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Full text of "KPFK folio"

Malvina Reynolds 



Died March 17,1 978, at the age of 77. 



RPFR 
FOLIO 90.7 fm 



MARCH 1979 



Pacif ica Radio • Los Angeles 



r 



KPFK STAFF 
General Manager 

Program Director 
Music 



News <& 
Public Affairs 



Cultural Affairs 

Promotion 

Operations 



Engineering 

Subscriptions 
Chief Bureaucrat 
Community Events 

Reception 

Traffic 
Folio Editor 



Jim Berland 

Anita Frankel 

Carl Stone, Acting Director 

Leni Isaacs 

John Schneider 

Joseph Spencer 

Lois Vicrk 

Paul Vorwerk (on leave) 

Susan Anderson, Director 

Ellin O'Leary, Acting Nevi's Ed. 

Earl Ofari 

Paul Vangelisti, Director 

Bill Hunt 

Linda Hunt, Director ■ 

Jane Gordon 

Peter Suiheim, Director 

Tim McGovern Production Dir. 

Helene Rosenbluth, 

Production Training Coordinator 
Peter Cutler 
Sylvester Rivers 
Roy E. Tuckman 
Andy Weiss 

Don Wilson, Chief Engineer 
Peter Suiheim 
Ahna Armour, Director 
Beverly Zelicr 
Mario Casetta, Director 
Mike Baiter 

Margaret Fowler (acting) 
Terry Hodel 
Roy E. Tuckman 
lane Gordon 



KPFK LOCAL ADVISORY BOARD 

Clifford Getz, Chair; Jacki Addis, Mario Casetta, 
Moctczuma Esparza, David Finkel, Peter Flaxman, 
Brownlee Haydon, Linda Hunt, Jonas Rosenfield Jr., 
Delfino Varcla. 

PACIFICA FOUNDATION NATIONAL 
BOARD OF DIRECTORS & OFFICERS 

R. Gordon Agnew, Hon. Chair; Jack O'Dell, Chair; 
Peter Tagger, President; Victor Honig, Treasurer; Peter, 
Franck, 1st V.P.; Marge Glaser, 2nd V.P.; Ralph Engle- 
man, 3rd V. P.; Greg Lewis, Secretary; Robert Barron, 
Steve Berner, Clifford Getz, Oscar Hanigsberg, Kenneth 
Jenkins, David Lampel, Acklyn Lynch, Jean Molyneaux, 
Roberto Navarro, William Sokol, William Swenson, 
Delfino Varela, Alex Vavoulis. 

PACIFICA FOUNDATION NATIONAL STAFF 

Joel Kugelmass, Exec. Director; Mike Krycler, Controller; 
Debra Kaufman, Admin. Ass't; Marianna Berkovich, Book- 
keeper; Ira Slobodien, Director of Data Processing. 

Pacifica National Office 

10960 Santa Monica Blvd., Los Angeles CA 90025 
213/479-0991 

Pacifica National News Service (Patti Neighmond, Dir.) 
& Washington News Bureau (Ted Clark, Bureau Chief) 
868 National Press Building, Washington DC 20045. 
202/628-4620 

Pacifica Program Service & Tape Library 

5316 Venice Blvd., Los Angeles CA 90019. 
213/931-1625 

PACIFICA NETWORK SISTER STATIONS 

KPFA: 2207 Shattuck Ave., Berkeley CA 94704 
WBAI : 505 Eighth Ave., New York NY 1 001 8 
KPFT: 419 Lovctt Blvd., Houston TX 77006 
WPFW: 1030 15th St. NW, Washington DC 20005 



KPFK SWITCHBOARD: ?13/ 877-2711 




Volume 21, Number 3. 

The Folio is a monthly publication of KPFK, 3729 Cahuenga Blvd. West; North Hollywood CA 91604. Application 
to mail at 2nd Class postage rales is pending at No. Hywd. CA and additional mailing offices. The KPFK Folio is 
not sold. It is sent free to each subscriber supporting our non-profit, non-commerical educational station, and con- 
tains the most accurate possible listings ol the programs broadcast. Subscriptions are $30 per year, and are transfer- 
rable to the other Pacifica Stations. Our transmitter is on Mt. Wilson. We broadcast in stereo multiplex with 25 micro- 
second prc-cmphasis. We broadcast Dolby calibration tones daily, before the principle evening music program. 
KPFK's mailing address is PO Box 8639, Universal City CA 91608. Phones: 213/8772711 and 984-2711. KPFK is 
owned and operated by the Pacifica Foundation, a non-profit institution. KPFK is a member of the Association of 
r.ilifornia Public Radio Stations. 



MARCH FOLIO PAGE 2 



THE VOLUNTEERS 

They turn the station on and off, and make it go in between. They run errands, produce programs, enj^ineer, stuff 
envelopes, answer phones, build things, help at off-air events- -in other words, we couldn't exist without them. 
Those not listed elsewhere in the Folio are: 



Joe Adatns 
Anthea Ashe 
Steve Barker 
Bruce Bidlack 
John Bliss 
Pam Boehnert 
Rene Bohne 
Roy Chapman 
Lucia Chappelie 
Louise Chevlin 
BJ Clark 
jane Clewe 
Diana Cline 
Peter Cole 
Peggy Collen 
Chuck Conden 
Gail Diane Cox 
Laura Ewig 
Mark Farjean 
Joe Feinblatt 
Dan Fitzgerald 
Ronald Pong 



Suzanne Gilbert 
Janet Frazier 
Brad Gordon 
Greg Gordon 
Larry Goldberg 
Ron Grayson 
Gail Griffin 
Robert Griffin 
Eda Mallinan 
Edward Hammond 
Burt Handelsman 
Bill Handelsman 
Virginia Harvey 
Jeanne Henley 
Larry Johnson 
Fred Jones 
Susan Judy 
Tom Kafka 
Alan Kanter 
jim Kepner 
Oave Krebs 
Jay Kugelman 
Chuck Larson 
Chris Lauterbach 



Volunteer 



Ne\vs 



Karen Lavett 
Lezlie Lee 
Rachel Levario 
Roger Lighty 
Elizabeth Luye 
Iris Mann 
Tim Marvin 
Kathy McCormack 
Maureen Mcllroy 
Bill McKinley 
Joan Midler 
Sam Mittciman 
David Morrison 
Ralph Neil 
Dennis O'Connell 
Nicole Oiknine 
Robert Orndorff 
Mike O'Sullivan 
Dan Paik 
Jay Potts 
David Rubin 
Paul Salazar 



Betty Sandoval 
Jeff Schafer 
Lisa Schlcin 
David Seidman 
Pearl Skotnes 
Pat Smith 
Joan Sprague 
Kevin Stern 
Ryn Streicher 
Gary Taylor 
Ed Thomas 
Jim Tindall 
Tom Turner 
Howard Vanucci 
Bill Vestal 
Bert White 
Katie Wise 
Dan Wright 
Martin Zimmerman 
. . . and any others 
inadvertently 
omitted. 



Whenever we do special fundraising days here at 
the station, you probably hear us mention time and again, 
"there are volunteers here in the conference room to take 
your pledge. . . "And you've probably wondered what it'd 
be like to do that. Well, here's your opportunity and your 
personal invitation. We'll be doing on-air fundraising this 
month, March 1, 2, 3, 16, and 18. We welcome your help, 
it's really quite easy and even fun, answering the phones, 
filling out the pledge forms, getting them in the mail, and 
getting involved with the intense momentum-building that 
goes with rooting the totals toward the goal. We need vou 
early, mid-day, or late, whichever time is most convenient 
to you, on anv or all of the above dates. Call Terry Model 
or Beverly Zeller to check for most useful times. 

KPFK's lO-Kilomcter Run and Saint Patrick's Day 
Breakfast is almost upon us, and the Run's coordinator Mike 
Baiter is recruiting help to register the runners, help with the 
run, and serve the breakfast. There will be a meeting for Run 
volunteers at the station the evening before the event, Fri- 
day the 16th at 8:00 p.m. It you can help, call Mike K tome. 



Peter, Tim and Margaret in the Production Depart- 
ment can still use the help of steady volunteers experienced 
in recording, editing, or control board operation. And Roy 
of Hollywood asks any volunteers who came to the meeting 
(or maybe new ones), who would specifically be interested 
in working the "graveyard shift" t(- drop him a line directly. 
Roy wants some reliable, regular volunteer production-train- 
ees for midnight to 6 a.m., from one to four days a week, 
Monday through Thursday. Training and work will encom- 
pass board operation, tape editing, recycling of tape, typing 
program labels, dubbing, and some production work. Rov'll 
be doing the training and is looking only for people interested 
in KPFK and wanting to apply whatever skills the station 
needs in the future. 

We are still looking for help with kcvpunching. It's 
m IBM 029 machine, and it needs warm bodies to keep it 
company. II you lype well but never punched key, Ahna of 
Subscriptions can train you. Call her. I Isewherc in Bureaucra- 
cy, help is needed in answering the phones, making calls, sort- 
ing, opening envelopes, packaging premiums, and the like. If 
you'd like to help but can't during the day, Ahna will be in 
for a work night on Tuesdays. Call during the dav and let her 
know you're coming. 

That number lo call, for all <if the above, remains: 

213 / 877-271 1 or 984-271 1 fwesiside & valley) 



MARCH FOLIO PAGE 3 



IMPORTANT FILiVI CLUB NEWS 



There was .in unprecedented demand for reservations lor 
OIK )anuar\' film, Hard Core. So much so, that both screen- 
ings filled up bv 1 p.m. Most months, empty seals for the 
Saturday show remain when the phones close. 

As we go to press, it is still too early to know whether this 
was a one-time phenomenon due to the controversial nature 
of the film, or a problem which wc will have confronted a- 
gain with Norma Rae. 

Plans are underway to provide for an additional film each 
month to accomodate any overflow demand. This lllm will 
be either a new release or a classic film of special merit. Re- 
servations priority' will go to members who were unable to 
obtain reservations to the main feature, if and when the de- 
mand exceeds supply. You will be notified when this plan 
is ready for full implementation. 

In the meantime, we arc attempting to obtain a special film 
for those who tried unsuccessfully to make reservations for 
Hard Core. When this film is announced, everyone else will 
be on Ivs/hcr Pacifica honor to abide by the special reserva- 
tions provisions. 

New Reservation Time! 

Please note the new reservation system, as it will be impos- 
sible for you to make reservations the "same old way!" We 
will be taking reservations Thursdav evening prior to the 
screening, 6:00 to 10:00 p.m. ONLY! NOT FRIDAY'!!!! 
This month, it's Thursday March 29. Same number, 985-5735. 
You must have your card ready when you call for reservations, 
and when you come to the theater. 

Don't leave home without it! 



cA Perfect Couple 

Directed by Robert Altman. 

Written by Robert Altman and Allan Nicholls. 



A Perfect Couple has been described to us as an upbeat, 
"boy meets girl" film set against the world of rock music. 

It is the story of Alex (Paul Dooley), the eldest son of a 
wealthy and domineering "old world" Greek family, and 
his relationship with the much younger Sheila (Marta Hef- 
lin), a singer in a rock band. While their backgrounds are 
very different, each comes out of a basically patriarchal 
"nuclear family" situation. 

Music, mainly rock and some classical, plays an integral role 
in the film, with 12 songs. The use of music is naturalistic- 
there is always a reason for it to be there. 

To attain the realism sought for the film, maximum use is 
made of real locations, placing the characters amidst crowds 
of non-actors. In the story, Sheila's group stages a showcase 
at a Los Angeles recording studio. Altman produced a legiti- 
mate showcase for the group, using hidden cameras to shoot 
600 invited guests, all people from the LA music scene. In 
the middle of the crowd, the actors improvised dialogue and 
interaction as they mingled through the unsuspecting throngs. 
We arc told that, at this "typical rock party," the invited 
guests never knew who the actors were. 

Several scenes in the film are set against the "Great Expecta- 
tions" video dating service. Altman feels that the existence 
of the dating service points out a very real problem in our 
culture - loneliness. 



SATURDAY, MARCH 31: Los Feliz Theater, 1822 N. Vermont, L.A. 

SUNDAY, APRIL 1 : Music Hall Theater, 9036 Wilshire, Bev. Hills. 

Please note theater location! Don't assume yon know! 




RESERVATIONS: NEW SYSTEM! NEW SYSTEM! NEW SYSTEM! 

fROM NOW ON, WELL BE TAKING RESERVATIONS IN THE EVENING, TO 
GIVE WORKING PEOPLE BETTER ACCESS TO THE FILMS THEY CHOOSE. 

RESERVATIONS WILL BE TAKEN THURSDAY EVENING, MARCH 29, FROM 
600 P.M. TO 10:00 P.M. THE NUMBER REMAINS: 213/ 985-5735. 

YOU MUST HAVE YOUR FILM CLUB CARD WITH YOU BOTH 
WHEN CALLING FOR YOUR RESERVATION, AND AT THEATER. 




MARCH FOLIO PAGE 4 



Report to the Listener 




At this writing, it appears that we have a chance to 
sustain our current level of staffing thanks to the support 
from many of you. We have made up the $10,000 deficit 
that resulted from our making less than projected on Win- 
terfair 78. This docs not completely solve the problem. If 
you return to your December 78 Fnlio, you v^ill see that 
our budget for this fiscal year required that we raise more 
money than last in order to sustain our growth through Feb- 
ruary. We must increase our income at the rale of $6,000 a 
month for the rest of the fiscal year. This is no small task. 

In order to raise this money and at the same time 
to limit on-the-air fundraising to fewer days and shorter 
pledge drives, we have devised the follwing plan. Its success 
will be judged as we progress and the plan will be held to or 
altered accordingly. 

We will have Pledge Periods in the Spring, no longer 
than one week at a time. For March we plan five days, spaced 
in two groups, March 1 -3, and March 16 & 18. In April, as 
Pacifica celebrates its 30th Anniversary, we will lead up to 
the date of celebration (April 15) with a week of special pro- 
gramming and fundraising. In Mav we will have throe pledge 
days, and again in June and )uly two or three days depend- 
ing on the success of the earlier efforts. 

The goal for the six months, January through lunc, 
is 5120,000 pledged on the air and received from direct mail 
solicitations to you, our current subscribers. This is a 20% 
increase over last year. It is absolutely necessary to compen- 
sate for inflation and to include the growth we have been 
striving for. 



If we plan to raise $100,000 of that amount in on- 
the-air pledges, wc must raise $3333 per day for 30 days. To 
reduce the number of days to 21 , wc would need to raise 
$4762 per day . Keep your ears to the totals and you will be 
able to tell how wc are doing. 

Of course, this increase, we hope, will represent 
new listeners and new listener response, and to assure this 
wc are discussing a major initiative in development and fund- 
raising. As that emerges, I believe KPFK will project a strong- 
er presence in the community, make more people aware of 
what we offer and win a larger audience for the kind of pro- 
gramming wc do at our best. 

It is a difficult circle to break ou> of. We need more 
money to do better work, and that better work will get us 
more money. So we inch forward. We all of you pushing 
and pulling us with your generosity and concern, I know that 
we will make it. 

Sinccrciv, 




im Berland, Manager 



Report to the Listener airs this month every Mon- 
day evening from 7:30 to 8:00. V'ith Open Phones. 



MARCH FOLIO PACE 5 



Highlights 



Cultural Affairs 



Nldzakc Shanpc, 
author of "Boogie 
Wnopic Landscapes,' 
diirins a previous 
visit to KPFK's 
Studios. Photo by 
Roy of Hollywood. 




Los Angeles Theater of the Ear (L.A.T.E.) Presents: 

"BOOGIE WOOGIE LANDSCAPES" by Ntozake Shange 

This radio premiere of a new work by the author of 
For Colored Girls Who Have Comidcred Suicide When the 
Rainbow is Einif was first performed on stage by the New 
York Shakespeare Festival, December 18, 1978. The writer 
describes her own work: "An evening in the colored hemi- 
sphere of ntozake shange. memories/ visions' & dreams/ of 
a girl-child raised in our degrees c& angles." Adapted for radio 
and directed by Paul Vangeiisti, with the assistance of Bisa 
Williams, this Los Angeles Theater of the Ear production 
will be broadcast live before a studio audience. Admission 
is free, but seating is limited. For reservations call 877-271 1 
during business hours. This program is part of the Los An- 
geles Theater of the Ear's continuing scries of live radio dra- 
ma, partially funded by a grant from the National Endow- 
ment for the Arts. L.A.T.E. is produced for KPFK Radio 
by Bill Hunt, Patrick Tovatt and Paul Vangeiisti. 

SCULPTURE IN AMERICA 

Starting in March, KPFK's Cultural Affairs Depart- 
ment will broadcast in eight-part scries of interviews, record- 
ed in June 1978, at the 10th Annual Sculpture Festival in 
Toronto. The host of the series is Los Angeles artist Bruria 
Finkel. The series will air Saturday evenings and rebroadcast 
the following Thursdays on Kiilchtir at 1 1 :30 a.m. Scheduled 
for March are: Robert Irwin, March 17, 7:30 p.m.; Carl An- 
dre, March 24, 7:30 p.m.; and George Ricki, March 31 , 6:30 
p.m. Artists and critics interviewed in subsequent programs 
include Marcia Tucker, Lilla Katzcn, Ivan Carp, Guido Moli- 
narc and Marshall McCluhan. 

ANARCH FOLIO PAGE 6 



THE MORNING READING: A Dorothy Parker Retrospective 

"I enjoyed her more than I have ever enjoyed any 
other woman. She was modest. . . her view of people was 
original and sharp, her elaborate, overdelicate manners made 
her a pleasure to live with. . . and the wit, of course, was so 
wonderful that neither age nor illness ever dried up the spring 
from which it came fresh every day. . . ." 

Lillian Hellman, in 
An Unfinished Woman 

Beginning Monday, March 12, and continuing 
through the end of the month, the Cultural Affairs Dept. 
rekindles one of the bright lights of American letters with 
a retrospective of the works of Dorothy Parker. The reader 
is Eliza Lewin, familiar to KPFK audiences as a member of 
the Janus Company Radio Theater, which does original ra- 
dio drama every Thursday at 1 1 :30 p.m. 

Of special note in the series: on Wednesday the 
28th, Bill Hunt joins Ms. Lewin in a speical radio perfor- 
mance of Parker's one-act play. Here We Are; and on Thurs- 
day the 29th, the voice of Dorothy Parker herself is heard 
in a reading of one of her most insightful short stories, 
Horsie. All on the Morning Reading, weekdays at 11 :30 a.m. 



THE CORRECT CHANGE COMEDY MINUTES 

A series of five original radio plays, created especial- 
ly for KPFK will air each Tuesday this month (and Friday 
the 30th), at 4:30 p.m. 

The Correct Change Comedy Minutes are contem- 
porary plays that wittily examine the fates of ordinary peo- 
ple caught in extraordinary circumstances. They're short 
(10-20 minutes long), snappy, and wry. Producers Laura 
Fanning and Susan LaTempa selected plays that vary from 
the haunting tale of a discredited food critic, to a mystery 
thriller about announcements ("the white zone is for the 
immediate. . . ."). Peter Sutheim and Janet Dodson, who 
provided technical production, were called upon to create 
intricate effects ranging from the sound of a Dodge Colt 
accelerating to the rattle of mannequins from Cincinalti. 
The plays were performed by Dierdre Berthrong, )acque 
Lynn Colton, Laura Fanning, Bill Hunt, Alex Kubik, Karin 
Shea, and Peter Weiss. Don't miss The Correct Change Co- 
medy Minutes, airing Tuesdays March 6, 13, 20, 27, and 
Friday March 30, at 4:30 p.m. 



Public Affairs 



FAIR SEX, FAIR GAME: 

Some Wiimen Say No to the Sexual Safari. 

