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Full text of "North Carolina manual [serial]"

THE LIBRARY OF THE 

UNIVERSITY OF 

NORTH CAROLINA 




THE COLLECTION OF 
NORTH CAROLINIANA 



C917.05 
N87m 
1949 
C.4 




7482476 



This book may be kept out one month unless a recall 
notice is sent to you. It must be brought to the North 
Carolina Collection (in Wilson Library) for renewal. 



Form No- A-369 



NORTH CAROLINA 

MANUAL 

1949 



NORTH CAROLINA MANUAL 

1949 




Issued by 

Thad Eure 

Secretary of State 

Raleigh 



1949 



JANUARY 

S M T W T F S 

1 

■2 :\ 1 .-> () 7 !! 

') 10 11 12 1:5 1 1 ir> 

16 17 18 l<) 20 21 22 
2.i 21 2r> 26 27 28 29 
30 31 

MAY 

S M T W T F S 

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15 16 17 18 19 20 21 

22 23 24 25 26 27 28 

29 30 31 

SEPTEMBER 

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KEHRtJARY 

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27 28 

JUNE 

S M T W T F S 

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12 13 14 15 16 17 18 

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26 27 28 29 30 

OCTOBER 

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30 31 



MARCH 

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12 3 4 5 

6 7 H 9 10 11 12 

13 I I 15 16 17 18 19 

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JULY 

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31 

NOVEMBER 

S M T VV T F S 

12 3 4 5 

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APRIL 

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AUGUST 

S M T W T F S 

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14 15 16 17 18 19 20 

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DECEMBER 

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1950 



JANUARY 

S M T W T F S 

12 3 4 5 6 7 

8 9 10 11 12 13 14 

15 16 17 18 19 20 21 

22 23 24 25 26 27 28 

29 30 31 

MAY 

S M T W T F S 

12 3 4 5 6 

7 8 9 10 11 12 13 

14 15 16 17 18 19 20 

21 22 23 24 25 26 27 
28 29 30 31 

SEPTEMBER 

S M T W T F S 

1 2 

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 

10 11 12 13 14 15 16 

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FEBRUARY 

S M T W T F S 

12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 

12 13 14 15 16 17 18 

19 20 21 22 23 24 25 

26 27 28 

JUNE 

S M T W T F S 

12 3 

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 
25 26 27 28 29 30 

OCTOBER 

S M T W T F S 

12 3 4 5 6 7 

8 9 10 11 12 13 14 

15 16 17 18 19 20 21 

22 23 24 25 26 27 28 

29 30 31 



MARCH 

S M T W T F S 

12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 
12 13 14 15 16 17 18 
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 
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JULY 

S M T W T F S 
1 

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 

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30 31 

NOVEMBER ' 

S M T W T F S 

12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 
12 13 14 15 16 17 18 
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 

26 27 28 29 30 



APRIL 

S M T W T F S 
1 

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 

23 24 25 26 27 28 29 
30 

AUGUST 

S M T W T F S 

12 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 

13 14 15 16 17 18 19 

20 21 22 23 24 25 26 
27 28 29 30 31 



DECEMBER 

S M T W T F S 

1 2 
3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 
31 



ryj'. 



TO THE 

1949 MEMBERS OF THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY 
OF NORTH CAROLINA 

TO THE 

STATE, COUNTY, CITY AND TOWN OFFICIALS 

AND TO THE 

PEOPLE OF THE OLD NORTH STATE 
AT HOME AND ABROAD 

THIS MANUAL IS RESPECTFULLY 
DEDICATED 




Secretary of State 



^ 
^ 

^ 



CONTENTS 

PART I 
HISTORICAL 

Page 

The State 11 

The State Capitol 19 

Chief Executives of North Carolina 

Governors of Virginia 21 

Executives under the Proprietors 21 

Governors under the Crown 22 

Governors Elected by the Legislature 22 

Governors Elected by the People 24 

The State Flag 27 

The Mecklenburg Declaration of Independence 28 

The Great Seal of North Carolina 30 

The State Bird 33 

The Halifax Resolution 34 

Name of State and Nicknames 35 

The State Motto 35 

The State Colors 36 

The State Flower 36 

The State's Most Famous Toast 36 

Legal Holidays in North Carolina 36 

Population of the State since 1675 37 

State Song 38 

The Constitution of North Carolina 39 

The American's Creed 77 

The American Flag 

Origin 77 

Proper Display 79 

Pledge to the Flag 83 

The National Capitol 85 

Declaration of Independence 88 

Constitution of the tlnited States 93 

PART II 

CENSUS 

Sixteenth Census, 1940 

Population of State 117 

Population of Counties 118 

Population of Cities and Towns 118 



6 North Carolina Manual 

PART III 
POLITICAL 

Page 

Congressional Districts 127 

Judicial Districts 127 

Senatorial Districts and Apportionment of Senators 128 

Apportionment of Members of the House of Representatives. . 131 

State Democratic Platform 132 

Plan of Organization of the State Democratic Party 139 

Committees of the Democratic Party 

State Democratic Executive Committee 154 

Congressional District Executive Committees 159 

Judicial District Executive Committees 163 

Senatorial Executive Committees 167 

Chairmen of the County Executive Committees 170 

State Republican Platform 172 

Plan of Organization of the State Republican Party 181 

Committees of the Republican Party 

State Republican Executive Committee 186 

Congressional, Judicial and Senatorial District Committees 188 

Chairmen of the County Executive Committees 188 



PART IV 

ELECTION RETURNS 

Popular and Electoral Vote for President by States, 1948. . . . 193 

Popular Vote for President by States, 1932-1944 194 

Vote for President by Counties, 1928-1948 196 

Vote for Governor by Counties, Primaries, 1948 199 

Vote for Governor by Counties, General Elections, 1928-1948 . 202 
Vote for State Officials, Democratic Primaries, 1940 and 1944. 205 

Vote for State Officials by Counties, Primary, 1948 206 

Total Votes Cast— General Election, 1948 211 

Vote for Governor in Democratic Primaries, 1920-1948 212 

Vote for Congressmen in Democratic Primary, May 29, 1948 . 213 

Vote for Congressmen in Second Primary, June 26, 1948 215 

Vote for Congressmen in Republican Primary, May 29, 1948 . . 216 

Vote for Members of Congress, 1934-1948 217 

Vote for United States Senator, Primary, May 29, 1948 231 

Vote for United States Senator, General Election, 

November 2, 1948 233 

Vote on Constitutional Amendments by Counties, 1948 235 

Vote on Prohibition, 1881, 1908, 1933 240 



Contents 



PART V 
GOVERNMENTAL AGENCIES, BOARDS AND COMMISSIONS 

Page 

Agencies, Boards and Commissions 243 

North Carolina Institutions 
Correctional 

White 264 

Negro 264 

Educational 

White 265 

Negro 272 

Hospitals 

White 275 

Negro 278 

Confederate Woman's Home 278 

Examining Boards 279 

State Owned Railroads 285 

PART VI 

LEGISLATIVE 

The General Assembly 
Senate 

Officers 289 

Senatoi's (Arranged Alphabetically) 289 

Senators (Arranged by Districts) 290 

Rules 291 

Standing Committees 306 

Seat Assignments 313 

House of Representatives 

Officers 314 

Members (Arranged Alphabetically) 314 

Members (Arranged by Counties) 316 

Rules 319 

Standing Committees 335 

Seat Assignments 347 

PART VII 
BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 

Executive Officials 351 

Administrative Officials 359 

United States Senators 375 

Representatives in Congress 378 

Justices of the Supreme Court 387 

Members of the General Assembly 

Senators 394 

Representatives 426 

Occupational and Professional Classification 486 



8 North Carolina Manual 

PART VIII 

OFFICIAL REGISTER 

Page 
United States Government 

President and Vice-President 493 

Cabinet Members 493 

North Carolina Senators and Representatives in Congress 493 

United States Supreme Court Justices 493 

United States District Court 

Judges 493 

Clerks 494 

District Attorneys 494 

United States Circuit Court of Appeals 

Judge Fourth District 494 

State Government 

Legislative Department 495 

Executive Department 495 

Judicial Department 495 

Administrative Department 496 

State Institutions 497 

Heads of Agencies other than State 498 

County Government 499 

ILLUSTRATIONS 

State Capitol 18 

State Flag 26 

State Seal 31 

State Bird 32 

State Song (Words and Music) 38 

Map of North Carolina 75 

The American Flag 77 

Map Showing Congressional Districts 144, 145 

Map Showing Senatorial Districts 176, 177 

Map Showing Judicial Districts 208, 209 

Seating Diagram of Senate Chamber 312 

Seating Diagram of House of Representatives 346 

Pictures 

Governor 350 

State Officers 355 

Senators and Congressmen 377, 383 

Justices of the Supreme Court 388 

State Senators 395, 401, 409 

Members House of Representatives 427, 435, 443 

451, 459, 467, 475 



PART I 
HISTORICAL 



THE STATE 

North Carolina, often called the "Tar Heel" state, was the scene 
of the first attempt at colonization in America by English-speak- 
ing people. Under a charter granted to Sir Walter Raleigh by 
Queen Elizabeth, a colony was begun on Roanoke Island. This 
settlement, however, was unsuccessful and later became known 
as "The Lost Colony." 

The first permanent settlement was made about 1650 by immi- 
grants from Virginia. In 1663 Charles II granted to eight Lords 
Properietors a charter for the territory lying "within six and 
thirty degrees northern latitude, and to the west as far as the 
South seas, and so southerly as far as the river St. Matthias, 
which bordereth upon the coast of Florida, and within one and 
thirty degrees of northern latitude, and so west in a direct line 
as far as the South seas aforesaid . . ." and the colony was called 
Carolina. In 1665 another charter was granted to these noblemen. 
This charter extended the limits of Carolina so that the northern 
line was 36 degrees and 30 minutes north latitude, and the south- 
era line was 29 degrees north latitude, and both of these lines ex- 
tended westward to the South seas. 

In 1669 John Locke wrote the Fundamental Constitutions as a 
model for the government of Carolina, The Lords Proprietors 
adopted these constitutions and directed the governor to put into 
operation as much of them as was feasible. In 1670 there were 
four precincts (changed to counties in 1739) : Pasquotank, Per- 
quimans, Chowan, and Currituck. North Carolina now has one 
hundred counties. 

Carolina on December 7, 1710, was divided into North Carolina 
and South Carolina, and Edward Hyde, on May 12, 1712, became 
the first governor of North Carolina. 

In 1729 seven of the eight Lords Proprietors sold their interest 
in Carolina to the Crown and North Carolina became a royal 
colony. George Burrington was the first royal governor. Richard 
Everard, the last proprietary governor, served until Burrington 
was appointed. 

North Carolina, on April 12, 1776, authorized her delegates in 
the Continental Congress to vote for independence, and on Decem- 
ber 18, 1776, adopted a constitution. Richard Caswell became the 

11 



12 North Carolina Manual 

first governor under this constitution. On November 21, 1789, the 
State adopted the United States Constitution, being the twelfth 
state to enter the Federal Union. North Carolina, in 1788, had 
rejected the Constitution on the grounds that certain amendments 
were vital and necessary to a free people. 

A Constitutional convention was held in 1835 and among several 
changes made in the Constitution was the method of electing the 
governor. After this change the governor was elected by the peo- 
ple for a term of two years instead of being elected by the Legis- 
lature for a term of one year. Edward Bishop Dudley was the 
first govei-nor elected by the people. 

North Carolina seceded from the Union May 20, 1861, and was 
readmitted to the Union in July, 1868. 

A new State Constitution was adopted in 1868 and since that 
date the governor has been elected by the people for four-year 
terms and he cannot succeed himself. There has not been a new 
constitution since 1868, but numerous amendments have been 
added to it. 

North Carolina has had a democratic administration since 1900, 
during which period it has made its greatest progress. 

Noi'th Carolina has had two permanent capitals — New Bern 
and Raleigh — and there have been three capitol buildings. Tryon's 
Palace in New Bern was constructed in the period, 1767-1770, and 
the main building was destroyed by fire February 27, 1798. The 
first capitol in Raleigh was completed in 1794 and was destroyed 
by fire on June 21, 1831. The present capitol was completed in 
1840. 

The State in 1790 ceded her western lands, which was com- 
posed of Washington, Davidson, Hawkins, Greene, Sullivan, Sum- 
ner, and Tennessee counties, to the federal government, and be- 
tween 1790 and 1796 the territory was known as Tennessee Terri- 
tory, but in 1796 it became the fifteenth state in the Union. 

In 1738, the General Assembly of North Carolina passed an act 
authorizing the establishment of district courts which served as 
appelant courts. These courts were authorized to be held in Bath, 
New Bern, and New Town — now Wilmington. In 1746, the General 
Assembly repealed the Act of 1738 and established district courts 
to be held at Edenton, Wilmington, and Edgecombe. From 1754 
until 1790, other districts were formed as the State expanded in 



The State 13 

territory and developed needs for these districts. By 1790, there 
were eight judicial districts divided into two ridings of four dis- 
tricts each. In 1806, the General Assembly passed an act establish- 
ing a superior court in each county. The Act also set up judicial 
districts composed of certain contiguous counties, and this practice 
of expanding the districts has continued from five districts in 
1806 until now there are twenty-one districts. 

When North Carolina adopted the Federal Constitution on Nov- 
ember 21, 1789, she was authorized to send two senators and five 
representatives to the Congress of the United States according to 
the constitutional apportionment. In 1792, when the first federal 
census had been completed and tabulated, it was found that North 
Carolina was entitled to ten representatives. It was then that 
the General Assembly divided the State into ten congressional dis- 
tricts. In 1812, the State had grown and prospered until it was 
entitled to thirteen representatives in Congress. Between 1812 and 
1865, however, the population decreased so much in porportion to 
the population of the other states of the Union that North Car- 
olina was by 1865 entitled only to seven representatives. Since 
1865 the population of the State has shown a slow but steady 
increase, and now there are twelve congressional districts. The 
State, therefore, has two senators and twelve representatives in 
the Congress of the United States. 

North Carolina supports a nine-month school for every child of 
school age and maintains a fleet of 5,113 busses by which it trans- 
ports 359,143 children to school each school day in the year. Dur- 
ing a nine months term these 5,113 busses travel approximately 
33,809,564 miles. 

The State also maintains approximately 50,448.3 miles of county 
rural roads and 1,123.8 miles of county municipal roads, totaling 
51,572.1 miles. The State also maintains 10,330.1 miles of State 
rural roads and 1,032 miles of State municipal roads. This totals 
62,934.2. These roads are maintained from gasoline tax, drivers' 
licenses and licenses for automobiles, trucks, and busses. From 
March 4, 1921, to June 30, 1948, the State of North Carolina has 
spent $922,777,759.02 for the construction, betterment, upkeep, 
debt service, and salaries of employees of the State Highway 
Commission and other employees connected with road construc- 
tion and maintenance. This sum includes all items spent on the 
highways during this period. 



14 North Carolina Manual 

North Carolina extends from the sea coast to the mountains 
and is approximately 550 miles from East to West. It is approxi- 
mately 250 miles wide. The highest peak east of the Mississippi 
is Mount Mitchell, extending 6,684 feet above sea level. 

North Carolina from its earliest time has always been an agri- 
cultural state. In the early period the chief exports were beef, 
pork, tobacco, corn, and of course, naval stores such as tar, pitch, 
and turpentine, which the farmers developed for additional in- 
comes. Some of the principal agricultural products are corn, cot- 
ton, tobacco, wheat, barley, oats, peanuts, soya beans, various 
types of hay, potatoes, garden truck, dairy products, beef, pork, 
poultry, and fruits. The production of flu-cured tobacco in 1948 
totaled 746,300,000 pounds. During the same year North Carolina 
produced 350,000,000 pounds of peanuts, which was an average 
yield of 1,225 pounds per acre. The cotton crop for 1948 amounted 
to 680,000 bales of 500 pounds gross weight. The production of 
hay, including all types, amounted to approximately 1,284,000 
tons. The corn crop for 1948 amounted to 69,006,000 bushels. The 
amount of corn was produced from 2,226,000 acres. The Irish 
potatoes for 1948 amounted to 10,508,000 bushels. These potatoes 
were produced from a total of 71,000 acres. Sweet potatoes pro- 
duced during the year amounted to 5,635,000 bushels produced 
from 49,000 acres. Soya bean production during the year 
amounted to 3,500,000 bushels. North Carolina produces much 
fruit and nuts. During 1948, 976,000 bushels of apples, 1,646,000 
bushels of peaches, 209,000 bushels of pears, 5,600 tons of grapes, 
and 2,500,000 pounds of pecans were produced. 

In addition to the agricultural products produced in North Car- 
olina, the State is becoming to be known as an industrial State. 
The State manufactures furniture, textiles, tobacco, and almost 
any kind of manufacturing done in any other section of the Na- 
tion. There are in North Carolina eight tobacco manufacturing 
establishments, not including stemmeries, which employ 16,000 
persons whose annual income is $37,722,000.00. The value of the 
tobacco products produced during the year of 1948 was $912,875.- 
000.00. The tobacco factories manufactured cigarettes, cigars, 
smoking tobacco, chewing tobacco, and snuff. 

There are in the State 300 furniture manufacturing establish- 
ments which employ 31,500 persons whose salaries amount to 



The State 15 

$40,000,000.00. The value of the furniture manufacturing in North 
Carolina during- 1948 was $95,445,000.00. 

There are approximately 900 textile manufacturing plants in 
the State. These plants employ 222,000 persons whose gross earn- 
ings are approximately $400,000,000.00. During 1948 these 900 
plants produced products valuing at approximately $1,000,000,- 
000.00. Some of the products manufactured are cotton, yarn, 
thread, twine, cordage, cotton woven goods, both broad and nar- 
row; silk and rayon thread, yarn and woven goods, woolen and 
worsted yarn, hosiery, both seamless and full-fashion made of cot- 
ton, silk, and nylon. 

The citizens of North Carolina have ever been patriotic when 
the call for military service to the State was made. During the 
War Between the States approximately 125,000 persons saw mili- 
tary service in some capacity. In World War I, 86,457 persons 
saw service in the several branches of the military services of the 
country, including the Navy, the Army, and the Marines. Of this 
number there were 195 nurses who participated in the war. Dur- 
ing World War II, 373,324 persons had active service in the several 
branches of the armed forces of the country. Approximately 18 
per cent of the persons in the service were Negroes. There were 
4,328 women in the several branches of armed services. During 
World War II, many camps were erected in the State for the 
training of persons for active combat duty. Most of these have 
been disposed of by the Federal Government, but the Federal Gov- 
ernment still maintains Fort Bragg, one of the largest military 
camps of its kind in the world. Camp Lejeune for the training 
of the Marines, and Cherry Point for training Marines for air 
services. 

Rural electrification began in Noi'th Carolina in 1917, but very 
little progress was made until 1935. Cleveland County, however, 
in 1925 built approximately 90 miles of rural electric lines to 
serve the farmers of that county. In 1935, there were in North 
Carolina 1,884 miles of rural lines serving 11,558 farms. The last 
report of the Rural Electrification Authority in North Carolina, 
July 1, 1947, showed there were 39,394 miles of rural lines serv- 
ing 240,534 consumers. Of this number, it was estimated that 
157,580 customers were farmers. North Carolina has made its 
greatest progress in agricultural development and rural electri- 



16 . North Carolina Manual 

fication of the farms during the last quarter of a century. When 
rural electrification first began in the State, it consisted chiefly 
of lights for the home produced by some type of battery system. 
Now farms are electrified and stoves, ranges, washing machines, 
lights, sweet potato curers, milkers, hay curers, motors for grind- 
ing grain, and many other items are in use. It is one of the many 
good labor-saving devices for the rural homes and farm activities. 




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THE STATE CAPITOL 

The original State Capitol of North Carolina was destroyed by 
fire on June 21, 1831. 

At the session of November, 1832, the Assembly resolved to re- 
build on the old site, and $50,000 was appropriated for the pur- 
pose. Commissioners were appointed to have the work done. The 
rubbish was cleared away, the excavations made and the founda- 
tions were laid. On July 4, 1833, the cornerstone was set in place. 

After the foundations were laid the work progressed more 
slowly, and it was so expensive that the appropriation was ex- 
hausted. The Legislature at its next session appropriated $75,000 
more. To do the stone and finer work many skilled artisans had 
been brought from Scotland and other countries. The Building 
Commissioners contracted with David Paton to come to Raleigh 
and superintend the work. Mr. Paton was an architect who had 
come from Scotland the year before. He was the buildei', the archi- 
tect, and designer. 

The Legislature was compelled to make appropriations for the 
work from time to time. The following is a table of the several 
appropriations made: 

Session of 1832-33 $ 50,000.00 

Session of 1833-34 75,000.00 

Session of 1834-35 75,000.00 

Session of 1835 75,000.00 

Session of 1836-37 120,000.00 

Session of 1838-39 105,300.00 

Session of 1840-41 31,374.46 

Total $531,674.46 

The stone with which the building was erected was the property 
of the State. Had the State been compelled to purchase this ma- 
terial the cost of the Capitol would have been considerably in- 
creased. 

In the summer of 1840 the work was finished. At last, after 
more than seven yeai's, the sum of $531,674.46 was expended. As 
large as that sum was for the time, when the State was so poor 

19 



20 North Carolina Manual 

and when the entire taxes for all State purposes reached less than 
$100,000, yet the people were satisfied. The building- had been 
erected with rigorous economy, and it was an object of great pride 
to the people. Indeed, never was money better expended than in 
the erection of this noble Capitol. 



Description of the Capitol, Written by David Patton, 

the Architect 

"The State Capitol is 160 feet in length from north to south 
by 140 feet from east to west. The whole height is 97^/2 feet in the 
center. The apex of pediment is 64 feet in height. The stylobate 
is 18 feet in height. The columns of the east and west porticoes 
are 5 feet 2^/^ inches in diameter. At entablature, including block- 
ing course, is continued around the building, 12 feet high. 

"The columns and entablature are Grecian Doric, and copied 
from the Temple of Minerva, commonly called the Parthenon, 
which was erected in Athens about 500 years before Christ. An 
octagon tower surrounds the rotunda, which is oranamented with 
Grecian cornices, etc., and its dome is decorated at top with a 
similar ornament to that of the Choragic Monument of Lysicrates, 
commonly called the Lanthorn of Demosthenes. 

"The interior of the Capitol is divided into three stories: First, 
the lower story, consisting of ten rooms, eight of which are appro- 
priated as offices to the Governor, Secretary, Treasurer, and Comp- 
troller, each having two rooms of the same size — the one contain- 
ing an area of 649 square feet, the other 528 square feet — the two 
committee rooms, each containing 200 square feet, and four 
closets; also the rotunda, corridors, vestibules, and piazzas, con- 
tain an area of 4,370 square feet. The vestibules are decorated 
with columns and antse, similar to those of the Ionic Temple on the 
Ilissus, near the Acropolis of Athens. The remainder is groined 
with stone and brick, springing from columns and pilasters of the 
Roman Doric. 

"The second story consists of Senatorial and Representatives' 
chambers, the former containing an area of 2,545 and the latter 
2,849 square feet. Four apai'tments enter from Senate Chamber, 
two of which contain each an area of 169 square feet, and the 



The State Capitol 21 

other two contain each an area of 154 square feet; also, two 
rooms enter from Representatives' chamber, each containing an 
area of 170 square feet; of two committee rooms, each containing 
an area of 231 square feet; of four presses and the passages, 
stairs, lobbies, and colonnades, containing an area of 3,204 square 
feet. 

"The lobbies and Hall of Representatives have their columns 
and antse of the Octagon Tower of Andronicus Cyrrhestes and 
the plan of the hall is of the formation of the Greek theatre and 
the columns and antte in the Senatorial chamber and rotunda are 
of the Temple of Erectheus, Minerva Polias, and Pandrosus, in 
the Acropolis of Athens, near the above named Parthenon. 

"Third, or attic story, consists of rooms appropriated to the 
Supreme Court and Library, each containing an area of 693 square 
feet. Galleries of both houses have an area of 1,300 square feet; 
also two apartments entering from Senate gallery, each 169 square 
feet, of four presses and the lobbies' stairs, 988 square feet. These 
lobbies as well as rotunda, are lit with cupolas, and it is pi'oposed 
to finish the court and library in the florid Gothic style." 

CHIEF EXECUTIVES OF NORTH CAROLINA 

Governors of "Virginia" 

Ralph Lane, April ...., 1585-June ...., 1586. 
John White, April ...., 1587-August ...., 1587. 

Chief Executives Under the Proprietors 

William Drummond, October ...., 1663-October ...., 1667. 
Samuel Stephens, October ...., 1667-December ...., 1669. 
Peter Carteret, October ...., 1670-May ...., 1673. 
John Jenkins, May ...., 1673-November ...., 1676. 

Thomas Eastchurch, November ...., 1676- , 1678. 

Thomas Miller, ,1677- 

John Culpepper, , 1677- , 1678. 

Seth Sothel, , 1678- 

John Harvey, February ...., 1679-August ...., 1679. 
John Jenkins, November ...., 1679- , 1681. 



22 North Carolina Manual 

Seth Sothel, , 1682- , 1689. 

Philip Ludwell, December ...., 1689- , 1691. 

Philip Ludwell, November 2, 1691- , 1694. 

Thomas Jarvis, , 1691- , 1694. 

John Archdale, August 31, 1694- , 1696. 

John Harvey, , 1694- , 1699. 

Henderson Walker, , 1699-August 14, 1704. 

Robert Daniel, , 1704- , 1705. 

Thomas Gary, , 1705,- , 1706. 

William Glover, , 1706- , 1708. 

Thomas Gary, , 1708-January ...., 1711. 

Edward Hyde, , 1710-May 9, 1712. 

Edward Hyde, May 9, 1712-September 8, 1712. 
Thomas Pollock, September 12, 1712-May 28, 1714. 
Gharles Eden, May 28, 1714-March 26, 1722. 
Thomas Pollock, March 30, 1722-August 30, 1722. 
William Reed, August 30, 1722-January 15, 1724. 
George Burrington, January 15, 1724-July 17, 1725. 
Richard Everard, July 17, 1725-May ...., 1728. 

Governors Under the Crown 

Richard Everard, May , 1728-February 25, 1731. 

George Burrington, February 25, 1731-April 15, 1734. 
Nathaniel Rice, April 15, 1734-October 27, 1734. 
Gabriel Johnston, October 27, 1734-July 17, 1752. 
Matthew Rowan, July 17, 1752-November 2, 1754. 
Arthur Dobbs, November 2, 1754-March 28, 1765. 
William Tryon, March 28 1765-December 20, 1765. 
William Tryon, December 20, 1765-July 1, 1771. 
James Hasell, July 1, 1771-August 12, 1771. 
Josiah Martin, August 12, 1771-May ...., 1775. 

Governors Elected by the Legislature 

Name, Gounty, Term of Office 
Richard Gaswell, Dobbs, December 19, 1776-April 18, 1777. 
Richard Caswell, Dobbs, April 18, 1777-April 18, 1778. 
Richard Caswell, Dobbs, April 18, 1778-May 4, 1779. 
Richard Caswell, Dobbs, May 4, 1779-April, 1780. 



Governors 23 

Abner Nash, Craven, April, 1780-June 26, 1781. 
Thomas Burke, Orange, June 26, 1781-April 26, 1782. 
Alexander Martin, Guilford, April 26, 1782-April 30, 1783. 
Alexander Martin, Guilford, April 30, 1783-April 1, 1785. 
Eichard Casvirell, Dobbs, April 1, 1785-December 12, 1785. 
Richard Caswell, Dobbs, December 12, 1785-December 23, 1786. 
Richard Caswell, Dobbs, December 23, 1786-December 20, 1787. 
Samuel Johnston, Chowan, December 20, 1787-November 18, 1788. 
Samuel Johnston, Chowan, November 18, 1788-November 16, 1789. 
Samuel Johnston, Chowan, November 16, 1789-December 17, 1789. 
Alexander Martin, Guilford, December 17, 1789-December 9, 1790. 
Alexander Martin, Guilford, December 9, 1790-January 2, 1792. 
Alexander Martin, Guilford, January 2, 1792-December 14, 1792. 
R. D. Spaight, Craven, December 14, 1792-December 26, 1793. 
R. D. Spaight, Craven, December 26, 1793-January 6, 1795. 
R. D. Spaight, Craven, January 6, 1795-November 19, 1795. 
Samuel Ashe, New Hanover, November 19, 1795-December 19, 1796. 
Samuel Ashe, New Hanover, December 19, 1796-December 5,1797. 
Samuel Ashe, New Hanover, December 5, 1797-December 7, 1798. 
W. R. Davie, Halifax, December 7, 1798-November 23, 1799. 
Benjamin Williams, Moore, November 23, 1799-November 29, 1800. 
Benjamin Williams, Moore, November 29, 1800-November 28, 1801. 
Benjamin Williams, Moore, November 28, 1801-December 6, 1802. 
James Turner, Warren, December 6, 1802-Decemb'er 1, 1803. 
James Turner, Warren, December 1, 1803-November 29, 1804. 
James Turner, Warren, November 29, 1804-December 10, 1805. 
Nathaniel Alexander, Mecklenburg, December 10, 1805-December 1, 

1806. 
Nathaniel Alexander, Mecklenburg, December 1, 1806-December 1, 

1807. 
Benjamin Williams, Moore, December 1, 1807-December 12, 1808. 
David Stone, Bertie, December 12, 1808-December 13, 1809. 
David Stone, Bertie, December 13, 1809-December 5, 1810. 
Benjamin Smith, Brunswick, December 5, 1810-December 9, 1811. 
William Hawkins, Warren, December 9, 1811-November 25, 1812. 
William Hawkins, Warren, November 25, 1812-November 20, 1813. 
William Hawkins, Warren, November 20, 1813-November 29, 1814. 
William Miller, Warren, November 29, 1814-December 7, 1815. 
William Miller, Warren, December 7, 1815-December 7, 1816, 



24 North Carolina Manual 

William Miller, Warren, December 7, 1816-December 3, 1817. 
John Branch, Halifax, December 3, 1817-November 24, 1818. 
John Branch, Halifax, November 24, 1818-November 25, 1819. 
John Branch, Halifax, November 25, 1819-December 7, 1820. 
Jesse Franklin, Surry, December 7, 1820-December 7, 1821. 
Gabriel Holmes, Sampson, December 7, 1821-December 7, 1822. 
Gabriel Holmes, Sampson, December 7, 1822-December 6, 1823. 
Gabriel Holmes, Sampson, December 6, 1823-December 7, 1824. 
H. G. Burton, Halifax, December 7, 1824-December 6, 1825. 
H. G. Burton, Halifax, December 6, 1825-December 29, 1826. 
H. G. Burton, Halifax, December 29, 1826-December 8, 1827. 
James Iredell, Chowan, December 8, 1827-December 12, 1828. 
John Owen, Bladen, December 12, 1828-December 10, 1829. 
John Owen, Bladen, December 10, 1829-December 18, 1830. 
Montfort Stokes, Wilkes, December 18, 1830-December 13, 1831. 
Montfort Stokes, Wilkes, December 13, 1831-December 6, 1832. 
D. L. Swain, Buncombe, December 6, 1832-Deceiiiber 9, 1833. 
D. L. Swain, Buncombe, December 9, 1833-December 10, 1834. 

D. L. Swain, Buncombe, December 10, 1834-December 10, 1835. 

R. D. Spai£?ht, Jr., Craven, December 10, 1835-December 31, 1836. 

Governors Elected by the People 

E. B. Dudley, New Hanover, December 31, 1836-December 29, 1838. 
E. B. Dudley, New Hanover, December 29, 1838-January 1, 1841. 
J. M. Morehead, Guilford, January 1, 1841-December 31, 1842. 

J. M. Morehead, Guilford, December 31, 1842-January 1, 1845. 
W. A. Graham, Orange, January 1, 1845-January 1, 1847. 
W. A. Graham, Orange, January 1, 1847-January 1, 1849. 
Charles Manly, Wake, January 1, 1849-January 1, 1851. 
D. S. Reid, Rockingham, January 1, 1851-December 22, 1852. 
D. S. Reid, Rockingham, December 22, 1852-December 6, 1854. 
Warren Winslow, Cumberland, December 6, 1854-January 1, 1855. 
Thomas Bragg, Northampton, January 1, 1855-January 1, 1857. 
Thomas Bragg, Northampton, January 1, 1857-January 1, 1859. 
John W. Ellis, Rowan, January 1, 1859-January 1, 1861. 
John W. Ellis, Rowan, January 1, 1861-July 7, 1861. 
Henry T. Clark, Edgecombe, July 7, 1861-September 8, 1862. 
Z. B. Vance, Buncombe, September 8, 1862-December 22, 1864. 
Z. B. Vance, Buncombe, December 22, 1864-May 29, 1865. 



Governors 25 

W. W. Holden, Wake, May 29, 1865-December 15, 1865. 

Jonathan Worth, Randolph, December 15, 1865-December 22, 1866. 

Jonathan Worth, Randolph, December 22, 1866-July 1, 1868. 

W. W. Holden, Wake, July 1, 1868-December 15, 1870. 

T. R. Caldwell, Burke, December 15, 1870-January 1, 1873. 

T. R. Caldwell, Burke, January 1, 1873-July 11, 1874. 

C. H. Brogden, Wayne, July 11, 1874-January 1, 1877. 

Z. B. Vance, Mecklenburg, January 1, 1877-February 5, 1879. 

T. J. Jarvis, Pitt, February 5, 1879-January 18, 1881. 

T. J. Jarvis, Pitt, January 18, 1881-January 21, 1885. 

A. M. Scales, Rockingham, January 21, 1885-January 17, 1889. 

D. G. Fowle, Wake, January 17, 1889-April 8, 1891. 
Thomas M. Holt, Alamance, April 8, 1891-January 18, 1893. 
Ellas Carr, Edgecombe, January 18, 1893-January 12, 1897. 
D. L. Russell, Brunswick, January 12, 1897-January 15, 1901. 
C. B. Aycock, Wayne, January 15, 1901-January 11, 1905. 

R. B. Glenn, Forsyth, January 11, 1905-January 12, 1909. 
W. W. Kitchen, Person, January 12, 1909-January 15, 1913. 
Locke Craige, Buncombe, January 15, 1913-January 11, 1917. 
Thomas W. Bickett, Franklin, January 11, 1917-January 12, 1921. 
Cameron Morrison, Mecklenburg, January 12, 1921-January 14, 
1925. 

Angus Wilton McLean, Robeson, January 14, 1925-January 11, 1929. 
O. Max Gardner, Cleveland, January 11, 1929-January 5, 1933. 
J. C. B. Ehringhaus, Pasquotank, January 5, 1933-January 7, 1937. 
Clyde R. Hoey, Cleveland, January 7, 1937-January 9, 1941. 
J. Melville Broughton, Wake, January 9, 1941-January 4, 1945. 
R. Gregg Cherry, Gaston, January 4, 1945-January 6, 1949. 
W. Kerr Scott, Alamance, January 6, 1949- 



THE STATE FLAG 
An Act to Establish a State Flag 

The General Assembly of North Carolina do enact: 

Section 1. That the flag- of North Carolina shall consist of a blue 
union, containing in the center thereof a white star with the letter 
N in gilt on the left and the leter C in gilt on the right of said 
star, the circle containing the same to be one-third the width of 
the union. 

Sec. 2, That the fly of the flag shall consist of two equally pro- 
portioned bars ; the upper bar to be red, the lower bar to be white ; 
that the length of the bars horizontally shall be equal to the per- 
pendicular length of the union, and the total length of the flag 
shall be one-third more than its width. 

Sec. 3. That above the star in the center of the union there 
shall be a gilt scroll in semicircular form, containing in black let- 
ters this inscription: "May 20th, 1775," and that below the star 
there shall be a similar scroll containing in black letters the in- 
scription: "April 12th, 1776." 

In the General Assembly read three times and ratified this 9th 
day of March, A.D., 1885. 

No change has been made in the flag since the passage of this 
act. By an act of 1907 it is provided: 

"That the board of trustees or managers of the several State in- 
stitutions and public buildings shall provide a North Carolina flag, 
of such dimensions and material as they may deem best, and the 
same shall be displayed from a staff upon the top of each and 
every such building at all times except during inclement weather, 
and upon the death of any State officer or any prominent citizen 
the Flag shall be put at half-mast until the burial of such person 
shall have taken place. 

"That the Board of County Commissioners of the several coun- 
ties in this State shall likewise authorized the procuring of a North 
Carolina flag, to be displayed either on a staflp upon the top, or 
draped behind the Judge's stand, in each and every courthouse in 
the State, and that the State flag shall be displayed at each and 
every term of court held, and on such other public occasions 
as the Commissioners may deem proper." (Rev., s. 5321; 1885, c. 
291; 1907, c. 838.) 

27 



THE MECKLENBURG DECLARATION OF 
20th May, 1775* 

Declaration 

Names of the Delegates Present 

Col. Thomas Polk John McKnitt Alexander 

Ephraim Brevard Hezekiah Alexander 

Hezekiah J. Balch Adam Alexander 

John Phifer Charles Alexander 

James Harris Zacheus Wilson, Sen. 

William Kennon Waightstill Avery 

John Ford Benjamin Patton 

Richard Barry Mathew^ McClure 

Henry Downs Neil Morrison 

Ezra Alexander Robert Irwin 

William Graham John Flenniken 

John Quary David Reese 

Abraham Alexander Richard Harris, Sen. 

Abraham Alexander was appointed Chairman, and John McKnitt 
Alexander, Clerk. The following resolutions were offered, viz. : 

1. Resolved, That whosoever directly or indirectly abetted or in 
any way form or manner countenanced the unchartered and 
dangerous invasion of our rights as claimed by Great Britain is 
an enemy to this country, to America, and to the inherent and in- 
alienable rights of man. 

2. Resolved, That we '.he citizens of Mecklenburg County, do 
hereby dissolves the political bands which have connected us to the 
mother country and hereby absolve ourselves from all allegiance 
to the British Crown and abjure all political connection contract 
or association with that nation who have wantonly trampled on 
our right and liberties and inhumanly shed the blood of Ameri- 
can patriots at Lexington. 

3. Resolved, That we do hereby declare ourselves a free and in- 
dependent people, are, and of right ought to be a sovereign and 



* The above is foUTid in Vol. IX, pages 1263-65 of The Colonial Records of 
North Carolina. 

28 



Mecklenburg Declaration 29 

self-governing association under the control of no power other 
than that of our God and the General Government of the Congress 
to the maintenance of which independence we solmenly pledge to 
each other our mutual cooperation, our lives, our fortunes, and 
our most sacred honor. 

4. Resolved, That as we now acknowledge the existence and con- 
trol of no law or legal officer, civil or military within this County, 
we do hereby ordain and adopt as a rule of life all each and every 
of our former laws — wherein nevertheless the Crown of Great 
Britain never can be considered as holding rights, privileges, im- 
munities, or authority therein. 

5. Resolved, That it is further decreed that all, each and every 
Military Officer in this Country is hereby reinstated in his former 
command and authority, he acting comformably to these regula- 
tions. And that every member present of this delegation shall 
henceforth be a civil officer, viz., a justice of the peace, in the 
character of a "committee man" to issue process, hear and deter- 
mine all matters of controversy according to said adopted laws 
and to preserve peace, union and harmony in said county, and 
to use every exertion to spread the love of Country and fire of 
freedom throughout America, until a more general and organized 
government be established in this Province. 



THE GREAT SEAL 

The Constitution of North Cai'olina, Article III, section 16, re- 
quires that 

"There shall be a seal of the State which shall be kept by the 
Governor, and used by him as occasion may require, and shall be 
called 'The Great Seal of the State of North Carolina.' All grants 
and commissions shall be issued in the name and by the authority 
of the State of North Carolina, sealed with The Great Seal of the 
State,' signed by the Governor and countersigned by the Secretary 
of State." 

The use of a Great Seal for the attestation of important docu- 
ments began with the institution of government in North Carolina. 
There have been at various times nine different seals in use in 
the colony and State. 

The present Great Seal of the State of North Carolina is 
described as follows: 

"The Great Seal of the State of North Carolina is two and one- 
quarter inches in diameter, and its design is a representation of 
the figures of Liberty and Plenty, looking toward each other, but 
not more than half fronting each other, and otherwise disposed, as 
follows: Liberty, the first figure, standing, her pole with cap on 
it in her left hand and a scroll with the word 'Constitution' in- 
scribed thereon in her right hand. Plenty, the second figure, sitting 
down, her right arm half extended toward Liberty, three heads of 
wheat in her right hand, and in her left the small end of her 
horn, the mouth of which is resting at her feet, and the contents 
of horn rolling out. In the exergon is inserted the words May 
20, 1775, above the coat of arms. Around the circumference is the 
legend 'The Great Seal of the State of Noi-th Carolina' and the 
motto 'Esse Quam Videri'." (Rev., s. 5339; Code ss. 3328, 3329; 
1868-9, c. 270, s. 35; 1883, c. 392; 1893, c. 145.) 



80 



THE STATE BIRD 

By popular choice the Cardinal was selected for adoption as 
our State Bird as of March 4, 1943. (S. L. 1943 c. 595; G. S. 
145-2.) 

This bird is sometimes called the Winter Redbird because it is 
most conspicuous in winter and is the only "redbird" present at 
that season. It is an all year round resident and one of the com- 
monest birds in our gardens and thickets. It is about the size of a 
Catbird with a longer tail, red all over, except that the throat and 
region around the bill is black; the head is conspicuously crested 
and the large stout bill is red; the female is much duller — the 
red being mostly confined to the crest, wings and tail. There are 
no seasonal changes in the plumage. 

The Cardinal is a fine singer, and what is unusual among birds 
the female is said to sing as well as the male, which latter sex 
usually has a monopoly of that art in the feathered throngs. 

The nest is rather an untidy affair built of weed stems, grass 
and similar materials in a low shrub, small tree or bunch of briars, 
usually not over four feet above the ground. The usual number of 
eggs to a set is three in this State, usually four further North. 
Possibly the Cardinal raises an extra brood down here to make 
up the difference, or possibly he can keep up his normal population 
more easily here through not having to face inclement winters 
of the colder North. A conspicuous bird faces more hazards. 

The Cardinal is by nature a seed eater, but he does not dislike 
small fruits and insects. 



33 



THE HALIFAX RESOLUTION 

Adopted by the Provincial Congress of North Carolina in Session 

at Halifax, April 12, 1776 

It appears to your committee that pursuant to the plan concerted 
by the British Ministry for subjugating America, the King and 
Parliament of Great Britain have usurped a pov^^er over the per- 
sons and properties of the people unlimited and uncontrolled; and 
disregarding their humble petitions for peace, liberty and safety, 
have made divers legislative acts, denouncing v^ar, famine, and 
every species of calamity, against the Continent in general. The 
British fleets and armies have been, and still are, daily employed 
in destroying the people, and committing the most horrid devasta- 
tions on the country. The Governors in different Colonies have de- 
clared protection to slaves who should imbrue their hands in the 
blood of their masters. That ships belonging to America are de- 
clared prizes of war, and many of them have been violently seized 
and confiscated. In consequence of all of which multitudes of the 
people have been destroyed, or from easy circumstances reduced 
to the most lamentable distress. 

And Whereas, The moderation hitherto manifested by the 
United Colonies and their sincere desire to be reconciled to the 
mother country on constitutional principles, have procured no 
mitigation of the aforesaid wrongs and usurpations, and no hopes 
remain of obtaining redress by those means alone which have been 
hitherto tried, your committee are of opinion that the House should 
enter into the following' resolve, to wit : 

Resolved, That the delegates for this Colony in the Continental 
Congress be empowered to concur with the delegates of the other 
Colonies in declaring Independency, and forming foreign alliances, 
reserving to this Colony the sole and exclusive right of forming 
a Constitution and laws for this Colony, and of appointing dele- 
gates from time to time (under the direction of a general repre- 
sentation thereof) , to meet the delegates of the other Colonies for 
such purposes as shall be hereafter pointed out. 



34 



NAME OF STATE AND NICKNAMES 

In 1629 King Charles the First of England "erected into a 
province," all the land from Albemarle Sound on the north to the 
St. John's River on the south, which he directed should be called 
Carolina. The word Carolina is from the word Carolus, the Latin 
form of Charles. 

When Carolina was divided in 1710, the southern part was 
called South Carolina and the northern or older settlement was 
called North Carolina, or the "Old North State." Historians had 
recorded the fact that the principal products of this State were 
"tar, pitch and turpentine." It was during one of the fiercest 
battles of the War Between the States, so the story goes, that the 
column supporting the North Carolina troops was driven from the 
field. After the battle the North Carolinians, who had successfully 
fought it out alone, were greeted from the passing derelict regi- 
ment with the question : "Any more tar down in the Old North 
State, boys?" Quick as a flash came the answer: "No; not a bit; 
old Jeff's bought it all up." "Is that so; what is he going to do 
with it?" was asked. "He is going to put it on you'uns heels to 
make you stick better in the next fight." Creecy relates that Gen- 
eral Lee, hearing of the incident, said: "God bless the Tar Heel 
boys," and from that they took the name. — Adapted from Grand- 
father Tales of North Carolina by R. B. Creecy and Histories of 
North Carolina Regiments, Vol. Ill, by Walter Clark. 

The State Motto 

The General Assembly of 1893 (chapter 145) adopted the words 
"Esse Quam Videri" as the State's motto and directed that these 
words with the date "20 May, 1775," should be placed with our 
Coat of Arms upon the Great Seal of the State. 

The words "Esse Quam Videri" mean "to be rather than to 
seem." Nearly every State has adopted a motto, generally in Latin. 
The reason for their mottoes being in Latin is that the Latin 
tongue is far more condensed and terse than the English. The three 
words, "Esse Quam Videri," require at least six English words 
to express the same idea. 

35 



36 North Carolina Manual 

Curiosity has been aroused to learn the orijyin of our State motto. 
It is found in Cicero in his esay on Friendship (Cicero de Ami- 
citia, chap. 26.) 

It is a little sinp:ular that until the act of 1893 the sovereign 
State of North Carolina had no motto since its declaration of in- 
dependence. It was one of the very few States which did not have 
a motto and the only one of the original thirteen without one. 
(Rev., s. 5320; 1893, c. 145; G. S. 145-2.) 

The State Colors 

The General Assembly of 1945 declared Red and Blue of shades 
appearing in the North Carolina State Flag and the American 
Flag as the official State Colors. (Session Laws, 1945, c. 878; G. S. 
144-6.) 

The State Flower 

The General Assembly of 1941 designated the dogwood as the 
State flower. (Public Laws, 1941, c. 289; G. S. 145-1.) 

The State's Most Famous Toast 

(Not Officially Designated) 
"Here's to the land of the long leaf pine 
The summer land where the sun doth shine; 
Where the weak grow strong 
And the strong grow great, 
Here's to 'down home' 
The Old North State." 
(Composed in 190^ by Mrs. Harry C. Martin, former resident of 
Raleigh, N. C, but now living in Toinessee.) 

Legal Holidays 

January 1 — New Year's Day. 

January 19 — Birthday of General Robert E. Lee. 

February 22 — Birthday of George Washington. 

Easter Monday. 

April 12 — Anniversary of the Resolutions adopted by the Pro- 
vincial Congress of North Carolina at Halifax, April 12, 1776, 
instructing the delegates from North Carolina to the Continental 
Congress to vote for a Declaration of Independence. 

May 10 — Confederate Memorial Day. 

May 20 — Anniversary of the "Mecklenburg Declaration of Inde- 
pendence." 



Population 37 

May 30 — Memorial Day (Applies to State and National Banks 
only) . 

July 4 — Independence Day. 

September, first Monday — Labor Day. 

November, Tuesday after first Monday — General Election Day. 

November 11 — Armistice Day. 

November, Fourth Thursday — Thanksgiving Day. 

By joint Resolution No. 41 of Congress, approved by the Presi- 
dent December 26, 1941, the fourth Thursday in November in each 
and every year after 1941, vv^as designated as Thanksgiving Day 
and made a legal public holiday to all intents and purposes. 

December 25 — Christmas Day. 

Population 

1675 (Estimated) 4,000 

1701 (Estimated) 5,000 

1707 (Estimated) 7,000 

1715 (Estimated) 11,000 

1729 (Estimated) 35,000 

1752 (Estimated) 100,000 

1765 (Estimated) 200,000 

1771 (Estimated) 250,000 

1786 (Estimated) 350,000 

1790 (Census) 393,751 

1800 (Census) 478,103 

1810 (Census) 555,500 

1820 (Census) 638,829 

1830 (Census) 737,987 

1840 (Census) 753,409 

1850 (Census) 869,039 

1860 (Census) 992,622 

1870 (Census) 1,071,361 

1880 (Census) 1,399,750 

1890 (Census) 1,617,947 

1900 (Census) 1,893,810 

1910 (Census) 2,206,287 

1920 (Census) 2,559,123 

1930 (Census) 3,170,276 

1940 (Census) 3,571,623 



THE OLD NORTH STATE 



(Traditional air as sung in 1928) 



William Gaston 
With spirit 



Collected and abbanobd 
BT Mbs. E. E. Randolpe 




:fcs=fc 



g __g— g:=:S3=bs J i=S=t^ 



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1. Car - o - li - nal Car - o - li - nal heav-en's bless-ings at - tend her, 

2. Tho' she en - vies not oth - ers, their mer - it - ed gio - ry, 

3. Then let all those who love us, love the land that we hve in, 




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jux^jn: ^ 



While we live we willcher-ish, pro - tect and de- fend her, Tho' the 
Say whose name stands the fore - most, in lib - er - ty'ssto • ry, Tho' too 

As hap ■ py a re - gion as on this side of heav-en, Where 

S ^: 



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— *- j-sp — 



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scorn - er may sneer at and wit - lings de 
true to her - self e'er to crouch to op 
plen - ty and peace, love and joy smile b 



?as= 



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}-o »- 



- fame her, Still our hearts swell with 
-pres-sion, Who can yield to just 
e - fore us, Raise a.loud, rais; to- 



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Chorus 

4^- 



at — 



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glad - ness when ev - er we name her. 

rule a more loy - al sub-mis-sion. 

geth - er the heart thrill - ing cho-rus. 



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Hur - rah! Hur - rahl the 




rit 



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Old North State for -ev 



er, 



Hur 



rah! 



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Hur - rah! the good Old North State. 



CONSTITUTION OF THE STATE OF NORTH 

CAROLINA 



PREAMBLE 



We, the people of the State of North Carolina, grateful to Al- 
mighty God, the Sovereign Ruler of Nations, for the preservation 
of the American Union and the existence of our civil, political, 
and religious liberties, and acknowledging our dependence upon 
Him for the continuance of thooe blessings to us and our posterity, 
do, for the more certain security thereof and for the better gov- 
ernment of this State, ordain and establish this Constitution: 

ARTICLE I 

DECLARATION OF RIGHTS 

That the great, general, and essential principles of liberty and 
free government may be recognized and established, and that the 
relations of this State to the Union and Government of the United 
States, and those of the people of this State to the rest of the 
American people, may be definied and affirmed, we do declare: 

Section 1. The equality and rights of persons. That we hold it 
to be self-evident that all persons are created equal; that they 
are endowed by their Creator with certain inalienable rights; that 
among these are life, liberty, the enjoyment of the fruits of their 
own labor, and the pursuit of happiness. 

Sec. 2. Political potver and government. That all political power 
is vested in, and derived from, the people; all government of right 
originates from the people, is founded upon their will only, and 
is instituted solely for the good of the whole. 

Sec. 3. Internal government of the State. That the people of 
this State have the inherent, sole and exclusive right of regulat- 
ing the internal government and policies thereof, and of altering 
and abolishing their Constitution and form of government when- 
ever it may be necessary for their safety and happiness; but 
evei-y such right should be exercised in pursuance of the law, and 
consistently with the Constitution of the United States. 

39 



40 North Carolina Manual 

Sec. 4. That there is no right to secede. That this State shall 
ever remain a member of the American Union; that the people 
thereof are a part of the American Nation; that there is no right 
on the part of the State to secede, and that all attempts, from 
whatever source or upon whatever pretext, to dissolve said Union 
or to sever said Nation, ought to be resisted with the whole power 
of the State. 

Sec. 5. Of Allegiance to the United States Government. That 
every citizen of this State owes paramount allegiance to the Con- 
stitution and Government of the United States, and that no law 
or ordinance of the State in contravention or subversion thereof 
can have any binding force. 

Sec. 6. Public debt; bonds issued binder ordinance of Con- 
vention of 1868, '68-'69, '69-'70, declared invalid; exception. The 
State shall never assume or pay, or authorize the collection of any 
debt or obligation, express or implied, incurred in aid of insur- 
rection or rebellion against the United States, or any claim for 
the loss or emancipation of any slave; nor shall the General 
Assembly assume or pay, or authorize the collection of any tax 
to pay, either directly or indirectly, expressed or implied, any 
debt or bond incurred, or issued, by authority of the Convention 
of the year one thousand eight hundred and sixty-eight, nor any 
debt or bond incurred or issued by the Legislature of the year one 
thousand eight hundred and sixty-eight, either at its special ses- 
sion of the year one thousand eight hundred and sixty-eight, or at 
its regular sessions of the years one thousand eight hundred and 
sixty-eight and one thousand eight hundred and sixty-nine, and 
one thousand eight hundred and sixty-nine and one thousand eight 
hundred and seventy, except the bonds issued to fund the interest 
on the old debt of the State, unless the proposing to pay the same 
shall have first been submitted to the people, and by them ratified 
by the vote of a majority of all the qualified voters of the State 
at a regular election held for that purpose. 

Sec. 7. Exclusive emoluments, etc. No person or set of per- 
sons are entitled to exclusive or separate emoluments or privileges 
from the community but in consideration of public services. 

Sec. 8. The legislative, executive, and judicial poxvers dis- 
tinct. The legislative, executive, and supreme judicial powers of 
the government ought to be forever separate and distinct from 
each other. 



Constitution 41 

Sec. 9. Of the power of suspending laws. All power of sus- 
pending laws, or the execution of laws, by any authority, without 
the consent of the representatives of the people, is injurious to 
their rights, and ought not to be exercised. 

Sec. 10. Election free. All elections ought to be free. 

Sec. 11. In criminal prosecutions. In all criminal prosecu- 
tions, every person charged with crime has the right to be in- 
formed of the accusation and to confront the accusers and wit- 
nesses with other testimony, and to have counsel for defense, and 
not be compelled to give self-incriminating evidence, or to pay 
costs, jail fees, or necessary witness fees of the defense, unless 
found guilty. 

Sec. 12. Ayisivers to criminal charges. No person shall be 
put to answer any criminal charge except as hereinafter allowed, 
but by indictment, presentment or impeachment. 

Sec. 13. Right of jury. No person shall be convicted of any 
crime but by the unanimous verdict of a jury of good and lawful 
persons in open court. The Legislature may, however, provide 
other means of trial for petty misdeameanors, with the right of 
appeal. 

Sec. 14. Excessive hail. Excessive bail should not be required, 
nor excessive fines imposed, nor cruel or unusual punishment in- 
flicted. 

Sec. 15. General warrants. General warrants, whereby any 
officer or messenger may be commanded to search suspected places, 
without evidence of the act committed, or to seize any person or 
persons not named, whose offense is not particularly described 
and supported by evidence, are dangerous to liberty, and ought not 
to be granted. 

Sec. 16. Imprisonment for debt. There shall be no imprison- 
ment for debt in this State, except in cases of fraud. 

Sec. 17. No person taken, etc., but by law of the land. No 
person ought to be taken, imprisoned, or disseized of his freehold, 
liberties or privileges, or outlawed or exiled, or in any manner 
deprived of his life, liberty or property but by the law of the land. 

Sec. 18. Persons restrained of liberty. Every person restrained 
of his liberty is entitled to a remedy to inquire into the lawful- 
ness thereof, and to remove the same, if unlawful; and such 
remedy ought not to be denied or delayed. 



42 North Carolina Manual 

Sec. 19. Covfroversies at law respectmg jiroperty. In all con- 
troversies at law respectin.t? property, the ancient mode of trial by 
jury is one of the best securities of the rights of the people, and 
ought to remain sacred and inviolable. No person shall be excluded 
from jury service on account of sex. 

Sec. 20. Freedom of the press. The freedom of the press is one 
of the great bulwarks of liberty, and therefore ought never to be 
restrained, but every individual shall be held responsible for the 
abuse of the same. 

Sec. 21. Habeas corpnts. The privileges of the writ of habeas 
corpus shall not be suspended. 

Sec. 22. Property qualification. As political rights and privi- 
leges are not dependent upon, or modified by, property, therefore 
no property qualification ought to aff'ect the right to vote or hold 
ofiice. 

Sec. 23. Representation and taxation. The people of the State 
ought not to be taxed, or made subject to the payment of any im- 
post or duty without the consent of themselves, or their represen- 
tatives in General Assembly, freely given. 

Sec. 24. Militia and the right to bear arms. A well regulated 
militia being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of 
the people to keep and bear arms shall not be infringed; and, as 
standing armies in time of peace are dangerous to liberty, they 
ought not to be kept up, and the military should be kept under 
strict subordination to, and governed by, the civil power. Nothing 
herein contained shall justify the practice of carrying concealed 
weapons, or prevent the Legislature from enacting penal statutes 
against said practice. 

Sec. 25. Right of the people to assemble together. The people 
have a right to assemble together to consult for their common good, 
to instruct their representatives, and to apply to the Legislature 
for redress of grievances. But secret political societies are dan- 
gerous to the liberties of a free people, and should not be tolerated. 

Sec. 26. Religious liberty. All persons have a natural and inalien- 
able right to worship Almighty God according to the dictates of 
their own consciences, and no human authority should, in any case 
whatever, control or interfere with the rights of conscience. 

Sec. 27. Education. The people have the right to the privilege 
of education, and it is the duty of the State to guard and main- 
tain that right. 



Constitution 43 

Sec. 28. Elections should be frequent. For redress of grievances, 
and for amending and strengthening the laws, elections should 
be often held. 

Sec. 29. Recurrence to fundamental princijyles. A frequent re- 
currence to fundamental principles is absolutely necessary to pre- 
serve the blessings of liberty. 

Sec. 30. Hereditary emoluments, etc. No hereditary emoluments, 
privileges, or honors ought to be granted or conferred in this State. 

Sec. 31. Perpetuities, etc. Perpetuities and monopolies are con- 
trary to the genius of a free State, and ought not to be allowed. 

Sec. 32. Ex post facto laivs. Retrospective laws, punishing acts 
committed before the existence of such laws, and by them only 
declared criminal, are oppressive, unjust, and incompatible with 
liberty; wherefore no ex post facto law ought to be made. No law 
taxing restrospectively sales, purchases, or other acts previously 
done, ought to be passed. 

Sec. 33. Slavery prohibited. Slavery and involuntary servitude, 
otherwise than for crime, whereof the parties shall have been duly 
convicted, shall be, and are hereby, forever prohibited within the 
State. 

Sec. 34. State boundaries. The limits and boundaries of the 
State shall be and remain as they now are. 

Sec. 35. Courts shall be open. All courts shall be open; and 
every person for an injury done him in his lands, goods, person, 
or reputation, shall have remedy by due course of law, and right 
and justice administered without sale, denial, or delay. 

Sec. 36. Soldiers in time of peace. No soldier shall, in time of 
peace, be quartered in any house without the consent of the owner; 
nor in time of war but in a manner prescribed by law. 

Sec. 37. Other Hghts of the people. This enumeration of rights 
shall not be construed to impair or deny others retained by the 
people; and all power not herein delegated remain with the people. 

ARTICLE II 

LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT 

Section 1. Two branches. The legislative authority shall be 
vested in two distinct branches, both dependent on the people, to- 
wit: a Senate and House of Representatives. 



44 North Carolina Manual 

Sec. 2. Time of assembling. The Senate and House of Represen- 
tatives shall meet biennially on the first Wednesday after the first 
Monday in January next after their election; and, when assembled, 
shall be denominated the General Assembly. Neither house shall 
proceed upon public business unless a majority of all the members 
are actually present. 

Sec. 3. Number of seyiators. The Senate shall be composed of 
fifty Senators, biennially chosen by ballot. 

Sec. 4. Regulations in relation to districting the State for Sen- 
ators. The Senate Districts shall be so altered by the General 
Assembly, at the first session after the return of every enumera- 
tion by order of Congress, that each Senate District shall contain, 
as near as may be, an equal number of inhabitants, excluding 
aliens and Indians not taxed, and shall remain unaltered until the 
return of another enumeration, and shall at all times consist of 
contiguous territory; and no county shall be divided in the forma- 
tion of a Senate District, unless such county shall be equitably 
entitled to two or more Senators. 

Sec. 5. Regulations in relation to apportionment of representa- 
tives. The House of Representatives shall be composed of one hun- 
dred and twenty Representatives, biennially chosen by ballot, to 
be elected by the counties respectively, according to their popula- 
tion, and each county shall have at least one Representative in the 
House of Representatives, although it may not contain the requi- 
site ratio of representation; this apportionment shall be made by 
the General Assembly at the respective times and periods when the 
districts of the Senate are hereinbefore directed to be laid off. 

Sec. 6. Ratio of representation. In making the apportionment 
in the House of Representatives, the ratio of representation shall 
be ascertained by dividing the amount of the population of the 
State, exclusive of that comprehended within those counties which 
do not severally contain the one hundred and twentieth part of the 
population of the State, by the number of Representatives, less the 
number assigned to such counties; and in ascertaining the number 
of the population of the State, aliens and Indians not taxed shall 
not be included. To each county containing the said ratio and not 
twice the said ratio there shall be assigned one Representative; to 
each county containing two but not three times the said ratio there 
shall be assigned two Representatives, and so on progressively, and 



Constitution 45 

then the remaining Representatives shall be assigned severally to 
the counties having the largest fractions. 

Sec. 7. Qualifications for senators. Each member of the Senate 
shall not be less than twenty-five years of age, shall have resided 
in the State as a citizen two years, and shall have usually resided 
in the district for which he was chosen one year immediately pre- 
ceding his election. 

Sec. 8. Qualifications for represeyitatives. Each member of the 
House of Representatives shall be a qualified elector of the State, 
and shall have resided in the county for which he is chosen for 
one year immediately preceding his election. 

Sec. 9. Election of officers. In the election of all officers whose 
appointment shall be conferred upon the General Assembly by the 
Constitution, the vote shall be viva voce. 

Sec. 10. Powers in relation to divorce and alimony. The Gen- 
eral Assembly shall have power to pass general laws regulating 
divorce and alimony, but shall not have power to grant a divorce 
or secure alimony in any individual case. 

Sec. 11. Private laws in relation to names of persons, etc. The 
General Assembly shall not have power to pass any private law to 
alter the name of any person, or to legitimate any person not born 
in lawful wedlock, or to restore to the rights of citizenship any 
person convicted of an infamous crime, but shall have power to 
pass general laws regulating the same. 

Sec. 12. Thirty days notice shall be given anterior to passage of 
private laws. The General Assembly shall not pass any private 
law, unless it shall be made to appear that thirty days notice of 
application to pass such a law shall have been given, under such 
direction and in such manner as shall be provided by law. 

Sec. 13. Vacancies. If vacancies shall occur in the General 
Assembly by death, resignation, or otherwise, writs of election 
shall be issued by the Governor under such regulations as may 
be prescribed by law. 

Sec. 14. Revenue. No law shall be passed to raise money on the 
credit of the State, or to pledge the faith of the State, directly or 
indirectly, for the payment of any debt, or to impose any tax upon 
the people of the State, or allow the counties, cities or towns to do 
so, unless the bill for the purpose shall have been read three sev- 
eral times in each House of the General Assembly and passed three 



46 North Carolina Manual 

several readings, which readings shall have been on three different 
days, and agreed to by each House respectively, and unless the 
yeas and nays on the second and third readings of the bill shall 
have been entered on the journal. 

Sec. 15. Entails. The General Assembly shall regulate entails 
in such a manner as to prevent perpetuities. 

Sec. 16. Journals. Each House shall keep a journal of its pro- 
ceedings, which shall be printed and made public immediately after 
the adjournment of the General Assembly. 

Sec. 17. Protest. Any member of either House may dissent 
from, and protest against, any act or resolve which he may think 
injurious to the public, or any individual, and have the reasons of 
his dissent entered on the journal. 

Sec. 18. Officers of the House. The House of Representatives 
shall choose their own Speaker and other officers. 

Sec. 19. President of the Senate. The Lieutenant-Governor shall 
preside in the Senate, but shall have no vote unless it may be 
equally divided. 

Sec. 20. Other senatorial officers. The Senate shall choose its 
other officers and also a Speaker (})ro tempore) in the absence of 
the Lieutenant-Governor, or when he shall exercise the office of 
the governor. 

Sec. 21. Style of the acts. The style of the acts shall be: "The 
General Assembly of North Carolina do enact." 

Sec. 22. Powers of the General Assembly. Each House shall be 
judge of the qualifications and election of its own members, shall 
sit upon its own adjournment from day to day, prepare bills to be 
passed into laws; and the two Houses may also jointly adjourn to 
any future day, or other place. 

Sec. 23. Bills and resolutions to he read three times, etc. All 
bills and resolutions of a legislative nature shall be read three 
times in each House before they pass into laws, and shall be signed 
by the presiding officers of both Houses. 

Sec. 24. Oath of members. Each member of the General Assem- 
bly, before taking his seat, shall take an oath or affirmation that 
he will support the Constitution and laws of the United States, and 
the Constitution of the State of North Carolina, and will faith- 
fully discharge his duty as a member of the Senate or House of 
Representatives. 



Constitution 47 

Sec. 25. Terms of office. The terms of office for Senators and 
members of the House of Representatives shall commence at the 
time of their election. 

Sec. 26. Yeas mid iiays. Upon motion made and seconded in 
either House by one-fifth of the members present, the yeas and 
nays upon any question shall be taken and entered upon the 
journals. 

Sec. 27. Election for members of the General Assembly. The 
election for members of the General Assembly shall be held for the 
respective districts and counties, at the places where they are now 
held, or may be directed hereafter to be held, in such manner as 
may be prescribed by law, on the first Thursday in August, in the 
year one thousand eight hundred and seventy, and every two years 
thereafter. But the General Assembly may change the time of 
holding the elections. (Changed to Tuesday after first Monday in 
November, c. 275—1876.) 

Sec. 28. Pay of members and officers of the General Assembly. 
The members of the General Assembly for the term of their office 
shall receive a salary for their services of six hundred dollars each. 
The salaries of the presiding officers of the two houses shall be 
seven hundred dollars each : Provided, that in addition to the 
salaries herein provided for, shou.ld an extra session of the Gen- 
eral Assembly be called, the members shall receive eight dollars 
per day each, and the presiding officers of the two houses ten 
dollars per day each, for every day of such extra session not ex- 
ceeding twenty days; and should an extra session continue more 
than twenty days, the members and officers shall serve thereafter 
without pay. 

Sec. 29. Limitations npon power of General Assembly to enact 
private or special legislation. The General Assembly shall not pass 
any local, private, or special act or resolution relating to the estab- 
lishment of courts inferior to the Superior Court; relating to the 
appointment of justices of the peace; relating to health, sanitation, 
and the abatement of nuisances; changing the names of cities, 
towns, and townships; authorizing the laying out, opening, alter- 
ing, maintaining, or discontinuing of highways, streets, or alleys; 
relating to ferries or bridges; relating to non-navigable streams; 
relating to cemeteries; relating to the pay of jurors; erecting new 
townships, or changing township lines, or establishing or changing 



48 North Carolina Manual 

the lines of school districts; remitting fines, penalties, and for- 
feitures, or refunding moneys legally paid into the public treas- 
uiy; regulating laboi', trade, mining, or manufacturing; extending 
the time for the assessment or collection of taxes or otherwise re- 
lieving any collector of taxes from the due performance of his 
official duties or his sureties from liability; giving effect to in- 
formal wills and deeds; nor shall the General Assembly enact any 
such local, private, or special act by the partial repeal of a gen- 
eral law, but the General Assembly may at any time repeal local, 
private, or special laws enacted by it. Any local, private, or special 
act or resolution passed in violation of the provisions of this sec- 
tion shall be void. The General Assembly shall have power to pass 
general laws regulating matters set out in this section. 

Sec. 30. The General Assembly shall not use nor authorize to be 
used any part of the amount of any sinking fund for any purpose 
other than the retirement of the bonds for which said sinking fund 
has been created. 

ARTICLE III 

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT 

Sec. 1. Officers of the Executive Depart^ncnt ; ToDis of Office. 
The Executive Department shall consist of a Governor, in whom 
shall be vested the supreme executive power of the State; a Lieu- 
tenant Governor, a Secretary of State, an Auditor, a Treasurer, a 
Superintendent of Public Instruction, an Attorney General, a Com- 
missioner of Agriculture, a Commissioner of Labor and a Commis- 
sioner of Insurance, who shall be elected for a term of four years 
by the qualified electors of the State, at the same time and places 
and in the same manner as members of the General Assembly are 
elected. Their term of office shall commence on the first day of Jan- 
uary next after their election, and continue until their successors 
are elected and qualified: Provided, that the officers first elected 
shall assume the duties of their office ten days after the approval 
of this Constitution by the Congress of the United States, and shall 
hold their offices four years from and after the first day of January. 

Sec. 2. Qiialifications of Governor and Lieutenant-Governor. No 
person shall be eligible as Governor or Lieutenant-Governor unless 
he shall have attained the age of thirty years, shall have been a 



Constitution 49 

citizen of the United States five years, and shall have been a resi- 
dent of this State for two years next before the election; nor shall 
the person elected to either of these two offices be eligible to the 
same office more than four years in any term of eight years, unless 
the office shall have been cast upon him as Lieutenant-Governor 
or President of the Senate. 

Sec. 3. Retioms of election. The return of every election for 
officers of the Executive Department shall be sealed up and trans- 
mitted to the seat of government by the returning officer, directed 
to the Secretary of State. The return shall be canvassed and the 
result declared in such manner as may be prescribed by law. Con- 
tested elections shall be determined by a joint ballot of both Houses 
of the General Assembly in such manner as shall be prescribed 
by law. 

Sec. 4. Oath of office for Governor. The Governor, before enter- 
ing upon the duties of his office, shall, in the presence of the mem- 
bers of both branches of the General Assembly, or before any Jus- 
tice of the Supreme Court, take an oath or affirmation that he will 
support the Constitution and laws of the United States, and of the 
State of North Carolina, and that he will faithfully perform the 
duties appertaining to the office of Governor, to which he has been 
elected. 

Sec. 5. Duties of Governor. The Governor shall reside at the 
seat of government of this State, and he shall, from time to time, 
give the General Assembly information of the affairs of the State, 
and recommend to their consideration such measures as he shall 
deem expedient. 

Sec. 6. Reprieves, commutations, and pardo7)s. The Governor 
shall have power to grant reprieves, commutations, and pardons, 
after conviction, for all offenses (except in case of impeachment), 
upon such conditions as he may think proper, subject to such regu- 
lations as may be provided by law relative to the manner of apply- 
ing for pardons. He shall biennially communicate to the General 
Assembly each case of reprieve, commutation, or pardon granted, 
stating the name of each convict, the crime for which he was con- 
victed, the sentence and its date, the date of commutation, pardon, 
or reprieve, and the reasons therefor. 

Sec. 7. Annual reports from officers of Executive Department 
and of public institutions. The officers of the Executive Depart- 



50 North Carolina Manual 

ment and of the public institutions of the State shall, at least five 
days previous to each regular session of the General Assembly, sev- 
erally report to the Governor, who shall transmit such reports, 
with his message, to the General Assembly; and the Governor may, 
at any time, require information in writing from the officers in 
the Executive Department upon any subject relating to the duties 
of their respective offices, and shall take care that the laws be 
faithfully executed. 

Sec. 8. Commaiidcy-in-Chicf . The Governor shall be Commander- 
in-Chief of the militia of the State, except when they shall be called 
into the service of the United States. 

Sec. 9. Extra sessions of General Assembly. The Governor shall 
have power, on extraordinary occasions, by and with the advice of 
the Council of State, to convene the General Assembly in extra 
session by his proclamation, stating therein the purpose or pur- 
poses for which they are thus convened. 

Sec. 10. Officers whose appointments are not otherwise provided 
for. The Governor shall nominate and, by and with the advice and 
consent of a majority of the Senators-elect, appoint all officers 
whose offices are established by this Constitution and whose ap- 
pointments are not otherwise provided for. 

Sec. 11. Duties of the Lieutenant Governor. The Lieutenant 
Governor shall be President of the Senate, but shall have no vote 
unless the Senate be equally divided. He shall receive such com- 
pensation as shall be fixed by the General Assembly. 

Sec. 12. In case of impeachmeyit of Governor, or vacancy caused 
by death or resignation. In case of the impeachment of the Gov- 
ernor, his failure to qualify, his absence from the State, his in- 
ability to discharge the duties of his office, or, in case the office of 
Governor shall in any wise become vacant, the powers, duties and 
emoluments of the office shall devolve upon the Lieutenant-Gov- 
ernor until the disability shall cease or a new Governor shall be 
elected and qualified. In every case in which the Lieutenant-Gov- 
ernor shall be unable to preside over the Senate, the Senators shall 
elect one of their own number President of their body; and the 
powers, duties, and emoluments of the office of Governor shall de- 
volve upon him whenever the Lieutenant-Governor shall, for any 
reason, be prevented from discharging the duties of such office as 
above provided, and he shall continue as acting Governor until the 



Constitution 51 

disabilities are removed, or a new Governor or Lieutenant-Gov- 
ernor shall be elected and qualified. Whenever, during the recess 
of the General Assembly, it shall become necessary for the Presi- 
dent of the Senate to administer the government, the Secretary of 
State shall convene the Senate, that they may elect such President. 

Sec. 13. Duties of other executive officers. The respective duties 
of the Secretary of State, Auditor, Treasurer, Superintendent of 
Public Instruction, Attorney General, Commissioner of Agriculture, 
Commissioner of Labor, and Commissioner of Insurance shall be 
prescribed by law. If the office of any of said officers shall be 
vacated by death, resignation, or otherwise, it shall be the duty of 
the Governor to appoint another until the disability be removed or 
his successor be elected and qualified. Every such vacancy shall be 
filled by election at the first general election that occurs more than 
thirty days after the vacancy has taken place, and the person 
chosen shall hold the office for the remainder of the unexpired term 
fixed in the first section of this article. 

Sec. 14. Council of State. The Secretary of State, Auditor, 
Treasurer, Superintendent of Public Instruction, Commissioner of 
Agriculture, Commissioner of Labor, and Commissioner of Insur- 
ance shall constitute, ex-officio, the Council of State, who shall ad- 
vise the Governor in the execution of his office, and three of whom 
shall constitute a quorum; their advice and proceedings in this 
capacity shall be entered in a journal, to be kept for this purpose, 
exclusively, and signed by the members present, from any part of 
which any member may enter his dissent; and such journal shall 
be placed before the General Assembly when called for by either 
house. The Attorney General shall be, ex-officio, the legal adviser 
of the executive department. 

Sec. 15. Compensation of executive officers. The officers men- 
tioned in this article shall, at stated periods, receive for their serv- 
ices a compensation to be established by law, which shall neither be 
increased nor diminished during the time for which they shall have 
been elected, and the said officers shall receive no other emolument 
or allowance whatever. 

Sec. 16. Seal of State. There shall be a seal of the State, which 
shall be kept by the Governor, and used by him, as occasion may 
require, and shall be called "The Great Seal of the State of North 
Carolina." All grants and commissions shall be issued in the name 



52 North Carolina Manual 

and by the authority of the State of North Carolina, sealed with 
"The Great Seal of the State," and signed by the Governor, and 
countersigned by the Secretary of State. 

Sec. 17. Department of Agriculture, Immigration, and Statis- 
tics. The General Assembly shall establish a Department of Agri 
culture. Immigration, and Statistics, under such regulations as may 
best promote the agricultural interests of the State, and shall 
enact laws for the adequate protection and encouragement of 
sheep husbandry. 

Sec. 18. Department of Justice. The General Assembly is auth- 
orized and empowered to create a Department of Justice under 
the supervision and direction of the Attorney-General, and to enact 
suitable laws defining the authority of the Attorney-General and 
other officers and agencies concerning the prosecution of crime 
and the administration of the criminal laws of the State. 

ARTICLE IV 

JUDICIAL DEPARTMENT 

Section 1. Abolishes the distinction hetivceyi actions at law and 
suits in equity, and feigned issues. The distinction between actions 
at law and suits in equity, and the forms of all such actions and 
suits, shall be abolished; and there shall be in this State but one 
form of action for the enforcement or pi'otection of private rights 
or the redress of private wrongs, which shall be denominated a 
civil action; and every action prosecuted by the people of the State 
as a party, against a person charged with a public off'ense, for 
the punishment of the same, shall be termed a criminal action. 
Feigned issues shall also be abolished, and the facts at issue tried 
by order of court before a jury. 

Sec. 2, Division of judicial powers. The judicial power of the 
State shall be vested in a Court for the Trial of Impeachments, 
a Supreme Court, Superior Courts, Courts of Justices of the 
Peace, and such other courts inferior to the Supreme Court as 
may be established by law. 

Sec. 3. Trial court of impeachment. The Court for the Trial of 
Impeachments shall be the Senate. A majority of the members 
shall be necessary to a quorum, and the judgment shall not extend 
beyond removal from and disqualification to hold office in this 
State; but the party shall be liable to indictment and punishment 
according to law. 



Constitution 53 

Sec. 4. Impeachment. The House of Representatives solely shall 
have the power of impeaching. No person shall be convicted with- 
out the concurrence of two-thirds of the Senators present. When 
the Governor is impeached, the Chief Justice shall preside. 

Sec. 5. Treason against the State. Treason against the State 
shall consist only in levying war against it, or adhering to its 
enemies, giving them aid and comfort. No person shall be con- 
victed of treason unless on the testimony of two witnesses to the 
same overt act, or on confession in open court. No conviction of 
treason or attainder shall work corruption of blood or forfeiture. 

Sec. 6. Supreme Court. The Supreme Court shall consist of a 
Chief Justice and four Associate Justices. The General Assembly 
may increase the number of Associate Justices to not more than 
six, when the work of the Court so requires. The Court shall have 
power to sit in divisions, when in its judgment this is necessary 
for the proper dispatch of business, and to make rules for the dis- 
tribution of business between the divisions and for the hearing 
of cases by the full Court. No decision of any division shall be- 
come the judgment of the Court unless concurred in by a majority 
of all the justices; and no case involving a construction of the 
Constitution of the State or of the United States shall be decided 
except by the Court in banc. All sessions of the Court shall be held 
in the city of Raleigh. This amendment made to the Constitution 
of North Carolina shall not have the effect to vacate any office or 
term of office now existing under the Constitution of the State, and 
filled or held by virtue of any election or appointment under the 
said Constitution, and the laws of the State made in pursuance 
thereof. (By c. 16, 1937, amending s. 1403 of the Consolidated 
Statutes, the number of Associate Justices was increased to six.) 

Sec. 7, Terms of the Supreme Court. The terms of the Supreme 
Court shall be held in the city of Raleigh, as now, until otherwise 
provided by the General Assembly. 

Sec. 8. Jurisdiction of Supreme Court. The Supreme Court shall 
have jurisdiction to review, upon appeal, any decision of the 
courts below, upon any matter of law or legal inference. And the 
jurisdiction of said court over "issues of fact" and "questions of 
fact" shall be the same exercised by it before the adoption of the 
Constitution of one thousand eight hundred and sixty-eight, and 
the court shall have the power to issue any remedial writs neces- 



54 North Carolina Manual 

sary to give it a general supervision and control over the proceed- 
ings of the inferior courts. 

Sec. 9. Claims against the State. The Supreme Court shall have 
original jurisdiction to hear claims against the State, but its deci- 
sions shall be merely recomendatory; no process in the nature of 
execution shall issue thereon; they shall be reported to the next 
sesion of the General Assembly for its action. 

Sec. 10. Judicial district for Superior Courts. The State shall 
be divided into nine judicial districts, for each of which a judge 
shall be chosen; and there shall be held a Superior Court in each 
county at least twice in each year, to continue for such time in 
each county as may be prescribed by law. But the General Assem- 
bly may reduce or increase the number of districts. (Changed by 
acts of General Assembly to twenty-one districts.) 

Sec. 11. Residences of judges, rotation in judicial districts, and 
special terms. Every judge of the Superior Court shall reside in 
the district for which he is elected. The judges shall preside in the 
courts of the different districts successively, but no judge shall 
hold the courts in the same district oftener than once in four 
years; but in case of the protracted illness of the judge assigned 
to preside in any district, or of any other unavoidable accident to 
him, by reason of which he shall be unable to preside, the Gover- 
nor may require any judge to hold one or more specified terms in 
said district, in lieu of the judge assigned to hold the courts of the 
said district; and the General Assembly may be general laws 
provide for the selection of special or emergency judges to hold 
the Superior Courts of any county, or district, when the judge 
assigned thereto, by reason of sickness, disability, or other cause, 
is unable to attend and hold said court, and when no other judge 
is available to hold the same. Such special or emergency judges 
shall have the power and authority of regular judges of the Su- 
perior Courts, in the courts which they are so appointed to hold; 
and the General Assembly shall provide for their reasonable com- 
pensation. 

Sec. 12. Jurisdiction of courts inferior to Supreme Court. The 
General Assembly shall have no power to deprive the Judicial De- 
partment of any power or jurisdiction which rightfully pertains 
to it as a coordinate department of the government; but the Gen- 
eral Assembly shall allot and distribute that portion of this power 
and jurisdiction which does not pertain to the Supreme Court 



Constitution 55 

among the other courts prescribed in this Constitution or which 
may be established by law, in such manner as it may deem best; 
provide also a proper system of appeals; and regulate by laws, 
when necessary, the m.ethods of proceeding in the exercise of their 
powers of all the courts below the Supreme Court, so far as the 
same may be done without conflict with other provisions of this 
Constitution. 

Sec. 13. In case of ivaiver of trial by jury. In all issues of fact, 
joined in any court, the parties may waive the right to have the 
same determined by a jury; in which case the finding of the judge 
upon the facts shall have the force and effect of a verdict by a 
jury. 

Sec. 14. Special courts in cities. The General Assembly shall 
provide for the establishment of special courts, for the trial of 
misdemeanors, in cities and towns, where the same may be neces- 
sary. 

Sec. 15. Clerk of the Supreme Court. The clerk of the Supreme 
Court shall be appointed by the Court, and shall hold his office 
for eight years. 

Sec. 16. Election of Superior Court clerk. A clerk of the Su- 
perior Court for each county shall be elected by the qualified 
voters thereof, at the time and in the manner prescribed by law 
frr the election of members of the General Assembly. 

Sec. 17. Terms of office. Clerks of the Superior Courts shall hold 
their offices for four years. 

Sec. 18. Fees, salaries, and emolumeyits. The General Assembly 
shall prescribe and regulate the fees, salaries, and emoluments of 
all officers provided for in this article; but the salaries of the 
judges shall not be diminished during their continuance in office. 

Sec. 19. What laivs are, and shall he, in force. The laws of North 
Carolina, not repugnant to this Constitution or the Constitution 
and laws of the United States, shall be in force until lawfully 
altered. 

Sec. 20. Disposition of actions at law and suits in equity, pend- 
ing when this Constitution shall go into effect, etc. Actions at law 
and suits in equity pending when this Constitution shall go into 
effect shall be transferred to the courts having jurisdiction there- 
of, without prejudice by reason of the change ; and all such actions 
^nd suits commenced before, and pending the adoption by the 



56 North Carolina Manual 

General Assembly of the lules of pratice and procedure herein 
provided for, shall be heard and determined according to the prac- 
tice now in use, unless otherwise provided for by said rules. 

Sec. 21. Elccfiotft, fcn)is of office, etc., of Justices of the Su- 
}))-eme and Judges of the Supej-ior Courts. The Justices of the 
Supreme courts shall be elected by the qualified voters of the 
State, as is provided for the election of members of the General 
Assembly. They shall hold their offices for eight years. The judges 
of the Superior Courts, elected at the first election under this 
amendment, shall be elected in like manner as is provided for 
Justices of the Supreme Court, and shall hold their offices for 
eight years. The General Assembly may, from time to time, provide 
by law that the judges of the Superior Courts, chosen at succeed- 
ing elections, instead of being elected by the voters of the whole 
State, as is herein provided for, shall be elected by the voters 
of their respective disti'icts. 

Sec. 22. Trmisactions of business in the Superior Court. The 
Superior Courts shall be, at all times, open for the transaction 
of all business within their jurisdiction, except the trial of issues 
of fact requiring a jury. 

Sec. 23. Solicitors and SoHcitorial Districts. The State shall be 
divided into twenty-one solicitorial districts, for each of which a 
solicitor shall be chosen by the qualified voters thereof, as is 
prescribed for members of the General Assembly, who shall hold 
office for the term of four years, and prosecute on behalf of the 
State in all criminal actions in the Superior Courts, and advise the 
officers of justice in his district. But the General Assembly may 
reduce or increase the number of the solicitorial districts, which 
need not correspond to, or be the same as, the judicial districts 
of the State. 

Sec. 24. Sheriffs and Coroners. In each county a sheriflF and a 
coroner shall be elected by the qualified voters thereof as is pre- 
scribed for the members of the General Assembly, and shall hold 
their offices for a period of four years. In each township there 
shall be a constable elected in like manner by the voters thereof, 
who shall hold his office for a period of two years. When there is 
no coroner in a county the Clerk of the Superior Court for the 
county may appoint one for special cases. In case of a vacancy 
existing for any cause in any of the offices created by this section, 



Constitution 57 

the commissioners of the county may appoint to such office for 
the unexpired term. 

Sec. 25. Vacancies. All vacancies occurring in the offices pro- 
vided for by this article of the Constitution shall be filled by the 
appointments of the Governor, unless otherwise provided for, and 
the appointees shall hold their places until the next regular elec- 
tion for members of the General Assembly, when elections shall 
be held to fill such offices. If any person, elected or appointed to 
any of said offices, shall neglect and fail to qualify, such offices 
shall be appointed to, held and filled as provided in case of 
vacancies accurring therein. All incumbents of said offices shall 
hold until their successors are qualified. 

Sec. 26. Terms of office of first officers. The officers elected at 
the first election held under this Constiution shall hold their of- 
fices for the terms prescribed for them, respectively, next ensuing 
after the next regular election for members of the General Assem- 
bly. But their terms shall begin upon the approval of this Consti- 
tution by the Congress of the United States. 

Sec. 27. Ji(risdiction of justice of the peace. The several justices 
of the peace shall have jurisdiction, under such x'egulations as the 
General Assembly shall prescribe, of civil actions, founded on 
contract, wherein the sum demanded shall not exceed two hundred 
dollars, and wherein the title to real estate shall not be in contro- 
versy; and of all criminal matters arising within their counties 
where the punishment cannot exceed a fine of fifty dollars or im- 
prisonment for thirty days. And the General Assembly may give 
to the justices of the peace jurisdiction of other civil actions where- 
in the value of the property in controversy does not exceed fifty 
dollars. When an issue of fact shall be joined before a justice, on 
demand of either party thereto, he shall cause a jury of six men 
to be summoned, who shall try the same. The party against whom 
the judgment shall be rendered in any civil action may appeal 
to the Superior Court from the same. In all cases of a criminal 
nature the party against whom the judgment is given may appeal 
to the Superior Court, where the matter shall be heard anew. In 
all cases brought before a justice, he shall make a record of the 
proceedings, and file same with the clerk of the Superior Court 
for his county. 



58 North Carolina Manual 

Sec. 28. VacaTicies in office of justices. When the office of justice 
of the peace shall become vacant otherwise than by expiration of 
the term, and in case of a failure by the voters of any district 
to elect, the clerk of the Superior Court for the county shall ap- 
point to fill the vacancy for the unexpired term. 

Sec. 29. Vacancies in office of Snperioy Court clerk. In case the 
office of clerk of a Superior Court for a county shall become vacant 
otherwise than by the expiration of the term, and in case of a 
failure by the people to elect, the judge of the Superior Court for 
county shall appoint to fill the vacancy until an election can be 
i-egularly held. 

Sec. 30. Officers of other courts inferior to Supreme Court. In 
case the General Assembly shall establish other courts inferior to 
the Supreme Court, the presiding officers and clerks thereof shall 
be elected in such manner as the General Assembly may from time 
to time prescribe, and they shall hold their offices for a term not 
exceeding eight years. 

Sec. 31. Removal of judges of the various courts for inability. 
Any judge of the Supreme Court, or of the Superior Courts, and 
the presiding officers of such courts inferior to the Supreme Court 
as may be established by law, may be removed from office for 
mental or physical inability, upon a concurrent resolution of two- 
thirds of both Houses of the General Assembly. The judge or pre- 
siding officer against whom the General Assembly may be about 
to proceed shall receive notice thereof, accompanied by a copy 
of the causes alleged for his removal, at least twenty days before 
the day on which either House of the General Assembly shall act 
thereon. 

Sec. 32. Removal of cle)-ks of the vcD'ious courts for inability. 
Any clerk of the Supreme Court, or of the Superior Courts, or of 
such courts inferior to the Supreme Court as may be established 
by law, may be removed from office for mental or physical in- 
ability; the clerk of the Supreme Court by the judges of said 
court, the clerks of the Superior Courts by the judge riding the 
district, and the clerks of such courts inferior to the Supieme 
Court as may be established by law by the presiding officers of 
said courts. The clerk against whom proceedings are instituted 
shall receive notice thereof, accompanied by a copy of the causes 
alleged for his removal, at least ten days before the day appointed 



Constitution 59 

to act thereon, and the clerk shall be entitled to an appeal to the 
next term of the Superior Court, and thence to the Supreme Court, 
as provided in other cases of appeals. 

Sec. 33. Amenchnents not to vacate existing offices. The amend- 
ments made to the Constitution of North Carolina by this Conven- 
tion shall not have the effect to vacate any office or term of office 
now existinis: under the Constitution of the State, and filled, or 
held by virtue of any election or appointment under the said Con- 
stitution and the laws of the State made in pursuance thereof. 

ARTICLE V 

REVENUE AND TAXATION 

Section 1. Capitation tax; exemptions. The General Assembly 
may levy a capitation tax on every male inhabitant of the State 
over twenty-one and under fifty years of age, which said tax shall 
not exceed two dollars, and cities and towns may levy a capitation 
tax which shall not exceed one dollar. No other capitation tax 
shall be levied. The commissioners of the several counties and of 
the cities and towns may exempt from the capitation tax any 
special cases on account of poverty or infirmity. 

Sec. 2. Application of proceeds of State and coimty capitation 
tax. The proceeds of the State and county capitation tax shall be 
applied to the purposes of education and the support of the poor, 
but in no one year shall more than twenty-five per cent thereof 
be appropriated to the latter purpose. 

Sec. 3. State taxation. The power of taxation shall be exercised 
in a just and equitable manner, and shall never be surrendered, 
suspended, or contracted away. Taxes on property shall be uniform 
as to each class of property taxed. Taxes shall be levied only for 
public purposes, and every act levying a tax shall state the object 
to which it is to be applied. The General Assembly may also tax 
trades, professions, franchises, and incomes: Provided, the rate 
of tax on income shall not in any case exceed ten per cent (10*^), 
and there shall be allowed the following exemptions, to be deducted 
from the amount of annual incomes, to-wit: for married man with 
a wife living with him, or to a widow or widower having minor 
child or children, natural or adopted, not less than $2,000; to all 
other persons not less than $1,000, and there may be allowed other 
deductions (not including living expenses) so that only net in- 
comes are taxed. 



60 North Carolina Manual 

Sec. 4. Liviifatiovs upon the increase of public debts. The Gen- 
eral Assembly shall have the power to contract debts and to pledge 
the faith and credit of the State and to authorize counties and 
municipalities to contract debts and pledge their faith and credit, 
for the following purposes: To fund or refund a valid existing 
debt; to borrow in anticipation of the collection of taxes due and 
payable within the fiscal year to an amount not exceeding fifty 
per centum of such taxes; to supply a casual deficit; to suppress 
riots or insurrections, or to repel invasions. For any purpose 
other than these enumerated, the General Assembly shall have 
no power, during any biennium, to contract new debts on behalf 
of the State to an amount in excess of two-thirds of the amount 
by which the State's outstanding indebtedness shall have been re- 
duced during the next preceding biennium, unless the subject be 
submitted to a vote of the people of the State; and for any purpose 
other than these enumerated the General Assembly shall have no 
power to authorize counties or municipalities to contract debts, 
and counties and municipalities shall not contract debts, during 
any fiscal year, to an amount exceeding two-thirds of the amount 
by which the outstanding indebtedness of the particular county 
or municipality shall have been reduced during the next preceding 
fiscal year, unless the subject be submitted to a vote of the people 
of the particular county or municipality. In any election held in 
the State or in any county or municipality under the provisions 
of this section, the proposed indebtedness must be approved by a 
majority of those who shall vote thereon. And the General Assem- 
bly shall have no power to give or lend the credit of the State in 
aid of any person, association, or corporation, except to aid in 
the completion of such railroads as may be unfinished at the time 
of the adoption of this Constitution, or in which the State has 
a direct pecuniary interest, unless the subject be submitted to a 
direct vote of the people of the State, and be approved by a ma- 
jority of those who shall vote thereon. 

Sec. 5. Property exempt from taxation. Property belonging to 
the State, or to municipal corporations, shall be exempt from tax- 
ation. The General Assembly may exempt cemeteries and property 
held for educational, scientific, literary, charitable, or religious 
purposes; also wearing apparel, arms for muster, household and 
kitchen furniture, the mechanical and agricultural implements of 



Constitution 61 

mechanics and farmers; libraries and scientific instruments, or 
any other personal property, to a value not exceeding three hun- 
dred dollars. The General Assembly may exempt from taxation 
not exceeding one thousand dollars ($1,000.00) in value of prop- 
erty held and used as the place of residence of the owner. 

Sec. 6. Taxes levied for counties. The total of the State and 
county tax on property shall not exceed fifteen cents on the one 
hundred dollars value of property, except when the county prop- 
erty tax is levied for a special purpose and with the special ap- 
proval of the General Assembly, which may be done by special or 
general act: Pyovidcd, this limitation shall not apply to taxes 
levied for the maintenance of public schools of the State for the 
term required by ai'ticle nine, section three, of the Constitution: 
Provided, further, the State tax shall not exceed five cents on the 
one hundred dollars value of property. 

Sec. 7. Acts levying taxes shall state objects, etc. Every act of 
the General Assembly levying a tax shall state the special object 
of which it is to be applied, and it shall be applied to no other 
purpose. 

ARTICLE VI 

SUFFRAGE AND ELIGIBILITY TO OFFICE 

Section 1. Who may vote. Every person born in the United 
States, and every person who has been naturalized, twenty-one 
years of age, and possessing the qualifications set out in this 
article, shall be entitled to vote at any election by the people of 
the State, except as herein otherwise provided. (The 19th amend- 
ment of the United States Constitution, ratified Aug. 6, 1920, 
provided that the "right of citizens of the United States to vote 
shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any 
state on account of sex." North Carolina accordingly by c. 18, 
Extra Session 1920, provided for the registration and voting of 
women.) 

Sec. 2. Qualifications of voters. He shall reside in the State of 
North Carolina for one year, and in the precinct, ward, or other 
election district in which he offers to vote four months next pre- 
ceding the election: Provided, that removal from one precinct, 
ward, or other election district to another in the same county 
shall not operate to deprive any person of the right to vote in the 
precinct, ward, or other election district from which he has re- 



6? North Carolina Manual 

moved until four months after such removal. No person who has 
been convicted, or who has confessed his guilt in open court upon 
indictment, of any crime the punishment of which now is, or may 
hereafter be, imprisonment in the State's Prison, shall be per- 
mitted to vote, unless the said person shall be first restored to 
citizenship in the manner prescribed by law. 

Sec. 3. Voters to be registered. Every person offering: to vote 
shall be at the time a legally registered voter as herein prescribed 
and in the manner hereafter provided by law, and the General 
Assembly of North Carolina shall enact general registration laws 
to carry into effect the provisions of this article. 

Sec. 4. Qualification for registration. Every person presenting 
himself for registration shall be able to read and write any section 
of the Constitution in the English language. But no male person 
who was, on January 1, 1867, or at any time prior thereto, en- 
titled to vote under the laws of any State in the United States 
wherein he then resided, and no lienal descendant of any such 
person, shall be denied the right to register and vote at any 
election in this State by reason of his failure to possess the 
educational qualifications herein prescribed: Provided, he shall 
have registered in accordance with the terms of this section prior 
to December 1, 1908. The General Assembly shall provide for the 
registration of all persons entitled to vote without the educational 
qualifications herein prescribed, and shall, on or before November 
1, 1908, provide for the making of a permanent record of such 
registration; and all persons so registered shall forever thereafter 
have the right to vote in all elections by the people of this State, 
unless disqualified under section 2 of this article. 

Sec. 5. Indivisible plan; legislative intent. That this amendment 
to the Constitution is presented and adopted as one indivisible 
plan for the regulation of the suffrage, with the intent and pur- 
pose to so connect the different parts, and to make them so de- 
pendent upon each other, that the whole shall stand or fall to- 
gether. 

Sec. 6. Elections by -peojyle and General Assembly. All elections 
by the people shall be by ballot, and all elections by the General 
Assembly shall be viva voce. 

Sec. 7. Eligibility to offi.ce ; official oath. Every voter in North 
Carolina, except as in this article disqualified, shall be eligible to 



Constitution 63 

office, but before entering upon the duties of the office he shall 
take and subscribe the following* oath: 

"I, , do solemnly swear or (offirm) that I will 

support and maintain the Constitution and laws of the United 
States, and the Constitution and laws of North Carolina not in- 
consistent therewith, and that I will faithfully discharge the duties 
of my office as So help me, God." 

Sec. 8. Disqualification for office. The following classes of per- 
sons shall be disqaulified for office: First, all persons who shall 
deny the being of Almighty God. Second, all persons who shall 
have been convicted or confessed their guilt or indictment pend- 
ing, and whether sentenced or not, or under judgment suspended, 
of any treason or felony, or of any other crime for which the 
punishment may be imprisonment in the penitentiary, since be- 
coming citizens of the United States, or of corruption or malprac- 
tice in office, unless such person shall be restored to the rights of 
citizenship in a manner prescribed by law. 

Sec. 9. When this chapter operative. That this amendment to 
the Constitution shall go into effect on the first day of July, nine- 
teen hundred and two, if a majority of votes cast at the next gen- 
eral election shall be cast in favor of this suffrage amendment. 

ARTICLE VII 

MUNICIPAL CORPORATIONS 

Section 1. County officers. In each county there shall be elected 
biennially by the qualified voters thereof, as provided for the elec- 
tion of members of the General Assembly, the following officers: 
A treasurer, i-egister of deeds, surveyor, and five commissioners. 
(Under authority of the Public Laws of 1935, c. 362, s 13, provi- 
sion was made for the quadrennial election of registers of deeds, 
certain counties being exempted.) 

Sec. 2. Duty of county commissioners. It shall be the duty of 
the commissioners to exercise general supervision and control of 
the penal and charitable institutions, schools, roads, bridges, levy- 
ing of taxes, and finances of the county, as may be prescribed by 
law. The register of deeds shall be ex officio clerk of the board of 
commissioners. 

Sec. 3. Counties to be divided into districts. It shall be the duty 
of the commissioners first elected in each county to divide the 



64 North Carolina Manual 

same into convenient districts, to determine the boundaries and 
prescribe the name of the said districts, and to report the same 
to the General Assembly before the first day of January, 1869. 

Sec. 4. Toivuships have corporate powers. Upon the approval of 
the reports provided for in the foregoing section, by the General 
Assembly, the said districts shall have corporate powers for the 
necesary purposes of local g-overnment, and shall be known as 
townships. 

Sec. 5. Officos of townships. In each township there shall be 
biennially elected, by the qualified voters thereof, a clerk and two 
justices of the peace, who shall constitute a board of trustees, 
and shall, under the supervision of the county commissioners, have 
control of the taxes and finances, roads and bridges of the town- 
ships, as may be prescribed by law. The General Assembly may 
provide for the election of a larger number of justices of the peace 
in cities and towns, and in those townships in which cities and 
towns are situated. In every township there shall also be bien- 
nially elected a school committee, consisting of three persons, 
whose duties shall be prescribed by law. (Amended by c. 141, 
1877.) 

Sec. 6. Trustees shall assess property. The township board of 
trustees shall assess the taxable property of their townships and 
make returns to the county commissioners for revision, as may 
be prescribed by law. The clerk shall be, ex officio, treasurer of 
the township. 

Sec. 7. No debt or loan except by a majority of voters. No 
county, city, town, or other municipal corporation shall contract 
any debt, pledge its faith or loan its credit, nor shall any tax 
be levied or collected by any officers of the same except for the 
necessary expenses thereof, unless approved by a majority of 
those who shall vote thereon in any election held for such purpose. 
Sec. 8 No money drawn except by laiv. No money shall be drawn 
from any county or township treasury except by authority of law. 
Sec. 9. When officers enter on duty. The county officers first 
elected under the provisions of this article shall enter upon their 
duties ten days after the approval of this Constitution by the 
Congress of the United States. 

Sec. 10. Governor to appoint justices. The Governor shall ap- 
point a sufficient number of justices of the peace in each county. 



Constitution 65 

who shall hold their places until sections four, five, and six of this 
article shall have been carried into effect. 

Sec. 11. Charters to remain in force until legally changed. All 
charters, ordinances, and provisions relating to municipal cor- 
porations shall remain in force until legally changed, unless in- 
consistent with the provisions of this Constitution. 

Sec. 12. Debts in aid of the rebellion not to be paid. No county, 
city, town, or other municipal corporation shall assume to pay, 
nor shall any tax be levied or collected for the payment of any 
debt, or the interest upon any debt, contracted directly or in- 
directly in aid of or support of the rebellion. 

Sec. 13. Powers of General Assembly over miinicijjal corpora- 
tions. The General Assembly shall have full power by statute to 
modify, change, or abrogate any and all of the provisions of this 
article, and substitute others in their place, except sections seven, 
nine and thirteen. (Recent amendment repealed old section 9 and 
renumbered section 10-14.) (Under the general authority of this 
section several statutory amendments have been made. See notes 
supra, ss. 1 and 5.) 

ARTICLE VIII 

CORPORATIONS OTHER THAN MUNICIPAL 

Section 1. Corporations under general laws. No corporation shall 
be created, nor shall its charter be extended, altered, or amended 
by special act, except corporations for charitable, educational, 
penal, or reformatory purposes that are to be and remain under 
the patronage and control of the State; but the General Assembly 
shall provide by general laws for the chartering and organization 
of all corporations, and for amending, extending, and forfeiture of 
all charters, except those above permitted by special act. All such 
general laws and special acts may be altered from time to time 
or repealed ; and the General Assembly may at any time by special 
act repeal the charter of any corporation. 

Sec. 2. Debits of corporations, how secured. Dues from corpora- 
tions shall be secured by such individual liabilities of the corpora- 
tions, and other means, as may be prescribed by law. 

Sec. 3. What corporations shall include. The term "Corporation" 
as used in this article shall be construed to include all associa- 
tions and joint-stock companies having any of the powers and 
privileges of corporations not possessed by individuals or partner- 



fi6 North Carolina Manual 

ships. Aiul all corporations shall have the right to sue, and shall 
be subject to be sued, in all courts in like cases as natural persons. 

Sec. 4. Legislature to provide for organiziyig cities, towns, etc. 
It shall be the duty of the Lep:islature to provide by general laws 
for the organization of cities, towns, and incorporated villages, 
and to restrict their power of taxation, assessment, borrowing 
money, contracting debts, and loaning their credit, so as to prevent 
abuses in assessment and in contracting debts by such municipal 
corporations. 

ARTICLE IX 
education 

Section 1. Education shall be encouraged. Religion, morality, 
and knowledge being necessary to good government and the hap- 
piness of mankind, schools and the means of education shall for- 
ever be encouraged. 

Sec. 2. General Assembly shall provide for schools; separation 
of the races. The General Assembly, at its first session under this 
Constitution, shall provide by taxation and otherwise for a general 
and uniform system of public schools, wherein tuition shall be 
free of charge to all the children of the State between the ages 
of six and twenty-one years. And the children of the white race 
and the children of the colored race shall be taught in separate 
public schools; but there shall be no discrimination in favor of, 
or to the prejudice of, either race. 

Sec. 3. Counties to be divided into districts. Each county of the 
State shall be divided into a convenient number of districts, in 
which one or more public schools shall be maintained at least six 
months in every year; and if the commissioners of any county 
shall fail to comply with the aforesaid requirements of this sec- 
tion, they shall be liable to indictment. 

Sec. 4. What property devoted to educational purposes. The 
proceeds of all lands that have been or hereafter may be granted 
by the United States to this State, and not otherwise appropriated 
by this State or the United States; also all money, stocks, bonds, 
and other property now belonging to any State fund for purposes 
of education, also the net proceeds of all sales of the swamp lands 
belonging to the State, and all other grants, gifts, or devices that 
have been or hereafter may be made to the State, and not other- 
wise appropriated by the State or by the terms of the grant, gift, 



Constitution 67 

or devise, shall be paid into the State Treasury, and, together 
with so much of the ordinary revenue of the State as may be by 
law set apart for that purpose, shall be faithfully appropriated 
for establishing- and maintaining in this State a system of free 
public schools, and for no other uses or purposes whatsoever. 

Sec. 5. Con7ity school fund; proviso. All moneys, stocks, bonds, 
and other property belonging to a county school fund; also the 
net proceeds from the sale of estrays; also the clear proceeds of 
all penalties and forfeitures and of all fines collected in the several 
counties for any breach of the penal or military laws of the State; 
and all money which shall be paid by persons as an equivalent 
for exemption from military duty, shall belong to and remain in 
the several counties, and shall be faithfully appropriated for 
establishing and maintaining free public schools in the several 
counties of this State : Provided, that the amount collected in each 
county shall be annually reported to the Superintendent of Public 
Instruction. 

Sec. 6. Election of trustees, and provisions for maintenance, of 
the University. The General Assembly shall have power to provide 
for the election of trustees of the University of North Carolina, 
in whom, when chosen, shall be vested all the privileges, rights, 
franchises, and endowments thereof in any wise granted to or 
conferred upon the trustees of said University; and the General 
Assembly may make such provisions, laws, and regulations from 
time to time as may be necessary and expedient for the mainten- 
ance and management of said University. 

Sec. 7. Benefits of the University. The General Assembly shall 
provide that the benefits of the University, as far as practicable, 
be extended to the youth of the State free of expense for tuition; 
also, that all the property which has heretofore accrued to the 
State, or shall hereafter accrue, from escheats, unclaimed divi- 
dends, or distributive shares of the estates of deceased persons, 
shall be appropriated to the use of the University. 

Sec. 8. State Board of Education. The general supervision and 
administraton of the free public school system, and of the educa- 
tional funds provided for the support thereof, except those men- 
tioned in Section five of this Article, shall, from and after the 
first day of April, one thousand nine hundred and forty-five, be 
vested in the State Board of Education to consist of the Lieuten- 



68 North Carolina Manual 

ant Governor, State Treasurer, the Superintendent of Public In- 
struction, and ten members to be appointed by the Governor, sub- 
ject to confirmation by the General Assembly in joint session. The 
General Assembly shall divide the State into eight educational 
districts, which may be altered from time to time by the General 
Assembly. Of the appointive members of the State Board of Edu- 
cation one shall be appointed from each of the eight educational 
districts, and tw^o shall be appointed as members at large. The 
first appointments under this section shall be : Two Members 
appointed from educational districts for terms of two years; two 
members appointed from educational districts for terms of four 
years; two members appointed from educational districts for terms 
of six years; and two members appointed from educational dis- 
tricts for terms of eight years. One member at large shall be 
appointed for a period of four years and one member at large 
shall be appointed for a period of eight years. All subsequent 
appointments shall be for terms of eight years. Any appointments 
to fill vacancies shall be made by the Governor for the unexpired 
terms, which appointments shall not be subject to confirmation. 
The State Superintendent of Public Instruction shall be the admin- 
istrative head of the public school system and shall be secretary 
of the board. The board shall elect a chairman and vice chairman. 
A majority of the board shall constitute a quorum for the trans- 
action of business. The per diem and expenses of the appointive 
members shall be provided by the General Assembly. 

Sec. 9. Potvers and Duties of the Board. The State Board of 
Education shall succeed to all the powers and trusts of the Presi- 
dent and Directors of the Literary Fund of North Carolina and 
the State Board of Education as heretofore constituted. The State 
Board of Education shall have power to divide the State into a 
convenient number of school districts; to regulate the grade, 
salary and qualifications of teachers; to provide for the selection 
and adoption of the textbooks to be used in the public schools; to 
apportion and equalize the public school funds over the State; and 
generally to supervise and administer the free public school system 
of the State and make all needful rules and regulations in rela- 
tion thereto. All the powers enumerated in this section shall be 
exercised in conformity with this constitution and subject to such 
laws as may be enacted from time to time by the General Assem- 
bly. 



Constitution 69 

Sec. 10. Agricultural department. As soon as practicable after 
the adoption of this Constitution the General Assembly shall estab- 
lish and maintain, in connection with the University, a depart- 
ment of agriculture, of mechanics, of mining, and of normal in- 
struction. 

Sec. 11. Children must atterid school. The General Assembly is 
hereby empowered to enact that every child of sufficient mental 
and physical ability shall attend the public schools during the 
period between the ages of six and eighteen years, for a term of 
not less than sixteen months, unless educated by other means. 

ARTICLE X 

HOMESTEADS AND EXEMPTIONS 

Section 1. Exemptions of personal property. The personal prop- 
erty of any resident of this State, to the value of five hundred 
dollars, to be selected by such resident, shall be and is hereby 
exempted from sale under execution or other final process of any 
court issued for the collection of any debt. 

Sec. 2. Homestead. Every homestead, and the dwellings and 
buildings used therewith, not exceeding in value one thousand 
dollars, to be selected by the owner thereof, or in lieu thereof, at 
the option of the owner, any lot in a city, town, or village with 
the dwellings and buildings used thereon, owned and occupied by 
any resident of this State, and not exceeding the value of one 
thousand dollars, shall be exempt from sale under execution or 
other final process obtained on any debt. But no property shall 
be exempt from sale for taxes or for payment of obligations con- 
tracted for the purchase of said premises. 

Sec. 3. Homestead exemption from, debt. The homestead, after 
the death of the owner thereof, shall be exempt from the payment 
of any debt during the minority of his children, or any of them. 

Sec. 4. Laborer's lien. The provisions of sections one and two 
of this article shall not be so construed as to prevent a laborer's 
lien for work done and performed for the person claiming such 
exemption, or a mechanic's lien for work done on the premises. 

Sec. 5. Benefit of widotv. If the owner of a homestead die, leav- 
ing a widow but no children, the same shall be exempt from the 
debts of her husband, and the rents and profits thereof shall inure 
to her benefit during her widowhood, unless she be the owner of 
a homestead in her own right. 



70 ' North Carolina Manual 

Sec. 6. Property of married women sectired to them. The real 
and personal property of any female in this State acquired be- 
fore marriage, and all property, real and personal, to which she 
may, after marriage, become in any manner entitled, shall be 
and remain the sole and separate estate and property of such 
female, and shall not be liable for any debts, obligations, or en- 
gagements of her husband, and may be devised, and bequeathed, 
and, with the written assent of her husband, conveyed by her as 
if she were unmarried. 

Sec. 7. Husband may inspire his life for the benefit of wife and 
children. The husband may insure his own life for the sole use 
and benefit of his wife and children, and in case of the death of 
the husband the amount thus insured shall be paid over to the 
wife and children, or to the guardian, if under age, for her or 
their own use, free from all the claims of the representatives of 
her husband, or any of his creditors. And the policy shall not be 
subject to claims of creditors of the insured during the life of the 
insured, if the insurance issued is for the sole use and benefit 
of the wife and/or children. 

Sec. 8. How deed for homestead may be made. Nothing con- 
tained in the foregoing sections of this Article shall operate to 
prevent the owner of a homestead from disposing of the same by 
deed; but no deed made by the owner of a homestead shall be 
valid without the signature and acknowledgement of his wife. 

ARTICLE XI 

PUNISHMENT, PENAL INSTITUTIONS, AND PUBLIC CHARITIES 

Section 1. Punishments; convict labor; proviso. The following 
punishments only shall be known to the laws of this State, viz.: 
death, imprisonment with or without hard labor, fines, removal 
from office, and disqualification to hold and enjoy any office of 
honor, trust, or profit under this State. The foregoing provision for 
imprisonment with hard labor shall be construed to authorize the 
employment of such convict labor on public works or highways, 
or other labor for public benefit, and the farming out thereof, 
where and in such manner as may be provided by law; but no 
convict shall be farmed out who has been sentenced on a charge 
of murder, manslaughter, rape, attempt to commit rape, or arson ; 
Provided, that no convict whose labor may be farmed out shall 
be punished for any failure of duty as a laborer, except by a 



Constitution 71 

responsible officer of the State; but the convicts so farmed out 
shall be at all times under the supervision and control, as to their 
government and discipline, of the penitentiary board or some of- 
ficer of this State. 

Sec. 2. Death jynnishmcnt. The object of punishment being not 
only to satisfy justice, but also to reform the offender, and thus 
prevent crime, murder, arson, burglary, and rape, and these only, 
may be punishable with death, if the General Assembly shall so 
enact. 

Sec. 3. Penitentiary. The General Assembly shall, at its first 
meeting, make provision for the erection and conduct of a State's 
Prison or penitentiary at some central and accessible point with- 
in the State. 

Sec. 4. Houses of corection. The General Assembly may provide 
for the erection of houses of correction, where vagrants and per- 
sons guilty of misdemeanors shall be restrained and usefully em- 
ployed. 

Sec. 5. Houses of refuge. A house or houses of refuge may be 
established whenever the public interests may require it, for the 
correction and instruction of other classes of off'enders. 

Sec. 6. The sexes to be separated. It shall be required, by com- 
petent legislation, that the structure and superintendence of penal 
institutions of the State, the county jails, and city police prisons 
secure the health and comfoi't of the prisoners, and that male and 
female prisoners be never confined in the same room or cell. 

Sec. 7. Provision for the poor and orphans. Beneficient provi- 
sions for the poor, the unfortunate, and orphan being one of the 
first duties of a civilized and Christian State, the General Assem- 
bly shall, at its first session, appoint and define the duties of a 
Board of Public Charities, to whom shall be entrusted the super- 
vision of all charitable and penal State institutions, and who shall 
annually report to the Governor upon their condition, with sug- 
gestions for their improvement. 

Sec. 8. Orphan houses. There shall also, as soon as practicable, 
be measures devised by the State for the establishment of one or 
more orphan houses, where destitute orphans may be cared for, 
educated, and taught some business or trade. 

Sec. 9. hiebriates and idiots. It shall be the duty of the Legisla- 
ture, as soon as practicable, to devise means for the education of 
idiots and inebriates. 



72 North Carolina Manual 

Sec. 10. Deaf mutes, blind, a7id insane. The General Assembly 
may provide that the indigent deaf-mute, blind, and insane of the 
State shall be cared for at the charge of the State. 

Sec. 11. Self -supporting. It shall be steadily kept in view by 
the Legislature and the Board of Public Charities that all penal 
and charitable institutions should be made as nearly self-support- 
ing as is consistent with the purposes of their creation. 

ARTICLE XII 

MILITIA 

Section 1. Who are liable to yniUtia duty. All able-bodied male 
citizens of the State of North Carolina, between the ages of 
twenty-one and forty years, who are citizens of the United States, 
shall be liable to duty in the militia: Provided, that all persons 
who may be averse to bearing arms, from religious scruples, shall 
be exempt therefrom. 

Sec. 2. Orgayiizing, etc. The General Assembly shall provide for 
the organizing, arming, equipping, and discipline of the militia, 
and for paying the same, when called into active service. 

Sec. 3. Governor C07n7nander-i7i-chief. The Governor shall be 
commander-in-chief, and shall have power to call out the militia 
to execute the law, suppress riots or insurrections, and to repel 
invasion. 

Sec. 4. Exemptions. The General Assembly shall have power 
to make such exemptions as may be deemed necessary, and to 
enact laws that may be expedient for the government of the 
militia. , | 

ARTICLE XIII 

AMENDMENTS 

Section 1. Convention, how called. No convention of the people 
of this State shall ever be called by the General Assembly, unless 
by the concurrence of two-thirds of all of the members of each 
House of the General Assembly, and except the proposition, Con- 
vention or NO Convention, be first submitted to the qualified 
voters of the whole State, at the next general election, in a man- 
ner to be prescribed by law. And should a majority of the votes 
cast be in favor of said convention, it shall assemble on such day 
as may be prescribed by the General Assembly. 



Constitution 73 

Sec. 2. How the Constitution may be altered. No part of the 
Constitution of this State shall be altered unless a bill to alter 
the same shall have been agreed to by three-fifths of each House 
of the General Assembly. And the amendment or amendments so 
agreed to shall be submitted at the next general election to the 
qualified voters of the whole State, in such manner as may be 
prescribed by law. And in the event of their adoption by a ma- 
jority of the votes cast, such amendment or amendments shall 
become a part of the Constitution of this State, 

ARTICLE XIV 

MISCELLANEOUS 

Section 1. Indictments. All indictments which shall have been 
found, or may hereafter be found, for any crime or offense com- 
mitted before this Constitution takes eff'ect, may be proceeded 
upon in the proper courts, but no punishment shall be infiicted 
which is forbidden by this Constitution. 

Sec. 2. Penalty for fighting duel. No person who shall hereafter 
fight a duel, or assist in the same as a second, or send, accept, or 
knowingly carry a challenge therefor, or agree to go out of the 
State to fight a duel, shall hold any office in this State. 

Sec. 3. Drawing money. No money shall be drawn from the 
Treasury but in consequence of appropriations made by law; and 
an accurate account of the receipts and expenditures of the public 
money shall be annually published. 

Sec. 4. Mechanic's lien. The General Assembly shall provide, 
by proper legislation, for giving to mechanics and laborers an 
adequate lien on the subject-matter of their labor. 

Sec. 5. Governor to make appointments. In the absence of any 
contrary provision, all officers of this State, whether heretofore 
elected or appointed by the Governor, shall hold their positions 
only until other appointments are made by the Governor, or, if 
the officers are elective, until their successors shall have been 
chosen and duly qualified according to the provisions of this Con- 
stitution. 

Sec. 6. Seat of government. The seat of government in this 
State shall remain at the city of Raleigh, 



74 North Carolina Manual 

Sec. 7. Holding office. No person who shall hold any office or 
place of trust or profit under the United States, or any depart- 
ment thereof, or under this State, or under any other state or 
government, shall hold or exercise any other office or place of 
trust or profit under the authority of this State, or be eligible to 
a seat in either House of the General Assembly: Provided, that 
nothing herein contained shall extend to officers in the militia, 
notaries public, justices of the peace, commissioners of public 
charities, or commissioners for special purposes. 

Sec. 8. Intermarriage of whites and Negroes prohibited. All 
marriages between a white person and a Negro, or between a 
white person and a person of Negro descent to the third genera- 
tion, inclusive, are hereby forever prohibited. 



^f)x 




THE AMERICAN'S CREED 

I believe in the United States of America, as a government of 
the people, by the people, for the people; vi^hose just powers are 
derived from the consent of the governed; a democracy in a 
republic; a sovereign nation of many sovereign states; a perfect 
union, one and inseparable; established upon those principles of 
freedom, equality, justice and humanity for which American 
patriots sacrificed their lives and fortunes. I therefore believe it 
is my duty to my country to love it, to support its constitution, 
to obey its laws, to respect its flag, and to defend it against all 
enemies. 

(The American's Creed by William Tyler Page was adopted 
by an act of Congress, April 6, 1918.) 



THE AMERICAN FLAG, ITS ORIGIN 

In 1775 the Philadelphia Troop of Light Horse carried a stand- 
ard with thirteen alternate blue and silver stripes in the upper 
left-hand corner. At Cambridge on January 2, 1776, Washington 
without authorization of the Continental Congress, raised a flag 
consisting of thirteen alternate white and red stripes with the 
crosses of St. George and St. Andrew in a blue field in the upper 
left-hand corner. It was called the "Union Flag," "Grand Union 
Flag" and the "Continental Flag," and was employed until dis- 
placed by the Stars and Stripes adopted by the Continental 
Congress. 

The beautiful tradition that Betsy Ross, as early as June 1776, 
made a Stars and Stripes flag from a pencil sketch supplied by 
Washington but changed the points of the stars from six to five, 
has become a classic. Historians doubt its accuracy. Half a dozen 
localities claim to have been the place where the Stars and Stripes 
was first used. Within New York State such contention has been 
for Fort Ann on July 8, Fort Stanwix on August 3, Bennington 
on August 13, and Saratoga on September 19, 1777. The flag with 
thirteen stripes and thirteen stars, authorized on June 14, 1777, 
continued to be used as the national emblem until Congress 
passed the following act, which President Washington signed: 

77 



78 North Carolina Manual 

"That from and after May 1, 1795, the flag of the United 
States be fifteen stripes, alternate red and white; and that 
the union be fifteen stars, white in a blue field." 

This action was necessitated by the admission of the States of 
Vermont and Kentucky to the Union. 

The flag- of 1795 had the stars arranged in three rows of five 
each instead of in a circle, and served for 23 years. 

With the admission of more new states, however, it became 
apparent that the 1795 flag would have to be further modified; 
hence in 1818 a law was passed by Congress providing: 

"That from and after the fourth day of July next, the flag 
of the United States be thirteen horizontal stripes, alter- 
nate red and white; that the union have twenty stars, white 
in a blue field. 

"That on the admission of every new state into the Union, 
one star be added to the union of the flag; and that such 
addition shall take effect on the Fourth of July next suc- 
ceeding such admission." 

Since 1818 additional stars have been added until today there 
are 48 on the flag. No law has been passed to designate how the 
stars shall be arranged. At one time they formed a design of a 
larger star. Now by common practice they form six rows of eight 
stars each. 

Betsy Ross, it is now said, lived at 233 Arch Street, Philadel- 
phia, and not at 239. She made flags, but says Theodore D. 
Gottlieb, she never made the first Stars and Stripes. He adds: 
"The Department of State, the War and Navy departments, the 
Historical Sites Commission of Philadelphia and other official 
bodies repudiate the legend. The book and pamphlet material 
available is overwhelmingly against the legend. 

"The story arose for the first time on March 14, 1870, when 
William J. Canby read a paper before the Pennsylvania Histori- 
cal Society in which he states that in 1836, when his grandmother, 
Betsy Ross, was 84 years old and he was 11, she told him the 
story. He apparently thought little of it because nothing was done 
until 1857, when at the suggestion of his Aunt Clarissa, oldest 
daughter of Betsy, he wrote out the notes as he remembered the 
conversation. 



The American Flag 79 

"Nothing: further was done until 1870 when he wrote his paper. 
The Historical Society of Pennsylvania thought so little of the 
paper it neither catalogued nor kept a copy of it. Even George 
Canby, younger brother of William, disputed several points in 
the paper. 

"The legend grew to strength from 1888 to 1893 when pro- 
moters secured an option on the so-called Flag House. 

"Modei'n historical researchers are giving much thought to 
Fi-ancis Hopkinson of New Jersey as the possible designer and 
the Fillmore or Bennington flag as the first flag." 

The Proper Display of the American Flag 

Sec. 2. (a) It is the universal custom to display the flag only 
from sunrise to sunset on buildings and on stationary flagstaffs 
in the open. However, the flag may be displayed at night upon 
special occasions when it is desired to produce a patriotic effect. 

(b) The flag should be hoisted briskly and lowered ceremoni- 
ously. 

(c) The flag should not be displayed on days when the weather 
is inclement. 

(d) The flag should be displayed on all days when the weather 
permits, especially on New Year's Day, January 1; Inauguration 
Day, January 20; Lincoln's Birthday, February 12; Washington's 
Birthday, February 22; Army Day, April 6; Easter Sunday (va- 
riable) ; Mother's Day, second Sunday in May; Memorial Day 
(half staff until noon). May 30; Flag Day, June 14; Independence 
Day, July 4; Labor Day, first Monday in September; Constitution 
Day, September 17; Columbus Day, October 12; Navy Day, 
October 27; Armistic Day, November 11; Thanksgiving Day, 
fourth Thursday in November; Christmas Day, December 25; 
such other days as may be proclaimed by the President of the 
United States; the birthdays of States (dates of admission); and 
on State holidays. 

(e) The flag should be displayed daily, weather permitting, on 
or near the main administration building of every public institu- 
tion. 

(f) The flag should be displayed in or near every polling place 
on election days. 



80 North Carolina Manual 

(g) The flag should be displayed during school days in or near 
every schoolhouse. 

Sec. 3. That the flag, when carried in a procession with another 
flag or flags, should be either on the marching right; that is, the 
flag's own right, or, if there is a line of other flags, in front of 
the center of that line. 

(a) The flag should not be displayed on a float in a parade ex- 
cept from a staff", or as provided in subsection (i). 

(b) The flag should not be draped over the hood, top, sides, or 
back of a vehicle or of a railroad train or a boat. When the flag 
is displayed on a motorcar, the staff shall be fixed firmly to the 
chassis or clamped to the radiator cap. 

(c) No other flag or penant should be placed above or, if on 
the same level, to the right of the flag of the United States of 
America, except during chui'ch services conducted by naval chap- 
lains at sea, when the church pennant may be flown above the 
flag during church services for the personnel of the Navy. 

(d) The flag of the United States of America, when it is dis- 
played with another flag against a wall from crossed staffs, should 
be on the right, the flag's own right, and its staff should be in 
front of the staff of the other flag. 

(e) The flag of the United States of America should be at the 
center and at the highest point of the group when a number of 
flags of States or localities or pennants of societies are grouped 
and displayed from staffs. 

(f) When flags of States, cities, or localities, or pennants of 
societies are flown on the same halyard with the flag of the United 
States, the latter should always be at the peak. When the flags 
are flown from adjacent staffs, the flag of the United States 
should be hoisted first and lowered last. No such flag or pennant 
may be placed above the flag of the United States or to the right 
of the flag of the United States. 

(g) When flags of two or more nations are displayed, they are 
to be flown from separate staffs of the same height. The flags 
should be of approximately equal size. International usage forbids 
the display of the flag of one nation above that of another nation 
in time of peace. 

(h) When the flag of the United States is displayed from a staff 
projecting horizontally or at an angle from the window sill, bal- 
cony, or front of a building, the union of the flag should be placed 



The American Flag 81 

at the peak of the staff unless the flag is at half staff. When the 
flag is suspended ovei' a sidewalk from a rope extending from a 
house to a pole at the edge of the sidewalk, the flag should be 
hoisted out, union first, from the building. 

(i) When the flag is displayed otherwise than by being flown 
from a staff, it should be displayed flat, whether indoors or out. 
When displayed either horizontally or vertically against a wall, 
the union should be uppermost and to the flag's own right; that 
is, to the observer's left. When displayed in a window, the flag 
should be displayed in the same way; that is, with the union or 
blue field to the left of the observer in the street. 

(j) When the flag is displayed over the middle of the street, it 
should be suspended vertically with the union to the north in an 
east and west street or to the east in the north and south street. 

(k) When used on a speaker's platform, the flag, if displayed 
flat, should be displayed above and behind the speaker. When dis- 
played from a staff in a church or public auditorium, if it is dis- 
played in the chancel of a church, or on the speaker's platform 
in a public auditorium, the flag should occupy the position of 
honor and be placed at the clergyman's or speaker's right as he 
faces the congregation or audience. Any other flag so displayed in 
the chancel or on the platform should be placed at the clergyman's 
or speaker's left as he faces the congregation or audience. But 
when the flag is displayed from a staff in a church or public 
auditorium elsewhere than in the chancel or on the platform it 
shall be placed in the position of honor at the right of the con- 
gregation or audience as they face the chancel or platform. Any 
other flag so displayed should be placed on the left of the congre- 
gation or audience as they face the chancel or platform. 

(1) The flag should form a distinctive feature of the ceremony 
of unveiling a statue or monument, but it should never be used 
as the covering for the statue or monument. 

(m) The flag, when flown at half staff, should be first hoisted 
to the peak for an instant and then lowered to the half-staff posi- 
tion. The flag should be again raised to the peak before it is 
lowered for the day. By "half-staff" is meant hauling the flag to 
one-half the distance between the top and bottom of the staff. 
Crepe streamers may be affixed to spear heads or flagstaffs in a 
parade only by order of the President of the United States. 



82 North Carolina Manual 

(n) When the flag' is used to cover a casket, it should be so 
placed that the union is at the head and over the left shoulder. 
The flag should not be lowered into the grave or allowed to touch 
the ground. 

Sec. 4. That no disrespect should be shown to the flag of the 
United States of America; the flag should not be dipped to any 
person or thing. Regimental colors, State flags, and organizations 
or institutional flags are to be dipped as a mark of honor. 

(a) The flag should never be displayed with the union down 
save as a signal of dire distress. 

(b) The flag should never touch anything beneath it, such as 
the ground, the floor, water, or merchandise. 

(c) The flag should never be carried flat or horizontally, but 
always aloft and free. 

(d) The flag should never be used as drapery of any sort what- 
soever, never festooned, drawn back, nor up, in folds, but always 
allowed to fall free. Bunting of blue, white, and red, always ar- 
ranged with the blue above, the white in the middle, and the red 
below, should be used for covering a speaker's desk, draping the 
front of a platform, and for decoration in general. 

