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Full text of "McCormick corn machines"

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I I HC LINE I 

i GRAIN MACHINES 1 

= BINDERS = 

= HEADERS = 

= REAPERS = 

^ HEADER-BINDERS = 

= HAY MACHINES = 

S MOWERS = 

= RAKES E 

= HAY PRESSES £ 

E SWEEP RAKES = 

= HAY LOADERS E 

= STACKERS H 

= TEDDERS E 

= S»DE DELIVERY RAKES = 

= COMBINED SWEEP RAKES = 

= AND STACKERS S 

= CORN MACHINES 1 

= PLANTERS = 

= PICKERS = 

= BINDERS S 

S ENSILAGE CUTTERS = 

= CORNSTALK RAKES = 

H STALK CUTTERS S 

^ SHELLERS = 

S CULTIVATORS = 

= HUSKERSANO SHREDDERS E 

§ TILLAGE = 

2 DISK HARROWS H 

= CULTIVATORS = 

g SPRING-TOOTH HARROWS = 

= PEG-TOOTH HARROWS H 

E COMBINATION HARROWS = 

§ GENERAL LINE 1 

= MOTOR TRUCKS = 

= FEED GRINDERS E 

E KNIFE GRINDERS E 

E BINDER TWINE E 

= THRESHERS = 

= STONE BURR MILLS = 

E GRAIN DRILLS E 

S CREAM SEPARATORS = 

E OIL AND GAS ENGINES = 

a MANURE SPREADERS E 

S FERTILIZER SOWERS E 

^ OIL TRACTORS = 

= FARM WAGONS AND TRUCKS E 

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micm 

CORN MACHINES 










INTERNATIONAL HARVESTER COMPANY OF AMERICA 

CHICAGO USA 





CORMICK 




Save All Your Corn and Get Its Full Feeding Value 

In comparing the cost of harvesting the corn crop by hand with the more modern 
methods, the corn grower quite frequently figures into his expense only the amount he 
actually pays out for hired help. The loss sustained through waste is rarely considered 
or taken into account. 

From the standpoint of economy in harvesting the corn crop, every corn grower can 
afford modern corn harvesting machines. From the standpoint of actual feeding value 
of the stalks, the corn grower cannot afford to be without these machines. The corn 
binder and the husker and shredder together absolutely eliminate three sources of waste 
which are unavoidable when following the old-fashioned method of husking the corn 
by hand. 

When gathering corn by hand, hired help often leave their wages in the field in corn 
that they failed to gather for various reasons. They are interested in gathering the 
largest possible amount each day, and as a rule are not particular about gathering 
either the small or the fallen ears, or in picking up the ears that miss the wagon. The 
use of a corn binder and a husker and shredder precludes waste of this character. 

Another large loss sustained by leaving the cornstalks standing in the field is the 
waste of valuable organic soil food. The vegetation that has grown from the soil should 
be returned to the soil in so far as possible. The soil is hungry for it and needs it. A 
large percentage of the benefit that the soil might receive from the cornstalks is lost 
through a process of weathering, never to be regained, when the stalks are left standing 
in the field. The poor residue that is left in the spring is of little value as compared 
with the value of barnyard manure that results from feeding live stock with the shredded 
stover. Thus the value of the corn binder and the husker and shredder from the stand- 
point of soil improvement is readily seen. 

Last, but not least, is the actual feeding value of shredded stover. Livestock is 
usually turned into the cornfield after the corn crop is harvested, but the food value of 
the stalks is small even when favored with fair weather, which is unlikely at that season 
of the year. Snow-covered cornstalks are of less value. When properly shredded, 
about thirty-seven per cent of the food value of the corn crop is found in the stalks. 
Thus, for example, if the value of the ear corn from an acre of ground amounts to $25, 
the value of the shredded cornstalks from the same acre would amount to $ 1 4.68. 

Thousands of corn growers have eliminated these sources of waste by cutting their 
corn with a McCormick corn binder, husking the ears, and shredding the stalks with a 
McCormick husker and shredder. They all agree that it is a paying proposition — that 
corn machines pay for themselves by the saving they make the first year or two — that 
the purchase of McCormick corn machines is the first step toward the abolishment of 
drudgery in harvesting the corn crop. 

The sooner you own McCormick corn machines, the sooner you will be saving all 
of your corn crop. Furthermore, you vAW not look forward to corn harvest with dread. 

2 





M*= CORMICK 



Save Time and Eliminate Hard Labor with a 
McCormick Corn Binder 




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McCormick corn binder with bundle carrier 

There is a right time for cutting and shocking corn. This work should be done just as the ears 
begin to glaze. The sweet, nutritious juices in stalks and blades which make the fodder so valuable 
are then preserved. A few days' delay in cutting and the stalks and leaves are a tasteless, woody 

fibre that cattle do not relish. 

To harvest corn at the proper time with a corn knife is 
almost impossible unless a large force of men is employed to do 
the work. That means a big expense, and it is not always pos- 
sible to secure the required help at the right time. Cutting corn 
by hand is a slow, tedious job and most farm hands prefer farm 
work that is less disagreeable. 

The man who owns a McCormick corn binder is fortified 
■^^ against the danger of the loss of a part of his corn crop. He need 
not worry about securing extra help, or paying high wages. He 
can be sure of having his corn safely harvested within the limited 
time in which the work must be done to get the full feeding 
value from it. 

The McCormick corn binder is simple in construction, light 
in weight and compact. Two horses will handle it easily in 
most conditions of corn. These and many other good features 
make it an especially desirable machine. 

The McCormick corn binder straddles only one row of corn 
in opening up the field. This is a decided advantage because 
it leaves only one bent row to cut. Farmers of experience want 
corn binder satisfaction. The McCormick corn binder is built 
for such farmers. 
3 




Only one bent row to cut 
when opening up a field 





M^^CORMICK 

Large Main Wheel with a Wide Rim 

Corn is one of the most difficult 
'(A % 'jyit "'^^^yiil crops to handle because the ground in 

i^^-^T*^ 1^ the cornfield is usually loose and the fibre 

of cornstalks is very tough. Under these 
conditions it is difficult to secure suffi- 
cient traction to operate a corn binder- 
The excellent traction of the McCor- 
mick corn binder is due, to a great 
extent, to the construction of the main 
wheel. The McCormick is equipped 
with an unusually large main wheel, 
having a wide rim and large, heavy lugs 
which grip and hang to the soil. The 
McCormick will cut corn in the fields where the ordinary binder 
fails utterly. 

The main wheel of the McCormick corn binder is equipped 
with a removable roller bearing which aids in light draft. The 
grain w^heel has a removable 
sleeve, or bushing, which can 
be renewed w^hen ■worn. 

Raising and Lower- 
ing Device 

A substantial all-steel main frame Both the main and grain 

well braced. Notice that the divid- -wheels are provided with 
ers are an extension of the frame L' U U1.-, »U„ 

worm gears vi'hicn enable the 
operator to adjust the machine to cut any desired height of 
stubble. 

A corn binder will always do its best work when work- 
ing level. The raising and lowering device on the McCormick 
makes it possible to raise or lower either side of the machine 
and keep it level for sidehill work. 

All- Steel Main Frame 

The main frame on the McCormick corn binder is 
made of square steel tubes. It is trussed and braced like 
a bridge and will withstand the most severe strains in the 
field. It holds all the shafts and boxes in perfect alignment 
in this way contributing much to the light draft of the 
machine. 

The main frame is so compact and rigid that it holds 
together and supports the entire machine. It is constructed 
in such a way as to strengthen the extended dividers and 
hold them properly to their work. 

4 





Two flat spring rods help hold the corn 
in the proper position for elevating 




M*=CORMICK 




Gathers Bent and Tangled Corn 

Almost any corn binder will do faidy good 
•work when the corn is standing and is not too 
heavy, but it takes an unusually strong binder 
and one with special features to gather corn 
when it is down, tangled and twisted. By refer- 
ring to the illustration of the main frame, it will 
be seen that the dividers are long and sufficiently 
wide between the points to pick up bent and 
tangled stalks which are blowrn across the rovers. 

