 
as'y-lum, 153.1 

A-8ym'me-tral, 169, 170. 

A8-ym-met'ric-al, 116. 

A-sym'me-try. 

AB'ymp-tote (aa'lM-), 
162, 171. 

Aa-ymp-tot'ie (eu*ifn-). 

AB-ymp-tot'io-al {(tr- 
im-), 

A-gyn'deton (Gr.) [pi. 
A-syu'de-tOj 196. J 

At, 10. 

At'a-bal, 170. nWB.] 

At'a-erhanr Y a t aff n an, 

A-tax'ic. 

Ate («, or «) [bo Wr. ; 
«,Wk.Wb. Gd.;«, 
Sm. 203. J 

At'e-lene, 170. 

Atelier (Fr.) (a#'Ie-a), 
154. 

A-thal'a-motts. 

Atb-a-na'Bian (ath-a- 
na'than, or aOiha-^M*- 
zhan) [ath-€t^ma*»hanj 
Wb. Gd.; ath-a-na*- 
zhan, Wr. ; ath-a- 
n&zh'i-an, Sm. 155.] 

A'the-ism (-ism\ 133. 

A'tbe-fst. 

A-tbe-ist^ie, 109. 

A-the-iBt'io-al, 108. 



Ath-e-iuB'um (L.), or 
Ath-c-ne'uiii (Kn<;.) 
(HI) [L. pi. Athe- 
tUB'a't Ktig. pi. Ath- 
e-ne'unuB, i98.] 

A-tbo'Di-ao. 

A-tbirst', 232. 

Ath'lete, (J7I, 831) Iflo 

155.] 
Atb-let'ie, 170. 
Atbw4rt', 17, 171. 
A-tilt'. 

AtUn-te'an, 110. 
At'lan'Ut i-tiz) (L. pi.). 
At-Un'tic. 
At4a»'tirdi$ {-dMz) (L. 

pl). 
At'laa. 

At-mom'e-ter. 
At'moB-phere, 36, 171. 
At-moB-ph(Vic, 143. 
At-moB-phdr'ie-al. 
At'om. 109, 170. 
A-tom'lc, 109. 
A-tom'ic-al, 106. 
At'om-ism i-izm), 
At'om-ist. 
At'om-lze, 202. 
Atom-oro-gy, 106. 
A-tone', 24. 
A-toned% 166, 183. 
A-tone'moit. 
A-t5n'er. 
A-ton'io. 
A-tonMng. 
At'o-ny,93,170. 
A-top'. 

At-ra-bll-a'ri-an. 
At-ra-bil-a'ri-olia, 171. 
At-ra-bU'ia-ry (-fdi'ya- 

ry). 
At-rabil'ioiiB (-MPynt). 
At-ra-mcnt-a'oeoii8 

(-«AtM), 112. 
At-ra-ment'al. 
At-ra-ment-a'ri-ottB. 
At-ra-ment'o&a. 
Atrip'. 
A-tro'doQS (-«JkiM), 40, 

160, 171. 
A-troc'i-ty, 39, 171. 
Afro phled (Jid), 171. 
At'ro-pby, 93, 170. 
Attach', 10, 103. 
At-tacb'a-ble, 164. 
Attach^ (Fr.) (at-ta- 

«»«'). 
At-tacbcd' {-t€u:ht')y 166, 

Note C, p. 34. 
At-tach'ing'. 
At-tacb'ment. 
At-tack', n. A v. 10, 62. 



ftll; 6a«<ntbere; (Sb m in toot; ^ as in faede ; gh as g in go -, V^a$ in thia. 



ATTACKABLE 



106 



AUTflOE&ai 



At-tack'a-ble, 164. 
At-tack'er. 
At-tain', 23. 
At-Uin'a-ble, IM. 
At-tainMer. 
Attained', 166. 
At-tain'ing-. 
At-tain'ment. 
At-taint', 23. 
At-taint'ed. 
At-taint'iiig« 
At-tHint'meut. 
At-taint'ure (-yitr), 91, 
[Attar, 20:).— See O t- 

taranaOtto.J 
At-tem'per. 
At-tera'pered (-purd). 
At-tem'per-lng. 
At-tem'pcr-ment. 
Attempt' (-tenU'), 162. 
At-tempt'ed ^-temt'-). 
At-tempt'lnfir (-temt'-). 
At-tond', 15. 
At-tend'anoe, 169 
At-tend'ant, 160 
At-tend'ed. 
At-tend'er. 
At-tend'ing. 
At-tent'. 
At-teB'tion. 
A^ten'tIve, 61. 
At-ten'u-ant, 91. 
At-ten'u-ate, a. ft v. 73. 
At-ten'u-at-ed, 183. 
At-ten'u-at-ing. 
At-ten-u-a'tion. 
At-test', 16. 
At-test-a'tion, 112. 
At-teet'ed. 
At-test'er, or At-tett'- 

or, 169. 
At-test'ingf. 
At'tic, 170. 

At'ti-<$i8m (-9igm)y 133. 
At'ti-cize, 202. 
At-tire', n. A v, 
At-tired', 165, 183. 
At-tar'er. 
At-tTr'ing. 
At'ti-ta<fe. 
At-ti-tu'di-nal. 
At-tol'lent, 170. 
At-tom' (at4um')[A t - 

turn, 203.] 
At-tor'ney (-Ittr 'ny), 1 66. 

[pi. At-tor'neya, 190.] 
At-tor'ney-gen'er-al, 

216. 
Attract', 10, 103. 
At-tract-A-bil'l-tT. 
At-tract'a-ble, IM. 
At-tract'ed. 
At-tractlle, 162. 



At'tract'tng^. 
At-trao'tion. 
At-tractlve, 94. 
At-tract'or. 
At'tra-hent [eo Wk. 

Bm. Wr } tU^ra^keiU, 

Wb. Gd. 166.1 
At-trib'u-ta-bte, 164. 
At'tri-bute, n. 161. 
At-trib'ute, V. 161. 
At-trib'ut-ed, 183 
At-trib'ut-ing. 
At-tri-bu'tion. 
At-trib'u-tlve. 
At-trite'. 
At-trl'tioti (-Mahfunh 

112. 
At-tune', 26. 
[ A tt n r n , 203. — 5« 

Attorn.] 
A-typ'lc. 
Xu'bnm, 17, 171. 
Auc'tion, 17. 
Aue'tfon-a-ry 72. 
Auc-tlon-eer', 122« 169« 
lu-da'cipus (-da'tAtM), 

112,160. 
Au-dac'i-ty, 169, 171,236. 
Au'di-ble, I6f, Utf 
Au'di-bly, 93. 
In'di-enoe (169) [so Sni. 

Wr. Wb. Gd. ; otr'jl- 

«n«, Wk. 134, 16&] 
Au'dit, n. A v. 
Au'dit-€d. 
Aa'dit-ing. 
Au'di-tor, 88. 169. 
Au-di-to'ri-al, 49, N. 
Au'di-to-ry, 86, 93. 
Au'di-tresB. 
Au-g«'an, 110. 
Au'ger (awfgur) (138), 

n. an instrument for 

boring. [See Augur, 

Aught (atof) (162), fuany 



' Incorrectly written 

O u g h t . — 5ee Ought, 160. 

Au'gite, 45. 

Aug'ment. n. 103, 161. 

Aug-ment', v, 103, 161. 

Aug-ment'a-ble, 164. 

Aug-ment-a'tlon. 

Aug-ment'a-tlye. 

Aug-ment'er, 77. 

Au'gur (160), n. a sooth- 
says : — V. to foretell. 
[iS^ Auger, 160.] 

Au'gured {ato'gwrd)^ 
165. 

Au'g^-er. 



itn-gu'ri-al. 

Au'gu-ry, 91, 93. 

Xu'gust, n. 161. 

XvL-gVi«ify a. 161. 

Au-gus'tan. 

Au-gus'tln^ {-flnz\ n. 

Auk, 17. [pi, 

Au-la'Han, 40, N. 

Au'lic. 

Aula (aton) (162), n. an 
ell. [.See Awn, 160.] 
[Aune,203.1 

Aul'na-ger (me^'tM^vr) 
(J02) [Aulnager, 
203.— See Alnager.] 

Aunt {iknt) (in, n. a fe- 
male relAtea to a per- 
son by being the sis- 
ter of that person's 
Hither or motlier . [ SSet 
Ant, 160.] 

Au'rate. 

Au'rat-ed. 

Au're-ate, 169. 

Au-re'li-a. 

An-re'lf-an. 

Ju-re'o-la (L*>. 

Au'ric. 

Au'ri-de, 164. 

Au-ric'u-lar, 89, 106. 

Au-ric'u-late. 

Au-ric'U-lat-ed. 

Au-rif er-ofts, 106, 171. 

Au'ri-form, 109. 

Au-ri'gal. 

Au-rig'ra-phy, 106. 

Au'ri -scalp. 

Au'rist. 

Au'roohs (mp'nmbt), 171. 

Au-ro'ra, 49, N. ; 72. 

Aus-4Sul-ta'tion. 

AuB-cul-ta'tor, 169. 

Aus-cul'tarto-ry, 86, 93. 

Au'spi-cate. 

Au'spToe, 169. 

Au-spY'dofis (-MpUh^tu), 
112, 169, 171, 

Au-stere', 169. 

Au-stSr'i-ty, H3. 

Aa'stml. 

Au-stra'liHm. 

Aus'tri-an, 78^ 169. 

Aus'trD-man-cy, 169. 

Au-then'tio. • 

Au-then'tic-aL 

Au-then'ti-cate, 169. 

Au-then'ti-cat-ed, 163. 

Au-then'ti-cat-ing. 

Au-then-ti-oa'tion. 

Au-then-tl5'i-ty, 17L 

Au-then'ticfl. 

Au'thor, 88, 169. 

Au'thor-ess. 



&, e, 1, 5, u, ftlonff', &, 6, 1, 5, fi, jp, short iHtuin far, a <w in iast, kaaim 



AUTHOSITATIVB 



107 



AXIOM 



In-tbdr'i-ta.tYve, 171. 
Au-thor'i-ty, 109, 170. 
Aa'thor-isMi-ble, 183. 
Aa-tiior-iz^'tioii. 
In'thor-ize, 202. 
Xvi'thor-ized, 165, 183. 
Aa'thor-fz-inig. 
Au'thor-Bhip. 
In-to-lH-og'ra-^her. 
lu-to-bi-o-graph'ic 
An-to-bi-o-CTapb'io-aL 
la-to-bi-ogf'ra-phjr, IM. 
la-to-iear'poiiB. 
jSu-4och'th(m (Gr.) (aw- 

toV-) [pi. Ju-ioeh- 

tho-nis X^nMz)^ 196.1 
An-toeb'tho-mil (^oF-). 
Aa-tocb'tho-nottB 
^ (-toifc'-). 

^u-toc'r»-cyi 108, 169. 
^u'to-crat. 
Au-tCMsrat'ic, 109. 
Aa-to-crat'to-Al, 108. 
Att-toc'nirtrioe, 160. 
Au-toc'ra-trix. 
Jtuto-da-fe (Port.)iow'- 

to-dd-W) [pi. JhOo*- 

da-ft, 198.1 
jSuto-de-fe (dp.), (aw'to- 

dn-fti') [pL jitao9-d&- 

fey 198.J 
Av-tog'e-noftg Mto'e-), 
Aa'to%rilph, 171. 
An-to-grapb'ic. 
^Q-to-gTi^h'io-al. 
jtu-to^ra-phy, 108* 
Au'to-matb. 
lu-to-mat'ie, 109. 
jlu-to-mat'ic-al, 108. 
Au-tom'a-tisin (-tizm). 
Au-toip'a-ton (170) [L. 

pi. Au4om'a-4a ; Eng. 

pL An-tom'a-toiu 

(-#on«), 198.] 
^u-tom^a-tottB. 
jia-tom'e-ter, 106. 
Au-to-nom'io. 
Aa-ton'o-my. 
Au-top'sic. 
Au-top'8ic-«I. ' 

dn'top-sy, 169. 
^a'tumn {ato'tttw^^ 162. 
An-tiim'nal, 171. 




yo-ry) 

A-vaU% 28. 
A-vail-a-bil'i-tT. 
A-vail'a-ble, 16^ 
A-vailed', 166. 
A-vall'ing. 

Av-^-lanche' (WMh 
I'dMh') (171) [bo Wr. ; 



m9'a49nffaL Sm. ; &v- 

anlanch'yrb, Od.l66.] 
Atfant-courier (».) (o- 

i^itng'koa^ir) [bo wr. 

Qd,i Av-Hng^koo-rtry 

Sm. 164, 165.1 
A-riiat'guftrd (a-vttn<'- 

fftfrd, or o-vttnfl^'^ttitf) 

[a-«ttnl'p<ir(i,Wb.Qd.; 

a-vdnt'gdrdf or o- 

vdng'gttrdt Wr. ; o- 

vdnfattrd, Wk.; o- 

vang'^gdrd, Sm. 164, 

165.] 
Ar'a-ifoe, 169, 170. 
Av-arrt'doas (-H«Vim), 

169, 171. 
Ar-a-tar' [so Sm. Wr. ; 

av-orfart or a-«tt'tor, 

6d. 154, 155.1 
A-yaant', 17. 
A^vi (L.). 
Av'en-age. 
A-renge', 15, 45. 
A-venged' (^vei^),166, 

183. 
A-reng'er (-per^'-), 
A-veng'mg (-wei^), 
Av'ens ^avenz). 
Av'en-taU [ATeii- 

taile,203.J 
A-vent'tt-rine. 
Ay'e-nue, 160, 170. 
A-ver*, 21, N. 
Av'er-age, 170. 
A-ver'ment. 
A-verred' (-«enl'), 16S| 
A-ver'ring. [I?*. 

A-v6r'ra-iflt. 
Av-er-run-oa'tor. 
A-verse', 21, N. 
A-ver'aion, 171. 
A-vert', 21, N. 
A-vert'ed. 
A-vert'ing. 
A-vid'1-ty, 170. 
Ar-o-oa'tien, 170. 
Av'o-ea-tlve [bo Bm.; 

a^voVorOvy Wr. ; a- 

vofkchttvy Wb. Qd. 

165.1 
A-vold', 27. 
A-void'ft-ble, 164. 
A-Toid'anoe, 169. 
A-Toid'ed. 
A-void'er. 
A-roid'lng. 
Av-oir-du-pois' (mhur- 

du-poiz'y 171). 
Av'o-Bet, 170. 
A-voucb', 28. 
A-rouebed' (-votccM')f 

165 i Note C, p. 34. 



A-Toneh'er. 
A-youcb'ing'. 
A-Tow', 28. 
A-vow'al. 
A-TOwed'. 169. 
A-vow-ee', 122. 
A-vow'er. 
A'Tow'nr 

A-volsed' (-VMM')) Note 
C, p. 34. 

A-THl'sion. 

A-vun'ca-lar L-vwig^At 
54,108. 

A'wait', 23. 

A-wait'ed. 

A-walt'ing. 

A-wake', 23. 

A-wa'ken {^wa'kn\ 149. 

A-wa'kened {-wa'knA). 

A-wa'ken-ing l-wa'kt^), 

A-wftrd', ITT 

A-wftrd'ed. 

A-wftrd'er. 

A-w&rd'lng. 

A-ware' (a-«0^), 14* 

A-wav' (23, 160i, ad. at 
a oiBtanoe. [See A- 
weigh.] 

Awe (air), 171. 

A-w8ath'er. 

A-w^gE' (a-«wO (23, 
102), ad, denotiog the 
poBition of an anchor 
when It iB ralBod from 
the ground and It 
hanging by the eable. 
[-See Away, 160.] 

Xwe'-struck, 215. 

Aw'fiil (-fSbt), IW, 186. 

Aw'ftil-ly i-fSoU), 93. 

A-whlle', 25, 33. 

Awk'ward, 171. 

Awl (17), n. a amall 
pointed instrument to 
bore holes with. [8at 
AU, 160.] 

Awn. 

A-woke', 24. 

A-wry' (-rl')» 1«2. 

Ax'al. 

Axe (ax) [A x , 203.1 

Axe'hgad, 206. 

Ax'i-al. 

Ax-if er-ott«, 108, 233. 

AxMl, n. 160. 

Axtle, a. 160. 

AxAl'la (L.) [pi. Ax4lf^ 
la, 198.] 

Ax'il-la-ry, 72, 98. 

Ax'in-ite, 152. 

Ax-in'o-man-cy. 

Ax'i-om (aks^i^fn), or 
Ax'iom {ak^yum) 



fiiUl 6«ifi there; d^ m in foot j 9 <u in DscUeighM gin go ;(&<»•» this. 



AXIOM ATIO 
[akt'tum, Sm. ; M- 

^l^kum^'wt. iss.}" 
Ax-l-o-nul'H:, 10». 
Ax-l-D-nut'lo-d, lOe. 

Ax'lc (aii'i), 171. 



ad. (lau), Toi. [pi. of 
lye (a)i ad. [IM), id- 



Ai'l-mutii, iw, i; 
A.'i-iimth-»l t«o 

WrVlM.] 



ure (asA'ur) (17, 171 
(BO Wr.; aji'ur, or 
i'i»«r, Wb. Gd. ; a'- 
zhar, Wk. ; a'ift'oor, 

2s'ut«d (dzA'utff], or 

Xi'ured (itiA'tml). 
Ai'y-Ko(l«. 



Bab-ble, 10, IM. 
Babied Ib^'UO), IBS. 
Bab'bler, 170. 
Bab'bUng. 



Bab-oob', 121, 171,231 
Bs'by, m. 
Ba'bTlicNid. 
Bk'bv-lRb. 
Bab-T-lo'Bl im, 17L 
Bxb-ir-lan'lc. 
Bab-r-lon'lo-d. 
Bub-y-la'Dlah. 

rSeeBock, leo.] 



Biic'ohii-Dal(-ta-), 171. 
Bu-cbi-na'li-u (-ta-]. 
Bw/ebimt (-tani) (IM), 

».>prleiIorBa«bui. 
BH'nbiuite ( .innf) ( ISO) , 

». B prleitsH of Bie- 

Bao'ohic (Mb), 6Z. 
Bao'chlc-al (-1.T*-). 
fiu-clPer-oui, 1<8, 148, 

BBC-di'o-rofiB, lOS, 148. 

BicWel-OT, IM, 171. 

Buk (10), n. tho part of 
the bod; In which the 
■ploele.[S«Bacieo.J 

Back'bar. 

Buk'blte. 

Back-bit'er, ISJ. 

Buk-biClnE. 

BMli-blf ten (6M'»). 



back-gfun'mon, 370. 
BBck'groDDd, 206. 
Buik'hBDd-ed, «M. 

Back'liL^, 206. 
BBck'sighl -III), lot. 

Buch-Bltde'. 
BMt-Blid'er. 
Baek-Blid'lng. 
BMk-Blid'den (-lUd'tt). 

BMk;sword (-terd), 102. 



Baffle, 164. 

Burned {bitf'fiS), ISX 

BaTfllns- 
Bug, 10, ^<l, SL 
£a-giiif (Fr). 
Bag-a-aHe' i,Vt.), 
Bag'gBge, 170. 



171. 



Big'pipe, 2U0. 

Bi9,n. luretr . [ &s Bile, 

Bill'i-ble, IM. 
Billed, iw 
Ball-ee', 12 



. srlBul 
Bill'lff, 171, 

filil'^. 
BiU'or, or Bill-or' 



203.] 



Balt'ed. ' '^"'^ 
BUflog. 



Bik'er-T. ' 

Bik'lng. 

Bak'tlSih (At.) (baf- 
•A«ilk)rBuk>bl>li, 
BiDkBliiah, ud 
Buak>hlBh,as.] 

B.i;«-eh5ng. 

BBl'anned (ftoj'onrt), 

BHl'anc-hur. 

Bal'oo-nledi-nlill. 

[•Tw^.'sd.! uS'Sl 
nv, Bio.j baUcB>»f, 

Btld.a. wifhODttudron 
the bead. [5« Bawled, 

1B0.J 
Bai'da-ohin (.jUn). 

lOI'drle, 171.' 

Bale, n. ■ handle. [Sei 



BaleTUI ( /iW), 180. 
Bal'ins, ife. 
[Bairat«r,203.-S« 

BalllBter.1 
Ba-liie' IbaUtz'), 121. 
Balk, n. * B. {bauli) 

(102) [the aoDD and 



u, j,Ji>iWi l,«>I,a,1>.f.<*orii i 



noon alHi Ban k»uid 

Biiwl[,i03.) 
fiUked (»auH), IM, 

Note C, p. 34. 
BUk'er (&wf «■>. 
BUk.'bac(baKt'-). 
BUI, •-mTlWn^ glob 

dIw. {5m B*i^, lOa.l 
Bil'Ud, 170. 
Bal'lnd-mone'er {-lad- 

wmtf'atoT, M, M.; 

aot. 

Bd'lui, 170. 
Bul'lut, 170. 
Bil'liirt^. 

BtU'eaeMoO- 

Bil'let (Fr.) (M'», or 
bal'tei JliU'U, Sm. 1 
Joi'W.Wb.Gd.i 6ai- 
ta',orbal'lft,Wi.1S6.] 

Sal-t^^' 11..) [pL £(l^ 

Bul-Ui'ter [u Sm. Wb. 
Gd. j baeii*-tvr, Wr. 



Bul-loon', ni, 171. 
B>I-l«tii'lst. 
B4l'lot, iTO. 
BatUhtUd^ ( PtX » Sm. 

Wr. { bal'la4ad, Wb. 

Od.lS!i][BaI<>tad«, 



DSln (Mm), IW, 171. 
BUm'T (bon'H), M. 
[Balotade.aos.— ;! 



U'Mm, 17L 
U-um'ia. 



BBl-u-rim' (-naOi U2. 
BuD-boo'. 
BsiB-boo'ite, IM. 
BuB-baa'cled< .boo'zld). 




Ban'dled (ban'd 

Bui-dlt'H,<i.Dl. 17D. 
Bu'doff, ■»». 
Bu-doOeer' ( 122) [B ■ B 

Bui-dpre' [u Wr. 



Bui'jo [BkHler.aoS.] 

Buk's-ble, I«t. 
Buked JAim^U), Note 

Buik'liig:. 
Buk'nvt 
BukirnuMy, 1«. 
Ban'iwr.lTO. 
Ban'oered (-Mml), lU. 



BAIXFOOTED 

Bm'iane, 17ft. 
DaD'aocK, i7aL 

Ban'quetfbiu^lhHi: 
Bu'quet-ed. [M, 171 
Ban'qnet-er. 



n»!: 



Bun'tend, IW. 
Bu'ter-er. 

But'Un^' 
tBiDTsn, va. — att 

Bipb'n-nwt, St. 
Biv>'tln> (-Mm), VU, 
Bip'UiI-er-r, 171. [W. 
BHp'ttit'lc, UW. 
Bip-tlBl'lc-il, loe, 
Bap-U'i'n-bk. IM. 
B.p-tl.e', aOK. 
Bip-tiied', ]«. 
B^t-tii'er, US. 
Bip-til'Ine. 

Bwrt. 11, M. 
Bu-buu [Birbl- 

c«ll,»01.J 
Bu^ba'dlu. 
Bur-tw'rl-au, », M. 
Bwbir'Ie, 170. 
Bir'ba-rtBm <-rlni),13t. 
llar-blr't-t]'. 108, lio. 
Bu'bu-tH.an. 

Itar'bate. 

Ku'bK-Ka.t, 171. 
Bsj'be-eiied, IM, 171, 
Bar'be-CD-lng, 183. 
Barbed, lU. 



Baribered [-61^. 
Bar'ber-rj, W. 

|Biirbiciin,20a.-SM 

BBrt'Ing. 

Bur'buie. 

Bard(in,n.>wwt.[,SM 

Barred, IflO.l 
Bard'io. 
Bare OjIt), a. naked. 

[S« Bear, IM.) 
Bared <b<nl), IM, IBX 
BBreTaimi Iblr'/ttJSOt 
Bare'fdiit(Mr-),»M. 
B«re'fiR.t-ed (Mr'-)- 



bUi 6«<iillumi Obsaiiifaot; p at 1» bcUe i gh « g to go i (I) m 



BAftecs 

Barepe (Fr.) (ba-rdJsh*). 
Bar'gain (barfaMn^m. 
Bar'gaincd (-gMnd), 
Bar-gain-ee', 122. 
Bar'ffoin-er. [iSm Bsr- 

gainor.l 
BaWgain-lnff. 
Bar-gain-^r'. 

9Sr So written tnd pro- 
noaneed, when eontnwled 
yrith Bargamet, 

Barge, 11, 45. 
Ba-rtria, 170. 
Bar'ing {bir^inff), part, 

makmg bare. [See 

Bear'iag, 100.1 
[B ar it o n e , 203.— jSS0e 

Barytone.] 
Ba'ri-um, 78, 109. 
Bark, 11. 
Bar'keep-er, 206. 
Barked (barkt), 166. 
Bark'er. 
Bark'er-7, 93. 
BarkMng. 
Bark'y, W. 
Bar'ley, 96, 169. 
Barm, 11, 135. 
Bam, 11. 135. 
Bar'na-cle, 161. 
Bftr'o-lite, 152. 
Ba-rom'e-ter, 170. 
Bftr-o-mefric, 109. 
Bilr-o-met'riG-al, 108. 
BAr'on, 170. 
Bllr'on-age. 
Bftr'on-esB. 
B9r'o-net, 170. 
B&r'o-net-age. 
BSr'o-net-cy, 169. 
Ba-ro'nl-al, 79. 
Bftr'o-ny, 93, 170. 
Bar'o-Bcope. 
B&r-o-scop'le, 109. 
Bftr-o-Boop'ic-al, 106. 
Bftr-o-sel'e-iiite. 
Ba-rouche' (btt-rooth^), 

156, 171. 
Bftr'ra-can. 
Bftr'raek, 170. 
Bftr-ra-ooon', 122. 
Bfir'ras. 

Bftr'ra-tor, 169, 170. 
B&r'ra-trofis. 
Bftr'ra-try, 170. 
Barred (6orrf)(176),par<. 

did barf^ee Bard,160.] 
BftWrel. 
Bftr'relied (105) FBar- 

r e 1 e d , 203. — -Sec 177, 

and Note £, p. 70.1 
Bftr'ren, 149, 171. 
Bftr'ren-neBS, 170. 



110 

Bir-rt-«ade', n,Av. 170. 
BXr-ri-cad'ed, 183. 
Bftr-ri-cad'ing. 
Bftr'ri-er, 170. 
Bilr'ring, 176. 
Bftr'ri»4er, 170. 
Bttr'row, 101. 
Bar'ter, n. A v, 
Bar'teted, 166. 
Bar'ter-er. 
Bar'ter ing* 
Bar'ti-zan [bo Gd. ; 6ar- 

H-tan'y Wr. 166.] 
Ba-ry'ta, 171. 
Ba-ry'tea (-Uz). 
Ba-ryt'ic. 
BttHy4one, 93, 170. 
Ba'Bal. 
Ba.8&it' 071) [BO Sin. 

Wr. } ba-e9W^ Wb. 

Gd. 155.1 
Ba-fi&It'io [BO Sm. Wr. } 

bazSWdy Wb. Gd. 

155.1 
Ba-BiUt'i-fomi [bOnMV- 

H-form, Wr. j ba-»9W' 

i-fbrmy Gd. 155.] 
Ba-B&itlne, 152. 
Bas'a-ii]te(&a«'a-nI<)[BO 

Sm. Gd.) boB'tHnMt, 

Wr. 156.] 
Base (23), a. H. ft V. [See 

BasB, 160.] 
Baaed (bUsth 165, 1^ 
Base'ment. 
Ba-8haw', 12t. 
Ba8h'Ail(-/d60,189. 
Ba'sio. 

Ba'sl-n^, 186. 
Ba'si-f^, 94. 
Bas'U {baz'U). 
BaB'i-lar (baz*i^r) [so 

Sm. Wb. Gd. ; basfi- 

lar, Wr. 155.] 
Bas'i-la-ry {bagfi-ta-rp) 

[BO Sm. Wb. GkLj 

ba»*Ua^ryy Wr. 165.1 
Ba-Bil'ic(-2i2'til;),n.fta. 
Ba-6il'ie-al (-zU'tk-). 
Ba-8il'i-ca (-«ii'l-to). 
Ba-Bil'i-eon {-tii*\-h(m\ 
Bas'i-liBk (bassf-), 78,171. 
Ba'Bin (ba^an)^ 149. 
Ba'sis (L.) [pi. Ba'sei, 

198.] 
Ba-Bis'o-lnte. 
Bask) 12, 131. 
Basked (bdakt)^ 166, 183. 
Bas'ket, 131. 
Bask'ing. 

B&sque (Fr.) (ba»k), 
Bass, 12, 131, 161. 
Bass (161), ii» the low- 



BATTEL 

Mt put In harmony. 

[SometimeB written 

BaBe,160,203.] 
Bas'set, n. ft o. 
Bas'set-ing, a. ft n. 176. 
Baa-soon', 66, N.} 121. 
Bas-Boon'ist. 
B&BB^re-lief irW)* 
BasB-Tl'ol, 205. 
BftBs'wdbd, 206. 
B&st. 

Bas'tard, 131» 
Bas'tard -ize, 202. 
Bas'tard-ized, 165, 163. 
Bas'tard-iz-lng. 
Bas'tard-v, 93. 
Baste, 16l 
Bast'ed. 

Bas-tile' (hae-tMV)^ 12L 
Bas-ti-nade', 122. 
Bas-ti-na'do, n. ft «. 79 

[pi. of n. Baa-ti-na'- 

does {-^Uiz).] 
Bas-ti-na'doea, 188. 
Bas-ti-na'do-ing. 
Bast'ing. 

MBt'ion (dew^'yim}, 6L 
Bas'yie (baa'Uh 171. 
Bat, 10. 

Bat'a-ble, 164, 169. 
Bata'taB. 
Batch, 10, 44. 
Bate, V, to abate. [Ste 

Bait, 160.] 

Bfith [pl.Bi£thB(M&«)*] 

Bathe. 

BatHed, 166, 183. 

BatE'er. 

BatE'ing. 

BatH'ing-room, 316. 

Ba'tboB. 

Bat'ing, 163. 

Batiste* (Fr.) (bai-iei') 

[Bati8t,203.] 
Bat'let. 
Ba-ton* f Fr.) (b€hi9ikgf) 

[bo Ga. ; ba-tSna^ or 

hat'oriy Wr. ; 6tt'i6iMr, 

Sm. 154, 166.1 
Ba-tra'diiHm (-Ira'MOf 
Bat'ra^hite (4tt). [171. 
Bat'ra-choid {-ktridf, 
B&t-ra-chOm-T-om'a- 

chy (-kdm-i-orn'o-J^), 

116, 171. 
Bftt-ra-eoph'a-goUB 

i-kof'-), 
Bats'man, 214. 
Bat-tal'ia (-tal'tfa), 166w 
Bat-tal'ion (-ial'inmU 

171. 
Bat-tal'ioned (-vimd), 
Bat'tel, 149. [165. 



a, e, 1, 6, &, y, lonffi ft, 6, 1, 0, tt, f, ehott iHaiinfUtkaein ftst, kaeim 

a 



Bat'^-ler [BatcUr, 
Wb. Gd. Sre 177, and 
Mole K, p. 70. — B I - 

But'len', n. & o. Ibat'n), 

Bat'tcD-ing[&a('B-}. 



BmfUT-iag. 

B»t'tcr-7,^ 170, 
Birt'ttng, 170. 
Bat'tlBh, 170. 
Bat'tle, IM. 

Bat'lle^door (-(Ur). 



Bitieller.1 

BU'IilDg. 

B*t-lol'o-g7, IM. 
[Biinble, SW.—See 

BnwUe-l 
m>ak, BsDlk, SOS. 

— Aw Bilk.] 

B»T'«-ror l'»o Wb. Qd. j 
baI^*f1l«', Wr. 1U.7 
Bar'in. 

Baw'blerBlable,3oa.1 
BuKd. 
_ B»»d'l-1r. 

Bnwd'i." 
[BBwh, xa See 

Balk.] 
B|wl, V' to iBBke « dau- 

oroHB oaloTT- ISee 

Ball, 180.1 
Bawled, Mt. 
Ba«l'«r. 
Bawl'lne. 
BiT (^ •>. an bilc« of 

ttieMa. (Set Bct.iso.I 

W.Bt,jt.-SteBiize, 

Bty-a-dm- (Fl-.> (114) 
[K> Od.i ^o'M-iltr, 
Sm. Wr. IM, 160.1 

Bsr'ard. 

Bar'o-net i>aWr.Od.i 
ba'ym-a, Wk. Sm. 

«qw™ (Ft.) (Woo) [so 
Gd.; bVoo, or bi-S, 



BiMbA Ike iban. {Sh 

Beech, l«D.] 
B£aoh'7, *3- 
Bea'ooD (6<';hi), IM. 
Bea'HHwd (be'tixq. 
Bea'Donlug (te'ts-). 
Bead, IS. 
Bea'dle, IM. 
BeHl'TjOl, :im. 
Beada'mBD (Udf-), » 
BAa'elclN. 
Brak, 13. 
Beaked MH). 
BcBk'er, U, 77. 
Beam, «. A e. 13. 

Ba«,l«).l ^ 
Btar'a.ble, IM. 
Biard, n. & e. 13. 
Beard'ed. 
Beard'lng. 
BtaT'erTM, 77. 

BiMt, 13. ' 

Bcas('li-ae«<, 78,171. 



lesa iOral ITr.) (iO-*^ 
da'»i.oT bt-t-^aDlsti 

m-i'-ie'iU.Wt,. Gd.lM; 

itimimendt (FY.) (bo- 
ntnd', or bo-fn^ivl'). 



Beau;U.ftil |(.ii'«/dS)). 

Buia'a^J-iog.'""' 

Beaa'tr (M'i*), », K. 
Uajjei, 13, j5. 
Be»«4'D0 Ijrka). 
B»«IUl>' (-i^dn'). 1«3. 
Bfr^otUnied ■{-limut'i.ue. 
Be.dUm'ln)[ (.Maj. 



diLb«<r'). 

Beck'OD (»ef n), IM. 

Becloud', ^ 

Bn»«e' ( .iiiBi'),M,l«, 

Be-eom'incC ■Ja>H'-)>ua 

Bad, 10. 

Ue^al/blf, IM. 

Be-dag'gle, IM. 

Be-dSi'Bn l-tlaren). 

Be^l*B^l'. 

BetUab'. 

Bfr^lai'ile, IM. 

Bed'cl6lhe>l-U^t*)r>o 
Bm. Wb. Od.i fred'. 
Ust,Wt.;btll'kclhl, 
or bed'iUt, Wr. JU.J 

Bed'dad,tK. 
Bed'dtng. 
Bed'9-fni»{-«r) [B ed- 

BeJaw-'tfteJii'). 
B»dewed' i-ttue), 1«. 
Be-dew'jDK. 

B«-dl'ieD (te^'oO, or 
Be.dli'ea (fWH&'n) 

Wr.i »»4«i'i>, Wb. 
Gd. tea-i 

led'tam. 
tninwi.Ite, 1K. 
ted'o ■ " "■ 

5us; 

iM'pnM, 
I Bed'iisllt. 

' Bed-rM'deo i-riSin). 



-Ina 'ibat'oo-tra) 



1 1 • W in Amc > 4t> «* <■ SnM > « lU <« <^adle i eb IM g fH go i tb <•• i» tl 



BEDSTEAD 



112 



BEMUSED 



Bed'BtSad. 
Bed'ward. 
Bee (13), n. an insect 

that makes houey. 

[See Be, 160. J 
Beech (i3), n. a forest 

tree. [See Beach, ItiO.] 
Beef. 13. 

Beet^Bteak (itdk), 14, 
Bee^iive. [171. 

Bc-el'ze-bub, 171. 
Been (6in), [not Mn, 

\6S]part. of Be, [See 

Bin, IflO.] 
Beer ( 13), u. a fermented 

liquor. [See Bier, 160.] 
Bees'wax ibiz'-)f 214. 
Beet (13), n. a kind of 

yegetable. [/See Beat, 

160.] 
Bee'tle (1<M), n. a cole- 
opterous insect. [See 

Betel, 160.1 
Bee'tling, m. 
Beeves (bivz), n, pi. 

Note C, p. 34. 
Be-fUr [Befal, Sm. 

203.1 
Be-lHUen' {-fcaolnf), 
Be-fiUl'ing. 
Be-fit'. 

Be-fit'ted, 176. 
Be-fit'ting. 
Be-fool', 19. 
Be-iore', 24. 
Be-friend'. 
Be-fri^nd'ed. 
Be-M^nd'ing. 
Beg, 15. 
Be-gan'. 

Be-get' {-ghet% 138. 
Be-get'ter, 176. 
Be-get'ting. 
Beg^gar, 169, 170, 171. 
Beg'gar-y, 93, 171. 
Begged {hegd), 176, 183. 
Beg^ging.(-i)rWn^), 138. 



Be-gha 




Be-gmdge', 45. 
Be-grudged', 150, 183. 




Be guil'ing (-f/hW-), 
Be-guil'er (-ghlV-), 
Biauin (Fr.), n. ma$. 

(hn-aanff'i or b^- 

wiw). 
Biguine (Fr.), n. /cm. 

(bd-ghin'), 
Be-gun'. 

Be-hiUr i-hdif'), 162. 
Be-have'. 
Be-havedS 165. 
Be-hav'ing, 183. 
Be-liav'ior (-Wr'yur) 

[Behaviour, Sm. 

199, 203.] 
Be-head', 15. 
Be-hj^ad'ed. 
Be-hSad'ing. 
Beheld'. 
Be'he-moth, 150. 
Be'hen. 
Be-hest', 122. 
Be-hind\ 25. 
Be-hold', 24. 
Be-hdld'en(-AdM'n),149. 
Be-hold'er. 
Be-hdld^ng. 
Be-hool% 19. 
Be-hoove' [Behove, 

203.] 

Be-hooved',150, 183. 

Be-hoov'ing. 

[Behove, 203.] 

tar Properly written 
Behoove. Simart. 

Be'ing. 

Be-la'bor, 169. 

Be-la'bored {-la'burd). 

Be-la'bor-ing. 

Be-laid' [Belayed, 
203.1 

Be-lared. 

Be-lay'. 

Belayed' ri87) [Be- 
laid, 203.] 

Be-lay'mg. 

Belch, 15, 44, Note 2. 

Belched ^belcht)^ Note 
C, p. 34. 

Belch'ing. 

Bel'dilm. 

Be-lea'gner (4e'flrA«r), 
171. 

Be-lea'guered, 150. 

Be-lea'guer-ing. 

Be-lejm/nlte, 152. 

JJrf es-prii (Fr.) (JM es- 
pri') [pi. Beaux es- 



Be-gird' i-ghird'), 21. 
Be-gird'ed {-ghird'-). 
Be-gird'Ing (rghimi''). 
Begirt' {-ghirt*). 
Be^ne' (18, N.) [so 

Wr. J be-gawn't Wb. 

Gd. 155.] 
Begot'. 

Be-got'ten (-got'n), 149. 
Be-grime'. 
Be-grTmed', 150, 183. 
Be-grim'ing. 

a, e, i, 6, u, y, long ;&,«,!, 5, 1i, f , thort ', Ik at in Ur, k a$ in fast, kasin 



prits (b6z es-pre*)^ 
198.] 

Bel'fry, 93. 

Bel'gi-an, 78. 

Bcl'gic. 

Bel'ial [hiVydD^or Be'li- 
al [biVycUy Sm. ; be'li- 
al, Wr. Wb. (5d. 155.J 

Belie'. 25. 

Belied', 165, 183. 

Be-lief, 13, 171. 

Be-liev'a-ble, 161. 

Believe', 13, 171. 

Believed', 166. 

Be-liev'er, 183. 

Be-liev'ing. 

Be-lif tie, 164. 

Be-lit'tled, 165. 

Be-lit'tling. 

Bell (15), n. a hollow 
vessel used for mak- 
ing a ringing sound. 
[^ Belle, 160.] 

Bcl-la-don'na, 72, 170. - 

B^lle n. a gtiy young 
lady. [See Bell, I60.f 

Belles-lettres (Fr.) (bd- 
let'tur) [so Sm. Gd. ; 
bel-let'r,WT. ; belln'- 
tur, Wk. 154, 155.] 

Bel'li-cose [so (3d. j 6€2- 




171 
Bell'-met'al (-me^'Z, or 

met'al), 205. 
Bel'low, 101. 
Bel'lowed, 165, 188. « 
Bel'low-er. 
Bel'low-ing. 
Bel'lows {bel'us)t 171. 
Bel'lu ine, 152. 
Bel'ly, n. & v. 
Bel'ly-ing. 
Bel'o-man-cy, 169. 
Be-ldng', 18, N. 
Be-ldnge(d'(-ton^d'),105. 
Be-ldng'ing. 
Be-loved' (be-luvd'), 

part. 150. . 
Be-lov'ed (&e-{«r'e(f), 

part. a. 150. 
Be-low', 24. 
Belt, 16. 
Bel'tane [Beltein, 

Beltin,203.] 
Belt'ing. 
Be-ly'ing. 
Bel've-cKre, 171. 
Be-moan', 24. 
Be-moan^', 165. 
Be-moan'infic. 
Be-mused' r-mued'). 



BEN 



113 



BETTEft 



.,16. 

Ben'-nut, 06, N. ; 209. 
Bench, 15, 44, Note 2. 
Beneh'er. 
Beod, 15. 

Bend'a-ble, 164, 169. 
Bcnd'ed. 
Bend'er. 
Bend'lng. 
Bend'leC 
Bend'y, 03, 169. 
Beneath', 38. 
Ben'e-dTct, 171. 
Ben-e-dict'Ine, 152. 
Ben-e-dic'tion, 171. 
Ben-e-dic'tYve, 84. 
Ben-e-dio'to-ry, 86. 
Ben-e-fac'tlon, 171. 
Ben-e-fac'tor. 
Ben-e-fac'treas. 
Ben'e-f Yoe, 169, 171. 
Ben'e-flced (-Jist). 
Be-neri-oenoe, 170. 
Be-neri-cent, 171. 
Ben-e-n'ciai {-fi8h'a^% 

46, N. 2; 171. 
Ben-e-fTcia-ry {-fish'ya- 

ry) [so Wk. Sm. Wr. ; 

ben-e-Jish'a-ryf Wb. 

Gd. 155.1 
Ben'e-fit, 170., 
Ben'c-flt-ed, 176. 
Ben'e-flt-ing. 
Be-nev'o-lcaoe, 169, 171. 
Be-nev'o-lent. 
Ben-gal-ee', 122. 
Ben-gal-ese' (-««'), «. 

sitig. A pi. 
BG-nfght' i-nW), 162. 
Be-nig^ht'ed {-nU'ed). 
Be-nig'ht'ing' {^nlt'ing). 
Be-nign' (fre^in'), 162, 

171. 
Be-nig'aant, 169. 
Be-nig^'ni-ty, 93, 171. 
Ben'net, 170. 
Bent, 15. 

Be-aumb' (be-num^)y\(S2, 
Be-nambea' {-numd^), 

166. 
Be-namb'ment(-nttm'-). 
Ben-zo'ic, 109. 
Ben-zoin', 21, 121. 
Ben'zole. 
Ben'zo-Une, 152. 
Be-queath', 38, 140, 171. 
Be-queatHed', 165. 
Be-qucatH'er. 
Be-qaeatE'ing>. 
Bequest^ 34, 52. 
Be-rate', 23. 
Be-rat'ed, 183. 
Be-rat'ing. 



Ber^ber-tee, 1A2. 

[B er berry, 203.— <See 

Barberry.! 
Be-re'an, 110. 
lie-reave', 13. 
Bereaved', 150, 183. 
Be-reave'ment, 185. 
Be-reav'er. 
Be-reav'ing^. 
Bereft'. 

Ber'ga-mot, 21, N. 
rBurgfamot,203.] 
Ber'finn-der. 
Ber'un [so Sm. Wb. 

Gd.: ber-Un', Wk. ; 

her-Un', or her'Un^ 

Wr. 155.] 
Berme {berm), 21, N. 
Ber'nard-Ine, 152. 
B6r'o-e (L.), 163. 
B£r'rled (6€r'«), a.hav- 

ins^ berries. [<»6e Buri- 
ed, 160.] 
B£r'ry, n. a small ihiit. 

[See Bury, 160.] 
Berth (21 N.), n. a place 

in a ship to sleep in. 

[See Birth, 160.] 
Ber'yl, 170. 
Ber'yl-lYne, 152. 
Be-say le'. 
Be-seech', 13, 44. 
Be-seech'ing. 
Be-seem'. 
Be-«eem'ingf. 
Be-set^. 

B^-set'ting. 176. 
Be-ahwfl ^ ii^ ^ yu '),19. 
Be-side'. 
Besides' {-tMz')y Note 

C, p. 34. 
Be-siege', 13 
Be-sieged', 150, 183. 
Be-sieg'er (-»«/-), 183. 
Be-sieg'ing (-«^''-)' 
Be-smear', 13. 
Be-smeared', 150. 
Be-smear'ing. 
Be'8om(6«';n(m), 40,171. 
Be-sot', 18. 
Bc-BOt'ted, 176. 
Be-sot'ting. 

Be-Bonght° {-9awt^)y 162. 
Be-spat'ter, 170. 
Be-spat'tered, 150. 
Be-spat'ter-ing. 
Be-speak', 13. 
Be-speak'er. 
Be-sp€ak'ing. 
Be-spoke', 24. 
Be spok'en («p0i(;'n),149. 
Be-spr^ad'. 
Best, 15. 



Besf ha (ftorfMl) (100) 
[8oWr.Wb.Gd.;tef£'. 
{-ai, 8m.; 6es'cM-al» 
Wk. 131, 155.1 

Best Ul'i ty (bett-^'U 
ly)[8oWb. Gd. ;6e««. 
1-a/^1-<y. Sm. ; 5e«<-tf1- 
al'\4yy Wr. ; hea-cM- 
al'\4y^ Wk. 134, 166.1 

Best'lal-ize {hett^wOrU), 

Be-stir', 21, N. 

Be-stirred', 150, 170. 

Be-fltir'ring. 

Bestow', 2(. 

Be-stdw'al. 

Be-stowed', 150, 188. 

Be-st6w'cr. 

Be-stow'ment. 

Be-strevr' Ibt-vtrfH^i or 
6«-#«ra') [soWr. Gd.} 
bestroo'f Sm« ; (e- 
gtrC', Wk. 165.J 

Be-strew'ing. 

Be-strid'. 

Be-strid'den (^rid'n), 

167. 170. 
Be-stride', 25. 
Be-fftrid'ing. 
Bet, 15. 
Betake', 23. 

Be'tel ibeftl) (149), an 
aromatic shrub of the 
East Indies. [See Bee- 
tle, 160.1 [Be tie, 
203.] 

Beth'el. 

Bethink'. 

Be-think'ing. 

Be-thoughF {-thawi')^ 

162. 171. 
Be-tid', 16. 
Betide', 25. 
Be-times' (-/Iin«'). 
[Betle, 203 — See 

tel.J 

Be-to'ken (-U/kn), 149. 
Be-to'kened i-to'knd)^ 

150. 
Be-to'ken-ing (-to'lm-). 
Bct'o-ny, 93, 170. 
Be-t4Jbk', 21. 
Betray', 23. 
Be-tray'al. 
Be-trayed', 150, 187. 
Be-tray'er. 
Be-tr6th', 18, 37. 
Be-trdth'al. 
Be-tr«thed' (-/r«W), 

Note C, p. 34. 
Be-tr6th'ing. 
Be-tr5th'ment. 
Bet'ted, 176. 
Bet'ter, a. comparative 



ftU} Of if» there; Oba«if»foot;$a«infiicile;gha«g{ngojt&a#<i»thlB. 

10* 



or jPMd. [ A> Bettor 
Bet'lerea, UO. 

BefKr-nKnt. 

Bet'lar,«.oiw who beta 

[SeeBtita, ISO.] 
ifc'I'ly, iro. 
Bu-twoen', 13. 

Bev'el [Wk. Wr. Wli. 

Gd.i Wl, Sm. US.] 
Bey'elled (160) fBev. 

eled, Wb. G3. «(1 

— Sm IJ?, •nd KoU 

E, u. 70.] 
Bev'el-Ung IBeTel 

las.Wl. Gd.lIOJ.J 
Bev'er-ure, 170. 
Be»'y, «^ 170. 
Bo-wUl', 23. 
Be-wBll«t', IM. 



Bc-wil'dered l-dunl), 
IfiO. 



iSi. 



klgb 



Note C, p. W. 

Be-»ib:h'« 

Bc-wttch'lD 
Be-ivlti'li'ment. 
Bc-wriy' Ibt-ra'), 
Bey (to), B. ft Ti 

or Tartar eovemor. 

[.See Bsj, IW.] 
Be.Tond', 18. 
Be-imf lao Wr. Wb. 

Qil.i6(a'oB/,Sm.lS5.1 
Bfi'el ibei'el, or bei'l) 

["O Wr. ; biz'el, Wb. 

Gd. i tiei*!, Sm. 16S.] 
Be-iwr-. S4, 1?1. ■■ 

Bem>4r'iliD. lOtl. 



ii4 

Bl'ble, at, IM. 



BfLP 

Ihune Ibr eurylng % 
dead bodyto the gmn 

Bleet'lnga i-ina^)- 

mPer-oa: 

BU'fiD [B e > a n n .— fi^ 
~ uan.aaa.] 

BiPi^fte, i:a 



Bii'o-rtno [Biforln, 



Big.ie. 

Big'a.mJrt, iro. 
Biit'a-niy, 93, 170. 

Big'gio(-oftiB),138. 
Bl^bt (bif),H. * BniU 



. [S( 



I^HaWban-iU, 73, Ti. 
Dice, as. 
B]H%pli'a-li>na. 
Bi-chro'iaata t-iri'-). 
Bi-ctp'l.tal, 78, lU. 
Bi-f^'l-Io&a. 

Blck'ered {~unl), UK). 

BliA'erJni'. 

Bick'ern (-urn). 

BI-coQ'ju-gala. 

BI«oni'o(l». 

Bl-cor'po-ral. 

Bi-3™'r»l t-kroo'-). 

Bid, 10. 

Btd'dsD (b^n), IW. 

Bld'der, 170. 

Btd'dlDs. 

BldeT^S. 

Bment'al, 79i 

K-dent'ste. 

Bl-det' (Ft.) (fiHW, or 
Jit^da-lK Wr.i 61- 
de<', Wb. Gd.jM-iIa', 
Sm. 16$.] 



BlBht(6I?) «. 

inlet of the ■ 

Bite, 1110,1 
Blg-ot, 81i, (jO. 
Blg'oc^d, 170. 
'"-'—-7. 

■y Ibt-dioo'tiT/). 



BiK'oHy. 
Mon'try ibi-i 
ffi-lu'gate. 
BEjH'eoiH rw 
Gd.j WV« 



'bUte, 7S, IW. 



li-lam'el-Iate. 

lI.]Bin'el.Ut«d. 
Bil'au-der. 
-I-Ut'er.»l. 
_ll' berry. 
BU'bofpl.B 

bit, i«3).] 

U,OTbU'l , ,._ 

Wb. '■■ - 

Blld'et 






.*. the niiJd gei 

ed by the Uver. 
!BIe, n, a paluAil tu 



a, i, i, e, a, y, long i 1. e, I, fi, U, f , * 



u ta&r. a ^< to bat, %-nin 



Billed lbiij>[), UO, US. 
Bin»-ry ^va-rf). 
ffi-UD'aUl (-Jlrv^woOi 
Saia'ealal (M-MHf- 
B^'goMUi CK-I«V'< 

BJnotBVwtfMjiSi.in. 

K-llVer-al, 7W. 

Bilk, IS. 

Ulked (MUt), Hots 0, 

Bill, la, 173. 

Bill'b«bk, (OS. 

BUIed (Aitd). «■ hntDg 

■ biU. rSHBidld,U».l 
BU'IM, iW 
SU'lH-doux (Fr.) (NfJe- 

<tao)f|>l. e«'J«!-«>M> 

(Mt-A^dAu'), IW.] 
Saoet^l, ITS. 
Btl'let-lDg. 
BUl'lud nttpMirtfJ. 
BUl'iuda /MPannte), 

tM,I71. 
HininM-nM ( Jfnvz-]- 
BilI'loa ( Al'Hfl), &1. 
Bil'lot, 170. • 

mi'lSir, 101. 



119 

) I Bl'lW-IT, 72, Oi. 

■ ; m'BMXe. 

! Knd, 20. 
. I Knd'tr. 
• BTnd'er-y, «S, as. 

Bin'o-ele,Me,l*», 176, 

Bi-uo'n<m,'79,'m. 

K-Dom'inoDI. 



Bin [ISji n. ■ BheM ct 
eel) fir Zntn. {£M 



I, iro. 



Bi-ooi'M [BlaaxTd, 

HO.— Sm Oilde.J 
K-Of 'el-late, 170, 



Bfo-tnie, IKt. 
BIp'B-roDi. 
BipaR'I'ble, IM. 
Bl|Par-tllc r»Od.: M 
Jjar'nfc, Wr. IM.j 
Bl4>ar'tfen( l-par'lXetit] 
Btftr-Ute, 1>I. 



Bi-pin'Mte, I7D- 
Bi^a-niiCt-M. 
Bi-pU'«m»o Gd. ; ftf- 

ph-cU, Wr. lis.) 
Bf-plie'l-tt, 171, 
Bi-po^nr, 74, 79. 
BT-po-lir'l-tr, 108. 

Bi-pont'lnc, lO. 

Bi-pD'pll-late, 170- 



Wk. 1M.1 

W-iio«-drBt'lB. 
BI-qnlD'nie, 1^ 
K-n'dt.lte. 
BSti'a-it-eO. 
Btrob, tl, H. 
Blreh'Mi(Un*'B}tI«. 
Btrd,tl,N. 
Blrd'-IIke, 118, 
Blrd'lime, >Da. 
ISS."'' ■™"-' 



Blith'dir, Jot. 

BlB'eo.ttD. 

Bit'sntt (tWUti, in. 



BlB'mnth (hit'-), 171. 

Bla'mdtli^ («»'■). 

BlB'muth-lo (Oil'-), 101). 

Bl'xm (1«() [«o Wb. 
Gd.;M2'tin,8m.iM'- 
ton, or Mj'hb, Wr. 

«(i(jM (Fr.) (Kit). 

BIs-wx'niB (171) [» 
WIL. Bin. Wr.i «.- 
(ati'nt, Wb. Gd. ltS.1 

B-rtip'iaed (,«<l). 

Bis'loit. 

Bi»'ton.iT (MJ'ton-). 

Bia'troflSt) [Bliter, 
Wb. Od. — Sm ISt, 
and Na(« S, B. 70.1 

Bi-iuI'Mte. 

B3->ul'ooB*. 

Bi-eul'iiliate. 

Bit (in), n. > part of « 
bAdle; a tool for 
boring, Ad. [SeeBM, 



Blfflil, IH.I 
Mt'er, 183. 
Bi-tera'ale, 21, H. 
Bit'lDg, IS3. 
Bitt, •. a pine of ttm- 

btr pndectlng perpsD- 

diaulariT from adeoK. 

(S« Bit, ISO.] 
Bfl'ted, lA 
Blt'I«o (M('n), SB, Itt. 
Blt'ter,l70. 



«M*«lten;«i«*)lbM]tattafMlk;tfhMK<nBo){h(N<»tiiil. 



BITUMEN 



116 



BUSTER 



BlT-ta'men (L.)» 125. 

BT-tu'mi-nate, 171. 

Bl-tu'mi-nat-ed, 183. 

Bl-tu'mi-nat-ing. 

Bl-tu-mi-nirer-o&B, 106. 

Bl-tu'mi-nize, 202. 

Bl-tu'mi-nized. 

Bl-tu'mi-niz-ing. 

Bl-tu'mi-noiis, 171. 

Bi'vilye. 

Bi-valv'otlB. 

Bi-valv'n-lar, 80. 

Bi-vault'ed. 

Bi-ven'tral. 

Blv'i-oQs, or Bi'vi-ofis 

rWv't-fW, Wb. Gd. ; 

hVvi-uSy 8m. Wr.l65.] 
Biv'ottact n. (Fr.) (biv'- 

wak,or b1v'oo-aJe)\bilv- 

waky Wr. Wb. Grd.j 

hlv'oo-akj Sm. 155.] 
[Bizantine, 203.~ 

See Byzantine.] 
Bi-zdrre' (Fr.). 
Blab, 10. 

Blabbed (blabd)^ 166,176. 
Blab'ber. 
Blab'binff. 
Black, 10, 181. 
Black'a-moor [so Sm. 

Wr. Wb. Gd. ; blak'- 

a-nar, Wk. 165.] 
Black'b^Il, n. & v. 
Black'b&lled C-bawld)^ 

165. 
Black'bftU-ing. 
Black'b6r-ry. 
Black'bird, 206. 
Black-board. 
Black'cap. 
Blacked iplaM)^ 166; 

Note C, p. 34. 
Black'en {blaJcIn), 149. 
Black'ened (blakfnd). 
Black'en-ing (blak'n-). 
Black'en-er (blaJ^n-ur), 

77. 
Blaek'-eyed (-id), 171. 
Blaok'fish, 206. 

Black-guard(&to^'0ar<O 
171 J Note C, p. 34. 

Black'ing. 

Black-lead' [so Wr. ; 
blak'Ud, Gd. 155.] 

Black'-let'ter, a. A n. 

Black'smith, 206. 

Blad'der, 170. 

Blad'der-y, 93. 

Blade, 23. 

Blad'ed, 183. 

Blain, 23. 

Blam'a-ble, 164, 183. 

Blam'arbly, 93. 



Blame, 23. 
Blamed, 166. 
Bliira'er. 
Blame'wor-thy (-wttr- 

thy\ 215. 
Blanch, 12, 131. 
Blanched(&2dnoftl),Note 

C, p. 34. 
Blanch-im'e-ter, 170. 
Blanch'ing. 
Blanc-mcmge ) /pw. \ 
Blanc-manger \ ^'^'> 

Ibla-mon^') [BoWr.j 

hlong-mongzh', Sm. ; 

bla-mof^', Wb, Gd.l54, 

156J 
Bland, 10. 
Bland'lBh, v, 104. 
Bland'lBhed (-isht)^ 

Note C, p. 34. 
Bland'iBh-lng. 
Bland'ish-ment. 
Blank, 10, 54. 
Blanked {blangkt), Note 

G, p. 34. 
Blank'et, 64. 
Blank'et-ed, 176. 
Blank'et-ing. 
Blank-verse' (216) [so 

Wr. ; blank'vurt, Gd. 

155.] 
Blare (&^r), 14. 
Blar'ney, 98. 
Blas-pheme', 36, 171. 
BlaB-phemed% 150, 183. 
Blas-phem'er. 
Blas-phem'iufi'. 
Blag'phe-mooB, 171. 
Blas'phe-my, 93, 171. 
Blast. 
Blast'ed. 
Blas-te'ma (Gr.). 
Blas-te'maL, 
Blast'er. 

Blast'-fur-nace, 209. 
Blast'ing. 
Bl&s-to-car'poiis. 
Blas'to-derm. 
Bla'tant, 100. 
Blay, 23. 
Blaze, 23. 
Blazed, 160, 183. 
Blaz'er. 
Blaz'ing. 

Bla'zon (JbWxn)^ 140. 
Bla'zoned {bla'znd\VSi. 
Bla'zon-er {Jbla'zn-), 
Bla'zon-ing (bla'zn-), 
Bla'zon-ry (&to'i8»-),171. 
Blea'bSr-ry. 
Bleach, 13, 44. 
Bleached (62dc/U), Note 

C, p. 34. 



BlSach'ep-7, 93. 
Bleach'ing. 
Bleak, 13. 
Blear, 13, 67. 
Bleared, 150. 
Blear'-eyed (-mI^ 
Bleat, 13. 
BlSat'ed. 
Bleat'ing. 
Bleb, 15. 
Bled, 16. 
Bleed, 13. 
Bleed'ing. 
Blem'ish, 170. 
Blem'ished (-f«M). 
Blem'ish-ing. 
Blench, 15, 44, Note 2. 
Blend (16), v. to min- 
gle. [<9ee Blende, 160.1 
Blende, n. sulphuret 

of zinc. [Set Blend, 

160.1 
Blend'ed. 
Blend'ing. 
Blend'ofis, 183. 
Blen'ny, 170. 
Blent, 16. 
Bless, 16, 174. 
Blessed {ble8i)ypart,VS&* 
Bleas'ed, a. 160. 
Bless'er, 169. 
Bless'ing. 

Blest. [Ste Blessed.] 
Blet, 16. 
Ble'ton-ism (-»«m), 133, 

136. 
Ble'ton-ist. 
Blet'ting, 176. 
Blew, V. (blft), did blow. 

[See Blae, 160.] 
Blight (Jbm)y 162. 
Bllght'ed (PtU'eO), 
BlTght'ing (fiUfing), 
Blind, 26. 
Blind'age. 
Bllnd'ed. 
Blind'er, 77. 
Blind'iold. 
Blind'fold-ed. 
Blind'fold-ing. 
BlTnd'ing. 
Blind'side (206) [so Sm. 

Wr. Gd.} btiMt-adft 

Wk. 166.1 
Blink ibUngk)^ 16, 54. 
BUnk'ard. 
Blinked {blingM)y Note 

C, p. 34. 
Blink'er, 77, 
BUnk'ing. 
Bliss, 16, 174. 
BUsB^fiil {-/obl)^ 180. 
Blis'ter, 16, 77. 



a, g, i, 5, u, y, long ; ft, S, 1, 5,.U, f, short ', Haiin far, & a« tn ^t, & <u in 



BLISTERED 



117 



BOLTED 



Blis'tered, 180. 
Biis'ter-ing. 
BU8'ter-7, 93. 
BHthe, 25, 38. 
BlitHe'some {blHh'aum), 
Bloat ('^, 130), r. to 

swell. [SeeBlote,160.] 
Bloat'ecLr. 
Bloat'er. 
Bloat'ing. 
Blob, 18. 
Blob'ber, 170. 
Blob'bei^Upped (-^IpOi 
Block, 18, 181. [215. 
Block-ade'. 
Block-ad'ed, 183. 
Block-ad'lBg. 
Bloek'head, 206. 
Block'ing. 
Block-till' (200)r so Wp.; 

blokfHn, Wb. Gd.l55.J 
Blom'a-ry (bloom*-) (72) 

rBloomary,203.] 
Blond, a, 18. 
Blonde^ n. (Fr.) (bUmd), 
Blood (blud), 22. 
Blood'ed (6/tu2'-)- [209. 
Blood'hound (bltid'-), 
Blood'i-ly, 171. 
Blood'i-ness {bhtd*-). 
Blood'ing {blud'-). 
Blood'root {bind*-), 20fl. 
Blood'shed {blud'), 
Blood'shot {Jblud'-S. 
Blood'Bhot-ten {bhtd^- 

shotn)t 149, 171. 
Blood' -ves-sel, 200. 
Blood'wort(&/tid'irurf). 
Blood'7 {blud'p)t 93. 
Bloom, 10. 
Bloom'a-iy [Bloms- 

r7,203.] 
Bloomed, 150. 
Bloora'er. 
Bloom'ing. 
Bloom'y, 93, 109. 
Bios' som, 170. 
Blos'somed {-mmd^tlSO. 
Blos'som-ing. 
Blos'som-j. 
Blot, 18. 
Blotch, 18, 44. 
Blote, V. to dry and 

8mokc[ See Bloat,10O.1 
Blot'ted, 170. 
Blotter. 
Blot'tiDgr. 
Blonse {blouz) 

[Bio wze, 203.1 
Blow, 24. 
Blow'er. 
Blow'iiig. 
Blown. 



Blowce (28) [Blonse I 

203.] 
Blowzed (^bUmzd). 
Blowz'y. 
Blub'ber, 170. 
Blub'bered, 166. 
Blub'ber-ing. 
Blud'gwn (Mi^'«n),171. 
Blue (20), n. a kind of 

color. [;See Blew, 160.1 
Blue'b«r-ry, 206. 
Blae'biid. 
Blue'y, 93, 171. 
Bfufl^ 22, 173. 
BIulTy, 93. 
Blu'ing, 183. 
Blu'isb, 171. 
Blun'der. 

Blun'dered (-tfttni), ISO. 
Blun'der-er, 77. 
Blun'der-ing. 
Blunt, 22. 
Blunt'ed. 
Blunt'ing. 
Blur, 21. 
Blurred, 160, 176. 
Blur'ring. 
Blurt, 21. 
Blush, 22, 46. 
Blushed (bhuhi)^ Kote 

C, p. 34. 
Blush'ing. 
Blus'ter, 22, 77. 
Blus'tered, 150. 
Blus'ter-er, 77. 
Blus'ter-ing. 
Boar, n. the male of the 

ho^. [See Bore, 100.] 
Boara, H, a thin piece of 

sawed timber. [See 

Bored, 160.1 
Board'a-ble, 164. 
Board'ed. 
Board'er. 
Board'ing. 
Boast. 24. 
Boasred. 
Boast'er. 

Boast'ftil {-f$U)y 180. 
Boast'ing. 
Boat, 24, 130. 
Bdat'a-ble, 160. 
Boat'bill, 206. 
Boat'-bulld'er (-bUd^- 

iir),aoo. 

Bdat'ing. 

Boat^swain (hofgn, in 
■aunan*! language) 
[so Wb. Gd.j bot'- 
m0an,oolloquiall7 bo'- 
«it, Sm. ; bat'sw&n, or 
fto'«n, Wr. 155.] 

Bob, 18, 31. 



Bobbed (bcbd), 100, 17& 
Bob'bln, 170. 
Bob-bln-et' [to Od.| 

bob'bi-neiy Wr. 165.] 
Bob'blng. 
Bob'o-Iink, 171. 
Bob'stiy, 200. 
Bob'talf. 

Bob'tailed (-tdld), ]60. 
Boc'a-slne, 162. 
Bock'ing. 
Bock'land FBook- 

land, 209.1 
Bode, 24. 
Bdd'ed. 

BodTce (bod'M, 100,171. 
Bod'Ied (6od'M),90,186. 
Bod'i-less, 109, 171. 
Bod'i-ljr, 78, 93. 
Bod'ing. 
Bod'kin. 

Bod'lel-«i (-»-), 171. 
Bod'7, 93, 170. 
Bod'y-ing. 

BoB-o'tian (be^'ikan). 
Bog, 18. 
Bog'gle, 164. 
Bog'gled {bog'ld), 166. 
Bog'glfer. 
Bog'gllng. 

Bo-he'mi-an. 

Boil, r. 27. 

Boil, n. [Bile, 203.— 
See Bile.] 

Boiled, 160. 

Boil'er. 

Boil'er-y. 

Boil'ing. 

Bois'ter-otts. 

Bo'la-ry, 72. 

Bold, (24)a.daring. fear- 
less. [SeeBowlWy 160] 

Bold'-faoed (/H8t\2\6, 

Bole, n. a kind of min- 
eral. [See Boll, and 
Bowl, 160.] 

Bolero (Sp.) {bo-Wro). 

Boll, n. the capsule of a 
plant. [See Bole,#rki 
Bowl, 100.] 

Bol'Urd. 

BolFing Fso Wr. ; b9P' 
ing, 6d. 155.] 

B5-logn-$se' {bd-lon- 
yezf), 171. 

Bo-logn'ian {-idn'pan), 

Bol'ster. [171. 

Bol'fltered (-tturd)^ 15a 

Bol'ster-ing. 

Bolt, 24,138. 

Bolt'ed. 



fidli 6a«tii there; Ob oi in iiM>t > 9 air <m facile 3 gh at gm go ;tha« in this. 



Belt'er. 

Bolt'iug, 



Bun.)) ibmn), JK. 
- Buiii'lurd, n. ibur^- 

Dom-bHrd^t v- (bust 



Doro-cr J, iotf, 1/ V 
Bom-bar<1'iiiff CDun-). 
Bom-bant'inctal (bum-). 
[BambsBlli, -OU.^ 

rStt Bombsilnc.] 
BonHbast (bum'-\ or 
Bom-b.st' (*"».-)l". 
fbum'iiaii, Wk. Wb. 
b<I. ;bUiR-&u<', Sm.| 
bum-b4tt', or bun'- 
W«(, Wr.l 



Boni-b«at'lc {bum-), tO». 
Bom-rn-iPrte' (ftum). 
Bom-bi-zine' ibuMia- 
1"') (KOrBomba- 

Bomb'-Bbeli (»««*-)■ 
BoiD-bys'i:Doili, 171. 
Boiu'ftjj; (L.)- 

Biyna-part-ism (-^) 
(IS3,(38)[so.G<l.;6o- 

iton'ft™ err.) (b«v'- 

Bondj IS. [Jrrf'j™). 



Bone'Bet'tinK, 17B. 



Bon'lng:, IK!. 
Bo-nl'ib(.SpJ)(bo-ne'to). 
Bon-mot' [Ft.) (ftonc- 



118 

Aon^Hi' (Pr.) ((ov- 



B«(>ii cm, «. * V. [h 

8lH. Wr. n^ Oa. i 

booh, Wk. IM.] 



Betik'bTDd-«r, 209. 

Bdbk'biDd-er-y. 

BObk'biid-fng. 

BObk'csM, 66, (r. 

Bdbk'-keep'er. 

Bifck'-teep'iHg-. 

B<^6k'Und [Boek- 

l.nd,M3.1 
BAbk'moa-ger (-mvTi^- 

B&k'Kll-er. 

fi«>k'HU-lne'. 
BObk'worml-iMim). 



Boo»e (toot) [Baii«« 

Boaie, 303,1 
Bou'bt Iboo'aA [Boa 

By, Boo. r,^] 

Boot, 10. 
Boot'ed. 



BooBe.f 

Bi>-peep'j^ 
Bur'a-ble, 1M,1S3. 
Bo-niD'lo, 23S. 

AsHitJ, Sn. lU.] 



Bor'dercd (-(tHnI), ISO. 
Bor'der.er, 77. 



Ibnrteb* 
Kpolni- 



ed laBtrumcQt a clrou- 
lormatloa. [5m Boar, 

&o're.al,W,N.ilW. 

Bo'rt-ai (L.). 
Bond (bBra), part, of 
£arc.[S«Boaid,iai}.] 



Orn, pnrt. of flear, to 
bring rorth. 

canr [S« Boarn, 160. 1 
e'ron, Bi. 
or'ouKh (WIT'S), 2S, 

^r'roned (A'sr'ri)d),iaa 



kdai'uin, Sm.; Ano'- 
luIB, Wb. Gd. IM-l 
BoBBj 18, 171. 

BoBsM^ti), IW ; Roto 

Bot, 16. 

Bo-Un'b, m, 170. 
Bo-tao'lc-at, lOS. 






i.,itti. 



I, fi, i, 0, B, Mo^ i S, & 1, 0, ft, }, dtMl i i (M O bi, k <u to Art, t o) <H 



Botch, 18, 44. 

Botabed IboM), UO; 

NdU C, p. M. 
Bolch'er. 

Botoli'T, n. 
Both, il, 37. 

Baih'M. 

Btth'nt*. 

BM'rr-ald. tS, 171. 
Bot-rT-oJd'iL 
BofiT-o-Ute, 112. 
Bot'tla, IM. 
Bot'tled (bufUi, U>. 

Bot'llliur. 

Bot'tom: 

Bat'tomed Ibet'amd), 
Bol'lom-lnB. [ua. 

BoVtomij, 171. 

Bon-dolr' (Wi.) (boO' 

Bongb [ImHIttI, 171), 

[«e Bow, IW.] 
Bong-hl IbawtXitB, 171). 
.BtJiwie (Fr.) t6oo-i*f') 

in. 1SS.1 
BotUUi (rr.UbiwI-Hl'). 

BaurSer (ftsP,iiir) 



Bonnmd (iouiut), ISO. 

Boua'Dlns. 
BsDDd.A. 
Bannd'a-rr, n, 171. 
Bound'ed. 

Bonnd'eD ibottiuVin) [ra 
Sm-Wb-Od-ikouHd'- 

Bpun'U^B C» Wr. 

or bount'yu*. oollo- 
QDlAlly, bount'cke-nt, 
Bm.; fcwn'(i*«-M, Wk. 

Boua'tl-M i-fOtl, 71, 

Boon'ty, » ej. 
Boaqutt (Fr.) (boihU') 
[bo Wb. OA^ beo-liV, 



Bour'ijmi-Ht Itnar'-). 
BoargruU (IV.) (boor- 
ikvA') (Ifli), n. ■ am. 

treoii.aol] 



i3aune(rr.)(toor(). 
Bouie (ftuu) [Booie, 

Boa-nro-plie'dait [m 
Wr. Gd. ; iov-Mnfk'- 
e-dm, Sm. IM.} 

[Bou*T, Ml.— Set 
Booij.] 

Bout, 28. 

Bout,-ri,^ (Fr.) t6«»- 

I 



BSwI'er. 

Bow'llne r^Kii) [m 
8iD.i6o'nn,Wb.<}d.i 
£ou'n», Wk.i Au'Rh, 
or (ou'Rn, Wi. lOS.] 

Bawl'lng. 



BOwI'liiHl-ler, M> 
Bov'-^, KM, Kza. I. 



Boxed OmkH), ISO. 



BoK'.tree, SM, Eio. 4. 

Bui'vdbd, we. 

Boy, :f7. 



lOT'hl 



Bno'clle, 170. 

Snaed (ArOK), IWi 

Note C, p. M. 
Biue'M. 

Bnoh'l4l (emfl-o^, « 
Bra'Bbl-il tbra'a^: 
[bT^ft-nl, Wb. Gd. 



Ibrai), 



-o-pod (bra*'-). 
— -lee'tlo 

Bi^KjK'n-phTfW-) 

Bra-chyPo-py (-HpT 

Brmhyp'ter^m C-Wf^-) 

(.ti*'(ff-ib-lln.J 

Br*ok'o(.ed. 

Bract, 10, ai' 
Braot'i^al, 160,171. 
Kract'e-tte. 
Biut'a-o-lila. 
Brad, 10. 

Brag, 10. 

(i?0} (w wi. 8i»' 
Wr.; brmg-iHlo'tlui, 

Wb. Gd. ISI.] 
Brag'gart, 170. 



tMitattntbtatebatiKtoot; j at In (IwUs ; gd iw gfngQi (|||H fnll|k. 



BSAOOED 



120 



BREVIPEKNATE 



Bragged (bragd), 150, 

Brag'ger (-ffur)y 138. 
Brag'gln^ i-ghing). 
. Brah'ma [B r a m a, 203.] 
Brali'miu [Br am in, 

203.] 
Braid (brdd) (23), v. to 

weave together. [See 

Brayed, itiO.] 
Brail, 23. 
Bruin, 23. 

Brained (5r And), 150. 
Brait, 23. 

Brake (23), n. an appa- 
ratus for checking^ the 

motion of a wneel. 

[See Break, 160.] 
Brake'raan, 206. 
Brak'r, 03. 
Bsam^ble, 164. 
BranL'bling, 183. 
Bram'bly. 
Brii'min [Brahmin,* 

203.] 
Bra-min'io-al, 106. 
Bran, 10. • 

Branch, 131. 
Branched (brdnchi)tl50,. 
Brau'chi-al (frraiwr'- ' 

ftl). 54, 171. 
JBrawchi^e (L.)(&ran^'- 

ki-i). 
Branch'ing. 

Bran'chi-o-pod (brang'- 
Branch'y,93,160. [in-). 
Brand, 10. 
Brand'ed. 
Brand'er. 
Brand'ing. 
Bran'dlsh, 104. 
Bran'di8hed(<(li<M),160. 
Bran'dish-ing. 
Brand'ling. 
Bran'dy, 10, 93. 
Bran'gle (brang'gt)y6^j 

164. 
Brang'gled (bran'ald). 
Bran'gler (brang^~j. 
Bran'&fling {brang'-), 
Bran'lin. 
Bran'ny, 170, 176. 
Brant, 10. 
Brash. 
Bra'sier (bra'zhurX17l) 

[Brazier, 203.J 
Brass, 12, 131, 174. 
Bras'sart. 
Bras' set. 
Bras' 8i-ca (L.). 
BrasB'i-ness, 160. 
Brass'y, 93. 
Brat, 10. 



Bra-ya'do [not hnrrW- 

do, 153.] 
Brave, Zi. 
Braved, 150, 183. 
Brav'er-y, 171. 
Brav'ing. 
Bra'vo, or Bra'vo, inr 

terj. [so Wr. j bra'vOt 

Wb Gd. ; brd'vo, Sm. 

155.] 

wgf " The proper EnO" 
liaA ezclMnation it 'Oh! 
brave!' or 'Brave! Ol'" 
Umartm 

Brii'vo, or Bra'vo, n. [so 

Wr.; brd'vo, Wk.; 

br&'vo, Sm. Wb. Gd. 

155.] [pi. Bravoes, 

(-p««), 192J 
Brchvu'ra (ft.). 
Brawl, 17. 
Brawled, 150. 
Brawl'er. 
Brawl'ing. 
Brawn, 17. 
Brawn'y, 93. 
Bray, 23. 
Brayod (brad), v, did 

brav. [5eeBraid,160.] 
Bray4r. * 
Bray'ing. 
[Brayle, 203. — 5ee 

Brail.] 
Braze, 23. 

Bra'zen, (bra'zn), 149. 
Bra'zen-faoed (bra'zn- 

fUst), 216. 
Bra'zier (bra'zhur) 

[Brasier,203.] 
Bra-zil'-w<55d(6fa-«ir- 

tod6d) [so Wb. Gd.; 

bra-zeFw6ddyWT. 155] 
BrEzang, 183. 
Breach (13), n. a frac* 

tare. [iVee Breech,160.] 
BrSad ( 15), n. food made 

of grain. [See Bred, 

160.1 [34. 

Breadth, 15, Note C, p! 
Break {br&k), v. to rend. 

[See Brake, 160.] 
Break'age. 
Break'er. 

Brgak'fast (frrcJfc'-), 143, 
BrSak'fast-ed. [171. 
Briak'fast-ing. 
Break'w^-ter, 206. 
Bream, 13. 
Bream'ing. 
Breast (brest), 15. 
BrSast'ed. 
Breast'fast. 
Breast'ing. 



BrSast'-wheel. 
Br^ast'work (ftres^'- 

wurk), 200. 
Breath, 15. 
Breath'a-ble, 161. 
BreatEe, 13, 38. 
Breathed, 150, 183. 
BrdatH'er. 
BreatE'ing. 
Brec'Ba (It.) (bret'dM) 

[so 8m. W>. ; breV- 

»ha, Wb. Gd. 155.1 
Brec'ciat-ed (brac'shdi- 

«d) [soSm. Wb.Gd.; 

brekfahH-at-ed, Wr. 

155.] 
Bred, v. did breed. [See 

Bread, 160.] 
Breech, n. the thick end 

of a firearm behind 

the bore. [See Breach, 

160.1 
Breeched (Jbr^cM), Note 

C, p. 34. 
Breech'es {brich'ez\\7l. 
Breech'ing (brich'ing^f 
Breed, 13. [171. 

Breed'er. 
Breed'ing. 
Breese (&rte) (160), n. 

the gadfly. [Breeze, 

Brize,203.] 
Breeze (160), n. a gentle 

gale. 
Breez'y, 93. 
Brent, 15. 
Bret, 15. 
Breth'ren (127, 145) [pi. 

orbrother, 194.] 
Breve (briv). 
Bre-vet', n. [so 8m. Wb. 

Grd. ; bre-vet' or brev'- 

ei, Wr. 155.1 
Bre-vet', aJTbre-vet', or 

brev'et, Wr.; brev'et, 

Sm. 155.] 
Bre-vet', r. 
Bre-vet'ted, 176. 
Bre-vet'ting. 
Brev'ia-ry (briv'ya-rp) 

[so Wk. Sm. Wr. ; 

bre'v%-chryy Wb. Gd. 

155.1 
Bre'vi-ate [so Sm. Wb. 

Crd. ; brev'y&t, or brB'^ 

vt-at, Wr. 155.] 
Bre'vi-a-ture [so Sm. 

Wb. Gd.; brev'pa-tikr, 

Wr. ; briv'ya-chMr, 

134, 155.1 • 
Bre-vier' (bre-vBr'), 
Brev'i-pea. 
Brev-i-pen'nate. 



a, e, i, o, u, y, long ; ft* S, 1, 0, 11, ff short; ^iaain fiuTi kofin last, & a« «» 



BKEVITY 



121 



BROUGHAM 



Brev'i-ty, lOO, 171. 
Brew (6roo^ 19. 
Brew'affe (6rtK)'-). 
Brewea (brood), v. did 

brew. [.S^ Brood,10O.] 
Brew'er (6nx>-), IV, 77. 
Brew'er-y f 6roo'-)» 171. 
Brew'ing (oroo'-). 
Brew'is {Jbroo^-). 
[B r i a r , aOX — ;8;6e Bri- 
er.] 
Bri-a're-aa, 110, 109. 
Bribe, 25. 
Bribed, 150, 189. 
BriVinf. 
Brib'er. 
BriVer-y, 171. 
Brick, 16, 181. 
Brick'ldlii (M/), 182,171. 
Brick'la^'-iiigf. 
Brick'mak-er. 
Brick'work (-wwh). 
Brid'al [See Bridle, 14B.] 
Bride, 25. 
Bride'gTOom, :i06. 
Bride'maid. 
Bride'maa. 
Bride'welL 
Bridge 
BridL 
Bridg' 

Bridg*7(orw 
Brt'cSe (IM) [See Bri 

dal, 148.1 
Bn'dled (jM'dld), 183. 
Bri'dler. 
Bri'dliner. 
Bri-doon', 121. 
Brief, 13. 
Bri'er, (189) [Briar, 

203.1 
Bri'ered C-urd), 160. 
Bri'er-7, 171. 
Brigr, 16. 
Bri-gade', 121. 
Brig-a-dier', 122,189,171. 
Brig'and. 156, 170. 
' Brig'an-dme [so Wk. 

Wr. Wb. Gd. j hrig'- 
- an-diUy Sm. 155.] 
Brig'an-tiiie [so Wk. 

Wr. Wb. Gd. ; brtg^- 
■ a»-#In, Sm. 155.] 
Bright (5HI), 102. 
Bright'en {bnt'n), 149, 

162. [160. 

Bright'ened (bt^rnd), 
Bright'en-lng (brlfn- 

4ng), 
Bright'-eyed (brfl'Id), 

206, Exc. 5. 
Brill, 16, 172. 
Brill'ian-C7(-|fa9i-<y),171 




Brilliant (-yan<), 171. 

Brim, 16. 

Brimmed (frHmd), 150, 

176. 
Brim'ftil (-/dZ»). 
Brim'mer, 176. 
Brtm'ming. 
Brim' atone, 130. 
Brtnd'ed. 

Brin'dled (frHn'<«(l).171, 
Brine, 25. [183. 

Bring. 16, 54. 
Bring'er. 
Brinnah, 183. 
Brink, 16, 54. 
Brin'y, «. 
Brisk, 16. 
Brisk'et. 

Bris'tle (hria^rii 182, 171. 
Bris'tled (brWid). 
Bris'tling (In-UfUnff), 

162. 
BriB'tlT (6r<»'/y), 171. 
Brit, 16. 
Bri-tan'ni-a [so Wr.; 

brl4an'9a, Wb. Gd. 

155.] 
Bri-tan'nie. 
Brit'iBh, 170. 
Brit'on. 

Brittle (-dr«'Oi 184. 
Britz'Bka (brY«'l»), 171, 
Brize TBree B e, 203.1 
Brdacn' v.to pierce, [see 

Brooch, 160.] 
Broached (brffcM), 150. 
Broach'er. 
Broach 'ing. 
Broftd {brawd), 17, 171. 
Broad'ftxe, 171,208. 
Broftd'cast. 
Broad'cldth, 18. 
Broad'en (6raw^fi),149. 
Broftd'Bide. 
Brob-dig-na'gi-an. 
Bro-cade', 121. 
Bro-cad'ed, 183. 
Bro'cage [Brokage, 

208.] 
Broc'co-lX, 170. 
Brty-chure^ (Fr.) (bro- 

«ft«r'). 
Brod'e-kin [bo Wb. Gd.; 
. brdd^kinyWr. ; brSd^- 

e-hin, Sm. 155.] 
Bro'gan. 

wgr" Bro-^mC, u it la ofr 
ten pronounced, ii not 
sanctioned bj any orthoS- 

put. 

Br5gne (fir^g), 168. 
BroU, 27. 
Broiled, 150. 



Broiring. 
Broke, A. 130. 
Brok'en (brtVn)MA^ 
Bro'ker, 24, 77. 
Bro'ker-age. 
Bro'ma. 
Bro'mal, 72. 
BrO-ma-tol'o-gy fso 

Gd. ; frrVm-a-tol'a-flift 

Wr. 155.] 
Bro'mlde [Bro mid. 

203.1 
Bro'mine, 152. 
Bron'chi-a, n. pi, 

{br9ng'iii-a\ 
Bron'chl-al foron^ftl-). 
Bron'chlK {firong*h%-t). 
Bron-chi'tiB {hron-W. 

tie) [not brong-kd'tis, 

Bron'cboB (brong'ku^ 
[pi. Bron'chi ifironfp- 
M, 108.] 

BrOnxe, or Brdnxe, %, 
& V, [bo Wr. (id.j 
br9nz, wk. Sm., 155.1 

Brdnxed, 165, 183. 

BrSnz'ing. 

Brooch (6r8dk). ». aa 
ornamented pin need 
to fasten parts of a 
dress. [See Br0acb« 

leo.i 

Brood, n. the yonng 
birds hatched at one 
time by the Bam# 
mother. [See Brewed. 
160.1 

Brood'ed. 

Brood'ing. 

BrObk, n. ft «. [so Sm. 
Wr. Wb. Gd. ; brook, 
Wk. 155. — See Book.] 

BrObked ibrobia), Nota 

• C, p. 34. 

Brdbk'ing. 

Broom. 19. 

Broom'stlck, 208. 

Broom'y, 93. 

Brose. 

Broth (6rairf A, or brSth) 
[so Wr. } brawth, Wb. 
Gd. ; brStht Wk. Sm. 
155.] 

Brdth^d, 149. 

Broth'el-ler [Broth- 
eler,Wb. Gd.-^See 
177, and Note E,p.70.] 

Broth'er (bruth'ur) 
1) [pl.Broth'ers, or 

^tYxfran lull 



(171) 

BretJ 



reth'ren, 19l.] 
Broth^r-hdbd. 
I Brough'am (&roo'aifi,or 



fUl; 2 a« In there ; Ob OS In foot }^ as <» faeibigh OS gin go ;tha« in thia. 



6roDiB, Qd. lU], n.a 
kiTui of cairisfffl. 
Brought lltrnir<),lM,171 
Brow, % [pi. Brow* 

Jbraaz}, iM. — St* 
IrowM, Ita.] 
BroWbeU. 
Brow 'beat-en (-bitii). 

Brown. 28. 

Browned, 110, 

Brown'laj. 

Browse (*ro»»), V. tO 



Browe'lDK i^roicn'ing), 

B^u'in(^™l'(B), 1». 
BrulK {dn»i), IS, 171. 
Bruised (Aroozfl), 1 SO, 1S3 
Brute'er {brooi-ur) 
Brnlg'lng ibrooz'ing) 

mor. r$tt Bru1«, ISO.] 
Bru'm^ (troa'noi). 
Brunette' (broo-ntf), 

121. 
Brun'lon f Snui'iniB) [lo 

ffr. Gd. , troon'min, 

Sm. 1S3.] 



ilm*gu« [(>.) (fenwit;. 
Bru-lal'i-tj' (ftroo-), 108, 

ICO. 

Bru'ial.iaa (ftroo-), 302. 
Bni'tal-lied {bron-), IK, 

Bni'til-Ii-fne (brco-). . 
Bru'lal-ly fiiniii-1,93. 
Brute (ftronii-n. »n ff- 

Bniit, lw7]' 
Bni'[t-f lod (ftnw'-), 



[£m 



Bru'Uly(6.__ 

Bru'tl.fy-lpg (tnw'-), 
Bmt'iBh Ibrool'-). 
Brr'o.ny, 03, 171. 
BuVble, IM. 
BuiyUed (Aut'IiO, 1S3. 
Bub'bliDK. 
Bub'bly. 



BU'bon'o-flfite 
Wr. Gd.i 
HI, Sm. IK 

Buccal, 170. 



Jle r«o Wk. 

Wr. Gd. i Sii'to-Bo- 
"" " IM.] 



ient»ur [w 
-tn'lAur.oriii 
»r, Wr. 1».] 



BuB'kieThif I), IW. 
Bue'kled IbtMUt). ISS 
Busk'ler. 

Bnn'kUng, 



Boddfa'a (,6ood'a) {h 
Wr.: MiI'D, Gd. lll».] 
Bnddb'iun (bood'iiw] 

Sm.j bM^l2n,Gd.] ' 

Bnddh-lHt'lc (booat 
Bnd'dlng. UK. 
Bud'dU, ilM. 
Budge f l»i), K, W. 
Budged (I^ma), ISD. 
Budget (bii^'etl. 



•■<t& 



Bnllt, IS, 171, 



flulii'y, BS. 
Ball [h»0. 9), ITg. 
Bul-Ian'tic Itugf-), 170. 
Bul'lu-r? (tMl-), 71. 

Bnrietf&t'rK), 170. 

Bnl'le-tln (UfCe-tM, or 
fc»J'8-«n) [171) [w 
Wr. ; mt'i-tln. Sou i 
bHPe-an, Wb. Gd. 

lao.i 

Bull^-flght (b^f/Ui. 

Bnll'Tsd^cii^l'UJ, W, 

BulL'ion [ftMl'ntn], 17L 
BuU'iaD'lit (luoI'Min-). 
Bull'lst (iu^if'id). 
Bill 'look ftooJ'ci), 171. 
Bua'a-eFe(j»ib'l),3M. 
BuU'y (SSJ'w), "" 



«f«),03. 



SUlu(HJ 
Dl'tcL 



Bnmp'er. 

Btimp'Un, n. ■ slown, 

ISk BumUn, 148.1 
Bun[Bunn,aj3.] 
Buiicli.2i,44. 
Bunoh'l-De», 7%, 17L 
Buncb'r, 83. 
Ban'dle, )M. 
Bua'died (bun'iUtO. IBI. 
Bnn'dllQB. 
Bnne, £i, H- 
Bnn^i-law (kia^'-y. 



B. M(Hv i *, «! 1. 0. 0. f > fbof i H Of fit ftr. * M fq a«t, S «• in 



Ban?'-hBls, mt. Exo. t. 

Ittl, 
BunJ^led [ tmm^ld) , ISS. 



Bunt'llne I» Wr, j 
»unf'an,Wb,Od.1U.] 

Bm'jo* [Bun I on. 

303.] 
BBoyClKOIF), m. 

Tut OKiiirtac. H ii «flM 
r ■Mil' ihaniG IK< •!««. 



[»< li«rT7, 10U.I 

Buih (tS.il), W. 
Buih't'l IbMk'fl], in, 
Buah'el'Un {bJiiih-). 
Bnmb'i-aetm (biHih-i, TV- 
BhiIi'Idk CbiMk'ina'i. 

Buah'T IbOik'ui. 
Bi»1*d(tU'<d%m,UI. 
Bua'l-lT (M*^ S. 
BiuImu (Ma'Mi), 171, 



Bnakli^i] (-bul), 1*0. 
"—■-'7, M. 
-_.., U, 17*. 
BuBt.S. 
Baa'tud. 

BDi'Uedlhit'U), in. 
-'-->'»,<I«r), 



-reaa'ant-lat (-ro*-)- 
Ahrtttf (Ft.). 
[Burg, 1IC8.-5IW 

BiirVU'. 

Bur'gi-mot (Barfft- 
not, iia. — SatBaf- 

Bnr-gM' f w G4. ; bm'- 
«.Tfr:i4S.1 

Bonrgeoia.} 

Bur'gvai. 

Bugfli (fcjnrt (U» 
fffurg,aa.f 



Uli«iutollMt«i»M(n(b«tifM(vacUe;i^<Mg<)iKi>;ibMiAtUi- 



BPTTBIO 

wHhMcO- 



it'ir), 1?!. 



UT thine- 1S<« I 



Bottib'ned (hwdl'iird}, 

"-•ch'or-liiB (MSc*'-). 

eh'eryjifa*'-). 

But'ltMtfa. 

latt, ». k mut to b* 
ahotst: — D.hiatrlke 

with tbe bead. [5m 

But, im-i 



But'tODHl (hi/'nd). 
But'ton-log (&»('■-). 
But'lreia^TO. 
But'treiMd lbtit'ntt\ 

BS-ty^'c^'a (™'. 
.Am) [bo Sm. Vr ; 
bSt-g-ra'iluu, Wb. 



BUTYAINE 



124 



CAKING 



Bu'tyr-lne, 152. 

Bu'tf-rofia [bo Sm. Wr.; 
MUfp^rut, Wb. Gd. 

Bux'e-otts. [155.1 

Bux'ine, 152. 

Bux'om, 160. 

Buy(6l)(171),r.topap- 
ciiase. {See By, 100.] 

Buy;er (V O. 

Bny'ing (by'-). 

Buzz, *Z2, 175. 

Baz'zard, 170. 

Buzzed {buzd)f 150. 

Buzz'ing. 

By (61, oolloqulally M), 
prep.throug-h or with, 
&c. [SeeBvij, 160.] 

By, or Bye, n. some- 
thing aside fh>m the 
main aul^eet. [See 
Bye, 160.1 

Bye, n. a village. [See 
By, 160.] 

By'*g6ne, 200, Exe. 4. 

By'-tow. 

Bys'sKne, 162. 

Byi'aut (L.). ^ 

By 'word (-tcwrd). 

By-zan'tian (-«Aan). 

Byz'an-tine, a. & n. Fbo 
Wr. ; byz-an'tin, Od. 
155.] 

c. 

Cab, 10. 

Ca-bal', n. ft v. 121. 
Cab'a-la, 72. 
Cab'al-ism (-i^m), 136. 
Cab'al-i8t. 
Cab-al-iat'ic, 109. 
Cab-al-ist'ic-al, 106. 
Ca bal'ier, 176. 
Cab'al-line, a. & n. 82. 
Cab'a-ret (ifcoA'a-rfl, or 

kab'a^ret) [ao Wr. ; 

kab'a-rtLj Sm. ; kab'a- 

ret, Wb. Gd. 155.] 
Cab'bage, 70, 170. 
Cab'in, 170. 
Cab'ined (-Imf)} 150. 
Cab'i-net, 170. 
Cab'in -ing. 
Ca-btWi-an, 78. 
Ca-Mr'ic. 
Ca'ble, 104. 
Ca'bled (Jta'62d), 183. 
Ca'bling. 
Caboose' (121) [Cam- 

bpose, Coboose, 

2a3.] 



Cab'ot-age. 
Cab-ri^o4et' (Fr.) ihab- 

ri-o-U'). 
Cab'ums {^•umz). 
CacVgogue {-gog), 87. 
Ca'oao (to'ito) [so Wr. ; 

konka^Oi Wb. Gd. 165.1 
Cach'arlot (kaeh'a-lot) 

[so Wr.; kach'a4ot, 

Wb. Gd. 165.] . 
Ca4^ (Ft.) {kMh), n. a 

holedug in the ground 

fbr oonoealing and 

f reserving provisions 
See Cash, 160.] 

Ca-chet'ic i-kef-). 10». 

Ca-chet'io-al (Hte<'-))108. 

Ca-ohex'y {ka-bex'y) 
[so Sm. Wr. Wb. Ga.; 
kak^ek-^, Wk. 155.1 

Caoh-in-na'tion {kak-), 

Cach'o-long {ktuh'-). 

Ca-ciqw^^.) (*»-#«*'). 

Cack'er-el. 

Cac'kleritaJE:'/), 164. 

Cat/kled {kaVld)^ 160, 

Cac'klcr. [183. 

Cao'kling. 

Cao-o-chym'ic (-Wm'-). 

Cao-o-ohym'io-alf-Wm'-) 

Cac'o-chym-y (-Inm-y)* 

Cae-o-de'mon. 

Cao-o-e'thes (L.) {4hMz)t 
113. 

Ca-eog'ra-phy. 

Ca-oor o-gy. 93. 

Cao-o-phon'ic, 100. 

Cac-o-phon'io-al, 106. 

Cao-o-pho'ni-oils. 

Ca-coph'o-ny, 108. 

Cac-o-tech'ny {-teV-), 

Ca-cot'ro-phy. 

Cac-ta'ceous {-^fwut)* 

Cao'tus. 

Cad. 10. 

Ca-dav'er-otts. 

Cad'dlce {kad'U) [C a d - 
dis,203.] 

Cad'dls [so spelled in- 
variably when it 
means a kind qf rih- 
boti \ but, in the sense 
of a ca»e-woTmi it is 
written also Cad- 
dice, 203.] 

Cad'ddw, 101. 

Cad'dy, 03. 

Cade, 23. 

Ca'denoe, 169. 

Ca'denced {-dentt\ 160. 

Ca'denc-ing, 183. 

Ca-detS 121. 

Ca'dew (Jcafdu), 



Gd. 166.] 
Ca-hoot'. 
[Caie> 203.— Ste 

Caique.] 
[Caiman, 203.— See 

Cayman.] 
Cairn {kirn). 
Cais'son [so Sm. Gd.: 

ka-90(nVt Wr. 166.1 

[Cai s BO on , Sm.203j 

WBT When ipelled eai»- 
toon. Smart pronounoei K 
kortoon'. 

Cai'tiir, 23. 

CiO'e-put, 160. 

Carjole'. 

Ca-JoledS 160, 183. 

Ca-jol'er. 

Ca-jol'er-y. 

Ca-jol'ing. 

Cake, 23. 

Caked (1;AM), Note C, 

p 34 
Otk^ing, 183. 

a,e,i,5,tt;y,lan^jil,fi,l,6,tt,^«fcor<iil«ii»^,»a»<nflwt,fta»iii 



Cadge ikttf), 46. 
Cadg'er(il»i/'ur)[80 Sm. 

Wr. Wb. Gd. ; k^^wr, 

Wk. 165.] 
Ca'dl (Ar.). 
Ca-dil'lac. 
Cad-me'an, 110. 
Cad'mi-a. 
Cad'mi-um, 160. 
Cad-u-oe'an [so Sm. 
. Wr. } kardu'ce-an,yn>, 

Gd. 155.] 
Ca-du' ceus (1j.) ^kordu'' 

$hu») [so Wr.; ka^duf- 

she-u8t Wk. Sm. ; ka- 

du'ce^u3,Wh.G± 156.] 
Ca-du'oo&s. 
Cae'cum (se'ctttn). 
[Cassarean, 203.— 

See Cesarean.] 
C»s-pi-toBe' (si«-). 
C»-su'ra (»e-zu*ra) [so 

Wk. Sm. Wr ; «e-««'- 

ra, or se-^m'ra, Gd. 

155.] [Ce8ttra,Sm. 

203.1 
C»-Bu'ral {$e-zu*rdl). 
Cafi (Fr.) ijkafh), 
Caf-feac, 100. 
Caf-fe'Ine [Caffein, 

203.] 
Cafflpe (Xw/ttr), 164. 
Cag[Keg,203.] 
Cage, 23. 
Caged, 150, 183. 
Cacr'ing (Jfca/M. 




CALABASH 



125 



CALUMNIATOE7 



Cal'a-bosh. 

Cal'a-boose, 109. 

Cal-ft-man'co (^tnanff'ko) 

Cal'a-ma-ry, 72. 

Cal'am-bac. 

Cal-a-mirer-o&i, 106. 

Cal'a-mXne [so Sm. Wb. 
€rd. ; kM'a-^ln, or 
kdPa^min, Wr. 155.] 

CaPa-mite. 

Ca-lamM-tofis. 

Ca-lam'1-ty, 108, 109. 

CaVa-mas [L. pi. Cctla- 
m»; Eng. pi. Cal'a- 
muB-es.l 

Ca-laah', 121. 

Cal'oar. 

Cal'car-ate. 

Cal-ca're-ofia, 160. 

Cal'oe-at-ed [so Sm.Wr. 
Wb. Od.; kaV$ke-U' 
edy Wk. 134, 155.] 

Cal'oe-don. 

[Calcedonv, 203.— 
See Chaloeaonr.] 

Cal-oe'1-form, 100. 

Cal-eirer-ofia, 106. 

Cal'ci-fonn, 109. 

Cal-dn'a-bte (104) [so 
Sm. Wb. Gd. J foj- 
9ln'a-bU or luiPii-na- 
bl, Wr. 155.] 

Cal-ei-na'tion, 112. 

Cal-cin'a-to-ryj 80. 

Cal-c!ne', or Cal'dne (so 
Gd.;X»/-«IfiSWk.Sm. 
Wr. 155.1 

Cal'dte. 

Cal'ei-um [so Sm. Wb. 
6d. ; kaPshe-^m, Wr. 
134, 155.1 

Calc'*8in-ier [ao Gd.; 
kalk^n'tur, Wr.l55.] 

Cale'-spar, 224. 

Calc'-tfiff. 

Cal'cu-la-ble, 104. 

Cal'ea-la-ry, 72. 

Cal'ou-Ute. 

Cal'cu-lat-ed, 183. 

Cal'ca-Iat-iiig. 

Cal-ctt-la'tion, 112. 

Cal'ca-lat-lTe, 84. 

Cai'ca-lat-or. 

Cal'cu-la-to-ry, 80. 

Cal'eu-lus LL. pi. Calctt^ 
H (nsedr when the 
word has its medical 
sense of a morbid con- 
cretion) i Eng. pi. Cal- 
culases fused when 
the word means a 
mePiod of compuia- 
Hon), 196.] 



Cftl'dron, 17. 

Ca-Uchef(¥T.XlM4d$h') 

Cal-e-do'ni-an, 109. 

Cal-e-fa'dent {-/af$hent) 

Cal-e-fto'tion. 

Cal-e-fiMs'to-ry, 80. 

CkU'efn4Hntrff (Fr.) 
(,-boora). 

Cal'en-dar, n. a register 
of the year. [See Cal- 
ender. 100.] 

Cat'en-<ler,n.a hot press 
for cloth: — v. to 
dress, as cloth, by hot 

SresRing. [SeeCalen- 
ar, lOO.J 
Cal'en-dered {-durd)tl60 
Cal'en-der-ing. 
CaFen-drer. 
Cal'ends {-endz), 136. 
Cal'en-ture. 
Ca-les'cenoe. 

caif (*40 (i«8) ipL 

Calves (kiivz)j 193.1 
Cal'1-ber, or Cal'i-bre 
OaPi-tmr) [so Wr. 

CT" Walker and Web* 
Iter gire thii word only in 
the fint ipclUng. Smart 
■pelli it ealtter, wlien it 
meaoi the bore <^ a ym, 
and cal&tre, wlien it means 
menial capacity. In the 
fint form he prononncee it 
hafirbftir^ and ia the aee- 

Cal'ioe (-<«), 100. 
Cal'i-oo [pi. Cal'i-eoea, 

192.} 
[Calif, 203.— .Ste Ga- 

Uph.] 
[Califate, 203.— Ste 

Caliphate.] 
Calipash', or Cal'i- 

pash [kal-i-pash'f Sm. 

Wr. ; kal'liHuh, Wb. 

Gd. 165.J [Cal 11- 

S ash. 203.] 
-1-pee', or Cal'i-pee 
[kat-i-pif, Sm. Wr.; 
hd'i-pi, Wb. Gd. 155.] 
rCallipee,203.] 
Cal'i-pers (-purz), 78, 
130 [Calliper 8,202.1 
Caaiph (kam [Calif, 

Kalif, 203.1 
Cal'iph-ate [Call fate, 

Kali fate, 203.1 
Cal-is-then'ic [not Ca* 

lis'then-ic, 153.][Cal- 

li8thenie,203.] 
Cal-is-then'ics. 
Cal'i-ver. 



[CaUx,203.— iSteCal- 

CUk* Ckmtfk) (148, 161, 
108) [Can Ik, 203.1 

Cftlk, IBI. 

C&lked {kawti). Note C, 
p. 34. 

Cftlk'er {kawkfer). 

Cal'kln, or CkWia 
(kal'kin. or kawVin) 
[soWr.;Jka/'«n,Tiil- 
garly kawViny Sm.; 
£awFifi,Wb.Gd.l55.] 

CkWingikawk'ing),l92. 

can, 17, 172. 

called, 150. 

Cail'er. 

Cal-Ug'ra-pher. 

Cal-U-grapb'ic, 100. 

Cal-li-graph'ie-al, 108. 

Cal-Ii^ra-phist. 

Cal-lig'rarphy, 108. 

canning. 

Cal-li'op^, 170. 
[CaIlipaBh,203.— iSte 

Calipash.] 
[Callipee, 203. — Ste 

Calipee.] 
^Calliper8,203.— 5e« 

Calipers.] 
[Callisthenio, 203. 

— See Calisthenic] 
Cal-los'i-ty, 78, 109. 
Cal'lofis. 
Cal'lOw, 170. 
Calm (kitm), 102. 
CiUmed (kiimd), 150. 
Cahn'er {kdm'-). 
CSlm'lng {kdm'-). 
Ca-log'ra-phy, 106. 
Cal'o-mel. 
Ca-16r'io [so Wr. Wb. 

(M.; ka4o^rik, 8m. 

155.] 
Calorific, 109. 
Ca-ldr-i-n-ca'tioii. 
Cal-o-rim'e-ter, 108. 
Ca-ldr-i-mo'tor [so (M. ; 

ka48r'i'tno4or, Sm.; 

ktU-<Hri-mo'tor^ Wr. 

155.] 
Cal'o-type, 170. 
Ca-loy^er. 
Calp, 10. 
Cal'trop. 
Ca-lum'ba. 
Cai'u-met, 89. 
Ca-lnm'ni-ate, 78. 
Ca-lum'ni-at-ed, 183. 
(ja-lum'ni-at-lng. 
Ca-lnm-nl-a'tion, 112. 
Ca-lum'ni-at-or. 
Carlum'ni-a-to-ry, 88. 



lUl; 6*o«<ii there; d& a« if» foot ; $ as <» fteile ; gh m g in go ; th a« in thii. 



GALUMNtOUi 

Gt-lum'ni-ottt. 
Carum-ny, 03. 
C«l'va-ry, 72. 
CiUve (to), 102. 
Calved (kbtvd), 100. 
CiUv'iojr (I'ctr'Oi 183. 
Cal'via-lam (-izm), 133, 

130. 
Cal'viQ-iBt. 
Cal-vin-ist'ic, 109. 
Cal-viQ-iBt'ic-al, 106. 
Calx (LO [L.pl. CkOoes} 

£ng. pi. Calxea, im.] 
Ga-lyc'i-nal [so Wb. 

Gd.; JfcaM^'naZ,Wr, 

166.] 
Cal'y-^nne [bo Wr. Wb. 

Oa.; ial'y-tin, Sm. 

165.1 
Cal'y-cle (kal'i-kl), 16i. 
Cal'y-cled(ikai'»-i^)*183 
Ca-ly^'u-late. 
Ca-lyc'u-Iat-ed. 
Carlyp'tra [C a 1 y p t e r , 

Ca-lyp'tri-fonn. 
Ca'lyx [L. pi. CaVy-t^ 

(-*iz)\ Eng. pL Ca'- 

lyx-eB, 198.] 
Cam (10), n. a oontriv* 

anoe to produce al< 

ternating motion. [5^6 

Oham, 100.] 
Ca-ma'ieu (-ma'yoo),171< 
Cam'ber. 
Cam'beit-ing. 
CamOii-al, ]^. 
Cam'bist. 
Cam'bi-um. 
Cam-boo se' [C a b Q s e, 

203.] 
[0 am brel, 203. ^ 5m 

Gambrel.] 
Cam'bri-an. 
Cam'bric. 
Came, 23. 
Cam'el, 170. 
Ca-me'le-on, 109. 
Ca-mel'o-pard, w Cam'- 

el-o-pard [so Wr. Gd.; 

ha-mePo-pard^ Wk. ; 

ham'd-ihpardt Sm. 

165.] 
Cam'e-o, 170. 
Cam'e-ra. 
Cam-e-ra-Iist'io. 
Cam-e-ra-Ust'ioa, 
Cam'er-«t-ed. 
Cam-er-a'tion. 
Cam-is-ade'. 
Cam-i-sa'do. 
Cam'i-sated. 
Cam'let. 



186 

[C a m o m i U, a03w— Sh 

Chamomile.] 
Ca'motts. 
Camp, 10. 
Cam-paff'iiol. 
Cam-paign' (-p4n')i W* 
Cam-paign'er (-i>«n'-). 
Cam-pairi-form, 100. 
C4m-pa-iii'le(-ne7e),103, 
Cam-pa-nil'i-form. 
Cam-pa-noI'a-giBt. 
Cam-pa-noPo-g:y, 106. 
Cam-pan'a-late. 
Cam-pes'tral. 
Cam-pes'tri-an. 
Cam-phene' [io Wr.; 

kam'f^n^ 8m. Wb. Gd. 

166.] 
Cam'pho-gequ 
Cam'phor. 
Cam'phor-ate. 
Cam'phor-at-ed. 
Cam'pbor-at-ing. 
Cam'pi-oo, 109. 
Can (10), n. (t yessel for 

liquor ;— t^. to be able. 

[See Khan, 100.] 
Ca'^naan-ite ('-nan-), 171. 
Ga-naan-it'im (-nan-), 
Ca-na'di-an, 100. [163. 
CanaiOe (Fr.) (ka^fU) 

[ho Sm. ; ka-nUf, Wk. 

Wr. 164, 155.] 
Can'a-kin. 
C%-nal'. 
[Canal-coal, 903.^ 

See Cannel-ooal.] 
Can-a-Uo'u-Ute. 
Can-a-lic'u-Iat-ed. 

Ca-na'ry. 

Can'cel. 

Can'oel-late. 

Can'cel-Iat-ed. 

Can-eel-Wtion, IVL 

Can'ceUecl_(-«e/<l) [ C a n- 

eeled.Wb. Gd. 203. 

•^See 177, and Note 

E, p. 70.] 
Can'eel-Ung PC an eel- 

ing,Wb.ua.203.j 
Can'oer. 
Can'oer-ate. 
Can'oer-at-ed. 
Can-cer-a'tion. 
Can'oer-ite. 
Can'oer-ofis. 
Can'eri-form (kan^-)^ 
Can'crTne (ton^'-). 
Can'orite (kang'-), 
Can-de-U'orum rL.) 

iL. pi. Can-de-la'ora ; 
:ng. pi. Can-dela'- 

brums, 196.] 



Can'dent. 

Can-des'cenoe, 171. 

Can'did, a. honest. iSe§ 
Candled, 100.] ^ 

Can'di-da-cy, 171. 

Can'di-4ate, 78, 100. 

Can'died {-did), a. In- 
crusted with sugar. 
[See Candid, 100.] 

Can'dle, 104. 

Can'dle-mas, 180. 

Can'dor [(Jandour. 
Sm. 109, ;i03.] 

Can'dy,03. 

Cane, 23. 

Caned, 160, 183. 

Ca-uic'u-lar. 

Can'i-cule. 

Ca-nin«', 121, 150. 

Canning, 183. 

Can'Is-ter, 170. 

Can'ker (fcon^'-), 94. 

Can'kered (kang'hui^ 
IqO. 




Exc. 1. 
Can'ker-y (kang*-). 
Can'nel-ooal [Can^l- 

ooal,203.] 
Can'nl-bal, ^8, 170. 
Can'ni-bal-ism (4zin), 
Can'non (170), n. a great 

gun. [See Canon, 100.} 
CiHi-non-ade', ». & v. 
Can-non-ad'ed, 183. 
Can-non-ad'ing. 
Can-no%«?r') or Cmw 

non-ier', 122. 
Can'not, 170. 

a^ Aeeodlnf to W«!in 
fUr and Woroettvr it wovld 
be more analogical to wrlta 
can and not • separately. 
But t» join them li more 
contiat^nt vUh (heir uiual 
pronunclftloti a* a simply 
word (caa'ofV, the two n'i 
hayins (ha cnct dMeribe^ 
tai § OK 

Can'nn-lar, 69. 

Can'ny, 03, 170. 

Ca-noe' (-noo')i V^ 

Can'on (170), n. a ml^ 
or law. [ See Cannon. 
100.] ^ 

Cafkon (kanfyun) (Sp.)» 
fi. a deep gorge worn 
by a water-eourse. 
[See Canon, 101.J 
[Canyon, 203.J 

Cau'on-esB, 170. 

Ca-non'fc, 109. 



^ — -,_ — , J — ^ — , --,- 

■ * ' 

^^'h^hh^^i ti<>liO»tt,f, ahorf; K nf <n £ar^ a at {« i^ft, I <m H 



Cu-oa-lBt'lo. va. 
Ctn-rat-1-ii'tioa, lU. 
Cu'oa-lie, W(l. 
Cuo'tiD-tied, IW, tS3. 
Cim'on-li-lng. 
Cut'o-pled (-p'ld), W. 
Cui'o-p7, ^ ITfi, 
Cjn'tf-pj.loe, ISO. 
Ca-no'Tolkii^. 

C«B t»-l»ir'l-«i)(-6r«'-). 
[CsDtalTTer, wS. - 

Sm Cantlleier.] 
Cm'ts-loupe (-loop). 

(-(unp'-). 
Om-te'to, or Om|-M'(« 
(It-) r»o Wr. f taa-U^ 

to, 04- IM.] 
Can-Httrfce nt.} C-ta- 

Cuit'ed. 

CBn-lem', 121. ' 
Cu'lel [Cm tl«, 903.1 
SHCutUerer.] 



Cni'tle(l64) [Ontel, 

Ofo'to [pi. Can'Ui 

Cui'toa. 
Cvi'ton-al. 

Cm'tooad (-Uaid), 160. 
Cwi'ton-ing. 

cuD'tflD-iw, a«. 



187 

dotb oT bun)) or af 
flu. Fw« CtovMi. 

iw.] 

Cui'vwi, •. to UUIB- 

Ine : — to dlKaii ; — 

Om'TiBBed, Ifib. 

Cu'fus-er. 

Ci'nj^M. 

C«.'y<«.lCifion MJ.) 
Gnn-io'nl fit.), ISl. 

ClK>Ut'clK>Dil^£DI)'cJkBW 



■.-^IH .... „., 

. ™'««-T*. Wk- 8(0. 
C^ptl>ll-fon]i, ?8, l«L 

Cw'l-i*], o. (JOB) relst- 
ing to the nepa 1 — n. 
the upper part of t 
pillar. 'iSa Capitol, 
160.1 '^ 

Cap'f-laUat. 



bodT. [Sa Capital, 

Cip^T-U'll-iui. 
Cap'l-toUne. 



Ca-plt'u-lit-or. 
Ca-pll'ulam. 
C^l|Tt (^«*>^[Co- 



tlIliSatl»t^r«i A^^QtotiiaiinCU^leifba'icin^ithiufnthlay 



CAPTIVATE 



128 



CARPET 



Cap'ti-TCte, 73. 
Ci^'U-yat ed, 183. 
Cftp'ti-yat-lng^. 
Cap-ti-va'tion. 
Cap'tlve, 84. 
Cap-tiv'i-ty, 108, IW. 
Cap'tor, 88. 
Capt'ure (-ifur)t 91. 
Capt'ured (-$urd), 150, 

183. 
Capt'ur-ing {-jfur-), 01. 
Cap-tt-chia' {-ahin'), 46. 
Cap'u-let. 
Car, 11. 
Cftr'a-bine [bo Wb. 6d.: 

kar'a-Mn, Wr. IM.j 

[Carbine, 203.] 
Cfir-arbl-neer', 122. 
Cftr'ackrCarao, 203.1 
Cir'a-c&r, 170. 
C&r'a-cole [Caraeol, 

203.] 
Cftr'a-co-ly [C a r a c o U, 

203.] 
[Caraffheen, 203.— 

See Carrikgeeu.] 
C&r'a-mel [Caromel, 

^.] 
Cir'at, n. a weig^ht of 

four grains, [see Ciur- 

rot, ieo.1 
Cftr-a-vaas or Cftr'a-ran 

(170) rjfcdr-a-pon', Wk. 

am. Wr. } kdr^thvatij 

Wb. Gd. 155.] 
Cftr-a-van-eer'. 
Cftr-a-van'sa-ry (72) 

[Caravansera, 

203.] 
Cftr'a-vel [Carrel, 

203.] 
Cftr'a-way(170) [Car- 

raway,203.] 
Car'bine [bo Sm. Grd. ; 

kar-bw, Wk.; toW- 

ftin, or Jtar-bln'y Wr. 

155.1[Carabine,203] 
Ciur-bi-neer'. 
Car'bdn. 
Car-bou-a'oeouB (-thua)^ 

112. 
Car'bon-ate, 73. 
Car'bon-at-ed. 
Car-bon'io. 109. 
Car-bon-irer-ouB, 106. 
Car-bon-i-za'tion. 
Car'bon-ize, 202. 
Car'bon-ized, 150, 183. 
Car'bon-iz-injgf. 
Car'boy. 

Car'bun-cle(-6t«n^-Jfc/),54 
Car'bun-cled {-bung-kid) 
Car-bun'cu-lar(-6tinfir'-). 



Car-ban-cn-la'tioii 

(-5ttii^-)- 
Car'bu-ret-ted [C a r b n - 

reted,Wb.Gd.203.] 
Car'oa-Jou {-joo), 
Car'ca-net. 
Car'casB [Caroaae, 

203.] 
Car-d-no'ma. 
Car-d-nom'a-tofiB. 
Card. 11. 
Car'aa-mine, 152. 
Car'da-mom. 
Card'ed. 
Card'er. 
Car'di-a. 
Car'di-ae, 78. 
Car-dl'ao-al (106) [io 

Wk. Wr. Wb. Gd.; 

kar*di-ak^,Sm, 155.] 
Car-dl-ag'ra-phy, 106. 
Car-dl-aFgi-a. 
Ciur'di-al-fy. 
Car'di-nal, 78, 109. 
Car'di-nal-ate. 

Car'di-^d. 
Car-di-ol'o-ey, 106. 
Gar-di'tiB. 
Car-doon', 121. 
Care (Wr), 14. 
Cared (it<rd),.165, 183. 
Ca-reen'. 
Ca-reen'affe, 109. 
Ca-reened, 150. 
Ca-reen'ing'. 
Ca-reer', 171. 
CweffuK^kirf/Sot), 
Ca-reBB'. 
Ca-ie«Bed' (ba-rett'). 

Note C, p. 34. 
Ca-ress'ing. 
Ca'ret, 49, N. 
Cacre'wom (WH-). 
Car^o [pi. Car'goea, 

Car'groose. 
Cftr'Ib. 

C&r-ib-be'an, 110. 
Cdr'i-bou {-boo) (Pr.) 

[Cariboo, 203.1 
Car'i-ca-ture, n.(16i) [ao 

Sm. Wr. Wb. Gd.; 

kHr-i-kori^r' , Sm. ; 

k&r^ka^hAr't Wk. 

134, 155.] 
C&r-l-ca-ture', r. 122,161. 
C&r-i-ca-tured', 165, 183. 
Cftr-i-ca-tur'ing. 
CHr-i-oa-tur'iat. 
Car-i-cog'ra-phy, 108. 
C&r'I-coSs, 170. 
Ca'ri-€8 (-««>, 171. 



Cftr'iMon [bo Wb. Gd-j 
ka-rU'onj Wr. 155.1 

Cftr'i-nate, 109. 

Cftr'i-nat-ed. 

Car'ing (WH-). 183. 

Cftr'i-ole. 

[Car i op Bi s,203.~5M 
CaryopsiB.] 

Ca-ri-os'i-ty, 106, 109. 

Ca'ri-o&B, 78; 

Car'Ungs {-iingz)^ n.pl. 

Car'locL 

Car-lo-vin'gl-aii. 

Car'man, 196. 

Car'mel-ite, 83. 

Car-min'a-tlv«, 84, 170. 

Car'mine, or Car-mine' 
[bo Wr. ; kar'mlH^ 
Wb. Gd.; kar-mln', 
Wk. Sm. 155.] 

Car'nage, 169. 

Car'nal. 

Car-nal'i-ty, 106. 

Car-na'tion, 112. 

Car-na'tioned {-shund), 

Car-nel'ian (-yan), 51. 

Car'ne-ofis. 

Car'ney, 96, 169. 

Car-ni-^fl-ca'tion. 

Car'tti-f ied, 186. 

Car'ni-5, 78, 94. 

Car'ni-fy-ing. 

Car'ni-val, 169. 

Car-niv'o-ra, n. pi, 

Car-niv'o-ro&B, 106. 

Car-noBe'. 

Car-noB'i-ty, 106, 169. 

Cftr'ol, 170. 

Cftr-o-lin'i-an, 109. 

Cftr'olled {^uld) (150) 
[Caroled, Wb. (3d. 
203.1 

C»r'or-ling_ [Caro- 
ling , Wb. Gd. 203.1 

C4r-o-Iyt'ic [Carolit- 
ic,20i] 

[ C a r o m e 1 , 203. ~ <S!m 
Caramel.] 

Ca-rot'id, 170. 

Ca-rous'al (-rtma?'-), 72. 

Ca-rouse' {-rouz'). 

Carp, 11. 

Carpal, 72. 

Car-pa'tlii-an. 

Carped {karpt)t Note Cf 
p. 34. 

Car'pel. 

Car'pel-la-ry, 72. 

Car-pel'lum, 170. 

Car'pen-ter. 

Car'pen-try, 93. 

Carp'er. • 

Car'pet. 



a, S, i, 5, u, 5, long ; &,€,!, 6, fi, jp, 8hort ; Iktuin far, ikot in fiiat, k at in 



CARPETED 



129 



CABTORECJM 



Car'pet-ed. 
Car'pet-iQg^. 
Car-phol'o-gy. 
Carp'ing. 
Car po-nte, 83. 
Ca-pol'o-gist, 106. 
Car-pol'o-gy, 106. 
Cir'ra-geen {-ghfn) 

[Carag^heeOf 2OT.] 
[CTa r r a w a y , 203.— 5ee 

Caraway.] 
Oir'rel. 

Cftr'riage (-r«), !«, 171. 
C&r'rl^, W, 186. 
C&r'ri-er, 170. 
CarTi-on, 170. 
G&r'rom. 
Cilr'roii-ade. 
Cdr'rot (170), n. a plant. 

[.S^eeCa'rat, 100.] 
Car'rot-y, ua. 
Cftr'ry, 170. 
Ciir'ry-ftll, 206, Exe. 3. 
Car'ry-iiijf. 
Cart, 11. 

Carte^danch^ (kart- 

blongsh*) [so Sm. ; 

ksart-bldnshff Wk.; 

kdtrtbldnch'j Wr. j 

tdrt-bHtMh',Qd,Viit 

165.] 
Cart'ed. 
Car tel', n. [so Wk. Sm. 

Wr. ; kar-tel', or jfcor'- 

ta, Gd. 155.] 
Cart'er. 

Car-te'sian (-zhan)^ 112. 
Car-tha-gin'i-an. 
Car'tha-mlne, 82. 
Car-thu'slan {-zhan). 
Car'ti-lage, 109. 
Car-ti-Iag'i-nottB {-U^-). 
Cart'lng:, 

Car-to^ra-pher, 108. 
Car-to-graph 'ic. 
Car-to-^raph'io<aL 
Car-to^ra-phy. 
Car-toon', 121. 
Car-touoh' (-tooch'), 121. 
Car'tridge (-lr{f), 109, 
Carf u-la-ry, 72. [171. 
Cftr'a-cage. 
Cftr'u-cate. 

C^'iin-«le (-ung-Jd), 54. 
Ca-run'cu-lar (-rung^-^ 
Ca-nm'ca-late (-r»«^'-). 
Ca-mn'ca-lat-€d 

Ca-nm^cU'lofiB (-^nin^). 
Carve, 11. 
Canred, 166, 183. 
Car'vel [C a r a V e 1 , 203] 



Canr'er, 77. 

Carv'iog. 

Cftr-y^i'tes (-itz), n. pi, 

Cir-y-at'io, 109. 

Cftr-y-at'ld. 

C&r-y-at'i-dea (-diz), n. 
pi. 171. 

Car-y-oph-yMa'oeoQB 
i-o/'il-a'skw), 171. 

Cftr-y-o-phyl'lofis, or 
Cftr-y-opn' v1-1oub[ See 
AdeaopnyllouB.] 

Cftr-y-op'BlB, or Ci-ry- 
op'siB [bo Wr. ; kar- 
y-op'aitt Sm.; U-fy- 
opfH9, Gd. 155.] 

Ca'sal. 

Caa'ca-beL 

CaS'^ade', 121. 

Caa-ea-rU'la, 170. 

Case 23 

Caae^ CkAMt\ 160, 183, 
Note C, p. 34. 

CaBe'hard-en (-AarePn). 

Case'hard-enea l-hard- 
nd)j 165. 

Caae'hard-en-iDgf-kanl- 
n-), 149. 

Ca'se-Ine [C a b e in, 208] 

Case'mate. 

Caae'roat-ed. 

Caae'ment (kdz'ment, or 
kds'ment) JkHz'ment, 
Wk. Sm. wr. ; Jfc«»'- 
ment, Wb. Gd. 155.1 

Ca'ae-ofiB [bo Wb. Gd. ; 
ba*8e^uB, or Jka'«Ae-tw, 
Wr.; In'tJb'tM, Sm. 
26, 155.] 

Ca'aem (-zum), 136, 171. 

Cash (10), ft. r^dy mon- 
ey. [See Cache, 160.] 

Caahed {ktuht). Note C, 
p. 34. 

Ca-ahew' (ha-Mhoo^)* or 
CaBh'ew (kash*o6)[kti- 
ehoo', Wk. Sm.; ka- 
shu', or kaeh'u, Wr. ; 
kash'u, Wb. Gd. 155.] 

Cash-ier' (kash-irf), n. 
[bo Wb. Gd.; ka-akir', 
Wk. Sm. Wr. 155.] 

Ca-shier' {ka-sher*), v, 
[Wk. Sm. Wr. ; kosh- 
er', Wb. Gd. 155.] 

Ca-Bhlered' (shird'), 
150. 

Ca-Bhier'ing (-#A«r'-). 

Ca8h'mere(171) [soWb. 
Grd. ; luuh'miTj or 
kash^mir', Wr. 165.] 

Cash'oo. 

C&B'ing. 



G4Bk(12,131)[Caaqne 
(in the aenae of a hel- 
met), 203.] 

Caak'et. 

Caa'pl-an, 78. 

Catgue (Fr.) (kdtk) 
[(7a a k, 203.]^ 

Caa'Ba-da, or Caa-Ba'da 
Ikae'a-da, Wk. Sm. 
Wb.Gd.; ktu^f da, or 
ktu^a-da, Wr. 155.] 
[Casaaya, Casaa- 
vi,203.] 

CMM-Wk'XiOtk, 

(^aa'aa-va, or Caa-Ba'ra 

[kaa'fjk^oa, Gd. ; kaa- 

a'va, or kaa'thva, Wr. 

155.] [203.] 

[Ca8Bada,CaaBaTi, 
Caa'Bia Ikaeh'va) [bo 

Sm. Wb. (M. ; kaah*' 

the-a, Wk. Wr. 155.] 
Caa-aid'e-otta. 
Caa'si-do-ny, 170. 
CteB'Bi-mere f ao Wr.Wb. 

Gd. ; koB^-wtir', Sm. 

165.1 
Caa-Bl-o-pe'a, 160, 170. 
Caa'Bock, 170. 
Caa'aooked (-toki). 
Caa-Bon-ade' [ao (M. ; 

kaefon-ad, Wr. 155.] 
Caa'ao-wa-ry, 170. 
Caat (12, 131), v. to 

throw : — n. a throw. 

[See Caate, 160.] 
Caa-ta'U-an, 109. 
Caa-ta-net'/>r Caa'ta-net 

[ka9-ta-net',Sm,i kaa'- 

ta^net, Wk. Wr. Wb. 

(M. 155.] 
C&Bt'a-way. 
Caste (kUi) n, elaas. 

[See Caat, 160.] 
Caa'tel-lan, 170. 
Cas'tel-la-ny, 72. 
Cas'tel-lat-ed. 
Cast'er. 

Cas'ti-gate, 78, 169. 
Cas'ti-git-ed, 183. 
Cas'ti-gat-ing. 
Cas-ti-ga'tion. 
Cas'ti-gat-or. 
Caa'ti-ga-to-ry. 
Cas-til'ian (-tU'yan). 
Chafing. 

Cast'-i-ron (-I-tim). 
Cas'tle (kaeri), 162, 104. 
Cas'tled {kas'ld). 
Cas'tle-ry (keu'l^ry). 
CaatMing. 
Cas'tor, 88. 
CllB-to're-nm, 169. 



fill; dMlnthore; db « <n foot ; 9 a« <» fkdle ; gh a« g <n go ; t^ m <n thia. 



, Cl-Orrta' (Ur'UltSi 17 
Ca-tKnh'il l-tdr'-). 



C»-t«B'tro-phS, KB, I». 



Calh'o lie, 109. 
"- -hol'l-dtm f-«femj 
) Wk. Sm-i ia-tlmi'. 



J'J&S"'^ 



CuVI-lln-lan (-tan), 171, 



C^-Mip'ter. 
1 Ca-top'tric, 1<KL 
) Ci-lop'trlc-al. loa. 
■ Ca-top'tro-maD-cf. 



tie (W''n. IM- 



Cs'ler. 
Ca'ler«d, l«5. 
C«'Mr-«. 

Ssf er-plFtar, 179, 171. 
nVer-winl. 
CBVer-w&Dled, IW. 

Cafer-vaul-liu;. 
Cilei, f •"^' 



Cat-ui-ul 'n>-motlB. 
Cat'i-pum i-pasm), 134. 
Cst-»-pe!t'lc. 



Cst'fieh, 200. 
Cat'— ' 



'harp-lngi (-^w). 



iiliI,S,u,y, b>iVil,B,l, 



itott'eWn, Vb. Gd! 
— 1 [.Sm Kx oalUo- I 

1 k. . . 



ClD'KTwCfioV'lJ). 

COu'lnir {tam^-). 



^'Mi-" 



Cbi'tiiHivd (-tkHwi},UIL 
Cm'Oon-er. 
Ciu'tioa-lng. 
Cin'tloDi t-tkMt). 
Civ-d-ade' [m Wt- 

8m. Wr. 1 teD'otWd. 

Wb. Od. IM.] 



tCsTozoD, ioa.— £m 

CwflBMnl 
.^ Ci-Tlire' (S^rtr^ Bf 

■ fcw-jfft-') r»o Wt. ; 
ka-rir'.yn.Qi.ibim- 

Cw't-eoni. 
Csr'll, 170. 

fled.Wli. Od-aOS.— 
Bte in »ia Sou E. 

CuT'U-ltag (C»»ll- 

iBg,vnt.Qi.iTTaa-] 

Oir'fc, 170, 
Civ'liiC, 1«3. 

c«'»7, aa. 

CSV, 17. 
Cived, 100. 

ClWk^'auk.W.] 

. Ctx'on (.baJWoo). 



Wr. WK. Gd.( M 
y«n', an. lU-l 



[Cli«iiuln, 



, .lD,Ce<i^ln,3aa.] 
Ce'd-tf EM 8m. Wli. 

Oe'dVi ". ■ gwaa of 
tiws. rAHCeder.UO.J 

Ce'darn. 

SS" 



K SeaUng, 



Cel'ebrate, IK. 
Cel'e-brat4d, 18S. 
Oel's-bnt-iog. 



■UTer. [St( vemaii 
Ccn-ao'rl^l, M, H. 



IjSm^ttwni A«|fKf«ot;]M>t)&«U«ivb<uv<ncaitt)<"^l>>i*- 



CBNSOBIOUB 



132 



CHA6RBBN 



y 



Cen-io'ri-ofis, 1A9. 

Cen'8u-al, a. relating to 
m oensus. [<See Sensa- 
al. 100.] (104. 

Cen'8ur-a-ble (-«Attr-)* 

Cen'Bure i-thur,) 

Cen'sured (-fAurd). 

Cen'sur-er {^thur). 

Cen'sur-ing (-«A«r-). 

Cen'sus. 

Cent, n. a hundredth 
Dfurt of a dollar. \8e€ 
Scent, and Sent, 160.] 

Cent'age. 

Cen'taur, 171. 

Cen'tftn-ry, 171.. 

Cen-te-naM-an, 109. 

Cen-te-na'ri-ofiB. 

Cen'te-na-ry, 72. 

Cen-ten'nl-al, 109, 170. 

Cen-tes'i-mal, 78. 

Cen-tes-l-ma'tion. 

Centi-«ip'i-tofiB, 160. 

Cen-tiri-dofis. 

Cen-ti-fo'U-o&s. 

Cen'ti-grade, 109. 

Cemfti^avMnt (Pr.). 

Cen-ti-li'tre (Fr.)(tang- 
H-le'tr) [Centili- 
ter (sen-tti'i'tur), 
Wb. Gd. 2a3.] 

Cen'time (Fr.) (sutng- 
tern'). 

Cen-tim'e-ter, 106. 

Cen-tirmitre(Fr.) (aOng- 
H-ma'tr), 

Cen'ti-ped [Centi- 
pede (8en'H-ped)t 

Cent'ner. [203.] 

Cen'to [pi. Cen'toB, 1921 

Cen'to-nism {-nizm),l^ 

Cen'tral, 72. 

Cen'tral-ism (-ism), 133. 

Cen-tral'i-ty, 108, 160. 

Cen-tral-i-za'tion. 

Cen'tral-ize, 202. 

Cen'tral-ized, 183. 

Cen'tral-iz-ing. 

Cen'tre (104) [Center, 
Wb. Gd. 203. — See 
Note E, p. 70.1 

^en'tred (-<crd),164,183, 

€en'tric. 

Cen'trlc-al. 

Cen-tric'i-ty, 169. 

Cen-triru-gal, 89, 170. 

Cen'tring. 

Cen-trip'e-tal, 109. 

Cen-tro-bftr'ic. 

Cen-tum'vir (L.) [pi. 
Cen-tum'vi-rl, 198.J 

Cen- turn' vi-rate. 

Cen'tu-ple, 164. 



Cen-ta'ri-al. 
Cen-tu'ri-on, 49, N.; 109. 
Cen'tu-ry, 171. 
Ceph-a-lal'g^c, 109. 
Ceph'a-ldl-gy. 
Ce-phal'ic, a. An. 
Ceph-a-li'tis. 
Ceph-a-loro-ey, 109. 
Co-phal'o-poa [so 8m. 

Wr. ; 8€f-€U'o-podt Gd. 

155.] 
Ceph-al-o-pod'ie. 




Wr.; 

165.] 

Ce-n'ceouB (-«&««), 112. 
Ce-ram'ic, 109, 170. 
C£r'arBlne [Ceraein, 

203.] 
C«r'a-8ite,83, 152. 
Ce'rate. 
Ce-rat'ed, 183. 
Cer'a-trine [Cera- 

trin,203.] 
Cer-be're-an, 110, 169. 
Cer'be^rua (L.). 
Cere, n. the naked Bkin 

that coverB tiie base 

of the bill of some 

birds : — v. to cover 

with wax. [See Sear, 

Seer, Sere, 160.] 
Ce're-al, 49, N. ; 109. 
Ctr^-bei'lum (L.) [pL 

Ctr-e-bel'la.] 
C6r'e-bral, 156. 
Cir'e-brum (L.). 
Cere'cloth, 206. 
Cere'ment, 171. 
C^r-e-mo'ni-al, 109. 
C6r-e-mo'ni-otlB. 
C6r'e-mo-ny, 171. 
Ce're-ofis, a. waxen. 

[See SeriouB, 160.] 
CefrBs (-rBz) (L.). 
Ce'rIne[Cerin,203.] 
Ce'rite. 
Ce'ri-um, 169. 
Cer'nu-ottB. 
Cfir-o-graph'io. 
CSr-o-graph'io-al [bo 

Wr. J se-ro-grafik-aL 

Wb. Gd. 155.] 
Ce-rog^ra-phist. 
Ce-rog'ra-phy, 168. 
C6r'o-man-cy. 
Ce-roon' fSeroon, 

Seron,203.] 
Ce-ro-plas'tic. 
C6r'rl-al, 170. [00. 

Cer'tain (-tin), 21, N. ; 
Cer'tatn-ty (wr'Wn-). 
Cer-tif i-cate, 169. 



Cer-ti-fl-cs'tion. 
Cer'ti-f led, 180. 
Cer'ti-fi-er. 
Cer'ti-f^, 78, 94, 169. 
Cer'ti-iy-ing. 
Ce-ru'le-an, 110, 109. 
Ce'ruse (-root) [bo Sol 

Wr. ;»«'r«*,Wk.Gd. 

155.] 
Ce'rused (-roott), 
Cer'vi-eal, 110, 169. 
Cer'vine (82, 162) [bo 

Sm. Wb. Gd-j teHvin, 

Wr. 155.] , 
Ce-sa're-an (-za'-), 109. 
Ces •pl-tI'tiouB(-tf»«A'tM). 
Ces'pi-tose. 
Ces'pl-tofiB. 
Ces-sa'tion. 
Ces'Bion (sesh'un), «. 

the act ot ceding. [Se» 

Session, 160.] 
Ces'sion-a-ry (gesh'nn-), 

160. • 

Ces'sor, 88. 
Cess'pool [SeBspool, 

203.] 
Ces'tuB. 
[Cesura, 203. — See 

Cassura.] 
Ce-ta'oe-a (-«Ae-a), 171. 
Ce ta'cean (shan), 
Ce-ta'oeous {shus), a. 

relating- to the Ceta- 

oea. [See Setaoeoa8» 

160.] 
Ce'tIne[Cetln,203.] 
Ce-to-log'ic-al (-fe»'-), 

108. 
Ce-toVo-gist, 108. 
Ce-tol'o-gy, 108, 170. 
Ciy-lon-ese* (-§z'), 
Chab'a-sie (kab'ct-sB* or 

6hab'€t-8e) [so Wr. j 

kdb'asi, Wb. Gd.j 

ahdb'asi, Sm. 155.] 
Chab'a-Bite {kctb'-). 
[Chad (shad), Sm. 203. 

— See Shad.] 
Chafe, 23. 
Chafed (cfc<tA)> ^Ote C, 

p. 34. 
Chafer. 
Chaif, 12, 131. 
Chaffer, 170. 
Chftf fered (-fura)^ 150. 
Chaffer-er. 
Charfer-ing. 
Chaffinch, 170. 
Chaffy, 131, 170. 
Chafing, 183. 
[Chagreen, 203.-~ 

See Shagreen.] 



a, e, !, o, u, y, long; &, S, X, 6, ft, y, short ; Viatin fitf, kcuin fiut, ktuin 



rin-grln', wii. WL 

Chi-gTiQed '( jjho^rfliul') 
Cbn-Rrin'liig (jko- 

Cliilned, ISO. 

ChUu'lBf. 

Ohaln'-pump. 

ChilKd [dUrd]'. 
Cbalr'maD faUr'-), US. 
ChilK ((U:), M. 
Chs-Uie' (ta-). 
Chi-U'u (jto-). 
Cliia-oe-don'lo(l>»y,K»- 
Cliil-ced'o-Df,orCtuil'- 

Wr. Qd.; iai-taPo- 

Hf, Sm. IMk] 
Cliu-coK'n-pber (toj-), 

Chal-flog'n^ihtat <la^). 
Cbd-ow'n-phT lta(-). 
Ctul-ds'lo (taJ-\ IW. 
Cbil'di-lim (Wdo- 

itm). 
Chia-de'ul (ia^}, 110. 
Cbil-dee' flut-), 121. 
Cbal'der. 
CbU'dron. or Cbll'dron 



CMlk (cJbw^, int. 
Cbaiked Ic&ontt), NoU 



CU't&i4 



CiuI't«iiE«^bl«, ISS. 

Clud'leiiged, IW, 18S. 

Chil'IeD-gcr. 

ChU'kii'^Ds. 

Chi lyb'e-ata (to-), IN. 

CluiB otoffl), n. the 

SOTer«i^ of INirkey- 

\Set Cun, 1IM.1 
Cia-tnade' (Fl.} (lAa- 



188 

[Cbsmbril [i 









'red l-A"*)' )«>• 

- (Ft.) (akiM^, 

-mol') [.o wl. 

un. ; ikaauT, Wk.j 

ikm'wii, Sm.lM.iU.] 

[Hhsmot*, 203.1 

Chun'o-mlle (><«'■) 

[Cimomlls.lWa.] 

Cbua-p^ne' {Ooii^ 

C')i"->Ueht ipuk- 
■wiae. [5«GluiB- 
ptlgiii and clumpftln, 

Cbun-p*lg;ii' (>ta«- 
pan'i, H. ■ fliL Dpai 
-"■"fj;—"- 



Of dlatiODOr in u »- 
(.^ggCbuii- 



CMmped ( 



ChJtaiped (HUn^O. 

CbAmW-tor (ikam 
ptr-tBTl [« 8m. Wi 
c3uan'per~t0T,Vni. Q 
1».1 
^ham'per-l 

Ciam-p^'on (Fr,) 

ChuD'i^-tni, 7S, IK. 
Cb4n«, 12, 131. 
CluDced (cMmI), Note 



CBASAOTumiCAI. 

Chu'Bdlgd (ISO) 
[CbaBnalcd, W1>. 
Od. iOS^SH 177, and 
Not*K,p, ?D.L 

BCtlDg, Vb. Od. 

Chuit, 12, Ul. 

Cbint'dd. 

Chint'er. 

Chunt'Mtlfer, IM, Mi^ 

diknt'lns. 

Chiut'n. 

Ch.'oif«'.),BE. 

Cbamt'lc (to.), 10*. 

Cbiib, tckan, or clop), 
I. (» Wr. Gd.; nlos, 
Sm.i c*<f>, Wk. lUn 

Chap f(?ihd|>, ordbflf)],*. 

C1»p(aiiip),a.thajaw. 

?»."■""'■ 

Ckapeam (Fr.) ((M''') 
[pi. CkuMoix (ilkv'- 
*«), 188.7 

Chip'el. 

Cluip'ellMTin, 170. 

Glup'el-Un^rCliipcl- 
lDK,Wb.Od. 1U.— 
5« 177, ud NOU K, 

Cfidp'eVrJ. 

Cluv'tr-tm (Fr.) (tkajp'- 



tng) [» 



Wk-i 



hup^lle 



Chiqt'let. 

Chapped (okqrf, or 

Jbui (ckofx) [C h p I, 



tUllT. 

Chir (cttr) (lltn. it. ■ 
■nuhjob. rCbaii, 
Chore, aa.l 

Chlr'an-ter liar'). 

Chir-«-ter-rat'ls (Mf^), 



Lj I Of In Ibere i <% at in foot ; fUlnaiiUaigliiuginKa; Hi at 



OilAKAOMUBATION 



Char), I IB. 
ObU'H4ar-iM (tar'-). 
Chir'K-4er-liisd,ua,l8S. 
Cbir'ao-tarJi-lng. 



Cburred, IW. 

tChmre, ai 

Chw, md a 



ChMg'er (Bfcorj'-), 

SHIMfrfr'-w.. 

Bm. WV Od. 1 OUr'- 
Us, or cAo'W^r, WT. 



Chsr-la-Un'lc-*! (Oar-t. 
Chir'la-lui-laiu (iltar'- 

Chw'li-Ma-ry (»lM»r'-). 
Char' look. 
Okir'talt«-Auw' (Fi.) 

(•har'lot-rooi'). 

Ctumwd.Utk 
Clisnn'er. 



chud, 

Gbili'rla^, JI, H. 
Cliifry, 11, 170. 

moHIa [I,.) (ior'ta). 
Chsr-la'oeoai (Inr-la 
Chnr'ter. [fihu 

Chur'tRred, 1». 
Chnr'ler-er. 



Ch.r'r (dUp'-l [H Wl. 
Bb. Od. j oM^iF, 01 
ota'rv, Wr- US.] 

duCk^le, l*t. 

Chaud (cUtf), Mrt. 
rrom Okate. [Sic 

Cbuto, laa.] 



M 



U,133, 



Chu-tie'er (-«»'). 
CliKa-ti»'liig (-fl*'-). 

ohu'U-iTTiait. 

Cliae'U'ble (cJkoi'O 
[Chailbis, Obai- 
Ible, 103.1 

Chut, lA. 

Chftaai (Ft.) (rta-W') 
[pi. Ctafamu (Oo- 

loi'), loe.] 

Chlt'y-lii-n7iaal'-),Tl. 

Cha-t07'uit (i]^-<a^- 

Cba-toT'ment Itha-tot'l 
Chat'Cel lehatiD mm 

[so Wk, 8b. Wb. 

Ud. I cMat'L or akof- 

«l, Wr. IS*.] 
C&af top, IM. 
Chaf MNd, lt& 
Cbaftarer. 
ChM'ter-inj, 
Chal't?, ITS 

Chaud'-m«]'lar{tUd'-) 
Cbluffbr rChaufor, 

203.] 
ChaT'cn-dn. 

ChWen (qIU'ii), IM. 
Cbvap'fned (cAlp'o^. 
Cbean'an-er (ckia'n-i. 
Cbid, II. 
Cbiat'B-bla, IH, IW. 



Chvat'liw. 
Ch«-l«o'ei>. 
Chesk, n. [Chaqm«, 



[Ch«qiieii,tgin.f^ 
Cbeofc'iBg, 
dwA'nuta, a. A *. 
Cheak'nut-Ml. 
Cbaak'mitJDii. 
Cboct'r. ^ 
Chosk, U. 
Oh«r, 13. 
CWred, 100. 

Wt. Wb. Od. ; c*»f'- 
jai, or oWrVBi, Wk. 
IM.] 

Cheer'l-lT, 78, itt. 

Cbeer'1-iWH. 

Cbeer'lDi:. 

Cbeer'f. 

Cbaose (cUa). 

Chwa'T (cMi'w), 

CiV^auertCfr.) (aU- 
dooPT') [lo Wr.j ihtf- 
doovr', Wb. Od. Ui, 



Chlffre.l 
ChBl-ron'foMii (*f-)- 
OhB-ko^(aoW»,ioW 



Cbem'liyal (tern'-) llht 

ChemlatrrJ 
C«c-mlH' (Ft.) (aW- 



i, i, 1, «, b, ^ iow 1 *••«>• 0> B> f> **«Tl i K <w in br, ioi i> ait. ■ Of te 



OBMH* 
tai.iSS.] (CSfMli- 



rChcqae, ; 
* CheA.1 
FCbeqaer, i 
CheAer.] 



beckerA.J 



Sherif.1 
Clrir'bih, 48, ««. 
Cher'libHl r-ilW). 

ChSr'lBti-liitr. 
Che-root' [ j**-ft] 



lOt'fiiU-rotiCUBO 



Chfllr fire), a. MtU 
Chl-lo'nl-u (M-). 

-pod iW/'-). 

CWmb (qMh) (MB) 



^1] [,5a 



M toand 1> htiTmanT. 
F8H(Mmb,l(».] 

Chim'tr. 

CtJ-ai»'n (M-). 

"-= -irfr'lo-il {«-).•» 

.;ln-^fB itklmf). 

- CU^'ner (K, ISB) [pL 
'^nueri, ISO.} 
n-pMi'MeB [.o Wf. 



[Chealble,2(».— 5h 

Cbamble.l 
CheH, 16, m. 
Chest, IS, 44. 
Chen'ed. 
Cherfnnt (nlUt'mit), 

(lK)tCheinBl,aB.] 
Che'Ufi. 

(rtiW S^ati-yMi' )iivii. 
C£>it-a-UL-r'(nk«'«Ur') 



Chev'ron (rtep'nm). 
Cber'ntoM (BJhfp'nTntf) . 
Che,'«».-el (.»«'.). 
Ch#» (dbm) [no Bra. 
•Wr.) tku, int. G± 

Chewed (ahood). 

(cAe-ioof). 
Cfal^Hw' (aU). 



•a,'Vk. IW.j 
dB'co-pla (dUu'- 



mhl^rfW 



Ihlo'ooiu* (-fe^). 
Ibloe [Climb Ihi the 
HUM of M« b4^ ^ 
a eatic), a».] 
libied, ISJ. 
, Jbi4ieiie' t-nti'), IM. 

Chink (eJUnat), M. 
. [Chlnkipln, lot.— 
,Sh ChlD«»lii.1 
Chinknl (cMna«S. 
Cbint'JwIeriW'.). 
CWnk'r^cWnfl&r). 
CbhoKd (cUh^. 178. 



[Chii 



lapln. 



Mli tn 



le. r. to All iHth 

fSMCilnti, 148.1 

C, p. MJ, A. a UDd of 
MlM. [JiM OUdM, 
148.] 

« then i «b M lit foot ) g at l» IkaUe i gb M g In gd 1 Q) n* (b OU 



it^^uE 



Chip'plng, I7«. 

Clii-n'm (M-), 
CbI-rai?rio-ia (*f-). 
Chl'ro-plph (*i-), I». 
Chl-ro^m-pber (»-)■ 
Chl-ro-gMifti'io <S-).10e 
Chi-ro-grapli'ln-al («-). 

CbI-Ti>g'n-phist (M-}. 
ChT-rog'ri-phy (fti-). 
CW-ro5Sg'fc»l (iM-TD- 






8m. Wb. Gd., _.. , 

■w-Wi or ilr'iMBaii- 

«, Wr. IdS.I 
Chf-ro-mim'tlc («-]- 
Chi-ro-man'dc-al (&-). 
ChlTi>-nom'ic (M-). 
Chi-ran'fr.mr (W-), 106. 
Cbl'ro-plRBt (lU'O. 
Chi'ro-ptKl (it'-). 
Chi-rop'o-diet (MO. 
Chl-ros'0-pblgt (jH-i. 
Chirp, 21,}). 
Chirped Ichirpt), Kate 

C, p. 34. 
Chirp'er. 
Cbtrp'inK- 
Cblr'nip, 170. 
Cblr-rupcd (-rupl). 
CfaVrnp-lng. ^ 
Cbls'el iMa'/ti, MB. 
Chls'elled (cSfi'eW) 

[Chiseled, Wb.Od. 