(e) The flag should never be fastened, displayed, used, or 
stored in such a manner as will permit it to be easily torn, soiled, 
or damaged in any way. 

(f) The flag should never be used as a covering for a ceiling. 

(g) The flag should never have placed upon it, nor on part of 
it, nor attached to it any mark, insignia, letter, word, figure, 
design, picture, or drawing of any nature. 

(h) The flag should never be used as a receptacle for receiving, 
holding, carrying, or delivering anything. 

(i) The flag should never be used for advertising purr)Osen in 
any manner whatsoever. It should not be embroidered on such 
articles as cushions or handkerchiefs and the like, printed or other- 
wise impressed on paper napkins or boxes or anything that is 
designed for temporary use and discard; or used as any portion 
of a costume or athletic uniform. Advertising signs should not be 
fastened to a staff or halyard from which the flag is flown. 

(j) The flag, when it is in such condition that it is no longer 
a fitting emblem for display, should be destroyed in a dignified 
way, preferably by burning. 



The American Flag 83 

Sec. 5. That during the ceremony of hoisting or lowering the 
flag or when the flag is passing in a parade or in a review, all 
persons present should face the flag, stand at attention, and salute. 
Those present in uniform should render the right-hand salute. 
When not in uniform, men should remove the headdress with 
the right hand holding it at the left shoulder, the hand being 
over the heart. Men without hats merely stand at attention. 
Women should salute by placing the right hand over the heart. 
The salute to the flag in the moving column should be rendered 
at the moment the flag passes. 

Sec. 6. That when the national anthem is played and the flag is 
not displayed, all present should stand and face toward the music. 
Those in uniform should salute at the first note of the anthem, 
retaining this position until the last note. All others stand at 
attention, men removing the headdress. When the flag is displayed, 
the salute to the flag should be given. 

Sec. 7. That the pledge of allegiance to the flag, "I pledge al- 
legiance to the flag of the United States of America and to the 
Republic for which it stands, one Nation indivisible, with liberty 
and justice for all," be rendered by standing with the right hand 
over the heart; extending the right hand, palm upward, toward 
the flag at the words "to the flag" and holding this position until 
the end, when the hand drops to the side. However, civilians will 
always show full respect to the flag when the pledge is given by 
merely standing at attention, men removing the headdress. Per- 
sons in uniform shall render the military salute. 

Sec. 8. Any rule or custom pertaining to the display of the flag 
of the United States of America, set forth herein, may be altered, 
modified, or repealed, or additional rules with respect thereto may 
be prescribed, by the Commander in Chief of the Army and Navy 
of the United States, whenever he deems it to be appropriate or 
desirable; and any such alteration or additional rule shall be set 
forth in a proclamation. 

The Pledge to the Flag 

(Taught in many of the schools and repeated by pupils daily) 
"I pledge allegiance to the flag of the United States of America, 

And to the Republic for which it stands. 

One Nation, indivisible. 

With liberty and justice for all." 



84 North Carolina Manual 

The Pledge to the Flag-, according to a report of the Historical 
Committee of the United States Flag Association (May 18, 1939), 
was written by Francis Bellamy (August 1892), a member of the 
editorial staff of The Youth's Compcmion, in Boston, Massa- 
chusetts. It was first repeated at the exercises in connection with 
the celebration of Columbus Day (October 12, 1892, Old Style). 
The idea of this national celebration on Columbus Day was largely 
that of James B. Upham, one of the junior properietors of The 
Youth's Covifpanion. 

Francis Hopkinson, a signer of the Declaration of Independence, 
was the designer of the Stars and Stripes — not Betsy Ross of 
Philadelphia, who made flags. He also designed the first Great 
Seal of the United States, and a number of coins and several items 
of paper currency in the early days of the Republic. 

Hopkinson, born in Philadelphia (September 21, 1737), and a 
graduate of the University of Pennsylvania, was the first native 
American composer of a secular song, "My Days Have Been So 
Wondrous Free." He was a lawyer and later a judge in New 
Jersey, and then in Pennsylvania. He died in Philadelphia (May 
9, 1791). His portrait, painted by himself, hangs in the rooms of 
the Pennsylvania Historical Society, Philadelphia. He played the 
organ and the harpsichord. 



THE CAPITOL AT WASHINGTON 

The Capitol building in Washington, D. C, is situated on a 
plateau 88 feet above the level of the Potomac River and covers 
an area of 153,112 square feet, or approximately three and one- 
half acres. Its length, from north to south, is 751 feet, four 
inches; its vi^idth, including approaches, is 350 feet; and its loca- 
tion is described as being in latitude 38°53'20.4" N. and longitude 
77°00'35.7" W. from Greenwich. Its height above the base line on 
the east front to the top of the Statue of Freedom is 287 feet, 
five and one-half inches. The dome is built of iron, and the aggre- 
gate weight of material used in its construction is 8,909,200 
pounds. 

The Statue of Freedom surmounting the dome is of bronze and 
weighs 14,985 pounds. It was modeled by Thomas Crawford, 
father of Francis Marion Crawford, the novelist, in Rome, and 
the plaster model shipped to this country. It was cast in bronze 
at the shops of Clark Mills, on the Bladensburg Road, near Wash- 
ington. The cost of the casting and the expenses in connection 
were $20,796.82, and the sculptor was paid $3,000 for the plaster 
model. It was erected and placed in its present position Decem- 
ber 2, 1863. 

The grounds have had an area of 58.8 acres, at one time a part 
of Cern Abby Manor, and at an early date were occupied by a 
subtribe of the Algonquin Indians known as the Powhatans, whose 
council house was then located at the foot of the hill. By sub- 
sequent purchase of ground at the north of the Capitol and at the 
west of the new House Office building the area of the grounds 
has been increased to 139% acres. 

The Rotunda is 97 feet 6 inches in diameter, and its height from 
the floor to the top of the canopy is 180 feet, 3 inches. 

The Senate Chamber is 113 feet, 3 inches, in length by 80 feet, 
3 inches, in width and 36 feet in height. The galleries will accom- 
modate 682 persons. 

The Representatives' Hall is 139 feet in length by 93 feet in 
width and 36 feet in height. 

The room, until 1935 the meeting place of the Supreme Court, 
was, until 1859, occupied as the Senate Chamber. Previous to 
that time the court occupied the room immediately beneath, now 
used as a law library. 

85 



86 North Carolina Manual 

The Capitol has a floor area of 14 acres, and 430 rooms are de- 
voted to office, committee, and storage purposes. There are 14,518 
square feet of skylights, 679 windows, and 550 doorways. 

The dome receives light through 108 windows, and from the 
architect's office to the dome there are 365 steps, one for each day 
of the year. 

The southeast cornerstone of the original building was laid 
September 18, 1793, by President Washington, with Masonic cere- 
monies. It is constructed of sandstone from qaurries on Aquia 
Creek, Va. The original designs were prepared by Dr. William 
Thornton, and the work was done under the direction of Stephen H. 
Hallet, James Hoban, George Hadfield, and B. H. Latrobe, archi- 
tects. 

The north wing was finished in 1800 and the south wing in 1811. 
A wooden passageway connected them. On August 24, 1814, the 
interior of both wings was destroyed by fire, set by the British. 
The damage to the building was immediately repaired. 

In 1818 the central portion of the building was commenced, 
under the architectural superintendence of Charles Bullfinch. The 
original building was finally completed in 1827. Its cost, includ- 
ing the grading of the grounds, alterations, and repairs, up to 
1827, was $2,433,844.13. 

The cornerstone of the extensions was laid on the Fourth of 
July, 1851, by President Fillmore, Daniel Webster officiating as 
orator. This work was prosecuted under the architectural direc- 
tion of Thomas U. Walter till 1865, when he resigned, and it was 
completed under the supervision of Edward Clark. The material 
used in the walls is white marble from the quarries at Lee, Mass- 
achusetts, and that in the columns from the quarries at Cokeys- 
ville, Maryland. The House extension was first occupied for legis- 
lative purpose December 16, 1857, and the Senate January 4, 1859. 

The House office building was begun in 1905 and occupied on 
January 10, 1908; later a story on top was added. The Senate 
office building was started in 1906 and occupied on March 5, 1909. 
The House building cost, with site, $4,860,155; the Senate struc- 
ture, $5,019,251. 

Among the paintings in the Capitol are: 

In Rotunda: Signing of the Declaration of Independence, Sur- 
render of General Burgoyne, Surrender of Lord Cornwallis at 



The National Capitol 87 

Yorktown, Va., George Washington Resigning His Commission as 
Commander in Chief of the Army, all by John Trumbull. 

Baptism of Pocahontas, by John G. Chapman; Landing of Co- 
lumbus, by John Vanderlyn; Discovery of the Mississippi River, 
by DeSoto, by William H. Powell; Embarkation of the Pilgrims, 
by Robert W. Weir. 

In House Wing: Westward the Course of Empire Takes Its Way, 
by Emanuel Leutze; First Reading of the Emancipation Proclama- 
tion, by Francis Bicknell Carpenter. 

In Senate Wing: Battle of Lake Erie, by William H. Powell; 
Battle of Chapultepec, by James Walker. 



THE DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE 

(Unanimously Adopted in Congress, July 4, 1776, at Philadelphia) 
When, in the course of human events, it becomes necessary for 
one people to dissolve the political bands which have connected 
them w^ith another, and to assume among the pow^ers of the earth, 
the separate and equal station to vv^hich the Laws of Nature and 
of Nature's God entitles them, a decent respect to the opinions of 
mankind requires that they should declare the causes which impel 
them to the separation. 

We hold these truths to be self-evident : That all men are created 
equal; that they are endowed by their Creator with certain in- 
alienable Rights; that among these are Life, Liberty and the pur- 
suit of Happiness. That, to secure these rights. Governments are 
instituted among Men, deriving their just powers from the con- 
sent of the governed; That, whenever any Form of Government 
becomes destructive of these ends, it is the Right of the People 
to alter or to abolish it, and to institute new Government, laying 
its foundations on such principles, and organizing its powers in 
such forms, as to them shall seem most likely to effect their Safety 
and Happiness. Prudence, indeed, will dictate that Governments 
long established should not be changed for light and transient 
causes; and, accordingly, all experience hath shewn, that mankind 
are more disposed to suffer, while evils are sufferable, than to 
right themselves by abolishing the forms to which they are ac- 
customed. But when a long train of abuses and usurpations, pur- 
suing invariably the same Object, evinces a design to reduce them 
under absolute Despotism, it is their right, it is their duty, to 
throw off such Government, and to provide new Guards for their 
future security. Such has been the patient sufferance of these 
Colonies, and such is now the necessity which constrains them to 
alter their former Systems of Government. The history of the 
present King of Great Britain is a history of repeated injuries 
and usurpations, all having in direct object the establishment 
of an absolute Tyranny over these States. To prove this, let Facts 
be submitted to a candid world. 

He has refused his assent to Laws, the most wholesome and 
necessary for the public good, 

88 



Declaration of Independence 89 

He has forbidden his Governors to pass Laws of immediate and 
pressing importance, unless suspended in their operation till his 
Assent should be obtained; and, when so suspended, he has utterly 
neglected to attend to thein. 

He has refused to pass other Laws for the accommodation of 
large districts of people, unless those people would relinquish 
the right of Representation in the Legislature — a right inestim- 
able to them, and formidable to tyrants only. 

He has called together legislative bodies at places unusual, un- 
comfortable and distant from the depository of their public Re- 
cords, for the sole purpose of fatiguing them into compliance with 
his measures. 

He has dissolved Representative Houses repeatedly, for opposing 
with manly firmness his invasions on the rights of the people. 

He has refused for a long time, after such dissolutions, to 
cause others to be elected; whereby the Legislative powers, in- 
capable of Annihilation, have returned to the People at large for 
their exercise; the State remaining, in the meantime, exposed to 
all the dangers of invasion from without, and convulsions within. 

He has endeavored to prevent the population of these States for 
that purpose obstructing the Laws for Naturalization of For- 
eigners; refusing to pass others to encourage their migration 
hither, and raising the conditions of new Appropriations of Lands. 

He has obstructed the Administration of Justice, by refusing 
his Assent to laws for establishing Judiciary Powers. 

He has made Judges dependent on his Will alone, for the tenure 
of their offices, and the amount and payment of their salaries. 

He has erected a multitude of New Offices, and sent hither 
swarms of Officers to harass our people, and eat out their sub- 
stance. 

He has kept among us, in times of peace. Standing Armies with- 
out the Consent of our Legislature. 

He has affected to render the Military independent of, and 
superior to, the Civil power. 

He has combined with others to subject us to a jurisdiction 
foreign to our constitution, and unacknowledged by our laws; giv- 
ing his Assent to their Acts of pretended Legislation: 



90 North Carolina Manual 

For quartering large bodies of armed troops among us: 

For protecting them, by a mock Trial, from punishment for any 

Murders which they should commit on the Inhabitants of these 

States : 

For cutting off our Trade with all parts of the world: 

For imposing Taxes on us without our Consent: 

For depriving us, in many cases, of the benefits of Trial by jury: 

For transporting us beyond Seas, to be tried for pretended 
offenses: 

For abolishing the free System of English Laws in a neighbor- 
ing Province, establishing therein an Arbitrary government, and 
enlarging its Boundaries, so as to render it at once an example 
and fit instrument for introducing the same absolute rule into 
these Colonies: 

For taking away our Charters, abolishing our most valuable 
Laws, and altering, fundamentally, the Forms of our Govern- 
ments : 

For suspending our own Legislatures, and declaring them- 
selves invested with power to legislate for us in all cases whatso- 
ever. 

He has abdicated Government here, by declaring us out of his 
Protection and waging War against us. 

He has plundered our seas, ravaged our Coasts, burnt our towns, 
and destroyed the lives of our people. 

He is at this time transporting large Armies of foreign Mer- 
cenaries to complete the works of death, desolation and tyranny, 
already begun with circumstances of Cruelty and perfidy scarcely 
paralleled in the most barbarous ages, and totally unworthy the 
Head of a civilized nation. 

He has constrained our fellow-Citizens, taken captive on the 
high Seas, to bear Arms against their Country, to become the exe- 
cutioners of their friends and Brethren, or to fall themselves by 
their Hands. 

He has excited domestic insurrections amongst us, and has 
endeavored to bring on the inhabitants of our frontiers, the merci- 
less Indian Savages, whose known rule of warfare is an undis- 
tinguished destruction of all ages, sexes, and conditions. 



Declaration of Independence 91 

In every stage of these Oppressions We have Petitioned for 
Redress in the most humble terms; Our repeated Petitions have 
been answered only by repeated injury. A Prince, whose char- 
acter is thus marked by every act which may define a Tyrant, is 
unfit to be the ruler of a free people. 

Nor have we been wanting in attentions to our Britain brethren. 
We have warned them from time to time of attempts by their 
legislature to extend an unwarrantable jurisdiction over us. We 
have reminded them of the circumstances of our emigration and 
settlement here. We have appealed to their native justice and 
magnanimity, and we have conjured them by the ties of our com- 
mon kindred to disavow these usurpations, which inevitably in- 
terrupt our connections and correspondence. They, too, have been 
deaf to the voice of justice and of consanguinity. We must, there- 
fore, acquiesce in the necessity, which denounces our Separation, 
and hold them, as we hold the rest of mankind — Enemies in War, 
in Peace Friends. 

We, Therefore, the Representatives of the United States of 
America, in General Congress Assembled; appealing to the Su- 
preme Judge of the world for the rectitude of our intentions, do, 
in the Name and by authority of the good People of these Colonies, 
solemnly publish and declare, That these United Colonies are, and 
of Right ought to be, free and independent States; that they are 
Absolved from all Allegiance to the British Crown, and that all 
political connection between them and the State of Great Britain 
is, and ought to be, totally dissolved; and that as Free and Inde- 
pendent States, they have full Power to levy War, conclude 
Peace, contract Alliances, establish Commerce, and to do all other 
Acts and Things which Independent States may of right do. And 
for the support of this Declaration, with a firm reliance on the 
protection of Divine Providence, we mutually pledge to each other 
our Lives, our Fortunes, and our sacred Honor. 

John Hancock 

Button Gwinnett Edward Rutledge 

Lyman Hall Thos. Heyward, Junr. 

Geo. Walton Thomas Lynch, Junr. 

Wm. Hooper Arthur Middleton 

Joseph Hewes Samuel Chase 

John Penn Wm. Paca 



92 



North Carolina Manual 



Thos. Stone 

Charles Carroll of Carrollton 

James Wilson 

Geo. Ross 

Caesar Rodney 

Geo. Reed 

Tho. M. iKean 

Wm. Floyd 

Phil. Livingston 

Frans. Lewis 

Lewis Morris 

Richd. Stockton 

Jno. Witherspoon 

Fras. Hopkinson 

John Hart 

Abra Clark 

George Wythe 

Richard Henry Lee 

Th. Jefferson 

Benja. Harrison 

Thos. Nelson, Jr. 

Francis Lightfoot Lee 



Carter Braxton 
Robt. Morris 
Benjamin Rush 
Benja. Franklin 
John Morton 
Geo. Clymer 
Jas. Smith 
Geo. Taylor 
Josiah Bartlett 
Wm. Hippie 
Saml. Adams 
John Adams 
Robt. Treat Payne 
Eldridge Gery 
Step. Hopkins 
William Ellery 
Roger Sherman 
Samuel Huntington 
Wm. Williams 
Oliver Woolcott 
Matthew Thornton 



THE CONSTITUTION OF THE UNITED STATES 

Preamble 

We, the people of the United States, in order to form a more per- 
fect Union, establish justice, insure domestic tranquility, provide 
for the common defense, promote the general welfare, and secure 
the blessings of liberty to ourselves and our posterity, do ordain 
and establish this Constitution for the United States of America. 

Article I 

Section 1 — All legislative powers herein granted shall be vested 
in a Congress of the United States, which shall consist of a Senate 
and House of Representatives. 

Sec. 2 — 1. The House of Representatives shall be composed of 
members chosen every second year by the people of the several 
States, and the electors in each State shall have the qualifications 
requisite for electors of the most numerous branch of the State 
Legislature. 

2. No person shall be a Representative who shall not have at- 
tained to the age of twenty-five years, and been seven years a citi- 
zen of the United States, and who shall not, when elected, be an 
inhabitant of that State in which he shall be chosen. 

3. Representatives and direct taxes shall be apportioned among 
the several States which may be included within this Union, ac- 
cording to their respective numbers, which shall be determined by 
adding to the whole number of free persons, including those bound 
to service for a term of years and excluding Indians not taxed, 
three-fifths of all other persons. The actual enumeration shall be 
made within three years after the first meeting of the Congress of 
the United States, and within every subsequent term of ten years, 
in such manner as they shall by law direct. The number of Repre- 
sentatives shall not exceed one for every thirty thousand, but each 
State shall have at least one Representative; and until such enum- 
eration shall be made, the State of New Hampshire shall be en- 
titled to choose 3; Massachusetts, 8; Rhode Island and Providence 
Plantations, 1; Connecticut, 5; New York, 6; New Jersey, 4; 

93 



94 North Carolina Manual 

Pennsylvania, 8; Delaware, 1; Maryland, 6; Virginia, 10; North 
Carolina, 5; South Carolina, 5; and Georgia, 3.* 

4. When vacancies happen in the representation from any State, 
the Executive Authority thereof shall issue writs of election to fill 
such vacancies. 

5. The House of Representatives shall choose their Speaker and 
other officers, and shall have the sole power of impeachment. 

Sec. 3 — 1. The Senate of the United States shall be composed of 
two Senators from each State, chosen by the Legislature thereof, 
for six years; and each Senator shall have one votet 

2. Immediately after they shall be assembled in consequence of 
the first election, they shall be divided as equally as may be into 
three classes. The seats of the Senators of the first class shall be 
vacated at the expiration of the second year; of the second class at 
the expiration of the fourth year; and of the third class at the ex- 
piration of the sixth year, so that one-third may be chosen every 
second year, and if vacancies happen by resignation, or otherwise, 
during the recess of the Legislature of any State, the Executive 
thereof may make temporary appointments until the next meeting 
of the Legislature, which shall then fill such vacancies.! 

3. No person shall be a Senator who shall not have attained to 
the age of thii'ty years, and been nine years a citizen of the United 
States, and who shall not, when elected, be an inhabitant of that 
State for which he shall be chosen. 

4. The Vice President of the United States shall be President of 
the Senate, but shall have no vote, unless they be equally divided. 

5. The Senate shall choose their other officers, and also a Presi- 
dent pro tempore, in the absence of the Vice President, or when he 
shall exercise the Office of President of the United States. 

6. The Senate shall have the sole power to try all impeachments. 
When sitting for that purpose, they shall be on oath or affirmation. 
When the President of the United States is tried, the Chief Justice 
shall preside; and no person shall be convicted without the con- 
currence of two-thirds of the members present. 

7. Judgment in cases of impeachment shall not extend further 
than to removal fi'om office, and disqualification to hold and enjoy 
any office of honor, trust, or profit under the United States; but the 

* Sse Article XIV. Amendments. 
+ See Article XVII, Amendments. 



Constitution of the United States 95 

party convicted shall nevertheless be liable and subject to indict- 
ment, trial, judgment, and punishment, according to law. 

Sec. 4 — 1. The times, places, and manner of holding elections 
for Senators and Representatives shall be prescribed in each State 
by the Legislature thereof, but the Congress may at any time by 
law make or alter such regulations, except as to the places of 
choosing Senators. 

2. The Congress shall assemble at least once in every year, and 
such meeting shall be on the first Monday in December, unless they 
shall by law appoint a different day. 

Sec. 5 — 1. Each House shall be the judge of the elections, re- 
turns, and qualifications of its own members, and a majority of 
each shall constitute a quorum to do business; but a smaller num- 
ber may adjourn from day to day, and may be authorized to com- 
pel the attendance of absent members, in such manner and under 
such penalties as each House may provide. 

2. Each house may determine the rules of its proceedings, punish 
its members for disorderly behaviour, and, with the concurrence of 
two-thirds, expel a member. 

3. Each House shall keep a journal of its proceedings, and from 
time to time publish the same, excepting such parts as may in their 
judgment require secrecy; and the yeas and nays of the members 
of either House on any question shall, at the desire of one-fifth of 
those present, be entered on the journal. 

4. Neither House, during the session of Congress, shall, without 
the consent of the other, adjourn for more than three days, nor to 
any other place than that in which the two Houses shall be sitting. 

Sec. 6 — 1. The Senators and Representatives shall receive a 
compensation for their services, to be ascertained by law, and paid 
out of the Treasury of the United States. They shall in all cases, 
except treason, felony, and breach of the peace, be privileged from 
arrest during their attendance at the session of their respective 
Houses, and in going to and returning from the same; and for any 
speech or debate in either House they shall not be questioned in 
any other place. 

2. No Senator or Representative shall, during the time for which 
he was elected, be appointed to any civil office under the authority 
of the United States which shall have been created, or the emolu- 



96 North Carolina Manual 

merits whereof shall have been increased during such time ; and no 
person holding any office under the United States shall be a mem- 
ber of either House dui'ing his continuance in office. 

Sec. 7 — 1. All bills for raising revenue shall originate in the 
House of Representatives; but the Senate may propose or concur 
vi^ith amendments, as on other bills. 

2. Every bill which shall have passed the House of Representa- 
tives and the Senate shall, before it becomes a law, be presented to 
the President of the United States; if he approve, he shall sign it, 
but if not, he shall return it, with his objections, to that House in 
which it shall have originated, who shall enter the objections at 
large on their journal, and proceed to reconsider it. If after such 
reconsideration two-thirds of that House shall agree to pass the 
bill, it shall be sent, together with the objections, to the other 
House, by which it shall likewise be reconsidered, and if appi'oved 
by two-thirds of that House, it shall become a law. But in all such 
cases the votes of both Houses shall be determined by yeas and 
nays, and the names of the persons voting for and against the bill 
shall be entered on the journal of each House respectively. If any 
bill shall not be returned by the President within ten days (Sun- 
days excepted) after it shall have been presented to him, the same 
shall be a law, in like manner as if he had signed it, unless the 
Congress by their adjournment prevent its return, in which case 
it shall not be a law. 

3. Every order, resolution, or vote to which the concurrence of 
the Senate and House of Representatives may be necessary (except 
on a question of adjournment) shall be presented to the President 
of the United States; and before the same shall take effect, shall 
be approved by him, or being disapproved by him, shall be repassed 
by two-thirds of the Senate and House of Representatives, accord- 
ing to the rules and limitations prescribed in the case of a bill. 

Sec. 8 — 1. The Congress shall have power: 

To lay and collect taxes, duties, imposts and excises, to pay the 
debts and provide for the common defense and general welfare of 
the United States; but all duties, imposts and excises shall be uni- 
form throughout the United States; 

2. To borrow money on the credit of the United States; 

3. To regulate commerce with foreign nations, and among the 
several States, and with the Indian tribes; 



Constitution of the United States 97 

4. To establish an uniform rule of naturalization, and uniform 
laws on the subject of bankruptcies throughout the United States; 

5. To coin money, regulate the value thereof, and of foreign 
coin, and fix the standard of weights and measures; 

6. To provide for the punishment of counterfeiting the securities 
and current coin of the United States; 

7. To establish postoffices and postroads; 

8. To promote the progress of science and useful arts, by secur- 
ing', for limited times, to authors and inventors, the exclusive right 
to their respective writings and discoveries; 

9. To constitute tribunals inferior to the Supreme Court; 

10. To define and punish piracies and felonies committed on the 
high seas, and oflFenses against the law of nations; 

11. To declare war, grant letters of marque and reprisal, and 
make rules concerning captures on land and water; 

12. To raise and support armies, but no appropriation of money 
to that use shall be for a longer term than two years; 

13. To provide and maintain a navy; 

14. To make rules for the government and regulation of the land 
and naval forces; 

15. To provide for calling forth the militia to execute the laws 
of the Union, suppress insurrections, and repel invasions; 

16. To provide for organizing, arming, and disciplining the 
militia, and for governing such part of them as may be employed in 
the service of the United States, reserving to the States respec- 
tively the appointment of the officers and the authority of training 
the militia according to the discipline prescribed by Congress; 

17. To exercise exclusive legislation in all cases whatsoever over 
such district (not exceeding ten miles square) as may by cession 
of particular States and the acceptance of Congress, become the 
seat of the Government of the United States, and to exercise like 
authority over all places purchased by the consent of the Legisla- 
ture of the State in which the same shall be, for the erection of 
forts, magazines, arsenals, dock-yards, and other needful build- 
ings; — and 

18. To make all laws which shall be necessary and proper for 
carrying into execution the foregoing powers, and all other powers 
vested by this Constitution in the Government of the United States, 
or in any department or officer thereof. 



* This clause is superseded by Article XII, Amendments. 



98 North Carolina Manual 

Sec. 9 — 1. The migration or importation of such persons as any 
of the States now existing shall think proper to admit, shall not be 
prohibited by the Congress prior to the year one thousand eight 
hundred and eight, but a tax or duty may be imposed on such im- 
portation, not exceeding ten dollars for each person. 

2. The privilege of the writ of habeas corpus shall not be sus- 
pended, unless when in cases of rebellion or invasion the public 
safety may require it. 

3. No bill of attainder or ex post facto law shall be passed. 

4. No capitation or other direct tax shall be laid, unless in pro- 
portion to the census or enumeration hereinbefore directed to be 
taken.* 

5. No tax or duty shall be laid on articles exported from any 
State. 

6. No preference shall be given by any regulation of commerce 
or revenue to the ports of one State over those of another; nor 
shall vessels bound to, or from, one State be obliged to enter, clear, 
or pay duties in another. 

7. No money shall be drawn from the Treasury but in conse- 
quence of appropriations made by law; and a regular statement 
and account of the receipts and expenditures of all public money 
shall be published from time to time. 

8. No title of nobility shall be granted by the United States; 
and no person holding any office of profit or trust under them, 
shall, without the consent of the Congress, accept of any present, 
emolument, office, or title, of any kind whatever, from any king, 
prince, or foreign state. 

Sec. 10 — 1. No State shall enter into any treaty, alliance, or 
confederation; grant letters of marque and reprisal; coin money; 
emit bills of credit; make anything but gold and silver coin a ten- 
der in payment of debts; pass any bill of attainder, ex post facto 
law, or law impairing the obligation of contracts, or grant any 
title of nobility. 

2. No State shall, without the consent of the Congress, lay any 
imposts or duties on imports or exports except what may be abso- 
lutely necessary for executing its inspection laws; and the net pro- 



*See Article XVI, Amendments. 



Constitution of the United States 99 

duce of all duties and imposts, laid by any State on imports or 
exports, shall be for the use of the Treasury of the United States; 
and all such laws shall be subject to the revision and control of the 
Congress. 

3. No State shall, without the consent of Congress, lay any duty 
of tonnage, keep troops, or ships of war in time of peace, enter into 
any agreement or compact with another State, or with a foreign 
power, or engage in war, unless actually invaded, or in such im- 
minent danger as will not admit of delay. 

Article II 

Section 1. — 1. The Executive power shall be vested in a Presi- 
dent of the United States of America. He shall hold his office dur- 
ing the term of four years, and, together with the Vice President, 
chosen for the same term, be elected as follows: 

2. Each State shall appoint, in such manner as the legislature 
thereof may direct, a number of electors, equal to the whole number 
of Senators and Representatives to which the State may be entitled 
in the Congress; but no Senator or Representative or person hold- 
ing an office of trust or profit under the United States, shall be 
appointed an elector. 

3. The electors shall meet in their respective States, and vote by 
ballot for two persons, of whom one at least shall not be an inhabi- 
tant of the same state with themselves. And they shall make a list 
of all the persons voted for, and of the number of votes for each; 
which list they shall sign and certify, and transmit, sealed, to the 
seat of the Government of the United States, directed to the Presi- 
dent of the Senate. The President of the Senate shall, in the pres- 
ence of the Senate and House of Representatives open all the cer- 
tificates, and the votes shall then be counted. The person having 
the greatest number of votes shall be the President, if such number 
be a majority of the whole number of electors appointed; and if 
there be more than one who have such majority, and have an equal 
number of votes, then the House of Representatives shall imme- 
diately choose by ballot one of them for President; and if no person 
have a majority, then from the five highest on the list the said 
House shall in like manner choose the President. But in choosing 
tion from each State having one vote; a quorum, for this purpose, 
the President, the votes shall be taken by States, the representa- 



100 North Carolina Manual 

shall consist of a member or members from two-thirds of the 
States, and a majority of all the States shall be necessary to a 
choice. In every case, after the choice of the President, the person 
having the greatest number of votes of the electors shall be the 
Vice-President. But if there should remain two or more who have 
equal votes, the Senate shall choose from them by ballot the Vice 
President.* 

4. The Congress may determine the time of choosing the electors 
and the day on which they shall give their votes; which day shall 
be the same throughout the United States. 

5. No person except a natural born citizen, or a citizen of the 
United States, at the time of the adoption of this Constitution, 
shall be eligible to the office of President; neither shall any 
person be eligible to that office who shall not have attained to the 
age of thirty-five years, and been fourteen years a resident within 
the United States. 

6. In case of the removal of the President from office, or of his 
death, resignation or inability to discharge the powers and duties 
of the said office, the same shall devolve on the Vice President, and 
the Congress may by law provide for the case of removal, death, 
resignation, or inability, both of the President and vice President, 
declaring what officer shall then act as President, and such officer 
shall act accordingly until the disability be removed, or a President 
shall be elected. 

7. The President shall, at stated times, receive for his services a 
compensation which shall neither be increased nor diminished dur- 
ing the period for which he shall have been elected, and he shall 
not receive within that period any other emolument from the 
United States, or any of them. 

8. Before he enter on the execution of his office, he shall take 
the following oath or affirmation : 

"I do solemnly swear (or affirm) that I will faithfully execute 
the office of President of the United States, and will, to the best of 
my ability, preserve, protect, and defend the Constitution of the 
United States." 

Sec. 2—1. The President shall be Commander-in-Chief of the 
Army and Navy of the United States, and of the militia of the sev- 
eral States, when called into the actual service of the United 



Constitution of the United States 101 

States; he may require the opinion, in writing, of the principal 
officer in each of the executive departments, upon any subject re- 
lating to the duties of their respective offices; and he shall have 
power to grant reprieves and pardons for offenses against the 
United States, except in cases of impeachment. 

2. He shall have power, by and with the advice and consent of 
the Senate, to make treaties, provided two-thirds of the Senators 
present concur; and he shall nominate and, by and with the advice 
and consent of the Senate, shall appoint ambassadors, other public 
ministers and consuls, judges of the Supreme Court, and all other 
officers of the United States, whose appointments are not herein 
otherwise provided for, and which shall be established by law; but 
the Congress may by law vest the appointment of such inferior of- 
ficers as they think proper in the President alone, in the courts of 
law, or in the heads of departments. 

3, The President shall have power to fill up all vacancies that 
may happen during the recess of the Senate, by granting commis- 
sions which shall expire at the end of their next session. 

Sec. 3 — He shall from time to time give to the Congress infor- 
mation of the State of the Union, and recommend to their consid- 
eration such measures as he shall judge necessary and expedient; 
he may, on extraordinary occasions, convene both Houses, or either 
of them, and in case of disagreement between them with respect to 
the time of adjournment, he may adjourn them to such time as he 
shall think proper; he shall receive ambassadors and other public 
ministers; he shall take care that the laws be faithfully executed, 
and shall commission all the officers of the United States. 

Sec. 4 — The President, Vice President, and all civil officers of 
the United States, shall be removed from office on impeachment 
for, and conviction of, treason, bribery, or other high crimes and 
misdemeanors. 

Article III 

Section 1 — The judicial power of the United States shall be 
vested in one Supreme Court, and in such inferior courts as the 
Congress may from time to time ordain and establish. The judges, 
both of the Supreme and inferior courts, shall hold their offices 
during good behavior, and shall, at stated times, receive for their 
services a compensation which shall not be diminished during their 
continuance in office. 



102 North Carolina Manual 

Sec. 2 — 1. The judicial power shall extend to all cases, in law 
and equity, arising- under this Constitution, the laws of the United 
States, and treaties made, or which shall be made, under their 
authority; — to all cases affecting ambassadors, other public min- 
isters and consuls; to all cases of admiralty and maritime jurisdic- 
tion; — to controversies to which the United States shall be a 
party; — to controversies between two or more States; — between a 
State and citizens of another State; — between citizens of different 
States; — between citizens of the same State, claiming lands under 
g-rants of different States, and between a State, or the citizens 
thereof, and foreign States, citizens, or subjects. 

2. In all cases affecting ambassadors, other public ministers and 
consuls, and those in which a State shall be a party, the Supreme 
Court shall have original jurisdiction. In all the other cases before 
mentioned the Supreme Court shall have appellate jurisdiction, 
both as to law and fact, with such exceptions and under such regu- 
lations as the Congress shall make. 

3. The trial of all crimes, except in cases of impeachment, shall 
be by jury, and such trial shall be held in the State where the said 
crimes shall have been committed ; but when not committed within 
any State the trial shall be at such place or places as the Congress 
may by law have directed. 

Sec. o — 1. Treason against the United States shall consist only 
in levying war against them, or in adhering to their enemies, giv- 
ing them aid and comfort. No person shall be convicted of treason 
unless on the testimony of two witnesses to the same overt act, or 
on confession in open court. 

2. The Congress shall have power to declare the punishment of 
treason ; but no attainder of treason shall work corruption of blood, 
or forfeiture except during the life of the person attainted. 

Article IV 

Section 1 — Full faith and credit shall be given in each State to 
the public acts, records, and judicial proceedings of every other 
State. And the Congress may by general laws prescribe the man- 
ner in which such acts, records and proceedings shall be proved, 
and the effect thereof. 

Sec. 2 — 1. The citizens of each State shall be entitled to all privi- 
leges and immunities of citizens in the several States, 



Constitution of the United States 103 

2. A person chai-ged in any State with treason, felony, or other 
crime, who shall flee from justice, and be found in another State, 
shall, on demand of the Executive authority of the State from 
which he fled, be delivered up, to be removed to the State having 
jurisdiction of the crime. 

3. No person held to service or labor in one State, under the 
laws thereof, escaping into another, shall, in consequence of any 
law or regulation therein, be discharged from such service or labor, 
but shall be delivered up on claim of the party to whom such 
service or labor may be due. 

Sec. 3 — 1. New States may be admitted by the Congress into this 
Union; but no new State shall be formed or erected within the 
jurisdiction of any other State; nor any State be formed by the 
junction of two or more States, or parts of States, without the con- 
sent of the Legislatures of the States concerned, as well as of the 
Congress, 

2, The Congress shall have power to dispose of and make all 
needful rules and regulations respecting the territory or other 
property belonging to the United States; and nothing in this Con- 
stitution shall be so construed as to prejudice any claims of the 
United States, or of any particular State, 

Sec, 4 — The United States shall guarantee to every State in this 
Union a republican foi*m of government, and shall protect each of 
them against invasion, and, on application of the Legislature, or of 
the Executive (when the Legislature cannot be convened), against 
domestic violence. 

Article V 

The Congress, whenever two-thirds of both Houses shall deem it 
necessary, shall propose amendments to this Constitution, or, on the 
application of the Legislatures of two-thirds of the several States, 
shall call a convention for proposing amendments, which, in either 
case, shall be valid to all intents and purposes, as part of this Con- 
stitution, when ratified by the Legislatures of three-fourths of the 
several States, or by conventions in three-fourths thereof, as the 
one or the other mode of ratification may be proposed by the Con- 
gress; provided that no amendment which may be made prior to 
the year one thousand eight hundred and eight shall in any man- 
ner aff"ect the first and fourth clauses in the Ninth Section of the 
First Article; and that no State, without its consent, shall be de- 
prived of its equal suffrage in the Senate. 



104 North Carolina Manual 

Article VI 

1. All debts contracted and engagements entered into before the 
adoption of this Constitution, shall be as valid against the United 
States under this Constitution, as under the Confederation. 

2. This Constitution and the laws of the United States which 
shall be made in pursuance thereof; and all treaties made, or which 
shall be made, under the authority of the United States, shall be 
the supreme law of the land; and the judges in every State shall be 
bound thereby, anything in the Constitution or laws of any State 
to the contrary notwithstanding. 

3. The Senators and Representatives before mentioned, and the 
members of the several State Legislatures, and all executive and 
judicial officers, both of the United States and of the several 
States, shall be bound by oath or affirmation to support this Con- 
stitution; but no religious test shall ever be required as a qualifi- 
cation to any office or public trust under the United States. 

Article VII 

The ratification of the Conventions of nine States shall be suf- 
ficient for the establishment of this Constitution between the States 
so ratifying the same. 

Done in Convention by the Unanimous Consent of the States 
present the Seventeenth Day of September, in the Year of Our 
Lord one thousand seven hundred and eighty-seven, and of the 
Independence of the United States of America the Twelfth. In 
witness whereof we have hereunto subscribed our names. 

GEO. WASHINGTON, President and deputy from Virginia, 
New Hampshire — John Langdon, Nicholas Gilman, Massachusetts 
— Nathaniel Gorham, Rufus King, Connecticut — Wm. Saml. John- 
son, Roger Sherman, New York — Alexander Hamilton, New Jersey 
— Wil. Livingston, David Brearley, Wm. Patterson, Jona. Dayton, 
Pennsylvania — B. Franklin, Robt. Morris, Thos. Fitzsimmons, 
James Wilson, Thomas Mifflin, Geo. Clymer, Jared Ingersoll, Gouv. 
Morris, Delaware — Geo. Read, John Dickinson, Jaco. Broom, Gun- 
ning Bedford, Jr., Richard Bassett, Maryland — James McHenry, 
Danl, Carroll, Dan. of St. Thos. Jenifer, Virginia — John Blair, Jas. 
Madison, Jr. North Carolina — Wm. Blount, Hu. Williamson, Richd. 
Dobbs Spaight, South Carolina — J. Rutledge, Charles Pinckney, 
Charles Cotesworth Pinckney, Pierce Butler, Georgia — William 
Few, Abr. Baldwin. Attest: William Jackson, Secretary. 



Constitution of the United States 105 

The Constitution was declared in effect on the first Wednesday in 
March, 1789. 

Amendments to the Constitution of the United States 
The following amendments to the Constitution, Article I to X, 
inclusive, were proposed at the First Session of the First Congress, 
begun and held at the City of New York, on Wednesday, March 4, 
1789, and were adopted by the necessary number of States. The 
original proposal of the ten amendments was preceded by this 
preamble and resolution: 

"The conventions of a number of the States having, at the time 
of their adopting- the Constitution, expressed a desire, in order to 
prevent misconstruction or abuse of its powers, that further de- 
claratory and restrictive clauses should be added, and as extending 
the ground of public confidence in the Government will best insure 
the beneficient ends of its institution: 

"RESOLVED, By the Senate and House of Representatives of 
the United States of America, in Congress assembled, two-thirds of 
both Houses concurring, that the following articles be proposed to 
the Legislatures of the several States, as amendments to the Con- 
stitution of the United States; all or any of which articles, when 
ratified by three-fourths of the said Legislatures, to be valid to all 
intents and purposes, as part of the said Constitution, namely": 

Amendments 

the ten original amendments 

(Sometimes called our Bill of Rights) 
(Declared in force December 15, 1791) 

Article I 
Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of re- 
ligion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the 
freedom of speech or of the press ; or the right of the people peace- 
ably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of 
grievances. 

Article II 

A well-regulated militia being necessary to the security of a free 
State, the right of the people to keep and bear arms shall not be 
infringed, 



106 North Carolina Manual ,• 

Article III 

No soldier shall, in time of peace, be quartered in any house 
without the consent of the owner, nor in time of war but in a man- 
ner to be prescribed by law. 

Article IV 

The rio'ht of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, 
papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, 
shall not be violated, and no warrants shall issue, but upon prob- 
able cause, supported by oath or affirmation, and particularly de- 
scribing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be 
seized. 

Article V 

No person shall be held to answer for a capital or otherwise 
infamous crime, unless on a presentment or indictment of a grand 
jury, except in cases arising in the land or naval forces, or in the 
militia, when in actual service in time of war or public danger ; nor 
shall any person be subject for the same offense to be twice put in 
jeopardy of life or limb; nor shall be compelled in any criminal 
case to be a witness against himself, nor be deprived of life, lib- 
erty, or property, without due process of law; nor shall private 
property be taken for public use, without just compensation. 

Article VI 

In all criminal prosecutions, the accused shall enjoy the right to 
a speedy, and public trial, by an impartial jury of the State and 
district wherein the crime shall have been committed, which dis- 
trict shall have been previously ascertained by law, and be in- 
formed of the nature and cause of the accusation; to be confronted 
with the witnesses against him; to have compulsory process for 
obtaining witnesses in his favor, and to have the assistance of 
counsel for his defense. 

Article VII 
In suits at common law, where the value in controversy shall 
exceed twenty dollars, the right of trial by jury shall be preserved 
and no fact tried by a jury shall be otherwise re-examined in any 
court of the United States than according to the rules of the com- 
mon law. 



Constitution of the United States 107 

Article VIII 

Excessive bail shall not be required, nor excessive fines imposed, 
nor cruel and unusual punishments inflicted. 

Article IX 

The enumeration in the Constitution of certain rights shall not 
be construed to deny or disparage others retained by the people. 

Article X 

The powers not delegated to the United States by the Constitu- 
tion, nor prohibited by it to the States, are reserved to the States 

Article XI 

The judicial power of the United States shall not be construed to 
extend to any suit in law or equity, commenced or prosecuted 
against one of the United States, by citizens of another State, or 
by citizens or subjects of any foreign State, 
respectively, or to the people. 

(Proposed to the Legislatures of the several States by the Third 
Congress on the 5th of March, 1794, and declared to have been 
ratified by Executive Proclamation, January 8, 1798.) 

Article XII 
The electors shall meet in their respective States, and vote by 
ballot for President and Vice President, one of whom at least shall 
not be an inhabitant of the same State with themselves; they shall 
name in their ballots the person voted for as President, and in dis- 
tinct ballots the person voted for as Vice President; and they shall 
make distinct lists of all persons voted for as President, and of all 
persons voted for as Vice President, and of the number of votes for 
each, which lists they shall sign and certify, and transmit, sealed, 
to the seat of the Government of the United States, directed to the 
President of the Senate; the President of the Senate shall, in the 
presence of the Senate and House of Representatives, open all the 
certificates, and the votes shall then be counted; the person having 
the greatest number of votes for President shall be the President, 
if such number be a majority of the whole number of electors ap- 
pointed; and if no person have such majority, then from the per- 



108 North Carolina Manual 

sons having- the highest numbers, not exceeding three on the list of 
those voted for as President, the House of Representatives shall 
choose immediately, by ballot, the President. But in choosing the 
President, the votes shall be taken by States, the representation 
from each State having one vote; a quorum for this purpose shall 
consist of a member or members from two-thirds of the States, and 
a majority of all the States shall be necessary to a choice. And if 
the House of Representatives shall not choose a President, when- 
ever the right of choice shall devolve upon them, before the fourth 
day of March next following, then the Vice President shall act as 
President, as in the case of the death or other constitutional dis- 
ability of the President. The person having the greatest number of 
votes as Vice President shall be the Vice President, if such number 
be a majority of the whole number of electors appointed, and if no 
person have a majority, then from the two highest numbers on the 
list, the Senate shall choose the Vice President; a quorum for the 
purpose shall consist of two-thirds of the whole number of Sena- 
tors, and a majority of the whole number shall be necessary to a 
choice. But no person constitutionally ineligible to the office of 
President shall be eligible to that of Vice President of the United 
States. 

(Proposed by the Eighth Congress on the 12th of December, 

1803, declared ratified by the Secretary of State, September 25, 

1804. It was ratified by all the States except Connecticut, Dela- 
wax'e, Massachusetts, and New Hampshire.) 

Article XIII 

1. Neither slavery nor involuntary servitude, except as a punish- 
ment for crime whereof the party shall have been duly convicted, 
shall exist within the United States, or any place subject to their 
jurisdiction. 

2. Congress shall have power to enforce this article by appro- 
priate legislation. 

(Proposed by the Thirty-eighth Congress on the 1st of February, 
1865, declared ratified by the Secretary of State, dated December 
18, 1865. It was rejected by Delaware and Kentucky; was condi- 
tionally ratified by Alabama and Mississippi; and Texas took no 
action.) 



Constitution of the United States 109 

Article XIV 

1. All persons born or naturalized in the United States, and sub- 
ject to the jurisdiction thereof, are citizens of the United States 
and of the State wherein they reside. No State shall make or en- 
force any law which shall abridge the privileges or immunities of 
citizens of the United States; nor shall any State deprive any per- 
son of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law; nor 
deny to any person within its jurisdiction the equal protection of 
the laws. 

2. Representatives shall be apportioned among the several States 
according to their respective number's, counting the whole number 
of persons in each State, excluding Indians not taxed. But when 
the right to vote at any election for the choice of electors for Presi- 
dent and Vice President of the United States, Representatives in 
Congress, the executive and judicial officers of a State, or the mem- 
bers of the Legislature thereof, is denied to any of the male inhabi- 
tants of such State, being twenty-one years of age, and citizens of 
the United States, or in any way abridged, except for participation 
in rebellion or other crime, the basis of representation therein shall 
be reduced in the proportion which the number of such male citi- 
zens shall bear to the whole number of male citizens twenty-one 
years of age in such State. 

3. No person shall be a Senator or Representative in Congress, 
or elector of President and Vice President, or hold any office, civil 
or military, under the United States, or under any State, who, hav- 
ing previously taken an oath, as a member of Congress, or as an 
officer of the United States, or as a member of any State Legisla- 
ture, or as an executive or judicial officer of any State, to support 
the Constitution of the United States, shall have engaged in insur- 
rection or rebellion against the same, or given aid or comfort to the 
enemies thereof. But Congress may, by a vote of two-thirds of each 
House, remove such disability. 

4. The validity of the public debt of the United States, author- 
ized by law, including debts incurred for payment of pensions and 
bounties for services in suppressing insurrection or rebellion, shall 
not be questioned. But neither the United States nor any State 
shall assume or pay any debt or obligation incurred in aid of insur- 
rection or rebellion against the United States, or any claim for the 
loss or emancipation of any slave; but all such debts, obligations, 
and claims shall be held illegal and void. 



110 North Carolina Manual 

5. The Congress shall have power to enforce by appropriate leg- 
islation the provisions of this article. 

(The Reconstruction Amendment, by the Thirty-ninth Congress 
on the 16th day of June, 1866, declared ratified by the Secretary of 
State, July 28, 1868. The amendment got the support of 23 North- 
ern States; it was rejected by Delaware, .Kentucky, Maryland, and 
10 Southern States. California took no action. Later it was rati- 
fied by the 10 Southern States.) 
be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on ac- 

ARTICLE XV 

1. The right of the citizens of the United States to vote shall not 
count of race, color, or previous condition of servitude. 

2. The Congress shall have power to enforce this article by ap- 
propriate legislation. 

(Proposed by the Fortieth Congress the 27th of February, 1869, 
and was declared ratified by the Secretary of State, March 30, 
1870. It was not acted on by Tennessee; it was rejected by Cali- 
fornia, Delaware, Kentucky, Maryland and Oregon; ratified by the 
remaining 30 States. New York rescinded is ratification January 5, 
1870. New Jersey rejected it in 1870, but ratified it in 1871.) 

Article XVI 

The Congress shall have power to lay and collect taxes on in- 
comes, from whatever source derived, without apportionment 
among the several States, and without regard to any census or 
enumeration. 

(Proposed by the Sixty-first Congress, July 12, 1909, and de- 
clared ratified February 25, 1913. The income tax amendment was 
ratified by all the States except Connecticut, Florida, Pennsyl- 
vania, Rhode Island, Utah, and Virginia.) 

Article XVII 

1. The Senate of the United States shall be composed of two 
Senators from each State, elected by the people thereof, for six 
years; and each Senator shall have one vote. The electors in each 
State shall have the qualifications requisite for elector's of the most 
numerous branch of the State Legislatures. 



Constitution of the United States 111 

2. When vacancies happen in the representation of any State in 
the Senate, the executive authority of such State shall issue writs 
of election to fill such vacancies; Provided, That the Lep:islature of 
any State may empower the Executive thereof to make temporary 
appointments until the people fill the vacancies by election as the 
Legislature may direct. 

3. This amendment shall not be so construed as to affect the 
election or term of any Senator chosen before it becomes valid as 
part of the Constitution. 

(Proposed by the Sixty-second Congress on the 16th day of May, 
1912, and declared ratified May 31, 1913. Adopted by all the States 
except Alabama, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, 
Maryland, Missississippi, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Utah and 
Virginia.) 

Article XVIII 

1. After one year from the ratification of this article the manu- 
facture, sale, or transportation of intoxicating liquors within, the 
importation thereof into, or the exportation thereof from the 
United States and all territory subject to the jurisdiction thereof 
for beverage purposes is hereby prohibited. 

2. The Congress and the several States shall have concuri'ent 
power to enforce this article by appropriate legislation. 

3. This article shall be inoperative unless it shall have been rati- 
fied as an amendment to the Constitution by the Legislatures of the 
several States, as provided in the Constitution, within seven years 
from the date of the submission hereof to the States by the 
Congress. 

(Proposed by the Sixty-fifth Congress, December 18, 1917, and 
ratified by 36 States; was declared in effect on January 16, 1920.) 

Article XIX 

1. The right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be 
denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on ac- 
count of sex. 

2. Congi-ess shall have power, by appropriate legislation, to en- 
force the provisions of this article. 



112 North Carolina Manual 

(Proposed by the Sixty-fifth Conp:ress. On August 26, 1920, it 
was proclaimed in effect, having- been ratified (June 19, 1919 — 
August 18, 1920) by three-quarters of the States. The Tennessee 
House, August 31st, rescinded its ratification, 47 to 24.) 

Article XX 

1. The terms of the President and Vice President shall end at 
noon on the 20th day of January, and the terms of Senators and 
Representatives at noon on the 3rd day of January of the years in 
which such terms would have ended if this article had not been 

ratified; and the terms of their successors shall then begin. 

2. The Congress shall assemble at least once in every year, and 
such meeting shall begin at noon on the 3rd day of January, unless 
they shall by law appoint a different day. 

3. If, at the time fixed for the beginning of the term of the 
President, the President elect shall have died, the Vice President 
elect shall become President. If a President shall not have been 
chosen before the time fixed for the beginning of his term, or if the 
President elect shall have failed to qualify, then the Vice President 
elect shall act as President until a President shall have qualified; 
and the Congress may by law provide for the case wherein neither 
a President elect nor a Vice President elect shall have qualified, de- 
claring who shall then act as President, or the manner in which 
one who is to act shall be selected, and such person shall act ac- 
cordingly until a President or Vice President shall have qualified. 

4. The Congress may by law provide for the case of the death of 
any of the persons from whom the House of Representatives may 
choose a President whenever the right of choice shall have devolved 
upon them, and for the case of the death of any of the persons 
from whom the Senate may choose a Vice President whenever the 
right of choice shall have devolved upon them. 

5. Sections 1 and 2 shall take effect on the 15th day of October 
following the ratification of this article. 

6. This article shall be inoperative unless it shall have been rati- 
fied as an amendment to the Constitution by the legislatures of 
three-fourths of the several States within seven years from the 
(late of its submission. 



Constitution of the United States 113 

(Proposed by the 72nd Congress, First Session. On February 6, 
1933, it was proclaimed in effect, having been ratified by thirty- 
nine states.) 

Article XXI 

1. The eighteen article of amendment to the Constitution of the 
United States is hereby repealed. 

2. The transportation or importation into any State, Territory, 
or possession of the United States for delivery or use therein of 
intoxicating liquors, in violation of the laws thereof, is hereby 
prohibited. 

3. This article shall be inoperative unless it shall have been rati- 
fied as an amendment to the Constitution by conventions in the 
several States, as provided in the Constitution, within seven years 
from the date of the submission hereof to the States by the 
Congress. 

(Proposed by the 72nd Congress, Second Session. Proclaimed in 
effect on December 5, 1933, having been ratified by thirty-six 
States. By proclamation of the same date, the President proclaimed 
that the eighteenth amendment to the Constitution was repealed 
on December 5, 1933.) 



PART II 
CENSUS 



POPULATION OF THE STATE OF NORTH CAROLINA 

Sixteenth Census of the United States: 1940 

Between 1930 and 1940 North Carolina's urban places con- 
tinued to grow faster than the rural areas, according to the final 
figures from the Sixteenth Decennial Census, issued by Director 
William Lane Austin, of the Bureau of the Census, Department of 
Commerce, 

The final count of the Sixteenth Census showed that on April 1, 
1940, North Carolina had a population of 3,571,623, an increase of 
401,347 over the 3,170,276 residents reported in the 1930 Census. 
This change represents an increase of 12.7 per cent as compared 
with 23.9 per cent between 1920 and 1930. The population increase 
in urban areas from 1930 to 1940 was 20.3 per cent as compared 
with 10.0 per cent in the rural sections. Urban residents accounted 
for 27.3 per cent of the State's population in 1940, as compared 
with 25.5 per cent in 1930. In 1940, residents of urban areas num- 
bered 974,175, while the rural population amounted to 2,597,448. 
The Census Bureau considers as urban areas the incorporated 
places of 2,500 or more. The remaining territory is classified as 
rural. 

There were 26 incorporated places of 10,000 or more in North 
Carolina, 5 (Burlington, Greenville, Hickory, Lexington, and Reids- 
ville) having reached this size since 1930. All but one (New 
Bern) of these cities increased between 1930 and 1940, Hickory 
having had the most rapid grovirth (83.2 per cent). 

Ninety-one of the 100 counties gained population between 1930 
and 1940, Alamance County, with an increase of 36,3 per cent, had 
the most extensive growth. 

The first census of North Carolina was taken in 1790, returning 
a population of 393,751. The population has shown an increase at 
every census since that time, but the rate of increase during the 
past decade was the lowest since that of 1860 to 1870. The popula- 
tion passed 1,000,000 between 1860 and 1870, 2,000,000 between 
1900 and 1910, and 3,000,000 between 1920 and 1930. The present 
population represents a density of 72.7 inhabitants per square mile. 
North Carolina's total area in square miles is 52,712. Land area 
is 49,142 square miles; water area is 3,570 square miles. 

Table 1 presents the figures for counties and for incorporated 
places of 10,000 or more, and Table 2 for incorporated places of 
less than 10,000. 

117 



118 



North Carolina Manual 



TABLE 1. POPULATION OF COUNTIES AND OF INCORPORATED PLACES 
OF 10,000 OR MORE IN NORTH CAROLINA: 1940 



County or Place 



The State 

Urban 

Rural 

Per Cent Urban 



Counties: 
Alamance _ 
Alexander- 
Alleghany- 

Anson 

Ashe 



Avery 

Beaufort.-. 

Bertie 

Bladen _... 
Brunswick- 

Buncombe. 

Burke 

Cabarrus.- 
Caldwell--. 
Camden . . . 



Carteret . . 
Caswell... 
Catawba.. 
Chatham. 
Cherokee - 



Chowan... 

Clay 

Cleveland. 
Columbus. 
Craven 



Cumberland. 

Currituck 

Dare 

Davidson 

Davie 



Duplin 

Durham 

Edgecombe. 

Forsyth 

Franklin... 



Gaston... 

Gates 

Graham.. 
Granville. 
Greene 



Population 
1940 



3,571.623 

974,175 
2,597,448 
27.3 



57,427 
13,454 
8,341 
28,443 
22,664 

13.561 
36,431 
26,201 
27,156 
17,125 

108,755 

38,615 

59,393 

35,795 

5,440 

18,284 
20,032 
51,653 
24,726 
18,813 

11,572 
6,405 
58,055 
45,663 
31,298 



59,320 

6,709 

6,041 

53,377 

14,909 

39,739 
80,244 
49,162 
126,475 
30,382 

87,531 
10,060 
6,418 
29,344 
18,548 



County or Place 



CorNTiES — Cont. 

Guilford 

Halifax 

Harnett 

Haywood 

Henderson 



Hertford. 
Hoke.... 
Hyde- .. 
Iredell... 
Jackson. . 



Johnston. 

Jones 

Lee 

Lenoir 

Lincoln... 



McDowell 

Macon 

Madison 

Martin 

Mecklenburg. 



Mitchell 

Montgomery.. 

Moore 

Nash 

New Hanover. 



Northampton. . 

Onslow 

Orange ._. 

Pamlico 

Pasquotank 



Pender 

Perquimans - 

Person 

Pitt 

Polk 



Randolph 

Richmond 

Robeson 

Rockingham. 
Rowan 



Rutherford - 

Sampson 

Scotland 

Stanly 

Stokes 



Population 
1940 



153,916 
56,512 
44,239 
34,804 
26,049 

19,352 

14,937 

7,860 

50,424 

19.366 

63,798 
10,926 
18,743 
41,211 

24,187 

22,996 
15,880 
22,522 
26.111 
151,826 

15,980 
16,280 
30,969 
55,608 
47,935 

28,299 
17,939 
23,072 
9,706 
20,568 

17,710 
9,773 
25,029 
61,244 
11,874 

44,554 
36,810 
76,860 
57,898 
69,206 

45,577 
47,440 
23,232 
32,834 
22,656 



County or Place 



CorNTiES — Cont. 

Surry 

Swain 

Transylvania 

Tyrrell 

Llnion 

Vance 

Wake 

Warren 

Washington 

Watauga 

Wayne 

Wilkes --.. 

Wilson 

Yadkin 

Yancey 

Total 

Incokpobated 
Places of 10.000 
OR Moke 

AsheviUe 

Burlington 

Charlotte 

Concord 

Durham 



Elizabeth City. 

Fayette ville 

Gastonia 

Goldsboro 

Greensboro 



Greenville.. 

Hickory 

High Point. 

Kinston 

Lexington.. 



New Bern 

Raleigh 

Reidsville 

Rocky Mount. 
Salisbury 



Shelby 

Statesville 

Thomasville 

Wilmington 

Wilson 

Winston-Salem. 



Population 
1940 



41,783 
12,177 
12,241 
5,556 
39,097 

29,961 
109,544 
23,145 
12,323 
18,114 

58.323 
43,003 
50,219 
20,657 
17,202 



3,571,623 



51,310 
12,198 
100,899 
15,572 
60,195 

11,564 
17,428 
21,313 
17,274 
59,319 

12,674 
13,487 
38,495 
15,388 
10,550 

11,815 
46,897 
10,387 
25,568 
19,037 

14,037 
11.440 
11,041 
33,407 
19,234 
79,815 



Population of Cities and Towns 



119 



TABLE 2. POPULATION OF INCORPORATED PLACES OF LESS 
THAN 10,000 IN NORTH CAROLINA: lfl40 



City or Town 



2,500 TO 10,000 

Albemarle 

Asheboro 

Beaufort 

Belmont 

Bessemer City 



Brevard 

Cunton 

Chf pel HiU. 
Cherryville. 
Clinton 



Dunn 

h^e. ion 

Elkin 

Iiirii viUe .. 
Icrtst Lity. 



G.i ham 

hanlet 

hei.dcTS&n 

H 'I GiTSonviiie-.. 
Ki: gs Mountain. 



Laurinburg - 

Lenoir 

Lircolnton.. 
Lumberton. 
Marion 



Monroe 

Mooresville 

Morehead City. 

Morganton 

Mount Airy. . . 



Mount Olive 

Newton 

North Wilkesboro.. 
Oxford 

Roanoke Rapids — 

Rockingham 

Roxboro 

Sanf ord 

Scotland Neck 

Smithfield 



Southern Pines. 

Spencer 

Spindale 

Tarboro 

Valdese 



Wadesboro . . 
Washington. 
Waynesville . 
White ville... 
Williamston. 



County 



Stanly 

Randolph. 
Carteret... 

Gaston 

Gaston 



Transylvania. 

H;iy wood 

Orange 

Gcston 

Sampson 



Hrrnett...- 

Chowan 

Surry 

Pitt 

RutherforQ- 

Alamance. . 
Richmond.. 

Vance 

Henderson.. 
Cleveland. . 



Scotland . . 
Calawell. . 
Lincoln — 
Robeson... 
McDowell. 



Union 

Iredell. - 
Carteret- 
Burke.. 
Surry. -- 



Wayne 

Catawba 

Wilkes 

Granville 

Halifax 

Richmond.. 

Person 

Lee 

Halifax 

Johnston... 

Moore 

Rowan 

Rutherford . 
Edgecombe - 
Burke 

Anson 

Beaufort 

Haywood... 
Columbus. . 
Martin 



Popula- 
tion 
1940 



4,060 
6,981 
3,272 
4,356 
3,567 

3,061 
5,037 
3,654 
3,225 
3,557 

5,256 
3,835 
2,734 
2,98C 
5,035 

4 339 
5,111 

7,647 
5,381 
6,547 

5,685 
7,598 
4,525 
5,803 
2,889 

6,475 
6,682 
3,695 
7,670 
6,286 

2,929 
5,407 
4,478 
3,991 
8,545 

3,657 
4,599 
4,960 
2,559 
3,678 

3,225 
3,072 
3,952 
7,148 
2,615 

3,587 
8,569 
2,940 
3,011 
3,966 



City or Town 



Less Than 2,500 

Abbottsburg 

Aberdeen 

Acme 

Addorl 

Advance 



Ahoskie 

Alexander Mills. 

Andrews 

Angler 

Ansonville 



Apex 

Arapahoe... 
Archdalc . . . 
Arlington2. 
Arthur 



Atkinson.. 
Atlantic. - 
Aulander.. 

Aurora 

Autryville. 



Ayden 

Baileys 

BakersviUe . 
Banner Elk. 
Bath 



Battleboro. 

Bayboro..- 
Beargrass.. 
Belhaven.. 



Bennett 

Benson 

Benton Heights. 
Bethel 



Beulaville 

Biltmore Forest . 

Biscoe 

Black Creek 



Black Mountain. 
Bladenboro 

Blowing Rock... 

Boiling Springs.. 



Bolivia... 

Bolton 

Boone 

Boonville. 
Bostic 



County 



Bladen 

Moore 

Columbus. 

Moore 

Davie 



Hertford . _ . 
Rutherford . 
Cherokee... 

Harnett 

Anson 



Wake 

Pamlico... 
Randolph. 
Yadkin... 
Pitt 



Pender... 
Carteret.. 

Bertie 

Beaufort. 
Sampson . 



Pitt 

Nash 

Mitchell. - 

Avery 

Beaufort. 



Edgecombe. 

Nash 

Pamlico 

Martin 

Beaufort . . - 



Chatham. 
Johnston - 

Union 

Pitt 



Duplin 

Buncombe... 
Montgomery. 
Wilson 



Buncombe. 

Bladen 

Caldwell . . 
Watauga.. 
Cleveland. 



Brunswick 

Columbus 

Watauga 

Yadkin 

Rutherford . . . 



Popula- 
tion 
1940 



157 

1,076 

196 

123 

186 

2,313 

819 

1,520 

1,028 

519 

977 
307 
1,097 
440 
181 

312 

711 

1,057 

492 

94 



645 
437 
344 
380 

270 

428 

114 

2.360 



229 
1,837 

768 
1,333 

567 
476 
843 
333 

1,042 
724 

654 

613 

203 
760 
1,788 
405 
226 



1 Returned in 1930 as Keyser. 



2 Incorporated aince 1930 



120 



North Carolina Manual 



TABLE 2. POPULATION OF INCORPORATED PLACES OF LESS 
THAN 10.000 IN NORTH CAROLINA: IHO— Continued 



City or Town 



Less Than 2,500 
— Continued 

Bowdens 

Bridgeton 

Broadway 

Brookford 

Brunswick 



Bryson 

Buie 

Buies Creek. 

Bunnlevel 

Bunn. _ 



Burgaw 

Burnsville . 
Calypso. . - 
Cameron . . 
Candor. _. 



Carolina Beach. 

Carrboro 

Carthage. , 

Gary 

Cashiers 



Castalia 

Catawba 

Cerro Gordo . 
Chadbourn . . 
Cherry 



China Grove. 
Claremont... 

Clarkton 

Clayton 

Cleveland 



Clyde 

Coats. 

Colerain... 
Columbia.. 
Columbus. 



Conetoe 

Conover 

Conway 

Cornelius... 
Council 

Cove City.. 
Creedmoor. 

Creswell 

Crossnore . . 
Crouse 

Culberson.. 

Dallas 

Davidson... 
Deep Run.. 
Delpo , 



County 



Duplin 

Craven 

Lee... 

Catawba 

Columbus 

Swain 

Robeson 

Harnett 

Harnett 

Franklin 

Pender 

Yancey 

Duplin 

Moore 

Montgomery.. 

New Hanover. 

Orange 

Moore 

Wake 

Jackson 

Nash 

Catawba 

Columbus 

Columbus 

Washington.. 

Rowan 

Catawba 

Bladen 

Johnston 

Rowan 

Haywood 

Harnett 

Bertie 

Tyrrell 

Polk 

Edgecombe... 

Catawba 

Northampton. 
Mecklenburg. 
Bladen 

Craven 

Granville 

Washington.. 

Avery 

Lincoln 

Cherokee 

Gaston 

Mecklenburg. 

Lenoir 

Columbus 



Popula- 
tion 
1940 



220 

616 
338 
910 
227 

1,612 
118 
435 
158 
248 

1,476 
997 
678 
311 
509 

637 
1,455 
1,381 
1,141 

353 

341 
402 

379 

1,576 

108 

1,567 
467 
484 

1,711 
506 



516 
827 
307 
1,090 
390 



194 
1,195 

449 

1,195 

73 

371 
640 
459 
266 
221 

98 

1,704 

1,550 

150 

263 



City or Town 



Less Than 2,500 
— Continued 

Dell view 

Denton 

Denver 

Dillsboro 

Dobson 

Dover 

Drexel 

Dublin 

Dudley 

Dundarrach 

East Bend 

East Flat Rock 

East Laurinburg 

East Lumberton 

East Spencer 

Edward 

Elizabethtown 

Elk Park 

Ellenboro.. 

EUcrbe 

Elm City 

Elon College 

Enfield 

Eureka — 

Everetts 

Evergreen 

Fair Bluff 

Fairmont... 

Faison 

Faith 

Falcon 

Falkland 

Fountain 

Four Oaks 

Franklin 

Franklinsville 

Franklinton. 

Fremont 

Fuquay Springs 

Garland 

Garner 

Garysburg 

Gatesville 

Germanton 

Gibson 

Gibsonville \ 

Glen Alpine 

Glenwood 

Qod^'in.,, -- 



County 



Gaston 

Davidson. 
Lincoln. . 
Jackson.. 
Surry 



Craven. 
Burke.. 
Bladen. 
Wayne. 
Hoke.. 



Yadkin 

Henderson. 
Scotland.. 
Robeson... 
Rowan 



Beaufort 

Bladen 

Avery 

Rutherford, 
Richmond.. 



Wilson 

Alamance. 
Halifax.... 

Wayne 

Martin 



Columbus. 
Columbus . 
Robeson... 

Duplin 

Rowan 



Cumberland. 

Pitt 

Pitt 

Johnston 

Macon. 



Randolph. 
Franklin . . 

Wayne 

Wake 

Sampson . . 



Wake 

Northampton. 

Gates 

Stokes 

Scotland 



Popula- 
tion 
1940 



Alamance 

Guilford 

Burke 

McDowell. 

Qumberland 



677 
254 
290 
520 

623 
881 
325 
152 
126 

1,262 
1,103 
890 
1,039 
2,181 

142 
1,123 
467 
471 
693 

946 
494 
2,208 
194 
265 

279 
970 
1,993 
751 
449 

206 

188 

483 

828 

1,249 

851 
1,273 
1,264 
1,323 

484 

768 
320 
297 
140 
435 

1,753 

665 
176 
123 



Population of Cities and Towns 



121 



TABLE 2. POPULATION OF INCORPORATED PLACES OF LESS 
THAN 10,000 IN NORTH CAROLINA: I9i0-Continued 



City or Town 


County 


Popula- 
tion 
1940 


City or Town 


County 


Popula- 
tion 
1940 


Less Than 2,500 

— Continued 

Gold Hill. .._ _.. 


Rowan 

Martin 

Chatham.. 

Lenoir. 


249 
142 
416 
120 
1,873 

555 
456 
405 
469 
374 

524 
98 
348 
154 
150 

336 
187 

1,508 
972 

1,959 

569 
357 
1,311 
629 
395 

394 
319 
900 

773 

748 

763 

527 

225 

90 

758 

199 
873 
499 
304 
928 

1,733 

7'» 

456 

571 

1,095 


Less Th\n 2 500 
— Continued 
Kernersville. . . 
Kittrell... 


Forsyth 


2,103 
184 


Gold Point 


Goldston 


Knightdale 


Wake 


'i'\9 


Graingers-- _ 


La Grange 


Lenoir 

Rutherford 

Columbus 

Rowan 


1,647 
212 


Granite Falls.. 


Caldwell 

Rowan 


Lake Lure... 


Granite Quarry. 


Lake Waecamaw 

Landis 


429 

1,650 

274 


Grifton _ _ 


Pitt 


Grimesland _ 


Pitt 


Lansing 


Ashe 


Grover 


Cleveland 

Halifax 


Lasker 


Northampton.. _ 
Cleveland 

Henderson 

Cleveland 

Rockingham 

Richmond 

Bertie 


169 
342 


Halifax 


Lattimore 


Hamilton 


Martin. 


Laurel Park 

Lawndale 


171 


Hamilton Lakes.. _ . 


Guilford 

Iredell 


1 006 


HarmonV-. 


Leaksville 


1 886 


Harrellsville 


Hertford 

Martin 




299 


Hassell 


Lewiston 


304 


Hayesville. _ _ 


Clay 


Liberty. 


Randolph 

Anson 


922 


Haywood. 


Chatham 

Haywood 

Moore 


Lilesville 


556 


Hazelwood 


Lillington 


Harnett 

Cumberland 

Halifax 


914 


Hemp2 


Linden.. 

Littleton 1 

Locust 


224 


Hertford 


Perquimans 

Macon 

Burke 

Orange 






1 1,200 
151 


Highlands . . 


Warren 

Stanly.. 


Hildebran.. . 


Hillsboro .. 


Longview. 


Catawba. 

Franklin 

Gaston 

Wilson 


1 489 


Hobgood . . . 


Halifax . 


Louisburg 


2 309 


Hoffman ... 


Richmond 

Wake 

Greene 

Cumberland 

Madison 

Caldwell 

Mecklenburg 

Union 

Union 

Jjincoln 

Northampton... 

Moore 

Onslow 

Martin 

Ashe 

Lee 

Yadkin 

Buncombe 

Bertie.... 

Duplin. 

Johnston 


Lowell. 


1 826 


Holly Springs . 


Lucama 


362 


Hookerton 


Lumber Bridge 

Mc.Adenville 

Me Donalds. __ 

McFarlan. 

Macclesfield 

Macon 


Robeson 

Gaston 


196 


Hope Mills. 


887 


Hot Springs 

Hudson . . . 


Robeson 

Anson 

Edgecombe 

Warren 

Rockingham 

Duplin 

Catawba 

Moore 

Dare.. 

Hertford 

Cherokee 

Northampton . . 

Robeson 

Madison 

Madison 

Union 

Mecklenburg 


127 

184 


Huntersville. 


367 


Icemorlee.. . 


197 


Indian Trail ... 


Madison.. ._ .. 


1. 683 


Iron Station 

Jackson . . 


Magnolia 

Maiden _ _. 

Manly 

Manteo 

Mapleton 

Marble . 

Margarets\ ille 

Marietta 

Marshall 


730 
1. 803 


Jackson Springs 

Jacksonville 

Jamesville 

Jefferson 

Joncsboro 

Jonesville... 

Jupiter 


249 
571 
127 
356 
95 

71 
1,160 


Kelford. 

Kenansville 

Kenly 


Mars Hill 

Marshville... 

Matthews 


517 

1,007 

486 



[ncurporatod since 1930. 



122 



North Carolina Manual 



TABLE 2. POPULATION OF INCORl'ORATED PLACES OF LESS 
THAN 10,000 IN NORTH CAROLINA: IMO-Continued 



City or Town 



Less Than 2,500 
— Continued 

Maury 

Maxton 

Mayodan 

Maysville 

Mebane 



Merry Oaks- 

Micro 

Middleburg-. 
Middlesex... 



Milton 

Milwaukee 

Mineral Springs. 

Mocksville 

Mooresboro 



Mortimer 

Morven 

Mount Gilead... 

Mount Holly 

Mount Pleasant. 



Murfreesboru- 

Murpljy 

Nags Head 

Nashville 

Nebo 



Newland 

New London..^ 

Newport 

Newton Grove. 
Norlina 



Norman 

North Lumberton. 

Norwood 

Oakboro 

Oak City 



Oakley. . 
Old Fort - 
Oriental-. 
Orrum . . . 
Pactolus. 
Palmyra. 



Pantego 

Parkersburg . 

Parkton 

Parmele 

Patterson 

Peachland... 



County 



Greene 

Robeson 

Rockingham. 

Jones 

Alamance 

Orange 



Chatham- 
Johnston - 

Vance 

Nash 



Caswell 

Northampton. 

Union 

Davie 

Cleveland 



Caldwell 

Anson 

Montgomery- 
Gaston 

Cabarrus 



Hertford. - 
Cherokee.. 

Dare 

Nash 

McDowell. 



Avery 

Stanly... 
Carteret- 
Sampson . 
Warren. . 



Richmond. 
Robeson. -- 

Stanly 

Stanly 

Martin 



Pitt 

McDowell. 
Pamlico.. - 
Robeson... 

Pitt 

Halifax 



Beaufort . 
Sampson. 
Robeson. 
Martin.. - 
Caldwell. 
Anson 



Popula- 
tion 
1940 



274 
l,(i56 
2,323 

732 

2,060 



157 

289 
181 
545 

329 

291 

89 

1,607 

296 

42 

602 

915 

2,055 

1,017 

1,550 

1,873 

45 

1,171 

235 

471 
243 

480 
339 
794 

327 
452 
1,515 
503 
512 

27 
774 
535 
173 
369 

93 

294 
105 
441 
417 
158 
390 



City or Town 



Less Th\n 2.500 
— Continued 

Pembroke 

Pikeville 

Pilot Mountain 

Pinebluff 

Pine Level 

Pinetops 



Pinetown.. 

Pineville . . 
Pink Hill-. 
Pittsboro.- 
Plymouth- 



Polkton 

Pollocksville. 
Powellsville.. 

Princeton 

Princeville... 



Prcctorville.. 

Raeford 

Ramseur 

Randleman- . 
Red Springs- 



Rennert... 

Rhodhiss-. 

Richfield-. 
Richlands. 



Rich Square. . 
Roaring Gap.. 
Robbinsville . . 

Roberdel 

Robersonville . 

Rockwell 

Rocky Point-. 

Ronda 

Roper 

Roseboro 



Rose Hill 

Rosman 

Rowland 

Roxobel 

Royal Cotton Mills. 



Ruth-3 

Rutherfordton. 

Saint Pauls 

Salemburg 

Saluda 

Saratoga2 



County 



Robeson 

Wayne 

Surry 

Moore 

Johnston . . . 
Edge combe - 



Beaufort 

Mecklenburg- 
Lenoir 

Chatham 

Washington.. 



Anson 

Jones 

Bertie 

Johnston... 
Edgecombe 



Robeson. - 

Hoke 

Randolph. 
Randolph - 
Robeson. . 



Robeson. 

Burke 

Caldwell. 
Stanly. . . 
Onslow.. 



Northampton. 

Alleghany 

Graham 

Richmond 

Martin 



Rowan 

Pender 

Wilkes 

Washington - 
Sampson 



Duplin 

Transylvania. 

Robeson 

Bertie 

Wake 



Rutherford 

Rutherf rd--- 

Robeson 

Sampson 

Polk 

Wilson 



Popula- 
tion 
1940 



783 
425 
925 
330 
595 
713 



253 

1.144 
307 
826 

2.461 

521 
408 
267 
512 

818 

209 
1,628 
1,220 
2,032 
1,559 

194 
930 
266 



942 

24 

399 

490 

1,407 

825 
416 
379 
716 
939 

727 
529 
999 
332 
417 

318 
2,326 
1,923 
371 
539 
292 



2 Incorporated since 1930. 



3 Name changed from Hampton in 1930. 



Population of Cities and Towns 



123 



TABLE 2. POPULATION OF INCORPORATED'PLACES OF LESS 
THAN 10,000 IN NORTH CAROLINA: 19iO-Continued 



City or Town 



Less Than 2,500 
—Continued 

Seaboard 

Seagrove 

Selma 

SeverQ 

ShallotteCity 



Sharpsburg . 



Shelmerdine . 
SilerCity.... 



Simpson 

Sims 

Smithtown.- 
Snow Hill... 
South Creek. 



South Mills 

Southport 

South Wadesboro. 

Sparta 

Speed 



Spring Hope-. 
Spruce Fine... 

Staley 

Stanley 

Stantonsburg . 



Star 

Stedman . . 

Stem 

Stokes 

Stoneville. 



Stonewall 

Stovall 

Swanquarter. 
Swansboro-.- 
Sylva 



Tabor 

Taylors ville. 
Teacheys- _ _ 

Todd 



Townsville. 

Trenton 

Trinity 

Troutman . 
Troy 



County 



Northampton. 

Randolph 

Johnston 

Northampton. 
Brunswick 



{Edgecombe. 
Nash 
Wilson 

Pitt 

Chatham. __ 



Pitt 

Wilson... 
Yadkin... 
Greene... 
Beaufort . 



Camden 

Brunswick.. 

Anson 

Alleghany.. 
Edgecombe. 

Nash 

Mitchell 

Randolph. . 

Gaston 

Wilson 



Montgomery- 
Cumberland . 

Granville 

Pitt.- 

Rockingham. 



Pamlico.. 

Granville. 
Hyde... 
Onslow... 
Jackson. - 



Columbus. 
Alexander . 

Duplin 

Ashe 

Watauga.. 



Vance 

Jones 

Randolph 

Iredell 

Montgomery- 



Popula- 
tion 
1940 



562 
316 
,007 
323 
381 



345 

76 
2,197 

298 
173 
162 
928 
152 

479 
1,760 
502 
648 
127 

1,222 
1,968 

255 
1,036 

595 

611 
356 
218 
216 
615 

261 
415 
271 
454 
1,409 

1,552 
1,122 

228 

I 136 

221 
431 
975 
566 
1,861 



City or Town 



Less Than 2,500 
— Continued 

Tryon 

Turkey 

Union... 

Unionville. 

Vanceboro 



Vandemere . 

Vass 

Vaughan 

Waco 

Wade 



Wagram 

Wake Forest.. 

Wallace 

Walnut Cove. 
Walstonburg.. 



Warrensville2. 

Warrenton 

Warsaw. 

Washington Park. 



Waxhaw 

Weaverville. 

Webster 

Weldon 

Wendell 



West Jefferson. 

Whitakers 

Whitehall 

Wilkesboro 



Wilson Mills. 

Windsor 

Winfall 

Wingate 

Winterville. . 



Winton 

Wood 

Woodland 

Woodville 

Wrightsville Beach . 



Yadkin College. 

Yadkinville 

Youngsville 

Zebulon 



County 



Polk 

Sampson . 
Hertford . 

Union 

Craven... 



Pamlico 

Moore 

Warren 

Cleveland 

Cumberland . 



Scotland . 
Wake--.. 
Duplin-.. 
Stokes... 
Greene... 



Watha Pender 



Ashe 

Warren.. 
Duplin... 
Beaufort . 



Union 

Buncombe. 

Jackson 

Halifax 

Wake 



Ashe... 

Edgecombe - 

Nash 

Wayne 

Wilkes 



Johnston 

Bertie 

Perquimans. 

Union 

Pitt. 



Hertford 

Franklin 

Northampton. 

Bertie 

New Hanover. 



Davidson. 
Yadkin... 
Franklin.. 
Wake.... 



Popula- 
tion 
1940 



2,043 
188 
306 
144 
826 

436 

728 
218 
281 
380 

388 
1,562 
1,050 
1,084 

198 

150 

1,147 

1,483 

295 

214 

611 

880 

84 

2,341 

1,132 

883 

883 

170 
1,309 

436 

1,747 

160 

541 

848 



733 
173 
486 
426 
252 

72 

734 

553 

1,070 



Incorporated since 1930. 



PART 111 
POLITICAL 



CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT 

(Chapter 3, Public Laws 1941) 

First District — Beaufort, Camden, Chowan, Currituck, Dare, 
Gates, Hertford, Hyde, Martin, Pasquotank, Perquimans, Pitt, 
Tyrrell, Washington. 

Second District — Bertie, Edgecombe, Greene, Halifax, Lenoir, 
Northampton, Warren, Wilson. 

Third District — Carteret, Craven, Duplin, Jones, Onslow, Pam- 
lico, Pender, Sampson, Wayne. 

Fourth District — Chatham, Franklin, Johnston, Nash, Randolph, 
Vance, Wake. 

Fifth District — Caswell, Forsyth, Granville, Person, Rocking- 
ham, Stokes, Surry. 

Sixth District — Alamance, Durham, Guilford, Orange, 

Seventh District — Bladen, Brunswick, Columbus, Cumberland, 
Harnett, New Hanover, Robeson. 

Eighth District — Anson, Davidson, Davie, Hoke, Lee, Montgom- 
ery, Moore, Richmond, Scotland, Union, Wilkes, Yadkin. 

Ninth District — Alexander, Alleghany, Ashe, Cabarrus, Cald- 
well, Iredell, Rowan, Stanly, Watauga. 

Tenth District — Avery, Burke, Catawba, Lincoln, Mecklenburg, 
Mitchell. 

Eleventh District— McDoweW, Polk, Rutherford, Cleveland, Gas- 
ton, Madison, Yancey. 

Twelfth District''— Buncombe, Cherokee, Clay, Graham, Hay- 
wood, Henderson, Jackson, Macon, Swain, Transylvania. 

JUDICIAL DISTRICTS 

Eastern Division 
First District— Camden, Gates, Currituck, Chowan, Pasquotank, 
Beaufort, Hyde, Dare, Perquimans, Tyrrell. 

Second District— Nash, Wilson, Edgecombe, Martin, Washington, 



*Creat3d by the 1941 General Assembly. 



128 North Carolina Manual 

Third District — Bertie, Hertford, Northampton, Halifax, War- 
ren, Vance. 

Fourth District — Lee, Chatham, Johnston, Wayne, Harnett. 

Fifth District — Pitt, Craven, Carteret, Pamlico, Jones, Greene, 

Sixth District — Onslow, Duplin, Sampson, Lenoir. 

Seventh District — Wake, Franklin. 

Eighth District — Brunswick, Columbus, New Hanover, Pender. 

Ninth District — Robeson, Bladen, Hoke, Cumberland. 

Tenth District — Granville, Person, Alamance, Durham, Orange. 

Western Division 
Eleventh District — Ashe, Forsyth, Alleghany. 
Twelfth District — Davidson, Guilford. 

Thirteenth District — Richmond, Stanly, Union, Moore, Anson, 
Scotland. 

Fourteenth District — Mecklenburg, Gaston. 

Fifteenth District — Alexander, Montgomery, Randolph, Iredell, 
Cabarrus, Rowan. 

Sixteenth District — Catawba, Lincoln, Cleveland, Burke, Cald- 
well, Watauga. 

Seventee7ith District — Avery, Davie, Mitchell, Wilkes, Yadkin. 

Eighteenth District — McDowell, Transylvania, Yancey, Ruther- 
ford, Henderson, Polk. 

Nineteenth District — Buncombe, Madison. 

Twentieth District — Haywood, Swain, Cherokee, Macon, Gra- 
ham, Clay, Jackson. 

Twenty-first District — Caswell, Rockingham, Stokes, Surry. 

APPORTIONMENT OF SENATORS BY DISTRICTS IN 

ACCORDANCE WITH THE CENSUS OF 1940 AND 

THE CONSTITUTION 

(Chapter 225, Public Laws 1941) 
First District — Bertie, Camden, Chowan, Currituck, Gates, Hert- 
ford, Pasquotank and Perquimans counties shall elect two senators. 



District Divisions 129 

Second District — Beaufoit, Daie, Hyde, Martin, Pamlico, Tyrrell 
and Washington shall elect two senators. 

Third District — Northampton, Vance and Warren shall elect one 
senator. 

Fourth District — Edgecombe and Halifax shall elect two sena- 
tors. 

Fifth District — Pitt shall elect one senator. 

Sixth District — Franklin, Nash and Wilson shall elect two sena- 
tors. 

Seventli District — Carteret, Craven, Greene, Jones, Lenoir ano 
Onslow shall elect two senators. 

Eighth District — Johnston and Wayne shall elect two senators. 

Ninth District — Duplin, New Hanover, Pender and Sampson 
shall elect two senators. 

Tenth District — Bladen, Brunswick, Columbus and Cumbeiland 
shall elect two senators. 

Eleventh District — Robeson shall elect one senator. 

Twelfth District — Harnett, Hoke, Moore and Randolph shall elect 
two senators. 

Thirteenth District — Chatham, Lee and Wake shall elect two 
senators. 

Fourteenth District — Durham, Granville and Person shall elect 
two senators. 

Fifteenth District — Caswell and Rockingham shall elect one sen- 
ator. 

Sixteenth Distiict — Alamance and Orange shall elect one sena- 
tor. 

Seventeenth District — Guilford shall elect one senator. 

Eighteenth District — Davidson, Montgomery, Richmond and 
Scotland shall elect two senators. 

Nineteenth District — Anson, Stanly and Union shall elect two 
senators. 

Twentieth District — Mecklenburg shall elect one senator. 

Twenty-first District — Cabarrus and Rowan shall elect two sen- 
ators. 



130 North Carolina Manual 

Twenty-second District — Forsyth shall elect one senator. 

Twenty-third District — Stokes and Surry shall elect one senator. 

Twenty-fourth District — Davie, Wilkes and Yadkin shall elect 
one senator. 

Twenty-fifth District — Catawba, Iredell and Lincoln shall elect 
two senators. 

Twenty-sixth District — Gaston shall elect one senator. 

Twenty-seventh District — Cleveland, McDowell and Rutherford 
shall elect two senators. 

Twenty-eighth District — Alexander, Burke and Caldwell shall 
elect one senator. 

Twenty-ninth District — Alleghany, Ashe and Watauga shall elect 
one senator. 

Thirtieth District — Avery, Madison, Mitchell and Yancey shall 
elect one senator. 

Thirty-first District — Buncombe shall elect one senator. 

Thirty-second District — Haywood, Henderson, Jackson, Polk and 
Transylvania shall elect two senators. 

Thirty-third District — Cherokee, Clay, Graham, Macon and 
Swain shall elect one senator. 



APPORTIONMENT OF MEMBERS OF THE HOUSE OF 
REPRESENTATIVES IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE 

CENSUS OF 1940 AND THE CONSTITUTION 



(Chapter 112, Public Laws 



No. of 
County Reps. 

^ Alamance 1 

Alexander 1 

-Alleghany 1 

V Anson 1 

Ashe 1 

Avery 1 

'--Beaufort 1 

-Gertie 1 

Bladen 1 

Brunswick 1 

'- Buncombe 3 

Burke 1 

u-Cabarrus 2 

, Caldwell 1 

Camden 1 

■Carteret 1 

v^Caswell 1 

Catawba 1 

Chatham 1 

Cherokee 1 

^Chowan 1 

Clay 1 

Cleveland 1 

Columbus 1 

Craven 1 

Cumberland .... 2 

Currituck 1 

Dare 1 

Davidson 1 

Davie 1 

Duplin 1 

Durham 2 

Edgecombe 1 

Forsyth 3 



No.oj 
County Reps. 

Franklin 1 

Gaston 2 

Gates 1 

Graham 1 

Granville 1 

Greene 1 

Guilford 4 

Halifax 1 

Harnett 1 

Haywood 1 

Henderson 1 

Hertford 1 

Hoke 1 

Hyde 1 

Iredell 1 

Jackson 1 

Johnston 2 

Jones 1 

Lee 1 

Lenoir 1 

Lincoln 1 

Macon 1 

Madison 1 

Martin 1 

McDowell 1 

Mecklenburg .... 4 

Mitchell 1 

Montgomery .... 1 

Moore 1 

Nash 1 

New Hanover ... 1 

Northampton ... 1 

Onslow 1 

Orange 1 



1941) 

No. of 
County Reps. 

Pamlico 1 

Pasquotank 1 

Pender 1 

Perquimans 1 

Person 1 

Pitt 2 

Polk 1 

Randolph 1 

Richmond 1 

Robeson 2 

Rockingham .... 1 

Rowan 2 

Rutherford 1 

Sampson 1 

Scotland 1 

Stanly 1 

Stokes 1 

Surry 1 

Swain 1 

Transylvania ... 1 

Tyrrell 1 

Union 1 

Vance 1 

Wake 3 

Warren 1 

Washington 1 

Watauga 1 

Wayne 1 

Wilkes 1 

Wilson 1 

Yadkin 1 

Yancey 1 



131 



STATE DEMOCRATIC PLATFORM FOR 1948 

The delegates of this convention, representing the Democratic 
voters of the 100 counties, adopt the following: declaration as the 
platform of the Democratic party of North Carolina for 1948: 

National Affairs 

While conceding to its individual delegates the right to disagree 
about details, this convention endorses the broad policies of the 
Democratic administration, and desires to emphasize and reaf- 
firm the historic devotion of our paity to the rights and powers 
of the governments of the several states of our Federal Union. 

This convention calls upon all Democrats in the country and 
in North Cai'olina to join their forces and to submerge their dif- 
ferences in the face of a common enemy. 

Congress 

The North Carolina representatives in both houses of the Na- 
tional Congress have reflected vast credit on their state by the 
diligence and the ability with which they have performed their 
duties. We commend their records. 

The General Assembly 

We commend unreservedly the record of progressive achievement 
made by the 1947 General Assembly. While it avoided prodigality 
of expenditure, it authorized the largest appropriations in the 
state's history. The cooperation between the legislative and execu- 
tive branches of government was particularly close and made 
possible a prompt dispatch by the General Assembly of its urgent 
business. 

The Cherry Administration 

The administration of Governor R. Gregg Cherry has spanned 
;',cme of the most tiying years in the history of the nation and 
of the state. When he assumed his present duties in January, 
1945, the country was engaged in a world conflict. The surrenders 
of Germany and Japan changed the character without altering 
the gravity of the problems which his administration had to meet 
and master. 

132 



Democratic Platform 133 

Governor Cherry has led North Carolina courageously and 
capably through these extremely difficult years. The broad know- 
ledge of the state's needs which he gained through many years 
of legislative service has enabled him to meet every emergency 
and issue with informed judgment. 

His prudent handling of the state's finances at a time when 
there were every temptation to embark the state government 
upon a program of extravagance accounts largely for the fact 
that Noi'th Carolina is now in such a fortunate financial position 
and that it is fiscally able to cope with any likely emergency that 
may arise in the foreseeable future. 

We commend the vigorous, alei-t, honest and progressive admin- 
istration which Governor Cherry has given to the state's aff'airs. 
He has built securely upon the accomplishments of his Democratic 
predecessors. 

Finances 

The state's financial position was never stronger than today. It 
can be summarized as follows : 

1. Sufficient funds to retire the General Fund debt as it matures 
have been set aside and invested in interest-bearing state and 
Federal securities. 

2. The 1947 General Assembly appropriated $50,000,000 out of 
current cash funds for much-needed physical betterments and 
additions at various state institutions. 

3. A postwar reserve fund of $30,000,000 has been established 
and invested in interest-bearing government securities. This fund 
is wisely conceived to take care of any sudden shrinkage in cur- 
rent tax revenues and to make certain that funds are available 
to finance appropriations authorized by the General Assembly. 

4. The end of the current fiscal year will undoubtedly find a 
sizeable working surplus in the General Fund. 

This truly amazing record has been achieved without any in- 
crease in taxes and without any unwise cui'tailment of the services 
of state government. It has been made possible by our tax system 
which enables the state to benefit immediately from the increas- 
ing prosperity of its people. 

With its finances in such a sound condition, the state can more 
confidently and prudently enlarge its services and increase the 
salaries of its employees. 



134 North Carolina Manual 

Salaries of State Employees 
The 1947 General Assembly increased the salaries of regular 
teachers approximately 30 per cent and the compensations of other 
state employees approximately 20 per cent. Increased living costs 
in the interval have tended to deprive these salary increases of 
much of their value and now make further pay increases both 
necessary and just. The 1949 General Assembly should make 
material upward adjustments in the salaries of all state employees. 
The Democratic party believes that those who render the in- 
dispensable services of state government are worthy of their hire. 

Education 

During the Cherry administration the appropriation for the 
salaries of the teachers has been increased 62 per cent. Other 
improvements in the school system have been made. 

A well-rounded program of further educational progress in 
North Carolina must include following objectives: 

1. The payment of such salaries for teachers as may be neces- 
sary to attract and to hold in the state's services the best qualified 
teachers and to compensate justly these indispensable public 
servants ; 

2. The employment of more teachers to lighten appreciably 
the heavy pupil load and to insure to each child the individual 
attention to which he is entitled; 

3. An acceptance by the state of a larger measure of financial 
and administrative responsibility for the enforcement of the com- 
pulsory attendance law; 

4. The strengthening of the facilities which the state provides 
in its institutions for the training of teachers; 

5. Reasonable state assistance on an equalization basis to the 
local communities for the erection of new school buildings and 
the modernization of existing buildings; 

6. Increased financial support of the various state-maintained 
institutions of higher learning. 

To this program and these objectives the Democratic party 
pledges its fullest support. 

Veterans 

Responding to the urgent recommendations of Governor Cherry, 
the General Assembly established the Veterans Commission to 



Democratic Platform 135 

meet the needs of our citizens who served in the armed forces. 
This commission has rendered extremely helpful service to thou- 
sands of veterans in various ways. This prog:ram should be con- 
tinued. 

Highway Program 

We especially commend the earnest and effective efforts made 
by Governor Cherry to set up a ten-year program for improving 
secondaiy roads and the excellent progress which has been made 
in getting this program under way. 

North Carolina has 12,000 miles of primary roads and 48,000 
miles of secondary roads. The State has undertaken a stupendous 
task in the maintenance of 60,000 miles of roads without a tax 
on land or property. Under the guidance of Governor Cherry, the 
Highway Commission has constructed more miles of new highway 
than during any similar period, and it has also launched on a 
program of unprecedented secondary road construction which, 
when completed, will provide 30,000 miles of all-weather roads 
in the rural areas where only dirt roads now exist. We are proud 
of this accomplishment. We pledge a continuation and enlargement 
of this all-important program to the end that all regions of the 
state shall be adequately served by all-weather roads. 

We further commend the Highway Commission for its humane 
program in the treatment of prisoners, especially the young, for 
whose benefit segregation from older criminals has been provided. 

Highway Safety 

The accomplishments of the Cherry administration in promoting 
highway safety are particularly praiseworthy. We promise to press 
the fight to make our highways safe for travel, not by penal 
methods but by careful supervision of the traveling public and 
by education in the methods of safe driving. 

Agriculture 

A prosperous agriculture is essential to a prosperous economy 
in North Carolina. More than a third of our people look directly 
to farming for their livelihoods. The state's gross farm income 
last year was approximately $900,000,000 which bore its just share 
of the cost of local and state government. 

The attitude of the Democratic state government toward agricul- 
ture has been enlightened and its services have been of incalculable 



136 North Carolina Manual 

value. The State Department of Agriculture is one of the most 
efficient and progressive in the nation. Other state agencies con- 
cerned with agricultural progress in its many aspects are render- 
ing the most beneficial service. 

While much has been accomplished, more remains to be done 
to increase the farm income of the state and to bring added con- 
veniences to the rural population. Better schools, the extension 
of rural electrification, better secondary roads, an expansion of 
agricultural research, no state tax on land — all these are essential 
parts of a program looking to continued agricultural advance in 
North Carolina. To such a program the Democratic party pledges 
its earnest and ett'ective support. 

Public Welfare 

North Carolina has been a leader in the field of public welfare 
since the inclusion in its Constitution 80 years ago of a mandate 
for "beneficient provision for the poor, the unfortunate and the 
orphan." Through years of economic uncertainty and of interna- 
tional stress the state has made steady progress toward meeting 
this fundamental obligation. 

We commend the record of the Democratic party in this respect 
and urge that adequate provision be made for the needy aged, for 
dependent and neglected children and for citizens dependent upon 
public concern for financial assistance. We recognize that eco- 
nomic needs is not limited to any special age groups and that the 
state's responsibility covers all of its disadvantaged citizens. 

Important as are the provisions for the necessities of everyday 
living, North Carolina has also recognized the state's obligation 
to provide a broad program of social services to alleviate in- 
dividual and family problems. Even more important are those 
measures designed to prevent social and economic problems. 

For its work in helping to attain these goals we commend the 
Commission to Study Domestic Relations Laws and urge the en- 
actment of the legislative changes shown by its study to be neces- 
sary to modernize and improve the state's statutes dealing with 
family relationships and the protection of children. 

Health 

North Carolina has one of the most efficent and progressive 
state boards of health in the nation. Its achievements have at- 



Democratic Platform 137 

tracted nationwide attention and approval. There is no more im- 
portant agency of the state government. We applaud its accom- 
plishments and promise our fullest support of its objectives. 

The Hospital and Medical Care Program gives promise of 
achieving much in making hospital and medical care available to 
peoples in all sections and all classes. We approve the appropria- 
tions already made by the General Assembly and pledge our sup- 
port to such additional appropriations as may be necessary to in- 
sure the most complete functioning of this program. 

The health of the children of North Carolina is the immediate 
and inescapable concern of the state government. The place to 
begin with any program designed to safeguard and to promote 
the health of the state's children is in the public school. We 
urge upon the 1949 General Assembly the wisdom of making such 
appropriations as may be necessary to institute a broad school 
health program. 

Mental Institutions 

The 1947 General Assembly authorized substantially increased 
appropriations for the operation of the state's mental institutions 
and for the enlargement of their facilities. The professional per- 
sonnel at these hospitals has been increased. Accommodations for 
850 additional patients have already been provided. Further ex- 
pansion in facilities are planned. We commend the actions of 
the General Assembly and the helpful interest of Governor Cherry. 
We pledge our continued concern for the welfare of the mentally 
ill and our increased support of our mental institutions. 

Labor 

During the past year North Carolina had few strikes and only 
four of these work stoppages involved serious loss of production. 
This record of industrial peace is all the more notable because 
North Carolina ranks 12th among the states of the union in in- 
dustrial development. It was made possible by the excellent rela- 
tions between labor and management which prevail in North 
Carolina and by the effective services rendered by the State De- 
partment of Labor in settling industrial disputes through concilia- 
tion, mediation and other amicable methods. The Democratic party 
pledges its full support to its legitimate aspirations of labor, 



138 North Carolina Manual 

Conservation and Development 

The successful efforts of the State Board of Conservation and 
Development to attract new industries to North Carolina and to 
encouia^e the establishment of locally owned and managed in- 
dustries are especially deserving of commendation. This important 
activity of the state government merits enlarged support. 

We strongly endorse the department's publicity program. It is 
being conducted with uncommon effectiveness. Money spent for 
this purpose is yielding rich dividends in an expanding tourist 
industry and in the attraction of new residents to the state. 

Our forest resources are of inestimable value. They should be 
conserved for productive uses. Present appropriations do not 
enable the State Board of Conservation and Development to 
provide the most inclusive and efficient forest fire protection. This 
inadequacy should be corrected. 

We commend the 1947 General Assembly for the statesmanship 
which it displayed in making a substantial appropriation for the 
development of the state park system. We pledge our continued 
support of state parks as facilities which a truly enlightened 
state should provide for its citizens. 

The Wildlife Commission, created by the 1947 General Assembly, 
in seeking to preserve the game and fish of our state, is making 
splendid progress in that direction and should be commended for 
the constructive program. 

General 

It is impossible in a relatively brief platform to rehearse all 
of the accomplishments of the state government or to mention 
the names of all of the state officials who are serving the state's 
interests capably and honestly. The State of North Carolina is 
a huge business with thousands of employees. Working together, 
they are making a record in efficient government which calls for 
the utmost praise. 

For nearly a half century the Democratic party has been in 
control of the state government of North Carolina. During that 
long period of power and of responsibility, it has given to the 
people of this state intelligent and honest government. Upon the 
record which it has made and which is a part of the proud history 
of the state, it invites the allegiance and the votes of the people 
of North Carolina, 



PLAN OF ORGANIZATION OF DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

OF NORTH CAROLINA 

State and District Committees 

Section 1. The State Democratic Executive Committee shall con- 
sist of nine men and nine women from each congressional district 
in the State, who shall be elected at the preliminary meetings of 
delegates from the congressional districts, held on the morning of 
the State Convention as provided in Section 29 hereof; provided, 
however, that every county shall have at least one member on the 
Committee. 

Sec. 2. As early as is practicable after each State convention, 
the Chairman shall call the State Democratic Executive Committee 
to meet for the purpose of electing a chairman and a vice chair- 
man, one of whom shall be a woman, and each of whom shall serve 
for a term of two years, and until his or her successor shall be 
elected. 

Sec. 3. The Chairman of the State Democratic Executive Com- 
mittee, as early as practicable after his election shall appoint his 
advisory or campaign committee, consisting of not less than five 
nor more than twenty, and a secretary of the State Democratic 
Executive Committee. 

Sec. 4. The Congressional Democratic Executive Committee for 
each congressional district in the State shall consist of two mem- 
bers from each county in said district, who shall be elected at the 
preliminary meetings of delegates from the congressional districts 
held on the morning of the State Convention as provided by Sec- 
tion 29 hereof; provided, however, that in any congressional dis- 
trict embracing less than five counties, the committee shall consist 
of three members from each county in the district. 

Sec. 5. The Judicial Democratic Executive Cominittee for each 
judicial district in the State shall consist of two members from 
each county in said district, who shall be elected at the preliminary 
meetings of delegates from the congressional districts held on 
the morning of the State Convention as provided by Section 29 
hereof; provided, however that in any judicial district embracing 
less than five counties, the committee shall consist of three mem- 
bers from each county in the district. 

139 



140 North Carolina Manual 

Sec. 5-A. The Solicitorial Democratic Executive Committee for 
each solicitorial district in the State shall consist of two members 
from each county in said district, who shall be elected at the pre- 
liminary meetings of delegates from the congressional districts 
held on the morning of the State Convention as provided by Sec- 
tion 29 hereof; provided, however that in any solicitorial district 
embracing less than five counties, the committee shall consist of 
three members from each county in the district. 

Sec. 6. The State Senatorial Executive Committee for each sena- 
torial district in the State which comprises more than one county 
shall consist of one member from each county in said district, 
who shall be elected at the preliminary meetings of delegates from 
the congressional districts held on the morning of the State Con- 
vention as provided by Section 29 hereof. In districts composed of 
only one county, the county democratic executive committee of 
said county shall have jurisdiction as in the matter of county 
candidates. 

Sec. 7. It shall be the duty of the Chairman of the State Demo- 
cratic Executive Committee, as soon as practicable after the State 
Convention, to designate one member as chairman and one member 
as secretary of each of the executive committees provided for in 
each of the foregoing four sections. The State Chairman shall 
notify the members so selected of their appointment, and in case 
any member shall fail or decline to accept such appointment, he 
shall appoint some other member in his stead. 

Sec. 8. All democratic executive committees shall meet at such 
times and places as the chairman of the respective committees may 
appoint and designate in the call. If for any reason there should 
occur a vacancy in the chairmanship of any executive committee, 
or if such chairman should be incapacitated or should fail or refuse 
to act, the secretary shall call a meeting of said executive com- 
mittee for the purpose of electing a successor to the said chairman. 
If no meeting shall be called within five days after such vacancy 
occurs, then any other officer of said executive committee, or any 
three members thereof, may call a meeting to fill said vacancy; 
provided, however, if such vacancy shall be in a state senatorial 
executive committee, in that event, any member thereof, after said 
vacancy shall have existed for five days, may call a meeting to fill 
such vacancy. 



Plan of Organization 141 

Sec. 9. The State Democratic Executive Committee shall have 
the powei- to fill all vacancies occurring in said committee; vacan- 
cies occurring in congressional, judicial, and senatorial commit- 
tees shall be filled by the executive committee of the county in 
which such vacancies occur; precinct committees shall fill all va- 
cancies occurring in their respective committee. 

Sec. 10. All officers of the State Executive Committee and the 
National Committeeman and the National Committeewoman from 
the State and the President of the Young Democratic Clubs of the 
State shall be ex-ofiicio members of the Committee with the power 
to vote. 

Sec. 11. All executive committees shall have the power to ap- 
point subcommittees or special committees for such purposes and 
with such powers, in their respective jurisdictions, as may be 
deemed necessary or desirable. 

Sec. 12. In each election year the Chairman of the State Demo- 
cratic Executive Committee shall convene said Committee in the 
City of Raleigh on or before the 10th day of March, and at said 
meeting the following business shall be transacted: 

(a) The time and place of holding the State Convention shall be 
determined and duly published. 

(b) A common day shall be fixed, on which all precinct meet- 
ings shall be held for the election of delegates to the county con- 
ventions. 

(c) A common day shall be fixed for the holding of a county 
convention in each county in the State for the purpose of electing 
delegates to the State Convention. 

Sec. 13. Immediately after the adjournment of the aforesaid 
meeting of the State Democratic Executive Committee, it shall be 
the duty of the chairman to publish the proceedings of the same, 
and it shall be the duty of the secretax-y of the committee to notify, 
in writing, the several chairmen of the county democratic execu- 
tive committees in the State of the respective dates so fixed for 
the holding of precinct meetings and county conventions. Directly 
after receipt of such notice, it shall be the duty of each chairman 
of a county democratic executive committee in the State to fix 
the hour and places for holding the precinct meeting in his county, 
the hour and places for holding the precinct meetings in his county, 
hour and place for holding the meeting of the county democratic 



142 North Carolina Manual 

executive committee required by the provisions of Section 20 to 
be held on the day of the county convention; and tliereupon the 
said chairman shall issue a call for the precinct meetings, the 
county convention, and the meeting of the county democratic 
executive committee. The call shall be in w^riting and, at least ten 
days before the day set for the precinct meetings, it shall be 
posted at the courthouse door of the county and copies thereof 
shall be sent to the chairman of all precinct committees in the 
county; a copy of the call also shall be sent as a news item to 
each newspaper published in the county. 

County and Precinct Organization 

Sec. 14. The unit of county organization shall be the voting 
precinct. In each precinct there shall be an executive committee 
consisting of five active Democrats, at least two of whom shall be 
women, who shall be elected by the Democratic voters at the pre- 
cinct meeting called by the chairman of the county democratic 
executive committee as provided in this plan of organization. The 
precinct committee so elected shall elect from its membership a 
chairman and a vice chairman, one of whom shall be a woman. 

Sec. 15. The precinct meetings shall be presided over by the 
chairman of the precinct committee, but in his absence, the vice 
chairman of the committee shall preside, and in the absence of 
both the chairman and the vice chairman, any member of the com- 
mittee may preside. 

Sec. 16. At the said precinct meeting, the Democratic voters in 
attendance shall elect delegates and alternates to represent the 
precinct in the county convention ; and said delegates or alternates, 
or such of them as shall attend the county convention, shall be 
entitled to vote the full democratic strength of their precinct upon 
all questions, nominations, or elections which may come before the 
county convention. The chairman, or presiding officer, and the sec- 
retary of the precinct meeting shall certify to the county conven- 
tion the names of the delegates and alternates selected at the 
meeting. 

Sec. 17. Each precinct shall be entitled to cast in the county 
convention one vote for every 25 Democratic votes, and one vote 
for fractions over 12 Democratic votes cast by the precinct for 
Governor at the last preceding gubernatorial election : provided 



Plan of Organization 143 

that every precinct shall be entitled to cast at least one vote in 
the county convention, and each precinct may appoint as many 
deleg-ates to said convention as it may see fit, not exceeding: three 
delegates and three alternates for each vote to which said precinct 
may be entitled in the county convention. 

Sec. 18. At every precinct meeting, if requested, a vote shall be 
taken on the different questions, nominations, and elections antici- 
pated to come before the county convention, and in that event, the 
chairman or presiding officer and the secretary of the precinct 
meeting shall certify to the county convention the vote so cast, 
and the relative vote as fixed in the precinct meeting shall not be 
changed in the county convention, except by tw^o-thirds vote of the 

entire unit of delegates desiring to change its vote. 

Sec. 19. In case there shall be a failure to hold a precinct meet- 
ing in pursuance of the call of the chairman of the county demo- 
cratic executive committee, or if at any meeting thei'e shall be a 
failure to elect delegates to the county convention, in either event, 
the precinct democratic executive committee shall appoint the dele- 
gates and alternates from the Democratic voters of the precinct. 

Sec. 20. The chairman of the several precinct committees shall 
compose the County Democratic Executive Committee, w^hich shall 
meet on the same day as the county convention first held in each 
election year, the meeting to be held either before or after the 
convention at an hour and place to be designated in the call issued 
in pursuance of Section 13 hereof. At said meeting a chairman 
of said county executive committee shall be elected. Immediately 
after the election of the chairman, the committee shall elect one or 
more, but not exceeding three, vice chairmen, and also a secretary. 
If more than one vice chairman shall be elected, the order of then- 
succession shall be designated by title, e.g., first vice chairman, 
second vice chairman, third vice chairman. Either the chairman 
or the first vice chairman shall be a woman. The chairman, vice 
chairman or vice chairmen, or secretary need not be members of 
the County Democratic Executive Committee, but all of the said 
officers shall be ex -officio members of the committee, with the power 
to vote. If for any reason there should occur any vacancy in the 
chairmanship of a county executive committee, by death, resigna- 
tion, or removal, or if such chairman should be incapacitated or 
should fail or refuse to act, then the vice chainnan or vice chair- 



144 



State Congr 




;ial Districts 



145 




146 North Carolina Manual 

men, in their order of succession, and thereafter the secretary, 
shall, in such order of succession, be vested with the full authority 
and power of the chairman until such time as said county executive 
committee has met and duly elected a successor to such chairman. 
A majority of said precinct chairmen, in person or by proxy in the 
person of some active Democrat of the precinct in which an absent 
chairman resides, shall constitute a quorum. The county executive 
committee may appoint a central committee of five who shall act 
in its stead when the county executive committee is not in session. 

Sec. 21. In case there shall be a failure to elect any precinct 
executive committee prior to the day of the county convention, 
the county democratic executive committee at its meeting held on 
the day of the said convention shall appoint the committee for such 
precinct. 

Sec. 22. The county executive committee shall have power to 
make any rules with regard to holding precinct meetings which it 
may deem proper, not inconsistent with the rules prescribed in this 
plan ; it shall be the duty of said committee to prepare and furnish 
all forms and blanks needed in making the returns from said pre- 
cinct meetings, and any reported challenges and appeals there- 
from ; and it shall have the power to raise the funds necessary to 
pay the expenses thereof. 

Sec. 2.3. All county conventions shall be called to order by the 
chairman of the executive committee of such county, and in his 
absence, by the vice chairman or by one of the vice chairmen in 
the order of succession set out in Section 20 hereof, and in his or 
their absence, by any member of the county executive committee 
who may be present at the convention, and in case none of the fore- 
going persons shall be present then by any delegate to the conven- 
tion, and he shall preside until a permanent chairman is elected 
by the convention. 

Sec. 24. The chairman shall provide the convention with a suf- 
ficient number of secretaries or ready accountants, who shall re- 
duce the votes to decimals and tabulate the same, disregarding all 
fractions after the second or hundredth column. 

Sec. 25. Nothing herein contained shall prevent the convention 
from making nomination by viva voce or acclamation where a 
vote by township or precinct is not demanded by any Democratic 
elector present. 



Plan of Organization 147 

Sec. 26. The county democratic executive committee shall have 
the power to make such other rules and regulations for the holding 
of county conventions not inconsistent herewith, as may be deemed 
necessary or expedient. 

Sec. 27. Any chairman of a county executive committee who 
announces his candidacy for an elective office in the primary shall 
resign immediately as such chairman and the vacancy shall be 
filled as heretofore provided; but any chairman who shall so resign 
may be reelected to such chairmanship if and when a vacancy 
occurs after the primary. 

State Convention Rules 

Sec. 28. The state convention shall be composed of delegates ap- 
pointed by the several county conventions. Each county in the 
State shall be entitled to elect to the State convention one delegate 
and one alternate for every 150 Democratic votes and one delegate 
and one alternate for fractions over 75 Democratic votes cast 
therein for Governor at the last preceding gubernatorial election. 

Sec. 29. A preliminary meeting of the delegates shall be held 
by each congressional district on the morning of the state conven- 
tion, at rooms to be designated by the State Executive Committee, 
for the purpose of selecting the following committees and ofiicers 
of the convention: 

1. One member of the committee on Resolutions and Platform. 

2. One member of the committee on Permanent Organization, 
Rules, and Order of Business, which committee will nominate a 
permanent president and secretary of the convention. 

3. One vice president of the convention. 

4. One district assistant secretary. 

5. One member of the committee on Credentials and Appeals. 

6. Nine men and nine women as members of the State Demo- 
cratic Executive Committee, with at least one member being se- 
lected from each county. 

7. Two members from each county for the congressional, judi- 
cial, and solicitorial district democratic executive committees; pro- 
vided, however, in districts embracing less than five counties, three 
members of each said committee shall be elected from each county 
in said district. 



148 North Carolina Manual 

8. One member for each county of the State Senatorial Execu- 
tive Committee where the district embraces more than one county. 

Sec. 30. Such delegates (or alternates of absent delegates) as 
may be present at any democratic convention shall be allowed to 
cast the whole vote to which their precinct or county may be 
entitled. 

Sec. 31. In all conventions provided for by this plan, after a 
vote is cast, there shall be no change in such vote until the final 
lesult of the ballot shall be announced by the chairman of said 
convention. 

Sec. 32. The chairman of the different county conventions shall 
certify the list of delegates and alternates to the State Conven- 
tion, and a certified list of said delegates and alternates to the sec- 
reary of the State Executive Committee. 

Sec. 33. The secretary of the State Democratic Executive Com- 
mittee shall make up a roll of all delegates and alternates from 
the several counties and transmit the same to the chairman of the 
State Convention. 

Sec. 34. In all conventions a nomination may be made by any 
majority, even though it be a fraction of a vote. 

Sec. 35. In all State Conventions it shall be the duty of the dele- 
gates from the several counties to choose one of their number 
chairman, whose name shall be reported to the president of such 
convention, and whose duty it shall be to cast the vote of his 
county as directed, and the vote as announced by him shall be re- 
corded unless some delegate from that county shall challenge its 
accuracy, in which event it shall be the duty of the president of 
the convention to cause the roll of delegates from that county to 
be called, when the vote of such county shall be tabulated and 
recorded according to the response of its delegates; but in no event 
shall the vote of one county be challenged by a delegate from 
another county. 

Rotation of State Senators in Districts Composed of More 
Than One County 

Sec. 36. That in all State Senatorial Districts composed of more 
than one county, in which it has been the custom to concede the 
right to nominate a senator to one county of the district, by a plan 



Plan of Organization 149 

of rotation or otherwise, and in which such plan was followed in 
the Primary Election of 1936, the same shall remain in full force 
and effect until terminated as herein provided. 

The executive committees of the several counties composing such 
Senatorial District may hereafter adopt a plan for the nomination 
of candidates foi- the State Senate by one or more counties com- 
posing- such district, but such plan shall not be effective until the 
executive committee of each of the counties composing the district 
shall, by a majority vote, approve such plan and file with the 
chairman of the State Executive Committee a copy of the resolu- 
tion approving the same. The agreement in any senatorial district 
composed of only two counties may be terminated by a majority 
vote of the county executive committee of any one of the counties 
and in districts of more than two counties by a majority vote of 
each of the executive committees of at least two counties, provided 
that notice of the termination of such agreement must be filed 
with the chairman of the State Executive Committee at least 120 
days in advance of the date of the primary election at which the 
candidates for the General Assembly are to be nominated. The 
chairman of the State Executive Committee shall promptly notify 
the State Board of Elections of all such agreements and of the 
termination thereof. 



Nomination of Candidates for County and Township Offices and 
for the General Assembly in Counties Not Under Primary Law 

Sec. 37. In all counties in which the selection of candidates for 
members of the General Assembly and county and township offices 
is not provided for by the primary law, nominations shall be made 
in the following manner: 

(a) The county democratic executive committee shall meet and 
set a time and place for holding a county convention for the nomi- 
nation of candidates for the aforesaid offices, and shall also set the 
time and places for holding the necessary preliminary precinct 
meetings, and thereupon the chairman of the county executive com- 
mittee shall issue a call for the precinct meetings and the county 
convention, notice of which call shall be sent to the precinct officials 
and published in such manner and form as shall be directed by 
the said county executive committee. 



150 North Carolina Manual 

(b) At the meeting- held in each precinct in pursuance of said 
notice, delegates and alternates to represent it in the county con- 
vention shall be elected from the body of the Democratic voters of 
the precinct; and said delegates or alternates, or such of them as 
shall attend the county convention shall be entitled to vote the full 
Democratic strength of their precinct in the nomination of candi- 
dates and upon all questions which may come before said county 
convention. 

If there is a failure to hold a precinct meeting in pursuance of 
said notice, or if said meeting shall fail to elect delegates to rep- 
resent it in said convention, the precinct executive committee shall 
appoint delegates and alternates from the Democratic voters of 
the precinct. 

(c) Each precinct shall be entitled to cast in the county con- 
vention one vote for every 25 Democratic votes, and one vote for 
fractions over 12 Democratic votes cast by the precinct for Gov- 
ernor at the last preceding gubernatorial election: provided that 
every precinct shall be entitled to cast at least one vote in the 
county convention, and each precinct may appoint as many dele- 
gates to said convention as it may see fit, not exceeding three dele- 
gates and three alternates for each vote to which said precinct 
may be entitled in the county convention. 

(d) The precinct meetings shall be presided over by the chair- 
man of the precinct committee, but in his absence, the vice chair- 
man of the committee shall preside, and in the absence of both the 
chairman and vice chairman, any member of the committee may 
preside. 

(e) The county executive committee shall have power to make 
any rules with regard to holding precinct meetings which it may 
deem proper, not inconsistent with the rules prescribed in this 
plan; it shall be the duty of said committee to prepare and furnish 
all forms and blanks needed in making the returns from said pre- 
cinct meetings, and any reported challenges and appeals therefrom. 

Appointment of Democratic Members of County Board 

of Elections 

Sec. 38. The chairman of the Democratic Executive Committee 
in each county shall, before submitting to the State Chairman rec- 



Plan of Organization 151 

ommendations as to Democratic members of the county Board of 
Elections in such county, call a meeting- of the democratic execu- 
tive committee of the county and submit such recommendations for 
the approval of the executive committee, and only when such 
recommendations are approved by a majority of the committee 
present, shall same be submitted to the State Chairman by the 
county chairman. The time of such meeting- of the respective 
county executive committees for the purpose of passing on such 
recommendations shall be fixed by the State Chairman. 



Miscellaneous Provisions 

Sec. 39. In the several counties of the State where primaries 
are provided for by law, whether optional or mandatory, this plan 
of organization shall nevertheless be followed in all matters not 
inconsistent with such laws. 

Sec. 40. In the nomination of candidates for municipal offices to 
be voted for in any town or city election, where the same is not 
controlled by charter or legislative enactment, a municipal demo- 
cratic executive committee may be created for the purpose of 
facilitating the orderly selection of such candidates. The commit- 
tee shall be composed of five residents of the municipality, at least 
two of whom shall be women, to be elected biennially at a meet- 
ing of all members of the regular precinct executive committee or 
committees who reside in the municipality, the meeting to be called 
and presided over by the chairman of the county democratic execu- 
tive committee. It shall be the sole function of any municipal 
democratic executive committee created under the provisions of 
this section to supervise and direct the selection of candidates for 
municipal offices, and in so doing, the committee shall follow in 
principle the procedure set out in Section 37 hereof, and to that 
end, the committee may formulate such rules and regulations as 
may be deemed necessary, practicable, and fair in applying in 
principle the procedure set out in said Section 37. The committee 
shall elect from its membership a chairman and vice chairman, one 
of whom shall be a woman ; and all vacancies in membership shall 
be filled by the committee. 



152 North Carolina Manual 

Filling Vacancies Among Candidates and Selecting Candidates 

in Special Elections 

Sec. 41. In the event any person nominated as a candidate of 
the democratic party for a state office shall die, resign, or for any 
reason become ineligible or disqualified between the date of nomi- 
nation and the ensuing general election, the vacancy caused there- 
by shall be filled by the action of the state executive committee; 
in the event of such vacancy in the case of a district office (except 
in a state senatorial district opei'ating under a rotation agree- 
ment which concedes the candidate for senator or one of the can- 
didates for senator to one county), the vacancy shall be filled by 
the action of the executive committee for such district; and in the 
event of such vacancy in the case of a county office, or the house 
of representatives, or the state senate in a district composed either 
of only one county or of two or more counties operating under a 
rotation agreement which concedes the candidate for senator or 
any one of the candidates for senator to one county, in either of 
said events, the vacancy shall be filled by action of the county 
executive committee of the county wherein such vacancy occurs; 
provided, that should a vacancy occur in any office after a nomina- 
tion has been made, or if a special election shall be ordered to fill 
a vacancy either in the Congress of the United States or in the 
General Assembly of North Carolina, in any or either of said event 
or events, a nomination shall be made by the appropriate com- 
mittee in like manner as hereinbefore provided. Any nomination 
made under the provisions of this section shall be certified imme- 
diately by the chairman and secretary of the nominating com- 
mittee to the board or boards of elections, State or county, having 
the responsibility of printing and distributing the ballots on which 
the name of the nominee shall appear. 

Sec. 42. The right of appeal shall lie from any subordinate 
committee or convention to the committee or convention next 
superior thereto, and in all county or state conventions appeals 
shall be first referred to the committee on Credentials and Appeals, 
or a special committee provided by the convention, and the find- 
ings and reports of such committee had before action thereon by 
the convention. 

Sec. 43. It shall be the duty of the county executive committees 
and their chaijrmen to make such reports and furnish such infor^ 



Plan of Organization 153 

mation to the chairman of the State Democratic Executive Com- 
mittee and chairman of the several district committees as the said 
State and district chairmen may desire. 

Amendments to Plan of Organization 

Sec. 44. The State Democratic Executive Committee shall, by 
a majority vote of the full committee, have power to amend this 
plan of org'anization. 

The foregoing' is the plan of organization of the Democratic 
party of North Carolina as adopted by the State Democratic Ex- 
ecutive Committee, at a meeting held in the City of Raleigh on the 
5th day of March, 1918, together with all amendments thereto up 
to and including a special meeting of said committee held in the 
City of Raleigh on August 28, 1946. 

CAPUS M. WAYNICK, 

Chairman. 



COMMITTEES OF THE STATE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

(From list furnished by Secretary, State Democratic 
Executive Committee) 

State Democratic Executive Committee 

1948 

OFFICERS 

Chairman Capus Waynick 

Vice-chairman Mrs. D. A. McCormick 

Secretary Victor S. Bryant 

Committees 
First District 

geaufort S. M. Blount Washington 

Beaufort Elizabeth Warren Washington 

Camden Mrs. Annie Forbes Shawboro 

Chowan Cam Byrum Edenton 

Currituck Mrs. Dudley Bagley '..'.'. Moyock 

Dare Bruce Etheridge Raleigh 

Gates A. P. Godwin, Jr Gatesville 

Hertford D. C. Barnes Murfreesboro 

Hyde Mrs. S. M. Gibbs Swan Quarter 

Martin Hugh Horton Williamston 

Martin Mrs. E. S. Peele Williamston 

Pasquotank John H. Hall Elizabeth City 

Pasquotank Mrs. Irving Midgette Elizabeth City 

Perquimans Mrs. Jack Kanov Hertford 

Pitt Mrs. W. I. Bissette Grifton 

Pitt Dr. Paul Jones Farmville 

Tyrrell Mrs. Earl Cohoon Columbia 

Washington Carl Bailey Plymouth 

Second District 

Halifax A. L. Hux Halifax 

Halifax Mrs. Lois Grumpier Halifax 

Halifax Eric W. Rodgers Halifax 

Greene Maynard Hicks Snow Hill 

Greene Mrs. E. A. Rasberrv Snow Hill 

Bertie W. V. Hoggard Aulander 

Bertie Mrs. C. W. Beasley Colerain 

Northampton Hinton L. Joyner Jackson 

Northampton Mrs. Sallie Parker Jackson 

Lenoir Merriwether Lewis Kinston 

Lenoir Mrs. Verde Noble Kinston 

Edgecombe Henry C. Bourne Tarboro 

Edgecombe Mrs. Sallie Shore Rocky Mount 

Warren John Kerr, Jr Warrenton 

Warren Mrs. W. D. Rodgers Warrenton 

Wilson T. Boddie Ward Wilson 

Wilson Mrs. W. A. Lucas Wilson 

Wilson Mitchell Ferris Wilson 

Third District 

Carteret M. Leslie Davis Beaufort 

Carteret Mrs. Clayton Fulcher, Sr Morehead City 

Craven Rurrell Hardison Rt. 1, New Bern 

154 



State Committees, Democratic 155 

Craven Miss Leonora Carawan New Bern 

Duplin R. D. Johnson Warsaw 

Duplin Mrs. Guy Gooding Kenansville 

Jones W. M. WTiitaker Trenton 

Jones Mrs. John D. Larkins. Jr Trenton 

Onslow John D. Warlick Jacksonville 

Onslow Mrs. Catherine Venters Jacksonville 

Pamlico T. B. Woodard Bayboro 

Pamlico Mrs. E. R. Godwin Oriental 

Pender Clifton L. Moore Burgaw 

Pender Mrs. Vivian Whitfield Burgaw 

Sampson A. McL. Graham Clinton 

Sampson Mrs. N. L. Vann Clinton 

Wayne Faison Thompson Goldsboro 

Wayne Mrs. Hugh Dortch Goldsboro 

Fourth District 

Wake L. S. Brassfield Raleigh 

Wake Sherwood Brockwell Raleigh 

Wake Mrs. William Hatch Raleigh 

Wake Mrs. E. L. Shearon Cary 

Johnston Mrs. R. E. Earp Selma 

Johnston Mrs. Norman Johnson Selma 

Johnston W. H. Creech Smithfield 

Nash O. B. Moss Spring Hope 

Nash Miss Bessie Bunn Rocky Moimt 

Nash Ben H. Neville Whitakers 

Franklin E. F. Griffin Louisburg 

Franklin Mrs. J. W. Mann Louisburg 

Chatham Walter D. Siler Siler City 

Chatham Mrs. Margaret Sharpe Chapel Hi'l, St. Rt. 

Vance J. C. Cooper Henderson 

Vance Mrs. B. A. Scott Henderson 

Randolph E. D. Cranford Asheboro 

Randolph Miss Blanche Miller Asheboro 

Fifth District 

Stokes S. P. Christian Danbury 

Stokes Mariorie Pepper Danbury 

Surry William M. Allen Elkin 

Surry Mrs. J. Raymond Smith Mt. Airy 

Surry J. Pate Fulk Pilot Mountain 

Rockingham J. M. Sharpe ReidsviUe 

Rockingham George Hunt ReidsviUe 

Pockintrham Mrs. J. D. Smith ReidsviUe 

Granville Mrs. D. G. Brummitt Oxford 

Granville O. G. Clayton Stem 

Granville N. E. Cannadv Oxford 

Person Claude T. Hall Woodsdale 

Person F. D. I^ong Roxboro 

Forsyth Mrs. Eunice Avers Winston-Salem 

Forsyth Mrs. D. M. Winecnff Winston-Salem 

Forsyth Robert W. Gorrell Winston-Salem 

Caswell Mrs. Mamie Carter Rt. 4, Danville, Va. 