, Women have been bombarded with cvcr-incrcasini; 
quantities of pornogrnphic magazine images in the hands ol 
fathers, uncles, brothers, sons, husbands, lovers and boyfriends. 
In the movies, and on the cover of record albums too, we have 
been subjected to raping, stabbing, burning, beating, gagging, 
binding, torturing, even dismemberment in the name of male 
sexual pleasure. Women's bodies have been painted, plucked, 
tinted, shaved, clothed, exposed, fetished, fragmented and 
contorted to fit a million male fantasies. Most women cringe 
a little and keep silent. But in November 1978, 350 women 



Helcnc Roscnbluth, 
producer of a two-part 
docunicnlary on women's 
response to pornography 
afid violence in the 
media. 

Dr. Carl Faber, Clinical 
Psyrholonist and UCLA 
Extension lecturer, is 
back with a new series 
on Anxiety and Fear, 
on "SoniethinK's Hap- 
pening." after midnii;hi. 

Photo of the two of 
them together, taken 
at a lecture two years 
aso, by Roy of 
Prescience. 



got together in San Francisco for a Conference on Pornogra- 
phy and Violence in Media, to say a resounding NO to the 
misogynist message of pornography and its violent influence 
in societ\ . KPFK's Helcne Rosenbluth attended the confer- 
ence and brought back her tapes to share with KPFK's listen- 
ers. It is a difficult and many-faceted problem, as you can 
sec by the titles of the workshops and the discussions they 
provoked. In two parts, Thursday Match 22 and 29, 8:00 
p.m. (and rebroadcast the following Tuesdays at 2:00 p.m.). 
Topics for part one include Pornography and the First A- 
mendment; What is Pornography; and the Effects of Porno- 
graphy. Part two covers Child Porn; Pornography and Racism; 
and Pornography and the New Left. 




HOLDING UP MORE THAN HALF THE SKY 

March 8 is International Women's Day. It began in 
1908, when massive demonstrations of garment workers in 
New York protested "sweat shops" and child labor, and de- 
manded wonjen get the right to vote. It spread to Europe in 
1910, when German socialist leader Clara Zetkin raised a 
motion at the Socialist International Ct)ngrcss in Copenha- 
gen to immortalize March 8 as an international working wo- 
men's holiday. The motion w.is seconded by Lenin, and it 
spread thrt)ughout the socialist world. In the meantime, 
what began as ,m American holidav was "forgotten" in Ame- 
rica, until it was rediscovered more than half a cenlurv latei 
by the women participating in the new feminist movement 
of the late fiO's. It has become more prevalent in recent years 
even to the extent of being mentioned on the mass media, at 
the end ol the evening newscast perhaps, but little mention 
is made of the origins ol the da\ 

In a month-long celebration ol this historic day. 
Holding Up More TInin Hal! the Sky will be feaiuring docu- 
mentaries on women organizers, women writers, <\nd present- 
day violence against women. Produced by the Women's Co- 
aliii.m of KPFK, HUMTHTS airs Wednesdays at 5:00 p.m. 



SOMETHING'S HAPPENING AFTER MIDNIGHT 

/ WANT TO DIE: The Experience and Meaning of Ansiety 
and Fear. This month, Something's Happening features ano- 
ther UCLA Extension course with clinical psychologist Dr. 
Carl Faber. Quoting from the UCLA Extension Catalogue: 

"Attempting to deal with anxiety usually includes 
suppression, distortion and the illusion of mastery. Anxiety 
is viewed as a failure of self-discipline, belief of courage-a 
serious failure to achieve the desired goal of an anxiety-free 
state where love, peace and creativity How in some constant, 
harmonic way . 

"Deeper wisdom and understanding arc in radical 
opposition to this. Fear, with its instinctual value in self- 
preservation, becomes the major voice in calling us to con- 
sciousness; it consistently exposes our illusions, ignorance 
and limitations; it teaches about isolation and alienation. 
Ultimately, anxiety and fear force us to examine our ambi- 
valence toward our many "dyings" in the process of living." 

The six-lecture course will air on Tuesday nights, 
just after midnight, at the top of Something's Happening. 
Tapes arc made available courtesy of UCLA Extension. 



MARCH FOLIO PAGE ? 



Snecial Davi in March 



Special programming and fundraising days are 
scheduled for five days in March. Thev will be 
highlighted by focus around a theme, and they 
will be scheduled around six to eight hours per 
day of fundraising. The Folio lists in detail the 
program schedule and the fundraising times, so 
that subscribers can listen to the parts they want, 
and skip the "pitch," to which they have already 
responded! Ah, the advantage of having a Folio! 



Themes for the days are: 
Thursday, the 1st: "Uncensored Voices." 
Friday, the 2nd: Science Fiction. 
Saturday, the 3rd: "Different Drumming." 
Friday the 16th: "Give the Money & Run." 
Sunday the 18th: "Bury Me in My Overalls," 
a tribute to the beloved folksinger Malvina 
Reynolds, on the 1st anniversary of her death. 
Please see Folio listings for all the details. 



March, 1979 
DEAR KPFK PEOPLE 



Feedback 

(please U),c rnorr paper if yon need lo.'J 



Mail to: 

KPFK-FEEDBACK 
PO Box 8639 
Universal City CA 91608 



1 



(name & address optional) 
Name 



May we print your name in the Folio?. 
Do you wish a written response? 



Address 



MARCH FOLIO PAGE 8 



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MARCH FOLIO PAGE 9 




Thursday- 



The function of a special fundraising day is 
threefold. First, of course, we need to raise funds and 
new subscriptions for listener-supported free radio— 
KPFK. But we also just want to "show off" a bit, what 
we have done, what we arc doing, or what we can or 
might do. And third, to you, our regular supporters who 
make it all possible, we want to present programs you 
want to hear again, or for the first time, so that despite 
scheduled fundraising times, you can enjoy those parts 
of the day dedicated to interesting, informative and 
sometimes inspiring radio which our listener-sponsored 
structure allows us to aspire to without fear. 

y 

Uncensored Voices Day was difficult to pro- 
gram. The difficulty was lo take a small sampling of the 
giant pile of potential programs gathered for the day— 
we could have presented three or four days' worth of 
"uncensored voices" easily! Some of the day's programs 
are "war horses" we've broadcast again and again, which 
are still appreciated and requested. Some may be now to 
you. All have been on our air in the past, and serve tri- 
bute to the Pacifica which is "there" when "there" may 
not yet be of interest to the general media public. 

Hope you enjoy the day -and tell a friend. 

Roy Tuckman, Producer 

6:00 SUNRISE CONCERT/ Carl Stone 
7:30 PAYING THE PIPER: Fundraising 

8:30 EARLY THIS MORNING 

So good to have a Folio! The morning news is 
up Vi hour this morning to catch regular non-subscribing 
listeners. How important is it to hear KPFK's morning 
news and information service? 

9:00 WILFRED BURCHETT: 

Four Decades and Three &)ntinents 

We've selected Pan 2 of our recently broadcast scries of 
5 programs with Wilfred Burchctt, international journal- 
ist: In this part of the interview, he describes what ho 



saw as the first Western correspondant to enter Hiro- 
shima after the Atomic Bomb. An important voice, to 
be heard on KPFK, and perhaps nowhere else in South- 
ern California. 

9: 1 5 NO NEWS IS BAD NEWS 

A plea to the news missers who, not having a 
Folio, missed out and we hope are thus motivated to 
help support KPFK's News and Public Affairs program- 
ming. 

10:00 VIOLETA PARRA: A Woman of the Continent 

Carlos Hagen presents a brief survey on this le- 
gendary Chilean folk singer whose songs and especially 
protest songs arc well known throughout Latin America. 
Carlos discusses her life and some of the reasons why she 
suffered so much nr^glcct and rejection from the artistic 
cultural Establishment of Chile. Included also is a gener- 
ous sampling of the songs, lyrics and performing style of 
Violcta Parra, which shows her immense versatility, from 
old colonial songs lo vibrant songs of political and social 
protest. A voice rarely heard, except on KPFK, and judg- 
ing from the response to this many-times-broadcast 
program, a wonderful one. 

11:00 THE VOICE OF MARIO CASETTA 

A not-loo-rarc opportunity lo hear Mario raising 
funds for kPFK in the late morning hours. 

12:00 ATRIBLTE TO PAUL ROBESON: 
His Songs and Thoughts 

A very censored voice, heard during the blacklist days 
as well as after his death on Pacifica Radio. An inspiring 
and inspired program of his life and music. 

1:20 FUNDRAISING 

2:30 DYLAN THOMAS: Reading at KPFA 

In 1952, the pool dropped bv our sibling station 
in Berkeley and recorded a short reading. Few heard it, 
few were interested in hearing him, but the tape has since 
become a collector's item. 



MARCH FOLIO PAGE 10 



2:45 ALAN WATTS: Way Beyond the West 

The since-noted philosopher used to have a regu- 
lar program on KPFA Berkeley, as an unknown "Beatnik" 
advocate of Zen and other Eastern stuff. . . . This program 
is the first of a series broadcast on KPFK many times in 
the past 20 years, and constantly re-requested. 

3:15 FUNDRAISING 

4:00 GEORGE BERNARD SHAW ON WAR 

A statement recorded by the playwright in 1937 
when he was 84 years old. A rare and poignant tape. 

4:15 FUNDRAISING 

5:30 THE EVENING NEWS 

Early again, to make non-subscribing regular liS' 
tcners wonder if it's worth 57 cents a week to hear KPFK 
News. They might be missing 8 cents worth today for not 
having a Folio. 

6: 1 5 AN I NFORMAL TALK WITH CHE GUEVAR.A 

Our archives yielded this extraordinary find-a 
conversation with the revolutionary leader conducted at 
our sibling station WBAI New York in the early 60's. 

6:45 FUNDRAISING 

7:30 PiAF: In Memoriam 

Another extraordinary documentary exploring 
the life and art of the famous French popular singer, 
Edith Piaf. The prf)gram is a moving tribute to her life 
and art and is illustrated with a large number of her re- 
cordings, many of them very rare. Produced by Carlnr 
Hagcn. 

8:30 FUNDRAISING 

9:00 TINY TIM AND SIGMUND FREUD 

Yes folks, everyone knows, or at least can re- 
member Tiny Tim. But before he was famous, he was 
actually discovered by our then raving Music Director 
and current programmer William Malloch. A nostalgic 
24 minutes with a later famous voice. Recorded in Ap- 
ril, 1966. 

At 9:25, The Voice of Sigmund Freud. The 
"Psychoanalytic Review" presents the voice of Freud 
recorded in 1938 shortly before his death. Introduction 
by Marie Coleman Nelson, managing editor of the Review. 

9:30 FUNDRAISING 

10:30 ISAAC BASHEVIS SINGER 

The Nobel Prize winning author, a familiar voice 
on KPFK, reads /I Friend of Kafka, and responds to audi- 
ence questions. Recorded at Cal State Northridge in 1970, 
produced bv Cvnthia Sears. 

11:10 FUNDRAISING 

12:00 SOMETHING'S HAPPENING!/ Roy of Hollywood 

Tonight a fundraising-typc night with Patricia Ro- 
chelle Diegcl who will give psychic readings, especially to 
new subscribers. To you oldies, the secret word is "lion." 
Goal is 41,000 as our part in the 3-day March fundraiser. 
Then open night for whatever untill 5:00 when we present 
part 8 and last of ZBS Media's Stars N' Staff featuring' "The 
Bureau of Disillusionmcnts Vs. the Great Gnrboni'o" or 



"Come Back, Duke of Earll"; "Rocket Pierre and the Crown 
Jewels of lupiter," and part 3 of "Boogie Woogie to the 
Stars and Bach Again." Goodbye S.N'S., we'll be looking 
forward to the upcoming Incredible Adventures of lack 
Flanders in a month or so. 



Friday 2 




i9iTTHe wTURevei? 



6:00 SUNRISE CONCERT/ Carl Stone 

7:00 SF ON RADIO-I 

First Contact, about the first meeting between 
Terrans and aliens. Then, the first contact between KPFK 
people and those who should think about supporting their 
community radio station. 

8:00 SFONRADIO-II 

The Stars Arc the St\'.\, written by Theodore 
Sturgeon. Followed by more appeals for support. 

9:00 THIS .MORNING 

Susan Anderson hosts, with a special edition of 
"Read All About It," devoted to science and technology. 
Also, Terry Hodel's Calendar. 

10:00 SCIENCE FICTION PANEL 

Lester Del Rcy, Fred Pohl, Alan Dean Foster, 
Larry Niven and the late Leigh Bracket! in a taped dis- 
cussion of science fiction from the inside out. 



MARCH FOLIO PAGE 11 



11:00 TANSTAAFL. ... 

There Ain't No Such Thinq As A Free Lunch, said 
Robert Heinlein, and that is one of the themes we'll mention 
when we ask for your support. 

12:00 MOON CONCERT 

2:00 FRANK HERBERT: Vision Revision 

The author of Dune talks with Professor Willis 
McNelly about his visions of the future. This interview was 
recorded February 1969. Happy Decade! 

3:30 THE FUTURE BEGINS WITH YOU 

The future of KPFK, that is. And this appeal for 
funds is the way it happens. 

4:00 SCIENCE FICTION FESTIVAL 

A two-hour mix of sf, readings, interviews, and 
other material, plus appeals for funding. At least we're 
asking for less than NASA is. 

6:00 THE EVENING NEWS 

Back to the news of today. 

6:45 COMMENTARY: Your Turn 
7:00 FUNDRAISING 

7:30 BRAVE NEW WORLD-1 

The CBS Radio Workshop dramatization, intro- 
duced by the author himself, Aidous Huxley. 



8:00 BRAVE NEW KPFK 

To keep that terrifying dream from happening, 
we need your support. 

8: 30 BRAVE NEW WORLD-I I 

The second half of the CBS Radio Workshop 
production of Aidous Huxley's classic novel. 

9:00 BRAVE NEW KPFK-II 

Again, your support is our gt)al. 

9:30 GOING DOWN SMOOTH 

The Robcri Silverberg story, read by Mitchell Harding. 

10:00 HOUR 25 

A special edition of the only science fiction radio 
program in Southern California. Including Terry Model's 
document try on Women in SF. And at 1 1 :30, Linda Sirawn 
hosts Futurewatch, monitoring the cutting edge, where sci- 
ence and religion are forming our future. 

12:00 GOODBYE PORKPIE HAT/ Paul Vangelisti 

Paul Vangelisti, our Cultural Affairs Director, puts 
on his other hat and programs jazz recordings and live per- 
formances, when there arc folks in town to drop in. 

2:00 THE BIG SLEEP/ John Breckow 

This is what you do when you don't want to 
sleep quite yet. The listening is easy. 




Saturday 3 



This is a special day at KPFK -unique in broadcasting, as ' 
far as we know. Non-stop drumming, live, records and tapes, 
from 8:30 a.m. to midnight. It's all planned to engage, amuse, 
intrigue and, we hope, delight you as we diddle-de-dum along 
with Taiko, Tupan and Tabia, Conga and Bongo, Flair Snare 
and a few you have yet to hear of. We're drumming up new 
subscribers to keep listener-sponsored radio alive in Southern 
California and this promises to be a lively way to do it. In 
the old days, they sang: "Toss a nickel on the drum, save 
another drunken bum." Now we march to a different drum- 
mer: "Call 985-KPFK, join the club and subscribe today!" 
Produced by Mario Casetta and Carl Stone, from morning 
'lil night. 



6:00 
7:30 
8:30 

9:30 



NO STRINGS ATTACHED/ Scott Bodell 

FUSION/ Lauren Lee 

THE NIXON TAPES/ Tom Nixon 
On the drum head. 



THE DRUMS OF INDIA 

An exciting sonic display, featuring the legendary 
I ,P. Gosh with percussion ensemble. This musician of monu- 
mental reputation demonstrates his virtuosity on a wide va- 
riety of drums from the sub-coniineni: the large wooden 
Pakhjwaj; cylindrical clay Khol; North Indian double-drum 
T.ibia; South Indian Mridangam; ihc shallow opcn-sidcd 
Khanjari; wooden cotlon-thrcadcd Dholak; Kakarn with dou- 



MARCH FOLIO PAGE 12 



ble drums; ihe hourglass-shaped Huruk; string and leather ac- 
tivated Khamak; the bass Bayan in the Tabia pair and finally, 
concert ensemble with each drum making a distinctive con- 
tribution to the total spectrum of sounds. Presented by 
Mario Casetta, who will include subscription information 
and requests at intervals. 

10:30 LIVE DRUMMING: Hank Levin 

Musicologist and amhority on Indian drums, 
in person to explain and demonstrate the ancient per- 
cussion of India. 

12:00 ZAONDEKaZA 

Selections from the Demon Drummers' first album 
with Victor Records of Japan. Contains "Tsugarujamisen," 
"Yataibayashi," "Odaiko"and "Ajikan" (music, rituals, 
dances). 

12:30 DRUMMING UP TRADE WITH THE CAR SHOW 

We have not been able to confirm the rumor that 
Len and |ohn will extemporize solely on the brake drum in 
honor of the day; we imagine they'll remind non-subscribers 
to get in touch, and we're positive they'll answer phone-ins 
about a wide range of car problems. 

1 :30 AFRICAN DANCES AND GAMES 

From west Africa, a collection of games and dances 
using such tribal rhythms as Hatsitsia, Yewe Cult, Agbekor, 
Sogbo, Kinka, Gahu, Sowu and Drum Rhythms of West Af- 
rican Highlife dancing. Music in the Ewe style in South-East- 
ern Ghana and South Western Togo. From S&R Records No. 
2000, Created especially for the dancer. And Mario Casetta 
interviews Bob Frazier. (With the Ladzekpo Brothers). 

2:30 LIVE DRUMMING: Saadoun Al-Bayati 

Whether you say Durbooka, TabIa Derbecki or 
Dumbek, it's all fantastic drumming in the hands of this 
Iraqui master drummer. 

3:30 DRUMMING UP TRADE WITH DAN WRIGHT 

Song S. Celebration with an accent on - how did 
you guess? - drums & drumming. And subscription appeals. 



5:00 ZAONDEKaZA 

Perhaps the most dramatic, unusLial and exciting 
drum ensemble on the face of the earth -five women and 
eleven men, marathon runners all, from the Japanese island 
of Sado, in breathtaking percussion music. Latest album 
contains "MonochriMnc II," premiered at Berlin Melamusic 
Fcstival-76, (Maki Ishii) , is a follow-up to "Mono-Prism" 
which was a commissioned work for )apanesc Drums of 
Ondeko-za artd premiered at Tanglewood with Seiji Ozawa 
and the Boston Symphony. Also to be heard are "Yumega- 
hama" Drums and "Variations on Mikuii Taiko." Presented 
by Mario Casetta, with of course a subscription break or two. 

6:00 THE EVENING NEWS 

6:15 LIVE DRUMMING 

Another special in-stiidio drimi performance. 

7:00 AFRaAMERICAN DRUMS 

From the Harold Courlander collection produced 
by Moses Asch on Ethnic Folkways Library Album P-502: 
Puerto Rico, Bomba Dance Drums; the Bahamas, lumping 
Dance Drums; Cuba, Djoka Dance Drums, Lucumi Drums; 
Haiti, Quitta Seche Dance Drums & )uba Dance Drumming; 
Jamaica, Cumina Drums; Brazil, Drum Rhythms for the Deity 
Eshu and Drum Rhythms for the Deitv Ogoun; Virgin Islands, 
Bamboula Dance DrLims; Surinam, Oiuka Drums; USA,Jazz 
Drumming by Baby Dodds & Street Band Drumming. Pre- 
sented by Mario Casetta, with inicrsticial subscription in- 
formation and requests. 

8:00 THE WILLIAM MALLOCH PROGRAMME 

Or, "Drum Along with William." 

10:00 IMAGINARY LANDSCAPE 

Carl Stone and Leni Isaacs host tonight's presenta- 
tion of Steve Reich's Drumming, and remind non-subscrib- 
ing listeners how to take the pledge. 

12:00 TESSERACT/ Phil Mendclson 

2:00 ON THE CORNER/ Ron Pelletier 



Zaondeko-za, Japanese demon drummers (pictured on opposite page), at noon and 5:00 p.m. Below, Baby Dobbs, Afro-American jazz drums, 
at 7:00 p.m. (left), and Steve Reich, whose drumming will be heard on "Imaginary Landscape" at 10:00 p.m. All arc part of our "Different 
Drumming" Day, based on an idea from William Malloch, to raise interest and support for KPFK. 



