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TN 

^4 



CAUFORNLA STAii: Mi-Mi\u iiuUJLAU 

FERRY BUIUJIN*-. S*.N rRAHJ'"lSCO 



ilHEW HAMILTON 



Stota Ifinendogut 



Mines and Mineral Resources 



July, 1915 




OF 




Shasta County 
Siskiyou County 
Trinity County 



CfTAITERS OF STATE v t r s RKT^KT 








GIFT or 





I 



CALIFORNIA STATE MINING BUREAU 

FERRY BUILDING, SAN FRANCISCO 
FLETCHER HAMILTON State Mineralogist 



Mines and Mineral Resources 



Shasta County 
Siskiyou County 
Trinity County 



F.MCN HAMILTON 

iTAti MlftUtALOeiSf 



By G. CHESTER BROWN, Field Assistant 

n 




C14456 



California. 

State Pbintinq Office 

1915 






0'' 



"■'' ll>^^\ 



^• 



4^' 



CONTENTS. 



Page 

INTRODUCTION -, 1 

Chapter I. Shasta County. 

Introduction 3 

Water Resources ^ 6 

Timber Supply 6 

Transportation Facilities , --_ 6 

Table op Mineral Production __ 6 

Mining Industries 7 

Climatic Conditions 7 

Mineral Resources 7 

Hydroelectric Plants . 8 

Asbestos : 8 

Chrome : 11 

Clay Products 12 

Coal 12 

Copper 13 

Description op Copper Belt 13 

Outline of the Geology of the Copper Belt 14 

Orb Deposits 15 

Mines 16 

Gold •-.— 29 

History 30 

Geology of Districts : 31 

Auriferous Gravel 32 

Dredging - 33 

Mines — Quartz and Placer 33 

Granite '. 60 

Infusorial Earth 61 

Iron Ore 61 

Limestone ,- 62 

Macadam 63 

Manganese 63 

Marble 63 

Mineral Springs 64 

Sandstone 64 

Tuff 64 

Zinc 64 

Bibliography 65 

Chapter II. Siskiyou County. 

Introduction I 66 

Geological and Topographical Features 67 

Description of Streams 67 

Table op Mineral Production 70 

Electrical Power Plants 72 

Chrome 72 

Clay Products , 72 

cox. „. 45S363S 

Copper 73 



IV CONTENTS. 

Page 

Gold 76 

Dbscription op Mining Districts 77 

MiNBS — Quartz 81 

MiNBS — ^Placbr 99 

MiNBs — Hydraulic 100 

Mines — Ground Sluicing 114 

MiNBS — ^Dript 116 

Dredging 120 

Granite . 121 

Iron 121 

Limestone 121 

Macadam 123 

Marble 123 

Mineral Water 124 

Ornamental Stones 125 

Platinum 125 

Quicksilver 126 

Sandstone 126 

soapstone 127 

Bibliography 128 

Chapter III. Trinity County. 

Introduction 129 

Geology ^ 130 

History 130 

Mining Conditions 130 

Mineral Resources 131 

Electrical Power Plants 132 

Asbestos 132 

Chromite 133 

Coal 133 

Copper 134 

Gold 138 

Mining Districts 138 

Mines — Quartz 1*^ 

Placers — Hydraulic 1^" 

Placers — Ground Sluicing 1*^2 

Placers — Drift 1^^ 

Dredging ^'^'^ 

Granite ^'"^ 

Iron ^"^^ 

Limestone ' 



176 
177 
177 



Marble ^'^'^ 

Mineral Paint 

177 

Mineral Water 

1 70 
Ornamental Stones ^'° 

Platinum ^'^^ 

Quicksilver 179 

Soapstone 180 

Bibliography 181 

INDEX .. 183 



ILLUSTRATIONS. 

Page 

Lassen Peak, eruption of June 14, 1914, at 9 :45 a. m 4 

Lassen Peak, new crater, 400 feet long, June 28, 1914 . 5 

Stock & Stevens asbestos quarry, croppings 9 

Stock & Stevens asbestos quarry f chrysotile deposit 10 

Smelter, Afterthought mine 16 

Mammoth smelter, bag house in center 24 

Section of Gladstone mine 43 

Stope map of Uncle Sam mine ' 57 

Plan of workings. Uncle Sam mine 57 

Holt & Gregg lime plant, Kennett 63 

Klamath River near Happy Camp 68 

Scott Bar 79 

Davis hydraulic mine, Happy Camp 103 

Dam of Forks of Salmon Mining Company 105 

Marble Mountain, Siskiyou County 122 

Island Mountain Consolidated copper mine 136 

Globe mine, twenty-stamp mill 146 

Globe mine, section of flume 147 

Section of Headlight mine, Trinity County 149 

Trinity Bonanza King mine; interior of mill 155 

Trinity Bonanza King mine; automatic tram 155 

Dredge of Alta Bert Dredging Company 175 



INTRODUCTION. 

The three counties presented herewith are situated at the extreme 
north end of the State, and midway between the eastern and western 
boundary counties. They thus include the upper end of the Sacra- 
mento Valley, with its northernmost tributaries, also portions of both 
the Sierra Nevada Mountains on the east and the Coast Ranges on the 
west, the two systems forming a junction at Mount Shasta in Siskiyou 
County. Lassen Peak which has recently been attracting attention by 
its renewed volcanic eruptions is in southeastern Shasta County. 

The drainage systems of western Siskiyou and Trinity counties are 
tributary to the Klamath and Trinity rivers which flow direct to the 
Pacific Ocean. This western drainage area is the only district in 
California, where hydraulic mining is still active on any considerable 
scale, because of the silt question not affecting any navigable streams. 

Though the central part of this section of the State is traversed 
north and south by a transcontinental railroad line, the greatest draw- 
back to the development of the three counties in question is lack of 
transportation facilities. This is particularly true of the distinctly 
mineral areas, in the rugged, western mountains. In addition to the 
mineral output, lumbering and stock raising are important industries. 

Acknowledgment is here made of assistance rendered by the various 
owners and operatives of properties, both during the field work and in 
the subsequent preparation of this report. 



SHASTA COUNTY. 

Field Work in November, 1913. 

INTRODUCTION. 

Shasta County, noted since 1896 for its copper resources, has an area 
of 4050 square miles, and lies in the mountainous regions at the head 
of the Sacramento Valley. It is bounded on the north by Siskiyou, on 
the east by Lassen, on the south by Plumas and Tehama, and on the 
west by Trinity County, and derived its name from Mount Shasta, 
which, when the county was organized, stood within its limits. In 1852, 
when Siskiyou County was created, it was made to take in that portion 
of Shasta which contained this mountain, thereby depriving the county's 
name of its significance and fitness. 

The western border of the county is along the Trinity Range summit, 
and the county reaches eastward high up the slope of the Sierra Nevada 
Range, which bears westward and merges with the Coast Range in 
Shasta and Siskiyou counties. Short irregular ranges cover the greater 
part of the county between the main ranges to the east and west. 

In the southeastern comer is Lassen Peak, an old volcanic cone, 
which has exhibited true volcanic activity since May 30, 1914. In 
the bowl of the much eroded old crater a series of steam explosions 
have opened a new vent, and from it stones have been thrown over 
an area more than one half mile in diameter, and ejected volcanic ash 
has been wind-borne in sufficient quantities to make a perceptible 
deposit at a distance of fifteen to twenty miles. No freshly molten 
lava has been seen and no heat has been noticeable except that of 
escaping steam. Sulphur fumes and slight sulphur deposits near the 
vent have been noticed by nearly all observers. On June 28, 1914, 
the new crater was estimated to have a length of 400 feet. (See photos 
No. 1 and No. 2.) 

''A heavy eruption took place on June 14th, and two new craters 
opened up a mile from the main hole. A shower of ash and stones fell 
from the craters and the smoke rose to a height of 5000 feet.'' (Report 
of J. M. Stark, United States Forest Service Lookout on Mount 
Turner.) 

That volcanic activity is not yet extinct in the Lassen Peak district 
is shown by the presence of numerous solfataras and hot springs. At 
Bumpass' Hell, near the southern base of the peak, there are boiling 
mud pools and occurrences of vigorous solfataric action. Near by, 
at the head of Mill Creek, the sulphur deposited by such action is so 
abundant that attempts have been made to mine it. 

2— C14456 



*•• •• • • 



.mines' and mineral resources. 




SHASTA COUNTY. 




o 



6 MIKES AND MINERAL RESOURCES. 

Lassen Peak has four distinct summits, the highest having an eleva- 
tion of 10,527 feet. During a period of activity a few hundred years 
ago the lava from this mountain blanketed the eastern portion of 
Shasta County as far as the Sacramento River.* 

Water Resources, Shasta County has a splendid water supply. The 
rainfall, occurring chiefly in the winter, exceeds forty inches as a rule, 
and the snows of the higher ranges maintain the streams throughout 
the summer months. 

The Sacramento, McCloud and Pitt, the principal rivers, afford 
valuable power resources. The first two of these rise in the mountains 
above the northern boundary, while the last has its source in Modoc 
County. The Sacramento flows southward through the western half 
of the county in a deep, sinuous and picturesque canyon, crossing the 
copper belt near the apex of the Sacramento Valley plain. The torren- 
tial Pitt crosses the axis of the Sierra Range through heavy forests and 
deep canyons and joins the Sacramento in the midst of the copper belt. 
The McCloud discharges into the Pitt amid the gossan cappings of the 
copper deposits. Thus there is a general convergence of the important 
rivers and streams of the county in and through the chief mineral 
region. 

Timber Supply, The timber supply of Shasta County in the higher 
ranges is excellent, but in other sections adjacent to the mining dis- 
tricts, the supply is generally limited, although on some of the higher 
ridges yellow pine is found in considerable abundance. 

Transportation Facilities, The California and Oregon branch of the 
Southern Pacific railway system crosses the county and affords direct 
transportation facilities for the copper belt along the course of the 
Sacramento River. 

The Mountain Copper Company operates a narrow gauge railroad 
between the mine and Keswick Station. This road is eleven miles long 
and extremely tortuous in its course, descending a grade of nearly 
2000 feet between the mine and its terminus. 

The Sacramento and Eastern, a standard gau^e railroad owned by 
the General Electric Company, connects the Bully Hill Mine with Pitt 
station on the Oregon branch of the Southern Pacific Railroad. This 
road is about fourteen miles long. 

The Delta Consolidated railroad, owned by the Delta Consolidated 
Mining Company, connects Delta, a station on the Oregon branch of the 
Southern Pacific Railroad, \^ith the mine. This narrow gauge road is 
seven miles long. 

♦Bibl. : Lassen Peak Folio, U. S. Geol. Surv., 1894 ; University of California, publica- 
tions in Geography. August 7, 1914; Mining and Scientific Press, Vol. 109, p. 143. 



SHASTA COUNTY. 7 

Good wagon roads serve the outlying territory from the Southern 
Pacific Eailway. 

Mining Industries. Shasta County is identified with the State's early 
mining activity, this industry, however, being practically confined to 
the western third of the county, for the eastern half is buried, as a rule, 
under lava deposits, which effectually hide the minerals that undoubt- 
edly exist. 

In that portion of the county west of the Sacramento Eiver, the early 
placers were rich and extensive, and recent and ancient auriferous 
gravel deposits remain, affording opportunities for various forms of 
placer mining, including gold dredging, which is being pursued near 
Redding. 

Hydraulic mining operations are very limited, due to the State debris 
law, as Shasta is one of the counties affected by this act. 

Quartz mining was of slow development, owing to the base character 
of the ores in most of the districts in which gold-bearing veins were 
early discovered. 

Copper mining has received a setback due to the fume agitations and 
lawsuits resulting therefrom, yet a solution of this problem is looked 
for in the near future, as experimental plants are now being erected 
which should eliminate the trouble. The Mammoth was the only smelter 
in operation in Shasta County in 1913. 

The smelting of iron ore with hydroelectric energy, as practiced 
at Heroult on the Pitt, is focusing the interest of the industrial world. 
The work has been done on a large and practical scale and results are 
of a definite nature. 

Climatic Conditions. Shasta County has a wide range of climatic 
conditions, due to the difference in altitude from the valley floor, 
approximately 500 feet above sea level, to over 10,000 feet. Agriculture 
is pursued in the valleys and foothills, and a diversity of soil products 
grown. 

Mineral Resources. Its mineral resources consist of gold, silver, cop- 
per, zinc, iron, chrome, barite, asbestos, coal, limestone, cement mate- 
rials, clays, marble, granite, and mineral waters. 

Shasta County in 1913 was first in the production of copper, silver 
and pyrite, third in lead, and sixth in gold. This county ranked fourth 
in the total mineral production of the State, but exclusive of petroleum, 
leads all others. 



MINES AND MINERAL RESOURCES. 

HYDROELECTRIC PLANTS. 



The Northern California Power Company Consolidated, organized 
in 1900, is one of the large power distributing concerns of California. 
This company has seven generating stations, all in Shasta County, 
connected with its distributing system, as follows : 



Coleman 

Volta .— 

Kilarc 

Inskip — 

South Power House- 
South Cow Creek 

Snow Creek 

Total 



SUtlon 

capacity, 

b.i». 



20.00O 

8.500 
8.00O 
8.00O 
6,500 
2,000 
1.600 



54.6CO 



The water resources of the Battle Creek drainage, in the main, sup- 
ply its present requirements. The transmission system is modem in 
every respect, and some 970 miles of line distribute power throughout 
Shasta, Tehama, Glenn, and into portions of Trinity, Butte and Colusa 
counties. A reservoir is being constructed at the head of Bumey Creek 
with a capacity of 30,000 acre feet. 

ASBESTOS. 

The holdings of Stock & Stevens are being developed in a systematic 
manner and considerable asbestos of a commercial grade is blocked 
out. This group, consisting of 1100 acres, is situated in Sees. 1, 2, 3, 
4, 33, and 34, T. 37 and 38 N., B. 5 W., in the Trinity Forest Reserve, 
and about 3 miles east of Sims Station. The elevation varies from 3500 
to 6300 feet. Mears Creek runs through the property. The croppings 
have been opened up in places for a distance of 13,500 feet (see 
photos Nos. 3 and 4). The country rock is principally serpentine, 
through which numerous dikes of diorite and gneiss have been thrust. 
This serpentine carries chrysotile asbestos, both slip and cross fiber, 
hornblende amianthus (Italian floss), amphibole, and mass fiber of all 
kinds. One deposit of chrysotile is 270 feet long, 100 feet high, and 
probably over 400 feet wide on the surface. There are four chrysotile 
quarries, the cropping faces being 100' to 500' in height, with no over- 
burden. One ridge, 7000 feet long, a continuous chrysotile zone, can 
be worked by means of a steam shovel, from both sides. The average 
elevation of this ridge is about 6200 feet. A report on this asbestos 
deposit has been made by II. Leslie Parker (April, 1913). Mr. Parker 
states that '*on these claims is a wonderful development of actinolite, 
occurring in the cross fiber fissures, some of which are five inches or 
more in width and then decreasing in size to ribbon-like seams. The 



SHASTA COUNTY. 




!3 



CO 



O 






10 



MINES AND MINERAL RESOURCES. 



structure of this actinolite is similar to that of cross fiber chrysotile. 
In the creek bottom is shown cross fiber chrysotile of superior quality 
and is associated with slip fiber chrysotile, which occurs on the slicken- 
slded fractures caused by the rock movements. The claims on the 
whole are covered with a growth of excellent yellow pine, suitable for 
all mining, milling and tramway purposes. Hydroelectric power can 
be cheaply developed on Hears Creek, sufficient for very extensive 
mining and milling operations." 

Investigations made to determine the quality of this asbestos by the 
Eaton-Philbrick laboratories show **that it is of the best quality, and 




Photo No. 4. Stock & Stevens' asbestos quarry, chrysotile deposit. 

that it is well adapted to any of the many uses to which asbestos has 
been put. The amphibole especially is recommended as a filter mate- 
rial, as it is easily worked up to the desired degree of fineness, gives a 
good yield of the finished product, and makes a firm close felt. The 
chrysotile fiber is of good tensile strength and very flexible. It also 
makes good filter material if extra long fiber is desired. 

** Sample marked, Amphibole-White fibrous. Fire test : Fibrous mate- 
rial submitted to heat of furnace up to 2500 degrees F. showed no signs 
of fusion. Acid test: Prolonged action of hydrochloric and sulphuric 
acids had no appreciable effect on this material. 



SHASTA COUNTY. 11 

*' Sample marked, Slip Material. Fire Test: This material was 
shredded and put into the furnace and heated to 2500 degrees F. No 
signs of fusion were observed even on the finer fragments. The original 
material being very brittle in itself it can not be said that this heating 
had any effect at all." 

An excellent exhibit of asbestos from the Stock & Stevens quarry is 
on display in the State Mining Bureau's museum, San Francisco. 

Anaconda, asbestos deposit consisting of 120 acres, is located in 
Sec. 6, T. 37 N., R. 4 W., about 4 miles north of Sims Station. It 
is owned by the Pacific Coast Asbestos Company, A. Boldeman, presi- 
dent; office, Oakland. There are seven small veins on the claims, 
having an average width of 2 feet. Strike is north and south, dip 50° 
E. The asbestos occurs between a slate hanging-wall and a granite 
footwall. Development work consists of several open cuts. Idle. 

Z). E. Miles, 1515 Lafayette street, Alameda, reports asbestos on 
his land in Sec. 36, T. 38 N., R. 5 W., about 5 miles northwest of 
Sims Station. No development work has been done to prove the extent 
of the deposit. 

CHROME. 

Prim & Dougherty own three chromite claims in Sees. 13 and 24, 
T. 37 N., R. 5 W., near Sims Station. This chrome belt has been opened 
up for a length of over 1000 feet. The ore is lustrous black, carrying a 
high percentage of chromic oxide; it lies in serpentine, in lenticular 
form. The workings consist of short tunnels, and a 30-foot shaft with 8 
feet of ore on the bottom. About 1500 tons of ore extracted from the 
original discovery on the north of Shotgun Creek. The chromite is 
shipped to Colorado, Montana and Arizona, and has been used for 
furnace bottoms at the Bully Hill and Keswick copper smelters. Prim 
& Dougherty own another claim in Sec. 22, T. 37 N., R. 5 W., on 
which very little development work has been done and from which no 
ore has been shipped. 

Bibl. : Bull. No. 38, pp. 270, 271, 362. 

Little C<istle Creek in Sec. 2, T. 38 N., R. 4 W., near the boundary 
line between Shasta and Siskiyou counties. Owner, L. H. Brown, of 
Dunsmuir. Holdings consist of 80 acres, located in 1906. Deposit 
worked by open cuts. Equipment consists of a short tramway and 
dwelling. Production to end of 1913, about 2400 tons. Four men 
employed. 

Holden et al. of Lamoine own eight claims in Sec. 22, T. 37 N., 
R. 5 W. Only a small amount of development done, so prospective value 
can not be determined. 



12 MINES AND MINERAL RESOURCES. 

CLAY PRODUCTS. 

The Sacramento River Valley bottom, below the mountains, contains 
extensive clay banks, and on the higher table lands debris accumulation 
has in places formed clay deposits. 

Alata Lime and Brick Company, formerly known as Coleman & Hill, 
owns the clay bank in Block 29, Reddinj? Grant, about IJ miles south 
of Redding, in the Sacramento River bottom. The clay is 6 feet thick, 
the upper 4 feet being plastic, which grades into and rests upon a be^l 
of sand, underlaid in turn by gravel ; color is tawny. In former years 
a great many bricks of good quality were burned in this yard. 
Bibl. : Bull. No. 38, p. 256. 

Holt (C Gregg of Redding own a clay deposit in See. 17, T. 30 N., 
R. 4 W., in the town of Anderson. Tlie holdings consist of 200 acres, 
patented. Another deposit owned by this firm is 2 miles north of 
Anderson, near the railroad. This clay bed is 15 feet thick and worked 
by means of open cuts. Equipment for making bricks consists of 
grinding mill, brick kiln of a capacity of 40,000 bricks in seven hours, 
cars, etc. The stack is 120 feet high, with 12 feet diameter at base an 1 
8 feet at the top. Cost about $4.50 per thousand to manufacture the 
brick, which are used for buildings in Redding and other towns in th<.* 
Sacramento Valley. Fifteen men employed at present. Plant operated 
upon demand. 

This firm also owns a good deposit of fire clay in Sec. 34, T. 3i N., 
R. 5 W. Used in limekilns for lining. 
Bibl. : Bull. No. 38, p. 257. 

R. L. Reading owns an extensive clay deposit in the Reading Home- 
stead, east of Cottonwood. This deposit, on the Sacramento River, is 
1 mile long and ^ of a mile wide. The clay is 30 feet thick, capped by 
15 feet of gravel. It has not been developed. 

Southern Pacific Railway Company owns a clay bed in Sec. IS), 
T. 32 N., R. 4 W. This deposit covers about 40 acres, and is topped with 
gravel. It is undeveloped. 

Redding Brick and Tile Company owns 40 acres, patented, in See. 
19, T. 31 N., R. 5 W., 3 miles soutliwest of Redding. Small kiln at 
Redding. Idle. Operated upon demand. 
Bibl. : Bull. No. 38, p. 257. 

COAL. 

A bed of coal in Sec. 20, T. 33 N., R. 1 W., M, D. xM., has been pros- 
pected to a limited extent by ]\I. Kincaid, but the quality is poor, due 
to the presence of slate. The total thickness of this bed is 15 feet and is 
often traversed by sheets of slate and clay. It is of late origin geologi- 



SHASTA COUNTY. 13 

cally speaking, and the dip is practically horizontal. It would not pay 
to work. Coal croppings are found in other localities near this section, 
especially on Sees. 3, 7, 8, and 21, T. 33 N., R. 1 W., and also on Sec. 12, 
T. 33 N., R. 2 W. Very little work has been done and no coal has yet 
been found that could be mined at a profit. 

Bibl. : Reports VII, pp. 190, 191 ; XI, p. 29. 

A body of coal-bearing strata of recent origin is noted in the eastern 
part of Shasta County, among the western foothills of the Sierra 
Nevadas, about T. 37 N., R. 1 E., M. D. M. This deposit, covering 
several townships, consists of strata of soft and unaltered shales and 
sandstones, having a thickness of about 150 feet, and are spread out 
unconformably over the upturned edges of the metamorphic gold-bear- 
ing slates which form so large a part of the mass of the Sierras. 

COPPER. 

Description of copper belt. (Extract from Bulletin No. 50.) The 
crescent-shaped copper belt of Shasta County has a length of approxi- 
mately 30 miles, and a width of from ^ to 4 miles. The city of Redding, 
near its western end, is a little south of the chord of the arc 
described by the belt, while Iron Mountain and the Furnaceville dis- 
trict are the western and eastern ends, respectively, of the horn. The 
ore deposits occur as disconnected masses, or groups of vein formations, 
forming individual lodes and districts, and not as a continuous fissure 
system. These groups of deposits vary both in form of occurrence and 
in mineralization, being massive, lenticular beds of sulphides on the 
west, while the eastern half of the belt consists of irregular vein systems, 
the entire length being marked by massive exposures of gossan which 
cap its mineralized formations. These croppings of iron oxide and sul- 
phide stand out boldly on the elevations, especially on Iron Mountain, 
the westerly end of the copper belt. Southerly from Iron Mountain only 
two or three known copper deposits occur, widely separated, the min- 
eral formations of the belt being succeeded through the adjacent regions 
by gold quartz veins. 

The belt intersects the Sacramento River in Sec. 36, T. 34 N., R. 
5 W., M. D. M., at the point where it receives the Pitt, and for 10 
miles eastward it exhibits its gossan croppings on both sides of the latter 
stream, being bolder, however, on the north side. The McCloud River 
empties into the Pitt about 4 miles east of the Sacramento, thus 
terminating in the midst of the copper belt. The Pitt enters the belt 
farther eastward, and many of the tributaries to this stream and the 
Sacramento cross it ; numerous gulches diminish its apparent continuity, 
the gossans here and there having been eroded away or covered by 
surface wash. 



14 MINES AND MINERAL RESOURCES. 

The ores all carry gold and silver, with a low percentage of the baser 
metals, zinc, antimony, lead, etc. ; the values as a rule are higher in the 
central and eastern districts of the belt than in the larger ore bodies 
developed to the west. Many of the important copper properties were 
originally worked for their gold and silver values remaining in the 
decomposed portions of the deposits near the surface above the copper 
sulphides which are now being developed. 

Fluxing materials are plentiful and easily accessible, due to the 
quartz districts adjacent to and the large lime deposits in and near the 
copper belt. 

An ample supply of wood and timber, abundance of water, suitable 
smelter sites, transportation facilities, and good climatic conditions, 
present many favorable features for copper mining and smelting. 

The Mountain Copper, Mammoth, Bully Hill, Balaklala and After- 
thought are the noted copper mines. Smelters have been erected and 
operated by these companies, but only one, the Mammoth, was in 
operation in 1913. The Mountain Copper plant has been dismantled 
and the ore is now shipped to their smelter near Martinez. 

Outline of the Geology of the Copper Belt. (Extract from Bulletin 
No. 50.) The oldest sedimentary rocks are those of the Devonian age, 
which are found especially along the western districts extending north- 
ward from Clear Creek to the Big Backbone, and also east of the Sacra- 
mento River, in the vicinity of Baird. These rocks are metamorphic 
and include the limestones and their underlying slates, or schists, found 
near Kennett, Copley and Horsetown. 

The Carboniferous represents the next succeeding period among the 
sedimentary rocks, and includes both limestones and slates. This period 
is represented by the conspicuous limestone belt east of the McCloud 
River, near Baird, and extending in a southerly direction beyond the 
Pitt River. 

The next oldest sedimentary rocks, succeeding the Carboniferous 
period, is represented by those of the Triassic age, which occur still 
farther east in the vicinity of Squaw Creek and Bear Mountain. They 
consist, for the most part, of silicious slates, overlain in some places by 
limestone which is usually very fossiliferous. The limestones to the 
north and east of Bully Hill belong to the Triassic period. 

The igneous rocks are vitally connected with the ore deposits of the 
copper belt. The geological age to which they seem referable can not 
be younger than the Cretaceous nor older than the Triassic. Most of 
the rocks are of acid character, being high in the percentage of silica. 
In the main, igneous rocks seem to underlie all of the sedimentary rocks. 
Rhyolite, trachyte and andesite are names properly given to surface 
flows of volcanic rocks, and such flows occur throughout the copper 
districts, associated with tuffs and breccias of a similar age and charac- 



SHASTA COUNTY. 15 

ter. These volcanic rocks, including both the flows and the fragmental 
rocks, are especially seen near Iron Mountain, the Shasta King, Bully 
Hill and Afterthought mines. Porphyry and diabase dikes occur in 
the belt also, the latter accompanying the iron ores. The copper belt, 
in the main structural features, consists of a number of north and south 
folds, or belts, of sedimentary rocks which belong to a succession of 
periods, and beneath which extend the rocks of the great granitic 
intrusions. Dike rocks have been found penetrating both the eruptives 
and the overlying sedimentary rocks. 

ORE DEPOSITS. 

The deposits of copper belonging to the Shasta belt are vastly different 
from the usual quartz veins as ordinarily understood, both as to their 
forms as ore bodies and as to their origin. These ore bodies, as a rule, 
are of great size, consisting of large bodies of massive sulphides occur- 
ring along the borders of or within areas of eruptive rocks. They are not 
often bounded along the sides by definite walls, though sometimes one 
wall is in evidence, emphasized as to its extent by a selvage of clay and 
other similar material showing a certain amount of either lateral or 
vertical movement. Evidence is lacking to show that such walls have 
had any connection with the genesis of the ore. The ore bodies fade 
out by gradual transitions from ore, in which there is more or less 
waste, to rock in which there is more or less ore, and finally into rock 
with only a small percentage of disseminated sulphides. 

There are three classes of ore deposits within the copper belt. The 
first of these consists of deposits of magnetic iron (magnetite) with 
pyrrhotite and pyrite, as represented north of the Pitt River, and south- 
east of Baird, and the largest at the head of Potter Creek. The second 
class consists of massive deposits of pyrite, chaleopyrite and other sul- 
phides, which form the principal deposits of copper ore lying west of the 
Sacramento River, and includes the ore bodies of Iron Mountain, Squaw 
Creek, Backbone Creek, etc. The third class, including vein-like deposits 
of mixed sulphides, and a relatively large percentage of gold, silver, zinc, 
antimony, etc., is represented by the ore bodies of Copper City, the 
Bully Hill, Afterthought, and other mines. 

Residual accumulations of metallic oxides often form thin crusts of 
masses of ** gossan," or else only stain the rocks upon which it is depos- 
ited. The chief metallic element of the '* gossan" is iron, though it very 
often contains a small percentage of copper, and it has often formed 
an ore of gold and silver, as in the Iron Mountain, Bully Hill and 
Afterthought mines. 

The ''gossan" at the Iron Mountain consists in many cases of crusts 
of limonite many feet in thickness, while at the Bully Hill the surface 
indications are very different, although the term ''gossan" is likewise 



16 



MINES AND MINERAL RESOURCES. 



applied. Instead of crusts of limonite the surface at the latter is 
largely covered by broken and stained masses of rock, often light col- 
ored, but generally containing some metallic oxides. 

COPPER MINES. 
Afterthought, formerly known as the Peck, is located in the North 
Cow Creek mining district, in Sees. 10, 11, 15 and 5, T. 33 N., R. 2 W.. 
M. D. ]\I., in the Shasta Forest Reserve, and in the town of Ingot, 
which is 24 miles from Redding, the county seat. This group, 
consisting of 1650 acres, of which 1550 are patented, is owned by tho 
Afterthought Copper Company, formerly known as the Great Western 
Development Company, S. E. Bretherton, president and manager; T. II. 




Photo No. 5. Smelter, Afterthought Copper Mine. 

Adams, secretary; J. H. Bull, superintendent; F. L. Wilson, chemist. 
Home office, Indianapolis, Ind. The Copper Hill and the After- 
thought claims hold the larger part of the ore body and are the main 
producers. The ore body is distinctly a contact deposit in a formation 
of marked schistose character, which is indicatory of severe metamor- 
phic action, the richest ore being encountered where the greatest move- 
ment has taken place in the shales and stratified andesite. The coiitfict 
is followed to a considerable depth, much of the best ore being mined 
from the lower levels. 

There are two parallel veins, the Afterthought and Copper Hill, 
having a northwest and southeast strike, and a dip of 40° NE. Occur- 
rence and shape of the ore resembles that of the Bully Hill. Workin^^s 
consist of a main adit 2200 feet in length (nine tunnels in all), six levels, 
crosscuts, raises, slopes, 5:M)-fcot sliaft and 230-foot winze, comprising 
in all several thousand f(H't of development work. Ore shoots have a 



SHASTA COUNTY. 17 

length of 400 and a width of 25 feet. The ore is extremely refractory, 
containing, besides gold, silver and copper, a high percentage of zinc 
(sphalerite) and barinm. The average ore carries 2.81% copper, 11.6% 
iron, 5.4% lime, 3% zinc, 20.25% sulphur, 18% silica, 5.3% alumina, 
7.4% barite, and $4 per ton in gold and silver. Laboratory experi- 
ments are being made to endeavor to devise a method of working the 
high grade zinc ores. 

The mine equipment consists of a 30-inch gauge railroad, 1 mile 
long from the mine to the smelter, Davenport steam locomotives, two 
20 h.p. steam and one 30 h.p. electrical hoists, cages, air compressor, 
drills and all necessary buildings. The smelter plant, 1 mile below 
the mine in the town of Ingot, 150 tons daily capacity, was constructed 
in 1904 and operated until 1908, during which tim^ the output aver- 
aged $350,000 yearly (see Photo No. 5). This plant consists of two 
blast furnaces, two hot blast stoves, blowers, pumps, sampling mill, 
crushers, storage bins, ore yards, shops, dwellings and offices, and one 
electrical substation, power being obtained from the Northern Cali- 
fornia Power Company. Company also owns the railroad from 
Anderson to Bella Vista (old Shasta Lumber Company's road), and 
supplies are hauled from Bella Vista to the plant, a distance of 12 
miles. The cost of operating the smelter is heavy, so that only a high 
grade of ore can be handled. This property is on the eastern end of 
the copper belt, and was discovered in 1872 by James Peck, and after 
passing through several hands was acquired by the present owners in 
1903. Worked at one time for gold only, as some of the oxide ore on 
the surface was very rich. Company claims a considerable tonnage of 
good ore in sight. During 1913 only five men were employed. Donkey 
mine adjoins this group on the east. 
Bibl. : Bull. No. 50, pp. 102-105. 

Arps, in Sees. 20, 21, 28 and 29, T. 34 N., R. 3 W., IJ miles north 
of Copper City, in the Pittsburgh mining district, consists of 250 acres 
in the Shasta Forest Reserve, adjoining the Copper City claims of the 
Bully Hill Mining Company. Owners are Arps & Saeltzer. Develop- 
ment work consists of five tunnels, from 350 to 850 feet long, and a 160- 
foot drift. Ore is base, carrying considerable zinc. Formation similar 
to the Bully Hill. Some good ore found on the surface. Arps, one of 
the owners, doing some development work. Prospect. 
Bibl. : Bull. No. 50, p. 110. 



Balaklala Copper Mine, consisting of 1149 acres, patented, is in the 

Flat Creek mining district, in Sees. 10, 11, 12, IS^A^^Mc^^hnd 21, 

T. 33 N., R. 6 W., about 3 miles northwest of^^^S^feM^^Jt 

owned by the First National Copper Compani^ but ft^ofj^^rated url^der 

u N r V It: R s I T \' 

OP 




18 MINES AND MINERAL RESOURCES. 

the name of the Balaklala Consolidated Copper Company, T. W. Law- 
son, president ; W. A. Kerr, secretary ; F. M. Leland, general manager ; 
D. S. Epperly, superintendent. Home oflSce, New York. Property 
acquired in 1905 from the Western Exploration Company. The mines 
are located on the south side of Squaw Creek at an elevation of 2400 
feet. The country rock is meta-rhyolite ; several faults from 2 to 100 
feet in width parallel with the strike of the ore bodies. Ore bodies 
consist of a hard, heavy iron sulphide, carrying chalcopyrite, a little 
galena, covellite and some gold and silver. Two large separate ore 
bodies are known, one near Mule Gulch, the other in the vicinity of 
Windy Camp. The eastern body, near Mule Gulch, was discovered by 
means of diamond drills and developed through the Weil tunnel, which 
has a length of 2400 feet. Raises were made through its entire thick- 
ness, and drifts run on both sides through the ore and the dimensions 
were found to be 1200 feet in length (east to west), 300 feet in width 
(north and south), and from 20 to 40 feet thick. The development 
work comprises several thousand feet of drifts, three crosscuts from 
40 to 400 feet in length, eight levels, eight raises from 40 to 400 feet in 
height, tunnels and open cuts. Ore is blocked out in 25-foot sections 
from the Weil tunnel. The other deposit, Mule Gulch, is over 900 feet 
long and 20 to 60 feet thick. Ore is reported to run : gold .025 oz. ; 
silver .85 oz. ; copper 2.46%; silica 23.5%; iron 29.8%. Equipment 
consists of 16,500 feet of aerial tramway to bring ore from mine to 
smelter, 3 miles of telephone line, and all equipment necessary t^ 
operate a large mine. ^>The smelter plant, some 3 miles from the work- 
ings, at Coram, consists of four 18-foot McDougal roasting furnaces, 
three 55'^ x 240'' water jacketed blast furnaces, smelting furnaces, one 
17'x92' reverberatory furnace, water plant, sampling mills, three 
boilers using oil for fuel, generators, offices, etc. Electric power 
obtained from Northern California Power Company. Daily capacity 
of smelter 1000 tons ; production in 1908 was 3,061 tons. Smelter idle 
since 1911. Number of men employed at present sixty-five — fifteen in 
mine and fifty on surface. Total operating cost in 1908 was $5.58 
per ton. One of the large copper mines of Shasta County, with over 
2,000,000 tons of ore in sight. Hall desulphurizing plant being 
installed. 

Bibl.: Bull. No. 50, pp. 88-94; Reports X, p. 638; XII, p. 245; 
XIII, p. 61. 

Bald Eagle, consisting of 140 acres, in Sec. 10, T. 34 N., R. 3 W., 
2 miles north of De La Mar, in the Pittsburg mining district. Claims 
are in the Shasta Forest Reserve. Owner, J. Gilardy. Ore similar to the 
Bully Hill. Only small amount of development work done and extent of 
ore body not determined. Idle at present. 



SHASTA COUNTY. 19 

Brushy Canyon, consisting of 160 acres in Sec. 34, T. 34 N., R. 3 W., 
about 2 miles southeast of Copper City, in the Pittsburgh mining 
district. Owners, W. Collins et al. A tunnel is in over 300 feet 
through a black, slaty-shale formation, distorted and sheared by intru- 
sions. Ledge outcrops on the surface. Idle. 
Bibl. : Bull. No. 50, p. 102. 

Bully Hill, one of the famous copper mines of California, is located 
in Sees. 15, 16, 21, 22 and 28, T. 34 N., R. 3 W., M. D. M., in the Pitts- 
burgh mining district, near the town of De La Mar, and in the Shasta 
Forest Reserve. The holdings comprise 450 acres, of which 320 are 
patented, and include the old Winthrop and Baxter, Bully Hill, Rising 
Sun and Rising Star groups, all well toward the eastern end of the cop- 
per belt. General Electric Company, of Syracuse, New York, owners. 
Geo. Hanley, superintendent. The Sacramento and Eastern standard 
gauge railroad, owned by this company, connects the mine with Pitt 
station on the Oregon branch of the Southern Pacific Railroad. 
This road is about 14 miles long, and handles all necessary freight. 
The Bully Hill mine lies in meta-rhyolite. The ore is found in veins 
trending northeast and southwest with almost a vertical dip to the 
east, width from 4' to 400', averaging about 30'. The eastern wall is 
formed by basalt, and the vein occupies a shear zone. Two main 
parallel lodes have been exploited. The ore occurs in irregular lentic- 
ular bodies, connected by narrow seams of ore, attaining an average 
width of 45 feet, and a length of 200 feet. In the basalt wall are 
found ore deposits fully equal to those occurring in the vein. The 
ore is of a complex and refractory nature, carrying zinc, antimony, cop- 
per, gold and silver. Copper oxides are found in the upper levels, 
changing into copper glance (chalcocite) with depth, and chaleopyrite 
in the lowest levels. 

The mine has been opened by a number of tunnels with extensive 
drifts, crosscuts, raises, comprising several thousand feet. There are 
nine levels 100 feet apart, eight raises from 50 to 560 feet in height, 
and 1100-foot crosscut on the Bully Hill claim. The lowest tunnel (No. 
3 level) was run as a crosscut and struck the vein at a distance of 1100 
feet, and about 600 feet below the gossan outcrop. At this point a 
station (100 feet square) was established, extensive hoisting and pump- 
ing machinery installed, and a 3-compartment shaft sunk to a depth of 
950 feet. No. 3 level is connected by chutes and raises with the upper 
workings, of which some drifts run along the vein 800 and 1000 feet. 
This level is connected by railway with the smelter 1 mile distant and 
the ore handled through it. The mine is timbered by the square set 
system, the timbers being floated down the Pitt River from the timber 
region to the northeast. 



20 MINES AND MINERAL RESOURCES. 

The mine equipment consists of ears, tools, a 2-drum electric hoist, 
two electrical pumps, shops, compressor plant, and all necessary dwell- 
ings. 

The smelting plant, daily capacity 400 tons, was installed in 1901, 
at a cost of $200,000, and consists of one water-jacket furnace (42" x 
120"), two calcining furnaces, five converters for bessemerizing the 
matte, shops, etc. Idle during 1913. The product of the converters 
is blister copper about 98% fine, and is shipped to the refinery built 
by Capt. De La Mar on Kill von KuU, near New York City. As 
the ore carries considerable zinc, laboratory tests are being made to 
find a proper method of treatment. During 1913 sixteen men were em- 
ployed. This mine has the greatest depth below the surface of any 
copper property in California, and has produced several millions. It 
was worked as a silver mine in the '60s by H. McDonnell, as the ore 
on the surface carried high values in this metal. Acquired later by 
James Sallee, and purchased by Captain De La Mar in 1899 and sold 
in 1903 to present owners. 

Bibl. : Bull No. 50, pp. 78-84; Report XIII, pp. 61, 62. 

Chance, in Sec. 21, T. 34 N., R. 3 W., consists of 80 acres, patented, 
in the Pittsburgh mining district, about 1 mile north of Copper City. 
Owner, R. G. Dunn. Ore body, consisting of heavy grayish sulphides, 
is similar to the Bully Hill. Extent of shoot not determined, as only 
small amount of development work has been done. Short tunnels. 
Bully Hill group of claims to the east. Prospect. Idle. 

Congress, consists of 120 acres in Sec. 4, T. 33 N., R. 2 W., in the 
North Cow Creek district, about 2 miles west of Ingot. Owner, H. A. 
Cook, of Ingot. A series of exploration tunnels aggregating 500 feet 
have been run, but no great depth below the croppings have been 
reached. Owner does assessment work only. Prospect 
Bibl. : Bull. No. 50, p. 111. 

Copley listed under gold. 

Crystal Group, consisting of twenty-three claims, is located in Sec. 11, 
T. 33 N., R. 6 W., in the Flat Creek mining district, adjoining the 
Balaklala on the north and the Vulcan on the west, and about 3^ miles 
northwest of Coram. Owners, Crystal Copper Company, W. S. Tyler, 
president; J. L. McGinnis, secretary. Short tunnels. Idle. Prospect. 
Bibl.: Bull. No. 50, p. 113. 

De Dallis, consists of 175 acres in Sec. 34, T. 34 N., R. 3 W., in 
the Pittsburgh mining district, aboiit 1^ miles southeast of Copper City, 
in the Shasta Reserve. Owners, Ellis et al. Slate foot and quartz- 
porphyry hanging-walls. Ore body said to be 200 feet long and 8 



SHASTA COUNTY. 21 

feet wide. Several hundred feet of development work consisting of 
420-foot tunnel and drifts. Three men employed. Prospect. 
Bibl. : Bull. No. 50, p. 102. 

Donkey, consists of 40 acres, patented, in Sec. 11, T. 33 N., R. 2 W., 
in the North Cow Creek mining district, about 2 miles northeast of 
Ingot, and in the Shasta Forest Reserve. Owner, A. J. McKendrick, 
of Ingot. It is an old property located in 1876 by A. J. Cook, and 
said to be an extension of the Afterthought lead. The ore occurs in 
rhyolite, and is a heavy grayish sulphide, carrying a high percentage 
of zinc, in addition to copper, gold and silver. Development work 
consists of a 200-foot shaft, 300 feet of drifts, and a 100-foot raise. 
Equipment consists of electrical hoist, 1500-gallon electrical pump, 
and dwellings. Western Zinc Company of San Francisco worked the 
property on a lease for a time and shipped 300 tons of ore to their 
plant at South San Francisco. Ore very difficult to treat on account 
of zinc. Property has been a producer. Idle. 
Bibl. : Bull. No. 50, pp. 105, 106. 

Friday & Lowden, consists of thirteen claims, in Sees. 5 and 6, 
T. 33 N., R. 5 W., about 3 miles west of Kennett, in the Backbone 
mining district. Owner, J. R. Lowden et al., of Redding. This group 
of claims is the first encountered on the copper belt on the north 
side of Squaw Creek, and is directly east of the gold belt in which the 
Uncle Sam mine is located. Elevation about 2000 feet. The geolog- 
ical conditions are similar to those found in adjacent territory on the 
copper belt. Oxide ore carries considerable gold, and the property 
was worked at one time for this metal. Workings consist of about 
1000 feet of tunnels. Idle. 

Bibl. : Bull. No. 50, pp. 94, 95. 

Oiant Consolidated, consists of thirteen claims, in Sees. 19 and 24, 
T. 33 N., R. 5 and 6 W., about 3 miles northwest of Copley, in the 
Flat Creek mining district. Owners, W. H. Soderberg et al., of San 
Francisco. Claims are located on the eastern edge of this part of the 
copper belt, north of the Jumping Jack. Only slightly developed by 
a 310-foot tunnel, and some open cuts. Prospect. Idle. 
Bibl. : Bull. No. 50, p. 85. 

Gold Belt, consists of six claims, in Sec. 4, T. 33 N., R. 2 W., about 
2 miles west of Ingot, in the North Cow Creek mining district, and in 
the Shasta Forest Reserve. Owners, Jones & Tucker, of Ingot. A 
50-foot shaft penetrated 6 feet of iron capping, below which a schistose 
and slaty formation was encountered, carrying copper sulphurets with 
traces of gold, silver and zinc. Prospect. Idle. 
Bibl. : Bull. No. 50, p. 111. 



22 MINES AND MINERAL RESOURCES. 

Oolinsky Oroup, formerly known as Little Backbone, under bond tc 
J. Bayhau, is located in Sec. 28, T. 34 N., R. 5 W., about 4 mile^ 
west of Kennett, in the Backbone mining district. Owner, B. Gtolinsky. 
of Kennett. Holdings consist of 300 acres, patented, adjoining the Man.- 
moth mine on the east. Ore body and formation similar to the Mam 
moth. Workings consist of several tunnels, one being 800 feet ir 
length, 400 feet of drifts, and one stope. Ore bin and dwellings on the 
property. Produced $70,000. Five men employed. Some good or- 
in sight. 

Bibl.: Bull. No. 50, p. 111. 

Great Verde, formerly known as the Vulcan, is located in Sees. 11 
and 12, T. 33 N., R. 6 W., about 7^ miles west of Kennett, in th^ 
Flat Creek mining district. Holdings consist of twelve claims (four 
patented), owned by the Vulcan Mining Company of San Francisco 
W. K. Lisle, superintendent. Several tunnels. Some low grade ore 
in sight. A little prospecting done with a diamond drill. Adjoins the 
Balaklala on the north. Idle at present. Prospect. 
Bibl. : Bull. No. 50, p. 98. 

Hartford consists of ten claims, 3 miles north of the mouth of 
Protem Creek. Owners, Hartford Consolidated Mining Company, "W. 
Gerry, president. Limited amount of sulphide ore. Only developed to 
a limited extent by 500 feet of tunnels. Lode on the surface 8 feet 
wide, and can be traced about 100 feet. Surface ores consist of oxides 
and carbonates of copper. Prospect. Idle. 
Bibl. : Bull. No. 50, p. 108. 

Indiana and Last Chance consists of four claims, in Sec. 29, T. 33 N.. 
R. 5 W., about i mile north of Copley, in the Flat Creek mining district. 
Owners, Roan & Putney. Workings comprise several hundred feet of 
tunnels and drifts. Heavy sulphide ore, with some high grade oxides 
on the surface. Small producer. Two men employed. 

Ingersoll, formerly known as the Peerless, is located in Sees. 25 
and 36, T. 33 N., R. 6 W., in the Flat Creek mining district, about 2 
miles west of Copley. Holdings consist of 300 acres, adjoining the 
Trinity Copper Company's property. Heavy gossan outcrop similar 
to the Trinity Copper, on same lead. Workings consist of a 350-foot 
tunnel on the lode, and a 190-foot crosscut. Idle. 
Bibl. : Bull. No. 50, p. 114. 

Jumping Jack, consists of five claims in Sees. 24 and 25, T. 33 N., 
R. 6 W., in the Flat Creek mining district, about 3 miles west of Copley. 
Owner, W. Candrick. Claims on same belt as the Iron Mountain. Only 



SHASTA COUNTY. 23 

slightly developed by a tunnel 400 feet long; extent of ore body not 
determined. Prospect. One man working. 
Bibl.: BuU. No. 50, p. 85. 

Kosh Creek, consists of twelve -claims, in Sec. 23, T. 37 N., R. 1 W., 
several miles north of the copper belt. Owners, W. Murray et al. 
Ore is a dark basaltic rock, carrying native copper, which occurs in 
globules and films in the vesicles of the rock. Ore zone said to be 200 
feet wide. Slightly developed. Idle. Prospect. 
Bibl. : Bull. No. 50, p. 108; Report XIII, p. 63. 

Loradne, located in Sees. 7 and 8, T. 33 N., R. 5 W., adjoins the 
Spread Eagle group on the northeast, and about 4 miles west of Coram 
Station. Owner, D. Endicott et al. One tunnel 425 feet long on the 
ore body and several short crosscuts. Idle. 
Bibl. : Bull. No. 50, p. 87. 

Mammoth Copper Mine, the largest copper producer in California, is 
located in Sees. 2, 3, 29, 31, 32, and 33, T. 33 and 34 N., R. 5 W,, 
about 4 miles northwest of Kennett. The holdings, consisting of 2500 
acres patented, and several claims held by location, are owned by the 
United States Mining and Smelting Company, but this mine is 
operated as the Mammoth Copper Mining Company. President, 
W. G. Sharp ; secretary, P. W. Bachelder ; general manager, F. W. Met- 
calf ; superintendent of mine, R. E. Hanley; superintendent of smelter, 
J. H. Kerbin. Home oflSce, Boston, Mass. Elevation at main 
workings 3000 feet. Formation and character of ore similar to other 
mines on the western portion of this copper belt. Some of the ore 
bodies are 800 feet long and 90 feet wide, and are opened up by 
numerous tunnels, drifts, stopes, etc., aggregating over 60,000 feet of 
development. The lowest tunnel, the Coleman level, is over 2200 feet 
long, and serves for hauling the ore from all parts of the workings to 
the surface, where it is dumped into bins, and then conveyed to the 
smelter, a distance of four miles, by means of electric cars. In working 
the mine the top-slicing method is used. After removing the ore from 
a certain area the empty stope is filled by caving down the roof. The 
effect of this method is seen on top of the mountain above the workings, 
where the ground has caved in many places and is crossed by numerous 
fissures. 

The greatest depth on the ore bodies is 700 feet. There is a large 
tonnage of low grade ore blocked out. The mine equipment consists 
of all mechanical devices necessary to operate on a large scale, such as 
compressors, sawmill, shops, railways, both electric and steam (at 
smelter), ore bins, dwellings, etc. Nelson, the discoverer of this mine, 



24 MINES AND MINERAL RESOURCES. 

worked it in a small way for gold, as the gossan carries gold valuer 
similar to the Iron Mountain. The smelter at Kennett has a capacity 
of 2200 tons (see photo No. 6). A bag house has been installed t< 
gather the fumes. The semi-pyritic process of smelting is used, th^^ 
ore being treated with a low percentage of coke. The matte is treatt l 
and refined at Chrome, New Jersey. Smelter is not running at ful. 
capacity, as only 1200 tons are being handled at present. About 82' 
men are employed. Operating cost is very low. The smelting proce.s^ 
consists in eliminating the excess of iron in the ore by adding an exce.v 




Photo No. 6. Mammoth Smelter; bag house in center. 

of silica and lime to the charge, so as to obtain a thin slag. It requires 
one car of coke to three of ore and silica, which are automatically 
conveyed from the weighing platform to the blast furnaces (five in 
number) by means of electrical trains. The matte from the furnaces is 
taken to the converters by means of a 50- ton crane. The converters, 
made by Allis-Chalmers Company, are 96" x 150'' and are acid lined. 
When the five converters are running the first matte is reconcentrated 
in the blast fiirnace up to 40%. ]\Iatte as low as 18% has been treated. 
The bag hou.se, contained in a building 210' long, 63' wide and 6Q' 
high, was built in 1910 to remove the arsenic, siilphur and other impur- 
ities from tlie fumes. This house is divided into five sections or towers, 
each section containing 592 bags, or a total of 2960. The bags, madi* 
of woolen, are 34 feet long and 18 inches in diameter, and are set 
longitudinally. The residue, collected in the bags from the fumes, is 
in the form of a white powder (arsenic, sulphur, gold), and when 
shaken from the bags drops into a water hopper and is then removed. 
As no process has as yet been devised for treating this residue, it is 
stored near the smelter. Some 16 tons o])tained daily at the present 
time. Upon leaving the blast furnaces, these fume.s pass through a 
steel pipe 10 feet in diameter, thence into brick flues, then into four 



SHASTA COUNTY. 25 

steel pipes, each 8 feet in diameter, thence into a fan discharge chamber 
from which they enter steel pipes 4 feet in diameter, arranged in nine 
sets of five each, and then into the distributing chamber of the bag 
house. 

Bibl. : Bull. No. 50, pp. 95, 97. 

Marshall & Walters, consists of 160 acres in Sees. 14 and 15, T. 
33 N., E. 6 W., in the Flat Creek mining district, about 4 miles west 
of Coram Station. Owners, Marshall & Walters, of Redding. Slightly- 
developed by a tunnel 400 feet long. Prospect adjoining the Stowell 
on the south. Idle. 

McClure, consisting of 160 acres, patented, is located in Sees. 9 and 
16, T. 34 N., R. 3 W., 1^ miles north of Copper City, in the Pittsburgh 
mining district, and adjoins the Bully Hill on the northeast. Owners, 
Mt. Shasta Gold Mines Corporation. Formation and ore body similar 
to its famous neighbor. The principal development work consists of a 
crosscut tunnel over 500 feet long, in which some good ore is exposed. 
Prospect. Two men employed. 
Bibl. : Bull. No. 50, p. 110. 

Mineral Mountain consists of six claims, en the southwest terminus of 
the copper belt, in Sec. 13, T. 32 N., R. 6 W., in the Flat Creek 
mining district, and 3 miles south of Iron Mountain. Owners, D. T. Cal- 
lahan et al. Three hundred-foot tunnel shows sulphide ore. Surface 
indications of other ore bodies. Prospect. Idle. 
Bibl. : Bull. No. 50, p. 84. 

Morris, consists of 120 acres, in Sec. 10, T. 34 N., R. 3 W., in the 
Pittsburgh mining district, about 2\ miles north of De La Mar, and in 
the Shasta Forest Reserve. Owner, W. H. Barkhurst, of Redding. Ore 
similar to Bully Hill. Two tunnels, 400 feet and 80 feet in length. 
Prospect. One man working. 

The Mountain Copper, formerly known as Iron Mountain, is the 
pioneer copper mine of the Shasta County copper belt. The holdings, 
consisting of several hundred acres, patented, are located in Sees. 34 
and 35, T. 33 N., R. 6 W., M. D. M., 11 miles by railroad northwest of 
Keswick. Owners, Mountain Copper Company of London, England. 
F. B. Lawson, chairman of board of directors ; A. N. Frewer, secretary ; 
W. P. Kett, general manager ; W. L. Cole, superintendent. This com- 
pany controls a large acreage on Iron Mountain, between Slick Rock and 
Boulder creeks. Elevation varies from 2400 to 3200 feet. The mine is 
opened up by thousands of feet of tunnels driven from points high up 
the sides of the hill, and the ore has been stoped from a large portion of 
the ore body on the south side. Country rock is rhyolite and quartzite. 



26 MINES AND MINERAL RESOURCES. 

Deposit consists of massive lenses, with ''gossan" (reddish oxide cap- 
ping) on the surface, and below the capping a heavy grayish sulphide, 
carrying copper, gold and silver. Equipment consists of 11 miles of 
narrow gauge steam road which hauls the ore from the mine to the 
railroad (Southern Pacific Railway Company), cars, shops, 75 h.p. 
electric hoist, pumps, dwellings, etc. Power obtained from North- 
em California Power Company. The old smelter at Keswick has been 
dismantled and the ore is now shipped to the company's 350-ton smelter 
near Martinez. The company owns a large area of timber land on the 
Pitt River, 65 miles from Keswick, and the timber is floated down the 
Pitt and Sacramento rivers to this place. There is a large tonnage of 
ore blocked out in the mine; 350 men employed at present. Splendid 
success has been made in locating ore by means of the diamond drill. 
This property was worked in the eighties as a gold and silver mine, 
and was acquired in 1895 by London capital and the Mountain Mines 
Syndicate, Ltd., was formed, and in 1897 was transferred to the present 
Mountain Copper Company, composed practically of the same indi- 
vidual interests. The company has paid several millions in dividends. 
(For fuller details see Bull. No. 50, pp. 70-78.) 

Mountain Monarch consists of 120 acres, in Sees. 28 and 32, T. 32 N., 
R. 6 W., 2 miles south of Stella, in the Shasta mining district. 
Owners, Mountain Monarch Mining Company, of Redding. W. P. 
Aron, president. Ore occurs in meta-andesite, and is 5 feet wide on 
the surface, principally malachite. A crosscut has been run for a 
length of over 700 feet, and some ore exposed, but main ore body hais 
not been reached. Idle. 

Ohio consists of 120 acres, patented, in Sec. 12, T. 33 N., R. 6 W., 
5 miles west of Coram, in the Plat Creek mining district. Owners, Bliss 
Estate, of New York. Heavy sulphide ore, similar to the Iron Mountain. 
Several tunnels have been run, longest 530 feet. Idle. 

Oregon Consolidated, in Sees. 13, 14 and 23, T. 33 N., R. 6 W., 
about 6 miles west of Copley. Owners, Scamman et al. Holdings con- 
sist of six claims. Development work consists of several tunnels com- 
prising about 1500 feet in all. Some sulphide ore exposed, but the 
extent of the ore body not determined. Under bond at one time to the 
Baker Consolidated Copper Company of Detroit, Mich. Idle. Pros- 
pect. 

Bibl. : Bull. No. 50, p. 113. 

Pitt River, consisting of 140 acres, is located in Sec. 25, T. 34 N., 
R. 3 W., about 3^ miles northeast of Copper City, in the Pittsburgh 
mining district and in the Shasta Forest Reserve. Owner, E. Popejoy. 
Ore and formation similar to Bully Hill. Some of the oxide ore on the 



SHASTA COUNTY. 27 

surface carries good gold values. One tunnel 500' long. A little ore 
shipped to smelter. One miner employed. 

Polkingham consists of five claims in Sec. 11, T. 33 N., R. 2 W., 1 
mile south of Ingot, in the North Cow Creek mjning district and in tht> 
Shasta Forest Reserve. Owners, Polkingham Mining Company, ol' 
Ingot. R. Polkingham, president. A shaft 100 feet deep has been sunk 
on the croppings. Little ore in sight, some gold values in oxidized zone. 
Idle. 

Bibl.: Bull. No. 50, p. 111. 

Pope joy, in Sec. 25, T. 34 N., R. 3 W., 3 miles northeast of Copper 
City, in the Pittsburgh mining district and in the Shasta Forest Re- 
serve. Owner, W. Randall. The holdings, consisting of 100 acres, 
adjoin the Pitt River claims. Base ore similar to Bully Hill, extent of 
ore body not determined as development work confined to several short 
tunnels. Prospect. Idle. 

Roseman consists of nine claims and a smelter site, in Sees. 3 and 
34, T. 33 and 34 N., R. 4 W., about 6 miles east of Kennett. Owner, H. 
Roseman et al., of Redding. Ore occurs in or near a lime deposit, the 
footwall apparently being in serpentine. The formation has nothing in 
common with either the West Side district or the Bully Hill. Work- 
ings mainly along the outcrop, consisting of short tunnels. Idle. 
Bibl. : Bull. No. 50, p. 109. 

Shasta King constitutes the principal mining holding of the Trinity 
Copper Company, a Boston corporation; T. W. Lawson, president. 
The property consists of eighty-four patented claims, 580 acres on 
Squaw Creek and 800 acres of placer, mineral and timber lands, in 
Sees. 11, 12, 23, 24, 25 and 26, T. 33 N., R. 6 W., 7 miles west of Ken- 
nett. The Shasta King workings face the Balaklala, but are sev- 
eral hundred feet below it. The property was acquired in 1900 and 
development work pursued on an extensive scale for some years. The 
ore body has been opened up by tunnel levels, cutting it on the main 
level for over a distance of 1000 feet around the mountain side, and 
these have been connected by drifts along the footwall. The large ore 
body of a massive sulphide character, similar to the Balaklala, outcrops 
on the mountain side, forming one half of Squaw Creek canyon, course 
of which at the mine is east and west. The gossan croppings are very 
prominent and can be followed several thousand feet. A large tonnage 
of ore said to be blocked out. A double track incline 850' long 
handles the ore from the mine to the Balaklala aerial tram. The equip- 
ment consists of large ore bins at the mine and at Coram, shops, dwell- 
ings, and a large ofiice building in Kennett. No mining work being 
pursued at present. Three men employed as watchmen. 

Bibl.: Bull. No. 50, p. 87. 
3— €14456 



28 MINES AND MINERAL RESOURCES. 

Shdsta May Blossom, formerly known as the Keith, consisting^ of 
twenty-two elaimfi, is located in Sec. 14, T. 34 N., R. 3 ^W., i mile 
north of De La Mar, in the Pittsburgh mining district. Owners, Shasta 
May Blossom Copper Company, of Pruitvale; M. Lindley, president. 
Vein matter is a spar-schist footwall and granitic-porphyry hanging. A 
body of gossan croppings 30 feet wide is found near the top of the hill. 
Development work consists of 7 tunnels, aggregating 2000 feet, and 
several open cuts. Prospect. Two men employed. 
Bibl. : Bull. No. 50, p. 100. 

Spread Eagle, consisting of twenty-seven claims, in Sec. 13, T. 
33 N., R. 6 W., 4 miles west of Coram, in the Flat Creek mining" district, 
have been recently purchased by the Mammoth Mining Company. 
Former owner, W. G. Onn, of Copley. Development work consists of 
eight tunnels, aggregating about 3000 feet. Some good ore in sight. 
Bibl. : Bull. No. 50, p. 85. 

Stevenson consists of 140 acres, in Sec. 14, T. 33 N., R. 6 TV^., 3i 
miles west of Coram, in the Flat Creek mining district. Owner, C. 
Butler. Only slightly developed by means of short tunnels and open 
cuts. On the main copper belt. Gossan croppings well defined. 

Stowell, formerly known as the Grab, and also as the Webster Con- 
solidated, is one of the old locations on the West Side copper belt. It 
consists of three claims in Sec. 14, T. 33 N., R. 6 W., 4 miles west of 
Coram, in the Flat Creek mining district. Owners, Stowell Estate, oi 
Redding. Workings consist of short crosscut tunnels, aggregating 
c'bout 800 feet of development work, but none has reached the objective 
point. One man working. 
Bibl. : Bull. No. 50, p. 85. 

Sugar Loaf, formerly known as the Galvin, consists of 340 acres, in 
Sees. 25 and 26, T. 33 N., R. 6 W., immediately northeast of the 
Mountain Copper Company's holdings, on Sugar Loaf Mountain, the 
first prominent outcrop on the copper belt after leaving the Iron Moun- 
tain mines. The formation is the same as that encountered elsewhere 
on the belt. Croppings of gossan, 400 feet wide in places, indicate the 
presence of ore bodies in the rhyolitic rocks. It is owned by the Copper 
Mountain Consolidated Mining Company, of Redding ; J. Pilluis, presi- 
dent ; F. Grotefend, secretary. The development work consists of twelve 
tunnels, aggregating over 4000 feet. No definite ore body exposed as 
yet. Equipment consists of air compressor, shop and dwellings. 
Electric power obtained from Northern California Power Company. 
Three men employed. 

Bibl. : Bull. No. 50, p. 84. 



I 

J 



SHASTA COUNTY. 29 

Sulphide consists of four claims, in Sec. 16, T. 32 N., R. 6 W., ^ 
mile from Stella, in the Shasta mining district. Owner, J. F. Conkling. 
A. shallow exploration tunnel run along a contact shows up low grade 
sulphides carrying a little gold. Prospect. Idle. 

Summit Group, owned by the Stauffer Chemical Company of San 
Francisco, is located in Sec. 30, T. 34 N., R. 5 W., 4 miles northwest 
of Kennett, in the Backbone mining district. Chas. Kunze, of Kennett, 
superintendent. This property is situated on the eastern slope of 
Bohematosh Mountain, and adjoins the Mammoth Company's holdings 
on the west. The country rock is heavily mineralized, and the ore body 
is the same in character as the more southerly part of the copper belt. 
Extent.of ore body not determined, but is over 30 feet wide in places. 
The workings consist of three tunnels, one 400 feet long, and a 350-foot 
raise. A 4-drill Sullivan compressor, shop and dwellings constitute 
the surface equipment. Five men employed. 
Bibl. : Bull. No. 50, p. 97. 