Caswell John O. Gunn Yancejrville 

Sixth District 

Orange Mrs. R. P. McClamrock Chapel Hill 

Orange R. O. Forrest Hillsboro 

Orange O. S. Robertson Hillsboro 

Alamance H. J. Rhodes Burlington 

Alamance A. M. Carroll Burlington 

Alamance Mrs. John Vernon Burlington 

Alamance E. T. Saunders Burlington 



156 North Carolina Manual 

Durham R. H. Sykes Durham 

Durham Percy Reed Durham 

Durham Mrs. E. S. Swindell Durham 

Durham E. C. Brooks^ Jr Durham 

Durham S. E. Rlane Durham 

Guilford P. C. Rucker Greensboro 

Guilford Mrs. H. C. Yarborough Greensboro 

Guilford Geo. C. Hampton Greensboro 

Guilford Mrs. Marion L. Keith Greensboro 

Guilford Mrs. Lynn Hunt Pleasant Garden 

Guilford H. A. Wood Jamestown 

Seventh Di.strict 

Bladen J. A. Bridger Bladenboro 

Bladen Mrs. George Curry Clarkton 

Bladen C. L. Braddy Council 

Brunswick R. O. Lewis Shallotte 

Brunswick Mrs. G. C. McKeithan Shallotte 

Brunswick Mrs. Rossie Holmes Leland 

Columbus W. A. Thompson Hallsboro 

Columbus Mrs. J. K. Powell Whiteville 

Columbus A . W. Williamson Cerro Gordo 

Cumberland Wilbur Clark Fayetteville 

Cumberland Mrs. J. M. Pringle Fayetteville 

Cumberland Mrs. J. D. Devane Fayetteville 

Harnett Duncan C. Wilson Dunn 

Harnett Mrs. W. E. Nichols Coats 

New Hanover R. M. Kermon Wilmington 

New Hanover Mrs. Thomas Gause Wilmington 

Robeson F. L. Adams Rowland 

Robeson Mrs. Tasca T. Meakin Rennert 

Eighth District 

Anson James Hardison Wadesboro 

Anson Mrs. Heath Philfer Marshville 

Davidson Carlos Kennedy Thomasville 

Davie George H. Schutt Mocksville 

Hoke laurie McEacharn Raeford 

Lee W. R. Williams Sanford 

Lee Mae Oliver Sanford 

Montgomery George MjAuley Mt. Gilead 

Moore Paul Butler Southern Pines 

Moore Mrs. Paul McCain Southern Pines 

Moore Miss Helen Fields Pinehurst 

Richmond Vance McGirt Hamlet 

Scotland W. G. Shaw Wagram 

Union J. B. Simnsnn Monroe 

Wilkes C. C. Falls. Sr N. Wilkesboro 

Wilkes Miss Zell Harris Roaring River 

Yadkin E. H. Poindexter Cana 

Scotland Mrs. M. G. McGuire Laurinburg 

Ninth District 

Alexander J. C. Fortner Taylorsville 

Alexander Mrs. R. E. Curren Taylorsville 

Alleghany R. F. Crous» Sparta 

Alleghany Mrs. Edna Thompson Sparta 

Ashe Ira Johnston Jefferson 

Ashe Mrs. Elizjibeth Hensley W. Jefferson 

Cabarrus G. C. Mau'dei Kannapolis 

Cabarrus Mrs. W. M. Sherrill Concord 

Caldwell V. D. Guire Lenoir 

Caldwell Mrs. J. C. Spencer Lenoir 

Iredell C. D. Stevenson Statesville 



State Committees, Democratic 157 

Iredell Mrs. Eleanor Armour Statesville 

Rowan H. Nelson Woodson Salisbury 

Rowan Mrs. Ed L. Kitchie Spencer 

Stanly W. E. Smith Albemarle 

Stanly Mrs. D. W. Bennett Norwood 

Watauga Dr. H. B. Perry Boone 

Watauga Mrs. Bessie M. Edmiston Sugar Grove 

Tenth District 

Avery R. T. Lewis Minneapolis 

Avery Mrs. Hope B. Teaster Minneapolis 

Burke A. B. Stoney Morganton 

Burke W. C. Hudson Morganton 

Burke Mrs. Yates Palmer Valdese 

Catawba L. A. Mullinax, Jr Newton 

Catawba Mrs. Mack Bowman Hickory 

Catawba Mrs. Y. W. Mann Newton 

Lincoln M. T. Leatherman Lincolnton 

Lincoln Mrs. Ranson Killian Lincolnton 

Mecklenburg Mrs. Joe Irvin Charlotte 

Mecklenburg James J. Harris Charlotte 

Mecklenburg Tom W. Bird Charlotte 

Mecklenburg James B. Whittington Charlotte 

Mecklenburg Mrs. W. G. Craven Charlotte 

Mecklenburg Mrs. R. L. Sing Charlotte 

Mitjhell Nathan H. Yelton Bakersville 

M it -hell Mrs. R. T. Dent Spruce Pine 

Eleventh District 

Gaston B. B. Gardner Gastonia 

Gaston Sarah Mason White Gastonia 

Cleveland O. M. Mull Shelby 

Cleveland Ralph Gardner Shelby 

Clevf land Clyde Nolan Shelby 

Rutherford Earl Yelton Spindale 

Rutherford J. Harvey Carpenter Rutherfordton 

Rutherford Mrs. Robt. C. Hawkins CliflFside 

McDowell Hugh Beam Marion 

McDowell Robt. Proctor Marion 

McDowell Mrs. John Poteat Marion 

Polk C. P. Rogers Tryon 

Polk Mrs. Eugenia Wol 'ott Tryon 

Yancey Mrs. Chas. Hutchins Burnsville 

Yancey C. P. Randoljih Burnsville 

Madison Zeno Ponder Marshall 

Madison Mrs. J. Clyde Brown Mars Hill 

Twelfth District 

Buncombe Weldon Weir Asheville 

Buncombe Mrs. Ruth Goodson Asheville 

Buncombe Don S. Elias Asheville 

Cherokee Mrs. J. N. Moody Murphy 

Clay C. L. Davis Hayesville 

Graham Mrs. Vivian Chambers Robbinsville 

Haywood O. L. Yates Waynesville 

Haywood Mrs. Jack West Clyde 

Henderson H. E. Buchannan Hendersonville 

Henderson Mrs. Lucille Allen Hendersonville 

Jackson Miss Jane Coward Sylva 

Jackson Dan K. Moore Sylva 

Macon Mrs. George Patton Franklin 

Macon James L. Houser Franklin 

Swain I. B. Jenkins Bryson City 



158 North Carolina Manual 



Swain E. B. Whitaker Bryson City 

Transylvania J. S. Silverstein Brevard 

Transylvania Mrs. Geo. Massey Brevard 

EX-OFFICIO 

President, Yoiingr Democratic 

Clubs of N. C Clifton Blue Aberdeen 

National Committeeman Jonathan Daniels Raleigh 

National Committeewoman .... Miss Beatrice Cobb Morganton 



State Committees, Democratic 159 

State Democratic Congressional District 

Executive Committee 

1948 

First District 

Beaufort Malcolm Paul Washington 

Beaufort Adelaide Mayo Washington 

Camden W. I. Halstead South Mills 

Camden Mrs. P. P. Gregory Shawboro 

Currituck J. J- Ward Knotts Island 

Currituck D. W. Bagley Moyock 

Chowan R. D. Dixon Edenton 

Chowan E. N. Elliott Tyner 

Dare Roy Davis Manteo 

Dare A. B. Hooper Stumpy Point 

Gates E. C. Hand Gatesville 

Gates R. E. Miller Gates 

Hertford W. L. Daniels Winton 

Hertford R. H. Underwood Murfreesboro 

Hyde M. A. Matthews Englehard 

Hyde J. H. Swindell Swan Quarter 

Martin A. E. James Robersonville 

Martin Clarence Griffin Williamston 

Pasquotank J. B. Flora Elizabeth City 

Pasquotank L. W. Midgette Elizabeth City 

Perquimans Emmett Winslow Hertford 

Perquimans W. W. White, Jr Hertford 

Pitt W. I. Bissette Griffon 

Pitt Jack Edwards Greenville 

Tyrrell R. L. Spencer Columbia 

Tvrrell Sarah Taft Columbia 

Washington Harry P. Barnes Cherry 

Washington W. R. Hampton Plymouth 

Second District 

Bertie W. S. Pritchard Windsor 

Bertie Mrs. L. D. Perry Colerain 

Edgecombe Robert Corbett Macclesfield 

Edgecombe Millard Jones Rocky Mount 

Greene Mark C. Lassiter Snow Hill 

Greene R. A. Mewborn Snow Hill 

Halifax M. S. Benton Roanoke Rapids 

Halifax Mrs. Clifton Moss Ringwood 

Lenoir Thomas Mewborn Kinston 

Lenoir W. C. Boone Kinston 

Northampton Edgar Martin Conway 

Northampton Eric Norfleet Jackson 

Warren R. W. Thornton Littleton 

Warren W. E. Turner Henderson, Rt. 2 

Wilson W. M. Harrell Wilson 

Wilson Larry I. Moore Wilson 

Third District 

Carteret William H. Bell Newport 

Craven J- E. Witherington Vanceboro 

Duplin A. C. Hall Wallace 

Jones John D. Larkins, Jr Trenton 

Onslow E. W. Summersill Jacksonville 

Pamlico '. J- C. Wiley Grantsboro 

Pender Roy Rowe Burgaw 

Sampson William G. King Clinton 

Wavne Robert Holmes Mount Olive 



160 North Carolina Manual 

Fourth District 

Chatham V. R. Johnson Pittsboro 

Chatham Mrs. Eleanor Farrell Pittsboro 

Franklin Chas. P. Greene Louisburg 

Franklin E. F. Griffin Louisburg 

■Johnston Roy Atkinson Clayton 

Johnston J. A. Wellons, Jr Smithfield 

Nash J. Henry Vaughan Elm City 

Nash L T. Valentine Nashville 

Randolph J. H. Wylie Asheboro 

Randolph R. W. Wood Asheboro 

Vance Fred S. Royster Henderson 

Vance W. W. White Manson 

Wake John Anderson Raleigh 

Wake Banks Arendell Raleigh 

Fifth District 

Caswell W.C.Taylor Blanch 

Caswell Junius White Ruffin 

Forsyth Paul A. Bennett Winston-Salem 

Forsyth Joe L. Carlton Winston-Salem 

Granville I.E. Harris Creedmoor 

Granville B. S. Royster, Jr Oxford 

Person J. S. Merritt Roxboro 

Person Jerry L. Hester Roxboro 

Rockingham J. Hoyte Stultz Leaksville 

Rockingham Roy Blalock Reidsville 

Stokes John Taylor Danbury 

Stokes J. G. H. Mitchell Walnut Cove 

Surry J. M. Cooper Eikin 

Surry A. P. Fulk Pilot Mountain 

Sixth District 

Alamance Duke Parrish Saxapahaw 

Alamance M. M. Gerringer Burlington 

Alamance E. R. Hanford Rt. 5, Burlington 

Durham Harvey Harward Durham 

Durham Bill GilliEm Durham 

Durham J. S. Stewart Durham 

Guilford L. P. McLendon Greensboro 

Guilford W. T. Powell High Point 

Guilford D. L. Webster Greensboro 

Orange O. J. Coffin Chapel Hill 

Orange Mrs. W. A. White Chapel Hill 

Orange J. D. Eskridge Hillsboro 

Seventh District 

Bladen D. McL. Shaw Ivanhoe 

Bladen John R. Davis Rt. 5, Fayetteville 

Brunswick C. C. Hewett Shallotte 

Brunswick Mrs. Sam J Frink Shallotte 

Columbus Elmo Powell Whiteville 

Columbus Horace Shaw Whiteville 

Cumberland James McRae Fayetteville 

Cumberland D. P. Russ. Jr Fayetteville 

Harnett Earl Westbrook Dunn 

Harnett Mrs. Eugene Lassiter Rt. 1, Erwin 

New Hanover Fred D. Poission Wilmington 

New Hanover Aaron Goldberg Wilmington 

Robeson Grady Harrell Shannon 

Robeson Mrs. David Townsend Rowland 

Eighth District 

Anson F. E. Liles Wadesboro 

Anson J. A. Leach Wadesboro 



State Committees, Democratic 161 

Davidson P. B. Critcher Lexington 

Davidson Paul Wilson Lexington 

Davie Jacob Stewart Mocksville 

Davie J. H. Eid;;on Moeksvjlle 

Hoke Ryan McBiyde Raeford 

Hoke Mrs. Tom Sinclair Raeford 

Lee J. G. Edvifards Sanford 

Lee Max McLeod Sanford 

Montgomery W.J. Batten Troy 

Montgomery Dr. W. T. Harris Troy 

Moore H. Clifton Blue Aberdeen 

Moore Clyde Auman West End 

Richmond I. S. London Rockingham 

Richmond John Pittman Rockingham 

Scotland George McLeod Johns 

Scotland Peter D. Jones Laurinburg 

Union R. P. Steagall Monroe 

Union Miss Edith Marsh Monroe 

Wilkes C. B. Eller N. Wilkesboro 

Wilkes Carl Buchan N. Wilkesboro 

Yadkin J. W. Hudspeth Yadkinville 

Yadkin E. H. Barnard Yadkinville 

Ninth District 

Alexander Harry Miller Stony Point 

Alexander Mrs. J. C. Connolly Taylorsville 

Alleghany W. F. Osborne Sparta 

Alleghany Robert G. Randolph Sparta 

Ashe , W. E. Vannoy West Jefferson 

Ashe W. D. McMillan West Jefferson 

Cabarrus D. Ray McEachern Concord 

Cabarrus Dr. J. O. Nolan Kannapolis 

Caldwell E. F. Allen Lenoir 

Caldwell James Farthing Lenoir 

Iredell J. G. Lewis Statesville 

Iredell D. E. Turner Mooresville 

Rowan W. D. Kiziah Salisbury 

Rowan Paul V. Phillips Salisbui-y 

Stanly R. L. Brown, Jr Albemarle 

Stanly J. B. Little Albemarle 

Watauga Kidd Brewer Boone 

Watauga Gorden Winkler Boone 

Tenth District 

Avery R. W. Wall Newland 

Avery Mrs. Zelzah McCoury Senia 

Burke T. Earl Franklin Morganton 

Rurke A. P. Causby Morganton 

Catawba E. T. Harrill Newton 

Catawba E. C. Willis Hickory 

Lincoln R. B. Nixon Lincolnton 

Lincoln Bruce F. Heafner Lincolnton 

Mecklenburg James Armstrong Charlotte 

Mecklenburg Robert Lassiter Charlotte 

Mitchell Edward Fortner Spruce Pine 

Mitchell John B. Peterson Poplar 

Eleventh District 

Cleveland Mrs. Geo. Ray Shelby 

Cleveland Max Dixon Shelby 

Gaston F. H. Cunningham Gastonia 

Gaston Miss Maida Adams Gastonia 

Madison Judson Edwards Rt. 2, Mars Hill 

Madison E. Y. Ponder Rt. 1, Marshall 



1()2 North Carolina Manual 



McDowell Grayson Neal Marion 

McDowell J. C. Bowman Marion 

Polk W. H. McDonald Tryon 

Po!k Oliver Taylor Mill Spring 

Rutherford Myles Haynes Cliffside 

Rutherford Chas. Flack Forest City 

Yancey Frank Howell Burnsville 

Yancey W. E. Anslin Burnsville 

Twelfth District 

Buncombe C. W. Dermid Asheville 

Buncombe Colvin G. White Asheville 

Cherokee Frank Forsyth Murphy 

Cherokee Frank Mehaffey Andrews 

Clay T. C. Gray Hayesville 

Clay Aubrey B> ers Hayesville 

Graham L. W. Wilson Robbinsville 

Graham F. S. Griffin Robbinsville 

Haywood J. M. Queen Waynesville 

Haywood Wayne McCracken Waynesville 

Henderson Everett Moore Hendersonville 

Henderson Dr. T. W. Sumner Hendersonville 

Jackson Raljih Sutton Sylva 

Jackson John Shepard Sylva 

Macon J. J. Mann Franklin 

Macon Jerry Franklin Franklin 

Swain R. C. Wiggins Bryson City 

Swain R. E. Breedlove Bryson City 

Transylvania J. O. Wells Brevard 

Transylvania Miss Thelma Galloway Brevard 



State Committees, Democratic 163 

State Democratic Judicial District Executive 

Committees 
1948 

eastern division 

First District 

Beaufort J. B. Grimes Washington 

Beaufort John Rodman Washington 

Camden R. L. Whaley Camden 

Camden R. L. Bray Belcross 

Chowan R. C. Holland Edenton 

Chowan John W. Graham Edenton 

Currituck S. A. Walker Snowden 

Currituck T. G. Griggs Point Harbor 

Dare Martin Kellog Manteo . 

Dare I. P. Davis Manteo 

Gates '*"■ H. Rountree Sunbury 

Gates Hubert Esson Gatesville 

Hyde J. H. Jarvis Englehard 

Hyde J. L. Simmons Fairfield 

Pasquotank F. T. Horner Elizabeth City 

Pasquotank J. K. Wilson, Jr Elizabeth City 

Perquimans Walter Oakley, Jr Hertford 

Perquimans Charles Johnson Hertford 

Tyrrell C. R. Chaplin Columbia 

Tyrrell George M. Kelly Columbia 

Second District 

Edgecombe Eugene Simmons Tarboro 

Edgecombe Cameron Weeks Tarboro 

Martin H. G. Horton Williamston 

Martin Charles H. Manning Williamston 

Nash J. N. Sills Nashville 

Nash I. D. Thorp Rocky Mount 

Washington Blount Rodman Plymouth 

Washington E. L. Owens Plymouth 

Wilson Walter Pittman Wilson 

Wilson Mrs. Elizabeth Swindell Wilson 

Third District 

Bertie E. R. Tyler Roxobel 

Bertie Mrs. Clara Maddrey Catling Windsor 

Halifax W. B. Allsbrook, Jr Roanoke Rapids 

Halifax Mrs. Charles R. Daniels Weldon 

Hertford J. B. Burden Ahoskie 

Hertford J. W. Copeland Ahoskie 

Northampton W. H. S. Burgwyn Woodland 

Northampton Buxton Midgett Jackson 

Vance Irvin R. Watkins Henderson 

Vance A. Waddell Gholson Henderson 

Warren John M. Picot Littleton 

Warren R. H. Bright Warrenton 

Fourth District 

Chatham Wade Paschal Silor City 

Chatham Mrs. Ada Diggs Chapel Hill 

Harnett F. H. Taylor Buie's Creek 

Harnett M. O. Lee Lillington 

Johnston Albert A. Corbett Wilson Mills 

Johnston W. J. Hooks Kenly 

Lee D. B. Teague Sanford 

Lee Gabe Holmes Sanford 

Wayne W. R. Allen Goldsboro 



164 North Carolina Manual 

Fifth District 

Carteret A. L. Hamilton Morehead City 

Craven John A. Simpson Vanceboro 

Greene K. A. Pittman Snow Hill 

Greene P. B. Holden Snow Hill 

Jones George R. Hughes Trenton 

Pamlico E. C. Miller Bayboro 

Pitt John B. Lewis Farmville 

Pitt Frank Wooten, Jr Greenville 

Sixth District 

Duplin Grady Mercer Beulaville 

Lenoir Eli J. Perry Kinston 

Lenoir B. Cameron Langston Kinston 

Onslow Carl V. Venters Jacksonville 

Sampson Stewart B. Warren Clinton 

Seventh District 

Franklin H. H. Hobgood Louisburg 

Franklin W. L. Lumpkin Louisburg 

Wake Mrs. Barber Towler Raleigh 

Wake Mrs. J. M. Newsom Raleigh 

Eighth District 

Brunswick W. J. McLamb Shallotte 

Brunswick Mrs. Riley Usher Shallotte 

Columbus J- K. Powell Whiteville 

Columbus J- W. Brown Whiteville 

New Hanover Allan Marshall Wilmington 

New Hanover Murray G. James Wilmington 

Pender Leon Corbett Burgaw 

Ninth District 

Bladen H. J. White Bladenboro 

Bladen Edward B. Clark Elizabethtown 

Cumberland Lacy S. Collier Fayetteville 

Cumberland V. C. Bullard, Jr Fayetteville 

Hoke N. A. McDonald Raeford 

Hoke W. D. McLeod Raeford 

Robeson Frank McNeill Lumberton 

Robeson Mrs. Butler Thompson Lumberton 

Tenth District 

Alamance John H. Vernon Burlington 

Alamance R. T. Hawkins Mebane 

Alamance Cooper Hall Burlington 

Durham Austin Stubbs Durham 

Durham M. T. Spears Durham 

Durham Dan K. Edwards Durham 

Granville A. W. Graham, Jr Oxford 

Granville Edward F. Taylor Oxford 

Orange C. C. Carter Chapel Hill 

Orange James Webb Hillsboro 

Orange Paul Robertson Chapel Hill 

Person Robert P. Burns Roxboro 

Person R- B. Dawes Roxboro 

WESTERN DIVISION 

Eleventh District 

Alleghany J- K- Doughton Sparta 

Alleghany Ross Richardson Sparta 

Ashe R- L. Ballou Jefferson 



State Committees, Democratic 



165 



Ashe R. W. Barr W. Jefferson 

Forsyth J. Earle McMichael Winston-Salem 

Forsyth Fred M. Parrish, Jr Winston-Salem 

Twelfth District 

Davidson Roy Hughes Thomasville 

Davidson J. S. Spruill Lexington 

Guilford Eugene Shaw Greensboro 

Guilford D. M. Davidson Gibsonville 

Guilford Dr. E. G. Purdom Guilford College 



Thirteenth District 

Anson 
Anson 
Moore . . . 
Moore . . . 
Richmond 
Richmond 
Scotland 
Scotland 
Stanly . . 
Stanly . . 
Union 
Union 



Fourteenth District 

Gaston 

Gaston 

Mecklenburg 

Mecklenburg 



. . F. J. Coxe Wadesboro 

. . P. J. Kiker Wadesboro 

. . U. L. Spence Carthage 

. . Lament Brown Pine Bluff 

. . Thomas Leath Rockingham 

. . Nash LeGrand Rockingham 

. . Joe Cox , Laurinburg 

. . Tom Gill " Laurinburg 

. . R. R. Ingram Albemarle 

. . Vance Honeycutt Albemarle 

. . H. B. Smith Monroe 

. . W. C. Massey Monroe 



. L. B. Hollowell Gastonia 

. Mack Holland Gastonia 

. David McConnell Charlotte 

. Erwin Boyle Charlotte 



Fifteenth District 

Alexander Frank Johnson Stony Point 

Alexander Mrs. Anna B. Allen Taylorsville 

Cabarrus H. I. Alexander Kannapolis 

Cabarrus H. W. Calloway Concord 

Iredell D. P. Nantz Statesville 

Iredell W. W. Smoot Statesville 

Montgomery W. L. Curry Troy 

Montgomery Everett Freeman Mt. Gilead 

Rowan C. L. Coggins Salisbury 

Rowan Kerr Craig Ramsay Salisbury 

Randolph Lawrence Hammond Randleman 

Randolph Alton Craven Randleman 

Sixteenth District 

Burke C. E. Cowan Morganton 

Burke O. L. Horton Morganton 

Caldwell F. L. German Lenoir 

Caldwell D. H. Thorne Lenoir 

Catawba John C. Stroupe Hickory 

Catawba Edward Houpt Newton 

Cleveland C. C. Horn Shelby 

Cleveland A. A. Powell Shelby 

Lincoln W. H. Childs Lincolnton 

Lincoln Joseph Ross Lincolnton 

Watauga Wade E. Brown Boone 

Watauga A. E. South Boone 

Seventfienth District 

Avery Fred Coffey Banner Elk 

Avery Mrs. Lucille Winters Elk Park 

Davie Dr. M. H. Hogle Mocksville 



166 North Carolina Manual 



Davie Mrs. O. C. McQuage Mocksville 

Mitchell George Bartlett Spruce Pine 

Miti hell Mrs. E. G. Miller Bakersville 

Wilkes J. R. Rousseau N. Wilkesboro 

Wilkes Larry S. Moore N. Wilkesboro 

Yadkin H. A. Logan Boonesville 

Yadkin J. W. Shore Boonesville 

Eighteenth District 

Henderson J. E. Shipman Hendersonville 

McDowell W. D. Lonan Marion 

McDowell E. P. Dameron Marion 

Polk E. B. Cloud Columbus 

Rutherford Chas. Dalton Spindale 

Rutherford Lee Powers Lake Lure 

Transylvania Cecil J. Hill Brevard 

Transylvania Mrs. C. H. Lyday Brevard 

Yancey Bill Atkins Burnsville 

Yancey Frank Huskin Burnsville 

Nineteenth District 

Buncombe Floyd Padgett Asheville 

Buncombe R. R. Wiliams, Jr Asheville 

Buncombe George Craig Asheville 

Madison George Martin Spring Creek 

Twentieth District 

Cherokee J. B. Gray Murphy 

Cherokee W. D. Whitaker Andrews 

Clay H. M. Moore Hayesville 

Clay Fred O. Scroggs Hayesville 

Graham R. B. Morphew Robbinsville 

Graham C. P. Sawyer Robbinsville 

Haywood R. E. Sentelle Waynesville 

Haywood Larry Cagle Clyde 

Jackson Frank Hall Sylva 

Jackson John W. McDevitt Sylva 

Macon R. S. Jones Franklin 

Macon Mrs. Virginia Merrill Franklin 

Swain W. T. Jenkins Bryson City 

Swain Will Cooper Bryson City 

Caswell W. B. Horton Yanceyville 

Caswell Robert F. Wilson Yanceyville 

Rockingham C. S. Scurry Reidsville 

Rockingham B. A. Young Madison 

Stokes L. H. Van Noppen Danbury 

Stokes A. S. Ellington Walnut Cove 

Surry Frank E. Freeman Dobson 

Surry Wilson Barber Mount Airy 



State Committees, Democratic 



167 



State Democratic Senatorial Executive Committees 

1948 

First District 

Bertie Charles H Jenkins Aulander 

Camden George W. Johnson Camden 

Chowan Walter Holton Edenton 

Currituck R. P. Midgette Currituck 

Gates Martin Kellog Sunbury 

Hertford A. J. Eley Ahoskie 

Pasquotank N. E. Aydlett Elizabeth City 

Perquimans B. C. Berry Hertford 

Second District 

Beaufort D. E. Redditt Washington 

Dare John P. Hooker Manteo 

Hyde E. A. Williams Swan Quarter 

Martin J. C. Smith Robersonville 

Pamlico L. F. McCabe Oriental 

Tyrrell E. R. Davenport Columbia 

Washington W. T. Freeman Plymouth 

Third District 

Northampton H. R. Harris Seaboard 

Vance W. R. Vaughan Henderson 

Warren Amos L. Capps Aixola 

Fourth District 

Edgecombe Frank E. Winslow Rocky Mount 

Halifax Paul Johnson Littleton 



Fifth District 

Pitt 



, Walter Jones Farmville 



Sixth District 

Franklin J. K. Tarrington Youngsville 

Nash M. F. Morgan Bailey 

Wilson George W. Tomlinson Wilson 

Seventh District 

Carteret C. G. Holland Beaufort 

Craven John F. Rhodes. Jr New Bern 

Greene J. H. Whitaker Snow Hill 

Jones Rudolph Pelletier Trenton 

Lenoir Albert W. Cowper Kinston 

Onslow Marion A. Cowell Jacksonville 



Eighth District 

Johnston J. 

Wayne C. 



Marvin Johnson Smithfield 

C. Flowers Goldsboro 



Ninth District 

Duplin W. D. Herring Kenansville 

New Hanover A. A. Lenon Wilmington 

Pender Robert Grady Johnson Burgaw 

Sampson Peter McQueen. Jr Clinton 



168 North Carolina Manual 

Tenth District 

Bladen M. L. Fisher Elizabethtown 

Bladen Homer Tatum White Oak 

Brunswick Walter M. Stanaland Shallotte 

Brunswick Mrs. John Chadwick Shallotte 

Columbus Hugh Nance Cerro Gordo 

Columbus Richard Stone Lake Waccamaw 

Cumberland Mrs. James Pringle Fayetteville 

Eleventh District 

Robeson County Democratic Executive Committee 

Twelfth District 

Harnett W. A. Johnson Lillington 

Harnett Jesse Capps Dunn 

Hoke Archie Watson Red Springs 

Moore W. P. Saunders Robbins 

Randolph Clyde Avers Asheboro 

Thirteenth District 

Chatham J. B. Ingle Siler City 

Lee W. W. Seymour Sanford 

Wake Vaughan Winborne Raleigh 

Fourteenth District 

Durham C. C. Edwards Durham 

Granville Claude E. Lyon Creedmoor 

Person J. W. Green Roxboro 

Fifteenth District 

Caswell George L. Seat Semora 

Rockingham C. S. Burton Reidsville 

Sixteenth District 

Alamance Mrs. Ava Faulkener Burlington 

Orange L. J. Phipps Chapel Hill 

Seventeenth District 

Guilford Julius C. Smith Greensboro 

Eighteenth District 

Davidson Ford Myers Thomasville 

Montgomery J. S. Edwards Troy 

Richmond Lacy Speight Rockingham 

Scotland J. Nelson Gibson, Jr Gibson 

Nineteenth District 

Anson B. T. Hill Wadesboro 

Stanly John B. Boyette Albemarle 

Union Page Price Monroe 

Twentieth District 

Mecklenburg County Democratic Executive Committee 

Twenty-first District 

Cabarrus J. S. Hartsell Concord 

Rowan J. D. Carter Spencer 

Twenty-second District 

Forsyth County Democratic Executive Committee 



" " State Committees, Democratic 169 

Twenty-third District 

Stokes Marshall Watts Walnut Cove 

Surry Fred Folger Mount Airy 

TVenty-fourth District 

Davie J. B. Cain Cana 

Wilkes J. Gordon Hackett N. Wilkesboro 

Yadkin Grover S. Williams Booneville 

Twenty-fifth District 

Catawba John W. Aiken Hickory 

Iredell Sam G. Hall Statesville 

Lincoln Jack Schrum Lincolnton 

Twenty-sixth District 

Gaston County Democratic Executive Committee 

Twenty-seventh District 

Cleveland D. W. Royster Shelby 

McDowell P. J. Story Marion 

Rutherford Wade Matheny Forest City 

Twenty-eighth District 

Alexander J. A. Alexander Stony Point 

Burke E. M. Hairfield, Sr Morganton 

Caldwell L. A. Dysart Lenoir 

Twenty-ninth District 

Alleghany D. M. Edwards Sparta 

Ashe W. B. Austin West Jefferson 

Watauga Council Cooke Boone 

Thirtieth District 

Avery Earleen G. Pritchett Banner Elk 

Madison James Holcombe Marshall 

Mitchell E. H. Poteat Bakersville 

Yancey Wm. B. Huskins Burnsville 

Thirty-first District 

Buncombe County Democratic Executive Committee 

Thirty-second District 

Haywood R- D. Coleman Canton 

Henderson W. W. Walker Hendersonville 

Jackson E. L. McKee Sylva 

Polk G. H. Bridgeman Tryon 

Transylvania T. J. Wilson Brevard 

Thirty-third District 

Cherokee Walter Mauney Murphy 

Clay Andrew Aubrey Hayesville 

Graham Ed Ingram Robbinsville 

Macon Fred Edwards Franklm 

Swain T. D. Bryson, Jr Bryson City 



170 North Carolina Manual 

CHAIRMEN DEMOCRATIC COUNTY EXECUTIVE 

COMMITTEES 

1948 

County Name Address 

Alamance D. K. Muse Mebane 

Alexander T. Elisha Bebber Taylorsville 

AlleRhany R. F. Crouse Rt. 2, Sparta 

Anson James A. Hardison Wadesboro 

Ashe Todd Gentry West Jefferson 

Avery R. T. Lewis Minneapolis 

Beaufort Malcolm C. Paul Washington 

Bertie J. B. Davenport Windsor 

Bladen C. L. Braddy Council 

Brunswick D. Bert Frink Shallotte 

Buncombe R. R. Williams Asheville 

Burke Col. Charles Walton Morganton 

Cabarrus J. Lee White Concord 

Caldwell V. D. Guire Lenoir 

Judge A. R. CrisD Lenoir 

Camden W. W. Forehand Shiloh 

Carteret Irvin W. Davis Beaufort 

Caswell Joseph H. Warren Prospect Hill 

Catawba Ralph Sm\ re Hickory 

Chatham Wilkins P. Horton Pittsboro 

Cherokee H. A. Mattox Murphy 

Chowan Lloyd E. Griffin Edenton 

Clay Allen J. Bell Haynesville 

Cleveland Clyde Nolan Shelby 

Columbus W. Avery Thompson Hallsboro 

Craven William F. Ward New Bern 

Cumberland H. R. Clark Fayetteville 

Currituck S. A. Walker Snowden 

Dare M. L. Daniels Manteo 

Davidson Charles W. Mauze Lexington 

Davie J. H. Thompson Mocksville 

Duplin F. W. McGowen Kenansville 

Durham J. Leslie Atkins, Jr Durham 

Edgecombe Haywood P. Foxhall Tarboro 

Forsyth Calvin Graves 707 Wachovia Bk. Bldg. 

Winston-Salem 

Franklin E. F. Griffin Louisburg 

Gaston L. B. Hollowell Gastonia 

Gates C. P. Hathaway Sunbury 

Graham Ed Tubeville 'Robbinsville 

Granville Edward F Taylor Oxford 

Greene K. A. Pittman Snow Hill 

Guilford Frank R. Hutton 118 S. Greene St., Greensboro 

Halifax Henry T. Clark Scotland Neck 

Hartnett I. R. Williams Dunn 

Haywood W. G. Byers Waynesville 

Henderson L. B. Prince Hendersonville 

Hertford D. C. Barnes Murfreesboro 

Hoke Dr. W. P. Baker Raeford 

Hyde C. L. Bell Swan Quarter 

Iredell John F. Long Rt. 1, Statesville 

Jackson Dan M. Allison Sylva 

Johnston Alvin Narron Rt. 1, Middlesex 

Jones John D. Larkins, Jr Trenton 

Lee W. E. Horner Sanford 

Lenoir Meriwether Lewis 114 Caswell St., Kinston 

Lincoln Thomas E. Rhodes Lincolnton 



State Committees, Democratic 171 

County Name Address 

Macon T. H. Johnson Franklin 

Madison F. E. Freeman Marshall 

Martin Elbert S. Peel Williamston 

McDowell S. J. Westmoreland Marion 

Mecklenburg Louis G. Ratcliffe. . . 126 Brevard Court, Charlotte 

Mitchell Rex O. Wilson Spruce Pine 

Montgomery David H. Harris Troy 

Moore M. G. Boyette Carthage 

Nash M. P. Dawson Rocky Mount 

New Hanover David Sinclair Wilmington 

Northampton W. J. Long Garysburg 

Onslow Thomas R. Marshall Jacksonville 

Orange R. O. Forrest Hillsboro 

Pamlico J. C. Wiley Grantsboro 

Pasquotank N. Elton Aydlett Elizabeth City 

Pender John T. Wells Burgaw 

Perquimans C. P. Morris Hertford 

Person R. B. Dawes Roxboro 

Pitt John G. Clark Greenville 

Polk C. P. Rogers Tryon 

Randolph Waldo C. Cheek Asheboro 

Richmond Clyde H. Causey Rockingham 

Robeson E. M. Johnson Lumberton 

Rockingham Dr. G. P. Dillard Draper 

Rowan Walter H. Woodson, Jr Salisbury 

Rutherford A. Myles Haynes Forest City 

Sampson Stewart B. Warren Clinton 

Scotland Dr. J. G. Pate Gibson 

Stanly Crayon C. Efird Albemarle 

Stokes R. J. Scott Danbury 

Surry John Lewellyn Dobson 

Swain I. B. Jenkins Bryson City 

Transylvania W. A. Wilson Brevard 

Tyrrell A. L. Walker Columbia 

Union J. Emmett Griffin Monroe 

Vance Irvine B. Watkins Henderson 

Wake J. W. Bunn Lawyers Bldg., Raleigh 

Warren John Kerr, Jr Warrenton 

Washington H. H. Allen ...» Plymouth 

Watauga W. R. Winkler Boone 

Wayne J. T. Flythe Mt. Olive 

Wilkes C. Watson Brame North Wilkesboro 

Wilson R. B. Tapp Stantonsburg 

Yadkin C. E. Hartman Yadkinville 

Yancey C. P. Randolph Burnsville 



NORTH CAROLINA REPUBLICAN STATE 
PLATFORM 1948 



Issued by 

NORTH CAROLINA REPUBLICAN STATE COMMITTEE 
Lexington, North Carolina 

Tlie Republicans of North Carolina, in Convention assembled, 
reaiRrm our allegiance to the principles of our party and rededi- 
cate it to the service of our State and our Nation. We submit to 
the people the following declaration of its principles and objectives. 

National Affairs 

America stands at the threshold of Peace. We have conquered 
a powerful combination of enemies that challenged the principles 
upon which this Republic was founded. We have engaged in a 
great struggle to preserve our liberty and independence, our right 
of representative self-government, and our American way of life. 
We have tested and proved our right to enjoy the heritage of 
freedom that our forefathers won for us. 

For three and one-half long, fearful and weary years all our 
efforts were set on victory. Now, victory has come! Does it mark 
the end of a war that ends all wars, or a few years hence will 
fighting once more stop and victory come to us — or to others? 
The answer depends on what we do with our victory. The war 
settled nothing, except our present superiority in men, morale, and 
material. The war did not destroy the greed, remove the misun- 
derstandings and right the wrongs which helped to bring on the 
war. Our military victory and the unconditional surrender of our 
enemies have given us the opportunity and responsibility to make 
the peace, that is, the chance to remove the causes of war, which 
unless corrected will undoubtedly produce other wars in the years 
to come — whenever the Nations have caught their breath, replen- 
ished their arms, and marshalled their youth for the slaughter. 

This generation has expended in this war national resources to 
which our descendants were justly entitled. Our generation has 
incurred a national debt that will require the labor and substance 

172 



Republican Platform 173 

of many succeeding generations to pay. If we wage war for which 
our children must pay, then we must see to it that foundations are 
built upon which they may live in peace. They must not fall heir 
to both our debts and our feuds. 

In this time of world crises America is without a foreign policy. 
Yet America stands today as the most powerful and potentially 
influential Nation in the world. We must rise to our responsibility 
as a world leader. We must fulfill our promises of freedom to the 
liberated Nations of the world. We must assert our belief in de- 
mocracy and the freedom and dignity of the individual. We must 
exert the moral forces of this Nation to create conditions in the 
world which will breed goodwill and peace, not hatred and war. 
We must accord the small and weak Nations the same measure of 
justice which we seek for ourselves. We must merit by our actions 
the respect of the world instead of attempting to buy good-will 
with our goods and our money. 

We demand a firm and positive foreign policy based upon justice, 
morality and freedom for all the world. We demand a unified 
foreign policy so that our efforts may be as united in the pursuit 
of peace as they are in the prosecution of war. We demand that 
the American people be given full information concerning our 
treaties and commitments to all Nations. 

And finally, we endorse the principles of the United Nations 
Organization. We urge that it develop effective means to prevent 
war by formulating just international laws, mobilizing world 
opinion, and exerting moral pressure, and that it repel all military 
aggressions by the use of force if necessary, in order that the 
Nations of the world may learn to live under law as do the peoples 
of those Nations. 

In order that this war may not have been in vain, America 
must secure and preserve the fruits of victory at home as well 
as abroad. 

We urge the following reforms to the end that democracy, free 
enterprise, and the rights of men may be re-established in America. 

We urge speedy reconversion and full production of consumer 
goods as the greatest need of our national Economy. Only by all- 
out production can America expect to furnish full employment, 
increase our wages and standard of living, retire our national debt, 



174 North Carolina Manual 

support the social services, and maintain the machinery of gov- 
ernment. Adequate production will eliminate all necessity for price 
controls and the threat of greater inflation. 

We deplore the open warfare existing between labor and indus- 
try in America. Since the war has ended great strikes have caused 
incalculable loss of wages and profits and deprived the people of 
needed goods and essential services. We demand equal protection 
under law for both labor and industry and special privileges to 
neither. We demand that the government, representing all the 
people, enforce the law with equal justice to all. We hold that 
both labor and industry have basic rights which are secure only 
in a system of free men and free enterprise. We favor labor's 
rights of free organization, collective bargaining, and fair stand- 
ards of employment. We favor the rights of industry to a fair 
profit conductive to risk and expansion. We demand that labor and 
industry accept responsibility to the people commensurate with 
these rights. 

A free, prosperous and bountiful agriculture is essential to na- 
tional well being. Agriculture must be freed of confusing regu- 
lations and impracticable controls that restrict production. The 
farmer should receive for his products a price that includes a 
profit. We condemn the present policy of this administration which 
holds down the price of all the farmer sells and increases the cost 
of all he buys, thus crushing the farmer between the upper and 
lower mill stones. 

We demand that the administration immediately abolish all 
Federal Departments created for the war emergency, and curtail 
the vast system of peace time bureaus and commissions whose 
functions are no longer necessary or desirable, and the mainte- 
nance of which imposese tremendous expense upon the people. 

There are now SVz million civilian employees of the Federal 
Government. They represent one job-holder for every 40 persons 
in America, and the number is being increased daily since the 
war ended. This condition was never necessary; it is now intol- 
erable. We demand that the number of civilian employees be 
greatly reduced. 

America has the greatest national debt of any country in his- 
tory. In order to maintain our national solvency we must immedi- 



Republican Platform 175 

ately balance the budget by the drastic reduction of government 
expenditures. 

We are opposed to giving help in money or goods to any Nation 
which fails to show a consistent desire to cooperate in building and 
maintaining world peace. 

For the past 14 years the New Deal has steadily undermined 
American traditions and institutions. It has fostered the alien 
doctrine that government must be the master of the people. It has 
created a vast system of bureaus and commissions as new instru- 
ments of public power which have provided shackles for the liber- 
ties of the people. It has taken from the people the right of local 
self-government and concentrated power in the hands of political 
puppets of an economic autocracy. The concentration of personal 
power in the hands of one man or group of men which has been 
accomplished during recent years is destructive of democracy. We, 
therefore, favor the submissions of an amendment to the Federal 
Constitution limiting presidential tenure to one term of six years, 
without the right of succession, and that retiring Presidents shall 
become members-at-large for life of the United States Senate with 
all the privileges and emoluments of that office. 

In short, we demand a recurrence to fundamental principles of 
American democracy. Unless we renew the teachings and prac- 
tices of democracy ourselves, we can not hope to persuade other 
Nations to accept our faith. 

The Republican party pledges to the people a rebirth of Ameri- 
can liberty, individual initiative, and free enterprise, that Amer- 
ica may be strong and sound within, and continue to be the light 
and hope of the freedom loving people of the world. 

State Affairs 

For forty-eight years the Democratic Party has held complete 
control of the government of North Carolina. It has sought and 
assumed entire responsibility for the social, educational, physical, 
and moral welfare of the people of this State. Where do we stand 
among the 48 States after these many years of control and man- 
agement by Democratic Politicians? Let us take stock. 

In the matter of health North Carolina ranks 42nd among the 
States in the number of hospital beds per 1,000 population. We 
have thirty-four counties with no hospital facilities, and 82 coun- 



176 



State Sen 




al Districts 



177 




178 North Carolina Manual 

ties with inadequate hospital facilities. Our State ranks 45th in 
the number of Doctors. And North Carolina holds the appalling 
record of having led the Nation in the percentage of our men re- 
jected as physically unfit for military service. One-half of the 
whites and 70 per cent of the negroes having been rejected. 

A generation ago the Democratic machine entered an unholy 
alliance with the enemies of public education to retard the develop- 
ment of State Institutions of higher learning. Since that time it 
has shown an indifference to educational advancement in North 
Carolina. The Democratic Party resisted for 30 years our demand 
for "a general and uniform system of public schools" supported 
by the State. As a result, in matters of education North Carolina 
ranks 40th among the States. 

Insane persons, orphans, and delinquents are the wards of a 
Christian state. The Democratic Party has grossly neglected the 
care and maintenance of these unfortunate persons, and has failed 
to provide for them adequate facilities and sufficient competent 
personnel. 

The Democratic machine of Noi-th Carolina has shown con- 
tempt for moral principles by imposing upon the people of this 
State an unjust and iniquitous election law consciously designed 
to encourage fraudulent and corrupt practices in order that the 
will of the machine might always prevail and the citizen deprived 
of the greatest privileges of democracy — a free voice in his gov- 
ernment. Recent election scandals and thievery have been shielded 
by the Democratic machine. The Democratic Party has also denied 
the people of this State the democratic right of a state-wide refer- 
endum upon the manufacture and sale of intoxicating liquors. 

The Republican Party of North Carolina, if permitted to serve 
the people, pledges to effect the following reforms: 

Eliminate all useless departments of State governments and 
consolidate all over-lapping functions. 

Reduce the number of State employees to the bare essentials 
of efficient administration. 

The Democratic machine procured the passage of the Sales Tax 
as an emergency measure in 1933, and promised its early repeal. 
The time for its repeal is now long over-due. The Republican 
Party is opposed to the sales tax in principle and practice. We 
advocate its out-right repeal. 



Republican Platform 179 

Lower income and property taxes on the individual so as to 
raise no more than necessary to maintain an economical govei'n- 
ment, and to discharge the responsibilities of an enlightened State. 

Revise the capital and corporate tax rates so as to remove our 
present disadvantage in competing with other States and so that 
North Carolina may encourage the expansion of old and the 
establishment of new industries. 

Increase exemption for income tax to $2,500.00 for married 
persons, with an additional $400 for each dependent. Give full de- 
duction for hospital and doctor bills, and a deduction up to $500 
a year for the educational expenses of each dependent over 18 
years of age. 

Provide adequate facilities for training more doctors, State aid 
for building and maintaining rural hospitals, create public health 
centers where necessary, promote preventive medicine, and en- 
courage better health training in schools. These things protect 
the mother and infant at child birth, reduce infant mortality, pro- 
duce stronger minds and bodies during a longer life, and thus pro- 
mote the welfare of the State and all its citizens. 

State construction and maintenance of public school buildings, 
allocating the money in accordance with population, in order to 
fully provide the general system of public schools required by the 
Constitution of North Carolina. 

Provide better teaching personnel in the schools and a substan- 
tial increase in teachers' pay, based upon ability and experience 
under the supervision of a non-partisan merit system. 

We advocate that disability benefits under the Workmen's Com- 
pensation Act be increased commensurate with the advance in cost 
of living. 

We condemn the operation of unsound school buses on unsafe 
roads by inexperienced drivers. 

Provide adequate facilities and competent care for the insane, 
orphans, and delinquents. 

Place the construction, improvement and maintenance of farm 
to market roads first in our State Highway System, with adequate 
expansion and maintenance of our primary Highways. 

An honest and uniform election law applying to primaries and 
general elections alike; out-right repeal of the absentee ballot, 
except for citizens in the armed forces, and a bi-partisan State 



180 North Carolina Manual 

Board of Elections required to investigate and prosecute all viola- 
tions of the election law. 

The rank and file of the Republican party believe in sobriety and 
temperance, as well as democratic processes. We oppose the man- 
ufacture and sale of intoxicating liquors in this State unless a 
majority of the people shall approve in a state-wide referendum. 

We realize and accept our obligations to the veterans of all 
wars. It is the determined policy of the Republican Party that 
the needs of our service men and women shall be fully recognized 
by the State. Veterans services are now inadequate. Such services 
should be extended to every county and to the larger cities so that 
they may be available to the veterans at all times. The National 
government must be ever mindful of the disabled veteran, and the 
orphans and widows of those who gave their life for their coun- 
try, that they shall have adequate aid to maintain proper stand- 
ards of living. 

The American People are demanding at this hour that the gov- 
ernment of foreign countries recognize their minority parties and 
give them representation in their government in accordance with 
the American concept of democracy. The Republican Party sug- 
gests that we practice in our State the democracy which we so 
fervently preach. We demand a non-partisan Judiciary in North 
Carolina, and that Superior Court Judges be elected by the voters 
of their respective judicial districts, and that the minority party 
be accorded representation on the Supreme Court, the School and 
Highway Commissions, and all other departments of government 
proportionate to its vote. 

These are our pledges to the people of this State. These are 
some of our hopes and aspirations for North Carolina. Let us 
view these things not as Republicans or Democrats, but as Ameri- 
cans and as North Carolinians. Let us vote our convictions. Let 
us rise above party labels. 

We invite all citizens of every party and political creed to join 
hands with us in this declaration of principles and profession of 
faith in the ultimate triumph of good government for the people 
of North Carolina and of America. 



PLAN OF ORGANIZATION OF THE REPUBLICAN 
PARTY OF NORTH CAROLINA 

Adopted in Convention, April 10, 1946, at Winston-Salem 

ARTICLE I 

The Precinct as a Unit 

The unit of party action shall be the election precinct. In every 
precinct in each general election year there shall be selected in 
mass-meeting in every precinct in the state a Precinct Committee 
of five or more voters, one of whom shall be designated as Chair- 
man, one as Vice-Chairman, who shall be a woman, and one as 
Secretary. The members and officers of the precinct committee 
shall hold their places for two years from the date of election, 
and until their successors are chosen. The chaii'man of the County 
Committee shall designate the time and place of holding precinct 
meetings after ten days notice thereof. Precinct Meetings shall 
elect one delegate and one alternate to the County Convention for 
each fifty votes or fraction thereof cast for the Republican candi- 
date for Governor at the last election. Other Precinct Meetings 
may be called and held at such times and places as will be desig- 
nated by the chairman of the Precinct Committee, after first giv- 
ing ten days' notice of such meeting. In the event any Chairman of 
any Precinct fails to act, then the Chairman of the County Com- 
mittee shall appoint some one in his or her place. 

ARTICLE II 
County Conventions and County Committees 

1. A County Convention shall be called in each general election 
year by the Chairman of the County Committee, who shall desig- 
nate the time and place for holding same, after giving ten days' 
notice thereof, and the delegates and alternates elected at the 
precinct meetings, shall sit as delegates and alternates in the 
County Convention. The County Convention shall choose a Chair- 
man, and a Vice-Chairman, who shall be a woman, and other of- 
ficers, all of whom shall be qualified voters in the county. A 



181 



182 North Carolina Manual 

County Committee of five or more voters shall be chosen in such 
County Convention, who shall hold their places for a term of two 
years, and until their successors are elected. Nominations may 
be made by the precinct meetings for membership upon the County 
Committee. Such biennial County Convention shall elect one dele- 
gate and one alternate to the State and all District Conventions, 
for every two hundred votes, or fraction thereof, cast for the Re- 
publican nominee for Governor at the latest election in said 
county. 

2. That if one-third of the members of the County Committee 
shall desire a meeting of the County Committee, it shall be the 
duty of the Chairman of the County Committee to call said meet- 
ing; and if said Chairman shall fail or refuse to call said meeting 
upon petition of one-third of the members, then one-third of the 
members may call the meeting of the County Committee by giving 
to the Chairman and Secretary and the members of the County 
Committee at least five days' notice. 

3. For good cause shown, any Chairman, Vice-Chairman, Sec- 
retary, or member of the County Committee may be removed from 
his or her position upon a vote of two-thirds of the members of 
the County Committee but said cause for removal shall be confined 
to inefficiency and party disloyalty. Upon such removal the County 
Committee shall have the authority to fill the unexpii'ed term. 

ARTICLE III 

Congressional, Judicial, and Senatorial Committees 
1. The Republican Congressional, Judicial, and Senatorial Dis- 
trict Committees shall be composed of the Chairman of the several 
County Committees within the district, and the permanent Chair- 
man and the Secretary of said District Convention. The aforesaid 
Congressional, Judicial, and State Senatorial Conventions shall 
be called by the permanent chairman of the Convention upon ten 
days' notice of the time and place for holding same. Upon the 
failure for any reason of the Congressional District Chairman in 
any case to call a Congressional Convention, the said call may be 
issued by the Secretary of the Congressional District in any case 
to call a Congressional Convention, the said may be issued by the 
Secretary of the Congressional District Committee. 



Plan of Organization 183 

ARTICLE IV 
State Convention 

1. A State convention shall be called in every general election 
year by the Chairman of the Republican State Committee after 
twenty days' notice therof, to all members of the State Committee 
and all Chairmen of the several County Committees of the time 
and place of holding the same. The State Convention biennially 
shall choose and elect a State Chairman and a State Vice-Chair- 
man, one of vifhom shall be a woman. (Two assistant Chairmen of 
the State Committee shall be appointed by the State Chairman 
with such duties as may be delegated by the Chairman. They shall 
serve at the pleasure of the State Chairman, and be responsible 
directly to him.) The State Convention each year of a Presidential 
election shall recommend to the National Republican Committee 
for a term of four years the name of two persons, a man, and a 
woman, for National Committeeman and National Committee- 
woman, respectively. Vacancies in the Office of State Chairman 
and State Vice-Chairman shall be filled by the State Committee 
until the next State Convention, which shall elect successors to 
fill the unexpired terms. In the event of vacancy in National Com- 
mitteeman or National Committeewoman, the State Committee 
shall make recommendations to the National Committee for the 
appointment of successors to fill the unexpired terms. 

ARTICLE V 

1. The Republican State Committee shall be composed of four 
members from each Congressional District casting^ ten thousand 
votes or a greater fractional part thereof for the Republican Can- 
didate for Governor at the latest preceding election, and one ad- 
ditional member from each Congressional District for every Con- 
gressional District for the Republican candidate for Governor at 
the latest preceding election. The Members of the State Com- 
mittee in each Congressional District shall be greater elected for 
a term of two years, or until successors are elected and qualified, 
by the Delegates to the Congressional Convention of the respective 
Districts. Vacancies occurring in representation from any Con- 
gressional District shall be filled by a vote of the majority of the 
remaining members residing- in the District in whi<;h svich vacancy 
may occur. 



184 North Carolina Manual 

2. The State Chairman, the State Vice-Chairman, two Assist- 
ant Chairmen, the National Committeeman, the National Com- 
mitteewoman, and the permanent Chairman and Secretary of the 
preceding- State Convention shall be members of the State Com- 
mittee ex-officio. 

3. The State Committee shall have the power to elect a Sec- 
retary and an Assistant Secretary, one of whom shall come from 
the Youno- Republicans, a Treasurer, and other Officers which may 
appear necesary, who shall sei've for a term of two years and 
until their successors are chosen. 

4. The State Committee shall meet annually upon the call of 
the Chairman and Secretary, or upon the failure of the Chairman, 
upon the call of the Vice-Chairman and Secretary, on or about 
the anniversary of the birth of Abraham Lincoln, which meeting 
shall be followed by an annual statewide Lincoln Day Dinner, to 
be held under the auspices of the Republican State Committee, and 
the Youno- Republicans of North Carolina. 

5. There shall be a Republican State Central Committee, com- 
posed of the State Chairman, Secretary, Treasurer and State Vice- 
Chairman, two Assistant Chairmen, the National Committeeman, 
the National Committeewoman, all of whom shall be members ex- 
officio of the Republican State Central Committee, and seven other 
members to be appointed by the Chairman to serve for a term of 
two years. The State Central Committee shall meet upon the call 
of the Chairman, and shall have active Management of the State 
Campaigns, with power to appoint a Finance Committee, a pub- 
licity Committee, a Campaign Committee, and such other Com- 
mittees as it may be necessary in the proper conduct of the affairs 
of the Party, and to do all other things pertaining to Party af- 
fairs, which it may be authorized to do from time to time by the 
Republican State Convention in session; and the State Central 
Committee shall report its proceedings to the full State Com- 
mittee at each sesion. 

6. A member or members of the State Committee from a ma- 
jority of the counties shall constitute a quorum of the State Com- 
mittee for the transaction of business. 

7. There shall be a liberal representation of women wherever 
practicable, in all the meetings and activities of the Republican 
Party, 



State Committees, Republican 185 

ARTICLE VI 
1. No delegate, alternate or other member of a Convention shall 
cast any vote by proxy, provided, however, that any delegate or 
delegates present shall have the right to cast the entire vote for 
the precinct in County Conventions; and of the County in State 
and District Convention. 

ARTICLE VII 

Convention Procedure 

1. The State, District, and County Conventions shall be called 
to order by their respective Chairman, or in the absence of the 
Chairman, by the Vice-Chairman, Secretary, or some member 
thereof, in order stated, who shall have the power to appoint and 
receive the reports of Credentials Committee, to appoint other 
temporary and necessary committees, at or before the convening 
of the Convention, and to form a permanent organization. 

2. The certificate of the Chairman and Secretary of any Con- 
vention authorized to elect delegates and alternates shall be deemed 
sufficient to place the name of such delegate and alternate on the 
temporary roll of the respective Conventions, and unless success- 
fully challenged, shall be a complete authorization to said delegates 
and alternates to act. 

ARTICLE VIII 

Records, Reports, and Accounts 
1. The Chairman, Secretary, and Treasurer of the State, Dis- 
trict, and County Committees shall keep faithful and accurate 
records of any and all monies received by them for the use of 
said committees, and shall make faithful and accurate report 
thereof when so requested. 

This revised and amended Plan of Organization of the Repub- 
lican Party of North Carolina adopted by the State Republican 
Convention assembled at Winston-Salem, North Carolina, April 
10th, 1946. 



186 North Carolina Manual 

COMMITTEES OF THE STATE REPUBLICAN PARTY 

(From list furnished by Chairman, State Republican Executive 

Committee) 

State Republican Executive Committee 

state organization 

Chairman : Sim A. DeLapp Lexington 

Vice Chairman : Mrs. Walter Zachary Yadkinville 

Vice Chairman, Eastern District: A. L. Butler Clinton 

Vice Chairman, Western District: J. M. Baley, Jr Marshall 

Secretary : F. J. Beal Lenoir 

Treasurer: C. C. Wall .'.'.'.'.■.■.■.■.■.■.■.■ Lexington 

National Committeeman : J. E. Broyhill Lenoir 

National Committeewoman : Mrs. W. P. Few Durham 

First District 

C. T. Allen, Aurora Roy Manning. Plymouth 

Adrain Mitchell, Winton Floyd Cahoon, Columbia 

Second District 

Thomas J. Moore, Wilson J. R. Cameron, Kinston, RFD 

Mrs. Margaret Reynolds, Roanoke Rapids J. H. Satterthwait, Tarboro 

Third District 

Clarence Fisher, Clinton A. L. Butler, Clinton 

Julian T. Gaskill, Goldsboro 

Fourth District 

Samuel J. Morris, Raleigh J. C. Dixon, Siler City 

Ezra Parker, Benson A. I. Ferree, Asheboro 

W. L. Ward, Asheboro 

Fifth Di.strict 

E. S. Redman, Mt. Airy, Rl S. J. Craver, Winston-Salem 

H. L. Fagge, Leaksville W. Y. Tucker, Winston-Salem, R6 

E. R. Nelson, Danbury S. R. Allred, Burlington, R2 

Sixth District 

Worth D. Henderson, Greensboro Z. H. Howerton. Greensboro 

Walter L. York, High Point T. C. Carter, Mebane 

P. M. Caudle, High Point Linwood Hall, Burlington 

N. D. McNairy, Greensboro Andrew H. Hutchins, Durham, R4 

John Crawford, Chapel Hill E. B. Cranford, Durham 

D. L. McBane, Mebane, Rt. 2 

Seventh District 

J. A. Maultsby, Whiteville Thad H. Pope, Dunn 

D. R. Johnson, Winnabow H. Edmund Rodgers, Wilmington 

Eighth District 

P. E. Brown, N. Wilkesboro J. G. Hudson, Rockingham 

W. B. Somers, N. Wilkesboro Coy S. Lewis, Robbins 

W. E. Rutledge, Yadkinville J. T. Jackson, Lexington 

J. B. Payne, Winston-Salem, R5 R. V. Alexander, Cooleemee 

Dr. A. D. Barber, Sanford 



Plan of Organization 187 

Ninth District 

Ray Jennings. Taylursville G. C. Peeler, Salisbury 

Walter Johnson, Sparta Ellis Honeycutt, Albemarle, Rl 

Edison E. Thomas, Grassy Creek J. J. Morton, Albemarle 

O. O. Cruse, Concord, R3 Russell D. Hodges, Boone 

Monroe, Adams, Statesville James Hickman, Hudson 

Tenth District 

C. S. Nantz, Lincolnton Frank C. Patton, Morganton 
Loomis Klutz, Newton Mrs. Louis G. Rogers, Charlotte 

D. T. Nance, Plumtree J. Don Street, Buladean 

Wm. T. Alexander, Charlotte 

Eleventh District 

R. C. Erskine, Tryon Clyds M. Roberts, Marshall 

J. S. Dockery, Rutherfordton Walter R. Chambers, Marion 

J. J. Nowicki, Burnsville E. R. Tweed, Marshall 

G. V. Hawkins, Shelby Thomas A. Hannah, Mt. Holly 

Twelfth District 

Hugh E. Monteith, Sylva Theodore Jenkins, Robinsville 

Lewis P. Hamlin, Brevard Robert N. Tiger, Hayesville 

M. F. Lominac, Asheville Alf R. Higdon, Franklin 

Clyde Jarrett, Andrews Glenn E. Boyd, Waynesville, R2 



188 



North Carolina Manual 



State Republican, Congressional, Judicial and Senatorial 

District Committees 

The work of the State Republican Congressional, Judical and 
Senatorial Executive Committees is handled by the Chairmen of 
the Republican County Executive Committees. 

Chairmen, Republican County Executive Committees 

1948 



Alamance — Sam T. Johnston, Graham. 
Alexander — Fred Johnson, Taylorsville, 

R2. 
Alleghany — Beale Poole, Sparta. 
Anson — C. A. Bland, Wadesboro. 
Ashe — James F. Yates, Warrensville. 
Avery— R. M. Fields, Elk Park 
Beaufort — Zeno Ratcliff, Pantego 
Brunswick — W. A. Kapp, Bolivia 
Bertie — D. H. Greene, Aulander 
Bladen — C. C. Atkinson, Elizabethtown. 
Buncombe — B. H. Taylor, Asheville 
Burke — R. M. Lineberger, Morganton 
Cabarrus — O. O. Cruse, Concord, R3. 
Caldwell— E. C. McCall, Lenoir 
Camden — J. B. Burgess, Old Trap 
Carteret— C. R. Wheatly, Beaufort. 
Caswell — M. F. Law, Pelham 
Catawba — Hayden Hayes, Hickory 
Chatham — J. C. Dixon, Bennett 
Cherokee — D. M. Reese, Murphy 
Chowan — A. S. Smith, Edenton 
Clay — Rual White, Hayesville 
Cleveland— J. Worth Silvers, Shelby 
Columbus — Dr. L. Baggett. Whiteville. 
Craven — W. B. Rouse, New Bern 
Cumberland — Cecil C. Culbreth, Sted- 

man 
Currituck — J. T. Etheridge, Shawboro. 
Dare — W. C. Gaskill, Manteo. 
Davidson — W. G. Morris, Lexington 
Davie — E. C. Morris, Mocksville 
Duplin — H. B. Kornegay, Calypso 
Durham — E. P. Cranford, Durham 
Edgecombe — J. H. Satterthwaite, Tar- 

boro, Rl. 
Forsyth — Buford T. Henderson, Wins- 
ton-Salem. 
Franklin — W. R. Young, Louisburg. 
Gaston — Kelly Bumgardner, Mt. Holly. 
Gates — H. A. Eure, Corapeake. 
Graham — Frank W. Colvard, Robbins- 

ville. 
Granville — W. L. Peace, Oxford. 
Greene — Roland E. Jones, Snow Hill. 
Guilford — N. D. McNairy, Greensboro. 
Harnett— J. 0. West, Dunn. 



Haywood — J. B. McClure, Canton 

Henderson — Lee Staton, Flat Rock, 
RFD. 

Hertford— A. S. Mitchell, Winton. 

Hoke — M. L. Sides, Aberdeen, Rl. 

Hyde — Edsac Bridgman, Scranton. 

Halifax — Otis J. Reynolds, Roanoke 
Rapids. 

Iredell— A. Z. Goforth, Statesville. 

Jackson — David S. Stillwell, Sylva. 

Johnston — E. A. Parker, Benson. 

Jones — 

Lee— C. R. Hall, Sanford. 

Lenoir — Ray Cameron, Kinston, Rl. 

Lincoln — Hewitt Quinn, Lincolnton. 

Macon — George Reece, Franklin. 

Madison — E. R. Tweed, Sr., Marshall. 

Martin — Wheeler Martin, Williamston. 

McDowell — Clarence M. Pool, Marion, 
R2. 

Mecklenburg — Ernest M. Morgan, 
Charlotte. 

Mitchell — John C. McBee, Spruce Pine. 

Montgomery — Elton Tucker, Troy. 

Moore — A. H. Trotter, Robbins. 

Nash — John C. Matthews. Spring Hope. 

New Hanover — James B. Swails, Wil- 
mington. 

Northampton — W. F. Outland, Wood- 
land. 

Onslow — Albert N. Venters, Jackson- 
ville. 

Orange- George N. Harward, Chapel 
Hill, RFD. 

Pamlico — N. C. Rice, Arapahoe. 

Pasquotank — M. N. Toxey, Elizabeth 
City. 

Pender -E. C. Highsmith, Rocky Point. 

Perquimans — T. C. Babb, Hertford. 

Person — Wallace Wright, Roxboro. 

Pitt- 
Polk— Hugh M. Thompson, Saluda. 

Randolph — Lacy Lewis, Sr., Asheboro. 

Richmond — B. A. Cox, Ellerbe. 

Robeson — Fred R. Keith, St. Pauls. 

Rockingham — J. Banner Shelton, May- 
odan. 



State Committees, Republican 



189 



Rowan — D. A. Rendleman, Salisbury. 
Rutherford —J. E. McFarland, Ruther- 
fordton. 

Sampson — Clarence Fisher, Clinton. 

Scotland — Mrs. R. M. Bundy, Laurel 
Hill. 

Stokes— Odell T. Neal, King. 

Stanly — Henry N. Thompson, New Lon- 
don. 

Surry — A. F. Dobson, Dobson. 

Swain — Jack Hicks, Bryson City. 

Transylvania — Ralph Fisher, Brevard. 



Tyrell — W. E. Bateman, Columbia. 
Union — J. H. Mills, Monroe. 
Vance — Walter Finch, Kittrell. 
Wake — Chesley S. Smith, Raleigh. 
Warren — W. B. White, Norlina. 
Washington — E. A. Harrison, Ply- 
mouth. 
Watauga — I. B. Wilson, Boone. 
Wayne— R. E. Cox, Goldsboro, R4. 
Wilkes— N. B. Smithey, N. Wilkesboro. 
Wilson — Thos. J. Moore, Wilson. 
Yadkin — Walter Zachary, Yadkinville. 
Yancey — E. T. Moody, Burnsville. 



PART IV 
ELECTION RETURNS 



ELECTION RETURNS— 1948 
Popular and Electoral Vote for President by States 





Popular Vote 


Electoral Vote 


State 


Truman 
Demo- 
crat 


Dewey 
Repub- 
lican 


Wallace 

Pro- 
gressive 


Thurmond 
States 
Rights 


Truman 
Demo- 
crat 


Dewey 
Repub- 
lican 


Thurmond 

States 
Rights 


Alabama _ _ 




40.930 


1,522 

3.310 

751 

190.381 

6,115 

13,713 
1 050 

11,683 
1,636 
4,972 


171,443 

"40^068" 
1,228 






11 


Arizona. .- . 


95.251 


77 

50 

1,895 

239 

437 

69 
194 

76 
101 
1,961 
821 
494 
423 
341 

72 
150 
294 
909 
993 
483 
5 
655 

94 
264 

29 
121 
981 

80 

2,828 

258 

114 

1,445 

268 

258 

1,902 

134 

5 

129 

202 

282 

124 

75 
173 
376 
316 
590 

47 


597 
959 
269 
714 
754 
588 
347 
691 
514 
103 
079 
018 
039 
210 
657 
234 
814 
370 
027 
617 
043 
039 
677 
774 
357 
299 
124 
303 
764 
572 
592 
684 
817 
216 
197 
892 
386 
651 
914 
240 
402 
926 
093 
277 
251 
959 
q47 


4 
9 

25 
6 






Arkansas. . __ 


149 

1.913 
267 
423 
67 
282 
254 
107 

1,994 
807 
522 
351 
466 
136 
111 
286 

1,151 
958 
692 
19 
917 
116 
224 
31 
107 
895 
105 

2,781 

459 

96 

1.452 
452 
238 

1,752 

188 

34 

117 

270 

750 

149 

45 

202 

462 

429 

647 

52 


659 
134 
288 
297 
813 
328 
646 
370 
715 
833 
380 
902 
756 
344 
916 
521 
788 
595 
966 
384 
315 
769 
165 
291 
995 
455 
464 
599 
070 
323 
791 
7S2 
861 
426 
619 
423 
567 
402 
700 
151 
557 
808 
781 
188 
310 
s.i;4 






( 'alifornia . 






('Olorado 






Connecticut _ . . 




8 
3 




Delaware . 








Florida^. _ 


89,880 
85,055 


8 

12 

4 

28 




Georgia . . . . . 












Illinois 






Indiana.. . _ _ 


9,649 

12,125 

4,603 

1,567 

3,035 

1,884 

9,983 

38,157 

38,955 

27,866 

225 

3,998 

6,641 




13 




Iowa. „ __ 




10 






8 




Kentucky 


10.411 
204.290 


11 




Louisiana. 




10 


Maine __ _ . . 




5 

8 




Maryland . 


2.476 


..-.._-.._ 




Massachusetts.- _ 




Michigan 




19 






"167^538" 
42 


11 




Mississippi 




9 




15 
4 






Montana 








6 




Nevada 


1,469 
1,970 

42.683 

1.037 

.501.167 

3.915 

8.220 

37,596 


_. 


3 




New Hampshire 

New Jersey 


4 
16 








4 




New York 


47 






69,652 
379 


14 
10 






4 




Ohio 




Okl^Vinmfi 






Oregon 

Pennsylvania 


14,661 

55,161 
2,587 
154 
2,801 
1,861 
3,764 
2.679 
1,279 
1,863 

29,745 
3,311 

25,282 
931 




6 
35 




46 
"102^607" 


..... 






South Carolina 




8 






4 






73,815 
106,909 


12 

23 

4 










Utah 










3 




Virginia 

Washington 

West Virginia 


42,840 


11 
8 
8 

12 
3 




















Wyoming 


















Totals... 


24,045,052 


21,896,927 


1,137,957 


1,168,687 


304 


189 


38 



193 



194 



North Carolina Manual 



OS 



o 
as 



5D 

CO 



C<1 



Eh 

<: 
n 

Q 

CO 

O 
XfX 

w 

H 
O 
> 

o 

Ph 



o 


Dewey 
Republican 


•^ 00 i« O CO 
lO(M lO CFl C^ 


CI t^ lO CO r^ 

Ir^ -* 1-H O CO 
lO t^ d »o i— ' 


"Tj" T-i I -. CO CO 
-H o; CD Ol -rf 
CO OOCl O Tji 


o '* cr^o CO 

>0 CO T to C) 

f- -rf Ol CO -"3^ 


CO C3 to CO O 
*-H 'rt- t-- to 00 

'^ r^ ■^ ^ CO 


'^J- :r; CO <M GO 

•<tl lO «D l-H CO 


O CO CO CO o 
cr^ lO '^ lO O 

CO i-H w 


Oi iftt r^ cq CI 

CO t- -^ -^ o; 

CR 00 »0 -* CO 


I- to CI ^ 'rr' 

CO to Oi C) oo 
^ CI 05 


r^ CO '-H CO OS 
Cq CD as CI 

to r^ CO 


1 t 

to r-! 
O S 

o o 


CO CO lO Tj^ 1— 1 
■^ (M CO CO CO 
Oi O O lO CO 


CO CO r^ r--. c:. 

-<*' CO t-^ '00 c:> 
--H ^ CO ^ CO 


C; CO CD GO '35 
t- O I- lO CO 
'•S' '^ CO rp to 


■<t< 1— < O CO 05 

CO CO Oi cr- oj 
»o CO 'Tf ci oo 


•^ to t^ CO CO 
CO^ >OlO -rt< 
CO tO CO to CI 


cc o QC 00 -<r 

Oi CC -^ CC' CO 
^ ^ Oi c^ 


in OC' Oi C/!) r-- 
CO CO CO CO O 
'rf CO ct ^ 


o ^ c:; r- c^i 
t--. oo c; GO t^ 

o r^ 'Tj' o -rr 


2S1 

140 

315 

1.035 

1,106 


OS OO t- O CO 

'OC to O ^ CO 

to i-i OO' .-' ca 


Popular Vote, 
1940 


Willkie 
Republican 


1-H Oi-H -^ OO 


Oi O CO O CO 
^ 'Tf »0 CD lO 

c/:)'^ ^ CO »o 


O CO o a- f 

-*- CO t- CO 00 
CI -rf CO ^ CO 


CD ^ -^ o r- 

Tf to CO O 1— ' 
'I** cs to t-- Cl 


'«*' Tt- cr. a; — 
r- CO O t- O 
Cl COO tOC3 


C^ TJ- (M ■^ OD 

Tji ic -* lO ir- 

CO fM 


CO CD ?l' ^ O 
CO ^ ^ 


t"- OS CI Ol O 
■* CiCO co^ 
O COCD '^ -^ 

CI 


ci CO ci c; Ci 

to CO CO CO CO 

^ ci cr. o 


CO t^'^ OiC^ 

OS r^os»o 

to GO CO 


Roosevelt 
Democrat 


cor^ c^ QC '^ 

CS) CO C^ ^ CO 

r-M co<r>co 


i— t C". Tf -^ CI 
-M C?:> CO Cr- -rf 
CO lO CO •— ' CO 


■^ CO O »C CI 
CO CD O CI CI 

oi O CO. r^ CI 


i-H GO 'O Cq ^ 
to t-- -rj- CI Ci 

[•- T^ to to OC 


CD Ir^ CD GO r- 

c:i CO r-- as r- 

T-H CJ -** CD CD 


o lO oor^ »^ 

to Oi iC t^ CD 
(M ^ GO (M 


r^ -* o »o r^ 

^ r-- »o CD c-i 

'^ CO Cl ^ 


c: -^ OO '<** t^ 

..^ r, r^ CD 1^5 

i-" CO to CO tc 
CI 


Oi CO Tj- CO' CI 

^ lO oor- CO 

CO ^ CO O O 


'cf '00 '00 to CO 
-rf CO to -^ CO 

CO ^ a- ^ CI 


Popular Vote, 
1936 


Landon 
Republican 


GO CO vx '-' r- 

lO coco CO CO 
CO ■<*' O 'Tf (M 


»0 -^ 00C<1 Oi 

■CO i-H Tfi Tt^ a; 

CD O M cr^ '"S^ 


CO O t^ t^ c^ 

C5 t^ t^ CI o 

CO lO c; t^ r^ 


1— CO CO CO CO 
Ol CI CO ■^ CO 
r- GO -rf lO- I— 


r-.lO^ CD^ 

CO CO C5 O CO 
■^ -^ oo CD t^ 


^CO C^ CO ri 
CO CO CO CO 00 


GO Tf GC CO CO 
t^ lO t^ CO CO 
CI 


r^ C-. GO CI CD 
lO CO -^ CO CO 


CD oo ^ GO Ci 

CO CD CO CD Ol 

^ CI t- CO 


to CT) CD -^ 
CO CD CI 


^ o 

o o 

o S 

O o 

PSQ 


iC (M lO CO --H 

Ol C<J CO CO <M 

■^ t-- t^ ooo 


cr. CI t - -rr o 

(M O' ^ CO Dl 
^ t- -H -o o 


C 'Tt* CD O '* 
C:- t* iC CI '«5' 

cr- a: 1^ lO cr. 


■rp CO CI CD '* 

cr. CO ^ ■^ ~- 
X CO CO r- r-- 


i-H CO CO OS ■<*< 
^ ^ •<*' CO to 

COCO o CO -rr 


GO CO CO CO lO 
CO OOtT COCTi 

1— 1 


(M cr- c- »c CO 

CO CD '«»- »C <M 
CO <M C^ ^ 


Cl '^ ^ '^ ^ 

<X' CO CI CO ■<*■ 
CI a: CO Tt^ lO 

c? 


ci CD cr. ci CO 

C; CI XJ rj' ^ 

CI 1-" CO a; o 


G98 
157 

1,111 

156 
347 


rf OS 


c 

§1 


lo ■'J^ t - M' t- 

I- O CO O — 
CD ■^ -^ OS CO 


O CO O CO CI 

csj t- r- CO ^ 

t^ O ^ OO CO 


CD '«*' CO 'OO CO 

lO CO CO ai ^ 

t-- »-. -rt^ -rr t-- 


CO '— ' Tf oi -^ 
to CO CO to Ci 

■oo CO '-' cr:. 'CO 


3S O CO 00 t-- 

to 00 ^ r^r- 

a;^ r^O '-« 


■<jH CO CO r^ as 

CO CO C^^ "^ GO 


t^ 1^- CR c- •— « 

CO ic CD ^ r- 


ci r^ '^ Ci '«*' 

CO r- >-■ -^ era 

-* CO '<*' CO CO 


■00 CD 'Tj' CO as 

■^ CD oo CO CO 


CO to 'tJ^ GO — 
CO CD I^-O 
CO to CI 


> s 

o o 

s a 

O QJ 


O '^ c^i r^ t- 

.-H CO O iO t-- 
C2 C^l CO 1— 1 CO 


<M cr: r-- CO' C5 

CO ^ O ^ t- 
CD CO CO ■-* "* 


'^ -* cr- '^ -^ 
O lO 1— ' o t— 
CO o O Cl to 


c/:: I ^ "rjH CO o 
^ o ^ -* O 
"^ O CO •-< t-^ 


CO 00 CD CO CI 
O CD CD '00 OO 


r- c; Oi ■'T O 

O f- 00 -M »0 

eq .-' CO (M 


^ -"f O '«*< Ci 
CO »0 C3 CO O 
C5 C3 (M r^ 


CQ CI ■Xi'Tf o 
OO CO C". CI GO 
OO 00 »o '^ »o 


OS oo ■* O -— ' 
-rr ci ^ o r^ 

Cl ^ CO GO 00 


O O to t-- OS 
O '^ CI cq to 
CO — O ^ CO 


ii 





Alabama - 

Arizona 

Arkansas 

California. 

Colorado. _ 


Connecticut 

Delaware- _.. 

Florida 

Georgia 

Idaho 


Illinois. - 

Indiana 

Iowa 

Kansas. _ 

Kentucky. _ _ 


Louisiana. 

Maine.. - 

Maryland-- _. 

Massachusetts 

Michigan. 


Minnesota 

Mississippi 

Missouri _. 

Montana 

Nebraska 



Election Returns 



195 



— H CO lO OO I- 

^ -^ cooo-^ 

CO 05 CO CO CO 


»o urs CO Tf lO 

to CO CJi O-l CO 
^ lOC^ '* CO 


CO t-- t- to w 

•<SH OO Tj- CO w 
O -^ to CO CO 


to 1— ' r- CO cji 

<M Ci O-l Tt* 00 
'rt^ CO to C<1 CD 


1 

Ci CI w 

!-< CO '^4 

OO tOC5 


GO 
CI 

CO 

O 

o 
cf 

CI 


<M OCO t^ CO 

1— < as OS 


CO CO (N Ol lO 
CO^ 00^ c^ 
(M ^ lO CO C^ 


toco 'rt< tOOi 

CO o-a coo* 

OD w -H -M 


CJi C5 t— -^ CD 
1-1 w CO 


CI -* -« 

CI r- to 

coco 


coco rt* CiCO 
IM CDt^ QC CO 
CD COOOCOtM 


C5 '^ CO cr>lO 
c: -rf* CO'* CO 

CO '— ' t-^ »0 CO 


Cs CD i— ' —H r— 

r^iOO wo 
"* CO CO t- r- 


tO OOO CO-* 
O 00 CI t— ir^ 

CO O COC) t- 


l^CO C?i 

r^ w w 

t^ Tf Tj* 


to 

o 
to 

ca" 

o 

CD 

to' 

CI 


Oi CS b- '— < -^ 

C<1'^ GOCOO 

1-t Oi CO 

CO 


1-^ O O^ GO 
<M O r- O -* 

»0 ■^ lO -«*" 'M 


O to O CO oo 
'TtH r- ci ciO 

Ci w CO 


w OCO CI o 

CI to to -* oo 

OU w CI '^ 


CI o o 

05 to -* 

CO CO 


05 It- CD lO 00 

(M (M t^ <-i r- 

c<i t-( coco ^ 


CO O COfM lO 
CO c: t— t— "O 

CO to t-- OO lO 


CO --S* CO to CO 
■«* w <M CO to 


CI 1-1 1-1 coco 
to to r~ CO CI 

T-H WCOCO w 


CO CO CO 
CI CI CO 


to 
to 

s 

CO 
CI 


^O-* Cir- 
ca ^ -rt* r- CM 

.-H c: O 

CO 


CO -rf CD GO O 
C'l ^ »0 CO <M 


C5 CO TP t-- Ci 
OOCO !>• CO 
cow l-H w 


CiCO CCCi C5 
C3 C5 £- O CI 
i-( 1-i CO 


CO Oi CI 
l:--r- to 

COCO 


lOCl -«** Ci CO 

-^ C-- O C: ■^ 
CS <M -rt* CO Cl 


lO CO C5 CO UO 

■^ CO COi-' '-' 
O O ^ CO -* 


tOOl oca "H 
CO O I^ CO O 

O w -^ CO CO 


w t- Oiw to 

to r^ CO CD Tf 

w CI C3 Ci w 


Owt^ 

CO CI oO 
to 00 CI 


CO 

CO 

CO 

■* 

CI 

t^ 

CJ 


31 
125 

1,01(3 

103 

3,251 


Ci -rf CO TT G/D 
O' C^ CO t- »o 
CO f— ' I>- Tf <M 


w ^ lO w w 
I - 'X- O CO to 
i-" ^ w CO 


O ■* -* to CI 
^ to CO CO CO 
00 i-i C3 '"t" 


CD-* Ci 

CiO to 
-*r- 


(M (M ^ OO 
Q0-* (M -^ t— 

GO co-<t« r- CO 


"rt< i-H 05 (N t— 
OO lOOCSl t^ 
(M t^ t^ f-1 C5 


O O CO l>- CO 
OCM -^ t- w 

CO -^ CO CS lO 


w to t- CO CI 

1-1 to CI CO Ci 
t^iOOCO GO 


QOOOOi 
to CI CO 

cooot- 


CO 
Oi 

CO 

CD 

cd' 


^H ■<*< CI ■— ' o 

r- O — CO OO 


CO c^ r- to to 

(M r- (M -^ iM 

03 ^ CM --H 


O -«*^ w to CO 
'0>.-t r-< 1-1 


CO -^i-" GO CO 
OcO oo Ci O 


too QO 
Ca OOCO 
CO CO 


GO O CI OC' fM 
CO CD 'rft CO (NI 
Oi '^ iO GO O 


■^ COC^l CSCO 
to -^ C<J OCO 
^ ^ ,_-, CO t- 


GO w i-( I-- CO 
CO 'fJ' C>CO OO 

t-- to t-- I— ' O 


lO CO ■* O Ci 

00 -* '■^ oo r- 

'^ CI 1-H C3 to 


CI -* -* 

oo OOCI 
to 05 CO 


CI 

CO 

to 


■^ OOCO iOCO 
COO GOO 05 

i-H CO 


CO CO r- i-i CO 

^ CO ^ O CO 
CO »-i 1-- to 01 


CO 'tK CO O CO 
lO CO w O (M 
CO w i-i w CO 


'* O CI -^ OS 
CO «0 CO CO to 
1- w CI ■* 


CI CJ CI 

oo CD 
to oo 


'rj* 05 CO t— CO 

r- cs CO w CO 

CD CO CO (M CI 


"Tt^ C^ C5 »0 C: 

-rji r- Ir- CO 1-H 

CO t— CO ■— ' O 


O O CO M CD 
Tti (M t-- w O 

to CO C)<M GO 


cs to ■* t- to 

lO t- oo CO "* 
C5 t^ C5 CD CO 


— 1 w CO 
CO ■* CO 

t^r- to 


to 

CI 

g 


ea CO iO'* t— 

r-. O t~- lO CO 

1-H r- c: 


C*0 ^ t— CO CO 

o r- c-i GO CO 

1— 1 


CO 'Tt^ w CI CO 
to --H CS (M 

^ ,-. l-H 


t^-* GO Ci CO 

C5 oot- OOO 

ca 


O r— Ci 

CO -* CO 
COCO 


CD GO O d O 
to O CO GO lO 
I- CO COO CI 


CO O to GO 1— « 
CO to C; CD t^ 
toco CO -^ GO 


OO CO r— to CO 

•^ »0 -^ '— " CO 
Ci CO CO to 0-- 


ooo coo o 

-(f to CD CO to 
CO t-CI ClCl 


-*oo 

Ci 1— < r~ 

w -* CO 


CI 

GO 

CI 
CI 


C0(0 CO IlO -^ 

(N OO" CiCO 

1-H CO lO 


t- COW CO CO 

CI r- O w I-" 
"«f 1— ' CO to <N 


tC to <M CO CS 
O -* O 'X> to 
(M 1-1 T-. ^ (M 


O CO coco CO 
COi-< too to 

t— w d CO 


to r- ■* 

OOto 

-* t- 


Nevada 

New Hampshire 

New Jersey __- 

New Mexico 

New York 


North Carolina 

North Dakota 

Ohio 

Oklahoma 

Oregon 


Pennsylvania 

Rhode Island 

South Carolina 

Sout h Dakota 

Tennessee 


Texas_ 

Utah 

Vermont 

Virginia. 

Washington ___ 


West Virginia 

Wisconsin 

Wyoming 


CO 

1 



196 



North Carolina Manual 



00 
-^ 

I 

CO 

IN 

OS 



O 
O 

P3 

H 
Z 

Q 

5q 

CU 

Qi 
O 

H 
O 
> 





sjojoaia 
puotajnqx 


^ -m" CO ^ -^ C^i 


sjopaij 


CO-— •'— < •— « *Mr^^-CCiiM I—" -^ <M ■^,_,,— ICO CO"— < :c 


sjojaaig 
Xa.ttaQ 


'd;'rfTj'r^co>oioioo-jDOn^'*t--r--o-H-HX>iC'<j'coio»oio-^ocooasTf»^ 
iM — r^-<jHto3i»oooOGnyDr^as'Xic<i'Miot--o^'M'-HOOTr'rtico,t--cot^'Mco 

'— 'COCO'Tt^'MCnO •0C0'^C0T^O'-H»CC0"^O'-0'— 'MOi'— il^t-*-HCO»O^OiC 

»o |^^ ■^ '«*' c^ ^ .^ _H :o '^j- -«** ^"^ ohm" cm' —T^* -h' ^" oo 'm'^^-tj-' 


sJojDaig 


^-^-t--(^^cocoiO'<J"^(^^'^^^oc^:co:o— *^-rf^^or-c:i^C5^-<rc-i^i----^0 

S_S § § S § £ S S? S S q§ g fe 5 S S S_f^_S g S S 8 § 2 g § S S S 




sjopaia 


t^i^oi — c^^^-oc-^coasC3loc<30 3-, oo5«co!M--:;-j:5co'0<n— ■cotC'TM-coS 
^M— -*co— • -^'os'io-* -* — r [--"im'c-i" — Tci'— T n '^'m'^n 


sjojoaig 
}|aAasooy; 


CC cc — . CO TO CO O ^ ^ •«■ t^ cr, -^ — 1 C-l CO (M •* >o --C: — . ^ t^ — ■ t^ ^ Tf -^ lO TO CO -j5 

" '^.^."'.".^ t- — -O CO_ :c t^ O Tf t- ^ CB « X u; CO •?) — t, « TO O O -3= C^ ^ t~ 
Oi<M^COTt< -^COC-lCJOTOCStO co'^'o'co'ci^'^'oD »0 -^TO^" CDCqto'c/ 


o 

05 


sjojoaia 


C^lr-t^^u^TJHTO00C0fMC00iC;»0-^Ci^TOai'^t^TO>O'*TOGCC<l»0CCMO^ 
COIMeocor^OO lOifflt^OCiCO— •.^COTOOOTO — CECiTO — -HCOCKUDC)^ 


sjo^oaia 
IjaAasooy 


Tfl~cr. U5t^ — U5(MOJ1^00<Nlt^COOCOCOCgO — StotoSo-, oSc-IoStocc 




TO 


8J0^aa|2 
uopuBq 


t^ — XI — . t^ — . ^ O — "O O TO uo — ■ 1^ Ol t^ t^ C>J ^ TO « TO Tj. CO ^ >:■ Ol TO !M TO cr. 

S 5_§ S S S - = S ^.-.°.^.^.- ".° -.n-.^' S.-.-.- S Si S S g S 2 


sjopaig 
^laAasooy 


iOiMiOO<M01COCOOOTOTj.t~0»OcOt~COCOOOCOOSCO>OmC3Tl-TOTOT)- 
C]TO^MiOCOCO<MTO-<-^^05000=ci-Ht^t-iOn<C5iOTl.O!M:0-5'I~TOO 
O CJ CO TO lO X — X CO t^ TO ^ C-q CO O I » TT O CO ^ "O CO CO CO >0 lO TO CO v; ^ C3-. CO 




C-1 

CO 

05 


sjojoaia 
sEtnoqx 


■^GOif^lOCCfMOiOTOt^t^t^cOTO^iCTOI^OSiOiOOOiOCOOiO-^TOt^-^iC^^ 

TOC-)— . cocq-p CO— •TO^TOrr lo t^>ra<M (M«o— i-K< tn-rmiK 


sjo}oa[a 
jaAoojj 


QO(MOCO^COOiiOCOOOWDCO-<J^OGC»005I^Ow^iO'^C^TO^C;t^^cOCOO 


sjo}oa)3 
ipAasooy 


OCO^C^i— ■tOC']-^'^tO-^^iOC;tO»COC:OCOOOCT:'^:DQCUtiC-lC;'-HCl^'^C5 

-M ct; o M r- O lO '-^ cc c-KM X' Tf -rj- CI -^ --C Tf c-5 CO '^ CO o o CO o r^ -M c^i CO -^ »6 


C0<M^-rJ*-<*H^>OCO'M(M0C»O0r»O CO^:j0TfCO--^^J04O'<J'iO^^a:'Mrrt-- 


1— t 


sjojaaia 
jaAoojj 


oiOGCOi:^co-^^-H-^Ooocot-»ocoo5co:cai(M'^-X)eor-'*-X)^oo; — CO 
^0!r=<^Jco^^<^^r--^cocnO'rJ^o-*co-<J'tO'-'^OlOO^■cococo'X^^o>o^<M 
::C' o CO r^ CO ^ "0 CO oi Ci lO ^ »o c^i ^1 ---I r-^ »o CO '^^ CO ^ r- to cs] lo ^ :<:■ ■;:; C5 cr.' r- 

-j:r M ^ -^ CO 'm' ^ ^ ^^ *^ '-^ "^ ^ t-T co' co' ^ ^ co' (m' « cc c^i" (N u6 


SJopaia 
qjirag 


0(M'^r-ooocooc-3:dC^cr. ^-^lO-^cco — ■^■co-^-^^t-co-ooior-C'i 
(X5(^^1--•rJ'lOCicoOlO'^oco^c:>c^^'r^co■^^--co01— 'ioc::cr;»ccoc^QC-<j'Qr. 




n 


illiirt^liiillllllllliilill^liil 



Election Returns 



197 



Tt<ast-»oocDTfcor-c^ 

M to 1— • I:-- C^ lO "Tf CO C^l CO 



5<^^.-HO-^cot--co'-Hcc^-lOcoococo^-lO'--'I>.^-.r-«^-o50<-«':ooco'^^<x)l>-ool^^^* 



•^ Oi '^ C^ O i—i CO »— 1 C^ i-H (M C<lf~i 1-i (M "^ i-H 1— I ITS TT i-H CO r^ 




O'— 'C>D^OSi:^COt-^'^C^X)COi— '»O0:)Ct'--ii0G000Tr'i0OU0C0t0»OC0CCiO'-HO"^'-HG0C0O=O^ 

i-HOcoc?coc^'-^c>oc^)t-^Oi>''--<^ocoooo^/Dcoco'^i-''>DtocoOtO'— •'-o■n^Olcool1-H(^^,■^^^co■^ 
^(riu^CTsas»o»C':oci'-HCDcocc^^cocct--0'-H<ric^i'^»oi--uoOGOcoc>oi-Heouocoocoocoaicocooi^ 

r£>C^-^(X} '-« CO (M^r-- CDCOIr-CO'M'— I •O-^Ol-— icO^OCO'MC^l'^CO''*' 'MCOt'-iOCOCOCO'— «'-<■— ' COOOC^ 



C«>TT<OiCOCO':Ou^COi^O'— *a5CO»OQJCO"^"^CO'-HOO"*C»OCOCOOO"<J^C^COCOCOOl^^^COI:^OlO'-H<:^ 

■^i-HL^c^iou^c^'— '■^■^o^'—''— '^^^^Cl»^^oaiC^'— iO»ot^i— 'OocotJ^coo5UDcor^c^i>.coco«— (c^ 
^•OC<lO'-HcocO'-Hal"^'-HaJO'-H^-Hcoa^':o■^c^c/Dl0^o^ocO'-^'^^"^'-Hcn>OGOco'-H■^■^t--cc■^ 



CO c^ -^ (M Ci CO <—" (M 



(M f-H 



c^cjr^-«*'»cc5»coouT)OiOiiocn>oc<i"^«:)a;c^i'-HOococotor-<ccGoOTrO'-Hr^'^0'-H"^»ooo^ot---:^ 

^oalc:D■^o<»'-H(^^05lX'^-lO^'CJlcoc^llOOcco^■^l0^x;»oc^JOOoc^^'-S'-H^^I^^^•-Ht^ol■^co^ 

^-•cooi^''-HGC'^^lO■^Oi^ot^^DOt^OicO'-HC^lC^■^J<cs'-HQoc<^■^oasOcDt^O"^■^t■~c^c^^"^t•-c:lO 



CDCOCOCO'— i'-iCO<MCOCO«Or->^i— ii— ( GO-^OOi-tCOlOTpC^C^-^-^lOi— lC^JC0t>-O5C0G^lC0'-HM.— I C-iaDC^l 




cD■T^■^c<^cc■<r■*o^r5C^c^'-H<x:■^■^c^cccoo■-Hc^^~l-H,-H,-HoooccOIr^O'tooocococoTt^ai'X>05^-■■^ 

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■Tpcooico^cD■n'c^^o^c:ocyDcco■^X'00"^"^co^--^-ooioooasco^o^-cc^^CiccccciOW5"^}<.-HO 

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Election Returns 205 

VOTE FOR STATE OFFICERS IN DEMOCRATIC PRIMARIES 

1940 AND 1944 



1940 

FOR GOVERNOR— 

J. Melville Broughton 147,386 

W. P. Horton 105,916 

A. J. Maxwell 102,095 

Lee Gravely 63,030 

Thos. E. Cooper 33,176 

Paul D. Grady 15,735 

Arthur Simmons 2,058 

FOR LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR— 

R. L. Harris 150,661 

W. Erskine Smith 127,522 

L. A. Martin 76,861 

D. L. Tompkins 42,672 

FOR SECRETARY OF STATE— 

Thad Eure 274,408 

Walter Murphy 137,598 

FOR STATE AUDITOR— 

George Ross Pou 262,870 

Charlie Miller 127,600 

FOR COMMISSIONER OF AGRICULTURE— 

W. Kerr Scott 252,912 

C. Wayland Spruill 157,933 

FOR INSURANCE COMMISSIONER— 

Dan Boney 266,974 

William B. Oliver 122.107 



1944 

FOR GOVERNOR— 

R. Gregg Cherry 185,027 

Ralph McDonald 134,661 

Olla Ray Boyd 2,069 

FOR LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR— 

L. Y. Ballentine 181,002 

W. I. Halstead 59.246 

Jamie T. Lyda 18,940 

FOR SECRETARY OF STATE— 

Thad Eure 218,984 

W. N. Crawford 55,274 

FOR STATE AUDITOR— 

George Ross Pou ; . . 197,348 

Fred S. Hunter 71,151 

FOR STATE TREASURER— 

Charles M. Johnson 219,198 

L. J. Phipps 45.475 



20fi 



North Carolina Manual 



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Election Returns 



207 



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Election Returns 



211 



TOTAL VOTES CAST— GENERAL ELECTION 

1948 

President 
Democrats Republicans Progressives States Rights 

Harry S. Truman Thomas E. Dewey Henry A. Wallace James S. Thurmond 



459,070 



W. Kerr Scott 
570,995 



H. P. Taylor 
544,560 



Thad Eure 
546,480 



Henry L. Bridges 
538,504 



Henry L. Bridges 
537,145 



258,572 



3,915 



69,652 



Governor 

George M. Pritchard Mary Price 
206,166 3,364 

Lieutenant-Governor 

Kyle Hayes Kenneth Harris 



206,511 



3,368 



Secretary of State 

James S. Dockery 
207,332 

Auditor (Regular Term) 

M. V. Hickman 
208,641 

Auditor (Short Term) 



Treasurer 



Brandon P. Hodges Ben L. Spence 



538,583 



Clyde A. Erwin 
542,052 



209,668 

Superintendent of Public Instruction 

Buford T. Henderson 

208,377 

Attorney General 



Harry McMullan 
538,996 

L. Y. Ballentine 
538,594 



D. S. Coltrane 
537,689 



Herbert F. Seawell Jr. C. O. Pearson 
209,443 3,567 

Commissioner of Agriculture (Regular Term) 



Watt H. Gragg 
207,741 



John W. Stubbs 
3,326 



Commissioner of Agriculture (Short Term) 



Forrest H. Shuf ord 
539,653 



Commissioner of Labor 

M. K. Harrill 

207,038 



Insurance Commissioner 

William P. Hodges Deems H. Clifton 



538,653 



207,092 



212 North Carolina Manual 

VOTE FOR GOVERNOR IN DEMOCRATIC PRIMARIES 

1920-1948 

1920 
First Primary 

Cameron Morrison fo'ooo 

O. Max Gardner on i on 

R. N. Page ^U,18U 

Second Primary 

Cameron Morrison c?'n7Q 

O. Max Gardner bl,U(.i 

1924 

Angus Wilton McLean ^oo'rH! 

Josiah William Bailey ^•^•° '* 

NO PRIMARY IN 1928 
1932 
First Primary 

J. C. B. Ehringhaus i?r'f o? 

Richard T. Fountain i no'noo 

Allen J. Maxwell 101,^)61 

Second Primary 

J. C. B. Ehringhaus i co'a^^ 

Richard T. Fountain Ib8,9a 

1936 
First Primary 

Clyde R. Hoey 193.972 

Ralph McDonald Jo« 7=9 

A. H. Graham a'l^t 

John A. McRae *'-''"'' 

Second Primary 

Clyde R. Hoey I^.^A.a 

Ralph McDonald 214.414 

1940 

J. Melville Broughton -^H'^?? 

W. P. Horton 105.916 

A. J. Maxwell 102.095 

Lee Gravely 63.030 

Thos. E. Cooper ^t'llt 

Paul D. Grady oltl 

Arthur Simmons "^'"^^ 

1944 

R. Gregg Cherry lo^Al] 

Ralph McDonald nnal 

011a Ray Boyd ^'^'^^ 

1948 
First Primary 

Charles M. Johnson }l,ltl 

W. Kerr Scott ^I'ofiV 

R. Mayne Albright i a'o7i 

Oscar Barker o 5oq 

W. F. Stanley, Sr ^-^f" 

011a Ray Boyd -'l^^ 

Second Primary 

W. Kerr Scott 217,620 

Charles M. Johnson 182,b84 



Election Returns 



213 



VOTE FOR CONGRESSMEN IN DEMOCRATIC PRIMARY, 
MAY 29, 1948, BY DISTRICTS 



FIFTH CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT 



Counties 


Thurmond 
Chatham 


Bob 
Duncan 


Caswell - - _ _ - - 


1,241 
7,186 
2,520 
1,418 
2,789 
485 
4,560 


458 


Forsyth __ -_ 


1,990 


Granville 


704 


Person 


739 


Rockingham 


1,986 


Stokes . . . . - 


1,997 


Surry 


1,071 








Total 


20,199 


8,945 







SIXTH CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT 



Counties 


Carl T. 
Durham 


Thomas 
Turner 


Alamance 


3,952 
6,333 
7,030 

2,598 


2,366 


Durham 


4,027 


Guilford... 


8,530 


Orange 


635 








Total. . . 


19,913 


15,558 







SEVENTH CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT 



Counties 


F. Ertel 
Carlyle 


Hargrove 
Bellamy 


Bob 

Young 


Bladen 


2,173 
788 
1,674 
4,424 
552 
1,222 
7,931 


469 
605 
2,143 
1,035 
404 
6,692 
1,056 


876 


Brunswick 


446 


Columbus 


2,061 


Cumberland . 


1,894 


Harnett.- 


4,472 


New Hanover 


1,513 


Robeson 


896 


Total 


18,764 


12,404 


12,158 







214 



North Carolina Manual 



VOTE FOR CONGRESSMEN IN DEMOCRATIC PRIMARY, 
MAY 29, 1948, BY DISTRICTS 



EIGHTH CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT 



Counties 


C. B. 
Deane 


Giles Y. 
Newton 


Anson . - . 


2,371 
639 
3,308 
1,068 
2,483 
1,532 
2,793 
1,898 
1,508 
2,116 
1,960 
829 


478 


Davie 


184 


Davidson ... . 


1,091 


Holie 


200 


Lee 


455 


Montgomery .............. _ 


242 


Moore 


47f; 


Richmond 


1,649 


Scotland . ..... .. . ........ 


553 


Union 


570 


Wilkes.... 


415 


Yadkin 


101 








Total 


22,505 


6,416 







TENTH CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT 



Counties 


Hamilton C. 
Jones 


Marvin Lee 
Ritch 


Avery .... 


346 
2,117 
2,662 
1,499 
8,884 

354 


36 


Burke 


427 


Catawba . 


457 


Lincoln . 


199 


Mecklenburg 


4,786 


Mitchell 


74 








Total 


15,862 


5,979 







Election Returns 



215 



ELEVENTH CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT 



Counties 


A. L. 
Bulwinkle 


CO. 

Ridings 


Cleveland _ - _ 


3,479 
3,849 
1,097 
1,451 

491 
2,406 

520 


1,945 


Gaston - 


2,381 


McDowell 


1,439 




499 


Polk _ 


1,246 


Rutherford 


3,248 


Yancey 


765 








Total 


13,293 


11,523 









VOTE FOR CONGRESSMEN IN SECOND PRIMARY, 

JUNE 26, 1948 



SEVENTH CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT 



Counties 


F. Ertel 
Carlyle 


Hargrove 
Bellamy 


Bladen 


3,075 
1,042 
3,635 
4,578 
2,399 
1,659 
7,320 


1,088 


Brunswick _ _ __ 


544 




2,365 


Cumberland _____ 


1,418 


Harnett _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ 


2,822 


New Hanover _ 


6,275 


Robeson 


1,5^9 








Total 


23,708 


16,041 







216 



North Carolina Manual 



VOTE FOR CONGRESSMEN IN REPUBLICAN PRIMARY 

MAY 29, 1948 



TENTH CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT 



Counties 


P. C. 
Burkholder 


Manley R. 
Dunaway 


Louis G. 
Rogers 


Roy A. 
Harmon 


T. L. 

Mullen 


Avery. . 


95 
19 
38 
6 
159 
72 


16 
11 

16 
2 

85 
18 


365 
95 
339 
9 
411 
498 


1,591 

138 

29 

135 

65 

1,423 


17 


Burke 


12 


Catawba. . 


35 


Lincoln 

Mecklenburg 

Mitchell 


33 
141 

46 






Total 


389 


148 


1,717 


3,381 


284 







Election Returns 



217 



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224 



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230 



North Carolina Manual 



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Election Returns 



231 



VOTE FOR UNITED STATES SENATOR 
Primary, May 29, 1948 



County 



Alamance.-. 
Alexander. . 
Alleghany.. 

Anson 

Ashe 

Avery 

Beaufort 

Bertie 

Bladen 

Brunswick. 
Buncombe.. 

Burke 

Cabarrus. .. 
Caldwell..-. 

Camden 

Carteret 

Caswell 

Catawba — 
Chatham . . - 
Cherokee. .- 

Chowan 

Clay 

Cleveland... 
Columbus... 

Craven 

Cumberland 
Currituck... 

Dare 

Davidson. -. 

Davie 

Duplin 

Durham 

Edgecombe . 

Forsyth 

Franklin.... 

Gaston 

Gates 

Graham 

Granville. .. 

Greene 

Guilford.-.. 

Halifax 

Harnett 

Haywood... 
Henderson.. 
Hertford... 

Hoke 

Hyde 

Iredell 

Jackson 

Johnston 

Jones 

Lee 

Lenoir 

Lincoln.. -. 
Macon 



J. Melville 

Broughton 

(Short Term) 



,576 
327 
84 
,630 
576 
281 
,837 
,103 
,969 
970 
,563 
,500 
,496 
,388 
383 
,343 
,336 
,144 
,439 
,403 
683 
288 
,399 
,517 
,701 
,917 
654 
,154 
,714 
519 
,283 
,722 
,616 
,655 
,269 
.029 
369 
353 
810 
202 
041 
508 
604 
,335 
657 
993 
761 
374 
698 
,826 
252 
774 
,850 
,829 
644 
915 



William B. 

Umstead 

(Short Term) 



3,320 

898 

342 

1,713 

1,106 

172 

2,153 

808 

1,645 

1,059 

3,695 

1,522 

1,402 

1,411 

774 

1,252 

701 

1,175 

1,706 

449 

550 

286 

3,741 

2,757 

2,090 

3,912 

863 

189 

2,604 

390 

1,617 

6.700 

2,361 

4,130 

1,739 

3,840 

436 

461 

2,231 

976 

9,007 

3,021 

2,790 

3,117 

1,050 

910 

766 

446 

3,325 

1,326 

3,606 

463 

1,716 

2,438 

1,233 

1.135 



J. Melville 

Broughton 

(Regular Term) 



3.746 

342 

189 

1.624 

610 

254 

2,836 

1.180 

1,968 

982 

9.349 

1.524 

1.543 

1,320 

354 

1,373 

1,341 

2.242 

1,486 

1,377 

672 

296 

2,377 

3,531 

2,710 

3,904 

665 

1,199 

2,736 

587 

3,374 

4,740 

2.674 

5.630 

2.188 

3,009 

362 

343 

1,820 

1,237 

8,018 



William B. 

Umstead 

(Regular Term) 



,369 

2,634 

2,387 

1,673 

990 

771 

416 

697 

1,715 

4,152 

782 

1,866 

1,926 

682 

894 



3,298 

887 

734 

1.633. 

1.167 

170 

2,158 

761 

1,553 

1,035 

3,500 

1,493 

1,330 

1,374 

781 

1,235 

699 

1,116 

1,672 

440 

533 

268 

3,581 

2,643 

1,970 

3,780 

812 

190 

2,543 

367 

1,514 

6,715 

2,293 

3,995 

1,851 

3.706 

419 

453 

2,240 

939 

8.872 

2,861 

2,777 

3.088 

1,022 

881 

734 

436 

3,329 

1,320 

3,452 

427 

1,633 

2,422 

1,202 

1,070 



232 



North Carolina Manual 



Vote for United States Senator, Primary, May 29, 1948— (Con't.) 



County 



Madison 

Martin 

McDowell. -- 
Mecklenburg. 

Mitchell 

Montgomery. 

Moore 

Nash 

New Hanover 
Northampton 

Onslow 

Orange 

Pamlico 

Pasquotank. _ 

Pender 

Perquimans. . 

Person 

Pitt 

Polk 

Randolph 

Riclimond — 

Robeson 

Rockingham. 

Rowan 

Rutherford... 

Sampson 

Scotland 

Stanly 

Stokes 

Surry 

Swain . . 

Transylvania. 

Tyrrell 

Union 

Vance 

Wake 

Warren 

Washington.. 

Watauga 

Wayne 

Wilkes 

Wilson 

Yadkin 

Yancey 

Totals... 



J. Melville 

Broughton 

(Short Term) 



886 
876 
362 
,899 
177 
873 
536 
666 
545 
714 
675 
162 
701 
925 
409 
269 
995 
,875 
879 
,214 
,652 
,416 
,918 
,365 
,130 
,393 
,462 
,328 
,697 
,192 
533 
,212 
286 
,504 
,889 
,872 
,529 
899 
415 
,395 
231 
236 
605 
545 



206,605 



William B. 

Umstead 

(Short Term) 



1,209 

884 

1,459 

7,962 

259 

691 

2,253 

2,568 

5,061 

1,776 

1,368 

2,223 

519 

1,552 

943 

678 

1,676 

3,661 

707 

1,770 

1,494 

4,508 

2,087 

2,563 

2,954 

1,223 

1,143 

1,200 

811 

2,030 

704 

800 

209 

1,691 

1,239 

9,715 

1,340 

&39 

782 

2,198 

1,362 

1,951 

431 

702 



188,420 



J. Melville 

Broughton 

(Regular Term) 



779 

1,966 

1,306 

8,864 

188 

1,091 

1,593 

3,744 

4,600 

1,707 

1,681 

1,216 

688 

919 

1,474 

262 

1,014 

3,940 

926 

243 

586 

331 

999 

242 

052 

528 

1,423 

1,349 

1,752 

3,256 

418 

1,197 

394 

1,479 

2,,S43 

9,152 

1,572 

907 

416 

3,476 

1,247 

3,283 

657 

555 



207,981 



William B. 

Umstead 

(Regular Term) 



1,130 

827 

1,409 

7,787 

250 

965 

2,209 

2,482 

4.881 

1,740 

1,291 

2,264 

490 

1,482 

904 

673 

1,635 

3,564 

683 

1,794 

1,411 

4,317 

2,005 

2,458 

2,798 

1,156 

1,033 

1,181 

764 

1,920 

700 

746 

205 

1,647 

1,205 

9,411 

1,292 

543 

795 

2,112 

1,375 

1,838 

427 

692 



183,865 



Election Returns 



233 



VOTE FOR UNITED STATES SENATOR 
November 2, 1948 



County 



Alamance 

Alexander — 
Alleghany. -- 

Anson 

Ashe 

Avery -- 

Beaufort 

Bertie. 

Bladen 

Brunswick... 
Buncombe.. - 

Burke 

Cabarrus 

Caldwell 

Camden 

Carteret 

Caswell 

Catawba 

Chatham 

Cherokee 

Chowan 

Clay 

Cleveland 

Columbus 

Craven 

Cumberland . 

Currituck 

Dare 

Davidson 

Davie 

Duplin 

Durham 

Edgecombe.. 

Forsyth 

Franklin 

Gaston 

Gates.. 

Graham 

Granville 

Greene 

Guilford 

Halifax 

Harnett 

Haywood... 
Henderson.. 
Hertford... 

Hoke 

Hyde 

Iredell 

Jackson 

Johnston 

Jones 

Lee 

Lenoir 

Lincoln 

Macon 



J. Melville 
Broughton 
Democrat 



10,868 
2,534 
1,893 
3,217 
4,S96 
918 
4,244 
2,930 
3,310 
2,669 
20,826 
7,842 
8,451 
6,246 
661 
3,711 
1,947 
10,913 
3,726 
3,034 
1,135 
1,372 
7,330 
6,2.54 
5,349 
7,111 
1,225 
928 
9,449 
2,257 
5,989 
13,083 
6,640 
16,400 
4,507 
12,916 
935 
1,543 
3,769 
2,442 
23,349 
6,490 
6,857 
7,987 
4,595 
2,124 
1,490 
739 
7,380 
4,319 
9,581 
1,260 
3,461 
5,399 
4,534 
3.012 



John A. 
Wilkinson 
Republican 



4,031 



249 
219 
290 
143 
709 
422 
46 
378 
1,878 
9,017 
5,940 
3,838 
4,553 
69 
1,229 
258 
8,473 
1,843 
2,468 
64 
1 , ISS 
1,569 
902 
529 
1,360 
53 
201 
7,459 
2,579 
914 
2,940 
281 
6,555 
153 
5,258 
42 
1,096 
193 
59 
10,472 
349 
1,891 
2,521 
4,629 
105 
113 
231 
3,990 
2,432 
3,070 
58 
672 
264 
3,569 
2,203 



William T. 

Brown 
Progressive 



29 
3 
2 
3 
9 
5 
5 
4 



129 

9 

36 

6 

2 

8 

5 

33 

6 

13 

5 

4 

13 

12 

20 

44 





24 

■ 6, 

10 

591 

31 

651 

■ 4 

-- 1 



11 

4 
417 

9 
12 

T 
14 

5 




15 

5 
20 



2 
14 

4 



234 



North Carolina Manual 



Vote United States Senator, November 2, 1948 — (Con't.) 



County 


J. Melville 
Broughton 
Democrat 


John A. 
Wilkinson 
Republican 


William T. 

Brown 
Progressive 


Madison 


2,582 

4,608 

4,466 

23,983 

1,024 

2,. 599 

4,251 

7,817 

8,598 

3,577 

3,259 

4,158 

1,426 

2,338 

1,665 

890 

3,132 

8,6,50 

2,443 

7,603 

5,107 

7,923 

9 , 69S 

9,751 

7,347 

5,392 

2,427 

5,815 

4,593 

7,957 

2,068 

3,449 

749 

4,245 

4,059 

19,656 

2,518 

1,731 

3,726 

6,718 

6,453 

6,185 

2,274 

3,705 


3,165 

105 

2,411 

7,187 

2,778 

1,921 

2,311 

417 

1,732 

176 

244 

1,232 

667 

.342 

2.55 

73 

324 

,501 

1.521 

7 , 877 

618 

672 

2.262 

5,319 

4,205 

4,910 

174 

5,560 

3.225 

4,086 

1,276 

2,720 

288 

537 

257 

3,561 

108 

251 

3.650 

1.270 

7.958 

406 

3,544 

2.194 


7 




4 


MrOowell - - - 


16 


Mprklcnburc 


149 


Mitchell -- - 


6 




1 




11 


Nash --- 


9 




69 




3 


Onslow - 


5 


Orang6 - - - 


128 




6 


Pasnuotank - -- - 


6 


Pender - - -- - 


4 




2 


Person - 


7 


Pitt 


87 


Polk 


2 




6 




25 




92 


Rorkinffham - - 


21 




37 




17 




81 


Sontland 


21 




20 


Stokes - - - 


10 




6 




2 




10 


Tyrrell -- - - - 







9 




34 


Wake 


170 


Warren 


7 




4 




3 




8 


Wilkes - - 


11 




23 


Yadkin 


9 




6 








540,762 


220,307 


3,490 







VOTE ON CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENTS BY COUNTIES 



Proposed amendments to the Constitution of North Carolina 

submitted to a vote of the people at the General Election 

November 2, 1948 



No. 1 
CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT FAILED OF ADOPTION 

Chapter 361, Session Laws 1947. 

Article II, Section 28 

"Section 28. Pay of members and officers of the General Assem- 
bly . The members of the General Assembly for the term of their 
office shall receive a salary for their services of twelve hundred 
dollars ($1,200.00) each. The salaries of the Presiding Officers of 
the two Houses shall be fifteen hundred dollars ($1,500.00) each. 
Provided, that in addition to the salaries herein provided for, 
should an Extra Session of the General Assembly be called, the 
Members shall receive two hundred and fifty dollars ($250.00) and 
the Presiding Officers of the two Houses three hundred dollars 
($300.00) for such Extra Session." 

No. 2 
CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT FAILED OF ADOPTION 

Chapter 784, Session Laws 1947 
Article V, Section 4 

"Power to contract debts. The General Assembly shall have the 
power to contract debts and to pledge the faith and credit of the 
State and to authorize counties and municipalities to contract debts 
and pledge their faith and credit." 

235 



236 North Carolina Manual 

No. 3 
CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT FAILED OF ADOPTION 

Chapter 421, Session Laws 1947 

Article V, Section 6 

"Section 6 of Article V of the Constitution of North Carolina is 
hereby amended by striking out in the first sentence of said Sec- 
tion the word "fifteen" and inserting in lieu thereof the words 
"twenty-five." 

No. 4 
CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT ADOPTED 

Chapter 34, Session Laws 1947 

Article VII, Section 7 amended to read as follows: 

"Sec. 7. No debt or loan except by a tnajority of voters. No 
county, city, town, or other municipal corporation shall contract 
any debt, pledge its faith or loan its credit, nor shall any tax be 
levied or collected by any officers of the same except for the neces- 
sary expenses thereof, unless approved by a majority of those 
who shall vote thereon in any election held for such purpose." 



Election Returns 



237 



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Amendment Niunber 3 
reasing the amount of total 
te and county tax which 
y be levied on property, by 
nging the limitation on said 
from fifteen (15) cents on 
one hundred dollars 
)0.00) valuation to twenty- 
(25) cents on the one 
dred dollars ($100.00) 








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Election Returns 



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VOTE ON PROHIBITION 1881 AND 1908 



August, 1881 



May, 1908 



For 

Prohibition 

48,370 



Against 

Prohibition 

166,325 



For 

Prohibition 

113,612 



Against 

Prohibition 

69,416 



Vote on calling convention to consider proposed amend- 
ment to the Constitution of the United States repealing 
the 18th amendment and Election of Delegates. 



November, 1933 







Delegates 


Delegates 


For 


No 


For Repeal 


Against 


Convention 


Convention 


of 


Repeal of 






18th 


18th 


120,190 


293,484 


Amendment 


Amendment 






115,482 


300,054 



PART V 

GOVERNMENTAL AGENCIES, 
BOARDS AND COMMISSIONS 



GOVERNMENTAL BOARDS AND COMMISSIONS 

ADVISORY BUDGET COMMISSION 

1925, c. 89; 1929, c. 100, s. 4; 1931, c. 295; G. S. 143-4 

Composition : Six members. Chairman of the Appropriations and 
Finance Committees of the House and Senate, and two members 
appointed by the Governor. 

Appointed by the Governor: 

LeRoy Martin Raleigh 

T. Clarence Stone Stoneville 

Appointed by the Legislature: 

Edwin Pate Laurinburg 

R. Grady Rankin Gastonia 

W. Frank Taylor Goldsboro 

Larry I. Moore Wilson 

NORTH CAROLINA AERONAUTICS COMMISSION 
1945, c. 198; 1947 c. 1069; G. S. 63-39 

Composition: Five members appointed by the Governor. 

Roy Rowe, Chairman Burgaw 

William Olsen Raleigh 

Thomas Davis Winston-Salem 

Paul McMurray Fletcher 

Herbert H. Baxter Charlotte 

George Franklin, Secretary Raleigh 

STATE BOARD OF AGRICULTURE 

Rev. s. 3931; Code s. 2184; 1901, c. 479, ss. 2, 4; 1907, c. 876, s. 1; 
1931, c. 360, s. 1; 1937, c. 174; C. S. 4661; G. S. lK)6-2 

Composition: Eleven members, ten appointed by the Governor. 

L. Y. Ballentine, Chairman, Ex-officio Raleigh 

W. B. Austin Jefferson 

W. I. Bissette Grifton 

David Townsend Rowland 

Hoyle C. Griffin Monroe 

243 



244 North Carolina Manual 

Claude T. Hall Woodsdale 

A. B. Slagle Franklin 

T. Holt Haywood Winston-Salem 

Miss Ethel Parker Gatesville 

J. H. Poole West End 

Dr. R. E. Earp Selma 

■ . ' ^ ' 1 v;i . 

STATE BOARD OF ALCOHOLIC CONTROL 

1937, c. 49, ss. 2, 3; c. 411; 1939, c. 185, s. 5; 
1941, c. 107, s. 5; G. S. 18-37; G. S. 18-38 

Composition: Three members appointed by the Governor. 

Carl L. Williamson, Chairman Raleigh 

Sam Etheridge Washington 

S. C. Brawley Durham 

Roy L. Davis, Secretary Manteo 

STATE DEPARTMENT OF ARCHIVES AND HISTORY 

Rev. s. 4539; 1903, c. 767, s. 2; 1907, c. 714, s. 1; 1941, c. 306; 
1943, c. 237; 1945, c. 55; C. S. 6141; G. S. 121-1 

Composition: Seven members appointed by the Governor. 

R. D. W. Connor, Chairman Chapel Hill 

Miss Gertrude S. Carraway New Bern 

J. Allan Dunn Salisbury 

Clarence W. Griffin Forest City 

W. T. Laprade Durham 

McDaniel Lewis Greensboro 

Mrs. P. F. Patton Hendersonville 

Dr. C. C. Crittenden, Director Raleigh 

NORTH CAROLINA STATE ART SOCIETY 
1929, c. 314; 1943, c. 752; G. S. 140-1 

Composition: Sixteen members. Four members Ex-officio; four 
members appointed by the Governor; eight members elected by 
the Art Society. 



Governmental Boards and Commissions 245 

Ex-officio : 

W. Kerr Scott, Governor Raleigh 

Harry McMullan, Attorney-General Raleigh 

Clyde A. Erwin, Superintendent of Public Instruction . . Raleigh 
Mrs. C. C. Barnett, Chairman of the Art Department, 

State Federation of Women's Clubs Asheville 

Appointed: 

Dean Alice Baldw^in Durham 

Mrs. Charles A. Cannon Concord 

Mrs. Louis V. Sutton Raleigh 

Robert L. Humber Greenville 

Elected: 

Mrs. Henry London Raleigh 

William Henley Deitrick Raleigh 

Earl Mueller Durham 

John Rembert Chapel Hill 

Edwin Gill Raleigh 

Miss Katharine Morris Raleigh 

Dr. Clarence Poe Raleigh 

Alexander Crane Raleigh 

Miss Lucy Cherry Crisp, Executive Secretary Raleigh 

STATE BOARD OF ASSESSMENT 
1939, c. 310, s. 200; 1941, c. 327, s. 6; 1947 c. 184; G. S. 105-273 

Composition: Five members, all Ex-officio under the Act. 

Edwin Gill, Commissioner of Revenue, Chairman Raleigh 

W. O. Suiter, Director of Department of Tax Research. . . . Raleigh 
Stanley Winborne, Chairman, Public Utilities Commission Raleigh 

Harry McMullan, Attorney General Raleigh 

Brandon P. Hodges, Director of Local Government Raleigh 

J. C. Bethune, Secretary Raleigh 

STATE BANKING COMMISSION 
1931, c. 243, s. 1; 1935, c. 266; 1939, c. 91, s. 1; G. S. 53-92 

Composition: Seven members. Two Ex-officio, five appointed by 
the Governor. 
Brandon P. Hodges, Chairman, Ex-officio Raleigh 



246 North Carolina Manual 

Harry McMullan, Ex-officio Raleigh 

B. Bascom Blackwelder, Secretary Hickory 

H. D. Bateman Wilson 

R. P. Holding Smithfield 

R. C. Lewellyn Dobson 

Boyd B. Massagee Hendersonville 

STATE COMMISSION FOR THE BLIND 
1935, c. 53, s. 1; 1937, c. 285; G. S. 111-1; 111-3 

Composition: Eleven members. Five Ex-officio, six appointed by 
the Governor. 

Judge Sam M. Cathey, Chairman Asheville 

Dr. Howard E. Jensen Durham 

Ernest R. Alexander Kannapolis 

V. J. Ashbaugh Durham 

H. I. McDougle Charlotte 

Thomas S. Payne Washington 

Ex-officio Members: 

Ernest C. McCracken Raleigh 

E. N. Peeler Raleigh 

Dr. J. W. R. Norton Raleigh 

Charles H. Warren Raleigh 

Dr. Ellen B. Winston Raleigh 

H. A. Wood, Executive Secretary Raleigh 

N. C. BOARD OF BOILER RULES 
1935, c. 326; G. S. 95-54 

Composition: Five members. One Ex-officio, four appointed by 
the Governor. 

Forrest H. Shuford, Chairman, Ex-officio Raleigh 

William W. Lloyd Greensboro 

Wm. E. Shuping Greensboro 

William H. Ruffin Durham 

R. Gordon Thomas Raleigh 

BUILDING CODE COUNCIL 
1933, c. 392. s. 4; 1941, c. 280, s. 2; G. S. 143-139 

Composition: Five members appointed by the Governor. 
Walter W. Hooke, Chairman Charlotte 



Governmental Boards and Commissions 247 

Ross Shumaker, Vice-Chairman Raleigh 

Robert H. Pinnix, Secretary Gastonia 

J. C. Warr Hamlet 

J. L. Rouse Wilmington 

BOARD OF PUBLIC BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 

1941, c. 224, s. 2; G. S. 129-2 

Composition: Five members, all Ex-ofRcio under above Act. 

W. Kerr Scott, Governor Raleigh 

Thad Eure, Secretary of State Raleigh 

Brandon P. Hodges, Treasurer Raleigh 

Harry McMullan, Attorney General Raleigh 

R. G. Deyton, Asst. Director Budget Raleigh 

BOARD OF CONSERVATION AND DEVELOPMENT 

1925, c. 122, s. 6; 1927, c. 57; 1941, c. 45; 1945, c. 638; 
G. S. 113-4; 113-5 

Composition: Fifteen members appointed by the Governor. 

W. Kerr Scott, Governor, Chairman Raleigh 

Josh L. Home, Vice-Chairman Rocky Mount 

J. Wilbur Bunn Raleigh 

Oscar P. Breece Fayetteville 

K. Clyde Council Wananish 

George W. Gillette Wilmington 

W. J. Damtoft Canton 

Percy B. Ferebee Andrews 

A. H. Guion Charlotte 

W. Roy Hampton Plymouth 

Robert W. Proctor Marion 

Miles J. Smith Salisbury 

D. M. Stafford Pomona 

A. K. Winget Albemarle 

Eric Rodgers Scotland Neck 

Chas. S. Allen Durham 

R. Bruce Etheridge, Director Manteo 



248 North Carolina Manual 

NORTH CAROLINA BOARD OF CORRECTION 
AND TRAINING 

1943, c. 776; s. 1; 1945, c. 847; 1947, c. 226; G. S. 134-90* 

Composition: Ten members. One Ex-officio, nine appointed by 
the Governor. 

C. A. Dillon, Chairman Raleigh 

Dr. W. A. Stanbury, Vice-Chairman Gastonia 

Mrs. Howard G. Etheridge Asheville 

W. N. Harrell Wilson 

Charles H. Young Raleigh 

Miss Diana Dyer Winston-Salem 

W. Jasper Smith Bethel 

A. L. Burney Southern Pines 

Dr. C. F. Strosnider Goldsboro 

Dr. Ellen B. Winston (Ex-ofRcio) Raleigh 

S. E. Leonard, Commissioner Raleigh 

*(This Board has the management of the Stonewall Jackson 
Training School, Eastern Carolina Training School, State Home 
and Industrial School, Morrison Training School and State Train- 
ing School for Negro Girls.) 



STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION 
N. C. Constitution, Art. IX, sec. 8; G. S. 115-16.1 

Composition: Thirteen members. Three Ex-ofRcio; ten appointed 
by the Governor and confirmed by the General Assembly. 
H. P. Taylor, Lieutenant Governor, Chairman, Ex-officio . . Raleigh 

D. Hiden Ramsey, Vice-Chairman Asheville 

Dr. Clyde A. Erwin, Supt., Public Instruction, 

Secretary, Ex-officio Raleigh 

Brandon P. Hodges, State Treasurer, Ex-officio Raleigh 

J. A. Pritchett Windsor 

A. McL. Graham Clinton 

A. S. Brower Durham 

H. E. Stacy Lumberton 

Santford Martin . , Winston-Salem 



Governmental Boards and Commissions 249 

J. Harold Lineberger Belmont 

B. B. Dougherty Boone 

(Two vacancies.) 

STATE BOARD OF ELECTIONS 

Rev. 4300; 1901, c. 89, s. 5; 1933, c. 165, s. 1; C. S. 5921; G. S. 163-8 

Composition: Five members appointed by the Governor. 

Hubert E. Olive, Chairman (D) Lexington 

Walter H. Woodson, Secretary (D) Salisbury 

J. Ray Morgan (D) Waynesville 

Adrian S. Mitchell (R) Winton 

Thomas C. Carter (R) Mebane 

R. C. Maxwell, Executive Secretary Raleigh 

EMPLOYMENT SECURITY COMMISSION 

Ex. 1936 c. 1, s. I'D; 1941, c. 108, s. 10; 1941, c. 279, ss. 1-3; 
1943,, c. 277, s. 15; 1947 c. 598; G. S. 96-3 

Composition: Seven members appointed by the Governor. 

Henry E. Kendall, Chairman Raleigh 

R. Dave Hall Belmont 

Marion W. Heiss Greensboro 

C. A. Fink Spencer 

Dr. Harry D. Wolf Chapel Hill 

Buxton Midyette Jackson 

Mrs. W. T. Bost Raleigh 

GASOLINE AND OIL INSPECTION BOARD 

1937, c. 425, s. 9; 1941, c. 220; G. S. 119-26 

Composition: Five members. Two Ex-officio, three appointed 
by the Governor. 

