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Full text of "Members of the Beaufort hunt, past & present"

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Past ana Present 







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MEMBERS OF THE 
BEAUFORT HUNT 
PAST "3? PRESENT 



CIRENCESTKH 

STANDARD PRINTING WORKS 

1914 



FOR PRIVATE CIRCULATION ONLY. 
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. 




Since one fox on foot more diversion will bring 

Than twice twenty thousand cock pheasants on wing, 

The man we all honour, whate'er be his rank, 

Whose heart heaves a sigh when iiis gorse is drawn blank, 

Qu.'i situm ! Qu.i'situm ! fill up to the brim, 

We'll drink, if we die for't, a bumper to him. 

Egerton Warburton. 



Preface. 

It often occurred to me during the many years I acted as 
Honorary Secretary to the Beaufort Hunt that there ia no record 
of any sort of the past or present members of the Hunt. I am fully 
aware that the list that follows is by no means complete ; still, I 
have done the best I could with the materials I had to work from. 
They consisted of two or three account books that had been kept 
by the late Colonel C. W. Miles from 1861 to 1888, and since then 
from books that I have kept myself. 

I have added a few items culled from my scrap book and other 
sources which I hope may prove of interest to my hunting friends. 

In the compilation of the list of names I have to thank Her Grace 
the Duchess of Beaufort for her help and for the great interest she 
has taken in it. 

For carefully arranging and making copies of extracts, etc., 
my thanks are due to Mr. E. P. Harmer. 

Frank Henry. 

Elmestree, Tetbury, 
May, 1911. 



flDembers of the Beaufort 1!3unt 
Ipast anb present 

His Royal Highness The Prince of Wales (H.M. King Edward VH.) 

1867 

His Grace The 7th Duke of Beaufort, K.G. 

His Grace The 8th Duke of Beaufort, K.G. 

Her Grace The 8th Duchess of Beaufort 1845 

His Grace The 9th Duke of Beaufort, A.D.C. 

Her Grace The 9th Duchess of Beaufort 1885 

The Lady Geraldine Somerset 1854 

The Lady Edith Somerset (Countess of Londesborough) 1854 

The Lady Blanche Somerset 1903 

The Lady Diana Somerset 1904 

The Marquis of Worcester 1906 

The Marquis of Waterford 
The Marchioness of Waterford 
The Lord Henry Somerset 
The Lord Arthur Somerset 
The Lord Edward Somerset 
The Lady Edward Somerset 
The Lord Fitzroy Somerset 
Colonel Henry Somerset 

Colonel Poulett Somerset 1855 

Poulett Somerset, Mrs. 1858 

Granville Somerset, Q.C. 
Granville Somerset, Mrs. 

H. Somers Somerset Reigate Priory 

The Lady Katherine Somerset Reigate Priory 



6 BEAUFORT HUNT: PAST AND PRESENT. 




Adam, Major and Mrs. 


Coates 


1902 


Adams, F. 


Bristol 


1867 


Addington, the Right Hon. Henry 
Unwin 


Estcourt 


1836 


Adey, Captain William 


Wotton-under-Edge 


1861 


Allfrey, Captain Moubray 


Greenways 


1898 


Allfrey, The Hon. Mrs. 


Greenways 


1898 


Allfrey, Arthur 


Greenways 


1905 


Ancaster, The Countess of 


Drummond Castle, Crieff 


1903 


Angel, J. B. 




1865 


Annaly, The Lord 


Holdenby House 




Asquith, Mrs. 


Easton Grey 


1880 


Atherley, Major Evelyn 


late Royal Horse Guards 


1884 


Atherley, Mrs. Evelyn 


Norton Grange 


1888 


Awdry, E. M. 


Chippenham 


1897 


Awdry, P. Delme 


Chippenham 


1897 


Awdry, R. W. 


Lavington 


1908 



BE AV FORT HUNT : 

Bailey, F. H. and Mrs. 

Bailey, Captain F. and the Hon. Mi 

Baillie, Lieut.-Colonel Hugh 
Baillie, J. B. 
Baker, T. B. Lloyd 

Baker, Granville E. Lloyd 

Baker, H. 0. Lloyd 

Baker, Michael Lloyd 

Baker, F. D. 

Baker, W. Proctor and Mrs. 

Baker, Hugh 

Baker, R. L. 

Baker, Miss 

Baldwin, John 

Baring, Captain Henry 

Barker, Percy Raymond 

Barker, Reginald Raymond 

Barker, Hugh Raymond and Mrs. 

Barnett, Philip 

Barrington, The Lord 

Bateson, Sir Thomas, M.P. 

Bathurst, The Right Hon. the 5th 
Earl 

Bathurst, The Right Hon. the 6th 
Earl 



PAST AND PRESENT. 


7 


Chippenham 




1912 


•s. Sheldon Manor, 

Chippenham 


1913 


Royal Horse Guards 


1861 


Chippenham 




1870 


Hardwicke Court 
(or 


before) 


1861 


Hardwicke 




1862 


Hardwicke Court 




1862 


Hardwicke 




1913 
1865 


Brislington 




1880 


Chedglow 




1903 


Chedglow 




1912 


Chedglow 




1913 


Arthur's Club (or 


before) 


1861 


late 17th Lancers 




1863 


Fairford Park 




1866 


Tetbury 




1893 


Foxley 




1911 


Cirencester 




1901 


Shrivenham 




1867 


Devizes 




1863 


1 

Cirencester House 
(or 


before) 


1846 


1 

Cirencester House 




1861 



BEAUFORT HUNT: PAST AND PRESENT. 



Bathurst, The Right Hon. the 7th 
Earl 

Bathurst, The Countess 

Bathurst, Colonel the Hon. Ben., 
M.P. 

Bathurst, The Lady Meriel 

Bayly, John 

Bayly, Robert 

Beach, W. W. B. 

Beauclerk, Captain F. 

Bengough, J. C. 

Benson, R. L. 

Bentinck, Major The Lord and Lady 
Charles 

Beresford, General D. W. 

Beresford, Admiral Lord Charles, 
G.C.B., etc., etc. 

Bernard, Charles 

Bernard, Charles, jun. 

Berners, J. A. 

Biddulph, The Hon. Claud 

Bill, Captain C. H. 

Bishop, Major and Mrs. C. W. 

Blagrave, J. Gratwicke 

Blathwayt, Colonel 

Blathwayt, Captain G. W. 

Blathwayt, W. T. 



Cirencester House 




1882 


Cirencester House 




1893 


Cirencester 




1897 


Cirencester House 




1913 


(or before) 


1846 


Bathwick (or 


before) 


1861 


Oakley Hall 




1861 


Hilmarton 




1880 


The Ridge 




1873 


9th Lancers 




1910 


Lyegrove 




1901 


Cheltenham 




1867 


Badminton 




1867 


Broad Hinton (or 


before) 


1861 


Broad Hinton 




1872 


Kingscote 




1896 


Rodmarton 




1897 


The Priory, Tetbury 


1864 


Barton Abbotts 




1898 


Calcot, Reading 




1885 


Dyrham Park 




1845 


Dyrham Park 




1845 


Dyrham Park 




1845 



BEAUFORT HUNT: 

Blathwayt, R. V. 

Blathwayt, C. P. 

Blathwayt, Robert Wynter 

Block, James, and Miss 

Borrer, Hamlyn 

Bourke, Colonel the Hon. J. J. 

Bouverie, Seymour Pleydell 

Bouverie, Mrs. Seymour 

Bouverie, Walter 

Boycott, Digby 

Brand, Andrew 

Bridges, Captain G. H. 

Bridges, Captain Strachan 

Brienen, Baron and Baroness de 

Bright, Lieut.-Colonel Robert 

Brinton, Major J. C. 

Brown, Kenworthy 

Browne, Colonel W. L. 

Bruges, R. Ludlow 

Bulkeley, Sir Richard Williams 

Burdon, W. B. C. 

Burges, Miss 0. 

Burn, Major-General J. M. 

Bush, G. de Lisle 



PAST AND PRESENT. 9 

Dyrham Park 1845 

Dyrham Park 1845 

Dyrham Park 1875 

Charlton Cottage 1861 

Dursley 1880 

CUfton 1872 

Crudwell 1889 

Crudwell 1891 

Lavington 1881 
(or before) 1846 

Easton Grey 1867 

Clifton 1878 

late R.H.A. 1878 

The Priory, Tetbury 1880 

Leigh Court 1865 

late 2nd Life Guards 1912 
Bath 

Stouts Hill 1861 

Seend 1866 

Baron Hill, Beaumaris 1861 

Chedglow 1907 

The Ridge 1913 

Alderley 1890 

Eastington Park 1880 



10 



BEAUFORT HUNT: PAST AND PRESENT, 



Butler, Lieut.-Colonel F. J. P. and 
the Hon. Mrs. 


Wick House 


1901 


Buxton, Gerard and Mrs. 


Tockenham 


1907 


Byng, Colonel the Hon. Charles 


late 1st Life Guards 


1867 


Byng, The Hon. Alfred 


late 7th Hussars 


1878 


Byng, Major the Hon. Lionel 


Avening House 


1900 


Byng, The Lady Eleanor 


Avening House 


1906 



Caldwell, Captain Ralph W. 

Callander, Miss Muriel (Mrs. W. 
Baird) 

Calley, Colonel and Mrs. T. P. 

Calthorpe, The Hon. F. 

Campbell, The Hon. A. F. 

Campbell, The Hon. Mrs. A. F. 

Cambridge, H.R.H. The Duke of 

Candy, Captain Henry 

Cantelupe, The Viscount 

Cardwell, T. H. 

Cardwell, Miss (Mrs. Wormald) 



Lackham 



1862 



Deanscroft, Oakham 1880 

Burderop 1878 

Grosvenor Square 1861 

Lasborough 1884 

Lasborough 1884 

(or before) 1846 

late 9th Lancers 1867 

(or before) 1846 

Newnton House 1877 

Newnton House 1895 



BE AV FORT HUNT: PAST AND PRESENT. 11 

Cardwell, Miss Mary (Mrs. Cooke) Newnton House 1897 

Carrington, The Lord (Marquess of 



Lincolnshire), K.G. 
Cave, Sir Charles D., Bart. 
Cave, Miss 
Cave, Charles H. 
Chaloner, Colonel R. 
Chaplin, Eustache 
Chaplin, Captain Percy and Mrs. 
Chaplin, Drummond 
Chaplin, Miss (Mrs. F. Godman) 
Chaplin, The Right Hon. Henry 



late Royal Horse Guards 1867 

Clifton 1864 

Stainbridge 1875 

Rodway Hill House 1881 



Gisboro 


1878 


Lasborough 


1870 


Chavenage 


1870 


Chavenage 


1885 


Chavenage 


1888 



6, Charles Street, 

Berkeley Square 1895 



Upton House 1905 

Bristol 1861 

Elberton 1865 

Ingelburne Manor 1892 

Eastcourt 1894 

Rowde Ford 1906 



Chaplin, Miss Sibell 

Charlton, Colonel 

Charleton, George B. 

Charrington, C. E. N. and Mrs. 

Charteris, R. B. and Mrs. 

Charteris, Mrs. R. (Miss Tryon) 

Chesterfield, The Earl of 

Chester-Master, Colonel T. W. 

Chester-Master, Andrew and Mrs. Lea, Malmesbury 

Cholmondeley, The Marquess of Cholmondeley 

Cholmondeley, The Lord George 

Cholmondeley, The Lady Susan 

Clifford, Henry J. 



Knole Park 



Cholmondeley 
Cholmondeley 
Frampton 



(or before) 1846 
1861 
1903 
1875 
1908 
1876 
1866 



12 BEAUFORT HUNT 

Clitherow, Colonel Stracey 

Close, Admiral 

Clutterbuck, Edmund 

Clutterbuck, Hugh 

Clutterbuck, Edmund H. 

Clutterbuck, Hugh F. 

Clutterbuck, Captain E. R. Middlewick 

Codrington, Sir William, Bart. Dodington 

Codrington, The Lady Georgina Dodington 

Codrington, Sir Gerald, Bart. Dodington 

Codrington, Miss (Lady Vavasour) Dodington 

Codrington, Miss Florance Dodington 

Codrington, Miss Evelyn Dodington 

Codrington, George T. G. C. Sands Court 

Codrington, Lieut.-General Sir Alfred, 
K.C.V.O., C.B. 



PAST AND PRESENT. 

Highgrove (or before) 1861 

Fishponds 1879 

Hardenhuish (or before) 1861 

Monks, Corsham 1861 

Hardenhuish 1870 

Dicketts, Corsham 1882 



Coleman, Walter 
Coleman, Major W. T. 
Coles, Henry Stratton 
Collins, Major W. 
CoUyer-Bristowe, A. 
Colston, Edward 
Colston, Colonel C. E. 
Colston, Captain E. M., M.V.O. 
Cookson, J. Blencowe and Mrs. 



1904 
(or before) 1846 
(or before) 1846 
1862 
1865 
1869 
1874 
1874 

1881 
1861 
1880 



Kington Langley 

Langley Fitzurse 

Corsham 

late Scots Greys 1902 

Draycot 1875 

Roundway Park (or before) 1861 

Roundway 1869 

Grenadier Guards 1898 

Meldon Park, 

Northumberland 1869 



BE AV FORT HUNT: PAST AND PRESENT. 



13 



Cooper, W. 

Coote, Captain Richard 

Cotes, Charles 

Cotes, Major Arthur 

Coventry, Captain Henry 

Cowley, The 2nd Earl and Countess Draycot 

Cowley, The 3rd Ear! 

Cowley, Countess (Lady Violet Neville) Draycot 

Cox, E. Richardson 

Crawley-Boevey, Sir M. 

Cresswell, C. R. E. 

Cripps, Frederick 

Croome, W. Fielder 

Cross, F. Richardson 

Cuadra, Mr. and Mrs. de 

Currie, The Lord 

Curzon, The Viscount 

Curzon, The Hon. H. 

Cust, The Hon. Miss 



Cobham 


(or before) 


1861 


Malmesbury 




1867 


Stanton Rectory 


1864 


Rowden Hill 




1870 


Charlton Park 




1881 


Draycot 




1866 


Draycot 




1874 


Draycot 




1893 


South Wraxall Manor 


1902 


Flaxley Abbey 




1861 


Pinkney Park 




1870 


Cirencester 




1867 


Cirencester 


(or before) 


1861 


Clifton 




1891 


Malmesbury 




1894 


Estcourt 




1875 




(or before) 


1846 


Gopsall 


(or before) 


1861 


Bath 




1894 



14 BEAUFORT HUNT : 

Dalgety, A. G. 

Dancer, Sir Thomas, Bart. 

Dancer, Miss G. 

Daniel, Thos. 

Dansey, Colonel E. M. 

Darell, Sir Lionel Edward, Bart. 

Darell, Edward 

Darling, Sir Charles 

Denison, Lady Irene 

Des Voeux, Henry 

Dew§, W. 

De Winton, Walter 

De Winton, Captain W. 

Donovan, Captain Thompson 

Dorington, Sir John, Bart. 

Dungarvan. The Viscount 

Duntze, Sir John, Bart. 

Dupplin, The Viscount 
Dutton, The Hon. James 



PAST AND PRESENT. 

The Priory, Tetbury 1901 

Yate 1870 

Yate 1911 

Huckridge (or before) 1861 

late 1st Life Guards 1869 

Fretherne 1865 

Fretherne 1870 

Pew Hill 1889 

Blankney 1905 

Chippenham 1863 

Coates 1861 

MaesUwch Castle 1855 

late 1st Life Guards 1889 

Malmesbury 1863 

Lypiatt Park 1861 

Turf Club 1892 

The Priory, Burton Hill 

(or before) 1861 

Dupplin Castle 1861 

Bibury (or before) 1861 



BEAUFORT HUNT: PAST AND PRESENT. 



15 



Elwes, J. Henry 




Colesborne 


1861 


Emmott, W. Rhodes 




Horton 


1888 


Essex, The Earl of 




Cassiobury Park 


1895 


Estcourt, T. G. Bucknall, 


M.P. 


Estcourt 


1830 


Estcourt, General James Bucknall 


Estcourt 


1850 


Estcourt, The Right Hon. 
Sotheron 


T. H. 


Estcourt 


1850 


Estcourt, Edward Dugdale Bucknall Estcourt 


1850 


Estcourt, The Lord 




Estcourt 


1860 


Estcourt, The Lady 




Estcourt 


1870 


Estcourt, Captain T. E. 




Scots Greys 


1905 


Esterhazy, Count A. 




(or before) 


1846 


Eustace, Major-General Sir Francis, 
K.C.B. 


1 
Barton End 


1909 


Eustace, F. R. 




Barton End 


1909 


Evans, Rev. A. 




Little Somerford 


1867 


Evans, Charles 




Corsham 


1893 


Ewart, Colonel W. Salisbury 
and Mrs. 


Petty France 


1873 



16 BE AVI OUT HVIST : 

Fane, The Lady Enid 

Farquhar, W. 

Fenwick, Captain C. H. 

Fernie, C. W. B. 

Firth, C. H. Bramley 

Fitzclarence, The Lord Adolphus 

Fitzhardinge, The 2nd Lord 

Fitzhardinge, The 3rd Lord 

Fitzmaurice, The Lord and Lady 
Charles 

Folkestone, The Viscount (5th Earl 



PAST AND PRESENT. 




Spye Park 




1912 


Badminton 




1865 


Norton Manor 




1896 


Keythorpe 




1876 


Ashwiek 




1901 


(or 


before) 


1846 


Berkeley Castle 




1861 


Berkeley Castle 




1898 



Bowood 



1895 



of Radnor) 






Longford Castle 


1867 


Forestier-Walker, D. 


P. and Mrs. 


Hillesley 


1905 


Forestier-Walker, Major 
Roland 


and Mrs. 


Newnton House 


1908 


Forrest, T. Forsyth 






Cirencester 


1888 


Forster, R. Carnaby 






Vasterne Manor 


1906 


Fowler, Sir R. N., Bart., 


M.P. 


Gastards 


1863 


Fowler, Sir Thomas, 


Bart 


- 


Gastards 


1888 


Fox, R. A. 






Yate 


1887 


Francis, C. K. 






7, Granville Place, W. 


1886 


Francis, Mrs. C. K. 


(Miss Lovell) 


7, Granville Place, W. 


1872 


Fry, Frank R. 






Clifton 


1878 


Fry, A. M. 