There are three sets of conveyor chains on 
the McCormick corn binder. Each set of con- 
veyors comprises tw^o chains, one being placed 
on each side of the dividers on the inside. 
These chains are so geared that the upper chains 
move faster than the low^er ones. This action 
of the chains straightens up the bent stalks. The 
faster motion of the upper chains carries the top 
portion of the corn back between the dividers so 
that the stalks are perpendicular when they are 
cut. They are therefore conveyed to the binding 
attachment in an upright position. 

If the conveyor chains should become loose 
after long wear, it is an easy matter to tighten 
them; it is not necessary to remove the chains 
to do so. 



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Three sets of conveyor chains are provided for carrying 
the stalks to the binding attachments in an upward position 

Two Flat Springs Hold the Corn 
Against the Conveyors 

Another feature that adds greatly to the satisfactory 

work of the McCormick corn binder and insures positive 

elevation of all the cornstalks is the spring rod feature. 

One flat spring below^ the lower conveyor chain and 

one above it hold the stalks against the chain until the 

corn gets to a point where the packers are sure to reach 

it. Without this feature, short corn will fall over and will not be fed properly to the binding 

attachment. Short corn that is filled w^ith v^^eeds is especially troublesome in this respect. 

The McCormick corn binder elevates all the corn, and does it easily. 

5 



It is an easy matter to tighten the conveyor chains 




CORMICK 




Sectional view of the cutting apparatus. Notice that 
the stationary knives curve outwardly from the rear 



Cutting Apparatus 

The cutting apparatus on the McCor- 
mick corn binder consists of three knives, 
two stationary and one reciprocating. The 
position and form of the stationary knives, 
being curved outwardly from the rear, 
cause them to cut the stalks with a gradual 
drawing stroke. Thus the most difficult 
part of the cutting is completed before the 
corn reaches the reciprocating knife. 

The reciprocating knife completes the 
operation and cuts all weeds, vines and 
green undergrowth between the hills in the 
row. This does away with all possibility 
of the machine choking and leaves a clean, 
neat-appearing field. 




Efficient Binding 
Attachment 

The binding attachment on the 
McCormick corn binder consists 
of upright standards, to v^fhich 
are attached the packers and 
discharge arms. In design it is 
very similar to the binding attach- 
ment used on the McCormick 
grain binder, except that it is ar- 
ranged so that the bundles are 
bound while in a vertical position 
instead of in a horizontal position. 

Experience has demonstrated 
that it is easier to bind corn in 
this position. It requires less 
power and insures evenly butted 
bundles which are easy to 
handle. 

The breastplate is provided 
with a stop finger which prevents 
stalks from throwing the twine 

out of place and discharging unbound corn. The needle has a solid wing which shields the ears 
from the action of the packers. The packers work below the needle and do not come in contact 
with the ear corn. Both the lower discharge arm and the lower packer are attached low on the 
binding attachment. This in connection with the adjustable butt pan feature described on page 7 
makes the McCormick corn binder an especially desirable machine for work in short corn. 

6 



A simple and effective binding attachment 





M^ CORMICK 



Accurate Knotter 

The McCormick knotter has only two moving 
parts — the bill hook and the twine disk. These two 
parts work in an accurately-constructed frame. In tying 
a knot the twine is fed towards the bill hook by the 
twine holder. This relieves the strain on the twine 
and eliminates the danger of the twine pulling out 
of the twine holder or breaking when tying a knot. 

The McCormick knotter does not require as close 
adjustment in order to tie effectively as other knotters. 
This is due to the great amount of surface on the cord 
holder, which is in contact with the twine. 

Every McCormick knotter is tested before being 
shipped. This, together with the simple construction, 
accounts for its excellent work in the field. 

Convenient Band Adjustment 

The butt pan on the McCormick corn binder has 
a range of adjustment of 12 inches. By shifting the 
butt pan high or low, the position of the band on the 
bundle can be regulated to conform with the require- 
ments of all sizes and conditions of corn. 

The lever for changing the position of the butt pan is within easy reach of the driver. This is 
a decided advantage because frequently both tall and short corn are found in the same field. The 
range of adjustment is sufficient for binding any length of corn. 




The butt pan at its lowest posi- 
tion for extremely tall corn 




^M' 




The butt pan raised to its high- 
est position for short corn 



The adjustment for tying bundles of long or short corn around the 
middle can be made from the seat while the machine is in operation 




M^ COR.MICK 




McCormick Bundle 
Carrier 

The McCormick bundle carrier is sup- 
plied on special order for McCormick 
corn binders. It is compact in every 
detail and can be raised out of the way 
when not in use. It is controlled by a 
foot treadle and delivers the bundles 
gently across the rows out of the way of 
horses and machine. Three to five 
bundles can be carried on this bundle 
carrier. Hence, there is a big saving of 
labor in shocking the corn. 

Kaffir Corn Attachment 

The Kaffir corn attachment is a zigzag- 
shaped rod which can be attached to 
the discharge arm of the McCormick 
corn binder to hold the heads of Kaffir 




c 



The McCormick bundle carrier swings the 
bundles out of the way of horses and machine 



corn, milo maize, and similar grains in the proper position to the binding attachment until tied 
and discharged. 

This attachment can be supplied for any McCormick corn binder at small cost. 



C 




Kaffir corn attachment fast- 
ened to the discharge arm 



The McCormick is Easy to Oil 

More machines become badly worn from lack of oil than 
from actual work in the field. To do away with this condition, 
the designers of the McCormick corn binder have seen to it that 
all oil holes can be seen 
readily, and are within easy 
reach. 

Oiling from the front of 
a machine is dangerous when 
horses are hitched to it. All 
oil holes on the McCormick 
can be reached from the sides 
and rear of the machine. 

By keeping the driving 
shaft, the packers, and the 
roller axles on the rocking 
lever well oiled, the life of the 

machine is lengthened and All oil holes can be seen readily 

the draft reduced. and are -within easy reach 




c 




M*=CORMICK 





The tongue truck keeps the com binder running steadily 



Tongue Truck 

A tongue truck can be 
furnished with the Mc- 
Cormick corn binder at 
a slight additional cost. 
The short stub tongue 
and all the parts neces- 
sary to attach the tongue 
truck to the corn binder 
are furnished regularly 
with the attachment. 
The holes in the pole are 
properly bored and ad- 
justments are made to 
make it easy to attach 
the tongue truck when 
ordered as a separate 
attachment. 

When equipped with 
a tongue truck, the 
weight of the McCormick 
corn binder is more 



evenly distributed to the ground and the binder runs very steadily. 

A feature of the McCormick tongue truck is the way the wheels are hinged. In turning cor- 
ners, the wheels turn at a greater angle than the pole. This makes it easy to turn square corners 
without crovk'ding the horses. Every farmer will appreciate this convenience when he recalls the 
difficulty of making short turns with more than two horses in his team. 

McCormick Twine 

McCormick twine is made from carefully selected 
sisal and manila fibres, and every step in the manufac- 
ture is taken under rigid inspection. Every lot of 
McCormick tvyrine is w^eighed, measured, and tested to 
insure full length and full strength. 

As a result, McCormick twine is alw^ays reliable and 
dependable. It does not clog or kink, is free from flaws, 
and will not pull thin and break like inferior twine. 

Buy McCormick twine if you wish to avoid troubles 
in the cornfield. It is made in the five following brands: 



Sisal 
Standard 
Extra Manila 
Manila 
Pure Manila 



500 feet per pound 
500 feet per pound 
550 feet per pound 
600 feet per pound 
650 feet per pound 
9 




Insist upon getting McCormick twine 
— it works freely in the knotter 





MCCORMICK 



The McCormick Corn Binder Elevator Saves Extra Handling 

of Bound Bundles 

Quite frequently farmers who use a corn binder wish to cut their corn and place it in the silo 
while green. In some instances they desire to fall plow their cornfields. Then it is best to remove 
the corn and stack it convenient to the barn where it can be shredded later on. In cases of this 
kind, the corn binder elevator saves much time and labor in handling the bound bundles. 