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MARCH FOLIO PAGE 13 




SOMOS.. A journalistic milestone for the four 
million Chicanos in California. This provoca- 
tive regional monthly magazine is filled with 
the most recent irrfomnation on literature, 
politics, education, personalties, art, and per- 
spectives on trends that reflect Chicanismo. 
For your personal subscription, complete the 
information slip below and return to: 

SOMOS Magazine Subscriptions 
P.O. Box 5697, San Bernardino. CA._92412 

D 1 year^To D 2 yeare-$18 □ 3 years-$24 D Bill me 

Charge to my: No. : 

O Bank Amehcard n Master Charge a VISA 

Mame & Address 

City, State, & Zip 



MARCH FOLIO PAGE 14 



6:00 
9:00 



Sunday 4 



GOSPEL CARAVAN 

Host is the legendary Prince Dixon. 



BIO-MEDITATION/ Jack Gariss 

An experiential, experimental exploration of 
states of consciousness, body states, and you. 

10:00 CARLOS HAGEN PRESENTS: Radio Collage 

n : 00 DOROTHY HEALEY: Marxist Commentary 

Longtime activist and analyst in the Southern Cali- 
fornia movement for social change, vk'ith guests and open phones. 



9:30 FOLKSCENE/ The Larmans 

Traditional and contcmpdrary American folk music, 
music from the British Isles, France, Australia, New Zealand, 
and Canada. The program features live music, interviews 
with the performers, and the finest in recorded music. 

1 2:00 SMOKE Rl NGS/ | ohn Breckow 

As the smoke rings clear. . . join host John 
Breckow and noted jazz musicians, writers, archivi5*s, and 
record producers for conversation and a rich variety of music. 



12:00 



1:00 



MANY WORLDS OF MUSIC/ Mario Casetta 
A musical journey to the far and near corners. 



THE SUNDAY OPERA/ Fred Hyatt 

DELIBES: Lakme with Mado Robin as Lakmc, and 
Libero de Luca as Gerald. Georges Sebastian conducts the 
Orchestra and Chorus de I 'Opera Comique. A European Dec- 
ca recording. 

5:00 THE SOUR APPLE TREE/ Qare Spark 

Form, ideology, and consciousness. Critical analysis 
of current cultural history. Guests, phones, recent scholar- 
ship. Entertaining. 

6:00 THE SUNDAY NEWS/ Sanford Fidell 

6:30 THE SCIENCE CONNECTION 

Astronomer Steve Kilston and physicist Vera 
Kilston explore the adventure of humans trying to under- 
stand nature. Call in if you have questions. Or answers. 

7:00 PREACHIN' THE BLUES 

Frank Scott and Mary Aldin present blues both 
ancient and recent, from close by and far away, from their 
extensive collection of the whole gamut of recorded blues. 

8:30 LESBIAN SISTE«?S/ Helene Rosenbluth 

Audrc Lordc spoke at the Conference on Feminist 
Perspectives in Pornography about the difference between 
erotica and pornography,. Poetry of Adrienne Rich and 
Nellie Wong. 



Audrc Lordc, Adrienne Rich 



i""** 



Monday 5 



6:00 



SUNRISE CONCERT/ Carl Stone 

This morning's featured work is BACH's Actu^ 
Tragicus "Gottes Zei! ist die allcrbestc Zeit " featLiring 
soloists Elly Ameling, Maureen Lchane, Kurt Equiluz 
and Barry McDanicI, along with the Aachener Domchor 
and members of the Collegium Aurcum, conducted by 
Rudolf Pohl. Harmonia Mudi HB 21441. 

9:00 THIS MORNING 

News; commentary by Richard Santillan; Read 
All About It and Terry Hodel's Calendar. 



10:00 
11:00 



FOLKDANCE WITH MARIO! 



THE MORNING READING 

Bill Hunt and Paul Vangelisti offer selections 
from the Memoirs of lacqiies Casanova. 

1 1 -30 KULCHUR: In the Wings/ John Medici 

12:00 NOON CONCERT /John Schneider 

Today we present Momcntc (Europe Version 1972) 
by Karlheinz STOCKHAUSEN. Those who are familiar with 
his music, listne in and get a surprise; those who aren't, listen 
in and get a stirprisc anyway. 



2:00 



3:00 



EARPLAY1979 

Rebroadcast of Cusier, from Feb. 28, 9:30 p.m. 




CLOSE-UP/ Rick James 

Miles Alwad. Classic performances by trumpeter 
Miles Davis, who has propounded enough musical innova- 
tion and history to fill volumes. 

3:30 ORGANIC GARDENING 

Master gardener Will Kinney along with genial host 
and amateur gardener Barbara Spark will answer your ques- 
tions and perhaps save your garden's whole season! 

DEALING/ Barbara Cady 

ASIAN OUTLOOK 

Information and features on the Asian community. 

CALENDAR/ Terry Hodel 
THE EVENING NEWS 
COMMENTARY/ Charles Morgan 

LABOR SCENE/ Sam Kushner 

Working people, organized and otherwise, are one 
ol the largest and most influential social groups in modern 
society. What they do affects you. Live guests, open phones. 

MARCH FOLIO PAGE 15 



7:30 



8:00 



REPORT TO THE LISTENER/ Jim Berlaiid 

General Manager's face to face with the listeners. 



LA VI DA LATIN A 

Luis Torres and David Sandoval offer information 
and features from the Latino community, with music. 

9:00 CHAPEL, COURT AND OOUISTT RYSI DE 

KPFK's Showcase for Larly Music presents a varied 
program of music from the more remote epochs of European 
history, featuring rare and hard-to-find recordings. Your host 
Joseph Spencer, will be present in the studio to take phone 
calls, answer questions, and solicit liston-TS. ideas for future 
editions of CC&C. 

10:30 IN FIDELITY/ Peter Siitheim 

LA's only noncommercial program about atidio. 
Tonight: Microphone perspectives. Four different "true 
stereo" mikings of a variety of live music, done simulta- 
neously on an 8-track recorder. Maybe you'll want to guess 
which technique was used in each example. Prepared by 
Wes Dooley and Ron Streichcr of Audio Engineering As- 
sociates. Peter is KPFK's Director of Operations. Open phones. 

12:00 SOMETHING'S HAPPENING!/ Roy of Hollywood 

From UCLA Extension, recorded by KPFK, Media 
Power in LA, a series of panels organized and moderated by 
Ellen Stern Harris. Tonight, Panel No. 2 (No. 1 was not re- 
corded) of 9: "The Los Angeles Times as Dominant Media 
Force" with Maury Green, TV commentator: Dave Shaw, 
LA Times press critic; Jean Palmer; Bob Gottlieb, journalist, 
author and co-producer of KPFK's IVIedia Watcli; Richard 
Adier of the Herald Examiner (ca. 2 hrs.). Then Tlie Subject 
Was Roses by Rank D. Gilroy with Jack Albertson, Irene 
Dailey and Martin Sheen (Columbia DOS 708) (ca. 2 hrs.). 
In between and afterwards, open night. 



Tuesday 6 



6:00 



SUNRISE CONCERT/ Carl Stone 

Today's featured work: PERGOLESI's La Serva 
Padrona, with Maddalena Bonifaccio and Siegmund Nims- 
gern, Bass, along with the Collegium Aureum led by Franz- 
josef Maier. Harmonia Mundi KHB-21022. 

9:00 THIS MORNING 

News; commentary by Grace Jacobs; "Read All 
About It;" and Calendar. 

10:00 FOLKSCENE/ The Lai mans 

Today, folk music from the British Isles. 

11:00 THE ^/lORNING READING 

Tlic Memoirs ol Jacques Casatiova. 

1 1 :30 KULCHUR: Backstasc/ Gil Laurence 

Gil Laurence takes his tape recorder around the 
world cif LA Theater, interviewing those who make it happen. 

12:00 NOON CONCERT: 

At the Keyboaid/ Leonid Hambro 

Dclores Stevens plays works from the contemporary piano 
literature on today's bioadcasl, live from KPFK's studios. 



2:00 



3:00 



UNCENSORED VOICE REBROADCAST 

Rebroadcast from Thursday the 1st. 



CLOSE-UP/ Rick James 

Miles Ahiead. Concluding our focus on the music 
and background of the influential trunrpeter Miles Davis. 

3: 30 STRAWBERRY SHORTBREAD/ Pat Benson 

Examining the public schools, parental involvement, 
multicultural and multilingual plans for the schools, and the 
other ways the schools could be made to serv? the community. 




■lUJ 11 



4:30 



THE CORRECT CHANGE COMEDY MINUTES 

SPECIAL SERIES. This month's Tuesday Deaiing 
programs have given over to this mini-series of special radio 
plays created for KPFK (see "Highlights"). The 5th and last 
play in the series will air Friday March 30, also at 4:30 p.m. 
Today's episode: Ttie Anxiety of Mary Francis, by Jack Po- 
dell, examining the pervasiveness of "dookie" in the life of 
a nine-year-old. Featuring Jacque Lynn Colton, Dierdre 
Terthrong, Laura Fanning, and Bill Hunt. Technical produc- 
tion by Peter Sutheim. Produced by Laura Fanning and 
Susan La Tempa. 

5:00 LA 5 PM/ Burt Wilson 

Tlie Nuclear Menaces. Burt explores the many sides 
of nuclear power and armament. Open phones. 



5:55 
6:00 
6:45 



CALENDAR/ Terry Hodel 
THE EVENING NEWS 



TAKING SIDES 

Debating the important current issues, with spokes- 
people from widely divergent viewpoints. The moderator is 
Anita Frankel. 



7:30 
8:00 



OPEN JOURNAL: Late breaking features 



CALIFORNIA UPDATE 

California Public Radio's Gabriela Castelan and 
Donovan Reynolds produce this weekly series of features 
on important state issues, from Sacramento. 

9:00 RUDOLF BUCHBINDER: Live at UCLA 

SPECIAL BROADCAST. Tonight's recital was re- 
corded live last January 27 at UCLA's Royce Hall. The con- 
cert features the Czech-born pianist Rudolf Buchbinder in 
recital. Mr. Buchbinder has been praised internationally for 
his clarity, precision and musicianship, and was the recipient 
of the Grand Prix du Disque for his recording of the com- 
plete Haydn Sonatas. Tonight we hear SCHUMANN: Fantasy 
in C major, Op. 1 7; BEETHOVEN: 32 Variations on an Ori- 
ginal Theme in C minor; Sonata in F minor. Op. 57; HAYDN: 
Sonata in F major j-j. 16. The intermission features a conver- 
sation between Buchbinder and Henri Temianka. Produced 
for radio by Carl Stone in cooperation with UCLA. Recorded 
using the Dolby 'A' Noise-Reduction System. Note: the Bos- 
ton Symphony concert (regularly heard at this time) will air 
at Noon tomorrow, Wednesday the 7th. 



MARCH FOLIO PAGE W 



1 1 :00 THE BIG BROADCAST/ Qobb Lynes 

Adventures by Morse (1940's): "Land of the Living 
Dead" parts 1 and 2 (2 30' chapters). 

12:00 SOMETHING'S HAPPENING!/ Roy of Hollywood 

Tonight we begin a 6 lecture series from UCLA Ex- 
tension by Dr. Carl Fnber: / Want to Die— The Experience 
and Meaning of Anxietv and Fear. Tonight, talk no. 1: "An- 
xiety as Calling ano Inspiration" (ca 90'). The series will run 
Tuesday nights for the next 6 weeks (see "Highlights" section 
for details). Then Dudley Knight drops by and reads an sf or 
horror story live on The Graveyard Shift (ca 60'). From Al 
Huebner, producer of The Health Department, a Great At- 
lantic Radio Conspiracy (GARC) program on nuclear ener- 
gy (60') followed by The Atomic Bombing of Worcester, 
from WCUW, Worcester, Mass., giving us a first hand experi- 
ence of a nuclear disaster as it might have happened, or might 
still happen, from the National Federation of Community 
Broadcasters (NFCB) (36'). At 5:00, )ack Gariss with Bio- 
Meditation. 




Wednesday 7 



6:00 SUNRISE CONCERT/ Carl Stone 

This morning's featured work: CAVALLI's La 
Calisto, Janet Baker and James Bowman, soloists; Glynde- 
bourne Festival Opera Chorus and the London Philharmonic 
Orchestra conducted by Raymond Lcppard. Argo ZNF 11-12. 

9:00 THIS MORNING 

News; commentary by Jeff Horton; "Read All 
About It;" Calendar of Events. 

10:00 FOLKDANCE WITH MAR^O! 

1 1 :00 THE MORNING READING 

The Memoirs of Jacques Casanova. 



11:30 KULCHUR: Theater Qose-Up/ Ray Tatar 

Call In For Comedy. Theater Close-up focuses on 
LA's improvisational theater. Live call-in with live studio 
audience, moderated by Ray Tatar and produced by Piper 
Thomas. Today: OFF THE WALL. 

1 2:00 NOON CONCERT: Boston Symphony 

(Note: Normally scheduled on Tuesday evening, 
this one Boston Concert was moved to this spot to allow 
for a special Recital yesterday evening in prime time. The 
Boston returns to its Tuesday evening 9 p.m. slot next week.) 

BEETHOVEN: Symphony No. 4 in B flat major; J ANACEK: 
Slavonic Mass. Soloists: Esther Hinds, soprano; Joy Davidson, 
mezzo-soprano; John Milchinson, tenor; Victor Braun, bari- 
tone. The New England Conservatory Chorus, Lorna Cooke 
de Varon, conductor; Gillian Weir, organist. Andrew Davis 
conducts. William Pierce hosts. Dolby A (subj. to change). 

2:00 THE BIG BROADCAST/ Bobb Lynes 

Surprise Special of the Month! 

3:30 RUTH'S KITCHEN/ Rirth Ziony 

Recipes, recommendations, condemnations, 
gossip and gobbling in the Kitchen. 

4:30 SOCIOLOGIST'S EYE ON SPORT 

Jonathan Crower and guests cast a unique perspec- 
tive on the world of sport, organized and individualized. 

5:00 HOLDING UP MORE THAN HALF THE SKY 

So You've Heard It Before. In celebration of Inter- 
national Women's Day, March 8, the life of the Black woman 
in Apartheid South Africa is portrayed through women's po- 
etry, writings and music. Featured are the poems of Susan 
Anderson and Zindzi Mandela, seventeen-year-old daughter 
of the banished Nomzamo Winnie Mandela and Nelson Man- 
dela, ANC leader serving life sentence on Robben Island; ex- 
cerpts from Joyce Sikakane's The Window on Soweto: and 
the music of Miriam Makeba, Lelta Mbulu, and Mayibuyc. 
Produced by Pearl Skotnes and Susan Anderson. 

5:55 CALENDAR/ Terry Hodel 

6:00 THE EVENING NEWS 

6:45 COMMENTARY/ Charles Morgan 

7:00 CONSIDER THE ALTERNATIVES 

Foreign policy issues, disarmament, nuclear power 
in world relations, and more. From the Longhorn Radio 
Network. 



7:30 
8:00 

9:30 



OPEN JOURNAL: Ute breaking features 

UP FROM THE ASH GROVE/ Ed Pearl 

Music of the p.?ople-country, city, old, new. 



EAPPLAY 1979 

Stevie. Glenda Jackson stars in the story of 
Stevic Smith, a celebrated English poet and a remarkable 
woman. Written by Hugh Whitemore and directed by Dic- 
kon Reed. Originally produced by the BBC, and funded by 
the Corporation for Public Broadcasting and the National 
Endowment for the Arts. Rebroadcast Monday the 12th, 
2:00 p.m. 

10:30 CLOSE 

Original rr.dioworks by artists. 



MARCH f^OLIO PAGE 17 



10:45 RADIO FREE OZ 

Do movie stars really cat Comatoast, the breakfast 
of champions for breakfast? Arc nose straws in? )oJn the 
troups at O^ for an in depth probe of Hollywood's lowest 
budget set -Victoria, Peter, Phil, Howard, Suzie, John and 
who knows who else? 

12:00 SOMETHING'S HAPPENING!/ Roy of Hdlywood 

The "Something's Happening Players" (Dimension 
of Imagination) strike again with a scries of 5 new produc- 
tions to be broadcast at this time every week. Tonight, House 
Guest by Joseph K. Adams (30'). An unusual ghost story 
with a cast of lots headed by Dorothy Carruthers, Doug 
Blackburn and Michael Abrams. Then, an alternative view 
of International Women's Day with To Women by Count 
Leo Tolstoy, read by Larry Josephson, KPFA (15'). Then 
the first of 4 related dramas by Earplay. Tonight, The Day 
John Williams Fell Down the Stairs and Died (60'). We sa- 
lute CBS, now beginning a new radio drama scries, by prc- 
sentiiig some of the best old radio ever made, "CBS Radio 
Workshop." Tonight, "Annie Christmas," narrated by Wil- 
liam Conrad (30'); "Heaven is the Sky," narrated by Frank 
Gross (30'), and their first production, "Brave New World" 
(60'), narrated by Aldous Huxley, the author, with Joseph 
Kcarns, William Conrad and Lawrence Dobkin. At 5:00, 
Aldous Huxley continues with the 5th of the Huxley Lec- 
tures delivered at UCSB in the Fall of 1959. 



Thursday 8 

6:00 SUNRISE CONCERT/ Carl Stone 

9:00 THIS MORNING 

News; Paul Schrade's commentary; "Read All 
About It;" Terry Hodel's Calendar. 

10:00 FOLKSCENE/ TTie Urmans 

Lnglish ballad singer Frankie Armstrong, recorded 
live in concert at McCabe's Concerts in Santa Monica. 

11:00 THE MORNING READING 

The Memoirs of Jacques Casanova, selected and 
read by Paul Vangelisti and Bill Hunt . 

11:30 KULCHUR 

Digest of news, criticism and features on the arts. 



tSurt Wilson talks with vctcr.iii Ron Kovic on "LA 5 PM" today. 





12:00 NOON CONCERT: Chapel, Court and Countryside 

First an hour of keyboard music by the great Gustav 
Lconhardt, who will be appearing in recital Wednesday March 
14. Heard in this hour will be works for harpsichord and or- 
gan by Bach (no. 224). In the second hour, the incredible 
Catalonian soprano Montserrat Figueras, her husband jordi 
Savall, and their Ensemble Hesperion XX will perform works 
from the early 17th Century in Spain (no. 208). Your host 
is Joseph Spencer. 

2:00 WE CALL IT MIJSIC 

Hosts Jim Sccley and Tom Halladay play bop and 
other quasi-antiques from the early days of jazz. 

3:00 GREY POWER 

Host Aurelia Morris and guests explore the joys 
and pains of the aging process. 

3:30 THE HEALTH DEPARTMENT 

Host Al Huebner of Science for the People offers 
a wealth of information in the form of taped lectures, mini- 
documentariis, articles and guests, on health care systems- 
as they are and as they should be. 

4: 30 DEALI NG/ Barbara Cady 



News and views of varying hues. 



5:00 



LA 5 PM/ Burt Wilson 

The Vietnam Veteran. Burt and Vietnam vet Ron 
Kovic, author of "Born on the Fourth of July" discuss the 
plight of the returned veterans from the most tragic and 
most quickly forgottep US war. Open phones. 

5:55 CALENDAR/ Ten7 Hodel 

6:00 THE EVENING NBVS 

6:45 COMMENTARY/ Wiiliaiti Winter 

7:00 INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL 

Local experts on international relations discuss 
world events as they are analyzed in the international press. 

7:30 OPEN JOURNAL 

Time reserved for late- breaking features. 

8:00 SCHUBERT LIVE: A Sesquicentennial Celebration 

The Musical Instruments ot Schubert's Time. A quick 
history of the keyboard with recorded and live examples of 
music performed on keyboard instruments of the 1800's. In- 
cluded are excerpts from a Beethoven Piano Concerto on in- 
struments of the age, and the comparison of the Trout Quin- 
tet on early and contemporary instruments performed by 
Jorg Demus and Collegium Aurcum, and Rudolf Serkin with 
musicians from Marboro. The guest artist is Gloria Cheng. 