Edwin Gill, Commissioner Revenue, Chairman, Ex-officio. .Raleigh 
H. L. Shankle, Director Gasoline and Oil Inspection 

Division, Secretary, Ex-officio Raleigh 

J. H. Quattlebaum Charlotte 

Henry C. Dobson Elkin 

Ray Bandy Rocky Mount 



250 North Carolina Manual 

GENERAL STATUTES COMMISSION 

1945, c. 157; 1947 c. 114; G. S. 164-14 

Composition: Nine members appointed as follows: One each by 
the Presidents of the N. C. State Bar and N. C. Bar Association; 
one each by the Deans of the law schools of Duke, Wake Forest 
and the University of N. C; one each by the President of the 
Senate and the Speaker of the House, and two by the Governor. 

Robert F. Moseley, Chairman Greensboro 

I. M. Bailey Raleigh 

Dan K. Edwards Durham 

Luther E. Barnhart Concord 

Frank W. Hanft Chapel Hill 

Albert R. Menard, Jr Wake Forest 

Dr. Malcolm McDermott Durham 

Henry A. McKinnon Lumberton 

Ralph H. Ramsey, Jr Brevard 

Clifton W. Beckwith, Secretary, Ex-officio Raleigh 

NORTH CAROLINA STATE BOARD OF HEALTH 

Rev. s. 4435; Code, s. 2875; 1879, c. 177, s. 1; 1885, c. 237, s. 1; 
1893, c. 214, s. 1; 1911, c. 62, s. 1; 1931, c. 177, s. 1; 1945, c. 281; 

C. S. 7048; G. S. 130-1 

Composition: Nine members. Five appointed by the Governor, 

four elected by the Medical Society. 

Dr. S. D. Craig, President Winston-Salem 

Dr. G. G. Dixon, Vice-President Ayden 

Dr. H. Lee Large Rocky Mount 

Dr. W. T. Rainey Fayetteville 

Dr. Hubert B. Haywood Raleigh 

Dr. John LaBruce Ward Asheville 

Dr. James 0. Nolan Kannapolis 

Mr. Jasper C. Jackson Lumberton 

Dr. Paul E. Jones Farmville 

Dr. J. W. R. Norton, State Health Officer, Secretary Raleigh 



Governmental Boards and Commissions 251 

STATE HIGHWAY AND PUBLIC WORKS COMMISSION 

1933, c. 172, s. 2; 1935, c. 257; s. 1; 1937, c. 297, s. 1; 
1941, c. 57, s. 1; 1945, c. 895; G. S. 136-1 

Composition: Chairman and ten commissioners appointed by the 
Governor. 

H. W. Jordan, Acting Chairman Cedar Falls 

Merrill Evans Ahoskie 

John G. Clark Greenville 

James A. Bridger Bladenboro 

John N. Hackney Wilson 

George W. Kane Roxboro 

George S. Coble Lexington 

Ben E. Douglas Charlotte 

Raymond Smith . Mt. Airy 

T. Max Watson Spindale 

D. Reeves Noland Waynesville 

STATE (HOSPITAL) ADVISORY COUNCIL 

1945, c. 1096; G. S. 131-120 

Claude F. Gaddy, Chairman Raleigh 

Dr. R. E. Earp Selma 

James P. Richardson Charlotte 

George Watts Hill Durham 

Dr. David A. Young Raleigh 

NORTH CAROLINA HOSPITALS BOARD OF CONTROL 

1943, c. 136; 1945, c. 925; G. S. 122-7* 

Composition: Fifteen members appointed by the Governor. 

H. 0. Lineberger, Chairman Raleigh 

W. G. Clark, Vice-Chairman Tarboro 

Mrs. Andrew Blair, Secretary Charlotte 

T. C. Byrum Edenton 

Thomas O'Berry Goldsboro 

R. P. Richardson Reidsville 

John Umstead Chapel Hill 

J. L. Daw^kins Fayetteville 



252 North Carolina Manual 

Ryan McBryde Raeford 

Dr. T. V. Goode Statesville 

Dr. Yates S. Palmer Valdese 

Francis A. Whiteside Gastonia 

Kelly E. Bennett Bryson City 

Leonard L. Oettinger Kinston 

Mrs. Rivers D. Johnson Warsaw 

David A. Young, M.D., General Superintendent Raleigh 

Roy M. Pui'ser, General Business Manager Goldsboro 

*(This Board has the management of the State Hospital at 
Raleigh, the State Hospital at Morganton, the State Hospital at 
Goldsboro, the State Hospital at Butner, and the Caswell Training 
School.) 

NORTH CAROLINA INDUSTRIAL COMMISSION 
1929, c. 120, s. 51; 1931, c. 274, s. 8; G. S. 97-77 

Composition: Three members appointed by the Governor. 

T. A. Wilson, Chairman Winston-Salem 

Pat Kimzey Brevard 

Buren Jurney Statesville 

NORTH CAROLINA INSURANCE ADVISORY BOARD 

1945, c. 383, G. S. 58-27.1 

Composition: Seven Members. One statutory and six appointed 
by the Governor. 

William P. Hodges, Commissioner of Insurance, 

Chairman, ( Statutory) Raleigh 

W. H. Andrews Greensboro 

Thomas F. Southgate Durham 

George F. Jones Charlotte 

Edwin Pate Laurinburg 

John H. Anderson, Jr Raleigh 

W. H. Nelson Spray 



Governmental Boards and Commissions 253 

THE BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS OF THE LAW 

ENFORCEMENT OFFICERS' BENEFIT 

AND RETIREMENT FUND 

1937, c. 349, s. 8; 1939, c. 6; 1941 cc. 56, 157; 1943, c. 145; 

G. S. 143-166 

Composition: Seven members. Three Ex-officio, four appointed 
by the Governor. 

Henry L. Bridges, State Auditor, Chairman Ex-officio .... Raleigh 
William P. Hodges, Commissioner Insurance, 

Secretary, Ex-officio Raleigh 

Brandon P. Hodges, State Treasurer, Ex-officio Raleigh 

John M. Gold Winston-Salem 

C. V. Faulkner Nashville 

B. Everett Jordan Saxapahaw 

W. B. Lentz Asheville 

LIBRARY COMMISSION OF NORTH CAROLINA 

1909, c. 873, s. 1; C. S. 6597; G. S. 125-18 

Composition: Five members. Tm^o Ex-officio, two appointed by 
the N. C. Library Association, one appointed by the Governor. 

Carrie Broughton, Chairman, Ex-officio Raleigh 

Dr. Clyde A. Erwin, Superintendent Public Instruction, 

Ex-officio Raleigh 

Mrs. Ford S. Worthy Washington 

Lawrence Wallace Smithfield 

J. W. Adkins Gastonia 

Miss Marjorie Beal, Executive Secretary Raleigh 

LOCAL GOVERNMENT COMMISSION 

1931, c. 60, s. 7; 1931, c. 296, s. 8; 193a, c. 31, s. 1; G. S. 159-3 

Composition: Nine members. Four Ex-officio, five appointed by 
the Governor. 
Brandon P. Hodges, State Treasurer, Chairman and Treasurer, 

Ex-officio Raleigh 

Thad Eure, Secretary of State, Ex-officio Raleigh 

Henry L. Bridges, State Auditor, Ex-officio Raleigh 

Edwin Gill, Commissioner of Revenue, Ex-officio Raleigh 



254 North Carolina Manual 

R. Lynn Bernhardt Salisbury 

S. P. Douglas Lumberton 

W. F. Carr Durham 

Jas. G. Haynes Winston-Salem 

Jno. L. Skinner Littleton 

W. E. Easterling, Secretary Raleigh 

LOCAL GOVERNMENTAL EMPLOYEES' 
RETIREMENT SYSTEM 

1938, c. 390, s. 8; 1941, c. 357, s. 6; 1943, c. 535; 1945, c. 526; 
1947, c. 259; G. S. 128-28 

Composition: Ten members. Two Ex-officio, eight appointed by 
the Governor and approved by the Senate. 

Brandon P. Hodges, State Treasurer, Chairman, Ex-officio, Raleigh 

Clyde A. Erwin, Supt. Public Instruction, Ex-officio Raleigh 

Caldwell McDonald Charlotte 

Paul Kelly Raleigh 

Millard F. Jones Rocky Mount 

Jonathan Woody Waynesville 

Mrs. Annie Swindell Durham 

Walter C. Sanders Monroe 

Thomas F. Royal Wadesboro 

Earl Tate Lenoir 

Nathan H. Yelton, Executive Secretary Raleigh 

NORTH CAROLINA MEDICAL CARE COMMISSION 

1945, c. 1096, G. S. 131-117 

Composition: Twenty members. Two Ex-officio, eighteen ap- 
pointed by the Governor. 

James H. Clark, Chairman Elizabethtown 

Clarence Poe, Vice-Chairman Raleigh 

J. W. Bean Spencer 

Paul B. Bissette Wilson 

Franklin J. Blythe Charlotte 

Dr. W. M. Coppridge Durham 

Don S. Elias Asheville 

Sample B. Forbus Durham 

Dr. G. Fred Hale Raleigh 



Governmental Boards and Commissions 255 

Dr. Fred C. Hubbard North Wilkesboro 

B. Everett Jordan Saxapahaw 

Dr. W. S. Rankin Charlotte 

Mrs. Dillard Reynolds Winston-Salem 

William M. Rich Durham 

W. B. Rodman, Jr Washington 

Rev. C. E. Rozzelle Winston-Salem 

Flora Wakefield, R.N Raleigh 

Dr. J. Street Brew^er Roseboro 

Dr. J. W. R. Norton, Ex-officio Raleigh 

Dr. Ellen B. Winston, Ex-officio Raleigh 

Dr. John A. Ferrell, Executive Secretary Raleigh 

NORTH CAROLINA MERIT SYSTEM COUNCIL 

1941, c. 370, s. 1; G. S. 126-1 

Composition: Five members appointed by the Governor. 

J. L. Memory, Jr., Chairman Wake Forest 

Gordon Hunter Roxboro 

Hoyt W. Boone Greensboro 

Col. J. W. Harrelson Raleigh 

Alton A. Lennon Wilmington 

Dr. Frank T. DeVyver, Supervisor Durham 

N. C. MUNICIPAL BOARD OF CONTROL 

1917, c. 136, sub. c. 2, s. 4; 1935, c. 440; 1941, c. 97; 
C. S. 2779; G. S. 160-196 

Composition: Three members. All Ex-officio under the Act. 

Harry McMullan, Attorney General, Chairman Raleigh 

Thad Eure, Secretary of State, Secretary Raleigh 

Stanley Winborne, Chairman Utilities Commission Raleigh 

THE NORTH CAROLINA STATE BAR COUNCIL 
1933, e. 210; 1937, c. 51; G. S. 84-17 

Composition: Twenty-five members of the Council. Four Ex-of- 
ficio as officers of the North Carolina State Bar, and one each 
from the twenty-one Judicial District of the State. 



256 North Caroijna Manual 

OFFICERS: . , 

Thomas P. Pruitt, President Hickory 

J. B. James, First Vice President Greenville 

Armistead W. Sapp, Second Vice President Greensboro 

Edward L. Cannon, Secretary-Treasurer Raleigh 

COUNCILLORS: 

Junius D. Grimes, First District Washington 

Z. V. Norman, Second District Plymouth 

Julius Banzet, Third District Warrenton 

D. H. Bland, Fourth District Goldsboro 

Albion Dunn Fifth District Greenville 

John D. Warlick, Sixth District Jacksonville 

I. M. Bailey, Seventh District Raleigh 

Louis J. Poisson, Eighth District Wilmington 

Dickson McLean, Ninth District Lumberton 

R. P. Reade, Tenth District Durham 

G. H. Hastings, Eleventh District Winston-Salem 

J. F. Spruill Twelfth District Lexington 

W. L. Mann, Thirteenth District Albemarle 

J. Laurence Jones, Fourteenth District Charlotte 

H. M. Robins, Fifteenth District Asheboro 

B. F. Williams, Sixteenth District Lenoir 

Kyle Hayes, Seventeenth District North Wilkesboro 

R. W. Proctor, Eighteenth District Marion 

Kester Walton, Nineteenth District Asheville 

John Queen, Twentieth District Waynesville 

P. W. Glidewell, Sr. Twenty-first District Reidsville 



STATE BOARD OF PENSIONS 

1921, c. 189, s. 1; C. S. 5168(a); G. S. 112-7 

Composition: Three members. All Ex-ofRcio under the above Act. 

W. Kerr Scott, Governor Raleigh 

Harry McMullan, Attorney General Raleigh 

Henry L. Bridges, Auditor Raleigh 



Governmental Boards and Commissions 257 

NORTH CAROLINA STATE PORTS AUTHORITY 

1945, c. 1097, s. 1, G. S. 143-216 

Composition: Seven members appointed by the Governor. 

R, B. Page, Chairman Wilmington 

A. G. Myers, Vice-Chairman Gastonia 

W. O. Huske, Secretary and Treasurer Fayetteville 

H. S. Gibbs Morehead City 

Samuel B. Frink Southport 

T. Henry Wilson Morganton 

J. H. White Winston-Salem 



STATE PROBATION COMMISSION 

1937, c. 132, s. 5; G. S. 15-201 

Composition: Five members appointed by the Governor. 

Dr. Clyde A. Erwin Raleigh 

Judge W. C. Harris Raleigh 

Dr. John S. Bradway Durham 

Judge Wilson Warlick Newton 

L. P. McLendon Greensboro 

J. H. Sample, Director Asheville 



NORTH CAROLINA STATE BOARD OF PUBLIC WELFARE 

Rev. s. 3913; Code, s. 2331; 1868-9, c. 170, s. 2; 1909, c. 899; 1937. 
c. 319, s. 1; 1943, c. 775, s. 1; 1945, c. 43; C. S. 5004; G. S. 108-1 

Composition: Seven members appointed by the Governor. 

Irving Carlyle, Chairman Winston- Salem 

E. Hervey Evans, Vice-Chairman Laurinburg 

Mrs. R. H. Latham, Secretary Asheville 

Robert Hairston Reidsville 

Mrs. Walter C. Crowell Monroe 

R. A. Whitaker Kinston 

Frank A. Daniels Raleigh 

Dr. Ellen Winston, Commissioner Raleigh 



2.'58 North Carolina Manual 

DIVISION OF PURCHASE AND CONTRACT 

1931, cc. 261, 396; C. S. 7502; G. S. 143-48 

W. Z. Betts, Director Raleigh 

Board of Award: 

Edwin Pate Laurinburg 

R. Grady Rankin Gastonia 

W. Frank Taylor Goldsboro 

Larry I. Moore, Jr Wilson 

T. Clarence Stone Stoneville 

LeRoy Martin Raleigh 

NORTH CAROLINA RECREATION COMMISSION 

1945, c. 757, s. 3; G. S. 143-207 

Composition: Eleven members. Four Ex-officio, seven appointed 
by the Governor. 

W. Kerr Scott, Governor, Ex-officio Raleigh 

Dr. Clyde A. Erwin, Superintendent of Public Instruction 

Ex-officio Raleigh 

R. Bruce Etheridge, Director, Department of Conserva- 
tion and Development, Ex-officio Raleigh 

Dr. Ellen Winston, Commissioner of Public Welfare, Ex- 
officio Raleigh 

R. L. McMillan, Chairman Raleigh 

Montgomery S. Hill, Vice-Chairman Greensboro 

Rev. Charles S. Hubbard Hillsboro 

W. J. Kennedy, Jr Durham 

Mrs. John G. Neviritt Charlotte 

Max A. Parrish Gastonia 

K. W. Watkins Boone 

ROANOKE ISLAND HISTORICAL ASSOCIATION 

1945, c. 953, G. S. 143-200 

Composiion: Twenty-four members. Three Ex-officio, twenty- 
one appointed by the Association. 



Governmental Boards and Commissions 259 

OFFICERS: 

Jonathan Daniels, Chairman Raleigh 

Lindsay C. Warren, Honorary Vice-Chairman Washington 

Herbert Peele, Honorary Vice-Chairman Elizabeth City 

W. D. Carmichael, Honorary Vice-Chairman Chapel Hill 

Dr. Clarence Poe, Honorary Vice-Chairman Raleigh 

Melvin Daniels, Vice-Chairman Manteo 

C. S. Meekins, Treasurer Manteo 

Isaac P. Davis, Secretary Manteo 

Dr. C. C. Crittenden, Historian Raleigh 

Martin Kellogg, General Counsel Manteo 

DIRECTORS: 

W. Kerr Scott, Governor, Ex-oflficio Raleigh 

Harry McMullan, Attorney General, Ex-ofRcio Raleigh 

Dr. C. C. Crittenden, Director Department 

Archives & History, Ex-officio Raleigh 

J. C. B. Ehringhaus Raleigh 

J. Spencer Love Greensboro 

Miles Clark Elizabeth City 

Mrs. Dillard Reynolds Winston-Salem 

D. Hiden Ramsey Asheville 

Victor Meekins Manteo 

John Harden Greensboro 

Mrs. Frank P. Graham Chapel Hill 

E. L. Winslow Hertford 

Mrs. Ford S. Worthy Washington 

R. Bruce Etheridge Raleigh 

Theodore S. Meekins Manteo 

Roy Davis Raleigh 

M. K. Fearing Manteo 

Dr. C. Sylvester Green Durham 

Mrs. Charles A. Cannon Concord 

Paul Green Chapel Hill 

Samuel Selden Chapel Hill 

*J. Melville Broughton Raleigh 

Melvin Daniels Manteo 



* Deceased. 



260 North Carolina Manual 

NORTH CAROLINA RURAL ELECTRIFICATION AUTHORITY 

1935, c. 288, s. 1; G. S. 117-1 
Composition: Six members appointed by the Governor. 

Gwyn B. Price, Chairman Raleigh 

Dr. S. H. Hobbs, Jr., Vice-Chairman Chapel Hill 

Dr. Jane S. McKimmon Raleigh 

E. F. Allen Lenoir 

W. M. Sherard Hendersonville 

D. E. Purcell Reidsville 

STATE STREAM SANITATION AND CONSERVATION 

COMMITTEE 

1945, c. 1010, s. 3; G. S. 143-213 

Composition: Sixteen members. Six Ex-officio, ten appointed by 
the Governor. 

James M. Jarrett, Chairman, Ex-officio Raleigh 

W. H. Riley, Secretary, Ex-officio Raleigh 

Dr. J. W. R. Norton, Ex-officio Raleigh 

R. Bruce Etheridge, Ex-officio Raleigh 

Herman G. Baity, Ex-officio Chapel Hill 

Capus Waynick, Ex-officio Raleigh 

Fred Doutt Canton 

John C. Roberts Gastonia 

Earl N. Phillips High Point 

P. M. Burdett Asheville 

Roy Williamson Rocky Mount 

J. V. Whitfield Burgaw 

W. P. Saunders Robbins 

J. S. Silversteen Brevard 

John H. Isenhour Salisbury 

T. F. Bridgers Wilson 

THE NORTH CAROLINA SYMPHONY SOCIETY, INC. 

194.3, c. 755; 1947, c. 1049; G. S. 140-6 

Composition: Sixteen members. Two Ex-officio, four appointed 
by the Governor, ten chosen by the members of the Symphony 
Society. 



Governmental Boards and Commissions 261 

OFFICERS: 

Spencer Murphy, President Salisbury 

Russell M. Grumman, Exec. Vice-President Chapel Hill 

Mrs. Chas. E. Johnson, Vice-President Raleigh 

Mrs. Ernest Hunter, Vice-President Charlotte 

Richard E. Thigpen, Vice-President Charlotte 

Dr. Christopher Crittenden, Secretary Raleigh 

A. C. Hall, Treasurer Raleigh 

Albin Pikutis, Business Manager & Asst. Treasurer . . Chapel Hill 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE: 

Governor W. Kerr Scott, Ex-ofRcio Raleigh 

Dr. Clyde A. Erwin, Ex-officio Raleigh 

Mrs. A. C. Burnham Chapel Hill 

C. Sylvester Greene Durham 

Russell M. Grumman Chapel Hill 

A. C. Hall Raleigh 

John W. Harden Greensboro 

Mrs. Charles E. Johnson Raleigh 

Robert W. Madry Chapel Hill 

Mrs. Fred B. McCall Chapel Hill 

Spencer Murphy Salisbury 

Benjamin F. Swalin Chapel Hill 

Elizabeth Van Valkenburg Raleigh 

Dr. Christopher Crittenden Raleigh 

Dr. Harry E. Cooper Raleigh 

Cleveland Thayer Asheboro 



TEACHERS' AND STATE EMPLOYEES' 
RETIREMENT SYSTEM 

1941, c. 25, s. 6; 1943, c. 719; 1947, c. 259; G. S. 135-6 

Composition: Eight members. Two Ex-officio, six appointed by 
the Governor and approved by the Senate. 
Brandon P. Hodges, State Treasurer, Chairman, 

Ex-officio Raleigh 

Dr. Clyde A. Erwin, Supt. Public Instruction, 

Ex-officio Raleigh 



262 North Carolina Manual 

Paul Kelly Raleigh 

Millard F. Jones Rocky Mount 

Jonathan Woody Waynesville 

Mrs. Annie Swindell Durham 

Walter C. Sanders Monroe 

Thomas F. Royal Wadesboro 

Nathan H. Yelton, Executive Secretary Raleigh 

TEXTBOOK COMMISSION 

1923, c. 136, s. 325; 1943, c. 627, s. 1; 1945, c. 707, ss. 4, 12; 
C. S. 5735; G. S. 115-278.4 

Composition: Twelve members. Appointed by the Governor and 
the Superintendent of Public Instruction. 

Dr. L. E. Spikes, Chairman Burlington 

Elementary Division: 

Frances Lacy, Secretary Raleigh 

Grace Brunson Winston-Salem 

Eloise Rankin Charlotte 

Mary Blackstock Asheville 

Mrs. Floyd Souders Fayetteville 

Mrs. Manley Williams Wilmington 

High School Division: 

Jinsie Underwood, Secretary Gastonia 

Mrs. Estelle McClees Komerska Burlington 

Iva E. Shockley Durham 

E. M, Thompson Burgaw 

George S. Willard, Jr Wilson 

UTILITIES COMMISSION 
1933, c. 134; 1941, c. 97; G. S. 62-1 

Composition: Three members appointed by the Governor and 
approved by the Senate. 

Stanley Winborne, Chairman Raleigh 

Fred C. Hunter Raleigh 

Robert Grady Johnson Raleigh 

Elsie Riddick, Chief Clerk Raleigh 



Governmental Boards and Commissions 263 

VETERANS COMMISSION 
1945, c. 723; G. S. 165-5 

Composition: Five members appointed by the Governor. 

Burgin Pennell, Chairman Asheville 

Robin S. Kirby, Vice-Chairman Charlotte 

S. Amos Maynard, Secretary Greensboro 

Josiah A. Maultsby Whiteville 

Herbert H. Taylor Tarbtro 

Jack C. Pamplin, Acting Director Reidsville 

N. C. WILDLIFE RESOURCES COMMISSION 

1947, c. 263; G. S. 143-241 
District 

1 — Jas R. Winslow^ Robersonville 

2 — Thomas J. White, Chairman Kinston 

3— S. B. Coley Raleigh 

4 — Harry A. Greene Raeford 

5 — Frank T. Erwin Durham 

6— D. K. Sing Charlotte 

7 — R. Floyd Crouse Sparta 

8 — Geo. W. Keesee Gastonia 

9 — Dan M. Furr Asheville 

Clyde P. Patton, Director Raleigh 



NORTH CAROLINA INSTITUTIONS 

CORRECTIONAL (White) 

Eastern Carolina Industrial Training School for Boys, 

Rocky Mount 

1923, c. 254, s. 2; 1925, c. 306, s. 5; 1927, c. 144; C. S. 7362; 

G. S. 134-67 

Under the North Carolina Boai'd of Correction and Training. 
1943, c. 776; G. S. 134-90 

State Home and Industrial School for Girls, Saaiarcand 

1917, c. 255, s. 2; 1925, c. 306, s. 4; 1929, c. 219, s. 1; 1»37, c. 147, s. 
1; 1947, c. 226; C. S. 7329; <J. ;g. 134-32 

Under the North Carolina Board of Correci:oi\ a*id Training. 
1943, c. 776; G. S. 134-90 

Stonewall Jackson Manual Training and Industrir^ School, Concord 

1907, c. 509, s. 6; 1907, c. 955, s. 2; 1925, c. 806, s. 2; 
C. S. 7313; G. S. 134-1 

Under the North Carolina Board of Correction and Training. 
1943, c. 776; G. S. 134-90 

CORRECTIONAL (Negro) 

Morrison Training School, Hoffman 

1921, c. 190, s. 2; 1925, c. 306, s. 6; 1927, c. 63; 1941, c. 241; 

G. S. 134-90 

Under the North Carolina Board of Correction and Training. 
1943, c. 776; G. S. 134-90 

State Training School for Negro Girls, Kinston 
1943, c. 381; 1947, c. 226; G. S. 134-84.1 

Under the North Carolina Board of Correction and Training. 
1943, c. 776; G. S. 134-90 



264 



North Carolina Institutions 265 

EDUCATIONAL (WHITE) 
APPALACHIAN STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE, BOONE 

Rev. s. 4229; 1903, c. 798, ss. 1, 9, 11; 1907, c. 526, s. 1; 1915, c. 527 

s. 1; 1917, c. 100, s. 1; 1919, c. 231, s. 1; Pr. 1925, c. 204; 

Pr. 1929, c. 66; G. S. 116-66 

Composition: Nine members appointed by the Governor, ap- 
proved by Senate. 

V. D. Guire, President Lenoir 

G. P. Hagaman, Vice-President Valdese 

W. M. Moore Statesville 

W. J. Conrad, Jr Winston-Salem 

Wade E. Brown Boone 

Mrs. E, F. Reed Lenoir 

(Three vacancies) 



EAST CAROLINA TEACHERS COLLEGE, GREENVILLE 

1907, c. 820, s. 15; 1911, c. 159, s. 2; 1925, c. 306, s. 7; 1927, c. 164; 
1929, c. 259; C. S. 5866; G. S. 116-59 

Composition; Thirteen members. Twelve appointed by the Gov- 
ernor with the approval of the Senate. One Ex-officio. 

Dr. Clyde A. Ervdn, Chairman Ex-officio Raleigh 

Arthur B. Corey Greenville 

John P. Steadman Lumberton 

Arthur L. Tyler Rocky Mount 

Warren R. Williams Sanford 

Mrs. J. C. Holland Raleigh 

Thomas J. Hackney Wilson 

Dr. Lewis H. Swindell Washington 

Ralph M. Garrett Greenville 

Henry Belk Goldsboro 

C. P. Morris Hertford 

Hugh G. Horton Williamston 

T. T. Hamilton Wilmington 



266 North Carolina Manual 

NORTH CAROLINA SCHOOL FOR THE BLIND, RALEIGH 

Rev., 4187; Code s. 2227; 1881, c. 211, s. 1; 1917, c. 135, s. 1; 
1925, c. 306, s. 10; G. S. 116-106 

Composition: Eleven members appointed by the Governor. 

Alfred Williams, Chairman Raleigh 

George R. Bennette Greensboro 

E. J. Britt Lumberton 

Mrs. E. R. Buchan Kinston 

W. G. Enloe Raleigh 

Allison B. Farmer Bailey 

James Penland Asheville 

Ben R. Roberts Durham 

Dr. Carl V. Tyner Leaksville 

Carroll W. Weathers Raleigh 

E. N. Peeler, Secretary Raleigh 

(One vacancy) 

N. C. SCHOOL FOR THE DEAF AT MORGANTON 

Rev. s. 4293; 1891, c. 399, s. 2; 1901, c. 210; 1925, c. 306, s. 11; 
C. S. 5889; G. S. 116-121 

Composition: Seven members appointed by the Governor. 

Dr. How^ard E. Rondthaler, President Winston- Salem 

H. L. Wilson, Secretary Morganton 

W. L. Morris Marion 

L. A. Dysart Lenoir 

Rev. James R. Fortune Durham 

Dr. F. E. Motley Charlotte 

(One vacancy) 

OXFORD ORPHANAGE, OXFORD 

Private Laws, 1923, c. 119 

Composition: Three members appointed by the Governor. 

Dr. R. L. Flowers Durham 

T. L. Simmons Rocky Mount 

Benjamin Cone Greensboro 



North Carolina Institutions 267 

PEMBROKE STATE COLLEGE, PEMBROKE 

1925, c. 306, s. 9; 1929, c. 238; 1931, c. 275; 1941, c. 323; 

G. S. 116-81 

Composition: Eleven members appointed by the Governor. 

L. W. Jacobs, Chairman Pembroke 

John L. Carter, Secretary Pembroke 

S. A. Hammonds Lumberton 

Edmund Lowry Rowland 

M. L. Lowry Pembroke 

Z. A. Lowry Pembroke 

Elias Harris Maxton 

J. 0. Brooks Fairmont 

C. L. Maynor Pembroke 

James A. Sampson Pembroke 

J. R. Spaulding Rowland 

James E, Hillman, Ph.D., Director Raleigh 

TRUSTEES UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 

The State College of Agriculture and Engineering of the 

University of North Carolina at Raleigh 

Woman's College of the University of North Carolina 

at Greensboro 

Composition: One hundred members. Elected by the General 
Assembly. The legal term of office expires April 1st of year in- 
dicated. 

C. S. 5789; G. S. 116-4 

*Executive Committee 
Governor W. Kerr Scott, Chairman Raleigh 

1950 

Mrs. Laura Weil Cone Greensboro 

Mrs. May L. Tomlinson High Point 

Victor S. Bryant Durham 

*Term expires July 1, of year indicated. 



268 North Carolina Manual 

1952 

T. J. Pearsall Rocky Mount 

Clarence Poe Raleigh 

Clyde K. Council Wananish 

1954 

John W. Umstead Chapel Hill 

Jno W. Clark Franklinville 

J. C. B. Ehringhaus Raleigh 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES FOR LIFE 

Cameron Morris Charlotte Mecklenburg 

J. C. B. Ehringhaus Raleigh Wake 

Clyde R. Hoey .... Washington, D. C. (appointed from Cleveland) 
R. Gregg Cherry Gastonia Gaston 



EX-OFFICIO 

W. Kerr Scott, Governor . . . Haw River Alamance 

Clyde A. Erwin, State Su- 
perintendent of Public 
Instruction Rutherfordton Rutherford 

Arch T. Allen, 

Secretary to Board Raleigh Wake 



1949 

Miss Emily S. Austin Tarboro Edgecombe 

Miss Annie Moore Cherry . . Red Springs . . (appt. from Halifax) 

David Clark Charlotte Mecklenburg 

James H. Clark Elizabethtown Bladen 

Clyde K. Council Wananish Columbus 

*Josephus Daniels Raleigh Wake 

B. B. Everett Palmyra Halifax 

Mrs. R. S. Ferguson Taylorsville Alexander 



* Deceased. 



North Carolina Institutions 269 

James S. Ficklen Greenville Pitt 

James A. Gray Winston-Salem Forsyth 

R. L. Harris Roxboro Person 

W. E. Horner Sanford Lee 

Hugh Horton Williamston Martin 

R. E. Little Wadesboro Anson 

Dan K. Moore Sylva Jackson 

Thomas J. Pearsall Rocky Mount Nash 

J. Hawley Poole West End Moore 

J. A. Pritchett Windsor Bertie 

Claude W. Rankin Fayetteville Cumberland 

Dr. Foy Roberson Durham Durham 

T. Clarence Stone Stoneville Rockingham 

W. Frank Taylor Goldsboro Wayne 

Mrs. May L. Tomlinson .... High Point Guilford 

F. E. Wallace Kinston Lenoir 

Graham Woodard Wilson Wilson 

1951 

Arch T. Allen Raleigh Wake 

E. S. Askew Oriental Pamlico 

Kemp D. Battle Rocky Mount Nash 

J. A. Bridger Bladenboro Bladen 

Charles A. Cannon Concord Cabarrus 

Thurmond Chatham Winston- Salem Forsyth 

Wm. G. Clark Tarboro Edgecombe 

A. M. Dixon Gastonia Gaston 

F. W. Hancock, Jr Oxford Granville 

E. W. Stevens Warsaw Duplin 

Fred L Sutton Kinston Lenoir 

Charles A. Jonas Lincolnton Lincoln 

A. H. London Pittsboro Chatham 

Mrs. Sadie McB. McCain . . Sanitorium Hoke 

*Mrs. Gertrude D. McKee . Sylva Jackson 

R. A. Maynard Burlington Alamance 

"Raymond Maxwell New Bern Craven 

A. L. Monroe Raleigh Wake 

* Deceased. 



270 North Carolina Manual 

Kemp B. Nixon Lincolnton Lincoln 

John J. Parker Charlotte Mecklenburg 

R. W. Proctor Marion McDowell 

tR. J. Reynolds Winston-Salem Forsyth 

B. F. Royal Morehead City Carteret 

Wm. B. Shuford Hickory Catawba 

Miss Gi-ace Pemberton 

Taylor Danbury Stokes 

1953 

Wade Barber Pittsboro Chatham 

Samuel M. Blount Washington Beaufort 

Victor S. Bryant Durham Durham 

Gertrude Carraway New Bern Craven 

John W. Clark Franklinville Randolph 

Collier Cobb, Jr Chapel Hill Orange 

George S. Coble Lexington Davidson 

Mrs. Laura Weil Cone Greensboro Guilford 

John G. Dawson Kinston Lenoir 

Joseph C. Eagles Wilson Wilson 

E. Leigh Winslow Hertford Perquimans 

W. Roy Hampton Plymouth Washington 

John Sprunt Hill Durham Durham 

B. K. Lassiter Oxford Granville 

John Q. LeGrand Wilmington New Hanover 

Henry A. Lineberger Gastonia Gaston 

Mrs. Frances Newsome 

Miller Raleigh Wake 

Glenn C. Palmer Waynesville Haywood 

Edwin Pate Laurinburg Scotland 

James C. Pittman Sanford Lee 

J. E. Ramsey Salisbury Rowan 

Roy Rowe Burgaw Pender 

J. Benton Stacy Ruffin Rockingham 

Kenneth S. Tanner Spindale Rutherford 

William B. Umstead Durham Durham 



T Resigned. 



North Carolina Institutions 271 

1955 

H. D. Bateman Wilson Wilson 

W. H. Currie Carthage Moore 

B. E. Fountain Rocky Mount Edgecombe 

P. B. Ferrebee Andrews Cherokee 

0. Max Gardner, Jr Shelby Cleveland 

H. S. Gibbs Morehead City Carteret 

A. H. Harris Oriental Pamlico 

1. T. Johnson Jefferson Ashe 

V. G. James Elizabeth City Pasquotank 

J. C. Kesler Salisbury . Rowan 

John Kerr, Jr Warrenton Warren 

W. L. Lumpkin Louisburg Franklin 

M. C. Lassiter Snow Hill Greene 

J. Spencer Love Greensboro Guilford 

J. F. Milliken Monroe Union 

R. I. Mintz Southport Brunswick 

H. B. Marrow Smithfield Johnston 

W. D. Merritt Roxboro Person 

L. P. McLendon Greensboro Guilford 

Mrs. Rosa B. Parker Albemarle Stanly 

Clarence Poe Raleigh Wake 

C. A. Rudisill Cherryville Gaston 

G. M. Stephens Asheville Buncombe 

J. W. Umstead Chapel Hill Orange 

■•■Lionel Weil Goldsboro Wayne 

NORTH CAROLINA VOCATIONAL TEXTILE SCHOOL 
1945, c. 806; G. S. 115-255.1 

Composition: Seven members. One Ex-oificio, six appointed by 
the Governor. 
J. Warren Smith, Director of Vocational Education, 

Ex-officio Raleigh 

Otis M. Mull, Chairman Shelby 

George W. Coggin, Secretary Raleigh 



* Deceased. 



272 North Carolina Manual 

R. L. Stowe, Ji- Belmont 

John F. Matheson Mooresville 

C. A. Cannon Kannapolis 

Frank L. Jackson Davidson 

Carl A. Rudisill Cherryville 

WESTERN CAROLINA TEACHERS COLLEGE, CULLOWHEE 

1925, c. 270, s. 1; 1929, c. 251, s. 2; G. S. 116-46 

Composition: Nine members appointed by the Governor, ap- 
proved by the Senate. 

Brandon P. Hodges, Chairman Asheville 

Harry E. Buchanan Hendersonville 

Dan M. Allison Sylva 

Edwin B. Whitaker Bryson City 

Morgan Cooper Forest City 

Glenn C. Palmer Clyde 

Mrs. J. S. Silversteen Brevard 

H. Bueck Murphy 

R. S. Jones Franklin 

W. E. Bird, Secretary Cullowhee 

EDUCATIONAL (NEGRO) 

THE NEGRO AGRICULTURAL AND TECHNICAL COLLEGE 

OF NORTH CAROLINA, GREENSBORO 

Rev., s, 4223; 1899, c. .389, ss. 2, 3; 1939, c. 65, s. 4; 1943, c. 132; 

C. S. 5828; G. S. 116-94 

Composition: Sixteen members. One Ex-officio, fifteen appointed 
by the Governor. 
Dr. Clyde A. Erwin, Supt, of Public Instruction, Ex-officio . Raleigh 

Chas. A. Hines, Chairman Greensboro 

G. Foster Hankins Lexington 

Shelly B. Caveness Greensboro 

J. Wilson Alexander Huntersville 

Guy B. Phillips Chapel Hill 

Geo. T. Ashford Red Springs 

Harry B. Caldwell Greensboro 

Z. "Vance Bunting Bethel 



North Carolina Institutions 273 

Emmett Bellamy Wilmington 

W. R. Vaughan Henderson 

H. A. Scott Haw River 

L. P. McLendon Greensboro 

Rev. John J. Green Greensboro 

Dr. C. T. Whitten High Point 

Pierce C. Rucker Greensboro 

ELIZABETH CITY STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE, 
ELIZABETH CITY 

1921, c. 61; 1925, c. 306; G. S. 116-103 

Composition: Nine members appointed by the Governor, ap- 
proved by the Senate. 

G. R. Little, Chairman Elizabeth City 

Mrs. J. G. Fearing, Secretary Elizabeth City 

W. I. Halstead South Mills 

Dr. N. C. Newbold Raleigh 

Capt. J. L. Wiggins Edenton 

Miles S. Clark Elizabeth City 

John H. Hall Elizabeth City 

Thomas Peele Elizabeth City 

W. Howard Pitt Hertford 

FAYETTEVILLE STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE, 
FAYETTEVILLE 

1921, c. 61; 1925, c. 306, s. 9; G. S. 116-103 

Composition: Nine members appointed by the Governor, ap- 
proved by the Senate. 

John H. Cook, Chairman Fayetteville 

Maurice Fleishman, Secretary Fayetteville 

W. E. Horner Sanford 

Terry A. Lyon Fayetteville 

Emil Rosenthal Goldsboro 

J. L. Emanuel Raleigh 

Richard M. Lilly Fayetteville 

Dr. W. L. McRae Red Springs 

Dr. Nathaniel Leary Wilmington 



274 North Carolina Manual 

NORTH CAROLINA COLLEGE AT DURHAM 
1925, c. 306, s. 9 (a); 1939, c. 65, s. 4; 1947, c. 189; G. S. 116-99 

Composition: One Ex-officio. Twelve members appointed by the 
Governor, approved by the Senate. 
Dr. Clyde A. Erwin, Supt. of Public Instruction, Ex-officio Raleigh 

Dr. R. L. Flowers, Chairman Durham 

Jule B. Warren, Secretary Raleigh 

Oscar G. Barker Durham 

E. T. Bost Concord 

R. M, Gantt Durham 

Dr. Edgar W. Knight Chapel Hill 

Spencer Murphy Salisbury 

J. T. Pritchett Lenoir 

Dr. C. C. Spaulding Durham 

W. Frank Taylor Goldsboro 

F. E. Wallace Kinston 

Capus Waynick Raleigh 

THE COLORED ORPHANAGE OF NORTH CAROLINA, 

OXFORD 

1887, c. 47; 1927, c. 162; G. S. 116-139 

Composition: Thirteen members. Five appointed by the Governor 
and eight under the by-laws of the Institution. 

Appointed by the Governor: 

Dr. R. L. Noblin Oxford 

John S. Watkins Oxford 

Benjamin K. Lassiter Oxford 

W. T. Yancey Oxford 

M. S. Currin Oxford 

Appointed under by-laws: 

Dr. E. E. Toney, Chairman Oxford 

Dr. T. A. Bishop Rich Square 

S. B. Simmons Greensboro 

Dr. C. C. Spaulding Durham 

Dr. G. D. Games Wilmington 

J. W. Mitchell Hampton, Va. 

Dr. J. W. Seabrook Fayetteville 

L. E. Austin Durham 



North Carolina Institutions 275 

N. C. SCHOOL FOR THE BLIND AND DEAF, RALEIGH 

Rev., 4187; Code s. 2227; 1881, c. 211, s. 1; 1917, c. 135, s. 1; 
1925, c. 306, s. 10; G. S. 116-106 

Composition: Eleven members appointed by the Governor. 

Alfred Williams, Chairman Raleigh 

George R. Bennette Greensboro 

E. J. Britt Lumberton 

Mrs. E. R. Buchan Kinston 

W. G. Enloe Raleigh 

Allison B. Farmer Bailey 

James Fenland Asheville 

Ben R. Roberts , Durham 

Carl V. Tyner Leaksville 

Carroll W. Weathers Raleigh 

E. N. Peeler, Secretary Raleigh 

(One vacancy) 

THE WINSTON-SALEM TEACHERS COLLEGE, 
WINSTON-SALEM 

1921, c. 61; 1925,, c. 306, s. 9; G. S. 116-103 
Composition: Nine members appointed by the Governor, ap- 
proved by the Senate. 

H. E. Fries, Chairman Winston-Salem 

John C. Whitaker, Vice-Chairman Winston- Salem 

Archie K. Davis Winston-Salem 

R. W. Gorrell Winston-Salem 

Gordon Gray Winston-Salem 

R. M. Hanes Winston-Salem 

0. A. Kirkman High Point 

J. Harmon Linville Kernersville 

Dr. R. S. Hairston Winston-Salem 

HOSPITALS (WHITE) 
CASWELL TRAINING SCHOOL, KINSTON 

1921, c. 183, s. 2; 1925, c. 306, s. 3; 1945, c, 925, s. 1; 

C. S. 6159 (a); G. S. 122-7 

Under the North Carolina Hospitals Board of Control 

1943, c. 136; G. S. 122-7 



276 North Carolina Manual 



r^^ 



THE NORTH CAROLINA HOSPITAL FOR THE TREATMENT 

OF SPASTIC CHILDREN 

1945, c. 504, G. S. 131-128 

Composition: Nine members appointed by the Governor. 

Dr. W. M. Roberts Gastonia 

Thomas O'Berry Goldsboro 

George Hughes Pollocksville 

Dr. O. L. Miller Charlotte 

Charles E. Norfleet Winston- Salem 

Robert P. Cherry Tarboro 

Dr. Lernox D. Baker Durham 

Dr. Ellen B. Winston Raleigh 

.Toel W. Wright Asheville 



THE MOSES H. CONE MEMORIAL HOSPITAL, 
GREENSBORO 

Pr. 1913, c. 400 

Composition: Fifteen members. Eight members appointed by 
Mrs. Moses H. Cone; three members appointed by the Governor; 
one members appointed by the Gi-eensboro City Commissioners; 
one member appointed by the Guilford County Commissioners; 
one member by Watauga County Commissioners and one by the 
Guilford County Medical Association. 

Herman Cone, President Greensboro 

Ceasar Cone, Vice-President Greensboro 

C. M. Vanstory, Jr. Secretary Greensboro 

N. S. Calhoun, Ti*easurer Greensboro 

Benjamin Cone Greensboro 

Mrs. Julius W. Cone Greensboro 

Miss Etta Cone Baltimore 

Bernard M. Cone Greensboro 

Dr. Samuel F. Ravenel Greensboro 

L. P. McLendon Greensboro 

Dr. E. D. Apple Greensboro 

Dr. Fred Patterson Greensboro 

Dr. Marion Y. Keith Greensboro 



North Carolina Institutions 277 

Charles A. Hines Greensboro 

Howard Holderness Greensboro 

J. E. Holshouser Boone 

N. C. SANATORIUMS FOR THE TREATMENT OF 
TUBERCULOSIS 

BLACK MOUNTAIN, McCAIN AND WILSON 

1907, c. 964; Ex. session 1913, c. 40, s. 1; 1923, cc. 96, 127; 1925, 
c. 306, s. 12; 1935, c. 91, ss. 2, 3; 1935, c. 138; 1939, c. 325; 

G. S. 131-62 

Composition: One Ex-officio. Twelve members appointed by the 
Governor with the approval of the Senate. 
Dr. J. W. R. Norton, Secretary of State Board of Health 

Ex-officio Raleigh 

Lee L. Gravely, Chairman Rocky Mount 

Dr. Thurman D. Kitchin, Vice-Chairman Wake Forest 

Carl C. Council, Secretary Durham 

Dr. G. E. Bell Wilson 

Dr. J. N. Britt Lumberton 

R. E. Finch Black Mountain 

Charles A. Cannon Concord 

Edwin Morgan Laurel Hill 

Mrs. P. P. McCain Southern Pines 

E. A. Rasberry Snow Hill 

Dr. Paul Ringer Asheville 

Dr. J. R. Terry Lexington 

NORTH CAROLINA ORTHOPEDIC HOSPITAL, GASTONIA 

1917, c. 199, s. 4; C. S. 7254; G. S. 131-1 
Composition: Nine members appointed by the Governor. 

Paul C. Whitlock, President Charlotte 

George Blanton, Chairman Shelby 

W. Harrelson, Secretary Gastonia 

Ralph S. Robinson, Treasurer Gastonia 

Kay Dixon Gastonia 

Paul R. Ervin Charlotte 



278 North Carolina Manual 

J. A. Jones Charlotte 

Dr. R. A. Moore Winston-Salem 

Herman Weil Goldsboro 

STATE HOSPITAL AT BUTNER 

1947, c. 537; G. S. 122-1 

Under the North Carolina Hospitals Board of Control 
1943, c. 136; G. S. 122-7 

STATE HOSPITAL AT MORGANTON 

1921, c. 183, s. 2; 1925, c. 306, s. 3; 1947, c. 537; G. S. 122-7 

Under the North Carolina Hospitals Board of Control 
1943, c. 136; G. S. 122-7 

STATE HOSPITAL AT RALEIGH 

1921, c. 183, s. 2; 1925, c. 306, s. 3; 1947, c. 537; G. S. 122-7 

Under the North Carolina Hospitals Board of Control 
1943, c. 136; G. S. 122-7 

HOSPITALS (NEGRO) 
STATE HOSPITAL AT GOLDSBORO 

1921, c. 183, s. 2; 1925, c. 306, s. 3; G. S. 122-7 

Under the management of the North Carolina Hospitals 

Board of Control. 
1943, c. 136; G. S. 122-7 

N. C. CONFEDERATE INSTITUTION 

Woman's Home at Fayetteville 
1913, c. 62; C. S. 5135; G. S. 112-2 
Composition: Seven members appointed by the Governor. 

Henry L. Anderson, Chairman Fayetteville 

A. E. Cook, Secretary Fayetteville 

Mrs. E. R. MacKethan Fayetteville 

Mrs. Quinton Gregory Halifax 

Mrs. Walter Woodard Wilson 

Mrs. J. S. Rowe Hickory 

Mrs. A. L. Thompson Greensboro 



Examining Boards 279 

EXAMINING BOARDS 
STATE BOARD OF ACCOUNTANCY 

1913, c. 157; 1925, c. 261, s. 11; 1939, c. 21; C. S. 7008; G. S. 93-12 
Composition: Four members appointed by the Governor. 

Elton B. Taylor, President Charlotte 

Charles E. Elberson, Vice-President Winston-Salem 

E. E. Peacock, Secretary-Treasurer Chapel Hill 

Charles Lowrimore Wilmington 

STATE BOARD OF ARCHITECTURAL EXAMINATION 
AND REGISTRATION 

1915, c. 270, s. 1; C. S. 4986; G. S. 83-2 

Composition: Five members appointed by the Governor. 

Walter W. Hook, President Charlotte 

Erie G. Stillwell, Vice-President Hendersonville 

J. Burton Wilder, Treasurer Greensboro 

Ross Shumaker, Secretary Raleigh 

James B. Lynch Wilmington 

STATE BOARD OF BARBER EXAMINERS 

1929, c. 119, s. 6; G. S. 86-6 

Composition: Three members appointed by the Governor. 

J. M. Cheek, Chairman High Point 

M. B. Berry Roxboro 

A. M. McCoy Black Mountain 

R. P. Branch, Executive Secretary Raleigh 

STATE BOARD OF CHIROPODY EXAMINERS 

1919, c. 78, s. 3; C. S. 6765; G. S. 90-190 

Composition: Three members appointed by the North Carolina 
Pedic Association. 

Fred W. Isaacs, Chairman Durham 

L. D. Abernethy, Secretary Charlotte 

0. B. McRae Greensboro 



\ 



280 North Carolina Manual 

NORTH CAROLINA STATE BOARD OF CHIROPRACTIC 

EXAMINERS 

1917. c. 73, s. 1; 1933, c. 442, s. 1 ; C. S. 6711; G. S. 90-140 

Composition: Three members appointed by the Governor. 

Dr. M. H. Dollar, President Raleigh 

Dr. Linwood G. Harrison, Vice-President High Point 

Dr. C. H. Peters, Secretary-Treasurer Rocky Mount 

NORTH CAROLINA LICENSING BOARD FOR CONTRACTORS 

1925, c. 318, s. 2; G. S. 87-2 

Composition : Five members appointed by the Governor. 

R. A. Bryan, Chairman Goldsboro 

H. S. Grain, Vice-Chairman Durham 

V. B. Higgins Greensboro 

N. R. Dickerson, Jr Monroe 

James M. Wells, Jr., Secretary-Treasurer Raleigh 

N. C. STATE BOARD OF COSMETIC ART EXAMINERS 

1933, c. 179; 1935, c. 54, s. 2; G. S. 88-13 
Composition: Three members appointed by the Governor. 

Mrs. R. J. Hinshaw, Chairman North Wilkesboro 

Mrs. Hilda Smith, Duke, Vice-Chairman Kinston 

Mrs. A. E. Pleasants, Secretary Greensboro 

Mrs. Lois Hilton, Executive Secretary Raleigh 

STATE BOARD OF DENTAL EXAMINERS 

1879, c. 139; 1915, c. 178; 1935, c. 66, s. 1; G. S. 90-22 
Composition: Six members elected by the Society and commis- 
sioned by the Governor. 

Dr. D. L. Pridgen, President Fayetteville 

Dr. Frank O. Alford, Secretary-Treasurer Charlotte 

Dr. Wilbert Jackson Clinton 

Dr. A. T. Jeannette Washington 

Dr. Neal Sheffield Greensboro 

Dr. Walter E. Clark , Asheville 



Examining Boards 281 

BOARD OF EXAMINERS OF ELECTRICAL CONTRACTORS 
1937, c. 87, s. 1; G. S. 87-39 

Composition: Five members, three appointed by the Governor, 
two Ex-officio. 

N. E. Cannady, Chairman, Ex-officio Oxford 

E. C. Peele, Ex-officio Burlington 

Marion B. Haynes, Vice-Chairman Asheville 

R. S. Fouraker Raleigh 

W. A. Darden Gieenville 

Mrs. James H. Anderson, Secretary-Treasurer Raleigh 

EMBALMERS LICENSING BOARD 

Rev., s. 4384; 1901, c. 338, ss. 1, 2,3; 1931, c. 174; 1945, c. 98, s. 1; 

C. S. 6777; G. S. 90-203 

Composition: Five members elected by The North Carolina 
Funeral Directors and Burial Association. 

Harlowe Mims, President Raleigh 

William Shepherd, Vice-President Hendersonville 

John Ward, Secretary-Treasurer Wilmington 

C. H. Brown Kannapolis 

Wilbur Vought Oxford 

STATE BOARD OF REGISTRATION FOR ENGINEERS 
AND LAND SURVEYORS 

1921, c. 1, s. 3; C. S. 6055(d); G. S. 89-3 

Composition: Five members appointed by the Governor. 

J. E. S. Thorpe, Chairman Franklin 

A. C. Lee, Vice-Chairman , Charlotte 

G. S. Harrell Shannon 

Robert B. Brice Raleigh 

Carroll L. Mann, Secretary Raleigh 

N. C. BOARD OF LAW EXAMINERS 

1933, c. 210, s. 10; c. 331; 1935, cc. 31, 61; 1941, c. 344, s. 6; 

G. S. 84-24 

Composition : Seven members elected by the Council of the N. C. 
State Bar. 



089 



North Carolina Manual 



L. R. Varser, Chairman Lumberton 

George B. Greene Kinston 

Kingsland Van Winkle Asheville 

Irving E. Carlyle Winston-Salem 

L. T. Hartsell, Jr Concord 

Bennett H. Perry Henderson 

Charles R. Jonas Lincolnton 

Edward L. Cannon, Secretary Raleigh 



STATE BOARD OF MEDICAL EXAMINERS 

Rev., s. 4492; Code, s. 3123; 1858-9, c. 258, ss. 3, 4; Extra Session 
1921, c. 44, s. 1; C. S. 6606; G. S. 90-2 

Composition: Seven members appointed by the N. C. Medical 
Society. 

Dr. Thomas Leslie Lee, President Kinston 

Dr. Ivan Procter, Secretary Raleigh 

Dr. Charles W. Armstrong Salisbury 

Dr. M. D. Bonner Jamestown 

Dr. R. B. McKnight Charlotte 

Dr. Paul G. Parker Erwin 

Dr. Malory A. Pittman Wilson 



NORTH CAROLINA BOARD OF NURSE EXAMINERS 

1917, c. 17, s. 1; 1925, c. 87, s. 2; 1931, c. 56; C. S. 6729; 

G. S. 90-158 

Composition: Five members. Three members elected by the asso- 
ciation, one each by the State Medical Society and the North Car- 
olina State Hospital Association. 

Miss Ethel Burton, R.N., President Raleigh 

Miss Miriam Daughtry, R.N., Secretary-Treasurer Raleigh 

Miss Esther Lewis Creasman, R.N Asheville 

Dr. Moir S. Martin Mount Airy 

Dr. Louten R. Hedgepeth Lumberton 



Examining Boards 283 

NORTH CAROLINA STATE BOARD OF EXAMINERS 

IN OPTOMETRY 

1909, c. 444, s. 3; 1915, c. 21, s. 1; 1935, c. 63; C. S. 6689; 

G. S. 90-116 

Composition: Five members appointed by the Governor. 

Dr. James A. Palmer, President Charlotte 

Dr. Henry B. Day, Secretary-Treasurer Raleigh 

Dr. E. Alan Bisanar Hickory 

Dr. Kenneth L. Quiggins Greenville 

Dr. P. N. DeVere Morganton 

NORTH CAROLINA STATE BOARD OF OSTEOPATHIC 
EXAMINATION AND REGISTRATION 

1907, c. 764, s. 1; 1913, c. 92, s. 1; 1937, c. 301, s. 1; 
C. S. 6701; G. S. 90-130 

Composition: Five members appointed by the Governor. 

Dr. E. M. Stafford, President Durham 

Dr. Frank R. Heine, Secretary-Treasurer Greensboro 

Dr. John H. Bell Elizabeth City 

Dr. Wallace Hoffman Statesville 

Dr. T. T. Spence Raleigh 

NORTH CAROLINA STATE BOARD OF PHARMACY 

Rev., s. 4473; 1905, c. 108, ss. 5, 7; C. S. 6652; G. S. 90-55 

Composition: Five members appointed by the Governor. 

J. G. Ballew, President Lenoir 

H. C. McAllister, Secretary-Treasurer Chapel Hill 

John C. Brantley, Jr Raleigh 

R. A. McDuffie Greensboro 

W. A. Gilliam Winston-Salem 

N. C. STATE BOARD OF PHOTOGRAPHIC EXAMINERS 

1935, c. 155, art 2, s. 1; c. 318; G. S. 92-2 

Composition: Five members apopinted by the Governor. 

Charles A. Farrell, Chairman Greensboro 

B. A. Culberson Asheville 



284 North Carolina Manual 

Ray W. Goodrich Winston-Salem 

George M. Hoole Charlotte 

Ben A. Stimson Statesville 

Edwin M. Stanley, Secretary-Treasurer Greensboro 

STATE BOARD OF EXAMINERS OF PLUMBING AND 
HEATING CONTRACTORS 

1931, c. 52, s. 1; 1933, c. 57; 1939, c. 224, s. 1; G. S. 87-16 

Composition: Seven members appointed by the Governor. 

W. H. Sullivan, Chairman Greensboro 

L. L. Vaughan, Vice-Chairman Raleigh 

J. M. Jarrett, Secretary-Treasurer Raleigh 

H. G. Baity Chapel Hill 

R. V. Sisk Charlotte 

R. H. Haley Charlotte 

C. C. Davis Wilmington 

W. F. Morrison, Executive Secretary Raleigh 

BOARD OF EXAMINERS FOR LICENSING TILE 
CONTRACTORS 

1937, c. 86, s. 3; G. S. 87-30 
Composition: Five members appointed by the Governor. 

J. Knight Davis, Secretary Wilmington 

G. W. Carter, Treasurer Kinston 

J. R. Renfrow, Jr Charlotte 

V. J. McDaniel Asheville 

Aldo Marus Greensboro 

NORTH CAROLINA BOARD OF VETERINARY 
MEDICAL EXAMINERS 

Rev., s. 5432; 190.3, c. 503, s. 2; C. S. 6755; G. S. 90-180 

Composition: Five members appointed by the Governor. 

R.' E. Taylor, President Hendersonville 

H. J. Rollins, Vice-President Rockingham 

P. C. McLain. Secretary-Treasurer High Point 

B. H. Kinsey Washington 

C. E. Nicks Elkin 



Examining Boards 285 

STATE OWNED RAILROADS 

DIRECTORS OF STATE-OWNED RAILROADS 
Directors Altantic and North Carolina Railroad 

Directors : 

^Raymond Maxwell New Bern 

Judson H. Blount Greenville 

L. B. Jenkins Kinston 

William Dunn, Sr New Bern 

James D. Potter Beaufort 

M. E. Robinson Goldsboro 

Dr. J. H. Harper Snow Hill 

Abel Warren Garland 

George P. Folk Edenton 

Leo H. Hai-vey Kinston 

H. S. Gibbs Morehead City 

George W. Ipock Ernul 

Officers: 

*Raymond Maxwell New Bern 

Leo H. Harvey, Vice President Kinston 

Judson H. Blount, Chairman of Board Greenville 

F. E. Wallace, Secretary-Treasurer Kinston 

William A. Allen, Jr., Attorney Kinston 

T. L. Blow, Expert Goldsboro 

Meriwether Lewis, Inspector Kinston 

Directors North Carolina Railroad 
Directors: 

Henry A. Dennis Henderson 

D. P. Stowe Belmont 

Herbert Miller Lincolnton 

Joseph T. Carruthers, Jr Greensboro 

James A. Adderton Lexington 

J. B. Benton Benson 

E. C. Greene Asheville 

E. S. Powell Reidsville 

* Deceased. 



286 North Carolina Manual 

Irving F. Hall Raleigh 

Hugh McRae Wilmington 

W. E. Holt Charlotte 

Officers: 

Joseph T. Carruthers, Jr., President Greensboro 

Alexander Webb, Vice President Raleigh 

Thomas W. Bird, Secretary-Treasurer Charlotte 

R. 0. Self, Asst. Secretary-Treasurer Raleigh 

LeRoy Martin, Asst. Secretary-Treasurer Raleigh 

Albert Doub, Expert Raleigh 

James H. Pou Bailey, Attorney Raleigh 



PART VI 
LEGISLATIVE 



MEMBERS OF THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY OF 

NORTH CAROLINA— SESSION 1949 

Officers and Members of the Senate 

OFFICERS 

H. P. Taylor President Wadesboro 

J. C. Pittman President pro tern Sanford 

S. Ray Byerly Principal Clerk Sanford 

Robert Rasberry Reading Clerk Grifton 

Herman Scott Sergeant-at-arms Rt. 3, Chapel Hill 

SENATORS 

(Alphabetically Arranged) 

Name District Party Address 

Allsbrook, Julian R. ...Fourth Democrat Roanoke Rapids 

Earnhardt, Luther E. . . Twenty^first Democrat Concord 

*Blythe, F. J Twentieth Democrat Charlotte 

Brock, B. C Twenty-fourth Republican Mocksville 

Campen, Sam M Second Democrat Alliance 

Crawford, W. H Thirty-second Democrat Sylva 

Currie, Claude Fourteenth Democrat Durham 

Dalton, Chas. C Twenty-seventh Democrat Spindale 

Dearman, C. H Twenty-fifth Democrat Statesville 

Eagles, J. C, Jr Sixth Democrat Wilson 

Fountain, L. H Fourth Democrat Tarboro 

Gass, Rex Twenty-second Democrat Winston-Salem 

Gibbs, Frank H Third Democrat Warrenton 

Halstead. W. I First Democrat South Mills 

Hester, R. J., Jr Tenth Democrat Eli-zabethtown 

Hodges, W. B Thirty-second Democrat Hendersonvilie 

Jones, Paul E., Dr Fifth Democrat Farmville 

Larkins, John D., Jr. . . Seventh Democrat Trenton 

Little, R. E Nineteenth Democrat Wadesboro 

Long, F. D Fourteenth Democrat Roxboro 

Marshall, Wm. F Twenty-third Democrat Walnut Cove 

McKinnon, Henry A. . . Eleventh Democrat Lumberton 

Moss, O. B Sixth Democrat Spring Hope 

Nichols, L. B Thirt.v-third Democrat Andrews 

Parker, Frank M Thirty-first Democrat Asheville 

Pate, Edwin Eighteenth Democrat Laurinburg 

Penny, Geo. T Seventeenth Democrat Greensboro 

Perry, H. B., Dr Tvv'enty-ninth Democrat Boone 

Peterson, C. A., Dr. . . . Thirtieth Republican Spruce Pine 

Phillips, Wade H Eighteenth Democrat Lexington 

Pittman, J. C Thirteenth Democrat Sanford 

Price, J. Hampton .... Fifteenth Democrat Leaksville 

Rankin, R. Grady . . . .Twenty-sixth Democrat Gastonia 

Richardson, O. L Nineteenth Democrat Monroe 

Rodman, John C Second Democrat Washington 

Rowe, Roy Ninth Democrat Burgaw 

Shaw, Gilbert A Tenth Democrat Fayetteville 

Simms, R. N., Jr Thirteenth Democrat Raleigh 

Talton, Hardy Eighth Democrat Pikeville 

Thomas, J. Benton .... Twelfth Democrat Raeford 

Vann, Henry Ninth Democrat Clinton 

Walker, Hal Hammer . . Twelfth Democrat Asheboro 

Ward, D. L Seventh Democrat New Bern 

Warlick, G. Andrew . . . Twenty-fifth Democrat Newton 

Weathers, Lee B Twenty-seventh Democrat Shelby 

Webb, James Sixteenth Democrat Hillsboro 

Whitley, Adam J., Jr. . . Eighth Democrat Smithfield 

Wilson, Max C Twenty-eighth Democrat Lenoir 

Winslow, J. Emmett . . First Democrat Hertford 

Woodson, Nelson Twenty-first Democrat Salisbury 

* Elected February 12, 1949, to succeed Joe L. Blythe, deceased. 

289 



290 North Carolina Manual 

senators 

Arranged by Districts 

(Democrats unless otherwise indicated) 

District Name Address 

1st— W. I. Halstead South Mills 

1st — J. Emmett Winslow Hertford 

2nd — Sam M. Campen Alliance 

2nd — John C. Rodman Washington 

3rd — Frank H. Gibbs Warrenton 

4th- Julian R. Allsbrook Roanoke Rapids 

4th — L. H. Fountain Tarboro 

5th — Dr. Paul E. Jones Farmville 

6th— J. C. Eagles, Jr Wilson 

6th — O. B. Moss Spring Hope 

7th — John D. Larkins. Jr Trenton 

Tth -D. L. Ward New Bern 

Sth-Hardy Talton Pikeville 

8th- -Adam J. Whitley, Jr Smithfield 

9th— Roy Rowe Burgaw 

9th— Henry Vann Clinton 

10th- -R. J. Hester, Jr Elizabethtown 

10th— Gilbert A. Shaw Fayetteville 

nth— Henry A. McKinnon Lumberton 

12th— J. Benton Thomas Raeford 

12th— Hal Hammer Walker Asheboro 

13th— J. C. Pittman Sanford 

13th— R. N. Simms, Jr Raleigh 

14th— Claude Currie Durham 

14th- -F. D. Long Roxboro 

15th— J. Hampton Price Leaksville 

16th— James Webb Hillsboro 

17th— Geo. T. Penny Greensboro 

18th -Edwin Pate Laurmburg 

18th— Wade H. Phillips Lexmgton 

19th— R. E. Little Wadesboro 

19th— O. L. Richardson Monroe 

20th— F. J. Blythe* Charlotte 

21st— Luther E. Earnhardt c. ?-^^ 

21st— Nelson Woodson ■ • ■. • t^alisbury 

22nd-Rex Gass Winston-Salem 

23rd— Wm. F. Marshall ^ ,?"^, -u^ 

24th-B. C. Brock (R) Mocksvil e 

?5th— C. H. Dearman Statesv.lle 

25th— G. Andrew Warlick Newton 

S6th— R. Grady Rankin Gastonia 

27th-Chas. C. Dalton ^^cu^l ! 

L7th— Lee B. Weathers t „ Z 

rSth- Max C. Wilson r"°I 

?9th-Dr. H. B. Perry _• • • ■ Boo^« 

.-^Oth-Dr. C. A. Peterson (R) ^^Thev U^ 

31st— Frank M. Parker xi' ' j • 

32nd-W. B. Hodges Hendersonv.lle 

s^f~T'^-R''-^^TV°"^ ;::::: :::::: 'Andrews 

33rd — L. B. Nichols 

* Elected February 12, 1949, to succeed Joe L. Blythe, deceased. 



RULES AND STANDING COMMITTEES 

OF THE SENATE 

1949 
Powers and Duties of the President 

1. The President shall take the chair at the hour fixed by law 
or at the time fixed by the Senate upon adjournment on the pre- 
ceding' legislative day, and shall call the members to order. 

2. It shall be the duty of the President, upon order being ob- 
tained, to have the Sessions of the Senate opened with prayer. 

3. In the absence of the President, the President pro tempore 
shall reconvene the Senate and preside, and during such time shall 
be vested with all powers of the President except that of casting 
a vote in case of tie when he shall have voted as a Senator. And 
in the event of the absence of the President and President pro 
tempore at any time fixed for the reconvening of the Senate, the 
Principal Clerk of the Senate, or in his absence also, some mem- 
ber of the Senate Committee on Rules, shall call the Senate to 
order and designate some member to act as President. 

4. After the prayer, and upon appearance of a quoixim, the 
President shall cause the Journal of the preceding day to be read 
and approved, unless the Chairman of the Committee on Journal 
or some member of the Senate by motion sustained by a majority 
of the members present, have the reading thereof dispensed with 
and the same approved as written. 

5. The President shall preserve order and decorum and proceed 
with the business of the Senate according to the rules adopted. He 
shall decide all questions of order, subject to an appeal to the 
Senate by any member, on which appeal no member shall speak 
more than once unless by leave of the Senate. A two-thirds vote 
of the members present shall be necessary to sustain any appeal 
from the ruling of the Chair. 

6. All questions for a vote shall be put as follows: "Those in 
favor say 'Aye'," and after the affirmative vote is expressed — 
"Opposed 'No'." After which the President will announce the re- 



291 



292 North Carolina Manual 

suit. If a division on any vote is desired, it must be called for im- 
mediately before the result of the voting: is announced on any 
question, and upon such call, the President shall require the mem- 
bers to stand and be counted for and against any proposition 
under consideration. 

7. The ayes and noes may be called for on any question before 
the vote is taken, and if the call is sustained by one-fifth of the 
Senators present, the roll of the Senate shall be called and the ayes 
and noes taken, and the same shall be entered upon the Journal. 
If a Senator desires the ayes and noes recorded on any question, 
he shall address the Chair and obtain recognition and say, "Upon 
that vote or question I call for the ayes and noes." Whereupon 
the President shall say, "Is the call sustained?" If one-fifth of the 
members present then stand the roll is called and the ayes and 
noes recorded. If less than one-fifth present stand, the Chair an- 
nounces, "An insufficient number up" and a viiia voce vote is then 
taken. 

8. If any question contains several distinct propositions, it shall 
be divided by the President, at the I'equest of any Senator, pro- 
vided each subdivision, if left to itself, shall form a substantive 
proposition. 

9. The President shall have general direction of the Hall of the 
Senate, and in case of any disturbance or disordeily conduct in 
the galleries or lobbies, he shall have the power to oi'der the same 
cleared. 

10. He shall have the right to call on any member to perform 
the duties of the Chair, but substitution shall not extend beyond 
one day. 

11. The Lieutenant Governor, as President of the Senate, being 
a Constitutional Officer shall not have the right to debate any ques- 
tion or to address the Senate upon any proposition unless by per- 
mission of the majority members present, and shall have the right 
to vote only when there is a tie vote upon any question or election. 

12. The Lieutenant Governor, as President of the Senate, unless 
he shall have by law disqualified himself from that office, shall have 
the exclusive right and authority to appoint all Committees, regu- 
lar or special, but he may delegate said authority in any instance, 
as he may choose. 



Senate 293 

13. All acts, addresses and resolutions, and all warrants and 
subpoenas issued by order of the Senate shall be signed by the 
President. 

14. The President shall appoint door-keepers and pages, and 
such laborers as may be necessary, and shall assign to them their 
duties during sessions, and when not in session they shall be under 
the direction of the Principal Clerk and Sergeant-at-Arms, to 
perform such duties as are necessary and proper to the conduct of 
the Senate. 

15. No person except members of the House of Representatives, 
clerks of the General Assembly, Judges of the Supreme and Su- 
perior Courts, State Officers, former members of the General 
Assembly and persons particularly invited and extended the privi- 
leges of the floor by the President shall be admitted to the floor 
of the Senate during its sessions : Provided, that no person except 
members of the House of Representatives and officers of the Gen- 
eral Assembly shall be allowed on the floor of the Senate or in the 
lobby in the rear of the President's desk, unless permitted by the 
President of the Senate. 

16. The President of the Senate, in the interest of orderly pro- 
cedure and in order properly to expedite the business of the Senate, 
may refuse to recognize any member for the purpose of extending 
the courtesies of the floor, lobbies or galleries to any one or group 
during any particular order of business, but shall recognize such 
member for said purpose at the close of such order of business if 
he then desire recognition. 

17. The President may assign such space or place on the floor 
of the Senate as he desires proper to Reporters desiring to take 
the proceedings of the sessions, provided such does not interfere 
with members of the Senate and its officers and clerks in the per- 
formance of their duties. 

18. Smoking shall not be allowed on the floor or galleries of the 
Senate during sessions : Provided, that smoking may be permitted 
in the side lobbies and in the lobby in the rear of the President's 
desk. 

19. The pages of the Senate shall be responsible to and under 
the direction of the President at all times when the Senate is 
in session, and shall not exceed fourteen in number. They shall 
report to the Principal Clerk at other times to be assigned such 
duties as he may direct and shall be under his supervision. 



294 North Carolina Manual 

Order of Business 

20. After approval of the Journal, the order of business shall 
be as follows: 

(1) Reports of standing committees. 

(2) Reports of select committees. 

(3) Introduction of bills, petitions, and resolutions. 
(3a) Messages from the House of Representatives. 

(4) Unfinished business of preceding day. 

(5) Special Orders. 

(6) General Orders — First, local bills on third reading roll call, 
then local bills on second reading roll call. After that the vica 
voce second reading local calendar in numerical order, taking up 
the Senate bills in first order. After disposition of the local calen- 
dar, the public calendar of bills will be considered in the same 
order, that is: 

(a) First, third i-eading roll call bills. 

(b) Second reading roll call bills. 

(c) Second reading bills to be considered viva voce, with Senate 
bills taking precedence in order over House bills. 

But messages from the Governor and House of Representatives 
and communications and reports from State Officers and reports 
from the Committee on Engrossed and Enrolled Bills may be re- 
ceived and acted on under any order of business. 

21. Any bill or other matter may be taken up out of order upon 
order of the President or upon motion sustained by a majority of 
the membership present and voting. 

Powers and Duties of Principal Clerk 

22. The President and the Principal Clerk of the Senate shall 
see that all bills shall be acted upon by the Senate in the order 
in which they stand upon the Calendar, unless otherwise ordered 
as hereinafter provided. The Calendar shall include the numbers 
and titles of bills and joint resolutions which have passed the 
House of Representatives and have been received by the Senate 
for concurrence. 

23. The Principal Clerk shall certify the passage of bills by the 
Senate, with the date thereof, together with the fact whether 



Senate 295 

passed by a vote of three-fifths or two-thirds of the Senate, when- 
ever such vote may be required by the Constitution and laws of 
the State. 

24. All necessary supplies and stationery for the Senate, its 
various offices and committees of the Senate shall be purchased 
upon requisition of the Principal Clerk, with the approval of the 
President of the Senate. 

25. The office of Engrossing Clerk is discontinued, and the 
duties of that office as heretofore performed by the Engrossing 
Clerk shall devolve upon the Principal Clerk, who is charged with 
the responsibility therefor. 

26. The Principal Clerk shall cause the Journal of the Senate 
to be typewritten in duplicate, original and carbon, the original 
to be deposited in the office of the Secretary of State as the record, 
and the other (carbon) copy to be delivered to the State Printer. 

27. All Committee Clerks, when not in attendance upon the 
direct duties connected with the committee to which they are 
assigned, shall report to the Principal Clerk of the Senate and, in 
order to expedite the work of the Senate, shall perform such cleri- 
cal or stenographic work as may be assigned to them. 

Standing Committees 

28. The following committees shall be named by the Lieutenant- 
Governor : 

On Agriculture. 

On Appropriations. 

On Banks and Currency. 

On Claims. 

On Commercial Fisheries. 

On Congressional Districts. 

On Conservation and Development. 

On Constitutional Amendments. 

On Corporations. 

On Counties, Cities, and Towns. 

On Courts and Judicial Districts. 

On Distribution of Governor's Message. 

On Education. 

On Election Law. 

On Employment Security Commission. 



296 North Carolina Manual 

On Engrossed and Enrolled Bills, 

On Finance. 

On General Statutes. 

On Immigration. 

On Institutions for the Blind. 

On Institutions for the Deaf. 

On Insurance. 

On Internal Improvements. 

On Interstate and Federal Relations. 

On Journal. 

On Judiciary No. 1. 

On Judiciary No. 2. 

On Justices of the Peace. 

On Library. 

On Manufacture, Labor, and Commerce. 

On Mental Institutions. 

On Military Affairs. 

On Mining. 

On Penal Institutions. 

On Pensions and Soldiers' Home. 

On Propositions and Grievances. 

On Public Health. 

On Public Roads. 

On Public Utilities. 

On Public Welfare. 

On Railroads. 

On Rules. 

On Salaries and Fees. 

On Senate Expenditures. 

On Senatorial Districts. 

On State Commission for the Blind. 

On Teachers and State Employees Retii-ement. 

On Veterans' Affairs. 

On Water Commerce. 

On Wild Life Resources. 

Joint Committees 

29. 

On Printing. 

On Trustees of the Greater University. 



Senate 297 

30. The Committee on Engrossed Bills shall examine all bills, 
amendments, and resolutions before they go out of the possession 
of the Senate, and make a report when they find them correctly 
engrossed: Provided, that when a bill is typewritten and has no 
interlineations therein, and has passed the Senate without amend- 
ment, it shall be sent to the House without engrossment, unless 
otherwise ordered. 

31. All bills introduced in the Senate providing for appropria- 
tions from the State, or any subdivision thereof, shall, before being 
considered by the Senate, be referred to the Committee on Appro- 
priations, and bills referred to other Committees carrying any of 
the provisions herein mentioned, shall be re-referred to the Senate 
as being bills to be considered by the Appropriations Committee 
before proper action may be taken by the Senate. All bills intro- 
duced in the Senate providing for bond issues, levying taxes, or in 
any manner affecting the taxing power of the State or any sub- 
division thereof, shall before being considered by the Senate, be 
referred to the Committee on Finance, and bills referred to other 
committees carrying any of the provisions herein mentioned shall 
be re-referred to the Senate as being bills to be considered by the 
Finance Committee before proper action may be taken by the 
Senate. 

32. Every report of the committee upon a bill or resolution 
which shall not be considered at the time of making the same, or 
laid on the table by a vote of the Senate, shall stand upon the 
general orders with the bill or resolution; and the report of the 
committee shall show that a majority of the committee were pres- 
ent and voted. 

33. The chairmen of the following committees, with the ap- 
proval of the President of the Senate, shall appoint clerks in 
order to expedite the business of the Session of 1949, as follows: 

Finance; Roads; Judiciary No. 1; Judiciary No. 2; Counties, 
Cities and Towns; Election Laws; Insurance; Agriculture; Con- 
servation and Development; Appropriations; Education; Rules; 
Public Health; Manufacturing, Commerce and Labor; Propositions 
and Grievances; Banks and Currency; Constitutional Amend- 
ments; Public Welfare; Employment Security Commission; Courts 
and Judicial Districts; Salaries and Fees; Mental Institutions; 
Federal and Interstate Relations; Public Utilities; Teachers and 



298 North Carolina Manual 

State Employees Retirement; Veterans Affairs; Corporations; 
Penal Institutions; Wild Life Resources; and Trustees of Greater 
University. 

In addition to the above-named clerks, the President of the 
Senate shall, upon recommendation of the Rules Committee, ap- 
point additional clerks, who shall perform such duties as may be 
assigned them by the Principal Clerk of the Senate. 

Decorum in Sessions 

34. When any Senator is about to speak in debate or deliver 
any matter to the Senate, he shall rise from his seat and respect- 
fully address the President. 

35. No member shall speak until recognized by the President 
and when two or more members rise at the same time, the Presi- 
dent shall name the member to speak. 

36. No remark reflecting personally upon the action of any 
Senator shall be in order in debate unless preceded by a motion 
or resolution of censure. 

37. When a Senator shall be called to order he shall take his 
seat until the President shall have determined whether he was in 
in order or not; if decided to be out of order, he shall not proceed 
without the pennission of the Senate ; and every question of order 
shall be decided by the President, subject to an appeal to the 
Senate by any Senator; and if a Senator is called to order for 
words spoken, the words excepted to shall be immediately taken 
down in writing, that the President or Senate may be better able 
to judge of the matter. 

38. No Senator shall speak or debate more than twice nor longer 
than thirty minutes on the same day on the same subject with- 
out leave of the Senate. 

39. When the President is putting a question, or a division by 
counting shall be had, no Senator shall walk out of or across the 
chamber, nor when a Senator is speaking, pass between him and 
the President. 

40. Every Senator who shall be within the bar of the Senate 
when the question is stated by the chair shall vote thereon, unless 
he shall be excused by the Senate or unless he be directly in- 
terested in the question; and the bar of the Senate shall include 
the entire Senate Chamber. 



Senate 299 

41. When a motion to adjourn or for recess shall be affirma- 
tively determined, no member or officers shall leave his place until 
adjournment or recess shall be declared by the President. 

42. Senators and visitors shall uncover their heads upon enter- 
ing the Senate Chamber while the Senate is in session, and shall 
continue uncovered during their continuance in the Chamber. 

43. No Senator or officer of the Senate shall depart the service 
of the Senate without leave, or receive pay as a Senator or officer 
for the time he is absent without leave. 

Procedural Rules in Debate 

44. Every bill introduced into the Senate shall be printed or 
typewritten. Amendments need not be typewritten. 

45. All bills should be read by their titles, which reading shall 
constitute the first reading of the bill, and unless otherwise dis- 
posed of shall be referred to the proper committee. A bill may be 
introduced by unanimous consent at any time during the session. 

46. Every Senator presenting a paper shall endorse the same; 
if a petition, memorial, or report to the General Assembly, with a 
brief statement of its subject or contents, adding his name; if a 
resolution, with his name; if a report of a committee, a statement 
of such report with the name of the committee and members mak- 
ing the same; if a bill, a statement of its title which shall contain 
a brief statement of the subject or contents of the bill, with his 
name; and all bills, resolutions, petitions, and memorials shall be 
delivered to the Principal Clerk and by him handed to the Presi- 
dent to be by him referred, and he shall announce the titles and 
references of the same, which shall be entered on the Journal. 

47. When a bill is materially modified or the scope of its appli- 
cation extended or decreased, or if the county or counties to which 
it applies be changed, the title of the bill shall be changed by the 
Senator introducing the bill or by the committee having it in 
charge, or by the Principal Clerk, so as to indicate the full pur- 
port of the bill as amended and the county or counties to which 
it applies. 

48. After a bill has been tabled or has failed to pass on any of 
its readings, the contents of such bill or the principal provisions 
of its subject-matter shall not be embodied in any other measure. 
Upon the point of order being raised and sustained by the Chair, 



.100 North Carolina Manual 

such measure shall be laid upon the table, and shall not be taken 
therefrom excejDt by a vote of two-thirds of the elected membership 
of the Senate: Provided, no local bill shall be held by the Chair 
as embodying the provisions, or being identical vi^ith any State- 
wide measure which has been laid upon the table or failed to pass 
any of its readings. 

49. Whenever a public bill is introduced, a carbon copy thereof 
shall accompany the bill. The Reading Clerk shall stamp the copy 
with the number stamped upon the original bill. Such copy shall 
be daily delivered to the joint committee hereinafter provided for. 
The Principal Clerk shall deliver the carbon copy of the bills desig- 
nated to be printed as herein after provided for the public printer 
and cause 400 copies thereof to be printed. On the morning fol- 
lowing the delivery of the printed copies the Chief Clerk shall 
cause the Chief Page to have one copy thereof put upon the desk 
of each member, and shall retain the other printed copies in his 
office. A sufficient number of the printed copies for the use of the 
committee to which the bill is referred shall be by the Chief Page 
delivered to the Chairman or Clerk of that Committee. If the bill 
is passed, the remaining copy shall be by the Chief Page delivered 
to the Principal Clerk of the House for the use of the House. The 
cost of printing shall be paid from the contingent fund of the 
Senate. The Chairman of the Rules Committee of the Senate and 
the Chairman of the Rules Committee of the House shall appoint 
a sub-committee consisting of three members of the Senate and 
two members of the House from the body of the Senate and the 
House, and such chairman shall notify the Principal Clerk of the 
House and of the Senate who has been appointed. Such subcom- 
mittee shall meet daily and examine the carbon copies of the public 
bills introduced and determine which of such public bills shall be 
printed and which shall not, and stamp the copies accordingly. 
If the member introducing a public bill, which the committee shall 
determine should not be printed, so desires, he may appear before 
the committee at the next meeting thereof with reference thereto. 

50. When a bill has been introduced and refered to a committee, 
if after ten days the committee has failed to report thereon, then 
the author of the bill may, after three days' public notice given in 
the Senate, on motion supported by a vote of two-thirds of the 
Senators present and voting, recall the same from the committee 



Senate 301 

to the floor of the Senate for consideration and such action theron 
as a majority of the Senators present may direct. 

51. All motions shall be reduced to writing, if desired by the 
President or any Senator, delivered at the table, and read by the 
President or Reading- Clerk before the same shall be debated; but 
any such motion may be withdrawn by the introducer at any time 
before decision or amendment. 

51a. When a bill is reported by a committee with an unfavorable 
report, but accompanied by a minority report, the minority report 
shall be placed on the calendar and considered the following day, 
and the question before the Senate shall be "The adoption of the 
Minority Report" and if failing to be adopted by a majority vote, 
the bill shall be placed upon the unfavorable calendar. Before a 
minority report can be considered by the Senate, it must be signed 
by at least three (3) members of the committee who were present 
and voted on the bill when the bill was considered in the committee. 

On General Orders and Special Orders 

52. Any bill or other matter may be made a special order for 
a particular day or hour by a vote of the majority of the Senators 
voting, and if it shall not be completed on that day, it shall be 
returned to its place on the Calendar, unless it shall be made a 
special order for another day; and when a special order is under 
consideration it shall take precedence of any special order or sub- 
sequent order for the day, but such subsequent order may be taken 
up immediately after the previous special order has been dis- 
posed of. 

53. Every bill shall receive three readings previous to its being 
passed, and the President shall give notice at each whether it be 
the first, second, or third. After the first reading', unless a motion 
shall be made by some Senator, it shall be the duty of the Presi- 
dent to refer the subject-matter to an apropriate committee. No 
bill shall be amended until it shall have been twice read. 

On Precedence of Motions 

54. When a question is before the Senate no motion shall be re- 
ceived except those herein specified, which motion shall have prece- 
dence as follows, viz: 

(1) For adjournment. 



802 North Carolina Manual 

(2) To lay on the table. 

(3) For the previous question. 

(4) To postpone indefinitely. 

(5) To postpone to a certain day. 

(6) To commit to a standing- committee. 

(7) To commit to a select committee. 

(8) To amend. 

(9) To substitute. 

55. The previous question shall be as follows: "Shall the main 
question be now put?" and until it is decided shall preclude all 
amendments and debate. If this question shall be decided in the 
affirmative, the "main question" shall be on the passage of the bill, 
resolution, or other matter under consideration; but when amend- 
ments are pending, the question shall be taken upon such amend- 
ments, in their inverse order, without further debate or amend- 
ment: Provided, that no one shall move the previous question ex- 
cept the member submitting the report on the bill or other matter 
under consideration, and the member introducing the bill or other 
matter under consideration, or the member in charge of the meas- 
ure, who shall be designated by the chairman of the committee re- 
porting the same to the Senate at the time the bill or other matter 
under consideration is reported to the Senate or taken up for 
consideration. 

56. When a motion for the previous question is made and is 
pending, debate shall cease and only a motion to adjourn shall be 
in order, which motions shall be put as follows: adjourn, previous 
question, lay on the table. After a motion for the previous ques- 
tion is made, pending a second thereto, any member may give 
notice that he desires to offer an amendment to the bill or other 
matter under consideration; and after the previous question is sec- 
onded such member shall be entitled to offer his amendment in 
pursuance of such notice. 

Some Questions to Be Taken Without Debate 

57. The motions to adjourn and lay on the table shall be decided 
without debate, and the motion to adjourn shall always be in order 
when made by a Senator entitled to the floor. 

58. The respective motions to postpone to a certain day, or to 
commit, shall preclude debate on the main question. 



Senate 303 

59. All questions relating to priority of business shall be decided 
without debate. 

60. When the reading of a paper is called for, except petitions, 
and the same is objected to by any Senator, it shall be determined 
by the Senate without debate. 

61. Any Senator requesting to be excused from voting may 
make, either immediately before or after the vote shall have been 
called for and before the result shall have been announced, a brief 
statement of the reasons for making such request, and the question 
shall then be taken without debate. Any Senator may explain his 
vote on any bill pending by obtaining permission of the President 
before the vote is put: Provided, that not more than three minutes 
shall be consumed in such explanation. 

Questions That Require a Two-Thirds Vote 

62. No bill or resolution on its third reading shall be acted on 
out of the regular order in which it stands on the Calendar, and 
no bill or resolution shall be acted upon on its third reading the 
same day on which it passed its second reading unless so ordered 
by two-thirds of the Senators present. 

63. No bill or resolution shall be sent from the Senate on the 
day of its passage except on the last day of the session, unless 
otherwise ordered by a vote of two-thirds of the Senators present. 

64. No bill or resolution after being laid upon the table upon 
motion shall be taken therefrom except by a vote of two-thirds of 
the Senators present. 

65. No rule of the Senate shall be altei-ed, suspended, or re- 
scinded except on a two-thirds vote of the Senators present. 

66. When a bill has been introduced and referred to a com- 
mittee, if after ten days the committee has failed to report there- 
on, then the author of the bill may, after three days' public notice 
given in the Senate, on motion supported by a vote of two-thirds 
of the Senators present and voting, recall the same from the com- 
mittee to the floor of the Senate for consideration and such action 
thereon as a majority of the Senators present may direct. 

67. All bills and resolutions reported unfavorably by the com- 
mittee to which they were referred, and having no minority report, 
shall lie upon the table, but may be taken from the table, and 



304 North Carolina Manual 

placed upon the Calendar by a two-thirds vote of those present 
and voting. 

68. After a bill has been tabled or has failed to pass on any of 
its readings, the contents of such bill or the principal provisions 
of its subject-matter shall not be embodied in any other measure. 
Upon the point of order being raised and sustained by the Chair, 
such measure shall be laid upon the table, and shall not be taken 
therefrom except by a vote of two-thirds of the elected member- 
ship of the Senate: Proiiided, no local bill shall be held by the 
Chair as embodying the provisions, or being identical with any 
State-wide measure which has been laid upon the table or failed 
to pass any of its readings. 

Proceedings When There Is Not a Quorum Voting 

69. If, on taking the question on a bill, it shall appear that a 
constitutional quorum is not present, or if the bill require a vote 
of a certain proportion of all the Senators to pass it, and it ap- 
pears that such number is not present, the bill shall be again read 
and the question taken thereon ; if the bill fail a second time for 
the want of the necessary number being present and voting, the 
bill shall not be finally lost, but shall be returned to the Calendar 
in its proper order. 

On Conference Committee and Report 

70. Whenever the Senate shall decline or refuse to concur in 
amendments put by the House to a bill originating in the Senate, 
or shall refuse to adopt a substitute adopted by the House for a 
bill originating in the Senate, a conference committee shall be ap- 
pointed upon motion made, consisting of the number named in the 
motion; and the bill under consideration shall thereupon go to and 
be considered by the joint conferees on the part of the Senate and 
House. In considering matters in difference between the Senate 
and House committed to the conferees only such matters as are in 
difference between the two houses shall be considered by the con- 
ferees, and the conference report shall deal only with such mat- 
ters. The conference report shall not be amended. Except as 
herein set out, the rules of the House of Representatives of Con- 
gress shall govern the appointment, conduct, and reports of the 
conferees. 



Senate 305 



Miscellaneous 



71. When a question has been once put and decided, it shall be 
in order for any Senator who shall have voted in the majority to 
move a reconsideration thereof; but no motion for the reconsidera- 
tion of any vote shall be in order after the bill, resolution, mes- 
sages, report, amendment, or motion upon which the vote was 
taken shall have gone out of the possession of the Senate; nor 
shall any motion for reconsideration be in order unless made on 
the same day or in the next following legislative day on which the 
vote pi'oposed to be reconsidered shall have taken place, unless 
same shall be made by the Committee on Enrolled Bills for verbal 
or grammatical errors in the bills, when the same may be made at 
any time. Nor shall any question be reconsidered more than once. 

72. In case a less number than a quorum of the Senate shall 
convene, they are authorized to send the doorkeeper or any other 
person, for any or all absent Senators as a majority of the Sena- 
tors present shall determine. 

73. No papers, writings, pamphlets, or printed matter shall be 
placed on the desks of the Senators or distributed in the Senate 
Chamber without the approval of the Principal Clerk, 

74. That in case of adjournment without any hour being 
named, the Senate shall reconvene the next legislative day at 11 
o'clock A. M. 

75. In the event the Senate Rules do not provide for, or cover 
any point of order raised by any Senator, the rules of the United 
States House of Congress shall govern. 



306 North Carolina Manual 

STANDING COMMITTEES OF THE SENATE 

Committee on Agriculture 

Senators: Moss, Chairman; Van, Long, Price, Campen, Currie, 
Dearman, Ea,s:les, Fountain, Gass, Hester, Jones, McKinnon, Pate, 
Perry, Pittman, Rowe, Talton, Weathers, Whitley, Wilson, Wins- 
low, Crawford, Ward, Thomas, Brock. 

Committee on Appropriations 

Senators: Pate, Chairman; Blythe, Currie, Richardson, Mar- 
shall, Weathers, McKinnon, Allsbrcok, Gibbs, Simms, Moss, Lar- 
kins, Warlick, Phillips, Halstead, Whitley, Campen, Dalton, Dear- 
man, Perry, Crawford, Walker, Jones, Wilson, Brock. 

Committee on Banks and Currency 

Senators: Larkins, Chairman; Webb, Hodges, Curi'ie, Pate, 
Blythe, Gass, Ward, Weathers, Wilson, Rankin, Little, McKinnon, 
Parker, Loner, Vann, Thomas, Peterson. 

Committee on Claims 

Senators: Shaw, Chairmxin; Walker, Dalton, Nichols, Webb, 
Penny, Earnhardt, Allsbrook. 

Committee on Commercial Fisheries 

Senators: Winslow, Chairman; Hester, Campen, Rodman, 
Ward, Rowe, Blythe, Allsbrook, Jones, Shaw, 

Committee on Congressional Districts 

Senators: Thomas, Chairman; Winslow, Gibbs, Eagles, Whit- 
ley, Walker, Penny, Simms, Price, Warlick. 

Committee on Conservation and Development 

Senators: Richardson, Chairman; Larkins, Weathers, Pate, 
Gibbs, Currie, Hester, Allsbrook, Webb, Rodman, Rowe, Wilson, 
Nichols, Crawford, Peterson. 

Committee on Constitutional Amendments 

Senators: Gibbs, Chairman; Phillips, Pate, Richardson, Earn- 
hardt, McKinnon, Whitley, Rowe, Rankin, Weathers, Simms. 



Senate 307 

Committee on Corporations 

Senators: Gass, Chairman; Parker, Webb, Penny, Little, Pate, 
Rodman, Ward, Allsbrook, Hodges, Earnhardt, Phillips, Walker, 
Dearman, Simms, Thomas, Brock. 

Committee on Counties, Cities and Towns 

Senators: Hodges, Chairman; Gibbs, Rowe, Richardson, Vann, 
McKinnon, Fountain, Wilson, Larkins, Pittman, BIythe, Ward, 
Long, Nichols, Dalton, Jones, Perry, Penny, Price, Peterson. 

Committee on Courts and Judicial Districts 

Senators: Fountain, Chairman; Richardson, Moss, Pittman, 
Allsbrook, Barnhardt, Halstead, Thomas, Warlick, Hester, Shaw, 
Simms, Parker, Brock. 

Distribution of Governor's Message 

Senators: Whitley, Chairman; Vann, Webb, Currie, Simms, 
Woodson. 

Committee on Education 

Senators: Pittman, Chairman; Richardson, Larkins, Currie, 
Barnhardt, BIythe, Rodman, Gibbs, Gass, Rankin, Rowe, Pate, Hes- 
ter, Long, Weathers, Phillips, Webb, Eagles, Hodges, Perry, Tal- 
ton, Winslow, Whitley, Dearman, Peterson. 

Committee on Election Laws 

Senators: Marshall, Chairman; Price, Larkins, BIythe, Ward, 
Gass, Wilson, Hodges, Vann, Pittman, Little, Winslow, Dalton, 
Nichols, Jones, Perry. 

Committee on Employment Security Commission 

Senators: Weathers, Chairman; Barnhardt, Gass, Larkins, 
BIythe, Pate, Rankin, Fountain, Whitley, Nichols, Walker, Webb, 
Woodson, Pittman, Dalton, Currie, Wilson. 

Committee on Engrossed and Enrolled Bills 

Senators: Dearman, Chairman; Woodson, Shaw, Warlick, 
Penny, Parker, Nichols, Perry, Talton, Little. 



r 
308 North Carolina Manual 

Committee on Finance 

Senators: Rankin, Chuirmayi; Rodman, Ward, Rowe, Earn- 
hardt, Vann, Price, Fountain, Hodges, Long, Little, Gass, Hester, 
Eagles, Penny, Parker, Pittman, Winslow, Talton, Thomas, 
Nichols, Woodson, Shaw, Webb, Peterson. 

Committee on General Statutes 

Senators: Woodson, Chairmwn; Rodman, Allsbrook, McKinnon, 
Richardson, Earnhardt, Warlick, Parker. 

Committee on Immigration 

Senators: Crawford, Chairman; Dearman, Campen, Thomas, 
Hestei', Dalton, Nichols, Halstead, Fountain, Penny. 

Committee on Institutions for the Blind 

Senators: Simms, Chairman; Jones, Gibbs, Thomas, Walker, 
Moss, Nichols, Perry, Peterson. 

Committee on Institutions for the Deaf 

Senators: Wilson, Chairman; Warlick, Allsbrook, Halstead, 
Price, Penny, Woodson, Dalton, Perry, Peterson. 

Committee on Insurance 

Senators: McKinnon, Chairman; Earnhardt, Webb, Little, 
Fountain, Gass, Wilson, Pate, Eagles, Winslow, Ward, Phillips, 
Hodges, Rodman, Richardson, Simms, Parker, Thomas, Peterson. 

Committee on Internal Improvements 

Senators: Talton, Chairman; Vann, Weathers, Hester, Penny, 
Long, Phillips, Eagles, Gibbs, Campen, Halstead. 

Committee on Interstate and Federal Relations 

Senators: Price, Chairman; Richardson, Penny, Fountain, 
Rowe, Weathers, Larkins, Shaw, Moss, Gass, Pate, Phillips, Mc- 
Kinnon, Ward, Talton, Walker, Webb, Nichols, Hester. 

Committee on .Journal 

Senators: Walker, Chairman; Shaw, Penny, Woodson, Craw- 
ford, Fountain. 



Senate 309 

Committee on Judiciary I 

Senators: Rodman, Chairman; Richardson, Earnhardt, Hester, 
Larkins, Little, Halstead, Parker, Moss, Phillips, Pittman, Wilson, 
Brock. 

Committee on Judiciary II 

Senators: Allsbrook, Chairman; Ward, Price, McKinnon, Wood- 
son, Dalton, Fountain, Eagles, Gibbs, Shaw, Warlick, Dearman, 
Simms, Walker. 

Committee on Justices of the Peace 

Senators: Dalton, Chairman; Walker, Campen, Marshall, 
Thomas, Phillips, Winslow, Parker, Halstead, Larkins, Brock. 

Committee on Library 

Senators: Hestei-, Chairynan; Long, Shaw, Penny, Weathers, 
Dearman, Rowe, Price, Woodson, Crawford, Brock. 

Committee on Manufacture, Labor and Commerce 

Senators: Rowe, Chairman; Richardson, Webb, Currie, Pate, 
Rodman, Hodges, Little, Rankin, Gass, Earnhardt, Woodson, Pitt- 
man, Dearman, Weathers, Price, Larkins, Crawford, Marshall, Dal- 
ton, Brock. 

Committee on Mental Institutions 

Senators: Webb, Chairman; Halstead, Simms, Warlick, Ward, 
Currie, Long, Dearman, Wilson, Fountain, Penny, Earnhardt, 
Weathers, Perry, Jones, Whitley, Vann, Peterson. 

Committee on Military Affairs 

Senators: Simms, Chairman; Elythe, Eagles, Fountain, War- 
lick, Wilson, Winslow, Larkins, Woodson, Dearman, 

Committee on Mining 

Senators: Nichols, Chairmayi; Marshall, Hodges, Crawford, 
Wilson, Parker, Dalton, Penny, Warlick, Petei'son. 

Committee on Penal Institutions 

Senators: Penny, Chairman; Gass, Hodges, Winslow, Hester, 
Price, Vann, Eagles, Jones, Whitley, Peterson. 



f^lO North Carolina Manual 

Committee on Pensions and Soldiers' Home 

Senators: Crawford, Chairman; Campen, Halstead, Thomas, 
Little, Gass, Shaw, Weathers, Brock. 

Committee on Propositions and Grievances 

Senators: Vann, Chairman; Pittman, Rowe, Richardson, Foun- 
tain, Ward, Long, Gibbs, Eagles, Larkins, Moss, Currie, Little, Mc- 
Kinnon, Hodges, Allsbrook, Winslow, Hester, Whitley, Simms, 
Peterson. 

Committee on Public Health 

Senators: Currie, Chairman; Jones, Perry, Peterson, Price, 
Hester, Halstead, Pate, Rankin, Walker, Larkins, Wilson, Rowe, 
Hodges, Blythe, Woodson, Crawford. 

Committee on Public Roads 

Senators: Ward, Chairman; Weathers, Gibbs, Little, Pate, 
Richardson, Blythe, Rowe, Webb, Vann, Parker, Pittman, Hal- 
stead, Currie, Long, Hodges, Fountain, Gass, Hester, Wilson, 
Eagles, Jones, Perry, Winslow, Whitley, Talton, Campen, Peterson. 

Committee on Public Utilities 

Senators: Barnhardt, Chairman; Larkins, Rankin, Richardson, 
Blythe, Ward, Pate, Pittman, Little, Hester, Woodson, Rowe, War- 
lick, Price, Simms, Walker, Webb, Rodman, Gibbs, Gass, Nichols, 
Brock. 

Committee on Public Welfare 

Senators: Long, Chaimum; Parker, Warlick, Jones, Weathers, 
Whitley, Little, Hodges, Winslow, Fountain, Rowe, Nichols, Craw- 
ford, McKinnon, Richardson, Allsbrook, Blythe, Currie, Gass, Moss, 
Rodman, Simms, Walker. 

Committee on Railroads 

Senators: Eagles, Chairman; Penny, Pate, Phillips, Moss, 
Woodson, McKinnon, Simms, Blythe, Rodman, Nichols. 

Committee on Rules 

Senators: Blythe, Chairman; Gass, Richardson, Fountain, Pate, 
Eagles, McKinnon, Hodges, Rodman, Rankin, Larkins, Simms, 
Rowe, Shaw. 



Senate 311 

Committee on Salaries and Fees 

Senators: Hester, Chairman; Perry, Webb, Penny, Vann, Hal- 
stead, Weathers. 

Committee on Senate Expenditures 

Senators: Penny, Chairman; Warlick, Phillips, Pittman, Simms, 
Currie, Long, Talton. 

Committee on Senatorial Districts 

Senators : Perry, Chairman; Dalton, Penny, Fountain, Vann, 
Moss, Price, Campen. 

Committee on State Commission for the Blind 

Senators: Jones, Chairman; Perry, Rowe, Long, Weathers, 
Crawford, Nichols, Peterson. 

Committee on Teachers and State Employees Retirement 

Senators: Phillips, Chairmxin; Allsbrook, McKinnon, Dearman, 
Fountain, Crawford, Currie, Rodman, Wai'd. 

Committee on Veteran Affairs 

Senators: Warlick, Chairman; Blythe, Simms, Parker, Eagles, 
Fountain, Winslow, Allsbrook, Larkins, Wilson, Woodson. 

Committee on Water Commerce 

Senators: Halstead, Chairmayi; Hester, Campen, Rowe, Rod- 
man, Ward, Shaw, Vann, McKinnon, Talton, Fountain. 

Committee on Wildlife Resources 

Senators: Parker, Chairman; Allsbrook, Hester, Ward, Phil- 
lips, Winslow, Hodges, Marshall, Little, Rodman, Earnhardt, Dear- 
man, Perry, Price, Campen, Vann, Pittman, Jones, Thomas. 

Committee on Printing 

Senators: Campen, Chairman; Weathers, McKinnon, Penny, 
Eagles, Perry, Wilson. 

Committee on Trustees of the Greater University 

Senators: Little, Chairman; Parker, Pate, Winslow, Richard- 
son, Rodman, Ward, Webb, McKinnon, Pittman, Currie, Simms, 
Marshall, Blythe, Campen, Dearman, Eagles, Perry, Rankin, Alls- 
brook, Rowe, Brock. 



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Seat Assignment Chart — Session 1949 HI 8 

NORTH CAROLINA SENATE 

(Democrats unless otherwise indicated) 

District Name County Address Seat 

1st — W. I. Halstead Camden South Mills 29 

1st — J. Emmett Winslow Perquimans Hertford 30 

2nd — Sam M. Campen Pamlico Alliance 25 

2nd — John C. Rodman Beaufort Washington 16 

3rd— Frank H. Gibbs Warren Warrenton 9 

4th — Julian R. Allsbrook Halifax Roanoke Rapids . . 6 

4th — L. H. Fountain Edgecombe Tarboro 21 

5th — Dr. Paul E. Jones Pitt Farmville 26 

6th~J. C. Eagles, Jr Wilson Wilson 23 

6th — O. B. Moss Nash Spring Hope 13 

7th — John D. Larkins, Jr Jones Trenton 19 

7th— D. L. Ward Craven New Bern 20 

8th~Hardy Talton Wayne Pikeville 40 

gth — Adam J. Whitley. Jr Johnston Smithfield 39 

9th— Roy Rowe Pender Burgaw 37 

9th — Henry Vann Sampson Clinton 38 

10th — R. J. Hester. Jr Bladen Elizabethtown .... 14 

10th— Gilbert A. Shaw Cumberland Fayetteville 50 

11th — Henry A. McKinnon Robeson Lumberton 22 

12th — J. Benton Thomas Hoke Raeford 4 

12th — Hal Hammer Walker Randolph Asheboro 41 

13th — J. C. Pittman Lee Sanford 2 

13th — R. N. Simms, Jr Wake Raleigh 1 

14th — Claude Currie Durham Durham 27 

14th F. D. Long Person Roxboro 28 

15th — J. Hampton Price Rojkingham Leaksville 10 

16th— James Webb Orange Hillsboro 42 

17th Geo. T. Penny Guilford Greensboro 12 

18th — Edwin Pate Scotland Laurinburg 32 

18th —Wade H. Phillips Davidson Lexington 43 

19th — R. E. Little Anson Wadesboro 8 

19th — O. L. Richardson Union Monroe 7 

*20th F. J. Blythe Mecklenburg Charlotte 11 

21st — Luther E. Barnhardt Cabarrus Concord 17 

21st— Nelson Woodson Rowan Salisbury 18 

22nd Rex Gass Forsyth Winston-Salem ... 47 

23rd — Wm. F. Marshall Stokes Walnut Cove .... 31 

24th— B. C. Brock ( R ) Davie Mocksville 44 

25th — C. H. Dearman Iredell Statesville 48 

25th G. Andrew Warlick Catawba Newton 49 

26th— R. Grady Rankin Gaston Gastonia 15 

27th Chas. C. Dalton Rutherford Spindale 35 

27th Lee B. Weathers Cleveland Shelby 5 

28th— Max C. Wilson Caldwell Lenoir 46 

29th— Dr. H. B. Perry Watauga Boone 24 

30th Dr. C. A. Peterson (R) ....Mitchell Spruce Pine 36 

31st Frank M. Parker Buncombe Asheville 3 

32^(1 W. B. Hodges Henderson Hendersonville . . . .33 

32nd — W. H. Crawford Jackson Sylva 45 

33rd— L. B. Nichols Cherokee Andrews 34 



* Elected February 12, 1949, to succeed Joe L. Blythe, decea.sed. 



Officers and Members of the House of Representatives 

OFFICERS 

Kerr Craige Ramsay Speaker Salisbury 

Mrs. Annie E. Cooper Principal Clerk Raleigh 

Ralph Monger, Jr Reading Clerk Sanford 

H. L. Joyner Sergeant-at-arms Jackson 

REPRESENTATIVES 
Alphabetically Arranged 

Name County Party Address 

Alexander, Hugh Q Cabarrus Democrat Kannapolis 

Allen, Arch T Wake Democrat Raleigh 

Allen, Thomas W Granville Democrat Creedmoor 

Arnold, E. O Washington Democrat Roper 

Averitt, F. M Cumberland Democrat Fayetteville 

Eacon, F. P Polk Democrat Tryon 

Baldwin, H. T., Jr Richmond Democrat Rockingham 

Baldwin, T. Fleet Chatham Democrat Siler City 

Barker, Raymond Stanly Republican Albemarle 

Eell, C. L Hyde D :mccr2t Swan Quarter 

Blackwell. Winfield ....Forsyth Democrat Winston-Salem 

Blue, H. Clifton Moore Democrat Aberdeen 

Bost, E. T., Jr Cabarrus Democrat Concord 

Branch, Joseph Halifax Democrat Enfield 

Bridger, D. H Bladen Democrat Bladenboro 

Brown, Frank H., Jr. . . Jackson Democrat Cullowhee 

Bunn, C. Settle Nash Democrat Spring Hope 

Burfoot, Noah Pasouotank Democrat Elizabeth City 

Caveness, Shelley B. ... Guilford Democrat Greensboro 

Collier, T. J Pamlico Democrat Arapahoe 

Cooper, Thomas E New Hanover Democrat Wilmington 

Corey, A Martin Democrat Jamesville 

Craven, Walter G.. Mrs. . Mecklenburg Democrat Charlotte 

Crissman. Walter E. ... Guilford Democrat High Point 

Dalrymple. Robert W. . . Lee Democrat Sanford 

Dalton, J. McRae Forsyth Democrat Winston-Salem 

Davis, Grover C Haywood Democrat Waynesville 

Davis, Roy W McDowell Democrat Marion 

Divelbiss, J. E., Jr. . . Buncombe Democrat Asheville 

Doughton, J. K Alleghany Democrat Sparta 

Duncan, J. H Cherokee Democrat Murphy 

Dungan, D. C Rowan Democrat Salisbury 

Edwards, A. C Greene Democrat Hookerton 

Edwards, Dan K Durham Democrat Durham 

Eggers, S. C Watauga Republican Boone 

Ervin, Joe, Mrs Mecklenburg Democrat Charlotte 

Falls, B. T., Jr Cleveland Democrat Shelby 

Fisher, Ralph Transylvania Republican Brevard 

Fisher, Troy A Cumberland Democrat Fayetteville 

Floyd, F. Wayland .... Robeson Democrat Fairmont 

Fountain, Ben E Edgecombe Democrat Rocky Mount 

Gantt, Robert M Durham Democrat Durham 

Garland, James Boyce . . Gaston Democrat Gastonia 

Gentry, Todd H Ashe Democrat W. Jefferson 

Gibbs, H. S Carteret Democrat Morehead City 

Gobble, F. L Forsyth Democrat Winston-Salem 

Greene, H. A Hoke Democrat Raef ord 

Hanford, E. R., Sr. . . Alamanje Democrat Burlington 

Harding. F. D. B Yadkin Republican Yadkinville 

Hardison, Burl G Craven Democrat New Bern 

Harris, R. L Person Democrat Roxboro 

Hatch, William T Wake Democrat Raleigh 

314 



House of Representatives 315 

County Name Party Address 

Hathaway. Clarence P. . Gates Democrat Sunbury 

Hayes, Robert Smith ..Randolph Republican Randleman 

Hayman, D. L Dare Democrat Nags Head 

Hocutt, Ronald Johnston Democrat Wendell 

Horton, O. Lee Burke Democrat Morganton 

Howard, Carl W Gaston Democrat Bessemer City 

Huskins, J. Frank Yancey Democrat Burnsville 

Johnson, E. R Currituck Democrat Currituck 

Jones, J. W Camden Democrat South Mills 

Jonesi Woodrow W. ... Rutherford Democrat Rutherfordton 

Kearney, H. C Franklin Democrat Franklinton 

Kerr, John H., Jr Warren Democrat . . ; Warren ton 

Kilpatrick, Frank M. . Pitt Democrat Ayden 

Kirkman, O. Arthur ..Guilford Democrat High Point 

Kiser, Roger C Scotland Democrat Laurinburg 

Lassiter, Robert, Jr. . . Mecklenburg Democrat Charlotte 

Leatherman, M. T Lincoln Democrat Lincolnton 

I^ittle, Earl F Alexander Democrat Taylorsville 

Littlei Hal W Anson Democrat Wadesboro 

Little! J. C, Jr Wake Democrat Raleigh 

Long,' J. Robert Swain Democrat Bryson City 

Maddrey, C. Gordon .... Hertford Democrat Ahoskie 

Martin, L. A Davidson Democrat Lexington 

Massey, Dennis Graham Democrat Robbinsville 

Matheson, John F Iredell Democrat Mooresville 

McDaniel, Leslie H. ... Buncombe Democrat Oteen 

McMullan, J. H Chowan Democrat Edenton 

Moore, Larry I., Jr. . . . Wilson Democrat Wilson 

Morris, Harvey Mecklenburg Democrat Charlotte 

Noble, G. N Jones Democrat Trenton 

Outlaw, Lewis W Duplin Democrat Seven Springs 

Page, G. Troy Johnston Democrat Clayton 

Parker, Howard E Harnett Democrat Erwin 

Parrott, Marion A Lenoir Democrat Kinston 

Pass, Fred D Clay Democrat Hayesville 

Powell, J. K Columbus Democrat Whiteville 

Powell! R- G Rockingham Democrat Reidsville 

Pritchard, Warren H. .Mitchell Republican Spruce Pine 

Pritchett, J. T Caldwell Democrat Lenoir 

Rackley, Almon E Sampson Republican Clinton 

Ramsay', Kerr Craige . Rowan Democrat Salisbury 

Regan, John B Robeson Democrat St. Pauls 

Roberts, Clyde M Madison Republican Marshall 

Royster! Fred S Vance Democrat Henderson 

Scott, LeRoy Beaufort Democrat Washington 

Shomaker, R. A Avery Republican Newland 

Shreve, Clyde A Guilford Democrat Stokesdale 

Slagle,' C. S Macon Democrat Franklin 

Smith, H. B Union Democrat Monroe 

Smoot, J. N Davie Republican Mocksville 

Snow, ' George K Surry Democrat Mt. Airy 

Spruill, C. Wayland . . . Fertie Democrat Windsor 

Story, T. E Wilkes Republican Wilkesboro 

Tatem, C. W Tyrrell Democrat Columbia 

Taylor, Roy A Buncombe Democrat Black Mountain 

Taylor! W. C Caswell Democrat Blanche 

Taylor! W. Frank Wayne Democrat Goldsboro 

Umstead, J. W., Jr Orange Democrat Chapel Hill 

Van Noppen, Leonard H.Stokes Democrat Danbury 

VanderLinden, Harry . . Catawba Democrat Hickory 

Venters, Carl V Onslow Democrat Jacksonville 

Wallace, J. P Montgomery Democrat Troy 

Whitfield, J. V Pender Democrat Burgaw 



316 North Carolina Manual 

Name County Party Address 

Whitmire. R. Lee .... Henderson Democrat Hendersonville 

Williamson, Odell Brunswick Democrat Shallotte 

Winslow, E. Leigh .... Perquimans Democrat Hertford 

Woodard, J. Raynor . . . Northampton Democrat Conway 

Worthington, Sam O. . . Pitt Democrat Greenville 

REPRESENTATIVES 

Arranged by Counties 

(Democrats Unless Otherwise Indicated) 

County Names Address 

Alamance E. R. Hanford, Sr Burlington 

Alexander Earl F. Little Taylorsville 

Alleghany J. K. Doughton Sparta 

Anson Hal W. Little Wadesboro 

Ashe Todd H. Gentry W. Jefferson 

Avery R. A. Shomaker (R) Newland 

Beaufort LeRoy Scott Washington 

Bertie C. Wayland Spruill Windsor 

Bladen D. H. Rridger Bladenboro 

Brunswick Odell Williamson Shallotte 

Buncombe J. E. Divelbiss, Jr Asheville 

Leslie H. McDaniel Oteen 

Roy A. Taylor Black Mountain 

Burke O. Lee Horton Morganton 

Cabarrus Hugh Q. Alexander Kannapolis 

E. T. Bost, Jr Concord 

Caldwell J. T. Pritchett Lenoir 

Camden J. W. Jones South Mills 

Carteret H. S. Gibbs Morehead City 

Caswell W. C. Taylor Blanche 

Catawba Harry VanderLinden Hickory 

Chatham T. Fleet Baldwin Siler City 

Cherokee J. H. Duncan Murphy 

Chowan J. H. McMullan Edenton 

Clay Fred D. Pass Hayesville 

Cleveland B. T. Falls, Jr Shelby 

Columbus J. K. Powell Whiteville 

Craven Burl G. Kardison New Bern 

Cumberland F. M. Averitt Fayetteville 

Troy A. Fisher Fayetteville 

Currituck F. R. Johnson Currituck 

Dare D. L. Hayman Nags Head 

Davidson L. A. Martin Lexington 

Davie J. N. Smoot (R) Mocksville 

Duplin Lewis W. Outlaw Seven Springs 

Durham Dan K. Edwards Durham 

Robert M. Gantt Durham 

Edgecombe Pen E. P'ountain Rooky Mount 

Forsyth Winfiold Blackwell Winston-Salem 

J. McRae Dalton Winston-Salem 

F. L. Gobble Winston-Salem 

Franklin H. C. Kearney Franklinton 

Gaston James Boyce Garland Gastonia 

Carl W. Howard Bessemer City 

Gates Clarence P. Hathaway Sunbury 

Graham Dennis Massey Robbinsville 

Granville Thomas W. Allen Creedmoor 

Greene A. C. Edwards Hookerton 

Guilford Shelley B. Caveness Greensboro 

Walter E. Crissman High Point 

O. Arthur Kirkman High Point 

Clyde A. Shreve Stokesdale 



House of Representatives 317 

County Name Address 

Halifax Joseph Branch Enfield 

Harnett Howard E. Parker Erwin 

Haywood Grover C. Davis Waynesville 

Henderson R. Lee Wliitmire Hendersonville 

Hertford C. Gordon Maddrey Ahoskie 

Hoke H. A. Greene Raeford 

Hyde C. L. Bell Swan Quarter 

Iredell John F. Matheson Mooresville 

Jackson Frank H. Brown, Jr Cullowhee 

Johnston Ronald Hocutt Wendell 

G. Troy Page Clayton 

Jones G. N. Noble Trenton 

Lee Robert W. Dalrymple Sanford 

Lenoir Marion A. Parrott Kinston 

Lincoln M. T. Leatherman Lincolnton 

Macon C. S. Slagle Franklin 

Madison Clyde M. Roberts (R) Marshall 

Martin A. Corey Jamesville 

McDowell Roy W. Davis Marion 

Mecklenburg Mrs. Walter G. Craven Charlotte 

Mrs. Joe Ervin Charlotte 

Robert Lassiter, Jr Charlotte 

Harvey Morris Charlotte 

Mitchell Warren H. Pritchard (R) Spruce Pine 

Montgomery J. P. Wallace Troy 

Moore H. Clifton Blue Aberdeen 

Nash C. Settle Bunn Spring Hope 

New Hanover Thomas E. Cooper Wilmington 

Northampton J. Raynoi Woodard Conway 

Onslow Carl V. Venters Jacksonville 

Orange J. W. Umstead, Jr Chapel Hill 

Pamlico T. J. Collier Arapahoe 

Pasquotank Noah Burfoot Elizabeth City 

Pender J. V. Whitfield Burgaw 

Perquimans E. Leigh Winslow Hertford 

Person R. L. Harris Roxboro 

Pitt Frank M. Kilpatrick Ayden 

Sam O. Worthington Greenville 

Polk F. P. Bacon Tryon 

Randolph Robert Smith Hayes (R) Randleman 

Richmond H. T. Baldwin, Jr Rockingham 

Robeson F. Wayland Floyd Fairmont 

John B. Regan St. Pauls 

Rockingham R. G. Powell Reidsville 

Rowan D. C. Dungan Salisbury 

Kerr Craige Ramsay Salisbury 

R)utherfoi'd Woodrow W. Jones Rutherfordton 

Sampson Almon E. Rackley (R) Clinton 

Scotland Roger C. Kiser Laurinburg 

Stanly Raymond Barker (R) Albemarle 

Stokes I eonard H. van Noppen Danbury 

Surry Geo. K. Snow Mt. Airy 

Swain J. Robert Long Bryson City 

Transvlvania Ralph Fisher (R I Brevard 

Tyrrell C. W. Tatem Columbia 

Union H. B. Smith Monroe 

Vance Fred S. Royster Henderson 

Wake Arch T. Allen Raleigh 

William T. Hatch Raleigh 

J. C. Little, Jr Raleigh 

Warren John H. Kerr, Jr Warrenton 

Washington E. O. Arnold Roper 

Watauga S. C. Eggers ( R) Boone 

Wayne W. Frank Taylor Goldsboro 



318 North Carolina Manual 

County Name Address 

Wilkes T. E. Story (R) Wilkesboro 

Wilson Larry L Moore, Jr Wilson 

Yadkin F. D. B. Harding (R) Yadkinville 

Yancey J. Frank Huskins Burnsville 

Enrolling and Indexing Departments 

Enrolling Clerk N. F. Ransdell Varina 

Indexer of Laws Thomas A. Banks Raleigh 



House of Representatives 319 

RULES AND STANDING COMMITTEES OF THE 
HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES 

1949 

Touching the Duties of Speaker 

1. It shall be the duty of the Speaker to have the sessions of the 
House opened with prayer. 

2. He shall take the chair every day at the hour fixed by the 
House on the preceding legislative day, shall immediately call the 
members to order, and, on appearance of a quorum, cause the 
Journal of the preceding day to be approved. 

3. He shall preserve order and decorum, may speak to points of 
order in preference to other members, rising from his seat for 
that purpose, and shall decide questions of order, subject to an 
appeal to the House by any member, on which appeal no member 
shall speak more than once, unless by leave of the House. A two- 
thirds vote of the members present shall be necessary to sustain 
any appeal from the ruling of the Chair. 

4. He shall rise to put a question, but may state it sitting. 

5. Questions shall be put in this form, namely, "Those in favor 
(as the question may be) will say 'Aye','' and after the affirmative 
voice has been expressed, "Those opposed will say, 'No'." Upon a 
call for a division the Speaker shall count; if required he shall ap- 
point tellers. 

6. The Speaker shall have a general direction of the hall. He 
shall have a right to name any member to perform the duties of 
the Chair, but substitution shall not extend beyond one day, except 
in case of sickness or by leave of the House. 

7. All committees shall be appointed by the Speaker, unless 
otherwise specially ordered by the House. 

8. In all elections the Speaker may vote. In all other cases he 
may exercise his right to vote, or he may reserve this right until 
there is a tie; but in no case shall he be allowed to vote twice on 
the same question. 

9. All acts, addresses, and resolutions, and all warrants and sub- 
poenas issued by order of the House shall be signed by the Speaker. 



.'^20 NoRT?T Carolina Manual 

10. In case of any disturbance or disorderly conduct in the gal- 
leries or lobby, the Speaker or other presiding officer shall have 
power to order the same to be cleared. 

11. No person except members and officers and clerks of the 
General Assembly, Judges of the Supreme and Superior Courts, 
State officers, former members of the General Assembly who are 
not registered under the provisions of Article 9 of Chapter 120 
of the General Statutes of North Carolina, and persons particu- 
larly invited by the Speaker shall be admitted within the hall of 
the House: Provided, that no person except members and officers 
of the General Assembly shall be allowed on the floor of the House 
or in the lol^y in the rear of the Speaker's desk, unless permitted 
by the Speaker of the House. 

12. No motion to suspend the rules for the purpose of extending 
the courtesies of the floor, lobby or gallery shall be made during 
the consideration of the Public Calendai", except upon motion of 
the Speaker. 

13. Reporters wishing to take down debates may be admitted 
by the Speaker, who shall assign such places to them on the floor 
or elsewhere, to effect this object, as shall not interfere with the 
convenience of the House. 

14. Smoking shall not be allowed in the hall, lobbies, or the gal- 
leries while the House is in session: Provided, that smoking may 
be permitted in the lobby in the rear of the Speaker's desk. 



Order of Business of the Day 

15. After the approval of the Journal of the preceding day, 
which shall stand approved without objection, the House shall pro- 
ceed to business in the following order, viz. : 

(1) The receiving of petitions, memorials, and papers addressed 
to the General Assembly or to the House. 

(2) Reports of standing committees. 

(3) Reports of select committees. 

(4) Resolutions. 

(5) Bills. 

(6) The unfinished business of the preceding day. 



House of Representatives 321 

(7) Bills, resolutions, petitions, memorials, messages, and other 
papers on the Calendar, in their exact numerical order, unless dis- 
placed by the orders of the day; but messages and motions to elect 
officers shall always be in order. 

No member shall rise from his seat to introduce any petition, 
resolution, or bill out of order unless he is permitted so to do by 
a suspension of the rules. 

On Decorum in Debate 

16. When any member is about to speak in debate or deliver any 
matter to the House, he shall rise from his seat and respectfully 
address the Speaker. 

17. When the Speaker shall call a member to order, the member 
shall sit down, as also he shall when called to order by another 
member, unless the Speaker decides the point of order in his favor. 
By leave of the House a member called to order may clear a matter 
of fact, or explain, but shall not proceed in debate so long as the 
decision stands but by permission of the House. Any member may 
appeal from the decision of the Chair, and if, upon appeal, the de- 
cision be in favor of the member called to ordei', he may proceed; 
if otherwise, he shall not, except by leave of the House; and if 
the case, in the judgment of the House, require it, he shall be 
liable to its censure. 

18. No member shall speak until recognized by the Chair, and 
when two or more members rise at the same time the Speaker shall 
name the member to speak. 

19. No member shall speak more than twice on the main ques- 
tion, nor longer than thirty minutes for the first speech and fifteen 
minutes for the second speech, unless allowed to do so by the 
affirmative vote of a majority of the members present; nor shall 
he speak more than once upon an amendment or motion to commit 
or postpone, and then not longer than ten minutes. But the House 
may, by consent of a majority, suspend the operations of this rule 
during any debate on any particular question before the House, 
or the Committee on Rules may bring in a special I'ule that shall 
be applicable to the debate on any bill. 

20. While the Speaker is putting any question, or addressing 
the House, no person shall speak, stand up, walk out of or cross 



322 North Caroi.tna Manual 

the House, nor when a member is speaking:, entertain private dis- 
course, stand up, or pass between him and the Chair. 

21. No member shall vote on any question when he was not 
present when the question was put by the Speaker, except by the 
consent of the House. Upon a division and count of the House on 
any question, no member without the bar shall be counted. 

22. Every member who shall be in the hall of the House for the 
above purpose when the question is put shall give his vote upon a 
call of the ayes and noes, unless the House for special reasons 
shall excuse him, and no application to be excused from voting or 
to explain a vote shall be entertained unless made before the call 
of the roll. The hall of the House shall include the lobbies and 
offices connected with the hall. 

23. When a motion is made it shall be stated by the Speaker 
or, if written, it shall be handed to the Chair and read aloud by 
the Speaker or Clerk before debate. A motion to table or adjourn 
shall be seconded before the motion is put by the Speaker to the 
vote of the House. 

24. Every motion shall be reduced to writino-, if the Speaker 
or any two members request it. 

25. After a motion is stated by the Speaker or read by the 
Clerk, it shall be deemed to be in possession of the House, but 
may be withdrawn before a decision or amendment, except in 
case of a motion to reconsider, which motion, when made by a 
member, shall be deemed and taken to be in possession of the 
House, and shall not be withdrawn without leave of the House. 

26. When a question is under debate no motion shall be received 
but to adjourn, to lay on the table, to postpone indefinitely, to 
postpone to a day certain, to commit or amend, which several mo- 
tions shall have precedence in the order in which they stand ar- 
ranged; and no motion to lay on the table, to postpone indefinitely, 
to postpone to a day certain, to commit or amend, being decided, 
shall be again allowed at the same stage of the bill or proposition. 

27. A motion to adjourn or lay on the table shall be decided 
without debate, and a motion to adjourn shall always be in order, 
except when the House is voting or some member is speaking; but 
a motion to adjourn shall not follow a motion to adjourn until 
debate or some other business of the House has intervened. 



House op Representatives 323 

28. In case of adjournment without any hour being named, the 
House shall reconvene on the next legislative day at twelve o'clock 
noon. 

29. When a question has been postponed indefinitely, the same 
shall not be acted on again during the session, except upon a two- 
thirds vote. 

30. Any member may call for a division of the question, when 
the same shall admit of it, which shall be determined by the 
Speaker. 

31. When a motion has been once made and carried in the 
affirmative or negative, it shall be in order for any member of the 
majority to move for the reconsideration thereof, on the same or 
succeeding day, unless it may have subsequently passed the Senate, 
and no motion to reconsider shall be taken from the table except 
by a two-thirds vote. But unless such vote has been taken by a 
call of the yeas and nays, any member may move to reconsider. 

32. When the reading of a paper is called for, which has been 
read in the Houses, and the same is objected to by any member, 
it shall be determined by a vote of the House. 

33. Petitions, memorials, and other papers addressed to the 
House shall be presented by the Speaker; a brief statement of the 
contents thereof may be verbally made by the introducer before 
reference to a committee, but shall not be debated or decided on 
the day of their first being read, unless the House shall direct 
otherwise. 

34. When the ayes and noes are called for on any question, it 
shall be on motion before the question is put; and if seconded 
by one-fifth of the members present, the question shall be de- 
cided by the ayes and noes; and in taking the ayes and noes, or 
on a call of the House, the names of the members will be taken 
alphabetically. 

35. Decency of speech shall be observed and personal reflection 
carefully avoided. 

3G. Any member may arise at any time to speak to a question 
of personal privilege, and upon objection to him proceeding, the 
Speaker shall determine if the question is one of privilege. 

37. Fifteen members, including the Speaker, shall be authorized 
to compel the attendance of absent members. A quorum shall con- 
sist of a majority of the qualified members of the House. 



324 North Carolina Manual 

.38. No member or officer of the House shall absent himself from 
the service of the House without leave, unless from sickness or 
inability. 

39. Any member may excuse himself from serving on any com- 
mittee if he is a member of two standino- committees. 

40. If any member shall be necessarily absent on temporary 
business of the House when a vote is taken upon any question, 
upon entering- the House he shall be permitted, on request, to vote, 
provided that the result shall not be thereby affected. 

41. No standing: rule or order shall be rescinded or altered with- 
out one day's notice given on the motion thereof, and to sustain 
such motion two-thirds of the House shall be required. 