The McCormick elevator attachment is built to meet the demand of busy farmers. It does 
away with the extra handling of bound bundles in the field. It can be placed on any McCormick 
corn binder without making any new holes in the frame. It simply takes the place of the bundle 
carrier. This attachment elevates the bundles when they are discharged from the machine and 
delivers them endwise to the wagon drawn alongside of the machine. It is not necessary to turn 
the bundles for they are deposited on the wagon in such a way as to make the loading easy. 

If a corn binder elevator is to give satisfaction, it must be light in construction so that it will 
not add to the draft of the machine. At the same time, it must be very strong and thoroughly 
braced. The McCormick corn binder elevator is securely attached to the corn binder at the lower 
end, and thoroughly braced by steel rods at the upper end. It is as light as an elevator can be and 
still do good work. 

The elevator attachment is i 1 feet 6 inches long, and 26 inches wide over all. The 
flaring side boards are 8 inches wide and have extensions at the center. This attachment adds 

very little to the draft of the machine. 

A caster wheel is furnished which is independent of the 

elevator attachment. It is fastened on the same side of the corn 

binder frame as the elevator. It aids in keeping the machine 

\ steady and prevents it from overbalancing when going over 

rough ground or turning corners. 




Rear view of McCormick corn binder with elevator attached 
This shows substantial construction of the driving mechanism 

10 




M^ CORMICK 



How the Elevator Attachment Operates 





1 lie elevator is adjustable to thico positions 
It will accommodate any height of wagon 



The McCormick elevator attachment is 
operated from the binder by means of a chain 
which is driven from the main countershaft. 
This chain is kept at the proper tension at all 
times by means of a very efficient tightener. 
All gears and sprockets on the elevator are cor- 
rectly designed so that they run with a minimum 
amount of friction. 

The conveyor for carrying the corn to the 
wagon consists of two chains connected with 
wooden slats at intervals of \6'i inches. Each 
of these slats has two metal fingers which en- 
gage the bound bundles as they are delivered to 



the elevator. Properly formed rods, similar to the rods on the regular bundle carrier, guide the 
bundles and insure their falling squarely on the elevator. 

An ordinary wagon with a hay rack attached can be driven under the elevator without danger 
of coming in contact with it. The upper end of the elevator is a sufficient distance from the ground 
to permit of a large load being taken on if desired. The upper part of the elevator is protected by 
a metal shield. This prevents the conveyor from coming in contact with any part of the load. 
The elevator is hung loose, so that it will give and not break if it strikes the wagon. This attach- 
ment is adjustable to three positions or heights to accommodate any height of wagon. 

Where corn is tangled or matted, it sometimes becomes advisable 
to use a top discharge chain in connection with the elevator attach- 
ment. This consists of a conveyor chain which extends from near 
the top boards to about midway of the elevator. It assists in separat- 
ing the tops of the bundles and insures the bundles being carried to 
the elevator tops first. The top discharge chain is driven from a split 
sprocket on the packer shaft by means of a chain, it is 
furnished on special order. 




Notice that the elevator is protect- 
ed underneath by a metal shield 



McCormick corn binder with elevator — the elevator 
can be attached in place of the bundle carrier 

11 





M*=CORMICK 



A Husker and Shredder Husks the Corn Quickly and 
Increases the Feeding Value of the Fodder 




A McCormick husker and shredder being operated by an I H C oil 
engine — the ideal outfit for handling the corn crop economically 

Corn fodder must be shredded to get the full feeding value from it. Shredding adds nothing 
to the fodder but merely reduces it to a condition so that stock can eat it. Authorities agree that 
at least 30 per cent of the value of the corn crop is contained in the stalks. Properly handled corn 
stover has a high feeding value, and it proves an excellent substitute for hay. 

In the course of a season storms ruin a great part of the nutriment of the stalks when left in the 
field. Shredded stover occupies less space than the stalks in an uncut form, and can be blown 
into the mow where it is protected from the damaging storms, and is convenient to feed to the stock. 

Another point to consider is the fact that husking shocked corn by hand is a most unpleasant 
task. It is usually done late in the fall or early in the winter when it rains, snows, and sleets. 
Shocks are torn dow^n and hunted through for the ears of corn. The husks are removed and the 
ears piled on the ground w^here they are exposed to the elements. This naturally causes a w^aste 
of part of the crop besides being a waste of much valuable time. 

With the advent of high prices and the scarcity of help, it is absolutely necessary to make 
every minute count. In many sections, time is saved by several farmers banding together and 
buying a husker and shredder in partnership. The machine is started early in the fall and never 
allowed to remain idle till all the partners have their corn safely under cover. By resorting to the 
exchange of help plan, the cost of husking is reduced to a very small figure. Husking corn with 
a shredder leaves the shredded stover as clear gain when the cost per bushel is compared with the 
old method of husking by hand. 

With a McCormick husker and shredder, corn can be husked and the stalks shredded in record- 
breaking time. The stover will be delivered to the barn or stack, and the ears delivered to the 
wagon or corn crib. With the extra value secured from the fodder by this method, and with the 
saving of time and labor, there is no question but that the McCormick husker and shredder will 
enable a farmer to greatly increase the profits of his corn crop. 

12 




M^ COR.MICK 



"^ McCormick Improved 6-Roll Husker and Shredder 





McCormick Improved 6-roll husker and shredder ready for trans- 
portation. It takes only a few minutes to prepare it for operation 

The McCormick Improved 6-roll husker and shredder is a large capacity machine. It appeals 
to farmers who grow corn extensively and for those who make a practice of doing custom work. 

A feature of the Improved 6-roll that will appeal to a shredder man is the ease with which it 
can be moved from one job to another. The feed tables and blower pipe can be folded out of 
the way. There are no attachments to be removed. Everything is compact, and it takes only a 
few minutes to prepare the machine for operation when the new job is reached. 

The speed of the shredder head on the Improved 6-roll is about 1,000 revolutions per minute. 
In average conditions, when operated at full capacity, this shredder will husk'from 30 to 75 bushels 
per hour. 

It requires from a 1 5 to a 20-H. P. oil engine to operate this machine. A 20-H. P. oil engme 
will run it to its maximum capacity. 

McCormick Shredders Equipped with Safety Appliances 

All the buskers and shredders described in this catalogue are equipped with the safety devices 
required by the Labor Commission of the state of Minnesota which as you know has exceptionally 
stringent laws in regard to safety appliances. 

Hard oilers with long feed pipes are provided to reduce danger in oiling. Gear shields are 
used to avoid clothing becoming entangled in the gears. 

Safety clutches controlled by levers extending to the feed table are provided for throwing the 
snapping rolls and the self-feeder in and out of gear. These devices make it unnecessary for the 
operator to take any risks should stalks or obstructions become wedged in the front of the rolls. 

13 




CORMICK 




Side view of the Improved 6-roll showing 
ho-w power is transmitted from the shredder 
head to the crank shaft pulley. The belt 
tightener for this belt is operated by a lever 



The self-feeder, husking 
rolls, agitators, ear corn eleva- 
tor, beater, etc., are run by the 
power furnished from the crank 
shaft. 

The cleaning fan for remov- 
ing stalks, leaves, etc. from the 
shelled corn is operated by a 
small belt direct from the crank 
shaft pulley. This fan is fur- 
nished only on the Improved 
6-roll. The suction from the 
blower on the Improved 8-roll 
is sufficient to clean the shelled 
corn thoroughly. 