GOLD. 

The gold production record of Shasta County from 1880 is derived 
principally from two sources — the smelting of base ores, and the milling 
of quartz (siliceous ores). 

The closing down of all but one of the smelters has caused a material 
decrease in the amount of gold produced, and several of the quartz 
mines supplying ore to these plants have stopped operations also. 
Adjacent to different parts of the copper belt are gold quartz districts, 
in which are many veins carrying low, medium, or high grade ores, 
which are base, as a rule, and can not be efficiently and profitably 
reduced by milling processes. They occur notably in the vicinity of 
- the old town of Shasta, 4 miles south of Iron Mountain, and are dis- 
tributed for several miles south and east of this end of the belt, espe- 
cially through the Shasta, Flat Creek and Old Diggings districts. In 
fact, gold quartz veins are abundant in close proximity to the copper 
belt generally, and the smelters have created a market for these ores and 
enabled the development of a number of quartz properties. 

In 1912 the quartz mines produced $702,267 in gold and $4,200 in 
silver, while the copper smelters yielded $220,775 gold and $420,894 
silver. 

French Gulch, 21 miles northwest of Redding, the most active quartz 
mining district in Shasta County, produced $380,305 in gold in 1912, 
or oyer 50% of the gold yield from siliceous ores. The Gladstone, 
one of the famous quartz mines in this county, is the largest producer 
in this district, next in order being the Milkmaid and Franklin, 
Brunswick, El Dorado and Eureka, Halcyon, Summit, and Washington. 



30 MINES AND MINERAL RESOURCES. 

The Midas, another famous quartz mine, is the only gold producer in 
the Harrison Gulch district. 

There are also a few small quartz producers near Stella, Buckeye, 
Igo, Kennett, Keswick and Ono. 

Placer mining is very limited, the dredging operations near Bedding 
affording the largest output. A small production is reported from the 
placers at French Gulch, Bayles (Delta), and Lamoine. 

HISTORY. 

Beading, of Trinity fame, gave his name to the district which sprang 
up in 1849 around Clear Creek and lifted Shasta City to prosperity. 
In this district, centering around Shasta, were a number of camps 
along and near Clear Creek, the most famous being Horsetown, whicli 
passed out of existence years ago. The bed of the creek proved rich 
and by the autumn of 1850 several dams were placed to turn the 
current. This stream is now being worked by means of a dredge. 

The main Sacramento Biver toward Soda Springs, acquired fame 
chiefly in 1850 when Dog Creek and other tributaries lured the pros- 
pector. Dredging operations are being pursued at the present time on 
the Sacramento Biver, just above Bedding. 

Placer gold was discovered in the region of Bully Hill as early as 
1853, which became known as the Pittsburgh district. With this dis- 
covery began a stampede which resulted in the location of a large 
number of placer claims, many of which were of little value, and active 
interest lapsed before 1870. 

In 1862 gold was discovered in the surface rock near Copper City, 
and when the ore was found to contain silver as well as gold, there was 
another rush into this district and a search begun for the supposed . 
rich veins of gold and silver. Bully Hill was located at this time. 

Eight quartz mills, comprising a total of 60 stamps, had been erected 
in this county prior to the year 1896, three mills (40 stamps), being 
in operation in French Gulch at that time. 

The Washington Mine, near French Gulch, discovered in 1852, is 
said to be the first quartz location in Shasta County, and in 1869 had 
the largest mill, consisting of 22 stamps. This property is still worked 
in a limited way and a small production obtained. All the old work 
ings are caved. 

In 1877 a mill was erected at Copper City to work ore from the Bully 
Hill, and during a period of three years over $640,000 was produced, 
the surface ore only being worked. 

The principal gold quartz deposits are fissure veins, generally nar- 
row, having steep dips, and occurring either in slate or in meta-andesite, 
and associated as a rule with porphyry dikes. The usual trend of the 
fissure is east and west, though minor variations are found occasionally. ' 



SHASTA COUNTY. 31 

GEOLOGY OF DISTRICTS. 

The deposits in the French Gulch district lie within the area of slate 
and conglomerate, generally associated with intrusive granite porphyry 
dikes. The workings in the Gladstone mine clearly demonstrate the 
persistency of the ore bodies with depth. 

A good wagon road connects French Gulch with Redding, the county 
seat and freight terminal for this district. The haul is about 21 miles 
over an easy grade. 

The line of the Northern California Power Company passes through 
the district, so that cheap electrical power is at hand. 

The topography of the county is such as to afford good tunnel sites. 
Mining operations can be pursued throughout the entire year. The cost 
of mining is reasonable. 

Bibl.: Report X, p. 635; U. S. Geol. Surv., BuU. No. 540, pp. 31, 
55,66. 

In the vicinity of SteUa, 11 miles northwest of Redding, the fissure 
veins cut the quartz diorite and alaskite porphyry, and the pay 
ore is apparently found along the edge of the latter. This district is 
said to rank next to French Gulch in total gold output. At the present 
time none of the properties are being worked on an extensive scale, 
hence the output is small. 

Bibl.: U. S. Geol. Surv,, Bui. No. 540, p. 47. 

In the Dog Creek District the deposits are all within the areas of 
metaTandesite, cut by dikes of feldspathic dacite porphyry and occa- 
sionally alaskite. The pay ores exposed in the development work consist 
of irregular shoots, but the extent of these bodies has not been deter- 
mined as yet. Delta, the nearest railroad point, is on the edge of this 
district, and a narrow gauge railroad extends from this station westerly 
for a distance of 7 miles. A number of promising quartz properties 
have been developed to a limited extent in this district, and the numer- 
ous ledges of pay ore should lead to considerable production in the near 
' future. 

Bibl. : U. S. Geol. Surv., Bull. No. 540, p. 71. 

The gold zone extends from the base ore belt, southwesterly, to the 
extreme boundary of Shasta County, including Igo, Ono and Harrison 
Gulch districts. 

The Igo District is 13 miles southwest of Redding, and some good 
placer ground has been worked in this section. The debris law has. 
stopped hydraulic operations. The quartz mining has been carried on 
to a limited extent. The pay shoots are short but carry good values in 
gold. Good wagon road from Redding to the town of Igo. The same 
general conditions apply to Ono, some 7 miles west of Igo. 



32 MmES AND MINERAL RESOURCES. 

The Harrison Gulch District, 50 miles southwesterly from Redding 
near the Trinity County line, is known principally on account of the 
Midas mine. Here the ore occurs in slate, near a porphyry dike, and 
considerable evidence of faulting is found. The pay shoot has an 
average width of 12 inches. The haul is rather expensive, as two 
mountain ranges must be crossed. 

The Squaw Creek District, extending westerly from Kennett, con- 
tains both base and free milling ores. The Uncle Sam gold mine is in 
this district. Rich pockets are often found along the contact of slate 
and meta-andesite and many prospectors have made a stake by ** pocket 
hunting. ^ ' The direct cause of several of the failures in lode mining 
is due to the installation of mills more elaborate than the size of the 
ore body justified. 

Bibl. : Report X, p. 639- 

AURIFEROUS GRAVEL. 

An immense deposit of auriferous gravel, commencing southwesterly 
from the city of Redding, in Sec. 36, T. 31 N., R. 6 W., near the old 
site of Ilorsetown and trending east to the foothills of the Lassen Buttes 
and down the Sacramento Valley, has been extensively worked in the 
past. 

Oregon Gulch, about 10 miles in length, was exceedingly rich and 
was worked from its source to the valley. It empties into the Sacramento. 
River IJ miles south of Redding. 

Onley Creek, another rich stream, heads in the Muletown Mountains, 
runs in a southeasterly course and empties into the Sacramento River 
about 1 mile south of Oregon Gulch. 

An old river bed, having a general northeast and southwest course, 
and crossing the Sacramento River one mile north of Redding at right 
angles has been traced from the northeast to the western boundary of 
the State. It passes through the old site of Horsetown, thence westerly 
and southeast of Igo ; here it turns to the southwest and passes through 
the old town of Ono, and can then be traced from here to Watson's 
Gulch, and thence into Arbuckle. This channel can be distinctly 
observed on the top of Arbuckle Mountain, 3000 feet above sea level; 
from which point it takes a short bend and runs in a westerly direction 
to Knob Gulch and can be traced up this gulch for over 10 miles. The 
placers of Knob Gulch were very rich where the channel crossed it. 
Upon approaching the Chauchalua Mountains all traces of the river bed 
disappear and are not again visible until Hay Fork, in Trinity County^ 
is reached. From that point it takes its regular course, passes through 
Humboldt County and empties into the Pacific Ocean at Gold Bluflf. 



SHASTA COUNTY. 33 

Hazel Greek, some 15 miles long, was worked in early days throughout 
its entire length, the gravel being very rich. This stream, after flowing 
southwesterly through country- rock of slate and granite, empties into 
the Sacramento River in Sec. 18, T. 37 N., R. 4 W., near Sims Station. 

DREDGING. 

There are several thousand acres of dredging ground along Clear 
Creek and the Sacramento River. Some of the land adjacent to the 
town of Igo is being drilled to determine dredging possibilities. Only 
two dredges are in operation in Shasta County at the present time, one 
on Clear Creek a few miles below Redding, and the other on the Sacra- 
mento River just above that city. The ground along Clear Creek, on 
which -dredging is being pursued, averages 20 feet in depth, the gravel 
being loose river wash, carrying few large boulders and only a little 
clay. The contour of the ground is fairly even and the timber growth 
is scattered: The gold is generally fairly coarse and worth about $19 
per ounce. Conditions for economical working are very favorable. 

Suction dredges have been operated along the Sacramento River, 
above Redding, and also along Clear Creek, but with poor success. 

William Desilhorst successfully operated a steam scoop along Clear 
Creek for several years, but the best ground has evidently- been worked , 
out as the plant has been idle for some time. 
Bibl. : Bull. No. 57, pp. 213-218. 

GOLD MINES— QUARTZ AND PLACER. 

Accident, formerly known as the Sybel, consists of 80 acres, pat- 
ented, in Sec. 7, T. 33 N., R. 7 W., about 5 miles northwest of 
I French Gulch, in the French Gulch mining district. Owners, Accident 
Gold Mining Company; home office. Redding; G. E. Garwood, 
president. Elevation at mine workings 3700 feet. Three veins on 
claims. Slate foot land diorite-porphyry hanging- walls. Strike N. 
80° W., dip 50° N. Ore shoot 100 feet long and 3 feet wide, free 
milling. Workings consist of a tunnel 2200 feet long, 400 feet of drifts, 
and a 100-foot stope. Reduction equipment consists of a 4-foot Hunt- 
ington mill, operated by steam power. Property said to have been a 
producer. Idle. Prospect. 

Bibl. : U. S. Geol. Surv., Bull. No. 540, pp. 68-69. 

Advance Consolidated, consisting of 135 acres (20 acres patented), 
is located in Sec. 2, T. 35 N., R. 6 W., 7 miles west of Delta, and i 
mile from the Delta Consolidated Railroad, in the* Dog Creek mining 
district. Owners, Advance Consolidated Mining Company of 
San Francisco. Three parallel veins on this group 4 feet wide. Ande- 



34 MINES AND MINERAL RESOURCES. 

site footwall and diorite hanging, strike east and west, dip vertical 
Pay shoot 400 feet long and 4 feet wide, free milling. Workings con- 
sist of four tunnels on the vein from 50 to 1100 feet long, and 1000 feet 
of drifts, stopes and raises. Reduction plant consists of old rolls (six il 
number), crusher, 50-ton cyanide plant (failure). Small producer. 
Considerable money expended on plant and in experimenting with the 
ore. Delta Consolidated to the east, and Trinity Consolidated to the 
south. One man working. 

Alice, consists of 120 acres, in Sec. 19, T. 32 N., R. 5 W., 1 mile 
southwest of Keswick, in the Shasta mining district. Owner, P. Bontc. 
Three parallel veins 3 feet wide, strike N. 60° E., dip S. 75° E., 
granitic-porphyry walls. Pay shoot 80 feet long and 3 feet wide, 
free milling. Best ore has a width of 8 inches. One tunnel 60O feet 
long on the veins, short stope and 200-foot drift. Reduction equipment 
consists of an old 4-stamp mill (850-pound stamps). Idle. Small pro- 
ducer at one time. Three men doing some prospecting work. 

Bibl. : Reports XII, p. 245; XIII, p. 349. 

Al Toland, consists of 60 acres, in the Shasta Forest Reserve, in 
Sec. 28, T. 36 N., R. 6 W., 7^ miles west of Delta and 1^ miles west 
of Delta Consolidated Railroad, in the Dog Creek mining district, 
Owner, A. L. Toland. Elevation 3700 feet. One vein on claims, width 
2i feet, strike NW. and SE., dip 45° SW., pay shoot 110 feet long 
and 2^ feet wide, free milling. Workings consist of several short tun- 
nels. Main tunnel 200 feet long and 180-foot winze at face of same: 
short drift and stope. Old 2-stamp mill, steam driven. Idle. Small 
producer, some high grade. Two men employed. 

American Mine, formerly known as the French Oulch, adjoins the 
Gladstone on the west, the workings consisting of tunnels at several 
elevations between 2500 and 3150 feet on the north ridge of Cline 
Gulch. This group is located in Sees. 12 and 13, T. 33 N., R. 7 W., 
3J miles northeast of French Gulch, in the French Gulch mining dis- 
trict. The holdings consist of 60 acres, patented, and 40 acres held 
by location. Owners are W. Franck et al., of French Gulch. The 
country rock consists of slate and conglomerate. Fissure vein has a 
strike of N. 63°-80° W., and a dip of S. 75° E.; slate walls. Pay 
shoot 125 feet long and 2 feet wide, free milling. Length driven 
on vein 1400 feet in tunnel, greatest depth 650 feet ; four tunnels from 
50 to 1400 feet in length ; one stope 125 feet long and 240 feet in height; 
80-foot winze and 300-foot raise. Mining and filling method used. 
Some of the old workings caved. Mine equipment consists of \ mile 
single track tram (mine to mill), cars, shop and dwellings. The old 
10-stamp mill, steam driven, is idle. Two men employed doing prospect 
work. Property said to have produced $300,000. Rich ore worked 



SHASTA COUNTY. 35 

from the surface. Located in 1886, and sold to a San Francisco com- 
pany which became involved in financial difficulties, and finally acquired 
by the present owners, the creditors. Not worked on any scale since 
1908. 

Bibl.: Beports, VIII, pp. 564^565; X, p. 637; XII, p. 245; XIII, 
p. 349 ; U. S. Geol. Suiv., Bull. No. 540, pp. 35, 60-61. 

Atlantic, consists of 100 acres, in Sees. 17 and 20, T. 31 N., R. 6 W., 
3 miles northwest of the town of Igo, in the Igo mining district. 
Owner, W. L. Kingsbury. Two parallel veins about 150 feet apart 
have been worked in a small way. Pay shoot 70' long and 15" 
wide, in granite. One tunnel on vein for a distance of 440 feet. A little 
ore shipped to Selby smelter gave returns of $80 per ton in gold. 
Small producer. Two men employed. 

Australia, consists of 80 acres, in Sees. 19 and 30, T. 32 N., R. 6 W., 
3 miles north of the old town of Shasta in the Shasta mining dis- 
trict. Owner, M. Garrecht. Elevation at main tunnel 1300 feet. 
Three veins, two parallel, on the claims ; only parallel veins have been 
worked. Strike east and west, dip 60° N., meta-andesite footwall 
and granitic porphyry hanging. Pay shoot 60 feet long and 4 feet 
wide. Workings consist of three tunnels on the veins, longest tunnel 
340 feet with a 40-foot winze at the face. Old 3-stamp mill, driven by 
water power from Brandy Creek (ditch 1 mile long), is idle. Stamps 
weigh. 850 pounds each. Small producer. Two men employed. 
Bibl. : Report XIII, p. 362. 

Black Bear, consists of 80 acres, in Sec. 9, T. 29 N., R. 10 W., 1 
mile south of Harrison Gulch, in the Harrison Gulch mining district. 
Owners, W. D. Lilly et al., of Redding. One vein 5' wide in slate, 
only slightly developed. Two short tunnels. 

Black Hawk, consists of 80 acres in Sec. 14, T. 31 N., R. 6 W., 
about 1 mile northwest of Centerville, in the Igo (formerly South 
Fork) mining district. Owner, W. Dunham. One vein, meta-andesite 
walls, only small amount of development work by a tunnel 400' long. 
Little ore taken out. Idle. Prospect. 

Black Spider, consists of 80 acres, in Sec. 19, T. 32 N., R. 5 W., 
about 1^ miles southwest of Keswick. Owner, R. Bell. Workings con- 
sist of old shaft 460 feet deep, a 420-foot tunnel, and short drifts. 
Ore shoot 160 feet long and 6 feet wide, free milling, but low grade. 
Little ore extracted. Idle. Alice prospect to the east. 
Bibl.: Reports XII, p. 246; XIII, p. 350. 

Bodie, in Sees. 6 and 32, T. 32 and 33 N., R. 7 W., about 3 miles 
southwest of French Gulch, in the French Gulch mining district, con- 
sists of 40 acres, at an elevation of 3800 feet. Owner, F. B. Rossi. 
4—014456 



36 MINES AND MINERAL RESOURCES. 

Vein occurs between a granodiorite footwall and a granitic-porphyry 
hanging. Pay shoot 250 feet long and 2 feet wide, free milling. Work- 
ings consist of a tunnel 560 feet long on the vein, 400 feet of drifts, 
stope 110 feet in length and a 40-foot shaft (caved). Old 5-stanip 
mill has been removed from the property. Small producer at one time. 
Idle. 

Bonanza, in Sec. 6, T. 32 N., R. 6 W., 4 miles northwest of 
Stella (old Whiskeytown), consists of 60 acres, at an elevation of 
1600 feet. Owner, M. C. Dewey et al., of Stella. Three veins, two 
parallel about 300 feet apart, and one cutting these at an angle of 40°. 
The vein that has been worked has a north and south strike, and dips 
50° southeast, slate footwall and granitic-porphyry hanging. This 
vein is cut by a diorite dike 20 feet wide, with an east and west strike. 
Pay shoot is 120 feet long and 14 inches wide. Workings consist of 
three tunnels about 50 feet apart — lower 180 feet long, middle 120 
feet, and upper 60 feet long. Bright Star to west. Idle. 

Bright Star, formerly known as the Iron Mask, consisting of 120 
acres, is located in Sec. 31, T. 32 N., R. 6 W., about 4^ miles north- 
wast of Stella, in the Shasta mining district. Owner, S. W. Ley>^, 
of San Francisco. Elevation 2400 feet. The vein has a north and 
south strike, and a dip of 60° E., slate footwall and granitic-porphyry 
hanging. Pay shoot said to be 200 feet long and 16 inches wide. 
Workings consist of two tunnels. Main tunnel on vein is 900 feet 
long and crosscut 180 feet in length, also 450 feet of drifts and a stope 
200 feet long. Old 5-stamp mill idle, driven by water; ditch 2 miles 
long, from Whiskey Creek. Property has been a producer but idle at 
present. Bonanza to the west. 

Bibl.: Report XII, p. 250; U. S. Geol. Surv., Bull. No. 540, p. 55. 

Brunswick, consists of 100 acres, in Sec. 20, T. 33 N., R. 7 W., 5 
miles west of French Gulch, in the French Gulch mining district. 
Elevation 3200 feet. Owners, Brunswick Mining Company. Two 
parallel veins. Strike east and west, dip 60° N., quartz-porphyry 
footwall and slate hanging. Pay shoot said to be 250 feet long and 
6 feet wide, free milling. About 6 inches of good ore on hanging- wall 
side. Five tunnels run on the vein, from 100 to 800 feet in length, 700 
feet of drifts, a stope 200 feet long and several open cuts, constitute the 
development work. Old 5-stamp mill idle. Said to have produced 
$100,000. Idle. 

Bibl. : Report XIIT, p. 351 ; U. S. G. S., Bull. No. 540, pp. 35, 37, 68. 

Bulwer and Virginia, in Sec. 18, T. 33 N., R. 7 W., 5 milcri north- 
west of French Gulch, in the French Gulch mining district, consists of 
40 acres. Elevation 2400 feet. Owners, J. Reinhaus et al., of French 



SHASTA COUNTY. 37 

Gulch. Three parallel veins on the claims, strike north and south, dip 
65° E., granitic-porphyry footwall and slate hanging. Ore shoot 200 
feet long and 2 feet wide, free milling, 700-foot tunnel on the vein. 
Little ore extracted. Idle. 

Bunker Hill consists of 60 acres, patented, in Sec. 29, T. 32 N., 
R. 5 W., 3 miles east of Shasta, in the Shasta mining district. Owners, 
Pryor and Logan. Elevation 1000 fe^t. One vein 5 feet wide, strike 
north and south, dip 40° E., granitic-porphyry walls. Workings con- 
sist of a tunnel 460 feet long and 200 feet of drifts. Idle. 

Cahtmet Consolidated, consisting of 80 acres of patented mineral 
land, is located in Sec. 20, T. 32 N., B. 5 W., about 1 mile south of 
Keswick. Owners, Dr. Garlick et al., of San Francisco. Elevation at 
tunnel 750 feet. Only one of the several veins on the claims has been 
worked. Strike is east and west, dip 15° N., diorite walls. Pay 
shoot over 200 feet long, with an average width of 20 inches. Ore is 
free milling near the surface, but tends to become base with depth 
(copper sulphides). Maximum depth on vein about 250 feet. The 
workings consist of a tunnel on the vein 1100 feet long, several hundred 
feet of drifts, raises and stopes. The reduction equipment consists of 
a 40-stamp mill (old), steam driven, four Prue vanners, and an old 
10- ton chlorination plant. Mine was a producer at one time, but has 
not been worked in recent years. Inez to north. 

Bibl. : Reports, VIII, p. 563 ; X, p. 631 ; XI, pp. 43, 395. 

Carnegie Group, Ltd., formerly known as the Clipper and Snider, is 
located in Sec. 1, T. 33 N., R. 6 W., 7^ miles west of Kennett, in the 
Plat Creek mining district. The group, consisting of 120 acres, 
patented, is owned by A. Di Nola et al., of San Prancisco. Elevation 
2300 feet. The vein has an east and west strike and dips 45° N., 
average width 2\ inches; granitic-porphyry walls. Pay shoot 200 feet 
long and 2^ feet wide, free milling. The workings consist of a shaft 
230 feet deep, with three fevels at 50', 150' and 200', drifts, 50-foot 
raise, and a stope 130 feet long, as well as a 460-foot tunnel, all on the 
vein. The reduction equipment consists of a 10-stamp mill, steam 
driven, two Prue vanners and blanket table. Idle. Property has been a 
producer but idle at present. Some ore in sight. Mentioned in our 
eleventh, twelfth and thirteenth reports. 

Central, consists of 80 acres, patented, in Sec. 33, T. 33 N., R. 5 W., 
2\ miles east of Copley, in the Plat Creek mining district. Owner, 
A. A. Anthony, of Whitehouse. Elevation 1500 feet. Two parallel 
veins about 150 feet apart on the claims, strike north and south, dip 
40° E., quartz-porphyry walls. Pay shoot 230 feet long and 6 feet 
wide, free milling near the surface but base with depth (copper sul- 
phides) . Workings consist of a tunnel on the vein, 1340 feet long, 900 



38 MINES AND MINERAL RESOURCES. 

feet of drifts and one stope. Old 6-foot Huntington mill, steam driven, 
Some production from the oxidized ore near the surface. Idle. 

Bibl.: Reports, VIII, pp. 565-566; X, p. 631; XII, p. 246; XIII, 
p. 351. 

Chapman and Voluntine (drift and hydraulic) mine, consists of 100 
acres, patented, in Sec. 25, T. 36 N., R. 6 W., J of a mile south of 
Centerville. Owner, C. A. Chapman of Redding. Course of channel, 
northeast and southwest, soft granite bedrock. Pay gravel about 20 
feet deep. Worked as a drift mine for some years, and then as a 
hydraulic proposition. Water obtained from Happy Valley ditch. 
Good producer until operations were stopped some twelve years ago on 
account of the debris law. Some good ground yet to be worked. 
Princess placer to the southwest. 

Clara, consisting of 60 acres, patented, is located in Sec. 17, T. 32, 
N., R. 5 W., ^ mile west of Keswick. Owner, 0. La Platte. Elevation 
1000 feet. Three parallel veins, granitic-porphyry walls. Pay shoot 
160 feet long and 20 inches wide, free milling. Tunnel on main vein 
700 feet long. A little high grade extracted. Prospect. Idle. 

Cleveland, consists of 60 acres, patented, in Sec. 15, T. 32 N., R. 5 W., 
4 miles west of Redding, in the Shasta mining district. Owner, D. H. 
Hunt, of Redding. Elevation 800 feet. Vein is 15 inches wide between 
diori*e walls, strike northwest, dip S. 60° W. Pay shoot said to be 
200 feet long and 15 inches wide. Ore is base, carrying gold with sul- 
phides of copper, lead and iron. Worked for gold. Some rich ore 
shipped to smelter. Only slightly developed by 200-foot tunnel, drift 
and stope. Idle. 

Climax, consists of 60 acres, in Sees. 16 and 21, T. 31 N., R. 6 W., 
about 3 miles northwest of Igo. Owner, S. W. Robinson. One vein 
in granite. Ore shoot short, free near surface but base with depth. 
Only limited amount of development work by means of short tunnels. 
Old Justin mill dismantled. Has been a small producer. Worked a 
few months each year. Prospect. 

Colorado, in Sees. 16 and 17, T. 33 N., R. 7 W., 3 miles northwest 
of French Gulch, in the French Gulch mining district, consists of 80 
acres. Elevation 1600 feet. Owner, T. McDonald of French Gulch. 
Vein is 10 inches wide, strike northeast and southwest, dip 40° N., 
granite-porphyry footwall and slate hanging. Ore shoot 160 feet long, 
free milling, 400-foot tunnel on the vein. Idle. 

Compton, consists of 40 acres, in Sec. 20, T. 32 N., R. 5 W., IJ miles 
south of Keswick, in the Shasta mining district. Owner, G. F. Bassett 
Elevation 900 feet. One vein in graaitic-porphyry. Short pay shoot. 
Slightly developed by short tunnel and drift. One man working. 



SHASTA COUNTY. 39 

Consolidated Oold Dredging Company, operating along the Sacra- 
mento River, own 260 acres, in Sees. 20 and 28, T. 32 N., R. 5 W., 
about 1^ miles northeast of Redding. W. F. McClure is president of 
the company, and W. D. Egilbert, superintendent of dredge. Course 
of channel is north and south, slate bedrock, hard and tilted. Depth 
of pay gravel from 8 to 20 feet. Dredge equipped with 5-foot buckets 
and handles about 50,000 cubic yards of gravel per month. Power is 
obtained from Northern California Power Company. Twelve men 
employed. 

Consolidated Kascinaska, formerly known as QiM/rtz Hill, in Sec. 
10, T. 32 N., R. 5 W., 4 miles southwest of Redding. Owners, Kascin- 
aska Mining Company, Chicago, Illinois. Holdings consist of 80 acres, 
patented, at an elevation of 950 feet. Two parallel veins strike N. 40° 
W., dip 50° W., slate footwall and quartz-porphyry hanging, width of 
vein 8 inches. Pay shoot 140 feet long and 4 feet wide, free milling, low 
grade. Workings consist of several tunnels from 50 to 480 feet long, 
drifts and stopes. Idle for several years. Mentioned in our Twelfth 
and Thirteenth Reports. 

Copley, consists of 60 acres, in Sec. 32, T. 33 N., R. 5 W., near the 
town of Copley, in the Flat Creek mining district. Owner, J. R. King. 
Elevation 860 feet. Worked the oxidized ore on the surface for the 
free gold, but with depth the ore became base, still carrying best values 
in gold. One vein, strike northeast and southwest, dip 60° NE., 
width 4 feet. Length of pay shoot not determined. Workings consist 
of 310-foot tunnel, 60-foot drift and stope 60 feet long. Owner doing 
assessment work. 

Bibl. : Report XIII, p. 352. 

Corrine, consists of 160 acres, in Sec. 32, T. 32 N., R. 5 W., 1 mile 
west of Redding, in the Shasta mining district. Owners, E. P. and J. C. 
Connor of Redding. • Elevation 800 feet. Two parallel veins, strike 
northeast and southwest, dip vertical. Pay shoot 200 feet long and 
15 inches wide, free milling, carrying rich sulphurets. Workings con- 
sist of four tunnels from 60 to 430 feet long, and old 110-foot shaft, 
600 feet of drifts and a stope 160 feet long. Reduction equipment con- 
sists of 5-stamp mill (750-pound stamps), and one Wilfley table. Idle. 
Property was a producer at one time. Two men at work. 

Cortez, consisting of 65 acres, is located in Sec. 10, T. 33 N., R. 2 W., 
i mile northwest of Ingot, in the North Cow Creek mining district. 
Owner, A. J. Cook, of Ingot. Elevation, 1400 feet. Two parallel veins 
about 40 feet apart. Length of pay shoot not determined. Vein on 
contact between rhyolite and shale. Three short tunnels on veins. 
Afterthought copper mine to northeast. One man working. 
Bibl.: Reports, XII, p. 70; XIII, p. 352. 



40 MINES AND MINERAL RESOURCES. 

Crystal, consists of 60 acres, in Sec. 17, T. 31 N., R. 6 W., 3 miles 
northwest of Igo, in the Igo mining district. Owners, Kingsbury & 
Hubbard. Three parallel veins in granite. Ore is a grayish gold-silver 
sulphide. Pay shoot short and values are not uniform. Only slightly 
developed with short tunnels. A little ore shipped to smelter ^ave 
returns of $50 per ton in gold and silver. Worked a few months duriner 
the year. Prospect. 

Delta Consolidated, the largest quartz property in the Dog Creek 
minino: district, is located in Sees. 1, 3, 6, and 31, T. 35 and 36 N., 
R. 5 W., 6^ miles west of Delta. The holdings consist of 650 acres (80 
acres patented timber land) in the Shasta Forest Reserve. Owners are 
the Delta Consolidated Mining Company of Redding. S. T. White, pres- 
ident; S. D. Furber, secretary. Elevation varies from 2800 to 3000 
feet. The mine is connected with Delta, a station on the Oregon branch 
of the Southern Pacific Railroad, by means of a narrow guage railroad, 
6^ miles long, constructed by the company. There are 10 veins on the 
claims. The principal lodes, known as the Pioneer, Rickard, Scorpion, 
Black Oak and Caledonia, have a strike of N. 70° E., and a vertical 
dip, and can be traced on the surface for several thousand feet. The 
walls are andesite. Pay shoot is said to be 800 feet long and 18 inches 
wide, free milling. Maximum depth on ore body is 300 feet. Work- 
ings consist of several tunnels on the veins, from 20 to 1600 feet in 
length, drifts, nine raises from 100 to 200 feet high, and a stope 200 
feet long. Mine equipment consists of cars, one Climax geared engine, 
tools, shop and dwellings. The reduction equipment consists of three 
separate mills, with a total of 10 stamps, operated by water power 
obtained from Dog Creek. Ore reserve estimated at 20,000 tons. Cost 
about $4.25 per ton to work. Ample timber at hand. Three men em- 
ployed at present, but force to be increased shortly. Rich ore worked 
years ago in an arrastra. Advance Consolidated to the west, and Trinity 
Consolidated to the south. 

Bibl. : Report XIII, p. 353. 

Diamond, formerly known as Black Priuce, consists of 80 acres, in 
Sec. 18, T. 31 N., R 6 W., 4 miles northwest of Ii?o, in the Igo mining 
district. Owner, S. W. Robinson. Four veins on the group, but only 
one, the Black Prince, has been worked. Granite footwall and meta- 
andesite hanging. Pay shoot 100 feet long and 2 feet wide, ore base 
below the surface. A tunnel 400 feet long, short drifts, and one stope 
on the vein. Ore shipped to smelter gave returns of $50 per ton in gold 
and silver. Prospect being worked by Roberts & "Wheeler of Igo, under 
a lease. 

Bibl. : Report XIII, p. 355. 



SHASTA COUNTY. 41 

Edna B., in Sec. 6, T. 31 N., R. 5 W., IJ miles east of Shasta, in 
the Shasta mining district, consists of 100 acres, owned by J. H. Beecher 
of Anderson. Elevation 1300 feet. One vein 3 feet wide, quartz- 
poryhyry walls, strike northeast and southwest, dip 45° E. Pay shoot 
200 feet long and 3 feet wide, free milling. Workings consist of a 
tunnel 500 feet long on the vein and 400 feet of drifts. Small producer 
at one time. Idle. 

Bibl. : Reports XII, p. 247 ; XIII, p. 355. 

El Dorado and Eureka, consisting of 40 acres, is located in Sec. 3, 
T. 32 N., R. 7 W., ^ miles south of French Gulch, in the French Gulch 
mining district. Elevation 3000 feet. Owner, J. C. Connor, of Redding. 
Two parallel veins on claims, slate footwall and quartz-porphyry hang- 
ing; strike is northwest and southeast, dip 45° SE. Pay shoot 240 feet 
long and 3 feet wide, free milling. Workings consist of a tunnel 580 
feet long on the vein and 300 feet of drifts. Small producer. Two 
men employed. 

Bibl. : Reports XII, p. 247 ; XIII, p. 355 ; U. S. Geol. Surv. Bull. 
No. 540, pp. 56, 57. 

Empire, consists of 60 acres, patented, in Sec. 18, T. 33 N., R. 7 W., 
5 miles northwest of French Gulch in the French Gulch mining district. 
Elevation 3000 feet. Owners, J. E. Franck et al., of French Gulch. 
Property formerly owned by the Empire Mining Company of Salt Lake 
City, Utah. One vein has been worked. Strike east and west, dip 15° 
N. granitic-porphyry footwall and slate hanging. Ore shoot 100 feet 
long and 6 feet wide. Workings consist of four tunnels from 115 to 
500 feet long, 300 feet of drifts and one stope 100 feet long. Old 5-stamp 
mill, steam driven. Idle. A small producer several years ago. One 
man working. 

Bibl. ; Report XIII, p. 356. 

Empire, consists of 120 acres, in Sec. 9, T. ;:0 N., R. 7 W., 3 miles 
southwest of town of Ono, in the Ono mining district. Owners, McCor- 
mick and Murray Estate, of Redding. Two parallel veins exposed on 
the surface, with slate walls. Pay shoot about 80 feet long and 1 foot 
wide, ore free milling. Only slightly developed by a tunnel 500 feet 
long. Little ore shipped to smelter. Idle. 

. Esperanza, consists of 160 acres, in Sec. 29, T. 29 N., R. 10 W., about 
IJ miles east of Harrison Gulch, in the Harrison Gulch mining district. 
Owner, A. J. Oswald. Four veins exposed on the surface, three being 
parallel. A shaft has been sunk on the Lucky George claim to a depth 
of 214 feet, and three crosscuts run, longest 141 feet, working through 
a fault. A little ore on the surface. A 12 h.p. steam hoist used. Four 
^^^•n employed. Prospect. 



42 MINES AND MINERAL RESOURCES. 

Eureka Tellurium, consisting of 290 acres, near Middle Creek, is 
located in Sec. 32, T. 32 N., R. 5 W., 3 miles southwest of Redding. 
Owners, Eureka Tellurium Company, J. E. Jarvis, president. Eleva- 
tion 700 feet. Ten veins on the group, but only one has been worked. 
Strike N. 25° E., dip 60° E., width 3 feet; walls are slate. Pay shoot 
130 feet long and 3 feet wide, free milling on surface, but base with 
depth. Ore said to contain tellurides. Several tunnels on the vein, 
main tunnel is 520 feet long. A furnace 5 feet by 20 feet, with 8-foot 
agitators, 16 barrels, 3 feet by 4 feet, hollow and egg-shaped, and a 4- 
foot steam filter, with a small precipitating vat, constituted the reduc- 
tion equipment. Small production from property some years ago. 
Idle. 

Bibl.: Reports, XI, p. 43; XII, p. 248; XIII, p. 356. 

Evening Star, consists of 60 acres, patented, in Sec. 4, T. 32 N., R. 
5 W., 2 miles southeast of Copley, in the Flat Creek mining district. 
Owners, Estate of F. Litsch. Three parallel veins, strike N. 50° W., 
dip 50° S., greenstone footwall and granitic-porphyry hanging. Pay 
shoot 230 feet long and 14 inches wide, free milling. Development work 
consists of a tunnel 1100 feet long and 1000 feet of drifts. Three men 
employed. 

Florerice, consists of 60 acres, in Sec. 18 T. 30 N., R. 7 W., about 
8 miles southwest of Ono. Owner, A. E. Baker. One vein 10 feet 
wide, has been slightly developed, strike N. 30° W., dip 40° E., slate 
walls. Ore is low grade and base, carrying some copper, lead and zinc, 
besides gold. Idle. 

Franklin, consists of 40 acres, in Sec. 10, T. 33 N., R. 2 W., 1 mile 
southwest of Ingot, in the North Cow Creek mining district. Owner, 
J. A. Cook, of Oakland. Short ore shoot in which some high grade is 
found. Worked by lessees at times. Only slightly developed by short 
tunnels. 

Gambrinus Mine, discovered in 1870, is located in Sec. 16, T. 32 N., 
R. 6 W., in the town of Stella (Whiskey town). This well known prop- 
erty is owned by the Shasta Monarch Mining Company, of Redding. 
T. W. Rogers, superintendent. The holdings consist of 80 acres. 
Elevation about 1200 feet. There are four parallel veins on the group, 
three being only 60 feet apart, strike is N. 50° W., dip 45° N., meta- 
andesite footwall and quartz porphyry hanging. The pay shoot is 220 
feet long and 18 inches wide, free milling ore. The workings consist 
of several tunnels, the main tunnel being 410 feet long on the vein, 
stopes and drifts, also a crosscut 110 feet long. The mine equipment 
consists of cars, tools, shop and dwellings. A new 10-stamp mill with 
two concentrators constitute the reduction equipment, operated by steam 



SHASTA COUNTY. 



43 



power. Property has been a producer for many years and was worked 
in the early days by gophering along the rich surface streaks. The 
tailings are dumped into Whiskey Creek. Ten men employed. 
Bibl.: U. S. Geol. Surv., Bull. No. 540, pp. 38, 39, 50, 51. 

Garfield, consisting of 80 acres, is located in See. 34, T. 33 N., R. 
5 W., 2 miles east of Copley, in the Flat Creek mining district. Eleva- 
tion, 1200 feet. Owner, George Barr. One vein, strike N. 50° E., dip 
40° E., quartz-porphyry walls. Ore shoot 90 feet long and 2 feet wide, 
free milling. One tunnel 570 feet long and 230-foot drift. Small pro- 
ducer. Two men employed. Sam Houston to the north. 

Gladstone, the largest quartz producer in Shasta County, is located in 
Sees. 1, 7, 8, 12 and 18, T. 33 N., R. 6 and 7 W., M. D. M., about 4^ miles 
northeast of the town of French Gulch, in the French Gulch mining dis- 
trict. The holdings consist of 178 acres, patented, and 485 acres held 
by location, at an elevation of 2300 feet. It was acquired in 1901 by 
the present owners, Hazel Gold Mining Company, J. 0. Jillson, presi- 

^ECnON ALONG GLA03rONS V£fA/ 
fOS/r/O/^ OF 0/i£ sHoors 










44 MINES AND MINERAL RESOURCES. 

dent and manager; E. L. Young, superintendent. The upper 1000 feet 
of the vein has been mined by means of tunnels, while the lower portion 
is worked from a blind shaft on the main adit level, and is developed by 
three levels (see map). The exhausted stopes and upper workings are 
filled with waste obtained in crosscutting. The country rock consists of 
slate, conglomerate and sandstone. There are two fissure veins that 
have been worked, strike east and west, dip vertical, width 3 feet ; both 
walls are slate. The ore shoot is 300 feet long and 3 feet wide, free 
milling ore. Length driven on vein 2500 feet. Greatest depth 2100 feet. 
Workings consist of eleven levels below the main adit, the lowest being 
1150 feet below the adit ; all drifts to the east, No. 3 being the shortest, 
having a length of 600 feet ; raises made from one level to another for 
air; shaft 1150 feet deep from adit tunnel; several stopes, one being 
300 feet long, 4 feet wide and 1100 feet high. Mine equipment consists 
of new hoisting plant (375 h.p., 2-reel drums), compressor plant, elec- 
tric cars, shops and dwellings. Electric trains, consisting of ten cars 
(2200 pounds to a car), haul the ore from the mine to the mill. There 
are also 9 miles of power and 5 miles of telephone lines on the property. 
Reduction equipment consists of 30-stamp mill (electrically driven), 
nine concentrating tables and electroplating plant. All machinery 
operated with electric power from Northern California Power Company. 
Stamps weigh 1050 pounds and drop at the rate of 106 times per min- 
ute from a height of 6 inches. Mill crushes 100 tons in twenty-four 
hours, through a 40-mesh screen; 92% extraction is obtained. Tailings 
dumped into Clear Creek. Company employs 140 men, 40 on top, 90 in 
mine and 10 in mill. Property produced $3,000,000 since 1901. Orig- 
inal owners of this mine took out $80,000 in high grade. New hoist over 
shaft will have a steel gallows frame. About 70 gallons of water per 
minute is pumped with electrical pumps. American mine to the east. 
Bibl.: Reports, VIII, pp. 568-569; X, p. 637; XI, p. 45; XII, p. 

248 ; XIII, p. 357 ; U. S. Geol. Surv., Bull. No. 540, pp. 35, 37, 46, 

57-60. 

Golden Crown, consists of 80 acres, in Sec. 19, T. 31 N., R. 6 W., 
2 miles northwest of Igo, in the Igo (South Fork) mining district. 
Owners, Dunham & Gilson. One vein 1 foot wide, syenite footwall 
and granitic-porphyry hanging. Short ore shoot, free milling. Pros- 
pect, only slightly developed. Little ore shipped to smelter. Idle, 

Gt'cat Falls and Hope, consists of 100 acres, in Sees. 7 and 18, T. 
31 N., R, 6 W., 4^ miles northwest of Igo, in the Igo (South Fork) 
mining district. Owner, Mrs. M. Ballou. Elevation 2100 feet. Four 
veins, three parallel, syenite footwall and granite hanging. Ore shoot 
80 feet long and 2 feet wide, free milling. Workings consist of a tunnel 



SHASTA COUNTY. 45 

on vein 520 feet long, short drifts and a stope. Little ore shipped. 
One man- employed. 

Gray Eagle, consists of 100 acres, in Sec. 10, T. 29 N., R. 10 W., 
1 mile south of Harrison Gulch, in the Harrison Gulch mining dis- 
trict. Elevation 3000 feet. Owner, A. E. Johnson. One vein 12 inches 
wide, slate footwall and diabase hanging. Short ore shoot. Prospect. 
Halcyon consists of 40 acres, in Sec. 17, T. 33 N., R. 7 W., 4 miles 
northeast of French Gulch in the French Gulch mining district. Eleva- 
tion 2000 feet. Owner, C. L. Watson of French Gulch. Vein has a 
northeast and southwest strike and dips N. 80° W., slate footwall and 
tuff hanging. Ore shoot 80 feet long and 1 foot wide, free milling. 
Developed by means of a tunnel 400 feet long, 500 feet of drifts and 
130-foot shaft. A little ore milled. One man working. Prospect. 

Hardscrahhle Mine (drift and hydraulic), formerly known as the 
Fiety Hill, is located in Sees. 27, 34 and 35, T. 31 N., R. 6 W., i mile 
south of Igo, and consists of 1700 acres, patented. Owners, Happy 
Valley Land and Water Company, of Olinda. A. E. Bowles president. 
This company owns the old Dry Creek Tunnel and Flume Company's 
ditch, now known as Happy Valley ditch, which diverts water from the 
North Fork of Cottonwood, Eagle, Andrews and South Fork of Clear 
creeks. Course of channel is north and south, slate, sandstone and 
granite bedrock. Workings consist of old 1500-foot tunnel and several 
shafts 50 feet deep. Some of gravel 50 feet deep, average 20 feet. 
About 120 acres have been worked. Operated in the sixties by Alvinza 
Hayward as a drift and hydraulic mine. Has been a famous producer. 
Idle for several years. Water supplied to consumers through the old 
ditch. 

Bibl.: Reports, XII, p. 249; XIII, p. 359. 

nighland Mine, consisting of 60 acres, is located in Sec. 14, T. 33 N., 
R. 7 W., 2 miles northeast of French Gulch in the French Gulch mining 
district. Elevation 2800 feet. Owner, Highland Mining and Tunnel 
Company, of French Gulch; G. R. Simmons, superintendent. Strike 
of vein is north and south, dip 20° E., slate footwall and quartz- 
porphyry hanging. Pay shoot 250 feet long and 3 feet wide, free mill- 
ing ore. Greatest depth on vein 400 feet in tunnel. Development 
work consists of several tunnels, 400 feet of incline shaft, drifts and 
slopes. Main tunnel is 1800 feet long on vein. Old 5-stamp mill is 
driven by water power; a ditch 3 miles Icng takes the water out of 
Clear Creek. Property said to have produced $100,000. Four men 
employed. 

Bibl. : U. S. Geol. Surv., Bull. No. 540, p. 69. 



46 MINES AND MINERAL RESOURCES. 

Hope, in Sec. 8, T. 32 N., R. 7 W., 5 miles southwest of Freed 
Gulch, in the French Gulch mining district, consists of 60 acres. Eleva 
tion 1200 feet. Owners, M. Welch et al., of French Gulch. Ore shooi 
100 feet long and 1 foot wide, free milling, slate walls. Workiii?^ 
consist of tunnel 480 feet long, 400 feet of drifts, one stope 80 feet Ion? 
and 140-foot incline shaft. Rich ore on the surface was worked ii 
arrastra. Idle. 

I7iez, consists of 120* acres, in Sees. 19 and 20, T. 32 N., R. 5 ^S.. 
about J of a mile south of Keswick. Owner, W. T. Lee. Ore shoo: 
short. Ore free on the surface but base with depth. Workings cod 
sist of a 300-foot tunnel, 100-foot drift and several open cuts. 

J. I. C, in Sec. 13, T. 33 N., R. 7 W., 3 miles northeast of FreucJ) 
Gulch in the French Gulch mining district, consists of 40 acres. Eleva 
tion 2500 feet. Owner, V. Fox, of French Gulch. Strike of vein h 
northeast and southwest, dip N. 68° W., width 2 feet. Pay ore is 
found in pockets between slate walls. Workings consist of a tunnel 
1000 feet long, 300 feet of drifts and 220 feet of incline shaft. Some 
rich ore found. Idle. 

Bibl. : Reports, XII, p. 250; XIII, p. 360. 

Jubilee, consists of 40 acres, in Sec. 23, T. 31 N., R. 6 W., i mile 
from Centerville. Owner, 0. Westbrook, of Larkin. Five veins on 
claims, slate footwall and granitic-porphyry hanging. Pay shoot lOO 
feet long and 4 feet wide, free milling ore. Only slightly developed. 
One man working. 

Kit Carson, consists of 100 acres, patented, in Sec. 3, T. 32 N., R- 
5 W., 2^ miles southeast of Copley, in the Flat Creek mining district. 
Elevation 950 feet. Owners, Joshua Hendy Estate. Four parallel 
veins 3 feet wide, strike northeast and southwest, dip 50° E., granitic- 
porphyry footwall and slate hanging. Pay shoot 200 feet long and 3 
feet wide, low grade. Workings consist of a 700-foot tunnel and 300 
feet of drifts. Idle. 

Laconia, in Sec. 1, T. 35 N., R. 6 W., 7 miles west of Delta and 1 
mile east of Dog Creek Railroad, in the Dog Creek mining district, con- 
sists of 20 acres, in the Shasta Forest Reserve. Elevation 2000 feet. 
Three parallel veins, strike east and west, dip 40° S., meta-andesite 
footwall and quartz-porphyry hanging. Pay shoot 80 feet long and S 
feet wide. Short tunnels. Idle. 

Liberty, consists of 240 acres, patented, in Sees. 31 and 36, T. 33 K, 
R. 5 and 6 W., 1| miles northwest of Copley, in the Flat Creek mining 
district. Elevation 2000 feet. Owners, J. Chambers et al., of Redding. 
Three veins 2 feet wide, strike east and west, dip 65° N., quartz- 
porphyry walls. Pay shoot 220 feet long and 2 feet wide. Base ore. 



SHASTA COUNTY. 47 

Workings consist of a tunnel 1850 feet long, a 250-foot shaft and short 
drifts. Small producer at one time. One man employed. 

Lodi, consists of 60 acres, in Sec. 16, T. 31 N., R. 6 W., about 3i 
miles north of Igo. Owners, W. D. Bull et al. Elevation 1400 feet. 
One vein 2 feet wide. Short ore shoot. Ore base below the surface, 
consisting of gold, silver, zinc and galena. Slightly developed with a 
short tunnel. Little ore shipped. Idle. 

Bibl.: Reports, XII, p. 252; XIII, p. 361. 

Lost Channel (drift) mine, consisting of 580 acres, is located in Sees. 
3, 4 and 34, T. 30 and 31 N., R. 6 W., and extends southerly from 
the town of Igo for a distance of 1^ miles. Owner, C. A. Russell of 
Igo. The bedrock is soft, decomposed granite, slightly tilted. Course 
of channel is north and south/ and contains some pay to a depth of 
20 feet below the surface. Best values found 4 feet above bed- 
rock. Workings consist of several tunnels, longest 1800 feet; also a 
number of old shafts 50 feet deep, all along Dry Creek. About 5 acres 
have been worked. Some of the gravel is rich. Gold is 875 fine, 
and sells for $18 per ounce. Leased by Porter & Thompson of Seattle, 
Wash., who endeavored to work the ground as a *'dry land'' proposition, 
using a shovel and then dumping the gravel into a rotary grinder, 
then running the tailings over a short copper plate. Experiment a 
failure. Power obtained from Northern California Power Company. 
Holdings now being drilled to determine dredging possibilities. Six 
men employed. Property has been a producer since 1865, when the 
first location (the Blue Bird) was made by T. White. Piety Hill drift 
mine to the northeast. 

Mad Mule, formerly known as the Banghart, is located in Sec. 
32, T. 33 N., R. 6 W., 5 miles northwest of Stella (by road), in the 
Shasta mining district. Holdings consist of 60 acres, located in 1887 
and owned by the Mad Mule Mining Company of San Francisco ; T. W. 
Briggs, superintendent. Two parallel veins exposed. Strike east and 
west, dip 30° N., slate footwall and meta-andesite hanging. Pay 
shoot 80 feet long and 16 inches wide. Four tunnels run on the veins, 
from 200 to 1000 feet in length. A tunnel is being run to obtain 
more depth on the ore body, four men being employed. Depth at 
present is about 250 feet. Surface sluiced oflf years ago and was 
rich. Best ore found near the footwall. 

Bibl.: Reports IX, p. 38; XI, p. 396; XII, p. 252; XIII, p. 361; 
U. S. Geol. Surv., Bull. No. 540, pp. 40, 42, 52-54. 

Mad Ox, consists of 80 acres in Sec. 32, T. 33 N., R. 6 W., 5 
inailes northwest of Stella. Owners, Caribou Gold Mining Company 
of Trinity Center. Elevation at tunnel 1800 feet. The vein has a 



48 MINES AND MINERAL RESOURCES. 

strike of N. 30° E., dip S. 80*^ E., andesite forms both walls. Pay 
shoot 100 feet long and 14 inches wide, free milling. Worked td 
a depth of 150 feet. Four short tunnels and one shaft on the vein. 
Worked but little since 1911. 

Bibl.: Reports, XI, p. 397; XII, p. 252; XIII, p. 361; U. S. Geol 
Surv., Bull No. 540, p. 51. 

Maduro, consists of 60 acres, in Sec. 20, T. 32 N., R. 5 W., 1 mil. 
south of Keswick. Owner, W. Shattuck. Elevation 800 feet. Four 
parallel veins, but little developed. Only enough work done to hold 
the claims. Prospect. Idle. 

McCall, consisting of 60 acres in the Shasta Forest Reserve, is 
located in Sec. . 32, T. 36 N., R. 5 W., 7 miles southwest of Delta, 
in the Dog Creek mining district. Elevation 1600 feet. Owners, 
A. J. Kirk et al. One vein 3 feet wide, strike N. 50° W., vertical 
dip, granodiorite footwall and slate hanging. Pay shoot 80' Ion? 
and 27 inches wide, free milling. Four tunnels, about 60 feet apart, 
from 50 to 1200 feet long, and 400 feet of drifts constitute the develop 
ment work. Little high grade shipped. 

McKinnon, consists of 60 acres, in Sec. 6, T. 35 N., R. 5 W., 11 
miles west of Delta, and 1^ miles east of Dog Creek Railroad in the 
Dog Creek mining district, and in the Shasta Forest Resen e. Owner. 
A. McKinnon. One vein exposed, strike east and west, dip 70° N., 2 
feet wide, granodiorite walls. Pay shoot 160 feet long and 2 feet 
wide, free milling. Three tunnels on the vein from 60' to 750' in 
length. Two men employed. 

Midas, quartz mine, consisting of 550 acres, is one of the famous 
gold producers of Shasta County. It is located in Sees. 3, 4, and V\\ 
T. 29 N., R. 10 W., some 52 miles southwest of Redding, by road, and 
in the Harrison Gulch mining district. The Victor Power and Mining 
Company has recently acquired this property. President, J. H. Sharp: 
secretary, P. II. Coffman ; superintendent, A. L. Fletcher. Home ofiBee. 
Red Bluff. There are three known veins on the group — Gold Hill. 
Baldwin and :\Iiddle--^trike N. 48° W., dip 75° S., average width 
14 inches. There is considerable faulting, largest fault over 400 feet 
in width. The ore occurs in lenticular form, the pay shoots varying 
in length from 200 to 400 feet, width 14 inches, free milling. The 
Baldwin vein has been extensively worked. The development work 
consists of two double compartment shafts (6'xl2'), one being 1400 
feet deep, 14 levels, 26,000 feet of drifts, 11,000 feet of crosscuts, raises, 
stopes from 50' to 300' lonj?, and tunnels fnmi 50' to 900' in length. 
Stripping and filling method of mininn: used. Timber obtained from 
company's holdings and worked in sawmill some three miles from 
the mine. The mine eciuipment consists of two steam hoists and all 



SHASTA COUNTY. 49 

necessary equipment such as cars, shops, tools and dwellings. Steam 
power used for hoisting throughout the year, while mill, pumps and 
compressor run on steam for seven months, balance of year by water 
power. The reduction equipment consists of a 20-stamp mill, 1000- 
pound stamps, six Frue concentrators and a new 100-ton cyanide 
plant, fine grinding with tube mill. Several thousand tons of tailings 
have been impounded ready for treatment. Company also owns 1200 
acres of timber land. Number of men employed — top 25, mine 98, 
mill 4, total 127. Production for 1912— tons, daily 53. monthly 1597, 
for year 19,166. Percentage of extraction 76.83. Cost per ton 1912, 
development $1.86, mining $5.64, milling $0.58, general $1.07, total 
$9.15. The mine has been in active operation for the past twenty 
years and has produced several million dollars in gold. Victor mine 
to the east. 

Milkmaid and Franklin, also known as the Westernj has been a 
gold producer for many years, being one of the early discoveries in 
the French Gulch district. It is owned by the Western Exploitation 
Company, H. F. Musser, manager, and comprises 120 acres, consisting 
of the Milkmaid and Franklin groups, situated in See. 17, T. 33 N., 
R. 7 W., 3 miles by wagon road from the town of French Gulch. 
Elevation 1700 feet. Of the country rock, slate and granitic-porphyry 
form the hanging and footwall respectively. Two veins have been 
followed in the Franklin workings, one with a N. 5°-30° W. strike 
and a dip of 75° E., the other strikes W. The intersection of the two 
veins has not been discovered. The vein with the northward strike is 
in the western part of the workings and has been stoped for 70 feet on 
the main level. The other vein has been followed for 700 feet on the 
main level. The maximum width is 4| feet, average 16 inches, but 
narrows down to a seam in places. The ore consists of ribbon quartz, 
carrying pyrites, and is free milling. The workings on the Franklin 
consist of a main adit about 1300 feet long, and two shorter levels, con- 
nected by a raise on the vein and a 130-foot winze connecting the main 
level with the old level, also drifts and stopes, totaling several hundred 
feet of development work. Stopes as a rule are filled with waste. 

The Milkmaid, which adjoins the Franklin on the east, has not been 
worked recently, but has been a producer in the past. One vein has 
a strike of N. 30° E., dip vertical, and has been developed with 
tunnels, drifts and stopes, also a 400-foot incline shaft sunk at an 
angle of 45°. Ore was rich and free, but the vein was small. The 
mine equipment consists of cars, tools, shop and dwellings. The reduc- 
tion equipment consists of a new 10-stamp mill on the Milkmaid group. 
The operating power, electricity, is obtained from the Northern Cali- 
fornia Power Company. The stamps weigh 1100 pounds each, and 



50 MINES AND MINER.VIi RESOURCES. 

drop at the rate of 102 times per minute for a distance of 6 inch(^, 
the ore being crushed through a 40-mesh screen and thence conveyed 
to four Prue vanners. Fourteen men employed. Considerable ort 
extracted by lessees in former years. Production in last five years 
about $350,000. Property adjoins the^old Washington mine. 
Bibl. : U. S. Geo. Surv., Bull. No. 540, pp. 35, 61, 63, 64. 

Minnesota, in Sees. 1 and 2, T. 32 N., R. 6 W., 2 miles southwe> 
of Copley, in the Flat Creek mining district, consists of 100 acns, 
patented. Owner, J. W. Parmalee. Five veins on the claims, four 
parallel, diorite footwall and granitic-porphyry hanging. Work cod- 
fined to one vein having a strike of N. 40° E., dip 35° N. Pay shoot 
150 feet long and 4 feet wide, free milling. Workings consist of a 
tunnel 1900 feet long, 1000 feet of drifts, raises, and a stope 150 iw: 
long. Old 10-stamp mill idle. Producer at one time. Two iiiei 
employed. 

Mount Pleasant consists of 80 acres, in Sec. 32, T. 32 N., R. 5 \V., 
1 mile west of Redding, in the Shasta mining district. Owners, H. C 
Cummings et al. Elevation 900 feet. Vein has a northwest and south- 
east strike and dips 45° E., slate footwall and quartz-porphyry hang 
ing. Pay shoot 140 feet long and 3 feet wide, free milling. Workings 
consist of a tunnel 500 feet long and short drifts. One man employed. 

Mount Shasta, one of the quartz producers of this county, is located 
in Sec. 33, T. 32 N., R. 6 W., about 3 miles south of the town of 
Stella. Owner, Mount Shasta Mining Company, of San Francisco; 
O. M. Vail, superintendent. The holdings consist of 120 acres, which 
were acquired from George Leversay, by the Mount Shasta Gold Mines 
Corporation. This corporation failed in 1905 and the mine was idle 
until 1911, when it was secured by the present owners. Elevation 220H 
feet. There are two parallel veins on this group about 50 feet apart, 
strike N. 40° W., dip 40^-50° S., quartz-diorite footwall and granitic 
porphyry hanging. Pay shoot 400 feet long and 12 feet wide, low- 
grade, free milling. Development w^ork counts of a shaft 465 feet 
deep, seven levels, 300-foot drift on the seventh level, several stopes and 
short tunnels. Mine equipment consists of cage, wooden gallows frame, 
steam hoist, dwelling, etc. The 8-stamp mill, steam driven, is idle. 
Stamps weigh 1050 pounds each. Some ore blocked out. Four men 
working. 

Bibl. : U. S. Geol. Surv., Bull. No. 540, pp. 39, 44, 46, 47-48. 

Morton & Bliss, formerly known as the Filey d; Bliss, consists of 100 
acres, patented, in Sec. 1, T. 33 N., R. 6 W., 6^ miles west of Ken- 
netl, in the Backbone mining district. Owner, Bliss Estate, of New 
York. Elevation 2600 feet. Two parallel veins 3 feet wide, strike 



SHASTA COUNTY. 51 

northeast and southwest, dip 40° E. Pay shoot 200 feet long and 
3 feet wide, free milling. Workings consist of two tunnels on the 
vein 380 to 2400 feet long, 500-foot drift, raise and stope 200 feet long. 
Old 10-stamp mill idle. Stamps weigh 850 pounds each. Mill can be 
operated both with steam and water power, water from South Fork 
of Squaw Creek. Property has been a producer, but idle at present. 

Murray consists of 120 acres, in Sec. 18, T. 32 N., E. 5 W., 1^ 
miles north of Keswick. Elevation 1000 feet. Owners, Mount Shasta 
Mining Company. H. C. Cummings, of Redding, manager. Vein about 
6 feet wide, strike N. 40° E., dip 50° S. Pay shoot about 230 feet 
long, 6 feet wide, quartz-porphyry footwall and syenite hanging. Ore 
free milling but low grade. Developed by means of a tunnel 530 feet 
long, 200-foot drift and one short raise. Four men working. Small 
producer at one time. 

Bibl. : Reports XII, p. 243 ; XIII, p. 362. 

Nellie and Annie, consists of 80 acres in Sees. 1 and 2, T. 33 N., 
R. 7 W., 5 miles north of French Gulch, in the French Gulch mining 
district. Elevation 3200 feet. Owners, M. Welch et al., of French 
Gulch. The vein has an east and west strike and dips 60° S., slate 
footwall and granite-porphyry hanging. Pay shoot 230 feet long and 2 
feet wide, ore free milling. A tunnel 340 feet long, and short drifts 
constitute the development work. A little production by lessees. 

New York and Skylark, consisting of 60 acres, is located in Sec. 
17, T. 33 N., R. 7 W., 4 miles northwest of French Gulch, in the French 
Gulch mining district. Elevation 2800 feet. Owner, W. Richards. 
Two parallel veins about 200 feet apart strike east and west, dip 60° 
N., slate walls. Ore shoot 180 feet long and 5 feet wide, low grade, 
free milling. Workings consist of a tunnel on the vein 340 feet long, 
a 40-foot winze and 1 stope. Production record small. Idle. 

Niagara, formerly known as Black Tom, was at one time one of the 
famous quartz producers of the French Gulch mining district, but has 
been idle since 1905. This group, consisting of 410 acres, patented, is 
located in Sees. 1, 6, 7, 8, 15 and 18, T. 33 N., R. 7 W,, about 4^ miles 
by road from French Gulch. Elevation 2800 feet. It is on the same 
hill as the Washington mine, and the claims were located in 1857. Own- 
ers, W. W. Bunzoine et al., of French Gulch. The vein system is not 
well defined. The main veins, two in number, one on the Niagara, and 
the other on the Scorpion claims, have been worked. The strike is north- 
east and southwest, dip N. 70° W., footwall is granitic-porphyry 
and hanging-wall is slate. The ore is free-milling with some pyrites. 
Ore shoot 200 feet long and 3 feet wide. Workings consist of six tun- 
nels, four being crosscuts from 150 to 2200 feet in length, 2000 feet of 
drifts, several stopes and raises. Tunnel on Niagara claim is 1662 



52 MINES AND MINERAL RESOURCES. 

feet long. The reduction equipment consists of four old stamp mills, 18 
stamps in all, steam driven. Mine said to have produced over $1,000,- 
000 in gold. Maximum depth about 500 feet. Said to be on the same 
lead as the Washington mine. 

Bibl.: Reports X, p. 636; XI, p. 50; XII, p. 253; XIII, p. 263. 
U. S. Geol. Surv., Bull. No. 540, pp. 35, 37, 44, 67. 

North Star consists of 60 acres, in Sec. 18, T. 31 N., E. 6 W., 4 
miles northwest of Igo, at an elevation of 1600 feet. Owner, J. W. 
George. One vein in syenite and slate, but slightly developed, short 
ore shoot, little high grade extracted. Idle. Prospect. Mentioned in 
our Report XIII. 