42. The members of the House shall uncover their heads upon 
entering the House while it is in session, and shall continue so 
uncovered during their continuance in the hall, except Quakers. 

43. A motion to reconsider shall be determined by a majority 
vote, except a motion to reconsider an indefinite postponement, or 
a motion to reconsider a motion tabling a motion to reconsider, 
which shall require a two-thirds vote. 

44. After a bill has been tabled or has failed to pass on any 
of its reading:s, the contents of such bill or the principal pro- 
visions of its subject-matter shall not be embodied in any other 
measure. Upon the point of order being raised and sustained by 
the chair, such measure shall be laid upon the table, and shall not 
be taken therefrom except by a vote of two-thirds of the elected 
membership of the House: Provided, no local bill shall be held by 
the Chair as embodying the provisions or being identical with any 
Statewide measure which has been laid upon the table, or failed 
to pass any of its readings. No amendment or rider to a bill before 
the House shall be in order unless such rider or amendment is 
germane to the bill under consideration. 

45. A motion to table an amendment sent up from the floor shall 
not be construed as a motion to table the principal bill or any other 
amendment which has been offered thereto, and if such motion is 
carried, only the amendment shall lie upon the table. 

46. When a member desires to interrupt a member having the 
floor he shall first obtain recognition by the Chair and permission 
of the member occupying the floor, and when so recognized and 



House of Representatives 325 

such permission is obtained he may propound a question to the 
member occupying the floor, but he shall not propound a series of 
questions or interrogatories or otherwise interrupt the member 
having the floor; and the Speaker shall, vi^ithout the point of order 
being raised, enforce this rule. 



Standing Committees 

47. At the commencement of the session a standing committee 
shall be appointed by the Speaker on each of the following sub- 
jects, namely: 

On Agriculture. 

On Appropriations. 

On Banks and Banking. 

On Commercial Fisheries and Oyster Industry. 

On Commission and Institutions for the Blind. 

On Congressional Districts. 

On Conservation and Development. 

On Constitutional Amendments. 

On Corporations. 

On Counties, Cities, and TowTis, 

On Courts and Judicial Districts. 

On Drainage. 

On Education. 

On Election and Election Laws. 

On Employment Security. 

On Engrossed Bills. 

On Expenditures of the House. 

On Federal and Interstate Cooperation. 

On Finance. 

On Health. 

On Higher Education. 

On Mental Institutions. 

On Institutions for the Deaf. 



326 North Carolina Manual 

On Insurance. 

On the Journal. 

On Judiciary No. 1. 

On Judiciary No. 2. 

On Manufacturers and Labor. 

On Military Affairs. 

On Penal Institutions. 

On Propositions and Grievances. 

On Public Utilities. 

On Public Welfare. 

On Roads. 

On Rules. 

On Salaries and Fees. 

On Senatorial Districts. 

On Teachers' and State EmiDloyees' Retirement. 

On Veterans Leg-islation. 

On Wildlife Resources. 

Joint Committees 

On Enrolled Bills. 

On Justices of the Peace. 

On Library. 

On Printing'. 

On Public Buildings and Grounds. 

On Trustees of University. 

The first member announced on each committee shall be chair- 
man, and where the Speaker so desires he may designate a vice 
chairman. 

48. Whenever the House shall decline or refuse to concur in 
amendments put by the Senate to a bill originating in the House, 
or shall refuse to adopt a substitute adopted by the Senate for a 
bill originating in the House, a conference committee shall be ap- 
pointed upon motion made, consisting of the number named in 
the motion; and the bill under consideration shall thereupon go 



House of Representatives S27 

to and be considered by the joint conferees on the part of the 
House and Senate. In considering- matters in difference between 
the House and Senate committed to the conferees only such mat- 
ters as are in difference between the two houses shall be consid- 
ered by the conferees, and the conference report shall deal only 
with such matters. The conference report shall not be amended. 
Except as herein set out, the rules of the House of Representatives 
of Congress shall govern the appointment, conduct, and reports of 
the conferees. 

49. In forming a Committee of the House, the Speaker shall 
leave the Chair, and a Chairman to preside in committee shall be 
appointed by the Speaker. 

50. Upon bills submitted to a Committee of the Whole House, 
the jill shall be first read throughout by the Clerk, and then 
again read and debated by sections, leaving the preamble to be 
last considered. The body of the bill shall not be defaced or inter- 
lined, but all amendments, noting the page and line, shall be duly 
entered by the Clerk on a separate paper as the same shall be 
agreed to by the committee, and so reported to the House. After 
report, the bill shall again be subject to be debated and amended 
by sections before a question on its passage be taken. 

51. The lules of procedure in the House shall be observed in a 
Committee of the Whole House, so far as they may be applicable, 
except the rule limiting the time of speaking and the previous 
question. 

52. In a Committee of the Whole House a motion that the com- 
mittee rise shall always be in order, except when a member is 
speaking, and shall be decided without debate. 

53. Evei'y bill shall be introduced by motion for suspension of 
the rules, or by order of the House, or on the report of a com- 
mittee, unless introduced in regular order during the morning 
hour. 

54. All bills and resolutions shall be reported from the com- 
mittee to which referred, with such recommendations as the com- 
mittee may desire to make. 

55. Every bill shall receive three readings in the House previous 
to its passage, and the Speaker shall give notice at each whether 

it be its fii'st, second, or third reading. 



328 North Carolina Manual 

56. Any member introducing a bill or resolution shall briefly 
endorse thereon the substance of the same. 

57. When a bill has been introduced and referred to a commit- 
tee, if after ten days the committee has failed to report thereon, 
then the author of the bill may, after three days' public notice 
given in the House, on motion supported by a vote of two-thirds of 
the Members present and voting, recall the same from the com- 
mittee to the floor of the House for consideration and such action 
thereon as a majority of the Members present may direct. 

58. The Clerk of the House shall keep a separate calendar of 
the public, local, and private bills, and shall number them in the 
order which they are introduced, and all bills shall be disposed of 
in the order they stand upon the Calendar; but the Committee on 
Rules may at any time arrange the order of precedence in which 
bills may be considered. No bill shall be twice read on the same 
day without the concurrence of two-thirds of the members. 

59. All resolutions which may grant money out of the Treasury, 
or such as shall be of public nature, shall be treated in all respects 
in a similar manner with public bills. 

60. The Clerk of the House shall be deemed to continue in office 
until another is appointed. 

61. On the point of no quorum being raised, the doors shall be 
closed and there shall be a call of the House, and upon a call of 
the House the names of the members shall be called over by the 
Clerk and the absentees noted, after which the name of the absen- 
tees shall again be called over. Those for whom no excuse or suf- 
ficient excuses are made may, by order of those present, if fifteen 
in number, be taken into custody as they appear, or may be sent 
for and taken into custody wherever to be found by special mes- 
senger appointed for that purpose. 

Previous Question 

62. The previous question shall be as follows: "Shall the main 
question be now put?" and, until it is decided, shall preclude all 
amendments and debate. If this question shall be decided in the 
affirmative, the "main question" shall be on the passage of the bill, 
resolution, or other matter under consideration; but when amend- 
ments are pending, the question shall be taken upon such amend- 



House of Representatives 329 

merits, in inverse order, w^ithout further debate or amendment. If 
such question be decided in the negative, the main question shall 
be considered as remaining under debate: Provided, that no one 
shall move the previous question except the member submitting 
the report on the bill or other matter under consideration, and the 
member introducing the bill or other matter under consideration, 
or the member in charge of the measure, who shall be designated 
by the chairman of the committee reporting the same to the House 
at the time the bill or other matter under consideration is reported 
to the House or taken up for consideration. 

When a motion for the previous question is made, and pending 
the second thereto by a majority, debate shall cease; but if any 
member obtains the floor, he may move to lay the matter under 
consideration on the table, or move an adjournment, and when both 
or either of these motions are pending the question shall stand: 

(1) Previous question. 

(2) To adjourn. 

(3) To lay on the table. 

And then upon the main question, or amendments, or the motion 
to postpone indefinitely, postpone to a day certain, to commit, or 
amend, in the order of their precedence, until the main question 
is reached or disposed of; but after the previous question has been 
called by a majority, no motion, or amendment, or debate shall 
be in order. 

All motions below the motions to lay on the table must be made 
prior to a motion for the previous question; but, pending and not 
after the second therefor, by the majority of the House, a motion 
to adjourn or lay on the table, or both, are in order. This consti- 
tutes the precedence of the motions to adjourn and lay on the table 
over other motions, in Rule 25. 

Motions stands as follows in order of precedence in Rule 26 : 

Previous question. 

Adjourn. 

Lay on the table. 

Postpone definitely. 

To commit or amend. 

When the previous question is called, all motions below it fall, 
unless made prior to the call, and all motions above it fall after 



330 North Carolina Manual 

its second by a majority required. Pendiii,ii- the second, the motions 
to adjourn and lay on the table are in order, but not after a second. 
When in order and every motion is before the House, the question 
stands as follows : 

Previous question. 

Adjourn. 

Lay on the table. 

Postpone indefinitely. 

Postpone definitely. 

To commit. ■ 

Amendment to amendment. 

Amendment. 

Substitute. 

Bill. 

The previous question covers all other motions when seconded 
by a majority of the House, and proceeds by regular g-raduation 
to the main question, without debate, amendment, or motion, until 
such question is reached or disposed of. 

63. All committees, other than the Committee on Appropria- 
tions, when favorably reporting- any bill which carries an appro- 
priation from the State, shall indicate same in the report, and 
said bill shall be referred to the Committee on Appropriations for 
a further report before being acted upon by the House. All com- 
mittees, other than the Committee on Finance, when favorably 
reporting any bill which in any way or manner raises revenue or 
levies a tax or authorizes the issue of bonds or notes, whether 
public, public-local, or private, shall indicate same in the report, 
and said bill shall be re-referred to the Committee on Finance for 
a further report before being acted upon by the House. 

64. The Principal Clerk and the Sergeant-at-Arms may appoint, 
with the approval of the Speaker, such assistants as may be neces- 
sary to the efficient discharge of the duties of their various offices, 
and one or more of whom may be assigned by the Speaker from 
the Principal Clerk's office to the office of the Attorney General 
for the purpose of drafting bills. 

65. The Speaker may appoint a Clerk to the Speaker, a Chap- 
lain of the House, and he may also appoint ten pages to wait upon 
the sessions of the House, and when the pressure of business may 
require, he may appoint five additional pages. 



House of Representatives 331 

66. The Chairman of each of the following' committees: Agri- 
culture, Appropriations, Banks and Banking, Conservation and 
Development, Constitutional Amendments, Counties, Cities, and 
Towns, Courts and Judicial Districts, Education, Elections and 
Election Laws, Employment Compensation, Finance, Health, 
Higher Education, Insurance, Judiciary No. 1, Judiciary No. 2, 
Manufacturers and Labor, Mental Institutions, Military Affairs, 
Propositions and Grievances, Public Utilities, Public Welfare, 
Roads, Rules, Salaries and Fees, Veterans Legislation and Wild- 
life Resources may each appoint a clerk to the said committee. All 
committee clerks heretofore provided for are to be appointed by 
and with the approval of the Speaker. With the exception of the 
Clerks appointed to the Appropriations and Finance, the Clei-ks 
to all the other above-named committees, when not on duty with 
their specific committee shall report to and be under the super- 
vision of the Principal Clerk of the House for assignment to 
special duty with other committees and to serve the convenience 
of the members of the House. 

67. The Chairman of all committees shall notify, or cause to be 
notified, the first named introducer on such bills as are set for 
hearing- before their respective committees, the date, time and 
place of such hearing. 

68. That no clerk, laborer, or other person employed or ap- 
pointed under Rules 59, 60, and 61 hereof shall receive during such 
employment, appointment, or service any compensation from any 
department of the State Government, or from any other source, 
and there shall not be voted, paid, or awarded any additional pay, 
bonus or gratuity to any of them, but said persons shall receive 
only the pay for such duties and services as now provided by law. 
When the House is not in session the pages shall be under the 
supervision of the Principal Clerk. 

69. The chairman and five other members of any committee 
shall constitute a quorum of said committee for the transaction 
of business. 

70. The Committee on the Journal shall examine daily the 
Journal of the House before the hour of convening, and report 
after the opening of the House whether or not the proceedings of 
the previous day have been correctly recorded. 



332^ North Carolina Manual 

71. When a bill shall be reported by a committee with a recom- 
mendation that it be not passed, but accompanied by a minority 
report, the question before the House shall be "The adoption of 
the minority report," and if failing to be adopted by a majority 
vote, the bill shall be placed upon the unfavorable calendar. Such 
minority report shall be signed by at least one-fourth of the mem- 
bers of the Committee who were present and voting when the 
bill was considered in Committee. In the event there is an un- 
favorable report with no minority report accompanying it, the 
bill shall be placed upon the unfavorable calendar. To take a bill 
from the unfavorable calendar, a two-thirds vote shall be 
necessary. 

72. A bill from the unfavorable calendar shall not be debatable, 
but the movant may make a brief and concise statement of the 
reasons for the motion before making the motion, taking not more 
than five minutes. 

73. Whenever a public bill is introduced a carbon copy thereof 
shall accompany the bill. The Reading Clerk shall stamp the copy 

_ with the number stamped upon the original bill. Such copy shall 
be daily delivered to the joint committee hereinafter provided for. 
The Principal Clerk shall deliver the carbon copy of the bill desig- 
nated to be printed, as hereinafter provided for, to the Public 
Printer and cause four hundred copies thereof to be printed. On 
the morning following the delivery of the printed copies, the Chief 
Clerk shall cause the chief page to have one copy thereof put upon 
the desk of each member and shall retain the other printed copies 
in his office. A sufficient number of the printed copies for the use 
of the committee to which the bill is referred shall be by the chief 
page delivered to the chairman or clerk of that committee. If the 
bill is passed, the remaining copies shall be by the chief page de- 
livered to the Principal Clerk of the Senate for the use of the 
Senate. The cost of printing shall be paid from the contingent 
fund of the House of Representatives. The Chairman of the Rules 
Committee of the House and the Chairman of the Rules Committee 
of the Senate shall appoint a sub-committee consisting of two 
members of the House and two members of the Senate from the 
body of the House and Senate, and such chairmen shall notify the 
Principal Clerk of the House and the Senate who has been so ap- 
pointed. Such sub-committee shall meet daily and examine the 



House of Representatives 333 

carbon copies of the public bills introduced and determine which 
of such bills shall be printed and which shall not, and stamp the 
copies accordingly. Such sub-committees shall serve for one week 
unless for good cause the chairmen of the respective rules com- 
mittees shall determine otherwise. If the member introducing a 
public bill, which the committee shall determine should not be 
printed, so desires, he may appear before the committee at the next 
meeting thereof with reference thereto. 

74. Whenever any resolution or bill is introduced a carbon copy 
thereof shall be attached thereto, and the Principal Clerk shall 
cause said carbon copy to be numbered as the original resolution 
or bill is numbered, and shall cause the same to be available at 
all times to the member introducing- the same. In case the resolu- 
tion or bill is a public resolution or bill, an additional carbon copy 
shall also be attached thereto for the use of the Public Printer, 
under the provisions of Rule 66. 

ARTICLE II 

Constitution of North Carolina 

Sec. 29. Limitations upon power of General Assembly to enact 
p7'ivate or special legislation. 

The General Assembly shall not pass any local, private, or 
special act or resolution relating to the establishment of courts 
inferior to the Superior Court; relating to the appointment of 
justices of the peace; relating to health, sanitation, and the abate- 
ment of nuisances; changing the names of cities, towns, and 
tovimships; authorizing the laying out, opening, altering, main- 
taining, or discontinuing of highways, streets, or alleys; relating 
to ferries or bridges, relating to non-navigable streams, relating 
to cemeteries; relating to the pay of jurors; erecting new town- 
ships, or changing township lines, or establishing or changing the 
line of school districts; remitting fines, penalties, and forfeitures, 
or refunding moneys legally paid into the Public Treasury; regu- 
lating labor, trade, mining, or manufacturing; extending the time 
for the assessment or collection of taxes or otherwise relieving 
any collector of taxes from the due performance of his official 
duties or his sureties from liability; giving effect to informal wills 



334 North Carolina Manual 

and deeds; nor shall the General Assembly enact any such local, 
private, or special act by the partial repeal of a general law, but 
the General Assembly may at any time repeal local, private, or 
special laws enacted by it. Any local, private or special act or 
resolution passed in violation of the provisions of this section shall 
be void. The General Assembly shall have power to pass general 
laws regulating- matters set out in this section. 



House of Kepresentatives 335 

STANDING COMMITTEES OF THE 
HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES 

Alphabetically Arranged 

Committee on Agriculture 

Mr. Royster, Chairmayi 
Mr. Movi-is, V ice-Chairman 

Messrs: Allen of Granville, Arnold, Blackwell, Blue, Branch, 
Bridger, Brown, Bunn, Collier, Corey, Dalrymple, Davis of Hay- 
wood, Dou.o'hton, Duncan, Dung-an, Edwards of Greene, Eggers 
(R), Falls, Fisher of Cumberland, Fountain, Gantt, Gobble, 
Greene, Hanford, Hardison, Harris, Hathaway, Hocutt, Horton, 
Jones of Camden, Kilpatrick, Little of Alexander, Little of Anson, 
Maddrey, McMullan, Mooie, Outlaw, Page, Parker, Powell of 
Columbus, Powell of Rockingham, Rackley (R), Regan, Robei'ts 
(R), Scott, Shoemaker (R), Shreve, Slagle, Smith, Snow, Spruill, 
Taylor of Caswell, VanderLinden, Venters, Whitfield, Winslow, 
Woodard. 

Committee on Appropriations 

Mr. Taylor of Wayne, Chairman 
Mr. Royster, Vice-Chairman 

Messrs : Alexander, Allen of Granville, Allen of Wake, Arnold, 
Bacon, Baldwin of Chatham, Barker (R), Blackwell, Blue, Brown, 
Bunn, Mrs. Craven, Messrs: Crissman, Dalrymple, Davis of Hay- 
wood, Davis of McDowell, Divelbiss, Edwards of Durham, Eggers 
(R), Falls, Fisher of Cumberland, Floyd, Garland, Gentry, Han- 
ford, Harding (R), Hardison, Harris, Hayes (R), Horton, Jones 
of Camden, Kerr, Kilpatrick, Kiser of Alexander, Little of Anson, 
Little of Wake, Long, Maddrey, Massey, Matheson, Moore, Outlaw, 
Page, Parker, Pass, Powell of Rockingham, Pritchard (R), 
Pritchett, Scott, Shreve, Slagle, Smoot (R), Spruill, Story (R), 
Tatem, Taylor of Buncombe, Umstead, Wallace, Whitfield, Wil- 
liamson, Woodard. 



336 North Carolina Manual 

Committee on lianks and Banking 

Mr. Matheson, Chairman 
Mr. Doughton, Vice-Chairman 

Messrs: Baldwin of Richmond, Baldwin of Chatham, Blackwell, 
Best, Bridger, Burfoot, Caveness, Cooper, Crissman, Dalton, 
Fountain, Harding (R), Hardison, Harris, Jones of Rutherford, 
Kerr, Lassiter, Little of Anson, Lon.g, Martin, McDaniel, Parrott, 
Powell of Columbus, Pritchett, Snow, Taylor of Buncombe, Worth- 
ington. 

Committee on Commercial Fisheries and Oyster Industry 

Mr. Scott, Chairman 

Mr. Williamson, Vicc-Chai)man 

Messrs: Arnold, Bell, Burfoot, Collier, Gibbs, Greene, Hayman, 
Johnson, Jones of Camden, McMullan, Noble, Tatem, Venters, 
Whitfield, Winslow. 

Committee on Commissions and Institutions for the Blind 

Mr. Smith, Chairman 

Messrs: A veritt. Craven, Divelbiss, Duncan, Hardison, Hatch, 
Long, Morris, Shoemaker (R), Spruill, van Noppen. 

Committee on Congressional Districts 

Mr. Williamson, Chairman 

Messrs: Allen of Granville, Arnold, Barker (R), Brown, Bunn, 
Cooper, Davis of McDowell, Doughton, Fisher of Transylvania 
(R), Hanford, Hayman, Kirkman, Long, Maddrey, Outlaw, Page, 
Powell of Rockingham, Smoot (R), Tatem, Taylor of Caswell. 

Committee on Conservation and Development 

Mr. Whitfield, Chairman 
Mr. Hathaway, Vice-Chairman 

Messrs: Arnold, Averitt, Blue, Bost, Bridger, Brown, Bunn, 
Burfoot, Caveness, Cooper, Corey, Dalton, Divelbliss, Dungan, 
Edv/ards of Greene, Eggers (R), Falls, Fountain, Gantt, Gentry, 
Greene, Hayman, Hocutt, Horton, Howard, Johnson, Jones of 
Camden, Kerr, Kilpatrick, McMullan, Moore, Outlaw, Parrott, 



House of Representatives 337 

Powell of Columbus, Royster, Scott, Slagle, Smoot (R), Snow, 
Taylor of Caswell, Umstead, VanderLinden, Wallace, Winslow. 

Committee on Constitutional Amendments 

Mr. Kerr, Chairman 
Mr. Smith, Vice-Chainnan 

Messrs: Allen of Wake, Averitt, Blue, Best, Caveness, Davis 
of McDowell, Fountain, Gantt, Harris, Hatch, Kearney, Lassiter, 
Little of Anson, Little of Wake, Pritchard (R), Royster, Shreve, 
Snow, Story (R), Taylor of Buncombe, Taylor of Wayne, Venters, 
Worthington. 

Committee on Corporations 

Mr. Jones of Rutherford, Chairman 

Messrs: Alexander, Averitt, Bost, Caveness, Crissman, Davis 
of McDowell, Edwards of Durham, Floyd, Hatch, Leatherman, 
Little of Anson, Little of Wake, Matheson, Parker, Pritchett, 
Rackley (R), Regan, Venters, 

Committee on Counties, Cities and Towns 

Mr. Shreve, Chavrmayi 

Mr. Gibbs, Vice-Chairman 

Messrs: Averitt, Bacon, Baldwin of Richmond, Baldwin of 
Chatham, Cooper, Crissman, Dalrymple, Dalton, Davis of Hay- 
wood, Dungan, Edwards of Durham, Falls, Fisher of Cumberland, 
Floyd, Gantt, Hanford, Harding (R), Hatch, Hathaway, Hayes 
(R), Hocutt, Howard, Jones of Camden, Jones of Rutherford, 
Kearney, Kilpatrick, .Kirkman, Little of Alexander, Maddrey, 
Martin, McDaniel, McMullan, Morris, Noble, Page, Pritchett, 
Rackley (R), Regan, Roberts (R), Story (R), Whitfield, William- 
son, Woodard. 

Committee on Courts and Judicial Districts 

Mr. Worthington, Chairm,an 
Mr. Winslow, Vice-Chairm,an 
Messrs: Allen of Wake, Averitt, Blackwell, Branch, Caveness, 
Edwards of Durham, Floyd, Fountain, Harding (R), Hatch, 



338 North Carolina Manual 

Howard, Ken-, Lassiter, Leathermaii, Martin, Parrott, Powell of 
Columbus, Pritchard (R), Scott, Shreve, Taylor of Wayne, van 
Noppen, Venteis, Whitmire. 

Committee on Drainage 

Ml'. Kilpatrick, Chainiuni 
Messrs: Arnold, Corey, Hathaway, Johnson, Jones of Camden, 
McMullan, Noble, Outlaw, Scott, Tatem, Whitfield. 

Committee on Education 

Mr. Edwards of Greene, Chairuian 
Mr. Taylor of Buncombe, V ice-Chairman 

Messrs: Harris, Alexander, Allen of Wake, Arnold, Averitt, 
Barker (R), Blackwell, Branch, Brown, Bunn, Collier, Cooper, 
Mrs. Craven, Messis: Doughton, Edwards of Durham, Eg-gers 
(R), Mrs. Ervin, Messrs: Falls, Floyd, Fountain, Garland, Gobble, 
Greene, Harding (R), Hayman, Hocutt, Horton, Kearney, Kerr, 
Kilpatrick, Kirkman, Kiser, Leatherman, Little of Alexander, 
Little of Wake, Massey, Matheson, Noble, Page, Powell of Colum- 
bus, Pritchett, Scott, Smith, Snow, Story (R), Taylor of Wayne, 
Umstead, Venters, Woodard. 

Committee on Elections and Election Laws 

Mr. Blue, Chairman 
Mr. Crissman, Vice-Chairman 
Messrs: Barker (R), Blaskwell, Bridger, Brown, Dalrymple, 
Duncan, Eggers (R), Gentry, Hatch, Horton, Huskins, Jones of 
Rutherford, Kerr, Kirkman, Massey, McDaniel, Moore, Morris, 
Outlaw, Pass, Story (R), van Noppen, Wallace, Whitmire, Worth- 
ington. 

Committee on Employment Security 

Mr. Hathaway, Chairman 
Mr. Horton, Vice-Chairman 
Messrs: Allen of Granville, Baldwin of Richmond, Bost, Collier, 
Mrs. Craven, Messrs: Crissman, Dalton, Doughton, Eggers (R), 
Gentry, Hardison, Harris, Howard, Kerr. Parker, Powell of Colum- 
bus, Powell of Rockingham, Royster, van Noppen, VanderLinden, 
Winslow, 



House of Representatives 339 

Committee on Engrossed Bills 

Mr. Gobble, Chairman 

Messrs: Allen of Granville, Baldwin of Chatham, Brown, Davis 
of McDowell, Doughton, Duncan, Gentry, Long, Massey, Noble, 
Powell of Rockingham, Regan, Smoot (R). 

Committee on Expenditures of the House 

Mr. Baldwin of Richmond, Chairman 
Messrs: Bacon, Corey, Dalton, Duncan, Fisher of Cumberland, 
Gentry, Leathei-man, Little of Alexander, Long, Massey, Morris, 
Outlaw, Pritchett, Regan, Smoot (R), Umstead. 

Committee on Federal and Interstate Cooperation 

Mr. Crissman, Chairman 
Messrs: Alexander, Bacon, Mrs. Ervin, Messrs: Falls, Gentry, 
Leatherman, Parker, Whitfield. 

Committee on Finance 

Mr. Moore, Chairman 
Mr. Allen of Wake, Vice-Chairman 
Messrs: Averitt, Baldwin of Richmond, Bell, Bost, Branch, 
Bridger, Burfoot, Caveness, Collier, Cooper, Corey, Dalton, Dough- 
ton, Duncan, Dungan, Edwards of Greene, Mrs. Ervin, Messrs: 
Fountain, Gantt, Gibbs, Gobble, Greene, Harris, Hatch, Hatha- 
way, Hayman, Hocutt, Howard, Huskins, Johnson, Jones of 
Rutherford, Kearney, Kerr, Kirkman, Lassiter, Leatherman, Mar- 
tin, McDaniel, McMuUan, Morris, Noble, Parrott, Powell of Colum- 
bus, Rackley (R), Regan, Roberts (R), Royster, Shoemaker (R), 
Smith, Snow, Taylor of Caswell, Taylor of Wayne, van Noppen, 
VanderLinden, Venters, Whitmire, Winslow, Worthington. 

Committee on Health 

Mr. Taylor of Buncombe, Chairman 
Dr. Bridger, Vice-ChairTnan 

Messrs: Blackwell, Bost, Caveness, Corey, Mrs. Craven, Messrs: 
Davis of Haywood, Edwards of Greene, Edwards of Durham, 
Eggers (R), Mrs. Ervin, Messrs: Fisher of Cumberland, Gantt, 
Harris, Hathaway, Hocutt, .Kearney, Kilpatrick, Kirkman, Las- 
siter, Martin, Massey, Moore, Parrott, Powell of Columbus, Powell 



340 North Carolina Manual 

of Rockingham, Rackley (R), Royster, Slagle, Snow, Spruill, 
Taylor of Caswell, Umstead, Wallace, Whitfield, Whitmire, Wood- 
ard. 

Committee on Higher Education 

Mr. Pritchett, Chairman 
Mr. Gantt, Vice-Chairman 

Messrs: Allen of Wake, Brown, Bunn, Collier, Eggers (R), Mrs. 
Ervin, Messrs: Garland, Harris, Hathaway, Hayes (R), Horton, 
Johnson, Kiser, Lassiter, Massey, McMullan, Noble, Pritchard 
(R), Royster, Shreve, Smith, Umstead, Wallace, Whitfield, Wins- 
low. 

Committee on Institutions for the Deaf 
Mr. Horton, Chaivnian 

Messrs: Allen of Granville, Davis of Haywood, Duncan, Han- 
ford, Hardison, Kearney, Massey, Noble, Pritchard (R), Shoe- 
maker (R), Smoot (R), Spruill. 

Committee on Insurance 

Mr. Huskins, Chairynan 
Mr. Snow, Vice-Chairman 
Messrs: Allen of Wake, Baldwin of Richmond, Blackwell, Bost, 
Branch, Caveness, Crissman, Fountain, Gibbs, Greene, Harris, 
Hocutt, Jones of Rutherford, Kilpatrick, Kiser, Lassiter, Little of 
Wake, Long, Matheson, Outlaw, Pritchett, Royster, Shreve, Tay- 
lor of Wayne, Umstead, Venters, Worthington. 

Committee on the Journal 

Mr. Wallace, Chairman 
Messrs: Baldwin of Chatham, Davis of Haywood, Garland, 
Gobble, Johnson, McDaniel, Pritchard (R). 

Committee on Judiciary No. 1 

Mr. Allen of Wake, Chairynan 
Mr. Jones of Rutherford, Vice-CJmirman 

Messrs: Alexander, Averitt, Blackwell, Caveness, Crissman, 
Edwards of Durham, Fisher of Transylvania (R), Horton, How- 
ard, Huskins, Kerr, Lassiter, McMullan, Parrott, Powell of Colum- 



House of Representatives 341 

bus, Regan, Snow, Story (R), Taylor of Buncombe, Taylor of 
Wayne, Venters, Whitmire, Worthington. 

Committee on Judiciary No. 2 

Mr. Bost, Chairman 
Mr. Martin, Vice-Chairman 

Messrs: Baldwin of Chatham, Branch, Davis of Haywood, Davis 
of McDowell, Falls, Floyd, Fountain, Gantt, Garland, Harding 
(R), Hatch, iKearney, Kirkman, Leatherman, Little of Wake, 
Moore, Pritchard (R), Pritchett, Roberts (R), Scott, Shreve, 
Smith, van Noppen. 

Committee on Manufacturers and Labor 

Mr. Greene, Chainnan 
Mr. Fountain, Vice-Chair'rnan 
Messrs: Alexander, Baldwin of Richmond, Branch, Bridger, Bur- 
foot, Dungan, Edwards of Greene, Edwards of Durham, Mrs. 
Ervin, Messrs: Falls, Fisher of Cumberland, Gibbs, Gobble, Han- 
ford, Harding (R), Hardison, Harris, Hathaway, Hayes (R), 
Jones of Rutherford, Kerr, Kirkman, Little of Anson, Matheson, 
McDaniel, Parker, Powell of Columbus, Powell of Rockingham, 
Royster, Scott, Shoemaker (R), Shreve, Taylor of Caswell, Tay- 
lor of Wayne, Umstead, VanderLinden, Wallace, Worthington. 

Committee on Mental Institutions 

Mr. Spruill, Chairman 
Mr. Kilpatrick, Vice-Chairman 
Messrs: Alexander, Allen of Granville, Barker (R), Blue, 
Branch, Burfoot, Davis of Haywood, Divelbiss, Edwards of 
Greene, Mrs. Ervin, Messrs: Gantt, Garland, Greene, Hanford, 
Hatch, Horton, Little of Wake, Long, Maddrey, Matheson, Morris, 
Page, Parrott, Pass, Powell of Rockingham, Pritchard (R), 
Pritchett, Roberts (R), Slagle, Umstead, Winslow, Woodard. 

Committee on Military Affairs 

Mr. Snow, Chairman 
Messrs: Dalrymple, Dungan, Edwards of Durham, Fisher of 
Transylvania (R), Floyd, Gibbs, Hathaway, Howard, Kiser, Little 
of Alexander, Parrott, Taylor of Wayne, van Noppen, Vandei"- 
Linden. 



;342 NoRTTi Carolina Manual 

Committee on Penal Institutions 

Mr. Hardison, Chairman 

Messrs: Alexander, Allen of Granville, Arnold, Bell, Blackwell, 

Bridg-er, Cooper, Dalrymple, Falls, Fisher of Transylvania (R), 

Garland, Hanford, Harris, Kearney, Massey, Morris, Moore, 

Parker, Pritchett, Royster, Spruill, Umstead, Wallace, Woodard. 

Committee on Teachers' and Employees' Retirement 

Mr. Gantt, CIiai)-)iia)i 
Messrs: Baldwin of Chatham, Doughton, Fountain, Garland, 
Ilariis, Hayes (R), Hocutt, Huskins, Jones of Camden, Kerr, 
Lassiter, Matheson, Scott, Smith, Umstead, Wallace. 

Committee on Propositions and Grievances 

Mr. Caveness, Chairman 

Mr. Bost, Vice-Chairman 
Messrs: Branch, Dalrymple, Dalton, Edwards of Greene, Mrs. 
Ervin, Messrs: Falls, Fountain, Gantt, Gibbs, Gobble, Greene, 
Hatch, Hathaway, Hayman, Hocutt, Johnson, Kearney, Lassiter, 
Leatherman, Little of Alexander, Matheson, McDaniel, Noble, 
Page, Parrott, Powell of Columbus, Regan, Royster, Scott, Smith, 
Snow, Taylor of Wayne, van Noppen, VanderLinden, Venters, 
Wallace, Williamson, Worthington. 

Committee on Public Utilities 

Mr. Blackwell, Chairman. 
Mr. Whitmire, V ice-Chairman 
Messrs: Allen of Wake, Baldwin of Richmond, Bost, Branch, 
Caveness, Collier, Doughton, Dungan, Edwards of Greene, Fisher 
of Cumberland, Fountain, Greene, Harris, Hathaway, Hocutt, 
Huskins, Jones of Rutherford, Kerr, Kirkman, Kiser, Lassiter, 
Little of Anson, Little of Wake, Matheson, McDaniel, Moore, Mor- 
ris, Outlaw, Parker, Royster, Smith, Snow, Taylor of Wayne, 
Wallace, Whitfield, Whitmire, Williamson. 

Committee on Public Welfare 

Mr. Edwards of Durham, Chairman 
Mr. Dungan, Vice-Chairman 
Messrs: Corey, Baldwin of Richmond, Barker (R), Blackwell, 
Branch, Mrs. Craven, Messrs: Dalton, Divelbiss, Edwards of 



House of Representatives 343 

Greene, Eggers (R), Mrs. Ervin, Messrs: Gantt, Greene, Harding 
(R), Harris, Hayman, Hocutt, Horton, Huskins, Johnson, Kerr, 
Ivilpatrick, Kiser, Maddrey, Martin, McMullan, Moore, Powell of 
Columbus, Rackley (R), Shreve, Slag'le, Snow, Tatem, Taylor of 
Buncombe, Wallace, Whitfield, Whitmire, Winslow, Woodard. 

Committee on Roads 

Mr. Hatch, Chairman 
Mr. VanLinden, Vice-Chairmaii 

Messrs: Allen of Granville, Bacon, Baldwin of Richmond, Bald- 
win of Chatham, Bell, Blue, Bost, Bridger, Burfoot, Caveness, 
Crissman, Dalton, Dalrymple, Davis of Haywood, Divelbiss, Dun- 
can, Dungan, Fisher of Transylvania (R), Fisher of Cumberland, 
Gantt, Gentry, Gibbs, Hanford, Hardison, Hathaway, Hayman, 
Howard, Huskins, Johnson, Jones of Camden, Jones of Rutherford, 
Lassiter, Little of Anson, Long, Maddrey, Martin, McDaniel, Mc- 
Mullan, Moore, Moriis, Outlaw, Parker, Parrott (R) , Regan, 
Royster, Scott, Shoemaker (R), Shreve, Slagle, Spi'uill, Tatem, 
Taylor of Caswell, Wallace, Whitfield, Whitmire, Williamson, 
Winslow, Worthington. 

Committee on Rules 

Mr. Harris, Chairman 
Ml'. Whitfield, Vice-Chairman 
Messrs: Allen of Wake, Bost, Bridger, Caveness, Collier, Ed- 
wards of Greene, Falls, Gibbs, Gobble, Greene, Hathaway, Hocutt, 
Horton, Jones of Rutherford, Kearney, Kerr, Lassiter, Martin, 
Matheson, McDaniel, Moore, Outlaw, Powell of Columbus, Royster, 
Scott, Spruill, Story (R), Taylor of Wayne, Umstead, van Nop- 
uen, VanderLinden, Worthington. 

Committee on Salaries and Fees 

Mr. Morris, Chairman 
Mr. Johnson, Vice-Chairman 

Messers: Corey, Davis of Haywood, Fisher of Transylvania (R), 
Fisher of Cumberland, Gentry, Gobble, Harding (R), Hardison, 
Hayes, (R), Horton, Jones of Camden, Long, Massey, Pass, Shoe- 
maker (R), Smoot (R), Tatem, van Noppen. 



344 I '- North Carolina Manual 

Committee on Senatorial Districts 

Mr. Fountain, Chairman 
Messrs: Bacon, Branch, Brown, Corey, Gentry, Gobble, Hatch, 
Huskins, Leatherman, Little of Alexander, Massey, Shoemaker 
(R), Umstead. 

Committee on Veterans Legislation 

Mr. Branch, Chairman 
Mr. Alexander, Vice-Chairman 
Messrs: Baldwin of Richmond, Baldwin of Chatham, Barker 
(R), Bell, Bunn, Mrs. Craven, Messrs: Dalrymple Duncan, Dun- 
can, Edwards of Durham, Gibbs, Greene, Hanford, Hayes (R), 
Horton, Howard, Jones of Camden, Kearney, Little of Wake, Mad- 
drey, McDaniel, Noble, Parker, Parrott, Pritchett, Roberts (R), 
Royster, Scott, Shreve, Snow, Story (R), Taylor of Buncombe, 
van Noppen, VanderLinden, Whitmire, Williamson, Woodard. 

Committee on Wildlife Resources 

Mr. Hocutt, Chairman 
Mr. Scott, Vice-Chairman 

Messrs: Allen of Wake, Bacon, Baldwin of Richmond, Bunn, 
Cooper, Crissman, Dalton, Davis of McDowell, Divelbiss, Dough- 
ton, Duncan, Dungan, Edwards of Greene, Falls, Fountain, Gantt, 
Gibbs, Greene, Hardison, Hathaway, Hayman, Huskins, Johnson, 
Jones of Camden, Kilpatrick, Little of Alexander, Maddrey, 
Matheson, McDaniel, Moore, Morris, Pass, Roberts (R), Shreve, 
Slagle, Smoot (R), Snow, Spruill, Story (R), Taylor of Buncombe, 
Wallace, Whitfield, Williamson. 

Committee on Enrolled Bills 

Mr. Averitt, Chairman 
Messrs: Bunn, Burfoot, Mrs. Ervin, Messrs: Gobble, Hardison, 
Pass, Roberts (R). 

Committee on Justices of the Peace 

Mr. Alexander, Chairman 
Messrs: Arnold, Brown, Dalrymple, Floyd, Hayes (R), Jones of 
Camden, McMulIan, Pass, Powell of Rockingham, Smith. 



House of Representatives 345 

Committee on Library 

Mr. VanderLinden, Chairman 
Messrs: Burfoot, Allen of Granville, Barker (R), Mrs. Craven, 
Messrs: Crissman, Davis of McDowell, Mrs. Ervin, Messrs: 
Hatch, Howard, Johnson, Riser, Little of Anson, McMullan, Wins- 
low. 

Committee on Printing 
Mr. Winslow, Chairman 
Messrs: Alexander, Bell, Blue, Bunn, Gobble, Howard, Pass, 
Rackley (R), Tatem, Taylor of Caswell, Slagle. 

Committee on Public Buildings and Grounds 

Mr. Falls, Chairman 
Messrs: Averitt, Blue, Burfoot, Dalton, Davis of McDowell, 
Divelbiss, Morris, Pass, Tatem, Taylor of Caswell. 

Committee on Trustees of the University 

Mr. Umstead, Chairman 

Messrs: Allen of Wake, Averitt, Bridger, Burfoot, Caviness, 
Collier, Cooper, Mrs. Craven, Messrs: Crissman, Fountain, Gar- 
land, Gibbs, Greene, Harding (R), Harris, Horton, Huskins, Jones 
of Rutherford, Kerr, Riser, Martin, Matheson, McMullan, Moore, 
Morris, Noble, Outlaw, Parrott, Powell of Columbus, Pritchard 
(R), Pritchett, Roberts (R) Shreve, Spruill, Story (R), Taylor 
of Wayne, VanderLinden, Venters, Whitfield, Whitmire, Winslow, 
Worthington. 






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House of Representatives 347 

Seat Assignment Chart — Session 1949 
NORTH CAROLINA HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES 

(DEMOCRATS UNLESS OTHERWISE INDICATED j 

County Name Address Seat 

Alamance E. R. Hanford, Sr BurlinRton 106 

Alexander Earl F. Little Taylorsville 117 

Alleghany J. K. Doughton Sparta 38 

Anson .' Hal W. Little Wadeshoro 82 

Ashe Todd H. Gentry W. Jefferson 70 

Avery R. A. Shomaker ( R ) Newland 108 

Beaufort LeRoy Scott Washington 9 

Bertie C. Wayland Spruill Windsor 7 

Bladen D. H. Bridger F'ladenboro 118 

Brunswick Odell Williamson Shallotte 76 

Buncombe J. E. Diveibiss, Jr Asheville 40 

Leslie H. MoDaniel Oteen 39 

Roy A. Taylor Black Mountain 41 

Burke O. Lee Horton Morganton 34 

Cabarrus Hugh Q. Alexander Kannapolis 27 

E. T. Bost, Jr Concord 28 

Caldwell J. T. Pritchett Lenoir 35 

Camden J. W. Jones South Mills 73 

Carteret H. S. Gibbs Morehead City 5 

Caswell W. C. Taylor Blanche 45 

Catawba Harry VanderLinden Hickory 63 

Chatham T. Fleet Baldwin Si'er City 66 

Cherokee J. H. Duncan Murphy 87 

Chowan J. H. McMullan Edenton 105 

Clay Fred D. Pass Hayesville 96 

Cleveland B. T. Falls, Jr Shelby 19 

Columbus J. K. Powell Whiteville 85 

Craven Burl G. Hardison New Bern 53 

Cumberland F. M. Averitt Fayetteville 98 

Troy A. Fisher Fayetteville 99 

Currituck E. R. Johnson Currituck 75 

Dare D. L. Hayman Nags Head 74 

Davidson L. A. Martin Lexington 15 

Davie J. N. Smoot (R» Mocksville 107 

Duplin Lewis W. Outlaw Seven Springs 113 

Durham Dan K. Edwards Durham 60 

Robert M. Gantt Durham 57 

Edgecombe Pen E. Fountain Pocky Mount 54 

Forsyth Winfield Blackwell Winston-Salem 42 

J. MjRae Dalton Winston-Sa'em 43 

F. L. Gobble Winston-Salem 69 

Franklin H. C. Kearney Franklinton Ill 

Gaston James Boyce Garland Gastonia 80 

Carl W. Howard Bessemer City 81 

Gates Clarence P. Hathaway Sunbury 4 

Graham Dennis Massey Robbirsvi'le 72 

Granville Thomas W. Allen rireedmoor 59. 

Greene A. C. Edwards Hookerton 17 

Guilford Shelley B. Caveness Greensboro 29 

Walter E. Crissman High Point 30 

O. Arthur Kirkman H'gh Po'nt 31 

Clyde A. Shreve Stokesdale 32 

Halifax Joseph Branch Fnfie'd 13 

Harnett Howard E. Parker Frwin 92 

Haywood Grover C. Davis Waynesville 64 

Henderson R- Lee Whitmire Henderson villc 61 

Hertford C. Gordon Maddrey Ahoskie 18 

jj„t;e H. A. Greene Raeford 3 



348 North Carolina Manual 

County Name Address Seat 

Hyde C. L. Bell Swan Quarter 68 

Iredell John F. Matheson Mooresville 62 

Jackson Frank H. Brown, Jr Cullowhee 112 

Johnston Ronald Hocutt Wendell 58 

G. Troy Page Clayton 88 

Jones G. N. Noble Trenton 67 

Lee Robert W. Dalrymple Sanford 71 

Lenoir Marion A. Parrott Kinston 26 

Ijincoln M. T. Leatherman Lincolntnn 86 

Macon C. S. Slagle Franklin 78 

Madison Clyde M. Roberts (R) Marshall 102 

Martin A. Corey Jamesville 91 

McDowell Roy W. Davis Marion 95 

Mecklenburg Mrs. Walter G. Craven Charlotte 23 

Mrs. Joe Ervin Charlotte 22 

Robert Lassiter, Jr Charlotte 24 

Harvey Morris Charlotte 21 

Mitchell Warren H. Pritchard (R) Spruce Pine 116 

Montgomery J. P. Wallace Troy 48 

Moore H. Clifton Blue Aberdeen 25 

Nash C. Settle Bunn Spring Hope 55 

New Hanover Thomas E. Cooper Wilmington 94 

Northampton J. Raynor Woodard Conway 89 

Onslow Carl V. Venters Jacksonvlle 79 

Orange T. W. Umstead, Jr Chapel Hill 97 

Pamlico T. J. Collier Arapahoe 49 

Pasquotank Noah Burfoot Elizabeth City 77 

Pender J. V. Whitfield Rurgaw 2 

Perquimans E. Leigh Winslow Hertford 119 

Person R. L. Harris Roxboro 16 

Pitt Frank M. Kilpatrick Ayden 8 

Sam O. Worthington Greenville 6 

Polk F. P. Bacon Tryon 8-3 

Randolph Robert Smith Hayes (R) Randleman 115 

Richmond H. T. Baldwin, Jr Rockingham 33 

Robeson F. Wavland Floyd Fairmont 50 

John B. Regan St. Pauls 51 

Rockingham R. G. Powell Reidsville 44 

Rowan D. C. Dungan Salisbury 14 

Kerr Craige Ramsay Salisbury Speaker 

Rutherford Woodrow W. Jones Rutherfordton 20 

Sampson Almon E. Rackley (R) Clinton 109 

Scotland Roger C. Kiser Laurinburg 56 

Stanly Raymond Barker (R) Albemarle 103 

Stokes Leonard H. van Noppen Danbury 65 

Surry Geo. K. Snow Mt. Airy 90 

Swain J. Robert Long Bryson City 114 

Transylvania Ralph Fisher (R) Brevard 110 

Tyrrell C. W. Tatem Columbia 46 

Union H. B. Smith Monroe 84 

Vance Fred S. Rovster Henderson 36 

Wake Arch T. Allen Raleigh 11 

William T. Hatch Raleigh 12 

J. C. Little, Jr Raleigh 10 

Warren John H. Kerr, Jr Warrenton 1 

Washington F. O. Arnold Roper 93 

Watauga S. C. Eggers (R) Boone 101 

Wayne W. Frank Taylor Goldsboro 59 

Wilkes T. E. Story (R) Wilkesboro 100 

Wilson Larry I. Moore, Jr Wilson 37 

Yadkin F. D. B. Harding (R) Yadkinville 104 

Yancey J. Frank Huskins : Burnsville 47 



PART VH 

BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 




W. Kerr Scott 
Governor 



Biographical Sketches 

EXECUTIVE OFFICIALS 
WILLIAM KERR SCOTT 

GOVERNOR 

(Elected by the People) 

William Kerr Scott, Democrat, was born at Haw River, Ala- 
mance County, on April 17, 1896. Son of R. W. and Elizabeth 
Hughes Scott. Attended Hawfields Graded School, 1902-1908; 
Hawfields High School 1909-1913; N. C. State College 1913-1917; 
B.S. Degree in Agriculture, honor student and athlete. Farmer 
and dairyman. Emergency Food Production Agent, U. S. Depart- 
ment of Agriculture, 1917; Private Field Artillery, 1918; Ala- 
mance County Farm Agent, 1920-30; Master North Carolina State 
Grange, 1930-33; Regional Director, Farm Debt Adjustment 
Program of Resettlement Administration, 1934-36; State Commis- 
sioner of Agriculture 1936. Reelected 1940, 1944. Resigned Feb- 
ruary 14, 1948, to become candidate for Governor. Elected Gov- 
ernor November 2, 1948. Member American Jersey Cattle Club; 
N. C. Jersey Cattle Club (President) ; N. C. Rural Electrification 
Authority and first North Carolinian to make public address 
advocating rural electrification (Statesville in 1930) ; N. C. Dairy 
Association (President) ; State Farmers Convention (President) 
1934; N. C. Cotton Growers Cooperative Association (Advisory 
Board) ; Walter B. Ellis Post No. 63 American Legion, Burling- 
ton; Oi'iginator Tobacco Advisory Council; Tobacco Advisory 
Board (Chairman 1945) ; National Association of Commissioners, 
Secretaries and Commissioners of Agriculture (President 1947) 
National Advisory Committee of Agricultural Research and Mar- 
keting 1946-1948; Special Commission to Mexico to study Hoof 
and Mouth Disease 1947. 

Received Progressive Farmer award "Man of the Year" as 
N. C. Agricultural Leader in 1937. Junior Order American Me- 
chanics. Hawfields Presbyterian Church (Deacon 1920-32, Elder 
1933-48). Married Miss Mary Elizabeth White of Hawfields, 
July 2, 1919. Three children: Osborne W., Haw River; Mary 
Ken- (Mrs. A. J. Loudermilk), Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio; Robert W., 
student Duke University. Address: Haw River, N. C. 

351 



352 North Carolina Manual 

THAD EURE 

secretary of state 

(Elected by the People) 

Thad Eure, Democrat, of Hertford County, was born November 
15, 1899, in Gates County, N. C. Son of Tazewell A. and Armecia 
(Langstun) Eure. Attended Gatesville High School, 1913-1917; 
University of North Carolina, 1917-1919; University Law School 
1921-1922. Lawyer. Past member. North Carolina Bar Associa- 
tion; North Carolina State Bar, and Hertford County Bar Asso- 
ciation, Mayor of Winton, 1923-1928. County attorney for Hert- 
ford County, 1923-1931. Member of General Assembly of 1929, 
representing- Hertford County. Principal Clerk of the House of 
Representatives, Sessions of 1931, 1933, 1935, and Extra Session, 
1936. Presidential Elector First District of North Carolina, 1932. 
Escheats Agent, University of North Carolina, 1933-1936. Elected 
Secretary of State in the General Election of November 3, 1936, 
and assumed duties of the office December 21, 1936, by virtue of 
executive appointment, ten days prior to the commencement of 
Constitutional term, on account of a vacancy that then occurred. 
Re-elected Secretary of State in General Elections of 1940, 1944, 
and 1948. President, Ahoskie Kiwanis Club, 1927. Theta Chi Fra- 
ternity; Junior Order; B.P.O. Elks; President, N. C. Elks Associa- 
tion, 1946; T.P.A.; Member Board of Trustees, Elon College; 
President Elon College Foundation; American Legion, Forty and 
Eight; President, National Association of Secretaries of State, 
1942. Congregational Christian Church. Married Miss Minta 
Banks of Winton, N. C, November 15, 1924. Of this union there 
are two children, a daughter and a son, Armecia and Thad Eure, 
Jr. Legal residence, Hertford County, N. C. Official address: State 
Capitol, Raleigh. 

HENRY LEE BRIDGES 

STATE AUDITOR 

(Elected by the People) 

Henry Lee Bridges, Democrat, was born in Franklin County, 
N. C, June 10, 1907. Son of John Joseph and Ida Loraine (Car- 
roll) Bridges. Attended Wakelon High School, 1914-1920; Wiley 



Biographical Sketches 353 

School, Raleigh, 1921; Wakelon High School, 1922; Millbrook High 
School, 1923-1925; Mars Hill Junior College, A.B. Degree, 1929; 
Wake Forest College, B.A. Degree 1931 ; Wake Forest Law School, 
1932-1933. Attorney-at-Law. Member of the Greensboro Bar Asso- 
ciation; N. C. State Bar. Deputy Clerk, Superior Court of Guil- 
ford County, August, 1935-September, 1940; December, 1941- 
October, 1942; December, 1945-June 1, 1946. (Break in dates 
caused by Military Service). Secretary and Treasurer, Guilford 
County Democratic Executive Committee, 1933-1940. Member and 
Past Master of Greensboro Lodge No. 76 Ancient Free and Ac- 
cepted Masons. Chorazin Chapter No. 13 Royal Arch Masons; 
Ivanhoe Commanding No. 8 Knights Templar; Sudan Temple 
A.A.O.N.M.S. Enlisted in National Guard May, 1934 as a Private; 
promoted to Sgt. February, 1935; commissioned Second Lieuten- 
ant, June 18, 1935; commissioned First Lieutenant, November 18, 
1939; promoted to Captain, January 28, 1943; to Major on in- 
active status, January 17, 1947. Entered Federal Service, Sep- 
tember 16, 1940; released from active duty November 2, 1941; 
recalled to active duty October 7, 1942; relieved from active duty 
December 14, 1945. Veteran World War II, Post No. 53 American 
Legion Local; Local No. 506 Forty-Eight, Deacon Hayes Barton 
Baptist Church; Member Board of Trustees Wake Forest College. 
Married Miss Clarice Hines, December 12, 1936. Tvfo children: 
Joseph Henry, age six years; George Hines, age three years. 
Home address: 2618 Grant Ave., Raleigh, N. C. 



BRANDON P. HODGES 

STATE TREASURER 

(Elected by the People) 

Brandon P. Hodges, Democrat, was born in Asheville, North 
Carolina September 6, 1903. Son of Daniel Merritt and Clara 
(Patton) Hodges. Attended City Schools of Asheville, Porter 
Military Academy, 1919-1921. University of North Carolina, Jan- 
uary 1922-June 1923; Law School, 1923-1924; Wake Forest Law 
School September 1925-January 1926. Lawyer. Judge pro tern 
Asheville Police Court, 1927-1930; Buncombe County Attorney 
1936-1946. Senator in the General Assembly of 1943 and 1945. 
Chairman Senate Committee on Appropriations 1945. Member 



054 North Carolina Manual 

Advisory Budget Commission 1945-1946. Executive Counsel 1947 
General Assembly. Mason. Sigma Chi Fiaternity. Presbyterian. 
Married Miss Genevive Hare. Children: Brandon P., Jr., and 
Sarah Jane Hodges. Home address: Asheville, N. C. 

CLYDE ATKINSON ERWIN 

SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 

(Elected by the People) 

Clyde Atkinson Erwin, Democrat, was born in Atlanta, Georgia, 
February 8, 1897. Son of Sylvanus and Mamie (Putman) Erwin. 
Attended grammar schools of Charlotte and Waco and graduated 
from Piedmont High School, Lawndale, N. C, 1914. Attended 
University of North Carolina 1915-1916 and subsequent summer 
schools. Life member National Education Association; member 
American Association of School Administrators; North Carolina 
Education Association President, 1932-1933; member National 
Committee on Rural Education; Regional Consultant National 
Committee on Emergency in Education; President Rutherfordton 
Kiwanis Club, 1932; honorary member for life Rutherford County 
Club. Mason; all branches, including: Shrine. Member Sigma Chi, 
Phi Kappa Phi, and .Kappa Phi Kappa. Principal Gault School, 
Jonesville, S. C. 1916-1917; Waco High School, 1917-1919; Clitf- 
side Public Schools and Avondale Public Schools, 1919-1923. Su- 
perintendent Rutherford County Schools, 1925-1934. Appointed 
State Superintendent of Public Instruction by Governor J. C. B. 
Ehringhaus, October 24, 1934, succeeding the late Dr. A. T. 
Allen. Elected for a full term November 3, 1936. Re-elected in 
1940, 1944, 1948. Chairman Board of Trustees of East Carolina 
Teachers College; member Board of Trustees of Greater Univer- 
sity, North Carolina College at Durham, Agricultural and Tech- 
nical College, and Elizabeth City State Teachers College. Awarded 
Pd.D. honorary degree Catawba College, Salisbury, N. C, in May 
1935. Member High School Textbook Committee 1927-1932; chair- 
man Elementary Textbook Commission 1933-1934. President 
Southern Council Chief State School Officers 1944-1949; Member 
Executive Committee and Legislative Committee National Council 
of Chief State School Officers, 1944-1948; Member Yearbook Com- 
mittee American Association of School Administrators, 1945-1946. 



Thad Euro 

Secretary of State 

Henry L. Bridges 
State Auditor 

r ran don P. Hodges 
State Treasurer 



Clyde A. Erwin 

Superintendent uf Publij 
lustruction 

Harry McMuUan 

Attorney General 

L. Y. Ballentine 

Commissioner of Agriculture 



Forrest H. Shuford 
i Commissioner of Labor 

Wm. P. Hodges 

Commission of Insurance 




State officials, who are elected by the people in addition to the Governor and Lieutenant 
Governor. The above officials constitute the Council of State with the exception of the Attorney 
General who is the legal adviser to the Executive Department. 



356 North Carolina Manual 

Vice-President National Council of Chief State School Officers 
1948. Member Board of Advisory Editors, The School Executive. 
President National Council of Chief State School Officers, 1949. 
Member Army Advisory Committee in Raleigh; Member Honorary 
National Committee for the Voorlezer's House ; Member Committee 
on Scouting in the Schools; Member National Committee on 
School Savings; Member Committee on Educational Buildings and 
Equipment of the American Council on Education; Member Com- 
mittee on National Teachers Examination of American Council 
on Education; Member of North Carolina Chapter of Horace 
Mann League; Member National Commission on Safety Educa- 
tion. Consultant on Regional Schools Southern Governors' Con- 
ference; Vice-President Regional Council for Education. Consul- 
tant National Safety Council; Consultant Educational Policies 
Committee of the National Education Association; Consultant to 
Rural Editorial Service for State Education Associations. Meth- 
odist, Lay leader in Marion District; Superintendent Cliff side 
Sunday School; teacher Ladies' Class, Rutherford M. E. Church 
for ten years. At present teacher of College Sunday School Class, 
Edenton Street Methodist Church. Married Miss Evelyn Miller 
of Waco, N. C; two children, Frances Elizabeth and Clyde A., 
Jr. Address: Raleigh, N. C. 

LYNTON YATES BALLENTINE 

COMMISSIONER OF AGRICULTURE 

(Elected by the People) 
Lynton Yates Ballentine, Democrat, was born at Varina, Wake 
County, N. C, April 6, 1899. Son of James Erastus and Lillian 
(Yates) Ballentine. Attended Oakwood and Cardenas Elementary 
Schools and Holly Springs High School, 1913-1917. Graduated 
from Wake Forest College in 1921 with an A.B. Degree, having 
specialized in political economy. Dairyman, farmer, and business- 
man. Member Wake County Board of Commissioners, 1926-1934, 
State Senator from the Thirteenth Senatorial District 1937, 1939, 
1941, and 1943. Member Board of Agriculture, 1941-1944. Elected 
Lieutenant Governor November 7, 1944. Elected Chairman State 
Board of Education 1945. Elected Commissioner of Agriculture, 
November 2, 1948. A charter member of the Fuquay Springs Post 
of the American Legion. Baptist. Address: Varina, N. C. 



Biographical Sketches 357 

FORREST HERMAN SHUFORD 

COMMISSIONER OF LABOR 

(Elected by the People) 
Forrest Herman Shuford, Democrat, was born in Cleveland 
County, North Carolina, June 3, 1897. Son of J. M. and Ella 
(Copeland) Shuford. Attended Public Schools of Cleveland County 
and graduated from Piedmont High School, Lawndale, N. C, At- 
tended Berea College, Berea, Kentucky; Textile School of North 
Carolina State College, Raleigh, N. C, and Duke University, Dur- 
ham, N. C. Worked in textile mills in Rhode Island and in Gas- 
tonia, N. C, 1921-1924. Principal of Ellenboro High School 1924- 
1925; Spindale School 1925-1926. Boys' Commissioner, City of 
High Point, High Point, N. C, 1925-1933. Appointed Chief In- 
spector of the Department of Labor in 1933 by Major A. L. 
Fletcher, Commissioner. Granted leave of absence from the De- 
partment of Labor to serve as N.R.A. Labor Compliance Officer 
for North Carolina 1934-1935. Appointed Commissioner of Labor 
by Governor Clyde R. Hoey, September 12, 1938. Elected to the 
office of Commissioner of Labor in the General Election November 
8, 1938. Re-elected November 5, 1940; November 7, 1944 and Nov- 
ember 2, 1948. Member Society of Safety Engineers; Served in the 
Navy during World War I. Member American Legion since its 
organization; Past Commander of Andrew Jackson Post No. 87 of 
American Legion, High Point, N. C; La Society Des 40 Hommes 
et Chevau. Past President, North Carolina Conference for Social 
Service. Past President, International Association of Govern- 
mental Labor Officials. Appointed by President Franklin D. Roose- 
velt in 1944 as Advisor to Governmental Delegates to the Inter- 
national Labor Organization Conference in Philadelphia, Pennsyl- 
vania, and appointed by President Harry S. Truman in 1947 as 
Advisor to Governmental Delegates to the International Labor 
Organization Conference which met in Geneva, Switzerland. Mem- 
ber President's Committee on Industrial Safety. Address: Raleigh, 
N. C. 



358 North Carolina Manual 

WILLIAM PARKER HODGES 

COMMISSIONER OF INSURANCE 

(Elected by the People) 
William Parker Hodges, Democrat, was boi'n in Williamston, 
Martin County, N. C, October 19, 1906. Son of W. J. and Deborah 
(Parker) Hodges. Attended public schools of Williamston, 1924; 
Wake Forest College, LL.B., 1928. Executive Secretary Commis- 
sion on Revision of the Laws of North Carolina relating to 
Estates, 1936-1939. Kappa Alpha Order, Province Commander, 
1935-1936, Blue Goose. Practiced law in Raleigh, 1929-1936; ap- 
pointed Chief Deputy Commissioner of Insurance, July, 1936; ap- 
pointed Commissioner of Insurance by Governor Broughton, Sep- 
tember 10, 1942, to fill the unexpired term of Hon. Dan C. Boney, 
deceased. Elected Commissioner of Insurance in the General Elec- 
tion, November 7, 1944 and November 2, 1948 for four year terms. 
Executive Committee, National Ass'n. of Insurance Commis- 
sioners, 1945-46 and 1946-47, Secretary 1947-48 and 1948-49; 
member of Board, Law Enforcement Officers Benefit and Retire- 
ment Fund. Baptist. Married Miss Olga E. Dodds, August 6, 1935. 
Two children: William Parker, Jr., and Elizabeth. Address: Ra- 
leigh, N. C. 

HARRY McMULLAN 

ATTORNEY GENERAL 

(Elected by the People) 
Harry McMullan, Democrat, was born at Hertford, N. C. July 
23, 1884. Son of Dr. J. H. and Lina (Tucker) McMullan. Attended 
Edenton Public Schools; LL.B., University of North Carolina 
1905; LL.D. (Honorary), University of North Carolina, 1946. 
Lawyer. Member D.K.E. and Gimghoul fraternities. Senator from 
the Second Senatorial District in the General Assembly of 1929. 
Engaged in practice at Washington, N. C. 1907 to 1933; County 
Attorney for Beaufort County 1926 to 1933; Chairman North 
Carolina Industrial Commission. North Carolina Bar Association. 
American Bar Association. Appointed Attorney General by Gov- 
ernor Hoey April 30, 1938, to suceed Attorney General A. A. F. 
Seawell upon his appointment to the Supreme Court; elected for 
the unexpired term of A. A. F. Seawell, November 1938; elected 



Biographical Sketches 359 

for full four-year term, November 5, 1940; re-elected November 
7th, 1944 and November 2, 1948. Episcopalian. Married Miss Pattie 
M. Baugham of Washington, N. C, October 4, 1911. Four children. 
Address: Raleigh, N. C. 

WALTER FOSTER ANDERSON 

DIRECTOR OF THE STATE BUREAU OF INVESTIGATION 

(Appointed by the Attorney General) 

Walter Foster Anderson, Democrat, was born in Davie County, 
N. C, October 8, 1903. Son of James Garfield and Tobitha (Tut- 
terow) Anderson. Attended Center Grade School; Mocksville 
High; Rutherford College; Institute of Government; FBI National 
Academy. Served as member of the Winston-Salem Police Depart- 
ment, October 8, 1925-October 1, 1942; Chief of Police of the Win- 
ston-Salem Police Department, February 1, 1935 to October 1, 
1942; Chief of Police of the Charlotte, N. C. Police Department, 
October 1, 1942-April 1, 1946; Past President, FBI National Acad- 
emy Associates; 2nd Vice-President, International Association 
Chiefs of Police. Mason. Methodist. Married Miss Mary Elizabeth 
Powell, April 3, 1926. Three children: Mary Louise Anderson; 
Nancy Janet Anderson; Doris Foster Anderson. Address: 1224 
Courtland Drive, Raleigh, N. C. 

WILMER ZADOC BETTS 

DIRECTOR DIVISION OF PURCHASE AND CONTRACT 

(Appointed by the Governor) 
Wilmer Zadoc Betts, Democrat, of Wake County, was born Octo- 
ber 17, 1896, in Hillsboro, Orange County, North Carolina. Son of 
Wilmer Conrad and Tessie (Ray) Betts. Attended Centennial Pub- 
lic School of the City of Raleigh, 1903-1910, and graduated from 
the Raleigh High School in 1914; North Carolina State College 
1914-1918, B.S. in Civil Engineering. Deck Officer and Extra Ob- 
server, U. S. Coast and Geodetic Survey, 1918; Civil Engineer on 
construction of Camp Polk (Tank Camp) near Raleigh in 1918- 
1919; Bridge Designer and Bridge Maintenance Engineer for 
North Carolina State Highway Commission 1919-1923; appointed 
1923 by Frank Page as Purchasing Agent of the North Carolina 



360 North Carolina Manual 

State Highway Commission and served until 1941; appointed 1941 
by Governor J. Melville Broughton as Director of the Division of 
Pui'chase and Contract; reappointed 1945 by Governor R. Gregg 
Cherry as Director of the Division of Purchase and Contract. 
Member of Advisory Committee, Federal Supply Project, Commis- 
sion on Organization of the Executive Branch of the Government 
1948-1949; Consultant, U. S. Treasuiy Department, Bureau of 
Federal Supply 1948-1949. Member Hiram Lodge No. 40 Ancient 
Free and Accepted Masons of Raleigh; Wilmington Consistory, 
Valley of Wilmington, Orient of North Carolina, A.&A.S.R. of F., 
S.J., U.S.A.; Sudan Temple A.A.O.N.M.S. Shrine; Raleigh Shrine 
Club; Delta Sigma Phi Fraternity; Theta Tau Engineering Fra- 
ternity, North Carolina Society of Engineers; Past Secretary, Past 
President and member of the Carolinas-Virginia Purchasing 
Agents Association; Past National Director and member of the 
National Association of Purchasing Agents; Past Treasurer, Past 
President and now Honorary President and a Director of the Na- 
tional Institute of Governmental Purchasing, Inc.; member of The 
Association of School Business Officials; Past Secretary and mem- 
ber of the Lions Club of Raleigh. Director, North Carolina State 
College Foundation, Inc.; member of the Advisory Committee on 
Engineering School Expansion at North Carolina State College; 
member of the Executive Committee of the General Alumni Asso- 
ciation of North Carolina State College; member of the Alumni 
Memorial Building Committee of North Carolina State College. 
Baptist; member of First Baptist Church of Raleigh. Married 
Elizabeth Moultrie Drake of Bennettsville, South Carolina, Decem- 
ber 27, 1922. Two children: a son. Dr. Wilmer Conrad Betts, M.D., 
and a daughter, Mrs. Baxter Wilson Napier, Jr. Address: Ra- 
leigh, N. C. 

CARRIE L. BROUGHTON 

state librarian 
(Appointed by the Governor) 
Carrie L. Broughton, Democrat, was born in Wake County, Ra- 
leigh, N. C. Daughter of Needham B. and Caroline R. (Lougee) 
Broughton. Attended Raleigh Public Schools; Peace Junior Col- 
lege; North Carolina College for Women; Meredith College. Mem- 
ber American and North Carolina Library associations; North 



Biographical Sketches 361 

Carolina Literary and Historical Association; Chairman Library 
Commission. Appointed Assistant State Librarian in 1902 and State 
Librarian in 1919. Baptist; active in Church work. Address: 125 
Hawthorne Rd., Raleigh, N. C. 

CHRISTOPHER CRITTENDEN 

DIRECTOR OF THE STATE DEPARTMENT OF ARCHIVES AND HISTORY 

(Appointed by the Executive Board of the Department) 
Christopher Crittenden, Democrat, was born in Wake Forest, 
N. C, December 1, 1902. Son of Charles Christopher and Ethel 
(Taylor) Crittenden. Attended Wake Forest Grammar and High 
Schools. A.B. Wake Forest College 1921 and A.M. in 1922; Yale 
University, Ph.D. 1930. Director State Department of Archives 
and History (formerly the State Historical Commission) since 
1935; Secretary State Literary and Historical Association since 
1935; Member American Historical and Southern Historical asso- 
ciations; President Society of American Archivists; President 
American Association for State and Local History 1940-1942. Mem- 
ber History Club and Watauga Club of Raleigh. Principal Roxo- 
bel, N. C, Public School 1922-1923; Instructor in History, Yale 
University 1924-1925; University of North Carolina 1926-1929; 
Assistant Professor of History, University of North Carolina 1930- 
1935. Author of North Carolina Newspapers before 1770; The 
Commerce of North Carolina 1763-1789; and various historical 
articles and book reviews. Editor The North Carolina Historical 
Review. Baptist. Married Miss Janet Quinlan of Waynesville, 
N. C, 1930. Three children: C, Jr., born 1933; Robert Hinton, 
born 1936; Ann Lane, born 1938. Address: Raleigh, N. C. 

ROBERT BRUCE ETHERIDGE 

DIRECTOR DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION AND DEVELOPMENT 

(Appointed by the Governor) 
Robert Bruce Etheridge, Democrat, was born at Manteo, July 
31, 1878. Son of Van Buren and Matilda Etheridge. Attended pub- 
lic schools of Manteo and Atlantic Collegiate Institute, Elizabeth 
City; A.B. Trinity College (now Duke University) 1899. Cashier 



362 North Carolina Manual 

Bank of Manteo 1907-1933. General Insurance. Clerk Superior 
Court, Dare County; Superintendent of Schools; member State 
Executive Committee 1928-1941; Postmaster, Manteo 1914-1922; 
County Chairman Democratic Executive Committee. State Senator 
from Second District 1907. Representative in General Assembly 
1903, 1905, 1929, 1931, and 1933. Director Department of Con- 
servation and Development since 1933. Member New York World's 
Fair Commission. Chairman Ex-ofRcio Cape Hatteras National 
Seashore Commission. Mason, Treasurer Masonic Lodge twelve 
years; Junior Order; Woodmen of America; Red Men; Kappa 
Sigma (college fraternity). Married Miss Elizabeth Webb, April 
22, 1908. Address: Manteo, N. C. 



EDWIN MAURICE GILL 

COMMISSIONER OF REVENUE 

(Appointed by the Governor) 

Edwin Maurice Gill, Democrat, was born in Laurinburg, N. C, 
July 20, 1899. Son of Thomas Jeffries and Mamie (North) Gill. 
Graduate of Laurinburg High School; Trinity College, 1922-24. 
Representative in the General Assembly from Scotland County, 
1929 and 1931. Private Secretary, Governor Gardner, 1931-1933; 
Commissioner of Paroles, 1933-1942; appointed Commissioner of 
Revenue by Governor Broughton, July 1, 1942. Member North 
Carolina Probation Commission since 1937. Admitted to the Bar 
January 28, 1924 and practiced law in Laurinburg, 1924-1931 as 
a member of the firm of Gibson and Gill. Member North Carolina 
Bar Association. President American Parole Association, 1940- 
1941; President Southeastern States Probation and Parole Asso- 
ciation, 1939-1940; Vice-President, The American Parole Associa- 
tion, 1939-1940; Secretary-Treasurer, 1938-1939; Director Ameri- 
can Prison Association, 1939-1940; Vice President, 1941-1942. 
Member of Executive Committee of the National Tax Association, 
1944-1947. Member of Executive Committee of National Associa- 
tion of Tax Administrators for terms 1946-48 and 1948-50; Mem- 
ber of the American Legion. Sigma Nu Phi, legal fraternity, and 
Omicron Delta .Kappa, leadership fraternity, honorary member, 
Duke University, 1940. Methodist. Address: Raleigh, N. C, 



Biographical Sketches 363 

GURNEY POPE HOOD 

COMMISSIONER OF BANKS 

(Appointed by the Governor with Advice and 
Consent of the Senate) 

Gurney Pope Hood, Democrat, was born in Grantham's Town- 
ship, Wayne County, N. C, November 26, 1884. Son of Solomon 
Pope and Betsey (Rhodes) Hood. Attended Wayne County Public 
Schools 1890-1899; Goldsboro Graded School 1900-1901. Studied 
law under private teacher 1906-1908; licensed to practice 1908. 
Appointed Commissioner of Banks April 1931. Member National 
Association of Supervisors of State Banks; President 1938-1939; 
Chairman Executive Committee 1937-1938; Chairman District No. 
2, 1940-1943. President Hood Finance Corporation 1924-1929; Pres- 
ident, The Hood System, Inc., 1929-1931; Served as officer for va- 
rious banking institutions in North Carolina. Alderman, Golds- 
boro, 1911, 1913; Mayor, Morehead City, 1917-1919. Member House 
of Representatives from Wayne County in the General Assembly 
of 1929 and 1931. Corporal North Carolina National Guard 1906- 
1908. Mason; I.O.O.F.; Woodmen of the World; Past State Coun- 
cilor, Junior Order United American Mechanics, and State Coun- 
cil Treasurer; Member National Board of Trustees 1929-1941; 
Member National Board of Control since 1941. Methodist; Lay 
Leader 1919-1920; Member Commission on Budget, Annual Con- 
ference 1930-1940; Member Commission on World Service and Fi- 
nance, Annual Conference since 1940; President since 1944; Dele- 
gate to General Conference 1938; Uniting Conference 1939; Juris- 
dictional Conference 1940-1944; General Conference, The Meth- 
odist Church 1940-1944. Vice-President, North Carolina Council of 
Churches 1948; Member Board of Directors, National Conference 
of Christians and Jews 1948. Married Miss Marion Lee Stevens, 
June 16, 1915. Children: Robin Pope, Samuel Stevens and Lee 
Rawlings Hood. Address: Goldsboro, N. C. 



364 North Carolina Manual 

FRED CALDWELL HUNTER 

STATE UTILITIES COMMISSIONER 

(Appointed by the Governor with the approval of the Senate) 

Fred Caldwell Hunter, Democrat, was born in Mecklenburg 
County, N. C, April 14, 1884. Son of J. G. Mc. and Jane E. Hun- 
ter. Attended Bethany High School, Clover, S. C, 1904-1906; A.B. 
University of North Carolina 1911; LL.B. Washington and Lee 
University 1915. Judge Mecklenburg County Recorder's Court 1930- 
1938. Appointed Utilities Commissioner by Governor Broughton, 
April 1941, reappointed February 1943. Presbyterian. Address: 
Raleigh, N. C. Permanent Address: Route 10, Charlotte, N. C. 



ROBERT GRADY JOHNSON 

STATE UTILITIES COMMISSIONER 

(Appointed by the Governor with the approval of the Senate) 

Robert Grady Johnson, Democrat, was born at Burgaw, N. C, 
May 5, 1895. Son of Joab F. and Myrtie (Grady) Johnson. Edu- 
cated at Burgaw High School; University of North Carolina and 
Wake Forest College. Private U. S. Army February 1918 to May 
1919. Mason. Lawyer. Member Board of Aldermen Burgaw 1922- 
1928; Chairman County Board of Elections; Member Democratic 
Executive Committee; Senator in the General Assembly of 1929; 
Representative from Pender County in 1931 and 1933; Speaker, 
House of Representatives 1935. Appointed Member State Highway 
Commission May 1937 and appointed Director of Prisons in Sep- 
tember of that year. Appointed Chairman Board of Alcoholic Bev- 
erage Control August 1941. Appointed Utilities Commissioner 
April 1942 and re-appointed for six-year term in April 1945. Mar- 
ried Mrs. Louise White Freeman, December, 1936. Three children: 
Louise Grady, age 8; Robert White, age 6; and Marion Lee, age 2. 
Address: Raleigh, N. C. 



Biographical Sketches 365 

HENRY WATSON JORDAN 

CHAIRMAN STATE HIGHWAY AND PUBLIC WORKS COMMISSION 

(Appointed by the Governor) 

Henry Watson Jordan, Democrat, was born at Ramseur, August 
31, 1898. Son of Henry Harrison and Annie Elizabeth (Sellars) 
Jordan. Attended Rutherford schools, 1913-1915; Emory and 
Henry College; D.D.S. Emory University Dental School, 1919. Cot- 
ton Textile Manufacturer. Member County School Board of Gas- 
ton; County School Board of Randolph. Sergeant, Student Army 
Training Corps; Commander, American Legion, 1922. Scottish 
Rite, York Rite Mason; Shriner (Oasis Temple). Member of 
Rotary Club, President 1924; Master Masonic Lodge, 1924-1926. 
Methodist; Chairman Board of Stewards, 1925-1940. Married Miss 
Mary Ruth Rankin, November 3, 1933. Three children: Henry H. 
Jordan, 2nd; Anne Rankin Jordan; Thomas Andrew Jordan. Ad- 
dress: Cedar Falls, N. C. 



BUREN JURNEY 

MEMBER NORTH CAROLINA INDUSTRIAL COMMISSION 

(Appointed by the Governor) 

Buren Jurney, Democrat, was born at Olin, Iredell County, N. C, 
February 23, 1890. Son of Zack T. and Sarah Louise (Patterson) 
Jurney. Attended public schools of Iredell County and Mars Hill 
College from January 1908 until May 3, 1912; University of North 
Carolina 1912-1913; Wake Forest Law School 1914-1915, Lawyer. 
Member Industrial Commission since 1936. Senator in the General 
Assembly of 1923 and 1925. Methodist. Permanent Address: 
Statesville, Official Address: Raleigh, N. C. 



f?fi6 North Carolina Manuat- 

HENRY E. KENDALL 

CHAIRMAN EMPLOYMENT SECURITY COMMISSION 

(Appointed by the Governor) 

Henry E. Kendall, Democrat, was born in Shelby, N. C, August 
24, 1905. Son of Henry E. and Mary Whitelaw (Wiseman) Ken- 
dall. Attended Shelby Public Schools, 1912-1922; N. C. State Col- 
lege, 1922-1926, B.S. in C.E. Member Theta Tau Professional 
Engineering Fraternity; The Raleigh Engineers Club; North Car- 
olina Society of Engineers; Lions Club of Raleigh; American Le- 
gion. Registered Engineer. From January 1, 1937 through Sep- 
tember 1942, was in charge of "Operation of Plant" for State 
School Commission as it was at that time. Member Tau Beta Pi, 
Engineering Scholastic; Pi Kappa Alpha Fraternity. Mason. Com- 
missioned 1st Lt. Engineers Corps, September 18, 1942 ; Promoted 
Captain April 19, 1943; Major, May 15, 1944; Lt. Col., January 10, 
1946; Served twenty months in E T and eight months in 
Asiatic Pacific, a total of twenty-eight months overseas; Separated 
from service, August 7, 1946. Married Miss Eliza Katharine Kerr, 
of Yanceyville, N. C, June 21, 1947. Presbyterian. Address: 2814 
Exeter Circle, Raleigh, N. C. 

WILLIAM PATTON KIMZEY 

MEMBER NORTH CAROLINA INDUSTRIAL COMMISSION 

(Appointed by the Governor) 

William Patton Kimzey, Democrat, was born in Henderson 
County, N. C, April 14, 1901. Son of William Rucker and Re- 
berta (Patton) Kimzey. Attended Brevard High School 1918; Da- 
vidson College, A.B., 1923; Cumberland University, Lebanon, 
Tenn., LL.B., 1926. Lawyer. Member N. C. Bar Association; 
President Transylvania County Bar Association 1936-1937; Presi- 
dent Eighteenth Judicial District Bar 1936-1937. President Bre- 
vard Kiwanis Club 1934. Attorney, Transylvania County Board 
of Education 1930-1939. Attorney for Transylvania County 1936- 
1939. Representative in the General Assembly 1937 and 1939. 
First Lieutenant Infantry Officers Reserve Corps, U. S. Army, 
1926-1942. Member Lambda Chi Alpha, social fraternity; Phi Pi, 
legal fraternity. Member of Dunn's Rock Lodge No. 267; A.F.& 



Biographical Sketches 367 

A.M.; Royal Arch Masons; Knights Templar; Oasis Temple, 
A. A. O.N. M.S. Appointed member of the Industrial Commission in 
1939. Head History Department, University Military School, Mo- 
bile, Alabama, 1923-1925. Liquidating agent all closed banks in 
Transylvania, Henderson, Polk and Rutherford Counties 1933- 
1936. Lt.-Gov. 8th District Co-operative Club Int. 1947-1948. Pres- 
byterian. Married Miss Juanita Sprinkle, March 9, 1929. One 
daughter, Patricia Ann Kimzey, born March 18, 1937. Address: 
Raleigh, N. C. 



JOHN VAN BOKKELEN METTS 

THE ADJUTANT GENERAL 

(Appointed by the Governor) 

John Van Bokkelen Metts, Democrat, was born in Wilmington, 
N. C, December 17, 1876. Son of James Isaac and Cornelia Froth- 
ingham (Cowan) Metts. Attended Tileston School and Cape Fear 
Academy 1882-1893; Military School. Member Adjutant General 
and National Guard associations of the United States. Member 
Board of County Commissioners, New Hanover County. In com- 
mand 119th Infantry, 30th Division, World War 1917-1918, 
awarded Distinguished Service Medal issued by the War Depart- 
ment for meritorious service. Brigadier General; commanding 
General 60th Infantry Brigade, June 1, 1926-December 12, 1936. 
Appointed The Adjutant General North Carolina, June 15, 1920. 
Recommended by the Governor and appointed by the President, 
State Director of Selective Service effective September 17, 1940, 
and inducted into federal service October 15, 1940. Member Saint 
Johns Lodge No. 1, A.F. and A.M., Wilmington, N. C. Episco- 
palian. Married the late Miss Josephine S. Budd, of Petersburg, 
Virginia, November 1906. Two children: Josephine Budd Metts 
(Mrs. Spotswood Hathaway Huntt) and John Van B. Metts, Jr. 
Address: Raleigh, N. C. 



368 North Carolina Manual 

JOHN WILLIAM ROY NORTON 

skcretary state board of health 

(Appointed by the North Carolina State Board of Health with the 
approval of the Governor) 

John William Roy Norton, Democrat, was born in Scotland 
County, July 11, 1898. Son of Lafayette and Tola Josephine (Rey- 
nolds) Norton. Attended Snead's Grove school, 1916-1920; A.B. 
Degree, Trinity College (Duke University) June 1920; one year's 
work in the Law School, Trinity College, 1922-1923; University 
of N. C. Medical School, Chapel Hill, 1924-1926; Vanderbilt Uni- 
versity Medical School, 1926-1928, M.D. Degree, 1928; interne at 
Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, Mich., July 1928-June 1929; mem- 
ber medical staff of the Henry Ford Hospital, July, 1929-June 
1930; chief of the medical department Holt-Crock Clinic, Fort 
Smith, Arkansas, July 1930-August 1931. Member of the Wake 
County and North Carolina Medical Societies; American and 
Southern Medical Association; North Carolina and American Pub- 
lic Health Associations. Delta Omega and Sigma Xi honorary 
Public Health and Scientific Societies. Scientific Exhibit medal 
(N. C. Medical Society) 1947. Reynolds Medal (N. C. Public 
Health Association) 1948. Woodmen of World; Mason. Delta 
Sigma Phi, Alpha Kappa Kappa, Sigma Nu Phi Fraternities. 
Author of Rabies Control; Diphtheria Control; Observations on 
1948 Polio Epidemic in North Carolina; Planning a Public Health 
Program. Many artciles in N. C. Health Bulletin. Private to Sec- 
ond Lieutenant of Field Artillery, 1918; Captain to Colonel in 
Medical Corps, 1940-1945. Methodist; Steward, 1934-1935. Mar- 
ried Miss Juanita Harris Ferguson, 1928. Three children: Ger- 
aldine, 19; Jean, 12; LaFayette Ferguson, 9. Address: 2129 Cow- 
per Drive, Raleigh, N. C. 

PAUL APPERSON REID 

controller state board of education 

(Appointed by the State Board of Education with the 

approval of the Governor) 

Paul Apperson Reid, Democrat, was born in Stokes County, 
August 10, 1902. Son of W. H. and Maggie (Apperson) Reid. 
Graduated from Pilot Mountain High School; A.B. in Education, 



Biographical Sketches 369 

University of North Carolina, 1929, M.A., 1938. Member National 
Education Association; American Association of School Adminis- 
trators; N. C. Education Association (President Social Science 
Department, 1933; High School Principals Department, 1937; 
Northeastern District, 1942-1943). President N. C. City High 
School Principals Association, 1937; Halifax-Northampton School- 
masters' Club, 1934; Albemarle Schoolmasters' Club, 1942-43. Mem- 
ber Raleigh Chamber of Commerce; Raleigh History Club; Chair- 
man Membership Committee, 1945; Raleigh Kiwanis Club, Presi- 
dent, 1948. Chairman Personnel Selection Committee Wake Coun- 
ty Community Chest, Inc., 1949. Author of "Gubernatorial Cam- 
paigns and Elections of David S. Reid." Methodist; Chairman 
Board of Stewards, 1948-1949. Married Miss Magdalene Fulk, De- 
cember 20, 1924. Address: 903 Canterbury Road, Raleigh, N. C. 



LANDON COATS ROSSER 

COMMISSIONER OF MOTOR VEHICLES 

(Appointed by the Governor) 

Landon Coats Rosser, Democrat, was born in Chatham County, 
October 6, 1894. Son of James L. and Emma Susan (Hackney) 
Rosser. Attended Broadway High School, 1907-1911; B.S. Engi- 
neering, N. C. State College, 1915. Farmer. Member of Lions 
Club; American Legion. Mason. Sheriff of Lee County, N. C, 
1920-1926. Representative from Chatham County in the General 
Assembly of 1947. Commissioned 2nd Lieutenant, August 15, 1917; 
1st Lieutenant, November 1, 1918; discharged World War I, May 
12, 1919. Commissioned Captain, March 9, 1934; Major, June 1, 
1941; Lt. Colonel, July 5, 1942; Colonel, January 14, 1943; dis- 
charged World War II, December 14, 1946. Awarded Army Com- 
mendation Ribbon for service as Post Executive, Fort Bragg, 
March 1, 1942-March 31, 1946. Methodist. Married Miss Hilda 
Gorrell, June, 1933. One daughter: Ann Hackney Rosser. Ad- 
dress: Mt. Vernon Springs, N. C. 



370 North Carolina Manual 

JOHN HARRIS SAMPLE 

DIRECTOR STATE PROBATION COMMISSION 

(Appointed by the North Carolina State Probation Commission 
with the appioval of the Governor) 

John Harris Sample, Democrat, was boin in Hendersonville, 
N. C, March 17, 1899. Son of Augustus E. and Anna Elizabeth 
(Cannon) Sample. Attended Hendersonville graded school, 1906- 
1913; Blue Ridge School for Boys, 1913-1917; Davidson College, 
1917-1921, B.S. Degree; Law School, University of North Caro- 
lina, 1922-1924. Lawyer. Member of State and County Bar Asso- 
ciations. N. C. State Board of Elections, 1933-1937; Attorney for 
Buncombe County Board of Financial Control, 1933-1937; Presi- 
dent, Probation Association of North Carolina, 1941-1943; Direc- 
tor, Interstate Crime Commission, 1939-1941; Member Professional 
Council, National Probation Association, 1939-1947. Phi Delta Phi 
(Legal Fraternity) ; Kappa Alpha Fraternity; Mason. Entered 
U. S. Army July 1918 serving until January 1919; Commissioned 
Lieutenant in the Infantry, September, 1918. Member of Ameri- 
can Legion ; La Societe Des 40 Hommes et 8 chevauz ; Military 
Order of the World Wars; Sons of Confederate Veterans; Civi- 
tan Club; Commander, Raleigh Post American Legion, 1945- 
1946. Presbyterian. Married Miss Daisy Rice Bartlett, 1930. One 
daughter: Mary Ellen Sample. Address: 507 N. Blount St., Ra- 
leigh, N. C. 



CARL LEVERING WILLIAMSON 

CHAIRMAN BOARD OF ALCOHOLIC CONTROL 

(Appointed by the Governor) 

Carl Levering Williamson, Democrat, was born in Raleigh, N. C, 
December 7, 1893. Son of Bailey Peyton and Ella S. (Mial) Wil- 
liamson. Attended Warrenton High School; Virginia Military 
Institute and N. C. State College. Commissioner of Public Safety, 
City of Raleigh 1931-1933; Postmaster 1933-1942. Methodist. Mar- 
ried Miss Betty Robertson 1918. Children: Carl L., Jr., Bailey 
Peyton, John Clark, Milliard Mial and Benjamin Robert. Address: 
Raleigh, N. C. 



Biographical Sketches 371 

THURSTON ADGER WILSON 

CHAIRMAN NORTH CAROLINA INDUSTRIAL COMMISSION 

(Appointed by the Governor) 

Thurston Adger Wilson, Democrat, was born in Lexington 
County, S. C, August 28, 1895. Son of George Mendenhall and 
Mary Jane (Bowers) Wilson. Attended Public Schools, Columbia, 
S. C. Appointed by Governor Gardner, May 1, 1929, to serve on 
the first State Industrial Commission ; appointed Chairman, March 
1, 1939. Member, International Typographical Union since August 
5, 1913; American Society Safety Engineers; North Carolina So- 
ciety of Safety Engineers and its first president. Veteran of 
Safety. Vice President, South Carolina Federation of Labor, 1923 ; 
President of Raleigh Typographical Union, 1934-1935; President, 
North Carolina Federation of Labor, 1927-1930; Chairman Textile 
Section and Member Board of Directors, 1937-1938, and Member 
Executive Committee, 1936-1938, of the National Safety Council. 
President, International Association of Industrial Accident Boards 
and Commissions, 1944-1945. Ex-officio, Commission on Revision 
of the Insurance Laws, 1944-1947; Chairman, National Conference 
Committee on Workmen's Compensation, 1945-1946. Director, Com- 
munity Chest of Raleigh, 1942-1944. Organized North Carolina 
Statewide Safety Conference, 1930, which was the first one in 
the South; organized the first State Textile Safety Contest, 1936, 
the only one in the United States. Served in World War, June 28, 
1918-December 9, 1918. Mason; Junior Order United American 
Mechanics; American Legion; Forty and Eight. Lutheran. Mar- 
ried Miss Nancy Davis Ladshaw of Spartanburg, S. C, July 10, 
1928. Three children: Mary Joanna, Thurston Adger, Jr., and 
Nancy Lu. Address: Raleigh, N. C. 

STANLEY WINBORNE 

CHAIRMAN STATE UTILITIES COMMISSION 

(Appointed by the Governor with approval of the Senate) 

Stanley Winborne, Democrat, was born at Murfreesboro, N. C, 
August 25, 1886. Son of B. B. and Nellie (Vaughan) Winborne, 
Attended public schools; Dr. E. E. Parham's School, Murfrees- 
boro; University of North Carolina 1907; Ph.B. Degree. Member 



372 North Carolina Manual 

of North Carolina Bar Association. Member of the North Caro- 
lina Society of the Cincinnati. Mason. Pi Kappa Alpha Fra- 
ternity; Order of the Gorgan's Head. Kiwanis Club. Mayor, Mur- 
freesboro 1909-1910; County Attorney 1911-1914; Representative 
from Hertford County 1915-1919; Senator from First District 
1921; Democratic nominee for Presidential Elector 1928. Ap- 
pointed member of the Corporation Commission in February 1930, 
by Governor Gardner; elected for unexpired term in November 
1930; re-elected for regular term 1932. Appointed Utilities Com- 
missioner by Governor Ehringhaus, effective January 1, 1934; 
elected for four-year term in November 1934; re-elected November 
8, 1938; made Chairman of present N. C. Utilities Commission by 
General Assembly 1941. Methodist. Married Miss Frances Sharp 
Jernigan, April 17, 1912. Four sons, three daughters, six grand- 
sons and five granddaughters. Address: Raleigh, N. C. 



DR. ELLEN BLACK WINSTON 

COMMISSIONER OF PUBLIC WELFARE 

(Appointed by the State Board of Public Welfare. Subject to 
approval by the Governor) 

Dr. Ellen Black Winston, Democrat, was born in Bryson City, 
N. C, August 15, 1903. Daughter of Stanley Warren and Mari- 
anna (Fischer) Black. Attended Bryson City Public Schools, 1909- 
1920; Converse College, Spartanburg, S. C, A.B., 1924; Graduate 
work at N. C. State College and University of North Carolina, 
M.A., University of Chicago, 1928; Ph.D., 1930. Honorary L.H.D., 
Woman's College of University of North Carolina, 1948. Appointed 
Commissioner of the State Board of Public Welfare, June 1, 1944. 
Member American Sociological Society, American Public Welfare 
Association, National Conference of Social Work, North Carolina 
Conference for Social Service, North Carolina Mental Hygiene So- 
ciety, American Association of University Women, Raleigh Busi- 
ness and Professional Women's Club, Raleigh Woman's Club, and 
North Carolina Archaeological Society. President State Legislative 
Council, 1943-1944; Legislative Chairman State Federation of 
Women's Clubs, 1943-1944. International Relations Chairman, 
N. C. Branch American Association of University Women, 1943- 
1946. Chairman Administrative Board of State Nutrition Com- 



Biographical Sketches 373 

mittee, 1947-1948. President, N. C. Conference for Social Service, 
1948-1949. Member various National Committees of American So- 
ciological Society, Head, Department of Sociology and Economics, 
Meredith College, 1940-1944. Consultant Federal Works Project 
Administration, 1939-1943. Consultant National Resources Plan- 
ning Board, 1940-1943. Consultant United States Office of Educa- 
tion, 1942-1944. Member Board of Directors, North Carolina Men- 
tal Hygiene Society, North Carolina Conference for Social Service, 
American Public Welfare Association, and Hospital for Treatment 
of Children Affected with Spastic Ailments. Chairman North Car- 
olina Board of Eugenics. Ex-officio Member N. C. Medical Care 
Commission, State Recreation Commission, State Commission for 
the Blind, and State Board of Correction and Training. Member 
of Resource-Use Education Commission; Commission on Domestic 
Relations Statute; National Commission on Children and Youth. 
Listed in "Biographical Director of American Scholars," "Who's 
Who in the American Education," "Who's Who in the Western 
Hemisphere," and "Who's Who in America." Co-author of "Seven 
Lean Years"; "The Plantation South, 1934-1937"; and "Foundations 
of American Population Policy." Special technical editor National 
Economic and Social Planning Association and for the Carnegie 
Corporation of New York. Presbyterian. Married Sanford Rich- 
ard Winston, August 30, 1928. Address : Raleigh, N. C. 



NATHAN HUNTER YELTON 

EXECUTIVE SECRETARY, TEACHERS' AND STATE EMPLOYEES" 
RETIREMENT SYSTEM 

(Elected by Board of Trustees) 

Nathan Hunter Yelton, Democrat, was born at Bakersville, 
N. C, April 5, 1901. Son of David and Sarah Jane (Deyton) Yel- 
ton. Attended Berea Academy, Ky., 1916-1918; Friendsville High 
School, (Tenn.) 1921-1922; Yancey Collegiate Institute, Burnsville, 
N. C, 1922-1923; Maryville College, Tenn., 1923-1924; Summer 
Schools, University of Tennessee; B.S., Vanderbilt University; 
George Peabody College, Nashville, Tenn., 1928; Graduate work at 
the University of North Carolina, 1930, and in School Adminis- 
tration, George Peabody, 1931. Member of Municipal Finance Of- 
ficers Association, U. S. and Canada; Southern Conference on 



,174 North Carolina Manual 

Teacher Retirement; National Council on Teacher Retirement. 
President High School Principals Association, Western District, 
N.C.E.A., 1931; Western District, Superintendent's Association, 
N.C.E.A., 1934. Superintendent Mitchell County Schools, 1931- 
1937; State Director Public Assistance, 1937-1941; Executive Sec- 
retary, State School Commission, 1941-1942; Controller State 
Board of Education, 1942-1943; Director and Executive Secretary 
of the North Carolina Local Governmental Employees' Retirement 
System for cities and counties of North Carolina which began 
July 1, 1945. Immediate past president of Southern Conference 
Retirement Officials. Chairman Mitchell County Democratic Exec- 
utive Committee, 1933-1937; Delegate to 1936 National Democratic 
Convention in Philadelphia; Member State Democratic Executive 
Committee, 1933-1943; elected again in 1945 and at present a mem- 
ber of The State Democratic Executive Committee. Pvt., Student 
Army Training Corps, 1918; Captain U. S. Army, December 19, 
1943 to October 7, 1945 with eighteen months overseas. Attached 
to British 11th Armored Division for eight months; participated 
in the invasion of Normandy, Northern France and Rhineland 
Campaigns. Attached to 3rd Army with headquarters in Munich 
in charge of Military Government Education program for Bavaria 
in the denazification of the German School System. Promoted to 
rank of Major and now holds this commission in the Officers Re- 
serve Corps. Mason. Member of American Legion and Veterans 
of Foreign Wars. Presbyterian; Deacon; teacher of Young 
Couples' Class; member Board of Directors of Vanguard Bible 
Class. Married Miss Cerena Sue Polk on April 16, 1922. One 
daughter, Natalie. Address: 100 Faircloth Street, Raleigh, N. C. 



UNITED STATES SENATORS 



*JOSEPH MELVILLE BROUGHTON 

UNITED STATES SENATOR 

Joseph Melvin Broug'hton, Democrat, was born in Ra- 
leigh, N. C, November 17, 1888. Son of the late J. M. and 
Sally (Harris) Broughton. Attended the Public Schools 
and Hugh Morson Academy in Raleigh. Graduated from 
Wake Forest College 1910. Principal Bunn High School, 
Franklin County 1910-1912. Reporter on The Winston- 
Salem Journal 1912. Attended Harvard Law School 1912- 
1913 and began the practice of law in Raleigh 1914. Chair- 
man Democratic Executive Committee, Wake County 
1914-1916; President Raleigh Chamber of Commerce 1918; 
Attorney City of Raleigh 1921-1924; member Raleigh 
School Board 1922-1929. Senator from the Thirteenth 
Senatorial District in the General Assembly of 1927 and 
1929. President Wake County Bar Association 1933, and 
North Carolina Bar Association 1936. Keynote speaker 
State Democratic Convention 1936; Presidential Elector 
at Large 1936; Member Board of Trustees Wake Foi-est 
College since 1918 and of the Board of Trustees of the 
Olivia Raney Library since 1920. Elected Governor of the 
State of North Carolina in the General Election of 1940. 
Elected as United States Senator November 2, 1948 for 
"short term" (November-December 1948) and the regular 
term beginning January 3, 1949. Baptist; Superintendent 
Tabernacle Sunday School, Raleigh, from 1913 to 1940; 
teacher men's Bible Class for the past fifteen years. Mar- 
ried in December 1916, to Miss Alice H. Wilson, of Ra- 
leigh, daughter of the late W. W. Wilson, Grand Secretary 
of the Grand Lodge of Masons of North Carolina. Four 
children: one daughter and three sons. Home Address: 
Raleigh, N. C. 



* Died March 6, 1949. 






376 North Carolina Manual 

CLYDE R. HOEY 

UNITED STATES SENATOR 

Clyde R. Hoey, Democrat, was born in Shelby, N. C, December 
11, 1877. Son of Captain S. A. and Mary Charlotte Catherine 
Hoey. Attended Shelby High School, but left school and began 
work October 1, 1890, in a printing- office. Purchased a newspaper 
and began editing and publishing same, August 1, 1894, and con- 
tinued in that capacity until January 1, 1908. In the meantime 
studied law and, after reaching twenty-one, was licensed to prac- 
tice in 1899, continuing to practice along with the newspaper work 
until 1908, since then entire time has been given to the practice 
of law. Attended University of North Carolina Summer Law 
School, June-September, 1899. Lawyer. Member North Carolina 
Bar Association; the American Bar Association; North Carolina 
State Bar. Representative from Cleveland County in the General 
Assembly of 1899 and 1901 ; State Senator, 1903. Chairman, Cleve- 
land County Democratic Executive Committee, 1903-1909. Served 
on State Advisory Democratic Committee ten years. Assistant 
U. S. Attorney for Western District of North Carolina, July, 1913, 
to December, 1919. Member Congress, December, 1919, to March 
4, 1921. Served as Governor of North Carolina, January 7, 1937- 
January 9, 1941. LL.D., Davidson College, 1937; LL.D., University 
of North Carolina, 1938; LL.D., Duke University, 1938. Elected 
to the United States Senate in 1944 for a term of six years; mem- 
ber of Senate Committees on Agriculture, Finance and Expendi- 
tures in the Executive Departments. Mason; Junior Order; Red 
Men; Woodmen of the World; Knights of Pythias; Odd Fellows. 
Methodist. Married Miss Bessie Gardner, March 22, 1900. Chil- 
dren: Clyde R. Hoey, Jr., Charles A. Hoey, and Isabel Y. Hoey. 
Home address: Shelby, N. C. 



Senator J. Melville Broughton 



Bonner — First District 

Kerr — Second District 



Harden— Third District 

Cooley — Fourth District 



Chatham— Fifth District 

Durham Sixth District 




REPRESENTATIVES IN CONGRESS 

HERBERT COVINGTON BONNER 

(First District— Counties, Beaufort, Camden, Chowan, Curri- 
tuck, Dare, Gates, Hertford, Hyde, Martin, Pasquotank, Perqui- 
mans, Pitt, Tyrrell and Washington. Population, 239,040.) 

Herbert Covington Bonner, Democrat, was born in Washington, 
N. C, May 16, 1891. Son of Macon Herbert and Hannah Selby 
(Hare) Bonner. Attended Public and Private Schools, Washing- 
ton, N. C; Warrenton High School 1906-1909. Farmer. Sergeant 
Co. I, 322nd Infantry, 81st Division World War. Attended Officers 
Training School, Longres, France, after Armistice. Commander 
Beaufort County Post 1922, and District Commander American 
Legion, N. C. Dept., 1940. Elected to Seventy-sixth Congress from 
the First Congressional District, November 1940, to succeed Lind- 
say C. Warren, resigned. Re-elected to Seventy-seventh, Seventy- 
eighth, Seventy-ninth, Eightieth and Eighty-first Congress. Epis- 
copalian, Mason, Elk and Legionnaire. Married Mrs. Eva Hassell 
Hackney, August 2, 1924. Address: Washington, N. C. 



JOHN HOSEA KERR 

(Second District—Counties: Bertie, Edgecombe, Greene, Halifax, 
Lenoii-, Northampton, Warren, and Wilson. Population, 293,297.) 

John Hosea Kerr, Democrat, of Warrenton, was born at Yan- 
ceyville, N. C. Son of Captain John H. Kerr, of the Confederate 
Army, and Eliza Katherine (Yancey) Kerr. Was a student in 
Bingham School, Orange County, N. C, just prior to its removal 
to the City of Asheville. Graduated with A.B. Degree from Wake 
Forest College in 1895. Studied law at Wake Forest under Dr. 
Needham Y. Gulley, LL.D., and was one of the first three law 
students to be admitted to the Bar from this institution, and the 
only one of these three to practice law in the State of North Caro- 
lina. Degree of Doctor of Law was bestowed by the Trustees of 
Wake Forest College. Elected Solicitor of what is now the Third 
Judicial District and served for eleven years. While Solicitor was 
elected Judge of the Superior Court of said District and served 
eight years. While serving on the Bench was nominated for Con- 



Biographical Sketches 879 

gress to succeed Hon. Claude Kitchin, deceased. Was elected to 
the 68th Congress of the United States at a Special Election held 
November 6, 1923, and re-elected to the 69th, 70th, 71st, 72nd, 73rd, 
74th, 75th, 76th, 77th, 78th, 79th, 80th and 81st Congress. The 
ranking Democrat on the Appropriations Committee and the Chair- 
man of the Subcommittee for National Defense; Member of the 
Deficiencies subcommittee; Member Democratic House Steering- 
Committee. In 1935, was appointed by the President as one of a 
Special Congressional Committee composed of three Senators and 
six Representatives to investigate the eligibility for admission of 
the Hawaiian Islands into the Union as a State. In 1941, was 
appointed by the Secretary of State as Chairman of the American 
Delegation to the International Congress of the Western Hemis- 
phere held in Mexico City. Home address: Warrenton, N. C. 



GRAHAM A. HARDEN 

(Third Dist)ict — Counties: Carteret, Craven, Duplin, Jones, 
Onslow, Pamlico, Pender, Sampson, and Wayne. Population, 
251,370.) 

Graham Arthur Barden, Democrat, was born in Sampson Coun- 
ty, N. C, September 25, 1896. Son of James Jefferson and Mary 
Robinson (James) Barden. Attended Burgaw High School; Uni- 
versity of North Carolina, LL.B. Degree. Attorney-at-law. Mem- 
ber of Phi Delta Phi Legal Fraternity; Sigma Chi Fraternity. 
Member of Sudan Shrine; Doric Masonic Lodge; Benevolent and 
Protective Order of Elks; American Legion; Master of Doric 
Lodge 1928; Exalted Ruler of the Elks Lodge; Commander of 
the American Legion; Counsellor of the Junior Order. Served in 
the United States Navy during World War I. Judge of Craven 
County Court. Representative from Craven County to General 
Assembly 1933. Elected to the Seventy-fourth Congress, the Sev- 
enty-fifth Congress, the Seventy-sixth Congress, the Seventy-sev- 
enth Congress, the Seventy-eighth Congress, the Seventy-ninth 
Congress, the Eightieth Congress, and the Eighty-first Congress. 
Presbyterian; Deacon of First Presbyterian Church, New Bern. 
Married Miss Agnes Foy; two children, Graham A., Jr., and Agnes 
F. Barden. Address: New Bern, N. C. 



380 North Carolina Manual 

HAROLD D. COOLEY 

(Fourth Dist)ict — Counties: Chatham, Franklin, Johnston, Nash, 
Randolph, Vance, and Wake. Population, 358,573.) 

Harold Dunbar Cooley, Democrat, of Nashville, N. C, son of the 
late R. A. P. Cooley and Hattie Davis Cooley; born July 26, 1897; 
attended the public schools of Nash County, the University of 
North Carolina, and the law school of Yale University; licensed 
to practice law in February, 1918; served in the Naval Aviation 
Flying Corps during the World War; presidential elector in 1932; 
President, Nash County Bar Association, 1933; member of Junior 
Order United American Mechanics, Phi Delta Theta fraternity, 
and Phi Delta Phi national law fraternity; member of Baptist 
Church; married Miss Madeline Strickland in 1923, and is father 
of two children — a son, Roger A. P. Cooley, 2nd, and a daughter, 
Hattie Davis Cooley. Elected to Seventy-third Congress, July 7, 
1934; re-elected to the Seventy-fourth Congress, November 6, 1934, 
and to each succeeding Congress. Address: Nashville, N. C. 

THURMOND CHATHAM 

(Fifth District — Counties: Caswell, Forsyth, Granville, Person, 
Rockingham, Stokes, Surry. Population, 323,217.) 

Thurmond Chatham, Democrat, was born at Elkin, N. C, August 
16, 1896. Son of Hugh Gwyn and Martha Lenoir (Thurmond) 
Chatham. Attended Woodberry Forest School, 1912-1915; Uni- 
versity of North Carolina, 1915-1916; Yale University, 1916-1917; 
Honorary Degree, Doctor Textile Science, State College, 1941. 
Woolen Blanket Manufacturer; Chairman of Board, Chatham 
Manufacturing Company, Elkin. Member Forsyth County Com- 
missioners, 1924-1928; Board of Conservation and Development, 
1936-1940. Trustee University of North Carolina. Former Presi- 
dent, N. C. Dairymans Association and N. C. Guernsey Breeders 
Association. Seaman 2nd Class, U. S. Navy, 1917; Ensign (T), 
1918-1919; Commander, 1942-1946. Service in Atlantic and Pacific, 
1943-1944 on U.S.S. Phoenix. Awarded Bronze Star for combat 
operations; Secretary Navy Commendation Medal. Methodist. 
Married Miss Lucy Hodgin Hanes, October 29, 1919. Two sons: 
Hugh Gwyn Chatham and Richard Thurmond Chatham, Jr. Ad- 
dress: 112 Stratford Road, Winston-Salem, N. C. 



Biographical Sketches 381 

CARL T. DURHAM 

(Sixth District — Counties: Alamance, Durham, Guilford and 
Orange. Population, 314,659.) 

Carl Thomas Durham, Democrat, was born at White Cross, Bing- 
ham Township, Orange County, N. C, August 28, 1892. Son of 
Claude P. and Delia Ann (Lloyd) Durham. Attended White Cross 
Graded School 1898 to 1908; Mandale High School 1909, 1910, 1911 
and 1912; University of North Carolina School of Pharmacy 1916 
and 1917. Pharmacist. Member N.C.P.A.; vice-president N.C.P.A. 
Member Chapel Hill Board of Aldermen 1922 to 1927; Chapel Hill 
School Board 1927 to 1938; Orange County Board of Commis- 
sioners 1933 to December 1, 1938. Elected to the 76th Congress, 
77th Congress, 78th Congress, 79th Congress, 80th Congress and 
81st Congress. Third ranking member of the Armed Services Com- 
mittee and Vice-Chairman of the Joint Committee on Atomic 
Energy. Married Miss Margaret Joe Whitsett, December 30, 1919. 
Five children : Celia, Margaret, Eulalia Ann, Carl T., Jr., and 
Mrs. Sue D. Sessler. Address: Chapel Hill, N. C. 

FRANK ERTEL CARLYLE 

(Seventh District — Counties : Bladen, Brunswick, Columbus, 
Cumberland, Harnett, New Hanover and Robeson. Population, 
318,298.) 

Frank Ertel Carlyle, Democrat, of Lumberton, N. C; lawyer; 
born in Lumberton, N. C, April 7, 1897, son of William W. and 
Lillian O. Carlyle; educated in the public schools of Robeson Coun- 
ty, Wilson Memorial Academy, Nyack, N. Y., and the University 
of North Carolina; licensed to practice law in January 1921; mar- 
ried Lois Godwin Caldwell, daughter of Luther H. and Nora G. 
Caldwell, May 19, 1927. One daughter, Lois Godwin Carlyle, 16 
years of age, now a student at Ward-Belmont, Nashville, Ten- 
nessee. Served in the United States Navy during World War I; 
former member Robeson County Board of Elections; former chair- 
man Robeson County Democratic Executive Committee; former 
president 9th Judicial District Bar Association; past president 
Lumberton Rotary Club; member of the American Legion for 
more than 25 years, and past commander of Lumberton Post; 
Baptist; 32nd degree Mason, Shriner; Phi Delta Theta Fraternity; 



382 North Carolina Manual 

elected Solicitor 9th Judicial District of North Carolina in 1938, 
and re-elected in 1942 and 1946; elected to the 81st Congress No- 
vember 1948; member of the Committee on Post Office and Civil 
Service. 

CHARLES BENNETT DEANE 

(Eighth District' — Counties: Anson, Davidson, Davie. Hoke, Lee, 
Montgomery, Moore, Richmond, Scotland, Union, Wilkes, and Yad- 
kin. Population, 340,457.) 

Charles Bennett Deane, Democrat, of Rockingham, N. C, was 
born in Ansonville Township, Anson County, N. C, November 1, 
1898. Son of John Leaird and Florence Mae (Boyette) Deane. 
Attended Pee Dee Academy, Rockingham, N. C; Trinity Park 
School, Durham, N. C, 1918-1920; Graduated from Wake Forest 
Law School with LL.B. Degree, 1923. Owner of General Insurance 
Business; Administrative Lawyer. Member, Richmond County 
N. C. Bar Association; Licensed by North Carolina Supreme 
Court as an attorney, February 1923. Register of Deeds, Rich- 
mond County, N. C, 1926-1934; Compiler, United States Congres- 
sional Directory, 1933-1936. Attorney, Wage and Hour Division, 
Washington, 1939-1940. Mason; Benevolent and Protective Order 
of Elks. For several years and at present, Trustee, Wake Forest 
College. Student, Army Training Corps, Trinity Park School, 
1918-1919. Baptist. Recording Secretary North Carolina Baptist 
State Convention, 1932-1947. Married Miss Agnes Walker Cree, 
October 15, 1927. Three children: Betty Cree Deane, 19; Agnes 
Carol Deane, 15; Charles B. Deane, 11. Address: Rockingham, 
N. C. 

ROBERT LEE DOUGHTON 

(Ninth District — Counties: Alexander, Alleghany, Ashe, Cabar- 
rus, Caldwell, Iredell, Rowan, Stanly, and Watauga. Population, 
310,225.) 

Robert L. Doughton, Democrat, Laurel Springs, was born at 
Laurel Springs, November 7, 1863. Educated in the public schools 
and at Laurel Springs and Sparta High Schools. Farmer and 
stock raiser. Appointed a member of the Board of Agriculture in 
1903. Elected to the State Senate from the Thirty-fifth District 
in 1908. Served as director of the State Prison from 1909 to 1911. 



Senator Clyde R. Hoey 



Carlyle — Seventh District 
Deane Eighth District 



Doughton — Ninth District 
Junes Tenth District 



Bulwinkle— Eleventh District 
Redden -Twelfth District 





AdPim 



384 North Carolina Manual 

Elected to the Sixty-second, Sixty-third, Sixty-fourth, Sixty-fifth, 
Sixty-sixth, Sixty-seventh, Sixty-eighth, Sixty-ninth, Seventieth, 
Seventy-first, Seventy-second, Seventy-third, Seventy-fourth, Sev- 
enty-fifth, Seventy-sixth, Seventy-seventh, Seventy-eighth, Sev- 
enty-ninth, Eightieth and Eighty-first Congresses by large majori- 
ties. Chairman of the Committee on Ways and Means Seventy- 
third to Seventy-ninth Congresses, inclusive. Re-elected Chairman 
of the Committee on Ways and Means, Eighty-first Congress. Has 
held this position longer than any other man in the history of the 
Government. Alternating chairman, Joint Congressional Committee 
on Internal Revenue Taxation. 



HAMILTON CHAMBERLAIN .lONES 

(Tenth District — Counties: Avery, Burke, Catawba, Lincoln, 
Mecklenburg and Mitchell. Population, 295,822.) 

Hamilton Chamberlain Jones, Democrat, of Charlotte, N. C, 
was born in Charlotte, N. C. Son of Hamilton Chamberlain, Jr. 
and Sophia Convere (Myers) Jones. Attended Charlotte Gram- 
mar School; Central High School, Washington, D. C; Homers 
Military School, Oxford, N. C; A.B., Elective Law, University of 
North Carolina; M.A., Elective Law, Columbia University, New 
York City. Attorney at Law. Member of the American Bar Asso- 
ciation; North Carolina Bar Association; Chairman of Executive 
Committee, North Carolina Bar Association, 1936; President, 1940. 
Member of North Carolina State Bar; Mecklenburg Bar Associa- 
tion, President, 1932. Recorder of City of Charlotte; Juvenile 
Court Judge; United States Assistant District Attorney of West- 
ern District of North Carolina, 1919-1921. Chairman of Demo- 
cratic Party of Mecklenburg County for fourteen years. State 
Senator, State of North Carolina. Presented portrait of former 
Chief Justice W. A. Hoke to Supreme Court of North Carolina 
with accompanying address which is filed in the office of the Clerk 
of the Supreme Court of North Carolina. Member and President, 
Charlotte Rotary Club; Vice-Chairman, Charlotte Chamber of 
Commerce; Member of the Executives' Club; Member and Vice- 
Chairman of the Board of the Charlotte Memorial Hospital Au- 
thority; Chairman, Executive Committee of Thompson Orphanage 
and Training School. Member of Blue Lodge Masonry; Thirty- 



Biographical Sketches 385 

second Degree Mason; Oasis Temple of Shrine; Charlotte Red 
Fez Club; Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks; Knights of 
Pythias; SAE Fraternity, University of North Carolina and Co- 
lumbia University; member of the Gimghoul, University of North 
Carolina. Episcopalian; Senior Warden, Junior Warden, member 
of Vestry, Superintendent of Sunday School. Elected to Eightieth 
Congress on November 5, 1946, and to Eighty-first Congress. Mar- 
ried Miss Bessie Smedes Erw^in, October 23, 1915. Three children: 
William Erwin Jones, age 27; Mrs. Elizabeth Jones Boehmer, 24; 
Miss Alice McAden Jones, 19. Address: 201 Cherokee Road, Char- 
lotte, N. C. 



'> 



ALFRED LEE BULWINKLE 

(Eleventh District — Counties: Cleveland, Gaston, Madison, Mc- 
Dov^^ell, Polk, Rutherford, and Yancey. Population, 265,757.) 

Alfred Lee Bulwinkle, Democrat, Gastonia, Gaston County, 
N. C, born April 21, 1883. Attended school at Dallas, N. C. 
Studied law under the late Oscar F. Mason of Gaston County, and 
at the University of North Carolina. Doctor of Civil Laws, Lenoir- 
Rhyne College, Hickory, N. C. Admitted to the Bar 1904. Lawyer. 
Prosecuting Attorney Municipal Court of City of Gastonia 1913- 
1916. Democratic Nominee for Senator from Gaston County for 
the General Assembly 1916; withdrew on account of military serv- 
ice on the Mexican border 1917. Captain Company B, 1st Inf. 
N.C.N.G. 1909-1917. Major, commanding Second Battalion, 113th 
Field Artillery, 55th F. A. Brigade, 30th Division 1917-1919. 
Served in American Expeditionary Forces in France. Married Miss 
Bessie B. Lewis, Dallas, N. C; children: Mrs. E. Grainger (Fran- 
ces McKean) Williams, Little Rock, Arkansas, and Alfred Lewis 
(Major, Inf. World War II), Lawyer, Gastonia. Lutheran. Mem- 
ber Executive Board United Lutheran Church of America. Mem- 
ber of various patriotic and fraternal organizations and bar asso- 
ciations. Elected from the Ninth Congressional District of North 
Carolina to 67th, 68th, 69th, and 70th Congresses. Elected from 
the Tenth District of N. C. to the 72nd to 77th Congresses, inclu- 
sive. Elected from the Eleventh District 1942, 78th through 80th 
Congresses. Re-elected to the 81st Congress, 1948. United States 
Delegate to the International Civil Aviation Conference, Chicago, 
1944, and Montreal, Canada, 1947. United States Adviser Inter- 



38G North Carolina Manual 

national Civil Aviation Conference Organization, Geneva, Switzer- 
land, 1947. Member Committee on Interstate and Foreign Com- 
merce. Office in Washington: 1313 House Office Building. Home 
address: Gastonia, N. C. 

MONROE MINOR REDDEN 

(Tivelffh District — Counties: Buncombe, Cherokee, Clay, Gra- 
ham, Haywood, Henderson, Jackson, Macon, Swain, and Transyl- 
vania. Population, 260,908.) 

Monroe Minor Redden of Henderson County, was born in Hen- 
dersonville, N. C, September 24, 1901. Son of John L. and Julia 
(Trimble) Redden. Attended the public schools of the county; 
graduated from Fruitland Institute, 1919; attended Law School, 
Wake Forest College; admitted to the Bar, 1923. Chairman, Hen- 
derson County Democratic Committee, 1930-1946; Chairman, State 
Democratic Executive Committee of North Carolina, February, 
1942-August, 1944; elected to Eightieth Congress, November 5, 
1946, receiving largest total vote and largest majority of any con- 
gressional candidate in the State; re-elected to Eighty-first Con- 
gress November 2, 1948. Married Miss Mary Belle Boyd, 1923. 
Two sons, Monroe, Jr., and Robert M. Home address: Henderson- 
ville, N. C. 



JUSTICES OF THE NORTH CAROLINA 
SUPREME COURT 

WALTER PARKER STACY 

CHIEF JUSTICE 

Walter Parker Stacy, Democrat, born in Ansonville, N. C, De- 
cember 26, 1884; son of Rev. L. E. and Rosa (Johnson) Stacy; 
educated Weaverville (N. C.) College 1895-1898; Morven (N. C.) 
Hig-h School 1899-1902; University of North Carolina, A.B. 1908; 
attended Law School, same, 1908-1909, LL.D. (Hon.) 1923; mar- 
ried Maude DeGan Graff, of Lake Placid Club, N. Y., June 15, 
1929 (since deceased) ; practiced law in pai'tnership with Graham 
Kenan 1910-1916. Represented New Hanover County in General 
Assembly of N. C. 1915; Judge Superior Court, 8th Judicial Dis- 
trict 1916-1920; elected, 1920, Associate Justice Supreme Court of 
North Carolina for full term ; appointed by Governor A. W. Mc- 
Lean, March 16, 1925, to succeed Chief Justice Hoke (resigned) 
and in 1926, in 1934, and again in 1942, nominated without oppo- 
sition in primary and elected Chief Justice Supreme Court for 8- 
year terms; member American and North Carolina Bar Associa- 
tions. General Alumni Association University of North Carolina 
(president 1925-1926) ; lecturer summers 1922-1925 inclusive, in 
Law School University of North Carolina, tendered deanship of 
same 1923; lecturer Northwestern University School of Law, sum- 
mer sessions 1926-1927; named by U. S. Board of Mediation, under 
Railway Labor Act, as neutral arbitrator to serve on Board of 
Arbitration (six members), and later elected chairman of board 
to settle wage controversy between the Brotherhood of Locomotive 
Elngineers and certain railroads in southeastern teri'itory of United 
States 1927-1928; appointed by President Coolidge, 1928, member 
of Emergency Board of five, under Railway Labor Act, to inves- 
tigate and report respecting a dispute between officers and mem- 
bers of the Order of Railway Conductors and Brotherhood of Rail- 
way Trainmen, and certain railroads located west of the Missis- 
sippi River; named by U. S. Board of Mediation, January 1931, 
to serve as neutral arbitrator in controversy between Biotherhood 
of Railroad Trainmen and New York Central, the "Big Four" 
and P. and L. E. railroads, and again in November 1931 to serve 



Chief Justice Stacy 



Justice Devin 

Justice Barnhill 



Justice Winborne 
Justice Seawell 



Justice Denny 

Justice Ervin 




Biographical Sketches 389 

as neutral arbitrator in controversy between Brotherhood of Rail- 
way and Steamship Clerks, etc., and Railway Express Agency. 
Appointed by President Hoover 1932, member of Emergency Board 
of three, later elected chairman of Board, to investigate and report 
concerning a number of questions in difference between L. and A. 
and L. A. and T. railways and certain of their employees. Chair- 
man Commission appointed to redraft Constitution of North Caro- 
lina 1931-1932. Appointed by President Roosevelt in 1933, in 1934 
and again in 1938 to Emergency Boards under Railway Labor Act. 
Appointed by President Roosevelt 1934, Chairman National Steel 
and Textile Labor Relations boards; and again in 1941 as an Alter- 
nate Member of the National Defense Mediation Board; and in 
1942 as an Associate Member of the National War Labor Board 
and also as a Member of the National Railway Labor Panel. Ap- 
pointed by President Truman 1945, Chairman of the President's 
National Labor-Management Conference. Methodist. Residence: 
Wilmington, N. C. Office: Raleigh, N. C. 



WILLIAM AUGUSTUS DEVIN 

ASSOCIATE JUSTICE 

William Augustus Devin, Democrat, was born in Granville 
County, July 12, 1871. Son of Robert Ira and Mary (Transou) 
Devin. Attended Horner Military School 1883-1887; Wake Forest 
College; University of North Carolina Law School 1892-1893. 
Member North Carolina Bar Association. Mayor Oxford 1903- 
1909. Representative in the General Assembly 1911 and 1913. 
Member Constitutional Amendments Commission 1913; Judge Su- 
perior Court 1913-1935; appointed Associate Justice Supreme 
Court by Governor Ehringhaus, October 1935, succeeding Associate 
Justice W. J. Brogden; elected for eight-year term, November 3, 
1936, re-elected November 7, 1944. Honorary degree LL.D. con- 
ferred by the University of North Carolina. Member N. C. Na- 
tional Guard; Captain 1901-1907; member staff of Governor Craig 
with rank of Major. Mason. Baptist. Teacher Bible Class since 
1915. Author of addresses on legal and historical subjects. Mar- 
ried Miss Virginia Bernard, November 29, 1899. One son, Wil- 
liam A. Devin, Jr., Washington, D. C. Home address: Oxford, 
N. C. Office: Raleigh, N. C. 



'MO North Carolina Manual 

MAURICE VICTOR BARNHILL 

ASSOCIATE JUSTICE 

Maurice Victor Barnhill, Democrat, was born in Halifax County, 
December 5, 1887 Son of Martin V. and Mary (Dawes) Barn- 
hill. Attended public schools of Halifax County; Enfield Graded 
School; Elm City Academy; University of North Carolina Law 
School 1907-09. Member North Carolina Bar Association. Prose- 
cuting- Attorney, Nash County Court, April 1914; member Legis- 
lature (House) 1921; Judge Nash County Court, April 1923; for- 
mer Chairman Nash County Highway Commission and Board of 
Trustees Rocky Mount Graded School District. Judge Superior 
Court, June 1924. Appointed by Governor Clyde R. Hoey, July 1, 
1937, Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of North Carolina 
and elected for term of eight years November 8, 1938; re-elected 
November 1946. Member Phi Delta Phi Legal Fraternity; Mason 
and Shriner. Married Miss Nannie Rebecca Cooper, June 5, 1912. 
Two children: M. V. Barnhill, Jr.; Rebecca Barnhill. Methodist. 
Address: Rocky Mount, N. C. 



JOHN WALLACE WINBORNE 

ASSOCIATE JUSTICE 

John Wallace Winborne was born in Chowan County, N. C, 
July 12, 1884. Son of Dr. Robert H. and Annie F. (Parker) Win- 
borne. Attended Horner Military School, Oxford, 1900-1902; A.B., 
University of North Carolina, 1906; LL.D., University of North 
Carolina, 1946. Married twice: first to Charlie May Blanton, 
March 30, 1910 who died November 4, 1940. To them two children 
were born: daughter, Charlotte Blanton now Mrs. Charles M. 
Shaffer, Builington, N. C, and a son, John Wallace, Jr., of At- 
lanta, Ga. Second marriage to Mrs. Lelage Gates Rorison, June 
14, 1947. Taught Bingham Military School, Asheville, N. C, 1906- 
1907. Admitted to practice. North Carolina, 1906. Practiced, 
Marion, N. C, since 1907. Member firm of Pless and Winborne, 
1907-1919; Pless, Winborne and Pless, 1919-1926; Pless, Win- 
borne, Pless and Proctor, 1926-1927; Winborne and Proctor, 1928- 
1937. Member, Board of Aldermen, 1913-1921; Attorney, Marion 
and McDowell County, 1918-1937. Member Local Selective Board 
during World War I. Chairman Democratic Executive Committee, 



Biographical Sketches 391 

McDowell County, 1910-1912; member State Democratic Executive 
Committee, 1916-1937; Chairman, State Democratic Executive 
Committee, 1932-1937. Member Local Government Commission of 
North Carolina, 1931-1933. Delta Kappa Epslon; Mason; Execu- 
tive Club of Raleigh; Honorary member of North Carolina 
Society of the Cincinnati; Marion iKiwanis Club (president, 1932). 
Appointed by Governor Hoey Associate Justice Supreme Court of 
North Carolina, July 1, 1937; elected for a term of eight years 
in November, 1938; re-elected for a term of eight years in Nov- 
ember, 1946. Home address: Marion, N. C. Official address: Ra- 
leigh, N. C. 

AARON ASHLEY FLOWERS SEAWELL 

ASSOCIATE JUSTICE 

A. A. F. Seawell, Democrat, of Lee County, was born near 
Jonesboro, Moore County, October 30, 1864. Son of A. A. F. and 
Jeannette Anne (Buie) Seawell. Attended Jonesboro High School 
1877-1879; University of North Carolina, Ph.B., Class of 1889; 
University Law School 1892. Honorary LL. D. University of 
North Carolina 1937. Lawyer. Order of Coif, U.N.C.; member 
Phi Delta Phi Legal Fraternity. Representative in the General 
Assembly of 1901, 1913, 1915 and 1931; State Senator 1907 and 
1925. Mason; Knights Templar; Shrine; Newcomen Society; Torch 
Club; History Club (Raleigh), Executives Club. Appointed Assist- 
ant Attorney General, July 1, 1931. Appointed Attorney General 
by Governor J. C. B. Ehringhaus, January 16, 1935, to succeed At- 
torney General Dennis G. Brummitt; elected to full term, No- 
vember 1936. Appointed Associate Justice Supreme Court by Gov- 
ernor Hoey, April 30, 1938, to succeed Associate Justice George W. 
Connor. Elected November 8, 1938, for unexpired term, ending 
January 1, 1945. Elected November 7, 1944, to full term. Presby- 
terian; Ruling Elder since 1901. Married Miss Bertha Alma Smith, 
April 12, 1905; four sons and two daughters. Address: Raleigh, 
N. C. 