All chains which are used 
to transmit power on the Mc- 
Cormick Improved huskers and 
shredders are equipped with 
effective chain tighteners which 
hold the chains at the proper 
tension for good work. 



How Power is Applied to the 
Improved 6-Roll 

Power is applied directly to the shredder head. From 
here it is transmitted to the crank shaft and to the blower 
by means of belts, and to the lower snapping roller by 
extra strong gears. The upper snapping roller is driven 
by a chain through a countershaft direct from the lower 
roller. This chain is kept at the right tension for good 
work by an automatic tightener which quickly adjusts itself 
as the rollers spread out or come together in taking more 
or less fodder through the snapping rolls. 

This arrangement for driving the snapping rolls gives 
the McCormick greater capacity than that of the ordinary 
machine of the same size, and makes it possible to change 
the position of the rolls in relation to each other for 
various conditions of corn. 

The crank shaft belt and the blower belt are furnished 
with adjustable belt tighteners, which are clearly illustrated 
on this page. These tighteners make it possible to get the 
best power from the belts with the minimum amount of 
friction and wear. 




Rear view of improved 6-roIl machine to show method of 
driving the blower. The tightener for the blower belt is 
exceptionally strong and has a wide range of adjustment 

14 




MCCORMICK 




Cutter Head for Improved 6 -Roll Husker 
and Shredder 

A cutter head can be substituted for the shredder head on 
the Improved 6-roll husker and shredder. This device, which is 
furnished on special order at additional cost, is so constructed 
that the knives can be supplied to cut three lengths of stalks. 
Four long knives cut '-(.-inch lengths, two long knives, 1/2-inch 
lengths, and two short knives, 3-inch lengths. 

When ordering the Improved 6-roll machine with a cutter 
head, the number of knives should be specified. Also whether 
the knives are to be long or short. If desired, sufficient knives 
wrill be furnished so that adjustments can be made for cutting 
any one of the three lengths. This gives the operator the 
advantage of having three cutter heads in one. 

Blower Pipe Can be Turned in any Direction 



Wh. 




This blower pipe 
can be turned in 
any direction. It is 
furnished regularly 
with the Improved 
6-roII machine 



The blower pipe on the McCormick Improved 6-roll machine is made up of sections securely 
connected by substantial bands that join each section. As many sections as desired may be joined 
together quickly and held firmly in any position by means of thumbscrew^s. 

The blower pipe is mounted on 
a turntable so that the stover can 
be blown in any direction. It per- 
mits the blower pipe to be moved 
in a complete circle, which aids in 
building stacks or in filling mows 
and silos. The blower has force 
enough to blow the stover to any 
part of the ordinary mow^. This 
saves time and labor in distributing 
the stover. 

An adjustable feature makes it 
possible to run the blower pipe to 
almost any desired angle. The 
hood at the end of the pipe is 
also adjustable and is operated by 
ropes. 

Twenty feet of pipe are furnished 
regularly with this machine and 
additional sections will be fur- 
nished on special order. 

A hinged cover on the rear of 

, , , w „ , 111 *^® Improved 6-roll makes the 

Rear view of the Improved 6-roIl to show the hinged , , , , . i i ii i 

cover which makes the blower accessible. Notice that blower, sfiaker. Sieve and shelled- 

the blower pipe can be swung in a complete circle Corn torvs^arder easily accessible. 

15 





M^ CORMICK 



McCormick Improved 8-Roll Husker and Shredder 





McCormick Improved 8-roll husker and shred- 
der with elevator folded and blower pipe 
telescoped, ready to move to the next job 



The McCormick Improved 8-roll husker and shredder is much the same as the Improved 6-rolI 
except that its capacity is greater and it requires a little larger engine for operation. 

This machine is as simple as it is possible for a husker and shredder to be and still do good 
work. The quality of work done cannot be equalled. 

The blower is at the extreme rear of the machine in direct line with the course which the 
stover takes. The outside of the blower is made of sheet steel. To this is riveted a malleable 
spider with six arms, to which steel fan blades are fastened. The fan blades are reinforced by steel 
bars on the top and outer edge where the stover strikes when entering the fan. A heavy steel 
trace is riveted to the bottom of each of the fan blades and disk, thus insuring a very rigid and 
durable fan. The spider is keyed to the fan shaft. The bevel gears which operate the fan are 
propelled by direct power from the flywheel of the shredder head. 

The speed of the shredder head is about 1 ,000 revolutions per minute. The quality of corn, 
weather conditions, etc., determine to a large extent the amount of corn that can be husked in a 
day. Under favorable conditions, however, the 8-roll will husk from 80 to 100 bushels per hour. 
It requires from a 20 to a 25-H. P. oil engine to operate this machine, 25-H. P. being required 
to get the maximum capacity. 

The 8-roll machine is equipped regularly with the " Farmer's Friend " blower. The pipe can 
be swung in a complete circle. It is made to telescope, and can be lengthened or shortened while 
the shredder is in operation. 

16 




M*= CORMICK 



How the Improved 8-Roll Operates 





Sectional view of McCormick Improved 8-roll husker and shredder, which 
shows the course that corn and stover take in going through the machine 



The sectional view above is designed to show how the McCormick Improved 8-roII husker 
and shredder operates. The whole corn is carried from the feed table to the snapping rolls by the 
self feeder, which is made up of an endless belt, a feeder head and a retarding hood. The 
snapping rolls remove the ears and deliver the stalks to the shredder head where they are torn into 
small pieces. The shredded stover then falls into the shaker, where 
all shelled corn, smut, dirt, etc., is removed from it. From here 
the stover is carried through the 
blower pipe to the stack or mow. 

After the ear corn is removed by 
the snapping rolls, it drops to the 
husking rolls which have a large 
husking surface. The husking rolls 
remove all the husks and deliver the 
ears to the conveyor, which carries 
the corn to the wagon box, bin, or 
crib, as may be desired. 

Agitators are placed over the husk- 
ing rolls to keep the ears moving par- 
allel with the rolls. These agitators 
extend well up to the snapping rolls 
and straighten up short and broken 

stalks so that the machine can handle j^j^^^ ^^ ^^^ improvec 

tnem. away to show soUd construction of the fans 






M^ CORMICK 

Features Common to McCormick Improved 6 and 8-Roll ^ 

Huskers and Shredders 

Self-Feeder Eliminates Danger of Operator Becoming Injured 

RETARDING HOOD 

McCormick Improved 6 and 8- 
roll huskers and shredders are equip- 
ped with the best and most practical 
self-feeder ever placed on a husker 
and shredder. 

This self-feeder forwards the 
stalks to the snapping rolls in a con- 
tinuous flow and does away with the 
danger of the feeder's hands getting 
caught in the rolls. It is utterly im- 
possible for the feeder to meet with 
an accident unless he deliberately 
leaves the feeding platform and steps 
on to the feed table. T 

The McCormick self-feeder is 
comprised of a conveyor belt, a 
feeder head, and a retarding hood. 
The feeder head, which is placed in front of the snapping rolls, acts as a force feed, bridg- 
ing the space between the belt and the snapping rolls. The conveyor belt carries the stalks to the 
feeder head. The knives on the feeder head move the stalks forward and prevent the accumula- 
tion of broken pieces of stalks and leaves. The retarding hood is placed over the conveyor 
belt. It retards the tops of the bundles and prevents the stalks from getting into the machine 
in whole bunches. It assists in furnishing an even flow of stalks to the snapping rolls. The 
retarding hood is hinged at each end. This permits it to adjust itself to large and small bunches 

of stalks. 

The man who is feeding a McCormick husker and shredder has absolute control over the 
feeding mechanism at all times. Should anything go wrong with the machine, he can stop the 
self-feeder and snapping rolls instantly by means of the gear-shifter rods, which are conveniently 
located immediately under the edge of the feed table, where they are out of the way and do not 
interfere with the handling of the corn. 