«B.— Sm U7, uid 

Kote E, p. 70.1 
ChtB'iU-lliig [(Thlsel- 

ing.wB. Od. aw.] 

Chis'leT'coMi-fB). 
CbiB'tets^ Ichit'il^, 

Vr. 

iit;-c . 

ir-ial'rio'i«SH'i'r«:j 
Sm. Wr. i t 






IdT'iil-rolla (lUe'al- 
™»)fBo8iii.Wb. Gd.i 
(hir'al-rut, Wk. i 

■'""■"'"vr"" 






CI .'-),I71. 

C. (tlo-), 

Cblo-mni'e-try (l!lo-\ 
Chlo'ro-phene [ito'-J. 
Cblo'nt^pbf 1 (Wo'-J. 
ChlD-roph'^l-UU Ikh-). 

Chlo-rot'la lllo-). 
Chlo'r<A> C^-)' 
diWrD-ret («o-). 
Chock, 181. 
Choc'o-Ute, IJS, 171. 



ChOkeS (e*BW), Note C, 

Cfiau'e'r, 183. 
Cbok'illE. 
ChflU'j. 

Chol'er (hol'tir), n. u- 
ger. rS«Coll«,I«».] 
CSol'er-* (tofO. l?l> 

Cbol'er-ie (itoC-)- 
Cho-leB'ter-lne (to-). 
Cho-lf ^m'btc (to-). 
Chon-droir'rg-pbrtfeHi-) 
ChomiroPo-gT (ton-). 
Chon-drop-lc-rji'l-«n 

Clion-drot'o-nij (jton-). 

ChooM («*oos). 

Chooa'er ((Aom'-l. 

Cltooe'ing Icltoot'-). 

Chop, IS, M. 

Chupln tckop'int or rAt>- 
pln') fio Wr. ; c*™"- 
in, (M. ; cAo^jf n'.Wk. 

Chopptd (cftopt), 179. 



CHBtSTBNINO 



rChopB, no.— Bee 

Ciiapa.] 
Chop^Uck. 
Cbo-rBg'ic (io-raf'-l. 
C*o-raV«(L.)(*o-). 

Cho-rBi av-). 

Cbo'ral-JM {to'-). 
Cbora (i-ord), ». tbe 
BtrtDf of a mnBicid 

that lurmoDlze i — a 
right tine Joining the 

[Sm Cord,"noj' "^ 
Chord 'irf ikord'-t 
ChorCt'lnit (ioni'-l. 
Char«[C1iBr,Chitre, 



Cho-re'BB ((-o-V 

Cho'rl-ant (to'-). 

Cho-rl^m'bic (^:). 

Ch(i-ri-<iin'2>iu(L.)(ti>J 

Cbo'ri^m (bo'-). 

Cho'riet, »S,H. 

Chor'lBt-erlBoSm.Wr. 
Wb. Od. 1 twlrJirt-Br, 
Wk.lSS.1 [QnlriBt- 

Cho'^™g'r».pbef{to-). 

Cho-ro-grapb'ic (to). 

Cba-roj^ph'Ic-at (to-). 
[ »o Wb. Gd. i l-or-it- 
'graj'ilc-al, Wr. 16S.] 

CGo-rog'rB-phy Ito-y 

Cbo'rord tko'-). 

Cho'rui (to'-), S2, 1». 

Cboee (dUi), 13H, IHI. 

CiboM (Fr.) (iftBE), lAI. 

Chos'en (fAvi'n). 11«. 

Cliollgh (cfcun (M), n. ■ 
Una of bird. [Sm 

Chair, im.] 

tChonle, 203. — 5m 

Jonl.l 
IAoa»e\dimt), 2S. 
CiwuBed IcAoujf). 
ChouB'ing, 183. 
Chow'der, 77. 
Chre-nia-tlB'tfoB (tr(-). 
Chrfie-tom's-thyaTeirO. 
Chrlnn {triim), I33,13e. 



*i>-J. ■ 



(ftrf«-tro»-rt'). 
ChiiM/ea (trtf'n), VS. 
Chrlat'eneil (kna'ad), 

Chrie*t'en-hig (trla'n). 



*,t,l,d,&, j.liitv; &,M,0,G,f,Morfi KoalitftT.fc 



cBBiariAN 

Cbrtrt'lu Ikrtiffiin), 

CbriWliin-liiii 'ikriif- 

OdTi trU-cltl-amfi-it, 
Wk. i krilt-gl-ait'Uf, 
Wr. liS.l 
Cbriit-Un-l-»'tlaB 

Chrlgt'Uo-Ue (triil'- 

ChHifii 

CftSt'li 

C&Srt'nu 

Ctirt>-tol'o-ey (iri«-). 



Chrn'mo-griph ttro'-). 
Chron'tc ftrc™'-). 
Chfon'lc «J Htob'-),14S. 
Chrcm'l-ele lkron'-),U8, 

Chron'l-cted {tron'i- 



Cbrau'i-cliiig (tron''-), 

IKS. 
Chron'o-griipli (troB'-). 
Chron'o-gnin (tron' ). 



Cliro-iiog'i»-plMr(*ro-). 
Chro-nog'ra-phj (tro-J. 
Chtv-DoPa-zer (£»-). 
Chro-ao-lo^io (tro-no- 

Chro-n'o-log'lo-Bl firo- 
no-ioJ'tt-Sl) [M Vk. 
Sm. Qd.i imn-o-lDf'- 
a-al. Wr. 1».) 

Chro-nol'o-^.1 (t„.-). 

Chro-nol'o-gy {iro-). 

dm-naia'e-teT (iro-). 



CIMBAL 

[Chrmlitrr, m.— 

^n Chgmlitrr.] 

CT-U'rluU.. 
Clb'ol, [JU. 
Cl-tK/rt-wn ih.)[SL a- 

C1-ca[da' (L.j [pL C1- 



Vtri-nint (-» 



Cl-ca'irfa! (L.) tOe-a- 
Iri'cu (-Ml), iwt.) 

(Clcatrlimnl.aib.— 
£«Ck>thuot.1 

Cltx-Irt-u'tloD. 

Clo'i-triied, UO, 183. 
Clo'm-lrii-lne. 

•if'tv, wk. ua.i 

CHcerone (It.) (ci«-cA«- 
nyne, or tU-fi-m'iv\ 
rsoWr.Od.1. 
rv>ft4, Bm. It 



U.1 



Clcli-o-r»'«lini [lO-o- 

Ootl'o-rj (rtf.). Si. 

Cfc*»6i» (It.) (dke-dUt- 
bafo, or ir-di'At^) 

S>Wr.Gh].;cil«^:Ma- 
'o, Sdl 1M, 13«.] 

CId, 16, 39. 



aOeviHi* (Ft.) (hhI*- 

vitng-). 
CUrae (Tr.) (rtrfl. 
Cf-MT' r8ef.r,!0J.J 
C^ei^ICL.)n.p^. 
aVit-tj (»«'i~-rBr), 51, 
Clli-ste, IW. [171. 

ai'l-it-ed. 
Cr-U'rUn (-«rt'on). 
a-UMoas (-iMh'tu), a. 

muleorhalr. [SaeBl- 

IMou., IM.] 
Cil'1-o-gr.de. 



CIm'Inl, I 



-SetCr- 
iT.an.— 8M8I- 



utefiMti ja<fs&cUaighiMgi»go;lba(fiitbliL 



OUIBBIO 

Cim'e-tar [Selmltar, 

203.] 
Ci'miss. 

Cim-me'ri-aii, 160, 17D. 
Clm'o-Ute. 
Cin-cho'aa (-JtoM. 
Cin-cHo'ni-H i-kof-}. 
Cia'clio-ulae (-iko->* 
Cinct'ure, 91. 
Cinct'ared {-ifmrd^i 2M. 
Cin'der, 171. 
Ciu'der-y. 
Gio'droilB. 
Cia-e-fac'tlOB. 
Gin'er-ar^, 72, 171, 333. 
Cin-er-a'tioB. 
Ci-ne'ri-otls, IW. 
Cin-6r-I'tioiiB (-ish'usy. 
Cin-ga-lese' i4iz). 
Cin'na-bar, 170. 
Cin'na-bar-fne, 84. 
Cin'aa-mon, 170. 
Ciihque (Fr.) (Hngk), 
Ciitque'-foil {single''), 
Ci'on [Scion, 2<I3.] 
Cl'pher, 25, 36. 
Ci'pbcred {•/uird)f IfiO. 
CVphet-ing, 
Cip'o-liD, 170. 
[Circsean, 203.— >iSte 

Citeton.] 
Cir-cas'sian (mr-ktith'- 

an) [«d Gd. ; »ut- 

lauh'ia^ Wr. 155.] 
Ctr-ce'an (IIO) [Gir- 

eeak,203.] 
Cit-een'sial (shal). 
Cir-cen'fliaii (-Bhan). 
Cir'ci-nal, 78, 100. 
Cir'd-natc. . 
Clr'cle, 21, N. ; 164. 
Cir'cled i-kld)^ 100, 183. 
Cir'der. 
Cir'clet. 
Cir'cUilf. 
Cif'CuH (-*«), 171; 
Cir'cuJt-ed (-kU-), 
CJf-^ttit-eer' (-*«), MB. 
Clr'cult-er (-«*-). 
Cir-cu'i-totis, 160. 
Cir-cu'i-t^, 108. 
Gir'ctt-lar, 80, 108. 
Clr-€tt-lftr'i-ty. 
Cir'ca-late, 171. 
Cir'cu-lat-ed, 183. 

Cir cu-la'tiofi, lliS. 
Clr'ctt4a-tlre, 106. 
Cir'cu-la-to-ry. 
<Xr-ciitt4un'bt«nti 160. 

Cir-cum-^eH'ton ("t^'- 
ffun) [bo wb. Qd. ; 



18S 

165.1 
Clr^oitm-tlM (-fls), 90S. 
Clr'cum-cised (-«iiid), 

160, 183. 
Cir'cam-dS'er (-ttx-), 
Clr'cttm-ciii-ing (-«i2<). 
Cir-eum-dCaion (-HxV- 

ttfi). 
Cir-«uin'ftr-enM, 160. 
Clr-«um-fe-ren'tlal 

(-9kal), 
Cir-oiim-ib-re&'tof. 
Clr'eam-flect. 
Cir'cain-flex. 
Cir-oam'fiu-ence, 105. 
Oit-cwn'flU'tnt. 
Cir-cum'fltt-ottB. 
Cir-cum-fo-ra'nA-ottB. 
Cir-oum-fiit*' (>/iteO. 
Cir-oum-fused^ {-flUdf), 
Clr-oum-fv'rite. 
Cir-cum-fus'iiqi^ (-yV«M. 
Cir-cam-fti'Blon i-zhun}. 
Ctr-cnm'gj-rate, 106. 
Clr-oum-jiT'-ra'tion. 
Cir-cum-jA'oenoe. 
df-oum-lo-ou'tioii. 
Cir-cum-loc'o-to-ry, 
Clr-cunb-mured'. 
Clr-cam'Bav'i-g^bte. 
Cir-cum-ttav'i-gHte. 
Cir-cum-nar^i-^jt-edj 

183. 
Cir-cum-nay'l-gat-lftg. 
Cir-cum-nay-i-gfii'tloii. 
Cir-cum-nav'i-gat^r. 
Cir-coBii-po'lar. 
Clr-cam-8ci8'BTle(-8i«'f2) 
Cir-cumHicrib'a-ble, 183. 
Cir-oum-Bcribe'. 
Cir-cum-Bcribed'. 
Cir-cuxn-Bcrib'ef. 
Cir-oum-Bcrib'hiff. 
Cir-cum-8cript'i-blc,160. 
Cfr-tsum-scrip'tlon. 
Cir-com-Bcrip'tlve. 
Cir'cam-Bpe«t, 171. 
Clr-cnm-spec'tion. 
Cir'cum-stftii«6, 171. 
Cir'oiini-Btiinced 

(stantt), 
Gir'cam-BtBEBc-ififf. 
Cir-eam-Btan'tlar(^*fk<tl) 
dt-onm-stan'ti-ate 

CM-dt) [bo Tf k. Sm. 

Wr. } »nr-t9tm-gtanf' 

shai, Wb. Od. 165.] 
Cir-cttiti-Btalt'tNtt'^d 

i'SKi-at-), 
Cir-eiim-Btall'ti4t4fiff 

Cir-cMmi-tal'Uiti, 170. 



Ctr-cum-Tee'ttoii. 

CIr-oiim-Teiif. 

Clr-oum-yent'ed. 

Cir-eam-TMl'tioii. 

Cir-cum-yent'lTe, M. 

Cir-cnm-yeBt'. 

Cir-eun-yo-la'tion. 

Cir-cum-yolve'. 

Cir-oiim-yolyed',150, M 

Cir-cum-yaly'ing. 

Ci^diB [pi. Glr'etiB-es 

(H»).] 
C!r-rif er-bm, 100, 170. 
Clr'-ri-fortii, 160, 170. 
CTr-rigf'eruotts (-r«'-). 
ar'ri-ped, 78, 160, ITOl. 
CIr-ro-ca'ttu4BS. 
Clr'rose. 
CIr*ft»-Btra't«B. 
CIr'ro&B (170) a. hariiiff 

tendxllB. [;9ee Cirrus, 

MO.] 
C¥r'nM(L.),n.[pl.CVr- 

H,08]atendMi. [Se^ 

Cirrous, 160.] 
Clr'Bo-cele. 
CiB-alp'lne [bo Wr. Wb. 

Gd. ; Miz-^Upfkh Sm. 

155.] 
CiB-at-lan'tte. 
Cis-mon'tand. 
CiB'pi-daae. 
as'Boid, 170. 
CiBt, n. a place of in- 

Ciat, n. a poach or Bad. 

[CyBt,ao3.] 
CiBt'ed[C78t6d,200.] 
CiB-ter'ciaii {-shan). 
CiB'tem, 171. 
CiB'tic[C7Btio,208.] 
Ctt, 16. 
Cira-ble, IM. 
Cit'a-del, 171. 
at'al. 
Ci-ta'tion. 
Ci'ta-to-ry, 06, 03. 
Cite, V. to call: — to 

quote. [See Site, 

Sight, 160.1 
Cit'ed, 183. 
Cft'er. 
Cft'ing. 

Cith-arriB'tlC, 100. 
Cith'erft [OlttOrll, 

203] 
Cit'i-iea(-9ii),76,l«». 
Cifrtlte. 
Cit'rittA. 
Ctfrlo. 
Cit'rU. ^ ,^ 



i««,it6,m,^l0n#j«t«,l•^,tt,f,lteH5ftjwMtek4B««ilill%ftM«» 



CITRON 

Cit'roiit 86* 

Cit'tern (170) [Cith- 
ern, 203.1 
Cit'y, ie», 170, 190. 
Gres (Hvz), 136. 
Civ'et, 170. 
Civ'ic. 

Civ'il, 149, 170. 
Cl-yil'uui (-fan), 51. 
CIv'U-iBt. 

Cl-yU'i-ty, 78, 106, 160. 
CfT'U-iz-a-ble, 164, 160. 
Cir-U-T-za'tioD, 112. 
CiT'il-ize, 170, 202. 
Civ'iMzed, 150, 183. 
Civ'il-iz-«r. 
CiT'il-iz-in^. 
Civ'il-l3r,66,170. 
Clab'ber. 
CUck, 181. 
Clacked (JbloM), Note 

C, p. 34. 
CUck'er. 
Clack'insr. 
Clad, 10. 
Claim, 2^. 
Claim'a-ble, 164. 
Claim'ant, n. one who 

claims. [See Clanuuit, 

IflO.] 
Claimed, 150. 
Claim'er. 
Claim'ing'. 

Clair-Toy'anoc (klir-), 
Clair-Toy'ant (kltr-). 
Clara, n. A v. 10. 
Claimant, a. cryinff. 

[See Claimant, 160. J 
Clam'ber. 

Clam'bered (-burd), 150. 
Clam'ber-ing[. 
Clammed iklamd), 150, 

176. 
Clarn'ming. 
Clam'mi-ness, 109. 
Clam'my, 170. 
Clam'or [Clamour, 

Sm. 190. 203.] 
Clam'ored (-«r</), 150. 
Clam'or-er. 
Ciam'or-ing. 
Clam'or-ofis, 171. 
Clamp, 10. 
Clamped (Jbfomp^). 
damp'ing. 
Clan, lo: 

Clan-des'tTne (82, 152) 
_[noi klan'des-tin,153.] 
Clang, 10, 54. 
Clanged (klangd)^ 150. 
Clang'ing. 
Clan'gor(iUan^^or),54, 

Note 2. 



189 

Claii'cNMNotta (tkm§'' 

cSSi (klanffk), 10, 54. 

Chmked {klanffkt)^ Note 
C,p.34. 

Clank'ing (klanakf-), 

Chmnish, 176. 

Clap, 10. 

Clap'board (kkOffUrd), 
Note C, p. 34. 

CHapped (klapt), 

Clap^per, 176. 

Clap'per-elaw. 

Clap'ping, 170, 176. 

Clap'-trap. 

Cli^-en-ceux', or CULr- 
en-oieux' (Mttr-eii- 
ffioo') [so Wr. J klAr 
en-shu^, Gd. ; klAr- 
ens-yoo', 8m.; 154, 
155.] 

Clare-ob-Bcnre' (klir~), 

CUr'et, 170. 

ClAr'i-chord (-ford). 

Cl&r-i-fi-ca'tion, lia» 
171. 

CUr'l-ned, 186. 

CUr'l-fi-er. 

ClUr'l-fT. 78, 94, 169. 

CWr'l-iy-ing, 186. 

CUr'1-net [Clario- 
net, 203.] 

Clftr'i-on (160, 170) [to 
8m. Wr. Gd. j JWiW- 

' win, Wk. 155.1 

Cfa'ry, 49, N. 

Clash, 10, 46. 

Clashed (klasht). 

Clash'ing. 

Clasp, 12, 131. 

Clasped (kldtpt)^ Note 
C, p. 34. 

Clasp'er. 

Clasp'ing. 

Clasp'-knife. 

Class, 12, 131, 174. 

Classed (kUut). 

Cl&ss'i-ble, 164, 160. 

Cl&s'sic. 

Cl&s'sic-al, 108, 170. 

Cl&s'sl-dsm (-«tem),136. 

Cl&s'sl-cist, 160, 170. 

Clas-sif ic, 109. 

Clas- si-fl-ca'taon. 

Clas'si-f led, 186. 

Clas'si-fy, 78, 94, 170. 

Clas'ai-fy-lng. 

Class'ing. 

Class'maii. 

Class'mate. 

Chit'ter, 170. 

Chit'tered, 150. 

ClaVter-er. 



CLsr 

Clafter-teff. 
CUttM iklawM)^ 17. 
CUuB'tral. 

Cl&us'u-lar («aiB«''},l06 
Cla'rate. 
Cla'vat-ed. 
Clare, 23. 
Clav'el-lat-ed. 
Cla'yi-a-ry, 78. 
ClaT'i-chord (-torti). 
Clar'l-cle. 164, 170. 
Cla-vlc'u-lar, 108. 
CWvi-€r(Vr.) Ikla'fft'M) 

[so Wr. ; kia'vi-urf 

Gd. ; 154, 155.1 
ClavM-ger. 

Cla-vlg>er-otts (-rtf-). 
aa'vS (In) [L. pi. Ofa^- 

vi» i-viz)i £ng. pL 

Cla'vy, 169. 

Claw, 17. 

Clawed, 150. 

Claw'li^. 

Clay, 23. 

Clayed, 150, 187. 

Clayes (klAz). 

Clay'ey, 98, 160. 

Clay'ing. 

Clay'more [GUy- 
more,203.] 

Clead'lng. 

Cl^an, l.f. 

Cleaned, 150. 

Clean'ing. 

Cli'an'U-nesB, 160. 

Cl^an'ly, a. (161) eteen, 
neat. 

Clean'ly, ad, (161) nest- 

Clean'nesB, 66, N.: 170, 

230. 
Cl«anse (klenz), 16. 
Cleansed (klenzd), 183. 
ClPans'er (klenz-), 
Cleans'i-ble (J;len«'-)f 

164, 169. 
ClSans'ing ikiauf-). 
Clear, 13. 
Clear'age. 
Clear'aaoe. 
Cleared, 150. 
Clear'er. 
Clear'ing. 
Cleat, 13. 
Clear'age. 
Cl^are, 13. 
Cleaved, 150L 
Clear'er. 
Cl«ar'inff. 
CledgeT^ 

Ciedg/vrWa;'-). 

Clef {il4r, or JUin [flo 



fidl; 6aiin there; 6b <u in foot j 9 at <» fiudle i gh a$ g in gi^ ifj^ as in tU» 



t 



CLEFT 

Wr. } kttfy Wb. Gd. ; 
Jb^V, Wk. Sm. 155.] 

„- Though Walker 
rei only the pronunchir 
„on kl\f, yet he ■«/■,— 
** Eren without the plea of 
brerity, ele/'is chauffed by 
moalciuit mto elif," 

Cleft. 

Clem'a-tis. 

Clem'en-cy, 109. 

Clem'cnt, 169. 

Clem'ent-Ine, 84, 152. 

Clc-op'ter-otts. 

Clcp'sy-dra f bo Sm.Wb. 
Gd. ; kfqr9p^ra, or 
klep-sy'dra,, wr, 155.] 

Clergy, 21, N. 

Cler'gy-a-We, IW. 

Cler'sfy-man, 196. 

Cl^rac. 

Cl^r'ic-al, 106. 

ClPr'i-sy. 169. 

Clerk (klerkj or klark) 
r Wcri:, Wb.Gd. j klark, 
Wk. 8m.; klarkj or 
klerk, Wr. 166.] 



The pronunciatloa 
Marl; !■ the prevailing one 
in England, bat i-fenk ia 
Tery generally preferred in 
the United States. 

C16r'o-man-cy, 169. 

Clev'er, 77, 170. 

Clev'lB. 

Clev'y 

Clew(ito) (26) [Cine, 
2a3.] 

Click, 16, 181. 

CUckcd iklikt)t Note C, 
p. .^. 

Click'er. 

Click'et. 

CUck'ingr. 

Cli'ent, 169. 

Cli-ent'al. 

Cli'ent-ed. 

Cliff; 16, 173. 

CUffc, 16. 

Clim-ao-t^r'io, or CH- 
mac'ter-io, a,&n,fBO 
Wr.; klim-ak-ter^ikt 
Wk. Sm.; kti-makf- 
ter-ikj Wb. Gd. 165.] 

Clim-ac-t$r'ic-al. 

Cli'mate, 73. 

CU-mat'Ic, 109. 

Cn-mat'ic-al, 106. 

Cli'ma-tize. 202. 

Cli-HLa-tosr'ra-phy, 106. 

Cli-ma-toPo-gy, 108. 

Cli'max. 

Climb (JbAm) (162), v, to 



140 

mount by means of 

the hands and feet. 

[See Clime, 160.1 
CUmb'a-ble i-ktlm^-). 
Climbed ikllmd). 
Climb'er (Ailin'-). 
Climb'ing {kllm'-). 
Clime, n. climate, re- 

jrion. [ See Climb,160.] 
Clinch, 16, 44. 
CUnohcd {klincM) ;Sote 

C, p. 34. 
CUnch'er. 
Clinoh'er-bnilt (-biU) 

[Clinker-built, 

203.] 
CUnch'ing. 
Cling, 16, 54. 
CUng'stone, 206. 
Cllng'y, 93. 
CUnao. 
Clln'lc-al. 

CUnique (Fr.)(*Kn-«fcO. 
Clink (kUnak)j 16, M. 
CUnked {klinffkt). 
Clink'er (klingk'-). 
[Clinker-built, 203. 

— See Clincher-built] 
Clink'ing {klingV-). 
Cli'noid. 

Cli-nom'e-ter, 106. 
Cll-no-met'ric. 
Cll-no-met'rio-al. 
Cli-nom'e-try, 108. 
Clip, 10. 

cupped {kUpt)y 176. 
Clip'per* 170, 176. 
Cllp'ping. 
Clique (Fr.) {kJMk), 
Cliqu'ish (klik'-). 
Cliqu'ism (kli^k'Um), 
Cli'vers (-imr«). 
Cliv'i-ty, 169. 
Cloa'ca (L.) [pi. Cla- 

a'casj 198.] 
Clo-a'cal. 
Cloak, 24, 130. 
Cldaked (kldkt), 150. 
Cloaking. 
Clock, 18^ 181. 
Clock'-work (-wurk). 
Clod, 18. 
aod'dy, 176. 
Clod'hop-per. 
Clod'pate, 206. 
Clod'pat-ed. 
Clod'poU [Clot poll, 

203.1 
Cldff'f^C lough, 203.] 
Clog, 18. 
Clogged CklogO), 165, 

Clog'gi-ness (-ffhl), 138. 



CLOVEN 

Clog'ging i-ghing), 

Clog'gy i-ghy), 

Clofs'ter. 

Clols'ter-al. 

Clois'tered, 160. 

Clois'ter-cr. 

Clois'ter-ing. 

Clon'ic 

Close (kUiz)t V. A n, 24, 

161. 
Cldse (kl08)i n., a. & ad, 

161. 
Cldsed (kldzd). 
Clos'er (W52'-). 
Clos'et (kloz'-). 
Clos'et-ed {kloz'-). 
Clos'et-ing {kloz'-), 
Clos'ing (kl9z'-). 
Clos'nre lkUz'yur)i 91. 
Clot, 18. 
Clot'bur, 206. 
Cloth iklOth, or klawth) 

(18 N.) [so Wr. Wb. 

Gd. ; klothf Wk. Sm. 

166.] 
Clothe, 24, 38. 
ClotEed (klothd)j 150. 
ClotEes (kT5thz) [so 

Sm. ; kliUhz, or kt9z, 

Wr. Gd. ; kli^z, Wk. 

155.] 

ta^ Though Walker 

SlresLonly the pronuncia« 
on ktoz, he ipeaki of it a* 
** a corruption that ia not 
incurable.** 

CIdth'ier (klot^'tn^)fil, 

ClotR'ing. 

CloFpdlf [ClodpoU, 

203] 
Clot'ted,66,N.} 176. 
Clot'ting. 
Clot'ty, 93. 
Cloud, 28. 
Cloud'-capt. 
Cloud'ed. 
Cloud'i-ly, 169. 
Clond'i-ness. 
Cloud'ing. 
Cloud'y, 93, 169. 
Clough ikluf, or kiof) 

iso Wr. ; khtf, Sm. ; 
iof, Gd. ; klouy Wk. 
165.] [Cloff(inthe 
sense of an aUowanc6 
in weight), 203.] 

Clout, 28. 

Clout'ed. 

Clout'ing. 

Clout'-ifill. 

Clo'rate. 

Clove. 

Clo'ren (klo'vn), 149. 



a, 6, i, 5, u, ftlong} Ik, S, I, Q, fi, f, thort ; K cm <n far, ka» ia fast, kaain 



CLOVEN-FOOTED 



141 



CODLING 



Clo'ven-f<R>t'ed. 

Clo'ver. 

Clo'vered (^-vurd), 150. 

Clown, 'JS, 

Cloy, 27. 

Cloyed ikloid), 160. 

Cloy'ing. 

Club, 22. 

Clubbed ^klvbd), ISO, 
17rt. 

CluVbist, 170. 

Club'-lV5bt. 

Cluck, 22, 181. 

Clucked (klukt)t Note 
C, p. 34. 

Cluck'ing. 

[Clue, 203.— fi^ee Clew] 

Clump, 22. 

Clum^Bi-ly (-arl), 169. 

Clum'si-ness (-21-)* ~8< 

Clum-sy i-zy), ie». 

Clunch, 22, 44. 

duns', 22, 54. 

Clu'nl-al. 

CluB'ter, 77. 

Clus'tcred, 150. 

Clus'ter-ing. 

Clutch, 22, 44. 

Clutched ikltOcki), 

Clutch'lng. 

Clut'ter, 170. 

Clut'tered, 150. 

Clut'ter-ing. 

Clyp'e-ate, 160. 

Clys'mi-an (Wte'-)- 

Clys'mJc ikUz'-). 

Clys'ter, 16, 77. 

Co-a-cer'vate. 

Coach, 24, 44. 

Coach'man, 206. 

Co-ad'ju-tant, 169. 

Co-ad-ju'tor, 122. 

Co-ag'u-la-ble, 164. 

Co-ag'u-lant, 160. 

Co-ag'u-late, 73. 

Co-ag'u-lat-ed, 183. 

Co-ag'u-lat-ing. 

Co-ag-u-la'tion. 

Co-ag'u-latTve, 84, 106. 

Co-ag'u-lat-or. 

Co-ag'u-la-to-rT, 86. 

Co~aff'u4um (L.). 

Cd-«id', 223. 

rC o a k,203.— 5'.pc Coke.] 

■Coal (24), n. a carbona- 
ceous substance. [See 
Cole, 160.] 

Cdaled (kold)^ part. 
burnt to charcoal. 
I See Cold, 160.] 

Co-a-lesce' r-fcs')» 171. 

Co-a-lesced' {-lest'). 

Cd-arlea'dng (^-les'inff). 



C5-a-les'cence (4et'eni). 

Cd-n-le«'cent {-les'ent). 

Coal'ing. 

Cd-u-ll'tion {-lish'un), 

Coal'y, 03, 169. 

Cdam'ings. 

Co-ap-ta°tlon, 

C6-arc-ta'tion. 

Coarse (tors), a. not 
fine. ISee Coarse, 
160.J 

Cdast. 24. 

Coast'ed. 

Coast'er. 

Cdaat'ing. 

Coast' wise (-40I2;). 

Coat (34, 130), ». a kind 
of garment. [See 
Cote, 160.] 

Cdat'ed. 

C6at-ee', 121. 

Cdat'inff. 

Coax, ^. 

Coaxed (kOks^. 

Coax'er. 

Cob, 18. 

Co'bait, or CoOwlt 
(-bdU) [kofhawU, Sm.; 
ko'MU, Gd. ; k9b'aU, 
Wk. J ko'bawlt, or 
kob'aU, Wr. 155.1 

C6'ha\tAne(ko'bawtt-in) 
[kofpvUin, Gfd.j kob^- 
o/Mn, Wr. 165.] . 

Cob'bing, 170. 

Cob'ble, V. 164. 

Cob'ble, n. [Co'ble (hi 
the sense of a amaU 
jUhing hoat\ 203.] 

Cob'bled (X»&'ld), 150, 
183. 

Cob'bler. 

Cob'bUng, 183. 

Coble Tkob'l) [Cob- 
ble, 203.] 

fCoboose, a03.— 5«e 
Caboose.] 

Cob'wcb, 206. 

Cob'webbed (-imM). 

Cob-web'br [Cob- 
weby, Gd. 203.1 

Coc-agnef(, Fr.)(£o£-an') 

Coc-cifcr-ouB, 108. 

Coc'cyx (koVaiks). 

Cooh'i-neal (78, 109) [so 
Wr. Wb. Gd. ; koch- 
i^eV), Sm.; ku^h'i- 
nil, Wk. 165.] 

Coch'le-an (ifco *-), 169. 

Coch-le-a'rl-form {kok-). 

Coch'le-a-ry (kok'-), 72. 

Coch'le-atc (Icok'-). 

Coch'le-at-ed {kok'-). 



Coch'lJte (kok*'). 

Cock, 18, 181. 

Cock-adc'. 121. 

Cock-ad'ea. 

Cock-a-too', 122. 

Cock-a-toon'. 

Cock'a-tHce, (171) [nai 
kok'a-tris, 153.] 

Cock'bill. 

Cock'boat, 206. 

Cock'chaf-«r. 

Cocked ikokt)^ 165. 

Cock'er. 

Cock'er-eL 

CJoek'et. 

Cock'ing. 

Ck>c'kle, 164. 

Coc'kled (kokfld), 165, 

Cock'ling. [183. 

Cock'ney, 98, 160, lUO. 

Cock'ney-ism (-nt-izm). 

Cock'pit, 206. 

Cock' roach. 

Cock's«comh (-i*Mi) 
(213) [Coxcomb, 
203.] 

Cock'spur. 

Cock'swain (kok'twHn)^ 
or kok'ni) [so Wr. j 
kol^stc&n, ooll. kok^' 
in, Wk. Sm. ; koV- 
atcdn, contracted hito 
kok'an, Wb. (M. 155.] 

■ar* Seamen alwayi pr»- 
amrnee this word eotfmu 

Co'ote iko'kd) (171) 

[Cacao, 203.] 
Co'oda-nut. 
Co-ooon% 121. 
Co-ooon'er-y. 
Coc'tlle. 
Coc'tion. 
Cod, 18. 
CodMie, 164. 
Cod'dled (kod'ld), 150. 
Cod'dling. 
Code, 24. 



Co-de'ia {-defyd), 
Co-delne [r 

203.] 
Co'dex (L.) ( 

ci8 (-»iz), ll 
Cod'fish, 206. 



odein. 



Co'dex (L.) [pL CotPP 
ci8(-»ez), 198.] 



Cod'ger (kqi'ur). 
Cod'i-cil, 109. 
Cod-1-dl'la.ry, 72, 170. 
Cod-i-fi-ca'tion. 
Cod'l-f ied, 186. 
Cod'i-ft-er. 
Cod'i-fy, 78, 94. 
Co-d!lle' (-dU'). 
Cod'llng. 



fldl ', %aBin there ; iSbastn foot i^asin facile ; gh a« g in go ; th m In thia. 



/ 



COEFFICIENT 



142 



COLUMATION 



Co-ef-fl'cient {-^h'ent), 

171. 
C€B'li-ac (»«'-) [Celiac, 

20:}.] 
Co-emp'tion (-e«»/-),162. 
Co-e'qual. 

Co-€rce' (-er«')» IW, 171. 
Co-erced'(-cr»f0,150,183 
Co-er9'l-ble, 164, 169. 
Co-erc'ing. 
Co-ercion {-shun). 
Co-erg'Ive, 84. 
Co-CB-Ben'tlal. 
Co-eH-Bon-ti-al'i-t7(-«M- 

al'-) [so Wk. Sm.Wr.j 

ko-es-nen-shal'i-tfi, 

Wb. GU. 165.] 
Co-e-ta'ne-oQs. 
Co-e-ter'nal, 21, N. 
Co-c-ter'ni-ty, 108, 169. 
Co-e'val. 
Co-exist' (egz~). 
Co-ex-Ist'ed (-egz-). 
Co-ex -iet'ence i-egz~)j 

169. 
Co-«x-iflt'ent(-^»-),169. 
Co-ex iat'ing {-egz-), 
Co-ex-ten' Blve, 84. 
Coffee, 66, N. ; 170. 
Coffer. 
Coffer-dam. 
Coffer-er. 
Coffin, 170. 
Coffined (-/«fkf), 150 
Coffiu-intr. 
Coffle (164) [Cavfle, 

203.] 
Coff, 18. 
Co'gon-oy, 169. 
Co'gent. 

Cog^ged (koffd), ITW. 
Cogr'firing, irw. 
Coff-i ta-bil'I-tv (ccj-), 
Cogr'i-ta-ble (ccj^-), 164. 
Cojr'i-tate (CO/'-), 169. 
Co«r'i-tat-ed (cq?'-), 183. 



Cc^i-tat-ing (ccj'-). 




[CO|a^nlac,203.J 
Cog'nato. 
Cog-na'tion. 
Cogr-nT'tion (^ish'un). 
Cog'ni-za-ble {kog'nir 

za-blj or konH-za^l). 
Cog'ni-zanoe {kog'nir 

zansy or konH-zant) 

[bo Wk. Wr. Gd. ; 

Kon'i-zan$, Sm. 1S5.] 
Coft'ni-zant, 78. 
C<^-nI-zee' (kog-ni-ze' ^ 

or kon^zv). 



Cog-ni-Kor'(i;o^-ni-«or', 

or kon-^zor, 
Cog-no'men (L.), 126. 
Cog-nom'i-nal, 228. 
Cog-nom-i-na'tion. 
Cog-nott-cen'te (It.) [pi. 

(jog-no8-cen'ti (-/«), 

198.] 
Cog-noB'd-ble, 164, 171. 
Cqg'-wheel. 
CoHiab'it. 
Co-hab'it-ant, 228. 
Co-hab-it-a'tion. 
Cb-hab'it-ed. 
Co-hab'it-er. 
Co-hab'it-ing. 
Co'-heir (-^r), 223. 
Co-here'. 
Cohered' (-A«rtfO* 150, 

183. 
Co-her'ence. 
Co-her'en-cy, 169. 
Co-her'ent, 49, N. 
Co-her'ing. 
Co-he-Bi-bil'i-ty. 
Co-he'si-ble, 164, 169. 
Co-he' Bion {-zhun), 
Co-he'Blve, 84. 
Co'hort, 139. 
Coif, n. & V. (27) 

[QaOif,203.] 
Coifed ikoift), 150. 
Coif Aire [kmf^oor, 8m. 

(See § 26) i jfcotf/oor, 

Wr, 165.] 
Coigne (koin) (162). n. 

a comer; — a wedge. 

[See Coin, 160.f 

[Co in. Quoin, 203.] 
Coil, 27. 
Coiled, 159. 
Coil'ing. 
Coin, n. a comer;— a 

wedge. rCoigne, 

Qnoin,203.] 
Coin, fi. a piece of met- 
al nsed as money: — 

V. to convert into 

money ; to invent. 

[See Coigne, 160.] 
Coln'age. 
Co-in-dde'. 
Co-in'd-dence, 169. 
Co-in'ci-dent, 169. 
Coined, 150. 
Coin'er. 
Coir, 27. 
CoiB'tril. 

[C o i t , 203.-5(06 Qnoit] 
Co-I'tion i-ish'un). 
Coke (24) [C oak, 203.] 
Coked (kok), 
Cok'ing. 



Col'an-der(lttf'-) [Cul' 

lender, 203.] 
Coi-ber-tine' (kol-b^f- 

tin') [so Wk. Sm.j 

koVoer-teny Wr. ; kol'- 

her rtn, Wb. Gd. 155.] 
Col'chi-cum (-W-), 171. 
Col'co-thar. 
Cold, a. not warm. [See 

Coaled, 160.] 
Cole (24), n. a plant of 

the cabbage family. 

[See Coal, 160.] 
C!o-le-op'ter-an. 
Co-le-op'ter-otie. 
CoIe'Bced, 206. 
Cole'wort {-wurt). 
Col'ic, 170. 
Col'ick-y, 182. 
Col'in. 
Col-i-se'um (111) [C o 1 - 

OS Be am, 203. J 
Col-lab-o-ra'tion. 
Col-lab-o-ra'tor, 170. 
Col-lapse', 170. 
Col-lapsed' {-Uipst'). 
Col-laps'ing. 
Col-lap'sion. 
Col'lar, n. a neck-band. 

[See Choler, 160.] 
CoI'lared {-lurd)y 160. 
Col'lar-ing. 
Col-lat'a-ble, 164. 
Collate'. 
Col-laVed, 183. 
Col lat'er-al, 170. 
CoMat'ing. 
Col-la'tion, 112. 
Col-la'tion-er. 
Col-lat'Tve, 84. 
Col-lat'or, 228. 
CoI'league (-»o), 171. 
Col-Iect', r. 161. 
CoI'lect, n. 161. 
Col4ec-ta'ne-a (L. pi.). 
Col-lec-ta'ne-oliB. 
Col-lect'ed. 
Col-lect'i-ble, 164, 109 
Col-lec'tion. 
Col-lect'Yve, 84. 
Col-lect'or. 
Col-leg'a-ta-ry, 72. 
Col'lege (-^*), 169, 171. 
Col-le'gi-an. 
Colrle'gi-ale, 73. 
Col'let, 170. 
Collide'. 
Col-lid'ed, 183. 
Col-lid'ing. 
Col'lier {kol'yur), 17L 
Col'lier-y (koVffur-jf). 
Col'li-mat-ing. 
Col-li-ma'tion, 112. 



i> S) i> 0> ti) filong* ^ ^> '* ^* ^ f,9hort; Jiaaim far, a as m fast, & a« iii 



OOLUMATOE 



148 



OOlfllAND 



Col-li-mmtor. 

Col-lin-e-a'tion. 

Col-Ua'gual, 170. 

Gol-ll-qaa'tion. 

Col liq'ua-tlve (-^fc'twi.) 

Col-lrsion (-Hzkfun). 

Col'lo-oate, 170. 

Coiao-cat-ed. 

Col'l4M»t-i]ig. 

Gol-lo-oa'tk>n, 112. 

Col-lo'di-on, leo, 170. 

Col'k>p. 

Col-lo'qoi-al. 

CoI-lo'qai-4il-i8iii (4«in). 

Gol'lo-qoist. 

Col'lo-quy, 170. 

Ck)l-lude'. 

Col-liid'ed, 183. 

Col-lud'er. 

Col-lad'in^. 

Ck>l-lu'Bion {-zhun), 

Col-lu'slve. 

Col-lu'so-rjr. 

CoUM'vi^ (-««) (L. 

sing. & pi.). 
Col'lj, 03, 160. 
Col4vr'Utm (L.) [pi. 

CM-lyr'i-aJ] 
Col'o-cynth, 171. 
Col-o-cynth'Kne fC o 1 o - 

ernthin, 203.1 
Cologne' (Jeo-tHf^). 
Co'Ion. 
Colonel (Jttfr'neO* 171. 



The ipelHiig b 
Freneh; the pronu liga- 
tion comei from the Spaa- 
iah Vwroueir Smart, 

Colonelcy (kur*n^9if). 

Co lo'nl-al. 

Col'o-nist, 170. 

Col-o-ni-za'tion, 112. 

CoVo-nlze, 170, 202. 

Col'o-nized, 150, 183. 

Col'o-niz-lnff. 

Col-on-nadeS 170. 

Col'o-nv, 170. 

Col'o-pDon, 170. 

Col-o-pho'ni-an. 

Col'o-pho-nr, or Co- 
loph'o-ny[iE;of'0-/o-ny, 
Wb. Gd. ; hoVo-fon-y, 
Sm.; ko4ofo-np,WYi.i 
hoAofo-ny, or Jko^'o- 
/o-ny, Wr. 155.] 

Col-o-qotn'ti-da. 

Col'or (kul'ur) (22) 
[Colour, Sm. 208.1 

Col'or^-blj (i-w//-), 104. 

Col'or-a-bly (Jctd'-), 

Col or-a'tion {knl-). 



Col'or-a^nre VhtV-), 
Col'ored {kuVwrd)^ 171. 
Col-or-ifio (inaHcH^- 

ik) fsoSm. Wb. Gkl.} 

kotr<»r^ik^ Wk. Wr. 

156.] 
Col'or-inff (Jfc«d'-). 
Col'or-lgt(i&t«i'-) 
Conors ikuVwrz). 
Co-los'gal, 170. 
Col-oa-se'an, 110. 
Col-os-9e'um (L.).[C ol- 

iseum, 203.1 
Co-loB'aian {koAo9h'an). 
Co-Iob'bub (L.) [L. pi. 

Co4o9'8l i Eng. pi. 

Co-loB'au8-e8 (-««)i 

198.1 
Col'port-ase Tso Gd. ; 

kol-p9rt^i Wr. 165 J 
Col'p6rt-or (bo Wb. 

Gd,i kol^p9rfifr. Wr. 

155.J 
Col'staff. 
Colt, 24. 

Colt'er [C o a 1 1 e r,203.1 
Colt V-fdbt, 213. 
Col'u-ber. 
Col'u-brine, 82, 152. 
Co-lum'ba. 
Col'um-ba-ry (72) [bo 

Sm. Wb. Gd. ; 1^ 

him^ba^ry, Wk. ; kol^- 

um-b€hry f or ko-him'- 

ha^ry, Wr. 155.] 
Co-lom'bi-'an, 109. 
Co-lum'bic. 
Col-um-bifer-oas, 108. 
Col'om-biae, 82, 152. 
Corum-bite. 
Co-lum'bi-um, 160. 
Col-u-mePla, 170. 
Col'ttmn (^f»X 162) [fiof 

kol'yum, 153.] 
Co-Ium'nar. 
Col'umned (-leffMl). 
Co-lam-ni-a'tion. 
Co-lure' n21) [noi kol'- 

yur, 163.] 
Col'za. 
Co'ma, 72. 
Co-mat«', n. [so Wk. 

Sm. Wr. ; ik6^na/,Gd. 

155.] 
Gdm'ate, a. [so Bm. 

Wr. ; WnUU, Wb. 

Gd. 155.] 
Co'ma-tose [so Sm.Wb. 

Gd.; kotn-n-toz', Wk. 

Wr. 165.] 
Co'ma-touB [sq Wb. 

Grd. ; kom'thiuB. Wr. 

156.] 



COmb (Mm), 24, 102. 

Com'bat (kum'batf or 
kom'bat) [bo Wr.; 
kum'bat, Wk. Sm.: 
komfbat, Wb. Qd.l66.J 

Com'bat-a-ble (itum' -,or 
kom'-) [bo wr. ; kom- 
bai'aAttj CM. 166.1 

Com'bat-ant Ikwrn'-f or 
k9m'-), 

Com'bat-er (kum'-j or 
kSm'-), 

Ck>m'b«t-Ire (Jwm'-, or 
kdm^-). 

Combed (k9md). 

Com-bin'a-ble, 164. 

Com-bi-na'tloD. 

Com-bin'a-to-ry, 72. 

Com-bine'. 

Ck>m-biued', 160. 

Com-bin'er. 

Comb'inK (k5m'-). 

Com-bin'ing. 

Com-bttBt% 121. 

Com-bu8-ti-bU'l-ty. 

Com-buB'ti-ble, 104,100. 

Com-bus'tion {-bu^'' 
yun). 

Com-bus'tlye. 

Come (kuM)t 22, 163. 

Co-me'di^an, 100. 

Com'e-dy, 171. 

Come'li'neBS(l:tMn'-),160 

Come'ly (hum'-), 171. 

Com'er {kum'-), 183. 

Com'et, 18, 170. 

Com-et-a'ri-um. 

Com'et-a-rr, 72. 

Com-«t-og'ra-phy, 108. 

Com'fit {kum'')y 22. 

Com'fi-ture (Jfcwm'-). 

Com'fort (ifettw'-)f 135. 

Com'fort-a-ble (jbum'-), 
132, 16*. 

Com'fort-ed (kum*-). 

Com'fort-er (Jtt*m'-). 

Com'fort-ing (kum'-), 

Com'frey (.kfim'fry) 
rCumfrey, Corn- 
fry, 203.] 

Com'lc, 170. 

Com'ic-al. 

C!om'io-al-ly, 170. 

Com'ing (kum'-). 163. 

C(MnVH-a (L. pi.) (*o- 

Co-ml'tial {mMi'dt). 
Com'i-ty, IflO, 170. 
Com'ma, 170. 
Com-mand'. 

0^- " Speakers of thf 
old whool, and the vulgar, 
universally prononnce the 



Ikll; Ooa In there; d& <m fn foot $$ <m in fiMile ; gheM gin go jthM in this. 



COMMANDANT 



144 



COMMUNING 



o broad {^m In /or] In both 
thew wonti IcoiHinaud and 
demaniiy ^fuutrt. They 
are verr commonly pro- 
noancea, in the United 
States, com-mAHd" and tttt- 
m&nd'. 

Com-man-dant^ 122. 

Com-mand'ed. 

Com-maiid'er. 

Com-mand'er-y fCom- 
mandry,203.] 

Com-mand'iag. 

Com-mand'meat. 

[Commandry, 203. 
— See Commandery.] 

Com-mat'ic. 

Com'ma-ti8m (-tizm). 

Com-mC'as'ur-a-ble 
(nazh^-), 1<H. 

Com-mem'o-ra-ble, 164. 

Coni-niem'o-rate, 170. 

Com-mem'o-rat-ed. 

Com-mem'o-rat-ingf. 

Com-mem-o-ra'tion. 

Com-mem'o-ra-tlve, 84. 

Com -mem'o-ra-to-ry . 

Com-mcnoe'. 

Com-menoed' (-mensf), 

Com-menoe'ment. 

Com-men^'ing, 183, 

Com-meud'. 

Com-mend'a-blerso Sm. 
Wr. Wb. Gd. ; ifcom'- 
men-da-blt or kom- 
mend'a-bl, Wk. 107, 

Com-mend'a-bly. [155.] 

Com-men'datn (L.)- 

Com-mend'a-ta-ry (72), 
a. holding in oom- 
mendam. [See Com- 
mendatory. 148.] 

Com-mend-a'tion. 

Com-mend'a-tor. 

Com-mend'a-to-ry, a. 
bestowing commend- 
ation. [See Com- 
mendatary, 148.] 

Com-mend'ed. 

Com-mend'ing. . 

Com-men-su-ra-bil'i-ty 
(shoo-). 

Com-men'su-ra-ble 
(-«Aoo-), 164, 171 

Com-men' su-rate 
(shoo-). 

Com-m@u-BU-ra'tion 
(shoo-). 

Com'ment, v. [bo Wk. 
Sm. Wb. Go". } kom'- 
en*, or kom-erU', Wr. 
156.] 

Com'ment, n. 170. 

Com'ment-a-ry, 72. 



Com'ment-a->tor. 

Com-ment'ed. 

Com'meut-er [so Sm. 
Wb. Gd. ; kom-ent^urf 
Wk. ; kom'ent ur, or 
kom-eni'urt Wr. 155.] 

Com'merce (-murs), 170. 

Com-mer'ciiil (shal). 

Com-mi-na'tion. 

Com-min'a-to-ry. 

Com-min'gle (-ming'gt), 
54, 164. r^^). 

Com-min'gled (-miug'- 

Com-min'gling l-ming'- 
gling). 

Com'mi-nate, 169, 170. 

Coui'mi-nat-ed, 183. 

Com'ml-nat-ing. 

Com-mi-nu'tion, 112. 

Com-mis'er-a-bie 
(-miz'-), 164. 

Com-mis'er-ate (-miz'-). 

Com-mis'er-at-ed 
(-miz'-). 

Com-mis'er-at-ing 
(-miz'-). 

Com-mJB-er-a'tion 
(-miz-). 

Com-mis'er-a-tlve 
(•4niz'-), 

Com-mis'er-at-or 
(-miz'-). 

Com-mis-Ba'ri-al, 170. 

Commissariat (Fr.) 
(kom-issHr'e-a., or 
Kom4ssa'ri-at) [so 
Wr, J komrissdr'e-at 
Sm. ; kom-issa'ri-at, 
Wb. Gd. ; 164, 155.] 

Com'miB-sa-ry, 72, 170. 

Corn-mis' sion (-mish'- 
un). \und). 

Com-mis'8loned(-mMA'- 

Com-mis'sion-er 
(-mish'un-). 

Com-mis'sion-ing 
(-mish'un-). 

Com-misB'orQ (-mish'- 
yur)y 91. 

Com-mit', 170. 

Com-mit'ment. 

Com-mit'tal, 176. 

Com-mit'ted. 

Com-mit'tee (161, 170), 
n. a body of persons 
appointed lor any pur- 
pose. 

Com-mit-tee' (161), n. 
the person to whom 
the care of an idiot or 
alunatic is committed. 

Com-mit'ter (176) 
[Committor, 203.] 



Com-mit'ti-ble, 164, 169. 
Com-mit-tor', 118. 

09- Thii word is thus 
spelled and pronounced 
when it is contrasted with 
CSoiM-miC-tee'. 

Com-mix'. 

Com-mixed' (-miksf), 

Com-mJx'ing. 

Com-mixt'iou (-ffun), 

Com-mixt'ure (-yury9l, 

Com-mode' [so Wk.Wr. 
Wb. (jrd. j kom'mud, 
Sm. 166.1 

Com-mo'di-ofis [so Sm. 
Wr. Wb. Gd.; kom- 
mo'di-us, or kom-mo'- 
ji-tts, Wk. i:J4, 155.] 

Com-mod'i-ty, 169, 170. 

Cbm'mo-dore (170) [so 
Sm. Gd. ; kom'mo- 
ddPf or kom-modor'j 
Wk. Wr. 155.] 

Com'mon, 170. 

Com'mon-a-ble, 164,109. 

Com'mon-age. 

Com'mon-al-ty, 145. 

Com'mon-er, 170. 

Com'mon-ness, 170. 

Com'mon-place, n.&a, 

Com-mon-place', v. 

Com 'mon-place-bdbk, 
206, Exc. 4. 

Com'mon-plaoed' 
(-plasf), 

Com-mon-pla^'ing. 

Com'mons (-munz), 

Com-mon-weal'. 

Com'mon- wealth, or 
Com-mon-wealth' [so 
Wr. i kom'monrwetth, 
Wk. Sm.; kdm-mon- 
weUh', Wb. Gd. 155.] 

Com-mon-wealths'man, 
171, 214. 

Com'mo-ranoe. 

Com'mo-ran-cy. 

Com-mo'tion. 

Com-move' (-moov'). 

Com-mune', 170. 

Com-muned', 150. 

Com-mu-ni-ca-bil'i-ty. 

Com-mu'ni-ca-bly, 164. 

Com-mu'ni-cant, 160. 

Com-mu'ni-tate,.73, 78. 

Com-mu'ni-cat-ed, 183. 

Com-mu'ni -oat-ing. 

Com-mu-ni-ca'tion. 

Com-mu'ni-cat-lve, 84. 

Com-mu'ni-cat-or. 

Com-mu'ni-ca-to-ry. 

Com-mun'ing, 183. 



\ 



a, e, 1, o, u, y, long -, a, £, Y, d, % y> ^hort , H as in ftat k as in Ikst, iiasin 



COMMUNION 



145 



COHPORTAIUA 



C(mi-muiiMoii C^ffun), 
Com-mun'ion-ist (-yun). 
Corn'mu-nism {-^izm). 
t)om'mu-iiiBt. 
Com-mu-nist'ie. 
Ck>m-inu'iil-t]r, 100. 
Com-mut-a bil'i-ty. 
Com-mat'a-ble, 104, 1<W. 
Com-mu-ta'tion. 
Com-mot'a-ttve, 8A. 
Com-mute'. 
Com-mut'ed. 
Com-mut'ing^. 
Com-mut'u-al. 91, 170. 
Co-mofie' [so 8m. Wr, ; 
ko'm08,Wh. Gd. 166,] 
Com'pact, n. 103, 161. 
Com-pact^ a. A v. 161. 
Com-pact'ed. 
Com pact'i-ble, 16i. 
Com-pact'Ing'. 
Com-pac'tion. 
Com-pa'gis (^-Jlz) [L. 



singf. A pi.] 
dm-pan'lOQ {-vun 
Com-pan'lon-a-Dle 



Com-pan'lOQ (-wun), 51. 



(-^n-), 164, 109. 
Com'pa-ny («tti»'-). 
Com'pa-ra-ble (122) [nol 

kom-pdr'a-bl, m, 

163.] 
Com'pa-rates, n. pi, 
Com-pftr'a-tlve, 84, 170. 
Com-pare' C-p^r'), 14. 

Com-pared^(-i>«rdOilfiOf 
183. 

Com-par'er (-pir*-). 

Com-par'ing i-pir-), 

Com-pSr'i-son (^kom- 

pdf^l-gun, or kom- 

ottr'l-^n) [bo Wr. ; 

kom-pdr*i-8unt ooll. 

tam-pdr*i-gn, Sm. ; 

kom-pHr'i-suftf Wb. 

6d. ; kom^9dr'i-tnf 

Wk. 166.] 
Corn-part'. 
Com-part'ed. 
Com-part'ing. 
Com-part'ment. 
Com'pass (itum'-), 22. 
Com'paB8-a-ble (kum'-)t 

164, 109. 
Com'paBsed (kum^patt). 
Com'paas-es (kum'pat- 

ez\ n.pl. 171. 
^Com'pasB-ing- (itum'-). 
'Com-pas'sion (-jmmV- 

un). 
Com-pas' sion-ate 

{-ptuh'un-). 
Com-paa' sion-at-ed 

(-jNuA'tcn-). 



Com-pAB'Rion-at-ing 

(-/MuA'un-)* 
Compat i-bil'i-tr, 160. 
Com-pat'1-ble, 104, 160. 
Com-pa'tri-ot [bo Wk. 

Sm. Wr.; kom-pa'trU 

oit or kom-pat^ri-ot, 

Gd. 155.1 
Corn-pen^, 121. 
Com-pel'i 16. 
Com-pcl'ia ble, 161, 176. 
Com-pel-la'tlon, 112. 
Com-pel'la-to-py. 

Compelled' (-fNtMO>lW- 

Com-pel'lar. 

Com-pel'Unff'. 

Com'pend, w 

Com-pen'di-otti [bo Sm. 
Wr. Wb. Gd. } kom- 
pen'ii-iM,Wk.l34,155.j 

Com-pen'dl-um, 160. 

Com-pen'sate [bo Wk. 
8m. Wr.; Jcom-pen'- 
sdtf or iom'pen-»at, 
Gd. 1.55.]^ 

Com-pen'Bat-od. 

Com-pen'Bat43ig. 

Com-pen-Ba'tion. 

Com-pen'Bartlve. 

Com-pen'sa-to-ry. 

Com-pete', 13. 

Com-pet'ed, 183. 

Com'pe-tenoe. 

Com'pe-ten-ey, 160. 

Com'pe-tent. 

Com-pet'ing, 183. 

Com-pet'1-tlve, 84. 109. 
Com-petl-tor, 171. 
Com-pl-la'tiou« 112. 
Com-pUe', 25, 10). 
C(ftn-pned', 150, 18& 
Com-pil'er. 
Com-pn'ing. 
Com-pla'cenoe, 171. 
Com-pla'cen-cy, 168L 
Com-pla'cent. 
Com-pla-cen'tlal. 
Corn-plain', 23, 103. 
Com-plain'a-bie, 164. 
Com-plaln'ant. 
Com-plained', 160. 
Com-plain'er. 
Com-plain'ing. 
Com-plaint',23. 
Com-plal-sanoe' (-zant') 

[BO Wk. Sm. Wr.; 

)bom'p2flHz»fM,Wb.Gd. 

165] 
Com-plai-sant' (-zant') 

[bo Wk. Sm. Wr. ; 

hm'pla-zantt Wb.Gd. 

155.] 



Com'ple-mrat, n. fU- 
neBB. [.See CompU- 
mfnt, Kiu.] 

Com-ple-ment'al, a.thst 
complcteB. iSeeComr 
plimcntal, 160.] 

Com-ple-ment'a-ry, a. 
eompleting. (See 
CompUmental, 160.1 

Gom-plete', IS, 3DB. 

Com-plet'eo. 

Com-plet'ing. 

Com-ple'tlon. 

Com-plet'Tve. 

Com-ple'to-ry, «6. 

Com'plex [not kom- 
plex', 163, 166.] 

Com-plex'ion {-P^eV' 
shun). 

Oom-plex'ion-a ry 
(-plek'8hun-)f 72. 

Com-plex'ioned {-pkV' 
shund), 

Com-plex'1-ty, 160. 

Com-pli'a-ble, 164. 

Com-pli'anoe. 

Com-pli'ant, 160. 

Com'pli-oate, 73, 78. 

Com'pli-eat-ed, 188. 

Com'pli-cat-faig. 

Com-pli-ca'tioii. 

Com-plif'l-ty, 160, 17L 

Com-plTed', 186. 

Com-pli'er. 

Com'pli-ment, n. an aflt 
or an expreaslon of 
dviUty. [See Com- 
plement, 160.1 

Com-pli-ment'iu, a. fan- 
plying compUmenta, 
{see Complemental, 
160.] 

Com-pli-ment'a-ry, a. 
bestowine compli- 
ment. []9ee Comple- 
mentary, 160.] 

Com'pli-ment-er. 

Com'pUne [C o m p 1 i n , 
203.] 

Com'plot. n. 161. 

Com-plots V. 161. 

Com-plot'ted, 176. 

Com-plot'ting:. 

Com-plu-ten'siaa 
v-8Aan). 

Com-ply', 25. 

Com-pone'. 

Com-po'nent [bo Wk. 
Sm. Wr.; leom-po'- 
netU, or kom'po-nent^ 
Gd. 166.1 

Com-port'. 

Com-p5rt'a-ble, 164. 



1U1', 6a«<» there; Ob<M<nfoot; 9a«<»Aeiie;gha«g<iigo;tha<liithiB. 

13 



OOMPOETED 



146 



CONCOMITANT 



Gom-pQrt'ed. 
Com-pdrt'ing. 
Com-pose' {-pHx^), 24. 
Com-po8ed'(-p0;i;aO»165, 

183. 
Com-pSs'er (-pdz' ). 
Com-pds'ingf l-pdz'-). 
Coub-poB'Ite {-poz'it) 

(83, 16i) [Ttot kom'po- 

zit, 153.1 [un), 

Com-po-srtion {-zish'- 
Com-poa'i-tlve (^-poz'-). 
Com-poa'i-tor (-po«'-). 
Com'poat. n. 101. 
Com-posr, V. 103, 101. 
Com-pos'ure (,-pdz'-),9U 
Com'pote. 

Com'pouad. a. & n. 161. 
Coin-pound', v. lAl. 
Com-pound'a-blc, 161. 
Com-pound'ed. 
Oom-pound'er. 
Com-pound'ln&f. 
Com-pre-hend', 122. 
Com-pre-hend'ed. 
Com-pre-hend'er. 
Com-pre-hend'inc^. 
Cont-pre-hen'si-ble, 164. 
Com-pre-hen'si-bly. 
Com-prc-hen'sion. 
Com-pre-hen'slve. 
Corn-press', v. 103, 161. 
Com'press, n. 161. 
Corn-pressed' (-prest'). 
Coai-pre8-8i-bu'l-ty,160. 
Com-press'ing. 
Com-press'Ive. 
Com-press'or. 
Coin-presB'ure(-f>rMft'-) 
Com-print', v. 161. 
Com'print. n. 161. 
Com-print'ed. 
Com-print'ing. 
Com-prise' {-prJz'). 
Com-pri8ed'(-prl«d')l50 
Com-pris'ing (^-prlz'-). 
Com'pro-mise (-mJz), 
Com'pro-mised {/mlzd), 
Com'pro-mis-er {-naz-). 
Com'pro-mis-in^-mU-) 
Com'pro-mit. 
Com'pro-mit-tedrc o m- 

p r o m i t ed , Wb. Gd. 

177, 203.] 
Com'pro-mit-tins 

rCompromiting, 

Wb. Gd. 177, 203.1 
Goinp-trol'ler(ito7i-^02'- 

ur) [Controller, 

203.] 

09* This word ii now 
written Comptroller only 
when used in a technical 



to denote am ivfto 
tsoamUte* lAe occowiff v 
other qfioer$. 

Com-pul'slon. 
Com-pul'slve. 
Coin-pul'so-ry, 86. 
Com-punc'tion 

i-pungk'-). 
Com-punc'tiofi8 

{-pungk'shus). 
Com-pur-ga'tion. 
Com'pur-ga-tor [so Sm. 

Wr. ; bom-ptw-ga'tor, 

Wb. Gd. 155.] 
Com-put'a-ble, 16i, 160. 
Com-pn-ta'tion. 
Com-pute', 26. 
Com-pat'ed, 183. 
Com-put'er. 
Com-put'ing. 
Com'rade [so Sm. Wb. 

Gd. ; kum'rdd, Wk. } 

kom'rdd, or Jtum'rfld, 

Wr. 155.] 
Con, 18. 

Con-oat'e-nate, 169. 
Con-cat'e-nat-ed. 
Con-cat'e-nat-ing. 
Con-cat-e-na'tion. 
Con'care (kong'-), 54. 
Con-cav'ity, 108, 160. 
Con-ca'voiis. 
Con-ceal', 13. 
Con-ceal'a-ble, 164, 169. 
Con-cealed', 166. 
Con-ceal'er. 
Con-ceal'ing, 
Con-oeal'ment. 
Con-cede'. 
Con-ced'ed, 183. 
Con-ced'ing. 
Con-ceit', 121, 169, N. 
Con^ceit'ed. 
Con-«eit'ing. 
Con-oeiv'a-blo, 164, 160. 
Con'cglve', 169. 
Con-ceived', 165, 183. 
Con-ceiv'er. 
Con-ceiv'ing. 
Con-cent', n. harmony. 

[See Consent, 160.] 
Con-cen'trate. 
Con-cen'trat-ed, 183. 
Con-cen'trat-ing. 
Con-oen-tra'tion. 
Con-cen'tre [Concen- 
ter preferred by Wb. 

and Gd. — See Note 

E, p. 70.] 
Con-cen'trlc, 109. 
Con-cen'tric-al, 106. 
Con-cep'ta-cle, 164, 169. 
Con-cep'tion. 



Con-oep'tloa-fll-lst. 
Con-cem', 21, K. 
Con-cerned' {'temd')^ 
Con-cem'ing. £165. 

Con-cem'ment. 
Con-oert', v. 103, 161. 
Con'ccrt, n. 103, 161. 
Con-cert'ed. 
Con-cert'lng. 
Con-cer*to (It.) \^\.Con- 

cer't99 i-tHz), 192.1 
Con-ces'sion {-sealvwi), 
Connses'sion-a-ry, 72. 
Con-ces'slve. 
Con-ces'so-ry. 
Conch (hongk)t 62, 54. 
Coneh'i-fer {kongV-)t 

160. 
Conch-if er-oils {kongh- 



if-), 108. 
'onch 



Conchlte (kongV-), 153. 
Conch'oid {kongk'-S. 
Conch-old'al {hhngh-). 
Conch-o-log'ic-al 

(&on^fc-o-to/-), 108. 
Conch-ol'o-gi8t(ii;<>fa^i^) 
Conch-ol'o-gy 

{kongk-)y 108. 
Conch-yl-i-a'oeou8 

(^k<yngk-il-i-a'8hus)yll2 
Conch-yl-i-om'e-try 

ikongk-)t 108. 
Conch-yl'i-oiis (^kongk-) 
Con-cierge (Fr.) (jboit. 

Con-cil'I-ate fso Sm. 
Wr. Wb. Gd. ; hm^ 
tU'yat, Wk. 155.] 

Con-dl'i-at-ed, 183. 

Con-cil'i-at-ing. 

Con-cil-i-a'tion. 

Con-cil'i-at-or. 

Con-cil'i-a-to-rylso Wk. 
Wr. Wb. Gd.; kon- 
sWya-tikr-y, Sm. 155.] 

Con-CISC', 121. 

Con'clave {kong'-), 54. 

Con'da-vist {kong'-)» 

Con-elude', 28. 

Con-clud'ed, 183. 

Con-clud'er. 

Con-clud'lng. 

Con-clu'sion (-«&»«i). 

Con-du'slve, 84. 

Con-du'so-ry, 86. 

Con-coct', 103. 

Con-coct'.ed. 

Con-coct'ing. 

Con-coc'tion. 

Con-coc'tire. 

Con-cora'i-tance, 78, 109L 

Con-eom'i-tan-cy, 169. 

Con-com'i-tant, 169, ITQl 



&• 6, i, 5, fi, y, long > ftt Si 1> 6, ft, f, short 3 ii m mi ftr, kaain fast, & mm» 



CONCOBO 



147 



0ONFI9CATOBT 



Oon'flord (kong'-), M. 
Con-cord'a-ble, UH. 
CooHsord'anoer Ifitf. 
Con-oord'ant. 
CoB-cord'at. 
Ck>n-€ord'i8t. 
Con'cdurae (Jcon^k&r*). 
Con-cres'ceiice, 171. 
Con-cres'd-blfe, IM. 100. 
Con-crete', v. 161. 
Con'crete {bwM'hr€t)y 
n, [so Sm. Wb. Od. ; 

155.] 
Ckm-cret'ed, 183. 
Con-cret'ing. 
Coii-cre'tk>a. 
Con-cre'tiOB-aL 
CoQ-cre'tiOB-ariy, 72. 
Con-eretlve. 
CoQ-cu'bin-agie. 
Con-cu'Un-a-iy, 72. 
CoB'cu-biae (iwn^'-),fii. 
Con-ca'pis-oence* 
Con-cn'pia-oeat. 
Con-cur', 21. 
Con-curred, IfiO, 170. 
Con-e&r'renee, IfiO, 170. 
Ck>Q-ciir'rent. 
Con-^ar'ring. 

Con-oaa'slTe, 84. 
Con-demn' i~dem'), 102. 
Gon-dem^na-blejiaMW. 
Con-dem-na'tion. 
Coii<dem'jia-to^. 
Con-demoMl' i-demtP), 

lfi2. 
Con-dem'ner [imi^ kon- 

.dran'or, 153.1 
Coii.dem'ningTiuif koB- 



dem'ing, 153.J 
Oon-den-Mrbil'i-tr. 
Con-den'aa-ble, Idi, 109. 
Gon^den-sa'tioii. . 
Con-den'sa-tilve. 
Con-dense'. 168. 
Con-densea' (-^leiM^}. 
Con^lens'er. 
Con-dens'ing^. 
Con'der, n. a pilot. [Se^ 

Condor, 160.] 
Con-de-s4iend', 17L 
Con-de-Boend'ed. 
Con-de-Mend'ing^. 
Con-de-soen'Bion. 
Con-digni' i-dtnf), 121, 

102. 
Con'di-roent, 160. 
Con-dl'tion (-diaA'tm). 
CoQ-dX'tion-al (-dUV- 

un-). 



OoiMlI'tloBed (-dUhf^ 

und). 
Con-do'la-to-rx, 80. 
Con-dole', 103. 
Con-doled', 166, 183. 
Con-dole'ment. 
Con-do'lenoe (100) [fiof 

kon'do-lens, 153.J 
Con-dol'er. 
Con-ddl'ing^. 
Con'dor (88), n. a kind 

ofTulture. [iSteCon- 

der, 160.J 
Con-dnoe'. 26. 
Con-duoed' (-«M«<'), 

Note C, p. M. 
Con-du9'i-ble, 164, 160. 
Con-do^'Ive, 84. 
Con'duct, n. 103, 161. 
Con-dnet', v. 103, 101. 
Con-duot'ed. 
Con>dnct-i-fail'147, 108. 
Con-ducf 1-Ue, 104, 109. 
Con-duot'ing; 
(}on-duo'tio]i. 
Con-duct'lTe. 
Con-diiet-iT'i4f. 
Con-duefor. 
Con'dnit (kim'dU, or 

kan'«Uinhin'dit,Wk. 

Sm. Wr.; kom^dU, 

Wb. Gd. 166.1 
Con'df le, 171. 
Con'dy-lold. 
Cone, 24. [nj 

rCone7,208.~5ee 
Con-fab^n-la'tioB. 
Con-ftr-re«'tion. 
Con-feof , V. 103, 101. 
COB'fCCt, M. 103, 101. 
Con-ftet'ed. 
Con-fect'ing. 
Con-ibe'tion. 
Con*liBe'tion<«r. 
Con-fec'tion-er-7, 109. 
CoB'fed'erm-^, 100. 
Con-fed'er-ate. 
Con^fed'er^it-ed, 188i 
Con-fed'er-at-er. 
CoB-fed'er4t-ing. 
C!on-ied-«r-a'tioB. 
Con-fer', 21, N. 
Con'fer-enoe, 170. 
•fO>n-fer'ra-ble, 104, 170. 
CoB-fenred', 150, 170. 
Cton-fer'rer, 21, ». 
Con-fer'ring. 
Con-fets'. 103. 
Con-fesued' i-fut^), 
CoB-i^Bs'ing. 
Con-fes'aion {-fe$k*un). 
Con-fes'flion-al {-/esh*- 

1MI-). 



Con-fba'akm-A-rj, 72. 

Con-feaa'or, or Con'- 
feas-or [htm-fut'ttr^ 
Wb. (M. ; i»n/e«-«ir, 
Wk. 8m. i konf^fet-UTf 
or konrfu'ur, W r.l07, 
155.1 

Con-ff-dant' (100), «. 
ma». [bo Wk. Sm. 
Wr. ; kon^MatU^ 
Wb. Od. 156.J 

Con-fi-dante' (100), «. 
/em. [bo Sm. Wr.| 
kon>Ji<laiU, Od. 166.1 

Cou-fide', 25. 

Con-fid'ed, 183. 

Con'fl-denoa. 78, 109. 

Con'fi-dent. 160. 

Con-fi-dcn'tial (^Aol). 

Con-fid'er. 

Con-fid'lng. 

Con-fig-tt-ra'tioiL 

Con-fm'a-ble, 104, 109. 

Con-fine', v. (active), 
103, 161. 

Con'fine, v. (neuter) [to 
Sm. Wb. (M.; him- 
/!»', Wk.5 kon^/Ht^, 
or kan'/lih Wr. 16&.] 

Con'fine, «. 103, 161. 

Con-fined', 106, 183. 

Con-fine'ment. 

0>n-fin'er (161), n. one 
who, or that which, 
oonfl^ea. 

Con'fin-er (101), n, a 
borderer, [so Sm. 
Wb. Od. ; kon-fln'urt 
Wk.; kon-fln'urt op 
kof^Ji-nurt Wr. 165.] 

Con-fin'ing. 

Con-firm', 21, N. 

Con-firm'a-Ue, 104. 

Con-fir-ma'tion, 112. 

Con-firra'a-tlTe. 

Con-firm'a-to-ry, 80. 

Con-firmed'. 105. 

Ck»n-flrm-ee' (122) [Law 
term.] 

Con-firm'er. 

0>9-firm'ing. 

Con-firm-oi' (118, 122) 
[Law term.] 

Con-fis'oa-ble, 104. 

Con-fit'oate, v,A a. [so 
Wk. Sm. Wr,; kon- 
Jls'katy or kan'JMBOit 
(M. 156.] 

Con-fls'cat^ 188i 

Con-fis'cat-ingf. 

Con-fis-ca'tion. 

Con'fis-oat-or. 

Con-fia'oa4(My. 



ftUi 0af Mthoro; iSbati»tooti9aMinfk^oii»igha»gingOi^asinibiM, 



CONFLAGRATION 



148 



CONNECT 



pon-flapgra'tion. 

CoD-fllct', V. 103, 161. 

Cou'llict, n. 103, 161. 

Con-lliot'ed. 

Con-flict'inf^. 

Con-fllct'lve. 

Coii'llu-enoe, 109. 

Coii'flu-ent, a. An. 109. 

Cou'llux. 

CoQ-form'. 

Con-lbrm'a-ble, 164, 109. 

Con-form'a-bly, 93. 

Con-form-a'tion. 

Con-formed', 16S. 

Con-fbrm'ing. 

Coa-form'iBt. 

CoQ-form'i-ty, 109. 

Con-fouudS 'M, 

Cou found'ed. 

Con-found'er. 

Con-1'ound'inff. 

Con-fra-ter'nr-ty, 169. 

Con-fVont' (-/runt') [bo 

Sm. Wb. Gd. -, £on- 

/^fU', Wk. ; kon- 

fruiU'y or kon-frOfU\ 

Vr. 156.J 

Con-front'ed {-/runt'-). 

Con-front'er (•frurU'-), 

Coii-frontaiig(;/H<ta'-). 

Con-fu'cian {shan). 

Con-fus'a-ble C-f^-), 
164. 

Con-Aise' C-/^'). 

Con-fii8ed^(-y*«d')» 183. 
Con-fus'ing r-yite'-). 

Con-fii'sion (-zhun), 

Con-fut'a-ble, 164. 

Con-fut'ant. 

Con-Ai-ta'tion. . 

Con-fut'a-tlye. 

Confutes 26. 

Con-fut'ed. 

Con-fut'er. 

Con-fut'ing. 

Con'gl rfr.) [so Sm. 
Wr. Wb. Gd.; hon- 
je'f Wk. 165J, H. leave. 

Con'ge, n. a kind of 
moulding. 

Con'ge, v.jM Sm. Gd.; 
kon-je^, Wk. ; kon'jt, 
or kon-4e'y Wr. 156.] 

Con-geal'i 13. 

Con-geal'a-ble, 164, 169. 

Con-gealed'. 

Con-geal'ing. 

Con-geal'ment. 

Con'geed, 188. 

Con'gee-ing. 

Con-gG-la'non. 

Con'jge-ner [so Sm.Wb. 
GcT; kon^'nur, Wk.; 



I kon^Je-nuTf or hon^- 
nur, Wr. 166.] 
Con-ge'ni-al, or Con- 

fcu'ial (yoZ) [so Wr. ; 
onrje'ni-dl, Wk. Sm. 
Wb. Gd. 165.] 
Con-ge-nl-al'i-ty, 108, 

160. 
Cun-gen'1-tal, 169. 
Con'ger {kong'ffur), 

•n, lifo. 

Con-ge'ri-es (-fa;), n. 

sing. & pi. 144. 
Con-geet'. 
Con-gest'ed. 
Con-gest'ion(-/e«^tfvn> 

61. 
Con-geatTye, 84. 
Con'gi-a-ry, 72. 
Con-glo'bate [so Wk. 

Wr. Wb. Gd. ; kcmg*- 

glo-bSt, Sm. 166.1 
Con-glo'bat-ed, 183. 
Con-glo'bat-ing. 
Con-glo-ba'tion. 
Con-glob'u-late. 
Con-glom'er-ate, 170. 
Con-gIom'er<at-ed. 
Con-glom'er-at-ing. 
Con-glom-er-a'tion. 
Con-glu'ti-nant-, 78, 109. 
Con-glu'ti-nate. 
Con-glu'ti-nat-ed, 183. 
Con-glu'ti-nat-ing. 
Con-glu-ti-na'tion. 
Con-gltt'ti-nat-Iye. 
Con-glu'ti-nat-or . 
Con'go ikong^ffO). 
Con-grat'u-lant. 
Con-grat'u-late, 108. 
Con-grat'u-lat-ed. 
Con-grat' u-lat-ing. 
Con-grat-u-la'tion. 
Con-grat'u-lat-or. 
Con-grat'u-la-to-ry, 171. 
Con'gre-gate {kong'-), 

160. 
Con'gre-gat-ed {kong'-), 
Con'gre-gkir-tDg(^k<mg*-) 
Con-gre-ga,'tion(^kang-), 
Con-gre-ga'tion-al 

ikong-), 
Con-gre ga'tion-al^sm 

(-ism). 
Con-gre-ga'tion-al-ist 

(kong-), 
Con'gress {kong'-), 54. 
Con-grcs' sion-al 

(-gresh'un-), 
Con'gru-enoe {kong'- 

groo-)t 19, 54, 169. 
Con-gru'en-oy (-groo'-), 

160. 



Con'gru-ent ijtomg'^ 

groo-)^ 169. 
Con-gru'i-tjr {-groo'-'U 

19, 169. 
Con'gru-oHa (kong'' - 

groo-). 
Con'ic, 170. 
Con'lc-al. 
Co-nii^er-ou8, 108. 
Co'ni-form, 78, 160. 
Co-ni-ros'tral. 
Con-ject'ur-arble(-yKr-), 

91, 169. [183. 

Con-Jeet'ur-al i-tfur-)^ 
Con-lect'ure, 91. 
Con-ject'ured (^ffurd-)^ 

160. 
Con:Jecfur-er (•vur-). 
Con- ect'ur-ing (-yiir-). 
Con- oin', 27. 
Con- oined', 160. 
Con-join'ing. 
Con-loint', 121. 
ConMu-gal, 72. 
ConMu-gate, 73. 
Con'Ju-gat-ed. 
Con'lu-gat-ing. 
Con- u-ga'tion-aL 
Con- u'gl-al. 
Con- unct', 121. 
Con- uno'tion, 171. 
Con- unc'tdon-al. 
Con- unct'Ive, 84. 
Con- unct'ure, 91. 
Con-Ju-ra'tion. 
Con-jure' (124, 161), v. 

to epioin solemnly. 
Con'Jure {kun'Jur) (124, 

161), V. to praotiae 

magle. 
Con-jured', 161, 183. 
Con'jured (kun'Jurd), 

161. 
Con-jar'er (161), «. one 

who enjoins solemn- 
ly. [See Coi]()aror, 

160.] 
Con'jur-er (kun'-) (161), 

n. an enchanter. 
Con-jur'ing, 161, 183. 
Con( ur-ing {kun'-), 161. 
Con-jar'or,n. one bound 

by oath with others. 

[Law term^—See Con- 
jurer, 160.] 
On-naa'oenoe, 171. 
Con-nas'oenHoy, 169. 
Con-nas'oent. 
Con-nate' [soWk. Sm. 

Wr. ; kon'at, Wb. GKL 

155.] 
Con-nat'u-raL 
Con-nect% 16, 103. 



itStiy o, u, y, lonffi &, S, I, d, tl, ft short', ViMin tkr,ka$in ftst, k'iuin 



CONNECTED 



149 



CONBTITUTINO 



Con-neet'ed. 

Con-necVing, 

Con-neo'tion [Con* 
nexion, 203.] 

Con-nect'Yve, M, 

Con-nect'or. 

Conned (kSnd), 160, 176. 

[Connexion, 303.— 
See Connection.] 

Con'ning, 176. 

Con-ni'vance, 160, 170. 

Con-nive', 25, lOS. 

Con-nived', 183. 

Con-niWent. 

Con-niv'er. 

Con-niy'lng. 

Con-noU-teur* (Fr.) 
{hon-ia-»9tr* ^ or konrU- 
9wr') [ao Wr. ; hm- 
iM-airT, or konfU-sir^ 
Gd.; hon-nBL-tur* , Sm, 
154, 155.] 

Con-nu'bi-al, 160, 170. 

Co'noid. 

Co-noid'al, 72. 

Co-noid'ic, 109. 

Co noid'io-al, 108. 

Con'quer (kon^kur) 
(54) [bo 8m. Wr. ; 
honkfur, Wb. Od.} 
kong'kur, or kojtff'' 
kwury Wk. 155.1 

Con'qner-a-ble (iton^'- 
kur-\ 164, 169. 

Con'qaered(l;o7i^itord) 

Con'quering {kong'- 
kur-). 

Con'quer-er (koruj'kw-) 

Con'quest {kangOnoest), 
54. 

Con-san-gnin'e-otts, 169. 

Con-gan-^iiin'i-tj, 171. 

Con'8cienoe(-«A«n«), 171 

Con'sdencea {-sherut). 

Con-Bci-en'tio&s {-sht- 
en*shus) [not kon-al- 
en'shuB, 153. 166.] 

Con'scious (-«AtM). 

Con'Beript. 

Con-Bor(p'tion. 

Con'Be-crate, 160. 

Con'Be-erat-ed. 

Con'ae-crat-er. 

Con'se-crat-ingf. 

Con-se-ora'tion. 

Con-Beo-ta'ne-otlB, 160. 

Con'seo-ta-rr, or Con 
see' ta-ry Ikon' 8ek4a' 
ry, Wk. Wr.Wb. Gd.; 
kon-»ek'ta-ry, Sm.l55] 

Con-Be-cu'tion. 

Con-Bec'u-tTve. 

Con<Be-nes'cenoe. 



Coii-«e-iieB'een-c7. 
Con-Bcnt', n. ooncnr- 

renoe:— V. to ag^ree. 

{See Concent, 160.1 
Con-Ben-ta'ne-ouB, loO. 
Con-Bent'ed. 
Con-Bent'er. 
Con-sen'tient (-dtetU). 
Con-Bent'ingf. 
Con'se-qucnce. 
Con'se-quent. 
Con-se-quen'tial (-aJkol). 
Con-serv'a-ble, 164, 100. 
Con-aerv'an-ey. 
Con-Berv'ant. 
Con-Ber-va'tlon. 
Con-Berv'a-tism (-*<««•), 

136. 
Con-BerWa-tlve. 
Con'Ber-va-tor, or Con- 

aer-va'tor Xkon'ser- 

vA-toTf 8m. W r.; kon- 

sur-va'tor, Wk. Wb. 

Gd. 155.] 
Con-aerv'a-to-ry, 86. 
Con-aerve^ v. 10:i, 161. 
Con'serve, n. 103, 161. 
Con-Benred', 150, 183. 
Con-serF'er. 
Con-aerv'lng. 
Con-Bid'er, 104. 
Con-!«id'er-a<ble,164,160. 
Con-Hid'er-a-bly. 
Con-aid'er-ate, 73. 
Con-aid-cr-a'tion. 
Con-8id'ered(^r(l}, ISO. 
Con-aid'er-er. 
Con-aid'er-ing^. 
Con-aign' (-HnOi 162. 
Con-aignecr (-aifuf ). 
Con-algn-ee' (-«1ii*), 118. 
Con-aign'er (•!»'-). 
Con-aign'ing (-Hit'-). 
Con-aign'ment (-#ln'-). 
Con-aign-or' (kon-stn- 

oH) TLaw term^ cor- 
relative to Conngnee] 
Con-aiat', 16. 
Con-aiat'ed. 
Con-aiat'enoe. 
Con-Biat'en-cy, 160. 
Con-aiat'ent. 
Con-alat'ing. 
Con-aia-to'ri-al, 49, N. 
Con'sia-to-ry, or Con- 

aia'to-ry [ao Wr. ; 

kon'sis-to^i Wk. 

8m. ; kon-Hst'o-ry, 

Wb. Gd. 155.] 
Con-Bo'ci-ate (-«W-)(46, 

73)[BoWk. Sm. Wr.; 

kon-B&tkat^ Wb. Qd. 

165.] 



Ooo-io'd4lt-ed, <-«M-). 

Con-ao'dHit-ing (-«A1 ). 

Con-ao-d-a'tion (-«M-). 

Con-Bol'a-ble, 164, 160. 

Con-ao-la'tlon. 

Con-Bol'a-to-ry, 86. 

Con-aole', «. 161. 

Con'aole, n. 161. 

Con-aoled', 160, 183. 

Con-Bol'er. 

Con-Bol'i-dant, 160. 

Con-aol'i-date, 160. 

Con-aol'i-dat-ed, 183. 

Con-BoFi-dat-lng. 

Con-aol-i-da'tion. 

Con-Bol'ing, 183. 

Con-sols', or Con'Bola 
{-s9lz) f ao Wr. ; kon- 
•dlz'^ »m. ; kon'$olZt 
Wb. Gd. 155.] 

war ** Th« aninitiatwl 
talk of MlUnf eontoU, till 
they Icam ou the stock ez- 
ehftiige that the technical 
nronuncUliou ia eom-mM*" 
SMort, 

Con'BO-nanoe. 
Con'80-nan-«y. 
Con'ao-nant. 160. 
Con-BO-nant'al. 
Con'ao-noas. 
Con'aort. n. 161. 
Con-Bort', V. 103, 161. 
Con-Bort'od. 
ConHM>rt'ing. 
Con-apic'u-ofia. 
Con-aplr'a-cr, 160. 
Con-api-ra'tion, 112. 
Con-apTr'a-tor. 
Con-apire', 25. 
Con-apired', 150, 183. 
Con-apir'er, 49, N. 
Con-apirMng. 
Con'ata-ble (Irtin'-)* 22, 

164. 
Con-Btab'n-la-ry, 72. 
Con'atan-cy, 164. 
Con'atant. 
Con'stel-late [bo 8m. 

Wh.Gd,'ykon-8tei'ldt, 

Wk. Wr. 155.] 
Con-atel-la'tion, 112,170. 
Con-ater-na'tion. 
Con'ati-pate, 169. 
Con'ati-pat-ed, 183. 
Con'ati-pat-ing. 
Con-ati-pa'tion. 
Con-atit'u-en-cy, 169. 
Con-atit'u-ent. 
Con'ati-tute, 78. 
Con'ati-tut-ed, 183. 
Con'ati-tut-cr. 
Con'ati-tut-ing. 



lUl; 6 M in there; 46 a§ in t9ot',^Min ladle; gh <u g In go ; ^ m if» v&ia. 

13* 



coNarmrnoif 



150 



OONTINENCT 



CoiI'lti-tB'tlOfl. 

Con-itl-ta'tioii-aL 
CoD-ati-tu'tion-al-ist. 
Con-sti-ta-tion-al'i'^. 
CoQ-sti-tu'tionad 

{-8hund)f 171. 
Con-sti-tu'tioQ'Ut. 
Con'sti-tnt-lTe. 
Ck>n-8traittS 23. 
Con-Btrain'a-ble, IM. 
Con-itriUBed', UQ. 
Con-striin'er. 
Cop-strain'ins^. 
Con-Btrainf. 
Ck>n-Btrict'. 
Con-gtriot'ed. 
Con-strict'lng. 
Con-ttrJc'tion. 
Con-strictlye, Si. 
Con-striofor. 
Con-Btringe'. 
Con-8tiinged'(-c«Wiild') 
Con-Btring'ent (-iUif^'- 

ent), li& 
Con-strinee'iiig. 
Con-Btrucr. 
Con-stracfed. 
CoQ-Btniot'er fC o n * 

8truotor,a03.] 
Con-Btruc'tloa. 
Con-Btruc'tioiiHd. 
Con-Btruo'tion-4«t. 
Con-itnict'Jve. 
Con-Btruct'or [Con- 

Btruoter,203.] 
Con'strue (A;on'«<rM>) 

[so 8m. Wr. } ton'- 

atrUf Yfb. Gd.; kon'- 

atru, or kan'ttWf Wk. 

166.] 

0-**Itl«ftie«idal to 
■emiiMriea of iMminn, 
that the latter pronuBCl»> 
tion [coit'atw-lfliould pre- 
▼ail there." Walter. 

Gon' stnied (-$trood),iSti 
Con'stru-ing {-ttroa-). 
Con-Bub-stan'tial (-ahal) 
Con-Bub-Btaii-ti-4u'i-ty 

C-shX-). 
Ck>n-Bub-BtaQ'tl-ate 

(-^hl-at) [BO Wk. Sm. 

Wr. ; kon-wb-atanf' 

»Mtt, Wb. Gd. 166.] 
Con-snb-Btan-ii-a'tiiMi 

(-»M-). 
Con'Bue-tude (-nM-),171 
Con-8a&-tu'di-nal(-«i0e-) 
Con- Bue-tu'di-na-ry 

(-«i>c-), 72. 
COn'sol^ IS. 
Oon'BuI-age. 
Oon'Bul-ftr [80 Sm. Wr. 



Wb. Gd.$ ko»'alM4art 
Wk. 156.] 

Con'8ul-ate, 73. 

Con-Bult', V. 

Con-Bult', or Coit'solt, 
n.[kon-$ttU',Sm.Wb. 
Gd. ; kon'suU, or k<m- 
9uU', Wk. Wr. 166.J 

Con-8uIt-a'tUm, 

Con-Bult'ed. 

Con-BQlt'er. 

Con-ault'lng. 

Con-sultlTe. 

Con-Bum'a-ble, IMt 109. 

Con-some'. 

Con-Bomed', 183. 

Con-anm'er. 

Con-Bom'ing. 

Con-Bum'mate, «. [ao 
Wk. Sm. Wr.; Istm- 
Mtm'Atf or koH'ntm- 
Mj Gd. 166.] 

Con-Biun'mate, a. 

Con-Bum'mat-ed. 

Con-aum'mat-ing. 

Con^um-ma'tioa. 

Con-aump'tion (-mmmM) 
102. 

CoQ-Bump'tlTe (-nun'-)* 

Con'tact, 18. 

Con-tact'n-al. 

Con-ta'gion (-jun), 171. 

Con-ta'gion-ist (-^ifTt-). 

Con-ta'gio&a (^^tu). 

Con-tain', 23. 

Con-tain'a-ble, UM, 160. 

Con-tain'ant. 

Con-tainedS 160. 

Con<tain'er. 

Con-tain'ing. 

Con-tam'i-nate, 78, 160. 

Con-tam'i-nat-ed. 

Con-tam'i-nat-ing. 

Con-tam-i-na'tion. 

Con-temn' (-ton')* 10& 

Con-temnecp {-iemd'). 

Con-tem'ner. 

Con-tem'ning'. 

Con-tem'pls^ (122) [w> 
Wk. Sm.; honrtem'- 
pUU, or kon'tem-pULt^ 
Gd. 165.1 

Con-tem'plat-ed, 183. 

Con-tem'plat-ing. 

Con-tem-pla'tion. 

Con-tem'pla -tKre. 

Con-tem'plat-or, cr 
Con't«m-piat-or [so 
Wr. ; hon-tem'plnt-or^ 
Wk. ikon'tem-pldt-ort 
Sm. Wb. Gd. 165.1 

Con-tem-po-ra'ae-oaa, 
171. 



Con-tem'po-fs-ry (7^ 
[Cotemporary, 

203.] 

mST Webster and Good* 
rich prefer eo-tetnporaiy. 
But Bmart Woreeeter, 
•ad most wrtlari give the 
preference to 9tm-tempO' 
vary. **I prefer etm-tem' 
porani^^ Myi Dr, Camp- 
Dell, Ho eo-teMfWrary. Tat 
general use in word* com- 
pounded with the iniep- 
arable prepoiition eon m 
to retain tlie n befDre a 
oonionant, and exponge it 
befbre a rowel or an A 
mute.** There are teveral 
exceptloni to the rule re- 
ferred to bj Dr. Campbell, 
•a co-jMirfner, co^MTBener, 
co-repent, eo-tideU^ co-4ti^ 

^BHvi^ n^^^^" B^w^^^ %^a^^^MnW ^^B* • 

Con-tempt'. 15. 
Con-temp'tt-bie (Aon- 

tem'H-bl) (164, \m) 

[so Wk. Sm. Wr.; 

icon^enuA'i^lf Wb. 

Gd. 166J 
Con-temp'n-bly (-fem'-) 
Con-tempt'u-o&B, 89. 
Cou-tend', 16. 
Con-tend'ed. 
Con-tend'er. 
Con-tend^ing. 
Ck>n-tent', a. v. ft o. 15. 
Con-tent'ed. 
Con-tent'ing. 
O>n-ten'tiou. 
Con-ten'tioaa (-a&tit). 
Ck)n-tent'ment. 
Con-tents', or Con'- 

tentB, n,pL[%o Wr. $ 

kon-terUa', Wk. Sm. ; 

kan'tents* or Jbo»- 

tenis', Gd. 166.] 



rorath 



Walker mya of fhit J 
▼oi^that it » is often heard J 
with the aoeent on the flrrt / 
■yllabla.** / 

Con-ter'mi-notts. 
Ck>n-test', v. 16, 103, 161. 
Con'teat, n. 161. 
Con-test'a-ble, 161, 160. 
Con-teat-a'tioii. 
Con-test'ed. 
Con-teat'ing. 
(^n'text, 18. 
Con-text'u-ral. 
Con-text'ure, 91. 
Con-tl-eu'i-ty, 160. 
Con-tig-'u-oas. 
Con'ti-nence, 78, 160. 
Con'ti-nen-oy. 






CaSTlSENT 



151 



CONVEY AALB 



Con'ttHieBt, IML 

Con-ti-aent'aL 

Con-tia'ipeiioe. 

Con-tin'gen-cy, 160. 

Oon-tin'gent. 

Con-tin'u-a-bly, 164. 

Con-tin'u-al. 

CoiMia'a-anee. 

Con-tin-nVtion. 

Con-tin'u-a-tlve, 84, KM. 

Con-tin'ue i-ffoo), 

Con-tin'ued (-yoody, 188. 

Con-tm'u-er. 

Conotin'tt-iBff. 

Con-ti-nu'i-ty, 160. 

Gon-tin'u-o&B. 

Con-tour' (Pr.) Ikot^- 
toor'), 114, 12L 

Con-tort'. 

Con-tort'ed. 

Con-tort'ing. 

Con-tor'tion, 112. 

Con'trft-biiuid. 

Con-tract', v. 103, 161. 

Con'tract, n. 103, 161. 

Con-fra4St'e(L 

Con-tract-i-bU'i-tT. 

Con-tract'i-ble, 164, 160L 

Con-tnotTle, 81, ISSL 

Con-tract'in^. 

Con-trao'tion. 

Con-tract'Ive. 

Con-tract'or. 

Con'trai-danoe [Coun- 
try-dance. 203.— 
Set Country-daBM.] 

Con-tra<dict', 122. 

Con-tra-diet'ed. 

Com-tra-diet'er. 

Con-tra-dicfingf. 

Con-trardle'tloB. 

Con-trardiet'Iy«. 

Oon*tra-dict'or. 

Con-tra-dict'o-rr, 66. 

Con-tra-dis-tine'non. 

Con-tra-dis-tin'gnish 
{.-Ung'gwish), 64. 

Con-tra-dis-tin'ffuislied 
(■iing'gtoUM)^ Note 
C, p. 34. 

C(»-tra-diB-tin'ffaiBh- 
ingr {-iing'gmah-). 

Cottrtral'to (it,). 

Con-tra-mure', 122. 

Con'tra-rfes (-rU), n.pl. 

Con-tra-ri'e-ty, 160. 

Con'tra-ri-ly, 171. 

Con'tra-ry, 72. 

Con'tr&8t, n. lai, 161. 

Con-tr&8t% v.l0:),131,161 

Con-tr&st'ed. 

Con-trast'ine. 

Con-tra-yal-la'tion. 



Con-tra-Tene', 12C 
Con-tra-vened', 165, 18S. 
Con-tra-r«n'er. 
Con-tnKT«n'ing. 
CoB-tra-ven'tion. 
Con-trib'u-U-ry (72) 
[Contributory, 

Con-triVute [noi kon'- 

tri-but, 153, 156.1 
Con-trib'ut-ed, 183. 
Con-trib'ut-lng. 
Con-tri<bu'tion. 
Con-trib'ut-lye. 
Con-trib'iit-or. 
Con-trlb'tt-to^ry [Con- 

tributary,2U3.] 
Con'trite Fto Wk. Wr. 

Wb. Gd.» lw»4rtt', 

8m. 165.] 

ve Um acenit oa In* 
iMt ivUable.'* Waiker. 
— '* Thif word if aeccnted 
both waji. more common- 
l7 on Um irat qrllftMe, 
mors toudattttUj oa tint 
• — Smart. 



Con-tri'tton (trUh'un). 
Con-triT'a-ble, 164, 160. 
Con-triv'anoe, 160. 
Com-triTe'. 
Con-tiiyed', 165, 188. 
Con-triv'er. 
Con-tiiT'ing. 
Con-tror, 24. 
Con-trol'la-ble, 164, 176. 
Con-tr6Ued'(-lr6U0,166 
Con-trol'ler [Co m n - 

troUer, 203. — /Sm 

Comptroller.] 
Con-trolOlnsr. 
Con-taro-yersial i-tkat). 
Con'tro-yer-sy, 160. 
Con'tro-vert. 
Con'tro-Tert-ed. 
Con'tro-yert-ing. 
Con'tro-vert-ist. 
Con-tu-ma'cioue(-«A«M). 
Con'tu-ma-cy, 1:22, 160. 
Con-tu-me'li-ofis. 
Con'tu-me-Iy, 122, 171. 
Contuse' <-tikz'). 
Contused' i-tHzd'), 183* 
Con-tus'ing (-«««'-). 
Con-tu'siou (-zhun). 
Co-nun'dmm, 86. 
Con-ya-lesoe' (-le$'). 
CoB-ya-lesoed'^ i-leU'), 
Con-ya-les'cence, 171. 
Con-va'les'cent. 
Con-ya-lcB'dng. 
Con-vec'tion. 
Con-yen'a-ble, 164, 100. 



Con-T«ne'. 13. 

Con-ycnea', 165, 183. 

Con v^n'or. 

Con-yen' ienoe iy€iu\ 
(171) [BO Wr. Gd.} 
I'on-ve'nj-en^, Wk. 
Sm. 166.] 

Con-yen'ten-cy (-yen-)* 
100. 

Con-y§n'ient (-yen!- ) !«• 
Wr. (}d.j kon-vc^td- 
en/, Wk. 8m. 165. J 

Con'yent, n. 

Ck>n-yen'ti-cle, 164, 171* 

Con-ven'ti-oler, 183. 

Con-yen'tlon. 

Con-yen'tion-aL 

C<m-yen'tion-al-lgm 
(-fzm). 

Con-yen'tloB-a-ry, 72. 

Con-yent'u-al. 

Con-yerge', 21, N. 

Con-yerged', 165, 183. 

Con-yerg'enoe i-verf-). 

Con-yeig'en-ey i^verj'-)^ 
160. 

Con-yerg'ent C-verf-). 

Con-yerg'ing l^verJ'-). 

Con-yer'aa-ble, 164, 160. 

Con'yer-sance [so Gd. ; 
kon'ver-$an$f or ko%^ 
ver^iaM, Wr. 165.J 

Con'yer-santriOO) [so 
8m. Wr. Wb. (Sd.; 
kon'ver-tant, or kon- 
veHsant^ Wk. 165.] 

Con-yer-aa'tion, 112. 

Con-yer-aa'tion-aL 

Con-yer-sa'tion-ist. 

Con-yer'sa-tlye, 72,,84. 

Convert€izione Cit.) 
(kon^ver-§4it-8e-o'na) 
rpl. Conv€r§azioni 
{kon-ver-adt-se-o'ni). ] 

Con-yerse', 21, X. 

Con-yersed' (-«er«t'),183 

Con-ycrs'err 

Con-yers'lng. 

Con-yer'sion. 

Con-yers'Iye. 

Con-yert', 21, N. 

Con-yert'ed. 

Con-yert'cr. 

Con-yert-i-bil'i-ty, 160. 

Con-yert'i-ble, 164, 100. 

Cou'yex [not kon-yeka'* 
163, 166.] 

Con-vex'i-ty, 108, 160. 

Con' vex- ly (93) [so Sm. 
Wr. Wb. Gd.; *o»- 
veks'lff^WlL. 165.] 

Con-vey' (-ra'), 23. 

C!on-yey'a-ble (-va'-),ieO 



fiiUi Oat is there; dbatfofoot; $a«mfiieUe; gb at gin go ;tj| at fntlOf. 



COHVBYAKCB 



Con-Tey'iTn-liig (-tm'-)- 
Con-reyed' {-raii'), ISO. 

Con-Tej-'lDK (-™'-). 
Coiii-vlet',ip.lB,103,Wl. 
Coa'vict, ». lOS, Ifll. 
Coo-vlct'ed. 
CoD-Tlct'ins. 



Con-Tlnceii' (-!■<»('), 
16$. 183. 

Con-vinj'er. 

Coo-vlot'l-ble, IM, IW. 

Coa-Tino'iDE. 

Con-.lv'lsT {180) tao 
Sm. Wb. Qd., ion- 
viv'gat, Wk. 1*5.1 

COD-vlT'ilU-lBt. 



Con-roked' (-oeW), 

Note C, p. 3*. 
Con-vdk'ine. iSi. 
CoD'volulf 

Coo'volat-ed. 

COD-TO-lu'tlDIl, 112. 

Con-yol»e', IS. 
Con-voWed' (^wIHP-), 



Cool'lr, ad. flit's.; 148. 
Coo'lj, n. (MM) [pi. Coo- 

Coom, n.' dirt. [S« 



« drr nller. \See 
CooiB, 180.] 

Coo.pee' [Conpee, 

k»p>lr, or C««*r t» 
8m. Wr. ; ioop^er, 
Wk. i toSp'Br, Vb. 
Gd. lU.] 

Coop'er-sce. 

CCMjp'er-ate, 223. 

Co-op'er-it-ed, 185, 

Ci^<^eT-at-ing:. 

Com>p.er-»'tlon. 

Coop'er-lng. 

Co-or'di-rule, 123. 

Cool, IH. 

Co-p»l'ba (to^M'fta) [lo 



"■si'r 



piil,caplTl,«n.J 



CoitTafl 



Isei' \-mltf), 



Cm.vul'Blv 

Co'ny, or Con'y (tun'tr) I 

ftwGd.;£(/iw, 8m. 1 I 

1™'!', Wk. , tuB'jF.or < 

to'fqi, wt. r ■ 
aa~"liL>itinluiiri]'piv- } 

lbrin1«mDrtikd[ii|.''£nHirJ. ( 

CklO, le. 

Cooed (£ooi{), 188. 

Dfek (ai) f&e Bool 
Cdbked (It^U), 1 

C,n.3t. 
Cabter-y, 9J. 



Cop'per-T, M.' 
Cop'plB (lop'it), \0». 



Cop'ro-tlte, 83, ISS. 



Cop'u-Ute. 
Cop'u-Ut^d. 
Cop'u-Ut-lnff. 
Cop-u-la'tton. 
Cop'u-liMlTe, S4, at 
Cop'j, 180, 170. 
[Copyer, £03. — £1 

Copier.l 
Cop'y-hold. 



Cti^uet'ted l-trt'-), 11 
Co-quet'tlng i-ktt'-). 
CSr's-ile.lSl. 



InpolTpe*. [S« 
1, IM.] 
li'oeoui (^Akeu). 



CCr-il-Hfe 

Co-nl'Ilfonn, 180. 
COr ■l-Ug'e Dotii (-Hf). 
C6r;ta-ITl*,(«, 1^ 

C6r al lold'Bl.' 
Car'a-Dschr.AaJ:] [C r ■ 
anlch.Coronaeh, 

Corb.' 

Corb'an. 

Cor'bell (itoWfteO, n. % 
little basket to be 
filled wdth e»rth,— 
mterm In fortifloitlos. 
[Sf. Corbel, 1(10.1 

Cor-bel. n. s Mulpfnred 

architecture. [.Sm 



CORDIALITY 



153 



CORYBANTIC 



(kord'nal) [kor'd%-<u^ 
Sm. VVb. Gd. ; kord'- 
ycUi or kor'di-nl, Wr. ; 
lor'jv^d, Wk. 134, 
155.1 

Cor-cU^l'i-ty, or Cord- 
ial'i-ty' (-yoi'-) Ikor- 
diaVi^y, Sm. ^b. 
Grd. ; Kord-yi-al'i-ty, 
Wr. J kor-ji-aVi-tyj 
Wk. 131, 165.1 

Cor'di-form, 160. 

Cord'lng. 

Cor'don f Fr.) (kor'dont 
or kor*aOng)lkor'danf 
Wb. Gd.; kor'ddng, 
Sm. ; kor*don, or ibor'- 
dffn^, Wr. 15t, 156.] 

Ctor'do-van. 

Cor'du-roj [bo Sm.Wr.; 
kor-du-roi'y Wb. Gd. 
155.] 

Cord'w-ain-er. 

Core, 24, 163. 

Cored (kdrd), 166, 183. 

Co-ri-a'oeous (-MtM),112 

Co-ri-an'der. 

Co-rin'thi-an, 78, 160. 

Cork, 17. 

Corked {kortt)^ Note C, 

Cork'ing. [p. 34. 

Cork'-tree, 206, £xo. 4. 

Cork'y, 93. 

Cor'mo-rant. 

Com, 17. 

Cor'ne-a, 75, 109. 

Corned (kornd), 16S. 

Cor'nel, 140. 

Cor'ner, 17, 77. 

Cor'nered (-fturd), 166. 

CoWner-ing. 

Cor'net. 

CoWnet-CT, 160. 

Com'field, 206. 

Cor'nloe (-nis), 169. 

Cor'ni-cle, 78, IW. 

Cor-nic'u-late, 73, 80. 

Cor'nl-form, 160. 

Cor'nist. 

Com'^laws (-lawz). 

Cor-fiu-co'pt-a (L.) fpl. 
Cor-nu-co'pi-a^-pi-l), 
108.] 

Cor-nate'. 

Com'y, 03. 

C6r'o-dy [Corrody, 
203.1 

Cdr'ol, ft. a corolla. 
[See Coral, 160.] 

Co-rol'la. 170. 

Cdr-ol-la'oeoas (-shtu). 

Cfir'ol-la-ry (72)[bo Wk. 
Sm. Wb. Gd., tor'- 



rna-ry, or ko-rel'a- 

ryy Wr. ]6o.] 
Cor'ol late. 
Cor'ol-Ut-ed. 
C<3r'ol-let. 
Co-ro'na (L.) Cpl. Co- 

ro'n«(-n«).] 
[Coronaoli, 203. — 

See Coraaach.] 
Cdr'o iiol, n. ft a, [so 

Sm. Wb. Gd. ; ho^rof- 

nal, Wk. J ko-ro'wUf 

or kdr^o-nal, Wr. 166.J 
Cdr'o-na-ry. 72. 
C6r'o-nat-ea. 
Cdr-o-na'tion. 
Cdr'o-ner, 77, 170. 
Cor'o net, 86, 170. 
C6r'o-net-ed. 
Co-ron'i-form, 78, 160. 
Cor'o-noid. 
Cdr'o-nule. 
Cor'po-ral. 
Cor-po-ra'16 (L.), 163. 
Cor'po-ral-ly, 170, 
Cor'po-rate, 73. 
Cor-po-ra'tion. 
Cor'po-rat-or. 
Cor-po're-al, 100. 
Cor-po're-al-ly. 
Cor-po-re'i-ty, 108, 160. 
CoWpo-sant {-zant). 
Corps (Fr.) (kdr) (166), 

n. a body of troops. 

[See Core, 160.] [pi. 

Corps ikOrz).} 
Corpse (korp8)t n. a 

dead hnman body. 

[See Corps, 148.] 
Cor'pu-lence, IflO. 
Cor'pu-len-ey, 160. 
Cor'pu-lent. 
Cor-pus'cle (-ptw'/), 162. 
Cor-pus'en-lar, 108. 
Cor-reef , 15, 105. 
C6r-rect'ed. 
Cdr-rect'ing. 
C6r-rec'tion, 170. 
C6r-rec'tion-al. 
C6r-rect'lve, 84. 
C6r-reot'or. 
C6r-rect'o-ry, 86. 
Cdr're-late. 
Cdr-re-la'tion. 
C6r-rel'a-tTve, 84, 170. 
Cdr-re-apond', 170. 
Cdr-re-spond'ed. 
Cdr-re-spond'ence, 100. 
C6r-re-spond'ent. 
Cdr-re-spond'ing. 
Cor'ri-dor, 78, 170. 
CSr-ri-gen'da (,h,),n.pl. 
Cdr'ri-gent, 78. 



C«r-H pri-Wl'i-ty, 171. 
Cor'ri jfi-ble, IW. 
Cor-ri'val, 
C/cir-ri'val-ry. 
Cttr-rob'o-rant. 
('dr-rob'o-rate, 170. 
Cor-rob'o-rat-ed. 
Cdr-rob'o-riit-iug. 
Cdr-rob-o-ra'tioa. 
Cor-roVo-ra tire. 
Cor-rob'o-ra-to-ry, 86. 
corrode', 24. 
C<ir-r6d'ed, 183. 
Cdr-rod'ent, 160. 
Cdr-rdd'ing. 
Cdr'ro-dy [Corody, 

203.] 
Cdr-ro'sion {-zhun), 
Cdr-ro'slve, 84. 
Cor'ra-gant, 170. 
Cdr'ru-gate, 66, 80. 
Cdr'm gttt-ed, 183. 
Cdr'ru-gat-iug. 
Cdr-ru ga'tion, 112. 
Cdr'ru-gat-or. 
Cfir-ru'gent (-«»'-), 2flL 
C6r-rupt', 22. 
C5r-rupt'ed. 
C6r-rupt'er. 
C6r-rupt-l-bil'i-ty, 160. 
Cdr-rupt'i-ble, 78, 164. 
Cdr-rupt'i-bly. 
Cor-rupt'ing. 
Cdr-rup'tioB. 
Cdr-mpt'Tve. 
Cor'sair (sir), 171. 
Corse (tor«), or Cdrae 

(Wr») [so.Gd. ; kor$, 

Sm.; kdrs^Wk.i kOr$, 

or tor«, Wr. 156.] 
Corse'let (iwr»'-), 171. 
Cor' set. 
Cor'si-can, 78. 
C .rs'ned. 

Cor'tegei Fr.)(tor'«t«fc). 
Cor*tes (Sp.) (toH^), 

n.pl, 
Cor'ti-cal, 78. 
Cor'tl-«ate. 
Cor'tl-cat-ed. 
Cor-ti-eifer-ofis 108, 
Cor-tl^'i-form, 78, 160. 
Co-nun'dmm. 
Co-rus'cant. 
Co-rus'cate [so Sm. 

Wr. ; kSr*ui-bM, Wb. 

Gd. 155.] 
Co-rus'cat-ed, 183. 
Co-rus'cat-ing. 
C6r-u8-ca'tion. 
Cor-vette' (Fr.), 114,171. 
Cor'vlne, 82, 152. 
Cor-y-ban'tlc. 



lUl, 0<M In there; db a« in foot ; 9 a« •« ftdle, ghiu gin go ;^a« in this. 



CCr'ymb, 1! 



COr-j-|)be'ui (L.) [I 
pi. Cor-y-phte'i i Klog 
tl. Cor-y-phe'QUs 



Co'Bey tio'iV) [Co.T, 
Co'st-ly (-1I-), 78,93. 
Co'iriiw, 1S2. 
Cos-mct'je (tm-), 
Cat-meCie-iil llvs- 
CoB'mia (J»2'-j. 
Coi'mirHil ikot'- ). 
Coi'mle-il-ly {I91'-}. 
Cot-vnag'o-itl (toi-i. 

CoB-mo-gon'k-il (toj-). 
COH-mog'o-nlBt rlxu-). 
Oas-BK^o-nj (im-). 
COB-mof 'n-pher Itoz-), 



CoBt'ly, i3, 
COHt'ras-rv, 7 
CoatuiiiL-' (1 



fContempor.rr, 

liut. — See ContempO' 

mry.j 
CB-te-rti (Fr.Xtt-U-rl''. 

!«o wit. Wr. Gd. . 

lo[.<.n', Sin. lU.lU.j 
Co-thuni'ate. 
Co-lhurn'it-ed. 
Co-tlc'u-lu, lOS. 
Co-tld'al. 
Co-tll'lou Ito-m'mn] 

ttoV/r.Wb.Gd.iio^ 

tit'jiSngjSm. ; to-tO- 

finff'.Wt. iH, IK.] 
Cotillon, Cotll. 
Ian,2(».] 



Col'ton Ikot'n), 1«. 

Cof ton-T Itat'a-K). 
Co-lyl-e'd™ (171) [bO 

Km. Wb. Gd. ; kol-a- 

Wdon, Wr. 16S.] 
Co-tTl-e'don-oli8 ' fiio 

Gd.; tol-u-lal'o^U, 

8m. Wr. iSs.i 
Co-trl'l-rorm, is, lU. 
Cot'y.lold. 
LCou'Dge, 303.— 3te 

Cowhage.] 
Couch, %. 
Coucli'ui.eT. 
Caui^h'int, ira. 
Couched Itouckt). 
a*-c»«C( Fr-Xioo-rt*' ) 

Cou'Enrptoo'-). 
Cougt (ifljS, 18, N. 
Conshcd [W/ll, Bote 

rCo'nii»Be.a03, — See 
CowhBKe.J 

Conid (jSdi, isa. 

Coul'ler [Colter, MB.] 



COUKTEBMAND 



DerofiicounctL [«« 

CouDBellDr, Mk] 

[Councilor, Wb. 

Od.-Jta^Sec 177, *Dd 

Note E, p. 70.1 
Coun'Bcl.n.uivlce. [S«e 

CouDdl, 14G.] 
Coun'»ell«i l-ttld) 

[ConliBelEd, Wb. 

(id. aos. — See l7T,uid 

HotrE.p. 70.1 
Conn'Bel-llng TConn- 

seliDK, Wb. Gd. 

Coun'Bel-lor, n.one who 
gives Hdyice, [See 
CounciUor, SiS.] 
[CounBclor, Wb. 

Gd.ao3.| 



Coun'te-nSDCB. t«S. 
Coun'te-nBBced (-nimti) 



CoDn-teT-bal'Bn; Ing. 

CouSjtcr^ftltljSi, 171. 

Coun'ter-ftlt-er.' 
CouD'ter-fdMng:. 
CoDD.ter-nuud'; >. IH, 



i,i,i,6,b,f. kmg j 1, e, I, 0, U, f , ikort i k of la Ar, > 



COUHTEUIAND 



156 



COWdUP 



Coan'ter-Buoid. «• Ml. 
Coun-ter-muid'ed. 
Coun-ter-mand'iiig. 
Coim-ter-maroh', v. lAl. 
Coan'ter-marob, n. Idl. 
Coon-ter-mark', v. ML 
Coao'ttf-mark, n. 161. 
Coon-ter-mine', v, Ml. 
Coun'ter-mine, «. Ml. 
Coun-ter-mure', «. 181. 
Coim'ter-mure, n. Ml. 
Coun'ter-pane. 
Coun'ter-part. 
Coun-ter-plof , v, l(n. 
Coun'ter-plot. n. Ml. 
Coun-ter-plot'ted, 176. 
Coun-ter-plot'tlsg. 
Comi'terilMint. 
Conn-ter-poiBe' {-poiz'), 

V. 161. 
Coun'ter^oiae (-fiote}, 

n. 161. 
Ooun-ter-jMiaed' 

i-poizd% 166. 
Coun-ter-poia'ing 

(-poii?-)* 183. 
Coun-ter-ngn' (-<f»'),v. 

161, 162. 
Conn'ter-og^ 0^**)* *• 
Coim-ter-rignea' [ML 

(-rtwfO* MS. 
Coun-terHUgfn'iiiir 

Coim-tor-gink', vJMp.61. 
Coan'ter-sink, n. ML 
Coun-ter-vail'. 
Conn ter-riUed', 16& 
Coim-ter-Tidl'iiifi[. 
Coun-ter-yal-la'Qoii. 
Coun-ter-weigh' C-wdf). 
Coon-ter-weighea' 
l-wltd% 162, 166. 
Coaii-ter-weiB:h'iiiff 

Coun'ter-weight (-^pM). 
Count^eaa, 22& 
Counting. 
Cofin'tri^ied (iam'-), 

78, 171. 
Cottn'tiT ikunf'), 22, 93. 
Cofiii'try*danoe JTC o n - 

tra-aaaoe,203.] 

nappoMd to be eofraptad 
from OmUra-dtuiea (s 
danoe in which the perliee 
■taad oppoeite to oae 
anotherX '* •• thoorh,'* to 
nee tiie w twdt of Trench, 
■^it wen the dance of the 
conntiy folk end mnl die- 
tricCs, M centraated with 
the qnadriHe and walta, 
and more artlAeial daaeee 
of the town.** 



Coun'tj, 28, 93. 

Coup de maim (Fr.) 

{koo'tkA-mang'). 
Ckmp d**M (Fr.) {Jhoo^- 

dA-tdf), 
C<nM^d*4aiP <Fr.) iboth 

duhW) [ao Sm. ; koo- 

401', Wr. Od. 166.1 
Ckmn^i (Fr.) {boo-pV). 
Cou-pee' {koo^) 

rCoopee,203.T 
Cottp'le itup'l)f Idi. 
Cottp'tod (bupfld), 
Cofipaet ikup'-), 22. 
Co&p'UBg (kup'-), 
Cou-ponT (Fr.) (koo- 

pong'). 
Cottr'age (ibMr'-)* 1^- 
Coar-a'geoua (Mfvo'- 

itM), 171. 
C!ou-riint' (JwhrmU^ 

[ao Wk. Wr. Gd.; 

loo-rSiU', 8m. 155.1 
Cou'rl-€r (Fr.) (fcoo^t- 

ur) [ao Sm. Go. ; koo- 

rer^, Wk.; koofriTt 

Wr. 154, 165.1 
Cdurae {kOra), 21. 
Covraed ik9r8t\ M3. 
Cours'er (k5rr-). 
Cdars'lng (lOrs'-). 
Court (l:0K),2i. 
Court'ed. 
Court'e-ottB (kurt^e-us^U 

or Cdurt'eoi&a (kSrr- 

yu9) fao Wr. ; kurt'e- 

tM, (jrd. ; knri'ytu, 

Sm. ; £«r'cAe-i», Wk. 

134, 155.] 
Cdort'er. 
Co&rt'e-saii (kwri-&- 

zan'f or kun'e-zan) 

[kurt-e-zan', Wk. Sm. 

Wr. •, kur^te-zant Wb. 

Gd. 155.1 
Collrt'sled (kurt'»id)^ 

171, 186. 
Cofirt'e-ay (kwHte-ap) 

Courte'ay (kurt'sp) 
(148), n. a beadinff and 
depreaalon of the oodv 
by a woman or a iriri, 
expressire of ciyiUtr : 
— i t^. to make a oourte- 
BY. [Curtsy, 203.1 

Cofirte'ay-ing (kurt'-). 

Court'ier (kort'yur)lnoi 
kort'i-ur, 145, 153.J 

Cdurt'Iineas, 7B, MO. 

Cdurt'Ung. 

Court'ly, 193. 



CQui'HBMr'tial (•«ftal)b 
205, 216. 

CoOA^in (tea'n) (m\ 
n. one related to 
another, aa the chil- 
dren of brotbera and 
alatera. [See Coien, 

ieo.i 

Co&a'In-gor'man (iNw'- 

fi-) [pi. Coua'ina-ger'- 

man {ktu'n*-), iw.} 
Cove, 24. 

Cov'e-nant (Imv'-), 169. 
Cov'e-nant-ed {ktiiv'-). 
0ov-04i«nt-ee' (ibvo-). 
CoT'e^iant-er ikwf'-% 

160. 
CoWe-nsnt-ing (inv'-)* 
Cor'e-nant-or (inM^-), 

160. 
[Corenona, 203.— 

^MCoTinooa.] [Law 

term.l 
Cov^er (kuv'ttr), 22, 77. 
Coy'ered (kuv'urd)^ M6. 
Cov'er-er (ifcwi;'-). 
Cov'er-ing (*i«r-)- 
CoT'er-let (kwf-). 
Cov'ert (kuv*-), 171. 
Cor'ert-ure (tawr'-). 9L 
Coy'et iknv'ei), 22. 
Cov'et-arble(tov'-),164k 
CoT'et-ed (ijtiv'-). [169. 
CoT'et-ing {ktn/-). 
Cov'et-oOs (ktwf-) \noi 

kuv'e-ehaa, 153, 156.] 
Cor'ey {kuv'v), 22, 9S. 
Cov'in (^kuv'in). 
Cov'ing. 
CoWin-otta [Coven- 

o u a , 203.] 
Cow. 28. 
Cow'ard, 72. 
Cow'ard-Toe (-if), MQl 
Cowed {kowd)f 165. 
Cow'er. 

Cow'ered (-wd), 166. 
Cow'er-ing. 
Cow'hage [Coaage, 

CowTtoh,203.] 
Cow'ing. 
[Cowlloh. 203.— Sl0 

Cowhage.] 
Cowl, 28. 
Cowled {kowld), 
Cow'llok, 206. 
Co-work'er (-lonri;'-)* 
Cow'-poz [Cow- 

pocK,208.] 
Cow'ry, 190. 
CoValip [Cow's-llp 

{kowz'Up), Wb. Oa. 

203.] 



ftUi 6itf intbere; 6b«f tnfoot} 9iMl»fiHsUesgha«giogo;^a«ltitbis. 



teXOOMB 



156 



CBENSLLE 



Cox'efimb ikoks'lOm), 

39, N. ; 162. 
Cox'oomb-ry (-kOm-). 
Cox-com'lo-al. 
Coy, 27. 
Coz'en {kuz*n') (140), V. 

to cheat. [See Cous- 
in, 160.] 
Coz'en-afi;e (kuz^n-). 
Coz'eaea (kuz'nd), 
Coz'en-er (kuz'n-). 
Coz'en-ing (Jcuz'n-). 
[C o X e y , 2U3«~ «9ee Co- 

sey.] 
[Cozr, 208. — ;9ee Co- 

sey.] 
Crab, 10. 

Crab'-ap'ple, 205. 
Crab'bed, 66, N. ; 170. 
Crab'by. 

Crab'-tree, 206, Exc. 4. 
Crab'yaw. 
Crack, 10, 181. 
Cracked (Jcrdkt), Kote 

C, p. .34. 
Crack'er. 
Crack'ing. 

Crack'le<*rat'i), 164. 
Crackaed {krdk'ld)^ 183. 
Crack'Ung. 

Oro-co'r»-«nn€(Fr.),171. 
Cra'dle, 164. 
Cra'dled ikra'dld), 183. 
Cra'dling. 
Craft, 12, 131. 
Craft'I-ly, 78, 03. 
Cralt'i-ness, 160. 
Craft'y. 
Crag, 10. 
Crag'ged (-flrfcaf), 138, 

176. 
Cragf'gi-ness (-^W-). 
Crag'gy {-ghy), 138. 
Cram, 10. 
Cram'bo. 

Crammed {kramd), 176. 
Cram'mer. 
Cram'ming. 
Cramp, 10. 
Cramped {krampt), 
Cramp'ing'. 
Cramp'i-ron (-l'«m). 
Cram-poons' (-poons), 

n,pl. 122. 
Cran'age. 
Cran'ber-ry [not kram'- 

bgr-ry, 163, 166.] 
[Cranch, 203. — ^^ee 

Craunch.] 
Crane, 23. 

Cranes'bill (kranzf-)fiH 
Cra'nl-al, 78, 160. 
Cra-ni-og'no-my, 108. 



Cri-iii-o-log'io-al(-l(;/'-). 
Cra-ni-oPo-giat. 
Cra-ni-ol'o-gy, 10^>. 
Cra-ni-om'e-ter, x08. 
Cra-ni-o-met'rio-al. 
Cra-ni-om'e-try, 108,160. 
Cra-ni-OB'oo-py, 108. 
Cra'ni-um, 78, 160. 
Crank Ikrangk), 10, 64. 
Crftn'kle {Jcrang'kt), 64, 

164. 
Cran'kled (krangfJOd), 

183. 
Cran'kling {krana*-)^ 
Crank'y (Jcrangk^y), 
Cran'nied (,kran'id),l71, 
Cran'ny, 66, 170. 
Crants. 

Crap'au-dXne, 82, 152. 
Crape, 23. 
[Crapnel, 203. — 5e6 

Grapnel.] 
Cra'pu-la (L.Hbo Sm. j 

krap'u-lat Wr. Wb. 

Gd. 164, 165.] 
Crap'tt-lenoe, 169. 
Crap'tt-lent, 106. 
Crap'tt-lofis. 
Crash, 10, 46. 
Crashed (krtuht)^ Note 

C, p. 34. 
Crash'ing. 
Cras'sa-ment, 170. 
Cras'si-tude, 160, 170. 
Cratch. 10, 44. 
Cratch'-Cra'dle (205) 

rScratch-Craale, 

Cratcn'es (-«?), n. ph 

Crate, 23, 163. 

Cra'ter, 23, 77. 

Cra-t6r'I-form, 78, 160. 

CrUunch (IrSncA) 
[Cranch, 203.] 

Crdunched (krUncM), 

Cnlanch'ing {krUnch'-), 

Cra-vat', 121. 

Crave, 23, 163. 

Craved, 165. 

Cra'ven (jfcm'w), 140. 

Crav'er. 

Crav'lng. 

Craw. 17. 

Craw'flsh [Cray- 
fish, 203.] 

Crawl, 17. 

Crawled, 165. 

Crawl'er. 

Crawl'ing. 

[C ray fish , 203. — 5m 
Crawfish.] 

Cray'on, 23, 86. 

Graze, 23. 



erased, 166, 183. 

Cra'zi-ly, 78, 93. 

Cra'zl-ness, 160. 

Craz'ing. 

Cra'zy, 160. 

Creak, v. to make a 

harsh, grating noise : 

— n. a harsh noise. 

[See Creek, 160.] 
Creaked (krBkt). 
Creak'ing. 
Cream, 13. 
Creamed, 166. 
Cream'ing. 
Cream'y. 
Cre'auoe. 
Crease, 13. 
Creased (krlst), Note Q 

p. 34. 
Cre-ate*. 
Cre-at'ed, 183. 
Cre-at'lng. 
Cre-a'tion. 
Cre-at'Ive, 84. 
Cre-at'or, 228. 
Creat'ur-al (-yiir-), 01. 
Creat'ure (9i) {krit'ynr) 

[so Wr. Gd.-rJkre'ture, 

coll. kret'8h*oor, Sm. ; 

kre'chUr, Wk. 26; 44^ 

Note 1 ; 165.] 
Cre'denoe, 169. 
Cre-den'dum (L.) [pL 

Cre-den'da, 108.] 
Cre'dent. 

Cre-den'tial (shal). 
Cred-i-bil'i-ty, 78, 160. 
Creda-ble, 78, 164. 
Cred'i-bly, 93. 
Cred'it, 16, 170. 
Cred'it-a-ble, 164, 160 
Cred'it-a-bly. 
Cred'it-ed. 
Cred'it-ing. 
Cred'it-or. 
Cre-du'li-ty, 78, 08. 
Cred'u-lotts, 89. 
Creed, 13. 
Creek (13) [no* krik, 127, 

153],n. a rivulet. [Set 

Creak, 160.] 
Creek'y, 160. 
Creep, 13. 
Creep'er. 
Creep'ing. 
Cre'nate. 
Cn^nat-ed. 
Cren'a-ture. 
Cren'el-late, 170. 
Cren'el-lat-ed, 183. 
Crcn'el-lat-ing. 
Cren-el-la'tion. 
Cre-nelle'. 



1 
\ 






& e. i> d, tt, y, long} ft, S, 1, 5, 11, f, short} Jiatin tu, km in fiurt, kasi» 



Cnn'dled (-<J(i). 

Cre'ole. 



Cre-o-i 



te, 171. 



Crep'1-Ute, IW. 

Crep'l-Ut-«d, 183. 
Cr«p'i-tat-]D^. 

Crept, la 






n-lw, SB, 1 



Crea'iet, KD. 

Cnat'tUlen (-fiaeln). 

Cn-U'osoiu l-iJuui,! 12. 

Cre'Ho. 

Cre'tln-iBiiir-lm), 136. 
Ci'e-vlUte' (t'rO- 



Cnw'el tkroo'-), n. ■ 
UudofvunorirorR- 
ed. [Sm Cruel, lao.] 



Crim'i-iut-lTe. 
Clim'i-u-to-rj, 8S. 

Crlmpal Itrimpi). 

Crim'ple, IM, 

Crim'pled ikrim'piai. 

Clim'plliur- 

Crim 'eoulkrim'iii), 1 W. 

Crlm' Mined l-tnd), lU. 

Crt'niMd. " 

Criuifeik (Mnid). 

CrtDKa'lliiK. 

CrinK'«r<trt.^'-l. 

C^^sleVMniF^a^, M. 
Ciio-I-«iiI('ii-nl. 
Cri-nlg'er-aas {-»()"'-). 

Crtn'lde (iriM'tl), H. 
Crlu'klfld itHnfUd). 
Crtn'kUDg (jL-Hh^'-J. 

Cri-noid'cl. 

Cri-Dold'^on. IN. 
CriD'o-Une, 82, IS2 [lul 
krin'o-lin, 143.1 



Crnet.] 
Crib, 16. 
(Mintage, i; 
CTibb«d;i6i, 
CribT)ing. 



Crlb'rl-form, 78. 
Crteli'toa-lte (Mi-) [lo 



Criek. 

Criok'ct, IB. 

Crkk'et-er. 

Cri'coid [mi Sm. Wr 

MJfM, Od. 1U.I 
Cifal,lSS. 
Cri'er. 

Crlm'l-n^, 143, KM. 
Crim-t-OBl'l-ty. 
Criiii'1-nal-W, 170. 
Crira't-nate, 72, 1». 
Crlin'i-iut«d. 
Ciim'l-nal-lug. 



dun (■<fa*i), in. 
me' CFr-Xtri4(^) 

CAi'mI-Idk ikriA). 

CntieA IkrBit), Not* 

C,p.3l. 
CrAiiL'ei, n. one who 

«rciiilu. IStt Croksr, 

■w.l 
ak'Iui 



Creak'Iug. 

Civ'clmi(-ckti),>.nl. 
Cm-diet' (Fr.} (fro- 
Crock, IS, IHl. [(Ik)'}. 



Crock'er^T^ 133, iL 



e-au, Wk.: hv^«- 






Gd.ikTDk'- 

CT«fl-dU'l-u [n 
■pelled br Gd. ^ 

(f;oc(.dlU«n. 

Cmc-O^Ul'l-tT, WS, 



Crlf Ic, 18, 17 
Crlt'i&-' -" 



Crlt'io-»l-lT. 
Crlt'l-dae (.»isU7S,ae) . 
rCrltieiie,Bin. a)3.j 
bit'l-elsed i-tizd). 
Crlt'i-oiii-er (-til). 
CrlVi-^l-tng i-IU). 



j(-ta*),17L 

Cro'nr, IBO. 
Crdbk [See Book.] 
Crdbk'ed. 
Crdbk'ine. 

Cro'eiered (-ikurd), US. 
Croa'let [CroaaUt, 

an.] 

Crosa (IS, N.). 

Croei'Ur, 209. 

CroBs'-blUed. 
. CroBHd (trSK), Hota 

C, p. M. 
, CroBS'-ejred (-Id). 
. CroBB'inff. 

CrosaJ-legged j-i^d). 

Crotdi, IS, M, 
CrotcJied (kroclit), UO. 



• CM <n there ) Ob u <i> f iM>t i p OB te Acil* ; gh Of g Ih go i t 



Croup (i™«i). W. 
Crsa -puts' (jerao-y. 
Crou'pl-«r (bro»'pt-mr). 
CrwtfKroBt.MS.] 

CMffed (brtd), UL 
Crowd, as. 
Crowd 'ed. 

Crowd'lng. 
CrSw'frJ&t, 

Crownla, 
Crowned, W. 

Crowo'-wbecL 
Craw'i'-Obt (kr»t'-), 

213. 
Cru'd4l (lcroo>MM-al) 
(bo Wk. 8iB. Wr. i 
l-r«'iAaf, Wb. Od. 

Cra'aT-nM (trw'dkl-aO 
[90 Wk. Sm. Wr. i 
Irfl'lUt, Wb. Od. 

Cru'iJ-ble (*««'-), 78, 



Cm'ol-ffed, UC. 

Cth'cI-Ai ihroa'-i, 78, 

Cru-d-flic'lon <*ro<M»- 

fiflhun), 171, 
Cru'di-fbriD (£nw'-}. 
Cro'cl-n Itroo'-), M. 
Cru'd^ing {tno'-' 



•if-h " 



(inw- 



Ctd'oiU (Ima'-). 
Crude ikrood), 1>. 
C™'dl-tf(ibri»'-), 78,93. 
Cni'il (inw'-), o. oo- 
feellns. [5« Crewal, 

Cm'el-tr (itroo'-J. 
Crn'ot (fc™'-) [Crow- 

Cmlw, W.] 
CrulH (:fercMH) r«>< 
kroot, 1M, ISS], «. to 

«- « rOVlElS' TOTftffO. 

[S« Cnwi, pL at 

Craw, IM.] 
Cmlud itroozd), 189. 
Cmii'or (ibr«u' -)- 




[Crammed, a03.] 

Cnimb'iiuf (jtrun'-) 

[Crnmmlng.aM.] 

Crum'bled (Icnm^bld). 

(^".m'nu^'e, IM, 150. 



im'pled (tnxa'rtit). 



I'pltoB. 



Crup'perfjbmp'ur, or 
fa^'«r) [W'w. 
Wk.Sm. Wr.il-roip'- 
■r, Wb. GiL liS.I 

Cni'ril (troo'-). 

Cru-atid«' (tnw-), 131. 

Cru-Md'er (ta-oo-), 18S. 

Gru-BAd'ing {kroo-}. 

Crote, n. fiiraiit) Itu* 
krooi, lai, U.?.] 



Crr'iiw, 18«. 

Crj-oph'o-r«l (-*/-). 
Crypt, Ifl. 
Crjp'tlc. 



Grya-Ul-lii'a-ble, 104. 
CiTI.t»l-ll-»'tkHU 
CryB'tal-lize, l?0.ai2. 
Crji'til-Uied, IW, 181. 
Cry§.|a].log'ra-pbor. 
Crj B-l«l' Id -gr wb'lo, lOf. 
CrTi4il-lo«niA'le«l, 

IDS. 
Crr»4il4ag'ra-phr, H8^ 



Cubbed (tuMO UO.ITS. 

Cubibj^lB. 
Cube, 30. 



Cu'blt, HO. 

Cu'bit^I, 228. 

CD'bit^d. 

Cu'boid. 

Cii-boid'iL 

Cuck'ine-ctool. 

Cuck'oo ' [UU'oo), iO, 

Cn-oul'!ite <170) [t» 



at, Wb. Gd. 1U.1 
?a.cul'litred [la Wk. 
Sm. Wr.; iu'*»J.a(- 
cd, Wb. Gd. ISS.] 



Crutched IkrutU). 
CroMhtig, 



CtrOURBIT 

Ca'oar-bit [Ciievr- 

bite,203.] 
Oi-eur-bi-ta'oeoaB 

Cad, 22. 

Cud'bear (-&«r), 171. 
Cud'die, IM. 
Cud'dled (kud^ld)^ 183. 
Cud'dling. 
Cud'dy, 170. 
Cud'gel, 149. 
Cttd'gelied {-jeid) (166) 

rCudfl'eled, Wb. 

Gd.20».— .Se0i77,aiid 

Note £, p. 70.] 
Cud'gel-ler [C a d g e 1 - 

e r , Wb. (Jd. 203!] 
Cud'gel-Uiiff [Cadflrel- 

i]ig,Wb.Gd.2(3.] 
Cud'weed. 
Cue (itft), 26. 
Cuff, 22, 173. 
Cuffed ik^ft). Note C, 

p. 3i. 
Cuff^ing. 
Coi-rags (kwi-rU^t or 

kwBf-rm) (171) [io 
- Wr. J Jcwi-Totfy Wk. 

Wb. Gd.; l!i0f'ra«, 

8m. 16S.J 
Cui-ras-sier', (iwl-fflM- 

aer'), 122, 171. 
Cuish (kwU), 
Cnl-dee' (121) [bo Wk. 

Sm. Wr. ; kmffdM^ Wb. 

GKl. IfiS.I 
Cu-Uf'i-form, 78, IdO. 
Cu'U-narry, 72, 171. 
Cull, 22. 
Culled, 165. 
CInllen-der [ColftH- 

der,203.] 
Cnll'er, n. one who 

enlls, or Kleoto. \89e 

Color.] 
Cnll'ing. 
Cull'ion (-ywi). 
Cul'Ui. 

Cul'ly, 170, 190. 
Culm, 22, 133. 
Cul-mlf er-ofis, !€& 
Cul'ml-nate. 
Cul'ml-nat-ed, 183. 
Cul'mi-iiit-ixig. 
Cul-ml-na'tion. 
Cnl-pa-Ul'i-tY, 106, V&k 
Cul'p^^ble, m. 
Cnl'prit, 22. 
Cnl'tl-Ta-bie, 104. 
Cul'ti-Tit4i-ble, 104. 
Cul'ti-yate, 160. 
Cul'tf-Tat«d, 183. 
Cul-ti-Ta'tioa, 112. 



169 

Cul'tl-Tit^r. 
Cul'trate. 
Cul'trit-ed. 
Cul'tri-ibim, 109. 
Cult'ure. 91. 
Cul'ver-m. 
Cul'vert, 22. 
Cul'ver-tail. 
Cttl'ver-taUfd. 
Cum'bent, 169. 
Oim'ber, 104. 
Cum'bered (-fturtl), 166. 
Cum'ber-ing. 
Cum'ber-aome (-mmr). 
Cum'branoe, 169. 
CJum'bri-an, 169. 
Cum'brotts. 
Cum'finey (98, 109) 

[Comfrey,203.] 
Cum'in, 170. 
Cu'mu-ia-tlTe, 81. 
Cu'mu-loae [so Wb. 

(>d. ; CO WW W <^ Wr. 

165.] 
Cu'mu-lo-«Ir-ro*ttni'* 

tus. 
Cu'mn-lo-0tra'ta«, 224. 
Cu'mu4u» (L.) [pi. Cuf- 

m«-A, 198.] 
Cu'ne-al, 169. 
Ca'ne<ate. 
C^u'ne-at-^d. 
Cu-ne'i'ibnii, 169. 
Ca'nI-form, 106. 
Cun'ner, 170. 
Cun'ning, 170. 
Cup, 22. 
Cnp'board {JbA'hwrd) 

(Vote C, p. 34) [bo 

Wk. Wr. Gd. ; kub*- 

bordf 8m. 155.1 
Cu'pel rC o p p e 1 , 203.] 
Cu-pel-Ia'tlon, 170. 



Cup'ftil (^0> 107. 
Cu-pid'l-ty, 170. 
C!u'po-la [not ka'pa-ld, 

127, 163.] 
(Tupped (teupt)f 176. 
Cnp'per. 
Cup'piiiff. 
Cn'pre-ouB, 170. 
C«-prireiM>fis, 106. 
Cu'pule. 
Cu<pu-lifer-ofis. 
(?ur,21. 

Cur-a-bUa-ty, 160. 
Cur'a-ble, 164. 
Cn-ra-eda' (Aw-fO-iO') 

(171) [80 Sm. (M.; 

JKHHTt-m/, Wr. 165.] 
Oi'ra-oy, 169. 
CuHnaa'Bdw, 170. 
Cu'rate, 49, N. 



CUITAIMD 

CKr'a4lTe. 

Ctt-ra'tor, 86. 

Curb, 21. 

Curbed, 166. 

Curbing. 

Curb'roof, 206, Xzo. 8. 

Cur-cu'li-o, 169. 

Cur'ca-ma. 

Curd, 21. 

Curd'ed. 

Curd'iHMM, 109. 

Curd'lng. 

Cur'dle, 164. 

Cur'dled (4»»r'42d), 188. 

Cur'dling. 

Card'y, 93. 

Cure, 26. 

Cured, 165, 183. 

Cur'er. 

(TurTew (->•), 171. 

Curbing, 183. 

Cu-ri-o-iog'lo i-k^-y 

Cu-ri-o«'i-1y, 106, 1601 

Cu'ri-olU. 

Curl, 21. 

Curled {iMrlO}, 166. 

Curl'er, 77. 

Cur'lew (-/a), 171. 

Curl'i-neBS, 169. 

Curl'lng. 

Curl'y, 93. 

Cur-mud'geon (fmS'- 

«n), 171. 
(Tttr'rant (170) [bo Sm. 

Wb.Gd.Wr.jMr'om 

Wk. 165], n. 
C;fir'ren-cy, 169, 170. 
Cttr'rent, a. 169. 
CHr-rl'cle, 16ft, 170. 
C«r-ric'ic-lttm (L.) [pi. 

Cir-ric'M4a, 196.1 
C&r'ried (k^id), 186. 
CttWri-er, 169. 
Cur'rish, 21, 170. 
Cttr'ry, n.St»,ZL 
Cttr'ry-ing. 
Curse, 21. 
Cursed (Jturif), Note C* 

p. 34. 
Curs'ing. 
Cur'slre. 
Cur'so-rl-ly, 169. 
Cnr'so-ri-ness. 
Cur'so-ry, 96. 
Curt, 21. 
Cur-taU'. 
Cur'tail-^og. 
Oir-tiUled' r4i<ir)» 165. 
Cur-tail'er. 
Cur-tail'ing. 
Cur'tain (fair'MM) [not 

kaWtn,] 163. 
Cnr'taXned (-«»<()« IM* 



Mk;^a$k^thiBfi Oba»ii»l6ot}9a«ii»ftoUeigha«gt»gOitba«i»tbi» 



[Cart.j, 3Ce.-8n 



Od. ; kmr-vet', Wk. 
hir'eei, or *iir-«w*' 
Wr. iSi.) 
CoF'Tl-llD'e-al, leg. 



Caah'st (jbiuaft'of), 3). 
Cuh'iou(ib»>t'un), 171. 
CDibltnud (JbAiA'und). 



Cuato'di-iil. 
CuB-to'dl-ui, im. 

Cot'tCMly, 8fl, m. 
Cos'lom, 22, ia». 
CnB'tom-*-ble, IM, IM 
Cll«'toIB-.n.ljr. 
Cua'tom-a-rr, a. 72. 

Cua'tomedi^nimJ), 17 
CuB'toni-er. 



:ii-tic'u-Ur, 108. 



Cuf porM, IMS. 
Cot^, ITS. 
Cof UuiM, MS. 
Cnt^ne, ITS. 
Cot'tlsTdah. 



Ct-ai'o-g«ii, 170. 
CT-*-DOiu'e-leT, 108. 



Cro'lle. 
Cye-llo-*!. 

Cj'alo-ETlph (127) [» 
Sm. «>. i ritio-pTOf, 
Gd. 1GG.1 

Cf'olold. 

Cy-clold'al. 

C;-dofd'l4n. 

Cv-clom'e-tTT. IW. 

Cy-clo-p«'dl-. l-pf-) 
[CTelopedU,»n.1 

Cr-ofo-pe'Bn, lio. 

CT-slo-ped'lc, IW. 

Cy-tlo-ped'lc-il, 108. 

Cv-ilop'ir. 



8w«n. [S 
rl-ln-der, i; 



'^p 



Cj'D«lClni.,a)3.] 
(^-nuT'(m)[SiinH] 

Cym'hl, n, ■ kind < 
miiBlcal InBtnimen 
[Sw ambil, 1«0.] 

Cym'bl-Jonn, IW. 

Cjme, 2S. 

C^'moK, or Cf-mos 



im', Wr. 



S.1 
( (,-nang'tt). 



Cy-o«n'i 
CJ-nui'l...... 

Cjm-UTj-lom'n-ehrC-*!!). 

C^'I-cInd i-tfxm), 130. 



Cr'ni 



«[so 



r Cfn'fl 



;/pre>. ()?jU.skind 



Cjp'rl-"- 

Cyp'Hoe, «, UX. 
Cj'pcua, H. I (bin, 
tnoBpufnt, bUck 

Cfr-e-iu'lu. 148.] 

CT-re'ni-iui. 

Cjr.|-o-lo(|:'f«<-WM. 

CyBtfciit.aoa!] 



Crt'o^liit. 
Cmr(«(rHT.»i 



Dabbed (dnM), 160, 170. 
D»b;bing. 

Dab'bletl (dai'ld), 183. 

Dub'bUog. 

r>»c'^yl,'l7i. 
D«'t)'l-iU'. 
Dut-tyl'ie. 
Duc-tjl'l-o-el Jpb 
IDactyroKlrph, 



DK'dil (rf*-) TDedil, 
an.] 

)K.da'll-ui (il(-) (l«» 
[Dcdslim.lRn.] 

>i^',-ionB (d«i'-) 

[DedalouB.ttOS.] 



Daf f<nlll, 170. 
Dae'jjer (-mir), 
Dsg'pe, IM. 



i, t, [, «, i, y, Joiw i 1, «,!, 6 



l,f,(itarti«w«itBu,s 



AAGDEBKEIAN 
IH-gii«Tn'l-u i-gUn-^ 

Tieh Id du StaDDlntAI to 
W*bmi^ DtcaHurr. But 
Ig thfDIUIaurlH of anuH 
dopBAn-oteri. Sfnul PfO- 

da-fMr-i'-tli^ 
Dah'U-a [lo Wr. i dul' 

HO, Wb. Gd. ; da'a-a, 

Bm. lur In0( dil'vL 

15S.] ' ' 
Ml'lT, 1 
DUn'tl-l 
IMin'tli 



Dil'n 



J, N. 



Dll'BJIxIfda'zJrf]. 

I>«'kerlD»fclV,mi 

Dil'U-wiDe, im, 170. 
Sul'lled (-IM), W, 186. 
I>»l'U-er: 

i>ia'iT,OT,]7o. 

Dal'ton-Un (-fim), IM. 
Dud (10), n. a female 



[5u 



I>am'mge, IM. 
Dnni'iigie-a-ble, 1«4, 
Dun'iiged, IK, 183. 



Wr. ^iJam-fU-ien' , Wb 

ken, Uamokln. 

I>iuii'u-keened, 18S. 
Dua'a«-keen4iiE. 
Dun'u-klQ, n. Tm 8m. 
mj.Gd.jdani^iu-Un. 



UIi«<ulntlMni( 



Dondedm. [5m Dun. 
>un-'iu-bll'l-tT, 1«B. 



DiunDiHl (rlanij), pari. 



Dmnoe, IZ, 131. 



Du^de. 



I'^^on, or Du>- 
ae-ii'cm ldan'(Jff-/l-on, 
Wb. Gd. ; dail-<if.n'- 
<m, Wt. 8m. Wr. 

Du'dl prat. IM. 
Du'dl«, l(H. 
IMa'dled (dan'dU), UD. 

Dau'dllw- 
Du'druf, 171. 
Dui'd;r, 10, m. 



„ ;?7. 

Wn'tfCT-ollB. 
Dui'glo(*iB'ffi),M,lM. 
Dan'gled {dang'gtd). 



Dtt'iDg {(Or'-), 183. 

Dark'™ {*lrfii), 140. 
Dsrk'eaed (liar-i'iuj). 
-— '-■en-er (rfarfn). 



Dv'lliw. 
D«ni,ll. 
Darned, IAS. 



Dar'UvBl. 

Dub, 10, M. 

Diabed (AuiW), Kota C, 






Dat'ed, 183. 



Da'ttim (L.) [pt. ZWlo, 



Daubed idawM), IM. 
Diub'i7. 

Diub'T. 

Mogii'tCT (dav'-), 1(B. 

Diiunt (r*tft(> (II) [wX 

DioDt'ed (({iln(-). 
Dgunt'er [riflni'-l. 
Daunt'lng (cttlnJ^-). 

Da'vR 'fio Sm'. Wf. ; 
dae'il, Wb. Gd, IM.J 
Daw, 17. 
Daw'dlfl, IIM. 
Daw'dlFd {<laa'41tt}. 
Daw'dllnff. 

Dawned, 'iSO. 

Dawn'ing. 

Day, n. the tlmB be- 
tween the lialnR and 
the KtUng: or tlie 
inn ; the period uC 



twenlT-toui 
ISfi: Oer, It 



ligbugiitBOit&iUint 



PIACON 



162 



DBCUTHISRED 



DCa'oon (de'kn), 149. 
Dea'oon-ry (deftn-). 
D«ad, 15. 

DSad'en {ded*n\ 149. 
D«ad'U-nesB, 160. 
Dead'lv, 93. 

^ " )r8o 

Wr. ; dM/ixi England, 



riy, 



Deaf (<»/) rso Wk. Sm. 



more commonly dif in 
America, Gd. 1A6.] 

w&^ IHA thoQgh oom- 
non in the V. 8., la not 
th« pronnnciaflon of tho 
belt speaken ia thi« 
counti7« 

Deafen (d^n) (149) [bo 
Wk. Sm. Wr. ; d^fi, 
or difn, Gd. 156.] 

Deafened (<f^tuf), 150. 

Deaf en-ing (<^/^n-). 

Deal. 13. 

Deal'er. 

Deal'in^. 

Dean. 13. 

Dean'er-y, 

Dear, a. costly, pre> 
clous. [See Deer, 100.] 

Dear' born. 

Dearth {deHh)^ 21, Note. 

Dear'y. 