9:30 CLEVELAND ORCHESTRA: Live in G)ncert 

WALTON: Partita: BABIN: Concerto No. 2 tor 
Two Pianos; BLOCH: Sintonia Breve; HINDEMITH: Sym- 
phonic Metamorphosis of Themes by Weber. The duo- 
pianists are Richard and John Contiguglia. Louis Lane 
conducts. Robert Conrad hosts. Stereo, (subj. to change). 

1 1 :30 THE JANUS COMPANY RADIO THEATRE 

LIVE! Original radio play by Jan and Mallory 
Gellcr. Also featuring Eliza Lewin, Jan Rabson and Mike 
Hodcl. 



12:00 SOMETHING'S HAPPENING!/ Roy of Hollywood 

Time to polish up our auras as we present Susan 
Ford, aura reader, who will do live psychic readings of our 
auras (the secret word is "rainbow") and what it means in 
relation to the rest of us. Then open night until 5:10, when 
we be,i;in a series of talks by the late Anthropologist Mar- 
garet Mead. Tonight, " The Childhood Basis of Creativity." 



• Friday 9 

6:00 SUNRISE COhCERT/ Carl Stotie 

9:00 THIS MORNING 

News; commentary: "Your Turn" (listener response 
to KPFK commentators. For information on how to take 
part, call News & P. A. Director Susan Anderson at 877-271 1), 
"Read All About It" and Terry Model's Calendar. 

10:00 INDEPENDENT MUSIC/ Mario Casetta 

Sampling the music from the small, independent 
record labels. 



11:00 



11:30 



THE MORNING READING 

Concluding The Memoirs ot Jacques Casanova. 



KULCHUR 

Wrap-up of this week in the arts. Hosts are Paul 
Vangelisti, Bill Hunt and Dean Cohen. 

12:00 NOON CONCERT: Soundboard/ John Schneider 

Early music performed on the lute, archlute and 
baroque guitar. Music by Besard, Galilei, Mellii, Foscarini, 
Corbetta, Merchi and Bakfark will be heard and discussed. 



2:00 



3:00 



REEL TIME 

Selections from the Pacifica Archives. 



CLOSE-UP/ Rick James 

Featuring the music and background of the founder 
of the modern generation of jazz trombonists, ).J. Johnson. 

3:30 AMERICAN INDIAN AIRWAVES 

Interviews, opinion and cultural expression from the 
various facets of the Native American community, locally and 
nationally. Hosts are Liz Lloyd and Matt Keshena of the Tri- 
bal American Consulting Corp. With a mix of music from 
Native American traditions and tribes. 



4:30 
5:00 



DEALING/ Barbara Cady 



MEDIA WATCH 

Media is/are big business in Southern California. 
Hosts Bob Gottlieb and Claudia Fonda-Bonardi offer cri- 
ticism, analysis, reports and guests from/about it/them. 

5:55 CALENDAR/ Terry Hodel 

6:00 THE EVENING NEWS 

6:45 PRIME TIME 

Features on aging, produced in DC by Thea 
Marshall for the National Retired Teachers Association 
and the American Association of Retired Persons. 

7:00 INSIDE LA. / Earl Ofari 

Radiomagazine on local events and their impact 
on the rest of the country. 




7:30 CHILD'S PLAY 

Stories and features for children, mostly on record. 
Programmed by the Cultural Affairs Department. 

8:00 AFRO-BLUE / Sheila Eldridge 

Jazz, the best of the mainstream, with a taste of 
the avant-garde, and an accent on female vocalists. 

10:00 HOUR 25: Science Fiction 

Mike Hodel, John Henry Thong, Terry Hodel and 
guests delve into whatever needs delving this week. 

1 2:00 GOODBYE PORKPI E HAT/ Paul Vangel isti 

2:00 THE BIG SLEEP/ John Breckow 

When the bars close and the streetsweepers are 
making their rounds, join your amiable commentator and 
curator of the archives as he uncorks a vintage bouquet of 
fine recordings, rare "airchecks" and live performances. 



Saturday 10 



6:00 NO STRINGS ATTACHED/ Scott Bodel! 

Music for acoustical instruments 

7:30 FUSION/ Lauren Lee 

Fusion and progressive jazz. 

8: 30 THE Nl XON TAPES/ Tom Nixon 

Eclectica with a theme. 

9:30 HALFWAY DOWN THE STAI RS/ Uncle Ruthie 

Ruth Buell's song and story hour of kids &. others. 

10:30 FOLK MUSIC/ John Davis 

12:30 THE CAR SHOW 

Len Frank and John Retsek provide car-fare. 
They also answer your questions on motor problems. 



1:50 
2:00 
3:30 
6:00 
6:30 
6:45 



WEEKEND CALENDAR/ Terry Hodel 

BALLADS, BANJOS & BLUEGRASS/ Tom Sauber 

SONG <& CELEBRATION/ Dan Wright 

THE SATURDAY NEWS/ Larry Moss & friends 

ON FILM/ Dean Cohen 



DOUBLE TAKE/ Paul Lion 

Lion reviews plays; representatives from the pro- 
ductions respond. 



MARCH FOLIO PAGE 19 




Composcr/conductur of experimental music Bernard Rands visits 
Leni Isaacs and Carl Stone on "Imaginary Landscape" tonight at 10. 



7:00 



8:00 



THE PERFECT CRIME/ Mike Model 

All about whodunits, the writing and reading. 



THE WILLIAM MALLOCH PROGRAMME 

A musical (mostly classical) treasure hunt with 
the critic, composer, former music director of KPFK and 
Artistic Director of the Ojai Festival. 

10:00 IMAGINARY LANDSCAPE 

Conversations with Bernard Rands. The England- 
born composer/conductor Bernard Rands is currently living 
and working at the University of California at San Diego, . 
where he heads the experimental music and theater ensem- 
ble SONAR. Venturing northward into our Studio D in 
North Hollywood, he spent an afternoon with Leni Isaacs 
and Carl Stone, playing and talking about his music and the 
ambitious concerns of his ensemble. Tonight we present that 
conversation and listen to the music. Heard will be: Wild 
Track I {]914';, Ballad / {]969), Aum (\976), Llendre (1974). 
and Wild Track II (1974). 

12:00 TESSERACr/ Phi! Mendelson 

Contemporary and electronic music. 

2:00 ON THE CORNER/ Ron Pelletier 



Sunday 11 

6:00 GOSPEL CARAVAN/ Prince Dixon 
9:00 BiaMEDITATION/ Jack Gariss 



10 
11 

12 



00 CARLOS HAGEN PRESENTS: Radio Collage 
00 DOROTHY HEALEY: Marxist Commentary 
00 MANY WORLDS OF MUSIC/ Mario Casetta 



1 :00 THE SUNDAY OPERA/ Fred Hyatt 

ORFF: Carmina Burana with Gundula )anowitz, 
soprano; Gerhard Stoize, tenor; Dietrich Fischer-Dicskau, 
baritone. The Choir and Orchestra of the German Opera of 
Berlin are conducted by Eugen lochum. Deutsche Gram- 
mophon 1 39 362. ORFF: Oedipus der Tyrann with Ger- 
hard Stoize as Oedipus, Kieth Engen as Creon, Astrid Var- 
nay as Jocasta. Rafael Kubelik conducts the Chorus of the 
Bavarian Radio and Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra. 
Deutsche Grammophon 139251/53. 

5:00 THE SOUR APPLE TREE/ Qare Spark 

Form, ideology, and consciousness. Critical analysis 
of current cultural history. Guests, phones, recent scholarship. 
Entertaining. 

6:00 THE SUNDAY NEV/S/ Sanford Fidell 

6:30 THE SCIENCE CONNECTION/ Steve, Vaa Kilston 

7:00 PREACHIN' THE BLUES/ Frank Scott, Mary Aldin 

8:30 IMRU/ The Gay Radio Collective 

A magazine-style format produced by the indepen- 
dent, all-volunteer Gay Radio Collective. Featuring lively 
discussions with gay newsmakers and personalities; music 
and poetry by gay artists; special production features; and 
open phones for listener-participation. Also including the 
regular IMRU news report of events in or affecting the Les- 
bian and Gay community, along with announcements of 
community interest. 

9:30 FOLKSCENE/TheUrmans 

The O'Larmans will dress in green, dance around 
the studio, and pretend to be Irish in this special evening of 
Irish music in honor of St. Patrick's Day. 

12:00 SMOKE RINGS/ j ohn Breckow 



Monday 12 



6:00 SUNRISE CONCERT/ Carl Stone 

This morning's featured work; SCHUBERT'S /Wt/ss 
in T-flat, with soloists Felicity Pa'mer, Helen Watts, Kenneth 
Bowen, Wynford Evans, and Christopher K?ytc, with the 
Choir of St lohn's College Cambridge and the Academy of 
St. Martin-in-the-Fic!ds directed by George Guest. Argo 
ZRG825. 

9:00 THIS MORNING 

News; commentary by Mike Hall; Read All About 
It ; and Terry Hodel 's Calendar. 

10:00 FOLKDANCE WITH MARIO! 

11:00 THE MORNING READING 

A Dorothy Parker Retrospective, selected works 
from the writings of a witty and compassionate woman 
whose biting wit has lost none of its edge. The reader is 
Eliza Lcwin. Continues throughout the month. 

1 1 :30 KULCHUR: In the Win^/ John Medici 

1 2:00 NOON CONCERT/ J ohn Schneider 

MOZART: Quartet in C fOissonanf): MAHLER: 
Symphony No. 9; STRAVINSKY: Septet (1953). 



MARCH FOLIO PACE 20 



2:00 EARPLAY 1979 

Stei'ie, starring Glenda Jackson, rebroadcast from 
Wednesday the 7th, 9:30 p.m. 

3:00 CLOSE-UP/ Rick James 

FEaturing trombonist ).). Johnson, the first 
musician to show himself capable of adapting the rigorous 
demands of bop to his instrument. 

3:30 ORGANIC GARDENING 

Master Gardener Will Kinney, along with Barbara 
Spark, answer your gardening questions. 

4:30 DEALING/ Barbara Cady 




8:00 LAVIDALATINA 

Hosts David Sandoval and Luis Torres share news 
and features about the Latino community, with music. 

9:00 CHAPEL, COURT AND COUNTRYSI DE 

KPFK's Showcase for Early Music pays tribute to 
the great Dutch harpsichordist Gustav Leonhardt, who will 
appear in concert locally on March 14. Featured: some less- 
often-heard recordings of Leonhardt in his varied guises of 
harpsichordist, organist, pianist, accompanist and conductor. 
Your host is Joseph Spencer. 

10:30 IN FIDELITY/ Peter Sutheim 

For audiophiles and music lovers. Tonight's guest 
is Dick Rosmini, guitarist, recording engineer, writer and 
consultant to TEAC. He has some strong views on recording 
techniques, from the musician's perspective rather that the 
audience's. Home studio techniques. The limitations of audio. 
Open phones for your questions and input. 

12:00 SOMETHING'S HAPPENING!/ Royuvhollywood 

From UCLA Extension, recorded by KPfK, Medici 
Power in LA, no. 3: "Will California Become a One-Newspa- 
per State?" A panel discussion organized and moderated by 
Ellen Stern Harris. Panel features Mr. Haropian of the Valley 
News;Gladwyn Hill of the New York Times; Larry Jencks 
of the San Jose Mercury News; Francis Dale of the H?rald 
Examiner and Alfred Jacobi of the San Diego Union (2 hrs). 
Then Oliver Goldsmith's She Stoops to Conquer, directed 
by Howard Sackler, with Alastair Sim, Claire Bloom, Bren- 
da de Banzie (Caedmon TRS 309-M) (ca. 2Vi hrs). Then 
open night for whatever. 



.-x 1 -J 

Ida Honorof takes on the medical establishtnent, today at 5;00 p.m. 



Tuesday 13 



5:00 CONSUMER AWARENESS 

Consumer Activist Ida Honorof conducts an ex- 
clusive interview with Dr. Irwin Bross, Director of Bio- 
statistics, Roswell Park Memorial Institute for Cancer Re- 
search, at his home in Eggersville, NY. Bross has been an 
outspoken critic of "the War on Cancer;" in 1977 he in- 
formed a House Subcommittee that "Much of the money 
for cancer research has been wasted on 'scientific boondog- 
gles' such as the worthless cancer vaccine program, a $500 
million log-jam of rhetoric, pushed by technicians cashing 
in on the anti-cancer money." Bross on mamography: "If 
the mamography epidemic of iatrogenic cancer is winding 
down, another and possibly worse epidemic is just starting 
up, produced by the X-ray equipment commonly called 
CAT scanners-of very little value in the diagnosis of cancer- 
but a serious danger to the patient." The interview is in 2 
parts; continued on Monday the 26th, 5:00 p.m. 

5:55 CALENDAR/ Terry Hodel 

6:00 THE EVENING NEWS 

6:45 COMMENTARY/ Charles Morgan 

7:00 LABOR SCENE/ Sam Kushner 

7:30 REPORT TO THE LISTENER/ J imBerland 

Your turn to let us have your constructive 
criticisms, your likes and dislikes, and your questions 
and suggestions about KPFK. Open phones. 



6:00 SUNRISE CONCERT/ Carl Stotie 

Featured work: DEBUSSY 's Pelleas et Melisande, 
with Suzanne Danco and Pierre Mollet. Ernest Ansermet 
conducts I'Orchestre dc la Suisse Romande. Richmond RS 
63013. Mono. 

9:00 THIS MORNING 

News; commentary by Charles Johnson; "Read 
All About It;" and Calendar. 

10:00 FOLKSCENE/ The Larmans 

An American folk sampler, traditional and contem- 
porary folk music. 

1 1 :00 THE MORNING READING 

Continuing Eliza Lewin's reading of /I Dorothy 
Parker Retrospective, selected works from the writings of 
a witty and compassionate woman with edge still intact. 

1 1 :30 KULCHUR: Bacl<sta^/ Gil Laurence 

Backstage interviews with those are involved in 
making LA theater happen. 

12:00 NOON CONCERT 

At the Keyboard/ Leonid Hambro 

Today, a live program on improvisation, featuring pianist 
Richard Grayson. 

2:00 SCHUBERT LIVE: A Sesquicentennial Celebration 

Rebroadcast from Thursday the 8th, 8:00 p.m. 

MARCH FOLIO PAGE 21 



starts march 11 

Sundays 

11:00 am & 1:00 pm only 



A LAEMMLE THEATRE 

THE ROYAL THEATRE 

11523 SanU Monica Blvd. 
WmI Loi Angeles. CA 90025 



$3.50 General Admission 
$3.00 Senior Citizens 
$2.00 Children 11 a under 

DISCOUNT TICKET: 

$12.50(5 ADM. ) 




ALL FEATURES 
IN HEBREW 
WITH ENGLISH 
SUBTITLES. 



1979 



GQQtC*:, UOLQtO UtfflLXf;^ 

li'ITII GCIAJ PUASURE Wf MHOUUCl THE 197'; ISRAELI FILM fCSTlMl . THCEE OF THE flVE 
nU\S ARf HMJUG THEIR LOS AWGELtS PREMIERE IW THIS FESTIVAL; AWP A FOURTH, ITS U.S.A. 
PREMIERE. HAPPUC, ALL Fll'f MOl'IES CM BE EWJcWEP AVP APPRECIATEP BV VOUNG AWP OLV 
AlKE. THE .'WflE"; ARE IW HEBREW WITH EHGLISH SimULCS. 

IF VOll PREFER API/AWE TICKETS, l€ URGE YOU TO USE THE RESERI/ATIO.'J FORM KLOW. ALSO, 
VOU IW USE THE FORM TO PURCHASE ISRAELI FILM FESTIl/AL PISCOU'fT TIC>CETS . WE U'ILL BE 
HARPS' TO HELP VOUR GROUP ARRA'/GE A THEATRE PARTV. FOR FURTHER INFOR.'MTION CALL US 
AT -m-IO-ll, MOMPAV THROUGH FRIPAV, 9:00 AM TO 5:30 PM. 



t A PREMIERE 



Mar 11 



J 'I 



NOMINATION SB 

Best Foreign Film 



A GRABBER 

LARGER THAN LIFE' The bcti 

■ nd moal authenlic dim 

oniric lubiscl •■,ic..->."^ wcB^ ' 

AS EICITINC AS ANV CLASSIC 
WESTERN AND ALL THE MORE 
AHA2ING SINCE IT IS TRUE .v.i'ir 



H HtW »OBR POS' 



With Klaus Kinsky, Yehoram Gaon, 
Sybil Danning. Assal Dayan, 
Gila Almagor and Arik Lavi, ' 
Produced by M.GOLAN t. Y. GLOBUS 



inji' y:^2a 



ipta 



,, WRITTEN A PRODUCED BY MENACHEM GOLAN 
,. DIRECTED EY B0A2 DAVIDSON 




On July 4, 1976, the Israeli armed" 
forces successfully rescued 104 
ttijacked hostages from terrorists 
in Uganda, an unprecedented rescue <' 
«hich captured the imagination of 
the world. OPERATION THUNDERBOI T 
is the story of that event. 
"...Menachem Gel an ' s best film, 
and one of the best Israeli films 
•■o n^-fe. . . "-Var I ety . 



I A PRfMIER£ 



Mans 



the Great'Telephone RoBber y 



^M^n □■'3lD'70n TIC/ 

Casi Gad) Y»gil. Bomb* Zur, Yahuda Etfroni' 

.'irecteo try Mt.NAHEM (".tOLAN 

with quest star SHA I OPH I R 

Meshulam is a bank clerk who has a passion /or 

crime, fiction and following r/w progress of Israel's 

underv^rld in the press. He is turned down by the 

police force because of his high I. Q. 

He gets caught up m a robbery at his bank, this is 
tfte story of Meshulam's heroic attempt to get ran- 
torn money to retrieve his kidnapped mother in the 
most ingenious bank robbery ever undertaken. 



UAN-GLOBUS PRODUCTION 

100 mm 




Mar 25 



_ niBflUDIE ACAtlMT AWAIt 



■OMIIATIOI 

" FOBEIGN flLH 

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Producer: MENACHEM GOLAN 
DIRECTED BY MOSMf MIZRAHI 
GILA ALMAGOR 

5MAI OPHIR "* "nrtdrv *f»»ctlr.t famllv (Jramj 

YOSSEPH SHILOAH "* '•*''■• ^ •««»• "P'««*vt 

MICHAI »AT-ADAJW 
AVNER><l2(CIAHOU 
110 m i nutes 



y«an ^tf txfor* Ivvd 
dwica" 

-Son FrwxJito Exmnii 



■ ALL PROGRAMS SUBJECT TO CHANGE. | » 
MARCH FOLIO PACE ?7 



l.A PREMIERE ^ 



apr 




Tzauani 
Family 



They all mean well, good 
and simple people as they 
are, but on one particu- 
lar weekend, with all of 
them under one roof, many 
things can happen - and 
they do! 

'fOniiii 



Starring GABI AMRAN I 
LEVANA FINKELSTEIN 

'jyax nnsc/n 



lymY 



g|3r 



U.S.A. PREMIERE 



This piclurt is ■ lulllanglh feature of candid!' 

camera set ups, using 1/2 million feet of raw stock! 

material to get the funniest results of people in • 

I L.*'.'l'.'.'9!'.'.i'.'i'?!'W... .,....„... ,, i 




I I . ZviShisial 90 mm. 

Boyz Davidson, Zvi Sfiitni; 
Ophelia Stral, Itiik Albalach 



For information on advance group sales, call 478-t04l. 

TO ORDER BY MAIL: Make check or money order payable to 
Royal Theatre, 11523 Santa Monica Bl. LA.CA 90025 
Either ENCLOSE A SEXF-ADDRESSED STAMPED ENVELOPE or 
include 25«f for return postage and handling charges. 

"O T'lcket Order form Q"" "3^^ 



(FOR GROUPS OF 20 OR MORE: 
CALL 478-1041.) 