FEEDER KlAD 



Self-feed which is furnished with ail Improved 6 and 8-roll machines 




The snapping rolls on the Improved 6-roll machine are 24^16 inches 
long and on the Improved 8-roll machine they are 34J^ inches long 

18 





M*' CORMICK 



Aggressive Snapping Rolls 

McCormick snapping rolls have heavy corrugations or flutes running lengthvi^ise, which 
make them very aggressive. The snapping rolls are placed in the machine one above the other, 
immediately in front of the shredder head. They can be operated in different positions with relation 
to the bars and spaces. If the stalks are hard and frozen, the bars may be set opposite each 
other, but for ordinary work the rolls should be adjusted so that the bars will be opposite the 
spaces. To make this adjustment, it is only necessary to remove the snapping roll chain, turn the 
top roll to the desired position, and put on the chain again. 

Owing to the corrugations or ribs on the rolls the ears are snapped from the stalks without being 
crushed. The tension springs at each end of the roll are stiff enough so that the rolls will snap off 
ears of corn and still open up freely to permit stalks to pass through without binding on the boxes 
or adding to the draft of the machine. The tension of these springs can be adjusted to keep the 
rolls in proper mesh at all times. The lower snapping roll runs in removable brass boxes, which 
can be renewed when w^orn. 

Shredder Head 




Saw-tooth shredder head 



The McCormick shredder head slits the stalks into fine pieces, tearing out the pith so that it 
makes an excellent absorbent. It breaks up the fodder so that more is eaten by the cattle, especially 
the joints and sweet portions of the stalks where sugary matter collects. It shreds the fodder with- 
out leaving chunks or sharp-edged pieces which are hard for the cattle to digest. 

The shredder head regularly furnished is of the saw-tooth type, which consists of saw-shaped 
teeth arranged in the form of a double spiral. The construction is such that in one revolution of 
the shredder head no two teeth strike the stalks in the same place. As a result, the teeth come in 
contact with every portion of the stalk and shred the fodder thoroughly. 

The knife type of shredder head which is furnished on special order cuts and shreds the fod- 
der. Both the knife type and the saw-tooth type of shredder heads are clearly illustrated on this 
page. Notice that the ends of the shredder 
head are bell-shaped. This prevents stalks 
from winding on the shaft and keeps dirt and 
trash from falling into the babbitted bearings 
or boxes. 

It is not necessary to run the McCormick 
shredder head at excessive speed to get good 
results. Its construction is such that it will do 
excellent work when running one thousand 
revolutions per minute. 




Knife shredder head furnished on special order 



19 




CORMICK 




McCormick husking rolls have 
a large husking capacity 



Husking Rolls Have Large Capacity 

McCormick huskers and shredders are equipped with the cele- 
brated interlocking husking rolls which have a reputation for large ca- 
pacity and clean husking wherever huskers and shredders are used. 
The husking rolls on the Improved 6-roll husker and shredder 
are 38/2 inches long; on the Improved 8-roll theyare47/2 incheslong. 
Case-hardened set screws are supplied to be screw^ed into the 
bars of each husking roll w^henever dry corn is to be shredded. 
They can be put on or removed easily, hence the machine can be 
operated with or w^ithout them, as the conditions of the corn may 
require. 

The husking rolls on the Improved huskers and shredders are 
placed parallel with the length of the machine and revolve together 
in pairs. Each pair of rolls can be taken out independently of the 
others. Each pair of husking rolls is equipped with a spring at 
either end which can be adjusted easily to give just the amount of 
pressure betvi'een the rolls the operator desires. These springs are 
flexible enough to permit the gears to go entirely out of mesh, so 
that the movable roll stands idle, thus preventing breakage should 
any foreign substance get between the rolls, or if the rolls become 
overloaded with trash. While the movable roll stands idle, the 

other roll shreds the trash, so that it passes through 

the rolls readily w^ithout damage to the machine. 

The husking roll springs can be renevk^ed when 

necessary without removing the rolls. 

Gears for driving the husking rolls are extra 

heavy and give long-virearing service. A heavy sill 

at each end supports the husking rolls and holds 

them in perfect alignment. 

The rolls are provided w^ith removable roller 

bearings at each end, which reduce draft. 

Husking Rolls Equipped with 
Agitators 

Agitators, clearly shown on this page, are 
placed between each set of rolls and keep the ears 
straight and moving at all times. They also assist 
the snapping rolls to clear themselves of all short 
and broken pieces of stalks which might lodge 
between the feeder and the rolls. 

These features insure clean husking, increase 
the capacity of the machine, and make it possible 
to work with the McCormick husker and shredder 
when other machines are standing idle. 

20 




End view of husking rolls show^- 
ing agitators and tension springs 





M^ CORMICK 



) Shelled Corn Removed from Stover and Delivered to the Bagger 

No husker and shredder has yet 
been put on the market that will not 
shell more or less corn. Dirt and 
smut will always be found in the 
stalks to a certain extent. Shredded 
stover is worth little unless the dirt, 
smut, and shelled corn are removed 
in the process of shredding. 

Separating the shelled corn from 
the stover is very important because 
if the shelled corn is allow^ed to re- 
main in the stover, fermentation will 
take place and the stover will become 
spoiled. The McCormick husker and 
shredder shells very little corn in 
shredding, and what is shelled is 
cleaned and saved. 

After the corn passes through 
the snapping rolls and shredder 
head, the stover falls to a shaker and 



is thoroughly agitated until all the 
shelled corn, weed seeds, dirt, etc., 
passes through the shaker to the shoe below. 

The shoe is provided virith a sieve and a screen, the 
action of which separates the dirt, weed seeds, snov/, etc., 
from the shelled corn. The w^eed seeds, dirt, etc., drop 
to the ground, and the shelled corn is conveyed to an all- 
metal bagger, which delivers it into a sack. 

While this process of cleaning is going on, the shelled 
corn is subjected to a suction draft from the blower on the 
Improved 8-roll, and an under cleaning blast from the 
cleaner fan on the Improved 6-roll. The action of the air 
removes pieces of stalks, leaves, etc., v^rhich remain in the 
shelled corn after it passes over the screen. 

The shoe is located under the shaker, and has exactly 
the reverse motion. This makes the action of each more 
effective because it prevents trash from lodging and accu- 
mulating between them in freezing weather. 

This construction of the shaker and shoe, together 
with the manner in which they are attached to the counter- 
shaft and rocker arms, makes a practically perfect counter- 
balance which relieves the shredder of the rocking strains 
and jars so often found w^here machines are equipped 
with vibrators. 

21 





All the shelled corn is cleaned and 
delivered to this all-metal bagger 




CORMICK 




The fifth wheel arrangement on the 
front truck makes it possible to turn 
the machine in a complete circle 



All Steel Axles and Wheels 

The trucks on McCormick Improved 
buskers and shredders are exceptionally 
strong and heavy. The front and rear axles 
and wheels are made of steel. The spokes 
of the wheels are very heavy and are cast 
solidly into the hub. The front truck is built 
with a ball-and-socket-joint fifth vifheel, and 
the machine is so constructed that the wheels 
turn under the sills. 

This construction makes it possible to 
turn the machine in a complete circle in its 
ow^n length, using the rear v^^heels as a pivot. 
This feature will be especially appreciated 
when it becomes necessary to set the machine where space is limited. 

This construction also makes it possible to drive the machine over rough roads without damaging 
it. There is no twisting strain when one wheel drops into a rut or passes over an obstruction. 

The tongue is of the combination type, an extension pole being used for a team. This exten- 
sion can be removed, leaving a stub pole, which makes a convenient coupling for an engine. 

Pulleys and Required Power for Operation 

McCormick Improved 6 and 8-roll huskers and shredders are equipped regularly with a 
9-inch diameter, 9-inch face drive pulley. On special order a 6, 8, or 1 0-inch drive pulley will be 
supplied for either machine. It requires from a 1 5 to a 20-H. P. oil engine to operate the Improved 
6-roll machine to capacity, and from a 20 to a 
25-H. P. oil engine to operate the Improved 8-roIl. 