Death, 15, 37. 

De-ha'ch (Ft.) (da-bd*- 
M) [so Sm. } ik^afkl, 
Wr.j de-bakfly Wb. 
Gd. 154, 155.] 

De-bar', 11. 

De-barred' {-bard'), 170. 

De-bar'rins[. 

De-base', ^, 

De-based' (-Ml««Oi 183- 

De-bas'er. 

De-bas'ing. 

De-base'ment. 

De-bat'a-ble, 164. 

De-bate', 23. 

De-bat'ed, 183. 

De-bat'er. 

De-bat'ing. 

De-bftuchS 17, 44. 

De-bauched' (-bawchtf). 

Deb-au-chee' {-o-thi'), 
122. 171. 

De-bauch'er. 

De-bftuoh'er-y. 

De-b&Hoh'ing. 

De-bent'ure, 91. 

De-benf ured (-yvrtl). 

De-MI'i-tate, 109. 

De-bil'i-ta^«d, 183. 

De-bil'i-t«t4ng. 

De-bil'i-ty, 108, 169. 

Deb'it, 170. 

DeVit^. 



DeVit^Bg. 

De-bi-tn-mln-I-za'tkni. 
De-bl-tu'min-ise, 20(2. 
De-bi-tu'min-ized, 183. 

De-bi-tu'min-iz-ing. 
Deb-o-nalr' (-««r'), 122. 
De-bonch' l-booth'), 40. 
2M6H« (Fr.) (.dA-brif), 

H.pl. 

Debt idet)j 15, 102. 

Debt-ee' {det-i'), 121. 

Debt'or (cM'ttr), 102. 

Dibut (Fr.) (da-inif)lpo 
Gd. ; dAA>*o&y Sm. 
(see I 20); dO-Aoo', 
Wr. 154, 155.] 

Debutant (Fr.) (dO-frw- 
tdng'). 

Dec'a-ehord (-kord), 

Dee'a-dal, 72. 

Dec'ade, 171. . 

De-ca'dence, 122. 

De-ca'den-1^, 109. 

Dec'a-gon. 

Dec'a-gram [D e c a - 
gramme, 203.J 

Dec-a-gyn'i-an {-jin'-). 

De-cajry-no6s {-kq^-}, 

Deo-a-he'draL 

Dec-a-he'dron [pi. 

Deo-a-he'dra, 196.1 

Dec-a-li'tre (Fr.) (-fe'- 
tur) [De c a 1 i t e r 
(d€k*all-tur, Sm. idi- 
ixU'i-tur, Gd.), 203.] 

De-cal'o-gist. 

Dec'a-ldgue (-loa), 87. 

De-cam'er-on, 105. 

2>ec'flHf»Mre (Fr.) (-m«- 
tur) [D ecameter 
(de-kam'e-tur, or dek'- 
a-me-tur), Grd. 208.] 

De-camp', 10, 103. 

De-camped' (4Mmpf). 

De-camp'ing. 

De-camp'ment, 165. 

Dec'a-nal [so Sm. Wb. 
Gd. 'f deje^a-naly or <ie- 
Jba'noZ, Wr. 155.] 

De-can'dri-an, 109. 

De-can'drofis. 

Deo^m'fi^-lar (-^m^'-). 

De-cant', 10. 

De-cant-«'tion [so Sm. 
Wb. Gd. ; dA<m4a'' 
tionj Wk. Wr. 155.] 

De-«anfed. 

De-cant'er. 

De-cmt'iiue. 

Deo-a-pb/notti, or De- 
oanh'yHoBs. [Set 
Aaenophylloaa.] 

De-Mm>'i-4ate, 109. 



De-oap'ltit^ 163L 
De-cap'i-tat-ing. 
De-cap-1-ta'tion. 
Deo'a-pod. 109. 
De-eap'o-doiks, 105. 
De-car-bon-i-za'tion. 
De-oar'bon-ize, 202. 
De-car'bon-ized, 183. 
De-car' bon-ix-inig. 
Dee'a-stich {stilt). 
Dec'a-style. 
De-cfty', 23. 
De-cayed' (-MkiOt 1^- 
Dc-cay'er. 
De-cay'ing. 
De-cease', 13. 
De-ceased' (^M')* 
De^as'ing. 
De^jeit', l£ 109. 
De-c€it'ful (-yPoO. 
De-ceiv'a-ble, 104, 109. 
De-ceive' (-»er'),13, 109. 
De-ceived' {-Uvd'), 183. 
De-ceiv'er. 
De-ceiv'Ing. 
De-oem'ber, 120. 
DeHsem'fid, 122. 
De^em'vir (L.) [pL De- 

cem'vtn, losj 
De-oem'vi-ral, 72. 
De-cem'yi-rate, 109. 
De'cen-cy, 160. 
De-oen'na-ry, 72, 170. 
De-cen'ni-al, 109, 170. 
De'oent, 171. 
De-cep'tion« 
De-cep'ttre, 84. 
De-dd'a-ble, 104, 183. 
De-dde', 25. 
De-cid'ed, 183. 
De-ad'er. 
De-cid'ii^. 
De-cid'u-o&s, 89. 
De^'i-gram [D e $ i • 

gramme, 2(03.] 
Des'i4i-tre (Fr.) (-»- 

tor)[DeciIiter(de- 

8il'i4ur)j Gd, 203.] 
De-dU'ion (-y»n). 
De-dll'lonth (-yuii«A). 
De$'i-mal, 171. 
De^'i-mate, 73. 
De^'i-mat-ed, 183. 
De^'l-mat-ing. 
De^-l-ma'tion, 112. 
J>ef'i-me4rt (Fr.) (-wM- 

imr) [Decimeter 

(d&sim^»4Hr)t Sm. 

Wb. (5d. 203.] 
De-4i'pher. 
De-d'pher-a-bla, 104. 
De-ci'phered (-tH'/UrO^ 

150. 



1 



^efi>«fU>y,ioii9ift,i,I,d,fl,t*fJkor<;ila«t»fiur»iat<i»fiMt,Aaf4» 



DECIPHEBER 



168 



DEFEATUfO 



De-d'pher-er, 77. 
De-ei'pher-inff. 
De-d'sion (-«uA'im). 

Beck, 16, 181. 
Deok'ed idekt), 149. 
Deck'ei. 
Beck'ing. 
De-claim', 23, 108. 
Be-daim'er. 
De-claim'ins^. 
Dec-la-ma'tion, 112. 
De-clam'a-to-ry, 86. 
Be-cUr'a-ble C-kUr*-), 

tM. 
I)eo-l»-ra'tioii. 
Be-cUr'a-tlve, 84, 143. 
De-cUr'a-to-iy, 86. 
De-clare' (-lOir*), 14. 
De-oUred^ (-klird'), 183. 
De-clar'er (kltr'-). 
De^lar'ing (-W*/-). 
De-clen'sion. 
De-clin'a-ble, 164. 
Dec-li-na'tioii. 
Dec'li-na-tor. 
De-clin'a-to-iy. 
De^ne'. 25, 103. 
De-cUned', 166, 183. 
De-cUn'er. % 

De-elln'lng*. 
Deo-li-nom'e-ter, 106. 
De-cfin'ofis. 
De-clir'l-tofis. 
De-diy'i-ty, 108, 160. 
De-cli'yotta. 
De-eoct', 18, 103. 
De-coet'i-ble, 164, 169. 
De-coc'tlon. 
De-ooctlve, 84. 
De-ool'late, 170. 
De-col'lat-ed. 
De-ool'Ut-ing^. 
De-col-la'tfon. 
De-ooi'or i-kuV-). 
De-coi'or-ant (-kul'-) 
De-ool-or-a'tion (-Intl-), 
De-ool'ored ('kul'urd)^ 

165. 
De-ool'or-fagf {-kul^-). 
De-col'or-Sze i-isul'-), 

202. 
De-col'or-ixed i-kul'-), 
Be-col'or-iz-inff (-kul'-). 
D»-com-pdB'a-ol€ 

i-p9»-)s 1«*. 
De-oomipoM' (•j>6c')» 

122. 
D»-oom-posed' (-pOMd'). 
De-oom-pOB'inff i-pOM'-). 
De-eom>po-Bl'a<ni 

De-oom-pomid', if. A a. 



Doo'o-nctB. 
Dec'o-rat-cd, 183. 
Dee'o-rit-ing^. 
Deo-o-ra'tioii, 112. 
Dee'o-ra-tlve. 
Dec'o-rat-or. 
De-oo'rotiB, or Dee'o- 

rollB [80 Wr. Od. ; 

de-ko^rotu, Wk. 8m. 

126, 166.] 
De-oor'ti-cate. 
De-cor'ti-cat-ed, 183. 
De-cor'ti-cat-ing. 
De-cor-ti-oa'tion. 
De-co'rum, 126, 160. 
De-coy', 27. 
De-coyed', 165, 187. 
De-coy'ing. 
De-creaae" (4Tf<0) 13« 

118. 
De-creaaed' C-krUt'), 

166. 
De-creaB'ing', 183. 
De-cree'. 
De-creed', 188. 
De-cre'er. 
De-cree'ing. 
Dec're-ment, 106. 
De-erep'it [not de-krep'- 

id, 141. lbs.] 
De-crep'i-tate, 169. 
De-crep'i-tat-od. 
De-crep'i-tat-ing^. 
De-crep-i-ta'tlon. 
De-crep'i-tude, 160. 
De-orea'cent, 171. 
De-cre'tal [bo Sm. Wr. 

Wb. Gd.; de-kre'Udy 

or dek're4alt Wk. 

165.] 
De-cre'tiBt. 
De-cre'ttve. 
Dec're-to-ry, 72, 122. 
De-cri'al. 
De-cried', 186. 
De-cry', 25, 
De-cam'bence, 160. 
De-cum'ben-cy. 
De-cam'bent. 
De-cam'bi-tare. 
Dec'a-ple, a, n. A v. 

161. 
Deo'a-pled (-pld)t 183. 
Dec'a-ptlBg. 
De-ca'ri-on, 169. 
De-cfir'reiit. 
De-cor'BlTe. 
De-caa'aate, 170. 
De-cna'aat-ed. 
Do-eaa'aat-ing. 
De-caa-aation. 
[Dodal. 203.^5^80 

Dedal.] 



[Dedal I an, 208.— Ai 

Dsdalian.] 
[DedaiooB, 208.— 

See Dcdaloua.] 
Ded'i-cate, 160. 
Ded'1-cat-ed, 183. 
Ded'i-cat-ing. 
Ded-i-ea'tion. 
Ded'1-cat-or. 
Ded'i-ca-to-ry, 80. 
De-dace', 26. 
De-duced' (-<iaf<'). 
De-duc'inff. 
De-da9'i-^e, 164, 160. 
De-duet', 22, 103. 
De-dnet'ed. 
De-dnct'in|r. 
De-duc'tion. 
De-ductl7e, 84. 
Deed, 13. 
Deem, 13. 
Deemed, 166. 
Deem'ing. 
Deem'atcr, 77. 
Deep, 13. 

Deep'en (d<j>'n), 140. 
Deep'ened ((lft»'iul)» 

160. 
Deep'en-iug (dip'f^). 
Deep'-aeat-ed, 200, 

Exe.6. 
Deer (13). n. a quadro- 

ped of the spenas 

Cervut. {See Dear, 

160.] , 

De-lkoe', 23. 
De-fiiced' (-/ZM'), 183 
De-face'ment. 
De-faj'er. 
De-fac'ing. 
De-far cate. 
De-fal'cat-ed. 
De-fal'cat-ing^. 
De-fal-ca'tion [ao Sm. 

Wb. Gd. ; d^-<d-ka'' 

«ft«n, Wk. Wr. 165.] 
Def-a-ma'tion. 
De-fam'o-to-ry, 86. 
De-fame', 23. 
De-ikmed', 166, 183. 
De-fam'er. 
De-fun'infif. 
De-ftult'7l7. 
De-fftnlt'ed. 
De-fftnlt'er. 
De^Attlfing. 
De-fea'aanee (hmhk), 

122. 
DcfCa'ai-bla (•A'*^-)* 

164. 
De-f €at', 13. 
De-fSat'ed. 
De-f6at'ing. 



ftll;d<M<i»tlifiFei dbofinfooti 9<M<i»lkdl«;g]i<Mg<iigoft£^a«lfithis. 



DeNOUEHENT 



Dcn-llc-n-U'tloii. 
Den'tJ-fonn, 78, VSt. 
Den'li frlw (-Mi) (10 
Inot den'tri-fld, KB.] 
Dea'UI. 



Den-tlBt'lc-il. 



Be-Du-da'tion (no Wk. 
Wb. Gd. ; dam-da'- 
rtun, Sm. Wr. 146.] 

De-nuite', M. 

De-Dud'ed, 183. 

De-nun'd-iM (-tht-Ot^ 
[soSra.Wr, iite-nKs'- 
tk»l, Wb. Gd. ISE.I 

De-Diin'd-at-ed l-iM-). 

D«-Dua'd-it-lag (-(bl-)- 

De-niin-cl-B'tlon (eht). 

De-Dun'd-U-or t^^i-). 

De nj', 2B. 

De-oB'ttrii-ent. 

De'o-dand. 

De^i'dor-iie, SM. 

De-o'dor-iz-tDg. 
Dc-on-tol'o-gT, loa. 
D«-ox'Ma4e peozf- 

De-OK'liit-ofl. 
De-ox'i-diMna. 
De-ox-l-di'tlon. 
De-ox'l-dlze (»R) [Da- 
oxydlie.MO.) 



S« Deoxidize.] 
De-oi')r-gen-»te, 171. 
De-oK'y-pen-il-ed. 

l>e-ox'y-gi.Ti-al-lng. 

De-psrlM 1,139. 
De-part'ed. 

[>e-part'iiig. 
De-part' ment. 
De-psrt-menl'al, 122. 



— See Dependent.] 
De-pend'cnce, 160. 

De-pend'ent, a. (De 

pendant, a03.] 
[Dependent, n. »» 

— S«1>ependaiit.J 
De-pend'er. 



De^icl'ur-ine (-vw-). 
De-pll'a-to-ry, 80. 
De-ple'tlOD. 

De-plor'B'^e, ik. 
De-plar'a.bl;. 
Dep-la-ra'tiOD. 
De-plare', S4. 
Deplored', IW, 183. 
De^plor'er, it, S. 
De-pl5f'lne. 
Deploy', 87. 
De-ployed', JM, 188. 
De-plOT'ing. 
De-po'nenl, 140. 
De-pop' a-late, St. 
De-pop' n-lBt-ed. 
De-pop'D-iat-ln^* 
De-pop-n-U'tloii. 

De-pAr-ta'tlon, or Dep- 

or-t«'tlon [rfe-pBi-to'- 

fABB^WliiWr. Gd.l»] 



DEFBES8 

De-pOrVmeDt. 

De-p6«'«- We( -pa»'-),1M. 
De-p5»'al(y*i'-), 183. 
Do-poie' (-pss'i. M, 
De-posed' i-^:(f), 183. 
De-p6a'er C-psi' ). 
De-poB'l[« l-ptzi-i. 



De-pa>'lt«d (-pBz'-). 

De-pos'lt-ing f-plii'-). 

Dep-o-al'tioD i-xUh'itni 
iBOWk.TTr.Wb.Gd.i 
ae-po-siift'tra.Sm.lSS) 

De-poB'lt-or (-pSj'-). 

De-poa'i-to-rj (-pff**-) 
(861,n.Ilie place wbere 
any thing; le depoait- 
ed. (5u Depoaltary, 

Dtpot ( Fr.y {rf«-iW, or 
(Si-p8') (de-py. Wb. 
Gd.Wr.i ilA-DC',Sm. 
165.] 

Dep-r«-T»'llon. 

De-prtf'er,' 183. 
De-pnv'inff. 
De-priy'l-ty, 123, IW. 
Depfre-ca-Kle, IM. 
Dep're-cate, 160. 



Dep're-ds-to-ry, 8S. 



t.«,i.e, Q, j,iiHWii,«,i, 



ft, f, ilurt j i « <A br> i M Is ftat, i <u in 



0BPBESSEO 



167 



DB8PICABLB 



De-pressed' (-preai'), 

De-press'ing. 

De-pTeB'Bioj^-pretk'mn) 

De-press'Ive, M. 

Dfr-press'or. 

De-priT'a-ble, Idi. 

Bep-ri-va'tlon. 

De-prive', 25. 

De-priyed', 1«6, 188. 

De-priv'er. 

De-priT'ing'. 

Depth, 16, 37. 

Dep'u-rate, 73, 80. 

Dep'u-rat-ed. 

Dep'u-rat-ing. 

Dep-u-ra'tion. 

Dep'u-rat-or. 

Dep'u-ra-to-ry, 86. 

Dep-u-ta'tion. 

Depute', 26, 108. 

De-put'ed. 

De-pat'ing^. 

Dep'u-ty, 89, 03. 



'** This word it often 
mitprOBOunced [tfafiCbK-iy] 
eren by good ■peakexa." — 
WcMer. 

De-range', 23. 

De-ranged', 165, 183. 

De-rang'ing (-rflu/'-). 

De-range'ment, 185. 

Der'e-lict, 169, 171. 

D5r-e-lIc'tion. 

De-ride', 25, 103. 

De-rid'ed. 

De-rid'er. 

De-rid'ing. 

De-ri'Bion (de-rizhfun), 

171. 
De-ri'rive, 8i. 
De-ri'BO-ry, 86, 03. 
De-riv'a-ble, 164. 
Der-i-va'tion. 
Der-i-va'tion-al. 
De-riT'a-tlve, 84, 160. 
De-rive', 25, 103. 
De-rived', 165, 183. 
De-riv'er. 
De-riv'ing. 
Derm, 21, N. 
Derm'al. 
Derm-at'lo. 
Derm'a-toid. 
Derm-a-tol'o-gf , 108. 
Derm-off'ra-pny, 108. 
Derm'oid. 
Derm-ot'o-my, 106. 
D6r'o-gate. 
D«r'o-gat-ed, 183. 
DSr'o-gat-ing. 
Der-o-ea'tion. 
De-rog'arto-rv, 86. 
Der'rfck, 170. 



Der'vlB rDerriie, 

Dervish, 203.1 
Des'oant. n. 103, 161. 
Des-oant', o. 103, 161. 

tr- Bj the poctt It b 
often aeeented on the int 
ly liable. 

Des-cant'ed. 

Des-cant'er. 

Des-oant'ing. [171. 

De-soend' {-$etuP)i 30, 

De-Bcend'ant, n. 148. 

De-soend'ed. 

De-soend'ent, a. 148. 

De-8oend'er. 

De-soend-i bil'i-ty. 

De-soend'i ble, 164, 160. 

De-soend'ing. 

De-floen'slon, 171. 

De-seen' sion-al. 

De-scent' {-sent*), 15, 30. 

De-scrib'a-ble, 164, 160. 

De-scribe', 25, 103. 

De-scribed', 166, 183. 

De-scrib'er. 

De-scrib'ing. 

De-scried'. 186. 

De-scrip'tion. 

De-serip'tlve, 84. 

De-scry', 25. 

De-scry'lng. 

Des'e-crate, 160. 

Des'e-orat-ed, 183. _ 

Des'e-erat-ing. 

Des-e-cra'tion. 

Des'ertr (des'tcrl), a. 
waste; solitary: — n. 
an uninhabited plaoe. 
[See De-serf, n. 4e v. 
161.] 

De-sert' (de-zert') (21, 
N.), H. that which is 
deserved : — «. to for- 
sake ; to leave. (See 
Des'ert, a. A i». 161, 
and Des-sert', n. 148.1 

De-sert'ed (-«cr«'-). 

De-sert'er (-«er«'-). 

De-sert'lng (-zert'-). 

De-ser'tion (-«cr'-). 

De-serve' (-zerv'), 21,N. 

De-served'(-«ert«P),166. 

De-serv'ed-ly (-«cr»'-). 

De-serv'er (-zerv^-), 

De-serv'ing (-«ertr-). 

[Deshabille, 203.— 
See Dishabille.] 

De-sic'oant, a. A n. 

De-sio'cate [so Wk. Sm. 
Wr. i de-Hk/dt^ or 
de»'i-kiU, 6d. 156.] 

De-sic'oat-ed, 183. 

De-sic'cat-ing. 



Det-io-oa'tion, 170. 

De-sic'ca-tive. 

De-sid'er-a-tlve. 

De-Hd-er-n'tum (L.)fpl. 
De-Hd-er-a'taj 108.] 

De-sign' ide-Aw. or tU- 
xWX 16!4)r BO Wr. Gd.: 
desln'j Wk. Sm. 165.] 

Des'lg-nate [i»o< dex'|g- 
nat, nor de-iig'iiM^ 
153.] 

Des'ig-nat-ed, 183. 

Des'lg-nfit-ing. 

Des-ig-na'tion. 

De-signed' {-^ind*, or 
'Zlnd'), 162. 

De-Bign'er i-sln'-, or 
-zItP-), [-«ln'-). 

De-sign'ing (-«!»'-, or 

De-sip'i-eni. 

De-sir-a-bil'i-ty (-«Ir-). 

De-sir'a-ble (-^l*^-), 164. 

De-sir'a-bly (-«lr'-). 

De-sire' (-«lr'). 

De-sired' (-zlrd'\ 183. 

De-sir'ing (-«lr'-). 

De-sir'o&s (-«lr'-). 

De-sist', 16, 103, L16. 

De-sist'ed. 

De-sist'ing. 

Desk, 16. 

Des'man. 

Des'o-late, 136. 

Des'o-lat-ed, 183. 

Des'o-liit-er. 

Des'o-lat-ing. 

Des-o-la'tion. 

Des'o-la-to-ry, 72. 

De-spair' (-spir*\ 14. 

De-spaired' \-spird'), 

De-spair'ing (-rair'-). 

De-spatch' [Dis- 
patch, 203.J 

nr The spelUnflr de- 
apatch is meet In conrorm- 
tty with the etymology of 
this word (Fr. dfpit^er), 
and Is preferred by 
Walker, Smart, and 
Worcesieri but Webster 
and Goodrich prefer (/»- 
patch. Worcester remarlcs: 
**Oood usage, as welt as 
the dictionaries. Is much 
divided." 

De-spatohed' (~gpacht''i 

[Dispatched, 203.J 
De-spatch'ing [D i s - 

patching, 203.1 
Des-pe-ra'do [pi. De«- 

pe-ra'does (-d(9«),102.] 
Des'peivate, 132. 
Des-per-a'tion. 
Des'pi-ca-ble (164) [not 

des-pik'a-bl, 153.] 



fidl; 6a«<M there} Sbcuin foot ,9 at in faeHoi ghat gin go i^ at in tbiB. 



DBSnCABLT 



168 



BSVISB 



Des'pi-ea-blf. 

De-Rpine' (-^Wyj 26. 

De-spiaed' r-fl!pl»IOt 183. 

De-spifl'er (splz'-). 

De-mpiz'ing (^U'-). 

De-8|rite', n. ft prqi. 

De-flpoil^ 27, 103. 

De-BpoUed', les. 

De-ipoil'er. 

De-spoU/ing. 

De-spond', 18. 

De-spond'ed. 

De-spond'enoe, 160. 

De-spond'oi-ej'. 

De-Bpond'ent. 

Qe-Bpond'ing. 

Des'pot. 

Des-pot'ic, 109. 

Des-pofic^, 106. [136. 

Dea'pot-lBm ['izm)^ 133, 

De-flpa'mate [bo Sm. 
Wr. i de»'pn-mat, Wb. 
Gd. 1S5.J 

De-spu'mat-ed. 

De-8pu'inAt4ng. 

DeB-pu-ma'tion, 112. 

DeB-qaa-ma'tion. 

DeB~aert' (dez-zert*)^ n, 
a Bervice of flmit, pas- 
try, &c., at a meid. 
[See Deaert, n. A v, 
148.] 

Des-ti-na'tioii. 

Des'tlne, 162, 171. 

Ites'tTned (-Mnd), 183. 

tteB'tin-ing. 

IteB'ti-ny, lfl». 

Des'ti-tute. 

DcB-ti-tu'tion. 

T)e-8troy', 27. 

De-stroyed', 166, 168. 

De-Btroy'er. 

De-8troy'ing. 

De-struot-i-bil'i-tr. 

De-Btruct'i-ble, 164. 

l>e-Btruc'tioii. 

De-8truct'Ive. 

Des-u-da'tion. 

Des'ue-tude (-«>e-), 171. 

DeB'ul-to-ri-ly. 

DeB'ul-to-ri-neas. 

Defl'ul-to-ry, 86. 

De-tachS 10, 44. 

De-taohed' (•^odU'). 

De-taoh'ing. 

}>e-tach'inent. 

De-taiV, v. 23. 

De-tail' , or De'tail, n. 
[80 Wr. ; de-iOl', Wk. 
Wb. Gd. i de'MZ, Sm. 
165.1 

De-tifled', 160. 

De-tail'er. 



De^airtBg. 
De-tain', Si. 
De-taia'der. 
Detained', 166. 
De-tain'er. 
De-tain'iag. 
Detect', 16, 103. 
Dc-tect'a-ble, 16i^ 160. 
De-tect'er. 
De-teet'ing. 
De-tec'tioB. 
De-teotaTe,84. 
De-tent', 121. 
De-ten'tion. 
De-ter', 21,N. 
De-terg«'. 
De-teiied', 166, 163. 
De-terg'ent (terff-), 
De-terg'ing (-terj'-). 
De-te'ri-o-rate, 40, N. 
De-te'ri-o-rat-ed. 
De-te'ri-o-rat-ing. 
De-te-rl-o-ra'tion, 
De-tor'ment. 
De-ter'mi-na-ble, 164. 
De-ter'mi-nato, a. 
De-ter-mi-na'tion. 
De-ter' mi-na-tlve. 
De-ter'mlne. 
De-ter'mlned (-iitVmi), 

150. 
De-ter'mia-er, 163. 
De-ter'min-ing. 
De-t€r-ra'tlon, 170. 
Deterred', 166, 176. 
De-ter'ring, 21, "S. 
De-ter'Blve. 
De-test', 14. 
De-te8t'a-ble, 164. 
Det-es-ta'tion, or De- 

tea-ta'tion (det-eirta*- 

shun, Wk. wr. Gd. ; 

de-tes4a'^unj Sm. 

155.] 
De^Bt'ed. 
De-teBt'er. 
De-teat'lng. 
De-throne'. 24. 
De-thronea', 166, 183. 
De-throne'ment, 186. 
De-thr5n'er. 
De-thron'ing. 
Det'i-nne [bo Sm. Wb. 

Gd. ; de-tin'u, Wk. ; 

det'i-^u, or de-lin'ii, 

Wr. 165,] 
Det'o-nate. 
Det'o-nat-ed, 183. 
Det'o-nat-ing. 
Det-o-na'tion. 
Det-o-nY-za'tion. 
Det'o-niae, 106, 202. 
Det'o-nized, 183. 



D6t'o-ii]»-ing. 

De-traot', 10. 

De^racfed. 

[Detracter, 208.— 
See Detractor.] 

De-tract'ing. 

De-trac'tion. 

De-tract'Ive. 

De-tract'or [Detract- 
er, 203.] 

De-tract'o-ry, 66. 

Det'ri-ment, 106, 160. 

Det-ri-ment'al. 

De-tri'tal. 

De-trT'tion {4rith'un). 

De-tri'tus. 

Detrude' (•4rood% 19. 

De-trud'ed(-<rvMM2'-), 183 

De-trud'iug {-tt'ood'-), 

De-trun'cate (-trung'A. 

De-trun'oat-eaC-trttitp'-) 

De-trun-ca'tion. 

De-tru'sion (-<roo'«Atttt) 

Deuce {dAs) [Duae, 
203.] 

Deu-ter-og'a-mist, 106< 

Deu-ter-og'a-my. 

Deu-ter-on'o-my, 108. 

Deu-ter-op'a-thy. 

Deu-ter-oa'co-py. 

Deu-tox'Ide [so Wr.i 
du-tox*ld, Sm. 156.] 
[Deutoxyd,203.] 

De-vap-o-ra'uon. 

De-vfta'tate, or Dev'aa- 

. tate [de^&s'Utt, Wk. 
Sm. ; dev'(u4M, Wb. 
Gd. ; de-vAft'ua, or 
dev'as4lUj Wr. 155.] 

De-v&a'tat-ed, or Dev'- 
aa-tat-ed. 

De-vlla'tat-ing, or Der'- 
aa-tat-infif. 

Dev-as-ta'aon. 

De-vel'op [ D e T e 1 o p e, 
203.1 

De-vel'oped {-ofi). 

De-vel'op-er. 

De-vel'op-Ing. 

De-yel'op-ment. 

De-Te8t'[D i v e a t,203.] 

a^ Written deveti m a 
tediDical term in lav. 

De'Tl-ate, 73, 78. 
De'vi-at-ed, 183. 
De'yl-at-ing. 
De-vi-a'tion. 
De-vice', 25, 121. 
Dey'ii (<Wl), 140. 
De'vi-otts, 78. 
De-yTa'a-ble (-ol«'-), 164. 
De-vise' (-«l«'), 25, 103. 



&» S, i, (^ tt, y, lemg ; &, 69 1, d, ft, f, short ifiasin Ikr, husia that, 9k as in 



DBVISBD 



169 



DICEPHALOUS 



De-vised' (-f>l««fO» 183. 

Dev-I-aee' (-««'>, 122. 

De-vis'er (-t»l«'-), n. one 
who contrives. [Ste 
Devisor, 160.] 

De-vfs'iDg (-«!»'-). 

De- vi8'or(-t««'-X 1 18)[so 
Sib. Wb. Od. ; dev^ 
zor'i or de-vVzuTf Wr. 
166], ». dte who be- 
queathes. [Law term, 
correlative of devUee, 
— See Deviser, IfiO.] 

De-vit-ri-fi-ca'tion. 

De-void', 27, 121. 

I>ero<r (Fr.) (dev-wor'). 

De-volve*, 18, 103. 

De<volved', 166, 133. 

De-volv'lng. 

De-vote', 2i. 

De-vot'ed, 183. 

Dev-o-tee', 128. 

De-v6fer. 

De-vot'ing. 

De-vo'tion. 

De-vo'tion-al. 

De-vour', 28, 103. 

De-voured% 166. 

De-vour'er. 

De-vour'ilig. 

De-vout', 28. 

Dew {dA) (26) [ne* doo, 
163|, n. moisture de- 
posited in eonse- 
quenoe of the cooling* 
of the atmosphere; 
[See Due, 160.] 

Dew'drop (d«'-). 

Dew'i-ness (d«'-), 16^. 

Dew'lap (<»'-), 206. 

Dew'point (€»'-). 

Dew'y (<«'y), 03. 

Dex-tgr'i-ty, 108, 160. 

Dex'ter-ofis [Dex- 
trous, 203.] 

09- The qwlUiiff d«x- 
teroug is the ontj form 

STen hj Welker and 
nartt ead it !• preferred 
tnrWoroeeter. WeMterand 
Croodrich, howerer, prefer 
the tpelling dextrow. 

Dex'tral. 
Dex-tral'i-ty. 
Dex'trlne, ^2, 152. 
Dex-tror'sal. 
Dex'troiis [Dexterons, 

203. — See Dexterous.] 
Dev (d&)f n. a Turkish 

title of dignitv. {See 

Day, 160.r 
[Dhurra, 203. — 5e6 

Donra.] 



Di-a-be'tes {4i»), «. 
Hna, A pi, 

Di-a-Det'io. 

Di-abaer-y (233, Bxe.) 
[so Od.; A-o^J-f^, 
wr. 166.] 

Di-a-bol'ic, 100. 

Dia-bol'le^J. 

Di-ab^o-lism (-lfoiii),136. 

Di-a-ea-thol'i-eon. 

Di-a-cftus'tio. 

Di-aA'7-lon (-af-)[Dl- 
achylum, 20B.J 

Di-ae'o-iial, 79. 

Di-ac'o-nate. 

Di-a-oous'tic, a. 28. 

Di-arcous'tiei, n. 38. 

Di-a-crit'ie. 

Di-«-crit'if-al. 

Di-a-del'phi-an, 109. 

Di-a-del'phoils. 

Di'ardem, 171. 

Di'a-demed ('demd),%SO. 

Di^r'e-flis (-«r'-) [pi. 
Di-aer'e-B«8(-««2;),19e.] 
[Dieresis.203.] 

Di-ag-no'sis, 125. 

Di-ag-nos'tie. 

Dl-ag'o-nal, 70, 106, 170. 

Di'a-gram. 

Di'argrftph, 127. 

IX>a-graph'ic. 

Di-a-graph'ic-al. 

IKf-a-gryd'i-ate. 

Dfal, 25, 72. 

Di'a-lect, 171. 

Di-a-lect'ie, a.Stn, 

Di-a-lect'ic-al. 

Di-a-leet'ics, «. 

Di-a-lec-t3'dan(4Mk'aA) 

Di'al-ing. 

Di'al-isf. 

DI-«iaa^ (161), A. a 
rhetorical figure by 
whidi arguments are 
placed ID various 
points of view. 

IM'al-lage [bo Wb. Gd. j 
di-aVkhjif Sm. Wr. 
155] (161), n. a miner- 
al of a foliated struc- 
ture, whose joints and 
fl^actures present dif- 
ferent lines. 

m-al'o-gism (■;^«ii»),136. 

Df-al'o-gist, 170. 

Df-al-o-gist'ic. 

Di-al-o-gist'ic-al. -" 

Di'a-k>^e (-log), 87. 

Di-al'y-sls (171) [pi. Di- 
al'y-ses (-siz), 108. 

Di-a-mag-net'lc. 

lA-am'e-ter, 70, 108. 



Di-a-met'rle. 
IM-a-met'ri»«l. 
Dl'a-mond (dl'i 

or di'numa) [so Wr. 

Gd. ; di*a-mond, Wk.} 

di'amond, colL dff- 

wumd, 8m. 166.] 
Di-an'dri-an. 
Di-aa'drotts. 
DM-pa'soii (-Mm), 166, 

171. 
Di-a-pen'te, 163. 
Di'a-per, 77. 
IH-a-pfaa-ne'i-tf. 
IM-a-phan'ic. 
Di-aph'a-notts (-<^-). 
Di-a-phon'ie. 
Di-a-phoB'ie-«L 
Df^i-phoB'ics. 
Df-a-pho-re'sis, 128. 
Di-a-pho-ret'io. 
Di'a-phragm i-^^ramy, 

106,162. 
Di-a-phrag-mat'ie. 
Di-a-po-r^ais, 122, 12$. 
K-a'ri-an (160) [so Sm. 

Gd. ; dl-u^ri-nfh Wr. 

165.] 
Di'a-rist. 
K-ar-rhoe'a (^rifa) (171) 

[Diarrhea, 203.] 
I»-ar.rhoet'io i-ret*-) 

[Diarrhetic,203.] 

93r Walker, Smart, and 
WoTCcater give only the 
formi diarrhoea and dian- 
rhoetic, Webrter and Good- 
rich aire only the forma 
diamea and aiarrkeHe, 

IM-ar-thro'sis, 122, 126. 

Di'*-ry. 

Di'as-tase. 

Di-as'to-le, 163. 

Di'a-style. 

m-a-tes'sa-rOB, 170. 

Di-a-ther'mal, 21, K. 

Di-a-ther'mariioils. 

Di-ath'e-sia. 

Di-a-ton'ic. 

Di'a-tribe fso Wb. Gd. 5 

di'a-trl-be, Sm. ; dt'et- 

frf&, or dMr^'ri4t€f 

Wr. 165.] 
Di-at'ro-bi£t, 106. 
Di-a-zeu'tic (-«••'-). 
Dib'ble, 164. 
Dib'bled ((H&'id), 183. 
DlVbler. 
Dib'bling. 
Dib'stone, 206. 
Dice (25), n. [pL of Die, 

194.] 
Di-oeph'a-lofis. 



ftU; 6a«<» there) AM<»fi>ot;ta«<n>fiuslleigha<g<ngo;tha4inthia. 

16 



DICER 

Djf 'er, 183. 
Di-ehU-TnTd'e-aOi 

l-iia-). 
Di4hat'o-mo(Ll <-!»<-). 
Di-obof o-iuT C-J»('-). 
Di-chro-lBin (-tro-bn). 
Di-chnmut'lo l-bro-), 
Dic'ins. 
DIck'r. 
Di-CD-tTl-e'doa [bo Sm. 

Wb.Gd.;(n-iot-iF-J«'- 

don, Wr. IM.] 
Di-co-tfl-e'dan-otla [lO 

Sin. Od. I fji-jboi-v- 

i«i'>Mi«i, Wt — ■ 
Dlc'tnto, IB, 73. 
Dlo'lat4d, 1B3. 
Dlc'dt-log. 



Its.] 



relSiUio 8m. 
(«'(a-rtr. Wb. 



DIc'iLon. 
Mc'llon-MT, 72. 
jWe'fum (L.) [pi. JJio"- 



M-dac'tyl. 
IHHjac'trl-oHs. 
Did Jip'por [so WTt. Sm. 
Wr. j iJlAip'ur, Wb. 



Did'dkil liUd'td), 183. 
DUt'dUoB. 
Di-deu-D-lia'dnL 
Dr.del'phlo [Uidol- 

phTo,Gd.«H.] 
Di.del'|ihyt [urdel- 

p h I B , Qd. £».] 



l>red, 1 



) (25, IBfl), 
a Die. [Sa 



DIHIDUTB 



tng'Bi-ia-n.TS. 
Dkg'nl.Ir. MB. 
D&'o-nOti. 

isV^x, m. 

m-greu', TV. lOa. 

I»-grt««'ing. 
Dl-gm'ilou (.^mk'- 

Dl-gica'Bloii-al (-pmV- 
im-). _ 

IM-lfyn'i-Mi (^'0 
MgYnoBB lii(i'-) [» 
Qd . -, (fi'ii^flHt, Wr. 

M-he'dml. 

IM-he'dTan. 

DUce, £S. 

Diked (dIU), Note C, p. 

k'W, 1B3. 
^.-Ii«in.d8te, 73, 1». 
I>I-Up'l-di(.ed. 
DI-l«p'l-dit-ine. 
DI-Up-1-di'tian. 
Dl-tap'l-dil-or. 

w'"i''dl-Mi',"'vt" 
Qd. ; dl-iM', Sm. 155.1 
M-lil/ed, or M-lilsd. 

;'or, or DE-l^'or. ' 
lo-rl-ly. 



Wr. Gd. ; A Wnio, 
Wk. Sid. ItU.I 

OU-fl-tan'lt (Ifc) {(— ' 
») [nl. DU-et-ic 
(-ian'le), IBS.] 
.)tl-«t-lan'teJiim (-ton). 
Dil'l-eenoe, IW. 
'""i-gent. 
, Id, ira. 

...-.ntC, a. A «. is, lot. 
DMiit'od, 1S3. 



i6s!i 

D.mid'l^te, a 



t,e,I,«,(i,MiHWi»,i, 



^f.tADritHMtaOv.iai 



DT-mlnlab, n. lU. 
DT-mln'lnhed c-4tkt). 
D1-Diln'Isb-IaK. 



Dimnieil (dintJ), 176. 

Dlm'misRi 170. 
IM-mor'pblBin (-jbn). 



Jt, 






IHm'ptcd Idlm'pid), 183. 



ZAa'aiagt 170. 
Mnt/lS 

Di«o'e-un, or IK-D-ee'- 
MD fso Wr. i (fl-ct'e- 



a iflBi M 

; dblo- 

iiu-w, Wk. lU.I 

TMp'lamBIe, n. 

n-pUfmit-ed, or Dlp'- 
lo-nut-ed.o-rsoWr.i 
dl-pio'mlU-ar, 8m. ; 
dmJo'nurf-eil, Wb. 

oa. 15a.] 

Dfl^lD-mat'le. 

Dip-lD-iDst'lo-al-lr. 

Dip-lo-nut'ici, (L 

Dl-pIo'ms-HBt. 

Dipped idfpO, IM, 178. 

IMp'per. 170. 

Dip'plng. 

Dlp'ter-Bl. 233. Exe. 

Dlptote. 

Dip'ty-"- 



(-«t). 



_>i-r«^li-n'tion. 
I IMn (25, S7, Note), e 
dieuUil. [5« Dfei 



Dl i4p-pQLat'ed. 
DiH-ap.polQt'lii|f. 

IH«-»p-pro-b«'ti01i. 
Di»-Bp'pro-b»-to-rr, M. 
Wi-ap-prov'iil 

f-prmW), 183. 
Df»-Bp-prov«' (-prone'). 
DlB-np-prO'ed' 

(-pnwpf/'). 
IMi-MTIl' (ctts-), IM. 
Dis-inned (iHi-ornan. 
Dts-u-m'lne' (dfs-). 
DIi«r-rin^ef 176: 
DlB-w-ringwi', 183. 
DlB-nr-ranj^'nWDl, 185. 

Dis-ar-rSred', 188. 
Dlsjir-rjj'lne. 
Dis ae'ter (df:.% 
IHs-w'troSa (dte-). 
DiB-a-vow'. 
Ma-a-YOw'al. 
IXs-a-Towed', 188. 

UB-biiud' !db-, or aU) 
(IM) Idh.4a)id', Wk. 
< (M (» ttiera ; DEi oJ At fbot ; g oi <ii ftoUe j gb at g in go ; t^ of Jn tUi. 



IN-CB'ciaa (-e'lAon) [ 



tX-op'tTieUl, loe. 

t»-o-ri'nu, or Dt-o-ril'- 

ma [di-o-rJi'iiki, Sm. 
Wr. ] ^■o-rafma.Wb. 
Gd. 164.) 
n-o-nun'la. 



Si/'ttiHV, Wb. Gd. 



DI-rMt'rli. 
Dlre'nil i-Jfil). 
Dim, 21, Note. 

Dlrki^Note, 
Din, £1. 

Dirt'Ied (-id), W, la 
Mn'i-ly. 



-M11-tT, 108, IW. 

< Dtaa'bie CHz-, or i«a-) 
tlM, 164) frfic^'Al, 
„ 1 Wk, Sm. Wr. : dif-a'- 
H I bl, Wb. Qd. 155.] 



Dl»«'ble<t Idlzii'bld, or 



Ula-a-bus'iDg (Mi'-). 
DII-wt-Tan'Oge, 131. 
Dla^d-Tad-ta'gaoav 

Dla-iif'r«it''pd. 
DlBHir-tbet'lng. 



DiB-ar-arm'anoe. 

Ula-af-anned', 105. 
Dla-af-Bnu'lnB. 
Dia.a-gree'. 
DiB-kgree'able, IM 

lli»*t(r™'.-bl)'. 
Dto-a-greed', 1H8. 



iB-a-fi:r«fi'ji]ir. 
l>-aAow'7l?0. 



I»8BANDED 



172 



DISCREET 



2: - 



Sm. Wr. ; dit-battd', 
Wb. Gd. 155.1 

DiB-baiui'ing; (dix-^ or 

dU-). 
Dis-be-Uer. 
Dis-be-lieve', 109. 
Dis-be UevedS 160, 183. 
Dis-be-liev'er. 
Dis-be-Uev'ing. 
Dis-bur'den {diz-bur*- 

dn, or dit-bur'dn) 

(136)[dMr-dttr'd», Wk. 

8m. Wr. ; dU-bur*dn^ 

Wb.Gd. 155.] [Dl8- 

burthen, 203.] 
Dis-bur'dened {diz- 

bur^dnd, or dii-bur^- 

dnd), 
DiB-bur'dea-lng^ {diz- 

bur'dn-ing, or dit- 

bur'dn-ing), 
Dis-burse' r<M»-, or di»-) 

Idiz-bura'j Wk. Sm. 

Wr.; dU-bur$', Wb. 

Gd. 155.1 
Disbursed' (diz-imnt', 

or dit-burst'). 
Dis-burse'memt (diz-* or 

dU-). 
Dis-burs'er (diz-^ or 

dU')j 183. 
Dis-burs'iiiff (diz-^ or 

dis-), 
rDisbarthen, 208. 

— See Diflburden.] 
Dis-card', 11, 103. 
Dis-card'ed. 
Dis-card'ing. 
Dis-eem' (diz-zem*), 

40,150. 
Dis-cemed' {diz- 

zemd'\ 150. 
Dis-cem'er {diz-zem'-), 
Dis-eem'i-ble {diz- 

zerW')^ 164. 
Dis-cern'i-bly (diz- 

zem'-). 
DiB-oem'ing {diz- 

zem'-). 
Dis-eern'ment (diz- 

zem'-). 
Dis-charge', 11. 
Dis-charged', 183. 
Dis-charg'er i-cktui''). 
Dis'ci-form, 78, 160. 
Dis-cl'ple, 164. 
Dis'ci-plin-a-ble, 164. 
Dis-ci-pU-iia'ri-an,49, N. 
Dis'ci-pU-na-ry, 72. 
Dis'ci-pllne, 82, 152. 
Dia'ci-pUned (-pAiul), 

183. 



Die'd-plhi-inff. 
Dis-claimS 23. 
Dis-claimed'. 
Dis-claim'er. 
Dis-claim'ing. 
Dis-close' (-kl9z')y 24. 
Dis-dosed' {-kUizdf), 
Dis-clos'er {-kl9z'-), 
Dis-closMng {-kUs^'), 
Dls-clds'ure I'kUizf-)^ 01. 
Dis'coid, a. k n, 
Dis-eoid'al. 
Dis-col'or i-kwl'wr) 

[Discolour, Sm. 

190,203.] 
Dis-col-or-a'tioB 

{-kul'-y, 112. 
Dis-cd'ored {-kul'urd)^ 

160. [D 1 8 o o 1 - 

oared, 109,203.] 
Dis-ool'or-ing (-jbi/^-). 

rDiBcoloaring, 

199, 203 J 
Dis-oom'flt {rkmn'-). 
Dis-com'fit-ed (-AwmM> 

171. 
Dis-con'fit4iig (nlwm'O. 
Dis-com'fit-ure (Awm'-). 
Dis-oom'fort i-kum'Ay 

135. 
Dis-eom-mode'. 
Di8-€om-mdd'ed, 188. 
Dis -com-mod'ing. 
Dis-com-pose' (-p0«'). 
Difl-com-posed' 

Dis-oom-pde'ing 

(-p««'-). 
Dis-com-poB'nre 

(-p««'-), 91. 
Dis-con-oert', 21, Note ; 

171. 
Di8-«o»-«ert'ed. 
Disoon-certlng. 
Dis-con-oer'tiom. 
Dis-con-nect'. 
Dis-oon-nect'ed. 
Dis-oou-neot'ing. 
Dis-con-nec'tion. 
Di8-eon'BO-late,*73. 
Dis-con-tent'. 
Dis-con-tent'ed. 
Dis-oon-tent'ing'. 
Dia-oon-tiii'a-aiiee, 160. 
Dis-con-tiii-u-a'tlon. 
Dis-oon-tin'ike. 
Dis-con-tin'ued (^M), 

183. 
Dia-oon-tin'ii-iiig. 
Di8-€on-ti-nn'i-ty, 108. 
DiB-con-tin'a-olls. 
Dis'cord. 
DiB-oord'anoe, 160. 



Dis-cord'an-cj. 

Dis-cord'ant. 

Dis 'count, n. 

DiB'count,or Dis-oonnt', 
r. (so Gd. ; dU-kount^, 
Wk. Sm. Wr. 156.] 

tar' " The accent fon 
oie lait lyllabte] is proper, 
but iu the mercantile 
world the rerb ia veiy 
eommonlj made to bear 
the aame accent aa tha 
noun." — AnarC 

Dis-coant'a-ble, 164. 

Dis-coim'te-naiioe. 

Dis-coun'te-nanoed 

(rfumet). 
DiB-coun'te-naD$-infir. 
Dis'oonnt-er, or I>i»- 

oount'er [dU'kottni- 

«r, Gd. ; dU-koufU'- 

tiT, Sm. Wr. 155.1 
Dis-co&r'age (•Mr'-), 

22, 171. 
Dis-co&r'aged (-MH-), 

183. 
Dis-cofir'age-matt 

(•Mr'Ot 185. 
Dis-eoiir'a-ger. 
Dia-e5ur8e^(-Mr»'), 

91. A Vt 

Dia-couraed' (-JtoralOi 
183. 

Dia-coiir8'ef> (-itfra'-). 

Dia-ooura'ing (-kOrw'-), 

Dia-cooralve, 84. 

Dia-eofirt'e-otts (dU- 
kurt'e-^u), or Dia- 
eonrt'eofis (dw-ibffrf'- 
yus) [so wr.; dis- 
imrt'e^us, G4.; dtz- 
kUH'yuZy Sm.} die- 
kur'chue, Wk. 155.1 

Dis-cour'te-ay {-kur'-y, 
160. 

Dls'eoiiB, a. shaped lika 
a disk. [See Diacsa, 
100.J 

Dis-cov'er (kuv'-). 

Dis-coy'er-a-ble (•cuv'-), 

DiB-cov'ered (-kmf*urd)^ 

150. 
Dia-oor'er-er (-tev'-)* 
Di8<eoy'er-ture (-A»»v'-). 
Dia-ooF'er-y (-*itr'-), 

171, 233, £xc. 
DiB-crod'it. 
Di8-cred'it-a-ble, 164. 
DiB-cred'it-a>bly. 
Dis-cred'it-ed. 
Dia-cred'it-in 



I Dis-creet' (13), a. pru 



t 



kt^U6tVLtftioitffilk^^U(^t^ft9k9riifkMimUttkaiimta0t,tLa$im 



OfSCREPAlTCE 



173 



DISBSABTBNED 



dent, o- iSte Discrete, 

Dis'cre-paiioe [so Wk. 

Sm. Wr. ; d»«-<jr«»'- 

aiw,Wb.Gd.l07,155.] 
DiB'cre-pan-cy fso. Wk. 

Sm. wr.; <w«-*rep'- 

(m-«v, Wb. Gd. 107, 

155.1 
Dis'cre-pant [«o Wk. 

Sm. Wr. ; aia-brqt'' 

ant, Wb. Gd. 155.] 
Dls-erete' (13), a. Bep|»- 

nte, distinct. [See 

IMsereet, 100.] 
Dis^re'tlon (-kr^shfun). 
IMs-ere'tioii-al {4eresh'' 

un^). 
IHs-cre'tioii-s-ry 

(-kresh'un^), 72. 
Ins-cre'tJve. 
IMs-crim'i-nate, 73. 
Dis-erim'i-nat-ed, 183. 
Dis-crimM-nat-ing. 
0ls-erim-i-iut'tlon. 
Dis-ciim'i-na-tlve. 
Dis-crim'i-nat-or. 
Dis-erim'i-na-to-ry. 
Dls-crown', 28. 
IMs-crowned', 16&( 
IMs-crown'lns-. 
IMs-cur'Blre, M. 
Dis-cor'so-iy. 
Dis'cag [L. pi. IHs'ci; 

"Bag. pi. Dfs'eus^s 

J-ez), 196], n. a quoit. 
See DlflcottS, 160.} 
B-coss', 22, ia3. 
Dis-cassed' i-ktutf), 165. 
IMs-cass'er. 
Dis-cass'ing. 
Dis-eas'sion (-fttwVtm). 
Dis-dain' (<l&s-da»')> 23* 

130. 
Dis-daiiied' (diz-dAnd^), 

150. 
Dts-dain'fla (dbhd^tmf- 

IMs-daiB'faiff (di»-), 
IHs-ease' (<ft^«')* 138. 
Dis-eased' (diz-izd'), 

183. 
Dis-gas'ing (-««'-)• 
DiB-em-barlr. 
DiB-em-bark-a'tioii. 
Dls-em-bftr'rass, 170. 
Dis-em-bftr'rassed 

('Ttut), 165. 
DiB-em-D&r'rasB-liisf. 
Dis-em-bodled (-<cf), 

171, 180. 
Dis-cm-bod'y. 
Dis-em-bod'y-isg^. 



DiB-em-boffne' (-M^* 

87, 171. 
DiB-em-bogned' 

{-Ugdf), 183. 
DiB-em-b^^e'ment 

(-*»^'-). 185. ' 
Dis^m-bdgfu'ing 

(-*V-). 

Dis -cm-bo w'el. 

Dis-^m-bow'elled (-eld) 
[Disembow- 
eled, Wb. Gd. 208. 
•^See 177 1 and Note 
E, p. 70.] 

DlB-em-bow'el-Unff 
[Dis em bowel- 
iB8r,Wb. Gd.a03.] 

Dis-em-broU'. 

Dis-em-broiled', 165. 

Dis-em-broil'iaff. 

Dis-en-a'ble, m. 

Dls-en-a'bled (-a'Md), 
183. 

Dis-en-a'bliiig. 

Dis-^i-am'oiued 
C-am'urd). 

Dis-en-ohuif , lU. 

Dis-en-chaat'ed. 

Dis-en-chant'er. 

Dis-en-ehant'ing^. 

Dis-en-chanfmeiit. 

Dis-en-cun'ber. 

DiB-en-cnm'liered 
{Amrd)^\e&. 

DiB-en-cum'ber-iagf. 

DiB-en-ciun'braiifle. 

Dis-en-gage'. 

DlB-en-gaged', 183. 

DiB-en-gage'ment. 

Dis-en-gag'ing {-a^*-), 

Dis-en-no'ble, 104. 

Dis-e»-no'bled(-«o'Ud)« 
Dis-en-no'bling. 
Dis^n-slare'. 
Dis-en-Blared', 183. 
Dis-ea-slav'ing. 
DiB-en-tan'gle (-foMr'- 

oO,**, iw. 
Dis-en-tan'gled (-ten^r'- 

DM-en-taii'gling 

[DiBcnthrall. 203. 
— See DialnthraU.] 

Dis-es-teem'. 

DiB-es-teemed', 165. 

Dis-eB-teem'ing. 

Dis-es-ti-ma'tion. 

Dis-fa'vor [Disfa- 
vour, Sm. 190, 203.1 

DiB-fa'rored (Hwnd), 
165. 

Dis-ik'Yor-ing. 



Dls-flgm-ra'tiaii. 
Dis-fig'ure, 01. 
Dts-flg'ared (-^MftOtlBS. 
Dis -flg'ure-ment. 
Dis-fig'ar-er (-yMr^), OU 
DIs-flg'ar-iiig (-yur-). 
Dis-frni'oUse {^cMx) 

\noi dis-flran'ohis, 

153.] 
Dis-fhm'ohlsed 

i-chXzd). 
Dls-iyaa'chlse-ment 

(-cAU). 
DiB-gar'nish, 101. 
Dis-gar'niBhed {^niakt\ 
Dis-gar'nish-ing. 
Dis-gorge' («t-., oi 

di«-) Tdiz-^arf, Wk 

Sm. Wr. ; ai$-igori\ 

Wb. Gd. 155.]^ 
Dls-gorged' (»£«-, oi 

die-), 165, 183. 
Dis-gorge'meiit (dis-, ob 

die-). 
DlB-jorg'ing (-iforf-), 

Dis-graoe' {die-, or die-) 

Idiz-gras', Wk. Sm. 

Wr. ; die^frde', Wb. 

(M. 155.1 
Dis-graoed' idie-gr^t', 

or die-gr&et'). 
DiB-graoe'ful (diz-gras'- 

fSoi, or dii-grwfdil), 
Ins^ra^'ing. 
Dis-gutse' {iMz-gkt^, or 

dis-ghW) (171) Idiz- 

qMz', Wr. ; die-ffhlz^, 

Wb. Grd. ; dizg^gW, 

Wk. ; diz-gnnze, Sm. 

26, 53, 136, 155.] 
Dis-guised' (diz-ghMz^, 

or dU-ahlzd'), 150,183. 
Di8-gaiB(er (Mz-f^U^' 

ur, or dt«-^al«'«r). 
DiB-guis'ine {diz-ghi:^' 

ing, or dw-^AU'liM). 
DiB-gusf (die-, or tft*-) 

Idiz-guet', Wk. Sm. 

Wr. ; dis-guet*, Wb. 

(M. 136, 155.1 
Dis-gnst'ed (di«-, or 

dis). 
DiB-gttct'ing {diz-, or 

d{s-). 
Dish, 16, 40. 
Dis-ha-bnie' (-6^') (171) 

fDeshabille, 203.] 
DlBh'cldth, 206. 
Dis-heart'en (-hart'n), 

149 
Dis-heart'ened i-karff- 

nd), 165. 



ftU; OotMtiieres dbosinlboAi^af <ii&oile;gb a#g in go jl^aato this. 

15* 



DISHEARTENING 

Dts-beirt'eii-liur 

l.hari'n-j. 
Dlitted «JuA(), Note C, 

S^iibeT'el, 1W. 

Dl-ihcv'elled (-fid) 

(IBS) [Di > h - 
eled , Wb. Od 
— See 177, and Mote 
K, p. 70,1 

Dl-gher'elllng tpl- 

DtBh'lng. 

Dig-bcm'eat (dis-on'-). 



DlB-lioii'or-tblr Idit- 
DiThoo'or-try (dli- 
Dta-hon'ored (iKt-on'- 



DIs-lD-cll-ni'aon. 



DIs-ia-coT'po-ntb i 

* V. n. 
Dia-in-cor-po-riit-ei], 



Die Is-ftct'int. 
IHi-ln-fKfed. 
Dti-lo-ftc'tlon. 



DlB-la-gen'a- 
Dts-in-fiPr'lt, 



Dli-la-te-rn'tlon. 
Dis-ln-ter', 21, Not*. 



en*-**, Wt. Sm. Wr. i 
(H>-in'<er-6>(-«(, Wb. 
Oil. 130, lU.l 

DI.-lD-ter'mMit. 

DtB-ln4hrUI' [Di 



I' [blien- 



tbr>l,Sm.»3.] 
DiB-bi-tbrUled', IffiL 
Dl»-bi-thraU'lng. 



Dta-ioln' (dti-, or d{>-) 
tiUzMn', Wk. Sm. 
Wr. i dit-join', Wb. 
Qd. IM, 155.) 

DtBplolnel' ((Hz-, oi 

DtBplolii'luK ((H2-, or 

DlB-JolDt' ((Hz-, or dit) 

[^-joifit', wit. 8m. 

Wr. ; diM-joHit', Wb. 

Gd. 130, ISS.i 
DlBjolat'ed (dtx-, 01 

dU-j. 
DlB-Jolut'iDS {dlt-, or 

DK-luDcf Idtz-, m 

dU-). 136. 
IMt-JmutlTe (dit-, or 

(Hi-). 
Diik, IS. 
Dli-lfke' rdfi-, or dli.] 

Mii-nt', wk. am. 

Wr.j dii-av, Wb. 

Gd, 198, 165.) 
mi-Ilked' Idit-mt', or 

dit-lUcf). 
DiB.L-k'lng (dit; or 



Dls'in»l(dii'.), 130. 
Dln'Rut-l; (iH:'-), 130, 

Ua-mui'tle (diz-, or 
(Ki-l rdlt«i.in't2, Wk. 
Sm. Vr. i (Htmini'- 



H, Wb. Od. 138, 



Idlt-mta', Sm. Wr. i 
dit mill' , Wb. Gd. 
136, 165.1 
Dli-DiJise'ed (dit;-, or 



\Vr.; dii-mi', 

Gd. 136, 155.) 

J, ('jjjj 



iHi-) r(l£i-nKn)'5iu-, 
Wk. Sm. Wr.) <Hi- 
mem'bm; Wb. GO. 

DiH-mem'bered (dli- 
Tnm'5urd, or dit- 
mem'turd]. 

Dla-m«in'ber-biK (dfl-, 

DiB ■ mem'ber-ment 

DIiiWbi' (dit^ti', or 

Tk. Sm. Wr.* (Ht-* 
n(«', Wb. Gd. 130, 



dinaiiW 1051 
ate C, p. 3t. 
■nlsB'lng (di»-, or 



Ifl-miB'Blan (dis-ntlth'- 

lB"nionnt' '"idii^ or 

dii-) (28) r>Hi-<iwUfi(', 

Wk. Hm. Wr.j di*- 

nunm<', Wb. Gd. 136, 

155,) 

ia-mODDt'ed (dfi-, ur 

UB-mount'liig ((Hz-, or 

be'dl^noe, ItO. 
lUs-o-be'dl-ent. 
--lB^)-bey' (-60'). 

ls-o.be:rM' (-Md'), 
Ws-olbey'er (-6*'-). 



Si n, 7- Ion; j 1, 1, 1, B, U, }, ttoH ; iatin tu, kattn Sut, t 



DISOBETINO 

Di8-o-bC7'iii£^ f-bA'-). 
Pls-o-blige' [so Sm. 

Wr. WD. Gd. i dis-o- 

bW', or dU-o^l^f^ 

Wk. 166.1 
BiB-o-bliged', 183. 
DlB-o-blige'ment. 
DiB-o-blig-ing i-baf-). 
DiB-or'der (Mz-, or dis-) 

[diz-or'dur, Wk. 8m. 

Wr.j dis-orfdwtyrh. 

Gd. 136, 156.] 
Dis-or'dered {diz-or'- 

durd, or dU-ordurd), 

150, 171. 
Dis-or'der-ing (diz-. Or 

dis-). 
Dis-or'der-ly (diz-, or 

dis-). 
Dis-or-gan-i-za'tioii. 

idiz-, or dis), 112. 
Dis-or'gan-ize (diz-, or 

dis-) [diz-or^gaj^lZf 

8m. Wr. ; dis-or'gan- 

Iz, Wb. Gd. 136, 165.] 
Dis-or'gan-ized (mz-, or 

dis-). 
Dis-or'gan-u-er (diz-, 

or dis-). 
Dis-own' (diz-^in'f or 

di$-9n')[diz-9n', Wk. 

8m. Wr. ; dU-lhi', 

Wb. Gd. 136, 165.] 
Die-owned' {diz-9nd\ 

or dis-Ond')i 166. 
Bis-pftr'age, 70, 170. 
DU-pftr'aged, 160, 1S3. 
Dis-pftr'age-ment. 
Dis-pftr'a-ger. 
Dis-p&r'a-ging. 
Bis'pa-rate. 
Bis-pftr'i-ty, 106, 169. 
iMs-part'. 
Bis-part'ed. 
DlB-part'ii^. 
IMs-pas'Bioii {-pash'- 

un). 
Dis-paB'sion-^ite (-pash'- 

Uflr). 

I>i»-pateh' [Dee- 

patch, 203. — iSee 
Despatch.] 

Dis-patched^ (-patcM') 
.[Despatched, 

Dls-patch'ing fDes- 
patching,203.] 

Dis-pelled' (pOd'), 176. 
Dis-pel'ling. 
Dls-pen'sa-rv, 72. 
DiB-pen-sa'tion. 
DiB'pen>M-tor [so Sm. 



176 

Wr. ; dis-pen-sa'tar, 

Wk. Wb. Gd. 155.] 
Dls-pen'sa-to-ry. 86. 
Dis-pense', 16 ; Note D, 

p. 36. 
DiB-pensed' (-petuf). 

Note C. p. 34. 
Dis-pens'er. 
Dls-pens'ing, 183. 

Dl8-p«o'ple7-ii<'p{)> 164. 
Dis-peo'pled ipi'pld), 

183. 
Dis-peo'pler {-pi'-). 
Dis-peo'pUng (-pi'-). 
Di-sperm'oQB. 
Dis-perse', 21, Note. 
Dis-persed' i-pertt'), 

Dis-pers'er, 183. 

Dis-pers'ing. 

DiB-per'sion. 

Dis-perslve. 

Dis-plr'it, 170. 

Dis-plr'it^. 

Dis-plrat-ing. 

DiB-plaoe'. 

DiB-plaoed' (^lOit'). 

Dis-plaoe'ment. 

DiB-pl&c'ing. 

Dis-pUnt'. 

Dis-plAnt'ed. 

Dis-plftnt'ing. 

Dis-pIayS 23. 

Dis-pUyed', 166, 188. 

Dls-play'er. 

Dis-play'hig. 

Dis-plea8e'7-p2«;e')* 
Dis-pl^ased' {^lizd'). 
Dis-pleasMng i-pliz'-). 
DiB-pl^as'ure (-plezh'-), 

01, 171. 
Dis-plode'. 
Dis-pldd'ed, 183. 
Dis-plod'ing. 
Dis-plo'Bion C-zhun). 
Dis-plo'sYye, 84. 
Dis-plume', 26. 
Dis-plumed', 166. 
Dis-plum'lng. 
Dis-port'. 
Dis-port'ed. 



pis-port'ing. 
I'a-ble 



(-j>6»'-), 



Dis-pos' 

164, 160. 
Dis-pds'al ipOz'-). 
Dis-pose', 136. 
Dis-posed' {-pUzd'), 
Dis-poR'er {-pOz'-). 
DiB-pdB'lng, (-j>ff«'-)' 
Dis-po-sl'tion {-zish'- 

ttn). 
Dls-poB-BesR' (poz- 

zes') [so Wk. Sm. 



DISEOBB 

Wr. ; dis-pos-ses'f 

Wb. Gd. 166.— Sm 

Possess.] 
Dis-pos-sessed' {-poz- 

zest'). 
Dis-pos-sess'ing (-poz- 

zes'-\. 
Dls-pralse' (-prdz'). 
Dis-proof. 
Dis-pro- por'tion. 
Dis -pro-p6r'tion-a-ble, 

164. 
Dis-pro-pdr'tioii-a-bly. 
Dis-pro-pdr'tion-al. 
Difl-pro por'tion-al-ly. 
Dis-pro-pdr'tion-atc, 73. 
Dis-prov'a-ble {-proov'- 

a-bl), 164, 183. 
Dis-prov'al {■proov'-). 
Dis-prove' f -proot;'-), 10. 
Dis-proved' {-proovd'). 
Dis-prov'er (•proav'-). 
DiB-prov'ing l-proatr-). 
Dis^pg-ta-bte (164) [so 

Sm. Wr. Wb. Gd.; 

dis'pu-t€hhl, or dis- 

pu'ta-bl, Wk. 166.] 
Dis'pa-tant. 
Dis-pa-ta'tton, 112. 
Dis-pu-ta'tiofts (shu$), 
Dis-put'a-tlve, 84. 
DiB-pute',26. 
Dis-put'ed, 183. 
Dis-put'er. 
Dis-put'lne. 
Dis-qaal i-fl-ea'tion 

(kual-)t 112, 116. 
Dis-qual'i-ned (-kwot'-), 

186. 
DiB-<iiial'i-f y (-kwoV-). 
Dis-qual'l-fy-ing 

(^twol'-). 
Dis-qui'et. 
Dis-qui'et^. 
Dis-qui'et-ing. 
Dis-qui'e-tfKK, 106. 
Dis-qoi-sX'Uon i-zish'- 

un). 
Dis-re-gard'. 
Dis-re-gard'ed. 
Dis-re-gard'ful {-/oil), 
Dis-re-gard'lng. 
DlB-rclash, 170. 
Dis rel'iahed i-%sht), 

165. 
Dis-rel'ish-ing^. 
Dis-rep'fi-ta-oie, 164. 
Dis-rep'u-ta-bly. 
Dis-re-pute'. 
Dis-re-spect'. 
DiB-re-spect'flil (-fSoT). 
Disrobe' (diz-, or dis'-) 

[diz-rib', Wk. Sm. 



fiOl; dosititherei Sbasinfoot; 9 as in fiudle i gh as g in go ; t2l as in this. 



IH8R0B8D 



17« 



DlBTRlBimVS 



Wr.; <Ut-^^',Wb.Gd. 

165.1 
Disrobed' (dU-r9bd', 

oriiif-rVM'), 165, 183. 
IMs-rdb'iiiff (dig-t or 

Dis-mp'tioii (diz-i or 
dU') [diz-rup'skuny 
Wk. Sm. Wr.j dit- 
rup'tihun, Wb. Gd. 
155.J 

Dis-Bat-i»-fac'tion. 

DiB-8«t-is-fan'to-rT, 86. 

Dis-Bat'it-ned, 186. 

Bis-Mt'is-^, 9i. 

Dis-sat'iB-fy-ing. 

DisMctS 15, 1(8. 

Dis-seot'ed. 

Dis-seetM-ble, 164, 109. 

Dis-sect'lng. 

I>iB-«ec'tlom. 

Dls-sect'or. 

DiB-seis'in (•«l«'<»), of 
DiB-Beiz'in. 

DiB-seize', or DU-ieifle' 

(-«*z')- 
DlB-Belzed', or IMs- 

Beised' (-«««d0>150,183 
DlB-Beiz'ing^, or IMa- 

BeiB'ing {-stz'-). 
DiB-Beiz-ee', 118. 
Dis-Bciz'or, 118. 
DiB-sem'ble, IM. 
Dis-Bem'bled (^em'Mci), 

183. 
DiB-sem'bler. 
Dis-Bem'blin^. 
DiB-Bem'i-nale, 7S, 170. 
DiB-aem'i-nit-ed, 183. 
DlB-sem'i-nat-ing. 
DiB-Bem-i-na'tion. 
DiB-Bem'i-nat-or. 
Dis-Bea'Bion. 
Dis-sent', 15. 
Dis-sent'ed. 
Dis-Bent'er. 
IMB-Ben'tient (^ffteirf)* 

171. 
DiB-Bent'ing^. 
Dis-Bep'i-ment, 160, 170. 
DiB-Ber-ta'tion. 
Bis-Berve', 21, N. 
Dis-seryed', 165. 
DiB-BervToe, 169. 
DiB-Bervloe-a-ble, 164, 

183 
Dia-^etv'mg, 
Dis-sev'er. 
Dis-Bev'er-anoe, 160. 
Dis-sev-er-a'tion. 
Dis-sev'ered i^wrd), 150. 
DlB-Bev'er-iBg. 
DiB'si-denoe, 170. 



DlB'sl-deiit. 
IMB-BU'i-enee (100) [bo 

8m. Wb. (M.; dU- 

t«'yen«,Wk.;<«{«-«a'- 

vena, or diM-iil^t-ent, 

Wr. 155.1 
DiB-BiPi-ent. 
DiB-Bim'l-lar, 100. 
Di»-Biiii-i-Ur'l-tr. 
IXs-Bi-mll'i-tiide, 100. 
DiBHdm-a-la'lion. 
Dis'Bi-pate, 73, 170. 
DiB'Bi-pat^, 183. 
XMs'Bipat-ing. 
Dia-si-pa'tioii. 
DiB-so'oi-ate (^t-M) 

[flo Wk. Sm. Wr. ; 

di9-$o'ihAt, Wb. Gd. 

155.1 
I>iB-Bo'oi-a1^^(ntM<«-). 
Dl»-Bo'ci-at-ing^. 
DiB-BO-ci-a'tioB (so- 

akt). 
DiB-BO-la-b«'i-tT. 
Dis'BO-lu-Ue, 156, lOi. 
DIb'bo lute, 170. 
Dis-so-ln'tion. 
DiB-Bolv-arbU'l-ty (dU- 

xdV'), 160. 
I>i»-Bohr'a-ble(<ite-«ol9'- 

a-bl), 136, 164, 183. 
DiB-Bolre' (dU-9ol9'), 

136, 171. 
DiB-Bolred' (dig-tfokkP), 

183. • 

DiB-8oly'eiit(<lte-«oir'-)* 

DiB-Bolv'iiig((lis-;^olv'-). 

Dis'so-nanee, 160.* 

DiB^BO-nant. 

Dis-Boade' f-Moici'), 171. 

DiB-Buad'ed i-iwitd'-), 
183. 

DiB-Bwad'er (-awad'-), 

DiB-Buad'ing (MvAd'-). 

Dis-Bua'aioa (-noA'- 
zhun). 

DlB-Bua'sYve {-gwa'Hv). 

DiB-Bvl-lab'ic, 109, 170. 

DiB-Byl'U-ble, or Ois'- 
BTl-la-ble (164) [bo 
Wr. Gd. ; dit-Hl'a-hl, 
Sm.,di«'«i^a-frl,Wk. 
165.] 

Dis'taff, 171. 

DiB-tain'. 

DiB-tained', 150. 

Dis-tain'ing'. 

Dis'tance, 169. 

Dis'tanced (-tofwl). 

Dis'tane-in^. 

Dis'tant. 

Dis-taate'. 

DlB-tast'ed, 183. 



fDiv.tiUte'fta (;^5N). 
DlB-Uflt'injf. 
DiB-tem'per. 
Dia-tem'per-a-tore. 
DlB-tem'pered (-jmr^v 

150, 166. 
DiB-tem'per-lBff. 
DiB-teDdS 15. 
DiB-tend'ed. 
DiB-tend'liur. 
DiB ten-Bi-Sl'i-tf, 109. 
Dis-ten'slve. 
IXfl-ten'Bion, 169. 
DiB'tleh {4%k) [not dis'- 

tich, 153.1 
DfB'tieh-oiUi (-MX;-)- 
Di8-Ul'rDiBtill,W1>. 

Gd. m. — See 179, and 

Note E, p. 70.1 
DiB-tiria-ble, 161, 176. 
DiB-tiMa'tion. 
DlB-ttiaa-to-rr, 86. 
DiB-tiUed' {-md'), 17«. 
DiB4iner. 
DiB-tiiaer-y, 170. 

Di»-til'Uiigr. 
DiB-tlnct' i-Ungktf), 54. 
Dia-tiDc'tkm {-HagV-), 
DiBtinct'Ive. 
DlB-tln'g^iilBh i^Ung*' 

owi»h), 171. 
DlB-tin'gaish-A-ble 

(-ting'gtffish'thbl)^ MO. 
DlB-tin'flrniBhed (-Mn^- 

gtffiaia), 166 s Note C, 

p. 34. 
D&-tta'eiiiBh-er (-Un^- 

DlB-tin'guiBh-liig 
i-Hngrgwish'). 
I>iB-tort^ 17. 
DiB4ort'od. 
DiB-tort'ing^. 
DiB-tor'tion. 
Dis-tract', 10. 
Dia-traet'ed. 
DiB-tracfinff. 
DlB^rae'tioiii 
Dia-train'. 
Difi-train'anble, 16A. 
I>i84s«iiied', 166. 
Dis-train'or. 
Dis-tresB', 15. 
Dis-treBBed'(4rw<')>10A. 
Dis-tress'liil (-/dol). 
Dia-treBB'ing'. 
Dis-trib'u-ta-ble, 164. 
Dis-trib'u-ta-ry, 72. 
DlB-trib'aCe. 
Dis-trib'ut-er. 
Dis-trib'ut img, 
Dis-tri-ba'tion. 
Dia-trib'a-tlve. 



S, g, !, o, «i % long, A, ^, !, d, tt, j^, thori, ft oa <» fiur, a M In Cut, kaaim 



DIBTBICT 



177 



DOFFED 



DtB'trkt (ifl) [nofdftt'- 

trikt, ur, i5J.] 
Dis'trict-ed. 
Dis'triot-iag. 
DiB-tru8t', 22. 
DiB-trust'ed. 
DiB-truBt'ful i-JSol). 
DiB-trust'ing. 
DiB-turb', 21. 
DiB-turb'anoe, 169. 
DlB-tnrbed', 166. 
DlB-turb'er. 
Dis-turb'ine. 
Dis-un'ion (-An^mmXSl) 

[bo Sm. Wr. Wb. Gd.; 

ai»-u'n%^un,Wk. 166.] 
DiB-iin'ion-ist (-Oit'yttn- 

ist). 
Dis-u-nite', 89. 
Dto-a-Bff ed, 183. 
DiB-u-nit'er. 
DiB-a-mt'iBg. 
Dis-a'ni^y, 106, 169. 
Di^uB'age i^-}, 70. 
DiB-u8e'(-o«0, n. 26, 161. 
DiB-uBe' ('•z'h V, 161. - 
DiB-U86d'(-«2Ml' ),lfiO,183. 

Ditch, 16, 44; Note D, 

p. 37. 
Ditched idida)^ Note 

v/f p. «i4. 
Ditch'er. 

Diteh'ingr. 

Di'the48m (4cm), 106. 
IM'the^Bt. 
Di-tlie-iBt'ie, 109. 
Di-the-iBt'ic-al, 106. 
Dith'7-nunb, 171. 
Dith-y-ram'bie. 
Di'tone. 
Dit'ri-glyph [bo 8m. 

Wr.; Mrigilif^ Gd. 

156.] 
Di-tro'chee(-te>,7B. 
DIt-tan'der. 
Dit'tBruy. 
Dit'tTed (-Md), 99. 
Dit'to, 170. 
Dit'ty, 08, 170. 
Di-u-ref ic, 109. 
Di-uWiial, 72, 79. 
DK-yan', 121, 166. 
Di-vttr'i<CKte, 73, 170. 
Di-vAr'i-cat^. 
DT-vir'i-cat-ine. 
Di-yftr-i-ea'tioii. 
Dive, 25. 
Dived, 166, 183. 
Div'er. 

Dl-verge'. 21, N.; 79, 166. 
D1-Terged', 165. 
Dl-yerg'enoe {-veif-). 



Df-rerg'ent {•veri'-'S 
Dl-verg'ing l-very-), 
Di'vers {•vurz)y a. 148. 
Di'verse (^in*r»), a. 146. 
Di'verae-Iy, 106. 
Dl-ver'si-fied, 186. 
Dl-ver'si-form, 109. 
DI-ver'8i-i^, 94. 
DI- ver' si-f y-ing'. 
DI-yer'Bion, 21, N. ; 79. 
DI-yer'8i-ty, 169. 
Dl-yert', 21, 79 
Dl-yert'ed. 
D!-vert'er. 
Dl-yert'lng. 
DI-yer'tlBe-ment {Aiz- 
mong), 

0^ Rmftii ipeHfl tiila 
word DiTertiiemcBt, 
and Mjfl of It, **aa old 
word in the lutgiMf e: bvt, 
M a modem word, reviTcd 
with • half French pro- 
nunciation by making the 
kat ifrltaUe aaaal i-momg)^ 
to sifniiy a Aort buUet or 
other efiUrtainment bttvoe^m 
tkt act* qf lonffer pieeeM.** 

Dl-yertlye, 84. 
Dl-yeet' (16, 79) [De- 

y e 8 1 , 203. — S^eeNote 

under Deveat.} 
Dl-yest'ed. 

DI-ye8t'i4>le, 164, 169. 
Dl-yest'lng. 
DI-vTd'a-ble, 164, 183. 
Di'yl-di'yl (de^w^le^v^ 
Dl-yide', 25, 79. 
Dl-vid'ed, 183. 
Diy'i-dend, 169. 
Dl-yid'er. 

Dl-yid'ers (<«r«),4i.^ 
Dl-yid'in^. 
Diy-T-na'tioii. 
Dl-yine', a.n.iiv. 25,79. 
Dl-yined', 166, 183. 
Dl-vin'er. 
Di-vln'tng. 
Diy'ing, 183. . 
IMTliig^^beU,215. 
DI-yiB/l-ty, 106, 160. 
DI-yi»-i-blFi-ty i-viz-), 
Dl-yi8'i-ble (-vizfUi), 

164y 169. 
Df-viB'l-Wy (-t*8r'-). 
DI-Tl'Biea {^vizh'un), 
DI-yi'8or i-zur), n. the 

number by which the 

dividend Ib divided. 

[See Deviser, 160.^ 
Dl-vdroe', 24, 79. 

Dl-ydrced'(-«dr«<0» 1^* 
Dl-yorc'er. 
DV-vor^'i-ble, 164. 



Df-ySr^'ing. 

D!-v6r5'Ive. 

Dl-vulge' 22, 45. 

Dl-vulged',. 166. 163. 

Dl-vulg'er (vul^'-). 

DT-yulff'lng (^-vu^'-), 

Dl-vul'sion. 

DI-yul'Blve, 84. 

Di2'zi-ne88, 160, 170. 

Diz'zy, 93. 

Do idoo)t 19. 

[D o a t , 203.— 5m Dote] 

bof'i-ble (164) [so Wk. 
Sm. Wr. ; do^n^l^ or 
do9'i4»U Gd. 156.] 

Do9'ile_(162) [bo Wk. 
Sm. Wr.; clo'«t7, or 
doB*Uy Gd. 165i; a. 
teachable. [iSe0i>oB- 
Bil, 100.1 

Do-dVi-ty, 169. 

Do9'i-ma-cy, 169. 

Do9-i-maB'tio, 100. 

Dock, 18, 161. 

Dock'age, 169. 

Dook'et. 

Dock'et-ed. 

Dook'et-ing. 

Dock'-yara. 

Doc'tor, 18, 68. 

Doc'tored, 165. 

Doc'tor-al. 

Doo'tor-ate. 

Doc'tor-ing. 

Doc'trin-al. 

Doe'trlne, 152. 

Doc'u-ment. 

Doc-u-ment'aL 

Doo-u-ment'a-ry, 72. 

Dod'der, 77. 

Dod'dered {-dmr^^ 165. 

Do-dec'a-gon. 

Do-deo-a-gyn'i-Hi 

Do-de-eag'y-nottfl 

(-fcV'-). 
Do-deo-a-lie'draL 
Do-deo-a-he'dron. 
Do-de-can' dri-aa. 
Do-de-ean'droftB. 
Dodge (dOJDt 18« 45. 
Dodged {Mjd)^ 15Q, 163. 
Dodg'er. 
Dodg'ing. 
Dd'(U>, SA. 
Dde (d«), «. a Bhe-deer. 

[See Dough, 160.1 
Do'er (A>o'-), 19, 77. 
DocB (dtw) [not doos, 

163.] 
Doe'sUn (dS^), 206. 
Doff, 18, ira. [p. 94. 
Doffed {detft). Note C« 



ftU ; a« i» Hmto i 0& M <i» lioet ; f oi In fiwilt ; gh Of g i» go ; (h a« in this. 



DOFFER 



178 



DO WELLED 



DoflTer, 170. 

DofPins, 

Dog, 18. 

Dol'day, 206. 

Doge, 24, 45. 

Dogged (dogd) (161), v. 

did dog; a. i38, 161. 
Dog'ger-el i-gur-el) 

[Doggrel,:^a3.] 
Dog'gish {-ghiah). 
Dog'ma, 72. 
Dog-mat'ic, 100. 
Dog-mat'ic-ai. 
Dog-mat'icB. 
Dog'ma-tism (-Hzm) fl36 
Dog'ma-tist. 
Dog'ma-tize, 202. 
Dog'ma-tized, 183. 
Dog'ma-tiz-er. 
Dog'ma-tiz-iug. 
Dog'Btar, 206. 
Dog'wd&d. 
DoPly, 27, 93. 
Do'ing (doo'-). 
Doit, 27. 

Do-lab'ri-form, 160. 
Dole, 24. 
Doled, 165. 
Dole'ful i-fool), 
Dol'ing, 183. 
Dole' some {-sum), 160. 
Doll, 18, 172. 
Dol'lar, 74, 170. 
Dol'o-mite. 
Do'lor, 88. 
Dol-o-rif er-oiis, 106. 
Dol-o-rific. 
Dol'o-rofis, 170. . 
Dol'phin, 18, 35. 
Dolt, 24. 
Do-main', 23. 
Dome, 24. 
Do-mes'tio. 
Do-mes'tic-ate. 
Do-mes'tic-at-ed. 
Do-mes'tic-at-ing. 
Do-mes-tic-a'tion. 
Dom'i-clle, 152, 160. 
Dom'i-clled, 165. 
Dom-i-cil'la-ry (-tfiTtfo- 

ry) (72, 171) [so Wk. 

Sm.Wr.; dam^-sil'i' 

a-rvj Wb. Gd. 165.1 
Dom-i-dl'i-ate, 73. 
Dom-i-cil'i at-ed. 
Dom-i-cil'i-at-ing. 
Dom-i-dl-i-a'tion. 
Dom'i-cil-ing, 183. 
Dom^i-nant, 160. 
Dom'i;iiate. 
Dom'i-nat-ed, 183. 
Dom'i-nat-ing. 
Dom-i-na'tion. 



Dom'i-nat-Tve [so Sin. j 

dom't-na-tivMr* Wb. 

Gd. 155.] 
Dom'i-uat-or. 
Dom-i-neer', 169. 
Dom-i-neered' {-nfrd'), 
Dom-i-neer'ing. 
Do-min'i-cal, 72. 
Do-min'i-can. 
Do-mlu'ion {'pun). 
Dom'i-no [pi. Dom'i- 

noB (-n02), 1U2.J 
Don, 18. 
Do'nate. 
Do'nat-ed, 183. 
Do'nat-iug. 
Do-na'tion. 
Don'a-tlve, 84. 
Done (dun), part, from 

Do [See Dun, 160.] 
Do-nee', 118, 121. 
[Donjon, 203.— Sto 

Dungeon.] 
Don'key {dong'kff), 98. 
Do'nor {-naior), 17, 24. 
Doom, 19. 
Doomed, 166. 
Doom'ing. 
Dooms'day {doomz'-), 

214. 
Doop*(<»r),-24. 
Door'-keep-er. 
Dor [Dorr, 203.] 
[D o r a , 203. — 566 Dou- 

ra.] 
Do-ree', or Do'ree [so 

Wr. ; do-re' ^ Wb. Gd.} 

do' re, Sm. 155.] 
rpory,2a3.] 
Do'rian, 49, N. 
Ddr'ic, 170. 

Ddr'i-cism {-sUmi), 136. 
Dor'man-cy. 
Dor'mant, 17, 72. 
Dor'mer, 17, 77. 
Dor'mi-tlve, 84. 
Dor'mi-to-ry, 86. 
Dor'mouse, 200. 
[Dorr, 203 — See Dor.] 
Dor'sal, 17, 72, 148. 
Dor'sel, 17, 76, 148. 
Dor'ser, 17, 77. 
Dor-sif er-ofis, 106. 
Dor-Bip'a-rotis. 
Do'ry (49, N.), n. a kind 

offish. [Dor ee,203.1 
Do'ry, n. a kind of small 

boat. 
Do0e, 24. 
Dos'sil (170), n. a lump 

of lint, — a term used 

in surgery. [See Do- 
cile, 160.] 



Dost {dust) [not dOtt, 
153], V. the seoond 
person singular of the 
present tense indica- 
tive, f^om Do. [See 
Dust, 160.] 

Dot, 18. 

Do'tage, 24, 160. 

Do'tal, 24, 72. 

Do'tard. 

Do-ta'tion. 

Dote (24) [Do at, 203.1 

Dot'ed, 1(3. 

Dot'er. 

Dot'ing. 

Dot'tard, 17a 

Dot'ted, 170. 

Dot'ter-eL 

Dot'ting. 

Dofib'le (d«6'0, l«*i 171. 

Doftb'led (<iii5'2d), 183. 

Doubl^''fntendr€{doob'' 
Irong-tona'dr.) 

Doublet (dttft'-), 22. 

Dottb'ling (dub'-). 

Dofib-loou' {dub-), 121. 

Doubt {dour), 28, 162. 

Doubt'a-ble {dout'a-bl). 

Doubt'ed {dout'-), 

Doubt'er {dout'-). 

Doubt'ftil (dout'JSol). 

DoviWrnl-iy(douf/odl-). 

Doubling {dout'-). 

Douceur TFT.){doo-»wr') 

Douchie (Fr.) {doosh). 

Dough {d6) (162), n. 
flour or meal moist- 
enal with water for 
making bread. ISee 
Doe, 160.] 

Dough'nut {da'-), 162. 

Dough'ti-ly {dow'-). 

Dough'ti-ness Cdoto'-). 

Dough'ty {dow'-), 162. 

Ddugh'y {dd'y), 162. 

Dou'ra {doo^ra) {At.) 

iDora, Dhnrra, 
)urra,a03.] 
Douse, 28. 
Doused {dowst), 
Dous'ing. 
Dove {duv), 22. 
Dove'tail {duv'-), 171. 
Doye'tailed {duv'-), 166. 
Dove'tail-ing {duv'-), 
Dow'a-ble, 164,^ 169. 
Dow'a-ger, 45. 
Dow'dy. 
Dow'cl. 
Dow'eliedr 6W) [D o w- 

eled, Wb. Gfd. 203. 

— See 177, and Note 

E, p. 70.] 



a, e, i, 5, fi, y, long; ft, 6, 1, 5, tt, f, ihort', 'A at in fu, katin tut, %a$in 



DOWELUNQ 
Dow'el-llnE [Dowe 

iuK,wS.a<Lma.] 

Dow~et, 28, 77. 



Domi'hJIl, a. ft i>. 
pown'lncis, IW. 
Down'rightf-rK). 1< 
Down' ward, 72. 
Down'wirda (-vard 



Dngeei (dragd), 17fl> 
Dttg'gios (-glUng). 
Drag'gle, IM. 

Drag'net, aOfl. 
L>rjig'o-]njui [pL DiBff- 

I>r*t['aa'B-biaDd(dni0'- 



(Do. 



Down 
Dow'l, 

Dox-oTo^, , 

Doied idoid), m, 

I>oi'en((liut'n) (I* 
Do»D, roniy 

Doi'i-uMa, 171. 
Deling. 



Dnb'ble, IM. 
Dnb'blea (4rab'Uf),t8^ 
Diab'bUng. 

Dnubm Jdram) [IBS, 



Unc [Set Drxusht 
ieO.)[IJt»aght,20:i. 



)ri.fL r. [Dr.nglil, 
2030 

draogSI b if nn sceur- 

•mm, 203.— 

lee Draqghtuiivi-] 



[D^ 



DrsJn, 23. 
Draln'i-ble, IM. 
DraiD'HBB, ISO. 



Arm sen Ml, ittct.] 
Dri'nu, or Drun'k [k 
Wk. Wr. ; dronfa 
Sm.i dra'ma, or drd' 

DnuD'a-tlie, 202. 
Dmo'a-tlsBd, T83. 

Drank IrfroTSS), 10, M. 

Drape, 'O. 

Draped (drapO. 183. 



Draught (dr4fl),n. ant 
of drawing or - piUI- 
lae;~<iBpabUllr of 

whloh Is tskea b; 
drawing i — the act of 
drinldiigi—tbc liquor 

air ^ ^ a drawlc^, or 

Una ; — a drala ; — 
depth of water In 
wElcb a *blp fioattj 
.» boTcl glT«n to parta 



amUlUrybod)'! — an 
order IbrthnpaTment 
ofmoney. [SeeDraft, 
180.] [Draft, AM.) 

«^ ThB ■pcLILni dmglU 



mild veilcatory. 
Dring-hta ' man(ifr4ni'-. 



Draw«'(lUI)raoWr.i 
dr<np'*,Wb.Gil. IM.] 



Draw'cri C-ttra) [not 
drawi, l(d}, n. pt an 
ander garment for the 
lower Dioba. 

Drawl, ^T 



I'ing. 



Drar'agB, 1M>. 

Drfad (drecOi U- 
Dri^ad'ed. 

DrEad'ftil l-JUt). 

DrSad'iSoEht l-nout). 
Dreamed (drimd), laS. 



ill i t oa fn there ; Obaiia foot ) { 



(n OoUe ighatgingo;tJiiuin Ibia. 



I>nuBd(dna<)[Drs 



Drll/bled (drO'U}, HB. 



Drift, IS. 
Prift'sd. 

Drllt'tap. 

DrlUed, M. 

DrlU'lnc. 
' DHnk (Srfntft), IS, H. 

Drtak'tBg-. 

Dripped (drM), HnU 

C,p.M;l?5- 
Drlp'plDS, 170. 
Drive, ^ 

Drir'el (dHw'n, IM- 
Driv'elled (iMp'M) 

(DrJTelid, Wb. 

Gd.aw.— S«177,Bld 

Note E, p. 70.) 
Drlv'el-ler, [Drlrel- 
■Tb. M. IW8.J 



er.Wb 
Drlv'el-lli 



Drii'ile, IN. 
Diii'ilod {ilHi'U), 183. 
Drti'iUna. 
Droit, 24, ITS. 
Drilll'er-r. 

Drom'e-dk-rjr ((fnm'-), 
72,171. 

Dranek, lU, ISL 

DroD'lIur. 

Drfln'laG. 

Droop (ID), V. to hug 
dowBi to Unniilu 
[S«Drup«, l«o!] 

Drooped {ib-oopi), lU. 

Droop'lD^. 

Dropped (dnot) (Note 
C, p. M; ISO, 17«) 



Drop'ir, 1<W' 
[Dropt, aoa. — :SU 

Dropped.] 
Droal, 18, 174. 



DroM'l-aeai, 171, Ue. 
DrODsbi (droll*) (l«) 




pa'oeouH idroo-p«' 
K (droop) (19), ». . 



DUI.CIFYINO 



DruM (drDo»). 
Drused (droott). 
Dra-»endroo'za),n.fL 
Dru'sF tdroo'jy). 
Dry, is. 

Drj'-nuTH, sat, Exo. I. 

D!?ilas,72. 

Du'iU-lini (-<«•), IM. 

Dn'il-Ut, H. ona who 
beUevei Id Ibe doo- 
MDcorduiUaiii. [St 
Duellist, 148.] 

Dn-«l-l«t'lo. 

Dn'ilr-ehy (-t»). 

DuU>Ml'(diiM), 170. 
Dubiber [Dappar. 

Du'bi-ofti, 78. 
Du'bl-ti-ble, 104. 

DBa'Bl'lwXdii'kit.Ut.] 



Du'ei-llDg [DBellaD;, 

Wb. Gd. ma Sh 

177, uid Not« £, p. 
70.1 

Dn'el-Un, A. MM who 
flEliti duela. ISttm'- 

ai^i48.j_ 

rDiieIlat,trb.Gd.203.} 

Du'et, ISl. 

DuflbirDnfrie.iOS.] 
Dug, 22. 
Du-gong', lai. 
Duke (26) [not dook, 
ftorjook.l^, 134, Ul, 

Quke^dou, IW. 
Dul^»-In•'«, 72. 

Dul-ci-a-ca'tlon. 
Dnl'cl-fied, 18«. 

Dul'oUfyJng. 

u <« br, 4 at te liwt, 1 oi lit 



OUUSIMES 



f81 



Dnl'el-mw. 

Dull, 22, 172. 

DulVanL 

Dui'ly,6«,N.} 178. 

Dul'oesB (178) [Dn li- 
ne s 8 , Wb. Gd. 203.] 

Dulse, 22; Note D, p. 
37. 

Du'ly, 3ft, 93. 

Dumb (dum)f 182. 

Dum'fouad [D u m b - 
found, 203.] 

Dum'fouud-ed. 

Dum'foand-lng. 

Dump, 22. 

Dump' ling. 

Dum'py. 

Don (22), a. of m daric- 
biovm color: — V. to 
solicit with impor- 
tonity : — n. one w1m> 
duns. [5€«Done, IflO.] 

Dunce, 22, 30. 

Dunc'er-y. 

Dun'der. 

Dune, 26. 

Dun'flsh, 208. 

Dung, 22, 54. 

Dunged {dungd)^ 186. 

Duu^geon (-jun) (171) 
[Donjon, 203.1 

Dnng'tUl. 208. 

Dung'lng. 

Dung'y. 

Dun'nage, 180, 170. 

Dunned (dMfuOt 178. 
Dun'ner. 
Dun'ninff. 
Dun'nlsn, 170. 
Ihi-o-de-cen'ni^Al, 170. 
Ihi'O-def'i-mAl, 180. 
Ihi-o-de^'im-fid, 171. 
D«-o-dcc'i-md (189) [pL 

Du-o-de^'i-mot 

i-maz), 192.1 
Du-o-dec'u-ple, 18*. 
Du-o-den'a-ry, 72. 
Du-o-de'num. 
Du-o-lit'er-al. 
Dup'Srble, 181, 183. 
Dupe, 26. 
Duped (d«j7<). Note C, 

p. 34. 
Dup'er-y, 233, Exc. 
Du'pll-cate, 73, 169. 
Du'pli-cat-ed, 83. 
Da'pli-cat-ing. 
Du-pli-ca'tion, 112. 
Dn-plif'i-ty, 106, 160. 
Dup'per fDubber, 

203.1 
Du-nrbU'i-ty, 189. 



Dii'nirble,i8,H.;188. 

Dn'ra-bly. 

Dn'ranoe. 

Du-ra'tlon, 49, N. 

Du'ress [so Wk. Sm. 
Wr.; du^rtM'^ Wb. 
Gd. 155.1 [Durepse, 
Sm. 203.1 

During, 49, N. 

[Durra. 203. — ^8te 
Doura.) 

Durst, 21. 

[Duse, 208. — iSM 
Deuce.] 

Dusk, 22. 

Dusk'i-ly. 

DuBk'i-nees, 180. 

Dask'y. 

Dust (22), n. earthy or 
other matter in the 
state of a dry pow- 
der : — V. to firee irom 
dust. [.SeeDoatflOO.] 

Dust'ed. 

Dust'er. 

Dnst'l^en, 180. 

Dust'ing. 

Dnst'y, 93. 

Dutch, 22, 44^ 

Dm'te-ofts, 188. 

Du'ti-a-ble, 184. 

Du'ti-fUW^O* 
Du'tl-Ail-Iy i'/Sbty, 
Dn'ty, 26, 93. 
Durum'vir (L.) Tpl. Dm- 

tMM'vi-rl, 198.] 
Du-um'vi-ral. 
Dn-um'vi-rate, 73. 
Dwale,23. 
Dwftrf, 17, 171. 
Dwftrfed ((b0or/(),Note 

C, p. 34. 
Dw&rfing. 
Dwell, 15, 172. 
DweUed (dkMU) (186) 

[Dwelt, 203.] 

W^ Dk«U la now BMra 
coauiKmly immI tfaaa 
dwOied, 

DweU'er. 

Dwelling. 

Dwelt(l»)[Dwelled, 
203.] 

Dwin'^dle, 184. 

Dwin'died {dwin'did)y 
183. 

Df-4ui'io. 

Dye (<n) (25), n. a col- 
oring liquor. [See 
Die, 160.1 

Dyed {did) (183), part, 
from Dye. [;SeeDied, 
160.] 



Dye'ing(183)j 
Dye. X 5m 



from 
. . 'ingilOO.] 

Dy'er (87, N.;, n. one 
wliose business it is 
to dye cloth, Ae. {Set 
Dire,180.J 
Dye'stnflr, 208. 



Dy'hig (184), pari, from 
Diel See Dyeing, 180.1 
Dj^.nam'e-ter, lo£ 



Ihrn-a-met'rlo-aL 

Df -namMe, 100. 

Dy-nam'ie-al, 106. 

Dy-nam'ies. 

Dyn-a-mom'e>ter, 108. 

Df-nas'tic. 

Dyn'aa-ty, or Dy'naa-tY 
\din'at-ty^ Sm.; dl'- 
fUM-ey, wb. CSd. ; ta'- 
nae-tjf, or din'oe-ly, 
Wk. Wr. 165,] 

H^Alfhoofh Walker, 
in deference to the major- 
ity of ortlioepiete, putt the 
pronunciation drnaafy 
Brat, he eaya that '* analo- 
gy la clearly tar the lut" 
tim'attg.} 

Dys'cra-sy. 180. 
Dys-en-t$rio. 
Dys'en<iter-y, 171. 
Dys-pep'si-a (L.). 
Dy B-pep'sv ( 107>f so Sm. 
Wb. Gd.; dWpep^, 



or 

] 



Wk.; dis'pgihMf, 

dis-pep'sy^ W r. 166. 
Dys-pep'tie, 109. 
Dys-pep'tio-al, 106. 
Dys'pha-gT. 
I^B-pho'ri-a. 
Dysp-ncB'a (Hif-), 17L 
Dysp-thet'ic. 
Dys'u-ry [so Sm. Wb. 

CSd. } dizh'u-ru, Wk. ; 

dizh'u^ry, or oite'u-fy, 

Wr. 166.J 

E. 

fiaoh, 13, 44. 

fia'ger (C^tcr), «. ar- 
dent, earnest. {See 
Ea'gre, 160.] 

fta'gle («V0, 164, 171. 

fia'gle-eyed (<'i7M(f), 
2M, Exo. 2, 6. 

P.a'glet. 

fta'gre (t'gur) (164), n. 
a tide swelling above 
Another tide. [See £»- 
ger,180.] [Eger,203.J 

Rar (*r), 13. 

eared («r4), 186. 



ftU ; 8 4U In there ; 8b «t <n fbot } 9 <i# <« £uile ; gfa M g <» go i th at in thii. 

16 



Eiiri (ert), Zl, N. 
Enr'll-Deaa (eH-), 171. 
Ksr'lj- {tr--), 21, N. 
BuTl{ern)Ul,N.),«.to 

Ribar. [awUrn, UO.'J 
Earacd (ermt), WS. 
Eu'aen («r'-). 
Kara'lng (tm'-J. 
Ear'-rtna:, ^«e, Sxo. 1. 
Etnb(erlh),2l,S. 
Eirthed {««■*), Note 

C, p. 3+. 
EMtfi'BO (erfi'n), MB. 
Earth'l-neas («■[&'-], 

E vtb'lDg (crIA'-). 



{ml 



Esrtb'y ((rtA'v)< 
fiiK lis), 13, 17. 
eased (fal), lU, 183. 

Sm. Wt. ; li'tl, VTb. 
Gd.l».] 
fiue'meuElf ' ' 

Siia'Lly (*»*- 
pja'l- ■ 



„.. ..■"'*™' 

Baat'era. 
Enat'log. 

Eiaf won! [dot ilfud, 
U^ 1*1.1 

EAt <((), past tmaa and 
paet partlfliple ttoa 



fi*t'en («'n), lU. 

(o'dah-to-Ua'). 
£im dt vie (Fr.) (o'duJk- 



Ebbed (eM), ISO. 
Ebb'-dd«. 



EfiUp'tla. 

Kc'l&ue <-iop). 871 

Nofe D, p. 37. 
- -Qoni'^ or too- 



E^iDlt'lent r-gnt). 
Eb-ul-ll'liOD l-tUk-UH). 
E.bur'iie-ui, uu, IW. 

Ec'ba-ali. 
EC'bU'lo. 
Ec'bo^lo (Gr.), 103. 
Ec<»D'trio [Ezcen- 

Eo-cea-trl^'l-ty, l._, 

E<«liy-nio'»U (tl), 

Efl-clc-B|.u'te* (-^le-ci- 

EoHd^-alUi'tie (-Icle-ii- 
oi'CU) [ao Hm. Wb. 

af'iit, Wi. I&S.I 
Eo-(!le-gi-aa'tii>.J l-kle- 

Efl-cle-al-o-iog:'lo4l (ile- 



lam'io-il.lT, ( 
Mom'Irml-lT. 






l>(Gr). 



^'^Ta'f.orfex't"^ 

ly, 203.1 
Ec-aUt'lc (Eztdtlo, 

Ea.aut'lr:.*L 

Ec'ta-aia. 
Ec-tbllp'alt. 

tkt-u-men'Jo^l [(Eon- 

incalcal,«M.] 
E-da'Dloaa (.jAim), Ut. 



B^!hom'e-ti7 (tom'-). 1 

Cctelmlaiaiunt (Tr,) 1 

L.-many) [BO 1 

■UT'»U-n9iie, ] 

Qiu. , c»'-Ur'a^.nmtf, ' 

mdng', or t-kltr'ia- 
nenJ, Wr. IH, IM.] 

Eo-lamp'ay. 

E-dat' (Fr.) (■-<I^, or 

eWtf, Wr. WL Gd.: 
t.tloHT'.Wk. IU,15fi.] 

Ec-leo'tlg. 

Ec-le«'U.ci«n (-titm). 

Ec'loinii l-lem). Via. 

E-ollpae', -5. in. 

£.cUp*ed' {-iilpiV), 183. 

E-clips'ln^. 



I'i-JJ-iuB. 

dile (i£>) [Adile, 



Ed' it, 13, le. 

Ed'ltHid. 

Ed'lt-lng. 



a,e,i,0,a,T,J«wii.e.l.tst>.)>altarli i 



ale, it, K.( 78, 
< lkr> kat in bat, & «« <• 



EDUCATED 



183 



ELATINO 



Ed'n-dit-ed, 188. 

£d'u-cat-lngf. 
.£d-u-ca'tion, 160. 

£d-a-ca'tioa-al. 

Kd'u-oat-or, 80, 228. 

£-duce', 20, 75. 

E-duced' (-dti««'). 

E-du9'ing'. 

£-duc'tion. 

£-duc'tor. 

£-dul'oo-rate. 
. E-dul'oo-nt-ed, 183. 

£-dul'co-rat-ing. 

£-dul-co-ra'tion. 

£-dul'co-nt-Ive [so 
Sm. Wr. ; e-dul'h(MXi' 
Uv, Wb. Qd. 155.J 

E-durco-rit-or. 

Eel (11), 13. 

Ef-faoe', 23. 

Ef-faoe'a-ble, 164, 183. 

Ef-faoed' (-/2M'), 183. 

Ef-fa^'ing. 

Ef-fect', n. * V. 

Ef-fect'lve. 

Ef-fect'or, 88, 228. 

Ef-fect'u-al, 160. 

Ef-fect'u-al-ly. 

Ef-fcct'u-ate. 

Ef-fect'u-it-ed, 183. 

Ef-fect'u-at-ing. 

Ef-fem'i-narcy, 160. 

£f-fem'l-nate, a. & v, 
73. 

Ef-fem'i-nat-ed, 183. 

£f-fGin'i-iiat-ing. 

Ef-fer-vesoe' (-tva')* 171. 

Ef-fer-vesoed' (^vesf), 

Ef-fer-yea'cence, 171. 

Ef-fer-vea'cent. 

Ef-fer-vea'd-ble, 164. 

Ef-fete'. 121. 

Ef-fi-ca'cioas (-thus), 
112, 160. 

Ef fi-ca-cy, 160. 

Ef-fl'deaoe (-JMi'efu). 

Ef-fl^cien-cy (Jlnh'en- 
w) [so Wb. Gd. ; ^- 
fish'^en-sp, Sm. {See 
§26); ef-fish'yen-tyy 
Wk. Wr. 166.1 

Ef-fl'cient C-fish'ent), 

Ef-flgr'i-ca (L.) (-ftj'i- 
iz), 144. 

Ef fl-ry, 170. 

Ef-flo-resce' (-res'), 171. 

Ef-flo-resced' (-r«rt'). 

Ef-flo-res'oenoe. 

Ef-flo-rea'oen-cy. 

Ef-flo-res'oent, 171. 

£f-flo>re8'cixtg, 183. 

£rfla-enee, 105, 160. 

Efflu-ent. 



Ef-flii'Ti-iim (L.) [pi. 

Ef-flu'vi-a, 108.J 
Efflux. 
Ef-flux'ion {-fluk'shun), 

46, Note 1. 
Ef l<»rt, 136. 
Ef-ft-ont'er-y {'/runt''), 

233, Exo. 
Ef-Ail'genoe. 
Ef-fulVent. 
Ef-fuse' (-/lUr'). 
Ef-fuBed^ C-faz<ff), 183. 
Ef-fiia'ing (ytte'-). 
Ef-ih'Bion (-«Attn). 
£f-Ai'8lve, 84. 
Eft, 15. 
E'ger i-gur) [Eagre, 

203. — See Eagre J 
E-gcBt'ion i-yun), 51. 

Eggi 16, 175. 
Eglan-tine, or Eg'lan- 

tlnersoWr.Gd.; eg'- 

lan-nn, Sm.; eg'ktn^ 

«», Wk. 165.1 
E'go-iam (-izm), 133. 
B'go-ist. 
E'tfo-tlsm, or E^^'o- 

tism (-iizm) [so Wr. ; 

e'ffo-tizm, Wk. Wb. 

Gd. ; eg'o-tizm, Sm.] 

99" Thongh Walker, In 
deference to iDl the author- 
ities of his time, pro- 
nounces this word e'0o- 
thsm, he says, that, by anal- 
ogy, it ought to be pro- 
nounced eg^ottjun, 

E'go-tlst, or Eg'o-tist. 
£-go-tist'io, or Eg-o- 

tist'ic, 100. 
&-go-ti8t'ic-al, or Eg-o- 

tist'ic-al, 106. 
E-gre'glottB (e-gre'j^u) 

[so Wr. Wb. Gd. j e- 

ffretjUu, Wk. Sm. 

166.] 
E'greBB, 76. 
E'gret. 

E-gyp'tian (-jip'shan). 
ET'der^own (I'dur-), 
Ei'der-dack (I'dur-). 
Eight i&t) (162), a. & n. 

moe four. (See Ate, 

160.] 
Eigh'teen (d'tut), 

9&r ** When we are 
eonnting, thir^teen, foW' 
teoit J^teen, te.. the for- 
mer syllable will be ao- 
eentedt but. in using one 
of the words separated, ei- 
ther the last qrllable will be 
accented, or each syllable 



win be pronoQBMd «■ a 
distinct word." SmarU 

Elgh'teenth {a'ttnth). 
Eight'fold (d^'-), 162. 
Eighth (atth). 

W^ In tliis word, the 
i presents the singular 
anomaly of serving Doth 
as the last letter in eight, 
and as the flrst ktler in 
the digraph th. 

Eigh'ti-eth (d'K-), 171. 
Eight'BOore (A/'-), 206. 
Eigh'ty (d'^y), 171. 
Eigne (d'nC, or an) [no 

Wr. ; a'ni, Sm. j dn, 

Wb. Gd. 165.] 
£i'ther (i'tbur) [bo 

WTc. Sm. Wr. } ffhur^ 

or I'tkur, Gd. iddT] 

119" With regard to the 
pronunciation of the 
words either and neither. 
Walker reroaricst "Anal- 
og, without hesitation, 
gives the diphthong tlie 
sound of long open e 
rather thun'^that of t;** 
and Smart says: ** Usage, 
as well as regularity, Ik- 
Tors the sound i in 
these two wonls.** 

E-Jac'u-late, 73, 80. 

E-lac'u-lat-ed, 183. 

E-Jac'u-lat-ing. 

E-lac-u-la'tion. 

E-Jae'u-larto-ry, 80. 

Eject', 16, 75. 

£-]ect'ed. 

E-Ject'ing. 

E-jeo'tion. 

E-ject'ment. 

E-Ject'or, 88, 228. 

Eke, V. 

Eked (iH), Note C, p. 

34 
ek'ine, 183. 

E-lab'o-rate, a, A v. 73. 
E-lab'o-rat-ed, 183. 
E-lab'o-rat-ing. 
E-lab-o-ra'tiou. 
E-lab'o-rat-or. 
E-la'in [so Sm. Gd. j e- 

lan'j or e-Win, Wr. 

165.] 
E-lapse'. 10. 
E-lapBed' {-laptP), 
E-lapB'ing, lid. 
E-las'tlc. 
E-lastif'i-ty, 109. 
Elate', 23. 
E lat'ed, 183. 
E-lat'er. 
E-lat'ing. 



lUlj Oa«<n there; db <w In foot ; 9 a« in focile j gh a« g <n go ; th a« <» this. 



ELATIOir 

El'bow, 15, 24. 

El'bowed i-Md), 188. 

El'bdw-ioir. 

Kl'der, a. a n. 

El'dest. 

Ei-Do-rS^do [so Sm. 

Wr. ; €l-do-rh'dOj Gd. 

156.] 
El-e-€am-p«ne', 122. 
E-lect', a. & n. 
E-lect'ed. 
E-leGt'mg^. 
E-lec'tion. 
E-lec-tioB-eer', 1&9, 
£-leo-tion-eered' C-HxP)^ 

165. 
E-lec-tion-eer'infif. 
Elective. 
E-lect'or, 88, 228. 
E-lect'o-ral. 
E-lect'o-rate, 
E-lect-o'ri-al. 
E-lee'tric, 100. 
£-lec'trie-aI, 106. 
E-lee'tric-al-ly. 
S-lec-trl'dan i-triah*- 

an), 
E-lec-tri9'l-ty, 171. 
E-lec'tii-f I-a-ble, 164. 
E-lec-tri-ff-ca'tion. 
E-lee'tri-f Ted, 99, 180. 
E-lec'tri-^, 94, 160. 
E-lec'tri-fy-ing. 
E-lec'tro-ohem'lB-try 

^ {'kew^-f or -kim'-), 224. 
E-Iec'tro-dj^-nam'iCB. 
E-lec-trol'y-sls. 
E-lec'tro-lyte. 
E-lec-tro-lytMc. 
E-lec'tro-lyz-a-Ue, 104. 
E-lec'tro^lyze, 171. 
E-lec'tro-lyzed, 183. 
E-lec'tro-lyz-ing. 
E-lec'tro-mi^'net, 224. 
E-lec'tro-mag>-net'ic. 
E-lec'tro-mag'net-ism 



(-4zin). 



E-lec-trom'e-ter, 108. 
E-lec'tro-mo 'tire. 
E-lec'tro-mo'tor. 
E-lec'tro-neg'ft-tfTe. 
E-Ieo-troph'o-ruB [pi. 

E-lec-troph'o-ri, ife.] 
E-lec'tro-plafing. 
E lec'tiTO-po'lar. 
E-lec'tro«p08'i tf re 

(rpoz'-), 
E-leo'trcKBoopd. 
E-lec'tro-type, n. A v, 
E-lec'tro-typed (-«p<). 
E-lec/tro-typ-ing, 183. 
£-lect'u-a-ry, 72, 89. 






184 

El-«e-mo8'y-ii»-ry (eT-f- 

moz'-), 72, 171. 
El'e-gance, 169. 
El'e-gant. 
El-e-gi'ac, or E-le'gi-ao 

a08) {el-e-fl'akj Wk. 

»m. Wr. ; e-le'ji-€tk, 

Wb. Gd. 165.] 

99^ **El-efirac Ic anotb- 
er exception [to the rule in 
I 108] from the undue 
weight of clamioal author- 
Wy." SmarU — " E-le'gi- 
ac is the general pronunci- 
ation or this country 
[U.S.]." Goodrieh, 

El'e-gist, 45. 
EVe-gy, 169, 170. 
El'e-ment, 169. 
El-e-ment'al. 
El-e-menfaL-Iy, 170. 
£l-e-m«iit'a-ry, 72. 
El'e-ml. 
E-leneh' {-lengV) [bo 

Sm. J «-teni', Wb. 

Gd. ; e-lengk'f or e- 

Usnch', Wr. 166.] 
E-lench^ic-al {-lengk'-). 
Ere^phant, 160. 
El-e-phan-ti'a-siB. 
El-e-phant'Tne, 152. 
El'e-phant-oid [so Wr. ; 

el-e-phari-toia', Wb. 

Gd. 165.1 
El-e-phant-oid'al. 
£l-eu-sin'i-an (-«-«tV-). 
Bl'e-yate, 73. 
El'e-vat-ed, 183. 
El'e-vat-ing. 
El-e-va'tion. 
EFe-Tat-or, 88, 228. 
El'e-vat-o-ry, 86. 
B-lev'en (tlev'n) (149) 

{not lev'n, 153.] 
E-lev'enth (fi-lev'nth). 
Elf (16) [pi. Elves 

(elvz), 193.T 
Elfin. 
Elfish. 
E-li5'it, 171. 
E-lic'ft-ed. 
E-lic'it-lng. 
Elide'. 
E-lid'ed, 18S. 
E-Bd'ing. 
El-i-gi-bil'i-ty, 171. 
El'igi-ble, lOis, 164. 
Eri-gi-bly. 
E-lim'i-nate. 
E-Um'i-nat-cd, 183. 
E-lim'inat-lng. 
E-llm-i-na'tion. 
El-i-Qua'tion. 
E-B'sion i-lizh'un}. 



ELOTRIATIKG 

^lite (Pr.) (orlif), 
E-lix'lr, 86. 
E-liz'a-beth-an [so Sm. 

Wr. ; €-liz-a-oeth'anf 

Wb. Gd. 155.] [not e- 

liz-a-be'thap, 153.] 
Elk, 16. 
Ell, 15, 172. 
Ellipses 171. 
El-lip'sis (L.) [pi. El* 

lipases (-»te), 198.] 
El-Up'Boid. 
El-lip-Boid'al. 
El-lip'tic, 109. 
£l-lip'tio-al, 108. 
El-lip'tic-al-ly. 
El-Up-ti5'i-ty, 171. 
Elm, 15, 133. 
El'men. 
•Elm'y, 16, 93. 
EL-o-cu'tion (110, 170) 

[See Allocution, 148.J 
El-o-cu'Tion-a-ry, 72. 
El-o-cn'tion-ist. 
±-loge (Fr.) (a-lSzh'). 
E-lon'gate (-loitg'-), 54. 
E-lon'gat-«a (^-long'-). 
£-lon'gat-ing {-lona^-). 
E-lon-ga'tion {e-lona~ 

ga'ihun) [so Sm. Wd. 

Gd. ; el-ong-ga'shun, 

Wk. Wr. 165.] 
E-Iope', 24. 
Eloped' (-I9pt')t Note C, 

5. 34. 
dp'ing, 183. 
E-lojie'ment, 186. 
E'lops. 

El'o-qnence, 170. 
El'o-quent, 34. 
Else (eb), Note D, p. 

37. 
ElseVhSre {eU'whir), 
£-lu'oi-date. 
E-lu'd-dat-ed, 183. 
E-hi'ci-dat-tog. 
£-lu-ci-da'tion, 112. 
£-ltt'cl-dat-lTe, 84. 
£-lu'cl-dit-or. 
E-lu'ei-dat-o-ry, 86. 
E-lude', 26. 
E-md'ed, 183. 
£4ad'i-ble, 164, 160. 
E-lud'ing. 
E-ln'sion (-2;ftttn),n. act 

of eluding. [.SeelUa- 

sion, 148. J 
E-lu'sIve. 
E-lu'so-ri-neBB. 
E-lu'BO-ry. 
E-ln'tri-ate, 73. 
E-lu'tri-at.ed, 183. 
E-lu'tri-at-ing. 



a, ^ i» 5» u, y, tonigr i &» j&, I, d» ft, j^, «Aore j ii at in fiur» a at tfn fiut, ft <w «» 



ELUTRIATION 



185 



EMB&YOLOaT 



Eng. pi. 



B-la-tri-a'tioii. 

Sires {,dvz)y pi. of EJf. 

£-ly''si-an {e-lizh'i-an) 

[so Wk. Sm. Wr.j 

e-lizh^pan, 6d. 155.] 
B-ly'si-um (e-lizhH-um) 

[so Wk. Sm. Wr.; 

e-lizh'fmmf Gd. 155.J 

[L. 5>1. - ■ 

ie-lizh'*^) ; 

£-I^'Bi-am8 

umz), 198.] 
E-lyt'ri-form, IfiO. 
El'y-tron [pi. El'y-tn, 

196.] 
El'y-trum, or E-ly'- 

trttm [so Wr. ; eVi- 

trunii Gd. ; e-tl'trum, 

Sm.] [pi. El'y-tra, or 

E-ly'tra, 198.] 
El'ze-vir. 
B-ma'ci-at« (-fM «) [so 

Wk. Sm. Wr. j e-ma'- 

shat, Wb. Gd. 155.1 
E-ma'ci-at-ed i-shtat), 
E-ma'ci-at-ing(-sAl-a*-). 
E-ma-ci-a'tion (-«W-). 
Em'a-naat (169), a. 

flowing from. [See 

Eminent, 148.] 
Em'a-nate, 109, 171. 
Em'a-nat-ed, 183. 
Em'a-nat-ing. 
Em-a-na'tion. 
Em'a-nRt-Ive Tbo Sm. 

Wr. Wb. Gd.; em'et- 

na-av, Wk. 155.] 
E-maa'ci-pate, 73. 
E-man'd-pat-cd, 183. 
E-man'ei-pat-ing. 
E -man-ci-pa'tion. 
E-man'ci-pat^r. 
E-mar'gi-nate, v. & a. 
E mar'gi-nat-ed. 
E-mar'gi-nat-ing. 
E-mar-gi-nation, 112. 
£-mas'cu-late. 
B-mas'cn-lat-ed. 
£-mas'cu-lat-ing. 
E-mas-cu-la'tion. 
Em-bale'. 

Em-baled', 166, 183. 
Em-bal'ing. 
Em-balm' (-difm'), 162. 
Em-babnea' {-bdmd')» 
Em-balm'er (-b'dm'-)* 
Em-balm'ing (-bum'-), 
£m-bank'ment (em- 

bangk'-) ['Imbank- 

ment,2a^.] 
[Emb arc at ion, 203. 

— See Embarkation.] 
£m-bar'go, n. & v. [pi. 



of n. £m-bar'«oe8 
(-^^)*192.] [Imbar- 
go,203.J 

Em-bar'goed (-^d(f),188. 

£m-bar'go-ing. 

Em-barl? [fmbark, 
203.] 

Embarked' {-barktf). 

Em-bark'ing. 

£m-bark-a'Bon [Em- 
bar cation, 203.] 

Em-bftr'rass, 170. 

Em-b&r'rassed {-raat). 

Em-b&r'rass-ing. 

Em-b&r'rass-ment. 

Em-bas'sa-dor [Am- 
bassador, 203. — See 
Note under Ambaasa- 
dor.] 

Em'bas-Bj. 

Em-bat'tle, 164. 

Em-bat'tled (-&a<'2(2), 
183. 

Em-bat'tling. 

£m-bed'rimbed,203.] 

Em-bed'ded, 176. 

Em-bed'ding. 

Em-bel'lish, 170. 

Em-bel'lished (liahiy. 

Em-bel'lish-ing. 

£m-bel'lish-ment. 

Em'bers i-burz), n.pl. 

Em'ber-weck. 

Em-bez'zle, 164. 

Em-bez'zled i-bez'ld)^ 
183. 

Em-bez'zle-ment. 

Em-bez'zler. 

Em-bez'zllng. 

[Embitter, 203.— 
See Imbitter.] 

Em-blaze'. 

Em-blazed', 183. 

Em-Uaz'iag. 

Em-bla'zon {-bla^zn), 
149. 

£m-bla'zoned (-bla'znd) 

£m-bla'zoQ-er (-bla'zn-) 

Em-bla'zon-ing (-6to'- 
zn). 

Em-bla'son-ryC-frfa'^sm-) 

Em'blem, 15, 76. 

£m-blem-at'ic, 100. 

Em-blem-at'ic-al, 106. 

Em-blem-at'io-al-ly. 

Em'blc-menta (^em'bl-), 
n.pl. 

Em-bodied (-id), 99. 

£m-bod'i-er. 

Em-bod'i-ment, 169. 

£m-bod'y, 93. 

Em-bod'y-ing. [149. 

Em-bold'en (-bdlafn). 



Em-bdld'ened(-MI(l'fMl) 
Em-bold'en-ing {bold'- 

ft-). 
Em'bo-lism (-lizm), 136. 
Em-bo-Us'mal i-liz'-), 
Em-bo-lis'mio {4iz'-). 
Em'bo-lus [pi. Em'bo- 

li, 196.] 
EmbormoifU' (Fr.) 

(Ung-hong-ptcSmg'), 
[Emborder, 203.— 

See Imborder.] 
[E m b o s o m , 203.— 5ee 

ImboBom.l 
Em-boss', 18, 171. 
Em-bossed' (-do«<'),165 s 

Not€ C. p. 34. 
£m-boBs'ing. 
Em-boBs'ment. 
JEmbouchure' fFr.) 

(Ong-booshoof^ ). 
Em-bo w'el [I m b o w - 

el, 203.] 
£m-bow'elled(-«2dXl50) 

[Emboweled, Wb. 

Gd. 203. — See 177, and 

Note E, p. 70.] 
Em-bow'el-ler [E m < 

boweler, Wb. Gd. 

203.] 
£m-bow'el-Ung [£ m- 

boweling,WD.Gd« 

203.] 
Em-bow'el-ment. 
Em-braoe', 23. 
Em-braced'(-&ra«^),169. 
Em-bril9'er, 183. 
Em-bra9'er-y. 
£m-brac'ing. 
Em-bra'sure (-zhiirj or 

zhur) [emHtra'zhttr^ 

Wk. Grd.j em-bra-ztkr', 

Sm. ; ew»-oro-«ftoor', 

or em-bra'zhurf Wr. 

155.] 
Em'bro-cate, 73. 
£m'bro-cat-ed, 183. 
Em'bro-cat-ing. 
Em-bro-cation. 
Em-broid'er. 
Em-broid'ered {-urc^t 

160, 166. 
Em-broid'er-er, 77. 
Em-broid'er-ing. 
Em-broid'er-y, 171. 
Em-broil', 27. 
Em-broiled', 16&. 
Em-broil'ing. 
Em-broil'ment. 
Em'bry-o, 160, 171 [pi. 

Em'bry-os (-a«), 192.] 
Em-bry-og'ra-phy, 106. 
Em-bry-ol'o-gy, 108. 



fall; iatintiierei (fbatinfoot; $a«tnfiiSQUe} gh a« gin go jth cm in tbia. 



EMBBTONATE 

Bm'brr-o-iutc. a, 
Em' bry -o-iul-ed. 



blUJT.] ' 

E mcDd', IS. 



E-mergMi', IM. 
E-merij'eiice (-msrj'O. 
G-meiv'en-c]' (-iiKrj'-)i 

B-mere'ent (-mirj'-l. 

£-mI>''Miu (L.). a. ft n. 
[pi. of n. E-mtr'i-ti, 

Em'cr-adi (-odz). 
Em'er-oldB. 

Kmer'nion (2J, N.), n. 
Mtoromergine. [Sm 

Em'cr-T,»3, iro. 
E-mM-fo. 

E-iuct'ic-id. 
E-mrt'lc-al-ly. 
Em'e-tJne (,62)[EmB- 

tin.aa.] 

E'meii <-tiifi) [Emew, 
Ema, 203.1 



Em'i-srate, 13. 
Em'l-gT>t-iHl, 183. 
Em't-grat-ing;. 



E-mix'alan (-nith'an). 
E-mli'mve, W. 
£-mlt', ]«. 
E-mlt'Mil, ITS. 



f »o 8m, ; f-Bwi'^Ia*, 

Wr. ; (-«oi'H-«, Wb. 

Gd. IM.l 
E -m ol 'lllt-«d (-mol'ytl-) 
E-mol'llit-lng i-moi'- 

yai). 
B-niol'llmt i-malfsenl) 

lio Vik. am. Wr. ; 

e-moi'K-enf, Wb. Qd. 

B-moI'n-meiit, S». 
E-mol-u-meal'sL 

E-mo'lionlikl. 

Em-piled', 183. 
Em-pale'meDt. 
Ein-pil'lDS. 
Em-pan^el [EmpBD- 

Impannel, all) 

Em-pui'«Ued {-tld) 
[Erap»iin6led, 
\Vli.Gd.2«l.— Seel77, 

Em-psa'el-liuz ' lEm- 
pADuellng, Wb. 

Em-psim'^(-pnnn'), 13S. 

Em'phi-Bis [pi. Em'. 

pbit-«i-B (-ui), IK.) 
Em'phn-fllief 202. 
Em'pha glzod, 183, 
Em'Bh«-«ii-lM[, 
Em-phat'lclA. 
Em-phaflc-al, 
Em pby-ae'mn. 
Em phr-wui'l-toni. 

Eni-plr'lc or Em'plr-iov 

11, Sm.i «nVlr-/t,or 
tm.pfr'ik, Wk. Od. 

Em-ptr'lca. lOe. 

Em-plr'lc-al, a. iinw»r- 
raated by gdmce. [5k 
Empyrical, ISO.] 

Em-pIr'l-clBm (-(inn]. 

Em pTl■'i^;l«l. 

Em-pl«'llc. 

Employ', i?. 

EtABlojit {Ft .yfina-^ol- 

Em^iloyai', IM, IW. 
Emi)loy'er. 
Em-ploy 'ing. 



Km-pcy^-u" (L.) [L. 
pi. En^to'ri^i Edit. 

Em-pov'er^iQ [Tm- 

poTerlsh.aoT.J 
Em-poY'er-lihed (.feMl. 
Em-po»'er-lBb-er. 
Em-poT'er-lBh-lDg. 
Em-pov'er-l8h-ment. 
Em-poWer [Impow- 



Wb. Qd. IK.] 
Em-py-r*u'mfl (-roo'-), 
En-py-reu-mat'lo 

Sm-p^r'lc 

Em' 11 -late, 73, ae. 
Em'u-ISted. 
Em'11-lnt-inff. 
Em D-ln'tlon, 112. 
En'u-Ut-Ire [bo W 

en'M-ia-He, Wb. I 

155.1 
Em'u-lat-or. 
E-mnl'Eeiit. 
Em'u-ioDB, lOe. 
E-mal'rton. 

E-mnnc'to-ryC-SHin; 
En-&'ble, tM, 
Eu-a'blad (-o'bM). 
En-B'bllnK, 183. 
En-nct', 10. 



ii B> &i yi 'OR0 i i, S, I, 



IJ,t,>Aar(ili<ulnfkr,ai 



I <B IMtt A at {» 



BNALLAGE 



187 



BNBOR8SD 



E-nal'lft-ge (L.) (163) [bo 
Sm. WD. Gd. J en-al'- 
la-je, Wk. Wr. 166.] 

En-am'el. 

En-am'el-lar, a. resem- 
bling enamel. [See 
Enameller, 160.] [E n - 
a m e 1 a r , Wb. Gd. 
203.] 

En-am'elled {-eld) [En- 
ameled, Wb. Gd. 
203. — S^ee 177, and 
Note E, p. 70.] 

£n-am'el-ler,n.one who 
enamels. [See Enam- 
elar, 160.1 [Enam- 
eler, Wb. Gd. 203.] 

En-am'el-ling [E n a m - 
eling,Wb.Gd.203.] 

En-am'or [Enamour, 
Sm. 199.] 

En-am'ored (•4ird), ISO, 

En-am'or-ing. 

En-an-the'sia. 

En-armed' {-armd'), a, 

En-ar-thro'aiB. 

En-cage' (23) [In- 
oage.201, 203.] 

En-caged', 183. 

En-cag'ing (-*«!/'-). 

En-camp', 10. 

En-camped' (-kan^t^), 

£n-camp'ing. 

En-camp'ment. 

[Encase, 201^ 203.— 
See Incase.] 

En-cau'ma. 

£n-cd,u8'tic. 

En-cave'. 

En-caved', 183. 

En-cav'ing. [satti^). 

En-ceinte (Fr.) {Ung- 

En-ce-phal'ic. 

En-chafe'. 

En-chafed' (-choft'). 

En-chafing, 183. 

En-chain', 23. 

£n-«bained', 166. 

En-chain'ing. 

En-chant', 131. 

En-chant'ed. 

En-chant'er. 

£n-chant'ing. 

£n-chant'ment. 

En-chant'resa. 

En-chaae' (2$) [In- 
ch a »e. 901, »)3;T 

En-chased' (-chmt'), 

Kn-ehas'ing. 

Bn-chJ-rid'l-on Je^-W-) 
(171) [so Wr. Wb.Gd.; 
eng-kt-rid'i-im, Sm. 
165.] 



En-cho'ri-ri (-W-), 171. 
En-dr'cle ( 164) [I n c I r- 

cle,201, 203.J 
En-cir'cled (-»»r'ifeW). 
En-cir'cling. 
[£ n cl a 8 p , 201, 203. — 

See Inclasp.] 
En-dit'ic, 109. 
En-clit'ic-al, 108. 



Eu-clit'lo-al-lv. 
En-dose' {-khz') [In- 
close, 201, 20:).J 

W^ Both forma eneloae 
and inclote are in good 
use. Walker, Smart, and 
'Worcetter, prefer the first; 
Webster and Goodrich the 
last. 

En-closed' {-kl6zd'),\Ba. 
En-dds'ing (-JtWa'-). 
En-clos'ure {-kUz'yu/r) 

[Inclosnre, 201, 

203.] 
En-co'mi-ast, 160. 
£n-co-mi-ast'ic, 109. 
En-co-nd-ast'ic-al, 108. 
En-co'mi-um (L.) (169) 

fL. pi. Hn-co'mi-a ; 

Eng. pi. En-co'nd- 

ums {-ttmz), 198.] 
£n-oom'pas8 (-Ittm'-), 

171. 
En-com'passed (-itum'- 

pa»t). 
En-com'pass-ing 
. {-kutn'-). 
Encore (Fr.)(a«p-fcflr'), 

n. & V. 
En-cored' {-'dng^Ord'), 
En-c6r'ing {dng-kOr'-), 
En-coun'ter. 
£n-coun'tered, 160. 
En-coun'ter-ing. 
En-cofir'f^e, 70. 
En-cottr'aged, 166, 
En-cottr'age-ment. 
En-oottr'a-ger, 183. 
En-oolir'a-ging. 
En-cri'nal, 72. 
En-cri'nic, 109. 
En-crin'it-al. 
En'cri-nrte, 162, 160. 
En-croach' (24, 44) [In- 
. croaoh,203J 
En-cr5achedr (-£rOdU'), 

165. 
En-crQaeh'ing. 
En-croach'meat. 
[£norii8t,201,803.— 

See Inorust.] 
En-cum'ber.. 
En-cnm'bered (-burdy, 

160. 



En-enm'ber-faig. 
£n-cum'branoe (109) 

[In cam bran ce, 

203.] 
En-c;c'lic-al, 171. 
En-cy-clo-pe'di-a, 

fin-oy-do-pe'di-a. 

9^ Both modes of spell- 
ing this word aie In good 
nse. The former is pre- 
ferred by Worcester; the 
latter by Walker. Smart, 
Webster, and Goodrich. 

En-cy-dp-pe'di-an. 
En-cy-clb-ped'ic. 
En-cy clo-ped'io-al. 
En-cy-clo-pe'dist. 
En-cyst'ed, 171. 
End. 16. 
, En-dah'ger. 
En-dan'gered (-d^rd), 

160. 
£n-dan'ger-lng. 
En-dear', 13. 
£n-deared', 166. 
En-dear'ing. 
En-dear'ment. 
En-d6av'or (-dev'ur) 

[Endeavour, Sm. 

199, 203.] 
En-dgav'ored {dev'urd). 
En-dSav'or-ing (^-dev'- 
ur-), 
En-dec'a-gon. 
End'ed. 

En-deic'tic (-<ilJl''-), 171. 
En-dem'ie, 109, 170. 
£n-dem'ic-al, 108. 
[Endict, 201, 203.'- 

See Indict.] 
End'ing. 
[Endite, 201, 203.— 

See Indite.] 
En'dlve (84) [not en'- 

div, 163.] 
En'do-gen. 

En-do^en-ofis (-Ay'-)* 
En-do-phyl'lotts, or En- 

doph'yl-lofis [See Ad- 

enophyllous.j 
En-dorse' [Indorse, 

201, 203.] 



The two forma 
cforte and indorte, and 
their correspoo<Ung deiivr 
atives, are in good use. 
W«lker gives only endorse, 
and Smart only indortm. 
Webster and Goodrich pre- 
t^ indorte, Worcester na« 
both forms; but he ittdW 
eates no preforenoa for ei- 
ther. 

£n-dor8ed'(-<lor<<'),l$3. 



fUlj dofinthercj <3& m <n foot ;> 9 m i}> facile jgha« gt» go jUim in this. 



,y 






Endued', 1S9, IS3. 
Kn-du'lng. 
En-dnr't^e, 1M. 



Ene'ld, or E'ne id [M 
Wr.ie-ne'irf.Sin.Qil. 

155.) [x:aeia,va.\ 

Ene'ilia^[«) Sm. W 

En-er-get'lc, 45, IDS. 
ED-er«el'lc-R]. 108. 
Eo-er-geVk-al-lT. 
En'er-glie. 
En'tr-glicd, tS3. 
En'er-i;ii-iiig. 
En'er-gy, 170. 
li-nervfaCe (21, N.) [nol 

en'er-YRt, 1S3.] 
E-nerv'Bt-ed, isl. 
E-norv'it-lng. 
Bu-er-va'tloD. 
Eii-fee'ble, IM. 
En-fee'bled(-/<'6Id).183. 
En-fWhllng. 
En-RoB" i'/tfl, 171, 

oughl U MLVa betn rirfif'- 
Kn-RoHed' (-/iff'). 
£n-R)oiriDg (-/)^-). 
En-RofTmeat (-ftr-1- 
Bn-fl-Uda', n. ^ c. [iO 
Wk. Wr. Wb. «a. i 
onff -jMdiJ', Sm. UU.1 
En-lf-lid'cd, W3. 



i,8.!,6.u,f,I«wil,e,I,6.0.J.AortillM 



R dI? nuif Ic-il, lOe. 
EnlK'uu-Ilat. 
EnlolnMi;) [lD)oln, 
Kn-lolned', IW. 
En. Bln'iiie. 

£a Dy*! bie, 1«4. 

En- ored', IIU, 188 
En- oJ.;iag. 

En-liiD'dle, IH. [IfO. 
En-klD'dled r-Mn'Siit), 
En-kln'dlliis. 
En-Urd'(lO[Inl«rd, 



En-liBfit'on (-iM'n), 140 



En-IIM' (10) r 
En-Uit'ed. 



<:n-llT'm-lng-(-nr'n-). 
EniujM (Ft.) (aiw 

Dn'ml-tT.BS, ■<». 
Ji.-116-.-ooo-W-he'iird. 

s-gon fao Wr. i en-ii*'- 



E'n-no'blod(-na'aid), IBS. 



E-oo(lEh'(-n5f),M,l7l. 
En-qiure' rrnqulre. 

aol.ao.] 



ENRAGING 



189 



ENUMERATION 



En-ragMngf (rU^'-). 
En-rapt'ure, 91. 
Eri-rapt'ured (-ywrrf). 
Eu rupt'ur-iujr (-yt«r-)i 

91. 
£u-rav'ish. 
£n-rav'ifihed {-isht). 
En-rav'ish-ing. 
En-rich', 16, 44. 
En-richcd' (-rtcA<'), .m, 

Note C, p. 'M. 
En-rich'ing. 
En-rich'ment. 
En-robe', 24. 
En-robed', 165, 183. 
En-rob'ing. 
En-roll' rEnrol, Sm. 

179 203' 1 
En-rdUed' ( rflid'). 185. 
En-roll'injj. 

En-rol'meot [Enroll- 
ment, Wb. Gd. 178, 

203.] 
En-root', 19. 
En-root'ed. 
£n-root'ing. 
£n-Ban'gulae (sanff'' 

gwin)j 54, 171. 
En-san'gulned (sang*- 

gtrind). 
En-8an'guYn-ing ^sanff*- 

gwin-). 
En-sconce', 171. 
En-8conced' (.skonsf). 
£n-8Con9'ing, 183. 
En-Bhrine' (141) [In- 

Bhrine,203.j 
£n-Bhrincd', 165, 183. 
En-shrln'ing. 
En'si-form, 108, 16^. 
En'sign (sin), 162. 
En-slave'. 23. 
En-slaved', 165. 
En-slav'er. 
£n-8]av'ing. 
En-snare' {-snir') (14) 

[In8nare,20l, 203.J 



Both fnrmt, en- 
$it<m and tnmnre,, are in 
good use. Smart preR>r« 
niMarex Webster and. 
Goodrich tiuriHrre. WoTce»- 
ter allows either. 

En-8nared'(-an*rel'),166. 
En-snar'er {'8nh''-\ 
En-snar'ing {-antr'-). 
En-sphere', 13, 36. 
En- sphered', 165, 183. 
En-spher'ing. 
En-stamp', lO. 
En-stampcd' {stampV), 
En-stAmp'ing. 
£n-Bue', 26. 



£n-Bued', 165, 183. 

En-Bu'lng. 

[Ensurance, 203.— 
See Insurance.] 

En-sure' {shoor^ [In- 
sure, 20i, 2a}. j 

auT" This word, accord- 
dlnir to Smart, should be 
spelled enwre when it is 
used in the general sense 
to make certain^ and in- 
fui-e when it is used in 
the technical sense to yiicu^ 
eattee againft ton. 

Ensured' {shoord'). 
En sur'cr {-shoQr'A. 
En-sur'ing {-shoor'-). 
En-tab'la-ture, 171. 
En-tair, n. & v. 23. 
En tailed', 165. 
En-tall'ing. 
En-tall'ment. 
En-tan'&^le (-tanff'ffl), 

£n-tan'gled {4ang'gld)f 

183. 
En-tan'gle-ment(-fan^'- 

En-tan'glii^. 
JFn'to-w (Gr.). 
En-tas'tic. 
En-tel'c-chy (-A1). 
En'ter, 15, 77. 
En'tered, 150. 
En'ter-ing. 
En-t6r'o-cele. 
En-ter-og'ra-phy, 108. 
En-ter-oro ory, 108. 
£n-ter-om'pna-lds [E n- 

teromphalu 8,203] 
[Enterplead,2a3. — 

See Interplead.] 
En't«r-prise (-prJz), 136. 
En'ter-prlsea {-prizd). 
En'ter-pris-ing (-prU-). 
En-ter-tain'. 
En-ter-tained', 165. 
En-ter-taln'ing. 
En-ter-tain'ment. 
En-the-as'tic. 
[Enthrall, 201, 203. 

— i<:ee Ihthrall.] 
En-throne', 24. 
En-throned', 183. 
En thronging. 
En-thu'si-asm {-zt-azm) 

(136, 171) [so Sm. Wr. 

Wb. Gd. J en-thu'zM- 

assnty Wk. 155.] 
En-thu'fii-ast (-«!-). 
P^n-thu-Bi-ast'ic {-zt), 
En-thu-si-ast'Io-rtl (-«;l-). 
En -thy-me-mat'ic. 
En-thy-me-mat'ic-al. 



En'thy-meme. 

Entice', 25. 

Enticed' {-tlst'), 183. 

En-ti5'er. 

En-tiy'ing. 

En-Ure' (25) [In tire, 
20 J, 203. J 

En-tire'ty. 

En-ti'tle (164) [In ti- 
tle, 201, 203.] 

En ti'tled (ti'ttd), 183. 

En-ti'tling. 

En'ti ty, U3, 169. 

En-tomb' i-toom') (162) 
[Intomb,201, 2a3.j 

En-torabod' (^-toomd'). 

En-tomb'iug (-^>o»i'-). 

En-tonib'ment (-toom'-) 

En-tom'ic, 109. 

En tom'ic-al, 106. 

En'to-mold. 

En-to-mo-log'io-al 

i-lcd'')' 
En-to-mol'o-gist, 106. 

En-to-mol'o-gy, 108. 

En-to-moph'a-gt>fis. 

En-to-mos'tra-can. 

En-to-mo s'tra-eofis. 

£n-ton'ic. 

En-to-zo'on [pi. En-to- 

zo'a, 198.] 
En'trails {-tralz), n. pi, 
En'trance. n. 161. 
En-trance', v. (131, 161) 

[I nt ranee, 208.1 
En-tranced' (-trdnst'). 
En-trane'ing, 183. 
En-trap', 10. 
En-trapi>cd' i-trapt'), 

165, Note C, p. 34. 
En-treat', 13. 
En-trcat'ed. 
En-treat'ing. 
En-trcat'y. 

Entrie (Fr.) (Una tri'). 
Entremets (Fr.) (^dng- 

truh-ma')y n. pi. 
Entra>ot (Fr.) {Ung- 

trunrp&). 
Entresol (Fr.) {dng- 

trvh-soV). 
En'try (15, 93) [pi. En'- 

tries (-iriar), 99, 190.] 
[Entwine, 201,203.— 

See Intwine.l 
E-nu'cle-ate, 73, 179. 
E-nu'cle-at-ed. 
E-nu'cle-at-lng. 
E-nu-cIe-a'tion. 
E-nu'mer-ate, 73. 
E-nu'mer-at-ed, 183. 
E-nu'raer-at-ing. 
E-nu-mer-a'tion. 



foli\j^asin there \ Ciicain foot \^a8%n flicilc ; gh a< g in go ; (h a< in this. 



ENUMEIHTrVE 

; iiu'm*t-itIire[iio Sm. 



Wb.Gd IU.| 
E-nun'otste (-ala-al 
(171) [ao Wk. Sid 
Vi. i e «Mn'<M(, Wb 

Od. lu;] 

H^iiD'ci-ii-ed l-ah1.). 
K-naa'd-it-iiw (-1AI-). 
EmD-d-a'tloalibl-j. 
BDDD'd-it-lTe(-ift(-a(-' 
[lO'Sni.; e-HVn'ila 

(to. frb. W™.'] 

E-uuq'd.to-rytjM) 
Kn-vpl'ap,D.(IrD)rKD. 

»elope,2U3.) 
Kn-Tel-ape' {ft.) (Ong- 
mi Op', or on-cij-ap'), 
». foiw-Bel-Bp', Gd. i 
<.n-t-<-Jip',WS.iaB(n''- 
ISp, Sm. 1 anjj-PBJop', 



CAS 



™^'ii"bris.ss;^' 


liktihi.cmto'vliv.' 


En 


■ycI'oped(-op(),lSO. 


En 


-Tel'op-lng. 




■reI'opm™t. 


Ed 


-Ten'om, 169. 


£D' 


-™n'onied(.B-MD,U10 


Ed. 


■Teo'om-lnff. 
Vl-»-ble, 1(3, 189. 




;vted, w, ise. 






Ed' 




En. 


H'raniM,]*. i 104. 


i" 


vl'raDed(.n»iid),lBO. 


Ed. 




£u- 


■i'ron., Br' EnM- 






»'cf-rflBs, or mi*- 




»B.Wk. 164.] 




.»|^ Tl«..gl._^ W.ftn 








.roMfl«I.I,e».i,"Thi; 




KTSffSl 


Z 



i, e, 1, 0, n, r, Kmv ; a, e, I, a, 11, J, ihort ; i at in tu, inu in ftat, a a« J» 



EPIPLOON 



191 



ERADICATED 



E-pii^'lo-on. 
E-pis'co-pa-cy, 160, 171. 
E-piH'co-pal. 
E-pis-co-pa'li-an. 
£-pi B-co-pa'li-an-iBm 

(-izmh 136. 
E-pis'co-pate. 
Ep'i-BOde, 78, 160. 
Ep-i-8o'di-al. 
Ep-i-sod'io. 
Ep-i-Bod'io-al. 
Ep-l-spaa'tio. 
Ep'i-sperm. 
E-p^s'tle (-pU'f), 192, 

171. 
E-pis'to-la-ry, 72. 
Ep-is-tol'io. 
£p is-tol'io-al. 
E-pis-to-lo-spraph'io. 
E-pis-to-lo^ra-phy. 
E-pis'tro-phe, 163. 
Ep'i-style. 
Ep'i-taph i-tif), [not 

ep'i-taf, 127, 163.] 
£p-i-ta'phi-an. 
Ep-i-taph'ic. 
E-pit'a-Bis. 
Ep- i-tha-la'mi-um. 
Ep'i-tliet, 78, 169. 
Eplthet'ic. 
E-pit'o-me (163) [pit £- 

pit'o-mea (-me»;.J 
£-pit'o-mist. 
£-pit'o-mJze, 202. 
E-pit'o-mized, 183. 
E-pit'o-mlz-er. 
E-pit'o-mlz-lngf. 
Ep'i-trite. 
E-pit'ro-pe, 163, 
Ep-i-zo'an. 
Ep-i-zo-ot'ic. 
£p'ocli {ep'ok) [bo Sm. 

Wb. Gd. ; ep'oki or 

e'poky Wk. Wr. 155.] 
Ep'o-cha {'ka). 
Ep'ode [bo Sm. Wb. 

Gd. , ep'od, or 9'pdd, 

Wk. 165.] 
Ep-od'ic [bo Gd.j e-pod'- 

ik, Wr. 155.] 
Ep-o-pee', 122. 
Eprouvette (Pr.) («- 

proo-vet'). 
Ep-u-lot'ic. 
Ep-u-ra'tion. 
£-qaa^bil'i-tr (B-kwa-), 

or Eq-ua-bil'i-ty {ik- 

wa-), 171. 
E'qua-ble (e'kwa-bl), or 

Kq'ua-ble lek^wa-bl) 

m, 164) le'kiea-bl, 

Wk. Wr. Wb. Gd., 

ek'worbl, Sm. 155.] 



E'qua-blv {efkw<i-\ or 

Eq'ua-Wy (ek'toa-). 
E'qual, 34, 52. 
[£ q u a 1 e d , 203. — /S^ 

Equalled.] 
[Equaling, 203.— 

See Eqaamngf.l 
E-qual'i-ty ^-kwoV-), 

160. 
E-qual-i-za'tion. 
E'qual-ize, 202. 
E'qual-ized, 183. 
£'qual-fz-ing. 
E'qualled {e*kwald) 

[Equaled,Wh. Gd. 

zm. — See 177, and 

Note E, p. 70.1 
E'qual-linsf [Equal- 

ing, Wb. Gd. 203.] 
E'qual-ly, 03, 170. 
[Equanb^ular, 203. 

— See Equiangular.] 
E-qua-nim'i-ty, IW, 

171. 
E-qaa'tion, 34, 52. 
E-qua'tor, 171. 
E-qua-to'ri-al [so Wk. 

Wr. Wb. Gd. , eJfc-iw»- 

to'rt^, Sm. 165.] 
Eq'uer-ry {eJ^wer-y, or 

e-kwer^) (171, 100) 

[bo Wr. J eJetoer-Vi 

Sm, ; e-kwer'ff, Wt. 

Gd. 155.] [E query, 

203.^ 
E-ques'tri-an. 
E-queB'tri-an-ism 

(j4zm), 
E-qui-an'gu-lar (-ana'-) 

[80 Wr. Wb. (?d.j 

ek^un-ang'gu4ar, Sm. 

155.] 
E-qui-dis'tant [so Wk. 

Wr. Wb. Gd. j ek-wi- 

dis'tanty Sm. 155.] 
E-qui-lat'er-al [so Wk. 

Wr. Wb. Gd. j ek^wi- 

lafer-oiy Sm. 165.] 
E-qui-li'brate [so Wk. 

Wr. Wb. Gd. ; ek^uoi- 

li'br&tt Sm. 155.] 
E-qui-li'brat-ed. 
E-qul-Ii'brat-lng. 
E-qui-li-bra'tion. 
E-quil'i-briBt, 160. 
E-qul-lib'ri-um (171) [so 

Wk. Wr. Wb. Gd. ; 

ek^oi-lib'ri-umf Sm. 

155.] 
E-qui-mul'ti-ple (164) 

[80 Wr. Wb. Gd.; 

ek-wi-mul'H-plf Sm. 

165.] 



E-qui'nal. 
E'quine, 34, 62. 
E-qui-noc'tlal (-shai) 

Qo Wk. Wr. Wb. 

Gd. ; ek-wi-nok'ahtUt 

Sm. 166.] 
E'qui-nox [so Wk. Wr. 

Wb. Gd. , ek'tei-noks, 

Sm. 165.] 
E-quip', 16, .34, 62. 
Eq'ui-page (ek'wt-), 171. 

inot e-kwip'iy, 153.] 
E-quip'ment. 
E'qui-poise (,-poiz) 

(171) [so Wk. Wr. 