GENERAL ADMISSION $3.50 

SENIOR CITIZENS $5.00 

CHILDREN 11 4 UNDER $2.00 

ISRAELI FESTIVAL DISCOUNT TICKETS: 5 ADI^ISS IONS/$ 12. 50 



NAMF 



riTY/2iP_ 

SEND 



FVIONE 



_D1SC0UNT TICKETS((5 ADMISSIONS) $12.50 FACH. 



IF APrtlCABLf : GROUP AFFILIATION_ 

NO. or TICKETS DATF 

NO. Of TICKETS DATE 



PLEASE NOTE: All tickets (except Group Sales oi 
20 or more) are available at the boxoffice on 
the day of performance. 



3:30 STRAWBERRY SHORTBREAD/ Pit Bciison 

4:30 THE CORRECT CHANGE COMEDY MINUTES 

Episode 2: Clean Clothes, a play by Susan LaTempa 
in which Saundra Briskctt, discredited food critic, gets a des- 
perate and mysterious phone call from an old flame. Featur- 
ing Laura Fanning, Alex Kubik, Bill Hunl, and Dicrdre Ber- 
throng. Technical production by Peter Sutheim. Produced 
by Susan LaTempa and Laura Fanning. 

5:00 LA 5 PM/ Burt Wilson 

The New Army Drcit'l. Burl examines the pressures 
now being exerted for a program of military conscription. 
Open phones. 

5:55 CALENDAR/ Terry Hodel 

6:00 THE EVENING NEWS 

6:45 TAKING SIDES: Debate 

7:30 OPEN JOURNAL: late breaking features 

8:00 CALIFORNIA UPDATE 

From California Public Radio 

9:00 BOSTON SYMPHONY: Live in Concert 

TCHAIKOVSKY: Swan Lake, Act I; Violin Con- 
certo in D Major. Isaac Stern, soloist. Sciji Ozawa conducts. 
William Pierce hosts Recorded using the Dolby 'A' Noise- 
Reduction System (programs subject to change). 

1 1 :00 THE BIG BROADCAST/ Bobb Lynes 

Adventures by Morse: "Land of the Living Dead" 
parts 3 and 4. (2 30' chapters). 

12:00 SOMETHING'S HAPPENING!/ Roy of Hollvwood 

We begin with lecture no. 2 of UCLA Extension's 
. series / Want to Die— The Experience and Meaning of Anxi- 
ety and Fear with Dr. Carl Faber. Tonight: "Anxiety as Un- 
lived Creativity" (ca 90'). Then from the NFCB (National 
Federation of Community Broadcasters): The Kids Nobodv 
Wants to Talk About (6'), about the lost kids in the cities 
and our inability to help them. From Al Huebncr, producer 
of The Health Department, a program on solar energy (30'). 
Then The Voyager Record, a rebroadcast of this news spe- 
cial, courtesy of Linda Strawn. This is the 111 -minute re- 
cording bioadcast from the Voyager 1 and 2 to give 
whatever beings might find it an idea of who we are (or were). 
The description of the sounds and music will follow the broad- 
cast so we can all experience it as the extra-terrestrials might 
(can? shall? could?). Following this, an answer with "the tape 
from the future" found in a N^w York elevator and evident- 
ly a communication or maybe not. At 5:00, lack Gariss with 
Bio-Meditation. 



Wednesday 14 



6:00 SUNRISE CONCERT/ Carl Stone 

This morning's featured work is Christoph 
DEMANTIUS' Ot'(//5f/;t' Passion nach dem llvanqelislcn 
St lohanne (St. John's Passion), performed by the Stutt- 
gart Cantata Choir led by August Langebcck. Harmonia 
Mundi 20 21956. 




Happy lOOtli Birthday, Albert Einstein (3/14/1879)! A special Einstein 
Memorial proRrani will air after iiiicliiiKlit on "SoniethinK's Happening." 
(photo from an old Life Magazine, with ). Robert Oppenheimer) 



9:00 THIS MORNING 

News; commentary by Lucy Fried; 
About It;" and Calendar. 

10:00 FOLKHANCE WITH MARIO! 



•Read All 



11:00 



11:30 



THE MORNING READING 

A Dorothy Parker Rctrospeclive. 



Eliza Lewin reads. 



KULCHUR; Theater Close-Up/ Ray Tat3r 

Call In for Comedy. Focus on LA's improvisational 
theater. Live call-in with live studio audience, moderated b\' 
Ray Tatar and produced by Piper Thomas. Todav, THE LA 
CONNECTION. 

1 2:00 NOON CONCERT/ J olin Schneider 

t /i7zz al Noon. Today's focus is on the ) AZZ FLUTE: 

with m'j.sic by Herbie Mann, Hubert Laws, Paul Horn, Eric 
Dolphy and others. 

2:00 THE BIG BROADCAST/ Bobb Lynes 

Variety Shows: The Dean Martin & jerry Lewis 
Show (2/27/49); Kraft Music Hall with Al |olson (10/2/47); 
Phiico Radio Time with Bing Crosby (3/26/47). 



3:30 
4:30 
5:00 



RUTH'S KITCHEN/ Ruth Ziony 
SOCIOLOGIST'S EYE ON SPORT/ )on BrovNcr 



HOLDING UP MORE THAN HALF THE SKY 

A,'/i5 Dfiddv (jooilniqhl, ,-1 Speak-Oi/l on Incest. 
Louise Armstrong talks about her book and the experi- 
ences she had while writing it. Included ,irc excerpts from 
the book and a poem by Audic Lord. Produced by Pearl 
Skotncs. 

5:55 CALENDAR/ Tcriy Hodcl 

6:00 THE EVENING NEWS 

6:45 COMMENTARY/ Charles Morgan 



MARCH FOLIO PAGE 23 



7:00 CONSIDER THE ALTERNATIVES 

The nuclear debalc, in all of its laccis. 

7:30 OPEN JOURNAL: Lite breaking features 

8:00 UP FROM THE ASH GROVE/ Ed Pearl & friends 

9:30 EARPLAY 1979 

Tonight a double bill: Sltiftiiigs, a lively comedy 
which asks the romantic question: would you marry a taxi- 
dermist? Rounding out the hour is an encounter with Dan 
Kclley in a bar, which reveals him as a classic casualty of 
American business: / Hope I Never Get to Monmouth. 
Rcbroadcast Monday the 19th, 2:00 p.m. 

10:30 CLOSE: Radioworks bv artists. 

10:45 RADIO FREE OZ 

Pierre Barrois was a student of bats and the natural 
history of quadrupeds. Born around 1770 in France, he also 
engraved copper and is rcpjtcd to be the great, great, great 
grand uncle of Peter Bergman, loin us for more disgusting 
family stories, strange music and a contingent who thinks 
earthquakes are nature's way of having fun-Peter, Phil, Vic- 
toria, Howard, Suzie, John and Mr. X. 



S 



12:00 SOMETHING'S HAPPENING!/ Roy of Hollywood 

The "Something's Happening Players" (Dimension 
of Imagination) present "The Old Man in the Swamp" by 
David L. Krebs (producer) (30'). An alien being helps a man 
find a reason to live. Then, to celebrate the 100th Anniver- 
sary of the birth of Albert Einstein (3/14/ 1879). we present 
an Einstein Memorial Program (60'). Then the second of four 
related dramas produced by Earpla\ with "The Austere Gren- 
dolyn Parker Elliot" (60'). Continuing our salute to CBS, 4 
more CBS Radio Workshop Productions: "A Pride of Car- 
rots" with )une Foray, Daws Builerand Bill Thompson 
(9/14/56); "Analysis of Satire" with Stan Frebcrg, )unc 
Foray, Daws Butler and Marvin Miller (8/31/56); "A Dog's 
Life" narrated by Ralph Bell (nd); and "The Green Hills of 
Earth" by Robert Heinlein, with Jackson Beck, |an Martin 
and Bill Lipton (nd). (30' each). At 4:55, the 6th Huxley 
lecture delivered by Aldous Huxlev in 1959. 



Thursday 15 

6:00 SUNRISE CONCERT/ Qrl Sto>Tc 

9:00 THIS MORNING 

News; George Smith's ct)mmentary; "Read All 



About It;" Terry Hodel's Calendar. 

10:00 FOLKSCENE/ The Larmare. 

Singer-songwriter Shep Cooke shares his music and 
thoughts with host Howard Larman. 

11:00 THE MORNING READING 

A Dorothy Parker Retrospective. 

11:30 KULCHUR: Arts Digest 

12:00 NOON CONCERT: Chapel, Court and Countryside 

The Early History of Bowed String Instruments 1. 
Joseph Spencer discusses the early history of the ancestors of 
the viol and violin families, and plays examples of the first 
works written specifically for bowed strings, leading into the 
rise of consort playing with the viol family in the 16lh Cen- 
tury; featuring works by Ortiz, Morley, Purcell, de Caurroy, 
Scheldt, Gabrieli, and others (no. 245). 



2:00 
3:00 
3:30 
4:30 
5:00 



WE CALL IT MUSIC/ Seeley & Halladav 
GREY POWER/ Aurelia Morris 
THE HEALTH DEPARTMENT / Al Hiiebner 
DEALING/ Barbara Cady 




LA 5 PM/ Burt Wilson 

The CIA in Angola. F(3rmer CIA operative John 
Stockwell discusses clandestine maneuvers with Burt. 
Open phones. 

CALENDAR/ Terry Hodel 

THE EVENING NEWS 

COMMENTARY/ William Winter 

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL 

Local experts on international affairs. 

OPEN JO! 'RNAL: Lite breaking features 

8:00 SCHUBERT LIVE: A Sesquicentennial Celebration 

Schubert heard few public performances of his work. 
Instead, the music was played in intimate settings with family 
and friends. Tonight's concert is a tribute to The Schubertiads 
of his time. The program includes: Duo in A minor for Piano 
Duet, D. 9-*' 7 ( 1 8 28 ) ; Sonata tor Piano in A Major, D. 664 
(1 819); Five Songs for Woman 's Voice: Die Hirt oufdem Fel- 
sen, D. 965 (1828); Variations on an Original Theme for Pi- 
ano Duel, D. 813 (1 824); Four Vocal Quartets with Piano; 
Fantasy in F minor for Piano Duet, D. 940 (1828). Perfor- 
mers: Robert Winter, plant); Gloria Cheng, piano; Susan 
Strick, soprano; Daryll Stevens, clarinet; Vocal Quartet: 
Denell Meyer, soprano; Loren Roberts, alto; Ron Naditch, 
tenor; Steve Paskowitz, bass-baritone. Recorded November 
19, 1978 in Schoerberg Hall by Peter Sutheim with assist- 
ance from Susan jud\ . The concert was presented by The 
Arts, University Extension (UCLA), in cooperation with the 
Committee on Fine Arts Productions. Produced bv l.eni 
Isaacs. Rebroadcast Tuesdav March 20th, 2:00 p.m. 

9:30 CLEVELAND ORCHESTRA: Live in 0)ncert 

CHAVEZ: Sinfonia India: FALL A: El amor hru/o: 
GRIEG: Piano Concerto: DVORAK: Scher/o Capriccioso. 
Features Mark Zeltser, pianist, and Nati Mistral, mezzo- 
soprano. Eduardo Mata conducts. Robert Conrad hosts. 
Stereo (subject to change). 



IVtARCH FOLIO PAGE 24 




MALLORY GELLER, shown 
licrc finisliiiiK the Santa 
Monica Marathon, is featured 
in tlie title role of the laniis 
Company Radio Theatre's 
production of "The Runner," 
aired Thursday the 1 5th at 
11;30p.m. The KPFK 10 km 
chainp (he beat all two of the 
other KPFK staff & program- 
mers who entered onr first 10- 
kilometer run last summer. . . 
Ed.), Mallory will be defend- 
inj; his title at the KPFK St. 
Patrick's Day Run this Satur- 
day morninji, March 1 7 (see 
back cover for more details). 
Photo: jan Geller 



1 1 :30 ) ANUS COMPANY RADIO THEATRE 

The Runner. )an and Mallory Geller's original 
radio futurefantasy celebrating KPFK's upcoming Si. 
Patrick's Day Race. Featuring Jerry Bono, Mike Model, 
Eliza Lewin, |an Ridolphi Geller and Mallory Geller as 
the runner. 

12:00 SOMETHING'S HAPPENING!/ Roy of Hollywood 

We continue our psychic catchup with the other 
(better?) half of the Diegel crew. Tonight, live guest John 
Dicgel, who uses the Tarot as his vehicle, for live readings 
with the cards (the secret word is "ace"). Then, as time al- 
lows, open night until 4;30 when we present another talk 
by Margaret Mead, The Limits of Loyalties. 



Friday 16 



* Give The Money And Run ' 



This special day of programming serves double-duty: 
First, wc want to call your attention to the "Second 
Annual KPFK 10 Kilometer Run and St. Patrick's Dav 
Breakfast," tomorrow morning starting at 8:30 at the 
Merry-Go-Round area of Griffith Park. If you don't 
care to join the runners, join the rest of us as we break- 
fast in the Park, for the benefit of KPFK. Details listed 
on the back cover of the Folio, in any case, listen to the 
issues being raised today by the special programs on run- 
ning. Then make up your own mind about running. The 
second purpose for special programming, is to focus at- 
tention on the way listener-sponsored radio can serve 
needs that commercial radio can't. And to remind all 
those who have not yet subscribed, that we can only 
be as good as the support wc get from the listeners. Those 
of you who are reading these words have alieady come 
to that conclusion, and have put your money where 
your ears arc. For you, we offer a specific timetable of 
where the fund appeals come in, so you can avoid them 
if you choose, but we hope you listen to the day's pro- 
grams, and tell your friends to listen. 

6:00 SUNRISE CONCERT/ Girl Stone 
8:00 FUNDRAISING 

9:00 THIS MORNING ABBREVIATED 

The mtirning newscast. 

9:20 RUNNING ANLTTRITION 

Live guest Bill Eincrton, the living folk legend and 
veteran runner, expert on running and nutrition. 

9:45 FUNDRAISING 

10:15 MUSIC TO LIFT THOSE KNEES BY! 

1 0: 30 RUNNI NG & MEDALS 

An interview on tape with Frank Shorter, 1972 
Olympic gold medalist, 1976 Olympic silver medalist, dis- 
tance runner, TV commentator. 



10:45 FUNDRAISING 

11:05 THE RUNNING GAME 

Jonathan ) . Brower, Ph. D., host of KPFK's A So- 
ciologist 's Eye on Sport, talks with athletes about the run- 
ning game. 

1 1 :30 MUSIC TO LIFT THOSE PHONES BY! 

12:00 RUNNING & WOMEN 

Taped discussion with Olga Connolly, intramural 
Sports Director ar Loyola University, gold medalist, 1956 
Olympics, and the first and only woman flag bearer at Oly- 
mpic games. 

1 2: 1 5 MUSIC TO RUN TO THE PHONES BY 

Mixing music with fundraising. 

1 :30 A RUNNING START: Lynda Hiiev 

Lynda Huey comes in live with Jonathan Brower. 
She is a former college track Coach and author of A Run- 
ning Start: An Athlete, .4 Woman. 

2:00 RUNNING FAST 

Take a spring through the next hour: music, 
Bill Rodgers -the fastest American marathon runner of 
all time-on tape, and Joe Douglas, local track coach, 
joins us live in our studios. 

3:00 RUNNING AS ADDICTION 

William Glasser, psychiatrist, playwright, and 
author of Positive Addiction, on running as a form of 
positive addiction. 

3:30 KPFKCAN BE HABIT- FORMING 

Fundraising. 

3:50 RUNNING IN AN ORGANIZED FASHION 

Jonathan Grower in a taped interview with Peter 
Roth, author of Running Centers in 125 American Cities, 
and treasurer of the New York Ciiy Marathon Club and 
officer of the New York Roadrunners. 



MARCH FOLIO PACE 25 




Pholo: )oe Feinblatt 



4:00 



RUNNING & ACTIVISM 

The evening's off to a running start with some 
fundraising, some music, )acl< Scott, former sprinter, 
sports activist, author of The Athletic Revolution; also 
Laszio Tabori in-studio. He's the third ma.i ever to run 
the mile in under four minutes, former world record-hold- 
er in the 1 500 meters. 

6:00 THE EVENING NEWS 

6:45 RUNNING & BEING BLACK 

John Carlos, Bronze medalist 1968 Olympics in the 
200 meter run, known internationally for his black-fisted 
protest that year. Currently, he's an aide for Councilman 
David Cunningham in athletic events for underprivileged 
kids in Los Angeles. 

7:00 FUNDRAISING 

8:00 RUNNING: Fitness or F.adness? 

Americans are taking up physical fitness in the 
millions. Does this signal a permanent awareness of the 
importance of health, or is it just a momentary fad? A 
documentary by Earl Ofari, featuring interviews with par- 
ticipants and observers. 

9:00 RUNNING AS THERAPY 

Some fundraising, live guests, and fancy footwork 
featuring Dr. Ronald Lawrence, President of the American 
Medical Joggers Association, Neuropsychiatrist, on running 
as a modality of therapy. 

10:00 RUNNING DOCTORS 

Sports podiatrists, Dr. Daniel L. Altchuler and 
Dr. Robert N. Mohr. Most of their patients are runners. 

11:00 LAST LEG OF THE RUN 

In the last leg of our run for the money, help us 
reach the finish line before midnight. And join us tomorrow 
for KPFK's Second Annual 10 Kilometer Run and St. Patrick's 
Day Breakfast, at Griffith Park. Sec Folio Back Cover. 

12:00 GOODBYE PORKPIE HAT/ Paul Vangelisti 

2:00 THE BIG SLEEP/ John Breckow 



On your mark, get set, go! 

Throngs ol runncis galhercci for the start of KPFK's 10 kilometer run 
last summer. The event is expanded this year to include the great spec- 
tator sport, eating! For those who haven't begun their physical fitness 
regimen for 1979 yet, and can't "get into" running (or their running 
shorts), KPFK is providing St. Patrick's Day Breakfast while waiting 
at the finish line. See Back Cover of the Folio for more details. 



Saturday 17 



6:00 
7:30 
8:30 
9:30 



NO STRINGS ATTACHED/ Scott Bodell 

FUSION/ Lauren Lee 

THE NIXON TAPES/ Tom Nixon 

HALFWAY DOWN THE STAIRS/ Uncle Ruthie 
Engaging stories, entrancing songs, no sugar. 

10:30 FOLK MUSIC/ John Davis 

1 2: 30 THE CAR SHOW/ J ohn Retsek, Len Frank 

The dynaflow duo answer your car questions. 



1:50 
2:00 
3:30 
5:00 



WEEKEND CALENDAR/ Terry Hodel 
BALLADS, BANJOS & BLUEGPJ\SS/ Tom Sauber 
SONG & CELEBRATION/ Dan Wright 



OUT LOUD!/ Frank Greenwood 

Information and opinion focusing on LA's Black 
community, with guests and open phones. 

6:00 THE SATURDAY NEWS/ Larry Moss 

6:30 A SCOFF OF REVIEWERS 

KPFK's motley crew of critics and reviewers 
gather round the open phones for a taste of your responses. 

7:00 THE WOLF TONES 

To commemorate St. Patrick's Day, we offer songs 
of Irish Independence. 

7:30 SCULPTURE IN AMERICA 

The first in a series of interviews, conducted bv 
Bruria Finkel at the 10th Annual Sculpture Festival in 
Toronto, June 1978. Tonight, sculptor Robert Irwin. 
(Rebroadcast Thursday the 22nd, 1 1 :30 a.m.) 

8:00 THE WILLIAM MALLOCH PROGRAMME 

A musical, mostly classical, treasure hunt conducted 
by critic/composer/Artistic Director of the Ojai Festival WM. 

10:00 IMAGINARY LANDSCAPE 

^ Other Voices, Other Sou/ids. Continuing the scries 
produced by the composer and experimental vocalist, loan 
LaBarbara. 

J2:00 TESSERACT/ Phil Mendeison 

Contemporary and electronic music. 