Clifton 


1913 


Fuller, John B. 






Neston 


1855 


Fuller, George P. 






Neston 


1861 



BEAUFORT HUNT: PAST AND PRESENT. 17 

Fuller, Sir John Neston 1874 

Fuller, Lady Neston 1898 

Fuller, W. F. Cricklade 1875 

Fuller, H. F. Grovefield, Bucks 1889 

Fuller, E. F. Neston 1901 

Fuller, R. F. Melksham 1901 

Fuller, Mrs. R. F. Neston 1912 

Furmidge, J. H. Lucknam 1907 



Gardiner, Charles 


Lympstone 


1869 


Garrett, Mrs. E. (Miss Walmsley) 


Lucknam 


1898 


George, W. 


Cherington 


1861 


George, Miss 


Cherington 


1898 


George, Miss C. 


Cherington 


1898 


Gibbs, Lieut.-Colonel George A., 
M.P. 


Tyntesfield 


1906 


Gibson-Watt, Captain and Mrs. 


Doldowlod, Radnor 


1908 


Gist, Major Frank 


Kingscote Cottage 


1875 


Gist, Mrs. Frank 


Kingscote Cottage 


1876 


Gist, Frank 


Charlton, Tetbury 


1896 



18 BEAUFORT HUNT: PAST AND PRESENT, 

Gladstone, J. E. 

Goddard, F. Pleydell 

Goddard, Mrs. 

Goldney, Sir Gabriel, Bart., M.P. 

Goldney, Sir G. Prior, Bart., C.V.O., 
C.B. 

Goldney, F. H. 

Goldney, The Hon. Sir John, Kt 

Golightly, Miss A. (Mrs. C. Gippi 

Golightly, Colonel R. E., D.S.O. 

Goodrich, James 

Gore, F. W. G. 

Goidon, Captain W. A., C.M.G. 

Gorst, Miss Eva 

Gosling, Edward Lambert 

Gouldsmith, John D. 

Graham, Sir Reginald H., Bart. 

Granville, The Earl 

Greatorex, Thomas Price 

Grey, The Earl 

Griffiths, Edward 

Grove, Sir Thomas Fraser, Bart. 

Guilford, The 7th Earl of 

Gwatkin, Miss (Mrs. Copeland 
Griffiths) 

Gwatkin, R. G. 



Bowden Park 


1877 


Swindon 


1895 


Swindon 


1887 


Chippenham 


1865 


Derriads 


1865 


Corsham 


1865 


Monks Park 


1865 


Shipton Moyne 


1877 


Ashcroft 


1883 


Norton Court 


1861 


Tetbury 


1882 


Southend House, Wickwar 1914 


Castle Combe 


1910 


Winslow 


1902 


Ashton Keynes 


1893 


Norton Conyers 


1863 




• 1867 




1863 


Westonbirt 


1895 




1867 


Feme 


1861 


Waldershare Park 


1880 


Potterne 


1910 


Potterne 


1885 



BEAUFORT HUNT: PAST AND PRESENT. 



19 



Hale, Colonel John Blagden 

Hale, Robert Blagden, M.P. 

Hale, Colonel Mathew HoUord 

Hale, Major-General Robert 

Hale, General Edward Blagden 

Haigh, G. H. 

Hall, Colonel Spencer 

Hamilton, Captain and Mrs. E. C. 

Hamilton, Miss H. 

Hanbury-Tracey, The Hon. Mrs. 
(Miss Palmer) 

Hankey, B. H. A. 

Hankey, W. H. A. 

Hankey, Captain C. 

Harding, Charles 

Harding, C. H. 

Hardwicke, The Earl of 

Harford, W. A. 



Alderley 


1840 


Alderley 


1840 


Alderley 


1855 


late 7th Hussars 


1855 



Alderley (or before) 1861 

Bath 1885 

Malmesbury 1881 

Great Somerford 1900 

Great Somerford I9ii 



Lackham 


1902 


Stanton Manor 


1904 


Notton 


1909 


Notton 


1910 


Upton Grove 


1873 


Upton Grove 


1892 


Draycot 


1867 


Petty France 


1872 



20 



BE AV FORT HVI^T : PAST AND PRESENT. 



Harford, Mrs. W A. 
Harford, Francis 
Harford, H. W. L. 
Harford, Mrs. H. W. L. 
Harford, J. C. 
Harford, Miss C. L. 
Harford, Miss Jessie 
Harford, Miss Betty 
Hargreaves, John 
Harris, Herbert J. and Mrs. 
Harris, Leslie H. 
Harris, Miss 



Petty France 
Oldown 
Horton 
Horton 
Lampeter 
Blaise Castle 
Petty France 
Petty France 
Leckhampton Court 
Bowden Hill 
Bowden Hill 
Bowden Hill 
Sutton Benger 



Harrison, Cuthbert 

Harrison, Miss (Mrs. J. Ballantyne) Sutton Benger 

Harrison, Henry B. Sutton Benger 

Hartley, W. H. Lye Grove 

Hatzfeldt, T.S.H. Prince and Princess Draycot 

Haydon, Colonel W.'H. Maidford 

Helme, Colonel Sir George, K.C.B., 

G.M.G. Chippenham 

Heneage, Michael Compton Bassett 

Heneage, Major Walker, V.C. Compton Bassett 

Heneage, Major G. C. Walker, M.V.O. late Grenadier Guards 

Henry, Lieut.-Colonel Frank Elmestree 

Henry, Mrs. Frank Elmestree 

Henry, Captain G. F. Doughton House 



1904 
1877 
1885 
1904 
1890 
1898 
1912 
1913 
1878 
1886 
1912 
1913 
1897 
1899 
1912 
(or before) 1861 
1896 
1894 



1886 
1861 
1864 
1888 
1867 
1870 
1883 



BEAUFORT HUNT: PAST AND PRESENT. 


21 


Henry, Mrs. G. F. 


Doughton House 




1895 


Henry, Edward 


Charlton Court 




1888 


Henry, Mrs. Edward 


Charlton Court, 




1895 


Henry, Lieut.-Colonel Vivian 


Elmestree 




1890 


Henry, Miss Maud (Mrs. Morrison- 
Bell) 


Elmestree 




1892 


Heywood, H. D. Beresford 


Wrentnall, Shropshire 


1891 


Hicks-Beach, Sir Michael (Viscounl 
St. Aldwyn) 


Williamstrip 




1862 


Hill, Thomas D. 


Malmesbury (or 


before) 


1861 


Hill, C. Gathorne and Mrs. 


Yate 




1887 


Hill, Major and Mrs. E. T. 


Winterbourne 




1900 


Hill, Maurice 


Yate 




1913 


Hilton-Green, F. 


Alderley 




1907 


Hoare, Charles 


Cirencester 




1875 


Hoare, Arthur 


Trull 




1895 


Hoare, Mrs. Arthur 


Trull 




1878 


Hoare, Colonel Reginald 


4th Hussars 




1912 


Hobson, Edward 


Stoke Park (or 


before) 


1846 


Holden, Henry 


Cirencester 




1880 


Holford, R. S. 


Westonbirt (or 


before) 


1846 


Holford, J. Gwynne 


Buckland 




1867 


Holford, Sir George L., K.C.V.O., 
CLE. 


Westonbirt 


' 


1880 


Holroyd, T. 


(or 


before) 


1846 


Hoole, Colonel 


Chavenage 




1892 


Hopkinson, C. C. 


Avening Court 




1874 



22 



BE AV FORT HUNT: PAST AND PRESENT. 



Hornsby-Drake, Lieut.-Colonel and 
Mrs. 

Howard, The Hon. Henry, M.P. 

Howard, Colonel Henry 

Howard, The Hon. Cecil 

Howard, The Hon. J. K. 

Howard, Algar 

Howard, The Lady Katherine 

Howth, The Earl of 

Humphries, Sidney 

Hunt, Captain G. Warwick 

Hurle, J. A. Cooke 



Compton Bassett 1913 

(or before) 1846 
(or before) 1846 



Charlton Park 


1867 


Charlton Cottage 


1905 


Thornbury 


1912 


Charlton Cottage 


1910 


Howth Castle 


1865 


Westbury-on-Trym 


1909 


Late 4th Hussars 


1869 


Brislington 


1902 



Ireland, J. Clayfield 


Brislington 


1861 


Islington, The Lord 


Hartham Park 


1880 


Islington, The Lady 


Hartham Park 


1897 



BEAVFOBT HUNT: PAST AND PRESENT. 



23 



Jacoby, C. and Mrs. 


Lye Grove 


1888 


Jardine, Mrs. David 




1880 


Jarrett, Captain C. 6. and Mrs. 


Charlton, Tetbury 


1873 


Jenkinson, Sir George, Bart. 


Eastwood 


1872 


Jenkinson, Captain J. Banks 


Rifle Brigade 


1911 


Jenner, Captain L. C. D. 


late 60th Rifles 


1911 


Jersey, The Earl of 


(or 


before) 1846 


Joicey, James 


Poulton Priory 


1898 


Joicey, John G. 


Poulton Priory 


1898 


Jones, Colonel Inigo 


Kelston 


1857 


Jones, Major-General Inigo, C.V.O., 
C.B. 


Kelston 


1868 


Jones, Major F. T. 


Chippenham 


1873 


Jones, Miss A. Inigo 


Kelston 


1912 


Jones, Miss M. Inigo 


Kelston 


1912 


Jones, H. R. Inigo 


Scots Guards 


1913 



24 BE AV FORT HUNT: PAST AND PRESENT. 

Kearsley, Major R. W. late 5th Dragoon Guards 1879 

Kerry, Major the Earl of, D.S.O. 

King, Mervyn and Mrs. 

King, T. P. and Miss 

King, Percy 

Kingscote, Colonel Thomas 

Kingscote, Colonel Sir Nigel, K.C.B. 

Kingscote, Colonel H. B. 

Kingscote, The Lady Emily 

Kingscote, Nigel R. F. 

Kingscote, Miss (Mrs. A. Maitland 
Wilson) 

Kingscote, Miss Winifred (The 

Countess of Cholmondeley) Kingscote Park 1875 

Kingscote, Thomas A. F., M.V.O. Watermoor House 1867 

Kingscote, The Hon. Mrs. Watermoor House 1882 

Kington, Captain William M. W. late 5th Dragoon Guards 1863 

Kinsky, Count (or before) 1846 

Kirkland, Sir J. 1864 



Bowood 


1896 


Clifton 


1874 


Newark 


1879 


Clifton 


1882 


Kingscote Park 


1821 


Kingscote Park 


1856 


8, Eaton Terrace, S.W. 


1862 


Kingscote Park 


1863 


Kingscote Park 


1874 


Kingscote Park 


1875 



BE AV FORT HUNT: PAST AND PRESENT. 25 

LangtoD, W. F. Gore Padbury 1860 

Lansdowne, The Marquis of, K.G. Bowood 1867 

Law, G. 0. Christian Malford 1861 

Law, Colonel Edwin Dauntsey 1895 

Lee, Colonel A. H. Vaughan, M.V.O. late Royal Horse Guards 1893 



Lindsay, David B. 




Willesley 


1886 


Lindsay, Walter 




Westonbirt 


1899 


Lister, Henry 






1861 


Lister, the Hon. T. 




10th Hussars 


1898 


Little, General Sir Archibald, 


G.C.B. 


Upton House 


1855 


Little, Captain Lockhart 






1855 


Little, James 




Upton House 


1874 


Little, Major Cosmo 




Upton House 


1874 


Little, The Lady Guendolen 




Upton House 


1903 


Little, Miss (Mrs. A. Brocklehurst) 


Upton House 


1874 


Little, Colonel Malcolm, C.B 


• 


late 9th Lancers 


1878 


Little, Miss Agnes 




Upton House 


1886 


Little, Miss Violet 




Upton House 


1887 


Little, Archibald 




Upton House 


1888 


Little, Miss Charlotte (Mrs. St, 


, Clair) 


Upton House 


1908 


Lockwood, Robert 




Cottles, Melksham 


1901 


Lockwood, Miss (Mrs. W. Lysley) 


Wotton 


1899 


Lockwood, Miss Rachel 




Cottles, Melksham 


1902 


Lockwood, Miss C. (Mrs. C. 


de 






Paravicini) 




Cottles, Melksham 


1903 



26 BEAUFORT HVNT : PAST AND PRESENT. 

Londesborough,The Earl and Countess 



(Lady Edith Somerset) 

Londesborough, The Earl of 

Londesborough, The Countess of 
(Lady Grace Fane) 



Londesborough Lodge 
Blankney 



Blankney 
Londonderry, The Marquis of, K.G. Badminton 



1867 
1880 

1876 
1875 



Long, Walter 

Long, The Right Hon. Walter H., 
M.P. 



Rood Ashton (or before) 1846 



Rood Ashton 
Rowden Hill 
Rowden Hill 



Long, Robert C. C. 

Long, Mrs. Robert 

Long, Miss Margaret (Mrs. Giffard) Rowden Hill 

Long, Captain W. H. B. Rood Ashton 

Long, Captain Walter, D.S.O., Scots Greys 

Long, Eric Rood Ashton 

Lonsdale, The Earl and Countess of Lowther Castle 



Lopes, George 

Lord, Herbert Owen 

Lovell, John 

Lovell, Francis 

Lovell, P. Audley 

Lovell, Captain P. Audley D. 

Lowsley-Williams, George 

Lowsley-Williams, Mrs. 

Lowndes, E. C. 

Ludlow, The Lord 



Sandridge Park 
Lilly Brook 
Cole Park 



1870 
1882 
1912 
1910 
1883 
1884 
1900 
1878 
1880 
1899 
(or before) 1846 



late 1st Life Guards 1840 

Cole Park (or before) 1846 

late Coldstream Guards 1880 

Chavenage 1891 

Chavenage 1898 

Castle Combe 1870 

Heywood, Wilts 1888 



BEAUFORT HUNT: 


PAST AND PRESENT. 


27 


Luttrell, C. M. F. 


Bath 


1900 


Lyon, Captain Wittit 


late 2nd Life Guards 


1861 


Lyon, Captain Frederick 


Royal Artillery 


1861 


Lysley, Captain G. L. 


Pewsham 


1897 


Lysley, Miss (Mrs. Heigham) 


Pewsham 


1897 


Lysley, W. 


Notton 


1897 



Mackay, G. E. and Mrs. 
Mackeson, Colonel W. 
Mackirdy, Elliot and Mrs. 
Manners, The Hon. Fitzallan 
Marjoribanks, George J. 
Markham, Wilfred 
Martin, J. E. H. and Mrs. 
Master, T. W. C. 
Mathews, T. G. 
Maudslay, Henry 
Menzies, Keith 
Menzies, Stewart 



Kington Langley 1900 

late 5th Dragoon Guards 1875 

Abbey House, Malmesbury 1910 

Langley 1898 

Lees, Berwickshire 1887 

Badminton 1912 

Oaksey 1900 

The Abbey, Cirencester 1836 

Newport Towers, Berkeley 1893 

Upton Grove 1875 

Westonbirt 1912 

Westonbirt 1912 



28 BE AVI OUT HVA'T 

Meredith-Brown, M. 
Merewether, H. A. 



PAST AND PRESENT. 

Hullavington 1865 

Bowden Hill (or before) 1861 



Merewether, Captain H. 


Bowden Hill 


1865 


Metcalfe, W. 


Mangotsfield 


1861 


Metcalfe, Dawson 


Mangotsfield 


1861 


Methuen, Field-Marshal Lord, 






G.C.B., etc., etc. 


Corsham Court 


1863 


Methuen, The Hon. C. 


Corsham Court 


1913 


Methuen, The Hon. Paul 


Corsham Court 


1911 


Methuen, The Hon. Miss K. 


Corsham Court 


1913 


Meux, Sir Henry, Bart. 


Dauntsey 


1880 


Mildmay, G. L. and Mrs. 


Dockem House, Coates 


1907 


Miles, Colonel Sir William, Bart. 


Leigh Court 


1820 


Miles, P. W. S. 


Kingsweston 


1836 


Miles, J. W. 


Kingsweston 


1840 


Miles, Colonel C. W. 


Burton Hill 


1842 


Miles, Sir Philip J., Bart. 


Leigh Court 


1844 


Miles, Edward P. W. 


Dauntsey House 


1850 


Miles, W. H. 


Leigh Court 


1852 


Miles, H. Cruger W. 


Kingsweston 


1855 


Miles, Colonel C. Napier, C.B., M.V.O 


. Ingelburne Manor 


1861 


Miles, Sir H. WilUam, Bart. 


Leigh Court (or before) 


1861 


Miles, Audley C. 


Burton Hill 


1862 


Miles, Vyvyan 


Burton Hill 


1864 


Miles, Captain Tremayne 


late 18th Hussars 


1872 


Miles, Major A. E. 


Seagry 


1873 



BEAUFORT HUNT: F 


AST AND PRESENT. 


29 


Miles, Mrs. A. E. 


Seagry 


1912 


Miles, Miss Clarissa 


Ingelburne Manor 


1882 


Miles, Miss 0. Tremayne 


Didmarton 


1905 


Miles, Captain W. 


1st Royal Dragoons 


1914 


Miller, Audley M. 


Badminton 


1902 


Miller, T. Butt 


Cricklade 


1888 


Miller, Mrs. Butt 


Cricklade 


1898 


Mirehouse, G. T. 


Cirencester 


1890 


Mitchell, A. C. 


Highgrove 


1881 


Mitchell, Mrs. A. C. 


Highgrove 


1896 


Mitchell, Miss 


Highgrove 


1903 


Mitchell, J. Henry 


Highgrove 


1910 


Mitchell, Frank 


Highgrove 


1910 


Mitchell, David 


Highgrove 


1910 


Montgeon, Miss de 


Malmesbury 


1894 


Morgan, The Hon. Godfrey (The 
Lord Tredegar) 


Tredegar Castle 


1861 


Morgan, The Hon. Frederick 


Ruperra Castle 


1870 


Morley, The 3rd Earl of 


Saltram 


1885 


Morley, The Countess of 


Saltram 


1885 


Mornington, The Earl of 


Draycot (or before) 


1 1861 


Morrice, Major L. E. 


The Priory, Malmesbury 


1907 


Morrison-Bell, Captain E. F., M.P. 


Pitt House, Devon 


1907 


Morritt, Robert 


Charlton 


1861 


Mostyn Pritchard, Mrs. (Miss 
M. Mathews) 


North Nibley 


1898 



30 



BEAUFORT HUNT: PAST AND PRESENT. 