Bibl. : Report XII, p. 253. 

Old Spanish, formerly known as Deakin & Taylor, and as Enright, 
is located in Sec. 31, T. 32 N., R. 5 W., 2 miles west of Redding. 
Owner, J. Sallee. Holdings consist of 60 acres, at an elevation of 800 
feet. Vein 5 feet wide, strike north and south, dip 45° E., slate 
walls. Pay shoot 140 feet long and 5 feet wide, low grade, free milling. 
Workings consist of a 460-foot tunnel, 600 feet of drifts and 1 stope. 
Old 4-stamp mill. Idle. Property a producer at one time. 
Bibl. : Report XII, p. 246. 

Olive, consisting of 80 acres, is located in Sec. 19, T. 32 N., R. 5 W., 
1^ miles southwest of Keswick. Elevation 1100 feet. Owner, 
Wright Estate. Three parallel veins, granite footwall and schist 
hanging. Pay shoot 230 feet long and 6 feet wide, low grade, free 
milling. Old 4-stamp mill idle. Small producer several years ago. 

Oro Fino consists of 60 acres in Sec. 34, T. 32 N., R. 6 W., i mile 
east of old town of Shasta. Elevation 1200 feet. Owner, C. H. 
Berhrens. Two parallel veins, quartzite footwall and hornblende hang- 
ing, east and west strike, and a dip of 60° S. Pay shoot 200 feet 
long and 2 feet wide, ore free milling. Only slightly developed by 
means of three tunnels on vein, longest 700 feet. One man working. 
Bibl. : Report XI, p. 44. 

Oro Vista, in Sec. 36, T. 32 N., R. 6 W., i mile southeast of old 
town of Shasta, consists of 60 acres. Elevation 1600 feet. Owner, 
N. D. Fowler. Three parallel veins, strike east and west, dip 85° 
N. Pay shoot 170 feet long and 4 feet wide, low grade, free milling. 
Workings consist of a tunnel 530 feet long, and short drift. Two men 
employed. 

Potosi consists of 60 acres, patented, in Sec. 15, T. 31 N., R. 6 W., 
1^ miles northwest of Centerville, in the Igo mining district. Eleva- 
tion 1000 feet. Owner, E. P. Jones. One vein, slate footwall and 



SHASTA COUNTY. 53 

granitic-porphyry hanging. Pay shoot 100 feet long and 1 foot wide ; 
some high grade extracted. Short tunnel and 90-foot shaft comprise 
the workings. Idle. 

Bibl.: Reports XII, p. 254; XIII, p. 363. 

Princess (drift and hydraulic) mine consists of 300 acres, patented, 
in Sees. 25 and 26, T. 31 N., R. 6 W., 1 mile south of Centerville. 
Owner, I. Baer. Course of channel is northeast and southwest, granite 
bedrock ; depth of gravel, 30 feet. About 40 acres worked. Workings 
consist of an old tunnel on bedrock 600 feet long, drifts and old shafts 
50 feet deep. Water supply was obtained from Boulder .Creek 
through a ditch 12 miles long. Owner had a permit from the debris 
commission, granted in 1901, to operate, but the retaining dam was 
condemned and the property has been idle since that time. Chapman 
& Voluntine hydraulic mine to the northeast. 

Red Hill (drift and hydraulic) mine, formerly known as Gardner 
Bros,, consists of 60 acres, in Sec. 1, T. 30 N., R. 7 W., J mile north- 
east of town of Ono. Owners, M. Gardner et al., of Ono. Course of 
channel northeast and southwest; soft granite bedrock, gravel 20 feet 
deep. Water obtained from Eagle Creek through a ditch 2 miles 
long. Formerly worked as a hydraulic mine, but on account of the 
debris lawr it is operated by drifting. In operation during the winter 
months. Small producer. 

Bibl.: Reports XII, p. 255; XIII, p. 363. 

Ueidy in Sec. 3, T. 32 N., R. 5 W., 2 miles southeast of Copley, 
in the Flat Creek mining district, consists of 140 acres. Owner, J. M. 
Selnave. Elevation 1900 feet. Three parallel veins, strike N. 40° 
E., dip 35° E. Pay shoot 200' long and 2' wide, free milling. Bonded 
to Geo. Bayha. Two men working. 

liuby and Pearl consists of 100 acres, in the Shasta Forest Reserve, 
in Sec. 4, T. 38 N., R. 5 W., 6 miles north, of Castella. Owner, 
J. Wall. Elevation 5500 feet. One vein, strike northwest and south- 
east, dip 40° E., granite walls. Pay shoot 80 feet long and 1 foot 
wide, ore free milling. Developed by means of one tunnel 400 feet 
long on vein, and short drifts. Bryan mill, capacity 5 tons daily. 
Idle. Small producer. 

Sam Houston, in Sec. 34, T. 33 N., R. 5 W., about 2 miles east 
of Copley, in the Flat Creek mining district, consists of 80 acres. Ele- 
vation 1000 feet. Owners, Sam Houston Mining Company of San 
Francisco. Three veins, quartz-porphyry walls. Pay shoot short, 
similar to the Garfield prospect. A little ore in sight. Idle. 

Scottish Chief consists of 120 acres, patented, in Sec. 31, T. 33 N., 
R. 5 W., ^ mile northwest of Copley, in the Flat Creek mining district. 



54 MINES AND MINERAL RESOURCES. 

Elevation 900 feet. Owner, W. Menzel. One vein 2 feet wide, strike 
northwest and southeast, dip 75° E., granite walls. Pay shoot 80 
feet long and 2 feet wide, free milling ore. Workings consist of a 
tunnel on vein 800 feet long, drift and stope. Old 3-foot Huntington 
mill. Idle. Small producer at one time, but the property has not 
been worked recently. 

Shasta Dredging Company, operating on the old Quinn ranch, owns 
400 acres of land along Clear Creek, in Sees. 31 and 32, T. 31 N., 
R. 5 W., about 4 miles southwest of Redding, in the old Horsetown dis- 
trict. This property was operated for a time by the California and 
Detroit Mining Company, but their suction dredge proved a failure 
and the present owners acquired the holdings in 1902. A. S. Newsome, 
president; W. A. Palmer, manager; and J. Heaton, superintendent of 
dredge for the company. Home office, San Francisco. The course of 
the channel is east and west, slate and sandstone bedrock tilted. Pay 
gravel about 20 feet deep. About 100 acres have been worked. Dredge 
equipped with 5-cubic foot buckets and 6' x 30' screens. Power from 
Northern California Power Company. Boat handles about 60,000 cubic 
yards per month. Twelve men employed. Three new hulls have been 
built by present company. Ground worked in the early days with 
rockers and was rich. 

Bibl. : Bull. No. 57, p. 216. 

Silver Falls, formerly known as South Fork, consists of 240 acres, in 
Sec. 20, T. 31 N,, R. 6 W., 2 miles northwest of Igo. Owners, Silver 
Falls Mining Company, of Redding; H. Rogers, president. Eight 
veins on the claims, granite walls. Workings consist of 600-foot tunnel 
and drifts. Two men working. Small producer. Atlantic to north- 
east. 

Siskiyou and Nightingale consists of 40 acres in the Shasta Forest 
Reserve, in Sec. 2, T. 35 N., R. 6 W., 7 miles west of Dog Creek 
Railroad, in the Dog Creek mining district. Elevation 2200 feet. 
Owners, Glenn County Mining Company; home office, Millsaps; 
Geo. Millsaps, president ; A. Luce, secretary. Five veins on the claims. 
Strike of main vein east and west, dip vertical, slate f ootwall and ande- 
site hanging. Pay shoot 450 feet long and 3 feet wide, free milling. 
Workings consist of five tunnels on vein from 100 to 500 feet long and 
four drifts. Two men employed. Active development work to be pur- 
sued. Delta Consolidated to north and Trinity Consolidated to south. 

Slattery & Welch (hydraulic) mine consists of 30 acres, in Sec. 
8, T. 33 N., R. 6 W., about 5 miles northeast of French Gulch, in the 
French Gulch mining district. Owners, Slattery & Welch, P. J. Slat- 
tery, superintendent. Course of channel northeast and southwest. Pay 
gravel from 5 to 10 feet deep. Water obtained from Clear Creek and 



SHASTA COUNTY. 55 

Klines Gulch through a ditch 3 miles long. Only worked for a short 
time during the winter season. Some coarse gold found. Small pro- 
ducer. 

Slide consists of 100 acres, patented, in Sees. 7 and 8, T. 32 N., 
R. 5 W., 1 mile north of Keswick. Owner, J. McCreary. Pay shoot 
110 feet long and 2 feet wide, free milling, granitic-porphyry walls. 
Workings consist of a tunnel on vein 700 feet long and 600 feet of 
drifts. Two men working. Prospect. 

Summit and Montezuma, midway between the Brunswick and Niag- 
ara mines, is located in Sec. 17, T. 33' N., E. 7 W., 5 miles west of 
French Gulch, in the French Gulch mining district. Elevation 4200 
feet. Holdings consist of 60 acres, patented, under lease to Allen & 
Alexson. Property owned by Porter & Wheeler Estate, of Redding. 
Two parallel veins on this group, strike northeast and southwest, dip 
70° N. Ore shoots are short and 8 inches wide, free milling, some 
high grade found, a 3-ton lot giving returns of $423 per ton in gold. 
Workings consist of three adits about 40 feet apart, 200-foot drift 
and a stope 40 feet long. The lessees have the ore milled at the Wash- 
ington mill. 

Bibl. : Report X, p. 641 ; U. S. Geol. Surv., Bull No. 540, pp. 35, 
37, 44, 67. 

Sunday Gulch, a recent location, consists of 300 acres, in Sec. 10, 
T. 29 N., R. 10 W., 3 miles southeast of Harrison Gulch. Owners, 
Victor Mining Company ; J. H. Sharp, president ; A. L. Fletcher, super- 
intendent. Four parallel veins, strike N. 70° E., dip 45° S., main 
vein is 4 feet wide and gave returns in places, on the surface, of 
$8 per ton in gold, slate footwall and diabase hanging. Prospect, just 
being developed by means of short tunnels. Two men employed. 

Sunny Hill, formerly known as Summit and Gray Eagle, consists 
of 100 acres in Sec. 1, T. 30 N., R. 8 W., about 7 miles west of Ono, 
in the Ono mining district. Owner, M. Mariscano, of San Fran- 
cisco. One vein 1 foot wide, strike north and south, dip vertical, 
hornblende schist footwall and granitic-porphyry hanging. Pay shoot 
80 to 100 feet long, ore free milling. Workings consist of tunnel 530 
feet long, 300 feet of drifts and one stope. Elevation at tunnel 4500 
feet. Reduction equipment consists of two 5-foot Huntington mills run 
by water power ; water from Jerusalem Creek. Producer at one time ; 
some high grade ore found. Two men employed. 
Bibl.: Reports XII, p. 257; XIII, p. 365. 

Tanglefoot, consists of 60 acres in Sec. 12, T. 30 N., R, 8 W., about 
8 miles southwest of Ono. Owner, W. M. Lee. Two parallel veins 
about 200 feet apart, strike N. 40° W., dip 50° E. Pay shoot 60 feet 



56 MINES AND MINERAL RESOURCES. 

long and 10 inches wide; free milling; some high grade ore extracted. 
Only slightly developed with a tunnel 450 feet long. Idle. 

Texas Consolidated, one of the old gold producers of Shasta County, is 
located in Sees. 32 and 33, T. 33 N., R. 5 W., about 1 mile east of 
Copley, in the Flat Creek mining district. The holdings consist of 
220 acres, patented; elevation 1800 feet. Owned by the Texas Con- 
solidated Mining Company, C. E. Jarvis, president. Home office, 
Cleveland, Ohio. There are four known veins on this group. The 
main vein has a N. 50° E. strike and dips 70° E., width 4 feet, quartz- 
porphyry walls. Pay shoot 340 feet long and 4 feet wide, ore free 
milling. The development work consists of a tunnel on the main vein 
4000 feet long, several thousand feet of drifts, raises and stopes. The 
mine equipment consists of all necessary machinery, shop and dwell- 
ings. The reduction equipment consists of a 20-stamp mill, driven by 
electricity; eight Triumph concentrators, and an old 3-ton chlorina- 
tion plant, all idle. Power obtained from Northern California Power 
Company. Mine under lease to Geo. Bayha. Four men employed. 
Some ore in sight. 

Bibl.: Reports X, pp. 629, 630; XI, pp. 43, 395-397; XIT, p. 258; 
XIII, p. 365. 

Three Sisters, consisting of 60 acres, patented, located in See. 15. 
T. 33 N., R. 7 W., 2 miles northwest of French Gulch, in the French 
Gulch mining district, elevation 1700 feet. Owned by Ellery et al., of 
French Gulch, Three veins on the claims carrying rich ore in spots. 
One pay shoot is 200 feet long and 18 inches wide, between granitic- 
porphyry walls. Workings consist of a tunnel 1350 feet long on the 
vein, 800 feet of drifts, a stope 200 feet long and a winze 120 feet 
deep; ore free milling. The 3^-foot Huntington mill, steam driven, is 
idle. Property has been a producer, but has been worked in only a 
small way since 1905. 

Bibl.: Report XIII, p. 367; U. S. Geol. Surv., Bull. No. 540, p. 69. 

Tom Green, adjoining the Brunswick mine en the west, is located 
in Sec. 15, T. 33 N., R. 7 W., 5* miles west of French Gulch, in the 
French Gulch mining district. The holdings, consisting of 80 acres, 
located in 1887, elevation 4400 feet, are owned by J. E. Francks et al., 
of French Gulch; leased to W. P. Ilight. Three parallel veins, but 
only one has been worked, strike north and south, dip 45° E., granitic- 
porphyry footwall and slate hanging. Ore shoot 210 feet long and 2 
feet wide; ore is free milling. Workings consist of a tunnel on the 
vein 1900 feet long, drifts, stopes and a raise 80 feet in height. Old 
10-stamp mill, steam driven, is idle. Worked by lessees since 1906. 
Three men employed. Small producer. 



SHASTA COUNTY. 



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58 MINES AND MINERAL RESOURCES. 

Trinity Consolidated, consisting of 120 acres, patented, elevation 
2400 feet, is located in Sees. 1 and 2, T. 35 N., E. 6 W., west of Delta, 
and H miles west of D. C. R. R., in the Shasta Forest Reserve. Owner, 
Alden Anderson of Sacramento. Eight veins on the group, six being 
parallel, strike of paraUel veins east and west, dip vertical, slate foot- 
wall and meta-andesite hanging, width 3 feet. Pay shoot 450 feet long 
and 3 feet wide, free milling ore. Workings consist of several tun- 
nels on the vein from 50 to 450 feet long, drifts, raises and stopes. 
Maximum depth 160 feet. Reduction equipment consists of a 10-stamp 
Hendy mill, built in 1900; stamps weigh 1100 pounds. Mill operated 
by both steam and water power, water being obtained from Dog Creek- 
through a ditch 1 mile long. Property has been a small producer. It 
is on the same lode as the Delta Consolidated. Advance group to the 
north and Siskiyou to the northeast. Idle at present. 

Bibl.: Reports XIII, p. 367; U. S. Geol. Surv., Bull. No. 540, pp. 
35, 37, 54, 55. 

Truscott, formerly known as the Emigrant, consists of 40 acres in 
Sec. 25, T. 32 N., R. 7 W., about 6 miles northwest of Stella. Owner. 
John Martin, of San Francisco. Elevation at main tunnel 2600 feet. 
Two veins on the claims; the main vein has a strike of N. 20° E., 
dip 70° W. ; the other vein is small and crosses the main vein at a 
slight angle, slate footwall and andesite-porphyry hanging. Pay shoot 
100 feet long and from 5 to 10 feet wide, free milling, low grade. 
Development work consists of four tunnels 40 feet apart on the vein, 
from 50 to 610 feet in length, drifts and stopes. Property has been 
a producer. Two men working. 

Bibl. : Report XII, p. 248. 

Uncle Sam, one of the noted quartz mines of this county, is located 
in Sec. 1, T. 33 N., R. 6 W., 6 miles west of Kennett, in the Backbone 
mining district. Elevation 2300 feet. Present owners are the Dakin 
Company, of San Francisco, who control 140 acres of patented mineral 
ground. The mine was discovered in 1886 by J. Conant, who sold it 
to Dakin and his associates, and after working the property for a 
time it was acquired by the Sierra Buttes Mining Company. This 
company operated the mine for several years, producing over $1,000,000 
in gold, from a maximum depth of 450 feet. A wagon road connects 
Kennett, a town on the Oregon Branch of the Southern Pacific Rail- 
road, with the mine. Several veins, only one of which has been worked, 
strike N. 80° W., dip 55° NE., width 4 feet. Lode can be traced on 
the surface for 2000 feet. Ore is free milling. The development work 
consists of five tunnels, four on the vein, from 50 to 3000 feet long, one 
crosscut 400 feet long, drifts, raises and stopes (see map). The mine 



SHASTA COUNTY. 59 

equipment is complete ; compressor plant destroyed by fire in 1913. The 
reduction plant consists of a 20-stamp mill, four Frue vanners, old 
canvas and chlorination plants. Mill operated by electricity from' 
Northern California Power Company. Stamps weigh 850 pounds each. 
Property operated for a time by a Portland company on a leacse. Idle 
since May, 1913. Some ore blocked out. New ore shoot recently dis- 
covered. 

Bibl. : Reports X, p. 639 ; XI, pp. 47, 395, 398 ; XII, p. 258 ; XIII, 
p. 367. 

Utah and California, also known as the Waiker, is located in Sees. 
3 and 4, T. 32 N., E. 5 W., 2 miles southeast of Copley, in the Flat Creek 
mining district. Holdings consist of 270 acres, elevation 800 feet. 
Owned by Walker Bros., of Salt Lake City, Utah. Five veins on the 
group. Main vein has a north and south strike and dips 80° E., quartz 
porphyry walls. Pay shoot 300 feet long and 5 feet wide, low grade, 
free milling. Workings consist of a tunnel 2300 feet lorfg on the vein, 
several thousand feet of drifts and stopes. Reduction equipment con- 
sists of 10-stamp mill and four Frue vanners, steam driven. Stamps 
weigh 1000 pounds each. Producer at one time. Idle. 

Bibl.: Reports X, pp. 630-631; XII, p. 259; XIII, p. 368. 

The Victor, adjoining the Midas mine on the east, consists of 250 
acres, in Sec. 3, T. 29 N., R. 10 W., in the town of Harrison Gulch, 
in the Harrison Gulch mining district. Elevation at mine shaft 2600 
feet. Owners are the Victor Power and Mining Company, j; H. Sharp, 
president; P. H. Coffman, secretary; A. L. Fletcher, superintendent; 
R. D. Jackson, consulting mining engineer. Home office. Red Bluff. 
Two veins on the group, known as the Baldwin and Gold Hill, 
* strike N. 50° W., dip 75° SW., diabase walls, average width of veins 
2 feet. Pay shoot 300 feet long and 2 feet wide. Ore free milling. 
Several faults, one being 400 feet wide. The development work con- 
sists of a shaft (4'x90 which is 400 feet deep, five levels, 800 feet of 
drifts, 960-foot crosscut, raises and one stope 300 feet long. Shaft sunk 
on a 45° incline. The mine equipment consists of three distillate 
engines (15, 32 and 50 h.p.), hoist, 50-foot gallows frame, compressor, 
pumps, shop, dwellings. Reduction equipment consists of a 3-stamp 
Nissen mill and two Frue concentrators. Stamps weigh 1300 pounds 
each. Plant operated with distillate, costing 19ff per gallon; use 100 
gallons per day. Seven men employed. Property a small producer at 
present. The wagon road from Redding to Harrison Gulch passes 
through the Victor claim. Workings confined mainly to the Victor 
claim. 

5— C14456 



60 MINES AND MINERAL RESOURCES. 

Washington, located in 1852, was the first quartz location in Shasta 
County and is one of the oldest mines in California. At one time it 
was the largest producer in the French Gulch mining district. The 
holdings consist of 82 acres in Sees. 16 and 17, T. 33 N., R. 7 W., 
3 miles northwest of French Gulch. Elevation 2300 feet. Owners, 
Washington Grold Mining Company, of Redding: C. L. Watson. 
manager. Leased to Maxwell & Ketch. Two veins about 60 feet apart 
have been worked ; one has a north and south strike, with a dip of 70° E. 
and has been worked only near the surface; the other has an east 
and west strike, with a north dip, and has been worked to a depth of 
500 feet. The north and south vein seems to cut off the other. The 
east and west lead pincheTTti places and at times widens to 10 feet. 
being in a well-defined fault plJme. The footwall is granitic porphyn^ 
and the hanging slate ; ore is free milling. The workings consist of six 
tunnels from 300 to 2400 feet long, drifts, raises and stopes, comprising 
in all several thousand feet. The main tunnel caved in many places. 
One stope is skid to be 400 feet long, 5 feet wide and 250 feet high. 
The reduction equipment consists of an old 10-stamp mill and two 
vanners; stamps weigh 850 pounds each. Custom ore treated in this 
mill. Mine said to have produced over $2,000,000. The first mining 
operations consisted in sluicing the rich and decomposed material on the 
outcrop. Some of the oxidized ore was rich, running at times over $600 
per ton in free gold. Three men employed by the lessees. Milkmaid 
to the south. 

Bibl.: Reports X, pp. 635-636; XI, p. 50; XII, p. 260; XIII, 
p. 368; U. S. Geol. Surv., Bull. No. 540, pp. 35, 37, 44, 64-66. 

GRANITE. 

The granite in Shasta County is generally of a light color, contain- 
ing some hornblende and shows the effect of strong pressure, as the 
rock, when not decomposed, is much jointed and cross-jointed. It is 
not much used for building or monument purposes on account of 
fracture planes and quartz seams cutting through the rock. 
Bibl. : Bull. No. 38, p. 53. 

Masterton Quarry, consisting of 60 acres, is located in Sec. 20, T. 
32 N., R. 6 W., about 1^ miles south of Stella. This deposit is very 
massive. Only the boulders are worked. Used for curbing and coping. 
Idle at present. 

Jewel Quarry is located in Sec. 25, T. 31 N., R. 6 W., 2\ miles east 
of Igo. Massive deposit. Rock grayish in color and similar to Master- 
ton deposit. It has not been worked for several years. 



SHASTA COUNTY. 61 

INFUSORIAL EARTH. 
Several exposures of infusorial earth, locally called ** chalk," are 
found in the northeastern part of this county, but more especially along 
both banks of the Pitt River, near the mouth of Hat Creek, and up 
that creek for about 5 miles. Only a relatively small part of these beds 
is pure, the greater portion being mixed with sand. The beds are sel- 
dom over 10 feet thick and are interbedded with tuffs and basaltic 
debris. These exposures are especially prominent in Sees. 7, 17 and 
18, T. 36 N., R. 4 E., M. D. M. 

Bibl. : BuU. No. 38, pp. 296, 363. 

IRON ORE. 

The most prominent deposits of iron ore are found in close proximity 
to the McCloud Carboniferous limestones on both sides of the Pitt River. 
There are also extensive surface indications of iron ore bodies, north 
of Pitt and east of McCloud rivers. 

Bibl. : Reports II, p. 195 ; IV, pp. 236, 259 ; Bull. No. 38, pp. 
301-304. J. S. Diller, U. S. Geol, Surv., Bull. 213, pp. 130, 219, 
and Bull. No. 225, p. 178. 

Nohle Electric Steel Company, formerly known as Shasta Iro7i Com- 
pany, owns 320 acres in Sec. 25, T. 34 N., R. 3 W., M. D. M., about 
5 miles east of Pitt. The Sacramento Valley and Eastern Railroad 
connecting Pitt, a station on the Oregon branch of the Southern Pacific 
Railroad, with the Bully Hill mine, passes through a portion of these 
holdings. John Crawford is superintendent for the Noble Electric 
Steel Company ; home office, San Francisco. The iron ore lies between 
quartz-diorite and limestone (McCloud). The deposit is large and 
massive, consisting of iron oxide and magnetite, and is worked as a 
quarry, the ore being shot down and conveyed to the smelter a dis- 
tance of ^ mile by means of an automatic tramway. 

The method of treatment consists in retorting the ore in an electric 
smelter, using charcoal and carbon, electrically heated, thus igniting 
the charcoal, which is used as a means of reducing the ore. The carbons, 
two in number, are 6 feet long and 6 inches in diameter. No stack on 
the retort, as draft is obtained by means of blowers. A proper charge 
(charcoal, barren quartz and limestone fluxes) is charged simultane- 
ously with the ore, so the whole is well mixed by the time it reaches 
the smelting zone. Tap furnaces three times and run the ore into sand 
pig beds. When it has cooled down so that it will not ''bleed," the sow 
with its attendant pigs is lifted from each bed by grab-hooks and carried 
on a traveling crane. The iron is broken up by a drop, lifted by a 
^^agnet and transferred to the platform scales, where it is weighed. 
Prom here it is stacked according to grade, grading altogether by silicon 



62 MINES AND MINERAL. RESOURCES. 

content, as sulphur and phosphorua are very low. Grades run from 
No. 1 silicon, containing 4.5%-5% silicon, to foundry low with 
1%-1.25% silicon. The iron is tougher, finer grained, and has a more 
homogeneous fracture than other charcoal irons. Daily production 
about 25 tons. 

The furnaces are long and narrow, consisting of rectangular shell 
25' long, 10' wide and 8' high, battered four ways at the bottom to form 
a crucible. The portion above the bottom corresponds to the back or 
smelting zone of the blast furnace. The shell, lined with standard 
furnace brick, supports five charging stacks 18 feet high, and between 
these are suspended four electrodes which penetrate vertically into the 
charge. Electricity obtained from Northern California Power Com- 
pany. Twelve men employed at present. Lime is also manufactured. 

LIMESTONE. 

Three parallel belts of limestone, having a general north and south 
strike, occur in the western half of this county. The most eastern 
belt is found on Cedar Creek, east of the Afterthought mine in the 
southern portion of T. 34 N., R. 1 and 2 W., and in Sees. 7 and 8, T. 
34 N., R. 2 W., the furance flux for the Bully Hill mine coming from 
the latter sections. Another belt is found in Sec. 26, T. 33 N., R. 4 W., 
and can be traced for many miles, forming the McCloud bluflfs, near 
the United States Fisheries. The most western belt crops out east of 
the Sacramento River in the northern part of the county, and is again 
found west of Kennett, on the south side of the divide between the two 
Backbone creeks. This deposit has been more extensively worked than 
any of the others, and is of good quality. 

Bibl. : Diller, U. S. Geol Surv., Bull. No. 196, p. 94; Bull. No. 213, 
p. 365 ; Bull. No. 225, p. 176. State Mining Bureau Bull. No. 38, 
pp. 88-91, 366; Vol. I of Paleontology of California, Whitney; 
Report XI, pp. 35-40. 

nolt & Gregg Quarry is located in Sec. 32, T. 34 N., R. 5 W., and 
consists of 120 acres, patented, about 2 miles northwest of Kennett 
on the south slope toward Little Backbone Creek, at an elevation of 
2000 feet. This excellent limestone deposit, on the western belt, is 
owned by Holt & Gregg, of Redding; F. M. Kindelberger, superin- 
tendent. Quarrying method of mining used. The limestone is hauled 
to the kilns at Kennett, a distance of 2 miles, by means of an electric 
railway, power being obtained from the Northern California Power 
Company (see photo No. 7). The crude material is roasted in three 
Hoffman continuous kilns, crude oil being used for fuel. Lime removed 
every two hours. Output is 25 tons in twenty-four hours. Product 
is of an excellent grade and sold extensively throughout California. 
Thirteen men employed. 



SHASTA COUNTY. 



63 



MACADAM. 

The macadam used for the streets of Redding comes from the 
Redding Municipal Quarry, located in Sec. 29, T. 32 N., R. 5 W., 1 mile 
northwest of this city. The holdings consist of 30 acres, patented. 
The quarry work is under the direction of the superintendent of streets. 
The rock is altered, siliceous in character, and igneous in origin. The 




Photo No. 7. Holt & Gregg Lime Plant, Kennett. 

deposit is massive and easily worked. The equipment consists of a 300- 
ton ore bin, a rotary crusher of 250 tons capacity, air compressor, four 
machine drills, ^ mile of narrow gauge track and ore cars, all operated 
by electric power from Northern California Power Company. Only 
worked upon demand. 

Bihl. : Bull. No. 38, p. 324. 

MANGANESE. 

Manganese is reported on land owned by the Shasta Copper Company 
(Furber, White et al., of Redding), in Sees. 1 and 36, T. 33 and 34 N., 
R. 4 W., near Heroult. A shaft 30 feet deep constitutes the develop- 
ment work. Analysis of some of the ore shows : 

20.00% manganese. 
34.00% silicon. 

6.72% iron. 
$1.65 per ton in gold. 

MARBLE 

Marble is found in Sec. 3, T. 33 N., R. 4 W., about 5 miles east of 
Kennett. The quality and extent is not known, as the deposit is con- 
siderably broken up on the surface and has not been developed. 
Bibl.: Report VI, p. 98; Bull. No. 38, p. 107. 



64 MINES AND MINERAL RESOURCES. 

MINERAL SPRINGS. 

Big Bend Hot Springs are located about 52 miles northeast of Red- 
ding, on land owned by J. E. Hill ; post office, Big Bend. There are six 
mineral springs on this land, sulphur and iron, temperature 140° F. 
Good for rheumatism. No water bottled. 
Bibl. : Report XI, p. 29. 

Castle Rock is located in See. 15, T. 38 N., E. 4 W., about 2 miles 
north of Castella, at an elevation of 1900 feet. Owner, G. M. Parkiiisoii. 
There are five mineral springs, waters contain sodium chloride, sodium 
carbonate, potassium, and a trace of lithium. Good for all stomach 
troubles. Daily flow 2000 gallons. Temperature 40°. Waters sold on 
the market. 

Bibl. : Report Xll, p. 346 ; Anderson, ** Mineral Springs and Health 
Resorts of California,'' p. 119. 

SANDSTONE. 

A few miles northeast of Redding the Cretaceous Chico sandstone 
forms the surface rocks of Sees. 7 and 18, T. 32 N., R. 4 W. This 
deposit occurs in thick horizontal beds so that the quarrying of large 
blocks is a simple matter. Rock has a tawny color, quality is fair. 
Bibl. : Bull. No. 38, p. 138. 

At the Texas Spring Quarry, in Sec. 29, T. 31 N., R. 5 W., owned 
by California Sandstone and Construction Company of San Francisco. 
a little work has been done in the past, but the quality is not good on 
account of the number of niggerheads and fossils contained in the 
sandstone. 

Bibl. : Bull. No. 38, pp. 138-139. 

TUFF. 

A belt of tuff extends from Clover Creek to Bear Creek, a distance 
of 5 miles, in Sec. 18, T. 31 N., R. 2 W. ; in the forks of old Cow Creek, 
and South Cow Creek, a bluff of Tuscan tuff rises with steep sides 
from 30 to 50 feet hi^h. The tuff has a light gray color and easily cuts 
to any desired form, but hardens on exposure. Being light, it makes a 
good building material for a temperate climate. 
Bibl. : Bull. No. 38, p. 161. 

ZINC. 

A body of ore carrying zincblende and galena is found in Sec. 21, 
T. 34 N., R. 1 W. This ledge is 4 feet wide, strike east and west, 
dip 50° N. Slightly developed by means of a short tunnel. Country 
rock is shale. 

Bibl. : Bull No. 38, pp. 355-356. 



SHASTA COUNTY. 65 

The ore of the Donkey Mine (See. 11, T. 33 N., R. 2 W.) carries 
considerable zinc, associated with copper, gold, silver and lead. This 
mine is listed under copper. 

There is more or less zinc in the form of sphalerite associated with 
the ores of several of the copper mines of Shasta County, particularly 
at Bully Hill and at the Afterthought mine. 

BIBLIOGRAPHY. 

References: California State Mining Bureau Publications. 
Report I. Pagre 15. 

II. Pages 47. 159, 174, 181-182, 183, 186, 187, 188, 195, 200. 
IV. Pages 14 69 112 236 
V." Pages 67', 68*, 70, '72, 87, 89, 93, 97-100, 101, 110, 112, 114, 115. 
VI. Part I, pages 28, 30, 74, 95, 98, 99, 104, 105, 114, 115, 118, 120, 121, 129. 
132, 134. • 
Part II, pages 63, 87. 
VII. Pages 149, 150, 190, 191. 
VIII. Pages 562-572. 
IX. Page 39. 
X. Pages 627, 638. 
XI. Pages 24-53, 29, 395-399. 
XII. Pages 61, 69, 70, 244-260, 327, 346, 377, 378, 395, 411. 
XIII. Pages 50, 55, 61-63, 349, 270, 504, 519, 520, 557, 602, 610, 623, 626, 632, 
637, 638, 646. 
Bulletin No. 27, page 196. 

No. 36, pages 98-100. 

No. 37, pages 52, 105, 107. 

No. 38, pages 53, 88-91, 107, 138, 139, 230, 256, 257, 270, 271, 296, 301-304, 

324, 348. 360, 362, 363, 365, 366, 370, 371, 378. 
No. 50, pages 38-114. 
No. 57, pages 213-218. 

No. 67, pages 12, 16, 18, 19, 20, 27, 29, 31, 32, 36-39, 42, 48, 53, 54, 69, 70, 
74, 76, 81. 88, 109, 112, 122. 127. 131, 140, 150. 151, 180, 189. 
Register of Mines, and map of Shasta County. 
References: United States Government publications. 
Graton, L. C. — ^The Occurrence of Copper In Shasta County, California, U. S. Geo- 
logical Survey, Bull. No. 430, p. 71, 1910. 
U. S. Geological Survey, Bull. No. 540, pp. 20, 21. 
Diller, J. S. — Redding Folio No. 138, Geological Atlas U. S., U. S. Geological Survey, 

1906. 
Raymond, R. W. — Mining in the States and Territories West of the Rocky Moun- 
tains, p. 143. 1874. 
Iron Ores of the Redding Quadrangle, California, U. S. Geological Survey, Bull. 

No. 213. 
Mining and Mineral Resources in the Redding Quadrangle, California, in 1903, by 

J. S. Diller, U. S. Geological Survey, Bull. No. 225. 
Lassen Peak Folio, Topo. Sheet, Redding, Red Bluff, U. S. Geological Survey, Bull. 

No. 507, pp. 99-101. 
U. S. Geological Survey — Mineral Resources of U. S. 
Year. Page. 

1902 178, 238. 

1903 175,176.217. 

1904 154, 165, 166. 168, 173, 177. 

1905 115, 164, 165-169, 172, 173, 181, 182. 

1906 120, 178-185, 194, 195. 

1907 (Part I) 120, 189-194, 198, 199, 221-225. 

1908 (Part I) 168, 194, 205, 206, 316, 318. 320, 321, 324-326, 347-349. 

1909 (Part I) 132, 167, 168, 261-266, 268, 269, 282-285. 

1910 (Part I) 349, 350-354, 357-359, 375, 378. 

1911 (Part I) 465-476,495-498. 

1912 (Part I) 238, 239, 285, 290, 291, 308-310, 571, 572, 575-579, 584-586, 598, 602, 

616, 626. 
University of California Publications in Geography, August 7, 1914. 
Vol. 1 of Paleontology of California, Whitney. 
Mineral Springs and Health Resorts of California, Anderson, pp. 119, 169, 246. 



66 JflNES AND MINERAL RKSOUBCES. 

SISKIYOU COUNTY. 

Field Work in September, 1913. 
introduction. 

Siskiyou County, with an area of 3040 square miles, lies along 
the northern l)oundary of California, and has Del Norte adjoining it ou 
the w<*st, MckIoc on the east and Shasta and Trinity counties on the 
south. It has an exceedingly broken and picturesque expanse of moun- 
tains, and canyons cut by many streams running westerly to the Klam- 
ath River and southward to the Sacramento River, the former stream 
coursing through the county for 70 miles. 

The most prominent mountain ranges are the Klamath, Scott and 
Salmon. ^Mount Shasta, in the southern part, having an elevation of 
14,380 feet, is a noted landmark. The Sierra Nevada lava sheet covers 
a portion of the eastern part of the county, forbidding both mining and 
agriculture. 

The mineral wealth, which constitutes the basis of Siskiyou's pros- 
I)erity, is concentrated in various belts and districts. There are two 
main agricultural sections, the Scott and Shasta valleys, which afford 
supplies for the surrounding country. 

Although the day of simple placer mining has passed, the aurif- 
erous gravels still provide the bulk of the county's gold output. Gold 
dredging is being successfully pursued on Mc Adams Creek, near Fort 
Jones ; and as there are many acres of gravel that will yield handsome 
returns by this method of mining, dredging bids fair to become one of 
the important industries of the county. 

Hydraulic mining has been extensively pursued along the Klamath 
River and important tributaries, and large areas of pay gravel still 
remain to be worked. The old method of river mining by means of 
wing -dams has practically passed out of existence. 

Quartz mininsr, which really gives stability to the industry, has made 
wonderful strides in Siskiyou County during the past ten years, iu 
spite of the lack of transportation facilities, especially railroads. 
The Oregon branch of the Southern Pacific Railroad, which crosses 
the county, connects at ^lontague with the Yreka railroad, thus afford- 
ing a rail connection for Yreka, the county seat. Wagon roads to the 
remote mining districts are being constructed as rapidly as the funds 
of the county will permit. 

The unusual strikes of ''high grade" ore in the Salmon range, espe- 
cially in the Ilomestake and Hiixhland mines, has stimulated lode mining 
and given the county the publicity it deserves. The Black Bear, with 
a production record of over $2,500,000, is the most noted gold quartz 
producer in Siskiyou County. There are many prospects that should 



SISKIYOU COUNTY. 67 

develop into producers with the expenditure of a moderate amount of 
money. The conditions for mining are ideal, due to the abundance of 
both water and timber, and the California-Oregon Power Company 
affords cheap electrical power to many of the mining sections. 

The minerals found within the borders of this county are many and 
widely distributed, among which may be enumerated, gold, platinum, 
silver, lead, chrome, copper, and coal. There are several mineral 
springs also, the most famous being the Shasta, on the line of the 
Oregon branch of the Southern Pacific railroad. 

GEOLOGICAL AND TOPOGRAPHICAL FEATURES. 

The formation and metalliferous belts of Siskiyou County are not so 
clearly defined as in the middle counties of the State; the Coast and 
Sierra Nevada ranges are here merged into one. The strike of the 
stratification has been changed from west of north to north 20° east. 

In the Klamath, Salmon and Scott ranges, the mountains are rough 
and sharply defined, and table lands are seldom seen, as sharp serrated 
ridges have replaced them, with deep gorges and precipitous canyons. 

Though the mountains of the western half belong to the Coast 
Range system, their general geological character is that of the Sierras, 
as granites, diorites and metamorphic slates and limestones, similar 
to the latter mountain system, comprise their mass. Between these 
western mountain systems and the lava beds, which cover a large area, 
including much of the drainage area of the Shasta and Little Shasta 
rivers and Cottonwood Creek, is a section, the characteristic rock of 
which is a fossiliferous sandstone. In the Shasta and Willow Creek 
valleys coal seams are found, stratified with the sandstone; these 
seams of lignite (coal) of good quality, vary from a few inches to four 
feet in width arid rest on a quartzite substratum, which formed the 
rim rock of the basin. 

Following the quartzite in a westerly direction for about 1 mile, a belt 
of magnesian rocks containing iron is observed, which continues for 
some 2 miles, when the main gold-bearing belt of the region is 
encountered. 

DESCRIPTION OF STREAMS. 
Klamath River. 

This river and its tributaries have been important agents in the dis- 
tribution of placer gold throughout the country (see photo No. 1). 
Its source is in the mountain ranges of northern California and southern 
Oregon, drawing from the Upper and Lower Klamath, Goose and 
Rhett lakes, and flowing southwesterly into the Pacific Ocean at a 
point forming the western extremity of the dividing line between Del 
^!orte and Humboldt counties. The length of the Klamath is some 

6— C14456 



68 



MINES AND MINERAL RESOURCES. 



362 miles, the average grade being 12 feet to the mile, 70 miles of which 
ia in Siskiyou County. 

Ck)ld is found wherever the river has deposited gravel, whether it 
be in an old channel a thousand feet above the present stream, or iu 
the river bottom. Below the mouth of Scott River it has cut its way 
through the northern end of the Ck)ast Range practically at right angles 
to its trend, and runs through a narrow canyon from a few hundred 
to several thousand feet in depth, with banks as steep as the material 
will stand and which are covered with a dense growth of timber and 




Photo No. 1. KUmath River near Happy Camp. 

brush. At Oak Bar, Happy Camp, Hamburg Bar, Orleans Bar and a 
few other points, the mountains recede far enough from the stream 
to admit of a few acres of level land being farmed; the rest of the 
country is too steep for cultivation. 

Bibl. : Report VIII, pp. 582, 584, 585. 

Scott River. 

Scott River, one of the important tributaries of the Klamath, enters 
this stream in Sec. 6, T. 45 N., R. 10 W., M. D. M., at an elevation 
of 1650 feet above sea level. It has a length of 61 miles, an average 
course of 20° to the northwest, and is fed by a watershed area of 812 
square miles, with 26 miles of tributaries. This stream flows through 
the mineral districts of Oro Fino, Quartz Valley, Callahan and Scott 
Bar. In the vicinity of Callahan, on the headwaters of this stream 
and especially on the South Fork, rich deposits of gravel are found, 



SISKIYOU COUNTY. 69 

whichL have been mined for many years. Below Callahan the river 
runs through a portion of Scott Valley, a rich and fertile plateau, which 
is successfully cultivated, and in which are situated the flourishing 
towns of Etan and Fort Jones. The lower end of the river, for about 
4 miles above its mouth, runs through a canyon, and here gold is found 
in the benches on the hillsides and in bars in the river. Scott Bar, 
in the center of this district and 2 miles from the mouth of Scott River, 
is the village from which supplies are distributed to the adjacent 
territory. 

Bibl. ; Report VIII, pp. 593, 594, 605, 606. 

McAdanris Creek. 

This stream, a branch of Moffat Creek, tributary to Scott River, rises 
in the Forest Mountain Range and flows in a southerly direction. The 
placer ground on this creek, from its source to its junction, a distance 
of some 10 miles, has been rich, but the valley expands and the soil 
deepens so rapidly that only shallow depths were worked. It is good 
dredging ground, however, and the lower end of the stream is being 
worked by this method of mining. 
Bibl. : Report VIII, p. 618. 

Yreka Creek. 

Yreka Creek, some 10 miles in length, rises in the Forest Moun- 
tains, flows in a northerly direction and empties into the Shasta River 
in See. 1, T. 45 N., R. 7 W., M. D. M. It is fed by several tributaries 
and has been an important gold producer in the past. Near Hawkins- 
ville, 2 miles northeast of Yreka, the county seat, the valley is over 1 
mile wide, and there is still a large area of auriferous gravel unworked, 
due to overburden and difficulty of drainage. Hydraulic elevators have 
been employed, with but poor success. The scarcity of water has also 
been another serious handicap. 
Bibl. : Report VIII, p. 618. 
Indian Creek. 

Indian Creek, a tributary to the Klamath River, rises in the lofty 
snow-clad peaks of the Siskiyou Mountain Range, near the boundary 
line between California and Oregon. It has a length of 16 miles, flows 
in a southeasterly direction, and its tributaries, east and west, embrace 
14 miles ; its watershed area covers 144 square miles. Placer deposits are 
found along the entire length of Indian Creek. Happy Camp, a village 
on the west bank of the Klamath River at the junction of the Klamath 
and Indian Creek, is the distributing point for the country generally 
between Hamburg and Orleans Bar. 
Bibl. : Report VIII, p. 599. 



70 MINES AND MINERAL RESOURCES. 

B«aver Cr««lc 

This stream, a tributary to the Klamath River, rises in the Siskiyou 
Mountain Range, near Mount Sterling. It has a length of 12 miles, 
a general southwesterly course and is fed by the north and south forks 
of Hungary Creek, Bumble Bee, West Fork of Beaver and other 
smaller creeks. Placer mining has been pursued along these creeks for 
the past forty years, and although worked in a crude way considerable 
gold has been produced. The formations consist of granite, serpentine, 
slate and porphyrite-sehist, cut by gold-bearing quartz ledges and 
porphyry dikes, which have fed these watercourses for ages. 
BibL: Report VIII, p. 591. 

Humbug Cr««k. 

This creek, a tributary to the Klamath River, rises in the Humbug 
Mountains and flows in a northeasterly direction. It has a length of 
some 10 miles and has been a noted producer of placer gold. Near 
its source the banks of this stream are steep, the water being confined 
in a well defined canyon, of heavy grade, but as it approaches the 
river it widens out, forming large bars, which have been extensively 
mined. One claim of less than 7 acres has been constantly worked 
for the last thirty-five. years, the output to date exceeding $260,000. 
Other creeks in this section tributary to the Klamath and whicii 
have been noted placer producers are Little Humbug and Barkhouse. 
From the head of Little Humbug over $2,000,000 was extracted by 
ground sluicing, and there is still considerable virgin ground to be 
worked, especially near its mouth, but there is only sufficient water in 
this creek to allow a two or three months' run each year. Barkhouse, 
the next creek below Little Humbug, has also been a noted producer, 
but mining operations are limited on account of the scarcity of water. 
Bibl. : Report VIII, p. 591. 

Mineral Production of Siskiyou County from 1894 to 1913 (inch) 
from Records of State Mining Bureau. 





Substances 


1894 
__| $700,781 83 


1895 


1896 


Gold 




$950.006 43 


$1,091.264 82 


Flatinuni 




1 600 00 




Silver 


177 30 
80.800 00 


652 65 


Mineral waters 












1 




Totals 


- „J $761,381 83 

1 


$1,030,983 78 


$1,091,917 47 



SISKIYOU COUNTY. 



71 



Substances 


1897 


1898 


1899 


Gold ._ 


$842,123 00 
84 00 


$768,804 00 
32100 


$901,771 00 
100 00 


Silver _ __. 






Totals _.- 


$842,157 00 


$769,125 00 


$991,871 00 







Substances 


1900 


1901 


1902 


Gold __ 


$951,397 00 
13,996 00 
45,000 00 


$S83,043 00 

6,406 00 

175,000 00 


$906,989 CO 


Silver _ 


233 00 


Mineral water _ _ ___ 

Copper 


187,500 00 
23 00 










Totals i 


$1,010,883 00 


$1,037,451 00 


$1,094,745 00 







Substances 


1903 


1904 


1905 


1906 


Gold 


$613,576 00 

22 00 

60,000 00 


$892,685 00 

1,280 00 

60.000 00 

2100 


$803,035 00 
2.499 00 




Silver _ 




Mineral water 




Platinum _ 


93 00 
1,250 00 




Sandstone — -. — 




$1,600 00 










Totals - ._ 


$663.598 00 


$943.936 00 


$806,877 00 


$1,500 00 







Substances 


1907 


1908 


1909 


Copper _ _ _ 


$39 00 

398,017 00 

140 OO 

1,000 00 

300 00 

36,250 00 

39,000 00 

12,897 00 

3,087 00 






Gold 


$504,156 00 

183 00 

1,680 00 


$416,160 00 


Lead „ 


144 00 


Lime _ _.._ 


300 00 


Limestone 


2,200 00 


Mineral water _ 


80,000 00 


10,000 00 


Rubble _ 


600 00 


Sandstone _ 


1,485 00 
6,126 00 


1,750 00 


Silver _ _ 


2,145 00 


Pumice stone _„ 


600 00 


Macadam __ _ 






4,528 00 


Unapportioned, 1900-1909. inclusive- — — . 






1,202,742 00 










Totals -. __ 


$490,680 00 


$593,629 00 


$1,640,969 00 







Substances 


1910 


1911 


1912 


Crushed rock 


$9,475 00 

14,745 00 

437,376 00 

735 00 

525 00 

60,000 00 

2,000 00 

2,322 00 


$6,580 00 

1,000 00 

422,297 00 

120 00 

24 00 

120,000 00 

455 00 

2,561 00 




Gems ._ 


$250 00 


Gold ... 


472,314 00 


Lime 




Limestone . 




Mineral water 


120,000 00 


Sandstone 


250 00 


Silver .. 


2,960 00 


Chrome . 


2,310 00 


Stone industry 






609 00 










Totals 


$527,178 00 


$553,087 00 


$598,713 00 



72 MINES AND MINERAL RESOURCES. 





1913 


Coal - - 


^,500 00 


Gems 






250 00 


Gold 






♦180,125 00 


Mineral water 


120,000 00 


Prnnlce stone ^ ... .^.. 






2,000 00 


Silver 






•1.228 00 


Stone industry 


4,883 00 










Total 


$909,066 00 







'Production from dredging operations included in Stanislaus total. 

ELECTRICAL POWER PLANTS. 

The California-Oregon Power Company serves the following towns 
in Siskiyou County with cheap electrical power: Yreka, Montague, 
Hombrook, Dorris, Ager, Hawkinsville, Thrall, Croy, Fort Jones, Oro 
Fino, Green view. Walker, Etna, Weed, Sisson, Dunsmuir, and Castella. 

The power plants are located at Fall Creek (capacity 2500 k.w.), 
Shasta River (380 k.w.), Klamath Falls (1500 k.w.), Gold Roy 
(2500 k.w.), Prospect (4750 k.w.), a total of 11,630 k.w. In addition 
to the plants mentioned, another is being installed on the Klamath 
River, near Fall Creek, with a capacity of 4000 k.w. and the system 
will then have a total generating capacity of 15,630 kilowatts. 

CHROME. 

Considerable float of chromite is found near the top of the Forest 
Mountains, in Sec. 13, T. 44 N., R. 8 W., Southern Pacific Railroad 
Company, owner ; and in Sec. 18, T. 44 N., R. 7 W., Wm. Ramus and 
Carl Hill, Yreka, owners. The country rock is serpentine ; the chromite 
is found in relatively small pieces. No development work has been 
done. Float of chromite is reported in the vicinity of the Dewey mine, 
about 10 miles southwest of Gazelle. 
Bibl. : Bull. No. 38, pp. 272, 363. 

GLAY PRODUCTS. 

T, T. Garvcy, of Yreka, owns a large bank of reddish colored clay, 
containing some minute quartz pebbles, in Sec. 27, T. 45 N., R. 7 W., 
M. D. M. A good quality of brick has been manufactured and used in 
Yreka. 

Bibl. : Bull. No. 38, p. 257. 

r. Hamilton, of Fort Jones, formerly made bricks from the surface 
clay from a deposit in Sec. 2, T. 43 N., R. 9 W. 
Bibl. : Bull. No. 38, p. 257. 



SISKIYOU COUNTY. 73 

T. A. Reynolds, of Fort Jones, had an old brick kiln, using surface 
clay, from a deposit in Sec. 11, T. 43 N., R. 9 W. 
BibL: Bull. No. 38, p. 257. 

Peter Smith, of Etna, owns a bank of clay in Sec. 21, T. 42 N., 
R. 9 W., M. D. M. This deposit consists of 4 feet of clay of good 
quality, from which bricks were burned and used in buildings in Etna. 
Bibl. : Bull. No. 38, p. 257. 

J. Walker, of Greenview, has a deposit of grayish colored clay of good 
([uality, located in Sec. 32, T. 43 N., R. 9 W., M. D. M. ; a good grade 
of bricks manufactured at one time. 
Bibl. : Bull. No. 38, p. 258. 

COAL. 

The coal deposits north of Yreka, in the vicinity of Ilombrook and 
Ager, have furnished a small amount of coal for domestic use for sev- 
eral years. It is a good grade of lignite, burns freely and leaves no 
klinkers. 

The Black Butte Mountain Deposits near Ager, and the Kosh Creek 
deposits near Glazier along Kosh Creek in T. 38 N., R. 1 E., have not 
been developed at all. 

The Siskiyou Coal Manufacturing Company's holdings near Horn- 
brook have been exploited by several open cuts along the croppings. 
The vein is 5 feet wide, with 30 inches of good lignite. Coal has been 
reported near Oak Bar, but is inferior in quality to the other deposits. 
Bibl. : Report XI, p. 449. 

COPPER. 

The copper mines and prospects, while of recent development, are 
worthy of careful consideration, and are widely scattered over the cen- 
tral and northern portions of the county. The formations in which 
these deposits occur are either peridotite or gabbro, or a metamorphic 
schist overlying these eruptives, and several of the mountain peaks 
show the reddish-brown color which peridotite assumes in weathering. 
In the Happy Camp district, which has been noted for its placer gold 
production, there are several prospects of merit ; and one property, the 
Grey Eagle, has been developed into a copper mine of considerable 
magnitude, with a large tonnage of ore blocked out. 
Bibl. : Bull. No. 50, pp. 120-141. 

Blue Ledge, owned by Blue Ledge Mining Company, of New York, is 
located in Sec. 21, T. 48 N., R. 11 W., M. D. M., in the Elliott mining 
district in the Siskiyou Mountain range and near the boundary line 



74 MINES AND MINERAL RESOURCES. 

between California and Oregon. Elevation at mine is 4000 feet. Hut- 
ton is the nearest post office. The mine is connected by wagon road 
with Joe Bar, an old placer camp. The ore occurs in a north and 
south vein, dip vertical, its outcrop being traceable for 3000 feet ; walls 
are micaceous schist. Ore consists of pyrite, chalcopyrite and other 
sulphides and oxides of iron and copper, the average value being above 
0% eo[)per and $5 per ton in gold. Two main tunnels 250 feet 
apart are connected by winzes and stopes; both show ore and have 
intennediate drifts showing over 150 feet in a solid body 40 feet wide 
in places. The workings comprise over 3000 feet of development. A 
large tonnage of ore blocked out. It is reported that the company has 
planned the erection of a smelter on the Applegate River. 
Bibl. : Bull. No. 50, p. 128. 

Copper Queen, in See. 3, T. 46 N., R. 7 W., in the Cottonwood min- 
inf^ district, 10 miles northwest of Ilornbrook. Owners, J. D. and R. 
Abbott, of Yreka; comprises 20 acres on Hunter Creek; small ledge in 
lime and diorite-schist, 110-foot tunnel. Idle. 
Bibl. : Bull. No. 50, p. 123. 

Davis, in He.c. 12, T. 14 N., R. 6 E., in the Happy Camp mining 
district, 13 miles southwest of Happy Camp. Owner, R. Davis. Ledge 
20 to 30 feet wide in schist and limestone; short tunnels; ledge not 
found in place as yet ; strong gossan cropping, carrying some gold value ; 
bonded to J. I). Parish and eight men employed; F. H. Dakin, super- 
intendent; claims on Clear Creek. 

Grey Eagle (formerly known as the Dewey), in Sec. 4, T. 17 N., 
R. 7 E., in the Happy Camp mining district, 8 miles northwest of 
Happy Camp. Owner, Incorporated Company, of New York; 
J. D. Farish, nianaj^er; Fred II. Dakin, superintendent; comprises 240 
acres, patented; on Indian Creek at an elevation of 2550 feet; a strong 
vein from 10 to 80 feet wide in schist with a northwest and southeast 
strike and a dip of 45° E.; ore shoot over 300 feet long, consisting of 
chalcopyrite and pyrite ; eight tunnels from 50 to 600 feet in length, six 
being crosscuts and two on the ledge ; and several hundred feet of drifts 
and raises;" large tonnage blocked out; ore carries from 2^% to 18% 
copper and $1.50 per ton in gold; strong gossan croppings on the sur- 
face ; five men employed ; property located in 1892 and sold to present 
company in 1908. 

Bibl. : Bull. No. 50, p. 132. 

Hummer, in Sec. 18, T. 40 N., R. 7 AV., in Callahan mining dis- 
trict ; owned by Mischler & Rollins, of Callahan. Claims worked to a 
limited extent by shallow shafts and open cuts; formation is serpen- 
tine, though the ore deposits are connected with dikes of quartz- 



SISKIYOU COUNTY. 75 

porphyry which have penetrated the serpentine; ore lies in irregular 
bodies, consisting of pyrrhotite and other sulphides, carrying copper; 
ore said to contain nickel. Idle. 
Bibl. : Bull. No. 50, p. 123. 

Little, in Sec. 12, T. 46 N., R. 12 W., in the Seiad mining district; 
10 miles west of Hamburg Bar. Owners, Little & Straisch ; comprises 
60 acres, located in 1899 ; ledge 39 feet wide, with northwest and south- 
east strike and dip of 20° E.; in schist and limestone; 40-foot tunnel. 
Idle. 

Monarch, in Sec. 7, T. 40 N,, R. 7 W., Callahan mining district; 
owaied by Monarch Copper Mining Company, of Callahan; 240 acres, 
patented; tunnels and shafts (shallow); sulphide ore. Idle. 
Bibl. : Bull. No. 50, p. 124. 

Phillips, in Sec. 6, T. 46 N., R. 12 W., in the Seiad mining dis- 
trict; 14 miles west of Hamburg Bar. Owner, S. Phillips; comprises 
40 acres, located in 1900; ledge 30 to 100 feet wide, with northwest 
and southeast strike and dip 35° E.; in schist and limestone; 110-foot 
tunnel ; strong gossan cropping traceable for 1500 feet ; only do assess- 
ment work. 

Polar Bear, in Sec. 12, T. 40 N., R. 8 W., in the Callahan mining 
district ; owned by Welkes & Sons ; comprises one claim ; ore bodies 6 
feet wide, consisting of chalcopyrite and pyrrhotite, in serpentine; 
200 tons extracted, said to carry 17% copper. Idle. 
Bibl. : Bull. No. 50, p. 124. 

Preston Peak, at head of South Fork of Indian Creek, 1^ miles north 
of Preston Peak; owned by Preston Peak Copper Mining Company; 
ledge 20 to 30 feet wide, in diorite; ores are pyrite and chalcopyrite; 
300-foot tunnel in ore; ore said to carry 12% copper with gold; 
one of the pioneer discoveries of the Siskiyou belt. Idle. 
Bibl. : Bull. No. 50, p. 132. 

Pluhis, in Sees, 12 and 14, T. 40 N., R. 8 W., in Callahan mining 
district; owned by McCarter, of Callahan; comprises five claims; ore, 
(pyrrhotite with small percentage of copper) ; occurs in gabbro and ser- 
pentine. Idle. 

Bibl. : Bull. No. 50, p. 123. 

Rainbow, in Sec. 24, T. 40 N., R. 5 W., in the Mt. Eddy mining 
district, 4 miles southwest of Sisson ; owned by Wood & Sheldon Lum- 
ber Company ; comprises 300 acres ; tunnels and open cuts ; one tunnel 
400 feet long; ledge is 6 feet wide, in serpentine; ore is massive sul- 
phides; gossan croppings 100 to 600 feet wide are exposed for over 



a nik («i a if»iir ^f Ml. E*ddr. bavine a strike of 70^ NW. and 
dip of tK*' : fKOBiiaxiTV rulitnd near pn^>erty; property was frst 
vorkfd fir fl<»jd. iLirrv jtar*^ a«i, Idle. 
B:R : BiilL \o- ^x p, 125, 

ft-^ftn'p. in S«SL 5, (L 7 axni >, T. 43 X^ R. 8 W., 4 miles nortl^ 
tast of Fort Jones: owx^rd bj i^rorpe HeoderaoD; eomprises 15 claims; 
dt*vt4o|^ bj shaiTiL ai>d tmwris: \td^ 6 feet wide in serpentine, 
some iif the i»i>e is repc^tt^ to carry 20^ cx^per. Idle. 
BiM. : Bull Xo. :iO, p. 125. 

SAiMr, in St^. 7, T. 4^ X^ R. If W^ in the Seiad mining district; 
12 miles wt-st of HaiL'*»ur|r Bar, Owner. C. Shiner. Comprises 40 
aeres. at an rWvaVAvn ^.f 2»aX^ ft^t; located in 1S99; ledge 30 to 100 
feet wide, with nv»rthwt^t and stc^ntheast strike and dip of 30° E., in 
sehist and limestone: M^fixM tunnel: stnmg gossan cropping; ore is 
ehaleopyrite. Only do assiesscirnt work. 

T€bbe. in Se^*. 32, T. 4 X,. R 9 W.. in the Oak Bar mining dis 
triet : 4 miles north of Oak Bar. Owner. G. A. Tebbe. Comprises 40 
acres: ledge SO feet wide in schist and limestone; 120-foot tunnel in 
ore. Idle. 

TTe/rA, in See. 1, T. 46 X., R, 12 W.. in the Seiad mining district; 
14 miles west of Hamburg Bar. Owner, E, Welch. Comprises 40 
acres, located in 1S1*9; Kxige .>0 feet wide, with northwest and south- 
ea.st course and dip of 40" E.: in sehist and limestone; two tunnels, 30 
and 60 feet long: strong gi^ssan cropping. Only do assessment work. 

Ydlow Buitf. in Sk^-. 25, T. 40 X.. R. 5 W., 15 miles from Mon- 
tague, on the north .slope of Mount Shasta: owned by Yellow Butt^ 
Mining Company ; L. D. Ball, superintendent : vein is 5 feet wide, in 
wrhist and granite; strike north and south; dip 60° W. ; ore is massive 
sulphide; tunnels and shafts. Idle, 
liibl. : Bull. Xo. 50, p. 126. 

GOLD. 

T\ut main gold-bearing belt of Siskiyou County consists of meta- 
nir>rf>hic slates, granites, diorites, and lime^stones, with occasionally 
i/itrusive masses of porphyry, trap and syenite. This belt is from 5 
to 12 miles in width and about 60 miles long, widening and narrowing 
at pliuutH on its line of strike, which varies from N. 20° to 30° E. 
In some phices it is veined and seamed with stringers of quartz; in 
others it is soft, carrying' tab' in excess, with irregular bunches of quartz, 
rich in ^,'ohl, dcsif^nalcd in hydraulic mining as *'seam diggings" and 
hcinp: easily worktul with a stream of water under a heavy pressure head. 
In other localities on the b.;lt, where the formation has been fissured, 



SISKIYOU COUNTY. 77 

or near the line of contact, quartz veins occur either singly or in groups, 
and as a rule are small, but rich in gold. 

This belt is interrupted and broken at several points and is by no 
means prolific in auriferous quartz veins throughout its entire extent, 
nor do the same rocks prevail in all the quartz districts. 
. A striking feature of the occurrence of the auriferous veins is their 
relation to the culminating peaks of the mountain systems crossed by 
the belt, for they conform to the lines of foliation of the ranges, being 
especially noticeable in the Salmon Range, New River, Knownothing, 
Deadysrood and Humbug districts. Quartz Valley and Oro Fino, on 
opposite sides of a minor isolated mountain, are the only exceptions to 
the rule indicated. 

Salmon IMountain, composed of eruptive rocks, porphyries and gran- 
ites, seems to have been a disturbing element, as auriferous rocks do 
not come to the surface for about 10 miles beyond. Reaching as far 
as the known southerly limit of this gold-bearing belt extends, and 
crossing it, a belt of argillaceous slate and porphyry, having a width of 
2 miles, is encountered, and then a decided belt of serpentine from 3 to 
6 miles in width is entered, traceable for several miles on its line of 
strike. A belt of micaceous schist is observed at Scott's Bar, and 
westerly from this point belts of granite, limestone, and syenite are 
alternately crossed, until another belt of auriferous slates is entered, 
which has been but slightly prospected. 

DESCRIPTION OF MINING DISTRICTS. 
Salmon River District. 

This district, the largest in Siskiyou County, comprises its entire 
southwestern corner, and includes the drainage area of the Salmon 
River and its tributaries. Topographically, it is a tangle of mountain 
ridges separated by precipitous canyons and river gorges. A wagon 
road 43 miles in length connects Etna, in Scott Valley, with Forks of 
Salmon, a small town located at the junction of the North Fork of the 
Salmon River. All the fairly level land in the district consists of a 
few bars on the Salmon River and its branches, so that this section is 
practically dependent on supplies from the outside. 