Wb. Gd. ; ^wi-poizt 

Sm. 155.] 
E-qul-poVienoe (160, 

170)[soWk. Wr. Wb. 

Gd. , ek-toX-pol'lenSt 

Sm. 155.1 
E-qui-pol'len-cy. 
E-qui-pol'lent [so Wk. 

Wr. Wb. Gd. j eJk-wl- 

poVlenty Sm. 155.] 
E-qui-pon'der-anoe [so 

Wk. Wr. Wb (M., 

ek-ufl-pon'der-ani, 

Sm. 155.1 
E-qui-pou'der-ant. 
E-quipped' {-hwipt /, 

166, 176; Note C, 

p. :i4. 
EKiuip'ping. 
Eq-ui-se'tum (ek-wl-), 
E-quis'o-nance [so Wr. 

Wb. Gd.; ek-w%'8o'' 

nans, Sm. 155.] 
Eq'ui-ta-ble (ek'fH^a- 

W), 122, 164, 171. 
Eq'ui-ta-bly (e.t'wi-)- 
Eq'ui-tant {ek'ioi-). 
Eq-ui-ta'tiou {ek^vi-). 
Eq'ui-tv (^ek'wi-tp). 
E-quiv'a-lence, 160. 
E-quiv'a-len-cy. 
E-quiv'a-lent. 
E-quiv'o-oal, 171. 
E-quiv'o-cal-ly. 
E-quiv'o-cate, 73. 
E-quiv'o<cat-ed, 183. 
E-qaiv'o-oat-ing. 
E-quiv-o-ca'tion. 
E-quiv'o-cat-or. 
E-qui V 'o-ca-to-ry . 
Eq'ui-voke (ek'wt). 
E-qui^oqu^ (Fr.) {a-ke- 

vOk'). 
E-qulv'o-roiis. 
E'ra, 13, 49, N. ; 72. 
E-rad'i-ca-ble, 164. 
E-rad'i-oate, 73, 160. 
E-rad'i-cat-ed, 183. 



fall i 6 08 in there ; (Sbasin foot ; 9 cm in facile ; gh a« gin go ; th oa »» thia 



ERADICATINQ 

E-rad'l-cat-lag. 

K-nd-l-aa'Uuu, 1)3. 

E«d'l-iHt-Wi- Oiti [go 
Sm. i t-rad^ilea tU', 
Wr. Wb. GJ. iM.] 



K-rn'Hlou l-ihunl. 
K-H'aura (-:&<«'), 171. 
Ere (<r), <ui. A ("TP 

before. [Ste Ab 

Hdr, 1«0.1 
E-rcut', IS. 
E-ruct'a-ble, IM. 

E-roi't^lel IDS. 



Br-o-init'ic^. 
Ei-'e-mism C-UWim), 138. 
£r-E-iliiB'llc 
Kr'ffot, 21, N. 
Er'sot-lBm i-ian'}. 
Er-Rim'e-ter (lOS) tio 

Sm. Wr.; l-ri-om/e- 

lur, Gd. lSa.1 
Gr'mlne (t&f) [Er- 

Er'mlried (-mind), UO, 

E-roJc, 1». 
E-r6ii'ed, 183. 
E-rod'enl. 
E.rdd'ld^. 



[Erpe"o*iSgr, a03. 
— 5m HerpKtology.] 

Br'raini c'l?*) fw Sm. 
Wr. Wb. Gd. i ar'- 

^^ TliDUiih ' WK]k«r 

Er'ran^ry. 

Gr-ra'ta(L.),«.iiI.[,SE« 
Erratum.) 

i, 6, i, a, ii, j, ton 



Br-n'tum (L.) [pi. Er- 

ra'ta, lUH.] 
fci^rhlae (-Tin), 162, iri. 
EiTedlerd),2i,M.i 171, 
Err'lue. 

Erse, il.N.i' 171.' 



Br'u-ditf (Si) [lO Bra. 
Wb. Qn. ! ir-a-iaf, 
WkiMr'u-aU.ortr'- 



rsemlfdp. 



Es-caped' (ei-liapf),ltS, 

ISii ; Note C, p. 31. 
Es^pe'ment. 



Ea-carp'meiit. 

E9chB-lot' le»h-n-lof) 
[aoSm.Gd.i ilia-lol', 
Wk. i alt^-M', or 

[Shnliot.soa.] 
EB'cbtirf-Ivir), S2, 171. 
En-chirot'io (■*«-), 109. 
Es^:lis-tol'O.Ky <-*a-). 



ESPYING 
Ga-cbSM'a-ble, IM. 

Kit-chc.ni'«ar' 
Es-cheut'iug. 

£a-chew' {-chay'yt 10, 

Ea-dlened' (-chocd'), 

Eg.clieii'lDg' (-cboo'-) 
Es'oart, n. 103, lUl. 
EB-oort', e. 193, 181. 
E«-cort'ed. 
EB-oorl'iag. 
EiHirl-talr' (u-trs- 

Iwor'l [bd Wb. Gd. ; 

e»-*™-Hr', Wk. H3.I 
EtcrUoire (Kr.) (u- 

Sr*.(H»r') [bo Wr. ; 

f'-lire-taar', Ijm. ISl, 

IW.) 

(hi Auglii'li^ (umVftS 



Ei-cutch'eon (-tucft'- 

Ea-ouMh'eoned (Jsica'- 
twifl. 



Es-o tL-iJl-cism (-»fem). 
EB-pal'ier (-yur), 171. 
Ej-pC'oUl . i-pcsh'at). 



EB'pl-0-nHge itt'pi-o- 

[aa Wr. Gd. ; a'pl- 
u-ndsA. Sm. 15S.] 

EB-pou|a«l li^^OJ W'- 

EB-pOUBO' (-pOb^'J. 

Eb-pouboI' (-poHzd'), 

EB-pous'ing ( jiouz'-). 
Ei-prit (Jt corjw (i"r,} 
tea-pre'dBA-tSr'). 



Ii, f , aftsrf ; fi <u Jn far, i i 



ESQUIMAU 



193 



EUROPEAN 



BB'qni-mau (es'kt-mS) 
rpl. Esvaui-maux 

(-010, or -mdz), 196.] 

Es-quire' (-Ineirf), 

Es'aay, «. 161. 

£B-Bay% V. 161. 

EB-aayed' (-«4dO> 187. 

£s-Bay'ing. 

Es'say-ist, or Es-sav'- 
ist [BO Wr. ; tn'aa-tatt 
Sm.j es-sa'iat, Wk. 
Wb. Gd. 165.1 

Es'senoe* 170, 171. 

EB'Benoed (sengt), 183. 

EB-Benc'ing. 

EB-sen'tiaTr^Aai). 

EB-Ben-ti-al^i'ty l-8ht-). 

EB-Ben'tial-ly (-ihal-)^ 
170. 

EB-tab'Ush, 104. 

EB-tab'lished i4isht), 

EB-tab'lish-ing. 

Es-taVlish-ment. 

Es-ta-fet'. 

Es-torfeHef (Fr.). 

0^ Smart glre* only 
the English Ibrm of this 
word {<atgfet\ Woreoter 
onlv the French form if- 
tafette). Goodrich gWea 
bothfomu. 

Es-tate', 23. 
Es-teem', 13. 
Es-tcem'a-ble, 164. 
EB-teemed' ir^imd'), 

165. 
EB-teem'ing'. 
[E B t h e tl 1203. — iSef 

iEBthetie.1 
Es'ti-marble, 164, 171. 
Es'ti-mate, n. & v. 73. 
Es'ti-mat-ed, 183. 
EB'ti-mat-ing. 
£B-ti-ma'tion, 112. 
Es'ti-mat-lTe, 84. 
£B'U-mat-or, 183. 
Es'ti-val, 78. 
EB-ti-ra'tion r£ s 1 1 - 

y a t i o n , 203. j 
Es-top'. 

EB-topped' {-topt'), 
Es-top'pel [ K B t o p - 

ple,£Btopel,203.] 
EB-to'yers (-twr«), n. 

Ef-triide' (Fr.)<e»-«radO 

J BO Sm. Wr. ; es- 
rad', Wb. Gd. 154, 
165.J 
EB-trange', 23, 45. 
Es-tran^ed', 166. 
EB-trange'ment, 185. 
EB-traDgf'ing, {-trat^'-). 



Es-tra-padeS 122. 
EB-tray'. 23. 
Ea-trear. 
Es-treat'ed. 
Ea-treat'ing^. 
Ea-trepe'moit. 
Kat'u-a-ry, 72. 
ttagire (Fr.) (a-td- 

zhtr'). 
Etoh (ecA), 15, 44 ; Note 

D, p. 37. 
Etched (ecJU), Note C, 

D. 34. 
Etch'er (ec*'-), 77. 
Etch/ing {ecV). 
£-teWnal, 21, Note. 
E-ter'nal-ly, 170. 
K-ter'ni-ty, 78, tt3, 169. 
E-ter'nixe, 202. 
E-ter'nized, 183. 
E-ter'au-ing. 
£-te'Bi-an {-zhX-an) [bo 

Sm. Wr. ; e-te'zhan^ 

Wb. CW. 155.] 
E'ther, 13. 37, 77. 
E-the're-al, 49, N. ; 160. 
E-the're-al-ize, 202. 
£-the're-al-ized, 183. 
£-the're-al iz-ing. 
E-thgr-l-n-ca'tion. 
E-th«rM-fonn, 169. 
E-ther-!-za'tion. 
E'ther-ize, 202. 
E'ther-ized, 183. 
E'tber-iz-ing. 
Eth'ic, 15, 37. 
Eth'ic-al, 108. 
Eth'icB. 

£-thU>'pi-aii, 160. 
E-thi-op'ic. 
Etb'mold. 
Eth-moid'al. 
Eth'nic. 
Eth'nio-al, 108. 
Eth-nog'ra-pher, 108. 
Eth-no-graph'io. 
Eth-no-graph'ic-al. 
Eth-nog'ra-phy, 108. 
Eth-no-log'ic (-U^'-). 
Eth-nol'o-gist, 108. 
Eth-nol'o-gy. 
E'ti-o-Ute, 73, 122. 
E'ti-o-latred, 183. 
£'ti-o-lat-iiig. 
£-ti-o-la'tion, 112. 
E-tl-o-log'ic-al (-«(?;'-). 
E-ti-ol'o-gy, 108. 
Et-i-quette' i-ket')^ 122. 
£t-ne'an, 110. 
E-tma'can. 
ttui (Fr.) (et-^D%') [bo 

Wk. Sm. Wb. Gd.; 

tL-twl'^ Wr. 154, 155.] 



Webeter and Good- 
rich, btfriidPt tliii French 
form of the word, give alio 
the Anglicised form Et- 
wee. 

Et-y-mo-log'ic (-fcy'M. 

Et-y-mo-log'ic-al(-2q;^). 

Et-y-mo-log'ic-al-ly 

Et-y-mol'o-giat, 108. 
Et-y-mol'o-flry, 108, 170. 
Et/y-mon [Gr. ^ L.pl. 

£t'y-ma; Eng. pi. £t'- 

y-mona (-monz), lOa] 
Eu'cha-rist (u'kon), 171. 
Eu-clia-rist'ic (u-lea-). 
Eu-cba-riat'ic-al (u-ka-). 
Eu'cby-my (u'kjf-). 
Eu'cra-sy, 169. 
Eii'cre {u'kur), 164, 17L 
£u-di-om'e-ter, 108. 
Eti-di-o-met'ric. 
Eu-di-o-met'rio«l. 
Eu-di-om'e-try, 108. 
Eu'lo-giRt, 108. 
Eu-lo-giBt'ic, 160. 
Eu-lo-giBt'io-al, 10& 
Eu-lo'gi-um, 160. 
Eu'lo-gize, 202. 
Eu'lo-gized, 183. 
E&'lo-giz-ing. 
Eu'lo-gy, 26, 93. 
£u'no-my. 
Eu'nuch (-nuk). 
Eu'pa-to-ry, 86. 
Eu-pep'ay [ao Sm. Wb, 

Gd. ; u'pep-ay, Wk. ; 

v'pep-sy, or u-pep'sy^ 

Wr. 155.] 
Eu-pep'tic. 
Eu'phe-miam {■'mizm)^ 

136, 169. 
Eu'phe-mist. 
Eu-phe-miat'lo. 
Eu-phe-miat'ic-al. 
Eu-phon^ic, 109. 
Eu-phon'lc-al, 108. 
Eu-pho'ni-o&B, 169. 
Ea'pbo-uiam {-nizm), 
Eu'pho-ny, 86, 93. 
Eu'phra-8y, 169. 
Eu'phu-iam {-izm). 
Eu'phu-iat. 
Eu-phu-iat'io. 
Eu-plaa'tic, 109. 
£u-rl'puB, or Eu'ri-puf 

[so Wr. ; u-ri'p%u, 

Wk. (3d.; «V1-1HM, 

Sm. ^s&.\ 

Eu-roc'ly-don. 
Eu'rope, 171. 
£u-ro-pe'an (110) [not 
u-ro^pe-an, 153.] 



fifdl ; 6 as in there; 6^ at in foot ',qa»in fiusile ; gh cm g in go j th a« in this. 

17 



n'rvU-tDT l"' Wr 
Wb, Gd,i u-ria'mg 
Bm. lU [Eurith 
my,8in.aB.l 

Ba-BU'chl-u i-a-i. 

En'rtrle. 

£u-l«r'[>c-ai. 110, 1«. 

Eu-tbi4U'(l-* l-tkt-a). 

EQ'than-a-tr (-tw) m 
ED-than'MrTH'thm 
B-t¥i Sid.) w-Aon'o 
tg.'Wk. ; a-Om'ing 
or uitlkoK-a-iv. Wr. 
u'JJkd-fld-Wi or u 
«iaB'a-»v, Gd. !».] 



id'eS, IBS. 



K-vBU-trcl'lc-*!, or Ev- 
■n-gd'Ia-al (Vl Wi.; 
tmm-iel'it-al, Wb. 

Od-t CV^sPitDl, 

Wk. Sm. ISB.] 
K-vm-gel' lc-«l-lr. 
E'TnD'^l'i-damf -Htm). 

i:;sfl:iS-. 

E-TBa'srcl-Ezed, 183. 
E-ran'gcMi-lns. 
E-rap'o-ra-ble, IM. 



£-va'slTa, U. 



E'ren (e'nn), I4B. 
E'teoeiHi'vad), ISO. 
E'ven-lng (e'nn). 



^i;^!^')- 



ftmole sheep. [See 
You, leo.l [pi. £veB. 
— Sm Use, 100.1 
Ewer iyoor) (171), n. » 
kind or pltDher. [See 

EWf^cVm''*), 40, N. 
Bx.ito'er-bsM (en-d*'-) 

(H?) [to Wk. Bm. 

Wr. i Oi-a-tr-bat, 

Wb. Gd. IM.J 
B !t.»5'er-b4t-ea (e^-)- 
Ei-sf'er-bil-lQp (e?i-J. 
Ex-m-er-bs'tion («*-). 
Ex-iKt'[effz-),4a, 137. 
Ex-Mt'ed C«iO- 
Ex-M^er gff,-) [Ex- 

EK^ilo^'^^^i!.' 
Ex-Bct'or (iff:-) [Sk- 

Ei-sglm-ale' { Vi-t(f •), 



EZCBLLKNCiT 

£x-«g'gtr-U-al (epi. 
oj'O, 183- 

Es.ak'kct-ujiis (eir>- 
nC-1. 

Ex-w.gW4'tlaa (iff* 

Ex-ilt' (»«-), 17, 137. 

EK-UtVflDO (MI-)- 

Ex-Ul'ed (tgt-i. 
Ez-ua'ln-i-ble Itgi-), 

Ex-un-ln-a'tlon (Mc-). 
Es-un1ne (<az)i ia2. 
Bx-Wdtiwil (epi-). Its. 
Ex-«n'tn-er(effi-), 183. 
Bx-ualn-liis (epi-)- 
Ex-un'pte ^ma-am'BD 

(I37.l«4)[>aw'k-"n. 

Wb. Gd.i eat-Ui'pl, 



Sx -na-Uicm's-totti. 
Ex-sn-Ibe'ets, 12S. 
Si'irch (-ari). 
lixiarch-ite (-ort-) tw 



Ex-u'per-iMiig legt-}. 
Bx-u-per-stloa (ai-). 
Ex-can-det'csoae, 171. 



£x'cs-T(ita(l37) [«>9ni. 
Wb. Gd. i eta-ka'rtt, 
Wk. I et)'in.D«, or 
et«-ifl'rf»,Wr. IM.] 



B, &, j, inw • *• «■ I> 0> Oi f I **«rt 1 S w to Sn, * oi In fiwt, I oi (■ 



fiXCELLENT 



195 



EXFOLIATIVE 



Ex'cel-lent. 
£x-cel'lingr. 

[Exoentrie, 203.— 
See Eocentrio.] 

Ex-cept', 16. 

£x-oept'ed. 

£x-oept'ing. 

£x-oep'tion. 

£x-cep'tion-a-ble, 164. 

£x-oep'tion-al. 

£x-cept1ye, 81. 

£x-oept'or. 

£x-oerpt' [so Sm. Wb. 
Gd. ; dcsserpt't or 
ek9'serpU Wr. 156.1 

Ex-cerp'ta (L.), n,pl. 

Ex-oesB', 121, 137, 171. 

Ex-ces'slve, 8i. 

Ex- change', 23. 

Ex-chittge-a-bil'i'ty. 




171. 

Ex-<»a'a4>le (-«f«'-), IM. 
Excise' {-9lz% n. ^ v. 
Excised' i-Azd')^ 150. 
Ex-cise'inan (•«l«'-), 

106. 
Ex-ds'ing (-«l2;'-). 
Ex-cl'aion (-^isA'tm). 
Ex-cit-a-bil'i-ty, 160. 
Ex-at'a-ble, 164, 183. 
Ex-cit'ant, or Ex'd- 

taut [so Wr. ; ekB-tU'- 

an/,Wb. Gd.; ektfaX- 

tant, Sm. 155.] 
Ex-d-ta'tion. 
Ex-oifa-tlve, 84. 
Ex-cit'a-to-rjr, 86. 
Ex-dte', 25, 137. 
Ex-cit'ed, 183. • 
Ex-otte'ment, 18S. 
Ex-cit'er. 
Ex'dt'ing. 
Exclaims 23. 
Ex-claimedS 165.' 
Ex-claim'ing. 
Ex-da-ma'tfon, 171. 
Ex-clam'a-t!ve. 
£x-clam'a-to-ry, 86i 
£x-clttde', 26. 
Exclud'ed, 183. 
£x-clud'i]i^. 
Ex-clu'slon (-zkun). 
Ex-clu'sion-ist (-«A«mi-). 
Ex-cln'sYre, 84. 
Ex-oog'i-tate (-ken'-), 
Ex-cog'i-tat-ed (-W-). 
Ex-cog'i-tat-ing (-kc^'-), 
Ex-cog-i-ta'tion (-b^-). 
£x-com-mii'iii-c»4>le» 

164. 



Ex-<»m-mii'iii<«ate. 

£x-oom-mu'ni-<)at-ed. 

Ex-com-mu'ni-cat-ing. 

Ex-com-mu-ni-ca'tion. 

Ex-co'ri-ate, 49, N. 

£x-co'ri-at-ed, 183. 

£x-co'ri-at-iiig. 

Ex-co-ri-a'tion. 

Ex-cor-ti-ca'tion. 

Ex'cre-ment. 

£x-crc<ment'al. 

£x-cre-mGn-tI'tloai 

{'tish'tu). 
Ex-cres'cence, 171. 
£xcre8'oeiit. 
Ex-crete', 13, 137. 
£x-cret'ed, 183. 
Ex-cret'ing. 
Ex-cre'tion. 
Ex-cret'Ive, or Ex'ere- 

tlve [ekS'kr€t*iVi Sm. ; 

€k8'tere-Hvy Wk. Wb. 

Gd. ', eks'kre-Hvy or 

ekS'kret'iv, Wr. 155.1 
Ex-cret'o-ry, or Ex'- 

ore-to-ry [eks-krit'o- 

ry, Sm. ; ek$'kre-t0' 

2r, Wk. Wb. Gd.j 
s'kre-to-rjf, or dbt- 
krifo-rvt Wr. 155.] 
Ex-cru'd-ate (4eroo'9M- 
dt) r so Wk. Sm. Wr. ; 
ek»-Mi'8hatj Wb. Qd. 
155.} 
Ex-om'cMi^ed {-hroo'- 

£x-crtt'd-&t-lng (-iroo'- 

sht). 
Ex-cru-d>a'tion (-kroo^- 

sM), 
Ex-cul'pate, 73, 137. 
Ex-eul'pit-ed, 183. 
Ex-cnl'pat-lng. 
Ex-cttl-pa'tion, 112. 
Ex-cnl'pa-to-ry, 86w 
Ex-cfir^nt, 170. 
Ex-our'sion. 
Ex-cur' slve. 
Ex-ctts'a-ble (-M«'-)i 

183. 
Ex-cus'a-to-ry (kBz'-), 
Ex-cuse, n. 26, 161. 
£x<euBe' i-kaz')t v. 136, 

137, 161. 
Ex-oused' {-kOzd'), 183. 
Ex-cuB'ing (-Jfc««'-). 
Ex'e-cra-Dle, 164. 
Ex'e-cra-bly, 93. 
Ex'e-crate, 137, 169. 
Ex'e-crat-ed. 
Ex'e-crat-ing. 
Ex-e-era'tioB. 
Ex'e-cra-to-ry (86) [so 



Wr. Wb. Gd. ; e*»'e- 
crat-o-rpf Sm. 155.] 

Ex'e-cute, 169. 

£x'e-cut-cd, 183. 

£x'e-cut-er [E x e c a • 
tor,20:j.] 

Ex'e-cut-ing. 

Ex-e-eu'tioQ, 112. 

Ex-e-cu'tion-er. 

Ex-ec'u-tive (egz-), 40, 
N. J 84, 137. 

£x-ee'u-tor (^;7-) [Ex- 
ec u t e r . 2^03.] 

Ex-ec-u-to'ri-al {egz-), 

Ex-ec'u-to-ry {egz-). 

Ex-eo'u-trix [egz-), 

Ex^-ge'8i8 (Gr.), 113. 

£x'e-gete. 

Ex-e-get'ic, 109. 

Ex-e-get'ic-al, 106. 

Ex-em'plar {egz')t 137. 

Ex'em-p^a-rv {egz'A^ 
107, 137. 

■ST* Thii word, m imv 

nouueed by all the orthoe- 
pif ti, if an exception to the 
general rule by which x at 
the end of an accented syl- 
lable has the soand of bt. 
It is sounded as gt in ex- 
emplary^ because it haa 
that sound in the priml* 
tive eawiHplar. 

Ex-em-pli-n-ca'tloii 

{egz-), 112, 116. 
Ex-em'pll-fied (ea«-)> 

99. 
Bx-em'pU-f y {egz-), 94. 
Ex-em'pli-f y-4ng {egz-), 
£x-empt' {egz-€!m^y, 

W7, 162. 
£x-emp'tion {Mz-emf-). 
Ex-e-qua'tur (£.)• 
Ex-e'qui-al. 
Ex'e-qules {-kwiz), «. 

pi. 171. 
Ex'er-dse {-Hz), 137, 

171. 
Ex'er-dsed {-9lzd), 183. 
Ex-er-ds'a-ble (•sU'-), 

164. 
Ex-ergne' (egz-erg'y, 

171. 
Ex-erf (egz-), 21, N.j 

137. 
£x-ert'ed {egz-). 
Ex-ert'ing {egz-). 
Ex-er'tion {egz-). 
Ex-fo'li-ate. 
Ex-fb'li-at<ed, 183. 
Ex-fo'U-at-lng. 
Ex-fo-li-a'tioQ. 
Ex-fo'U-a-tlve. 



IIUl{6at.ifitiiere} dbiittAfoot} ^ at in AnHe }gh at gingia ',\^ as in thin. 



EXHALABLE 



196 



EXPERIMENTALIST 



£z-hal'a-ble (egz-), 137, 

IM. 
Ex-hal'ant (egz-h 183. 
£x-ha-la'tion (figz-). 
Ex-hale' (^2-), 23, 137, 

139. 
Ex-haled' (cgz-), 183. 
Kx-hal'ingr (egz-). 
Ex-hkuBV(egz-), 17, 137, 

139. 
Ex-h&uBt'ed (egz-). 
£x-hau8t'i-ble (egz-), 

164, 169, 171. 
Ex-h&ust'ing (egz-). 
Ex-h&uBt'ion (egz- 

JuuD8t'yun)j 171. 
Ex-haust'Ive (egz-)j 84. 
Ex hib'it(«o2r-), 137, 139. 
Ex-hib'it-ed (egz-). 
Ex-hib'it-er (egz-). 
Ex-hib'it-inff (egz-). 
Ex-hi-W'tion (-bish'un)^ 

171,231, Exc. 
Ex-hlb'it-Ive (egz-)y 84. 
Ex-hib'it-o-ry C^gz-). 
£x-hll'a-rant (egz-). 
Ex-hil'a-rate (egz-)^ 139. 
Ex-hil'a-rat-ed (egz-). 
Ex-hil'a-rat-lng (egz-). 
Ex-hil-a-ra'tion (egz-). 
Ex-hort' (egz-), if, 137, 

139. 
Ex-hor-ta'tion (dfe»-). 
Ex-liort'a-tlve (egz-). 
Ex-hort'a-to-ry (egz-). 
Ex-hort'er (egz-). 
Ex-hu-ma'tion (eks-). 
Ex-hume' (egz-), 26, 

137, 139. 
£x-humed' (^z-Mmd'), 

183. 
Ex-hum'ing (egz-). 
[Exiccate, 203.— 

See Exsiccate.] 
Ex'i-gence, 137, 169. 
Ex'i-gen-cy, 169. 
Ex'i-gent. 
Ex-i-gru'i-ty, 169. 
Ex-ig'u-ofis. 
Ex'ile (eks'll), n. 81, 

137. 
Ex'Ue (eks'll), v. [bo 

Sm. Gd. J eg-zlV, 

Wk. ; eg-zW, or eks'- 
ll, Wr. 155.1 
Ex-ile' (eg-zW), a. [so 

Wk. Sm. Wr. j eksHl, 

Gd. 165.] 

0^ ** Authority Is cer- 
tainly on the side of the 
ultimate accent ; but it 
may be questioned wheth- 
er it is not contrary to anal- 
ogy." Walker. 



Exiled, 163. 
Ex'il-ing^. 
Ex-11'i-ty (egz-). 
Ex-i8t' (egz-), 137. 
Ex-ist'ed (egz). 
Ex-ist'ence (egz-), 109. 
Ex ist'ent (egz-). 
Ex-ist'ing (egz-). 
Ex'it, 137. 
Ex-mayor (-ma'tcr, or 

-mir'), 222, N. 
Ex'ode. 
£x'o-du8. 
Ex offl'd-o (L.) (ekt- 

Of-fi8h'\-0). 

Ex'o-gen. 

Ex-og'en-ofis (-o/-). 
Ex-on'er-ate (egz-), 137. 
Ex-OQ'er-at^d (egz-), 

183. 
Ex-on'er-at-ing (egz-). 
Ex-on-er-a'tion (egz-). 
Ex-on'er-at-Ive (egz-) 

J so Sm. ; egz-on'ur-€h 
iv, Wr. Wb. Gd. 156.] 
Ex-o-phyl'lofis, or Ex- 

oph'yl-lou8. [/Sc* Ade- 

nophylloas.J 
Ex'o-ra-ble, 164. 
Ex-or'bi-tanoe (egz-). 
Ex-or'bi-tanAsy (egz-), 

169. 
£x-or'bi-tant (egz-). 
Ex'or-dBe (-atorsiz) 

(202) [not eks-or'siz, 

136.] 
Ex'or-ciaed (slzd), 183. 
Ex'or-cis-er (-Hz-). 
Ex'or-cis-lnflf (slz-). 
Ex'or-cism (-sizm), 136. 
Ex'or-cist. 
Ex-or'di-al (egz-). 
Ex'os-mose [bo Sm. 

Gd. ; eks-o$-md8', Wr. 

165.] 
Ex-os'Be-ofis [so Wr. 

Wb.Gd. J ek8-08h'*us, 

Sm. (See §26): eks- 

osh'e-us, Wk. 166.1 
Ex-os-to'Bts, 109, 126. 
Ex-o-t6r'ic, 109. 
Ex-o-t6r'ic-al, 108, 
Ex-ot'ic. 
Ex-ot'ic-al. 
Ex-ot'i-cism (-sizm), 
Ex-pand', 10, 1.37. 
Ex-pand'ed. 
Ex-pand'iag. 
Ex-panse', lO, 137. 
Ex-pan-ei-bil'i-ty. 
Ex-pan' si-ble, 164. 
Ex-pan'sion. 
Ex-pan'slve, 84. 



Ex-pe^'tlouB (-dUW- 

U8). 

Ex-pa'tl-ate (-8hiiU) Tso 
Wk. Sm. Wr.; eks- 
pa'eh&t, Wb. Gd. 156.] 

Ex-pa'ti-«t-ed (-shl). 

Ex-pa'ti-at-ing (-shl). 

Ex-pa-ti-a'tlon (-shl). 

Ex-pa'ti-at-or (-shl). 

Ex-pa'ti-a-to-ry (-shl-). 

Ex-pa'tri-ate. 

£x-pa'tri-at-ed, 183. 

Ex-pa'tri-at-ing. 

Ex-pa-tri-a'tion. 

Ex-pect', 15, 137. 

Ex-pcct'ance, 169. 

Ex-pect'an-cy, 169. 

Ex-pect'ant. 

Ex-pect-a'tion. 

Ex-pect'ed, 150. 

Ex-i)ect'er. 

Ex-pect'ing. 

Ex-pec'to-rant. 

Ex-pec'to-rate, 73. 

£x-pec'to-rat-ed. 

£x-pec'to-rat-ing. 

Ex-pec-to-ra'tton. 

Ex-pec'to-rat-Ive (84) 
[bo Sm. ; eks-pek'to-rtt- 
tiv, Wr. Wb. Gd, 
166.] 

Ex-pe'di-ence. 

Ex-pe'di-en-cy, 169. 

£x-i)e'di-eiit [bo Sm. 
Wr. Wb. Gd. j eks-pef- 
di-ent, or eks-pe'H- 
ent, Wk. 166.] 

Ex'pfe-dite. 

Ex'pe-dit-ed, 183. 

Ex'pe-dit-lng. 

Ex-pe-dl'tion (-diOif^ 
un)/231, Exc. 

Ex-pe-dl'tion-a-ry 
(-aiah'un-), 72. 

Ex-pe-di'tiouB (-dtcA'- 

U8). 

Ex-pel', 16, 137. 
Ex-pel'la-ble, 164, 176. 
Expelled' (peld'), 166. 
Ex-pel'ler, 176. 
£x-pel'ling. 
Expend', 16, 137. 
Ex-pend'ed. 
£x-pend'ing. 
Ex-pend'i-ture, 109. 
Ex-penae', 15, 137. 
Ex-pen'8lve, 84. 
Ex-pe'ri-ence, 169. 
Ex-pe'ri-enced (-erut). 
Ex-pe'ri-en^-ing, 183. 
Ex-per'i-ment, 169. 
Ex-per-i-ment'al. 
£x-p6r-i-ment'al-ist. 



a, e, !, o, u, y, long ; ft, (, 1, 5, 6, t* fhort ;'da$in far, a as in fkst, kasin 



^7 

EXPERIMENTALLY 



Ex-pSr-i-menfal-ly. 

Ex-p^r-i-ment-a'ri-an. 

Ex-pgr-i-meat-a'tion. 

Ex-p€r'i-meiit-€r. 

Ex-p6r'i-ment-iBt. 

£x-perf , a, & n. (21, 

K,)[not eke'purt, ld3.] 
Ex'pi-a-ble, 164. 
Ex'pi-ate, 73. 
Ex'pl-at-ed. 
Ex'pi-at-ing. 
£x-pi-a'tion. 
Ex^i-a-to-ry (86) [bo 

Wr.Wb.G<l.,eJfc»'|p«- 

it-a-ryy Sm.J 
Ex-pir'a-ble, 164. 
Ex-pl-ra'tion, 171. 
Ex-pir'a-to-ry, 49, N". 
Expire', 25, 137. 
Ex-pired, 183. 
Ex-pir'ing. 
£x-plaia', 23, 137. 
Ex-plain'a-ble, 164. 
Ex-plained', 165. 
Ex-plain'er. 
Ex-plain'infi^. 
Ex-pla-na'tion. 
Ex-plan'a-to-ry, 86. 
Ex'ple-tXve, 84. 
Ex'ple-to-ry. 
Ex'pU-ca-ble (164) [not 

ex-plik'a-bl, 153.1 
Ex'pU-eate, 73, 137. 
£x'pU-cat-ed, 183. 
Ex'pU-cat-ing. 
EX'pli-ca'tion, 112. 
Ex'pIi-cat-Xve, 84. 
£x'pU-eat-or. 
Bx'pll-cat-o-ry [bo Sm. 

Wr.; eks'pli-KO-to^ni, 

MTb. Gd. 166.1 
Ex-pU5'lt,'171. 
Ex-plode'.24, 137. 
Ep-plod'ed, 183. 
£x-pl6d'er. 
£x-pldd'ing. 
£x-ploit' (27, 121) {not 

ex'ploit, 15:1.] 
Ex-plo-ra'tion. 
Ex-pl6r'a-to-ry. 
Ex'plore', 24, 137. 
£x-piored', 183. 
Ex-plor'er, 49, N. 
£x-pldr'ing. 
Ex-plo'«ion {'Zkun)fll2, 
Ex-plo'sTre, 84. 
Expo'nent (122) [not 

ex'po-nent, 153.1 
Ex-po-nen'tial (^-ahat). 
Ex-port', «. 137, 161. 
Ex'port, n. 137, 161. 
£x-pdrt'a-ble, 164. 
Ex-port-a'tion. 



197 

Ex-port'ed. 
Ex-port'er. 
Ex-port'ing. 
Ex-poBe' (-»««'), V. 161. 
Exposi (Fr.) (eka-po- 

««'), n. 161. 
Ex-posed' (^-p6zd'), 183. 
£x-p6s'er {-pUz'-), 
Ex-pos'ing l-pOz'-). 
Ex-po-Bl'l!on (-ziah^- 

un). 
Ex-pofl'i-t!fve (-poz^-), 
Ex-po«'i-tor {-poz'-). 
Ex-poB'i-to-ry {-poz'-). 
Ex-pos'tu-late, 73. 
£x-poB'ta-lat-ed. 
Ex-poB'tu-lat-ing. 
Ex-poB-tu-la'tion. 
Ex-pos'tu -lat-or. 
Ex-pos'tu-la-to-ry [bo 

Wr. Wb. CW.J eks- 

pos'tu-UU^-ry^ Sm. 

155.J 
Ex-poB'nre (-pCz*-), 91, 

112. 
Ex^toand', 28, 137. 
£x-pound'ed. 
Ex-pound'er. 
Ex-pouiid'ing. 
Ex-pres'i-dent (-prez'-), 

222, Note. 
Ex-press', 15, 137. 
Ex-press'age. 
Ex-pressed' (-prest^). 

Note C, p. 34. 
Ex-press'i-ble, 164, 169. 
Ex-pres'sion (-presh'- 

un),- 
Ex-presB'Yve, 84. 
ExjAro-brate [so Sm. 

Wb. Gd.; ek8-pro'- 

brat, Wk. ; eks-Dro'- 

brntf or eks'pro-hrlU, 

Wr. 155.J 
Ex'pro-brat-ed, 183. 
Ex'pro-brat-ing. 
Ex-pro-bra'tion. 
Ex-pro'bra-tlve. 
Ex-pro'pri-ate. 
£x-pro'pri-at-ed, 183. 
Ex -pro'pri-at-ing. 
Ex-pro-pri-a'tion. 
Ex-pugn' ("jXin'), 162. 
Ex-pug'na-ble, 164. 
£x-pug-na'tion. 
Ex-pu ;ned' (-pflnd'). 
Ex-pugn'er (-pfln'-^. 
Ex-pu^'ing l-pQw-), 
Ex-pui'sion. 
Ex-pul'sTve. 
Ex-pano'tion. 
Expunge', 22, 137. 
Ex-punged', 1&3. 



EXTENSIBILITY 

Ex-pung'ing (-punf-). 
£x-par^te [so Sm. 

Wr. i eka-pur'gdi^ or 

eks'pur-g&t, Gd. 155.] 
Ex-pur'gat-ed, 183. 
Ex-pur'gat-ing. 
£x-pur-ga'tion, 112. 
Ex-par(ga-tor, or Ex'- 

pur-gat-or [so Wr. i 

'ek8-pur'g€htor, 8m. ; 

tks'pur-gfU-oTi Wb. 

Gd. 155. J 
Ex-pur'ga-to-ry, 86. 
Ex'qui-Blte (eka'kwi- 

zU) (i;$7, 152) [not 

eks-kwiz'it. 153.] 
Ex-san-guin'i-ty 

{-gvjiw-). 
Ex-san'gui-noi&8 

{-aan^gwl). 
Ex-san^gui-oUs {-9ang'- 

fMi-), 
Ex-scind' isind*), 162. 
Ex-sdnd'ed {-Hnd'-). 
Ex-sdnd'ing (-»ind'-). 
Ex-serf, 21, N. 
Ex-sert'ed. 
Ex-aert'tte, 152. 
Ex-sic'cant. 
Ex-aic'cate [bo Wk. 

Sm. Wr. ; eks-Hk'kMt 

or eks'sik-kdt, Gd. 

155.1 [Exiocate, 

203.] 
£x-sic'cat-cd, 183. 
Ex-sic'cat-ing. 
£x-sic-«a'tion. 
£x-8ic'ca-tlve, 84. 
Ex-spu-Y'tion (-wA'un). 
Ex-stip'u-late. 
Ex-suc'cofis (170) [E X- 

aceoaB,2(Ki.j 
Ex-8uc'tion. 
[ExBudation, 203, 

— See Exudation.] 
Ex'tant, 137, 169. 
[Extatic, 203.~£rM 

Ecstatic] 
Ex-tem-po-ra'ne-ofis, 

169. 
Ex-tem'po^ra-iy, 72. 
Ex-tem'po-re [not eks- 

tem'por, 144, 153.] 
Ex-tem'po-rlze, 202. 
Ex-tem'po-rized, 183. 
Ex-tem'po-riz-er. 
Ex-tem'po-riz-lng. 
Extends 15, 137. 
Ex-tend'ed. 
£x-tend'er. 
Ex-tend'i-ble, 164, 109, 
Ex-tend'ing. 
Ex-ten-Bi-bil'i-ty, 169. 



£iU{ 6cM<ii there; Cbaaintoot-, fMinfadle; gliMgtngojthMtntbis. 



EXTENSIBLB 



1^ 



FABVCATION 



Ex-ten'Bi-ble, 161. 
Ex-ten'ene, 152. 
Ex-ten'ston. 
Ex-ten'slre, M. 
£x-ten'Bor. 
Extent', 16, 137. 
£x-ten'a-ate, 73, 80. 
Ex-ten'u-iit-ed, 183. 
£x-ten'u-at-ing. 
£x-ten-u-a'tlon. 
£x-teii'tt-at-or. 
Ex-te'rl-or, 49, N. } 118. 
Ex-te-ri^r'i-ty, 109. 
Ex-ter'mi-nate, 21, N. 
£x-ter'ml-iiat^, 183. 
Ex-ter'mi-nat-ingf. 
Ex-ter-mi-na'tioa 
Ex-tcr'mi-nat-or. 
Ex-ter'ml-iia-to-ry (86) 

[bo Wr. Wb. Gd.j 

eks-ter'mi^ndt-ihry, 

Sm. 155.1 
Ex-tern', 21, N. 
£x-ter'nal. 
Ex-ter-nal'i-ty, 160. 
Ex-ter-ra'ne-ofiB. 
Ex-ter'sion. 
Extinct' i-tingW)^ 16, 

54. 
Ex-tinc'tion. 
Ex-tin'sfoish {rting*- 

ffwianjj 104. 
Ex-tin'g:ui8h-a-bl9 

{-tin^gwUh-Orbl), 164, 

171. 
Ex-tin'gruiBhed {-ting'- 

gwisht). Note C, p. 34. 
Ex-tin'guish-er {-ting'- 

gwiah-). 
Ex-tin'gulBh-ing (-Mn^'- 

gvjish-). 
Ex-tin'eoiBh-ment 

{-Hng'giDish-). 
Ex-tir'pa-ble, 164. 
Ex-tir'pat«, 21, N. 
Ex-ttr'pat-ed, 183. 
Ex-tir'pat-ing. 
Ex-tir-pa'tion. 
Ex-tir'pat-or, or Ex'- 

tir-pat-or [so "Wr. j 

eks-iir'pdt-oTy Wk. 

Sm. ; eks'tir-pat-or, 

Wb.Gd. 155.1 
Extol' [not eks-tol', 

153.1 
Ex-tolled' (-WW), 176. 
Ex-tol'ler. 
Ex-tol'ling. 
Ex-tor' si ve, 84. 
Ex-lort', 17, 137. 
Ex-tort'ed. 
Ex-tort'ing. . 
Ex-tor'tion. 



Bx-tor'tioiiHi-ry-, 72. 
Ex-tor'tion-iite, 73. 
Ex-tor'tion-er. 
Ex'tn (72) [noteki'trft, 

163.] 
Ex'tract. n. 103, 161. 
Ex-tract', v, 103, 161. 
Ex-tract'ed. 
£x-tract'ing. 
Ex-trac'tion. 
Ex-tract'Ive, 84. 
£x-tract'or, 88. 
Ex-tTftHU'tion {-dUhf- 

un). 
Ex-tra'doB. 
£x-tra-do'tal, 222. 
Ex-tra-Jn-dl'dal (-<K«A'- 

al), 222. 
Ex-tra'ne-ottB, 106, 160. 
Ex-traor'di-na-rl-ly 

(-<ror'-),72. 
EX'traor'ai-na-ry 

C-trof^ (17, 72, 171) 

[BO Yna, Sm. Wb. 

Grd. ; eks-tror'di-na- 

ry, or eks-tra-or'di- 

na-ry, Wr. 166.1 
Ex-trav'a-ganoe, 160. 
£x-trav'a-gant. 
Ex-tray-a-gan'za. 
Ex-trar'a-sate. 
£x-trav'a-Bat-ed, 183. 
Ex-tray'a-Bat-ing. 
Ex-trav-a-Ba'tion. 
Ex-treme', 13. 
£x-trem'iBt. 
Ex-tr6m'i-ty. 
£x'tri-ca-ble, 164. 
Ex'tri-cate. 
Ex'tri-cat-ed. • 
Ex-tri-ca'tion. 
Ex-trin'sto, 100. 
Ex-trin'slo-al, 108. 
Ex-trin'Bic-al-ly. 
Extrude' l-irood'), 26. 
Ex-trud'ed (,-trood'-), 

183. 
Ex-trud'lng (^rood'-). 
Ex-tru'slon (^-trof^- 

zhun). 
Ex-tu'ber-anoe. 
Ex-tu'ber-ant. 
Ex-u'ber-anoe (ea«-), 

137; 169. 
Ex-u'ber^ant {egz-), 
[ExuccouB, 203.— 

See ExBucGOUB.] 
Ex-u-da'tion. 
Ex-ude' {ek9-)i 26. 

■ar* Thli word if an ex- 
ception to the general role, 
(§ m\ by which x ii 
■ounded m gz at the end 



or a ii^bl*, whra tht 
next ■grilabte li eocented, 
and bc^ne with a ToweL 

Ex-nd'ed, 183. 
Ex-nd'ing. 

£x-ul'oer-ate {egz^), 137. 
Ex-ul'oer-at-ed (figz'\ 

183. 
Ex-ul'cer-at-ing {egz-). 
Ex-nl-oer-a'tion (egz-). 
Ex-ult' ieg9-), 22, 137. 
Ex-ult'ant (egz-), 160. 
£x-ult-a'tion (egz-). 
Ex-u'vi-a (L.) (egz^- 

vi-c), n. "pl. 
Eje (I). 25, 171. 
Eye'b&il (I'-), 206. 
Eye'bright (I'hrit), 162. 
Eye'brow (I'-), 206. 
Eyed (id), 150, 183. . 
Eye'-glasB, 209. 
Ey'ingjl'-), 183. 
Eye'laah (I'-). 
Eye'let (I'-). 
Eye'lid (l'-). 
Ey'er (I'-) (67, 183), n. 

one wbo eyes. [See 

Ire, 148.] 
Eye'- ser- vast (I'-), 
Eyc'Bight (l'8U), 162, 

206. 
Eye' sore (I'-). 
Eye'-stone (!'-), 24, 166. 
Eye'-tooth (I'-). 
Eye'-wA-ter (I'-). 
Eye'-wit-neBB (I'-). 
Eyre (#r), n. a journey ; 

a court of justices 

itinerant. [See Air, 

Ere, Heir, 1(30.] 




[Aerie, 203.] 



F. 

Fa-ba'oeons i-ahue), 160. 

Fa'bi-an, 78. 

Fa'ble, 23, 164, 230. 

Fa'bled {/a'bld), 183. 

Fa'bler, 77. 

Fa'bUng. 

Fab'rio [so Wr. Wb. 
Gd. ; fab'rik, or fa'- 
bHk, Wk. } fa'brik, 
Sm. 155.] 

Fab'ric-ate, 73, 228. 

Fab'ric-at-ed, 183. 

Fab'rio-at-ing. 

Fabric- a' tion. 



a, e, 1, 5, Uf Xi long > ft, 6, X, 5, 0, jr, short iHeuin far, a cur ^ fiwt, ieis i» 



1 



FABRIOATOft 



199 



FAMNBD 



FaVrie-at-OFk 
Fab'u-Ust, 80. 
Fab'u-lo&s, 106. 
Fa-^ade' (Rr.) ift^Sd') 

[80 8m. Wr. j/a-«a<l', 

Gd. 165.] 
Face, 23. 
Faced ifi9t)f Note C,p. 

Fa^'et r./ii»'««) (171), n. a 
small surfaoe or Ikoe. 
[See Faucet, 148.1 

Fa^'et-ed (/a»'-). 

JSi-cc'^i-cB (L.) CA^M'- 
4At-^), n. p2. 

Fa-ce'tioCiB (-sfttw), 10». 

Fascial (-sJudh lOtf. 

Fac'Ilc (/«'«), 171. 

Farcil'itate, 73, 100. 

Fa-dl'i-tat-ed, 183. 

FiHsil'i-tat-ing. 

Fa-cil-i-ta'tion, 112. 

Fa-cU'i-ty, 78, 100. 

Fa$'iag. 

Foo-Bim'i-ie. 

Fact, 10. 

Fac'tioii. 

Fac'tion-ist. 

Fac'tioi&B i-8hu$), 100. 

Fao-tl'tiotts i-tUh^ui), 

Fac'tor, 88. 

Fac-to'ri-Ul. 

Fac'to-ry, 86, 03. 

Fac-to'tum. 

Fac'ul-ty, 170. 

Fade (23), v, to rsnlsh ; 
to decay. [See Fayed, 
160.] 

F&d'ed, 183. 

Fad'ing. 

[F « c al , 209— fiSse Fe- 
cal.] 

Fie'cea (L.) (fefsU), n. 
9^. [Feces, 203.] 

[Faecula, 203.— <See 
Fecula.] 

[Faery, 203^ - 5ee 
Fairy.] 

Fag, 10. 

Fag^nd', 206, Exc. 3. 

Fagged (/a^d), 165, 176. 

Fag'glng i-ghing)y 138. 

Fag'ot, 170. 

Ffihr'en-heit (/Br'en- 
«)(171)i80 Qd,i/H'' 
ren-hUj Wr. 155.J 

Fa-lence' (Fr.) (Jkh 
vans'). 

Fail, 23. 

Failed i/Uld), 165. 

Fail'ing. 

Fail'ure, 01. 

FUn, a. glad:— ^. 



gladly. [8€e Fane, 
Feign, 160.] 

Faint, a. weak, swoon- 
ing:— v. to grow 
weak; to swoon. [See 
Feint, 160.] 

Faint'ed. 

Faint-h^lrt'ed (206, 
JBxc 5) [so Wk. Sm. 
Wb. Gd.; nifWhart- 
edj Wr. 165.] 

Faint'ing. 

Fair (ffr) (14), €». free 
from blemish: — n. a 
meeting for traffic 
[See Fare, 160.] 

Fair'y iftr'y)^ n. & a, 
40, N. [Faery, 203.1 

Falr'y-land (/M-). 

FUth, 23, 37. 

Faith^AU (-/ooO> 180. 

Fa'kir {so Sm. Gd. ; 
ftrkir^t or /a'Jfcur, Wr. 
155.] [Faquir, Fa- 
queer, 203.] 

W3^ Gk)odricli jtiononii* 
ew tills word jMteerf, 
when It it spdled Jbgirir. 

FaKcade', 121. 

Fal'cate. 

Fal'oat-ed. 

Fal-ca'tion. 

Fai'chion (JtwVchun) 
[so Sm. Wb. Gd. ; 
fawl'shun, Wk. ; 

fatoUchuny or fanta'- 
8hun, Wr. 155.] 
[not fftl'chun, 153.] 
rFaulchion,203.] 

FU'oon iftno'kn) (140, 
162) [so Wk. Sm. 
Wr. ; yot0'*n, or/d^ 
kan, dd. 155.] 

I^'oon-er (/aw'kfirur) 
[so Wk. Sm. Wr. J 
faw'kn-urt or/eU'kof^ 
itr, Gd. 156.] 

F&l'co-net [so Sm. Wb. 
Gd. ; ftiiwVk<HMtj 

Wk. ; faeko-nety or 
fawVko-net, Wr. 166.] 

Fal'con-ry (fhw'knrry) 
[so Sm. Wr. ; /ow'- 
Jcn-ry^ or fcWkon-rVf 
(M. 165.] 

Fa-ler'ni-an, 21, N. , 
160. 

FMl/17, 172. 

Fal-la'cious (-sAtw), 100. 

Fal'la-ey, 160, 170. 

FUlen (/a*oln\ 

Fal-li-bil'i-ty, 160. 



Fal'U-ble, 78, IM, 17a 
Failing. 
Fal-lo'pi-an. 
Fal'low, 10, 101. 
Fal'low-deer. 
Fallowed (-tod), 187. 
Fal'low-ing. 
F&lsc, 17. • 
FUselhekrt'ed, 206, 

Exc. 5. 
F&lse'hdbd, 171. 
Fed-iet'to at.). 
Fai'si-f i-a-ble, 164. 
F41-8i-n-ca'tion, 112. 
Fai'sl-f ied, 00, 186. 
F41'si-fi-er. 
Fal'si-f y, 04. 
Fai'si-ty,78,l». 
Fai'ter, 17, 77. 
F&l'tered, 160. 
F&l'ter-ing. 
Fame, 23. 

Famed (Jttmd), 183. 
Fa^nil'iar (-yur), 61, 

171. 
Fa-mll-lftr'i-ty (-yflr'Y- 

te) [so Wb. Gd.; 

ja-mu-i-dr*i-tyf Sm. ; 

fa-mil-yi-dr'i^fft Wk. 

Wr. 155.1 
Fa-mil'iar-ize (-yur-). 
Farmil'iar-ized (-yMr-). 
Fa-mil'lar-iz-ing 

i-yur-). 
Fam'i-ly, 78, 03. 
Fam'Tne, 10, 82, 162. 
Fam'ish, 10. 
Fam'iBhed (^aki). 
Fam'ish-ing. 
Fa'mofis, 100, 160. 
Fan, 10. 
Fa-nat'ie, 100. 
Fa-nat'ic-al, 108. 
Fa-nat'1-dsm (-sizm). 
Fan'cled, 00, 186, 
Fan'ci-er. 
Fan'cl-Ail ( ./SoQ. 
Fan'cy, 10, 160. 
Fan-dan'go (-dang'-). 
Fane (23), n. a temple. 

[See Feign, 160.] 
Fan'fitre (Fr.) {far), 

154. 
Fan'fa-ron [so Sm. Wb. 

Crd. ; fan'Jii^^nt 

Wk. ; fawfa^on, cat 

fan'/a^9n, Wr. 166.] 
Fan-ia-ron-ade', 122. 
Fang, 10, 54. 
Failed i/angd), 166. 
Fan'got (fang'-), 
Fan'ion {-yun). 
Fanned i/and), 166, 176. 



fUl$ d ^wtn^tbere; Cbitt in foot', 9 m in iuAlai.ghu§.g in go i^<u in iM». 



Fan-Mii-a (It.) ( 
lFBiit..in,2(B. 

Phintasdi,] 
FtiD-Iu'tlc, l6». 



Tur-cy, WO. 

F»rB ijtr) ( 14), n. pri« 
of «P"a"«Be:— P. to 

ftoVoir, lao.]™ 
FBre-well' <Jtr-wfP\ 
int. [80 8m. m. i rtr- 

/(r-ioel, or fir-ml', 
fir'wa, or nr-uel', 
Wk.KS.] 



Fare'wsll ( rtr-wrf), b. 
[bo Sm. Wr. i Jir'vtl, 
oi/lr-tBel'.f'iT'vKl, of 
fhr-viei', Wk.i Ar- 
weC, Gd. J55.] 
«-"WhnitiiiiHdu 



Tne'weU t/Pr'wefl, o. 
[>oSm.*r.iy»r'HW, 
or/dr'ttel, Wk. IM.] 






FAUCET 

OIH«r(J!H*'«r 



i^fl-DOH. 

Funn, II, 13*. 
Fiim'm-bU. 164, IW. 
Fsniiod (farmdj, 164. 
Firm'er. 
Ksrm'er-y, 231, Eio. 

Fir'o (y»r'o), 
Fir-ni'go. 



FiP'ther, aJ. to B freat 
er diBtaace : — a. mon 
remote. ISee FMheT., 



vordi (ha IDrii 



hei^mSBt [Fur- 
eimott.m.] 



.,. -jing, 11, 38, M. 

FBr'piQ-fale (-/Ww- 
TaJT[Bo Sm. Oa. y'a?- 
Aingalj Wt. i ybr'- 

Jbfiissil, Wt. 1M.1 

««'(iH(L.)(-i»il,n.Df. 

F»»'d-a (yJui'i-n). 

Fm'olal Cfaik'yah (l^D 



i. Wr.i/a.*'*- 



Fus'ei^ite (/>»*'(-«). 
F»»'cl-at-ed(/otft'f-a(. 
FaB-ds»'tlon ( ftMft" ' 
Fis'd-cle, ie4. 
Fm'd-cled (-iid), 1: 
Fas-ala'n-tiu-. 106. 
Fu-cic'u-late, ICS- 

J'Ju-cic'u-iuj (L.) 
i!V«-cfc'B.n, IBS.] 

FHB'cl-nst-ed, 183. 



I Fimilne' f-tlit'), 121, 

I Fnsli'lon('r!uA'un),17l. 

- FmBh'lon-H-ble (ftiih'- 

I ttn-nJtl), 1A4. im. 

, Fash'loned (yiuA'iinil), 

e,I,fi,fl,f,iAor(iSailiiIiir,a. 



FAULT 



201 



FELWORT 



a cask. [See Facet, 

148.1 
F&ult, 17, 156. 
FaaltM-nesB, 100. 
Fault'y, «J. 
Fftuu (17), n. a rural 

deity. [See Favm.] 
Fau'na, 72. 
F&un'iHt. 

Faux pa» (Fr.) {fo^pti), 
Fa-ve'o-late fso Wr, ; 

/a've-o-m, Gd. 155.] 
Fa-YiiaofiB, 170. 
Fa'vor, 23, 88. 
[Favour, Sm. 199, 

203.] 

mr Smart inserta the « 
In ul the deriTattvea of 
thii word. 

Fa'vor-a-ble, 164. 
Fa'vored (-imrd), 150. 
Fa'vor-er. 
Fa'vor-lng. 
Fa'vor-Ite, 83, 162. 
Fa'Tor-it-iam (-izm). 
Forvose'. . 
Fawn (17), n. the young 

of the fallow deer : — 

V. to court &Tor. 

[See Faun, 160.] 
Fawned (/atnuf), 150. 
Fawn'cr, 11, 77. 
Fawn'ing'. 
Fay, n. & v. 23. 
Fayed (JTld) (187), v. did 

Iky. [See Fade, 160.] 
Fay'lng. 
Ffe^al-ty, 144. 
Fear, 13, 67. 
Feared (^rrf), 165. 
Fear'fuR-ySoZUiaO) Fbo 

8m. Wr. wb. Grd. j 

/er'fSbly or filr'fdol, 

"WTc. 155.1 
Fear'ftil-ly (fSol-), 170. 
Fear'n&ught (^nawt) 

(102) [F e a r - 

nought, 203.] 
[Fease, 203. — 5ee 

Feaze.] 
Foa-Bl-biVi-ty (-z%-). 
Fea'Bi-ble (-zl-hl), 164. 
Fea'si-bly (-«!-). 
Fenst, 13. 
Feast'ed. 
FeaBt'er, 77. 
FoaBt'ing. 
Feat, n. an exploit. 

[See Feet, 160.] 
F/^ath'er, 16,38,77. 
Fratli'ered, 150, 171. 
F«atR'er-ing. 
FeatK'er-y. 



FSat'ure, 13, 91. 

Featured i-yurd)y 183. 
Feaze (13) [FeaBC, 

Phee8e,2a3.] 
Feazed, 165, 183. 
Feaz'ing. 

Feb-ri-fa'dent {-sheat). 
Fe-brif er-oftB, 108. 
Fe-brii'lc, 109. 
Fe-briru-gal [bo Wr. i 

febri-fu'galj Wb. Gd. 

165.1 
Feb'ri-flige, 169. 
Fe'brile, or Feb'rHe 

(162) [bo Wr. Wb. 

Gd. i/ib'rU, Wk. Sm. 

156.] 
Feb'ru-a-ry (^roo-) (72, 

171) [not feb'u-a-ry, 

142, 163J 
Fe'cal [Faecal, 2a3.] 
[Fecea, 203. — <$e6 

FnceB.j 
Fe'dal (shal), 
Fe'cU (L.). 
Fec'u-la (108) [F»cn- 

1 a , 203.] 
Fec'u-lence, 169. 
Fec'u-len-cy. 
Fec'u-lent. 
Fec'und [so Wk. Sm. 

Wr. ; fefkund, Wb. 

Gd. 155.1 
Fec'un-date [so Sm. ; 

fe'hun-cUU, Wb. Gd. ; 

/9-kun'ddty or ftkfun~ 

d«, Wr. 156.] 
Fec-un-da'tion, 112. 
Fe-cund'i-ty, 169. 
Fed, 15. 

Fed'er*al, 2:33, Exc. 
Fed'er-al-ism, 133, 136. 
Fed'er-al-ist. 
Fed'er-al-ize, 202. 
Fed'er-al-ized, 183. 
Fed'er-al-iz-ing. 
Fed'er-ate, 73. 
Fed-er-a'tlon. 
Fed'er-at-!ve [so Sm. 
fed'er-a-tiv, Wr. Wb. 

Gd. 156.] 
Fee, 13. 
Fee^ble, 164. 
Fee'bly, 93. 
Feed (188), part, from 

Fee. 
Feed, v. to Bupply with 

food ; to take food. 
Feed'er, 77. 
Feed'ing. 
Fee'ing. 
Feel. 13. 
Feel'er. 



Feel'ing. 

Fee'-Bim'ple, 164, 205. 

Feet, n. plural of Foot. 
[See Feat, 160]. 

Fee'-tail', 206. 

Feign ( /an) (23, 162), v. 
to diBsemble. [See 
Fane, 160.] 

Feigned i/Hnei), 162, 
171. 

Feign'ing {/An'-). 

Feiut (/an/) (Zi), n. a ' 
false appearance. [See 
Faint, i(iO.] 

[Fclandera, 203.— 
See Filandera.] 

[Feldspar, 203.— 
See Felspar.] 

Fe-119'i-tate, 73, 169. 

Fe-119'i-tat-ed, 183. 

Fe-li5'i-tat-ing. 

Fe-li5-i-ta'tion. 

Fc-li9'i-tofi8, 171. 

Fe-U9'i-ty, 169. 

Fe'line, 152. 

Fell, a, & V. 15, 172. 

Fell'a-ble, 164, 109. 

FeUed ifeld), 165. 

Fell'er, 77. 

Fell'ing. 

Fel'loe, n. the rim of a 
wheel. [See Fellow, 
160.] [Felly, 203.] 

Fel'low (101), n. a com- 
panion. [See Felloe, 
160.] 

Fel'low-creat'ure, 206. 

FeFly, ad. 66, N. 

Fel'ly, n. (66) [Fel- 
loe, 203.] 

0^ F«Dy ii BOW the 
more usual epelUng of thia 
word. 

Fel'on, 86, 170. 
Fe-lo'ni-otts, 78, 100. 
Fel'on-y, 93. 
Fel'spar [Feldspar, 

■ST* Smart gfTee only 
the form ftttSpar, ana 
Worcester prefer! it. Web- 
ster and (Joodrich preftr 
feldtpar^ and give also the 
forms fe Ids path and 
felspath. 

Fel-spath'ic, 109. 
Felt, n. A v. 15. 
Felt'ed. 
Felt'ing. 
Fe-luc'ca, 170. 
Fel'wort {-wuH). 



fidl ; ta$in there ; 66 at f» fbot ; qeuin fiMSlle ; gh m gin go ; th as 4n thie. 



FEMALE 



202 



FIBQBD 



Fe'male. 

Feme^cotfert (Fr.) Cflm- 

ko-veri') [bo sm. ; 

fUm-ko^ert', or Jtm- 

kuv'urtf Wr. J /tm- 

kuv'urtj Wb. Gd. 164, 

155.] 
Fememsole (Fr.) (/tm- 

$W) [bo Sm. ; fim- 

801' t Gd. , mm-mV, 

Wr. 164, 165.] 
Fem'i-nal. 
Fem-i-nal'i-ty, 100. 
Fem'i-ulne, 152, 171. 
Fem'o-ral, 72. 
Fe'mur (L.) [pL Fem'o- 

ra, 198.] 
Fen, 15. 
Fence, 16, 39. 
Fenced {fenst) (105, 

183) ; Note C, p. 34. 
Fen5'er, 77, 183. 
Feng'i-ble, a. 104. 
Fen^'i-bles i-blz), n,pl, 
Feny'ing. 
Fend, 15. 
Fend'ed. 
Fend'er, 77. 
Fend'ing. 
Fe-nes'tral, 7?. 
Fe-nes'trate, a, 73. 
Fen-es-tra'tion. 
Fen'neo, 170» 
Fen'nel, 66, 170. 
Fen'ny, 170. 
[Feod, 203. — 5(M 

Feud.] 

F6off (>V)» 171. 
FSoiTee, or FSoff-ee^ 

(118) [80 Wr. ; /^cc, 

Wk. Sm. J fef-ee', 

Wb. Gd. 155.] 
FfioiTer, or FfiolFor, 

118. 
FSoff^ment. 
Fe'ri-al, 72, 78. 
Fe'rine, 152. 
Fer-ment', r. 103, 101. 
Fer'ment, n, 21, N. j 

101. 
Fer-ment-arbil'i-ly. 
Fer-ment'a-ble, 164, 

109. 
Fer-ment-a'tlon. 
Fer-ment'a-tlve. 
Fer-ment'ed.. 
Fer-ment'ing. 
Fern, 21, N. 
Fem'v, 93, 169. 
Fe-ro'ciouB (-shus)t 160. 
Fe-ro9'i-ty, 169, 171. 
FSr-ra-rese' (-rtz'h 
FSr're-o&s, 100, 170. 



FeWret, «». A V. 60, 170. 

Fer'ret-ed. 

Fer'ret-er. 

Fer'ret-lng. 

Fgr'ri-age, 70, 171. 

Ffir'rled, 99. 

FCr-rifer-oui, 108. 

F6r-ro-cy'an-ate. 

FCr-ro-cy-an'ic, 100. 

F6r-ro-cy'an-Ide [Fer- 
rocyanid, 2&^.j 

Ffir-ro-cy-an'o-gen. 

Ffir-ro-pras'si-ate 
(-pnwft'l), 46, 73. 

F6r-ro-pru8'8ic. 

Fer ru'gl-nat-ed. 

Fer-ru'gi-notts, 160. 

Fer'rule U'tr'rU) (00, 
171). [so Wk. Sm.j 
fir'ru, or fer'nUj 
Wr.\ ftrfril, or f9rf' 
riU, Gd. 155], n. a 
ringf put round any 
thing to keep tt from 
Bpli^ing[. [See Fer- 
ule, 1487] 

F€r'ry, 66, 170. 

Fer'ry-bdat, 200. 

Fer'tllc, 21, N. i 152. 

Fer-til'i-ty, 160. 

Fer-til-I-za'tion. 

Fer'til-ize, 202. 

Fer'til-ized, 183. 

Fer'til-iz-er. 

Fer'til-Iz-inff. 

FSr-u-la'ceols (-«Acm), 

89, 109. 

Ffir'ule (fUr'rUj or 
fMr'rU) [BO Gd. ; 
/ir'ttZ, Wr. 155], n. a 
ruler or similar in- 
strument used in 
school 8 to punish 
children by striking 
the palm of the hand : 
— r. to punish with 
the ferule. [See Fer- 
rule, 148.] 

Fer'uled (ftr'Ud, or 
fUr'nad), 105, 183, 

Ffir'ul-ing (firfrU-t or 
fgr'riU^. 

Fer'ven-cy, 160. 

Fer'vent, 21, N. 

Fer'vid, 169. 

Fer'vor, 88. 

Fes'oue, 171. 

Fes'cued (-kad), 183. 

Fes'cu-ing. 

Fes'els C-elz), n. p2. 

Fesse (/ea). 

Fes'tal, 15, 72. 

Fes'ter, 15, 77. 



Fes'tered, 160. 
Fes'ter-ing. 
Fes'ti-val, 72, 160. 
Fes'tlve, 84. 
Fes-tiv'i-ty, 160. 
Fes-toon', 121. 
Fes-tooned' (-toond'), 
Fes'tu-clne, 162. 
FeB'tu-oofiB [bo Sm. 

Wb. Gd. ,• /e«-<«'ItM, 

Wk. Wr. 166.] 
Fetal. 
Fetch, 16, 44. 
Fetched {feckfi, 166; 

Note C, p. 34. 
Fetch'ing. 
FiU {¥r.) C/at)t n. a 

ftstivaL [See Fate, 

160.1 
Fite-cham-piire (Fr.) 

{filt-8fiam:patr'), 
Fe'tich Cti8h)t 171. 
Fet'ich-iHm (iabriem), 

or Fet'i-cism {-atzm)y 

133,136. 
Fet'id [not fe'tid, 163.1 
Fe-tif ev-ofis, 106. 
Fet'iock. 
Fe'tor {-tawr)j 88w 
Fet'ter, 170. 
Fef tered, 160. 
Fet'ter-ing. 
Fe'tuB [pi. Fe'tuB-OB 

(-fo) [Foetus, 203.1 
Feud (J^) (20) [Feod, 

203.] 
Feud'al, 72. 

Feud'al-ism (^m), 136. 
Feu-dal'i-ty, 169. 
Feu-dal-I-za'tion. 
Feu'dal-ize, 202. 
Feu'dal-ized, 183. 
Feu'dal-iz-ing. 
Feu'da-ry, 72. 
Feu'da-to-ry, a. A », 

[Feudatary, 203.] 
Feu dejoie (Fr.) {/oo^ 

duh ZMOU'), 164. 
Feud'ist. 
FeuUUmorU rF».) Woo'- 

il-mort)f 164. 

09" "It I> Anglicized 
Into fil'e-mot.'* Smart. 

FeuUleton (Fr.) ifoo'il' 

t5ng)i 154. 
Fe'ver, 13, 77. 
Fe'yer-few (tA*). 
Few (/«), 26. 
Fitters (Fr.) (/e-H'kr), 
Fi'at, 
Fib, 16. 
Fibbed iJfbO), 176. 



•,e,i,d,tt,y,fofV>&«6i^^tttJ^»«A0rt}%<M<»^>ft<MMiiMl9A<MM 



208 



FINANCIEB 



FibOwr. 

Fih'bing. 

Fi'bre (IM) [Fiber, 

Wb. Gd. 203. — 5'ec 

Note E, p. 70.] 
Fi'bril [not flb'ril, 163.1 
Fl-bril'Ibtts [so Gd. j/1- 

bHl'lus, or JifrMu, 

Wr. 155.] 
Fi'brlne (152) [no! flb'- 

rin, 153.] [Fibrin, 

203.1 
Fi'brin-ofiBTBO Qd.;/b'- 

rin-tM, Wr. 155.1 
Fi'btottB, 25, 100, 109. 
Fib'u-la (L.) [pi. Flb'n- 

1», 108.1 
Fic'kle iflk't), IM. 
Fick'ly. 
Fic'tlle, 152. 
Fic'tion, 10, 4flw 
Fio'tion-al. 
Fic'tion48t. 
Fio-tI'tiou8 (-/ifft'tif). 
Fic'tor (-totor), 88. 
Fid, 10. 
Fid'dle, 104. 
Fid'dled (;M';<I). 
FidMler, 183. 
FidMUngr. 
Fl-del'i-tf (79, 109) [not 

fi-del'i-ty, 153.1 
Fidg'et. 
Fidgr'et-ed, 17& 
Fidgf'et-i-ness, 109. 
Fidg'et-ing. 



Fidg'et-y, 93. 
Fl-dii'eial 



{-thai), 79. 

Fl-du'd-a-rv {-aht-ehrp) 
[so Wk. Wr. ; /1-d«'- 
sha-ry, Sm. Wb. GM. 
165.] [203.] 

Se(h), f»<.(25)tFy, 

TiQtifSf), 13. 

Field (>id), 13. 

Field'iare {/ild'ftr) [so 
Wr Wb. Gd. ; aid'- 
/»r,coU./«'y»r, Sm. 
155.] 

Fiend (And) [not ftnd, 

, 200, Exe. 6. 
Fierce C/tr») fso 8m. 
Wr. Wb. Gd. ; /Brs, 
or firs, Wk. 155.J 

99" ** The flrat mode of 
pronouncing thii -word 
Mfri] it the moat general: 
the lecond MTrvJ, U heard 
QSOeichleilj on the stage." 

n'e-f^ Pa*et-M (L.) (flf- 



127, 153.] 
Fiend'Uke, 



Fi'er-l-ly, 109. 

Fi'er-i-nesg, 171. 

Fi'er-y, 93. 

Fife, 26. 

Fifed (/I/O, 183. 

Fif er, 77. 

Fifinff. 

Fifteeur^MBiffliteeii.] 

Fifteenth. 

Fifth, 10, 37. 

FiPti-eth. 

Fifty, 03. 

Fig, 10. 

Tight (fit), 25, 102. 




Fig 

Fig'-trce, 200, Bxo. 4. 

Mg-u-rarbll'l-ty, 109. 

Fig'a-ra-ble, 104. 

Fiff'n-ral. 

Fip'u-rantiVr.), n. nuu. 
fso Gd. ; Jifru^rHjUj 
Wr. ; flg-thr97ig', Sm. 
155.] 

Fig'u-rihUe (Fr.), n. 
/Ism. [so Qa,j Jta-u- 
rdiU', Wr. ; JW-»- 
Hfnfftf Sm. 155.J 

Fig'n-rate. 

Fig'u-rat-ed. 

Fig-a-ra'tion. 

Fig'a-ra-«lTe, 84. 

Fig'ure, 01. 

Fig'ured i-ptird), 

Fig^'ur-ing l^yttr-). 

Fl-la^oeons {-8hu9)t 79. 

FiVa-cer. 

Fil'a-ment. 

Fll-a-ment'ofis. 

Fil'an-ders (-durs), n. 
pi. [Felanders, 
203.1 

Fil'a-to-ry. 

Fll'a-ture. 

FJl'bert. 

Filch, 10, 44, N. 2. 

Filohed {Jtlcht), 166 ; 
Note C, p. 34. 

Filch'er. 

Filoh'ing. 

File (25), n. a thread ; a 
list ; an instrument 
for abrading: — v. to 
string upon a thread ; 
to place upon file ; to 
abrade wltn a file. [ See 
Phyle, 100.] 

Filed, 183. 

Fii'e-mot [See Feuille- 
morte.] 

Firer. 

Final i-yal), 10, 61. 



Fn-i^tton. 

Fil-i-buB'ter. 

Fil-i-bus'ter-ing. 

Fil-i-bus'ter-ism (-tern). 

Fl-Iia'i-form, 108. 

Fil'i-coid. 

Fiia-form, loa 

Fiia-grane. 

Fif i-gree, 109. 

Fil'i-greed, 188. 

Mfing. 

Fifings (■4ngz\n,pl, 

FUl, 10. 

Filled iJUd)t 106. 

Fllfer. 

Fif let, 06, 170. 

Fil'let-ed. 

Fil'let-ing. 

Fll'li-beg [Philibeg, 
203.] 

Fill'ing. 

FifUp. 

Fil'liped (-Hot), 106. 

FU'U-peen fPhilope- 
na,a03.] 

Fif ly, 170. 

Film, 133. 

Film'i-ness, 109. 

Film'y. 

M-lose' [so Sm. Wr. ; 
mas, Gd. 155.1 

Fil'ter, n. a strainer : •— 
V. to strain. [See 
Philter, 160.] 

Fif tered, 150. 

Fifter-ing. 

Filth, 10, 37. 

Fllth'i-ly. 

Filth'i-ness, 109. 

Filth'y, 03. 

Fif trate, 73. 

Fif trat-ed, 183. 

Fiftriit-ing. 

Fil-tra'tion, 112. 

Fim'ble, 164. 

Flm'bri-ate. 

Fim'bri-at^, 183. 

Fim'bri-at-ing. 

Fin (16), n. a membr» 
nous organ projecting 
from the body of fish- 
es ; —a natlye of Fin- 
land. [Finn (in the 
last sense), 203.1 

nn'a-ble, 104. 

Fi'nal, 25, 72. 

FUiU'le (It.) ( A-na'te). 

FT-naf i-ty, 109. 

Fi'nal-Iy, 06, N. 

F[-nance' (121) [not fi'- 
nans, 153.1 

FY-nan'dal (-ihat), 

Fin-an-cier' {sir') (128, 



fkllj OM^fttberos d&a«lrilbot;9aiif>ftdleighatgif»gost^a«^thi8. 



FINCH 



204 



FJLAMIN6 



160) [not fi-nan-^r', 

153.] 
Finch, 16, 44. 
Find (25), V, to dlBOOT- 

er. [See Fined, 160. J 
Find'er, 77. 
Find'infi^. 
Fine, 25. 
Fined (/ifui) (183)jmH. 

ffom line, ISeeFbadf 

160.] 
Fine'araw. 
Fine'draw-er. 
Fine'drftw-ins^. 
Fine'drawn. 
J'lne'nesB, 66, N. 
Fin'er. 
FSn'ery. 
Fi-nesae' (Fr.) (/e-n«i'), 

114, 171. 
Fl-neased' {-nesP), 
Fl-ness'ing. 
Fin'ger (jtftff'gur), 54, 

Note 2 ; 138. 
Fin'g^red {fina'gurd), 
Fin'ger-ing i/mg'gur-), 
Fin'ger-rin^ ijing'' 

gur-)t a06, £xc. L 
Fin'i-al, 160. 
Fin'i-cal, 72, 160. 
Fin'ing. 
Fiu'iah, 104. 
Fin'ished (-iiht), 
Fln'ish-er. 
FIn'iah-inff. 
Fi'nite, 152. 
Fln'i-tude, 109. 
Finn, n. a native of Tin- 
land. [Fin, 203.1 
Finned ( rind), 176. 
Fln'nr, 170. 
Fl-no'chi-o [so Wb.Gd.; 

fln'Och-o, Sm. ; fe-no'- 

8*«-o,Wk.Wr.l54, 155] 
Fin'-toed, 206, Exo. 5. 
Fiord' ( fe-ordf). 
Fir (21, N.), n. a kind of 

tree. [See Fur, 160.] 
Fire, 25. 

Fire'-arms (-artnz)* 
Fire'brand, 206. 
Fire'-brick. 
Fire'-clay. 
Fired, 183. 
Flre'-en'ffTne, 205. 
Fire'flaire(-;?«r) [Fire- 

f lair, 203.] 
Fire'- fly. 
Flre'lock. 
Fire'man, 106. ' 
Flre'place. 
Fire'-plug^. 
Kre'-proof. 



FIre'aide. 
Flre'wObd. 
Fire'works {-wurki), 

n.pL 
Rr'ingr, 40, N. 
Fir'kiu, 21 N. } 160. 
Firm. 21, N. 
Firm'a-ment, 171. 
Firm-a-ment'al. 
Fir'man (21, N.; 160) 

[pi. Fir'mans (-maius), 

100.] 
First, 21, N. 
First^.fniita (rfroaU)^ 

n. pi. 171. 
First'Iingr. 
First'-rate. 
Firth, 21, N. 
Fir'-tree, 206, Exo. 4. 
Msc, 181. 
llsc'al, 72. 
Fish, 16, 46. 
Fished (jbJU), 166; Note 

C, p. 34. 
Fish'er, 77, 
Fish'er-man, 106. 
Fish'er-y. 
Fish'gig i-ahig) [Fia- 

ffiff,20:i.l 
F^h^hdbk, 206, Exe. 1. 
Fiah'ing. 

Fiah'ing-line, 215. 
Fish'-Bhopf 66, N. ; 206, 

Exc. 1. 
FIsh'y, 03, 160. 
Fis'sTle, 152. 
Fis-sil'i-ty, 160. 
Fis'sion (fish'un), 
Fis-sip'a-rism (-rtero). 
Fis-sip'a-roHs, 170. 
Fls'si-ped. 
Fis-si-ros'tral. 
Fis'sure (fit^'vur). 
Fis'sured (JUh^yurd), 
Fist, 16. 

Fisfi-cuffs, n. pi. 
Fis'ti-nut. 
Fis'tu-la (L.) [pi. Fis'- 

tu-l», 108.] 
Fis'tu-lar, 74, 
Fis'tu-la-ry, 72. 
Fis-tu'Ii-form (108) [so 

Wr.; Jls'tu-U-fbrm, 

Gd. 155.] 
Fis'tu-lofis, 80, 109. 
Fit, 16. 
Fitch, 16, 44. 
Fitch'et. 
Fitch'ew (-oo), 
Fit'flil ( -ySSZ). 
Fit'ted, 176. 
Fit'ter. 
Fit'ting. 



FlTe,2ff. 

Fiye'.fdld, 206, Exc 6. 

Fix, 16,30, N. 

Fix'a-ble, 164. 

Fix-a'tion. 

Fixed ifik8t)y 166. 

Fix'ed-ness, 160. 

Fix^ing. 

Fix'l-ty, 160. 

Fixt'ure, 01. 

Fix'gUS (-ghig) [Fish- 
gig (in the sense of 
a harpoon)y 203.] 

Fiz'zle, lOi. 

Fiz'zled iJiz^ld), 183. 

Fiz'zling. 

Flab'bi-ness, 160. 

FUb'bj, 03. 

Fia-bel'late, 170. 

Flab-el-la'tlon. 

Fla-berii-form, 106. 

Fiac'dd (flaicfaid), 

Fla<M!id'i-ty, 171. 

Flag. 10. 

Flag'el-Ute i/k^'-), 170. 

Flag'el-lat-ed (^flt^'-), 

Flag'el-la^ing (>^;'-). 

Flag-el-ia'tion ljl<0-), 

Fla-gel'U-form, 108. 

Fla^eo-lct (Jlty'o-X 171) 
[not fliij'e-o-let, 145, 
153.] 

Flagged {flagd)^ 170. 

Flag'gl-ness (^ht-). 

FlagJging(-flrX«v), 138. 

FlJ^^SoS ^-i<«fc'i«), 

171, 231. 
Flag'on, 170. 
Fla'grance. 
Fla'gran-cy, 160. 
Fla'grant, 72. 
Flail, 23. 
Flaire, n. a Ush of the 

ray kind. [ See Flare, 

160.] 
Flfttre 23 
Flaked (.^),183 s Note 

C, p. 34. 
FUk'i-nesB. 
Flak'y. 
Flam^bean (Fr.) (Jamf- 

ho) [Fr. pi. Flam'- 

beaux {-b(iz\ Eng. pi. 

Flam'beau8(-&0«),1O8] 
Flam-boy'ant. 
Flame, 23. 

Flamed (flamd), 183. 
Fla'men (L.) [L, pi. 

Flam'i-nes (-nlz) ; 

Eng. pi. Fla'menB 

(-menz), 108.] 
Flam'ing. 



&^6,i,0,n,y, long} ft, «, 1, 0, tt, y, aftoW j 'iaain fiiv, a of in fiist, & ob <» 



FLAMINGO 



205 



FLOCK 



Fla-min'go (^ming'-) 

(64) [pf. Fla-mln'groes 

{'mi9iff'giiz)i 192.] 
Fla-min'ic-al, 108. 
Flam-ma-bil'i-ty, 109. 
Flam'ma-ble, 104. 
Flam'j, 93. 

Flanch [Flange, 2a3.] 
Fl&ng« [Flanch, 203.1 
Flank iftangk), 10, 64. 
Flanked C^n^i-^), 166. 
Flank'er, n. A v. 
FlHuk'ered, 160. 
Flank'er-ing. 
Flank'lng. 
Flon'nel, 66, 170. 
Flap, 10. 
Flftp'drag-on. 
Flap'jack, 206. 
Flapped (Jlapt), 176. 
Flare (.^r) (14), v, to 

waver ; to glitter j to 

spread oatward. (See 

YMre, IfiO.I 
Flared (flint), 183. 
Flar'ing (flirf-). 
Flash, 10, 46. 
Flashed (Jkukt), 166. 
Flash'l-ly. 
Flash'i-ness, 169. 
Flash'lng. 
Flash'y, 93, 169. 
Flask, 12, 131. 
Flask'et. 
Flat, 10. 
Flat'fish, 206. 
Flat'-i-ron (-l-«m). 
Flat'ted, 176. 
Flat'ten (flaffn), 149. 
Flattened (flatfnd),10O, 
Flat'ten-ing (flafn-), 
Flat'ter, 170. 
Flat'tered, 150. 
Flat'ter-ing. 
Flat'ter-y, 171. 
Flatting, 186. 
Flat'u-lence. 
Flat'u-len-cy, 169. 
Flat'u-lent, 89. 
Flaunt (fldnt) (11) [n&t 

flawnt, 153.J 
Fl&nnt'ed. 
Fiaunt'er. 
Flaunt'ing. 
Fiau'Ust. 
Fla'vor [Flarour, 

8m. 199, 203.] 
Flavored i-vurd) (150) 

[Flayoured, Sm. 

109, 2a3.] 
Fla'vor-lng [Flavour- 

ing,Sm. 199, 303. J 
Fla'vor-oiis. 



Flaw, 17. 

Flawed (flavpd), 166. 

Flaw'ing. 

Flaw'y, 93. 

Flax, iO, 39, N. 

Flax'en (flakfrn), 140. 

Fla<'seed,66N.; 206. 

Flax'y, 93, 169. 

Flay«23. 

Flayed (JUtd), 187 

Flay'er. 

Flay'ing. 

Flea (13), n. a small in- 
sect of the genus Pu- 
lex. [See Flee, 160.] 

Flea'bane, 206. 

Fleam (13) [Phleme, 
203.] 

Flea'wort i^wurt), 

]<leck, 16, 181. 

Flecked (flekt), 166. 

Flec'tion. 

Flec'tor (-towr), 88. 

Fled, 15. 

Fledge, 16, 46. 

Fledged (;^;d), 166. 

Fledg'ing, 183. 

Fledge'hng. 

Flee (13), v. to run, as 
from danger. (See 
Flea, 160.1 

Fleece, 13,39. 

Fleeced (flist), 165, 183 ; 
Note C, p. 34. 

Flee^'er. 

Fleec'ing. 

Flee^'y, 93. 

Fle'er (67, N.), n. one 
who flees. 

Fleer (13, 67, N.),©. to 
mock; to g^be:^n. 
a gibe ; a sneer. 

Fleered (JUrd)* 1<^* 
Flcer'er. 
Fleer'inff. 
Fleet. 13. 
Fleet'ed. 
Fleeting. 
Fle'men. 
Flem'ing, 170. 
Flem'ish. 
Flense (Jlenz), 136. 
Flensed (flenzd), 
Flcns'ing (flenz'-). 
Flesh, 15, 46. 
Fleshed (flesht), 166. 
Flesh'i-ness, 169. 
Flesh'ing. 
FleshMi-ness, 160. 
Flesh'ly, 93. 
Flesh' -mon'ger [3. 

(-mttn^'^r),206, £xc. 
Flesh'y. 



Fle-tiTer-ofis, 108. 

Fletz. 

FUur de Us (Fr.) iJkuf^ 

duh^e'). 
Flew iflu) (26) [not floo, 

1531, part, fVom Fig. 

[5^66 Flue, 160.] 
Flex-i-bil'i-ty, IW. 
Flex'i-ble, 164. 
Flex'I bly, 93. 
Flex'Ile, 152. 
Flex'ion (flek'thunhifi. 

Note 1. 
Flex'or i-<twr), 88. 
Flex'u-ose. 
Flex'u-o&B. 
Flex'ure, 91. 
Flick'er. 
Flick'ered, 160. 
FUck'er-lng. 
Fli'er [Flyer, 203.1 
Flight C/ftO, 25, 162. 
Fllght'i-ness (^<'-)- 
Flight'y, 93. 
Flim'sl-ly (-«l-)i 136. 
Flim'si-ness (-«!-). 
Fllm'sy (-«y), 136. 
Flinch, 16, 44, Note 2. 
FUnched iflincM)^ 166. 
Flinch'ing. 
Fling, 16, 64. 
Fling'er. 
Fling'ing. 
Flint, 16. 
FUnt'i-ness, 160.. 
FUnt'y, 93, 169. 
Flip, 16. 
Flip'-flap. 
Flip'pan-cy, 100. 
Flip'pant, 170. 
FUp'per, 77, 170. 
Flirt, 21, N. 
Flirt-a'tion. 
Flirt'pd. 
Flirt'ing. 
Flit, 16. 
Flitch, 16, 44. 
Flit'ted, 176. 
Flit'ter. 
Flit'tem. 
Flit'ting. 
Float, 24. 
Float'ed. 
Float'age [Flotage, 

203.1 
Floating. 
[F 1 o at 8 am , 203.— 5te 

Flotsam.] 
Hoat'y. 

Floc-dl-la'tion, 170. 
Floc'cu-lence, 169. 
Floc'cu-lent. 
Flock (18, 181), n. a ool- 



MLi da«<» there; Ob of In Ibot j 9 of tn fiuiile } gh a« g tn go ; ^ of •» this. 

18 



Ft«OCKSD 



206 



FOLD 



lection ef emaU ani- 
mals, BB aheeo or 
fowls } a lock or wool 
or hair, [pi' Flocks. 
— See Phlox. 160.1 

Flocked {Jlokt), 166. 

Flock'lBsr. 

Flock'f , 93. 

Fide, n. a mass of float- 
ing ice. [See Flow, 

Flog,' 18. [17<l. 

Flogffed (Jloffd)t 165, 

Flogr^Infir l-ghing), 138. 

Flood iJhtd)t 22. 

Flood'ed {fiud'A. 

Flood-gate {fiudf-). 

Flood'ing ( jTud'-)- 

Flook'ing. 

Floor ( «3r), 24. 

Floored (jMrd), 166. 

Floor'ing. 

Flo'ra, 72. 

Flo'ral, 49, N. 

Fldr'en-tine, or Fldr*- 
en-tlne [so Wr. ; fiHr*- 
en-tin, Wb. Gd. 155.] 

Flo-res'oenoe, 171. 

Flo'ret, 49, N. 

Fldr-i-cult'ure, 91. 

Fldr'id. 18, 48. 

Fldr-i-form, 108. 

Fldr'in [not flo'rin,153.1 

Flo'rist. 49, N. ^ 

Flos'cu-lar. 

Floa'cole. 

Flos'cu-lotis. 

Floss. 

Flot'age [Floataffe, 
203T 

Fio-ta'tion. 

Flo-til'la, 170. 

Flot'sam [F lot son, 
Floatsam, 203.] 

Flounce, 28, 39. 

Flounced (fioumt). 

Flounc'ing. 

Floun'der, 28, 77. 

Floun'dered (-durdSflSO 

Flour (67)f n. the edible 
part of jgrain pulver- 
ized. rSee Flower, 
160.] 

Floured (flourd), 165. 

Flour'ing. 

Floar'ish ( «ttr'-), 22. 

Flo&r'ished (Jlur'Uht). 

Flottr'ish-er. 

Flo&r'ish-lng. 

Flout, 28. 

Flout'ed. 

Flout'er. 

Flout'ing. 



Fl5w, V. to nm or more 
as a floid. {See Floe, 
160.] 

Flawed (;90<l), 188. 

Fldw'age. 

Flower (28, 67), f». that 
part of a plant hj 
which the seed is 

FToduced ; a blossom. 
See Flour. 160. ] 

Flower'-de-luce. 

Flowered, 28, 150. 

Flower'i-ness, 171. 

Flower'ing. 

Flower'y. 

Flow'ing. 

Fldwn, 24. 

Flu'ate. 

Fluc'tu-ate, 73, 89. 

Flnc'tu4it-ed, 183. 

Fluo'tu-at-ing. 

Fluc-tu-a'tion, 112. 

Flud'der [Finder, 
203.] 

Fliie, n. a passage for 
smoke, as in a chim- 
ney. (See Flew, 160.] 

Flu'en-cy, 169. 

Fln'ent. 

Fluffy, 170. 

Flu'gel-man(^V'-)ill» 
FluTd, 2ff, 80. 

Flu-id'i-ty, 169. 

Fluke, 20. 

Flum'mer-y, 170. 

Flung, 22. 

Flunk'y. 

Flunk'y-ism (-izm), 
Flu'or-Ide [Flnorid, 

203.] 
Flu'or-!ne. 
Flu'or-spar. 
Fmr'ried, 186. 
Fiar'ry, 21, 22. 
Flttr'ry-ing. 
Flush, 22. 

Flushed {fltuM), 166. 
Flush'er. 
Flush'ing. 
Flus'ter. 
Flus'tered, 150. 
Flus'ter-ing. 
Flute, 26. 
Flut'ed, 183. 
Flut'er. 
Flut'ing. 
Flut'ist. 
Flut'ter, 170. 
Flut'tered, 150. 
Flut'ter-ing. 
Flut'y. 

Flu'vi-al, 72, 169. 
Flu'vi-al-ist. 



Fhi'vi-a-tne. 
Flux, 22, 39. N. 
Fluxed ifiuktt), 166. 
Flux'ing. [N. 2. 

Flux'ion(/{tar'i^n), 46, 
Flux'ion-al iftul:'8httH') 
Flux'ion-a-ry iJltUef- 

thun-), 72, 171. 
Flux'ion-ist iJluf- 

thun^). 
Fly, 25. 

Fly'eatch-er, 206. 
[Flyer, 203.— /9a8 

Flier.] 
Fly'ing. 
Fly'ing«flsh. 
Fly'-trap. 
Fly'-wheel. 
Foal 24 
Foaled ' (Jiild), «. did 

foal. [See Fold, 160.1 
Foal'lng. 
Foam, 24. 

Foamed i/f>md), 166. 
Foam'ing. 
Foam'y. 
Fob, 18. 

Fobbed (Jbbd), 176. 
Fob'bing. 
Fo'cal, n, 
Fo'cTle, 152. 
Fo'cus (L.) [pi. Fo'0I, 

198 1 
Fod'der, 170. 
Fod'dered, 150. 
Fod'der-ing. 
Foe (Jo), 24. 
Foe'man, 196. 
Foet'l-cide ( /»'-). 
FoB'tus (13) [Fetui, 

203.] 
Fog, 18. 

Joff'gy (-ffhy), 138. 
Fo'gy i-ahy) (138, 190) 

IPogey, Fogie, 

203.J 
Fob, int. [so Sm. (3d. & 

/8h, Wk. Wr. 155.] 
Foi'ble, 27, 164. 
Foil, 27. 
Foiled, 166. 
Foll'er, 77. 
Foiling. 
Foist, 27. 
Foist'ed. 
Folst'er. 
Foist'ing. 
Fold, n. an endosnre for 

sheep;— a flock of 

sheep ; — a plait : — v, 

to lay in folds; td 

double. [See Foaled, 

160.] 



i, e,i,0,ft, y,fcHV: ft,«,!,6,fl, j^, <Aor<i M as In fiv, & as <n fiut, ft as <a 



FOLDAGE 

FSId'age. 

Fold'ed. 

Fold'er. 

Fold'in^. 

Fo-li-a'ceou8 {-tihus), 

Fo'li-age, 70. 

Fo'li-ate. 

Fo'lUt-ed, 183. 

Fo'li-at-ing. 

Fo-U-a'tion. 

Fo'U-a-ture. 

Fo'U-er. 

Fo-lifer-otts. 

Fo'li-o [bo Wk. Sm.Wb. 

Gd. ; foUi-Oj or fdl'yo, 

Wr. 155.] [pi. Fo'li- 

58 (-««), 192.J 
Fo'li-o-mort. 
Fo'U-oiiB. 

Folk (/tJit), 162, 171. 
Fdlk'land (/»*'-), !«*. 
Fol'li-cle. 164, 170. 
Fol-lio'u-lat-ed. 
Fol-lio'u-lofis. 
Fol'ldw, 18, 101, 170. 
Fol'lowed, 165, 188. 
Fol'low-er. 
Fol'low-inff. 
Fol'ly, 66, 170. 
Fo'mal-h&ut. 
Fo-ment', 15, 103. 
Fo-ment-a'tioii, 112. 
Fo-ment'ed. 
Fo-ment'lng*. 
Fond, 18. 
Fon'dle, IM. 
Fon'dled (/on'dW). 
Fon'dler, 183. 
Fon'dlingr. 
Fond'ly, 03. 
Font« 18. 
Font'al, 72. 
Font'a-nel, 10^. 
Food, 19. 
Fool, 19. 

Fooled {/oold)t 166. 
Fool'er-y. 

Fool'hard-i-nenB, 109. 
Fool'hard-y. 
Footing. 

Fools'oap f/oolz'-). 
Fdbt (2») [pi. Feet, 195.1 
F<R>t'bail,206. 
Fd'ot'boy. 
Fcfet'bndge. 
Fdbt'ed.- 
Tdbt'Wl, 206. 
Fabf gtuicd» C-tfardaOf 

n.pt. 
T&bVhm. 
Fdbt'hold. 
FiJbt'ingp. 
Fdbt'man, 196. 



207 

Fddt'mark. 

F<Sbt'muff. 

Fddt'paoe. 

Fddt'pad, 206. 

Fdbt'path. 

Fddt'print. 

Fdbt'rope. 

Fdbt'rot. 

Fddt'-Bore. 216. 

Fdbt'-sdl'dier (-t9VJur), 

206. Exc. 3. 
Fdbt'Btaik {-8tixwk\lGZ, 
Fddt'stail. 
Fdbt'step. 
Fddt'stool. 
Fddt'way. 
Fop, 18. 
Fop'Ung. 
Fop'per-y, 170. 
Fop'pish, 176. 
For, 17, 135. 
Fdr'age, 18, 70. 
Fdr'aged, 165. 
F6r'a-ger. 
Fdr'a-ging. 
Fo-ra'men (L.) [pi. Po- 

ram'i-na, 196 J 
Fo-ram'i-nat-ed. 
Fo-ram-in'i-fer [so CW. ; 

fUr-armMi^'fur^ Wr. 

155.] 

Fo-ratti-t-nifer-otts. 

For-as-much' (-««-)• 
Fo-ray', or Fdr'ay [bo 

Wr.;/o'ra,Wb. (Jd. 

155] [For ray, 203.] 
Forbade', 163, 171. 
Fbr-bear' (-fc«r), 14. 
For-bear'ance (-6*1^-), 

169. 

For-bear'ing<-6«r'-).l 16. 

For-bfd', 16. 

For-bfd'den(-6td'n),149. 

For-bid'dlng, 176. 

Forbore', 24. 

For-bome'. 

Force, 24. 

Fdreed ihrst\ 166, 183 ; 

Note C, p. 34, 
Force'ful {-fSbt)y 180. 
Foroe'meat, 206. 
Foroe'pump. 
FSrc'er, 183. 
Fdr9'i-ble, 164. 
F6r9'i-bly. 
Forc'ing^. 
Ford-pat-ed. 
For-d-pa'ttoxi. 
Fdrd, 24. 
Fdrd^able^ 104. 
FGrd'ed. 
Fdrd'ittg:. 
Fore (24), a. anterior: 



FORERUNNER 

— «kI. anteriorly. [5ei 

Four, 160.] 
Fore-bode', 24, 103. 
Fore-bod'ed, 183. 
Fore-bod'er. 
Fore-bod'ing. 
Fore'brace, 206. 
Fore'caat. 
Forc'caBt-ing. 
Fore'eas-tleC-ibM-0, 162, 

171. [n. pi. 

Fore-chains' i-chUnz')^ 
Fore-close' (-klOz'). 
Fore-closed' {-kl9zd'), 
Fore-cloB'ingr (-fcte«'-). 
Fore-clos'ure (^-JM»-)f 
Fore-date'. [91. 

Fore-dat'ed, 183. 
Fore-dat'ing. 
Fore'deck. 
Fore'fa-ther, or Fore- 

tWlher [sa Wr. /»r'- 

/a-TAwr, Sm. ; fir-fdf- 

Ifitir, Wk. Wb. Gd. 

155.] 
Fore-go', 24, VOSi* 
Fore-go'ing. 
Fore-gSne', 18, N. 
Fore'ground, 216. 
Fore'nand-ed. 
Fore'head {fir*ed% or 

/drfhed) fso Wr.; 

fir'hed, colL /Orfed, 

Bm. ; fSr'ed, or /Vr*- 

hed, Wb. Gd. 155.] 
Fdr'dgn i^in)t 97, 162. 
F6r'elgn-er (-»n-), 162, 

171. 
Fore-knew' (-»•»'), 162. 
Pore-know' {-nof), 162. 
Pore-know'er (-no'-). 
Fore-kn6w'ing (^-no'-), 
Fore-kndwl'edge (-noV- 

tj), 143, 162, 171. 
Fore'lock. 
Fore'man, 196. 
Pore'mast, 72. 
Fore'mdst. 
Pore'name. 
Fore-named' (-nUmd) 

[so Wk. Wr.; y^r'- 

namd, Qd. 155.] 
Fore'noon. 
Fo-ren'sio. 
Fore-or-dain', 223. 
Pore-or-dained', 166. 
F6re«or-dain'ing. 
Fore-or-dl-oa'tioB. 
Forc'part. 
Fore'plane. 
Fore-mn'. 
Fore-run'. 
Fore-run'aer, 176. 



fiOliOM 



Ford'ing. Fore-run'. 

1,196. Fore (24), a. anterior: Fore-run'ner, 

I II — ^^i^— i^M1*M«aaa^»^ lllMI I I I ■ — - ■ ■■■ ■■' ■■!■■■ 

i» thers } A otf <» feot ; 90* In ftdle } Sr^ <u g i» go ^ & 



i»m9* 



FORERUNNINQ 



208 



FOBSILI^NG 



Tore-Txm'rdng, 

Fore' said (-««d). ' 

Fore' sail. 

Fore-saw'. 

Fore-see'. 

Fore-Boe'ing. 

Fore-seen'. 

Fore-se'er. 183. 

Fore-shad'ow. 

Forc-shad'dwed, 188. 

Forc-shad'ow-ing. 

Fore-8hort'eii(-«Aorf'n)i 

149. fnd). 

Fore-8hor(/ened(-»Aor<'- 
Fore-short'en-iag 

(^-short'n-). 
Fore-show'. 
Fore-showed', 188. 
Fore-show'er. 
Fore-show'ing. 
Fore' side. 

Fore'siffht (-«10, 162. 
Fore' skin. 
Fdr'est, 170. 
Fore'staff, 193. 
Fore-stail'[Forc8tal, 

8m. 179, 5403.] 
Fore-tell'er. 
rore-tell'insr. [1«2. 

Fore'thougnt (-thawt), 
Fore-to'ken (-to'kn). 
Fore-to'kened {-to'knd). 
Fore-told'. 
Fore'top. 
For-ev'er. 

99^ For and ever are 
generally written separate 
oy £ngiish authors, and 
tney are not given as form- 
ing a compound word In 
tlie Dictionaries of Walker 
and Smart. '* It is the pre- 
yailing usage with Ameri- 
can writers, saya Worces- 
ter, " to form the two parts 
Into one word, ybrefer." 
Wilson says : " The words 
Ifor and ever] every where 
occur in the common ver- 
sion of the Bible as a 
phraae; and, the eye being 
thus accustomed to their 
separation, it would prot>- 
ably be better to retain this 
form." 

Fore-wftm'. 

Fore- warned', 165. 

Fore-wftm'ing. 

Fore-went'. 

For'felt (-^0» 70, 97, 171. 

For'felt-ure {-fit)t 91. 

For'fex. 

For-gave'. 

Forge, n. A v. <24) [not 

fawij, 163.] 
Forged, 165, 183. 



Farg'er (/»f:;'-)» M» 77. 
F6rg'er-y {/^rj'-) [not 

fawj'er-y, l5:j.] 
Forget' i-ahet'). 
For-get'ful (^-ghet'/Sol). 
For-get'-me-not 

i-ghet'), 221. 
For-get'ter (-firA««'-),176. 
Forging (/5r/-). 
Forgive', 163. 
For-giv'er, 183. 
For-giv'ing. 
For-got'. 

For-got'ten (-aot^n). 
Fo-ns-fa-mil'i-ate [so 

Sm. Wr. ; fo-risfa- 

miVytU, Wb. Gd. 155.] 
Fo-ris-fa-mil'i-at-cd. 
Fo-ris-fa-mil'i-at-ing. 
Fo-ris-fa-mil-l-a'tion. 
Fork, 17. 

Forked (/oriW), 166. 
Fork'y, 93. 
For-lom', 17. 
Form, 17, 135. 



When this word 
has the sense of a long vat, 
or of a clagf of ttudentf, the 
English pronunciation is 
Jorm. 

Form'al. 

Form'al-i8m(-{2m), 136. 
Form'al-lst. 
For-mal'i-ty, 169. 
For'mal-ize, 202. 
For'mal-ized, 183. 
For'mal-iz-ing. 
Form'al-ly, 66, N. 
Form-a'tion. 
Form'a-t!ve, 84. 
Formed (/orjiwf), 165. 
Form'er (228), n. one 

who forms. 
For'mer, a. anterior. 
For'mic. 
For'mi-cate, 73. 
For-mi-ca'tion. 
For'mi-da-ble (164) [not 

for-mid'a-ble, 153.] 
For'ml-da-bly. 
For'mu-la (L.) [L. pi. 

For'mu-l(B\ Eng. pi. 

For'mu-las, 198. J 
Form'u-la-ry, 72. 
For'ni-cate, a. A v. 
For'ni-cat-ed. 
For'ni-cat-ing. 
For-ni-ca'tion. 
For'ni-cat-or. 
For'ni-cat-ress. 
For-ray', or For'ray Fso 

Wr. ;/or-ra', Sm. Qd, 

156.] [Foray, 203.] 



For-sake', 23. 

For-sak'en {-adk^n), 149. 

For-siik'er. 

For-sak'ing. 

For-sObk', 20. 

For-sooth', 19. 

For-swgar'^(-«tr«r'), 171. 

For-sw6ar'er. 

For-swore'. 

Fdft (24, 160\ n. a small 

fortified place. 
Forte {¥r.) f24, 160), n. 

that in which one ex- 
cels. 
For'te (It.) (/or'<fl),161. 
FOrth, ad. torward in 

time or in place. [See 

Fourth, 160.] 
F6rth'-com-ing(-A:um-), 

206, Exc. 5. 
Forthwith', .37. 
For'ti-eth. 
For'ti-f I-a-ble, 164. 
For-ti-fl-ca'tion. 
For'ti-f ied, 99. 
For'ti-fi-er. 
For'ti-lv, 94. 
For-tis^ai-mo (It.). 
For'ti-tude, 169. 
Fort'night (-nif) (162) 

[so Wk. Sm. Gd.; 

forf'nU, or fort'nitf 

Wr. 156.] 
For'tress. 
For-tu'i-tofig, 169. 
For-tu'i-ty, 108. 
Fort'u-nate, 73, 89. 
Fort'une [so Wr. Grd.; 

for'tun, coll. fort'- 

sh'oon^See § 26); for'- 

chUn, Wk. iSee § 44, 

N. 1), 155.1 
Fort'une-tell'er, 205. 
For'ty, 93. 
Fo'rum (L.) FL. pi. Fo'- 

ra ; £ng. pi. Fo'rums 

i-rumz), 198.] 
For'ward. 
For'ward-ed. 
For'ward-er. 
For'ward-ing. 
For'wards (^wardz), 
For-zan'do (It.) {fort- 

san'do). 
Fosse (/o«). 
Fosse'way, 206. 
Fos'sil, 66, 170. 
Fos-sil-if er-ooB, 106. 
Fos'sil-ist. 
Fos-sil-I-za'tion. 
Fos'sil-ize, 202. 
Fos'sil-ized, 183. 
Fos'sil-iz-iag. 



a,§,i,5,u,y,2(>n^; &,e,![,0,fi, j^,<Aor«; ft <M <i» ftr, a m to fiut, ft <u <» 



FOS8ILOGT 



209 



FREEZING 



Fo8-8il'o-gy, 108. 

FoB-Bo'ri-il, 49, N. 

Fos'ter, 11. 

Fos'ter-child. 

Fos'tered, 150. 

Fos'ter-er. 

Foa'ter-iag. 

FoB'ter-lingr. 

Foth'er. 

FotE'ered, 150. 

Fot5'er-in«. 

Fou<;ht (ySttTf), 162. 

Foul (28), a. not clean ; 
not clear; shamefUl: 
—V. to soil, [^ee 
Fowl, 160.] 

Fouled, 28, 165. 

FoulMng. 

Foul'Iy, 66, N. 

Fou'mart (/oo'-). 

Found, 28. 

Foun-da'tlon. 

Found'ed. 

Found'er (228, N.), n. 
one who founds. 

Foun'der, v. to fill with 
water, and sink ; — to 
cause to be lame or 
sore, as the feet of a 
horse. 

Foun'dered (-dunJ), 
150. 

Found'er-ofis. 

Found'er-y [Found- 
ry, 203.] 

ii9-Tlie formi found' 
try and fowindru are both 
in good uie. Walker gives 
only foundry. Smart saya 
foundery or foundry. 
Worcester and Ck>odrich 
ipve both, but jn-efbr 
joundwy. 

Found'ing^. 

Found'lingr. 

Found'ry [F ou n d - 
ery,203.] 

Fount, 28. 

Fountain {^n), 70, 96, 
171. 

F6ur.(/»r) (21), a. A n. 
twice two. r<»eeFore, 
160.1 

Fdur'fold, 24, 217. 

Fou'ri-er-ism {/oo^ri- 
er-i^m) [so Grd. ; foo'- 
rer-izMt Wr. 165.J 

Four' score. 

Four'teen [See Eight- 
een.] 

Foar'teenth. 

Fourth. 

Fo've-ate. 



Fo-ve'o-late [so "Wr. $ 

/o've-o-i&t, (id. 165.] 
Fo-viPla. 
Fowl (28), n. a bird. 

[See Foul, 160.] 
Fowl'er. 
Fowl'lng. 
Fox, 18. 

Foxed i/okst), 166. 
Fox'glq^re {gluv), 
Fox'Uke, 20t>, £xc. 6. 
Fox'taU. 
Fra'cas (Fr.) [so Wb. 

Gd.'i fr'd-ka'y Sm.j 

fra'kaSi or /^d-ka', 

Wr. 154, 155.] 
Frac'tion. 
Frac'tion-al, 72. 
Frao'tious i-ehus), 160. 
Fract'ure, 91. 
Fract'ured (-yurd). 
Fract'ur-ing (-yur). 
Fragile (/Vfly'-), 152. 
Fra-gil'i-ty, 108, 169. 
Frag^ment, 10, 15. 
Frag'ment-a-ry, 72. 
Frag-'ment-ed. 
Fra'granoe. 
Fra'gran-cy, 160. 
Fra'grant, 72. 
Frail, 23. 
l>ail'ty. 
Fram'a-ble, 164. 
Frame, 23. 
Framed, 165. 
Fram'er, 183. 
Frame' work (-wurk). 
Fram'lng. 
Franc (frangls)^ n. a 

French silver coin. 

[;See Frank, 160.] 
Fran'ohlse {-chiz) (171) 

[not fran'chiz, 153.] 
Fran-cis'can. 
Fran'co-lin {frang'-), 

Fran-gi-bil'i-ty, 169. 

Fran'gi-ble, 104. 

Frank (^/rangk) (54), 
a. ingenuous ; sin- 
cere. [See Franc, 
160.] 

Franked (fi'anffkt), 

Frank'in-cense 

frangy-), [so Wk. 
im. Wr. ; frarikAn'- 
gens, or frankfin-eenSi 
Gd. 165.] 

Frank'ing ( frangV-), 

Frank'lin ifraTtgV-), 

Frank'pledge, 200. 

Fran'uc. 

Frap, 10. 



Frapped {J>ropt), 

Frap'ping, 176. 

Frarter'nal, 21, N. } 72. 

Fra-ter'ni-ty, 108, 160. 

Fra-ter-nl-za'tion [so 
Sra. ; froit-er'VLi'Za'' 
shun, Wr. (}d. 166.1 

Fra-ter'nize, 21, N. ; 
202 [not fra'tur-niz, 
153.] 

Fra-ter'nized, 183. 

Fra-ter'niz-er. 

Fra-ter'niz-ing. 

Frat-riHjid'al, 183. 

Frafri-dde, 169. 

Fraud, 17. 

Fraud'tt-lent, 89. 

Fraught i/^€Ufft)y 162. 

Fray (23), ». a chafe in 
doth ', a fight ; a quar- 
rel: — V, to mbj to 
frighten, fpl. of n. 

frays {fr/U),-'See 
hrase, 100.] 
Frayed iJ)rdd)y 187. 
Fray'ing. 
Freak, 13. 
Frec'kle, 164. 
Frec'kled (frefld), 150. 
Frec'kling. 
Free, 1.3. 
Free'benoh [so 8m. 

Wr. ; fre-benchf, Wb. 

Gd. 155.] 
Free'boot-er. 
Free'boot-ing. ^ 
Free'bom. 
Freed, 188. 
Free'man, 190. 
Free'dom, 169. 
Free'hold, 206i, 
Free'hold-er. 
Free'ing. 
Free'man, 196. 
Free'ma-son (•mU-m), 

149. 
Free'ma-Bon-ry (-ma- 

#n-). 
Fre'er, 183, 188. 
Free'stone, 130. 
Freo'think-erjr-fWn<7*-) 

[so 8m. Wb. (M.; 

frB-thingkfury Wk. 

165.1 
Free'think-ing. 
Free-will', n. (161) [ao 

Wk. Sm. Wb. m,i 

fri'wil, Wr. 155.] 
Free'will, a. 161. 
Freeze (13, 47), v. to be 

congealed with cold 

[See JYieze, 160.] 
Freez'ing, 183. 



flUlj dot In there; db at In foot; 9 a« •» fiioiie ; ghoa gin go ;^ at in tiiia 

18* 



ntKIGBT 



210 



WKO^AUTt 



Freight'ed (/•««' 



k 



Freiffht'er ( /V«' 
Freijfht'ing (/WW 
Frcuch, 16} H. 
French'1-f led, 186. 
Freuoh'i-f y, WL 

French'i-fy-inir. 
French'man, IMI. 

Fre-net'ic [Fhrenet- 

io,a03.] 
Fren'xled, 99. 
Fren'zy, 109. 
Fre'quen-cy, 160. 
Fre'quent, a. 103, 161. 
Fre-quenr , v. 103| 161. 
Fre-quent'artlve. 
Fre-quent'ed. 
Fre-quent'er. 
Fre-quent'inff. 
Fres'iso (It.T, «. fpl. 

Fres'coB {-kSz), 192.] 
Fresh, 16, 46. 
Fresh'en {/resh'nh 149. 
Fresh'enea (Jrtsk'nd), 

150. 
Fresh'en-in^ {/ireiWn-), 
Fresh'et, 76. 
Fresh'mani 196. 
Fret, 16. 

Fret^ful {-fSol)t 180. 
Fret'ted, 176. 
Fret'ter. 
Fret'ting. 
Fret'ty, 93. 
Fret'work (-wurk), 
Fri-Hrbil'i-ty, 108. 
Fri'a-ble, 164. 
Fri'ar (74), n. a brother 

or member of any re- 

ligiouR order. [5ee 

Frier, 160.] 
Fri'ar-y. 
Frib'ble, 164. 
Frib'bled ifiWld). 
Frib'bler. 
Frib'blinff. 
FHc-an-aeau^ y (Fr.) 

{frik-an-do'} [Frlo- 

a n d o , 203.1 
Fric-as-see', 122, 171. 
Frlc-aB-seed', 188. 
Frio-as-see'log. 
Fric'tion. 
Fric'tion-al, 72. 
Fri'day (-dw). 
Fried (/rW), 186. 
Friend ifrmd), 15. 
Frignd'lt-ness. 
Fri^nd'ly, 93, 160. 
Fri'er, n. one who fries. 

\See Friar, 160.1 
Friea'ic (fi-Bz*-). 



FriSM (JHz) (IS), f». 4 
eoarae wooUen <doth, 
with a nap on one 
tide ;— the part of an 
entablatare between 
the architraye and the 
comioe. [^ee Frees^e, 
160.] 

Frigr'ate, 170. 

Fright (/HOi 102. 

Fright'en (A'Wnh 149, 
ltt2. 

Frighfened C/HI'fMl), 
ISO. 

Frighf en-ing (Mfn-). 

Fright'fW^otfl). 

Frig'id(yVv'-)il«>46. 
Fri-gld'i-ty, 160. 

Frill, 16, 172. 
Frilled (/HM), 168. 
FriU'ing. 
Fringe, 16, 46. 




IMp'per. 
Frip'per-er. 
Frip'per-y, 170. 
Frl-seur* (Fr.) (/re- 

zur'). 
Frisk, 16. 
Frisked {friakt)^ 166; 

Note C, p. 34. 
Frisk'er. 
Frisk'et. 
Frisk'M (-/SaO. 
Frisk'i-ly. 

Frisk'i-ness, 160, 186. 
Frisk'ing. 
Frisk'y, 93, 160. 
Frit, 16. 
Frith, 16, 3?. 
Frit'ter, 170. 
Frittered, 160. 
lYit'ter-ing. 
FrI-vol'i-ty, 108, 160. 
Friv'o-loiis. 
Friz'zle, 164. 
Frlz'zled iJHz'ld), 183. 
Frlz'zler. 
Friz'iling. 
Fro, 24. 
Frock, 18, 181. 
Froek'-cdat, 206> 

. Exc. 1. 

Frocked iftokK). 
Frog, 18. 

Frog'hop-per, 206. 
FroFlc, 18, 170. 
Frol'icked (4U), 183. 
Frol'lck-ing. 
)b>ol'ic-8ome (-«iMn). 
i From, 18. 



Fron-dea'oeneef 171. 

Fron'dofis. 

Front (/ninQ (22) [m 
8m. Wr. wb. Gw.j 
frufU or front, Wk. 
165.] 

«r "Mr. BlMridtt 
muu thii word la the tee- 
ond manner only [/Voia] ; 
-but I am much mutakea 
if cttttom doei not elmoet 
uniTerMUly adopt the flnl 

Frontpage (Jruntf-), 70. 
Frdnt'al, 72. 
Fr6nVa-t«d. 
Front'ed (frufO^-^, 
Frdnt-ier'(121, 169) [so 

Sm. Wr. GW. ; fron*- 

chir, or AwU'pBr, 

Wk. 165.] 
FrOnt-iered' (-«rdO> 166. 
Fronting (ffvtU'-). 
Frdnt'ls-piece, 171. 
Front'let ifrwit'-). 
Frost (/^98tt or frowst) 

(18, N.) [so Wr. 

Gd. J fr99t, Wk. Sm. 

166.J 
Frost'ed. 
lYost'i-ly. 
Frost'i-nees, 160. 
Frosfing. 
Frost-work {-wurk^ 

206. 
Frost'wort (-«««r<).' 
Frost'y, 98. 
Froth {Jr6ik^ or 

firawth) (18, N.)_r80 

Wr. Gd. J fr9th, Wk. 

Sm. 155.] 
Froth'i-ly. 
Froth'i-ness, 109. 
Froth'y, 93. 
Fronnoe, 28. 
Frounced (frotonst). 
Froun9'ing. 
Fro'ward, 24, 72. 
Frown, 28. 
Frowned {frownd), 
Frown'ing. 
Froze, 24. 

Froz'en (/V'aa'n), 140. 
Fnio-tes'oenoe, 171. 
Frao-ttf er-otts, 108. 
Frac-ti-fY-ca''tiOft. 
Fmc'tl-f ied, 99. 
Frac'li-f f , 04. 
Fruc'ti-fy-ing. 
Fru'gal(/ro^r.),lt,7t, 
Frnyal'i-ty (froo-^ 



a, 6« i, 6, tt, y, iMi^ S it it Ii 5, ft, f , «ftor< s Hasiwfmirkeifiimiuii^lkaiii^ 



Fni'g.1-17 Ifreo'-), SO, 

Fro-glfer-ofii CA*>-)j 
rru-glT'o-roliB Ifroo- 

Trait i /root), W. 
Frult'uge l/root'-), 70. 
rnilt'er-er (/root'-i, 73. 
Fniit'er-y {Jrool'-). 
rniil'lul (/VooC/iSI), 



Mihui), Ku,\7l. 



FtTia'tum {I~) [pi, 

mi.te6'ce'nt (froo-). 
ftn'U-cosB (froo'-) [bo 

Fni'tr-eotti (Aiw'-J- 
fru-tlc'ii-laH. 



Fu'eafc*d. 
ru'coiil, 20, 27. 

Fu-CDld'll. 

Fd'cu* (L.) [pi. Ta'd, 

Fad 'die, IM. 
FnO'dled ui^'U), 183. 
Fud'dlur. 
rild'diing;. 

ru'erbfl, 7(1. ■ 

rn'ellBd (.eirf) (Fu- 
eled, Wb. Gd.' 203. 
— Sfl! 177, Hud Note 
E, p. 70.1 

Fo'efler rFaeler, 
Wb. Gd. 2(Q.l 

Fu'el-Une [FueHQg, 
Wb. Ga. aB.l 

Fn-gs'doiiB, 109. 

rB'gi-Hve, H4, 171. 
m'Ble.man, 164, !«l. 
J'ogue (/»oU171 i Note 
P, p. S7) [noi fli], 

Fnl'mim (L-l [L. pL 
Fut'cra; Eog. pi. 

lUli 8 a* (n there idb at 



Fi 
I 
FSI'g«i.i:y. 

FOl-iru-f*'*'™- 
FOlfu.rtte. m. 
Fu-lig'l-nolli {-H)'-). 
Pull (JEW), «l, 172. 



s.far 



Full'lDE ( fiUP-). 
FuU'y fy""''!'). 1" 
Ffil'ml-iiitte, 73, 1i 






wV. Wb. Gd. 



FiP^id'*''" 
FtU'volks, 100 



.■i:a,5 



-n-mun'bn-lilKHj [» 
8in. i fu-nam'inAa- . 
to™, Wr. Wb. Gd.i 
JOS.J 

■uac-ilon OiW*'- 



■^nd'inff. 

'^-□e're-il.U, N. ;im 
^n'goid (Anff'-). 
■uii'BoOB[yWriff'-)(lflO), 

Entt. pi. J'on'gTis*! 



J-u-iilo'a-liir, 74. 
ruu'ncl, 00, 1701 
Fun'ny, 10». 
t-nr (il), B. the 1 



'yl?^? 



'Crtna'SM), I f-ur-be-low-liig. 



Fur'blabed (MiU), 

ynr-bigh-er. 

Fur'blah-iDE. 

Fnr'oate. 

For-cil-od. 

For-M'' 



FDm^in-g: 

Fn'ral-W-rj [Fum»- 

F6m'T, M. 
Fun, si 



Far'fbr, 21, 100. 
Fnr-fti-ra'eeons (-lAtu). 
Fu'rl-olH,40,K.[r8. 
Furl, 21, I3S. 
Purled ( Afifl. !«. 



oHnfc (jto), li 



f oi {» Odle itAwglngoi^attotb 



PUXNIBHED 

For'nlilMil (-nUU). 
Fur'nlsh-er. 

Fnr'Dlah'Ina:. 
Fur'Dlture [M Wr. 

cou! fir'ni-clfoorl 
Bid. {Set t M);Ar'- 
ni^kT, WlL. IW.] 



cr-j. 



Fur-ry, 21,'lJO. 
Fnr'lpr, a. * ad. 

[Farthsr.SQl.] 

Fur'iGer^nn. 
Fur^ered l-tiurd), 

Fur'lGn-lai. 
Fur'tSer-man. 
Fur'iEer-mart (Far- 

•■«-"■"'••'■ 

Put'OVb, 84, l«t. 

Fa-nui'iite l-rmg'ti), 
M,1M. 

Fo'rr. 49, N. 

ruTM L/*i«) (II), n. ■ 
thornr ahrub of the 
seaa« I7Ju. IS« 
Fun, pi. of Fur, 

Fun'r/ «a. I*. 

Fui'ooGe, loa.lflg. 
FuseCrtH), F. 26, :3«. 
FuM 0«ij n, [FniB, 

ao.1 

FueetTfittaf), IS3. 
Fn-ioe' l-if), 121, 171, 
FuM-hU'l-ty (JBi-) 
Fua'l-ble (/&'-) (1«, 
IWjJwSio.Wr. Wb. 

155.1 
FD'ai-ibnn, 106. 
Fu'sil (-2*0 (138), a. o- 

p«Ue of MiiuF ftued. 

Fu'sil (,-nih [io Sm. 



rn-sll-oer' (-»U-j, 13X, 
Fal'lQg t J*!*-). 



Fnued (A«l), V. iHd 
n»a. [?« Fu«,U».] 

mDBthiesa. \3» 

FuBsed, ItW.] 
Fusl'Un (-imn), 22, Bl. 

Fust'1-aeiB, I'ii. 



Fuie, n. I^aa'e.ioa.' 
Fuwj 22, 175. 

Ff.lt^! [Fie, 203.1 



i, fc i, fc ft. r. »i>v 1 ». e. ». e. tt, f , » 



Gab'ble, IH. 
Oab'blL-d (gab'til), 1S3. 
Gub'bler,??. 
Qab'bllns. 
Ua'W-on, 78, 89. 
Gs-U-on-iuilo', 122. 
Ga'ble, 1«1. 
Gs'btet. 

Gad'ded, 170. 

Oad'der, 

Gad 'ding. 

Gad' ay, 209, 

Ga'doid [aa Wr. Qd.) 

ffod'oid, Sm. IU.1 
Gael laat), a. itng. k pL 
Giel'G{oW'it)(171)^ 

Wr. Wb. Gd. ; ga'd- 

ik, 8ni. 155.] 
Gaff (10) Vnot nil, 163.1 
Gaffer. 
GHTOeilM. 

Oige (23, 45, IflO], n. a 
pledgv ; — a obal- 

ten^ ^ — a Und of 

wblcb ■ ihip alok* In 

oTone ship M regarda 
anolher. [QaaKe(hi 



GAL AIM AL 

the lUt thna acnw 



Gilo, 2:1. 

Gained {j/ind), IM. 

Galn'nii(/wO. ISO. 
Galn-saJd' (Da»-«il' ), or 

Gala'aaliT (odit'ied] 

tGalna»j-ed, Wb. 

Gd.20J.l 
Oiln-aiT', or Giln'aar 

[aoWr.Gd. ;ff«n-*«', 



Qibi-aiT'titg', 

Galr^h(WUr'- 
Uh,.20i] 



Galt'ired (-urd), UO. 
G^t'er-lns. 

Ga'ja, 72. ^^ 

Gal-acloin'e-ier, lOS, 
Ga1-ar.toph'a.)^at 

Gal4D.toph'a.£01le 

Gat-aii-toph'a-roni 



: i i a* <■ far, a <ia is bat, a St In 



GAXA2«TfNE 



213 



GANOID 



Oal'an-tine, 152. 

Gorla'tianB (^stumz), n. 
pi. 112. 

Gal'ax-y, 03, 170. 

Gal'ba-num. 

Gale 2%. 

Gal'e-nB [80 Sm. Wb. 
Gd. ; gal'yM, Wk. ; 
gal'yctSt or ga'le^cu, 
iVr. lod«J 

Ga'le-ate, a. 73. 

Ga'le-at-ed. 

Ga-lee'to. 

Ga-le'na, 72. 

Ga-len'ic, 109. 

Ga-lea'ic-al, 108. 

Ga'len-ism (^m), 136. 

Ga'len-iRt. 

Ga-U'cian {-lUh'un), 

Gal-i-le'an, 110. 

Gaia-lee (170), n. a 
porch or chapel. 

Gal'i-ot [bo Sm. Gd.; 
gal'yxUi Wk. ; gal'yot, 
Wr. 155.] [Galliot, 
203.1 

GalM-pot (170), n. a 
kind of white resin. 
[See GaUipot, 160.] 

Gall, 17. 

Gal'lant (161), a. brave, 
high-spirited. 

Gal-Iaiit' [so Sm. Wr. j 
galldnV, Wk. Wb. 
Gd. 155.] (161), a. at- 
tentive to ladies. 

Gal-lant' [so Wk. Sm. 
Wr.; gal-ldnt', Wb. 
Crd. 155], n. one who 
is attentive to ladies : 
— V. to wait on or be 
attentive to, as ladies. 

Gallant'ed. 

Gal-lant'ing^. 

Gal'Iant-ly (161), ad. 
bravely. 

Gal-lautny (161), ad. in 
the manner of a gal- 
lant. 

Gal'lant-ry, 170. 

Gal'late [so Wr. Wb. 
Gd. ; gawl'&t, Sm. 
155.] 

Galled (gawld), 165. 

Gal'le-on, 170. 

Gal'ler-y, 171. 

Gai'Iess, 66, N. ; 178. 

Gal'ley (tt8) [pi. GtH'- 



ral'ley (tt8) 

leys, 190.] 

^ail'fly, 206. 



Gail'fly, 

Gal'lic [so Wb. Gd. ; 

gatol'ik, Sm. Wr. 

156], a. denoting an 



add obtained fiwm 
grall-nats. 

G«u'lic, a. belonging to 
Gaul, or France. 

Gal'lio-an. 

Gal'li-cism {-Hzm). 

Gal'li-m&u-lry. 

Gal-li-na'cean (shan). 

Gal-li-ua'ceous {-ahus), 
im. 170, 17L 

Gal'U-uip-per, 170. 

Gal'li-nule. 

[Galliot, 203. — 5ee 
Galiot.] 

Gal'li-pot (170), n. a 
small glazed pot, .used 
by apothecaries. [5ee 
Gfalipot, 160.] 

GaU'-nut. 

Gallon, 10, 86, 170. 

Gal-loon', 121. 

Gal'lop, 86, 170. 

Gal-lop-fide', 122. 

Gal'loped (^upt), 165. 

Gal'lop-er. 

Gal'lop-ing. 

Gal'lo-way. 

Gal'lows i-lu8) [pi. Gal- 
lowses (4u8-ez), 189.] 

99^8ome wntera have 
res^urded gallows as both 
aingular and plural, but 
the best modern authori- 
ties regard it as singular 
only, with the r^n>^ Pln^ 
nlgaUowtetu 

Ga-loche' (Fr.) (ga- 
t59h't or gorUish') 

to«*', Wk. Wr. Wb. 

Gd. 154, 155.] 
[Gait, 203.— 5e0 

Gault.] 
Gal-van'ic, 109, 170. 
Gal'van-ism {Azm). 
Gal'van-ist. 
Gal'van-ize, 202. 
Gal'van-izea, 183. 
Gal'van-iz-ing. 
G il-va-nog'ra-phy. 
Gal-va-noro-gist. 
Gal-va-nol'o-gy, 108. 
Gal-va-nom'e-ter. 
Gal-van'o-soope. 
Gam-ba'do [pi. Gam- 

ba'does (-d^z\ 192.] 
Gam'bit. 
Gam'ble, 164. 
Gam'bled {gam'bld). 
Gam'bler. 
Gam'bling. 

Gara-boge' (-6o<>;') (121) 
" I. Wr.; 



[so Wk. Smt 



. gam4f9jf, Wb. Gd. 

J55.1 
Gam-Do'gi-aa. 
Gam'bol, 10, 86. 
Gam'bolled (-bold) 

(165) [Gamboled, 

Wb. Gd. 203. — See 

177, and Note £, p. 

70.1 
Gam'bol-ling [G a m - 

boling, Wb. Gd. 

203.J 
Gam'brel [Cambrel, 

Ghambrel,203.] 
Game, 23. 
Gamed, 165. 
Game'iUl {-/Sol). 
Game'some (-mMi). 
Game'ster, 77. 
Gam'ing. 
Gam'mer. 
Gam'mon, 170. 
Gam'moned (-mund). 
Gam'mon-ing. 
Gam-o-pefafoiLs. 
Gam-o-phyl'lo&s, or 

Ga-moph'yl-loils [See 

Adenophyllous .] 
Gam-o-sep'al-oUs. 
Gam'ut, 170. 
Ganch, 10, 44. 
Ganched (gancht), 
Ganch'ing. 
Gan'der, 10, 77. 
Gang ( 10, 64), n. a band ; 

a crew. [See Gangue, 

160.1 ^ ^ ^ 

Gan'gli-ac (jgang*-)y 64. 
Gan'gli-form {gang'-). 
Gan'gli-o-form {gang'-). 
Gan'gli-on {gang'-), 64. 
Gan'gU-o-na-ry 

{gangf-), 72, 171. 
Gan-gu-on'io {gang'-), 
Gan'gre-nate {gang'-). 
Gan'gre-nat-ed 

{gang'-). 
Gan'gre-nat-ing 

{gang'-). 
Gan'grene {gang'-), 171. 
Gau'grened Cgamg'-), 

165. 
Gan'gren-ing {gang'-). 
Gran-gre-nes'oent 

{gang), 171. 
Gan'gre-nofis {gang'-), 
Gangue {gang), n. the 

matrix of an ore. 

[See Gang, 160.] 
Gang'way, 206. 
Gan'net, 170. 
Ga'noid [so Gd. ; gan'^ 

oid, Sm. Wr. 166.] 



failed a«if» there; (Sbof <i» foot $9 «'<» facile ;gha« gin go; tha^mthlBL 



OANOIDAL 



214 



GAUGE 



Ga-noid'al. 
6a-noid'i-an. 
G&nt'let, n. a miUtaiy 

gunishment inflicted 
7 making^ the of- 
iender run between 
two rows of men, 
each of whom gives 
him a stroke with a 
switch or a whip. 
[See Gauntlet, 148.] 

Gan'za. 

GaolO'aO (168) [Jail, 
203.J 



Xh© ft>nn ffool^ 

though heretofore com- 
mon, and Mnctioned by 
good • author! tief, U not 
no«r to gencrail/ lued ■■ 
JaiL 

Gaol'cr (laZ'-) [Jail- 

e r , 203.J 
Gap, 10. 
Gape (fft^y or gdp)[po 

Wr.} gup, Wk. Wb. 

Gd. J gapt 8m. 153.] 



** The e]q;>reBriTe 

but irreguhur pronuncia- 
tion of thii wora with the 
Italian a Ufiip} ia no longer 
prevalent/* &nart. "Thli 
pronunciation {gap}, how- 
ever, ia well fupported by 
authorities, and it is com- 
mon in the U. 8.** fForces- 
ier. 

Gaped (gi^t, or gBpt). 
Gap'er (jgw-* or gap'-). 
Gapping {g'^'-t or 

G^'a-gav. 

G&r^an-cine (-«<n) [so 
8m. Wr. ; gdr'an-stn, 
Gd. 165.] 

Garb, 11, 135. 

Gar'bage, 70. 

Gar'baged. 

Gar'ble, 166. 

Gar'bled {gar'bld), 183. 

Gar'bler. 

Gar'bles (gar^blz), n.pl. 

Gar'bling. 

Gar'bdard. 

Gar'den {gar'dn) (53, 
149) [so Gd. J o»ar'dn, 
Sm. (^ee S 26) , gar'- 
dn, or gar'deth' Wr. 
165.] 

Gar'dened (gar*dnd), 

Gar'den-er (jgar'dn-). 

Gar'den-ing (jfar'dn-). 

Gar'fish, 20(5. 

Gar'gan-cy, 98, 169. 



Gar'ga-rlsm (-rton). 

Gar'get ighei), 138. 

Gar'gil {ghU), 138. 

Gar'gie, 1(H. 

Gar'glcd {gar'gld), 183. 

Gar'g^ling. 

Gwr'eoX, 

Gar'ish (^Mr'-) [G air- 

lata, 203.1 r See Note 

under Gairisli.J 
Gar'land, 11, 72. 
Gar'lio, 11, 200. 
Gar'Uck-y, 182. 
Gar'meni. 
Gardner, 11, 77. 
Gar'liered (^urd), 150. 
Gar'ner-ing. 
Gar'net, 11, 76. 
Gar'nisb, 104. 
Gar'nished l-nUht). 
Gar-nish-ee', 122. 
Gar'uish-er. 
Gar'nish-ing. 
Gar'nish-ment. 
Gar'ni-ture, 169. 
Gar'pike. 
Ga'rofis [so Wk. Wr. 

Wb. Gd. ', gUrffUt Sm. 

166.] 
Gftr'ret, 11, N. 
G&r'ret-ed. 
Gftr-ret-eer', 122. 
GSr'ret-ing. 
GSr'ri-son (-*n), 149. 
Gftr'ri-Boned (-«nd), 166. 
GHr-r6t€' (8p.). 
Gar-rof 'ed, 183. 
Gar-rot'ing. 

Gttr-ru'li-ty (-roo'')^ 169. 
Gftr'ru-lo&B, (-roo->. 
Gar'ter, 11, 77. 
Gar'tered, 160. 
Gar't€r-ing. 
Ga'rum. 
Gfts (10, 174) [not gas, 

nor gfiXf 163.J 
Gas'con. 

Gas-con-ade', 122. 
Gas-oon-ad'ed, 183. 
Gas-con-ad'ing. 
Gas-con-id'er. 
Ga8'eK>ua igaz'-) (136, 

171, 176) [so 8m. Gd. ; 

gixz'e^us, or ga'ae-ust 

Wr. 165.] 
Gash, 10, 46. 
Gashed (jgaaht), 166 ; 

Note G, p. 34. 
Gash'ing. 
Gas'-hold-er, 206, Exc 

3. 
Gas-i-fY-ca'tion. 
Gas'i-f ied, 186. 



Gms'l-form, 106. 

Gaa'i-fy, 94, 176. 

Gas'i-fy-ing. 

Gas'ket. 

Gas' kins {-kinz)^ n,pl, 

Ga8'-me-ter,20<^£xc. 3. 

Ga Bom'e-ter {-zom'-) 
(108) [so 8m. Wr.; 
g€U-om'e-twrtGd. 165.1 

Ga-som'e-try {-torn'-} 
[so Wr. J gaz-orn'o- 
try, (M. 156.J 

Gasp, 12, 131. 

Gapped (gat^)j 166. 

Crasp'ing. 

Gas'sing. 

Gas'sy, 03, 170. 

Gas'ter-o-pod JQ a s - 
tropoa,203.j 

Gas-ter-op'o-do&s 
[Gastropodoaa, 
20:).] 

Gas'tric, 200. 

Gas-tril'o-quist. 

Gas-trll'o-quy, 171. 

Gas-tri'tis. 

Gas'tro-cele. 

Gas-trol'o-gy, 106. 

Gas'tro-man-cy, 109. 

Gas'tro-nome. 

Gras-tron'o-mer. 

Gas-tro-nom'ic, 109. 

Gas-tron'o-mist. 

Gas-tron'o-my. 

Gas'tro-pod [G a a - 
teropod, 203.1 

Gas-trop'o-doiiM [G as- 
ter op o do us, 203.] 

Gas-trdr'a-phy. 

Gas-tros'co-py. 

Gas-trot'o-my. 

Gate f 23), n. a fttime for 
closing a passages — 
an avenue. [See Gait, 
160.] 

Gate' way, 206. 

Gath'er, 10, .38, 77. 

GatH'ered, 160. 

GatK'er-er. 

GatE'er-insr. 

G&ua'i-ly. 

G&ud'i-neas, 169. 

Gaud'y. 

Gaufier-ing. 

Gauge igiS) (23, 160% 
n. an instrument 
for measuring; — the 
number of feet wliich 
a ship sinks in the 
water ; — the jMsition 
of a ship as re- 

fards another;— the 
readth of a railway. 



&, e, 1, 5,u, 9, long -, &,«,!, d, ft, f, short ; ft as »ti far, has in laat, ka$in 



GAUGE 



216 



GENIUS 



[Gage (In the first 
three senBes), 203.] 

Gauge (^0/)} V. to meas- 
ure. [See Gage, v. 
160.J 

Gauge'a-ble (jf^'-), IM, 
183« 

Gauged (gi^d)i 183. 

Gau&r'er (ffHj'-), n. one 
who gauges, or meas- 
ures. [See Gager, 
160.1 

Gauging igiU'')f part. 
& n. measuring. [See 
Gaging, 160.1 

GaulT 17. 

Gauit [Gait, Golt, 
203.1 

Gaunt {g'dnt\ [noi 
gawnt, 153.J 

Gaunt'let (jgdrU'-)^ n. a 
large iron glove. [See 
Gantlet, 160.1 

Gaunt'let-ed. 

(Huze, 17, 40. 

G4uz'y. 

Gave, 23. 

Gav'el, 170. 

Gav'el-kind. 

Ga-vot' [so 8m. s gcm'- 
otj Wr. Wb. Gd. 155.1 

Gawk, 17. 

Gawk'y, 93. 

Gay, 23. 

Gay'e-ty (171) [Gaie- 
2a3.] 



.*y. 



Gay'fyfG' 
Gaze, 23. 



aily,203.] 



Gazed, 183. 
Ga-zeUe', 121, 171. 
Gaz'er 

Gazette', 121, 171. 
Ga-zet'ted, 171. 
Gaz-et-tcer', 122, 109. 
Gaz'iag. 183. 
Gear {gfiir), 13, 138. 
Geared {ghMrd), 165. 
Gear'ing ighlr'-), 

Geat(j;«). • 

Geck'o (ghek'o) [soWr.; 

Jek'o, Gd. 165.] 
Gee, 13, 45. 
Geed, 188. 
Gee'inar. 
Geese JffhBs), n.pl. (138) 

[iS^ee Goose, 195.1 
Ge-hen'na ighe^)i 138. 
Gc'Ine, 152. 
Gel'a-ble, 164, 100. 
Ge-lat'i-nate. 
Ge-iat'i-nat-ed. 
Ge-lat'i-nat-ing. 
Ge-lat-i-na'tion. 



Gel'a-tYne (45,162)rG e 1- 

atin, 203.1 
Gel-a-tln'i-form ( 108)[so 

Wr. ; Jelat'i-ni-form, 

Wb. Gd. 155.1 
Ge-lat'i-nize, 2(u. 
Ge-lat'i-nizcd, 183. 
Ge-lat'i-niz-ing. 
Ge-Iat'i-no&s. 
Geld (ghelft). 
Geld'ed igheld'-). 
Geld'er (gheld'-), 
Geld'ing {gheld'-), 
Gei'lypeiiy,203.] 



Both foniM of this 
word are fbuad in xnott of 
the Dictionariet. Smart 
and Worcester indicate a 

8 reference for j>Uy, and 
lif form is now the mora 
common. 

Gelt {ghett). 

Gem, 15, 45. 

Ge-ma'ra (ghe-), 138. 

Ge-mttr'lc {^he-). 

Gem'el. 

Gem'i-ni (L.), n. pi, 

Gem'i-nous. 

Gem'ma-ry, 72, 170. 

Gem'mate. 

Gem'mat-ed. 

Gem-ma'tion. 

Gemmed (Jemd), 176. 

Ciem'me-o&s, 160. 

Gem-mlf er-ous, 106. 

Gem'minof, 176. 

Grem-mip'a-ro&s. 

Gem'mule, 170. 

Grem-mu-lifer-ofis. 

Gem'my, 170. 

Gems'boo ijemz'tHk") 
[GemBbok,203.] 

Gren-darme' {zhdn- 
darm') [pi. Gen- 
darmes', or Gene 
d^armes{zhdn-dann'). 



The plural form, 
ffeiu d'armet (armed men), 
IS the French expression, 
IVom which the word get^ 
darme is formed. 

Gen-darm'er-y. 
Gen'der,^ 15, 45, 77, 



Gen-e-a-lo&['lc-al, or Ge- 
ne-a-log'jc-al {-Igj'-) 
[Jen-e-a-loj'ik-ai 

Wb. ~" 



(40)'-) 
lit wr. 



.. _. Gd. \ji-ne-a-U>y- 
ik-al, Wk. Sm. 155J 

Gren-e-al'o-gist, or Ge- 
ne-al'o-gist. 

Gen-e-al'o-gy, or Ge-ne- 
Bl'o-gYi l06)[jen-e-aV- 
o-JVi Wr. Wb. Gd.j 



jt-ne-aVo-jff, Wk. Sm. 
155.] 

Gen'e-ra, n. pi, [See 
Genus.] 

Gen'er-al, 108, 233, Exe. 

Gen-er-al-ld'si-mo, 160, 
170. 

Gen-er-al'i-ty, 106, 160. 

Gen-er-al-Y-za'tion. 

Gen'er-al-ize, 202. 

Gen'er-al-ized, 183. 

Gen'er-al-iz-ing. 

Gen'er-al-ly, 170. 

Gkiu'er-ant. 

Gen'er-ate, 45, 72. 

Gen'er-at-ed, 183. 

Gon'er-at-ing. 

Grcn-er-a'tion, 45, 112. 

Gen'er-at-Ive [so Sm. ; 
gen'er-a-tiv, Wk. Wr. 
Wb. Gd. 155.1 

Gen'er^tor, 2528. 

Gen'er-at-rix. 

Ge-nCr'ic, 109. 

Ge-ni^r'ic-al, 106. 

Gten-er-os'i-ty, 169. 

Gen'er-o&B, 108, 160. 

Gen'c-sis, 45, 169. 

Gen'ct, n. a small-sized 
Spanish horse ; — an 
animal of the weasel 
kind. [See Genette, 
148.1 [Gene tte,20:).] 

Ge-neth'li-ac. 

Gen-eth-Ii'ac-al. 

Gre-neth-ll-al'o-gy. 

Gro-net'ic. 

Ge-nctte' (-n«f')» «• a 
cat skin made into a 
muff or a tippet ; — a 
small-sized Spuiish 
horse ; — an animal of 
the weasel kind. 
[Genet (in the last 
two senses), 203.] 

Gre-ne'van. 

Gre-ne'van-ism {-izm). 

Gen-e-vese' (-!?««'), n, 
sing, & pi. 

Ge'nf-al, 72, 78, 166. 

Ge-ni-al'i-ty, 169. 

Ge'ni-al-lv, 66, N. 

Ge-nio'u-fate. 

Gte-nic'u-lat-ed. 

Ge-nio-u-la'tion. 

Gen'i-tal. 

Gen'i-ting [Jennet- 
ing, 203.J 

Gen'i-tiv-al. 

Gen'i-tTve, 84, 108. 

Gen'ius U^n'ytu), or 
Ge'ni-us [so Wr. ; 
jBn'yu8t Gd. j jl'tii-ua. 



ftU } d at in there; 6b at in foot ; 9 a« in facile ; gh a< g in go ; tt^ofinthia* 



Wk. Sm. U6] [pi. 



ti..'a-twl'lT, M, S. i 170. 
Gvn'tUn (-fkdn). 

tieu'tile (81,1G2) [lo Bm. 
Wr. Gd. i >M'n(, or 
jen'ltl, Wk. lU.] 

Qca'tUJnuf-iiM}, lU. 
Qen-U-U'ttkf (- JiiA'at). 
Gea-tlU'tlatii (Urt'M). 

Geu'ile^foUc' (/»*) (pi. 
Gun'tle-foUi l-Jtlid).] 



Cjfa'jtmen), IGO, IM.) 



in<«praiiaaii»d^ 






«r<s 



ueKi-ffrapn'ic, itw. 
Ge-o-^rnpli'lo-il, lOS. 
Uf-ot^r-pby, *», 108. 

Ge-o-log'to-iil'f-M'-). 
Ge-ol'o-Kl.t, IS, 10*. 
Of-ol'o-fcr, 4S, log. 



(■IrUH'aa), n-i, nu 
Ge^iiii'p-tr7, 46, 108. 
Ge-o-pon'lB, log. 
Oe-o-poa'ic^T 108. 

Geor'gl-iin ( jor'-j. 
GeoHgio (^oryii). U, 

Geor'KlB-Kl IJaPja-). 

Ge-os^copr, ■•«- [Pi- 
Oe-rti'ni-uiD, ISO. 
Ger'ftt-con ( JfryinffHbi) 

Qemi.ai, N.i 4S. 
G«T'mui I pi. Ger'nuna 

l-manz), IM.] 
Ger'DuO'.der, or Oct- 

naa'dtTlioWT.iJtr'- 
man-der, Bm. i j*r- 
iBnfi'ii«r,Wli.Wb.Qd. 
Qer-muip', 121. [IM.J 



Ge-o-defUs, lOfl. 
Oe-o-dfBlo-ml, loa. 
Ge Jjd'e-5r ( 106) f M Wr 



l'e-5r(10»)(<"> 



Q^-oJlH'la^il, 108. 
Ge«.di Persona, W8. 
Ge-og-nSBt. 



Bm.^ jki-ttt^»J(Mi>- 



r^."Ki:^ 



i8l-lo.^'QO (iaJ-Io-f. 
nn) [M Gd. : JI-oW 
(('no, Wr. 165:] 



on(^'*'. 



Glb'™t(nM6'-),l38- 
Gibe(25,-lG),fl.KnKei. 

-r. to mar. (nm 

Gybe, IW.l 
Glbnl, lea, 1S3. 
Glb'er. 

I.. pi. 
m'.M/V wt. „-., 

ghWtHf, 8m. IM.] 
Grd'dl-lT (ghid'-i. 



Gid'dl-netB <ahid'-). 
Gid'dy (gMd'-), 13M. 

Gift (jAlrt), la, 1&. 



gSXKo! 



Gmc^ioc'-ifiTlWJ.n-the 
fourth part of a nlDt, 

Gil'lyBowUr.aM. 

GUI (obfU), pari. IVom 
Gild. (SnGulll.tW.I 

Glm'lMl, ie,4S,72. 

" let (ffJMm'-)' (1S8) 
I gMm'blel, 1S3.] 
%ICDfc(m'-). 

_ _ iDg CoWib'-). 

Glnp (fftinp), le, 138. 
Gin, 16, IB. 
Gln'ger, Ifc 45, 77. 
Gln'fFer-bresd.aM. 

ssias;*'-"- 

Ginf ko (U, M], [Gln- 

fco,aoS.] 
Gtn'gle, 4f , 1«. 
Giii'eledJiV(rM).183. 
Gln^ijer. 

Gin'ily-mold ighttv"--), 

5.1, M, IJI. 
Gle'ely-iDin (ghing'-) 

Glngko.] 
61nn«l ( jfitd), 178. 

Gln'nlne. iVfl.' 



iyrg" 



Gl-nfl^ <iai, 171) r«o 
Wr. Wb. Gd.; ail. 
ny, 8m. JM.] 

GVniDHlole ttke'ran- 
dSDjJo Sin. ; jlr'on- 
da^Wr.Wb.Gd.IM.] 



Glr'dleaTlDMr'rfW). 
Gir'dler {o*ir'-). 
Gir'dllng (ffMrf-). 
[Glre.aoS.— SeeQjTO.l 
Glrl{jjhiri),ai,H.il^ 



GI-r6nd'lBt Ue-mnd'M) 
[so Wr.j jl-rtTHl'W, 

Glrt(oAM),JI,N.i 1-18. 
Glrtb (hhitlh), 37, 138. 



tb(aftjrl 

t, a, K. 

GIre (dA2c), IS, 138, 1S3. 
GMen (oMn'n), MB. 
GlT-or Iffkiv'-), 183. 

' G^M.'] ^^~ " 

Glz'iud laftia'-), 171. 

Gla'brolis. 

GU'd-al (-t»-aO [to 
Wk. Sm. Wr. i oJa'- 
thal, Wb. Gd. 16S.1 

GU5'i.er (oUH'i^ir) lio 
Sm. Wr.; ahi'Ur, 
Wb. Gd. IM, fSB.] 

GU'cls (sto'fti. OTj/la- 
«»•) [bo w!i, Wr.j 
gla'tu.Wb.Qa.igla- 

QlS.'lo"' ' 
Glad'den (glad'a), I« 
GUd'denM (alad'nd). 
GIsd'dea-lDK lalad'it 
Glad'|.ate, A 
Gl»d'i-at-or [bo Sm.W 
Gd.i ffIad4M'ur,W 

Gladj-B.to'rl.11. 



with glair. 1 5a Glue, 

Gbdri-d (gitrd), Iflt. 
GIslr'iDE loUr'-). 
Glnlr'y TgUr'yl, 171. 

Glineed <(fMM(), IIU, 

183 i Note C, p, 34- 
Gianc'liiK. 
Gland, 10. 
Gland'erod (-Bni). 
Gland'«ii(irs),'n.^ 
Jjland-U'er-ofit, loe. 



dazEllW liebt ; ^ v. 
to ihlne wltti a du- 

zlliiifllKbt.[Sr!i! Glair, 
IflO.J 



GI^B'y, B3,)e9! 



co'ma, 17, n. 
co'ma-tottn fitt 
; glaia-kom'a-Uit. 



Glazvd, l«fi, 183. 

Giyiler(-i>iir),47, S. 

GI^Lo3. 