Myddelton, R. and Mrs. (Biddulph) Chirk Castle 
Mynors, The Rev, A. Baskerville Ashley Rectory 



1865 

1883 



Neeld, Sir John, Bart., M.P. 


Grittleton 


1834 


Neeld, Sir Algernon, Bart. 


Grittleton 


1858 


Neeld, Miss (Lady Willis) 


Grittleton 


1871 


Neeld, Miss Evelyn (Mrs. P. 
Wroughton) 


Grittleton 


1874 


Neeld, Lieut.-Colonel Sir Audley, 
Bart., C.B., M.V.O. 


late 2nd Life Guards 


1859 


Neeld, Rear-Admiral R. R. 


Twatley 


1860 


Neeld, Lieut.-Colonel M. G. 


late 17th Lancers 


1861 


Neeld, Elliot 


Grittleton 


1862 


Nell, H. and Mrs. 


Chipping Sodbury 


1907 


Nelson, Rev. 


Clack 


1867 



BEAUFORT HUNT : 

Ogilby, R. J. 
Oliphant, Philip Blair 
Orde, Charles 
Ormathwaite, The Lord 
Orred, John 
Osborne, Jere 
Otway, Major 
Owen, Hugh 
Owen, Captain Roderick 



PAST AND PRESENT. 31 

Dauntsey House 1914 

Datchet 1863 

Newcastle (or before) 1861 

late 1st Life Guards 1861 

Ashwick 1861 

Bristol 1875 

Cheltenham 1875 

Cheltenham 1875 

Cheltenham 1892 



Paget, The Lord Alfred (or before) 1846 

Paget, Gerald 1900 

Palairet, Captain Charles H. late 9th Lancers 1880 

Palk, The Hon. L. H. (Lord Haldon) 1870 

Palk, Colonel the Hon. E. A. Twatley 1884 

Palmer, Lieut.-Colonel G. Llewellyn Lackham 1880 

Palmer, Captain W. L. 10th Hussars 1899 

Palmer, Michael Lackham 1908 

Palmer, Captain Allen late 14th Hussars 1899 



32 BEAUFORT HUNT : 

Palmer, Major A. J. 
Pattenson, W. B. Tyllden 
Paul, W. J. 
Paul, W. M. 

Peel, Captain Edmund 
Phelps, W. J. 

Pierepoint, Henry 

Pitman, Ernest and Mrs. 

Playne, Arthur T. 

Playne, Lieut.-Colonel 

Playne, Mrs. W. H. 

Plunkett, The Hon. R. E. S., M.P. 

Pole, H. Van Notten 

Pole, Sir Pery Van Notten, Bart. 

Pollen, Sir R. Hungerford, Bart. 

Pollen, C. Hungerford 

Pollen, R. Hungerford 

Pollen, Miss Hungerford 

Pollock, Mrs. Erskine 

Pollock, Captain F. R. 

Pope, Captain M. E. W. 

Porteous, D. S. 

Porteous, Mrs. D. S^ 

Powell, Walter, M.P. 

Powell, Miss (Mrs. Lawrence) 



PAST AND PRESENT. 

Fairford Park 1910 

Christian Malford 1893 

Highgrove (or before) 1846 

Teignmouth (or before) 1861 

Boxwell 1874 

Chavenage (or before) 1 846 

Seagry House (or before) 1861 

Bath 1905 

Longfords 1864 

Avening 1886 

Avening 1898 

Woodway 1867 

Watermoor House 1861 

Todenham 1896 

Rodbourne 1860 

Rodbourne 1877 

Rodbourne 1888 

Rodbourne 1906 

Avening Court 1882 

Avening Court 1905 

Ashwick 1908 

Upton Grove 1880 

Upton Grove 1880 

Dauntsey House 1866 

Manor House, Coates 1866 



BEAUFORT HUNT : 


PAST AND PRESENT. 


33 


Powell, Godfrey 


Dauntsey House 


1880 


Poynder, W. H. 


Pew Hill 


1861 


Foynter, Major A. V. 


Didmarton 


1912 


Preston, Walter R. 


Seend Park 


1914 


Prodgers, Herbert 


Kington St. Michael 


1863 


Prodgers, Cecil Herbert 


Kington St. Michael 


1870 


Prodgers, G. J. 


Kington St. Michael 


1908 


Purnell, P. Bransby 


Stancombe 


1861 


Puxley, Mrs. (Miss Wroughton) 


Westonbirt Rectory 


1901 



Raglan, The Lord 

Randolph, Beverley 
Ribblesdale, The Lord 
Ricardo, Henry 
Ricardo, Major H. G. 
Ricardo, Miss (Mrs. Gibson Watt) 
Ridley, The Viscount 
Ritchie, Captain B. 



Cefn Tilla Court, Mon. 

(or before) 1861 

Yate (or before) 1861 

Gisburne, Yorks 1888 

Gatcombe (or before) 1861 



Gatcombe 


1881 


Gatcombe 


1908 


Blagdon 


1910 


15th Hussars 


1909 



34 BEAUFORT HUNT: PAST AND PRESENT. 

Robinson, Captain John Dyrham (or before) 1861 

Robinson, Sir William Fleming, Bart. Hillesley 1862 

Rolt, John Ozleworth 1861 

Rolt, J. W. Ozleworth 1880 

Rolt, Mrs. J. W. Ozleworth 1886 

Rooke, A. B. Chippenham 1850 

Rooke, Ernest W. Bath 1884 

Rooke, Mortimer Chippenham 1884 

Rossmore, The Lord late 1st Life Guards 1867 



Savernake, The Lord 


Christian Malford 




1886 


Savile, A. B. 


Clifton 




1861 


Schomberg, E. C. 


Seend 




1833 


Scobell, Henry 


Chippenham 




1861 


Scobell, General Sir Henry, K.C.B. 


late Scots Greys 




1893 


Scott, Major and Mrs. R. A. 


Lasborough 




1902 


Searancke, F. J. 


The Ranges, Dursley 


1865 


Shannon, The 6th Earl of 


Cirencester 




1880 


Shelburne, The Earl of 


Bowood (or 


before) 


1846 



BE AV FORT HUNT 
Shelley, John 



PAST AND PRESENT. 35 

(or before) 1846 



Smith, T. Graham 


Easton Grey 


1861 


Smith, T. Graham 


Easton Grey 


1876 


Smith, Mrs. T. Graham 


Easton Grey 


1880 


Smith, Rev. Oswald 


Crudwell 


1880 


Smith, H. Herbert 


Buckhill 


1881 


Smith, C. Herbert 


Buckhill 


1896 


Smith, Mrs. Marriott 


Buckhill 


1902 


Smith, Miss V. (Mrs. Ronald 
Carrington) 


Buckhill 


1902 


Speke, William 


Jordans, Somerset 


1861 


Speke, Charles 


Wormwood 


1899 


Speke, Herbert 


Wormwood 


1899 


Spencer, Edwards 


Cherington Park 


1906 


Spencer, Herbert 


Langley 


1899 


Spicer, Major John W. G. 


Spye Park 


1863 


Spicer, Miss Louisa 


Spye Park 


1880 


Spicer, Captain Julian 


late Royal Horse Guards 


1869 


Spicer, Captain John 


late 1st Life Guards 


1865 


Spicer, The Lady Margaret 


Spye Park 


1888 


Spicer, John F. F. 


Spye Park 


1890 


Spicer, Anthony N. F. 


Spye Park 


1912 


Spicer, Frank F. F. 


Spye Park 


1912 


Spicer, Simon Ralph F. 


Spye Park 


1912 


Spicer, Miss Joan F. 


Spye Park 


1912 



36 BEAUFORT HUNT: PAST AND PRESENT. 

Stancombe, J. F. Shaw Hill 1880 

Stancombe, W., jun. Potterne 1880 

Stanley, John (or before) 1846 

Starkey, J. Baytun Spye Park (or before) 1861 

Stephens, the Rev. Townsend (or before) 1846 

Stewart Richardson, Captain R. M. 11th Hussars 1911 

Stirling, Major Gilbert late Royal Horse Guards 1866 

Stopford, Major-General the Hon. 

Sir F. W., K.C.M.G., C.B. The Limes, Tetbury 1909 

Stoughton, T. A. Owlpen 1861 

Sturt, H. Gerard (Lord Alington) Crichel 1861 

Suffolk and Berkshire, The 17th 

Earl of Charlton Park (or before) 1846 



Suffolk and Berkshire, 
Earl of 


The 


18th 


Charlton Park 


1861 


Suffolk and Berkshire, 
Earl of 


The 


19th 


Charlton Park 


1884 


Suffolk and Berkshire, The Countess 
of 


Charlton Park 


1904 


Sumner, Arthur Holme 






Guildford 


1862 


Sutton, H. G. 






Compton Bassett 


1861 


Sutton, A. G. 






Christian Malford 


1888 


Sutton, H. C. 






Blunsdon 


1890 


Sutton, F. R. 






Blunsdon 




Sutton, Captain Frank 






Andover 




Symonds, Dr. F. 






Oxford 


1867 



BE AV FORT HUNT: PAST AND PRESENT, 



37 



Taylor, John 




The Rocks 


1876 


Taylor, Darcy E. 




The Rocks 


1881 


Taylor, G. Watson 




Erlestoke 


1885 


Taylor, Colonel Pierce 




Newnton Priory 


1895 


Taylor, L. H. and Mrs. 




Great House, Chipping 
Sodbury 


1896 


Taylor, J. E. 




Biddeston 


1898 


Taylor, W. F. 




Kingscote 


1893 


Thompson, Captain and Mrs. 


G. F. 


Christian Malford 


1911 


Throckmorton, Sir William, : 


Bart. 


Buckland 


1873 


Thynne, The Lord Henry 




Maiden Bradley 


1861 


Thynne, The Lord Alexander, 


, M.P. 


15, Manchester Square, W. 


1905 


Tidswell, R. I. 




Haresfield Court 


1894 


Tilney, Captain H. J. 




late Hth Hussars 


1905 


Townshend, Stephen H. 




Thornbury 


1861 


Trafalgar, The Viscount 




The Priory, Tetbury 


1884 


Trafalgar, The Viscountess 




the Priory, Tetbury 


1884 


Turner, C. E. 




Oldown, Tockington 


1912 



38 BEAUFORT 


HUNT: 


PAST AND PRESENT. 




Turner, Colonel W. Wyatt 


Pinkney Park 


1886 


Turner, Mrs. Wyatt 




Pinkney Park 


1886 


Turner, Algernon 




Royal Horse Guards 


1906 


Tuyll, Baron Carlo de 




Herton 


1882 


Tuyll, Baron Max de 




Horton 


1883 



Tuyll, Baroness de (9th Duchess 
of Beaufort) 



Horton 



1885 



Tuyll, Baroness Nora de (Countess 





LUtzow) 


The Priory, Tetbury 


1886 


Tuyll, 


Baron F. de 


Badminton 


1895 


Tuyll, 


Captain Maurice de 


10th Hussars 


1895 


Tyler, 


Roper K. 


Barton House, Tetbury 


1886 



Vachell, L. W. T. 



Bath 



1895 



Valletort, The Viscountess 
Edith VilUers) 


(Lady 


Badminton 


1905 


Vassall, R. 




Frenchay 


1883 


Vivian, The 2nd Lord 




Upton House 


1863 


Vivian, The Lady 




Upton House 


1866 


Vivian, The Hon. Crespigny (3rd 
Lord Vivian) 


Upton House 


1865 



BEAUFORT HUNT: PAST AND PRESENT. 



39 



Wait, W. K. 

Wait, H. W. K. 

Wallington, Edward 

Wallington, John 

Wallington, Colonel Sir J., K.G.B. 

Wallington, J. A. B. 

Wallington, Colonel Charles 

Wallington, Miss G. 

Wallington, Miss 

Wallington, Miss Alice 

Wallington, Edward William, 
C.V.O., C.M.G. 

Walmsley, J. 

Walmsley, J. 

Ward, Major M. S. 

Ward, The Hon. and Mrs. Cyril 

Ward Soames, E. and Mrs. 

Wasborough, C. W. 

Wasborough, Miss 



Clifton 


1878 


Brimpsfield 


1889 


Dursley 


1800 


Dursley 


1825 


Keevil Manor 


1844 


Keevil Manor 


1873 



The Priory, Chippenham 1883 

Hilperton 1886 

Hilperton 1886 

Hilperton 1886 



Hilperton 


1904 


Lucknam 


1876 


Lucknam 


1886 


Calne 


1863 


Sopworth 


1906 


Rood Ashton 


1904 


Bristol 


1895 


Bristol 


1905 



40 BE AV FORT HUNT: PAST AND PRESENT. 

Wellesley, Captain Henry (3rd Duke 



of Wellington) 


Draycot 


1867 


Wellesley, Lord and Lady Richard 


Lye Grove 


1912 


Wemyss, Randolph 


Wemyss Castle 


1896 


Wemyss, Lady Eva (Wellesley) 


Draycot 


1880 


Westmorland, The Earl of 


Apethorpe 


1861 


Westmorland, The Countess of 


Apethorpe 


1864 


Westmorland, The Earl of, A.D.C. 


Apethorpe 


1880 


Whyte-Melville, G. J. 


Tetbury 


1870 


Wightwick, Henry 


Calne 


1888 


Williamson, Captain C. H. 


Box 


1890 


Williamson, H. N. H. 


Royal Roise Artillery 


1910 


Wilson, Sir M. Wharton, Bart. 


Cirencester 


1865 


Wilson, Arthur Maitland 


Didmarton 


1880 


Wilson, Captain H. M. 


Rifle Brigade 


1906 


Wilson, Nigel M. 


Didmarton 




Wilson, Reginald M. 


Didmarton 




Wilson, Miss 


Norton 


1913 


Wilson, Noel 


Norton 


1913 


Wingfield, Digby 


late Royal Horse Guards 


1867 


Winthrop, Captain Ben 


late 15th Hussars 


1863 


Wrangham, W. T. 


The Rocks 


1862 


Wroughton, Philip, M.P. 


Woolley Park 


1888 


Wyndham-Quin, Colonel and Lady 
Eva 


Lasborough 


1898 


Wyndham, Charles 


Wans 


1861 



BEAUFORT HUNT: PAST AND PRESENT. 41 



Yarde-BuUer, Colonel John Chavenage (or before) 1861 

Yarde-BuUer, John (Lord Churston) Chavenage 1864 

Yatman, W. Hamilton Highgrove 1865 

Yatman, Captain F. H. Highgrove 1870 

Yockney, A. Pockeridge 1884 



BE AV FORT HUNT: PAST AND PRESENT. 43 



Appendix. 



Compiler's Notes. 

My first season with the Duke of Beaufort's Hounds was 
1866 — 67, when Tom Clark was huntsman, Jack West first whip, 
and Heber Long second whip. I had two seasons with Tom Clark, 
and in March, 1868, the Marquis of Worcester, the present Duke of 
Beaufort, commenced his long career as huntsman. Colonel Peter 
Miles was Honorary Secretary of the Hunt previous to my taking 
over the duties in 1888, and he had held the office for many years. 
In those days, the subscription was £5 to the "' Poultry Fund," and 
this only from members of the Hunt, i.e., those to whom the Duke 
of Beaufort had given " the Button," always a purely personal 
matter, as it is now, between His Grace and the recipient. In 1888 
a subscription, was started, and increased from time to time until 
the arrangement now existing came into force. Two seasons ago, 
i.e., 1911, the system of " capping " was adopted, and Mr. Audley 
Miller, who was subsequently appointed Secretary upon my retire- 
ment, undertook to act as collector. The Hunt Committee regretted 
the necessity of having to " cap," but they came to the conclusion 
that it was unavoidable. 

In my early days, the country hunted from Badminton included 
what is now known as the Avon Vale Hunt, which owes its origin to 
the 8th Duke of Beaufort lending the south-eastern portion of his 
country to Captain Spicer, who hunted it at his own expense until 
1895, in which year Colonel G. L. Palmer succeeded Captain Spicer, 
and hunted the country with his own pack as the Avon Vale. In 
1899 the Marquis of Worcester, who became sole master in 1894, 
again took over the whole country, and hunted four days a week 
himself, and Will Dale (who came into the country in 1896, when 
for one season Mr. Randolph Wemyss assisted the Marquis as joint 
master) two days a week. In 1912, the Avon Vale Hunt was again 
resuscitated, Mr. John Fullerton, late of the York and Ainsty, was 
appointed Master, hunting the country two days a week with 
his own hounds. In the previous year George Walters, who came 
from the Tynedale, was appointed huntsman to the Beaufort Hunt, 
and the country is now hunted as before, six days a week. 

If I was asked to say off hand what were the two best runs I 
took part in during the 47 seasons I have hunted with the Duke of 
Beaufort's Hounds, I sliould say, in my early days the run on the 



44 BE AV FORT HUNT: PAST AND PRESENT. 

26tli December, 1871, and, in my later days the one on January 8tli, 
1903. I remember them both very well. On the former day we 
found our first fox, an outlier, near Great Wood, had a quick gallop 
with him, and he was eventually lost near Dauntsey. Found our 
second fox in Great Wood at two o'clock, and ran hard in cover for 
30 minutes. I was lucky enough to get a start, along with Captain 
Ben Wlnthrop, for I have a vivid recollection that as we were going 
best pace towards Miles' Gorse, over the grass and nice jumpable 

fences, his shouting to me " By G , Sir, this is worth a guinea a 

minute! " and so it was. We passed the Gorse, crossing the brook 
over the hunting bridge, thence to Brinkworth, by Moodie's Gorse, 
Woodbridge Coppice, Eastcourt, Crudwell, Culkerdown, and whipped 
off as it was getting dark at Haresdown Barn, very near Eodmarton. 
I remember finding my chestnut mare, Cinderella (she won the 
Beaufort Hunt Cup a few months later, ridden by Sir Thomas Dancer), 
just about done, so I had to put in at Trull, where the late WilUam 
Kilminster soon refreshed me and her, and she trotted home with 
me and was none the worse. Eleven mile point ; time, over two 
hours. 