Its mining industry, which is much scattered, is diversified among 
the several branches of placer and quartz mining, the former being 
.followed along the Salmon River and its two principal branches, and 
to a less extent in some of the smaller side canyons making up into 
the gold-bearing quartz belts; large deposits are still untouched on 
the main river and on the South Fork. It is in quartz mining, however, 
that the permanent value of the district is to be realized. The main 
gold-bearing rock belt of the county crosses through the middle of this 
section. 



78 MINES AND MINERAL RESOURCES. 

In the geological center of the district, in the vicinity of Sawyer^s 
Bar, several noted gold producers have been developed. They lie at 
the heads of Black Bear, Eddy's and White's gulches, from 4 to 10 
miles distant from Sawyer's Bar. Quartz ledges on Jackass Gulch on 
the north side of the North Fork are being prospected and some pay ore 
developed. The Black Bear, Klamath, Gold Ball, Fagundez, Uncle Sam 
and Gold Run are the noted mines in this location. There are a number 
of prospects, also, which may develop into producers. In the same 
district near Snowden the recent strikes of **high grade" ore have 
caused considerable excitement. The Homestake, Highland, Overton, 
Zarina and Advance are the best known quartz properties, while the 
Big Cliff and Ilardscrabble comprise two of the many promising pros- 
pects. 

As a rule the country is heavily timbered and brushy, precipitous, 
and the surface broken, so that the quartz veins rarely show in place 
at the surface. 

Bibl.: Report XI, p. 423. 
Quartz Valley. 

This district, occupying the northwest corner of Scott Valley, has 
two distinct kinds of placer mines. At the southern end of the valley 
the pay gravel lies on a flat, nearly level bedrock, without defined 
channel rims, covered with 60 feet of soft pebbly gravel and alluvium. 
The gold is coarse and water-worn and the deposit has been worked by 
drifting. Its source is probably the gravels of an old buried river, 
traces of which are observable in Douglas Hill, and in benches on the 
west side of the valley north of where Shackelford Creek enters it. 
Other traces of this old channel are found on the western edge of Scott 
Valley as far south as Callahan. The main placer deposit lies on the 
eastern side, and appears to be the result of the direct erosion of the 
ferruginous limestones that compose the western slope of the mountain 
separating Quartz Valley from the main Scott Valley. These lime- 
stones are seamed with auriferous quartz veins for some 5 miles. On 
the eastern slope of this mountain only one ravine seems to have been 
eroded deep enough to get to the gold bearing rocks, but on the Quartz 
Valley side there are four such ravines. These places consist of angular 
fragments of country rock and quartz with sand and clay, in depth from 
1 to 30 feet, covered with a deposit of clay and surfaced with alluvium. 
The shallow placers near the heads of the ravines were worked out by 
the early-day miners. The gold is generally fine, rough and angular; 
and at one point from 8 acres of ground, over $200,000 was extracted, 
by means of hydraulic elevators. 
Bibl. : Report XI, p. 434. 



SISKIYOU COUNTY. 



79 



Oro Fine. 

A low range of hills separates Quartz Valley from Oro Pino. This 
district is 22 miles southwesterly from Scott Bar by the course of the 
river. The auriferous dirt is evidently derived from the erosion and 
decomposition of the mountain sides in the immediate vicinity, as but 
few pebbles or gravel that show the action of running water or wash are 
found intermixed. A small ravine tributary to Oro Pino Creek consti- 
tutes practically all the placer ground in this district, and mining 
operations have been confined to the use of hydraulic elevators. The 
average fineness of the gold in this district is 785. Hydraulic washings 
have yielded from 75 cents to 85 cents per cubic yard of gravel. The 
two principal placer mines are the Eastlick Brothers and the Wright 
& Fletcher. The quartz veins, while numerous, all carry more or less 
gold and are small, and the gold generally occurs in pockets, in the 
limestone. The Green Mountain Tiger and Johnson have been the main 
quartz producers in this section. 

Bibl.: Report VIII, p. 607; XI, p. 437. 

Scott Bar. 

This district, containing both placer and quartz mines, is situated on 
Scott River just above its junction with the Klamath, and was the 
first locality to be mined in Siskiyou County ; it has been a remarkably 




Photo No. 2. Scott Bar. 



rich district, although it includes a very small area (see photo No. 2). 
The gold, generally found on the bedrock, occurs in the form of nuggets, 
and is smooth and water-worn. 



80 MINES AND MINERAL RESOURCES. 

There are several large quartz ledges on Quartz Hill, which is across 
the river from Scott Bar, and one ledge is said to have yielded the 
Quartz Ilill Hydraulic and Quartz Alining Company considerable gold. 
The surface has been rich hydraulic ground. 
Bibl.: Report VIII, p. 605; XI, p. 447. 
Humbug Creek. 

This district, on the northeastern slopes of Old Baldy, is exclusively 
a quartz mining region, and is situated in the headwater forks and can- 
yons of Humbug Creek, about 16 miles northwest of Yreka. The first 
mining in the district was carried on in 1854, and since that time 
considerable gold has been produced, although the operations have been 
practically confined to surface workings, due to a theory that the pay 
ore did not go down. As a matter of fact, a more intelligent explora- 
tion of the ore bodies has disproved the conclusions of the pioneer 
miners, and the properties that have been worked to any depth at all 
have yielded good returns, the Spencer and Mountain Belle mines being 
examples. The ledges in the serpentine are small, averaging 1 foot 
in width, and upon reaching the water level carry the gold largely with 
the sulphurets. The adjacent slates and granites are full of ledges 
carrying low-grade gold ores. The sulphurets consist of pyrite, blende 
and galena. 

Bibl. : Report XI, p. 444. 
Cottonwood. 

This district, containing both placer and quartz mines, is located on 
the north side of the Klamath River, some 20 miles northeast of Yreka, 
and to the west of Ilornbrook, a station on the Oregon branch of the 
Southern Pacific Railroad. It was originally noted for its rich, shallow 
diggings in Cottonwood Creek and the ravines tributary to it from the 
west. The old blue lead channel, famous for its rich gravel, is here 
exposed by erosion of the sandstone capping and cut through by 
the Klamath River. The gravel is blue and strongly cemented and 
compacted, while the bank contains considerable pipe clay hardened 
almost to the consistency of stone and filled with angular rock frag- 
ments. The gold is coarse, occurring mostly on or close to the bedrock. 
Both the channel and the capping are considerably displaced, and dip 
on an angle of about 12^ to the east. In 1887 the outlet of the channel 
w^as discovered on the Klamath River, although the blue gravel had been 
mined in one of the ravines tributary to the Cottonwood, several years 
previous to that time. Some of the gravel on the bedrock gave returns 
of $6 per cubic yard. 

The quartz prospects have been only partially developed and there is 
but little mining activity in this district at the present time. The coun- 
try rocks, slate and quartz-porphyry contain many quartz ledges which 
carry gold values sufficient to warrant careful investigation. 



SISKIYOU COUNTY. 81 

The Hazel, with a gold production record of over $500,000, is the only 
quartz property that has been worked to any extent. 

Bibl. : Report XI, p. 448. 
Callahan. 

The placer mines in this district are confined to the old gravel 
channel and bars of the South Fork of Scott River. The channel and 
high bara of the main Scott River, below the junction of the South and 
East Forks at Callahan, was mined for a distance of 3 miles, and a 
Jarge annual gold output obtained. The high bars have been worked 
out and abandoned for a number of years, and the gold in the river 
channel is at such a depth that it cannot be profitably mined. On the 
South Fork, a few claims in the gulches and high bars are worked 
whenever water is available. On Jackson Creek, one of the headwater 
streams of the South Fork, 7 miles above Callahan, hydraulic mining 
is pursued on a small scale. The Montezuma River claim, 1 mile 
southwest of Callahan, was the largest gold producer, having a record 
of $50,000 annually. 

Bibl. : Report XI, p. 433'. 
Happy Camp. 

This district, also known as Indian Creek, is situated at the conflu- 
ence of Klamath River and Indian Creek, some 70 miles west of Yreka, 
and contains both placer and quartz mines. The shallow and more 
easily removed gravel deposits have been worked out, but the benches 
are still being hydraulicked for their gold content. There is a large 
expanse of mineral land yet to be developed. The shallow diggings 
yielded large returns and were worked over by the Chinese after being 
abandoned by the white miner. The Classic Hill, on Indian Creek, 
one of the famous hydraulic mines of this district, was worked for a 
number of years by Chinese. The formation consists of a soft talcose 
slate, intercalated with stringers of quartz, which in places concentrate 
and form a well defined quartz vein, rich in gold, the deposit being 
known as ''seam diggings." The quartz prospects are worked in a 
very limited way. The Grey Eagle copper mine is the only developed 
property in the district. 

GOLD MINES— QUARTZ. 

Advance, in Sec. 17, T. 40 N., R. 10 W., in the Liberty mining 
district, 13^ miles southeast of Etna Mills, in the Klamath Reserve. 
Owners, Advance Mining Company, of Denver ; president, 11. E. Wood ; 
watchman, C. Ritz. Comprises 100 acres, patented, on Cow Creek. 
Short ore shoots in dioritic schist and limestone; 400-foot tunnel, 
drifts and stopes. Equipment consists of 1500-foot tramway, dwellings, 
ftiid 5-stamp mill, driven by waterpower (water from Russian Creek, 



82 MINES AND MINERAL RESOURCES. 

through 2 miles of flume). Idle for several years. Ore low grade and 
free milling. Ilardserabble prospect to the south. 

Bailey, in Sec. 35, T. 46 N., R. 9 W., in the Deadwood mining 
district, 7 miles northwest of Fort Jones, at an elevation of 5000 feet. 
Owner, L. Bailey, (comprises 80 acres on Indian Creek. Short ore- 
shoot^ in diabase. Worked for pockets. Some rich ore on the surface. 
Small producer. Idle at present. 
Bibl.: Report VIII, p. 624. 

Baker, in Sec. 15, T. 44 N., R. 9 W., in the Deadwood mining dis- 
trict, 7 J miles north of Fort Jones, at an elevation of 5000 feet. Owner, 
George Baker. Comprises 60 acres on Indian Creek. Short ore-shoot 
in slate. Worked for pockets. 300-feet tunnel. Old 5-stamp mill, 
driven by waterpower. Small producer. 
Bibl.: Report, VIII, p. 625. 

Bender, in Sec. 18, T. 42 N., R. 11 W., in the Liberty mining dis- 
trict, 4 miles north of Etna Mills, in the Klamath Reserve. Owner, 
A. A. Chamberlain. Comprises 40 acres, at an elevation of 3300 feet. 
Short ore-shoot in limestone and diorite. 340-foot tunnel and 250 
feet of drifts. One SJ-foot Huntington mill, in poor condition. Some 
rich specimens found near the surface. Idle at present. 

Ben Neil, in Sec. 10, T. 44 N., R. 9 W., in the Deadwood mining 
district, 11 miles northwest of Fort Jones at an elevation of 7100 feet. 
Owner, B. Neil. Comprises 40 acres. Short ore shoot in diorite; 
100-foot tunnel. Small pockets taken out. Idle. 

Big Ledge, formerly known as the Lewis, in Sec. 8, T. 43 N., R. 9 W., 
in the Oro Fino mining distrcit, 6 miles northeast of Greenview. 
Owner, G. Lewis. Comprises 20 acres. Pockets in diabase. One ore- 
shoot is 100 feet long and 15 inches wide; 360-foot tunnel. Only do 
asse>ssment work. Idle. 

Bibl. : Report XII, p. 277 ; XIII, p. 388. 

Black Bear, discovered in 18()(), is the most noted and largest quartz 
producer in Siskiyou County. It is in Sec. 13, T. 39 N., R. 12 W., 
in the Liberty mining district; 9 miles south of Sawyer *s Bar in the 
Klamath Reserve. Owners, Black Bear Consolidated Mining Company, 
of Rollin; John Dagorett, president; leased to Rollin Mining Company 
of San Francisco; J. L. Dunscomb, president; W. A. Farish, Jr., 
superintendent. The ore bodies occur in lenticular shaped deposits, 
w^hich pinch out at times on the f ootwall side. The holdings comprise 70 
acres of patented ground, consisting of the Black Bear, South Black 
Bear and Yellow Jacket claims, with 10 acres for millsite; workings 
consist of tunnels and two shafts ; altitude, 3600 feet ; water supply from 
Black Bear and Auges Creek, through two flumes, each 1 mile long, and 



SISKIYOU COUNTY. 83 

1600 feet of pipe ; length along lode, 4500 feet ; length of ore shoot, 150 
feet; width of ore shoot, 3 feet; footwall, slate; hanging- wall, slate; 
number veins, two. 

Black Bear and east and west crossing at right angles; character of 
ore, free milling; strike, north and south; dip, 40° E.; greatest verti- 
cal depth below outcrop, 600 feet; length driven on vein, 1500 feet; 
workings, six tunnels from 100 to 700 feet long ; old shaft 550 feet deep 
(six levels) ; new shaft on Black Bear claim is 475 feet deep (size 
10'x40, sunk at an angle of 45° (3 levels) ; 4000 feet of drifts from 
old shaft, all to the west, several crosscuts; raise 3'x5'x30', in new 
shaft from third level (200 feet) ; old stopes all filled; source of power, 
water and electricity; mine equipment, hoist, cars, compressor plant, 
compressor pump, tools, shops, assay office, dwellings, and 100 h.p. 
electric plant with 2 miles of power line; reduction equipment, 16 
stamp mill, electrically driven (stamps weigh 650 pounds) ; number 
men employed, top 7, mine 2, total 9 ; cost (per ton) : development, 
$2.00, mining $1.50, treatment $0.80, general $0.60; production to 
date, $3,100,000. 

White Bear prospect to the north. From 1872 to 1881 the Black 
Bear mine paid $1,000,000 in dividends ; most of the work performed on 
Black Bear claim; good wagon road from Sawyer's Bar to the mine. 
Bibl. : Report VIII, pp. 620, 621 ; X, p. 656 ; XIII, p. 389. 

Black Hawk, in Sec. 31, T. 46 N., R. 7 W., in Virginia Bar mining 
district ; 5 miles north of Gottville in Klamath Reserve. Owners, Ladd 
& Ogden. Comprises 40 acres ; formation granite and schist ; ore found 
in small pockets ; 100 foot tunnel ; only do assessment work. 

Blind Lode, in Sec. 18, T. 43 N., R. 9 W., in the Oro Fino mining 
district ; 5| miles northeast of Greenview. Owner, H. J. Diggles ; com- 
prises 20 acres of patented land, located in 1876 ; 150-foot ore shoot, 6 
inches wide in diabase ; four tunnels, longest being 600 feet ; some rich 
ore extracted ; said to have produced $40,000. Idle. 
Bibl.: Report, XII, p. 278; XIII, p. 390. 

Blue Jay, in. Sec. 11, T. 47 N., R. 8 W., in Virginia Bar mining 
district; 5^ miles north of Gottville in Klamath Reserve. Owners, Blue 
Jay Mining Company; president, Mrs. P. D. Bennell; secretary, P. 
Billings; home office, Cleveland, Ohio; comprise 160 acres of patented 
land, purchased from Southern Pacific Railroad Company; formation, 
schist and diorite ; one vein 150 feet long and 5 feet wide ; low grade ; 
two tunnels, 250 and 400 feet long ; 10-stam'p mill built by Union Iron 
Works; 1000-pound stamps; two Johnson concentrators; water power 
and steam ; 2^ mile ditch from North Fork of Empire Creek ; small pro- 
duction. Idle since 1907. 



\ 

\ 

84 MINES AND MINERAL RESOURCES. 

Blue Lead, in Sec. 26, T. 42 N., R. 9 W., in the Liberty mining 
district, 5 miles southeast of Etna Mills in the Klamath Reserve. 
Owner, L. H. Cory; comprises 40 acres of patented land; short ore 
shoot in diabase ; rich on the surface ; 580-foot tunnel, old 80-foot shaft 
and drifts comprise several hundred feet of development work; old 
4-^tamp mill (650-pound stamp) ; said to have produced $40,000. 
Idle since 1908. 

Bonanza, in Sec. 14, T. 46 N., R. 7 W., in Cottonwood mining 
district ; 10 miles southwest of Ilombrook in Klamath Reserve. Owners, 
Klondike Mining and Milling Company; president, J. P. Kleprock; 
secretary, L. P. Kleprock; home office, Long Beach; discovered in 1883 
by C. Dovey ; formation hornblende schist and granodiorite ; short ore 
shoot ; pocket mine ; 1600- foot tunnel ; equipment, dwellings and 5-foot 
Huntington mill ; locator took out $10,000 in a pocket. Idle. 

Boijle, in Sec. 8, T. 45 N., R. 8 W., in the Humbug mining district; 
14 miles west of Yreka in the Klamath Reserve. Owner, C. E. Bunker; 
100 acres located in 1880; two parallel veins, strike N. 40° W., and 
dip 60° S.; ore shoot is 200 feet long and 2 feet wide; formation is 
slate; five tunnels from 40 to 900 feet in length; only do assessment 
work. Idle. 

Bibl. : Report XII, p. 278 ; XIII, p. 390. 

Brown Bear, formerly known as Golden and Eveleth^s, in Sec. 
2, T. 39 N., R. 11 W., in the Liberty mining district; 3 miles southeast 
of Sawyer's Bar in the Klamath Reserve. Owners, Swain and Cleaver; 
comprises 100 acres on White 's Gulch at an elevation of 3100 feet ; 160- 
foot ore shoot, 18 inches wide, with a course of N. 20° E. and dip of 25° 
E.; 480-foot tunnel, drifts and stope; 4-starap mill, driven by water 
power, from White's Gulch through 1^ miles of ditch and i mile of 
flume. Idle at present; has been a producer. 
Bibl.: Report XII, p. 283; XIII, p. 402. 

California Consolidated, formerly known as the Golden Ball mine, 
in Sees. 16 and 17, T. 39 N., R. 11 W., in the Liberty mining district; 
3^ miles southwest of Sawyer's Bar in the Klamath* Reserve. It is 
owned by the California Consolidated Mining Company; W. H. Yomig, 
of Oakland, president ; Geo. Ball, superintendent ; comprises 384 acres, 
17 being patented ; has been a producer and some ore still in sight, but 
no system of mining was pursued, so that much useless work was per- 
formed ; altitude, 3800 to 4700 feet ; fissure vein ; length of ore shoot 
1000 feet ; width 6 feet ; free milling ; strike N. 20° to 40° E., dip 
10° to 40° SE.; footwall, slate (soft); hanging-wall, slate; greatest 
vertical depth below outcrop, 600 feet; length driven on vein, 1000 



SISKIYOU COUNTY. 85 

feet; two. levels, one at 50 and other at 125 feet; drifts, 160 feet, from 
50-foot level, and 80 feet from 125-foot level ; another from Stevens tun- 
nel is 140 feet northeast and another 250 feet southwest ; two crosscuts, 
120 feet long ; two winzes, each 60 feet deep ; seven raises ; two stopes in 
Stevens tunnel, each being 40 feet by 40 feet ; several open cuts ; equip- 
ment, 25 h.p. compressor, small hoist, 150 h.p. electrical plant (on 
North Fork of Salmon River at Sawyer's Bar) with 3 miles of power 
line, 1500-foot tramway, dwellings, and 20-stamp mill driven by 
electricity. Idle. Production to date is $473,500 ; idle since 1910 ; only 
assessment work being done; property should be a dividend payer if 
properly managed; said to be a continuation of the Black Bear lode. 
Bibl.: Report XII, p. 282; XIII, p. 402. 

Gape Cod, in Sees. 18 and 19, T. 45 N., R. 7 W., in Greenhorn min- 
ing district ; 6 miles west of Yreka, in the Klamath Forest Reserve. 
Owners, Le May & Bulis; consists of 115 acres (40 acres patented) ; 
located in 1885 ; formation, slate and porphyry ; two parallel veins, shoot 
300 feet long and 14 inches wide ; 300-foot tunnel ; produced $12,000. 
Idle. 

Central, in Sec. 34, T. 48 N., R. 8 W., in Hungry Creek mining 
district, 16 miles northwest of Hornbrook. Owners, Coil and Haslett. 
Located in 1893, 20 acres. Short ore shoots; ledge 2 feet wide; two 
tunnels, one 400 feet long; formation, granite and schist; free milling. 
Idle. 

Champion, in Sec. 32, T. 12 N., R. 6 E., 10^ miles from Orleans, 
in the Cottage Grove mining district in Klamath Reserve. Owners, 
J. A. Hunter et al. ; 180 acres, located in 1899 ; two veins, in porphyry ; 
still in ore in workings; equipment, dwellings and one stamp mill 
(800-pound stamp) driven by water power, and 2-ton cyanide plant; 
water from Ten Eyck Creek through 2000 feet of ditch; claims are on 
the east slope of Prospect Hill; owner claims to have 14,000 tons of 
$15 rock in sight ; three men employed ; adjoins Twan & Hannan pros- 
pect. 

Cherry BUI, in Sec. 25, T. 45 N., R. 8 W., in the Greenhorn 
mining district; 6^ miles southwest of Yreka in Klamath Reserve. 
Owner, Incorporated Company; several tunnels, longest being 200 
feet; formation is diorite and porphyry; old 3-stamp mill, driven by 
steam power; adjoins Mt. Vernon on the west; been idle for a number 
of years ; small production record. 

Columbia, in Sec. 16, T. 45 N., R. 9 W., in the Scott River mining 
district, 7 miles northeast of Scott I^ar in the Klamath Reserve; 
elevation of 4700 feet. Owner, Scott River Mining Company, of 
Seattle; C. F. Lee, president; comprises 40 acres, on Old Baldy Moun- 



86 MINES AND MINERAL RESOURCES. 

tain; located in 1882; short ore shoot in slate and diabase; workings 
consist of 700-foot tunnel and 120-foot shaft; ore is free milling near 
the surface, but base with depth ; equipment consists of dwellings and 
10-stamp mill driven by steam and water power; only do assessment 
work ; said to have been a producer at one time. 
Bibl.: Report XII, p. 280; XIII, p. 394. 

Condensed, in Sec. 12, T. 38 N., R. 11 W., in the Liberty mining 
district; 15 miles southeast of Sawyer's Bar in the Klamath Reserve. 
Owner, W. H. Cady; comprises 60 acres at an elevation of 2400 feet; 
short ore shoot in granite; little high grade found on footwall side; 
220-foot tunnel. Idle. 

Cmnor, in Sec. 18, T. 43 N., R. 9 W., in the Oro Fine mming 
district ; 5 miles northeast of Greenview. Owner, J. Connor ; comprises 
20 acres short ore shoot ; pay in pockets ; 500-foot tunnel ; said to have 
produced $15,000. Idle. 

Bibl. : Report XIII, p. 395. 

Crawley, in Sec. 22, T. 40 N., R. 8 W., in the Callahan mining 
district, 1^ miles southwest of Callahan in the Klamath Reserve. 
Owner, C. A. Warden Estate ; comprises 60 acres ; short ore shoots ; pay 
ore occurring in pockets; in hornblende schist; 600-foot tunnel and 
500 feet of drifts, 30-foot stope; old 2-stamp mill, 650-pound stamps; 
said to have produced $60,000 ; only do assessment work. 
Bibl. : Report XIII, p. 396, 

Cxib Bear and Blue Jeans, in Sec. 9, T. 40 N., R. 10 W., in the 
Liberty mining district, 12 miles southeast of Etna Mills in the 
Klamath Reserve. Owners, Siskiyou Syndicate, of Los Angeles ; presi- 
dent, I. J. Luce; secretary, M. Marx; superintendent, C. Ritz; com- 
prises 100 acres; elevation 5800 feet; veins, two in number, occur in 
hornblende schist and quartz-porphyry; three short tunnels and open 
cuts, and ore being removed from the latter at present; good prospect; 
80 tons milled, which gave returns of over $20 per ton; five men are 
employed on the Highland lode ; discovered in 1898 by Chas. Cory. 

Cummings, formerly known as the McKeen, in Sec. 36, T. 40 N., 
R. 9 W., in the Callahan mining district, 3^ miles southwest of Calla- 
han in the Klamath Reserve; has been one of the best quartz pro- 
ducers in this district. It is owned by the Shasta Mining Company, of 
Callahan, with James McKeen as manager-superintendent, and com- 
prises 200 acres, patented, on Wildcat Creek at an elevation of 4200 
feet; strike of the vein is N. 40° E., dip 40° SW. ; ore shoots are 
short, being 130 feet long and 3 feet wide, all in granite; main 
tunnel is 800 feet long and, together with the drifts, crosscuts and 
stopes, comprise several thousand feet of work, but no depth has been 



SISKIYOU COUNTY. 87 

attained; old Kinkead mill (driven by water power) and a dwelling, on 
the property ; has been a good producer, said to exceed $500,000, and 
ore is free and easily worked; idle at present; has been worked since 
1874. 

Bibl.: Report XII, p. 280; XIII, p. 396. 

Dewey, one of the noted quartz mines of Siskiyou County, is located 
in Sec. 23, T. 42 N., R. 8 W., in the Gazelle mining district; 12 mile^ 
southwest of Gazelle in the Klamath Reserve. It is owned by the 
Squaw Mining Company and comprises 100 acres, patented, at an 
elevation of 6800 feet; the strike of the vein is N. 40° E., dip 30° 
SE. The ore occurs in granodiorite, having a width of 3 feet; 
workings consist of a shaft 400 feet deep, a tunnel 920 feet in length, 
drifts, raises and stopes, all comprising several thousand feet of 
development work ; equipment consists of hoist, dwellings, and old 
10-stamp and Huntington mills (poor condition) operated by steam 
and water power ; property said to have produced $900,000 ; discovered 
in the early eighties; idle since 1907. 

Double Eagle and Little Quartz, in Sec. 26, T. 46 N., R. 9 W., in 
Oak Bar mining district in Klamath Reserve, 30 miles west of Horn- 
brook. Owner, H. H. Barton ; comprises 20 acres ; pocket mine ; ore is 
hornblende schist and granitic-porphyry; 120-foot tunnel; produced 
$10,000, ore being crushed in an arrastra. Idle. 
Bibl. : Report XIII, p. 397. 

Eliza, in Sees. 4 and 9, T. 45 N., R. 8 W., in the Humbug mining 
district, 15 miles west of Yreka in the Klamath Reserve. Owners, 
Shur, Yunker & DeWitt, of Yreka. Group comprises 100 acres, located 
in 1865 by D. M. Lash; relocated in 1892 by present owners. Eleva- 
tion is 4500 feet. There is a good wagon road from the property to 
Yreka. The location covers the lode for a distance of 4500 feet. The 
fissure vein occurs in quartz-porphyry and diabase, the former being 
the footwall and the latter the hanging-wall. The strike is N. 20° 
E. and dip 45° E. ; ore shoot is 200 feet long and 5 feet wide ; a 1400- 
foot tunnel has been driven on the vein, giving 360 feet of backs ; above 
this lower tunnel there are four others from 100 to 800 feet in length ; 
there are five stopes in all ; equipment consists of dwellings and 10-stamp 
mill. Owners claim an ore reserve of 40,000 tons of value of $5 per ton 
and a production to date of $150,000; two men are employed doing 
development work in the lower tunnel; ore free near surface, but 
somewhat base with depth. 

Elk Creek, in Sec. 3, T. 45 N., R. 7 W., in Hawkinsville mining 
district, 6 miles north of Yreka. Owners, Elk Creek Mining Company ; 
president, L. F. Colburn ; secretary, J. E. Harmon ; home office, Yreka ; 



88 MINES AND MINERAL RESOURCES. 

100 acres located in 1903, in Klamath Reserve; three parallel veins; 
100- foot ore shoot 14 inches wide; formation, slate and porphyry; two 
tunnels 600 and 450 feet long; 10-stamp mill driven by electricity; pro- 
duction $20,000. Idle. 

Fagumhz (see Humpback). 

Flat wood and Nannu S., formerly known as Old Jackson, in Sec. 
5, T. 45 N., R. 8 W., in the Humbug mining district, 16 miles west of 
Yreka. Owner, L. W. Cousins ; comprises 80 acres ; short ore shoots in 
f?raniti(*-porphyry ; seven tunnels from 5 to 800 feet in length. Idle; 
only do assessment work. 

Franklin, in Sec. 16, T. 44 N., R. 9 W., in the Deadwood mining 
district, 8 miles north of Fort Jones at an elevation of 5500 feet. Own- 
ers, Miller & Arnold ; c'omi>rises 40 acres on Indian Creek ; ore shoot is 
120 feet long and 22 inches wide, with slate footwall and quartz- 
porphyry hanging-wall; 600- foot tunnel, drifts and 60-foot stope; claim 
production of $90,000 ; ore runs about $25 per ton and is worked in 
Baker's mill; leased to Wells & Brown. Idle since July, 1913; 20 tons 
of $25 rock on the dump. 

Golden Eagle, formerly known as the Sheba, in Sec. 7, T. 44 N., 
R. 9 W., in the Deadwood mining district ; 10 miles north of Fort Jones; 
was one of the producers in this section. It is owned by the Indian 
Creek Mining Company of San Francisco; president, I. J. Coe, and 
superintendent, T. E. Morrison ; comprises 80 acres, patented; ore shoots 
are 200 feet long and 15 inches wide, with diabase footwall and quartz- 
porphyry hanging-wall ; 750-foot tunnel, drifts and stopes, making sev- 
eral thousand feet of development work ; the equipment, consisting of 
50 h.p. boiler and 5-stamp mill, have been removed from the property 
and company has closed down and practically abandoned the buildings; 
has paid some dividends. 

Bibl.: Report VI 11, p. 625. 

Golden Seal in Sec. 18, T. 43 N., R. 9 W., in the Oro Fino mining 
district, 5 miles northeast of Greenview at an elevation of 3200 feet. 
Owner, V. Pitz ; comprises 20 acres, located in 1885 ; 300-foot ore shoot, 
8 inches wide, in syenite and quartz-porphyry; 525-foot tunnel on the 
vein ; a few pockets of high grade taken out. Owner works the claim 
in the winter. 

Golden West, formerly known as the King, in Sec. 15, T. SS N., 
R. 10 W., in the Salmon River mining district, 13 miles west of Calla- 
han, in the Klamath Reserve. Owner, J. S. Baggs; comprises 60 acres 
on Trail Creek at an elevation of 7000 feet; fissure vein, in schist; 
200-foot tunnel, still in ore ; one man is employed ; good prospect, with 
well-defined ledge of free milling ore, 4 feet wide and running from 
$8 to $15 per ton; discovered in 1904. 



SISKIYOU COUNTY. 89 

Gold Hill, formerly known as the Gilta, in Sec. 12, T. 9 N., 
R. 7 E., in the Liberty mining district, in Klamath Reserve, at an eleva- 
tion of 3500 feet. Owner, E. A. Dannenbrink ; comprises 60 acres of pat- 
ented land; ore shoot is 250 feet long and 3 feet wide, in slate and 
diorite ; several thousand feet development work, consisting of tunnels, 
crosscuts and stopes ; equipment consists of dwellings, and 10-stamp mill 
operated by steam and water power, idle at present; twelve men 
employed, doing prospect work ; property has been a producer. 

Grizzly Gulch, in Sec. 14, T. 44 N., R. 9 W., in the Deadwood 
mining district, 10 miles north of Fort Jones at an elevation of 7000 
feet. Owner, J. Shelly ; comprises 60 acres ; short ore shoots in diabase ; 
worked for pockets; said to have produced $4000 from 80-foot tunnel. 
Idle. 

Gumboat, in Sec. 15, T. 45 N., R. 9 W., 8 miles east of Scott Bar, 
in the Scott River mining district in the Klamath Reserve. Owner, 
A. Simon; comprises 40 acres; ore is base with depth (some chalcopy- 
rite), occurring in slate; length of ore shoot not determined; 120- foot 
tunnel ; 60-foot shaft ; only do assessment work. 
Bibl. : Report XIII, p. 404. 

Hansen, formerly known as Knownothing Creek, in Sees. 1 and 12, 
T. 9 N., R. 7 E., in the Liberty mining district, 8^ miles southwest of 
Forks of Salmon, in Klamath Reserve. Owners, Roberts & Hagland; 
comprises 60 acres of patented land, located in 1880; short ore shoot, 
in slate and quartz-porphyry; several tunnels, longest being 850 feet, 
equipment, dwelling and old arrastra ; two men employed doing pros- 
pect work ; has been a small producer. 
Bibl.: Report VIII, p. 622. 

Hardscrabile, in Sec. 17, T. 40 N., R. 10 W., in the Liberty mining 
district, 14 miles southeast of Etna Mills in the Klamath Reserve. 
Owner, Hardscrabble Mining Company, of Los Angeles ; C. B. Parrott, 
president; John Nefroney, superintendent; comprises 140 acres, at an 
elevation of 6100 feet ; length of ore shoot not determined ; country rock 
in dioritic-schist ; 400-foot tunnel ; two men employed. Highland Mine 
to the northeast. 

Hazel, in Sec. 25, T. 47 N., R. 8 W., in the Cottonwood mining 
district, 4 miles southwest of Hombrook, is the only large producer in 
this district. It is owned by the Hazel Gold Mining Company, of Chico ; 
J. A. Jillson, president, and J. W. Roper, secretary. The group com- 
prises 80 acres of patented land in the Klamath National Forest Reserve 
at an elevation of 2800 feet. There are three veins, known as the 
Isolate Patch, **C and Hazilett, which occur in the slate, the last two 
being practically parallel. The ore shoot is 150 feet long and 3 feet in 



90 MINES AND MINERAL RESOURCES. 

width, with a 40° dip to the south. There are five tunnels from 100 to 
1500 feet in length, all in the vein, comprising, with the drifts and 
stopes, several thousand feet of development work. The equipment 
consists of dwellings, assay office, and a 10-stamp Hendy mill (850- 
pound stamps) driven by waterpower from Ditch Creek through 1 mile 
of ditch. The property is said to have produced $800,000, but is idle at 
the present time. It was discovered in 1883 by H. Hazilett and then 
sold to the present owners. 

Hicks, formerly kno^Ti as China Gulch, In Sec. 2, T. 46 N., 
R. 7 W., 7 miles northwest of Hornbrook in the Klamath Reserve. 
0>\Tier, J. T. Ilicks. Comprises 40 acres. Ore shoot said to be 600 feet 
long, but only 3 inches wide on the surface, occurring in granite. 
Surface stripped of overburden and ore exposed a few feet below, which 
was crushed in an arrastra; 150-foot tunnel; 8-foot arrastra, run by 
water power; tailings impounded (150 tons on hand), which are to be 
treated in cyanide plant soon; said to assay from $5 to $15 per ton. 
Idle at present. Small producer. 

Highland, in Sec. 16, T. 40 N., R. 10 W., in the Liberty mining 
district, 11 miles southeast of Etna Mills in the Klamath Reserve, is 
one of the noted quartz mines of this county. It is owned by the 
Belgium-Bohemian IVIining Company, of Belgium. H. E. Mattern, 
superintendent. Comprises 100 acres at an elevation of 6400 feet. 
Supplies are brought over a 3-mile trail by means of pack animals ; ore 
shoots are about 130 feet long and 2 feet wide, having a strike of 
N. 40° E and a dip of 30° SE. ; footwall is dioritic-schist and hang- 
ing-wall is quartz-porphyry; workings consist of tunnels, the main 
tunnel having a length of 600 feet ; there are several thousand feet of 
development work, all near the apex of the mountain, so that only a 
shallow depth has been obtained; equipment consists of cars, mining 
tools, assay office, dwellings, and a 10-stamp mill (modern pattern) 
run by gasoline; twenty-six men are employed; said to have produced 
over $350,000; best ore found in pockets; discovered in 1899 by 
P. Musick, who extracted $80,000 from pockets. 

Highland, known also as the Old Highland. In Sec. 12, T. 39 N., 
R. 10 W., in the Salmon River mining district, 12^ miles northwest of 
Callahan in the Klamath Reserve. Owners, Denny-Bar Company. 
Comprises 60 acres on Trail Creek ; fissure vein between walls of granite 
and schist, being an extension of the Trail Creek ledge; 200-foot tunnel, 
and 400 feet of drifts; ore is free and easily worked; idle at present; 
owners only do assessment work ; Trail Creek prospect to the south. , 

Bibl. : Report XIII, p. 405. I 

Highland, in Sec. 25, T. 46 N., R. 7 W., in the Cottonwood mining | 
district, 3 miles west of Hornbrook in the Klamath Reserve. Owner, 



SISKIYOU COUNTY. 91 

C. A. Myers. Comprises 60 acres; ore shoot is 125 feet long and 

10 inches wide, being free milling and high grade ; formation is slate ; 
1500-foot tunnel on the vein; idle at present; discovered in 1903 by 
Donnelly Bros.; then abandoned and relocated by Rogers, who aban- 
doned it, and was relocated by present owner ; small producer. 

Hoboken, in Sec. 21, T. 45 N., R. 8 W., in the Deadwood mining 
district, 11 miles north of Fort Jones. Owner, T. A. Walker. Com- 
prises 40 acres, patented, on Cherry Creek ; 120-foot ore shoot, 10 inches 
wide, with diabase foot and slate hanging-walls; 600-foot tunnel and 
250-foot drift ; small producer at one time, the ore being crushed in an 
arrastra ; idle since 1907. 

Bibl.: Report XII, p. 284; XIII, p. 406. 

Homestake, in Sec. 15, T. 40 N., R. 10 W., in the Klamath Reserve. 
Owners, Taylor & Bobs; J. F. Boyle, superintendent. Comprises 
120 acres on the same lode as the Highland mine; formation is 
quartz-porphyry and dioritic schist ; worked by means of tunnels ; high 
grade (pocket) gold extracted, which has made the property noted; 
discovered in 1902 ; elevation is 6100 feet ; eight men are employed ; has 
produced several thousand dollars in high gi'adc; 2-mile trail from 
wagon road. 

Humpback, formerly known as Fagundez, in S^cs. 4, 5, 8 and 9, 
T. 39 N., R. 11 W., in the Liberty mining district; 3 miles south of 
Sawyer's Bar in the Klamath Reserve. Comprises 80 acres of patented 
land on Eddy's Gulch; elevation 3400 feet; length along lode 6000 feet; 
ore shoot is 80 to 100 feet long and 1 foot wide; strike N. 20° E., 
dip 25° NE. ; formation is slate; workings consist of 250-foot tun- 
nel, drifts and crosscuts; small producer; idle for several years. 
Bibl. : Report VIII, p. 619. 

Inyo, in Sec. 2, T. 45 N., R. 8 W., in the Humbug mining district, 

11 miles west of Yreka in Klamath Reserve at an elevation of 3100 feet. 
Owner, J. D. Fairchild. Comprises 20 acres, discovered in 1909 ; short 
ore shoots in quartz-porphyry pocket mine; produced $4000. Idle. 
Only do assessment work. 

Ironsides, formerly known as Little Wonder, in Sec. 26, T. 45 N., 
R. 8 W., in Greenhorn mining district, 7 miles southwest of Yreka, in 
Klamath Reserve. Owner, James Ironsides ; worked as a pocket mine ; 
three short tunnels; small producer of high grade ore. 
Bibl.: Report XII, p. 285; XIII, p. 408. 

Johnson and China Paul, in Sec. 12, T. 43 N., R, 10 W., in Quartz 
Valley mining district, 7 miles north of Greenview. Owner, S. H. IIol- 
gate. Comprises 80 acres ; 200-foot ore shoot, 10 inches wide, in diabase ; 
7— C14456 



92 MINES AND MINERAL BESOUBCES. 

680-foot tunnel ; some rich pockets extracted from Johnson claim ; idle 
since 1910. 

Bibl.: Report VIII, p. 626. 

Kangaroo, in Sec. 29, T. 40 N., R. 7 W., in the Callahan mining 
district, 9 miles southeast of Callahan in the Klamath Reserve. Owner, 
C. 0. Johnson. Comprises 60 acres; short ore shoot, in diorite and 
granitic-porphyry, 220-foot tunnel and 400 feet of drifts; worked for 
pockets ; some high grade ore extracted. 

Katie May, in Sec. 24, T. 45 N., R. 8 W., in the Greenhorn mining 
district, 6 miles west of Yreka in Klamath Reserve. Owner, A. S. 
Calkins ; comprises 20 acres ; located in 1886 ; relocated in 1900 ; short 
ore shoots in diorite and slate; 250-foot tunnel and 80-foot shaft; 
one stope, 60 feet by 4 feet by 50 feet; ore in sight consists of 100 
tons, valued at $14 per ton; only do assessment work. 
Bibl. : Report XIII, p. 409. 

King Solomon, in Sees. 6 and 7, T. 38 N., R. 11 W., in the Liberty 
mining district, 12 miles southeast of Sawyer's Bar in the Klamath 
Reserve, is another of the quartz producers of Siskiyou County. It 
is owned by C. B. Cottrell, of Westerly, R. I. ; W. H. Young, superin- 
tendent, and comprises 40 acres located in the eighties by P. Dannen- 
brink; length along lode 3000 feet; length of ore shoot, 230 feet; 
width 5 feet; strike north and south; dip 60° E.; footwall, quartz- 
porphyry; hanging- wall slate; ore free milling; workings: 130-foot 
shaft, tunnels, longest being 460 feet, over 1000 feet of drifts, cross- 
cuts and stopes, making in all several hundred feet of development 
work; equipment; cars, 30 h.p. boiler, small hoist, dwellings and 
an 8-stamp mill; has been a good producer and pay ore in sight; 
five men employed at present; mine being opened up so as to have a 
considerable tonnage blocked out. 

Little Bonsa, in Sec. 9, T. 45 N., R. 7 W., in Hawkinsville mining 
district, 4^ miles north of Yreka. Owner, C. N. Gordon; in Klamath 
Reserve; 20 acres, located in 1910; short ore shoot, 6 inches wide; two 
tunnels, longest 40 feet; idle since 1912. 

Lucky Strike, in Sec. 33, T. 41 N., R. 10 W., in the Liberty mining 
district, 9 miles southeast of Etna Mills in the Klamath Reserve. 
Owners, Lucky Strike Mining Company, of Los Angeles; president, 
T. Eagerly; superintendent, W. F. Smith. Comprises 80 acres; short 
ore shoot in hornblende schist ; 450-foot tunnel ; some high grade ore 
found near the surface ; two men employed. 

Lucky Strike, in Sec. 28, T. 45 N., R. 7 W., in Greenhorn mining 
district, 1^ miles northwest of Yreka. Owner, F. M. Osgood; superin- 
tendent, J. M. Beale; 160 acres, located in 1865; formation, slate; doing 



SISKIYOU COUNTY. 93 

development work; 1000 tons of ore in sight; four tunnels and one 
80-foot shaft; nine men employed. Some ore treated in custom mill at 
Yreka. 

Marrian & Goodale, in Sec. 15, T. 40 N., R. 10 W., in the Liberty 
mining district, 9^ miles southeast of Etna Mills in the Klamath 
Reserve. Owner, Incorporated Company, of San Francisco; James 
Hogan, manager; comprises 80 acres, located in 1903; short ore shoot, 
in hornblende schist; 480-foot tunnel; rich bunches of high grade 
found; 2-stamp mill driven by steam power; dwellings; has been 
a small producer ; idle at present. 

McClaughry Group, in Sec. 8, T. 45 N., R. 8 W., in the Humbug 
mining district, 14 miles northwest of Yreka in Klamath Reserve. 
Owner, C. Humphreys; comprises 80 acres; formation is dolomite; 
160-foot ore shoot, 2 feet wide; free milling; 600-foot tunnel; ore 
reserve consists of 1500 tons, assaying $20 per ton. Idle. 

Monarch, in Sec. 8, T. 39 N., R. 11 W., in the Liberty mining dis- 
trict. Owner, G. R. Godfrey; comprises 40 acres, on Eddy Creek, 
at an elevation of 3300 feet ; pocket mine ; 150-foot tunnel ; pockets occur 
in slate; only do assessment work. 

Morrison & Oarlock, formerly known as the Little Queen, is located 
in the Quartz Valley mining district, in Sec. 13, T. 43 N., R. 10 W., 
4 miles northwest of Greenview, and comprises 60 acres of patented 
land. It is owned by the Richman Company of Fort Jones and has 
a production record of $500,000. Idle since 1907 on account of law- 
suits. Altitude, 2800 feet; course of vein, N. 20° E, dip 45° E.; 
vertical depth 400 feet (shaft, size 5'x7'); number of levels, eight; 
1200-foot drift to the west on this level; walls, limestone and quartz- 
porphyry; length of ore shoot, 350 feet; width 16 inches; 1500- foot 
tunnel on vein; character of ore, brittle smoky quartz, free milling; 
mine equipment: 35 h.p. steam hoist, Gould water pump, cages, 
dwellings, assay office; reduction equipment: 10-stamp mill built by 
Union Iron Works, operated by electricity. 

Mount Vernon, in Sec. 25, T. 45 N,, R. 8 W., in the Greenhorn 
mining district; 6 miles southwest of Yreka in Klamath Reserve. 
Owner, Incorporated Eastern Company; ore shoots are 150 feet long 
and 2 feet wide, occurring in slate; strike N. 40° E.; dip 50° S. ; 
three tunnels, longest being 1200 feet on the vein ; equipment ; dwellings, 
assay office and 10-stamp mill driven by electricity, power being 
obtained by California-Oregon Power Company; has been a producer; 
worked at times by leasers ; idle at present. 

Nigger Boy, in Sec. 2, T. 46 N., R. 7 W., in the Cottonwood mining 
district, 5 miles southwest of Hornbrook in the Klamath Reserve. 
Owner, W. H. Allison; comprises 60 acres, located in 1898; formation 



94 MINES AND MINERAL RESOURCES. 

is slate and diorite ; ore shoot is 180 feet long and 2 feet wide ; two tun- 
nels, 1000 and 80 feet long on vein ; equipment : dwellings, mining tools, 
blacksmith shop, 2-stamp mill driven by steam and water power; 1^ 
mile ditch from Ash Creek; under bond to Commercial Copper and 
Gold Mining Company, of Tallant, Oregon; three men are employed; 
some production, and ore reserves, claimed. 

Ohio Group, in Sec. 8, T. 46 N., R. 6 W., in Pool's Paradise min- 
ing district; 7 miles south of Ilornbrook. Owner, W. Seeman; 60 
acres, patented, located in 1903; formation, syenite and diorite; base 
ore; 3(X)-fo<)t oreshoot, 1 foot wide; 500-feet tunnel. Idle. 

Old Indian, in Sec. 4, T. 9 N., R. 8 E., in Liberty mining district; 
9 miles southwest of Forks of Salmon, in Klamath Reserve. Owner, 
A. Nally ; comprises 40 acres, located in 1892 ; short ore shoot in serpen- 
tine; 200-foot tunnel; old 120-foot shaft (caved) ; worked as a pocket 
mine ; only do assessment work. 

Old Vet and Eclipse, in Sees. 10 and 11, T. 45 N., R. 8 W., in the 
Humbug mining district, 10 miles northwest of Yreka in Klamath 
Reserve at an elevation of 3900 feet. Owner, J. P. Horn; comprises 
40 acras ; two parallel veins in granite ; three tunnels, longest being 100 
feet ; few tons of ore milled, gave returns of $14 on plates. 
BibL: Report XIII, p. 418. 

Oregonian Group, formerly known as the Malloy, in Sees. 15, 16, 
21 and 22, T. 40 N., R. 11 W., in the Liberty mining district; 3 miles 
northeast of Sawyer's Bar in the Klamath Reserve. Owner, D. MaUoy; 
comprises 60 acres, located in 1886; 160-foot ore shoot 5 feet wide, 
strike N. 30° E., dip 40° NE.; strong ledge in granite; 420-foot tunnel; 
only do assessment work. 

BibL: Report XII, p. 289; XIII, p. 419. 

Oro Gravde, in Sees. 10 and 11, T. 45 N., R. 7 W., in the Humbug 
mining district, 12 miles northwest of Yreka in the Klamath Reserve. 
Owners, Trask & Corinson ; comprises 100 acres, located in 1860 and 
relocated in 1892 by present owners ; four parallel veins, having dolomite 
foot and porphyry hanging-walls ; 300-foot ore shoot, 2 feet wide ; 300- 
foot tunnel and 160-foot shaft; one stope 80 feet by 4 feet by 40 feet; 
10-foot arrastra run by water from Humbug Creek; owners claim ore 
reserve of 1000 tons, value $16; produced to date $20,000; some of 
the ore pans $40 per ton; owners do all the work. 
BibL : Report, XIII, p. 419. 

Overton, in Sec. 16, T. 40 N., R. 10 W., in the Liberty mining 
district; 13 miles southeast of Etna ]\Iills in the Klamath Reserve. 
Owners, Overton Gold ^Mining Company; C. E. Overton, president; 



siSKnrou county. 95 

L. E. Buckner, superintendent ; comprises 80 acres ; ore shoots are 100 
feet long and 20 inches wide, in dioritic schist ; 420-foot tunnel, drifts 
and stope ; 120 tons of ore on the dump, which is carried on mules to 
the Advance mill, a distance of 2 miles (5 mules handle 1 ton each trip, 
or 8 tons per day) ; property is idle at present ; small producer. 

Pilot Knoh, in Sees. 23, 24 and 26, T. 47 N., R. 7 W., in the 
Virginia Bar mining district, 3 miles north of Gottville in Klamath 
Reserve. Owners, Pilot Knob Mining Company ; president, W. D. Wall ; 
secretary and superintendent, T. K. Anderson; home oflSce, Gottville; 
comprises 310 acres ; formation, hornblende schist ; three veins ; length 
and width of ore body not determined ; crosscut tunnel 340 feet long, not 
in ore as yet ; several small tunnels in ore ; ore is free milling and runs 
$20 per ton; equipment consists of assay office, several dwellings, 600 
feet of aerial tramway; 5-stamp Risdon Iron Works mill (850-pound 
stamps) run by water power ; two men employed ; last ore milled gave 
returns of $18 per ton from 16 tons ; located in 1882. 

Prospect Hill, in Sec. 30, T. 12 N., R. 6 E., 11 miles from Orleans 
in the Cottage Grove mining district in Klamath Reserve. Owners, 
C. S. Little; several small tunnels in porphyry; free milling, 3-stamp 
mill; small production. 

Providence, in Sec. 18, T. 43 N., R. 9 W., in the Oro Fino mining 
district, 5 miles northeast of Greenview. Owners, Kradel Brothers; 
comprises 40 acres; short ore shoot in diabase; worked for pockets; 
650-foot tunnel ; small producer. Idle ; only do assessment work. 
Bibl. : Report XIII, p. 421. 

Quartz Hill, in Sec. 16, T. 45 N., R. 10 W., in the Scott River 
mining district, i mile south of Scott Bar on Scott River in Klamath 
Reserve. Owner, H. G. Noonan, of San Francisco; comprises 45 acres 
of patented land on Quartz Hill, located in 1862 ; ore occurs in slate, 
and has been worked both as a quartz and hydraulic mine, the surface 
having been worked as a placer deposit at one time ; water is obtained 
from Mill Creek through two ditches, one 6 miles and the other 5 miles 
in length ; the strike is northeast and southwest ; the bedrock, so-called, 
consists of alternate beds of slate and quartzite, enclosed by two 
parallel dikes, 1800 feet apart. The whole mass is crushed by these 
dikes of quartzite ; practically only the surface has been worked ; yearly 
production is from $10,000 to $12,000; equipment consists of old 10- 
stamp mill, two giants, and 1500 feet of pipe: some rich pockets found 
in the quartz seams. Idle at present. 

Bibl. : Report XII, p. 290 ; XIII, p. 421. 

Red Hill, in Sec. 4, T. 45 N., R. 7 W., in the Hawkinsville mining 
district; 5 miles north of Yreka. Owner, J. Phillips; in Klamath 



96 MINES AND MINERAL RESOURCES. 

Reserve ; 13-inch vein ; free milling ; 40 acres, located in 1903 ; three tun- 
nels, one 304 feet long ; formation quartz-porphyry ; ore treated in cus- 
tom mill at Yreka. Produced $6,000. 

Rceder Oroup, in Sec. 8, T. 46 N., R. 7 W., in Fool's Paradise 
mininsf district; 6 J miles south of Hombrook. Owner, B. C. Reeder; 
120 acres, located in 1875; formation slate; three tunnels, longest 250 
feet; rich pockets taken out on Bonanza claim, largest being $20,000; 
said to have produced $50,000 to date ; owner works claims. 

Robinson Gulch, in Sec. 18, T. 40 N., R. 10 W., in the Liberty 
mining district, 14 miles southeast of Etna Mills at an elevation of 
5400 feet. Owners, Robinson Gulch Mining Company, of Etna Mills; 

C. M. Chase, president ; A. A. Dyer, superintendent ; comprises 80 acres, 
located in 1903 ; short ore shoot in hornblende schist ; 100-foot tunnel ; 
only do assessment work; small pocket discovered on the surface. 

Rough it Frye, in Sec. 30, T. 12 N., R. 6 E., 11^ miles from 
Orleans, in the Cottage Grove mining district in Klamath Reserve. 
Owner, C. Frye ; 40 acres located in 1913 ; 175-foot tunnel and open cuts 
on surface for 600 feet ; vein is 11 feet wide ; free milling ; some ore runs 
$15 per ton; doing development work. 

Ruby Basin, formerly known as the Jumbo, in Sec. 36, T. 40 N., 
R. 11 W., in the Liberty mining district; 4 miles east of Sawyer's 
Bar in the Klamath Reserve. Owner, I. CuUberg, Jr., of Areata ; com- 
prises 100 acres on White's Gulch; 160- foot ore shoot; free milling, 
3 feet wide, north and south strike and dip 40° E. ; in slate ; 800-foot 
tunnel, 500 feet of drifts and 60-foot stope ; old 10-stamp mill, driven by 
water power ; small producer at one time. Idle at present. 

Saint Lawrence, in Sec. 12, T. 43 N., R. 10 W., in the Quartz Val- 
ley minin» district, 6 miles north of Green view. Owner, A. G. Myers; 
comprises 20 acres; pockets in the quartz-porphyry; 220- foot tunnel. 
Idle. 

Skelton, in Sec. 26, T. 41 N., R. 9 W., in the Liberty mining dis- 
trict, 5 miles southeast of Etna Mills in the Klamath Reserve. Owner, 

D. Skelton ; comprises 20 acres, located in 1893 ; 130-foot vein, 4 feet 
wide, but base in character and probably too low grade to pay to 
work, as it only carries $3 in gold per ton, 2% copper and a little silver. 
Idle at present. 

Specimen, in Sec. 15, T. 40 N., R. 9 W., in the Callahan mioing 
district, 5 miles west of Callahan in the Klamath Reserve. Owner, 
W. Ellis; comprises 60 acres, on Craig's Gulch; short ore shoot in 
hornblende schist; worked for pockets, and some rich specimens 
extracted; 150-foot tunnel. Idle at present. 
Bibl. : Report XIII, p. 427. 



SISKIYOU COUNTY. 97 

Star, in Sec. 12, T. 43 N., R. 10 W., in the Quartz Valley mining 
district, 6 miles north of Qreenview. Owner, F. Star; comprises 20 
acres, located in 1882 ; pockets in the quartz porphyry ; 700-foot tunnel. 
Idle. 

Sterling, in Sec. 20, T. 42 N., R. 8 W., in the Deadwood mining 
district, 13 miles northwest of Fort Jones at an elevation of 7300 feet. 
Owner, W. Crocker; comprises 40 acres on east fork of Deadwood 
Creek; short ore shoot in slate and diabase; worked for pockets; some 
rich ore extracted ; 620-foot tunnel ; only do assessment work. 
Bbl. : Report XIII, p. 428. 

Sundown, in Sec. 19, T. 47 N., R. 7 W., in Virginia Bar mining 
district, 4 miles north of Gottville in Klamath Reserve. Owners, Den- 
ver Mining Company, C. A. Von, president; home oflSce, Denver, 
Colorado; comprises 60 acres; formation, diorite and schist; ore shoot 
100 to 120 feet long, 2 feet wide ; two tunnels, 150 and 800 feet long ; 
5-stamp mill driven by water power; 1 mile ditch from Dutch Creek; 
small production. Idle. 

Taft, in Sec. 30, T. 11 N., R. 8 B., in Liberty mining district, 9 
miles northeast of Forks of Salmon by trail; in Klamath Reserve; at 
an elevation of 2800 feet. Owner, C. Taylor; comprises 40 acres, 
located in 1908 ; pocket gold in slate ; 100-foot tunnel ; small production. 
Idle. 

Teddy-Avalon, in Sec. 18, T. 47 N., R. 7 W., in Virginia Bar min- 
ing district, 7 miles north of Gottville in Klamath Reserve. Owner, 
E. J. Durkee ; comprises 40 acres ; formation is granite ; short ore shoot, 

1 foot wide ; 125-foot tunnel ; little high grade taken out ; free milling. 
Trail Creek, in Sec. 12, T. 39 N., R. 10 W., in the Salmon River 

mining district, 12 miles west of Callahan in the Klamath Reserve. 
OAvner, Trail Creek Mining Company, of Callahan; George A. Foster, 
president and superintendent; George Hart, secretary; comprises 100 
acres on Trail Creek at an elevation of 7200 feet, reached by trail from 
Callahan. The fissure vein occurs between schist walls, with a strike 
of N. 40° W., and a dip of 60° N.; ore shoot is 300 feet long and 

2 feet wide ; workings consist of an 850-foot tunnel, several small drifts 
and a stope 200 feet in length; equipment consists of two 3^-foot 
Huntington mills (capacity is 20 tons in twenty- four hours, through 
50-inesh screen) run by waterpower; tools, ore cars and dwellings; 
seven men are employed; owner claims an ore reserve of 3000 tons of 
rock; free milling; yearly production 1912 (seventy days' run) was 
$15,000 ; production to date $40,000 ; best prospect in the district. 

Twan & Hannan, in Sec. 30, T. 12 N., R. 6 B., 11 miles from 
Orleans in the Cottage Grove mining district in Klamath Reserve. 



98 MINES AND MINERAL RESOURCES. 

Owners, Twan & Hannan ; comprises 40 acres ; 400-foot crosscut tunnel, 
in porphyry ; only do assessment work ; ledge 4 feet wide on the surface; 
some ore crushed and treated in cyanide mill at Champion. 

Uncle Sam Consolidated, formerly known as the Sheffield, in Sees. 
3 and 10, T. 39 N., R. 11 W., in the Liberty mining district, 7 miles 
south of Sawyer's Bar in the Klamath Forest Reserve. Owners, Shef- 
field Estate; comprises 60 acres between White and Eddy gulches, 
located in 1873. Length along the lode, 3000 feet ; length of ore shoot, 
110 feet, and width 2 feet; vertical depth below outcrop, 300 feet; 
strike N. 20° E., dip 25° NE.; footwall, slate; hanging wall, quartz- 
porphyry; length driven on vein, 420 feet; ore free milling; water 
supply from White's Gulch through 1^ miles of ditch and ^ mile 
of flume ; old workings consisting of stopes and drifts are caved ; equip- 
ment consists of dwellings and .old 8-stamp mill, 780-pound stamps; 
producer for several years ; some good ore in workings. Idle at present. 
Bibl.: Report VIII, p. 619; XI, p. 433; XII, p. 293; XIII, p. 431. 

Wicks, in Sec. 13, T. 44 N., R. 10 W., in the Deadwood mining 
district, 12 miles northwest of Port Jones at an elevation of 6200 feet. 
Owner, Weeks Bros.; comprises 40 acres; short ore shoot in diabase, 
badly faulted ; little high grade extracted on the surface ; 150-foot tun- 
nel. Idle. 

White Bear, in Sec. 13, T. 39 N., R. 12 W., in the Liberty mining 
district, 9 miles southwest of Sawyer's Bar in the Klamath Reserve. 
Owners, Daggett & Smith ; comprises 20 acres, north of the Black Bear, 
on an east and west vein; ore shoot is 100 feet long and 2 feet wide, 
with a dip of 30° E. ; 400-foot tunnel and 2 drifts, each 80 feet in 
length ; equipment : dwelling and 5-stamp mill ; good prospect, but only 
small amount of development work; owners expect to employ several 
men during the winter. One man at work at present. 

Zarina, in See. 33, T. 41 N., R. 10 W., in the Liberty mining dis- 
trict, 9^ miles southeast of Etna Mills in the Klamath Reserve. Own- 
ers, Zarina Mining Company, of Etna Mills; J. W. Harris, superin- 
tendent; comprises 100 acres, located in 1900; elevation, 6500 feet; ore 
shoot, 130 feet long and 2 feet wide; dioritic schist walls; 350 and 
80-foot tunnels, drifts and stopes ; equipment consists of dwellings and 
5-stamp mill, driven by water power from lake above the property; 
small producer; not worked on any scale since 1911. One man 
employed at present ; best ore found in pockets, similar to the Highland. 



SISKIYOU COUNTY. 



99 



GOLD MINES^PLACER. 

A succession of terraces or benches of considerable width covered 
with trees and shrubbery and containing auriferous gravel banks, which 
range from 50 to 200 feet in height, are frequent along the Klamath 
River and its tributaries. These benches are often miles in extent, 
being frequently cut by the more modem and deeper channels, and were 
probably formed by glacial action, causing the river to seek a new 
channel, for the rim rocks are intact and sharply defined and were not 
worn away gradually. These old gravel channels have played an 
important part in the mining production of this county. 

An important change has taken place at the junction of the Scott 
River with Klamath, for here are found terraces or benches, usually 
three in number, with well defined trough-shaped depressions, rims 
intact, receding and ascending gradually from the river bed or its 
banks and forming a series of steps from 200 to 300 feet apart and from 
50 to 200 feet between respective channels. These are evidently the 
old river courses, buried in places 100 feet deep under the rocky debris 
that had slid from the mountain side during a cataclysm of nature, 
causing new channels cutting deeper into the rocky formation, to be 
formed. These deposits have been worked by both drift and hydraulic 
mining. 

Approximate production of placer mines, along the Klamath River 
from Humbug Creek to Scott River (from a known area) : 





Size of ground worked 


Number 

of cubic 

yards 


Value 
taken out 


Average 

per cubic 

yard 


Name of pn^wrty 


Length 
In feet 


Width 
In feet 


Depth 
in feet 


Virginia Bar _ 

M. Mott, at head of Virginia Bar 

Centennial 


100 

50 

685 

1,600 
100 
160 
150 

1,500 

160 

200 

60 


50 
16 
40 
200 
60 
50 
20 
30 
SO 
50 
30 


10 

10 

40 

25 

4 

6 

8 

6 

30 

6 

6 


1.851 

296 

40,000 

296.296 

888 

1,666 

836 

10,000 

6. COO 

1,851 

400 


$30,000 

8,000 

97,000 

300,000 

13,000 

8,000 

7,300 

23,000 

30,000 

26,000 

1,100 


$16 20 
27 00 
2 42 


Manzanlta Bar 


1 01 


Yanltee Dam 

Vatinell & Co 


14 62 
4 80 


Hereon ft Co. below Oak Bar 


8 72 


Poverty Point drift mine. 

Maplesden wing dam 


236 
6 00 


I>aggett 

Kola wing dam_ 


13 50 
2 75 







Portuguese Company, at Oak Bar, took out, with eleven men and use 
of derrick, in three days, by hand shoveling, $3000, or at rate of $1000 
per day. 

China Sam took out in one tub, or 5 cubic yards, 8 ounces of gold, 
valued at $134. 

Wm. McConnelVs claim, Humbug Creek, took out in one season, 
$34,000; same claim, next season, $28,000; same claim, next season, 
$22,000; total, $84,000; pick and shovel, and use of derrick, from one 
acre. 

8— C14456 



100 MINES AXD MINERAL RESOURCES. 

Daggett Mine, worked with pick and shovel, with four men, averaged 
$100 per day for several months. 

From Pine Grove Mine, from a pit 100 feet square, on bedrock, and 
18 feet deep, $6,000 was extracted. 

GOLD MINES— HYDRAULIC. 

Bark House Creek, in Sees. 23 and 26, in Oak Bar raining district, 
26 miles west of Hombrook in Klamath Reserve. Owners, N. B. and 
P. C. Lange; comprises 200 acres; micaceous schist bedrock; coarse 
gold found in crevices of bedrock; good producer years ago. Idle at 
present. 