Gleamed IgUmd), \t6. 
GleBm'lng. 
Gleam' y, 03. 
Glsim, 13. 



ttH; aoilntberai d&aitofaoti f aatoOalleg g&ats(»gOiQ)aiAtth 



GLEANED 



218 



GN0M0NIC8 



Oieaned (^M nd), 165. 

Glean'er, 77. 

Glean'ing^. 

Glebe, 13. 

Gleb'y, i», 100. 

Glee, 13. 

Gleet. 

Gleet' y. 

Glen, 15. 

Gle'ne [so Wr. Gd.; 

gleuy Sm. 165.] 
Gie'aoid. 
Glib, la. 
Glide, 25. 
Glid'ed, 183. 
Glid'er. 
Glid'ingr. 
GUm'mer, 66, 170. 
Glim'mered {-murd), 

160, 171. 
GUin'mer-iii£[. 
Glimpse igRmp$) (16) 

[bo Wk. Sm. Wr. J 

pUms, Wb. Gd. 165.] 
Glis'sa. 
GliB'ten {gUs'n), 149, 

162. 
Glis'tened (fflU'nd), 

165. 
Glis'ten-ing (ffWn-), 
GliB'ter. 

Glis'tered, 150, 165. 
Glis'ter-ing. 
Glit'ter, 16, 77. 
GUt'tered, 150, 166. 
Glit'ter-ing^. 
Gloam'ing. 
Gloat, 24. 
GlSat'ed. 
Gloat'ing. 
Glo'bard. 
Glo'bate. 
Glo'bat-ed. 
Globe, 24. 
Glo-bose'. 

Glo-bos'i-ty, 108, 169. 
Glo'bo&s. 
Glob'u-lar, 108. 
Glob'ule, 90. 
Glob'u-llne (152) 

rGlobulin,203.] 
Glob'u-lous. 
Glome, 24. 

Criom'er-ate, a, & v, 73. 
Glom'er-at-ed. 
Glom'cr-at-iag. 
Glom-er-a'tion. 
Gloom (19) [notdloom, 

141, 153.] 
Gloomed, 105. 
Gloom'i-ly, 186. 
Gloom'i-nesBy 169. 
Gloom'ing. 



Gloook'y. 

Glo'rted, 49, N. ; 99. 

Glo-ri-fl-ca'tion. 

Glo'rlfied. 

Glo'ri-f y, 49, N. j 94. 

Glo'rl-fy-ing. 

Glo'ri-o&B. 

Glo'ry. 49, N. i 93. 

Glo'ry-ing. 

[Glo8e,203.~jS'ee 

Gloze.] 
GloBB, 18, 174. 
GloB-sa'ri-al. 
GloBB'a-rlBt, 170. 
GlOBs'a-ry, 72. 
GloBsed (glost)f 166 j 

Note C, p. 34. 
Gloss'er. 
GloBs'i-ly, 186. 
GloBB'i-nesB, 169. 
GloBs'lng. 

GloBB-og'ra-pher, 108. 
GloB8-o-^raph'ic-al . 
GloBS-og'ra-phy, 108. 
Glos8-o-log'ic-al C-&V'-)' 

GlOBB-Ol'O-giBt. 

Gloss -ol'o-gy, 108. 
GloBB'y. 
Glot'tal, 72, 170. 
Glot'tis, 66, 170. 
Glot-tol'o-gy, 108. 
Glove {gluv), 22, 163. 
Gloved (gluvd), 183. 
Glov'er (gluv'-), 
G15w, 24. 
Glowed, 165. 
Glow'lng. 

Glow'worm (HMcrm). 
Gloze (24) [Qioae, 

20:).l 
Glozed, 165, 183. 
Gloz'er. 
Gloz'ing. 
Glu'cic, 20, 39, 52. 
Glu-ci'na. 
Glu'cTne, 152. 
Glu-cin'i-um. 
Glu-ci'num. 
Glu'cose. 
Glue, 26. 

Glued igl^, 165, 183. 
Glu'er. 

Glu'ey, 98, 169. 
Glu'ing, 183. 
Glum, 22. 
Glu-ma'oeouB (-ihus), 

109. 
Glume, 26. 
Glum'o&B, 100. 
Glut, 22^.' 
Glu'te-al, 169. 
Glu'ten, 26, 76, 149. . 
Glu'ti-nate. 



Gln'ti-iiit-ed, 183. 

Glu'ti-iiat-inir. 

Gla'tl-no&8. 

Glut'ted, 176. 

Glutting. 

Glut'tea (fflta^n), 149. 

Glut'tou-oas igltUffi-). 

Glttt'toQ-y CahU'n-y) 
[so Sm. Wr. Wb. 
Gd. ; glut'tun^, Wk. 
165.] 

Glyc'er-Ine (152) 
rGlycerin,;M3.] 

Gly-co'ni-an. 

Gly-con'io. 

Gly-oj^r'rhi-ilne [Gly- 
cyrrhizin,2a3.] 

Glyph (glif),lQ, 35. 

Glyph'ic. 

Glyph'o-fiT&ph. 

Gly-phojpra-pher, 108. 

Glyph-o-s[raph'ic, 109. 

Gly-phog*ra-phy, 108. 

Glyp'tio. 

Glyp-to-ffraph'lc. 

Glyp-tog'ra-phy. 

Glyp-to-the'ca. 

Gnarl (narO» 11> 162. 

Gnarled inarld) (161), 
r. did g^arl. 

Gnarled (161), a. knotty. 

Gnarl'ing (^narV-). 

Gnarl'y Itiarl'y), a. 
knotty. 

Gnash inash), 10, 162. 

Gnashed incuht\ 165. 

Gnash'ing {nosh'-). 

Gnat (na/)» 10, 162. 

Gnaw (natr), 17, 162. 

Gnawed (_nawd)t 165. 

Gnaw'er (nair'-\ 

Gnaw'lng {naw'-). 

Gn^ss (^nls) (102, 171), 
n. a primary rock re- 
sembling granite in 
its composition, but 
of a slaty structure, 
[^ee Nice, 160.] 

Gnels'soid. 

Gnels'sose. 

Gnome (nSm)t 24, 162. 

Gnom'ic (nom'-), 162. 

Gnom'ic-al {nom'-). 

Gnom-o-log'ic {nom-o* 
loj'-)t 109. 

Gnom-o-log'io-al {non^^ 
o-loj'-), 108. 

Gno-mol'o-gy (no-), 
108. 

Gno'mon (no'-), 162, 171. 

Gno-mon'ic {^no-)» 

Gno-mon'ic-al (no-). 

Gno-mon'ics (jno-). 



&, e, i. Of U) y, long \ &, £, I^ di ft, ft short , Hat in Gtf , k at in £ut, iiatin 



6NOMONIST 



219 



GOTHICIZED 



Gno'mon-ist (no'-)* 
Gno-mou-ol'o-g'y {no-), 
Gnos'tic (nor-)* 10^« 

171. 
Gnos'ti-dsm (not'ti- 

sizm). 
Gnu (ntt), n. a specieB 

of antelope inhabiting^ 

Southern Ai'rica. [<See 

Knew, 160.] 
Go, 24, 53. 
Goad, 24. 
Goad'ed. 
Goad'ing. 
Goal, 24. 
Goat, 24. 
Goat'herd, 206. 
Gdat'8uok-er. 
Gob'bet, 170. 
Gob'bing, n. 
Gob'ble, 164. 
Gob'bled iffob'ld). 
Gob'bler, 183. 
Crob'bling. 
Crob'e-lin, a. denoting a 

fine kind of French 

tapestry. {See Goblin, 

148.1 
Gob'iet, 18, 76. 
Gob'lin, n. an evil spir- 
it. [See Gobeim, 148.1 
Go'by, 93. 

Go'-cart, 206, Exo. 8. 
God, 18. 
God'chiid, 206. 
God'-daugh-ter 

i-dawf), 66, N. ; 162, 

206, £xc 1. 
God'dess, 66, 170. 
God'f &-ther, 206. 
God'head. 

God'like, 206, Exe. S. 
God4i-ness, 186. 
God'ly,93. 

God'moth-er (mt^ft'-)* 
God'sen3I 
Grod'son (-eun). 
God'ward. 
God'wit. 
Go'er, (24, 67, 77) [5ee 

Gore, 148.] 
Gog'gle, 164. 
Gog'gled (goa'ld). 
Gog'gle-eyed (aog^l- 

Id), 206, Exe. 6. 
Grog'gles {jgog'lz)t n. 

pi. 171. 
Go'ing. 
Goi'tre (-<wr) (27, 164) 

[Goiter, Wb. (Sd. 

203.— 5ee Note £, p. 

70.J 
Goi'tred i-ierd) [Goi- 



tered, Wb. Gd. 

203.] 
Goi'trofis, 27: 
Gold [BO Sm. Wr Wb. 

Gd. ; gdldt or goold, 

Wk. 155.] 

09* Though Walker, in 
deference to the very gen- 
eral usage in his time, al- 
lows the pronunciation 
gooldt hf! condemns it as a 
corruption, and *'an un- 
meaning deviation from 
the general rule " for the 
sound of o in words of 
this ciaM. 

(Jold'en {aold'n), 

Gold'flncb, 206. 

Gdld'flsh. 

Gold'ham-mer. 

Gold'ney, 08. 

Gold'smith, 206. 

Gold'stick. 

Goid'y-locks. 

Golf, 18. 

[Golt,203.— 5ee 
Gault.1 

Gom-phf'a-sis. 

Gom-pho'sis, 109. 

Go-mu'tl. 

(Jon'do-la, (72, 86) [not 
gunMa-Io, 153.] 

Gon-do-lierS 114, 169. 

CHine (18, N.j 163) [so 
Wk. Sm. ; g9n^ or 
gavmj Wr, j " pro- 
nounced nearly 
gawiif" Wb. Gd. 
155.1 

GK>ng, 18, 54. 

Go-ni-om'e-ter (106) [so 
Wr. Wb. Gd. ; g<m-i- 
om'e-tur, Sm. 155.] 

Gro-ni-o-met'ric. 

Gro-ni-o-met'ric-al. 

Go-nl-om'e-try, 108. 

Gdbd, 20. 

Gdbd'-by', 205. 

G<R>d'li-er, 186. 

Gdbd'li-est. 

GiSbd'li-ness, 186. 

G<rod'ly, 20, 93. 

Grdbds {goodz), n.pl, 

GiSbd'^, 93, 169. 

Goog'mgs (jgoqj'ingz)t 
n.pl. 

Goos'an-der [so Wb. 
Grd. ; goos-an'duri 
Wr. 155.f 

Goose (19) [pi. Geese 
ighis), 195.J - 

Goo8e'b6r-ry (gooz'- 
bir-y) (190) [so Wk. 



Sm. Wr. } gooi'hir- 
ry,Wb. Gd, 155.] 

Goose'neck, 206. 

Goos'er-y, 2*1, Exo. 

Go'pher, 24, 35. ^ 

GoPcock, 206. 

Gor'crow. 

Gor'di-an, 78. 

Gore, (24, 67) [See Gk)«r, 
148.J 

Gored (183), v. did 
gore. [See Grourd, 
160.] 

Gorge, 17, 46. 

Gorged, 183. 

Gor^eofis {-jw)^ 169. 

Gor'gjet {-Jet), 166, 

Gorg'ing {gorj'-), 183. 

Gor'gou. 

Gor-go-ne'ia (-nc'ya), 
n. pi. 51, 171. 

Gor-go'ni-an f G o r g o - 
nean,203,J 

Gor'hen, 200. 

Gor'ing. 

Gor'mand [Gour- 
mand, 203: J 

•^ Oowrmamd \m th« 
Ff«neh form of this word, 
•nd is more generallj used 
than gomumd, the Angli- 
•isedlbrm. 

Gor'mand-ism {Azm). 
Gor'mand-ize, 202. 
Gor'mand-ized, 183. 
Gor'mand-!z-er. 
Gor'nuiDd-iz-ing. 
Gorse, 17 ; Note D, p. 

37. 
GJdr'r, 49, N. ♦ 

GosOiawk. 
Gos'ling {ffoz*-). 
Gos'peir 18, 70. 
Gos'pelied (105) [Gos- 

peled, Wb. Gd. 

203. — See 177, and 

Note E, p. 70.] 
Gos'pel-ler [Gospel- 

e r , Wb. Gd. 203.] 
Gos'pel-ling [ G o s - 

peling, Wb. Gd. 

203.] 
Gos'sa-mer, 170. 
Gos'sa-mer-y. 
Gos'sip, 66, 170. 
Gos'siped i»ipt), 166. 
Gos'sip-ing. 
Got, 18. 
Goth, 18, 37. 
(Joth'ic. 

GothM-cism (-9iem), 136. 
Goth'i-cize, 202. 
Goth'i-cized, 183. 



fldli ^ at in then I ib at in foot-, 9 at in tualei ghat gin go i^ at in fhUft. 



60THICIZ1N6 



220 



GRASPED 



/fofh'1-dz-ing. 
Got'ten (jffotHi), 149. 
Gouge (gou^t or ffocf) 

[bo wr. ; gotnit Wb. 

Gd.; goqf, Wk. 8m. 

155.] 
Gouged {gowjd^ or 

goojd), ISi. 
Qoug'ing (gowf-, or 

gooj'-). 
Gourd {gOrd} [bo Sm. 

Wb. Gd. ; gordt or 

goord, Wk. Wr. 155.] 

09- Thongh Walker al- 
lows ffoord, he says: " The 
flrat \hdrd] it. In my opin- 
ion, pie moat agreeable lo 
Engliah analogy.** 

Gourd'i-neBB, 186. 
Gourd'y, 93. 
Gour'miind (Fr.) (jgoGrf- 

mdnd) [G o r m a n d « 

203. — See Note under 

Crortnand.] 
[Gournet, 203.~5ee 

Gurnet.] 
Gout (28, 161), n. an 

inflammation of the 

Joints, particularly 

those of the great 

toe. 
Gout (Fr.) (goo) (19, 

161), n. taste ; relisn. 
Gout'i-nesB, 28, 186. 
Gout'y, 28, 93. 
GoT'em (jguv'um)t 22, 

171. 
GoY'em-a-blo (^v'-), 

161. 
GK>v'em-ante (guv'um- 

dnt) [so Sm. Gd. ; 

guv^m-dnt'j Wr. ; 

go-vur-fUint' 1 Wk. 

165.] 
GoT'emod (guv'umd). 
GrOv'em-esB iguv'-). 
Grov'em-lng (jfuv'-), 
Gov'em-ment (^r'-), 

171. 
Gov-em-ment'al (guv-). 
Gov'em-or iguv'-)t 88, 

171. 
Gov'em-or-gen'er-al, 

205, 216. 
Gow'an. 
Gown, 28. 

Gowned (gownd), 165. 
Grown'man, 196. 
GoMms'man (jgouyna^-)^ 

215. 
Grab, 10. 

Grabbed (jgrabd)^ 176. 
Grab'bing. 



Oraee, 23, 39. 

Graced {grii9t\ 165, 

183 i Note C, p. 34. 
Graoe'flil ySbl), 180. 
Gra9'c8 (-ez)j n. pi. 
Gracing. 

Gra'cioQB {-»ku9\ 169. 
Grac'kle igrdkfVit 164. 
Gra-da'tion. 
Grad'a-to-ry, 86. 
Grade, 23. 
Grad'ed, 183. 
Grad'i-ent. 
Grad'ing. 
Grad'u-al, 89, 92. 
Grad'u-al-ly, 170. 
Grad'tt-ate, 73. 
Grad'u-at-ed, 183. 
Grad'u-at-ing. 
Grad-u-a'tion, 112. 
Grad'u-at-or, 228. 
Gradus (L.). 
Graff, 10, 173. 
Graf fer, 170. 
Graft, 12, 131. 
Graft'ed. 
Graft'er. 
Graft'iDg. 
Grail, 23. 
Grain, 23. 
Grained, 183. 
Grain'er. 
Grain'ing. 
Grain'y, 93, 169. 
Gral-la-to'ri-al, 49, N. 
Gral'la-to-ry. 
Gral'lic 
Gram, n. the unity of 

the French system of 

weights. [Gramme, 

203.] 
Gra-min'e-al. 
Gra-min'e-otis. 
Gram-i-ni-fo'li-oftB. 
Gram-i-niv'o-rotis. 
Gram'mar, 66, 170. 
Gram-ma'ri-an, 49, N. 
Gram-mat'ic, 109. 
Gram-mat'ic-al, 108. 
Gram'ma-tist. 
Gramme (Fr.) (gram) 

[Gram, 203.] 
[Grranade, 203.— 

See Grenade.] 
[Granado, 203.— 

See Grenade.] 
Grftn'a-rir (72, 123, 169) 

[not gran'a-ry, 153.} 
Grand, 10. 
Gran'dam. 
Grand'child, 206. 
Grand'-d&ugh-ter 

(-daw-)j 206, Exe. 1. 



Gran-dee', 121. 
Grand'eur (-jvur) (4St 

N.) [so Sm. Wr. 

Gd. i gran'Jur, Wk. 

156.] 
GrandTa-ther. 
Gran-dil'o-quenoe. 
Gran-dil'o-quent. 
Gran-dU'o-quoftB. 
Gran'di ose. 
Grand'moth-er 

{-muth"). t 

Grand'lpar-ent (-p#r-). 
Grand' sire. 
Grand'son. 
Grange, 23, 45. 
Gra-mf er-ofis, 106. 
Gran'i-form, 106. 
Granite, 152. 
Gra-nit'ic, 109. 
Gra-nit-i-fl-ca'tion. 
Gra-nit'i-form, 106. 
Gran'i-toid. 
Gra-niv'o-roiis, 100. 
Grant, 12, 131. 
Grant'a-ble, 164, 169. 
Grant'ed. 
Grant-«e', 118, 121. 
Grant'er, 160. 
Grant-or', or Grtot'or 

(118, 160) [Law term, 

correlative Of Grani^ 

ee.] 
Gran'u-lar, 72, 89. 
Gran'u-la-ry. 
Gran'u-late, 73. 
Gran'u-lat-ed. 
Gran'u-lat-ing. 
Gran-u-la'tlon. 
Gran'ule, 90. 
Gran'u-lite, 152. 
Gran'u-lo&B. 
Grape, 23. 

Grap'er-y, 233, Exe. 
Graph'ic, 10, 35, 200. 
Graph'ic-al, 108. 
Graph'ic-al-ly. 
Graph'ite, 70, 152. 
Graph'o-lite, 152. 
Graph-om'e-ter, 108. 
Graph-o-met'rio-al. 
Grap'nel (10, 76) 

[(jrapne 1,203.] 
Grap'ple, 164. 
Grap'pled (grap'ld), 

Grap'pling. 
Grap^to-lite, 152. 
Grap'y, 93, 169. 
Grasp, 12, 131. 
GraBp'a-ble, 164. 
Grasped (graspf), 166 j 
Note C, p. 34. 



i,e,i,6,u,y,tefv;»,6,!t,«,tt.f,«»or«jll«li»fap,4a«l»ftet,a««li» 



Qrilip'er. 

GriH, 12, 131, 174. 
GriBBBd igrtil), 106. 



Gnte'nil {-fiil), 180. 
Grite-flil-U (-/SI). 
Qrit'BT (ifej, H. I- ' 



ifey, n. ui I 



OraClng.m. 
Qn'UB, 23. IW. 
Grat'i-tudp, loe, u». 
Gn-ta'MoliH, 7», 100. 



Gnved, I6t, ISJ. 
GriT'el, ID, 7B. 
QrmT'elied (-eld) (MS) 
rCfr«TfllBd, Wb. 



ing,Wb.Gd. 203.] 
Cr..'J.lT. 
GriT'en (ffrair'n), iW. 



Gn-ylm'e^, 106. 



Gtif [GrsTt^tH.] 



Qttr'hag. 

- ■ wKk-o [«. Wr.i 

Swal:, Wb. Gd. 
^l[Ot«l.w»cke, 

Gnus. -a. 40. 

Grazed, WS. 
GTHz'er, 193. 
arB'»lKr(-iAiir),17, N. 
Qrai'lng. (ifll. 

OreiBe Iffrti), n. US, 
Greaw (ffrti), r.lSfl, 1(11. 
Gieaea (grtzd], 105. 

§SSi'..WiJ-). ■ 

Greu'lng (jjrtj'-). 

griB'y, iSa.] 
Greiit igriti (23), a. 

Qrlte,l«l.] 

Greal'er, o. more efett. 
(SfflGrtter.iaon 

Greave (oKc) (l3l, n. 
irmor jbr tbe Ws i— 
generally awed m the 
plural. [S« Grieve, 

Grebe, 13. 
Qre'dau (-lAan). 



Greea, 13. 
Greea'finoh, 206. 
Green' bonee. 
Green'neaB, 89, S. 
Green'room. 
GreenB {grtai), n. pi. 
Green'Btone 130, 206. 
Green' Bward. 
Greet, U. 
Greet'ed. 

Greeflng. 
Gre-ga.'ri-ouB,»,H. 
Gre.go'ri-aD. 
Gre-aade' nui) [Gra 
nade, Gisnado 

an.] 

Gren-a-tlier', 122, 169. 



no, K.l, «. 
be feellDga 



Grift", li 



Gril'l^e. 

GriUof (sriW), lit. 
Grill'lne. 
Grlm,ll. 



OriDd'atSiieClSD, nm 
[n vn. Wb. Gd 
grJnd'iUne, col 

prinJ'jtBn, or flrll 

Grinned IffrtBrfY, ITC 
Grin'ner,aM, N. 



e;A>Ml»ll>otij<u<nfiKiIeigh<uglagoi^a>fi>tUf. 



GRIPING 



222 



GUABD 



Grwette (lY.) (pre-zef.) 

6riB'li-neB8 (griz'-),18a. 

Gris'ly {grizHy), a. hor- 
rible ; frigrhtfuL [See 
Grizzly, 100.] 

Gri'sons (are'zunz), n. 
pL [so Wr. Gd. j gre'- 
zdnz, Sm. 155.] 

Grist, 16. 

Gris'tle (grU'l), 162,lfi4. 

Grist'ly (jfris'iy), ItW. 

Grit, 16. 

Grit'stone, 190, 200. 

Grit'ti-neBS, 186. 

Grit'tf, 170, 176. 

Griz'zle, 164. 

Griz'zled {griz'ld)^ 188. 

Griz'zly, a. somewhat 
gray. {See Grisly, 
160.] 

Groan, v, to utter a 
moumfhl sound, as 
in pain : — n. a moum- 
lul sound uttered in 
distress. [iSee Grown, 
100.] 

Groaned {grUnd)^ 166. 

Groau'lngc. 

Groat {grawt)^ 17, 171. 

Groats {grawts), n. pi. 

Groats' worth (grcaoW- 
wurth)y 171, 206. 

Gro'cer (24, 39), n. a 
trader in goods re- 

?uired for the table. 
See Grosser, lOO.J 
Gro'cer-y, 171. 
Grog, 18. 

Grog'ger-y (-m«r-), 138. 
Grog'ram [Groge- 
ram, Grogran, 
2a3.j 

Grog'shop, 206. 
Groin, 27. 

Groined (aroind), 165. 
Grom'ill [G r o m w e 11, 

203.1 
Grom'met, 170. 

•^ Seamen uraally 
pronounce thia word 
grton'et; and hence it ia 
soinettmet Incorrectly 
spelled Grummet. 

Grom' well [Gromill, 
203.] 

Groom (19), n. a ser- 
vant ; — a bridogroon^, 
[See Grume, l&H.] 

Groomed (groomd), 16Q. 

Groom'ing. 

Grooms'man 
{^roomz'')j 196, 214. 



Groove, 19. 

Grooved, 183. 

Groov'er. 

Groov'inif. 

Grooe 24^ 

Groped igrdpt^ 165, 183} 

Note C, p. 34. 
GroB'beak [Gross- 

beak,203.] 
GrdsB, 24, 174. 
Grd88'beak(206)[G r o s- 

beak,203.J 
Gros'su-lar, ?2, 170. 
Grot, 18. [171. 

Gro-tesqne'r^esJK), 121, 
Grot'to (66, 170) [pi. 

Grot'toB ictiz), 192.J 
Ground, 28. 
Ground'age. 
Ground'ed. 
Ground'ing. 
Ground'Ung. 
Ground'-nui. 
Ground'sel, n. a phmt 

of the genus Senecio. 
Ground' Sll,or Ground'- 

Bel, n. the horizontal 

timber of a building 

lying next to the 

ground; sill. 
Ground'work (Amurk), 
Group (joroop), 19. 
Group^ {groopt)y 183. 
Group'ing {groop'-). 
Grouse (jgrona), n. aing. 

Apl.'M, 
Grout, 28. 
Grout'ing. 
Grove, 24. 

Grov'el (,grov'l)t 149. 
Grov'elled {grov'ld) 

[Groveled, Wb. 

Gd.203.~5eel77,and 

Note E, p. 70.1 
Grov'el-ler (grov'l-) 

[Groveler, Wb. 

Gd. 2a3.] 
Grov'el ling (grovel-), 

[Groveling, Wb. 

Gd. 203.] 
Grow. 24. 
Grow'er. 
Grow'ing. 
Growl, !». 

Growled (jgnmld), 165. 
Growl'er, 28, 77. 
Growl'ing. 
Grown, part, from 

Qrow, [See Groan, 

160.] • 
Growtl), 24, 
Grub, 2?, 
Grubbed (jgrubd), 176. 



Grab'bfaig. 

Grudge, 22, 45. 

Grudged igrt^fdf, 165. 

Grudg'er, 183. 

Grudg'ing. 

Gru'el (groo'eH), 19, 26^ 

76. 
GruflT, 22, 173. 
Gruflfly, 178. 
Grum, 22. 
Grum'ble, 164. 
Grum'bled (-ft/d), 183. 
Grum'bler. 
Grum'bling. 
Grume (groom), n. a 

olot,a8ofblood. [See 

Groom, 160.] 
[Grummet, 203.— 5ee 

Grommet.] 
Gru'mo&B igroo'-), 19, 

100. 
Grunt, 22. 
Grunt'ed. 
Grunt'er. 
Grunt'ing. 
Gua-ch&'ro (gwa-), 
Gua'ia-cum (gwa'pat- 

kum), .34, 51, 171. 
Guan Igwun). 
Gua'na (jgwii'-). 
Gua-na'co (gwor) [pL 

Gua-n&'coB, 102.] 
Gua-nli'er-ods (^wa-). 
Gua'no {gw'd'iya), 
Gua'ra (^gw'd'-). 
Guftr-an-tee' (jg^r-), n. 

&«. (122) [Guaran- 
ty, 203.] 

9^ OuaratUee Is now 
more commonly used than 
guartoUjf. 

Gu&r-an-teed' (188) 
[Guarantied, 
(g&r'an-dd), 203.] 

Guar-an-tee'ing [Guar- 
antying (gdr'an- 
ty-ing), 203.] 

Gu&r'au-tor, 118. 



When tbia word i« 

naed aa the correrative of 
guarantee (in the senae of 
one to tohom surety is gii'^n), 
it is properly accented on 
the last ayllable (pruorHM- 
tor*), 

GuSr'an-ty, n. & v. 

[Guarantee, 2a3. 

— See Note under 

Cfttaraniee.} 
Guftr'an-ty-ing f Q u a r- 

an teeing, 203.] 
Guard (gard) (11 , 52, 53, 

146) [so Wr. Wb. Gd.; 



ft, e, !, 5, ii, y, Zon^ ; ft, €, Xf d, tl, j^, «Aor# ; ii a« l» flur, ft a» <» faft, & m <» 



B'ant,8m.lSMtX); 
guard, Wfc. JSS.J 
Gulrd'ed igurd'-)^ 

QuBrd'l-an (aard'i-an) 
[BO Wb. Oa. ; g'ard'- 
yan, am. (Sa CM); 
garifi-an, («■ jord'- 
yan, Wr. ; ffpard'i- 
-- i)rsi^ryi-oii,WI(. 



i?;.l 



Wr. WEG. 



a) [. 



Gueii'^er (pJka'-). 

Guesi'worS (**«'- 
wurt). 

Guest lahal) (IS, 17* j' 
Notel>,p.37), H. ODO 
enlcrUlDcd In the 
bouw or at Un table 
ol «nother. (See 
Gueesed. IW.] 

Ouhr (ffw), 21. 

Gnid'a-ble (ohlif -). IM. 

Guid'moe coil*-), 180. 

aiiIde(oAi(l),a9>t:!>a3i 
HolcD, p. a7. 

GuTd'ed (ffSid'-). 

iYnternlt'T, or aiaiMl- 
ition. [,ieeGlld,lfi0.1 
Goild'er (oniliJ'-li n. * 
Dutch mia.r^n Glid- 
er, ISO.] [Glider, 

Gullii'hUI (oUtd'-). 



ffAtl, Sm. (See f M), 
B-i, !ti, 165.1 
Gulls'leiS (ffhtt'-), U, 



6alI'I»-mot (itMI'-). 

Guil'le-rat (ffW-). 

Guil-]o-tlo(r (aAa-l» 
Mfl')(ias,17l)[BoWr.. 
sAi7™jJiii', Sm, 
gliil'lo-ltn. Gd. ISfi.] 



iQ'ln^ (-lln'-). 
.i«){lU,l?l).« 
alit;. [Sn 
SO.] 

:3h 



Giii^ leo.i 

Gulll'l-neBiKffWO'-) ,««. 
Gullt'r {ghiS'p). 
"iiln.'U?!! (pSim' 



Goln.'U?!! (pSim'-), 
Gulii'ea(^*J»V). "I- 
GalD'Ud (wtn'tmi) 

[Girlnlad^aoa.] 
Guljiure' (alu-ptr') [«o 

Wr. ; gh?p»r, Qd-iH, 



Galled (oiiM), IW. 

Gul'let,<lfi,in). 

Qul'lled. 

GuU'laf. 

Gul'ly,^, 170. 

Oul'l,Jii«. 



n>Ar'n-blc(IlG][n0t 



Gump'tlon ((jtmi'ifcun) 
[bo Sm. Wt. ; gvmp'- 
ihun, Wb. (id. jfisT 

Qum-reB'ln {-rB'm)rBO 
Sm. Wb- Od. ; gwa'-- 
rei-in, Wr. ISS.f 

Gum-nen'fl-^l. 

Gum.trag'a-eanth. 



Gunwale.] 

BDotled II lib. 

GuDvate, ISO.' 
Jun'air. 77, ITtf 
Jun'ner-r, 171. 



Gun'^^llM, IW. 
Gaa'pow-der, SOS. 



Oir-gle, IW. 
Gur|gled i-gld), ISJ. 

let [Ooarnet, 



GuB'aet, W, 170. 

a-t^ty. 

Quiif t' ea, IM. 
Gui, ij; 
Gut'tBper'chB[no( cuf ■ 

«d, ITS. 
er, 170. 



Guy nfti), 35,171. 

Giix'zle, IM. 

Gui'ited l-il<D, 183. 

Gui'zlor. 

[GwlniHd.aoa. — SM 
'■-Inlad.] 
II (ff*f-l. 

: Ulb) (25), B. lo 
ft itora one Bide of 



Gybed 'olitrf), 183. 

Gyb'tng (il6'-)- 

Gymia'Bl-aroli (jlm- 
mt'll-ar*), 171. 

Gym-na'Bi-umCWiima'- 
Bfti-um)IaoWr.iJln- 
na'ii-vn, Qd.j Jim- 
«iz'i-„v>, eoU. J«m- 

[L, pi. Oym-na'ti^ 



li dboiin A>4ti f a*lnIWla;gha(e'>>Eo- Ql^'^fi'*- 



eikf-a] ; Bu. pi. 
w»=), 1BS.1 



Gvm-no'tui. 



Gyp-ilf Br-oda. 108. 
Gyp'innitifai'-),-»,lM. 
Gyp'ar [Ofp'T. 2<»- 
— :SHlf0lelladsr<»p- 
OTp''>r-l■ln(-<Im)[O I p- 

Qy'rwe, a. *•.?». 

Gr'nt«d, 1S3. 

Or-n'tl^; 112. 






.,« GerfUcon.l 
Gy'ro-mau-flr, l«t. 

Gyre (flp), n. A b, {». 
4S)[OWe,!CE).] 

Gyvwl (jtvil), lea. 



B]l(ll,M)[Hah,!CO.] 
Ho-sr'kleB f-Ju). 
fld'ft«-M cDi^pm (L.). 
Hob'sr-dHsh-er, 171. 
Hub'fT-duh-er-r. 

hab'ur-Mx, Gd. ; Sab- 
»iM)M',Wk,Wr.l5i.l 
Hj-berVo-on r»o Wit. 
Wr. Grt. i Aai'w^B, 



H^wtt, 10, le, »i. 
Hib-it^ii-bU'i-tT, loa. 

Hib'lt-a-ble, lit. 
Hab^ltsD-cj, l<e. 

Hib-1-U'tlaa. 

HsVil-liiz. 
Ha-blt'n-mI,7S,a>, 

Hn-bll'n-il-lT. 
H»-hlt'anto. 



HH-gii' u-at-iD 
IUhIt-ii.a'tla 
HBb'i-tnde, 71 
Saciauia (Si 



I IklUht- 



Huk, 

HnVaa-TT. 
Huked IhaU). 

Hae'kle (Iftt) [Hsck. 

"--'"-■(-iidJ.lM. 

Hiok'nu-task, 171. 

HMk'iie)-(10,M). !>.,•>. 
& D. [pi. of a. Huk- 
DBTB (-nil), 190.1 

Haok'neyed l-nidj, 171. 

H^d, lO*^ ^' 
HHd'dock, 10,St,170. 



;HiemBtolDgT, aa. 

— S« HenuftlDify.] 
:HKniatr.»l„<,7a4 
K«-nia-to'ai« (fti) {{(Jb) 

•9- "Worli of thli 

IHenorrhttKe, »». 
HicinorrhOld, oA. 

— Sa Hemorrhoid.] 



Hi-bk'. H. (Hair- 

b>«,203.] 
Hilk (23), n. in nnder 

Arab. [S«Hiike,l«).] 
[Hyke.aoa.] 
Ball (Si), n. fhsen 
drops or rain: — v. to 
poDr down rroma 

a term of aslutatlau.' 

Hailed (UM], 10^. 

Hall'lQff. 

Hall'gtSue, H. 

Hall'j, 23, B3. 

Hair lUr) (H), n. ■ tlU- 
ment, or * oolIeotioD 
of fllamentH.ffrowlii^ 
from the shd of u 
animal. [Sfe Hue, 

[Hairbflll,a)3.-Se» 

Hiil?o1oth(Jur'Voa,or 

htr'lilairih}, 18, N. 
Hstrpd (?i*nitl, a. 
Hslr'lM.a (ilr'-), ISe. 
HiUr'yfAJr'yl.OT. 
Hake (23), ». a Sah al- 
. Ked to the sod. I Set 

Halk, im.l 
Hal'berd [BO 8m, Wb. 

fM. ; liiacl'burd,Wk.t 

ftnmrfeirrf. or ftoC- 

burd, Wr. ISS.l 
Hal bOTil-ter', 128. 
Hnl'oy-oo [BO 8m. Wb. 

Gd. 1 hal'iht'im.Wi.; 

hal'lM-un, or ial'il- 

un, Wr. lis.] 



HALE 



225 



HARANOUEa 



Hale (23), a. healthy. 

[5e« Hall, 160.] 
Hale (half or hatol), v, 

rBoWk.Wr.Gcl.iA«/, 

Bm. 165.] 



w. «*Thtsword, In flip 
miliar Uuigua«e, u eor> 
rupted, beyond reooveiy, 
into hand I but loiemn 
■peaking atill reqnirei ttie 
regular lound, rliyming 
with pale I tlie other sound 
would, in this case, tw 
groeaandrulgar." WaUcer. 

Haled (MM, or hawld). 

HSlf ihd/) (182) [pi. 
Halves (hUvz), 103.7 

Hall'-pen-ny (ha'pen- 
ny) [BO Wk. Sm. i ha'- 
pen-npt heg>'en-nv, or 
n^fpen-ny^Wr.', hap'- 
e»-ny, or ha'pen^iy^ 
Wb. Gd. .155.] [pi. 
Half«pen-nleB, or 
Hairpenoe, 194.] 

Hal'i-bat (hoVi-but) [so 
Wk. Wb. Gd.i Wi- 
htUy Sm. 155.] 

Hftl'i-mas (180) [bo Sm. 
Wr. Wb. Gd. j hoVi- 
ma«,Wk. 155.][Hal- 
lma8B,203.] 

Halting (Aa{'-,or hawV-) 

Hal-i-og'ra>pher, 106. 

Hal-i-og'ra-phy. 

HJUl (17, 172), n. a large 
room at the entrance 
of a house, or for a 
pablic aBsembly. [See 
Haul. 160.] 

Hal-le-lu'Jah (Au'ya) 
(61, 171)[BoWh.Gd.} 
Aa2-2e-2'oo'ya,Sm. (See 
§26) ; hal-le-U>&ya^ 
Wr. 155.J [Allefu- 
Jah,Aireluia, 203.1 

Haiaiard {JkaVyard^ 
[Hal yard) 203.] 

•^ Of these two forms 
Smart |riyes only hdlKard\ 
and this is pr efer r ed by 
Webster and Goodrich. 
Worcester prefers Aalyard. 

Hal-loo', int. A v, 
Hal-looed' (-lood'), 188. 
Hal-loo'lnflf. 
Hal'low. 

Hal'lowed, 165, 188. 
Hal-l6w-een' [so Wr. ; 

hal'lo-in, Gd. 155.] 
Hal'low-mas, 180. 
Hal-lu-ci na'tion. 
Hal-ln'd-na-to-ry. 



[Halm, 203.— 5ee 

Haum.J 
Ha'lo [pi. Ha'ldB (-29«), 

192.] 
Ha'loed, 188. 
Hal'o-gren, 170. 
Ha-lo^e-nou8 (-tof'-). 
Haaofd. 
HAls'er (htma'er) 

[Hawser, 203.] 
Hftlt, 17. 
Hait^ed. 
Hait'er. 
H&lt'ing. 
Halve (Aav), 162. 
U&lved (Jhiivd), 
HfUvcB (havz)y n. pi, 
Hal'yard [Halliard, 

203. — See Note under 

HcaUard.] 
Ham, 10. 
Ham'a-dry-ad [L. pi. 

Ham-a-dry'ci-ais 

(-dez)f Eng. pi. Ham'- 

a-dry-ads X-adz), 196.] 
Ha'mate. 
Ha'mat-ed. 
Hames (AAnu), n, pL 
Hamlet, 10, 76. 
Ham'let-ed. 
Ham'mer, 66, 170. 
Ham'mer-a-ble, 164, 160. 
Ham'mered (-n»fird),150 
Ham'mer-er. 
Ham'mer-ing. 
Ham'mdck, 170. * 
Ha'nfttiB, 100, 169. 
Ham'per, 10, 77. 
Ham'pered (^-pufd), IfiO. 
Ham'per-ing. 
Ham'ster. 
Ham'Btring, 206. 
Ham'string-ing. 
Ham'stmng. 
Han'a-per. 
Han'ces (-«ee), n. pi. 

[Hanche 8,203.] 
Hand, 10. 
Hand'bill, 206. 
Hand'bdbk. 
Hand'brt^adth. 
Hand'cart. 
Hand'caff. 
Hand'cuffed {-kufl). 
Hand'cuff-ing. 
Hand'ed. 
Hand'fol (-fSoT) (142) 

[pi. Hand'fulB (rfoolz)^ 

197.} 
Hand'i-craft, 169. 
Hand'i-crafts-man, 196. 
HandM-ly, 186. 
Hand'l-nesB. 



Hand'i-work (-tourjt). 
Hand'ker-chlef {hang'^ 

kur-chifOf 171. 
Han'dle, 164. 
Han'dle-a-ble, 164. 
Haa'dled (-<U<i), 183. 
Han'dler. 
Han'dling. 
Hand'maid, 206. 
Hand'maid-en(-md<2-n). 
Hand'rail. 
Hand'saw. 
Hand'Bcrew (,-»kroo), 
Hand'sel. 
Hand'selled (^eM) 

[Handaeled, Wb. 

Gd. 203.— ^M 177, and 

Note E, p. 70.1 
Hand'Bel-llng_[H an d - 

seling, Wb. Gd. 

203.1 
Hand'Bomc (hand'aum) 

[bo Sm. Wb. Gd.; 

han^aum, Wk. Wr. 

155], a. ample: — no- 
ble,— beautiflil. [See 

Hansom, 146.] 
Hand' spike. 
Hand'writ-ing (-rf^), 

162. 
Hand'y, 10, 93, 160. 
Hang, 10, 54. 
Hang^bird, 266. 
Hang'dog. 
Hang'er, 77. 
Hang'er^on. 
Hang'ing. 
Hang'man, 196. 
Hai^nail. 
Han's (hangk)^ 10, 64. 
Hank'er. 

Hank'ered (H<r«f), 160. 
Hank'er-ing. 
Han-o-ve'rlhan, 109. 
Han'sard. 
Hana, 10. 
Han-se-at'io. 
Han'som, n. a low kind 

of travelling vehicle. 

[See Handsome, 146.] 
Hap-haz'ard. 
Hap'less. 
Hap'ly, 10, 93. 
Hap'pen (Aap'n), 149. 
Hap'penea(Mp'9id),165. 
Hap'pen-ing. 
Hap'pi-ly. 

JRap'pi-neBB, 106« 186. 
Hap'py, 66, 170. 
Ha-rangne' {-rang' ),1 68. 
Ha-rangued' {;-rangd% 

165. 
Ha-rangu'er (-«r). 



ftUs da«l» there; dbof <n foot; 90* iitftdlejgh a« gin go; ^«U!in.thia. 



HARANGUING 

Ha-nuigu'iiig(-ln^)471. 

Hiir'asB, 10, 171. 

Hftr'assed i-<tst). 

Hiir'ass-iDg. 

Har'bin-grer, 46, 171. 

Har'bor(ll,88) [Har- 
bour, Sm. IW. 203.1 

Har'bored i-bord) (HV6) 
[Harboured, 8m. 
199, 203.] 

Har'bor-er [Har- 
bour c r, Sm. 199,203.] 

Har'bor-ing^ [Har- 
bouring, Sm. 109, 
aOtt.] 

Hard, 11. 

Hard'beam. 

Hard'en (hard'n)^ 149. 

Hard'cned (hard'nd), 
150. 

Hard'en-cr (hard'n-), 

Hard'en-ing {hard'n-). 

Hard'-fonght i-/awt)t 
206^ Exc. 5. 

Hard'hack. 

Hard'hdad. 

Hard'i-hdbd. 100. 

Hard'i-ly. 

Hard'i-nesa, 186. 

Hiird'y, 93, 169. 

Hare (A^r), n. a small 
quadruped of the gre- 
nnsLepus, [SeeHSr, 
160.] 

Hare'bell(ft«r'-)CH ai r- 
bell,203.] 

Halr'-bralned (A«r'- 
brand)f 206, Exc. 5. 

Hare'lip. 

Hare'llpped (-lipt).' 

Ha'rem, 49, N. 

Ha-ren'gi-form, 108. 

B&r'i-cot (Fr.) (Mr'e- 
ko), 

[Harier, 203. — 5e6 
Harrier.] 

Hark, 11, 136. 

Harl. 11. 

Har'le-quln (-iWn), 171. 
^ Har'lodc. 

Har'lot. 

Har'lot-ry. 

Harm, 11, 135. 

Har-mat'tan, 170. 

Harmed (harmd)^ 165. 

Harm'fuf (-/Sol), 180. 

Har-mon'ic. 

Har-mon'ic-al. 

Har-mon'i-ca. 

Har-moa'ic8, n. pi. 

Haf--mo'ni-oi&B, 78, 100. 

Har-mon'i-phon. 

Har'mon-lst. 



226 

Har'mon-lie, 202. 

Har'mOD-lzed, 1^. 

Har'mon-ix-er. 

Har'mon-!z-ing. 

Har-mo-nom'e-ter, 108. 

Har'mo-ny, 93. 

Har'mdst, 86. 

Har'mo-tdme. 

Har'nesB. 

Har'nessed (-fief#). 

Har'nesB-er. 

Har'nesB-ing. 

Harp, 11. 

Harped (harpt), 166, 

Note C, p. 34. 
Harp'er. 
Harp'ing. 

Harp'iugB i4ngz)tn.pL 
Harp'ist. 
Har-po-neer' [H a r - 

pooneer,203.] 
Har-poon', 11, 19, 121. 
Harpooned' (-poond'), 
Har-poon-eer f H a r - 

poneer,203.j 
Har-poon'er. 
Har-poon'ing. 
Harp' seal. 
Harp' si-chord (-kord), 

171. 
Har'py, 11, 93, 190. 
Hftr'ried, 180. 
Hftr'ri-er (77, 78, 171) 

[Harier, 203.] 



_ *• The original spell- 
ing, harier^ li difuwd." 
Smtirt. 

Hfir'row, 101. 
Hftr'rdwed, 165, 188. 
Hilr'row-er. 
Har'row-ing. 
Hftr'ry. 
H&r'ry-ing. 
Harsh, 11,46,135. 
Hars'let (11, 76) [Has- 
let, 203.] 

VST Of these two forms 
Walker and Smart prefer 
kaidet', Goodrich prefers 
'har$iet. Worcester gives 
both forms, without indi- 
cating any preference. 

Hart (11), n. the male 

of the red deer. {See 

Heart, 160.] 
Harts'horn, 214. 
Ha-ruB'p!ce [ A r a s - 

pice, 203.] 
Ha-rus'pi-cy [ A r u s - 

picy, 203.1 
Har'vest, 11, 7er. 
Har'vest-ed. 
Har'vest-er. 



HAUGHTILY 

Har'yest-lng. 
Has (Aa«), 10, 174. 
Hash, 10, 46. 
Haahed (&rf«A^), 166. 
Hash'ish [Hasch- 

inch. Hasheesh, 

2a3.] 
Has'let [so Sm. Wb. 

Gd. ; lui'»Ui, Wk. ; 

ha'slett or kas'let, Wr. 

1550 [Harslet, 203. 

— <8«e Note under 

Harslet.] 
Hasp, 12, 131. 
Hasped (hdspt). 
Has'sock. 
Hast, 10. 
Has'tate. 
HaB'tat-ed. 
Haste, 23. 
Hast'ed. 

Hast'en (Aa«'n), 149,162. 
Hast'ened {h&s'nd). 
Hast 'en er (Aas'ji-). 
Hast'en-ing {hds'n-). 
Hast'i-ly, 186. . 
Hast'i-ness, 169. 
Hast'ing. 
Hast'y, 93, 169. 
Hast'y-pud'ding 

i-pood'-), 205. 
Hat, 10. 

Hat'a-ble, 164, 100. 
Hatch, 10, 44. 
Hatched {hacM). 
Hatch'el [so Sm. Wb. 

Gfd i hakflt Wk. i 

hach'el, or hak'l^ Wr. 

155.] [Hackle, 203.] 
Hatch'elled (-eld) 

[Hatcheled, Wb. 

Gd. 203. — See 177, and 

Note E, p. 70.] 
Hatch'el-ler [Hatch- 
el c r , Wb. Gd. aa3.] 
Hatch'el-ling^H a t c h - 

eling, Wb. Grd. 

203.] 
Hatch'er. 
Hatch'et, 76. 
Hatch'ing. 
Hatch'ment. 
Hatch' way. 
Hate, 2.3. 
Hat'ed, 183. 
Hate'fiil (-/3oO» 180. 
Hate'fhl-ly (-fool-). 
Hat'er, 77. 
Ha'tred. 
Hat'ted, 176. 
Hat'ti-shgr'if, or Hat'- 

ti-sch?r'if. 
Haugh'ti-ly'(Aaio'-),162. 



a, e, 1, d, a, jtlongi ft» ^ X, 5, ft, f , 9hQri iHaain &r, kaain ftst, km in 



HAnOBTINBSB 

Elii2li'ti-&eB> [IkoK'-) 

Hangh'tf (taw'-), IIS 

Blul', V, to pnll; t< 
draw. [SmHsII, IfiO. 
Haul 'age. 

Haul' ins. 

Baom minim 

Halm, Hftwm 



H3i 



Sol haiTQCh, 1».1 
nohed (hancU). 
ifKont fUnf) (II) [no< 

luiwnt.]M.J 
Bloat'ed. 
H£unt'er. 

Halii'lel-W. 
Bmt'boy C*"'-). "1- 
Hauteur' {lio-tur'} [ao 
Bm. J *o-tar', or fto- 
(oor', Wr. 1 ho-Htr', or 

Mmt goat (Fr.) (ho- 

Bive (Aov), 10, 1S3. 
Hm'Tsn (!»'«», !«. 
Har'er-uok. 
HsvluK, ISl. 
Bav'os, U, 8S. 
Haw, 17. 
na«ad,l«. 
Hiv-haw' [Hiba, 

aos-i 

B^wk'fr. 

Bunked (ilautf), ISS. 



Uead'-ar.L', 2QS. 
H£ul'i-ly, IKS. 
Hend'l-iieg*, lae. 
Kfad'lns. 



HSid'wiy. 
Hiai'j, IS, K 
Heal, c. to ( 



Haw'kDf, 17,08, IW. 
Bawli'Ine:. 
Hawk'weed, 205. 
Bavse (ilavz) [aa 8m. 

Wb. ad.ihowi, Wk. 

Wr. 1M.1 
[Hawm, aa—Sea 

Uanm.] 
Bawe'ar [HkliBr, 

HHw'thorn, 13S. 
Hay, n. gnaa or* — ■ 
dried fbr fMdet 

Bm'urd, 10, 73. 



[Ste 



H , fn), 140. 

Hegi-k'ened (harvtuti. 
He^rk'ea^r (Aarl-'n-). 
HeSrk'_en-lng tMrif^). 

Hearac^j)(ai,N.),n, 
n oarriagc for convey- 



ai!'bra-ism (.Jim) (133. 
lM)[M.Sm. Wb.Gd.j 
htb'TO-iim, Wk.i *i'. 
bra-itm, oi htb'Ta- 
Um, Vii. US.] 

tUliSu to titers; doafafimti ; of tn belle ieli''Kf»BOi !&'"'>>('>'••' 



nnzen, iuq, i&t. 
ffo'MltWin, IM 
aaz'l-neu, ISS. 



mal. [&» Hart, 180.) 
brUt-a), MM, Exc fi.- 

HeUrth (JU^AJ <11] [not 

He£l'i-iy, Ids. 

Heart'l-itfaa, ISO. 

HeUnV-inaefkarWli), 
213. 

Helrt'-iilek, 209, Eic. G. 

Besrt'r (Aari'y], S3. 

B«at, 13. 

Heat'ed. 

Htath, !J, 37. 
Bca'tben Ott'lhn) (MB) 

Hj^lben-Ee Msi"!-i 
Rea'Iben^ied (ACtgn-). 



^■'TUi [acU'nr] li 

Heath'er-y fao Wr.; 

iKth'ur-a, Gd. ISS.I 
H^fLtii'y, 13, »3. 

nSye'(S>i)), 13. 
H6ay&J(Mpd), 183. 
HesT'en (*«'n), IW, 

H^Y'an-vard [Aev'n-). 
Hiiav'er, IW. 
Heaves (ft(D£).n.Dj. 
H»iv'l-lr, leu. 
Htav'l-neBB, 16>, 17L 

H^av'y lW(), 10, 93. 
Hiaf 'jf-lid'en (-iM'n), 



nonAisT 



228 



HBHIHEDEAL 



Hetyn-lst [so Sm. Wb. 

i^brthistt or heb'ra- 
Ut, Wr. 156.1 

Be-bra-i8t'ic, 109. 

He'bnirlae, 202. 

He'bra-ized, 183. 

He'brft-iz-ing. 

Ue'brew (-broo)t 13, 19. 

Be-brid'i-an. 

Heo'a-tomb (-toom, or 
torn) [helfartootn, Wk. 
Wr. Wb. Gd. ; AeA'a- 
tomi 8m. 165.] 

[Heckle, 203. — 5ee 
Hackle.l 

Bec'tare (Fr.), 164. 

Hec'tic, 200. 

Hec'tic-al, 108. 

Hee'to-gramme (Fr.) 
(164) TH e e t o - 
Grram,203.] 

MectolUre (Fr.) iheVto- 
Wtr) (164) [Hecto- 
liter (hek-tol'i'tur), 
Wb. Gd. 203.] 

HectonUtre{YT.) hek^to- 

. ina'^r)(164) [Hec to- 
rn e t e r ( Aejb-tom'e- 
<wr), Wb. Gd. 203.] 

Hec'tor, 15, 88. 

Hec'tored, 160, 166. 

Hec'tor-ing. 

Hec-to're-an, 110. 

Hec'tor-iBm ?-u;m), 136. 

Hecto9tire (Fr.) {Jkekfto- 
8tir\ 164. 

Hed'dle, 164. 

Hed-er-a'oeou0 (-shut), 

Hed'er-al, 233, Exc 

Hed-er-if er-otis, 108. 

Hedge Ch^)y 16, 46. 

Hedged (hejd)^ 183. 

Hedge'hog, 206. 

Hedg'er, 183. 

Hedge'-row, 206, Exc.3. 

Hedging. 171, 183. 

He-don'ic, 109, 200. 

Hed'o-nism (-fiiem). 

Heed, 13. 

Heed'ed 

Heed'ftil (-/ioO. 180. 

Heed'ing. 

Heel (13), n. the hind 
part of the foot: — v, 
to put a heel to j-- to 
incline. I See Heal, 
160.] 

Heel'er. 

Heel'ing. 

Heel'tap, 206. 

He-gi'ra, or HegM-ra 
ihej'-) [80 Wk. Wr. ; 



tMVra, Wb. Gd. i 

h^'i^raj Sm. 166.1 
H«it*er (MT^^rh 16, 171. 
Heigh'-bo ihi'M), 102. 
Height (M<) (26, 102) 

[Hight, Wb. Gd. 

•Mi. ~ See Note £, p. 

70.1 
Heighten (hlPn) (149, 

102). 
[Hight en, Wb. Qd. 

20:j.] 
Heightened (JkK'iui). 
Hei^ht'en-ini (AU'n-). 
Hei'notls {hSvnut) [no$ 

han'yuB, nor he'nua, 

163.] 
Heir («r) (14, 139), n. 

one who inherits. 

[See Air, Ere, Ejrre, 

IflO.] 
Heir-ap-par'ent {ir-<qh 

pir'etU)t 210. 
Heir'eBS (#r'-), 171. 
Helr'loom (^r'-). 
Hel'a-mys. 
Held, 16. 
Heat-ac. 
He-li'a&«l, 106. 
He-li'acnal-ly. 
Hel'i-cal, 72, 78. 
Hei'i^slne, 162. 
Hel'i-cite, 162. 
Hel'i-ooid. 
Hcl-i-oo'ni-an. 
He-li-o-cen'tric. 
He-li-o-cen'trio-«I . 
He'li-o-chrome (-Irflm). 
He-li-o-chrom'ic 

(-Arrojn'-). 
He-li-och'ro-my (-of-) 

[so Wr. ; he'li-o-kro- 

my, Gd. 165.] 
He'U-o-griph. 

He-I 

He 

He 

He-li-ol'a-try. 

He-Ii-om'e-ter, 106. 

He'Ii-o-BCope. 

He'Ii-5-8tat. 

He'li-o-trope. 

Hel-i-spher'ic. 

HeU-8pher'io-al. 

He'lU [so Wk. Wr. 

Wb. Gd. : hel'iks, Sm. 

155.] [pi. Hel'i-ces 

(-»«2), 198.] 
Hell, 15, 172. 
Hel'le-bore. 
Hel-le'ni-an. 
Hel-le'nio, or Hel-len'le 

(109) [ha-U'nik, Sm,i 




M-Wnih, Wb. Gd.| 

heyienik, or helrlmf- 

ikj Wr. lA.] 
Hel'le-nism C-nizm)tViA, 
Hel'le-nist. 
Hel-Ie-nist'ic, 109. . 
Hel'le-nize, 202. 
Hel'ie-niaed, 183. 
Hel'le-nlz-inur. 
Hel-les-pont'lne, US. 
HeU'ward. 
Hehm, 15, 133. 
Helmed (hHrnd). 
Hel'met, 16, 70. 
Hel'met-ed. 
Hel-min'thic. 
Hel-min-thO'log'lo 

(-to/-). 
Hel-min-tho-log'ifr«l 

i-ioj'-). 
Hel-min-thol'o-glrt. 
Hel-min-thol'o-gy, 1C8. 
Helm'wind. 
Hel'ot [80 Sm. Wr. } 

he'lot.Wh, Gd. 166.] 
Hel'ot-ism (^zm). 
Help, 16. 

Helped {helpt), 166. 
Help'er. 

Help'fol (^-fdbl), 180. 
Help'mate, 200. 
Help'meet. 
Hel'ter-Bkel'ter. 
Helve (helv), 16, 171. 
Helved (Aetod), 166. 
Hel-vet'ic. 
HelMne (162) [Hel- 

vin, 203.1 
Helv'ing, Ig3. 
Hem. 16. 

Hem'a-chate (4slU), 
Hem-as-tat'ic-al. 
Hem'a-tlne (162) 

[He mat in, 203.] 
Hem'a-tite ( 152)[H k m- 

atite,203.] 
Hem-a-tit'ic. 
He-mat'o-oele [so Sm. 

Wr. i hem'a4o-Hl, 

Wb. Gd. 155.J rH«- 

matocele,203.] 
Hem-a-toro-gy (106) 

[H Kmafology* 

He-mat'o-Blne (152) [so 
Wr. ; hem-nhto'etn^ 
Gd. 155.1 [He mat o- 
8 in, 20.1] 

[Hematosis, 203.— 
See Hsematosis,] 

Hem'i-cra-ny. 

Hera'i-oy-ele, 104, 171. 

Hem-i-he'dral. * 



&> S, I, o, % y, long ; ft, i, X, 5, tt, ft short , tiwin far, am in fiist, iiaein 



Bs-nilp'ter-sL 
He-mlp'ter-oU*. 

Uem'l-i>i>b«re, 7S, IM). 

Hem.l-aphilr'iii, MM. 

Heai-l-ipJi«r'k>«l, lOS. 

Eem'la-tloh l-Uli) iKt 
em. Wb. Qd. i Ifr 
mii'fit, Wk. 1 Jbnn'ii- 

Bem:j«>llcb-al(-rU-)()0 
Sid. ; he-mU'iik-ai, 
V/i. Gd. IM.1 

He-mlCro-pal. 

Hem'l.lroiw. 

He-mlt'ro-polU. 

Hsm'loFk, % IB. 

Hemmed Otemd), ITS. 

Hern'or-rfiMp (-rflfl 
(lea, i7inH«inor- 

Hem-or-rh^k (-nnf-). 
Hem-or-rholil'*! 

(-™W-), 162. 
Hem'ar-rhaldi l-roidx), 

«. pi. let, 171. 
Hemp'™ (iaap'n), i«. 



forth'' r>0 8m. 
>artft, or ASM- 



Od. iftnuO^ 
ftmi'yartft, 
JBrtt', Wr. 1 

Hm-dee'i-KOD. 
Hen dee-B-eyl-lab'le. 
'Ben-deo-vij'1'la-ble, 



Bei).dl'>-dyi. 
HeD'ner-;, 170. 

Blep,a>3.— SmH 



He-pttt-o-ffHa'tiic. 
Hcp-B-tog'rii-phy, KB. 
Hep-»-toPo-gy. 



229 

Hep'U-ohord (-tord). 



Hep-tAD'gu-lu 

H op-ta-pet' u-otta. 

Uep^tn^hy-l'lallH, (X 
Hep-taph'yll-oaa.rSe 
AdenopbyUODH.J 

Hep'tsrch (-fari:). 

Hep-Ureh'tc {-lor*'-). 



H^fBlii, u, ra. 
WO'tiA-eA. 

He-ril'dlg [so Wk. 8m. 
Wr. J klr-al'dii, Wb. 

Hfr'ild-ry, S3, 171. 
Qerblert, or»B*) (21, 

K. i 13B) [«*, Wk. 

Wr. Wb. Gd. ; liert, 

Herb'uRe fert'-, or 
ierfcq [m Wr, Qd. i 
ert'tf, ffti fteT^6«, 
Sm.lM.J 

Berb'nW, lO, ISS. 

Heri/uTfteri'-], 13B. 

Herb'sl-lam {herb'al- 
<£n>), 136, 13B. 

Herb'sl-fat (ftert'-). 

Her-ba'rl-um (Aa-j [L. 
pi. Her-ba'ri-a; Eng. 



I Herb-ee'oent, 171. 
"■rWPer-otli, 106. 

iierb-lT'ij-rn, n.pi. 

Uert'lrt!^'" '■ 

Her'bo-rtie, 802. 
Rer'bo-rized, 183. 

Erbfy (ert's, or heri' 



Hcrd'rd. 
HenJ'er. 

Uerds'griu (kcnU'-l. 

Here (13),'o4,'lo thit 
plioe. [Ste Heu, 



rk. Sm. Gd. -, klrqf, 
rMr-»',Wr.l66?i' 

-re'Bi-mh <-I1^^^t), 



htr'e-zt-iarkj 
:-ort, Gd. i'fte- 



HSiJe-tfc loe'. 



M> « <n foot ; f u ta fulie ; gliM gtn go i^aiiathit. 



HSEITABLB 



2S0 



HICKWAT 



Her'I-ta-ble, 164, 171. 

Hilr'i-tag*. lf», 171. 

Her-maptr ro-dite, 152. 

Her-mapb-ro-dit'io. 

Her-nuiph-ro-dit'io-«l. 

Her-me-neu(tic 109. * 

Hcr-me-neik^tic-al, 106. 

Her-me-neu'tic8. 
«Her-met'ic, 109. 

Her-metao-al, 106. 

Her-met'i<Hil*ly. 

Hcr'mit, 21, N. 

Her'mit-age, 100. 

Her'mit-a-ry, 72. 

Her-mit'io-al. 

Her-mo-dao'trl [so Wr. 
Wb.Qd.iher' mo-dak- 
til, Sm. 155.] [Her- 
modaotyle, Wr. 
203.] 

Bern [contracted from 
Heron.] 

Her'ni-a, 21, N. 

Her-ni-ot'o-mv, 109. 

He'ro. 13, 24, 49, N. 

He-ro'ic, 109. 

He-ro'io-al, 106. 

He-ro'lc-al-Iv. 

He-ro-i-com'io [so Wr. 
Wb. Gd.j hir-o^- 
kom'ibt Sm. 155.] 

Her'o-Ine (82, 143) [so 
Wk. Sm. Wb. Qd.; 
hir'o-inj or he'ro-iUi 
y^T. 155.1 

H6r'o-i8m' (-izm) (WO, 
143)[8oWk. Sm.Wb. 
Gd. ; htr'O'izm, or 
he'ro-Um, Wr. 155.1 

Hereon, 170. 

Her'an-rr. 

Her'on-shaw. 

Hero-ol'o-glst, 106. 

He'ro-wor'ihip 
{■wur'-). 

Her'pes (-plz), 

Hcr-pet'ic 

Her-pet-o-log'lc {4of-), 

Her-pfet-o-log'ic-al 

i-loj'-). 

Her-pe-tol'o-g^st, 108. 

Her-pe-tol'o-«fy (108) 
rErpetology,203.] 

Her'ringr, 06, 170. 

Hers iherz)y 21, N. 

Her'schel i-shel), 21, 
N. ; 171. 

Herse (hers)^ n. a lat- 
tice or portcullis set 
with spikes ;— a kind 
of candlestick used 



In ehurchei. [5m 
Hearse, 160.] 

Her-self. 

Her'sil-lon [so 8m. 
Wb. Gd. } her-$a'lon, 
Wr. 165.] 

Hes'i-tan-ojr (hez'-), 160. 

Hes'itant {hez'-), 

HesM-tate {hez'-). 

Hes'i-tat-ed (A»'-)» 163. 

Hes'i-tat-ing (hez'-). 

Hes-i-ta'Uon (hez-). 

Hesa-tat-Ive ihez'-). 

Hes'per. 

Ues-po'rI-an, 40, N. 

He8'i>e-rus. 

Hes'sian {hesh'an), 171. 

Het-er-o-car'potts. 

He^er-o-oeph'a-lo&8. 

Het-er-o-cer'cal. 

Het-er •o-chro'mofis 
i'kro*-) [so Wr. j het- 
er-ok'ro-rmUfSm. 155.] 

Het'er-o-dite, 152. 

Het-er-o-clit'ic. 

Het-er-o-clit'ic-al. 

Het'er-o-dox, 122, 171. 

Het'er-o-dox-y. 

Uot-er-og'a-mo&s. 

Het-cr-o-g^e'ne-al. 

Het-er-o-ge-ne'i-ty, 108. 

Het-er-o-g-e'ne-otiB. 

Het-er-o-mor'phoils. 

Hot-er-on'y-mods. 

Het-er-o-path'io. 

Het-er-op'a-thy, 108. 

Het-er-o-phvI'lo&B, or 
Uet er-oph'yl-lods 
[See Adenophylloas.] 

Het'er-o-pod, 171. 

Het-er-op'o-doiis. 

Het-er-os'dan (^-osh'an), 

Het-er-ot'ro-pous. 

Het-er-ot'ro-pal. 

Hew (Aft) r26, 51, N.), v. 
to cut with an axe or 
other edg^ed tool, so 
as to make an even 
surface. [;Sr«e Hue,160.] 

Hewed (fttkf), 165. 

Hew'er (Att'-)i 26, 77. 

Hewn (/tO»). 

Hex'a-chord (-kord), 

Hex-a-dao'tyl-ous. 

Hex'ade, 

Hex'a-g'on, 100. 

Hex-a^o-nal. 

Hex-a-gyn'i-an (-Jin'-). . 

Hex-a-gyn'i-a {-jtn'-). 

Hex-aff'y-nous (-<v'-)« 

Hex-a-ne'dral. 

Hex-a-hb'dron [pi. 
Hex-a-he'dra, 189.] 



Hez-A-he'mer-on« 

Hex-am'er-ofts. 

Hex-am'e-ter, 160. 

Hex-a-met'ric. 

Hex-a-met'rio-«L 

Hex-an'dii-a. 

Hex-an'dri-an. 

Hex^an'droUs. 

Hex-an'ini-lar (-ang*-), 
54, 108. 

Hex-a-pet'al-o&8. 

Uex-a-phyl'lo&s, or 
Hex-aph'yl-loiks [Se9 
Adenophyilous.] 

Hex'a-pla. 

Hex'a-plar, 135. 

Hex'a-pod. 

Hex-ap'ter-ofis. 

Uex'a-stich (^-^Hk), 

Hex'a-style. 

Hex-oc-ta-he'dron. 

Hev (Aa), int. an ex- 
clamation of joy or 
of exhortation. [See 
Hay. 100.] 

Hey'day (ha'da). 

Hi-a'tus [L. pi. Bi-a'' 
tiu', £ng. pi. Hi-a- 
tus-es (-ez), 198.] 

Hi-ber'na-de, 21, N. ; 
164. 

Hi-ber'nal, 70. 

Hi'ber-nate (73) fHy- 
bernate,203.j 

Hi'ber-nat-ed, 183. 

Hi'ber-nat-ing. 

Hi-ber-na'tion, 112. 

Hi-ber'nl-an, 21, N. ; 70. 

Hf-ber'ni-an-ism (-izm). 

Hi-ber'ni-cism (-sizm). 

Hlc'cou«rh (hik'up) (dO) 
[so Wb. Gd.; hik'- 
kup, or hik'kof, Wk. 
Wr. ; hikikqf, 8m. 
155.] [Hiccup, 

Hicknp,203.] 



'* Though hieeoiHffh 
ia the most general orthog- 
raphy, hicJfup i» the motfe 
usual pronunciation." — 
fVnUrer. Smart remarks 
that hie'cup ia ** preferable, 
in fiimtltar uae, both la 
apelling and aound.** 

Hie' coughed (hiytipi). 
Hic'cough-ing(AiJ;'«p-). 
[Hiccup, 203. — Sm 

Hiccough.] 
Hick'o-ry, 8(i, 171. 
[Hickup, 203.— iSte 

Hiccough.] 
Hick'wan. 
Hick' way. 



a, e, !, 5, u, y, Umg ;.&, €» 1, 9, ft, ft $hort ; H a« tn far, ktuin flitt, taain 



\^i 



HID 

Hid. 16. 

HId'ago. 

Mi-M'gb (Sp.) {he-daV- 

go)i iM. 
Hid'den (Atd'n), 149. 
Hide. 25. 
Hide'bound, 206. 
Hid'e-ouB llM) [so Sm. 

Wr. Wb. Gd. ; hid'e- 

Wy or Md'Je^iUy Wk. 

155.1 
Hid'er, 183. 
Hid'ing. 
Hie, V. to hasten. [See 

High, 160.] 
Hi'c-rarch (-rori;), 160. 
Hi'e-rarcli-al (-rarib-). 
&i-c-raroh'io-Al 

(-rorl'-). 
Hi'e-rarch-y (-rorJb-), 

171. 
Hi-e-rat'io, 109. 
Hi-e-roc'ra-CF, 169. 
Hi'e-ro-giypn. 
Hi-e-ro-glyph'io. 
Hi-e-ro-gljrph'io-al. 
Hi-e-ro-glyph'ic-al-ly. 
Hi-e-roff'ly-phist (108) 
80 Wr. } hl-e-ro-gl^- 
t, Wb. Qd. 165.J 
Hi'e-ro-gram. 
Hi-e- ro-gram-mat'ie. 
Hi -e-ro-STam'ma-tist. 
Hi-e-rog'ra-pher, 106. 
Hi-«-ro-graphMc. 
Hf-e-ro-ffraph'io-al. 
Hi-e-roff'ra-phy, 108. 
Hi-e-roro-giBt. 
Hi-e-rol'o-gy, 108. 
Hi'e-ro-man-oy. 
Hi-e-rDm-ne'mon. 
Hi'e-ro-phant, or Hi- 

Sr'o-phant [bo Gd. ; 

hi'e-ro-fant^m. ; M- 

tr-fo/ant. Wit.; *I- 

tr'a-fant, or hi'^'ro- 

fanty Wr. 165.] 
Hi-e-ro-phant'lc 
Hi-e-ro8'oo-py. 
Higr'grle, 16, 16#. 
Hig'gled (hig'ld), 183. 
Higf'gler. 
Hig'gling. 
Hieph (m (25, 162), a. 

elevated ; exalted. 

[See Hie, 160.] 
High'er (hi'ur) (67), a. 
• more high. [See Hire, 

148.1 
High'aand (hi'-)y 162. 
Htgh'-mlnd-ed. 
[HIght,n. Wb. CW. 

203. — See Height.] 



231 



High-wftT' (hUoaf) 

(162) (so Wk. 8m. 

Wr. ; hi'wa, Gd. 166.] 
High'wBy-man (W-)» 

102, 19i>. 
Hi-la'ri-otts, 79, 100. 
Hl-lar'i-ty, or Hi-14r'l- 

ty m-ldHi^yj Wk. 

Sm. i hUdr'i-tp, Wr. 

Gd. 165.] 
HU'a-ry. 
Hill, 16, 172. 
Hilled {hUd), 165. 
Hill'iug. 
Hill'ock, 86. 
Hill'-side. 
Hill'y, 93. 
Hilt, 16. 
Hilt'ed. 
Hi'lum. 
Him, 16. 

Him-a-liy'am, 171. 
Him-seli'. 
Hind, 26. 
Hind'b6r-ry. 
Hind'er, v. 147, 161. 
Hind'er, a, 147, 161. 
Hin'derwmoe [ H i n - 

d ranee, 203.] 

9^ Both forms of thia 
word are in good UM. but 
the contracted fomi (/lin- 
drcmce). according to 
tlinart, preraiU. 

Hin'dered i-durd), 160. 

Hin'der-er, 77. 

Hin'der-ing. 

HTnd'most. 

Hin-doo' [so Sm. Wr. j 

hin'doo, Wb. Gd. 

155.] fpl. Hin-doos' 

{-doos/).] 
Hm-doo'ism (-izm). 
Hin-dos-tan'ee [ H i n - 

doostanee,203.] 
Hindrance [Hinder- 

a n c e , 203. — S^ee 

Note under Hinder- 

ance.] 
Hinge, 16, 46. 
Hinged ikinjd), 183. 
Hing'ing ihinj'-). 

Hin%y. «S 170. 

Hint, 16. 

Hint'ing. 

Hint'ed. 

Hip(16), n. ft V. [Hep 
(In the sense of the 
fruU of the wiid 
brier)t Hyp (in the 
sense of to mruee mel- 
ancholy)i 203.] 

Hipped Oiipt) (166). 



HITTINO 

[Hypped (In the 
sense of dispirited), 
203.] 

Hip'po-camp. 

Hip-po-oen't&or. 

Hip'po-cras. 

Hip-po-crat'ie. 

Hip'po-drome, 170. 

Hip'po-griff. 

Hip'po-mane. 

Hip-po-pa-thol'o-gy. 

Hip-poph'a-gotts. 

Hip-po-pot'a-mus [not 
hip-po-po-ta'mas, 153] 
[L. pi. Hip-po^Ofot'o- 
ml i £ng. pi. Hip-po- 
pot'a-muB-es(-e2),lU8.] 

Hip-pu'ric 

Hire, (25, 67), v. to pro- 
cure temporarily for 
a price: — n. recom- 
pense. [See Higher, 
148.1 

Hired, 1G6, 183. 

Hire'iing. 

HiVer. 

Hir'ing. 

Hirsute', 121. 

His {hiz)y 10, 174. 

His'pid. 

Hiss, 16, 174. 

Hissed (hist), v. did 
hiss, [^ee Hist, 160.] 

Hiss'ing. 

Hist, int. commanding 
silence. [See Hissed, 
160.] 

His-tog-e-nct'ic {-toj'). 

His-tog'e-ny i-tq)'-). 

His-tog'ra-phy. 

His-to-log'rc i-loj'-). 

His-to-log'io-al (-iq/'-). 

His-tol'o-gist. 

His-tol'o-gy, 108. 

His-to'ri-an, 40, N. 

His^r'io, 109. 

His-tdr'ic-al, 108. 

His-to-H-ette' (Fr.),164. 

His-to-ri-og'ra-pher. 

His-to-ri-og'ra-phy, 108. 

His'to-ry, 132. 

His-tri-onMc. 

His-tri-on'ic-al. 

His'tri-on-ism (jizm). 

Hit, 16. 

Hitch, 16, 44. 

Hitched {hickt\ 16S. 

Hitch'ing. 

Hith'er, 16, 140. 

Hitli'er-to {-too), 

HitK'er-ward. 

HiFter, 176. 

Hlt'ting. 



fiOl; 6a<<» there; d6a«<n foot;9a«<nfltoile;gh<Mglf»go;y|a<l»thit. 



Hrnr-TiTT 



282 



HOMOBOPATHIG 



{Hity-tlty, 2«.— 
See Holtf-toity.] 

Hive, 25. 

Hived, 166, 183. 

Uives (Mvz), n, pi, 

Hiv'ing. 

Ho, int, calling atten- 
tion, r^ee Hoe, 160.] 
THoa (ho), 2(Kt.] 

Hoar, 24. 

Hoard (24), «. to store 
eecretly ; to aooumu- 
late. [See Horde, 160. 

HoAd'ed. 

Hoard'er. 

Hoard'ing. 

Hdar'firost, 200. 

Hoar'hoiind [H ore- 
hound, 203.J 

•^ Ths two forma of 
tkia word are both in um. 
Wnlker gives only hoar- 
hound, and Smart, ai well 
a« Webster and Goodrich, 
prefers it. Woroeiter jfn- 
hnhorehawid. 

Hoar'l-nesB, 180. 

Hoarse, 24. 

Hoar' stone, 24. 

Hoar'y, 93, 169. 

Hoax. 

Hoaxed (Jakat). 

Hob, 18. 

Hob'ble, 164. 

Hob'bled (hobtld), 

Hob'bler, 183. 

Hob'blingf. 

Hob'by, ^, 169. 

Hob-grob'lin. 

Hob'nail, 200. 

Hob'nailed. 

Hob'nob. 

Hock, n. a white Rhen- 
ish wine; — in quad- 
rupeds, the Joint at 
the lower extremity 
of the tibia: — r. to 
disable in this joint. 
[Hough (in the last 
two senses), 203.1 

Hocked {hofct) 

[Houghed, 203.] 

Hock'ing [Hough- 
ing, 203.] 

Hod, 18. 

Hod'den-gray (fcod'n-). 

Hodge'podge [Hotch- 
pot, Hotch- 
potoh,203.] 

Hod'man, 196. 

Hod'man-dod. 

Hoe (24), n. a tool used in 
gardeaiing, and shaped 



like an adse: — «. to 
dig or cut with a hoe. 
[See Ho, 1601 [pi. Hoes 
(h6z)] [5ee Hose, 160.] 

Hoed, 165, 183. 

Hoe'ing, 183, Exo. 

Hog, 18. 




Hoi'dened {hai'dnd). 
Hol'den-ing {hoi'dn-). 
Hoist, 27. 
Hoist'ed. 
Hoist'ing. 
Hoi'ty-toi'ty, a. A int. 

[Hity-tity,a03.J 
Hold (24), V. to have or 

g^asp in the hand. 

TSee Holed, 160.] 
Hold'back, 200. 
Hold'er. 
Hold'ing. 
Hole (24), n. a cavity : — 

to drive or to go into a 

hole, [^ee Hole, IGO.] 
Holed, V. did drive or 

go into a hole. [See 

Hold, 160.] 
fHolibut, 203.~iS^ee 

Halibut.j 
Hol'i-day [Holiday, 

203. — See Note under 

Holyclap.] 
Ho'h-ly, 186. 
Ho'li-ness, 169. 
HdPing. 
Hol'la, n. V. A int. [so 

Sm. Wb. Gd. ; hol-IW, 

Wr.j hollo', Wk. 

165.1 [Holloa, 

Hollo, Hollow, 

Halloo, 203.] 
Hol'laed, 188. 
Hol'la-ing. 
Hol'land-er. 
Hollo', or Hol-loa', 

int. [5e6 Holla.] 
Hol'lo, V. [so Wb. Gd. j 

fcoZ-io', Wr. 156.] [See 

Holla.1 
Hol'Ided. 
Hol'lo-ing. 
Hol'low, a. having a 

void space within: — 

n. a cavity: — t;. to 

excavate. 
Hol'low [so Sm. ; hoV- 

loy or hotrlo', Wr. Gd. 

155], V. to shout. [See 

Holla.] 



Hollowed, 188. 

Hol'ldw-iug. 

Hol'ly, 170. 

Hol'ly-hock. 

Holm [so Wr. Wb. Grd. ; 

hSlmy Sm. 166.] 
Hol'o-cAust. 
Hol-o-he'dral. 
Uol'ster, 24, 77. 
Hol'stered {-eturd), 160. 
Ho'ly, a. free from sin j 

— sacred. [See Whol- 
ly, 160.] 

HoVy-day [so Wk. Wr. ; 
hoHydu, Gd. 165.] 
[Holiday, 203.] 

n^ This word is now 
usually written holiday \ 
but when it is used in the 
sense of a day devoted to 
reliffiout senrtces, it is prop- 
erly written and pro- 
nounced, as Worcester re- 
marks, ho'ly^ay. 

Ho'ly-rood. 

ur " As applied to th« 

1>alace in Edinburgh, it 
B pronounced Aory-tvod." 
Smart, 

Ho'ly-stone. 
Hom'age, 70, 170. 
Hom'age-a-ble, 164. 
Home. 24, 130. 
Home'li-ness, 109, 180. 
Home'ly, 24. 
[Homeopathy, 203. 

— See Homoeopathy.] 
Ho-m6r'ic, 109. 
Ho-m^r'ic-al. 

Home' sick, 206. 
Home'spun, 24. 
Home' stead. 
Home'ward, or Home'*- 

wards {-ivardz). 
Hom-i-dd'al. 
Hom'i-cide, 106. 
Hom-i-let'ic. 
Hom-i-let'ic-al. 
Hom-i-let'ics. 
HomM-list. 
Hom'i-ly, 78, 93. 
Hom'i-ny (169) [Horn- 

ony,20:i.] 
[HommocK, 203. — 

See Hummock.] 
Ho-mo-cen'tric [so Sm. 

Wr. ; hom-o-8en'trikt 

Wb. Gd. 156.] 
Ho-mo-oer'cal. 
Ho-moch'ro-mottt 

i-mok'-) [so Sm. ; h(h 

tnok'ro-mus, or ho- 

mo-kr&mue, Wr. 165.] 
Ho-moB-o-path'lc (-me-). 



i,6,i,5,u,y,tofv;»,6,X,5,tt,t,«*ort} & oa ill fiff, & « ti» fiist, & M in 



H0MG50PATBT 



238 



HOROLOGY 



Ho-mce-op'arthy (-«m-) 

(106, 171) in<^ ho'me- 

o-path-y, 153.] 
Ho-mog'a-mo&s. 
Ho -mo-ge'ne-al. 
Ho-mo-ge-ne'l-ty, 108. 
Ho-mo-ge'ne-oQs, 169. 
Ho-moi-op'to-ton [so 

Wr. , hom-ci-cp'ta- 

ton, Gd. 156.] 
Ho-moi-ou'si-an (-oic/- 

zi-an) ri71) [so Sm. ; 

ho^moi-ow'si-an, 6d. ; 

ho-moi-ow'aJiant Wr. 

155.] 
Ho-mol'o-gate. 
Ho-mol'o-gat-ed. 
Ho-moro-gat-ing. 
Ho-mol-o -ga'tion. 
Ho-mo-log^ic-al {-loj'-). 
Ho-mol'o-goQs, 170. 
Hom'o-ldgue (-togr), 168. 
Ho-mol'o-gy, 108. 
[Homony, 203. — 5e6 

Hominy.] 
Hom'o-nyme, or Hom'- 

o-nym, 203. 
Hom-o-nym'ic, 109. 
Hom-o-nym'ic-al, 108. . 
Ho-mon'y-moli8. 
Ho-mon'y-my, 171. 
Ho-mo-ou'Bi-an (-aw'zi- 

an) [so Sm. » ho-mo- 

ow*8t-an, Gd. ; ho^mo- 

oto'shan, Wr. 155J 
Hom'o-phone, 35, 171. 
Ho-moph'o-nofis. 
Ho-moph'o-ny, 171. 
Ho-mop'ter-an. 
Ho-mop'tcr-oiiB. 
Ho-mot'ro-pal. 
Ho-mot'ro-pofiB. 
Hom'o-type. 
Hone, 24. 
Honed, 165, 1&3. 
Hon'est {(m'-\ 139, 171. 
Hon'est-y {on'). 
Hone'wort (-trwr/). 
Hon'ey (ftwn'y), 98, 169. 
Hon'ey-comb ihun'y- 

kom), 162, 171. 
Hon'eyed (hunfid). 

Hon'ey.suc-kle(/^ttn'y-)t 
164, 171. 

Hong, 18, 64. 

Honing. 

Hon'or (on'ur) (138, 

199) [Honour, Sm. 

a03.] 

•9" Smart Imertf fhe « 
in all the dcrirativM of 
this word except honora- 



Hon'or-a-ble ion'-), 164. 

Hou'or-a-bly (on'-). 

Hon'o-ra-ry (on'-), 72. 

Hon'ored (on'urd), 138. 

Hon'or-er (on'-), 77, 88. 

Hon'or-ing (on'-). 

H«)d,aGL 

Hdbd'ed. 

Hdbd'ing. 

Hddd'wfiik i'VHngk), 54. 

Hdbd'winked {-wingkt). 

Hdbd'wink-ing 
(-wingk-). 

Hdbf, 20. 

Hdbfed (hoon), 171 j 
Note C, p. 34. 

Hdbk (20) [See Book.] 

Hoo'kah, n. 

Hddked iho6kt)t 166. 

Hdbk'er. 

H<56k'y, 93. 

Hoop Ihoopi or hdbp)[»o 
Wr. J hoop. Win. Sm. j 
A<wp,Wb.6d. 155], n. 
a band of wood or of 
metal used to bind to- 
gether the parts of a 
cask, &c. ; — a ring : 
— V. to bind wnh 
hoops ; — to encircle. 

Hoop (19), n. a shout : 

• — V. to shout. 
[Whoop, 203.] 

Hooped {hoopt, or 
hoopt). V. did bind 
with hoops. 

Hooped (hoopt), V. did 
shout. [Whooped, 
203.1 

Hoop'ing {hoop'ino, or 
haop'inq), pari, ohid- 
ing with hoops. 

Hoop'ing, paH. shout- 
ing. rWnooping, 
203.1 

Hoop^ngwcough (-W/), 
18,N. [Whooping- 
cougn, 203.1 

Hoo'poo, or Hoo'poe 
(-poo). 

0^ Both formB of this 
word uresiven by Worces- 
ter and Goodrich, and the 
latter Oioopoe) Is pro- 
nounced by them hoafpoi 
but Smart gives only this 
form, and pronounces it 
Aoofpoo. 

Hoot, 19. 
Hoot'ed. 
Hoofing. 
Hoove (koov). 
Hop, 18. 



Hop'-bind. 

Hope, 24. 

Hoped {hdpt), 183. 

Hupe'ftil i-fSbl). 

Hope'flil-Iy i'/SoU). 

Hop'er, 183. 

Hop'ing. 

Hopped (hopt), 170. 

Hop'per. 

Hop'ping. 

Hop'ple (164) [Hob- 
ble, 203.1 

Hop'pled ihop'ld), 183. 

Hop'ples {hop'lz), n.pL 

Hop'pling. 

Ho'ral, 49, N. 

Ho'ra-ry (49, N.; 72) 
rsoWlc.Wr.Wb.(3d.; 
Mir'arryj 8m. 165.] 

Horde {htird) (!M), n. a 
migratory body of 
men. [5eeHoard,160.1 

Hor'de-Ine (162) [H or- 
dein,203.] 

Hore'hound [ H o a r - 
hound, 203.— .See 
Note under Hoar- 
hound.} 

Ho-ri'zon (86, 111) [nol 
hdr'i-zon, 153.] 

H6r-i-zon'tal, 72, 171. 

H6r-i-zon'tal-ly. 

Horn. 17. 

Hom'beam. 

Horn'bill, 206. 

Horn'blende, 171. 

Horn-blend'ic, 109, 186. 

Hom'-bObk, 206, Exc.i. 

Horned {Jwrnd), 166. 

Hom'er. 

Hom'et, 17, 76. 

Hom'ing. 

Hor'ni-to. 

Hom'pipe, 206. 

Hom'pout. 

Hom'stone, 24. 

Hom'work (^tmfrJb). 

Hom'wort {^wwrt), 

Hom'y, 93, 169. 

Ho-rog'ra-phy, 108. 

H6r'o-loge ih9r'o-l0j) 
[so Sm. Gd. J hUr'o- 
ISJ, Wk. Wr. 155.] 

HO'rol'o-ger. 

Hdr-o-log'ic(4Q;'-). 

H6r-o-log'ic-al (-to/-). 

Hdr-o-lo-gi-<^'ra-pher. 

Hdr-o-lo^-o-graph'ic 

Hdr-o-Io-gi-og'ra-phy. 

Ho-rol'o-gist. 

Ho-rol'q-gy (106) [so 
Wk. Wr. Wb. Gd. ; 
h8rfo46'jyt Sm. 155.] 



fUl; 6a$intherei A m in Ibot ; 9 a« in ftdle j gh a« g t» go ; t^ a< in tfai& 

20* 



HOBOMETBE 



284 



HUMANITASIAK 



Ho-rom'e-ter, 108. 
Ho-rom'e-try, 169. 
Hdr'o-Bcopc. 
Ho-ros'co-py, 108. 
Hdr'rent, 170. 
Hor'ri-ble, 104, 170. 
Hor'ri-bly, ffj. 
Hor'rid, (W, 170. 
Hor-rif ic, 109. 
Hfir'ri-fied, 186. 



Hdr'ri-fy, 94. 
fy-ing. 
Hdr-rip-i-la'tioii. 



H6r'ri-fy. 



Hor'ror, 18, 88. . 

Hors de combat (Fr.) 
(Mr duh com-bd'), 164. 

Horse, 17. 

Uoree'back, 206. 

Horse'liJbt. 

Horse'-jock-cy, 98. 

Horse'man, 196, 206. 

Horse'shoe {-shoo), 171. 

Horse'tail. 

Horse'whlp. 

Horse'wiiippcd {-whipt) 

Horse'whip-ping. 

Hor'ta-Ove, «4. 

Hor'ta-to-ry, 86. 

Hor'ti-cul-tor. 

H or-ti-cult ' ur-a]( -ifur-). 

Hor'ti-cult-ure, 91, 171. 

IIor-ti-cult'ur-i8t(-y«r-) 

Hor'tu-lan. 

Har'tus sic'cus CL.), 

Ho-san'na (-«an'-), 170. 

Hose, n. sing. & pi. 
Btooking-8 y — a flexi- 
ble tube for conduct- 
ing water to extin- 
Siish fires, &c. [See 
oe8,pl.of Hoe, IGO.] 

Ho' Bier (-zhur) (171) [so 
Wk. Wr. Wb. Gd.j 
ho'zh^ur, Sm. (See 
§ 26), 155.] 

Ho'sier-y (-zhur-). 

Hos'pice (-pSs), 156. 

Hos'pi-tarble <164, 171) 
[not hos-pit'a-bl, 163.] 

Hos'pi-ta-bly. 

Hos'pi-tal, 78, 139. 

Hos-pi-tal'i-ty. 

Hos'pi-tal-ler [H o b p i - 
taler, Wb. Gd. 2a3. 
— See 177, and Note 
E, p. 70.] 

Hos'po-dfir. 

Host, (24) [See Ghost.] 

Hdst'age, 139. 

Host'ess. 

Hos'tlle, 81, 152. 

HoB'ttle-ly, 66, N. 

Hos-til'i-ty, 108, 169. 



HoB'tler (<M7«r) (130, 
ie2)rsoWk.8in.Wr.; 
hos'tur, or asflur, Gd. 

Hot, 18. [155.] 

Hot'bed, 206. 

Hotch-pot, or Hotch'- 
potch [Hodge- 
podge, 203.1 

Ho-telC 

Botel de viUe (Fr.) (o- 
teV duh vBl). 

Hotel Dieu (Fr.) (otel' 
de-uh'). 

Hot'-house, 206, Exe. 3. 

Hot'prefls. 

Hot'pressed (-prest), 

Hot'presB-ing. 

Hot'spur. 

Hot'spurred (spurd). 

Hot't«n.tot (hot'n-)j\71. 

Hou'dah (72) [How- 
d ah, 203.1 

Hough (hok) (171), n. in 
quadrupeds, the joint 
at the lower extremi- 
ty of the tibia ;— r. to 
hamstring. [Hock,. 
203.1 

Hougncd (hokt) 
Hocked, 203,1 

Hough'ing (Hok'-) 
[Hocking, 203.] 

[Houlet, 203. — 5te 
Howlet.] 

Hound, 28. 

Hour (our) (139), n. the 
twenty-fourth part of 
a day. [ See Our, 160.] 

Hour'&flass (our'-). 

Hour'f (howr'y) [pi. 
Honr'ies (-»«).] 

House, n. 28, 161. 

House (howz)i r. 136,161. 

Housed (howzd), 183. 

House'hold, 206. 

House'leek. 

House' wife (huz'wif, 
or hous'wlf) [so Wr. ; 
huz'wXfy Wk. Sm. ; 
hous'wlf, Wh. Gd. 155.] 
[Huswife, 203.] 



In the lense of a 
little caae for pins, needl&t^ 
ftc., thU word, according 
to Smart, " Is colloquially 
pronounced huz^zif." 

House' wlfe-ry(A««'tt7V- 
ry, or hous'wlf -ry)[BO 
Wr.; hu^'tD\fyif,Wk.', 
hous'wif-ryf Wo. Gd.: 
huz'w\f-er-yy Sm.l55.] 

House' Wright (-rf 0, 162. 

Hous'ing Quyujz'-). 



HOTO, 24. 
Hov'el, 18, 76, 140. 
Hoy'elied (^eM) I H o ▼ - 

eled, Wb. Gd. 203. 

^See 177, and Note 

E, p. 70.] 
Hov'el-Iing [Hovel- 

ing,Wb. Gd. 203.] 
Hov'er (At«r'tir),22, 171. 
Hov'ertMi (huv'urd)y\Sfi. 
Hov'er-ing (hut^-). 
How, 28. 
How'dah (72) [Hou- 

dah,20;i.] 
How-ev'er. 
How'itz-er {-Us-), 171. 
How'ker. 
Howl, 28. 

Howled (howld), 165. 
How'let [Houlet, 203] 
Howl'ing. 
How-so-ev'er. 
Hoy, 27. 

Hub (22) [Hob, 203.1 
Hub'bub, 22. 
Huck'a-bsick. 
Huc'kle-backed (A«£'- 

l-bakt), 164, 171. 
Huc'klc-ber-ry (htik^U), 

104, 171. 
Huck'ster, 22, 77. 
Huck'stcred (-a^vrd), 

150, 165. 
Hnck'ster-ing. 
Hud'dle, 104. 
Hud'dled (hud'ld), 183. 
Hud'dler. 
Hud'dUng. 
Hu-di-bras'tic, 109. 
Hue, 26, 51, N. 
Huff, 22, 173. 
HuflTed (hufl), 
HufTer. 

Huf fi-nesB, 18& 
HuiTy, 93. 
Hug, 22. 
Huge, 26, 45. 
Hugged (hugd), 176. 
Hug'ging (-ghing), 138. 
Hu'gue-not (-ghe-), 171. 
Hu'gue-not-ism (-ghe- 
Hulk, 22. Inot-izm), 
Hull, 22, 172. 
Hulled (huld),lG6. 
Hull'ing. 
HuU'y. 
Hnl'rer. 
Hum, 22. 
Hu'man, 26, 72. 
Hu-mane', 23, 89. 
Hu'man-ism (-izm), 136. 
Hu'man-ist. 
Hu-man-i-ta'ri-an, 49,N. 



a I, ly d, tt, y, Umg -, a, fi, i; 5, ft, f, short I'lituin fu, kasin fiut, katin 



J 



HUMiJVfTABIAMIISM 

Hn-man-t-tft'il-aa-ism 

(-ism), 133, 136. 
Bn-man'l-ty, 108, IdO. 
Htt-man-Y-za'tion. 
Hu'man-isse, 2Q2. 
Hu'man-Ued, 183. 
Hu'maa-iz-er. 
Hu'man-iz-iog. 
Hum'bird, 206. 
Hum'ble {/uan'bljOr ttm- 

bl) (130, 161, 171) (eo 

Wr.j ^tim'6;,Wb.6d. , 

um'bl, Wk. Sm. 155.J 
Hum'ble-bee {hum'bl-, 

or um'bl-), 
Hmn'blod {hum'bldf or 

um'bld)y 165, 183. 
Httm'bl<»' {hum'-9 or 
• urn'-). 
Hum'bling (Aum'-, or 

um'-). 
Hum'bljr {hum'-f or 

Hurn'orimi, 22. 

Hu'mer-aL 

Hu'inic. 

Hu'mid, 51, N. 

Hu-mid'i-ty, 106, 109. 

Hu-mil'i-ate, 109. 

Hn-mil'i at-ed, 183. 

Hu-mil'i-at-ing^. 

Htt-xnil-i<a'tion. 

Hu-miia-ty, 106, 169. 

Hu'niYne [H a m i n, 203] 

Hummed (humd), 176. 

Hom'mel, 170. 

Hum 'me] led (^-meld) 
(166) [Hum me led, 
Wb. Gd. 263. --5e« 
177, and Note £, p. 
70,] 

Hum'mel-ler TH u m - 
m e 1 e r , Wo. Gd. 
203.] 

Hum'mel-ling [H u m - 
meling, Wb. Gd. 
203.1 

Hum'mer, 176. 

Hum'ming. 

Hnm'ming-bird, 215. 

Hum'mook (66, 170) 
[Hommock,203.] 

Hum'raock-y, 93. 

Hii'mor (u'oittr, or hu'- 
mur) (51, N. ; 88) [ao 
Wr. J u'mw, Wk. ; 
hu^mur (in the sense 
of moMure pr fluid of 
the ammal bodff)t w- 
mur (in other senses), 
Sm. ; hu'mur, Wb. 
Gd. 155. ] [H u m o u r , 
199,203.] 



S85 

war SbuwI omlls th« « 
la the last sylUtble of thli 
word when it means mouf- 
«re, u alto in the deriTS- 
tiTes having reference to 
this «en«e. But he inierta 
the V iu aU other catet. 

Htt'mored (u'murd, or 

hu'mord), 150, 171. 
Hu'mor-r«] (u'-, or /ia'-)« 
Hu'mor-ul-ism (u'tnur' 

al-izmy or hu'mur-<jU- 

izm), 136. 
Hu'mor-al-ist (ti'-, or 

hu'-). 
Hu'moT-ingiu'-, or hu'-) 
Hu'mor-ism (u'mur- 

izm^ or hu'mw^izm)t 

136. 
Hu'mor-lst(t('-, or hu'-) 
Hu'mor-ofi8(tt'-,or hu'-) 
Hu'mor-some (u'mur- 

8um, or hu'mur-9um)y 

171. 
Hump, 22. 
Hump'back, 206. 
Hump'-backed (-6aX:f), 

206, £xc. 5. 
Humped (AuinpOt 1^* 
Hu'mus. 
Hunch, ^, 44. 
Hunch'back, 206. 
Hunch'backed (-bakt), 
Hun'dred [so Sm. Wr. 

Wb. Gd.; hunfdredt 

or hun'durd, Wk. 

155.] 
Hun'drea-er. 
Hun'dredth. 
Hung, 22, 54. 
Hun-ga'ri-an, 49, K. 
Hun'ger ihwtff'gur)^ 54, 

138. 
Hun'gered(Aufi^'^r<^, 

150. 
Hun'ger-ing (hung'gur) 
Hun'gri-ly (hung^-),VSa, 
Hmi'gry (hung'-). 
Hunks {hung£8)^Mng. 
Hunt, 22.. 
HuntW. 
Hunt'er. 
Hunt'ing. 
Hunts'nuiB, 106. 
Hur'dle, 104, 164. 
Hur'dled (jhur'dUO, 189. 
Hur'dlJAg. 
Hur'dy-gur'dy, 2Qfiu 
Horl, 21. 
HnrKbat. 
Hurrbone. 
Hurled (Attr^tf), 166. 
Hurl'er. 
Hurl'ing. 



VSAGUXTB 

Huray^bw'ly. 

Hur-rah' [ H u r r a,208.] 

H&r'ri-cane, 170, 17L 

H&r'ried, 136. 

Htir'ri-er. 

Httr'ry, 21, 48, 66. 

Hur'ry-ing. 

Hurt, 21. 

HurtW. 

Hurt'ftU (-/Sol), 180. 

Hur'tle-b^r-jy (hur'th), 

Hus'band (ht&'-). 

Hu3'band-ed (huz'-). 

Hus'band-ing (huz'-). 

Htts'band-man (huz'-), 

Hus'band-ry (huz'-). 

Hush, 22. 

Hushed (hutht). 

Hush'ing. 

Husk, 22. 

Husked (huski). 

Husk'i-ness, 169, 186. 

Husk'ing. 

Huflk'y 93 

Hus-sarVwo^-^aWXl?!) 
[so Wk. Sm. i hoot- 
zar'y Wr. ; huz-ziar'f 
Wb. GKL 166],n. orlg- 
inalW, a Hungarian 
or FoUsh horse-sol- 
dier. [.9eeHuzza,148.] 

Hus'sv (huz'zy). 

Hust'iBgs (-ingz)t n. pi, 

Hus'tle (hus'V), 162, 164. 

Hus'tled (hu8'l4), 162, 
165. 

Hus'tUng (hus'Kng), 

Hus'wlfe (huz'z^j or 
huz'wif) [so Wr. ; 
huz'zif, Wk. Gd.: 
huz'unfy Sm. 155.1 
[Ho use wife, 203.1 

Hus'wife-ry (huz'zif- 
rwj or huz'wif-rp) 
rHousewifery, 

Hut, 22. 

Hutch, 22,44. 

Hutched (AucM). 

Hutch'ing. 

Hnt'ted, 176. 

Hut'ting. 

Unt-to'ni-aiu 169. 

Huz-za' ^hooz-zd') [ao 
Sm. Gd. ; hooz-zUff 
Wr. ; hoosHsa'y Wk. 
155], ipit. an excUan«- 
tionofjoy. [£eeHu9- 
sar, 148.1 

Huzzaed^ (hMtz^z^)t 
188. 

Huz-z&'iiig (Ami«-). 

Hy'andn^, 171. 



lUlj 6a« in there; db a« i» foot ;$««<» £u^ i gh«« gin go i^ 04 tii this. 



RYACtNTHINE 

Hy-s-dnthlne, 152. 
Hy't-6lt(-dlz},n.pL 
Hy'iat l^z), B-jJ. 

lrtyberB»'tc,aw.— 

Hee HJbemste.J 
Hr'brid [eo Sm. i W- 

brid, or ktb'rld, Wr. 

Od. 11^.} 
Hr'brlrt-liini i-fim). 
Hy brid'1-tT, 108. 
Hy'bHd^ns [M Sm.; 

Ufrid.ofi.^k. Wr. 

Wb, Qd. INU 
Hy'da-tld [to Sm.i Mif- 

Hy'iU-tlsfBoSm. Wr.; 
Wa-H^ Od. ISS.J 



Hy'drarL. pi. ffi/'rfrw; 

Ed?, pi. Uy'dru 

(■drat), 19S.1 
HyKtra^'Id. 
Hy'dra-giSgua l-gog), 



Hi'dr" - 



:«W. 



Hyyrl-C ,-, _-.,. 

Wr. ! hid'H.(nlai, 

Wb. Gd. 15* J 
Hy-dri^Hl'ic [bo 8m. 

Vfr. i hU-ri-od-ik, 

Wb. Gd. 155.] 
Hy-dro-csr'bon. 
Hy-drrnsr'bon-Ble. 
H y-drOHjar' bu-ret. 
Hy'dro-cele. 
Hyniro-ceph'i-liie. 
HyJro Ohio' rate i-iio'-) 
Hy.dni -chlo'ric C -ito'-). 
HMro-ej'a-nate. 
H)^-dro-!y-Ho'li!, 
H y jira-dr-iMm'ioB. 
H^'dro-RSD, 25, 45, 171. 
Hy'dro-gen-sle. 
H y'dro-gfln-St-ed. 
Hy'dro-gan-it-ing. 



H;'e-t(i-gi«ph. 

Hj*-to-grtpb'lo. 

HT-KB'iim (-yon), tl. 

ji-*n, or Hy*H, Wr. 

IkMl-in'. (id. 165.1 
Hy-gl-en'lc, 109. 
Hy^ol'o^, loe. 



HTPEBBOTJFORH 



Hv-gro-ncop'lc 
HykerHnfk, 203.1 
Hy-be o-aan'nu (-{»-). 



Hy-lop's-thlRiK-fMnii). 

Hy'lo-the-lBm (-fjin) 
[■o3ni.Gd.iW-/ijtt'- 
«-<in,or U-Ifr^AfiiBi, 
Wr. 155.1 

Hy-lo-lO'lc. 

Hj'men. 



Hymn (him) (1S2), n. « 
long lor B rellirioiia 
>er>1oe. r,S«e Ilim, 
im.l 

Hymn'-bdbk (Aim'-), 
209, Kxc 4. 

Hymatd (iiBKn, »r 
Hym'ned [m Wr. 1 
Aimd, Od. 155.] 



Hrmii'liicr (him'iag\or 
kym'pfng JK. Wr i 
Mm'ninjf.Wk. iftim'- 
ning, coll. ftba'fag, 
Sm. ; fttm'jns, Wb. 
Gd. 155.) 

HTm-iiol'o^let. 

Hym-not'o gy, 108. 

Hyold, 25, 5f. 

Hyprl6)[Hlp,203.] 

Hfr-pjil'U-ge, idilTO. ~ 
HS-pia'piat. 
Hy-per-W'Ic, 109. 
By-per'bH-ton. 
Hy-per'bo-la,2l,N.!l71. 
Hy-per'bo-!e, I6S. 
Hy-per-bol'ic, IW. 
Hy per-bol'lcsd, 106, 
Hy-per-boTic-al-ly. 
Hy.per-bol'1-fonn, 106. 



s,fi,r,i«itff •,«,!, 



E, f, titort i & at In lar, a 



HYPERBOLiSM 



Hy-per'bo-Usm {-Uzm). 
Hy-per'bo-list, 21, N. 
Hy-per'bo-loid. 
Hy-per-bo're-an, 49, N. 
Hy-per-car'bu-ret-tod 

[Hypercarburet- 

ed, Wb. Gd. 20:i.] 
Hy-per-cat-a-lec'tlc. 
Hy per-crit'ic, 109. 
Hy-per-crit'ic-al, 108. 
Hy-per-crit'i-cism 

l-sizm). 
Hy-per-du'li-a. 
Hy-per'me-ter, 21, N. ; 

108. 
Hy-per-met'rlc-al. 
Hy'per-Bthene [H 7 - 

perstene, 203. J 
Hy-per-8then'ic, 109. 
Hy-per-troph'ic, 109. 
Hy-per-troph'ic-al, 108. 
Hy-per'tro-phy, 21, N. 
Hy'phen, 25, 36. 
Hyp-nol'o-gist, 108. 
Hyp-nol'o-gy. 
Hyp-not'lc. 
Hyp'no-tiBm (-tizm), 
Hy-pob'o-le [so Sm. 

W r. J hl-pobf^o-le, Gd. 

155.] 
Hyp'o-c&ust. 
Hyp-o-ohon'dres (-ifcon'- 

durz)t n. pi. [so Wk. 

Wr. Gd. ; hip-o-kon'- 

drlz, Sm. 155.] 
Hyp-o -chon'dri-a 

(-»on'-)» »• pl' 
Hyp-o-chon'dri-ao 

(-)tonM,52, 171. 
Hyp-o-chon-dri'ao-al 

(-ifcon-), 108. 
Hyp-o-chon-dri'a-cism 

-kon-dri'a-sizm'), 136, 

171. 
Hyp-o-ehon-dri'a-sis 

\-kon-). 
Hyp'o-cist. 
Hyp-o-cra-t€r'i-form 

(108)[BoSm.Wr. ;Al- 

po-kra-ttr'i-formy Gd. 

155.] 
Hy-poc'ri-sy (169, 171) 

[not lii-pok'ri-By,153.] 
Hyp'o-crtte, 152, 171. 
Hjrp-o-crit'ic, 109. 
Hyp-o-erit/ic-al, 108. 
Hyp-o-gae'oiis {-Je'-). 
Hyp-o-gaB'tric [so Wk. 

Sm. Wr. ; hl-po-gaa'- 

tHky Wb. Gd. 155.] 

Hyp-o-gas'tro-cele [so 

* Sm. Wr. ; M-po-gas'- 

tro-sBl, Wb. Gd. 155.] 



237 

Hyp'o-gene. 

Hyp-o-ge'um [so Wk. 
Sm. Wr.j hlpo-je'utMt 
Wb. Gd. 156.J [pi. 
Hyp-o-ge'a, 198.] 




t-nus, Wb. Gd. 155.1 

Hv-po'pi-um [so Wr. 
Wb. Gd. ; hip-o'pi' 
unif Sm. 155.1 

Hy-pos'ta-sis [so Wk. 
Wr. Wb. Gd.; hip- 
os'ta-siSf Sm. 155.] 

Hy-po-Btat'ic, 109. 

Hy-po-stat'ic-al [soWk. 
Wr. Wb. Gd. j hip-o- 
8tat'ik-aly Sm. 155.1 

Hy-pot'e-nuse [so Wk. 
Wr. Wb. Gd.i hip- 
Gt'e-nOSy Sm. 155.] 
[Hypothenuse, 
203.] 

•9- Walker, Smart, and 
Webster give only the 
form A;/potentMe, and 
Goodrich prefers this form ; 
but Worcester prefers Ay- 
potkemam, 

Hy-poth'e-cate [so Wr. 
Wb. Gd. J htp^th'e- 
k&ty Sm. 155.] 

Hy-poth'e-cat-ed, 183. 

Hy-poth'e-cat-ing. 

H f -poth-«-ca'tion. 

Hy-poth'e-cat-or. 

Hy-poth'e-nuse [Hy- 
potenuse, 203. — 
See Note under Hy- 
potenuae.] 

Hv-poth'e-sis [so Wr. 
\Vb. Gd.; hip-oth'e- 
»tj», or hl-poth'e-8is, 
Wk. ; hipH}th'e-8i8, 
Sm. 155 ] 

Hy-po thet'ic [so Wk. 
Wr. Wb. Gd. ; kip-o- 
thet'ik, Sm. 155.] 

Hy-po-thet'ic-al. 

Hypped {hipt) (176) 
[Hipped, 203.] 

Hyp'ping [Hipping, 
203.] 

Hyp'pish [Hippish, 
203.] 

Hyp-so-met'ric. 

Hyp-som'e-try. 

Hyrse, 16, n. millet. 
[See Hearse, and 
Herse, 160.] 

Hy'son, 25, 86. 



ICHTHYOSAURUS 



Hrs'sop (his'sup) [so 
Sm. ; hiz'zup, or hi'- 
sup, Wk. ; hi'zup, or 
his'sup, Gd. 155.J 



^ Though Walker 
allows At'ztfp, he says: **To 

{>ronuunce the jf long be- 
bre double s is oontrary to 
every rule of orthoepy 1 
and, therefore, as the Nrst 
mode is undoubtedly the 
best, the otJier ought to be 
relinquished." 

Hys-te'ri-a. 
Hys-t^r'ic, 109. 
Hys-ter'ic-al, 108. 
Hys-ter'ics. 
Hys-ter'o-cele. 
Uys-ter-ot'o-mj, 106. 



L 

-am'bic, 109. 

-am'bus [L. pi. J-am'- 

61 ; Eng. pi. I-am'- 

bus-es i-ez), 198.] 
'bex, 15, 25. 
'bis, 16, 25. 
-ca'ri-an, 49, N. j 169. 
ce, 25, 39. 
oe'berg, 206. 
cc'boat. 
oe'cream. 
ced (l«0>183; Note C, 

p. 34. 
oe'house. 
oe'land-er. 
oe-land'ic, 109. 
ch-neu'mon (ik^u'-), 

171. 

ch-no-grliph'ic (fib-), 
ch-no-grftph'ic-al (i^-). 
ch-nog'ra-phy (»&-). 
ch-no-log'lc-al (»ib-»M>- 

loj'-). 

ch-nol'o-gy (ik-), 108. 
'chor (-fcatrr), 171. 
'ohor-oQs. 
ch'thy-o-col («/-}. 
ch-thy-o-ool'Ia (life-), 
ch-thy-og'ra-phy (ifc-). 
ch'thy-o-lite (**'-)» J62. 
ch-thy-o-log'ic-al (»&- 

thy-o-lcti'ik-aD, 108. 
ch-thy-oro-gist (ik-). 
ch-thy-ol'o-gy (ik-), 
ch'thy-o-man-cv (tfc*-). 
ch-thy-oph'a-gfst («*-). 
cIi-thy-oph'a-goCLs 

(ik-). 

ch-thy-oph'a-gy (ifc-). 
ch-thy-o-siu'rus (ik-). 



ftll i iasin there -, (Sbcuin loot ; 9 a8 in facile ; gh a< gin go ; th a« in this. 



ICHTHYOeia 
'd-rle lPM4i, IM, 171. 
-cuu*a-<:liiiim l-tlasm). 



ID-O-ffTlLpb'l 



'ra-phy, ice. 

[-«on-ol'o-e*, lOe. 
herand. 
hc'dron [pi. t- 

I'dri-n/n.irf; 



-de'», n, r», 

-d?'Hl-lBia(-um), 130. 
-dt'«l tat. 

-4e-al'i-tT, we, 10>. 
-dc-nM-u'IloD. 
-dCul-Ixe, i02. 
^'■I iied, 183. 
■de'ul-ii-loz. 
■dem (L.). 
4ea'd<v4], 108. 
■den'tle-il-Ir, IJO. 
-den-tl-fl-ai'Uan. 
-dcn'tl fied, IM. 

-dco'a-fj, w. 

l-Oai'tl-ly-iBg. 
I-Uen'O-tir, iflS, !(». 



l^Ien._., __„. 

■■Uen'O-tir, lflS,H». 

-de-o^^Tflph'lG [id Sm. 

Wt, : uJ-e-oirrJIr'jt.Gd. 

1S6.] 
T-de-o-trri^h'ic-Bl. 
I-de-0(?r»-phy, IM. 
l-de-rfoK-fc-al f-iqf'-) 

[wWr.; W-«-o-(^U!- 

I^le'ol'o'-gl^t [i-dt-nPo- 

C, or id-e-oi'o oirt, 
. ; ia-iH)fo-giit, 
Gel. 1SS.1 
I^e-ol'o-^ rilH} [lo 

W-e"il'o-jB, Wr^i M- 
e-oi'wv, O-l. IM.) 

Idcs(t£), n.nr. 

lfl-l-oc'rB-»f,l». 

Jd-l-o-cnVic, 100. 

Id-i-o-crat'lc-B], lOe. 

M'l*er, IBS, IJl. 

ld'I-Din,sn, 160. 

Id-l-o-nut'Ie. 

Id-i-o mM'ic-al. 

Id-1-o-mU'lc-Bl-Ij. 



l-o-pith'ie, IM. 

-i-op'8-tli7. 
:d-i-o-irn'or.-ir, 171. 

ijl^-tamT-to"). 

'(Ofdii-Jid) its. 

'itUiW. 
'dly. te. 

i'o-CTHs fio Wr. Wb. 
Od.: i'lfo-jtrM, 8m. 






ILLUMINXa 

Wr. Wb. Od.; IgAt- 

Viui, Sm. IBS.) 
IguiCiuMloin ™«' 1[ao 

Wb. Qd.i !-fu»n'a- 

don, Wr. ; Is-u-oa'a- 

dnn, Sm. u£l 
ll'fum. 

ll'i-»i, ie». 
Ill-ad. ;i,i«a: 

III, IS, ITl. 

IlJa'tion. 
II'l>-tIve(H)Iiu<Et-U'- 

IJy, ISS.]. ■ 
II Uud'a-tOe, IM. 
IH'-bred, M6, £xc. fi. 
ll-le-gal 7J. 
Il-le-gnl'l-tj, 108, IM. 
Il-le-gnl-lr, 170. 
II 1^-1 bll4-tT CJtlA. 
II-lfKl-bto t V). IM. 

ll-log'tblj (-I(f-). 
Il-le slt'l-ma«T, IM. 
Il-lectfi-mnte. 
II lc-Elt'i-nut.ed. 
II- ie-Slt'l-mtt-biZ. 
U-Ie-git-l-ma'IlaD. 
ll-linF'l-.-ble, l«. 
II Ittftnl, 93^ Kxe. 
II -llb«r-al']-t;, 171. 
II Us'tt, 170. 
Il-llln'l^a-bic, 104, IM. 
II-ll-Dl'tian (-Jifnt'ini.) 
Il-li-qni'tioii, 171. 
II-n'Blaa (-JuA'hh). 
Il-Ilt'«-.-«y. IM. 
II-UI'nHd. 
Il-ltt'er-aiW, 170. 
U-loff'hMil <-l<a'-). 
Tl-tu3e', 20, m. 
Il-lud'ed, IBS. 
H-lud'lug. 
II tame', 20, 103. 
II lumed', 183. 
ll-liim'lng. 
IMn'min-a-ble, IM. 
II tu'mla-ant. 
Il-lu'mln-ile, 73. 
IMu'mlD-it-ed- 
Il-lu-iBl.iui'K, ii.pt 
IMa'mlD-it-liig. 
'Mn-min-a'tltm. 
:Mu'mtn-at-lre (84) [■« 

Wr'.'wb. Od. iSS-i 
II-ln'mfn-U-oT. 
I-In'mlne. ItO. 
1-lu'mIned C-mtad). 
l-ln -mln-ee', 12*. 



k,l,l,li,%f,lime;t,e,J,6,i,h'hoTti llatltiEur,i<i)<itfitn,k<Ul> 



ILLTTMtNINO 

n-ln'mln-ing, 183. 

Il-Iu'min-iBm {'izm). 

Il-lu'sion {-zhun)j ». de- 
ception. r<See Elusion, 
•146.1 

IMu'slon-lst {-zhun). 

U-lu'Blve, M. 

Il-lu'so-ry, 88. 

Il-lus'trate. 

Il-luB'trat-ed, 183. 

Il-lus'trat-ing. 

IMus-tra'tion, 112. 

Il-luB'tra-tlTe, 84. 

IMuB'trat-or. 

Il-las'tra-to-ry, 86. 

Il-las'trl-ollB. 

Im'age, 16, 70. 

Im'age-a-ble, 164, 160. 

Im'a-ger-v [so Wk. 
Sm. ; im'&j-ry, Wb. 
Gd. ; im'€t-Jer-jf, or 
imfaj^ryj Wr. 155.] 

Im-ae'i-na-ble (-£u'-), 
104. 

Im-Bg'i<iia-iy i-qj'-), 72. 

Im-ag^-i-na'tioQ (-<t;-). 

Im-agM-na-tlve (-<?/'-). 

Im-ag^ne (-£(/'-)> 1^2. 

Im-ag'ined {-nj'ind). 

Im-agMn-er i-(^}'-), 183. 

Iin-ag'ln-ias^ (-<V'-)* 

I'maUf I-mam', or I- 
m&um'. 

[Imbankment, 
203.-~i9ee Embank- 
ment.] 

[Im b ar go ,203. — i^ee 
Embargo.] 

[I m b a rlc , 203. ~ See 
Embark.] 

Im-bathe'. 

Im-bathsd', 165. 

Im-bath'ing. 

Im'be-cfle, or Im-be- 
dle' ( »«') JTso Gd.; 
im-be-8el'f dm. ; im- 
bes'Uj or im4>e-»BV, 
Wk. Wr. 165.] 

Im-be-cil'i-ty, 109. 

[Imbed, 203. — See 
Embed.] 

Im-bibe' 25, 103. 

Imbibed', 183. 

Im-bib'er. 

Im-bib'lng. 

Im-bit'ter [Embit- 
ter. 203.] 

Im-bit'tered, 150. 

Im-blt'ter-er, 77. 

Im-bit'ter-in^. 

Im-bor'der fEmbor- 
d e r , 203.] 

Im-bor'dered (^-durd). 



2S9 

Im-bor'der-ing. 

Im-bo'som {-boofzum) 
[Embo9om,2a3.J 

Im-bo'somed (-ftoo'- 
zumd), 165, 171. 

Im-bo'som-lng (-6iw'- 
zum-). 

[ I m b o w e 1 , 203. — 5ee 
Embowel.] 

Im'bri-cate. 

Im'bri-cat-ed. 

Im-bri-ca'tion. 

Imbroglio (It.) (im- 
hrOVyo). 

Im-brown'. 

Im-browned' 
{-brownd'). 

Im-browu'ing. 

Im-bnie' i-hroo^\ 19. 

Im-bmed' {-hrood')t 
183. 

Im-bru'ing {A>ro&-), 

Im-bru'ment {Amtoo'-), 

Im-brute' {-broot'), 19. 

Im-brut'ed {-broot'-'). 

Im-brut'ing {-broot'-). 

Im-bae', 26. 

Im-bQed', 183. 

Im-bu'ing. 

Jm-i-ta-bfl'i-ty, 169. 

Im'i ta-ble, 164. 

Im'i-tate, 100. 

ImM-tfit-ed, 183. 

Im'i'tat-ing. 

Im-1-ta'tion. 

Im'i-tat Ive, 84. 

Im'i-tat-or, 183. 

Im-mac'u-late, 170. 

Im'ma-nen-cy. 

Im'ma-nent (169), a. In- 
herent. [See Immi- 
nent, 148.T 

Im-ma-te'ri-al, 49, N. 

Im-ma-te'ii-al-ism 
{-izm). 

Im-ma-te'ri-al-ist. 

Im-ma-te-ri-al'i-tj. 

Im^na-tnre', 170. 

Im-ma-tured'. 

Im-ma-tu'ri-^, 49, N. 

Im-meas'ur-a-ble 
i^ezhfur-€hbl) (171) 
[so Wb. Gd.j <m- 
mezh'vrra^li Wk. 
Wr. ; tin-m«*'oo-ro- 
5J, Sm. 155.] 

Im-meMi-ate (73) [so 
Sm. Wr. Wb. Gd.; 
im-me'di-aii or im- 
me'ji-at, Wk. 165.] 

Im-med'i-ca-ble, 164. 

Im-me-lo'di-o&s. 

Im-mem'o-ra-bie, 164. 



IMMUNITY 

Im-me-mo'ri-al, 49, N. 
Im-mense', 15, 39. 
Im-men'si-tf, 109, 171. 
Im-mcn'su-ra-ble 
i^-men' »hoo^a-bl) \im^ 
men'sh^oo-ra-bl, Bm. 
{See § 26) ; tiii-mc»'- 
8hu-rchblf Wk.; im- 
met^'tu-ra-bl, Gd. 
155.] 
Im-merge', 21, N. 
Im merged', 18-'). 
Im-merg'ing {-merj*-)* 
Im-mcrse', 21, N. 
Im-mersed' {-^merti^). 
Im-mers'lng. 
Im-mer'sion, n. aet of 
immersing or state of 
being immersed. [See 
. Emersion, 148.] 

m-mer'sion-ist. 

m-mesh', 15, 46. 
Im-meshed' {-mesht'), 
'm-mesh'ing. 

m-me-tho<rienal, lOS. 

m'mi-grant, 66, 170. 

m'mi-grate, 73, 78. 

m'mi-grat-ed, 183. 

m'mi-grat-iug. 

m-mi-gra'tion, 112. 

m'mi-uent (169), a. 
threatening closely. 
[See Immanent, 148.] 

m-min'gle (-ming'^l), 

m-min'gled {-m%ng'' 
gid). 

m-min'gling {-ming'-), 

m-mis-^-biPi-ty. 

m-mis'ci-ble, 164, 171. 
Im-mis'sion {-nrnh'^ 
ttn). 

m-mit'i-ga-ble, 164. 

m-mo-bU'i-ty, 106, 160. 

m-mod'er-ate, 170. 

m-mod-er-a'tion. 

m-mod'est, 170. 

m-mod'es-ty. 

m'mo-late, 73, 170. 

m'mo-lat-ed, 183. 

m'mo-lat-ing. 

m-mo-lu'tion. 

m-mo-lat'or. 

m-mdr'ai, 06, N. 

m-mo-ral'i-ty, 160. 

m-mdr'al-ly, 06, N. 

m-mor'tal, 72. 

ra-mor-tal'i-ty. 171. 

m-mor-t>al-l-za'tion. 

m-mor'tal-ize, 202. 

m-mor'tal-izcd, 183. 

m-mor'tal-iz-ing. 

m-mov'a-ble, 164, 183. 

m-mu'ni-ty, 170. 



flOl; 6af in there; dl> M <» foot ; $ of in fiusUe ; ghof g<Mgo;t^a«i»tbli. 



m-mare'.M. 


Im-piiate'. 23. 


m-perTo-ra-ble, 104. 


m-mured', 11«. 


Im-l«Ki;«l, 163. 


-.per^fo-rafsil, M. 


m-mu-M-ai'l-t)r, 106. 


Im-pnec'ms. 


m-per' b-nit-cd. 


Im-p«'ilea«e(-a<M). 




m-ran'ta-bl.:, iW. 


Im-pa'tient (-.*«(), 


m pe'r .al, M, tt. 


ui-mn'ta-Uj. 




■n-poT-al-lsm (-««), 






m-pc'ri-al lat. 


m.W.O.HM.iei. 




ra-pc r *l't-ty. 100. 


m'paol. »■ IW. Wl- 


m-pjivn'lng. 


lu-pt'r -al-ljr. 


m-piBt'ed. 


m-pcach', 13,«. 


m-porll. 


m-pact'lng. 


m-piach'a-ble, IM. 


mpL-rilled [ImpBr- 


saa^TA'^u. 


S:SK'"*''- 


-i'ff'ir7. 'and Nota 


ni palr-er iVrM. 


m-pOBeh'ment. 
mjKarl' (-jwrP), ai. 


P|rlllBB,Wb. Gd. 


m-te«rled' (•perld-). 




ra-[S'rt^^-J^i'iw). 


S-iSSSiSS: 


iii-p«'ri-one.40,N. 


SSSW'W; 


m-pSr'itili-a-ble. 104. 


m-pee'cB-blp, 1<M. 


i»-pi:-r'iDa-nciice,ai,H. 




m-pec'oan-cr. . 




Im-pa^ns'tkHi. 


mpoc-amt.' 


in-iBT-ma-ncil. 


l>n-^'eljj[Im^p«^n- 


ni-pe-ju-Dl-iM'i-tT. 


in-piT-iiusa-bll'l4r. 




m-pcdo', 13. 


m-pi-r'Die.a-blo, 104. 


Elupinnelfm! ' 
Ini|>,iu'oll«d(-«k)(lJus) 


in-p£d'ett. 




■ipi'Xli" 


m-por-io-nal'l tj. 


[1 m pinneled, 
Wb. Gd. WM.]JS« 
1?;, Md Nole IT, p. 


ni-per|iio nal-ly. 


m^'i-mcot, 109- 


ra-£^r'3S-^t^. 


ro,] 


m-pHl'lDK, l(«. 


m-ljor-aoim'tlon. 


Im-lAn'el-Uns [Im- 


m.ped;i iTve, W. 


m por-Bus'al-blc 






(-nm'.i-W), l«4, 171, 


IiH-pif'H-dise. 


S;^ led^'li^d'), m. 


m-piT'ti-aaucii, ^1, K. 


m-pe 'l«i.t, IIM, i;o. 


ui-per'tl-iien-cy. 


Im pAr'a-dlsed (-Out). 


m-pe 'lur, iro. 
oi-po 'ilQg. 


m-per'tt-ncnt/lOO. 
m-por-tQr*a-bll'i-ty. 


in.pen'. 


ia-iKr-tur'ba-blf, lU. 


Ini-pSr'l-tji, 108. 


■S-2?»,fffc? 


m-por-tur-ba'Uoo. 


Im-^l', 11. 


ni-per-vi-a-bil'l-tj. 


Im-p,rl'«n«, lOB. 




m-iiur'vl-a-blc, IM. 


Im-parltd', IflS. 


100.1 


m-por'vi-olis. 


Iio-pi.fl'iog. 


m-pcnd'ed. 


:,«eTffi'*'-^ 


Im-pu'-aaa.ee', 122. 




Iia-parf , 11. 




in-pctu.OBn-tj, 1C8, 


Im-p,.rt'«5ee. 


ra-pend'eut. JflB. 


m pv.>t'u-ali8. 


Iiap:irt'ed. 


m-pend'lDE. 




lm-p.rt'er. 


m-pene-tra-bll'i-tr. 






Di-peD'e-tn-ble, U4, 




m-pin'l-tenoe. 
m-pcn'l tcQ-C7, IBB 




Wr.r'«W-<Aai'«(r, 


m-pcu'l-teot. 




Wb. Od. 163.] 


lu-pea'nHtc, 170. 




Im-pMt-i-bll'i-iy. 


aSTS:!-'SJ''C 




m-p«n'i-ble, IM. 




m-pkM'a-blo, 104. 


I«nd,Ii»,] 




m-pU-el-bil'l-tr, IW. 
m-iril.'8l.ble, lai. 


:ss:"*- 




ia-pa>'Bloned (-iKuA'' 


m-pC-r'a-Oro, 84. 




and), 171. 


m-por^Uii-U-Wri-tr, 




Im-p»«'iilve, 84. 


iD-per.cep'li-ble, IM. 
m-pefftct. ai, 1*. 




lm-p8HiVI-tr, 109. 




Im-pM-U'tl™. 


m-per-fec'Uon. 





i,i,i,6,a,J,ionsi i.«.l. 



u f » lar, a oa 4n &at, I of fa 



IMPLAU8IBILITY 



241 



IMPROVISATION 



lm-pl&u>8i-bU'i-ty 

(-«!-), 108, 109. 
Im-pmu'si-ble {-zt-bl), 
Im-plead'. 
Im-plead'ed. 
Im-plead'er. 
Im-plead'inff. 
Im'ple-menf, 109, 171. 
Im-ple'tion. 
Im'plex. 

Im'pli-«ate, 73, 100. 
Im'pli-cat-ed. 
Im'pli-cat-ing^. 
Im-pli-ca'tiou. 
Im'pli-cat-Ive [so Sm. 
Wr. J im'pU-ka-tiVt 
Wb. Gd. 165.] 
Im-plif'it. 
~m-plled', 186. 

^m-pli'ed-ly. 

m-plo-ra'tion. 

:m-ploreS 24, 103. 

m-plorcd', 165. 

m-pldr'er. 

!m-pldr'iii|p. 

in-plumetr {-pl9md'), 
Im-ply', 26. 
"ni-ply'mg. 

[m-pol'i-cy, 160. 

in-po-lite', 152. 

:m-poFi-tic, 109. Exc. 

m-pon-der-a-bil'i-ty. 

m-ponMer-a-ble, 164. 

m-ponMer-ottB. 

m-po-ros'i-ty. 

:m-po'roii8, 49, N. 
Im-port', V. 24, 49, 161. 

■9* When thU verbhM 
the wnee of to tifP^/if, 
Smart pronoouoe* U im- 
pawrtf. 

Im'pdrt, n. 16, 161. 

■^ When this noun hM 
the senee of ngn\/icatvmt 
Smart |>ronouncea it <m'- 
pawrt. 

Im-pdrt'a-ble, 164, 109. 

Im-por'tanoe, 169. 

Im-por'tant [so Sm. 
Wr. Wb. Gd.; im- 
por'tantf or im-pdr'' 
tant, Wk. 165.] 



** The best nsafre,** 
says Walker, of the two 
modes which he cives, " is 
on the side of the flrst pro> 
nunciation [un-jwr'laMCl.'* 

Im-port-a'tioii. 
Im-port'ed. 
Im-port'er. 
Im-port'ing'. 



Im-port'a-nate (44» N. 
1) [so 8m. Wr. Wb. 
Gd. ; im-par*cku-niUf 
Wk. 165.J 
m-por-tune', 122. 
m-por-tuned', 183. 
m-por-tun'er. 
m-por-tun'ing'. 
m-por-tu'oi-ty, 160. 
m-poB'a-ble {-pOz'-)f 
164. 

m-pose' (-p9z'), 24, 40. 
m-posed' l-pdzd'). 
m-pos'er {-poz'-). 
m-pos'in^ {-poz'-), 
m-po-Bl'Uon {-zish'- 
un). 

m-poB-sl-bil'i-ty, 171. 
m-po8'8i-ble, 164, 170. 
m'post. 16, 24. 
m-pdst'hu-mate [so 
Sm. Wr. ; im-pos'tu- 
maty Wb. Gd. j im- 
pos'chu-m&t, Wk. 
166J 
Im-poBt'hu-mat-ed. 
Im-pdst'hu-mat-ing. 
Im-pdst-hu-ma'tion. 
Im-pdst'humc [so Sm.; 
im-pos't&m, Wr. Wb. 
Gd. ; im-poa'chtim, 
Wk. 156.] 
Ira-pos'tor, 88. 
Im-pdst'ure ^-yur) (91) 
[bo Wr. ; tm-pos'wr, 
coll. im-po8'ch*oor, 
Sm. (^ee § 26); im- 
pos'char, Wk. 155.] 
Im'po-tenoe. 
Im'po-ten-cy, 160. 
Im'po-tent, 105. 
Im-ponnd', 28. 
Im-pound'ed. 
Im-pound'ing'. 
Im-poY'er-isn [Em- 

poveriBh, 203.1 
Im-poy'er-iBhed (-wU), 
Im-pov'er-lBh-er. 
Im-pov'er-ish-ing. 
Im-pov'er-ish-ment. 
[I m p o w er , 203. — 

See Empower.] 
Im-prac-ta-ca-bill-ty. 
Im-prac'ti-ca-ble, 164. 
Im'pre-cate, 73, 169. 
Im'pre-cat-ed. 
Im'pre-cat-lng. 
Im'pre-cat-o-ry, 86. 
Im-pregn' (^-prin'), 162. 
Im-preg-na-bil'i-ty. 
Im-preg^'na-ble, 164 
Im-preg^'nate. 
Im-pre^nat-ed. 



Im-preg:'nat-in^. 
Im-preg-mi'tion. 
Im-preg^ned' {'prend')^ 

162. 
Im-pregn'ing^ (-prin'-), 

162. 
Im-pre-Bcrip-ti-bil'i-ty. 
Im-pre-Bcrip'ti-ble, 164. 
Im-pre88^ v. 103, 161. 
Im'presB, n. 103, 161. 
Im-preBsed' i-prest'), 

165 ; Note C, p. 34. 
Im-presB-i-bil'i-ty, 106. 
Im-presB'i-ble, 164. 
Im-press'ing. 
Im^pres'sion {-presh'' 

un), 
Im-preBB'Ive, 84. 
Im-preBs'ment. 
Im-pri-ma'tur (L.). 
Im-pri'mis (L.). 
Im-print', r. 16, 103, 

161. 
Im'print, n. 103, 161. 
Im-pris'on (-prfe'n), 

149. 
Im-priB'oned (-prtz'- 

nd), 166. 
Im-priB'on-er (-priz'' 

n-). 
Im-priB'on-ing (-priz' 

«-)• 
Im-priB'on-ment {-priz'^ 

n-). 
Im-prob-a-bil'i-ty, 160. 
Im-prob'a-ble, 164. 
Im-prob'l-ty. 
Im-promp'tu [so Sm. 

Wr. Wb. Gd. ; tf»- 

prom'tut Wk. 165.] 
Im-prop'er. 
Im-pro'pri-ate. 
Im-pro'pri-at-ed. 
Im-pro'pri-at-ing. 
Im-pro-pri-a'tion. 
Im-pro'prl-at-or [bo 

Sm. Wr. Wb. Gd.; 

im-pro-pH-dt'oTf Wk. 

165.] 
Im-pro-pri'e-ty, 100. 
Im-prov-a-bil'l-ty 

(^-proov-). 
Im-prove' (-iwoor'-), 

19. 
Im-proved' (-proovd'), 
Im-prov'er (-proor'-). 
Im-prov'iug {-proov'-), 
Im-prove'ment 

(-prooc'-). 
Im-pro V 'i-dence. 
Im-prov'i-dent. 
Im-prov'ing (-proov''), 
Im-prov-i-sa'non. 



fall; 0a« in there; Ob of in foot ;$ m in faoUe ; gh <m g »» go ; t]} a« in tbiff. 

21 



IlfPltOVISATIZfe 



242 



INCtlVD 



Im-pro-Tls'ft-tlxe 

i-viz'-h 202. 
Im-pro-vi8'a-tlsed 

i^viz'-), 183. 
Im-pro-via'a-tlx-iiig 

{-viz'-). 
Im-pro-vls'a-tor (-!>*«'-)• 
Im-pro-vise' (-»!«'), 202. 
Im-pro-vlaed' (-rial')* 
Im-pro-vii'er (-rf«'-). 
Im-pro-vis'ing {-vtz'-), 
Jm-prov-vi-sa-to're (It.) 

[pi. Jm-prov-vi-sa^- 

ri (-re), 198.1 
Jm-prov-vi-9a-tri'ce fit.) 

(tm-prov^oe-9a-trv- 

chd). 

m^ Goodrich ninarkf 
of the two preceding 
words, that ther are "usu- 
ally spelled with hut one 
« by the Eogllih and 
French." 

m-pra'denoe (-jwvw'-). 
m pm'dcnt {-proo'-). 
m'pu-denoe, 100. 
m'pu-dent. 

m-pu-dic'i-ty, 109, 171. 
m-pugn'^ i-p^n)y 102. 
m-pugued' {-pnnd'), 
m-pnfipi'er (-pfln'-). 
m-pins-Bant, 169, 170. 
m'palse {-puis), 171. ' 
m-pul'sioQ, 118. 
m-pul'Bive. 
m-pa'ni-ty, 106, 109. 
m-pure'. 
m-pu'ri-ty, 49, N. \8et 

Purihr.l 

m-pur'ple, 104, 104. 
m-par'plea {-pur'pld), 
m-pur'pllng-. 
m-put'a-ble, 104. 
m-pu-ta'tion. 
m-put'a-tTve, 84. 
ra-pute', ao. 
m-put'cd, 183. 
m-pflt'inff. 
n, prep. & ad. Within. 

[.S^eelnn, 100.1 
n-41-bil'i-ty, 106, 109. 
n-ac-ces-si-bil'i-ty. 
n-ao-ces'si-ble, 104. 
:n-ac'cu-ra-oy, 109. 
n-ac'cu-rate. 
n-ac'tion. 
n-ac'tlve, 84. 
n-acvtiv'l-ty. 
n-ad'e-qua-cy, 171. 
n-ad'e-quatc. 
n-ad-mis-si-bll'i-tr. 
n-ad-mis'si-ble, 104. 
In-ad-ver'tenoe, 21, N. 



In-ad-ver'ten-ey. 
In-ad-rer'teDt. 
In-il'ten-a-bie (-yen-;, 

101. 
In-am-o-rii'tK, n. fern. 
In-am-o-rS'to. n. moM. 
[bo Wr. Go. ; <}Mim- 

o-ra'to, Sm. ISS.] 

n-ane', 23. 

n-an'i-mate, 109. 

n-an'i-mat-ed. 

n-a-nY'tlon, 112. 

n-anM-ty, 106, 109. 

n-ap ph-ca-bil'1-ty. 

a-ap'pli-ea-ble, 104. 

A-ap-pre'd-a-ble (-^f^* 

8hl-aM)y 104. 

ii-ap-pro'pii-ate. 

n-apt'. 

n-aptM-tnde, 106. 

n-ar-tlc'n-Iate, 73, 89. 

D-ar-ti-n'cial {-fish'al). 

n-at-ten'tion. 

n-at-ten'tlre, 84. 

n-au'di-ble, 104. 

n-&a'gni-ral, 72. 

n-&u'gii-rate. 

D&u'g^-nit-ed, 183 

n-&u-gu-ra'tion. 

n-ftu'g^-rat-or. 

n-ftu-spl'dous {-tpith*- 

us), 112, 171. 

n'bom, 135. 

n'bred. 

n'ca {ing'ka) [so Sm. ; 

in'kay Wr. Wb. Gd. 
155.1 
In-cage' (23, 45) [En- 
cage, 203.] ' 
In-caged', 105. 
In-cag'ing (-I'd/-). 
In-carcu4a-ble, 104. 
In-ca-les'cence, 39, 171. 
In-ca-les'ccn-cy, 109. 
In-ca-los'oent. 
In-can-des'cenoe, 89. 
In-can-des'cent. 
In-can-ta'tlon. 
In-can'ta-to-ry, 80. 
In-ca-pa-bil'i-ty, 108L 
In-ea'pa-ble, 104. 
In-ca-pa<;'i-tate. 
In-ca-paQ'i-tat-ed. 
In-ca-pa^'i-tat-ing. 
In-ca-pa^'i-ty. 
In-car'cer-ate, 73. 
In-car'ocr-at-ed. 
In-car'oer-at-ing. 
In-oar-oer-a'tion. 
In-car'nate, a. A fit. 73. 
In-car'nat-ed, 183. 
In-car'nat-ing. 
In-car-na'tion. 



In-ear'na-tTve, 84. 
In-case' [Encase, 203.1 
In-cased^ {-kM'). 
In-CHB'ing. 

In-cftu'tious (-8hu8%l&f. 
In-oend'i-a-ri8m(-r/2rm), 
In-cend'i-a-ry (72. 109) 

[so Wr. Wb. Gd. j *n- 

send'uur-^y Sm. ; tn- 

cenUn-a-ry, or in-ten'^ 

jUt-ry. Wk. 155.1 
In-cense' (101), v. to in* 

flame with anger; to 

provoke. 
In'cense [so Wk. Sm. 

Wb. Ga. ; in'sens, or 

in-tetu', Wr. 1661, v. 

to bum ; — to permoM 

with incense. 
In'oense, n. 161. 
In-cen'sTve. 
In-cen'sor, 88. 
In'oen-so-ry, or lB-«eii'- 

80-ry [so Wr.j <«'- 

sensur-y, Wk. Sm. ; 

in-8«n'8o-rfff Wb. Gd* 

156.] 
In-cen'tTve, 84. 
In-cep'tlon. 
In-cep'tlve, 84. 
In-cep'tor. 

In-oer'ti-tudc, 21, N.106. 
In-oes'san-ey. 
In-ocfi'sant. 
In'cest. 
In-cest'u-oiis. 
Inch, 10, 44. 
[I n c h a 8 e , 201, 208. — 

See Enchase.1 
In-cho'artlve (-«©'-) [so 

Wk. Wr. Wb. Gd.; 

ing'ko-a-tivy Sm. 155.J 
InVi-dencfe, 39, 109. 
In'ci-dent, 127. 
In-ci-dent'al. 
In-ci-dent'al-ly. 
In-dn'er-ate. 
In-cin'er-at-ed. 
In-cin'er^t-ing. 
In-dn-er-a'tion. 
In-cip'1-enee. 
In-cip'i-en-cy, 100. 
In-clp'1-ent. 
Incise' {-s\z'-), 202. 
In-cised' {-g%zd*). 
lu-cis'ing {-glz'-). 
In-<?I'Bion {-Hzhfun)m 
In-d'slve, 84. 
In-ci'sor. 
In-cTt'ant. 
In-ct-ta'tion. 
Incite', 25. 
In-cit'ed, 183. 



ft, S, 1, 5, fi, y, fon^ S ft, «, X, 5, ft, 3^, tAorf ; ftoflft fkr, a as <n fftat, ft at lH 



INCITEMENT 



243 



IN€UEABIUTY 



In-dte'meiit. 

In-cit'er. 

In-cit'ing. 

In-cl-vin-ty. 

In-claspS 12, 131. 

In-clasped' {-kld»pt'). 

In-clkBp'ing. 

In-clem'en-cf, 149. 

In-clem'cnt. 

In-d'm'a-ble, IM. 

In-cli-na'tion. 

In-clin'a-to-ry (86) [so 
Sm. Wb. Od.j \ii- 
knn'a-to-ry, Wk. Wr. 
155.J 

■^ ** Th« tennlnAtioii 
atorv hM a tendency to 
•horten the precedinf vow- 
el, M It evident In fte- 
clamatory^ predatoriff Ac." 
Walktr, 

In-cline', 26. 
In-clined', 166, 183. 
Iii-clin,'er. 
In-clin'ing^. 

In-close' (-klSzf) [En- 
close, 201, 203.— 

See Note tinder JEn- 

dote J] 
In-dosed' (-ia9zd'),tSi. 
In-clos'lng' {-klOz'-). 
In-clos'ure (^-kldz^yur) 

[Enclosure, 201, 

203.] 
In-dude', 26. 
In-clfid'ed. 
In-cliid'ing. 
Tn-(iIu'sioD {-zhun), 
Jn-olu'slve, 8i. 
In-cog*. 
In-oog'nI-to. 
In-cog'ni-za-ble, 164. 
In-cog'ni-zanoe. 
In-eog'ni-zant, 169. 
Tn-oo-ne'rence, 49, N. 
Tn-co-he'ren-cy. 
In-oo-he'rent. 
In-com-bus-ti-bil'i-ty. 
In-com-bns'ti-ble, 164. 
In'oome t^-kum), 
In-oom-men-8UH*a-bil'i- 

ty (ntftoo-), 26, 46, 

Note 2. 
In-com-mai'sn-ra-ble 

{-shoo-), 164, 171. 
Jn-oom-men'sn-rate 

(-»fcoo-)46,Note2, 171. 
In-com-mode', 66, 170. 
In-com-m5d'ed, 183. 
In-oom-mdd'ing. 
In-com-mo'di-ofiB [so 

Sm. Wr. Wb. Gd. ; 

in^kom'mt^di-uSf or 



in-kom^mo'ji-uit Wk. 

156.] 
In-com-mn-ni-ca-bill- 

ty. 
In-coin-mu'ni-ca-ble,164 
In-oom'par-a-ble ( 164) 

inot in-kom-pdr'a-ble, 
53.] 
In-com-pat-i-biFi-ty. 
In-com-pat'i-ble, 164. 
In-com'pe-tenoe. 
In-com'pe-ten-<7, 169. 
In-com'pe-tent. 
In-com-plete'. 
In-cofni)OBlte {^poz'-) 

^152) [so Sm. Wr.; 

m-kom-poz'U, or in- 

kom'pO'Zit, Gd. 155.1 
In-com-pre-hen-si-bll'i- 

ty, 116. 
In-com-pre-hen'si-ble, 

164. 
In-com-pres8-l-bil'i-ty. 
In-com-press'l-ble, 164. 
In-eon-eeiv'a-^ble, 104, 

169. 
In-con-dn'sYve. 
In-con'dlte [so Sm.Wb. 

Gd. ; Wkwi-dft, Wk. ; 

in'kon-dltj or tn-kon'- 

dit, Wr. 165.] 
In-con-gTu'i-ty(-^oo'-). 
In-con'eru-ofis {-kong'- 

groo-), 19, 64, 169. 
In-con' se-quenoe. 
In-oon'se-quent. 
In-con-se-quen'tial 

(shctt). 
In-con-sid'er-a-ble, IM. 
In-^son-sid'er-ate, 73. 
In-con-sist'en-cy, 169. 
Tn-oon-siflt'ent. 
In-con-sol'a-ble, 164. 
In-con-splc'n-ofiB. 
In-con'stan-cy, 169. 
In-con' stant. 
In-con-test'a-ble, 164. 
In-con'ti-nence. 
In-con'ti-neot. 
In-eon-tro-vert-i-bll'i-ty 
In-con-tro-vert'i-ble. 
In-con-ven'ienoe {-yens) 

[so Gd. ; in-kon-ven'- 

yens, or in-kon-ve'ni- 

ens, Wr. ; in-kon-ve'' 

ni-enst Wk. Sm. 165.] 
In-oor'po-rate, 73. 
In-cor'po-rat-ed. 
In-cor'po -rat-ing. 
In-oor-po-ra'tion. 
In-cor-po're-al, 49, N. 
In-cor-po-re'i-ty, 169. 
In-oor-rect', 66, 170. 



In-oor rl-gi-bil'i-ty. 

In-oor'ri-gi-ble, 164. 

In-eor-rupt'. 

In-cor-rupt-i bil'l-ty. 

In-cor-rupt'i-ble, 164. 

Inoor-rup'tion. 

In-cras'sate, 73. 

In-cras'sut-ed. 

lu-cras'sat-ing. 

In-cras-sa'tion. 

In-cras'sa-tTve. 

fii-crease', v. 103, 161. 

In'creasc, or Increase' 
n. f so Wr. ; in'krBs, 
Wk. Sm. ; in-krWy or 
tn'fcr«», Gd. 156.] 

In-creased', 165. 

In-oreas'er. 

In^jreas'ing. 

In-cred-1-bfl'i-ty. 

In-cred'i-blc, 1G4. 

In-cre-du'li-ty, 108, 169. 

In-ored'a-lofis (45, N.) 
[so Sm. Wr. Wb. Gd. ; 
in-kred'u-ltu, or in- 
kred'ju-hte, Wk. 156.] 

In'cre-ment (54)[so Sm. 
Wb. Gd. i ing'kre- 
ment, Wk. Wr. 155.] 

[Incroach,203. — Sot 
Encroach.] 

In-crust' [Encrust, 
203.] 

In-erust-a'tion, 112. 

In-crust'ed. 

In-eruHt'ing. 

In'ou-bntc (54), [so Sm. 
Wb. Gd. ; mgfkthbdi, 
Wk. Wr. 166.J 

In'ou-bat-ed. 

In'cu-bat-ing. 

In-cu-bation, 112. 

In'cn-bus (64) [so Sm. 
Wb. Gd. ; ing*ku-bu9, 
Wk.Wr.l65.] [L.pl. 
in'cubi'y Eng.pl.In'- 
cu-buf>-es (-el), 196.] 

In-cul'cate, 73. 

In-oul'cat-ed, 183. 

In-cul'cat-lng. 

In-cul-ca'tion. 

In-cul'cat-or. 

In-cal'pate, 73. 

In-cul'pat-ed, 183. 

Tn cul'pat-ing. 

Tn-cnl -pa'tion. 

In-cul'pa-to-ry. 

In-cum'ben-cy, 169. 

In-cum'bent. 

[Incumbrance, 203. 
— See Encumbrance.] 

In-cur', 21. 

In-cur-a-bil'i-ty, 108. 



.ftU ; 6 Mim ik&m A'Of in -foot ; 9'0« l» JmUo ; gfa-oc- g.l» go-^^-o^ in tbls. 



INCURABLE 



244 



INDOCTRINATE 



In-cur'a-ble, 164. 

In-cu'ri-ottB, 4», N. 

Incurred' {kurd'), 166. 

In-cur'renoe, 109. 

In-cur'riag, 21. 

In-cur'Rion. 

In-cur'Blve, 84. 

In-curv'ate. 

In-curv'at-edf 183. 

In-curr'at-ing. 

In-curv-a'tion. 

In-dcbt'ed {-det'-), 162. 

In-de'cen-cy, 169, 

In-dc'ceiit. 

In-de-cl'sion (-Hzh'un), 

la-de-clio'a-ble, 164. 

In-de-co'rofiB, or In- 
dec'o-roiis (108) [eo 
Wk. Wr. Gd. j tn-de- 
ko'nu. Sm. 155.] 

In-de-co'riun. 

In-deed'. 

In-de-fat-i-ga-bll'l-ty. 

In dcfat'i-ga-ble, 164. 

In-de-fat'1-ff a-bl y . 

In-de-fea-Bi-bU'i-tT 

In-de-fva'si-bje (-zX-bl-). 

In-de-fen-si-bil'i-ty. 

lu-de-fcn'si-ble, 164. 

In-de-fin'a-ble, 164. 

In-deri-n!te, 152, 160. 

In-de-his'ccnce, 39, 171. 

In-de-his'cent. 

In-dcl-i-bil'i-ty, 108. 

In-deri-blc, 164, 169. 

In-dclM-ca-cy, 72, 169. 

In-del'i-catc, 73. 

In-dem-ni-fl-ca'tion. 

In-dem'ni-f led, 186. 

In-dem'ni-^. 

In-dcm'ni-fy-ing. 

In-dem'ni-ty, 106, 169. 