Then on January 8th, 1903, we found in a clump in Badminton 
Park, and came out near Worcester Lodge. Hounds ran from there 
to ground in Avening Wood without any perceptible check, in 55 
minutes ; nine mile points. I remember that run well, and a very 
fine run it was, the fox making his point without entering a single 
covert ; passing Park Wood, Bowldown, Beverston Brake, etc., 
as if they did not exist. I was not quite quick enough at starting, 
but I could see the leaders going, and had all I could do to keep them 
in sight. They were Mr. and Mrs. Bill Harford, Hugh Barker, Will 
Dale, and my son Edward on a one-eyed horse. Luckily for him the 
remaining eye was a good one. 

There have been, of course, scores of good runs during my time, 
and good hunts, too, some on the days I have been out, and many 
more, especially in the Wiltshire side of the country, when I have 
not been out. 

Mr. Herbert Nell's help in hunting the country from 1905 to 
March 5th, 1910, must not be forgotten, for no one worked harder, 
I might say as hard as he did, to show sport. He tells me that when 
hunting the Avon Vale country from near Chipping Sodbury he had 
to leave home very early, and was frequently not back till ten or 
twelve at night, and once not till two o'clock on a Sunday morning. 
His best season was 1908-9. He had 27| couple of hounds, started 
hunting on August 27th, and finished on the 1st of May, killed 26| 
brace, and ran 10 brace to ground. He says : "I finished the day 
I hurt my eye, viz., March 5th, 1910, which was a capital day (except 
the eye part of it). We had killed a fox in the big woods at Rood 
Ashton, and then went away with another, and ran him for two 
hours five minutes, and killed him." He adds : " It is wonderful 



BEAUFORT HUNT: PAST AND PRESENT. 45 

what pain one can go through when hounds are really running hard 
for their fox. Anything is worth a good hunt, I think ? '' In 
February, 1911, Mr. Nell was presented witli a silver model of his 
favourite hound, " Treasure." Mr. T. P. King made the presentation. 
A very fine silver cup had previously been presented to Mr. Nell by 
45 of the farmers in the Avon Vale. 

P.S. — In January, 1914, Mr. Fullerton, sent in his resignation, 
and Mr. W. R. Preston, of Seend Park, became Master of the Avon 
Vale. 

Frank Henry. 



Farmers and Foxhunting. 

Dear Frank Henry, 

My recollections, all pleasant, of Wiltshire and Gloucestershire 
farmers go back now for a good many years ; I think to the Season 
of 1879. I have always considered that the farmers of a country 
are half the country. I do not mean in the accepted and trite sense 
that hunting could not go on at all, much less flourish, without the 
support of the farming owners and occupiers of land ; but I mean 
that it makes the whole difference to be out with a pack and in a 
country where the farmers hunt themselves. In this respect — and 
I am speaking from some experience — yours are second to none. 
What is more, they set the tune, as it were, for a large zone of country. 
Somehow or other, whether it be due to the soil, or to the climate, 
or the forces of example, the Great Western Railway, say from 
Slough to the Severn, serves a great extent of territory hunted, I 
grant by different packs, but where the pleasure of sharing your fun 
with those Mho get their living by the land is truly to be enjoyed. 
Take Berkshire for instance. Mr. Garth's country and its farmers 
were exposed to, and apparently welcomed, the operations of several 
packs of hounds. It may be too much to say — though I am not so 
sure that it is — that Badminton is the centre from which these more 
extended influences have radiated ; but it is certainly not too much 
to assign to the great hunting family of the Somersets and to their 
long tradition and association with the land, those happy conditions 
which attend upon and foster foxhunting in your parts. 

Bad times had depressed and impoverished all who got their 
living by the land — owners and occupiers alike — when fiist I made 
acquaintance with the Duke's country. All over England forced 
sales of stock, arrears of rent, bankruptcies and compositions, farms 
given up, bad to let again and ill to follow when let, bore testimony 
to agricultural depression. But in Wiltsliiie and Gloucestershire 
the country gentlemen stood by their tenants, and the tenant farmers 
by their labourers, with the result that taking it all over I sliould 



46 BEAUFORT HUNT: PAST AND PRESENT. 

say that the Duke's country is better farmed now than it was say 
from 1880 to 1890. Perhaps less labour is employed, but the tillage 
lauds look to me cleaner, and a good deal has been laid down to 
pasture with excellent effect ; witness the fine grass fields about 
Easton Grey laid down by Graham-Smith with courage and foresight 
in the height of the depression. In these hard days many neigh- 
bourly things were done. I recollect hearing at the time of a young 
farmer telling the present Duke out cub hunting that it was his last 
day and that he was bound to sell a good young horse by " Birdhill " 
to make up the rent. Lord Worcester asked him the price, bought 
the horse, and begged him to ride it as his own for the rest of the 
season. I believe the conversation and the arrangement took place 
in Surrendel Wood. 

When I come to the farmers themselves, all kinds of recollections 
of fun we have had together flood in upon me, things going well, 
hounds favouring you at every turn, falls, being left behind, being 
pounded, or letting your horse go, all the ups and downs in short 
which make fox hunting what it means to us in England. What 
good talks, too, I have had with your folk riding on to cover in the 
days when we all had to ride, and riding home, perhaps on lame or 
stone cold horses. There was nothing like a Kich, a Kil minster, a 
Garlick, or a Teagle (to mention only a few of the ancient farming 
families) to get you over the long miles. Nor can I ever forget the 
ready and unfailing kindnesses my children have received from the 
farmers. Thanks to them the Duke of Beaufort's country is surely 
a paradise for boys home for the holidays, or little schoolroom girla 
on shifty ponies. I feel certain that my grateful experiences in this 
respect are common to every parent and guardian from Wootton 
Bassett to Bath, from Kingscote to the Plough Downs. 

Then outside the actual agriculturists, my memory travels back- 
wards to men like Frank Hiscock and Fred Godwin of Sodbury, and 
Charlie Rich, who let out and dealt in hunters, or any sort of horse, 
as well as farmed. There was a great deal to be learnt from these 
men in many kinds of ways, and if now and again you bought j^our 
experience, you bought it much cheaper and in a more amusing way 
than you get it at a fashionable dealer's at Cheltenham or Market 
Harborougli. One of the best horses I owned or rode I bought of 
C. Rich on a very fine Sunday afternoon early in February. The 
day was mild as milk, and Charlie's mood after a Sunday dinner in 
gentle harmony with all around. After much conversation, and after 
his son and heir, the Bill Rich of to-day, had been made to jump 
the animal in and out of a narrow strip of orchard seriously encum- 
bered by veteran apple trees, we dealt at £27. I rode Happy Jack 
for vears, and he was much admired in the Royal Procession at Ascot, 
or anvhow the Second Whip who rode him said so. Then there was 
Mr. Henry Jones of the " King's Arm:^," and Mr. Joe Moore, still at 
" The Bell," at Malmesbury, both prosperous in other lines of business. 



BEAUFORT HUNT: PAST AND PRESENT. 47 

but both farmers and versed in farming. Mr. Jones was ver}- fond of 
a talk about anything, and at one time was eloquent about and almost 
obsessed by the charm of Small Holdings. He was piicked with 
the idea that the most was not being got out of the soil under the 
existing conditions of our system of land tenure. Mr. Jones could 
express himself remarkably well, but I imagine the views he so ably 
advocated were largely conversational. Certainly no man would 
have been more upset by any changes which would have interfered 
with the proprietors of Estcourt or Charlton or Badminton. Two 
or three of the hunting tenant farmers were businesslike and racy 
speakers, and I remember especially a Fat Stock Show dinner at the 
" King's Arms," when the speaking was quite capital. Whilst I 
was Master of the Buckhounds several of my farmer friends from 
your part of the world came out with me on two occasions. Who 
runs may read. Cold print records their stirring exploits, especially 
Jim Rich's, in " The Queen's Hounds." Their presence gave me the 
greatest pleasure, and I often regret now the long railway miles which 
intervene between your cheerful and serene hunting grounds and 
my own in Craven. Distance alone has imposed a separation upon 
many long standing and amusing friendships with the farmers of 
the Duke of Beaufort's Hunt. 

Believe me, 

Yours sincerely, 

RiBBLESDALE. 

Gisburne, Yorkshire, 

28th April, 1914. 



By an Old Blue Coat. 

Nothing could be more to my mind than to be asked to write a 
very short appreciation of the 8tli Duke of Beaufort. It could be 
done far better by another, but I have so grateful a recollection of 
the man that I gladly offer such as I can. In the various duties 
which fell to him to perform he was, in my view, a Duke of Dukes, 
a Country Squire of Country Squires, a Neighbour of Neighbours, 
a Friend of Friends, and moreover the grandest of sportsmen. He 
had the great gift of a delightful personality, which was never away 
from him, in business — political or other — or sport, and both the 
older and the younger generations, to the latter of which I belonged, 
when I had the good fortune first to go to live in his country, had 
reason to revere him and consult him in everything, and never in 
vain. As for his Duchess, need one say more than that she was a 
high minded, charming lady. Everyone looked up to her, and with 
reason. He reigned over our country for many a year, and we all 
look back to him with gratitude. 



48 BEAUFORT HUNT: PAST AND PRESENT. 

It will be understood that a Master of Foxhounds such as the 
8th Duke of Beaufort would be quite sure several times during hia 
Mastership to be asked to accept from his friends some form of 
thanks to him for his sporting kindness. One such instance was in 
or about 1861, when a picture of the Duchess and himself, both 
mounted, the Duke on " Sportsman,"' along with two couple of 
hounds, was painted by Sir Francis Grant (President of the Royal 
Academy), and after being exhibited in Chippenham, Tetbury, and 
other towns, was presented to them, and is on the walls at Badminton 
now. 

Another instance, one moreover of great interest to the present 
writer, for to him was permitted the honourable duty of making 
the presentation, was in 1898. His Grace retired from the M.F.H-ship 
and from residence at Badminton. His numerous friends could 
not possibly be willing that he should leave them without some 
fresh record of their regard for him, and of their appreciation of 
all the sport he had shown them. A portrait of him was therefore 
painted by Mr. Ellis Roberts, for which his many friends were 
delighted to subscribe, and the presentation of this picture was made 
at a meet of the hounds at Badminton House on Saturday, March 
5th, 1898, in the presence of an enormous and enthusiastic assembly 
of his friends and neighbours. No one was missing. All '" Beaufort- 
shire " was there. His Hunting Country is best described this way, 
for it lies in two different though adjacent counties, Gloucester and 
Wilts, each equally eager to make him and his hounds welcome. 
A capital day's sport, moreover, followed the ceremony, which will 
be long remembered. 

I will only add a word or two. I am old enough to remember 
the fact of the Duke being for a time his own huntsman. 
The post became rather suddenly vacant in 1855, and, promptly 
deciding to hunt hounds himself, set his tailors to immediate work 
to fit him out with green plush coats at one clear day's notice, that 
the advertised appointment for the next day but one should be 
duly kept. I was not present myself, for I was at the University, 
but I know from a near relation, himself a real sportsman, that His 
Grace was one of the cheeriest huntsmen he had known, and it was 
a treat to hear him when hounds were drawing a covert. He hunted 
hounds all the remainder of that season and all the following one, 
when he engaged Tom Clark, from the Old Berkshire. Clark remained 
■with him for a long time and was succeeded in the post of huntsman 
by the present Duke. 

Well do I remember the day, March 4th, 1868, on which I saw 
young Lord Worcester in his first green plush coat and huntsman's 
cap, riding with his hounds down the hill from the Monument to 
Lower Woods, where he was to inaugurate his long and prosperous 
career as huntsman. We had a good day's sport, too, and everybody 
was pleased. He has indeed during all the years that have passed 



BEAUFORT HUNT: PAST AND PRESENT. 49 

since that day shown us capital sport, and wc earnestly hope he may 
live for many a year to direct our sport and to continue the happy 
hunting days which his beautiful pack of hounds is quite sure to 
provide for us. We thank him heartily, and gratefully acknowledge 
our good fortune in having had the 8th and 9th Dukes of Beaufort 
to preside over our country and for all their generosity in their manner 
of doing so. 



Contributed by Colonel Napier Miles, C.B. 

Dear Frank, 

You ask me to give you reminiscences of my father, the late 
Colonel Peter Miles. I must tell you he was always rather reticent 
about his* exploits in the hunting field, though he occasionally 
opened out with regard to his experiences during the seasons he 
hunted in Leicestershire, when Sir Richard Sutton was Master of 
the Quorn. He never quite liked the verses, flattering though 
they were, written by Davenport Bromley about him in the " Lays 
of the Belvoir Hunt," as he said they were not fair to Little Gilmour.* 

When in the 17th Lancers, and quartered in Dublin, during the 
forties, he used to buy all his horses from one Red Smith, who I 
take it was the Captain Steeds of that day, and who knew every horse 
hkely to make a hunter in the whole country round. Many a time 
he took my father to out of the way places where they sometimes 
would find a horse tied up in a sort of hovel surrounded by pigs ! 
Those were the days when every horse in Ireland had good blood 
in him, and such an animal as a '' Hackney " had never been heard of. 

In 1852 he had a black horse called the " Priest," a wonderful 
wall jumper. One day the late Duke of Beaufort saw him 
jump the wall at the bottom of Chavenage Park, which he thought 
was out of the way big for one who rode 17 stone, and had it 
measured ; it was found to be 5ft. 8in. This led to a bet being made 
with the late Mr. Robert Chapman that the horse would clear a 6ft. 
wall. The wall was built up for the purpose on the Westonbirt 
estate, just off Bowldown Wood on the Boxwell side, and can be seen 
now, it having always been kept up by the late Mr. Holford and his 
son after him. It was a capital place to choose, the turf being 
beautiful and springy, but unfortunately for my father he lost the 
bet as at each attempt the horse knocked a stone off with his hind 
toe. The horse was ridden by his second horseman, a light weight. 

He told me of a curious thing once happening to him which 
occurred not long after he had been in this country, when hunting 
with the V.W H, in the Cricklade district. Hounds were running 

* A copy of the verses referred to appeare at the end of the book 



50 BEAUFORT HUNT: PAST AND PRESENT. 

hard when he came to the Tadpole brook at an unjumpable phice. 
When in the air, thinking it was all U P, and that he was bound to 
go bang into the middle of it, he felt his horse give a sort of second 
spring as if he had doubled off an imaginary island, and was landed 
safe on the other side. I believe similar cases are not unknown. 

Later on in the sixties he had a very good grey horse, " Blue Pill," 
bought out of a drove of Irish horses that came over here. His 
portrait, with my father on him, is in Sir Reginald Graham's " Fox- 
hunting Recollections." One day when riding him my father got 
away with hounds from Great Wood a field in front of anyone else, 
ran over the Brink worth brook into the V.W.H. country, through 
Woodbridge to Braydon Pond plantation, without anybody over- 
taking him, which says a good deal for " Blue Pill," considering 
Tom Clark, George Fordham, and Custance, who I imagine were all 
riding about half my father's weight, were amongst the competitors. 
When I sent the photograph to Sir I^. Graham for his book I men- 
tioned this anecdote, and in his reply he said " I remember Blue 
Pill very well, and find in my diary the day which you mention, 
March 22nd, 1864. Met at L)nieham Green, from Great Wood 
fast to Woodbridge in V.W.H. country, and killed about 35 min. 
All grass. I remember it was much talked about for a long time : 
your father. Lord Vivian, Pincher Sutton, Fordham, and Clark 
were the only ones anywhere near." Mr. Sam Ferris, of Bradford, 
lately told me it was he who originally bought " Blue Pill " for £28 ! 

My father had wonderful hands, eye, and nerve. I recollect 
him telling me that in his younger days during a run that the fences 
were quite a secondary consideration to him, the only thing he 
thought of was how with his weight he was going to get to the end 
of it. The way this was accomplished is very well described by 
Davenport Bromley in a book entitled " Sport," in which my father 
is depicted as the hero, sailing over oxers and ridge and furrow in 
Leicestershire. 

Yours sincerely, 

C. N. Miles. 
February, 1914. 



The Late Sir Nigel Kingscote, K.C.B. 

Recollections of the Beaufort Hunt would not be complete without 
reference being made to that best of good sportsmen, Sir Nigel Kings- 
cote, of Kingscote, Colonel Henry has been fortunate enough to 
have obtained some records of him from his brother, Mr. Thomas 
Kint'scote, M.V.O., a few of which are appended, and will, it is 
thought, prove of interest. 



BEAUFORT HUNT: PAST AND PRESENT. 51 

Colonel Sir Eobert Nigel Fitzharclinge Kingscote, G.C.V.O., 
K.C.B., -was born on February 28th, 1830, the eldest son of Colonel 
Thomas Henry Kingscote, by his wife Lady Isabella Somerset, sixth 
daughter of the sixth Duke of Beaufort. Educated at home and by 
private tutors, he obtained a commission in the Scots Guards at the 
age of 16, and he served throughout the Crimean War, being A.D.C. 
to his great-uncle, Lord Raglan. He first mariied, in 1851, Caroline 
Sophia, daughter of Colonel Wyndham, of Petworth, afterwards 
created Lord Leconfield, but she died in 1852, and in 1856 he married 
Lady Emily Curzon, daughter of the first Lord Howe, and sister of 
the late Duchess of Beaufort and the late Lady Westmoreland, and 
half-sister of the Duchess of Abercorn. By her he had as issue a 
son and two daughters. The son, Mr. Nigel Richard Fitzhardinge 
Kingscote, formerly held a commission in the Rifle Brigade, and 
married, in 1912, Mrs. Aubrey Coventry, sister of Colonel Napier 
Miles ; the elder daughter married Mr. Arthur Maitland Wilson, of 
Stowlangtoft Hall, Bury St. Edmunds, and of Didmarton, and the 
younger daughter married the Marquis of Cholmondelcy. 

Although Sir Nigel had not been able to follow hounds for some 
years previous to his death on September 22nd, 1908, he is well re- 
membered by the older generation of hunting men in the Badminton, 
the Y.W.H. (Cirencester), and Berkeley countries as an especially 
straight rider, for his hunting career began when he w^as 16. He 
could well remember Will Long when he was with the Badminton, 
and during the late Duke of Beaufort's visit to Gibraltar Sir Nigel 
had the management of the famous pack under Clark the huntsman. 
An unpleasant experience of his was the breaking of a leg when 
riding one of the late King's — then the Prince of Wales — horses when 
the Prince was in Egypt ; he also broke ribs in the hunting field, 
but nearly up to the last he was fond of riding, and rarely missed 
that exercise before breakfast. In the grounds of Kingscote Park, 
899 feet above the sea level, and on the main road between Tetbury 
and Wotton-under-Edge, is one of the finest racecourses in England, 
although it has not been used for that purpose since 1825, while in a 
secluded dell in the Park a place is pointed out where many prize 
fights were contested in the palmy days of the Ring. The shooting 
on the Kingscote estate was kept up to a high standard, and the 
open coursing meetings held there at one time were the best in 
Gloucestershire. As a patron of all field sports Sir Nigel is greatly 
missed, and no man in Gloucestershire was more revered and beloved, 
these sentiments increasing to intensity the closer one got to his old 
home. 