EMERY BYRD DENNY 

ASSOCIATE JUSTICE 

Emery Byrd Denny was boi-n in Surry County, North Carolina, 
November 23, 1892. Son of Rev. Gabriel and Sarah Delphina 
(Stone) Denny. Attended public schools of Sui'ry County, Gil- 



392 North Carolina Manual 

liams Academy 1910-1914; University of North Carolina, 1916- 
1917 and 1919. Honorary Degree of L.L.D., University of North 
Carolina, 1946, and Wake Forest College, 1947. Admitted to prac- 
tice law, 1919. Member law firm of Denny & Gaston, 1919-1921, 
Mangum & Denny, 1921-1930, practiced alone, 1930-1942. Attor- 
nef for Gaston County, 1927-42; North Carolina Railroad, 1937- 
1938; Mayor of Gastonia, 1929-1937. Member State and Ameri- 
can Bar Associations. Chairman State Democratic Executive Com- 
mittee, 1940-1942. Enlisted as Private World War I, December 8, 
1917, promoted to Corporal, Sergeant, First Sergeant, and Master 
Electrician. Served in Aviation Section Signal Corps, Kelly Field, 
Texas, and Vancouver Barracks, Washington. Discharged Febru- 
ary 22, 1919. Member Gaston Post No. 23, American Legion. Past 
Master Holland Memorial Lodge No. 668, A.F. and A.M.; Past 
High Priest Gastonia Chapter No. 66, Royal Arch Masons and 
member Gastonia Commandery, No. 28, Knights Templar. Phi 
Delta Phi Legal Fraternity. Baptist. Appointed Associate Justice 
Supreme Court of North Carolina by Governor Broughton, Janu- 
ary, 1942, to succeed the late Associate Justice Heriot Clarkson. 
Elected to fill out the unexpired term and for the full eight-year 
term, November 3, 1942. Married Miss Bessie Brandt Brown, Sal- 
isbury, N. C, December 27, 1922. Children: Emery Byrd, Jr.; 
Betty Brown, Sarah Catherine, and Jean Stone. Address: Raleigh, 
N. C. Home Address: Gastonia, N. C. 

SAM J. ERVIN, JR. 

associate justice 
Sam J. Ervin, Jr., son of Samuel James and Laura (Powe) 
Ervin, was born at Morganton, N. C, September 27, 1896; grad- 
uated from the University of North Carolina with A.B. degree 
in 1917, and from Harvard Law School with LL.B. degree in 
1922; served in France with the First Division for 18 months in 
the First World War; twice wounded in battle, twice cited for 
gallantry in action, and awarded the French Fourragere, the 
Purple Heart with one Oakleaf Cluster, the Silver Star, and the 
Distinguished Service Cross; admitted to the North Carolina bar 
in 1919 and subsequently licensed to practice before various Fed- 
eral agencies and courts, including the Supreme Court of the 
United States; engaged in practice of law at Morganton since 



Biographical Sketches 393 

1922 with exception of periods of service on bench; has served 
in the following- capacities, namely: Representative from Burke 
County in General Assemblies of 1923, 1925, and 1931; Chairman, 
Burke County Democratic Executive Committee, 1924; Trustee, 
Morganton Graded Schools, 1927-1930; Member State Democratic 
Executive Committee, 1930-1937; Trustee University of North 
Carolina, 1932-1935, 1945-1946; Judge, Burke County Criminal 
Court, 1935-1937; Judge, North Carolina Superior Court, 1937- 
1943, resigning to resume practice of law; Member State Board of 
Law Examiners, 1944-1946; Member, North Carolina Hospital and 
Medical Care Commission, 1944; Government Appeal Agent, 
Burke County Selective Service Board No. 2, and Chairman, 
Burke County Labor Mobilization Board, Second World War; 
Representative from Tenth North Carolina District in 79th Con- 
gress, 1946-1947, declining: to seek renomination to resume prac- 
tice of law; Chairman, North Carolina Commission for Improve- 
ment of Administration of Justice, 1947-1949; Trustee, Davidson 
College, 1948-1950; Associate Justice, State Supreme Court, since 
February 3, 1948, having- been originally appointed to such office 
by Governor Cherry and having been subsequently elected thereto 
in November, 1948; Member of the following organizations: North 
Carolina Bar Association, North Carolina State Bar, American 
Bar Association, Association of Interstate Commerce Commission 
Practitioners, General Alumni Association of University of North 
Carolina (president, 1947-1948), American Legion, Veterans of 
Foreign Wars, Disabled American Veterans, Society of the First 
Division, Army and Navy Legion of Valor, Morganton Kiwanis 
Club, Morganton Chamber of Commerce, State Literary and His- 
torical Association, Southern Historical Association, Society of 
Mayflower Descendants, Sigma Upsilon, Phi Delta Phi, Junior 
Order, Knights of Pythias, Dokies, Knights Templar, Scottish 
Rite Masons (32nd degree), Morganton Presbyterian Church 
(elder) ; married Margaret Bruce Bell, of Concord, N. C, June 
18, 1924; three children: Sam J. Ervin, 3rd., Margaret Leslie 
Ervin, and Laura Powe Ervin. Home: Morganton, N. C. Office: 
Raleigh, N. C. 



Members of the Genero! Assembly 

HOYT PATRICK TAYLOR 

LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR AND PRESIDENT OF SENATE 

Hoyt Patrick Taylor, Democrat, was born at Winton, N. C, 
June 11, 1890. Son of Simeon P. and Kate (Ward) Taylor. At- 
tended Winton High School and Academy; Horner Military 
School; Wake Forest College. Lawyer. Vice-President and Dii"ector 
of Anson Sanatorium and Carolina Concrete Pipe Company. 
Director of Anson Telephone and Telegraph Company, Anson 
Building- and Loan Association, Anson Real Estate and Insurance 
Co., Hornwood Warp Knitting Company and Wadesboro Electric 
Service Company. Chairman of Board of Trustees of Meredith 
College. Former Mayor of Wadesboro, Chairman of Anson County 
Democratic Executive Committee, and Member Board of Trustees 
of the University of North Carolina. Served overseas with 371st 
Infantry in World War I, and awarded Silver Star and Purple 
Heart Decorations, and personal citation by General Pershing. 
State Senator from the Nineteenth Senatorial District in the Gen- 
eral Assemblies of 1937, 1939 and 1943, and the Special Sessions 
of 1936 and 1938. Legislative Assistant to the Governor General 
Assembly of 1945. Chairman of Finance Committee of the Senate 
in 1939, and Chairman of Appropriations Committee in 1943. 
Member of Advisory Budget Commission and Division of Purchase 
and Contract 1939, 1940 and 1943, 1944. Elected Lieutenant Gov- 
ernor November 4, 1948. Elected Chairman State Board of Educa- 
tion 1949. Charter Member Anson County Post No. 31 American 
Legion. Member Wadesboro Rotary and Executives Clubs. Mem- 
ber of Woodmen of the World, and Mason, Carolina Consistory, 
and Oasis Templer of the Shrine. Baptist. Married Miss Inez 
Wooten of Chadbourn, N. C, June 28, 1923. Three children : Hoyt 
Patrick Taylor, Jr.; Carolina Corbett Taylor; and Frank Wooten 
Taylor. Address: Wadesboro, N. C. 

JULIAN RUSSELL ALLSBROOK 

(Fourth District — Counties: Edgecombe and Halifax. Two 
Senators.) 

Julian Russell Allsbrook, Democrat, Senator from the Fourth 
Senatorial District, was born in Roanoke Rapids, N. C, February 
17, 1903. Son of William Clemens and Bennie Alice (Waller) 
Allsbrook. Gi'aduated from Roanoke Rapids Public Schools in 1920 ; 
attended University of North Carolina 1920-1924; President stu- 



Hoyt P. Taylor 

Lieutenant Governor 

President of the Senate 



Allsbrook of Halifax 
Barnhardt of Cabarrus 
Hlytlie of Mecklenburg 



Brock of Davie 

Campen of Pamlico 
Crawford of Jackson 



Currie of Durham 

Dalton of Rutherford 
Dearman of Iredell 



Eagles of Wilson 

Fountain of Edgecombe 
Gass of Forsyth 



Gibbs of Warren 
Halstead of Camden 
Hester of Bladen 








p^ 



hA^ 




396 North Carolina Manual 

dent body 1923-1924; permanent Vice President Class of 1924; Uni- 
versity Law School, 1922-1924. Lawyer. Member Halifax County 
Bar Association. Presidential Elector from Second Congressional 
District, 1936. Former member Board of Trustees Roanoke Rapids 
School District; Board of City Commissioners of Roanoke Rapids 
for one term. Senator from the Fourth Senatorial District in the 
General Assembly of 1935 and 1947. Representative from Halifax 
County in General Assembly of 1941. Democratic nominee to State 
Senate (1942) Primary. Resigned to enter U. S. Naval Reserve as 
Lieutenant (1942) and served until placed on Inactive Duty (1945). 
Lieutenant-Commander U. S. Naval Reserve. Phi Alpha Delta Law 
Fraternity. College honors: Golden Fleece, Order of the Grail, Tau 
Kappa Alpha Debating Fraternity. Mason; Widow's Son Lodge 
No. 519. Woodmen of the World. Member Roanoke Rapids 
Kiwanis Club. Baptist. Married Miss Frances Virginia Brown of 
Garysburg, N. C, June 24, 1926. Children : Richard Brown, Mary 
Frances and Alice Harris. Address: Roanoke Rapids, N. C. 

LUTHER ERNEST EARNHARDT 

(Twenty-first District — Counties: Rowan and Cabarrus. Two 
Senators.) 

Luther Ernest Barnhardt, Democrat, Senator from the Twenty- 
first Senatorial District, was born at Concord, N. C, November 
29, 1903. Son of George Thomas and Lillie Virginia (Faggart) 
Barnhardt. Graduated from Concord High School, May, 1921; 
LL.B. Wake Forest College, May, 1925. Lawyer. Member Cabar- 
rus County Bar Association, President, 1942; member State Bar 
and American Bar Associations. Chairman Cabarrus County 
Board of Elections, 1933-1944. Pi Kappa Alpha (Wake Forest 
College) National Fraternity; Charter member Golden Bough; 
Secretary Student Body. Member Rotary International. Trustee 
Concord Community Center, 1940-1941; Trustee Public Library 
1943. Member General Statutes Commission; Secretary and 
Director Concord Chamber of Commerce; National Counsellor, 
U. S. Chamber of Commerce; Vice-President and Director Concord 
Community Boys' Club, Inc. State Senator in the General Assem- 
bly, 1945 and 1947. Methodist; Member Board of Stewards; 
Teacher Adult Bible Class. Married Miss Burvelle McFarland, June 
3, 1930. Four children: Luther Ernest, Jr.; Phoebe Jean; John 
McFarland; Ann Drucilla Barnhardt. Address: Concord, N. C. 



*JOSEPH LEE BLYTHE 

(Ttve7itieth District — County: Mecklenburg. One Sena- 
tor.) 

Joseph Lee Blythe, Democrat, Senator from the Twen- 
tieth Senatorial District, was born in Huntersville, N. C, 
November 8, 1890. Son of Richard Samuel and Virginia 
(Gamble) Blythe. Attended Huntersville High School, 
1897-1908. Master Engineer Sr. Gr., United States Army, 
May 26, 1917 to July 21, 1919. Vice-President Blythe 
Brothers Company; Vice-President Charlotte Equipment 
Company; Secretary and Treasurer Concrete Supply 
Company; President First Federal Savings and Loan 
Association; President Piedmont Mop Company; Member 
of National Association of Manufacturers; Member Asso- 
ciated General Contractors of America; Member United 
States Chamber of Commerce and the American Road 
Builders Association. Senator from the Twentieth District 
in the General Assembly of 1939, 1941, 1943, 1945, and 
1947. State Director of Finance for Democratic National 
Committee, 1941-1945; Elected Democratic National Com- 
mitteemen for North Carolina by the North Carolina 
State Executive Committee upon resignation of Com- 
mitteeman in 1947, then reelected National Committee- 
man at the Convention by the Democratic National Com- 
mittee in Philadelphia in July, 1948. Appointed Treasurer 
of Democratic National Committee on May 28, 1948: 
Elected Treasurer of the Democratic National Committee 
July 15, 1948 at the meeting of the Democratic National 
Committee in Philadelphia. Member Masonic Order; 
Shrine (Oasis Temple); Elks; President, Mecklenburg 
Historical Society; Charlotte Country Club; Civitan Club. 
Member American Legion. Member Associate Reformed 
Presbyterian Church; Elder. Married Miss Cherrye High, 
September 14, 1921. Four children: Joseph Lee, Jr.; Sam 
uel Fitzhugh; Jane Chamblee; and Mrs. H. R. Richard- 
son. Address: 2238 Pinewood Circle, Charlotte, N. C. 



* Died January 23, 1949. 



398 North Carolina Manual 



BURR COLEY BROCK 



(Twenty-fourth District — Counties: Davie, Wilkes, and Yadkin, 
One Senator.) 

Burr Coley Brock, Republican, Senator from the Twenty-fourth 
Senatorial District, was born in Farmington, N. C, November 
26, 1891. Son of Moses B. and Vert (Coley) Brock. Attended 
schools of Cooleemee, Woodleaf, Farmington and Clemmons High 
School, graduating in 1913; University Law School, 1913-1915; 
A.B. 1916. Lawyer. Mason; Junior Order United American Me- 
chanics; Odd Fellows; Woodmen of the World; President Mocks- 
ville Lodge of P. O. S. of A., also county and district president, 
Chairman Boy Scout Committee, Farmington, 1940-1949; Member 
School Committee, 1941-1949. Representative in the General As- 
sembly from Davie County in 1917, 1933 and 1935; State Senator, 
1937 and 1943. Minority leader in the General Assembly, 1933; 
Chairman Joint House and Senate Caucus Committee, 1935. Meth- 
odist; Teacher Young Men's Class for eight years, Mocksville 
M. E. Church South; now teaching Men's Wesley Bible Class; 
Chairman Circuit Board of Stewards and Lay Leader Farming- 
ton M. E. Circuit; Superintendent of Sunday School for past two 
years; Associate Lay Leader Elkin District, 1940-1941; Lay 
Leader, 1942-43; Associate Lay Leader of Thomasville; Secretary 
and Treasurer of District Trustees and Member of the location 
and building committee. Government appeal agent World War IL 
Married Miss Laura Tabor, December 23, 1919. Children: B. C. 
Brock, Jr., Margaret Jo, Francis, John Tabor, James Moses, Rich- 
ard Joe, William Laurie and Rufus Leo. Address: Mocksville, N. C. 

SAM MACK CAMPEN 

(Second District — Counties: Beaufort, Dare, Hyde, Martin, 
Pamlico, Tyrrell, and Washington. Two Senators.) 

Sam Mack Campen, Democrat, Senator from the Second Sena- 
torial District, was born at Alliance, N. C, April 17, 1889. Son 
of Samuel and Sally (Potter) Campen. Attended Trinity Park 
School; Trinity College (Duke), 1906-1908, Class 1910. Merchant 
and Farmer. Postmaster, Alliance, 1913-1927; Chairman Pamlico 
County Board of Education, 1921-1930. Member of Masonic Lodge 
Bayboro, No. 331; Scottish Rite, New Bern; Shrine, Sudan 



Biographical Sketches 399 

Temple, New Bern. Married Miss Julia Weskett, August 27, 1913. 
One daughter: Mrs. W. C. Barfield, Wilmington; one grandson. 
Address: Alliance, N. C. 

WILLIAM HOWARD CRAWFORD 

(Thirty-second Distrct — Counties: Haywood, Henderson, Jack- 
son, Polk, and Transylvania. Two Senators.) 

William Howard Crawford, Democrat, Senator from the Thirty- 
second Senatorial District, was born at Cullowhee, N. C, March 
15, 1911. Son of W. E. and Emma T. (Painter) Crawford. At- 
tended Cullowhee Training School; Cullowhee High School, 1926- 
1930; B.S. Degree, Western Carolina Teacher's College, 1936. 
School principal and business man. Member of Lodge No. 358 
A. F. & A. M. Methodist; Board of Stewards; Sunday School 
Superintendent, 1939 to present. Married Miss Carma Jean Ashe. 
Two children : Yvonne and Carolyn Jean. Address : Sylva, N. C. 

CLAUDE CURRIE 

(Fourteenth District — Counties : Durham, Granville and Person. 
Two Senators.) 

Claude Currie, Democrat, Senator from the Fourteenth Sena- 
torial District, was born in Candor, Montgomery County, N. C, 
December 8, 1890. Son of John C. and Louise (McKinnon) Currie. 
Attended Oak Ridge Military Institute, 1911-1914; University 
North Carolina, A.B. and LL.B., 1926. Building and Loan Asso- 
ciation. State Senator, Eighteenth Senatorial District, 1927, 1945, 
and 1947. United States Army Air Corps, 1917-1919; Pursuit 
Observer, Sgt. Presbyterian. Address : Durham, N. C. 

CHARLES CLAXTON DALTON 

(Twenty-seventh District — Counties: Cleveland, McDowell, and 
Rutherford. Two Senators.) 

Charles Claxton Dalton, Democrat, Senator from the Twenty- 
seventh Senatorial District, was born in Rutherford County, June 
1, 1906. Son of E. Harvey and Laura (Weber) Dalton. Attended 
Forest City High School, 1923-1926; University of North Caro- 
lina, 1930, A.B. Degree; Southeastern University, Washington, 



400 North Carolina Manual 

D. C, 1933-193G, LL.B. Degree. Lawyer. Member of North Car- 
olina State Bar Association; Rutherford County Bar Associa- 
tion ; Spindale Rotary Chib. Solicitor, Rutherford County Re- 
corder's Court, 194G-1948. Sgt. Special Agent Counter-intelligence 
Corp, November 4, 1942-October 12, 1945. Member of Spindale 
Masonic Lodge No. 673. Methodist. Married Miss Amanda Haynes, 
December 20, 1936. One daughter: Laura Elizabeth Dalton. Ad- 
dress: Spindale, N. C. 

CLAUDIUS HURSELL DEARMAN 

(Ttveniy-fifth District — Counties: Catawba, Iredell, and Lincoln. 
Two Senators.) 

Claudius Hursell Dearman, Democrat, Senator from the twenty- 
fifth Senatorial District, was born at Harmony, N. C, June 1, 
1901. Son of C. A. and Elizabeth Jane (Albea) Dearman. At- 
tended Harmony High School, 1916-1920; University of North 
Carolina, 1921-1924; University of North Carolina Law School, 
1925-1926. Lawyer. Member of State and County Bar Associa- 
tions; Phi Delta Phi (Legal). Chairman of Statesville City School 
Board, 1939-1948. Mason; Statesville Lodge No. 27. Lieutenant, 
U, S. Naval Service, August, 1942; returned to inactive duty as 
Lieutenant Commander in November, 1945; Pacific Theater of 
Operations (Okinawa). Methodist; Member of Board of Stewards; 
Teacher of Men's Bible Class, 1933-1942. Married Miss Henrie 
Miller, June 18, 1932. One son: Henry Hursell Dearman, age 
fourteen. Address: Statesville, N. C. 



JOSEPH COLIN EAGLES, JR. 

(Sixth District — Counties: Franklin, Nash, and Wilson. Two 
Senators.) 

Joseph Colin Eagles, Jr., Democrat, Senator from the Sixth 
Senatorial District, was born at Wilson, N. C, October 5, 1910. 
Son of J. C. and Susie Whitehead (Moye) Eagles. Attended Wil- 
son High School, 1923-1927; University of North Carolina, A.B., 
1931; University of North Carolina Law School, J.D., 1934. To- 
bacconist and Farmer. Member of Kappa Sigma and Phi Beta 
Kappa Fraternities. Lieutenant in the U. S. Navy, 1944-1946. 



Hodges of Henderson 
Jones of Pitt 

Larkins of Jones 



Little of Anson 
Long of Person 
Marshall of Stokes 



McKinnon of Robeson 

Moss of Nash 

Nichols of Cherokee 



Parker of Buncombe 
Pate of Scotland 
Penny of Guilford 



Perry of Watauga 
Peterson of Mitchell 
Phillips of Davidson 



Pittman of Lee 

Price of Rockingham 
Rankin of Gaston 




402 North Carolina Manual 

Episcopalian, Vestryman, 1943-1944. Maii-ied Miss Betty Ledford 
Sparks, 1938. Two children: Betsy Boyden Eagles; Joseph Colin 
Eagles, III. Address: 1100 West Nash St., Wilson, N. C. 



LAWRENCE H. FOUNTAIN 

(Fourth District — Counties: Edgecombe and Halifax. Two Sen- 
ators.) 

Lawrence H. Fountain, Democrat, Senator from the Fourth 
Senatorial District, was born in the village of Leggett, N. C, 
Edgecombe County. Son of the late Lawrence H. and Sallie 
(Barnes) Fountain. Attended Leggett High and Tarboro High 
Schools; University of North Carolina, A.B. degree, 1934; LL.B., 
1936; Winner of Wiley P. Mangum Oratorical Medal and Mary D. 
Wright Debate Medal; Pi'esident Philanthrophic Literary Society; 
Member Debate Council; Member Board of Directors, Graham Me- 
morial Building; Member of Y.M.C.A. Deputation Teams visiting 
Schools, Churches and other Institutions in State on behalf of 
University. Lawyer. Member Edgecombe County Bar Association; 
North Carolina State Bar; North Carolina Bar Association; 
American Bar Association. Law Partner of V. E. Fountain in 
Law Firm of Fountain & Fountain, Tarboro, N. C. Member Tar- 
boro Kiwanis Club, Past President, 1940; former President Young 
Democratic Club of Edgecombe County; Eastern Organizer of 
Y D C's of North Carolina during administration of Ralph W. 
Gardner; former chairman, 2nd Congressional District Executive 
Committee of Y D C's of North Carolina. Member, Tarboro Mer- 
chants Association; Tarboro Chamber of Commerce; Tarboro 
Junior Chamber of Commerce; a Director of Edgecombe County 
Chapter, American Red Cross. Elected Tarboro's man of the year 
in 1948. Charter member of Tarboro's Executive Club. Reading 
Clerk in North Carolina State Senate, 1936 Special Session; 1937 
Regular Session; extraordinary Session of 1938; 1939 Regular 
Session; 1941 Regular Session. State Senator from the Fourth 
Senatorial District in the General Assembly of 1947. Enlisted in 
Army of United States, March 4, 1942, with grade of Private; 
advanced to Corporal and Staff Sgt. ; released from service as 
Major, J.A.G.O., March 4, 1946. Presbyterian; Deacon, 1941-1946; 
Ordained as Elder in June, 1946; to date, Sunday School attend- 



Biographical Sketches 403 

ence record of 32 years without absence; teacher Men's Bible 
Class, Howard Memorial Presbyterian Church, regularly broad- 
cast over Radio Station WCPS, Tarboro, N. C, each Sunday. 
Married Miss Chi'istine Dail of Mount Olive, N. C, May 14, 1942. 
Address: Tarboro, N. C. 



MARSHALL REX GASS 

{Twenty-second District — County: Forsyth. One Senator.) 

Marshall Rex Gass, Democrat, Senator from the Twenty-second 
Senatorial District, was born in Knoxville, Tennessee, December 
8, 1879. Son of William and Rebecca Adeline (Fox) Gass. Received 
his education at Knoxville, Tennessee. Tobacconist. Automobile 
Storage and Oil Dealer. Past Member and Director of the Cham- 
ber of Commerce; Past President of the Virginia-North Carolina 
Warehousemen's Association; Vice President Winston-Salem To- 
bacco Board of Trade, 1931. Representative in the General Assem- 
bly 1937, 1939, 1941, 1943, 1945, and 1947. Methodist. Married 
Miss Bessie Mae Lloyd, December 24, 1912. Two children: Rex, 
Jr., and Ralph. Address: Winston-Salem, N. C. 



FRANK HERBERT GIBBS 

(Third District — Counties: Northampton, Vance, and Warren. 
One Senator.) 

Frank Herbert Gibbs, Democrat, Senator from the Third Sena- 
torial District, was born in Rockingham, August 4, 1895. Son of 
J. T. and Mary Alice (Overbaugh) Gibbs. Attended Trinity Col- 
lege, 1912-1914 (academic) ; Law School, 1914-1916. Lawyer. 
Mayor of Warrenton, May, 1920, to November, 1934 and from 
December, 1941, to November, 1947. Ensign, U. S. N. R. F. (Naval 
Aviator); Enrolled December 11, 1917; Active service, March 4, 
1918 to December 23, 1918. Sigma Chi Fraternity. State Senator 
in the General Assembly of 1935 and 1939. Methodist. Married 
Miss Mary Tasker Polk, December 15, 1921. Two children: Mary 
Tasker and Frank H., Jr. Address: Warrenton, N. C. 



404 North Carolina Manual 

WILLIAM IRA HALSTEAD 

(First District — Counties: Bertie, Camden, Chowan, Currituck, 

Gates, Hertford, Pasquotank, and Perquimans. Two Senators.) 

William Ira Halstead, Democrat, Senator from the First Sena- 
torial District, was born in Camden County, N. C, September 16, 
1878. Son of Lemuel H. and Laura V. (Lamb) Halstead. Attended 
Atlantic Collegiate Institute, Elizabeth City, N. C; Wake Forest 
College; was licensed to practice law, September, 1909. Lawyer. 
Past President First District Bar; County Attorney. Mason (Past 
Master) ; Red Men (Past Sachem) ; Past President of Ruritan 
Club. Received awards for Selective Service, Civilian Defense 
and numerous activities during World War II. Representative in 
the General Assembly of 1929, 1931, 1941, 1943, and 1947; State 
Senator from the First Senatorial District, Special Sessions, 1936 
and 1938, Regular Sessions 1937 and 1939. Methodist (District 
Lay Leader) ; Teacher of Bible Class. First marriage to Miss Pau- 
line Jacobs, May 10, 1903 who died September 20, 1935. Second 
marriage to Miss Flora Ashe, Wadesboro, N. C, December, 1943. 
Three sons, William Leon, John Wiley and Lemuel Hubert; two 
grandchildren. Address: South Mills, N. C. 

ROBERT JAMES HESTER, JR. 

(Tenth District — Counties: Bladen, Brunswick, Columbus, and 
Cumberland. Two Senators.) 

Robert James Hester, Jr., Democrat, Senator from the Tenth 
Senatorial District, was born in Elizabethtown, N. C, February 5, 
1904. Son of Robert James and Rena Gaston (Melvin) Hester. At- 
tended Elizabethtown High School; Wingate Junior College, 1920- 
1923; Wake Forest College, 1923-1926. Lawyer, Member North 
Carolina State Bar. Member Ninth District Bar Association and 
Bladen County Bar Association ; served as President and Secretary 
of both. Mayor of Elizabethtown, 1927-1928; Judge, Bladen 
County Recorder's Court, 1928-1933; Solicitor, 1937-1938. Demo- 
cratic Precinct Chairman about eight years; Chairman, Bladen 
County Democratic Executive Committee, 1939-1944; State Demo- 
cratic Executive Committee two years. Junior Order United Amer- 
ican Mechanics, Member Masonic Order. Rotary International, 
Past President Elizabethtown Club. State Senator in the General 



Biographical Sketches 405 

Assembly of 1945 and 1947. Presbyterian; President, Men's Bible 
Class; Deacon. Married Miss Mary Pitkin Thomas, June 1, 1927. 
Two children: Robert J. Hester, 3rd, age 19. Herbert Thomas 
Hester, age 2 years. Address: Elizabethtown, N. C. 

WILLIAM BRYAN HODGES 

(Thirty-second District — Counties: Haywood, Henderson, Jack- 
son, Polk and Transylvania. Two Senators.) 

William Bryan Hodges, Democrat, Senator from the Thirty-sec- 
ond Senatorial District, was born in Norfolk, Va., October 9, 
1900. Son of Samuel Thompson and Louisa (Kirk) Hodges. At- 
tended Blue Ridge School for boys, Hendersonville, 1916-1917; 
Davidson College, 1919-1920. Banker. President State Trust Co., 
Hendersonville. State Senator from the Thirty-second Senatorial 
District in the General Assembly of 1945. Methodist. Married Miss 
Elizabeth Carrigan, July 7, 1935. Address: Hendersonville, N. C. 

PAUL ERASTUS JONES 

(Fifth District — County: Pitt. One Senator.) 

Paul Erastus Jones, Democrat, Senator from the Fifth Sena- 
torial District, was born near Bethel, Pitt County, April 9, 1890. 
Son of Solomon Major and Gertrude (Whichard) Jones. Gradu- 
ated from Bethel High School, 1907. Attended Richmond College 
Virginia, one year; Medical College of Virginia, 1907, Doctor of 
Dental Surgery, 1910. Dentist and farmer. Member Pitt County 
Medical & Dental Society; American Dental Association, served 
as Delegate since 1931. Consultant, Fifth Trustee District to 
Committee on Legislation; member Fifth District of N. C. Dental 
Society, Secretary 1925-1926, President 1928. Member N. C. Dental 
Society, President 1930. Fellow of The American College of 
Dentists. Elected to N. C. State Board of Dental Examiners 1938, 
serving until 1947. Vice President American Association of Dental 
Examiners 1943 serving two terms, President 1946. Member 
Chamber of Commerce, President 1921. Director of The Bank of 
Farmville, 1921-1937. Member of Farm Bureau; Rotary Club; 
Local School Board (twenty-five years. Chairman five years) ; 
Pitt County Board of Education, 1944-1949; Pitt County Demo- 
cratic Executive Committee (Chairman seven years) ; State Dem- 



406 North Carolina Manual 

ocratic Executive Committee, 1945 until present. Appointed to 
N. C. Board of Health, 1944 (served four years). Mason; Royal 
Arch; .Kniohts Templer; Shrine; served through all Blue Lodge 
offices. Author of several Essays before the N. C. Dental Society, 
including a Presidential Address in 1931; Presidential Address 
to American Association of Dental Examiners in 1946. First 
Lieutenant World War I, June 30, 1918-March 15, 1919. Member 
Christian Church; Deacon ten years. Married Miss Vernice Lee 
Lang, October 22, 1913. Two children: Mrs. Charles M. Duke; 
Dr. Paul E. .Jones, Jr. One grandson. Address: 502 North Main 
St., Farmville, N. C. 

JOHN DAVIS LARKINS, JR. 

(Seventh District — Counties: Carteret, Craven, Greene, Jones, 
Lenoir, and Onslow. Two Senators.) 

John Davis Larkins, Jr., Democrat, Senator from the Seventh 
Senatorial District, was born in Morristown, Tennessee, June 8, 
1909. Son of John Davis and Emma (Cooper) Larkins. Attended 
public schools of Cedartown and Hazelhurst, Georgia, and Fay- 
etteville, N. C, Graduated Greensboro High School June 1925: 
B.A. Wake Forest 1929, Law 1930 Wake Forest College; Lawyer. 
Member N. C. Bar Association, American Bar Association, North 
Carolina State Bar, Inc., and Fifth District Bar; U. S. Concilia- 
tion Commissioner-Referee for Jones County 1934-1936. Sigma 
Delta Kappa, National Legal Fraternity, Alpha Pi Delta Social 
Fraternity, Junior Order United American Mechanics; Mason; 
Zion Lodge, No. 81, Trenton; Woodman of the World. Trenton 
Rotary Club; New Bern Consistory No. 3 Scottish Rite, Shriner, 
Sudan Temple, B.P.O.E. No. 764, State Senator Seventh District 
Special Session 1936; Regular Session 1937; Special Session 1938; 
Regular Session 1939; President pro tem of 1941 Senate; State 
Senator from the Seventh District in the General Assembly of 
1941, 1943; Served as Chairman State Constitutional Amendment 
Committee Campaign 1938. Chairman N. C. Jackson Day Com- 
mittee 1939-1940; President Eastern Carolina Chamber of Com- 
merce 1940; Secretary N. C. for Roosevelt Headquarters 1940. 
Appointed Kentucky Colonel by Gov. A. B. "Happy" Chandler 
1939. Third Congressional District Chairman Navy Day League 
1941-42 and Chairman Third Congressional District War Produc- 



Biographical Sketches 407 

tion Board Industrial Salva.9:e Committee. Delegate-at-Large to 
Democratic National Convention in Chicago 1940, District Delegate 
1944, and Alternate to Delegate-at-Large, Democratic National 
Convention in Philadelphia 1948, Member of Notification Com- 
mittee to notify the Vice-President of the U. S. 1944. Baptist. 
Deacon; Chairman Board Deacons, Superintendent Sunday School 
1930-1942, State Campaign Chairman N. C. Division of the Amer- 
ican Cancer Society 1947-48, Attorney for Atlantic and N. C. 
Railroad 1945-46. Private, U. S. Army, World War II, Past Ad- 
jutant and Past Conmiander American Legion Post No. 154, Tren- 
ton, N. C, Member La Societe 40 Et 8, Finance Director Demo- 
cratic Naticnal Committee for N. C. Campaign 1948, County 
Chairman Democratic Executive Committee for Jones County since 
1944. Married Miss Pauline Murrill, of Jacksonville, N. C, March 
15, 1930. Two childien: Emma Sue and Pauline, ages 17 and 14. 
Address: Trenton, N. C. 

ROBERT EUGENE LITTLE 

(Nineteenth District — Counties: Anson, Stanly and Union. Two 
Senators.) 

Robert Eugene Little, Democrat, Senator from the Nineteenth 
Senatorial District, was born in Wadesboro, Anson County, N. C, 
January 10, 1893. Son of Robert Eugene and Mary Austin (Ben- 
nett) Little. Attended Warrenton High School, 1906-1907; Bing- 
ham School, Asheville, from fall term of 1907 through fall term 
of 1908; Trinity Park School, Durham, spring of 1909; Bingham 
School, Asheville, fall 1909 through spring term of 1911; Univer- 
sity of North Carolina, 1911-1915; Wake Forest Law School sum- 
mer 1916. Licensed to practice law by the Supreme Court, August 
term, 1916. Lawyer and Farmer, Member North Carolina and 
American Bar Associations. Member Board of Trustees University 
of North Carolina. Clerk Superior Court Anson County, 1930-1942. 
Served in U. S. Army, September 5, 1918 to December 22, 1918. 
Discharged with rank of Sergeant. Mason. Kappa Sigma Frater- 
nity University North Carolina. State Senator in the General 
Assembly of 1945. Episcopalian. Married Miss Rosa Leak Parsons 
of Rockingham, N. C, October 14, 1926. Three children: Rosa 
Parsons Little, Mary Bennett Little, and Robeit Eugene Little, 
III. Address: Wadesboro, N. C. 



408 North Carolina Manual 



FLEMMIE D. LONG 



(Fourteenth District — Counties: Durham, Granville and Person. 
Two Senators.) 

Flemmie D. Long, Democrat, Senator from the Fourteenth Sen- 
atorial District, was born in Person County, N. C, May 3, 1881. 
Son of Daniel D. and Cora A. (Brooks) Long. Attended County 
Public Schools. Farmer, merchant and fertilizer dealer. Chair- 
man Board of County Commissioners 1932-1938. Senator in the 
General Assembly of 1941 and 1945. Primitive Baptist. Deacon and 
clerk of Church, and Moderator of the Association for twenty 
years. Married Miss Ida C. Tillman in 1905. Address: Roxboro, 
N. C, RFD. No. 1. 



WILLIAM FLYNT MARSHALL 

(Twenty-third District — Counties: Stokes and Surry. One 
Senator.) 

William Flynt Marshall, Democrat, Senator from the Twenty- 
third Senatorial District, was born at Walnut Cove, N. C, July 
16, 1900. Son of Albert Franklin and Nannie (Flynt) Marshall. 
Attended Walnut Cove High School and Commercial School. Lum- 
berman. Banker. President, Stokes Lumber Company, Walnut 
Cove; President, State Planters Bank, W'alnut Cove. Commissioner 
Town of Walnut Cove, 1933-1938, and served as Treasurer during 
that time. Representative from Stokes County in the General 
Assembly of 1939, 1943, and 1945; State Senator from the Twenty- 
third Senatorial District, 1941. Member Walnut Cove Lodge No. 
629, A.F. & A.M.; Oasis Temple Order Mystic Shrine. Baptist. 
Married Miss Iva Lee Isaacs, April 24, 1924. Two sons: William 
Flynt, Jr., and Joe Isaacs Marshall. Address: Walnut Cove, N. C. 



HENRY ALEXANDER McKINNON 

(Eleventh District — County: Robeson. One Senator.) 

Henry Alexander McKinnon, Democrat, Senator from the Elev- 
enth Senatorial District, was born in Maxton, N. C, September 
22, 1892. Son of Alexander James (Sandy) and Virginia Lee (Mc- 



Ri,;hardson of Union 
Rodman of Beaufort 
Rowe of Pender 



Shaw of Cumberland 
Simms of Wake 
Talton of Wayne 



Thomas of Hoke 
Vann of Sampson 
Walker of Randolph 



Ward of Craven 

Warlick of Catawba I 

Weathers of Cleveland 







Webb of Orange 

Whitley of Johnston 
Wilson of Caldwell 



Winslow of Perquimans 
Woodson of Rowan 

Byerly — Principal Clerk 



f 




410 North Carolina Manual 

Kinney) McKinnon. Attended Maxton Public Schools, 1899-1909; 
A.B. Degree Trinity College, 1912; Trinity Law School, 1912-1914, 
Lawyer. Member of Robeson County Bar Association, Vice-Presi- 
dent at present time; American Bar Association. Director of 
Scottish Bank, Member Kiwanis Club, Lumberton, North Caro- 
lina; Mormax Club, Maxton, North Carolina; American Legion; 
Veterans of Foreign Wars. Past-President of Robeson County 
Club. Mayor of Maxton, N. C, 1922-1924; formerly member of 
Robeson County Board of Education; formerly Chairman 7th 
Congressional District Young Peoples Club; formerly Chairman 
of Robeson County Executive Committee; formerly on State Demo- 
cratic Platform Committee. Present Attorney for Robeson County; 
Attorney for the Town of Maxton; member of General Statutes 
Commission. Entered the armed forces July 1917 as a Private and 
was discharged as 1st Lieutenant December 1918. Alpha Tau 
Omega College Fraternity. Mason. State Senator from the Elev- 
enth District in the General Assembly of 1947. Methodist. Member 
of Board of Stewards of Chestnut Street Methodist Church in 
Lumberton. Married Miss Margaret Borden, November 3, 1920. 
Three children: Henry Alexander McKinnon, Jr.; Arnold Borden 
McKinnon; John Borden McKinnon. Address: Lumberton. N. C. 



OTWAY BINNS MOSS 

(Sixth District — Counties: Franklin, Nash and Wilson. Two 
Senators.) 

Otway Binns Moss, Democrat, Senator from the Sixth Sena- 
torial District, was born in Wilson, October 20, 1890. Son of Ver- 
non F. and Loula A. (Binns) Moss. Attended Wilson graded 
schools; LL.B. Wake Forest, 1913. Lawyer. Vice Recorder, Nash 
County Court, 1916-1922. Town Attorney Spring Hope, 1919-1946. 
Supervisor Census Fourth Congressional District, 1919-1920. Mem- 
ber School Board, 1919-1922. Chairman School Board, 1938-1943. 
Chairman Nash County Democratic Executive Committee, 1936- 
1946. Member State Democratic Executive Committee 1942-1946. 
State Senator in the General Assembly of 1923, 1925 and 1947; 
Representative, 1927, 1929, 1931 and 1933. Mason; Past Master 
Spring Hope Lodge; Shriner, Sudan Temple. Baptist. Superinten- 



Biographical Sketches 411 

dent Sunday School, 1920; Teacher Men's Bible Class, 1929-1932, 
1936-1946. Chairman Sub-Committee to render free legal service 
under Soldiers and Sailors Civil Relief Act 1941-1946. Chairman 
Nash County O. P. A. Enforcement Panel, 1944-1946; Nash County 
Member of Committee on Legal Aid Work 1944-1946; Past Presi- 
dent Nash County Bar Association 1946-1947, Member State Bar 
Association and North Carolina State Bar, Member American 
Bar Association. Married Miss Dolly Edwards, June 2, 1915; 
Three children. Address: Spring Hope, N. C. 



LEE BURRUS NICHOLS 

(Thirty-third District — Counties: Cherokee, Clay, Graham, Ma- 
con, and SM^ain. One Senator.) 

Lee Burrus Nichols, Democrat, Senator from the Thirty-third 
Senatorial District, was born at Sparta, N. C. Son of Richard 
Marion and Rosa (Cheek) Nichols. Attended Glade Valley School 
1912-1915; Davidson College, A.B. Degree, 1920; University 
Besancon, Besancon, France, 1919; University of North Carolina, 
1920-1921; University of California, 1922. Merchant. Member, 
Andrews Town Council, 1926-1928; Chairman, Cherokee County 
Board of Commissioners, 1932-1934; Chairman, Andrews School 
Board, 1938-1948; Principal, Andrews High School, 1920-1927. 
Member, Andrews Rotary Club, 1928-1948, President, 1932; Direc- 
tor for many years. Sergeant, 81st "Wild Cat" Division, 1917-1919. 
Member American Legion, Leslie Stillman Post 97 since organiza- 
tion; Commander Post, 1931. Presbyterian; Elder in Presbyterian 
Church, 27 years; Superintendent of Sunday School for 25 years. 
Married Miss Gene Candler, 1922. One son: L. B. Nichols, Jr. 
Address: Andrews, N. C. 



FRANK M. PARKER 

(Thirty -first District — County: Buncombe. One Senator.) 

Frank M. Parker, Democrat, Senator from the Thirty-first Sen- 
atorial District, was born in Asheville, N. C, August 25, 1912. 
Son of Haywood and Josie B. (Patton) Parker. Attended Public 
Schools of Asheville; University of Noi'th Carolina, A.B., 1934; 



412 North Carolina Manual 

LL.B., 1936. Attorney. Member of Buncombe County Bar Associa- 
tion; North Carolina Bar Association. Member of Phi Delta Phi 
(Leg-al Fraternity) ; Phi ,Kappa Sigma; Order of the Coif, 1936. 
S/Sgt. in the United States Army, January 17, 1944-September 
30, 1945. State Senator from the Thirty-first Senatorial District 
in the General Assembly of 1947. Episcopalian. Married Miss 
Dorothy G. Acee, May 18, 1940. Four children: Martha Elizabeth 
Parker, Dorothy Patton Parker, Mary Taylor Parker, Frank M. 
Parker, Jr. Address: 65 Edgemont Road, Asheville, N. C. 



EDWIN PATE 

(Eighteenth District — Counties: Davidson, Montgomery, Rich- 
mond and Scotland. Two Senators.) 

Edwin Pate, Democrat, Senator from the Eighteenth Senatorial 
District, was born in Laurel Hill, N. C, April 16, 1898. Son of 
Z. V. and Sallie (McNair) Pate. Attended North Carolina State 
College, B.S. 1921. Mex-chant, Farmer, and Banker. Senator in the 
General Assembly of 1941 and 1945. Presbyterian. Married Miss 
Marie Whitaker, October 20, 1921. Two children, one boy and one 
girl. Address : Laurinburg, N. C. 



GEORGE T. PENNY 

(Seventeenth District — County: Guilford. One Senator.) 

George T. Penny, Democrat, Senator from the Seventeenth Sen- 
atorial District, was born in Guilford County, N. C. Son of Mark 
and Clementine (Wright) Penny. Attended school at Randleman, 
N. C, 1884-1891. Realtor and Auctioneer. Member Real Estate 
Board and Chamber of Commerce of Greensboro. Past Exalted 
Ruler, Benevolent Protective Order of Elks, 1941-1942. State 
Senator in the General Assembly of 1945 and 1947. Methodist; 
Chairman, Board of Trustees of Grace Methodist Church. Married 
Miss Lena Welch, September 20, 1906. One daughter (deceased). 
Address: JeflFerson Square, Greensboro, N. C. 



Biographical Sketches 413 

HENRY BAKER PERRY 

(Twenty-ninth Distiict — Counties: Alleghany, Ashe, and Wa- 
tauga. One Senator.) 

Henry Baker Perry, Democrat, Senator from the Twenty-ninth 
Senatorial District, was born at Sugar Grove, N. C, September 
1, 1879. Son of John Kenedy and Sarah Louise (Dougherty) 
Perry. Attended Public Schools of Watauga County; Boone High 
School, 1899-1902; University of North Carolina, 1902-1903; Medi- 
cal School; North Carolina Medical College, 1905, M.D. Practicing 
Physician. Member of Ashe-Watauga Medical Society, President, 
1948; Medical Society of North Carolina; American Medical Asso- 
ciati n. Member of Board of Aldermen, Town of Boone, N. C, 
1929-1935. Served on Local Board of Watauga County as Medical 
Examiner, 1917-1919. Baptist. Married Miss Doris L. Taylor, 
September 2, 1909. Two children: Gertrude V. Perry, H. B. Perry, 
Jr. Address: Boone, N. C. 



CHARLES AUGUSTUS PETERSON 

(Thirtieth District — Counties: Avery, Madison, Mitchell, and 
Yancey. One Senator.) 

Charles Augustus Peterson, Republican, Senator from the Thir- 
tieth Senatorial Distiict, was born in Relief, N. C, October 1, 
1882. Son of Solomon and Julia (Edwards) Peterson. Attended 
Mitchell County Schools and Dwight Institute, Erwin, Tenn. M.D. 
North Carolina Medical College, 1907; Post-graduate Course, New 
York 1910; Tulane University 1922. Physician. Member Mitchell 
County, Tenth District and North Carolina Medical societies; 
Southern and American Medical Association; Ex-President 
Mitchell County Medical Association and Ex-Vice-President Tenth 
District Association. Examiner for local Draft Board; Local Sur- 
geon for C. C. and 0. R. R. Representative from Mitchell County 
in the General Assembly of 1923, 1935, and 1945. Senator from the 
Thirtieth Senatorial District, 1941. U. S. Pension Examiner. 
Member Vesper Lodge No. 554 A.F. and A.M., Bald Creek Chapter 
No. 56; Cyrene Commandery No. 5; Oasis Temple A.A.O.N.M.S. 
and Knights of Pythias; Past Master Vesper Lodge. Married 
Miss Norene McCall in 1908. Address: Spruce Pine, N. C. 



414 North Carolina Manual 



WADE HAMPTON PHILLIPS 



(Eighteenth District — Counties: Davidson, Montgomery, Rich- 
mond, and Scotland. Two Senatoi's.) 

Wade Hampton Phillips, Democrat, Senator from the Eighteenth 
Senatorial District, was born at Yadkin College, N. C, July 7, 
1879. Son of H. T. and Linnie (Robbins) Phillips. Received 
academic education at Yadkin College, N. C, 1889-1890. B.S., 
Erskine College, Due West, S. C, 1900. Law School of the Univer- 
sity of North Carolina, summer of 1904. Lawyer. Chairman, 
Davidson County Democratic Committee, 1906-1910. Deputy 
Superior Court Clerk, Davidson County, 1900-1904. Captain Lex- 
ington Rifles, Company A, Third Infantry, North Carolina Na- 
tional Guard. State Senator from the Twenty-third Senatorial 
District in the General Assembly of 1913. Major 120th Inf. N. C. 
National Guaixl Mexican Border 1916-1917. Judge Advocate's De- 
partment AEF 1917-1919. National Committee American Legion 
1921-1922. Department Commander American Legion 1924. Direc- 
tor N. C. Department Conservation & Development 1925-1929. 
Commander Lexington Company N. C. State Guard 1941-43. Ma- 
jor and Judge Advocate State Guard 1943-1945. Chairman David- 
son County Board of Elections 1946-1947. Past President Lexington 
Rotary Club. Partner law firm of Phillips & Bower. Married Miss 
Ora Huckabee. Five children and five grand-children. Address: 
Lexington, N. C. 



JAMES CARLTON PITTMAN 

(Thirteenth District — Counties: Chatham, Lee and Wake. Two 
Senators.) 

James Carlton Pittman, Democrat, Senator from the Thirteenth 
Senatorial District, was born in Gates County, N. C, Febi'uary 
25, 1900. Son of T. T. and Stella M. (Howell) Pittman. Attended 
Reynoldson High School, Gates, N. C, 1912-1916. LL.B., Univer- 
sity of North Carolina 1921. Lawyer. Member Lee County, Fourth 
District and North Carolina Bar Associations. Chairman Board of 
Elections, Lee County 1928; Judge Recorder's Court 1928; Attor- 
ney for town of Sanford 1927-1935, 1941-45. State Senator from 
the Thirteenth District in the General Assembly of 1937, 1941, and 



Biographical Sketches 415 

1945. County Attoiney for Lee County 1936-1940. President San- 
ford Kiwanis Club and Lieutenant Governor of Kiwanis Interna- 
tional, Sixth Division of the Carolinas Division; President Sanford 
Business Men's Association. Member Sigma Phi Epsilon, Social 
Fraternity. Elk. Baptist. Married Miss Hazel Faircloth, April 11, 
1925. Two boys: John T. and William B. Pittman. Address: San- 
ford, N. C. 



JOHN HAMPTON PRICE 

(Fiffeevth District — Counties: Caswell and Rockingham. One 
Senator.) 

John Hampton Price, Democrat, Senator from the Fifteenth 
Senatorial District, was born in Rockingham County, November 
20, 1899. Son of Robert B. and Hallie (McCabe) Price. Gradu- 
ated from Washington and Lee University 1924, with degree of 
LL.B., Attorney at law. Member Rockingham County Bar Asso- 
citation, North Carolina Bar Association. Councilor Twenty-first 
Judicial District, North Carolina State Bar. Senator from the 
Seventeenth District in 1939 and 1941; from the Fifteenth District 
in 1943 and 1945; President Pro Tem of the 1943 Senate. Mason. 
Sons of American Revolution; Rotarian; member Lambda Chi 
Alpha Fraternity. Methodist. Married Miss Sallie Hester Lane, 
May 2, 1929. Address: Leaksville, N. C. 



RUFUS GRADY RANKIN 

(Twenty-Sixth District — County: Gaston. One Senator.) 

Rufus Grady Rankin, Democrat, Senator from the Twenty- 
Sixth Senatorial District, was born at Belmont, February 25, 
1891. Son of Rufus Pinkney and Zoe (Hand) Rankin. Graduated 
from Gastonia High School, 1906; attended University of North 
Carolina, 1906-1909. President of Superior Yarn Mills, Mount 
Holly, N. C. State Senator from the Twenty-sixth Senatorial Dis- 
trict in the General Assembly of 1931, 1933 and 1947. Member of 
North Carolina Budget Commission 1931-1935. Member North 
Carolina Unemployment Compensation Commission 1943-1946. 
Member Board of Gaston County Commissioners, 1919-1925. Ma- 



410 North Carolina Manual 

son, including Blue Lodge, Chapter, Commandery, Scottish Rite, 
Shrine; Methodist; Steward. Married Miss Ruth Boyce, January 
13, 1913. Four children: R. G. Rankin, Jr.; David H. Rankin; 
George Mason Rankin; Mrs. Anna Rankin Lineberger; four 
grandchildren. Address: Gastonia, N. C. 



OSCAR LEONARD RICHARDSON 

(Nineteenth District — Counties: Anson, Stanly and Union. Two 
Senators.) 

Oscar Leonard Richardson, Democrat, Senator from the Nine- 
teenth Senatorial District, was born February 25, 1896. Son of 
Pinckney V. and Chloe J. (Lathan) Richardson. Graduate of 
Monroe High School; graduate of Trinity College, Durham, N. C; 
A.B., 1921; post graduate work at University of North Carolina; 
Trinity College Law School, 1922-1924. Lawyer. Member North 
Carolina State Bar and American Bar Associations. Clerk Su- 
perior Court of Union County, 1925-1934. Veteran of World War 
I; Foreign service 1917-1919; Member American Legion. Repre- 
sentative from Union County in General Assembly of 1939, 1941 
and 1943; Speaker, 1945; State Senator from the Nineteenth Dis- 
trict in the General Assembly of 1947. Methodist. Married Dec- 
ember 6, 1930 to Miss Sara Cowan. Two children: Sara Louise 
and O. L. Richardson, Jr. Address: Waxhaw Road, Monroe, N. C. 



JOHN CROOM RODMAN 

(Second District — Counties: Beaufort, Dare, Hyde, Mai'tin, 
Pamlico, Tyrrell and Washington. Two Senators.) 

John Croom Rodman, Democrat, Senator from the Second Sen- 
atorial District, born Washington, N. C, October 24, 1906. Son 
of Dr. John C. and Olzie W. (Clark) Rodman. Attended Fish- 
burne Military School, 1922-1924; University of North Carolina, 
Class '28. Secretary N. C. Young Democratic Clubs 1933; Na- 
tional Committeeman 1934. Lawyer. Member American Bar Asso- 
ciation; North Carolina Bar Association (Chairman Executive 
Committee 1941, Vice President 1946, President 1947) ; President 
First Judicial District Bar 1947; Democratic Nominee State 
Senate, Second District, 1942 (resigned prior to election to enter 



Biographical Sketches 417 

military service). Lt. (jg-.) USNR 1942; Lieut. 1944; Lt. Cmdr. 
1946; Commanding- Officer USS SC 732, 18 months, Pacific Area; 
Navigator USS BRAXTON (APA 138), 12 months, Pacific Area. 
Elk. Rotarian (President Washington Club 1934). President Wash- 
ington Chamber of Commerce, 1947-48. Episcopalian; Vestryman, 
St. Peter's Church, Washington. Married Miss Elizabeth Mixon, 
January 15, 1930. Address: Washington, N. C. 



ROY ROWE 

(Ninth District — Counties: Duplin, New Hanover, Pender and 
Sampson. Two Senators. 

Roy Rowe, Democrat, Senator from the Ninth Senatorial Dis- 
trict, born in Burgaw, N. C, May 29, 1905. Son of Nicholas Henry 
and Mary Belle (King) Rowe. Attended Carolina Industrial School, 
Pender County 1911-1920; Vanceboro Farm Life School 1920-1923; 
University of North Carolina from time to time from 1923-1931 ; 
Theatre Manager School, New York City 1931. Theatre owner and 
operator; Farmer. President, Theatre Owners of North and South 
Carolina (1934-1944), President Carolina Aero Club (1942-1944), 
Major (1944-1947) in North Carolina Wing of Civil Air Patrol. 
Licensed to operate private aircraft; Mason, King Solomon's 
Lodge 138, Burgaw; State Senator from the Ninth District in 
1937, 1941, and 1945. Member House of Representatives 1943; 
Chairman N. C. Aeronautics Commission (1943-1949). Unitarian 
and Universalist. Married Miss Nina Lavinia Worsley of Mays- 
ville, February 22, 1929. Two children : Tonia Rowe, and Roy 
Rowe, Jr. Address: Burgaw, N. C. 



GILBERT AVERY SHAW 

(Tenth District — Counties: Bladen, Brunswick, Columbus, and 
Cumberland. Two Senators.) 

Gilbert Avery Shaw, Democrat, Senator from the Tenth Sena- 
torial District, was born at Fayetteville, N. C, November 7, 1900. 
Son of John Gilbert and Lizzie Avery (MacPherson) Shaw. Gra- 
duated from Fayetteville High School, 1918; attended Davidson 
College, 1918-1920; Law School, University of North Carolina. 



418 North Carolina Manual 

Attorney at Law. Inducted into U.S. Army September 1942 and 
released from active duty with rank of Captain, February, 1946. 
Presbyterian, Address: Fayetteville, N. C. 

ROBERT NIRWANA SIMMS, JR. 

(Thirteenth District — Counties: Chatham, Lee and Wake. Two 
Senators.) 

Robert Nirwana Simms, Jr., Democrat, Senator from the Thir- 
teenth Senatorial District, was born at Raleigh, N. C, April 28, 
1910. Son of Robert Nirwana, Sr. and Virginia Adelaide (Eger- 
ton) Simms. Graduated from Hugh Morson High School, 1926; 
Wake Forest College, B.A. (Civics), 1930; Law School of Wake 
Forest College, 1929-1931. Lawyer, Licensed, 1931. Member Amer- 
ican State and County Bar Associations; President, Wake County 
Junior Bar Association, 1936. Member of the Raleigh Chamber of 
Commerce; Director, 1941-1942; President Raleigh Junior Cham- 
ber of Commerce, 1941-1942; (also formerly its First Vice-Presi- 
dent, Treasurer, and, for several different terms, local director) ; 
State Director, N. C. Junior Chamber of Commerce (several 
terms); Director, Raleigh Community Chest, 1941; Charter mem- 
ber and first Treasurer, Wake County Young Democratic Club; 
Member of the Kiwanis Club of Raleigh; Director, 1942; Raleigh 
Torch Club, International President, 1939; American Legion Post 
No. 1, Raleigh; Member of the Omicron Delta Kappa; Pi Kappa 
Delta; The Sphinx Club of Raleigh. Member of First Baptist 
Church; Deacon, 1942 to date of voluntaiy enlistment in Armed 
Services, and 1946-1950; Superintendent of Adult Department, 
1941 ; General Superintendent of Sunday School, 1942 to date of 
enlistment in Armed Services; Teacher of College Class, 1946 to 
date. Superintendent of Young People's Department, Tabernacle 
Baptist Church; Deacon, 1933-1940; Clerk of Deacons several 
years. Senator from the Thirteenth Senatorial Disti'ict in the 
General Assembly of 1947. 1st Lieutenant, United States Marine 
Corps Reserve, July 7, 1944 to December 8, 1945, Active duty. Co- 
author, "North Carolina Manual of Law and Forms" (Ninth 
Edition) 1938. Married Miss Florence Helen Briggs, December 
14, 1935. Two daughters: Virginia Egerton Simms and Helen 
Florence Simms. Adress: 1105 Harvey Street, Raleigh, N. C. 



Biographical Sketches 419 

HARDY TALTON 

(Eighth District — Counties: Johnston, and Wayne. Two Sena- 
tors.) 

Hai'dy Talton, Democrat, Senator from the Eighth Senatorial 
District, was born at Pikeville, N. C, August 18, 1900. Son of 
Mack DufRe and Rebecca (Pike) Talton. Attended Gurley School, 
Wayne County, 1906-1913; Kenly High School, 1914-1915. Tobac- 
conist and Farmer. Member, Harmony Masonic Lodge, No. 340, 
Master, 1943-1944; J.O.U.A.M. No. 312, Councilor, 1936 and 1948; 
District Councilor, 28th District, 1946; Grange No. 964, Master, 
1939-1948; Master of Wayne Pomona Grange No. 38, 1943-1948. 
Member of Pleasant Grove F.W.B.; Member of Board of Ruling 
Elders, 1932-1948; Teacher, 1927-1948. Married Miss Mildred 
Roberts, December 21, 1921. One daughter: Mary Ellen, age 19. 
Address: Route 2, Pikeville, N. C. 



JAMES BENTON THOMAS 

(Twelfth District — Counties: Harnett, Hoke, Moore, and Ran- 
dolph. Two Senators.) 

James Benton Thomas, Democrat, Senator from the Twelfth 
Senatorial District, was born in Scotland County, N. C, July 4, 
1892. Son of James Crawford and Rena (Benton) Thomas. Grad- 
uated from Ellerbe Springs School, 1900; attended Raeford Insti- 
tute. 1901-1909; Student of University of North Carolina, 1909- 
1010; graduated from Kings Business College, 1911. Farmer. Sec- 
Treas. Hoke Oil & Fertilizer Company for thirty years, now Vice 
President; Vice President McLauchlin Company; Sec.-Treas. Hoke 
Cotton Warehouse Company; Sec.-Treas. Colonial Frozen Foods, 
Inc.: Director, Bank of Raeford, Raeford Power & Manufactur- 
ing Company, Upchurch Milling Company. Past President, Rae- 
ford Kiwanis Club and N. C. Cottonseed Crushers Association. 
Deles-ate member, National Cotton Council. Member County Board 
of Education; Town Alderman; Chairman of Hoke County Dem- 
ocratic Executive Committee for twelve years. Mason; Shriner, 
Past President Raeford Shrine Club. 1st Lieutenant, N. C. Na- 
tional Guard before World War T; During World War U, served 
for four years as member County Rationing Board; Chairman 



420 North Carolina Manual 

County Salvage Board. Methodist. Trustee. Married Miss Kate 
Shaw, June 22, 1916. Two daughters: Mrs. Julian McLeod, Mrs. 
Robert E. Foreman. Address: Raeford, N. C. 



HENRY VANN 

(Ninth District — Counties: Duplin, New Hanover, Pender and 
Sampson. Two Senators.) 

Henry Van, Democrat, Senator from the Ninth Senatorial Dis- 
trict, was born in Sampson County, N. C. February 10, 1892. Son 
of Arthur and Portia (McPhail) Vann. Attended County Gram- 
mar School, 1898-1906; Salemburg High School, 1907-1908; Oak 
Ridge Auto Mechanic School, 1909-1910. Farmer, Auto Dealer; 
Theatre Owner and Operator. President Sampson Cotton Storage 
Warehouse, 1926-1945. Mayor of Clinton, 1925-1929. Mason. Mem- 
ber Hiram Lodge, No. 98, Clinton, N. C; Thirty-second degree 
'Masonry Wilmington Consistory; Sudan Temple, A.A.O.N.M. 
Shrine, New Bern, N. C. State Senator from the Ninth District 
in the General Assembly of 1945. Married Miss Beulah Madge 
Williamson, August 21, 1915. One daughter: Mrs. Claire Louise 
Vann Austin. Address: Clinton, N. C. 

HAL HAMMER WALKER 

(Tivelfth District — Counties: Harnett, Hoke, Moore, and Ran- 
dolph. Two Senators.) 

Hal Hammer Walker, Democrat, Senator from the Twelfth 
Senatorial District was born in Randolph County, July 21, 1918. 
Son of Hal Worth and Harriette (Hammer) Walker. Attended 
Christ School, Arden, N. C, 1933; University of North Carolina, 
1934-1941, A.B., LL.B. Degrees. Lawyer. Member of Randolph 
County Bar Association; N. C. Bar Association. Member Kappa 
Alpha & Phi Delta Phi (Le^-al) Fraternities. Mason, Balfour 
Lodge No. 188, A.F. and A.M.; B.P.O. Elks. Lieutenant Com- 
mander, U. S. Navy, 1941-1945 (Active Duty). Member, American 
Legion; 40 & 8; V.F.W. Methodist; Board of Stewards. Married 
Miss Edith Elizabeth Milks, March 1, 1941. Three children: Eliza- 
beth Hardy Walker, Martha Ann Walker, and Hal Hammer Wal- 
ker, Jr. Address: Asheboro, N. C. 



Biographical Sketches 421 

DAVID LIVINGSTONE WARD 

(Seventh District — Counties: Carteret, Craven, Greene, Jones, 
Lenoir and Onslow. Two Senators.) 

David Livingstone Ward, Democrat, Senator from the Seventh 
Senatorial District, was born in New Bern, N. C. June 1903. Son 
of D. L. and Carrie Louise Ward. Attended New Bern Public 
School; University of North Carolina, 1920-1924, A.B.; Wake 
Forest Law School. 1924-1926. Lawyer. County Solicitor, 1928- 
1930; State Board Conservation and Development, 1930-1937. 
Member of Elks, Junior Order. Member of American, North Car- 
olina and Craven County Bar Associations. Representative in the 
General Assembly of 1935, 1937, 1939, 1941, and 1943. Speaker 
of the House 1939. State Senator in the General Assembly of 
1945, and 1947. Secretary, State Democratic Committee, 1936- 
1940; State Gasoline Legislative Committee, 1936; State Advisory 
Budget Commision, 1937-1938; State Division Purchase and Con- 
tract, 1937-1938; the Interstate Commission on Crime, 1940. Dele- 
gate to the National Democratic Convention, 1936 and 1940. Assist- 
ant Secretary of National Democratic Convention 1944. Delegate 
at Large National Democratic Convention 1948. Episcopalian. 
Married Miss Leah Duval Jones, New Bern, N. C, December 10, 
1932. Two sons: D. L. Ward, Jr., born July 23, 1935 and John A. 
J. Ward, born December 9, 1944. Address: 95 East Front Street, 
New Bern, N. C. 



GEORGE ANDREW WARLICK 

(Twenty-fifth District — Counties: Catawba, Iredell, and Lincoln. 
Two Senators.) 

George Andrew Warlick, Democrat, Senator from the Twenty- 
fifth Senatorial District, was born at Newton, N. C, January 27, 
1894. Son of George Andrew and Lillie (Gill) Warlick. Graduated 
from Newton High School, 1909; Trinity Park School, 1910; 
Trinity College, now Duke University, 1913, A.B. Degree; Law 
School, Duke University, 1916, LL.B. Degree. Lawyer. Treasurer, 
Newton School Unit, 1921-1926; Catawba County Veterans 
Service Officer, 1945 to present. Member of Pi Kappa Alpha 
(Social fraternity) ; Omicron Delta Kappa (National Leadership 



422 North Carolina Manual 

fraternity). Member of Catawba Lodge 248 Ancient Free and 
Accepted Masons; Master, Newton Masonic Lodge, 1922, 1923, 
1924; Newton Kiwanis Club, President, 1947; Post 16, American 
Legion, Post Commander, 1920, 1921, 1922, 1932, 1947, 1948; 
Voiture 915, 40 & 8, Chef de train, 1947; Post 5305, Veterans of 
Foreign Wars, Vice Commander, 1947-1948. Captain, Fourth In- 
fantry Division, AEF, May 15, 1917-September 5, 1919; Major, 
Inf. Res. Corps, January 1, 1920-January 1, 1930; 1st Sgt. 291st 
Base Military Police, ETO, November 20, 1942-July 30, 1945. 
Methodist; Board of Stewards, 1946 to present; Teacher, Senior 
Men's Bible Class, 1945 to present. Married Miss Marion Hol- 
lingsworth (deceased), October 1, 1921. Three sons: George 
Andrpw Warlick, Jr., William Lee Warlick, Harry Eli Warlick. 
Address: 313 West Sixth Street, Newton, N. C. 



LEE B. WEATHERS 

(Twenty-seventh District — Counties: Cleveland, McDowell and 
Rutherford. Two Senators.) 

Lee B. Weathers, Democrat, Senator from the Twenty-seventh 
Senatorial District, was born in Shelby, N. C, September 15, 1886. 
Son of A. P. and Octavia (Nolan) Weathers. Attended Shelby 
Public Schools and Shelby High School. B.A., Wake Forest Col- 
lege, 1908. Editor and Publisher Shelby Daily Star. Member North 
Carolina Press and Southern Newspaper Publishers Associations; 
President North Carolina Press Association, 1928-1929. Prepared 
copy for Cleveland County Centennial Edition of Shelby Daily 
Star in 1940 which embraced history of Cleveland County. Direc- 
tor First National Bank and Vice President Cleveland Building 
and Loan Association. Secretary-Treasurer N. C. Railroad Com- 
mission, one year. Member State Board of Conservation and De- 
velopment, 1943-1944. Senator in the General Assembly of 1943, 
1945 and 1947. Mason. Baptist. Married Mrs. Breta N. Clary, 
of Roxboro. Children: Henry L. Weathers, and Miss Pearl 
Weathers. Address: Shelby, N. C. 



Biographical Sketches 423 



JAMES WEBB 



(Sixteenth District — Counties: Alamance and Orange. One Sen-^ 
ator.) 

James Webb, Democrat, Senator from the Sixteenth Senatorial 
District, was born in Hillsboro, N. C, November 28, 1904. Son of 
James H. and Annie Hudgins (Bond) Webb. Attended Misses 
Heartt's Private School, Hillsboro, N. C, 1910-1920; Fishburne 
Military School, Waynesboro, Va., 1921-1922; University of NoYth 
Carolina, 1926, B.S. in Commerce. President, Eno Cotton Mills, 
Hillsboro, N. C. Member of Alpha Tau Omega Fraternity. Mas-on. 
State Senator from the Sixteenth District in the General Assem- 
bly of 1947. Episcopalian; Vestryman. Married Miss Margaret 
Denson Raney, December 3, 1930. Four children. Address: Hills- 
boro, N. C. 



ADAM JACKSON WHITLEY, JR. 

(Eighth District — Counties : Johnston and Wayne. Two Sena- 
tors.) 

Adam Jackson Whitley, Jr., Democrat, Senator from the Eighth 
Senatorial District, was born in Johnston County, N. C, April 
14, 1894. Son of Adam Jackson and Abigail (Casey) Whitley. At- 
tended Smithfield Grammar and High School, 1901-1914; N. C. 
State College, 1915-1917. Farmer and Operator of Bulk Milk 
Plant. Member Smithfield Chamber of Commerce; Junior Order; 
Mason. Chairman, Democratic Executive Committee, 1945-1947; 
Precinct Committeeman, 1939-1945. Served as a Sergeant in 
World War I, 1917-1918. Baptist; Deacon, 1927-1948; Chairman, 
Board of Deacons, 1929-1948; Moderator of Johnston Baptist Asso- 
ciation, 1936-1948. Married Miss Florence Elizabeth Lassiter, 
February 14, 1923. Three children: Adam J. Whitley, III; Dennis 
Whitley; Leah Lassiter Whitley. Address: Smithfield, N. C, Route 
One. 



424 North Carolina Manual 

MAX C. WILSON 

(Twenty-eighth District — Counties: Alexander, Burke, and Cald- 
well. One Senator.) 

Max C. Wilson, Democrat, Senator from the Twenty-eighth 
Senatorial District, was born at Burnsville, N. C, July 3, 1904. 
Son of H. T. and Sevilla (Blankenship) Wilson. Attended Char- 
lotte University, 1922-1924; Wake Forest College, 1924-1925; 
Duke University, 1925-1930; A.B., 1930; LL.B. 1930. Lawyer. 
Member, Caldwell County Bar Association, North Carolina and 
American Bar Associations. Solicitor, Caldwell County Recorder's 
Court, 1934-1940; Chairman Caldwell County Democratic Execu- 
tive Committee, 1940-1946. Mason. Knights of Pythias, Loyal 
Order of Moose, B.O.O.E., LO.O.F., Sigma Nu, Sigma Nu Phi 
(Legal Fraternity). State Senator in the General Assembly of 
1943; Representative from Caldwell County in the General Assem- 
bly of 1947. Methodist. Married Miss Flossie Pulliam, August 7, 
1934. Two children: Sevilla Ann, age eight, and Max C, Jr., age 
five. Address: Lenoir, N. C. 



JULIAN EMMETT WINSLOW 

(First District — Counties: Bertie, Camden, Chowan, Currituck, 
Gates, Hertford, Pasquotank, and Perquimans. Two Senators.) 

Julian Emmett Winslow, Democrat, Senator from the First 
Senatorial District was born at Winfall, N. C, February 14, 1897. 
Son of Charles Cook and Martha (Leigh) Winslow. Attended 
Hertford High School and St. Paul's School. Oil jobber and mer- 
chant. Member North Carolina's Oil Jobbers Association; North 
Carolina Hardware Dealers Association; North Carolina Mer- 
chants Association. Sheriff, Perquimans County, 1932-1946. Con- 
gressional Committee Member, 1937-1949. Mason (32nd Degree) ; 
Shriner Sudan Temple. Second Lieutenant, U. S. Air Corps 
(Pilot), December 1917-October 1919; Second Lieutenant, U.S. 
Reserve Army Air Corps, October 1919-October 1924. Episcopa- 
lian; Member of Vestry. Married Miss Mary Clarke, 1926. Two 
children: Betty Randolph Winslow, Julian Emmett Winslow, Jr. 
Adress: Hertford, N. C. 



Biographical Sketches 425 



NELSON WOODSON 

(Twenty-first District — Counties: Cabarrus and Rowan. Two 
Senators.) 

Nelson Woodson, Democrat, Senator from the Twenty-first Sen- 
atorial District, was born at Salisbury, N. C, March 26, 1909. 
Son of Walter H. and Pauline (Bernhardt) Woodson. Attended 
Salisbury High School, 1921-1925; University of North Carolina, 
1929, A.B. Degree; University of North Carolina Law School, 
1932, LL.B. Degree. Attorney at Law. Member of Rowan County 
Bar Association ; North Carolina Bar Association ; American Bar 
Association. Partner, Woodson & Woodson, Attorneys. Served in 
the U. S. Army, 1942-1946; 77th Infantry Division in the Pacific; 
discharged as Captain. Episcopalian ; Member of Vestry. Married 
Miss Holt Whittle, October 19, 1946. Address: 225 South Fulton 
Street, Salisbury, N. C. 



REPRESENTATIVES 

KERR CRAIGE RAMSAY 

SPEAKER 

Kerr Craige Ramsay, Democrat, Representative from Rowan 
County, was born in Salisbury, N. C, July 23, 1911. Son of John 
E. and Elizabeth Erwin (Craige) Ramsay. Graduated from Salis- 
bury High School, 1927. A.B., University of North Carolina, 1931; 
University of North Carolina Law School, 1931-1932; Yale Uni- 
versity Law School, 1932-1934; LL.B., Yale University, 1934. 
Lawyer. Member Rowan County, Forsyth County, North Carolina 
and American Bar Associations. President, Salisbury Junior 
Chamber of Commerce, 1939-1940. Trustee and Secretary Rowan 
Memorial Hospital since 1937. Member N. C. Advisory Budget 
Commission, 1947-1949; Alternate Delegate at Large, Democratic 
National Convention, 1948. Rotarian. Phi Bet Kappa; Sigma Nu. 
Representative from Rowan County in the General Assembly, 1941, 
1943, 1945 and 1947. Rowan County Attorney since 1943. Presby- 
terian; Deacon since 1936. Married Miss Eleanor Walton Newman, 
June 26, 1940. One daughter: Eleanor Newman Ramsay, born 
March 26, 1941. Address: Salisbury, N. C. 



HUGH QUINCY ALEXANDER 

Hugh Quincy Alexander, Democrat, Representative from Cabar- 
rus County, was born in Glendon, N. C, August 7, 1911. Son of 
O. S. and Mary Belle (Reynolds) Alexander. Attended Goldston 
Grammar School, 1918-1925; West Durham High School, 1925- 
1928; Durham High School, 1928-1929; Duke University, 1929- 
1932; University of North Carolina Law School, 1934-1937, LL.B. 
Lawyer. Member of the N. C. Bar Association; Cabarinas County 
Bar. Shriner, Oasis Temple, President Cabarrus County Shrine 
Club, 1946; Member of Kannapolis Lion's Club; Kannapolis Junior 
Chamber of Commerce Club; Cannon Memorial Y's Men's Club; 
Young Men's Council (Y.M.C.A.), 1941. President of Interstate 
Y.M.C.A. Young Men's Council (N. C. & S. C.) ; Beaver-Pittman 
Post American Legion, Commander, 1946. Chairman Public Af- 
fairs Committee of North Carolina Junior Chamber of Commerce 



Kerr Craige Ramsay — Speaker 



Alexander of Cabarrus 

Allen of Granville 

Allen of Wake 



Arnold of Washington 
Averitt of Cumberland 
Bacon of Polk 



Baldwin of Chatham 
Baldwin of Richmond 
Barker of Stanly 



Bell of Hyde 

Blaekwell of Forsyth 
Blue of Moore 



Bost of Cabarrus 
Branch of Halifax 
Bridger of Bladen 





.^r^ 




428 North Carolina Manual 

1949. Representative in the General Assembly of 1947. Presby- 
terian — Elder 1939 until date entered service; Superintendent 
Sunday School, 1939-1942. Teacher of Young Ladies' Class. En- 
tered service as Ensign, U.S.N.R., June 19, 1942; discharged as 
Lieutenant, U.S.N.R., December 25, 1945. Married Miss Myrtle 
Elizabeth White, September 25, 1942. One daughter, Elizabeth 
Rippy Alexander and one son, Hugh Q. Alexander, Jr. Address: 
Florida Drive at Virginia Avenue, .Kannapolis, N. C. 



ARCH T. ALLEN 

Arch T. Allen, Democrat, Representative from Wake County, 
was born in Salisbury, N._ C, September 13, 1910. Son of Arch T. 
and Claribel (McDowell)" Allen. Attended Raleigh High School, 
1926; University of North Carolina, B.S., in Civil Engineering, 
1930; University of North Carolina Law School, J.D. Degree, 
1933. Lawyer. Member North Carolina Bar Association; North 
Carolina State Bar; Wake County Bar Association. Member of 
Sigma Nu and Phi Delta Phi Fraternities; Kiwanis Club; Raleigh 
Chamber of Commerce; President, Young Democratic Clubs of 
North Carolina, 1937-1938; Secretary, State Democratic Execu- 
tive Committee, 1940-1943. Lieutenant, U. S. Naval Reserve, in 
World War II with service in Pacific Theater of Operations. Mem- 
ber Raleigh Post No. 1, American Legion. Representative in the 
General Assembly of 1937, 1939, 1941, 1943, and 1947. Married 
Miss Annette Reveley Tucker, December 14, 1935. Children: 
Annette Reveley Allen and Arch T. Allen, III. Address: Ra- 
leigh, N. C. 

THOMAS WATKINS ALLEN 

Thomas Watkins Allen, Democrat, Representative from Gran- 
ville County, was born in Granville County, January 7, 1893. Son 
of Glaudious L. and Catherine (Bragg) Allen. Attended Creed- 
moor High School, 1910-1914. Farmer. Member County Board of 
Education, 1928-1932; North Carolina Library Commission Board, 
1940-1944, Entered service, April 18, 1918; promoted to Corporal 
January 5, 1919; discharged, June 23, 1919. Member Creedmoor 
Masonic Lodge, Master, 1934-1940; Wilton Junior Order United 
American Mechanics, Councilor, 1920; District Councilor at pres- 



Biographical Sketches 429 

ent; Member North Carolina State Grange, Member Executive 
Committee, 1940 to present; Member, Oxford Rotary Club; Chair- 
man, Tobacco Committee, N. C. State Grange; Member of North 
Carolina Tobacco Council; Chairman of The Board of Wilton 
Committee; President, Henderson Production Credit Association 
since 1934; President, Wake Rural Electrification Administration 
since 1942; Member, Board of Directors, Durham Mutual Ex- 
change since 1940 ; Chairman, Tobacco Committee National 
Grange; Member N. C. Farm Bureau; Master Granville County 
Pomona Grange; Member County Committee, Agricultural Con- 
servation Association of Granville County, 1936-1948. Three times 
a member of County Committee of Farmers Home Administra- 
tion; Member of Board of Directors of Tobacco Stabilization Co- 
operative Corporation; Member of Board of Directors of Tobacco 
Associates Incorporation; Member of Tobacco Advisory Committee 
to the Secretary of Agriculture under the Marketing Research 
Act. Baptist; Member Board of Deacons since 1922; Superintend- 
ent, Sunday School, 1919-1940; Vice Moderator Flat River Bap- 
tist Association. Married Miss Julia Farmer, September 11, 1921. 
Two children: Thomas W. Allen, Jr., age 26; Mildred A. Jenkins, 
age 23. Address: Creedmoor, N. C, Route 1. 

E. O. ARNOLD 

E. 0. Arnold, Democrat, Representative from Washington 
County, was born at Creswell, N. C, September 24, 1895. Son of 
James J. and Bettie (Brown) Arnold. Attended Cherry Graded 
School, Cherry High School, 1901-1914; Ecole d'Horticulture of 
Versailles, France; A.B. Degree, Atlantic Christian College; M.S. 
Degree, North Carolina State College. Nurseryman, farmer and 
merchant. Member of Farm Bureau. Mason. Private in the 
United States Army, 1918-1919. Member of Christian Church. 
Married Miss Cora Collins, March 4, 1918. Three children. Ad- 
dress: Roper, N, C. 

FRANKLIN MURPHY AVERITT 

Franklin Murphy Averitt, Democrat, Representative from Cum- 
berland County, was born in Fayetteville, N. C, December 12, 
1911. Son of Herschell Strange and Cornelia Andrew (Culbreth) 
Averitt. Attended Fayetteville High School, 1924-1928; A.B. Wake 



430 North Carolina Manual 

Forest, 1932; Wake Forest Law School, 1934-1936. Lawyer. Mem- 
ber Cumberland County Bar Association and North Carolina State 
Bar. Mason, Phoenix Lodge, No. 8. Representative in the General 
Assembly of 1945. Methodist; Steward, 1941-1943. Married Miss 
Carolyn Wooten Council, February 1, 1936. Three children: Cor- 
nelia Herndon, Franklin Murphy, Jr., and Carolyn Council Averitt. 
Address: Fayetteville, N. C. 

FRANCIS PICKENS BACON 

Francis Pickens Bacon, Democrat, Representative from Polk 
County, was born in Edgefield, S. C. Son of John E. and Rebecca 
Calhoun (Pickens) Bacon. Educated in Columbia, S. C. High 
School, 1885; University of Montevideo, Uruquay, South America, 
(1885 to 1888). Manufacturer, President of Rotary Club. Several 
times Mayor of Tryon. State Senator, 1925 and 1937. Episcopa- 
lian; Senior Warden and Vestrymen. Married. Address: Tryon, 
N. C. 

HIRAM THOMAS BALDWIN, JR. 

Hiram Thomas Baldwin, Jr., Democrat, Representative from 
Richmond County, was born at Rockingham, N. C, December 23, 
1915. Son of Hiram Thomas, Sr. and Virginia Roxie (Ussery) 
Baldwin. Attended the Richmond County Schools. Service Station 
and Cafe operator. Mason; member Junior Order United Ameri- 
can Mechanics; member Board Trustees Junior Order Childrens 
Home, Lexington, N. C. Served in the U. S. Merchant Marine, 
1942-1945. Representative in the General Assembly of 1947. Pres- 
byterian. Married Miss Minnie Evelyn Williams of Moore County, 
October 17, 1936. Two children: Judy Delora Baldwin, and Hiram 
Thomas Baldwin, III. Address: Rockingham, N. C. 

THOMAS FLEET BALDWIN 

Thomas Fleet Baldwin, Democrat, Representative from Chatham 
County, was born in Moore County, September 11, 1907. Son of 
Arthur 0. and Anna L. (Bain) Baldwin. Attended Country Life 
Academy, Star, N. C; Siler City High School. Special Student in 
Law, Wake Forest College. Admitted to the Bar in 1933; Wake 
Forest College, 1947. Lawyer. Member of Lions Club of Siler 
City; Patriotic Order Sons of America. Served in U. S. Navy, 



Biographical Sketches 431 

October 6, 1942-October 21, 1945 Rtlc. Baptist; Deacon, 1945-1949; 
Superintendent of Sunday School from 1935 until present with 
exception of three years in service. Married Miss Ruby L. Eu- 
banks, December 10, 1938. Two children: Thomas Fleet Baldwin, 
Jr., and Linda Lee Baldwin. Address: 227 South Third Avenue, 
Siler City, N. C. 

RAYMOND C. BARKER, JR. 

Raymond C. Barker, Jr., Republican, Representative from 
Stanly County, was born in Greenville, S. C, November 11, 1909. 
Son of Raymond C, Sr., and Adele (Weathersbee) Barker. Grad- 
uated from High School of Badin, N. C, 1927. Vice-President and 
Sales Manager, Albemarle Music Store, Inc., Albemarle, N. C. 
Served in U. S. Army, April 6, 1944-December 31, 1945, as an en- 
listed man. Member of American Legion. Mason. Member of the 
Albemarle Lions Club since 1936; Deputy District Governor of 
District 31B, Lions International, 1940. Twenty years active work 
in Boy Scouts of America; Past Scoutmaster Troops in Albemarle, 
N. C. Past president, Albemarle Merchants Association. Repre- 
sentative in the General Assembly of 1947. Methodist. Married 
Miss Mabel A. Chrisco, December 27, 1936. Two daughters: Jane 
Adele Barker, 7 years old; Judith Anne Barker, 5 years old. Ad- 
dress: Albemarle, N. C. 

CLIFTON LINWOOD BELL 

Clifton Linwood Bell, Democrat, Representative from Hyde 
County, was born in that County, February 2, 1891. Son of 
Eugene and Delia S. (Swindell) Bell. Attended Hyde County 
Schools and Oak Ridge Institute, 1909-1912; University of North 
Carolina, 1912. Licensed to practice law by N. C. Supreme Court, 
1917. Lawyer. County Attorney; Clerk Superior Court about 
eight years. Chairman Democratic Executive Committee about 
twenty years; Representative from Hyde County in the General 
Assembly of 1921, 1945 and 1947. Appeal Agent, Selective Service 
Act. Served in World War I. 60th Brigade, 30th Division, 119th 
Infantry, Company E. Twelve months over seas. In battle of 
Ypres, BelliCourt and Azincourt. Member Athenian Literai-y 
Society, Oak Ridge Institute. Mason; member Atlantic Lodge, No. 
294, Swan Quarter. Address : Swan Quarter, N. C, 



432 North Carolina Manual 

THOMAS WINFIELD BLACKWELL, JR. 

Thomas Winfield Blackwell, Jr., Democrat, Representative from 
Forsyth County, was born in Lexington, Ky., March 3, 1913. Son 
of Thomas Winfield, Sr. and Ruth Estelle (Crist) Blackwell. At- 
tended Public School and Hig'h School, Winston-Salem, N. C; 
Woodberry Forest School; A.B., University of North Carolina, 
1934. LL.B., Yale University, 1937. Lawyer and Tax Consultant. 
Phi Beta Kappa ; member of American Bar Association ; North 
Carolina Bar Association; Forsyth County Bar Association; State 
Executive Committee of North Carolina Bar Association, 1946- 
1948. Had active duty during- World War II in United States 
Navy, July 1942 through December, 1946; entered as Junior Lieu- 
tenant and became Lieutenant-Commander; served in Seventh 
Fleet in Southwest Pacific; also served in Caribbean. Member of 
American Legion; Veterans of Foreign Wars. Representative in 
the General Assembly of 1947. Baptist. Member of Board of 
Deacons at present; Founder and Teacher (1938 to the present) 
of The Young Men's Bible Class; Assoc. Superintendent of Young 
Peoples' Department, 1936-1939. Married Miss Mary Johnson 
Lambeth of Thomasville, N. C, June 1, 1940. Three children: 
Catharine Campbell Blackwell, Ruth Crist Blackwell and Mary 
Lambeth Blackwell. Address: Route No. 2, Country Club Road, 
Winston-Salem, N. C. 

HERBERT CLIFTON BLUE 

Herbert Clifton Blue, Democrat, Representative from Moore 
County, was born in Hoke County, N. C. (then Cumberland), 
August 28, 1910. Son of John Patrick and Christian (Stewart) 
Blue. Graduated from Vass-Lakeview High School in 1929. Pub- 
lisher "The Sandhill Citizen," Aberdeen, N. C. Member, Town of 
Aberdeen Board of Commissioners, 1945; President, Moore County 
YDC Club, 1941-1946; Elected 8th Congressional District YDC 
Chairman, 1946; Secretary North Carolina Young Democratic 
Clubs 1947-48; President North Carolina Young Democratic Clubs 
1948-49; Member Moore County Democratic Executive Committee; 
Moore County representative on 8th District Congressional Com- 
mittee. Former President, Central Carolina Press Association; 
Secretary-treasurer, Aberdeen Tobacco Board of Trade. Charter 
member, Aberdeen Lions Club, President of the club for the 1946- 



Biographical Sketches 433 

1947 term; Zone Chairman 1947-48. Mason. Woodman of the World. 
President Vass-Lakeview Hig'h School Alumni Association, 1933- 
1935; also 1942 to the present. Representative in the General As- 
sembly of 1947. Presbyterian. Served as Superintendent of Cypress 
Sunday School, 1930-1940; Deacon in Cypress Church, 1931-1941; 
Superintendent, Bethesda Presbyterian Sunday School, 1940 to 
present time; Deacon, Bethesda Church, 1941-1946; Elected Elder, 
Bethesda Church, 1946. Married Miss Gala Lee Nunnery, July 4, 
1937. Three children: Patricia Joyce, age 10; Herbert Clifton, Jr., 
age 8; John Lee, age 3. Address: Aberdeen, N. C. 

EUGENE THOMPSON BOST, JR. 

Eugene Thompson Bost, Jr., Democrat, Representative from 
Cabarrus County, was born in Cabarrus County, June 11, 1907. 
Son of E. T. and Zula A. (Hinshaw) Bost. Attended Mount 
Pleasant Collegiate Institute; Duke University, School of Law 
1930-1933. Bachelor of Law. Lawyer. Member American Bar 
Association; North Carolina Bar Association. Representative in 
the General Assembly of 1937, 1939, 1941, 1943, 1945 and 1947. 
Methodist. Mason. Married Miss Bernice Hahn, March 27, 1937. 
Address: Concord, N. C. 

JOSEPH BRANCH 

Joseph Branch, Democrat, Representative from Halifax County, 
was born in Enfield, N. C, July 5, 1915. Son of James C. and 
Laura (Applewhite) Branch. Graduated from Wake Forest Col- 
lege, 1938 with LL.B. Degree. Lawyer. Member of the Enfield 
Lions Club; Young Business Men's Association. Mason. Served in 
the armed forces of the United States from May 25, 1943 to 
November 29, 1945. Representative in the General Assembly of 
1947. Baptist. Married Miss Frances Jane Kitchen. Address: En- 
field, N. C. 

DEWEY HERBERT BRIDGER 

Dewey Herbert Bridger, Democrat, Representative from Bladen 
County, was born at Bladenboro, N. C, March 3, 1899. Son of 
Henry C. and Carrie (Love) Bridger. Attended Bladenboro High 
School; Wake Forest College, A.B. Degree, 1920; Jefferson Medi- 



434 North Carolina Manual 

cal College, M.D., 1922. Physician. Member of The American 
Academy of General Practice; Bladen County Medical Society, 
President, 1944; N. C. Medical Society; Southern Medical Society; 
Seaboard Medical Society, Vice-President, 1947; Local Seaboard 
Surgeon; Trustee, Wake Forest College; Vice-President, Bank 
of Bladenboro; Vice-President, Bladenboro Cotton Mills; County 
Chairman, North Carolina Good Health Program. S.A.T.C, 1918 
and 1919; Medical Examiner, draftees. Second World War. Phi 
Chi Medical Fraternity; Mason; Shriner; Rotarian. Baptist; 
Deacon; Chairman, Board of Deacons, 1940 to 1946. Married Miss 
Lois Dickson, April 11, 1923. Two children: Anne and Dewey H., 
Jr. Address: Bladenboro, N. C. 

FRANK H. BROWN, JR. 

Frank H. Brown, Jr., Democrat, Representative from Jackson 
County, was born at Cullowhee, September 21, 1915. Son of Frank 
H. and Hattie (Norton) Brown. Attended Cullowhee High School, 
1928-1932; Western Carolina Teachers College, 1932-1935; Honor 
Graduate, N. C. State College, 1937, B.S. (Agriculture). Farmer. 
Member of Jackson County Farm Bureau, President, 1948-1949; 
Jackson County Farmers Cooperatve, member Board of Directors, 
1948-1949. Member Jackson County Board of Education, 1947- 
1949. Lieutenant in the U. S. Navy, May 1, 1942 to March 12, 1946. 
Methodist; Stewart, 1947-1948; 1948-1949. Married Miss Elsie W. 
Earp, July 31, 1943. One son: Frank H. Brown, III, born October 
31, 1948. Address: Cullowhee, N. C. 

CHARLES SETTLE BUNN 

Charles Settle Bunn, Democrat, Representative from Nash 
County, was born at Spring Hope, N. C, February 4, 1892. Son 
of Charles Dew and Sidney Hawkins (Bissette) Bunn. Attended 
Stanhope School, 1900-1910; Trinity Park Prep School, 1910-1913; 
A.B. Degree, Trinity College, 1917. Farmer. Awarded Master 
Farmer Degree Vocational Education Department, 1937; Proctor 
Citizenship Cup Lions Club, 1937. President, N. C. Swine Breeders 
Association, 1936-1944; President, N. C. Crop Improvement Asso- 
ciation, 1947-1948. Commander, American Legion Post No. 91, 
1937-1940. Superintendent and Teacher in one of Nash County 



Brown of Jackson 
Bunn of Nash 

Burfoot of Pasquotank 



Caveness of Guilford 
Collier of Pamlico 

Cooper of New Hanover 



Corey of Martin 

Craven of Mecklenburg 
Crissman of Guilford 



Dalrymple of Lee 
Dalton of Forsyth 
Davis of Haywood 



Davis of McDowell 

Divelbiss of Buncombe 
Doughton of Alleghany 



Duncan of Cherokee 
Dungan of Rowan 
Edwards of Greene 




436 North Carolina Manual 

High Schools, 1917-1918; Chairman, N. C. Area School Commis- 
sion, 1945-1947; Member of N. C. Education Committee, 1947- 
1948. Officer Candidate, 1917-1918 Technical Military Training 
School, State College, N. C; Officers Training School, Camp 
Taylor, Louisville, Ky. Methodist; Steward and Trustee, 1918- 
1948; Sunday School Teacher and Superintendent, 1912-1948. Mar- 
ried Miss Agnes Mable Smith, 1917. Children: Charles Ivy, Esper 
Nan, Mark Settle, Braxton Craven, Agnes Sidney, Spruill Gil- 
more. Address: Spring Hope, N. C. 



NOAH BURFOOT 

Noah Burfoot, Democrat, Representative from Pasquotank 
County, was born at Elizabeth City, N. C, April 10, 1894. Son of 
Noah and Rennie (Aydlett) Burfoot. Attended Wilmer & Chew, 
Annapolis, Md., 1911; U.S. Naval Academy, Annapolis, Md.; 
Wake Forest College; North Carolina State, June 1917. President 
of Pasquotank Hosiery Company, Elizabeth City, N. C. Member 
Board of County Commissioners, Pasquotank County, 1934-1946, 
Chairman, 1936-1946. Mason; Red Men. Sgt. Major in the U.S. 
Armed Forces, 1917-1918. Methodist. Married Miss Harriet 
Glover, November 5, 1919. Address: 301 Culpepper St., Elizabeth 
City, N. C. 

SHELLEY B. CAVENESS 

Shelley B. Caviness, Democrat, Representative from Guilford 
County, was born in Randolph County, August 9, 1901. Son of 
I. F. and Mary Anne (Bray) Caveness. Attended Greensboro High 
School 1916-1920; University of North Carolina 1924. Lawyer. 
Member Greensboro and North Carolina Bar Associations; 
Kiwanis Club; Judge pro tern Greensboro Municipal Court 1929- 
1931; Judge Civil Division Greensboro Municipal Court 1931-33. 
Lambda Chi Alpha College Fraternity; Benevolent and Protective 
Order of Elks; Exalted Ruler Elks, 1931-32, District Deputy 
1932-33; Mason; Shriner. Major North Carolina State Guard. 
Member House of Representatives 1941, 1943 and 1945. Methodist. 
Married Miss Elizabeth Albright, September 27, 1929. Address: 
Greensboro, N. C. 



Biographical Sketches 437 

THEODORE JOSEPH COLLIER 

Theodore Joseph Collier, Democrat, Representative from Pam- 
lico County, was born in Wayne County, October 16, 1908. Son 
of Josiah and Matilda (Johnson) Collier. Attended Pikeville 
Elementary and High School, 1914-1925; University of North 
Carolina, 1929, A.B. Degree. Lumber Manufacturer. Teacher and 
principal in Pamlico County Schools from 1930-1942; in Wash- 
ington County, 1942-1945. Chairman of Board of Directors, 
Craven-Pamlico Library Service. Mason. Member of Ruritan Club; 
Triangle Club. Sigma Phi Epsilon and Phi Beta Kappa Fraterni- 
ties. Methodist; Steward; Member and Treasurer of Board of 
Trustees and Board of Directors of Camp Don-Lee, Inc.; Lay 
Leader. Married Miss Mildred Muse of Oriental, N. C, October 
25, 1930. Two children: Joseph, eight years old, and Betsy, three 
years old. Address: Arapahoe, N. C. 

THOS. E. COOPER 

Thos. E. Cooper, Democrat, Representative from New Hanover 
County, was born at Mullins, S. C, August 19, 1883. Son of Noah 
Bryant and Lucinda (Jenerette) Cooper. Attended Mullins, South 
Carolina, Public Schools and two years at Citadel, Charleston. 
Graduated at "Falls" Business College, Nashville, Tenn. Livestock 
Dealer. President North Carolina Bankers' Association, 1914. 
Chairman New Hanover County Board of Education for ten 
years, 1915-1925; former chairman of the New Hanover County 
Democratic Executive Committee. Former Mayor of Wilmington. 
Representative in the General Assembly, 1935 and 1937. Member 
of Elks. Methodist. Married Janie Laura Collins, of Conway, S. C, 
November 12, 1907. Two daughters: Lois Collins Cooper and Jane 
Collins Cooper. Address : 205 N. Fifth St., Wilmington, N. C. 

ALEXANDER COREY 

Alexander Corey, Democrat, Representative from Martin County, 
was born at Jamesville, N. C, June 30, 1879. Son of Joseph and 
Hannah Jane (Daniel) Corey. Attended County Rural School, 
1884-1886; Turlington High School, 1900-1901; Correspondence 
Course Surveying and Engineering 1914-1916; Read Law under 
A. R. Dunning, 1916-1919. County Surveyor. Member of North 



438 North Carolina Manual 

Carolina Society of Surveyors; Knights of Pythias; Woodmen of 
the World; Modern Woodmen of America, State Lecturer, 1927- 
1935. Mayor of Jamesville, 1910-1920; Postmaster of Jamesville, 
1914-1918; State Engineer for State Health Department, 1933- 
1936; County Surveyor, 1940-1948. Engrossing Clerk of Senate, 
1923-1931. Baptist; served as Church Clerk; Pastor of one Church 
for 25 years. Married Miss Lillian Jane Riggs of Mayesville, N. C, 
December 24, 1914. Four children: Marvin W. Corey, David A. 
Corey, Esther Marie Corey and Clifford C. Corey. Address: James- 
ville, N. C. 

JENNIE GRIER ERWIN CRAVEN 

Jennie Grier Erwin Craven, Democrat, Representative from 
Mecklenburg County, was born in Mecklenburg County. Daughter 
of William Grier and Florence Eisenhower (Hilton) Erwin. At- 
tended Charlotte High School; St. Marys Private School; Eliza- 
beth College. Member of Business and Professional Womens Club; 
President, N. C. American Legion Auxiliary two years, National 
President, National Chairman, Finance; National Child Welfare 
Chairman ; Assistant State Director, Civilian Defence in charge 
of Service Corps. Member, United Daughters Confederacy; Daugh- 
ters American Revolution; Served as Member, Childrens Com- 
mittee State Board of Welfare; Member of State WAC Recruit- 
ing Committee. Member State Democratic Committee; State Dem- 
ocratic Executive Committee; Precinct Committee; National 
Speakers Bureau, Womans Section (Democratic). Member of Mo- 
ravian Church, Secretary to the Vestry. Widow of Walter Gluya 
Craven. Address: 1615 E. Morehead St., Charlotte, N. C. 

WALTER EDGAR CRISSMAN 

Walter Edgar Crissman, Democi-at, Representative from Guil- 
ford County, was born in Surry County, N. C, December 11, 1902. 
Son of Charles E. and Ollie (Huff) Crissman. Attended High 
Point High School and graduated in 1922. A.B., University North 
Carolina, 1926; University Law School. Lawyer. Member Ameri- 
can Bar Association; N. C. State Bar and High Point Bar Asso- 
ciations. Vice-chairman Democratic Executive Committee of Guil- 
ford County, 1933-1942; Chairman High Point Democratic Execu- 
tive Committee, 1933-1942. State Councillor Junior Order United 



Biographical Sketches 439 

American Mechanics 1947-1948; Membei" Masonic Order. Repre- 
sentative in the General Assembly of 1945 and 1947. Baptist; 
Superintendent Sunday School since 1938. Married Miss Wilma 
Planzer, April 6, 1935. Address: High Point, N. C. 

ROBERT WATSON DALRYMPLE 

Robert Watson Dalrymple, Democrat, Representative from Lee 
County, was born near Sanford, N. C, June 16, 1922. Son of 
Thomas Clyde and Laura Eunice Dalrymple. Attended Broadway 
High School; N. C. State College, B.S. degree in Agricultural 
Economics. Farmer. Member of Farm Bureau; American Legion; 
Past Commander of Post No. 347; Veterans of Foreign Wars. Mem- 
ber Board of Directors, Junior Chamber of Comerce at Sanford; 
Secretary, Young Democrats Club of Lee County. Mason. Sigma 
Chi Fraternity. Entered Military service July 5, 1943, placed on 
inactive duty February 27, 1947; 1st Lieut, in Marine Corps. Pres- 
byterian; Teacher in Bible Class of Sunday School. Address: 
R.F.D. Jonesboro Heights Station, Sanford, N. C. 

J. McRAE DALTON 

J. McRae Dalton, Democrat, Representative from Forsyth 
County, was born at Danbury, N. C, August 18, 1886. Son of 
Rufus I and Cora (McCanless) Dalton. Attended Winston-Salem 
Schools and Salem Boys' School; Guilford College, 1904. Real 
Estate Dealer. Member, T.P.A., U.C.T., Twin City Club, Wilson- 
ian Democratic Club ; Travelers Protective Association ; United 
Commercial Travelers. Chairman of Forsyth County Democratic 
Executive Committee, 1944; Member of Forsyth County Ration 
Board. Methodist ; Member of Board of Stewards. Address : 643 
West Fifth St., Winston-Salem, N. C. 

GROVER C. DAVIS 

Grover C. Davis, Democrat, Representative from Haywood 
County, was born Januaiy 1, 1885. Son of Joseph S. and Nancy 
(Medford) Davis. Attended Cullowhee High School, 1903-1905; 
Western Carolina College, 1909; Wake Forest College, 1910-1913. 
Attorney at Law. Member of Haywood County Bar Association, 
President from 1931-1940; North Carolina Bar Association. Chair- 



440 North Carolina Manual 

man of Haywood County Board of Elections, 1916-1920; Attorney 
for Haywood County, 1918-1922, 1934-1936; Solicitor for 20th 
Judicial District, 1922-1930 (two terms). Methodist; Trustee for 
First Methodist Church, Waynesville, for past 15 years; Taught 
Men's Bible Class, 1938-1944. Married Miss Jessie McCrary, May 
30, 1916. Two sons: Dr. Grover McCrary Davis of Fort Lauder- 
dale, Florida, and Joseph Vance Davis, M.D. who died November 
8, 1945. Address: Waynesville, N. C. 

ROY WALTON DAVIS 

Roy Walton Davis, Democrat, Representative from McDowell 
County, was born at Ennis, Texas, September 9, 1900. Son of 
William Kennedy and Jennie Mae (Riley) Davis. Attended St. Joe 
Texas High School, 1915; Clarendon Junior College, Clarendon, 
Texas, 1917; North Texas State College, Denton Texas, graduat- 
ing in 1920; University of Tennessee, graduating in 1922 with 
B.S. Degree in Commerce; Wake Forest Law School, 1930-1931. 
Lawyer. Member of American Bar Association; North Carolina 
Bar Association; McDowell County Bar Association, President, 
1943; Gamma Eta Gamma Legal Fraternity. Solicitor, McDowell 
County Criminal Court, 1931-1937; Judge, McDowell County Crim- 
inal Court, 1938. Member of Sigma Nu Social Fraternity; Epsilon 
Eta Chapter, University of Tennessee. Vice-President, Marion 
Kiwanis Club, 1948; President, 1949; District Financial Chair- 
man, McDowell County Boy Scouts of America, 1947-1949; Mem- 
ber of American Legion, 1923 to 1949. Private in the U. S. Army 
in first World War, 1918. Methodist; Steward, 1947-1949; Trustee, 
1944-1949. Married Miss Mildred Wilson, May 10, 1927. One son: 
Roy Walton Davis, Jr., age 18. Address: 266 South Main Street, 
Marion, N. C. 

JAMES EDGAR DIVELBISS, JR. 

James Edgar Divelbiss, Jr., Democrat, Representative from 
Buncombe County, was born at Asheville, N. C, October 19, 1901. 
Son of Joseph Edward and Florence May (Leatherwood) Divel- 
biss. Attended Asheville City Schools. Co-Owner Community Coal 
& Lumber Company; Vice President, Biltmore Coal Company. 
President of Asheville Lions Club, 1941-1942; Member, Asheville 
City Council^ 1936-1940; Vice Mayor, 1940-1945. Member of Mt. 



Biographical Sketches 441 

Herman Lodge No. 118 A.F. & A.M.; Ionic Council No. 9 Royal 
and Select Masons; Oasis Temple, Shrine; Asheville Shrine Club, 
Methodist; Member Board of Stewards, 1946-1951. Married Miss 
Eleanor Bridger Cherry, December 25, 1921. One daughter: Daisy 
Cherrie (Mrs. R. H. Culberson). Address: 140 Westwood Road, 
Lakeview Park, Asheville, N. C. 



JAMES KEMP DOUGHTON 

James Kemp Doughton, Democrat, Representative from Alle- 
ghany County, was born at Sparta, N. C, May 18, 1884. Son of 
Rufus A. and Sue (Parks) Doughton. Attended Oak Ridge In- 
stitute, 1900-1902; University of North Carolina, 1903. Govern- 
ment Official. State Bank Examiner, and later National Bank Ex- 
aminer with assignments as Chief Examiner of the Atlanta and 
Richmond Federal Reserve Districts. Bank official in Washington, 
N. C. and Salisbury, N. C. Manager Richmond Agency Recon- 
struction Finance Coi'p., 1932-1933. General Agent and Chairman 
of the Board, Farm Credit Administration of Baltimore, 1934- 
1946. Methodist. Married Miss Josephine Lane Brown of Raleigh, 
February 2, 1910. Three children: James Kemp Doughton, Jr., 
Alice Brown Doughton, and Josephine Lane Doughton. Addi-ess: 
Sparta, N. C. 

JAMES HARALSON DUNCAN 

James Haralson Duncan, Democrat, Representative from Chero- 
kee County, was born at Clayton, Georgia, August 10, 1914. Son 
of Haralson Earl and Rachel (Justus) Duncan. Attended Rabun 
County High School, Georgia, 1919-1930. Wholesale Dealer in 
Petroleum Products. Member of Cherokee Lodge No. 146 Ancient 
Free and Accepted Masons, Master, 1947 and 1948. Storekeeper 
3rd Class, United States Naval Reserve; enlisted March 11, 1944, 
discharged, August 8, 1945. Baptist; Teacher of Young Men's 
Bible Class. Married Miss Maude Virginia Burleson, April 21, 
1935. Children: Two sons. Address: Murphy, N. C. 



442 North Carolina Manual 

DEADERICK CHANDLER DUNGAN 

Deaderick Chandler Dungan, Democrat, Representative from 
Rowan County, was born at Little Rock, Arkansas, October 6, 
1899. Son of John Morgan and Anne (Mitchell) Dungan. Attended 
Little Rock High School, 1913-1916; New Mexico Military Insti- 
tute, Rosewell, N. Mex., 1916-1918; University of Arkansas, Fay- 
etteville, Ark., 1919-1921. Farm Tractor & Implement Dealer. City 
Councilman, Salisbury, N. C, 1937-1947; Mayor of Salisbury, 
1939-1941. Sigma Alpha Epsilon Fraternity; Benevolent Protec- 
tive Order of Elks; Knights of Pythias; American Legion; Forty 
and Eight. Student (rank of private). Officers Training Corps, 
Fortress Monroe, Va., October-November, 1918; Lieutenant, Cap- 
tain, Major, Leiutenant-Colonel, North Carolina State Guard, 
1941-1947. Episcopalian; Vestryman, 1942-1943. Married Miss 
Vivian Gregory, November 29, 1924. Two daughters: Mrs. Pete 
M. Ebersole, Chapel Hill, N. C; Miss Jeanne G. Dungan. Address: 
630 South Main St., Salisbury, N. C. 



ALONZO CLAY EDWARDS 

Alonzo Clay Edwards, Democrat, Representative from Greene 
County, was born at Hookerton, N. C, September 29, 1904. Son 
of Dr. G. C. and Catherine (Herman) Edwards. Attended schools 
of Hookerton, 1910-1921; Trinity College, 1921-1924. Farmer. 
Member Greene County Agricultural Adjustment Administration 
Committee 1935-1940; Chairman, 1938-1940; North Carolina Farm 
Bureau State Membership Chairman 1942-1948 and Member of 
State Executive Committee 1937-1948. Representative from North 
Carolina to the National Farm Bureau Convention 1938, 1945, 
1946, 1947, and 1948; Vice-President North Carolina Farm Bureau 
1947-1948; Director, Peanut Growers Cooperative 1942-1949; Di- 
rector Coastal Plain Soil Conservation District 1942-1949; Presi- 
dent, North Carolina Association of Soil Conservation District 
Supervisors, 1946; Commissioner, Town of Hookerton 1931-1940 
Chairman United War Fund for Greene County 1943, 1944, 1945 
Mason; Jerusalem Lodge No. 95, A. F. & A. M., Knights Templar 
Royal Arch Masons; Sudan Temple, A. A. 0. N. M. Shrine; Junior 
Order United American Mechanics; Trustee, Jr. 0. U. A. M. Chil- 
dren's Home, Lexington, N. C. 1941-1948; State Councilor 1944- 



Edwards of Durham 
Eggers of Watauga 
Ervin of Mecklenburg 



Falls of Cleveland 

Fisher of Cumberland 
Fisher of Transylvania 



Floyd of Robeson 

Fountain of Edgecombe 
Gantt of Durham 



Garland of Gaston 
Gentry of Ashe 
Gibbs of Carteret 



Gobble of Forsyth 
Greene of Hoke 

Hanford of Alamance 



Harding of Yadkin 
Hardison of Craven 
Harris of Person 




444 North Carolina Manual 

1945, National Representative Jr. 0. U. A. M. 1945-1949; B. P. 0, 
of Elks; Lambda Chi Alpha; State Board of Education 1943-1948; 
Representative in the General Assembly of 1941, 1943, 1945, and 
1947; Methodist; Steward 1928-1948; Charge Lay Leader Hooker- 
ton Circuit 1935-1948; Sunday School Superintendent 1942-1949; 
Married Miss Bettie Hardy Taylor, Febi-uary 20, 1935. One son, 
Alonzo Clay Edwards, Jr. Address: Hookerton, N. C. 

DANIEL KRAMER EDWARDS 

Daniel Kramer Edwards, Democrat, Representative from Dur- 
ham County, was born in Durham, N. C, February 17, 1914. Son 
of Charles W. and Eva Marie (Kramer) Edwards. Attended Dur- 
ham High School; A.B. Degree, Duke University, 1935; grad- 
uated from Harvard Law School, LL.B. Degree, 1938. Lawyer. 
Member of the American Bar Association, North Carolina State 
Bar, and Bar Association; Past-President of Durham Civitan 
Club; Member of Phi Beta Kappa, Duke University; Chairman of 
the Durham County Chapter American Red Cross, 1947-48; Com- 
mander Durham Post V.F.W., 1947; Representative in the Gen- 
eral Assembly of 1947; Member N. C. General Statutes Commis- 
sion, 1948; Lt. Col. Infantry, NC NG, commanding 1st Bn. 119th 
Inf. Served in Army from September 16, 1940 to December 7, 
1945, attaining rank of Lt. Col. in the Infantry. Served in General 
Staff Corps and in infantry units. Awarded the DistingTiished 
Service Cross, Silver Star, Bronze Star Medal with Oak Leaf 
Cluster, Air Medal, Purple Heart and Combat Infantry Badge, 
Author of: "Amphibious Operations," Infanti'y Journal, April, 
1946; "Rise of Governmental Centralization in North Carolina," 
Popular Government, September 1947. Methodist, Steward. Mar- 
ried Miss Mary Partin, December 24, 1941. Four children: Kath- 
erine Leroy Edwards, Daniel K. Edwards, Jr., Claire Egan Ed- 
wards and Jane Harrison Edwards. Address: 406 Buchanan Road, 
Durham, N. C. 

STACY CLYDE EGGERS, SR. 

Stacy Clyde Eggers, Sr., Republican, Representative from Wa- 
tauga County, was born in Forest Grove, N. C, April 17, 1890, 
Son of Emsley R. and Lucinda M. (Johnson) Eggers. Attended 
Watauga County Public Schools, 1897-1908; Cove Creek High 



Biographical Sketches 445 

School, 1909; Appalachian Training School, 1909-1912. Farmer 
and real estate broker. Taught in Public Schools of Watauga 
County, 1911 and 1912. Member Boone Chamber of Commerce. 
Chairman Board of County Commissioners, 1924-1926; Bookkeeper, 
Shei'iffs' office, four years; County Tax Assessor: United States 
Commissioner. Merchant. President and Secretary-Treasurer, 
Sugar Grove National Farm Loan Association; Chairman Board 
of Directors, Mountain Burley Tobacco Warehouse; President 
Board of Directors, Wilkesboro National Farm Loan Association; 
Secretary-Treasurer, Boone Tobacco Board of Trade; Member 
Board of Directors, Watauga Fair Association. Mason, Thirty- 
second degree. Representative from Watauga County in the Gen- 
eral Assembly of 1945, 1947. Baptist. Sunday School teacher for 
the past twenty-seven years; Moderator, Three Forks Associa- 
tion, 1940-1944; Member, General Board Baptist State Convention 
1942-1945. Married Miss Nora South, December 3, 1913. Four chil- 
dren: First Lieutenant E. Morris Eggers, Air Corps, killed in 
action; Christine Eggers, Stacy C. Eggers, Jr., Margaret Eggers. 
Address: Boone, N. C. 



SUSAN GRAHAM ERVIN 

Susan Graham Ervin (Mrs. Joseph W.), Democrat, Representa- 
tive from Mecklenburg County, was born at Morganton, N. C. 
Daughter of J. Ernest and Susan Washington Clark Erwin. At- 
tended Saint Mary's School and Junior College, Raleigh; gi-ad- 
uated from Ward-Belmont College, Nashville, Tennessee; special 
courses in literature, creative writing and journalism at Univer- 
sity of North Carolina. House wife and journalist. Member of 
Mecklenburg Chapter, Daughters of American Revolution; Char- 
lotte Junior League; N. C. Society for the Preservation of Antiqui- 
ties; Health Board of Charlotte Y.W.C.A. Winner of Atlantic 
Monthly Nation-wide essay contest and several national poetry 
prizes. Author of articles and poems appearing in magazines and 
newspapers. Episcopalian. Widow of Hon. Joe W. Ervin, Con- 
gressman from the Tenth Congressional District. Address: 166 
Cherokee Road, Charlotte, N. C. 



446 North Carolina Manual 

BAYARD THURMAN FALLS, JR. 

Bayard Thurman Falls, Jr., Democrat, Representative from 
Cleveland County, was born at Shelby, N. C, September 14, 1911. 
Son of B. T. and Selma E. Falls. Attended Shelby Public Schools, 
1917-1929; LL.B., Wake Forest College, 1939. Lawyer. Member 
North Carolina State Bar. Gamma Eta Gamma, Law Fraternity. 
President Shelby Junior Chamber of Commerce. Charter member 
Shelby Lodge No. 1709 B.P.O.E. Representative in the General 
Assembly of 1943. Episcopalian. Married Miss Sara Hines, No- 
vember 12, 1938. Two children: Betsy Falls, age 6, Selma Falls, 
age 2. Address: Shelby, N. C. 

RALPH RUDOLPH FISHER 

Ralph Rudolph Fisher, Republican, Representative from Tran- 
sylvania County, was born at Greenville, S. C, February 3, 1892. 
Son of Dr. W. C. and Rhoda Emma (Walker) Fisher. Attended 
Columbus Institute, 1903-1904; Furman Fitting School, Green- 
ville, S. C, 1909-1910; Mars Hill College, 1910-1914; Wake Forest 
College, 1917. Lawyer. President, Brevard Chamber of Commerce, 
1941; Vice President, Lion's Club, Brevard, 1944-1945. Served in 
World War L 1917-1919. Commander Munroe Wilson Post 88, 
American Legion, 1940-1941; District Commander, 19th District 
N. C. Department, 1942-1945; Delegate to National Convention at 
Omaha, Neb., 1943. Noble Grande in Odd Fellows; Council Com- 
mander, Woodmen of the World. Chairman, Republican County 
Executive Committee; Delegate to Republican National Convention 
at Philadelphia, 1940. Representative in General Assembly, Regu- 
lar Session, 1921; Special Session, 1922; Regular Session, 1945. 
Member of First Baptist Church, Brevard. Married Miss Thelma 
Richardson, of Marion, Va., January 31, 1923. Address: Brevard, 
N. C. 

TROY ANCIL FISHER 

Troy Ancil Fisher, Democrat, Representative from Cumberland 
County, was born in Cumberland County, December 12, 1909. Son 
of W. L. and Rosa Belle (Allen) Fisher. Attended Cedar Creek 
School and Stedman School, 1916-1928. Farmer. Member of North 
Carolina Farm Bureau; President of Cumberland County Farm 
Bureau; A. A. A. Committeeman, 1940-1948. Member of Woodmen 
of the World. Baptist; Member of Board of Trustees since 1946, 



Biographical Sketches 447 

Married Miss Bertha Miller, January 21, 1940. Four daughters: 
Nancy Rose Fisher, age 8; Mary Ancil Fisher, age 5; Helen Troy 
Fisher, age 3; Bertha Sue Fisher, age 6 months. Address: Route 
5, Fayetteville, N. C. 

FRANCIS WAYLAND FLOYD 

Francis Wayland Floyd, Democrat, Representative from Robe- 
son County, was born at Lumberton, N. C, May 23, 1904. Son of 
Francis Afred and Nora May (Lewis) Floyd. Attended Fairmont 
High School, 1919-1922; Wake Forest College; Wake Forest Law 
School, admitted to practice in 1932. Attorney at Law. Member 
of N. C. State Bar; 9th Judicial District Bar Association; Robe- 
son County Bar Association. Solicitor, Robeson County Recorder's 
Court, Fairmont District, 1936-1940 and 1944-1948. Member of 
Woodmen of the World; Civitan International; Past Lieut. Gov- 
ernor, N. C. District Civitan; 32nd degree Mason; Shriner. 1st 
Lieutenant, N. C. State Guard, 1941-1947. Baptist. Married Miss 
Meddie Thompson, July 5, 1926. Two sons: Robert Francis Floyd, 
age 21; Edwin Oliver Floyd, age 17. Address: Fairmont, N. C. 



BENJAMIN EAGLES FOUNTAIN 

Benjamin Eagles Fountain, Democrat, Representative from 
Edgecombe County, was born in that county, January 17, 1897. 
Son of Almon L. and Louisa (Eagles) Fountain. Attended Edge- 
combe County Schools; Tarboro High School; John Graham Pre- 
paratory School, Warrenton, 1915-1917; University North Caro- 
lina, 1917-1918; Law School, 1921-1923. Lawyer, farmer, realtor. 
Member Rocky Mount and N. C. Bar Associations. Member Board 
of Trustees, Rocky Mount City Schools, 1934 to 1947; Trustee of 
Greater University of N. C; Government Appeal Agent, Local 
Draft Board No. 2, Edgecombe County, 1940-1942. Served in 
U. S. Navy, 1918; member American Legion; Commander Cole- 
man Pitt Post, 1927-1928. Presbyterian; Deacon since 1937; chair- 
man Board of Deacons 1941-1942. Representative in the General 
Assembly of 1943, 1945 and 1947. Married Miss Emmie Jane 
Green of Fountain Inn, S. C, June 14, 1928. Children: Benjamin 
Eagles, Jr., Arthur Green and Jane Bryson. Address: Rocky 
Mount, N. C. 



448 North Carolina Manual 

ROBERT MELVIN GANTT, SR. 

Robert Melvin Gantt, Sr., Democrat, Representative from Dur- 
ham County, was born in Belwood, Cleveland County, N. C. Son 
of Melvin Puckett and Georgianna (Jones) Gantt. Attended Bel- 
wood Institute, Cleveland County, from school age until entering 
college in 1904. A.B. Trinity College (now Duke University) June 
1909; Law School 1910-1912. Lawyer. Member Durham County 
Bar Association, President, 1935-1936; Member North Carolina 
Bar Association and North Carolina State Bar. Foi'merly member 
American Bar Association. State Director National Emergency 
Council, 1935-1937. Member State Guard, 1907-1909. Junior Order 
United American Mechanics, Councillor for State, 1925-1926. Rep- 
resentative in the General Assembly of 1945. Methodist. Married 
Miss Kathryn Claywell, December 16, 1914. Three children: Mrs. 
J. Carl Clamp, Robert Melvin Gantt, Jr., and Samuel Fox Gantt. 
Address: 1007 Gloria Avenue, Durham, N. C. 



JAMES BOYCE GARLAND 

James Boyce Garland, Democrat, Representative from Gaston 
County, was born at Gastonia, N. C, June 16, 1920. Son of Peter 
Woods and Kathleen (Boyce) Garland. Attended Gastonia High 
School, 1933-1937; University of North Carolina, 1941, B.S. in 
Commerce; Law School of University of North Carolina, 1946 
Commerce; Law School of University of North Carolina, 1946, 
LL.B. Attorney. Member of Gaston County Bar Association; North 
Carolina Bar Association; Secretary and Treasurer Fourteenth 
Judicial Bar, 1948-1949. Member of Beta Theta Pi Delta Pi Legal 
Fraternity; President of Phi Delta Phi, Vance Inn, 1945-1946. Vice 
President of Gastonia Junior Chamber of Commerce; Vice Com- 
mander of Gastonia Post No. 23 of American Legion. 1st Lieuten- 
ant, Field Artillery, 1942-1945; Served with Eighth Infantry Divi- 
sion in European Theatre of Operations; Received Bronz Star for 
heroic achievement in battle, 1945. Presbyterian; Member of 
Board of Deacons; Assistant Superintendent of Sunday School. 
Address: 510 South York Street, Gastonia, N. C. 



Biographical Sketches 449 

TODD H. GENTRY 

Todd H. Gentry, Democrat, Representative from Ashe County, 
was born in Ashe County, April 23, 1912. Son of J. B. and Leora 
(Trivett) Gentry. Attended West Jefferson High School, 1928- 
1932; Lees McRae College. Secretary-Treasurer and part owner 
of Oak Flooring Co., Inc., West Jefferson, N. C. Member of West 
Jefferson Merchants Association; Elk Club. Mason. Member of the 
Board of Directors of the West Jefferson Rotary Club. Methodist; 
Steward, 1932 to present, Charge Lay Leader last four years. 
Married Miss Nina Houck, September 1, 19.34. Children: Tony, 
Diane and Sarah. Address: West Jefferson, N. C. 

HENRY SYLVESTER GIBBS 

Henry Sylvester Gibbs, Democrat, Representative from Carteret 
County, was born at New Bern, N. C, April 28, 1895. Son of 
Henry Len and Oler Thatch (Farrow) Gibbs. Attended Warren- 
ton High School, 1911-1914; University of North Carolina, 1914- 
1915. Real Estate Dealer and Insurance. Mayor of Morehead City, 
1933-1939; Chairman Carteret County ABC Board, 1939-1948. 
Member Morehead City Port Commission, 1939-1948, Chairman, 
1945, 1946, 1947, and 1948; Member, State Ports Authority, 1945 
(term of six years) ; Yeoman, U. S. NRF., Fifth Naval District, 
1917-1919. President North Carolina Committee on Coastal De- 
fense, 1940. Director, Atlantic and North Carolina Railroad Com- 
pany, 1939-1948 (Member of Executive Committee, 1939-1948); 
Trustee, Greater University of North Carolina, 1947 (term of 
eight years). President, Morehead City Rotary Club, 1940; Presi- 
dent, Morehead City Community Assistance (Welfare) 1940. Rep- 
resentative in the General Assembly of 1941, 1943, 1945 and 1947. 
Episcopalian. Married Miss Lucille Leary, December 20, 1917. 
Two children: H. S. Gibbs, Ji'., born January 9, 1919, and Eric 
Gregg Gibbs, born November 18, 1921. Address: Morehead City, 
N. C. 

FLEETUS LEE GOBBLE 

Fleetus Lee Gobble, Democrat, Representative from Forsyth 
County, was born in Davidson County, N. C, January 1, 1891. Son 
of John H. and Frances (Foster) Gobble. Attended Public Schools 
Davidson Countv 1897-1910. Entei'ed Atlanta Barber College Janu- 



450 North Carolina Manual 

ary 2, 1911 and completed course. Barber. Barber and Beauty 
School Operator. Member Associated Master Barbers of America ; 
President State Association Master Barbers 1934-1935. Member 
Educational and Legislative Committee since 1935. Member Wil- 
son Democratic Club. Member of Chamber of Commerce. Member 
House of Representatives 1941, 1943 and 1945. Methodist. Treas- 
urer 1926-1928; President Men's Bible Class 1925-1926; Board of 
Stewards 1925-1932. Married Miss Blanche Evans. Three chil- 
dren: Juanita, Dr. Fleetus L., Jr., and James F. Address: Route 4, 
Winston-Salem, N. C. . - . 

HARRY ALEXANDER GREENE 

Harry Alexander Greene, Democrat, Representative from Hoke 
County, was born in Rock Hill, S. C, March 11, 1898. Son of 
James Alfred, Sr., and Mabel (Andrews) Greene. Fertilizer and 
cotton dealer. Coroner, Hoke County, 1945-1946. Representative 
in the General Assembly of 1947. Presbyterian, Deacon, 1942 to 
present. Sergeant, 1917-1919 in the Army of the U. S.; 1st Lt., 
N. C. National Guard, 1923-1929. Married Miss Hazel Hatsell, 
August 14, 1937. Two children: Frances Ward Greene, James 
Worthy Green. Address: Raeford, N. C. 

EDWARD R. HANFORD, SR. 

Edward R. Hanford, Democrat, Representative from Alamance 
County, was born in Alamance County, September 5, 1885. Son of 
Andrew Jackson and Elizabeth (Heritage) Hanford. Attended 
Whitsett Institute, 1905. Brick manufacturer. Member Burlington 
School Board, 1926-1930. Member Alamance County Commis- 
sioners 1930-1932 and 1943-1944. Woodman of America. Repre- 
sentative in the General Assembly of 1937. Married Miss Ava May 
Russell, April 30, 1907. Address: Burlington, N. C. 

FRANKLIN DANIEL BOONE HARDING 

Franklin Daniel Boone Harding, Republican, Representative 
from Yadkin County, was born at Yadkinville, N. C, June 29, 
1904. Son of Dr. Thomas Renny and Effie Morrison (Kelly) Hard- 
ing. Attended Yadkinville High School, graduating in 1920; Uni- 
versity of North Carolina, 1920-1925, A.B. Degree; University 



Hatch of Wake 
Hathaway of Gates 
Hayes of Randolph 



Hayman of Dare 
Hocutt of Johnston 
Horton of Burke 



Howard of Gaston 
Huskins of Yancey 
Johnson of Currituck 



Jones of Camden 

Jones of Rutherford 
Kearney of Franklin 



Kerr of Warren 
Kilpatrick of Pitt 

Kirkman of Guilford 



Kiser of Scotland 

Lassiter of Mecklenburg 
Leatherman of Lincoln 




452 North Carolina Manual 

Law School, 1927-1929. Lawyer. Member of North Carolina State 
Bar; North Carolina Bar Association. Mayor of Town of Yadkin- 
ville, 1931-1937, 1947-1948. Delegate to Republican National Con- 
vention, 1944. County Attorney for Yadkin County, 1944-1948. 
Member of Yadkin Masonic Lodge No. Ifi2 A. F. & A. M., Master 
at present. Trustee, Yadkinville Methodist Church. Married Miss 
Laura M. Bowman, 1931. One daughter: Laura Frances, age 12. 
Address: Yadkinville, N. C. 

BURL GARLAND HARDISON 

Burl Garland Hardison, Democrat, Representative from Craven 
County, was born in that County, November 14, 1901. Sen of L. H. 
and Debbie (Herring) Hardison. Attended Craven County Schools. 
Farmer and Merchant. Member Craven County Democratic Execu- 
tive Committee, 1928-1938. State Gasoline Inspector. 1937-1943. 
Representative from Craven County in the General Assembly of 
1945 and 1947. Mason. Member, Ionic Lodge No. 583; Sudan 
Temple, A.A.O.N. Mystic Shrine at New Bern. N. C. Member, 
Christian Church; Deacon. Married Miss Lillie Franks Hardison, 
January 22, 1922. Two children: Burl D. Hardison and Fannie 
Louise Hardison Duncan. Address: New Bern, N. C, Route 2. 

REGINALD LEE HARRIS 

Reginald Lee Harris, Democrat, Representative from Person 
County, was born in Roxboro, N. C, September 9, 1890. Son of 
William Henry and Rosa Lee (Jordan) Harris. Attended Virginia 
Military Institute. Chairman Person County Memorial Hospital; 
President Roxboro Cotton Mills; President Peoples Bank; Director 
Roxboro Building and Loan Association since its organization in 
1923. Representative in the General Assembly of 1927, 1929, 1931, 
1933, 1935 and 1947. Speaker of the House, 1933. Member Educa- 
tional Commission, 1929-1931; Advisory Budget Commission, 1931- 
1933; Textbook Rental Commission, 1935-1943; Chairman State 
School Commission, 1941-1943; Chairman State Board of Educa- 
tion. 1943-1945. Elected Lieutenant Governor November 5, 1940 
by the largest vote ever received by a candidate for this office. 
Trustee University of North Carolina since 1933. President North 
Carolina Cotton Manufacturers' Association, 1946. Director, North 



Biographical Sketches 453 

Carolina State College Foundation; Director, North Carolina 
Textile Foundation; Director, The Business Foundation; Director 
Home Economics Foundation; Director, Cotton-Textile Institute. 
Delegate, Democratic National Convention, 1936, 1940 and 1944. 
Methodist. Rotary Club. Kappa Alpha Fraternity. Married Miss 
Katharine Long of Roxboro on December 10, 1913. Six children. 
Nine grandchildren. Address : Roxboro, N. C. 