McCormick Shredder 
Knife Grinder 

The knives of the knife type of shredder head 
can be sharpened w^ithout removing them from 
the shredder head by means of the McCormick 
shredder knife grinder. This grinder is similar in 
design to the. regular McCormick knife and tool 
grinder, the principal difference being the arrange- 
ment for attaching it to the machine. 

Special directions for mounting and operating 
this machine are furnished with each grinder. Little 
experience is required to operate it successfully, 
for the entire operation of mounting the grinder 
and sharpening the knives is very simple. 

This machine is supplied only on special 
order. 

22 




A trainload of McCormick huskers 
and shredders ready for shipment 




M<=CORMICK 



McCormick Little Giant Husker and Shredder 





McCormick Little Giant husker and shredder with swinging blower 
ready for transporting. Shields are removed to show working parts 



The McCormick Little Giant husker and shredder is designed and built for the individual 
farmer, or for those who wish to do custom work on a small scale. It can be furnished with either 
four or six husking rolls. 

Every detail of this machine has been carefully worked out. The result is that the Little Giant 
husker and shredder makes perfect fodder and saves all the corn. The husking rolls on the Little 
Giant machine are placed level with the machine and at right angles to the length. The ear 
corn elevator operates from the side of the machine. 

The Litde Giant husker and shredder is regulady equipped with an 8-inch diameter, 8-inch 
face drive pulley. On special order a 6, 7, 9 or lO-inch drive pulley will be supplied. The speed 
of the shredder head is about 1,000 revolutions per minute. 

The capacity of the Little Giant husker and shredder is sufflciendy large to turn out a good 
day's work without requiring a large number of men and teams to keep the machine in operation. 
It is the most practical machine for the man whose power is limited. Under average conditions, 
the Litde Giant 4-roll husker and shredder will husk from 25 to 50 bushels per hour. The Little 
Giant 6-roll will husk from 30 to 60 bushels per hour. It requires from a 12 to a 1 5-H. P. oil 
engine to operate the Little Giant to its full capacity. 

23 




M*= CORMICK 




Interchangeable Shredder Head 

.ne McCormick Little Giant husker and shredder is 
regularly equipped with a saw-tooth type of shredder head. 
The knife type of shredder head will be suppHed on special 
order. Both these shredder heads are illustrated and described 
on page 19. 




McCormick Little Giant with 
regular blower. Ear corn ele- 
vator and blower pipe are in 
position for work 



The Little Giant husker and shredder can also be equipped with a cutter head supplied with 
knives to cut two lengths of stalks. Four long knives cut j^-inch lengths, while two short knives 
cut 1^-inch lengths. The number of knives should be specified when ordering cutter head for 



th 



is macrune. 



Husking Rolls and Reciprocator 



The husking rolls on the Little Giant husker and shredder are placed at right angles with the 
machine. They are arranged in pairs, and are readily accessible. Each pair of rolls can be taken 
out independently of the others. These rolls interlock like the teeth of a gear which insures clean 
husking and increases the capacity of the machine. 

Each set of rolls is held to its proper posi- 
tion for good work by springs at each end. 
These springs will give sufficiendy to prevent 
breakage of the rolls when foreign substance 
gets between them. They can be adjusted easily 
or replaced without removing the husking rolls. 

The reciprocator is furnished regularly on 
the Little Giant husker and shredder. Its pur- 
pose is to keep the ears moving evenly along 
the husking rolls. The reciprocator does away 
w^ith clogging or choking at this point, and in- 
sures clean husking. It is very efficient, and 
admits of adjustment for different conditions 
of corn. 




End view of husking rolls showing recip- 
rocator on 6-rolI Little Giant shredder 



( 



24 




M^ CORMICK 




Release Lever — Roller Clutch 

A release lever extends across the front of the feed 
table. This lever enables the operator to protect him- 
self from accidents while feeding the machine. The 
feeder stands squarely in front of his work, his position 
being such that the release lever is operated by the 
pressure of his body. By means of this lever the opera- 
tor can stop the snapping rolls whenever it is necessary 
to remove twisted stalks or to prevent foreign substances 
from passing through the snapping rolls. 

The roller clutch that is operated by this release 
lever is shown in the illustration. When the feeder 
places pressure on the release lever, the ratchets in the 
roller clutch are disengaged and the snapping rolls 
cease to revolve. This roller clutch imparts an instan- 
taneous and positive motion to the snapping rolls w^hile 
the machine is put in operation. 




Sectional view 
showing release 
lever and clutch 



Automatic Snapping Roller Drive-Chain Tightener 

The manner in which the snapping roller drive chain works is very effective. It is governed 

by an automatic regulator which keeps a steady motion on the 

upper roll regardless of 

its up and down motion. 

No matter how far apart 

the snapping rolls are 

forced by the corn, they 

cannot get out of line. 

The chain-tightener stud 

is fastened to the short 

stub axle at the rear of 

the radius bar. The 

\o^ffer end is controlled 

by a spring. As the 

pressure between the 

snapping rolls raises the 

upper one, the drive 

chain holds the idler 

sprocket wheel against 

the tightener spring. 

When the upper roll 

drops back in place, the 

TU^ L J 1 .L L jj I 1 1 1 tightener spring forces 

1 tie hard oil cups on the shredder head and on the . i' & - 

snapping rollers have long feed pipes to make oiling safe '"'' idler back. 

25 





M*=CORMICK 




Blower and Blower Pipe 

The blower on the Little Giant husker and shredder is a one-piece malleable casting. It is 
driven from the fly-wheel on the shredder head shaft at a speed sufficiently high to blow the stover 
a considerable distance beyond the machine. The sections of pipe regularly supplied 
with this blower are joined together by interlocking bands held in place by a thumb- 
screw. These bands are of such a nature as to enable the operator to lengthen or 
shorten the blower pipe quickly. They hold the sections of pipe together as securely 
as if they were one continuous piece. 

The hood which is attached to the end of the pipe enables the operator to 
direct the delivery of the stover to any 
part of the mov^^. This hood is controlled 
by means of ropes which extend to the 
blower. 

Tw^enty feet of pipe are supplied 
vAtYi each shredder. Additional sec- 
tions will be furnished on special 
order at extra cost. 

On special order the Little Giant 
Yifill be supplied with a swinging 
blower which can be swung in 
a complete circle. 



o 




The blower which is 
regularly furnished 
with the Little Giant 



McCormick Little 
Giant equipped w^ith 
swinging blower 

2i\ 



The interlocking bands of 
the blower pipe are held 
in place by a thumbscrew 





M^ CORMICK 



McCormick Corn Pickers Reduce Expense and 

Eliminate Drudgery 




Doing clean husking in an unusually trashy field with a McCormick corn picker 

The farmer who raises large fields of corn, and does not use a corn binder but prefers to leave 
the stalks standing in the field, is often confronted with the difficulty of securing help to harvest 
his crop. Picking corn by hand is slow, unpleasant work. Farm hands will not do it if other work 
is to be had. The work of harvesting corn by hand is a last resort unless a premium is paid. The 
man who uses a McCormick corn picker always has his preference of help, because farm hands 
would much rather operate a corn picker than harvest the crop by hand. 

The McCormick corn picker is a practical, labor-saving machine. It husks one row at a time, 
the capacity being limited only by the rate at which the horses walk. Under average conditions 
it will pick and husk from five to seven acres a day. 

The McCormick corn picker will meet all field conditions successfully. The gathering points 
are unusually long and sloping. They can be set at an angle, which permits them to pick up down 
stalks gradually. The sheet iron on the outer edge of each point is in the form of a large curved 
roll, so that stalks can be drawn over the points without being broken. 