Sir Nigel Kingscote was a clever, versatile man, who had seen 
much of the world in Court, camp, and senate, while his personal 
qualities made him very popular in the many different circles in 
which he had links, and by his death Gloucestershire and the country 
generally was deprived of a fine type of English gentleman, one 



52 BEAUFORT HUNT: PAST AND PRESENT. 

whose ever present sense of duty was illuminated by unfailing 
sympathy and kindness of heart. In short, he was in the fullest 
sense of the word a true English gentleman, who left the world all 
the better for his long and honourable life, and his bright inspiring 
example. To quote from a letter written by one of Sir Nigel's Glou- 
cestershire neighbours — " In a short time we who knew him so 
intimately will be gone, and cannot then speak of his splendid 
qualities, and it is our duty to his memory and to our race that a 
record should be left of him. I reverence the memory of the late 
Sir Nigel ; there is no one like him left that I know — Gentleman, 
Soldier, Statesman, Business man, Farmer, Sportsman, Friend — he 
excelled in all." 



Prolonged Connection with the Hunt. 

The following is a copy of a letter received by Colonel Henry 
from Sir John Wallington, K.C.B., who was for many years " Father 
of the Hunt," in answer to an enquiry as to how long a period his 
family had been connected with the Beaufort Hunt : — 

Keevil Manor, 

Trowbridge, Wilts, 

13th Deer., 1905. 
Dear Frank, 

I had the Blue Coat in 1844, so up to the present date, 1905, 
have worn it 61 years. 

My father, John Wallington, wore the Coat 68 years, and my 
grandfather, Edward Wallington, born 1760, died 1829, was also 
a member of the Duke of Beaufort's Hunt. 

Believe me. 

Yours very sincerely, 

John Wallington. 



Contributed by Will Dale. 

Fox Cottage, Didmarton, 

February, 1914. 
Dear Sir, 

During my career as Huntsman I hunted and killed 4,000 foxes, 
and assisted at killing a thousand more at Brocklesby and Bad- 
minton. The greatest number of days I was out in one season was 
186, at Badminton, and I was the only one of the firm who went 
the whole lot. This was when His Grace took over the Avon Vale 
side, and many a long trot and ride we had home, as there was no 



BEAUFORT HUNT: PAST AND PRESENT. 53 

motor then, and the foui-horse van conveyed the hounds. His 
Grace invariably took me with him when lie drove to Sutton Benger 
or elsewhere, and it took us much longer to come home when we 
left off at Bynol or Bushton, and then had to come to Sutton. But 
it was as pleasant as it could be, and if we had had an extra good day 
we had time to discuss all the merits attending it. On Friday 
Nov. 30th, 1900, when we met at Erlestoke, we had a long day and a 
good one. We had a capital gallop in the morning, and killed the 
first fox after running over the Steeple Ashton Vale, then later found 
in Erlestoke Wood, and ran over a lot of country to Lavington, 
and finally over the Downs ; some splendid hound work, which 
included some rare work over a large tract of new plough. A good 
bitch named Harriet stuck persistently to the fox, which I viewed 
a good way ahead, and we finally killed him in the open at Tilshed 
after a two hours' run, and we had to come to Melksham to the van, 
then home to Badminton, altogether about 32 miles. This was when 
we were hunting eight times a week by twice in the week having 
two packs out a day. So that it required some thought and something 
to do at home. But we always did it, and liked it. I made a practice 
of being up in the morning early, which is always essential in a 
big establishment. 

The number of good runs would fill a volume themselves, were 
I to relate them all. The foxes have not made the good points 
over the Vale in Dauntsey District as they did before the new railway 
came, but there are plenty of good foxes in the hunt. There is no 
country like it. It is needless to relate how the pack has improved 
since 1896. Having all the best pedigrees at my finger ends, and 
knowing all the best working sorts, I set about them, and having 
such a good hound authority as His Grace as Master, it is nothing 
to be wondered that the Pack got to the present state of perfection. 
By introducing the best of Brocklesby and the best old Belvoir 
blood, combined with the old strains of Lord H. Bentinck, and 
having seen and known all the best workers since the sixties (I myself 
commencing my career as Huntsman under such a Master of the 
science as Mr. Frank Foljambe), it need only be expected that such 
good results in hound breeding would have happy results. Being 
such a devoted lover of hounds and their work, the work and trouble 
that has been taken has shown for itself. 

Yours respectfully, 

Will Dale. 



54 BEAUFORT HUNT: PAST AND PRESENT. 



Presentations to the 8th Duke of Beaufort. 

(From the Wilts and Gloucestershire Standard, January 23, 1864.) 

The picture intended to be presented to His Grace, and which 
has been exhibited at Chippenham and Tetbury, contains the portraits 
of the Duke and Duchess. It was painted by Mr. F. Grant, K.A. 
(afterwards Sir Francis Grant), and is considered by those who 
Lave seen it to be one of the best of that celebrated artist's 
works. It is full size, being 12 feet high, and about 8 feet wide. It 
represents His Grace dressed in the blue and buff uniform of his 
Hunt, seated on his favourite grey horse, " Speculation," in an 
attitude of repose, looking back as if waiting for the huntsman to 
come up with the pack, in obedience to the summons of the horn, 
which the Di;ke is holding in his right hand. The Duchess is on a 
grey barb, which she purchased when at Gibraltar two years ago. 
She is dressed in a blue and buff riding habit and hat, and is looking 
towards the Duke. In the foreground are two of the best hounds 
of the Badminton pack, " Finder " and " Hector." The likenesses 
are considered very good. The frame is neat and without much 
ornament, and bears on a small tablet these words : " Presented to 
Henry, 8th Duke of Beaufort, by the gentlemen and farmers of his 
hunt, and other friends, January, 1864." 

The testimonial originated in a desire expressed by several farmers, 
as well as by the members of the hunt, to present to the Duke some 
token of the respect felt towards him by every class of those who, 
whether as owners or occupiers of land comprised within the hunt, 
or merely as hunting with His Grace's hounds, appreciate the liberal 
and sportsmanlike manner in which he has hunted the country 
since his father's death, and desire to offer him an acknowledgment 
of his courtesy and liberality. The number of subscribers exceeds, 
we are told, 400 ; and His Grace and the Duchess will value the 
compliment all the more from its being the joint present of persons 
of every rank of life. The picture is to be engraved before it reaches 
its final resting place at Badminton. 

(From the Wilts and Gloucestershire Standard, June 18, 1864.) 

The following correspondence has taken place on the occasion 
of presenting to the Duke of Beaufort the picture containing the 
Portraits of His Grace and the Duchess, painted by F. Grant, Esq., 
K.A. :— 

" January, 1864. 

" Dear Duke of Beaufort, — We send with this a list of the sub- 
scribers to the picture by Mr. Grant, containing the portraits of 
yourself and the Duchess, and on behalf of those whose names are 



BEAUFORT HUNT: PAST AND PRESENT. 55 

inscribed in that list we request your acceptance of the picture, as a 
token of the respect felt towards you by every class of those who, 
whether as members of the Beaufort Hunt, or as owners or occupiers 
of land comprised within the hunt, or merely as visitors occasionally 
hunting with your hounds, appreciate the liberal and sportsmanlike 
manner in which you have hunted this country since your father's 
death, and desire to offer you some acknowledgment of your courtesy 
and liberality. 

" It has been a great additional pleasure to the subscribers, since 
the idea of presenting you with a portrait of yourself was first started, 
to have been able to include in the same picture a portrait of the 
Duchess, not only because the picture will thus, we feel sure, be more 
highly prized by you, but also because it will thus bear witness to 
the esteem which is so sincerely felt towards Her Grace personally 
by all her neighbours. 

" We hope that this picture will serve to remind future owners 
of Badminton of the respect and affection with which their ancestors 
were regarded by those amongst whom they lived. 

" We are, dear Duke of Beaufort, 

Yours very truly, 

" Edw. D. Bucknall Estcourt, 
" C. W. Miles. 
" To His Grace the Duke of Beaufort, etc." 

" Badminton, January, 1864. 

" My dear Mr. Estcourt, — It is difficult to express sufficiently 
all I feel on the subject of your and Colonel Miles's most kind and 
flattering letter, conveying to me in the name of the subscribers 
Mr. Grant's picture of the Duchess and myself. Independently of 
the merits of the picture as a work of art, it is most valuable to me 
as a proof of the good feeling and regard of my neighbours and friends, 
feelings which, believe me, are warmly and gratefully returned by us 
both. The ready assistance and willing co-operation which I in- 
variably meet with from the members of my hunt, and the owners 
and occupiers of the land, and the hearty and successful efforts to 
preserve foxes, has added tenfold to the pleasures of the noble sport, 
and has made the hunting field, as it always should be, a place of 
cordial greeting and good fellowship, cemejiting together the ties 
which always have bound, and I trust always will continue to bind 
my family to this neighbourhood. 

" I am particularly sensible .of the kindness of the subscribers 
in wishing to add the portrait of the Duchess to the originally intended 
picture — an addition which indeed doubles its value to me, and which 
to her has been a most gratifying pioof of the esteem of those friends 
and neighbours among whom she is always so happy to find luM'self. 

" As you have written on behalf of the subscribers, I will ask 
you to convey to them, from the Duchess as well as myself, our 



56 BE AV FORT HUNT: PAST AND PRESENT. 

warmest thanks £(»• the great pleasure their kind and most handsome 
present has conferred upon us. 

" Believe me, my dear Mr. Estcourt and Colonel Miles, 

" Very sincerely yours, 

" Beaufort. 
" To Edw. B. Estcourt, Esq., and Lieutenant-Colonel C. W. Miles." 

The picture was exhibited at the Ro5'al Academy Exhibition of 
1864. 

In 1898, His Grace, the 8th Duke of Beaufort, who had four 
years previously handed over the Hounds to the Marquis of Wor- 
cester, and had taken up his residence at Stoke House, was presented 
with a portrait of himself by Mr. Ellis Roberts. The presentation 
was made on the occasion of a lawn meet at Badminton, on March 
5th, 1898, and in making the presentation on behalf of the subscribers, 

Lord Estcourt said " They felt in that country, in that fox- 
hunting country, that they owed an enormous debt of gratitude to 
the Duke of Beaufort. The Duke, on visiting Badminton again, 
would like to hear one thing — they had first class sport under his 
noble son, the Marquis of Worcester. They desired to express their 
obligations for all the Duke of Beaufort had done in the interests of 
sport. For very many years past they had had the very best of 
sport under His Grace's rule. There never was in the history of 
any presentation one which had met with such absolute concurrence, 
and which was so full of good feeling from those from whom it came 
as the present." 

The Duke of Beaufort, in replying, said : " It is very difficult 
for me to find words to express to you the gratification that I feel 
at the too great kindness you have shown me. I am sure no man 
has been more warmly, more heartily, supported in any country 
in England than I have been all my life. It was the same with my 
grandfather and my father before me, and I am happy also to feel 
that that same kind feeling still pervades, and that you support my 
son in the kind and generous way in which you have always supported 
me. I assure you that it is a difficult matter to find words to express, 
on behalf both of the Duchess and myself, what very great gratifica- 
tion you have given to us in this mark of your kindness. I hope that 
this picture will be handed down from son to son for many generations 
to come ; and if such a thing is possible as fox-hunting in the future, 
that the Master of Badminton will still be master of the hunt in this 
country, and the hounds will continue to show the sport which you 
are kind enough to say we have always shown you. As to Colonel 
Estcourt and the Committee, the gentlemen who have taken all 
the trouble about this matter, I am most grateful to them ; and I 
must say — of course I am no judge myself of a likeness of myself — 
that I have heard on all hands that no one could paint a more perfect 
likeness than Mr. Ellis Roberts has just done. I beg to thank him 



BEAUFORT HUNT: PAST AND PRESENT. 57 

for the trouble he took about it, and I thank you ladies and gentlemen 
all for very kindly coming here to-da}'^ to meet me, and I hope you 
may live long to enjoy not only sport of the field, but licalth and 
happiness." 

Accompanying the picture was a handsomely bound volume of 
names, containing the signatures of all the subscribers. On the 
fly-leaf of the volume was the following preface : "" At a general 
meeting of the subscribers of the Badminton Hunt, held at Malmes- 
bury, on the 11th of February, 1897, it was unanimously decided 
to ask His Grace the Duke of Beaufort to accept some small gift 
from those who have been identified with and have enjoyed the 
sport which he has provided for them for many years, and during 
which time they have received from him as their M.F.H. so many 
proofs of kindness." 

His Grace the 8th Duke of Beaufort died in May of the following 
year, to the great grief of everybody who had ever been associated 
with him. 



Presentations to the 9th Duke of Beaufort. 

In 1891 the members of the Hunt presented Lord Worcester 
with four pictures of the " Blue and Buff," as some acknowledgment 
of their obligations to him during the twenty-two years he had then 
hunted the hounds, and at the same time expressing their hearty 
thanks for the excellent sport he had shown. The pictures contained 
portraits of a number of friends whom His Lordship had been 
accustomed to meet out hunting, and reminded him of many pleasant 
years of sport. 

Li 189G, Lord Worcester was presented with a wedding present 
by gentlemen hunting with the Beaufort Hounds. The presentation 
took the form of a portrait of himself by Professor Herkomer, R.A., 
and the following account of the event is taken from the Wilts and 
Gloucestershire Standard of November 7th, 1896. 

" On Monday, at the White Hart Hotel, Tetbury ('previous to 
the opening meet for the season of the Badminton Hounds at Xewnton 
Lodge), the wedding present subscribed for by members ami followers 
of the hunt was presented to the Mar(]uis of Worcester. The gift 
took the form of a splendid portrait of the recipient, painted by 
Profes.sor Herkomer, R.A., the cost being 500 guineas. The portrait 
is of three-(juarter length, and represents the noble marquis in luuiting 
costume as Master of the Badminton Hounds. The likeness in 
admirable, the expression of the marquis being very happily caught, 
and the work altogether is worthy of the fame of the great artist 
from whose brush it comes. The ))ictur(^ bears the artist's signature, 
and to the frame is affi.xed the following inscription : — ' Presented 



58 BE AV FORT HUNT: PAST AND PRESENT. 

to the Marquis of Worcester, on his marriage, by the members ot 
the Beaufort Hunt and other friends hunting with the duke's hounds. 
October 9th, 1895." Among those who gathered to meet the 
Marquis at the Assembly-room of the White Hart Hotel were Colonel, 
Mrs., and the Misses Henry, General Hale, General Burn, Mr. G. 
Sotheron Estcourt, Mr. Erskine Pollock, Q.C., and Mrs. Pollock, 
Colonel Gist, Colonel Hoole, Mr. Lowsley Williams, Mr. A. C. Mitchell, 
Mr. T. H. Cardwell, Mr. D. Lindsay, Major Little, Mr. A. M. Wilson, 
Mr. Darling, Mr. A. Playne, Mr. W. Playne, Mr. S. Playne, Mrs. 
Raymond Barker, Messrs. Boustead, A. Dunsford, J. Garlick, C. 
Eich, W. T. Drew, H. Fry, Clarke (Didmarton), C. Hamblm, etc. 

General Eobert Hale, in making the presentation, said : Lord 
Worcester, — I have been requested by Sir Nigel Kingscote to express 
his great regret that he is unable to be present here to-day. The 
short notice and his engagement in London make it quite impossible 
for him to come down, otherwise I am sure Sir Nigel would have 
been very pleased to have stood in my position to-day. The task 
that has been entrusted to me is a very pleasant one, and I presume 
that one of the reasons whj' I have been asked to undertake it is 
the fact that it is now more than 40 years since I put on my first 
blue and buff coat, and therefore I am able to testify from my own 
personal experience to the sport that has been shown for so many 
years in this county by the liberality of your noble father and by 
yourself. (Cheers.) In asking you to accept as a wedding present 
this admirable portrait of 3'ourself, which I hope may be considered 
a good likeness, painted as it has been by one of the most eminent, 
if not the most eminent portrait painter of the present day, Professor 
Herkomer, I should wish, on behalf of the subscribers, who are 
ladies and gentlemen in the habit of hunting with the Badminton 
Hounds, to convey an assurance of the good will that they feel towards 
you and towards your house — (cheers) — and to offer their sincere 
congratulations on your marriage, and their heartfelt good wishes 
that health, happiness, and prosperity may attend Lady Worcester 
and your self through life. (Cheers.) We hope you may be long 
spared to dwell among your neighbours, and to preserve those tra- 
ditions which have made Beaufort and Worcester and Badminton 
household words throughout the country. (Cheers.) You have, I 
beheve, received a list of the names of the subscribers, and from that 
you will see that the expression of good feeling which the gift repre- 
sents is not confined to one section of the community, but that it 
conveys a sentiment which is universal. (Cheers.) It now only 
remains for me, in their names, to hand over this picture to your 
keeping. (Cheers.) 

Lord Worcester, in reply, said : General Hale, ladies and gentle- 
men, — I can only say I am very much obliged to you for so kindly 
giving me this picture, which I shall value very much, and I hope it 
will be handed down for many years to hang at Badminton, and. 



BEAUFORT HUNT: PAST AND PRESENT. 59 

being the work of Professor Herkomer, I hope it will be regarded 
as a work of art. Lady Worcester would have been very pleased 
if she had been able to be present, but she is going to Hartham this 
evening, and she thought the two journeys would be rather too 
much for her. I cannot say how very much obliged I am for your 
present, and for the kind expressions towards myself and my family. 
(Applause.) I will not detain you any longer. You know perfectly 
well I am not a good hand at speaking, and I will only thank you 
once again, and remind you that we ought to be getting on for the 
meet as soon as we can. (Cheers and laughter.) 

The proceedings then closed, and the party mounted their horses 
and rode to Newnton Lodge." 



Presentation to Colonel F. Henry. 