Beaudry, in Sees. 3, 11, 34, 35, 30, 26, 2 and 23, T. 39 and 40 N., 
R. 8 and 9 W., in the Callahan mining district, 1 mile southeast of 
Callahan in the Klamath Reserve is the best paying hydraulic mine in 
this district. Owner, J. Beaudry; comprises several of the old placer 
locations, with an area of 640 acres on Scott River and Wildcat Creek; 
the bedrock is schist ; gravel 20 to 60 feet deep ; water is obtained from 
South Pork of Scott River and Wildcat Creek through two ditches, one 
15 and the other 2 miles in length ; 7 giants, 4000 feet of pipe and three 
dwellings on the property ; six men employed at present making repairs 
to ditches ; use fifteen men during the season ; production said to be from 
$25,000 to $40,000 per year. 

Belle Josephine, formerly known as Slide Creek, in Sec. 14, T. 39 N., 
R. 9 W., in the Callahan mining district, 6 miles southwest of Calla- 
han in the Klamath Reserve. Owner, A. E. Westover; comprises 160 
acres, on Slide Creek, including the Abers, Carter and other old placer 
mines, which have been noted producers ; schist bedrock ; 30 to 50 feet 
of gravel ; water from Slide Creek through a ditch 2 miles long, carrying 
1100 inches; equipment consists of four giants, 2500 feet of pipe and two 
dwellings ; twelve men employed during operating season, but only three 
men at present. Cost about $1500 per year for ditch repairs ; property is 
paying dividends. 

Bloomer, in Sees. 33 and 34, T. 11 N., R. 7 E., in the Liberty mining 
district, 6 miles northwest of Forks of Salmon in the Klamath Reserve. 
Owners, Bennett Company; comprises 51 acres of patented land; bed- 
rock is schist; worked extensively years ago and was good producer. 
Idle. 

Bibl.: Report VIII, p. 612; XII, p. 278; XIII, p. 390. 

Blue Gravel, formerly known as the Black Lead, in Sec. 32, T. 45 N., 
R. 7 W., in the Greenhorn mining district, 2 miles south of Yreka in 
Klamath Reserve. Owners, Smith & Lee; comprises 200 acres, located 
in 1888; it was a famous placer producer at one time; slate bedrock; 



SISKIYOU COUNTY. 101 

10 feet of gravel ; about 60 acres have been worked. Idle since 1910 ; 
has been drilled for dredging ground. 
Bibl. : Report XIII, p. 390. 

Blue Hill, in Sec. 16, T. 45 N., R. 10 W., in the Scott Bar mining 
district, ^ mile south of Scott Bar in the Klamath Reserve. Owner, 
E. Jacobs; comprises 20 acres, along Scott River; slate bedrock; 20 to 
40 feet gravel; water from Mill Creek through a ditch ^ mile long; 
equipment one giant and 1000 feet of pipe; worked on a small scale. 
Idle on account of lack of water. 

Bowersox, in Sec. 2, T. 11 N., R. 7 E., in the Liberty mining dis- 
trict at Somes Bar in Klamath Reserve. Owner, W. P. Bowersox ; com- 
prises 40 acres ; schist bedrock ; 20 feet of gravel. Idle ; only worked to 
limited extent. • 

Brown <& George, in Sec. 1, T. 38 N., R. 11 W., in the Liberty min- 
ing district, 14 miles southeast of Sawyer's Bar in the Klamath Reserve. 
Owners, Banner Mining Company ; T. H. George, superintendent ; com- 
prises 40 acres on Shattuck Creek; schist bedrock; 10 to 40 feet of 
gravel ; two giants and 1000 feet of pipe. Idle. 
Bibl. : Report XIII, p. 391. 

Campbell, in Sees. 1, 2, 11, 12, 13 and 14, T. 43 N., R. 10 W., in 
the Quartz Valley mining district, 6 miles north of Greenview. Owners, 
Weed & Gardner; holdings comprise 1500 acres of patented land, being 
practically all the placer ground in this district, and includes the old 
Hull Gulch, Sucker Flat, Smith & Hand, Van Duzen Gulch and Meads 
Gulch properties; bedrock is quartz-porphyry; gravel from 20 to 80 
feet deep; water from Kidder and Shackleford creeks, through two 
ditches, one 14 and the other 5 miles long; equipment consists of three 
giants, and 3000 feet of pipe. Idle since 1910; some rich gravel; at 
one time a large production was obtained from these mines. 
Bibl.: Report XII, p. 279; XIII, p. 392. 

Cecilville, formerly known as the Sightmany in Sec. 30, T. 38 N., 
R. 11 W., in the Liberty mining district, 15 miles southeast of Sawyer's 
Bar in the Klamath Forest Reserve. Owner, G. H. Sightman; com- 
prises 40 acres on Crawford Creek; schist bedrock; 20 to 60 feet of 
gravel; water from Crawford Creek through 2|-mile ditch; one giant 
and 800 feet of pipe ; only worked on a limited scale during the winter ; 
small producer. 

China Creek, formerly known as the Reeves, in Sec. 5, T. 16 N., 
R. 7 E., in the Happy Camp mining district, 6 miles northeast of Happy 
Camp in the Klamath Forest Reserve. Owner, ( 'hincse Company ; com- 



102 ' MINES AND MINERAL RESOURCES. 

prises 40 acres of patented land ; schist bedrock ; 10 to 40 feet of gravel. 
Idle several years ; good producer in the past. 
Bibl : Report XIII, p. 393. 

Classic nai, in Sec. 36, T. 18 N., R. 6 E., in the Happy Omp min- 
ing district, 12 miles north of Happy Camp in the Klamatii 9orest 
Reserve. Owner, C. Wheeler; comprises 43 acres of patent(0ft land; 
schist bedrock ; 5 to 30 feet of gravel ; water from west braneh rf JWian 
Creek through a ditch 5 miles long, carrying 600 inches ; equipiBMt con- 
sists of two giants and 1000 feet of pipe ; has been a good produeer* Idle. 
Bibl. : Report XIII, p. 394. 

Crapo, in Sec. 11, T. 10 N., R. 7 E., 3 miles southwest of Pofks of 
Salmon in Klamath Forest Reserve. Owners, Bennett Company; com- 
prises 39 acres of patented ground; slate bedrock; 20 feet ot gravel. 
Idle. 

Bibl.: Report VIII, p. 612; XII, pp. 280, 282; XIII, p. 396. 

Cranin, in Sec. 22, T. 40 N., R. 12 W., in the Liberty mining dis- 
trict, 7 miles west of Sawyer's Bar in the Klamath Forest Reserve. 
Owner, French Syndicate of Paris, France; J. Sapp, watchman; com- 
prises 40 acres, patented, on West Fork of Salmon River ; slate bedrock; 
30 to 100 feet of gravel ; water from Boulder Gulch through 2-mile ditch 
carrying 800 inches; 5 giants, 3000 feet of pipe, derrick and dwellings; 
good producer at one time. Idle since 1910. 
Bibl.: Report XIII, p. 396. 

Davis, formerly known as the Van Brunt, in Sec. 11, T. 16 N.. 
R. 7 E., in the Happy Camp mining district ; ^ mile southwest of Happy 
Camp, was located in 1870 and has been worked since that time. It is 
owned by R. A. Davis, of San Francisco, and comprises 200 acres of 
patented land along the Klamath River ; the bedrock is schist and the 
gravel in places is more than 100 feet deep. Water is obtained from 
the South Fork of Indian Creek, through a ditch 10 miles long, having 
a capacity of 120 inches and which cost $40,000; equipment consists of 
three giants, sluice boxes and 2000 feet of pipe; twelve men employed 
during operating season ; cost of operating about $10,000 (period of five 
months) ; pays dividends; small amount of platinum obtained. (See 
photo No. 3.) 

Denny, in Sees. 17, 20, 21 and 29, T. 40 N., R. 8 W., in the Calla- 
han mining district, in town of Callahan, in the Klamath Reserve. 
Owners, Scott River Dredge Company; comprises 400 acres of old 
locations along the Scott River, 118 acres of which is patented; schist 
bedrock ; 20 to 60 feet of gravel, some boulders and some cement near 
the bedrock; 3-mile ditch from South Fork of Scott River; ground 



104 MINES AND MINERAL RESOURCES. 

noted placer producer in the early days ; company endeavored to work 
the bed of Scott River with a small dredge, but did not understand this 
business and dismantled the boat in 1910 and sold the machinery; 
property idle since that time ; some good ground yet to be worked. 

Dick Morris, formerly known as the Ramis, in Sec. 35, T. 46 N., 
R. 11 W., in the Hamburg Bar mining district, If miles northwest of 
Hamburg Bar in the Klamath Reserve. Owners, Johnson & Hanses; 
comprises 40 acres ; schist bedrock ; 10 to 30 feet of gravel ; two giants 
and 500 feet of pipe. Idle. Adjoins Hammer on the north. 

Dunriigan, in Sec. 20, T. 12 N., R. 6 E., in the T-Bar mining dis- 
trict, 36 miles (by trail) south of Happy Camp in the Klamath Forest 
Reserve. Owners, Dunnigan Consolidated Mining Company, of San 
Francisco; E. M. Wilbur, president; Mrs. E. J. Wilbur, secretary; J. M. 
Stickel, general manager; holdings comprise 160 acres, consisting of 
old benches; portion of land worked in the early days and relocated 
by J. ^I. Stickel in 1912; water obtained from T-Bar Creek through 
ditch J mile long ; bedrock in serpentine and slate ; depth of gravel from 
10 to 40 feet (loose) ; equipment consists of two giants, 2000 feet of pipe, 
dwelling and sluice boxes; one man employed at present; company 
intends to work a full crew in the spring ; said to be good ground. 

Eastlick, in Sees. 17 and 18, T. 43 N., R. 9 W., in the Oro Fine 
mining district, 5 miles northeast of Greenview. Owners, Richman & 
Beems, of Fort Jones; comprises 67 acres of patented land; bedrock 
is quartz-porphyry ; 30 to 60 feet of gravel ; two ditches from Mill and 
Kidder creeks, one 6 miles and the other 4 miles long; equipment con- 
sists of three giants and 2600 feet of pipe ; noted property at one time 
and yielded good returns. Idle for past three years. 

Bibl.: Report VIII, p. 608; XII, p. 281; XIII, p. 398. 

Elliott, formerly known as the Golden Nugget, in Sec. 20, T. 40 N., 
R. 11 W., in the Liberty mining district, f mile north of Sawyer's 
Bar in the Klamath Forest Reserve. Owner, M. L. Elliott; comprises 
20 acres, patented, on Jackass Gulch ; slate bedrock ; 15 to 40 feet of 
gravel ; two giants, 1000 feet of pipe and derrick ; water from Jackass 
Gulch through a flume 1| miles long ; good production in 1911 ; coarse 
gold on bedrock ; worked in winter. 
Bibl. : Report VIII, p. 603. 

Elision, in Sec. 33, T. 11 N., R. 7 B., in the Liberty mining dis- 
trict, 10 miles northwest of Forks of Salmon in Klamath Forest 
Reserve. Owner, A. E. Ellston; comprises 30 acres; slate bedrock; 20 
feet of gravel. Idle; only does assessment work; some rich gravel 
worked years ago. 



SISKIYOU COUNTY. 



105 



Espey, in Sec. 25, T. 47 N., R. 9 W., in the Oak Bar mining dis- 
triet, 30 miles northwest of Hombrook. Owners, Espey Mining Com- 
pany; home oflSce, Seattle, Wash.; in Klamath Reserve; 50 acres of 
ground ; bedrock is schist. Idle on account of lack of water. 

Fir Tree, in Sees. 19 and 20, T. 10 N., R. 8 E., in the Liberty min- 
ing district, 1 mile southeast of Forks of Salmon in Klamath Forest 
Reserve. Owners, Bennett Company; comprises 20 acres of patented 
ground; schist bedrock; 10 feet of gravel; 2^-mile ditch from Salmon 
River. Idle ; has not been worked for several years. 

Forks, formerly known as McNeals, in Sec. 13, T. 10 N., R. 7 B., 
in the Liberty mining district, in town of Forks of Salmon in the 
Klamath Forest Reserve. Owners, Bennett Company; comprises 50 
acres ; schist bedrock ; 20 feet of gravel. Idle ; under option to the La 
Grange Mining Company ; some rich gravel. 
Bibl.: Report XII, p. 287; XIII, p. 401. 

Forks of Salmon River, in Sees. 16, 17, 18, 13, 7, 8 and 9, T. 10 N., 
R. 7 and 8 E., in the Liberty mining district, 1^ miles northeast of 
Forks of Salmon in the Klamath Forest Reserve, is the largest hydraulic 



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Photo No. 4 — Dam — Forks of Salmon River Mining Company. 



106 MINES AND MINERAL. RESOURCES. 

mine in this district. It is owned by the Porks of Salmon River Min- 
ing Company, of San Francisco ; P. Salvage, president ; V. G. Bonaly, 
secretary, and M. A. Singer, superintendent. The holdings comprise 
520 acres of old placer locations, which were rich diggings in the early 
days. This company controls some 4 miles of the old channels and 
bars along the North Pork of Salmon River. The bedrock is schist, 
with 20 to 60 feet of gravel covering the same ; only about 3 acres of 
ground have been worked. Water is obtained from the North Fork of 
the Salmon River through a ditch carrying 3800 inches, having a length 
of 4 miles and a 50-foot pressed overflow dam impounds the water at 
the intake. The equipment consists of five giants, machine shop, small 
electrical plant, pipe, derricks, and dwellings ; sixteen men at $3 per day 
are employed. In 1911 and 1912, the yearly production exceeded 
$60,000; has produced over $200,000 since 1908. 

Fort Goff, in Sec. 31, T. 47 N., R. 12 W., in the Seiad mining dis- 
trict, 14 miles west of Hamburg Bar in the Klamath Reserve. Owner, 
G. Martin; comprises 80 acres of patented land along the Klamath 
River; schist bedrock; 10 to 60 feet of loose gravel; water obtained 
from Fort Goflf Creek through a ditch 1^ miles long carrying 800 inches; 
ecjuipment consists of two giants and 3100 feet of pipe; has not been 
worked since 1911; some good ground; small producer. 
Bibl.: Report VIII, p. 596; XII, p. 283; XIII, p. 401. 

Gardner and Denting, in Sees. 7 and 18, T. 43 N., R. 9 W., in the 
Oro Fino mining district, 5| miles northeast of Greenview. Owners, 
Weed & Gardner; comprises 150 acres of patented land; bedrock is 
([uartz-porphyry with quartz stringers running through it; 10 to 50 
feet of gravel. Idle. 

Bibl.; Report XIIL p. 402. 

Gecshan and Kcllncr, in See. 30, T. 40 N., R. 11 W., in the Liberty 
mininjx district, 2 miles west of Sawyer's Bar in the Klamath Reserve. 
Owners, Geeshan & Kellner ; comprises 20 acres on the Klamath River ; 
slate bedrock; 50 feet of gravel; water from North Fork of Salmon 
River through IJ-mile flume; one giant, 1200 feet of pipe and derrick; 
has been a good producer ; worked on a small scale during the winter. 

Gold Hill, in Sees. 28 and 29, T. 40 N., R. 11 W., in the Liberty min- 
ing district, in town of Sawyer's Bar in the Klamath Reserve. Owners, 
G. W. and O. R. Bigelow; comprises 80 acres on North Fork of- Salmon 
River; slate bedrock; 10 to 80 feet of gravel; water from Eddy'^ Gulch 
through 2 miles of ditch ; three giants, 1200 feet of pipe and hand der- 
rick ; good producer ; operated during the winter when water is plentiful. 

Gordaii, in Sec. 17, T. 18 N., R. 7 E., in the Happy Camp mining 
district, 5 nc^iles northeast of Happy Camp in Klamath Reserve. Owner, 



SISKIYOU COUNTY. 107 

C. Gordan ; comprises 60 acres ; schist bedrock ; 30 feet of gravel ; three 
men employed during operating season ; yearly production about $4000. 
Bibl. : Report XII, p. 283; XIII, p. 403. 

Grider, in Sees. 12, 15, 10, 14 and 11, T. 46 N., R. 12 W., in the 
Seiad mining district, 9 miles southwest of Hamburg Bar in Klamath 
Reserve. Owner, J. B. Grider; comprises 245 acres, patented; on the 
Klamath River; schist bedrock; 10 to 40 feet of gravel; water from 
Grider Creek through 3-mile ditch of a capacity of 240 inches; equip- 
ment consists of dwellings, two giants and 1500 feet of pipe ; operating 
season from four to five months ; average production monthly of $2000. 
Idle at present on account of lack of water. 
Bibl.: Report VIII, p. 600; XIII, p. 403. 

Haley y formerly known as the Halstectd, in Sec. 7, T. 16 N., R. 7 E., 
in the Happy Camp mining district, 10 miles southwest of Happy Camp 
in Klamath Reserve. Owner, M. Doolittle; comprises 40 acres of pat- 
ented land ; schist bedrock ; 10 to 30 feet of gravel ; some boulders and 
some cement. Idle for several years. 

Bibl. ; Report VIII, p. 601 ; XIII, p. 404. 

Hammer, in Sees. 36, 1 and 4, T. 46 N., R. 11 W., in the Hamburg 
Bar mining district, i mile west of Hamburg Bar in the Klamath Forest 
Reserve. Owners, Johnson & Caldwell; comprises 60 acres along the 
Klamath River; schist bedrock; 30 to 40 feet of gravel; water from 
Kuntz and Mill creeks through a 3-mile ditch ; four giants, 1000 feet of 
pipe, and dwelling; property leased; worked one month in 1913 and 
produced $400 ; some good ground. Idle at present. 

Happy Home, formerly known as the Maplesden, in Sec. 31, T. 
46 N., R. 10 W., in the Hamburg Bar mining district in the Klamath 
Forest Reserve, J mile east of Hamburg Bar. Owner, Maplesden 
Brothers ; comprises 40 acres on the Klamath River ; schist bedrock ; 
large portion of this ground has been worked; good pay on bedrock; 
two men are employed cleaning up the sluice boxes. 
Bibl. : Report VIII, p. 594. 

Hardscrahble, in Sees. 1 and 12, T. 44 N., R. 9 W., in the Dead- 
wood mining district, 6 miles north of Fort Jones. Owner, J. D. 
Duane; comprises 20 acres, patented, on Mc Adams Creek; quartz-por- 
phyry bedrock; 30 to 50 feet of gravel; water from McAdams Creek 
through a ditch 2 miles long; rich diggings years ago, worked by 
Chinese. Idle at present. 

Bibl. : Report XIII, p. 404. 



108 MINES AND MINERAL RESOURCES. 

Ilickey, in Sees. 24 and 25, T. 40 N., R. 12 W., in the Liberty min- 
ing district, 2 miles west of Sawyer's Bar in the Klamath Forest 
Reserve. Owners, Pike & Ilickey; comprises 20 acres, patented, on 
North Fork of Salmon River; slate bedrock; 25 to 70 feet of gravel; 
water from North Fork of Salmon River through 3-mile ditch. Idle 
in 1913 ; small producer when operated. 
Bibl.: Report XIII, p. 405. 

Hi You, in Sec. 29, T. 44 N., R. 8 W., in the Deadwood mining dis- 
trict, 8 miles north of Fort Jones. Owners, Wyman and Richman; 
comprises 40 acres, patented, on Deadwood Creek; quartz-porphyry 
bedrock ; 30 to 50 feet of gravel ; water from Deadwood Creek through 
a ditch 1| miles lon^; tw^o giants and 2000 feet of pipe; only worked a 
few times since 1905 ; good producer years ago. 
Bibl. : Report XIII, p. 405. 

Hooper Bill, formerly known as Preckel, in Sec. 21, T. 45 N., 
R. 10 W., in the Scott Bar mining district, ^ mile southeast of Scott Bar 
in the Klamath Reserve. Owner, H. Preckel ; comprises 20 acres along 
Scott River; slate bedrock; 20 feet of gravel; water from Pat Ford 
Creek through 1 mile of ditch ; equipment : one giant, 1100 feet of pipe 
and dwelling ; worked on a small scale. Idle on account of lack of water. 

Hoosier Hill, in Sec. 36, T. 46 N., R. 11 W., in the Hamburg Bar 
mining district, ^ mile west of Hamburg Bar in the Klamath Forest 
Reserve. Owner, C. L. Willard ; comprises 32 acres of patented ground, 
located in 1856 ; bedrock is schist ; 20 to 50 feet of gravel ; two giants and 
800 feet of pipe ; rich ground worked years ago ; leased, and only short 
season in 1913 due to shortage of water; small production. 

nuey Hill, in Sec. 25, T. 18 N., R. 6 E., in the Happy Camp Mining 
district, 14 miles north of Happy Camp in Klamath Forest Reserve. 
Owner, D. Huey ; comprises 40 acres, patented ; schist bedrock ; 20 feet 
of gravel ; two giants and pipe ; only worked in a limited way ; small pro- 
ducer; some good gravel. 

Bibl. : Report XIII, p. 407. 

Imperial Heights, in Sec. 33, T. 40 N., R. 11 W., in the Liberty 
mining district, 2 miles south of Sawyer's Bar in the Klamath Forest 
Reserve. Owner, Ed Ilickey ; comprises 40 acres on North Fork of 
Salmon River; slate bedrock; 20 to 80 feet of gravel; water from Shel- 
latoe Gulch through 2-mile ditch; 2 giants, 1700 feet of pipe and der- 
rick; operated during the winter; small producer. 

Jack Lowden, in Sec. 13, T. 46 N., R. 12 W., in the Seiad mining 
district, 10 miles w^est of Hamburg Bar in the Klamath Reserve. 
Owner, J. S. Lowden; comprises 140 acres of patented land along the 
Klamath River; slate bedrock; 5 to 40 feet of gravel; water from 



SISKIYOU COUNTY. 109 

Walker Creek through 2i-mile ditch of 1500 inches capacity ; one ^iant 
and 2500 feet of pipe ; four to five month operating^ season ; good ground. 
Joe Ramus, in Sec. 6, T. 45 N., B. 10 W., in the Scott Bar mining 
district, 3 miles north of Scott Bar, on Scott Bivev in the Klamath Forest 
Keserve. Owner, 6. A. Milne; comprises 60 acres; slate bedrock; 

20 feet of gravel; water from Tom Creek; through 2^ miles of ditch; 
equipment: two giants and 1000 feet of pipe; yearly production about 
$7500 ; worked years ago by rocker and said to have produced $500,000 ; 
two men employed at present ; idle on account of lack of water ; some 
good ground. 

Klein, formerly known as the Casey, in Sec. 4, T. 39 N., R. 11 W., 
in the Liberty mining district, 2^ miles south of Sawyer's Bar in the 
Klamath Forest Reserve. Owner, WoodfiU & Luddy; comprises 50 
acres; slate bedrock; 30 feet of gravel; water from Eddy's Gulch 
through i mile of ditch; one giant and 500 feet of pipe; worked on a 
small scale during the winter ; small producer. 
Bibl.: Report XII, p. 286; XIII, p. 411. 

Lowden, formerly known as McCreary, in Sees. 2 and 35, T. 45 
and 46 N., R. 11 W., in the Hamburg mining district, ^ mile south of 
Hamburg Bar in the Klamath Forest Reserve. Owner, J. S. Lowden ; 
comprises 60 acres, 20 of which are patented, and follows the course of 
the Klamath River ; schist bedrock ; 10 to 40 feet of gravel ; water from 
Tom Creek through a ditch 2 miles long; two giants and 1000 feet of 
pipe ; worked on a small scale ; idle on account of scarcity of water. 
Bibl.: Report XII, p. 286; XIII, p. 413- . 

McGuffey, in Sec. 16, T. 45 N., R. 10 W., in the Scott River minini? 
district, in town of Scott Bar in Klamath Forest Reserve. Owner, T. G. 
McGuffey ; comprises 40 acres, on Scott River, located in 1873 ; slate bed- 
rock; 20 to 40 feet of gravel; equipment consists of two giants, and 600 
feet of pipe ; worked on a small scale ; has been a good producer. 
, Bibl.: Report XII, p. 287; XIII, p. 415. 

Michigan-Salmon, formerly known as the Fed Tlill, in Sees. 19, 20, 

21 and 28, T. 10 N., R. 8 E., 1^ miles east of Forks of Salmon in the 
Klamath Forest Reserve, is one of the noted hydraulic mines in the Lib- 
erty district, and comprises 600 acres, 40 of which are patented. It is 
owned by the Michigan-Salmon' Mining Company of Detroit, Mich. ; 
president, S. Stevens; secretary, George Whitworth; superintendent, 
L. E. Taggett. These holdings, extending along the Salmon River for 
a distance of 2^ miles, consisting of old river bars and benches, include 
the well known Red Hill, Missouri Bar, Cash, Clovis and Rocky Bar 
placers, which were good producers during pioneer mining days. The 



110 MINES AND MINERAL RESOURCES. 

general course of the channel is southwest ; depth of gravel 20 feet ; bed- 
rock consists of slate and schist; about 60 acres have been worked; 
water is obtained from Knownothing Creek through 1 mile of ditch and 
3 miles of flume, having a capacity of 40 inches ; the equipment consists 
of two Ruble elevators (which are 90 feet long, 8^ feet wide and pitch 
at an angle of 17^), dwellings, three giants, pipe, etc. ; six men employed 
continually and twelve during operating season of seven months; 
operating cost about $12,000 per year; good profit made from 
operations. 

BibL: Report VIII, p. 615; XII, p. 290; XIII, p. 422. 

Milich, in Sec. 2, T. 10 N., R. 7 E., in the Liberty mining district, 
5 miles northwest of Forks of Salmon. Owner, P. Milich; comprises 
20 acres; schist bedrock; 30 feet of gravel; water from Crapo Creek 
through l^-mile ditch. Idle since 1911. 

Bibl.: Report XII, p. 288; XIII, p. 415. 

Native Son, in Sec. 13, T. 10 N., R. 7 E., in the Liberty mining 
district, 1 mile northeast of Forks of Salmon in the Klamath Forest 
Reserve. Owner, M. L. IMills; comprises 20 acres; schist bedrock, coarse 
gold being found on same ; 30 feet of gravel ; adjoins Forks of Salmon 
mine ; only short season 's run on account of lack of water ; some good 
gravel. 

NordJieimer, formerly known as McNeal, in Sec. 3, T. 10 N., R. 7 E., 
5 miles southwest of Forks of Salmon in Klamath Forest Reserve. 
Owners, Nordheimer Mining Company; H. B. Morey of MenIo Park, 
secretary ; Ed Kinarston, superintendent ; comprises 60 acres of patented 
land on Salmon River; schist bedrock; 15 to 25 feet of gravel; equip- 
ment two giants, pipe and dwellings ; five men employed at rate of $3 per 
day ; has been a good producer. Idle on account of lack of water. 
Bibl. : Report VIII, p. 611. 

The Pine Grove, hydraulic mine, in Sec. 10, T. 46 N., R. 9 W., in 
the Oak Bar mining district; is one of the famous placer properties on 
the Klamath River. It is 28 miles west of Hornbrook at an elevation of 
2600 feet and comprises an old river bar containing 100 acres. The 
pay gravel is over 1000 feet wide in places, with a depth of 18 feet and 
a northeast and southwest course, following the south bank of the Kla- 
math River. The bedrock is schist of medium hardness, and coarse 
^old is found here. It was formerly worked with hydraulic elevators, 
but at present a drag scraper is used to convey the gravel to the sluice 
boxes, a 2-reel steam hoist being attached to the scraper. Water for the 
sluice boxes is pumped from the river. Wood is the fuel used. The 
owner, H. H. Barton, has bonded this group to W. B. Carlock, of San 
Francisco; eight men are employed; about 30 acres have been worked 



SISKIYOU COUNTY. Ill 

and some of this ground, removed years ago, was very rich. Prom a pit 
100 feet square on bedrock, at a depth of 18 feet, over $6000 was taken 
out. In one day $300 of bedrock pay was panned out. 
Bibl. : Report VIII, p. 592. 

Portuguese, in Sec. 4, T. 46 N., R. 12 W., in the Seiad mining dis- 
trict, 12 miles west of Hamburg Bar in the Klamath Forest Reserve. 
Owner, H. Wood ; comprises 140 acres of patented land along the Kla- 
math River ; schist bedrock ; 20 to 50 feet of gravel, with from 4 to 10 
feet of cemented gravel in places, requiring blasting ; water is obtained 
from Portuguese Creek through l^-mile ditch; equipment consists of 
three No. 2 giants, dwellings and 2500 feet of pipe ; yearly production 
from $10,000 to $15,000; about 30 acres have been worked to date; 
bonded to Jerome Mining Company, of San Francisco. Idle on account 
of lack of water. 

Bibl.: Report VIII, p. 595; XII, p. 290; XIII, p. 420. 

Quartz Gulch, formerly known as Wingate HiU, in Sees. 5 and 6, 
T. 15 N., R. 7 E., in the Happy Camp mining district, 8 miles south- 
west of Happy Camp in the Klamath Forest Reserve. Owner, J. H. 
Wells ; comprises 40 acres of patented land ; slate bedrock, 10 to 20 feet 
of gravel. Idle for several years ; good producer at one time. 
Bibl. : Report VIII, p. 601. 

Russian Hill, formerly known as Russian Dump, Ahlgren and Red 
Hill, in Sees. 23 and 24, T. 40 N., R. 12 W., in the Liberty mining 
district, 5 miles west of Sawyer's Bar. Owner, A. Ahlgren; comprises 
80 acres on North Fork of Salmon River; slate bedrock; 40. to 80 feet 
of gravel ; water from North Fork of Little Salmon River, through 3- 
mile ditch; two giants, 2800 feet of pipe and derrick; good producer, 
having been worked since the eighties ; operated during the winter. 
Bibl.: Report XII, p. 276; XIII, p. 386. 

Rycroft, in Sec. 14, T. 39 N., R. 9 W., in the Callahan mining 

• district, 6^ miles southwest of Callahan in the Klamath Forest Reserve. 

Owner, S. Rycroft ; comprises 60 acres, on Slide Creek ; schist bedrock ; 

20 to 40 feet of gravel ; two giants and 1000 feet of pipe ; considerable 

gold extracted in past years. Idle. Do only assessment work. 

Bibl. : Report XIII, p. 423. 

Sauer Kraut, in Sec. 34, T. 11 N., R. 7 E., in the Liberty mining 
district, 9 miles southwest of Forks of Salmon in Klamath Forest 
Reserve. Owners, Chinese Company; comprises 40 acres of patented 
land ; slate bedrock, 15 feet of gravel ; produces about $2000 per year ; 



112 MINES AND MINERAL. RESOURCES. 

rich gravel in the early days. Idle on account of lack of water; use 
two No. 2 giants. 

Bibl.: Report XII, p. 291; XIII, p. 424. 

Sciad, in Sec. 11, T. 46 N., R. 12 W., in the Seiad mining district, 
f).i miles west of Hamburg Bar in Klamath Forest Reserve. Owner, 
T. K. Towne; comprises 60 acres along the Klamath River; schist bed- 
rock; 5 to 20 feet of gravel; water from Seiad Creek through 2-mile 
ditch ; giant and pipe ; do only assessment work. 

Siskiyou Klondike, in Sees. 15 and 16, in the Oak Bar mining 
district, 24 miles west of Ilornbrook in Klamath Forest Reserve. 
Owner, II. II. Barton ; comprises 40 acres ; bedrock schist ; 10 feet of 
gravel ; 2-mile ditch from McKinnoy Creek ; located in 1865 ; some pro- 
duction. Idle. 

Hiskiyou Mines Company, in Sees. 2, 1, 6, 7, 5, 12 and 18, T. 16 
and 17 N., R. 7 and 8 E., in the Happy Camp mining district, in town 
of Happy Camp, is the largest hydraulic mine in this section. It is 
owned by the Siskiyou Mines Company, of New York City; Dr. Har- 
beck, president; C. A. Gardiner, secretary, and W. A. Maguire, super- 
intendent. These holdings, comprising 1500 acres, of which 640 are 
patented, follow the Klamath River and include several famous old 
placer claims which were rich and which were only superficially worked 
by the early miners. The general course of the channel is northwest and 
southeast ; bedrock is schist ; gravel from 10 to 60 feet deep, consisting of 
bars and benches; water is obtained from Thompson Creek, through 3 
miles of ditch and 10 milas of flume ; equipment consists of five giants, 
several thousand feet of pipe and dwellings ; ten men employed at pres- 
ent ; operating expenses are heavy during the season. 

Siskiyou River Bend, formerly known as the Lou Daggett, and con- 
taining 20 acres, has been worked for many years and considerable 
gold extracted. It is in Sec. 9, T. 46 N., R. 9 W., 30 miles west of 
Ilornbrook, in the Oak Bar mining district, at an elevation of 2700 
feet. The bedrock is schist ; gravel from 20 to 50 feet deep with 10 
feet of pay. The present owner, A. C. Aiken, of San Francisco, has 
spent considerable time and money experimenting on methods of work- 
ing the ground; during the last season's run of three months $15,000 
was produced. Evans hydraulic elevator is used, water being obtained 
from Buckhorn Creek through a ditch 9 miles in length. 

Slumway, in Sec. 3, T. 10 N., R. 7 E., in the Liberty mining district, 
4^ miles northwest of Forks of Salmon in Klamath Forest Reserve. 
Owner, Bennett Company; comprises 40 acres of patented ground; 
schist bedrock ; 30 feet of gravel ; water from Slumway Creek, through 
3-mile ditch. Idle since 1910. 



SISKIYOU COUNTY. 113 

Squaw Oidch, also known as French John, in Sec. 1, T. 40 N., 
R. 9 W., in the Callahan mining district; 4 miles northwest of Calla- 
han, in the Klamath Reserve. Owner, D. L. Jones; comprises 60 acres; 
schist bedrock ; 30 feet of gravel ; two giants and 800 feet of pipe ; water 
from Sugar Creek through a ditch 9 miles long, carrying 800 inches; 
worked only in winter; small producer; worked years ago as a drift 
mine and some rich gravel removed. 

Stum, formerly known as the Colby, in Sec. 2, T. 16 N., R. 7 E., 
in the Happy Camp mining district, 1 mile north of Happy Camp in 
the Klamath Forest Reserve. Owner, G. H. Compton; comprises 200 
acres of patented land, on old river channel ; schist bedrock ; equipment 
consists of small reservoir to collect surface waters, 2 miles of ditch, 
one giant, and 1000 feet of pipe ; production $2000 per season of thre^ 
months ; lack of water limits mining operations ; good ground. 

Ten Eyck, in Sec. 28, T. 12 N., R. 6 E., in the Liberty mining dis- 
trict, 3 miles northwest of Somes Bar. Owner, W. Lord; comprises 
80 acres, slate bedrock; coarse gold found in bedrock crevices; tVd 
giants ; good producer for a number of years ; yearly production said to 
exceed $20,000 ; fifteen men employed during season ; four men working 
at present ; water from Ten Eyck Creek. 

Bibl. : Report VIII, p. 605 ; XIII, p. 430. 

Thomadn, in Sec. 5, T. 39 N., R. 11 W., in the Liberty mining dis- 
trict, 4 miles southeast of Sawyer 's Bar in the Klamath Forest Reserve. 
Owners, F. and C. F. Thomain; comprises 20 acres, on Eddy's Gulch; 
slate bedrock; 10 to 30 feet of gravel ; water from Eddy's Gulch through 
1 mile of flume ; one giant and 800 feet of pipe ; operated only during 
the winter ; small producer. 

Two and a Half, formerly known as the Walker, in Sec. 20, T. 40 N., 
R. 7 W., in the Callahan mining district, 6 miles east of Callahan, 
in the Klamath Reserve. Owner, W. Walker ; comprises 40 acres, on 
Grouse Creek; bedrock is schist; 10 to 20 feet of gravel; water from 
Grouse Creek through a ditch 2^ miles long carrying 600 inches; two 
giants and 600 feet of pipe. Idle at present; said to have produced 
$200,000. 

Willard, in Sec. .30, T. 46 N., R. 11 W., in the Hamburg Bar min- 
ing district, f mile south of Hamburg Bar in the Klamath Reserve. 
Owners, Willard & Hickman; comprises 20 acres along the Klamath 
River; schist bedrock; 30 to 50 feet of gravel; water obtained from 
Max Creek through 1-mile ditch ; one giant and 500 feet of pipe. Only 
worked in a small way. 

Bibl.: Report XII, p. 294; XIII, p. 432. 



114 MINES AKD MINERAL RESOURCES. 

Wm. Burns, in Sec. 33, T. 39 N., R. 11 W., in the Liberty mining 
district, 2 miles southeast of Sawyer's Bar in the Klamath Reserve. 
Owner, J. R. Peterson; comprises 20 acres, patented; slate bedrock; 
10 to 30 feet of gravel; one giant, 500 feet of pipe and a derrick. 
Worked during the winter season ; small producer. 

Windeler, in Sec. 20, T. 40 N., R. 11 W., in the Liberty mining 
district, 1 mile north of Sawyer's Bar in the Klamath Reserve. Owner, 
J. C. Windeler; comprises 20 acres on Jackass Gulch; slate bedrock; 
30 feet of gravel ; one giant and 500 feet of pipe ; some coarse gold found 
on bedrock. Little work during the winter ; small producer. 

Wood & Fehely, in Sec. 4, T. 46 N., R. 12 W., in the Seiad mining 
district, 11 miles west of Hamburg Bar in the Klamath Reserve. Own- 
ers, Wood & Fehely; comprises 60 acres, patented, on the Klamath 
River ; slate bedrock, best values being found in the soft bedrock ; 10 to 
30 feet of gravel ; water from Thompson Creek through a ditch IJ miles 
long ; three giants and 1800 feet of pipe ; employ four men during the 
season. Idle in 1912 ; good ground ; has been a steady producer. 
Bibl. : Report XIII, p. 432. 

Wright & Fletcher, in Sees. 7 and 8, T. 43 N., R. 9 W., in the Oro 
Pino mining district, 4 miles northeast of Qreenview. Owners, Wright 
Brothers ; comprises 80 acres ; bedrock is quartz-porphyry ; 20 to 60 feet 
of gravel; water from Kidder Creek through two ditches, one 9 miles 
long, also furnishes power for the Johnson mill, and the other, 4^ miles 
in length, for the hydraulic operations; two giants and 2100 feet of pipe ; 
best ground has been worked and yielded a good production ; property 
only worked on a small scale. Idle on account of lack of water. 
Bibl.: Report VIII, p. 609; XII, p. 294; XIII, p. 433. 

GOLD MINES— GROUND SLUICING. 

The extraction of gold from placer deposits by means of ground 
sluicing is pursued to a limited extent in the Hawkinsville, Oak Bar, 
Greenhorn, and Liberty mining districts. 

Anderson, in Sec. 33, T. 39 N., R. 11 W., in the Liberty mining 
district. If miles southeast of Sawyer's Bar in the Klamath Forest 
Reserve. Owners, Peterson Brothers; comprises 20 acres on Eddy's 
Gulch ; slate bedrock ; 20 to 30 feet of gravel ; water from continuation 
of Burns' flume, 1 mile in length; adjoins Burns' placer; worked on a 
limited scale during the winter ; small producer. 
Bibl.: Report VIII, p. 617. 

Baines, in Sec. 13, T. 39 N., R. 12 W., in the Liberty mining dis- 
trict, 10 miles southwest of Sawyer's Bar in the Klamath Forest Reserve. 
Owner, G. A. Baines ; comprises 20 acres on Bear Creek ; slate bedrock ; 



SISKIYOU COUNTY. 115 

10 to 20 feet of gravel; water from Bear Creek through i mile of 
flume ; worked during the winter on a limited scale ; small producer. 

Beaver Creek, in Sees. 30 and 31, T. 47 N., R. 7 W., in the Virginia 
Dale mining district, 2 miles northwest of Gottville on Beaver Creek 
in Klamath Reserve. Owner, J. E. Jones; comprises 160 acres, pat- 
ented ; slate bedrock ; 5 feet of gravel. Idle for several years. 

Beaver Creek, in Sec. 6, T. 46 N., R. 8 W., in the Oak Bar mining 
district ; 28 miles west of liornbrook. Owners, Paines & Barton ; 104 
acres patented ; 15 feet of gravel ; schist bedrock. Idle. 

Big Slide, in Sec. 19, T. 46 N., R. 8 W., in the Oak Bar mining dis- 
trict, 28 miles west of Hombrook in the Klamath Forest Reserve. 
Owner, E. F. Rider; comprises 20 acres of land; schist bedrock; 10 feet 
of gravel. Idle. 

Brazil, in Sec. 11, T. 45 N., R. 7 W., in the Hawkinsville mining 
district, 3 miles west of Yreka. Owner, A. Brazil ; in Klamath Forest 
Reserve; 80 acres, located in 1856; water from Greenhorn ditch; 10 
feet of gravel ; slate bedrock ; small output. 
Bibl.: Report VIII, p. 612; XIII, p. 391. 

Buckeye Bar, formerly known as Jackson, in Sec. 9, T. 46 N., 
R. 9 W., in Oak Bar mining district, 26 miles west of Hornbrook. Own- 
ers, Jackson Brothers ; in Klamath Reserve ; bedrock is schist ; gravel is 
10 feet deep. Idle on account of lack of water ; 2 miles of ditch from 
McKinney Creek ; contains 60 acres. 

Bibl.: Report VIII, p. 592; XII, p. 279; XIII, p. 391. 

Canal Oulch, in Sec. 4, T. 45 N., R. 7 W., in Hawkinsville mining 
district, 3 miles north of Yreka. Owner, W. Koester; in Klamath 
Forest Reserve; 20 acres, located in 1876; worked in spring; only little 
water; 10 feet of gravel; slate bedrock. 

Enterprise, in Sec. 16, T. 46 N., R. 9 W., in Oak Bar mining dis- 
trict, 24 miles west of Hornbrook. Owner, R. J. Fenile; in Klamath 
Forest Reserve; 40 acres of ground; schist bedrock; 10 feet of gravel. 
Idle. 

Indian Bar, in Sec. 30, T. 11 N., R. 7 E., 6 miles northeast of 
Forks of Salmon in Klamath Forest Reserve. Owners, Ayles & Dunn ; 
comprises 40 acres; schist bedrock; 15 feet of gravel. Idle; only do 
assessment work. 

Bibl.: Report XII, p. 277; XIII, p. 407. 

John Miller, in Sec. 3, T. 45 N., R. 7 W., in Hawkinsville mining 
district, 4 miles north of Yreka. Owner, J. A. Tiexeria; in Klamath 
Forest Reserve; 40 acres patented; 10 feet of gravel; slate bedrock. 
Idle for several years. 

Bibl. : Report XIII, p. 409. 



116 MINES AND MINERAL RESOURCES. 

McKinney Creek, in Sec. 9, T. 46 N., B. 9 W., in Oak Bar Mining 
district^ 26 miles west of Hornbrook. Owners, S. H. and S. R. Crary; 
in Klamath Forest Reserve ; contains 40 acres ; schist bedrock ; 12 feet of 
gravel ; water from McKinney Creek through a ditch 2\ miles long. 

O'Donnell, in Sees. 3, 4 and 10, T. 45 N., R. 7 W., in Hawkins- 
ville mining district, 3 miles north of Yreka. Owner, Mrs. O'Donnell; 
in Klamath Forest Reserve; 45 acres patented; worked since 1856; 
slate bedrock ; 10 to 20 feet of gravel ; small production. 
Bibl.:ReportXIII, p. 418. 

Paine, in Sec. 21, T. 46 N., R. 9 W., 28^ miles west of Hornbrook in 
the Oak Bar mining district in the Klamath Forest Reserve. Owner, 
A. A. Paine ; schist bedrock ; 8 feet of gravel ; comprises 20 acres. Idle. 

Santana Brothers, in Sec. 11, T. 45 N., R. 7 W., in Hawkinsville 
mining district, 2J miles north of Yreka. Owners, Santana Brothers, 
formerly known as Joe Lemois; 60 acres located in 1856; 7 feet of 
gravel; slate bedrock; small production. Idle until spring. 
Bibl. : Report XIII, p. 424. 

Simas & Rose, in Sec. 25, T. 45 N., R. 8 W., in Greenhorn mining 
district, 4i miles west of Yreka. Owners, Simas & Rose; in Klamath 
Forest Reserve; 160 acres patented; located in 1870; 8 feet of gravel; 
slate bedrock ; 2 miles of ditch ; season from February to June. Idle. 

Sylvester Ramus, in Sec. 11, T. 45 N., R. 7 W., in Hawkinsville 
mining district, 2^ miles north of Yreka. Owner, S. Ramus: in Klam- 
ath Forest Reserve; 87 acres; water from lower Greenhorn ditch, 6 
miles long; 5 feet of gravel; slate bedrock. Idle; worked each spring; 
small output. 

Sulphur Springs, in Sec. 18, T. 47 N., R. 7 W., in the Virginia Bar 
mining district, 7 miles north of Gottville, on Empire Creek in Klamath 
Forest Reserve. Owner, E. Campbell; comprises 20 acres; schist bed- 
rock ; 3 to 5 feet of gravel ; only small production in 1912. 

Tom Rogers, in Sec. 11, T. 45 N., R. 7 W., in Hawkinsville mining 
district, 2 miles north of Yreka. Owner, Phillips Brothers ; in Klamath 
Forest Reserve; 113 acres, patented; discovered in 1860; water from 
Greenhorn Creek; short season. Idle since May; 5 to 10 feet of gravel; 
slate bedrock. 

Bibl. : Report XIII, p. 430. 

GOLD MINES— DRIFT. 

Allgood & Castcll, in Sec. 12, T. 11 N., R. 7 E., in the Liberty 
inining (li.strict, 3 miles southeast of Somes Bar. Owners, Allgood & 
Cast (ill; comprises 40 acres; slate bedrock; 30 feet of graveL Idle; 
some rich gravel worked at one time. 



SISKIYOU COUNTY. 117 

Ascondry, in Sec. 10, T. 46 N., R 9 W., in Oak Bar mining dis- 
trict, 27 miles west of Hornbrook. Owner, W. Quingley ; contains 100 
acres ; 50-foot shaft ; schist bedrock ; 8 feet of gravel. Idle. 

California Bar, in Sec. 18, T. 46 N., R. 6 W., in the Cottonwood 
mining district, 9 miles southwest of Hornbrook in Klamath Forest 
Reserve. Owners, Vene Gold Bar Mining Company; comprises 20 
acres on old river bar ; bedrock is slate ; old shafts caved. Idle at pres- 
ent; water from Klamath River through a ditch 1^ miles long; some 
good ground. 

Bibl. : Report XIII, p. 391. 

Consolidated Sciwash, in Sec. 6, T. 44 N., R. 8 W., in the Deadwood 
raining district, 6 miles north of Fort Jones. Owner, H. Madison; 
comprises 90 acres, patented, on McAdams Creek; quartz-porphyry 
bedrock; 30 feet of gravel; 450-foot tunnel, and three 50-foot shafts (all 
caved) ; good producer at one time. Idle for a number of years. 
Bibl. : Report XIII, p. 395. 

Deep Channel, formerly known as Taylor & Maplesden, in Sec. 36, 
T. 46 N., R. 11 W., in the Hamburg Bar mining district, i mile west 
of Hamburg Bar in the Klamath Forest Reserve. Owner, Deep Chan- 
nel Mining Company, of Portland, Oregon ; president, J. L. McKittrick ; 
comprises 40 acres on the Klamath River ; schist bedrock ; gravel is from 
20 to 50 feet deep ; 100-foot tunnel 5' x 7' and 60-foot shaft, 4' x 6' 
(abandoned). Idle during 1913; some good ground and has been 
a steady producer. 

Bibl.: Report XII, p. 293; XIII, p. 429. 

Boolitile, in Sec. 5, T. 17 N., R. 8 E., in the Happy Camp mining 
district, 6 miles northeast of Happy Camp in the Klamath Forest 
Reserve. Owner, M-. Doolittle; comprises 40 acres of patented land 
along the Klamath River; schist bedrock; 30 feet of gravel; 120-foot 
tunnel, 5' x 7'. Idle ; producer at one time. - 
Bibl. : Report XIII, p. 404. 

Elk Creek, in Sec. 15, T. 16 N., R. 7 E., in the Happy Camp mining 
district, 1 mile southwest cf Happy Camp in the Klamath Reserve. 
Owners, Chinese Company; comprises 60 acres along the Klamath 
River; schist bedrock; 10 to 40 feet of gravel; 220-foot tunnel, 5' x7'; 
paid well at one time. Idle at present. 

Bibl. : Report XII, p. 281 ; XIII, p. 398. 

Empire Bar, in Sec. 2, T. 46 N., R. 7 W., in the Virginia Dale min- 
ing district, in town of Gottville, in the Klamath Reserve. Owners, 
an incorporated company ; comprises 20 acres, patented ; slate bedrock ; 



118 MINES AND MINERAL RESOURCES. 

5 to 8 feet of gravel ; old shafts ; small steam hoist ; worked by leasers 
at times, but idle at present ; has been a good producer. 
Bibl.: Report VIII, p. 589. 

Evans, formerly kn(fwn as the Berry, in See. 17, T. 8 N., R. 7 E., 
in the Happy Camp mining district, 5^ miles northeast of Happy Camp 
in the Klamath Reserve. Owner, C. A. Evans; comprises 20 acres; 
bedrock ia schist, with quartz stringers running through it; depth of 
gravel is 40 feet; 60 feet tunnel, 5' x 7' feet; only do assessment work; 
small producer at one time. 

EverUl, in Sec. 26, T. 46 N., R. 11 W., in Hamburg Bar mining 
district, 4 miles southwest of Hamburg Bar. Owner, J. H. Bverill; 
comprises 40 acres on the Klamath River; bedrock is slate; 120-foot 
tunnel on bedrock ; old 60-foot shaft ; equipment : dwelling, derrick, pipe, 
sluice boxes; good ground; leased to an incorporated company; T. C. 
Williams, superintendent ; three men employed. 
Bibl. : Report XII, p. 281 ; XIII, p. 400. 

French Bar Placer, in Sec. 17, T. 46 N., R. 10 W., in the Scott River 
mining district, i mile northwest of Scott Bar, in the Klamath Forest 
Reserve. Owner, Z. E. Russell; comprises 20 acres, on Scott River; 
slate bedrock; 20 feet of gravel; 40-foot tunnel, 5'x7'; only do 
assessment work. 

Gold Lead, in Sec. 8, T. 45 N., R. 10 W., in the Scott River mining 
district, IJ miles north of Scott Bar in the Klamath Reserve. Owner, 
M. Andrews; comprises 20 acres on the Scott River; slate bedrock; 
10 to 20 feet of gravel; water from Tom Creek through 1 mile of ditch; 
90 feet tunnel (5'x7'), on bedrock; equipment: car, blacksmith 
shop, mining tools; one man employed at $3 per day; production gen- 
erally about $4000 (five months run) ; some coarse gold found on the 
bedrock; easy ground to work. 

Klamath River Oold Mining Company, in Sec. 15, T. 46 N., R. 7 W., 
in the Cottonwood mining district, 12 miles southwest of Hombrook in 
Klamath Forest Reserve. Owners, Klamath River Gold Mining Com- 
pany; comprises 20 acres on old bar of Klamath River; bedrock is 
slate; gravel 5 to 20 feet deep; old shafts to bedrock; company spent 
considerable money without any return. Idle. 

Lucky Boh, in Sec. 2, T. 46 N., R. 7 W., in the Virginia Dale min- 
ing district, in town of Gottville. Owners, Freshour Brothers; com- 
prises 40 acres, being a bench and bar along the Klamath River; slate 
bedrock; 7 feet of gravel; old shafts from 30 to 50 feet deep; good 
producer years ago ; worked by leasers at times, but idle at present. 
Bibl. : Report XII, p. 287 ; XIII, p. 413. 



SISKIYOU COUNTY. 119 

McMahon, in Sec. 25, T. 40 N., R. 9 W., in the Callahan mining 
district, 3 miles southeast of Callahan in the Klamath Reserve. Owner, 
C. A. Crowley ; comprises 40 acres, on the Scott River ; schist bedrock ; 
good pay in the soft spots; 150-foot tunnel; old 40-foot shaft (caved) ; 
worked a little during the winter ; small producer. 
Bibl.: Report XII, p. 287; XIII, p. 415. 

Miller, in Sec. 34, T. 44 N., R. 9 W., in the Callahan mining district, 
5 miles southeast of Callahan in the Klamath Reserve. Owners, 
Jackson & Biedenbeck; comprises 20 acres; schist bedrock; 40 feet of 
gravel ; 2 tunnels 100 and 60 feet in length on the bedrock ; water from 
Jackson Creek through i mile of flume ; no production since 1911 ; some 
good ground. 

Bibl. Report XIII, p. 415. 

Montezuma, in Sec. 20, T. 40 N., R. 8 W., in the Callahan mining 
district, in town of Callahan in the Klamath Reserve. Owner, Hop- 
yick; comprises 20 acres on the Scott River; schist bedrock; 20 to 50 
feet of gravel; Chinese working over an old dump; noted producer 
years ago; best ground worked out. 

Bibl.: Report VIII, p. 612; XII, p. 288; XIII, p. 416. 

Paradise Flat, in Sec. 29, T. 40 N., R. 11 W., in the Liberty mining 
district, | mile west of Sawyer's Bar in the Klamath Reserve. Owner, 
A. Meyers; comprises 40 acres, patented, along the North Fork of the 
Salmon River ; slate bedrock ; 10 to 50 feet of gravel ; old bench ; 1000- 
foot tunnel; only worked on a small scale; said to have produced 
$140,000 ; seems to be a second bench, carrying good pay. 

Poverty Point, in Sec. 18, T. 46 N., R. 9 W., in the Oak Bar mining 
district, 32 miles west of Hornbrook on Klamath River. Owner, H. H. 
Barton; 200 acres (40 acres patented) ; located in 1876; in Klamath 
Reserve; country rock, schist and diorite; 20 feet of gravel; 2400-foot 
tunnel (caved) ; produced $23,000. Idle for ten years. 
Bibl.: Report VIII, p. 592; XIII, p. 420. 

Schuler, in Sec. 16, T. 45 N., R. 10 W., in the Scott River mining 
district in the town of Scott Bar in the Klamath Reserve. Owner, M. 
Sehuler; comprises 20 acres on Scott River; slate bedrock; 20 to 30 
leet of gravel ; 60 feet tunnel in river bank ; only do assessment work ; 
some rich ground worked at one time. 
Bibl. : Report XIII, p. 425. 

Sugar Hill, in Sec. 20, T. 40 N., R. 8 W., in the Callahan mining 
district, 5 miles southwest of Callahan in the Klamath Reserve. 
^wner, G. W. Smith ; comprises 40 acres on Fox Creek ; schist bedrock, 



120 MINES AND MINERAL RESOURCES. 

coarso gold being found in crevices in this bedrock; 320-foot tunnel, 
40-foot shaft (caved); 20 to 40 feet of gravel, loose. Idle; only do 
assessment work; some good pay extracted years ago. 
Bibl.: Report VIII, p. 611. 

Whistle Bar, formerly known, as the Blake, in Sec. 29, T. 40 N., 
R. 11 \V., in the Liberty mining district, at Sawyer's Bar in the Kla- 
math Forest Reserve. Owner, E. Curran; comprises 20 acres on the 
North Fork of the Sahnon River; slate bedrock; 30 to 100 feet of gravel, 
loose; 400- foot tunnel, 8'x7'; good producer at one time. Idle at 
present ; only do assessment work ; about one half of the gravel has been 
w^orked. 

Bibl. : Report VIII, p. 616. 

Wilson, in Sec. 29, T. 44 N., R. 8 W., in the Deadwood mining dis- 
trict, 8 J miles north of Fort Jones. Owner, F. L. Wilsoif ; comprises 40 
acres on Deadwood Creek ; quartz-porphyry bedrock ; 30 feet of gravel ; 
water from Deadwood Creek through ^-mile of ditch ; 320 feet bedrock 
tunnel and 50-foot shaft (caved) ; best groimd has been worked; only 
do assessment work. 

Bibl. : Report XIII, p. 432. 

GOLD DREDGING. 

Only one dredge in operation in Siskiyou County during the year 
1913. This boat, owned by the Siskiyou Dredging Company, is working 
on ^Ic Adams Creek, some 5 miles north of the town of Fort Jones. 

The Scott River Dredging Company operated a dredge on the Scott 

Rivor near Callahan during 1908 and 1909. The project was finally 

a])aiul()ned and the machinery sold to the Trinity Dredging Company, 

and hauled to Trinity Center, Trinity County, where it was installed. 

Bibl. : Bull. No. 57, p. 221. 

The Northern California Dredge Company, owning several acres of 
land along the Klamath River in Sec. 36, T. 46 N., R. 11 W., M. D. M., 
about J mile west of Hamburg Bar, endeavored to work their land by 
means of a suction dredge, which proved a failure. The dredge has 
been idle since 1911. 

Siskiyou Dredging Companj), in Sees. 14, 6 and 35, T. 44 and 43 N., 
R. 8 and 9 W., in the Deadwood mining district, 5 miles north of Port 
Jones, is the only dredge in operation in Siskiyou County. It is owned 
by the Siskiyou Dredging Company; G. J. Carr, president; J. C. Osgood, 
secretary ; J. W. Boles, superintendent ; home office is in San Francisco ; 
comprises an area of 165.5 acres on MeAdams Creek, 120 of which are 
patented, and includes the old Oak Grove, Diggles, Mathewson and 



SISKIYOU COUNTY. 12l^ 

Shaw drift claims; course of the channel is north and south; quartz- 
porphyry bedrock; 30 to 60 feet of gravel, loose and easily removed; 
2 miles of flume from McAdiams Creek for water. for floating dredge 
during the summer season ; 5^ cu. ft. Bucyrus type dredge with 98-foot 
digging ladder, and will handle gravel to a depth of 50 feet below the 
water level, and has a capacity of 2000 cubic yards per day or 154 
yards per hour; 10 miles of power line; electricity from California- 
Oregon Power Company, costing 1^ cents per cubic yard; ten men 
are employed ; total operating cost per cubic yard is 6 cents ; property 
acquired in 1909, and dredge has been operating since 1910; good 
dividends declared; about 20 acres have been worked. 
Bibl.: Bull. No. 57, p. 223. 

GRANITE. 

The greater^ portion of the granite in Siskiyou County is too much 
shattered to be used for monument or building purposes. There is a 
large body of granite, however, on Craggy Mountain, T. 41 N., B. 8 W., 
from which some good building blocks have been obtained. Another 
deposit, southeast of Etna on Mill Creek in Sec. 1, T. 41 N., E. 9 W., 
contains some fine-grained stone that has been used for monument 
work. A similar grade of granite is found in the southwest and south- 
east corners of T. 40 N., R. 8 and 9 W. 
Bibl.: Bull. No. 38, p. 54. 

IRON. 

Iron float is found in Sec. 10, T. 46 N., R. 10 W., on the north side 
of the divide between Buckhorn Creek and the Klamath River. 
Bibl. : Bull. No. 38, p. 304. 

LIMESTONE. 

Two limestone deposits, one northeast of Greenview and the other 
southwest of Callahan, have been worked and the material has been 
converted into lime. 

Bibl.: Bull. No. 38, pp. 92-93. 

Burton, in Sec. 17, T. 43 N., R. 9 W., in the Oro Fino mining dis- 
trict, 4 miles northeast of Greenview. Owned by T. Martin ; comprises 
40 acres, discovered in 1889 ; large limestone deposit having a width of 
1000 feet, but only 15 feet thick; limestone burned in kiln made of 
rocks, having the arch-shape form; capacity of kiln, 6 tons in five 
days; good grade of limestone; product produced upon demand. 

Farrington, in Sec. 24, T. 40 N., R. 9 W., in the Callahan mining 
district, 2^ miles southw^est of Callahan. Owned by S. Farrington; 
comprises 20 acres, located in 1873; massive deposit of limestone; the 



122 



MINES AND MINERAL. RESOURCES. 




SISKIYOU COUNTY. 123 

extent not determined ; surface stripped and limestone extracted from 
open cuts and burned in a small kiln of a capacity of 10 tons in four 
days; product is of splendid quality and was used in the hotel at Cal- 
lahan; very little demand for the product. Idle. 
Bibl.: Bull. No. 38, pp. 92-93. 

MACADAM. 

Steele Quarry, in Sec. 27, T. 45 N., R. 7 W., | mile southeast of 
Yreka. Owned by J. M. Steele ; comprises 100 acres, located in 1896 
deposit just being opened up and its extent not determined as yet 
plant consists of a crusher, operated by gasoline, cars, and mining tools 
^Ye men are employed ; rock used on streets in Yreka. 

MARBLE. 

A belt of marble runs from a short distance west of Etna Mills, in a 
northwest direction along the eastern slope of the Salmon Mountains, 
forming, farther north, part of the Marble Mountains, and in the 
Gfrider Mountains showing north of the Klamath River on Thompson 
Creek, and running farther north into Oregon. 

Bibl.: Report XIII, p. 632; Bull. No. 38, pp. 107-108. 

Marhle Mountain, a very large belt in Sees. 16, 19, 20 and 21, 
T. 43 N., R. 10 W., M. D. M., is a noted landmark; the limestone is 
metamorphosed, producing all varieties and colors of marble, but 
principally pure white. (See photo No. 5.) 
Bibl. : Bull. No. 38, p. 107. 

Barton & Barham, in Sec. 18, T. 46 N., R. 9 W., in the Oak Bar 
mining district ; owned by Barton et al. ; comprises 160 acres, located 
in 1913 ; massive deposit in schist ; no work done on claims ; marble is 
of the clouded variety, showing black streaks and probably of no com- 
mercial value. 

Bibl.: Report XIII, p. 632. 

Luce, in Sec. 41, T. 41 N., R. 8 W., in the Deadwood mining dis- 
trict, 3 miles north of Fort Jones. Owner, A. H. Luce ; comprises 160 
acres, patented, located in 1907 ; dike in schist, 300 feet wide and can 
be traced for 1500 feet, and is of good quality, taking a fine polish and 
easily worked; only small amount extracted from shallow cuts. Idle 
at present. 

McDaniels, in Sec. 6, T. 41 N., R. 9 W., M. D. M., on road from 
Etna to Sawyer's Bar. Owned by R. McDaniels of Etna; seams of 
diabase through the marble and body of pure white marble much smaller 
than in the Parker deposit. 

Bibl.: Report XIII, p. 632; Bull. No. 38, p. 107. 
9— C14456 



124 MINES AND MINERAL RESOUBCES. 

Parker, in Sec. 32, T. 42 N., R. 9 W., near Etna. Owned by A. 
Parker, Jr.; belt from 100 to 200 feet wide at elevation of 4000 feet; 
marble heavily bedded, in places being perfectly white and fine-grained, 
while in other places it is pink-colored and very coarsely crystalline; 
worked to a limited extent. 

Bibl.: Bull. No. 38, p. 107. 

Thompson Creek, in Sec. 8, T. 17 N., R. 8 E., H. M., in the Happy 
Camp mining district, 8J miles northeast of Happy Camp on Thomp- 
son Creek. Owner, J. C. Wood; comprises 40 acres, located in 1890; 
large massive beds in schist and serpentine, few open cuts, so that 
extent of marble deposit not determined; it is hard and takes a good 
polish; the crystals are large, white and translucent. Idle. 
Bibl.: Report XIII, p. 632. 

MINERAL WATER. 

Shasta Springs, on the Oregon branch of the Southern Pacific Rail- 
road in Sec. 12, T. 39 N., R. 3 W., are owned by the Shasta Springs 
Mineral Water Company, and the only water from Siskiyou County on 
the market. These springs were first brought to notice during the con- 
struction of the railroad in 1887. 

The three springs — Shasta, Glacier and Keystone — are all about 300 
feet apart. The water has a temperature of 51° F., and contains con- 
siderable carbonic acid gas, magnesium, potassium, iron, and a little 
manganese, lithium and arsenate. The bedrock is tufa, overlaid with 
doleritic lava. The equipment consists of bottling works and dwellings. 
Bibl.: Report XI, pp. 449-451; Mineral Springs of California, 
Anderson, p. 244. 