There is a convenient lever provided on the McCormick corn picker for raising and lowering 
the gathering points for different conditions of corn. When corn is straight and standing, it is 
usually desirable to work with the points some distance from the ground. Where the corn is down 
and tangled, it is necessary to set the points low so that they will pick up stalks that are crossways 
of the row^. 

This machine will not only snap the ears from the stalks that are standing, but it will get the 
ears on the stalks that are down, tangled, and twisted. It will husk corn much cleaner than it is 
usually husked by hand. 

27 





CORMICK 



The McCormick Corn Picker is Equip- ^^ 
ped with Conveniences that You Will 
Want on Your Machine 



The elevator side of the 
McCormick corn picker. 
The elevator can be raised 
high enough to accommo- 
date any height of wagon 



A special device on the Mc- 
Cormick corn picker of unusual 
importance is the lever for throw- 
ing the wagon elevator out of 
gear while the gathering chains, 
husking rolls, etc., are still in 
operation. This enables the 
operator to husk to the end of 
the row while the receiving 

wagon is being turned for the next row, without 
allowing ear corn to fall to the ground. 




Snapping rollers show- 
ing winding ribs. The 
lower ends of the rollers 
are supplied v^ith hard 
oilers. The upper ends 
are provided with re- 
movable roller bearings 



The capacity of the hopper at the lower end of the elevator is 
great enough to take care of all the corn that is ordinarily husked 
while the wagon is being turned. 

When the picker and wagon are in position to start down the 
next row, it is only necessary for the operator to give the lever a 
kick to start the elevator going again. 

The shipper lever, which operates the main clutch for throwing 
the McCormick corn picker in and out of gear, is located where 
the operator can reach it easily with his foot. 

This machine is regularly equipped with a five-horse hitch, 

which can be quickly made into a four-horse hitch, if desired. 

The hitch is constructed so that the machine can be drawn by 

two or three horses when being transported from one 

field to another. 

Draft is reduced by means of rollers and self- 
aligning bearings, and the proper 
arrangement of the parts 

A caster wheel is provided regu- 
larly which prevents the tongue 
from whipping and causes the ma- 
chine to run steadily over rough 
ground. 

28 





M^ CORMICK 

^ The McCormick Does Clean Husking Without Shelling 

the Corn 




Side view of McCormick corn picker showing construction of gatherers and location of levers 

Gathering Chains 

Gathering chains with lugs are placed just inside the gathering points to assist in picking up 
down and tangled corn and to help forward it to the snapping rollers. These chains are provided 
with efficient tighteners, which have ample latitude for adjustment. No matter how long the 
machine is used, it is never necessary to remove any of the links to tighten the chain. 

The gathering-chain shaft is driven through a safety clutch, which will slip should anything get 
caught in the gathering chains, thus preventing breakage. 

Snapping Rollers 

The snapping rollers illustrated on the opposite page have ribs which wind around the 
rollers. These ribs start at the point and wind toward the top, much in the form of a corkscrew. 
The ribs on the different rollers run in opposite directions, and the rollers are assembled so that 
the rib of one roller will run in the groove of the other. The ribs have cam-shaped enlargements 
at regular intervals which work in conjunction with similar enlargements in the grooves of the 
opposite roller. The function of these enlargements is to snap the ears from the stalks with a 
gradually increasing pressure. This avoids shelling corn from the butt of the ear. 

The winding ribs work the stalks through the rollers rapidly. There is never any danger of 
clogging at this point. 

A short distance from the upper ends, the ribs start to run straight around the rollers. This 
prevents the stalks from being forced against the bearings. 

29 




CORMICK 




The 
these rol 



Snapping Rollers — Continued 

The space between the rollers can be changed by means of an adjustment on the outer roller. 
This is an important feature, because when the corn is green and tough, it is necessary to run the 
rollers close together, but when it is dry and crisp, the tension may be relieved and the rollers set 
farther apart. 

The frame which holds the outer snapping roller is sufficiently rigid for the work it has to do, 
yet it will yield to permit the rollers to spread apart in case an obstruction should get betw^een them. 

The snapping rollers are placed on the machine at an angle, which permits the snapped ears 
to gravitate to the ear corn elevator which carries them to the husking rolls. 

Trash Rolls 

When working in down and lodged corn, some stalks are sure to be broken off by the snapping 
rollers and carried to the elevator. These stalks would choke the machine and cause breakage if 
they were not carried away immediately. To prevent this, trash rolls are furnished on the McCor- 
mick corn picker. These rolls, which are located at the upper end of the elevator, snap off the 
ears and carry the stalks out at the rear of the machine. The ears are carried to the husking rolls. 

The trash rolls are driven from a balance-wheel shaft through a pair of strong bevel gears, one 
of which is part of a safety clutch which prevents breakage should the trash rolls become clogged. 

Husking Rolls 

McCormick corn picker has eight husking rolls which operate in pairs. The surface of 
Is is made up of alternating sections of ribs and cylinders. Each section consists of four 

ribs, each one three inches long, running lengthwise 

of the roll, and four plain cylinders or spaces of 

corresponding size. In operation the rib section of 

one roll runs in the cylinder section of the companion 

roll. This construction makes it possible for the rolls to 

take a stronger grasp on the husks. 

Husking pegs are screwed into the cylinders betw^een 
the ribs of the rolls, to assist in clean husking. These 
pegs are especially valuable for work in dry corn, where 
husking is difficult. They are made in two lengths with 
different shaped heads, and can be replaced when worn. 
Each pair of husking rolls is equipped with springs 
at each end, which give sufficiently to prevent breakage 
in case a hard substance gets between the rolls. When 
running idle the husking rolls just come together, and 
the pressure of the springs is exerted on the yokes 
between the rolls instead of on the bearings. There 
is no pressure on the rolls until they spring apart in 
actual vsfork. 

The rolls are placed in the machine at an inclination 
that will permit the ears after being husked to gravitate 
to the wagon elevator. 

The husking rolls are provided at each end with 
roller bearings. 
30 





MCCORMICK 




Agitators and Ear Pressers 

The ear corn is delivered to the husking rolls from the snapping rollers 
in almost every conceivable shape. Clean husking demands that some 
means be provided for starting these ears lengthwise down the husking 
rolls. This is accomplished by agitators, which are placed just above and 
between each pair of rolls. These agitators are in the shape of an inverted 
"T" and are provided w^ith saw-tooth shaped edges. They work back and 
forth parallel to the husking rolls and assist in moving the ears at the proper 
speed for clean husking. 

Agitator fingers are placed over each pair of rolls, to keep the ears 
from piling up. if it were not for these fingers, some of the ears would go 
through the machine without being husked. These fingers revolve with 
the under side traveling toward the upper end of the husking rolls and 
force back any ears that have a tendency to ride by on other ears. 

Retarders are also provided to prevent the ears from slipping over the 
husking rolls too rapidly, leaving some of the ears unhusked. These ear 
retarders are located at the lower end of the husking rolls, and give the 
ears a slight pressure on the rolls just before the corn is deposited in the 
wagon elevator. 

The agitator shaft is driven through a safety clutch, which prevents 
breakage should the fingers get caught. 

Efficient Cleaner Chain 

The function of the cleaner chain is to deliver to the ground the 
husks that are torn from 
the ears by the husking 



D 



View from above showing rolls. This chain is con- 
agitator and ear pressers structed of metallic slats, 
SO placed that in case 
corn is shelled by the husking rolls it falls 
between the slats to the perforated bottom. 
The holes in the metallic bottom are of suffi- 
cient size to allovkT dirt and seeds from 
w^eeds to drop through, and yet are not large 
enough to permit shelled corn to fall to the 
ground. 

The cleaner chain is in the form of an 
endless apron, and as the under side travels 
toward the front of the machine, the metallic 
slats scrape the shelled corn into the wagon 
elevator. 

The cleaner is provided with a wind shield 
at the rear to prevent the wind from holding the 
husks under the husking rolls. 