(From the Wilts and Gloucestershire Standard of Nov. 9th, 1912.) 
The opening meet of the season of the Beaufort Hounds took 
place on Monday morning last at Ehnestree, Tetbury, the residence 
of Colonel Frank Henry, and the occasion was signalised by the 
presentation to the gallant Colonel of a portrait of himself painted 
by Mr. John Bacon, R.A., which had been subscribed for by past 
and present followers of the Beaufort Hunt in recognition of the 
services rendered by Colonel Henry as honorary secretary of the 
Hunt during the last 24 years. The presentation was made by His 
Grace the Duke of Beaufort. The presentation took place on the 
lawn just outside the front entrance to Ehnestree. The meet of the 
hounds was announced for eleven o'clock, and punctual, as usual, 
His Grace the Duke of Beaufort arrived with the pack. The assembly 
was a very large and distinguished one, the meet being peihaps the 
biggest which has taken place in the history of the Badminton 
Hounds, and the weather was everything that could be desired, both 
on the part of those gathered for the purpose of witnessing the inter- 
esting ceremony and those who combined therewith the intention 
of taking part in the subsequent day's sport. There was just enough 
sunshine to temper the nippiness of a November morning, and the 
presence of so many hunting men in " blue and buff," together with 
numerous ladies, and the extraordinary number of motor cars all 
combined to make an exceedingly picturesque spectacle. Amongst 
those present in addition to the Duke and Duchess of Beaufort and 
Colonel and Mrs. Henry, were Colonel Sir Audley Neeld, Sir George 
Holford, the Ladies Blanche and Diana Somerset, Mr. W. A. Harford, 
Mr. F. de Tuyll, Mr. Arthur M. Wilson, Lord Richard Wellesley^ 
Lord Ludlow, Lady Sybil Codrington, Lord Andover and the Ladies 
Howard, Lady Cholmondeley, Captain Morrison-B(!ll, M.P., and 
Mrs. Morrison- Bell, Mrs. Prideaux-Brune, Colonel Allan Henry, 



60 BEAUFORT HUNT: PAST AND PRESENT. 

Captain and Mrs. G. Henry, Captain and Mrs. E. Henry, Colonel 
Napier Miles, Mr. and Mrs. G. Lowsley- Williams, Mr. Aiidley Miller 
(secretary of the Beaufort Hnnt), Major and Mrs. Scott, Colonel and 
Mrs. Pierce Taylor, Mrs. Graham Smith, Mr. and Mrs. A. Hoare, 
Colonel Forestier-Walker, Captain Truman, Mr. D. Lindsay, Mr. 
Meredyth Brown, Mr. A. C. and Mrs. Mitchell, Mrs. Walmsley, Mr. 
W. Playne, Mr. Hugh Baker, Captain J. Spicer, Major A. Cope, 
Major-General Inigo Jones, Major A. E. Miles, Major Brinton, Mr. 
C. Harding, Colonel Balfour, Major and Mrs. Bishop, Mr. Carnaby 
Forster, Mr. G. de Lisle Bushe, Major Little, Dr. W. Wickham, Eev. 
Dr. Thomson, Mr. and Mrs. A. P. Kitcat, Major Playne, Major 
Eicardo, Mr. F. Plavne, Mr. J. T. C. Masters, Mr. Will" Dale, Mr. 
Roper Tvler, Mr. H.' Lisle Taylor, Mr. J. C. N. Hatherell, Mr. W. 
Warner. Mr. E. Garlick, Mr. T.Knight, Mr. Rufus Holborow, Mr. and 
Mrs. Frank Home, Mr. E. P. Fowler, Eev. A. Gabe Jones, Mr. G. 
Fowles, Mr. A. Witchell, Mr. E. Fowler, Mr. M. Driver, Mr. and Mrs. 
E. Deavin, Mr. A. Bozworth, Mr. H. Arkell, Mr. S. Keevil, the Hon. 
Cvril Ward, Dr. Heaton, Mr. Algernon Turner, Mr. P. Barber, Mr. W. 
Cave, Mr. W. Drew, Mr. W. Davis, Mr. S. Kilminster, Mr. C. Godwin, 
Mr. J. Calcutt. Mi'. J. Pineger, Mr. G. Beaven, Mr. Ernest Pritchard, 
and many otheis, the attendance being representative of nearly 
every family residing within many miles of Tetbury, and including 
nearly the whole of the farmers of the countryside and a great many 
Tetbury people. 

The company having gathered about the picture which had been 
on view on the lawn. 

The Duke of Beaufort said : Ladies and gentlemen, we are met 
here to-day to present to Colonel Henry his portrait and this album 
containing the names of the subscribers to the picture, as a slight 
return for all he has done for the Hunt during the 24 years he has 
acted as secretary. I suppose you are all aware how hard he has 
worked, how well he has attended to every detail connected with 
damage, loss of poultry, and all other matters connected with the 
Hunt. Unfortunately, we don't get any younger as time goes on, 
and Colonel Henry, alas ! found it impossible to ride and see what 
was going on whilst out hunting, and he therefore determined to 
resign. Luckily, that does not mean losing him from among us. 
(Hear, hear.) He is still living in our midst, and I trust will do so 
for many years to come. (Applause.) I hope when he looks at 
this picture and this album containing the names of those who have 
subscribed to the picture he will be reminded of many happy days 
and many old friends. (Hear, hear.) I will say no more, but will 
ask Colonel Henry to accept the picture as a token of our esteem and 
affection, and wish him and Mrs. Henry long life and happiness. 
(Applause.) 

Colonel Sir Audley Neeld said : Ladies and gentlemen, I don't 
intend to detain you long, and first of all I wish to endorse every word 



BEAUFORT HUNT: PAST AND PRESENT. Gl 

that His Grace has said with regard to Colonel Henry to-day. I 
have been asked, as chairman of the Beaufort Hunt Committee, to 
say a few words to-day on this very interesting occasion, an occasion 
I venture to say which is almost without precedent in the annals of 
any hunt in England. Colonel Henry has for 24 years voluntarily 
and without reward of any kind furthered the interests of the Beaufort 
Hunt. In times of great changes, in times of almost unspeakable 
difficulties, in times of severe agricultuial depression. Colonel Henry 
has done what he could in the interests of sport, and ho has promoted 
in this country a feeling with I'egard to that sport which shows our 
country is indeed a very happy one. He has removed many diffi- 
culties which might have been of sinister importance, by, to use the 
words in the address, " his continual courtesy, his great tact, and 
his genial and kind manner." (Hear, hear.) I venture to say I 
voice the opinion not only of the Committee of the Hunt, but every- 
body connected with this Hunt, when I say that we owe to Colonel 
Henry a debt of great and unpayable gratitude. (Hear, hear.) On 
behalf of everybody who has subscribed to this beautiful picture 
and this lovely album I venture to endorse the words that the Duke 
has already said, and wish Colonel and I\Irs. Henry good health, 
prosperity, and happiness, and in the name of all for whom I am 
speaking I trust that they may be spared for many years to enjoy 
those greatest blessings life can possibly give. (Applause.) 

Colonel Henry, in reply, said : My Lord Duke, Sir Audley Neeld, 
ladies and gentlemen, I need hardly tell you I find it very difficult 
to find words to express my gratitude for what you have all done 
for me. I confess I was surprised when I heard such a thing was 
intended, and more astonished when I heard of the number of people 
who had been kind enough to subscribe, and who have come here 
to-day to assist at the presentation. I am more particularly pleased 
to find by looking at the list of subscribers that my friends amongst 
the farmers have responded so well in supporting the presentation. 
(Hear, hear.) I confess when I undertook the secretaryship of the 
Hunt the first thing I thought of was the consideration that must be 
shown to the farming interest in the country. Farmers and fox- 
hunting go hand in hajid together, and good will must be shown on 
both sides. (Applause.) I am sure in this country the example 
shown by His Grace the Duke of Beaufort, and the good will he 
shows to the farmers on every possible occasion, is well known to us 
— (hear, hear) — and I can assure you that during my term of office 
of 24 years, when I have consulted His Grace about the payment of 
damage the advice His Grace has always given has been to act 
generously in the matter of any serious damage. (Hear, hear.) 
We are delighted to see His Grace here to-day. During the past 15 
or 16 years of my term of office, in furthering the good will that 
ought to exist between foxhunting and farmers, I was al)ly supported 
by one whom we are also glad to see here to-day. I was aided and 



62 BEAUFORT HUNT: PAST AND PRESENT. 

abetted by my old friend, Will Dale. (Applause.) He was always 
a favourite of everybody's here. (Hear, hear.) Now, I should not 
like 3^ou to think that I wish to take all the credit to myself of having 
managed the poultry fund of the Hunt ; not at all, for I was most 
ably assisted by the gentlemen who have so kindly given up their 
time and have loyally and efficiently helped me, and if I was to pick 
out one, who lives furthest from me, and who has done his work with 
discretion and tact, I should like to mention the name of Mr. Ernest 
Pritchard. (Hear, hear.) The Hunt owes him more than they 
think, and his system of accounts is the best I have come across. 
Whilst on the topic of accounts I should like to add one more name. 
When I undertook the management of the accounts of the Hunt it 
was a simple matter ; I only had 91 subscribers, and the subscription 
was something under £2,000. Lately, I have had 291 subscribers, 
and the subscription has been nearer £5,000 than anything else. 
(Hear, hear.) That is a serious matter, and I had to get assistance. 
I have been ably assisted by Mr. Edwin Deavin, and I beg now to 
thank Mr. Deavin for the trouble he has taken for the sake of the Hunt. 
(Applause.) I think, gentlemen, I have only one thing more to say, 
and that is I hope those who have loyally supported me will loyally 
support my successor, not only for his own sake but for the sake of 
foxhunting in Gloucestershire. (Applause.) Perchance my ex- 
perience may be of some use to him, and he knows very well that if 
at any time I can ever assist him I shall only be too proud and 
pleased to do so. (Hear, hear.) I only wish now to say that the 
day after to-morrow is, unluckily, my birthday. (Laughter and 
applause.) You won't all be here then, but you are here now, and 
if you feel inclined to go round the corner of the house and into my 
dining room you will have an opportunity of drinking my health. 
(Cheers.) 

The company then dispersed, and the Colonel being taken at his 
word his health was drunk most heartily. 



Presentations to Will Dale. 

At a meet of the Beaufort Hounds at Worcester Lodge on 
November 9th, 1911, Will Dale, who had been their huntsman for 
15 years, was presented with a handsome testimonial upon his retire- 
ment. The presentation, which consisted of an annuity to Dale and 
his wife, and a cheque for £200, was made by His Grace the Duke of 
Beaufort. The full amount subscribed was £2,263, and the album 
containing the names of the 1,132 subscribers was inscribed as 
follows : — 

" Presented to Will Dale on his retirement from active service 
by his old friends and comrades in remembrance of the many days 



BEAUFORT HUNT: PAST AND PRESENT. 63 

of good sport enjoyed with him in the Beaufort and other countries, 
and in appreciation of his unfailing keenness, courtesy, and kindness." 

Will Dale suitably replied, and feelingly expressed his gratitude 
to the committee and the subscribers, observing that the 15 years 
he had spent among them had been extremely happy ones. 

The earthstoppers and keepers of the Beaufort Hunt also pre- 
sented Dale with a silver coffee service, which bore the following 
inscription. 

" Presented to Will Dale upon his retirement by the Earthstoppers 
of the Beaufort Hunt as a small token of the good feeling which 
existed between them during the 15 years he w-as Huntsman to the 
Duke of Beaufort. August, 1911." 

The presentation was made at Chippenham by Mr. N. Croker, 
of Netheravon. 



Key to the 1846 Lawn Meet Picture. 

It may be of interest to reproduce the " Key " to the picture 
representing the Lawn Meet at Badminton in 1846, by " Craven," 
after the original picture by Messrs. William and Henry Barraud. 

" Until a very few years ago painting, in reference to sporting 
subjects, was in almost as primitive a state in this country, as it is, 
in its general character of one of the fine arts, at the present hour 
among the Esquimaux. The great masters, both ancient and modern, 
appear to have regarded it as beneath the dignity of the pencil — 
unless, indeed, the Sneyders types of Tonbridge ware dogs and 
horses are to be considered as tributes to the science and poetry of 
pictorial woodcraft. Comparisons however are proverbially offensive 
— let bye-gones, therefore, be bye-gones. Let us not inquire how 
much that was excellent in the equestrian groups of the Parthenon 
Seymour contrived to overlook, or how much that was execrable 
BO many of his successors managed to manufacture out of their own 
evil devices. This we will pass for a more grateful and a more grace- 
ful office. Banishing, as memories of the nursery night mares, the 
wooden cavalry common to the artists of our nursery days, let us 
' look at this picture ' — a fitting accompaniment for those which we 
owe to the genius of Francis Grant, and a few other worthies of his 
school and era. The Beaufort Hunt is essentially characteristic 
of the ' hour and the man ' it is designed to record. It sets before 
us a noble representative of the hneage of the olden chivalry about 
to take his pleasure in a manful and a popular pastime. All around 
is brave, and boon, and national — a scene that both ' points the 
moral and adorns the tale ' of the rural life of England. 

" The scene of this goodly masque of ' the silver shafted Queen ' 
is laid in front of * Badminton Park,' the seat of His Grace the Duke 



64 BEAUFORT HUNT: PAST AND PRESENT. 

of Beaufort, K.G. Time — any fair forenoon sent forth from the 
sweet South, between the feasts of All Saints and Easter. Dramatis 
Persons — by the following distinguished Company : — 

" No. 1. Count A. Esterhazy. When we find a foreign noble- 
man, accustomed to very different amusements, enter into the chase 
with the zeal, interest, and pleasure which the Count A. Esterhazy 
shows for the sport of fox hunting, it is a strong proof of the influence 
which the noble science is capable of exercising. In the costume of 
the Beaufort Hunt, this accomplished young nobleman looks all 
over a British Sportsman ; his presence at Badminton and in the 
field is at all times hailed with pleasure, for a more affable and agree- 
able man cannot exist. As a proof that the Count appreciates 
hunting beyond the mere parade of being seen out with hounds, he 
is in the habit frequently of visiting the kennel, and making enquiries 
into the various minuti;e incident to the chase with anxious interest. 
He rides fearlessly to hounds, and is an elegant horseman. 

" No.. 2. John Stanley, Esq. The performances of this gentle- 
man with hounds are better known in Cheshire and some of the 
crack Midland Counties than with the Beaufort Hunt, as he is only 
an occasional visitor ; but the specimen he has given is enough to 
confirm the report, that he is very difficult to beat. 

" No. 3. Lord Andover, as a sportsman, is gifted with the 
happy combination which but few possess, the faculty of being 
sufficiently forward to observe all the beautiful operations of the 
pack, without a particle of that jealous feeling towards his compeers 
which induces many to over ride hounds and destroy sport. His 
Lordship is by no means a light weight, yet he is always in a good 
place. As he resides within the limits of the Vale of White Horse 
country, he hunts principally with the hounds of that district, and a 
very clever pack of harriers of his own. During the intervals of sport 
Lord Andover keeps his friends in spirits by the witty effusions 
which flow from a source replete with anecdote and humour. 

" No. 4. Lord Alfred Paget. In consequence of the appoint- 
ments which this nobleman holds at Court, as Clerk Marshall and 
Chief Equerry to the Queen, the full enjoyment of field sports, which 
his taste and inclination would lead him to adopt, of necessity yields 
to his official duties. Whenever opportunities offer, however, he 
makes up for lost time ; he is a bold and fearless horseman, and 
always in a good place. The Duke of Beaufort usually mounts 
Lord Alfred Paget, and on the occasion, represented in the picture, 
Jew's-eye, a favourite horse belonging to His Grace, is seen in readiness 
for his noble guest. It may be said of this most popular scion of 
the house of Paget, that there is scarce a national sport of this country 
which he has not practised and promoted, and very surely that 
' nihil quod teligit non ornavit.' 



BE AV FORT HUNT: PAST AND PRESENT. 65 

" No. 5. DiGBY Boycott, Esq. All who are acquainted with 
this gentleman proclaim him to be one of the most agreeable of 
companions in the field and in social hfe ; he is a heavy weight, but 
remarkably fond of hunting. 

" No. 6. John Shelley, Esq. Since Mr. Shelley has hunted 
with the Beaufort Hounds (now about four or five seasons) he has 
obtained the enviable distinction of being an excellent sportsman 
and a capital rider. His stud generally consists of six or seven 
hunters, which are quite first rate ; they are kept at the Cross Hands, 
which saves them a vast deal of road work, as he resides himself with 
his family at Bath. No distance appears too great for him to ride 
to covert, and his ' turn out ' altogether is of the very first-rate 
description. Mr. Shelley is said to be particularly fond of timber 
jumping, a taste which he no doubt acquired in the land of his 
noviciate ; early impressions and customs are apt to be strong. I 
have known more than one hard rider, who on their first appearance 
in the stone wall countries, has selected the gates to ride over in 
preference to the walls, despite the timber being the higher of the 
two, but in process of time they usually take to the walls. 

" No. 7. Lord Adolphus Fitzclarence is introduced into the 
noble sporting group more on account of his intimacy with the 
Badminton circle than in consequence of his fondness for the chase. 
As a visitor Lord Adolphus usually attends the hounds mounted on 
one of the Duke of Beaufort's stud. Affability, kindness, and the 
utmost good humour, are the prominent characteristics of this most 
popular son of a most popular sire. 

" No. 8. John Wallington, Esq. This gentleman resides at 
Dursley, within the limits of Earl Fitzhardinge's Berkeley Country. 
He is a light weight, and a very neat horseman, a most agreeable 
companion, a good sportsman, and very regular attendant. 

" No. 9. Francis Lovell, Esq. This gentleman is a brilliant 
example of what may be done when the heart is in the right place. 
A few years since, when attending a pigeon match at the Red House, 
Battersea, incautiously resting on his gun, it went off accidentally 
and shattered his arm so dreadfully as to render amputation indis- 
pensable. With only one arm, however, he can do more with his 
horse than the generality of men can do with the usual complement. 
His seat is perfect, and his elegance on horseback is combined with 
the most undeniable nerve. An example of his resolution is current 
which must not be omitted. Riding at a very high quick-set hedge, 
as tough as whalebone, out of a lane, his horse had not power to 
penetrate it, and slipping from under him came back into the lane, 
leaving Mr. Lovell Uke a spread eagle in the hedge. Recovering his 
horse he made another effort, in which he succeeded, by getting 
through the fence in company with his nag, a resolute and daring 
attempt which many men would have declined. 