Upper Soda Springs, in Sec. 24, T. 39 N., R. 4 W., 2 miles north 
of Dunsmuir. Owned by George McCloud; water is heavily charged 
with carbonic acid gas; formation is similar to the Shasta Springs 
section ; water not on the market. 

Bibl.: Report XI, p. 452; Mineral Springs of California, Ander- 
son, p. 260. 

Scott Springs, in Sec. 7, T. 39 N., R. 3 W., 3 miles north of Duns- 
muir ; water and formation similar to Shasta Springs. Owned by J. J. 
Scott & Company. 

Bibl. : Report XI, p. 452. 

Castle Crag Soda Springs, at Castle Crag. Owned by Pacific 
Improvement Company; water has a temperature of 53° F., and con- 
tains sodium, potassium, magnesium, calcium, with a trace of iron, 
silicia, alumina, manganese, barium, lithium, borates, ammonium csl^- 
bonate ; it is a well known summer resort. 



SISKIYOU COUNTY. 125 

Klamath Hot Springs, in Sec. 27, T. 48 N., R. 3 W., at Klamath 
Springs. Owned by Edson Estate; claimed good for rheumatism and 
blood diseases; several dwellings on the property. 

Bibl. : Mineral Springs of California, Anderson, p. 183. 

Siskiyou Mineral, in Sees. 33 and 34, T. 48 N., R. 9 W., 14 miles 
northwest of Walker. Owned by J. Garreston; water contains con- 
siderable iron and magnesia, and said to be good for blood diseases; con- 
ducted as a summer resort ; several dwellings on the property. 
Bibl. : Report XIII, p. 521. 

Warmcastle Soda Springs, in Sec. 13, T. 39 N., R. 3 W., 1 mile 
south of Nabar. Owned by Estate of Judge Warmcastle ; elevation is 
3000 feet ; water contains considerable soda. 

ORNAMENTAL STONES. 

Vesuvianite is found on the South Fork of Indian Creek, 12 miles 
north of Happy Camp, on land owned by Dr. A. E. Heighway; dis- 
covered in 1901; outcrops for 300 feet along the hillside, above the 
creek, and large masses have fallen into the bed of the creek below. 
It is a hard and handsome stone, olive to green in color, and takes a 
fine polish. The associated rock is serpentine; the rich translucent 
green color, fine-grained sub-splintery fracture and brilliant luster, 
when polished, strongly suggest jade, and many have called it by that 
name; deposit has not been worked. This variety of vesuvianite is 
also known as califomite, F. H. Dakin of San Francisco also has 
claims covering portions of the deposit. 

Bibl.: Bull. No. 37, pp. 93-94; Bull. No. 67, pp. 125-126. 

Brusse, in Sec. 34, T. 17 N., R. 7 E,, in the Happy Camp mining 
district, 3 miles north of Happy Camp on Indian Creek. Owned by 
F. A. Brusse ; discovered in 1899 ; not in place, but pieces of float weigh- 
ing several pounds found along the creek ; associated with serpentine ; 
resembles the Heighway mineral. 

Oriffin Onyx Quarries are situated 6 miles south of Berryvale. Speci- 
mens in the State Mining Bureau are 7355 and 8969. 
Bibl.: Bull. 37, p. 112. 

PLATINUM. 
Small amounts of platinum are obtained with the gold in some of the 
placer mines of Siskiyou County, particularly on the streams traversing 
serpentine areas. 



126 MINES AND MINERAL RESOURCES. 

QUICKSILVER. 

A cinnabar deposit in the northern part of the comity on the head- 
waters of the West Pork of Beaver Creek above Oak Bar has been 
worked to some extent by the Siskiyou Quicksilver Mining Company. 
There is another small deposit on Horse Creek, which has not developed 
at all. 

The holdings of the Siskiyou Quicksilver Mining Company, of San 
Francisco, comprise several acres on the headwaters of the West Fork 
of Beaver Creek, some 15 miles west of Cole's Station. The develop- 
ment consists of several hundred feet of tunnelling and drifts. The 
reduction plant consists of a 10-ton furnace. Idle for some time; had 
a small production. 

Bibl.: Report XII, p. 370; XIII, p. 602; BuU. 27, p. 196. 

Barton & Lange, in Sec. 22, T. 46 N., R. 9 W., in the Klamath 
Reserve, 4 miles west of Oak Bar in the Oak Bar mining district. 
Owners, Barton & Lange ; comprises 60 acres of patented land, located 
in 1890 ; massive dike with no definite strike or dip ; the country rock 
(schist and diorite), impregnated with cinnabar; deposit 160 feet wide 
and can be traced 2000 feet ; short tunnel and open cuts comprise the 
workings; a few pounds (selected) of the semi-transparent crystals of 
cinnabar sold to Chinese for $4 per pound, to be used in paints and 
for medicinal purposes. Idle several years. 

Bibl. : Report XIII, p. 602. Bull. No. 27, p. 196. 

SANDSTONE. 

A very extensive bed of sandstone runs along the east side of the 
Kildal Hills, Black Mountain Range, and Cottonwood Mountains, into 
Oregon ; also found east of Yreka in two large exposures. It forms the 
rim of the Shasta Valley, having a northeast direction in Sec. 13, 
T. 45 N., R. 7 W., and also crops out a few miles south of Ager on the 
Herr ranch, where coal is found. Same belt exposed in the vicinity 
of Hornbrook in the ridges surrounding the valleys of the Klamath 
River and the lower part of Cottonwood Creek. A belt of fine-grained 
sandstone about i mile in width west of Hornbrook along the rim of 
Cottonwood Creek forms a landmark, as its surface sloping east com- 
prises the bare lower slope of the mountains, its gray color being distm- 
guishable from a long distance ; it is very fine grained, compact and hard, 
consisting of small granules of quartz, intermixed with some small ones 
of hornblende. 

Bibl. : Bull. 38, pp. 139-140. 

Antone, formerly known as the Weeks Quarry, in Sec. 2, T. 45 N., 
R. 7 W., 2 miles northeast of Yreka. Owned by Mrs. C. Antone ; com- 



SISKIYOU COUNTY. 127 

prises 160 acres, patented, at an elevation of 2700 feet ; occurs in strati- 
fied layers from 6 inches to 8 feet thick, and these sheets are pried from 
the deposit by hand ; very little blasting needed ; equipment at quarry 
consists of derrick of 2400 pounds capacity and mining tools ; three men 
employed; stone of good quality, and has been used since 1860; new 
high school and other buildings in Yreka constructed with this stone; 
also used for tombstones ; leased to J. P. Bussell. 

Fioch Bros. Quarry, in Sec. 13, T. 45 N., R. 7 W., near Yreka ; con- 
siderable stone removed; face of the quarry shows massive sandstone, 
nearly horizontal, dipping slightly east; upper bed is 10 feet thick, 
coarse grained ; of a very uniform texture, and tawny in color. 
Bibl.: Bull. No. 38, p. 140. 

Southern Pacific Railroad Company owns several quarries in Sec. 
29, T. 47 N., R. 6 W., near Hombrook ; stone breaks in large blocks, some 
weighing 4 to 5 tons; quarries worked by plug and feather method; 
sandstone used in construction of Jones & Horn buildings in Horn- 
brook, built in 1888 and shows no signs of weathering. 
Bibl. : Bull. No. 38, p. 140. 

SOAPSTONE. 

Taic is a hydrous silicate of magnesia (4 MgO, 5 SiOg, HgO) that 
occurs in dififerent varieties, of which soapstone is one of the most 
important. 

Soapstone is more compact and harder than talc and is used in the 
manufacture of many articles, such as bath and laundry tubs, switch- 
boards for electrical plants, sinks, griddles and many other articles. 

Talc is used as a powder, or flour talc, and as pieces sawed into various 
sizes and shapes. The flour talc is used in flreproof paints, electric 
insulators, boiler and steam pipe coverings, toilet powder, in the manu- 
facture of powder and other articles. 

Soapstone is found in several places in Siskiyou County, a large 
expose being noted in the northeast sections of T. 45 N., R. 11 W., south- 
east of Hamburg Bar, having a course of N. 50° E. and can be 
traced toward the ridge west of Scott River and is 50 feet wide ; it is 
of good quality and resists the effect of flre for years in flreplaces ; also 
used in sheets ^ to J of an inch thick for stove backs. There is another 
large belt south of Marble Mountain, in T. 13 N., R. 8 E., H. M., near the 
head of WoUey Creek. 

Bibl. : Bull. No. 38, p. 352. 

Talc is found in the Cottonwood Mountains, 30 feet wide, on the top 
of the divide between Beaver and Bumblebee creeks ; it has no grit and 
the iron content gives it a light ochreous color ; located by E. Caldwell 



128 MINES AND MINERAL. RESOURCES. 

of Hamburg Bar. A small exposure is found near Etna, in Sec. 32, 
T. 42 N., R. 9 W. Owned by J. Conners ; it occurs in a serpentine belt 
and has no grit. 

Bib!.: Bull. No. 38, p. 353. 

8I8KIY0U COUNTY. 

Bibliography. 
PublicatloDB Issued bj California State Mining Bureau. 

Pages 

Report II 47, 184-187. 189. 

Report IV 82, 78. 89, 115, 187, 810. 

Report V 67, 112. 

Report VI (Part I) 98, 96, 101, 118, Part n, pages «3, 187. 

Report Vin 14, 24, 681-«a. 

Report IX SI, 282, 818, 818. 

Report X 666-658. 

Report XI 42(M49. 

Report XII 61, 275-294, 846, 870, 464-471. 

Report XIII 34, 55, 64, 38&-435, 620, 621, 632. 

Pages 

Bulletin No. 27 193. 

Bulletin No. 87 98, 94, 112, 156. 

Bulletin No. 88. 64, 106, 107, 112, 115, 189, 140, 148, 280, 257, 258, 264, 

272, 280, 846-348. 352-864, 800, 862. 363. 36^-^72. 

Bulletin No. 50_ 120-133. 

Bulletin No. 57 218-223. 

Bulletin No. 67 8, 18, 19, 21, 29, 42, 67, 69, 70. 76, 78. 80, 82, 85, 110. 

115, 123, 124, 127, 162, 180. 

Register of mines and map of Siskiyou County. 

Publications by U. S. Government, U. S. Geological Survey. 

Mineral Resources of United States: 

Year Pages 

1938 - 173, 175, 176. 

1904 - 165, 166, 168, 178, 177. 

1905 _ - - 164-169, 172, 182-184. 

1908 -_ - 178-185. 196, 197. 

1907 (Part I) __.-180-194, 196, 198, 199, 226-228. 

1908 (Part I) -316, 318-321, 324^323, 347, 349-363. 

1909 (Part I) 281-265, 268, 269, 285, 286. 

1910 (Part I) - 349, 350, 352-364, 858, 859, 878, 879. 

1911 (Part D- - 465, 466, 468-470, 473-476, 500, 501. 

1912 (Part I) - >71, 572, 674-577, 584-586, 599, 602, 616, 680. 

Mineral Resources West of the Rocky Mountains. 



TRINITY COUNTY. 129 

TRINITY COUNTY. 

Field Work In October, 1913. 

INTRODUCTION. 

Trinity Comity, with an area of 3000 square miles, is bounded on 
the north by Siskiyou, on the east by Shasta and Tehama, on the 
south by Mendocino, and on the west by Humboldt County, and is 
drained by the Trinity, Mad, Eel and Van Dusen rivers. 

Trinity is a mountainous county, its eastern third being covered by 
the Coast Range, or Trinity Mountains, the summit of which divides 
it from Tehama and Shasta counties. The mountain ranges of Scott 
and Salmon on the north form the boundary between it and Siskiyou. 
Bully Choop, Baldy and other peaks in the Trinity and Salmon Moun- 
tain ranges reach an altitude of over 6000 feet. The hydrography of 
this county is very simple, the Trinity River and its confluents drain- 
ing all parts of it. This river, heading in the Scott Mountain division 
of the Coast Range, after flowing south for 60 miles, makes a detour 
to the northwest, which course it holds for another 60 miles, and unites 
with the Klamath River, in Humboldt County. From the section where 
Coffee Creek, one of the tributaries, flows into the Trinity, the great 
banks of auriferous gravel commence, parallel with the present river 
as far as Swift Creek, in Sec. 9, T. 36 N., R 7 W. The river formerly 
flowed west of the town of Trinity Center, at an elevation of several 
hundred feet above its present channel, thence taking a southwesterly 
course through the Buckeye Range (T. 34 N., R. 9 W.), on to Weaver 
Basin. 

Through this section, Trinity Center to Weaver Basin, is presented 
the only evidence of ancient river channels, the ancient river emptying 
into a great lake at the present Weaver Basin. The material filling 
this channel is composed of volcanic breccia and rocks of all forma- 
tions and ages — angular, irregular, rounded and intermingled with con- 
glomerates, clay and sands. 

The bed of Weaver Basin is a cement, several hundred feet in thick- 
ness below the auriferous gravel, deposited from the ferruginous, 
siliceous and calcareous matter carried down by the waters, erosions 
of the various formations along the channel settling in the basin, and 
there cementing. The absence of coarse material leads to the hypothesis 
that this cementation took place prior to the filling of the cement 
channel with auriferous sands and gravel. 
Bibl.: Bull. No. 540, pp. 16-18, U. S. G. S. 



130 MINES AND MINERAL RESOURCES. 

GEOLOGY. 

Scott Mountain, formed of igneous, volcanic rocks, with its showing 
of basalts, trachyte, and obsidian, overlaps the granite as shown in the 
Salmon Range to the west, its gray peaks towering above the timber 
line into the region of perpetual snow. On the east is the Trinity Range 
of granite, syenites, diabase and jwrphyries. Farther south on the 
range are metamorphic gneiss, hornblende and mica schists, then a slate 
belt, followed by a large belt of serpentine crossing in T. 38 N., R. 5 W. 

HISTORY. 

The first discovery of mineral in this county is attributed to Major 
Redding, in 1848, who prospected the Trinity River near Redding 
Creek (T. 32 N., R. 10 W.), and following his discovery came the pros- 
pectors from all sections, working the river bars, the ravines and 
gulches, extracting the gold from the gravel and sands by the rocker, 
tom and sluice. The evidence of these early workings can be seen along 
the course of almost every streamlet, creek, gulch and ravine tributary 
to the Trinity. 

MINING CONDITIONS. 

While Trinity County is lacking in railway facilities, the abundance 
of timber and water overcomes this handicap to a large extent. \ ' ■■ ' 

Gold mining has been the principal industry for over fifty years, the 
placers giving Trinity County its wealth, and there are still many 
hundreds of acres of auriferous gravel awaiting exploration. /Dredge 
mining is being successfully pursued at Trinity Center and Lewiston, 
and large areas in both these districts have recently been prospected 
for their dredging possibilities. 

The La Grange, the largest active hydraulic mine in the world, is i^ 
this county. 

Quartz mining is still in its infancy ; quartz veins, carrying gold, are 
being prospected and worked in different sections ; others that have been 
operated for several years have yielded and some are still yielding hand- 
some returns to the owners; Dedrick, and the North and East Forks 
are the most active quartz districts at the present time, due to the 
installing of machinery and the development work on the Globe and 
Craig mines in the former section, and to the number of prospects 
being opened up in the North and East Fork territory. 

The Brown Bear is the best known quartz mine in the county, and 
at one time was the largest producer. 



TRINITY COUNTY. 



131 



MINERAL RESOURCES. 

Its mineral resources consist of gold, silver, platinum, quicksilver, J 
chromic iron, coal, copper, building stone and asbestos. The govern- {, 
ment records show a total mineral production of $150,000,000. Mineral ( 
production of Trinity County, from 1894 to 1913, inclusive, from rec- J 
ords of California State Mining Bureau are as follows : 



Substances 


1894 


1895 


1896 


Gold 


fl,O12,065 84 

825 00 

5,000 00 


|1,1«6,745 IS 
1,257 28 


$1,296,830 si^' 


Silver 




Granite — __ _ . 




Qii{<>icRflTer .. , .. 


187,410 00 


139,066 00 








Totate 


fl,017,90O 84 


$1,806,412 41 


CL.485.885 80 







Substonces 


1897 


1898 


1899 


Gold 


$1,078,372 00 

259 00 

29,330 00 


1859,255 00 

314 00 

151,200 00 


$600,510 03 


Silver 

QaicksUver _ __ _ _ 


1,083 00 
123,624 00 


Granite ._ 


875 CO 










TtotalB — 


$1,107,961 00 


$1,010,769 00 


$715,595 00 







Substances 


1900 


1901 


1902 


Gold - - 


$671,606 00 

16,667 00 

106,962 00 

4,535 00 


$684,683 00 

2,668 00 

58,668 00 

5,500 00 

76100 


$719,992 00 
550 00 


Silver 


Qulckgllver _ 


10,251 00 


Granite __ 




Copper - — — __ 




Platinum _ 




468 00 










Totals - _ 


$698,689 00 


$762,283 00 


$r81,261 00 





SubsUnces 


1903 


1904 


1905 


Gold _ 


$607,728 00 

2,065 00 

11,056 00 

75 00 


$574,814 00 

135 00 

8,864 00 


$690,844 00 
8,044 00 
18,917 00 


Silver _ - 


Quicksilver „ . 


Granite 


Copper 






PlatinnTp 


200 00 


276 00 








Totals 


$621,244 Oa 


$679,088 00 


$708,265 00 





10— C14456 



132 



MINES AND MINERAL. RESOURCES. 



SuteUnoM 



Gold 

Sliver 

QuIckallTer 
Oranite ... 
Oopper ... 
Platinum . 



Totals 



|R»,84S00 
2,98100 
6.059 00 



180 00 



i85.S16 00 
2,899 00 
8.789 00 



IS70.O18 00 



l&ll.i&iOO 



9602.914 00 
4.2»00 
3.804 00 



9su.(a7 00 



SubaUnccfl 



Gold 

Silver 

Quickallver 

Granite 

Stone Industry 

Copper 

Unapportfoned. 1900-1909 (inc.). 



Totals 



9620.046 00 
2,802 00 
7.916 00 



111,307 00 



9641,570 00 



1500.851 00 
1.900 00 
5.622 00 



9508.433 00 



9612,149 0) 
6,777 00 
2,0^ 00 



9620,960 00 





SubsUnces 




1912 


1913 / 


Gold 


9723.508 00 

7.494 00 

758 00 

2,000 00 


9431,862 00 
16100 


Quicksilver 


Silver 


2,119 00 
1.000 00 


Stone Industry 








Totals 


9788.755 CO 


9435,142 03 





ELECTRICAL POWER PLANTS. 

Humboldt Gas & Electric Company, with its generating plants about 
one mile northwest of Junction City, on the Trinity River, serves the 
territory on its line between this town and Eureka, Humboldt County. 

Trinity Gold Mining & Reduction Company has a 700 horsepower 
plant on Cofifee Creek and supplies power to the Alta Bert Dredging 
Company, and to its own property, the Headlight Mine, near Trinity 
Center. 

Trinity Gold Dredge Company, with a 1500 horsepower plant, on 
Stewart 's Fork, supplies power for operating its dredge at Lewiston. 

The Bonanza King, generating plant, on the south fork of the Trinity 
River, supplies electricity for the mine and for the town of Trinity 
Center. 

ASBESTOS. 

Surface exposures of asbestos exist in the vicinity of Trinity Center, 
Weaverville, and Douglas City, but no work has been done on these 
deposits to determine their extent or commercial value. It is claimed 
that a promising deposit was uncovered some twenty-five years ago in 



TRINITY €OUNTY. 133 

constructing the Blythe ditch, in Sec. 28, T. 38 N., R. 6 W., but this 
ditch is now filled with debris and practically no indications of asbestos 
can be found. 

Bibl.: Bull. No. 38, pp. 264, 360. 

The Trinity Asbestos Mining Company is opening up a deposit of 
asbestos on a group of claims near the southern line of the county, and 
25 miles from Castella. 

CHROMITE. 

Chromite is a black ore with a submetallic luster and in appearance 
resembles some of the iron ores. It occurs in small octahedral crystals 
and granular masses in serpentine rock, and consists, when pure, of 
68% of chromium oxide and 32% of iron oxide; the commercial ores 
commonly run about 50% of chromium oxide and are generally sold on 
a 50% basis. It is a source of the chromium salts of commerce and is 
also used in the manufacture of chrome steel, in basic bricks, and in 
copper smelting. The quantity of this ore in California far exceeds the 
demand, the production value in 1912 being $11,260, from 1270 tons, 
reported from Shasta, Siskiyou and Fresno counties. 

A fair grade of chromite is found in Trinity County on the north 
fork of the east fork of the Trinity River, in T. 38 N., R. 6 W., M. D. M. 
Another deposit is said to exist near Hay Fork, upon which some 
development work has been done. 

Bibl.: Bull. No. 38, pp. 272, 363, 375. 

COAL. 

Hay Fork Valley Coal Field. Coal crops out in the bed of Hay Fork 
iJiver in two points, one in Sec. 12, T. 31 N., R. 12 W., near the town 
of Hay Fork, and the other in Sec. 7, T. 31 N., R. 11 W., about two 
miles east of the town. The upper cropping near the town contains two 
veins of coal, each two feet thick, greatly weathered on the whole, yet 
in some places a tough black lignite is observed; dip 24° E. Sandstone 
forms the roof and f ootwall ; deposit can be easily worked. This vein 
again outcrops in the hills north of the town. 

Hyampom Valley Coal Field extends over a large area, the best indi- 
cations being observed in Sees. 23, 24 and 25, T. 3 N., R. 6 E., H. M. 
These croppings, near the mouth of the Hay Fork of the Trinity River, 
are from 3 to 15 feet thick and dip at low angles eastward. Above the 
coal lies 8 inches of hard blue shale, 14 inches of sandstone, 22 feet of 
brown shale, and next gravel and soil to the surface. As no development 
work has been done, the commercial value of this deposit can not be 
stated. 



134 MINES AND MINERAL RESOURCES. 

Poison Camp Field, The croppings of coal are observed in Sees. 15 
and 22, T. 2 S., R. 6 E., H. M. The vein is 3 feet thick and dips 24° E. ; 
coal is very young, true lignite, tough and hard and resembles ebony 
wood; it has a dull brown-black color when split parallel to the fiber 
and glistening black when broken across the fiber. The coal is of good 
quality, as it runs high in carbon and low in ash, but the sand roof is 
so soft that mining would be difficult, unless it changes to a harder 
sandstone on driving under the hill. The analysis of this coal by 
Mathyas is as follows: Ash reddish-white color; no coking qualities; 
water 10.50; volatile matter 38.65; fixed carbon 24.15; ash 26.70. 

Coal also outcrops in Sec. 6, T. 33 N., R. 12 W., near Big Bar; it 
is 2 feet thick, and similar in color and quality to the Hyampom Valley 
deposit; no development work performed. 

Bibl.: Report X, p. 716; XII, pp. 62-63; XIII, p. 56. 

COPPER. 

The copper prospects of Trinity County are more widely scattered 
than those of any other county in northern California. They may be 
grouped in three belts, all of which are essentially areas of peridotite; 
New River, South Fork (territory lying to the east of the south fork 
of Trinity River, between Hyampom Valley and Rattlesnake Creek), 
and Trinity Center, near Carrville, and along the main branch of the 
Trinity River. Few of the prospects are of very great magnitude, and 
most of them are too inaccessible for present economical working. Some 
of the prospects contain ore of high grade and a few shipments have 
been made. 

The expense of working these prespects is apparent when the ordinary 
freight rate of $15 per ton, from Weaverville or Trinity Center to 
Redding is considered, while the added cost from the prospects to these 
points is often large. In spite, therefore, of the natural advantages of 
timber and water power, copper mining in Trinity County has not yet 
progressed very far. 

Bibl. : Report X, p. 716 ; XIII, p. 164; Bull. No. 50, pp. 140-146. 

Bear Tooth, in the New River mining district; Quimby post office, 
eight claims on the east side of New River, at an elevation of 2600 teet 
in Trinity Reserve. Owners, Bear Tooth Mining Company, F. P. 
Burris, president ; four parallel veins, from 1 to 4 feet wide ; f ootwaii 
in gabbro; hanging- wall is serpentine; 3 tunnels, upper 110 feet long, 
middle 300 feet, lower 125 feet in length ; lower 400 feet below upper, 
has a length of 120 feet; ore consists of sulphide of iron and copper; 
and in upper part of the vein the ore is oxidized and shows free gold 
in panning ; 8-ton Huntington mill. Idle at present. 
Bibl. : Bull. No. 50, p. 144. 



TRINITY COUNTY. 135 

Black Palangus, in Sec. 36, T. 1 N., B. 6 E., H. M. Owners 
Hutchens Brothers. Open cuts ; croppings are bold and 20 feet wide ; 
some of the ore, sulphide of iron and copper, assays 17% copper. Idle. 

Cinderella, in Sec. 9, T. 37 N., R. 7 W., M. D. M., in Trinity Center 
mining district. Owners, P. A. and E. A. Wagner, of Carrville. Com- 
prises 2 claims ; 300 feet of tunnels and 50-foot shaft ; vein said to be 
16 feet wide and to carry 10% copper; serpentine is the country rock; 
joins Copper Queen on the north. 

Copper Button, in Sec. 36, T. 37 N., R. 7 W., in the Trinity mining 
district. Owners, Osborne & Baker. Comprises 4 claims ; developed by 
short tunnels and open cuts; ore, which is high-grade, occurs in con- 
nection with dikes of quartz-porphyry in serpentine, and consists of 
oxides, carbonates and sulphides. Idle. 
Bibl.: Bull. No. 50, p. 145. 

Copper Queen, in Sec. 16, T. 37 N., R. 7 W., in the Trinity Center 
mining district. Leased to G. H. Fitch. Comprises 3 claims; short 
tunnels and shaft ; ore occurs in serpentine and consists of oxides and 
carbonates of copper, with a little sulphide at the lower levels. 
Bibl. : Bull. No. 50, pp. 145-146. 

Copper Queen, in Sees. 10 and 11, T. 1 S., R. 6 E., H. M., 35 miles 
southeast of Bridgeville, Humboldt County. Owner, J. Hutchens. 
Comprises 6 claims ; developed by a 40-foot tunnel and open cuts ; ore 
consists of sulphide of iron and copper ; strong gossan croppings. Idle. 

Croum Point, in Sec. 18, T. 37 N., R. 7 W., in Trinity Center mining 
district. Owner, G. L. Carr, of Carrville. Ore body is wide and exten- 
sive ; short tunnel and open cuts. Idle. 
Bibl. : Bull. No. 50, p. 145. 

Eureka, in Sees. 17 and 18, T. 37 N., R. 7 W., in the Trinity Center 
mining district. Owners, Dimmock & Hoefler, of Carrville. Comprises 
2 claims; 50- foot tunnel; siliceous ore carrying a small percentage of 
copper sulphide. Idle. 

Fortuna, in T. 1 S., R. 6 E., near the Copper Queen. Owner, For- 
tuna Mining Company, of Fortuna, Cal., C. Sweet, president. Holdings 
consist of 19 claims, about 30 miles from Bridgeville. Only slightly 
developed with open cuts and short tunnels. Conspicuous gossan crop- 
pings on claims. Ore is a sulphide of iron and copper. Idle. 

Gra/nite, on Quimby Creek, 6 miles above its mouth, in Trinity 

Reserve. Owners, F. C. Patton et al., of Weaverville; 7 claims; ore 

occurs in serpentine and slate; some of the ore carries 25% copper, with 

some gold ; only little development work ; facilities for mining are good. 

Bibl. : Bull. No. 50, p. 143. 



136 



MINES AND HINERAti RESOUBCES. 




TRINITY COUNTY. 137 

Island Mountain Consolidated, in Sees. 9, 10 and 15, T. 5 S., R. 6 E., 
in the Horseshoe mining district, 90 miles north of Ukiah. Owners, 
Leach and Wilcox, of Oakland, Cal. Comprises 275 acres along the 
Eel Eiver; elevation 750 feet; located in 1892; ore, iron sulphides, 
carrying copper, iron and zinc, occur in lenses between sandstone walls ; 
strike northwest and southeast ; greatest depth 145 feet ; workings con- 
sist of 400-foot tunnel and 2000 feet of drifts; claim 300,000 tons of ore 
in sight ; croppings in places 180 feet wide, and can be traced for 500 
feet; equipment consists of dwellings and shops; only little work done 
since 1895; about $20,000 has been spent in development work. The 
Northwestern Pacific Railroad is being built on a portion of this prop- 
erty and ore will be shipped to a smelter as soon as the road is completed. 
Largest copper mine in Trinity County. (See photo No. 1.) 
Bibl.: BuU. No. 50, p. 148. 

Jackson & Carter, in Sec. 29, T. 31 N., R. 10 W., 8 miles southeast 
of Hay Fork. Owners, Carter & Jackson. Comprises 4 claims ; 40-foot 
shaft ; lode 10 feet wide ; can be traced only a short distance ; ore con- 
sists of sulphide of iron and copper, said to assay 10% copper. Idle. 

Lone Vine, in Sec. 19, T. 1 N., R. 8 E., H. M., near the mouth of 
Rattlesnake Creek. Owners, D. and M. Murphy. Holdings consist of 
two claims. Only slightly developed. Ore occurs in diorite, and is a 
copper sulphide. Idle. 

Bibl. : Bull. No. 50, p. 142. 

Murphy, in Sec. 36, T. 1 N., R. 7 E., H. M., in the Hyampom Valley. 
Owners, M. and D. Murphy. Three shafts and one tunnel over 400 
feet long. Ore occurs in serpentine, in veins of white feldspathic 
rock, carrying high grade oxides, carbonates and sulphide. Idle. 
Bibl. : Bull. No. 50, p. 142. 

Nonpareil, in Sec. 5, T. 36 N., R. 12 W., 3 miles southeast of Couer, 
in the Trinity Reserve. Owner, C. S. McAtes, of Redding; short tunnel 
on the property ; lode varies from 1 to 14 feet in width, but can not be 
traced continuously for any distance; gossan croppings in places for a. 
mile along its strike; ore said to average 8% copper. Idle. 
Bibl.: Report XIII, p. 64; Bull. No. 50, p. 143. 

Quimhy, on Quimby Creek, in the Trinity Reserve, owned by the 
Quimby Mining Company ; six claims ; vein 4 feet wide ; sulphide, iron 
and copper, is oxidized near the surface and was milled; two tunnels, 
100 and 400 feet in length ; 300 feet of drifts. Idle. 
BibL: Bull. No. 50, p. 144. 



138 MINES AND MINERAL RESOURCES. 

Vine Oak, consists of two claims, in Sees. 2 and 35, T. 1 N. and 
1 S., R. 7 E., owned by I. P. Collins, Hay Pork. Ore consists of copper 
sulphide, carr>nng some gold, and occurs in diorite. Slightly developed 
by means of short tunnels. 
Bibl.: Bull. No. 50, p. 143. 

GOLD. 

Native gold is the principal valuable mineral of the veins, as the 
sulphides form only a small part of the total volume. The fissure 
veins are usually associated with dikes of soda-granite porphyry. The 
veins are persistent both in dip and strike, and below a shallow zone of 
surface enrichment show no marked change in character with depth. 
The pocket deposits are usually found along faulted contacts of the 
slate and meta-andesite. The vein filHng consists of quartz and calcite, 
with small amounts of galena, sp^itlerite and arsenopyrite, as well as 
free gold. 

mintMq districts. 

Canyon Creek Mining District^ famous in the early days for its rich 
placers, both creek and bench, is now being developed for quartz. This 
creek heads in the Salmon Range in T. 39 N., R. 10 W., and flows south 
and empties into the Trinity River at Junction City in Sec. 12, T. 
33 N., R. 10 W. The formation in this region consists of hornblende 
schist and granite-porphyry. The first quartz location was made in 
1889, on the Chloride, now one of the claims of the Globe group. 

Bibl. : Report X, pp. 710-711 ; Bull. No. 540, pp. 7e-78, U. S. G. S. 
Coffee Creek, one of the main tributaries of the Trinity, heading in 
the Granite Mountains of the Salmon River and flowing easterly 
through townships 37 and 38, has been worked for years for placer 
gold. The topography of the section between the headwaters of this 
creek and the Salmon River, in Siskiyou County, indicates that the 
river formerly had an outlet through Coffee Creek channel to the valley 
of the Trinity. Quartz mining has been diligently pursued along Coffee 
^ Creek and its tributaries, in recent years, and several high-grade pro- 
ducers developed. 

Bibl. : Report X, p. 697. 

Deadwood Mining District, is situated on the western slope of the 
Trinity range, in T. 33 N., R. 8 W., and is a continuation of the French 
Gulch mineral belt. Brown Bear is the famous quartz mine in this 
district. 

Bibl. : Report X, pp. 713-714; U. S. G. S. Bull. No. 540, pp. 69-71. 



TRINITY COUNTY. 139 

In the East Fork Mining District, the formation is mainly granitic 
gneiss and mica schists, overlying the true granite, and the quartz 
veins seem to be incased in the strata between the primary and meta- 
morphic rocks. In portions of this district the stratified rocks are much 
contorted, giving the veins very uncertain courses or dips, being 
especially noticeable in the Enterprise mine, where the vein has been 
disturbed and broken and is resting on the formation as a blanket ledge. 
The mica of the gneiss and schist is of a silvery white (muscovite), in 
places the mica entering the quartz, forming a quartz schist, and in such 
cases the vein yielded to the granitic rocks and pinched out. The Enter- 
prise is the most active quartz mine in this district. 
Bibl. : Report X, p. 710. 

The MinersviUe District includes the country along the Trinity River 
between Trinity Center and Papoose Creek. 

The contact between meta-andesite and slate has furnished rich 
pocket deposits, especially in the vicinity of the old town of Miners- 
viUe. Much gold has also been supplied to the placers of this neigh- 
borhood from the same source. 

The Five Pines is the most active quartz mine in this district at the 
present time. 

Bibl. : U. S. G. S. Bull. No. 540, pp. 73-76. 

Stewart's Fork, heads in the Salmon Mountains in T. 37 N., R. 
10 W., and flows southeasterly, emptying into the Trinity River in 
T. 34 N., R. 9 W. On Deer Creek, one of the tributaries to Stewart's 
Pork, several quartz locations have been made, but only a small amount 
of development work has been done. This region presents a promising 
field for the prospector. The formation consists of granite, with slate, 
and also large belts of dolomitic limestone in contact with the serpen- 
tine from the northeast; the quartz is white, containing sulphurets of 
arsenical iron, galena, copper and zinc; but little free gold is detected 
by panning. 

Bibl. : Report X, p. 713. 

Trinity Center Mining District, noted for the richness of its aurif- 
erous gravels, was settled in 1851. The deposits of gravel are in the 
form of benches caused by old river channels, and are about 1 mile in 
width, varying in depth from 20 feet on the lower to 80 feet on the 
upper benches, being a section of the flow of gravel from Coffee Creek 
to the Weaver Basin. Dredging operations are being successfully pur- 
sued near the town of Trinity Center. A large area of placer ground 
along the Trinity River between Trinity Center and Carrville, affords 
an excellent dredging field. 

Bibl. : Report X, p. 698; Bull. No. 540, p. 19, U. S. G. S. 



140 MINES AND MINERAL BESOUBGES. 

GOLD MINES— QUARTZ. 

Alaska, in Sec. 15, T. 35 N., R. 11 W., in the East Fork mining 
district, 10 miles northeast of North Fork. Owners, W. F. Jenkins et al. 
Comprises 40 acres, at an elevation of 3100 feet ; ore shoot is 340 feet 
long and 2^ feet wide between slate walls ; 560-foot tunnel and 1500 feet 
of drifts; 1 stope (100 feet by 4 feet by 80 feet) ; old 13-foot arrastra 
used for milling purposes; ore is free milling and rich; said to have 
produced $600,000; several years since property has been worked; no 
ore in sight. 

Bibl. : Report XIII, p. 437. 

Amy BalcJi, in Sec. 13, T. 33 N., R. 8 W., in the Deadwood mining 
district, 1 mile south of Deadwood. Owner, M. 6. Carter. Comprises 
60 acres, at an elevation of 3400 feet ; ore shoot is 110 feet long and 16 
inches wide, free milling and high grade, between waUs of quartz- 
porphyry; strike of vein S. 40° E.; dip 40'' N.; greatest depth 140 
f(»ct; workings consist of 540-foot tunnel, 400 feet Of drifts, 90-foot 
raise and 1 stope 50 feet by 3 feet by 90 feet; equipment consists of 
cars, dwellings and 9-foot arrastra run by waterpower from Thorne 
Gulch, through a ditch 1 mile long ; 2 men are employed doing prospect 
work ; said to have produced $60,000. 
Bibl. : Report XIII, p. 437. 

Annstrong, in Sec. 6, T. 37 N., R. 12 W., in the New River mining 
district, f mile north of Denny, in the Trinity Reserve. Owner, J. E. 
^Tiller. Compris(».s 40 acres; located in 1890; small vein in quartz- 
porphyry ; 210-foot tunnel ; little high-grade taken out on the surface. 
Idle. 

Bibl. : Report XIII, p. 437. 

Big Chief, in Sec. 16, T. 8 N., R. 8 E., in the New River mining 
district, 2 miles south of Denny in the Trinity Forest Reserve. Owners, 
Ladd Brothers. Comprises 40 acres; located in 1908; elevation 3800 
feet; extent of ore shoot not determined, but exposed continuously in 
tunnel, 100 feet long; walls are schist; width of vein 14 inches; ore 
runs from $15 to $60 per ton ; good prospect ; one man working. 

Bigelow, in Sees. 15 and 16, T. 34 N., R. 10 W., in the Canyon 
City mining district, 1^ miles southeast of Dedrick, in the Trinity 
Forest Reserve. Owner, J. E. Henry. Comprises 20 acres; short ore 
shoot in hornblende-schist and granodiorite ; 70-foot shaft ; little high- 
grade extracted ; endeavoring to find ore shoot beyond a fault ; 2 men 
employed. 

Blue Jacket, in Sees. 17 and 18, T. 37 N., R. 7 W., in the Trinity 
Center mining district, 1^ miles northwest of Carrville, in the Shasta 



TRINITY COUNTY. 141 

Eeserve. Owner, Adams Exploration Company, an eastern corpo- 
ration. G. L. Carr, superintendent. Comprises 450 acres; ore shoot 
200 feet long and 5 feet wide; strike N. 40° E.; dip 40° SE.; footwall 
is serpentine and hanging-wall is quartz-porphyry; maximum depth, 
320 feet. Workings: Tunnel 820 feet long, drifts, raises and stopes. 
Equipment: Cars, dwellings, blower, 5-stamp mill, driven by water- 
power from Coffee Creek through f mile of flume; 3 men employed; 
some ore in sight; producer at one time; ore free milling, but low- 
grade, with rich spots occasionally. 
Bibl. : Report XIII, p. 439. 

Blue Jay, in Sec. 13, T. 37 N., R. 8 W., in the Trinity Center min- 
ing district, 2^ miles west of Carrville, in the Shasta Forest Reserve. 
Owner, M. McIUwain. Comprises 40 acres ; located in 1886 ; 2 veins in 
quartz-porphyry ; short ore shoot 16 inches wide ; tunnels 500 feet long 
and 200 feet of drifts ; little high grade extracted. Idle. 

Blue Jay, formerly known as Knob, in T. 33 N., R. 8 W., in the 
Lewiston mining district, 4f miles northeast of Lewiston. Owners, Paul- 
son & Gifford. Comprises 40 acres on Eastman Gulch ; ore shoot 80 feet 
long and 1 foot wide ; high-grade stringers running from vein ; 480-foot 
tunnel,. 200 feet of drifts, 100-foot raise to surface from tunnel and 1 
slope 40 feet by 3 feet by 100 feet; equipment consists of cars, black- 
smith shop and dwelling ; 2 men employed ; ore reduced in the Venicia 
miU. 

Bonanza, in Sec. 9, T. 35 N., R. 11 W., in the East Fork mining 
district, 13 miles northeast of North Fork by trail, in Trinity Reserve. 
Owner J. L. Johnston. Comprises 40 acres at an elevation of 3000 feet ; 
320-foot tunnel and 500 feet of drifts and raises ; ore free milling and 
shoot 300 feet long and 4 feet wide ; little rich ore extracted. Idle at 
present. 

Bonanza, in Sec. 29, T. 35 N., R. 8 W., in the Minersville mining 
district, | mile north of Minersville, in the Trinity Reserve. Owner 
J. H. Tourtellate. Comprises 40 acres, located in 1890 ; elevation 2700 
feet; short ore shoot, free milling and high grade, in slate; 130-foot 
incline shaft, 200-foot drift and 60-foot tunnel; $15,000 extracted 
from pockets. Idle at present. 
Bibl. : Report XIII, p. 439. 

Brown Bear, in Sees. 11 and 12, T. 33 N., R. 8 W., in the Dead- 
wood mining district, in the old town of Deadwood, is the most famous 
quartz mine in Trinity County, having been a producer since 1875. 
It is owned by the Brown Bear Mining Company of Redding. Thos. 
McDonald, president; B. McDonald, superintendent. Comprises 586 
acres of quartz locations of which 200 are patented and 671 acres of 



142 MINES AND MINEBAIi BESOUBGES. 

timber land; number of veins, two— Monte Cristo and Last Chance; 
free milling ; ore shoot 600 feet long and 2 feet wide ; strike east and 
west ; dip 60^ E. ; walls are slate ; workings consist of seven tunnels from 
100 to 2400 feet in length, the main workings being on the Last 
Chance and Ned Roberts claims; greatest depth on vein, 750 feet; 
over 3000 feet of drifts and several stopes (200 feet by 4 feet by 
200 feet) ; equipment: cars, dwellings, assay oflSce and 10-stamp mill 
and two Wilfley tables, driven by waterpower from Deadwood Creek 
through a 3-mile ditch ; four men employed at present, one on top and 
three in the mine ; five men are leasing from the company; a production 
record of $8,000,000 is claimed. 

Bibl: Report VIII, p. 639; X, p. 713; XII, p, 308; XIII, pp. 
440-441. U. S. G. S. Bull. No. 540, pp. 70-71. 

Buck, in Sec. 14, T. 32 N., R. 9 W., in the Indian Creek mining 
district, 4J miles southeast of Douglas City. Owner, J. W. Phillips. 
Comprises 40 acres ; located in 1890 ; short ore shoot, 6 inches wide, in 
slate ; 210-foot tunnel, 200 feet of drifts and a stope, 40 feet by 3 feet 
by 50 feet ; some high grade near the surface ; ore somewhat rebellious 
as depth is attained ; old 9-foot arrastra. Idle. 

BiUUj Choop, in Sees. 5, 8, 9 and 4, T. 31 N., R. 8 W., in the Indian 
Creek mining district, 16 miles southeast of Douglas City. Owner, 
Bully Choop Gold Mining and Power Company of Atlanta, Georgia, 
J. P. Beck, president. Comprises 588 acres, of which 198 are pat- 
ented. Length of pay shoot, 230 feet; width, 6 feet; strike east and 
west; dip 40° S. ; walls quartz-porphyry; greatest depth, 320 feet; 
workings, several tunnels, longest being 1700 feet, several thousand 
feet of drifts, raises and stopes; ore, free milling, but becomes some- 
what base as depth is attained ; water for power obtained from north 
and south forks of Indian Creek, through a 3-mile ditch. Equip- 
ment: cars, dwellings, sawmill, electrical plant, telephone line (15 miles 
long), and 30-stamp mill driven by water and electrical power; has 
been a producer; some ore reserve in the mine. Idle at present. 
Bibl.: Report VIII, pp. 640-641; XII, p. 308; XIII, p. 441. 

Carrie, in Sec. 5, T. 37 N., R. 12 W., in the New River mining 
district, 3 miles northeast of Denny, in the Trinity Reserve. Owner, 
G. Ferney. Comprises 20 acres at an elevation of 4600 feet; small 
vein, in diabase; 380 feet of tunnels and 300 feet of drifts; ore high 
grade; some rich pockets found; produced $16,000. Worked by lessee. 

Chapman, in Sec. 33, T. 38 N., R. 8 W., in the Trinity Center min- 
ing district, 7 miles northwest of Carrville, in the Shasta Forest 
Reserve. Owner, W. Chapman. Comprises 60 acres, at an elevation of 
3700 feet; ore shoot is 80 feet long and 2 feet wide, in serpentine: 



liDl t - Tfc Tm 



TRINITY COUNTY. 143 

220-foot tunnel, 130-foot drift and 40-foot winze ; 5 J-foot Huntington 
mill, run by both steam and waterpower; 20 h.p. boilers; two men 
employed; some high grade ore; said to have produced $20,000. 

Cleveland, in Sees. 4, 9 and 16, T. 31 N., R. 8 W., in the Indian 
Creek mining district, 15 miles southeast of Douglas City. Owner, 
Cleveland Consolidated Mining Company, of Red Bluff, Cal., R. G. 
Hart, president. Comprises 100 acres, patented, at an elevation of 
5800 feet; 12-mile trail to mine; 300-foot ore shoot, 7 feet wide; low 
grade and base as depth is attained ; greatest depth, 220 feet ; 460-foot 
tunnel and 300 feet of drifts. Idle. Said to have a small production 
record. 

Craig, formerly known as the Mason and Thayer, in Sees. 4, 5, 
32 and 33, T. 34 and 35 N., R. 10 W., in the Canyon Creek mining 
district, 3 miles northeast of Dedrick, in Trinity Reserve. Owner, 
Craig Mining Company, F. M. Craig, president and manager; H. C. 
Stofer, superintendent. Comprises 100 acres, acquired by this com- 
pany in 1911 ; elevation 4200 feet ; length of ore shoot, 400 feet, width 
4 feet ; length driven on vein, 830 feet ; depth on vein, 420 feet ; three 
tunnels, on vein, from 100 to 830 feet in length, with drifts and cross- 
cuts, comprise several hundred feet of development work; walls are 
hornblende schist; strike of vein northwest and southeast; dip 60° 
N. ; equipment consists of cars, dwellings and assay oflSce ; number of 
men employed — ^top, four ; mine, eight ; total twelve ; considerable ton- 
nage of ore blocked out, all free milling ; one of the best properties in 
the district, ranking next to the Globe; excavation made for a 20- 
stamp mill. 

Bibl. : U. S. G. S. Bull. No. 540, p. 78. 

Dixie Queen, in Sees. 14 and 23, T. 32 N., R. 9 W., in the Indian 
Creek mining district, 5 miles southeast of Douglas City. Owners, 
Morris Brothers. Comprises 20 acres, at 2700-foot elevation; small 
vein, high grade and free milling, in slate ; 150-foot tunnel and 100-foot 
drift; two men employed; about $10,000 taken out in pockets. 

Enterprise, in Sees. 4 and 5, T. 35 N., R. 11 W., in the East Fork 
mining district, 7^ 6iiles north of North Fork, in the Trinity Forest 
Reserve. Owner, Enterprise Gold Mining Company, of Boston, Mass., 
Geo. S. Fenwick, secretary; comprises 160 acres, the first claim. Lone 
Jack, being located in 1882, and mine has been operated more or less 
continuously ever since; number of veins, 1; ore free milling and of 
good grade ; length of pay shoots — ^three shoots — ^900, 300 and 300 feet, 
and average width of 14 inches; strike northeast and southwest; dip 
from 10° to 45° NW. ; diorite walls; several tunnels, one being 1400 
feet long; 3000 feet of drifts and crosscuts; three stopes, 500 feet 
by 5 feet by 50 feet, 900 feet by 5 feet by 200 feet, and 300 feet by 5 



144 MINES AND MINERAL RESOURCES. 

feet by 240 feet ; greatest vertical depth, 500 feet ; equipment : cars, 5 
machine drills, Compressor plant, Cameron pump, small electric plant, 
sawmill, assay office, dwellings and small underground winch ; 10-stamp 
mill, run by waterpower, 1 Frue and 1 Woodbury table; number of 
men employed, mine 10, mill 2, total 12; production to date, over 
$350,000; cost over $7 per ton for operating; mine leased to Skinner 
A Day, who milled 1300 tons and saved $20,000 on the plates; con- 
siderable ore blocked out; some of the ore carries tellurium. 

Bibl.: Report VIII, p. 643; X, p. 710; XI, p. 482; XIII, p. 446. 

Eureka, in Sec. 33, T. 35 N., R. 10 W., in the Canyon Creek min- 
ing district, 3 miles south of Dedrick. Owner, Maple Creek Mining 
Company, of Weaverville ; L. E. Smith, president ; P. Flathery, super- 
intendent ; comprises 120 acres ; 200-foot ore shoot, 3 feet wide, between 
schist and porphyry walk; 400-foot tunnel and stope (60 feet by 4 feet 
by 80 feejt) on Gray Eagle Claim; ore worked in arrastra at one time; 
2 men employed, doing assessment work. 

Excelsior, in Sees. 5 and 8, T. 37 N., R. 12 W., in the New River 
mining district, 2^ miles northeast of Denny, in the Trinity Forest 
Reserve. Owners, Harris & Colegrave ; comprises 80 acres, at an eleva- 
tion of 4800 feet ; ore shoot 300 feet long and 18 inches wide ; between 
granite walls, maximum depth 315 feet; strike northwest and south- 
east ; dip N. 50° E. ; two tunnels, one on vein having a length of 700 
feet and the crosscut 240 feet; 1600 feet of drifts, several raises and 
stope (100 feet by 3 feet by 90 feet) ; old 2-stamp mill; said to have 
produced $160,000; only high grade ore worked. Idle. 
Bibl. : Report XIII, p. 446. 

Fair view, in Sec. 3, T. 34 N., R. 8 W., in the Minersville mining 
district, li miles southeast of Minersville, in the Trinity Forest Re- 
serve. Owner, Fairview Mining Company, of San Francisco; Charles 
AUenberg, president; H. Waldo, superintendent; comprises 320 acres, 
of which 160 acres are patented; elevation 3000 feet; strong fissure 
vein, in slate; strike northeast and southwest; dip 40° S. ; ore shoot 
is 500 feet long and 3 feet wide; greatest depth on vein, 450 feet; 
workings consist of 4 tunnels from 150 to 1500 feet in length, all con- 
nected with a raise and 2 stopes (100 feet by 4 feet by 140 feet); 
equipment consists of cars, 1000 feet of automatic tramway, assay 
office, dwellings and 40-stamp mill, driven by waterpower; water ob- 
tained from Stewart Fork, through a ditch five miles long ; production 
$500,000, from 1900 to 1907, and during this time 100 men were em- 
ployed; since 1907 it has been worked by lessees. 
Bibl. : U. S. Geol. Surv. Bull. No. 540, pp. 75-76. 



TRINITY COUNTY. 145 

Five Pines, in Sees. 20 and 29, T. 35 N., B. 8 W., in the Minersville 
mining district, two miles northwest of Minersville, in the Trinity- 
Reserve; owner. Five Pines Mining Company, of Minersville, H. J. Van 
Ness, president ; L. Van Ness, manager ; located in 1896 ; length of ore 
shoot not determined; ore occurs in meta-andesite and slate, and is 
free milling and high grade; workings consist of incline shaft, 225 
feet deep, one level with 90-foot drift and 1 stope (100 feet by 3 feet 
by 60 feet) ; equipment, sinall hoist, cage, dwelling and 2-stamp mill ; 
waterpower used; 4 men employed; production to date, $275,000; 
coarse gold and 80 per cent of the total value recovered in hand mortar 
and pan; rich pockets occur along the water courses; in a vertical 
depth of 44 feet, $45,000 was extracted from one pocket ; other pockets 
run from $10,000 to $15,000; surface ore is honeycombed and stained 
with manganese oxide ; best producer in this district. 
Bibl.: U. S. Geol. Surv. Bull. No. 540, pp. 73-74. 

Forget'Me-Not, in Sees. 8 and 9, T. 37 N., R. 7 W., in the Trinity 
Center mining district, IJ miles northeast of Carrville, in the Shasta 
Reserve. Owner, Carr Estate; comprises 34 acres, at an elevation of 
3500 feet; ore shoot 100 feet long and 2 feet wide, free milling; 
footwall is diorite and hanging-wall quartz-porphyry ; strike N. 40° E., 
dip 20° S.; workings: tunnel 1000 feet long, 400 feet of drifts from 
old shaft (100 feet deep), two stopes 40 feet by 3 feet by 50 feet; 
equipment: cars, dwelling, 50-h.p. boiler, 5-stamp mill driven by 
steam and water power; some high grade ore worked in an arrastra 
years ago; producer at one time; bonded to Adams Exploration Com- 
pany. Idle at present. 

Bibl.: Keport XIII, p. 446. 

Fountmn Head, in Sec. 4, T. 34 N., R. 11 W., in the North Fork 
mining district, 5 miles north of North Fork. Owner, R. EUson; com- 
prises 40 acres, reached by trail from North Fork; short ore shoot in 
slate; ore free milling and high grade; 460-foot tunnel, drifts and 
stope; old 5-stamp mill, steam driven (idle); said to have produced 
over $50,000; ore reserve worked out; idle at present. 
Bibl. : Report XIII, p. 447. 

Four Point, in Sec. 32, T. 35 N., R. 10 W., in the Canyon Creek 
mining district, 3 miles north of Dedrick, in the Trinity Reserve. 
Owner, H. C. Stof er et al. ; comprises 40 acres, located in 1894 ; 150-foot 
tunnel, all in ore, 15 inches wide; hornblende schist and quartz- 
Porphyry walls; building a 12-foot arrastra to be operated by water 
from Chloride Gulch; three owners working. 

Globe, in Sees. 15, 16 and 21, T. 35 N., R. 10 W., in the Canyon 
Greek mining district, 4 miles north of Dedrick, in the Trinity Reserve. 



146 



MINES AND MINERAL RESOURCES. 



Owner, Globe Consolidated Mining Company, a Canadian corporation; 
J. B. Goodyear, president; T. M. Craig, secretary; W. Macgreagor, 
superintendent; comprises 200 acres, acquired in 1910, and includes 
the old Bailey, Chloride and Globe groups ; elevation, 6100 feet ; length 
of ore shoot, 600 feet ; width 6 feet ; strike northeast and southwest ; dip 
60° E.; walls, hornblende schist; number of veins, 4: Chloride, Bailey, 




Photo No. 2. Globe Mine; 20-stamp mill. 

Globe and Boyd; free milling ore; length driven on vein, 1700 feet; 
greatest depth on vein, 620 feet ; 6 tunnels in all, from 250 to 1700 
feet long; several thousand feet of tunnels, crosscuts, drifts ^^^ 
stopes ; one stope is 200 feet by 6 feet by 40 feet (filled with waste) ; 
large tonnage blocked out in mine; mine equipment: cars, compressor 
plant, electrical plant, sawmill, dwellings, assay office, executive offices; 



TRINITY COUNTY. 147 

reduction equipment: 20-stamp mill just completed (direct cyaniding), 
100-ton cyanide plant, tubemill, 5600-foot automatic-gravity tramway 
from mine to the mill, 500-ton bins; water power used from Canyon 
Creek; plant complete cost over $300,000; number men employed: 
top 85, mine 25, total 110; property said to have produced $700,000 
before acquired by this company. (See photos Nos. 2 and 3.) 

Bibl.: Reports X, p. 711; XI, p. 483; XII, pp. 309, 310; XIII, 
p. 447; U. S. Geol. Surv. Bull. No. 540, pp. 76-78. 




Photo No. 3. Globe Mine; section of flume. 

Golden Chest, in Sec. 9, T. 35 N., R. 11 W., in the East Fork min- 
ing district, 13 miles northeast of North Fork, by trail, in Trinity 
Reserve. Owners, Boyce et al. ; comprises 40 acres, at an elevation of 
3300 feet; ore shoot, 300 feet long and 2 feet wide; fissure vein, with 
slate walls; strike east and west; dip 40° S. ; 490-foot tunnel, several 
hundred feet of drifts and stopes; only worked to a shallow depth, 
150 feet; free milling ore of good grade; equipment: cars, dwellings, 
5-stamp mill (old 750-pound stamps), and 4 concentrators; idle for 
several years ; some rich ore worked at one time and property said 
to have produced $200,000. 

Bibl. : Reports X, p. 711 ; XIII, p. 447. 

Golden Jubilee, in Sec. 10, T. 37 N., R. 8 W., in the Trinity Center 
mining district, 8 miles southwest of Carrville, in the Shasta Reserve. 
Owner, Coffee Creek Mining and Milling Company, of Redding ; R. M. 
Saeltzer, president ; J. Boedecker, superintendent ; comprises 150 acres, 
patented; elevation, 3200 feet; length of ore shoot, 140 feet; width, 
2J feet; strike northeast and southwest; dip 40° E. ; footwall slate. 



148 MINES AND MINERAL BESOUBCES. 

and hanging- wall diorite; workings consist of tunnel 750 feet long, 
several hundred feet of drifts, raises and stopes; equipment: cars, 
dwellings, blower and pipe, assay office, and 10-stamp mill driven 
by steam and water power (idle) ; 50-h.p. boiler; 5 men employed in 
mine; some high grade ore extracted; paid some dividends; said to 
have produced $250,000. 

Hardtack, in Sec. 6, T. 37 N., R. 12 W., in the New River mining 
district, 1 mile north of Denny, in the Trinity Reserve. Owner, T. J. 
Ladd; comprises 40 acres, located in 1889; elevation 4700 feet; ore 
shoot 80 feet long and 18 inches wide, in quartz-porphyry; 320-foot 
tunnel; little high grade ore extracted; only do assessment work. 
Bibl. : Report XIII, p. 448. 

Hard Times, in Sec. 6, T. 37 N., R. 12 W., in the New River mining 
district, 3 miles north of Denny, in the Trinity Reserve. Owner, E. C. 
Xniler; comprises 60 acres, at an elevation of 4400 feet; ore shoot 
100 feet long and 2 feet wide in diabase ; 210-foot tunnel and 400 feet 
of drifts; some rich ore extracted; said to have produced $20,000; 
worked at times by lessees. Idle. 
Bibl.: Report XIII, p. 448. 

Hay Fork Mining and Milling Company, in T. 31 N., R. 11 W. 
about 3^ miles southeast of Hay Fork. Owner, Dr. Mueller et al. 
of Redding ; comprises 100 acres, at an elevation of 3400 feet ; 2 veins 
in schist; short ore shoot; 3 tunnels, from 60 to 230 feet in length 
little high grade extracted. Idle. 

Headlight, in Sees. 20 and 21, T. 37 N., R. 7 W., li miles south 
east of Carrville, has the largest reduction plant in Trinity County. 
It is owned by the Trinity Gold Mining and Reduction Company, of 
New York; H. W. Miller, president; J. H. Lee, secretary; D. W. 
Shanks, general manager; D. Goodale, superintendent; comprises 423 
acres, of which 320 acres are patented ; in the Shasta Reserve ; elevation, 
3500 feet; ore shoot, 600 feet long and 35 feet wide, with several 
deposits, also; strike east and west; dip 22° N. ; footwall, andesite, 
and hanging-wall, slate; maximum depth, 200 feet; workings consist 
of several tunnels, one being 350 feet long, open cuts, raises and drifts, 
comprising several thousand feet of development work; ore free near 
the surface, but base with depth, containing iron and copper sulphides 
(see map-drawing ''C') ; company claims 300,000 tons at value of 
$6 per ton, as an ore reserve; mine equipment: cars, tools, 2 giants 
and pipe, shops, 700 h.p. electrical plant, with 2 miles of power 
line, assay office, sawmill, and dwellings; reduction equipment: 
40-stamp Hendy mill, electrically driven, and 250-ton cyanide plant, 
constructed in 1910, and idle at present, as values can not be saved 



TRINITY COUNTY. 



149 



and experiments have been made so far without success; 8 men are 
employed; production to date, $500,000, in two years; ore runs from 
$6 to $8 per ton; total operating cost per ton, from $2.10 to $2.40; 
electric plant is on Coffee Creek; one of the best equipped quartz 
mines in the county. 

Bibl. : Report XIII, p. 449. 




•■•(crioM* >—*<>. a* vKi.M.i» .«•• ^ HEAfiUCMTMiNC - 

Headlight Mine, Trinity County, California. 



Hunter, in the New River mining district, 40 miles by trail from 
Helena, in Trinity Reserve. Owner, J. P. Hennessy ; comprises 120 
acres, located in 1888; elevation 4500 feet; extent of ore shoot not 
determined; can be traced for 400 feet on the surface; workings con- 
sist of 500-foot crosscut tunnel and 600 feet of drifts, 1 stope and 
60 and 80 foot raises; equipment : cars, dwellings, 10-stamp mill (850 lb. 
stamps), one Frue vanner run by steam power; vein is spotted, with 
high grade found at times; idle since June, 1912; 9 men employed 
when in operation; small producer. 
Bibl. : Report XIII, p. 450. 

Isabel, in Sec. 32, T. 35 N., R. 10 W., in the Canyon Creek mining 
district, 2^ miles north of Dedrick, in the Trinity Reserve. Owner, 
T. E. Martin ; comprises 60 acres ; short ore shoot in granite ; 210 and 
90 foot tunnels; said to have produced some high grade ore. Idle. 

Jacoby, T. 33 N., R. 9 W., about 6 miles northeast of Lewiston, on 
Eastman Gulch. Owners, Goodyear & Richards; comprises 80 acres. 



150 MINES AND MINERAL RESOURCES. 

located years ago; ore shoot is 100 feet long and 14 inches wide, free 
milling and good grade; footwall is slate and hanging-wall quartz- 
porphyry; strike northwest and southeast; dip 15° S.; workings 
consist of 550-foot tunnel, 400 feet of drifts, and 1 stope, 60 feet by 
3 feet by 90 feet; greatest depth on vein is 200 feet; equipment 
consists of cars, dwelling and 2-stamp Hendy mill (1000-lb. stamps), 
driven by waterpower from Eastman Gulch through a ditch f mile 
long ; best ore in pockets and worked for high grade ; a production of 
$50,000 is claimed ; leased to Paulson Brothers ; idle at present. 

Jerusalem, in Sec. 9, T. 31 N., R. 8 W., in the Indian Creek mining 
district, 10 miles west of Ono, by trail. Owner J. T. Lockhard ; com- 
prises 80 acres; ore shoot is 200 feet long and 2 feet wide; 560-foot 
tunnel and 300 feet of drifts; some rich ore extracted at one time; 
idle for several years. 

Bibl. : Report XIII, p. 450. 

Lapman, in Sec. 12, T. 33 N., R. 8 W., in the Deadwood mining 
district, f mile north of Deadwood. Owner, Calumet-Michigan Min- 
ing Company, of Detroit; comprises 60 acres, on Thorne Gulch; ore 
shoot is 100 feet long and 10 inches wide; slate footwall, and quartz- 
prophyry hanging- wall ; 3 tunnels on vein from 50 to 450 feet long and 
300 feet of drifts; little high grade ore extracted; being worked by 
George Bacon, on a lease, who is prospecting for ''high grade." 

Last Chance, in T. 33 N., R. 8 W., in the Lewiston mining district, 
5 miles northeast of Lewiston. Owners, Newland & Dean. Comprises 
60 acres on Eastman Gulch; small vein, high grade, in slate; 220-foot 
tunnel, 250 feet of drifts, and 1 stope; equipment consists of cars and 
dwellings; worked for ''pockets"; claim a production of $20,000. Idle 
at present. 

Laurel, in Sec. 14, T. 32 N., R. 9 W., in the Indian Creek mining 
district, 4 miles southeast of Douglas City. Owner, C. E. Connor. 
Comprises 20 acres; located in 1893; small vein; worked for pockets; 
rich bunch taken out near surface ; 180-foot tunnel. Idle. 

Layman, formerly known as Horseshoe, in Sec. 33, T. 32 N., 
R. 11 W., in the Hay Pork mining district, 2 miles north of Hay Fork. 
Owner, Estate of J. B. Layman. Comprises 120 acres, at an elevation 
of 2900 feet ; 2 parallel veins, about 400 feet apart ; short ore shoot in 
schist ; 3 tunnels, 280, 85 and 60 feet in length ; little high grade found. 
Idle. 