2:00 ON THE CORNER/ Ron Pelletier 



MARCH FOLIO PAGE 26 



Remembering Malvina Reynolds 



' Bury Me In My Overalls ' 



Bury Me in My Overalls is a special tribute to a special lady— 
Malvina Reynolds. Since the earliest Los Angeles Hootenan- 
nies of 1946, through all the heavy struggles until her death 
a year ago, March 1 7, 1 978, Malvina's songs reached an ever- 
growning public, including her great "commercial" success 
such as Little Boxes. Her message was sometimes satirical, 
sometimes lyrical and alv/ays uncompromising. And because 
of the special regard and affection she had for KPFK (and 
our sister stations in Pacifica) and her deep understanding 
of the necessity of keeping listener-sponsored radio alive 
and grovi'ing, today is also devoted to the noble effort of 
increasing our roster of paid subscribers. Your response will 
be a tribute to Malvina who always fought the good fight, 
until the very end. So it's a day for mixing our messages 
with messages, all day until midnight, hoping to reach the 
many thousands of non-subscribing listeners with the strength 
of Malvina's convictions. Tell your friends to listen and we'll 
do our best to turn 'em on! This day produced by Mario 
Casetta who first presented Malvina Reynolds to Los An- 
geles audiences in 1946. 




Sunday 18 

6:00 GOSPEL CARAVAN/ Prince Dixon 
9:00 Bia MEDITATION/ Jack Gariss 

10:00 LITTLE BOXES: Songs by Malvina Reynolds 

And we leave the guitar case open for your 
contributions. 

11:00 DOROTHY HEALEY 

Rebroadcast of an interview Dorothy did with 
Malvina Reynolds in January of 1978. 

12:00 MANY WORLDS OF MUSIC/ Mario Casetta 

Mario plays songs by Malvina, Pete Seeger, Paul 
Robeson, Woody Guthrie, et al, and reminds you of the 
broadcast home all of these performers have enjoyed dur- 
ing the years, KPFK. 

2:00 MEMORIAL CONCERT FOR MALVINA 

Featuring Country Joe MacDonald, Margie Adam, 
and many more. Produced by Ed Schocnfeld from KPFK 
in Berkeley. We'll be taking intermissions for fundraising. 

5:00 MALVINA AND HER TIMES 

Special songs relating to the struggles of the years. 
We will be appealing for your support from time to time. 

6:00 THE SUNDAY NEWS/ Sanford Fidell 



6:30 



7:00 



SONGS FOR CHILDREN 

Malvina and Cassandra Records. 



A TRIBUTE TO MALVINA REYNOLDS 

Produced by Pearl Skotncs for KPFK's Women's 
Coalition, originally broadcast on Holding Up More Than 
Half The Sky. In two parts, with time out for fundraising. 



8:30 I REMEMBER MALVINA 

With some of her friends, and a mention of the 
needs of Pacifica Radio and listener-sponsorship. 

9:30 FOLKSCENE/ The Lirmaiis 

Tonight the Larmans sh.ire a rare taped per- 
formance of Malvina Reynolds in concert with Mich<iel 
Cooncy, at the Bethlehem Coffee House, Del Mar, New 
York, 11/8/72. The concert was sponsored bv the Pick- 
in', Singin' & Gatherin' Society. Those involved with the 
concert describe it as Malvina "al her most relaxed and 
entertaining." 

12:00 SIMOKE RINGS/ John Breckow 



Monday 19 



6:00 SUNRISE CONCERT/ Carl Stone 

Today's leature: MAHLER: Symphony No. 2, 
("Resurrection") with Bernard Haitink conducting the 
Conccrtgebouw Orchestra of Amsterdam and the Nether- 
lands Radio Chorus, with soloists Ellv Ameling and Aafjc 
Heynis. Philips recording. 

9:00 THIS MORNING 

News; commentary by Richard Santillan; "Read 
All About It;" and Terry Hodcl's Calendar. 

10:00 FOLKDANCE WITH MARIO! 

11:00 THE MORNING READING 

Eliza Lewin in a Dorothy Parker Retrospective. 

11:30 KULCHUR: In The Wings/ John Medici 



IVIARCH FOLIO PAGE 27 



1 2:00 NOON CONCERT/ J ohn Schneider 

Music by Stravinsky, Mozart, Sibelius (Symphony 
No. 2), Rach ( Violin Sonata No. 2). 

2:00 EARPLAY 1979 

Stuffings and / Hope I Never Get to Monmouth, 
rcbroadcast from Wednesday the 14th, 9:30 p.m. 

3:00 CLOSE-UP/ Rick James 

Bright Moments. Featuring the fascinating music 
and background of Rahsaan Roland Kirk, a man of many 
instruments and many moods. 

3:30 ORGANIC GARDENIMG' Kinney & Spark 

4: 30 DE ALI NG/ Barbara Qdy 

5:00 ASIAN OLFLOOK 

5: 55 CALENDAR/ Teny Hodel 

6:00 THE EVENING NEWS 

6:45 COMMENTARY/ Charles Morgan 

7:00 LABOR SCENE/ Sam KusJiner 

7:30 REPORT TO THE LISTENER/ J im Berland 

KPFK's Manager is often joined by other Staffers 
to hear your questions and suggestions about the station. 

8:00 LA VIDALATINA/ Sandoval <& Torres 

9:00 CHAPEL, COURT AND COUNTRYSIDE 

KPFK's Showcase for Early Music presents a pro- 
gram of Renaissance and Baroque music, featuring a record- 
ing of Dutch cellist Anner Bylsma playing Bach on the 'cello 
and the 'cello piccolo (a very rare instrument), and discussing 
his art. This recording was made live in concert at the 1979 
Santa Cruz Festival of Living Music. Joseph Spencer hosts. 

10:30 IN FIDELITY/ Peter Sulhcim 

A close, critical look at the audio retail trade. "Spiffs" 
and other commissions to salespeople. Don't go to the big 
chain stores for advice. But arc the "high end" stores really 
different? A panel argument among audio retailers with differ- 
ing points of view. Host Peter Sutheim is KPFK's Director of 
Operations. Open Phones. 

12:00 SOMETHING'S HAPPENING!/ Roy of Hollywood 

Continuing with Part 4 of the UCLA Extension series, 
Media Power in LA: "TV and Radio: The News in Capsule Form 
organized and moderated b>/ Ellen Stern Harris. Panel members: 
Tim O'Donnell, KNX Radio Editor: Warren Charadino, NBC; 
Stephanie Rank, Channel 9; Bill Stout, KNXT fca. 2 hrs). Then 
Henrik \bscn's Hedda Gabler. directed by Howard Sacklcr, with 
Joan Plowright. Anthony Quayle, Cathleon Nesbitt, Patrick 
Magee, Michael Gwynn and Zena Walker (Caedmon TRS 322- 
M) (ca 2'/'.' hrs). Leftover time is open. 




BEYOND 

FACILE 
ROUTINE 

For some the act is the same. Morning 
brings work. Afternoon is a traffic snarl. 

The evening news, supper and 

television follow, and then sleep. Other 

Southern Californians demand more. 

They work and play differently. They 

find time. They involve themselves 

personally. Physical exercise stimulates 

them. They choose an active lifestyle. 

We write, edit and design Sporting 

Times for these active Californians. Like 

them, Sporting Times is beyond faceless 

routine. 

Each issue includes a comprehensive 

range of articles on subjects from 

tennis, skiing, running, racquetball, 

backpacking and sailing, to those sports 

which make Southern California unique. 

So if you're an individual who pushes 

himself beyond routine, then welcome 

to Sporting Times, the magazine for . 

people who participate. 



Tuesday 20 



6:00 SUNRISE CONCERT/ Carl Stone 

Featured lodav: ViaLiricio KAGEL's /17hs/c for 
Renaissance /n\iiinncnts. The Collegium Inslrumentalis 
is led by the composer. DGG 137 006. 

MARCH FOLIO PAGE 28 




I would like Sporting Times mailed to 
me each month. As a charter subscriber 
I will always receive the lowest home- 
delivery rate. Payment must be 
enclosed. 



$4 



12 Issues 



Name 



Address. 



City. 



State. 



.Zip. 



P.O. Box 403 Glendale, Calif. 91209 
i ,idiviiiscmcnl ) 



9:00 THIS MORNING 

News; commentary by Grace Jacobs; "Read All 
About It;" Calendar. 

10:00 FOLKSCENE/ The Urmans 

Folk music from the British Isles today. 

1 1 :00 THE MORNING READING 

Dorothy Parker Retrospective with selections 
read by Eliza Lewin. 

11:30 KULCHUR: Backstage/ Gil Laurence 

Gil Laurence armed with tape recorder, covers 
the world of LA theater, and those who make it happen. 

12:00 NOON CONCERT: 

At the Keyboard/ Leonid Hambro 

Lee's guest today is Mary McDonald, performing live, 
music by HUMMEL and DUSSEK. 

2:00 SCHUBERT LIVE: A Sesquicentennial Cdebration 
Rebroadcast from Thursday the 1 5th, 8:00 p.m. 

3: 30 HOW TO BE WITH Kl DS/ Andrea King 

Andrea, the Director of the Greater Watts Day 
Care Center, explores issues of parenting and schooling, 
with guests and open phones. 

4: 30 THE CORRECT CHANGE COMEDY Ml NLTTES 

Today's episode: Overheard Conversations, a play 
by Susan LaTempa which takes us Through the Living Room 
Wall, Into the Laundromat, Into the Vice-President's Office, 
and Elsewhere for hitherto underheard conversations. Fea- 
turing Dierdre Berthrong, Jacque Lynn Colton, Bill Hunt, 
Alex Kubik, Karin Shea, Peter Weiss. Technical production 
by Peter Sutheim. Produced by Laura Fanning and Susan 
LaTempa. 

5:00 LA 5 PM/ Burt Wilson 

See ferry Run. Burt hosts a political discussion 
about Jerry Brown's coming race for the presidency. 

5:55 CALENDAR/ Terry Hodel 
6:00 THE EVENING NEWS 

6:45 TAKING SIDES 

Opposing viewpoints presented on timely issues. 
Moderator is Anita Frankel. 



7:30 
8:00 



OPEN JOURNAL: Ute breaking features 



CALIFORNIA UPDATE 

Public affairs features on state issues, produced by 
Gabriela Castelan and Donovan Reynolds from Sacramento. 

9:00 BOSTON SYMPHONY: Live in Concert 

TCHAIKOVSKY: Swan La/^e, Act W; Piano Con- 
certo No. 1 in B flat minor. Horacio Gutierrez, soloist. 
Seiji Ozawa conducts. William Pierce hosts. Recorded using 
the Dolby 'A' Noise-Reduction System (subj. to change). 

1 1 :00 THE BIG BROADCAST/ Bobb Lynes 

Adventures by Morse: "Land of the Living Dead" 
parts 5 and 6 (2 30' chapters). 

12:00 SOMETHING'S HAPPENING/ Roy of Hollywood 

UCLA Extension, lecture no. 3 in Dr. Carl Faber's 
series, / Want to Die— The Experience and Meaning of Anxi- 



ety and Fear: "Anxiety and Vulnerability" (ca 90'). Then 
Dudley Knight appears live to read a horror or sf story on 
The Graveyard Shift (ca 60'). Another Health Department 
rebroadcast for the night people from Al Hueb icr, a GARC 
program. What Did You L'at Today!' (30'). Then from the 
NFCB, An Ounce of Prevention (62') on the politics and 
economics of cancer research in the US. "Scientists explain 
how up to 90% of cancers are preventable, yet only 10-20% 
of the cancer research dollar is spent on preventive aspects 
of the disease. From WORT, Madison Wise, lack Gariss at 5. 



Wednesday 21 



6:00 SUNRISE CONCERT/ Qrl Stone 

Today's feature: HOLST's The Wandering Scliolar, 
a chamber opera in one act. Performances by Michael Rip- 
pon. Norma Burrowes, Michael Langdon and Robert Tear. 
The English Opera Group and the English Chamber Orchestra 
are conducted by Steuart Bedford. Angel S-371 52. 

9:00 TTIIS MORNING 

News; commentary Jeff Horton; "Read All About 
It;" and Terry Hodel's Calendar. 

10:00 FOLKDANCE WITH MARIO! 

11:00 THE MORNING READING 

A Dorotiiy Pori<er Retrospective, Eliza Lewin reads. 

1 1 :30 KULCHUR: Theater Qose-up/ Ray Tatar 

Call In for Comedy. Ray Tatar and Piper Thomas 
continue to focus on LA improvisational theater groups, 
with call-ins and a live studio audience. Today: THE 
GROUNDLINGS. 

12:00 NOON CONCERT/ John .Schneider 

jazz at Noon: Today's focus is on the JAZZ PIANO. 
Music by Art Tatum, Teddy Wilson, Bill Evans, Keith Jarrett, 
George Shearing and others. 

2:00 THE BIG BROADCAST/ Bobb Lynes 

Western Shows: Rancho Round-Up Time with 
Spade Cooley {618145); Dude Martin Radio Rancho (1/4/47); 
Andrews Sisters Eight-to-thc-Bar Ranch (11 /1 4/45). 

3:30 RUTH'S KITCHEN/ Rtith Ziony 

The Commander-in-Chief of the Clean Plate Club 
presents recipes and restaurants to your heart's content. 



4:30 



5:00 



SOCIOLOGIST'S EYE ON SPORT/ jon Brower 

A look beyondthe sports heros and headlines. 



HOLDING UP MORE THAN HALF THE SKY 

Silences. Tillic Olsen, working class writer, consum- 
mate artist and feminist, won the coveted O'Hcnry Award 
for the Best American Story, "Tell Me a Riddle," in 1961. 
Featured are a conversation with Olsen and excerpts from 
her literary works. Produced by Pearl Skotnes. 

5:55 CALENDAR/ Terty Hodel 

6:00 THE EVENING NEWS 

6:45 COMMENTARY/ Charles Morgan 

7:00 CONSIDER THE ALTERNATIVES 

Examining nuclear might, energy and policy. 



MARCH FOLIO PAGE 29 



LONG BEACH GRAND OPERA 

Michael Milcmlu Ani^ik [>iri.-LTu 



Pnsmls 



n 



a Jravtata 



Benita Valente 

Violetta 



Jerome Pruett 

Alfredo 



Louis Quilico 

Cermont 





"Dk coitf ;s nuraculottsly lovely 
The New York Times 



Bruce Ferden Conductor 



71k kadini) lym la'ior of ihe Viaim 

1 hlkioper 




Tlxfamoui yildropoliUiii 0/)fra Siar. 



John Wright Stevens Set Design 



LONG BEACH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 



SEE 



the FIRST Grand Opera ever in the beautiful TERRACE THEATER 



NEW 



professional production, never before seen in Southern California 



TWO PERFORMANCES ONLY 



March 28 and March 30 at 8:00 PM in the beautiful TERRACE THEATER 



LONG BEACH GRAND OPERA ORDER FORM 



ORDER NOW 



Please reserve tickets to Long Beach 

Grand Opera's production of La Traviata on 

March 28 at 8 PM 
March 30 at 8 PM 
at $ each. TOTAL $ 

D Check enclosed (Make payable to Long 
Beach Symphony/Opera 
Association) 

D Charge to: 



BankamentardiVISAi oi Masleti h.iiqp » 



t»p tt.itp 



Please indicate with an X where you would prefer to sit: 

ORCHESTRA LOGE BALCONY 

\ -aoo y 

•6 00 lor 
students and Senior Ciliiens 




NAME 

ADDRESS 

CITY 



ZIP 



PHONE 



Tickets are also available at the Long Beach Convention Center Box 
Office (213) 436-3661 and all Ticketron outlets. 



(advertisement) 



MARCH FOLIO PAGE 30 



7:30 OPEN lOURNAL: Late breaking feaftires 

8:00 UP FROM THE ASH GROVE/ Ed Pearl & friends 

9:30 CLOSE RADIO PRESENTS 

A special production of a live performance by 
CHRIS BURDEN. The public is invited. Admission is free 
of charge, but reservations are advisable. Call 877-271 1 
during weekdays 10—5. 

10:45 RADIO FREE OZ 

Could it be that Save the Pagans, Inc. has a secret 
file on you? Not even the FBI knows, but if you were lifing 
in LA between 1976-78, the folks at Oz will help you pene- 
trate this 1 268 BC cult. Stay tuned for a Proctor or a Berg- 
man, a Westermark or a Swcetzer, a Cowan or a Mayer. 

12:00 SOMETHING'S HAPPENING!/ Roy of Hollywood 

Dimension of Imagination presents the 3rd in the 
latest series of 5 productions with "Dreamthief" by Ed Tho- 
mas. A desperate movie producer resorts to stealing dreams 
for his next script. Starring the "Something's Happening 
Players" nka New Generation Players, aka 206 Players (they 
have to change their name after each production) (30'). 
From the NFCB, "Allen Ginsberg Today" (20'). Then the 
3rd of 4 related dramas from Earplay, "The Codicil to Mary 
Purty's Will" (60'). We then continue our salute to CBS 
with 4 more CBS Radio Workshop productions (30' each): 
"The City Wears a Slouch Hat" by Kenneth Patchen with 
Les Tremayne, music by John Cage; "Report on the Weans" 
(Hodel's favorite); "Report on ESP" (3/9/56); and "I Have 
Three Heads." Dates will be mentioned on the air. At 4:55, 
the 7th Huxley Lecture, delivered by Aldous Huxley in '59. 



Thursday 22 



4: 30 DE ALI NG/ Barbara Cady 

5:00 LA 5 PM/ Burt Wilson 

Ma Bell's Secret Destiny for America. Burt talks 
about the phone company's future plans and how consu- 
mers arc expected to finance them. Open phones (we hope!) 

5:55 CALENDAR/ Terry Hodel 

6:00 THE EVENING NEV/S 

6:45 COMMENTARY/ William Winter 

7:00 iriTERNATIONAL JOURNAL 

7:30 OPEN JOURNAL: Late breaking features 

8:00 FAI R SEX, FAI R GAME: 

Some Women Say No to the Sexual Safari 

Women have been bombarded with ever-increasing quantities 
of pornographic magazine images in the hands of fathers, un- 
cles, brothers, sons, husbands, lovers and boyfriends. In the 
movies, and on the cover of record albums too, we have been 
subjected to raping, slabbing, burning, beating, gagging, bind- 
ing, torturing, even dismemberment in the name of male sex- 
ual pleasure. Women's bodies have been painted, plucked, 
tinted, shaved, clothed, exposed, fetished, fragmented and 
contorted to fit a million male fantasies. Most women cringe 
a litth and keep silent. But in November 1 978, 350 women 
got together in San Francisco for a Conference on Porno- 
graphy and Violence in Media, to say a resounding NO to 
the misogynist message of pornography and its violent in- 
fluence in society. KPFK's Helene Rosenbluth attended the 
Conference and covered it for KPFK. Part One tonight co- 
vers discussions and workshops on Pornography and the 
First Amendment; What is Pornography?; and the Effects 
of Pornography. Rebroadcast Tuesday the27th, 2:00 p.m. 
Part Two will be broadcast next Thursday, 8:00 p.m. 



6:00 
9:00 



SUNRISE CONCERT/ Carl Stone 



THIS MORNING 

News: commentary by Paul Schradc; "Read All 
About It;" and Calendar with Terry Hodel. 

10:00 FOLKSCENE/ TTie Larmans 

Singer-guitarist Tom Rush makes a long-awaited 
visit to the program. 



11:00 

11:30 
12:00 



THE MORNING READING 

Eliza Lcwin reads from Dorothy Parker. 

KULCHUR: Arts Digest 



NOON CONCERT: Chapel, Court and Countryside 

The Early History of Bowed String Instruments, 2. 
In this two-hour segment, your host )oseph Spencer deals 
with the emergence during the 1 7lh Century of the bass 
m-^mber of the viola da gamba family as a virtuoso medium, 
featuring works bv Marin Marais, Sr. de Stc Colombe, 
William Lawcs, |.|. Fux, and Bach (no. 246). 