66 BEAUFORT HUNT: PAST AND PRESENT. 

" No. 10. Mr. French, Stud Groom. Previous to entering the 
service of the Duke of Beaufort, French filled the situation of trainer 
and gi'oom to Mr., now Sir William, Codrington, in whose service he 
distinguished himself, for the care he took of the horses placed in 
his charge, and his superior knowledge of the treatment of hunters. 
At the time when the half bred horse Conservative was in training, 
it is astonishing the distances he travelled with him from race to 
race, in short spaces of time (before vans or railways were in existence) 
always bringing him fresh and well to the post, and by his great care 
winning many races with him. In these forced marches his plan 
was to" ride a hack and lead Conservative by his side, trotting him 
along when the road was good, and thus performing a distance of 
thirty miles in the day, several days in succession when circumstances 
demanded it. Since the picture was taken French has left his place 
at Badminton, and is no longer in the service of the Duke of Beaufort. 

"No. 11. The Hon. Henry Howard, Member for Cricklade, 
and brother to Lord Andover, is a most straight forward determined 
rider to hounds, and highly respected in this hunt, as w^ell as in the 
Vale of White Horse country, where he hunts principally. 

" No. 12. The Duke of Beaufort. I should like to lay odds, 
if it was referred to a committee of twelve gentlemen, having an 
ordinarv knowledge of English society, to decide ' Who is the most 
popular man in this country ? ' that every one of the dozen would 
answer — ' the Duke of Beaufort.' In the character of a princely 
supporter of a great national sport, His Grace not only follows where 
his noble father led, but has taken a Hne of his own — a course worthy 
one of the most distinguished of our aristocracy. They say the 
Duke meditates giving up his hounds, should the railway nuisance 
spread in his neighbourhood, as present symptoms would indicate 
But my belief is, he is too thorough a sportsman to surrender hia 
' country,' so long as there is a sod of it left to cry ' whoo, whoop,' on. 
In the character of host his menage is perfect. A good judge of the 
fashion of English hospitality, already spoken of in his place in these 
brief biographies, was not long since taking his temporary leave, 
* God bless you, Duke,' he said, in the sincerity of a heart mellowed 
by good cheer, and a couple of hours at the horse-shoe table after 

it — ' God bless you ! B is not a bad shop, but Badminton 

is the best I ever was in.' If antiquity and excellence of descent 
are to regulate the precedence of fox hounds, then none in the world 
rank before the Beaufort. Their ' blood ' has long classed foremost 
among the most renowned in the annals of the chase, and the star 
by which it is marked in the Badminton kennel book, in the eyes 
of the true fox hunter is as proud a distinction as any device that 
ever sparkled on the breast of warrior or courtier. 

" No. 13. R. B. Hale, Esq., Member for West Gloucestershire. 
Although this gentleman does not hunt very regularly, he is a good 



BEAUFORT HUNT: PAST AND PRESENT. 67 

friend to foxhunting, and withal a most kind hearted man. The 
coverts at Alderley, on his father's property, are well stocked with 
foxes. 

"■ No. 14. Sir W. C. Codrington, Bart., Member for East 
Gloucestershire. There is no doubt that a knowledge of race-riding 
is a considerable adva]\tage in riding to hounds ; it renders a man 
alive to many little circumstances that are never thought of by 
those who have not given racing their attention. Previous to Sir 
William's alliance with Lady Georgina Somerset, he was very fond 
of it, and had a few horses in training ; but since the death of his 
father he seems to have declined the turf ; and also finding it 
necessary to visit some estates in the West Indies during the winter 
of 1844 and 1845, and last season not being in good health, he has 
not been so constant an attendant in the field as formerly. Sir 
William was never in the habit of keeping a very numerous stud, 
but his horses were always of a good sort, well bred, and in first rate 
condition. As a sportsman, and a staunch preserver of foxes, the 
limit of the Beaufort Hunt does not contain one more zealously 
devoted to the Noble Science. 

" No. 14-|. T. HoLROYD, Esq., has not hunted much during the 
last few seasons, but when he kept a regular stud he rode to hounds 
in a very straight forward and workmanlike manner. 

" No. 15. Count Kinsky. So little has this foreign nobleman 
been in the habit of hunting with the Beaufort hounds, that no just 
estimate can be formed of him in his appreciation of fox hunting, 
or of his experience in riding in chase, but as he goes fast, another 
visit to Badminton will probably afford him opportunities of dis- 
tinguishing himself. 

" No. 16. The Earl of Jersey. A long and successful career 
on the turf has rendered the name of Jersey familiar with most 
sporting classes of Her Majesty's liege subjects ; but losing his old 
trainer, Edwards, and having accepted the appointment of Master 
of the Horse, Lord Jersey gave up racing. The excellence of the 
blood which he possessed will distinguish his name as a breeder of 
racing stock in future generations, calling to remembrance the 
superiority of his Derby and Oaks winners — Middleton, Mameluke, 
Bay Middleton, Cobweb, and a long team of worthies descended 
from the celebrated Prunella, and many of the best mares heralded 
in the pages of turf genealogy. Lord Jersey's appearance in the 
saddle declares him at a glance to be a horseman, and there is that 
repose and self possession in his manner so characteristic of the 
genuine old English Sportsman. His seat on a horse is graceful, 
powerful and commanding, and I can bear testimony that he thinks 
much less of a fall than many of his more juvenile companions. As 
Lord ViUiers he was one of the ultra fast school ; its a stereotyped 



68 BEAUFORT HUNT: PAST AND PRESENT. 

anecdote, his declaring, tliat fox hunting would be perfect if in chase 
' the hounds would only get from under your horses' feet.' 

*' No. 17. The Earl Bathurst. Aware of the dislike which 
this nobleman has to public notoriety, it would be uncourteous to 
place him in a more prominent position than that which the artist 
has assigned him, in the midst of the elite of this sporting coterie. 

" No, 18. H. R. H. The Duke of Cambridge. Both on 
account of his elevated rank and his taste for all that is English and 
social in its relation, the royal duke was happily selected for the 
centre and cynosure of this tableau. This prince has long enjoyed 
golden opinions for the national bias of his habits, and the courtesy 
of his manners. 

" No. 19. The Duchess of Beaufort. This noble lady is 
represented leaning on the arm of the Duke of Cambridge. I would 
fain pay, in this place, that tribute of homage and admiration which 
is the free will offering of all the circles in which the Duchess of 
Beaufort is known ; but I am reluctantly withheld in the fear that, 
while seeking to grace my subject, I might give umbrage to one that 
delights to do good, but who might not desire ' to see it fame.' 

" No. 20. Lord Cantilupe — I cannot speak of from my own 
knowledge as a proselyte of Diana. He is always appointed as 
becomes ' a very perfect gentle knight ' ; and this much I do know, 
if he only manages to mount himself with hounds as cleverly as he 
does in the park, he ought generally to be on good terms with them. 

" No. 22. Lady Georgiana Codrington occasionally rides to 
covert to see the hounds throw off, but never follow-s them after- 
wards. Her Ladyship is a most elegant and accomplished horse- 
woman, and is here mounted on a horse called ' Ivanhoe.' 

" No. 23. R. S. HoLFORD, Esq. Silkwood, Bowldown, and 
Charlton Plantations are celebrated coverts on this gentleman's 
estates, and his anxious desire to preserve foxes in them is universally 
acknowledged ; but whether his keepers carry out these good in- 
tentions to the extent which those woods are capable of, is a question 
which it is said admits of some doubt.* 

" No. 24. Walter Paul, Esq., is a first-rate sportsman in the 
fullest meaning oi the term, and an anxious, zealous preserver of 
foxes ; but his woodlands are not very extensive. 

* This was writtx;n in 1846. At the present time there are plenty of foxes 
in these covers — 

" Of this there is no manner of doubt, 
No possililc probable shadow of doubt, 
No possible doubt whatever." — F.H. 



BEAUFORT HUNT: PAST AND PRESENT. 69 

" No. 25. The Marquis of Worce.ster. If there is any founda- 
tion for the apprehension which is expressed, that the good old 
English taste for hunting is on the decline, the noble Marquis may 
with great truth be looked up to as the champion who will throw 
down the gauntlet for it. The lively interest which His Lordship 
takes in every department of the Badminton hunting establishment, 
must be a source of the utmost gratification to all well wishers of 
fox hunting. In the field his attention is universally directed to the 
operations of the pack. When large coverts afford the wily denizens 
of the woods opportunities of slipping away unobserved, the Marquis 
takes up a point where he is most likely to give notice of the intended 
clandestine departure. If hounds in their ardour flash from the line 
of chase, and require to be turned to the huntsman, in the absence 
of a whip the Marquis instantly officiates ; he knows the name of 
almost every hound, and can recognise the first challenge of an 
unerring veteran with the accuracy of an old huntsman and ex- 
perienced sportsman. 

" As a proof of his taste for hunting, during the summer months 
taking up his abode at Troy House or in the neighbourhood of the 
silvery streams of Wales where the otter frequents, and rising ere 
the sun has gladdened the mountain tops, he is indefatigable in his 
labours, and enjoys the sport with an ardour never excelled. In 
the field he is courteous to all (but resolute in preventing mischief), 
and a very steady rider to hounds. 

" No. 26. Lady Rose Somerset frequently rides to covert to 
see the hounds throw off, and sometimes remains till a fox is found, 
apparently enjoying the exciting scene with much pleasure. Her 
ladyship is an elegant horsewoman, and the likeness of a favourite 
mare, Camilla, is here correctly given. 

" No. 27. Henry Howard, Esq. This gentleman, who is 
nearly related to Lord Andover, being first cousin by birth and half 
brother by marriage, is a very excellent sportsman and fine rider 
to hounds. 

" No. 28. Charles Long, second whip, is a nephew to William 
Long, the huntsman, and was born, if I may be permitted to use 
such a term, in the service of the late Duke of Beaufort. He has 
been employed as whipper-in eleven years, previously to which he 
was engaged in the kennel. As a horseman he is remarkably good ; 
and under the very excellent tuition of his uncle, it is almost super- 
fluous to add, that he understands his business in every department, 
and is a most civil, obliging, and well conducted young man. He is 
represented on a chestnut horse called ' Enchanter.' 

" No. 29. Mr. Long, huntsman. This excellent servant and 
very popular man first saw the light at Badminton ; when at the 
age of fourteen he was a recognised member of the stable corps. 



70 BEAUFORT HUNT: PAST AND PRESENT, 

There bis love of all that appertained to sporting soon displayed 
itself, and he presently became one of the whips to the late Duke's 
fox hounds. In 1807 be was made first whip, and ten seasons after 
he became huntsman. His appointment proved as satisfactory to 
his noble master as to the country generally. In the kennel he has 
long rated as a professor of all its difficult details ; and in the field, 
you shall go farther than the country he lives in to find bis like. 
His seat upon a horse is perfection ; bis frame muscular, bis habit 
spare. His career has not passed unbonoured ; he has had public 
testimonials of the most sterling sort offered to his worth ; and private 
proofs innumerable of the consideration by which he is held by all 
classes. Most excellent of Diana's disciples, we bid thee good speed. 
' To you what trophies of the chase belong. 
You won them well, and may you wear them Long ! ' 

" No. 30. John Lovell, Esq. The equestrian art appears to 
be an inheritance of the Lovell family, and this gentleman possesses 
it in the utmost perfection ; when hounds run he is sure to be with 
them, and is always well mounted. 

" No. 31, AuDLEY Lovell, Esq. Not so regular an attendant 
as his two brothers, but like them he is equally gifted in the attributes 
of a horseman. 

" No. 32, NiMROD Long, The youngest son of WiUiam Long, 
the huntsman ; a very promising lad, and mounted on his donkey 
has contrived to follow the hounds through many hard days. It 
has frequently been said to him by gentlemen in the field, that a 
pony should be substituted for his long eared charger, and his reply 
to one of them who made the remark was tolerably shrew and ap- 
propriate — ' A great many of the gentlemen. Sir, have told me that 
I ought to have a pony, but none of them have ever given me one.' 
He was then rising eleven years of age, 

" No. 33. William Stansby, first whip. This excellent servant 
came from the Worcestershire hounds about ten years since. He 
is a capital horseman, a nice weight, and particularly neat in his 
appearance. His mare, Ida, is faithfully pourtrayed. 

" No. 34. Second Horseman. 

" No. 35. The Rev. Townsend Stephens is here introduced 
merely as a friend of the Duke of Beaufort, As the Reverend gentle- 
man does not keep a stud of hunters, the inference may be drawn 
that he does not consider the chase orthodox in one of his cloth, 
beyond an occasional attendance at the covert side, 

" No. 36. Lord Curzon is but an occasional attendant on these 
hoimds ; hunting principally with the Quorn, the Athorstone, and 
the Warwickshire, with which packs he has distinguished himself 
as a very hard rider. He has a particularly fine seat on his horse. 



BEAUFORT HUNT: PAST AND PRESENT. 71 

and looks like a workman from the top of his cap to the heel of his 
boot. Horses mu t be of the right sort, and in first rate condition 
to carry him, or the tale will soon be told. 

" No. 37. The Earl of Shelburne, Member for Calne, an 
excellent preserver of foxes, and an enthusiastic admirer of every- 
thing appertaining to fox hunting. The artist has hit the mark 
by placing Lord Shelburne in juxta-position with Lord Curzon, as 
in conversation and in scrutinizing the merits of the splendid pack 
before them. What has just been stated of Lord Curzon equally 
applies to Lord Shelburne ; and when hounds are in cha.se 
wherever any man will go his Lordship will go likewise. 

" No. 38. Edward Hobson, Esq. Who can have hunted, in 
Leicestershire some seven or eight years ago, and not remember the 
kind, jocular, and merry countenance of Mr. Hobson ? If Momus 
has selected a mortal on earth to diffuse his humours through the 
coterie of the hunting field, surely this gentleman must be the one. 
If hounds went as fast as Mr. Hobson's jokes do, who would be able 
to live with them ; or if they went as fast throughout the day as he 
usually rides to covert, how many second horses would be in requisi- 
tion ? 

" No. 39; John Bayly, Esq. The great experience this gentle- 
man has had in riding to hounds, added to his thorough knowledge 
of the art of race riding, insures his being always in the front flight 
in a run. Experience in the latter branch of horsemanship is of great 
value to any man who is ambitious of fame as a rider to hounds when 
they go fast. It causes a man to exercise a due regard for pace, it 
directs him in the selection of gi-ound over which to make the most 
of his horse ; and it generally teaches him the necessity of holding 
his nag together, though on this latter point some racing men when 
in the hunting field appear to be singularly careless. Mr. John 
Bayly is favoured by nature with gifts which do not often fall to 
the share of one disciple of Diana ; he is a light weight, riding under 
lOst. 101b., and he is sufficiently lengthy to po.ssess an unexception- 
ally good seat on his horse, with good Jiands and plenty of nerve 
to bring all these attributes into effect ; he ranks as one of the best 
men in the Beaufort Hunt. His mare ' Daphne,' is celebrated for 
her extraordinary cleverness at stone wall jumping. 

" No. 40. The Earl of Chesterfield. Everything which this 
nobleman undertakes is executed in a princely style ; but that is 
not all, there is a kind affability in his manner which renders him 
popular with all classes. When Master of the Royal Buckhounds, 
Lord Chesterfield gave a prestige to that establishment which has 
never been surpassed ; and during the period in which his Lordship 
hunted the Pytchley country, the hounds, horses, and all the ap- 
pointments were first class. Being a heavy weight, none but first 



72 BEAUFORT HUNT: PAST AND PRESENT. 

rate and valuable hunters can carry Lord Chesterfield, and first rate 
they must be, to be permitted to occupy a place in his stud. In- 
dependently of the Chase, the Turf and the Road have been assisted 
most materially by Lord Chesterfield's patronage and taste. Among 
an extensive assortment of race horses he has had many excellent 
runners ; and although he has not yet had the fortune to win a Derby, 
the St. Leger fell to his share through the assistance of Don John, 
and in the Oaks he proved the old maxim — ' Industry must prosper.' 
The taste displayed by Lord Chesterfield in the Carriage department 
has certainly never been surpassed, and I believe I am correct in 
stating that he was the first to introduce that splendid blue, a colour 
which has been so much in fashion ever since. It is a treat to witness 
the ' turn out ' of the ' Drag ' from Chesterfield House, when any 
event is ' coming off down the road ' to induce his Lordship to make 
up a load. 

" No. 41. W. J. Phelps, Esq. Since this gentleman has taken 
up his residence at Chavenage, he has been a very regular attendant 
with the Duke of Beaufort's hounds ; he is fond of hunting, and a 
good sportsman. 

" No. 42. Walter Long, Jun., Esq. A most promising young 
sportsman, whose heart and soul appear to be centred in everything 
relating to fox hunting, 

" No. 43. Phillip Miles, Esq., Member for Bristol. A good 
sportsman, remarkably fond of hunting, and seldom missing an 
opportunity of being present until parliamentary duties require his 
attendance in London. 

" No. 44. Second Horseman, with Wandering Boy, in attendance 
on William Long. This man is remarkable for his peculiar neatness 
and appropriate turn out. 

" No. 45. Second Horseman. 

" The portraits of the hounds introduced into the picture are 
those of the leading worthies in the kennel at the time the work was 
executed." 



BEAUFORT HUNT: PAST AND PRESENT. 73 



"The Blue and the Buff." 

The late Major G. J. Whyte-Melville, the celebrated author, 
who hunted from Tetbury, and who met with a fatal accident whilst 
out hunting with the V.W.H. near Braydon Pond on December 5th, 
1878, wrote and dedicated the following poem to His Grace the 
Duke of Beaufort : 

In coats of all colours we follow the pack, 

There is green for the youthful and grey for the old ; 
The Church out a-hunting rides forward in black, 

And Royalty glistens in scarlet and gold : 
But Badminton borrows her hues from the sky, 

When it smiles in our faces, as upward we look. 
And the slowest of s])ortsmen is tempted to fly 

In the yellow and azure he dons for the Duke. 

Then give me a cheer for the Blue and the Buff I 

And one cheer more for the Buff and the Blue I 
The man in the coat is undoubtedly tough. 
But the heart in his waistcoat is tender and true. 

The harvest is gather'd, the fallows are bare. 