Cleaner chain, front view, 
showing perforated bottom 



31 





M^ CORMICK 



Powerful Driving Mechanism 

The driving mechanism on the McCormick corn picker is extremely simple and powerful Every 
principle of mechanics which reduces friction and draft have been incorporated in this machine. 

Power to drive all mechanism is transmitted by two large steel drive wheels to the main 
countershaft by means of two heavy chains. 

The husking-roll countershaft is driven directly from the main countershaft by a chain. Each 
set of husking rolls is driven from the husking-roll countershaft by bevel gears and pinions. 

The snapping rolls are driven from the main countershaft by a chain, bevel gears and pinions. 
The gears are shielded to prevent the operator from becoming injured. The self-aligning knuckle 
joint in the snapping roller gear shaft keeps the gears in perfect alignment, reduces friction and 
wear, and avoids cramping the bearings. 

The elevator which carries the ears from the snapping rollers to the husking rolls is driven 
from the husking-roll countershaft by a knuckle-joint countershaft and spur gears. 

All the mechanism on the McCormick corn picker is rigidly supported by a well-braced angle 
iron main frame, trussed at the points where the greatest strain comes. 

Good traction is insured by large, wide-faced drive wheels, well lugged. Scrapers are provided 
for keeping these wheels clean when working on wet or sticky ground. 




Rear view of the McCormick corn 
picker showing simple and direct driv- 
ing mechanism. This illustration shows 
also the husking-roUs and cleaner chain 



IH C PRINT 



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BRANCH HOUSES 

INTERNATIONAL HARVESTER COMPANY OF AMERICA 



(INOOnPORATEOl 



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ABERDEEN. S. O. 
ALBANY, N. Y. 
ATLANTA. GA. 
AUBURN. N. Y 
AURORA. ILL. 
BALTIMORE. MO. 
BIRMINGHAM. ALA. 
BISMARCK. N. D. 
BOSTON. MASS 
BUFFALO. N Y. 
CEDAR FALLS. lA. 
CHARLOTTE. N. C. 
CINCINNATI. OHIO 
CLEVELAND. OHIO 
COLUMBIA. S C. 
COLUMBUS OHIO 
CONCORDIA. KAN 
COUNCIL BLUFFS. lA. 
CRAWFORD. NEB. 
DAVENPORT. lA. 
DENVER. COLO 
DES MOINES. lA. 



DETROIT. MICH. 
DUBUQUE. lA. 
EAST ST. LOUIS. ILL. 
EAU CLAIRE. WIS. 
ELMIRA. N. Y 
EVANSVILLE. INO. 
FARGO. N. D. 
FT DODGE. lA. 
FT WAYNE, IND. 
GRAND FORKS. N. D. 
GRAND RAPIDS. MICH 
GREEN BAY. WIS. 
HARRISBURG. PA. 
HELENA. MONT 
HUTCHINSON. KAN 
INDIANAPOLIS. IND. 
JACKSON. MICH. 
JACKSONVILLE. FLA. 
KANKAKEE. ILL. 
KANSAS CITY. MO. 
KNOXVILLE. TENN. 
LANSING. MICH. 



LINCOLN. NEB. 
LITTLE ROCK. ARK. 
MADISON. WIS. 
MANKATO. MINN. 
MASON CITY. lA. 
MEMPHIS. TENN. 
MILWAUKEE. WIS 
MINNEAPOLIS. MINN. 
MINOT. N. D. 
NASHVILLE. TENN. 
NEW ALBANY. IND. 
NEW ORLEANS. LA. 
OGDENSBURG. N. Y. 
OKLAHOMA CITY.OKLA. 
OMAHA. NEB. 
PARKERSBURG. W VA. 
PARSONS. KAN. 
PEORIA. ILL. 
PHILADELPHIA. PA. 
PITTSBURGH. PA. 
PORTLAND. ORE. 
QUINCY. ILL. 



RICHMOND. IND. 
RICHMOND. VA. 
ROCKFORD. ILL. 
ST. CLOUD, MINN. 
ST. JOSEPH. MO. 
ST. LOUIS. MO. 
SAGINAW. MICH. 
SALINA. KAN. 
SALT LAKE CITY. UTAH 
SAN FRANCISCO. CAL. 
SIOUX CITY. lA. 
SIOUX FALLS. S. D. 
SOUTH BEND. IND. 
SPOKANE. WASH. 
SPRINGFIELD. ILL. 
SPRINGFIELD. MO. 
TERRE HAUTE. IND. 
TOLEDO. OHIO 
TOPEKA. KAN. 
WATERTOWN. S. O.. 
WICHITA. KAN. 
WINONA. MINN. 



For catalogues or special information sec IHC dealer or write nearest brzmch house ,,;= 

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Sold by 
INTERNATIONAL HARVESTER COMPANY OF AMERICA 

( Incorporated) 

CHICAGO USA 




For further information write International Harvester Company of America 
Chicago, III., or write our nearest branch house. 



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BF2ANCH HOUSES 

INTERNATIONAL HARVESTER COMPANY OF AMERICA 



IINCORPORATCOI 



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ABERDEEN. S O. 
fiLBANY. N Y. 

Itlanta. GK 
auburn, n. y 
aurora. ill. 
baltimore. mo. 
birmingham. ala. 
bismarck. n. d. 
boston. mass 
buffalo. n y. 

CEDAR FALLS. lA. 
CHARLOTTE. N. C. 
CINCINNATI. OHIO 
CLEVELAND. OHIO 
COLUMBIA. S C. 
COLUMBUS OHIO 
CONCORDIA. KAN 
COUNCIL BLUFFS. lA 
CRAWFORD. NEB. 
DAVENPORT. lA. 
DENVER. COLO 
OES MOINES. lA. 



DETROIT. MICH. 
DUBUQUE. lA. 
EAST ST. LOUIS. ILL. 
EAU CLAIRE. WIS. 
ELMIRA. N. Y 
EVANSVILLE, INO. 
FARGO. N D. 
FT DODGE. lA. 
FT WAYNE. IND. 
GRAND FORKS. N D. 
GRAND RAPIDS. MICH 
GREEN BAY WIS. 
HARRISeURG. PA. 
HELENA. MONT 
HUTCHINSON. KAN 
INDIANAPOLIS. INO. 
JACKSON. MICH. 
JACKSONVILLE. FLA. 
KANKAKEE. ILL. 
KANSAS CITY. MO 
.KNOXVILLE. TENN. 
LANSING. MICH 



LINCOLN. NEB. 
LITTLE ROCK. ARK. 
MADISON. WIS. 
MANKATO. MINN. 
MASON CITY. lA. 
MEMPHIS. TENN. 
MILWAUKEE. WIS 
MINNEAPOLIS. MINN. 
MINOT. N D. 
NASHVILLE. TENN. 
NEW ALBANY. IND. 
NEW ORLEANS. LA. 
OGDENSBURG. N. Y. 
OKLAHOMA CITY.OKLA. 
OMAHA. NEB. 
PARKERSBURG. W VA. 
PARSONS. KAN. 
PEORIA. ILL. 
PHILADELPHIA. PA. 
PITTSBURGH. PA 
PORTLAND. ORE 
QUINCY. ILL. 



RICHMOND. IND. 
RICHMOND. VA. 
ROCKFORD. ILL. 
ST. CLOUD. MINN. 
ST JOSEPH. MO. 
ST. LOUIS. MO. 
SAGINAW. MICH. 
SALINA. KAN. 
SALT LAKE CITY. UTAH 
SAN FRANCISCO. CAL. 
SIOUX CITY. lA. 
SIOUX FALLS. S. D. 
SOUTH BEND. IND. 
SPOKANE. WASH. 
SPRINGFIELD. ILL. 
SPRINGFIELD. MO. 
TERRE HAUTE. IND. 
TOLEDO. OHIO 
TOPEKA. KAN. 
WATERTOWN. S. D. 
WICHITA. KAN. 
WINONA. MINN. 



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HARVESTER PRESS