2:00 WE CALL IT MUSIC/ The Bop Kings 

Bop and early jazzy stuff with Jim Seeley and 
Tom Halladay. 

3:00 GREY POWER/ Aurelia Morris 

3:30 THE HEALTH DEPARTMENT/ Al HiKbner 




MARCH FOLIO PAGE 31 



9:30 CLEVELAND ORCHESTRA: Live in Concert 

MOZART: Symphony No. 8. K. 48; DEL TREDICI: 
Final Alice; TCHAIKOVSKY: Suite No. 3. The soprano solo- 
ist is Barbara Hendricks. Lorin Maazel conducts. Robert Con- 
rad hosts. Stereo (program subject to change). 

11 :30 JANUS COMPANY RADIO THEATRE 

Repertor\' radio produced espcci.illv for KPFK 
featuring Mike Hodel, Jerry Bono, Eliza Lewin, )an Rab- 
son, Maliory Geller and Jan Ridolphi Gellor. 

12:00 SOMETHING'S HAPPENING!/ Roy of Hollywood 

Tonight, a very speical live guest, Mike Hodel, yes, 
the very one. We will explore the depths of his essence, his 
tastes, his sins, his ideas, his adventures, his geslalt, his VW, 
his life and loves. R of H and Mike will priibably have a live, 
on-the-air ego contest, with open phones, and some interest- 
ing KPFK history. Then at 12:15 (or whenever the interview 
ends), we will have open night until 4:40 when Margaret 
Mead speaks on "Sexual Freedom and Cultural Change." 



Friday 23 



6:00 SUNRISE CONCERT/ Car! Stone 

9:00 THIS MORNING 

News; "Your Turn;" "Read All About It;" Calendar. 

10:00 INDEPENDENT MUSIC/ Mario Ci.setta 

1 1 :00 THE MORNING READING 

A Dorothy Partner Retrospective. Eliza Lewin reads. 

1 1 :30 KULCHUR: Weekly Arts Wrap-Up 

12:00 NOON CONCERT. Soundboard/ John Schneider 

Harvey Malloy and John Barcelona present a con- 
cert of music for Flute and Guitar performed live from 
Studio A. 

2:00 REEL TIME: Pacifica Archive Documentary 

3:00 CLOSE-UP/ Rick James 

Bright Moments. Concluding focus on the music 
and background of Rahsaan Roland Kirk, a fine artist. 

3:30 AMERICAN INDIAN AIRWAVES 

Hosted by Liz Lloyd and Matt Keshcna of the 
Tribal American Consulting Corp., with music of the tribes. 

4: 30 DEALI NG/ Barbara Cacfy 

5:00 MEDIA WATCfl 

Bob Gottlieb .md Claudia Fonda-Bonardi host. 

5:55 CALENDAR/ Terry Hodel 

6:00 THE EVENING NEWS 

6:45 PRIME TIME: Features on Aging 

7:00 INSIDE LA./ LirlOfari 

7:30 CHILD'S PLAY: Children's Stories 

8:00 AFRaBLUE/ Sheila Eldridge 

10:00 HOUR 25: Science Fiction 

MARCH FOLIO PAGE 32 




R.ilpli loncs makes electronic music live upstairs at KPFK's Studios 
Satiirilav at 10:00 p.m., on "Imasinarv L,inriscape." You're invited. 

1 2:00 GOODBYE PORKPIE HAT/ Paul Vangelisti 
2:00 THE BIG SLEEP/ John Breckow 

Saturday 24 



6:00 

7:30 

8:30 

9:30 

10:30 

12:30 



NO STRINGS ATTACHED/ Scott Bodell 
FUSION/ Lauren Lee 
THE NIXON TAPES/ Tom Nixon 
HALFWAY DOWN THE STAIP5/ Ruth Buell 
FOLK MUSIC/ John Davis 



THE CAR SHOW/ Len Frank, John Retsek 

Turning the brights on to illuminate those dim 
areas of understanding about your car. Open phones. 



1:50 
2:00 
3:30 
6:00 
6:30 
6:45 



WEEKEND CALENDAR/ Terry Hodel 
BALLADS, BANJOS & BLUEGRASS/ Tom Sauber 
SONG & CELEBRATION/ Dan Wright 
THE SATURDAY MEVVS/ Larry l^-loss 
ON FILM/ Dean Cohen 



DOUBLE TAKE/ Paul Lion 

Lion reviews plays; representatives from the pro- 
ductions respond. Tonight: the Los Angeles Actors Theater 
contemporary approach to Euripides' The Bacchae. Guest: 
Yuri Bogajcwicz, director. 



7:00 

7:15 
7:30 



ON PRINT/ John Ewing 

A new book critic joins KPFK's reviewers. 

ONSTAGE/ Livwencc Christon 



SCULPTURE IN AMERICA 

The second in a series of interviews conducted by 
Bruria Finkcl al the 1 0th Annual Sculpture FEstival in To- 
ronto, June 1978. Tonight; Carl Andre. Rebroadcast Thurs- 
day the 29th, 1 1:30 a.m. 

8:00 THE WILLIAM MALLOCH PROGRAMME 



W-fW-ZAt 






1 



10:00 IMAGINARY LANDSCAPE . 

Live Broadcast/Q)ncert: Miisic for Digital Fillers / 
/aLPH JONES, an electronic music composer best JNnown I 
for his explorations in the realm of ultrasonics, will present | 
fi live concert from our upstairs Studio Z here at KPFK. The 
laudicncc is invited to attend this broadcast performance nf 
Hones' own 90 minute work Music for DigituI Filters, which 
' Musical America Mciga/ine described in the following way: 
"In the background one can hardly hear a slowly sweeping 
wave; in the foreground are bell-like tones, stiddcn chimes 
and clusters of ring-modulated sounds that occur with sur- 
prising irregularity indeed. One of the piece's most appeal- 
ing aspects is its unpredictability." For best seating please 
arrive b v:^:40 p.m . at our studios at ^^700 r^t^|ipr^j).T rIvH. 
West, in North Hollywood. You can call 877-2711 during 
business hours for further details and directions. 

■^E^QQ-^IESSERACT/ Phil Mendelson 
2:00 ON THE CORNER/ Ron Pelletier 



Sunday 25 

6:00 GOSPEL CARAVAN/ Prince Dixon 

9:00 BiaMEDITATION/ Jack Gariss 

Experimental, cxperiencial explorations of you. 

10:00 CARLOS HAGEN PRESENTS: Radio Collage 
1 1 :00 DOROTHY HEALEY: Marxist Commentary 
1 2:00 MANY WORLDS OF MUSIC/ Mario Casetta 

1:00 TENOR OF THE TIMES 

. Tenor buff Fred Hyatt invites you to revel once 
again in the vocal and interpretive splendors of the fine 
lyric tenor, Peter Anders. 

1 :30 THE SUNDAY OPERA/ Fred Hyatt 

PUCCINI: La Fanciulla del West with Carol Nebett 
as Minnie, Placido Domingo as Dick Johnson (Ramerrcz), and 
Sherrill Milnes as jack Ranee. The Chorus and Orchestra of 
the Royal Opera House Covent Garden are conducted by 
Zubin Mehta. Deutsche Grammophon 2709 078. 

5:00 THE SOUR APPLE TREE/ Clare Spark 

Form, ideology and consciousness. 

6:00 THE SUNDAY NEWS/ Sanford Fidell 

6:30 THE SCIENCE CONNECTION/ Vera, Steve Kilston 

7:00 PRE ACHI N' THE BLUES/ Mary Aldin, Frank Scott 

8:30 IMRU/ The Gay Radio Collective 

Information and features, guests and open phones. 

9:30 FOLKSCENE/TTieLarmarB 

Traditional and contemporary folk music from 
many parts of the world, with live performances and inter- 
views, as well as recorded music. 

12:00 SMOKE RINGS/ )ohn Breckow 



Monday 26 

6:00 SUNRISE CONCERT/ Qrl Stone 

Featured today: Charles W/ES' Piano Sonata No. 2 
("Concord, Mass., 1840 60"), performed by Gilbert Kalish. 
Nonesuch H-71337. 

9:00 THIS MORNING 

News; commentary by Mike Hall, "Read All About 
It;" Terry Hodel 's Calendar of Events. 

10:00 FOLKD-^NCE WITH MARIO! 

11 :00 THE MORNING READING 

Continuing our Dorothy Parker Retrospective. 

11:30 KULCHUR: In the Wings/ )ohn Medici 

12:00 NOON CONCERT/ John Schneider 

Featuring today the ADASTRA QUARTET, re- 
corded live in KPFK's Studio D, performing string quartet 
music by Mozart, Haydn and Gershwin. 

2:00 EARPLAY REBROADCAST 

3:00 CLOSE-UP/ Rick James 

The Process of Improvisation. This week featuring 
the music and background of tenorman joe Henderson, a 
part of an historical process that is extremely important in 
modern and contemporary Afro-American music. 

3:30 ORGANIC GARDENING/ Will Kinney & B. Spark 

4:30 DEALING/ Barbara Cady 

5:00 CONSUMER AWARENESS/ Ida Honorof 

Continuing with Part 2 of Ida's interview with Dr. 
Irwin Bross, Director of Biostatistics at Roswell Park Memo- 
rial Institute for Cancer Research. Details on 3/12, 5 p.m. 

5: 55 CALENDAR/ Terry Hodel 

6:00 THE EVENING NEWS 

6:45 COMMENTARY/ Charles ^1organ 

7:00 LABOR SCENE/ Sam Kushner 

7:30 REPORT TO THE LISTENER/ J im Berland 

8:00 LA VI DA LATIN A 

Luis Torres and David Sandoval host an hour of 
information and mtisic from the Latino community. 

9:00 CHAPEL, COURT AND COUNTRYSIDE 
SPECIAL CONCERT 

Host Joseph Spencer is proud to depart from the usual 
format to present the radio premiere appearance of an 
important string quartet: THE SARTORI STRING QUAR- ; 
TET, with Murray AdIer, violin; Jay Allen Rosen, violin; 
Pamela Goldsmith, viola; Frederick Seykora, 'cello. The 
program; BEETHOVEN: String Quartet, Op. 18, No. 5: 
BARTOK: String Quartet, Op. 7, No. 1; BRAHMS: String ;; 
Quartet, Op. 51, No. 2. This concert will be broadcast 
LIVE from KPFK's Upstairs Studio Z. Listeners are cor- 
dially invited to attend without charge. Those attending 
arc requested to plan their arrival for at least 20 minutes 
prior to broadcast time (8:40 p.m.), to avoid disruption ii 
of the music. ^ 



liilARCH FOLIO PAGE 33 



11:00 IN FIDELITY/ Peter Sutheim 

The first half hour or so will have been pre-empted 
for the live chamber recital by the Sartori Quartet engineered 
by In Fidelity's host Peter Sutheim, who then emerges from 
the control room to tell how he did it and why. And other 
topics. Open phones. 

12:00 SCAIETHING'S HAPPENING!/ Roy of Hollywood 

We continue Mediu Power in LA, recorded by KPFK 
at a 1978 UCLA Extension course, organized and moderated 
by Ellen Stern Harris. Panel 5 is "Covering Government, Po- 
litics and the Grnssrools" with Warren OIney, KNBC and 
"News Conference;" Bill Boyarsky, author of Backroom Po- 
litics and LA Times City Hall reporter; Susan Litwin, free- 
lance writer and KLAC radio journalist (ca. 2 hrs). Then Hen- 
rik Ibsen's The Master Builder as presented by the National 
Theater of Great Britain, with Michael Redgrave, Maggie 
Smith, Celia Johnson and Max Adrian (Caedmon TRS 307- 
S) (ca 1 hr. 40'). Then open time for expansive experiments. ^ 



Tuesday 27 



6:00 



SUNRISE CONCERT/ Carl Stone 

Today's feature: BACH's Triple Concerto in A mi- 
nor for Harpsichord, violin and flute BWV 1044. This per- 
formance features Igor Kipnis, harpsichord, Hans-Martin 
Linde, flute and Neville Marriner, violin, along with the 
London Strings. Colin Tilney, continuo. Columbia M430540. 

9:00 THIS MORNING 

News; commentary by Charles Johnson; "Read 
All About It;" Calendar. 

10:00 FOLKSCENE/ TTie Larmans 

French folk music is featured today. 

11 :00 THE MORNING READING 

A Dorothy Parker Retrospective, Eliza Lewin reads. 

1 1 :30 KULCHUR: BacVstage/ Gil Laurence 

12:00 NOON CONCERT: 

At the Keyboard/ Leonid Hambro 

Today Lee features live performances by Cal Arts musicians. 



2:00 FAI R SEX, FAI R GAME: 

Some Women Say No to the Sexual Safari- 
Rebroadcast from Thursday the 22nd, 8:00 p.m. 

3:00 



1 



CLOSE- UP/ Rick James 

The Process of Improvisation. Music performed by 
tenorman Joe Henderson, who has worked with the very 
best of modern and contemporary jazz artists. 

3:30 STRAWBERRY SHORTBREAD/ Pat Benson 

Critical analyses of our public schools, and some 
suggestions on what concerned people can do to help. 

4:30 THE CORRECT CHANGE COMEDY MINUTES 

Episode 4: Almost an Orchestra, a play by Jack 
Podell that follows two candy factory workers as they turn 
away from Coconut Toastie Bars to a world of magic and 
music. Featuring Bill Hunt and Alex Kubik. Technical pro- 
duction by Janet Dodson. Produced by Susan LaTcmpa 
and Laura Fanning, (the last episode in this mini-series will 
be aired on Friday the 30th. also at 4:30 p.m.) 



5:00 LA 5 PM/ Burt Wilson 

777e Country: Is It Working? Burt hosts a discussion 
about the people's turning to consumer groups instead of 
politicians to get things done. Open phones. 

5: 55 CALENDAR/ Terry Hodd 

6:00 THE EVENING NEWS 

6:45 TAKING SIDES: Debate 

7:30 OPEN JOURNAL: Ute breaking features 

8:00 CALIFORNIA UPDATE: Sacramento Report 

9:00 BOSTON SYMPHONY: Uve in Concert 

TCHAIKOVSKY: Swan Lake, Act III; Variations 
on a Rococo Theme for Cello; Swan Lake, Act IV. Lynn 
Harrell is the soloist. Seiji Ozawa conducts. '.*'illiam Pierce f 
hosts. Recorded using Dolby 'A' (subi. to change). 

1 1 :00 THE BIG BROADCAST/ Bobb Lynes 

Adventures by Morse: "Land of the Living Dead" 
parts 7 and 8. To be continued in April. 

12:00 SOMETHING'S HAPPENING!/ Roy of Hollywood 

/ Want to Die— The Experience and Meaning of Anx- 
iety and Fear, talk 4 from Dr. Carl Faber's UCLA Extension 
series: "Hypochondriacs and the Experience of Creative iso- 
lation" (ca 90'). The final two talks will be broadcast in April, 
the 1st and 2nd Tuesdays. Then from KPFA, Berkeley, Eric 
Bauersfeld reads another "Black Mass,," Saturday Night (30'). 
From The Health Department, "Poisonous Rain," produced 
by Al Huebner (15'). Then a change of pace from the NFCB: 
The Editors Were Frantic (45'), an interview with Dan O'Neill, 
cartoonist who introduced OddBodkins and Air Pirate Fun- 
nies, on the craft of cartoon strips and their place in Ameri- 
can Culture. Produced by KTAO, Los Gatos CA. Then Fu- 
ture Poetry, also by KTAO, an interview with Dirk van 
Nouhuys, producer of computer cut-ups (30'). From Radio 
Canada International, a short story, "Come Away, Come 
Away" by Mayor Moore (30'). At 5, Bio-Meditation, J. Gariss. 



Wednesday 28 

6:00 SUNRISE CONCERT/ Carl Stone 

9:00 THIS MORNING 

News; commentary by Lucy Fried; "Read All 
About It;" and Calendar. 

10:00 FOLKDANCE WITH MARIO ! 

11:00 THE MORNING READING 

A Dorothy Parker Retrospective continues with 
Bill Hunt joining Eliza Lewin in a special radio performance 
of Ms. Parker's one-act play, Htc We Are. 

11 :30 KULCHUR: Theater Qose-Up/ Ray Tatar 

Focusing on LA's improvisational theater groups, 
with live call-ins ind a live studio audience. Moderated by 
Ray Tatar and Produced by Piper Thomas. Today: WAR 
BABIES. 

12:00 NOON CONCERT/ John Schneider 

ja// al Noon: Today's focus is on JAZZ VIBES, 
with music by Milt Jackson, Bobby Hutchcrson, Terry Gibbs, 
Gary Burton and others. 



MARCH FOLIO PAGE 34 



2:00 THE BIG BROADCAST/ Bobb Lvnes 

Breakfast in Hollywood {1IM47), with Tom Bren- 
naman; What's Do/n' Ladies? (10/30/47), with )ay Stewart; 
Welcome Travellers (40'$), with Tommy Baitlctt. 

3:30 RLTTH'S KITCHEN/ Ruth Ziony 

4: 30 FLTTUREWATCH/ Linda Strawn 

Monitoring the cutting edge, wlicre science and 
religion are forming our future. 

5:00 HOLDING UP MORE THAN HALF THE SKY 

Carlotta. Concluding our month-long celebration 
of International Women's Day, we honor Carlotta, heroine 
of Cuba's 19th Century black slave revolts, and all Cuban 
women on the 20th anniversary of Ctiba's independence. 
Featured are the prose poems of Margaret Randall and' 
others. Produced by Pearl Skotnesand Susan Anderson. 

5:55 CALENDAR/ Terry Hodel 

6:00 THE EVENING NBVS 

6:45 COMMENTARY/ Charles Morgan 

7:00 CONSIDER THE ALTERNATIVES 

Questions on nuclear policy, domestic and foreign. 

7:30 OPEN JOURNAL: Late breaking features 

8:00 UP FROM THE ASH GROVE/ Ed Pearl & Friends 

9:00 LOS ANGELES THEATER OF THE EAR 

(L.A.T.E.) PRESENTS 
BOOGIE WOOGIE LANDSCAPES, an evening in the colored 
hemisphere of Ntozake Shange. Memories/visions/& dreams/ 
of a girl-child raised in our degrees & angles. A radio premiere 
of a new work by the author of For Colored Girls Who Have 
Considered Suicide When the Rainbow is Eniif; First per- 
formed on stage by the New York Shakespeare Festival, De- 
cember 18, 1978. Directed for radio by Paul Vangclisti, this 
LATE presentation will be broadcast live before a studio au- 
dience. Admission is free, but sealing is limited. For reserva- 
tions call 21 3/877-271 1 , during business hours. This program 
is part of the Los Angeles Theater of the Ear's continuing sc- 
ries of live radio drama, partially funded by a grant from the 
National Endowment for the Arts. 

10:15 IS THE PvAINBOW ENUF? 

A discussion, hosted by Earl Ofari, of the image of 
the Black man in Ntozake Shangc's writing. Open phones, 
listener feedback requested. 

11:15 FUNDRAISING 

12:00 SOMETHING'S HAPPENING!/ Roy of Hollywood 

Dimension of Imagination presents " Very Small 
World" by David L. Krebs. A neighborhood juxtaposed mys- 
teriously to a Lilliputian world upsets the dclicpte ecological 
balance. The giant invaders from Earth must leave or devise 
a way to correct the imbalance. Dudley Knight heads a cast 
of many (30'). Then from the NFCB, a satirical "Visit to the 
Famous Film Critics School" (50') from KOPN, Columbia, 



Live pcrfnrniancc/broadc.isi (if "Boojjic Woojjio Landscapes," ,^ new 
play by Nto/ake Sliaiigc, author ■>■ "For Colored tiirls Who M.ivc 
Considered Suicide, When the R.iinbow is Lnuf." You are invited to 
.utend. Followed by a panel discussion, "Is the Raiiibow Enuf?" 
Wednesday at 9 and 10;1 5 p.m. Photo by Leonard Freed in the hook, 
"Black in White America" (LNS). 