In-dent', n. & v, 15. 

In-dent-a'tion. 

In-dent'ed. 

In-dcnt'lng^. 

In-dent'ure, 91. 

In-de-pcnd'ence, 160. 

In-de-penMen-cy. 

In-de-pen'dent. 

In-de-scrib'a-ble, 164. 

In-de-Btnict-I-bil'i-ty. 

In-de-stnict'i-ble, 164. 

In-de-ter'ml-nate. 

Jn'dex, n. & v. [pi. of 
n. In'dex-es (-ez), or 
(in the sense of expo- 
nents of qiiantittes) 
In'dl-c«B (sBz).] 

In'dexed {-dekst), 

In-dex'ic-al. 

In'dex-ing. 



Ind'iaii i-uan) (45, N. ; 
60 [so Sm. Wr. Wb. 
Od. i in'di-an, m'Ji- 
an, or itui'yan, Wk. 
165.] 

Ind'ia-mb'ber (ind'pa-) 
(l71,205)[soSm.Wb. 
Gd. ; in-ja-rub'her, 
Wr. 165.] 

Tn'di-cant. 

In'di-cate, 73, 78. 

In'di-cat-ed. 

In'dj-cat-ing. 

In-di-ca'tion. 

In-dic'a-tXve [bo Wk. 
Wr. Wb. Gd. ; in'di- 
c&t-iVf (in the general 
sense of showing, or 
pointing out), in-diif- 
a-tiv (as applied to 
note the mode of a 
verb), Sm. 155.] 

In'di-cat-or. 

In'di-ca-to-ry (86) [so 
Wr. Wb. Gd. ; in^dl- 
ka-tur-y, Sm. 155.] 

In'di-oes (-«««), n. pi. 
[See Index.] 

In-dict' (-dWO (162), v, 
to accuse. [See In- 
dite, 160.] [Kndict, 
201,203.1 

In-dlct'a-ble (-<iK'-),164. 

In-dlct'ed (-dK'-). 

In-dlct'er ( -dlt'-)y n. one 
who accnseB. [See 
Inditer, 160.] 

In-dict'ingr (-<IK'-). 

In-dic'tion. 

In-dict'ment (-dW'-) 
(162), n. an accusa- 
tion. [See Indite- 
ment, 160.] 

In-dif'fcr-enoe, 169, 
170. 

In-differ-ent. 

In'di-gence, 39, 46. 

In'di-gene. 

In-dig'e-noas (-dw'-), 
160, 171. 

lu'di-g'ent. 

In-di-geBt-i-bil'i-ty. 

In-di-gest'i-ble, 108. 

In-di-g'est'ion (^-yun), 

In-dig^nant. 

In-dig^-na'tion. 

In-di§:'ni-ty, 108, 160. 

In(di-go. 

In-di-gom'e-ter, 108. 

In'di-go-ttne, 152. 

In-dT-rect'. 

In-dis-ccm'i-ble (-dis- 
zern'i-bl), 164, 171. 



In-dis-creet' <160), a. 

imprudent. 
In-di8-crete' (160), a. not 

Bcnarated. 
In-dis-crd'tion ( krtth'- 

un). 
In-di8-crim'i-nate,73,100 
In-diB-peu'sa-ble, 164, 

171. 
In-dis-pose' <-p9z'). 
In-dis-posed' \-p9zd'). 
In-dis-po-sl'tion (^-ziah'- 

un). 
In-dis'pu-ta-ble 064) [so 

Sm. Wr. Wb. Gd.; m- 

dis'pu-ta-bly or in-dis- 

pu'ia-bl, Wk. 165.] 

•9- Though Walker, 
In deference to the author- 
ity of Johnaon, Aah. and 
otnen, allow* the pronun- 
ciation tn-du-pttta^tl^ h« 
aays of the other mode 
iin-difpurta-U)'. ** My ex- 
perience and reooUectloa 
groaaly fail me, if this is 
not the general pronunci- 
ation of polite and lettered 
ipeakera.** 

In-dis-BO-ln-biVi-ty. 

lu-dia'so-lu-ble, 164. 

In-dis-tinct'. 

In-dis-tin'gni sh^-ble 
{-ting'gvoish), 164,171. 

In-dite' (26), v. to com- 
pose, or write. [See 
Indict, 160.] 

In-dite'meut, n. act of 
one who compoBes, 
or writes. [See In- 
dictment, 160.] 

In-dit'er, n. one who 
composes or writes. 
[See Indicter, 100.] 

In-di-vid'u-al (45, N.) 
fsoSm.Wr. Wb.Gd.i 
%n-4i-vid'u-al, or %n- 
di-vUVlu-nl, Wk. 155. 1 

In-di- via' u-al-ism 
i-izm), 130. 

In-di-vid-u-al'i-ty, 108. 

In-di -vid-u-al-T-za'tion. 

In-di-vid'u-al-ize, 202. 

In-di-vid'u-al-ized. 

In-di-vid'u-al-iz-ing. 

In-di-vis-i-bil'i-ty ( -mz-) 

In-di-vi8'i-ble( viz^ )ACA 

In-doc'l-blefBO Wk.Sm. 
Wr. ; in-do'si-bl, or 
in-dos'i-bl, Gd. 155.J 

In-d09'lIe(152)[80\Vk. 
Sm. Wr. ; in-do'sU, 
or in-dos'il, Gd. 165.) 

In-do-cil'i-ty. 

In-doc'trin-ate, 73. 



a, e, 1, 5, u, y, long i ft, S, X, 6, tt, yt «Aor< ; ft <M <fi fke, ka§in iast, ka$in 



IXDOCTKINATED 



245 



INFLECT 



In-doo'trin-at-ed. 

In-doc'trin-itt-ingf. 

In-doc-tria-a'tioii* 

In'do-leaoe. 

In'do-lent, 160. 

In-dom'i-ta-ble, IM. 

In-dorse' [Endorse, 
201. 20^. — See Note 
under Endorse.^ 

In-dorsed' (-dorsr). 

In-^lorse'ment [E n - 
dorsementt:^03.] 

In-dors'er, 183. 

In-dors'ing. 

In'drl, 191. 

In-du'bi-tarble, l&L 

In-ducc'. 

In-daced' ^-dust'). 

In-duoc'ment. 

In-du9'ing, 183. 

In-duct'. 

In-duct'ed. 

In-duct'ingf. 

In-due' tion. 

In-duct'Ive.- 

In-duct'or. 

In-duct'ric, 109. 

In-duct'rie-al, 106. 

In-due' [Endue, 203.1 

In-duedS 165, 183. 

In-du'lng*. 

In-dulges 22, 46. 

In-dulged' (,-duQd*), 

In-dulg'enoe (-du^'-), 
In-dulg'ent (du{i'-), 
In-dulg'er {-dufj'), 
In'du-rate, 73. 
In'du-rat-ed. 
In'du-rat-lng. 
In-du-ra'tlon. 
In-du'ni-al (-zhi-al) [so 

Sm. ; in-du'shcU, Wr. 

Gd. 155.J 
In-du'si-um (-zhl4im) 

[so 8m. Wr. ; in-du'- 

shi^m, Gd. 155.J 
In-du8'tri-al. 
In-dus'trl-oQs, 169. 
In'duHtry (105) [not In- 

dus'try, 153.J 
In-e'bri-ant. 
In-e'bri-ate, 73, 78. 
In-e'bri-at-ed, 183. 
In-e'bri-at-ing. 
In-e-bri-a'tion. 
In-e-bri'e-ty, 169. 
In-ef fa-ble, 164, 170. 
In-ef-faoe'a-ble, 183. 
In-ef-feot'Ive, 84. 
In-ef-fect'u-al, 72, 89. 
In-ef-fi-ca'cious {-shtu), 
In-effi-ca-cy, 169. 



In-ef-fl'den-cy {-ftsh'en- 

«y), 171. 
In-ef-f I'dent {-Jtsh'ent). 
In-ei'e-gance, 169. 
In-el'e-gant. 
ln-el-1-gl-bil'i-ty, 108. 
In-el'i-gi-ble, 108, 164. 
lu-ept'. 

In-ept'i-tude, 106, 169. 
In-e-qual'1-ty (-kipol'-). 
In-eq'ui-ta-bie {-ek'wi- 

tail)y 164, 171. 
In-ert', 21, N. 
In-er'ti-a {shl-a) [so 

8m. Wr. ; in^r'thof 

Wb. Gd.] 
In-es'ti-ma-ble, 164. 
In-ev'i-ta-ble, 164. 
In-ex-act'. 
In-ex-cus'a-ble (-Wl«'-)» 

164. 
In-ex-hausta-ble, 164, 

169. 
In-ex'o-ra-ble, 164, 171. 
In-ex-pe'di-ent. 
In-ex-pe'ri-ence, 48, N. 
In-ex-pe'ri-enoed 

(-enst). 
In-ex-pert', 21, N. 
In-ex'pi-a-ble, 104, 169. 
In-ex'pli-ca-ble, 164. 
In-ex-press'i-ble, 164. 
In-ex-pug'na-ble, 164. 
In-ex-tin'guish-a-ble 

(-tifuf'gwish-abl), 164, 

171. 
In-ex'tri-ca-ble, 164, 

169. 
In-fai-li-bll'i-ty, 106. 
In-fal'li-ble, 164, 170. 
In'fa-moiiB, 100, 169. 
In'fa-my, 93. 
In'fan-cy, 109. 
In'fant, 16, 72. 
In-fan'ta (Sp.), n.fam, 
In-fan'te (Sp.) (-«), n. 

mas, 
In-fant'i-cide, 160. 
In'fant-ile, or In'fknt- 

ne fso Wr. ; in'/arU- 

U, Wk. Gd. ; inffarU- 

1Z, Sm. 155.J 
In'fant-fne, or In'fimt- 

Ine [so Wr. ; in'farU- 

In, Wk. Gd. ; inyimt- 

1», 8m. 155.] 
Ii»'ftnt-ry, 93, 105. 
In-fat'u-ate, 73, 89. 
In-fiit'u-at-ed, 183. 
In-fat'u-at-lng. 
In-fat-u-a'tion. 
Infect', 15, 103. 
In-fect'ed. 



fUl s d Of in there } db M 



In-feot'ing. 

In-fec'tion. 

In-fec'tio&B (shus). 

In-fec'und [so Wk. Sm. 
Wr. i in-fe'kund, Wb. 
Gd. 165.J 

In-fe-cund'i-ty. 

In-fe-U9'i-to&B, 171. 

In-fe-Us'i-ty. 

In-fer', 21,N. 

In-fer'a-ble (164) [In- 
ferrible, 20:).] 

■^ Smart layi of thit 
word: " It it bettor to apell 
it JnferrioleJ' 

In'fer-enoe, 176. 

In-fer-en'tial (shal)' 

In-fe'ri-or, 49, N. 

In-fe-ri-or'i-ty, 108. 

In-fer'nal, 21, N. 

In-ferred' (ferd'), 176. 

In-fer'ri-ble (164) [In- 
ferable, 2XXi.—See 
Note under InferO' 
bU.] 

In-fer'ring, 176. 

Infest', 15, 103. 

In-fest-a'tion. 

In-fest'ed. 

In-fest'er. 

In-fest'ing. 

In'fl-del, 76, 78. 

In-fi-del'i-ty, 108, 169. 

In-fil'trate, 73. 

In-fll'trat-ed, 183. 

In-fil'trat-ing. 

In-fil-tra'tion. 

In'fl-nlte, 152. 

In-fin-i-tes'l-mal, 116, 

In-fln'i-tlve, 84. 
In-fln'i-tude, 106. 
In-fln'i-ty, 106, 169. 
In-firm', 21, N. 
In-flrm'a-ry, 72. 
In-flrm'i-ty, 169. 
In-flx', 16, 39, N. 
In-flxed' i-Jtk3t*), 166} 

Note C, p. 34. 
In-flx'inff. 
In-flames 23. 
In-flamed', 183. 
In-flam'er. 
In-flam'ing. 
In-flamrma-bil'i-^. 
In-flam'ma-ble, 164, 170L 
In-flam-ma'tion, 112. 
In-flam'ma-to-ry, 86. 
Tn-flate', 23. 
In-flat'ed, 183. 
In-flat'ing. 
In-fla'tion. 
In-fleet', 15. 



in foot; 9 <m in ftdle ; gh a< g in go j th a« in thi» 
21^ 



In-Beo'liaD. 
lD-Seo'iiaa->L 
In-fiexed' (yletd'). 






In-fDrniwl' C-formd'), 
lOB. 



ohifie.] 
In-mn'gj-ble, IM. 
la-Cre'nuea-cr, itO. 

In-Muged' CjMhW). 
In-rrlnge'nient, 185, 

In-ftiQ^llb'n-ldr, lOB. 



caprion la Iha jteneral nOt 
n-fh^rt-aM, 49, N. 

in-BTn'tl-it-ed (ihf-al-). 
In-gra'd-it-init C-»ftI- 

In-)^t'l-tude, lOS, 1S9. 
Inj^te'dl-ent Tso Sm. 
Wr. Wb. Gd. ; *b- 

'x, s,x 0. fi, f , iMv ) 1. (, ), e, a, f , '«A«rt 1 1 at c 



In-rBi'tDg (/•I'-i. 
tn-fa-wyrl-ii 'n.i>l. 

In'gatli-er-W [go Wk. 
Sm. Wt.iJngath'ur- 
ing, Wb. Gd. I&^ 

In-^t'a-ble, 43, IM, 

In-gen'Ioi™ (Jfn'inu), 
or In-£e'nl-oiia (-J^- 
flJ-B.] l»o Wr. : (, 

^"'#i' 



(..'^Vn*. 



In-glo'rl^ills, 4S, N, 
iQ-Ula'vl-eB f-(j). 

Hccdtlon la the jnnen] 
n,k((M), Hx-hChm. 
•Dundrd h m u Iha «d 



In-h^e^', les, in. 
la-ber'en-ef. 



tn-her'l-Maee, US. 
In-bi<r'it-cd. 

In-bi'r'lt-lDK. 
ln-h«r'il-or, 
In-hlb'It. 
In-hlb'iMd. 
In-blb'lt-lDK. 
In-hi-M'tion (■bUVun). 
In^iib-ltMHT-, 88. 
In-hos'pi-tfr*le,194, 17T. 

iD-hofr-pl-Ul'l-^. 



l-bum'lDir. 

Oii.,tn-i-mi'ka:,Bm.i 
ia4m'ii-at, or in-l- 






ikiaitamJs 

Iii-im'i-ta.ble» IM. 

In-iq'ai-to&B (^kfwt-). 

In-iq'ui-ty (-iA'ici-), 171. 

In-I'tial {-wh'al). 

In-rtl-ate C-ish'i-) (171) 
[80 Wk. Sm. Wr. j <n- 
Uh'ate, Wb. Gd. 165.1 

In-I'ti-at-ed (-»»*'<-). 

In-I'tl^lMne (Uh'i-), 

In.I-ti-a'tiou (^A4-). 

In-rti-a-tive (-wA'»-). 

In-t'ti-A-to-rj (-IsVi-). 

In-Ject', 16. 

In-iect'ed. 

In-iect'iugr. 

In-jec'tioa. 

[Injoin, 201, 208.— 
Set £igoiiL.l 

In-Ju-cD'ciotts {-dUk'- 

tM). 

In-junc'tlott. 
Injure, 91. 
In'Jured (^^nd), 188. 
In'Jur-er. 
lu^ur-faig'. 
ln-ju'ri-ottB,4»,W. 
In'ju-ry, 80, «3. 
In-jus'tloe i^uy^ 11«, 

100. 

Ink({9^Jt),16,M. 

Ink'norn iingkf-)y 206. 

Ink'ling (%ngk'-), 

Ink'stand iinhk'-}, 206. 

Ink' 7 iingJc^io* 

In-laoe', 23. 

In-laoed' {-lOst^, 

In-lac'ing. 

In-laid', 187. 

In'land. 

In-lay', 23. 

In-lay'er, 1187. 

In-Iay'lngr. 

In'let. 

[Inlist, 201, 203.— 

See Enlist.] 
In'mate. 
In'mdst. 
Inn (16, 175), n. a house 

of enterttdnment for 

travellers ; a tavem. 

r^ccln, 160.] 
In-nate' (66, 170) Tso 

Wk. Sm. Wr. ; »n'- 

nuty or in~nat', Gd. 

155.] 
In-naV'i-ga-ble, 164. 
In'ner, 170. 
In-nerv-a'tion. 
In-ncrve', 21, N. 
In-nerved' (-nerurf'), 

183. 
In-nerv'ing. 
Inn'hold-er. 



S4T 

Inn'lng. 
Inn'keep-er. 
In'no-eence, 170. 
In'no-oent. 
In-noc'n-otts. 
In'no-vate, 105, 170. 
In'no-v&t-ed, 183. 
In'no-vat-ing'. 
In-no-va'tton. 
In'no-v&t-or, 88. 
In-nox'iotts {-noV- 

8hu8)t 46, Kote 1. 
In-nik-en'do (170, 171) 

{pi. In-na^^en'does 
-dO«r), 102.1 
In-nn'mer-a-ble, 164. 
In-oc'n-late, 73, 80. 
In-oc'n-lat-ed, 188. 
In-oc'u-lat-ingp. 
In-oc>ii-la'tion, ll£. 
In-oc'u-lit-or. 
lu-o'dor-oiis. 
In-or'di-nate, 78, 78. 
In-os'cu-late. 
In-os'cu-lat^, 183. 
In-os'ca-lat-in£f. 
In-os-eu-lation. 
In'quest, 34. 
In-qul'e-tnde, 160. 
In-qoir'a-ble, 104, 183. 
In-quire' [Enquire, 

201, 203.] , 
In-quired', 165, 168. 
in-quir'er. 
In-qulr'ing. 
In-qui-Bl'Uon (-ziBh'- 

un)^ 171, 231, Exc. 
In-quiB'i-tlve {-bwiz'-). 
In-quisl-tor (^-kwiz'-), 
In-auis-i-td'n-al 

(-hwiz-). 
In'rdad. 

In-san'a-ble, 164. 
In-sane', 23. . 
In-san'i-ty, 108, 160. 
In-sa-ti-arbil'i-ty (-»a- 

»*1-), 169. 171. 
In-sa'tl-a-ble _r-»a'«M-) 

(164) [so Wk. Sm. 

wr. ; in-sa^sha-bly 

Wb. Gd. 165.] 
In-sa'ti-a-bly (-«a'«W-). 
In-sa'ti^te Of a'«fc1-) [so 

Wk. Sm. Wr. ; in-sa'- 

8hat. Wb. Gd. 155.] 
In-sat'u-ra-ble, 164. 
In-scrib'a-ble, 164, 160. 
In-scribe', 25. 
In-scribed', 183. 
In-scrib'er. 
In-scnb'ing. 
In-scrip'tion. 
In-scrip'tlve, 84. 



Ill-S49r51P [I'll B »Tt> I 

8m. 170, 203.] 
In-scrolled' i^kr9ld')^ 

105. 
In-scrdll'ing. 
In-scm'ta-ble i-^kroo'-), 

164. 
In'sect, 16, 76. 
In-sectlle, 162. 
In-sect-iv'o-rofis, 108* 
In-se-cure'. 
In-se-cu'ri-ty, 40, N. 
In-gen'sate, 78. 
In-sen-si-bil'i-ty, 108. 
In-sen'si-ble, 164. 
In-sen'tlent (-mr'^ 

8?ient)y 46, 171. 
In-sep-a-ra-bil'1-ty, 168. 
In-sep'a-ra-ble, 104. 
In-scrt', 21, N. 
In-sert'ed. 
In-sert'ing^. 
In-ser'tion. 
In-ses-so'r^ i-n»t) n. 

pi. 
In-ses-so'ri-al, 49, N. 
In-shore'. . 
[Inshrine, 201, 203. 

>- See Enshrine.] 
In-sic-ca'tlon. 
In' side. 
ln-Hid'i*oiiB [so Sm. 

Wr. Wb. Gd.i in- 

«id't-tw, or in-^id'^' 

U8y Wk. 166.] 
In'sight (-»«), 102. 
In-sig'ni-a (L.), n.ph 
In-sig-nii'i-cance, 160. 
In-sig-nifi-can-cy. 
In-8ig-nil^i-cant. 
In-Big-nil'i-ca-tIv«. 
In-sln-cere'. 
In-sin-c6r'i-ty. 
In-sin'u-ate, 73. 
In-sin'u-at-ed. 
In-sin'u-at-lng. 
In-stn-u-a'tion. 
In-sin'u-a-tlve, 84. 
In-sin'u-it-or [so Wk. 

Wr. Gd.; in-Hn'u-<h 

tor, Sm. 166.] 
In-Bip'id, 170. 
In-fli-pid'i-ty, 108. 
Insist', 16. 
In-sist'ed. 
In-sistlng. 
In- sl'tion (-fit/k'un) [n> 

Wk. Sm. Wb. Gd.; 

in-sizh^wiii or <»-«tsfc'- 

nriy Wr. 166.] 
Jn ai'tu f L.). 
In-anare' (snirf) (14) 

[Ensnare, 201. 203.J 



ttilitatinlltBegety^m'infooti 9tir{f».flRite;-ghtnfi:in<go;cg|i0t<iltliis. 



IN8NARBD 



248 



INTENBIFr 



Iii-«iuured'(^«n<n(fOt 183. 
In-snar'er (snir*-), 

In'BO-Ute, V. to dry by 

the heat of the sun; 

to expose to the rare 

of the sun. [See ui- 

salate, 148.] 
In'so-Iat-ed. 
In'so-Ut-ing. 
In-so-la'tion. 
In'so-lenoe. 
In'so-len-ey, 100. 
In'so-lent. 
In-Bol-u-bil'i-ty, 106. 
In-sol'u-ble, IM. 
In-solv'a-ble, 161. 
In-Bolv'en-oy. 
In-Bolv'ent. 
In-som'ni-ofit. 
In-spect', 15, 103. 
In-spect'ed. 
In-spect'ing. 
In-spec'tion. 
In-spect'lre, 84. 
In-Bpect'or, 88, 109. 
In-spir'a-ble, 164. 
In-spi-ra'tion. 
In'spi-ra-to-ry, or In- 

spir'a-to-ry (80) [so 

Wr. i insplr'arto-ry, 

or in'tpi-ra-to-ry, Crd. 

155.] 
In-spire', 25. 
In-spired', 183. 
In-spir'er. 
ln-spir'in£f. 
In-splfr'it. 
In-splfr'It-ed. 
In-spTr'it-ing. 
In-spis'sate, 170. 
In-spis'sat-ed, 183. 
In-spis'sat-ing. 
In-splB-sa'tion. 
In-Bta-bil'i-ty, 108. 
In-Bta'ble, 164. 
In-BtaiP (17) [Inst al, 

203.] 
In-Btall-a'tioft, 171. 
In-Bt&llcd' (-atawld'). 
In-stail'lngr. 
In-Btai'ment (178) [In- 

Btallment, wb. 

Gd. 203.] 
In'stance. 

In'stanced (stanst), 
In'stanc-ing*. 
In'stant. 

Jn-stant-a'ne-oiiB, 169. 
In st&'tu quo (L.) [not 

in stat'yoo kwo, 153.1 
In-8t6ad' {-sted') [not 

in-Btid', 153.] 



In'itep. 

In'Bti-g^te, 73, 78. 

In'sti-gat-ed, 183. 

In'Btl-(fat-inff. 

In-Btiga'tion, 112. 

In'sti-gat-or, 88. 

In-Btir (179, 180) [In- 
Btill,Wb. Gd.203.] 

In-stil-la'tion. 

In-stilled' i-stild'), 165. 

In-stil'ler, 170. 

In-stil'linff. 

In-Btil'ment [In Bti li- 
me nt,Wb.Gd. 203.] 

In'stinct (-sHngkt) TM, 
161), n. natural im- 
pulae as distinguished 
from reason or delib- 
eration. 

In-BUn&tf' i-»tingW) (54, 
161), a. moyedj ani- 
mated. 

In-BUnafireC-stingbt'-). 

In'sti-tute, 26, 127. 

In'8ti-tut-ed, 183. 

In'sti-tut-ing. 

In-sti-tu'tion. 

In-Bti-tu'tion-al. 

In-sti-tu'tion-a-ry, 72. 

In'sti-tuMst, 183. 

In'sti-tut-or, 88. 

In-struct', 22. 

In-struct'ed. 

[Instructer, 203.— 
See Instructor.] 

In-struct'ing. 

In-struc'tion. 

In-struct'Yve, 84. 

In-struct'or [In- 
structer, 203.] 

In-Btruct'ress. 

In'Btru-ment (stroo-). 

In-Btru-ment'al (stroo-) 

In-stru-ment-al'i-ty 
i-stroo-), 108, 169. 

In-stru-mentna'tion 
(stroo-). 

In-Bub-or'di-nate. 

In-sub-or-di-na'tion. 

In-Buf fer-a-ble, 164. 

In-Buf-fl'cien-oy (-flsh'- 
en-). 

In-BVif-n' dent (^sh'ent) 

In'su-lar (72) [so Sm. 
Wr. Wb. Gd.; in'- 
8hu-lar, Wk. 155.] 

In-Bu-lftr'i-ty, 108. 

In'su-late f73J, v. to de- 
tach ; to isolate. [See 
Insolate, 148.1 

In'su-liit-ed, 183. 

In'su-liit-ing-. 

In-8u-la'tion. 



In'su-lat-or, 88. 
In'snlt, n. 103, 101. 
In-Bult', V. 103, 161. 
In-Bult'ed. 
In-sult'er. 
In-Bult'ing. 

In-BU-per-a-bil'i-^, 106. 
In-su'per-a-ble, 104. 
In-sup-port'a-ble, 164. 
In-sura-ble (-«Aoor'-), 

164. 
In-sur'anoe C-skoor'-) 
(40, 183) [Ensnr- 
ance, 201, 203.1 
In-Bure' (shoor') (19, 
46) [Ensure, 201, 
203.— See Note under 
Ensure.] 

n-snred' (^hoord'). 

n-sur'er {-ahoor'-). 

n-sur'ing (^-ehoor'-). 

n-sur'gent. 

n-sur-mount'a-ble, 164. 

n-sur-rec'tion, 170. 

n-Bur-reo'tion-Al. 

n-Bur-rec'tion-a-ry, 72. 

n-Bur-rec'tion-ist. 

n-tact'. 

n tagl'io (It.) (4dl'vo). 

n-tan-gi-bil'lty, 108. 

n-tan'gi-ble, 164. 

n'te-ger, 45, 105, 

n'te-gral, 72. 

n'te-grant. 

n'te-grate, 73, 109. 

n'te-grat-ed. 

n'te-grat-ing. 

n-te-gra'tion. 

n-teg'ri-ty, 106, 169. 

h-teg'u-ment, 89. 

n-teg-u-ment'a-ry, 72. 

n'tel-lect, 66, 170. 

n-tel-lec'tion. 

n-tel-lect1ve. 84. 

n-tel-lect'u-at, 72, 170. 

n-tcl-lecfu-al-ist. 

n-tel'li-genoe, 170. • 

n-tel'li-genQ-er, 183. 

n-tel'U-gent, 169, 170. 

n-tel-li-gen'tial {-shal). 

n-tel'li-gi-ble, 108, 164, 
171. 

n-tem'per-anoe, 109. 

n-tem'per-ate, 73. 

n-tend', 15. 

n-tcnd'an-cy, 169. 

n-tend'ant. 

n-tend'ed. 

n-tend'ing. 

n-tend'ment. 

n-tense', 15. 

n-ten'si-fied, 186. 

u-ten'si-fy, 94. 



a, e, I, o, H, f, long; ft, S, 1, 5, fi, f, short; Viasin fiir, kasin fiut, ft as in 



INTENSIFYING 



249 



INTERRUPT 



In-tcn'si-fy-ing. 
Iu-ten'8ioii, n. act of 

making^ intense. [See 

Intention, 1(K).] 
Xn-ten'8i-ty, 106, 160. 
In-ten'slve, 84. 
In-tent', a. & n. 16. 
In-ten'tion, n. design; 

purpose. [See Inten- 
sion. 160.] 
In-ten'tion-al. 
In-ten'tioned (-shund), 
In-ter', 21, N. 
In-ter'ca-lar. 
In-ter'ca-la-ry (72) [so 

Sm. Wr. Wb. Gd. ; 

inter-kal'a^, Wk. 

155.1 
In-tcr'ca-late,21, N.; 73. 
In-ter'ca-lat-ed, 183. 
In-ter'ca-lat-ing. 
In-ter-ca-la'tion. 
In-ter-cede', 109. 
In-ter-eed'ed, 183. 
In-ter-ced'ent 
In-ter-ced'er. 
In-ter-ced'ing. 
In-ter-cept/. 
In-ter-cept'ed. 
In-ter-cept'er. 
In-ter-oept'ing. 
In-ter-oep'tion. 
In-ter-oes'sion (-<efA'- 

un)f 46, 171. 
Xn-ter-oe8'sion-aI(^e«A'- 

un-). 
In-ter-oes'sor, 88. 
In-ter-ces'so-ry, 86. 
In'ter-change. n. 161. 
In-ter-change', v. 161. 
In-ter-change-anbil'i-ty. 
In-ter-change'a-ble, 1&4. 
In-ter-change'a-blr. 
Inter-changed', 183. 
In-ter-cipM-ent. 
In-ter-clude'. 
In-ter-clud'ed. 
In-ter-clud'ing. 
In-ter-clu'sion (~zhun). 
In-ter-co-lum-ni-a'tion. 
In-ter-oos'tal, 72. 
In'ter-coarse (-kSrs). 
In'ter-dict, n. 161. 
In-ter-dict', v. 161. 
In-ter-dict'ed. 
In-ter-dict'ing. 
In-ter-dic'tion. 
In-ter-dictlTe, 84. 
In-ter-dict'o-ry, 86. 
In'ter-est, n. A v, 
In'ter-est^«d. 
In'ter-«Bt-ing [not in- 
r-est'ing, 126, 153.] 



n-ter-fa'cial (-thai), 

n-ter-fere', 171. 

n-ter-fered', 183. 

n-ter-fer'enoe. 

n-ter-fer'er. 

n-ter-fer'ing. 

n'tcr-im. 

n-te'rl-or, 49, N. 

n-ter-ject'. 

n-ter-ject'ed. 

n-ter-jcct'ing. 

n-ter-jec'tion. 

n-ter-jec'tion-al. 

n-ter-lace'. 

n-ter-laced' (-l&st'), 

n-ter-la9'ing, 183. 

n-ter-lard'. 

n-tcr-lard'ed. 

n-ter-lard'ing. 

h'tor-leaf [pi. In'ter- 
leaves (-levz), 193.] 

n-ter-leave'. 

n-ter-leaved', 183. 

n-ter-leav'ing. 

n-ter-line'. 

n-ter-lin'e-al. 

n-ter-liu'e-ar, 72, 169. 

n-ter-lin-e-a'tion. 

n-ter-lined', 183. 

n-ter-lin'ing. 

n-ter-loc'u-tor [so Sm. 
Wb. Gd. ; in-ter-iok'- 
u-tur, or in-ter-lo-ku'- 
tur, Wr. ; in-ter-lo- 
ku'tur, or in-ter-lol^- 
u-tuTy Wk. 155.] 
In-ter-loc'u-to-ry, 86. 
In-ter-lope'. 
In-ter-loped' {-lopt'). 
In-ter-16p'er, 183. 
In-ter-lop'ing. 
In'ter-lude. 
In-ter-lud'ed. 
In-ter-lu'nar. 
In-ter-lu'na-ry, 72. 
In-ter-m&r'rii^fe (-H/), 

171. 
In-ter-mHr'ried. 
In-ter-mftr'ry. 
In-ter-mir'ry-ing. 
In-t€r-med'me, 164. 
In-ter-med'dlea C-med'- 

Id). 
In-ter-medMler. 
In-ter-med'dling. 
In-ter-mc'di-al [so Sm. 
Wr. Wb. Gd. j in-ter- 
m^di-ftlf or in-ter-me'- 

ji-aly Wk. 155.] 
In-ter-me'di-a-ry, 72. 
In-ter-me'di-ate, 73. 
In-ter'mi-na-ble, 21, N. ; 
164, 169. 



In-ter-min'gle {-ming'' 
gl)y IW. 

In-ter-min'gled (-ming'- 
gldh m. 

In-ter-min 'gling 
(-mti»^'-). 

In-ter-mis'sion (-miah'' 
un). 

In-ter-mis'slve, 84. 

In-ter-mit'. 

In-ter-mit'ted, 176. 

In-ter-mit'tentI 

lu-ter-mit'ting. 

In-ter-mix'. 

In-ter-mixcd' (-miksf). 

In-tcr-mixMng. 

In-ter-mixt'ure, 91. 

In-ter'nal, 21, N. 

In-ter'nal-ly, 170. 

In-ter-n£l'tion-al 
(•^tash'un-al) [so Sm. 
Wr. i in^er^na'shun- 
aly Wb. Gd. 165.] 

In-ter-nc'clne, 152. 

In-ter-pcl-la'tion. 

In-ter-plead' [Enter- 
plead, 201,203.] 

In-ter-plead'ed. 

In-ter-plead'er. 

In-ter-plead'ing. 

In-ter'po-late (21, N. ; 
105) [so Wk. Sm.Wr.j 
in'ter-po-l&t, or <n- 
ter'po-llLt, Gd. 165.] 

In-terpo-lat-ed. 

In-ter'po-lat-ing. 

In-ter-po-la'tion. 

In-ter'po-lat-or. 

In-ter-pose' (-p6z'). 

In-ter-posed' (-pOzd'), 

In-ter-p6s'er i-p9z'-), 
183. 

In-ter-p6s'ing (pOz'-), 

In-ter-po-sl'tlon {-zish'- 
un). 

In-ter'pret, 21, N. 

In-ter'pret-a-ble, 164. 

In-ter-pre-ta'tion. 

In-ter'pre-tat-lfve [ao 
Wk. Sm. Wr.; in4er'- 
pre-ta-Hv, Wb. Gd. 
155.] 

In-ter-ra'di-al, 224. 

In-terred' (-terd')j 21, N. 

In-ter-reg'num (L.). 

In-ter'ring, 176. 

In-t?r'ro-gate, 73, 170. 

In-t?r'ro gat-ed. 

In-t?r-ro-ga'tiOn. 

In-ter-rog'a-tTve. 

In-ter'ro-gat-or. 

In-ter-rog'a-to-ry, 86. 

In-ter-mpt'. 



fiUls ta9i» tbere ; iSbatin foot iqatin fiusUe igli€Ugingo',^€uin this. 



INTSMIUPTED 



2&0 



mVEIOHER 



iB-ter-mpt'ed. 

In-ter-mpt'er. 

In-ter-ropt'ing^. 

In-ter-rup'tion. 

In-ter-BCct'. 

In-ter-Bcct'ed. 

In-tcrnect'ing^. 

ln-ter-8cc'tion. 

In ter-sperse', 21, N. 

lQ-ter-8per8od'(-«p«rJ*') 

In-ter-spers'ing. 

lu-ter-sper'sion. 

In-ter-Btel'lar, 170. 

In-ter-stel'la-ry, 72. 

In'ter-Btlce, or In-tcr'- 
BtTce C-ttis) (lOU) [so 
Wk Wr. Gd. , in-^er'- 
atiSy Sm. )S5.] 

Inter Btl'tlal (-stiMh'al). 

In-ter-text'nre. 91. 

In-ter-trop'ic-ai, 106. 

In-ter-twinc'. 

In-tcr-twined', 183. 

In-ter-twin'ing. 

In-ter-twist'. 

In-ter-twist'ed. 

In-ter-twlst'ing. 

In'ter-val, 72. 

In-ter-vene'. 

In-ter-Tcncd', 183. 

in-tor-Ten'er. 

In-tcr-ven'lng. 

In-ter-ven'tlon, 

In'ter-view (-tJ*). 

In-ter-weave'. 

In-ter-weaved', 183. 

In-ter-weav'ing, 

In-ter-wove'. 

In-ter-wov'en (-wOv^n), 

In-test'a-ble, 1«4. 

In-test'a-cy, 109. 

In-test'ntc, 73. 

In-tes'tin-al. 

In-tes'tTne, 152. 

In-thraU' (179) [In- 
thral, Sm. — En- 
thrall, 201, 203.1 

In-thrailed' (-ttrairW'). 

In-thrftU'ing. 

In-thrai'ment (178)rin - 
thrallment, Wb. 
Gd. 203.] 

In'tl-ma-cy, IflO. 

In'ti-mate, a. A v, 73. 

In'tl-mat-ed, 183. 

In'ti-mat-ing. 

In-ti-ma'tion. 

In-tim'i-date, 109. 

In-tim'i-dat-ed. 

In-tim'i-dat-ing. 

In-tim-i-da'tion. 

[Intire, 201, 208.— 
See Entire.] 



[Intitle, 201, 203.* 

See KntltleJ 
In'to (^oo), 10, 19. 
lo-torer-a-ble, 104. 
In-tol'er-anoe, 169. 
In-tol'er-ant. 
In'to-nate. 
In'to-nat^. 
In'to-nat-ing. 
In-to-na'tton. 
In-tox'i-cate, 109. 
In-tox'i-cat-ed, 163. 
In-tox'i-cat-ing . 
In-tox-i-ca'tion. 
In-trac-ta-bil'i-ry. 
In-trac'ta-blc, IM, 109. 
In-tra'doB. 
[I n t r a n c e ', 203.— i9ee 

Entrance'.] 
In-tran'ri-tlve, 84. 
In-trench', 15, +4. 
In-trenched' (-frencW')* 

165 ; Note C, p 34. 
In-trench'ing. 
In-trench'ment. 
In-trep'id, 170. 
In-tre-pld'i-tf. 
In'tri-ca-cf , 109. 
In'tri-cate, 73, 78. 
Intrigue' (-triff'), 168. 
In-trigned' (-trigd'). 
In-trigu'er (,-treg'-). 
In-trigu'ing i^rBg'-). 
In-trin'Blc, 109. 
In-trin'sic-al, 106. 
In-tro-ces'sion {-tesh^- 

fcn). 
In-tro-duoe'. 
In-tro-duced' {-dOtt*), 
In-tro-du5'er. 
In-tro-du9'ing. 
In-tro-duc'tlon. 
In-tro-duc'tlve, 84. 
In-tro-duc'to-ry, 86. 
In-tro'it [so Sm. Wr. ; 

fn-#ro<r,Wb.Qd. ISS.j 
In-tro-mis'sion (^-mish'- 

un). 
In-tro-mit'. 
In-tro-mit'tcd, 176. 
In-tro-mit'ting. 
Tn-trorse'. 
In-tro-spec'tion. 
In-tro-spec'tlve. 
In-tro-BUB-oep'tion. 
In-tro-ver'slon. 
In-tro-vert', 21, N. 
In-tro-vert'ed. 
In-tro-vert'ing. 
In-trude' (-trood'). 
In-trud'ed (-trood'-), 
In-tmd'er (-trood'-"). 
In-trud'ing {-troodf-). 



In-tra'slon (-troo^zkwn), 

In-tm'Blve {-tro<^-). 

In-tru8t', 22. 

In-truRt'ed. 

In-truRt'ing. 

In-tu-T'tion (-ish'un), 

In-tu'i-tlvo, 84, 109. 

In-tu-mesce' (-me8')tl7U 

In-tn-mesccd' (-meet*), 

In-tu-mea'dng, 183. 

In-tu-mes'cenoe, 171. 

In-tU8-vuB-oep'tion. 

In-twine' [Entwinft, 
201, 203.1 

In-twined', 183. 

In-twin'ing. 

In-um'brare. 

In-um'brat'-ed, 183. 

In-nm'brat-ing. 

In-un'date. 

In-un'dat ed. 

In-un'dat-ing. 

In-un-da'tion. 

Inure', 20. 

Inured', 165, ffi3. 

In-ur'ing. 

In-urc'ment. 

In-um', 21. 

In-umed' {•urtuP), 

In-urn'ing. 

In-u-tll'i-ty, 108, 169. 

In-Tade' (23), v. to en- 
ter with a " 

nv. 
160.1 

In-vad'ed, 183. 

In-vad'er. 

In-Yad'ing. 

In-vag-i-na'tion (-wrf-)- 

In-val'id (161), a. of no 
force; weak. 

In'va-Iid, or In-va-lid' 
(-Wrf) [in'va-Hdy Wb. 
Gd.; in-va-lBd't Wk. 
Sm. Wt. 155] (161), 
n. one who is weak, 
or infirm. 

In-val'i-date, 73, 169. 

In-val'i-dat-ed, 183. 

In-ral'i-dat-ing. 

In-val-i-da'tion. 

In-Ttt-lid'i-ty, 108. 

In-val'u-a-ble, 164. 

In-va-ri-a-bil'i-ty. 

In-ya'ri-a-ble,49,N.; 164. 

In-ya'sion {-zhun). 

In-va'Blve, 84. 

In-vec'tTve. 

In-veigh' (-ra'), 162. 

In-vei|hed' (-rfld'), v. 
did inyeign, or raiL 
C^ee Invade, 160.] 

In-veigh'er (-ra'-). 



hostile 
army. [iSeelnveigfaed, 



%, «, i, o, fi, y, iong^ % Mi ^t% f* "^fOfH j tnt'^fi'flur, a a»^ ihst,'tiat^ 



INVfilORmo 



251 



IBBsntAOABIdD 



In-yeigh'iflg (-vaf-), 
In-vgrgle {-vefgt), IM, 

100. 
In-rei'gled {^ve'gld), 
In-vci'gflor. 
In-vel'glins". 
In-venr, 15. 
In-Tcnt'ed. 
[In Tenter, 203.— See 

Inventor.] 
In-vent'ing. 
lu-ven'tion. 
In-ventlve, 84. 
In-vent'or (88) [In- 

venter, 203.1 
In'ven-to-rjr (8o) [not 

In-ven'to-ry.l 
In-verse', 21, N. 
In-yer'slon. 
In-vert', 21, N. 
In-ver'te-brate, 78. 
In-ver'te-br&t-«d. 
In-yert'ed. 
In-vert'inff. 
In-vest', 15. 
In-vest'ed. 
In-ves'tl-ga>ble, 164. 
In-YeB'ti-gnte, 109. 
In-yes'ti-g^t-ed, 183. 
Xn-yes'ti-g^t ing. 
] n-y es-ti-ga'tion. 
In-yes'ti-gat-or. 
In-yest'ing. 
In^yest'i-tare. 
In-yesfment. 
In-vet'er-a-ey, 160. 
In-vet'er-ate, 73. 
In-vld'i-oGB (IdO) [bo 

Sm. Wr. Wb. Gd.j 

in-vid*i-us, or In-vid'- 

ji-us. Wk. 155.] 
In-vlg'o-rate. 
In-ylg'o-rat-ed. 
In-yig'o-rat-ing. 
In-ylg-o-ra'tlon. 
In-yin-cl-bil'i-ty, 108. 
In-vln'ci-ble, 164. 
In vi-o-la-bil'i-ty. 
In-vi'o-la-ble, 164. 
In-vl'o-late, 73. 
In-vl8-l-bil'i-ty (-<*?-), 

IGO. 
In-yis'i-ble (-!*»'-). 104. 
In-vi-ta'tion. 
In-yit'a-to-ry, 80. 
In-ylte', 25. 
In-yit'ed, 183. 
In-yit'er. 
In-yit'ing. 
In-ylt'ri-Ti-a-ble (104) 

[§o Wr. Wb. Gd. ; in- 

vit-H-fl'a-bl, Sni.l5S.] 
In-yo-ca'tlon. 



In'yolee. 

In'yoiced (-cwifQ. 
In'voif-ing. 
In-yofce'. 24. 
In-yoked' i-v9kt'), 
In-yok'lng, 18». 
In-yol'u-cel [so Wb. 

Gd.j tVi;o-l«-«e2,Wr. 

165.1 
In-yo-la'oel-late. 
In-yo-lu'cral. 
In-yo-!a'crate. 
In-yo-lu'cre (kur) (164) 

[so Wb. Gd.} in'vo- 

iu-kurj Wr. 155.] 
In-yo-ltt'cred (-kurd)t 
In-yo-lu'cret. [171. 
In-yo-lu'orum. 
In-yol'un-ta-ry, 72. 
In'yo-lute. 
In-yo-lQt-ed. 
In-yo-lu'tion. 
In-yolye'. 18. 
In-yolyed' (-w)?rd')» M*. 
In-yoly'lng, 1»J. 
In-yul-ner-a-bil'i-ty. 
In-yul'ner-a-ble, 164. 
In' ward, €td. A n. 
In' wards {-wardz), ad. 

& n.pL 
In-wrap' (-rap') (102) 

[Enwrap, 203.1 

In-wrapped'(-r(grtO» 170 

In-wrap'ping. 

I'o-date. 

I-od'ic, 109. 

ro-dTde[Iodld,203.] 

I'o-dlne, 152. 

I'o-dize, 202. 

I'o-di2ed, 183. 

I'o-dlz-ing. 

I'o-dotts. 

I-od'u-ret, 79, 80. 

I'o-llte, 152. 

I'on. 

I-o'ni-an, 169. 

T-on'ic, 79, lOO. 

I-o'ta,72. 

Ip-e-csac-u-anlia (116, 

171) [so Sm. Wr. Wb. 

6d. i ip-e-bak-u-a'na, 

Wk. 165.] 

d^ This ir«rd It ofteil 
•bridged, in common di«- 
eourie, to ^'e-cae* 

I-ras-d-bll'i-ty, 106, 109. 
I-ras'cl-ble, IW, 171. 
Ire (f r), 25, 163. 
Ire'ttil (-fSbl). 
I'ren-arch (-ark), 
I-ren'io-al. 
Tri-an, 169. 



I'ri-dal, 72, 78. 

Ir-i-des'cence, 39, 171. 

Ir-i-des'eent [so Wr. 
W b.Gd- ; l-ri-dee'een^, 
Sm. 155.1 

I-rid'1-um, 169. 

I'ris (49, N.) [L. pi. /r'- 
irdis {-dtz) i Bng. pL 
I'ris-es (-e«), 198lj 

I'ri-sat-cd. 

I'ri -scope. 

I'rised (-rist). 

I'rish, 49, N. 

t'rish-lsm {-izm), 

Ir'lsh-ry. 

Irk' some (-turn), 21, K. 

I'ron (J'am), 171. 

I'roned (i'urnd), 

I'ron-er (i'umr-), 

I-ron'io, 109. 

I-ron'io*al, 108. 

I'ron-ing (i'ttrfi-). 

I'ron-mon'ger {i'um- 
mung'ffur), 205, £x& 
3. 

I'ron-mon-ger-y (i'um" 
mung-guT-y)t 171. 

I'ron-r (<'t*H»-y) (161), 
a. made of iron;--* 
resembling iron. 

I'ron-y (i'run^) (161), 
n. B species of ridi« 
cule in which what is 
said is contrary tO 
what is meant. 

Ir-ra'di-anoe. 

Ir-ra'di-an-cy. 

Ir-ra'di-ant. 

Ir-ni'di-ate, 160. 

Ir-ra'di-at-ed, 183. 

tr-ra'di-at-ing. 

Ir-ra-di-a'tion. 

Ir-ra'tion-al (rash'un- 
al) [so Sm. Wr. ; tr- 
rasn'o-ruiit YTk. ; 1r- 
ra'shun-al, or 1r-< 
r(Mh'un-a2, Gd. 155.1 

Ir-ra-tlon-al'i-ty (-roeA- 
«n-), 108, 169, 171. 

Ir-re-claim'a-ble, 164. 

Ir-rec-on-cTl'a-ble, 164. 

Ir-rec'on-ciled. 

Ir-re-oov'er-a-ble (-Jfewr'- 
«r-o-60, 164, 169. 

Ir-re-deem'a-ble, 164. 

Ir-re-du5'i-ble. 164, 160. 

Ir-ref-ra-ga-bil'i-ty. 

Ir-ref ra-ga-bie (164) [so 
Sm. Wr. , Ir-r^rct' 
ga-bliOT \r-re-fraq' a^ 
bit Wk.i tr-re-fi-a'' 
ffo-blt or Ir-rc/'ro- 
ga-blt Gd. 155.] 



iUl; doe <» there; dbae<nfoot;9af<nfiMUe;ghaeg<ngo; t^otifitliii. 



IRREFUTABLE 



252 



ITCHY 



wr Walker remarlci of 
the flnt pronunciatioii 
• which he |rivei {ir-rrfrtk- 
ffor-tif)'' "If I am not much 
mistaken, it has not only 
the best usafre on its side, 
but the ciearest analogy to 
support It." 

Ir-re-fut'a-ble,orIr-rer- 
u-ta-blc (164) [so Wr.; 
^r^e-fat'orbl, Wk. 
Sm. {ir-r^u^Orbl, or 
Xr-re^/at'orbly Od.l65.] 

•P Though Walker, 
in defierence to all the au- 
thorities that preceded 
him, adopts the pronunci- 
ation tr-re-/i/^a-M, he says 
that analogy is in iavor of 
ir-r^ti-ti*-W. 

Ir-reg'u-lar, 72, 89. 
Ir-reff-u-lirM-ty, 108. 
Ir-rel'a-tlve, S4. 
Ir-rel'e-vant. 
Ir-re-lig^'ion (-lii'un). 
Ir-re-lig'lou8 (-/(/'t**). 
Xr-re'me-a-ble, 164. 
Ir-re-me'dl-a-ble, 164. 
Ir-re-mis'si-ble, 164. 
Ir-re-inis'slve. 
Ir-re-mov'a-ble (moov'- 

a-bl), 164. 
Ir-re-rau'ner-a-ble, 164. 
Ir-rep-a-raA)il'i-t3r, 169. 
Ir-rep'a-ra-ble (164, 169) 

[not ir-re-p§r'arbl, 

153.1 
Ir-rep'a-ra-blr. 
Ir-re-peal-a-bil'I-ty. 
f r-re-peal'a-ble, 164, 160. 
Ir-re-plev'i-a-ble, 164. 
Ir-re-plev'i-sa-ble, 164. 
Ir-rep-re-hen'sl-ble, 164. 
Ir-re-press'i-ble, 164,160. 
Jr-re-proach'a-ble, 164. 
Ir-re-pro V 'a-ble(-i>ro<w'- 

a-6/); 164. 
Ir-re-8i8t-i-bil'I-ty 

i-zist-), 108, 169. 
Ir-re-Bist'i-ble (-zist'-), 

164. 
Ir-res'o-lu-ble {-rez'-\ 

164. 
Ir-res'o-lute {-rez'-). 
Ir-res-o-lu'tion (-rez-). 
Ir-re-solv-a-bil'i-ty 

(-zolv-), 108, 169. 
lr-re-8olv'a-ble {-zolv*-), 

164. 
Jr-re-spectlve, 84. 
Ir-re8'pi-ra-ble, 164. 
Ir-re-8pon-8i-bil'i-ty. 
Ir-re-spon'si-ble, 164. 
Ir-re-triev'a-ble, 164. 



Tr-rer'er-enoe, 100. 

Ir-rev'er-ent. 

Ir-re-vers'i-ble, 164. 

lr-rev-o-c8-bil'i-ty. 

Ir-rev'o-ca-ble. 

Xr'ri-g^ate, 78, 160. 

Ir'ii-gttt-od. 

Ir'ri-gat-inip. 

Ir-ri-ffa'tion. 

Ir-rig^u-ofis, lOS. 

Ir-ris'i-ble (-r»«'-), 164. 

Ir-rl'sion (^rizh'tm). 

Ir-ri-ta-bU'i-tf. 

Tr'rl-ta-ble, 164, 169. 

Ir'ri-tant. 

Ir'ri-tate, 78, 169. 

Ir'ri-tat-ed, 183. 

Ir'rl-tat-ing. 

Ir-ri-ta'tlon. 

Ir'ri-tat-Ive [so Sm. 

Wr.j1r'ri-<a-«r,Wb. 

6d. 155.] 
Ir'ri-ta-to-iy (72) [bo 

Wr. Wb. Gd. ; IKri- 

tlU-o-ry, Sm. 156.] 
Iivro-ra'tion. 
Ir-rupt'ed. 
Ir-rup'tlon. 
Ir-rup'tlve, 84. 
Is {iz\ 174. 
I-Ba-gog'io (flr(?/'-), 109. 
I-8a-gog'ic-al (^q/'-),108. 
I'sa-gon. 

Is-chi-adMc (-i'1-),62,109. 
Is-chi-ag'ra (-fcl-). 
l8-cha-ret'Ic (-^•u-). 
Is-chu'ri-a (-ku'-). 
iB'clm-ry {-ku-). 
I'8ln-glas8 (-zing- (171) 

riBingglasB, Sm. 

Is'lam (fo'-), 171. 
Is'lam-ism {iz'tam-izm), 
Is-lam-lt'ic (t>-), 109. 
Island (i'land), 162, 171. 
Is'land-er (i'land-). 
Isle (10, 162, 171. 
Isl'et (Jl'et). 
I'so-bare (-Wr^. 
I-80-bar-o-met'ric. 
I-so-chi'mal(-A?t'-) [I s o - 

cheimal, Wb. Gd. 

203.1 
I-8o-cnl'men-al (-W-) 

[so Gd. ; l-80-kim'e- 

nal, Wr. 156.] 
I-so-chi'menc i-ki'-). 
I-80ch'ro-nal {-sok'-). 
I-BOch'ro-nism (-aok^ro- 

nizm), 136, 171. 
I-BOch'ro-nofis {-sok'-). 
I-80-cli'ual [ro Wr. ; 

l-sok'Unal, Gd. 155.] 



T-Bod'o-mon. 
I-BO-dy-nam'ic, 109. 
I-BO-ge-o-ther'mial. 
I-BO-gon'lc. 
I-BO^ra-phy, 108. 
I-BO-ny'e-tose. 
iB'o-late iiz'o-lat) [so 

Wk. Sm. Wr. ; Wo- 

lat, Wb. Gd. 165.] [not 

i'BO-lat, 163.] 
iB'o-lat-ed («r'-). 
iB'o-lat-ing (»«'-). 
Is-o-Ia'tion iiz-), 
I-Bol'o-go&B. 
I-80-mfr'ic. 

I-Bom'er-ism (^isrm),136. 
I-BO-met'ric, 109. 
I-BO-mct'rical, 106. 
I-BO-mor'phYsm i-j^zm)> 
I-BO-mor'phofis. 
I-8on'o-my, 108. 
I-Bo-p6r-i-met'ric-al. 
I-80-pe-rim'e-tary, 169 
I'so-pod. 
I-sop'o-doiiB. 
I'so-pyre. 

I-sos'ce-les (-ttF«), 171. 
I-80-Btem'o-nouB. 
I-80th'er-al. 
I'so-there. 
I'flo-therm. 
I-80-therm'al, 21, N. 
I- BOth-e-rom'brose. 
I-8o-ton'ic. 
iB'ra-el-ite (iz'rH-) (72) 

[bo Sm. ; iz'ra-€^-t^ 

Wr. Wb. Gd. 155.] 
lB-ra-el-it'ic(t>-),72, 10* 
Is-ra-el-it'lBn (i«-). 
iB'Bu-a-ble {ish'shoo-tf 

bl)y 169, 183. 
Is'sue (ish'shoo) (171) 

ri«/i"oo,Sm.(5ce§26)j 

t8h'8huy Wr. Wb. Gd. 

155.] 
Is'sued (iah'ahood), 183. 
Is'su-er (iah'shoo-). 
iB'su-ing (ish'sJux}-). 
Isth'mi-an (*««'-), 171. 
Isth'muB (<«<'-), 41, 171. 
It, 16, 41. 
I-tal'ian (-j/an) (51, 79) 

[not i-tal'yan, 163.] 
I-tal'lc (170) [not i-tal'- 

ic, 153.] 
l-tal'i-cize, 202. 
I-tal'i-cized, 183. 
I-tal'i-<nz-ing. 
Itch, 16, 44. 
Itched iicht). Note C, 

p. 34. 
Itch'ing. 
Itch'y. 



a, e, 1, o, a, y, long ;&,£,!, 5, 11, y, short ', 'Atuin far, a as in fast, Si as in 



ITEM 



258 



JAW 



I'tem. 

It'er-ate. 

It'er-at-ed, 183. 

It'er-at-Ing. 

It'er-a-tion. 

It'er-at-Ive (84) [bo 

Sm. J it'er-€i-tiVt wr. 

Wb. Gd. 166.1 
I-tin'er-an-cy, 169. 
l-tin'er-ant. 
I-tin'er-a-ry, 72, 
l-tin'er-ate. 
I-tin'er-at-€d. 
I-tin'er-at-ing. 
Its, 16, 39, 41. 
It-self, 
ri 1 1 r i a, 293.*5ee 

Yttria.] 
[Ittrium, 203. — 5e6 

Yttrium.] 
I-u'll-dan [soWr. ',yoo'- 

li-dauy Sm. 156.1 
rv!ed[Ivyed,a03.] 
I'vo-ry, 93. 
I'vy, 169. 
[I V y e d , 203 — See 

Ivied.] 
rry-man'tled (-Ud^ 

205.] 



J. 



Jab'ber, 66, 170. 

Jab'bered (-l^urJ), 150. 

Jab'ber-er, 77. 

Jab'ber-ing. 

Jab'i-ru i-roo), 

Jac'a-mar. 

Ja'cent. 

Ja'dnth. 

Jack, 181. 

Jack-a-dan'dy. 

Jack'ai [so Sm. Wr. 

Wb.Gd.jiaJfc-dZ',Wk. 

165.] 
Jack'a-lent. 
Jack'an-ape, or Jadc'an- 

apes. 
Jack'ass, 12, 131. 
Jack'block, 206. 
Jack'boots, n. pi. [so 

Sm. Wr. Wb. Gd.j 

jak-boots'j Wk. 155.] 
Jack'daw. 
Jack'et, 76. 
Jack'et-ed. 
Jack'-knife (-nl/), 162, 

206, Exc. 1. 
Jack'plane, 206. 
Jack'-screw (skroo), 

206, Exc. 3. 



Jack'straw. 

Jac'o-bin. 

Jac-o-bin'ic, 109. 

Jac-o-bin'ic-al, 106. 

Jac'o-bin-ism C-izm)* 
1.36. 

Jac'o-bite, 152. 

Jac-o-bit'ic-al, 108. 

Jac'o-bit-ism (-izm). 

Ja'cob's-lad'aer, 206, 
213. 

Jac'o-net. 

Jao-quard' (-Jterd')- 

Jac-ta'tion. 

Jac-ti-ta'tion. 

Jac-u-la'tion. 

Jac'u-lat-or. 

Jac'u-la-to-ry (86) [so 
Wr. Wb. Gd.jjaJfcV 
lat-o^ryf Sm. 165.] 

Jade, 23. 

Jad'ed, 183. 

Jad'ing'. 

JadMsfi. 

Jag (10) [Jagg, 203.1 

Jagged Uaga) (161, 
165), V. did jag, or 
notch. 

Jag'ged Ucig'ghed) (161, 
165), a. notched, un- 
even. 

Jag'ger (-gur)^ 138. 

Jag'gher-y [Jaggery, 

J«€r'&y (.-ghy), i38, 170. 

Jag'nire {-hir). 

Jag-hire-dar' (-Wr-). 

Jag-u-ar' (122) [no* jag'- 
war, nor ja'gwar, 
153.] 

Jah, 72. 

Jail (23) [Gaol, 203.— 
See Note ander Crool ' 

Jail'er [Gaoler, 203 

Jal'ap vnotioVwp, 153.^ 

Jam (10), n. a conserve 
of fruit ; — a thick bed 
of stone in a lead 
mine : — v. to squeeze 
tight ; to press. {See 
Jamb, 160.] [Jamb 
(in the second sense 
of the noun), 203.] 

Jamb Uam) (10, 162), 
n. the side piece of a 
door, fireplace, &c. ; 
— a thick bed of stone 
in a lead mine. {See 
Jam, 160.] [Jam (in 
the second sense), 
203.] 

Jammed {jamd)^ 176. 

Jam'ming. 






[Jane, 203. — See 

Jean.] 
Jan'gle U*^n0'gl)t 64, 

164. 
Jan'gled iJang'gld), 

Jan'gler {jang'-\ 
Jan'gling U^^ng'-). 
[Janissary, 203. — 

See Janizary.] 
Jan'i-tor, 88, 169. 
Jan-i-za'ri-an. 
Jan'i-za-ry (72, 171) 

[Janissary, 203.] 
Jan'seu-ism {-izm). 
Jan'sen-ist. 
[J a n t , 203. — See 

Jaunt] 
Jant'i-ly. 
Jant'i-ness. 

Jant'y [J aunty, 203.1 
Jan'u-a-ry (72) [not 

jen'u-a-ry, 127, 153.] 
Ja-pan'. 
Jap-an-ese' (-£«')* a. A 

n. Hng. & pi. 122, 171. 
Ja-panned' (-pand')t 

176. 
Ja-pan'ner. 
Ja-pan'ning. 
Ja-phet'ic, 109. 
Jar, 11, 49, 135. 
Jftr-a-rac'a. 
Jardes (j^^rdz), n. pi. 

[so Wr. Wb. Gd., 

zhardzy Sm. 155.] 
Jar'gon, 11, 86. 
Jar-go-nelle' (-n€j')» 114. 
Jarred U<^rd)t 166, 176. 
Jar'ring. 
Ja'sey (-zy), 169. 
Jas'hawk. 
Jas'mlne (^jaz'miny or 

jas'min) (162) [so 

Wr. ; jaz'min, Wk. 

Sm. ; jcba'min, Wb. 

G^. 155.] [Jessa- 
mine, 203. 
Jas'per, 10, 77. 
Jas'per-at-ed. 
Jas'per-y, 93. 
Jas-pid'e-an, 110. 
Jaun'dloe (-d»s), 169, 

171. 
Jaun'diced {-dist). 
Jaunt (11) [J ant, 203.] 
Jaunt'ed. 
Jaunt'ing. 
[Jaunty, 203. — 5e« 

Janty.] 
Jav-a-nese' (-n««')» <*• 
Jftve'lin, 146, 171. 
Jaw, 17, 46. 



fall} 6a« in there; dbosinfoot; (MinikGilej gh a» g in go ; th oa in this. 

22 



JAWBONE 

Jsfr'bone, 200. 

Jawed {jawd)f a. 

Jftw'y. 

Jay, 23. 

Ja2'cr-aBt. 

JSal'oiis, ]5, 100. 

Jgal'ofis-y. 



!%4 



JOLfER 



Jean (la) [bo Wb. Od. ; 

ifn,Wr 

203.] 



ifn,Wr. 155.] [Jane, 



Jeara CJirz\ n, pi. 

[Jeers, 203.] 
Jeer, 13. 

Jeered U'rd), 165, 
Jeer'er. 
Jeer'ing. 
Jeers (i»r«), .ft. ph 

[JearB,203.J 
Je-bo'vah, 72. 
Je-ho'vist. 
Jejune' i-joon*) [so 

Wk. Wr. ; /e-iftn', 

Wb. Gd.i jed'joont 

Sm. 155.] 
Jel'lled, 170, 171. 
Jel'If (M, 170) [Gel- 

ly, 203.— 5ee Note 

under Chlly.] 
Jen'net-ingf [G e n i - 

tingr,283.] 
Jen'ny, 6ft, 170. 




Jeop'ard-ed. 
Jeop'ard-ing'. 
Jgop'ard-ize, 202. 
JSop'ard-ized, 183. 
Jeop'ard-fi-inff. 
Jeop'ard-y, 171. 
JerMlw-a, 21, N. 
Jer-e-mi'ade, 171. 
[Jerfalcon, 203.— 

See Gerfalcon.] 
Jerk, 21, N. 
Jerked U^rht), 165 ; 

Note C. p. 34. 
Jer'kin (148), n. a 

Jacket 

Jerk'ing (141,148), porf. 

from Jerk. 
Jer'sey (-«w), 21, N. 
Jess, 15, 174. 
Jes'sa-mXne [ J a s - 

mine, 203.] 
Jes'se 
Jessed (Jc*0 (IBO), a. 

havingf jesses on. 
Jest(I5, 160),n.ajoke! 

— w. to joke. 
Jest'ed. 
Jest'er, 
Jesfins". 



Jee'v-it (i«r'-). 

-lt'lc(i< 
Jes-u-it'ic-al ( i«f-)i 108. 



Jes-n-it'ic ( ie«-), 109. 



(^*e»'u-<#- 



Jes'u-lt-ism 
<rm), 130. 

Jet, 16. 

Jet-d^eau (Fr.) CzM-do') 
1. Jett-d*eau (zhn- 
o', 1»8).J 

Jefsam [Jet son, 
Jettison, 203.] 

Jet'tee, n. a projection 
in a building;— a 
kind of pier. [Jet- 
ty (in the second 
sense), J u 1 1 y (ip 
both senses), 203.] 

Jet'ty, n. a kind of pier ; 
a mole. [Jet tee, 
203.] 

Jet'ty (176), a. made of 
jet ; black as jet. 

Jeu d^esprit (Fr.) (zhoo 
des-pri'). 

Jew (ju) (26, 171) [so 
Wk. Wb. Gd. ; foo, 
Sm. (See §26) I ju, or 
joo, Wr. 155.] 

Jew'el(jV-). 

Jew'elled (/m'cW) 

Jeweled, Wb. 
^d. 203. — 5'ee 177, 
and Note E, p. 70.] 

Jew'el-ler (m'~) [ J e w - 
eler, Wb.Gd.203.] 



K 



[Jewellery, 205.— 
See Jewelry.] 

Jew'el-linff (it*'-) 
rJeweling, Wb. 
Gd. 203.] 

Jew'eMy (Jtt'-). 

Jew'el-ry (ju'.) [Jew- 
ellery, 203.] 



^Jewetttry U fhe 
>no« regularly formed 
word ; but jewelry i« per*- 
naps the more common." 
Worcegtrr. —Jewehry is the 
only form given by SmAii, 
Webster, and OoiMlriclk. 

Jew'ess ijti'-). 

Jew'ish uu'-). 

Jew'ry {jn'-). 

Jew's-harp (ifl«'-)» 213. 

Jez'e-bel. 

Jib, 16. 

Jibbed (ii6d), 176. 

Jib'bing. 

Jib'-boom (208, Exo, 1) 

[Gib-boom, 203.] 
Jiffy, 66, 170. 
Jigr, 16. 
Jigr'&er (-gur) (138) 



[Chlflrre, __ 
ee r (in the sense ofa 



Ohlff- 
ff e r (in the sense of a 
Jbind of ijisect), 203. 



— See Chigrre.l 

Jilt, 16. 

Jllt'ed. 

Jilt'ingf. 

Jim'ray, 170. 

Jin'grlo {jinfffffD (54, 
16i)[Gin/le, 203.1 

Jin'gled (jmg'gld), litS. 

Jin'glinsr {jing*-). 

Jip'po. 

Job, 18. 

Jobbed (ioM), 178. 

Job'ber. 

Job'taing. 

Jock'ey, 169. 

Jock'eyed (-id), 171. 

Jock'ey-ing. 

Jock'ey-ism {-izm). 

Jo-cose', 121. 

Joc'u-lar, 72, 89. 

Joc-u -Iftr'i-ty, 106, 109. 

Joc'und. 

Jo-cund'1-ty, 

Jog, 18. 

Jogged {jOffd)j 165, 176. 

Jog'ger i-ffur), 138. 

Jog'ging (-ghing), 

Jog'gle, 164. 

Jo^'gled (.jog'ld), 183. 

Jof' gling. 

Join, 27. 

Join'der. 

Joined, 165. 

Join'er, 

Join'er-y. 

Join'ing. 

Joint, 27. 

Joint'ed. 

Joint'er. 

Joiat'ing. 

Joint'ress rJointnr- 

ess, 203. J 
Joint'ure, 91. 
Joint'ured (-yrird). 
Joint'ur-ing (-VMr-). 
Joint'ur-ess [Joint- 
ress, 203.] 
Joist, 27. 
Joist'ed. 
Joist'ing. 
Joke, 2C 

Joked (j«Jfe#), 165. 
Jok'er. 
Jok'ing. 

Jole(24) [Jowl, 208.1 
Jol'11-ty, 108, 169. 
Jol'ly, 66, 170. 
Jolt. 24. 
Joh^ed. 
Jolt'er. 



&,e,I,d,tt,y,2o9ijjr; &, S, 1, d, tt, f , <Aof^ ; II m <» ftr, a M In ft«t, ft o« «i 



JOLTWa 



■ JoD'jratl 



w" tut ; jun' 
Wk. I jvng'KmU, 



Job'IIbJJot'I), «E. 

Joi'llcd IJO"'"). 183, 

'—'OlDg U<^'ling). 



lu'bl-luit. 
Wb. Gd. IM.J 



Jumped (jKnitt), UH. 

[JuDCHTe, 303.— Sta 
Junket.] 



Jot, IS 
Jot'taJ 



Jour'nil-lMd Or'-]. 
Jour'niil-iz-iu^ ( jxr'.). 
Jour^ney (jtw^w)] 98, 

jDur'neyed (iiir'K.id). 
Jour'noj-er (jtir'-). 
Jmr'ner-iueO^-)- 
Jaur'ney-iDBD ( jur-). 
JoHat (jwf), ». * V. 



in^FiDi^T "WfN 



JoBit'ed, 

JoBM'Ing. 

Jo'vlnl, 73, 78. 

Jo-»ijil'l-tr, lOft, MB. 

Jflwl [bo fim. Wr.i 
JOuJ, WK Gd. IGSJ 
7J<>le< Choale, 

£03.1 

Jowl'er U'Ml'ur) [ao 
Hm. Wb. Gd. i ftU-nr, 
Tn.:J»Pr '— " 



-iiBi) (72) J 
Wb. Q<L J 



tio Wk. 
tifn, Wr 

Ju'di-lst. . 
jD-di.liClr. 
Ju-ds-l-Hk'ttoa. 
Ju'di.lif , TZ, Xa. 
Ju'di-lied, 183. 

Ju'da-iz-Jui^. 

JndgedOnJrf), 1«S, 1 
[Jadgftneat,2i)3 

Sat Judgmail.] 
Jndg'pr. 
Jndfr'lnz. 
jBd^ment (] 

[7udgenieiit,t 

Wb. Gd. i Vrfi^a- 



P»)[ioWr.;>^I(i*'- 
•ar-piSeei 2fi), Sra.; 
.ju-dwfc'n-ry, Wk. Wb. 

Fl (llflt'M). 



ll,II6,lffl. 

Jup'-poQ'' [so Sm. Wb; 
Gd. i Apj?mi', or 
jup'pon, Wr. IM.] 

jS'ni-to.rT, »e. 

Ju.rld'lc ■!, loe. 

Ju-rid'liMd-ly. 

jD4ll40n'lDlt [fO Wk. 
Wr. Wb. Gd. ; iu'ril- 
fonnff. Sn. US.] 

Ju-ris-dic'tlon. 

Ju-ri»-<Hc'tloo-U. 

Ja.rii.dle1Ive. 



Jul'cy.oa. - 
Jn'Jnbe. ». 
Jn'lcp. 26, 7fl. 



Jnat, 



•. * ^. (2!) [no< 
;, K7, IBSi 

. — See Note ouder 



Jo^'l?'" """' 
Joipd (' MD, IBS. 

3oyfnl(-Jiir\,\f». 
Joy'ftal-lj (-/5I-). 

buTTute^KeTltli M <■ iMt i ■ Of te Ihdk i ghat 8 fn go ; i|| M ta tbl*. 



Jnm'bled ( Jun Wd). 



'ot^-r; (-(iiA'^o- 



JUSTIFIABLE 

a) [aoWlL.Wr.'i Jus- 
h^ar-y (See S 20), 

Sm. J jus-tish'a-ryf 

Wb. Gd. 156.] 
Just'i-fl able, IM. 
Ju8t-i-fI-ca'tiou. 
Ju8t'if-i-ca-t1vG fso Sm.; 

iust-ifi-kativ, Wk. 

Wr. Wb. Gd. 165.] 
Just'if-i-ca-to-ry [so 

Sm.; jtuti/^i-ka-to- 

ry, Wr. Wb. Gd. 156.] 
JuBt'i-fied, IbO. 
Ju8t'i-fi-er. 
Just'i-f y, W. 
Just'i-fy-ing'. 
Jua'tle own, 162). 
Jus'tled {ju8'ld\ 183. 
Jus'tllng \j%u'ling). 
Jut, 22. 
Jute, 26. 
Jut'ted, 176. 
Jut'ting. 

Jut'ty [Jettee,a03.] 
Ju-vc-nes'cence. 
Ju-ve-ncs'cent. 
Ju've-nlle, 162. 
Ju-ve-nll'i-ty, 108, 160. 
Jux-ta-po- sl'tion 

i-zisWun), 171, 231. 



K 

[Kaffre, Kafir, 203. 
— See Caffre.] 

Kale (23), n. a kind of 
cabbage. [See Kayle, 
160.J [Kail, 203.] 

Ka-leid'o-seope, 171. 

Ka'lT. 

[Kali f, 203. — 5ce Ca- 
liph.] 

Kal'so-mTne, 152. 

Kam'a-chi (Jet). 

Kam'sin [Khamsin, 
203.] 

[Kan , 203. — See 
Khan.] 

Kan-ga-roo' {lamg-), 

Kant'i-an. 

Kant'ism (-ism), 136. 

Kant'ist. 

Ka'o-Iin [Kaoline, 
2a3.] 

Ka'ty-did. 

[Kaun , 203. — <Sfec 
Khan.l 

Kayle {JcdX), n. a nine- 
pin ; — a kind of game 
in Scotland. {See 
Kale, 160.] 



256 

KeVIab, 72. 

Keo'kle, 164. 

Kec'kled (leifc'W), 183. 

Kec'kling. 

Keck'sy, 169. 

Keck'y. 

Kedge, 16, 45. 

Kedged (ifc<yrf), 166. 

Kedg'cr, 1«3. 

Kedg'ing. 

Keel, 13. 

Kcel'age. 

Keeled (W&n, 166. 

Keel'er. ^ 

Keel'haul [Kecl- 

hale,203.] 

Keei'hftuled, 166. 

Keerhaul-ing. 

Keel'ing. 

K^l'Bon {kU'eun) [bo 
Sm. Wb. Gd.; kit'- 
»oni Wk. ; kei'son, or 
HVson, Wr. 165.] 

Keen, 13. 

Keen'ness, 66, N. 

Keep, 13. 

Keep'er, 77, 

Keep'ing. 

Keff(15)[Cag,203.J 

Kelp, 16. 

[Kelt, 203. — /S'ee 

Kilt.! 
Ken'nel, 66, 170. 
Ken'nelled {-neld) 

Kenneled, Wb. 
5d. 203. — See 177, 

and Note E, p. 70.] 
Ken'nel-ling [ K e n nc 1 •. 

ing,Wb.Gd. 203.1 
Ken'tle (164) [Qufn- 

t a 1,203.] 
Kent'ledge. 
Kept, 15, 142. 
Ker'chlef {-chif)y 21, 

N. ; 52, 140. 
Ker'chTefed {-chift). 
Kerf, 21, N. 
Ker-i-che'tib f-i-c'-) [so 

Sm. ; kir-i-ke'tibf Wr. 

155.J 
Ker'mes (-mez). 
Kern, 21, N. 
Ker'nel, 21, N. 
Ker'nelled C-wM) 

[Kerneled, Wb. 

Gd. 203. — See 177, 

and Note E, p. 70.] 
Ker'nel-ly. 
K?r'o-8ene, 171. 
Ker'sey C-zy), 21, N. ; 

160. 
Ker'sey-mere (-zy-j 

[Cassimere, 203.] 



t^ 



KILOGRAM 

Kcs'trel [Caatrel, 

2a3.] 
Ketch, 16, 44. 

[Ketch up, 203.— 5^ 

Catchup.] 
Ket'tie, 164. 
Kev'el. 

Kex, 16, 39, N. 
Key (ki) (13, 100), n. an 
instrument for fasten- 
ing and unfastening a 
lock;— a guide, £o. 
[See Quay, 160.] 

Key'-board, 209. 

Key '-stone, 24. 
[Khamsin, 203. — 
See Kamsin.] 

Khan (£aim, or kUji ) [ 80 
Wr. ; kattny Sra. Wb. 
Gd. 165.], n. in Per- 
sia, a governor; in 
Tartary, a prince. 
[See Can, 160.] 
TKan, Kaun, 203.] 

Knan'ate (katon-y or 

Kibe, 2J. Ikan-), 

Kibed (klbd). 

Kib'y. 03, 169. 

Kick, 16, 181. 

Kicked (kikt), 165 ; Note 
C, p. 34. 

Kick'er. 

Kick'ing. 

Kick'shaw. 

Kid, 16. 

KidMle (164) [not kitl, 
nor ket'l, 153.] 

Kid'dow, 101. 

KId'ling. 

Kid'nap, 10, 16. 

Kid'nappcd (-nopO* 177. 

Kid'nap-per. 

Kid'nap-ping. 

Kid'ney (98, 169) [pi. 
Kid'neys (-niz), 190.] 

Kil'der-kin. 

Kill (16, 172), r. to put 
to death. [See Kiln, 
160.] 

Kill'dee, or Kill'deer. ^ 

Killed (kild), 165. 

KUl'er. 

Kill'ing. 

Kihiaa)(162, 171),n.a 
kind of oren for heat- 
ing or drying anr 
tWng. [^cc Kin, 160.] 

Kiln'-dried (kiV-), 162. 

Kiln'-dry (kW-), 162. 

Kiln'-dry-ing (An7'-),162. 

Kil'o-gram (Eng.), or 
KiVo-gramme (Fr.), 
203. 



a, e, i, o, u, y, long , ft, «, 1, 5, fi, f , 8?iort ; ft <u tn Ikr, a a» in fiist, iLosin 



KILOLITRE 



. t (Ft.) (4e-(r) , 

tKtlolller,iW3.1 

Kn-ol'i-terfloWli. Od.; 
bU'o-a-lur, Sm. IM.I 

Ir) (161) [Kliomo. 



Klr'tlod Iktr'ttd), ISa. 
Kiu, 10, 171. 
lUued(«>l), lW;Hote 



[8o Wb. 



Kilt [Kelt, »».] 

Kllt'ed. 

Blm'bo. 

Kin. Ifl. 

Kind m, 1«) fio Sm. 

Wr.Wb. Gd.i ktlliuL 

Wk. 1W.1 
Kind-hcart'ed, 20S, 

Kxo. 5. 
Kln'dle, IM. 
KlQ'dled (Ua'dldi, 183. 
Kiu'dler. 
Kiad'H-DGH, 186. 
Kln'dlinir. 
KInd'ly. 
Kln'dred, a. A n. ling. 

Apt. 
Klne (Hn) (25, 5S) [h 

8m.' (See's i») .' *»!". 



Kii.ve (na 
a yilkic 



Klng'blnl, WS 
Klng-orift. 
Klng-oup. 
Klng'dom, m, 
Klng'flsh-er. 
Klng'lllic, wa. 
Kins-H-ne-s, I 

Kiag-pest, aM. 
KlDE(Un«£), IS.M. I 

Kin'ka-Jou(jt-lN^I:a-J<w) ! 



one sdmitlcd to ■ eer- 
taln military runk bj 

nJoB ; — a ptcc^ hi 
cbeaa. [See Nlflit, 



Kllch'm, IW. 

Kltf . 26. 

Klt'Ung. 

Klt'teii [Mf n), 148. 

Klop-e-nu.'nl-», 

Ka»b (noli), tO, \W. 

Knabbcd < nnM), 1 02, ] 6 

Knab'buig (mco'-), 1& 

Rn»ck(nfli),10,lM,18.. 
KuKskferinafur), tea. 
Knag (ROff), ]0, 102. 

" Sd (BOffll), 10 



Kiilt'ler (nii'-). 1% 

Knil'Unz (hU'-J. 
, KnlttlcTutt'O, ISZ, 104. 
■ --' e» (Htoa), n. pL 
___. [See Knife] 

Knob(i«>6), 18, 182. 

Knobbed (nobdj. lOS. 

Knob-bi-UBBB <no*'-}. 



id (ni(t)(13,I02),fl. 

...ir. [5eeKacc3,(iRiJ i 

Need, lflO.1 
KnCad'ed liad'-), 182. 
Knc«d'cr(nM'-f, 102. 
KuLiid'Ing (nrd'-), 1^ 
Kne« (nf f, n, 182. 
Koecd (iiAi).r). barhi? 1 

knecB. [See Knead, 

anil Seed, im.] 
Knpc'-deop (ni'-), loa. 



QDlte. [Sre Nol, 1«X] 



Knlck'-buick ( 

■:). 182,200, E!.__. 
; (nin (IM) [pi. 

KnlBht (ntt) (182); r 



t'wort inai'wurt), 
at (aooTt), 2S. 



All) Sufnlbere; |R> oi in Ibot j g oa t» Ikdle i gh of s (n go j thotMtlili. 



KNOW 



268 



hACmOSB 



Xn«w (««) (112), 9. to 
Derceive Intelleetual- 
lyi — to be informed. 
[See No, 160.] 

Kudw'a-bie (nd'-)> IM. 

Know'er {no'ur), 77. 

Kuow'iaginii'-). 

Kudwl'edge (nol'eDiient, 
171) [80 8iu. Wr.Wb. 
6d. ; noPei, or no'l^t 
Wk. 165.] 

•P Though Walker, in 
deference to the opinion 
of a few orthovpitte, aiiows 
no'l^t he remark! upon 
the greater coiiaittency of 
the flnt pronuncUtaoa 
[aoi'^y'Jp Willi aaakifjr. 

Known (n0tt), 102. 

Knuc'klo (nuk'Dt UK2, 
164 

Knuc'kled (ncel-'M), 183. 

Knuc'klin^ (ntcJl-'-). 

Knurl (»«r/), 21, 162. 

KnurleKl (nur/d), 105. 

Knurl'y {nurVy), 171. 

Ko-fi'la. 

Ko'ha. 

Koh, 24. 

Kohi'-ra'bL 

Ko'kob. 

Koo'doo, 19. 

Ko'peck. 

Ko'ran, 49, N. 

Ko'rot. 

Kou'misB (koo'-) [Ka- 
mi a s , 203. 1 

Krftal (JfcratrO [kr&'al, 
Sm.Wr. Wb. Gd. 166], 
n. a Hottentot villaffe, 
or collection of huts. 

0^* The pronunciation 
•irigned to thia word it 
that given to it by a reai- 
dent of Cape Colony w1m> 
recently visited one of tire 
oompilera of thla Tolame. 

Kra'ken. 

Krcm'lin. 

[Krout, 203. — See 

Crout.] 
Kru'ka (hroo'-) 
Krul'ler (krooV-)* 
Ka'fic. 
[KnmisB, 203. — 5a» 

Koumlsg.] 
Ku'ril. 

Ky'a-niKe» 202. 
Ky'a-nlzed, i83. 
Ky'cvnTz-ioff. 
Kvr'i-e. 

K^r-i-o-loffMo (loM. 
Kjrr-I o-logr'ic-ftl (-i<y'-). 



LS (11, 161), the 
of the sixth souod in 
the ascending diaton- 
ic scale. 

11(17, 161), <nl. behold. 
[See Law, IGO.] 

Lab'a-dist, 105. 

Lab'a-rum, 113, 233. 

La'bel, 76. 

La'belled r^&eld) [La- 
be 1 e d , Wb. (Ml 203. 
^See 177, and Note 
K, p. 70.] 

La'bel-ling [Label- 
in g , Wb. Gd. 203.] 

La'bent. 

La'bi-al, 72, 78. 

La'bi-ate, 73. 

La-bi-o-dent'al, 228. 

La'bor (88) [Labour, 
Sm., 199, 203.] 

Lab'o-ra-to-ry, 86. 

La'bored i-bur(t) (106) 
[Laboured, Sm. 
199, 203.1 

I^a'bor-er [L a b o u r e r, 
Sm. 190, 203.] 

La'bor-ing [Labour- 
in ?, Sm. 199, 203.] 

La-bo'ri-ofis, 49, N.; 
100, 169. 

La'bor-some ('»um% 22. 

Lab'ra-dor-ite, 83. 

La'brose, or La-brose' 
[la'brOs, Wb. Gd. ; 
la-br98*f or WbrdSy 
Wr. 165,] 

La-bur'num, 109. 

Lab'y-rinth, 93. 

Lab-y-rinth'al, 72. 

Lab-y-rinth'i-an, 169. 

Lab-y-rinth'ic, 109. 

Lab-y-rinth'io-al, 106. 

Lab-y-rinthM-form, 108. 

Lab-y-rinthTne, 82, 162. 

Lac (181), n. a resinous 
substance. [Seehaxk, 
160.] 

Lac'do (lak'sik)^ 39, 62, 
200. 

Lac'd(ne, 62, 162. 

Lace, 163. [34. 

Laced {l&sf)y Kote O, p. 

Lai;'er-a-ble, 164, 166. 

La^'er-ate, 160. 

La^'er-at-ed. 

La^'er-at-ing'. 

La^-er-a'tion, 112. 

La^'er-at-Iye, 84, 106. 



La-ceHU (L.), 21, K«te. 

La-cer'tian (.«ikan), 112. 

La-cer'tlne, 82, 162. 

Uehe,ft. nn^f.i or Lach'- 
es i-ez), n. pi. negli- 
gence. [Law term.] 

Lach'nr-mal (lak'-), ^ 
72. 

L8ch'rj-iBA<rT ClaV-)t 
62, 72. 

Lach'ry-marto-iT 
ilak'-)^ 86. 

Lach'ry-mose (ZoX/-), 
[so Wb. (jd. ; laJB-r%- 
»9«', Wr. 166.] 

Laf 'inff, 183. 

La-dn'i-ate. 

La-cin'i-at-ed. 

Lack (181), A defiden- 
oy, want:~i;. to be 
in want of. [See Lae, 
160.] 

Lack-a-dal'sic4a C-eib-\ 
116, 171. 

Lack-a-dai'sy (-zw), 169. 

Laeked(teJkO- NoteC, 
p. 34. 

[Lacker. — ^See Lae- 
quer, 203.1 

Lack'ey {laJs'v), n. & v. 
(98, I6U) |pl. of n. 
Lack'eys (tz), 190.] 

Lack'eyed (-id), 166. 

L«ek'ey-ing (-l-tn^). 

Lacking. 

Lack'-lus-tre (-/wr) 
(164) r£!^ Lustre.] 

La-con'ic, 109. 

La-<x«'ic-al, 72, 10& 

La-con'ic-al-ly, 170. 

La-con'i-dsm (-Hem), 
1.33, 1.36. 

Lae'on-ism (-izm) [so 
Wk. Sm. Wr. ; Mbon- 
izm, Wb. (Jd. 165.] 

Lac'quer (-kur) [Lack- 
er, 203.}^ 

Lac'quered (-kwrd), 165. 

Lac'quer-lng (-hur-). 

Lac'ta-rene, 171. 

Lac'ta-ry, n. 72. 

Lae'tate. 

Lao-ta'tion, 112, 109. 

Lae'te-al (72) [so Sm. 
Wr. Wb. Gd. ; tafc'- 
te-dl, or lai^tikerdit 
Wk. 165.] 

Lac-tes'ccnoe, 30, 171. 

Lae-tes'oeiit. 

Lac'tic. 

Lac-tif er-otts, 100, 106. 

Lac-tom'e-ter, 108. 

Lao-u-noae', 80, 122. 



a,e,i«d,tt, y, tofi^i il, £» I, d, tt, i^, xAori i aoite ftr, a of m ftit« & at i» 



LACU8TRAL 



259 



LAN6UISHER 



La-cns'tnil, 122. 
La-cus'trlne [bo TTr. 

Wb- Gd. ; lafkus-triHt 

Sm. 155.] 
Lad. 10. 

Lod'a-num, 109. 
Lad'der, 66, 1/0. 
Lade, v. to load. [See 

Laid, 160.] 
Lad'ed, 183. 
Lad'en (lad'n), 140. 
Lading, 183. 
La'dle (-dO, KM. 
La'dle-mi (la'dl-fool)^ 

180, 197. 
La'dy, 93, 190. 
La'dv-day (209) [bo Wr. 

Wb. Gd. J m-dy-dn'i 

Wk. Sm. 155.] 
La'dy'B-bed'straw 

{-diZ'), 213. 
La'dy-love (-Hv). 
La-dy's-fln'ger (la'diz- 

flnff'gur)y 213. 
La'dy's-slfp'per (-diz-). 
[Lsmmergeyer, 

20:i. — . See Lammer- 

gelr.] 
Lag, 10, 60, 53. 
La^er^beer i-gur-), 205. 
Lag'gard, 60, 72. 
Lagged (lagd), 165, 176. 
Lag'ger {-ffur), 138. 
Lag'ging ighing), 141. 
Lag'o-mvB. 
Lajgoon' [Lagnne, 

La'ic, 109. 

La'ic-al, 72, 108. 

Laid (23,187),r. did lay. 

I See Lade, 160.] 
Lain (187), part, from 

Lie. [^cc Lane, 160.] 
Lair («r) ( 14, 67), n. the 

couch of a wild beast. 

[See Layer, 148. J 
Laird (l€rd), 14, 49. 
La'i-ty, 93, 108, 169. 
Lake, 23. 
Lake'Iet, 76. 
Lak'er. 

Lal-Ia'tion, 66, 170. 
La'ma [not la'ma, 153.] 

[L I a m a (in the senRe 

of a wool-bearing 

qaadruped of South 

Ainerica)j2a3.J 
La'ma-ism (-izm)^ 1.^, 
La'ma-iBt. [188. 

La'ma-ite, 83. 
XArman'tTne (152) [La- 

mantin, Lamen- 

tin,203.] 



Lamb (torn), 162. 
Lam'ba-tlve, 84. 
Lamb'da-cism (lam'da- 

8izm)y 162. 
Lamb-doid'al (lam-) 

(l62)[Lamdoldal, 

203.1 
Lam' bent, 76. 
Lamb'kin {lam*-). 
Lamb's'- wool (lamz'- 

wodl) (213), n. a kind 

of beverage. 
Lame, 23. 
Lamed, 165, 183. 
Lam'el. 170. 
La-mel'la (L.) [pi. Lor 

meincR (-te), 198.] 
Lam'el-lar, 169, 170. 
Lam'el-late, 73. 
Lam'el-lat-ed. 
Lam-el-lifer-ofis, 106. 
La-mel'li-form, 108. 
La-ment', v. & n. 121. 
Lam'ent-a-blc, 123. 
Lam'ent-a-bly, 93. 
Lam-cnt-a'tion. , 
La-meut'ed. 
La-ment'er, 77, 169. 
La-mcnt'ing. 
Lam'i-naf (L.) [pi. 

Lam'i-nfe (-ne) 1U8.] 
Lam-in-a-bil'i-ty, 103, 

169. 
Lam'in-a-ble, 164, 160. 
Lam'in-ar, 169. 
Lam'in-a-ry, 72. 
Lam'in-at-ed. 
Lam-in-a'tion. 
Lam'ing. 
Lam'mas, 180. 
Lam'mer-geir (-ghlr), 

or Lfon'mer-gey-er 

( -^ftf -wr ) [ L BB m m e r - 

geyer,203.] 
Lamp, 10. 
Lam'pass, 171. 
Lamp'black. 142. 
Lam'per-eel, 206, Exc. 

3. 
Lamp'ic. 

Lamp'Ught (-m), 206. 
Lam-poon', n. & v. 121. 
Lam-pooned^ 165. 
Lam-poon'er. 
Lam-poon'ing. 
Lam-poon'ry. 
Lam'prey, 98, 160. 
La'na-ry, 233. 
La'nate. 
La'nat-ed. 
Lance, 12. 

Lanced (Untt), 183; 
I Note C, p. 34. 



Lftn'oe-o-lar, 74. 
LAn'ce-o-late. 
Lftn'oe-o-lat-ed. 
Lanc'er, 131. 
Lftn9'et, 76, 156. 
Lanch (13, 44), V. to 

throw, as a lance 

from the band. [See 

Launch, 160.1 
Lanched {Idncnt). 
Lanch'ing. 
Lftn'ci-form, 106. 
Lftn'ci-nate, 169. 
Lftn-ci-na'tion. 
Lanc'ing. 
Land, 10. 

Land'am-man, 196. 
Lan'd&u [so Sm. Wb. 

Gd. J km-datp', Wk. 

Wr. 165.1 [Lan- 

d a w (km'aaw, Wr.), 

2a3.1 
Lan-d^u-let', 122. 
Land'ed. 
Land'grave. 
Land-grav'i-ate, 123,171. 
Land'gra-vine (-f>8n). 
Land'hold-er. 
Land'ing. 
Land'la-dy (206) [so 

Sm. Wr. Wb. Gd.j 

Idn'llL-dy, Wk. 155.] 
Land'lock, 20». 
Landlocked {-lokt). 
Land'Iock-ing. 
Land'lo-per. 
Land'lord. 
Land'lub-ber, 206. 
Land'mark. 
Land'reeve. 
Land'scape, 142. 
Land'slide. 
Land'slip. 
Lands'man (JUmdz^- 

man)i 214. 
Lane, n. a narrow way 

or passage. [ See Lain, 

160.] 
Lan'grage {langlgrO^^ 

64.] 
Lan'grel {lang'-). 
Lang-syne', 166. 
Lan'guage {lang'gwOj)^ 

9v« Or. 

Lan'guld {lang'gtoid), 

141. 
Lan'gulflh (lang'gvHsh), 

104. 
Lan'gnished (ton'- 

gtnsM), 166 ; Koto C. 

p. .34. 
Lan'guish-er (Umg'' 

gtoiah-er), 77. 



fldl; da«<n there; <K> m in foot j 9 m <n facile ; gh m g <n go ; th <u in thla. 



lANOUISBINO 



260 



LAUD 



Lan'^ish-ing (ton'- 

gunsh-ing). 
Laii'^ish-ment {lang'- 

gwish-). 
Lan'guor {lang'gwur) 

Uwt lang'gur, 153.] 
[Laniard, 203. — 5ee 

Lanyard.] 
La'ni-a-rjr, or Lan'la- 

ly (-»«-) [»o Wr.j 

la'ni-a-ry, Gd.; Ian'- 

y^r-y^ Sm. 155. J 
La'ni-ate, or Lan'i-ate 

(iOQ) [so Wr. ; la'ni- 

at, Wk. Gd. i km'i-lUi 

Sm. 155.] 
La-nif er-oas, 106. 
La-nig'er-o&8 (-nif-). 
Lank {langk)^ 10, 54. 
Lank'y {langk'y), 100. 
Lan'ner, 170. 
Lan'ner-et. 

Lans'que-net (-Jte-), B2. 
Lan'tem[Lanthorn, 

203.1 
Lan'tna-nnm, or Lan- 

tha'ni-um. 
La-nu'gi-nose, 2, 465. 
La-nu'gi-nofis, 100. 
Lan'vard [Laniard, 

203.] 
La-od-i-ce'an, 72, 110. 
Lap, n. A v. (10) [pi. of 

n. Laps. — See Lapse, 

160.] 
Lap'dog, 206. 
La-pel', 121. 
Lap'ful (JSol), 180, 197. 
Lap-i-da'ri-an, 40, N. 
Lap'i-da-ry, 72, 169. 
Lap-i-des'oenoe, 39, 171. 
Lap-i-des'cent. 
Lap-i-dif ic, 170. 
Lap-i-dific-al. 
La-pid-i-fl-ea'ti<m, 112. 
La-pid'i-fied. 
La-pid'i-f f, 94, 108. 
La-pid'i-fy-lng. 
La'pis laz'u-b [so Sm. 

Wr' Wb. Gd. ; lazh'- 

fi-Zl, Wk. 165.1 
Lapped ilapt), 163 ; 

Note C, p. 34. 
Lap'per, 77. 
Lap'pct. 
Lap'ping^, 176. 
Laps'a-bie, 169. 
Lapse, n. & v. (10) [See 

Laps, pi. of Lap, 160.] 
Lapsed (lapat), 
Lap'sld-ed. 
I4aps'ing, 183. 
Lap'stone, 206. 



Lap'8u$ Un'gua (L.) 

(ling'gwe), 
Lap'wiug. 
Lar (L.) [pi. JLa'res 

(-r«z), 198.J 
Lar' board. 
Lar'ce-ny, 93, 169. 
Larch, i:)5. 
Lard. 49. 

Lar'<ia'ceous(-«Atw),112. 
Lard'cd. 
Lard'er. 
Lard'tngc. 
La' res {'rBz)yn. pi, [See 

Lar.] 
Largne. 

Lar'gesB (-jet), 46. 
L&Wi-at, 48, 66. 
Lark, 135. 
Lark' spur, 206. 
Lar'ml-er, 49. 
L&r'um (169) [so Wk. 

Sm. Gd. ; Idr'um, or 



Id'rumy Wr. 155.1 

[pi. Lar'- 
vae (-re), 198.] 



Lar'va (135) [\ 



Lar'val. 
Lar'vat-ed. 
Lanre, 189. 
La-ryn^e-al (-je-) [so 

Wr. Gd. i la^ng'ghe- 

aly Sm. 155.1 
La-ryn'ge-an {-je-), 110. 
Lar-yn-gi'tis. 
Lftr-yn-got'o-my, 108, 

116, 2^. 
LJlr'ynx (lAr'ingks) (Id, 

48,52, N.; 54) [so Sm. 

Wb. Gd. j m'ringks, 

Wk. ; l&r'ingks, or 

Wnngksy Wr. 155.1 
Las-car, or Las'car [so 

Wr. ; ku-karf, Sm. ; 

las'kary Wb. (3d. 

155.1 
Las-civ'i-ofis, 39, 100. 
Lash, 46. 
Lashed (lasht), 165 j 

Note C, p. 34. 
Lash'er, 169. 
Lash'ing. 
Lass, 12, 174. 
Las'fli-tade, 108, 127, 170. 
Las'so (86) fpl. Las'sos 

(-afl»), 192.J 
Last, 131. 
Last'ed. 
Last'ing. 

Latch, ^ ; Note D,p. 37. 
Latched ilacht), 34. 
Latch'et. 
Lateh'ing, 141. 
Late, 16:). 



La-teen', 121. 
La'tent. 

Lat'er-al, ^3.3, Exc. 
Lat'er-al-ly, 170. 
Lat'er-an, 72. [171. 

Lat-er-i-fo'li-o&s, 116, 
Lat-er-I'tious {^sh'ua), 
hath, n. & V. (14) {not 

Lath, 15.3] [pi. of n. 

Laths UdMz).] 
LUthe, 38, 16:i. 
LatTied (UtM), 131, 140. 
LSth'cr, n. & v. 77. 
L&tH'ered (-«rd), 150, 

l(i5. 171. 
L&th'er-ing. 
LaSG'ing, 140. 
Lath'y, 169. 
La'tian {-ahan), 
La-tib'u-lize, 202. 
La-tib'u-llzcd, 183. 
La-tib'u-liz-ing. 
Lat'i-clave. 
Lat-i-cos'tate, 116. 
Lat-i-den'tate. 
Lat-i-fo'11-ate. 
Lat-i-fo'li-o&s, 171. 
Lat'In (149) [not lafn, 

153.] 
Lat'Tn-ism (^m), 133. 
Lat'In-ist, 170. 
La-tin 'i-tas-ter. 
La-tin'i-ty, 108. 
Lat-ln-t-za'tion, 112,116. 
Lat'In-ize, 202. 
Lat'In-ized. 
Lat'In-iz-ing. 
Lat-i-ros'troiis [so Sm. 

Wb. Gd. Wr. ; M-«- 

ro»'«riM, Wk. 155.J 
Lat'ish, 183. 
Lai'i-tat (L.). 
Lat'i-tude, 26, 108, 170. 
Lat i-tud'in-al, 26, 72. 
Lat-i-tud-in-a'ri-an, 49, 

N.; 116. 
Lat-i-tud-in-a'ri-an-isnt 

(-i*«i»), 1.33, 136. 
Lat-i-tud'in-o&s, 108. 
La'trant. 
La-tri'a, or La'tri-a [tot- 

trVa, Sm. Wb. GKl. ; 

la'trt-a, Wk. Wr. 

155.] 
Lat'ro-bite, 152. 
Lat'ten, 66, 132, 149. 
Lat'ter, 170. 
Lat'tloe, 66, 169. 
Lat'ticed (Hat), 183 j 

Note C, p. 34. 
Lat'ti9-ing, 183. 
Laud (17), n. praise. 

[See Ix)rd, 148.] 



a, e, i, o, ft, % long j &» e» I> d, fi, t> fhorti \ia8in far, a cm in fast, & a< m* 



LAUDABLE 



261 



LECTIONAEY 



Laud'R-ble, 164, 10». 

Laud'a-bly. 

Laud'a-num {lawd'a- 
numf or lUd'a-num) 
[bo Wr. } Uiwd'or- 
num, Wb. Grd. ; lOd'- 
a-num^ Wk. Sm. 155.] 

L&ud-a'tion. 

Laud'a-to-rv, 86. 

Laud'ed. 

Laud'er. 

L&ud'ing. 

Laugh {hn (11,35) [not 
\M, 163.] 

Laugh'ar-ble (to/-). I'W. 

Laughed (/«(/%), 165 ; 
Note C, p. 34. 

Laugh'er (to/-). 

Laugh'ing (2ar-)i Ml. 

Laugh'ter (to/-). 

Launoe. 

Launch (11, 44), v. to 
cause to slide into the 
water, as a vessel : — 
n. the act of launch- 
ing a yessel; — a 
kind of long-boat. 
[5ee Lanch.] 

Launched {l&ncht), 

Launch'ing. 

Laun'dcr, 11, 156. 

Laun'dress [not lawn'- 
dress, 153.J 

Laun'dry, 127. 

L^u're-atc, a. tL v. 73, 
169. 

Lftu're-at-ed. 

L&u're-at-ing. 

L&u-re-a'tion. 

Lau'rel {Idr'el, or law'- 
rel) [so Wr. ; Wr'«, 
Wk. ; tSr'Uy Sm. ; 
law'rel^ Wb. Gd. 165.] 

Lau'relled {ISr'eld, or 
law' reld) (177) [Lau- 
reled, Wb.Gd. 2a3. 
— See 177, and Note 
E, p. 70.] 

Lftu'res-tlne, 1,52, 171. 

La'va [so Wk. Sm. 
Gd. ; to'ra, or lu'vot 
Wr. 165.] 

Lav'a-to-ry, 86. 

Lave, 36. 

Laved, IKJ. 

I^v'en-der, 170. 

La'ver. 

Lftv'ing, 228, N. 

Lav'ish, 66, 104. 

I^v'ished (isht), 

Lav'ish-er, 169. 

Lav'ish-ing. 

Law (17, 125), n. an es- 



. tablished rule. [See 
La, 160.] 

Law'ful {-/Sol), 180. 

Law'ful-ly (-/«tf^). 

Law'giv-er (ffhiv-)^ 206. 

Lawn, 17. 

Law'suit, 26, 206. 

Law'yer, 112. 

Lax, 10, 39, N. 

Lax-a'tion. 

Lax'a-tlve, 84. 

Lax'i-ty, 108. 

Lay, 23, 50. 

Lay'er (67), n. a stra- 
tum. [See Lair, 148.] 

Lay'er-ing. 

Lay'ing. 

Lay'man, 196, 206. 

La^^zar, 74, 169. 

Laz-a-ret', 122. 

Laz-a-ret'to, 170. 

Laz'a-rist, 105. 

[Lazaroni, 203.~ 
See Lazzaroni.] 

I^aze, 40. 

La'zi-ly, 186. 

La'zi-nesB. [uU.] 

Laz'u-li [5ee Lapis laz- 

La'zy, 169. 

Laz-za-ro'nl [L a z a r o - 
n i , 203.] 

Lea (13), n. a meadow. 
£;S^eeLee, 160.] 

Leach, v. to wash by 

[percolation, as ashes. 
See Leech, 160.] 
Letch, 203.] 
Leached (Ucht). 
Leach'ing. 
L€ad (161), n. a metal. 

[See Led, 160.] 
Lead (161), v. to guide 

or conduct. 
Lead'ed. 

L<sad'en (led'n), 149. 
Lead'er. 
Lead'ing. 
Leaf, n. & v. [pi. of n. 

Leaves (iSvz), 193.] 

[See Lief, 160.] 
Leafed (left) (165 ; Note 

C, p. 34). [See 

Leaved.] 
Leafi-ness, 186. 
Leafing. 
Leaflet, 76. 
Leafy, 93, 169. 
League (?«/7), 168. 
Leagaed ij^gd). 
I^agu'er (fSff'-). 
Leaguing {tiff'-). 
Leak (13), n. a fissure 

or crack that lets a 



fluid in or out: — p, 
to trickle or run in or 
out. [See Leek, 160.] 

Leak'age, 183. • 

Leaked(/eA;0> 165 ; Note 
C, p. 34. 

Leak'ing. 

Leak'y, 160. 

Leal [so Wr. Grd. j fe'trf, 
Sm. 155.] 

Lean, 43, 50. 

Leaned, 166. 

Lean'ing. 

Lean'ness, 66, N. 

Li^ant. V. did lean; — 
used colloquially for 
Leaned. [See Lent, 
160.] 

Lean'-to (-too)i 206, 
Exc. 4. 

Leap, n. & v. 

Leaped {IXpt, or lept) 
[so Wr. J lipt, Sm. : 
Upt, or lipty Gd. 155.] 

Leap'er. 

Leap'frog, 2C6. 

Leap'ing. 

Lei^)'year. 

Learn {lern), 21, N. 

Learned (2ern(2), part, 
150. 

Leam'ed {lem*ed), a. 
144,150. 

Leam'er (tern'-), 

Leam'ing (lem'-), 141. 

Learnt (fem<). 

L^ase, 136. 

Leased (Hat), 

Leash, 46. 

Leashed (UsJU), 166. 

Leash'ing. 

Least. 

Leath'er, 15, .38. 

LeatE'em, 1.35. 

LoatH'er-y, 169. 

Leave, 13. 

Leaved ( 165), part, hay- 
ing leaves or foliage. 

B^- Of leaved and 
lenfed, S mart n vs, **Leaoed 
is most in use." 

U^Kx'&a. (lev'n)_[no Wr. 

Gd. ; tet?'»», Wk. Sm. 

155.]' 
L?av'ened (lev'nd), 
L^av'en-ing (lev'n-ingy. 
Leav'ing, 183. 
I>3cli'er. 
Lech'er-otts. 
Ijech'er-y. 
Lec'tion, 169. 
Lec'tion-a-ry, 72. 



lallidotf in there; dbflwinfoot} 9a<t»&QUejgha«gtf»gO}yia«<ntIiis» 



LEFTODACTVL 



Lwi'uf-inB (mir-), Bl. 1 
Led, V. dSl lad. ISee 

L,'ad, ino.1 1 

Ledse. IS. ii. 
LcdK'tflLegci-.MO.] 1 

III/ written IrOber - lS^ I } 

- See L^r-llDC.I j i 
I*u{l-1), n. the Bicleor! j 
vtj lidug oppoBJte to ! i 
th« from wliich the ' - 
•rindblowi. tSethet, 
1W1.J ' 

Leoch ( ia),ii. in aqnitlB 



l>evk ( 13), It. a pluiit «]- 

Leered, W! 

Lee» («i), B. rifu. A bL 
Leel,J3,4l. ^ '^ 
Le«'wiird (tt'mirrf, M 
lO'urri) CW) [soWr.i 
U'wurd, W». Gd. i W- 
wnf, coll. Pov'ura, 
Sm. (5m i at), IA5.] 



Lce's-cy, lOS. WB. 
Le'iral, ra. 
Lc[irs1-ir.m (-(im), 13 

Le-Bul'i-tjj Iflfl, zn. 

Lc'Knl-ize, 202. 
Le'gaMzed, Iffi. 
Le'nnl-Tz-tiiEi:, IfO. 



s^M-fts; 



KB 



,170. 



to(73)[m>tIe'8it, 
L^H-toe', m. 



Le'frend (ley™!), or 
Wr.Gd. lityenrf.Wk.. 



i,6,I,fca,j,l«wii,«.l,S 



i at M Ikr, i> M in fMt, 1 u in 



LEPTODACTYLOUS 



268 



LICENSBD 



Lep-to-dac'tyl-ons. 

LeB'bi-an, 78, 169. 

Le'sion (-zhun)^ 47, 80. 

LesB, 15, 174. 

Les-see% 121. 

LesB'en (les'n) (104,149), 
V. to make legg. [See 
Lesson, 160.1 

Less'ened (les^nd)^ 165. 

Less'en-ing' {lea'n-). 

Less'er. 

Les'son (fea'n) (1W,149), 
n. a portion of a book 
required to be learned 
and recited by a pupil. 
[ See Lessen, 160.] 

Les'sor, (36, 118.* 



__ It ii pronounced 
?««-«oK when contracted 
with lea-tee'. 

Lgst fso Sm. Wb. Gd. 
Wr. J Uaty or Ust^Wk. 
155.] 

as- Though Walker al- 
lows lint (iSOff), he con- 
demns it a« contrary to 
analogy. 

Let, 15. 

[Let eh, 203.— ^ee 
Leach.J 

Le'thal, 72. 

Le-thar'gic, 76, 200. 

Le-thar'gio-al. 

Leth'ar-gy. 

Le'the, 163. 

Le-the'an, 110. 

Let'ter, 66, 170. 

Lettered, 150, 165. 

Let'ter-ing, 141. 

Let'ter-pa'per, 205. 

Let'ter-press. 

Let'ting. fl71. 

Let'tuce (let'tis), 90, 158, 

Leu-co'ma. 

Le'vant, or Lev'ant, a. 
[le'vant,Wk.Wb.Gd. ; 
lev'ant^ Sm. ; le'vant^ 
or le-vant', Wr. 155.] 

Le-vant', n. & v., 121. 

Le-vant'cr. 

Le-vant'lne, or Lev'ant- 
ine I so Wr. Gd. ; /e- 
van'Itn, Sm. 155.] 

Lev'ee, n. a ceremoni- 
ous morning recep- 
tion of visitors ; — an 
embankment on the 
margin of a river. 
[See Levy, 160.] 

asr When used to sig- 
nify an evening party or 
assembly, it is often pro- 
nounced, in th« United 
States, ?e-re'. 



Lev'el (Note F, p. 79) 
[not lev'1, 155.] 

Lev'elled (-eld) [Ley- 
eled, Wb. (3d. 203. 
— See 177, and Note 
E, p. 70.] 

Lev'el-ler [Leveler, 
Wb. Gd. 203.1 

Lev'el-ling [Level- 
ing,Wb. (Jd.aoy 

Le'ver[80 Wk.Sm.Wr.; 
lev'er, Wb. Gd. 155.] 

Lev'er-age, 70. 

Lev'er-et. 

Lev'i-a-ble, 186. 

Le-vi'a-than. 

Lev'Ied, 99, 186. 

Lev'i-gate, 169. 

Lev'i-gat-ed. 

Lev'i-gat-ing, 183. 

Lev-i-ga'tion, 112. 

LevM-rate [so Wr. ; le- 
vi'rate, Gd. 155.] 

Lev-i-ra'tion. 

Lev-i-ta'tion. 

Le'vite, 83, 163. 

Le-vit'ie-al, 108. 

Le-vit'i-cus, 171. 

Levity, 108. 

Lev'y (93, 169), n. the 
act of raising or col- 
lecting money or 
men ; — the quantity, 
amount, or number 
raised: — v. to raise, 
as taxes. [See Levee, 
160.] 

Lev'y-ing, 186. 

Lewd (torf), 26, 128. 

Lew'is (Za'ta) (26) [so 
Gd. ; loo'ia.Wr. j Too'- 
iSj Sm. 155.1 

Lex ( L.), 52, N. 

Lex'ie-al, 72, 108. 

Lex-i-cog'ra-pher, 108. 

Lex-i-co-graph'ic, 109. 

Lex-i-co-graph'ic-al . 

Lex-i-cog'ra-phy, 108. 

Lex-i-col 'o-gy, 108. 

Lex'i-con. 

Lex-1-graph'ic. 

Lex-i-graph'ic-al. 

Lex-ig'ra-phy, 93. 

[Lev, 203.— See Lye.] 

Ley'den (Za'rfn, or W- 
dn) (149) [la'dfiy Sm. j 
Wdn, Gd. Wr. 155.] 

Li-a-bYFi-ty, 108. 

Li'a-ble, 164, 109. 

Li'a-ble-ness, 185. 

Liaison (Fr.) (IB-&- 
zong'). 

Li'ar (67, 169), n. one 



who liee, or ikIaifleB. 
[Set I^yre, 148, and 
Lier, 160.1 

Li'a8,72. 

Li-as'sic, 109, 170. 

Li-ba'tion. 

Li'bel, 76. 

Li'bel-lant [L i b e 1 an t , 
Wb. Gd. 2a3.] 

Li'belled (-held) [Li- 
beled , Wb. Gd. 203. 
— See 177, and Note 
E, p. 70.1 

Li'beT-ler [Libeler, 
Wb. (Jd. 2o:i.J 

Li'bel-ling [Libel- 
ing, Wb. Gd. 203.] 

Li'bel-loas [Libel- 
ous, Wb. Gd.203.J 

LVber (L.). 

Lib'er-al, 66, 233. 

Lib'er-al-ism (-Mrm),133. 

Lib'er-al-ist. 

Lib-er-al'i-ty, 108, 169. 

Lib'er-al-ize, 202. 

Lib'er-al-ized, 165. 

Lib'er-al-iz-ing. 

Lib'er-al-ly, 170. 

Lib'er-al-mind'ed, 205. 

Lib'er-ate. 

Lib'er-at-ed, 183. 

Lib'er-at-ing. 

Lib-er-a'tion, 112. 

Lib'er-at-or, 88, 169. 

Lib-er-ta'ri-an, 49, N. 

Ub'er-ti-cide, 103. 

07* So pronounced by 
all the ortho^pists, though 
lir-ber'ti-eifle would he 
more analogical, and has 
the authority of Shelley 
(Adonais, st iv.) to sup- 
port it. Compare it^anti- 
eirfe, parenticirfe, itororir 
cide^ and tyrannicide. 

Lib'er-tYne, 82, 152. 
Lib'er-tin-ism {4zm), 
Lib'er-ty, 93, 105. 
LY-bid'ia-oGs, 108. 
LVbra (L.), 72. _ 
Li-bra'ri-an, 49, N. 
Li'bra-ry, 72, 105. 
Li'brate. 
Li'brat-ed. 
Li'brat-ing. 
Li-bra'tlon. 
Li'bra-to-ry, 86. 
L%-bret'to (It.). 
Lice (195), n. pi. [See 

Louse.] 
Li'cense [Licence, 

Sm. 2a3.] 
Li'censed {-senst)^ 165, 

ia3 J Note C, p. 34. 



fiiUj da« in there; Cbaain foot ioasin fiuale ; gh <m g fn go 5 jji /la <» thi n , 



LICENSEE 



264 



LINEAMENT 



Li-oens-ee', 122. 

Li'oeii8-«r. 

Li'ceng-ing. 

Li-cen'U-ate (-aft¥«) 
(73)[80 Wk.Sin.Wr. ; 
tt-sen'shat, Wb. Gd. 
155.J 

li-oen'tiouB {-shus), 
169. 

Li'chen (When, or lich*- 
en) (52, 149) [so Wr. 
Ga. ) lich'en (as the 
name of a tetter, or 
r'mewormyH'ken),Sm. 
155!] 

Lloh-en-og'ra-phy(Mifc-). 

Lick, 10, 181. 

Licked {Uia), 166 ; Note 
C, p. 34. 

Lick'er, n. one who 
licks. [See Liquor, 
100.] 

Lick'er-ish, 171. 

Lick'ing. 

Lick'spit-tle, 164. 

Lic'o-rice (169) [Llq- 
•uo rice, 203.] 

Lic'tor. 

Lid, 10, 42, 50. 

Lie, 25. 

Lief (13), orf. willing- 
ly. [See Leaf, 160.] 
[Li eve, 203.] 

Lii'ge, 13, 45. 

Li'en (Z«'e», or ft'cn) [bo 
Wr. Gd. ; Wen, Sm. 
155. J [not len, 163. J 

Li-en-ter'ic, 109. 

Li'en-ter-y, 116, 122. 

Li'er (07, 169), n. one 
who lies down. [See 
Lyre, 148, and Liar, 
160.1 

Lieu (W), 26. 

Lieu-ten'an-cy (iQ-ten'-, 

, or lev-ten'-). 

Lieu-ten'ant iln-ten'ant, 
or lev~ten'fint) [lev- 
ten'ant, Wk. Sm. j 
lH-ten'ant, or lef-ten'- 
ant, Grd. ; lev-ten' ant, 
or in-ten'ant, Wr. 
165.] 

oar " The Irregularity 
in sounding lievtenant may 
be accounted for by the 
practice, common when 
the word was first intro- 
duced from the French, of 
confounding the letters v 
and »: the word was writ- 
ten Kevlenanty and sound- 
ed leevtanantf which nat- 
urally shortened into Uv~ 
tenant.** Smart. 



[Liere, 203. — See 

Lief.] 
Lil'e, n. (163) fpL LlveB, 

193.] 
Life'blood {-blud), 206. 
Life'boat. 

Lii'e'-gl7-ing,206,Exo. 6 
Lile'guard {-gard)' 
Liie'-in-Hur'anoe 

(-•Aoor'-), 205. 
Lii'c'like, 206, Exc. 5. 
Liic'-long, 206, Exc. 5. 
Lifc'time, 206. 
Liit, 16. 
Llft'ed. 
Lift'er, 77. 
Lift'ing, 141. 
Lig'a-ment. 105, 100. 
Lig-a-ment'al, 72, 123. 
Lig-a-ment'otiB. 
Lig'an, 72. 
Li-ga'tion, 112, 151. 
Lig'a-ture, 00. 
Light {lit), 162. 
Llght'ed (/!«'-). 
Light'en {lU'n), 149, 162. 
Lightened {llt'nd). 
Light'cu-ing (JU'n'ing). 
Light'er {Jilt'-). 
Light'-head-od (W-)» 

206, Exc. 5. 
Light'-house (W-),206, 

£xc. 3. 
Light'-in'fknt-ry (Vif-), 

205. 
Lighting int*-), 162. 

Iight'ninor.(»<'-)» 17L 
Lights (Utz), n. pi. 
Light' some tfit'sum), 

102, 169. 
Lig-nal'oes (lig-nal'oz, 

or lln-al'5z) [so Gd. ; 

liff-nal'Oz, Sm. ; ttn- 

al'oz, or lig-ndVOz, 

Wr. 155.] 
Lig'ue-oiis, 169. 
Lig-nl-fY-ca'tion, 116. 
Lig'ni-form, 160. 
Lig'ni-fy, 9*, 169. 
Lig'ni-fy-ing. 
Lig'nine (82, 152) [L i g - 

nin,2a3.] 
Lig'uite, 83, 152. 
lAg'num vi'ta (L.) 

(vl'te). 
Lig'u-la. 
Like 25. 
Liked (hkt), 183; Note 

C p. 34. 
Like'li-hdbd, 186. 
Llke'ly, 93, 185. 
Lik'en (lik'n), 149. 
Lik'ened (Jlk'nd). 



t.ik'en-fng (rtJfn-). 
Like' wise (-frl«). 
Lik'ing, 183. 
Li'lac, TZ, 



' Thta word, wlth- 
oot any reason fbr it, i* 
often spelled I> i 1 a ehi and 
is often corruptly pto- 
BOUDceit la'lok.** amort, 

Lil-i-a'oeous {-8hu»),\VZ. 
Lil'Ied, 186. 

Lil-i-pu'tian (-aftan),171. 
Lil4I-bul-e'ro [lU-X^buV- 

e-roy Gd. 155.] 
Lil'y, 169, 170, j90. 
Ll-ma'ceous {^-shus). 
Li'ma-ture. 
Limb {JLim) (162), n. one 

of the extremities of 

the body : — r. to dia- 

member. [See, Limn, 
Lim'bate. [IGO.J 

Limbed ^imd), 162, 165. 
Lim'ber, 77. 
Limb'ing iJLim,'-), 162. 
Lim'bo (86) [pL Liin'- 

bos (-*<J«), 192.] 
Lim'bus, 169. 
Lime, 163. 
Limed, 165. 
Lim'ing 18:5. 
Lime'kiln (HJ), 162,200. 
Lime'stone. 
Lim'it, 06, 170. 
Lim'it-a-blc, 164, 109. 
Lim'it-a-rj, 72. 
Llm-it-a'tion. 
Lim'it-ed. 
Lim'it-ing. 
Limn (J.im) (162), v. to 

draw or paint. [Se» 

Limb, 160.] 
Lim'ner. 
Lim'ning. 
Limp, 16. 

Limped {JLimpt), 166. 
Lim'pet, 76. 
Lim'pid. 

Lim-pid'i-ty, 108, 109. 
Limp'iug. 
LImV» 169, 183. 
Lin'a-ment(169),n. lint; 

a tent for a wound. 

[Set Lineament, a'nd 

Liniment, 148.] 
Linch, 16, 44. 
Linch'pin. 
Lln'den, 149. 
Line, 25. 
Lin'e-age, 109. 
Lin'e-al, 72. 
Lin'e^il-ly, 170. 
Lin'e-a-ment (169), n. a 



ft} e, i, 0, ii, y, long ; &, S, X, d, ti, ^, ehort ; S a« in far, katin fiut, ft iw tit 



Itatnre. [See Uai- 

Un'e-sr, 74, 1». 
Uned, 1S3. 
Lin 'en. ae, 170. 

Ling, ie, M. 
Lin'i-er (Mtw'ffiW), M- 
Lin'gerHl (ftiw'jwrrf). 
Lin'gerlBg (Ih^gw-i. 
Uu'ijo (JiBff'oo), tte. 
LiD-^^ua-d^ru iUna- 

ouw-). 3*- 
Lin'gui-form *(liag'. 

gvH-), lOB. 
Lu'ffujat (Mn'mii^- 
Lln-uulst'lfl (Ung- 

UD-gulRt'lc-Bl lUng- 

gtSiPit-al), lOH. 
Li-nig'er-otts (■«(?■)■ 
LlD'i-ment (IW), n. ■ 
uml-flDld olntmenC 
(Sfe Linaraent, and 

Liu'ing. 

Lluk (ttnat, H), n. ft c. 
fpl. of n. IJnkB.— 

Llotoi (M^«).' 

Lln-nie^ (13, 72) [fuX 
lin'e-an, 153] itltt- 

Un'net/M, iJD, 

Lln'sej-'wfl&l'eeT IKh'- 



?;!vr'^.-., 



Li'on-tz. 
Ll'oa-iz' 
Li'on-is. 



U-go- 



Wb, (Id. ; HWott™ 
9m. 155.) 
Lfp^t-gram m»t'li!, o\ 

Lj-po-gnin'ma-tfat. 

Li.poth'y.niy (161. 171 

[aoWk. Sm.Gd.;!! 

poift'iHBff, Wr. W5.] 

ftll i A at in t&ei« ; d& a< Ai fb 



Limed (Kp(), 170. 
Up'pl-tnde, 1U7, m. 
Llq'uB-ble (_Ut'u!a-bt), 



l^n 



le-fa'cleat (lii^M- 



Lio'iild-Ts-lne t-vrt 
Llq'nor(i*i'(,r)(Jn), ■ 

liould BDbslance. [See 

iJcker, 160.1 
[Liquorice 201.- 

See Licorice.] 
Ll8'boii(lij'-),ifl,136. 

LlBpcd [IftipO. 
Lispjer, 77. 

Uat'ed. 
LlBt'el. 

Li8t'ea(Uil'n),I40,1l^ 
UBt'ened (fit'nd). ISB. 
UBt'cn-er (iK'n-S. 



Lit, 16. 
LlV.-ny, 
fLlter, 
tlfer^d. 



03. $«IJtre,] 
a. pcriAlnlDg 

according to 



La-rr-a'tin (L.). 
Llth'argc. 

LttEe^BOine (ttfK'ivnH 
rib Sm. Wr. Wt.Gd.: 
Mh'mm, Wk, IM.] 

Llth'i.a, 16». 

Ltth'io. 

Lltb'I-um, 160. 

UUi'iMlonie. 

Lt.tbod'o-mi,n.t>I. 

LI-thod'o-moOB. 

Llth'o-elyph, 17J. 

Lith'o-grtph, laj. 

Llth'o-graphed ( -grtfl), 
niiHotoC.p. 34. 

Li'thog'ra-phcr- 

Lltli^-graph'lc. 10». 

Llth^i-ifniph'lc a], 108. 

Lith'o-grapb .In g^. 

LI-thOK'ra-phj, ice, 160. 

Lllh^rd'al. 

Lith^i-lol'leil (.(di'-). 
LI-tbol'o-g7, lee. 
Llth'o-man.^. 
Lilh-on.tTlp'feorLlth- 

ontryptlo,^.] 
Lltlnni-trip'llrt Tao 

Wr. ; Ua'oK4Tip^ist, 

Sm. m.\ 

Lllh-on.trfp'tor [ea 
Wr, i «(S'on-(rfp-<or, 
Sm. Gd. ISB.] 



U-thot'o-mv, 108, a31. 

Lllli'o.trip.aT, 169. 

Lr-thot'ri^T, or Utfa'o- 
tri.tT [80 Wr.j i(- 
Owlfri-iy, Gd. ; («*'- 
o4tl4y, Sm. tSS.I 

L1th'o.type. 

Ufl-gant; n. 

Llt'1-eale, 73, VO. 

LH'l-Bit-ed. 

LJt'l-gat-lng. 

Llt-i^'UoB, 112. 

'""-OTt-(r- ■" 



Ll-t^^io 



{ti-i^'vi). 



[ietv.T. Sm.] k'Hir, 
Wr.Gd.lSS-l [Liter. 

K'ei^rred bjf Gd. Set 
oteE,p.?0.) 



LITTER 



266 



LONELINESS 



Lifter, 170. 

Lit'tered, 150. 

Lit'ter-ing'. 

Lit'tle {lU'l), AC, 162. 

Lit'to-ral (230), a. per- 
taining to, or g^w- 
Ing on, the shore. [See 
Literal, 148.] 

LX-tur'gio. 

LX-tur'gio-al, 72. 

Lit'ur-gy. 

Live, V. 161, 163. 

Live, a. 161, 163. 

Lived (Itvd) (161), V, did 
live. 

Lived (Rv<2) (161), a. 
having life. 

LTve'ii-hdbd, 186. 

LIve'li-ness. [153.] 

LIve'long [not liv'long, 

LIve'l3r,93. 

Liv'er. 

Liv'er-Ied (-id). 

IJv'er-wort (^i0ur^;,2O6. 

Llv'er-y, 105. 

Liv'er-y-man, 196. 

Lives (livz) (IGl, U03), 
n.pl. [5cc Life.] 

Lives {Civz) (161), v.does 
live. 

Liv'id, 170. 

Liv'ing. 

Livraison (Fr.) (Zev-rfl- 
zong'). 

Li'vre (li'vuryOT le'vur), 
[so Wr. Gd. ; U'vur^ 
Wl:. Sm. 155.1_ 

Lixlv'i-al, 232, jExc. 

Lix-iv'i-ate, a. & v, 73. 

Lix-iv'i-at-ed. 

Lix-ivM-at-ing. 

Lix-lv-i-a'tlon. 

Lix iv'i-ura, 100. 

Liz'ard, 72. 

Lla'ma (171) [Lama, 
203.] 

Lo (24), int. loolc ; be- 
hold. ['S'eeLow, 160.] 

Loach, 24, 44. 

JL>dad (24), n. a burden : 
— V. to freight; to 
burden. [See Lowed, 
160.] [Lode (in the 
sense of a mineral 
vein)t 203.] 

Ldad'ed. 

Load'ing. 

Load'star [Lodestar, 
203.] 

Load'stone [Lode- 
stone, 203.1 

Loaf (24), n, [pi. Ldaves 
iUvZj 166), 193.] 



LdaTer. 

Ldam, 2i, 153, 166. 

war **Ya]garij loom.** 
Waiter. ^^ 

Loam'y, 160. 

Loan (24), v. to lend. 

[.^ee Lone, 160.1 
Loaned {I6nd), 165. 
Loan'ing. 
Loath, a. (24. 37} 

[Loth, 203.] 
Loathe, v. 140, 163. 
Ldathed, 165. 
Loatli'in^. 

LoatH'some (loth' sum), 
Ldaves (luvz) (193), n. 

pi. [See Loaf.] 
Lo'bate, 73. 
Lo'bat-ed. 
Lob'by, 66, 170. 
Lobe, 24, 163. 
Lo-be'U-a, 72, 78. 
Lob'lol-ly. 
Lob'scouse. 
Lob'ster, 18, 77. 
Lob'ule, 90. 
Lo'cal, 72. 
Lo-cUle' (Ft.). 
Lo'cal-ism (-t>m), 133. 
Lo-cal'i-ty, 108, 160. 
Lo-cal-l-za'tion. 
Lo'cal-ize, 202. 
Lo'cal-ized, 183. 
Lo'cal-iz-ing. 
Lo'cate. 

Lo'ciit-ed, 228, N. 
Lo'cat-ing, 183. 
Lo-ca'tion. 
Loch (18, 52), n. a lake. 

[See Lock, 160.1 

[Lough, 203.J 
Lo-cha'ber^&xe (-ita'-), 

155, 171. 
Lock (18, 52, 181), n. a 

fastening for a door, 

&c. : — V. to fasten 

close. [ See Loch and 

Lough, 160.] 
Lock'age, 70. 
Locked (lokt), 165 ; Note 

G, p. 34. 
Lock'er, 77. 
Lock'et, 76. 
Lock'ing. 
Lock'ist. 
Lock'jaw, 206. 
Lock'smith. 
Lock'-up, 206, Exc. 4. 
Lo'co-fo'co, 24. 
Lo-co-mo'tion. 
liO-co-mo'tlve (84, 86) 

[8oWk.Wr.Wb.G}d.; 



lo'k<Hno4iOt Sm. 

155.] 
Loc'u-la-ment. 
Loc'u-lobs. 
Lo'cust. 

Lode [Load,a03.] 
[Lo de star, 203.— iSr«e 

Loadstar.] 
[Lodestone, 203.— 

See Loadstone.] 
Lo<lgr6) 45, 171. 
Lodged (lojd). 
Lodge'ment (185) 

[Lodgment, Wb. 

Gd. 203.1 
Lodg'er, 45. 
Lodg'ing. 
Loft, 18, N. 
LofVi-ly, 186. 
Loft'i-ness. 
Lott'y. 
Log, 18, 53. 
Log'a-rithm, 133, 140. 
Log-a-rith'mic, 109. 
Log-a*rith'mic-al, 108. 
Log'-book, 206. Exc. 4. 
Logged (logd), 166, 176. 
Log'gor-hr'ud {-ffur-). 
Lotf'iTing: i-ghiag)y 138, 

170, 176. 

235. 
108. 



Log'ic(Z<>y 
Log'lc-al 



/M, 45, 200, 

(-/oj'0, 72, 
LogMc-al-ly {Iqj'-). 
Lo-gi'cian (-jiiA'an),46, 

234. 
Lo-gis'tlc {-Jis'-"). 
'. Lo-gis'tic-al (t/w'-). 
I Lo-gora'a-chi8t( A-«s/),52 
i Lo-gom'a-cliy {-ky), 108. 
j Log-o-met'nc. 
I Log'o-type, 170. 
Lo<f'w<5bd, 206. 
Loin, 27, 150. 
Loi'tcr, 7?, 104. 
Loi'tcrcd, 150. 
Loi'ter-er. 

Loi'ter-ing. [15.3. 

L611, (18, 172) [no< 161, 
Lol'lard, 72. 
Lolled <to2d), 165. 
Lol'll-pop, 170. 
LCll'ing. 
Lom'bard (lum'burdy or 

lom'bura) [lum'burd, 

Sm. f lom'hurd. Wr. 

Gd. 165.] 
Lom-bard'io (Zum-, or 

lorn-). 
Lo'mcnt, 103. 
Lon'don-er (lun'-\ 22. 
Lone (24), a. solitary. 

[See Loan, 160.] 
Lone'li-ness, 186. 



a, e, I, o, ii, y, long', tt, fi, X, 5, fi, f, short; yi<uin &r, a <u in last, kasia 



LONELY 



267 



LUCEBN 



Lone'ly, 93. [171. 

Lone'some (-sum)^ 22, 
Long^, 18, N. 
Lon<^e (lunj) [Lunge, 

20:i.] 
Long-ed {longd)^ 165. 
Lom,r'er (lAi), n. one 

WHO long^s. 

hon' gcT(^ionff'ffurX 161 )i 
a. more long-. 

Lon-ge'val {-Je'-). 

Lon-gev'i-ty, 108. 

Lon-<^e'vo&B, 100. 

Long'in<|f. 

Long^'isu. 

Lou'^-tnde, 26. 169. 

Lon-&[l-tud'in-al. 

Long'-lired,206, Exo. 5. 

Loo, 19, 50. 

Loof [so Wk. Sm. Wb. 
Gd. ; W, Wr. 155], 
n. the after part of a 
Bh^*8 bow. [Com- 
monly written Luff, 
203.] 

Loof (looA or «/) [loofy 
Sm. ; luf, Wk. ; /«/, 
or loof, Wr. 155], v. to 
bring nearer the wind, 
as the head of a ship. 
[Luff, 203.] 

L<fok (20) [so Sm. Wr. 
Wb. Gd. J too&, Wk. 
155.] [S'ee Note under 
^ooib.j 

Ldbked (ITokt), 166; 
Note C, p. 34. 

Ldbk'er. 

Ldbk'ing. 

Ldbk'ing-glaBB (131, 
200, Exc. 4) [so Sm. 
Wr. Wb. Gd. ; look'- 
in-gldSy Wk. 155.] 

Ldbk'-out, 206, Exc 4. 

Loom, 19. 

Loomed, 166. 

Loom'ing. 

Loon, 19, 43. 

Loop, 19, .30. 

Looped (loopt). 

Loop'-hole, 206, Exe. 3. 

Loop'ing. 

Loose, a. &v. 

Loosed {loott)f Note C, 
p. .34. 

Loos'en (Zoos'nS 167. 

I^oos'ened (loos' nd),l(i5, 

I^ooBe'nesB, 185. 

Loo8e'8trife,66,N.; 216. 

LooB'ing. 

Lop, 18. 

Lopped {2opt)t 176. 



Lop'pep. 

Lop'ping. 

Lo-qua'ciouB {-kwa'- 
8hu8)y 40, 112, 171. 

Lo-qua9'i-ty {-kwas'-), 
109, 235. 

Lo'rate, 49, N. 

Lord (17, 135) [not law'- 
urd, 153.] 

Lord'ed. 

Lord'ing. 

Lord'li-nesB, 186. 

Lord'ly, 93. 

Lore (49, 67), n. learn- 
ing. [See Lower, 148.] 

Lorgnette (Fr.) (lom- 
yet'). 

Ldr'i-cate, 108, 169. 

Ldr'i-eat-«d. 

Ldr-i-ca'tion. 

Lor'i-keet, 4S, 17L 

L6r'i-ot. 

Lorn, 17. 

Lo'ry,49, Note; 190. 

Lose (looz), 19, 136. 

Los'er (looz'-). 

Los'ing (looz'). 

Loss, 18, N. ; 174. 

Lost, 18. 

Lot, 18. 

Lote'-tree, 206, Exc. 4. 

[Loth, 203. — 5ee 
Loath.] 



__ **The common or- 
thography it loath, pro- 
nounced with o long, but 
both the orthogrmph V and 

Sronunciatton originally 
»Uowed the analogy cv 
cto/A." ir«btter, 

I^'tion. 

Lo'tos (86) [LotUB, 

2a3.] 
Lot'ter-y, 160, 170. 
Lo'tuB [lLotOB,203.] 
Loud, 28. 
Lough (lok) (52, 156), n. 

a lake. [See Lock, 

160.] [Loch, 203.] 
Louis-a'or (Fr.) (loo-e- 
Lounge, 28, 45. [d9r'). 
Lounged, 165. 
Loung'er (lounj'-), 
Loung'injg (touty'-). 
Louse [pL Lice, 195.1 
Lou'sy l-zy), R6, 169. 
Lout, 28. 

Lou'vpr (ioo'-), 19, 77. 
Lov'a-ble (luv'-h 164. 
Lov'age (luv'-), 70, 169. 
Love (Zt*t?), 22, 163. 
Lore'-ap-ple (/tti/-),206, 

Exc. 2. 



Love'let-ter f /«»'-). ' 
Love'-lles-bleed'ing 

{luv'nz-)t 221. 
Love'li-nesB (luv'-), 
Love'lock (luv'-). 
Love'lom (/«»'-). 
Lovely (/wr'-), 93, 186. 
Lov'er Quv'-). 
Love'-8ick (hiv'-)f 206, 

Exc. 5. 
Lov'ing (?«rM. 
Lov'ing-kind'nesB 

(Zttr'-), 205. 
Low (24), a. not high or 

elevated. [See Lo, 

160.] 
Low [so Sm. Wr. Wb. 

Gd. ; lo, or low, W k. 

155], V. to bellow, aB 

a cow. 
Low'-bred, 200, Exc. 5. 
Lowed, t^. did low. [See 

Load, 160.1 
Low'er (161), v. to take 

or bring down. [See 

Lore, 148.] 
Lower (Zottr) (28, 161), «. 

to appear dark or 

l^loomy. 
Low'ered, 150, 161. 
Lowered (laurd), 150, 

161. 
Low'er-ing, 161. 
Lower'ing {lour*-), 161. 
Low'er-most. 
Lower'y {Jiourfy), 169. 
Low'ing. 
Low'land, 216. 
Low'li-neisB, 186. 
Low'ly. 

Low'-splr'it-ed, 205. 
Lox-o-drom'ic, lOU, 170. 
Loy'al [not law'yal, 

15.3.1 
Loy'al-ist. 
Loy'al -ly. 
Loy'al-ty. 
Loz'enge, 156. 
Lub'ber, 66, 170. 
Lu'bric, 26. 
Lu'bric-al. 
Lu'bri-cant, 72. 
Lu'bri-cate, 78, 169 
Lu'bri-cat-ed. 
Lu'bri-cat-ing. 
Lu-bri-ca'tion, 112. 
Lu-bri9a-ty, 169, 236. 
Luce, 26, 127. 
Lu'oent, 76. 
Lu'cem (20), n. a sort 

of hunting dog; — a 

species of trefoil. [See 

Lusern, 160.] 



fall ; d a# <» there ; dbo^infoot; 9 a« in faoile;gh a« gfn go; tha«tnthiB. 



LUCEENAL 



268 



LUXURY 



Ln-eem'al. 

Lu'cid [not loo'sld, 127, 

163.] 

Lu'd-fer, 26, 78. 

Lu-cifer-ofis, 106, IflO. 

Lu-cit'ic, IW. 

Lu'ci-form, 171. 

Luck, 22, 181. 

Luck'i-ly, 186. 

Luck'y, ft3, 160. 

Lu'cra-tlve, 72, 84. 

Lu'cre i-kur), IM ; Note 
E, p. 70. 

Lu'cu-brate, 26, 80. 

Lu-cu-bra'tion, 112. 

Lu'cii-lent, 89, 156. 

Lu'di-erofie, 78, 171. 

Luff (22, 173) fLoof, 
203.1 [C, p. 34. 

Luffed (lt{ft)y 106 J Note 

Luff'ing. 

Lug, 22. 

Lug^gaffe, 176. 

Luggea (Zu^</), 166. 

Lug'ger (-ffur). 

Lug'giug (,-ffhing), 138. 

Lu-gu'brl-ofiB, 169. 

Lukc'w&rm, 26, 127 

Lull, 22, 172. 

Lull'a-by. 

Lulled (luldyt 165. 

Lull'ing. 

Lu'ma-chcl {-ket) [go 
Wb. Gd. ; Poo'ma- 
kely Sm. (See § 20); 
Wma-chel, Wr. 155.] 

Lu-ma-cliel'la (-keV-). 

Lum-bag'in-oOs (-bc0'-). 

Lum-ba'go, 122. 

Lura'bar (70, 169), a. 
pcrtainiDg to the 
loins. [See Lumber, 
1(50.1 

Lum'ber (70, 169), n. 
any thing UBeless 
and cum6er8ome ; — 
sawed or split tim- 
ber: — V. to heap in 
disorder. [See Lum- 
bar, 100.1 

Lum'bered (-bard), 160. 

Lum'ber-er, 77. 

Lum'ber-ing. 

Lum'bric-ai. • 

Lu'min-a-ry, 26, 72, 160. 

Lu-min-if er-ous, 108. 

Lu-mln-os'i-ty, 108. 

Lu'min-oiis, 26, 100. 

Lump, 22, 64. 

Lumped (^lumpt). 

Lump'ing. 

LumpMsh, 80. 

Lump'suck-er. 



^ 



Lnmp'y, 160. 
Lu'na (L.), 20. 
Lu'n«-cy, 169. 
Lu'oar, 74, 127. 
Ln-na'ri-an, 40, N. 
Lu'nate. 
Lu'na t-ed. 
Lu'na-tic, 26, 100. 
Lu-na'tioQ, £^. 
Lunch, 22, 44. ' 
Lunched {luncht). 
Lunch'cou {lunch^uh) 
171) rso Sm. Wr. 

^b. Gd. ; lun'thufiy 

Wk. 155.] 
Lunch'ing. 
Lune, 127. 
JM-nette' (Fr.), 164. 
Lung, 22, 54. 
[Lunge, 203.— 5<e 

Longe.] 
Lung' wort (^umrt). 
Lu'ni-form, 106, 160. 
Lu-ni-so'lar, 122. 
Lu'nu4ar, 108. 
Lu'nu-late, 106. 
Lu'nu-lat-ed. 
Lu-per'cal [so Sm. Wr. j 

lu'per-kaly Wb. Gd. 

166.] 

ME^ Shakespeare aceenti 
the flnt syllable iMpef 
eal). 

Lu'pYne, 26, 82, 152. 
Lurch, 21,44. 
Lurched {lurcht)^ 165; 

Note C, p. 34, 
Lurch'er, 
Lurch 'ing. 
Lure, 26, 40. 
Lured, 166. 
Lu'rid, 26, 49, N. 
Lur'ing, 40, Note ; 236. 
Lurk, 21. 
Lurked {lurkt). 
i Lurk'er, 228. 
: Lurk'ing. 
Lurk'ing-plaoe, 206, 

Exc. 4. 
Lus'cious (Ifish'us), 171. 
Lu'sem (26), n. the 

lynx. [See Luoem, 

160.] 
Lu'si-ad i-z%-) [so Wb. 

Gd. ; lu'8i-aay Wr. 

155.] 
Lust, 22. 
Lust'ed. 
LuBt'ful i-fSol). 
Lust'i-ly, 186. 
Lust'i-ness. 
Lust'ing. 



Lns'tral, 230. 

LuB-tra'tion, 112. 

LuB'tre f 169) [L n i. 
ter, Wb. Gd. 203.^ 
See Note E; p. 70.] 

Lus'tring Tbo Wk. Sm. 
Wb. Gd.; lus'tring, 
or ItU'atringt Wr. 
156], n. a lustrouB 
silk. [Lutestring, 
203. — See Note waAer 
Lutestring,] 

LuB'tro&s, 100. 

Lus'trutnCL.) [pl.XffM'- 
tra, 198.1 

Lust'y, 160. 

Lu'sue Noriu'rm (I<.). 

Lu'tan-ist. 

Lu-ta'ri-ofis, 40, N. . 

Lu-ta'tion. 

Lute, 26, 163. 

Lut'ed, 183. 

Lu'te-ofis, 160. 

Lute'string, n. the 
string of a lute. 

war' ^*By misapprehen- 
sion of its etymology, the 
word hutnng la also often 
spelled thus {lutettring]: 
but however presenting 
this form to the eye. it has 
long since regained its trne 
character to the ear Civs'- 
tring].^ Smart 

Lu'ther-an, 26, 72. 

Lu'ther-an-ism {-izm), 
127, 133. 

Lu'them, 26. 

Lut'ing, 183. 

Lu'tose. 

Lux'ate. 

Lux'at-ed. 

Lux'at-ing. 

Lux-a'tion, 232, Exc. 

Lux-u'ri-ance (lugz-), 
40, Note ; 40, N. ; 137. 

Lux-u'ri-an-cy {lugz-). 

Lux-u'ri-ant {higz-u'r^ 
ant) (40, 49, N.) [so 
Wr. ; lug-z^frl-antt 
Wk. Sm. ; luks^'rv- 
ant, Wb. Gd. 165.] 

Lux-u'ri-ate (lugz-), 49, 
N. 

Lux-u'ri-at-ed (lugz-), 

Lux-u'ri-at-ing (Itwz-). 

Lux-u'ri-oiiB (jMgz-) 
(137, 2.^2, Exc.) [so 
wr. ^ lug-zu'ri-U8 (49, 
N.), Wk. Sm. ; luks'- 
H'ri-us, Wb. Gd. 165.] 

Lux'u-ry (89) [so Wb. 
Gd. ; luh'shu-ry, Wk. 



a,e,i,6,ii,y,?on^;»,€,I,6,tt,y,»Aor«; 8 « »» far, a a« <» fast, a w <n 



LYCANTHROPr 



MAONETO-ELECTRICITT 



«■] 



(IOSJ[liI 



Vk.Sm. Wb.Qd.in- 
tan'tkrol^, Wr. IM.J 
ly-oe'uni (HI, IW) [L. 
pi. Lii-cCa i Bag. pt. 

Lye (^4),' n. water Im- 

fi^egDated with, ullui- 
oe salt imbibed 

wood. tSee Lie, leo.l 
^[L^«y,W] 

LjmpTi'fifiiir). 1» 
Lynipliiit'li;, [09. 
LtubIi, 16, 44, Note 2. 
Lynched (HmU), IW; 

Note C, p. 34. 
Lynoh'Ing. 
Lynx (Jin^i.) m H), 

n. B qoHdnipea oT the 

est laad. (See Link, 

100.1 
Lyux'-eyed (litigta'ldl. 



ee'lUm, Siu. 169.1 
Hucbt-a-rel-ism (ouil;'- 

i-a-ivi-<23n), 133, 136. 
Hi-clile'e-lat-ed. 



Wr. Od. i n 
la' ikan, Sm. 
HHcb'ln-id (m, 



Wit. Wb, Gd.i Bu 
(Al'naj, Sm. 1S5.] 

M»ob'io-a(e I mat' A. 

Hnoh'in^t-ed {mat--). 

Haoh'ln.at-lae (•mai'-) 

Hwth-in-a'tlon | nulls). 

Ma^iAlne' (-^hla'). 114. 

Ho-ctaJn'cr-T l.ahtn--}. 

Ma-chln'i*t (-«Mny . 

Hack'er-el, NoU D, p. 
S7. 



Made, v. liid make. [SM 

Uald, IW.I 
Hs.del'ni {ma-dflra. or 

m<.-da'ra)(4ll,NJ[mo- 

de'ni, Wr, i mo-der'ro, 

Sm. : RO-da'ni, Wb. 

Gd. 165.1 
Hadem-ot-ieOe' (mod- 

mwa-sel') [ao 8m. 

Od. ; mad-eanoa-xtl'i 



lVi-oIbdi (-nim), 139. 
Ly'rtBt,41l,N. 
Ly-te'rl-BU, 40, N. 



id'am-Ized, 183, 



t^. [.SiH Macule, iAl.1 
Us'cni-oosui ( -ilium} 

(133) [»o Wk. Sm. 

Wr. : mak'ro-kotm, 

Wb. Gd. IM.l 
Ha-cram'e-ter, lOS. 
Ma'cron. 
Mac-ro-phyl'lofiS, or 

Ma-cropli'yl-lobs.- 

f See AdeaopbjUouB.} 

cm'ran (-leroo'-), 203. 
Ua-crou'roflg, or Ua- 

cru'roBa (-treo'-), 203. 
Mac'a-la f L.) [pi. JUac'- 



Mad'rnn, 73, 170. 
Ma.d<B«e> (Ft.) [pi. 
"-ntomes (ma-dam'), 



dened (mad'aJ), 
, Had'den-lng (mad'a-). 



In AoUe i gh at g in go i [^ lu <n thia. 



MAGNETOMETER 



270 



MALIGNANCY 



ne'to-€-lek4rWi4v, 
Gd. 155.] 

Mng^-net-om'e-ter, 106. 

Hafi^'net-o-mo'tor 
[Mag^neto-mo- 
ter,a03.] 

Hag-niPic, 109. 

Mag-nirio-al, 106. 

Ma^^-niPi-oenoe, 171. 

Hag^-nif i-oent, 127. 

Mag'ni-fied. 

Mag^'iii-fT-er, 186. 

Majf'nI-fy, 94. 

Mag:'ni-fy-ing, 186. 

Ma^-nil'o-quenoe 
{-hwens). 

Manr-uil'o-quent 
(-Xtren/). 

Mag'ni-tude, 160. 

Mag^-Do'li-a, 150. 

Maj^'pie. 

Ma^'uey (fnagh'y),TSote 
D, p. 37 ; 1«0. 

Ma«r'yar {mad'yar), 

Ma-na-ba-ra'ta, or M«- 
hnb-a-ra'ta lma-hab-<i- 
rH'ta, Sm. ; mH-lM- 
bd'rartd, Wr. 155.] 

Ma-hog^a-ny, 171. 

Ma-hom'et-an [ M a - 
homcdan, Mo- 
hammed an, 203.] 

Ma-hom'et-an-lsm 
(jizm). 

Maid, n. a virgin. [See 
Made, 160.] 

Maid'cD (tnad'n)^ 140. 

Maid'en-hr^d (mflrf'n-). 

Maid-ma'ri-an [no Wr. | 
Gd. ; mid-mir'pan, \ 
Wk. J mAd-mSr'i-ant 
Sm. 155.1 

Mail, n. defensive ar- 
mor J — ^postal convey- 
ance : — V. to send by 
post. [See Male, IGO.] 

Mail'a-ble, 164, 109. 

Mfdled, 165. 

Mail'ing. 

Maim, 23, 32. 

Maimed, 105. 

Maim'ing. 

Main, a. principal,chief: 
— n. wie ocean, the 
continent. [iS^eeMane, 
160.] 

Main'mast, 206, 216. 

Main'prise (-prlz) 

[MainprMe,203.] 

Main'sail. 

Main-tain' (men-t&n') 
[so Wk. Wb. Gd.j 
man-t&n', or mA»-^Sn', 



Wr. ; mdn-tdn'i 8m. 