And something foretells we shall have it to-day : 
There's a bloom on the gorse, there's a scent in the air, 

And the little red rover is forward away ! 
He is view'd by his Grace on the crest of the hill, 

But he whisks through the fence ere his brush can be seen. 
And we know by the whistle, so piercing and shrill. 

We must hurry to follow the Marquis in Green. 

Then give me a cheer, etc. 

How they drive to the front — how they bustle and spread — 

These badger-pyed beauties that open the ball 1 
Ere we've gone for a mile they are furlongs ahead. 

For they pour like a torrent o'er upland and wall. 
There is raking of rowel and shaking of rein, 

(Few hunters can live at the Badminton pace), 
And the pride of the stable's extended in vain. 

And the Blue and the Buff are all over the place I 
Then give me a cheer, etc. 

The tale is a long one — a tale to be told ; 

Like the tail of a comet it streams to the rear ; 
The dashing, the doubting, the crafty, the bold. 

Are all of them coming, but few of them here ; 
For some are defeated, and others are blown. 

While half of the Field in a lane is comjiress'd. 
Though a score of good fellows arc holding tlieir own. 

And a score of good horses are doing their best. 

Then give ine a cheer, etc. 

I would call them by name were I nearer the front. 

But you know them far better than me, I expect ; 
And it's little disgrace to be out of a hunt, 

When the pace is so good and the Field so select. 
There's a parson, a peer, and a soldier, I think. 

Of landlords a coujjle, of tenants a few ; 
A dandy in leathers, a doctor in pink. 

And a plentiful muster of comrades in blue. 

Then give rac a cheer, etc. 



74 BEAUFORT HUNT: PAST AND PRESENT. 

And what of the ladies so killing and fair ? 

In their Badminton colours how lovely they look ! 
When fun is the fastest, be sure they are there, 

By pluck or man'Buvre, by hook or by crook : 
While each, at a gallop, finds time, as she flies, ; 

To deliver her shafts. Does she know how they hurt, 
When shot by a pair of adorable eyes, 

As bright as her buttons, as blue as her skirt ? 

Then give me a cheer, etc. 

'Tis done ! They have got him ! He dies on the grass, 

In thirty-five minutes exact from the find ; 
For a fox cannot hope to live longer, alas ! 

When a pack so determined are raging behind. 
Untiring they race, undefeated they stoop. 

And they finish with blood, I am proud to remark : 
" Whoop ! tear him, good hounds ! " says Lord Worcester ; " Who-whoop 

And we'll find you another before it gets dark ! " 

Then give me a cheer, etc. 



The Visitors' Day. 

In the Badminton Country, January 23rd, 1889. 

Dedicated to John Hargreaves, Esq., late M.F.H. 

(By kind permission of Baily's Magazine.) 

They come from the East, those gay sportsmen in pink, 
Maiden Erlegh and Reading supplying their ranks, 

As westward they travel, to see what they think 

Of the Badminton ditches and Badminton banks ; 

Seventeen was their number in gallant array. 

At the Swalletts Grate meet, on the " Visitoi's' Day." 

Like flowers of the garden while summer still lurks, 
Their coats were resplendent in roseate hue ; 

And the " locals " remark'd that the pinks of South Berks 
Formed a sportsmanlike contrast to Badminton Blue 

But like flowers of the garden when autumn's away 

Were those coats at the end of the " Visitore' Day." 

In Greatwood's broad rides there are oceans of dirt, 
Our horses' legs stuck as if held by the stocks ; 

Lord Worcester looked grave, and was heard to assert 
That we must have got hold of a very load fox ; 

But his countenance changed from the grave to the gay 

Ere he came to the end of the " Visitors' Day." 

So we hied us to Dauntsey, the cream of the vale ; 

Two hundred and more to the withy-bed came ; 
And those who thereafter might falter or fail 

Had only themselves or their chargers to blame — 
The whistle resounded — 'twas " Porrard away" — 
And we all got a start on the " Visitors' Day." 

First towards Wootton Bassett, then round on the right, 
While Greatwood appears as the point he would make ; 

But Greatwood we missed by a field in our flight. 
O'er rail and canal-bank our journey we take ; 

Said our fox, " They may catch me who can on the clay. 

But I'll take no advantage on ' Visitors' Day.' " 



BEAUFORT HUNT: PAST AND PRESENT. 75 

Over Bushton's strong fences continued the game, 

And grief was the lot of both Blues and outsiders. 

As we ran past a covert, Black Dog is its name ; 

(Not so black as the garments of some of the riders !) 

Yet our guests, although here anel there prostrate they lay. 

Did credit to Berks on the " Visitois' Day." 

An ex-M.F.H., and his daughter so bold, 

Helme, and thiee of " The Boyals " were there to the fore, 
Sclater-Booth, with a hat prematurely made old. 

Which its shape shall recover, ah ! never no more ! 
But he came up ejuite Learning, as one who should say, 
" What's a hat more or less on the Visitoi-s' Day ? " 

By the ladies from Draycot we all were impressed. 

And the lady fioni C'oisham that i-ides the grey cob ; 

And the lady from Birdrup was going hei' best 

When most weie l.'eginning to sigh and to sob ; 

While Wroughton's fair Queen, and of course Easton Grey, 

Held their own in the run on the " Visitoi's' Day." 

Clyffe Wood is behind us ; again does our fox 

Treat the notion of rest with derision and laugh; 
Biishton hangings are gained, and we look at our clocks; 

By the points on the map seven miles and a half 
In thirty-six minutes, deny it who may. 
Though deep was the going on " Visitors' Day." 

Still forward, past Stanmore, a field to his left. 

Fresh foxes on foot, and diminished the pace ; 
But our " gees " are well nigh of a struggle bereft. 

As again to the valley our steps we retrace — 
At the mouth of a drain the hounds clamour and bay — 
Ninety minutes to ground on the " Visitors' Day." 

Space forbids me to offer an accurate score 

Of those who went best when the pace was " a hopper " ; 
Owen, Wilson, t'otes, Donovan, Harford, and more 

Went well, though they " took " an occasional " cropper" ; 
While many men found that " Macadam " will pay 
If used with discretion on " Visitoi-s' Day." 

Nor must I omit the full merits to state 

Of two Ncstors, oft mentioned in Badminton lays ; 

For the Duke anel the Colonel were giving such weight 
As woulel tax Major Egerton's brains to appraise — 

You must bring out a nag that can gallop and stay 

If you ride sixteen stone on the " Visitoi-s' Day." 

And what shall be saiel of the Badminton pack. 

Those " ladies " that raced from the moment they found ? 

Those twenty-three couple that led the attack. 

Each one of them there when they ran him to ground ? 

Like leeches to blood they stuck to their prey. 

The pride of Charles Ham))lin on " Visitors' Day." 

But by no means the least, tho' it may be the last, 

Comes he who inherits the ken of his race ; 

Though for thirty-six minutes hounds never were cast. 

Lord Worcester, the huntsman, was there in his place. 
His motto is " Sport," and we all of us pray 
That he'll show the same sport on next " Visitors' day." 

Our guests are departing, " Farewell " they exclaim, 
May never worse fortune South Berkshire betide 
Than to visit a eountry whose timc-honour'd name 

Me.ans a welcome to all who like sportsmen will ride, 
A welcome alike from November to May, 
Farewell to the Duke and the " Visitors' Day." 

P. K. BLAm-OLiruANT. 



76 BEAUFORT HUNT: PAST AND PRESENT. 



A Legend of the Quorn Countrie. 

When careful of his goods or spouse, 

A strong naan armed doth keep his house ; 

It may be termed for him a bore, 

To find a stranger at his door, 

Who binds the strong man at his ease. 

Pockets his cash and all he sees ; 

And tho' he does not take his life. 

Is far from civil to his wife. 

The ex-strong man looks on the while, 

Without the least desire to smile ; 

At least, I take it, such would be 

The case, did such things chance with me. 

There lived, I do not deal in dates, 

A Champion of the heavy weights. 

Who over Leicestershire had done 

Great things in spite of sixteen stone ; 

For many years laad been admired 

For going when the rest were tired ; 

Who feared no timber, liked a brook, 

Could calmly at a bullfinch look ; 

And thought himself in all his glory, 

Just at the period of my story ; 

But often when we feel most sure. 

We're apt to be the least secure ; 

And Gilmour, happy and content. 

With long-established precedent. 

By all men honoured and respected, 

Was rivalled when he least expected. 

'Twas in November's dreary sky. 

Strange meteors were seen to fly ; 

And rumor spread thi-oughout the land. 

That some convulsion was at hand ; 

And presently the fact was known. 

That one who weighed near seventeen stone. 

Light of hand and firm of seat, 

Arrived at Quorn, was hard to beat. 

Well ! all men deemed the fact absurd. 

And Gilmour laughed at what he heard ; 

And not until he saw the naan, 

The sinking in his boots began. 

When first he showed beside the gorse. 

Colossal seemed his coal-black horse ; 

His frowning brow and deep-set eye. 

His heart's resolve did not belie ; 

Not oft he smiled, but if a trace 

Of mirth did flit across his face, 

No joy, I ween, it did impart. 

But chilled the shuddering gazer's heart ; 

And Gilmour, at that harrowing look, 

Down to his very small-clothes shook ; 

When towards him with the lightning's speed, 

The stranger spurred his fiery steed. 

" My name, he said, is Peter Miles, 

" And there is none like me 

" Prom Land's End to Northumberland, 

" And all the North Countrie. 

" You Melton men, you Leicester knaves 

" Come ride with me, say I, 

" Five minutes over Skeftington, 

*' And then lie down and die. 

' I've heard of you Sir Gilemore, 



BE AV FORT HUNT: PAST AND PRESENT. 77 

" I know you're all my eye, 

" I'll cut you down, and hang you up, 

" Aye ! hang you up to dry. 

" Yes ! funking wretch ! I know you, 

" How you shudder at a rail, 

" How you shun the bristling bullfinch, 

" And at a Brook turn tail." 

But he who was not wont to brook 

A hasty word or angry look, 

Now, with a meek submissive face, 

Yielded the trophies of the chase. 

Without a blow resigned his sway, 

And Miles, triumphant, leads the way ; 

Thenceforth from gates and brooks he shrunk. 

Thenceforth by all was called a funk ; 

Such is the fate of human glory. 

Such the sad sequel to my story. 

I cannot tell the year of grace, 

In which these things were taking place ; 

But this I know, a portly Squire 

Now bruises over Leicestershire ; 

Whom Sutton loveth to commend. 

His guide, philosopher, and friend ; 

And none with him dispute the right 

To lead the field from morn to night. 

But though among the thrusting train, 

You seek for Gilmour's face in vain ; 

Wait till the second horsemen pass, 

You see a form — 'tis his, alas ! 

The heavy-weight who funks the stiles, 

And trembles at the name of Miles. 



Such is the lot of mortal man. 
Where (iilmom- ended. Miles began ; 
And Miles in turn must yield his sway. 
For every dog will have his day. 
1852. W. H. Bromley. 



The Great Wood Run. 

The celebrated Great Wood Run with the Badminton Hounds 
took place on Ash Wednesday, February 22nd, 1871, and was thus 
commemorated in verse by Mr. P. Kington Oliphant, who wrote 
under the nom de plume of " Dannyman." 

Come, pull off your boots — 'tis no time for a nap, 
Let us measure the run on the Ordinance map ; 
Much sport have we seen since {,\w frost, but this last day 
Proves the joke that Ash-Wediu'sil.iy's a regular " Past " day. 
Our meet Swallett's Gate, and .it (ireatwood the draw. 
For the stoutest of foxes the Vale ever saw ; 
In the corner we mov'd him, he's gone in a minute. 
Here's a chance for the riders who mean to be in it ; 
And, Heber, («) remember, you make our hearts glad 
When you whistle, and we can como to you my lad. 
Headed back near the brook, through Greatwood once more. 
He returns to the cover that's called Ueservoir : 

(a) Heber Long, whipper in. 



78 BEAUFORT HUNT: PAST AND PRESENT. 

Just touching on Faston, he crosses the rail, 

Right over t.o Brinkvvorth he threads thro' the Vale ; 

The Brook, as you'll see, was full up to the brim, 

Cis Howard (a) got across without losing a "Limb ; " (6) 

While Candy (r) commenced a succession of i^lunges, 

That rendered himself and his pal like two sponges ; 

But brooks are like casks ('tis no figure of speech,) 

They are full when a Bung (d) is inserted in each. 

Now, those who lost start had both struggled and spurred, 

When a check, after fifty-five minutes, occurred ; 

And some of the horsemen,^ dispersed o'er the plain, 

Took leave of us here, and ne'er saw us again ; 

But Lord Worcester, our huntsman, soon hit off the scent, 

And onward to Somerford Common we went ! 

Hard by, the Duke addressing. 
Ruck, (e) the stout yeoman, stands ; 

His hair was white. 

His farm rode light, 
Well cultured were his lands ; 
And with a voice prophetic, 
Thus to the Master spake — 

" The fox I viewed 

This side the Wood, 
My oath I'll hereby take ; 

He's earned a name. 

He's just the same 
(Mark well the words I speak.) 

Tlu'ockmorton's (/) hounds 

To Blunsdon's grounds 
Hunted last Thursday week. 

And when you stand 

With fox in hand. 
If such shall be your luck. 

Then thank the powers. 

That made him yours, 
And think on Edmund Ruck." 

He ceas'd — Red Lodge was past, and then the pack 

By Gospel Oak pursued the onward track ; 

In front old Sentinel and Sexton show'd. 

Close to the bridge they cross' d the Minety Road ; 

While, strangers to the country, on we pass, 

Straight to the glories of the Tadpole grass. 

But time had told its tale ; in dire despair, 

The " swells " perceiv'd no change of mount was there 1 

Said one, " The law which man from wife divorces 

Should never part us from our second horses." 

Alas ! no lagging groom can now avail 

To succour Jonas {g) in the Tadpole Wale. 

'Twas here, that, eating luncheon, 
And stern as hardy Norseman, 

A heavy-weight (h) 

Sat on a gate. 
And curs' d his second horseman. 
To him another sportsman (<) spake, 

(a) The Hon. Cecil Howard. 

(6) The Hon. Greville Nugent. 

(c) Captain Henry Candy, late 9th Lancers. 

(d) Colonel the Hon. Charles Byng. 

(e) A Braydon yeoman farmer. 

(/) Sir William Throckmorton, the Master of the V.W.H. 

(fir) Captain Jona.s Hunt, late 4th Hussai-s. 

(h) Colonel Peter Miles. 

(i) Mr. Canning, of Clifton. 



BEAUFORT HUNT: PAST AND PRESENT. 79 

Of civic mien and figure, 
(I hardly know which of the two 

In scales would prove the bigger,) 
" Oh ! Colonel, I am not the man 
A run is wont to frighten, 

But to my face 

Declar'd His Grace, 
This fox is going to Brighton I 

If this be true, 

'Tis time that you 
Were off like flash from pistol ; 

'Tis time that . I 

Should homeward fly 

Which is the road to Bristol ? " 

But onwards still, and onwards. 

This wondrous h\int proceeds, 
Upon the right lay Purton Stoke, 

We cross the Whitehall meads, 
And leaving Cricklade on his left, 

Seven Bridges on his right. 
Straight to the Thames he crossed the road — 

No bridge, no ford in sight ! 
And first and foremost, Worcester, 

The hero of the day. 
Plunged in the depths on Beckford, 

The old flea-bitten grey 
And after many a struggle, 

They reached the further side, 
The hounds were far before them, 

They must for dear life ride. 
And on to the canal bank 

And back across the river, 
It look'd as though this Greatwood run 

Were going to last for ever. 
On the right lay Castle Eaton, 

And Kempsford on the left ; 
The nags stood still, 
Brave Beckford's beat. 

Of all but life bereft. 
Some viewed the run from villages. 

On steeple's friendly roof. 
Some left their steeds in farming stalls. 

And tried to " pad the hoof ! " 
So, on they speed past Hannington, 

So, on past Crouch's Wood ; 
One brook alone remained to jump. 

There was but one who could ; 
And when this gallant fox appear'd 

E'en now amongst the slain. 
On the Swindon side of Highworth, 

He crept into a drain ! 

Three hours and thirty minutes 

Those hounds and nags did go. 
For them 'twas eight amd twenty miles, 

And fifteen for the crow. 
So, Hamblin, kennel huntsman. 

Share the honours of the day. 
For of all the Badminton dog pack 

There were but two away. 

Oh 1 for Whyte-Melville's pen, that I might tell 

The varied fortunes which our field befell ; 

For though the finish he iircsumes to treat on. 

Your bard's last resting place was Castle Eaton, 

Where, both for horse and man, he found good quarters. 



80 BE AV FORT HUNT: PAST AND PRESENT, 

Thanks to the parson, and his charming daughters. 
Of those who saw the end, I fain would fix on. 
Three gallant Colonels, Ewart, Bourke, and Dickson. 
The huntsman ; Heber, on his home-bred grey, 
Luce, Chaplin, Barker, and, to end my say, 
(Ye daring tbrusters, tell it not in Gath,) 
Attired in pink a veteran from Bath, (a) 
After such feats as this, I never can 
PiUy the sorrows of a poor old man ! 

But first among the foremost in the race, 

Jenkins, on Giffard, merited a place. 

Well known on various courses is his fame. 

Well known as " Mr. Merton " is his name ; 

While Grace, (b) on Cootey's (c) mount, appeared to be 

A brother worthy of great W. G. 

And undeniable to please my fancy, 

Are Charlie Bill, id) Jack Savile, (e) and Joe Dansey. (/) 

We all can testify to Candy's pluck, 

But can we estimate Byng's wondrous luck. 

Who saw the run for some three hours or more, 

And never hunted in this isle before 1 

My task is done — one moral from the tale 

Of beaten chargers toiling o'er the Vale, 

I fain would draw. Experience endorses 

The dogma that good hounds will beat good horses. 

Strangers from Quorn, or Pytchley, if you doubt, 

Bring down your " gee-gees," and let's see them out ; 

Let's see them out, on such like day, and you 

Will all admit my theory is true ; 

For time and points, and country all attest 

The finest run recorded in the West 1 

Dannyman. 

(a) Mr. Pitman. 

(6) Dr. Alfred Grace. 

(c) Captain Coote, late Carbineers. 

Id) Captain Charles Bill, of The Priory, Tetbury. 

(e) Late 7th Hussars. 

(j) Colonel Dansey, late 1st Life Guards. 



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