Maple, in Sec. 1, T. 34 N., R. 11 W., 4 miles south of Dedrick, in 
the Canyon Creek mining district, in Trinity Reserve. Owner, T. E. 
Reed. Comprises 20 acres; located in 1894; 100-foot ore shoot, 12 
inches wide, between slate and granodiorite walls; 230-foot tunnel, 
sind 1 stope (30 feet by 3 feet by 40 feet) ; 12-foot arrastra, run by 



TRINITY COUNTY. 151 

15-foot overshot wheel, water being obtained from Canyon Creek 
through 1 mile ditch; worked as a pocket mine and about $10,000 
produced. Owner does only assessment work. 
Bibl: Report XII, p. 312; XIII, p. 454. 

Modoc, in Sec. 31, T. 9 N., R. 7 E., in the New River mining dis- 
trict, i mile north of Coeur, in the Trinity Reserve. Owner, G. W. 
Healey. Comprises 20 acres ; located in 1889 ; ore shoot, 130 feet long 
and 14 inches wide, free milling and good grade; walls are diabase 
foot and granitic-porphyry hanging; strike is N. 30° W. ; dip 50° 
S.; workings, 480 and 160-foot tunnels, 600 feet of drifts and 
stope (80 feet by 3 feet by 60 feet); equipment: dwelling and old 
1-stamp mill (650-pound stamp), driven by waterpower from Eagle 
Creek through 1-mile ditch; some high grade ore worked, all free 
milling ; said to have produced $20,000. Idle. 

Mountain Boomer is the best producer in the New River mining 
district, but is very expensive to operate as supplies must be packed 
over a trail either from Hawkins Bar or North Fork, a distance of 
40 miles from the latter town. It is located in Sec. 5, T. 37 N., 
R. 12 W., in the Trinity Reserve, at an elevation of 5000 feet. Owner, 
Bobs Farm Mining Company, of Sacramento ; J. H. Byers, president ; 
W. H. Montgomery, secretary. Comprises 100 acres; located in 1883; 
length of ore shoot 260 feet and width 2 feet ; walls are hanging, dia- 
base; foot, quartz-porphyry; strike east and west; dip 45° N. ; 
maximum depth 700 feet; workings consist of several tunnels, longest 
being 1300 feet; 6 levels from 60 to 700 feet long, 2 crosscut tunnels 
300 and 600 feet in length, several raises, winzes and stopes (60 feet 
by 3 feet by 120 feet), all comprising several thousand feet of develop- 
ment work; equipment: cars, dwellings, sawmill, assay office, and 3- 
stamp mill and one 3-foot Huntington, run by steam and waterpower ; 
tailings impounded in brush dam ; number of men employed — ^mine 10, 
mill 2, total 12; said to have produced $350,000; lessees are working 
the old dump running the ore through the two mills. 
Bibl.: Report X, p. 715. 

Nonpareil, in Sec. 9, T. 37 N., R. 7 W., in the Trinity Center 
mining district, 2 miles northeast of Carrville, in the Shasta Forest 
Reserve. Owners, Strode Brothers. Comprises 40 acres; 2 parallel 
veins; ore shoot 110 feet long and 2 feet wide; strike N. 40° E.; 
dip 40° E. ; workings, tunnel on vein 420 feet long, 150 feet of drifts 
and 30-foot winze; ore free milling and some high grade found; said 
to have produced $20,000. Idle at present. 

North Star, in Sec. 32, T. 35 N., R. 11 W., in the East Fork 
mining district, 8 miles north of North Fork, in the Trinity Reserve. 



152 MINES AND MINERAL RESOURCES. 

Owner, North Star Mining Company. Comprises' 160 acres; located 
in lh84; 8 wins in all, being an extension of the Enterprise lode; 
strike northwest and southeast; dip S. 30° W. ; length of ore shoot 
300 feet, width 4 feet; free milling ore; walls are quartz-por- 
phyry; 950-foot tunnel, drifts and stopes comprise several hundred 
f(H»t of development work; greatest depth 400 feet; equipment: dwell- 
injrs, 10-stamp mill driven by waterpower from east fork of North 
Fork of Trinity River through 1-mile ditch; ore bins, assay office; 
said to have produced $200,000. Idle at present. 
Bibl. : Report XIII, p. 458. 

Oriole, in Sec. 22, T. 32 N., R. 9 W., in the Indian Creek mining 
district, 4 miles southeast of Douglas City. Owner, A. L. Paulson. 
Comprises 40 acres; located in 1894; short ore shoot 1-foot wide, in 
slate; free milling; 140-foot tunnel and 80 feet of drifts; one stope, 
40 feet by 3 feet by 40 feet; rotary mill, 5-foot bed (Cannon Ball 
mill), run by waterpower from Indian Creek; worked as a pocket 
mine; small producer. Idle at present. 

Oro Grande, in Sees. 8 and 9, T. 37 N., R. 7 W., in the Trinity 
Center mining district, 2^ miles northeast of Carrville, in the Shasta 
Reserve. Ow^ners, Strode Brothers. Comprises 50 acres; located in 
1888; elevation 2600 feet; ore shoot 120 feet long and 3 feet wide, 
free milling; footw^all is andesite and hanging-wall is quartz-prophyry ; 
strike north wx\st and southeast; dip 40° NE. ; maximum depth 
400 feet; workings, 2600-foot tunnel, 600 feet of drifts, raises and 
stope (40 feet by 2^ feet by 80 feet) ; equipment: cars, 3-drill com- 
pressor plant, air blower, dwellings, 5-stamp mill (650-pound stamps), 
run by waterpower from Hosteller Gulch through 1 mile ditch; 2 
men employed ; some rich ore produced ; pocket taken out in 1912. 
Bibl. : Report XIII, pp. 458, 459. 

Ozarli, in Sees. 4 and 9, T. 34 N., R. 11 W., in the North Fork 
mining district, 5 miles north of North Fork. Owner, D. G. Reid. 
Comprises 40 acres. Short ore shoots 2 feet wide in slate ; free milling 
and high grade; tunnel, 420 feet long, 500 feet of drifts and 1 stope 
(40 feet by 3 feet by 60 feet); old 10-foot arrastra; about $60,000 
produced, mostly from pockets. Idle. 
Bibl. : Report XIII, p. 459. 

Quimby, in Sec. 22, T. 7 N., R. 13 W., in the New River mining 
district, \ mile north of Quimby, in the Trinity Forest Reserve. Owner, 
Larson Brothers. Comprises 160 acres, located in 1902; elevation, 2260 
feet; tunnel 150 feet on the vein, all in ore; 2 crosscut tunnels, upper 
125 and lower 400 feet long with a 122-foot raise between them; 150 
feet of drifts; equipment: cars, dwellings, 6-stamp Merrill mill, and 



TRINITY COUNTY. 153 

1 Huntington and 1 table similar to Wilfley, run by waterpower using 
3 Pelton wheels ; ditch 1^ miles long from Quimby Creek. Ore is base 
to some extent, carrying copper and arsenic, so that only a 50% 
extraction is obtained by direct amalgamation. Two men employed. 
Small producer. 

Ralston, in Sec. 32, T. 35 N., R. 10 W., in Canyon Creek mining 
district, 2 miles northeast of Dedrick, in Trinity Forest Reserve. 
Owner, Trinity County Bank. Comprises 40 acres ; ore shoot 200 feet 
long in granite and 2 feet wide; 4 tunnels from 50 to 385 feet in 
length on the vein; 1 stope (60 feet by 3 feet by 80 feet) ; 2-stamp mill 
driven by waterpower and steam. Production to date about $40,000. 
Two lessees working in main tunnel. Some high grade found. 

Ray, in Sec. 12, T. 33 N., R. 8 W., in the Deadwood mining dis- 
trict, 1 mile west of Deadwood. Owners, Danners & HoUensworth. 
Comprises 80 acres, on Donnelly Gulch ; small vein in diabase ; worked 
for pockets ; small producer at one time ; 280-foot tunnel ; 200 feet of 
drifts. Idle. 

Bibl. : Report XIII, p. 460. 

Reindeer, in Sec. 3, T. 37 N., R. 8 W., in the Trinity Center 
mining district, 5 miles north of Carrville, in the Shasta Reserve. 
Owner, Wagner Mining Company of Berkeley, Cal. ; C. E. Wagner, 
president. Comprises 60 acres, at an elevation of 2900 feet ; short ore- 
shoot in granite, 18 inches wide; tunnel 340 feet long and 200 feet of 
drifts. Two men employed. Ore free milling and of good grade. 
Bibl.: Report XIII, p. 461. 

Ridgeway, in Sees. 6 and 31, T. 37 and 38 N., R. 12 W., in the 
New River mining district, IJ miles north of Denny, in the Trinity 
Reserve. Owner, Ridgeway Mining Company, of Weaverville; J. T. 
Jones, president. Comprises 80 acres, at an elevation of 4700 feet; 
ore-shoot 200 feet long and 1 foot wide; diabase walls, free milling; 
workings consist of 1000-foot tunnel, 400 feet of drifts, stopes (60 feet 
by 3 feet by 100 feet), and old incline shaft 200 feet deep (caved) ; 
maximum depth on vein, 400 feet; equipment consists of two 30 h.p. 
boilers, dwellings and old 10-stamp mill (750-pound stamps), run 
by steam power. Said to have produced $80,000. Worked by lessees at 
one time. All ore removed. Idle. 
Bibl. : Report XIII, p. 461. 

Silver Grey, in Sec. 33, T. 35 N., R. 10 W., in the Canyon Creek 
mining district, 2 miles northeast of Dedrick, in the Trinity Forest 
Reserve. Owner, R. L. Carter et al. Comprises 40 acres; ore shoot 
70 feet long and 15 inches wide; 380-foot tunnel and 120-foot drift 
and 1 stope (60 feet by 3 feet by 50 feet) ; 5-foot Huntington mill driven 



154 MINES AND MINEBAL RESOURCES. 

by waterpower; 1-mile ditch from east fork of Canyon Creek. Same 
high grade extracted. Production to date about $25,000. Two lessees 
working property at present. 

Smith, in Sees. 30, 31 and 19, T. 36 N., R. 9 W., in the Weaver- 
ville mining district, 4 miles south of Weaverville. Owners, Paulson 
& Blake. Comprises 274 acres, at an elevation of 3900 feet; short ore 
Rh(X)t 2 feet wide; in granodiorite ; 310-foot tunnel. Small pocket 
taken out on the surface. Idle. Only do assessment work. Vein not 
in place and greatest depth (70 feet) has not passed through the zone 
of disturbance. 

Star of the East, in Sec. 13, T. 33 N., R. 8 W., in the Deadwood 
mining district, 1^ miles south of Deadwood. Owner, M. Brady. Com- 
prises 20 acres, patented. Small vein in quartz-porphyry; some high 
grade extracted; 310-foot tunnel and several hundred feet of drifts. 
Idle. 

Supplanter, located in Sec. 23, T. 7 N., R. 13 W., in the New 
River mining district, 2 miles north of Quimby. Elevation 2600 feet. 
Owners, J. and Q. Foutes. Small stringers of high grade ore on the 
surface. Ore base with depth. Development work consists of several 
tunnels, 1200 feet of drifts, and a stope; 3-stamp mill and 1500 foot 
tramway from mine to mill. Worked during the winter. Small pro- 
ducer. 

Toughnut, in Sec. 6, T. 37 N., R. 12 W., in the New River mining 
district, 2 miles north of Denny in the Trinity Reserve. Owner, F. 
Ladd. Comprises 20 acres, located in 1890 ; ore shoot 100 feet long and 

2 feet wide; diabase foot and quartz-porphyry hanging- walls ; 260-foot 
tunnel. Little high grade ore found. Idle. 

Bibl. : Report XIII, p. 464. 

Triangle, in Sec. 11, T. 33 N., R. 8 W., in the Deadwood mining 
district, 1 mile west of Deadwood. Owner, J. Hollingsworth. Com- 
prises 40 acres, at an elevation of 3600 feet. Small vein in slate; 290- 
foot timnel, 300 feet of drifts, and 1 stope (40 feet by 3 feet by 
60 feet) ; said to have produced $15,000. Some high grade ore ex- 
tracted. Idle. 

Trinity Bonanza King, formerly known as Bonanza King Consoli- 
dated, in Sec. 14, T. 37 N., R. 7 W., in the Trinity Center mining 
district, 9 miles northeast of Trinity Center, in the Shasta Forest Re- 
serve. Owner, Foster Gold Mining Company, of San Francisco. C. 6. 
Foster, president. Comprises 130 acres, located in 1886. Elevation 
6100 feet; extent of ore shoot not determined; formation, slate and 
quartz-porphyry; 1000-foot tunnel, drifts and stopes (100 feet by 

3 feet by 70 feet). Equipment: cars, 3500- foot automatic tramway, 



TRINITY COUNTY. 



155 



assay oflRce, dwellings, electric plant and 20-stamp mill (electrically 
driven). Idle. Producer at one time. Some rich ore milled. Four 
men employed in extending lower tunnel. (See photos Nos. 4 and 5.) 
Bibl. : Report XIII, p. 440. 




Photo No. 4. Trinity Bonanza King Mine. Interior view, 20-8tamp mill. 




Photo No. 5. Trinity Bonanza King Mine. Automatic tram. 
11— C14456 



156 MINES AND MINERAL RESOURCES. 

Truf Blue, in Sec. 21, T. 37 N., R. 7 W., in the Trinity Center min- 
ing district, 1 mile southeast of Carrville, in the Shasta Forest Reserve. 
Owner, George LaBlanc; comprises 9 acres, located in 1892; elevation 
.'}7(M) feet ; ore shoot 80 feet long and 12 inches wide, free milling; slate 
foot and diorite hangin?- walls; 300-foot tunnel; small pocket taken out 
in 1911; owner doing assessment work. 

Tme Fissure, in Sec. 15, T. 35 N., R. 10 W., in the Canyon Creek 
mining district, 2 miles north of Dedrick, in the Trinity Forest Reserve 
Owner, Bank of Tehama; comprises 40 acres, patented; ore shoot, 250 
feet long and 4 feet wide, between schist and granite walls: 2 tunnels, 
460 and 120 feet long on the vein, and 600 feet of drifts, and 1 stope; 
said to have produced $30,000; being worked by two lessees; strong 
well-defined ledge on the surface ; good prospect. 

Uncle Sam, in Sees. 32 and 5, T. 9 and 8 N., R. 8 E., in the New 
River mining district, ^ mile north of Coeur, in the Trinity Reserve. 
Owner, J. CuUich; comprises 80 acres; ore shoot, 110 feet long and 10 
inches wide, free milling and high grade, between diabase walls; strike 
of vein, N. 40^ \V.; dip, vertical; 310-foot tunnel, 200-foot shaft, 
2 levels with 600 feet of drifts, raises and stope (80 feet by 3 feet by 120 
feet); equipment; two 30 h.p. boilers, dwellings, and old 5-stamp 
mill driven by steam power; said to have produced $60,000; idle at 
I)resent. 

Bibl. : Report XIII, p. 465. 

Voiicia, in T. 33 N., R. 9 W., in the Lewiston mining district, about 
G inil(»s northeast of Lewiston. Owners, Roberts, Fisher & Peterson; 
comprises 60 acres, on Eastman Gulch; ore shoot is 250 feet long and 
2 fe(»t wide, free millino:, between slate walls; strike, northwest and 
southeast; dip 10° S.; workings consist of 3 tunnels, from 100 to 750 
feet in length, each 100 feet apart, 500 feet of drifts and a stope, 100 
feet by 3 feet by 200 feet ; greatest depth is 200 feet ; equipment consists 
of ears, dw^ellings, and 5-stamp Hendy mill (1000-pound stamps) driven 
by w^aterpower from Eastman Gulch, through a ditch 1^ miles long; 
2 men employed in the mine; the best ore has been worked; claim a 
production of $500,000; been worked since 1886; custom ore treated in 
this mill at present. 

White Cloud Pocket, in Sec. 5, T. 34 N., R. 8 W., in the Lewiston 
mining district, 2 miles north of Lew^iston. Owner, J. W. Phillips; 
comprises 40 acres, patented ; small vein, in quartz-porphyry ; 200-foot 
tunnel and 250 feet of drifts; worked for pockets; $2500 pocket ex- 
tracted in 1912 ; idle at present. 

Yellow Astor, in Sees. 29 and 21, T. 35 N., R. 11 W., in the East 
Fork mining district, 9 miles northeast of East Fork. Owner, East 
Fork Development and Mining Company, of Boulder Creek, Cal. ; W. S. 



TRINITY COUNTY. 157 

G. Todd, president and manager ; Q. H. Aram, secretary ; comprises 40 
acres, located in 1905 ; 2 tminels, 135 and 170 feet, also 45-foot shaft, all 
in ore ; free milling and good grade ; walls are dolomite and hornblende 
schist; fissure vein; some ore blocked out; closed down during the 
winter. 

GOLD PLACERS— HYDRAULIC. 

Bald Point, in Sec. 33, T. 33 N., R. 9 W., in the Lewiston mining 
district, 4 miles southwest of Lewiston. Owner, P. M. Paulsen; com- 
prises 120 acres, patented, on the Trinity River; depth of gravel 20 
feet; slate bedrock; water from Grass Valley Creek through a ditch 
12 miles long; idle for several years; rich diggings worked in early 
days. 

Bibl. : Report XII, p. 313; XIII, p. 459. 

Bartel Jacobs, formerly known as Red Hill, in Sees. 1, 2, 34, 35 
and 36, T. 33 and 34 N., R. 11 W., in the Junction City mining 
district, 1 mile north of Junction City. Owners, H. and J. Jacobs; 
comprises 390 acres, of which 249 acres are patented ; slate bedrock ; 30 
feet of gravel ; water from Connor Creek through a ditch 3 miles long ; 
equipment: 2 giants, 1500 feet of pipe, dwelling; yearly produc- 
tion about $4000; only short season due to litigation over water 
rights; famous property and said to have a large production record; 
only 25 acres have been worked, with large area still remaining. 

Bates and Van Matre, in Sec. 33, T. 34 N., R. 8 W., in the Lewis- 
ton mining district, 4 miles north of Lewiston. Owner, Chinese Com- 
pany, of San Francisco; comprises 20 acres, patented, on the Trinity 
River; diorite bedrock; depth of gravel, 20 feet; water from Mooney 
Gulch through a ditch 2 miles long; equipment, giant, 1000 feet of 
pipe, dwelling; idle since 1911; has been a good producer. 
Bibl. : Report XIII, p. 438. 

Beaudry, formerly known as Greenhorn Gulch, in Sees. 28, 29, 20, 
32, 33, 5, 6, 7, 8 and 9, T. 35 N., R. 8 W., in the Minersville mining 
district, 4 miles north of Minersville, in the Trinity Reserve. Owner, 
L. E. Whipple, of Cleveland, Ohio; E. M. Gleason, watchman; comprises 
600 acres, on east fork of Stewart's Fork; diorite bedrock; 20 to 60 feet 
of gravel; water from east fork of Stewart's Fork through a ditch 5 
miles long; capacity, 2550 inches; equipment, 3 giants, 3000 feet of 
pipe, dwelling; watchman on property; idle since 1910 due to litigation, 
only assessment work being done ; good ground, and good producer at 
one time. 

Big Creek, in Sees. 7 and 8, T. 31 N., R. 11 W., in the Hay Fork 
mining district, 1 mile east of Hay Fork, in Trinity Reserve. Owner, 
Big Creek Placer Mining Company, of Oakland, Cal. ; A. E. Dawson, 



158 MINES AND MINERAL RESOURCES. 

president ; J. A. Healewood, huperintendent ; comprises 58 acres, on Big 
Creek; slate bedrock; depth of gravel 40 feet; water from Big Creek 
and Hay Pork River, through 2 ditches, each 2 miles long; capacity, 
600 inches; 2 giants, 1500 feet of pipe; dwelling; only worked on a 
small scale, due to lack of water. 

Big E<isi Fork, formerly known as Oswald, in Sees. 30 and 31, 
T. 35 N., R. 10 W., in the Canyon Creek mining district, 1 mile south 
of Dedrick. Owner, A. Dannenbrink; comprises 40 acres, patented, 
on east fork of Canyon Creek ; slate bedrock ; 20 feet of gravel ; equip- 
ment: 3 giants, 1800 feet of pipe, dwelling; 2 miles of ditch; 3 men 
employed at present making repairs; coarse gold; small amount of 
platinum found ; good producer. 

Bloss and McClury, in Sec. 5, T. 36 N., R. 7 W., in the Trinity 
Center mining district, ^ mile west of Trinity Center, in the Shasta 
Reserve. Owner, Sykes Mining Company, of Redding; L. McDonald, 
president; C. E. McDonald, secretary; comprises 136 acres, patented; 
elevation 2400 feet; bedrock, slate; depth of gravel 15 to 75 feet; 
water from Swift Creek through ditch 4^ miles long; capacity 3500 
inches ; head 300 feet ; equipment : 3 giants, 2000 feet of pipe, and sluice 
boxes; 12 men employed when operating; rich benches; worked since 
the seventies and a good producer; under option to Alta Bert Dredging 
Company. 

Bibl: Report X, pp. 699-700; XII, p. 307; XIII, p. 439. 

Blue Gravel, in Sec. 1, T. 31 N., R. 11 W., in the Hay Pork mining 
district, ^ mile east of Hay Fork, in the Trinity Reserve. Owner, 
D. E. Shack; comprises 40 acres, on Hay Fork Creek; slate bedrock; 
depth of gravel, 20 feet; water from Hay Fork River through a ditch 
1 mile long ; equipment : giant, 1000 feet of pipe, dwelling ; small pro- 
ducer ; idle on account of lack of water. 

Blue Lead, in Sees. 6, 31 and 36, T. 33 and 34 N., R. 9 and 10 W., 
in the Weaverville mining district, 1^ miles north of Weaverville. 
Owner, T. I. Woodbury; comprises 160 acres; slate bedrock; depth 
of gravel, 60 feet; water from Garden Gulch through a ditch IJ 
miles long; capacity 600 inches; equipment, 1 giant, 800 feet of pipe; 
idle ; good producer at one time. 

Bower & Matlock, in T. 31 N., R. 11 W., in the Hay Fork mining 
district, about 3J miles southeast of Hay Fork, in the Trinity Forest 
Reserve. Owners, Bower & Matlock, of Red Bluff, Cal. ; comprises 120 
acres on east fork of Hay Fork; schist bedrock; depth of gravel, 25 
feet; water from east fork of Hay Fork through a ditch 1 mile long; 
equipment: 2 giants, 1100 feet of pipe, dwelling; 2 men employed 
making repairs; short season due to lack of water; some good ground; 
small producer; 40 acres located as quartz claims. 



TRINITY COUNTY. 159 

Browii's Bar, formerly known as Hackerman Bar, in T. 7 N., R. 7 W., 
in the New River mining district, near Denny. Owner, Brackett and 
James Estate; comprises 140 acres; elevation 1950 feet; diabase bed- 
rock ; depth of gravel, 15 feet ; water from Longtail Creek ; equipment : 
giant, 900 feet of pipe, sawmill and dwelling; 2 men employed; small 
water supply, so only a few days ' run each winter ; gold coarse ; worth 
$18 per ounce. 

Burger, in Sees. 12 and 13, T. 34 N., R. 11 W., in the Junction 
City mining district, i mile west of Junction City. Owner, J. A. 
Burger; comprises 26 acres, of which 11 acres are patented; shale 
bedrock; depth of gravel, 30 feet; water from Gwin Gulch through 
Eagle and Empire ditch, 3 miles in length ; capacity, 600 inches ; head 
120 feet; equipment: 1 giant and 1000 feet of pipe; good producer 
at one time. Idle. 

Cdcy, in Sees. 26 and 27, T. 32 N., R. 9 W., in the Indian Creek 
mining district, 5^ miles southeast of Douglas City. Owner, Indian 
Creek Placer Mining Company, of Weaverville ; president and manager, 
H. M. Hall; comprises 65 acres, patented, on Indian Creek; slate 
bedrock; depth of gravel, 40 feet; water from Slate Creek through a 
ditch 1 mile long; idle at present; some good ground worked. 

Cement and Mule Creek, formerly known as Mule Creek, in Sees. 
30, 31 and 32, T. 35 N., R. 8 W., in the Minersville mining district, 
1^ miles north of Minersville in the Trinity Forest Reserve. Owner, 
J. Skewis ; comprises 150 acres, patented, slate bedrock ; depth of gravel, 
30 feet ; water from Mule Creek through a ditch 1 mile long ; capacity, 
1000 inches; equipment: 2 giants, 1000 feet of pipe, dwelling; idle 
since 1911; 10 acres worked and over $200,000 produced. 

Chapman & Fisher, formerly known as Gribble, in Sees. 18, 19, 
29 and 30, T. 33 N., R. 10 W., in the Junction City mining district, 
2 miles south of Junction City. Owners, Chapman & Fisher; com- 
prises 213 acres, patented, on Trinity River; bedrock, diorite and 
slate ; depth of gravel, 30 feet ; water from Gribble and Oregon gulches, 
through a ditch 3 miles long ; capacity, 600 inches ; equipment : 2 giants, 
1500 feet of pipe ; dwellings ; one of the best producers in this district ; 
little platinum found, the amount decreasing last few years; worked 
during the winter months. 

Bibl..: Reports X, p. 708; XIII, p. 442. 

Clover, in Sec. 12, T. 37 N., R. 8 W., in the Trinity mining dis- 
trict, 1^ miles northwest of Carrville, in the Shasta Forest Reserve. 
Owner, A. M. Daly; comprises 106 acres; slate, bedrock; 25 feet of 
gravel; water from Coffee Creek through ^ mile of flume; 2 giants 
and 600 feet of pipe ; produced about $200,000. Idle. 



160 MINES AND MINERAL RESOURCES. 

Corona de Oro, formerly known as the Upton, in the Lower Trinity 
mining district, in the Trinity Eeserve. Nearest town is China Flat. 
Owner, Corona de Oro Mining Company, of Eureka, Humboldt County, 
Cal. ; W. E. Olmstead, president; W. Taylor, secretary; slate bedrock; 
said to comprise 400 acres ; water from Cedar and Hawkins Bar creeks, 
through a ditch 3^ miles long; equipment: giant, 300 feet of pipe, 
dwellings ; said to have produced $1600 in eight days ; 8 men employed 
at present, but over 40 at one time, constructing 6 miles of flume and 
ditch and 1100-foot tunnel, to bring water from Cedar Creek to the 
mine; good ground. 

Curley, in Sec. 1, T. 31 N., E. 11 W., in the Hay Fork mining 
district, f mile northeast of Hay Fork, in the Trinity Reserve. Owner, 
W. Leach ; comprises 99 acres ; slate bedrock ; 25 feet of gravel ; water 
from Hay Fork River, through Woodbury ditch 3 miles long, capacity 
800 inches; equipment: 2 j^iants, 1600 feet of pipe, dwelling; only 
worked on a small scale, due to scarcity of water; small producer; 
some coarse gold. 

Dannerihrink, in Sec. 12, T. 34 N., R. 11 W., in the Junction City 
mining district, 6 miles north of Junction City. Owner, C. Dannen- 
brink Estate; W. F. Dannenbrink, superintendent; comprises 39.94 
acres; slate bedrock; depth of gravel, 30 feet; water from Gwin's 
Gulch, through a ditch 1 mile long; capacity 800 inches; equipment: 
2 giants, 1000 feet of pipe, dwelling ; 2 men employed making repairs, 
6 during operating season; pays a dividend; operated from January 
to June. 

Bibl. : Report XIII, p. 444. 

Dolly Varden, in Sec. 9, T. 33 N., R. 10 W., in the Junction City 
mining district, 2 miles west of Junction City. Owners, Schaffer 
Brothers; comprises 50 acres; shale bedrock, tilted; 12 feet of gravel; 
water from Ox Canyon and Lime Kiln Gulch, through a ditch 1 mile 
long; equipment: 1 giant and 1000 feet of pipe, dwelling; operated 
during the winter; some good ground; producer. 

Drinkwater, in Sees. 13 and 24, T. 31 N., R. 12 W., in the Hay 
Fork mining district, 2 miles south of Hay Fork, in the Trinity Reserve. 
Owner, Drinkwater Mining Company, of Oakland, Cal.; comprises 
100 acres, on Kingsbury Gulch; schist bedrock; depth of gravel, 20 
feet; water from Kingsbuiy Gulch, through 2 ditches each 2 miles 
long; capacity, 600 inches; equipment: 2 giants, 2000 feet of pipe, 
dwelling; operated on a small scale during the winter, due to poor 
water supply; some good gravel; small producer. 

Driver, in Sec. 15, T. 33 N., R. 10 W., in the Weaverville mining 
district, 2 miles southwest of Weaverville. Owner, G. D. Young; 



TRINITY COUNTY. 161 

comprises 160 acres; grano-diorite bedrock; gravel 40 feet deep; water 
from Button's Creek, through a ditch 1 mile long; small producer. 
Idle at present. 

East Fork, in Sees. 1, 2, 11 and 12, T. 36 N., R. 7 W., in the Trinity 
Center mining district, 3^ miles east of Trinity Center, in the Shasta 
Reserve. Owners, M. MacWaine et al., comprises 520 acres on east 
fork of Trinity River; bedrock slate; depth of gravel, 15 to 60 feet; 
water from east fork of Trinity River, through a ditch 3 miles long; 
capacity, 1000 inches; head, 300 feet; equipment: 3 giants, 2500 feet 
of pipe; dwelling; 10 men employed when in operation; benches, rich 
in places; producer. 

Eastman, in Sees. 33 and 34, T. 34 N., R. 8 W., in the Lewiston 
mining district, 4 miles north of Lewiston. Owners, Jim Sing et al. 
Comprises 114 acres, patented, on Trinity River at mouth of Eastman 
Gulch ; diorite bedrock ; depth of gravel, 30 feet ; water from Eastman 
Gulch through a ditch 5 miles long ; capacity 1000 inches ; equipment, 
2 giants, 2000 feet of pipe, derrick and dwelling ; 3 Chinese employed ; 
good producer; been worked for years; sold recently to a San Diego 
company. 

Bibl. : Report XIII, p. 451. 

Evans Bar, in Sec. 32, T. 33 N., R. 10 W., in the Junction City 
district, 5 miles south of Junction City. Owners, Carr Brothers. Com- 
prises 70 acres, patented ; slate bedrock ; depth of gravel 30 feet ; equip- 
ment, 2 giants, 1500 feet of pipe ; good producer at one time. Idle at 
present. 

Bibl. : Report XIII, p. 446. 

Garden Gulch, in Sees. 1, 12, and 36, T. 33 and 34 N., R. 10 W., 
in the Weaverville mining district, 1 mile north of Weaverville. 
Owners, J. A. Wallace et al. Comprises 107 acres on Weaver Creek; 
water obtained through a ditch 2 miles long; capacity 1000 inches; 
equipment, 2 giants, 2500 feet of pipe, dwelling; 4 men employed at 
present making repairs, and 10 during operating season; dividend 
payer ; some good ground. 

Gem, formerly known as the Scharber, in the Lower Trinity mining 
district, in Trinity Forest Reserve. Owners, Teal and Perigot. Com- 
prises 400 acres, patented, on the Trinity River; nearest town, China 
Flat; water from Scharber and Quimby creeks; slate bedrock; depth 
of gravel, 30 feet; equipment, 3 giants, 4000 feet of pipe, buildings, 
sawmill; 2 reservoirs; 6 men employed when in operation, from 
December to June; gold worth $18.50 per ounce; black sands carry a 
little platinum ; producer. 



162 MINES AND MINEBAL BESOUBCES. 

Gold Dollar, in Sec. 33, T. 33 N., R. 9 W., in the Lewiston mining 
district, 4 miles southwest of Lewiston. Owner, Last Chance Mining 
Company, of Weaverville. Comprises 50 acres, patented, on the Trinity 
River; slate bedrock; depth of gravel, 20 to 100 feet; some cemented 
gravel 3 feet thick and boulders ; water from Grass Valley Creek through 
a ditch 10 miles long; capacity, 2500 inches; equipment, 2 giants and 
1500 feet of pipe. Idle. Good producer at one time. 

Haas, in Sees. 7 and 12, T. 33 N., R. 10 and 11 W., 1 mile west of 
Junction City, in the Trinity Reserve. Owner, F. G. Haas. Comprises 
102 acres on Trinity River ; shale bedrock ; depth of gravel 10 to 40 feet ; 
water from Black's Gulch through a ditch 1 mile long; equipment, 

2 giants, 1500 feet of pipe, dwelling; worked on a small scale; rich 
gravel taken out at times from old bench. 

Bibl.: Reports X, p. 703; XII, p. 311; XIII, p. 448. 

Ilager & Haas, in Sees. 7 and 18, T. 33 N., R. 10 W., in the Junc- 
tion City mining district, 1^ miles east of Junction City. Owners, 
Ilager & Haas. Comprises 159 acres, patented, on Trinity River; 
elevation 1700 feet; shale bedrock; depth of gravel 10 to 30 feet; water 
from Black 's Gulch through ditch 7 miles long ; capacity 1800 inches ; 
head 250 feet ; equipment, 3 giants, 3500 feet of pipe, dwelling ; yearly 
production from $5000 to $7000 ; operating cost yearly $2500 ; some good 
ground; worked from January to June. 

Hayig Bar, in Sec. 36, T. 31 N., R. 11 W., in the Hay Fork mining 
district, 4 miles southeast of Hay Pork, in the Trinity Forest Reserve. 
Owner, Chinese Company. Comprises 40 acres; schist bedrock; depth 
of gravel, 20 feet ; water from east fork of Hay Fork River through a 
ditch 4 miles long; capacity 1600 inches; equipment, giant and 2000 
feet of pipe; water supply limited; produces about $3000 per year; 

3 Chinese employed. 

Happy Home, in Sec. 30, T. 35 N., R. 10 W., in the Canyon Creek 
mining district, ^ mile south of Dedrick. Owner, F. Heurtevant. 
Comprises 50 acres on east fork of Canyon Creek ; elevation 2400 feet ; 
slate bedrock; 15 to 30 feet of gravel; ditch 2 miles long; produced over 
$400,000 from 25 acres ; 3 benches ; considerable coarse gold. Idle. 

Haskins, formerly known as Hatchet Creek and Shoo Fly, Trinity 
Center mining district, ^ mile north of Trinity Center, in the Shasta 
Reserve. Owner, F. Petra. Comprises 128 acres, of which 53 acres 
are patented ; slate bedrock ; depth of gravel 20 to 30 feet ; water from 
Buckeye Creek through a ditch 6 miles long ; capacity 500 inches ; head 
150 feet; equipment, 2 giants and 1000 feet of. pipe; good producer at 
one time. Idle at present, and only assessment work performed last 
few years. 

Bibl.: Report XIII, p. 448-449. 



TRINITY COUNTY. 163 

Hawkins Bar, formerly known as Trinity River Hydraulic Oold Mine, 
in Sees. 28 and 29, T. 6 N., R. 6 E., in the lower Trinity mining 
district, in the Trinity Forest Reserve. Nearest town, China Flat. 
Owner, J. Smith. Comprises 340 acres, patented ; located in the sixties ; 
slate bedrock ; depth of gravel 28 to 38 feet ; water from Hawkins Bar 
Creek, through 5 ditches, having a total length of 2^ miles ; equipment, 
giant, 1800 feet of pipe, buildings ; idle since 1909 ; some good ground ; 
gold worth $18.25 an ounce; a little platinum. 
Bibl. : Report XIII, p. 449. 

Henderson, in Sec. 13, T. 6 N., R. 5 E., 8 miles from China Flat, in 
the Lower Trinity mining district, in the Trinity Reserve. Owners, 
Ferguson and Henderson. Comprises 60 acres on Trinity River ; located 
in 1896; slate bedrock; depth of gravel 25 feet; equipment, giant, 
800 feet of pipe, 2 buildings ; water from west fork of Sharburo Creek ; 
a little platinum with the gold; small producer; bonded in 1912; 
adjoining mines. Top Notch and Gem. 

Hook and Ladder, in Sees. 5 and 6, T. 33 N., R. 9 W., in the 
Weaverville mining district, 1 mile north of Weaverville. Owners, 
B. R. Rule et al. Comprises 124 acres; slate bedrock; depth of gravel 
35 feet ; water from Rush Creek through a ditch 8 miles long ; capacity 
600 inches; equipment, 1 giant, 1000 feet of pipe, dwelling; 2 men 
employed repairing ditch ; yearly production about $7000 and operating 
costs about $2200. 

Horseshoe and Homestdke, formerly known as the Testy, in Sec. 18, 
T. 33 N., R. 9 W., i mile south of Weaverville, has been a good producer 
of placer gold for a number of years. Owner, Homestake-EUerbrook 
Consolidated Mining Company, of Weaverville ; W. B. Testy, president ; 
A. J. Testy, secretary and superintendent. Comprises 170 acres ; slate 
bedrock; depth of gravel 30 feet; use surplus water from La Grange 
ditch, and water from Cooper, Watson, Kenkaid and Gold Run gulches ; 
1 mile of ditch ; capacity 300 inches ; equipment, giants and 1000 feet of 
pipe ; worked during the winter ; producer. 

Hydraulic Hill, in Sec. 29, T. 34 N., R. 11 W., in the North Fork 
mining district, in the Trinity Reserve. Owners, Lorenz Brothers. 
Comprises 35 acres; slate bedrock; depth of gravel 45 feet; water from 
Logan's Gulch through 1 mile of ditch; good producer at one time; 
coarse gold ; only 5 acres worked. Idle. 

Indian Creek and Panwocket, in Sees. 23, 26, 27 and 28, T. 32 N., 
R. 9 W., in the Indian Creek mining district, 4 miles southeast of 
Douglas City. Owner, Dr. D. B. Fields. Comprises 1667 acres, 345 
acres being patented ; sandstone bedrock ; depth of gravel 30 to 50 feet ; 
idle, as no water on claims, as old ditch from Indian Creek has been 
destroyed; some good ground. 
12— C144^ 



164 MINES AND MINERAL RESOURCES. 

Ingleside, in Sees. 27 and 28, T. 35 N., R. 8 W., in the Minersville 
mining district, 2 miles north of Minersville, in the Trinity Reserve. 
Owner, G. A. Seward. Comprises 60 acres; water from east fork of 
Stewart's Pork through a ditch 6 miles long; capacity 700 inches; 
elevation 2300 feet ; diorite bedrock ; depth of gravel 30 feet ; equipment, 
2 giants, 700 feet of pipe, dwelling; producer at one time; only assess- 
ment work performed. 

Jacob, in Sees. 34 and 35, T. 34 N., R. 11 W., in the Junction City 
mining district, 2 miles north of Junction City. Owner, H. Jacob. 
Comprises 71 acres, patented; shale, bedrock; depth of gravel 15 to 
40 feet; water from Connor Creek through a ditch 3 miles long; equip- 
ment, giant, 1000 feet of pipe, dwelling; worked on small scale; some 
good gravel; not sufficient water for a season's run. 
Bibl.: Report X, p. 707; XIII, p. 450. 

Joss, in Sees. 18 and 7, T. S3 N., R. 9 W., in the Weaverville mining 
district, 2 miles southeast of Weaverville. Owner, W. S. Lowden. 
Comprises 139 acres ; slate bedrock ; depth of gravel, 40 feet ; water from 
Rush Creek through a ditch 12 miles long ; equipment, giant and 1000 
feet of pipe ; idle ; some good ground ; has been a producer. 

King, formerly known as King and Bayhs, in the Trinity Reserve, 
on Rattlesnake Creek. Owners, King et al., of Helena. Slate bedrock; 
water from Rattlesnake Creek; 15 feet of gravel; 1 giant and pipe. 
Three men employed during operating season, lasting about four 
months. Coarse gold. 

La Grange, formerly known as the Ward and Trinity, is the largest 
hydraulic mine in the world in active operation. It is located in Sees. 
1, 12, 36, 9, 32, 6, 7, 2, 3, 11, 31, 10, 28, 29, 33, 20 and 13, T. 33 
and 34 N., R. 9 and 10 W., in the Weaverville mining district, 2^ miles 
west of Weaverville, the county seat. It is owned by the La Grange 
Hydraulic Mining Company, a French syndicate. P. Bouery, manager; 
C. Jansen, foreman. Comprises 3,000 acres, 1200 being patented. Ele- 
vation 2200 to 3500 feet. Bedrock is slate, tilted and soft in spots; 
gravel bank in places is 500 feet high ; loose, with some boulders ; water 
is obtained from Stewart 's Fork and Rush Creek, through 27 miles of 
ditches and flumes ; capacity, 12000 inches ; head 400 feet. Equipment 
very complete, consisting of several giants, pipe, sluice-boxes, electrical 
plant, ice plant, sawmill, shops, dwellings, and 32 miles of telephone 
line ; sluice-boxes are 3000 feet long, 5 feet wide and 4 feet deep ; iroJi 
rails, set 4 inches apart, are used for riffles ; handle 1100 cubic yards of 
gravel per hour. Thirty men, are employed all year around; more men 
employed when in oporaticn, the season lasting ten months. Some of 



TRINITY COUNTY. 165 

the giants are not moved for several months, due to size of the banks. 
Good dividend payer. 

Bibl.: Report VIII, p. 638; X, p. 702; XII, p. 311; XIII, p. 452; 
U. S. G. S. Bulls. No. 430, pp. 51-56; No. 470, pp. 16-18; 
No. 540, p. 19. 

Larsen, formerly known as Mason Bar and China Creek, in New 
River mining district, near Quimby, in the Trinity Reserve. Owners, 
Larsen Brothers. Comprises 40 acres ; bedrock granite ; depth of gravel 
TO to 30 feet ; water from China Creek. Equipment : giant, 800 feet of 
pipe, dwelling. Four men employed. Operated during the winter. 
Produced ^about $10,000 to date ; gold is coarse and worth $18 per 
omice. SmaU producer. 

Little Joe, in Sec. 25, T. 32 N., R. 9 W., in the Indian Creek min- 
ing district, 6 miles southeast of Douglas City. Owners, Rogers Broth- 
ers. Comprises 40 acres. Slate bedrock ; depth of gravel 5 to 20 feet ; 
water from Indian Creek, through a ditch 2^ miles long; 1 giant and 
1000 feet of pipe, dwelling. Producer at one time. Idle. 

Log Cabin Bar, in T. 7 N., R. 7 E., in the New River mining district, 
in the Trinity Reserve. Owner, F. Staley. Quimby nearest town. 
Comprises 40 acres, located in 1904. Granodiorite bedrock; depth of 
gravel, 40 feet ; water from Log Cabin Gulch ; 1 giant, 400 feet of pipe, 
dwelling. Fine gold, worth $17.50 per ounce ; a little platinum. Small 
producer. Limited water supply, hence a short operating season. 

Long Gulch, in Sec. 17, T. 35 N., R. 8 W., in the Minersville min- 
ing district, 2 miles northeast of Minersville, in the Trinity Forest Re- 
serve. Owner, F. Beaudry Estate. Comprises 120 acres, patented. 
Slate bedrock; depth of gravel, 50 feet. Equipment: 3 giants, 1000 
feet of pipe, dwelling. Idle. Rich ground worked in early days. 

Lower Buckeye, in Sees. 19, 30 and 29, T. 37 N., R. 7 W., in the 
Trinity mining district, 2 miles north of Trinity Center, in the Shasta 
Reserve. Owner, Trinity Gold Mining Company, of Ohio; E. A. EU- 
ston, president. Comprises 140 acres on Buckeye Creek. Slate bed- 
rock; 30 feet of gravel; water from Buckeye Creek through a ditch 2 
miles long; capacity 300 inches; head 140 feet. Equipment: 2 giants 
and 800 feet of pipe. Some good gravel. Idle since 1911. 

Lower Button's Creek, in Sees. 26 and 35, T. 33 N., R. 10 W., in 
the Indian Creek mining district, 3 miles north of Douglas City. 
Owners, Lorenz Brothers. Comprises 785 acres. Slate bedrock; depth 
of gravel, 50 feet ; water from Button 's Creek through a ditch 2 miles 
long. Equipment: 2 giants, 1500 feet of pipe, dwelling. Two men 
employed making repairs ; 6 men used during operating season. Good 
producer ; said to have produced at least $300,000 to date. 



166 MINES AND MINERAL RESOURCES. 

Ltu^ky strike and Effle Belle, in Sec. 24, T. 33 N., R. 10 W., in 
the Weaverville mining district, 4 miles southeast of Weaverville. 
Owner, J. Armentrout. Comprises 80 acres. Slate bedrock; depth of 
gravel, 30 feet; water from Democrat Qulch, through a ditch 1 mile 
long. Equipment: giant and 800 feet of pipe. Coarse gold found. 
Idle last two years. 

McAfee Bar, in T. 7 N., R. 7 E., in the New River mining district, in 
the Trinity Reserve. Owner, C. S. McAtee. Comprises 60 acres, one 
location, the Kuntz, being made in 1853. Nearest town, Quimby. 
Granite bedrock; 15 feet of gravel. Equipment: 1 giant, 400 feet of 
pipe, 2 small reservoirs, dwelling. One man employed ; working season 
lasts forty days. Fine gold worth $17.75 per ounce. Small 'producer. 

Maple Creek, in Sees. 4, 5, 6, 8, 29, 30, 32 and 33, T. 32 N., 
R. 10 W., in the Junction City mining district, 4 miles south of Junc- 
tion City. Owner, Maple Creek Mining Company, of San Francisco; 
F. L. Keller, superintendent. Comprises 1594 acres, of which 198 acres 
are patented. Bedrock, slate and diorite; depth of gravel, 25 feet; 
water from Dutch Creek, through a ditch 3 miles long. Equipment, 
3 giants, 2000 feet of pipe, dwellings. Four men employed. Producer. 
Operated during the winter. 

Meckel, in Sees. 13 and 14, T. 33 N., R. 10 W., in the Weaverville 
mining district, 1 mile southeast of Weaverville. Owners, Meckel 
Brothers; comprises 180 acres; diorite bedrock; depth of gravel, 20 to 
100 feet; water from Democrat Gulch, through a ditch 2 miles long; 
capacity, 300 inches ; equipment : 3 giants, 1500 feet of pipe, dwelling ; 
2 men employed making repairs, and 8 men during operating season; 
good producer; some coarse gold. 

Miller, in Sec. 33, T. 34 N., R. 11 W., in the North Fork mining 
district, i miles south of North Fork. Owner, C. Miller; comprises 
40 acres ; equipment : 2 giants, 1000 feet of pipe, dwelling ; some coarse 
gold ; yearly production about $2000. Idle in 1912. 

Monk, in Sec. 5, T. 32 N., R. 9 W., in the Indian Creek mining 
district, 1 mile east of Douglas City. Owner, W. Brannan; comprises 
30 acres on Indian Creek ; slate bedrock ; depth of gravel, 5 to 20 feet ; 
equipment : 2 giants, 1000 feet of pipe, dwelling ; producer at one time ; 
idle at present. 

Morrison Gulch, in Sees. 12 and 13, T. 37 N., R. 8 W., in the 
Trinity Center mining district, 2 miles northwest of Carrville, in the 
Shasta Reserve. Owner, C. Hilton; comprises 76 acres, patented, on 
Coffee Creek ; slate bedrock ; 25 to 30 feet of gravel ; water from Little 
Boulder Creek, through IJ miles of ditch; equipment: 2 giants, 1500 
feet of pipe, dwelling; 8 men employed during the season; good 
producer. 



TRINITY COUNTY. 167 

Montezuma, in Sees. 1, 2, 11 and 12, T. 33 N., R. 11 W., in the 
Junction City mining district, 1 mile north of Junction City. Owner, 
T. F. Bergin; comprises 77 acres, patented; slate bedrock; depth of 
gravel, 30 to 40 feet; producer at one time, but ground can not be 
worked any more on account of lack of water ; area worked, 10 acres. 

Nash, in Sees. 6, 7, 8, 28, 29, 30 and 31, T. 37 and 38, R. 9 W., 
in the Trinity Center mining district, 12 miles northwest of Carr- 
ville, in the Shasta Reserve. Owners, Trinity Hydraulic Gold Mining 
Company, Ltd., of London, England; G. Abrams, superintendent; com- 
prises 474 acres, patented, on Coffee Creek; slate bedrock; 15 to 30 
feet of gravel ; water from Coffee Creek, through 3-mile ditch ; capacity, 
3000 inches; head 200 feet; equipment: hydraulic elevators, 5 giants, 
2500 feet of pipe, dwellings, derrick; 8 men. employed at present and 
15 during the operating season; good producer; company also owns 
the *'Abram & Blythe'' placer properties, which are not worked. 
Bibl.: Report XIII, pp. 464-465. 

New River Placer, in Sec. 13, T. 6 N., R. 5 E., in the New River 
mining district, in the Trinity Forest Reserve. Owner, New River 
Mining Company, of Bakersfield, Cal. ; nearest town, Quimby; eleva- 
tion, 1650 feet; comprises 130 acres on Quimby Creek; granitic-por- 
phyry bedrock; depth of gravel 22 feet; equipment: 2 giants, 600 feet 
of pipe, sawmill and 5 buildings; 12 men employed when in operation; 
coarse gold, worth $18.35 per ounce; a little platinum; season lasts 
8 months; total operating costs 7 cents per yard; ** high-line'' ditch; 
producer. 

Nigger Hill, in Sec. 2, T. 32 N., R. 10 W., in the Indian Creek 
mining district ; 1^ miles northwest of Douglas City. Owner, G. Lew- 
man ; comprises 40 acres ; elevation, 1700 feet ; diorite bedrock ; 30 feet 
of gravel; water from Button's Creek, through a ditch 3 miles long; 
capacity, 500 inches ; equipment : 2 giants, 1000 feet of pipe, dwelling ; 
2 men employed, and 6 during operating season ; producer. 

O'Connell, in Sec. 33, T. 32 N., R. 9 W., in the Indian Creek 
mining district; 5 miles southeast of Douglas City. Owner, William 
Wallace; comprises 80 acres on Reading's Creek; slate bedrock; depth 
of graven, 5 to 20 feet; water from Reading's Creek, through a ditch 
f mile long; capacity, 500 inches; equipment: 2 giants, 800 feet of 
pipe, dwelling; 2 men employed, making repairs; when in operation, 
6 to 8 men employed; producer. 

PotUla, in Sec. 11, T. 33 N., R. 10 W., in the Weaverville mining 
district, 1 mile west of Weaverville. Owner, F. Potilla; comprises 
30 acres, on Grub Gulch; slate bedrock; depth of gravel, 20 feet; 
water from Grub Gulch, through a ditch 1^ miles long; equipment: 
giant and 800 feet of pipe ; small producer ; best values on bedrock. 



168 MINES AND MINERAL RESOURCES. 

Post d' Wilson, formerly known as Good Friday, in Sees. 19 and 
20, T. 33 N., R. 11 W., in the Junction City mining district, 2 miles 
south of Junction City. Owners, Post & Wilson; comprises 160 acres 
on Trinity River; slate bedrock; 25 to 50 feet of gravel; equipment: 
2 giants and 1500 feet of pipe; some good ground; worked during 
winter; producer. 

Potter & Humboldt, in Sees. 1, 6, 2, 5, 7 and 12, T. 34 N., R. 8 
and 9 W., in the Minersville mining district, 2 miles southwest of 
Minersville, in the Trinity Forest Reserve. Owner, Humboldt Placer 
Mining Company, of Blocksburg, Humboldt County; W. Stowers, 
superintendent; comprises 1270 acres on Stewart's Fork; slate bedrock; 
depth of gravel, 20 to 60 feet; water from Stewart's Fork, through a 
ditch 1 mile long; capacity, 2000 inches; equipment; 3 giants, 2000 
feet of pipe, dwelling; 2 men employed; good ground; producer; 
worked during the winter. 

Poverty Flat, in Sees. 18 and 19, T. 33 N., R. 9 W., in the Weaver- 
ville mining district, 3^ miles southeast of Weaverville. Owners, Lorenz 
Brothers. Comprises 30 acres, patented ; diorite bedrock ; 20 to 30 feet 
of gravel; equipment: two giants, 1000 feet of pipe, dwelling; water 
from Brown ^s Creek throuf?h a ditch 6 miles long ; capacity, 600 inches ; 
operated during the winter ; producer. 

Qiiimby, in Sec. 18, T. 6 N., R. 6 E., in the Lower Trinity mining 
district, in the Trinity Reserve. Owners, Ferguson and Ziegler ; nearest 
town, China Flat ; comprises 100 acres, located in the early fifties ; slate 
bedrock; depth of gravel, 25 feet; some cemented; scale — gold worth 
$18.50 per ounce; a little platinum; under option to Perigot and is to 
be drilled for dredging. 

Bibl. : Report XIII, p. 460. 

Railroad and Mt. Morensis, in Sees. 9, 15 and 16, T. 33 N., R. 10 W., 
in the Junction City mining district, 2 miles southwest of Junction City. 
Owners, Schaffer Brothers. Comprises 307 acres, patented, on the 
Trinity River; slate bedrock; depth of gravel, 30 feet; 2 giants, 600 
feet of pipe ; producer at one time ; idle since 1910. 

Red Flat, in Sec. 12, T. 84 N., R. 11 W., in the Canyon Creek 
mining district, 4 miles south of Dedrick, in the Trinity Reserve. 
Owner, Dannenbrink Estate. Comprises 55 acres, patented; slate bed- 
rock 25 feet of gravel; water from Gwin Gulch through 2-mile ditch; 
capacity^ 1500 inches; head, 150 feet; equipment: 2 giants, 1500 feet 
of pipe, dwelling ; yearly production from $6000 to $10,000 ; total operat- 
ing cost $2500; idle at present. 

Roe, in Sees. 1, 6 and 31, T. 32 and 33 N., R. 9 and 10 W., in the 
Indian Creek mining district, 1 mile east of Douglas City. Owner, 
C. E. Thayer. Comprises 36 acres, patented; slate bedrock; depth of 



TRINITY COUNTY. 169 

gravel, 25 feet ; water from Weaver Creek through a ditch 5 miles long ; 
capacity 600 inches ; has been a good producer ; idle. 

ScMoner, formerly known as the Rittubush, in Sec. 28, T. 33 N., 
R. 11 W., in the North Fork mining district, in the Trinity Reserve. 
Owners, H. C. Schloner et al. ; comprises 88 acres, located in the fifties; 
depth of gravel, 10 to 40 feet; slate bedrock; old bench; water from 
North Fork Gulch; best pay gravel last 3 feet above bedrock; equip- 
ment: 2 giants, 1200 feet of pipe, sluice-boxes and dwellings; 2 men 
employed ; yearly production, $1500 to $3000 ; gold worth $18 per ounce ; 
some platinum; worked during the winter season. 

Senger, in Sees. 12 and 13, T. 33 N., R. 10 W., in the Weaverville 
mining district ; J mile south of Weaverville. Owner, J. Senger. Com- 
prises 60 acres; grano-diorite bedrock; depth of gravel, 20 feet; water 
from West Weaver Creek through a ditch J mile long; equipment: 
giant and 1000 feet of pipe; good producer at one time; worked on a 
small scale during the winter. 

Sheridan, in Sees. 18 and 19, T. 33 N., R. 10 W., in the Junction 
City mining district, 1 mile south of Junction City. Owner, W. J. 
Dyman. Comprises 104 acres, patented ; shale bedrock ; depth of gravel, 
25 feet ; water from Simpson 's Gulch through a ditch 1 mile long ; head, 
200 feet ; capacity, 750 inches ; equipment : 2 giants, 1600 feet of pipe, 
dwelling ; 2 men employed and 6 when in operation ; production yearly 
about $5000 ; profit $3000 ;* worked from January to May. 
Bibl. : Reports XII, p. 313 ; XIII, p. 462. 

Slate Creek, in Sees. 2 and 3, T. 34 N., R. 9 W., in the Minersville 
mining district, 3 miles southwest of Minersville, in the Trinity Reserve. 
Owner, F. Cadematori. Comprises 120 acres on Slate Creek ; slate bed- 
rock ; depth of gravel, 40 feet ; water from Slate Creek through a ditch 
1 mile long ; capacity, 500 inches ; equipment : giant, 500 feet of pipe, 
dwelling ; idle ; only do assessment work. 

South Fork, in Sees. 22, 23', 14 and 15, T. 6 N., R. 5 E., in the 
Lower Trinity mining district, in the Trinity Reserve; nearest town, 
China Flat, Humboldt County. Owner, South Fork Gold and Platinum 
Mining Company; P. P. Hammer, president; J. Kahlker, secretary. 
Comprises 885 acres on Trinity River; equipment: giant, 600 feet of 
pipe, dwelling ; 1 man employed ; fine gold, and black sands carry a little 
platinum; property involved in litigation; depend on rains for water 
supply; small producer. 

Sowden, in Sec. 2, T. 33 N., R. 10 W., in the Weaverville mining 
district. If miles northwest of Weaverville. Owners, Ah Fong et al. 
Comprises 40 acres on Weaver Creek ; slate bedrock ; depth of gravel, 40 
feetr water from West Weaver Creek through a ditch 1 mile long: 



170 MINES AND MINERAIi RESOURCES. 

equipment: giant and 1000 feet of pipe; 2 Chinese employed; small 
producer. 

Steiner's Flat, formerly known as Hurst and Eliason, in Sees. 35 
and 36, T. 33 N., R. 10 W., in the Indian Creek mining district, 2 miles 
north of Douglas City. Owner, J. H. Lorenz. Comprises 180 acres, 
patented; slate bedrock; depth of gravel, 30 feet; water from Dutton's 
Creek, through a ditch 2 miles long; capacity, 600 inches; equipment: 
2 giants, 1500 feet of pipe, dwelling; 3 men employed and 8 during 
operating season; production yearly from $4000 to $10,000; some good 
ground; old producer; gold worth $17.50 per ounce. 

Sturdivant, in Sees. 7 and 8, T. 33 N., R. 10 W., in the Junction City 
mining district, H miles east of Junction City. Owner, Trinity Gold 
Mining Company, of San Francisco ; comprises 55 acres, patented, along 
the Trinity River; shale bedrock; depth of gravel, 15 to 35 feet; some 
coarse gold found; idle. 

Ten Cent ChUch, in Sees. 6 and 31, T. 33 and 34 N., R. 9 W., in the 
Weaverville mining district, 2 miles northeast of Weaverville. Owner, 
M. L. Woodbury. Comprises 69 acres, patented, at an elevation of 
2400 feet; slate bedrock; depth of gravel, 20 feet; water from East 
Weaver Creek through a ditch 2 miles long; equipment: 1 giant, 1000 
feet of pipe, dwelling; leased to Chinese company; Sing Lee, manager; 
2 Chinese employed; small producer; about 10 acres has been worked; 
some good ground. 

Tener, in Sec. 30, T. 8 N., R. 8 E., in the New River mining dis- 
trict, in the Trinity Reserve. Owners, W. L. and R. W. Tener. Com- 
prises 240 acres; slate bedrock; depth of gravel, 25 feet; water from 
Slide and Emigrant Creeks, through flume IJ miles long and 1000 
feet of ditch; equipment: 2 giants, 1600 feet of pipe, sawmill, build- 
ings, derrick ; 25 men employed installing equipment ; 6 prospect shafts 
have been sunk to bedrock and good pay found ; new location ; going to 
work bottom of Slide Creek. 

Texas Bar, in Sec. 6, T. 32 N., R. 9 W., in the Indian Creek mining 
district, i mile north of Douglas City. Owner, G. Vitzthum. Cora- 
prises 50 acres ; slate bedrock ; depth of gravel, 5 to 20 feet ; w:ater from 
Indian Creek through a ditch 3 miles long ; equipment : 3 giants, 1500 
feet of pipe, dwelling; 2 men employed making repairs, and 8 men 
during operating season ; good producer. 

Tolly Hill, in Sec. 34, T. 35 N., R. 9 W., in the Minersville mining 
district, 3 miles west of Minersville, in the Trinity Reserve. Owner, 
J. H. Cummings. Comprises 160 acres, on Bear Gulch; slate bedrock; 
depth of gravel, 50 feet; water from Bear Gulch through a ditch IJ 
mile^ long; capacity 40 inches; equipment — giant and 700 feet of pipe; 
idle; producer at one time. 



TRINITY COUNTY. 171 

Top Notch, in Sees. 12 and 13, T. 6 N., R. 5 E., in the Lower 
Trinity mining district, 8 miles from China Flat, in the Trinity Reserve. 
Owners, Ranny and HoUiday. Comprises 160 acres, located in 1905; 
slate bedrock; depth of gravel, 30 feet; water from west branch of 
Sharber's Creek through a ditch 1 mile long; capacity 500 inches; 
equipment — giant, 800 feet of pipe, dwelling ; fine gold, valued at $18.57 
per ounce; 1 ounce of platinum to 6 of gold; use the outfit owned by 
the Henderson mine; worked during the winter; small producer; 
adjoins the Henderson, Gem, and Negunda. 

Trinity Consolidated Hydraulic, in Sees. 1, 3, 7, 18, 8, 31, 6, 
14, 32, 33, 2, 35 and 36, T. 33 N., R. 8, 9 and 10 W., in both Weaver- 
ville and Indian Creek mining districts, near the towns of Weaverville 
and Douglas City. Owner, Trinity Consolidated Hydraulic Mining 
Company, an eastern corporation; general manager, D. W. Shanks, 
of Weaverville ; J. Murphy, superintendent ; comprises 2420 acres, of 
which 700 are patented; slate and diorite bedrock; length along chan- 
nel, 3 miles; depth of gravel, 50 to 400 feet; water from east Weaver 
Creek, through the old Cooper and Watson Ditch; also from east 
fork of Weaver Creek, through Sloan ditch ; also from Grider Gulch ; 
total length of ditches, 22 miles, capacity, 5000 inches; equipment: 
giants, several thousand feet of pipe, 1000 feet of 22-inch siphon 
and 500-feet suspension bridge, dwellings; 15 men employed at pres- 
ent ; 40 men during the operating season ; ranks next to the La Grange 
as a hydraulic mine; consolidation of several famous properties such 
as the Union Hill, McMurray and Hupp, Red Point, Bartolet, Douglas 
City, Ford & Foley and Harvey; good producer; several millions 
produced from these old holdings. 

Bibl.: U. S. G. S. Bulls. No. 430, pp. 51-56; No. 470, pp. 16-18; 
No. 540, pp. 18-19. 

Trinity River Mining Company, in Sees. 5 and 8, T. 33 N., R. 8 W., 
in the Lewiston mining district, 1^ miles north of Lewiston. Owner, 
Trinity River Mining Company, of Oakland ; Charles Heyer, president ; 
W. R. Thomas, secretary; under lease to Horseshoe Placer Mining 
Company; W. E. Procter, superintendent; comprises 600 acres, of 
which 103 acres are patented, on Trinity River ; diorite bedrock ; depth 
of gravel, 30 to 40 feet; waterpower obtained from Trinity, through 
a tunnel 1400 feet long, 12 feet wide and 10 feet high; equipment: 
Hendy 24-inch pump, turbine water wheel (1000 h.p.), rope trans- 
mission, 2200 feet of pipe, dwellings; water pumped from tunnel 
into elevated sluiceboxes ; 12 men employed ; rich diggings on the blue 
channel in early days; leasing company constructing concrete dam, 
340 feet long, 3 feet on bottom, 6 feet on top, and 18 feet deep, to divert 
all of the water in the Trinity River through the tunnel, so as to 



172 MINES AND MINERAL RESOUBCES. 

work the bed of this stream; holding company began work in 1905 
and spent $142,000; tunnel cost $54,000 (all hand work) ; no production 
as yet; some good ground, going better than $20 per cubic yard, has 
been worked on the **blue lead," a noted pay channel. 
Bibl.: U. S. Geol. Sur. Bull. No. 540, p. 20. 