155.] 

Maln-taln'a-ble {men-), 
169. 

Main-tained' (m«n-),165. 

Main-tain'er (inen-)^ n. 
one who maintains or 
supports. [See Main- 
tainor, 160.] 

Main-tain'ing (men-). 

Main-tain'or {men-), n. 
one who maintains a 
suit between others 
by furnishing money. 
[Law term. — See 
Maintalner, 160.] 

Main'ten-anoe (169, 171) 
[so 8m. Wr. Wb.Gd. : 
«nen'<en-afM,Wk. 155.J 

Maize (2:3,40), n. Indian 
com. [See Maze, 160.] 

Ma-Jes'tlc, 109. 

Ma-jes'tio-al, 228. 

Ma-Jes'tic-al-ly. 

MiO'cs-ty, 105. 

MaMor, 88, 169. 

Ma'jor-do'mo. 

Ma'jor-gen'er-al, 205. 

Ma-Jor'i-ty, 169. 

Ma-jns'cule. 

Make, 23, 52. 

Mftk'er. 

Make'-shift,206, Exe. 4. 

Makc'-weight {-wdt). 

Miik'ing, ill. 

Mal'a-chite (-WO, 62. 

Mal-a-col'o-gy, 108. 

Mal-a-cop-te-ryg'i-oiis 
(-ry'i-tts), 116, 171. 

Mal-a-cos'tra-oan. 

Mal-a-cos'tra-cotts. 

[M aladmini at ra- 
ti on, 2a3. S'eeMale- 
admini stration .] 

Mal-a-droit', 122. 

Mal'a-dy, 105. 

Mal'a-ga, 72. 

Mal'an-ders (-durz), 

Mal'a-pert, 21, N. 

Mal-ap^o-pos' (Fr.) 

(-»oO. 
Malar. 

Ma-la'rl-a (49, N.; [so 
Wb. Gd. ; mal-a'ri-a, 
Wr. J mal-d're-a, Sm. 
155.] 

Ma-la'ri-o&s, 100. 

Ma'late. 

Ma-lay' (121, 156), n. a 
native or an inhabit- 
ant of Malacca. [See 
Mdl^e, 160.] 

Ma-lay'an. 



[Maloonforma- 
tion, 203.— See 
Maleconformation.l 

[Malcontent. — See 
Malecontent.] 

Male, a. of the sex that 
begets young : — n. a 
ho-animal. [iS^ee Mail, 
ICO.] 

MAle, a prefix signlfr- 
Ing UK 



..w Ai a prefix, mate 
!■ pronounced mil by 
Smart, Worceiter, and 
most other orthoepisti, but 
bj Walker mdh and th« 
e, which is aunic In the 
pronunciation, i§ often 
omitted in the orthogra- 
phv. Worceiter remarlu: 
" There are words in which 
male has the same orinn 
and meaning [illj; but Uie 
letters are not so sepamble 
as to have the character of 
a prefix; as, nuii^^aetor.** 

M&le-ad-min-is-tra'tion 
[Maladminis- 
tration, 203.] 

Mftle-con-fbrm-a'tion 
[Malconforma- 
tion,203.] 

M&le-oon-tent' [Mal- 
content, 203.] 

Mal-e-die'tion, 144. 

Mal-e-fac'tor, or Mal'e- 
fac-tor (88, 116) [mal- 
efak'tur, Wk. Wr. 
\Vb. Gd.; nud'e-fak- 
tur^ Sm. 155.J 

Mftlc-fi'>a' sauce (mal-ff- 
zann) [so Wr. Gd. : 
mal-fa'zansy Sm. 155.J 
[Malfeasance, 
203.] 

[Maleformation, 
203.— See Malforma- 
tion.] 

Mslle-prac'tioe (171) 
[Malpracticc,203.j 

[Maletreat, 203.— 
See Maltreat.] 

Ma-lev'o-lence, 169. 

Ma-lev 'o-Ient. 

[Malfeasance, 20S. 
— See Malefeasance.] 

Mal-form-a'tion[M a 1 e- 
formation,203.] 

Ma'Iic, 200. 

Mal'Ioe, 109, 170. 

Ma-II'cious i-lith'fu), 
112, 109. 

Ma-lign' (-nn')f a, ft v. 
103, 121, 162. 

Ma-lig'nan-oy, 160. 



a, e, !, o, u, y, long ; tt, fi, X, 5, tt, f, thort ifiaiin flur, a at in fitst, ft a« {» 



aiALIGNANT 



271 



BIANIFESTABLE 



Ma-Iigr'nant, 72. 
Ma-lijfned' (-ftndO» 162. 
Ma-lig-n'er (-/In'-). 
Ma-lign'ing; (-/In'-). 
Ma-lig'ni-ty, 109. 
Ma-lin'ger {jna-ling'- 

gur) (54, 138) [so Gd. 
m. J morlin'jur, Wr. 

155.] 
Ha-lin'g^cred {-ling'- 

gurd), lt»5. 
Ma-lin'ger-er {-linff'- 

our-). I 

Ha-lin'g^er-ing- {-ling'- 

gvr). \ 

Mal'i-son {'Zn\ 136, 149. { 
Mai'kin (Tnaw'Hn)y 132, i 

1"*! 

MairrsoWr.Wb. Gd.j 
fnaf, Wk. Sm. 155], n. 
a heavy wooden ham- 
mer or beetle.rM a u 1 , 

2a3.] 

H&U [so 8m. Wr. Wb. 

Gd.}TOc/,Wk. 155],n. 

a public walk. 
Mail, V. to beat with a 

mall. [M au 1,203. — 

See Mall.] 
MaFlard, 72. 
Mal-le-arbil'i-ty, 169. 
Mal'le-a-ble, 1(»4, 229. 
Maiae-ate, 170. 
Mal'le-at-ed, 183. 
Mal'le-at-ing. 
Mal-le-a'tion, 112. 
Mailed, 1G5. 
Mal'Ie-o-lar. 
Mal'let, 66, 76, 170. 
MairiQg. 
MaFlow [pi. Mal'lowB 

(-to«), 1»9.] 



*' Seldom owd but 
in the plural form." — 
Worcester. 

Malm'sey {m^an'zy)y 
162, 169. 

[Malpractice, 203. 
— See Malepractice.] 

Mait, 17. 

Mait'ed. 

Mal-tese' {-tlz') (121) 
[so Wr. i mawl-Ua', 
Gd. 155.] 

Mal'tha, 72. 

Mal-thu'sian {-zhan) 
(112, 127) [mal-thu'- 
Bhan, Wr. ; malrthu'- 
8i-ant Gd. 155.] 

Mait'ing. 

Maltreat' [Male- 
treat, 203.] 



Mal-treat'ed. 

Mal-treat'ing. 

Mal-treat'mcnt. 

Malt'ster, 77. 

Ma'lum in se (L.). 

Mal-va'ceous (^-shus), 

Mul-ver-sa'tion. 

Mam'e-luke, 26. 

Mam-ma', 171. 

Mam'mal, 72, 170. 

Mam-ma'li-a, n. pi, 

Mam-ma'li-an. 

Mam-mal'o-gist, 45. 

Mam-mal'o-gy, 108. 

Mam'ma-ry, 72. 

Mam'mi-fer, 78. 

Mam-mifcr-ous, 106. 

Mam'mi-fbrm, 108. 

Mam'mil-la-ry, 170. 

Mam'mil-lat-ed. 

Mam'mon, 66, 86, 170. 

Mam'mon-ist. 

Mam'moth, 86, 170. 

Man,n. & v. (10, 43) [pi. 
of n. men, 195.] 

Man'a-cle, 104, 164. 

Man'a-cled {-bid), 183. 

Man'a-cling. 

Man'age, 160, 170. 

Man'age-a-ble, 164, 183. 

Man'aged. 

Man'age-ment, 185. 

Man'a-ger. 

Man'a-ging. 

Man'a-kin, 169. 

Man-a-tee', 122. 

Manch-i-neel', 122, 171. 

Man-ci-pa'tion. 

Man'ci-ple, 104. 

Mdn-d&'mus (L.). 

Man-da-rin' {-rSn'), 122. 

Man'da-ta-ry, 72. 

Man'date. 

Man'da-to-ry, .86. 

Man'dl-ble, l(H, 169. 

Man-dib'u-lar, 74, 108. 

Man-dib'u-late, 89. 

Man-dib' u-liit-ed. 

Man-<ii-bu'li-form, 108. 

Man'drake, 103. 

Man'drel (76j, n. an in- 
strument for holding 
the work in a tumer*8 
lathe. [See Man- 
drill, 148.] 

Man'drill, n. a large 
and powerful species 
of baboon. [See Man- 
drel, 148.] 

Mane (23), n. the lon^ 
hair on the neck ot 
certain animals. [See 
Main, 160.] 



ULsL-nege' (mornHzh') [so 

Wr. ; m&n-Azh', Sm. , 

ma-n&zh'j or man'^, 

Gd. 155.1 
Ma'nes (L.) (-n^^), n. 

pi. 
Man'ftil (-fool), 178. 
Man'ful-ly {-fuol-). 
[Maneuver, Wb. Gd. 

203. — See Manoeuvre.] 
[Maneuverer, Wb. 

Gd. 203. — 5ce ila- 

noeuvrer.] 
[Maneuvering, 

Wb. Gd. 203. — Se« 

Manoeuvring.] 
Man'ga-by {mang'-),5i. 
Man-ga-nese' (mang-ga- 

nSz^) (122) [so Sm. 

Wr. ; mang-gornls' , 

Gd. 155.] 
Man-ga-ne'sian (mang- 

ga-ne'zhi-an) [so 

Wr. ; mang-gorn^- 

iJuin, Gd. 155.] 
Mange, 23, 127. 
Man^el-wur'zel 

(rnang'gl-vmr'zl). 
Man'ger, 45. 
Mau'gi-ness, 186. 
Man'gle imang'gl), 64, 

161. 
Man'gled {mang'gld), 
Man'gler (mang'-). 
Man'gling {mang'-). 
Man'go {mang'-). 
Mangoose, 203. — 

/L^ee Mongoose, 203.] 
Man'go-stan Imang'-)^ 

or Man'go-steen 

{mang'-). 
Man' grove {mang'-) [so 

Wr. Gd. J man'grdVt 

Sm. 155.] 
Man'gy, 93, 156. 
[Man had en, 203. •— 

See Menhaden.] 
Man'hobd. 
Ma'ni-a. 

Mahii-a a po'ttt (L.). 
Ma'ni-ac, 108. 
Ma-ni'ac-al, 108. 
Man-i-che'an {-ke'-). 
Man'i-chee {-ke-) [so 

Sm. Gd. : man-i-tce'^ 

Wr. 155.J 
Man-i-chee'ism i-kt'- 

izm) [so Sm. Wr.*, 

m(m'%-ke'izm, Gd. 

155.] 
Man'i-chord {-kord), 
Man'i-fest. 
[Manifestable, 



fitll; ^atin there ', <Sb<uin foot } $ a« tn fkcile j gh iw g in go ; ]^ a« in this. 



MANIFESTATION 



272 



MAEG 



20^. — See Manifestl- 

ble.] 
Man-i-fcRt-a'tloii. 
Man'i-fegt-ed. 
Man'i-fcst-1-ble (IM) 

(Manifestable, 

203.] 
Han'i-fest-ing. 
Han'i-fest-ly, 126. 
Man-i-fest'o, n. [pi. 

Man-i-fest'oes (,-^z)j 

192.] 
Man'i-fDld. 
Man'i-kin, 109, 170. 
Ha'ni-oc. 
Han'i-ple, 164. 
Ma-nip' u-iar, 108. 
Ma-nip'u-latc. 
Ma-nip'u-lat-ed. 
Ma-nip'u-lat-ing. 
Ma-nip-u-la'tion. 
Ma'nis. 

Man'i-tou {-too). 
Man-kind' (52, 146) [bo 

Wr. Wb. Gd. ; man- 

kHnd't Sm.(.5ec§26); 

tnan-kylnd', Wk. 155.} 

03^ When used anti- 
thetically witli respect to 
woinanktudt the accent ii 
on the first syllable. 

[Manks, 203.— See 
Manx.] 

Man'like, 206, Exc. 5. 

Manai-ncas, 78, 186. 

Mau'ly, 93. 

Man'-mid'wTfe [ao 
Wr. J inan-mid'v>y\ 
Sm. 155.1 

Man'-mil'li-ner. 

Man'na, (i6, 72. 

Man'na^drop'pingf, 206. 

Man'naed, 1(55, 188. 

Manned, 165, 176. 

Man'ner (70, 170), n. 
mode, method. [See 
Manor, 160.] 

Man'nered (-nurd). 

31 an'ner-ism (-t'^m), 133. 

Man'ner-ist. 

Man'ner-ll-nes8. 

Man'ner-ly. 

Man'ninfi^. 

Man'nisn, 176. 

Ma-noeu'vre {-noo'vur) 
(109, 171) [so Wk. Sm. 
Wr. J ma-nA'vurt Wb. 
Gd. 155] [Maneu- 
ver, preferred by 
Gd. 203.J 

Ma-noBu'vred (-noo'- 
imrd) [Maneu- 

vered, 203.] 



Ma-n<sn'vrer (-noo'-) 
[Maneuyerer, 
203.] 

Ma-noeu'vring (-^mo*-) 
[M aneny erinff, 
203.] * 

Man-of-wAr', 221. 

Ma-nom'e-ter, 106. 

Man-o-met'ric-al. 

Man'or (66, 70, 170), n. 
a nobleman's estate 
in lands. [See Man- 
ner, 160.1 

Ma-no'ri-al, 49, N. 

Manse, Note D, p. 37. 

Man'sion, 112,234. 

Man'8laugli-ter(-«jatr-), 
206. 

Man'sue-tude(-M0e-),16O 

Man'tel {man'tl) (149), 
». the work in nront 
of a chimney over the 
Jambs of a nreplaoe. 



♦•This ■pellinff Is 

now prevalent Insteaciof 
mantle, in order to distin- 
guish between this word 
and mantle, a garment." 
Ooodrich. 

Man'tel-et (man'tl-et) 
[bo Sm. , man'tel-et, 
Wb.Gd.; mantelet', 
Wk. Wr. 165.] 

Man'ti-ger {-gur), or 
Man'n-g'er {-ffur) 
[man'tX-gurj Wr. wb. 
Gd. } man'tl-gurj Sm.; 
man-tVgur, Wk. 155.1 

Man'tle {-tl), 164. 



When this word 
means the work in front of 
a chimney, over the Jcumm 
of a fireplace, it is now 
more commonly written 
mamtel.— SM Note under 
MomUL 

Man'tled (-<2<2), 164, 165. 
Man'tUng^, 183. 
Man'tua {man^tu , or 

manHuHi) [tnan'fu, 

Sm., man'<^u-a^ Wk.; 

man'^u-a, or man'tUy 

Wr. Gd. 155.] 



' * Manteaa ... is the 

original word, and sag- 

!;ests the usual pronuncia- 
ion : the word ha'« no rela- 
tionship to the Italian city, 
and may therefore proper- 
ly differ Arom it in sound." 
Smart. 

Man'tua-mak-er 

205. 
Man'u-al, 72, 89. 
Man-u-duc'tion, 112. 



(-*«-), 



Man-u-fhct'o-ry, 80. 
Han-u-fkct'ure, n. & «. 

89,91. 
Man-tt-ftct'ured, 165. 
Man-u-fkct'ur-€r(-yttr-), 

91, 171, 183. 
Man-u-fact'ur-ing. 
Man-u-mis'sion (-m{<A'- 

un), 112, 169. 
Man-u-mit' ( 122)[8oW1e. 

Wr. Crd. ; man'tMiuY, 

Sm. 155.1 
Man-u-mirted, 176. 
Man-u-mit'ting. 
Man-u-mit'tor, 109. 
Ma-nur'a-ble,49,N.; 160. 
Manure', 103, 121. 
Ma-nured', 165. 
Ma-niir'er, 183. 
Ma- niH*'in?. 
Man'u-script, 89. 
Manx {iMingk9\ 62, 54. 

rMankR,203.] 
Man'y {men^y), 170, 171. 



**Ma'ny and a'nir, 
as they were originally pro- 
nounced, have been short- 
ened, by their frequent oc- 
currence in discourse, in- 
to meitny and emitf .** Sm/xrt, 

Map, 10, 30, 32. 
Magpie, 164. 
Mapped {vMxpt\ 176. 
Map'pino^. 
Mar, 11,49,135. 
Mftr'a-bou (-feoo), 105 

[bo Gd. ; mdr-a-boo'f 

Wr. 165.1 
Mftr'a-bout (-boot) [bo 

Gd.; m&r-a-boot', Wr. 

155.] 
M&r-a-nd'tJia (Heb.) 

(156) [bo Sm. Gd.; 

mdr-a-nath'at Wk. 

Wr. 155.1 
Mar-as-chi^no (-ie'-). 
Ma-ras'mufi (-ra«' -),136. 
Ma-raud', 17, 103. 
Ma-rftud'ed. 
Maraud'er [so Sm. Wr. 

Wb. Gd. ; mchro'durj 

Wk. 155.] 
Ma-rftud'iag. 
Mar-a-ve'dl, 156. 
Mar'ble, 135, 164. 
Mar 'bled (-bid), 165. 
Mar' bier, 183. 
Mar'bling. 
ilarc(l l,52,181),n.refli8e 

matter remaining af- 
ter tlie pressure of 

fruit. [See Mxirk, and 

Marque, 100.] 



a, e, i, o, a, y, long ; tt, £, 1, 6, ii, fy short ; Has in far, kaein fast, & as in 



MARCASITE 



273 



MARTTK 



Mar'ca-site. 

Mar-cc3'cent, 122. 

March, 11,44,49, 135. 

Murched (marcht), 165; 
Note C, p. 34. 

March'er. 

March'es (^-tz), 76. 

March'ing. 

Mar'cliiou-egs {-shun), 
141, 156. 

March'pane. 

Mar^dd, 80. 

Mar-cid'i-ty, 108, 169. 

Mare (mSr) (14), n. the 
female of the horse. 
[See Mavor, 160.] 

Mare'schal (mar^aluU) 
[so Wk. Wr. Wb.Gd.; 
m&r'esh-al^ by con- 
traction mar'shaiy 
Sm.J [MarBhal(the 
common orthogra- 
phv), 203.] 

Marga-rate. 

Mar-g&r'ic. 

Mar'ga-rfne ( 152) [M a^- 
garin,20a.] 

Marge, 11, 45, 49. 

Mar'gia, 1J,45. 

Mar'gin-al, 72, 106 

Mar'gin-ate. 

Mar'gin-iit-ed. 

Mar'grave, 103. 

Mar-grav'i-ate, 12.3. 

Mur'gra-vine (-»«n),183. 

Mar'i-gaid, 48, 106. 

Marine' {-rin')^ 121. 

Mftr'i-ner, 105. 

Ma-ri-ol'a-try. 

Miirash [so 8m. Wb. 
Gd. ; milr'ish, Wk. , 
mir'ishy Wr. 165.] 

M&r'i-tal [so Wk. Vr. 
Wb. Gd. ; ma^'talj 
Sm. 165.] 

M^r'i-tlfme [not m&r'a- 
tlm, 127, 153.] 

Mar'jo-ram, 72, 105. 

Mark ( 1 1, 135), n. a trace 
or impression : — v. 
to trace or impress. 
l^See Marc, tmd 
Maraue, 160.1 

Markea (marfct), 165; 
Note C. p. 34. 

Mark'er, 228. 

Mar'ket, 11, 76. 

Mar'ket-a-ble, 106, 169. 

Mar'ket-day', 205. 

Mar'ket-ed. 

Mar'ket-lng. 

Mar'ket*man. 

Mar'ket-place. 



Mar'ket-wom'an 
i-wiwm'')t 205. 

Murk'ing. 

MarlEs'mau, 214. 

Marl, 11, 135. 

Marled {marld), 165. 

Mar'llne, 82, 152. 

Marl'ing. 

Marl'y, tt3, 169. 

Mar'ma-lade, 105. 

Mar-mo-ra'ceo!i8 
{-8hu8), 112. 

Mar-mo're-an,49,N.; 110 

Mar-mo-set' ( -zet' )( 122) 
[so Wk. Wr. ; »ior'- 
mo-zetj Sm. ; marfmo- 
setj Gd. 156.1 

Mar'mot, or Mar-mot' 
fso Wr. ; mar'mott 
Wb. Gd. ; mar-mot'y 
Sm. J mar'moot, Wk. 
155.] 

[Marone, 203. — <See 
Marroon.] 

Mftr'on-Jte. 

Ma-roon' (121), n. a free 
negro living on the 
mountains in the 
West Indies. [See 
Mwroon, 148.] 

Mar'plot, 205. 

Marque (morifc), n. per- 
mission to pass the 
frontier of a country 
in order to make re- 
prisals. [See Mare, 
and Mark, 160.] 

Mar-quee' (-*«'), 114. 

Mar'quess C-kwes) (171) 
[Marquis, 20;}.] 



__ " Till of late, mar- 
moM was the usual form, . . . 
but thii ia now in a great 
d^ree discontinued, or 
used onl^ with reference 
to the foreign title." Smart. 

Mar'quet-ry {-ket-). 
Mar'quis [M a r q ue s s, 

203.J 
Mar'quis-ate {-kwiz-) 

[so Wk. Sm. Wr.; 

mar'kwis-dt, Wb. Gd. 

155.] 
Marred (mard)j 165. 
Mar'riage (-ry), 70, 160. 
M&r'riage-arble (-fij-)j 

183. 
Mar'rTed, 99. 
Mftr'ri-er, 186. 
M&r-roon' (121), n. a 

very deep red color 

witn a brownish cast. 

[See Maroon, 148.] 



«9* " It It generally 
though wrongly ipelleo 
mat-oon or metroae,'" Smart 

Mar'row, 48, 101. 

Mar'row-bone. 

Mar'row-fSt. 

Milr'row-y, 93. 

Mar'ry, 48, 93, 104. 

Mar'ry-iug, 186. 

Mars lmarz)t 11, 40. 

Marsh, 11, 4(>, 04. 

Mar'shnl (230), n. a civ- 
il or a military officer 
of high rank. [See 
Martial, ICO.] [M a r- 
e s c h a 1 , 203.] 

Mar'shalled (1()5)[M a r- 
shaled, Wb. Gd. 
20:j. — See 177, and 
Note E. p. 70.] 

Mar'8haFler(177)[M a r- 
shaler, Wb. iid, 
203.] 

Mar'shal-ling (177) 
[Marshaling, 
Wb, Gd. 203.] 

Mar'shal-sea. 

Marsh'-mal'low, 205. 

Marsh'-mSr'i-gdld. 

Marsh'y, 169. 

Mar-su'pi-al, 127. 

Mar-su'pi-um, 169. 

Mart, 11,41,49. 

Mar-tel'lo, 86, 170. 

Mar'tgn (149), n. a large 
kind of weasel : — a 
kind of swallow. 



In the last sense, 

the more usual orthogra* 
phy is Martin . 

Mar'tial (shal), a. per- 
taining to war or bat- 
tle. {See Marshal, 
160.] 

Mar'tin n49), n. a sort 
of swallow that builds 
in the eaves of houses. 
[See Marten, 148.] 
[Marten, 2a3. — 5ee 
Note under Marten.'\ 

Mar'tin-et (122) [so Sm. 
Wb. Gd. ; mar-ti-net', 
Wr. ; mar-tin-et'y in 
the sense of a rigid 
disciplinarian — mar'- 
tin-etf in the sense of 
a martin, Wk. 155.] 

Mar'tin-gale ( 105) 

[Martlngal,203.] 

Mar'tin-maa, 72, 180. 

Mart'let,-230. 

Mar'tyr, 95, 169. 



taXi d Of <» there; <K>a«i»foot; fo^mfaoile; gh a« gin go ; th a« in thisi 



MARTYBDOM 



274 



MATRONLY 



Mar'tyr-dom (•<iiim^ 

\i¥i» 

Har'tjrrcd, 150, 166. 

Mar'tyr-liitf, 170. 

M«r-tyr-o lojf'ic (-IcJ'-). 

Mar-tyr-o-loir'ie-al 
i-ioj'-). ^ 

Mur-tyr-oro-gflst. 

Mar-tyr-oro-gy. 

Mrtr'vt'l, 14tt. 

Mur- veiled [Mar- 
vel e d , Wb. Gd. 2ttJ. 
— See 177, and Note 
E, p. 70.] 

Mar'vcl-litiir [Marvel- 
i n ir , Wb. Ud. 203.] 

177) 
Wb. 



.« » 



Mar'vel-loQR (109, 

[Marvelous, 

(id. '^\.] 
Mafl'cle (^mas'U) [so 

Sm. Wr. ; nuts' kl, or 

mas'lt Gd. 155.] 
Mns'cu line, 89, 152. 
Mash, 10, H\. 
Mashed {masht), 166; 

Note C, p. 34. 
MaHh'ing'. 
Matih'y, 93, 160. 
Mask, 12, 131. 
Masked {md8kt)t 165. 
Mask'er, 77. 
Masking;. 
Mas' tin (max'Hn) 

[Mastlin,Me8lin, 

Mislin,20:).] 
Ma'pon (ma'an), 149. 
Ma-son'ic, 109, IZi. 
Ma'son-rv (-»n-)» 106. 
Mas'o-ran [M a s o r a , 

M a B s o r a , 203.] 
Mas-o-ret'ic. 
Mas-o-ret'ic-al. 
Mas'o-rite, 152. 
[M a s q tt e , 203. — £^ee 

Mask.] 
Mas-quer-ade' {-kur-), 

122. 
Mas-quer-ad'ed (-kur-). 
Mas-quer-ad'cr {-kur-). 
Mas-quer-ad'ing {kur-). 
Mass, 12, 174. 
Mfts'sa-cre {-kur-)t 171 ; 

Note E, p. 70. 
M&s'sarcred {-kurd)jl7l. 
MKs'sa-orer l-krur), 
M&s'sa-crlng. 
Mass'-book, 206,£xc.4. 
Mas' si-cot. 
Mas'sl-ness, 186. 
Mas'slve, Si. 
Mass'-meet-ing. 
Mass'y, (36, 169. 
Mast, 12, 131. 



Mast'ed. 

Mas'ter (12) [See Mia- 

ter.] 
Mas'ter^buHd'er, 206. 
Mas'tcr-ing. 
Mas'ter-ly. 
Mas'tcr-pi<kse. 
Mas'ter-ship. 
Mas'ter-stroke. 
Mas'ter-work'man 

(-tcurk'-)y 206. 
Mas'ter-y, 93, 16Q. 
Mast'-head, 206, Exc. 3. 
Mas'tic [Mastich, 

2a3.1 
Mas'ti-ca-blc, 164. 
Mas'ti-cate, 73, 160. 
Maa'ti cat-cd, 183. 
Maa'ti-cat-lng. 
Mas ti-ca'tion, 112, 160. 
Mas'tl-cat-o-ry, 86. 
Mas'tiff, ia3. 

oar ** The plaral {« Kf- 
nlar: Johnaon gives mao- 
(ircM, which is out of om." 
Smart. 

[Mastlin {maz'lin) 

{so Sm. Wr. ; mes'- 
itiy Wk. ; mdat'Uny 

Wb. Gkl. 155).— iSee 

Maslin, 203.] 
Mas'to-don (105) [so 

Wr. Wb. Gd. ; mast- 

o'don^ Sm. 155.] 
Mas'toid. 
Mat, 10, 41. 
Mat'a-co, 156, 170. 
Mat'a-dore- [so Sm. 

Wb. Gkl. ; mat-a-d9r*t 

Wk. Wr. 155.] 
Match, 10, 44. 
Match'a-ble, 164, 160. 
Matched {macht), 166; 

Note C, p. 34. 
Match'er, 77. 
Match'ing. 
Matchlock, 206. 
Mate (23, 161), n. a com- 
panion ; — a subordi 

nate officer of a ship : 

— r. to match. 
Md'te (Sp.) (md'ta) 

(161) [ma'te, Wr.; 

md-<a', (Jd. 166], n. 

Paraguay tea, — being 

the dried leaf of the 

Brazilian holly. 
Mat'ed, 183. 
Ma te'ri-alj 49, N. ; 72. 
Ma-te'ri-al-ism {-izm), 
Ma-te'ri-al-ist, 106. 
Ma-te-ri-al-ist'io. 
Ma-te-ri-al-ist'ic-al. 



Ma-te-ri-al'f-ty, 100. 

Ma-te'ri-Hl-ize, 202. 

Ma-te'ri-al-izcd, 183. 

Ma-te'ri-al-iz-ing. 

Ma-tc'ri-al-ly, 170. 

Afa-te'ri-a mcrf'f-co(Ij.). 

Matdriel {Vr.) {ma-ta'- 
reil). 

Ma-tcr'nal, 21, N. ; 72. 

Ma-ter'nal-ly, 170. 

Ma-ter'ni-ty, 109. 

Math-e-mat'ic, 109. 

Math-e-mat'io-al, 108. 

Math-e-mat'ic-al-ly. 

Matli-c-matMcs, 109. 

Ma-the'sis, 122. 

Mat'In, 140, 170. 

Mat'ing, 183. 

Mat'ins {4uz), n. pi. 

Mat'rass, n. a chemical 
vessel used in subli- 
mations. [ See Mat- 
tress, 148.] 

[Matress, 203. — See 
Mattress.] 

Ma'trfce (-tris) (161, 
]60)t n. the cavity in 
which any thing la 
formed; the womb; 
matrix. 

Mat'rlce (-rt»)(161, 169), 
n. a mould, — particu- 
larly for type, or for 
coin ;— in dyeing, the 
five simple colors, 
black, white, blue, 
red, and yellow. 

Mat'rici-dal (100) [so 
Sm. Wb. Gd. ; mat- 
ri-itVdalt Wr. 155.] 

Mat'ri-cide, 170, 230. 

Ma-tric'u-late, 89. 

Ma-tric'u-lat-ed, 183. 

Ma-tric'u-lat-ing. 

Ma-tric-u-la'tion, 112. 

Mat-ri-mo'ni-al, 72. 

Mat-ri-mo'ni-al ly. 

Mat'ri-mo-ny, 86, 126. 

Ma'trix (L.). 

Ma'tron (m) [so Wk. 
Sm. Wr. ; mai'ron, 
Wb. Gd. 155.] 

Mat'rou-age, 70. 

Ma'tron-ar(72) [so Sm. ; 
tnat'ran'-<Ui or ma'- 
tron-aly Wr. ; fnaf' 
min-cUi or ma4ro'nal^ 
Wk. ; mat'ron-oli 
Wb. Gd. 156.] 

Mat'ron-ize, 202. 

Mat'ron-ized, 183. 

Mat'ron-iz-ing. 

Ma'tron-ly [ so Wk. Sm. 



a, $, i, 5, fi, y, long\ ft, <$, I, d, ii, f , thort iHaein far, km in last, %a»ik 



MATROSS 



275 



MECHOACAN 



Wr. } mat'ron4y, Wb. 

Gd. 155.] 

Ma-tross^ 121. 

Mat' ted, 176. 

Mat'ter, 06, 170. 

Hiit'tci^of-fact, a. 220. 

Muttinff. 

Mat'tock, 171. 

Mat'tresB (170) [not ma- 
tras', 1531, n. a quilted 
bed, stuffed with hair, 
moss, husks, wool, or 
other soft material, 
instead of feathers. 
[SeS' Matrass, liS.] 
[Matre8 8,203.] 

Mat'u-rate. 

Mat'u-rat-ed, 183. 

Mat'u-rilt-ing. 

Mat-u-ra'tion, 112. 

Mat'u-ra-tlve {Si) [so 
Wr. Wb. Gd. , mafun 
r&-tiVt Sm. ; mach'u- 
rortiv, Wk. 155.] 

Ma-ture', 26, 127. 

Ma-tured', 165. 

Ma-ture'ly, 185. 

Mat-u-res'cent, 171. 

Ma-tur'ing, 18:1. 

Ma-tu'ri-ty, 49, N. } 160. 

Mat'u-ti-nal [not ma- 
tu'ti-ual, 153.1 

Maud'liu, 17, 171. 

Miu'gre i-gur) (164} 
f M auger, preferred 
by Gd. — See Note £, 
p. 70.] 

[Maukin, 203.— ^ee 
MalklQ.] 

Maul (17) [Mall, 2a3.] 

03^ Ai a noun, mean- 
ing a heavit wooden haut- 
meror beetle^ this word ia 
commonly written mall: 
fli a verb, in the literal 
senao, to ttrike with a malU 
it fullowa the ipelling of 
the nount in the deriva- 
tive lenae, to beat and 
bruvie in a coarae numntr, 
it ia oftener apelled mauL 

Mftuled, 165. 

MaulMng. 

Maul'stfck, 206. 

MiiuQd (12) [so Wk. 
Sm. Wr. ; mdnd, or 
matondt (Sd. 155.] 

Maun'dy-Thurs'day 
(-thurz'-), 

Mau-so-Ie'an, 110. 

Mau-so-le'nm, n. (Ill, 
150) FL. pi. Afdu-so- 
le'a i jSng. pi. Mau-so- 
le'ums i-umz), 108.] 



Ma'viH, 156. 

Maw, 17, 32. 

Mawk'ish. 

Maw'- worm (-untrm), 
206, Exo. 1. 

Max'il-lar [so Sm.Wb. 
Gd. ; nuw-zU'lar, 
Wk. ; max'u-iary or 
maX'U'lar, Wr. 163.] 

Max'il-la-ry, 72. 

Max-il'U-ibrm, 108. 

Max'im, 10, 80. 

Max'i-mum (L.) [pi. 
Max'i-ma, 1U8.J 

May, 23, 32. 

May'be, 206. 

May'day. 

May'flower {-flour), 

May'hap [so Gd. j mfl- 
ftop', Wr. 155.1 

May'hem, {ma'hem, or 
i»am) [so Wr. ; ma'- 
hem, >Vb. Gd. ; «nAm, 
Sm. 155 J [Law term. 
— See Maim.] 

May'ing. 

May'or, or Mayor (jmtr) 
(23, 67) [ma'ttr, Wk. 
Wr. Wb. Gd.; mtr, 
Sm. 155], n. the chief 
magistrate of a city. 
ISee Mare, 160.] 

May'or-al-ty. 

May'or-esB. 

May 'pole, 200. 

Maz'ard, 72, 170. 

Maz-a-rine' (-r«»')» 122. 

Maze (23, 40), n. a laby- 
rinth.[5ee Maizc,160.] 

Ma-zol'o-gy, 108. 

Maz'y, 109. 

Me, 13, 32. 

Mead, n. a kind of bev- 
erage , — a meadow. 
[See Meed, 160.] 

Mead'ow, 101. 

Moad'ow-y, 93. 

Mea'gre {-gur) [M e a - 
ger,203; Note £, p. 
70.] 



"In Johnion's Dic- 
tlonaiy, it ia apelt meatfer', 
in the Engliah Dictiona- 
riea which preceded that 
of Johnaon, generally mea- 
gre; and in moat or thoae 
publiflhed aince. meaper." 
norcttter. " Jfeoflwr, how- 
ever juKtiflable and de- 
sirable, is quite disused." 
Snuwt. 

m 

Mea'gre-ly (-gur-). 
Mea'gre-ness {-ffur-). 
Meal, 13, 50. 



Meal'i-neBB, 186. 

Meal'time, 206. 

Meal'y, 228. 

Meal'y-moutlied, 165, 
206, Exc. 5. 

Mean, a. wanting dig- 
nity or worth : — n. 
medium: — v. to in- 
tend ; to si&^nify. [See 
Mien, lOO.J 

Me-an'der, 77, 122. 

Me-an'dered(-dtfr<2),165. 

Me-an'der-injg. 

Mean'ing. 

Mean'ing-lesB. 

Mean'ing-ly, 93. 

Mean'ness, 66, N; 

Means (mfn«), n.ting, 
&pl. 

MSant. 

Mean'time, 206. 

Mean'while. 

Mease (mea, or mlz) 
[mesj Wk. Wr. Wb. 
Gd. , mBzy Sm. 155.] 

Moa'sled {me'zld). 

Mea'sles {me'zlz), 171. 

Mea'sly {me'tli/). 

Meas'ur-a-blc {mezh'ur- 
chbl), 47, KH. 

Meas'ur-a-bly (mezh'- 
ur-). 

Moas'ure {mezh'ur)^ 47, 
N., 91, 15(5. 

Meas'ured (mezh'urd), 
1G5. 

Meas'ure-ment (mezh'- 
ur-). 

Meas'ur-ing {mezh'ur-), 
91. 

Meat, n. food, — partic- 
ularly flesh used for 
food. [See Meet, and 
Mete, KK).] 

Me-chan'ic (-jfcon'-), 109. 

Me-chan'ic-al (-ton'-), 
108. 

Me-chan'ic-al-ly(-Z;an'-) 

Mech-arnl'cian (m^Xr-a- 
nish'an), 112. 

Me-chan'io-o«chem'ic- 
al {-kan'ik-o-kem'-), 
224. 

Me-chan'icB {-kan'-). 
Mech'an-ism {mek'an- 

izm), 62, 133, 136. 
Mech'an-ist {mek'-). 
Mech-an-og'raph-ist 

(mek-). 
Mech an-og'ra-phy 

(mek')t 108. 
Mech'lin {mek'-). 
Me-oho'a-can (-ko'-, or 



tidli da<«n there; Obof in foot j 9 (Win facile ;gh a«gtn go; t]^ (Win this. 



MBCOMUll 



276 



MELLIFICATION 



-dko'-) [jm Wr. ; ««■ 
Hm'a-kan, Sm. ; me- 
cho'a-kan., or me-bo*a- 
kan, Gd. 165.] 

Me-cu'ni-um, KtO. 

Med'al (72) [See Med- 
dle, 148.1 

He-dal'lic, 170. 

Me-dal'lion (me-dai'- 
yun)t 51, 170. 

Med'ul-listrM e d al i st, 
Wb. Gd. 2u:j. — See 
177, and Note K, p.70.] 

Mod'al-lur-gy [ M e d - 
alurgy, Wb. Gd. 

Med'dlc (104, 164. 170) 
[See Medal, 148.] 

Med'dled {med'ld). 

Med'dler (70^, n. one 
who mcddleg. [See 
Medlar, 160.] 

MedMle-some (med'^- 
sum), 171. 

Mt^'dlinor, 66, 170. 

Me' di-a (L.),n.pl. [ See 
Medium.] 

Me-dl-a;'val(1.3, 72) [bo 
Sra. Wb. Gd. ; med-i- 
c'm/, Wr. 155.] f Me- 
dieval, 20.3.] 

Me'di-al, 78, 171. 

MeMi-an, 72. 

Mc'di-ant, 72. 

Mc-di-as'tlne, 82, 162. 

Me-di-as-ti'num. 

Me'di-atc, a. & v. 73. 

Me'di-at-cd, 183. 

MeMi-atc-ly, 165. 

Me'di-at-ing. 

Me-di-a'tiou, 112. 

Mo^di-at-I-za'tion, 116. 

Me'di-a-tize, 202. 

Me'di-a-tized. 

Me'di-a-tiz-ing. 

Me'di-at-or, 126, 169. 

Me-di-a-to'ri-al, 49, N. 

Me'di-at-rix [so Sm. 
Wr. ; me-ai-a'trix, 
Wk. Gd. 155.] 

Med'ic able, 126, 164. 

Med'ic-al, 108. 

Med'ic-al-ly, 170. 

Med'ie-a-ment, 160. 

ter Walker. Smart. 
Worcester, Webster, and 
Goodrich, agree in pro- 
nouncing thii word with 
the accent on the flrat syl- 
lable : but Walker re- 
marks: **M7 judgment 
much fails me if the true 

Jironunciation ought not 
o be with the accent on 



the Meond, m in pndieth 

^1 ■■■# M 



Med'i-cate, 169. 

Med'i-eiit-ed. 

Med'i-cat-ing. 

Medi-ca'tion. 

Med'i-ca-ttve, 100. 

Med-i-ce'an, 110. 

Me-dif'in-al [so Sm.Wr. 
Wb. Gd. ; me-dis'i- 
niU, or med^si'nalf 
Wk. 166.] 



»• In poetry It wiU 
■onietimea be neccesarr to 
accent the penultiauito.** 
Stnart. 

Med'i-dne (166) [so 
Wk. Wr. Wb. Gd.i 
med'i-Hn^ ooU. med'- 
Hfij Sm. 165.] 



" Vulgarly and Im- 
properly prunouuoedMed'- 
anr WetMUr. 

Med'i-eo-Ie'gBl, 224. 

[Medjeval, 203.— 
See Mediaeval.] 

Me'di-o-cral, 72. 

Me'di-o-cre (-tor), 126, 
166. 

Me'di-o-criet. 

Me-di-oc'ri-ty (100) [so 
Sm. Wr. Wb. (3d.; 
me-^i-ok'ti-ty^ or me- 
ji-ok'H-ty, Wk. 134, 
165.] 

Med'i-tate, 160. 

Med'i-tat-ed. 

Med'-i-tat-ing. 

Med-i-ta'tion. 

Med'i-tat-Ive. 

Med-i-ter-ra'ne-an, 110, 
171. 

Me'di-um (169) [so Sm. 
Wr. Wb. Gd. ; mc'dt- 
«m, or me'Ji^tn, Wk. 
134, 155.] [L. pi. Me'~ 
di-a ; Eng. pi. Me'dl- 
ums (^7nz)f 196.] 

Med'lar (70), n. a kind 
of tree and its fruit. 
[See Meddler, 160.] 

Medley, 98, 160. 

Me-dul'lar, 74, 170. 

Med'ul-la-ry, 72. 

Me-dul'lTne (152) [Me- 
dullia,203.] 

Me-du'sa (L.) (26) [pi. 
Me-du'sae (-««-), 198.] 

Meech'ing.. 

Meed (1.3, 42), n. a re- 
ward. [See Mead, 
160.] 



Meek, 13, 62. 
Meck'en (m«il*'n), 101. 
Moek'eued (f^k'nd), 
Meck'en-ing {tiUk'n-). 
Meer'schaum {-HhawtHf 
ox -tkoum), 164, 156. 

ME^Thia word ii pro- 
nounced by all the oriho- 
epista ner'Mkoum, but the 
current. If not universal 
pronunciationUn the Unit- 
ed Statea, is mSr^Aawm. 

Meet ( 13), a. fit, proper : 

— t;. to enoouater. [ See 

Meat, 166.] 
Meefing, n. an inter- 
view ; an assembly. 

[See Meting, 160.] 
Mcet'ing-house, 206, 

Exc. 4 i 216. 
Meg'a-cosm (wboarm), 

136. [112. 

Meg-a^le'slan {-zHan), 
Meg-a-lo'nyx (122) [so 

Sm. Wr. ; meg-a-lon*- 

iks, GkU 155.] 
Meg-a-lo-s&u'rus. 
Me-ga'ri-on, 49, N. 
Mc-gftr'ic, 109. 
Meg'a-pcope. 
Meg-a-the'ri-um, 49, N. 
Mc'grim [tio^me-grim', 

153.] 
Mci-bo'miran, 26, 169. 
[Meiocene, 203.— 

See Miooene.l 
Mei-o'sis [ml-o'ffi», Wr. 

Wb. Gd. ; mVo-tiSt 

Sm. 165.] 
Mel-an-chol'ic {-koV-). 
Meran-chol-y {-kol-y). 
Miiange (Fr.) (md- 

lanzh') [so Wr. Wb. 

Gd. ; md'longzh, Sm. 

154.] 
Mel'an-ite, 152. 
[Melasses, 203.— 

See Molasses.] 
Mel-chis-e-di'cian {-kiz- 

e-dish'an), 171. 
M6lie (Fr.) (»na-i40i «. 

a confused fight. [iS^ee 

Malay, 160.] 
Me-lic'ra-to-ry, 86. 
Mel'i-lot, 170. 
Mol'io-rate (-yo-) (61) 

[so Sm. Wr. ; me'h-o- 

rat, Wk. J mel'yor-at^ 

Wb. Gd. 165.] 
Mt'1-io-ra'tion (-yo-), 
Mcl-llPer-oas, 108. 
Mel-lirio, 109. 
Mel-li-f I caption. 



a, S, i, o, u, y, long ; &,£,!} 5, t, f, short i \i€uin far, kcu in fast, k atin 



MELLIFLUiSNCE 



277 



MERCURIALIZED 



Mel-Ilf lu-enoe, 109. 

HeMif lu-ent, 108. 

Mel-litMu-oUs, 100. 

Mel-lig'e-noas iW-), ' 

Mel'li-litc, 152. 

Mel-liph'a-gan, 106. 

Mel'lit. 

Mel'lite, 152, 170. 

Meiaon (170), n. a yel- 
low po wder composed 
of carbon and nitro- 
gen. [See Melon, 
160.] '■ 

Mel'l6w(l01) [no* mel'- 
lur, 163.1 

Mellowed, 165, 188. 

Mel'low-ing. 

Mel-o-co-ton' (-toon') 
(122) [bo Wr. Gd.: 
mel-o-]co'tony Sm. 155.J 

Me-lo'de-on, • or Mel-o- 
de'on (154, ICO) fso 
Wr.; me-to'de-on, 6d. 
IS.**.] 

Me-loMiK>fiB (109) [BO 
Wr. Wb. GW. ; met-o'- 
di~us, Sm. ; me-lo'di- 
uSyOr me-lo'ji-tUyWk.. 
134, 155.] 

Mel'o-dist. 

Mel'o-dize, 202. 

MeFo-dized, 165. 

Mel-o-diz'ing, 183. 

Mcl-o-dra'ma [See 
Drama.] 

Mcl-o-dra-mat'ic, 109. 

Mel-o-dra-mat'ic-al, 
108. 

Mel-o-dram'a-tlst. 

Mcl'o-drame [so Wr. 
Wb. (M. ; m/^Uhdrllm, 
Sm. 155.] 

Mel'o-dy, 170. 

Mel'on (170), n. a trail- 
ing plant, and its fruit 
or several varieties, 
[^ee Mellon, 160.] 

Melt, 15, 64. 

Melt'ed, 228. 

Melt'er, 77. 

Mclt'ing. 

Mem'ber, 70, 103. 

Mem'bered (-frurd), 77, 
165. 

Mem-bra-na'ceotts 
{-shus), 171. 

Mem'brane. 

Mem-bra'ne-oUB, 109. 

Mem-bra-nirer-ofiB,108. 

Mem-bra'ni-form, 106. 

Mem-bra-nol'o-gy, 1C8. 

Mem'bra-no&8, 126. 

Me-men'to (86, 122) [pi. 



Me-men'toB i-tfiz^ 

192.] 
Mem'oir (mem'tror) 

n56) [so Sm. Wb. 

Ud. ; me-moir', or 

mem'icwr, Wk. Wr. 

155.] 
Mem-o-ra-bWi-a (L.), n. 

A^m-o-ra-bil'i-ty, 106. 

Mem'o-ra-bie, 164. 

Mem'o-ra-blv, 72. 

Mem-o-ran'dum, n. [L. 
pi. Mem-o-ran'aa \ 
£ng. pi. Mem-o-ran'- 
dums {-dumz)^ 198.1^ 

Me-mo'ri-al, 49, In . ; 
169. 

Me-mo'ri-al-ist. 

Me-mo'ri-al-ize, 202. 

Mc-mo'rl-al-ized. 

Me-mo'ri-al-Iz-ing. 

Me-nu^ri-a iech'ivi-ca 
(L.) (tefc'-). 

J/c-mCr'f-ter(L.). 

Mem'o-rize. 

Mem'o-rized, 183. 

Mern'orriz-ing. 

Mem'o-ry, 86, 233. 

Hem'phl'an, 35, 169. 

Men (15,43), n.p2. [See 
Man.] 

Mcn'ace, 70. 

Men'aoed, 165, 183. 

Men'a-oer. 

Men'a-cing. 

Men-age' (men-lteft'). 

Men-ag'er-ie (men-iizh'- 
ur-e) [so Sm. Wr. Gd.; 
men-azh-ur-ef , Wk. 
155.] [Menagery 
(men-df^er^i — so Wr . ; 
menfa-jer-y, Wb.Gd.), 
2a3.J 

Mend, 15. 

Mend'a-ble, 164, 169. 

Men-da'doas (^-9hus), 

Men da9'i-ty, 169. 

Mead'ed. 

Mend'er. 

Meu'di-can-cy. 

Men'di cant, 169. 

Men-di5a-ty, 108. 

Mend'ing. 

Men-gre'tian {shan), 

Men-Wden [M an ha- 
de n, 203.] 

Me'ni-al, 72, 169. 

Me-nin'ge-al (tjc-), 169. 

Me-nin'ges (:;««), n. pi. 

Me-nis'cal, 72. 

Me-nis'coid, 122. 

Me-nis'cus. 



Men'i-yer, or Me'ni-Ter 
[menH'Vurt Wr. Wb. 
Gd. ; m^ni-'vurt Sm. 
155.] [Minever, 203.] 

Men'non-itc, 170. 

Men' 8a et tho'ro (L.). 

Mcn'sal, 230. 

Hen'ses {-8iz)y n. pi, 

Men'stru-al {-atroo-). 

Mcn'stru-ate (stroo), 

Men'stru-at-ea {-stroo-). 

Men ' 8tru-at-ing( -stroo-) 

Men-Btru-a'tion(-»<roo-) 

Mcn'stru-oQs (-itroo-). 

Men'stru-um ( stroo-), 
n. (L.) [pi. Men'8tru-a 
{-stroo-), 198.] 

Men-su-ra-bil'i-ty 
{-shoo-). 

Men'su-ra-ble {tnen'- 
shoo-ra bl){lM)[men'- 
sh*oo-ra-bly Sm. {See 
§ 20) ; men'shu-ra-bl, 
Wk. Gd. ; mens'yoo- 
ra-bU Wr. 155.] 

Men'su-ral (-shoo-). 

Mcn-Bu-ra'tion {-shoO') 

Mcu'tal,72,2:i0. 

Men'tal-ly, 170. 

Men'tion. 

Men'tion-a-ble, 164. 

Men'tioned (-«A«m<{),166 

Men'tlon-ing. 

Men'tor, 88. 

Men to'ri-al, 49, N. 

Mc-pliit'ic, 109. • 

Mc-phit'ic-al, 108. 

Me-phi'tis [so Wr. Gd.; 
mefi-tis., Sm. 155] [pi. 
Meph'i4es (-««),198.] 

Mepn'i-tisra {4izm). 

Mer'can-tUe(81, 105) [so 
Wk. Wr. Gd. ; mer'' 
kan-tllj Sm. 155] [noi 
mer-kan'til, nor mer- 
kan-tol', 153.] 

Mcr-cap'tan. 

Mer'ce-na-ri-ly, 72. 

Mer'ce-na-ry, 169. 

Mer'cer,21,N.; 77. 

Hcr'chan-dise {-diz),20Si 

Mer'chant, 21, N. ; 72, 
1(59. 

Mcr'chant-a-ble, 164. 

Mer'chant-man, 206. 

Mer'chant-ry. 

Mcr'ci-ful (-fiwl), 186. 

Mer'ci-ful-ly {-fool-), 

Mer'ci-less. 

Mer-cu'ri-al, 72, 169. 

Mer-cu'ri-al-lst. 

Mer-cu'ri-al-ize, 202. 

Mcr-ou'ri-al-izcd. 



fall; d 03 »n there; db m in Ibot ; 9 a« in facile j gh a« g t'lt go ; th as t» this. 

24 



MERCURIALIZING 



278 



METAMORPHISH 



Hor-ctt'ri-al-iz-in;. 
Mer-cu'ri-fy, W. 
Mcr'cu-ry, 21, X. j 80. 
Mcr'cy, 129, 109. 
Mer'cy-sr»at. 
Merc, 13, 07. 
McWly, 185. 
Mer-c-tri'cloui (-<r*ffc'- 

ti9),40, 112. 
Mer-s^an'scr [iO Wr. 

Wd. Gd. ; mer'gan- 

«er, Sm. 153.] 
Merge, 21, N. 
Mer<red, 105. 
Meryf'er {mery-\ 
Merg'ing {merj'-), 
Mr-rl-carp, 109. 
Me-rid'ian (100) [iO 

Sm. Wr. Wb. Gd. ; 

me-Hd'i-arii or m«- 

r«7i-an, Wk. 134,155.] 
Me rid'i-on-al fao Wk. 

Wr. Wb. GU. J me- 

rid'Jun-al, Sm. 165.] 
Mcri'no(-r«'-)(l3, 122) 

[pi. Me-ri'noes (-r«'- 

n5z)t 192.1 
Mt^r-is-matMc (,-iz-) [so 

Gi. ; mXr-U-mwiky 

Wr. 155.] 
Mrr it, 48, 170. 
MdrMt-ed. 
Mr.r'it-ingr, 170. 
M.-'r-it-o'ri-otts, 49, N. 
Mer'i-tot, 105. 
MerMin, 109. 
Mcr'liag, 129. 
Mer'lon. 21, N. 
Mer'mfiid, 100. 
Mor'man, 196. 
Mo'ro-cele. 
Me-rop'i-dan. 
Mr.r'ri-ly, 170. 
M('r'ri-meiit, 160, 180. 
Mr-r'ry, 15, 48, 00. 
Mer'ry-An'drew 

{•droo). 
M (''r ' ry-mak'ing. 
Mr'r'ry-thought 

(-thawt)t 200. 
Mer'sion, 109. 
Me-ru'li-dan {-roo'-). 
Me-Bcems' i-sSmz'). 
Me8-en-t6r'ic {mez-). 
MeB'en-t6r-y (mez'-) [so 

Wk. Sm. Wr.; meit'- 

en-t^ir-y, Wb. Gd.l55.] 
Mesh, 15, 40. 
Meshed {mesht), 105 ; 

Note C, p. 34. 
Mesh'ing. 
Mesh'y. 109. 
MesM-al {mez'i-al^ or 



merVI-o/) [so Sm. ; 
' mez'i-nltWr.imefzhal, 

<}d. 155.J 
[M e 8 1 i n (mezfUn)fiXa. 

— See Mastlin.] 
Mes-mer-ee' (mez), 122. 
Mes-mt'r'ic (mez-), 109. 
Mc8-m6r'ic-al {mez-). 
Mes'mer-ism (mes^mur- 

izm)j 1.30, 150. 
Mes'mer-ist {mez'-). 
Mes-mer-I-za'tlon 

{mez'), 112. 
Mes'mer-ize Ernes'-), 202. 
Mes'mer-izca {mez'-). 
Mea'mer-iz-er {mez'-). 
Mes'mer-iz-ing- {mez'-). 
Mesne {min) (102), a. in 

law, intervening. [See 

Mean, Mien, lOU.] 
Mes'o-carp {met'-, or 

m^z'-). 
Mcs'o-co-loQ (mes'-i or 

mez'-) [mero-ko-ki/ii 

Wb. Gd. ; mez'o-ko- 

lun, Sm. ; mes-o-ko'- 

lun, Wr. 155.] 
Mes'o-labe (mes'-, or 

mez'-) imea'o-ldb, Wr. 

Wb. Gd.} mez'o-iab, 

Sm. 155.] 
Mes'o-sperm {me^-, or 

mez'-). 
Mes'o-tho^rax {mes'-^ or 

m^z'-)[mes' o-thn-rax, 

Wb. Gd. ; mez'o-iho- 

rcue, Sm. ; mes-o-tho'- 

rax, Wr. 155.] 



{met 



f_ 



or 



Mes'o-type 

mez'-). 
Mess, 15, 174. 
Mes'sas^e, 70, 170. 
Messed {mett), Note C, 

p. .34. 
Mes'sen-ger. 
Mes-si'acT, 122. 
Mes-si'ah, 72. 
Mes-Bi-an'ic. 
Mes'sieurs {met*yurz) 

[so Sm. ; mesh'thoorz, 

or mesh-thoorz' , Wk. ; 

mesh'yurz, Gd. j 

mesh'urZf or met'- 

yurz, Wr. 155.] 
Mess'ing, 228. 
Mess'mate, 180, 206. 
Mes'suage {-swdj), 06. 
Me8-tee'[M u s t e e,203.] 
Mes-ti'zo {-te'-) (13, m) 

[pi. Mes-ti'zds {-te'- 

z08), 192.] 
Met, 15, 41. 
Me-tab'a-tU (Gr.). 



Met-a-bo'U-an, 160. 
Met-a-oar^pal, 72. 
Met-a-oar'pas, 109. 
Me-tach'ro-nism {-ttd^- 

ro-nizm), 130. 
Met'ft-cism, 136. 
Mc'tage, 70. 
Met-a-gram'martism 

{^izm), 1:13, 136. 
Met'al (72) [so Sm.; 

met' I, Wk. Wb. Gd. ; 

met'l, or met'al, Wr. 

155.] 

asr Walker Myi of th« 

f»ronunciation metl^ " The 
mpropriety if bo ftrikinii 
M to encoura^^ an aocu- 
rmte vpeaker to restore the 
a to it« Mund as heard in 
medal." 

Met-€b4ep'tit (Gr.) [pi. 

Jdet-a-lep^tit {-tlz), 

198.] 
Met'a-Iep-sy, 160. 
Mct-a-lep'tic, 109. 
Mct-a-lep'tic-al, 106. 
Me-tal'lic, 170. 

asr In this word, as well 
as In orher derivatives of 
metalf as metaltfuet metai- 
Uu-gu* ftc., the I is doutH 
led, contrary to the gener- 
al rule (} I'G), on account 
of the two Tj* in the original 
Latin, inelaUwH. 

Met-al-lirer-ofis, 103. 
Me-talMi-form, 108. 
Met'al-llne {l(Xi, 152) [so 

Wk. Wr. Wb. Gd.j 

met'cU-lin, Sm. 155.] 
Mct'al-llst. 
Met-nMT-za'tion, 112. 
Met'al-lTzc, 202. 
Met'al-Iizcd, 105. 
Met'al-llz-lng, 183. 
Me-tal' lo-chrome 

{-krdm). 
Met-al-loch'ro-my 

{-lok'-), 105. 
Met- al-log'ra-phist. 
Met-al-log'ra-phy, 108. 
Met'al-loid. 
Met.<al-lold'al, 72. 
Met-al-lur'gic. 
Met-al-lur'gic-al. 
Met'al-lur-gist[nof met- 

al-lur'gist, 125, 163.] 
Met'al-Iur-gy, 122. 
Met'al -m&n, 190, 206. 
Met-a-mPr'lc. 
Met-armor'phio. 
Met-a-mor'phism 

{-ftzm). 



a, S, I, d, tt, f, long ; &» 6* I* 5, tt, ft thort ilk at in fiur, katin fiut, & cm M 



m 



METAMORPHI8T 



279 



MICKLB 



Het-a-mor'phist. 
Met-a-mor'phoBe (-/os), 

136. 
Mct-a-mor'phosed 

{•fost), 1()5. 
Met-a-mor'phos-er. 
Met-a-mor'phoM-ic. 
Met-a mor'phos-lng'. 
Het-a mor'pho-sls (lOS* 

109, 151)) [pi. Met-a- 

mor'pho-ses (-»^z), 

IIW.] 
Met'a-phor, 171. 
Met-a pkor'ic, 106. 
Met-a-pli6r'ic-al. 
Met-a-ph6r'ic-al-ly. 
Met'a-phor-ist [so Sm. 

Wr. ; met'a-for-ist, 

Wb. Gd. 166.] 
Met'arphraae {-/rdz). 
Met'a-phrast. 
Met-a-phrast'ic. 
Met-a-phrast'io-al. 
Met-a-phys'ic i-ftz'-). 
Met-a-phys'ic-al (-^«'-). 
Het-a-phys'lc-al-ly 

{-fiz'-)y 170. 

Met-a-phy-st'cian 

(-zi8h'an)j 46, 171. 
Met-a-phys'io-o-the-o- 

log'ic-al {-fiz'ik-o-the- 

o-k)j''), 224. 
Met-a-phys'lcs i-Jiz'-), 

109. 
Met'arplaBm (-plcizm), 

136. 
Me-tas'tarsis, 156. 
Het-a-stat'ic, 109. 
Met-a-tar'sal. 
Met-a-tar'suB, 169. 
Me-tath'e-Big (L.) [pi. 

Me-tath'e-8es isiz)i 

198.1 
Het-a-thet'ic, 109. 
Met-arthet'ic-al, 108. 
Met-a-tho'rax, 122. 
Mete, V. to measure : — 

n. a boundary. [See 

Meat, and Meet, lOO.I 
Met'ed, 183. 
Me-temp-Ry-eho'sis 

(Jbo'-), 109, 171. 
Met-emp-to'sis. 
Me'te-or (88, 169) [so 

8m. Wr. Wb. Gd.; 

m^te-ur, or me'che- 

ttr, Wk. 155.] 
Me-te-dr'lc, 109. 
Me-te-6r'ic-al, 108. 
Me'te-or-ite, 162. 
Me-te-or-og-'ra-phy, 108. 
Me'te-dr-o-ITte, or Me- 

te-6r'o-lite(152) [me'- 



te-9r-o-ttt, Sm. ; me- 

te-9r*o-lUf Wr. Gd. 

155.] 
Me-te-dr-o-log:'io 

i-tof-), 
Me-te-or-o-log^'io-al 

i-loj'-), 108, 
Me-te-or-ol'o-gist, 108. 
Me-te-or-ol'o-gy, 108. 
Me-te-dr'o-man-cy. 
Me'te-dr-o-8cope, or 

Me-te-or'o-8cope 

lme'te-9r-p-8kop, Sm. 

me^e-ar'd-BkOp, Gd. 

me-t^o-ro-akSpf Wk. 

me-te-or'o-skip, or me 

te'o-ro-8kdp, Wr, 155.] 
Me-te-or-os'oo-py, 108. 
Me'ter, n. one who 

metes, or measures. 

[See Metre, 160.] 
[Meter, 203. — 5ee 

Metre.] 
Me-thegain. 
Mc-thinks', 64. 
Mctli'od, 80. 
Me-thod'ic, 109. 
Me thod'ic-al, 106. 
Me-thod'io-al-ly. 
Metb'od-ism {-izm), 
Meth'odist. 
Meth-od-ist'ic. 
Meth-od-lst'ic-al. 
Mcth-od-ist'io-al-ly. 
Mcth-od-y-za'tion, 112. 
Meth'od-izc, 202. 
Meth'od-ized. 
Meth'od-iz-er. 
Meth'od-iz-ing. 
Meth-od-ol'o-gy, 106. 
Me-thought' i4hawt% 

162. 
Met'ic (166) [so Sm. 

Gd. ; meftik, Wr. 

155.] 
Met'ing, pari. fh)m 

Mete. [See Meeting, 

160.] 
Me-ton'io, 109. 
Met-o-nym'lc. 
Met-o-nym'ic-al, 106. 
Met'o-nym-y, or Me- 

ton'y-my (171) [so 

Grd. J met'o-nim-Vy 

Sm. ; me-ftm'i-wy^r 

vMt'o^im-yt Wk. Wr. 

155.] 
Met'o-pe, 163. 
Met-o-po-scop'lc-al. 
Met-o-pos'co-pist. 
Met-o-pos'oo-py, 108. 
Me'tre(m«'«ttr) (lM),n. 

measure. [See Meter, 



160.] [Meter, pr6> 

ferred by Gd. — See 

Note E. p. 70.] 
Met'ric-al, 72. 
Met'ric-al-ly, 170. 
Mct'ro-chrome {-krdm), 
Mefro-ffriph. 
Me-trol'o-gy. 
Met'ro-nooic. 
Me-tron'o-my, 108. 
Me-trop'o-lis. 
Met-ro-pol'i-tan [so 

Wk. Wr. Wb. Gd. j 

me-tro-poVi-tarit Sm. 

165.J 
Met'tle imet'l)y 164. 
Met'tled (meVld). 
Met'tle-somc {met'lr 

sum), 171. 
Mew (mu), n. & v. [pi. 

of n. Mews (mite), 

stables. — <Stfe Muse, 

160.] 
Mewed {mM). 
Mew'ing {mu'-). 
Mewl, V. to cry, as an 

infant. [See Mule, 

160.] 
Mewled {rmld). 
Mewl'er (iniW'-). 
Mewl'ing. 
Mex'i-can. 
Me-ze're-on, 49, Note; 

109. 
Mez'za-nine {-nin) [so 

Sm. Gd. ; mez'za-nln, 

Wr. J55.1 
Mez'zo^ri-lWvo (It.) 

{med'zo-). 
Mez'zo-tint {med'zo-). 
Mez-zo-tln'to {med-zo-) 

[med-zo-tin'toj or met- 

zo-tin'to, Wr. ; mez- 

zo-tint'o, or med-zo- 

tint'o, Gd. ; met-ao- 

tin'tOf Wk. ; met-zO" 

tin'tOj Sm. 155.1 
Mi'asm (mi'azm), 133t 

i:W. 
MT-as'ma (-oar'-) (L.) 

(151) [pi. MUu'ma'ta 

l-az'-), 198.] 
Mi-as'mal C-az'-), 72. 
Mi-as-mat'lc (-etz-). 
Mi-as-mat'io-al (-<»-). 
MT-as'ma-tist (-a«'-). 
Mi'ea, 25, 72. 
Mi-ca'ccous {-ehtta), 1 12. 
Mice (26), n. pL [See 

Mouse.] 
Mich'ael-mas (mWel-), 

171, 180. 
Mick'le (mik'l), 16(. 



fUX; 6a«<fithere; <K> a« <fi foot ; 9 m in fiidle ; gh m g m go ; th m in this. 



MICROCOSM 



280 



MILTWORT 



Mi'cTO cosm (-Jl*o«m). 

Ki-cro-eos'inic {-koz*-). 

Mi-cro-coB'inic-al 
(koz'-). 

Mi-i'ro-coiw'tic, 28, 10». 

Mi-cro-graph'ic, lUO. 

Mi-crotj'ra-phy, 108,109. 

Mi-croro-gy, lUK. 

Mi-crom'e-ter, lOH. 

Ml-oro-mct'ric, IW. 

M i-cro -met' ric-al. 

Mi'cro-plionc. 

Mi-cro-phon'lct. 

Mi-croph'o-uofiB, 100. 

Mi-croph'thal-my 
(-krqr-tOr-krQp^-)[mi' 
KTo/'thalniy, W r. } 
mi-krop'thM^fft Bin. 
155.] 

Hi-cro-phyl'lo&s, or 
Mi-cropn'yl-lofiH [See 
Adenophyllous.] 

Mi'cro-pyle. 

Mi'cro-Bcope, 156. 

Mi-cro-Boop'ic, 100. 

Mi-cro-Bcop'ic-al, 106. 

Mi'cro-soop-ist, 100. 

Mi-cros'co-py, 108. 

Mic-tu-ri'tion {-rUh'- 
un), 112. 

Mid, lA, 42. 

Hi'das's-ear (-dtu-es- 
«r), 213. 

Mid'-day, 60, N. 

Mid'dle (tntd'O* 1^4, 170. 

Mid'dlo-aged (midH- 

a/rf). 
Mid'dle-man (mid'l), 

200. 
Mid'dle-mdBt (mid'l-), 
Mid'dling, 60, 170. 
Midge, 16, 45. 
Midg'et (mi/'-)- 
Midaand, 216. 
Mid'moBt, 206. 
Mid'niffht i-nlt). 
Mid'rib. 
Mid'riff, 180. 
Mid' ship. 

Mid'8hip-maii,72,196,206 
Mid'Bhips. 
Midst, 16, 64. 
Mid'sum-mer, 210. 
Mid' way. 
Mid'wife, 180. 
Mid' wife ry [bo Wk. 

Sra. Wr. ; mui'tei/-ry, 

Wb. Gd. 155.] 
Mid'win-ter, 216. 
Mien ( 13),n. external ap- 
pearance and carriage. 

[See Mean, Menne, 

160.] 



Mlir, 10, 173. 

Miffed ^m{ft)t 105 ; Note 

i% p. 34. 
Mitring. 
Might (fAlf),'102. 
Might'i-ly (ml«'-), 188. 
Might'i-neBB (mi/'-). 
Mlglit'y (mi/'-) (lOU), a. 

powerful. [See Mity, 

160.] 
Mign-on-ette' (ifi<n-|rK»- 

e?'), 102, 171. 
MI'grate, 72. 
Mi'grat-ed, 183. 
Mi'grat-lng. 
Mi-gra'tiou, 112. 
Mi'gra-to-ry, 86. 
Mil-an-«8e' (-««')> «• 

Hiw, Si pi. 
Milcli, 10, 44, Note 2. 
Mild, 26. 
Mil'dcw i-du). 
Mil'dcwed i-dftd), 
Mil'dew-ing (-du-). 
Mile, 25, U3. 
Milc'agc, 183. 
Mile' stone, 206. 
Mil'foil, 103. 
Mil'ia-ry r-ya) (146), a. 

reaembling a millet- 

Beed j grannlated. 

[See Miliary, 148.] 
Mil'i-tant. 
Mil'i-ta-ry, 72. 
Mil'i-tate, 109. 
Mil'i tat-ed, 183. 
Mil'l-tiit-lng. 
MMi'tia (m%-li8h'a) [so 

Wb. Gd. ; mtlish'yd, 

Wk.-,m17t»A'ya,Wr.;, 

ml-<t«A"a, Sm. {See 

§ 26), 155.] 
Milk, 16, 60, 52. 
Milked imilkt), 165; 

Note C, p. 34 ; 64. 
Milk'er, 77. 
Milk'ing. 
Milk'i-nesB, 186. 
Milk'maid, 206. 
Milk'man, 106. 
Milk'pail. 
Milk'p&n. 
Milk'Bop. 
Milk'tooth. 
Milk'warm. 
Milk'white. 
Milk'wort {-wttrt). 
Milk'y, 169. 
Mill, 16, 172. 
Mill'd&m, 206. 
Milled, 165. 
Mil-le-na'ri-an, 49, N. $ 

160. 



Mil-le-mt'ri-an-iBm, 

(^-izm). 

Mii'lc-na-ry(72, 109), n. 
the Bpttce of a thou- 
sand years. [See MU- 
llnery, 148.] 

Mil leu'ni-al, 160. 

Mil-len'ni-al-ist. 

Mil-len'ni-mn, 169, 170. 

Mil'le-ped, 189. 

m3f 8o >pclled and pro- 
nounced Dy Wurctvter, 
Webster, aiid Guod:ich; 
by Sm*rt,tnith-/)ettei and 
by Walker, who i;ive« on \j 
the plural form, tuitlc' 
petit* (-pidt)i or mU-lep'^ 
dt» i-dizy 

Mil'lcpore, 170. 

Mill'er, \m. 

Mill'cr-Tte, 162. 

Mill'er'B-thuinb {mU*- 
erz'thum), 1(»2, 213. 

Mil Ics'i-mal, 72, 160. 

Mil'let, 6G, 7H. 

Mili'lii^ad, 206. 

Mil'li-a-ry (169), a. per- 
taining to, or denot- 
ing, a mile. [See Mll- 
larv, 148.] 

Mil'li-gram (Eng.), or 
MU'U-gramme (Fr.). 

Mil'li-Ii-ter [so Sm. j 
mU-UVi-tur, Gd. 155.] 

Mil'li litre (Fr.) (mW- 
le-le-tur). 

Mil'li-me-ter (Eng.), or 
MU'U-me-tre (Fr.) 
(mU'le'mtL4ur). 

Mil'li-ner, 77, 170. 

Mil'li-ner-y (169, 171), 
fi. the work or the 
goods of a milliner. 
[See Millenary, 148.] 

Mil-li-net', 171. 

Mill'ing. 

Mill'ion (-yicn), 51, 86. 

Mill'ion-a-ry (-yun-), 
169. 

Mill'ion-aire {-yun-ir) 
(Eng.), or MUl-ionr 
naive' (^-f/un-ir') (Fr.). 

Mill'ionth {-yurUh). 

Mill'pdnd. 

Mill'raoe. 

Mill'rea, or Mill'ree, 
20:3. 

Mill'stdne. 24. 

MiU'wheel. 

Mill'wright (-r«). I®. 

Milt, 16. 

Mil-ton'io, 170. 

Milt'wort (-wMrt), 206. 



i,e,i,d,u,^2oii^} &,e,I,d,tt,^iAor<i ft of <» flff , a as •» fast, & m «» 



IflLVINE 



281 



MISAPPLYINa 



Mil' vine (153) [so Sm.; 

mU'viJiy Wr, 1&5.] 
Mime, 25, i(». 
Mi-mot'ic fao Sm. ; ml- 

met'ik, Wk. Wr. Gd. 

155.] 
Mi-met'lc-al. 
Mim'ic, 200. 
Mim'ic-nl. 

Mim'icked (IJbf), 200. 
Mim'ick-iQg. 
Mim'ic-ry. 
Mi-mosr'ra-pher, 108. 
Mi-mo'sa, or Ml-mo'sa 

{-za) [ml-mo'sa, 6d. ; 

mtmo'za, Sm. ; mt- 

mo'sa, Wr. 155.J 
3fl-na'ciou8 (-Hhu8)t 112. 
MI-na9'i-ty, im. 
Min'a-ret, 7Cy. 
Min'a-to-ry, 86. 
Minoc, 10, 39. 
Minced {minst), 165; 

Note C, p. a*. 
Mince' meat, or 

Mincert'-meat(wima^) 
Mince'pie, or Minoed'- 

pie (^yninst'-). 
Min9'mg. 
Mind. 25. 
Miud'ed. 

Mind'ful C-fSot), 180. 
Mind'ful-ly (-/JoZ-), 170. 
Mind'ing. 
Mine, 1C3. 

B^-"When this word 
ia used adjectively before 
■ word b«i^nning with a 
vowel or h mute, as iu sny- 
infr, ' On mine honor,' the 
complete absence of ac- 
centual fon'e. and a atyle 
quite colloquiiU. will per- 
mit the shorteiiinir of thtt 
■uund into min." Snuvt. 

Mined, 165. 

Min'er ( 170"), n. one who 

mines. [See Minor* 

KK).] 
Min'er-al, 2-33, Exo. 
Min'er-al-ist, im. 
Mia-er-al-!-za'tion. 
Mia'er-al-ize, 202. 
Min'er-al-ized, 165. 
Min'er al-iz-er, 2^ N. 
Min'er-al-Iz-ing. 
Min-cr-al-og'ic {-oj'-). 
Min-er-al-og'io-al {-oj'-), 
Min-er-al'o-gist, 108. 
Min-er al'o-gy [not mia- 

ur ol'o-jy, 127, 151.] 
Min'e-ver [Meniver, 

203.1 
Min'gle (ming'gl), 64. 



Min'gled {ming'gld), 

183. 
Min'gler {ming'-), 
Min'ii^iiug {ming'-). 
Min'rate, v. & a. 73, 109. 
Min'i-at-ed, 183. 
Min'i-at-ing. 
Miu'ia-turc (mm'i-Mlr), 

or Min'i-arture [so 

Gd. Wr.; wim't-Wr, 

Wk. Sm. 155.] 
MinMa-tur ist (min'i-), 

or Min'i-artiir-ist. 
Min'i-bus, 170. 
Min'ie-ri'fle (-^l) (205) 

[so Wr. ; m»/i-e'-n% 

Gd. 156.] 
Min'i-kin, 66, 160. 
Min'im, 103. 
Min'i-mum (L.) [pL 

mn'i-may 198.] 
Min'ing, I8:i. 
Min'iou (-^en), 51, 86. 
Min'is-ter, 230. 
MinMs-tered, 150. 
Min-is-tc'ri-al, 49, N.j 

160. 
Min-is-te'ri-al-ly, 93. 
Min'is-ter-ing. 
Min'is-trant. 
Min-is-tra'tion, 112. 
Min'is-trat-Ive. 
Min'is-tress. 
Min'is-try, 
Min'i-um n69) [so Sm. 

Wb. Gd. ; fhm'yumf 

Wk. ; mtVi-vm, or 

min'yum, Wr. 155.J 
Mink {jningk)y 16, 54. 
Min'ne-sing-er, 171. 
Min'now, 101, 170. 
Mi'nor (70, 169), a. 

smaller : — n. one un- 
der age. [See Miner, 

160.] 
MK-nor'i-ty, 169, 
Miu'o-t&ur [not mi'no- 

t&ur, 15:).] 
Min'ster, 77. 
Min'strel, 230. 
Min'strel-sy, 160. 
3fint, 16. 
Mint W« 228. 
Mint'ed. 
Mint'ing. 
Min'u-end, 89. 
Min'u-et, 80, 156. 
MVnua (L.), 169. 
MY-nus'cule. 
Ml-nute', a. (121, 161) 

[so Wk. Sm.Wb. Gd. ; 

m'i-nW^ or ml-nut'y 

Wr. 155.] 



"If we with to b« 

Tery mimite, we pronounce 
the t in the tint ayllable 
long." Walker. 

Min'ute, n. {min'it) (90, 
160) [so Wb. Gd.j 
min'iu, or mm'W, Wr.j 
min'^, coll. min' it, 
Wk. Sm. 155.1 

Min'ut-ed (min^-). 

Min'ute-gun' (min'H-), 
205. 

Min'ute-ly (min'it-ly), 
161. 

Ml-nute'ly, 161. 

Min'ute-man (tV-), 196. 

Ml-nute'ness, 185. 

Min'ut-ing (-«-), 1&3. 

An-nu'ti-as (L.) (-«W «). 

Minx {mingks), 16, 54. 

Min'y, 169, 18:J. 

Mi'o-cene [Meiocene, 
203.] 

Miq'ue-let (-we-). 

Mi-rab'i-U dic'tu (L.). 

Mi'rach (rajfc), 49, N. 

Mlr'arde (-kl) (164) [not 
m6r'a-kl, 153.] 

Mlr'a-cle-mon'gcr (-kl- 
mung'gur)^^Q6i Exc.3. 

Ml-rac^u-loQs, 100, 108. 

Mirage' (Fr.Xine-rdzh'), 
171. 

Mire, 25, 49. 

Mired, 105, 183. 

Ml-rif ic, 109. 

MT-rli'ic-al, 108. 

MTr'i-ness, 49, N. ; 186. 

[Mirky(21,N.}, 203. 
— See Murky.] 

Mtr'ror, 48, 60, 170. 

Mirth, 21, N. 

Mirth'ful {-fSol), 180. 

Mirth'ful-ly {-/!S6l-). 

Mir'y, 49, N. ; 235. 

Mir'za, n. the common 
title of honor in Per- 
sia. [See Murza, 160.] 

Mis-ad- vent'ure, 91. 

Mi8-ad-vent'ur-ou8 
(ywr-w-s), 91, 171. 

Mis-al-Ii'ance. 

Mis-al-lied'. 

Mis'an-thrope (105) [not 
mis-an'throp, 153.J 

Mis-an-throp'ic, 109. 

Mis-an-tbropMc-al, 108. 

Mis^an'thro-pist. 

Mis-an'thro-py, 105, 156. 

Mis-ap-pli-ea'tion. 

Mis-ap-plTed% 186. 

Mis-ap-ply'. 

Mis-ap-ply'ing, 186. 



fiiUj dMtn there; db a« In foot ; 9 a« <n facile ; gh a<g<n go } tb a« in this. 

24* 



lOSAPPBEHEND 



282 



MIfiPELL 



Mis-ap-pre-hend', 110. 
Mis-ap-iirc-liend'ed. 
Mis ap-))rc-IieDd'iD£f. 
Mis -up pro-hen'Hion. 
M iH-iip-pro-i)ri-a'tlon. 
Mia-be-oame' i-k&m'), 
3Il8-bc-coiue^ \-kum'), 
MIb -be-com'lQ^ (itum'-). 
Mis-be-Iiave', llO. 
Mia-be-haved', 183. 
Mia-be-havMng'. 
Mls-be-hav'ior {-yur), 

61, 171. 
Mi8-be-lier. 
3Ii8-bc-lieve'. IW. 
Mis-believed', 183. 
Mis-be-liev'er. 
Mis-be-liev'ing. 
Mia-cal'cu-late. 
Mis-cal'cu-lat-ed. 
Mis-col'cu-lat-ing. 
Mia-cal-cu-la'tioD. 
MiB-c&ll' [Mi seal, 

Mla-callcd'. 
Mia-call'ing-. 
Mis-car'riaa'e (-rv), 70. 
Mia-car'ricd, 99. 
Mia-car'ry, Wi, 170. 
Mis-cJlr'ry-iug. 
Mis-<3a8t', 131. 
Mis-oast'ing^. 
Mis-ccl-la-na'ri-an, 49, 

N.; 109. 
Mis-ceUla'ne-a (L.), n* 



rK 



/. 



MiB-ccl-la'ne-oiig, 109, 

171. 
Mis-cel'la-nist, 105. 
Mis'cel-lariiy, 72, 156, 

171. 
Mis-chance'. ^ 

Mis -charge'. 
Mis'chlefc-cW/'), 171. 
Mis'chlef-mak'er, 205. 
Mis'chTev-oas (i03, 150, 

171) [not mla-chev'us, 

153.] 

ngr " Some old authors, 
and the vulgar stilt, accent, 
the second syllable."^imar( 

[M 1 8 chna , 203. ~ ^ee 

Mishna.] 
Mis-con-ci-ive', 169. 
Mis-con-ceived', 165. 
Mis-con-ceiv'ing. 
Mis-con-oep'tion, 112. 
Mis-con'dact, n. 161. 
Mis<con-duct', v. 161. 
Mis-con-8truc'tion. 
Mis-con'strue {-stroo) 

(150) [^66 Note under 

Construe.] 



Mls-eon'Btraed 

istrood). 
Mis-con'stra-ing 

{-9troo-). 
Mis'cre-ant, 144, 100. 
Mis-date'. 
Mis-dat'ed. 
Mis-dat'iag. 
Mi8-deed'. 
Mis-de-mean'or, 199. 
MiB-dl-rect', 161. 
Mis-dT-rect'ed. 
Mis-dl-rect'ing. 
Mis-dl-rcc'tiou, 112. 
Mis-do' i-doo'), 19. 
Misdo'er (-doo'-), 77. 
Mia-do'ins^ (-doo'-). 
Mia-done' (-dun'). 
Mia-em-ploy'. 
Mia-em-ployed', 187. 
Mia-em-ploy 'ing. 
Mia-em-ploy'ment. 
MiB-cn'try, 93. 
Mi'aer {-zur), 136. 
Mis'er-a-ble {miz'ur-a- 

bl), UH, 160. 
Mis'er-a-bly (mi«'-). 
Mu-e^e're (L.), 49, N. 
Mi'ser-ly {^-zur-). 
Mls'er-y (mis'-), 169, 

233, Exc. 
Mis-tea' Banoe {-zan») 

[80 Wr. Wb. Gd. i 

mU-fa'za'M, Sm. 155.J 
Mia-form', 17. 
Mla-forraed'. 
Mis-form'ing. 
MiB-fort'une (90) [See 

Fortune.] 
Mla-g-ave'. 
Mia-give' {-ghiv'), 
MiB-giv'en {-ghiv'n), 

149. 
Mia-glv'ing {-ghiv'-), 
Mis-got'teu {-got'n), 

149. 
Mis-gov'ern (^-guv'-). 
Mis-gov'emed {-guv'- 

urnd)j 165.' 
MiB-gov'em-ing 



{-guv'-). 
Mi 



s-gov'em-ment 



{rguv'-). 



Mis-guid'anoe, 53, 183. 

Mis-guide'. 

Mis-guid'ed. 

Mis-guid'ing. 

Mis-nap'. 

Mish'mash. 

Mish'na [Mlschna, 

203.] 
Mis-in-form'. 
Mis-in-form-a'tion, 112. 



Mls-in-formed', 166. 

Mis-in-form'er. 

Mia-in-fonn'ing. 

Miti-in-ter'pret. 

Mis-in-ter-pret-a'tion. 

Mis-in-ter'pret-ed. 

Mis-in-ter'pret^r. 

Mi8-in4er'pret-ing. 

MiB-join', 27. 

Mis-join'der, 77. 

Mis joined', 165. 

Mis-Join'ing. 

Mis-ludge', 45. 

Mis-judged', 183. 

Mis-judg'ing i^jvj'-). 

Mis-judfir'ment (185) 
[M i 8 Ju d g e m e n t , 
Sm. 203.~5ee Note 
under Abridgment.] 

Mis-laid'. 

Mis-lay'. 

Mis-lay'ing. 

Mi8'le(»ii2^/)( 164)f M i z- 
zle,203.] 

Mis-lead'. 

Mis-lead'er. 

Mis-lead'ing. 

Mis'led {tmz'ld) (161), 
V. did misle, or rain 
in very line drops. 
[Mizzled, 203.] 

Mi8-led'(161),r. did mis- 
lead. 

[M i 8 1 e t o c , 203.— iSee 
Mistletoe.] 

Mis-man 'age. 

Mis-man'aged, 183. 

Mis-man'age-ment. 

Mis-man'a-ger. 

Mis-man'a-ging. 

Mis-mark'. 

Mis-marked' (-markt'). 

Mis-mark'ing. 

Mis-match'. 

Mi8-mat<.'hed' (-mdcht*). 

Mis-match 'ing. 

Mis-mSas'ure (-mezh'- 
ur). 

Mis-mSas'urod {-mezh'- 
urd). 

Mis-m^as'ur-ing 
{•mezh'ur-). 

Mis-name'. 

Mis-named', 183. 

Mis-nam'ing. 

Mis-no'mer, 122. 

Ml-sog'a-mlst, 151. 

MK-sog'a-my, 169. 

MT-sog'y-nist (-«y'-), 
151, 166, 171. 

Ml-sog'y-ny (-«<>/'-), 93. 

[Mispell, 203. — 5e« 
MiBspeiy] 



a, e, i, o, u, y, long ; i&, S, Y, d, fi, f^ short ; \ia8in far, a cm in fast, 9, a< in 



MI8PEND 



283 



MISWRITING 



[Mi spend, 203.— <SSee 

MlHspend.j 
Mis-pick'el (-pifr*Z) (107) 

[so Grd. ', mis-pik'elf 

Wr. 166.] 
Mis-place'. 
Mis-placed' (-pldst'), 

166, Note C, p. 34. 
His-place'ment, 186. 
Mi8-plR9'ing, 1»3. 
Mis-plead'. 
Mis-piead'ed. 
Mis-plead'ing. 
Mis-points 27. 
Mis-point'ed. 
Mls-poiut'ing. 
Mis-print', 
Mls-print'ed. 
Mis-print'ing. 
Mis-pris'ion {-prizh'un) 

[not mis-priz'n, 163.] 
Mis-prize'. 
Mis-prized'. 
Mis-prfz'ing^, 183. 
Mis-pro-nounoe'. 
Mis-pro-uouuoed' 

{•Twunat'), Note C, 

Mis-pro -nonn^'ing. 

Mis-pro-nun-ci-a'tion 
(-«/t1^'-,or«la'-)(116) 
[See Pronunciation.] 

Ml 8 -pro-por'tion. 

Mis-pro-por'tioned, 166. 

Mis-pro-por'tion-ine. 

Mis-quo-ta'tion, ll£ 

Mis-quote'. 

Mis-quot'ed, 183. 

Mis-quot'ing. [140. 

Mis-reck'on (-rcife'n), 

MiR-reek'onea(-rei(;'neO' 
Mis-reck'on-ing 

(•rek'n). 
Mis-re-mcm'bcr. 
Mis-rc-mem'bcred, 166. 
M i s-re-mem'ber-ing. 
Mis-rcn'der. 
Misren'dcred (-durd). 
Mi s-rcn'der-ing'. 
Mls-re-p6rt'. 
Mis-re-p6rt'ed. 
Mis-re-port'ing. 
Mi8-rep-re-sent'(-jecn*'). 
Mis-rep-re-sent'ed 

(zent'-), 
Mis-rcp-re-sent'lng 



i-zent'-). 
Mis 



-rep-re-Bent-a'tion 

C-zent-), 
Mis-rule', 26, 128. 
Miss, ». &, V. (lA, 174} 

[pi. of n. Miss'eB,189.1 
Mls'sal (72), n. the Ro- 



msn Catholio nuiss- 
book. [See Missile, 
148.1 
Missed {miat\ (Note C, 

f). 34), V, did miss. 
See Mist, 160.] 
H'sel-tbrush {piiz'- 

zel-). 
[Misselto&, 203.-> 

See Mistletoe.] 
Mis-send', 66, N. 
Mis-send'ing. 
Mis-sent'. 
Mis-serve'. 21, N. 
Mie-servea', 166. 
Mis-serv'ing. 
Mis-shape'. 
Mis- shaped' (shl^t'), 
Mis-shap'en (-MOp'n), 

149. > 

Mis'sUe (81), n. a weap- 
on to be thrown. [See 

Missal, 148.] 
Miss'ing. 
Mis'sion (mish^un), 46, 

Note 2; 171. 
Mis'sion-a-ry {mish^- 

tin), 72, 169. 
Mis'sis. 



Thii fbrm of upell- 
Ini; repreaenti the prontm^ 
ciation of the commun 
title of married women of 
•II claaae*. It is a cormp- 
tfon of mtMrem, and ia al- 
vaya abbreviated, in writ- 
ing, to Mn, 

Mis'sYve, 66, 84. 
Mis-spell' (66, N.)[M 1 s- 
pen,203.] 

war Smart, following 
Jolinson, gives M 1 ■ ■ p e 1 . 

Mis-spelled', 166. 

Mis-spell'ing. 

Mis-spelt', 166. 

Mis-spend' (64) [Mis- 
pen d, 203.] 

Mis-spcnd'ing. 

Mis-spent'. 

Mis-state', 66, N. 

Mis-stat'od. 

Mis-state'ment, 186. 

Mis-stat'ing. 

Mis-step'. 

Mist (16), n. rain in the 
form of line and al- 
most imperceptible 
drops. [See Missed, 
160.J 

Mis-tak'a-ble, 164, 183. 

Mis-take'. 

MlB-tak'en (-Mit'n), 149. 

Mifl-tak'ing, 183. 



Mis-tAnght'(-fow<')4<B. 
Mis-teach'. 
Mis-teach'ing. 
Mis'ter. 

mar This form of ipcll' 
Ing represtnts the prontm- 
ciation of the common title 
of men of all ranks. It la 
never used except in con- 
nection with a proper 
name, the word tir talcing 
its place In addressing a 

Eerson. It is always at>- 
reviated in writing to Mr. 
** This fbrm of the word 
master "MLy» 8mart,**seems 
to have been adopted, or 
at least promoted, for the 
sake of analogy with nn»- 
treui for miatrew among 
our old writers often had 
the form mattret*^ in order 
to suit with fiianter, which 
was then used where we 
now find tutster." 

Mis-time'. 

Mis-timed', 166. 

Mis-tTm'ing, 183. 

Mist'i-ness, 186. 

[Mistlc, fm.--See 
Mizzle.] 

Mis'tle toe (miz'l-td) 
(166, 162) [M isle- 
toe, Misseltoe, 
203.1 

Mist'IIke. 206, Exc. 6. 

Mis-tdbk'. 

Mis'tral, 72, 103. 

Mis-trans-late', 116. 

Mis-trans-lat'ed, 228, N. 

Mis-trans-lat'ing. 

Mis-trans-la'tion, 112. 

Mis'tress (76) [See Note 
under Missis.] 

Mis-trust'. 

Mis-trust'ed. 

Mis-trust'ful (-/Sol). 

Mis-trust'ing. 

Mis-tune', 26, 127. 

Mis-tuned', 166, 183. 

Mis-tun'ing. 

Mi8t'7, 169. 

Mis-un-der-stand'. 

Mis-un-der-stand'ing. 

M is-un-der-stdbd' . 

Mi8-u8'age(-yoo2'-), 1.36. 

Mis-use' i-yooz'), v. 161. 

Mis-use', n. 161. 

Mis-used' (-yoozd')' 

Mis-us'er {-yooz'-). 

Mis-tis'ing (-yooz'-). 

Mis-wed'. 

Mis-wed'ded, 176. 

Mis-wed'ding. 

Mis-write' i^rU'), 162. 

Mi»-writ'lng (-H<'-). 



- * 

fldli da«<fi there; d5 a< in foot ; 9 a<.<» &clle ; gha« gin go it^Of in this. 



MI8 WRITTEN 

Xli-wiit'ten (-rWn). 
Mia-wrote' (-rfi*'), 544. 
Mis-wroogfat' (-ro»*')» 
162. 

Mis-yoked' i-ybkf), 

Mitcli'cU, 171. 

Mite (26), n. a very mi- 
nute animal or parti- 
cle. [See Might, IflO.] 

[Ml ter, 203. — 5«€ Mi- 
tre.] 

Mit'i-ga-ble, IM. 

Mit'i-gant, 72. 

Mit'l-gate, 73, 160. 

Hit'i-gat-ed, 183. 

Mit'i-gaMng. 

Mit-i-g^a'tion, 112. 

Mit'i-gat-Ive, 84. 

Mit'i-gat-or, lfl9. 

MrtrS, 72. 

Mi'tre(-«ttr)(l(H)[Mi- 
t e r, preferred by Wb. 
and Qd. — See Note 
E, p. 70.] 

Ml'tred (mi'turd). 

Mit'ri-form, 160. 

Mit'ten [not mit'n, 140, 
163.] 

MU'U-imu (L.), 160. 

Mitts, n. pL 

Mit'y (169), n. having 
mjtef. [See Mighty, 
160.] 

Mix, 16, 30, N. 

Mix'a-ble, 164, 100. 

Mixed (mikat) (66, Note 
C, p. 34) [Mixt, 
803.] 

aar ** This b«lng necM- 
larily pronounced, if in 
one syUable, m If written 
mixt, u quite unnecemari- 
ly made irregular by being 
so vrltten." Smart, 

Mix'ed-ly, or MIxed'ly 
{mikst'ly) [so Wr. j 
mi7c8'ed-lp^ 6d. ; 

mikst'ly, or miks'ed- 
Zy, Sm. 165.] [Mixt- 
ly,203.] 

Mix'er. 

Mix'lng. 

Mix-ti-Un'e-al. 

Mix-tl-lin'e-ar, 169. 

Mixt'ion (-^n), 86. 

Mixture, 01. 

Miz'zen {nUz'n), 149. 

Miz'zen-mast (mi^'n-). 

Miz'zle (164) [Misle, 
Mistle,203.] 

•9* ** The former vpdl- 
Ing fmUlcl U Muictionea by 



284 

•tymologyi the ItMmt [ati#- 
Ut\ if more analogical; the* 
moat u«ual spelling it, 
however, that which eon- 
forms to the pronundAr 
doa, namely, mi»zk," — 
Smart. 

Mlz'zled i-zld)t 165. 
Mlz'zling. 
Miz'zly, 170. 
Mne-mon'ic ('»e-)» 168. 
Mne-mon'io-al (n«-). 
Mnem-o-nl'cian {nemrO- 

nish'an), 46, 102. 
Mne-mon'iofl (ne-), 100, 

171. 
Mnem'o-teeh-ny (nem,'- 

Q4€h^y)y 162. 
Moan (24, 43), r. to be- 
wail. [5cc Mown,160.] 
Moaned!, 166. 
Moan'li]^, part* from 

Moan. [5eeMonlng, 

160.] 
M5at (34, 41), n. a ditch 

round a castle, liiled 

with water.[5€e Mote, 

160.] 
Mob, 18, 31. 
Mobbed, 165, 176. 
Mob'bing. 
Mob'bish. 
Mob'lle (81) [80 Sm.5 

mo-bil'y Wk. } mo>' 

bUj Wb. GKi. ; mo-Mi', 

or mobfUy Wr. 165.] 
Mo-bil'i-ty, 160. 
Mob-i-U-sa'tlon, 113. 
Mob'il-ize, 202. 
Mob'il-ized, 183. 
Mob'il-Iz-ing. 
Mob'le(fi»oPO (164) [so 

Sm. Wb. Gd. ; mo^bl, 

Wk^ mob'l, or mo'- 

blj Wr. 165.1 
Mobbed (mob'ld) [not 

mob'led, 166.] 
Mob'Unjg. 
Mdb-oc'rarcy (169) [so 

6d. ; ma-bok'ra-»ifi 

Wr. 155.] 
Moc'ca-son (-tn) (167) 

[Moecasin, Mog- 

gason,203.] 

■ar ** Often written 
pwecasin, and also often 
written and pronounced 
mofwosoii.** Irorecsfsr*. 

Mo'cha (-Jto), 52, 72. 
Mock, 18, 181. 
Mocked (mokt), 165 ; 

Note Cjb. 34. 
Mock'er, 77. 



MODULATE 

Mock'er-y, 100. 
MockMng. 
Mock4ng-bird, 206, 

Exc. 5. 
Mock'-he-ro'ie. 
Mock'-or'ange. 
Mock'-tur'tle, 164. 
Mo'oo (86) [pi. Mo'oSs 

(-k9z)j 102.J 
Mo'dal, 72. 
Mo'dal-ist, 106. 
Mo-dal'i-ty, 106, 160. 
Mode (163), n. manner. 

[See Mowed, 160.1 
Mod'el. n. & v. (76) \noi 

mod'i, 149.] 




Note £, p. 70.] 
Mod'el-ler [Modeler, 

Wb. and Gd. 203.] 
Mod'el-ling [Model- 
ing, Wb. and GKL 

2037] 
Mo-de'na. 
Mod'erwite, a. & v. 73» 

108, 2.33, Exc. 
Mod'cr-at-ed. 
Mod'er-ate-Iy, 185. 
Mod'er-at-ing. 
Mod-er-a'tiou, 112. 
Mod'er-at-ism (-iztn), 
Mod-e-rd'to (It.), 154. 
Mod'cr-at-or, 88. 
Mod'er-at-rix. 
Mod'em. 

Mod'em-ism (-fern), 133 
Mod'em-ist. 
Mod-em-I-za'tion, 112. 
Mod'em-ize, 202. 
Mod'em-ized, 165. 
' Mod'em-iz-er. 
! Mod'em-iz-ing. 
Mod'em-ness, 66, N. 
Mod'est, 7Q, 103. 
Mod'est-y, 93, 100. 
Mod'i-cum. [186. 

Mod-i-fi'arble, 164, 109, 
Mod-i-n-ca'tion, 233. 
Mod'i-ned,99. 
Mod'i fi-er, 186. 
Mod'i-ty, 0*. 
Mod'i-fy-ing, 186. 
Mo-dil'lion {-dU'yun). 
Mo-di'o-lar, or MoMl-o- 

lar [mo-dVo-lar^ Wr. ; 

mo'di-o-lary Sm. (3d. 

155.] 
Mod'ish, 156. 
Mdd'lst, 183. 
Mod'u-lat« (89) [00 Sm. 

Wr. Wb. Gd. J modf' 



a,e»i,5,ii,y,2oii^; t,e,I,«,n, j^,«Aor«i S m to ftr, a a« iit Oat, A of «» 



HOOULATBD 



285 



MONE7 



«^<, or MocTflUtf , 

Wk. 134, 166.] 
Saod'ii-lat-ecl, i83. 
Hod'u-lat-ing'. 
Mod-u-ia'tiou, 112. 
Mod'u-lut-or. 
Hod'ule (tfO) [so Sm. 

Wr. Wb. Gd. ; mod'- 

«i, or mod'j^, Wk. 

134, 155.] 
ModfQ4u9 (L.) (80) {pi. 

Mod'u-a, 1U8.J 
Mo'dus (L.) [L. pi. Mo*- 

dl ; £ng. pi. Mo'dus- 

68 (-ez), iW.] 
Hod'wall. 
H(B'8o-Goth'io(«e'«o-), 

13 224. 
[Mog^gason, 203.— 

See Mocoason.] 
ilo-gnVf 121. 
Mo'hair (Wr). 
Mo'ham'med-aii(72,170) 

rMabometan,Mar 

homed an, 2(Vi.] 
}tto-ham' med-Bn-iMU 

{-izm)t 133, 13G. 
Mo-ham'med-an-ize,202. 
Sfo-hara'med-an-ized. 
Mo-ham' med-an-Ix-iQg. 
Mo'hiiwk [Mohoek, 

203.1 
Mo-ho'lT, 191. 
Huhr (m9r) (102), m. a 

specie! of antelope iA- 

habiting Africa. [See 

Mohur,l48j and More, 

160.] 
Mo'hur, n. an East In- 
dian gold eoin, worth 

about tff.ft?. [See 

Mohr, and More, 148 ; 

(md Mower, IfiO.] 
Moi'dore (171) [so Wr. 

Wb. (3d. ; mmfffi-d^r, 

Sm. ; moi-ddH, Wk. 

156.] 
Moi'e-ty (moi*-i or 

mair'-) [mot'e-tyt Wk. 

Wr. Wb. Grd. ; maw'- 

e-tpt 8m. 155] 
Moil, 27. 
Moiled, 105. 
Moil'ing. 

M(n'neau(Fr.) (-«o),154. 
Moire' ^an-tique' (Fr.) 

(mwor'an-tik'). 
Moist, 27. 
Moist'en (mofa'it), 140, 

162, 167. 
Moist'ened (mMn'nd). 
Moist'en-ing {mois'ttr), 
MoiBt'yre, 91. 



Xo'lar, 74. 

Mo'lar-7, 160. 

Mo-las'ses {-Uafez) (76) 
[TOO-to«'ez, Wb. Qd.\ 
mo-ld'i'ez, Wr. ; mo- 
Idi'izy Wk. ; mo-Ids'- 
e«, Sm. 155.][MelaB- 
Be8,203.] 



** Commonbr called 
mokunet . . . properly me- 
lane»." Sinart. — ** Jle- 
Utaaet . . . !• more Moord- 
■nt witik etymology." — 
Ooodrich. 

[Mold, Wb. Gd. 208. 

~ See Mould J 
[Holder, Wl>. Gd. 

203. — iSee Moulder.] 
[Moldy, Wb. (3d. 203. 

— iSee Mouldy.] 
Mole, 24. 
Mo-lec'tt-lar (89) {luA 

mol'co-lar, 144, 153.] 
Mo-lec-u-lar'i-ty, 160. 
Mol'e-eule [not mol'- 

kul, 144, 163.1 
Mole'biU, 206. 
Molest', 103. 
Mol-est-a'tion, 112,143. 
Mo-lest'ed. 
Mo-lest'er. 
Mo-leat'ing. 
Mo'lin-ism (-im), 133. 
Mo'lin-ist. 
MdlL 18, 172. 
MolOah (72) [Mool- 

lah,203.] 
Mol'lient {mdlf^ent), or 

Mol'li-ent Iso Wr.; 

mol'vetUt Wk. Sm. ; 

motflent, Wb. Gd. 

155.] ri8«. 

Mol'll-n-arble, 164, 169, 
Mol-li-fT-ca'tion, 233. 
Mol'li-f led, 99. 
Mol'll-fy, 94, 170. 
MoJ'li-fy-ing, 186. 
Mol'lus'ca (L.), n,pL 
Mol-lus'can, 72. 
MoI-Iub'coUs, 100. 
Mol'lusk, 66, 170. 
Mo'looh (-lok), 52. 
Mo-losse' (-Jos'), 121. 
Mo-los'sus, 170. 
[Molt, Wb. (3d. 203. 

— See Moult.] 
Mdlt'en (m9ft'n),24, 140, 

167. 
Mol-yb-de'na, 123. 
Mo-lyb'de-notts. 
Mol-yb-de'nam (171) 

[not no-lib'de-Bam, 

163.] 



Ko'nMnt,24,7«. 

Mo'ment-a-ri-ly, 126,186. 

Mo'ment-a-ry, 72, 160. 

Mo-ment'otkB, 100. 

Mo-men'tum (L.) [L. 
pi. Mo-men'ta'i Eug. 
pi. Mo-moB'tuma 
{-tumz)^ rare, 196.1 

Mom'i-er (mum'-), 22. 

Mo'mdt. 

Mo'mus, 160. 

Mon'arolial (-I»0, 68, 
72. 

Mon'a-diism (-hizm\ 
133. 

Mon'kd (103) rso Sm. 
Wr. Wb. Gki. ; mon'- 
ad, or mo'nad, Wk. 
155.] 

Mon'a-delph. 

Mon-a-delph'i-aa, 160. 

Mon-a-delph'olis. 

Mo-nad'ie, 109. 

Mo-nad'ie^, 106. 

Mo-nan'der. 

Mo-nan'dri-an, 160. 

Mo-nan'dro&s, 100. 

Mo-nan'thoiis. 

Mon'arch (-ark), 62, 72. 

Mo-narch'i-al (^nark'-), 
160. 

Mo-narch'ie {-tiark'-). 

Mo-narcfa'ic-ul(-narl;'-). 

Mon'arch-ist (-arifc-). 

Mon'areh-lze {-ark-). 

Mon'arch-ized (-ark-), 

Mon'areh-lz-ing (-ark-)» 

'M.on' arch-y (-ark-), 169. 

Mon-as-te'ri-al, 40, N. 

Mon'as-tgr.y (116, 122) 
[so Wr. Wb. (3d.; 
fnon'at-trgi, or monf- 
OB-tXr-y, wk.; mon'- 
OB-Ur^, coll. mon'tu* 
try, Sm. 155.] 

Mo-nas'tic, 100. 

Mo-nas'tic-al, 106. 

Mo-nas'tic-al-ly, 170. 

Mo-nas'ti-dJBm (-Hsm). 

Mo-na8'ti<coB. 

Mo'nftul, 156. 

Mon'day {man'dy), 22. 

Mdnde (Jr.) (164) [so 
Sm. Wb. (3d. ; m9nd, 
Wr. 156.] 

Mon'e-ta-ry (mun'") 
(72) [so Sm. Wb. 
Od. ; mott'e-ta-ry, or 
mun'e-ta-ry, Wr. 
155], a. pertaining to 
money. [See Monito- 
ry, 148.] 

Mon'ey {mun'y) (96, 



ftU ; M <» there ; AMinlbotif iMmfludle;gbaegfogo>tba't»thi4' 



MONEYAGE 



286 



uosTAjnar 



109, 100) rpl< Moneys, 

171, i»r.j 

lAon'cj-&ge (mun'-). 
Hou'cy-bro'ker 

(mun'-\ 205. 
Mon'eyed (mun'id)i 171. 
Mon'ey-or {mun'-). 
Mon'ey-mak'er(mun'-), 

206. 
Mon'ger (mung'gur), 

M, i:38, 171. 
Mon'jfol (^mong'-)i 86- 
Mon-g^o'li-an, 109. 
Mon'goose (mon^'-) 

[M a n y; o o 8 e , 

Monerooz',203.] 
Moa'y:rel (tnung'-), 22, 

W, 141, 171. 
Mo-nil'i-form, 108. 
Mo'ning, n. a -foe kind 

of black tea. [See 

Moaning, 160.1 
Mo-nl'tion {-nish'tm). 
Mon'1-tTve, 84. 
Mon'i-tor, ir>9. 
Mon-i-to'ri-al, 49, N. 
Mon'i-to-ry ^8<»)» o. giv- 
ing admonitiou. [5ee 

Monetary, 148.] 
Mou'i-tresg. 
Monk {munglc)f 22, 54. 
Monk'er-y {mungk'-). 
Mon'key imung'k-yh 22, 

54, l(i9. 
Mon'key.jack'et 

(mung'-)i 206. 
Monk'tidbd {mungk'-), 
Monk'ish {mungk'-), 
Monk's'hwKl 

{munaks'-), 213. 
Mon-o-Da'sic, 109. 
Mon-o-car'di-an. 
Mon-o-car'pofis, 100. 
Mon-o-ceph'a-lofi 8. 
Mon- o-chla-myd'e-o1i8 

i-kla-)y 108, 169. 
Mon'o-chord (-kord). 
Mon-o-chro-mat'ic 

i-kro'-Y 
Mon'o-chrome (-Jferffm). 
Mon-o-chron'ic 

{-kron'-)f 62. 
Mon-o-cli'nofis. 122. 
Mon-o-co-tyl-e'don Fso 

Gd. J mon-o-kot-y-le'- 

dont Sm. Wr. 165. — 

See Cotyledon.] 
Mon-o-oo-tyl-e'don-otts, 

143. 
Mo-noc'ra-cy, 108. 
Mo-noc'u-lar, 106. 
Mon'o-cule. 
Mo-noc'u-lott8, 108. 



Mon-o-dae'tyl-otts. 
Mon'o-delph. 
Moii'o-dist. 
Mon'o-don. 
Mon-o-dra-mat'ic, 100. 
Mon'o-drame, 105. 
Mon'o-dy. 
Mo-noe'cian (-ne'«Aafi), 

13, 46, 169. 
Mo-noe'cioiis (-ne'- 

»hus). 
Mo-nog'a-mist. 
Mo-nog'a-mot&s. 
Mo-nog'a-my, 03. 
Mon-o-gas'tric, 230. 
Mon'o-gram, 106. 
Mon-o-gram'mic, 109. 
Mon'o-gram-mal, 72. 
Mon-o-gram-mat'ic, 

170. 
Mon'o-gram-molis. 
Mon'o-grSph, 127. 
Mo-nog'ra-pher, 108. 
Mon-o-graph'ic. 
Mon-o-graph'ic-ai. 
Mo-nog'ra-phist. 

Mo-nog'ra-pli^j 108. 

Mon'o-gyn ^-jin). 

Mon-o-gyn'i-an (-jin'-). 

Mo-nog'y-noQs (-n<y'-). 

Mon'o-Iith. 

Mon'o-llth-al, 106. 

Mon-o-Iith'ic, 109. 

Mo-nol'o-gist, 108. 

Mon'o-ldgue (-too), 87. 

Mo-nom'a-chy (-kg), 
108. 

Mon-o-ma'ni-a. 

Mon-o-ma'ni-ac, 108. 

Mon'ome [80 Urn, Gd. ; 
mon'<hme, Wr. 166.] 

Mo-nom'e-ter, 108. 

Mon-o-met'ric. 

Mo-no'mi-al, 169. 

Mon-o-mor'photiB. 

Mon-o-ou'si-an {-oio*zi- 
an) [mon-o-ow'si-an, 
Gd.; mon-o-ow'shanj 
Wr. 165. — iS'ec Hom- 
ooasian.] 

Mo-nop'a~thy, 108. * 

Mon-o-per'so-nal. 

Mon-o-pet'al-ol&B. 

Mo-noph'a-noti8. 

Mo-noph'thong 
{^nop'-)t or Mon'oph- 
thong (-o/-) [mo-nop'- 
thong, Sm. j mon'of- 
tkong, Wb. Gd. j mo- 
nofihongi or mon'of- 
thong, Wr, 165.] 

Mon-oph-thon'gal (-oj?- 
thong'-), 64, 72. 



Hon-o-phTl'loiis, or 
Mo-noph'yl-loQs. 
[See Adenophyllou»«] 

Mon-o-pliy 'o-dont. 

Mo-noph'y-Bitc, 152. 

Mo-noph-y-Bit'ic-aL 

Mo-nop'o-dy, 105. 

Mo-nop'o-list. 

Mo-nop'o-lize, 202. 

Mo-nop'o-Uzed, 183. 

Mo-nop'o-liz-er, 1^ 

Mo-nop'o-Uz-ing. 

Mo-nop'o-ly. 

Mon-o-pol'y-ldgue, 87. 

Mo-nop'ter-al, 72. 

Mon'op-tote, or 3fe- 
nop'tote [bo Wk. ; 
mon'op-tat, Sm. Wr. ; 
mo-nop'tut, Wb. Gd. 
155.] 

Mon'o-rhyme (-rim), 
162. 

Mon-o-Bcp'a-loliB. 

Mon-o- sperm'oiiB. 

Mon-o-spher'ic-al . 

Mon'o-Btich {stik), 141. 

Mon-o-Btroph'ic. . 

Mon-o-syl-iab'lc. 

Mon-o-Hyi -lab'ic-al. 

Mon'o-Bvl-Ia-ble, 164. 

Mon-o-thal'a-motiB. 

Mon'o-tbe-ism {-izm)^ 
133, 136. 

Mon'o-the-ist. 

Mon-o-the-i8t'ic, 100. 

Mo-noth'e^lite, 152, 160. 

Mon'o-tone, 166. 

Mo-not'o-nofis, 100. 

Mo-not'o-ny, 105. 

Mon'o-treme. 

Mon-o-tri'glyph, 122. 

Monseigneur (Fr.) 
{mOng-sSn'yur) [pi. 
MeaseigneurSf {m&- 
Min'yurz), 154.] 

Monsteur (Fr.) {mos- 
air'i or mos-yur') 
{moS'Blr'f Gd. ; 

mdngs-yoor'i or near- 
ly moa'yur'f Sm. ; 
mOa'yur', or inon-««r', 
Wr. 155] [pi. Mes- 
Mieurs, 198. — See 
MesBieurs.] 

Mon-soon', 121. 

MoTi'Bter, 77, 230. 

Mon'strance, 64. 

Mon-stros'i-ty, 160. 

Mon'stro&B, 100, 160. 

Mon-tan'ic, 100. 

Mon'ta-nism (-nizm)* 
136. 

Mon'ta-niBt. 



&,§,i,5,u,y,2on^; &»6,X,d,tt,y,«Aor«s ii « in far, a a» in fiwt, 4 « <» 



MONTANIdTIC 



Mon-bt-nln'iD-Kl. 



Mon-lc-ll-ua'ca. 

Mun'teia. 

Uoii-totli', or MoD'teth 

hnoa^eth'. Wb. Gii. ; 

num'tdh, Sm. ; n^'- 



Mvn-iair' (inBnjj-tieor') 

Mon'u-ntont, R9. 

Hoa^ (ie),' R. Blite of 
. [See Uooed, 



Hooiia (les, I8B|, r. did 
moo. [See Mood, IM.] 

Mood' in r, IBe, 
Mood'l-oega. 
Mood'y. ITO. 
[MDallah,!03. — f«e 

Mollah.] 
Moon, 19,32, «• 
Moon'bemn, 3Wl. 
Moon'Mlf f-ita/). 
Mooned, IflS. 
Moon'-eTed (~trf), 2DII, 






on'ehlae, Id 





oo'.hm-r, 





on'Blone. 




on'-Mruok 




on'won £-« 




on'r,(«.^ 




or, te, «. 


Mfis^n. 




or'-cock. 


oored, IM. 


Jo 


or'.fl.wl. 


io 


or'-esnifl. 


S-iS- 


o 


a:i: 



Moor'luid, 3M. 



Mope, 103. 
Hoped {mtpt), 
Kobe C, p. 3i. 



Hop'plng, irs. 

Map'w7TBs,iea. 



Ufir'al-ii-ln?. 
Mflrtl-ly, iS). 
MSr'alslaJi), n 



Mor'phew (-y»), J8, , 

Mor'plilne, RS, 162. 
Mor-pho-jog'lo (-Aii'-). 
Mor-pho-log'lftal 

Mor-pliol'o-ffv (-JM),108. 
Mor-rl. (lA) [Mor- 

rfce, 243.1 
Hilr'riB-diiuie. 
HOr'reir, (111,101. 
«br.(L.)(ni«-!). 
Morw, Note D, p. 37. 
Mor'iel, 149. 
Mort, la. 
Mor'MI, 72. 
Mor-lal'1-tr, 108, !«». 
Mor'tal-ty, 170. 
Mor'tar, 74, 189. 
Mort'g^[n (mor'-), IM. 
Mort'gBg:ed (moW^j^i). 

li iKi at In foot ; goifnflMillei gtKUgtngOiyiiMfotlili, 



Mor-dB^'1-ty, ItW. 
More (13s;, a. greater 

Mohur, and Uower, 
148 ; <aid Mobr, IW.I 

Mo-reeu', 121. 

Mo-rel' (121) [Morll 

kind of fnudbrDom), 



Mo-rOBqoe' (-r«*f ). 114. 
Mor-gft-nAt'io, 109. 
Mor'gir. 



Mo'ri-on, 49, ». 
Mo.rli.'i», 86. 
Mor'nion, se. 
Mor'mon-ite. 

Morn'lag, 14 1'. 
Mora'lnjt-glo'rr, 200, 

Mo-rone'.' ' 
Mo-roee'. 121. 
Mo-rose'l!', IBS. 
Mor'pheiis [so Wr.j 
nar'fc-Mt, Wk. Sm. 



MORTSAOKB 



h(ige-«i' [mor-gaS- 

jM' [\jmiem', , 
rebtfTeofMorf- ; 






lotb (ie,ir.; HA [pL 






'waa.','""' 

[duld'wirp IHold- 
w»rp,Wb.Gd. 203.1 

letilt<.:»(Uolt,Wb. 

<M. an. -a* KoM 

[fiuft'ed [Holtsd, 
Wb. Gd. :W3.] 
ISolI'liu; [Moltlnc, 

wb. Ga, ioa.] 






llort'g»-g«r (mor'^B- 

HoTtifer-olii. 
Mur-tl-n-o'tkn, IIS. 
Hor'U-fied, W. 

Mur^ll-fJ Ing, 180. 

If or'tlKtl (-MM), lU. 
Mur'tH-Ing, W3. 



MDi'ctu-tel {.So-). 
Mo-HTlle' (-Mf), 121. 
HuH'Mm (BWI'-) (1.18) 

[iioSni.Qd.iiiw»'Im, 

\Vr. IM.J 
Ha9qae(nH»jt) [H ■ k , 

Mosiul'to (-tC-XITt) 

i-ic'ni), 1».] 

MosB, IS, K. ; 17«. 



HDBt(»)[SKOlK»t.l 

UoB^iok [ICoitlo, 

If Oat'lr, 03. 
MM, IS. 

Hole (M, l«3), fl. ■ (mall 
pattlola. {9m Uoit, 



%,t,%,6,it,i,iotiti%t,\,6,'i,f,iltorl; 1 oi <■ br, 1 of <• AK, i 



Hu'tlOD-lne. 
Mo'tlvf, ^. 
Mo-Hv'l-tT. 
Mot'ler, /». 

Mo-lo'ri-af, «B, ». 

HoCtlc (moi'l), M4. 
Hof tied (-Ml, IW. 
Uot'to (Be,]S3) [pi. Hot. I 
"-' IW-l 




'e-buDk, I' 



KODKl! (moimf 1, IAS. 
HDUH'-riir,-Jt>»,Eia. 2. 

Mout'ing (moHz'-). 183. 
[Mou.liehe (F>.) 

(nuHM-tiuA';, wa.— 

Sn Muatwhe.l 
Maulh, a. (38, 37, l«l) 
rpl,Mi>uAa(«ioiiJ»«), 
&, 140 ) ^ote CT p. 

Hoii{li.*.3S,l«l. 

Uoutti'er. 

Mouili'nil i-fiit), W. 

Uoulh'plfw, 20S. 
Mov'a-blc (mooe'o.ftn 
(184, 189, t71, W3i 

M ov'n-bly (nooiJ'.). 

Moveil (nowl). 
Hove'inimt(n»nip'-), ISS. 
Mov'w Imooit'-), 7?. 
Mov'lug(-™»r'-),183. 
How (nod), n. IM. 



MOW 



289 



MITLTOCA 



How (mott) (101), 9, to 

put into a mow. 
Mow (101), r. to cut 

with a 807tbe, as 

Mowed (ffUHMf) (161), v, 

did moW| or put into 

a mow. 
Mowed (mffdf) (101), 9. 

did mow, or eat witi: 

a scythe. [See Mode, 

IfiO.] 
M6w'er, n. (07), one 

who mown. [See 

More, 149; and Mo- 

hur, 166.] 
Mow'ing {mou'ing) 

(161), jwrf. putting 

into a mow. - 
Mdw'ing (161), paH. 

cutting with a s<^he. 
Mdwn (24), part, from 

MSw. [See Moan, 

100.] 
Mox'a, 231. 
Mox-i-bus'tioii i-btul^^ 

yun). 
Mr. [^ee Mister.] 
Mrs. [See Missie.] 
Much, 22, 44. 
Mu-ciTic, IW. 
Mn'd-form, 108. 
Mu'ci-Iage, 109. 
Mu-Gl-lag'in-otts (4(0'-), 

!08, 116. 
Mu-cip'a-rotLs, 106. 
Muck, 22, 181. 
Muck' worm (-wurm). 
Muck'7, 169. 
Mn'eo-cele. 
Mu'co-pu'm-lent, 224. 
Mu-coB'i-ty, 108, 109. 
Mu-co'Bo^sac'cha-ilne 

(to-), 224. 
Mu'eofts (100), a. per- 
taining to mucus ; 

slimy. [See Mucns, 

160.] 
Mu'cro-nate, 105. 
Mu'cro-nat-ed. 
Mu'cu-lent, 89. 
Mu'cuB (169), n. a liseid 

fluid secreted by the 

membrane lining the 

oavities of the body. 

[See Mucous, 160.] 
Mud, n. & V. 22, 42. 
Mud'ded (176). v. did 

mud. [See Mnddied, 

148.] 
Mud'dYed (99). v. did 

make muddy. [See 

Mudded, 148.] 



Mud'dily, 180. 

Mud'di-ncsB. 

Mud'ding, 176. 

Mud'dle, 60, 164, 170. 

Mud'dled imud'li), 183. 

Mud'dling. 

Mud'dy, 170. 

Mud'dv-lng, 186. 

Mu-ez'zin, 66, 170. 

MuflT, 22, 173. 

Muran. 

Mttf'fle (mufl), 00, 161. 

Muffled iftwfld)^ 183. 

Murfler. 

Muffling. 

Mufti, tt7, IW. 

Mug, 22, 53. 

Mug'gcnt {rghent) (138) 

[so Wb. Gd. ; mug'- 

jent, Wr. 165.1 
Mug'get i-ghet), 76, 138. 
Mug-gle-to'ni-an (mnut- 

^T,m 

Mug'gy (-ghp), 
Mu-lat'to (170) [pi. Mu- 

lat'toes C46Z), 198.] 
Mn-lat'tress. 
Mul'ber-ry, 170. 
Mulch, 22, 44. 
Mulched (mulchf), 106; 

Note C, p. 34. 
Mulch'lng. 
Mulct. 22, 52, 64. 
Mulct'ed. 
Mulct'ing. 
Mulct'u-a-ry, 72, 89. 
Mule (20), n. a mongrel 

animal or plant. [See 

Mewl, 160.J 
Mu-let-eer', 144, 160. 
Mu-li-cb'ri-ty, 108. 
Mul'ish, 183. 
Mull, 22, 172. 
MuVta, 189. 
MQl-larga-taw'ny« 171. 
Mulled (muld)t 166. 
Mul'ldn (-lin) (97, 170, 

171) [Mullen, 203.] 
Mniaet, 170. 
Mull'ing. 

MuU ion {mul'yttn), 170. 
Mult-an'gn-lar {-ang'-), 
Mul-ti-at-tio'u-Iate. 
Mui-ti-cap'su-lar. 
MuI-tl-cSr'i-nate, 106. 
Mul-ti-cus'pi-date. 
Mul-ti-den'tate. 
MuI>1i-fa'ri-oii8, 40, K. \ 

169 
Mul'tl-id. 
Mul'ti-flo-rolis, or Mnl- 

tiflo-rotts [muVti-fio- 

n««, Sm. ; mid-tiflio- 



rttjr, Wb. Qd.j mvl- 
H^o'rus, Wr, 166.] 

MuPti-foil. 

Mul'tl-iSld. 

Mul'ti-form, 106. 

Mul-ti-form'ity, 106. 

Mu 1-ti-gen'er-ous 

(-J«n'0. 
Mul-ti-gran'u-Iate. 
MuI-tyVgotfs [so Sm. 

Wf . ; mul4t-ju'gtiS9 

Wb.Gd. 166.] 
Mul-ti-lat'er-al. 
Mul-ti-Un'e-al, 169. 
Mul-ti-loc'u-lar, 108. 
Mnl-til'o-qnence. 
Mul-til'o-quent, 109. 
Mul-til'o-ouotis. 
Mul-ti-no'aate. 
Mul-ti-no'dotts. 
Mul-ti-no'mi-al, 72, lOOL 
Mul-tip'a-rotks, 108. 
Mul-tip'ar-tite, 162, 166. 
MuFti-ped JMulti- 

pede,203.] 
Mul'ti-ple, 164. 
MnPtJ-pIex, 76, 78. 
Mul-ti-pli'arble, 164. 
Mul-ti-pl!-cand' (122) 

[not mul'ti-plT-kand, 

163.1 
Mul'ti-pM-cate, or Mul- 

tip'li-catc [mul'ti-pCi- 

kat, Sm. wb. (id.; 

mtU-tip'lirkdtf Wk. ; 

mtd-tip'lirkdt,OT mtU'- 

tirpn-katt Wr. 155.] 
Mul-ti-pn-ca'tion, 112. 
Jtnl'ti-pli-cat-Ire. 
Mul'ti-pli-cat-or[so Sm. 

Wr. ; mul-ti-pli-l-a'- 

<«r,Wk.Wb. Gd. 156.] 
Mul-ti-pli5'i-ty, 108, 160. 
Mul'ti-plied, 99, 186. 
Mul'ti-pli-er. 
Mttl'ti-ply, 94. 
Mnl'ti-ply-ing, 186. 
Mul-tip'o-tent. 
Mul-ti-pres'eBee 

(■prez'-). 
Mul-ti-ra'di-ate, 109« 
Mul-ti-se'ri-al, 49, H. 
Mul-tis'o-noQs, 166. 
Mul-ti-spi'ral, 49, N. 
3ful-ti-8tri'ate. 
Mul-ti-suf'cate. 
Mui'ti-tnde (26, 169)riio# 

mul'ti-tood, 127, 153.] 
Mul-ti-tu'din-arry, 72. 
Mul-ti-tu'din-ofis, 106. 
Mul'ti-valve. 
Mul-ti-valv'u-hBP, 108. 
Mnl-to'oa. 



MLi^aaimHnete; 6&a«lnl((K>t;9Mlnfiusila}ghaagi»go;tha«i»tbli. 

26 



MULTOCULAR 



290 



MUSTACHIOED 



Knlt-oe'ii-lar, 160. 
Mtd'tum inoar'vo (L.)* 
Halt-un'g^-iBte {^ng'-) 
Hal'ture, 01. 
Mum (212, 32), a. silent. 

[See Mumm, IflO.l 
Mum'ble, 1(H. 
Mam'bled, 166, 183. 
Mum'bler. 
Mum'bllng. 
Mumm (1^), V. to mMk 

one's self. [See Mum, 

160.1 
Mum'ma-chogf [Mum- 

mychogf,203.] 
Mummed {mumd), 165. 
Mum'mer, 170. 
Muni'mor-y, 160. 
Mum-mi-CI-oa'tion. 
Mum'mi-f ied, 99. 
Mum'mi-form, 106, 186. 
Mum'mi-^, 94. 
Mum'mi-fy-ing, 186. 
Mum'miag, 170. 
Mum'my, 66, 170. 
Mump, 22, 64. 
Mumped (tnumpt), 165. 
Mump'er. 
Murap'luff. 
Mump'isn. 
Mumps, 22. 
MuQch, 22, 44. 
Munched (muncht), 165 j 

Note C, p. U» 
Munch'ing. 
Mun'dane, 103. 
Mun-dl-fy-ca'tion. 
Mun-diri-ca-tlve. 
Mun-dun'g'us (-dung'-), 

54, \m. 

Mu-nlg'i pal, 72. 
Mu-nini-pal'i-ty, 108. 
Mu-nirl-cence, 105. 
Mu-nif i-cent, 171. 
Mu'ui-raent, 169. 
Mu-nt'tion i^iah'un). 
Muu-)eet', 121. 
Mun'uion {mun'yun). 
Mu'ral, 49, N. 5 72. 
Mur'der, 77. 
Mur'dercd, 150. 
Mur'der-er, 135. 
Mur'der-ess. 
Mur'der-lnff. 
Mur'der-ous. 
Mur'dress, 169. 
Mu'ri-ate, 49, N.; 108, 

169. 
Mu'ri-at^d. 
Mu-ri-at'ic, 109. 
Mn'ri-cate, 106. 
Mu'ri-cat-ed. 
Mn-ri-oa'to-his'pid, 224. 



Hu'ri-form, 106. 
Mn'rtne, 40, N. ; 152. 
Murk, 21. 
Murk'i-ly, 186. 
Murk'y(160)[Mlrlc7, 

20:i.] 
Mnr'mnr, 02, 109. 
Mur'mured, 150, 165. 
Mur'mnr-er, 135. 
MQr'mur-in&^. 
Mur'mur-oQs, 100. 
Mftr'raTn (-r<n), 06, 171. 
Mftr'rhine (-Hn} (171) 

[so Sm. ; nMr'tn, Wr. 

Wb. Gd. 155.] 
Mur'za, n. an hereditary 

nobleman among the 

Tartars. [See Mirza, 

160.] 
Mu-sa'ceons {-za'thus), 

46, 112. 
Mu-sa-rab'ic (-zor), 
Mus'ca-del, 105. 
Mus'ca-dlne, or Mus'- 

ca-dTne [so Wr.; tnu^- 

kadln, Wk. Gd. ; 

mus'ka-dinf Sm. 155.] 
Mus'oar-dlne, 152. 
Mus-c&r'i-form, 106. 
Mus'cat. 
Mus'ca-tel. 
Musch'el-kalk (moo»h'-) 

[bo Sm.',mtuh'el-kcUk, 

Wb. Gd. ; mooth'el- 

halkj Wr. 155.1 
Mus'clc (mus'O O^^^t 

104). [See Mussel.] 
Mus'cloa {mus'ld). 
Mua'cling^ {mu$'ling), 
Mus'ooifi. 
Mu8-CQl'o-ory, 108. 
Mus-cos'i-ty, 108, 169. 
Mus-co-va'do [not mus- 

ko-va'do, 153.] 



Thii word If from 
the SpaniRh mag-ca-M^ilo 
(unclnyed BUffar), in which 
a of the third avilable has 
properiy the Italian sound, 
or that of a in /an but tha 
best authorities give to a 
its long sound in the An- 
glicized form Mu$eovado. 

Mus'co-vfte, 105. 

Mus'co-vy. 

Mus'ou-lar. 89, 106. 

Mus-cu-lHr'i-ty. 

Mus'cu-lot&s, 100. 

Muse (mfljs;), n. one of 
the nine sister god- 
desses who presided 
oyer the liberal arts : 
— V. to meditate. [See 
Mews, 160.] 



Mused (mfljs<i), 183. 
Muse'ful (natz'JSol), 180. 
Mus'er (^tnOz'-). 
Mu-se'um (-ze'-) (111, 

11.3, 125) [not mu'M« 

nm, 153.] 
Mush. 22. 
Mush'room. 
Mu'sio i-zik), 200. 
Mu'sio-al C-zik), 72. 
Mu'sic-al-ly i-zik-), 170. 
Mu-si'cian {-ziah'an). 
Mu'siomaa'ter (-zik-)t 

205,209. 
Mu' sio-o*ma'ni-a(-a;£t-X 

224. 
Mu'sio-stool (-zik-). 
Mus'ing (mflr-), 183. 
Musk, 22. 

Mus'kct (76) [M us- 
que t, 203.] 
Mus-ket-eer'. 122, 169. 
Mus-ket-oou', 122. 
Mus'ket-ry, 03. 
Musk'i-ness, 186. 
Musk'rat, 206. 
Musk'y, 169. 
Mus'lln (muz*-), 
Mus'Iin-de-ilaine 

(muz'-), 171. 
Mus'lln-et (muz'-). 
Mus'mQn,or Mus'i-mon 
Mu-BO-ma'ni-a(-«o),l69. 
Mus'quash (-kwosh). 
[M u 8 q u e t ,203. — <Sree 

Musket.1 
[Musauito, 203.— 

See Mosquito.! 
Mus'rol (»ms'-, or 

muz'-) [mim'rOt, Sm. ; 

muz'roh Wr. Wb. (Jd. 

155.1 [M u s r o 1 6 , 

Wb. (M. 203.] 
Muss, 22, 174. 
Mus'sel (mue'l), n. a 

kind of bivalve mol- 

lusk. [Muscle, 203.] 
Mus'sul-man (171) [pi. 

Mus'8ul-mans(-maii«) 

190.] ^ 

Mus-sul-man'io, 170. 
Mus'snl-man-ish. 
Must, 22. 
Mus-tliche' (-tdsh') (189) 

[so Sm. Gd. ; mus- 

tash', Wk. ; mmttdfth'. 

ormus-tdsh'yWr. 155. 

TMouatache, 20.1.' 
Miis-tach'io {-t'dsh'o 

Jpl . Mn s-tach'ioB(miM- 
dsh'dz), 192.] 
MuB-tach'ioedX-fOsA'd/i) 
(188) [so Wb. Gd.j 



a, §, 1, 5, ci, y, long ;&,£,!, 5, fi, jr, •hori \lituin far, k as in fiist, keuin 



mm-U^iht-td, Wr. 



Mui'ti-l7, 188. 
MnB'tl-ncag. 
MuB'ly, 93. 
Mu-U-UI'l-ty, lOa. 
Mu'la-ble, IM. 
Ho'U-bly. 

Hu'U-to-i7,at. 

Mute,2S. 
Hutp'lv, Iffi. 
Uute'ne**. 
Hu'tl-Iate, ISe. 
Hu'tl-Ut-ed, 18S. 
Mu'tl-lil-ii^. 



Mnt'ton imot'n), 140. 

Uo'tu-al ImOI'mo-al) 
(80) [M Sm. Wr. Gd. i 
nu'cM-oI, Wlc. 134, 



Uy (onen ml) !«) i 



Irji^u. '1 look dovn Bp 



291 

Mj-(»-loE['ic{-J<(;'0.1«l, 
My-co-Iog'io-al t-i*5'-)i 

Hf-ool'o-gj, 108. 



Hj-o-umpti'io-iil. 
Mj-offtra-pblBt. 
Mv-mr'ni-phT, 108. 

M.-o-log'ic-al (-tri'-). 

My'ope, 19B. 

Hy'op-ey, 1W. 

Hy-o'ah, 10>. 
Hj-e-tWie. 
Hy-o-tU'l-tr, 108. 
My-ot'o-my, 108. 

Mfr'i..d. 
Myr'l-R-ffmm [M y r i- 

«er»mme,aM.l" 
i(irf't<wro«me' (Fr.) 

[so ftr. i nUr-i-a- 

orom, Gd. 155.1 
Mfr-l-«-ll'terr«fr.i-fl('. 

)^r,Gd.!S5][Hyr- 



jtfej-f-n-m*'(re (Pr.) 
(-mo'<ar) [bo Wr. i 
mlHi-a-nUi-ftir, Gd. 

M^r-U-pod. 

Si^i areh (-art), 
r-i-or* (Pr.) (•*■). 

My°'i° -ISg^e {-(OS), S?. 

mr-l-o-pfijl'lofia* or 
Mfr-I-opb'vl-lofiB 
I Stt A^nopliyllnii».l 

Mfr-l-o-rS'ma. or Kit' 
S-o-ri'm lnnr-l-o-ra-- 



Myr-ml-do'nl-ui. 
t» then i iSbatIn ftiot ) g w in &oU« ; gh cm g <n go ; 



HACBSOUS 



292 



trAtmcofY 



Ka'ere-olit, 109. 
Va'crite, 152. 
IVa'dir, 70, 10». 
Na^, 10, 63. 

gl-jltHf). i 

Ha'ud (na'pad)/>r Nil'- | 
ad (no'iM) [nc^pad, I 
Wr. Wb. Gd. ; na'a<f, 
Wk. Sm. 156.] [£iifi[. . 
pi. Naiads ; L. pi. * 
Na'%a-de» {na'ya- 
diz), lOH.] 

Nail, Zi, 50. 

Nailed, 165. 

Nail'er, IM. 

Nail'er-7, 233, Sxe. 

Kail'ing. 

JVa'tw (Ft.) (-«r), 154. 

Nil'ive-W (-«©-) [BO Gd.; 
na'tv-lpt or ntto'ly, 
Wr. 155. 1 

Naiveti (Fr.) (imA'«9- 
M>. 

Na'ked, 127. 

Ka'kir, 100. 

Nam'a-ble, 164, 183. 

Nam'bypam'by, 205. 

Name, 23, 103. 

Named, 165. 

Name'leM, 185. 

Namc^jr, 03. 

N im'cr. 

Name'sake, 200. 

Nam'ing. 

Nan-keen' (121) [N a n - 
kin, 203.] 

Nap (10, 30), n, a abort 
sleep ; — woolly or 
downy fibres on 
cloth :^«. to take a 
short sleep. [See 
Nappe, 160.f 

Na-p«e'an (-pr-)* 13. 

Nape (23) Inot niq>, 148, 
153.J 

Naph^tha (fuxp'-),30,141. 

Naph-thal^ic (nap-), 122. 

Naph'tha-lhie {nap'-) 
ri52)[Naphthalin, 

Na'pi-er's-boaes (no'- 
jpt^rz-hl^nz), 213. 

Na'pi-form Jso Sm.Wb. 
Gd. J nap^i'/army Wr. 
155.1 

Nap'nn, 230. 

Na-po'Ie-on, 171. 

Nappe (nap), n. one of 
the two parts of a 
conic surface which 
meet at the vertex. 
[5«eNap, 160.] 



Nap'pl-iiess, 181 

^•P'py. ^* 170- 
Nar-cis'sas, 170. 
Nar-cot'ic, 100. 
Nar-cot'ic-al, 108. 
Nar-cot'iC'O-ae'rid, 224. 
Nar'co-tTne (82, 152) 

[Nar CO tin, 203.1 
Nar'eo-tism (-Msm), 133. 
Nar'oo-tiae, 20Z, 
Nar'oo-tixed. 
Nar'co-tix^ng. 
Nard, 11, 135. 
Nardlne, 152. 
Na'rit (L.) i-rtz),n,pL 
Nte'nte, or Nir-rate' 

[so Wr. Gd.; nUr*- 

rdt, Wk. J nir-rai^, 

Sm. 155.] 
N&r'ra^ed, or Nir-rif - 

ed. 
Nftr'rat-Ing, or Nir^t'- 

N&r-ntlon, 40, Note 2 ; 

112. 
N&r'ra-tlve, 84. 
Nftr-i«t'or, 160. 
Nftr'rdw, 101, 153. 
Nftr'rdwed (-rO^ 188. 
Nir'row-er. 
N&r'row-in^. 
N&r'row-ramd'ed, aOS. 
Nar'rows (-r9z)^ n.]^. 
Nar'whal jr 136) [Nar- 

wal, Barwhale, 

Narral,2a3.] 
Na'sal (-zal)j 72, 136. 
Narsal'i ty i-zai*-)y 156, 

100. 
Na-sal-T-za'tion (-«a^). 
Na'sal-ize (-zai-), 202. 
Na/sal-lsed (-zal^), 183. 
Na'sal-iz-hdg (-ztdr-). 
Na'saMy (-aO-), 170. 
Nas'oen-cy, 100. 
Nas'eent, 30, 76. 
Nase'ber-ry {ndz'-)» 
Nas-i-cor'nofts (naz-), 
Nas'i-iorm inaz'-), 136. 
Na-sol'o-gy, 108. 
Nas'ti-ly, 12, 186. 
Nas'ti-ness. 
Nas-tnr'tion. 
Nas-tur'ti-um (-sAi-). 
Nas'ty, IS, 131. 
Na'tal, 72. 

Na-tal-rtial (-i«A'al)- 
NartalrrtiouB {-iak'us), 

112. 
Na'tant, 156. 
Na-ta'tion, 112. 
Na^tarto'ri-al, 40, N. 
Na'ta-to-ry, 86. 



1, l«»,44;KoteD, 

p. 37. 
Na'tion, 234. 
NA'tion-al (nasA'mn^ 

(143) [so Wk. Sm. 

Wr. ', na'Mhun-al, or 

nash'mm-al, Gd. 155.7 
Nft'tion-al-isra {nat»- 

un^aUzm), 133, 1.%. 
Nft'tion-al-ist {fuuV- 

un-). 
Nt-tion-al'i-ty (nosik- 

«»-), 106, 169. 
Nft-tkm-aI-(-sa'tioB 

(fUM&-«m-), 112. 
Ni'tion-al-iz« {noMk*- 

fin-), 202. 
Nft'tion-al-izod (natk'- 

un-), 166. 
N&'tion-al-f z-iBg (immT- 

ttfi-), 183. 
Nft'tion-al-ly(iMUft'Ki»-), 

171. 
Na'tlre, 84*156. 
Na'tiv-ism {-izm), 183. 
Na-tivl-ty, 108. 
Na'tro-fite Tso Sm. Wb. 

Cid.; naffrthtttj Wr. 

155.] 
Na'tron, 86. 
Nat'ter-jack. 
Nat'ty, 66, 170. 
Nat'n-ral (^, Not« I; 80, 

108) (so Wr.Wb. Gd. ; 

nat'chii^al, Wk. ; 

nat'di*oo-ralj ISmJSee 

$ 2R\ 155.] 
Nat'o-r8l-ism(^to»),136L 
Nat'u-rai-ist, 106. 
Nat-u-ral-l-xa'tlon. 
Nat'u-ral-ize, 202. 
Nat'n-ral-ised, 166. 
Nat'u-ral-iz-lng, 18S. 
Nat'u-ral-ly, 170. 
Na'tnre (naf'yvr) (44, 

Note 1 ; m, 156) [so 

Wr. Wb. Gd.; no'- 

char, Wk.; na^mr, 

ooll. nafch^oor (Sm 

f 26), Sm. 155,] 
N&ueht (tia«;l) (17, 162), 

A. s a. 



The nonn la oltea 
written Nonght, to db* 
tinguish it fhmi tunfgkt^a. 
— See Note unOet Abiv^ 

Nftngrhfi-Iy inawt'')l», 
N&ught'i-ness (nawi'-). 
Natterhf y (naw<'-)> !<>*• 
Nftn'ma-chy i-tg), 52, 

106. 
Naus'co-py, 106. 



i,§,i,d,n,y,foiV»i«^«»X»6>tl»f»«*or«>K^M«»flur»aat4i»fiMt,tM«» 



NBIQHBOEED 



Ska'«l-a(^ht■), 111,171. 
Naa'Be-Mit i-'he), 72. 
Nlu'se-alc {■!»*■ ). 
Naii'»e-»t-ea (-«*«-)■ 
KOn'K-it-lag <-«»*■). 
Mau-Be-»'tl™ (-.ft«-),llJ 



Hn'vil (72), o. pertnln- 
insr to ahlpi. [Sm 
NbwI, I48.f 

Na'varoh [-mirlO. 



HiiT-l-B«-hU'l-ly| II 

Mnv'i-gB-ble, IM. 
Nnv'l-m-blT. 
Nnv't-gaXe, lOe, IN. 

Nnv'l-g4t-eJ, IBS. 
NHT'lsiit-iiig. 



IM^, 13,30. 
Nfxped (nbil), IW; 

Note C, p. M. 
Ne.fr pol'l-un. 



Xrar'-^Kht-cd (-)H-}, 



Meyo-lii (L.) (8», ice) 
[pi. NebVlii !&.] 



Neb.n-lDB'1-tT, 106, 1W. 
NeVn-Jotii, lOfl, IM. 

rtes (-rt»), 

H-ly, 72, 108, 

■ami, IBB. 



NB^a-a. 



Ne9'«i 



1, rt, IJ 



Neol(ftlot!i,««.N'. 

Neck'er-cb(ef(-cA(r). 

Neck'-haad'kpr-^Ief 



»l'o^8t.l48. 



Nec'n>.m«iljBT, IM. 

8m. Wb. Od. I aelC- 
TO-<HiaHU!. Wr. IH.] 
Ntw-ro-iaao'tlG-al, lOS. 

Nec-fopb'»-gmi, lOS. 
Nec-Toph'il.sotis, IW. 

Nf-crap'o-lli (lOG) [Mr 
Sm. Wr.i •«irDji'«- 
Ha, Wb. Gd. ISS.] 



Hec-ta're^l, IN, 

N«j-tiir.irer-,iw, 'wa. 
See'tar-lne, §2, 152. 
Neo'taroba, lOO. 
Nec'ta-iy, 72. 
Kie( Fr.)l no) j»r(. /Wn. 

Btly:— B. to be In 
want of. [5« KoMd, 

Need'ed. 

Nwd'nii f-jKl), 180; 
NMd'l-ly, let 



' Keighibarid (M'im^ 



!■ tli«I > db WtoAot ; g M in ftcOai gh at g Ik go ; lb M <■ Bill- 



NZiaHBOBBOOD 
FN^ig-bboiirad, 

n^h'bor-lidbd 
iSel^hboor- 

HclKh'bar-i^ (na'-) 
[Setghbourlng, 

Sm. m.] 

Veisb'bor^-mtMl^m'-) 
[NelgbbOHrll- 

Mclgh'bor-lj- (na'-) 

Hdgbed {aad), 182, ItS. 
K*i5h'ins (««'-). 
Hi^HieT (lOB, N.) l»o 

Wk. Sm. Wr. i m". 

(bur, or «i'(6ur, OiL 

M^li (Inn In mart Dic- 
Ne'me-Hn (110) [m Wri 



Nh-o-Iok'ImI (In)'-)- 
NG^I'o-el™ (^n). 
Ne-ol'Oiilut, 1*. 
Mtol-o-giiflc. 
Ne-ol-oel«t'ic-«l. 



Ne-o-t*r'lc-J. 108. 
Ne-pen'the, IBfl. 
Hflnh'e-IInefSa.lWHm 
Wr. Wb. Od.i n^- 



294 

c-an, Sm. 1S61 

Neph-^-04iio-cjg'l4 

Neph'ew (HCTr'yofK or 
n^yoo) [ao frr. i 
nffi'voa, Wk. Sm.; 
n^VDO, Wb. Gd. IM.) 

by ilH £^b MlboCslw! 
but In UHTUnlUd 8ut«li 



Ke'r&Jil, «, N. 
He-re.|d'|.an, IN. 
Ne'rite. lOa. 
N^r-o-ll, or Nc-mTI 
[nfr'o-n, Wr. Wb. 

NprTe,2l,N.il3J. 
Merrcd (nerni), V. ft 



Nervine, 152. 
Nerv'hig. 

Nerr-o^ _[ iO Wi 
ntrv'Oi,Wb.Gd.lSl 
Nerv'oDi. 100. 

Neg'cl-mice [ntiht-en 

W, 8m. ;^(2J 



Nert-IS. 
NeM'ed. 

Nest'lnr. 

Nei'tle(nM'l), IM. 
Nes'tled (n«'MJ, 181. 
Nes'tUna (»«'lwip). 
N«-to'ii-ui, im. 



Keiti'er-nieBt, 130. 
NePted, ««, IT*. 
Net'ting, 170. 
NeVtle (mfl), M, IM. 
Ntt'tled (net'td), ISb 

Het;tling[B«'(Jiw), 

Heii'Syai,™'' ■ ^ 
NeQ-nl'gl-s. 
Nefi-ral'Kle,*a. 
Meu-nil'uj, 14S. 
Neu'rtne, St. 152. 
Neo-rOfi'ra-phjr, 108. 
Neu-ro^og'k-iil (-iqC-) 
Nru-rol'a-gJBt, 1U8. 

Neii rop'terf' 
Het-rop'ter-a (I.), 
Neu-rop'ler*L 
Nen-rop'ter-iin. 



Nea-ryp-iiol'o.gti(. 
NeQ-ryp-nol'o-gy, lOB. 

127, 163.1 ' 

Neo'trsl. tO. 
Nea-trnl'l-tr, IDS, 1». 

NeH'trsl-iie, aM. ' 
Neu'tnl-tied, IK. 
Nvu'Inl-ii'Cr, 1SS. 
Nen'tml-TB-lnff. 

Neu'tml-lr, IS). 
Ke»-vaiaa' (Fr.) (mt- 

cJns'i.n.pI. 
Nev'er, IM, 77. 

Exc's:*" "' ' ' 
New (nn) (M) [no< noo, 

127, 1531. a. of r««nt 

ori^D. iSftGootimd 

Knew, 180.] 
New'rf (n«'-). 
Mew-An'srled {«»• 

rtmffVMl.SOS-Kitc.B. 

faah'njid). 



l>i.l,a,&, f, Iinv>i.eiI>a.0.ti(*Or<i Iiuliiftr,4iu<iiftrt,laiA« 



NEWLY 



295 



NITBtFIED 



Wcwiy (n«'-). 
Kew'omade (nu'-). 
Ncw'nesB (»»«'-)• 
KewB (n^z). 
News' boy (nfl«'-), 206. . 
News'man {n'Az'-)^ 196. 
News'mon'ger (nA«'- 

mung'gur). 
Nc.ws'pa-per fnO«'-). 
NewB-pa-pe'ri-al (nO«-). 

or NewB-pa^pd'rl-«l 

(ufte-)> 203. 



The former fp«lllnjff 

of tbii colloquial word li 
the more analogical, but 
the latter it pcrhapa the 
more common. 

News'room (nftg'-). 

Newt (n4tt). 

New-to'ni-an, 109. 

New'-year, a. 212. 

Nexlle, 162. 

Next, 15, 39, N. 

Nib, 16. 

Nibbed, 165, 176. 

Nib'ble (nib'l)j 66, 164. 

Nib'bled (nifr'^d), 183. 

Nlb'bler, 170. 

Nib'bllng. 

Nice (25, 163), a, deli- 
cate; exact; requir- 
ing BcrupulouB care. 
r^<^0GneiSB, 160.1 

Nice'ly, 186. 

Ni'oene, or Ni-cene' 
[ni'sin, Wr. Wb. 
Gd.; nl-sfn', Sm. 166.] 

Nioe'neBB. 

Ni'ce-ty, 233. 



"In thli word «f 
our own compoeltion from 
mcf., we have unaecountsr 
bly run Into the pronun- 
ciation of the mute e." 

NYohe, 16, 163. 

Niched {nieht) (Note C, 

p. 34) [BO Wb. Gd. ; 

nich'edy or nicJU, Wr. 

1.55.1 
Nick, 16, 181. 
Nick'ar*tree, or Nick'- 

er-trcp, 206, Exc. 4. 
Nicked (nikt), 166 ; Note 



C, p. M. 
c'el, 

Wr. ; nik'elriky 



Nick'el, 149. 
Nick-el'ic (109) [bo 8m. 

Wb. 

Gd. 155.J 
Nick^l-ii'er-o&s, 106. 
Nick'ingr. 
[Nicknack, 203.— 

See Kniekknack.] 



Nick'name, n. ft v. 
Nick'named, 183. 
Nick'nam-ing. 
Nic-o-la'i-taa [bo Gd. 