WILLIAM THOMAS HATCH 

William Thomas Hatch, Democrat, Representative from Wake 
County, was born at Millbrook, N. C, April 1, 1905. Son of Na- 
thaniel Ward Hatch and Minnie (Thomas) Hatch. Attended Ra- 
leigh High School, 1924; Wake Forest College, LL.B. degree, 
1928. Attorney. Member Wake County Bar Association; District 
Bar Association; North Carolina State Bar; American Bar Asso- 
ciation; Member Raleigh Chamber of Commerce and the Execu- 
tives Club of Raleigh. Mason; Shriner; Member Junior Order. 
Representative in the General Assembly of 1937, 1939, 1941, 1943, 
1945, 1947, and two special sessions. Methodist. Married Miss 
Mabel Penney, Raleigh, N. C, June 24, 1943. Address: Wake 
Forest Road, Raleigh, N. C. 

CLARENCE PERCIVAL HATHAWAY, JR. 

Clarence Percival Hathaway, Jr., Democrat, Representative 
from Gates County, was born in Trotville, N. C. Son of Clarence 
Percival and Hattie Susan (Harrell) Hathaway. Graduated from 
Sunbury High School, Sunbury, N. C, 1934; Mars Hill College, 
1936. Bookkeeper. Member of the Ruritan Club. Entered Naval 
Service March 30, 1942 as third class petty officer; appointed 
Ensign, U. S. Navy Resei've, June 13, 1944; Separated from 
Service, November 27, 1945. Representative in the General Assem- 
bly of 1947. Member Masonic Lodge No. 126, Gatesville, N. C, 
Shriner, Commander American Legion Post 136, Gatesville, N. C. 
Methodist; Superintendent of Sunday School. Married Miss Alice 
Louise Payne, December 11, 1943. Two children: Clarence Percival 
Hathaway III; daughter, Harriet Anne Hathaway. Address: Sun- 
bury, N. C. 



454 North Carolina Manual 

ROBERT SMITH HAYES 

Robert Smith Hayes, Republican, Representative fiom Randolph 
County, was born near Randleman, Randolph County, N. C, June 
28, 1896. Son of Eli Lafayette and Nancy (Vickory) Hayes. At- 
tended New Salem School until 1913; Troy High School. Travel- 
ing Salesman. Member of Randleman Rotary Club, present direc- 
tor. Awarded Gold Medal for excellence in debating during Fresh- 
man year in High School; competed for High School State Cham- 
pionship at University of N. C. 1917. Mason; member of Grand 
Lodge. Member of Clyde Boling Post, American Legion, Winston- 
Salem, N. C. Received 5-10-15 year service honors as traveling- 
representative of National Lead Company, New York City; five 
year honors with American Marietta Company, Chicago, HI., Mari- 
etta Paint & Color Company, High Point, North Carolina Branch. 
Methodist; Steward; Sunday School Superintendent, 4 years; 
Charge Lay Leader 3 years. Served in the United States Navy 
as Seaman, -January 9, 1918 until August 27, 1919. Married Miss 
Bertie Manning of Winston-Salem, June 26, 1926. Two daughters: 
Betty Jean and Nancy Ellen. Address: Randleman, N. C, 



DEWEY LABON HAYMAN 

Dewey Labon Hayman, Democrat, Representative from Dare 
County, was born in Tyrrell County, November 25, 1898. Son of 
William Harrison and Louisiana (Belangia) Hayman. Attended 
Elizabeth City Academy, 1912-1914; R. B. Creecy Private School, 
1914-1916; International Correspondence School, Scranton, Penn- 
sylvania, Majoring in Engineering. Owner-Manager of The Ar- 
lington Hotel, Nags Head, N. C. Member of Dare Beaches Cham- 
ber of Commerce; member, Board of Directors, 1948-1949. Em- 
ployed by N. C. State Highway and Public Works Commission 
for 23 continuous years. Last position, Maintenance Supervisor, 
2nd District, First Division. Also worked on engineering and con- 
struction with State Highway and Public Works Commission. 
Member of Sudan Shrine Temple, New Bern, N. C; Improved 
Order of Red Men. Episcopalian; Vestryman, Church of the 
Advent, Williamston, N. C, 1940-1944. Married Miss Phoebe 
Gould, June 9, 1926. Two children: Mrs. Raymond Parent; Michael 
Hayman. Address: The Arlington, Nags Head, N. C. 



Biographical Sketches 455 

HERBERT RONALD HOCUTT 

Herbert Ronald Hocutt, Democrat, Representative from John- 
ston County, was born in Johnston County, June 6, 1905. Son of 
Thomas Bryant and Lina (Stott) Hocutt. Attended Kings Busi- 
ness College, Raleigh, N. C. Farmer and Insurance Agent. Mem- 
ber of the Society of Safety Engineers; Director of Southern 
Safety Conference 1945-1946. Member of several National Com- 
mittees. Director, North Carolina Highv\ray Safety Department, 
1936-1945. President, Local Unit of North Carolina Farm Bu- 
reau 1947. Mason. Representative in the General Assembly of 
1947. Baptist. Married Miss Annie Jean Flowers, July 21, 1932. 
Two sons: Ronald Jr., and Bennie Royster. Address: Wendell, 
N. C, Route No. 1. 

OSSIE LEE HORTON 

Ossie Lee Horton, Democrat, Representative from Burke County, 
was born in Chatham County, N. C, December 15, 1900. Son of 
Willis G. and Nettie Bernice (Watts) Horton. Attended Bonlee 
High School 1918-1922; Wake Forest College, 1922-1926— LL.B. 
Degree. Lawyer. Member Burke County Bar Association and 
N. C. State Bar. Attorney for the Town of Valdese 1948-49. 
Member Morganton Lions Club since 1929, Past President, Lieu- 
tenant-Governor Clubs West, 1933-1934. Member Catawba Valley 
Masonic Lodge, Past Master. Solicitor Burke County Criminal 
Court, 1930-1933; Judge 1937-1940; Chairman Burke County 
Board of Elections 1934-1947, 1940-1944; County Attorney, 1940- 
1945. Senator from the Twenty-eighth Senatorial District in the 
General Assembly of 1945. Methodist. Married Miss Mozelle Kib- 
ler, June 14, 1930. Address: Morganton, N. C. 



CARL WILEY HOWARD 

Carl Wiley Howard, Democrat, Representative from Gaston 
County, was born in McDuffie County, Georgia, December 31, 
1915. Son of Ocran and Essie (Wiley) Howard. Attended Rich- 
mond Military Academy, Augusta, Georgia, graduating in 1933; 
Emory University, AB Degree, 1938; Emory University Law 
School, LLB. 1941. Lawyer. Phi Delta Phi Legal Fraternity; 
Sigma Chi Fraternity. Mayor of Bessemer City, N. C, 1947-1948. 



456 North Carolina Manual 

Mason, Treasurer and Trustee of Masonic Lodge; All York Rite 
Bodies of Masonic; A. A. Order Nobles Mystic Shrine; Member 
of Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks; Lions Club, Presi- 
dent; American Legion, Commander of Post; Junior Chamber of 
Commerce. Major in World War II, January 1942-April 1946. 
Methodist; Member Board of Stewards, 1946 to date; Superin- 
tendent of Sunday School, 1946 to date. Married Beatrice Sexton 
1938. Two sons: Thoman Jackson Howard, age 6, and Robert Sex- 
ton Howard, age 2. Address: 215 Washington Ave., Bessemer 
City, N. C. 

J. FRANK HUSKINS 

J. Frank Huskins, Democrat, Representative from Yancey 
County, was born in Toledo, N. C, February 10, 1911. Son of 
Joseph Erwin and Mary Etta (Peterson) Huskins. Attended pub- 
lic schools of Yancey County; Yancey Collegiate Institute and 
Burnsville High School, 1923-1927; Mars Hill College, 1927-1929; 
University of North Carolina, 1929-1930, A.B. Degree; Univer- 
sity of North Carolina Law School, 1930-1932; Licensed to prac- 
tice in North Carolina, August 22, 1932; admitted to practice in 
Federal Courts, 1933. Lawyer. Member, 18th District Bar Asso- 
ciation; Vice-President, 1940-1941; North Carolina Bar Associa- 
tion ; Yancey County Bar Association. Attorney for Home Owners' 
Loan Corporation, 1933-1935. Mayor, Town of Burnsville, 1939- 
1942, resigning in middle of second term to accept commission 
in U. S. Navy. Served in United States Navy from July 10, 1942 
to February 18, 1946; Lieutenant Commander in United States 
Naval Reserve at present time. Member of the American Legion; 
Lions Club; Burnsville Men's Club. Representative in the General 
Assembly of 1947. Baptist. Married Miss Mary Bailey, January 
22, 1938. Address: Burnsville, N. C. 

EDWIN R. JOHNSON 

Edwin R. Johnson, Democrat, Representative from Currituck 
County, was born near Currituck Court House, September 10, 
1868. Son of Silas P. and Carolina (Coulter) Johnson. Attended 
public school and Atlantic Collegiate Institute of Elizabeth City. 
Merchant. Chairman County Democratic Executive Committee, 
1893-1937. Member State Senate, 1909, 1917; Representative in 



Biographical Sketches 457 

the General Assemblies of 1919, 1921, 1925, 1927, 1929, 1931 and 
1937. Chairman Board of County Commissioners, 1907-1909; 
former Chairman Board of Education. Food Administrator for 
Currituck County during World War I. Chairman Highway Com- 
mission, 1923-1924; Chairman Game Commission, 1923-1924. Mar- 
ried Mrs. Genevieve Holloman, 1910. Address: Currituck, N. C. 

JOHN WALTER JONES 

John Walter Jones, Democrat, Representative from Camden 
County, was born at South Mills, N. C, May 29, 1882. Son of 
Thomas Crowder and Georgiana (Williams) Jones. Attended 
Public Schools of Camden County. Retired Game Warden. Chair- 
man and member of Camden County Board of Education, 1918- 
1932; District Game and Fish Protector, 1943-1948; Secretary 
and member Camden County Democratic Executive Committee, 
1938 to present. Member New Lebanon Lodge No. 314, A.F. & 
A.M., Past Master, and present Secretary; Cherokee Chapter 
No. 14 Royal Arch Masons; Tyrian Council No. 19, Royal and 
Select Masters; Griggs Commandery No. 14, Knights Templar; 
Sudan Temple A. A. O.N. M.S. of New Bern, N. C; District Deputy 
Grand Master of District No. 1 from 1916-1919, and 1925. Metho- 
dist. Married Miss Maybelle Bartlett, October 1, 1905. Children: 
J. B. Jones, Washington, D. C; William B. Jones, Hampton, Va. ; 
Mrs. Margaret J. Leary, Arlington, Va.; one son, Winston L. 
Jones, died in Germany April 14, 1945, with General Patton's 
Third Army. Address: South Mills, N. C. 

WOODROW WILSON JONES 

Woodrow Wilson Jones, Democrat, Representative from Ruth- 
erford County, was born near Rutherfordton, N. C, January 26, 
1914. Son of Bernard Bartlett and Carl Jane (Nanney) Jones. 
Attended Forest City and Gilney, N. C. Grammar Schools, 1921- 
1928; Gilkey High School, 1928-1930; Rutherfordton- Spindale High 
School, 1930-1932; Mars Hill College, Mars Hill, N. C, 1932-1934; 
Wake Forest College Law School, 1934-1937, LL.B. Degree. At- 
torney. Member of the North Carolina Bar Association; Ruther- 
ford County Bar Association, President, 1943; 18th Judicial Dis- 
trict Bar Association, present Secretary-Treasurer; Rutherford- 
ton Kiwanis Club, President, 1943, Director, 1947; Rutherfordton 



458 North Carolina Manual 

Junior Chamber of Commerce. City Attorney for Rutherfordton, 
N. C, 1941-1943; Solicitor, Rutherford County Recorder's Court, 
1941-1944. Representative in the General Assembly of 1947. 
Baptist; Teacher, Baracca Sunday School Class, 1940-1944; Dea- 
con; Teacher Young Men's Sunday School Class. Lieutenant (jg.) 
United States Naval Reserve, Active duty, 1944-1946. Married 
Miss Rachel Elizabeth Phelps of Lillington, N. C, November 21, 
1936. Two children: Woodrow Wilson Jones, Jr., age 8 years; 
Michael Anthony Jones, age 6 years. Address: Rutherfordton, 
N. C. 

HENRY CRAWFORD KEARNEY 

Henry Crawford Kearney, Democrat, Representative from 
Franklin County, was born at Franklinton, N. C, February 1, 
1889. Son of Isaac Henry and Ozella Davis (Williams) Kearney. 
Attended Franklinton Public Schools, 1906-1916; LL.B Wake 
Forest College, 1922. Lawyer. Mayor of Franklinton, 1929-1939, 
1941-1945. Third N. C. National Guard, 1915-1917; 120th In- 
fantry 1917-1919; First Sergeant. Junior Order United American 
Mechanics; Past and Present Councilor. Lions Club, Past Presi- 
dent. Mason. Solicitor, Franklinton Recorder's Court. Representa- 
tive in the General Assembly of 1941 and 1945. Baptist; Trustee; 
Deacon. Married Miss Mary M. Gordon, December 20, 1922. Chil- 
dren: Mrs. Thomas F. East, Jr.; Rachel Gordon Kearney, student 
at Saint Mary's School. Address: Franklinton, N. C. 



• JOHN KERR, JR. 

John Kerr, Jr., Democrat, Representative from Warren County, 
was born in Warenton, N. C. Son of John H. and Lillian (Foote) 
Kerr. Attended Warrenton Public Schools until 1917; A.B., Uni- 
versity of North Carolina 1921 ; attended Wake Forest College Law 
School 1923. Lawyer. Member North Carolina Bar Association. 
Private in World War I. Representative in the General Assembly 
from Edgecombe County in 1929 and from Warren County in 
1939, 1941, 1943, 1945 and 1947; Speaker, 1943. Baptist. Chair- 
man Warren County Democratic Executive Committee since 1932. 
Married Miss Mary Hinton Duke. One son: John Kerr, III. Ad- 
dress: Warrenton, N. C, 



I.ittle of Alexander 
Little of Anson 
Little of Wake 



Long of Swain 

Maddrey of Hertford 
Martin of Davidson 



Massey of Graham 
Matheson of Iredell 

McDaniel of Buncombe 



McMullan of Chowan 
Moore of Wilson 

Morris of Mecklenburg 



Noble of Jones 
Outlaw of Duplin 
Page of Johnston 



Parker of Harnett 
Parrott of Lenoir 
Pass of Clay 







460 North Carolina Manual 

FRANK MARION KILPATRICK 

Frank Marion Kilpatrick, Democrat, Representative from Pitt 
County, was born in Grifton, N. C. 1891. Son of Frank Marion 
and Emma (Wilson) Kilpatrick. Attended school in Grifton, N. C, 
1907-1908; Johnson Bible College, Knoxville, Tennessee, 1909- 
1910; Lynchburg College, Lynchburg, Virginia; Southern Short- 
hand and Business College, Norfolk, Virginia, 1912. Farmer and 
Realtor; Member of Ayden Rotary Club; President of Rotary Club 
1940; Elected delegate to Rotary International, Havana, Cuba; 
Counsellor of the Junior Order. Member of the Pitt County High- 
way Commission for several years prior to the time the State 
took it over; Member of Board of County Commissioners, 1936- 
1940; Member of Town Aldermen of Ayden, 1942-1946. Served 
on Pitt County AAA Committee for about ten years; Member of 
Pitt County Democratic Executive Committee since 1938; Repre- 
sentative in the General Assembly of 1947. Member of Ayden 
Christian Church; Deacon for about 15 years. Married Miss Irma 
Cannon, December 25, 1923. Two children: Frank Kilpatrick, Jr., 
and Lois Anne Kilpatrick. Address: Ayden, N. C. 



OSCAR ARTHUR KIRKMAN 

Oscar Arthur Kirkman, Democrat, Representative from Guil- 
ford County, was born at High Point, N. C, April 16, 1900. Son 
of Oscar Arthur, Sr., and Lulu Blanche (Hammer) Kirkman. At- 
tended Public Schools of High Point, graduating in 1918; Univer- 
sity of Virginia, B.S., 1923; University of Virginia, M.S., 1924; 
one year of law at the University of Virginia, 1924-1925; two 
years of law, Oxford University (England) 1926-1928. Admitted 
to North Carolina Bar, 1929. Executive Vice-President and Gen- 
eral Manager High Point, Thomasville & Denton Railroad Comp- 
any of High Point, N. C. President, Atlantic B. & L. Association, 
High Point, since 1937; Director Southern Furniture Exposition 
Building, High Point; Regional Vice-President and Director, 
American Short Line Railroad Association, Washington, D. C, 
since 1930. Member Board of School Commissioners, High Point, 
1932-1939; Guilford County Board of Public Welfare, 1938-1939; 
Board of Trustees of Winston-Salem Teachers College, two terms. 
Mayor, City of High Point, 1939-1943; Councilman, 1945-Decem- 



Biographical Sketches 461 

ber 27, 1948. Federal Operating- Manager, railroads of Porto Rico 
on special assignment from the Office of Emergency Management, 
1943-1944. Teacher of Spanish, three years University of Virginia; 
Business Law, High Point College, one year. Member of Elks; 
Masons; Woodmen of the World; Royal Arcanum; Private U.S. 
Army, 1918; American Legion, Adjutant in the 20's; Alpha Kappa 
Psi Fraternity. National President, Alpha Kappa Psi, (Commerce 
and Business Administration Fraternity), Indianapolis, Indiana, 
1929-1933. Methodist; Member of Board of Stewards, 1929-1947. 
Married Miss Katharine Morgan of Salisbury, N. C, March 10, 
1939. Children: Larkin, age 11; Caroline, age 9; John age 7; 
Susan, age six months. Address: 501 West High Street, High 
Point, N. C. 

ROGER CLINTON KISER 

Roger Clinton Kiser, Democrat, Representative from Scotland 
County, was born in Yadkin Township, Stokes County, August 30, 
1894. Son of Edwin Kiser and Amy Florence (Butner) Kiser. At- 
tended public and private schools in Stokes County; Piedmont 
High School, Cleveland County; Guilford College; University of 
North Carolina; Teachers College of Columbia University. Teacher 
or principal for eighteen years in North Carolina schools. Farmer. 
Member Scotland County Farmers' Club, Aberdeen Tobacco 
Board of Trade, American Farm Bureau Federation, Rotary In- 
ternational, American Legion. Oiganized and commanded Comp- 
any "H" 5th Development Battalion, Camp McArthur, Waco, 
Texas, World War I. Mason. Member Christian Church. Married 
Miss Gertrude Margaret Bedell, Ridgewood, N. J., August 14, 
1926. Two children: Dorothy May Kiser, student, Guilford College; 
Edwin Marten Kiser. Address: 318 Vance St., Laurinburg, N. C. 

ROBERT LASSITER, JR. 

Robert Lassiter, Jr., Democrat, Representative from Mecklen- 
burg County, was born at Charlotte, N. C, January 30, 1912. Son 
of Robert and Daisy (Hanes) Lassiter. Attended Woodberry 
Forest, 1925-1930; Yale University, A.B., 1934; Harvard Law 
School, LL.B., 1938. Attorney. Lieutenant Commander, United 
States Navy, 1941-1945. Psi Eupsilon Fraternity. Methodist. Mar- 
ried Miss Elizabeth Fitton, 1943. One daughter. Address: 700 
Law Building, Charlotte, N. C. 



462 North Carolina Manual 

MARVIN T. LEATHERMAN 

Marvin T. Leatherman, Democrat, Representative from Lincoln 
County, vv^as born in Lincoln County, March 30, 1896. Son of 
Franklin J. and Parthena (Wesson) Leatherman. Attended Pub- 
lic Schools of Lincoln County ; Piedmont High School, Lawndale, 
N. C; Rutherford College; Law course. Wake Forest College. At- 
torney at Law^. Member, North Carolina State Bar Association ; 
Lincolnton Bar Association. Clerk Superior Court, Lincoln 
County, 1924-1930; Attorney, Lincoln County, 1930-1946. Knights 
of Pythias; Lincolnton .Kiwanis Club, President, 1946. Baptist; 
Deacon ; taught men's Bible Class for past twenty years. Married 
Mattie Tinman, January 24, 1924. One daughter: Marguerite, 
junior at Meredith College. Address: Lincolnton, N. C. 

EARL FRITZ LITTLE 

Earl Fritz Little, Democrat, Representative from Alexander 
County, was born at Waynesville, N. C, August 27, 1918. Son of 
Earl C. and Mag-gie (Nichols) Little. Attended Leicester High 
School, 1932-1936; Biltmore College, Asheville, N. C. Farmer. 
Served in the armed forces, June 13, 1941 to September 31, 1945 
as Sergeant. Methodist. Address: Taylorsville, N. C. 

HAL W. LITTLE 

Hal W. Little, Democrat, Representative from Anson County, 
was born at Wadesboro, N. C, August 11, 1905. Son of Henry W. 
and Effie (Allen) Little. Attended Wadesboro High School and 
Duke University. Merchant and Farmer. Member and President 
of Rotary Club; Member and President of Anson Executive Club; 
Woodmen of the World. Anson County Commissioner. Captain, 
United States Army, July 11, 1942 to January 16, 1946. Metho- 
dist; Chairman Board of Stewards. Married Miss Mary Louise 
Robbins, June 9, 1944. Two children: Dora Anne Little and Henry 
Wall Little, III. Address: Wadesboro, N. C. 

JAMES C. LITTLE, JR. 

James C. Little, Jr., Democrat, Representative from Wake 
County, was born at Raleigh, N. C, November 10, 1917. Son of 
James C. and Alma (Marsh) Little. Attended Needham B. 



Biographical Sketches 463 

Broughton High School, 1930-1934; Duke University, 1934-1938, 
A.B. Degree; Duke University Law School, LL.B. Degree, 1940. 
Attorney at Law. Member of the Wake County Bar Association; 
North Carolina Bar Association. National Committeeman North 
Carolina Young Democratic Club, 1948-1949. Kappa Sigma, Omi- 
cron Delta Kappa, Beta Omega Sigma Fraternities. First Lieu- 
tenant in the U. S. Marine Corps, 1942-1945. Presbyterian; Mem- 
ber of Board of Deacons. Married Miss Menefee Bennett, Decem- 
ber 14, 1946. One child: Menefee Bennett Little. Address: Raleigh, 
N. C . 

•JAMES ROBERT LONG 

James Robert Long, Democrat, Representative from Swain 
County, was born at Cullowhee, N. C, May 17, 1875. Son of 
John M. and Alice (Stephens) Long. Attended the County 
Schools; Cullowhee Normal and Lidustrial College (Now Western 
Carolina Teachers College), 1897. Insurance. Cashier of Bryson 
City Bank for 25 years; Register of Deeds, Jackson County, 1898- 
1901; Tax Clerk, North Carolina Tax Commission; Town Alder- 
man for Bryson City; Town Treasurer for Bryson City. Mem- 
ber of Bryson City Rotary Club, President, 1944. Methodist; Lay 
Leader, Waynesville District, 18 years; Member Board of Stew- 
ards, Bryson City Methodist Church, 25 years. Married Miss 
Ethel Smith, February 11, 1900. One child. Address: Bryson City, 
N. C. 

CHARLES GORDON MADDREY 

Charles Gordon Maddrey, Democrat, Representative from Hert- 
ford County, was born at Seaboard, N. C, November 9, 1904. 
Son of J. T. and Rowena Milner (Stephenson) Maddrey, Attended 
Seaboard High School, 1911-1922; Wake Forest College, A.B. De- 
gree, 1926; University of North Carolina, several summers. 
Farmer and merchant. Hertford County Farm Bureau-past presi- 
dent. Member of Rotary Club; Chamber of Commerce; Chairaian 
School Board; Past President Scotland Neck Kiwanis Club; 
Beechwood Country Club; Executive Member East Carolina 
Council BSA. Mason. Baptist; Chairman Board of Deacons; 
Teacher of Young Men's Bible Class. Married Miss Mabel Claire 
Hoggard, December 26, 1931. Two sons: Charles Hoggard Mad- 
drey, 12; Joseph Gordon Maddrey, 7. Address: 421 W. Church 
Street, Ahoskie, N. C. 



464 North Carolina Manual 

LISTER A. MARTIN 

Lister A. Martin, Democrat, Representative from Davidson 
County, was born in Leaksville, October 29, 1885. Son of A. B. J. 
and Lula W. (Hubbard) Martin. Attended Leaksville Public 
School; Oak Ridge Institute, 1904; University of North Carolina, 
1906-1908. Lawyer. Member North Carolina Bar Association and 
the Davidson County Bar Association. Judge, Recorder's Court, 
Thomasville, 1911-1913; Solicitor, Recorder's Court, Lexington, 
1920. Member of Lexington High School Board, 1925-1926. Mem- 
ber Lexington Rotary Club. Representative in the General Assem- 
bly of 1927, 1929 and 1937. Baptist. Member Board of Deacons; 
Teacher Baracca Class. Married Miss Jessie King, May 24, 1911 
(Deceased); three children: Jessie, Louise and Mary. Married 
Miss Claire Brown 1943. Address: Lexington, N. C. 

DENNIS ALEXANDRA MASSEY 

Dennis Alexandra Massey, Democrat, Representative from 
Graham County, was born at Cove Creek, Haywood County, Jan- 
uary 5, 1896. Son of Princess Vaughan and Lucinda (Owens) 
Massey. Attended Waynesville High School. Barber. Member of 
Missionary Baptist Church, Robbinsville; former Deacon and 
Treasurer. Ordained Minister and Pastor of Long Creek Baptist 
Church. Married Miss Arlene Slaughter, September 29, 1914. 
Three children: Glenn Massey; Mrs. Lucile Owen; Mrs. Dennis 
Mae Wiggins. Address: Robbinsville, N. C. 

JOHN FLOOD MATHESON 

John Flood Matheson, Democrat, Representative from Iredell 
County, was born in Cheraw, South Carolina, June 7, 1906. Son 
of Donald Stuart and Esten (Jennings) Matheson. Attended 
Cheraw High School, 1919-1923; B.S., North Carolina State, 1927. 
Textile manufacturer. Member of American Manufacturer's As- 
sociation; Cotton Textile Institute; U. S. Chamber of Commerce. 
City Councilman, 1936-1945. Member of Kappa Alpha and Phi 
Kappa Phi Fraternities. Representative in the General Assembly 
of 1947. Presbyterian. Married Miss Beth Davidson, April, 1945. 
One child, Mary Davidson Matheson, born April 22, 1946. Ad- 
dress: Mooresville, N. C. 



Biographical Sketches 465 



LESLIE HAROLD McDANIEL 



Leslie Harold McDaniel, Democrat, Representative from Bun- 
combe County, was born at St. George, South Carolina, May 10, 
1894. Son of James Calvin and Mary Ann (Shuler) McDaniel. At- 
tended elementary schools and Business High School, Washington, 
D. C; Washington College of Law, Washington, D. C, graduat- 
ing with Bachelor of Law degree in May of 1926. Retired Attor- 
ney-Examiner, Interstate Commerce Commission, Washington, D. 
C. Former member of District of Columbia Bar. Chairman of 
Oteen Precinct Democratic Executive Committee and member of 
Buncombe County Democratic Executive Committee. Member of 
Buncombe County Local Draft Board No. 1 ; Black Mountain 
Price and Rationing Board. Served in World War I ; promoted 
to rank of Sergeant. Accepted as candidate in Officers training 
school; commissioned as Second Lieutenant in Reserve Corps at 
end of war. Member of Loyal Order of Moose, Asheville, N. C. 
Member and past Commander of C. W. Francy Post No. 70, 
American Legion, Oteen, N. C; Past Chef de Train, 40 and 8, 
Western N. C. Voiture No. 1187; former member of Disabled 
American Veterans; Past member of the Rehabilitation Committee 
of the American Legion Department of North Carolina. Meth- 
odist. Married Miss Loretta Robbins, February 18, 1925. Address: 
Oteen, N. C. 

JOHN HENRY McMULLAN 

John Henry McMullan, Democrat, Representative from Chowan 
County, was born at Hei'tford, N. C, August 13, 1882. Son of Dr. 
John H. and Lina (Tucker) McMullan. Educated at Edenton 
Academy; University of North Carolina, class of 1903; University 
of North Carolina Law School, class of 1906. Lawyer. Member 
North Carolina Bar Association. First President, Chowan County 
Chamber of Commerce; Mayor of Edenton for eleven years; Judge 
Chowan Recorders Court for six years. DKE College fraternity. 
Trustee of University of North Carolina, 1919-1932, Representa- 
tive from Chowan County in the General Assembly of 1919; State 
Senator from the First Senatorial District in the General Assem- 
bly of 1925. Episcopalian. Married Miss Carolyn Barrow Clarke, 
1925. One daughter, Carolyn Clarke McMullan, now Mrs. Robert 
S. Grant. Address: 14 East King Street, Edenton, N. C. 



466 North Carolina Manual 

LARRY ICHABOD MOORE, JR. 

Larry Ichabod Moore, Jr., Democrat, Representative from Wil- 
son County, was born in Greenville, N. C, January 26, 1904. Son 
of Larry L and Ella (King) Moore. Attended New Bern Public 
Schools 1910-1920; University of North Carolina, A.B. course 
1920-22; B.S. course 1922-24; Law 1924-26. Lawyer, Farmer and 
Dairyman. Solicitor Wilson County General County Court 1929- 
1934. Representative in the General Assembly of 1939, 1941, 1943, 
1945 and 1947. County Attorney, Wilson County since 1943; Past 
President, Second Judicial District Bar Association; Past President 
Wilson County Young Democrats Club; served 8 years as Direc- 
tor, General Alumni Association of the University of North Car- 
olina and several years as President of Wilson County Alumni 
Association; member State Board of Health, 1943-1944; member 
Advisory Budget Commission; member Beta Theta Pi Social Fra- 
ternity and Phi Delta Phi Legal Fraternity; Member Farm Bu- 
reau, State Grange, Mason, (Past Master) ; Royal Arch Mason, 
(Past High Priest), Mt. Lebanon Council, No. 13, Royal and 
Select Masters (Past Illustrious Master) ; Knights Templar (Past 
Commander) ; Shriner, Past President Wilson County Shrine 
Club; Member of Benevolent and Protective order of Elks (Ex- 
alted Ruler 1941-42, Wilson Lodge No. 840, Honorary Life Mem- 
ber) . Married Miss Grace Thompson February 7, 1946. One daugh- 
ter, Grace Thompson Moore, born November 26, 1946; one son, 
Larry L Moore, III, born July 1, 1948. Address: Wilson, N. C. 



HARVEY MORRIS 

Harvey Morris, Democrat, Representative from Mecklenburg 
County, was born in Charlotte, N. C, September 18, 1887. Son of 
P. R. and Pinky Lee (Berryhill) Morris. Finished Charlotte 
Schools in 1905. Dairy Farmer. President of Morris Livestock 
Co., Morris Farm Equipment Co., and Morris Esso Service Co. 
Member of Mecklenburg County Welfare Board, 1936-1938; Board 
of County Commissioners, 1938-1940, National Guard, 1905-1908. 
Mason, Shriner, Elk, Moose, Eagles. Representative in the Gen- 
eral Assembly of 1945 and 1947. Presbyterian. Married Miss Iris 
Owen. Three children. Address : Charlotte, N. C. Route No. 6. 



Powell of Columbus 
Powell of Rockingham 
Pritchard of Mitchell 



Pritchett of Caldwell 
Rackley of Sampson 
Regan of Robeson 



Roberts of Madison 
Royster of Vance 
Scott of Beaufort 



Shomaker of Avery 
Shreve of Guilford 
Slagle of Macon 



Smith of Union 
Smoot of Davie 
Snow of Surry 



Spruill of Bertie 
Story of Wilkes 
Tatem of Tyrrel 




468 North Carolina Manual 

GEORGE NICHOLSON NOBLE 

George Nicholson Noble, Democrat, Representative from Jones 
County, was born in Jones County, February 2, 1908. Son of 
George G. and Sabrah (James) Noble. Attended Trenton High 
School, 1923-1927; N. C. State College, graduating in 1931, B.S. 
Degree. Merchant and Farmer. Mayor of Trenton, 1946-1948. 
Chief Petty Officer in Navy, November 1942-October 1945. ^Meth- 
odist. Married Miss Jane Bunting, September 25, 1942. One 
daughter. Address: Box 400, Trenton, N. C. 

LEWIS WRIGHT OUTLAW 

Lewis Wright Outlaw, Democrat, Representative from Duplin 
County, was born near Outlaws Bridge, Albertson Township, Dup- 
lin County, December 15, 1891. Son of Joseph Benjamin and Em- 
ma (Simmons) Outlaw. Attended Outlaws School, 1897-1910; re- 
ceived diploma in bookkeeping course at King's Business School, 
Raleigh, N. C, 1912. Farmer. Private Battery A, 113th Field 
Artillery, 30th Division, May 16, 1918, until mustered out March 
28, 1919. Member of Duplin County AAA Committee about 6 
years; served as chairman of the Board of Directors of the Tri 
County Electric Membership Corporation since set up ; Supervisor 
in Southeastern Soil Conservation District consisting of Wayne, 
Lenoir, Sampson and Duplin Counties; Representative in the 
General Assembly of 1947. Address: Seven Springs, N. C, 
Route 1. 

GILES TROY PAGE 

Giles Troy Page, Democrat, Representative from Johnston 
County, was born in Rockingham County on May 15, 1896. Son 
of William G. and Martha Elizabeth (Setliffe) Page. Attended 
Rockingham County Public School, 1903 to 1913; Leaksville Spray 
Institute, Leaksville, N. C, 1914 to 1915; Course in Salesman- 
ship at Eastman Correspondence School, 1921. Supply merchant, 
farmer and cotton ginner. Member North Carolina Merchants 
Association; Clayton Rotary Club since 1932, President, 1941; 
Attended National Conventions as delegate at Havana, Cuba, At- 
lantic City, N. J., and San Francisco, California. President, 
Homestead Building & Loan Ass'n. Clayton, N. C. Town Com- 
missioner of Clayton, N. C, 1937-1941, 1945-1947. .Knights of 



Biographical Sketches 469 

Pythias, Chancellor Commander, 1939-1940. No. 16 Mason, Master 
Granite Lodge No. 191, 1942; Secretary, 1943-1944; Past Masters 
Jewel. Baptist. Member Board Deacons 6 years; present Deacon; 
Sunday School superintendent since 1938. Married Miss Minnie 
Wiley Cox, October 10, 1925. One son: G. Troy Page, Jr. Address: 
Clayton, N. C. 

HOWARD ELLIOTT PARKER 

Howard Elliott Parker, Democrat, Representative from Har- 
nett County, was born at Bunnlevel, N. C, September 27, 1915. 
Son of James Washington and Crissie W. (Allen) Parker. At- 
tended Erwin Schools; graduated from High School, 1933; U. S. 
Armed Forces Institute Course (University of Wisconsin) 1945, 
on Labor Law. Representative Textile Workers Union of Amer- 
ica, CIO. Member board of directors Erwin Athletic Booster Club 
1948; Erwin Fire Department since 1947; North Carolina State 
Firemen's Association; Harnett County Farm Bureau. Chairman 
Harnett County Young Democrats, 1948. Member of Patriotic 
Order Sons of America, Washington Camp No. 68, Erwin, N. C; 
member of Order Law Committee, 1947; Deputy State President, 
1948. Member Junior Order, United American Mechanics, Wash- 
ington Council No. 191, Erwin, N. C; Chaplain local Council, 
1948. Co-Chairman Erwin Community Chest drive, 1948. Member 
of Erwin Post No. 133, American Legion. Enlisted in Army Air 
Forces as private October, 1942. Honorably discharged with rank 
of Staff Sergeant December, 1945. Married Miss Netral P. Pollard 
of Coats, N. C, 1942. One son: Howard E. Parker II, born 1945. 
Address: Erwin, N. C. 

MARION ARENDELL PARROTT 

Marion Arendell Parrott, Democrat, Representative from Lenoir 
County, was born at Kinston, N. C, August 23, 1918. Son of Dr. 
William Thomas, Sr. and Jeannette Euphemia (Johnson) Parrott. 
Attended Kinston Public Schools, 1924-1935; The Citadel, 1939, 
B.A.; University of North Carolina, 1947, LL.B. Lawyer. Mem- 
ber of Lenoir County Bar Association; Kinston Chamber of Com- 
merce; Lenoir County Farm Bureau. Member of Zeta Psi (Col- 
lege social fraternity) ; St. John's Lodge No. 4, Ancient Free 
and Accepted Masons; New Bern Consistory No. 3, Scottish Rite 



470 North Carolina Manual 

Masons (32nd degree) ; Veterans of Foreign Wars; American 
Legion; La Societe des 40 Hommes et 8 Cheveaux. Entered service 
with Service Battery, 113th Field Artillery, North Carolina Na- 
tional Guard, later transferred to Parachute troops; On active 
service, September 16, 1940 to March 18, 1946; Major, 377th Para- 
chute F. A. Battalion, 101st Airborne Division. Member of the 
Disciples of Christ Church; Deacon, 1948 — . Married Miss Lillian 
West, March 6, 1948. Address: 610 North Queen Street, Kinston, 
N. C. 

FRED DAVIDSON PASS 

Fred Davidson Pass, Democrat, Representative fi'om Clay 
County, was born at Hayesville, N. C, January 15, 1882. Son of 
William Bascom and Mary (Davidson) Pass. Attended Young 
L. G. Harris College, 1900-1904. Service Station and Hotel Owner. 
Mayor of Hayesville, May, 1947 to present. Member of Junior 
Order; Woodmen of the World; Lions Club. Methodist. Married 
Miss Katherine Hogsed, June 26, 1913. Address: Hayesville, N. C. 

JUNIUS KENNETH POWELL 

Junius Kenneth Powell, Democrat, Representative from Colum- 
bus County, was born in Whiteville, N. C, July 15, 1899. Son of 
Robert Henry and Nett (McKinnon) Powell. Attended Whiteville 
High School; Judge Walter Siler's Law School, Raleigh, and Wake 
Forest College. Lawyer. Solicitor, Columbus County Court, 1935- 
1936; Attorney for Columbus County, 1937-1939; Tax Attorney 
for Columbus County, 1939-1940; Attorney for Town of Fair 
Bluff, 1944-1946. 32nd Degree Mason; Shriner. Senator from the 
Tenth District in the General Assembly of 1947. Presbyterian. 
Married Miss Helen Simmons, October 7, 1919. One daughter: 
Mrs. Catherine Powell Powell (Student U.N.C. Law School). Ad- 
dress: Whiteville, N. C. 

RADFORD GILMORE POWELL 

Radford Gilmore Powell, Democrat, Representative from Rock- 
ingham County, was born at Reidsville, N. C, December 9, 1903. 
Son of William Johnson and Ophelia (Strader) Powell. Attended 
Mt. Carmel School; Reidsville High School, 1918. Employee of 
American Tobacco Company. First Vice President N. C. State 



Biographical Sketches 471 

Federation of Labor; President Local 192 T.W.LU., Reidsville; 
President Tobacco Workers International Union, A.F. of L., 1943- 
1944; Served as member of Board of Directors, Reidsville Cham- 
ber of Commerce, 1942-1943; Appointed by Ex-Governor Brough- 
ton during war to serve on Unemployment Compensation Board 
of Reidsville; Former member Junior Order of American Me- 
chanics, 1925. Boy Scout worker. Methodist; Former Superinten- 
dent of Sunday School; Teacher of Men's Bible Class for twenty- 
one years. Married Miss EfRe Mae Chapmon, April 11, 1924. Two 
children: Eleanor Gail Powell and Glen Harvey Powell. Address: 
Route 3, Reidsville, N. C. 

WARREN H. PRITCHARD 

Warren H. Pritchard, Republican, Representative from Mitchell 
County, was born at Spruce Pine, N. C, July 9, 1920. Son of 
Clyde and Pearl (Hall) Pritchard. Attended Harris High School, 
graduating 1937; Mars Hill Junior College, 1937-1939; B.S. De- 
gree Wake Forest College, 1941; Midshipman-Officers School at 
Harvard University; Graduate School of Bvisiness Administration, 
1943-1944; LL.B., Wake Forest Law School, 1947. Attorney. Mem- 
ber of Mitchell County Bar Association; Secretary, 17th District 
Bar Association. Member, American Business Club; Phi Beta 
Kappa and Omicron Delta Kappa Fraternities. Lieutenant, United 
States Navy, 1942-1946. Member of American Legion. Baptist; 
Superintendent Sunday School; Clerk, Mitchell Baptist Associa- 
tion. Address : Spruce Pine, N. C. 

JAMES TURNER PRITCHETT 

James Turner Pritchett, Democrat, Representative from Cald- 
well County, was born in Guilford County, August 13, 1889. Son 
of Henry C. and Margaret (Mebane) Pritchett. Attended Lenoir 
High School; A.B., University of North Carolina 1914; Univer- 
sity of North Carolina Law School and Wake Forest Law School. 
Lawyer. Member of Caldwell County Bar Association; State Bar 
and North Carolina Bar Association. Mayor of Lenoir 1919-1920. 
Prosecuting Attorney, Caldwell County Recorder's Court 1931- 
1934. Captain United States Army World War I; Alpha Tau Omega 
College Fraternity; Past Grand Chancellor, Knights of Pythias. 



472 North Carolina Manual 

Representative from Caldwell County in the General Assembly 
of 1939, 1941, 1943 and 1945. Presbyterian; Elder since 1937. 
Married Miss Marj?aret Preston Martin, Salisbury, N. C, Decem- 
ber 28, 1920. Two children: James Turner Pritchett, Jr., and 
Mebane Moore Pritchett. Address: Lenoir, N, C. 



ALMON EVERETT RACKLEY 

Almon Everett Rackley, Republican, Representative from Samp- 
son County, was born in Sampson County, December 9, 1895. Son 
of Valentine and Elizabeth (Cherry) Rackley. Attended Salem- 
burg Academy, 1913-1914. Tobacco Warehouseman and Farmer. 
Magistrate, 1918-1934; Constable, 1940-1948. Baptist. Married Miss 
Mary Peterson, February 28, 1915. One son: Pete F. Rackley. Ad- 
dress: Clinton, N. C. 



JOHN BRECKENRIDGE REGAN 

John Breckenridge Regan, Representative from Robeson County, 
was born at Lumberton, N. C, December 19, 1912. Son of John 
Breckenridge and Jannatta A. (Fisher) Regan. Attended Appala- 
chian State Teachers College, 1932-1934; Cumberland University, 
1934-1936, LL.B. Degree. Lawyer and Farmer. Member of North 
Carolina Bar Association ; Robeson County Bar Association ; Ninth 
Judicial District Bar, Treasurer. Solicitor of Recorder's Court, 
1938-1942. Member and twice Past Master of St. Pauls Masonic 
Lodge, Phoenix Chapter, No. 20; Member of Palestine Commandry 
No. 2, Fayetteville Council, No. 27, Sudan Temple; Grand Repre- 
sentative of the Grand Lodge of South Carolina to the Grand 
Lodge of North Carolina; Present District Deputy Grand Master 
of the 11th Masonic District. Member and twice President of St. 
Pauls Rotary Club, 1946, 1947. Methodist; Superintendent of Sun- 
day School, 1941, 1942; Teacher of Men's Bible Class; Member of 
Board of Stewards. Married Miss Mary Ann Brewer, December 
25, 1938. Children: John Breckenridge Regan, IH, Mary Brewer 
Regan, Annie Maynette Regan, George Duncan Regan. Address: 
gt. Pauls, N. C, 



Biographical Sketches 473 

CLYDE MORRIS ROBERTS 

Clyde Morris Roberts, Republican, Representative from Madison 
County, was born at Marshall, N. C, September 25, 1909. Son of 
George Garfield and Minnie (Allman) Roberts. Graduated from 
Marshall High School, 1927; attended Mars Hill College, 1927- 
1929; University of North Carolina, 1929-19.31, B.A. Degree. At- 
torney at Law^. Member of Marshall Bar Association; North Caro- 
lina and American Farm Bureau Federations; Past President of 
Marshall Men's Club; Clerk Superior Court, Madison County, 1939- 
1946; Vice Chairman, N. C. Young Republicans, 1940-1942; Chair- 
man, Madison County Republican Executive Committee, 1946- 
1948; Member of Committee on organization, N. C. Republican 
Convention, 1948; Member of N. C. Republican Executive Com- 
mittee, 1948. Social Science Teacher in Walnut High School, Madi- 
son County, 1931-1936; Special Agent, Southern Railway Police 
Department, 1936-1938. Member of French Broad Masonic Lodge 
No. 292, Marshall, N. C, Master, 1941-1942; Lieut. U.S.N.R. Oct., 
1943 — Jan. 1946; Member American Legion, Davis- Sexton Post 
No. 317; Boy Scouts of America, Committeeman, Troop 2; Mem- 
ber North Carolina Wildlife Federation. Baptist. Married Miss 
Lucile Roberts, May 13, 1944. One daughter: Cecelia Orlene 
Roberts. Address: Marshall, N. C. 



FRED STOVALL ROYSTER 

Fred Stovall Royster, Democrat, Representative from Vance 
County, was born in Dabney, N. C, December 31, 1908. Son of 
John Stovall and Alvada (Green) Royster. Attended Henderson 
High School, 1921-1925; Duke University. Tobacconist and 
Farmer. President, Bright Belt Warehouse Association, 1945-1948; 
President, Middle Belt Warehouse Association, 1944-1948; Chair- 
man, Flue-Cured Tobacco Marketing Committee, 1948. Member 
North Carolina Tobacco Advisory Council, 1948. Member Board 
of Directors, North Carolina Farm Bureau, 1948. Member Tobacco 
Committee, North Carolina State Grange, 1946-1948. Member 
Board of Directors, North Carolina Agricultural Foundation, 1946- 
1948. Member Henderson Rotary Club; Henderson Lodge 1681, 
B.P.O.E.; Mason. Chairman, Vance County Board of Elections, 
1934-1936. President, Henderson Chamber of Commerce, 1946. Rep- 



474 North Carolina Manual 

resentative from Vance County in the General Assembly of 1945 
and 1947. Methodist; Chairman, Board of Stewards, 1937-1946. 
Married Miss Launah Parker of Mooresville, N. C, January 4, 
1942. Address: Henderson, N. C. 



LEROY SCOTT 

LeRoy Scott, Democrat, Representative from Beaufort County, 
was born in Washington, N. C, October 20, 1909. Son of Lawrence 
M. and Sina (Whitford) Scott. Attended Aurora High School, 
1920-1921; Washington High School, September, 1922-June, 1927; 
LL.B., Wake Forest College, June, 1931; U. S. Naval Indoctrina- 
tion School at Dartmouth College, November, 1942-February, 1943; 
Naval Intelligence School at Washington, D. C, October 1, 1942- 
November 1, 1942. Attorney at Law. Member of the Elks Club; 
Veterans of Foreign Wars; American Legion; Junior Chamber of 
Commerce. U. S. Conciliation Commissioner under the Frazier 
Lempke Farm Bankruptcy Act. Lieutenant Commander in the 
U. S. Naval Reserve. Entered service October 1, 1942 and honor- 
ably discharged at San Francisco on November 1, 1945. Vice-Presi- 
dent, DVL. Fraternity at Wake Forest College; Vice-President of 
the Euzelian Literary Society; Student Council. Representative in 
the General Assembly of 1947. Episcopalian. Address: Wash- 
ington, N. C. • , - , 

ROBY ALAN SHOMAKER 

Roby Alan Shomaker, Republican, Representative from Avery 
County, was born at Banner Elk, N. C, April 20, 1887. Son of 
Robert T. and Louise (Johnson) Shomaker. Attended Walnut 
Grove Institute, Watauga County, N. C, 1907. Farmer, business 
man. Register of Deeds, Avery County, 1924-1932; Alderman, 
Town of Newland, N. C, 1939; First Deputy Sheriff, Avery Coun- 
ty, 1932-1937. Member of Masonic Order, Linville Lodge No, 489 
A. F. & A. M., Newland, N. C, Secretary, 1929. Baptist. Married 
Miss Sarah Fina Reece, February 22, 1914. Children: Eudine N. 
Shomaker Duncan; Lois Shomaker; Mary Louise Shomaker Bare; 
Sarah Victoria Shomaker Swan; Helen Ernestine Shomaker Wil- 
liams. Address: Newland, N. C. 



Taylor of Buncombe 
Taylor of Caswell 
Taylor of Wayne 



Umstead of Orange 
van Noppen of Stokes 

VanderLinden of Catawba 



Venters of Onslow 

Wallace of Montgomery 
Whitfield of Pender 



Whitmire of Henderson 
Williamson of Brunswick 
Winslow of Perquimans 



Woodard of Northampton 
Worthington of Pitt 

Annie Cooper — Principal Clerk 




476 North Carolina Manual 



CLYDE ALLISON SHREVE 



Clyde Allison Shieve, Democrat, Representative from Guilford 
County, was born in Rockingham County, N. C, June 25, 1908. 
Son of J. A. and Bessie D. (Lester) Shreve. Attended Bethany 
High School, Rockingham County, 1923-1927; University North 
Carolina, 1928-1931; Woodrow Wilson College of Law, Atlanta, 
Ga., LL.B., 1935. Lavi^er. Member State Bar; N. C. State 
Grange; N. C. State Farm Bureau; A. F. & A. M., Stokesdale 
Lodge No. 428; Jr. 0. U. A. M., Summerfield Council No. 174; 
State Vice Councillor, 1942-1943; State Councillor, Jr. 0. U. A. M., 
1943-1944; Deputy National Councillor, 1945; Instructor Business 
Law, Greensboro Evening College, September, 1949 ; Represen- 
tative from Guilford County in the General Assembly of 1943 
and 1947. Baptist. Married Miss Ruth Marie Doggett, December 
27, 1933. One son: Clyde Allison Shreve, Jr. Address: Stokes- 
dale, N. C. 

CARL S. SLAGLE 

Carl S. Slagle, Democrat, Representative from Macon County, 
was born at Franklin. N. C, September 10, 1889. Son of Chas. 
W. and Myra L. Slagle. Attended Franklin High School and North 
Carolina State College. Farmer. Mason. Methodist. Married Miss 
Louise Arthur, October 7, 1914. Three children: Mary, Myra and 
Siler, all married. Address: Prentiss, N. C. 



HENRY BASCOM SMITH 

Henry Bascom Smth, Democrat, Representative from Union 
County, was born in Union County, N. C, Ajjril 22, 1901. Son of 
M. M. and Laura Dona (Price) Smith. Attended the Unionville 
Public School; Monroe City High School, graduating, 1922; secured 
License as Attorney, 1929. Attorney at Law. Member of North 
Carolina State Bar; President of Thirteenth Judicial District 
Bar, 1947; Assistant Judge of County Court, 1930-32; Judge of 
County Court by appointment March 1, 1948-December 1, 1948; 
Prosecuting Attorney, 1932-1946. Mason. Member of Lions Club; 
President of Monroe Lions Club, July 1, 1946-June 30, 1947; Zone 
Chairman Lions International 1947-1948; Chairman Monroe Park 
and Recreation Commission; Methodist; member of Board of 



Biographical Sketches 477 

Stewards; Board of Trustees. Married Miss Marg'uerite Brown, 
June 1, 1933. Three children: Henry B. Smith, Jr., Margaret Ann 
Smith, William Lowery Smith. Address: 209 South Church Street, 
Monroe, N. C. 

JAMES NAPOLEON SMOOT 

James Napoleon Smoot, Republican, Representative from Davie 
County, was born in Davie County, January 22, 1891. Son of 
Samuel J. and Florence Ella (Walker) Smoot. Farmer. Chairman 
of Davie County Production Marketing Administration since 1944; 
helped organize and serve as President of the first Farm Bureau 
in Da. vie County; helped organize Center Grange and served in 
the fallowing offices: Assistant Steward; Chaplain; Member of 
Agriculture Committee at present; Supervisor of the Middle Yad- 
kin Soil Conservation District, 1944 to the present time. Meth- 
odist; Chairman of the Board of Stewards, 1938 to the present; 
District Steward, 1940 to the present. Married Miss Mary Esther 
Dwiggins, November 14, 1914. Five children: Address: Route 4, 
Mocksville, N. C. 

GEORGE KEY SNOW 

George Key Snow, Democrat, Representative from Surry County, 
was born in Surry County, N. C, May 5, 1891. Son of Joseph Ax- 
som and Cora Elizabeth (Key) Snow. Attended Trinity Park 
School, Durham, N. C, 1909-1910; Trinity College, 1910-1911; 
1915-1917. Lawyer. Member of the North Carolina State Bar; 
North Carolina Bar Association. Postmaster, Mount Airy, N. C, 
1920, 1924; Asst. Director Civilian Defense April- 16, 1942 to April 
15, 1944. State Salvage Manager War Production Board, April 
1944 to October, 1945. Commander, North Carolina Department of 
The American Legion, 1944-1945. Knights of Pythias, Chancellor 
Commander, 1924; Member of Kiwanis Club, Mount Airy, N. C. 
Served in the U. S. Army, May 2, 1917-August 7, 1919; Second 
Lt., September, 1917; First Lt., November, 1919; Captain, Feb- 
ruary, 1919. Representative in the General Assembly of 1947. 
Methodist; Steward for last 25 years. Married Miss Tula Nina 
Waller, September 15, 1919. One son: George K. Snow, Jr., born 
January 25, 1933. Address: 146 West Lebanon Street, Mount 
Airy, N. C. 



478 North Carolina Manual 

CHARLES WAYLAND SPRUILL 

Charles Wayland Spruill, Democrat, Representative from Bertit 
County, was born at Quitsna, April 6, 1889. Son of Charles Way- 
land and Annie E. (Tadlock) Spruill. Attended Oak Ridge Insti- 
tute, 1904-1906; State College 1908-1909. Merchant, farmer and 
manufacturer. Member Bertie County Road Commission, 1920- 
1921, 1925-1930. Chairman Snake Bite Township. Trustee, Repub- 
lican High School and Lewiston-Woodville High School. President 
Lewiston Telephone Co.; Vice President, Bank of Roxobel; Direc- 
tor, Harrington Manufacturing Co. Member of State Planning 
Board. Member of Mental Hospital Board of Control; Executive 
Board of State Hospital. Chairman of Appeal Board No. 1. County 
Commissioner of Bertie County, 1919-1920; Justice of the Peace, 
1915-1937. Shriner and Junior Order. Member of the Windsor 
Rotary Club; Chamber of Commerce; Senator, 1939. Member 
House of Representatives, 1933, 1935, 1937, 1945, and 1947. Bap- 
tist. Married Miss Ruth Bazemore, November 26, 1913. Two chil- 
dren: Hanah Ruth and H. B. Spruill. Address: Windsor, N. C. 

THOMAS EDGAR STORY 

Thomas Edgar Story, Republican, Representative from Wilkes 
County, was born in Blowing Rock, N. C. Son of Joshua Clingman 
and Martha Ann (Day) Story. Attended Watauga County Schools, 
1896-1904; Appalachian Training School, Boone, N. C, 1905-1909; 
Trinity College, 1909-1910. University of North Carolina, 1910- 
1913; A.B., 1913; M.A., 1919; Wake Forest Law School, 1933. 
Teacher 1906 and 1907 and High School Principal, 1913-1939; 
President, Wilkes County Teachers Association, 1927-1933; Presi- 
dent, High School Principals, N. C. Educational Association, 1924; 
Vice President, Northwest Division of the N. C. Educational Asso- 
ciation, 1931 and 1932; President, Northwest District Teachers 
Association, 1938-1939; Life Member National Education Associa- 
tion since 1925; Vice President, Wilkesboro Building and Loai 
Association, 1932-1939; Town Clerk, Trinity, N. C, 1922-1924 
Elected Dry Delegate for Wilkes County, November 7, 1933. Law- 
yer. Member, Wilkes County and Seventeenth Judicial District 
Bar Associations. Junior Order United American Mechanics, 
Councillor, 1923-1924; Knights of Pythias; Chancellor Commander, 
1928-1929; Mason, Master Lodge 1935 and 1942; Worthy Patron, 



Biographical Sketches 479 

Order Eastern Star, 1939-1940; Master, Wilkesboro Subordinate 
Grange 1936-1938; Master, Wilkes Pomona Grange 1938; Secre- 
tary, Kiwanis Club, 1932-1949; Chairman of Wilkesboro Scout 
Troop Committee No. 32, 1932-1940; Vice Chairman of Wilkes 
Scout District, 1941-1943. Secretary, Wilkes County Republican 
Executive Committee, 1944-1949. Member of Appeals Panel War 
Man Power Commission, 1944. Representative in the General 
Assembly of 1941, 1943, 1945, and 1947. Baptist; Secretary, Board 
of Deacons, 1925-1940; Sunday School Superintendent, 1927-1949. 
Moderator, Brushy Mountain Association 1934-1949. Married Miss 
Mary Clarissa Downs, September 3, 1918. Three children: Thomas 
Edgar, Jr., Donald Downs and William Robert. Address: Wilkes- 
boro, N. C. 

CHARLES WALLACE TATEM 

C. W. Tatem, Democrat, Representative from Tyrrell County, 
was born in Columbia, September 25, 1876. Son of Cammilas Eth- 
eridge and Ellen E. (McClees) Tatem. Attended Columbia Acad- 
emy, 1885-1891; Trinity School, 1892-1893. Civil Engineer. Rep- 
resentative in the General Assembly, 1927, 1929, 1931, 1933, 1935 
and 1937. Married Miss Ella Gertrude Wynne, September 24, 1896. 
Address: Columbia, N. C. 

ROY ARTHUR TAYLOR 

Roy Arthur Taylor, Democrat, Representative from Buncombe 
County, was born in Vader, Washington, January 31, 1910. Son 
of Arthur A. and Lola (Morgan) Taylor. Attended Candler Ele- 
mentary School, 1916-1923; Candler High School, 1923-1927; Bilt- 
more College, Asheville, N. C, 1927 to June, 1929; Maryville Col- 
lege, Maryville, Tenn., September, 1929-June, 1931, A.B. Degree; 
Asheville University Law School, January, 1934-January, 1936. 
Lawyer. Admitted to Bar, January, 1936. Member of Buncombe 
County Bar Association; North Carolina State Bar. Member of 
Junior Order United American Mechanics, District Deputy State 
Governor, 1940 and 1941; Lions Club, President Black Mountain 
Lions Club, 1943; Zone Chairman at present; President Black 
Mountain Chamber of Commerce, 1947; United States Naval Re- 
serve November 1943 to March 1946; Discharged with rank of 
Lieutenant; Served as Executive Officer and Commanding Officer 



480 North Carolina Manual 

of LST and participated in invasions on Luzon and at Okinawa; 
Representative in General Assembly in 1947; Member of Board of 
Trustees of Asheville-Biltmore College at present; Member of 
Board of Directors, Buncombe County Community Chest at pres- 
ent; Baptist; Sunday School Superintendent, 1935-1943; Deacon 
from 1937 to date. Married Miss Evelyn Reeves, May 8, 1932; Two 
children: Alan F. Taylor, age 7; Toni R. Taylor, age 6. Address: 
Black Mountain, N. C. 

WILLIAM CLAIRE TAYLOR 

William Claire Taylor, Democrat, Representative from Caswell 
County, was born at Blanche, N. C, October 22, 1901. Son of 
Nathaniel Jesse and Ada Jane (Pinchback) Taylor. Attended Mil- 
ton High School, 1915-1919; Guilford College. Farmer and mer- 
chant. Deputy Sheriff, Caswell County, 1920 through 1928. Rep- 
resentative in the General Assembly of 1937 and 1939. Methodist; 
Steward in Church since 1930. Married Miss Florence Toten Fos- 
ter, April 26, 1924. Three children: Florence Ann, William Na- 
thaniel, and John Bradsher. Address: Blanche, N. C. 

WALTER FRANK TAYLOR 

Walter Frank Taylor, Democrat, Representative from Wayne 
County, was born in Duplin County, N. C, April 4, 1889. Son of 
Luther and Ettie (Crow) Taylor. Attended Faison Male Academy; 
University of North Carolina, A.B. Degree, 1911; LL.B. Degree, 
1914. Lawyer. Member The American Bar Association; The N. C. 
State Bar; Wayne County Bar. President, N. C. Bar Association, 
1943-1944. Member of Goldsboro Kiwanis Club; B. P. 0. Elks; Phi 
Beta Kappa Alpha ; Golden Fleece. Member of the Board of Trus- 
tees of the University of North Carolina and of the North Caro- 
lina College at Durham. State Senator in the General Assembly of 
1921; Representative from Wayne County, 1939, 1941, 1943, 1945, 
and 1947. Member State Board of Law Examiners and of the Re- 
Codification Commission, 1941-1943; Chairman, Motor Transporta- 
tion Commission, appointed by Governor Cherry to study and rec- 
ommend changes in the laws relating to Motor Vehicle Transporta- 
tion; Member of Insurance Commission from 1943 to 1945 for Re- 
vision of Insurance Laws and re-appointed by Governor Cherry to 



Biographical Sketches 481 

serve from 1945 to 1947. Member of the Board of Aldermen of the 
City of Goldsboro for six years. Member of Commission author- 
ized by 1947 General Assembly to study the Administration of 
Justice in North Carolina; Member of Budget Commission 1948. 
Methodist; Member, Board of Stewards for several years and 
Chairman of the Finance Committee for several years. Married 
Miss Elizabeth Gibson, December 16, 1933. One child: Katharine 
Patterson Taylor, age eleven years. Address : Goldsboro, N. C. 

JOHN WESLEY UMSTEAD, JR. 

John Wesley Umstead, Jr., Democrat, Representative from 
Orange County, was born in Mangum Township, Durham County, 
April 7, 1889. Son of John Wesley and Lula (Lunsford) Umstead. 
Attended Public Schools of Durham County. Entered University 
of North Carolina in September, 1905 and graduated with the 
Class of 1909. Director, General Alumni Association of the Uni- 
versity of North Carolina since 1921. Trustee and Member of 
Executive Committee of the Greater University of North Caro- 
lina; Member of Executive Committee of Hospitals Board of Con- 
trol; Chairman of Commission on Merit System for Teachers; 
Member Study Commission on Education. State Senator from the 
Sixteenth Senatorial District, 1931, 1939. Member of House of 
Representatives from Orange County in 1941, 1943, 1945 and 1947. 
Mason; Elk; Grange; Farm Bureau. Methodist. Married Sallie 
Hunter Reade of Person County, January 20, 1914. Three children 
living: Frank Graham Umstead, Sarah Elizabeth Umstead, and 
Anne Reade Umstead. A son, John Wesley Umstead, III, Captain 
in U. S. Marine Corps, was killed in action on Saipan Island, 
June 14, 1944. Manager Chapel Hill District Office of Jefferson 
Standard Life Insurance Company. Address: Chapel Hill, N. C. 

LEONARD HAMPTON van NOPPEN 

Leonard Hampton van Noppen, Democrat, Representative from 
Stokes County, was born at Leaksville-Spray, N. C. Son of Dr. 
John James and Annie Pearl (Pratt) van Noppen. Attended Madi- 
son High School, class of 1932; LL.B. Degree, Wake Forest Col- 
lege, 1937. Lawyer. Member of North Carolina Bar Association; 
Stokes County Bar Association; 21st Judicial District Bar Asso- 



482 North Carolina Manual 

ciation, Secretary-Treasurer for three terms, 1946, 1947, 1948. 
Rotarian; Charter Secretary of Walnut Cove Rotary Club, 1947. 
Chi Tau Fraternity (now Sigma Phi Epsilon). Served in the 
United States Navy. 1943 to 1946; sei'vice in South West Pacific 
Area; Lieutenant, USNR. Episcopalian; member of Vestry. Mar- 
ried Miss Emorie Pepper, September 27, 1941. One daughter, Sally 
Ann van Noppen. Address: Danbury, N. C. 

WILLIAM HARRISON VANDERLINDEN, JR. 

William Harrison VanderLinden, -Jr., Democrat, Representative 
from Catawba County, was born in Hendersonville, N. C, April 2, 
1917. Son of Dr. W. H. and Floride Bowden (Morris) Vander- 
Linden. Attended Hendersonville High School, 1929-30; Valdese 
Hig-h School 1930-33; A.B. Degree, Lenoir Rhyne College, 1937. 
Member of firm Setzer Construction Co., Inc. Inducted in Army 
as private August 21, 1941. Served with 117th Infantry, 30th Di- 
vision; Commissioned 2nd Lt. July 6, 1942, Infantry School, Fort 
Benning, Ga. ; Assigned to 96th Infantry Division at Camp Adair, 
Oregon. Commanded Company H, 383rd Infantry. Separated from 
service in December 1945 as Captain. Major, Reserve, September 
1946. Member American Legion, Elks, Moose. State Commander 
Department of N. C, Veterans of Foreign Wars. Commands Com- 
pany H, 120th Infantry, N. C. National Guard. Representative in 
the General Assembly of 1947. Presbyterian. Address: 330-1 5th 
Avenue, Hickory, N. C. - 

CARL VERNON VENTERS 

Carl Vernon Venters, Democrat, Representative from Onslow 
County, was born at Richlands, N. C, January 18, 1906. Son of 
Wayne B. and Julia G. (Stevens) Venters. Attended Richlands 
High School, 1918-1921; A.B. Degree, University of North Caro- 
lina, 1926; LL.B., 1929. Attorney at Law. Member of N. C. State 
Bar. County Solicitor, Onslow County Ciiminal Court, 1947-1948. 
Editorial Staff, Edward Thompson Co., Law Publishers, Northport, 
L. I., N. Y., January 1930-August, 1935; Associate Member Law- 
Firm of Milbank, Tweed & Hope, 15 Broad St., New York, N. Y., 
September 1935 to August 1943; Associate Member Law Firm of 
Oliver & Donnelly, 110 E. 42nd St., New York. N. Y.. September, 



Biographical Sketches 488 

1943 to September, 1945. Member of Phi Gamma Delta (Social) 
and Phi Delta Phi (Legal) Fraternities. Episcopalian; member of 
Vestry, St. Pauls Episcopal Church, Northport, N. Y., 1932-1935; 
meiTiber of Vestry, St. Anne's Episcopal Church, Jacksonville, 
N. C, 1946-1948. Married Miss Margaret Dean Burnette, April 
30, 1930. Three children: Carl V. Venters, Jr., Wayne B. Venters, 
Margaret Gayle Venters. Address: Jacksonville, N, C. 

JOSEPH PAUL WALLACE 

Joseph Paul Wallace, Democrat, Representative from Montgom- 
ery County, was born in Troy, N. C, October 29, 1905. Son of 
James Rufus and Abbie Lou (Wooley) Wallace. Graduated from 
Troy High School, 1925. Automobile Dealer and Service Station 
Operator. Past President of Young Democratic Club of Mont- 
gomery County; Past President of Troy Rotary Club; President of 
Troy Merchants Association ; Chairman of Board of Commissioners 
of the Town of Troy, 1940-1942. Methodist; Church Treasurer, 
1940-1944. Mason. Senator from the Eighteenth Senatorial Dis- 
trict in the General Assembly of 1943; Representative in the Gen- 
eral Assembly of 1945 and 1947. Married Miss Miriam Rebecca 
McKenzie December 25, 1934. Three children. Address: Troy, N. C. 

JAMES VIVL4N WHITFIELD 

James Vivian Whitfield, Democrat, Representative from Pender 
County, was born in Seven Springs, N. C, July 23, 1894. Son of 
James Alexander and Helen Vivian (Powers) Whitfield. Attended 
Wallace High School; Horner Military School, Oxford, N. C, 
1909-1911; A.B., University North Carolina, 1915; M.A., 1919. 
Farmer. Captain in Reserve Corps of the Army, 1915-1917; Com- 
mandant Horner Military School, 1915-1917. Military Instructor, 
University of North Carolina, 1917-1918. Member, United States 
Foreign Service, 1919-1927; served at Montevideo, Uruguay; 
Bahia Blanca, Argentina; Havana, Cuba; Matanzas, Cuba 
and Monterey, Mexico. Director North Carolina Farm Bureau and 
North Carolina Forestry Association. Representative in the Gen- 
eral Assembly from Pender County, 1945 and 1947. Baptist. One 
child: John Whitfield. Married Mrs. Vivian Bartlet Stevens March 
2, 1946. Address: Burgaw, N. C. 



484 North Carolina Manual 

ROBERT LEE WHITMIRE 

Robert Lee Whitmire, Democrat, Representative from Hender- 
son County, was born in Brevard, N. C, January 21, 1898. Son 
of W. P. and Annie Floyd Whitmire. Attended Brevard and Hen- 
dersonville High Schools; attended University of North Carolina 
Lavi^ School 1919-1921 and admitted to the Bar in 1921. Member 
Henderson County Bar Association, North Carolina State Bar and 
American Bar Association. Chairman Henderson County Board of 
Elections 1922-1924. Hendersonville City Attorney 1923-1932. 
Delegate to the Democratic National Convention 1924. Served as 
enlisted man in United States Army from April 1917 to Febru- 
ary 1919. Overseas 1918-1919. State Senator from 27th Senatorial 
District 1927. Candidate for District Solicitor in 1934 and for 
Congress in 1938. Henderson County War Bond Drive Chairman 
during World War IL Commander Hendersonville Post of Ameri- 
can Legion 1923 and 1924. President Hendersonville Rotary Club 
1931. Member of Baptist Church, Masonic Lodge, American Legion 
and Veterans of Foreign Wars. Married Irene Louise Jones (now 
deceased) July 30, 1925, Madge Schacht Watson (now deceased) 
September 14, 1937, and Margaret Alice Davenport June 11, 
1946. One child, Robert Lee Whitmire, Jr., of Chapel Hill, North 
Carolina, born of first marriage. Address: Hendersonville, N. C. 

ODELL WILLIAMSON 

Odell Williamson, Democrat, Representative from Bi^unswick 
County was born in Ash, N. C, November 19, 1919. Son of John 
Bun and Love Williamson. Graduated from Waccamaw High 
School. Automobile Dealer. Methodist. Captain, Field Artillery, 
U. S. Army, April 29, 1942-October 31, 194,5. Representative in 
the General Assembly of 1947. Married Virginia Alma William- 
son, November 24, 1940. Address: Shallotte, N. C. 

EDWARD LEIGH WINSLOW 

Edward Leigh Winslow, Democrat, Representative from Per- 
quimans County, was born April 13, 1889 at Winfall, N. C. Son 
of Dr. Chai-les Cook and Martha Gordon (Leigh) Winslow. At- 
tended Hertford High School; North Carolina State College, 1905- 
1910. B.E., 1910. Oil Jobber, Farmer, Civil Engineer. Member of 
North Carolina Society of Engineers; Rotary Club; Director, Ply- 
mouth Country Club. Representative in the General Assembly of 



Biographical Sketches 485 

1947. Episcopalian. Senior Warden, 10 years; Vestry, 10 years. 
Married Miss Maureen Christine McManus, April 17, 1920. Two 
children: Edward Leigh Winslow, Jr., and John McManus 
Winslow. Address : Hertford, N. C. 

JOHN RAYNOR WOODARD 

John Raynor Woodard, Democrat, Representative from Northamp- 
ton County, was born at Pendleton, N. C, July 6, 1906. Son of 
Donald M. and Maggie (Maddrey) Woodard. Attended Buies 
Creek Academy, 1924-1925; Wake Forest College, graduating 
1930; B.S. Degree. Merchant and Farmer. Town Treasurer of 
Conway, 1941-1948; Member of Northampton County Board of 
Education, 1942-1943; member of Northampton County Board of 
Commissioners, 1943-1948. Member of Masonic Lodge; Scottish 
Rite Mason; York Rite Mason; member of Sudan Temple Shrine; 
member Roanoke Valley Shrine Club; member of Raleigh Shrine 
Club; Master, Pendleton Masonic Lodge, 1943-1948. Baptist; 
Deacon, 1939 — ; Sunday School Superintendent, 1940-1946; Sun- 
day School Teacher, 1931-1940, 1947-1948. Married Miss Bernice 
Norris, June 4, 1933. Two sons: John Raynor Woodard, Jr.; James 
Anderson Woodard. Address: Conway, N. C. 

SAMUEL OTIS WORTHINGTON 

Samuel Otis Worthington, Democrat, Representative from Pitt 
County, was born in Winterville, N. C, January 24, 1898. Son of 
Samuel G, and Lydia Campbell (Smith) Worthington. Attended 
Rural Schools, 1905-1912; Winterville High School, 1912 to 1917; 
University of North Carolina, two years of academic work and 
two years of law, fall of 1917 through summer of 1921. Attorney. 
Served in the Naval Unit of the S.A.T.C. at the University from 
September 1, 1918, to November, 1918. Served in N. C. State 
Guard October, 1943 to October, 1944. Representative from Pitt 
County in the General Assembly of 1939, 1941, 1943, 1945 and 
1947. Member Phi Alpha Delta Law Fraternity. Grand Chancellor 
of the Order of Knights of Pythias in the State of North Caro- 
lina from June, 1930 t o July, 1931. Supreme Representative from 
Domain of North Carolina to Supreme Lodge Knights of Pythias, 
1938-1948. Episcopalian. Married Miss Bessie Harrison, April 29, 
1926. Two children: Lina Hackett Worthington, age 19; Samuel 
Otis Worthington, Jr., age 13. Address: Greenville, N. C. 



OCCUPATIONS OF MEMBERS OF THE 
GENERAL ASSEMBLY OF 1949 



Senate 



LAWYERS 

Allsbrook, Julian R. 
Earnhardt, Luther E. 
Brock, B. C. 
Dalton, Chas. C. 
Dearman, C. H, 
Fountain, L. H. 
Gibbs, Frank H. 
Halstead, W. L 
Hester, R. J., Jr. 
Larkins, John D., Jr. 
Little, R. E. 
McKinnon, Henry A. 
Moss, 0. B. 
Parker, Frank M. 
Phillips, Wade H. 
Pittman, J. C. 
Price, J. Hampton 
Richardson, 0. L. 
Rodman, John C. 
Shaw, Gilbert A. 
Simms, R. N., Jr. 
Walker, Hal Hammer 
Ward, D. L. 
Warlick, G. Andrew 
Wilson, Max C. 
Woodson, Nelson 

FARMERS 

Campen, Sam M. 
Eagles, J. C, Jr. 
Jones, Dr. Paul E. 
Little, R. E. 
Long, F. D. 
Pate, Edwin 



Rowe, Roy 
Talton, Hardy 
Thomas, J. Benton 
Vann, Henry 
Whitley, Adam J., Jr. 

AUCTIONEER 

Penny, George T. 

AUTOMOBILE DEALER 

Vann, Henry 

AUTOMOBILE STORAGE 

Gass, Rex 

BANKERS 

Hodges, W. B. 
Marshall, Wm. F. 
Pate, Edwin 

BUILDING & LOAN 

Currie, Claude 

BUSINESS MEN 

Crawford, W. H. 
Thomas, J. Benton 

DAIRYMAN 

Whitley, Adam J., Jr. 

DENTIST 

Jones, Dr. Paul E. 

EDITOR 

Weathers, Lee B. 

FERTILIZER DEALER 

Long, F. D. 



Occupations 



487 



LUMBERMEN 

Marshall, Wm. F. 

MANUFACTURERS 

Rankin, R. Grady 
Webb, James 

MERCHANTS 

Campen, Sam M. 
Long, F. D. 
Nichols, L. B. 
Pate, Edwin 
Winslow, J. Emmett 

OIL DEALERS 

Gass, Rex 
Winslow, J. Emmett 

PHYSICIANS 

Perry, Dr. H. B. 
Peterson, Dr. C. A. 



PUBLISHER 

Weathers, Lee B. 

REALTOR 

Penny, George T. 

SCHOOL PRINCIPAL 

Crawford, William Howard 

THEATRE OWNERS 

Rowe, Roy 
Vann, Henry 

TOBACCONISTS 

Eagles, J. C, Jr. 
Gass, Rex 
Talton, Hardy 



HOUSE OF 

LAWYERS 

Alexander, Hugh Q. 
Allen, Arch T. 
Averitt, F. M. 
Baldwin, T. Fleet 
Bell, C. L. 

Blackwell, Winfield, Jr. 
Bost, E. T., Jr. 
Branch, Joseph 
Caveness, Shelley B. 
Crissman, Walter E. 
Davis, Grover C. 
Davis, Roy W. 
Edwards, Dan K. 
Falls, B. T., Jr. 
Fisher, Ralph 
Floyd, F, Wayland 



REPRESENTATIVES 

Fountain, Ben E. 
Gantt, Robert M. 
Garland, James Boyce 
Harding, F. D. B. 
Hatch, William T. 
Horton, 0. Lee 
Howard, Carl W. 
Huskins, J. Frank 
Jones, Woodrow W. 
Kearney, H. C. 
Kerr, John H., Jr. 
Lassiter, Robert, Jr. 
Leatherman, M. T. 
Little, J. C, Jr. 
Martin, Lister A. 
McDaniel, Leslie H. 
McMullan, J. H. 



488 



North Carolina Manual 



Moore, Larry I., Jr. 
Parrott, Marion A. 
Powell, J. K. 
Pritchard, Warren H. 
Pritchett, J. T. 
Ramsay, Kerr Craige 
Regan, John B. 
Roberts, Clyde M. 
Scott, LeRoy 
Shreve, Clyde A. 
Smith, H. B. 
Snow, Geo. K. 
Story, T. E. 
Taylor, Roy A. 
Taylor, W. Frank 
van Noppen, Leonard H. 
Venters, Carl V. 
Whitmire, R. Lee 
Worthington, Sam O. 

FARMERS 

Allen, Thomas W. 
Arnold, E. 0. 
Brown, Frank H., Jr. 
Bunn, C. Settle 
Dalrymple, Robert W. 
Edwards, A. C. 
Eggers, S. C. 
Fisher, Troy A. 
Fountain, Ben E. 
Hardison, Burl G. 
Hocutt, Ronald 
Kilpatrick, Frank M. 
Kiser, Roger C. 
Litle, Earl F. 
Little, Hal W. 
Maddrey, C. Gordon 
Moore, Larry L, Jr. 
Noble, G. N. 



Outlaw, Lewis W. 
Page, G. Troy 
Rackley, Almon E. 
Regan, John B. 
Royster, Fred S. 
Shomaker, R. A. 
Slagle, C. S. 
Smoot, J. N. 
Spruill, C. Wayland 
Taylor, William C. 
Whitfield, J. V. 
Winslow, E. Leigh 
Woodard, J. Raynor 

AUTOMOBILE DEALERS 

Wallace, J. P. 
Williamson, Odell 

BARBERS 

Gobble, F. L. 
Massey, Dennis A. 

BARBER AND BEAUTY 

SCHOOL OPERATOR 

Gobble, F. L. 

BOOKKEEPER 

Hathaway, Clarence P. 

BRICK MANUFACTURER 

Hanford, E. R., Sr. 

BUILDING & LOAN 

Kirkman, 0. Arthur 

BUSINESS MAN 

Shomaker, R. A. 

CAFE OPERATOR 

Baldwin, H. T., Jr. 



Occupations 



489 



CIVIL ENGINEERS 

Tatem, C. W. 
Winslow, E. Leigh 

COAL & LUMBER DEALER 

Divelbiss, J. E., Jr. 

CONTRACTOR 

VanderLinden, Harry 

COTTON DEALER 

Greene, H. A. 

COTTON GINNER 

Page, G. Troy 

DAIRYMEN 

Moore, Larry I., Jr. 
Morris, Harvey 

FARM TRACTOR & IMPLE- 
MENT DEALER 

Dungan, D. C. 

FERTILIZER DEALER 

Greene, H. A. 

GAME WARDEN 

Jones, J. W. (retired) 

HOTEL OWNERS 

Hayman, D. L. 
Pass, Fred D. 

HOUSEWIFE 

Ervin, Mrs. Joe 



INSURANCE 

Gibbs, H. S. 
Hocutt, Ronald 
Long, J. Robert 
Umstead, J. W., Jr. 

JOURNALIST 

Ervin, Mrs. Joe 

LIVESTOCK DEALER 

Cooper, Thos. E. 

LUMBER MANUFACTURERS 

Collier, T. J. 
Gentry, Todd H. 

MANUFACTURERS 

Bacon, F. P. 
Burfoot, Noah 
Harris, R. L. 
Spruill, C. Wayland 

MERCHANTS 

Arnold, E. O. 
Hardison, Burl G. 
Johnson, Edwin R. 
Little, Hal W. 
Maddrey, C. Gordon 
Morris, Harvey 
Noble, G. N. 
Page, G. Troy 
Spruill, C. Wayland 
Taylor, William C. 
Woodard, J. Raynor 

NURSERYMAN 

Arnold, E. 0, 



490 



North Carolina Manual 



OIL JOBBER 

Winslow, E. Leigh 

PETROLEUM PRODUCTS 

Duncan, J. H. 

PHYSICIAN 

Bridger, D. H. 

PUBLISHER 

Blue, H. Clifton 

RAILROAD OFFICIAL 

Kii-kman, O. Arthur 

REALTORS 

Dalton, J. McRae 
Eggers, S. C, Sr. 
Fountain, Ben E. 
Gibbs, H. S. 
Kilpatrick, Frank M. 

SALESMAN 

Barker, Raymond C, Jr. 

SERVICE STATION 
OPERATORS 

Baldwin, H. T., Jr. 
Morris, Harvey- 
Pass, Fred D. 
Wallace, J. P. 



SUPPLY MERCHANT 

Page, G. Troy 

SURVEYOR 

Corey, A. 

TAX CONSULTANT 

Blackwell, Winfield, Jr. 

TEXTILE MANUFACTURER 

Matheson, John F. 

TOBACCO COMPANY 
EMPLOYEE 

Powell, R. G. 

TOBACCO WAREHOUSEMAN 

Rackley, Almon E. 

TOBACCONIST 

Royster, Fred S. 

TRAVELING SALESMAN 

Hayes, Robert Smith 

UNION REPRESENTATIVE 

Parker, Howard E. 



PART vin 
OFFICIAL REGISTER 



UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT 

President Harry S. Truman, Missouri 

Vice President Alben W. Barkley, Kentucky 

THE CABINET 

Secretary of State Dean Acheson, Maryland 

Secretary of the Treasury John W. Snyder, Missouri 

Secretary of Defense Louis A. Johnson, West Virginia 

Attorney General Tom C. Clark, Texas 

Postmaster General Jesse M. Donaldson, Illinois 

Secretary of the Interior Julius A. Krug, Wisconsin 

Secretary of Agriculture Charles F. Brannan, Colorado 

Secretary of Commerce Charles Sawyer, Ohio 

Secretary of Labor Maurice J. Tobin, Massachusetts 

NORTH CAROLINA SENATORS AND REPRESENTATIVES IN CONGRESS 

SENATORS 

Clyde R. Hoey Shelby 

*Frank P. Graham Chapel Hill 

REPRESENTATIVES 

First District Herbert C. Bonner Washington 

Second District John H. Kerr Warrenton 

Third District Graham A. Barden New Bern 

Fourth District Harold D. Cooley Nashville 

Fifth District Thurmond Chatham Winston-Salem 

Sixth District Carl T. Durham Chapel Hill 

Seventh District F. Ertel Carlyle Lumberton 

Eighth District C. B. Deane Rockingham 

Ninth District R. L. Doughton Laurel Springs 

Tenth District Hamilton C. Jones Charlotte 

Eleventh District A. L. Bulwinkle Gastonia 

Twelfth District Monroe M. Redden Hendersonville 

UNITED STATES SUPREME COURT 

Fred M. Vinson Chief Justice Kentucky 

Harold H. Burton Associate Justice Ohio 

Hugo L. Black Associate Justice Alabama 

Stanley F. Reed Associate Justice Kentucky 

Felix Frankfurter Associate Justice Massachusetts 

William O. Douglas Associate Justice Connecticut 

Frank Murphy Associate Justice Michigan 

Robert H. Jackson Associate Justice New York 

Wiley B. Rutledge, Jr Associate Justice Iowa 

UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURTS IN NORTH CAROLINA 

JUDGES 

Eastern District Don L. Gilliam Tarboro 

Middle District J. J. Hayes Wilkesboro 

Western District Wilson Warlick Newton 



* Appointed March 22, 1949 to succeed J. Melville Broughton, deceased. 



494 North Carolina Manual 



CLERKS 

Eastern District A. Hand James Raleigh 

Middle District Henry Reynolds Greensboro 

Western District Oscar L. McClurd Asheville 

DISTRICT ATTORNEYS 

Eastern District John Hall Manning Raleigh 

Middle District Bryce R. Holt Greensboro 

Western District T. A. Uzzell, Jr Asheville 

UNITED STATES CIRCUIT COURT OF APPEALS 

For The Fourth Circuit 
Judge John J. Parker Charlotte 



STATE GOVERNMENT 

LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT 

President of the Senate H P. Taylor Anson 

Speaker of the House of 

Representatives Kerr Craige Ramsay Rowan 

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT 

Governor W. Kerr Scott Alamance 

Lieutenant-Governor H. P. Taylor Anson 

Secretary of State *Thad Eure Hertford 

Auditor *Henry L. Bridges Guilford 

Treasurer *Erandon P. Hodges Buncombe 

Superintendent of 

Public Instruction *Clyde A. Erwin Rutherford 

Attorney-General Harry McMullan Beaufort 

Comnnissioner of Agriculture *L. Y. Ballentine Wake 

Commissioner of Labor *Forrest H. Shuford Guilford 

Commissioner of Insurance *William P. Hodges Martin 

JUDICIAL DEPARTMENT 
Justices of the Supreme Court 

Chief Justice W. P. Stacy *Raleigh 

Associate Justice W. A. Devin *Raleigh 

Associate Justice M. V. Barnhill *Raleigh 

Associate Justice J. Wallace Winborne *Raleigh 

Associate Justice A. A. F. Seawell *Raleigh 

Associate Justice E. B. Denny *Raleigh 

Associate Justice Sam J. Ervin, Jr *Raleigh 

Librarian Dillard S. Gardner Raleigh 

Marshall Dillard S. Gardner Raleigh 

Clerk Adrian J. Newton Raleigh 

Reporter John M. Strong Raleigh 

Judges of Superior Court 

First District - . . . Chester Morris Currituck 

Second District W. J. Bone Nashville 

Third District R. Hunt Parker Roanoke Rapids 

Fourth District Clawson L. Williams Sanford 

Fifth District J. Paul Frizzelle Snow Hill 

Sixth District Henry L. Stevens, Jr Warsaw 

Seventh District W. C. Harris Raleigh 

Eighth District J. J. Burney Wilmington 

Ninth District Q. K. Nimocks, Jr Fayetteville 

Tenth District Leo CaiT Burlington 

Eleventh District J. H. Clement Walkertown 

Twelfth District H. Hoyle Sink Greensboro 

Thirteenth District F. Donald Phillips Rockingham 

Fourteenth District William H. Bobbitt Charlotte 

Fifteenth District Frank M. Armstrong Troy 

Sixteenth District *Wilson Warlick Newton 

Seventeenth District J. A. Rousseau N. Wilkesboro 

Eighteenth District J. W. Pless, Jr Marion 

Nineteenth District Zeb V. Nettles Asheville 

Twentieth District Dan K. Moore Sylva 

Twenty-first District Allen H. Gwyn Reidsville 

* Constitute the Council of State (Attorney-General is the legal adviser to the 
Executive Department). 

* Official (not legal) residences. 

* Resigned February 14, 1949 to accept appointment as Federal Judge of 
North Carolina Western District. 



496 North Carolina Manual 

Special Judges 

W. H. S. Burgwyn Woodland 

Charles L. Coggin Salisbury 

Paul B. Edmundson Goldsboro 

Luther Hamilton Morehead City 

Peyton McSwain Shelby 

George B. Patton Franklin 

George A. Shuford Asheville 

Emergency Judges 

Felix E. Alley Waynesville 

H. A. Grady New Bern 

Solicitors 

First District Walter Cohoon Elizabeth City 

Sejond District George M. Fountain Tarboro 

Third District E. H- Tyler Roxobel 

Fourth District W. Jack Hooks Kenly 

Fifth District W. J. Bundy Greenville 

Sixth District J. Abner Barker Roseboro 

Seventh District William Y. Bickett Raleigh 

Eighth District Clifton L. Moore Burgaw 

Ninth District Malcolm B. Seavvell Lumberton 

Tenth District William H. Murdock Durham 

Eleventh District Walter E. Johnston, Jr Winston-Salem 

Twelfth District Charles T. Hagan, Jr Greensboro 

Thirteenth District M. G. Boyette Carthage 

Fourteenth District Basil L. Whitener Gastonia 

Fifteenth District John R. McLaughlin Statesville 

Sixteenth District James C. Farthing Lenoir 

Seventeenth District Avalon E. Hall Yadkinville 

Eighteenth District C. O. Ridings Forest City 

Nineteenth District W. K. McLean Asheville 

Twentieth District T. D. Bryson, Jr Bryson City 

Twenty-first District Ralph J. Scott Danbury 

HEADS OF ADMINISTRATIVE DEPARTMENTS, BOARDS 
AND COMMISSIONERS 

Adjutant General J. Van B. Metts New Hanover 

Department of Agriculture . . . . L. Y. Ballentine, Commissioner Wake 

Board of Alcoholic Control Carl L. Williamson, Chairman Wake 

State Department of Archives 

and History Dr. Christopher Crittenden, Director Wake 

Art Society Miss Lucy Cherry Crisp, Executive Secretary . Pitt 

Banking Department Gurney P. Hood, Commissioner Wayne 

Commission for the Blind H. A. Wood, Executive Secretary Lincoln 

Budget Bureau R. G. Deyton, Assistant Director Yancey 

Building and Grounds George B. Cherry, Superintendent Wake 

Department of Conservation 

and Development R. Bruce Etheridge, Director Dare 

Board of Correction 

and Training S. E. Leonard, Commissioner Edgecombe 

State Board of Education Paul Reid, Controller Surry 

State Board of Elections R. C. Maxwell, Executive Secretary Wake 

Employment Security 

Commission Henry Kendall, Chairman Cleveland 

State Employment Service Ernest C. McCracken, Director Haywood 

State Board of Health Dr. J. W. R. Norton, Secretary Wake 

State Highway Patrol Under the direction of the 

Commissioner of Motor Vehicles 
State Highway and Public 

Works Commission Henry W. Jordan, Chairman Randolph 



State Government 497 



N. C. Hospitals Board 

of Control Dr. David G. Young, Superintendent 

Mental Hygiene Wake 

P. M. Purser, Business Manager Wayne 

Industrial Commission T. A. Wilson, Chairman Forsyth 

Department of Insurance William P. Hodges, Commissioner Martin 

Bureau of Investigation Walter F. Anderson, Director Mecklenburg 

Department of Justice Harry McMullan, Attorney General Beaufort 

Department of Labor Forrest H. Shuford, Commissioner Guilford 

Library Commission Miss Marjorie Beal, Secretary Wake 

State Library Miss Carrie L. Broughton, Librarian .... Wake 

Local Government Commission . . W. E. Easterling, Secretary Wake 

Medical Care Commission Dr. John A. Ferrell, Executive Secretary .. .Wake 

Merit System Council *Dr. Frank T. DeVyver, Supervisor .... Durham 

Department of Motor Vehicles. . Landon C. Rosser, Commissioner Chatham 

Municipal Board of Control Thad Eure. Secretary (Ex-officio) Hertford 

Paroles Commission William Dunn, Jr., Acting Commissioner . .Craven 

Probation Commission J. Harris Sample, Director Buncombe 

Department of 

Public Instruction Dr. Clyde A. Erwin, Superintendent. . .Rutherford 

State Board of Public Welfare. Dr. Ellen B. Winston, Commissioner Wake 

Division of Purchase 

and Contract W. Z. Betts, Director Wake 

Recreation Commission Miss Ronnie Sheffield, Assistant Director. . .Wake 

Retirement System Nathan Yelton, Secretary Mitchell 

Department of Revenue Edwin Gill, Commissioner Scotland 

Rural Electrification 

Authority Gwyn B. Price, Chairman Ashe 

Supreme Court Dillard S. Gardner, Librarian and Marshal . Orange 

Adrian J. Newton, Clerk Davidson 

John M. Strong, Reporter Wake 

Department of Tax Research.. W. O. Suiter, Director Wake 

Utilities Commission Stanley Winborne, Chairman Hertford 

Veterans Commission Jack Famplin. Acting Director Rockingham 

Wildlife Resources Com- 
mission Clyde P. Patton, Director Wake 

World War Veterans' 

Loan Fund Mrs. Grace Hinton Malloy, 

Acting Commissioner Wake 

HEADS OF STATE HOSPITALS, CORRECTIONAL AND 
EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS 

Confederate Woman's Home Mrs. Lucille McSwain .... Fayetteville 

Correctional 

White 

Eastern Carolina Industrial Training 

School for Boys Wm. D. Clark Rocky Mount 

State Home and Industrial School 

for Girls, Samarcand Miss Reva Mitchell .... Eagle Springs 

Stonewall Jackson Manual Training 

and Industrial School J. Frank Scott Concord 

Negro 

Morrison Training School for 

Negro Boys Paul R. Brown Hoffman 

Training School for Negro Girls Miss Mae D. Holmes Kinston 

* Address: Durham, N. C. All other official addresses, Raleigh, N. C. 



498 North Carolina Manual 



Educational 

White 

Appalachian State Teachers College B. B. Dougherty Boone 

East Carolina Teachers College J. D. Messick Greenville 

N. C. School for the Deaf Dr. C. E. Rankin Morganton 

Oxford Orphanage A. D. Leon Gray Oxford 

Pembroke State College Ralph D. Wellons Pembroke 

The State School for the Blind E. N. Peeler Raleigh 

University of North Carolina: 

President * Frank P. Graham Chapel Hill 

Chapel Hill Unit, Chancellor R. B. House Chapel Hill 

State College Unit, Chancellor J. W. Harrelson Raleigh 

Woman's College LTnit, Chancellor W. C. Jackson Greensboro 

Western North Carolina Teachers College. W. E. Bird (Acting) Cullowhee 

Negro 

Agricultural and Technical College F. D. Bluford Greensboro 

Elizabeth City State Teachers College S. D. Williams Elizabeth City 

Fayetteville State Teachers College J. W. Seabrook Fayetteville 

N. C. College at Durham Alfonso Elder Durham 

The Colored Orphanage of North Carolina. T. A. Hamme Oxford 

The State School for the Blind and Deaf. . E. N. Peeler Raleigh 

Winston-Salem State Teachers College . . . F. L. Atkins Winston-Salem 

Hospitals 
White 

Caswell Training School Miss Elizabeth Brown I Acting ) Kinston 

N. C. Sanatoriums for Treatment 
of Tuberculosis : 

N. C. Sanatorium Dr. H. S. Willis McCain 

Eastern Sanatorium Dr. H. F. Eason Wilson 

Western Sanatorium Dr. C. D. Thomas .... Black Mountain 

N. C. Orthopedic Hospital Dr. W. M. Roberts Gastonia 

State Hospital Dr. Louis G. Eeall Morganton 

State Hospital Dr. Edward N. Pleasants Raleigh 

State Hospital Dr. James Murdoch Butner 

Negro 

State Hospital Dr. Ira C. Long Goldsboro 

HEADS OF SOME ORGANIZATIONS OTHER THAN STATE AGENCIES 

N. C. Association Clerks 

Superior Court W. E. Church, Sec'y.-Treas Winston-Salem 

N. C. Association County 

Commissioners J. L. Skinner, Secretary Littleton 

N. C. Burial Association "^homas Creekmore, (Acting) Commissioner. Raleigh 

N. C. Citizens Association, Inc. . Lloyd Griffin, Executive Vice President .. Raleigh 
N. C. Education Association . . . Mrs. Ethel Perkins Edwards, 

Executive Secretary Raleigh 

N. C. Fire Insurance 

Rating Bureau Landon Hill, Manager Raleigh 

Institute of Government Albert Coates, Director Chapel Hill 

N. C. League of Municipalities. Mrs. Davetta L. Steed, Executive Sec'y- • • Raleigh 

N. C. Negro Teachers Assn....W. L. Green, Execvitive Secretary Raleigh 

Sheriffs Association John R. Morris, Sec'y.-Treas Wilmington 

Social Securit.v Board John H. Ingle, Manager Raleigh 

N. C. State Bar E. L. Cannon, Sec'y-Treas Raleigh 

State Employees' Credit Union . W. W. Jones. Treasurer Raleigh 

* Resigned March 26, 1949 to accept appointment as United States Senator. 



COUNTY GOVERNMENT 

ALAMANCE 

Alamance County was founded in 1849 from Orange. The name is supposed 
to be derived from an Indian word meaning "blue clay." The county gets its 
name from Alamance Creek, on the banks of which was fought the battle between 
the colonial troops under Governor Tryon and the Regulators, May 16, 1771. 
Population, 57,427 County Seat, Graham 

Office Officer Address 

State Senator 16th District James Webb Hillsboro 

Member House of Representatives. E. R. Hanford, Sr Burlington 

Clerk of Court D. J. Walker, Jr Graham 

Register of Deeds J. G. Tingen Graham 

Sheriff C. H. Moore Graham 

Treasurer George Holt Graham 

Auditor Walter F. Owen Graham 

Tax Supervisor Joe W. Cole Graham 

Tax Collector Currie Smith Graham 

County Accountant Joe W. Cole Graham 

Coroner Dr. H. H. Simpson Burlington 

Surveyor W. T. Hall Graham 

County Health Officer Dr. Robert King Chapel Hill 

Supt. of Schools M. E. Yount Graham 

Supt. of Public Welfare G. J. Anderson Haw River 

Home Demonstration Agent 

White Katherine Millsaps Burlington 

Colored Carrie S. Wilson Graham 

Farm Demonstration Agent 

White J- W. Bason Graham 

Colored Plese Corbett Mebane 

Chmn. Bd. Education Henry A. Scott Haw River 

Chmn. Bd. Elections J. H. Vernon Burlington 

District Game & Fish Protector. . . . Vance M. Perry Graham 

County Manager Joe W. Cole Burlington 

County Attorney L. C. Allen Burlington 

Veterans Service Officer Turner P. Messick Elon College 

General County Court : 

Judge George A. Long Burlington 

Solicitor Eugene A. Gordon Burlington 

Burlington Municipal Court: 

Judge C. C. Gates, Jr Burlington 

Solicitor Kenneth Young Burlington 

Commissioners 

Chairman L. P. Best Mebane 

Commissioner M. C. Loy Burlington 

Commissioner Ralph H. Scott Burlington 

Commissioner Foster Hughes Graham 

Commissioner H. M. Patterson Alamance 

ALEXANDER 

Alexander County was formed in 1847 from Iredell, Caldwell, and Wilkes. 
Was named in honor of William J. Alexander, of Mecklenburg County, several 
times a member of the Legislatvire and Speaker of the House of Commons. 
Population, 13,454 County Seat, Taylorsville 

State Senator 28th District Max C. Wilson Lenoir 

Member House of Representatives . . Earl F. Little Taylorsville 

Clerk of Court Charlie R. Watts Taylorsville 

Register of Deeds John Marshall Taylorsville 



500 North Carolina Manual 



Office Officer Address 

Sheriff Sledge Smith Taylorsville 

Tax Supervisor Gerald L. Gwaltney Taylorsville 

Tax Collector Sledge Smith Taylorsville 

County Accountant Gerald L. Gwaltney Taylorsville 

Coroner E. A. Adams Taylorsville 

Surveyor W. L. Harrington Taylorsville 

County Health Officer Dr. E. H. Ellinwood Newton 

Supt. of Schools Sloane W. Payne Taylorsville 

Supt. of Public Welfare Luther Dyson Taylorsville 

Home Demonstration Agent Agnes W. Watts Taylorsville 

Farm Demonstration Agent Price Brawley Taylorsville 

Chmn. Bd. Education W. S. Patterson Stony Point 

Chmn. Bd. Elections Paul S. Lackey Taylorsville 

District Game & Fish Protector. . . .Howard L. Wooten Stony Point 

County Attorney A. C. Payne Taylorsville 

Commissioners 

Chairman Dr. G. K. Carter Taylorsville 

Commissioner George Lackey Hiddenite 

Commissioner Marvin J. Benfield Rt. 2, Hickory 

ALLEGHANY 

Alleghany County was formed in 1859 from Ashe. The name is derived from 
an Indian tribe in the limits of North Carolina. 

Population, 8,341 County Seat, Sparta 

State Senator 29th District Dr. H. B. Perry Boone 

Member House of Representatives. . J. K. Doughton Sparta 

Clerk of Court Gene R. Irwin Sparta 

Register of Deeds Ernest E. Edwards Sparta 

Sheriff G. D. Richardson Sparta 

Treasurer G. D. Richardson Sparta 

Auditor Mrs. Ruby Irwin Sparta 

Tax Supervisor Ernest E. Edwards Sparta 

Tax Collector G. D. Richardson. Sparta 

County Accountant Mrs. Ruby Irwin Sparta 

Coroner Lee Woodruff Sparta 

Surveyor L. E. Edwards Sparta 

County Health Officer Dr. C. A. Thompson Sparta 

Supt. of Schools Miss Clyde Fields Sparta 

Supt. of Public Welfare Doris Wagoner Sparta 

Home Demonstration Agent Mrs. Frances C. Wagoner Sparta 

Farm Demonstration Agent R. E. Black Sparta 

Chmn. Bd. Education G. N. Evans Ennice 

Chmn. Bd. Elections G. Glenn Nichols Sparta 

District Game & Fish Protector. . . . D. T. Bryan Glade Valley 

Forest Warden George Royall Roaring Gap 

County Attorney R. F. Crouse Sparta 

County Librarian Mrs. Carrie Jones Sparta 

Veterans Service Officer Gene R. Irwin Sparta 

Commissioners 

Chairman J. C. Gambill Independence, Va. 

Commissioner D. M. Edwards Ennice 

Commissioner G. T. Perry Piney Creek 



County Government 501 



ANSON 

Anson County was formed in 1749 from Bladen. Was named in honor of 
George Lord Anson, a celebrated English admiral who circumnavigated the globe. 
He lived for awhile on the Pee Dee in South Carolina. In 1761 he was given the 
honor of bringing to her marriage with King George III, Charlotte, Princess of 
Mecklenburg, for whom Mecklenbug County was named. 

Population, 28,443 County Seat, Wadesboro 

Office Officer Address 

State Senators 19th District R. E. Little Wadesboro 

O. L. Richardson Monroe 

Member House of Representatives. .Hal W. Little Wadesboro 

Clerk of Court E. A. Hightower Wadesboro 

Register of Deeds Francis E. Liles Wadesboro 

Sheriff Ben M. Rivers Wadesboro 

Treasurer Francis E. Liles Wadesboro 

Auditor Francis E. Liles Wadesboro 

Tax Supervisor Francis E. Liles Wadesboro 

Tax Collector W. C. Hardison Wadesboro 

County Accountant Francis E. Liles Wadesboro 

Coroner Harvey H. Leavitt, Jr Wadesboro 

Surveyor Frank S. Clarke Ansonville 

County Health Officer Dr. Warren D. Carter (Acting) . . . Wadesboro 

Supt. of Schools J. O. Bowman Wadesboro 

Supt. of Public Welfare Kathryn Folger Wadesboro 

Home Demonstration Agent 

White Mrs. Rosalind Redfearn Wadesboro 

Colored Margaret R. Kirk Wadesboro 

Farm Demonstration Agent 

White J. W. Cameron Wadesboro 

Colored H. H. Price Wadesboro 

Chmn. Bd. Education Marshall D. Taft Wadesboro 

Chmn. Bd. Elections Lee Asheraft Wadesboro 

District Game & Fish Protector. . . . Vernon Watts Wadesboro 

Forest Warden Lamar Ratliff Rt. 3, Wadesboro 

County Attorney Taylor & Kitchin Wadesboro 

County Librarian Helen Thompson Wadesboro 

County Criminal Court: 

Judge Sydney F. Caligan Wadesboro 

Solicitor George C. Childs Wadesboro 

Commissioners 

Chairman J. Paul Teal Wadesboro 

Commissioner Henry Morton Rt. 1, Morven 

Commissioner Dr. E. Y. Sorrell Wadesboro 

Commissioner W. Bradley Wall Lilesville 

Commissioner Byrom W. Caudle Polkton 

ASHE 

Ashe County was formed in 1799 from Wilkes. Was named in honor of 
Samuel Ashe of New Hanover, brother of General John Ashe. Samuel Ashe was 
a revolutionary patriot, one of the first judges of the state, and afterwards 
governor. 
Population, 22,664 County Seat, Jefferson 

State Senator 29th District Dr. H. B. Perry , Boone 

Member House of Representatives. . Todd H. Gentry West Jefferson 

Clerk of Court C. S. Neal Jefferson 

Register of Deeds J. D. Stansberry Jefferson 

Sheriff W. B. Todd Jefferson 

Treasurer W. B. Todd Jefferson 



502 North Carolina Manual 

Office Officer Address 

Auditor E- W. Smith Jefferson 

Tax Supervisor H. H. Burgess Jefferson 

Tax Collector Mrs. Elizabeth V. Miller Jefferson 

County Accountant C. S. Neal Jefferson 

Coroner R. R- Badger West Jefferson 

Surveyor W. P. Colvard Grassy Creek 

County Health Officer Dr. C. E. Miller ( Acting) Jefferson 

Supt. of Schools A. B. Hurt Jefferson 

Supt. of Public Welfare Frances Tucker West Jefferson 

Home Demonstration Agent Ella Mae Crosby Jefferson 

Farm Demonstration Agent H. D. Quessenberry West Jefferson 

Chmn. Bd. Education L. P. Colvard Jefferson 

Chmn. Bd. Elections H. H. Lemly Fleetwood 

District Game & Fish Protector. . . . R. H. Koontz Jefferson 

Forest Warden Ralph Tomlinson West Jefferson 

County Attorney W. B. Austin - Ira T. Johnston Jefferson 

County Librarian Mrs. C. D. Neal Jefferson 

Veterans Service Officer Ralph Campbell West Jefferson 

Commissioners 

Chairman W. E. Vannoy West Jefferson 

Commissioner V. C. Lillard Creston 

Commissioner Wade H. Witherspoon Furches 

AVERY 

Avery County was formed in 1911 from Mitchell, Watauga, and Caldwell. 
Was named in honor of Colonel Waightstill Avery "of Revolutionary fame," 
Attorney-general of North Carolina, 1777-1779. 
Population, 13,561 County Seat, Newland 

State Senator 30th District Dr. C. A. Peterson Spruce Pine 

Member House of Representatives. . R. A. Shomaker Newland 

Clerk of Court C. H. Pittman Newland 

Register of Deeds Grant Webb Newland 

Sheriff A. T. Garland Newland 

Treasurer Avery County Bank Newland 

Auditor Ben Hughes Newland 

Tax Collector Ernest Johnson Newland 

County Accountant Ben Hughes Newland 

Coroner F. P. Guinn Elk Park 

Surveyor Paul Banner Banner Elk 

County Health Officer Dr. C. F. McRae Burnsville 

Supt. of Schools Geo. M. Bowman Elk Park 

Supt. of Public Welfare W. W. Braswell Montezuma 

Home Demonstration Agent Marie Scott Newland 

Farm Demonstration Agent Wayne Franklin Newland 

Chmn. Bd. Education J. F. Hampton Linville 

Chmn. Bd. Elections R. W. Wall Newland 

District Game & Fish Protector Wm. M. Carpenter Three Mile 

Forest Warden Jim Vance Crossnore 

County Attorney Charles Hughes Newland 

Veterans Service Officer K. L. Haga Montezuma 

Commissioners 

Chairman Lee Sturgill Linville 

Commissioner Robert Burleson Senia 

Commissioner Sam L. Heaton Kalmia 



County Government 503 



BEAUFORT 

Beaufort County was formed in 1705 from Bath. Was first called Archdale 
and name changed to Per.ufort about 1712. It was named in honor of Henry 
Somerset, Duke of Beaufort, who in 1709 became one of the Lords Proprietors 
of Carolina. He purchased the share originally owned by the Duke of Albemarle. 

Population, 36,431 County Seat, Washington 

Office Officer Address 

State Senators 2nd District Sam M. Campen Alliance 

John C. Rodman Washington 

Member House of Representatives. . LeRoy Scott Washington 

Clerk of Court N. Henry Moore Washington 

Register of Deeds C. C. Duke Washington 

Sheriff William Rumley Washington 

Treasurer W. A. Blount Washington 

Auditor W. A. Blount Washington 

Tax Supervisor W. A. Blount Washington 

Tax Collector Farl Redditt Washington 

County Accountant W. A. Blount Washington 

Coroner Fonner Paul Washington 

Surveyor Rupert Bonner Aurora 

County Health Officer Dr. E. M. Brown Washington 

Supt. of Schools W. F. Veasey Washington 

Supt. of Public Welfare Mrs. Edith Franklin Washington 

Home Demonstration Agent 

White Mrs. Frances Winslow Washington 

Colored Vivian Morris Washington 

Farm Demonstration Agent 

White W. Jj. McGahey Washington 

Colored Aaron Solomon Washington 

Chmn. Bd. Education Ralph H. Hodges Washington 

Chmn. Bd. Elections W. B. Carter Washington 

District Game & Fish Protector. . . . Wilson Clark Washington 

Forest Warden Albert Woolard RFD, Washington 

County Attorney M. C. Paul Washington 

County Librarian Mary Crawford Washington 

Veterans Service Officer James McKeel Washington 

Recorder's Courts : 
Washington 

Judge L. H. Ross Washington 

Solicitor J. D. Grimes, Jr Washington 

Aurora 

Judge W. W. Langley Aurora 

Solicitor W. A. Thompson Aurora 

Belhaven 

Judge M. M. Jones Belhaven 

Solicitor J. D. Grimes, Jr Washington 

Commissioners 

Chairman Dan E. Taylor RFD. Washington 

Commissioner A. D. Swindell Pantego 

Commissioner E. V. Swindell Bath 

Commissioner Max Thompson Aurora 

Commissioner Mark Taylor Chocowinity 

BERTIE 

Bertie County was formed in 1722 from Bath. Was named in honor of 
James and Henry Bertie, Lords Proprietors, who in 1728 owned the share of 
Lord Clarendon. 

Population, 26,201 County Seat, Windsor 



504 North Carolina Manual 



Office Officer Address 

State Senators 1st District W. 1. Halstead South Mills 

J. Emmett Winslow Hertford 

Member House of Representatives. . C. Way land Spruill Windsor 

Clerk of Court George C. Spoolman Windsor 

Register of Deeds L. S. Mizelle Windsor 

Sheriff Harry L. Smith Windsor 

Treasurer Mrs. Ethel Cherry Windsor 

Auditor L. S. Mizelle Windsor 

Tax Supervisor L. S. Mizelle Windsor 

Tax Collector Lacy M. Early Windsor 

County Accountant L. S. Mizelle Windsor 

Coroner Goodwin Byrd Windsor 

Surveyor J. B. Parker Rt. 1, Windsor 

County Health Officer Dr. W. P. Jordan Windsor 

Supt. of Schools J. L. Dupree Windsor 

Supt. of Public Welfare Norma P. Smith Windsor 

Home Demonstration Agent 

WTiite Mrs. Ann Cooper Windsor 

Colored Gabina Alston Gould Windsor 

Farm Demonstration Agent 

White B. E. Grant Windsor 

Colored M. W. Coleman Windsor 

Chmn. Bd. Education J. P. Rascoe Windsor 

Chmn. Bd. Elections E. G. Cherry Windsor 

District Game & Fish Protector. . . . W. L. Smallwood Windsor 

Forest Warden Miles White Windsor 

County Attorney John R. Jenkins Aulander 

Veterans Service Officer Mrs. S. S. Pugh Windsor 

Recorder's Court : 

Judge J. B. Davenport Windsor 

Solicitor M. B. Gillam, Jr Windsor 

Commissioners 

Chairman W. R. Lawrence Colerain 

Commissioner W. L. Powell Windsor 

Commissioner Henry Dempsey Rt. 1, Windsor 

Commissioner H. O. Raynor Powellsville 

Commissioner T. N. Peele Lewiston 

BLADEN 
Bladen County was formed in 1734 from Bath. Was named in honor of 
Martin Bladen, one of the members of the Board of Trade which had charge 
of colonial affairs. 

Population, 27,156 County Seat, Elizabethtown 

State Senators 10th District R. J. Hester, Jr Elizabethtown 

Gilbert A. Shaw Fayetteville 

Member House of Representatives. . D. H. Bridger Bladenboro 

Clerk of Court Carl C. Campbell Elizabethtown 

Register of Deeds D. T. Townsend Elizabethtown 

Sheriff John B. Allen Elizabethtown 

Treasurer Bank of Elizabethtown Elizabethtown 

Auditor P. G. Cain Elizabethtown 

Tax Supervisor P. G. Cain Elizabethtown 

Tax Collector H. M. Chason Elizabethtown 

Coroner Walter J. Melvin Rt. 2, Elizabethtown 

Surveyor A. A. Robbins, Sr Rt. 1, Council 

County Health Officer Dr. R. S. Cromartie Elizabethtown 

Supt. of Schools D. M. Calhoun Elizabethtown 

Supt. Qi Public Wejfp,re Mrs, Bessie R. Lyon .,.,,.,,,, Elizabethtown 



County Government 505 



Office Officer Address 

Home Demonstration Agent 

White Mrs. Lillie Hester Elizabethtown 

Colored Mrs. Mamie P. Moore Elizabethtown 

Farm Demonstration Agent 

White R. B. Harper Elizabethtown 

Colored Alvin C. McLendon Elizabethtown 

Chmn. Bd. Education J. Neill Clark Clarkton 

Chmn. Bd. Elections James Monroe Council 

District Game & Fish Protector E. W. Woodell Dublin 

Forest Warden M. H. McQueen Clarkton 

County Attorney H. H. Clark Elizabethtown 

County Librarian Thelma Cromartie Elizabethtown 

Recorder's Court : 

Judge Edward B. Clark Elizabethtown 

Solicitor Leon D. Smith Elizabethtown 

Commissioners 

Chairman H. J. White, Sr Bladenboro 

Commissioner Milton L. Fisher Elizabethtown 

Commissioner W. A. Haire, Sr Elizabethtown 

BRUNSWICK 

Brunswick County was formed in 1764 from New Hanover and Bladen. Was 
named in honor of the famous House of Brunswick, of which the four Georges, 
Kings of England, were members. 

Population, 17,125 County Seat, Southport 

State Senators 10th District R. J. Hester, Jr Elizabethtown 

Gilbert A. Shaw Fayetteville 

Member House of Representatives . . Odell Williamson Shallotte 

Clerk of Court S. T. Bennett Southport 

Register of Deeds A. J. Walton Southport 

Sheriff W. M. Stanaland Southport 

Treasurer Waccamaw Bank & Trust Co Southport 

Auditor W. P. Jorgensen Southport 

Tax Supervisor W. P. Jorgensen Southport 

Tax Collector W. P. Jorgensen Southport 

County Accountant W. P. Jorgensen Southport 

Coroner J. G. Caison Southport 

Surveyor H. R. Hewett Bolivia 

County Health Officer Barbara Adams Leland 

Supt. of Schools J. T. Denning Southport 

Supt. of Public Welfare Ruth Patterson Southport 

Home Demonstration Agent Corine Greene Southport 

Farm Demonstration Agent J. E. Dodson Supply 

Chmn. Bd. Education R. T. Woodside Southport 

Chmn. Bd. Elections Guy C. McKeithan Shallotte 

District Game & Fish Protector. . . . H. T. Bowmer Southport 

Forest Warden J. D. Mercer Bolivia 

County Attorney E. J. Prevatte Southport 

Recorder's Court : 

Judge W. J. McLamb Shallotte 

Solicitor J. W. Ruark Southport 

Commissioners 

Chairman R. L. Rabon Leland 

Commissioner G. B. Ward Ash 

Commissioner B. C. Williams Shallotte 



B06 North Carolina Manual 

BUNCOMBE 

Buncombe County was formed in 1791 from Burke and Rutherford. Was 
named in honor of Colonel Edward Buncombe, a Revolutionary soldier who was 
wounded and captured at the battle of Germantown. October 4, 1777, and died 
a paroled prisoner. May 1778, in Philadelphia. Colonel Buncombe lived in Tyrrell 
County. He was noted for his hospitality. Over the door of his house were 
these lines : "Welcome all to Buncombe Hall." 

Population, 108,755 , County Seat, Asheville 

Office Officer Address 

State Senator 31st District Frank M. Parker Asheville 

Members House of Representatives. .J. E. Divelbiss, Jr Asheville 

Leslie H. McDaniel Oteen 

Roy A. Taylor Black Mountain 

Clerk of Court J. E. Swain Asheville 

Register of Deeds George A. Digges, Jr Asheville 

Sheriff L. E. Brown Asheville 

Treasurer J. C. Garrison Asheville 

Auditor J. C. Garrison Asheville 

Tax Supervisor R. C. Crowell Asheville 

Tax Collector J. P. Brown Asheville 

County Accountant I. C. Garrison Asheville 

Coroner Dr. P. R. Terry Asheville 

Surveyor K. G. Roberts Rt. 2, Alexander 

County Health Officer Dr. H. C. Whims Asheville 

Supt. of Schools T. C. Roberson Candler 

Supt. of Public Welfare George H. Lawrence Asheville 

Home Demonstration Agent Mamie Sue Evans Asheville 

Farm Demonstration Agent W. Riley Palmer Asheville 

Chmn. Bd. Education Dr. B. E. Morgan Asheville 

Chmn. Bd. Elections Clyde W. Bradley Asheville 

District Game & Fish Protector. ... P. S. Bagwell, Jr Asheville 

Forest Warden D. E. Begley Haw Creek 

County Attorney Harold K. Bennett Asheville 

County Librarian Mrs. Hanna Plummcr Asheville 

Veterans Service Officer Richard S. Hulme Asheville 

Asheville City Court: 

Judge Sam M. Cathey Asheville 

Solicitor W. C. Hampton Asheville 

Commissioners 

Chairman Coke Candler Enka 

Commissioner John C. Vance Asheville 

Commissioner George D. Young Swannanoa 

BURKE 

Burke County was formed in 1777 from Rowan. Was named in honor of 

Dr. Thomas Burke, member of the Continental Congress and governor of North 
Carolina. 

Population, o8,615 County Seat, Morganton 

State Senator 28th Dist Max C. Wilson Lenoir 

Member House of Representatives. . O. Lee Horton Morganton 

Clerk of Court W. C. Ross Morganton 

Register of Deeds W. Alvin Berry Morganton 

Sheriff Ray Sigmon Morganton 

Treasurer Lillian Ross Morganton 

Auditor Lillian Ross Morganton 

Tax Supervisor Parks McGimsey Morganton 

Tax Collector X. H. Cox Morganton 

County Accoimtant Lillian Ross Morganton 

Coroner B- F. Setzer Morganton 

Surveyor James A. Harbison Morganton 

County Health Officer Dr. C. N. Sisk Morganton 



County Government 507 



Office Officer Address 

Supt. of Schools R. L. Patton Morganton 

Supt. of Public Welfare M. J. Lynum Morganton 

Home Demonstration Agent Evelyn Wiggins Morganton 

Farm Demonstration Agent R. L. Sloan Morganton 

Chmn. Bd. Education C. P. Whisnant Morganton 

Chmn. Bd. Elections T. Earl Franklin Morganton 

District Game & Fish Protector . . . H. L. Biggers Morganton 

Forest Warden Arthur Williams Morganton 

County Attorney C. E. Cowan Morganton 

County Librarian Mrs. M. R. McVey Morganton 

Veterans Service Officer Jack C. Winchester Morganton 

County Criminal Court: 

Judge Harry L. Riddle, Jr Morganton 

Solicitor J- S. Page Drexel 

Commissioners 

Chairman A. Parks McGimsey Rt. 5, Morganton 

Commissioner Lawrence Lane Morganton 

Commissioner Conley Poteat Drexel 

Commissioner Daniel Bounous Valdese 

Commissioner Ben Gibbs Glen Alpine 

CABARRUS 
Cabarrus County was formed in 1792 from Mecklenburg. Was named in honor 
of Stephen Cabarrus, of Edenton, several times a member of the Legislature and 
often Speaker of the House of Commons. 

Population, 59,393 County Seat, Concord 
State Senators 21st District Luther E. Earnhardt Concord 

Nelson Woodson Salisbury 

Members House of Representatives . . Hugh Q. Alexander Kannapolis 

E. T. Bost, Jr Concord 

Clerk of Court D. Ray McEachern Concord 

Register of Deeds John R. Boger Concord 

Sheriff Ray C. Hoover Concord 

Treasurer Margie M. White Concord 

Auditor C. N. Field Concord 

Tax Supervisor J- S. Braswell, Jr Concord 

Tax Collector Ray C Hoover Concord 

County Accountant C. N. Field Concord 

Coroner N. J. Mitchell Concord 

Surveyor S. G. Hawfield Concord 

County Health Officer Dr. J. Roy Hege Concord 

Supt. of Schools C. A. Furr Concord 

Supt. of Public Welfare E. Farrell White Concord 

Home Demonstration Agent Edith McGlamery Concord 

Farm Demonstration Agent R. D. Goodman Concord 

Chmn. Bd. Education Foyd Biggers Concord 

Chmn. Bd. Elections John Sharp Hartsell Concord 

District Game & Fish Protector . . . R. O. Caldwell Concord 

County Attorney Hartsell & Hartsell Concord 

County Librarian Annette Shinn Concord 

Veterans Service Officer E. A. Robbins, Jr Concord 

Recorder's Court : 

Judge E. R. Alexander Kannapolis 

Solicitor H. W. Calloway Concord 

Commissioners 

Chairman J- I-'Ce VV^hite Concord 

Commissioner R- W. Cline Concord 

Commissioner H. L. Fink Concord 

Commissioner C. M. Crowell Mt. Pleasant 

Commissioner P- E. Stallings Harrisburg 



508 North Carolina Manual 



CALDWELL 

Caldwell County was formed in 1841 from Burke and Wilkes. Was named 
in honor of Joseph Caldwell, the first president of the University of North 
Carolina. He was one of the first and strongest advocates of the public school 
system and of the railroad through the center of the state from Morehead City 
to Tennessee. 

Population, 35,795 County Seat, Lenoir 

Office Officer Address 

State Senator 28th District Max C. Wilson Lenoir 

Member House of Representatives. . J. T. Pritchett Lenoir 

Clerk of Court F. H. Hoover Lenoir 

Register of Deeds Margaret B. Moore Lenoir 

Sheriff G. D. Greer Lenoir 

Auditor Mrs. J. C. Spencer Lenoir 

Tax Supervisor James H. Sherrill Lenoir 

Tax Collector James H. Sherrill Lenoir 

County Accountant Mrs. J. C. Spencer Lenoir 

Coroner A. H. Goble Lenoir 

Surveyor Thomas P. Isbell Lenoir 

County Health Officer Dr. C. N. Sisk Lenoir 

Supt. of Schools L. B. Robinson Lenoir 

Supt. of Public Welfare Swanson Edwards Lenoir 

Home Demonstration Agent Barbara Hurst Lenoir 

Farm Demonstration Agent Max Culp Lenoir 

Chmn. Bd. Education Dr. J. F. Reece Lenoir 

Chmn. Bd. Elections A. F. Torrence Lenoir 

District Game & Fish Protector . . . Clyde McLean Lenoir 

Forest Warden Lee Steele Lenoir 

County Attorney W. H. Strickland Lenoir 

Veterans Service Officer Cecil Hailey Lenoir 

Recorder's Court 

Judge A. R. Crisp Lenoir 

Solicitor L. M. Abernethy Lenoir 

Commissioners 

Chairman Mark Goforth Lenoir 

ComiTiissioner M. M. Pennell Lenoir 

Commissioner John Warlick Lenoir 

Commissioner Coit F. Barber Lenoir 

Commissioner Stuart Lingle Lenoir 

CAMDEN 
Camden County was formed in 1777 from Pasquotank. Was named in honor 
of the learned Englishman, Charles Pratt, Earl of Camden, who was one of the 
strongest friends of the Americans in British Parliament. He took their side 
in the dispute over taxation without representation. 

Population, 5,440 County Seat, Camden 

State Senators 1st District W. I. Halstead South Mills 

J. Emmett Winslow Hertford 

Member House of Representatives. . J. W. Jones South Mills 

Clerk of Court Annie Forbes Camden 

Register of Deeds P. P. Gregory Camden 

Sheriff M. D. Stevens Camden 

Treasurer First Citz. & Nat'l. Bank Elizabeth City 

Auditor Mati'da Bartlett Camden 

Tax Supervisor Calvin Bray Camden 

Tax Collector M. D. Stevens Camden 

Coroner f^arroll Godfrey Camden 

County Health Officer Dr. W. L. Stevens (Acting) Camden 

Supt. of Schools J. F. Pugh Old Trap 



County Government 509 



Office Officer Address 

Supt. of Public Welfare Roy B. Godfrey Belcross 

Home Demonstration Agent Mrs. Mamie Sawyer Camden 

Farm Demonstration Agent L. L. McLendon Camden 

Chmn. Bd. Education E. L. Hale Camden 

Chmn. Bd. Elections Billie Forehand Shiloh 

District Game & Fish Protector . . . Lester Pierce Rt. 1, Elizabeth City 

Forest Warden M. B. Williams South Mills 

County Attorney W. I. Halstead South Mills 

County Librarian Mrs. Ethel Alexander Elizabeth City 

Recorder's Court: 

Judge R. L. Whaley Camden 

Commissioners 

Chairman D. F. Bartlett Shiloh 

Commissioner C. C. Meiggs Camden 

Commissioner R. L. Bray Belcross 

CARTERET 

Carteret County v f s formed in 1722 from Bath. Was named in honor of 
Sir John Carteret, afterwards (17441 Earl Granville, one of the Lords Pro- 
prietors. When the other Lords Proprietors sold their shares to the king in 
1728. Carteret refused to sell, and an immense tract of land in North Carolina 
was laid off as his share in 1744. It was called the Granville District and was 
the cause of a great deal of trouble. He lost it by confiscation when the Revolu- 
tion freed North Carolina from British rule. 

Population, 18,284 County Seat, Beaufort 

State Senators 7th District ^ohn D. Larkins, Jr Trenton 

D. L. Ward New Bern 

Member House of Representatives. . H. S. Gibbs Morehead City 

Clerk of Court A. H. James Beaufort 

Register of Deeds I. W. Davis Beaufort 

Sheriff C. G. Holland Beaufort 

Auditor J. D. Potter Beaufort 

Tax Collector E. O. Moore Beaufort 

County Accountant J. D. Potter Beaufort 

Coroner P. A. Lewis Beaufort 

Surveyor Phillip K. Ball Morehead City 

County Health Officer Dr. N. Thos. Ennett Beaufort 

Supt. of Schools H. L. Joslyn Beaufort 

Supt. of Public' Welfare Mrs. Pessie Henderson Beaufort 

Home Demonstration Agent Mrs. Carrie B. Gillikin Beaufort 

Farm Demonstration Agent R. M. Williams Beaufort 

Chmn. Pd. Education Dr. L. W. Moore Beaufort 

Chmn. Pd. Elections F. R. Seeley Beaufort 

District Game & Fish Protector . . . Ale.x Davis Marshallberg 

Forest Warden M. E. Foreman R.F.D.. Beaufort 

County Attorney A. L. Hamilton Morehead City 

County Librarian Mrs. L. A. Oakley Beaufort 

Veterans Service OfHcer C. L. Beam Beaufort 

Recorder's Court: 

Judge L. R. Morris Atlantic 

Solicitor M. L. Davis Beaufort 

Commissioners 

Chairman Dr. K. P. B. Bonner Morehead City 

Commissioner C. Z. Chappell Beaufort 

Tomm'ssioner L. W. Pe'letier Stella 

Commissioner Wallace Styron Sealevel 

Commissioner Tildon Davis Harkers Island 



510 North Carolina Manual 

CASWELL 

Caswell County was formed in 1777 from Orange. Was named in honor of 
Richard Caswell, member of the First Continental Congress, first Governor of 
North Carolina after the Declaration of Independence, six times re-elected Gov- 
ernor, and Major-General in the Revolutionary Army. 

Population, 20,032 , County Seat, Yanceyville 

Office Officer • Address 

State Senator 1.5th District J. Hampton Price Leaksville 

Member House of Representatives . . W. C. Taylor Blanche 

Clerk of Court George M. Harris Yanceyville 

Register of Deeds J- Burjh Blaylock Yanceyville 

Sheriff J. H. Gunn Yanceyville 

Treasurer -James N. Slade Yanceyville 

Auditor James N. Slade Yanceyville 

Tax Supervisor R. E. Wilson Y'anceyville 

Tax Collector R- E. Wilson Yanceyville 

Countv Accountant James N. Slade Yanceyville 

County Health Officer Dr. F. M. Drake Spray 

Supt. of Schools Holland McSwain Yanceyville 

Supt. of Public Welfare Leona Graham Yanceyville 

Home Demonstration Agent 

White C. Louise Homevvood Yanceyville 

Colored Helen M. Payne Yanceyville 

Farm Demonstration Agent 

White J- E. Zimmerman Yanceyville 

Colored William N. Knight Yanceyville 

Chmn. Bd. Edu.-ation O. A. Powell Yanceyville 

Chmn. Bd. Elections L. W. Lillard Yanceyville 

District Game & Fish Protector . . . Raymo-^d Allen Leasburg 

County Attornev Robt. T. Wilson Yanceyville 

County Librarian Mrs. S. A. Malloy Yanceyville 

Recorder's Court: 

Judge C. L. Pemberton Yanceyville 

Solicitor E. F. Upchurch Yanceyville 

Commissioners 

Chairman E. A. Allison Yanceyville 

Commissioner A. P. Dabbs Yanceyville 

Commissioner Geo. R. Carter Rt. 4, Danville, Va. 