MO, with lots of inside jokes for film buffs. Then the 4th of 
4 related Earplay dramas with "The Summer of Timoth\' 
Once" (60') by )anics W. Nicklc. Then to salute CBS, 4 more 
CBS Radio Workshop productions (30' each): "Witness' 
with Raymond Burr as the sole voice; "Brewsie and Willie" 
by Gertrude Stein; "Epitaph" and "People Are No Good." 
Dates will be broadcast. At 4:45, the last of the Huxley 
Lectures from 1959. 



Thursday 29 



6:00 SUNRISE CONCERT/ Carl Stone 

9:00 THIS MORNING 

News; cnnmcntary from George Smith; "Read 
All About It;" Calendar of Events. 

10:00 FOLKSCENE/ Tlie Larmans 

An hour ol Irish traditional music with fiddler 
Daniel Michael Collins accompanied on guitar by Mark Simos. 

1 1 :00 THE MORNI NG READI NG 

A special treat: the voice of Dorothy Parker 
.(herself) in a reading cf one of her most insightful short 
stories, Horsic. 

1 1 :30 KULCHUR: Arts Digest 




MARCH FOLIO PAGE 3ri 



1 2:00 NOON CONCERT: Chapel . Court and Countryside 

The Early Hislory of Bowed String Instruments, 3. 
In this final two-hour portion, Joseph Spencer traces the 
emergence of the violin family aroimd the turn of the 17th 
Century, its rapid rise and acceptance throughout Europe. 
Heard will be works by Cima, Farina, Biber, Cnrelli, Fux, 
Bononcini, Bach, Bocchcrini, Tartini and Paganini. (no. 247). 



2:00 
3:00 

3:30 

4:30 
5:00 



WE CALL IT MUSIC/ Halladay & Seeley 

GREY POWER/ Aurelia Morris 

On the joys and pains of the aging process. 

THE HEALTH DEPARTMErvn"/ Al Hiiebner 

Health care: as it is, and as it could be. 

DEALING/ airbara Cady 



LA 5 PM/ Burt Wilso-i 

ll'f all lake gas from the Gas Company. Burt and 
members of CAUSE give a report on spiraling gas rates and 
what you can do about them. Open phones. 

5: 55 CALENDAR/ Terry Hodel 

6:00 THE EVENING NEWS 

6:45 COMMENTARY/ William Winter 

7:00 INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL 

7:30 OPEN JOURNAL: Late breaking features 

8:00 FAI R SEX, FAI R GAME-I I : 

Some Women Say ^to to the Sexual Safari 

Women have been bombarded with ever increasing quantities 
of pornographic images in magazines, movies, record album 
covers. We have been subjected to raping, beating and tor- 
tures of all kinds in the name of male sexual pleasure. 
Women's bodies have becncontortcd, distorted and frag- 
mented to fit a million male fantasies. Most women cringe 
a little and keep silent. But in November 1978, 350 women 
held the first Conference on Pornography and Violence in 
Media. KPFK's Helena Rosenbluth brought back tapes of 
the discussions and workshops. Part Two tonight covers 
Child Porn; Pornography and Racism; and Pornography 
and the New Left. Rebroadcasl Tuesday 4/3, 2:00 p.m. 



Stit>tlc promotion of r.ipc on .i record nihiini cover? Tlie two very 
seductive women invitingly suck on their rjpe whistles. 




9:30 CLEVELAND ORCHESTRA: Live in Concert 

MOZART: Symphony No. 9, K. 73; BEETHOVEN: 
Violin Concerto in D major, Op. 61 ; R. STRAUSS: Sympho- 
nia Domestica, Op. 53. Leonid Kogan is the violin soloist. 
Lorin Maazel conducts. Robert Conrad hosts (subj to change). 

11:30 J ANUS COMPANY RADIO THEATRE 

Social Call. LIVE! In a future not too far away, 
a newly widowed woman is visited by her welfare officer 
in the new radio play by Mallory and )an Geller. 

12:00 SOMETHING'S HAPPENING!/ Roy of Hollywood 

Tonight our ritual end-of-the-month open phones 
for whatever happens. Comments, criticism, Panama Canal, 
suggestions, strokes, advice for the love-lorn, profound ex- 
plorations, and general communications among the night 
people. Then at 4:00, Margaret Mead talks on "Can We Find 
An Index for the Quality of Life?" 

Friday 30 

6:00 SUNRISE CONCERT/ Carl Stone 

9:00 THIS MORNING 

News; "Your Turn;" Read All About It; Calendar 

10:00 INDEPENDENT MUSIC/ Mario Casetta 

11 :00 THE MORNING READING 

A Dorothy Parker Retrospective. Eliza Lewin reads. 

1 1 :30 KULCHUR/ Vangelisti, Cohen and Hunt 

Their weekly wrap-up on the arts. 

12:00 NOON CONCERT: Soundboard/ John Schneider 

Ensemble music for guitar and various other instru- 
ments. All music is from Vienna from 1800 on. Composers 
represented are Schubert, Diabelli, Haydn, Weber, Schoen- 
berg and Webern. 

2:00 REEL TIME: Pacifica Archive Documentary 

3:00 CLOSE-UP/ Rick James 

77;f Process of Improvisation. Concluding this week's 
presentation of tenorman Joe Henderson. 

3:30 RED TAPE 

Keeping tabs on the bureaucracy, with focus on 
the special problems of the handicapped. Produced by 
John Kolik, Marcia Gayle and Gary Kline. 

4:30 THE CORRECT CHANGE COMEDY MINUTES 

Best Laid Plans, a play which finds LA reeling 
from the shock of a white-paper crime, while our young 
heroes enjoy a perfect day. Featuring Peter Weiss, Dierdre 
Bcrthrong, Bill Hunt, Jacque Lynn Colton, Karin Shae, 
Alex Kubik,and Laura Fanning. Technical production 
by Janet Dodson. Written and produced by LaLira Fanning 
and Susan LaTompa. 

5:00 MEDIA WATCH/ Fonda-Bonardi & Gottlieb 

5:55 CALENDAR/ Tenv Hodel 

6:00 THE EVENING NEWS 

6:45 PRIME TIME: Features on Aging 

7:00 INSIDE LA. / Earl Ofari 



MARCH FOLIO PAGE 36 




COME VISIT US 
AT OUR NEW LOCATION 

212 Pier Avenue 
Santa Monica, CA 90405 

(213)592-1136 

for the finest selection 

in Southern California of 

BLUES • BLUECRASS • OLD TIMEY 

AMERICAN FOLK MUSIC 

ENGLISH, IRISH & SCOTTISH FOLK MUSIC 

& OTHER ESOTERIC MUSIC. 

Also an extensive selection of jazz 
and ethnic music as well as dozens 
of related books and magazines. 

(ddvcriisenic'ilsj 




7:30 CHILD'S PLAY: Children's Stories 

8:00 AFRaBLUE/ Sheila Eldridge 

10:00 HOUR 25: Science Fiction 

1 2:00 GOODBYE PORKPI E HAT / Paul Vangelisti 

2:00 THE BIG SLEEP/ John Breckow 



Saturday 31 

6:00 NO STRINGS ATTACHED/ Scott Bodell 

7:30 FUSION/ Lauren Lee 

8:30 1U£ NIXON TAPES/ Tom Nixon 

9: 30 HALFWAY DOWN THE STAI RS/ Ruth Buell 

Songs and stories for kids of all ages. 

10:30 FOLK MUSIC/ John Davis 

1 2: 30 THE CAR SHOW/ Len Frank & J ohn Retsek 

1 : 50 WEEKEND CALENDAR/ Terry Hodel 

BALLADS, BANJOS & BLUEGRASS/ Tom Sauber 
SONG & CELEBRATION/ Dan Wright 
THE SATURDAY NEWS/ Lan-y Moss et al 



2:00 
3:30 
6:00 
6:30 



SCULPTURE IN AMERICA 

The third in a series of interviews, conducted by 
Bruria Finkcl at the 10th Annual Sculpture Festival in To- 
ronto, June 1978. Tonight: George Ricki. Rebroadcast 
Thursday April 5th, 1 1 :30 a.m. 

7:00 THE PERFECT CRIME/ Mike Hodel 

As the plot thickens, join whodunitfreaks from 
throughout the land in search of the perfect denouement. 

8:00 THE WILLIAM MALLOCH PROGRAMME 

10:00 IMAGINARY LANDSCAPE 

Sound Portraits of a Composer: Alexina Louie. 
Born in Canada of Chinese heritage, Alexina Louie com- 
poses, performs and leaches music while living in a canyon 
at the foot of the San Gabriel Mountains in California. To- 
night, we hear her speak and perform, share her favorite 
music, and silently observe her al work and at play. 

12:00 TESSERACT/ Phil Mendeison 

2:00 ON THE CORNER/ Ron Pelleticr 



COMING IN APRIL: 

Celebrate the 30th Anniversary of Pacifica Radio: 
Special historical Pacifica programming from the 
archives of all five Pacifica network stations. 



IVIARCH FOLIO PACE 37 



SJBSCRJPTJQI^iS 



THE COMPUTER 

Our computer is located in Berkeley, which saves us a 
lot of money but which is inconvenient. We send subscnp 
tions information to the computer twice a month. Around 
the middle of the month we do the regular Folio label run 
which returns the Folio labels, bills, renewal letter labels 
and income statements a few days later. The following 
week we do a "catch up" Folio label run for payments 
received late or for corrections processed after the regular 
run. 

Your payment may not go into the computer as 
quickly as you might think because: payments go to our 
lockbox at the Terminal 'Annex Post Office in Los Angeles, 
then they go to the bank and the bank processes the pay- 
ments and sends them to us-through the mail. This 
process often takes more than a week from the time you 
send your payment. So, if you send your check around 
the 8th of the month, there's a good chance you should 
receive the Folio for the following month and you'll also 
avoid duplicate billing, which has been the scourge of our 
subscriptions system. 

BILL PAYMENT 

Always send a bill with your check' A SI 5 payment 
received without a bill or renewal notice might be credited 
as a Film Club payment, a straight donation to the station 
or the Expansion Fund. If you send a check in for a 
pledge payment without a bill, you might be credited for 
a new subscription and still be billed for your original 
pledge. Likewise, if you send a payment for a subscription 
renewal on a company check without a renewal notice, 
you're likely to receive a new subscription at your com- 
pany address and still receive a renewal notice for your 
original subscription. So always be sure to refer to your 
account by the name on the account and the address at 
which you receive your Folio. 

FIRST CLASS FOLIO MAILING 

The Folio goes out by 2nd Class mail, and should 
take 2-5 days to get most places. Theoretically, 2nd Class 
gets better handling than our old non-profit permit, but 
our experience with the Post Office defies theory. First 
Class mailing is available for 38 extra per year (pro-rated 
at 75 cents per month for current subxriptions). This is 
often the answer for slow mailing areas like Goleta, Santa 
Barbara, Leucadia, Simi Valley oi Pearblossom-to name just 
a few. If you live in an area that gets relatively prompt 
service but want the Folio well before the beginning of 
the month, then you might want your Folio by 1st Class. 

I DIDN'T GET MY FOLIO 

The Folio is mailed around the 20th of the month. If 
you have not received your Folio by the first of the month: 
(1) check your subscription expiration date on the previous 
Folio label (upper right hand corner nf label). (2) Make 
sure you haven't moved without notifying us. (3) If you 
haven't moved and are currently enrolled as a subscriber, 
contact your local postmaster about delivery. (4) send us 
a previous Folio label with an explanatory note or call for 
a new Folio to be sent to you. 



MOVING-ADDRESS CHANGES 

If you move, your Folio will not be forwarded unless 
you request 2nd class forwarding from the Post Office. The 
best way to expedite an address change and assure continued 
receipt of the Folio is to call the station and ask for subscrip- 
tions or leave your name, old zipcode, and new address with 
the switchboard. There is an address change form on the 
back page of the Folio that can be used also. Whenever you 
do an address change with us, always include your account 
number at the top of your Folio label-that will insure 
instant handling. Address changes returned to us by the 
Post Office cost us 25 cents apiece and frequently take a 
month to be returned to us. 

PRISONER SUBSCRIPTIONS 

KPFK seeni-'s free to any prisoner, upon request, the 
Folio. 

CASSETTE FOLIOS FOR THE PRINT HANDICAPPED 

The Folio is available on cassette (returnable) to all 
print handicapped subscribers. If you 'vould like to 
receive the Folio in this form, please tear off the address 
label on the back of the Folio and send it along with 
a note (or you may call). Within two months, you will 
be receiving your complete program guide on cassette. The 
cassettes are returned to us at the end of each month, 

EXCHANGE MAILING LISTS 

KPFK exchanges and rents its SLibscriber lists to 
other organizations of common interest (Channel 28, 
Ralph Nader, ACLU, etc.). If you don't want to be 
on exchange mailing lists, send your Folio label to the 
Subscriptions Department and ask for an "NJ" Code. 
Your name will then be automatically removed from 
all mailings except for the Folio and renewal letters. 



NEW SUBSCRIPTION 

[ 1 S30/yr regular [ ] S15/6mos 

[ ] $!5/yr student 1 1 S8/6mos 

[ 1 S75 Film Club [ 1 S40 down Film Club 

S5/mo bill (add $5 ■service charge) 

GIFT SUBSCRIPTION 

Check subscription type, include your 
name & address as well as recipient's 

FILM CLUB CONVERSION OF CURRENT SUBSCRIPTION 
(S15 credit given— new subscription for 12 months created) 



$60 Full payment 



] S40 down, bill at S5/mo 

(add $.5 service charge) 



Name 



Address 



City and zip 



MAIL COUPONS AND CHECKS TO KPFK, PO BOX 54213 TERMINAL ANNEX, Los Angeles, CA 90054 

MARCH FOLIO PAGE 38 



N-Hturai Foods Started In 
The Valley At AL KAISERS 

for those tcho are 
rticore enoug/t to cat* • " 

ware Inn -Foi/^ 

■*- RESTAURANT • 

;IA25 \ rnlura Blvd . Sherman Oaks 



Cocktails . Dinner Dally trom 5 P.M. 

Lunch Mon thru Fri. from 11:30 A.M. 

ALL CREDIT CARDS HONORED 

. 783-5616 
872-1138 



n 




Starting a Business???? 
1000 BUSINESS CARDS 



Embossed 
100 



Contact us for alt your prtnling 
needs Fine quality Announce- 
ments, Stationery. Flyers, etc 
Ouf low prices are betng discounted even more 
To take advantage of this special offer, simply 
show us this ad or mention KPFK 



$12" 



- A.D.S., Attn Martin Blackwell — 

249 8. Western Ave . LA. CA S0004 
(213) 389-1955 / (213) 382-2194 



LOOKING FOR A GREAT PRE-SCHOOL? 

Alternative education still lives at 3/4 acre 
Los Angeles Family School, parent-owned 
professionally staffed, humanistic school, 
non-sexist, non-racist, non-graded. With 
emphasis on good nutrition, individual 
attention and open classroom. KPFK staff 
have their kids there (2). Now enrolling 
for the new year. Cory Gann, Director 
213/663-5049 12:30-4 p.m. weekdays. 

DIVORCE FORMS S75 

I will type the forms to dissolve that 
broken marriage. Other legal forms 
assistance S7/hour. In Anaheim, CA. 
Howard G. Johnson 714/635-4436. 

FREE NATURAL VITAMIN 
DISCOUNT CATALOG! 

Top quality. Money -saving larger sizes 
featured. Immediate service! Satisfaction 
guaranteed. Western Natural Products. 
Box 284-K, S. Pasadena 91030 



Are you a friend of 

the ALICE A. BAILEY books, 

looking for companions and 

co-workers to study with? 

We invite you to join us 
in the adventure— 

ARCANA WORKSHOPS 
213/273-5949 or 540-8689 

Please join us at the Intergroup 

FESTIVAL OF EASTER (ARIES) 

Wednesday, April 11, 1979, 8:00pm 
(please call for location) 

(Inquire About Our Weekly Workshops) 



RACHEL ROSENTHAL'S 
"GRAND CANYON" Audio Performance 
Cassettes now available. Write: R. Rosen- 
thal, 2375V2 S. Beverly Glen, LA 90064. 
213/474-1947 

EUROPE THIS SUMMER 

3 tours (Greece, Sicily, Italy, western 
Europe) guided by experienced culutral 
historians. Write: Dr. Kurt Bergel, Chap- 
man College, Orange 92666 or call 
714/538-6576. 

THE ART OF FUGUING 

Wm. Malloch's realization for strings, 
woodwinds and percussion of Bach's 
last great unified work. Die Ktinst der 
Fiigc, performed by an ensemble of 
40 LA musicians under Lukas Foss, 
is available through KPFK at a sub- 
stantial discount below the SI 2.95 
list price. Only 810 for either album: 
S-20 (Multiple Microphone) or S-21 
(Single Stereo Microphone), SIB both. 
Call 213/877-2711 weekdays 10-5. 

WANTED: USED BUNK BED 

or similar 2-bed contraption for 
child of KPFK Staff member. 
Hopefully Cheap. Call Ahna at 
213/877-2711. Leave message. 



No endorsement is implied by 
KPFK or Pacifica Foundation, 

YOUR AD WILL BE READ 
BY 15,000 SUBSCRIBERS. 
And their families & friends. 

Classified rate: $10 per inch, 
approx. 6 lines per inch, and 
40 characters per line, incl. 
spaces & punctuation. (A 
line of all-capitals= 25 char.) 

DEADLINE: 1st of month 
PRECEDING the month of 
publication. STRICT!!! 

PAYMENT IN ADVANCE. 
We cannot afford to bill you. 



# 



ALL ADS MUST BE 
PAID IN ADVANCE. 
We can't afford to do 
billing and follow-upl 



ORGANIC GARDENING SUPPLIES 

If you've been looking for rock phosphate, 
dolemitic limestone, rock potash, trace 
minerals and other good stuff for your 
garden, you can get them all from Master- 
Gardener Will Kinney's Vita Green Farms! 
We need your patronage to stay alive fi- 
narlcially. We have lost our acrage to for- 
eign investment money and musi move or 
close down immediately. We also have 
fertilizer lists, seed lists, water purifier da- 
ta, and prices for hard to find garden and 
health items you may need. And a map of 
how to find us. Or, No. Hywd. pick-up, 
before or after the Organic Gardening pro- 
gram Monday afternoons can be arranged. 
Box 878, Vista 92083. 714/724-2163. 
These arrangements must be made direct- 
ly with Will and NOT ON THE AIR during 
the program' 



moving? 

The r-^liu will NOT be automatically 
forwarded to your new address. It 
will be returned to us after a few 
weeks with your new address on it - 
probably not in time for the next 
Folio. So to avoid missing out, fill 
out this coupon and return it to Sub- 
scriptio.is. Be sure your label is on 
the hack. (We get .SOO-IOOO address 
changes a month). Thankyou. 


PLEASE PRINT!!!!! 


NAME 


NEW ADDRESS 


CITY STATE ZIP 

M.iil to: Subscriptions Dcpl., KPFK, ^729 CahuenRa Blvd. West, No. Hywd. CA 91C04 



MARCH FOLIO PAGE 39 




KPFK PRES 




10 Kilomete 



St. Patricks DayB 



lCiti9L4fsMi 



SATURDAY MARCH 17, 1970 
830 A.M. GRIFFITH PARK 



LosAn^eies 



INCLimt:: 

» T Shins to all enti 

*' Delicious breakfast ^ 

» liv« HntprtfiiiifTiHUt! 

» Pti/Hs tn »ll c«ter)niir 

• l^RrtiliciIc i>l ((impli' 



reijisttHtmii 




t|H/jr/1l 



Al I PHOCFrnS (;0 in llSTEIMER-SPOr 



FOLIO 

KPFK 90.7 FM 

3729 Cahuenga Blvd. West 

North Hollywood CA 91604 



Application to mail at Second Class 
rates is pending at North Hollywood 
Ca. and Additional mailing offices. 



pacifica 



DATED PROGRAM 

Time Value: Must arrive by March 1, 1979 



90065UPI325GX 
GREG V^R IGU 
325 W AVE 42 
LOS ANGELES CA 



11/79 A 



90065