Wr. ; nik-o-la'tafh 

Sm. 165.] 
Ni-co'tian (-9han) [so 

Wr. Wb. Gd. ; fO-ko'- 

shl-an^ Sm. 155.T 
Nl-co'tlHmlne (-»M-) 

[BO Sm. Wr. ; n%-ko'- 

«Aa-fi<n,Wb.Gd.l56.] 
Nic'o-tIne(82, 162)[N i c - 

otin, 203.] 
Nic'tate. 
Nic'tat-ed. 
Nic'tat-ingf. 
Nic-ta'tion. 
Nic'ti-tate. 
Nic'ti-tat^, 183. 
Nic'ti-tat-lng. 
Nic-ti-ta'tion, 112. 
Nid-a-ment'al, 100. 
Nide, 25. 
Nid'get {nij'et), 
Nid'f fl-cate, 169. 
Nid-i-f I-ca'tion, 112. 
Nid'u-lant. 
Nid-u-la'tion. 
Ni'dus (L.). 
Niece, 169, N. ; 171. 
N\-eVlo (It.), 170. 
Nigr'gard,66,72. 
Nig'gard-li-ne88, 106. 
Nlg'gard-ly. 
Nigh (nl), 162. 
Night {nit) (162), n. the 

time between sunset 

and sunrise. [See 

Knight, 160.] 
N igh t'-bloom-ing 

{nit'-), 206, Exc. 6. 
Night'cap {nlt'-)y 206. 
Night'fan {nU'-). 
Night'gown {nit'-). 
Night'-hawk (nU'-)y»6, 

Exc. 3. 
Night'ln-gale {nit'-), 
Night'jar {nit'-). 
Night'ly (««'-). 
Night'mare {nlt'mir). 
Night' shade {rat'-), 
Night'-time (««'-). 06, 

N. ; 206, Exc. 1. 
Night'-walk-er (n«'- 

wavjk-). 
Night'-walk-ing {nU>- 

\oawk-). 
Night'- watch {nit'-), 
Ni-gres'cent, 171. 
Nig-ri-fl-ca'tion [so 

Wr. ; nl-gri-/i-ka'- 

ihuut Sm. 155.J 



16 (217) Ipl. 
n-ces (-•e«M 
{-pinz),n. pi. 



Ni/jpYne [Nigrin, 

Nig'ri-tnde, 106. 

Iffhil de'betj or NU d^- 
bet (L.). 

Ni'hU dt'cU, or 2iU di'- 
cit (L.). 

m'hU ha'bet, or im 
ha'bet (L.). 

Nl'hll-iBm {-izm), 136. 

Ni-hil-ist'ic, 109. 

Ni-hll'i-ty, 108, 169. 

NU (L.), n. nothing,— 
a term in book-keep- 
ing to denote an entry 
that is cancelled. [See 
Nill, 160.] 

Niil (172), r. to be un- 
willing. [See Nil, 160.] 

NT-lom'e-ter, 108. 

Ni'lo- scope. 

Ni-lot'lc, 100. 

Nim-bif^er-ofiB, 106, 160. 

Nim'ble, 61, 164. 

Nim'bly. 

Mm'bus (L.), 160. 

Nine, 25. 

Nine'fold, 217. 

Nine'pence (217) fpl. 
Nine'pen- 

Nine'pinsi 

Nine'teen."[5ee Eigh- 
teen.] 

Nine'teenth. 

Nine'ti-eth, 186. 

Nine'ty, 93. 

Nin'ny, 66, 170. 

Nin'sin. 

Ninth, 25, 37. 

Nip, 16, 30. 

Nipped {nipt), 166 ; Note 
C, p. 34. 

Nip'per, 176. 

Nip'per-ing. 

Nip'pers {-purz), n,pl, 

Nip'ping. 

Nip'plc, 164. 

Ni'san. 

Ni'sl pri'us f L.) [so 
Wr. ;m'»1 i)ri'ti»,Wk. 
Sm. Wb. Gd. 155.] 

Nit (10), n. the egs of 
any small insect. [See 
Knit, 160.] 

[Niter, 203. — 5ee Ni- 
tre.] 

Nit'id, 66, 170, 166. 

Ni'trate. 

Ni'tre(-fttr) (164) [Ni- 
ter, 2ai. J 

Ni'tric,200. 

Ni-tri-n-ca'tlon. 

Ni'tri-fied, 99. 



fidlj dofifitbore; Cb (U i» foot i ^ a$ in £uil6ighM gin go ',t^ at in tbU^ 



NlTEIFtf 



2d6 



NOmSNTlTY 



Nl'trite, 70, 152. 
Ki'tro-8-e'ri-«l, 224. 
yvtro-gen. 
Ni-tro-ge'ne-otts. 
Nl'tro-gen-ftae (16ft, 202) 

[•o Wr. ; nf-trqfe' 

ntZt Gd. 155.] 
Ni-trom'e-ter, 109. 
Ni'tro-ma-ri-at'ic. 
Ni'troBe. 

Ni'trofiii, 100, 100. 
Ni'try, OT, 10». 
Nifty, 176. 
NWe-ottA, ]<». 
Ni^etU' (Ft.), 
Nix, 16, 39, N. 
NT-zam'. 
Ko (24), <Md, a word of 

denial or refhsal : — a. 

not any: — n. a rote 

ia tbeneeatire. [See 

Know, 1^.1 
No-a'chi-an C-1c\-) (52) 

[BO Wb. (>d. ; nOHilK- 

{-<in, Wr, 155.] 
Nob, 18, 31, 43. 
No-bil'i-ty, 106, 169. 
No'ble, 164. 

No'ble-man, 72, 164, 196. 
No-bless', or No'bless 

[no-hlea', Wk. Wr. 

Wb. Gd. ; no'bles, 8m. 

155.1 [Noble sae 

(Fr.), 203.] 
No'bly, 93. 
No'bod-y, 221, 227. 
No 'cent, 76. 
No(>-tam-bu-la'tion. 
Noc-tam'bu-lism 

i-HzmU 133, 136. 
Noc-tara'bu-list. 
Noc-til'u-cotts. 
Noc-tiv'a-gant. 156. 
Noc-tiv-a-ga'tlon. 
Noc-tiv'a-gofis. 
Noc'to-grCph. 
Noc'tu-a-ry, 72, 89, 
Noc'tule. 
Noc'turn. 
Noo-turn'al, 72. 
\ Noc'u-ottB. 
Nod. 18. 
No'dal, 72. 
No'dat-ed. 
No-da' tion, 112, 
Nod'ded, 176, 
Nod'ding, 170. 
Nod'dle, 164. 
Nod'dy, 06, 03. 
Node, 24, 163. 
No-dose'. 
No-dos'I-ty, 108, 169. 



I No'dait, 100^ IM. 

Nod'alar, 108, 100. 

Nod'ule(45, N. ; 90) [80 
8m. Wr. Wb. Gd. j 
noj'1, Wk. 194, 255.] 

Nod^u-lose. 

No^'io, 109. 

No-et'lo-al, 106. 

Nog, 18. 

Nog'gln(-^*<n)(6«,170}, 
A. a BmMil cup ; a g^tlL 
[See Noggtng:, 148.] 

Nog'eing i-ghinff\ n. a 

Sartitiou of ■cafttlinffB 
lied with bricks. 

[S^Noffldii, 148.] 
Noise (noM), 27. 
Noised (naizd), 165. 
Nois'i-ly (noir'-)» 186. 
Nols'i-Besfl (n&iz'-). 
Nois'ing (note'-), 183, 
Noi'Bome (-mm), HI9. 
Noi'sy i-zp)t M». 
No'lene vo'lens (I/.) (iio'- 

lenz vo'lenz). 
No'U me tan'ge-re (L.). 
Nol'hproa'e-qul (L.). 
Nom'ad (66) [so Sra. 

Wr. ; n&mctd, Wb. 

Gd. 155] [Nomsde, 

2ai.] 

No-ma^di-aa, 169. 

No-mad'ic, 109. 

Nom'ad-isra {-izm), 133. 

Nom'ad-ize, 202. 

Nom'ad-ized. 

Nom'ad-iz-ing. 

No'man-oy, 169. 

Nom'arch (-ar*). 52. 

Nom'bies {num'olz), n. 
pi. [NumbleB,20:U 

Nom'l>riI. 

Norn de guerr^ (-ghir*) 
(Fr.), 15*. 

Norn de plume* (Fr.). 

Nome, 21, 163. 

No'men-cla-tor [so Wr. 
Wb. Gd. ; no-men- 
Ida'tuTj Sm. ; nom-en- 
kla'tur, Wk. 156.] 

No'men-ola-tresB. 

No-men-cla'tur-al 
{-UHt'yur), 91, 108. 

No'men-cla-ture {-kldf- 
y»r) (44, Note 1, 91) 
r so Wr. Grd. ; no'men- 
kla-tarf Sm. ; nom'etk- 
kla-tUr, Wk. 155.] 

No-men-cla'tar-ist 
i-kldt'yur-), 91, 171. 

No'mi-al, 72. 

Nom'i-nal, 72, 78. 

Nom'i-nal-ism (-izm). 



Nom'i-iua48t. 
Nom-i-nal-ist'ie, 109. 
Nom'i-nal-ly, 170. 
Nom'i-nate, 169. 
Nom'i-nat-ed, 183. 
Nom'i-nat-ing, 228, K. 
Nom-i-na'tion, 112. 
Nom'i-na-tlve, 132. 
Nom-i-nee'. 
Nom-i-nor', 122. 
No-mog'ra-phy, 106. 
No-moPo-gy, 108. 
Nom'o-thete. 106. 
Nom-o-thet'io, 109. 
Nom-o-thet'lc-al, 106. 
N<m (L.). 



Thto Latin adrerb 
to uMd in EncUsh only t» 
m. prefix, and It employed 
to give a neftative mum to 
words. The compound* 
thus fbitned are printed 
with or without a hyphen 
after the prefix, accord! ngf 
as they more or less fl«- 
qnently oeeur. When the 
primary accent is oa any 
ether syllable, the prefix 
takes a secondary accent. 

Non-a-bil'i-tr. 
Non-ac-cept'anoe. 
Non'age, 70. 
Non-a-ge-na'ri-an, 49, 

N.; 169. 
Non-a-ges'i-mal. 
Non'a-gon, 170. 
Non*ap-pear'anoe. 
Ifon as-sump'tU (L.). 
. Non-at-tena'anoe. 
Nonce, 18; Note D, p. 37. 
NonchcUanee ( FrO (nof»- 

§ka4dn^, or n6ng'- 

ehtU'onge'), 154. 
Nonchalant (Fr.) (now- 

sJio-ldng'j or nong*- 

ehal-ong*), 154. 
Non-oom-mis'sioned 

{-misk'und), 171. 
Non-oom-mit'tal. 
Ifon eom'poe men'HM 

Non-con-cur'. 

Non-oon-duct'or. 

Non-con-form'ist. 

Non-con-form'i-ty. 

Non-oon-tent'. 

Non'de-script. 

Nan det'i-net (L.). 

None {nun) (163) [so 

Wk. Sm. Wr. ; nhn, 

or nun, Gd. 1551, a. 

& pron. not one. [See 

Nun, IflO.] 
Non-e-lect'. 
Non-en'ti-ty, 160. 



i, d, i, 5, ii, y, long-, ft, d, I, d, ti, jr, ehari } Hoe in fue, keuin fastr kaaim 



mtoei (nlMi). n. pi. 34, 

Mone'-so>pret't* 

(nim'to-prO-le), Ml. 
MuD-ee-HD'tlHl l-iSal). 
Jionatfac'tunlh.}. 
Xon at m-ven'luHh.). 

Non-ill'ioD 



""Si 

Wb. Gd, 



(170) [i 

Non'ji-i ._ 

8m. i aon-jir'iKg, Wi 
Wb. Gd. 143.1 

Hon'ta-ror (W, N.)^ [■ 

Wb! Gdl,' Hon'ja-roi 
Nan-nst'n-nl, M, If. 



Non'Bult^il. 
Non'iiuiMna:. 

Noo'dle, 164. 

Gd.; Siot, Wk.; 
nodl:, or ii«}fc, Wr. 
196.— see Book.) 
K(vo-log'l<j^ < -W'-). 

Ko-oi'o-gin, ibe. 

No-ol'iwry, 108. 
Kooo, 1ft W7, 
Noon'daT. 



a>-!^^L* 



».] 



Noowd (naowl). 
Nooa'iDff (wwjr'']. 



Mortb-Euf , IM. 
North-CBit'er-ly. 
Nortli-enafera. 



Noil5;tr-l 



Nonhnwu, IH.] 
Korth'wHTd, or iiortb'- 
North' wardl)-, 113. 

NoTth-wtafw-lT. 

Nor-we'Ei-aD, 1&. 
Nose (nil), n. A c. H, 

NoieTMn*(nBi'-), ax. 
NoBe'WcBil fn»s'-). 
Nosed Inlfid), IK. 



NJa'ine (bBi'-)- 
[NoBf*. aB.-»« 

Nozile.] 
Ho-ww'rB-jihy, lOB. 
NoB-o-log'Ic-a (-Iq]'-}. 

Nir-BOl'D-irlBt, 108. 

"irK «!!:>, S 

tol'ojp. Wk.i«o-»oi'- 
w>, or no-toVojf, 
__«T. IM.] 



No-U-Wl'I-lT, 108, 
NAt'ii-ble (lAl, II 

nortbr of noUi 

iiurkiiblc. 



carenl, Huiftr, saa 

NQl'»-bi» (181), ad. rfr 

Nat'uLl)'(lfil),a<(.wlUi 
bustllDK utlvitj Bsd 

No'DbI, 7!. 

Jfu-faii'da (L.), B. pi. 
No-la'rl-nl, W, N. 



NoTched it 

Nole C, p. 

Sale, 24, Itf^ 



34. 

'SM, Exc.4. 



Notb'iDg (nui 
Wk. Sm. W 

isf.'i 

Wo'llce, im. 
No'tJoM-We, 104, 
NiytlM-s-hlT. 
Nd'Ured (-(is(), 
Note C, p. 34. 
No'tlc-ln^. 
No-tt-n-ca'tloo. 

No'li-f j, M. ■ 



I'fc^) [so 



I, 4», M. ; 



MlHlboti VMteaoU*igta<i«g<i>go;yiaiinUil*. 



KoBr'lih, M, IM, 171. 
Nottr'lib-i-ble, 164. 
NoDr'iilied (.-itlU). 

Koiir'lBh-lne. 
KoOr^lih-nivnt. 
Mo-T«'u-lil« (ISS) fm 

Wr. Wli.Utl.^iiiMn'- 

mil, Sm. I&S.I 
Nu-VD'Uiui (-rtoiOi 1«. 



No»'.>i.tr. 

No-Tem'bcr. 126. 
Soi'en-n-ry (72) [■< 
Wk.Wr.i nor'ffi^lr-s 



ND4J-l<('iiar, Wb. Gd. 

Mo-vi'il-Me (-Hth't-al] 
[BoWk.Sm.Wr.jBo 
ci»Ji'a(,Wb. Gd. 165] 



Bow'el (wjWr. ; no'*!, 

No' where. 
No' vice (wU). 
Nox'loH B iHoli'ikta), M, 

Note 1 ; 171. 
yoyadt* (Fr.) (miill- 

mrf'), B. pi. 
Hoyrm (*>." ' 



5jKt,„ 



Hn'clejt-ed. 

Nu'«le-u», 169. 
Hu'Mile. 
TTude, 2fl, 1J7. 
MudES, 2i, 4S I Kote D 

p. 37. 
Hudfcoil (nifjiri, 183. 
NBde'lnB (nW-)- 
Na-dl-bmn'shl-Me 

(,-btang'tt-), 52, 54. 



i, i, I, «,&,;, bxv I ■><•)•<>■»<> f> " 



Nu'KH-to-ry, )!n, lit. 
Muc't^t (.;»«<), 138,170. 



Nul'H-ly. 7H 
Nul'll-lj-lnc 

Nul'li-tf, Ifl 



Wb. Od. iSi.l 
Nnn'dl-ul, 72. 

»iiii'ner-j-,aO,]ro. 
Sun'tlal (-(hoi) [nol 

nop'chul, IS!.] 
Nnp'ltali l-Ouiii). 
Nurse, 21, l.Wi Note D, 

P.3J. 
Nur>cdtnur(n.l<U,lS3,- 

Note t. p. 34. 
Mnra'H-T, IW. 
Kuw'lng. IS!. 
Nun'llDg, 183. 
Nur'tarc (mu-l'yar'h 44, 

Nur'turi^ (i«irt'|«rfl, 

Nuftiir-log (iiurt'irtir-) , 



to dKpignate by • ' ] 

Num'bfral (-»«rd), 150. 

14<iinb'liiir(num'-), Itt. 
Nu'mer-a-blo, let. 
Ku'mrr.al,-433, Exe. 
Nu'mer-m-rr, "2. 
No'mer-Ble, M. 
Nu'mer-at-ed, ]«». 
Nu'mer-M-ing. 

Nu'merit-or." 

Nu'mer-ollB, 100. 
ND-mls-mit'to (-nli-), 

Nu-nii* mM'la-tl 

Mu-njLmat'ice (-ml:-): 
Nn-mlB'nu-tlsl {-mii'-). 
Nu-ini«-iiiB-»l'o-el« 

Nu-inls-TiM-tol'o-g)r 

NulD'niii-lir, lOe, IW. 

Nurn'mu-li-rr, 72. 

NDm'BkDll, 171. 

Nun, 22, 43. 

Nun'cl-0 l-iM-o) _(1B21 
[■o Wk. 3m. Wr.i 
mn'«Art,Wb. Gd. 155.] 

I(nn'™-iM-tlTe,orNnn- 
cD'pa-MTe (ntm'tu. 
pa-Hv, Sm. : nttn^kn'- 
pa-tit, Wk. Wr. Wb. 



o. 

O (2t), sn Interjecttoa 
usod to deni>t« n call- 



Osk, 34. IK!. 

Oak'ea (sl/n), 1«. 

(Wc'uiB, 169. 

0«k'7, 1)3. 

Oar (24, i:U), n. in In- 
Btrumenl % which 
IjobM sre rowed. rs« 
O'cTgimJ Ore, iao.J 

Oara'man (or*'-). 

O'B-eiB [not 0-i's1lU3.] 

Oat, W, 41. 

Ont'ou (N'n), SI, 140. 

Oath (24, 3?) [pi. Cathi 
lBlhzy,m, I4i>.] 

Osf mjai (aonj I'm Sm. 
Wr. Wb. Gd. ; SCntU, 
or Bfmit, Wk. US.] 

Olxsla'Tste. 

Ob-com-preesed' 
(■preii'). 

Ob-oon'lo, 109. 

Ob-con'lc-Bl, IDS. 

Ob-cor'ilato. 

Ob'da-ra-CT, or Ob^dn'- 
ra-or (49, N. : IfiO) r»o 



nifah, Wr. IH.l 

O-be'dl-enca ITS) tm 

8m. Wr. TTb. OS. 

o-belJt-au, Wk, 134 



Obe'ili^nt, 



fl) Ibo V°' 



Obie-llie, 202. 

Ob'e-llied. 

Ob's-lii-toK. 




Ob'U-Kii-to-ri-iy, 136, 

iri.lsfl. 

Ob'll-sa-Iorl-neai. 

Ob'li-Bii-to-rT_(72, 8(1) 
fio Wk. Wr. Wb. 
(5d. ; ot'KToa-(ur-«, 
Sro. 1S5} (noTo-bllg'*- 

O-blT^'' (ihl) [to Sm. 
Wr. Wb. Gd. ; <^MIj^, 



0-bel'»anl <-baf-, 

■itf-). 
Ob'e-UBk, les. 

fUI itailn them ; db at In tbot ; j iw i» belle ;gh<Mj{(»gait{|(M<nUi 



OBBBRVATION 



O-blie'lng t-WU"'-), ] 
Obll-m>|J. 
Ob-lltTD-lite, lOe. 



Sm.; oWIt', WL, i 



Ob-llq'ol-ty {-MfWI-). 



ty, 143, ie». 
iit,49VH.ira. 



Ob-aeured'. ITO. ' 
Ob-«eare'l», B3, 185. 
Ob-Bcur-lng, 183. 
Ob-MU'ri-ty, 103. 
Ob-BP-cra'flon. 
Ob'se-quTea (-farfj), n. 



erv'»-blo i-ttrv'a- 
erT'a-biy {-leru'-). 



OB0BaVATIO2fAL 



800 



OGTOGENAftY 



OtKMtT-A'tiOll-al 

(-zerv-). 
Ob-Bcrv'K-tlre {-zenf'-), 
OVBerv-a-tor (-««ny-). 
Ob-8erv'a-to-ry(-«er»'-), 

86, 171. 
Ob-serre' (-zerv'-), 103. 
Ob-sefved' {'Zervey)^ 

165. 
Ob-Benr'er (-zerv''). 
Ob-Berv'ing {-zerv'-). 
Ob-8C8B'loD {-$eah*un), 
Ob-Bid'l-an (IGV) [so Wr. 

Wb. Gd. i ob-gidfpan, 

Sm. 155.] 
Ob-sld'1-on-al [so Wr. 

Wb. Gd. J ob-sid'yun- 

alj Sm. ; ob-8id'%-un- 

aL or ob-»\f'i^uH-al, 

Wk. 134, 155.] 
Ob-BO-les'cence, 39, 171. 
Ob-BO-leB'cent, 127. 
Ob'Bo^lete [not ob-iO- 

let', 153.] 
Ob'sta-cle, IM. 
Ob-Btet'ric 
Ob-Btet'ric-al, 72. 
Ob-Btet-rl'dan i^risH'- 

an). 
Ob-8tet'ric8, 109. 
Ob'Bti-na-€y, 72, 169. 
Ob'Bti-nate, 73. 
Ob-Btl-pa'tion. 
Ob-strep'er-o&8, 100, 

233, Exc. 
Ob-stric'tion. 
Ob-8truct'. 
Ob-struct'ed. 
Ob-struct'er. 
Ob-struct'ingf. 
Ob-8truc'tion. 
Ob-8trnct'Ive, 84. 
Ob'8tni-ent (-itroo-). 
Ob-tain', 23. 
Ob-taiQ'a-ble, 164. 
Ob-taned', 166. 
Ob-tain'er. 
Ob-tain'inff. 
ObteBt'. 
Ob-teBt-a'tioA. 
ObteBt'ed. 
Ob-te8t'ingf. 
Oh-tmde' l-trood'). 
Ob-trud'ed {-trood'-). 
Ob-trnd'er (trood'-S. 
Ob-trud'ing (-trood'-), 
Ob-tru'Bion (-troa- 

zhun\ 
Ob-tru'Btve (-/roo'-)fno< 

ob-troo'zir, 136, 163.J 
Ob-tund'. 
Ob-tund'ed. 
Ob-tund'ent, 127. 



Ob-tand'ins^. 
Ob-tiis-an'g^-iar 

i-ang'-). 
Ob4u8e', 26. 
Ob-tu8e'*an'gled (•<inff'- 



old). 
Ob-i 



-tuBe'neflB, 185. 
Ob-ta'aion {-zhun). 
Ob'rerBe. n. 135. 161. 
Ob^rerae', a. 101. 
Ob-vert'. 
Ob-vert'ed. 
Ob-vert'ing'. 
Ob'vi-ote, 169. 
Ob'vi-at-ed, 183. 
Ob'vl-at-ing. 
Ob-vi-a'tioD. 
Ob'vi-olSa, 100. 
Ob'vo-lute. 
Oe'ea-my, 170. 
Oc-ca'8ion {-zhun). 
Oc-ca'sion-al i-zhun-). 
Oo-ca'sion-al-iffm 
{-zhuf^-izm)^ 133, 

Oc-ca-ston-al'i-ty 

{-zhun-). 
Oo-ca'afon-al-lf 

{-zhunr), 170. 
Oc-ca'sioned {-zhund). 
Oo-ca'Bion-ing; {-zhunn). 
Oc-ca'BYre, 84, 136. 
Oc'cl-dcnt. 
Oo-ci-dent'al, 100. 
Oc-cip'it-al, 72. 
Oc'cl-put, 171. 
0(H}lu'8ion {-zhun)(\T, 

N.UBoWk.Wr. Wb. 

Ga. ; ok-loo'zkun, Sm. 

165.] 
Oc-cult', 121. 
Oc-cult-a'tion. 
Oc-ciilt'ing. 
Oc'cu-pan-cy, 169. 
Oc'cu-pant, 89. 
OG-cu-pa'tlon, 112. 
Oc'cu-pied, 99. 
Oo'cu-pi-er. 
Oc'cu-py, W. 
Oo'cu-py-ing, 186. 
Oo-cor', 21. 
Oc-curred', 165, 176. 
Oc-cttr'renoe, 21, 66. 
Oc-cihr'rent, 76. 
Oc-our'rinff, 21, 49. 
O'cean (-«Aan), 46, Note 

2 ; 234. 
O-ce-an'ic (she-), 156. 
0-cel'la-tea [so Sm. 

Wr. yO-sel'a-tedj^Wk. ; 

o'sel-ated, Wb. Gd. 

156.] 
O'ce-lot, 171. 



[Oeher, 203.— <9ee 

Ochre,] 
[OcherouB, 203. — 

See OchreouB.] 
[Ochery, 203.— £^60 

Ochrey.] 
Och'l-mr {oV-), 52. 
Och-loc'ra-cy {ok-), 106. 
Ooh-lo-crat'ic {ok-). 
Odi-lo-erat'ic-al {ok-). 
[Ochra, 203.— Sm 

Okra.] 
0-chra'oeott8 (-kre^- 

shus). 
O'chre (o'fa«r)(52, 164) 

[Ocher, Wb, Gd. 

20.3.] 
Ochre-a (L.) {-kre-) [pL 

O'cAre-ce {-kre-e), 

198.] 
O'chre ate {-kre-), 171. 
O'ehre-otiB {-kre) fO- 

cherouB, Wb. Gd. 

.303,] 
O'chrey {-kry) (169) 

^b g7203?''"^' 

TT D. vra. .cUo.J 

O-chro-leu'oollB {-kro-). 
O'ore-at-ed. 
Oe'tarchord {-kord). 
Oo'ta-gon, TZ. 
Oc-tag'o-nal, 106. 
Oo-ta-ne'dral [O c t a - 

edral,2a3.] 
Oc-ta-he'dron [O e t a - 

edroii,203.] 
Oc-tam'er-ofi8. 
Oc-tan'dri-a. 
Oc-tan'dri-an, 169. 
Oc-tan'drofiB. 
Oo-tan'gu-lai* {-tang'-y, 

108. 
Oc'tant, 72. 
Oc'tar-ehy {-ky), 
Oc'tave, 230. 
Oc-ta'vo (86) [pi. Oo- 

ta'vOB (^3a), 192.] 
Oc-ten'ni-al, 171. 
Oe-tiU'ion UU'yun)^ 

171. 
Oc-to'ber. 
Oc-to-dec'i-irid [pi. Oo- 

to-dee'i-moB (-mS«), 

192.] 
Qo-tOHden'tate. 
Oc'to-fld. 
Oc-to-ge-na'ri-im, 49, 

N.J 169. 
Oc-tcjff'e-na-ry {-to}'-), 

or Oc'to-ge-na-ry (72) 

[96 Wr. ; ok-toj'e-na- 

ry^ Wk. Sm. ; ok'to- 

^c-na-ry, Wb.Gd. 155.] 



a, e, i, 5, Uy y, long f ft, €, K, 0, il, f, short ; 'A€uin fyct, k m in fast, SLOsin 



Oct^ogT-noK {iitf-). 
Oo-toniH'itlu', IM. 
OfUt-wt-tf, n. 
Ooto-iuKi'D-lir, M>. 

Oe'to-pad. 

Oo-lo-Hperm'otU. 

Oc-to-irl-lBb'Id. 
Oc-to-Bvt-lob'ki-*]. 
Oo^lo-syl'ls-hlB, 1«. 



Oc'u-llBt. 

Od, orOd. 

O'dtUik JIT CdH-llBqiia 

lOdank, Odi- 

tlqne.aos.] 



Odd'-ftl-lflw. 
Odd'I-ty, 108. JM. 



dda (<>>b 

^-de'OB (I--,, t. 
M'lo, sr'Cd'le. 



O-dom'e-ler, IDS. 
O-d0-met'rie-«L 

Od-on-tnl'glc, or O-don- 
tal'glc rto Wr. ; od- 

(nl'Ht, Wb. Od. IW.j 
Od-on-Ul'gl-*. 
Od-DIttal'g7. 

fldl i • a* til tber* i tb •• In 



801 

Od-on-t(»'e-Dy (-(flf -) 
<MOD'ta^Tliph. 127. 
Od-on-Wn-phri MS- 
0-dDii't«rd. 
0-don't«-nte, 102. 
Od-un-Iol'o-gy, IDS, 
(>'dar(;o,Wl}[Odoal 



o-dTi'Um ITS. 

Od'jra-aer (M, l«t, 171) 
5« EoBoomlu.] 



— Set EeniDenlcal.] 
(E-de'iu (c-dc'inn). 

uad} lio Jri\'; e«'- 
KHrf, Wk. Wb. Gd. i 
Ij'vnit, Sm. IK.] 

(E-uan'thlc («-), 

(E-Dom'e-ter («-), lOfl. 

Cer (ir), prq), * adv. ■ 
povlical coDtractton 



E-BOpb-iwDt'a-iiif (t- 

&Bopii'«-groB <*-*y-) 



OPfln-to-n', M. 

Oir-bimd. 

Offln, Mt, 

oriNisr. 

OfH-aered (-*Mrd). W. 

ora-ter-iBK. 

Of-fl'etal {.jlrt'oO, Ui 

or-n'd«i-ir{-jirt'«(-). 

Or-fl'dal-t* {-«i*'oi-), 
lU. 



Of-n'oi-il.|Dir C^itf-). 
Of-n'd-»t-or (-jfa'V), 
Of-n-d'nil, or OrOe'i- 
Ml (H> Wr. 1 flM-rf- 
na/,8in.{ of-jti'l-Ktl, 



ouB l-JlA'm 
M.l»l. 



OttteV, or Of Mt, ■ 



IPafiaot. 
<a>BDi?ur. 



i.l^ 



[OrreniB.— Am Of- 

Or-ftn'ilii>, M. 
Offer, 77. IM. 
Offered {-fitrO), li>0,l». 
OPfer-fiiff. 



06SS 



802 



ONOMATBCHinr 



O'n^fiB, 76. 

O gyg'i-an (:«i'-). 

Oh J24), an exdamatioii 
or pain, sorrow, sur- 
prise, or anxiety. [See 
O and Owe, IGO.I 

Oil (^7) inot U, 153.1 

Oiled, 1(». 

Oil'cloth, aOA. 

Oirer-f. 

Oil'i-ness, 186. 

Oii'man, 196. 

Oil '-tree, 206, Exe. 4. 

Oil'y, W. 

Oint, 27. 

Oint'ed. 

Oint'ing. 

Oint'ment. 

0'kra[Oclira,Okro, 
203.] 

Old, 24. 

OM'eo (dld'n), 149. 

Old'-fash'ioned (-uiui). 

Olrl'ish. 

Old'wife [pi. Old'wnres 
(wlvz), 193.] 

O-le-ag'in'Ofis i-<0f-)tVBO 

O-le-an'der, 126. 

O le-as'ter, 126. 

O'le-f i-ant [so Sm. Gd.; 
o-lefi-antj or o'le-fl- 
antf Wr. 155.1 

O'le-ic. 



_ ** Thi« word, which 
might undoubtedi/ be ac- 
c«uted on the penultimate 
[^<ee § lOU], seema, in prac- 
tice, to yield to the mart 
general principle." {See 
) 1U5.] SHtart. 

O-le-ifep-oas, 108. 

O'le-Ine[Olein,203.] 

O-ie-om'e-ter, 108. 

O'le-o-res'in (-rear'-). 

O'le-ose, or O-le-ose' 
[o'le-os, Sm. Wb. Gd.; 
o-fe-fiaS Wk. Wr. 155.1 

O'le-oiis. 

Ol-er-a'oeons (nsfttM). 

Ol-fac'tioo. 

Ol-fac'to-ry, 86. 

O-lib'arnum, or Ol-i-ba'- 
nam (169) [o-Zid'a-I 
num, Wr. Wb. (Jd. ; i 
ol-i-ba'nunu Sm. 155.1 

Ol'id, 170. 

Ol'ld-otis. 

Ol'i-garch (-aark). 
' -all 



01'i-g"arch-ar (^-gark-), 
Ol-i-ffarch'ie {-garV-\ 
01-i-garch'io-af(-firorJr- 
Ol'i-garch-y {-gark-). 



) 



OPl 



Ol'i-slft. 
01-i-giBt'ie, 109. 
O'li<o,or Ol'io (0/'fo)rfO 

Wr. i o'U-o, Wk. Bm. 

Wb. Gd. 156.] 
Ol'1-to-ry, 86. 
Ol-i-va'oeoa8(^a«w),112. 
Ol-i-ras'ter. 
Ollre, 84, 170. 
OI'iTlne [so Wr. Wb. 

Gd.; o^'f-Hn, Sm. 155] 

'Olivin,203.] 

^la po-dri'da (^p.) 

i-dref'). 
O-lym'pi-ad, 160. 
O-lym'pi-an, 72. 
O lym'pic, 109. 
Om'bre (ffm'frnr, or dm'- 

bar) [0ii»'friir,Wk.Sm. 

Wr.; dm'6i*r, Wb. 

Gd. 155.] 
Om-brom'e-ter, 108. 
O-me'ga, or O-mcg'a 

[o-mefati, Wk. Wb. 

Gd. Wr. ; o-me^^at 

Sm. 155.] 
Om'e-let, or Ome'let 

[om*e4et^ Wb. Gd.; 

om'te*, Wk, Wr.; om'- 

tlet, coll. om'letf Sm. 

153.] 
O'men, 76. 
O men'tom. 
O'mer. 
Om'in-oilB (108) [not o'- 

min-ous, 153.1 
O-mis'si-ble, l64. 
O-mis'sion (-miiA'im), 

112. 
O-mis'sIre, 84. 
O-mit', 103. 
O-mit'ted, 176. 
O-mit'ting. 
Om'ni-bus, 169. 
Om-ni-fa'ri-ofis, 49, N. 
Om-nirer-otis, 108. 
Om-niric, 109. 
Om'ni-form, 108. 
Om-ni-form'i-ty, 108. 
Om-nig'e-no&s (-n<;'-). 
Om'ni-grftph, 127. 
Om-ni-pa'ri-ent. 
Om-ni-pftr'i-ty, 170. 
Om-nip'a-rotis, 106. 
Om-nip'o-tenoe. 
Om-nip'o-ten-cy, 160. 
Om-nip'o-tent. 
Om-ni-pres'enoe 

(-pr&j'-). 
Om-ni-pre8'ent(-pre«'-). 
Om-nT'sd-enoe (on»- 

nish't-ens), or Om- 

nl'scienoe (om^ish'- 



eiw)[0O Wr.; om-nUh'^ 
Y-eiM, Wk. Sm. ; om- 
nish'ens, Wb. Gd. 155.] 
Om-nl'sci-en-cy (om- 
it sk^-en-My), or Om- 
nl'sden-cy (oM-n&ifc'- 

Om-nl'sd-ent (-nicJk'Y- 
eiU), or Om-nl'sdent 
{-TUah'tHty, 171. 

Om'ni-om, 160. 

Om'ni-um gath'er-om. 

Om-nlr'a-g^t. 

Om-niv'o-rofts, 106. 

O-mog'rarphy, 106. 

Om'o-plate. 

Om'pna-clne, 152. 

Om-i)hal'ic, 109. 

Om-pha-Iop'ter. 

Om-pha-lop'tio. 

Om-pha-lot'o-my, 106. 

On, 18, 43. 

On'a-ger. . 

Once (wiins), 171. 

On-oot'o-my. 

On dU (Fr.) (on <fe). 

One (trun) (163), a. sin- 
gle : — profi. & n. a 
single person or a 
single thing. [See 
Won, 160.1 

One'-eyed (inm'-Ki), 
206, £xc. 5. 

O-nei-ro-crit'ic, 49. 

O-nei-ro-crit'ic-^ 

O-nei-ro-crit'ics. 

O-nei-rol'o-gist, 106. 

O-nei-rol'o-gy, 108. 

O-nei'ro-man-cy, 160. 

O-nei-ros'oo-pist. 

O-nei-ros'co-py, 106. 

One'ness {wun'nU)^ 66, 
N.; 171. 

On'er-a-ry (72), a. per- 
taining to burdens; 
burdensome. [See 
Honorary, 160.] 

On'er-ofig /not o'nur-oa, 
127, 153.J 

One'-sid-ed, 206, Exc 5. 

On'ion («n'ytm), 22, 51, 
171. 

On'-ldbk-er. 

5n'Iy, 24. 

On'o-man-CT, 160. 

On-o-man'tic. 

On-o-man'tiOnsL 

On-o-mas'tic. 

On-o-mas'ti-con (Gr.) 
[pi. On-iMtuu'ti-caf 
198.] 

On-o-ma-tech'ny 
i-tek'-). 



i, fi, i, 0, ii, ft long i i, €, 1, 5, fi, fftitort', Has in f)ur, katin fkst, ka$in 



ONOMATOLOGIST 



303 



OPTICS 



On' wards (-wardz). 

On'v-cha (on'l-iba), 
O'ny-cha (o'ni-i 
[onfi-iBa, so Wk. ^ 



On-o-ma-toI'O'gist [so 
Wb. Grd. ; o-nom-a- 
tol'o-jistf Wr. 165.] 

On-o-ma-tol'o-g^y, 108. 

On'o-ma-tope. 

On-o-mat'o-py. 

On-o-mat-o-p<B'ia i-p^- 
ya), 171. 

0-nom-a-to-po-et'io. 

On'set, 18, 76. 

On'sUuglit(-«foto<), 162, 
171. 

On-to-log'io (lof-). 

On-to-loif'io-al (4<y'-). 

On-tol'o-gist. 

On-ioVo-gj. 

(ynus pro-ban'dt (L.). 

On' ward, 72. 

On' wards (-trardi). 

► or 

-ka) 
, Wr. 

Sm. 165.] 
O-nych'o-man-CT 

(-ntifc'-), 52, 171. 
O'nyx, ft3, 171. 
O'o-lite. 162, 229. 
O-o-Utac, 109. 
O-oFo-gist. 
O-ol'o-gv, 108. 
Oo-long' [so Wr. I oo'- 

long, Gd. 165] [Oa- 

long,203.] 
Ooze, 19, 40. 
Oozed, 166, 183. 
Ooz'lQg. 
Ooz'y, 93, 169. 
O-pac'i-ty, 169. 
O-pa'co&s, 100. 
O'pah, 72. 
[Opake, 203. — iSSee 

Opaque.] 
O'pal (72) [so Wk. Wr. 

Wb. Gd.] 

■^ Smart marin the a 
in this word as having a 
•onnd intermediate De< 
tween that of o in orb and 
thatofoinoa. i8eeil8,N. 

O-pal-esoe', 39. 
O-pal-esoed' {-eat'). 
O-pal-es'cence, 171. 
O-pal-es'cent. 
O-pal-es'cing. 
O'pal-Yne, 82, 162. 
O'pal-ize, 202. 
O'pal-Tzed. 
O'pal-iz-ing, 183. 
O'pal-oid. 

Opaque' (168, 171 j Note 
D, p. 37) [Opake, 



ao:i 



•f 



Ope, 24, 163. 
O'pen (o'pn), 24, 149. 
O'pened (o'pnd), 150. 
O'pen-ing {-pn-}, 142. 
O'pcn-ness {o'pn-^nes), 

00, N. 
Op'er-a, 72, 189. 
Op-er-am'e-ter, 108. 
Op'er-ant. . [Exe. 

Op'er^ite, 73, 170, 233, 
Op'er-at-ed, 183. 
Op-er-at'ic 
Op-er-at'io^, 228. 
Op'er-at-in(j. 
Op-er-a'tion. 
Op'cr-a-tlve, 84. 
Op'er-at-or. 
O-per'cu-lar, 108. 
O-per'cu-late. 
O-per'cu-lat-ed. 
Op-er-cuai-form (108) 

[so Sm. Wr. ; o-per'- 

ht-U-formy Wb. Gd. 

166.1 
O-per'cu-lum (L.) [pi. 

0-per'ctt-to, 198.] 
Op-er-et'ta, 171. 
Op'er-osc, or Op-cr-ose' 

\op'ur-98t Sra. Wb. 

Gd. J op^r-os', Wk. 

W^r. 155. 1 
Oph'i-cleide (^-kad)y 166. 
O-phid'i-an, 169. 
O-phid'i-ous. 
Oph-i-o-log'ic i-ldj'-). 
Oph-i-o-log'ic4d (-to/'-). 
Oph-i-ol'o-glst. 
Oph-i-ol'o-gy, 45. 
Oph'i-o-man-cy, 169. 
Oph-i-o-mor'pnoiis. 
Oph-i-sftu'ruB. 
O'phite. 162. 
Oph-i-u'chus (-kus), 
Oph-thal'mi-a. 
Oph-thaI'mic {op-thaV- 

mikj or of-tkal'mik) 

[so Wr. ; op-thal'mik, 

Wk. 8m. ; of-thaV- 

nUk, Wb. Gd. 165.] 
Oph-thal-mog'ra-phjr 

{op-, or 0/-T, 108. 
Opb-thal-mol'o-gist 

(op-, or of-). 
Oph-thal-mol'o-gy (op-, 

or o/-), 108. 
Oph-thal-mom'e-ter 

(op-j or of-), 108. 
Oph-thal'mo-scope (op-, 

or of'). 
Oph-thal-mos'oo-py 

(0!P-. or of-), 108. 
Oph-tnal-mo-tol'o-gist 

(op-, or of-). 



Oph-thal-rao-tol'o-gj 

(op-, or of-). 
Opb-thal-mot'o-my(c»p-, 

or of), 108. 
Oph'thal-my (op'-, or 

of-). 
O'pl-ate, 73, 78. 
O-pifer-otts, 108. 
Opine'. 26, 103. 
Opined', 166. 
O-pin'ing. 
O-pin'ion ( yun), 51. 
O-pin'ion-at-ed (-yun-). 
O-pin'ion-4-tIve (-yun-). 
O'pi-um, 78, 160. 
Op-o-b&l'sam [so Sm. 

Wr. ; o-po-hawV8amy 

Wb. Gd. 156.] 
Op-o-del'doc (171) [so 

Sm. Wr. ; o-po-ael*- 

dok, Wb. Gd.; 155] 

[not o-po-dil'dok, 127, 

163.] 
0-pos^siim« 169, 170. 
Op'pi-dan. 
Op-po/nen-cy. 
Op-po'nent (122) [not 

op'o-nent, 163.J 
Op-por-tune', 122. 
Op-por-tune'ly, 185. 
Op-por-tunc'nesB, 66, N. 
Op-por-tu'ni-ty (26, 

108) [not op-por>too'- 

ni-ty, 127, l&J.] 
Op-pos'a-ble (-pOz'ct-bl), 

164, 169. 
Op-pose' (-p5z'). 9 
Op-poped' (-pOzed'). 
Op-p5B'iDg (-pOz'-). 
Op'po-sTte (-zU), 152. 
Op-po-sl'tion (-zish'un), 
Op-po-sl'tion-ist (-ziah'- 

««-). 
Op-pos'i-ttve (-poz'-). 
Op-press', 15, 103. 
Op-pressed' (-preat'), 
Op-press'ing. 
Op-pres'sion (-presh'- 

un), 112. 
Op-pres'slve, 84. 
Op-press'or, 88, 169. 
Op-pro'bri-otts, 100. 
Op-pro'bri-um, 169. 
Op-pugn' (-oOn'), 162. 
Op-pugnea' (-pitnd'). 
Op-pugn'er (-pan'-). 
Op-pugn'ing (-p«n'-). 
Op-Bi-om'e-ter, 108. 
Op'ta-tTve, 84. 
Op'tic. 

Op'tio-al, 108. 
Op tl'cian (-tiah'an). 
Op'tics. 



ftUs^Mlntherei dba«tff»lboti9a«<n£MUeigba«g<ngo;yia«<nthii. 



<Hi'U-me(L.}. 
Op-U-nilsm (-Mini). 
Oli'li-raist. 



O-put'cu-liin (L.) [id. 

h.pui'cu4a, 108.1 
O-inuop-fra'Um (L.}. 

Or'adi (+1. IM) [Or- 

ttr'i-cli!, IM. 
0-rac'u-lir, IDB. 
O nu'u-lalU, loe. 
0'rnl,4e, N.{72. 
O'rtl-lT, 170. 

ent, Sm. ; aj-'oiu", Wr. 
lft>. Gd. IM.J 

&--rtn-^ttrf' (Ft.). 

US.] 
O-rang'-oa-taDE' (i 

nnv'-oo-IWfr) [■ 
faag', Gd. i o-ronff 
(xytang, Wr. ISo.] 

O^HCrl J, «. N. 
6r-i-«r'io-iJ, 108. 



804 

Or'ifauil-1^ 
rOrahel, 201. — Sv 

Orolill.] 
Or'abn-tn (Jm-), *r 

Or-che«'tni (ta'-Vm 

Wr-iWiM-lm, Wb. 

Od. ; oria'tra, Wk. 



l(-ie 

Or^liEB^tra'tlDD 
"r-ebea-t™ l-J 
(l«] [Ore hi 
prercrrud by Wb. 



Orbed (orAfj), s. 

OibedforW), o. (160) 
tao Wb. Gd. ; B^bid, 
ororM.Wt.Wr.ior'- 
ied, Sm. lU.] 



rtff-in'-),l». 
■-elild-a'woiia [oi^Ud- 
'.dil"^ni' <-«d'-), 
■'clill («, Ml) [Ar- 



ir'df-Dl (iCU) [M Sm. 
Wr. Wb. Gd. i or'de- 
oJ, or or-je-al, I3t, 
lUli«<or.de'd,lS3.] 

Or-der, 104, 136. 

Or'dered (,-diird\ 140. 

Or'der-ini;, 142. 

Or'der-ly. 
Or'dl-iul, 78. 
Or'dJ^uuiM (IW), It. ■ 
Uv. [S« Ordiiuee 



•B.-rtlT,7a.l 

Of'dl-ii»-rY rn), a, [to 
im.Wr.Vfb. Gd. ; or-- 



Or'diard, 13S. 



OimrTAUZED 



Wt. Wr, Wb. (id. ( 



>r« (^4,«ij,n. ■ iBPtal 
comblaed wllh tame 



Or'giji-ij-»-Me, IM. 

Or-giin-1-.a'tJon. 
WE.n-ltt, 308. 
Or'gan.lied, IW. 
Or'gBO-iz-lng, IRS. 
Or-ffBH-^-graph 'fe. 
Or-gan^i^ni-phlat 
Or-^ui.(w'rm-pb7t 106. 

<^^aa-OB'(io-py, 108. 

(ar'gmt-Iln, Wr. Wb. 

Gd. ; or-aaH-tln' ,Bm. 

Its.] 
Or'gatnU-aaimj.Va. 
OHireiit I A.) lor'that) 

[£}<Dr'je-at,l4S,m.] 

Orguea (argi), n. pi. 171. 
Or^ty («-fc) [pC Of. 
gka (-^^, i«u.) 
^^ ThI* vord ■• ranlf 

Or'l-chdob i-kalt), 02. 



0-rl-eBt'»l, K». 

O-rf.BBt'al Jat. 
0-ri-«nt'Bl-lie, 

O-rl<0t'aI-iied. 



t-im). 
6-ri-«nt'Bl-lie, 203. 



i, i, i, t, u, y, f«w i i, «. 1, 3, ft, }. a«rt I H M to far. i « in eut, ft w «• 



OBIBNTALWlfG 

O-ri-ent' al-iz-in^. 
O-ri-ent-a'tioii, 116. 
O'ri-ent-a-tor. 
Or'i-f loe, l&i. 
OWi-flammc [Qri- 

flamb,203.] 
Or'i-gan, 170. 
O-rig'a-oam. 
Qr'i-gen-iMm (-jen-izm), 

133, 
5r'i-gen-ist {-Jen-). 
Or'i-gin, 78. 

0-rlg'i.na-We(-r(/'-),lMf 

IGll 
O-rig^in-al (-r^'-). 
Q-rig-in-al'J-ty (-^v-). 
O-rig'in-ate (r^'-h 




O-rig'In-Ji-ttve (-rii'-y 

O-rig'iu-it-orC-rif-). 
O-riPloa, 170. 

O'ri-ole, 40. N. 

O-ri'on, 122. 

0-ri8-mo-log'io-aI(-fe>/'). 

O-ris-mol'o-gy (108) [so 

Wb. Gd.; or^U-moV- 

o-jy, Wr. 155.] 
Or'i-son {-zun)^ 149. 
rOrk,203. — 5ee0re.] 
Oric (oW). 
Or'le-aus l-ana), 
Or'let. 
Or'lo. 
Or'lop, 86. 
Or-mo-lu' [so Wb. Gd. j 

or-mo-Poo't Sm. (Slec 

§ 2ii) ; or'fno-looy Wr. 

155.] 
Or'na-ment, 109: 
Or-na-ioRat'alt 109, 
Or-na-ment-a'tioa. 
Or'na-meat-ed. 
Or'na-ment-ing. 
Or'nate [not or-nat', 

163.1 
Or-nith'lc 

Or-nith-ich'nlte (-tt-'-). 
Or-aith-ich-nol'chgy 

(-»&-), 103. 
Or-nith'o-lite, 1S2. 
Or-nith-o-logr'io-al (to/-) 
Or-nitli-ol'o-giat, 108. 
Or-nith'o-man-cy, 169. 
Or-nith-o-rhyn'ohus 

irring'kus)^ 54. 
Or-o-graph'ic. 
Or-o-graph'lc-al. 
0-roi'ra-phy, 108. 
Or-o-log'le-al, 
O-rol'o-gy, 108. 
O'ro-tand (105) [so Gd. j 



806 

o-ro-Amd', Wr. 165.1 
{not dr'o-tund, 137, 

163.] 
Or'phan, 72. 
Or'phan-age, 70. 
Or'phaned (//and). 
Or-phe'an (il0> [so Sm. 

Wr.i or'/c-an, Wb. 

(M. 155.] 
Or'phlc. 
Or'pi-ment, 169. 
Or'plne (82, 162) [Or- 
pin, 203.] 
Or'rer-y, 233, £xe. 
Or'ris. 169. 
Orse'dew (-rffl-) [O r s e - 

due, 203.] 
Ort (17}, n. a fv^paetA', 

«^ refuse. 
Or'tho-dase. 
(Vtho-dox, 156. 
Or'tho-dox-y, 169. 
Or-tbo-drom'ic. 
Or-tho-drom'ics, 109. 
Or'tho-drom-y [so Sm. 

Wr. ; or'tho-dro-myt 

Wb. Gd. 155.] 
Or-tho-ep'ic, 109. 
Or-tho-ep'ic-al, 108. 
Or'tho-e-pist, 
Or'tho-e-pr (122, 229} 

[not or-tho'e-py, 163.J 
Or'tho-gon. 
Or-tbo^o-nal, 108. 
Or-thog'ra-pber. 
Or-thog'ra-phy, 108. 
Or-tho-graphac, 109. 
Or-tho-graph'ic-al, 106. 
Or-thog'ra-phiBt. 
Or-thog'ra-pby, 106 ; 

Note F, p. 79. 
Or-thol'o-gv. 
Or-tho-met'ric. 
Or-thom'e-try. 
Or-tho-ped'io. 
Or-tho-ped'io-al. 
Or-thop'e-dlst. 
Or-tnop'e-dy. 
Or-thoph'o-ny. 
Or-thop-noe'a (-i*^'-). 
Or-thop'ny. 
Or-tbop'ter-an, 
Or-thop'ter-ofis. 
Or'tbo-sty&e. 
Or-thot'ro-pal, 106. 
Or-thot'ro-potis. 
Or'tlye. 84. 
Or'to-lan, 72. 
Orts, n. pi. (17) [5fee 

Ort.J 
Or'val, 72. 
O-ryc'ter-ope. 
Or-yo-tog-nos'tic. 



00917 AST 

Or-yo-tog'no-sy, 106. 

Or-yc-tog'ra-pny. 

Or-yc-to-log'ic-al 
(-to/-). 

Or-yc-tol'o-gy, 93. • 

O'ryx [80 CM.} dr'ta?, 
Wr. 155.] 

Os'cbe-o-oele (-fee-). 

Os'cil-Un-cy, i09. 

Os^cil-late, 105, 170. 

Os'cil-lat-ed, 183. 

Os'cil-lat-inff. 

Os-cil-la'tion, 112. 

Os'cU-ia^o-ry (86) [so 
Wb.(Jd.;o»'«-a-<«r-y, 
Sm. ', o»M'a-iitr^, 
Wk. J os'U-a-toTpt or 
os-U'o-to-nft Wr. 156.] 

Os'ci-tan-oy, 169. 

Os'ci-taat, 78. 

Os-d-Wtion. 

Os'eu-lant, 89. 

Os'ctt-late. 

Os'cu-lat-ed. 

Os'cu-lat-ing, 183. 

Os-ou-la'tion. 

Os'cu-la-to-ry, 66. 

Os'eu-lat-rix. 

Os'cule. 

O'sler i-zhur)y 47, N. 

O'slered (zhurd), 166. 

Os'maa-li, 191. 

Os'ma-zome {oz'-). 

OB'ml-om (ozf-), 169. 

Os'moRC (o«'-). 

Os-mot'ic ioz-), 109. 

Os'na-burg (oz'-). 

Ot^pray (23) [Osprey, 



"The more eom- 
mon orthoi^niphy of this 
word in the Dictionaries {» 
emray, ma it is found in the 
Bible; but the orthography 
of the ornitliologietf ii o»' 
prey.** Worcester. 

Os'se-let. 

Os'se-ofiB (os'e-u8, oolL 
osh'u8)[BO Sm. ; os*- 
€-U8i Wb. Gd. ; os'e- 
tM, or o8h'e-u8, Wr. 

165.] 
0«'Bi-ele, 164. 
Gs-slf er-o&B, 106. 
Os-sifie. 

Os-si-n-ca'tion, 170. 
Os'si-ned, 99. 
Os'si-A*age. 
Os'si-f y, 94. 
Os'sl-f y-iujr, 186. 
Os-siv'o-rotts, 106. 
Os'su-a-ry (osA'tt-o-ry, 

or ot'tho^') [so Wr. ; 



26* 



osTBnas 



806 



OYERBALANCE 



Mh^u-a-rp, Wb. Gd. ; 

o«'tt-4lr-y, Sm. IM.] 
Os'tc-Ine. 
Os-teu-Bi bil'i-tf. 
Oft-Cea'si-ble, UM. 
OB-ten'si-bly. 
OB-ten'sIve, »4. 
Os-tent' [so Wk. 8m. 

Wr. } osfUnt, Wb. 

Gd. 16ft.] 
OB-tcnt*a'tioii. 
OB-tent-a'tio&ii, 171. 
Os'te-o-oele. 
Oa'te-o-oope [bo Wk. 

Sm. Wb. Qd.; Oi'te- 

O'kdp, or os-Mo-kOp, 

Wr. 155.] 
Ot-te-o-den'tlne. 
Os-te-og'c-ny ( -<y'-), IW. 
Os-te-og'ra-phy. 
Os-te-oPo-ger, 106. 
Os-te-o-log'ic i-loj'-), 
Os-te-o-logr'io-al {-lof-). 
Os-te-ol'o-gist. 
Os-te-ol'o-gy. 
Oa'te-o-plas-ty. 
Oe-te ot'o-my, 108. 
Os'ti-a-ry, or Ost'la-iy 

{o8t'yar-y) fso Wr. ; 

o«'rt-a-ry, Wb. Gd.j 

ost'y&r^, Sm. 156.]^ 
[Ostler, 203.— 5ec 

Hostler.] 
Os'tra-cism (-Hzm), VIQ. 
Os'tra-cize, 202. 
Os'tra-cized. 
Os'tra-ciz-ing, 183. 
Os-tre-a'ceous (skua), 

234. 
Os'trich [not os'trtj, 

153.] 
Os'tro-jETOth. 
Ot-a-coiiR'tic [so Wk. 

Wr. Wb. Gd. ; o-tct- 

kows'tik, Sm. 155.] 
O-tol'gi-a, 72. 
0-tal'j,dc, 45. 
O-tal'py, or O'tal-ffy 

[otal'jp, Wr. Wb. 

Grd. ; o'taljy, Sm. 

155.] 
Otb'er (uWur), 38, 77. 
OfR 'er- wise (tith 'ur- 

wlz) [so Sm. WrTWb. 

Grd. ; uth'ur^u^Zt or 

uth'ur^iBizj Wk. 155.] 
O-trbse' {shi-) [so 

Wr. ; o'8h6», Gd. 155.J 
(ytiriim cum dig-ni-ta'- 

te CL.) (o'shium), 
O-toff'ra-phy, 108. 
0-tol'o-gy. 
O-top'a-thy, 106. 



O-tot'o-my, 106. 

Ot'tar (M, 74), n, the 
esBcntial oil of roses. 
[^See Otter, 100] [At- 
tar, Otto, 203.] 

Ot'ter (00, 77), n. an 
aquatic quadruped of 
the weasel kind. [See 
Ottar, 160.] 

Ot'to, M. 

war Thi« li Mtothsr 
■pelUng of oUar t both 
toniii sr« in good uie. 
Smart girei otto only, lu 
hii Dictionaiy, but §my9t 
**aoroe penons have Utciur 
choMn to spell it €MarJ" 

Ot'to-man, 196. 
Ou-bU-ette' (Fr.) (oo-). 
Ouch, 2t$, 44. 
Ought (awt) (162), v. 

was obliged ; should. 

[See Auglit, 160.] 
Oui-direi Pr.)(oo-«-c»r') 
[O u 1 o n g , 203. — See 

Oolonglj 
Ounce, 28. . 
Our (28, 49), pron, or a. 

belonging to ub. [See 

Hour, lOU.] 
Ou-ran-og'ra-phlst. 
Ou-ran-og'ra-phy, 108. 
Ou-ret'ic. 
Ou-rol'o-gy, 
Ou-ros'co-py. 
Ours (nwrz)i 28. 
Our-sclf. 

Our-selves' {-selvz'). 
[Ousel, 203. — See Ou- 
zel.] 
Oust (28) [not oost, 163.J 
Oust'ed. 
Oust'er, 77. 
Oust'ing. 
Out, 28, 41. 
Out'blown .[so Sm. ; 

out-blSn', Wb. Gd. 

Wr. 155.] 
Outcast, 131. 
Out'crop, n. 103, 161. 
Out-crop', V. 103, 161. 
Out'cry, n. 
Out-cry', V. 
Out-do* (-<ioo')i 142. 
Out'door, 206. 
Out'er, 77, 169. 
Out'er-most, 130. 
Out'flt. 
Out'go-ing [so Sm. ; 

out-ffo'ingt Wb. Gd. 

Wr. 155.] 
Ont'-house, 206, Exc. 3. 
Out-land'ish, 126. 



Ont'Uw. 

Oat'lawed, 188. 

Out'law-ing. 

Out'law-ry. 

Out'lay. 

Out^let. 

Out'line, 206. 

Out'ly-ing [bo Wk. 

Wr. J out-n'inff, Sm. 

Wb. Gd. 155.] 
Out'-of-door', a. 220. 
Out'post. 
Out'pour-ing [so Sm. 

Wb. Gd.j <yiU-p9r*' 

ing, Wr. 165.] 
Out'rage, 70. 
Out'raged. 

Out-ra'geottfl (-jtu), 100. 
Out'rag-ing i^&j-). 
Outri {Ft.) (oo-traf), 
Ottt'rid<er, 126. 
Out'rig-ger i-gur), 138. 
Out-right' (-rtt') (162) 

[so Wk. Sm. Wr.: 

oiU'rlt, Wb. Gd. 165.1 
Out' side. 
Out-sid'er, 126. 
Out-stretcii'. 
Out-stretched'. 

(-stretcM'), 160 j Note 

C, p. M, 
Out-stretch'ing. 
Out-talk' (-tott*'), 66, X. 
Out-tell'. 
Out'ward. 

Out' wards (-wardz). 
Out'work (HTttrJfc), n. 

103, 161. 
Out-work' (-tw«rif ), v. 

103, 161. 
Ou'zel (oo'«0 (19, 149) 

[Ousel, 203.] 
0^^al, 72. 
O-val-bu'men, 156. 
O-val'i-form, 108. 
O-va'ri-al, 49, N. 
O-va'ri-an, 160. 
O-va'ri-ofis, 100. 
0-va'ri-um (L.) [pi. 

O^va'ri-ay 198.] 
O'va-ry. 
O'vate. 

OVate-ob'long. 
O-ra'tion, 112. 
Ov'en (ttr'n), 22, 149. 
O'ver, 77, 205, Exc. 1. 
O'ver-ills (-awlz), n. pi, 
O-ver-bal'ance, v. 161. 
O'ver-bal-anoe, n. (161) 

[so Wk. Sm. wr. ; 

o-fmr-btd'ans^Wh.Gd, 

165. — See Note under 

CounterbtUance,] 



i» 69 U 9, fit h^ongi i, i, 1, 5, 11, f^ short ; il at In fiu*, kaa in ikst, ft « i* 



OVER BOA KD 



0-ver-ch«rgo', v 
O'ver-cliaree, n. 
O-VLT-como' (-In 



O'ver-liy-lng, n. [k 

Sm.i o-p»r-M'(na,Wr 

G± IM.] 
O-TOr-ld&k'. 
O-Ter-ldOkGil' (-laW). 
O-TCr-ldbk'lDg. 

0'Ter-iDat«li> n. ISl. 



0-Ter-reiiched'(-r«W ) 






O-ver-threW ( 



O-ver-ireened', !«!. 
O-TPT-whelDiKl', laS. 



O-iIp'ii-roIiB, lOB. 
0-Ti-po»'it (.poi'-). 
O-»l-pO8'lI-0r (-yot'-). 



O'«o-lo [no* 8-YO 

g-Toi'o.g7..ioa. _ 



O-ruin CL.) [pl- 0'« 

One (0) (24), ti. to be In 
debted to. [Set O 

Owed (Id), V. -wM la 
debted to. 1S« Ode 

Ow'el-tjf. ;». 

Owl'er lottfl'ur. or »^ 

Wt..Gd.i-''T'i'Mr, Sm 
lU.— £«!Oit1uik.] 

OwI'Idc' (ot^'fno, 0. 
Sifing) [nwl'ing. Wli. 
Wr.Wb.Gd.;Sii'in^, 



rmiKqi4*ut nnmuncL- 
lorSiiSHil!^ Smart. 



Oi-ld-«-bll'l-tT tlOB) 
[OxYdabnitf, 
Wb.Gd. 203.1 

Ox'id-«-bla (164) [Oit- 
ydable, Wb. Gd. 

Oi'id-ato [Oxydate, 

Ox'ldlit*d[o'xyd«t- 

ed.Wb.Gd. 203.1 
Ox'lci.it-iPB [pxvi- 

ydstioQ, Wb. Ud. 
Ox'ld.»t-or rOxydst- 
OxlJenaajfOxyde, 



OxJdiz 



;(lfl4X0x- 

table.Wb. Gd. 

l-l»e(ici2)rOxyd- 
iie,Wb. Gtf. !»1.1 

Ox'ld-Tied [Oxyd- 
iied,Wb,(M. 803.1 

Ox'Id.lie.Dioiit (iSbi 

Wb. Gd. ■xa.) 
oj['id-ii-iiix(isi)[Ox- 
ydliing, Wb. Od. 

2M.1 

ox'itp, mt. 

Ox-o'nt-an, IDS, ISO. 
Ox'peclt-er. 
Ox'Utagat l-tunff). 



ia*i»tbsrti Ob (u fo Drat I gMlnfiioUeishiMgtn 



Ox'7-geh, 45. 
Ox'y-een-nt6j 106, 122. 
Ox'y-gen-it-ed. 
Ot'y-gen-kt-ing. 
Ox-y-gpcn-a'tlon, m. 
Ox'y-gen-at-or. 
Ox'y-gen-i«-a-ble, 106. 
Ox'y-gen-Ize, 202. 
Ox'y-gen-fzed, 166. 
Ox'y-jfen-!«e-ni6iit. 
Ox'y-8'en-Ia-liig'» 183. 
Ox-yg'cn-ottB (-^'-),100. 
Ox'y-tfon. 
Ox-y^onml, 106. 
Ox-y-ny'dro-gen. 
Ox'y-incl. 
Ox-y-mo'ron. 
Ox-y-mu'ri-ate, 49, K. 
Ox-y-mo-rl-at'lc, lOIK 
Ox'y-5-py. 
Ox-yph'o-ny, 108. 
Ox'y-aait. 
Ox't-sbI. 
Ox'y-tone (105)[Oxy- 

ton,203.] 
O'yer [not oy'er, 153.] 
0-yes' [io Sin. Wr. ; 

o-yit'jWk. 155] [O- 

y e 2 , 203.] 
Oys'ter. 

Oys'ter-catch'er, 205. 
OyB'ter-wom'an 

(-twam'-). 
Oz-o-oe'rite, (49, N.) [so 

Wr. ; oz-o-sir'ltj 8m.; 

o-zo-ke't^tj Gd. 16^.] 
Oz-o-na'tion. 
O'zone. 

O-zo-ni-n-ca'tion. 
Oz'o-nize (202) [so Wr.; 

o'zo-nlZt Gd. 155.] 
Oz'o-nized. 
Oz'o-niz-ing^. 
Oz-o-nom'e-ter, 168. 
Oz-o-no-met'rio. 
Oz-o-nom'e-try. 



P. 

Fab'tt-tar, lOd 

Pab-u-la'tioh. 

]Pab'a-loft8. 

Pab'u-lum (L.). 

Rl'ca, 189. 

Fae«, 23, 163. 

Paced (pastyj Ito; Kote 

C/, p. 34. 
Packer, 228. 
Pa-dhft' {porshaw') (121) 

[Pasha, Pashaw, 



60^ 

Pa-chft'He(-/f)lat0'-), 12^. 
Pach-v-dac'tyl -ofis 

{pak-). 
Pach'y-derm {vah*-), 
Fach-y-derm'al (p/xJfc-)« 
Pftdh-y-derm'a-taCpah-) 
Pach-y-derm'artoaa 

(pa*.). 
Pach-y-derm'old ipaik-), 
Pa-dfle. 
Pao i-fl-ca'tlo^, or Pa- 

df-I-ca'tion Tso Wr. ; 

jMjt-l-f^-ka'mun^ 

Wk. ; p€ht^-i-ka' shun, 

Sm. Wb. Gd. 156.] 
Pac-i-fl-ca'tor, or Pa- 

df-1-ea'tor. 
Pa-ciPI-ca-to-ry, 86. 
Pa^'i-fied. 
Pa^'i-fl-er. 
Pac'l-fy, 235. 
Pa^'l-f^-fiiff, 186. 
P&9'lng, m. 
Pack. 10, 181. 
Pack'«ne, 70. 
Packed {paki\ 165 ; 

Note C, p. 34. 
Pack'er. 
Pack'et. 
Pack'et-ed. 
Pack'et-fns'. 
Pack'et-snlp. 
Pack'fong [ P a k f o n s: , 

203.] ^^ * 

Pack'norse, 206. 
Pack'lng. 
Pack'thread. 
Pack'vrax [Pax wax, 

203.] 
Pa'co, n. a species of 

llama, [pi. Pa'cos 

ipa'kdz), 161, 192.] 
Pa'cos (101), n. a kind 

of mineral. 
Pact, 10. 
Pac'tlon. 
Pac'tioa-a], 72. 
Pac-tt'tious (rtiak'us). 
Pao-to'fi-an. 
Pad, 10, 30, 42. 
'Pad'dwl, 176. 
PadMinff. 
Pad'dle, 164, 170. 
Pad'dled (pad'ld), 105. 
Pad'dUngr. 
Pad'dock, 60. 
Pad'dy. 
PA-di-9hah^ [IP HdiBht^ 

5203.] 
Pad'lock. 
Pad-n-a-sby' (MK^tt-a- 

soy't coll. paa-ursoy') 

(89) [so Sm. ; pad-ise- 



Onfoy', Wb. Gd. ipaS- 
u-aoy', Wr. 155.] 

P^'an (13, 72) [See Pae- 
on, and Peon, 148.] 

[Pedobaptism. — 
See ^edobaptism, 
203.1 

[Psdotrophy, 209. 
— Bee Pedotrophy.] 

Ps'on, n. a foot con- 
sistine of one long 
syllable and three 
short syllables. [See 
Psean, 148 ; and Peon, 
160.] 

[Paeony, 203.— 56e 
Peony.) 

Pa'gan. 

Pa-gan'ic, 109. 

Pa-gan'ic-al, 108. 

Pa'gan-ish. 

Pa'gan-ism {-izm). 

Pa'gan4ze, 202. 

Pa'gan-ized. 

Pa'gan-is-ing. 

Page, 23, 163. 

Pag'eant (jfc^ent), o^ 
Pa'geant (payen/Uso 
Wr. ; p(^'unt, Wk. 
Sm. ipa'jenty or pq^'- 
ent, Gd. ]55.] 

Pag'eant-ry (pfly'cn*-). 

Paged, 1(15. 

Pag'l-nal (vaj'-). 

Pag-i-na'tfon (paS')* 

Pil'ing (PA;'-). 

Pargo'da. 

Pa-gu'ri-an, 169. 

Paid, 23, 171, 187. 

Pail (23), n. a ressel 
with a bail, nsed for 
carrying liquids, \_8et 
Pale, 160.] 

Pall'ftil (-;TOO, 197. 

Pain (33), n. a sensation 
of uneasiness. [Sw 
Pane, 160.] 

Pained, 165. 

Pain'ftil i-mV), 180. 

Pai'nim [Paynim« 

Pain'ing. [203j 

Pains {pd,f^), 

Pains'tak-er {pUnz'-). 

Pains'tak-lng (pffiur'-). 

Paint. 23. 

P&int'ed. 

Paint'er. 

P&int'lng. 

P&int'strakd. 

Pair ipir) (!S7\n, twd 
thfiigi^ of the fMme 
kind, Whi6fa go to^ 
gether, ot suit each 



a,S,!,o,d^9,ioiiflPrA»«>i^d»tt»|»Mor«; iotMfiri&iw^faat^ft of li» 



PAlftSD 



S09 



PALTERED 



Other. [See P«Ter, 
148; and Fare, rear, 

1(50.1 
Paired (pird), 1«. 
Pair'iiig {pir'-). 
Paix'huu. 
{PakiongT) 203.— itoe 

Packfong^.J 
Pal [Pall »'i(».1 
Pal'ace (70, 170) (ooU. 

pal'iSy in the U. S. ; 

pal'ds, or pal'ust in 

Eng.) 



•• In . . . paJace . . . 

althouffh the a in the iMt 
syllable may be roarkecl « 
£d unaoceDtedJ, yet the 
•hortening of this sound 
brirgs it to i. and this 
•gain easily slides into . . . 
oT •<> that tor common pro- 
• nunciatton the word . . . 
might be marked . . . pat- 
lis ipatat^ or pafuty 
Umart. 

Pal'a-din. 

[Palaio- (initial sfl- 

hibles). — 5«e Paleo-, 

203.] 



Pa-lfEs'tra i-les'-) (L.) 
[pi. Pa^t€B8'tr<B (-(«•'- 
tre)j lt«,l 

Pa-l8e-ti-oro-gy {-le- 
ahi-), 108. 

Pal-an-quin' (-&«»') [to 
WH. Wr. Wb. CM. i 
pal-anff-ktn' , Sm.lSol 
[Palankeen, 203.J 

Pal'a-ta-ble, MH. 

Pal'ft-tnl, 72. 

Pal'atc ( 170), ft. the roof 
of the month. [See 
Palette, and Pallet, 
148.] 

Pa-la'tial (-shal). 

Pa-lat'!c, or Pal'a-tlc 
[pa-lat'iky Wk. Wr. ; 
pcU'a-tik^ Sm. ; p<d'- 
a-tik, orpa-lat'ik, Gd. 
155.1 

P:i-larin-ate. 

Pal'n-tlne, 82, 102. 

Pala'ver. 

Pa-ia'vercd (-vwrrf). 

Pa-la'vcr-ing. 

Pale, a. wan ; pallid : — 
n. a stake ; a district : 
— r. to enclose; — to 

- make pale. [SuFtdU 
UK).] 

Palod, 1«6. 

Pa-le-a'oeons (•9j|tM),4d. 

Pii'le-o-jrrttph. 

PS-le-Ogpra-pher, 108. 



Pa-le>o-gnME>b'i<S 1^* 
Pa-le-o-jnraph'kyal. 
Pa-le-og'rarphist. 
Pa-le-og'ra-phy, 108. 
Pa-le-oro-gist, 45. 
Pa-le-ol'o-gy, 108. 
Pa-le-on-to-mph'io-fll. 
Pa-le-on-toff'rarphy. 
Pa-le-oa-to-loff'fo-Al 

(-to;'.), 108. 
Pa-le-on-tol'o-gy, 127. 
Pa- le-o-the'ri-um. 
Pal-es-tin'e-an, 110, 109. 
Pa-les'tric. 
Pa-les'tric-al. 
Paletot (Fr.) ipat'to), 
Pal'ette, ft. a painter's 

board. [See Palate. 

148} and Pallet, 100. J 

[Pallet, a03J 
Pai'frey, or Pal'ftey 

(lfl9) Jso Wk. Wr. ; 

pawP/ry, Wb. GkLj 

pal'/rvy Sm. 166.] 
Pal-i-n-<»'tion [so Wr. 

Wb. Gd. ; porli-fX- 

ka'shttnj Sm. 165.] 
Pa-lil'o-gy, 108. 
Pal'imp-sest [not pa- 

limp'sest, 163.] 
Pal'in-drome. 
Pal-in-drom'ic. 
Pal-in-drom'ic-aL 
PalMng. 
Pal-in- ffe-ne^n-a (Gr.) 

C-aftl-). 
Pal-in-gea'e-sy, 160. 
Pal'in-ode. 
Pal-in-dd^-al. 
Pal-i-sade'. 
Pal-i-sad'ed. 
Pal-i-sad'ing. 
Pal-i-sa'do [pi. Pali-sa'- 

does (-doz), 192.] 
Pal'ish, 183. 

Pan (17) [&« Pawl.] 

Pal' la (L.). 

PU4a'di-um (109) [L. 
pi. Palrla'dl^i Eng. 
pi. Pal-la'dl-oms 

i-umz), 198.] 

Pal'lah, 72. 

Pal'las. 

Pal'let, ft. A small, rude 
bed ; — a particular 
part of tiie mechan- 
ism of a clock or a 
wKtch. [Set Palate, 
HSjond Palette, 160.1 
[Pa Hat (in the latter 
sense), 202.] 

ParU-al. 

Pal'U-ate, 17a 



Pal'li-at-ed, 183. 

Pal'li-at-lnr. 

Pal-li-a'tioB. 

Pal'U-a-tlve, 128. 

Pal'li-arto-ry, 86. 

Pal'lid, 66, 170. 

Paiai-er. 

TklVing. 

Pal' li-o-bran'cfai.ate 
(-brana'kt-). 

Pal'UumiL.) [pi. Pat'- 
li-a.] 

Pall-Mall' (pel-rndf) 
(156^, ft. a game lor- 
merlr practised in 
England ; — a street 
in London, so named 
from, this game. [See 
Pellmell, i60.] 

Pal'lor {Aawr)^ 88. 

Palm(iiaAfft), 162. 

Pal'mar. 

Pal-ma'ceofis {-8hu9). 

PaPma-ry (72) [so Wr. 
Wb. Gd. J pahm'^-y, 
Sm. 166.] 

Pal'mate. 

Pal'mat^ed. 

Pal-mat'i-fid. 

Palmed {pahmd), 162. 

Palm'er {^pahm'-). 

Pal-met'to(80) [pi. Pal- 
met'toes l-tHz), 192.] 

Pal'mi-grade. 

Pal'mXne, 82, 152. 

Palm'ing Ijpiiahm'-). 

PaPmi-ped [Palmi- 
pede, 2a3.] 

PaPmls-ter. 

PaPmis-try, 166. 

Palm'-tree {pahm*-)^ 
206, Exc. 4. 

Palm'y(l69)(pa*m'y). 

Palp, 10, 30, 50. 

Pal pa-bil'i-ty, 108. 

PaPpa-ble, 164. 

Pal pa'tion. 

PaPpe-bral, 72, 169. 

Pal'pe-brotts, 100. 

PalpM-form, 108. 

Palp-ig'er-oils (-(/'-). 

Pal'pi-tate. 

Pal'pi-tat-ed, 183. 

PaPpi-tat-ing. 

Pal-pi-ta'tion. 

Pais'grare (powte'-)* 

Pais-gra-Tine' (powbr- 
ffra-vtn')y 166. 

Pai'sied (-zid). 

Pftl'sy ('ty)j 169. 

Pai'sy-lng i-zy), 

Pai'ter, 17. 

Pal'tered, 150, 165. 



fall; <a«i» there; dbMlftfi>Oitif ««lft&eU6; gh^agfo go; tha» in this. 



JPALTERINO 



310 



PANTOGRAFHICAL 



P&l'ter-ing. 

Pftl'tri-nesB, 180. 

PAl'try, 1«. 

Pa-lu'dal. 

Pa-Iu'di-no&s. 

Pal'y, IW. 

Pampas {-paz), n. pi, 

Pam'per (77), v, to feed 
luxuriouBly. \_See 
Pampre, IbO.] 

Pam'pered {^-purd), 

Para'per-ing. 

Pam'phlet, 230. 

Pain-phlct-eer'. 109. 

Pani-phlet-eer'iiig'. 

Pam-pin'i-form. 

Pam'pre (,-pur\ n. an 
ornament for col- 
umns, consiatiug^ of 
vine-leaves and clus- 
ters of g^rapes. [5ee 
Pamper, 160.] 

Pan, 10, 30, 43. 

Pan-a-oe'a [L. pi. Pan- 
orce'cB ; lEng, pi. Pan- 
a-ce'as {-azjj 198.] 

Pan-a-ce'an, 110. 

Panache (Fr.) {pan- 
ash'). [203. 

Pa-na'da, or Pa-na'do, 

Pun'cake, 206. 

Pan'oarte [so Gd. \pan- 
kart', Wr. 165.] 

Pan-cra'tian {-than), 

Pan-cra'ti-ast. 

Pan'cra-tist. 

Pan-cra'ti-um (L.) 

Pan'cre-as (pang'-) 

(64) [so Wk. Sm. 

Wr. ; pan'kre-as, 

Wb. Gfd. 165.] 
Pan-cre-at'Ic {pang-) 

[so Wk. Sm. i pan- 

Ire^'ik, Wr. Wb. 

Gd. 155.1 
Pan-da-na'ceous (-«/ktM). 
Pan-de'an ( 110) [so Gd. ; 

pan'de-an, Wr. 155.] 
Pan'dect. 
Pan-demMc. 
Pan-de-mo'nl-um, 100. 
Pan'der. 

Pan'dered {-durd), 160. 
Pan'der-ing-. 
Pan'der-ism (-izm), 
Pan-dlc-n-la'tion. 
[Pandit, 203.— 5ee 

Pundit.] 
Pan-do'ra, 40, N. 
Pan-dore' [so Sm. Wr.j 

pan'ddriWh, Gd. 165] 

[Bandore, 203.] 



PKn'donr (-door) [bo 

Sm,; pan-€U)or't Wr. 

166] [fiandoor, 

203.] 
Pan-dow'dy. 
PanMress. 
PanMu-rate, 106. 
Pan-du'ri-form, 108. 
Pane (23, 163), n. a 

square of ff lass. [See 

Pain, ICO.y 
Paned, 166. 
Pan-e-g^r'ic (-rtr'-), a,A 

n, [so Wr Wb. (3d. ; 

pane-jir'ikt Wk. Sm. 

166.] 



_ [n the United BtatM. 
thif word if pronounced 
by most apeaker* with the 
regular ahort aound off, in 
the penultimate ayllable: 
in England, it la common- 
ly pronounced with the 
■ound of ahort e, in the 
■ame ay liable. Smart 
■ava: *'The irregular aound 
of t and y, in iquirrel and 
panegyric^ we mav hope 
in time to hear reclaimed; 
• correiipondent refonna- 
tfon having taken place iu 
ipirit and mirucU.*' 

Pan-e-gyr'ic-al. 
Pan-e-gyr'ist, 46, 126. 
Pan'e-gyr-izc, 202. 
Pan'e-gyr-lzed. 
Pan'e-gyr-iz-lng. 
Pan'el (60, 170), n. a 
square of wainscot; 

— a schedule of Ju- 
rors' names. {See 
Pannel, 160.] 

Pan'eUed (-eld) [Pan- 
eled, Wb. (M. 203. 

— See 177 i and Note 
E, p. 70.] 

Pan'el-ling (177) F P a n - 
eling,Wb. Gd. 203.] 

Pang, 10, .30, 64. 

Pan^go-lin ipang''\ 54. 

Pan-nel-len'lc. 

Pan-hel'lcn-ism {-izm), 

Pan-liel'len-ist. 

Pan'ic, 170. 

Pan'i-cle, 164. 

Pan'i-cled (-JbW). 

Pa-niv'o-rottB, 106. 

Pan-nade' [not pan- 
nad', 163.J 

Pan'nel (60, 170), n. a 
kind of rustic saddle ; 

— a hawk's stomach. 
[See Panel, 160.] 

Pan'nier {pan'yur), or 
Pan'ni-er [so Wr. ; 



panfyur^ Wk. Wb. 
Gd.: pan'ni-ur, Sm. 
156.] 

Pftn'o-plYed {-plid). 

Pan'o-plv, 03. 

Pan-op'u-con. 

Pan-o-ra'ma, or Pan-o- 
ra'ma [so Wr. ; pan- 
o-ra'moj Sm. ; pan-o- 
rU'ma, Wb. (Jd. 155.] 

Pan-o-ram'ic. 

Pan-o-ram'io-al. 

Pan-phar'ma-oon. 

Pan-soph'io-al. 

Pan'so-phy. 

Pan-ste-o-ra'ma, or 
Pan-ste-o-ra'ma [paor- 
tte-o-ra'tna, Sm. wr. ; 
pan-8te-o-r'd'ma, Gd. 
166.] 

Pan'sy {-zy)x 169. 

Pant, 12, 131. 

Pan'ta-cosm {-kozm), 

Pan'ta-grAph (127) 
[Pantograph, 
Pentagraph,203.] 

Pan-ta-let", 122. 

Pan-ta-loon' (122) [pi. 
Pan-ta-loons' 
i-loonz'), 180] [not 
pan'ta-loonz, i53.] 

Pan-ta-morph'ic. 

Pan-tech 'ni-con {-tek'-). 

Pant'ed, 131. 

Pant'er. 

Pan'the-ism (-ism), 130. 

Pan'the-ist. 

Pan-the-ist'ic. 

Pan-the-ist'ic-al. 

Pan-the-ol'o-gist. 

Pan-the-ol'o-gy. 

Pan-the'on. 



Aa a claadcal word, 

it ia pronounced jtan'the- 
on, by Walker, Smart, and 
Oooarich; but, aa an £ng- 
liah word, they pronounce 
It pan-the'on. worcester'i 
pronunciation ia poii-fAe'- 
OM, in both caaea. 

Pan'ther. 

Pan'ther-Ine, 82, 162. 
Pan'tile [Pent lie, 

203.] 
Pant'fng. 
Pant'ler. 
Pan-to-chro-nom'e-ter 

l-hro-), 108. 
Ptai-to'fle {-too'fi), 160. 
Pan'to-griiph (127) 

[Pantagraph, 

Pen tag rap 11,203.] 
Pan-to-graph'fc. 
Pan-to-graph'ic-al. 



a, e,i, 5,u, y,2a»^3 &i fit X> 5> tt» tr 'fto'^ i & a* in ftr, a a« <» fast, & at lf» 



PANTOGBAPHY 



311 



PARAPET 



pAu-tog'ra-phy, 108. 

Pda-to-loff'ic i-ioj'-). 

Pan-to-log'io-al (lof-). 

Pan-tol'o^ist. 

Pan-tol'o-gy. 

Pan-tom'e-ter, 108. 

Pan-tom'e-trf. 

Pan'to-mime, HI. 

Pan-to-mim'ic. 

Pan-to-mim'ic-al. 

Pan'to-mim-ist. 

Paa'ton. 

P.ia-toph'a-gist. 

Pdii-toph'a-g^oiiB, 105. 

Pan-toph'a-gy, 45. 

P.in'try, 93. 

Piip, 10, 30. 

Pa pa', 11, 72. 

Prt'pa-cy, 169. 

Pii'pal, 72. 

Pa'par-ohf (-*y)i 52. 

Pa-pa' ver (L.). 

Pa-pav-cr-a'ceott« 
(-«Afc«), 112. 

Pa-pav'er-ofig. 

Pa-paw' (121) [Paw- 
paw, 203.] 

Pa'per, 231. 

Pa'per-out'ter, 205. 

P I'pered {^purd), 

Pa'per- mak'er. 

Pd'per-y, 109. 

P.i-pes'cent. 

Pii'phi-an, 78. 

Papier^machi (Ft.) 
(pap-pA-mah'sM). 

Pa-pu-io-na'ceouB (-yo- 
na'shfis), 112. 

Pa-pU'la (L.) [pi. Par 
pil'lce (-Us), 198.1 

Pap'il-la-ry, 72, 122. 

Prt-pll'late. 

Pa-pil'U-form. 

Pap-il-lose' [so Wr. ; 
pfip'U-lOs, Wb. Gd. 
155.1 

Pa-piPlotis, or Pap'il- 
lolis [so Wr. ; pchpil'- 
luSy Wk. ; pap'ilr-lusj 
Sm. Wb. Gd. 155.] 

Pa'pist. 

Pa-pist'io. 

Pa-pist'ic-al. 

Pa'pist-ry, 15«. 

Pap-poose' (148, 171), n. 
[Papoose, 203.J 

Pap-pose', a. 148. 

Pap'po&B (IGO), a, per- 
taining to, or oonsiBt- 
Ing- oi7 Pappus. 

Fap'pus (100), n. the 
soft, downy substance 
that grows on the 



seeds of oertain 

plants. 
Pap'py, 167, 178. 
Pap'u-a, 89. 
Pap'a-an. 
Pap'u-la (L.) [pi. Pap'- 

u-las (-le)j 198.] 
Pap'u-lar, 108. 
Pap-u-lose' [so Wr. ; 

pap'u-Ua, wb. Gd. 

155.] 
Pap'u-lo&s, 100. 
Pap-y-ra'oeous (-«Atw), 

93. 
Pa-pyr'e-an, 110. 
Pap-y-rog'ra-phy, 108. 
Pa-py'rus (113) (L.) [pi. 

Pa-py'ti, 198.1 
Par ( 11), n. eqaai value ; 

— asmalliish. [Parr 

(in the latter sense), 

203.1 
Pftr'a-ble, 164. 
Pa-raVo-la, 72, 189. 
Pir-a-bol'ie, 109. 
P4i>a-bol'io-al, 108. 
P.tr-a-bol'i-form, 108. 
Pa-rab'o -list. 
Pa-rab'o-Ioid. 
Piir-a-bo-loid'al, 126. 
Pir-a-cel'sian {-shan), 

112. 
Pftr-a-cel'siBt. 
P&r-a-oen'tric. 
Pftr-a-cen'trio-al. 
Pa-rach'ro-nism (-rofc'- 

ro-nizm), 133. 
Pir-a-chute' (shoot') 

(26,114) [soSm. ;|>ar- 

a-shut'^ Wr. ; par'ar- 

sh>U, Wb. Gd. 155.] 
Par'a-clete, 171. 
P.tr-ao-mas'tic. 
PAr-a-cros'tic, 109. 
Pa-rade'. 
Pa-rad'ed, 183. 
Par'a-digm (-dim), 162. 
Pttr-a-dig-mat'ie. 
Pir-a-dig-mat'ic-al. 
Pa-rad'ing". 
Piir-a-di'sal. 
PSr'a-dise, 136. 
Piir-a-dl-8i'ac-al,108,171. 
pjir'a-dos. 
Par'a-dox, 171. 
Pftr-a-dox'io-al. 
Pftr'af-fine, or Pir'af- 

flne [par'af-fln, 8m. 

Wb. Gd. ; par'af-fin, 

Wr. 155.1 
Par-a-gen'ic (-jen'-). 
Par-a-go'ge (-oe) (Gr.) 

(113,163) [so Wk.Wr. 



Wb. Gd. iparfa-gd-jit 

Sm. 155.1 
Pftr-a-goglc (-ao)'-). 
Pir-a-gog'io-al (.^q;'-)« 
PAr'a-g6n. 
Par'a-gram. 
Pilr-a gram'ma-tist. 
Par'a-grftph, 127. 
Pir-a-graph'io. 
Pjtr-a-jjraph'io-al. 
P&r-a-^ip'sis [Para* 

lipsis, Paralcp" 

sis, Paralepsy, 

203.1 
Pa-ra'li-an. 
PHr-a-tl-pom'e^na (Gr.) 

n.pl. 
Pir-al-lac'tlo. 
Pdr-al-lac'tic-al. 
PAr'al-lax, 170. 
P4r'al-lel, 171. 
Par'al-loled (-leld), 177. 
[Parallclcpi ped, 

2a3.— See Parallelo- 

pipcd.l 
Par'al-lel-ism, 13:i, 136. 
Par-al-lel'o-gram, 170. 
Par-al -lel-o-gram'mic. 
P4r-al lei -o-gram'miu-al 
Par-al lel-o-gram-mat'- 

ic, 101), 110. 
Par-al-lel o-pi'ped ( J 7 1 ) 

[so Wk.Wr.Wb. Gd. ; 

par-al-Iel-o-pip'edf 

Sra. 1651 [Parallel- 
epiped, 203.] 
Par-al-lel-o-pip'e-don. 
Pa-ral'o-gisra (-Jizm), 
Pa-ral'o-gize, 202. 
Parral'o-gized. 
Pa-ral'o-giz-ing. 
Pa-ral'o-gy, 108. 
Pa-ral'y-BiB, 93, 171. 
Pttr-arlyt'ic, 171. 
Par-a-lyt'ic-al. 
Pftr-al-y-za'tion [soWr.j 

pdr-<i-ti-za'8hun, Gd. 
Rlr'a-lyze, 171. [155.] 
Par'a-lyzed, 183. 
Pttr'a-lyz-ing. 
Pftr-a-mag-net'io. 
P&r-a-mag'net-ism 

(■izm). 
Par'a-ment. 
Pa-ram'o-ter, 108. 
Pilr'a-mount (106) [bo 

8m. Wr. Wb. Gd. ; 

par-a-mount', Wk. 

155.] 
Pftr'a-mour (-moor). 
Par' ar nymph. 
PSr'a-pegm (-pern), 162. 
Par'a-pet, 48. 



fiill ', 6a8in there ; Clboiin foot ;q<uin iaclle s gh a8 g in go ; th a< in this. 



PAKAPETBO 



312 



PAAOL 



Piir'aph. 
Pftr-tt-pher'nal. 
Pir-«-plier-iui'll-«, 144. 

Pftr'a-pbrase i-/^^t). 

Piir'a-phrased (-/^Azd), 

Vir'^phnM-ingl-friUf-), 

Pilr'a-phrast. 

PAr-a-phrast'io. 

Pdr-a-phrast'io-al. 

PAr-a-phre-ni'tU. 

Pftr-a-ple'fli-a. 

Pir'a-pleg-y (-pU^). 

P&r-ap'o-plex-y. 

P&r'a-sanfl^. 

Por-a-seene' (-98n'), 

rur-orscefnirum (L.). 

Pdr-a-8e-le'ne (Gr.)il63. 

Pilr'a-8ite. 83, i62. 

P^r-a-Bit'ic. 

Par-a-8it'lo-al. 

Ptir'a-sit-ism (4zm), 

Pftr'a-Bol [so Wb. Gd. ; 
p&r'€h8(iU Wk. ; pAr- 
a-sOV, Sm. ipdirii-tioL 
or;>«r'a-»«/, Wr. 155. J 

P&r-a-aol-ette', 14, 156. 

[ParasjUabic, 203. 

— SftsPariByllablc] 

Par-a-ther'mic, 109. 

Pa-rath'e-sis. 

PAr-a-ton-nirrtf (Fr.). 

par-avail'. 

Par'boil. 

Par'boiled, 166. 

Par'boil-ing^. 

Par'buc-kle (-kV). 

Par'buG-kled (-dtO^Xrld). 

Par'buc-kliaff. 

Par'cel, 14tf. 

Par'ceiled jfl65) [Par- 
celed, Wb. Gd. 203. 

— See 177, and Note 
E, p. 70.] 

Par'cel-ling (177)[Par- 
oelinff, Wb. Gd. 
203.] 

Par'oe-na-ry, 72. 

Par'oe-ner. 

Parch, 11, 136. 

Parched {parcilU)^ 106; 
Note C, p. 34. 

Parch'ing. 

Parch'ment. 

Pard. 11,49, 142. 

Par'don {-dn) [so Wk. 
Wr.Wb.Gd. xpar'dun^ 
coll. par'dn^^m. 156.] 

Par'don-a-ble {par'dn- 
a-bl), 164, 160. 

Par'doned {-dnd). 

Par'don-er (-dn-), 

Par'don-lng (-dn-). 



Par0(}iir)(l4,«7},«.to 

cut off the Burnoe of. 

{See Payer, 148; and 

Pair, Pear, 160.] 
Pared ipird). 
Pia-reg^'me-non. 
P&r-c-u^r'ic, 49. 
Par-rcrcon. 

Parrem'bo-le (Gr.), 163. 
Parren'chy-ma (-ren^'- 

ti') (52. 64) [so ftm. ; 

Do-ren'M-ma, Wk. 

Wr. Wb. Gd. 166.] 
Pa-ren-chym'a-tottB 

(Wm'-;. 
Pa-rea'cny-motkB 

(-reiw'Jbi-). 
Parren'e-sis [soWk.Wr. 

Wb. Gd.j pAr-t'ne- 

•if, Sm. 166.] 
Pftr-»*net'ie. 
Pftr-e-net'ic-al. 
Par'ent {pir*rent) (14, 

49, N.) [HO 8m. Wr. 

Wb. Gd.; pa'rent^ 

Wk. 155.] [not pa'rent 

nor pjir'eut, 163.] 

tar Though Walker dl- 
Tide* this word pa'mU, ■> 
If th« a were to have lt« 
Ions lonnd (No. 14, !> 28), 
ana the r iti rough or 
trilled sound merely (No. 
89. § 48), it ie well aMser- 
tained that his own pro- 
nunciation was pdHrml. In 
rcftrence to words like the 

{resent. Smart says: **The 
rst syllables of vitry^ m'- 
ri-ottSf teCrf/, po'rous. euf- 
rate, and thelllce ... in all 
Dictionaries previously to 
'Walker . Remodelled' 
[Smart's ediUon of Walk- 
er's Dictionary. .See p. 
zvii.], are wronglv refenred 
to the same mode of pro- 
nunciation as the first syl- 
lables of va'eantt m'eret^ 
ufi*lu, poftentt eyfbiCf and 
the like." 

Par'ent-age (p*r'-), or 

Par'ent-age Tso Wr. ; 

ptr'rent-dj, Sm. Wb. 

Gd. ; pAr^ent-ni, Wk. 

166.] 
Pa-rent'al. 
Pa-ren'the-BiB(Gr.) [pi. 

Pa-ren'the-B^B (-«<«), 

198.] 
Par-en-thet'lc. 
Par-en-thet'io-al. 
Pa-rent'i-dde. 
Par'er {pir'rur). 
Par'gras-ite, 162. 
Par'get (-jet), 46. 



Par'«jt4i*(^-),17». 

Par-bel'ic, 109. 

Piar-be'U-4Mi, or Par- 
hel'ion (-yvn) [m 
Wr. ; par-he' U-utit 
Wk. Sm.; par-kMl'' 
yun, Wb. Gd. 165.] 

Pa'ri-ah, or rfkr'k-ah 
[pa'ri-a^ Wb. (id.; 
pdHt-Of Sm. ; pah'ri- 
ah, Wr. 165] [nU p^ 
ri'a, 16.1.] 

Pa-ri'al, m. 

Pa'ri-an, 49, N. ; 169. 

P&r-i-dig'i-tate l-di^'-). 

Pa-ri'e-tal (105) [not 
pftr-i-e'tal, 163.] 

Pa-ri'e-ta-ry, 72. 

Pa^ri'e-tis ( L.) (-W*), n 
pi. 

Par'lng {pir'ring), 

Pa'rl piu'iu (L.). 

Par-i-mn'iuite. 

Pir'iBhTlli N. 
Pa-rish'ian-ca' (-cm-). 
Pa-ris'ian (-riryon) [so 

Wb. Gd. ; por^'yafif 

coll. pa-mA"an, Sm. 

(5e€_§ 2«) ; p»-K«A'l- 

any Wr. 155.] 
Pir-i-Bol'o-ffy, 10ft. 
Pftr-i-Bvl-lab'ic [Para- 

8y]Iabic,2U3.] 
par i-syl-lab'io-al. 
PaFi-ty, 48, 169. 
Park, 11, 40, 136. 
Par'lanoe, 72. 
Par'ley, 98, 169. 
Parleyed (n/id), 171. 
Par'tey-ing". 
Par'Ua-meat (-AOi 146« 

171. 
Par-lYa-ment-a'ri-an 

(-If), 49, N. J 169. 
Par-lla-ment'a-ry (-ft), 

ri, 150. 
Par'lor (88) [Parlour, 

203.] 
Par'lollB. 
Par-me-san' (-nm') [no# 

Par-me'san, 153.] 
Par-nas'si-an {-naah'X- 

an\ 171. 
Pa>ro'chi-al(-M-)i62,166. 
Pa-rod'ic. 
Pa-rod'io-al. 
Pftr'o-dTed (-di<l), 09. 
Pttr'o-dist. 
Pttr'o-dy, 03. 
Par'o-dj^-lng. 
Fftr'ol, a. ft n. [Law 

term] (170) [bo Sm. 

Wr.; pa^mPy Wb. 



a. §• i, 5, n, y, iofv; fti C, 1, 5, U, )f, 9hori\ Ikatin fiv, katin fiwt> & og <» 



PASOLB 



I. (HUituy 



Gd. Hi] [Pi 

■Si 

Pto- o-mol'o-gT, lUe. 

Par-o Do-ma'y-a l-ma'- 
Iftl-o) [bo Wk. 3ni. 
Wr.i Dar-a-na-DM'- 
Jtfta, WKQd. 153.) 

PAj-o-DO-maa'tle- 

PU-»-DO-mu'tlc-il. 

PSr-if-nora'a-H. 

Fir'iHif me, i?l. 

Pa-ran'r-mollt, V3. 

Paron'y-my. 

PSr-o-quet' (J^'J [bo 
Sid.; pir'o-lul, Wk. 
Wr. Wli. Gd. IM] 
[Faroket, P»tr«- 
kei:t,2<a.] 

F*-n)t'ld, isi 

P»r-o-U'tiB. 

PSr-OK-ysm (-itm), 138, 

pfc-oK-rs'nuil (-(i'-). 
Pur-quet' ( Fr. 1( por^a') 

155] [Marquette, 

203.] 
Far'quet-IT (-t«*-). 
PlrT(]I,l?I),n.a«niU 

liBh. (P.r,a03.J 
[ParrAaet. aJa.- 

Set Paroqnet.] 
TCr'ral, or Pifrel, «». 
P«r-rhe'al-a {-re'ifa) 



Par», 11,49. lU. 

psraed (iiartfj, ISG ; 

Hole e, p. 3t. 
Far'M* [bo Wr. Wb. 

Gd. i por-Me', Bm. 

Pars'er. 

Far-Bl -mCnl-oBB, leS. 
P»i'.l-mo-n T, 88. 
Parking, 1&. 
Pww'ley, Be, 189, 
Fan'Dlp [Paranep, 

inr) [aoWTt.Wr.Wb.' 
Gd. ; por'nin. eolL 



jej^r'm.). 



Par.tik'loK. 

Part'ed. 

Fart'er. 

Paj--t8rr«'(Fr.),lM,171. 

Par-tlieu'ln ( iw) [bo 



par'U-BBn f-taa) JwH 
par-M-ttn', 153][F«r- 
tla.n,203.] 

Far'tite, 152. 

Par-H'tfon (.itiA'uB). 

Far-H'ttOQ-al l-tMt'tm-i. 

pHr-tt'tloned (-HbA'kimI) 

Pai-t1'tl<ni.|iiK i-tiih'- 

Fa "(1 nve, St. 
Part'let. _ 



L,'l» 



— See Book, j 



PA9eiKG-Bf:LL 

Par'lTidge (11, 49) [not 

IJat'ry, 159.1 
Par-tn'H.ent,M, H. 



£»i,. 



Par'ty, ll 49, I3B. 
Par'lT-cdl'ored <-tul'- 

urd), 2M. 
^o™™' (Fr-K-tux/). 

PBH'chai (-MJ),' Ii2, 73, 

[p'i'ich-nower, 

203. — jiee Pusqiie- 

[Parhij 203, -Sm 

Pacha.] 
[F^ihaw, 20a. — 5se 



bll i e a« in tbere i da Of <» foot 



Faa'aen-gn, US. 
PitH-par-touf IVt.} 

Pkes'et.' 
FaB'Ber-Iiu, 152. 
P«B-Bf.bn'i-ty. 
Faa'Bi-ble, 164. 
PaB-Bl-Sorra'oeon* 

PaBB'jnz. 

Paes'lTig.lKll,SQ«,Eicc.l 

u <n nidlfl i gkatglagoi^atia tut. 



PASSION 



314 



PAUL 



Pas'sion (patVtm). 
Pas'sion-at. 
Pas'Blon-ate, 73. 
Pafl'8lon4Bt. 
Pas'slvc, 84. 
PSB-Biy'i-tj, 106, 109. 
Pasa'o-yer, 206. 
Pass-pa- role'. 
Pjkss'pdrt. 
Pass'word (-wurd). 
FkMt,n.a.itpr^, [See 

Passed, 160.1 
Paste. 2^ 163. 
Paste'bdard. 
P&st'ed. 
Pas'tel. 
Pas'tem. 
Pa»ticcio (It.) ipoB- 

tich'wo). 
Pas'til. 

PastiUe (Pr.) {pas-til'), 
Flas'time [not paa'tim, 

153.J 
F&stTne. 
Pas'tor, 88. 
Pas'tor-aee. 
Pas'tor-al. 
PdB-to-ra'le (It.). 
Pas'tor-ate. 
P&s'try, 03, 160. 
P&s'tor-a-ble ( pdit'tntr- 

a-bl), 01, 164. [01. 

Pas'tor-age {pAst'yur-)^ 
Pas'ture XpAst'yur), 91. 
Pas'tured {pdst'i/urd). 
Fks'tvir-ing (pdat'yur-). 
Pas'ty, or Pas'ty (16 1) 

Ipds'ty, Sm. Wb. 

Gd. ; pis'ty, Wk. ; 

pUs'ty, or pda'tf/f Wr. 

155], n. a kind of pie. 
P&8t'y (161), o. resem- 
bling paste. 
Pat, 10, 30, 41. 
Pat-a-coon', 122. 
Pat-a-go'ni-an. 
Pat-a-re'mo. 
Pat-a-vin'i-ty, 108, 160. 
Patch, 10, 44. 
Patched (pacht). 
Patch'er. 
Patch'ing. 

Pat-chou'ly {pa-choo'-). 
Patch'vrork (^umrk), 
Patch'v, 160. 
Pftte (23, 161), n. the 

head. 
Pa<<(Fr.)(pa-/a')(i6i), 

n. a kind of platform. 

[A term in fortifica- 
tion.] 
[Patee, 203.-566 

Pattee.] 



Pat-e-fko'tion. 

Pa-tel'la (L.) [L. pi. Pa- 
tel'lce, 108; Kne. pL 
Pa-tel'las (-laz), 180.1 

Pa-teiai-form, 108. 

Pat'en (140), n. the Tea- 
sel on wliich the con- 
secrated bread is 
placed. [See Patten, 
160] [Patin, Pa- 
tine, 20:).] 

Pat'ent, or Pa'tent, «. 
a. A V. [so Wk. wr. j 
pai'ent, Sm. Wb. Gd. 
166.] 

Pat'ent-a-ble, or^ Pft'- 
tent-a-ble, 104. 

Pat'ent-ed, or Pa'tent- 
ed. 

Pat^«nt-ee', or Pa4ent- 

Pat'ent-ingr, or Pa'tent- 

ing. 
l^-teFnal, 21, K. 
Parter'ni-tf. 
Pa'ter Noa'ter (L.) [so 

Wr. Wb. Gd. ; pat^ur 

noa'turi Sm. 155J 
Path (11, 37) [pi. Fiit^s 

ipafhz), 140, 180.] 
Pa-thet'lc. 
Pa-tht5t'io-al. 

P&th'lCSB. 

Pa-thog'e-ny (-thoj*-). 
Pa-thog^-no-mon'ic. 
Pa-thojj'no my, lOS. 
Path-o-log'ic (lof-), 
Path-o-Iogr'ic-al, (-fej;'-). 
Pa-thol'o-giat. 
Pa-thd'o-o^y. 
Path-o-poe?ia (-pe'ya). 
Pa'thSs. 
Path' way, 208. 
Pa'tienoe {-sJiens), 
Pa'ticnt (sJietU), 
Pat'in [Paten, 203.] 
Pat'Iue [Paten, 2t».] 
Pa-ti'na (It.) (-*«'-) [M 

Gd.; pafi-na, Wr. 

155.] 
Patois (Fr.) (pat^wnw'), 
Pa'tris Con-8crip'tl 

(Jj.) Cpa'trlz-). 
Pa'tri-al. 

Pa'trl-arch (-arJt). 
Pa-tri-arch'al (-arifc'-). 
Pa-tri-arch'ate {-arS/-). 
Pa-tri^irch'Ic (-aril*'-). 
Pa'tri-arch-y {-ark-). 
Pa-trl'cian (-trish'an), 

iGj 171. 
Pat-rTtdd'al. 
Pat'ri-cide, 78. 



Pat-rf-mo'ni-al. 
Pat'ri-mo-ny, 86. 
Pa'tH-ot, or Pat'ri-ot 

[so (5d. : pa'tri-otf 

Wk. Sm. Wr. 165.] 
Pa-tri-ot'ic, or Pat-ri- 

ot'ic. 
Pa'tri-ot-ism, or Pat'ri- 

ot-ism {^zm), 136. 
P&-trI-pas'sian {-pa$h^- 

an). 
Pa-tris'tJks. 
Pa-tris'tio-al. 
Pa-trdl', n. it v. 
Pa-trdlled', 166, 170. 
Pa-trol'ling. 
Pa'tron, or Pat'ron (86) 

[so Grd. ; pa'trun^ 

Wk. Sm. Wr. 155J 
Pa'tron-age, or Pat'- 

ron-age [pa'trun-dj, 

Sm. ; pai'run-tLj, Wk. 

Wr. Wb. Gd. 155.] 
Pa'tron-al, or Pat'ron- 

al [pa'trun-al^ Sm. $ 

paVrun-aly Wk. Wr. 

Wb. CKi. 166.1 
Pa'tron-ess, or Pat'ron- 

ess [so Gd. ipa'trun^ 

M, Wk.Sm.Wr. 155.] 
Pa'tron-ize, or Pat'ron- 

ize (202) [pa'trun-lZf 

Sm. ; pat^run-lz, Wk. 

Wr. Wb. Gd. 155] 

[Patronise, Sm. 

203.] 
Pa'tron-l2ed, or Pat'- 

ron-ized, 164. 
Pa'tron-iz-lng, or Pat'- 

ron-iz-ing. 
Pat-ro-nym'ic, 171. 
Pnt-ro-nym'ic-al. 
Pa-troon', 121. 
Pat-tee' [Patee, 203.] 
Pat' ten (140), n. a kind 

of wooden shoe. [See 

Paten, IfiO.] 
Pat'ter, 66, 170. 
Pat'tered, 160. 
Pat'ter-ing. 
Pat'tem, 170. . 
Pat'tcmed {-tumd), 
Pat'tem-ing. 
Pat'ty. 

Pat'u-lofis, 106. 
Pau'ci-ty, 160. 
Pau'gle {-ght) [Por- 

gee, Porgy, Po- 
^gy.Poggy, 203.1 
Paii-hau'gen (-ghen) 
JPohag en, 203.1 
[Paul, 203. — iSte 

PawL] 



i, e, I, 6, u, y, long I &, £, I, o, fi, f , Bhort iHaain fiur, kasin fiist, iLa$in 



PAULIANIST 



316 



PECKING 



Panai-an-ist. 

Pau-II^ci-an {-liah'i-an), 

Paul'Iue, 152. 

Paunch, or P&unch (44, 

N. 2) [bo Wr. fpdnch, 

Sm. ; p'dnshi Wk. ; 

pawnch, Wb. Grd. 

i55.] 

Pau'per. 

P&u'per-ism {-izm), 136. 

Pau'per-ize. 

P&u'per-lzed, 

i^u'per-Iz-ing. 

P&use {pavjz) (17, 40), 
n. a cessation : — v. to 
cease. [See Paws (pL 
of Paw), 160.1 

Paused {pawza), 105. 

Paus'er {pawz'-), 183. 

Paus'lng* (^pawz'')» 

Pav'age. 

Pav'an [Pavane, Pa- 
ven,Pavin,2a3.] 

Pave (23, 161), v, to floor 
with stone, brick, or 
other material. 

Pavi (Fr.) (pd-pfl'), ». 
the pavement. 

Paved, 105, 183. 

Pave'ment, 185. 

[Paven, 'JXXL^See 
PavanJ 

P&v'er [Fa V ier , Pav- 
lor,203.] 

Pav-e-sade', 114. 

Pa'vi-agfe. 

Pav'ier (-ifwr) [Paver, 
203.J 

Pa-viPion (•^ni'imn), 
171. 

[Pavin, 20^.— See 
Pavan.l 

P&v'Ing, 183. 

PavMor (-pur) [Paver, 
Pavier,2(B.] 

Pav'o-nine, 82, 162. 

Paw (17, 30) [pi. Paws 
(pawz)^ 189. — See 
Pause, 160.] 

Pawed, 165. 

Paw'ing. 

Pawl (17), n. a detent or 
click to stop the back- 
ward revolution of a 
ratchet wheel, a wind- 
lass, &c. [See Pail, 
160] [Paul,2a3.J 

Pawn. 17. 

Pawn'bro-ker. 

Pawned ( pawnd), 166. 

Pawn-€e^(n8, 121) [Law 
term, — correlative of 
Pawnor.] 



Pawn'er 

Pawn-or' (118,121) [Law 
term, — correlative of 
.Pawnee,] 

[Pawpaw, 203. — 5c« 
Papaw.] 

Pax, 10, 3tf, N. 

Pax-il-lose' [so Sm. ; 
mue'U-los, Wr. 165.1 

[Faxwax, 203.— See 
Packwax.] 

Pay, 23, .30. 

Pay'a-ble, 164, 169. 

Pay'day. 

Pay-ee' (118, 121) JLaw 
term, — correlative of 
Payor.] 

Pay'er (67) [See Pair, 
l^re, and Pear, 148.] 

Pay'ingf. 

Pay'mas-ter. 

Pay'nim [P a i n i m , 
203.] 

Pay-or' (118, 121) [Law 
term, — correlative of 
Payee.] 

Paz-a-ree', 122. 

Pea (13) [pi. Peas (viz), 
for the individual 
seeds; Pease ipfz), 
for the fruit taken 
collectively, 194.] 

Peace (13, 39), ». free- 
dom from commotion 
or disturbance. [See 
Piece, 160.] 

Peace'a-ble, 169, 183. 

Peacc'a-bly, 93. 

Peace'ful C-jfSbD, 180. 

Peace'ful-iy (JSbl-), 170. 

Peace'mak-er. 

Peach, 13, 44. 

Pea'chick. 

Pcach'-tree, 206, Exc. 4. 

Peach'y. 

Pea'cock. 

Pea'fowl. 

Pea'hen. 

Pea'-jack-et. 

Peak (13), n. the point- 
ed top of any things. 
[See Peek, and Pique, 
100.] 

Peak'ed, a. (160) [so 
Wr. ; 2>««, Gd. 165.] 

Peak'ish. 

Peal (13), n. a loud, con- 
tinued sound: — V. to 
utter a loud, 
longed sound. 
Peel, 160.] 

Pealed, 165. 

Peal'ing^. 



ftro- 
See 



[Pean, 2a3. — 5ee 
Ptean.l 

Pea'nut, 206. 

PSar (14, 48, 67), n. a 
well-kuown fruit of 
many varieties. [See 
Payer, 148 ; and Pair, 
Pare, 1(50.1 

Pearl (pert) (21, N.), 
n. a hard, smooth, 
lustrous, silvery- 
wliite substance, 

found in the shells of 
many species of mol- 
lusks. [See PurL 
148.1 

Pearl' ash ( perl'-). 

Pearled (perld), 165. 

Pearl'y ^pcr/'-), 169. 

Pdar-maiu' [so Wk. Sm. 
Wr.; pir'mHn, Gd. 
165.] 

Pdar'-shaped {-8Mpt)y 
206, Exc. 5. 

PSar'-tree, 206, Exc. 4. 

Pgas'ant {pezf-). 

P6as'ant-ry ipez'-). 

Peas'cod (pez'-) (214) 
[so Sm. Gd. 'ypia'kodj 
Wk. ; pez'kod, or 
piS»'kod, Wr. 165.] 

Pease (p««), (13, 194), 
n.pl. [Sec Pea.] 

Peat, 13, 30, 41. 

Pe'ba. 

Peb'ble, 164, 170. 

Peb'bled ipeb'ld), 183. 

Peb'bly. 

[Pecal, 203. — 5eePe- 
oul.] 

Pe-can', 121. 

Pe-ca'na [so Gd. ; pe- 
han'ttj Wr. 155.] 

[Pecary, 203. — 5ee 
Peccary.] 

Pec-ca-biVi-ty, 170. 

Pec'ca-ble, 164. 

Pec-cardil'lo (170) [pi. 
Pec-ca-dil'loes (-lOz), 
192.] 

Pec'can-cy, 169. 

Pec'cant, 72. 

Pec'ca-ry(72,93) [Pec- 
ary, Peccory,203.] 

Pec-ca'fH (L.) [so Wr. 
Gd. : p&t-ka'vtf Sm. 
156.f 

[Pechblende, 203. 
— See Pitchblende.] 

Peck, 15, 181. 

Pecked (.pekt), 166; 
Note C, p. 34. 

Peck'ing. 



fidl i 6 09 in there ; dbaein foot igasin fiMsile ighasgingOi^Min tbis. 



fflCTBN 



816 



PEGGEK 



Peoten* 

Pec'tic. 
Pec'ti-nalt 78. 
Pec'ti-nate, 109. 
Pec'ti-nat-ed. 
Peo-ti-na'tion. 
Pee'tlne (82, 102) [Peo- 

tiii,2u;i.] 
Pec'to-lite, lfi2. 
Pec'to-ral, 72. 
Pe<>to-rI- lo'qtti'«L 
Peo-to>ril'o-quisiii 

i-ktoum), 130. 
Pec-to-ril' o-quo&a. 
Pec-to-ril'o^uy, 03. 
Peo'ttl [BO Grd. ; pe^kul, 

Wr. 156.] rP«oal, 

Picttl,203.] 
Pec'u-late, 106. 
Pec'u-liit-ed, Iffi. 
Pec'u-lAt-iug. 
Pec-u-la'tion. 
Pee'u-liit-or. 
Pe-cul'iar {-var), or 

Pe-cu'llHur jm Wr. j 

pe-kfU'yart Wb. Gd. ; 

pe^ku'ii-ar, Wk. Sm. 

155.1 
Pe-cu4i-4r'l.ty [soWk. 

Sm. ; pt-JcQl-yAr'irty, 



Wb. 



pe-kM^ 



Hr'i.tjft Wr. 166.] 
Pe-cul'Ur-iae (-j^aw-). 
Pe-cun'ia-ri-ly i-ya-), or 

Pe^m'ni-a-ri-ly, 171. 

Pe-cun'la-iy (-y»")i_<>*' 

Pe-eu'ni-a-iy [ioWr. ; 

pe-kun'ya'-ry, Grd. j 

pe-lt£'A»-tfr-]/,Wk.SiA. 

165.] 
Peda-gogr'io(-flf<^'-). 
Ped-a>gog'io-al (-^;'-). 
Ped'a-gog'ism (-t2;m) 

(171; [«o Sm. Od.; 

ped'Orgo-jizm, Wr 

155.] 
Ped'argOgne (-gro^, «7, 

168, 171. 
Ped'a-go-ffT [eo Wb. 

Grd. ; pM'a-gcj-pt Wr. 

166.] 
Pe'dal (161), a, [so Wk. 

Wr. Wb. Gd. jped'aly 

Sm. 166.] 
Ped'al (161), «.(BO Sm. 

Wr. Wb. Gd. \ped'aXf 

or pe'daljWk. 165.] 
Pe-daMi-aa, 169. 
Pe-dal'i-ty. 
Ped'ant, 66, 170. 
Pe-dant/ic. 
Pe-dant'ic-al. 
Ped'ant-ry.^ 



Fe-da'rl-an, 40, N. 

Ped'ate. 

Pe-dat'i-fid. 

Ped'dle(/>ed'Oil«- 
Ped'dled iped^ld), 166. 

[Peddler, 203. — Se« 

Pedler.] 
[P«ddUry,203.— ;Ste 

Pedlery.] 
Ped'dUnf. 
Ped'es-t^ (106) [nut pe- 

des'tal, 163.] 
Pe-dea'tri-al. 
Pe-dea'tri-an. 
Pe-dea'trian-iem {-izm). 
Pe^ea'tri-an-iae, 202. 
Pe'di-al, 160. 
Pcd'l-«el, 171. 
Ped'i-o£l-late. 

0^ So pronounced by 
Worcef ter. M an adliecUve 
or a botanical term, mean- 
Ins fuminked with a pedi- 
ceL but pe-die'el4ate 
i-ai^'), aa a noun, or the 
name of one o/a» order qf 
echinodena*. Smart's pro- 
nunciatioB of the word, 
Imt both aenaea, ii ped'i><tl' 
late. TVebaier and Good- 
rich give the word only aa 
an adjective, and pro- 
Mmnoe It pecfireel-lmle, 

Ped'I-cellcd (-»eW). 
Ped'I-cle, 164. 
Pe-dic'u-lar, 108. 
Pe-dic-n-la'6on. 
Pe-dic'u-lotta. 
Pe-dlg'er-ott8 (-^0'-). 
Ped'i-gree, 78. 
Pe-dim'a-no&8. 
Ped'i-mane. 
Ped'i-ment, 106, 100. 
Ped'i-palp. 

Ped'ler [Peddle r,/or- 
mer^ jP e d 1 a r , 203.] 

tgr This word iaapelled 
pedJer, by Johnson, Walk- 
er, Smart, Worceater, and 
most other E^gliah lexi- 
cographers, hni peddler by 
Webster and Goodrich. 
Worcester says: ♦* If regu- 
larly tiMwed, as a verbal 
noun, from the verb to 
peddJe, the proper orthotg* 
raphy would be peddler t 
but the noun pedler, or 
pedlar, appeara to haTe 
oeen in use much loncer 
than the verb to pedale: 
and this feet accounts for 
tiie apparent inconsiatencv 
in the orthography ;—!»««- 
die not beisc found In the 
English Dictionarieswhich 
were published l>etbre that 
of Johnson." Walker fe- 



marki that ''there 48 tha 
aanie impropriety iu spell- 
ing this word with one d 
onlv. as there would be in 
■nclllnf toddler and JU- 
dler in the same manner." 
and the reason he asal^nia 
U, that the vowel in the 
first a J liable is liable to be 
wrongly pronounced with 
its long aound. 

Ped'ler-y. 

Pe-do-bap'tism (^izm) 
[BO Sm. Wr. Wb.Gd. ; 
ped'-o-bap'tizmt Wk. 
i66.] 

Pe-do-bap'tiat. 

Ped'o-man-cy, 160. 

Pe-dom'e-ter, 106. 

Ped-o-met'ric. 

Pcd 'O-met'ric-aL 

Pe-dot'ro-phyf P IB d o t- 
rophy,2Q3.] 

Pe-dan'de iduna'kOM, 
164. 

Pe-d]m'cled(*dun^'l:M). 

Pe-dun'eu-lar {-dung'-). 

Pe-dnn'cn-late {-dung'') 

Pe-dun'eu-lat-ed 
{-dung'-). ' 

Peek (13), v, to look sly- 
ly. [See Peak, owl 
Pique, 160.] 

Peel (13), n. bUh, ba?k, 
or rind; — a wooden 
Bbovel used by bak- 
erB : — v. to atrip off, 
aa akiB, ict. [See 
Peal, 160.] 

Peeled Oi«M>» 106. 

Peel'er. 

Peel'ing. 

Peep, 13, 30. 

Peeped (p^t), 1£5. 

Pcep'er. 

Peep'ing^. 

Peer (13, 40), ». Ut 
equal; a noUeoAMt: 
— V. to look narrowly. 
[See Pier, 160.] 

Peer'age (40, N.), n. the 
body of peers ; Uie 
nobiUty. [See Pier- 
age, 160.] 

Peered, 166. 

Peer'eBB. 

Peer'ing. 

Peer'Iesfl. 

Pee'vish. 

Peg, 15, 30,&3. 

Pe-gaAje-an, 110. 

Pe^'a-auB. 

Pegged, 176. 

Peg^ger (-gur), 138. 



a,§,I,d,u,y,l00^»A,Mid,iUj^»4A0r«ifta#tnftr,afl«lfil^,&a<tiB 



PEOGENa 



317 



PENTAHEDRON 



Feg'gingr (-ffhing), 

Pey/o-man-cy. 

Pei-ram'e-ter. 

Pei-ras'tlc. 

Pek'oe [so Gd^'jpe'ko, 

orpcA^OjWr. 155.] 
Pel'age, 70, 170. 
Pe-la'gfi-aii. 
Fe-Ia'^-aa-ism (-izm). 
Pe-lag*ic (-to/'-). 
[Pelesan, 203. -> Ske 

Pelicaa.] 
Pel'e-eoidrPelieoid, 

203.] 
Pel'e-rine, 82, 162. 
Pelf, 16, 6*. 
Pel'i-can (66, 72) [Pel - 

eeaB,20ci.] 
£Pelicoid,203.— 5ee 

Pelecoid.] 
Peri-om [so Wr. j m'- 

li-omy Wb: Gd. 156.J 
Pe-liaae' (-Ua'), ll4, 171. 
PeU, 15, 172. 
PeVlagfi. 
Pel'let, 170. 
PePU-cle, 78, IM. 
Pel-Uc'u-lar, 108. 
Pel'ii-to-rv, 86. 
Pell-mell', ad. eonfaa- 

fidly, [^eePaU-Kall, 

160.1 
Pel-ld^dd (26) [not pel- 

loo'sid, 153.] 
Pel-lu-cid'i-ty, 89. 
Pel-o-pon-ne'sian 

(^Aa»)(171)[soGd. ; 

hel-o-ponrne'shi-ant 

Wr. 166.] 
Peit, IST 
Pel'tate. 
Pel'tatned. 
Pelt'ed. 

Pel'ti-form, 108. 
Pel'ti-neryed, 166. 
Pelt'inff: ' 
Pel'try, 03, M». 
PeVric. 
Pel'vis. 

Pepi'mi-ca^ [P e mi- 
ca n, 203.] 
Pen, 16. 
Pc'nal, 72. 
Pen'al-ty, 93. 
Pen'ance, 170. 
Pe-na'tts (L.) (-!&;),». 

pi. 
Penchant (Fr.) {pong- 

8hong')i 164. 
Pea'cil, n. a small brash 

of hair; an instrn- 

meut for writing or 

drawing without ink : 



— «. to paint or draw. 
[See Pensile, 160:] 

Pen'cilled (siUi) [Pen - 
/oiled, Wb. (jTd. 20:). 

— See 177, and Note 
E,p. 70.] 

Pen'cil-Iing [Pencil- 
in ff , Wb. Ud. 203.1 

Pen'dant, n. any thiog 
hanging, particalariy 
by way of ornament. 
[See Pjendent, 148.] 

Pen'denoe, 171. 

Pen'den-oy, 160. 

Pen'4ent, a. hanging. 
[ See Pendant, 148.] 

Penrdenlte li'te (L.). 

Pen-den'tlve, 84. 

Pend'ing. 

Pcnd'u-loiis, 46, N. 

Pend'u-lnm, 169, 18|». 

Penie-tTA-bU'i-ty, 108. 

Pen'e-tra-ble, 126, 164. 

Pen-e-tra'H-a (!<.), n. pi. 

Pen'e-trate, m. 

Pen'ertratred, 183. 

Pen'e-trat-iijg. 

Pen-e-tra'tion. 

Pen'e-trat-Ive [»o Sm. 
Wr. J pen'e-tra4iVt 
Wb. Gd. 155.J 

Pen'tfuin (-fftinn)^ 171. 

Pon'hold-er. 

Pan'i-cil. 

Pen-i-cil'late. 

Pen-i-cil'lat^ed. [106. 

Pen-in'su-la, 46, Note 2 ; 

Pen-ih'su-Iar, 108. 

Pen-in'su-late. 

Pen-in'su-lat-ed. 

Pen-in'su-lat-ing. 

Pen'i-tence; 169. 

Pen'i-t©n-«y. 

Pen'i-tent, 171. 

Pen-i-ten'tial (^kiO). 

Pen-i-ten'tiarry (-gha-). 

Pen'knife (nen'lf) (162) 
[pi. Pen'knives (p«»'- 
\vz)y 193.] 

tar This word i» an ex> 
ception to the remark con- 
tained in the Lairt part of 
the note under § 4{6, the 
consonant spund of n not 
being dwelt upon la the 
pronunciation. 

Pen'man, 196,206. 
Pen'nant, 1:^0. 
Pen'nate. 
Pen'nat-ed. 
Penned, 166, 176. 
Pen'ni-form, 66. 
Pen-nig'er-oiiB (-n^'-). 



Pei^'ni-nerved, 166. 

Pep'ninfir, 176. 

Pen-nip^)-tent. 

Pen'non, 86, 170. 

Pen'ny [pi. Pen'niea 
{-nys), for the individ- 
ual coins; Pence, for 
an aggregate sum, 
194.J 

Pen'ny-a-Hn'er. 

Pen-ny-roy'al. 

Pen'ny-weight (-tcA<), 
162, 171. 

Pen-nyr-wise' (-tt»l«') 
(206, Exc. 6) [so Sm. ; 
pen'njhtelZt Wk. Wr. 
Wb. Gd. 156.] 

Pen'ny-worth C-wurth) 
[8pWk.Wr.Wb.Gd.j 
pen'ny-wurth, ooU« 
pen'nurthf Sm. 165.] 

aar ." This word is com- 
momy and without yttl- 
garity contracted fia 
sjpeaklngj ln0 pemuarwJf 

[Pe n 1 o g y, 203.— 5ee 

Pcei^ology.] 
Pen'sTle (81, 152), a. 

hanging, penduloua. 

[See Pencil, 160.] 
Pen'sion,' 109. 
Pen'sion-a-ry, 72. 
Pen'sioned {-ehund^ 
Pen'sion-er. 
Pen'sion-ipg. 
Pen'stve, 8^ 
Pen'»Ive-ly, 186. 
Pent, 15. 

Pen-ta-cap'su-lar, 108. 
Pen'ta-chord {'kQrd)i 
Pen'ta-cle, 164. 
Pen'ta-coc-eoiia [so 

Sm«; pen-ta-bo^'ku9f 

wr. Gd. 15!5.] 
Pen<tac'ri-nTte, 152. 
Pen-tft-cros'tlc. 
Pen'ta-dac-tyl. 
Pen'ta-gdn. 
Pen-jl;a^o-nal, 106. 
Pen-tag' o-no(ta. 
Pen'ta-gram. 
[Pientagraph,203.— 

See Pantograph.] 
Pen-ta-gyn'l-a (-jin'-). 
Pen-ta-gyn'i-an (-jin'-), 
Pen-tag'yn-ofiB (-i<jy'-) 
Pen-ta^ie'drair P e n t a - 

edral,203.J 
Pen-ta-hed*rio-al [Pen- 

taedrical, 203.] 
Pen-ta-he'dron [Pen- 

taedron,203r} 



ftiHX; JiaaintikSK', 6ii gu in foot : q at in ftu^** ; f^aa ^ ifn go ', ^ or in iit}^ 

27* 



PENTAHEDROUS 



818 



PERFORM 



Pen-ta-he'drotts. 100. 

Pen-ta-hex-A-he'dnU, 
110. 

Pen-t»-me'ran. 

Pen-tam'er-otts, 108. 

Ptm-tam'e-ter, 108. 

Pen-tam'j-ron. 

Pen-ton'aer. 

Pcn-tan'dri-a. 

Pen-tan'drotts. 

Pen-taQ'gfle {-ta»g*gt). 

Pen-tan'ga-lar (-kim^-). 

Pen-ta-pet'al-oos. 

Pen-ta-phyl'loaB, or 
PcQ-taph'yUofis. [See 
AdenopbyllouB.] 

Pea-tap'o-dy. 

Pen'tap-tote. 

Pen'tar-chy (-k^), 52. 

Pen'ta-spaat. 

Pen-ta-sperm'otts. 

Pen'ta-stich {-sHk). 

Pen'ta-style. 

Pcn'ta-teuch (-^OX:), 171. 

PcQ-ta-teuch'al (-WA*'-). 

Peu'te-con-ter. 

Pen'te-cdst [bo Sm.Wr. 
Wb. Gd. ; pen'te-kaet, 
Wk. 155.] 

Pon-te-cost'al. 

Pen'te-coB-ter. 

Pen-tcl'io. 

Pen-tcl'io-an. 

Pent'-house, 206.Exe.3. 

Peii'tne[Pantl 16,203.) 

Pe-nultS or Pe'nult 
fpe-ntttt', Sm. j pe'- 
nult, Gd. ; Dc'nuft, or 
penult', Wr. 155.] 

Pe-nultM-ma. 

Pe-nult'i-mate. 

Pe-num^bra^ 72. 

Pe-num'bral. 

Pe-nu'rI-ofiB, 49, N. 

Pen'u-ry, 89. 

Pe'on (86}, n. in Mexi- 
co, a bondman for 
debt ; in India, a na- 
tive constable. [See 
Psean, 148 ; and Pieon, 
160.] 

?e'on-age. 
e'o-ny [Paeony, Pi- 
o n y , 2a3.] 
Beo'ple {pefpl), 13, 164. 



.^^ This word iom«- 
timeii takes th^ plural form, 
but only when it i» if«e4 in 
the lenae of natUfn, 

pH^'pled {pe'pld)f 183. 

Peo'plin^. 

Pe-pas'tfc. 



Psep'pCT, 170. 

Pep'pered {-purd)^ 150. 

Pep'per-eraaB. 

Pep'per-idge, 109, 171. 

Pep'per-iMf. 

Pep'per-mint. 

Pep'per-BAuce. 

Pep'per-y, 109. 

Pep'Bln. 

Pep'tic 

Per, 21, N. 

P£r-ad-vent'are (91) 

[not par-ad-rent'ynr, 

163.] 
Per-am'bn-late, 127. 
Pcr-am'bu-lat^. 
Per-am'bu-lat-ing. 
Per-am-bu-la'tlon. 
Per-am'btt-lat-or. 
Per an'num (L.). 
Per-bi-sttl'phate [bo 

Sm. ; pur-bt-tuVftUy 

Wr. 155.1 
Per cap'iria (L.). 
Per-oeiy'a-ble, 104, 183. 
Perceive', 109, N. 
Per-oeived', 183. 
Per-ceiv'er. 
Per-ceiv'ing. 
Per-cent'age, 109. 
Per cenfttim (L.). 

nor Commonly abbr»* 
Tlated to per cent. 

Per'cept. 
Per-cep-ti-biPl-ty. 
Per-cep'tl-ble, 164. 
Per-cep'tion, 169. 
Per-oep'tlve, 84. 
Per-oep-tlv'i-ty, 106,109. 
Perch, 21, N. 
Per-chanoe'. 
Perched (percht)j 166; 

Note C, p. 34. 
Perch'er. 
Perch'inff. 

PeiMxhlo'rate (-tto'-). 
Per-chlo'rlc (-klo'-). 
Pei^chlo'rlde (-klo^-). 
Perndp'i-ence. 
Per-cip'i-ent, 169. 
Per'ooid. 
Per'oo-Iate. 
Per'oo-lat-ed, 188. 
Pter'co-lat-ing. 
Per-co-Ia'tion. 
Per'co-lat-or. 
Per-cuBs'. 

Per-cusBcd' (-ktut*), 
Per-cuBsMngc. 
Per-cus'Bion (-Imsh'un). 
Perrcus'sion-cap. 
Per-cuB'Blve, 84. 



Fer^eQ'tient(-9Jk«n<),l 12. 
Jifr di'em{L.). 
Per-di'tion {-dish'un). 
Per-du',or Per-due't^OS. 
Pfir'e-gri-nate. 

tSr This word ii an ex- 
eeption to the general rule 
() lOH), by which words 
ending In i-mtte are ae- 
eented on the antepenult. 

P$r-e-grl-na'tion. 
Per'e-gri-nat-or. 
Pfir'e-grine, 82, 152. 
P^r'erap-to-ri-ly C-em-), 

86, 126, 162. 
FSr'cmp-to-ri-neBB 

(-em). 
Per'emp-to-ry (-em-) 

(86, 122, 162) [bo Sm. 

Wr. Wb. (3ki. ; per'- 

em-tilr^ or pe^rem'- 

to-ry, Wk. 155.] 

tar Though Walker 
gires two nuMee of pro- 
nouncing this word, he 
■ayt: "I am much roiftak- 
en, if the flnt [per'eot- 
fur-y] has not otMained • 
eompiete victory .*' 

Per-en'ni-al, 170. 
Fdr-cn-nl-bran'chi-ato 

(-brang^kt-). 
Per'fect, a. & r. 21, N*. ; 

169. 

tar The Teri) !e eome- 
timea erroneotifly accent- 
ed on the last syllahle. 

PerTect-ed. 
Per-fect-i-bil'i-t». 
Per-fect'i-ble, 1«4, 109. 
Per'fect-ing, 156. 
Pcr-fec'tion, 169. 
Per-fec'tion-iBm {-izm). 
Per-fec'tion-iBt. 
Per-fectlve, 84. [112. 
Per fl'dent i-fieh'ent)t 
Per-fid'i-ottB/>r Per-fld'- 

iouB (-wis) [bo Wr. ; 

pur-jWi^Mj Wb. Gd. ; 

per-fid'yu8t yf)L, Sm. 

166.] 
Per'fl-dy, 21, N. ; 109. 
Per-fo'11-ate. 
Per-fo'li-at-ed. 
Per'fo-rate. 
Per'fo-rat-ed. 
Per'fo-rat-ingf. 
Per-fo-ra'tlon. 
Per'fo-ra-tfve. 
Per'fo-rat-or, 109. 
Per-forc8'. 
Per-form' (17) [so Sm. 

Wr. Wb. Got ; j»er- 



a, e, i, 5» ti, y, lo9V ; ft, e, X, 0, ft, f , «Aorf ; ft m <i» iltf , 4 a« <n tSiat, ft a« In 



FEFORMABLE 

form', or per-Jtrm'f 



Fer-lbmi'I-ble, 164. 
Por-ronned', I'w. 
Per-form'in^. 
PWfiime, or Per-ftune', 

iBBi.'wt. ; per'-fim', 
or per'ysm, 8m. Gd. 



Per-fome', v. 181. 

Pcr-ftinifd', 186. 

Per-fam'cr. 

Per-fum'w-r, 

Per'flinc-to-rf-lr, »r 
Per-flmn'to-rf-ly. 

Per'nioc-to-rl-Diwa, or 
Per-nino'to-ri-neia. 

Per'ftinc-to-ri, w Per- 
funo'to-ry im) [per'- 
rtittt-<a-™,Sm. i mw- 
>nt'fc>-r», Wlc.TVb. 
Gd. ; pur-fitni^to-r^, 
or pur'j'iHii-fcJTB, 
Wr. IM.] 

«- -Tba orteliiil of 
IhU word Li m LaUn ad- 
nwanlM citrdrulf iWotll 
of whlcTi tlu Twb, PArtl- 



fp tttrfomttit, 'in which 



Ifv"*' 



Per-hspa'im, 139. 



PSr-l-do-dec-a-lie'dnd. 

PPr'i-dot. 

Pfr'i-droiDe. 

PCr-lc'sian {-jftati). 

PSpi-eee (-je),'l38. 
PiVl-gone (eo Wr.; 
pf r-?a'o-fl(, Sm. loS.I 
PC-T'i-griph. 

171. 

P#r-l-ho'Ii-on (Gr.) tpl. 
Flr-l-he'H-a, UK.] 

Pi^-i-hcx-a-he'dral. 

P-VIl, «, 170. 

Pi'T'llled (lOBJ [Per- 
iled, Wl>.(id.:K».— 
S« 177, and Note E, 

PCr'n-ilng (177) [Per- 
il i q sTwb. Gd. 203.] 
Ptr'U-Dua, 169, 171. 



PSr-t-oc-tH-he'dnl 
Peirl-od, 49, N. 
Pe-rl-od'lc 
Pe-rl-od'lc-Bl. 
Pe-rl^jd'Ic-iU-lf , 170. 



[soWb.Gd.jpIr.jV- 



PSr-l-ps-tefic-tl. 
Per-l-p»-let'l-dBm 

(-(inn), 138. 
Per-l-pet'sl-oUn. 
Fe.ri^i'er-»1, KM. 
Per-fpher'lc, 109. 

prrlSf'^?-y,"l71. 
PSiJl-phMse Oii). 
Pe-riph'm-sts <L.) [pi. 

Pp-ripl«'r«-B?« {-Hi), 

198.] 
Per-l-phrsB'tlc 
Pitr-lphng'ttc-il. 

Ff^r.lp.DGU.moa'lc 

Per-lp-M" "- 

PtT-ip-nc- 

Pe-rtp'WT-T. 

Fe-rla'olan (-rtiS'a»). 
Pe-ris'd-i (-rtift'M), 



io'IimO. 



Pfr-l-BTOp'le. 
p&r-i'Bcop'tc-ml- 
PSr'lsh, fw. 
P^'lah-a-ble, IM, 109 
PEr'lBh-s-bly. 
FWIshed (-bJtf). 
PvT'l.gpenn. 
Pir-l-sphPr-lo. 
Piir-i-Bphi'r'lc-Rl. 

Pjr.iB-BO-lOg'lC-Bl 

P^rlb-Ml'D-gy, 93. 
Pi<r-|.niil'tlc 

P#r.|-irtreph'ie. 
PWi-BtjIe. 
PWJ-iya'to-le, 103. 

Pe-rit'o-moBs. 
Pir-i-ta-Ho'um (L.) 
[Peritoneum, 

Per-i-to-nl'ti*. 

Pf r'i-wig, IW. 



II MuinlbotijcMlntkalUighaJE'nilOil^''*'" 



FERIWINKLB 



820 



PBRTUEB 



PSr'1-win-iae (^wing-ki) 
(M, l«) [so Wr. Wb. 
Gd. } pir'tvfin-kl, 
Wk. } pkr't-winff'kl, 
Sm. 165.1 

Per'iure i-jur), 91. 

PerQured i-jurdh 

Per'jur-er, 

Per'jiu'4nflr. 

PcrOu-ry, 21, N. ; U». 

Perk, 21, N. 

Perked (perkt), 165. 

Per'kiQ-Uia (-im). 

Per'kin-igt. 

Perk'y, 10». 

Per-la'eeouB (-«kiw),112, 
IflO. 

Per'ma-nenoe. 

Per'ma-iiea-cjr. 

Per'niA-aent. 

Per-man-fi^an'to. 

Per-me-ft-bil'i-tf. 

Per'me-a-ble, 16i. 

Per'me-ftte, 169. 

Per'me^t-ed, 163. 

Per'me-«t4iig'. 

Per-me-a'tion, 112. 

Per'mi-an. 

Per-miB-Bl-bil'i-ty. 

Per-mis'si-ble, Idi. 

Pcr-iois'slve, M. 
Per-ittis'Blre-Iy, 186. 
Per-mit', or Per'mit, n. 

[wGd. iper'mUjWk. 

Bm. ; per'mit, orvwr- 

mU', Wr. 155.] 
Per-mit', r. 
Per-mit'ted, 176. 
Per-mit-tee', 
Per-mit'ter. 
Per-mlt'ting. 
Pw-mixt'ioa (-tfun), 
Per-mu-ta'Uon. 
Per'naji-oy. 
Pcr-nX'ciouB (-niih'u$)» 
Per-noc-ta'li-an. 
Pcr-noc-ta'tioa. 
Per'o-nate. 
Per'o-ne, 163. 
PSr-o-ne'al. 
PCr-o-ra'tlon. 
Per-ox'Ide (21, N.) 

fPeroxyd, Wb. 

Gd. 203.1 
Pcr-pai-dic'u4ar, 106. 
Pcr-pea-dJc-«-Ur'i-ty. 
Per'pe-trate, 109. 
Per'pe-trjt-ed, J83. 
Pcr'pe-trat-ing". 
Por-pe-tra'tion. 
Pcr'pe-trat-or. 
Per-pet'u-al, 108. 



Per-pet'n"«te, 7S, 89. 
Porpet'uHit-ed, 183. 
Per-pet'tt-at-iug. 
Per-pet-u-a'tion. 
Per-pe-to'i-ty. 
Perplex', 103. 
Perplexed' i-piektf), 

105 j Note C, p. 34. 
Per-i>lex'io{;. 
Per-plex'i-ty. 
Per'qui-Blte (^eO), ISe. 
Per-qui-Bl'tion {-kwt- 

z%sh'un). 
PCHron. 
[Perroquet, 003.— 

See Paroquet.] 
Per'ry, 48, 06. 
Per sal' turn {L,), 
Per-Bcni'U'tion 

{-tkroo-). 
Per se (L.). 
Per'ae-cute, 109. 
Per'se-cut-ed, 18S. 
Per'se-cfit-ing. 
Pcr-BB-cu'tion, 112. 
Per'ae-cut-or, 228. 
Per'ae-cut-rix. 
Per-Be-pol'i-taa. 
Per'Beus [See Note 

under Morpheus.] 
Per-fle-v$r'ance, 169. 
Per-He-vere'. 
Per-ae-vered'. 
Per-flc-ver'ing'. 
Per'sian (shan)t 169. 
Per'Bic, 200. 
Per'sl-cot (Fr.UflO Gd. j 

pSr-se-ko', Wr. 154, 

156.f 
Persinaqt (Fr.) {ptr- 

Per-Bist', 1*36. 
Per-slBt'ed. 
Per-Blst'enoe, 169. 
Per-BlBt'en-cy. 
Per-sist'ent, 228. 
Per-aiBt'Ive, 84. 
Per'aon (per'sn) (149, 

169)[8oWk.Wr.Wb. 

Gd. ; per'suny coll. 

per'tUf Sm 155.] 



Walker remArkt 

that he has " not the least 
oltjection " to the preaenra- 
tlon of the sound of the o 
In this word, *' on solemn 
occasions.** 

Per^Bon-a-ble, 164, 169. 
Per'aon-ag-e. 
Per'son-ar, 72. 
Pcr^Bon-al'i-ty, 108. 
Per'aon-al-ty, 145. 
Per'son-ate, 79* 



Per'fon^-ed, 168. 

Per'son-at-iDg. 

Per-Bon-a'tion. 

Per'Bon-at-or. 

Per- Bdn-i -fl-ca'tion,lt& 

Per-Bon'i-fled, 99. 

Per-Boa'i-t y, 94. 

Per-aon'i-fy-iog. 

Personnel (Fr.) {pit- 

so-neV). 
Per-apeo'tlve [not per'- 

Bpek-tiv, 153.J 

tar "In the poets, thif 
word often has the aceeni 
on the first syllahle." Smmi 

Per-Bpeo'to-ffrftph. 
Per-Bpeo-tog'ra-phy, 

lOS. 
Per-Bpi-ea'ekMM (^«*]b 

112, 169. 
Per-api-ca^'i-ty. 
Per-spi-cu'i-ty. 
Per-Bpic'u-ofiB, 108, 
Per-Bpir^-bil'i-ty. 
Per-apir'a-ble (49, N. ; 

164, 169) [not per'api- 

ra-bl, 153.1 
Per-api-ra/tMD. 
Pcr-a^r'a-tlve, 156. 
Per-apir'a-to-ry, 86. 
Per-apire', 135. 
Per-apired', 165. 
Per-Bpir'toff, 183. 
Per-suad'a-ble (-fwod^. 

o-U), IM. 
Per-aoade' (^lodd'), 34. 
Pcr-Buad'ed (-«ir«d'-). 
Per-suad'ingr (^-sw&d'-). 
Pcr-Bua'si-ble (-swa'si- 

bl) [bo Sm. Wr. Wb, 

Gd. ; per-swa^zt-btt 

Wk. M5.] 
Pcr-sua'sion (-mm'- 

zhun)i 47, K. 
Per-Bua'aYve (swe^-), 
Per-Bua'aXve-ly (-wpa'-), 

185. 
Per-Bua'ao-ry (-««»'-), 

86, 171. 
Per-Bal'pbate, 21, N.i 

117. 
Per-Bal-ta'tion. 
Pert, 21, N. J 135. 
Per-tain'. 

Pertained' (-MfM^'). 
Per-tain'ing. 
Per-ti-na'ciouB (-sAflw)» 

46, 112. 
Per-ti-ua^'i-ty. 
Per'ti-neaoe, 169. 
PoWti-nen-cy. 
Per'ti-nent, 108, 171. 
Pcr-turb', 103. 



a, e, 1, o, tt, y, to«^« A, €, 1, 0, fi» f» short-, ^fis infar,hiiisin fiist, ftps in 



PBRTURBANCC 



.821 



PHAa£U)£NOf7S 



pGr-turl>'aiiee. 100. 
Per-turb-u'tion. 
Fer-turbed', IM, 
Per-turb'ing. 
Per-to'flion i-xhun). 
Pgr'uke {-dbic) [twi pe- 

rook\ 16a.l 
Pgr'ule (-<H>0. 
Pe-niB'ai (-roos^-), 10. 

Pe-ruBed' ('Toom'), 
Pe-ruB'er {-rooz'-). 
Pe-rus'ing^ {-^ooz^-). 
Pe-ru'vi-an {-roo'). 
Pervade' (103, ItfO). to 

be in all ports. [See 

Pttrveved, 160.] 
Per-vad'ed, 183. 
Per-vttd'ing. 
Per-va'sion (-zhun). 
Per-va'alve, 84. 
Per-verse', 21, N. 
Per-ver'aion. 
Per-ver'sl-ty. 
Per-ver'riF«. 
Por'vert, <». 108, 1«1. 
Pervert', v. 103, 161. 
Per-vert'ed. 
Per-vert'er. 
Per-veit'i-Me, 100. 
Per-vert'ing. 
PeWvi-ofta, 21, N. ; 160. 
Pe-aade' (-zOd') fao 

Sm. ; pe-sHd', Qa. ; 

pe-sUd', Wr. !«.] 
Pea'aanry, 72. 
Pes'ai>«iiam (-inicm). 
Pcs'si-migt. 
Vea'B(Hwm-<Jt 160. 
Pest, ]((. 
Pea'ter, 77. 
Fea'tered, IM, 105. 
Pea'ter-er. 
Pea'ter-ingf. 

Pe«t'*hMiae, 206,Exe.3. 
PeBt-if or-ottg, 108. 
Pes'tl-leaee, 160. 
Pes'ti-leBt. 

Pe8-ti-len'tlal<-i*af)*>60 
Pea'tle (pea'A <ie2) [ao 

Sm. wb. Od. ; pe^tl, 

Wk.; pes'l, or pei^tl, 

Wr. 165.1 
Pet, 15. 
Pet'al [ao Sm. ; fp«t'a{, 

or peftal, Wr. Gd. ; 

IMs'to/, or pet'alf Wk. 

155.] 

II9» *• Bmr^Yw rl«ht the 
looff aoand -af « may be by 



analogy, I am apprehen 
tive that .... the ihwt 
iottnd i* In more feneral 
UM.** Waiter. 



Pct«l-ifer-oil8. 

Pe-taia-iorm, 108. 

Pet'^Mae, l&Z. 

Pet'al-lam (-izm). 

Pet'al-ite, m. 

Pet'al-oid. 

Pet'al-oila. 

Pe-tard', 121. 

Pet-ard-eer' (160) [Pet- 
ardier,203.j 

Pel'a-dus (L.). 

Pe-t&u'riat [bo Wr. Wb. 
Gd,}pet'{i-u'ri9tt 8m. 
155.J 

Pe-te<?hiHa ( -Al), or 
Pe-tech'J-al (-tek'-) 
[pe-te'kiral, Wk. Wr. ; 
pe-tek'i-al, Sm. Wb. 
Gd.i551[P«tecchi- 
al, Wb. Gd.203.] 

[Peterel, 203. — ^^ 
Petrel.] 

Pe'ter-penoe, n. pi, 

Pe'ter-wort (-wurt), 

Pet'i-o-lar. 

Pet'i-o-U-ry, 72. 

Pet'i-o-late. 

Pet'i-O'lat-ed. 

Pet-i-oPu-late, 80. 

Pet'i-olule, 26. 

P€(U (Fr.) ipet-if, 
meaning: Uitle in Jlg- 
urei in other aenaea, 
Pft'y) [bo Sm. ; pet% 
Wb. Gd.; petfy, or 
pet'it, Wr. 155.] 

Pe^tltioii {-tUkfun). 

Pe-tl'tion-a-ry (-««*'- 
««-), 72. 

Petl'lioaed (-tiah'unO). 

^-ti-tioa<oe^('<t<ft-Mn-), 

118, 122. 
Pe-ti'tioa-er (-Hahfun-). 

Pe-Wti-o prin-Hpfi-l 

(L.) {pe^Hsh'\-o). 
PeOt-^maUre^Vf.Xpei'tf' 

maHr). 
P«t'i-tOrry, 86. 
Pe-tonff'. 
Pe tra'>y, 40, N.