Valdor, formerly known as Huertevant, in Sees. 1, 2, 26, 27, 3*4, 
35 and 36, T. 33 and 34 N., R. 11 W., in the Junction City mining 
district, 1^ miles north of Junction City. Owner, M. Huertevant; 
comprises 845 acres, of which 786 acres are patented; schist bedrock; 
depth of gravel, 30 feet; water from Conner and Cannon creeks, 
through 2 ditches, one 3 miles long and the other 7 miles ; equipment : 
2 giants, 150 feet of pipe, dwellings; being prospected for dredging 
possibilities by W. Johnson; 5 men employed; land under bond to 
McCray et al. ; said to be good dredging ground; producer. 

William Morris, in Sec. 25, T. 32 N., R. 9 W., in the Indian Creek 
mining district, 53 miles southeast of Douglas City. Owners, William 
]\Iorris et al. ; comprises 80 acres, patented ; slate bedrock ; 5 to 20 feet 
of gravel ; water from Kline Creek, through ditch i mile long j capacity, 
200 inches; equipment: giant and 800 feet of pipe; water supply 
limited; small producer. 

Woodbury, formerly known as MacParlane, in Sec. 35, T. 31 N., 
R. 11 W., in the Hay Fork mining district, 3 miles southeast of Hay 
Fork, in the Trinity Reserve. Owner, Chinese Company, of Hay 
Fork; comprises 40 acres; schist bedrock; depth of gravel, 20 feet; 
water from Hay Fork Gulch through a ditch 4^ miles long; capacity, 
1200 inches; equipment: 2 giants and 1000 feet of pipe; worked on 
a small scale ; poor water supply ; good ground ; small producer. 

GOLD PLACERS— GROUND SLUICING. 

Blue Jib, in Sec. 13, T. 37 N., R. 8 W., in the Trinity Center min- 
ing district, 1^ miles northwest of Carrville, in the Shasta Forest 
Reserve. Owners, Graves & Carter; comprises 20 acres on Coffee 
Creek; slate bedrock; depth of gravel, 20 feet; water from Coffee 
Creek, through a ditch ^ mile long; small reservoir; small producer; 
some good ground; worked during the winter. 

Boyd, in Sec. 28, T. 8 N., R. 8 E., in the New River mining dis- 
trict, 1 mile south of Denny, in the Trinity Reserve. Owner, A. Boyd : 
comprises 20 acres, on Emigrant Creek; schist bedrock; depth of 
gravel, 10 feet; water from Emigrant Creek, through a ditch i mile 
long; equipment: 500 feet of pipe and dwelling; small producer; 
coarse gold 



TRINITY COUNTY. 173 

Haunted Bar, on Eagle and Slide creeks, in New River mining 
district, in Trinity Reserve. Owner, J. L. Mushick; comprises 100 
acres ; 900 feet of ditch and dwelling ; coarse gold ; a little platinum ; 
worked nine months of the year ; small producer. 

Lucky Strike, on east fork of New River, about 2^ miles above the 
mouth of Pony Creek, in the New River mining district, in the Trinity 
Reserve. Owner, C. Schwelder; comprises 60 acres; schist bedrock; 
15 feet of gravel; ^-mile ditch; small producer. 

Negunda, in Sec. 12, T. 6 N., R. 5 E., in the Lower Trinity mining 
district; post office, Burnt Ranch. Owner, H. Zeigler; works bed of 
slough; small producer. 

Stribbling, in North Fork mining district, on Grizzly Creek. Owner, 
P. T. Stribbling; comprises 40 acres; grano-diorite bedrock; coarse 
gold; small producer. 

GOLD PLACERS— DRIFT. 

Buckeye, in Sec. 19, T. 37 N., R. 7 W., in the Trinity Center 
mining district, 3 miles northwest of Trinity Center, in the Shasta 
Reserve. Owner, J. Larson; comprises 40 acres, on Buckeye Creek; 
slate bedrock; depth of gravel 50 feet; tunnel 60 feet long, 4 feet by 
7 feet; worked on small scale; good ground. 

Ellston, formerly known as Self-Shooter, in Sec. 7, T. 36 N., R. 12 W., 
in the New River mining district, 2 miles south of Denny, in the Trinity 
Reserve. Owner, R. ElLston ; comprises 20 acres on Emigrant Creek , 
slate bedrock; depth of gravel, 20 to 60 feet; tunnel, 50 feet long, 
5 feet by 7 feet; some coarse gold found; small producer. 

Graves, in Sees. 29 and 30, T. 37 N., R. 7 W., in the Trinity Cen- 
ter mining district, 3 miles north of Trinity Center, in the Shasta 
Reserve. Owner, Trinity Exploration Company, of Carrville ; D. Good- 
ale, superintendent and manager; comprises 350 acres, patented, along 
the Trinity River ; old tunnels and shafts ; bedrock 20 to 60 feet deep ; 
some rich ground; under option to Wilsie & Hammond; being pros- 
pected by drilling for dredging. 

Hidden Treasure, in Lower Trinity mining district, on west side of 
Trinity River. Owner, J. B. McDonald ; comprises 60 acres, located in 
1903 ; bedrock is slate ; depth of gravel, 40 feet ; running tunnel, pres- 
ent length being 65 feet; size 4 feet by 7 feet; not on bedrock; pros- 
pecting his ground; some good gravel. 

Rainbow, in Sec. 33, T. 38 N., R. 8 W., in the Trinity Center 
mining district, 6 miles northwest of Carrville, in the Shasta Reserve. 
Owner, Rainbow Mining Company, of Carrville, A. Patton, president; 
slate bedrock; 20 to 50 feet of gravel; comprises 60 acres on Coffee 



174 MINES AND MINEBAIi RESOURCES. 

Creek; tunnel, 120 feet long, 6^ by 3i feet and old shafts, 40 to 50 feet 
deep ; some rich ground worked ; small producer. 
Bibl.:Report XIII, p. 460. 

Sam Uampton, in Sees. 16 and 17, T. 35 N., R. 8 W., in the Min- 
ersville mining district, 4 miles north of Minersville, in the Trinity 
Reserve. Owner, C. E. Wright; comprises 80 acres, on east fork of 
Stewart's Fork; slate bedrock; depth of gravel, 30 to 50 feet; tunnel 
80 feet long, 4 feet by 6 feet; water from east fork of Stewart's Fork 
through a ditch f mile long; idle; worked during the winter; owner 
trying to find another pay channel. 

Snotv Gulch, in Sec. 20, T. 37 N., R. 7 W., in the Trinity Center 
mining district ; 3 miles north of Trinity Center, in the Shasta Reserve. 
Owner, G. Abrams ; comprises 35 acres on Snow Gulch ; tunnel, 60 feet 
long, 4 feet by 6 feet, another 40 feet, and 4 feet by 6 feet; old shaft 
40 feet deep; good producer. 

Wilker, in Sec. 5, T. 39 N., R. 7 W., in the Trinity Center mining 
district, J mile north of Trinity Center, in the Shasta Reserve. Owner, 
J. E. Crawford ; comprises 160 acres on Hatchet Creek ; schist bedrock ; 
depth of gravel, 10 to 45 feet ; tunnel 80 feet long, 3| feet by 6J feet ; 
equipment : car, 500 feet of pipe, dwelling ; water from Hatchet Creek 
through a ditch 1 mile long; some coarse gold; small producer. 

GOLD DREDGING. 

The kno\ni dredging fields in Trinity County are located along the 
Trinity River, near the towns of Trinity Center, Lewiston, and Junc- 
tion City, and consists of several thousand acres. Two dredges are in 
operation at the present time, one at Trinity Center, and the other at 
Lewiston. The ground near Junction City has been drilled and the 
installing of a dredge is contemplated. 

Bibl.: Bull. No. 36, pp. 102-104; No. 57, p. 11; U. S. G. S. Bull. 
No. 540, p. 19. 

Alta Bert, in Sees. 8, 9, 4, 5, 32, 33 and 29, T. 36 and 37 N., 
R. 7 W., in the Trinity Center mining district, in town of Trinity Cen- 
ter, in the Shasta Reserve. Owner, Alta Bert Dredging Company, of 
San Francisco ; H. Peake, president ; W. W. Johnson, secretary ; W. H. 
Christie, vice-president and manager; M. Ashley, superintendent. 
Comprises 2000 acres, patented, along the Trinity River. Slate and 
granodiorite ; depth of gravel, 15 to 40 feet; loose and easily worked; 
gravel channel in places over J mile wide. Dredge is of the Oroville 
type with S^-foot bucket, operated by electricity from Trinity Power 
Company ; sawmill, capacity 15,000 feet per day ; shops, office and sev- 
eral dwellings. Eighteen men employed. Company has acquired large 



TRINITY COUNTY. 



175 



number of old placer claims; also have an option on the Bloss & Mc- 
Clary hydraulic mine. Alta Bert is said to exceed the LaGrange 
hydraulic mine in production. Some very rich gravel. (See photo 
No. 6.) 

Bibl.: Bull. No. 36, p. 104; U. S. G. S. Bull. No. 540, p. 19. 




Photo No. 6. Dredge of Alta Bert Dredging Company. 

Trinity Oold Dredge Company, formerly known as Blakemore and 
Rocky Bar, in the Lewiston mining district, in Sees. 32, 33 and 28, 
T. 34 N., R. 8 W., 4 miles north of Lewiston. Owners, Trinity Gold 
Dredge Company of Chico; H. E. Chesboro, president; manager, 
E. L. Smith; superintendent, H. Harris. Comprises 900 acres, pat- 
ented, along the Trinity River. Slate bedrock ; depth of gravel, 40 feet ; 
loose and easily worked; dredge of Oroville type built by New York 
Engineering Company, with 11-foot bucket, and no stacker but run 
tailings on a 200-foot sluice-way floated on a barge, with iron rails for 
riffles, and no plates used ; shops ; 1500 h.p. electrical plant, with 5 miles 
of power line; dwellings; 15 men employed; pays dividends; been in 
operation since 1911. 

Bibl. : Bull. No. 36, p. 104; U. S. G. S. Bull. No. 540, p. 20. 

GRANITE. 

The granite in Trinity County is principally a hornblende granite, 
and where not decomposed generally shows the effect of strong pres- 
sure. These fracture planes and the quartz seams cutting through 
the rock render much of it unfit for commercial use. 

In the Rush Creek quarry, formerly worked by Masterson & Arm- 
strong, of Redding, the hard boulders found in the soft mass of weath- 



176 MINES AND MINERAL RESOURCES. 

ered granite were used for ornamental and monumental purposes. This 
deposit is in Sec. 26, T. 34 N., R. 9 W., M. D. M., on Rush Creek, 
6 miles east of Weaverville, the county seat, 

Bibl. : Report XII, p. 387 ; Bull. No. 38, p. 57. 

IRON. 

Iron ore deposits are reported in several localities in the county, but 
none of the merit have as yet been developed. In Sees. 4, 5, 9 and 10, 
T. 30 N., R. 10 W., M. D. M., on the northwest side of Chauchelulla 
Peak, stringers of iron ore are found lying in contact with large bodies 
of hypersthene, and the superficial resemblance of the latter material 
to iron ore may have caused the claim of large outcrops of iron ore 
in that vicinity. 

Bibl. : Bull. No. 38, p. 305. 

LIMESTONE. 

Limestone is found in many places in this county, a belt of Devonian 
limestone, associated with igneous rocks, is found running parallel with 
the South Fork of the Trinity River from its source to Hoopa Valley; 
also a parallel belt of Devonian limestone running to the northeast of 
the preceding and another belt of Carboniferous limestone entering 
Trinity from the southeast in T. 29 N., R. 10 W., running northwest 
along Hay Fork River, disappearing north of Hay Fork and showing 
farther north on New River. 

Bibl.: Bull. No. 38, p. 94; Diller- American Journal of Science, 
4th Series, Vol. 15, p. 342. 

On Brown's Mountain, in Sec. 21, T. 33 N., R. 9 W., M. D. M., a 
belt of limestone was quarried several years ago and burned in a lime- 
kiln, and the product used in the masonry of the courthouse at Weav- 
erville. It is owned by the Southern Pacific Railroad Company. 
Bibl. : Bull. No. 38, p. 94. 

In the Hay Fork Valley, in Sees- 1, 3 and 33, T. 31 N., R. 11 W., 
M. D. M., a belt of limestone, exposed in places running northwest, is 
observed. 

Bibl. : Bull. No. 38, p. 94. 

A body of limestone, at the head of Oregon Oulch, in Sec. 3, 
T. 33 N., R. 10 W., M. D. M., was the source of lime in 1856, which was 
used in the construction of several buildings in Weaverville. 
Bibl. : Bull. No. 38, p. 94. 



TRINITY COUNTY. 177 

MARBLE. 

Outcrops of gray marble occur near the mouth of East Fork and 
near Taylor's Plat, in the Big Bar mining district; deposit has not 
been worked and its extent not determined. 
Bibl. : Report XIII, p. 633. 

MINERAL PAINT. 

A body of red ocher has been used locally in Minersville, from the 
deposit owned by T. Bowerman, located in Sec. 15, T. 35 N., R. 8 W., 
M. D. M., on the east side of the east fork of Stewart's Fork. The 
ocher shows the blocky structure of the country rock, a highly weathered 
deposit of igneous origin. 

Southern Pacific Railroad Company owns a deposit of similar mate- 
rial in Sec. 9, T. 35 N., R. 8 W., M. D. M. 
Bibl. : Bull. No. 38, p. 342. 

MINERAL WATER. 

The Deer Lick Springs^ formerly known as the Coombs, in Sees. 
6 and 7, T. 30 N., R. 9 W., 9 miles southwest of Hay Fork, are the only 
springs in Trinity County to have the water on the market. Owners 
are the California Medicinal Springs Company, of New York; W. E. 
Joy, president. This company controls some 106 acres in all; there 
are 20 springs, one sulphur and the others iron. Water is bottled 
under the trade name of ''Nipicuro'' and is said to be good for all 
blood diseases. Only one spring has been developed, and the output 
at present is small. Reached by trail from Hay Fork. (Analysis 
follows.) 

Bibl. : Report XIII, p. 523. 

Another spring has been reported near Big Bar, in Sec. 3, T. 33 N., 
R. 12 W. It is owned by J. C. Pattison. 



178 



MINES AND MINERAL RESOUBCES. 



ANALYSIS OP "NIPICURO/' 
A natural medicinal spring water from Deer Lick Springs* Trinity County, California. 



Parts per 
million 



Grains per 
gallon 



Total BoUda 

Silica 

Iron and aluminum (Fe and Al). 

Calcium (Ca) 

Magnesium (Mg) 

Sodium (Na) 

Potassium (K) _._ 

Iodine (I) 

Sulphuric add radical (SO4) 

Carbonic acid radical (CDs) 

Bi-carbonic add radical (HGOs) . 
Metaboric add radical (BOs) .... 

Chlorine (CI) _. 

Oxygen to form FesOs 



8,660.00 

24.82 

9.47 

1,621.63 

21.43 

1,832.06 

1«8.17 

5.19 

1,604.17 

68.62 

436.08 

Heavy trace 

8,468.46 

4.06 



496.48 

1.44 

.66 

83.26 

1.24 

77.26 

9.14 

.80 

87.24 

8.11 

26.29 



200.94 
.23 



8.689.90 



Hypothetical form of combination- 
Sodium chloride (NaOl) _ 

Potassium Iodide (KI) 

Potassium chloride (KCl) 

Magnesium sulphate (MgSO*) -._ 

Sodium metaborate (NaBOs) -. 

Calcium chloride (CaOla) - 

Calcium sulphate (CaSO*) 

Calcium carbonate (CaCOa) 

Calcium bl-carbonate (Ca(HC0a)2) 

Iron oxide and alumina (FeaOa and AhOa). 
Silica (SIOs) 



8,888. 

6, 

806. 

101. 



83 



901.47 



196.61 

.39 

17.88 

6.06 



1,972 

1,643 

89 

763. 
18. 
24, 



Hydrogen sulphide gas 



117.82 



114.41 

89.68 

6.18 

43.90 

.78 

1.44 

6.83 



Reaction, strongly alkaline. 

Analysis made by Professor Sanford C. Dinsmore, United States Government Agricultural 
Department, Nevada State University, Reno. Nevada. 

ORNAMENTAL STONES. 

A prominent belt of jasper occurs on the divide between the north 
fork of Trinity River and the east fork of the north fork, showing 
especially in Sees. 5 and 8, T. 35 N., R. 11 W., M. D. M. 

Another belt is found on Red Mountain, at the head of Prospect 
Creek, in the southwest corner of T. 29 N., and in northwest comer of 
T. 28 N., R. 11 W., M. D. M. 

Garnet is found in the vicinity of Carrville. Discovered in 1899 by 
G. L. Carr; richly colored ouvaroite (lime-chrome garnet) in small 
dodecahedra] crystals from 1 to 3 millimeters in diameter, deep green 
in color, coating seams or cavities in chrome iron. 
Bibl. : Bull. No. 37, pp. 39, 53. 

PLATINUM. 

Platinum is found in a number of placer mines in this county, but 
more especially in a belt from 10 to 15 miles wide from Junction City 
westward down the Trinity River; also a belt running in a southerly 
direction and covering the east side of Hay Fork. All the mines 



TRINITY COUNTY. 179 

in the South Fork section carry some platinum associated with gold. 
One clean-up near Junction City gave returns of 7 ounces of platinum 
to 240 ounces of gold, and occurs in well rounded grains. In the 
vicinity of Hay Fork it occurs as shot. Trinity at one time led in 
the production of platinum, but Butte County now ranks first on 
account of the recovery in the dredging operations. 

Bibl: Report X, p. 717; Bull. No. 38, pp. 346-49, 369; Bull. 
No. 36, p. 104. 

QUICKSILVER. 

Surface indications of quicksilver ores are found in several places 
throughout Trinity County, but active mining for this metal has only 
been pursued in the northeastern part of the county, between Crow 
Creek, a tributary to the east fork of the Trinity River, and the north 
fork of the east fork of the Trinity River. On the surface the country 
rock is serpentine, at times very much altered, probably being a prod- 
uct 6i igneous rocks. The material wherein the ore bodies form is a 
feldspar porphyry. 

Bibl. : Reports VIII, p. 643; X, pp. 716-17; XII, pp. 371-72; Bull. 

No. 27, pp. 192, 193, 195; U. S. G. S., Monograph XIII, p. 366, 

1888. 

Altoona Quicksilver Mine, in Sec. 22, T. 38 N., R. 6 W., M. D. M., 
comprises the Trinity, Altoona and part of the Blockade mining claims, 
in the Shasta Forest Reserve, about 15 miles northeast of Carrville. 
It is owned by the Altoona Quicksilver Mining Company, of San 
Francisco. The holdings consist of several hundred acres of patented 
land ; elevation, 4700 feet ; acquired by this company in 1875, but 
prior to this time considerable quicksilver was extracted from surface 
workings. It was closed down from 1879 to 1894, on account of law- 
suits. Some work done since 1894.. There are four veins, three coming 
together at the lowest level, forming a mineralized zone 400 feet long, 
and from 4 to 50 feet wide; walls are quartz-porphyry; workings 
consist of a vertical shaft 450 feet deep, with 5 levels. In the lowest 
level, another shaft, 152 feet deep was sunk, from which 2 levels 
were driven. There are 7 levels in all, covering a territory of 1600 
feet in a northwest and 1120 feet in a northeast direction, within 
which 4 different veins were worked to a depth of 600 feet. Mine 
makes considerable, water, and was shut down in 1902, when fire 
destroyed part of the reduction plant, which has since been repaired. 
The reduction plant consists of a Knox & Osborne ore furnace. Several 
buildings on the property. It is the only quicksilver producer in the 
county, but only a few hundred dollars worth of this metal has been 



180 MINES AND MINERAL RESOURCES. 

the yearly output in recent years. Up to 1903 this mine produced 
29,181 flasks. The old dump is now being worked. Water in the 
lower levels 

Bibl.: Reports VIII, p. 643; X, p. 716; XII, p. 371; Bull. No. 27, 
p. 192; U. S. G. S., Monograph XIII, p. 366, 1888. 

Carr, consisting of one claim, in See. 22, T. 38 N., R. 6 W., M. D. M., 
is only slightly developed by open cuts, exposing a little ore. It is 
owned by G. Carr, of Carrville. 
Bibl. : Bull. No. 27, p. 193. 

Integral, a small quicksilver producer a few years ago, is located 
in Sees. 14, 15, 21, 22, 23, 27 and 28, T. 38 N., R. 6 W., M. D. M., 
near Altoona, and in the Shasta Forest Reserve. It is owned by the 
Integral Mining Company, of San Francisco; E. W. MeGraw, presi- 
dent. The holdings consist of 46 claims, and several sections of timber 
land. Ore occurs in lenses, but no large bodies exposed in the workings, 
which consist of a shaft 180 feet deep, 5 levels, a winze 120 feet deep, 
connecting the lower level with a tunnel 2760 feet long; also a few 
hundred feet of drifts ; considerable amount of surface work has been 
done. Reduction equipment consists of a 24-ton Knox & Osborne 
furnace. Several buildings on the property. Only do assessment work. 
Bibl.: Report, XII, p. 373; Bull. No. 27, pp. 193-194-195. 

Trinity, consists of three claims, undeveloped, in Sees. 21 and 22, 
T. 36 N., R. 6 W., near the Carr prospect. Owned by Rieschling 
Brothers. Idle. 

Bibl. : Bull. No. 27, p. 195. 

SOAPSTONE. 

Soapstone is found on Brown's Mountain, in Sec. 21, T. 33 N., 
R. 9 W., M. D. ^I., the croppings having a light gray color. It does 
not weather nor harden when exposed to the air. When put in the 
fire it does not disintegrate, and is used as fireproof material in fire- 
places. 

Bibl.: Bull. No. 38, pp. 353, 371. 



TRINITY COUNTY. 181 

BIBLIOGRAPHY. 

Publications by State Mining Bureau. 

Page 

Report II 35, 36, 47, 184, 190. 

Report IV 33, 158, 170, 310, 358. 

Report V 69. 

Report VI (Part 1) 102, 104, 106, 120, 127. Part 2, Page 188. 

Report Vn 189. 

Report VIII 63J, 643, 

Report IX 262. 

Report X 695, 727. 

Report XI 480, 484. 

Report XII 62, 63, 307, 314, 371, 372, 387. 

Report XIII .^^ 56^ .64. 437-.afiSy 523, 560, 661, 603, 604, 623, 

' ^~" — - — -" '6^6, 644. 

Page 

Bulletin No. 27 192, 193, 195. 

ailllPtin No ^6 102-104. 

Bulletin No. 37 39, 53. 

Bulletin Nol38 54, 94, 264, 272, 305, 306, 342, 346-349, 353, 360, 

bulletin No. 50 140-150. 

BulTttm No. T2"_r_ 53. 

BuiiltiS n2: 67:::::::::::::ii:ii:ii:i3', 21, 23. 24, 36, 42, 50, 74, 76, 80, 81, 123, 

127, 152, 180. 
Register of mines and map of Trinity County. 

Publications by U. S. Geological Survey. 

Monograph XIII. page 366, 1888. 
Mineral Resources of United States. 

Year Page 

1902 __ _ _239, 253. . 

1903 ^ I 173, 175, 176. , 

1904 _ _ _I ~ ~ 165, 166, 169-173, 177r 

1905 I_"""Z Z I ir~~r"r"'ril5, 164, 165-X69, 172, 182-184. 

1906 Z 178-185, 19'^. ' 

1907 (Part 1) 1 _"__"_.120. 189-193, 196, 198, 199. 228, 229. 

1908 (Part 1) 316-320, 824-326, 347, 353, 354^ 

1909 (Part 1) 261-265, 268, 269, 286, 28r. 

1910 (Part 1) 349-354, 358, 359, 379, 380.^ 

1911 (Part 1) 465-470, 473-476, 501-503) . 

1912 (Part 1) 571, 572, 574-577, 584-586, 600, 602, 631, 632. ^ 

Topogrraphical sheet, Shasta Quadrangle. 

Page 

Bulletin No. 193 51-54. 

Bulletin No. 196 9-24, 41-44, 52, 64, 1902. 

Bulletin No. 430 48-58. 1910. 

Bulletin No. 470 18-20, 21, 22, 25, 29, 1911. 

Bulletin No. 530 9-41. 1913 

Bulletin No. 540-A, 1913 

Other Publications. 

Geological History of Klamath Mountain Region. 

Diller, J. ^, Am. Jour. Sci., 4th Series, Vol. 15. p. 343. 
ri.ersey, O. H.,.Am. Geologist, Vol. 27, p. 245, 1901. 
Hersey, O. H.,t Am. JUUr. -^ci., 4th Series, Vol. 30, p. 273, 1912. 

Hersey, O. H., Gold Bearing Lodes in California. Am. Geologist, Vol. 25, pp. 76-96, 1900. : 
Hersey, O. H., Origin and Age of Certain Gold Deposits in Northern California. Am. 

Geologist, Vol. 24, pp. 38-43, 1899. 



INDEX. 



Pagb 
Abram & Blythe placer mine (see 
Nash) 

Accident mine 33 

Adams Exploration Co. 145 

Advance Consolidated mine 33-34 

Advance mine 78, 81 

Afterthought mine —14, 15, 16-17, 62, 65 

ore values at 17 

smelter of 16 

Ahlgren mine (see Russian Hill) 

Alaska mine 140 

Alata Lime & Brick Company 12 

Alice mine 34 

Allgood & Castell 116 

Alta Bert Dredging Co 158, 174-175 

Al Toland mine 34 

Altoona quicksilver mine 179 

American mine 34 

Amphlbole asbestos 8, 10 

Amy Balch mine 140 

Anaconda asbestos deposit 11 

Analysis, of copper ores 17, 18, 74 

of electric pig-iron 62 

of manganese ore 63 

of "Nipicuro" water 178 

Ancient river channels 

68, 78, 80, 99, 106, 130 

Anderson, Dr. Winslow 64, 124 

Anderson mine 114 

A^ntimony with copper ores 14, 49 

Antone quarry 126 

Armstrong mine 140 

Arps mine 17 

Arsenic with copper ore 24 

Asbestos, in Shasta County 8-11 

In Trinity County 132-133 

tests on 10-11 

Ascondry mine 117 

Assay values of copper ores 17, 18, 74 

of placer gold 159, 161, 163, 

165, 166, 167, 168, 169, 170, 171, 173 

Atlantic mine 35 

Auriferous gravel, in Shasta County 32 

gravel in Trinity County 139 

quartz veins in limestone 78 

veins, relation of, to peaks 77 

Australia mine 35 

Bag house at Mammoth mine 24 

Bailey mine 82 

Baines mine 114 

Baker Consolidated Copper Co 26 

Baker mine 82 

Balaklala mine 14, 17-18, 27 

operating costs at 18 

ore values at 18 

Bald Eagle mine 18 

Point mine 157 

Banghart mine («ee Mad Mule) 

Bank of Tehama 156 

Banner Mining Co 101 

Barite in copper ore 17 



Pagb 

Bark House Creek mine 100 

Bartel Jacobs mine 157 

Bartolet mine 171 

Barton and Barham quarry 123 

and Lang mine 126 

Base ores in Shasta County 7 

Bates & Van Matre 157 

Bear Tooth mine_- __ 134 

Beaudry mine 100, 157 

Beaver Creek district 70 

mine 115 

Belgium-Bohemian Mining Co 90 

Belle Josephine mine 100 

Bender mine 82 

Ben Neil mine 82 

Bennett Company 100, 105, 112 

Berry mine {see Evans) 

Bibliography, on Shasta County 65 

on Siskiyou County 128 

on Trinity County 182 

Bigelow mine , 140 

Big Bend hot springs 64 

Chief mine 140 

Creek mine 157 

East Fork mine 158 

Ledge mine 81 

Slide mine 115 

Black Bear mine 35, 78, 82-83 

Butte Mountain coal deposits 73 

Hawk mine 35, 83 

Lead mine (see Blue Gravel) 

Palangus mine 135 

Prince mine (aee Diamond) 

Spider mine 35 

Tom mine 51 

Blackmore mine (see Trinity Gold 

Dredge) 
Blake mine (see Whistle Bar) 

Blind Lode mine 83 

Blister copper 20 

Bloomer mine 100 

Bloss & McClary 158 

Blue Bird mine {see Lost Channel) 

Gravel mine 100, 158 

Hill mine 101 

Jacket mine 140-141 

Jay mine 83,141 

Jeans mine (see Cub Bear) 

Jib mine 172 

Lead mine 84, 158 

Ledge mine 73-74 

Bodie mine 35 

Bonanza King mine 132 

Bonanza mine 36, 84, 141 

Bower & Matlock mine 158 

Bowerman ocher deposit 177 

Bowersox mine 101 

Boyd mine 172 

Boyle mine __j._ 84 

Brazil mine 115 

Brick 6, 12, 72, 73 



184 



INDEX. 



Paob 

BriRht Star mine 36 

Brown ft George mine 101 

Bear mine 84. 130. 138, 141. 142 

chrome deposits {see Little 
Castle Creek) 

Brown's Bar mine 159 

Mountain limestone 176 

soapstone 180 

Brunswick mine 29, 36 

Brushy Canyon mine 19 

Brusse gem stone deposit 125 

Buckeye Bar mine 115 

Buckeye mine 173 

Buck mine 142 

Building stone (ace granite, sand- 
stone, tuff, etc.) 

Bully Choop mine 142 

Bully Hill mlne._14. 15. 19-20. 30. 62, 65 

base ores of 19 

copper oxides at 19 

silver In 20 

smelter of 20 

zinc In 20 

Bulwer ft Virginia mine 36 

Bumpass' Hell, boiling springs at 3 

Bunker Hill mine 37 

Burger mine 159 

Burns, Wm., mine 114 

Burton limestone deposit 121 

Butte County, platinum in 179 

Cacy mine 159 

California Bar mine 117 

and Detroit Mining Co 54 

Consolidated mine 84 

-Oregon Power Co 67, 72, 93, 120 

Sandstone & Construction Co. 64 

CjUifornite 125 

Callahan district 81 

Calumet Consolidated mine 37 

-Michigan Mining Co. 150 

Campbell mine 101 

Canal Gulch mine 115 

Canyon Creek district 138 

Cape Cod mine 85 

Carboniferous rocks, in Shasta 

County 14 

in Trinity County 176 

Carnegie Group, Ltd 37 

Carrie mine 142 

Carr mine 180 

Casey mine (see Klein) 

Castle Crag Soda Springs 124 

Rock Springs 64 

Cecilville mine 101 

Cement & Mule Creek mine 159 

Centennial mine 99 

Central mine 37,85 

"Chalk" In Shasta County 61 

Champion mine 85 

Chance mine 20 

Chapman and Fisher mine 159 

and Voluntine mine 38 

mine 142 

Cherry Hill mine 85 



Page 
China Creek mine 101 

Gulch mine (.see Hicks) 
Paul mine (see Johnson) 

Sam mine 99 

Chinese Company ___ ; 111, 157, 162 

Chloride mine (»ee also Globe) 138 

Chrome, In Shasta County 6, 11 

. in Siskiyou County 11, 72 

in Trinity County 133 

Chromlte (see chrome) 

Chrysotile asbestos 8, 10, 133 

Cinderella mine 1 135 

Cinnabar (see Quicksilver) 

Clara mine 38 

Classic Hill mine 81, 102 

Clay products, of Shasta County 12 

of Siskiyou County 72 

Clear Creek, dredging on 33 

Cleveland mine 38, 143 

Climatic conditions in Shasta County 7 

Climax mine 38 

Clipper mine (.see Carnegie) 

Clover mine 159 

Coal, In Shasta County 12-13 

In Siskiyou County 67, 73 

In Trinity County 133-134 

Coast Range system in Siskiyou 

County 67 

Coffee Creek district 129,138 

Mining ft Milling Co 148 

Colby mine (see Sturn) 

Coleman & Hill brickyard (see Alata) 

Colorado mine 38 

Columbia mine 85 

Commercial Copper & Gk)ld Mining 

Co. •- 94 

Compton mine 38 

Condensed mine 86 

Congress mine 20 

Connor mine 86 

Consolidated Gold Dredging Co 39 

Kascinaska mine 39 

Siwash mine 117 

Copley mine 20, 39 

Copper, antimony with 14 

arsenic with 24 

barite with 17 

blister 20 

Button mine 135 

City mill 30 

City ores 15 

geology of, in Shasta County_13-16 
gold and sliver with— 14, 24, 26, 29 

in Shasta County 13-29 

in Siskiyou County 73-76 

in Trinity County-_131, 132, 134-138 

lead with 14 

matte 20, 24 

Mountain Consolidated Mining 

Co 28 

nickel with 75 

ore deposits in Shasta County. _ 15 

ores, assays of 17, 18, 74 

Queen mine 74, 135 

zinc with 14, 17, 21, 64, 65 



INDEX. 



185 



Pagb 

Corona de Oro mine 160 

Corrine mine 39 

Cortez mine 39 

Costs, operating 17, 18, 

40, 49, 102, 121, 144, 149, 162, 167, 168 

various 17, 20, 49, 

100, 102, 106, 118, 121, 134, 147, 172 

Cottonwood district 80 

Craig mine - 143 

Crapo mine 102 

Crawley mine 86 

Cretaceous rocks in Shasta County. 14 

Cronln mine 102 

Crown Point mine 135 

Crystal group (copper) 20 

mine (gold) 40 

Cub Bear and Blue Jeans mines 86 

Cummings mine 86 

Curley mine 160 

Daggett mine 99, 100 

Dakin Company 58 

Dannenbrink Estate 160, 168 

mine 160 

Davis mine 74, 102, 103 

Deadwood district 138 

Deakln & Taylor mine (see old 
Spanish) 

De Dallis mine 20 

Dedrick district 130 

Deep Channel mine 117 

Deer Lick Springs 177, 178 

De La Mar, J. R 20 

Delta Consolidated mine 40 

Mining Company 6, 40 

railroad 6 

Denny-Bar Co. 90 

Denny mine 102 

Denver Mining Co. 97* 

Description of Siskiyou County 

streams 67-70 

Desilhorst, William, scoop dredge 33 

Dewey mine 72, 87 

Devonian rocks, in Shasta County 14 

in Trinity County 176 

Diamond mine 40 

Diatomaceous earth (see infusorial) 

Dick Morris mine 104 

Diller, J. S 65, 181 

Dixie Queen mine 143 

Dog Creek district 31 

Dolly Varden mine 160 

Donkey mine 21,65 

zinc in 65 

Doolittle mine 117 

Double Eagle & Little Quartz mine_ 87 

Douglas City mine 171 

Dredges, gold, in Shasta County 

30, 33, 39 

in Siskiyou County 69, 104, 120 

in Trinity County 130. 139, 175 

platinum recovered by 179 

Drinkwater mine 160 

Driver mine 160 

Dunnigan mine 104 

East Fork district 130, 139 

mine 161 



Page 
Eastlick mine 79, 103 

Eastman mine 161 

Edna B. mine 41 

El Dorado & Eureka mines 29, 41 

Electric power plants 8, 72, 132, 149 

Electric smelting of iron ore 7, 61-62 

Eliza mine 87 

Elk Creek mine 87, 117 

Elliott mine 104, 173 

Ellston mine . 104 

Emigrant mine (see Truscott) 

Empire Bar mine 117 

Empire mine 41 

Enrlght mine (see Old Spanish) 

Enterprise mine 115, 139, 143-144 

Esperanza mine 41 

Espey mine 105 

Eureka mine (see also El Dorado)- 144 

mine (copper) 135 

Eureka Tellurium mine 42 

Evans Bar mine 161 

Evans mine 118 

Eveleth's mine (see Brown Bear) 

Evening Star mine 42 

Everill mine 118 

Excelsior mine 144 

Fagundez mine (see also Hump- 
back) 78 

' Fairvlew mine 144 

Farrington limestone deposit 121, 123 

Fioch Bros, quarry 127 

Fire clay 12 

First National Copper Co.Tipany 17 

First quartz location in Shasta 

County — 60 

Fir Tree mine 105 

Five Pines mine 139,146 

rich pockets in 146 

Flat Creek district 29 

Fleetwood & Nannie S. mine 88 

Florence mine 42 

Ford & Foley mine 171 

Forget-Me-Not mine — — 145 

Forks of Salmon River mine 105-106 

Fort Goff mine 106 

Fortuna mine 135 

Foster Gold Mining Co 154 

Fountain Head mine 145 

Four Point mine 145 

Franklin mine (see also Milkmaid) _42, 88 

Freight rates to Trinity County 134 

French Bar Placer mine 118 

Gulch district 29,31 

mine (see American) 
John mine (see Squaw Gulch) 

Syndicate of Paris 102 . 

Friday and Lowden group 21 

Furnaces, electric, for smelting iron 62 

Furnaceville copper district 13 

Gambrlnus mine 42 

Garden Gulch mine 161 

Gardner and Deming mine — 106 

Bros, mine (see Red Hill) 

Garfield mine 43 

Garret 178 

Garvey brickyard - 72 



186 



INDEX. 



Paob 

Geeshan ft Kellner mine 106 

Gem mine 161 

Gems (»ee Ornamental Stones) 
GeoloRleal and topographical fea- 
tures of Siskiyou County 67 

Geoloify, of copper deposits In 

Shasta County 13-16 

of gold districts In Shasta 

County 31 

of Siskiyou County 67, 76-81 

of Trinity County 129, 130, 138 

Giant Consolidated irroup 21 

Gladstone mine 29,31,43-44 

section of, ore shoots In 43 

Glenn County Mining Co 54 

Globe mine 138,145-147 

Gold Ball mine 78 

Belt mine 21 

districts, of Shasta County. -__ 31 

of Siskiyou County 77-81 

of Trinity County 138-139 

Dollar mine 162 

dredging 30, 

33, 69. 104, 120. 130. 139, 174-175 

drift mines 116-120, 173 

geology of 31, 67. 130, 138 

gravels 32, 78, 80, 99, 129. 139 

ground sluicing for 114-116. 172 

Hill mine 89.106 

hydraulic mines ___100-114, 157-172 

In copper ores 14, 24, 26, 29 

In Shasta County 29-60 

in Siskiyou County 

68, 69, 70-72, 76-121 

in Trinity County_-131-132, 138-175 

Lead mine 118 

placer mines 33, 99. 157-174 

platinum with 125, 178 

quartz mines __33-60. 81-98. 140-157 
quartz ores, smelting of. with 

copper ^^ 

Run mine '^^ 

value of per ounce, from placers 

159, 161, 163. 165. 

166, 167, 168, 169, 170. 171. 173 
Golden Ball mine (see California 
Consolidated) 

Chest mine 147 

Crown mine 44 

Eagle mine 88 

Jubilee mine 147-148 

mine (see Brown Bear) 
Nugget mine (see Elliott) 

Seal mine 88 

West mine 88 

Golinsky group 22 

Gordan mine 106 

Gossan 15, 26, 27 

Granite in Shasta County 60 

in Siskiyou County 121 

in Trinity County 131, 175 

mine (copper) 135 

Graton, L. C 65 

Gravel, auriferous _32, 78, 80, 99, 129, 139 
Graves mine 173 



Page 
Gray Eagle mine (see also Sunny 
Hill) 45 

Great Falls ft Hope mines 44 

Verde mine 22 

Western Development Co 16 

Greenhorn district 114 

Gulch mine (see Beaudry) 

Green Mountain Tiger mine 79 

Grey E:agle mine (copper) 73, 74, 81 

Grlbble mine (see Chapman ft Fisher) 

Grlder mine 107 

Griffin onyx quarries 125 

Grizzly Gulch mine 89 

Gumboat mine 89 

Haas mine 162 

Hackerman Bar mine (see Brown's 
Bar) 

Hager ft Haas mine 162 

Halcyon mine 29, 45 

Haley mine 107 

Halstead mine (see Haley) 

Hamilton brickyard 72 

Hammer mine 89 

Hang Bar mine 162 

Hansen mine 89 

Happy Camp district 81 

copper mines In 73 

Happy Home mine 107, 162 

Hardscrabble mine 45, 78, 89, 107 

Hardtack mine 148 

Hard Times mine 148 

Harrison Gulch district 31, 32 

Hartford mine 22 

Harvey mine 171 

Hasklns mine 162 

Hatchet Creek mine (see Hasklns) 

Haunted Bar mine 173 

Hawkins Bar mine 163 

HawklnsvlUe district _ 114 

Hay Fork Mining & Milling Co 148 

Valley coal field 133 

limestone 176 

Hazel Creek placers 33 

Gold Mining Co 43, 89 

mine 81, 89 

Headlight mine 148-149 

Henderson mine 163 

Heroult. electric smelting at 7, 61 

Herr ranch, sandstone on 126 

Hersey, O. H 181 

Hickey mine 108 

Hicks mine 90 

Hidden Treasure mine 173 

"High grade" ore 66 

Highland mine 45, 78, 90 

History of mining in Shasta County 30 

in Trinity County 130 

Hi You mine 108 

Hoboken mine • 91 

Hoffmann continuous kiln for burn- 
ing lime 62 

Holden chrome claims 11 

Holt & Gregg, brickyard 12 

lime kiln 63 

quarry 62 



INDEX. 



187 



Page 

Homestake mine 78, 91 

Hook & Ladder mine 163 

Hooper Hill mine 108 

Hoosier Hill mine 108 

Hope mine (see also Great Falls) 46 

Horseshoe and Homestake mine 163 

Horseshoe mine (see Layman) 

Horsetown 30, 32 

Hot springs (see also under Mineral 

Water) 3 

Huertevant mine (see Valdor) 

Huey Hill mine 108 

Humboldt Gas & Electric Co 132 

Placer Mining Co 168 

Humbug Creek district 70, 80 

Hummer mine 74 

Humpback mine 91 

Hunter mine 149 

Hurst & Eliason mine (see Steiner's 
Flat) 

Hyampom Valley coal field 133 

Hydraulic Hill mine 163 

Hydraulic mines (see also under 

Gold) 66 

Hydroelectric plants 8, 72, 132 

Igo district 31 

Imperial Heights mine 108 

Incorporated Company of New York 74 

of San Francisco 93 

Incorporated Eastern Company 93 

Indian Bar mine 115 

Creek & Panwocket mine 163 

Creek district 69 

Creek Mining Co 88 

Creek Placer Mining Co 159 

Inez mine 46 

Infusorial earth 61 

IngersoU mine 22 

Ingleside mine 164 

Integral mine . 180 

Inyo mine 91 

Iron Mountain copper district 13 

mine 15, 25 

Iron ore, electric smelting of 7, 61—62 

in Shasta County 6, 7, 61-62 

In Siskiyou County 67, 121 

in Trinity County 176 

Ironsides mine 91 

Isabel mine 149 

Island Mountain Consolidated mine_ 

136, 137 

Jack Lowden mine 108 

Jackson and Carter mine 137 

mine (see Buckeye Bar) 

Jacob mine 164 

Jacoby mine 149-150 

Jasper 178 

Jerusalem mine 150 

Jewel quarry 60 

J. I. C. mine 46 

Joe Ramus mine 109 

John Miller mine 115 

Johnson & China Paul mine 79. 91 

Joss mine j. 164 

Jubilee mine 46 

18— C14456 



Page 
Jumbo mine (see Ruby Basin) 

Jumping Jack mine 22 

Kangaroo mine 92 

Katie May mine 92 

King and Bayles mine (see King) 

mine (see also Golden West)-_ 164 

Solomon mine 92 

Kit Carson mine 46 

Klamath Hot Springs 125 

Klamath River 66, 189 

district 67-68 

Gold Mining Co 118 

placer gold yield on 99 

Klein mine 109 

Knob Gulch placers 32 

Kols wing dam mine 99 

Kosh Creek mine 23 

Laconia mine 46 

La Grange hydraulic mine 130, 164 

Lapman mine 150 

Larsen mine 165 

Lassen Peak (see Mt. Lassen) 

Last Chance mine 150 

Mining Co. 162 

Laurel mine 150 

Layman mine 150 

Lead 6 

Lewiston district 130 

Liberty district 114 

mine 46 

Lignite (see Coal) 

Lime (see also Limestone) 62 

Limestone auriferous quartz veins in 78 

Limestone in Shasta County 6, 14, 62 

in Siskiyou County 121-123 

in Trinity County 176 

Little Bonsa mine ^.__ 92 

Castle Creek chrome deposits 11 

Joe mine 165 

mine 75 

Queen mine (see Morrison & 

Carlock) 
Wonder mine (see Ironsides) 

Lodi mine 47 

Log Cabin Bar mine 165 

Lone Pine mine 137 

Long Gulch mine 165 

Loraine mine 23 

Lost Cliord mine 47 

Lou Daggett mine (see Siskiyou 

River Bend) 
Lowden mine (see also Jack Low- 
den) 109 

Lower Buckeye mine 165 

Lower Button's Creek mine 165 

Luce quarry 123 

Lucky Bob mine 118 

Lucky Strike mine 92, 173 

and Effie Belle mine 166 

Macadam, in Shasta County 63 

in Siskiyou County 71, 123 

Mac'Parlane mine (see Woodbury) 

Mad Mule mine 47 

Ox mine 47 



188 



INDEX. 



Paob 

Maduro mine 48 

Malloy mine («ee Oregonian) 

Mammoth copper mine 14, 23-25 

bag house at 24 

gold In 24 

smelting practice at 24 

top-slicing stoping method in 23 

Mammoth Mining Co 28 

Manganese In Shasta County — . 63 

Manzanita Bar mine 99 

Maple Creek mine 166 

Maple mine 150 

Maplesden mine (see Happy Home) 

wing dam mine 99 

Marble, in Shasta County 63 

in Siskiyou County 123-124 

in Trinity County 177 

Mountain 122, 123 

Marrlan and Goodale mine 93 

Marshall and Walters mine 25 

Martinez, smelter of Mountain cop- 
per Co. at 26 

Mason and Thayer mine (see Craig) 
Bar and China Creek mine (see 
Larsen ) 

Masterson quarry 60 

Matte, copper 20, 24 

McAdams Creek district 69 

McAtee Bar mine 166 

McCall mine 48 

McClaughrey group 93 

McCloud River 6, 13 

McClure mine 25 

McConnell, Wm., claim 99 

McCreary mine (see Lowden) 

McDaniels quarry 123 

McGulJfey mine 109 

McKeen mine (see Cummings) 

McKinney Creek mine 116 

McKinnon mine 48 

McMahon mine 119 

McMurray and Hupp mine 171 

McNeal mine (see Nordheimer) 

Meckel mine 166 

Michigan-Salmon mine 109-110 

Midas mine 30, 32, 48-49 

Miles asbestos deposit 11 

Milich mine 110 

Milkmaid and Franklin mines__29, 49-50 

Miller, John, mine 115 

mine 119, 166 

Mills, early, in Sliasta County 30 

Mineral Mountain mine 25 

Paint in Trinity County 177 

Mineral production, of Shasta County 6 

of Siskiyou County 70-72 

of Trinity County 131-132 

Mineral resources, of Sliasta County 7 

of Siskiyou County 70 

of Trinity County 131 

Mineral springs (see Mineral water) 

Mineral water, in Shasta County 6, 64 

in Siskiyou County 124-125 

in Trinity County 177-178 



Page 
MlnersvlUe district 139 

Mining conditions in Trinity County 130 
Mining industries of Shasta County. 7 

Minnesota mine 50 

Modoc mine 151 

Monarch mine 75, 93 

Monk mine 166 

Montezuma mine (see also Summit) 

81, 119, 167 

Morris mine 25, 172 

Morrison and Carlock mine 93 

Gulch mine 166 

Morton and Bliss mine 50 

Mott, M., mine 99 

Mountain Belle mine 80 

Boomer mine 151 

Copper Co. 14, 25 

mine 25 

smelter of 26 

Mines Syndicate Ltd 26 

Monarch mine 26 

Mount Ltassen 3-6 

Pleasant mine 50 

Shasta 3,66 

Gold Mines Corporation 25 

mine 50 

Vernon mine 93 

Mule Creek mine 159 

Murphy mine 1 137 

Murray mine 51 

Nash mine 167 

Native Son mine 110 

Negunda mine 173 

Nellie and Annie mine 51 

New River Placer mine 167 

York and Skylark mines 51 

Niagara mine 51 

Nickel in copper ore 75 

Nigger Boy mine 93 

Hill mine 167 

Nightingale mine (see Siskiyou mine) 

"Nipicuro" water, analysis of 178 

Noble Electric Steel Co 61-62 

Nonpariel mine 137, 15\ 

Nordheimer mine 110 

Northern California Dredge Co 120 

Power Co. 8, 17, 18. 26, 28, 

31, 39, 44. 47, 49, 54, 56, 59. 62, 63 

North Fork district 130 

Star mine 52, 151 

Oak Bar district 114 

O'Connell mine 167 

O'Donnell mine 116 

Ohio group 94 

mine 26 

Old Diggings district 29 

Highland mine (see Highland) 

Indian mine 94 

Spanish mine 52 

Vet and Eclipse mine 94 

Olive mine 52 

Onley Creek 32 

, Ono district 31 



INDEX. 



189 



Paob 

Operating costs 17, 18, 

40, 49, 102, 121, 144, 149, 162, 167, 168 

Oregon Consolidated mine 26 

Gulch 32, 176 

Oregonian grroup 94 

Oriole mine 152 

Ornamental stones 125, 178 

Oro Fino district 79 

mine 52 

Grande mine 94, 152 

Vista mine 52 

Oswald mine (see Big Bast Fork) 

Ouvaroite garnet 178 

Overton mine 78, 94 

Ozark mine 152 

Pacific Coast Asbestos Co 11 

Pacific Improvement Co 124 

Paine mine 116 

Paradise Flat mine 119 

Parker, H. L 8 

quarry 124 

Pattison spring 177 

Peaks, relation of auriferous veins to 77 
Pearl mine (see Ruby) 
Peck mine {see Afterthought) 
Peerless mine (see IngersoU) 

Phillips mine 75 

Pierson & Co. mine 99 

Piety Hill mine (see Hardscrabble) 

Pilot Knob mine 95 

Pine Grove mine 100, 110 

Pitt River 6, 13 

floating mine timbers down 19 

mine 26 

Placer gold, assay value of 

159, 161, 163, 

165, 166, 167, 168, 169, 170, 171, 173 
Placer mines (see under Gold) 

yield of, in Siskiyou County 99 

Platinum in Siskiyou County 

67, 70, 71. 102, 125 

in Trinity County 131- 

132, 158. 159, 161. 163. 165, 
167, 168, 169, 171, 173. 179-180 

Plutus mine 75 

Poison Camp coal field 134 

Polar Bear mine 75 

Polkingham mine 27 

Popejoy mine 27 

Portuguese Company 99 

mine 111 

Post and Wilson mine 168 

Potter and Humboldt mine 168 

Potilla mine 167 

Potosi mine 52 

Poverty Flat mine -— 168 

Power plants (see Electric) 
Preckel mine (see Hooper Hill) 

Preston Peak mine 75 

Prim and Dougherty chrome claims 11 

Princess mine 53 

Prospect Hill mine 95 

Providence mine 95 

Pyrites 6 



Pagk 

Quartz Gulch mine 111 

Hill mine 39, 80, 95 

mills In Shasta County SO 

Valley district 78 

Quicksilver in Siskiyou County 126 

in Trinity County. _1 3 1-1 3 2, 179-180 

Quimby mine 137, 152, 168 

Quinn ranch, dredging on 54 

Railroad and Mt Morensis mine 168 

Rainbow mine 75, 173 

Ralston mine 153 

Ramis mine (see Dick Morris) 
Ramus mine (see Joe Ramus; also 
Sylvester Ramus) 

Ray mine 153 

Raymond, R. W 65 

Reading clay deposit 12 

Reading, origin of name 30 

Redding Brick & Tile Company 12 

Major 130 

Municipal quarry 63 

Red Flat mine 168 

Hill mine L 53. 95 

(see also Michigan-Salmon ; 
also Russian Hill ; atho 
Bartel Jacobs) 

Point mine 171 

Reeder group 96 

Reid mine 53 

Reindeer mine 153 

Reynolds clay deposit 73 

Richman Company 93 

Ridgeway mine 153 

Riley and Bliss mine (see Morton & 
Bliss) 

Robinson Gulch mine 96 

Rocky Bar mine (see Trinity Gold 
Dredge) 

Roe mine 168 

Roseman mine 27 

Rothrop mine 76 

Rough & Frye mine 96 

Ruby and Pearl mine 53 

Basin mine 96 

Rush Creek quarry 175 

Russian Dump mine (see Russian 
Hill) 

Hill mine 111 

Rycroft mine 111 

Sacramento and Eastern railroad.- 19, 61 

River 6, 13, 3-, 66 

Saint Lawrence mine 96 

Salmon Mountain 77 

Salmon River district 77 

Sam Hampton mine 174 

Houston mine 53 

Sandstone, in Shasta County 64 

in Siskiyou County 127 

Santana Brothers mine 116 

Sauer Kraut mine 111 

Scharbor mine (see Gem) 

Schloner mine 169 

Schuler mine 119 



190 



INDEX. 



Page 

Scott Bar district 69, 79 

Mountain 130 

River district 68 

Dredging Co. 102, 120 

Mining Co. ^ 85 

Springs 124 

Scottish Cliief mine 53 

"Seam diggings" 76, 81 

Section, of Gladstone mine 43 

of Headliglit mine 150 

of Uncle Sam mine 57 

Seiad mine 112 

Self-Sliooter mine (see Ellston) 

Senger mine 169 

Shasta Copper Co 63 

Shasta County 3-65 

antimony In 14, 19 

asbestos in 6. 8-11 

auriferous gravel in 32 

bibliography on 65 

brick in 6 

clirome in 6, 11 

clay products in 6, 12 

climatic conditions in 7 

c«al in 12 

copper in 6. 13-29 

geology of 13-16 

dredging in 30, 33, 39 

early mills in 30 

first quartz location in 60 

geology of 13-16, 31 

gold in 6, 29-60 

districts in 29-32 

dredging 30, 33, 39 

geology of 31 

granite in 60. 

gravel, auriferous in 32 

hydroelectric plants in 8 

infusorial earth in_ 61 

iron ore in 6, 15, 61-62 

lead in 6, 14 

limestone in 1 6, 14, 62 

macadam in 63 

manganese in 63 

marble in 63 

mineral production of 6 

resources of 7 

springs In 64 

water in 6, 64 

mining Industries of 7 

pyrites in 6 

sandstone in 64 

silver in 6, 14 

slate in 6 

stone industry in 6 

timber supply of^ 6, 14 

transportation facilities in 6 

tuff in 64 

water resources of 6, 14 

zinc in 14. 17, 19, 64-65 

Shasta district 29 

Dredging Co. 54 

King mine 14, 27 

May Blossom mine 28 

Mining Co. 86 

Monarch Mining Co 42 

Springs 124 



Page 
Sheffield mine (see Uncle Sam Con- 
solidated) 
Sheridan mine 169 

Shiner mine 76 

Shoo Fly mine (see Haskins) 

Shur, Yunker & De Witt 87 

Sierra Buttes Mining Co 58 

Nevadas in Siskiyou County 67 

Sightman mine (see Cecilvllle) 

Silver 6, 67, 70-72, 131-132 

in copper ores 14 

Falls mine 54 

Grey mine 153 

Simas and Rose mine 116 

Siskiyou and Nightingale mines 54 

Coal Mfg. Co 73 

Siskiyou County 66-128 

bibliography on 128 

brick in 72, 73 

chrome in 67, 71, 72 

clays in 72, 73 

coal in 67, 72, 73 

copper in 67, 71, 73-76 

dredging in 69, 104, 120-121 

electrical power plants in 72 

gems in (see also Ornamental 

stones) 71, 72 

geology of 67, 76-81 

gold in __- 68, 69, 70-72, 76-121 

districts 77-81 

dredging 69, 104, 120-121 

drift mines 116-120 

geology of 76-81 

ground sluicing 114-116 

hydraulic mines 100-114 

placer mines 99-100 

quartz mines 81-98 

granite in 121 

gravel channels in 68, 78, 80, 99 

iron in 121 

lead In 67, 71 

limestone in 71, 121-123 

macadam in 71, 123 

marble in 122. 123 

mineral production of 70-72, 99 

water in 67, 70-72, 124-125 

ornamental stones in 125 

platinum in 67, 70, 71, 102, 125 

pumice in 71, 72 

quicksilver in 126 

rubble in 71 

sandstone in __ ^ 71, 126-127 

silver in 67, 70-72 

soapstone in 127-128 

stone industry in 71, 72 

streams in 67-70 

table of placer production of 99 

talc in 127 

water resources of 67-70, 72 

Siskiyou Dredging Co 120-12L 

- Klondike mine 112 

Mineral Springs 125 

" Mines Company 112 

Quicksilver Mining Cq 126 

River Bend mine 112 

Syndicate 86 

Skelton mine 96 



INDEX. 



191 



Page 
Skylark mine (see New York) 
Slate 6 

Creek mine 169 

Slattery & Welch mine 54 

Slide Creek mine (see Beaudry) 

Slide mine 55 

Slumway mine 112 

Smith mine 154 

Peter, clay deposit 73 

Snider mine (see Carnegie) 

Snow Gulch mine 174 

Soapstone, in Siskiyou County__127-128 

in Trinity County 180 

Southern Pacific Railroad Co 6, 66, 72 

clay deposit of 12 

limetsone deposits of 176 

ocher deposit of '.- 177 

sandstone quarries of 127 

South Fork district (see Igo) 

mine (see also Silver Falls) 169 

Sowden mine 169 

Specimen mine 96 

Spencer mine 80 

Spread Eagle njine 28 

Squaw Creek district 32 

Gulch mine 113 

Mining Co. 87 

Stark, J. M 3 

Star mine 97 

of the East mine 154 

State Mining Bureau publications 

65, 128, 181 

Stauffer Chemical Co 29 

Steele quarry 123 

Steiner's Flat mine 170 

Stella district 31 

Sterling mine . 97 

Stevenson mine 28 

Stewart's Fork district 139 

Stock & Stevens asbestos quarries 8-11 

Stone industry, in Shasta County 6 

in Siskiyou County 71, 72 

in Trinity County 132 

Stope map, of Gladstone mine 43 

of Uncle Sam mine 57 

Stowell mine 28 

Streams of Siskiyou County 67-70^ 

Stribbling mine 173 

Sturdivant mine . 170 

Sturn mine 113 

Suction dredges for gold 33 

Sugar Hill mine 119 

I Loaf mine 28 

Sulphide mine 29 

Sulphur, at hot springs 3 

Springs mine -. — 116 

Summit and Montezuma mines 55 

group (copper) 29 

mine (see Sunny Hill) 

Sunday Gulch mine 55 

Sundown mine 97 

Sunny Hill mine 55 

Supplanter mine 154 

Sybel mine (see Accident) 

Sykes Mining Co 158 



Page 

Sylvester Ramus mine 116 

Table of mineral production, of 

Shasta County 6 

of Siskiyou County 70-72, 99 

of Trinity County 131-132 

placer gold yield in Siskiyou 

County 99 

Taft mine 97 

Talc (see also Soapstone) 127 

Tanglefoot mine . 55 

Taylor & Maplesden mine (see Deep 
Cliannel ) 

Tebbe mine 76 

Teddy-Avalon mine 97 

Tellurides 144 

Ten Cent Gulch mine 170 

Tener mine 170 

Ten Eyck mine 113 

Texas Bar mine 170 

Consolidated mine __ 56 

Spring quarry 64 

Thomain mine 113 

I Thompson Creek quarry 124 

Three Sisters mine 56 

i Timber supply, of Shasta County 6, 14 

I of Trinity County 130 

Toland mine (see Al Toland) 

j Tolly Hill mine 170 

1 Tom Green mine 56 

Rogers mine 116 

Top Notch mine 171 

Topographical features, of Siskiyou 

County 67 

of Trinity County 129 

Top-slicing stoping method 23 

Toughnut mine 154 

Trail Creek mine 97 

Transportation facilities 6, 66, 130 

Triangle mine 154 

Triassic rocks in Shasta County 14 

Trinity Asbestos Mining Co 133 

Bonanza King mine 154-155 

Center district 129. 130, 139 

Consolidated Hydraulic mine 171 

Consolidated mine 58 

Copper Co. 27 

Trinity County 129-181 

asbestos in 132-133 

Bank 153 

bibliography on 181 

chromite in 133 

coal in 133-134 

copper in 131-132, 134-138 

dredging in 130-139 

electrical power plants in 132 

gems in (see Ornamental stones) 

geology of 130, 138 

gold in 130. 131, 132, 138-175 

dredging 130, 139, 174-175 

drift mines 173-174 

geology of 138 

ground sluicing mines 172-173 

hydraulic mines 157-172 

mining districts 138-139 

pl9.cer mines 157-175 



192 



INDEX. 



Page 
Trinity County — Continued. 

quartz mines ^_140-157 

granite in 175-176 

history of 130 

Iron In 176 

limestone In 176 

marble in 177 

mineral paint in 177 

production of 131-132 

resources of 131 

water In 177-178 

mining conditions in 130 

districts in 138-139 

ornamental stones In 178 

platinum In 

131-132. 158, 159, 161. 

163, 165. 167, 169, 171, 173, 178-179 

power plants in 132 

quicksilver In 131-132, 179-180 

silver in 131-132 

soapstone in 180 

stone industry in 132 

table of mineral production of 

131-132 

tellurldes in 144 

timber resources of 130 

topography of 129 

water resources of 130 

Trinity Dredging Co 120 

Exploration Co. 173 

Gold Dredge Co 132, 175 

Gold Mining & Reduction Co. 

132, 148 

Gold Mining Co 165, 170 

Hydraulic Gold Mining Co 167 

quicksilver mine 180 

River 129, 130 

River Hydraulic Gold mine 163 

River Mining Co 171 

True Blue mine 156 

Fissure mine 156 

Truscott mine 58 

Tuff 64 

Tuscan tuff 64 

Twan and Hannan mine 97 

Two and a Half mine 113 

Uncle Sam Consolidated mine 78, 98 

Uncle Sam mine (Shasta County) — 

32, 57, 58 

plan of workings of 57 

stope map of 57 

mine (Trinity County) 156 

Union Hill mine 171 



Page 

United States Greologlcal Survey 

6, 65, 128. 181 

Mining & Smelting Co 23 

University of California publications 65 

Upper Soda Springs 124 

Upton mine (see Corona de Oro) 

Utah and California mine 59 

Valdor mine 172 

Vatinell & Co. mine 99 

Venicia 156 

Vesuvianite 125 

Victor mine 59 

Mining Co. 55 

Power and Mining Co 48, 59 

Vine Oak mine 138 

Virginia Bar mine 99 

Virginia mine (see Bulwer) 
Voluntine mine (see Chapman) 

Vulcan mine 22 

Wagner Mining Co 153 

Walker clay deposit 73 

mine (see Utah; also Two and 
a Half) 
Ward & Trinity mine (see La Grange) 

Warm castle Soda Springs 125 

Washington mine 29, 30, 60 

Water resources of Shasta County 6, 14 

Weaver Basin 129 

Welch mine 76 

Western Exploitation Co 49 

Exploration Co. 18 

Zinc Co. 21 

Whistle Bar mine 120 

White Bear mine 98 

Cloud Pocket mine 156 

Wicks mine i 98 

Wilker mine 174 

Willard mine 113 

William Morris mine 172 

Wilson mine , 120 

Windeler mine 114 

Wingate Hill mine (see Quartz Hill) 

Wing-dams, mining by 66 

Wm. Burns mine 114 

Wood & Fehely 114 

Woodbury mine 172 

Wright and Fletcher mine 79, 114 

Yankee Dam mine 99 

Yellow Astor mine 156 

Butte mine 76 

Yreka Creek district 69 

Zarina mine 78, 98 

Zinc - 64-65 

associated with copper ore. 17, 21, 65 



RETURN CIRCULATION DEPARTMENT 

202 Main Librory 642-3403 



LOAN PERIOD T 2 



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LIBRAR^Y^OSE 



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DUE AS STAMPED BELi 


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LIBRARY 


JSE FEB 10 '80 




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SBNTTONILL 






OCT 2 3 1936 






U. C. BERKELEY 







UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, BERKELEY 
FORM NO. DD6A, 20m, 1 1 /78 BERKELEY, CA 94720 



YC 69921 




■C i f)7Z 



1 1 



UNIV ERSip OF CAU FOR NIA UBBARY