Commissioner W. W. Pointer Blanche 

Commissioner E. S. Butler Rt. 1, Reidsville 

CATAWBA 

Catawba County was formed in 1S42 from Lincoln. Was named after a 

tribe of Indians which dwelt in that section of the State. Catawba County voted 
with Gaston and Lincoln until 1854. 

Population, 51,65.3 County Seat, Newton 

State Senators 25th District C. H. Dearman Statesville 

G. Andrew Warlick Newton 

Member House of Representatives. . Harry VanderLinden Hickory 

Clerk of Court P- W. Deaton Newton 

Register of Deeds Mrs. Willie Trott Newton 

Sheriff Ray E. Pitts Newton 

Treasurer N. J. Sigmon Newton 

Tax Suiiervisor C. E. Gwin Newton 

Tax Collector N. J. Sigmon Newton 

Coroner ^^'^ Reynolds Newton 

Surveyor G. Ssm Rowe Newton 

County Health Officer Dr. E. H. Ellinwood Newton 



County Government 511 



Office Officer Address 

Supt. of Schools M. C. Campbell Newton 

Supt. of Public Welfare Joseline Harding Newton 

Home Demonstration Agent Wylie Knox Newton 

Farm Demonstration Agent Jesse Giles Newton 

Chmn. Bd. Education Ralph A. Sigmon Claremont 

Chmn. Bd. Elections D. Lee Setzer Newton 

Distri 't Game & Fish Protector . . . John C. Fairchikl Conover 

County Manager N. J. Sigmon Newton 

County Attorney J. C. Rudisill Newton 

County Librarian George Lindler Newton 

Veterans Service Officer G. A. Warlick Newton 

Recorder's Court : 

Judge Emmett C. Willis Hickory 

Solicitor W. J. Sherrod Newton 

Hickory Recorder's Court: 

Judge Marshall V. Yount Hickory 

Solicitor George Hovey Hickory 

Commissioners 

Chairman Carl V. Cline Hickory 

Commissioner Adrian Shuford, Jr Conover 

Commissioner George L. Winters Claremont 

Commissioner C. E. Rudisill Vale 

Commissioner N. W. Jones Rt. 2, Newton 

CHATHAM 
Chatham County was formed in 1770 from Orange. Was named in honor 
of the great Englishman who won for England all of French America and was 
the most elotjuent defender of the American cause in the British Parliament dur- 
ing the Revolution -William Pitt, Earl of Chatham. 
Population, 24,726 County Seat. Pittsboro 

State Senators 13th District -T. C. Pittman Sanford 

R. N. Simms, Jr Raleigh 

Member House of Representatives. . T. Fleet Baldwin Siler City 

Clerk of Court E. B. Hatch Pittsboro 

Register of Deeds J. W. Emerson, Jr Pittsboro 

Sheriff G. H. Andrews Pittsboro 

Treasurer I?ank of Pittsboro Pittsboro 

Auditor T. V. Riggsbee Pittsboro 

Tax Supervisor J. W. Emerson, Jr Pittsboro 

Tax Collector G. H. Andrews Pittsboro 

County Accountant T. V. Riggsbee Pittsboro 

Coroner H. It. Stone Siler City 

Surveyor Lloyd R. Womble Siler City 

County Health Officer Dr. Catherine E. Coleman Pittsboro 

Supt. of Schools J. S. Waters Pittsboro 

Supt. of Public Welfare Mrs. C. K. Strowd RED, Pittsboro 

Home Demonstration Agent 

White Flossie Whitley Pittsboro 

Colored Mildred B. Payton Pittsboro 

Farm Demonstration Agent 

White J. B. Snipes Pittsboro 

Colored John Turner Pittsboro 

Chmn. Bd. Education C. A. Snipes Bynum 

Chmn. Bd. Elections C. M. Pattishall Rt. 4, Sanford 

District Game & Fish Protector . . . Eugene A. Jo"es Siler City 

Forest Warden Adolphus B. Clark Pittsboro 

County Attorney Wade Barber Pittsboro 

Coimty Librarian Mrs. Milton Heath Siler City 



512 North Carolina Manual 

Office Officer Address 

Veterans Service Officer Charles Beddingfleld Oxford 

County Criminal Court: 

Judge J- L. Moody Siler City 

Solicitor F- C. Upchurch Pittsboro 

Commissioners 

Chairman E. J. Dark Pittsboro 

Commissioner W. B. Emerson Bear Creek 

Commissioner E. E. Walden Moncure 

CHEROKEE 

Cherokee County was formed in 1839 from Macon. Was named after an In- 
dian tribe which still dwells in that section of the state. 
Population, 18,813 County Seat, Murphy 

Office Officer Address 

State Senator 33rd District L. B. Nichols ^J}^^^^^ 

Member House of Representatives. . J. H. Duncan Murphy 

Clerk of Court J- L- Hall ^''''^]!'^ 

Register of Deeds B. L. Padgett ^"'"^^^ 

gheriff Frank C. Crawford Murphy 

Auditor ■.::.: E. L. shields ^'""''u^ 

Tax Supervisor E. L. Shields ^"'^^^^ 

Tax Collector E. L. Shields ?!"'"''^^ 

County Accountant E. L. Shields ^J"'"^^^ 

Coroner Dr. Harry Miller Murphy 

Surveyor O. G. Anderson Culberson 

County Health Officer Dr. Marvin Nathan ^I"'""!}^ 

Supt. of Schools Lloyd Hendrix ?!"'■''^^ 

Supt. of Public Welfare Mrs. Laura H. Freeman Murphy 

Home Demonstration Agent Mary Cornwell Murphy 

Farm Demonstration Agent A. Q. Ketner ?;"''''!!^ 

Chmn. Bd. Education Noah Hembree Murphy 

Chmn. Bd. Elections A. J. Hembree Murphy 

Distri-:t Game & Fish Protector ... A. R. Dalrymple ?^"''^r^ 

Forest Warden Ernest Burnett Rt. 2, Murphy 

County Attorney J- B. Gray .. ^J"'"^^ 

County Librarian Josephine Heighway ^"'■^u^' 

Veterans Service Officer D. E. Sigmon Murphy 



Commissioners 

Chairman E A^ Wood ^^'^"'T' 

Commissioner W. E. Moore . . . . Murphy 

Commissioner M. H. Palmer Rt. 3. Murphy 



CHOWAN 
Chowan County was formed in 1672 from Albemarle. Was named for an 
Indian tribe dwelling in the northeastern part of the State when the English 
first came to North Carolina. 
Population, 11,572 County Seat, Edenton 

State Senators 1st District W. I. Halstead . South Mills 

J. Emmett Winslow Hertford 

Member House of Representatives. . J. H. MoMullan Edenton 

Clerk of Court E. W. Spires ^^^"1°" 

Register of Deeds M. L. Bunch Edenton 

Sheriff Bunch Edenton 

Treasurer . . . ■ George C. Hoskins Edenton 

Tax Supervisor " P- S. McMullan Edenton 



County Government 513 

Office Officer Address 

Tax Collector J- A. Bunch Edenton 

County Accountant E. W. Spires Edenton 

Supt. of Schools W. J. Taylor Edenton 

Supt. of Public Welfare Mrs. Carolyn C. McMuUan Edenton 

Home Demonstration Agent 

White Rebecca E. Colwell Edenton 

Colored Esther B. Rascoe Edenton 

Farm Demonstration Agent 

White C. W. Overman Edenton 

Colored J- B. Small Edenton 

Chmn. Bd. Education J. E. Wood Edenton 

Chmn. Bd. Elections L. S. Byrum Edenton 

District Game & Fish Protector ... R. E. Evans Rt. 1, Edenton 

Forest Warden F. V. White Rt. 1, Edenton 

County Attorney J. N. Fruden Edenton 

County Librarian Mrs. S. M. McMullan Edenton 

Veterans Service Officer Stephen H. Alford Elizabeth City 

Recorder's Court : 

Judge Marvin P. Wilson Edenton 

Solicitor Weldon A. Hollowell Edenton 

Commissioners 

Chairman W. W. Byrum Edenton 

Commissioner E. N. Elliott Tyner 

Commissioner A. S. Hollowell Edenton 

Commissioner J. A. Webb Rt. 2, Edenton 

Commissioner J. R. Peele Rt. 3, Edenton 

CLAY 
Clay County was formed in 1861 from Cherokee. Was named in honor of 
the great orator and statesman, Henry Clay. Prior to 1868 Clay voted with 
Cherokee. 
Population, 6,405 County Seat, Hayesville 

State Senator 3.3rd District L. B. Nichols Andrews 

Member House of Representatives. . Fred D. Pass Hayesville 

Clerk of Court Gaorge H. Martin Hayesville 

Register of Deeds William H. Crisp Hayesville 

Sheriff Glenn Swanson Hayesville 

Treasurer F. B. Garrett Hayesville 

Auditor F. B. Garrett Hayesville 

Tax Supervisor P. C. Scroggs Hayesville 

Tax Collector Glenn Swanson Hayesville 

County Accountant F. B. Garrett Hayesville 

Coroner Dr. P. B. Killian Hayesville 

Surveyor E. C. Mease Hayesville 

County Health Officer Dr. M. M. Nathan Murphy 

Sunt, of Schools Alien J. Bell Hayesville 

Supt. of Public Welfare Alvin L. Penland Hayesville 

Home Demonstration Agent Velma Beam Moore Hayesville 

Farm Demonstration Agent R. G. Vick Hayesville 

Chmn. Bd. Education Frank Rogers Shooting Creek 

Chmn. Bd. Elections W. G. Mingus Hayesville 

District Game & Fish Protector . . . Georre Garrett Hayesville 

Forest VN^arden Perry Tipton Hayesville 

County Manager F. R. Garrett Hayesville 

County Attorney T. C. Gray Hayesville 

Veterans Service Officer Martha F. Jones Hayesville 

Commissioners 

Chairman W- G. Mingus Hayesville 

Commissioner C. A. Auberry Hayesville 

Commissioner Wayne Hogsed Shooting Creek 



514 North Carolina Manual 



CLEVELAND 
Cleveland County was formed in 1841 from Rutherford and Lincoln. Was 
named in honor of Colonel Benjamin Cleveland, a noted partisan leader on 
the western Carolina frontier in the Revolution, and one of the "Heroes of 
King's Mountain." 

Population, 58,055 County Seat, Shelby 

Office Officer Address 

State Senators 27th District Chas. C. Dalton Spindale 

Lee R. Weathers Shelby 

Member House of Representatives. . B. T. Falls, Jr Shelby 

Clerk of Court E. A. Houser, Jr Shelby 

Register of Deeds Dan W. Moore Shelby 

Sheriff H. A. Lo.?an, Jr Shelby 

Treasurer Mrs. Lillian Newton Shelby 

Auditor Charles Wood.son Shelby 

Tax Supervisor Charles Woodson Shelby 

Tax Collector R. S. Gidney Shelby 

County Accountant Charles Woodson Shelby 

Coroner OIlie Harris Kings Mountain 

Surveyor D. R. S. Frazier Shelby 

County Health Ofhcer Dr. Z. P. Mitchell Shelby 

Supt. of Schools J. H. Grigg Shelby 

Supt. of Public Welfare Mrs. Mary B. Parker Shelby 

Home Demonstration Agent 

White Launa Brashers Shelby 

Colored Thelma E. McVea Shelby 

Favm Demonstration Agent 

White Ben Jenkins Shelby 

Colored Leon J. McDougle Shelby 

Chmn. Bd. Education A. L. Calton Lattimore 

Chmn. Bd. Elections H. C. Hendrix Shelby 

District Game & Fish Protector . . . H. F. Beam Shelby 

County Attorney B. T. Falls Shelby 

County Librarian Dorothy Grigg Shelby 

Veterans Service Officer Chalmos L. Miller Fallston 

Recorder's Court: 

Judge L. T. Hfimrick, Jr Shelby 

Solicitor Bynum E. Weathers Shelby 

Commissioners 

Chairman Z. V. Cline Rt. 1, Shelby 

Commissioner H. W. McKinney Rt. 1, Mooresboro 

Commissioner \. C. Bra.'kett Casar 

COLUMBUS 

Columbus County was fornned in 1808 from Bladen and Brunswick. Was 
named in honor of the Discoverer of the New World. 

Population, 45,663 County Seat, Whiteville 

State Senators 10th District R. J. Hester, Jr Elizabethtown 

Gilbert A. Shaw Fayetteville 

Member House of Representatives . . J. K. Powell Whiteville 

Clerk of Court Lee J. Greer Whiteville 

Register of Deeds Leo L. Fisher Whiteville 

Sheriff H=-rman D. Stanley Whiteville 

Auditor W. D. Brooks Whiteville 

Tax Supervisor Mrs. Veiie Rouse Whiteville 

Tax Collector W. D. Brooks Whiteville 

Coroner Hugh Nance Cerro Gorda 

Surveyor Herman Schnibben Whiteville 

County Health Officer Dr. Floyd Johnson Whiteville 

Supt. of Schools W. J. Boger Whiteville 



County Government 515 



Office Officer Address 

Supt. cf Public Welfare Mrs. Johnsie Nunn Whiteville 

Home Demonstration Agent Nan Ratliff Whiteville 

Fai-m Demonstration Agent Charles D. Raper Whiteville 

Chmn. Pd. Education R. J. Lamb Whiteville 

Chmn. Bd. Elections A. E. Powell, Jr Whiteville 

District Game & Fish Protector . . . D. E. Hewitt Whiteville 

Fill °st Warden Joe Teerelevick Whiteville 

County Attorney E. K. Proctor Whiteville 

County Librarian Edna Creech Whiteville 

Veterans Service Officer Thurston Formyduval Whiteville 

Recorder's Court : 

Judge W. E. Harrelson Whiteville 

Solicitor Richard E. Weaver Whiteville 

Commissioners 

Chairman A. W. Williamson Cerro Gorda 

Commissioner Alex W. Weir Lake Waccamaw 

Commissioner Bud Stephens Rt. 1, Boardman 

Commissioner D. H. Jordan Tabor City 

Commissioner William F. Floyd Whiteville 

CRAVEN 

Craven County was formed about 1712 from Bath. Was named in honor of 
William, Lord Craven, one of the Lords Proprietors of Carolina. 
Population, .31,298 County Seat, New Bern 

State Senators 7th District John D. Larkins, Jr Trenton 

D. L. Ward New Bern 

Member House of Representatives. . Burl G. Hardison New Bern 

Clerk of Court L. E. Lancaster New Bern 

Register of Deeds J. S. Holland New Bern 

Sheriff Chas. B. Berry New Bern 

Treasurer Branch Bank & Trust Co New Bern 

Auditor B. O. Jones New Bern 

Tax Supervisor B. O. Jones New Bern 

Tax Collector C. C. Pritchett New Bern 

County Accountant B. O. Jones New Bern 

Coroner Raymond Pollock, Jr New Bern 

County Health Officer Dr. Eugene A. Bain New Bern 

Supt. of Schools R. L. Pugh New Bern 

Supt. of Public Welfare Mrs. J D. Whitford New Bern 

Home Demonstration Agent 

White Jessie Trowbridge New Bern 

Colored Mrs. Marietta Carrington New Bern 

Farm Demonstration Agent 

White A. T. Jackson New Bern 

Colored Otis Evans New Bern 

Chmn. Bd. Education C. A. Seifert New Bern 

Chmn. Bd. Elections A. O. Kafer New Bern 

District Game & Fish Protector . . . R. L. Watson New Bern 

Forest Warden S. B. Norris New Bern 

County Attorney R. A. Nunn New Bern 

County Librarian Mary Scott Gurley New Bern 

Recorder's Court : 

Judge Lawrence E. Lancaster Vanceboro 

SoHcitor D. C. McCotter, Jr New Bern 

Commissioners 

Chairman G. W. Ipock Ernul 

Commissioner T. W. Haywood New Bern 

Commissioner C. D. I^ascaster New Bern 

Commissioner Fdvvrard Ipock New Bern 

Commissioner A. L. Dail New Bern 



516 North Carolina Manual 



CUMBERLAND 
Cumberland County was formed in 1754 from Bladen. Was named in honor 
of William Augustus, Duke of Cumberland, second son of King George IL Cum- 
berland was the commander of the English army at the battle of Culloden, in 
which the Scotch Highlanders were so badly defeated. Many of them came to 
America, and their principal settlement was at Cross Creek in Cumberland 
County. 
Population, .50,320 County Seat, Fayetteville 

Office Officer Address 

State Senators 10th District R. J. Hester, Jr Elizabethtown 

Gilbert A. Shaw Fayetteville 

Members House of Representatives. F. M. Averitt Fayetteville 

Troy A. Fisher Fayetteville 

Clerk of Court C. W. Broadfoot Fayetteville 

Register of Deeds J. W. Johnson Fayetteville 

Sheriff N. H. McGeachy Fayetteville 

Treasurer R. E. Nimocks Fayetteville 

Tax Supervisor T. G. Braxton Fayetteville 

Tax Collector B. C. Bramble Fayetteville 

Coroner Joe Pinkston Fayetteville 

County Health Officer Dr. M. T. Foster Fayetteville 

Supt. of Schools F. D. Byrd Fayetteville 

Supt. of Public Welfare E. L. Houser Fayetteville 

Home Demonstration Agent 

White Lena Bullard Rt. 2, Fayetteville 

Colored Jeannette Bass Fayetteville 

Farm Demonstration Agent 

White J. T. Monroe Fayetteville 

Colored B. B. Gaillard Fayetteville 

Chmn. Bd. Education L B. Julian Fayetteville 

Chmn. Bd. Elections F. B. Rankin Fayetteville 

District Game & Fish Protector . . . Oscar Chadwick Rt. 3, Fayetteville 

Forest Warden P. P. Smith Rt. 3, Fayetteville 

County Attorney C. C. Howard Fayetteville 

County Librarian Mrs. Dorothy Shue Fayetteville 

Veterans Service Officer Coy E. Brewer Fayetteville 

Recorder's Court : 

Judge James MacRae Fayetteville 

Solicitor Seavy A. Carroll Fayetteville 

Commissioners 

Chairman J. B. Wilkins Linden 

Commissioner Lector E. Ray Fayetteville 

Commissioner William K. Monroe Fayetteville 

Commissioner Fred Kinlaw Rt. 5, Fayetteville 

Commissioner Frank M. Barrett Fayetteville 

CURRITUCK 
Currituck County was formed in 1672 from Albemarle. Was named after an 
Indian tribe. 
Population, 6,709 County Seat, Currituck 

Office Officer Address 

State Senators 1st District W. I. Halstead South Mills 

J. Emmett Winslow Hertford 

Member House of Representatives . . E. R. Johnson Currituck 

Clerk of Court H. E. Forbes Currituck 

Register of Deeds Mrs. Edna L. Blossom Currituck 

Sheriff L. L. Dozier Currituck 

Tro?5surer Bank of Currituck Currituck 

.\uditor Mrs. Alice S. Brumsey Currituck 



County Government 517 



Office Officer Address 

Tax Supervisor Mrs. Edna L. Blossom Currituck 

Tax Collector L. L. Dozier Currituck 

County Accountant Mrs. Alice S. Brumsey Currituck 

Coroner J. Bryan Smith Spot 

Supt. of Schools W. H. Tuck Currituck 

Supt. of Public Welfare Norman Hughes Currituck 

Home Demonstration Agent Margaret Myers Currituck 

Farm Demonstration Agent L. A. Powell Barco 

Chmn. Bd. Education O. L. Woodhouse Grandy 

Chmn. Bd. Elections J. T. Etheridge Shawboro 

District Game & Fish Protector . . . W. L. Boswood Maple 

County Attorney E. R. Woodard Coinjock 

County Librarian Mrs. John D. Welch Moyock 

Veterans Service Offioer Norman Hughes Currituck 

Recorder's Court : 

Judge W. F. Leary Gregory 

Solicitor W. C. Morse, Jr Elizabeth City 

Commissioners 

Chairman N. M. Ansell Munden, Va. 

Commissioner Edward Roberts Gregory 

Commissioner H. D. Newbern, Jr Powells Point 

DARE 

Dare County was formed in 1870 from Currituck, Tyrrell, and Hyde. Was 
named in honor of Virginia Dare, the first English child born in America. 

Population, 6,041 County Seat, Manteo 

State Senators 2nd District Sam M. Campen Alliance 

John C. Rodman Washington 

Member House of Representatives. . D. L. Hayman Nags Head 

Clerk of Court C. S. Meekins Manteo 

Register of Deeds Melvin R. Daniels Manteo 

Sheriff Frank M. Gaboon Manteo 

Treasurer Bank of Manteo Manteo 

Auditor Clarence Day Manteo 

Tax Supervisor Mabel Basnight Manteo 

Tax Collector Frank M. Gaboon Manteo 

County Accountant C. S. Meekins Manteo 

Coroner Marvin Rogers Manteo 

County Health Officer Hal F. Daniels Manteo 

Supt. of Schools R. I. Leake Manteo 

Supt. of Public Welfare L P. Davis Manteo 

Home Demonstration Agent Mary E. Fearing Manteo 

Farm Demonstration Agent Robert S. Smith Manteo 

Chmn. Bd. Education E. P. White Buxton 

Chmn. Bd. Elections Mrs. Estelle B. Tillett Manteo 

District Game & Fish Protector ...Jack B. Ballance Kill Devil Hill 

Forest Warden A. B. Hooper Stumpy Point 

County Attorney Martin Kellogg, Jr Manteo 

County Librarian Mrs. Georgia E. Harwood Manteo 

Veterans Service Officer L P. Davis Manteo 

Recorder's Court : 

Judge W. F. Baum Manteo 

Solicitor Martin Kellogg, Jr Manteo 

Commissioners 

Chairman D. V. Meekins Manteo 

Commissioner C. C. Duvall East Lake 

Commissioner H. F. Perry Kitty Hawk 

Commissioner James W. Scarborough Avon 

Commissioner M. L. Burrus Hatteras 



518 North Carolina Manual 



DAVIDSON 

Davidson County was formed in 1822 from Rowan. Was named in honor 
of General William Lee Davidson, a soldier of the Revolution, who was killed 
at the Rattle of Cowan's Ford. When General Greene retreated across North 
Carolina before Cornwallis in 1781, he stationed some troops under General David- 
son at Cowan's Ford over the Catawba River to delay the British Army. The 
British attacked the Americans, killed General Davidson, and forced the passage. 
The United States has erected a monument in his honor on Guilford Battleground. 

Population, 53,377 County Seat, Lexington 

Office Officer Address 

State Senators 18th District Edwin Pate Laurinburg 

Wade H. Phillips Lexington 

Member House of Representatives. . L. A. Martin Lexington 

Clerk of Court M. P. Cooper Lexington 

Register of Deeds M. V. Lomax Lexington 

Sheriff W. G. Fritts Lexington 

Treasurer Mrs. Gladys Johnson liexington 

Auditor A. C. Michael, Jr Lexington 

Tax Supervisor A. C. Michael, Jr Lexington 

Tax Collector W. G. Fritts Lexington 

County Accountant A. C. Michael, Jr Lexington 

Coroner Dr. Dermont Lohr Lexington 

Surveyor Lee Vanhoy Welcome 

County Health Officer Dr. G. C. Gambrell Lexington 

Supt. of Schools Paul F. Evans Lexington 

Supt. of Public Welfare Matilda Umholtz Lexington 

Home Demonstration Agent I^ala Blalock Lexington 

Farm Demonstration Agent C. E. Bernhardt Lexington 

Chmn. Bd. Education Raljih Wilson Thomasville 

Chmn. Bd. Elections D. L. Pickard Lexington 

District Game & Fish Protector . . . J. B. Green Thomasville 

County Manager A. C. Michael, Jr Lexington 

County Attorney S. A. DeLapp Lexington 

County Librarian Antoinette Earle Lexington 

Veterans Service Officer Joe Hege, Jr Lexington 

Davidson County Court : 

Judge T. S. Wall, Jr Lexington 

Solicitor Charles Mauze Lexington 

Denton Recorder's Court : 

Judge A. S. Snider Denton 

Thomasville Recorder's Court: 

Judge W. H. Steed Thomasville 

Solicitor L. Roy Hughes Thomasville 

Commissioners 

Chairman D. S. Siceloff , Jr Lexington 

Commissioner Roby Taylor Lexington 

Commissioner A. A. Foltz Rt. 4, Lexington 

Commissioner Charlie A. Cline Thomasville 

Ccmmissioner A. R. Morris Denton 

DAVIE 
Davie County was formed in 1836 from Rowan. Was named in honor of 
William R. Davie, distinguished as a soldier of the Revolution, member of the 
Federal Convention of 1787, Governor of North Carolina, special Envoy Extraor- 
dinary and Minister Plenipotentiary to France, "Father of the University of 
North Carolina." 
Population, 14,909 County Seat, Mocksville 

State Senator 24th District B. C. Brock Mocksville 

Member House of Representatives . . J. N. Smoot Mocksville 



County Government 519 

Office Officer Address 

Clerk of Court S. H. Chaffin Mocksville 

Register of Deeds C. R. Vogler Mocksville 

Sheriff R- Paul Foster Mocksville 

Treasurer Inez Naylor Mocksville 

Auditor . . . . Inez Naylor Mocksville 

Tax Supervisor Inez Naylor Mocksville 

Tax Collector Kathlyn Reavis Mocksville 

County Accountant Inez Naylor Mocksville 

Coroner Dr. G. V. Greene Rt. 3, Mocksville 

Surveyor Sam L. Talbert Advance 

County Health Officer Dr. Eugene E. Taylor Mocksville 

Supt. of Schools Curtis Price Mocksville 

Sunt, of Public Welfare Amy Jane Talbert Advance 

Home Demonstration Agent Florence Mackie Mocksville 

Farm Demonstration Agent F. E. Peebles Mocksville 

Chmn. Bd. Education T. C. Pegram Cooleemee 

Chmn. Bd. Elections Dr. P. H. Mason Mocksville 

Distri t Game & Fish Protector . . . Tom B. Woodruff Mocksville 

County Attorney A. T. Grant Mocksville 

County Librarian Mrs. Blanche Clement Mocksville 

Veterans Service Officer F. R. Leagans Mocksville 

Commissioners 

Chairman R- P- Martin Mocksville 

Commissioner J. M. Groce Rt. 2, Mocksville 

Commissioner C. R. Carter Rt. 3, Mocksville 

DUPLIN 
Duplin County was formed in 1749 from New Hanover. Was named in honor 
of George Henry Hay, Lord Duplin, an English nobleman. 
Population, 39,739 County Seat, Kenansville 

State Senators 9th District Roy Rowe Burgaw 

Henry Vann Clinton 

Member House of Representatives. . Lewis W. Outlaw Seven Springs 

Clerk of Court R. V. Wells Kenansville 

Register of Deeds A. T. Outlaw Kenansville 

Sheriff Ralph J. Jones Kenansville 

Treasurer Ralph J. Jones Kenansville 

Auditor F. W. McGowen Kenansville 

Tax Supervisor F. W. McGowen Kenansville 

Tax Collector Gilbert Alphin Kenansville 

County Accountant F. W. McGowen Kenansville 

Coroner C. B. Sitterson Kenansville 

Surveyor R. W. Craft Beulaville 

County Health Officer Dr. G. V. Gooding Kenansville 

Supt. of Schools O. P. Johnson Kenansville 

Supt. of Public Welfare Mrs. Juliette M. Highsmith Kenansville 

Home Demonstration Agent 

White Hilda Clontz Kenansville 

Colored Mabel Peterson Warsaw 

Farm Demonstration Agent 

White Lacy F. Weeks Kenansville 

Colored R. E. Wilkins Kenansville 

Chmn. Bd. Education Robert M. Carr Wallace 

Chmn. Bd. Elections E. Walker Stevens Warsaw 

Distrijt Game & Fish Protector . . . Rill H. Ipock Wallace 

Forest Warden Ralph Miller Beulaville 

County Attorney H. E. Phillips Kenansville 

County Librarian Dorothy Wightman Kenansville 

Veterans Service Officer J. B. Wallace Kenansville 



520 North Carolina Manual 

Office Officer Address 

General County Court : 

Judge Robert L. West Warsaw 

Solicitor Grady Mercer Beulaville 

Commissioners 

Chairman A. C. Hall Wallace 

Commissioner G. D. Bennett Warsaw 

Commissioner L. P. Wells RFD, Mt. Olive 

Commissioner Arthur Kennedy Beulaville 

Commissioner Dallas Jones RFD, Warsaw 



DURHAM 

Durham County was formed in 1881 from Orange and Wake. Was named 
after the town of Durham, a thriving manufacturing city. 

Population, 80,244 County Seat, Durham 

State Senators 14th District Claude Currie Durham 

F. D. Long Roxboro 

Members House of Representatives. Dan K. Edwards Durham 

Robert M. Gantt Durham 

Clerk of Court Wilbert H. Young Durham 

Register of Deeds R. Garland Brooks Durham 

Sheriff E. G. Belvin Durham 

Treasurer J. Frank Adams Durham 

Auditor D. W. Newsom Durham 

Tax Supervisor Hubert T. Warren Durham 

Tax Collector J. M. Markham Durham 

County Accountant D. W. Newsom Durham 

Coroner R. A. Harton Durham 

Surveyor S. M. Credle Durham 

County Health Officer Dr. J. H. Epperson Durham 

Supt. of Schools W. M. Jenkins Durham 

Supt. of Public Welfare W. E. Stanley Durham 

Home Demonstration Agent 

White Virginia Patrick Durham 

Colored Estelle Nixon Durham 

Farm Demonstration Agent 

White W. B. Pace Durham 

Colored J. C. Hubbard Durham 

Chmn. Bd. Education T. O. Sorrell Durham 

Chmn. Bd. Elections Sigmund Meyers Durham 

District Game & Fish Protector . . . W. E. Lowe Durham 

Forest Warden J. C. Horton Durham 

County Manager D. W. Newsom Durham 

County Attorney R. P. Reade Durham 

County Librarian Clara Crawford Durham 

Veterans Service Officer Paul Noell Durham 

Recorder's Court : 

Judge A. R. Wilson Durham 

Solicitor W. J. Brogden, Jr Durham 

Commissioners 

Chairman R. L. Brame Durham 

Commissioner S. L. Proctor Durham 

Commissioner O. A. McCulIers Durham 

Commissioner George F. Kirkland Durham 

Commissioner J. P. McGuire Durham 



County Government 521 

edgecombe 

Edgecombe County was formed in 1735 from Bertie. Was named in honor of 
Ri^'hard Edgecombe, who became Baron Edgecombe in 1742, an English noble- 
man and a lord of the treasury. 

Population, 49,162 County Seat, Tarboro 

Office Officer Address 

State Senators 4th District Julian R. Allsbrook Roanoke Rapids 

L. H. Fountain Tarboro 

Member House of Representatives. . Ben E. Fountain Rocky Mount 

Clerk of Court W. S. Babcock Tarboro 

Register of Deeds Miss M. B. Bunn Tarboro 

Sheriff Tom P. Bardin Tarboro 

Treasurer Edgecombe Bank & Trust Co Tarboro 

Auditor M. L. Laughlin Tarboro 

Ta.x Supervisor M. L. Laughlin Tarboro 

Tax Collector R. L. Stancil Tarboro 

Coroner Dr. J. G. Raby Tarboro 

County Health Officer Dr. John A. Lineberry Tarboro 

Supt. of Schools E. D. Johnson Tarboro 

Supt. of Public Welfare Constance F. S. Rabin Tarboro 

Home Demonstration Agent 

White Mrs. J. W. VanLandingham Tarboro 

Colored Hazel S. Parker Tarboro 

Farm Demonstration Agent 

White Joe Powell Tarboro 

Colored F. D. Wharton Tarboro 

Chmn. Bd. Education Dr. W. W. Green Tarboro 

Chmn. Bd. Elections Robt. P. Cherry Speed 

District Game & Fish Protector . . . Floyd P. Lupton Tarboro 

Forest Warden C. M. Fisher Tarboro 

County Attorney C. H. Leggett Tarboro 

County Librarian Janie Allsbrook Tarboro 

Veterans Service Officer Herbert H. Taylor, Jr Tarboro 

Recorder's Court : 

Judge Herbert H. Taylor, Jr Tarboro 

Solicitor M. C. Staton Tarboro 

Commissioners 

Chairman B. C. Mayo Tarboro 

Commissioner Leslie Calhoune Rocky Mount 

Commissioner W. C. Hargrove Tarboro 

Commissioner E. Y. Lovelace Macclesfield 

Commissioner J. T. Lawrence RFD, Tarboro 

FORSYTH 

Forsyth County was formed in 1849 from Stokes. Was named in honor of 
Colonel Benjamin Forsyth. U.S.A., a citizen of Stokes County, who was killed 
on the Canadian frontier on June 28, 1814, during the second war with Great 
Britain. 
Population, 126,475 County Seat, Winston-Salem 

State Senator 22nd District Rex Gass Winston-Salem 

Members House of Representatives. Winfield Blackwell Winston-Salem 

J. McRae Dalton Winston-Salem 

F. L. Gobble Winston-Salem 

Clerk of Court W. E. Church Winston-Salem 

Register of Deeds J. M. Lentz Winston-Salem 

Sheriff Ernie G. Shore Winston-Salem 

Auditor W. N. Schultz Winston-Salem 

Tax Supervisor . . . , William M. Taylor Winston-Salerrj 



522 North Carolina Manual 

Office Officer Address 

Tax Collector Walter A. Mickle Winston-Salem 

County Accountant W. N. Schultz Winston-Sa]em 

Coroner Dr. W. N. Dalton Winston-Salem 

Surveyor .Tune Lineback Winston-Salem 

County Health Officer Dr. Fred G. Pegg Winston-Salem 

Supt. of Schools R. F. W. Brimley Winston-Salem 

Supt. of Public Welfare A. W. Cline Winston-Salem 

Home Demonstration Agent 

White Mrs. Elizabeth Tuttle Winston-Salem 

Colored Mrs. Lottie Hairston Winston-Salem 

Farm Demonstration Agent S. R. Mitchiner Winston-Salem 

Chmn. Bd. Education Dan L. Drummond Winston-Salem 

Chmn. Bd. Elections T. Spruill Thornton Winston-Salem 

District Game & Fish Protector ... J. E. Scott Clemmons 

County Attorney Nat S. Crews Winston-Salem 

County Librarian Janet Trotter Winston-Sa!em 

Winston-Salem Municipal Court: 

Judge Leroy Sams Winston-Salem 

Solicitor C. F. Burns Winston-Salem 

Commissioners 

Chairman Roy W. Craft Winston-Salem 

Commissioner James G. Hanes Winston-Salem 

Commissioner William B. Simpson Winston-Salem 

FRANKLIN 
Franklin County was formed in 1779 from Bute. Was named in h(jnor of 
Benjamin Franklin. 
Population, 30,382 County Seat, Louisburg 

State Senators 6th District J. C. Eagles, Jr Wilson 

O. B. Moss Spring Hope 

Member House of Representatives. . H. C. Kearney Franklinton 

Clerk of Court John W. King Louisburg 

Register of Deeds Alex T. Wood Louisburg 

Sheriff John P. Moore Louisburg 

Treasurer First Citizens Bk. & Trust Co Louisburg 

Auditor J- H. Boone Louisburg 

Tax Supervisor J. H. Boone Louisburg 

Tax Collector K. A. Braswell Louisburg 

County Accountant J. H. Boone Louisburg 

Coroner Willis Perry Louisburg 

County Health Officer Dr. J. R. Turner Louisburg 

Supt. of Schools W. F. Mitchell Youngsville 

Supt. of Public Welfare Lucy P. Burt Louisburg 

Home Demonstration Agent 

White Mrs. Essa D. Shaw Louisburg 

Colored Margaret Bladen Louisburg 

Farm Demonstration Agent 

White Walter E. Fuller Louisburg 

Colored Geo. Leonard P. Moore Louisburg 

Chmn. Bd. Education H. S. Pearce Franklinton 

Chmn. Bd. Elections A. F. Johnson Louisburg 

District Game & Fish Protector . . . Phil R. Wilson Bunn 

Forest Warden Joe A. Pearce Louisburg 

County Attorney E. F. Griffin Louisburg 

County Librarian Nannie Crowder Henderson 

Veterans Service Officer Mary White Nash Rt. 2, Zebulon 

Recorder's Court : 

Judge J. E. Malone Louisburg 

Solicitor E. F. Griffin Louisburg 



County Government 523 

Commissioners 

Office Officer Address 

Chairman H. S. Pearce Franklinton 

Commissioner P. W. Joyner Rt. 1, Louisburg 

Commissioner H. T. Bartholomew Louisburg 

Commissioner J. Ira Weldon Rt. 3, Louisburg 

Commissioner L. L. Sturdivant Rt. 1, Castalia 

GASTON 

Gaston County was formed in 1846 from Lincoln. Was named in honor of 
Judge William Gaston, Member of Congress and Justice of the Supreme Court of 
North Carolina. From 1846 to 1852 Gaston voted with Lincoln and Catawba. 
Population, 87,531 County Seat, Gastonia 

State Senator 26th District R. Grady Rankin Gastonia 

Members House of Representatives. James Boyce Garland Gastonia 

Carl W. Howard Bessemer City 

Clerk of Court Paul E. Monroe Gastonia 

Register of Deeds Mrs. Rubye D. Rhyne Gastonia 

Sheriff Hoyle T. Efird Gastonia 

Treasurer E. L. Froneberger Gastonia 

Auditor C. E. Dent Gastonia 

Tax Supervisor Fred H. Shuford Gastonia 

Tax Collector Fred H. Shuford Gastonia 

County Accountant C. E. Dent Gastonia 

Coroner Wm. G. McLean Gastonia 

Surveyor James Burrell Gastonia 

County Health Officer Dr. R. E. Rhyne Gastonia 

Supt. of Schools Hunter Huss Gastonia 

Supt. of Public Welfare T. Graham Ponder Gastonia 

Home Demonstration Agent Lucile Tatum Gastonia 

Farm Demonstration Agent Paul Kiser Gastonia 

Chmn. Bd. Education M. A. Stroup Cherryville 

Chmn. Bd. Elections James Mullen Gastonia 

District Game & Fish Protector . . . W. K. Harris Gastonia 

County Attorney H. B. Gaston Belmont 

County Librarian Mrs. Bruce Heafner Gastonia 

Veterans Service Officer Charlie Hawkins Gastonia 

Recorder's Courts : 

Bessemer City: 

Judge C. B. Woltz Bessemer City 

Solicitor Henry L. Kiser Bessemer City 

Cherryville: 

Judge G. A. Lohr Cherryville 

Solicitor D. P. Dellinger Cherryville 

Gastonia : 

Judge Julius T. Sanders Gastonia 

Solicitor O. F. Mason, Jr Gastonia 

Mount Holly : 

Judge T. A. Belk Mount Holly 

Solicitor Christine Batchelor Mount Holly 

Commissioners 

Chairman R. L. Stowe Belmont 

Commissioner B. B. Gardner Gastonia 

Commissioner J. W. Summey Dallas 

Commissioner C. Edwin Hutchison Mount Holly 

Commissioner Fred Ormand Bessemer City 

Commissioner R. E. Eaker Cherryville 



524 North Carolina Manual 



GATES 

Gates County was formed in 1778 from Chowan, Perquimans, and Hertford. 
Was named in honor of General Horatio Gates, who commanded the American 
Army at the battle of Saratoga. At this battle an entire British Army was 
captured, but General Gates contributed nothing to that success. It is regarded 
as one of the most important battles in the history of the world. 

Population, 10,060 County Seat, Gatesville 

Office Officer Address 

State Senators 1st District W. I. Halstead South Mills 

J. Emmett Winslow Hertford 

Member House of Representatives. . Clarence P. Hathaway Sunbury 

Clerk of Court L. C. Hand Gatesville 

Register of Deeds Tazewell D. Eure Gatesville 

Sheriff L. F. Overman Gatesville 

Treasurer Bank of Gates Gatesville 

Auditor Tazewell D. Eure Gatesville 

Tax Supervisor Tazewell D. Eure Gatesville 

Tax Collector L. F. Overman Gatesville 

County Accountant Tazewell D. Eure Gatesville 

Coroner J. W. Parker Gatesville 

County Health Officer Dr. P. B. Cleveland Gatesville 

Supt. of Schools W. C. Harrell Gatesville 

Supt. of Public Welfare Mrs. Clarine G. Carter Gatesville 

Home Demonstration Agent 

White Bertha Mallard Gatesville 

Colored Mrs. Pennie Battle Gatesville 

Farm Demonstration Agent 

White John W. Artz Gatesville 

Colored H. L. Mitchell Gatesville 

Chmn. Bd. Education H. F. Parker Eure 

Chmn. Bd. Elections P. F. Edmond Gatesville 

District Game & Fish Protector . . . D. E. Barnes Corapeake 

Forest Warden H. L. Langston, Jr Gates 

County Attorney Hubert Eason Gatesville 

County Librarian Dorothy Avery Winton 

County Court: 

Judge H. V. Beamon Gatesville 

Solicitor Hubert Eason Gatesville 

Commissioners 

Chairman C. H Carter Hobbsville 

Commissioner W. L. Askew Eure 

Commissioner J. E. Gregory Sunbury 

Commissioner T. J. Stallings Hobbsville 

Commissioner A. H. Russell Roduco 

GRAHAM 

Graham County was formed in 1872 from Cherokee. Was named in honor 
of Governor William A. Graham, United States Senator, Governor of North Caro- 
lina, Secretary of the Navy, Confederate States Senator. Graham County voted 
with Cherokee until 1883. 

Popultion, 6,418 County Seat, Robbinsville 

State Senator 33rd District L. B. Nichols Andrews 

Member House of Representatives. .Dennis Massey Robbinsville 

Clerk of Court Thomas M. Carver Robbinsville 

Register of Deeds Harvie J. Odom Robbinsville 

Sheriff J. B. Crisp Robbinsville 

Auditor R. P. Jenkins Robbinsville 

Tax Supervisor J. F. Hyde Robbinsville 



County Government 525 

Office Officer Address 

Tax Collector R- P- Jenkins Robbinsville 

County Accountant R. P. Jenkins Robbinsville 

Coroner Sam Sharpe Robbinsville 

Surveyor R- O. Sherrill Yellow Creek 

County Health Officer Dr. Marvin M. Nathan Murphy 

Supt. of Schools Floyd S. Griffin Robbinsville 

Supt. of Public Welfare Mrs. Lura S. Bales Robbinsville 

Home Demonstratin Agent Nellie Jo Carter Robbinsville 

Farm Demonstration Agent P. J. Gibson Robbinsville 

Chmn. Bd. Education Patton Phillips Robbinsville 

Chmn. Bd. Elections C. P. Sawyer Robbinsville 

District Game & Fish Protector . . . C. L. Garland Robbinsville 

Forest Warden Wayne Ayres Robbinsville 

County Attorney R. B. Morphew Robbinsville 

Veterans Service Officer Mrs. Gladys H. Jordan Robbinsville 

Commissioners 

Chairman Clyde Lovin Robbinsville 

Commissioner J. H. Collins Robbinsville 

Commissioner J. D. Allen Robbinsville 

GRANVILLE 

Granville County was formed in 1746 from Edgecombe. Was named in honor 
of John Carteret, Earl Granville, who owned the Granville District. He was 
Prime Minister under King George II, and a very brilliant man. 

Population, 29,344 County Seat, Oxford 

State Senators 14th District Claude Currie Durham 

F. D. Long Roxboro 

Member Hoiise of Representatives. . Thomas W. Allen Creedmoor 

Clerk of Court A. W. Graham, Jr Oxford 

Register of Deeds Mrs. Flora O. Mann Oxford 

Sheriff E. P. Davis Oxford 

Auditor W. J. Webb Oxford 

Tax Supervisor W. J. Webb Oxford 

Coroner F. Earle Hunt Oxford 

County Health Officer Dr. Ballard Norwood Oxford 

Supt. of Schools B. D. Bunn Oxford 

Supt. of Public Welfare Hallie Coppedge (Acting) Oxford 

Home Demonstration Agent 

White Mrs. Dorothy G. Wilkinson Oxford 

Colored Mary Parham Oxford 

Farm Demonstration Agent 

White C. V. Morgan Oxford 

Colored J. R. Redding Rt. 2, Oxford 

Chmn. Bd. Education Dr. R. L. Noblin Oxford 

Chmn. Bd. Elections John N. Watkins, Jr Oxford 

District Game & Fish Protector . . . Thomas D. Brummitt Oxford 

County Attorney T. G. Stem Oxford 

County Librarian Mrs. Edith F. Cannady Oxford 

District Game & Fish Protector . . . T. G. Stem, Jr Oxford 

Recorder's Court : 

Judge F. W. Hancock, Jr Oxford 

Solicitor Edward F. Taylor Oxford 

Commissioners 

Chairman A. H. A. Williams Oxford 

Commissioner W. D. Mangum Rt. 1, Oxford 

Commissioner W. W. Whitfield Creedmoor 

Commissioner R. T. Eakes Rt. 4, Oxford 

Commissioner Fielding Knott Rt. 2, Oxford 



526 North Carolina Manual 

GREENE 

Greene County was formed in 1799 from Glasgow. Was named in honor of 

General Nathaniel Greene, Washington's "right-hand man." Next to Washington, 

General Greene is regarded as the greatest soldier of the Revolution. He fought 

the battle of Guilford Courthouse and saved North Carolina from the British. 

Population, 18,548 County Seat, Snow Hill 

Office Officer Address 

State Senators 7th Distri-:t John D. Larkins, Jr Trenton 

D. L. Ward New Bern 

Member House of Representatives. . A. C. Edwards Hookerton 

Clerk of Court J. E. Mewborn Snow Hill 

Register of Deeds Mrs. Beulah R. Edwards Snow Hill 

Sheriff H. K. Cobb Snow Hill 

Treasurer B. S. Albritton Snow Hill 

Auditor Geo. W. Edwards Snow Hill 

Tax Supervisor Geo. W. Edwards Snow Hill 

Tax Collector W. R. Lane Snow Hill 

County Accountant Geo. W. Edwards Snow Hill 

County Health Officer Dr. S. B. McPheeters Snow Hill 

Supt. of Schools B. L. Davis Snow Hill 

Supt. of Public Welfare Rachel Payne Sugg Snow Hill 

Home Demonstration Agent Margaret McGowan Snow Hill 

Farm Demonstration Agent John Grant Snow Hill 

Chmn. Bd. Education Ed. S. Taylor Walstonburg 

Chmn. Bd. Elections H. Maynard Hicks Snow Hill 

District Game & Fish Protector . . . W. L. Heath Snow Hill 

Forest Warden J. C. Joyner Snow Hill 

County Attorney W. G. Sheppard Snow Hill 

County Librarian Mrs. Edna L. Baker Snow Hill 

County Court : 

Judge W. G. Sheppard Snow Hill 

Solicitor C. W. Beaman Snow Hill 

Commissioners 

Chairman J. S. Whitley Walstonburg 

Commissioner Lemuel Dawson Snow Hill 

Commissioner L. F. Herring Snow Hill 

Commissioner W. B. Gay Walstonburg 

Commissioner E. E. Butts Hookerton 

GUILFORD 

Guilford County was formed in 1770 from Rowan and Orange. Was named 
in honor of Francis North, Earl of Guilford, an English nobleman. He was the 
father of Lord North, who was Prime Minister under King George III during the 
Revolution. Lord North afterwards succeeded his father as Earl of Guilford. 

Population, 153,916 County Seat, Greensboro 

State Senator 17th District George T. Penny Greensboro 

Members House of Representatives. Shelley B. Caveness Greensboro 

Walter E. Crissman High Point 

O. Arthur Kirkman High Point 

Clyde A. Shreve Stokesdale 

Clerk of Court J. P. Shore Greensboro 

Register of Deeds John H. McAdoo Greensboro 

Sheriff John E. Walters Greensboro 

Treasurer W. C. Johnson Greensboro 

Auditor John T. Harrington Greensboro 

Tax Supervisor Wm. F. Hester Greensboro 

Tax Collector Wm. F. Hester Greensboro 



County Government 527 



OflSce Officer Address 

Coroner W. W. Harvey Greensboro 

Surveyor R^ilph D. Stout Greensboro 

County Health Officer Dr. R. M. Buie Greensboro 

Supt. of Schools F. D. Idol Greensboro 

Supt. of Public Welfare Mrs. Blanche Carr Sterne Greensboro 

Home Demonstration Agent 

White Nell Kennett Greensboro 

Colored Rosa Winchester Greensboro 

Farm Demonstration Agent 

White J. I. Wagoner Gibsonville 

Colored B. A. Hall Greensboro 

Chmn. Bd. Education J. H. Joyner Whitsett 

Chmn. Bd. Elections Wade Renfrow High Point 

District Game & Fish Protector . . . John Davis Oak Ridge 

County Manager Harry Weatherly Greensboro 

County Attorney T. C. Hoyle, Sr Greensboro 

County Librarian Mrs. Nellie Rowe Jones Greensboro 

Veterans Service Officer John W. Clay Greensboro 

Greensboro Municipal Court : 

Judge E. E. Rives Greensboro 

Solicitor E. D. Kuykendall Greensboro 

High Point Municipal Court: 

Judge D. C. MacRae High Point 

Solicitor L. J. Fisher, Jr High Point 

Commissioners 

Chairman James A. Doggett Greensboro 

Commissioner W. G. Ragsdale Jamestown 

Commissioner L. C. Amos Greensboro 

Commissioner F. Logan Porter High Point 

Commissioner Chas. T. Hunt Pleasant Garden 



HALIFAX 

Halifa.x County was formed in 1758 from Edgecombe. Was named in honor 
of George Montagu Dunk, Earl of Halifax, president of the Board of Trade, 
which had control of the colonies before the Revolution. 

Population, 56,512 County Seat, Halifax 

State Senators 4th District Julian R. Allsbrook Roanoke Rapids 

L. H. Fountain Tarboro 

Member House of Representatives. . Joseph Branch Enfield 

Clerk of Court George A. Hux Halifax 

Register of Deeds F. D. Wilson Halifax 

SheriiT H. A. House Halifax 

Auditor C. S. Vinson Halifax 

Tax Supervisor C. S. Vinson Halifax 

Tax Collector Mrs. Ruth S. Gregory Halifax 

County Accountant C. S. Vinson Halifax 

Coroner Ruf us Britton Roanoke Rapids 

County Health Officer Dr. Robert F. Young Halifax 

Supt. of Schools W. Henrv Overman Halifax 

Supt. of Public Welfare J. B. Hall Halifax 

Home Demonstration Agent 

White Florence Cox Halifax 

Colored Ruth Whitworth Halifax 

Farm Demonstration Agent 

White W. O. Davis Halifax 

Colored D. J. Knight Halifax 



528 North Carolina Manual 



Office Officer Address 

Chmn. Bd. Education C. L. Kelly Littleton 

Chmn. Bd. Elections S. W. Dickens Enfield 

District Game & Fish Protector . . . C. M. Pettitt Enfield 

Forest Warden Manford Lawrence Halifax 

County Attorney Irwin Clark Scotland Neck 

County Librarian Mrs. Gay Spivey Halifax 

Veterans Service Officer Frank A. Cole Roanoke Rapids 

Re.-order's Court: 

Judge Chas. R. Daniel Weldon 

Solicitor Robt. C. Josey, III Roanoke Rapids 

Commissioners 

Chairman D. G. Dickens Littleton 

Commissioner J. R. Wrenn Roanoke Rapids 

Commissioner Meade H. Mitchell Weldon 

Commissioner C. S. Alexander Scotland Neck 

Commissioner R. Hunter Pope Enfield 

HARNETT 

Harnett County was formed in 18-55 from Cumberland. Was named in honor 
of Cornelius Harnett, eminent Revolutionary patriot, President of the Provincial 
Council, President of the Council of Safety, delegate to the Continental Congress, 
author of the Halifax Resolution of April 12, 1776. Harnett voted with Cum- 
berland until 1865. 

Population, 44,239 County Seat, Lillington 

State Senators 12th District J. Benton Thomas Raeford 

Hal Hammer Walker Asheboro 

Member House of Representatives. . Howard E. Parker Erwin 

Clerk of Court Howard Godwin Lillington 

Register of Deeds Inez Harrington Lillington 

Sheriff W. E. Salmon Lillington 

Auditor Herbert L. Carson, Jr Lillington 

Tax Supervisor Berles Johnson Lillington 

Tax Collector W. D. Harrington Lillington 

Coroner Grover C. Henderson Dunn 

Surveyor Walter Lee Johnson Lillington 

County Health Officer Dr. W. B. Hunter Lillington 

Supt. of Schools C. Reid Ross Lillington 

Supt. of Public Welfare Wilma Williams Angier 

Home Demonstration Agent 

White Loraine Vail Lillington 

Colored Ida P. Hinnant Lillington 

Farm Demonstration Agent 

White C. R. Ammons Lillington 

Colored L. K. Boston Lillington 

Chmn. Bd. Education S. G. Thomas Rt. 1, Broadway 

Chmn. Bd. Elections H. C. Strickland Angier 

Dietrict Game & Fish Protector . . . T. J. Turlington Rt. 3, Dunn 

Forest Warden J. Ellis Byrd Bunnlevel 

County Attorney W. A. Johnson Lillington 

County Librarian Mrs. S. K. McKay Lillington 

Veterans Service Officer L. B. McLean Erwin 

County Recorder's Court : 

Judge F. H. Taylor Buies Creek 

Solicitor Neill Mck. Ross Lillington 

Dunn Recorder's Court : 

Judge H. Paul Strickland Dunn 

Solicitor J. Shepard Bryan Dunn 



County Government 529 

Commissioners 
Officer Address Office 

Chairman L. A. Tart Dunn 

Commissioner Carson Gregory Rt. 1, Angier 

Commissioner C. G. Fields Angier 

Commissioner J. A. Senter Lillington 

Commissioner Paul Tysinger Rt. 2, Cameron 

HAYWOOD 

Haywood County was formed in 1808 from Buncombe. Was named in honor 
of John Haywood, who for forty years (1787-1827) was the popular Treasurer 
of the State. 

Population, .34,804 County Seat, Waynesville 

State Senators 32nd District W. H. Crawford Sylva 

W. B. Hodges Hendersonville 

Member House of Representatives. . Grover C. Davis Waynesville 

Clerk of Court C. H. Leatherwood Waynesville 

Register of Deeds B. D. Medford Waynesville 

Sheriff R. V. Welch Waynesville 

Treasurer Chas. H. Metcalfe Waynesville 

Auditor Chas. H. Metcalfe Waynesville 

Tax Supervisor Sebe Bryson Waynesville 

Tax Collector Sebe Bryson Waynesville 

County Accountant Chas. H. Metcalf Waynesville 

Coroner Dr. J. Frank Pate Canton 

Surveyor H. P. Ledbetter Hazelwood 

County Health Officer Dr. Mary Michal Waynesville 

Supt. of Schools Jack Messer Waynesville 

Supt. of Public Welfare Mrs. Sam Queen, Sr Waynesville 

Home Demonstration Agent Mary M. Smith Waynesville 

Farm Demonstration Agent Wayne Corpening Waynesville 

Chmn. I'd. Education R. T. Messer Waynesville 

Chmn. Pd. Elections Jerry Rogers Hazelwood 

Forest Warden R. E. Caldwell Rt. 2, Waynesville 

County Manager George A. Brown, Jr Waynesville 

County Attorney M. G. Stamey Waynesville 

County Librarian Margaret Johnston Waynesville 

Veterans Service Officer J. H. Howell. Jr Waynesville 

Commissioners 

Chairman George A. Brown, Jr Waynesville 

Commissioner J. R. Hipps Waynesville 

Commissioner D. J. Noland Waynesville 



HENDERSON 

Henderson County was formed in 1838 from Buncombe. Was named in honor 
of Leonard Henderson, Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of North Carolina. 

Population, 26,049 County Seat, Hendersonville 

State Senators 32nd District W. H. Crawford Sylva 

W. B. Hodges Hendersonville 

Member House of Representatives. . R. Lee Whitmire Hendersonville 

Clerk of Court Geo. W. Fletcher Hendersonville 

Register of Deeds L. L. Burgin, Jr Hendersonville 

Sheriff F. D. Dalton Hendersonville 

Tax Supervisor Mrs. Virginia Harrell Hendersonville 



530 North Carolina Manual 

Office Officer Address 

Tax Collector J. M. Stewart Hendersonville 

County Accountant D. G. Wilkie Hendersonville 

Coroner Pruce A. Cox Hendersonville 

County Health Officer Dr. Gordon Wlieeler Hendersonville 

Supt. of Schools R. G. Anders Hendersonville 

Supt. of Public Welfare Mrs. Lucinda C. Cole Hendersonville 

Home Demonstration Agent Helen Higdon Hendersonville 

Farm Demonstration Agent D. W. Bennett Hendersonville 

Chmn. Bd. Education Floyd Osborne Arden 

Chmn. Bd. Elections L. T. Dermid Hendersonville 

District Game & Fish Protector . . . Lester Miles Hendersonville 

Forest Warden Jim Rhodes Edneyville 

County Attorney L. B. Prince Hendersonville 

Veterans Service Officer Wm. E. Jamison Hendersonville 

Recorder's Court : 

Judge J. E. Shipman Hendersonville 

Solicitor J. W. Jackson Hendersonville 

Commissioners 

Chairman D. G. Wilkie Hendersonville 

Commissioner F. V. Hunter Hendersonville 

Commissioner M. L. Walker Hendersonville 



HERTFORD 

Hertford County was formed in 1759 from Chowan, Bertie, and Northampton. 
Was named in honor of Francis Seymour Conway, Marquis of Hertford, an Eng- 
lish nobleman. He was a brother of General Conway, a distinguished British 
soldier and member of Parliament, who favored the repeal of the Stamp Act. 
The word Hertford is said to mean "Red Ford." 

Population, 19,352 . County Seat, Winton 

State Senators 1st District W. I. Halstead South Mills 

J. Emmett Winslow Hertford 

Member House of Representatives. . C. Gordon Maddrey Ahoskie 

Clerk of Court Arthur W. Greene Winton 

Register of Deeds T. D. Northcott Winton 

Sheriff C. W. Parker Winton 

Auditor H. J. Brown Winton 

Tax Supervisor T. M. Condon Winton 

Tax Collector T. M. Condon Winton 

County Accountant H. J. Brown Winton 

Coroner E. S. Williams Ahoskie 

County Health Officer Dr. J. B. Ruffin f Acting) Ahoskie 

Supt. of Schools J. R. Brown Winton 

Supt. of Public Welfare J. R. Raper Winton 

Home Demonstration Agent 

White Mollie C. Parker Winton 

Colored Clara O. York Winton 

Farm Demonstration Agent 

White J. W. Ballentine Winton 

Colored Melvin L. Johnson Winton 

Chmn. Bd. Education Geo. T. Underwood Murfreesboro 

Chmn. Bd. Elections J. William Copeland Murfreesboro 

District Game & Fish Protector ... J. H. Vinson Winton 

Forest Warden J. R. Jordan Winton 

County Attorney ^ C. Wallace Jones Winton 

County Librarian Dorothy Avery Winton 

Veterans Service Officer Jos. D. Blythe Ahoskie 



County Government 



531 



Office 

Recorder's Court : 

Judge 

Solicitor 



Officer 



Address 



. W. D. Boone Winton 

. Jos. D. Blythe Ahoskie 



Chairman . . . 
Commissioner 
Commissioner 
Commissioner 
Commissioner 
•Commissioner 



Commissioners 

. Fred Jones Winton 

. W. H. Basnight Ahoskie 

. C. S. Fairless Harrellsville 

. R. C. Brett Come 

. W. C. Ferguson Murfreesboro 

. W. H. Vinson RFD, Woodland 



HOKE 

Hoke County was formed in 1911 from Cumberland and Robeson. Was named 
in honor of Robert F. Hoke, of North Carolina, Major-General in the Confed- 
erate States Army. 



Population, 14,937 



County Seat, Raeford 



State Senators 12th District J. Benton Thomas Raeford 

Hal Hammer Walker Asheboro 

Member House of Representatives. . H. A. Greene Raeford 

Clerk of Court J. B. Cameron Raeford 

Register of Deeds J. E. Gulledge Raeford 

Sheriff D. H. Hodgin Raeford 

Auditor J. A. McGoogan Raeford 

Tax Supervisor J. A. McGoogan Raeford 

Tax Collector D. H. Hodgin Raeford 

County Accountant J. A. McGoogan Raeford 

Coroner W. L. Roper^ RFD. Maxton 

County Health Officer Dr. J. W. Vvillcox Carthage 

Supt. of Schools K. A. MacDonald Raeford 

Supt. of Public Welfare Mrs. C. H. Giles Raeford 

Home Demonstration Agent Josephine Hall Raeford 

Farm Demonstration Agent A. S. Knowles Raeford 

Chmn. Bd. Education Carl G. Riley Rt. 3, Raeford 

Chmn. Bd. Elections G. B. Rowland Raeford 

District Game & Fish Protector . . . H. R. McLean Raeford 

Forest Warden Foster McBryde RFD, Raeford 

County Attorney A. D. Gore Raeford 

County Librarian Mrs. Ina P. Bethune Raeford 

Veterans Service Officer Marion Maxwell Raeford 

Recorder's Court : 

Judge Henry McDiarmid RFD, Raeford 

Solicitor J. M. Andrews RFD, Red Springs 



Commissioners 

Chairman W. M. Thomas Raeford 

Commissioner Julian H. Wright Raeford 

Commissioner J. Fulford McMillan RFD, Raeford 

Commissioner F. Knox Watson RFD, Red Springs 

Commissioner J. W. Smith RFD, Vass 



532 North Carolina Manual 



HYDE 

Hyde County was formed in 1705 from Bath. Called Wickham until about 

1712. Named Hyde in honor of Governor Edward Hyde, of North Carolina, a 

grandson of the Earl of Clarendon. The Earl was one of the Lords Proprietors. 
Governor Hyde was a first cousin of Queen Anne. 

Population, 7,860 County Seat, Swan Quarter 

Office Officer Address 

State Senators 2nd District Sam M. Campen Alliance 

John C. Rodman Washington 

Member House of Representatives. . C. L. Bell Swan Quarter 

Clerk of Court Ralph L. Roper Swan Quarter 

Register of Deeds Bonner R. Lee Swan Quarter 

Sheriff Claude D. Davis Swan Quarter 

Treasurer Carolina Bank & Trust Co Swan Quarter 

Auditor Maude W. Jones Swan Quarter 

Tax Supervisor Maude W. Jones Swan Quarter 

Tax Collector Claude D. Davis Swan Quarter 

County Accountant Maude W. Jones Swan Quarter 

Coroner Pratt Williamson Swan Quarter 

County Health Officer Dr. D. E. Ford Washington 

Supt. of Schools N. L. Shelton Swan Quarter 

Supt. of Public Welfare Esther S. Williams Swan Quarter 

Home Demonstration Agent Iberia R. Tunnell Swan Quarter 

Farm Demonstration Agent J. P. Woodard Swan Quarter 

Chmn. Bd. Education George Cutrell Fairfield 

Chmn. Bd. Elections B. F. Mason Swan Quarter 

District Game & Fish Protector . . . L. B. Tunnell New Holland 

Forest Warden Archie Berry Fairfield 

County Attorney Geo. T. Davis Swan Quarter 

County Librarian Mrs. Ford S. Worthy Washington 

Recorder's Court: 

Judge Joseph S. Simmons Fairfield 

Solicitor Geo. T. Davis Swan Quarter 

Commissioners 

Chairman J. E. Berry Lake Landing 

Commissioner H. L. Sadler Swan Quarter 

Commissioner Ella Z. Baynes Fairfield 



IREDELL 

Iredell County was formed in 1788 from Rowan. Named in honor of James 
Iredell, of Edenton, who was one of the foremost lawyers of the State. In 1788 
and 1789 he was one of the leaders in the State in advocating the adoption of 
the Constitution of the United States. His speeches in the Convention of 1788 
at Hillsboro were among the ablest delivered by any of the advocates of the 
Constitution. Washington appointed him in 1790 a Justice of the Supreme Court 
of the United States. 

Population, 50,424 County Seat, Statesville 

State Senators 25th District C. H. Dearman Statesville 

G. Andrew Warlick Newton 

Member House of Representatives . . John F. Matheson Mooresville 

Clerk of Court C. G. Smith Statesville 

Register of Deeds Mariemma Henley Statesville 

Sheriff Walter D. Morrison Statesville 

Treasurer John T. Gillespie Statesville 



County Government 533 

Office Officer Address 

Auditor C. D. Stevenson Statesville 

Tax Supervisor C. D. Stevenson Statesville 

Tax Collector John T. Gillespie Statesville 

County Accountant C. D. Stevenson Statesville 

Coroner James E. Meacham Statesville 

Surveyor Robert B. Kestler Statesville 

Countv Health Officer Dr. Ernest Ward Statesville 

Supt. of Schools T. Ward Guy Statesville 

Supt. of Public Welfare Mrs. R. M. Rickert Statesville 

Home Demonstration Agent 

White Mary B. Strickland Statesville 

Colored Juanita Stokes Statesville 

Farm Demonstration Agent 

White Roger W. Murdock Troutman 

Colored D. O. Ivey Statesville 

Chmn. Bd. Education C. H. Knox Cool Springs 

Chmn. Bd. Elections W. W. Hartness Statesville 

District Game & Fish Protector . . . H. A. Robertson Statesville 

Forest Warden H. G. Brown Rt. 7, Statesville 

County Manager C. D. Stevenson Statesville 

County Attorney Z. V. Turlington Statesville 

County Librarian George Linder Statesville 

Veterans Service Officer S. C. Morrison Statesville 

County Recorder's Court : 

Judge C. B. Winberry Statesville 

Solicitor Macon Simons Statesville 

Mooresville Recorder's Court: 

Judge H. A. Holstead Mooresville 

Solicitor George A. Morrovy Mooresville 

Commissioners 

Chairman John F. Long Statesville 

Commissioner J. L. McLain Troutman 

Commissioner W. E. Webb, Sr Statesville 

Commissioner R. L. Shoemaker Statesville 

Commissioner R. H. Kennedy Statesville 



JACKSON 

Jackson County was formed in 1851 from Haywood and Macon. Named in 
honor of Andrew Jackson, who was born in Mecklenburg County (the site of his 
birthplace is now in Union), won the brilliant victory over the British at New 
Orleans, in 1815, and was twice elected President of the Unied States. 

Population, 19,366 County Seat, Sylva 

State Senators 32nd District W. H. Crawford Sylva 

W. B. Hodges Hendersonville 

Member House of Representatives. . Frank H. Brown, Jr Cullowhee 

Clerk of Court John E. Henson Sylva 

Register of Deeds Glenn Hughes Sylva 

Sheriff C. G. Middleton Sylva 

Treasurer Jennings A. Bryson Sylva 

Tax Supervisor Jennings A. Bryson Sylva 

Tax Collector Tom L. Clayton Sylva 

County Accountant Tom L. Clayton Sylva 

Coroner C. W. Dills Dillsboro 

Surveyor Rogers Z. Coward Webster 

County Health Officer Dr. Mary Michal Waynesville 



534 North Carolina Manual 



Office Officer Address 

Siipt. of Schools W. V. Cope Sylva 

Supt. of Public Welfare G. C. Henson Sylva 

Home Demonstration Agent Mary Johnston Sylva 

Farm Demonstration Agent M. L. Snipes Sylva 

Chmn. Bd. Education W. R. Enloe Sylva 

Chmn. Bd. Elections Oscar A. Lovedahl Cowarts 

District Game & Fish Protector . . . W. B. Cope Sylva 

Forest Warden Charles Evans Cullowhee 

County Attorney C. C. Buchanan Sylva 

County Librarian Mrs. Helen H. Kittrell Bryson City 

Veterans Service Officer T. W. Ashe Sylva 

Commissioners 

Chairman Jennings A. Bryson Sylva 

Commissioner Ed Fisher Sylva 

Commissioner M. V. Breedlove Glenville 



JOHNSTON 

Johnston County was formed in 1746 from Craven. Afterwards parts of 
Duplin and Orange were added. Was named in honor of Gabriel Johnston, Gov- 
ernor of North Carolina from 1734 to 1752. 

Population, 63,798 County Seat, Smithfield 

State Senators 8th District Hardy Talton Pikeville 

Adam J. Whitley, Jr Smithfield 

Members House of Representatives. Ronald Hocutt Wendell 

G. Troy Page Clayton 

Clerk of Court H. V. Rose Smithfield 

Register of Deeds W. G. Massey Smithfield 

Sheriff C. L. Denning Smithfield 

Treasurer J. Narvin Creech Smithfield 

Auditor J. Marvin Johnson Smithfield 

Tax Supervisor W. C. Stephenson Smithfield 

Tax Collector Thomas L. Upchurch Smithfield 

County Accountant J. Marvin Johnson Smithfield 

Coroner J. D. Creech Smithfield 

Surveyor C. B. Fulghum Selma 

County Health Officer Dr. E. S. Grady Smithfield 

Supt. of Schools H. B. Marrow Smithfield 

Supt. of Public Welfare W. T. Woodard, Jr Selma 

Home Demonstration Agent 

White Margaret Clark Smithfield 

Colored Lucy O. Toole Smithfield 

Farm Demonstration Agent 

White John E. Piland Smithfield 

Colored L. R. Johnson Smithfield 

Chmn. Bd. Education W. H. Call Selma 

Chmn. Bd. Elections L. L. Levinson Benson 

District Game & Fish Protector . . . W. H. Norton Smithfield 

Forest Warden .Alfred Coats Four Oaks 

County Attorney Hugh A. Page Clayton 

County Librarian Virginia Williamson Smithfield 

Veterans Service Officer W. M. Gaskin Smithfield 

Recorder's Court : 

Judge W. I. Godwin Selma 

Solicitor P. D. Grady, Jr Kenly 



County Government 535 



Commissioners 
Office Officer Address 

Chairman R. P. Holding Smithfield 

Commissioner J. B. Wooten Rt. 1, Princeton 

Comimissioner J. Dobbin Bailey Kenly 

Commissioner Jesse H. Austin Clayton 

Commissioner Henry M. Johnson Four Oaks 



JONES 

Jones County was formed in 1778 from Craven. Was named in honor of 
Willie Jones, of Halifax. He was one of the leading patriots of the Revolution, 
was President of the Covmcil of Safety, and was opposed to the adoption of the 
Constitution of the United Statss. It was due to his influence that the Conven- 
tion of 1788 rejected it. 

Population, 10,926 County Seat, Trenton 

State Senators 7th District John D. Larkins, Jr Trenton 

D. L. Ward New Bern 

Member House of Representatives . . G. N. Noble Trenton 

Clerk of Court W. Murray Whitaker Trenton 

Register of Dseds George G. Noble Trenton 

Sheriff J. P. Taylor Trenton 

Auditor Mary E. Brock Trenton 

Tax Collector Zelle Pollock Trenton 

Coroner E. B. Barker Trenton 

Surveyor J. R. Burt Trenton 

Supt. of Schools W. B. Moore Trenton 

Supt. of Public Welfare F. Joe Koon.^e Trenton 

Home Demonstration Agent 

White Mary Helen Tew Loftin Trenton 

Colored Gladie B. Simmons Trenton 

Farm Demonstration Agent 

White A. V. Thomas Trenton 

Colored George E. McDaniel Trenton 

Chmn. Bd. Ele.-tions E. M. Philyaw Comfort 

Chmn. Bd. Education T. M. Wooten Trenton 

District Game & Fish Protector . . . C. R. Parker Pollocksville 

Forest Warden T^lwood McDaniel Trenton 

County Attorney George R. Hughes Pollocksville 

Commissioners 

Chairman G. O. Mallard Trenton 

Commissioner R. O. Taylor Rt. 3, Kinston 

Commissioner T. W. Creagh Pollocksville 

Commissioner P. W. Westbrook Rt. 5, Kinston 

Commissioner J. C. Foscue Maysville 



LEE 

Lee County was formed in 1907 from Chatham and Moore. Named in honor 
of Robert E. Lee. 

Population, 18,74.3 County Seat, Sanford 

State Senators 13th District J. C. Pittman Sanford 

R. N. Simms, Jr Raleigh 

Member House of Representatives. .Robert W. Dalrymple Sanford 

Clerk of Court E. M, Underwood Sanford 



536 North Carolina Manual 

Office Officer Address 

Register of Deeds Jno. W. Mcintosh Sanford 

Sheriff A. Glenn Buchanan Sanford 

Auditor J. C. Muse Sanford 

Tax Supervisor Flora E. Wyche Sanford 

Tax Collector W. H. Campbell Sanford 

County Accountant Flora E. Wyche Sanford 

Coroner Dr. J. H. Byerly Sanford 

Surveyor J. Chandler Eakes RFD, Sanford 

County Health Officer Dr. Lynn Mclver Sanford 

Supt. of Schools G. R. Wheeler Sanford 

Supt. of Public Welfare J. D. Pegram Sanford 

Home Demonstration Agent Julia Alexander Sanford 

Farm Demonstration Agent K. S. Harmon Sanford 

Chmn. Bd. Education Dr. Waylon Blue Jonesboro 

Chmn. Bd. Elections Conrad Donnell Sanford 

District Game & Fish Protector . . . Tom Rollins Sanford 

Forest Warden A. C. Ferrell RFD, Sanford 

County Attorney D. B. Teague Sanford 

County Librarian Mrs. James King Sanford 

Veterans Service Officer W. D. Gregson Sanford 

County Criminal Court: 

Judge S. Ray Byerly Sanford 

Solicitor J. G. Edwards Sanford 

Commissioners 

Chairman W. R. Makepeace, Jr Sanford 

Commissioner C. N. Castleberry RFD, Jonesboro 

Commissioner H. H. Brewer Jonesboro 

Commissioner J. M. Cheshire Sanford 

Commissioner John W. Garner RFD, Jonesboro 



LENOIR 

Lenoir County was formed in 1791 from Dobbs and Craven. Was named in 
honor of General William Lenoir, one of the heroes of King's Mountain. 

Population, 41,211 County Seat, Kinston 

State Senators 7th District John D. Larkins, Jr Trenton 

D. L. Ward New Bern 

Member House of Representatives . . Marion A. Parrott Kinston 

Clerk of Court John S. Davis Kinston 

Register of Deeds Camille Aldridge Kinston 

Sheriff S. R. Churchill Kinston 

Aviditor Katie Cobb Kinston 

Tax Supervisor M. G. Williams Kinston 

Tax Collector M. G. Williams Kinston 

Coroner R. T. Jarman Kinston 

Surveyor Alfred Cheney, Jr Kinston 

County Health Officer Dr. R. J. Jones Kinston 

Supt. of Schools E. E. Sams Kinston 

Supt. of Public Welfare G. B. Hanrahan Kinston 

Home Demonstration Agent 

White Esther Sue Brickhouse Kinston 

Colored Victoria G. Black Kinston 

Farm Demonstration Agent 

White F. J. Koonce Kinston 

Colored W. N. Payton, Jr Kinston 

Chmn. Bd. Education E, §. Wooten RFD, Kinston 



County Government 537 

OfiBce Officer Address 

Chmn. Bd. Elections E. R. Wooten Kinston 

Dist. Game & Fish Protector D. B. Bell Kinston 

Forest Warden I. E. Brown Kinston 

County Attorney T. J. White Kinston 

County Librarian Mrs. Anna M. Jenkins Kinston 

Veterans Service Officer R. B. Edmundson Snow Hill 

LaGrange Recorder's Court : 

Judge Henry Rouse LaGrange 

Municipal-County Court: 

Judge Albert W. Cowper Kinston 

Solicitor P. H. Crawford, Jr Kinston 



Commissioners 

Chairman W. L. Measley LaGrange 

Commissioner Harry Sutton Kinston 

Commissioner Mark N. Smith Deep Run 

Commissioner R. R. Goodman Kinston 

Commissioner B. C. Langston Kinston 



LINCOLN 

Lincoln County was formed in 1779 from Tryon. Was named in honor of 
General Benjamin Lincoln, a distinguished general of the Revolution, whom 
Washington appointed to receive the swords of Lord Cornwallis at the surrender 
of Yorktown. 

Population, 24,187 County Seat, Lincolnton 

State Senators 25th District C. H. Dearman Statesville 

G. Andrew Warlick Newton 

Member House of Representatives. . M. T. Leatherman Lincolnton 

Clerk of Court Thos. E. Rhodes Lincolnton 

Register of Deeds W. H. Boring Lincolnton 

Sheriff George E. Rudisill Lincolnton 

Auditor W. H. Boring Lincolnton 

Tax Supervisor R. B. Gates Lincolnton 

Tax Collector George E. Rudisill Lincolnton 

County Accountant W. H. Boring Lincolnton 

Coroner Frank P. Heavner Lincolnton 

Surveyor Hoke S. Heavner Lincolnton 

County Health Officer Dr. E. H. Ellinwood Newton 

Supt. of Schools Joe R. Nixon Lincolnton 

Supt. of Public Welfare Mrs. Rose W. Grigg Lincolnton 

Home Demonstration Agent Ainslee Alexander Lincolnton 

Farm Demonstration Agent Graham Morrison Lincolnton 

Chmn. Bd. Education Dr. W. G. Bandy Lincolnton 

Chmn. Bd. Elections J. Robt. McNeely Lincolnton 

Dist. Game & Fish Protector .... George W. Lee Lincolnton 

County Attorney S. M. Roper Lincolnton 

County Librarian George Linder Newton 

Veterans Service Officer Macie Duncan Lincolnton 

Recorder's Court: 

Judge Kemp B. Nixon Lincolnton 

Solicitor Bruce F. Heafner Crouse 



538 North Carolina Manual 

Commissioners 

Office Officer Address 

Chairman Jas. A. Abernethy, Jr Lincolnton 

Commissioner Sam P. Wehunt Cherryville 

Commissioner P. A. Hoover Vale 

Commissioner John M. Ritchie Alexis 

Commissioner Blair Wilkinson Iron Station 

MACON 

Macon County was formed in 1828 from Haywood. Was named in honor of 
Nathaniel Macon, Speaker of the National House of Representatives, United 
States Senator, President of the Constitutional Convention of 1835. 

Population. 15,880 County Seat, Franklin 

State Senator 33rd District L. B. Nichols Andrews 

Member House of Representatives . . C. S. Slagle Franklin 

Clerk of Court J. Clinton Brookshire Franklin 

Register of Deeds Lake V. Shope Franklin 

Sheriff J. P. Bradley Franklin 

Treasurer J. P. Bradley Franklin 

Tax Supervisor Lake V. Shope Franklin 

Tax Collector J. P. Bradley Franklin 

County Accountant Lake V. Shope Franklin 

Coroner O. L. Blaine Franklin 

Surveyor Ray Norton Highlands 

County Health Officer Dr. Mary Michal Waynesvilie 

Supt. of Schools G. L. Houk Franklin 

Supt. of Public Welfare Mrs. Eloise G. Potts Highlands 

Home Demonstration Agent Caroline Cory Franklin 

Farm Demonstration Agent S. W. Mendenhall Franklin 

Chmn. Bd. Education C. G. Moore Franklin 

Chmn. Bd Elections J. J. Mann Franklin 

Dist. Game & Fish Protector Perry Tipton Hayesville 

Forest Warden T. Fred Bryson Franklin 

County Attorney R. S. Jones Franklin 

County Librarian Mrs. Helen H. Kittrell Bryson City 

Veterans Service Officer Mrs. Billy Bryson Franklin 

Commissioners 

Chairman W. E. Baldwin Franklin 

Commissioner John W. Roane Franklin 

Commissioner W. W. Edwards Highlands 



MADISON 

Madison County was formed in 1851 from Buncombe and Yancey. Was named 
in honor of James Madison, fourth President of the United States. 

Population, 22,522 County Seat, Marshall 

State Senator 30th District Dr. C. A. Peterson Spruce Pine 

Member House of Representatives. .Clyde M. Roberts Marshall 

Clerk of Court Fred English Marshall 

Register of Deeds A. W. Coates Marshal! 

Sheriff Hubert Davis Marshal! 

Treasurer Citizens Bk. & Bk. of French Broad. Marshal! 

Auditor Miriam Eller Marshall 



County Government 539 

Office Officer Address 

Tax Collector R- W. Ponder Marshall 

County Accountant Miriam Eller Marshall 

Surveyor Birchard Shelton Rt. 3, Marshall 

County Health Officer Dr. W. A. Sams Marshall 

Supt. of Schools Mrs. Edna G. Rhodes Marshall 

Supt. of Public Welfare Mrs. Frances G. Ramsey Marshall 

Home Demonstration Agent Mrs. Margaret D. Smith Marshall 

Farm Demonstration Agent V. L. Holloway Marshall 

Chmn. Bd. Education J. Clyde Brown Waverly 

Chmn. Bd Elections Glenn Reems Rt. 1, Marshall 

Dist. Game & Fish Protector .... Raymond Ramsey Mars Hill 

Forest Warden J. Moody Chandler Rt. .3, Marshall 

County Attorney Chas. E. Mashburn Marshall 

Commissioners 

Chairman Roy Roberts Barnard 

Commissioner Claude J. Wild Rt. 3, Marshall 

Commissioner R. W. Rice RFD, Mars Hill 



MARTIN 

Martin County was formed in 1774 from Halifax and Tyrrell. Was named 
in honor of Josiah Martin, the last royal governor of North Carolina. It is 
probable that this name would have been changed like those of Dobbs and 
Tryon, but for the popularity of Alexander Martin, who was Governor in 1782 
and again in 17!)0. 

Population, 26,111 County Seat, Williamston 

State Senators 2nd District Sam M. Campen Alliance 

John C. Rodman Washington 

Member House of Representatives . A. Corey Jamesville 

Clerk of Court L. Bruce Wynne Williamston 

Register of Deeds J- Sam Getsinger Williamston 

Sheriff C. B. Roebuck Williamston 

Treasurer R- H. Smith Williamston 

Auditor J- Sam Getsinger Williamston 

Tax Supervisor M. L. Peel Williamston 

Tax Collector M. L. Peel Williamston 

County Accountant J. Sam Getsinger Williamston 

Coroner S. R. Biggs Williamston 

County Health Officer Dr. John W. Williams Williamston 

Supt. of Schools J. C. Manning Williamston 

Supt. of Public Welfare Mary W. Taylor Williamston 

Home Demonstration Agent 

White Elizabeth Parker Williamston 

Colored Mrs. Cleo Tyner Williamston 

Farm Demonstration Agent 

White T. B. Brandon Williamston 

Colored Richard Edwards Williamston 

Chmn. Bd. Education J. D. Woolard Williamston 

Chmn. Bd. Elections Sylvester Peel Williamston 

Dist. Game & Fish Protector Ben H. James Rt. 3, Williamston 

Forest Warden Marvin H. Leggett Jamesville 

County Attorney E. S. Peel Williamston 

County Librarian Mrs. Ford S. Worthy Washington 

Veterans Service Officer Mrs. Joanna Martin Williamston 

Recorder's Court : 

Judge Chas. H. Manning Williamston 

Solicitor Paul D. Roberson Robersonville 



540 North Carolina Manual 

Commissioners 

Office Officer Address 

Chairman J. H. Edwards Williamston 

Commissioner C. C. Martin Jamesville 

Commissioner W. M. Harrison Rt. 2, Williamston 

Commissioner C. Abram Roberson Robersonville 

Commissioner H. S. Johnson Hamilton 

McDowell 

McDowell County was formed in 1842 from Rutherford and Burke. Was 
named in honor of Colonel Joseph McDowell, an active officer of the Revolution. 
McDowell voted with Rutherford and Burke until 1854. 

Population, 22,996 County Seat, Marion 

State Senators 27th District .... Chas. C. Dalton Spindale 

Lee B. Weathers Shelby 

Member House of Representatives. .Roy W. Davis Marion 

Clerk of Court S. D. Martin Marion 

Register of Deeds Ruth I. Lackey Marion 

Sheriff CM. Pool Marion 

Treasurer Ruth I. Lackey Marion 

Tax Supervisor Mary G. Burgin Marion 

Tax Collector C. M. Pool Marion 

County Accountant Mary G. Burgin Marion 

Coroner S. J. Westmoreland Marion 

Surveyor M. V. Snypes Nebo 

County Health Officer Dr. J. F. Miller Marion 

Supt. of Schools N. F. Steppe Marion 

Supt. of Public Welfare Nelle G Lonon Marion 

Home Demonstration Agent .Jean Steele Marion 

Farm Demonstration Agent S. L. Homewood Marion 

Chmn. Bd. Education Dr. J. B. Johnson Old Fort 

Chmn. Bd. Elections T. W. Gowan Marion 

Dist. Game & Fish Protector . . . . T. W. Gowan Marion 

Forest Warden Monroe LT. Marlow Nealsville 

County Attorney R. W. Proctor Marion 

County Librarian Alice Bryan Marion 

Veterans Service Officer Barron P. Caldwell Marion 

County Criminal Court : 

Judge Paul J. Story Marion 

Solicitor W. D. Lonon Marion 

Commissioners 

Chairman C. A. Workman Marion 

Commissioner G. Watson Wilson Marion 

Commissioner R. L. James Old Fort 

MECKLENBURG 

Mecklenburg County was formed in 1762 from Anson. Was named in honor 
of Princess Charlotte, of Mecklenburg, Queen of George HL King of England. 
The county seat. Charlotte, one of the prettiest cities in the State, was also 
named in her honor. Mecklenburg County was the scene of some of the most 
stirring events in the Revolution. 

Population, 151,826 County Seat, Charlotte 

State Senator 20th District F. J. Blythe Charlotte 

Members House of Representatives. Mrs. Walter G. Craven Charlotte 

Mrs. Joe Erwin Charlotte 

Robert Lassiter, Jr Charlotte 

Harvey Morris Charlotte 



County Government 541 



Office OflScer Address 

Clerk of Court J. Lester Wolfe Charlotte 

Register of Deeds John R. Renfrew Charlotte 

Sheriff J. Clyde Hunter Charlotte 

Treasurer Mrs. Jessie C. Smith Charlotte 

Auditor G. D. Bradshaw Charlotte 

Tax Supervisor Rufus A. Grier Charlotte 

Tax Collector P. W. Davenport Charlotte 

County Accountant G. D. Bradshaw Charlotte 

Coroner W. M. Summerville Charlotte 

Surveyor J. W. Spratt Charlotte 

County Health Officer Dr. E. H. Hand Charlotte 

Supt. of Schools J. W. Wilson Charlotte 

Supt, of Public Welfare Wallace H. Kuralt Charlotte 

Home Demonstration Agent 

White Helen John Wright Charlotte 

Colored Minnie T. Miller Charlotte 

Farm Demonstration Agent 

White Geo. B. Hobson Charlotte 

Colored W. B. Harrison Charlotte 

Chmn Bd. Education W. B. McClintock Charlotte 

Chmn. Bd. of Elections Chase Brenizer Charlotte 

Dist. Game & Fish Prc'ector .... Joe Withers Charlotte 

Forest Warden Joe Withers Charlotte 

County Attorney Taliaferro & Clarkson Charlotte 

County Librarian Hoyt R. Galvin Charlotte 

County Recorder's Court : 

Judge J. Edward Stukes Charlotte 

Solicitor Ray Rankin Charlotte 

City Recorder's Court: 

Judge E. McA. Currie Charlotte 

Solicitor John A. McRae, Jr Charlotte 

Domestic Relations Court : 

Judge F. Marion Redd Charlotte 

Commissioners 

Chairman Sid Y. McAden Charlotte 

Commissioner Arnie D. Cashion Davidson 

Commissioner J. Caldwell McDonald Charlotte 

Commissioner Carl J. McEwen Rt. 3, Matthews 

Commissioner Sandy G. Porter Rt. 3, Charlotte 



MITCHELL 

Mitchell County was formed in 1861 from Yancey, Watauga, Caldwell, Burke 
and McDowell. Was named in honor of Dr. Elisha Mitchell, a professor in the 
University of North Carolina. While on an exploring expedition on Mt. Mitchell, 
the highest peak east of the Rocky Mountains, Dr. Mitchell fell from a high 
peak and was killed. His body is buried on top of this loftly mountain. Mitchell 
County voted with Yancey County until 1868. 

Population, 15,980 County Seat, Bakersville 

State Senator 30th District Dr. C. A. Peterson Spruce Pine 

Member House of Representaives .. Warren H. Pritjhard Spruce Pine 

Clerk of Court J. H. McKinney Bakersville 

Register of Deeds Brack Buchanan Bakersville 

Sheriff Sam C. Gouge Bakersville 

Treasurer Ike Byrd Bakersville 

Auditor , J. Dont Street Bakersville 



542 North Carolina Manual 

Office Officer Address 

Tax Collector Ike Byrd Bakersville 

County Accountant J. Dont Street Bakersville 

Coroner Hughes Burleson Spruce Pine 

County Health Officer Dr. C. F. McRae Burnsville 

Supt. of Schools J. B. Deyton Bakersville 

Supt. of Publi? Welfare Rayburn Yelton Bakersville 

Home Demonstration Agent Izola Williams Bakersville 

Farm Demonstration Agent George Conrad Bakersville 

Chmn. Pd. Education Harper Wilson Bakersville 

Chmn. Bd. Elections W. H. Young Clarrissa 

District Game & Fish Protector . . . Wallace Ellis Rt. 1, Toecane 

Forest Warden .'. Frank H. Bryant Ev^'art 

County Attorney W. C. Berry Bakersville 

County Librarian Mrs. R. B. Hughes Bakersville 

Commissioners '' 

Chairman T. W. Dale Spruce Pine 

Commissioner Howard Harrell Relief 

Commissioner J. H. DeGroat Hawk 



MONTGOMERY 

Montgomery County was formed in 177S from Anson. Was named in honor 
of the brave General Richard Montgomery, who lost his life at the battle of 
Quebec in 1775 while trying to conquer Canada. 

Population, 16,280 County Seat, Troy 

State Senators 18th District Edwin Pate Laurinburg 

Wade H. Phillips Lexington 

Member House of Representatives. . J. P. Wallace Troy 

Clerk of Court Charles H. Dorsett Troy 

Register of Deeds A. A. Maness Troy 

Sheriff Earl D. Bruton Troy 

Auditor Harry P. Northrop Troy 

Tax Supervisor W. L. Wright Troy 

Tax Collector J. C. Peckwith Troy 

County Accountant J. S. Smitherman Troy 

Coroner -. C. N. Eckerson Troy 

Surveyor .Jake M. Furr, Jr Troy 

County Health Officer Dr. Warren D. Carter (Acting) ... Wadesboro 

Supt. of Schools J. C. Edwards Troy 

Supt. of Public Welfare Frank M. Ledbetter Troy 

Home Demonstration Agent Mrs. David H. Harris Troy 

Farm Demonstration Agent A. M. Garriss Troy 

Chmn. Bd. Education Dr. D. G. Ridenhour Mount Gilead 

Chmn. Bd. Elections E. E. Crutchfield Troy 

District Game & Fish Protector . . . C. M. Capel Mount Gilead 

Forest Warden Guy A^Iexander Mount Gilead 

County Attorney Currie and Garriss Troy 

Veterans Service Offi.'er E. A. Pipkin Troy 

Recorder's Court : 

Judge David H. Harris .' . Troy 

Solicitor Bob V. Howell Troy 

Commissioners 

Chaii-man W. E. Watkins Troy 

Commissioner W. J. McLeod Biscoe 

Commissioner R. B. Jordan, Jr Mount Gilead 



County Government 543 



MOORE 

Moore County was formed in 1784 from Cumberland. Was named in honor 
of Captain Alfred Moore, of Brunswick, a soldier of the Revolution and after- 
wards a Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States. 

Population, .30,969 County Seat, Carthage 

OflSce Officer Address 

State Senators 12th District J. Benton Thomas Raeford 

Hal Hammer Walker Asheboro 

Member House of Representatives. . H. Clifton Blue Aberdeen 

Clerk of Court John Willcox Carthage 

Register of Deeds Bessie McCaskill Carthage 

Sheriff C. J. McDonald Carthage 

Auditor Maida Jenkins Carthage 

Tax Supervisor Maida Jenkins Carthage 

Tax Collector W. T. Huntley Carthage 

County Accountant Maida Jenkins Carthage 

Coroner Hugh P. Kelly Carthage 

Surveyor W. N. McLauchlin Carthage 

County Health Officer Dr. J. W. Willcox Southern Pines 

Supt. of Schools H. Lee Thomas Carthage 

Supt. of Public Welfare Mrs. W. B. Cole Carthage 

Home Demonstration Agent Flora McDonald Carthage 

Farm Demonstration Agent E. H. Garrison, Jr Carthage 

Chmn. Bd. Education F. D. Farrell Aberdeen 

Chmn. Bd. Elections S. C. Riddle Carthage 

District Game & Fish Protector . . . Ale.x Fields Southern Pines 

Forest Warden Vernon Davis Southern Pines 

County Attorney M. G. Boyette Carthage 

County Librarian Mrs. Dorothy H. Avery Southern Pines 

Veterans Service Officer Mrs. Louise W. Clarke Southern Pines 

Recorder's Court : 

Judge J. Vance Rowe Aberdeen 

Solicitor W. A. Leland McKeithen Pinehurst 

Commissioners 

Chairman Gordon M. Cameron Pinehurst 

Commissioner John M. Currie Carthage 

Commissioner T. L. Blue Rt. -3, Carthage 

Commissioner L. R. Reynolds Robbins 

Commissioner W. H. Jackson Robbins 

NASH 

Nash County was formed in 1777 from Edgecombe. Was named in honor of 
General Francis Nash, a soldier of the Revolution, who was mortally wounded 
while fighting under Washington at Germantown. The United States has erected 
a monument in his honor at the Guilford Battleground near Greensboro. 

Population, 55,608 County Seat, Nashville 

State Senators 6th District J. C. Eagles, Jr Wilson 

O. B. Moss Spring Hope 

Member House of Representatives. . C. Settle Bunn Spring Hope 

Clerk of Court J- N. Sills Nashville 

Register of Deeds William S. Bunn Nashville 

Sheriff C. V. Faulkner Nashville 

Auditor J- C. Ellis Nashville 

Coroner M. C. Gulley Nashville 

County Health Officer Dr. J. S. Chamblee Nashville 

Supt. of Schools L. S. Inscoe Nashville 



544 



North Carolina Manual 



Office 



Officer 



Address 

. Nashville 



Supt. of Public Welfare James A. Glover 

Home Demonstration Agent 

White Mrs. Effie Vines Gordan Rocky Mount 

Colored Mrs. Jimmie Edwards Rocky Mount 

Farm Demonstration Agent M. E. Hollowell Nashville 

Chmn. Bd. Education John R. Roberson Rt. 1, Spring Hope 

Chmn. Bd. Elections William. G. Collins Nashville 

District Game & Fish Protector . . . Henry Braswell Sharksburg 

Forest Warden Alvin Jones Nashville 

County Attorney I. T. Valentine Nashville 

County Librarian Mrs. Ruth Jeffreys Rocky Mount 

Veterans Service Officer Hobart Brantley Spring Hope 

Recorder's Court : 

Judge J. W. Grissom Rocky Mount 

Solicitor John M. King Rocky Mount 



Commissioners 

Chairman J. Henry Vaughan RFD, Elm City 

Commissioner Dal Alford Rocky Mount 

Commissioner J. W. B. Overton Rocky Mount 

Commissioner J. Madison Skinner Rt. 2, Whitakers 

Commissioner M. H. Griffin Bailey 



NEW HANOVER 

New Hanover County was formed in 1729 from Bath. Was named after 
Hanover, a country in Europe whose ruler became King of England with the 
title of George I. 



Population, 47,935 



County Seat, Wilmington 



State Senators 9th District Roy Rowe 

Henry Vann 

Member House of Representatives. . Thomas E. Cooper 

Clerk of Court A. L. Meyland 

Register of Deeds A. B. Rhodes 

Sheriff F. Porter Davis 

Auditor Charles F. Smith 

Tax Supervisor Addison Hewlett 

Tax Collector C. R. Morse 

County Accountant Charles F. Smith 

Coroner W. Gordon Doran 

County Health Officer Di-. A. H. Elliott 

Supt. of Schools H M. Roland 

Supt. of Public Welfare J. R. Hollis 

Home Demonstration Agent 

White Ann Mason 

Colored Rebecca Lawrence 

Farm Demonstration Agent R. W. Galphin 

Chmn. Bd. Education Dr. John T. Hoggard 

Chmn. Bd. Elections J. D. Carr 

District Game & Fish Protector . . . Tommy Hines 

County Attorney Marsden Bellamy 

County Librarian Mrs. Emma Woodward MacMillan 



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Recorder's Court : 

Judge H. Winfield Smith Wilmington 

Solicitor C. P. Yow Wilmington 



County Government 545 

Commissioners 
Office Officer Address 

Chairman Addison Hewlett Wilmington 

Commissioner J. M. Hall Wilmington 

Commissioner H. R. Gardner Wilmington 

Commissioner G. W. Trask Wilmington 

Commissioner Claud O'Shields Wilmington 

NORTHAMPTON 

Northampton County was formed in 1741 from Bertie. Was named in honor 
of George, Earl of Northampton, an English nobleman. His son, Spencer Comp- 
ton. Earl of Wilmington, was high in office when Gabriel Johnston was Governor 
of North Carolina, who had the town of Wilmington named in his honor. 

Population, 28,299 County Seat. Jackson 

State Senator 3rd District Frank H. Gibbs Warrenton 

Member House of Representatives. . J. Raynor Woodard Conway 

Clerk of Court Geo. P. Burgwyn Jackson 

Register of Deeds A. H. Martin Jackson 

Sheriff J. C. Stephenson Jackson 

Treasurer The Farmers Bank Woodland 

Tax Supervisor H. D. Hart Jackson 

County Accountant H. D. Hart Jackson 

Coroner James T. Buffaloe Jackson 

County Health Officer Dr. W. R. Parker Jackson 

Supt. of Schools N. L. Turner Jackson 

Supt. of Public Welfare Mrs. Janet Brown Jackson 

Home Demonstration Agent 

White Mrs. John Price Jackson 

Colored Annie Mae Rich Rich Square 

Farm Demonstration Agent 

White P. H. Jameson Jackson 

Colored Ernest W. Goodrum Rich Square 

Chmn. Bd. Education Dr. J. Wesley Parker Seaboard 

Chmn. Bd. Elections W. H. S. Burgwyn, Jr Woodland 

District Game & Fish Protector . . . N. B. Hughes Jackson 

Forest Warden Henry Bottoms Margarettsville 

County Attorney J. Buxton Midyete Jackson 

County Librarian Mrs. L. A. Froelich Jackson 

Veterans Service Officer B. F. Ricks Jackson 

Recorder's Court: 

Judge Fric Norfleet Jackson 

Solicitor Rallard S. Gay Jackson 

Commissioners 

Chairman R. W. Thompson Garysburg 

Commissioner John E. Boone Jackson 

Commissioner S. G. Baugham Rich Square 

Commissioner P. A. Bullock Seaboard 

Commissioner J. Grady Davis Conway 

ONSLOW 

Onslow County was formed in 1734 from Bath. Was named in honor of 
Arthur Onslow, for more than thirty years Speaker of the House of Commons 
in the British Parliament. 

Population, 17,939 County Seat, Jacksonville 



546 North Carolina Manual 



Office Officer Address 

State Senators 7th District John D. Larkins, Jr Trenton 

D. L. Ward New Bern 

Member House of Representatives. . Carl V. Venters Jacksonville 

Clerk of Court J. R. Gurganus Jacksonville 

Register of Deeds Mildred Morton Jacksonville 

Sheriff I. Dan Sanders Jacksonville 

Treasurer First Citizens Bank & Trust Co. . . Jacksonville 

Tax Supervisor J. J. Cole Jacksonville 

Ta.x Collector T. J. Marshall Jacksonville 

County Accountant J. J. Cole Jacksonville 

Coroner Talbert Jones Jacksonville 

Surveyor R. E. Koonce Jacksonville 

County Health Officer Dr. Eleanor Williams Jacksonville 

Supt. of Schools B. B. C. Kesler Jacksonville 

Supt. of Public Welfare Laura M. Starling Jacksonville 

Home Demonstration Agent Edith Harriss Jacksonville 

Farm Demonstration Agent Charlie C. Clark Jacksonville 

Chmn. Bd. Education R. L. Williams Jacksonville 

Chmn. Bd. Elections Guy Lockamy Jacksonville 

District Game & Fish Protector . . . Lonnie Koonce Richlands 

Forest Warden Robt. Mellville Jacksonville 

County Attorney John D. Warlick Jacksonville 

County Librarian Dorothy Wightman Kenansville 

Veterans Service Officer W. E. Baggs Swansboro 

County Criminal Court: 

Judge Harvey Boney Jacksonville 

Solicitor A. Turner Shaw Jacksonville 

Commissioners 

Chairman H. M. Ennett Sneads Ferry 

Commissioner Jim K. Sabiston Jacksonville 

Commissioner W. Victor Venters Richlands 

Commissioner H. B. Moore Swansboro 

Commissioner M. M. Gray Rt. 1, Maysville 

ORANGE 

Orange County was formed in 1753 from Granville, Johnston, and Bladen. 
Was named in honor of William of Orange, who became King William III of 
England. He was one of the greatest kings of England and saved the English 
people from the tyranny of James II. His name is held in honor wherever 
English liberty is enjoyed. 

Population, 23,072 County Seat, Hillsboro 

State Senator 16th District James Webb Hillsboro 

Member House of Representatives. .J. W. Umstead, Jr Chapel Hill 

Clerk of Court E. M. Lynch Hillsboro 

Register of Deeds J. E. Law Hillsboro 

SheriiT S. T. Latta Hillsboro 

Auditor Ira W. Ward Hillsboro 

Tax Supervisor Ira W. Ward Hillsboro 

Tax Collector Carl C. Davis Hillsboro 

County Accountant Ira W. Ward Hillsboro 

Coroner H. J. Walker Hillsboro 

County Health Officer Dr. O. David Garvin Chapel Hill 

Supt. of Schools G. T. Proffit Hillsboro 

Supt. of Public Welfare Mrs. Jean Herr Hillsboro 

Home Demonstration Agent 

White Mrs. Kathryn Hamrick Chapel Hill 

Colored Sarah L. Lawson Hillsboro 



County Government 547 

Office Officer Address 

Farm Demonstration Agent 

WTiite Don S. Matheson Hillsboro 

Colored M. C. Burt Hillsboro 

Chmn. Bd. Education J. S. Compton Cedar Grove 

Chmn. Bd. Elections R. J. Smith Hillsboro 

District Game & Fish Protector . . . Robert F. Logan Chapel Hill 

Forest Warden Wordie R. Fitzgerald Hillsboro 

County Attorneys Graham & Eskridge Hillsboro 

County Librarian Mrs. Douglas Davis Roxboro 

Veterans Sei-vice Officer Walter G. Wren Hillsboro 

Recorder's Court : 

Judge L. J. Phipps Chapel Hill 

Solicitor Jerry B. Stone Hillsboro 

Chapel Hill Recorder's Court : 

Judge Henry A. Whitfield Chapel Hill 

Solicitor C. P. Hinshaw Chapel Hill 

Commissioners 

Chairman Collier Cobb, Jr Chapel Hill 

Commissioner H. G. Laws Hillsboro 

Commissioner Ben F. Wilson Efland 



PAMLICO 

Pamlico County was formed in 1872 from Craven and Beaufort. Was named 
after the sound of the same name, which was the name of a tribe of Indians 
in eastern North Carolina. There was a Pamlico Precinct in North Crolina as 
early as 1705. Pamlico Ccunty voted with Beaufort up to 1883. 

Population, 9,706 County Seat, Bayboro 

State Senators 2nd District Sam M. Campen Alliance 

John C. Rodman Washington 

Member House of Representatives. . T. J. Collier Arapahoe 

Clerk of Court Hallett W. Mayo Bayboro 

Register of Deeds T. Z. Spencer Bayboro 

Sheriff R. A. Whorton Bayboro 

Treasurer Bank of Aurora Bayboro 

Auditor T. Z. Spencer Bayboro 

Tax Supervisor T. Z. Spencer Bayboro 

Tax Collector R. A. Whorton Bayboro 

County Accountant T. Z. Spencer Bayboro 

Coroner G. F. ( Jack I Harris Bayboro 

Surveyor R. C. Holton Rt. 1, New Bern 

County Health Officer Sina Campen Bayboro 

Supt. of Schools A. H. Hatsell Stonewall 

Supt. of Public Welfare Marion S. Tingle Bayboro 

Home Demonstration Agent Julia Dail Oriental 

Farm Demonstration Agent J. P. Stoval Stonewall 

Chmn. Bd. Education Ben W. Lupton Stonewall 

Chmn. Bd. Elections Hubert Smith Oriental 

District Game & Fish Protector . . . Herman K. Spain Stonewall 

Forest Warden J. T. Whorton Merritt 

County Attorney Z. V. Rawls Bayboro 

County Librarian Mary Scott Gurley New Bern 

Recorder's Court : 

Judge T. B. Woodard Bayboro 

Solicitor Z. V. Rawls Bayboro 



548 North Carolina Manual 

Commissioners 

Office Officer Address 

Chairman C. D. Fentress Maribel 

Commissioner T. G. Potter Lowland 

Commissioner M. D. Brinson Grantsboro 

Commissioner E. R. Goodwin Oriental 

Commissioner M. D. Powers Meritt 

PASQUOTANK 

Pasquotank County was formed in 1672 from Albemarle. Was named for a 
tribe of Indians in eastern North Carolina. 

Population, 20,568 County Seat, Elizabeth City 

State Senators 1st District W. I. Halstead South Mills 

J. Emmett Winslow Hertford 

Member House of Representatives. . Noah Burfoot Elizabeth City 

Clerk of Court Miles W. Ferebee Elizabeth City 

Register of Deeds J. C. Spence Elizabeth City 

Sheriff W. L. Thompson Elizabeth City 

Treasurer First & Citizens Nafl Bank . . . Elizabeth City 

Auditor J. F. Ferrell Elizabeth City 

Tax Supervisor J. I. Saunders Elizabeth City 

Tax Collector W. L. Thompson Elizabeth City 

County Accountant J. F. Ferrell Elizabeth City 

Coroner Dr. W. H. C. White Elizabeth City 

County Health Officer Dr. John H. Bonner Elizabeth City 

Supt. of Schools J. H. Moore Elizabeth City 

Supt. of Public Welfare A. H. Outlaw Elizabeth City 

Home Demonstration Agent 

White Mrs. Virginia B. Harris Elizabeth City 

Colored Mrs. Eliza J. Tolbert Elizabeth City 

Farm Demonstration Agent 

White S. L. Lowery Elizabeth City 

Colored E. A. McCoy Elizabeth City 

Chmn. Bd. Education D. S. Morgan Elizabeth City 

Chmn. Bd. Elections J. K. Wilson, Jr Elizabeth City 

District Game & Fish Protector . . . Lester A. Pierce Elizabeth City 

Forest Warden Graham C. Harris Rt. 2. Elizabeth City 

County Attorney McMullan & Aydlett Elizabeth City 

County Librarian Mrs. Ethel P. Alexander Elizabeth City 

Veterans Service Officer R. L. Garrett Elizabeth City 

Recorder's Court : 

Judge F. T. Horner Elizabeth City 

Solicitor P. G. Sawyer, Sr Elizabeth City 

Commissioners 

Chairman G. E. Halstead Weeksville 

Commissioner S. G. Etheridge Elizabeth City 

Commissioner Cecil J. Reel Elizabeth City 

Commissioner M. J. Reid Rt. 1, Elizabeth City 

Commissioner P. A. Pritchard Rt. 2, Elizabeth City 

Commissioner W. O. Etheridge Rt. 3, Elizabeth City 

Commissioner T. C. Whitehurst Rt. 3, Elizabeth City 

PENDER 

Pender County was formed in 1875 from New Hanover. Was named in honor 
of General William D. Pender, of Edgecombe County, a brave Confederate sol- 
dier who was killed at the battle of Gettysburg. The last order ever given by 



County Government 549 



the famous "Stonewall" Jackson on the battle field was to General Pender: "You 
must hold your ground, General Pender, you must hold your ground," he cried 
as he was carried off the field to die. General Pender held his ground. 

Population, 17,710 County Seat, Burgaw 

OflSce Officer Address 

State Senators 9th District Roy Rowe Burgaw 

Henry Vann Clinton 

Member House of Representatives. . J. V. Whitfield Burgaw 

Clerk of Court C. D. Murphy Burgaw 

Register of Deeds H. C. Walker Burgaw 

Sheriff J. T. Brown Burgaw 

Treasurer Mrs. V. C. Bordeaux Burgaw 

Auditor George F. Lucas Burgaw 

Tax Collector L- R. Bradshaw Burgaw 

Coroner Harvey L. Blake Burgaw 

Surveyor J- T. Wells Burgaw 

County Health Officer Dr. Eleanor H. Williams Jacksonville 

Supt. of Schools T. T. Murphy Burgaw 

Supt. of Public Welfare H. B. Thomas Burgaw 

Home Demonstration Agent 

White Mrs. John Register Burgaw 

Colored Mrs. Arvista Wiley Burgaw 

Farm Demonstration Agent 

White R. R. Rijh Burgaw 

Colored Chester Wiggins Burgaw 

Chmn. Bd. Education D. J. Farrier Burgaw 

Chmn. Bd. Elections Arthur Anderson Watha 

District Game & Fish Protector . . . W. L. Rivenbark Burgaw 

Forest Warden Joe F. Johnson Burgaw 

County Attorney Leon H. Corbett Burgaw 

County Librarian Mrs. Jeptha Casey Burgaw 

Veterans Service Officer T. J. Betts Burgaw 

Recorder's Court: 

Judge C. E. McCullen, Jr Burgaw 

Solicitor Leon H. Corbett Burgaw 

Commissioners 

Chairman J. F. Bradshaw Burgaw 

Commissioner K. D. Pigford Willard 

Commissioner A. H. Page Burgaw 

Commissioner E. L. Langston Rocky Point 

Commissioner S. L. Lanier Maple Hill 

PERQUIMANS 
Perquimans was formed in 1672 from Albemarle. Was named after a tribe 
of Indians. 

Population, 9,77.3 County Seat, Hertford 

State Senators 1st District W. I. Halstead South Mills 

J. Emmett Winslow Hertford 

Member House of Representatives. .E. Leigh Winslow Hertford 

Clerk of Court W. H. Pitt Hertford 

Register of Deeds J. W. Ward Hertford 

Sheriff M. G. Owens Hertford 

Treasurer Max R. Campbell Hertford 

Auditor W. F. C. Edwards Hertford 

Tax Supervisor J. W. Ward Hertford 

Tax Collector M. G. Owens Hertford 

County Accountant W .F. C. Edwards Hertford 

Coroner Dr. C. A. Davenport Hertford 

County Health Officer Dr. T. P. Brinn Hertford 



550 North Carolina Manual 

Office :' Officer Address 

Supt. of Schools . . . . J. T. Biggers Hertford 

Supt. of Public Welfare C. Edgar White Hertford 

Home Demonstration Agent 

White Nina Braswell Hertford 

Colored Mrs. Wilma B. Alston Hertford 

Farm Demonstration Agent 

White I. C. Yagel Hertford 

Colored W. C. Stroud Hertford 

Chmn. Bd. Education W. E. Dail Durants Neck 

Chmn. Bd. Elections A. W. Hefren Hertford 

District Game & Fish Protector . . . G. E. Winslow Hertford 

Forest Warden J. W. Noweil Winfall 

County Attorney Chas. E. Johnson Hertford 

County Librarian Mrs. Silas Whedbee Hertford 

Recorder's Court : 

Judge Chas. E. Johnson Hertford 

Solicitor J. S. McNider Hertford 

Commissioners 

Chairman E. M. Perry Hertford 

Commissioner R. T. Brinn Hertford 

Commissioner Geo. W. Jackson Hertford 

Commissioner Roy S. Chappell Rt. 1, Hertford 

Commissioner T. M. Twine Belvidere 

PERSON 

Person County was formed in 1791 from Caswell. Was named in honor of 
General Thomas Person, Revolutionary patriot, member of the Council of Safety, 
and trustee of the University. He gave a large sum of money to the University, 
and a building was erected in his honor called Person Hall. 

Population, 25,029 County Seat, Roxboro 

State Senators 14th District Claude Currie Durham 

F. D. Long Roxboro 

Member House of Representatives . . R. L. Harris Roxboro 

Clerk of Court J. Alex Bass Roxboro 

Register of Deeds W. T. Kirby Roxboro 

Sheriff C. C. Holeman Roxboro 

Treasurer J. B. Rigsbee Roxboro 

Auditor T. C. Brooks Roxboro 

Tax Supervisor T. C. Brooks Roxboro 

Tax Collector C. C. Holeman Roxboro 

County Accountant T. C. Brooks Roxboro 

Coroner Dr. A. F. Nichols Roxboro 

Surveyor T. C. Brooks Roxboro 

County Health Officer Dr. O. David Garvin Chapel Hill 

Supt. of Schools R. B. Griffin Roxboro 

Supt. of Public Welfare Mrs. T. C. Wagstaff Roxboro 

Home Demonstration Agent 

White Mary Ruth Church Roxboro 

Colored Ethel Tuck Roxboro 

Farm Demonstration Agent 

White H. K. Sanders Roxboro 

Colored C. J. Ford Roxboro 

Chmn. Bd. Education E. E. Bradsher Roxboro 

Chmn. Bd. Elections D. D. Long Roxboro 

District Game & Fish Protector . . . Jack Daniel Roxboro 

County Attorney R. p. Burns Roxboro 

County Librarian Mrs. Ruth Davis Roxboro 

Veterans Service Officer Mrs. Nancy B. Crumpton Roxboro 



County Government 551 

Office Officer Address 

Recorder's Court : 

Judge F. O. Carver Roxboro 

Solicitor T. F. Davis Roxboro 

Commissioners 

Chairman W. R. Cates Roxboro 

Commissioner John Jones Rt. 3, Roxboro 

Commissioner John H. Merritt Woodsdale 



PITT 

Pitt County was formed in 1760 from Beaufort. Was named in honor of 
William Pitt. (See Chatham County.) 

Population, 61,244 County Seat, Greenville 

State Senator 5th District Dr. Paul E. Jones Farmville 

Members House of Representatives. Frank M. Kilpatrick Ayden 

S. O. Worthington Greenville 

Clerk of Court David T. House, Jr Greenville 

Register of Deeds Charles P. Gaskins Greenville 

Sheriff Ruel W. Tyson Greenville 

Auditor Rosa Exum Greenville 

Tax Supervisor J. D. Joyner Greenville 

Tax Collector J. D. Joyner Greenville 

County Accountant Rosa Exum Greenville 

Coroner G. H. Rouse Rt. .3, Greenville 

Surveyor F. McCoy Tripp Winterville 

County Health Officer Dr. J. M. Barrett ( Acting) Greenville 

Supt. of Schools D. H. Conley Greenville 

Supt. of Public Welfare K. T. Futrell Greenville 

Home Demonstration Agent 

White Verona Lee J. Langford Greenville 

Colored Amelia Capehart Greenville 

Farm Demonstration Agent 

White S. C. Winchester Greenville 

Colored Dennis Dupree Greenville 

Chmn. Bd. Education W. H. Woolard Greenville 

Chmn. Bd. Elections J. H. Harrell Greenville 

District Game & Fish Protector ... J. O. Teel Greenville 

Forest Warden N. S. Tyson Greenville 

County Attorney S. B. Underwood Greenville 

Veterans Service Officer Arthur B. Corey Greenville 

County Recorder's Court : 

Judge Dink James Greenville 

Solicitor Charles Whedbee Greenville 

Ayden Municipal Court: 

Judge C. V. Cannon Ayden 

Solicitor F. M. Wooten, Jr Ayden 

Greenville Municipal Court: 

Judge J. W. H. Roberts Greenville 

Solicitor Eli Bloom Greenville 

Commissioners 

Chairman M. B. Hodges Griffon 

Commissioner G. H. Pittman Falkland 

Commissioner J. Vance Perkins Greenville 

Commissioner M. W. Smith Rt. 3, Greenville 

Commissioner J. T. Dupree Rt. 4, Greenville 



552 North Carolina Manual 



POLK 

Polk County was formed in 1855 from Rutherford and Henderson. Was 
named in honor of Colonel William Polk, "who rendered distinguished services 
in the battles of Germantown, Brandywine, and Eutaw, in all of which he was 
wounded." Polk County voted with Rutherford until 1868. 

Population. 11,874 County Seat, Columbus 

Office Officer Address 

State Senators 32nd District W. H. Crawford Sylva 

W. B. Hodges Hendersonville 

Member House of Representatives . . F. P. Bacon Tryon 

Clerk of Court Robert S. McFarland Columbus 

Register of Deeds C. W. Ballenger Columbus 

Sheriff W. D. Hines Columbus 

Treasurer Max H. Feagan Columbus 

Tax Supervisor J. L. Rhodes Columbus 

Tax Collector Max H. Feagan Columbus 

County Accountant J. L. Rhodes Columbus 

Coroner James E. Johnson Tryon 

Surveyor G. W. Pearson Saluda 

County Health Officer Dr. J. T. Ramsaur Rutherfordton 

Supt. of Schools N. A. Melton Columbus 

Supt. of Publij Welfare Jeanette MacGregor Columbus 

Home Demonstration Agent Margaret C. Arledge Tryon 

Farm Demonstration Agent Paul T. Culbertson Tryon 

Chmn. Bd. Education S. L. Fagan Rt. 1, Landrum. S. C. 

Chmn. Bd. Elections J. L. Rhodes Tryon 

District Game & Fish Protector . . . Arthur Pack Tryon 

Forest Warden O. C. Feagan Columbus 

County Attorney I. T. Arledge Tryon 

Veterans Service Officer Woodrow Wilkins Columbus 

Commissioners 

Chairman R. E. Brantley Tryon 

Commissioner C. O. Story Lynn 

Commissioner E. A. Westbrook Tryon 

RANDOLPH 

Randolph County was formed in 1779 from Guilford. Was named in honor 
of Peyton Randolph, of Virginia, the President of the first Continental Congress. 

Population, 44,554 County Seat, Asheboro 

State Senators 12th District J. Penton Thomas Raeford 

Hal Hammer Walker Asheboro 

Member House of Representatives. . Robert Smith Hayes Randleman 

Clerk of Covirt Tom Presnell Asheboro 

Register of Deeds Mrs. Alese M. Ward Asheboro 

Sheriff B. F. Morgan Asheboro 

Auditor A. T. Allen & Co Asheboro 

Tax Supervisor Mrs. O. L. Priest Asheboro 

Coroner T. R. Farlow Asheboro 

Surveyor M. W. Gardner Asheboro 

County Health Officer Dr. G. H. Sumner Asheboro 

Supt. of Schools T. F. Bulla Asheboro 

Supt. of Publij Welfare James F. Burgess Asheboro 

Home Demonstration Agent Maxine Templeton Asheboro 

Farm Demonstration Agent E. S. Millsaps Asheboro 

Chmn. Bd. Education Guy B. Lane Ramseur 

Chmn. Pd. Elections R. A. Gadd's Asheboro 

District Game & Fish Protector . . . Lawrence Davis Asheboro 

Forest Warden Bill U. Davis Asheboro 

County Attorney John G. Prevette Asheboro 

bounty Librarian Charlesanna Fox Asheboro 



County Government 553 

OflSce Officer Address 

Recorder's Court : 

Judge A. I. Ferree Asheboro 

Solicitor J. V. Wilson Asheboro 

Commissioners 

Chairman S. G. Richardson Seagrove 

Commissioner T. W. Bingham Farmer 

Commissioner Branson E. Davis Sophia 

Commissioner C. A. Fagg Central Falls 

Commissioner Dr. J. L. Fritz Asheboro 

RICHMOND 

Richmond County was formed in 1779 from Anson. Was named in honor of 
Charles Lennox, Duke of Richmond, principal Secretary of State in William 
Pitt's second administration. He was a strong friend of the American colonies 
and made the motion in the House of Lords that they be granted their in- 
dependence. 

Population, 36,810 County Seat, Rockingham 

State Senators 18th District Edwin Pate Laurinburg 

Wade H. Phillips Lexington 

Member House of Representatives. .H. T. Baldwin, Jr Rockingham 

Clerk of Court Thomas L. Covington Rockingham 

Register of Deeds Mrs. Agnes C. Flake Rockingham 

Sheriff Carl H. Holland Rockingham 

Treasurer Farmers Bank & Trust Co Rockingham 

Auditor Mary T. Covington Rockingham 

Tax Supervisor Mary T. Covington Rockingham 

Tax Collector Carl H. Holland Rockingham 

County Accountant Mary T. Covington Rockingham 

Coroner W. W. King Rockingham 

Surveyor John S. McNeill Rockingham 

County Health Officer Dr. G. F. Reaves Rockingham 

Supt. of Schools Frank D. McLeod Rockingham 

Supt. of Public Welfare O. G. Reynolds Rockingham 

Home Demonstration Agent Mrs. Jane Pittman Rockingham 

Farm Demonstration Agent 

White N. L. Hendrix Rockingham 

Colored Frank Wright Rockingham 

Chmn. Bd. Education James W. McKenzie Rockingham 

Chmn. Bd. Elections C. H. Causey Rockingham 

District Game & Fish Protector . . . Walter Bray Rockingham 

Forest Warden J. A. Pippin Rockingham 

County Attorney A. A. Reaves Hamlet 

County Librarian Mrs. Dorothy Moore Rockingham 

Veterans Service Officer J. J. Gray Hamlet 

Richmond County Special Court: 

Judge J. Thomas Page Rockingham 

Solicitor Jamos H. Pittman Rockingham 

Hamlet Recorder's Court : 

Judge W. C. Boney Hamlet 

Solicitor Beverly W. Ball Hamlet 

Commissioners 

Chairman A. L. Capel Rockingham 

Commissioner Palmer N. Nicholson Rt. 3, Mt. Gilead 

Commissioner J. H. McRae Ellerbe 

Commissioner J. P. Gaddy Rockingham 

Commissioner John F. Hamer . Rockingham 



554 North Carolina Manual 



ROBESON 

Robeson County was formed in 1786 from Bladen. Was named in honor of 
Colonel Thomas Robeson, a soldier of the Revolution. He was one of the leaders 
at the battle of Elizabethtown, which was fought in September, 1781. By this 
battle the Tories in the southeastern part of the State were crushed forever. 
The commander of the Whigs was Colonel Thomas Brown. 

Population, 76,860 County Seat, Lumberton 

Office Officer Address 

State Senator 11th District Henry A. McKinnon Lumberton 

Members House of Representatives. F. Wayland Floyd Fairmont 

John B. Regan St. Pauls 

Clerk of Court B. F. McMillan Lumberton 

Register of Deeds D. G. Kinlaw Lumberton 

Sheriff W. C. Britt Lumberton 

Treasurer W. D. Reynolds Lumberton 

Auditor W. D. Reynolds Lumberton 

Tax Supervisor Leila E. Ivey Lumberton 

Tax Collector L. McK. Parker Lumberton 

County Accountant Ann McPhatter Lumberton 

Coroner D. W. Biggs Lumberton 

Surveyor Grady S. Harrell Shannon 

County Health Officer Dr. E. R. Hardin Lumberton 

Supt. of Schools C. L. Green Maxton 

Supt. of Public Welfare Mrs. Kate S. McLeod Lumberton 

Home Demonstration Agent 

White Evelyn Caldwell Lumberton 

Colored LaSenia McC. Murchison Lumberton 

Farm Demonstration Agent 

White O. P. Owens Lumberton 

Colored S. T. Brooks Lumberton 

Chmn. Bd. Education Adrian MoRae Rowland 

Chmn. Bd. Elections E. P. Bond Rowland 

District Game & Fish Protector . . . E. W. Cain Lumberton 

Forest Warden Braddy Pait RFD, Lumberton 

County Manager W. D. Reynolds Lumberton 

County Attorney Henry A. McKinnon Lumberton 

Veterans Service Officer A. E. Watson Rowland 

Recorder's Courts : 

Lumberton District: 

Judge W. B. Ivey Lumberton 

Solicitor J. H. Barrington, Jr Lumberton 

Fa'rmont District : 

Judge Pay Lewis Fairmont 

Solicitor M. L. Page Faii-mont 

Red Springs District : 

Judge A. P. Spell Red Springs 

Solicitor Z. V. McMillan Red Springs 

Maxton District : 

Judge R. C. Hollard Maxton 

Solicitor Roy W. McGinnis Maxton 

St. Pauls District: 

Judge A. B. Johnson St. Pauls 

Solicitor George T. Deans St. Pauls 

Rowland District: 

Judge F. L. Adams Rowland 

Solicitor R. L. Campbell Rowland 



County Government 555 

Commissioners 
Office Officer Address 

Chairman C. A. Hasty Maxton 

Commissioner J. C Herring Lumberton 

Commissioner J- A. Singleton Red Springs 

Commissioner George Lewis Pate Rowland 

Commissioner V. J. Griffin Fairmont 

Commissioner J. T. Graham St. Pauls 

ROCKINGHAM 

Rockingham County was formed in 1785 from Guilford. Was named in honor 
of Charles Watson Wentworth, Marquis of Rockingham, who was the leader of 
the party in the British Parliament that advocated American independence. He 
was Prime Minister when the Stamp Act was repealed. 

Population, 57,898 County Seat, Wentworth 

State Senator 15th District J. Hampton Price Leaksville 

Member House of Representatives . R. G. Powell Reidsville 

Clerk of Court John W. Satterfield Wentworth 

Register of Deeds R. E. Wall Wentworth 

Sheriff M. S. Hodges Wentworth 

Treasurer Eugene Irvin Wentworth 

Auditor Eugene Irvin Wentworth 

Tax Supervisor Eugene Irvin Wentworth 

Tax Collector Eugene Irvin Wentworth 

County Accountant Eugene Irvin Wentworth 

Coroner Dr. M. P. Cummings Reidsville 

Surveyor A. R. Strange Reidsville 

County Health Officer Dr. B. M. Drake Wentworth 

Supt. of Schools Allan Lewis Reidsville 

Supt. of Public Welfare Mrs. John L. Wilson Madison 

Home Demonstration Agent 

White Marion Bullard Reidsville 

Colored Mrs. Zadie Jackson Reidsville 

Farm Demonstration Agent 

White J. E. Foil Wentworth 

Colored Dewey Williamson Wentworth 

Chmn. Bd. Education E. S. Powell Reidsville 

Chmn. Bd. Elections Dr. Hunter Moricle Reidsville 

District Game & Fish Protector ... A. D. Neal RFD, Reidsville 

County Attorney Junius C. Brown Madison 

County Librarian Marianne Martin Madison 

Veterans Service Officer Lantz M. Sykes Leaksville 

Leaksville Recorder's Court: 

Judge Herman Peters Leaksville 

Solicitor Allan D. Ivie, Jr Leaksville 

Reidsville Recorder's Court : 

Judge E. H. Wrenn Reidsville 

Solicitor D. F. Mayberry Reidsville 

Commissioners 

Chairman Hari-y Davis Leaksville 

Commissioner C. S. Burton Reidsville 

Commissioner J. Otha Moore RFD, Reidsville 

Commissioner J. J. Webster Stoneville 

Commissioner R. T. Moore Madison 



55B North Carolina Manual 

ROWAN 
Rowan County was formed in 1753 from Anson. Was named in honor of 
Matthew Rowan, a prominent leader before the Revolution, and, for a short 
time after the death of Governor Gabriel Johnston, acting Governor. 

Population, 69,206 County Seat, Salisbury 

Office Officer Address 

State Senators 21st District Luther E. Earnhardt Concord 

H. Nelson Woodson Salisbury 

Members House of Representatives. D. C, Dungan Salisbury 

Kerr Craige Ramsay Salisbury 

Clerk of Court Paul A. Swicegood Salisbury 

Register of Deeds Graham D. Carlton Salisbury 

Sheriff J. H. Krider Salisbury 

Treasurer J. E. Haynes Salisbury 

Auditor J. E. Haynes Salisbury 

Tax Supervisor J. E. Haynes Salisbury 

Tax Collector W. S. Overton, Jr Salisbury 

County Accountant Frank P. Buck Co Salisbury 

Coroner Dr. G. C. Mock Salisbury 

Surveyor M. E. Miller Salisbury 

County Health Officer Dr. C. W. Armstrong Salisbury 

Supt. of Schools C. C. Erwin Salisbury 

Supt. of Publi:' Welfare Mrs. Lucille Donelly Salisbury 

Home Demonstration Agent 

White Mildred Ingram Salisbury 

Colored Mrs. Annie Johnson Salisbury 

Farm Demonstration Agent 

White P. H. Satterwhite Cleveland 

Colored A. C. Grant Salisbury 

Chmn. Bd. Education J. F. Link Salisbury 

Chmn. Bd. Elections J. Giles Hudson Salisbury 

District Game & Fish Protector ... Ed Burt Salisbury 

County Attorney Kerr Craige Ramsay Salisbury 

County Librarian Edith Clarke Salisbury 

Veterans Service Officer Paul P Hinkle Salisbury 

County Court : 

Judge A. C. Rufty Salisbury 

Solicitor Ira R. Swicegood Salisbury 

Commissioners * 

Chairman J. D. Carter Spencer 

Commissioner P. K. Dry Land